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Full text of ""76." A cook book"

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^6' 
A COOK BOOK, 



EDITED BY THE 



Ladies of Plymouth Church, 



DeS M.OINES, JOWA. 



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" All the labor of man is for his mouth, 
j^ And yet the appetite is not filled." 



■Solomon. 




^ . . " What say you to a piece of beef and mustard?" 

/\\ I — Shakspeare, 



DES MOINES: 

MILLS A OOMPANT, PBINTER8 AND FtTBLIBHSRS. 
1876. 



/ 

o 



v 



K<^^ 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year eighteen hundred and seventy-six, 

By mills & COMPANY, 
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, 



PRINTED AND STEREOTYPEB 

BY MILLS & COMPANY, 

DES MOINES, IOWA. 



TO THE MEMORY OF 

Miss Jennie M.. Chase. 

THE DEAE GIBL WHO PKEPABED A LAKGE PART OF THE MANUSCRIPT OF THIS VOLUME, 

AND WHOSE LAST LIFE-WORK WAS FOR IT; WHO WAS EARLY CALLED FROM 

A CHEERFUL, LOVIKG, UNSELFISH SEHVIOF. IN THE HOME, THE OIE- 

OLE OF FRIENDSHIP AND THE CHURCH, AND WHO NOW 

SERVES WITH THE MINISTERING HOSTS OF GOD ; 

THIS PAGE, 

LINKING HEB NAME WITH A WORK SO MUCH HEB OWN, 

IS AFFECTIONATELY INSCRIBED 

BT THOSE WHO HAVE SHARED THE LABOR. 



?f(s^i<SCs^. 




Si 

II ROMETHEUS stole fire from the Celestials, so the tra- 
dition tells us, and brought it down to mortals. He has 
long had the credit of doing it because of the great pity 
■'fO he felt for the wretched condition of primitive men, who, in 
y;\. utter savagery, devoured their grains, flesh and fish in the 
natural way, unconverted into grateful dishes by the pro- 
cesses of roasting, baking or boiling. 

But it is time for this memorable conceit, so complimentary to 
Prometheus, and very likely originated by him for the sake of 
effect, to be thoroughly exploded, Jupiter saw through the trick at 
the time, as is clear from the rough way in which he handled the 
thief. 

The undoubted fact is that the sly old fellow was looking out 
for himself and his own enjoyment in the whole transaction, car- 
ing no more for man than demagogues care for the "dear people." 
He, like other inhabitants of Olympus, was much in the habit of 
walking to and fro in the earth and taking a place in human feasts. 
At the festivals of the gods, which were very near together and 
lasted a long time, there was always a grand display of good cook- 
ing. The gods and goddesses of mythology were great epicures. 
Raw meats were not in favor with them, and the cultivated taste 
of Prometheus rebelled when he had set before him in mundane 
banquets, joints of pork, beef and mutton which had never pass- 
ed through the fire. 



VI ' PREFACE. 

Imagine a dainty feeder from the higher world, eating whole 
wheat without gravy, or tearing the uncooked flesh from a pheas- 
ant's breast to get at the wish-bone to break v/ith some comely 
daughter of Hellas! It was for the sake of providing more 
toothsome morsels for himself, when he should come down for 
further junketings with the brave men and fair women of Asia 
Minor and the ^gean Islands, that he stole the fire. The larceny 
was in the interest of the culinary art. Since the adv^ent of fire, 
cooking has been one of the industries and fine arts of the world. 
The great quest ion, "what shall we eat?" which has alvva^^s engaged 
the attention and stimulated the efforts of humanity, has hardly 
surpassed in interest or importance, that other question, "now 
shall we cook what we eat?" By what ingenious manipulations 
shall the many materials which enter into that generous compound 
known as "good living," be so combined that the best ends of 
taste and nourishment may be secured? It is not enough that the 
nutritive qualities of food be retained, while, in the cooking, all 
that can please the taste is driven off. So this question involves 
not only eating, but eating "with enjoyment. Good food must not 
be repulsive to the palate. There can be no more fruitful source 
of domestic discord than the perpetual appearance on the family 
table of unpalatable viands. Many a man has first begun to sus- 
pect that his wife was not his true affinity, when he has had his 
taste disgusted by ill-cooked meats, insipid soups and spoiled veg- 
etables. Sour bread is closely related to sour temper. 

A man of ancient Sybaris, a city noted for luxury, is said to 
have once tasted the black broth of the Lacedaemonians. He de- 
clared after it, that he could not wonder the Spartans were so 
brave in battle, for the reason that the pains of death, however 
dreadful, were as nothing when compared with the misery of liv- 
ing on such execrable food. 

The economic question, too, is of importance. People of lim- 
ited means must cook, and they must avoid excessive outlay. All 
the income cannot go to the filling and boiling of the pot. The 
burning down of a house to roast a pig, after the Chinese method, 
is too costly, in a country where houses are expensive. How then 



PREFACE. ' vn 

shall we cook so that we can afford to eat, becomes a topic for 
careful study. It is possible to prepare food that shall be like the 
savory meat of Isaac, full of nutriment and pleasant to the taste, 
from materials that cost but little. The strength of the ox is not 
all concentrated in choice roasts nor porter-house steaks. Some 
of the undiscovered possibilities of the culinary art lie in the di- 
rection of furnishing a good meal from the smallest quantity of 
inexpensive material, as well as in the other direction, of turning 
to its best account the very choicest of material. 

The man who can cook well and economically, and can teach 
the art, is a benefactor to his kind, and deserves a statue of brass, 
if not a canonization. 

The woman who can do it, holds the key of the home citadel. 
She commands the situation. Her husband rejoices in her, and 
her children, rosy, strong and fair, live, with good digestion, to 
bless her memory for her good cooking, as well as for her other 
virtues. 

Good cooking is a valuable ally of godliness. Dyspepsia is the 
stronghold of depravity. An abused and impaired stomach is but 
another name for the eclipse of faith. Pernicious moods, harm- 
ful introspections and horrible bug-bears of suspicion and doubt 
are the portion of him who has been so unfortunate as to damage 
his most important vital function by feeding on food spoiled for 
human uses, in the cooking, and made fit only for creatures with 
the digestive apparatus of the ostrich. 

This little book is an outgrowth from the experience of many 
who wait upon the domestic altars of our city. It gives the 
results of countless experiments in the direction of prudent 
wholesome, healthful, enjoyable cooking. It is hoped and be- 
lieved that it will give help in many ways to those who shall 
consult it, — that it will be the chart to guide many a young 
house-keeper serenely through the most dangerous passages 
of domestic life, — that it will be the "Open Sesame" to many 
a culinary mystery, — that it will check the growing tendency 
to seek divorce, by removing one of the causes of matrimonial 
infelicity; so, in all ways fulfilling the mission of a good book. 



VIII PREFACE. 

Milton well says, "As good almost kill a man as kill a good 
book; wlio kills a man kills a reasonable creature, God's image; 
but he who destroys a good book, kills reason itself." 

The ladies who have compiled this manual have thought it not 
best to include alcoholic condiments, believing it better to lack a 
certain piquancy in a few articles of food, than to bring to the 
home table anything which may so easily work mischief. 

The aim of the book will be realized if it shall become a minis- 
ter of help to many known and unknown patrons, to whom its 
compilers would say in the renowned classic of Jefferson, "May 
you live long and prosper." 



^oi;f>^. 



"^I^^l^ OUP may be made of any kind of fresh meat. Allow a 
^^Mp pound of uncooked meat to a quart of water. Bones 
f|i^cy^^ boiled with the meat are an improvement, as the marrow 
f .^nt, adds to the richness. The meat should be put into cold 
n\ ' water, without salt, and heated gradually — never allowing 
the water to boil hard, nor stop boiling. The kettle must 
be kept covered. Keep boiling water to renew with as it 
evaporates. Never fill in with cold water and do not season till 
nearly done. The bones and pieces left from a roast at dinner, 
may be made into soup the next day — a piece of raw meat may 
be added if necessary. The vessel in which the soup is to be boiled, 
should be perfectly sweet and clean. As the scum rises to the 
surface, skim with care, and, if it is slow in rising, a little cold 
water may be thrown in, to bring it up more speedily. Soup 
should be boiled from three to five hours, and never allowed to cool 
in the vessel in which it is made. If very rich, the oily substance 
should be skimmed from the top, as it is quite unwholesome. It 
is better to boil the soup the day before using, as the fat can be 
more easily removed after it has cooled. 

' Soup kept on hand ready made, is called stock. The supply may 
be kept good by saving and boiling such bones and pieces as are 
left on the platter from every day cookery. This should be strained 
before setting away. It is very convenient for making gravies, and 
adding to vegetable soups; and in winter may be kept a long time. 
In summer it needs to be made fresh frequently. 

PLAIN BEEF SOUP, 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Take a shank bone, wash nicely, and, after breaking it in sev- 
eral places, put it into a pot of cold water, without salt. Let it 



10 SOUPS. 

boil slowly, and take off the scum as it rises. When it has boiled 
half an hour, add one cup of pearl barley, and boil two and a half 
or three hours. Half an hour before taking it up, have three or 
four good sized potatoes pared and sliced an eighth of an inch 
thick, and put them in to boil.. Add salt and pepper to taste. 
If the soup is too rich, skim the fat from the top before putting 
on the table. 

COMMON MEAT SOUP. 

MRS. DR. UOFFMAN, BEARDSTOWN, ILL. 

Boil four pounds of beef in salt water until it is soft. Care 
must be taken to use enough water in the beginning, but if more 
is necessary never add cold, but boiling, water. (This is a rule 
with every kind of soup.) If the soup is too weak, take out the 
meat and boil it down. If a few roots, such as carrots, celeriac, 
etc., are added, it will make a very palatable soup. 

SAGO SOUP. 

MRS. DR. HOFFMAN, BEARDSTOAYN, ILL. 

Take of the beef broth as above, and add as much sago as is 
necessary, but do not make the soup too thick; boil it until the 
sago is done, then take the yolks of two eggs, beat them up with 
a little of the broth, then pour them into the- soup and let it come 
to a boil. 

EGG-BARLEY SOUP. 

MRS. DR. HOFFMAN, BEARDSTOWN, ILL. 

Take three dry rolls, grate them, beat two eggs into them, stir 
well together, and pour slowly into the boiling meat soup, stirring 
continually. It will have the appearance of barley. After boil- 
ing a short time, serve with a little grated nutmeg. 

A GOOD VEGETABLE SOUP. 
Different kinds of vegetables, such as carrots, turnips, etc., are 
cut into small pieces and boiled soft in meat soup. Then take a 
head of Savoy cabbage; clean, cut it into quarters, boil soft in 
water, press it out or drain the water off, then put into the soup. 
Brown meat soup is best. When all is sufficiently soft, pour as 
much soup over it as is necessary to make the desired quantity; 



SOUPS. 11 

toast slices of fine white bread or stale rolls, and put into it. 
Before serving, grate nutmeg over it. 

O^ULIFLOWER SOUR 

MRS. DR. HOFFMAN, BEARDSTOWN, ILL. 

Pick all the little green leaves from the cauliflower, and put it 
into boiling water; after a minute or two the water should be 
poured off, meat soup poured^n, and boiled together with pars- 
ley and carrots, in a tightly covered pot, until nearly soft. Sprin- 
kle a spoonful of flour over it, shaking the pot, but not stirring it, 
as that will break the cauliflower, which should be avoided, Pour 
as much more meat soup over it as is desired, and boil until all is 
soft. "When ready to serve, take the 3^0] ks of tv/o or three eggs, 
beat them well in the soup tureen, and pour the soup slowly over 
them, stirring continually. Small pieces of white bread, fried in 
butter, may be added just before serving. 

AN EXCELLENT SOUP WITHOUT MEAT. 

Peel and slice six onions, six potatoes, six carrots, and four tur- 
nips; ; fry them in a half a pound of butter, and pour on four quarts 
of boiling water. Toast a crust of bread as brown and hard as 
possible, but do not burn it, and put it in with some celery, sweet 
herbs, pepper and salt; stew it all gently for four hours, and 
strain through a coarse cloth. If desired, an anchovy and a spoon- 
ful of catsup may be used. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

MRS. DR. HOFFMAK, BEARDSTOWK, ILL. 

Take beef broth and add tomatoes to suit the taste, (having pre- 
viously cooked, mashed, and strained them very fine), a little pep- 
per, sugar, and two tablespoonfuls of flour, or pulverized crackers. 
Boil ten minutes and then serve. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

MISS LIZZIE SMITH, MT. CARROLL, ILL. 

Take six peeled tomatoes of medium size, with one pint of water, 
cook thoroughly, season with butter, pepper and salt. At the 
last, add one quart of sweet milk, let it come to a boil, and take it 
up at once, or the milk will curdle. 



12 SOUPS. 

POTATO SOUP. 

MRS. J. KUHN. 

Peel four or five good sized potatoes, and boil in two quarts of 
water. When boiled soft, pour off the water, mash the potatoes 
fine and return them to the water. Take a piece of butter about 
the size of an Qg^., fry it with two tablespoonfuls of flour (and, if 
desired, an onion), till brown. Then add it to the soup, with salt 
and pepper to taste. 

POTATO SOUP. 

MISS W. JOHNSON. 

Peel and slice three potatoes; boil them in two quarts of water 
till nearly done, then add one teacup of milk. Pepper, salt and 
butter to taste. Just before removing from the fire, pour in one 
cup of sweet cream. 

BEAN SOUP. 

MISS W. JOHNSON. 

Soak one pint of beans in cold water over night. Boil till ten- 
der, then mash and strain them through a colander. Boil them 
up in two quarts of meat broth, and season to taste. 

BEAN SOUP. 

MRS. C. C. HOWELL. 

After breakfast, put one coffee-cup of beans into four quarts of 
water, with the trimmings from your breakfast steak, or other bits 
of meat. Let it boil constantly until dinner, adding water if nec- 
essary. Season with salt and pepper, and when done, strain into 
the soup tureen through a colander, and you have a delicious soup 
with very little expense. 

PEA SOUP. 

MRS. G. F 



If dry peas are used, soak them over night in a warm place, 
using a quart of water to each quart of the peas. Early next 
morning, boil them an hour, putting in a teaspoonful of soda, a few 
minutes before removing them from the fire. Take them up, put 
them into fresh water, and boil them until tender (3 or 4 hours); 



SOUPS. 13 

boil with them a pound of salt pork; it should be taken upas soon 
as tender. Other meat can be used if preferred, and the soup 
seasoned to taste. Green peas need no soaking, and only an hour's 
boiling. 

GREEN PEA SOUP. 

Mix two quarts of green peas with a quarter of a pound of lean 
ham, cut into small dice; put into a stew pan, add a cup of cold 
water, and place over a sharp fire, stirring the contents occasionally ; 
when very tender, add two tablespoonfuls of flour, which mix well 
in, mashing the peas with your spoon against the sides of your stew 
pan. Add two quarts of stock (meat broth), a tablespoonful of 
sugar, and a little pepper and salt. Boil all well together five min- 
utes. Strain and serve. 

GREEN CORN SOUP. 

MKS. W. H. CLEGHORN. 

Take one dozen ears of green corn, and shave the corn from the 
cobs. Put the cobs into a gallon of cold water, and boil 30 min- 
utes, after which remove them and skim the water thoroughly. 
Chop or bruise the corn, and boil it 30 minutes in the same water. 
Then add two quarts of fresh milk, and season with butter, pep- 
per and salt to taste. Let it boil up and serve. 

GREEN PEA SOUP. 
Shell the peas, and boil the pods and peas in separate vessels. 
If you have no stock (meat broth), add a little fresh meat, or a slice 
of ham to the water in which the pods are boiled. "When the pods 
are thoroughly boiled strain the water through a colander; return 
the liquor to the pot, and add the peas a quarter of an hour before 
serving. Butter and season to suit the taste. Pour over crackers 
if desired. t 

OYSTER SOUP. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

• 

To one quart of sweet milk and one pint of boiling water, add 
the liquor from one quart of oysters. Boil this up together, then 
add the oysters and half a teacupful of cracker crumbs rolled 
fine. Add butter, salt and pepper to taste. Much boiling hard- 
ens the oysters. Serve with hot toast and crackers. 



14 SOUPS. 

CHICKEN SOUP. 

Old fowls are best for making soup. Cut up as for frying; boil 
gently in three quarts of water till the meat is well cooked; skim 
carefully. Add a teacupful of rice, and season to taste. Some 
prefer to add sweet milk or cream. Pick the meat carefully from 
the bones and serve with the soup, or make into salad. 

CHICKEN AND OYSTER SOUP. 

Cut up a full-grown fowl as for frying. Clean the giblets nicely, 
and put all in the soup kettle, with just enough water to cover 
them; let it simmer gently; remove all the scum. When the 
chicken is tender, take it up, strain the liquor, and return it to the 
kettle. Use a quart of sweet milk to a quart of broth; add boiling 
water if necessary. Add a quart of oysters with their juice, and 
two or three blades of mace, a tablespoonful of butter, one of 
wheat flour rubbed into the butter, and one gill of hot cream; stew 
gently five minutes. Cream must always be boiled before being 
put into soup or gravy. Use the chicken for salad. 

MOCK TURTLE SOUP. 

Take the head and two feet, of a calf, that have been carefully 
cleaned. Separate the jaws and remove the brains. Place the 
meat in cold water, let it heat slowly, and skim with care. When it 
is done, take it up, and set it away until the next day. Then skim 
off the fat, pick the meat from the bones, and chop fine; put the 
liquor and /jar^ of the meat in the pot. Tie, in a thin muslin 
cloth, a few grains of allspice, bruised slightly, and a dozen cloves; 
add to the soup, also, a grated nutmeg; this is spice enough for 
half a gallon of soup. Salt and pepper to taste. Stir frequently 
to prevent the meat from burning. Half an hour before the soup 
is done, one tablespoonful of batter, made with water and browned 
flour, should be added for each gallon; force-meat balls may also 
be added, if desired. Fifteen minutes before sending to the table, 
add half a gill of good catsup to each quart of soup. To each 
gallon, add two tablespoonfuls of lemon juice. The yolks of eight 
hard-boiled eggs, sliced, should be put into the soup after it is 
poured into the tureen. This soup may be made equally good 
with a shank of veal or beef. A little butter and cooked Irish 



SOUPS. 15 

potatoes added to the remaining meat and laid in pie-crust, make 
a good mock turtle pie. 

FORCE-MEAT BALLS. 
Chop half a pound of lean veal, or other meat, fine, together 
with a little raw salt pork; add a small tea-cup of bread crumbs, 
moistened with cream. Season with salt, pepper, curry powder 
or cloves. Work all together with a well-beaten egg. If the 
paste is too stiff, add another egg., or only the yolk, or a little more 
cream. If not stiff enough, they will fall to pieces. Make into 
balls, the size of half an egg and boil part in the soup, fifteen 
minutes. Fry the remainder in hot lard and serve up in a sepa- 
rate dish. 

NOODLE SOUP. 

MRS. J. KUHN. 

Take two eggs and flour enough to make very stiff, and roll out 
as thin as possible. Let it dry a little, then turn in one edge and 
make it in a long roll. Cut slices across this as thin as can be 
done with a sharp knife. Put them into plain beef soup just long 
enough before serving, to have them come to a boil — a longer time 
will make them heavy. 

DUMPLINGS FOR SOUP. 

MRS. J. B. LYMAN, ROCKPORD, ILL. 

One-half pint of sweet milk, two tablespoonfuls of butter; when 
scalding hot, stir in flour until stiff; three eggs. 

SCOTCH BROTH. 

Take the chops from a neck of mutton ; cut the remainder into 
small pieces and let it stew gently the Avhole day. Boil a quarter 
of a pint of pearl barley in a little water, till tender ; strain it 
dry. Chop fine two large onions and turnips and put with the 
barley and meat into a close stew-pan; strain the broth into it, 
also the water from the barley; let it boil one hour and a half and 
skim well. Season it only with salt and pepper. 

PORTABLE SOUP. 

Take the liquor in which beef or veal, or any scraps of fresh 
meat, good bones, or fowls, have been boiled. Remove all the 



16 SOUPS. 

fat and strain the liquor into the stew pan ; boil briskly, putting 
in salt to taste and plenty of pepper. Leave the stew-pan un- 
covered, and watch closely to prevent burning. Drop a little 
upon a cold plate and when of a consistency to make thick 
jelly, pour it on platters, having it not over three quarters of 
an inch in thickness. When cold, cut in pieces about three inches 
square and set them in the sun to dry, turning them frequently. 
When perfectly dry, put them in an earthen vessel with white 
paper between each layer. If the. directions are strictly fol- 
lowed these cakes will keep good a long time. 

OCHRA, OR GUMBO SOUP. 

MRS. G. E. OSGOOD. 

Cut up a chicken and a small piece of salt pork as if to fry; take 
two quarts of young and tender ochra, slice it, and put into a 
pot with the meat, with just cold water enough to cover it, 
and stew for an hour. Then add one quart of ripe tomatoes sliced, 
and two or more quarts of boiling water. Cover closely, and 
skim frequently. Boil till the meat and vegetables fall to pieces, 
then add butter, pepper and salt to taste; serve hot. This is a 
southern dish, but ochra is raised in this latitude. 



^im. 




ISH to be really good tnust be fresh. If the eyes are 
bright and the flesh firm, it is a pretty sure indication of 
- their freshness. 



TO FRY FISH. 

An iron spider is the best utensil for the purpose. The 
lard used for frying should be sweet and clean and free from 
salt. The lard should be just the right heat. If a small piece of 
bread thrown in fries crisp, the lard is ready; if the bread burns 
it is too hot. As soon as the fish is done, lay it on a soft cloth by 
the fire to absorb the grease. 

HOW TO BROIL FISH. 

When thoroughly cleaned and washed, dry the fish with a towel; 
rub it inside and outside with a little butter, and salt and pepper 
it on both sides. Have a sharp fire and the draught good, set on 
the fish and turn over often enough to prevent it from charring. 
It must broil quickly. When done, place the fish on a warm plat- 
ter, the inside up, and spread over butter. When turning the 
fish, do not use a knife and fork, but lay a dish on it and hold it 
with one hand, while you turn the gridiron over with the other. 
Lay the skin side down, first. 

TO BOIL FRESH FISH. 
After being well scaled and cleaned, rub salt over the 
inside of the fish; wrap each fish in a cloth and sew it on, then 
place in a kettle of warm water, salt the water, simmer gently till 
the fish will separate, but not fall from the bone. This may be 
ascertained by opening the cloth and trying it in one place, but 
fasten it up again if not done. Serve with rich drawn butter, 
with eggs. 

2 17 



18 FISH. 

TO BAKE FISH. 

The simplest way is very good. Spread little pieces of bread 
with butter; pepper and salt them and lay them inside the fish; 
take a needle and thread and sew it up; lay it into a dish and 
put a few thin slices of pork on it; sprinkle over salt and flour 
it well. Baste it with the liquor which cooks out of it. A fish 
weighing four pounds will cook in an hour. 

BAKED FISH. 

MRS. A. L. FEISBIE. 

Open the fish so that it will lie perfectly flat. Rub salt over it 
and lay it in a dripping pan, with a very little butter and water. 
Put it in a very hot oven and bake twenty minutes or a half hour, 
according to thickness of the fish. When done it will be a deli- 
cate brown and will be cooked through without the trouble of 
turning. Of course the skin side is laid next the dripping pan. 
White fish cooked in this way are especially nice. 

FISH CHOWDER. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

Take three or four pounds of fish for six or eight persons; cut 
in sections, crosswise. Take five or six slices of salt pork, lay 
them in the bottom of the kettle and let them fry slowly until all 
the fat is fried out; then remove the scraps of pork and lay in 
about one-third of the fish, then a layer of potatoes, then a 
sprinkling of chopped onions (chop two onions for the whole,) 
then pepper and salt and some flour dredged in so as not to lump. 
Place in layers until the whole is used. Cover with cold water 
and boil fifteen minutes, then add a half dozen Boston crackers, 
split and wet in cold water; add one pint of sweet milk. Bdil 
five minutes more and serve. 

TO POT FRESH FISH. 

Let the fish lie in salt and water several hours. For five pounds 
of fish take three ounces of salt, two ounces of pepper, two of 
cinnamon, one of allspice, and half an ounce of cloves. Cut the 
fish in slices and lay in the jar in which it is to be cooked — a 
layer of fish, then sprinkle spices, with flour and bits of butter on 



FISH. 19 

top; another layer of fish and seasoning, till all is packed. Fill 
the jar with equal proportions of vinegar and water; lay on a 
cloth pressed down close to the sides of the jar, and put flour on 
top, so no steam may escape. Bake moderately six hours; let it 
remain in the jar till cold, when it can be sliced for tea. 

SHAD. 

Fresh shad are good baked or broiled, but much the best 
broiled. For broiling, sprinkle salt and pepper on the inside 
when cleaned, and let it remain some hours. Salt shad for broil- 
ing should be soaked ten or twelve hours, in cold water. For 
boiling, they need be soaked only long enough to enable the scales 
to be easily removed. The roe is good either broiled or fried. 

BAKED HALIBUT. 

Lay five or six pounds of fresh halibut iu salt and water for two 
hours, then wipe dry, score the skin in squares, and set in a 
tolerably hot oven; baste quite often with butter melted in hot 
water. When done, a fork will easily penetrate it. Serve with 
drawn butter, flavored with walnut catsup, or such sauce as may 
be preferred. 

HALIBUT 
Is nice cut in slices, well seasoned, then broiled or fried. The 
fins and thick part are good boiled. 

SMOKED HALIBUT. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Enough may be soaked for several days at one time, hang it 
up to dry, and broil what is needed on a gridiron; when done, 
butter well, and serve while hot. 

SALMON TROUT, 

When thoroughly cleaned and washed, should be wiped care- 
fully and laid into a dripping pan, with water enough to prevent 
scorching. Bake slowly, basting often with butter and water. 
W^hen done, have ready a cup of sweet cream, diluted with a few- 
spoonfuls of hot water, stir in carefully two tablespoonfuls of 
melted butter, and a little chopped parsley. Heat this by placing 



20 FISH. 

the vessel in boiling water; add the gravy from the fish and boil up 
once. Place the fish in a hot dish and pour over the sauce. 
Pickerel are good baked in the same way. 

HOW TO CHOOSE A SALT MACKEREL. 

A poor mackerel when salted has a heavy dead appearing eye, 
but a fat one will have a substance which resembles white jelly, 
sometimes covering the eye and extending back from it on the 
head. All salt mackerel have it to some extent, and the larger 
the accumulation of this substance, the fatter and better the fisn. 
In soaking fish, use plenty of water, and put the skin side upper- 
most, as the salt will then fall to the bottom and leave the fish 
freshened. If it is very salt, the water may need to be changed. 
The fish will broil nicer to be hung up an hour or two to dry, 
before cooking, though wiping with a soft dry cloth will answer 
very well. 

BOILED MACKEREL. 

If fresh, simmer them fifteen minutes in a little water with 
salt. Do not let them boil hard. If salted, let them lie in hot 
water half an hour before boiling, then change the water. 

SOUSED MACKEREL. 

If fresh, when cleaned, boil them in salt and water. If salt, 
freshen them a little first. When boiled, take them out of the 
water, and save about half enough to cover them; mix it with an 
equal quantity of vinegar. Heat it scalding hot, wit,h a few pep- 
per-corns and cloves, and pour it over the fish. They will be 
sufficiently pickled in the course of three days. 

CANNED SALMON. 

MRS. G. E. OSGOOD. 

Set the can of salmon in a kettle of boiling water, let it stand 
half an hour, take it out, pour off the juice or oil from the salmon 
and pour over it a dressing made of equal quantities of butter and 
vinegar, boiled together. 

TO BROIL SMOKED SALMON. 
Wash well in cold water and wipe dry; cut in pieces to serve 



FISH. 21 

and broil on a hot gridiron, turning several times. When well 
heated through, take up, and put on melted butter. 

HOW TO COOK COD-FISH. 

Soak the thickest part for two days in sweet skimmed-milk, 
changing the milk twice. Roll in flour, and fry quite brown. 
Scald, but do not boil, a teacup of thick sweet cream, and pour 
over the fish. 

TO PREPARE COD-FISH FOR THE TABLE. 

MRS. J. M. OTIS. 

Remove the skin and bones. Make the fish fine by cutting it 
first in short pieces, then pick very fine. Throw into cold water 
for ten or fifteen minutes, letting it stand in a warm place. Pre- 
pare cream as for dried-beef. When it boils, add the fish skimmed 
from the water, and serve. 

BOILED COD-FISH. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Soak over night; put in a pan filled with water, and simmer 
two or three hours. Serve with drawn butter, with hard-boiled 
eggs sliced in it. 

DRAWN BUTTER. 

Half a cup of butter, large tablespoon of flour rubbed with 
the butter. Pour on one pint of boiling water. Salt to taste. 

COD-FISH BALLS. 

MES. E. P. CUASE. 

Take mashed potatoes, and half as much cod-fish as potatoes; 
add apiece of butter and one hard-boiled egg. Mash well together, 
and make in balls. Fry brown in equal parts of butter and 
lard. 

COD-FISH ON TOAST. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Pull the fish into small strips, and soak about half an hour in 
luke-warm water; drain ofl^ the water, and pour on milk; add 



22 SHELLFISH. 

butter. Three or four beateu eggs improve it. Let it heat, but 
do not let it boil or it will harden. Turn it on buttered toast. 

FRIED FRESH COD-FISH. 

Cut the fish into slices about two inches thick, dip in egg, then 
in bread crumbs, and fry to a rich brown in plenty of fat.' 

Cod-fish is good baked after being boiled, and dressed with a 
rich sauce of cream, butter and hard-boiled eggs; rub a little 
flour into the butter. Garnish with parsley. 

BROILED COD-FISH. / 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Soak till freshened enough, which can be determined by tast- 
ing; wipe dr}', and broil on gridiron. Do not forget to grease 
the bars. This makes a nice relish for tea. 



gl)ell-5^iA. 



OYSTER PIE. 

AKE a nice paste, and line a deep dish, turn a tea-cup 
down in the center; this will draw the liquor under it 
'1^ and prevent it from boiling over; it also keejDS the 
upper crust from falling in and becoming clammy. Lay 
in the oysters, with a little salt, pepper, butter and flour. 
Use but little of the liquor. Make a wide incision in the 
upper crust, so that when the pie is nearly done you can 
pour in half a tea-cup of sweet cream or milk. Secure the 
edges by moistening the under crust, and sprinkling flour on it 
before pinching down the top; place in the oven immediately 
and bake an hour. If allowed to stand, the under crust will be 
clammy. 




SHELL-FISH. 23 

OYSTER PATTIES. 

Take a pint of oysters, season with salt and pepper to taste, put 
into a stew pan, with a large tablespoonful of fresh butter; set 
this on the stove, and, as the butter melts, stir carefully; 
scald the liquor by itself, and when the butter is hot, but not 
boiling, pour the oyster liquor in, stir all together, and let it stew 
fifteen minutes; set this aside in an earthen vessel. Have patty 
pans lined with puif paste; bake them a light brown color; just 
before serving, fill these with oysters. They should be eaten imme- 
diately, as the gravy, by soaking in, will render the pastry heavy. 

ESCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Butter your pan or dish; cover the bottom with crackers, rolled 
fine. Add a layer of oysters. Alternate the crackers and oysters 
until you have three or four layers, the crackers being the top 
layer. Sprinkle each layer with salt and pepper and bits of butter. 
Moisten with a mixture of the oyster liquor and milk — butter on 
the top. Bake about three-quarters of an hour. 

PICKLED OYSTERS. 

MKS. D. O. FINCH. 

Drain the liquor from the oysters, scald and skim it till clear. 
Then scald the oysters in the liquor till they begin to shrivel. 
Skim them out; add vinegar and whole allspice to taste; let scald 
and pour over the oysters. 

TO FRY OYSTERS. 

MRS. C. W. NELSON. 

Take the largest oysters and spread them upon a napkin; put 
another over to dry them; then season with salt and pepper; 
have ready some beaten ^^'g^ and crackers rolled fine; prepare 
in your pan some sweet lard and butter. Dip each oyster into 
the egg, then roll in the cracker and drop into the boiling fat; 
there must be enough to allow the oysters to float. Serve with 
hot cakes. 



24 SHELL-FISH. 

STEAMED OYSTERS. 

MRS. C. H. SWEENEY. 

Wash the oysters, put them in a deep dish in the steamer, and 
let them cook till they shrivel. In the meantime have the liquor 
on the stove in a half pint of water; scald and skim, add one 
quart of milk' and butter; pepper and salt to taste; roll one 
cracker fine and sprinkle in and let all scald together; pour over 
the oysters, and serve immediately. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 
To fry, take fresh and good sized oysters, open and turn them 
into a colander for half an hour, to drain them. Beat two or three 
eggs in a bowl. Turn the oysters into fine cracker crumbs, and 
then shake them so that little of the crumbs shall adhere. Put the 
oysters into the beaten eggs, and stir them, after which, take 
them out one by one; see that they have been well dipped in the 
Q^'g., and roll them in bread or cracker crumbs. As soon as an 
oyster is well rolled in crumbs, put it into the palm of your 
hand, on its flat side, and press gently on it with the other hand. 
When thus prepared put them away in a cold place until they 
are put in the pan. They may be dipped in ^g^ and rolled a 
second time, half an hour after the first time. After being rolled 
in crumbs, they may be kept in a cold place for hours before being 
fried, but the quicker they are eaten after they are fried the bet- 
ter. When fried, turn them into a colander, dust fine salt over 
them and serve hot. 

BROILED OYSTERS. 

After being strained, they are rolled in fine cracker crumbs, 
then shaken gently on a rough towel, dipped in melted butter, 
rolled in bread or cracker crumbs, and broiled on the gridiron. 
Serve hot. 

STEWED OYSTERS. 

Put the oysters on the fire in a pan, with a little salt and butter; 
remove them at the first boil, add pepper and a little milk and 
cream, and serve. 



SHELLFISH. 35 

ROASTED OYSTERS. 
Put oysters, in the shell, on the gridiron or hot coals; when 
cooked, the shell usually opens a little; remove from the fire 
take off half the shell, put on butter, salt and pepper, and eat 
while hot. 

OYSTER FRITTERS. 
Scald them in their own liquor, and wipe dry. Add one pint of 
milk to the liquor, a teaspoonful of salt, and five well-beaten eggs, 
with flour enough to make a thin batter, and drop the oysters into it. 
Take up each oyster in a spoonful of batter, and fry in boiling 
lard, till a light brown. Lay a soft napkin on a flat dish, and serve 
the fritters on this, that the grease may be absorbed by it, and not 
soak into them. 

ANOTHER OYSTER PIE. 
Line a deep baking dish with rich puff paste, as for any other 
pie; fill with crackers or crusts of light bread. Have the top 
crust much thicker than the under one, and butter the edges so 
the crust will part easily when done. Put a roll of paste around 
the edge of the top crust, and bake. Drain the liquor from the 
oysters, put in a little hot water, salt and pepper, and set over 
the fire; when it comes to a boil, add a cupful of rich milk or 
cream; when it boils up once, put in the oysters, and stew five 
minutes; add a piece of butter, stir, and remove from the fire 
as soon as it melts. Time your work so that the crust shall be ready 
just as soon as the oysters are. Lift the top crust, pour in the 
hot oysters, and serve immediately. 

CLAM FRITTERS. 

Chop a dozen clams fine; take the liquor from the clams, and 
add one pint of milk; to this add four beaten eggs, and flour 
enough to make a thin batter. Season to taste. Fry in hot lard. 

LOBSTER CROQUETTES. 

Take boiled lobster and chop fine, season to taste, and have fine 
bread crumbs about one-third of the quantity of meat, and mix with 
two tablespoonfuls of melted butter. Make this into balls, roll in 
beaten q^^.^ then in fine bread crumbs, and fry in hot lard. Serve 
immediately. 



?OUl<¥^Y. 




TO SELECT AND PREPAEE POULTRY. 



RY the wing, and if it is easily disjointed or turned back, 
the fowl is young; if a turkey, it has also a smooth leg 
and soft bill, and if fresh, the eyes will be bright and 
' the feet moist. If the fowls are dressed, select by their 
'skin and breast bone. The young ones have a thin and ten- 
der skin, and the breast bone yields readily when pressed by 
the fingers. (They should be killed by having the neck cut, and 
then hung by the legs so that they will bleed freely, in order to 
make them white and healthy to eat.) Scald and pick off the 
feathers, being careful to remove all the pin-feathers. A pair of 
tweezers or the point of a dull knife is frequently a great 
help. Cut the oil-bag out from above the tail, and singe off 
the hair by holding over a blazing paper, so the fire may reach 
all parts. Then remove everything from the inside, keeping 
the gizzard, heart and liver to stew for the gravy. Great care 
must be used in separating the gall-bag from the liver — if broken 
it renders what it touches unfit to eat. Thoroughly wash and 
cleanse the fowl. A little soda may be thrown into the water 
after the first washing, and then rinse in clear water. Cut off 
the legs at the first joint above the feet, and if to be cut up, 
the following way is advised, as each piece has a good portion 
of meat. Cut it open right through the back and so clear 
through the breast bone, being careful to leave the breast «iqual 
on both halves; then, after removing the flyer of the wings and 
the drumsticks, cut each half crosswise into four, five, or six 
pieces, according to the size of the fowl, being careful so to cut 
as to leave good meat on each piece, 

27 



28 POULTRY. 

TO ROAST A TURKEY. 

MRS. J. P. POSTER, 

Prepare according to directions given above. Make a dressing 
of fine bread crumbs, season with salt and pepper and add sage or 
such sweet herbs as are preferred. Do not flavor too strongly with 
any one thing; mix all together and pour over melted butter to 
moisten it nearly enough, then add a little water. Put salt on 
the inside of the turkey, and fill the crop and body with the 
dressing; sew it up with white woolen yarn (for it will not tear 
the flesh as cotton does), tie the legs and wings close to the body, 
lay into a dripping-pan, and rub a little salt and butter over it, 
or lay on two or three slices of salt pork; pour over a tea-cup of 
water, and place it in the oven. It should be roasted slowly at 
first, and basted frequently. If desired, oysters can be used in 
the dressing and sauce. Mix the oysters with the bread, omitting 
the herbs, and moisten with the liquor of the oyster instead of 
water. 

For the gravy, boil the heart, liver and gizzard, till very tender; 
then chop fine and return to the water in which they were 
boiled; add oysters and their liquor, also some butter rubbed in 
flour to thicken the gravy, and season to taste; boil till oysters and 
flour are cooked, then serve. 

BOILED TURKEY. 

Prepare as for roasting. Half a ciip of rice boiled with a turkey 
makes the meat look white, or wrapping it closely in a cloth 
dredged with flour before putting it to boil will have the same 
efi"ect. A small piece of salt pork improves the flavor. Oyster 
sauce is very nice for turkey cooked in this way. 

TO WARM OVER TURKEY. 

Pick the meat from the bones, and chop fine; spread a layer 
of crackers or bread crumbs in the bottom of a buttered dish; 
moisten with a little milk or water, then put on a layer of turkey, 
(a little cooked ham minced fine and mixed with it is an im- 
provement,) a few bits of butter and the dressing, then another 
layer of crumbs and so on till near the top, seasoning to taste all 
the way through, and pouring on the gravy left from the day 



POULTRY. 29 

before, adding water if necessary. The top layer should be 
crumbs soaked in warm milk and beaten up light with two eggs 
and spread smoothly over, with bits of butter on the top. Turn a 
pan or deep plate over this till cooked through, and then remove 
the cover and let the top brown. 

OTHER WAYS. 

Cut the pieces that are left, up fine, and warm with the 
gravy, or make a turkey pie of them. 

ROAST CHICKEN. 

Having picked and prepared the chicken for cooking, make a 
stuffing as for a turkey. Rub salt over it and place in dripping- 
pan with pieces of butter laid on the breast ; put in hot water 
enough to cover the bottom of the pan, and baste frequently, 
turning the pan so the chicken may roast equally on all sides. 
When done, take up the chicken and make a gravy by mixing 
flour with butter, or, if preferred, the fat of the drippings, and 
adding the giblets, pre\iously boiled and chopped, to the liquor 
in the dripping-pan. Boil up and serve. 

FRICASSEED CHICKEN. 

MES. J. P. POSTER. 

The chickens should be cut up according to previous directions; 
wash and lay in cold salt water for half an hour; put in a pot with 
the skin side down, with a few slices of salt pork; sprinkle in 
pepper, and put on just enough water to cover them (hot, not 
boiling water, is best). Cover and stew slowly till tender, then 
remove the chicken, and skim the oil from the top of the liquor, if 
the chickens are fat; take a piece of butter and mix with flour 
enough to thicken the remainder. Boil till the flour is cooked. 
Have ready some hot shortcakes or biscuits, split open, and laid 
on your platter, or toast if preferred. Lay on your chicken and 
pour gravy over the whole. If the pork does not salt it suffi- 
ciently, add salt before taking up the chicken. Old fowls are 
best cooked in this way. 

BROILED CHICKEN. 

MRS. J. M. OTIS. 

Cut the chicken into desirable pieces for the table; put it into 



30 POULTRY. 

a stewpan with water sufficient to keep it from scorching, and a 
very little salt; when it is dry, place the pieces upon a hot, but- 
tered gridiron, over coals; turn frequently to prevent scorching; 
when done butter and season to the taste. Chicken prepared in 
this way is tender and juicy. 

BROILED CHICKEN. 

None but young and tender chickens should be broiled. They 
should be split down the back, and, after a thorough washing, be 
wiped dry. Place the chicken, inside downward, on a buttered grid- 
iron. The fire should be clear and bright, with no smoke; cover with 
a deep plate or pan, and broil till cooked through, turning several 
times to prevent charring. When done, lay on a heated platter, 
put on plenty of sweet butter, and season to taste — serving imme- 
diately. 

TO FRY CHICKEN. 

MRS. TURNER. 

Season the chicken with salt and pepper, before rolling in flour; 
have hot, equal proportions of lard and butter, jn sufficient quan- 
tity to cover it well; let it fry slowly and be sure not to let it burn; 
when done, take it out, and if gravy is desired pour in a little water 
or milk, and thicken with flour or corn starch. 

SMOTHERED CHICKEN. 

MRS. E. S. SPEED, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Split up the back, and wash thoroughly in two or three waters; 
^ut into a pan to bake, and salt it well; add a little pepper if 
desired; lay a lump of butter on the breast, pour a little water in 
the pan; a very small piece of red pepper is an improvement. If 
the chicken is young, cook in a very quick oven till well browned; 
baste often. 

CHICKEN PIE. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Clean and cut the chickens in pieces ready to serve. Boil them 
in water barely to cover them till cooked nearly enough for the 
table; skim the water carefully. Some remove the skin if it is 
very thick. Line a deep dish with a thick paste made like soda 
or baking powder biscuit, only a little richer; place the pieces of 



POULTRY. 31 

chicken in layers; such as have bones in them should be laid from 
the center to the edge, to make carving more easy. Put in the 
hearts and livers, sprinkle each layer with flour, salt and pepper, 
lay over it a thin slice of salt pork, or a small piece of butter, put- 
ting rather more seasoning on the top layer, and pour over all as 
much of the liquor in which the chickens were boiled as the dish 
will hold without danger of boiling over. Roll the upper 
crust twice as thick as for fruit pies, make ai] incision for the steam 
to pass out, and lay it over the dish, first wetting the under crust 
with water, so the edge will be closed tightly. Bake in a quick 
oven till done. 

CHICKEN PUDDING. 
Cut up as for fricassee, and stew slowly in a little water; season 
well with salt, pepper and butter, unless there is salt pork with it; 
in about an hour take out the chickens to cool; save the water in 
which they Avere stewed, for gravy. Take three cups of flour, a 
little salt, three tablespoonfuls of melted butter, four well beaten 
eggs and a quart of milk; mix together with two tablespoonfuls of 
baking powder; put a layer of chicken in the bottom of a baking 
dish and pour over enough batter to cover the meat, alternate the 
layers of chicken and batter till the dish is full; let the batter be 
on the top to form the crust. Bake moderately till done through, 
and the crust a light brown. 

JELLIED CHICKEN. 

MRS. C. BOWElSr. 

Boil the chicken, till thoroughly done, seasoning with butter, 
pepper and salt. Then take out and remove all bones and skin, 
leaving nearly one quart of liquor in the kettle. For one chicken 
dissolve one half box of Coxe's gelatine in one cup of hot water 
and pour into the liquor with the chicken; cook a few minutes, 
then turn into molds and set away to cool. Do not pick the 
chicken into ver^'^ fine pieces; it cuts and looks much rjicer if left in 
large pieces. Slice with a sharp knife, and you have a handsome 
and most palatable dish for your table. 

TO MAKE AN OLD FOWL TENDER. 

Put one tablespoonful of lemon juice into the water in which it 
is boiled. Strong vinegar may be used but is not so good. Citric 
acid is a better substitute — a lump the size of a large pea. 



32 POULTRY. 

A DRESSING FOR CHICKEN. 

MRS. E. S. SPEED, RTJSHVILLE, ILLS. 

Take as much bread as needed, crumb it very fine, season with 
salt, pepper and sage, to suit the taste; butter the size of an egg, 
and a- tablespoonful of water; boil two eggs hard, chop fine and 
mix with bread. 

TO DRESS A PRAIRIE CHICKEN. 
Lay the chicken on its back, head towards you; with a sharp 
knife cut the skin through on the breast bone; with the hands pull 
the skin apart down from off the breast and back, to the point of 
the breast bone, then cut the meat and ribs off from the back 
bone by running the knife from the point of the breast bone for- 
ward to the wing joints on both sides, and take off the entire 
breast, then take out each leg by skinning it and unjointing it from 
the body. The breast and legs of a prairie chicken are all that 
it is profitable to cook. 

TO FRY PRAIRIE CHICKEN. 

MRS, J. P. FOSTER. 

Take the legs and breast of a young prairie chicken, let them 
lie in cold salt and water an hour, or better still, with salt and pep- 
per sprinkled on them over night. Slice the breast in four pieces, 
roll it and the legs in flour, and lay in hot lard, cover tightly and 
set where it will steam till nearly done, then remove the cover, 
and fry a light brown. 

BROILED PRAIRIE-CHICKEN. 

Prepare the chicken as for frying, wipe dry and broil over 
hot coals; none but the most tender should be broiled, unless 
first steamed, or parboiled in very little water. 

STEWED PRAIRIE CHICKEN. 

MRS. J. PARMELEE. 

When chickens are too old to broil or fry, they are nice prepar- 
ed as follows: After dividing them, put in a pan with sufficient 
water to just cover them; slice in a good sized onion to about 
two chickens, a little salt and pepper. Let them stew very sloio- 
ly for four hours, never allowing them to boil. When done, thick- 
en the liquid with butter rubbed in flour. 



POULTRY. 33 

ROASTED QUAIL. 

MRS. J. PARMELEE. 

Pick and clean the quails, then use dressing as for turkey with 
addition of onion. Put in a dripping pan and bake three-quar- 
ters of an hour, basting frequently. They are nice cold, for tea 
or supper. 

TO ROAST PIGEONS. 
Pick out the pinfeathers, or if too many, pull oif the skin; clean 
the inside thoroughly; soak half an hour in considerable water 
to take out the blood ; boil half an hour, with a little salt in the 
water, and take oif the scum as fast as it rises; take them out, 
fiour well and place in a dripping pan; strain the water in which 
they were boiled and put part of it in the pan with a small piece 
of butter, and baste the pigeons; add pepper as you choose. 
Roast them nearly two hours. 

ROAST DUCK. 

Clean and wipe dry your duck; prepare the stuflBngthus: chop 
fine and throw into cold water three good sized onions, cut one 
large spoonful of sage leaves and mix with bread crumbs and a 
piece of butter the size of a walnut; drain the onions, and add 
with a little salt and pepper. Mix these together and stuiF the 
duck well; dredge and baste like a turkey. Ccok an ordinary 
sized duck over an hour. A nice gravy is made by straining the 
drippings; skim off all the fat, then stir in a spoonful of. browned 
flour and a teaspoon ful of mixed mustard. Serve hot. Currant 
jelly is necessary with duck. 

TO BOIL DUCK. 

MRS. S. MERRILL. 

Scald and lay them in water a few minutes, then lay them in a 
dish, pour boiling milk over them, and let them lie in it two or 
three minutes; take them out, dredge with flour and put them in 
a saucepan of cold water, cover close and boil twenty minutes; 
take them out, cover, and set where they will keep warm, and 
make the sauce as follows : chop a large onion and a bunch of 
parsley fine and put therein a gill of gravy; add a tablespoonful 
of lemon juice, a little salt, pepper, and a small piece of butter; 
stew them half an hour, then lay the ducks into a dish and pour 
the sauce over them. 
3 



34 POULTRY. 

SMOTHERED DUCK. 

MRS. J. ANKENEY. 

Pick and dress as turkey, and put in a pot with a pint of water; 
add salt, pepper and a piece of butter; tie a cloth on the pot, and 
cover air tight as nearly as possible. Stew slowly for four or five 
hours. 

ROAST WILD DUCK. 

MRS. J. P. f6sTER. 

Parboil in water with a little salt, placing an onion in each duck 
to absorb the fishy taste that some ducks have; if onion is not 
agreeable, a carrot is said to answer the same purpose. When 
boiled, take the duck and stuff as you would turkey, except that 
onion seems to be necessary. Roast till brown and tender, bast- 
ing with butter and water at first, then with the drippings. Make 
a gravy by taking off the superfluous fat and thickening with 
browned flour. 



MS^S^H. 



HE most desirable requisite to make the following re- 
ceipts good and practical, is good meat. There is no 



[[^^ ^ cook in the world who can broil a "chuck steak" into a 
kj^ sirloin, or roast old ox-beef into a tender "rib roast," or 
Y make a savory bit of mutton out of an old, tough sheep. 

' The cook may do much towards supplying the want of real 
goodness in the meat, by skillful labor, but to place on the table 
the choicest dishes, the best of meats are necessary. Every good 
cook should know how to select the best meats, instead of de- 
pending on the butcher. 

Beef, to be the best, should be from a young steer — killed at 
three to four years old — after having been fattened as quickly as 
possible, on good, rich food. THe quicker beef is fattened, the 
richer and more tender it is, and beef of this class has a bright, 
rich, red, juicy look, while poor beef looks dark, dry, acid a brown- 
ish red color. 

The best cuts for steaks are from the hind quarter, the loin 
being generally chosen as the best, but many prefer the round, 
because, while not so tender, it is more juicy. 

For roasting, rib cuts are the best, the bone being removed 
from the meat, it being skewered so that it comes on the table 
rolled. There is, however, a difference of taste and fancy as to 
removing the bones before cooking. Some real epicures think 
the bones give the meat a richness of flavor not attainable with- 
out them. 

The fore-shoulder furnishes nice pieces for stewing and boiling, 
and an experienced butcher will supply a few very eatable steaks 
from it. Corned beef usually comes from the fore-quarter, but 
butchers generally corn nearly every part which they fail to sell 
fresh. 

35 



36 MEATS. 



VEAL. 



The calf matures much more rapidly than the lamb and, if well 
fed and cared for, may be killed at five weeks old, though, in the 
great majority of cases, the veal improves very rapidly during the 
sixth and seventh weeks of the calf's age, and it will pay the 
owner to feed a calf during these two weeks. Calves are some- 
times killed at four weeks old, but the meat is soft, and too tender 

to either cook or eat, and is very unwholesome. 

» 

MUTTON. 

In selecting mutton, choose, as a rule, a medium sized sheep, or 
a small one. The flesh should have a clear, fresh hue, and the 
fat, especially around the kidneys, look fat, rich, and rather oily, 
and a clear white, not a dull whitish color, and not dry. For 
roasting, the loin is the choice cut; but the fore-shoulder, when 
properly boned, stuffed and basted, is very nice. The leg is for 
boiling, or chops. 

The age at which lambs furnish the best meat, extends from 
three to ten months, and at ten, most lambs become sufficiently 
developed to be called mutton. Like mutton, the hind-quarter is 
the best; but if the fore-quarter be prepared properly, it is rich 
and good, and many prefer it to the hind- quarter. 

CARE OF FAT MEAT AND DRIPPINGS. 

When meat has more fat than is desirable to cook with it, the 
fat should be trimmed off, such pieces as are nice should be cut 
small and put in a vessel with a little water, and stewed slowly 
till the fat is extracted and the water boiled out, then strained in 
a dish. Any surplus fat in the drippings of a roast may be add- 
ed also, and when meat is boiled, the fat that rises on the top 
should be saved. It is well to clarify all such fat by putting it 
into a kettle to melt slowly, stirring occasionally till it looks 
clear, then strain and set away for use. This saves butter, for it 
may be mixed in equal proportions with that or lard, for ginger 
cakes or pie crust. By some it is considered more healthy for 
frying doughnuts than lard. It needs careful watching to see 
that it does not grow stale; it is necessary to clarify it quite often 
in summer, but it will keep longer in winter; keep it in tin or good 



MEATS. 37 

solid stone jars that will not absorb tlie grease and grow rancid. 
Mutton is not good to put with other fat, being too hard and tallowy. 
All refuse grease should be saved for making soap. 

A FRENCH WAY OF COOKING MEATS 

MRS. HILL, MUSCATINE, lA. 

Any kind of a piece of meat, rubbed well with salt and pepper, 
and put into a covered tin pail, placed in a kettle of boiling 
water and cooked till done, will be found very juicy and tender. 
The water must be kept boiling all the time. A delicious gravy 
can be made from the juice of the meat. 

ROAST BEEF. 

To roast in a cooking stove, the fire must have careful attention 
lest the meat should burn. Lay it, well floured, and seasoned, into a 
dripping pan, with rather more than enough water to cover the 
bottom, turn the pan around often, that all parts may be equally 
roasted, and baste frequently. The oven should be quite hot when 
the beef is first put in that the outside may cook quickly and thus 
retain the juices. A large roast of 8 or 10 pounds is much better 
and more economical than a small one, even in a small family. 
The first day it can be served rare; that which is near the outside 
will be well enough cooked for any one. It can be re-roasted on 
the next day. If much remains serve cold on the next, or cut in 
very thin slices, dip each one in flour, then chop two onions fine, 
place a layer of meat in a baking dish and sprinkle it with salt 
pepper and onions; above this, place a layer of sliced or canned 
tomatoes; alternate the layers till the dish is nearly full, moisten- 
ing with the gravy; place a layer of tomatoes upon the top, fill 
with boiling water, cover with a plate, and bake two hours. 

ROAST BEEF. 

MRS. M. P. TURNER. 

A 10 pound roast is the nicest. Put it into a hot oven and let 
it crisp over, as soon as possible, to keep all the juice inside the 
meat. After the meat is well browned, put a little boiling water 
into the dripping pan, grease a paper, two or three thicknesses, and 
lay over the meat, then turn a dripping pan over all. 



38 MEATS, 

BEEF A r.A MODE. 

MRS. C. P. KEEVES. 

Take a tender, fresh round, take out the bone and with a sharp 
knife make many deep incisions, then wash and season well with 
pepper and salt. For the dressing, crumb the soft part of a ba- 
ker's loaf, to which add 1 teaspoonful of sweet marjoi'am, 1 of 
sweet basil, 2 small onions, mixed tine, 2 or 3 small blades of 
mace finely powdered; salt and pepper. Rub well together with 
six ounces of butter, fill the incisions, and tie tape around the meat 
to keep in place. Bake until well done. 

STEWED BRISKET OF BEEF. 

Put three or four pounds of brisket into a kettle and cover it 
with water; remove the scum as it rises, and let it boil steadily 
two hours; take it from the kettle and brown it with butter in a 
spider; when it is browned on every side, return it to the kettle 
and stew it gently five hours more; add more water if it boils 
away; pat in a few cloves, salt and pepper, as you' think neces- 
sary. Half an hour before dinner add tomato or mushroom 
catsup. The water in which it was stewed is a nice soup. 

STEWED BEEF. 

MRS. J. M. OTIS. 

The ends of the slices of "Porterhouse" steak are nice for 
stewing. In this case, have the thin part cut off before the meat 
is sliced. Cover the piece to stew with boiling water, and cook 
till every partis perfectly tender; season when two-thirds cooked. 
The water must be entirely cooked away to ratain the sweetness 
of the meat. " 

BROILED STEAK. ^ 

MRS. J. M. OTIS. 

Select your steak carefully. The wide end of the slice of 
"Porterhouse" is nice, or the "loin." Have the gridiron hot and 
' buttered, and over hot coals; place the beef upon the gridiron, 
and cook till the blood begins to start upon the upper side before 
turning, if the fire is not too hot. To retain the juice, beef 
should be cooked rapidly at first. Turn frequently rather than 



MEATS. 39 

scorch. When done, remove to the platter and season to the 
taste. Use no salt while cooking. This prevents the blood from 
escaping. 

BEEF STEAK ROLL. 

MRS. G. A. PRITCHARD. 

Select a nice, tender, sirloin steak; pound it well, season with salt 
and pepper; then make a nice dressing of chopped bread, well but- 
tered, salted and peppered, with a little sage, and mixed together 
with a very little warm water. Spread this on the meat, then 
begin at one end and roll it together; tie with strings. Put into 
a dripping-pan with a little water. Bake about tliree-quarters of 
an hour. To be eaten warm, or sliced cold for tea. 

BEEF STEAK AND ONIONS. 

Take thick beefsteak, (that which is not so tender will answer,) 
cut it in pieces ready to serve; put into a spider with a little hot 
water; slice up three or four onions, and stew very slowly several 
hours. Let the water boil out and the meat become brown, then 
stir flour into the fat which has come from the meat. If there is 
too much, take some out and pour on boiling water, and stir till 
the flour is cooked. Pour the meat and gravy into a deep dish or 
platter, and serve. 

Bay leaves, which can be obtained at the druggists, are a good 
substitute for those who do not like onions, but the leaves should 
be taken out before sending to the table. ^ 

TOMATO STEAK. 

MRS. S. MERRILL. 

Take two pounds of beef, cut it in small strips, and put it into 
a pot with seven medium sized tomatoes; stew it very slowly; 
add a dessert-spoonful of sugar, salt, a little clove, and, ju^ be- 
fore you take it up, a dessert-spoonful of butter. If you have 
tomato catsup, add a little, and, if you like, chopped onion. This 
is a good rule for cooking beef that is tough, as it renders it more 
palatable than most other ways. Some think this dish is better 
when heated over, the next day. 



40 MEATS. 

BEEFSTEAK FOR THE OLD. 

Take coarse, lean beef, with a small quantity of suet; run 
it through a sausage cutter, or chop very fine; add pepper 
and salt; make into cakes three quarters of an inch thick, and 
cook as you would beefsteak. The poor will find it cheap, and 
the rich, nearly as good as the choicest cuts. 

BEEF BALL. 

MISS LIZZIE SMITH. 

3 lbs. choice beef (rare) chopped fine, 10 butter crackers crush- 
ed thoroughly, ^ tea cup butter, pepper and salt to the taste, ^ 
cup water. Mix all well together, press down hard in pans, dip 
a few spoonfuls of the water in which the beef was boiled over the 
top and bake 1^ or 2 hours. Slice when cold. 

BEEF OMELET. 

MRS. W. H. CLEGHORN. 

One and one-half pounds of good beefsteak chopped fine, one 
cup suet, two slices of wheat bread soaked in water, two eggs 
and half a cup of sweet cream; season well with salt and pepper. 
Mold into a loaf or roll and bake three-fourths of an hour, basting 
frequently. 

SPICED BEEF. 

Chop tough beefsteak, raw, and a piece of suet the size of an 
egg; season with pepper, salt, and a little summer savory; add 
two eggs, half a pint of bread crumbs, four or five tablespoonfuls 
of cream, a small piece of butter; mix and make into a roll, with 
flour sufficient to keep together. Put in a pan with a little drip- 
pings and water, and bake as a roast. Slice thin when cold. 

TO BOIL CORNED BEEF. 

Wash it thoroughly and put into a pot that will hold plenty of 
water; the water should be cold; skim with great care; allow 
forty minutes for every pound after it has begun to boil. The 
goodness depends much on its being boiled gently and long. If 
it is to be eaten cold, lay it in a vessel which will admit of its 
being pressed with a heavy weight, as salt meat is very much 
improved by pressing. 



ME A TS. 41 

CORNED BEEF. 

MRS. M. E. KELLOGG. 

To have good corned beef, select a good piece of brisket or 
flank, and put it into a pot of boiling water; throw in a handful 
of salt, or enough to suit the taste, and boil till tender; then add 
potatoes, turnips and cabbage, with a piece of salt pork. This 
makes a good Yankee dinner, superior to beef pickled in brine. 

TO MAKE TOUGH BEEF TENDER. 

MES. CHAELES SWEENEY. 

Cut the steak, the day before using, into slices about two 
inches thick; rub over them a small quantity of carbonate of soda; 
wash off next morning; cut into suitable thickness; ccok to 
suit the taste. 

BOILED TONGUE. 

MES. J. B. STEWAET. 

Boil and skim; sprinkle some flour over it; put in cloves, and 
turn a cup of jelly over it. Bake moderately fifteen minutes. 

BAKED TONGUE. 

MES. M. E. KELLOGG. 

Season with common salt, a very little salt-petre, half a cup of 
brown sugar, pepper, cloves, mace and allspice, powdered fine. 
Let it remain for a fortnight, then take out the tongue, put it in 
a pan; lay on some butter; cover with bread crumbs, and bake 
slowly till so tender that a straw will easily go through it. To be 
eaten cold. Will keep a long time, and is very nice for tea. 

FRIED LIVER. 

Cut it in slices, and lay in cold salt water to draw out the blood. 
Some place it over a slow fire till the liver turns white. Take it 
out, roll each piece in flour or bread crumbs, season and put in 
hot lard. Cover, and cook slowly, till the liver is tender, then 
uncover and fry quickly till brown. Another way is to pour 
boiling water on the liver for a few moments, and proceed as 
above. 



42 MEATS. 

TO FRY TRIPE. 

MRS. A. Y. EAWSON. 

Cut in pieces convenient for serving; beat an egg lightly and 
dip each piece in the Qg^. Have your frying-pan hot and fry 
brown in butter. It will take a good deal of butter to make it 
nice and keep from burning. 

TO COOK DRIED BEEF. 

MRS. J. M. OTIS. 

Chip the beef as for the table; put it in a basin of cold water, 
and set it in a warm (not hot) place. Put a bowl of cream in a 
stew-pan over the fire, and when hot, shake in flour from the 
dredging-box, till it is, on boiling, of the consistency of thick 
cream; set off the stew-pan, and add to the thickened cream the 
beef which has been drained from the water, and it is ready for 
the table. The quantity of water used, and the length of time it 
is allowed to remain in the water, will necessarily depend upon 
the saltness of the beef. Fifteen minutes is usually sufficient. 

HOW TO FRY DRIED BEEF. 

MRS. T. HUNT. 

It is nice shaved off with a plane; then put it into a hot frying- 
pan, with butter to fry it until brown. Put in a tablespoonful of 
flour, then pour in hot water enough to make a gravy. Let it 
stew a moment before taking it up. 

TO WARM OVER COLD MEATS. 

MRS. S. MACY, NEWPORT, R. I. 

Take the pieces of cold steak or roast and put into a stew-pan, 
and nearly cover with water; slice in two or three onions; add 
butter, pepper and salt, and stew until very tender; mix a little 
flour in cold water and stir in to thicken the gravy. Tough steak 
is nice prepared in the same way. 

MEAT BALLS. 

MRS. M. R. KELLOGG. 

Chop fine any kind of cold meat; mix it with one or two eggs, 
and some butter; season it with salt and pepper, and sprinkle 
over flour; roll it in balls and fry brown in hpt lard. 



MEATS. 43 

HASH. 

MES. ANDREWS. 

Chop cold beef to a fine hash, and season it; mash and season 
hot boiled potatoes, and place them around a flat dish for a bor- 
der, two or three inches in width; put the hash in the center and 
cover with fine bread-crumbs, and put into the oven and brown. 

HASH ON TOAST. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

Cold pieces of beefsteak are nice, chopped fine, cooked in a 
little butter and water, and thickened with flour; pour over pieces 
of toast laid on a platter, and moistened with hot water, salted. 
Garnish with hard-boiled eggs. 

HASH, WITH POTATOES. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Cold pieces of beef, either boiled, broiled or baked, can be used 
for the dish. Free the meat from all pieces of bone, chop fine, 
and mix with two parts of potatoes to one of beef. Potatoes 
boiled with the skins on are best. They should be cold, and 
chopped not quite so fine as the meat. Put them in a spider with 
melted butter or clarified drippings, and just enough hot water to 
keep from burning. Season to taste, and keep stirring till the 
whole is cooked together. If liked crisped, let it remain still long 
enough to bake a crust on the bottom, and then turn out on a flat 
dish. Other meats may be used instead of beef. 

BEEF AND MUTTON PIE. 
Take slices of tender meat, pound thin and broil ten min- 
utes; cut off the gristly and bony parts; season it highly with 
salt and pepper; butter, and cut it into small pieces. Line a 
pudding-dish with pastry; put in the meat, and to each layer put 
a teaspoonful of tomato catsup, and a large spoonful of water. 
Sprinkle flour over the whole and cover it with pie- crust, having 
a slit in the center of it. Lay strips of pastry over, so as to give 
it a tasteful appearance, and bake it about an hour. Cooked 
mutton, and roast beef or broiled beef, can be made into a good 
pie. Cut them into small pieces, season with salt and pepper; 
add gravy, or butter and water, till you can see it at the top. 



44 MEATS. 

MOCK TERRAPIN. 

MES. M. R. KELLOGG. 

Take half a calf's liver, season, and fry brown; chop it, not 
very fine, and dredge thickly with flour; add two boiled eggs, 
chopped fine, a teaspoonful of made mustard, a very little cayenne 
pepper, and a piece of butter as large as an ^^'g\ pour on a teacup- 
ful of water, and let it boil a few minutes. Veal is very nice to 
use instead of liver, when preferred. This is a good supper dish. 

PRESSED MEAT. 

MISS LIZZIE SMITH. 

Boil till very tender, and pick apart with the fingers, not using 
a knife at all; season with butter, pepper and salt; pour over 
enough of the liquor the meat is boiled in to make it moist; 
press tight over night and slice thin. Nice for chicken or veal. 

ROAST VEAL. 

The shoulder, loin and fillet are the best pieces for roasting. 
The loin is considered the choicest. Veal is less juicy than beef, 
and requires more basting. When nearly done, baste it with 
melted butter, dredge it with flour, and let it brown nicely before 
taking up. For the gravy, mix flour with the fat in the pan, or a 
little butter, and stir into the drippings. Serve in a gravy boat. 

SHOULDER OF VEAL. . 

Remove the bone, and fill the space it occupied with a dressing 
made as for turkey or chicken ; keep well basted and proceed as 
with the above. A fillet of veal may be prepared in the same 
■way, by removing the leg bone with a sharp knife. 

. TO FRY VEAL STEAK. 

MRS. BELLE WARD. 

Cut out all the bone and fat, putting the fat into the frying pan 
to try out while you prepare the steak; pound the steak quite 
thin, and season well wiMi salt and pepper; then dip into a 
mixture of Q^^ and bread crumbs, and lay into the hot fat, frying 
thoroughly until brown. 



MEATS. 45 

SPICED VEAL. 

MRS. G. R. OSGOOD. 

Chop three pounds of veal steak and one thick slice of salt 
pork, as fine as sa,usage meat; add to it three Boston crackers, 
rolled fine; half a teacup of tomato catsup, three well-beaten 
eggs, one and one-half teaspoons of salt, one teaspoon of pepper, 
and one grated lemon; mould it in the form of a loaf of bread, 
put it into a small dripping pan, cover with one rolled cracker, 
and baste with a teacupful of hot water and two tablespoons of 
butter. Bake three hours, basting very often. 

VEAL OR LAMB PATTIES. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

Use cold veal or lamb; chop fine, taking equal parts of meat 
and bread crumbs; season with sage, salt and pepper, and moisten 
with eggs and melted butter, or gravies from the meat; make 
into little cakes, and fry in butter till well browned. 

VEAL LOAF. 

MRS. F. CORNING. 

Three pounds of veal; three-quarters of a pound of salt pork, 
three hard-boiled eggs, chopped fine; six crackers, pounded fine; 
two teaspoons of pepper, two tablespoons of salt; mix well, 
and make into two loaves; bake two hours; baste with butter 
and water. 

VEAL LOAF. 

MRS. R. A. BUNKER, SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

Three pounds of veal, one and one-half pounds of salt pork, 
both chopped fine; two pounded crackers, two eggs well beaten, 
one nutmeg, two teaspoons of pepper, two teaspoons of 
chopped parsley, two teaspoons of celery, and the rind and 
juice of one lemon. Put batter on the loaf after kneading. Bake 
in a roll, two hours. 

VEAL OMELET. 

MRS. T. E. BROWN. , t • 

Three pounds of raw veal, chopped fine; two p©»»ds of boiled 
pork, also chopped; three eggs, one tablespoon of milk, beaten 



46 MEATS. 

with the eggs, four Boston crackers, pounded fine; two tea- 
spoons of pepper, a scant tablespoon of salt— ^sage to taste. Mix 
well together in the shape of a loaf, and bake two hours. Baste 
often with melted butter and water. 

MOTTLED VEAL. 
Boil an equal number of pounds of salt tongue and lean veal 
separately; boil with the veal half a cup of rice to whiten it, but 
separate it from the veal afterwards; when the meats are quite 
cold, chop each very fine; season the tongue with pepper, sage 
or savory, a teaspoonful of made mustard, a pinch of cloves and 
of cinnamon. The veal can be seasoned the same way, with the 
addition of salt; moisten a little with the water in which the veal 
was boiled, and have bowls, or some small jars, well buttered; 
put in alternate spoonfuls of tongue and veal, so as to have the 
light and dark meat in irregular spots; pack in tightly, smooth 
over the top, pour on melted butter and set away to cool; 
when cool, cover tightly. This keeps some time, and when 
turned out and sliced thin, is a pretty, as well as a savory dish. 

SCALLOPED VEAL. 

MES. A. L. TRISBIE. 

Take cold veal, either baked or boiled; chop it fine; put a layer 
in the bottom of a bettered pudding-dish, and moisten with 
gravy; water in which the bones and refuse pieces of the meat 
have been boiled, answers nicely' ; spread on this a layer of cracker 
crumbs wet with milk, and thus alternate until the dish is full, 
beating an ^g^ with the cracker that is to form the top layer. A 
little ham, chopped with the veal, greatly improves it. 

Remnants of spare-rib or of ham may be used in the same way. 

» VEAL POT-PIE. 

Cut in pieces ready for serving; add two or three slices of 
ham or salt pork; stew very gently till nearly done. A few 
moments before serving, have ready a crust made as for baking 
powder biscuits but rather richer; roll and cut in small squares, 
drop in the boiling gravy, cover, and let it boil till the crust rises 
to the top and is cooked. Serve immediately, or the crust will 
become heavy. Season to taste before putting in the crust. 



MEATS. 47 

VEAL SAUSAGES. 

Take two pounds of lean veal and one pound of salt fat pork; 
grind as for sausage meat, and season in the same way — that is, 
with salt, pepper, and such sweet herbs as you prefer. Fry a 
light brown. 

TO ROAST A SHOULDER OF MUTTON. 

Season and roast the same as beef, basting with butter and 
water till there is gravy enough to use. It requires to be cooked 
more than beef. Serve with currant jelly. 

TO COOK A LEG OF MUTTON. 

MRS. BELLE WARD. 

Put the mutton into warm water, with salt and one small red 
pepper; boil until tender, allowing the water to boil nearly away; 
then take it out, and if not seasoned enough, sprinkle with salt, 
pepper and flour, place in a hot oven with the broth, and 
bake half an hour, basting often until the meat is a light brown. 

MUTTON CHOPS. 

Trim off the superfluous fat, and broil over a bright fire ; season 
and butter them when cooked; do not have them rare. They 
can also be fried by first dredging with flour or bread crumbs. 

FILLET OF MUTTON. 

Cut a fillet, or round, from a leg of mutton; remove all the 
fat from the edges, and take out the bone; rub it all over 
with a very little pepper and salt; have ready a stuffing of finely 
minced onions, bread crumbs and butter, well seasoned and 
mixed; fill with this the place of the bone; make deep incisions 
or cuts all over the surface of the meat and fill them closely with 
the same stuffing; bind a piece of cloth around the meat to keep 
it in shape, and stew with just enough water to cover it; let it 
cook slowly and steadily from four to six hours, in proportion to 
its size and toughness, skimming frequently. When done, serve 
with its own gravy. 



48 MEATS. 

MUTTON FRICASSEE. 

MRS. J. KUHN. 

Cut the meat up in small pieces, and put in boiling butter; 
spice with cloves, nutmeg, onions, salt and bay leaf; after frying 
till brown, pour boiling water over it; cover and boil slowly 
about an hour. 

MUTTON CROQUETTES, 

Remove the fat and skin from cold mutton, mince it fine as 
possible, season, and make up with the gravy into little oval 
balls; dip in o,^'^ and then in bread crumbs and fry brown. 

LAMB WITH RICE. 

Partly roast a small fore-quarter of lamb; cut it in pieces, and 
lay in a dish; season, and pour over it a little water; boil a pint 
of rice till dry, salt it, and stir in a piece of butter, also the yolks 
of four well-beaten eggs, only reserving enough to put over the 
top; spread the rice and the remainder of the eggs over the lamb, 
to form a covering; bake a light brown. 

STEWED LAMB WITH GREEN PEAS. 

For a large dish, take a quarter of nice lamb and cut it into 
steaks; remove the skin and all the fat; season the steaks with 
salt and pepper, and if liked, a little nutmeg; lay them in a 
kettle and pour on just enough water to cover them, and stew 
gently for an hour, skimming when necessary; then add a quart 
or more of young green peas, a lump of loaf sugar, and some bits 
of fresh butter; let it cook slowly till the peas are well done. 
Take them up together, or serve in separate dishes. 

IRISH STEW. 

Take five or six mutton chops; the same quantity of beef, veal 
and pork; six or eight Irish potatoes, peeled and quartered; three 
or four onions sliced, and salt and pepper to taste; add a pint of 
good gravy, flavored with catsup, if liked. Cover all very closely, 
and let it simmer slowly for two hours (never allowing it to stop 
simmering). A slice or two of ham is an improvement. Stir 
occasionally to prevent burning. 



MEATS. 49 

ROAST PIG. 
A pig, to be right for roasting, should be from a month to six 
weeks old. A very essential thing is to see that your butcher 
has done his part in cleansing it thoroughly. Examine every 
part — the ears, mouth and Avhole head, also the fat; if the hair 
should not all be removed, immerse it in hot water and scrape all 
•out. Wash the whole, inside and out, wipe dry, and wrap 
immediately in a wet cloth to keep it from the air. For stuffing, 
take a cup of bread crumbs seasoned as you prefer, and moisten 
with three tablespoonfuls of melted butter; mix all together, 
with a half cup of warm water or milk and two eggs well beaten;, 
then stuff the pig into his natural size and shape, sew him up and 
bend his feet under, close up to his body, and skewer them there; 
dredge with flour, and put into a pan with a little hot water; 
baste with butter first, then with the drippings; when it begins to 
cook, rub it over every few minutes with a cloth dipped in melted 
butter — this makes the skin soft and tender. It will require as 
much as two hours to cook well, perhaps more. Send to the 
table whole, garnished with parsley and celery tops. Skim the 
gravy well and thicken with brown flour; add a little hot water 
if necessary, also some lemon juice. 

ROAST LEG OF PORK. 

This should be from a young pig. Score the skin in lines 
across the leg, as it is to be carved, and put it into a pan with a 
little water; heat slowly at first, or it will blister; baste with 
butter till there is enough of its own gravy for that purpose. 
Pork requires to be thoroughly cooked, and a leg weighing six 
pounds will require at least two hours, with a hot fire. When 
done, take it up, skim the fat from the gravy, add boiling water 
and thicken with flour; season to taste. 

Another way, is to remove the bone with a sharp l^nife, and 
fill the cavity with a dressing made of bread crumbs, seasoned to 
taste; lemon juice or vinegar improves it. The dressing can be 
put in where the skin is scored if the scores are cut deep. The 
leg must be tied with tapes to keep in shape and prevent the 
escape of the dressing; make the gravy as before. Apple sauce 
and pickles are always an acceptable accompaniment of roast 
pork. 

4 



50 MEATS. 

ROAST SPARE-RIB. 

Cover with a greased paper till it is half done; remove the 
paper and dredge with flour; baste at first with butter, then with 
its own gravy, quite often. Just before taking up, sprinkle bread 
crumbs seasoned with salt, pepper and sage, thickly over the 
surface; let it cook a few moments and baste with butter. Make 
a gravy and send to the table separately. 

PORK STEAKS. 

Fresh pork steaks should be in nice slices, with the skin taken 
off. Season them with salt, pepper, and sage if liked; broil or 
fry them quickly, using no butter. When fried, and gravy is de- 
sired, mix flour with the fat and pour in boiling water, or milk if 
preferred, and serve separately. 

PORK CHOPS. 

Dip first in beaten ^^^^ then in cracker or bread crumbs; sea- 
son to taste and fry in hot lard, turning often till well done. 

SOUSE. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Clean pigs' feet and ears thoroughly, and soak them a number 
of days in salt and water; boil them very tender and split them. 
(They are good fried). To souse them cold, pour boiling vinegar 
over them, spiced with pepper-corns and a little salt. They will 
keep good, pickled, for a month or two. 

PIG'S HEAD, (ROASTED.) 

Clean and split the head of a half-grown pig, take out the 
brains and set in a cool place; par-boil the head in salted water, 
then take it out and wipe dry, cover with beaten ^^^^ sprinkle 
thickly with bread crumbs seasoned to taste, and roast, basting 
with butter and the water in which the head was boiled, and in its 
drippings. Wash the brains until they are white, beat them up 
with one-fourth part bread crumbs, pepper and salt, together 
with a beaten Q^^'., make into balls, and roll in flour and fry in 



MEATS. 51 

hot fat to a light brown. Place on the dish around the head, and 
pour on the fat from the dripping-pan; thicken the remainder with 
brown flour and boil up once. 

PRESSED HEAD. 

MRS. M. R. KELLOGG. 

Pig's head is good baked with beans, or cured and smoked. It 
is also good prepared with spices. Boil the several parts of the 
entire head, and the feet, in the same way as for souse. All 
must be boiled so perfectly tender as to have the meat easily 
separated from the bones. After it is neatly separated, chop the 
meat while warm and season with salt, pepper, cloves, nutmeg 
and cinnamon. Put it in a strong bag, and, placing a weight on 
it, let it remain until cold; or put it in any convenient dish, 
placing a plate with a weight on it to press the meat. Cut in' 
slices when used. 

SCRABBLE. 

MRS. C. H. SWEENEV. 

After boiling a pig's head and feet for head-cheese, take a 
cup of the meat and chop fine; put it in one gallon of hot water; 
when it boils hard, stir in meal to make the consistency of mush. 
Salt to taste, pour into a square bread-pan and, when cold, cut in 
slices and fry for breakfast. 

TO COOK A HAM. 

MRS. M. R. KELLOGG. 

Boil it three or four hours, according to the size, then skin it and 
place in the oven for half an hour, then cover with bread crumbs 
and replace in the oven for another half hour. Boiled ham is 
alwa3-s improved by heating in an oven till much of the fat is 
cooked out. 

TO BOIL HAM. 

Ham should be put into cold water to boil; if it is very salt, the 
water should be changed just after it begins to boil. A pint of 
good vinegar added to the water improves the ham very much. 
When boiled tender, remove the skin and, if desired, cut off some 
of the fat. It may be set in an oven fdr a while, or not, just as 
the taste dictates. If set on the table whole, a few cloves stuck 
here and there, give it a pretty appearance. Garnish with celery 
tops or sprigs of parsley. 



52 MEATS. 

STEAMED HAM. 

Lay in cold water for twelve hours, scrape and wash thoroughly. 
Place a steamer over a pot of boiling water, put in the ham and 
cover closely; keep the water boiling all the time; allow twenty- 
five minutes steaming for each pound of meat. Skin while hot. 

TO GLAZE HAM. 

The ham should be a cold boiled one, from which the skin was 
removed when hot. Cover the ham all over with beaten ^-^^'t 
make a thick paste of cream, pounded cracker, salt and a 
teaspoonful of melted butter. Spread this evenly over the ham 
and brown in a moderate oven. 

BROILED HAM. 

If very salt, soak the slices in lukewarm water half an hour, 
then take them out, cut off the rind and broil quickly over hot 
coals. If cooked slowly, it will harden, 

FRIED HAM. 

If too salt, put the slices in cold water in the frying-pan, let it 
come to a boil, turn it off and fry the ham quickly, turning often. 

HAM AND EGGS. 

Fry the ham quickly; 'remove from the pan as soon as done. 
Drop the eggs, one at a time, into the hot fat; be careful not to let 
the yolks break and run, and keep the eggs as much separated as 
possible, to preserve their shape. The ham should be cut in 
pieces the right size to serve and, when the eggs are done, one 
should be laid on each piece of ham. If any eggs remain, they 
can be placed uniformly on the edge of the platter. 

TO WARM HAM. 

MRS. A. L. FEISBIE. 

Take any pieces of cold boiled or fried ham, chop them with 
bread and put the mixture into the stew-pan. When it is hot, 
break into it one or two eggs, according to the quantity; season 
with pepper and salt to the taste. Stir constantly after break- 
ing in the eggs, and serve as soon as the eggs are sufficiently 
cooked. 



MEATS. 53 

HAM TOAST. 

Chop some lean boiled ham fine, put it in a pan with a little 
pepper and a lump of butter; when quite hot stir in two well- 
beaten eggs, mix quickly, spread on hot buttered toast. 

HAM SANDWICHES. 

Cut bread in thin slices, butter them and lay between each two 
some nice slices of cold boiled ham. A little mustard spread on 
the meat, improves it for many. 

FRIED SALT PORK. 

MRS. C. H. RAWSON. 

Take a nice piece of pork with scarcely any lean, cut in thin 
slices; have the skillet half full of either warm or cold water^ 
lay the pieces in and let them remain until the water boils, then 
take them out, turn out the water, roll the pieces in flour or 
Indian meal and fry till a delicate brown on both sides. 

PORK SAUSAGES. 

Take thirty pounds of pork, mostly lean; chop it very fine, 
season with eight ounces of salt, one -half ounce of salt-petre, two 
ounces of pepper, and such sweet herbs as suit the taste. They 
should be finely sifted; sage, summer savory, or sweet marjoram 
are all good. To keep for family use, the meat can be packed in 
stone jars and covered with a cloth, over which pour melted lard. 
When used, make into cakes. 

Bags for holding the meat, may be made of old white muslin, 
large enough to allow a slice to be from three to four inches in 
diameter. Keep in a cool place. 

BAKED PORK WITH APPLES. 

MRS. C. H. SWEENEY. 

Put the roast in a pan and season well with salt and pepper. 
When about half done or more, pour off the fat, then surround 
your roast with apples prepared in the following way: pare the 
upper part of the apples about two inches wide, and put a band 
or cap of dough around the peeled part; place in the pan as 
described, and bake till done. This is very nice. 



9 



54 MEATS. 

NEW ENGLAND SAUSAGES. 



MRS. A. Y. RAWSON. 

To fifty pounds of meat, cut fine, put seventeen and one-half 
ounces of salt, three and one-half ounces of pepper, ten ounces of 
sage and savory. 

TO PREPARE LARD. 

MRS. C. D. SPRAGUE. 

Obtain the "leaf" from a butcher, skin and scrape till it is 
clean, then cut it up in small pieces, and put over the fire in an 
iron kettle, which should be scrupulously clean, with a little 
water. When about half cooked, add a small teaspoonful of dry 
soda. As this makes the lard foam up, it is necessary to have 
room in the kettle, so it shall not boil over. When done, most 
of the scraps will be eaten up, and the lard will be very pure 
and white. Strain into a tin or stone vessel, and keep in a cool, 
dry place. It remains hard in warm weather. 

CORNED BEEF. 

MISS LIZZIE SMITH, MT. CARROL, ILLS. 

To 6 gallons of water, add 9 lbs. of pure salt, 3 lbs. of brown 
sugar, 1 qt. molasses, 3 oz. of salt-petre, 1 oz. pearlash. Let 
these ingredients be boiled and carefully skimmed as long as im- 
purities rise to the surface. When the water is ready to receive 
the rest of the material, pour in the salt-petre only, and when 
dissolved, and the water boiling, dip your beef, piece by piece, 
into the salt-petre walEfer, holding it in for a few seconds only. 

When the beef has been thus immersed and become quite cool, 
pack it in the cask where it is to remain; when the pickle is per- 
fectly cold, pour it on the meat which ' should be kept down by 
cover and stone. This amount of pickle is intended for 100 lbs. of 
beef. The immersion of the beef in hot salt-petre water contracts 
the surface by closing the pores and prevents the juices of the 
meat from going out into the pickle. The salt-petre absorbed by 
the contracted or cooked surfaces will modify the salt that passes 
through it, the whole producing the most perfect result. 



MEATS. 65 

BRINE FOR CURING BEEF. 

MKS. T. HUNT. ^ 

To 100 lbs. of beef, take 10 lbs. of salt and 2 of salt-petre, 1 
qt. of molasses. Boil and skim ; when cold, pour over the meat. 

FOR CURING PORK AND HAMS. 

MRS. M. R. KELiLOGG. 

For pork, make brine enough to cover the pork (let it be as 
strong as possible). For every layer of pork put a layer of ground 
black pepper, say 1 lb. to a barrel. Put in 3 or 4 oz. of salt-pe- 
tre; this is not enough to make it taste, yet it is enough to keep 
the hams from getting hard. When used the second time do not 
scald the brine. For hams, to each 100 lbs. take 9 lbs. of salt, 
5 oz. of salt-petre, 1 qt. of molasses, a large spoonful of soda and 
4 Oz. of ground black pepper. Let the hams remain in brine from 4 
to 6 da^*^ smoke and sack. Care should be taken to prevent the 
pork from freezing, or to be sure the frost is all out vsrhen put in 
the brine. This is a very superior receipt. 

BRINE FOR HAM. 

MRS. C. P. HOLMES. 

12 lbs. salt, \ lb. salt-petre, 3 qts. molasses, to 6 gals, water. 
Boil and skim; when cool, pour over the meat. Before packing, 
take salt, salt-petre and molasses and rub the ends around the 
bone. This for 100 lbs. 

TO CURE HAMS. 

For curing fifty pounds, allow three quarts of coarse salt, one- 
half pound of salt-petre, and two quarts good molasses. Add 
enough soft water to cover the hams. Common sized hams 
should be kept in this pickle five weeks, larger ones six. They 
should all be taken out once a week, and those which Avere on 
the top laid in first, and the lower ones last. They should be 
smoked from two to three weeks with walnut wood, or with saw- 
dust and corn cobs mixed. Meat smoked with cobs is very 
delicate. 

Pieces of beef for smoking may be laid in this pickle after the 
hams are sent to the smoke-house, but more salt should be added. 



56 . . MEATS. 

HOW TO KEEP HAMS THROUGH THE SUMMER. 

When removed from the smoke house, do not suffer a fly to 
come near them, but immediately sew them in a coarse cloth or 
stiff brown paper and pack them in slacked ashes. There is no 
method so sure to preserve them from insects, and the effect of 
the ashes is to improve the meat, but care should be taken that 
the hams be so secured that the ashes will not touch them. The 
ashes should be perfectly cold and dry and the barrel be in a dry, 
cool place. 



i^aa^. 




W^ UCCESS in nice cooking greatly depends on the fresh- 
ness of the eggs used. There are various ways of 
|t^>fi^ determining in regard to this, but none appear to be 

infallible. Old stale eggs are cold all over, fresh eggs 

have a warm spot on the big end, which may be de. 

tected by applying it to the tongue. Another : If placed 
in cold water, a fresh egg will go to the bottom and lie on the 
side, a bad egg will float, a stale egg may sink but will stand on 
one end. When eggs are plenty it is a good plan to pack them 
for use at times when it is difficult to procure them. Some of the 
simpler methods of preserving them are to pack them in bran or 
salt with the small end down. If they are to be kept some time, 
it is better to grease the shells before packing them. Mix half a 
pint of unslacked lime with the same quantity of salt and a couple 
of gallons of water. The water should be turned on the lime 
boiling hot; when it is cold lay the eggs in with great care not to 
crack the shells, otherwise they will spoil very soon. The eggs 
should be perfectly fresh when put in. Do not make the lime- 
water any stronger, or the lime will eat the shells. They should 
be kept in a cool place, but never allowed to become chilled or 
frozen. 

FRIED EGGS. 

MKS. A. L. FEISBIE. 

Put a very little butter in each cup of a gem pan, which should 
be hot enough to hiss, break an egg into each cup and fry till the 
eggs are hard as is desired. This is a quick and easy way of fry- 
ing eggs; as they preserve the shape of the cup, it makes a very 
pretty dish. 

57 



58 EGGS. 

BAKED EGGS. 

MRS. J. P. POSTER. 

Break into a well buttered, shallow tin plate, five or six eggs, 
(five is better), sprinkle over a little salt and pepper and bits of 
butter; place in a moderately hot oven till the whole sets. This 
makes a very delicate and pretty breakfast dish. 

SCRAMBLED EGGS. 

Put a piece of good butter into a frying-pan and, when hot, 
pour in the eggs, which should be previously broken in a dish 
and seasoned. Stir constantly till cooked as much as desired, 
and serve in a hot dish. Cook them just as the meal is ready to 
be eaten, for they are not good if allowed to stand. Some add a 
little milk or cream with the eggs. 

POACHED EGGS. 

Have the water boiling, and the toast moistened in a little salt 
water, and buttered. Break the eggs, one by one, carefully into 
the water, let them boil till the white sets, remove with an eg^g 
slice, pare off the ragged edges and lay each egg upon a slice of 
toast; put over bits of butter, salt and pepper. Eggs require to be 
quite fresh to poach nicely. 

.BOILED EGGS. 

The most delicate way of preparing eggs is by pouring over 
them boiling water, and letting them stand 15 minutes closely cov- 
ered. If kept hot without boiling, the white becomes very ten- 
der and delicate. An egg cooked the day it is laid requires a 
longer time to cook than one that is a day or two old. 

ANOTHER WAY. 

Put the eggs on in cold water and let it come to a boil, or 
place them in a sauce pan of boiling water, being careful not to 
let them crack or break, by dropping them in. Three minutes 
will be enough to cook them if desired soft, ten if hard. 

PICKLED EGGS. 

Boil as many as you wish to pickle until quite hard; when done, 
place in cold water till you can remove the shells, being careful 



EGGS. 69 

not to mar the eggs. Lay them in wide-mouthed jars and pour 
over them scalding vinegar well seasoned with whole pepper, 
allspice and a few pieces of ginger root, or such spices as you may 
prefer. When cold, cover closely and let them remain for a 
month, when they will be ready for use. They make a nice relish 
for cold meats. 

OMELET. 

MRS. G. M. HIPPEE. 

Six eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately. One cup milk, 
one tablespoon of butter melted in the milk, one tablespoon of 
flour; cook slowly in a buttered skillet, on top of the stove, 
without stirring. 

OMELET. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHARD. 

Eight eggs to one cup of cream or milk; beat them all together; 
pepper and salt to taste. Pour all into a greased pan, and let 
them fry until they can be turned over, but not till done too hard. 

FRIED OMELET. 

MRS. C. W. NELSOK. 

Six eggs; beat the yolks, and add one tea cup of milk; beat 
two tablespoons of flour with a little milk; beat the whites to a 
stiff froth, mix all together, and fry in a buttered spider. 

BAKED OMELET. 

MRS, F. V. STOWE. 

Boil one-half pint of milk; beat six eggs thoroughly, the yolks 
and whites separately; add one-half teaspoon of salt and a piece of 
butter the size of a walnut, to the boiling milk; stir all into the 
beaten eggs, and pour into a buttered deep dish. Bake ten min- 
utes, in a quick oven, to a delicate brown. 



m\jc^^ SK® ^si<sf)0. 






WHITE SAUCE. 

■S:^M^|i?i UT a piece of butter about the size of an egg into a 
.. sauce-pan, set over a good fire, have a wooden spoon 
ready and move the butter all over the bottom of the 
(■jjTD pan, so as to melt it as fast as possible, without allowing it 
Iv. to burn. Then take the sauce-pan from the fire, put in it 
about two tablespoonfuls of flour and stir the flour" well and 
fast, so as to mix it thoroughly with the butter; no lumps must 
be left. If the butter cools before the flour is mixed, set the pan 
back on the fire a inoment. When well mixed, heat again, stir- 
ring fast, until the mixture turns of a yellowish color, when the 
flour is cooked. To finish, pour into the pan the liquor to be 
used, either water, milk or broth, stir and mix it with the butter 
and flour over the fire, then season and it is ready. 

DRAWN BUTTER. 

Mix smoothly several teaspoonfuls of flour with cold water, and 
pour into two-thirds of a pint of boiling water, stirring briskly un- 
til the whole boils up well; then remove it from the fire, but keep 
it warm. Have ready about a quarter of a pound of good butter, 
cut into small pieces, and stir them into the liquid. When the 
butter is melted, the sauce is ready for use. It should be free 
from lumps, but if not, it must be strained through a small sieve. 
If the butter is to be used for fish, put in slices of hard boiled 
eggs or capers. It may be converted into curry sauce by sprink- 
ling in a little curry powder. 

61 



63 SAUCES AND SALADS. 

BURNT BUTTER. 

Put a couple of ounces of butter into a frying-pan. Heat over a 
moderate fire till of a dark brown color, add a half teaspoonful of 
vinegar and season to taste. This is nice for fish, or salad. 

SAUCE FOR BOILED MEATS. 

MRS. CARPENTER. 

Chop fine one onion and a small quantity of mixed pickles. Put 
these in a stew-pan with a gill of vinegar, one teaspoonful of 
bread crumbs, pepper and salt. Boil all together five minutes, 
then add one gill of water and boil ten minutes longer. 

MINT SAUCE FOR LAMB. 

Wash and chop fine some green spearmint; to two tablespoonfuls 
of the minced leaves put eight of vinegar, adding a little brown 
sugar. Serve cold. 

SHIRLEY SAUCE. 

MRS. E. M. PARROTT, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Six large, ripe tomatoes, one pepper, one onion, one tablespoon- 
ful of salt, one tablespoonful of sugar, one cup of vinegar; chop 
pepper and onion fine; mix all together and boil one hour. Bot- 
tle while hot. It is improved by running through a colander. 

BREAD SAUCE. 

Slice an onion and simmer in a pint of milk till tender. Have 
a cup of fine bread crumbs in a sauce-pan and strain the milk 
over it. Cover and soak half an hour, stir till smooth, season to 
taste and add three tablespoons of butter. Boil up once and 
serve. Boiling water may be added if too thick. 

PARSLEY SAUCE. 

MRS. J. PARMELEE. 

One tablespoonful of flour, a quarter of a pound of butter; mix 
together, and pour over it boiling water. Boil the parsley from 
three to five minutes, then squeeze and chop fine, and add to the 
butter. 



SAUCES AND SALADS. 63 

EGG SAUCE. 

Boil the eggs very hard; when taken up, put them into cold 
water; shell and chop the eggs rather fine, throw them into 
melted or drawn butter, beat it well and serve. 

CRANBERRY SAUCE. 

MRS. C. E. PARKER, RtTSHVILLE, ILL. 

Stew your berries well, rub through a colander or sieve, sweeten 
to taste, blanch some almonds and, when partly cold, add them 
to the berries and put in a mold, turn out and serve. 

CRANBERRY SAUCE. 

Wash and pick over a quart of cranberries, put them in a sauce- 
pan with a teacup of water, stew gentl}^, stirring now and then till 
cooked thick. Sweeten to taste on removing from the fire. 
Mold them, or put into the dish in which they are to be served. 
Some persons add a little cooking soda to save sugar, but it 
changes the color, an4 is apt to affect the taste, if a trifle too 
much is used. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

MISS WESTGATE, JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 

Eighteen ripe tomatoes, one onion and three green peppers 
chopped very fine, one cup of sugar, two and a half cups of vine- 
gar, two teaspoonfuls of salt, one teaspoonful each of cinnamon, 
cloves and allspice (ground). Cook till thick as catsup, but do 
not strain. 

OYSTER SAUCE. 

Separate the oysters from the juice; if there is not enough of 
the latter, add one-third water, season it and set where it will 
boil, thicken with a little flour, mixed smoothly with milk. When 
it has boiled several minutes, add half a pint of oysters to each 
pint of liquid; let them scald through, and remove from the fire. 
Cut a piece of butter the size of an e^^ in small pieces, and put 
in. Serve immediately with poultry. 

Another way is to put the oyster juice in the gravy of the fowl, 
and thicken with oysters and a little flour. 



64 SAUCES AND SALADS. 

CELERY SAUCE. 

Take a few stalks of blanched celery, chop them rathev fine 
and add them to a white sauce, giving just one boil after the 
celery is in. 

ESSENCE OF CELERY. 

Steep an ounce of celery seed in half a pint of vinegar. A 
few drops of this will give a fine flavor to soups, or sauces for 
poultry. 

SAUCE FOR BROILED FISH. 

Put a great spoonful of butter into a gill of cream, keep it hot, 
stir it often, and when the fish is dished, turn the sauce 
over it. 

TO MAKE CURRY POWDER. 

Three ounces each of coriander seed and turmeric; black pepper, 
allspice, mustard and ginger each one ounce; cardamom seed and 
cumin each one-half ounce. Beat together, sift well, bottle and 
cork tight. To be used in seasoning meats and soups. 

CURRANT CATSUP. 

^ MISS M. A. BARTHOLOMEW. 

Six quarts of juice boiled away half, two pounds of sugar, two 
ounces of cinnamon, two spoonfuls pepper, one of mustard and 
cloves, one-half teacup salt, one pint of vinegar. Add the spices 
after the juice has boiled away, and ten minutes before taking off. 

MUSTARD SAUCE FOR LETTUCE OR CABBAGE. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Two tablespoonfuls of white sugar, two-thirds of a tablespoon- 
ful of made mustard, one teaspoonful of salt, one-third of a tea- 
spoonful of pepper, butter the size of a black walnut, the yolk of 
one hard-boiled egg. Mix well together, using as much vinegar 
as is needed for the materials used. Put all together on the stove 
and let it come to a boil, then add one or two well-beaten eggs, 
stirring briskly till they are cooked. When ready, pour over the 
cabbage or lettuce, which must be chopped fine. 



SAUCES AND SALADS. 65 

CURRANT SOY. 

MES. W. S. PKITCHABD. 

Five pounds of currant pulp, three pounds of sugar, one pint 
of vinegar, one tablespoon of black pepper, one-half tablespoon 
of cloves, two teaspoons of salt; spice it more if you like. Put 
the currants through a sieve; boil two hours. 

GRAPE CATSUP. 

MRS. C. P. HOLMES. 

One quart of grape juice, one pint of vinegar, one pound of 
sugar; spice with ground cloves; boil until quite thick. 

GRAPE CATSUP. 

MRS. R. T. WELLSLAGER. 

Squeeze the grapes as for jelly, three-fourths pound of sugar to 
one pint of juice. Spice to taste with salt, black pepper, nut- 
meg, cloves and cinnamon. Boil until it is quite thick. To four 
quarts, just before it is done, put one cup of vinegar. 

GOOSEBERRY CATSUP. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHARD. 

Nine pounds of gooseberries, six pounds of sugar, one ounce 
each of nutmeg, cloves, allspice and cinnamon in a bag together, 
one quart of vinegar; put all in a kettle and cook about three 
hours; then take off and strain through a sieve; put away in any- 
thing you choose. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

MRS. C. C. HOWELL. 

Take one peck of ripe tomatoes, pare them and cook until soft 
enough to press through a sieve, thus taking out seeds and all 
hard parts. Take the juice and add one pint of vinegar, one 
pint of sugar, three tablespoons of ground cinnamon, two table- 
spoons of allspice, one tablespoon of cloves, one tablespoon of 
pepper, and a little salt. Boil two hours. When done, put away 
in bottles. Will keep for years. 

5 ' 



66 SAUCES AND SALADS. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

MRS. D. O. FIISrCH AND MRS. F. CORNING. 

Wash the tomatoes, and slice them; to every gallon put four 
tablespoons of ground pepper, six tablespoons of salt, one table- 
spoon of allspice, one tablespoon of cloves, eight tablespoons of 
mustard. Mix spices well together, add one pint of good vine- 
gar. Boil slowly four hours in a tin vessel; strain through a 
coarse sieve. Put in bottles, cork, and seal. 

CUCUMBER CATSUP. 

MRS. J. PARMELEE. 

Take twelve large cucumbers, grate them and salt well; then 
grate four onions, salt also. Let them stand five or six hours, then 
strain and add as much vinegar to the mixture as you obtain of 
liquid by straining. Season with cayenne pepper. 

WALNUT CATSUP. 
The walnuts should be young and tender enough to pierce with 
a pin. Prick them and lay in an unglazed jar, a layer of walnuts 
and a light sprinkling of salt, until all are used. Pound them 
lightly with a piece of wood, to break or bruise them. Let them 
stand ten days, stirring every day; then strain the juice into a 
saucepan. Cover the shells with boiling vinegar to extract the 
remainder of the juice, crush to a pulp and strain through a colan- 
der into the sauce-pan. For every quart allow one ounce each 
of black pepper and ginger, and one-half ounce each of cloves 
and nutmeg, a pinch of cayenne, a thimbleful of celery seed tied 
in a bag, and an onion minced fine for every two quarts. Boil 
all together, an hour for each gallon. Bottle when cold, dividing 
the spice equally in the bottles. Cork and seal. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

MRS. T. W. CARPENTER. 

Two good sized fowls, one tea-cup of olive oil, one-half jar of 
French mustard, the yolks of ten hard boiled eggs, one-half pint of 
vinegar, one teaspoonful of cayenne pepper, eight heads of celery, 
one teaspoonful of salt, or more if required. Boil the fowls and put 
in salt enough to make palatable. When cold, cut the meat from 



SAUCES AND SALADS. 67 

the bones in pieces about a quarter of an inch in size. Cut the 
white part of the celery in the same way. Mix the chicken and 
celery and set them away. Beat the eggs to a paste with oil, 
then add vinegar, mustard, pepper and salt, and mix thoroughly. 
Do not pour the dressing over the salad till half an hour before it 
is served, or it will wilt. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

MRS. M. J. WELLSLAGER, 

Boil three chickens till tender. Pick the meat from the bones, 
and chop fine. Use celery in the proportion of one-third celery 
to two-thirds chicken. Chop it separately, and not quite as fine 
as the chicken. For a dressing, take one tumbler and a half of 
vinegar, three teaspoonfuls of mustard, half a cup of melted but- 
ter or oil, the yolks of five eggs, salt and pepper to taste. After 
beating, heat this dressing over a slow fire; then stir till nearly 
cold; then mix together, adding three hard boiled eggs, chopped. 
This dressing is also very nice for chopped cabbage. 

DRESSING FOR CHICKEN SALAD, WITHOUT CELERY. 

MRS. WM. H. MEKRITT. 

For one chicken, take one tablespoonful of mustard, pepper and 
salt, one tea-cup of rich sour cream, one tea-cup of vinegar, one- 
half teaspoonful of celery seed. Mix well together, place on the 
stove, stirring all the time; when as thick as custard, take off and 
set away till just before using; then mix with chicken and cab- 
bage. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

Take one can lobster; pick out the soft parts and mash them; chop 
the rest of the lobster and the cabbage fine, having a little more 
than one-third cabbage; four hard boiled eggs; mash yolks and 
chop whites. Add mustard and vinegar to taste. 

ASPARAGUS SALAD. 

MRS. DR. HOFFMAN, BEARDSTOWN, ILL. 

After having scraped and washed (not cut) the asparagus, boil 
it soft in salt and water, taking care that the heads are not injur- 
ed; drain off the water, add some pepper, salt and strong vinegar 



68 SAUCES AND SALADS. 

and let it cool. Before serving, arrange the asparagus so that the 
heads will all lie in the centre of the dish; mix the vinegar in 
which it was put with good olive oil, and pour on the asparagus. 

BEAN SALAD. 

MRS. DE. HOFFMAN, BEAEDSTOWN, ILL. 

String young beans, cut into inch pieces, wash and cook soft in 
salt water. Drain them well, add five cut or chopped onions, 
pepper, salt and vinegar; let them cool, and then add olive oil. 

POTATO SALAD. 

MES. HARRY GLIDDEN, IfEW YORK. 

Take cold boiled potatoes, and enough raw onion to season 
nicely, mince fine, make a dressing as for lettuce salad, and pour 
over it. If preferred, melted butter may be used in place of 
the oil. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

MES. J. K . 

Mix the yolk of one fresh q^v with 2 tablespoonfuls of olive 
oil very slowly, a'dd 1^ spoonfuls of mustard, .3 of salt, a little 
pepper, and last of all, 2 spoonfuls of vinegar. Beat the white 
of the ^^^ to a stiff froth and lightly stir in. This is also excel- 
lent over sliced tomatoes. 

CABBAGE SALAD. 

MES. E, T. WELLSLAGER. 

One tumbler and a half of vinegar, yolks of five or six eggs, 
two-thirds of a cup of butter, three hard-boiled eggs, three tea- 
spoonfuls of mustard; mix all thoroughly through the cabbage. 



V5^G(S{¥Si3l<i^0. 




FIRST thought may be, "Very little need be said on 
that subject; anybody can cook vegetables!" I beg 
leave to differ; many think it such a simple thing to do, 
that they fail to give enough care and thought to their pre- 
paration to make them sufficiently attractive and palatable. 
In France no family, in the middle station of life, ever dines 
without a dish of dressed vegetables, upon which as much care 
has been bestowed in cooking as upon the principal dish of the 
dinner, and which is often eaten alone. 

RULES APPLICABLE TO THE COOKING OF ALL VEG- 
ETABLES. 

First. Have them as fresh as possible; summer vegetables 
should be cooked on the same day they are gathered, if possible. 
Second. Lay them, when peeled, in cold water for some time 
before cooking. Third. If to be boiled, put a little salt in ths 
water. Fourth. Cook them steadily after you put them on. 
Fifth. Be sure they are thoroughly done — rare vegetables are 
neither palatable nor healthy. Sixth. Drain well. Seventh. Serve 
hot. 

ARTICHOKES. 

Boil till tender, drain well, season with salt, pepper and melt- 
ed butter. Some prefer them pickled raw, either whole or sliced. 

JERUSALEM ARTICHOKES. 

These may be sliced and boiled like turnips, or cooked in any 
way in which Irish potatoes are cooked. They require longer 
boiling than potatoes. Boiled and dressed as a salad, they are 
considered particularly good. 

69 



70 VEGETABLES. 



ASPARAGUS. 



If brought from market, keep it co6l and moist, till wanted. 
This may be done by putting it in the cellar with the cut ends in 
a dish of water. Let it lie in cold water a. few minutes before 
cooking. Cut off all that is tough and tie in small bundles. 
Have the water boiling hot, and use just enough to cover the as- 
paragus. Boil fifteen or twenty minutes. Have some bread 
toasted, dip it in the liquor, lay in the dish, butter it, skim out 
the asparagus and lay on the toast, butter and pepper it, thicken 
the liquor a little and pour over the whole. 

ANOTHER WAY TO COOK ASPARAGUS. 

MISS AGNES NEWTON. 

Cook very much as you do green peas. Cat the asparagus into 
small pieces, and put into boiling water, with a little salt. Boil 
about three-quarters of an hour, then add butter and pepper and 
thicken a little with flour stirred in milk. 

BEETS. 
Beets must not be cut before boiling, as this causes them to 
lose their sweetness. Salt the water and, when done, take them 
out into a pan of cold water, and rub the skins off quickly; slice 
them, and dress with butter, pepper and salt, or vinegar if desired. 
Old beets lose their sweetness, and are best, served with hot 
spiced vinegar, into which has been stirred a little sugar. 

BEET GREENS. 
Take young beets, boil tops and bottoms in salt water, drain 
well in a colander, butter and eat with vinegar; an excellent dish 
in summer. 

STRING BEANS. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Break off both ends and "string" carefully, then break into inch 
pieces. Put them in boiling water enough to cover them, taking 
care that they do not boil dry; throw in salt enough to season 
them, and cook from two to three hours. When done, drain 
nearly all the water off; add milk, butter and pepper. Thicken a 
little if desired. 



VEGETABLES. ' 71 

ANOTHER WAY. 

String and boil whole with a small piece of corned beef or 
pickled pork, enough to season them. Stew nearly dry and 
serve hot. 

TO DRY LIMA BEANS. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Gather the beans when in a right state to cook. String the 
pods with a darning-needle threaded with twine. Hang the strings 
in a shady, airy place till the pods are thoroughly dried, then 
shell and hang up the beans in a paper bag till needed for use. 
They require to be soaked over night, then cooked as when 
green. They make nice winter succotash with dried sweet-corn. 

LIMA AND BUTTER BEANS. 

Shell into cold water, and let them lie awhile; boil an hour, 
with a little salt in the water; drain and butter well, peppering 
to taste. 

ANOTHER WAY. 

Prepare and cook as above, and pour a teacup of sweet cream 
over the beans, and let it boil up; salt and pepper to suit the 
taste. 

SUCCOTASH. 

MRS. M. N. MILES. 

This is usually made of green corn and Lima beans, though for 
the latter, string or butter beans may be substituted. Boil the 
beans nearly an hour; while they are boiling, prepare the corn, 
thus: clean thoroughly from husk and silk, cut off the corn care- 
fully from the cob and with the back of the knife scrape the cob 
gently. Add the corn to the beans ten minutes before taking up. 
While boiling, season to the taste with salt, pepper and butter. 
Do not have too much water in the beans, and do not let them boil 
dry. A little cream added, improves it, 

BEAN PODS FOR PICKLING. 

String and boil till tender, in salt water; drain off the water 
and pour over them hot spiced vinegar. They are good for use 
in a day or two, and make a nice relish with meats. 



72 ' VEGETABLES. 

BAKED BEANS. 

MRS. J. M. LAIED. 

Take one quart of dry beans, parboil them till they begin to 
burst open, then drain them out into a deep dish and put in two 
tablespoonfuls of molasses. Put a piece of salt pork the size of a 
coffee-cup into the centre of the dish and cover it with the beans; 
add salt if your pork is fresh; till your dish with the- water from 
the beans and keep it filled until almost done, then bake until 
dry. They should bake five or six hours. 

BAKED BEANS WITHOUT PORK. 

MKS. LEWIS, CHICAGO. 

One quart of beans soaked over night and parboiled in the 
morning, changing the water several times. Put into an earthen 
crock, with salt, a piece of butter the size of an egg, water to 
cover, and bake all day. 

BAKED BEANS. 

The "Household" says: "Many people do not understand how 
to have nice baked beans. Bake the beans all day, and if con- 
venient, let theln stay in over night, baking full twenty-four 
hours, and our word for it, they will come out in the morning 
with a flavor that will make your mouth water to taste them. We 
sometimes see persons who only have a moderate liking for baked 
beans, who invariably bake them three or four hours, and that is 
why they do not like them any better. A day and a night is none 
too much time to bake them, having parboiled them only until 
the skins will crack, when the air comes to them." 

CABBAGE. 

In preparing the various dishes from this excellent vegetable, 
care should be taken in the choice of the heads. For boiling or 
for hot slaws, loose heads may be used, but for slicing and eating 
raw with the different kinds of dressing, a white^ firm head should 
be selected. Many who like cabbage, will not cook it on account 
of the odor which it exhales. Harper's Bazar says this is easily 
prevented by putting in the pot with the cabbage, a piece of 
charcoal tied in a cloth, and simmering instead of boiling. 



VEGETABLES. 73 

BOILED CABBAGE. 

After removing all the loose, outside leaves, cut the cabbage 
in halves, lay in a pan with the cut sides up and cover with salt 
water. Let it stand a few minutes, and turn out quickly. (This 
is done to remove any insects that may be hidden in the cabbage.) 
Put in the kettle with boiling water enough to cover it, adding 
sufficient salt. When tender, take up in a colander to drain, 
then put in a hot dish and cover with slices of butter. Some like 
cabbage boiled in the liquor in which corned beef or ham has 
been boiled. When coOked in this way the meat is first taken 
out, as the flavor of the cabbage would injure it. Skim off the 
grease before putting the cabbage in; boil briskly; when done, it 
will sink to the bottom; drain well. 

CABBAGE COOKED IN MILK. 

MRS. n. C. HARRIS. 

Chop the cabbage fine, put in a stew-pan and cover with sweet 
milk; let it cook slowly, as the milk will burn easily, until ten- 
der; season with pepper, salt and butter. 

COLD SLAW. 

MRS. J. P. POSTER. 

Slice or chop the cabbage fine. It is better to be sliced. Put 
it in a vegetable dish in layers, with a little salt and pepper on 
each layer. Take one cup of thick cream, either sweet or sour, 
make quite sweet with sugar and stir in briskly half a cup of 
vinegar. Pour the dressing on just as you sit down to eat. 

CABBAGE DRESSING. 

MRS. G. R. OSGOOD. 

To four well-beaten eggs stir in, over a slow fire, one pint of 
vinegar until quite thick and hot (not boiling), then mix in two 
teaspoonfuls each of mustard, black pepper and salt, one-half cup 
of oil or melted butter. Do not turn it over the cabbage, or cauli- 
flower until quite cold. It can be kept in a cool place for a 
month. 



74 VEGETABLES. 

CABBAGE DRESSING. 

MRS. H. C. HARRIS. 

Yolks of two eggs, two tablespoonfuls of vinegar, a small tea- 
spoonful of mustard, a little salt, a small lump of butter rubbed 
in flour. Heat, and pour hot over chopped cabbage. 

FRIED CABBAGE. 

. E. A. C. 

The cabbage should be sliced as for slaw, only much coarser; 
put it in a skillet with water sufficient to cover. Boil twenty 
minutes, having it closely covered, then pour off most of the 
water; add butter, pepper, salt and half a teacup of vinegar, and 
let it cook about ten minutes longer. 

CAULIFLOWER. 

MRS. E. A. C. 

After taking off the leaves, boil about half an hour in salted 
water, drain, and just before sending to the table, pour on a little 
drawn butter made with milk. 

CREAM CABBAGE. 

MRS. C. D. SPRAGUE. 

Slice cabbage as for cold slaw, and salt it. Pour over while 
hot the following: one small cup of vinegar, one well-beaten egg, 
and a small piece of butter. Let the cabbage stand till cold, and 
pour over it one-half cup of sweet cream. 

HOT SLAW. 

MRS. y^. H. SIBLEY. 

Mince or slice the cabbage, the finer the better. Put a piece 
of butter the size of half an egg into the spider; when melted, 
put in the cabbage, and a cup of boiling water, salt and pepper. 
Cover close, and cook till tender and dry. Have ready an q^^^ 
well beaten, half a cup of vinegar, a tablespoonful of sugar, (more 
if you wish,) thoroughly mixed, and pour over the cabbage the 
last thing before taking up. Stir for a moment and serve hot. 



VEGETABLES. 75 

TO COOK CAULIFLOWER. 

• » 

Pick off all the green leaves and soak the head in salt water 
two or three hours, then boil 20 or 30 minutes in milk and water 
(using half as much milk as water) with a little salt. When taken 
up put on a little butter and eat with vinegar and pepper. Some 
prefer drawn butter poured over it before sending to the table. 

CAULIFLOWER. 

MKS. DR. HOFFMAN, BEARDSTOWK, ILL. 

After preparing the cauliflower, put it into equal parts of boil- 
ing water and milk, (the latter improves the appearance and 
taste), a little salt and a piece of fresh butter. Cook it, but not 
too soft; it should retain its form. Stir the yolks of two or three 
eggs and a little flour into some cold meat soup, add a little of 
the water in which the cauliflower has been boiled and, a few 
drops of lemon juice; set the whole into a pot containing boiling 
water until it begins to thicken, and pour it over the cauliflower, 
which has been previously arranged in a dish. If desired, a little 
grated nutmeg may be added. 

STEWED CARROTS. 
Half boil the carrots; then scrape them nicely, and cut them 
into thick slices. Put them into a stew-pan with as much milk as 
will bajely cover them, a very little salt and pepper and a sprig 
'or two of chopped parsley. Simmer them till they are perfectly 
tender but not broken. When nearly done, add a piece of fresh 
butter rolled in flour. Send them to the table hot. Carrots 
require long cooking. 

TO PRESERVE CORN. 

MRS. WYLIE BURTON. 

Cut the corn from the cob, and put down in an earthen jar, with 
every sixth measure, salt; measure with a pint cup. When the jar is 
full, let the first covering be of the inside leaves of the husk put 
down on the corn. For cooking, have a large kettle full of boil- 
ing water; squeeze the brine from the corn, and put it in the boil- 
ing water without washing; let it boil until the water is*quite salt; 
have a tea-kettle of boiling water ready to put on the corn as soon 
as the salt water is poured off; change the water until the corn is 
sufficiently freshened. Season with butter, cream and a little su- 
gar and pepper. 



76 VEGETABLES. 

CORN FRITTERS. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Boil and grate six ears of corn. Add three eggs, beaten, half 
a cup of milk, one teaspoonful of salt, pepper, butter the size of 
a hickory-nut, and flour enough to make a batter. Have a little 
lard or butter hot in a spider, drop in the batter and turn as you 
do batter cakes. A nice dish for breakfast, made from corn 
boiled for dinner the day before. 

CORN PUDDING FOR MEATS. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Take six large ears of corn, boil ten minutes, cut the corn fine 
and mix with two heaping tablespoonfuls of flour, one pint sweet 
milk, salt, pepper and butter. Bake from half to three-quarters 
of an hour. Serve hot. 

HULLED CORN. 

MRS. H. C. HARRIS. 

Take two quarts of dry, rijDe corn; put two and one-half tea-cups 
of hard wood ashes in a bag and place (with the corn) in warm water 
in a kettle, with sufficient water to cover the corn; let it come to a 
boil, and in the morning (the corn is to be fixed at night), if the 
hulls do not come ofi", boil again. As soon as they will come ofi", 
wash in several waters with the hands, and put into cold or milk 
warm water, and boil until tender; be sure to have a good deal of 
water, or the corn will burn. 

GREEN CORN FOR WINTER USE. 
Parboil it, cut it from the cobs, dry in the sun, put in a bag 
and hang in a dry place. When wanted for the table, soak sev- 
eral hours, and cook slowly half an hour, without boiling. 

■GREEN CORN CAKES. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Mix a pint of grated sweet corn with three tablespoonfuls of 
milk, a teacup of flour, a large spoonful of salt, a little pepper 
and one ^g'g. Drop this mixture by the large spoonful into a 
frying-pan, and fry till brown; use butter for frying. These are 
nice served with meat for dinner. 



VEGETABLES. 77 

TO BOIL GREEN CORN. 

MES. M. N. MILES. 

Green corn should be boiled only ten minutes, either on the cob 
or cut off, to suit the taste. 

CUCUMBERS. 

The chief desideratum in preparing cucumbers for the table, is 
to make them cool and crisp. Many consider them very un- 
wholesome, but if they are pared and sliced into a dish of cold 
salt water, an hour before needed, they will certainly be less so. 
If you have ice, lay a piece in the dish in which they are brought 
to the table. Eat with salt, pepper and vinegar. 

CUCUMBER RELISH. 

MRS. WYLIE BURTON. 

Take the largest cucumbers that are not yellow, slice them a 
little thicker and salt a little more than for the table. Slice at 
night, and in the morning squeeze every particle of fluid from 
them. Put them into a jar, with white mustard seed, a little 
mace and sliced horse-radish to taste. Cover them with white 
wine vinegar. They will keep good the year round if prepared 
in this way. 

EGG PLANT. 

MRS, W. H. SIBLEY. 

Peel the ^^s, plant, cut in rather thin slices, strew salt between 
them; let them stand ten or fifteen minutes, drain the juice from 
them, cover with cold water and let them stand a half hour long- 
er; drain them as dry as possible, roll each slice in flour; have 
ready a hot frying-pan or spider, the bottom covered with butter; 
lay in the slices, pepper them, and fry a rich brown. The sooner 
eaten after cooking, the better. 

EGG PLANT. 

F . 

The purple variety is best. Peel and parboil; mash fine and 
season with salt, pepper and butter, to taste. Put this mixture in 
a deep earthen dish, lay over it bread crumbs and bits of but- 
ter, and bake a light brown color. 



78 VEGETABLES. 

ANOTHER WAY. 



After peeling the egg plant, parboil it five or six minutes, then 
cut the slices crosswise, and season with pepper and salt; dip them 
in beaten ^^^ and then in fine cracker crumbs; fry a light brown 
in hot lard. Serve with a folded napkin upon the bottom of the 
dish; send to the table as fast as cooked. They must be thor- 
oughly cooked. 

GREENS. 

The leaves of white mustard, spinach, water cresses, cowslips, 
dandelions, and the roots and tops of small beets are good for 
greens. If not fresh and plump, soak in salt water for half an 
hour previous to cooking. Boil them with a little salt in the wa- 
ter, until they sink to the bottom of the pot. Drain very dry in a 
colander; butter and serve. 

ONIONS. 

The onion is one of the most healthful of all the vegetables, 
and is especially beneficial to those whose labor taxes the brain 
or those who are afflicted with nervous diseases; but owing to its 
unpleasant effects upon the breath many persons eschew it alto- 
gether. It is said that chewing and swallowing a few grains of 
roasted coffee will remove this difficulty, and any utensil in which 
onions have been cooked may be freed from their odor by turning 
it bottom upwards, over a hot stove after it has been washed. 

For seasoning, the red oqion will answer, but for boiling, stew- 
ing, etc., the white silver-skinned and sweet onion are greatly 
preferable. 

BAKED ONIONS. 

For baking, large onions only should be used. Wash them 
and boil an hour with the skins on, in slightly salt water; let the 
water be boiling when they are put in; change the water once or 
twice during the hour. Take out the onions, lay them on a cloth 
that the moisture may pass off; roll each one in a round piece of 
buttered tissue paper, twisted at the top to keep it close, and bake 
in a moderate oven nearly an hour. When cooked tender, remove 
the skin, and brown, basting with butter; season with pepper and 
salt, and pour over the melted butter. 



VEGETABLES. 79 

• ONIONS BOILED. 

Cut a slice from both ends, and skin them. They are improved 
by laying them in cold water, after peeling, for a half hour or 
more. Cover them with boiling w^ater and milk; cook fifteen or 
twenty minutes. Change the water, have a tea-kettle of boiling 
water ready, add a little milk, and boil till tender. Drain, and 
season with rich milk or cream, butter, salt and pepper, and let 
the whole simmer on the back of the stove before serving. Never 
cook in an iron pot. 

YOUNG ONIONS STEWED. 



After skinning, lay them in cold water half an hour or more. 
Put into a sauce-pan with hot water enough to cover them. When 
about half cooked, throw off nearly all the water, add some milk, 
a tablespoonful of butter, with seasoning to taste; stew gently 
till tender, dish up and serve. 

ONIONS FRIED. 

Prepare as for boiling, slice and put into a stew-pan with a lit- 
tle boiling w^ater; cover closely, and let them steam fifteen or 
twenty minutes; remove the cover that the water may all evapo- 
rate, and, at the same time add a good sized piece of butter, salt 
and pepper, and let them fry brown, stirring often to prevent their 
burning. Serve hot. 

PARSNIPS. 

MRS. A. Y. EAWSON. 

Scrape the parsnips clean and boil until tender; if not very 
large an hour will be long enough to cook them; then cut in slices 
lengthw'ise, and have ready a hot frying-pan well buttered, and 
fry a light brown. Spread a little butter on each slice after it is 
done, if desired. 

ANOTHER WAY. 

MRS. W. H. SIBLEY. 

Prepare as above, mash well, season with a little butter, pep- 
per and salt. Make into balls or cakes, roll in flour and fry as 
you would slices. 



80 VEGETABLES. 

PARSNIP FRITTERS. 

Boil tender, mash smooth and fine, picking oni all the hard 
parts. For two large parsnips, allow one egg, two-thirds of a cup 
of rich milk, one tablespoonful of butter, one of salt and three 
tablespoonfuls of flour. Beat the eggs light, stir in the mashed 
parsnips, beating hard, then the butter and salt, lastly the milk. 
Fry as fritters, or as griddle cakes. 

MASHED PARSNIPS. 

Boil and scrape them, mash smooth, picking out the fibres; 
mix in three or four spoonfuls of cream, a large spoonful of but- 
ter, pepper and salt to taste. Heat to boiling in a sauce-pan and 
serve, heaping in a mound as you would potatoes cooked in the 
same way. 

POTATOES. 

This root still bears its original American name, signifying 
"Earth apple," and is divided into many varieties, the most 
common of which are Early and Late Rose, White Neshannock, 
Peach-Blows, Mercer, Peerless, Irish Grays or Jersey Blues, Prince 
Albert, etc. Next to bread, there is no vegetable article, the prepa- 
ration of which, as food, "deserves to be more attended to than, 
the potato." "The great art of cooking potatoes is, to take them 
up as soon as done. When boiled, baked, fried or steamed, they 
are rendered watery by continuing to cook after they reach the 
proper point. For this reason potatoes to bake or boil, should be 
of nearly the same size." 

SARATOGAS— FRIED POTATOES. 

MES. MARY MYERS. 

Wash, pare and slice some raw potatoes; cut each slice an inch 
and a half long, half an inch wide and a quarter of an inch thick. 
Let them lie in cold water until the other preparations for break- 
fast are made. Have ready in a frying-pan some hot lard or nice 
drippings. Take the potatoes out of the water into a cloth, wipe 
dry, fry quickly a light brown. Remove from the lard with a 
perforated skimmer, into a deep dish in which a napkin has been 
laid. Sprinkle with salt, and eat while hot, if you want them 
crisp and nice. Some slice them very thin. 



VEGETABLES. 81 

YOUNG POTATOES. 

MRS. HILL. 

To cook them when very young, wash them, scrape off the 
skin, put them in a stew-pan, cover with hot water, boil gently 
until tender and pour off the water. Add to a quart of potatoes 
a heaped tablespoonful of butter, with a teaspoonful of flour 
rubbed into it, pour in a tumblerful of sweet cream or milk, stew, 
uncovered, five minutes; serve in a hot dish. 

BOILED POTATOES. 

There is a conflict of authorities as to whether cold, or boiling 
water should be used when putting the potatoes to cook. The 
result of our experiments stands somewhat thus: Garnet, White 
Fountain and Early Rose are apt to dissolve in cold water, giving 
off their starch too readily, perhaps; we boil them in hot water. 
Peach-Blows, Prince Alberts, and other late varieties, are best 
put in cold water, ahrays pouring off the water the instant they 
are done, and letting the potatoes dry a few minutes. 

BAKED POTATOES. 
Select medium sized, smooth potatoes; bake in a quick oven 
from half to three-quarters of an hour, according to size of 
potato and amount of heat. If eaten as soon as done, they are 
warranted to be good. 

STEWED POTATOES FOR BREAKFAST. 
Pare and slice into cold water enough potatoes for the family 
meal; stew in enough salted water to cover them; watch and 
stir them from the bottom occasionally, that they may not burn. 
When tender, add a cup of milk; let it boil up; put in a lump of 
butter, salt and pepper enough to season properly. Thicken 
slightly with flc)ur. Turn into a covered dish. 

POTATO CAKES. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Take enough good sized potatoes for a meal, peel and grate on 
a coarse grater and stir in from three to five eggs, then add a 
little flour and season to taste. Beat well and fry in hot lard. 
One good sized spoonful makes a cake. 
6 



83 VEGETABLES. 

MASHED POTATOES. 

< L. V. S, 

Pare and let them lie in cold water from five to fifty minutes, ac- 
cording to convenience, unless they are old potatoes, when they 
are improved by being longer in water. "Boil in hot or cold 
water, according to the toughness of texture. A coarse, waxy 
potato, is best cooked in cold water." Throw in a little salt; 
drain thoroughly; when done, put in another pinch of salt, and 
mash in the pot with a potato beetle till all the lumps disappear. 
Add a tablespoonful of butter, milk or cream to moisten suffi- 
ciently, and beat the whole with a large spoon till it is foamy. 
Some then form the whole into a mound on a plate, butter the 
surface and brown slightly in the oven. 

POTATO BALLS— A BREAKFAST DISH. 

MRS. "W. H. SIBLEY. 

Mashed potatoes left from dinner, make a nice dish for break- 
fast if prepared thus: put them into a deep dish, pour in a little 
rich milk or cream; beat the white of an ^g%^ and work the whole 
together until well mixed. Make into balls or cakes three-fourths 
of an inch thick, and roll in flour. Have ready in a frying-pan a 
little melted butter, just enough to keep them from adhering. 
Brown nicely on both sides. Serve in a hot dish. 

SWEET POTATOES. 

The best way to cook sweet potatoes, is to bake them with their 
skins on. Some boil them till nearly done, then put in the oven 
and finish. Others boil them till done and serve hot. When 
boiled, if any are left over, they are excellent sliced and fried for 
breakfast the next day. Another way is to pare, and place in the 
dripper in which you are roasting beef, basting occasionally till 
done. They are delicious cooked in this way, as also are Irish 
potatoes. 

SUMMER SQUASH. 

A few general rules are applicable for the cooking of the differ- 
ent kinds of this vegetable. Unless they are very young and 
tender, pare them, being careful to cut away all the rind; then 



VEGETABLES. 83 

quarter and remove the seeds; let the pieces lie in cold water till 
you are ready to cook them. When boiled, drain well, roash till 
smooth; season with salt, pepper and butter, and keep hot till 
served. It improves them to put a little salt in the water in 
which they are boiled. 

WINTER SQUASH. 

Wash, cut into medium sized pieces, pare and remove seeds. 
Boil till tender. Drain as dry as possible, and before mashing, let 
it stand a few minutes on the top of the stove that all the water 
may evaporate. Season with butter, salt and pepper. It requires 
more time for cookincr than summer squashes. 

BAKED WINTER SQUASH. 

Wash but do not pare. Cut into squares, remove seeds and 
bake the same length of time as potatoes. Some consider squash 
cooked in this way a good substitute for sweet potatoes. 

RAW TOMATOES. 

When tomatoes are to be. eaten raw, do not scald them — they 
are better to have the ekins removed with a sharp knife. Slice 
them and lay in a dish; they are very much improved by standing 
on ice for an hour or two before being eaten. Do not season be- 
fore placing on the table, as some prefer salt, while others like 
sugar best. 

STEWED TOMATOES. 

Select ripe tomatoes, pour boiling water over them and let them 
stand a few moments; then remove to a pan of cold water, and 
slip off the skins; cut out the core and hard part, slice, and put 
to cook in a sauce-pan; stir them occasionally; cook half an hour; 
season with salt, pepper and sugar, if liked, and add a small piece 
of butter; stir ten minutes longer. If desired, the tomatoes may 
be thickened before being served, by adding bread crumbs, or, if 
preferred, toast some pieces of bread and lay in the bottom of the 
dish in which they are to be served. Some think a small onion, 
minced, improves the flavor; others add a quarter as much green 
corn as tomatoes, and stew gently. 



84 VEGETABLES. 

TOMATO FRITTERS. 

MRS. T. W. CARPENTER. 

Take one quart of stewed tomatoes, stir in one ^s^^., one small 
teaspoonful of soda, and flour enough to make as stiif as pancakes. 
Fry by dropping in hot lard. 

STUFFED TOMATOES. 

MRS. C. E. PARKER, ILL. 

Choose large and smooth tomatoes, cut out a lid, scoop out the 
seeds, and cook them with the juice twenty minutes; add an equal 
quantity of bread crumbs, or partly cooked rice, and one finely 
chopped onion to a dozen tomatoes; stew ten minutes longer; 
season with salt, pepper and butter, and a little sugar, if you like. 
Stuff the tomatoes with this, replace the lid, dust with bread 
crumbs, season as for inside and bake half an hour. 

SCALLOPED TOMATOES. 

MRS. MARY ANDREWS. 

Pour boiling hot water over the tomatoes and then peel and 
slice them. Butter a deep dish and put a layer of tomatoes upon 
the bottom; season with salt and pepper; add a layer of bread 
crumbs, another of tomatoes, seasoning as before, then another of 
bread crumbs, and proceed in this way until the dish is full, end- 
ing with bread crumbs, over which lay many little bits of butter; 
bake an hour. Add sugar to pepper and salt, if preferred. 

SALSIFY, OR VEGETABLE OYSTER, STEWED. 

Scrape the roots and drop into cold water as soon as cleaned, 
as exposure to the air causes them to turn dark. Cut into inch 
pieces; put into a stew-pan with enough boiling water to cover 
them and cook until tender. Drain off nearly all the water and 
add a cup of rich milk or cream. Stew a few minutes, rub a 
teaspoonful of flour in a lump of butter, stir it in and season with 
salt and pepper. It will be found to have a good deal of the 
oyster taste. 



VEGETABLES. 85 

SALSIFY FRIED. 

Scrape the roots and let them lie in cold water a few minutes; 
boil in salt water till tender; mash thoroughly, picking out all the 
fibres; season with butter, salt and pepper. Beat an egg and stir 
in, and if not moist enough to work out into cakes, add a little 
milk. Make into cakes an inch thick, roll in flour and fry a light 
brown. 

SALSIFY ON TOAST. 

Prepare as for stewing. Boil, and instead of draining off the 
water, add butter, salt and pepper and a little flour. Toast some 
slices of bread; lay a slice of toast and pover with salsify, then 
another slice and more of the salsify until all is used. A covered 
dish is preferable. 

SPINACH. 

MRS. DR. HOFFMAN, BEAKDSTOWN, ILL. 

Wash well; boil a few minutes in plenty of water; then dip 
into cold water, press well to free from water and chop fine. 
Stew it with plenty of butter for fifteen minutes; sprinkle with 
flour and cook a few minutes more. Then add some strong meat 
gravy in which may be the gravy of a roast. After this, it must 
not boil any more, and must be served as soon as possible. The 
dish may be ornamented with slices of hard boiled eggs. 

YOUNG TURNIPS— BOILED WHOLE. 

Pare smoothly, and lay in cold water half an hour. Put them 
in boiling water, with a tablespoonful of butter, and stew until ten- 
der; drain dry without breaking, place in a deep dish and cover 
with butter drawn in milk. Care should be taken to serve hot. 

MASHED TURNIPS. 

c . 

Peel, cut in half inch slices and lay in cold water half an hour; 
put to cook in boiling water with a little salt — cook till tender; if 
young, it will require thirty minutes to boil them, and a longer 
time for older ones. Drain well, let them stand over the fire 
a few moments for the moisture to escape and then mash; season 
with salt, pepper, butter and cream. 



86 VEGETABLES. 

ANOTHER WAY. 

Pare and quarter the turnips; then dip into a sauce pan, some of 
the liquor in which you are boiling corned beef or pork; skim off 
the grease and boil till tender. Serve hot, with the rest of your 
boiled dinner. They are apt to give the meat an unpleasant fla- 
vor if boiled in the same vessel with it. 



^^%m SK® Ys^sg¥. 




-s^l OOD P^LOUR has a yellowish tinge, and when pressed 
^^[i'=r by the hand, retains the creases. Poor flour is not so 
r^<Sa. adhering, has a dingy look and can be blown about. 



Flour made from sprouted wheat makes a soft, running 
dough which cannot be easily moulded; it is an impossibil- 
ity to make good bread from such flour. The sifting of 
flour before using makes it lighter. 
Good yeast is as indispensable to good bread as is good flour. 
The recipes for yeast in this book will be found excellent if good 
flour is used. Yeast should be kept in a stone jug, well corked, 
or in a self-sealing glass jar; these should be scalded every time 
fresh yeast is made, sweetened with soda water, and rinsed with 
cold water. 

A little molasses always improves bread or cakes made from 
unbolted or rye flour. A little butter or lard improves cakes made 
of Indian meal, as it makes them more tender. A tablespoon 
of lard, and the same quantity of white sugar, added to the sponge 
at night, will make the bread more tender and palatable. 

Bread will keep better in a covered tin box than in anything 
else. 

CARRIE'S JUG YEAST. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Peel twelve potatoes and boil in one gallon of water, with three 
large handfuls of hops thrown in loose. When done, mash pota- 
toes through a colander; then lay a towel in the colander, and strain 
the hops; add one-half cup of brown sugar, one-half cup of mo- 
lasses, one-half cup of salt. When cool enough, put in one pint 
of yeast, and let it stand twenty-four hours before using; then 
pour into a jug, cork tight, keep in a cool place, and always shake 
well before using. 

87 



88 BREAD AND YEAST. 

JUG YEAST 

MRS. WM. n. RAY, RUSHYILLE, ILL. 

Four large potatoes, one large handful of hops, in a bag, one 
large spoon of sugar, one large spoon of flour, one quart of water. 
Boil hops and potatoes till potatoes are done; then squeeze 
out hop-bag, mash potatoes, and add sugar and flour. When cool 
enough, put in a cup of good yeast. Keep in a cool place. 

DRY YEAST. 

MRS. LUCINDA AVRIGHT, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Twelve good sized potatoes, one pint of hops, one gallon of 
water, one tea-cup of dry yeast, soaked; stir in a little flour and 
let rise. Wash the potatoes clean, and boil without peeling; boil 
the hops with the potatoes, loose. When the potatoes are done, 
peel and mash; mix with a pint of flour; strain the water from 
the hops into it; when cool, stir in the yeast and let rise twenty- 
four hours; then mix with Indian meal, roll out, and cut it into 
cakes to dry. 

AN UNFAILING YEAST. 

MRS. C. H. ATKINS. • 

Put a handful of hops into a bag and drop it into two quarts 
of boiling water; while steeping, wash, peel and grate six medium 
sized potatoes; take out the hops, put in the potatoes and boil a 
few ininutes, stirring continually; add a half tea-cup of white or 
light brown sugar, the same of salt. When cool, stir in a tea-cup 
of yeast; let it rise till it becomes a mass of foam, then stir down 
and jug it tight. 

YEAST. 

MRS. J, M. OTIS. 

One large handful of hops, one dozen potatoes, one cup of su- 
gar, one-half cup of salt, one tablespoonful of ginger. Mash the 
potatoes in the water in which they are boiled, and pour into a 
jar; add the sugar, salt and ginger; steep the hops till the strength 
is gone, and add the water to this mixture till you have one gal- 
lon. When cooled to blood heat, add one cup of the same yeast. 
Keep warm from six to eight hours. When light, bottle and set 
in the cellar. 



BREAD AND YEAST. 89 

YEAST. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHAKD. 

A double handful of hops (in a thin bag), one quart of boiling 
water, one quart of potatoes cut in small pieces. Boil the potatoes 
with the hops until thoroughly done, keeping them covered tight all 
the time. Take the potatoes out and mash well, then pour the 
boiling hop water over them; add two tablespoons of sugar, two 
of ginger, one of salt; let it stand until just warm, and add one tea- 
cup of yeast, or more. It will keep two weeks in summer and two 
months in winter. 

BREAD. 

MRS. W, S. PRITC^ARD. 

Take one pint of peeled potatoes cut in small pieces; boil 
them in one and one-half pints of water, skim out, and mash fine. 
Add four tablespoons of fine flour to the potatoes, pour over 
the potato-water and stir till smooth. When cool, add four 
tablespoons of my (Mrs. Pritchard's) yeast and a teaspoon of 
salt. Let it rise over night. In the morning, take the bread- 
bowl, filled with flour, pour one pint of boiling water in the cen- 
ter, and mix; add enough cold water to make lukewarm; then 
pour in the sponge made the night before, mix the dough soft and 
knead one-half hour. Put back in the bread-bowl and set to rise; 
when light, knead down and set to rise again; then knead into 
loaves and when light, bake in a moderate oven. This quantity 
will make four loaves. 

BREAD. 

4 MRS. J. M. OTIS. 

Mix a batter with warm water and a little salt; to each quart of 
water use one teacup of yeast. (If the weather is not very warm, do 
this at night; but if quite warm, the bread is not so sweet as if 
mixed in the morning.) When light, add flour till the dough is stiff 
— knead thoroughly, cover and let rise again. When it is again 
light, knead, and again let it stand. If this is done several times 
the bread will be of a finer texture than if put into the pans with- 
out kneading. After the dough has risen sufficiently knead into 
loaves and let rise until light, then bake in a hot oven. 



90 BREAD AND YEAST. 

BREAD. 

MRS. MILES. 

In all cases, have good, sweet yeast. You will never fail in 
bread-making by following a few general rules. On the evening 
of the day before bread is wanted, take one quart of water (warm 
or not, according to the weather), two-thirds of a cup of yeast; 
stir in flour to make a thick batter; let rise, knead it well at night 
and cover close. In the morning, it will be light; knead lightly, 
put into pans and bake when sufficiently risen. 

SALT-RISING BREAD. 

MRS. W. C. BURTON. 

In the evening, fill a pint cup half full of new milk and let it 
come almost to boiling heat; thicken with corn meal to the con- 
sistency of mush, put a sauce-plate over the cup, wrap it in flan- 
nel and put it where it will keep warm. In the morning, set the 
salt-rising in the usual way; then add the corn meal preparation, 
make rather stiff with flour and, if done right, it will rise in fifteen 
minutes. Mix the bread with sweet milk, warm and knead until 
it looks smooth. (The longer it is kneaded the whiter the bread.) 
Add one spoonful of sugar to the loaf ; mashed potatoes as 
used in the hop yeast, improve it. Graham bread can be made 
the same way by omitting the yeast. 

FRENCH ROLLS. 

MRS. J. PARMELEE. 

One pint of milk, one teacup of butter, one teacup of sugar, 
three eggs, one teacup of yeast, flour enough to knead. Set the 
sponge with milk and yeast and a little flour. When light, beat 
the eggs, butter and sugar together and mix with the sponge and 

let rise again. 

FRENCH ROLLS. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHARD. 

Rub two ounces of butter into a pound of flour, adding the 
■whites of three eggs, well beaten, one tablespoon of strong 
yeast, a little salt and sufficient milk to make a stiff dough. Set 
it in a warm place to rise. It should be light in an hour. When 
risen, divide into rolls and bake about ten minutes. 



BREAD AND YEAST. 91 

FRENCH ROLLS. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

One quart of lukewarm milk, one teaspoon of salt, one large 
teacup of home-brewed or one-half cup of baker's yeast, flour to 
make a stiff batter. When light, add one %^^ and two table- 
spoons of butter. Knead in flour enough to roll, and when 
light again, make into rolls. Let them rise thirty minutes. To 
enrich, add another o.^'g and more butter. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

MRS. R. A. BUNKER, SPRI:N^GFIELD, ILL. 

At night, take two quarts of flour, rub in two tablespoons of 
lard, make a hole in the middle and put in one pint of cold, boiled 
milk, one-half cup of yeast, three tablespoons of sugar and a 
little salt. Let this stand till morning without mixing, then beat 
it well, and let it stand till noon; roll out and cut round. Spread 
on a little piece of butter, fold over, put into a pan and let stand 
until ready to bake. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

ALICE HART ROSCOE, MISSOURI. 

Make a hole in the center of one quart of flour, and put in a 
piece of butter (melted) the size of an o.^'g., a little salt and a 
tablespoon of sugar; pour over this one pint of cold, boiled 
milk and one-half teacup of yeast. When the sponge is light, 
work fifteen minutes; let it rise again and cut in round cakes. 
When light, flatten each cake with the rolling-pin, put a small 
piece of butter on the top, and fold over. Put in pans, and when 
light, bake in a quick oven. 

RUSKS. 

MRS. J, PARMELEE. 

Make a sponge of flour and three large tablespoons of yeast, 
at noon; the same evening, take one quart of new milk and warm 
sufiiciently to melt one half cup of butter with two cups of sugar; 
■when cool, add two eggs well beaten; then take what you judge 
to be a right quantity of flour and pour the milk, etc., with the 
sponge into the middle of it, stir into a light dough and let it rise 
all night; in the morning, make up. 



9a BREAD AND YEAST. 

SWEET RUSKS. 

MRS. FENTON SANDERS, BEARDSTOWN, ILL. 

Three eggs, one-half pound of sugar, one-half pound of butter, 
one pint of warm sweet milk, one-half pint of fresh yeast, and 
flour sufficient to make a soft dough. Let it rise well. 

DES MOINES RUSK. 

r 

MRS. W. A. COLTON. 

One quart of milk thickened with flour as for sponge, one cup 
of yeast; set it in a warm place to rise. When light, add two 
cups of sugar, two cups of shortening and five eggs well beaten; 
make this as stiff as you can possibly stir it; let it stand until 
very light, roll out in cakes, using as little flour as possible. Let 
them stand until very light again; when baked, rub a little sugar 
and water over them. 

RUSK. 

MRS. P. H. CARPENTER. 

One pint -of bread dough, one tumbler of warm milk, butter 
the size of an Q^'g^ one small cup of sugar, one-half teaspoon of 
soda. Set to rise; when light, roll out, make into rolls, and let 
rise again until very light, before putting in the oven. 

EGG ROLL. 

MRS. G. COOPER. 

Three eggs, one cup of sugar, one cup of yeast, one cup of lard 
or butter, one pint of sweet milk. Make sponge at night, mix in 
the morning, and add a little soda. Roll thin as pie crust, spread 
on lard and roll up. 

SWEET BREAD. 

MRS. E. S. SPEED, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

,One tea-cup of yeast, one tea-cup of sweet milk, one coffee 
cup of sugar, one tea-cup of currants or chopped raisins, but- 
ter the size of an ^^^., one tablespoon of cinnamon. Stir in 
flour and let rise; when light, work into a loaf and put in a 
pan. Spread with butter, sprinkle thickly with white sugar, and 
bake. 



BREAD AND YEAST. 93 

IMPERIAL BISCUIT. 

MRS. E. P, CHASE. 

Beat one-half cup of butter and one tablespoon of sugar to 
a cream. Take light bread dough, roll thin, and spread with 'the 
butter and sugar; roll a second layer and spread like the first, lay 
one on the other; then roll a third piece, and lay on top (do 
not spread the upper layer). Cut in biscuit, and let stand till very 
light. Bake in a moderately hot oven. 

MILK BISCUIT. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

Two and one-half pounds of flour, one-half pound of butter, 
two gills of yeast and a little salt. Rub flour, butter and salt to- 
gether; add the yeast and enough milk to make a soft dough. 
Knead well and put in a pan to rise; this must be done at night; 
the next morning, knead lightly, make into small biscuit, place in 
tins, put in a warm place to rise, and as soon as light, bake in a 
quick oven. 

FRENCH BISCUIT. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHARD. 

Three pounds of flour, one pound of sugar, one-half ounce of 
salts of hartshorn sifted through the flour, ten eggs, ten ounces of 
butter, lemon to taste. Roll thin, and sprinkle with sugar. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

MRS. FANNIE OLMSTED, LE ROY, N. T. 

One quart of warm water; make middling thick batter with 
Graham flour; add one-half cup of yeast. Stir thoroughly, and 
set in a warm place to rise. When light, put in one-half cup of 
sugar. Stir in as much flour as will be absorbed by the moisture, 
but do not make too thick. When risen, bake in a hot oven. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

MRS. R. T. WEI.LSLAGER. 

Mix well together, one cup warm water, two tablespoons of 
syrup, one-half teaspoon of soda; to this add one cup of white 
flour; add Graham flour (stirring with a spoon), till stiff". Let rise 
one-half hour in a warm place. Bake one and one-fourth hours. 



94 BREAD AND YEAST. 

GRAHAM YEAST BREAD. 

MRS. J. M. OTIS. 

Prepare a batter as for fine flour bread (see Mrs. Otis' rule for 
making bread), using the same proportion of yeast to the water. 
When light, add one spoon of sugar for each quart of water, 
and mix sufficiently stiff to knead, but not so stiff as for fine flour 
bread; let it stand to rise. When light, knead and let rise again. 
When again light, knead, divide and put into pans for baking. 
Let it rise again in the pans. Graham bread requires to be baked 
a little longer and more slowly than fine flour bread. 

INDIAN BROWN BREAD. 

MRS. M. A. TURNER. 

One quart of boiling water, salt and thicken as for mush, very 
stiff. Cook well; as soon as done, add one pint of molasses; stir 
until cool; then add one coffee cup of yeast; mold and set in a 
warm place to rise — put it into a pan that can be placed in a 
steamer. Let it rise, and steam two hours, and set in the oven to 
dry. It may be baked in bread pans if the outside is greased to 
prevent the crust from being too hard. 

BROWN BREAD. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHARD. 

Three cups of yellow corn meal, one cup of flour, one cup of 
sweet milk, two cups of sour milk, one-half cup of black molasses, 
one teaspoon of salt, one teaspoon of soda; steam five hours. 
(Improved by putting in oven five or ten minutes.) Mix the salt 
with the meal and flour, then add molasses, sweet and sour milk, 
and in the last cup of sour milk put the soda. A great deal depends 
on the mixing; the water must be boiling before the mixture (in 
the crock) is put into the steamer. It must not stop boiling, 

• BROWN BREAD. 

MRS. WM. H. RAY, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Three cups of brown flour; mix in tlie flour two teaspoons of 
soda, even teaspoon of salt, two-thirds cup of molasses, enough but- 
termilk or sour milk stirred in to make batter like pound cake, or 
to drop from a spoon pretty thin. Steam three hours; bake fif- 
teen minutes. Very nice. 



BREAD AND YEAST. 95 

BROWN BREAD. 

MES. C. B. SMITH. 

Two tea-cups of buttermilk, two tea-cups of sweet milk, two- 
thirds cup of molasses, one tablespoon of so(Ja; salt and thicken 
with one-third corn meal and two-thirds Graham flour, sufficiently 
to drop from the spoon. Steam three hours. Very nice. 

BROWN BREAD. 

MRS. M. J. AVELLSLAdER. 

Three cups corn meal, one cup flour, one cup Graham flour, one 
cup molasses, one teaspoon soda in the molasses, two teaspoons 
baking powder in the flour, three cups sweet milk. Steam three 
or four hours. 

BROWN BREAD. 

MRS. J. LAIRD. 

One and one-half coffee-cups of sour milk, one cup corn meal, 
one-half cup flour, one-half cup molasses, two eggs, piece of lard 
the size of an ^^■g., one teaspoon of soda dissolved in the milk. 
Pour into a tin pail and cover. Place it in a pot of boiling water, 
and cook three hours. This is very nice without eggs. 

BROWN BREAD. 

MRS. ROUNDS. 

Three cups of rye, three or four cups corn meal, two cups of 
Graham flour, one and one-half cups molasses, salt, and stir quite 
thin with sour milk, and soda to sweeten. Steam two and one-half 
hours, and bake one half hour. 

BROWN BREAD. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

Three cups of sweet milk, three cups of corn meal, two cups of 
Graham flour or one cup of wheat flour and one cup of Graham, 
one cup of molasses, one teaspoon of salt, one teaspoon of soda. 
Boil five hours. 

STEAMED CORN BREAD. 

One cup of sweet milk, two cups of sour milk, three cups of 
corn meal, one cup of flour, one cup of molasses, large teaspoon 
of soda. Steam four hours. 



96 BREAD AND YEAST. 

BOILED CORN BREAD. 

MRS. CURTIS BATES. 

Three cups of corn meal one and a half cups of shorts, one-half 
cup of flour, one cup of molasses, three cups of sweet milk, one 
teaspoon of soda, one teaspoon of salt. Boil in a covered gallon 
tin pail four hours; put it in the water when cold and do not let 
it stop boiling. 

BOILED CORN BREAD. 

GRANDMA FARNHAM. 

Four cups of sweet milk, two cups of sour milk, four cups of 
corn meal, two cups of flour, one cup of molasses, ome teaspoon of 
salt, one teaspoon of soda. Boil three hours. 

CORN BREAD. 

MRS. F. M. MILLS. 

Stir one pint of corn meal into one quart of boiling milk; beat 
three eggs, whites and yolks separately, then put together and 
beat again; use salt and sugar to suit the taste. Bake one and 
one-half hours. 

CORN BREAD. 

JENNIE M. CHASE. 

One quart of sour milk, three eggs well beaten, one teaspoon 
of salt, one tablespoon of melted lard, meal enough to make a 
batter (not stiif). Add one teaspoon of soda, the last thing. 
Bake in shallow pans. 

CORN BREAD. 

MRS. CLEGHORN. 

Four cups of corn meal, two cups of flour, one-half cup of 
molasses, one teaspoon of soda. Add sufficient water or milk to 
make a stiff batter. Steam three hours. Brown in the oven. 

CORN BREAD. 

MRS. T. E. BROWN. 

One pint of sweet milk, one pint of corn meal, two eggs beaten 
very light, piece of butter the size of an &^^., a little salt; three 
teaspoons of baking powder in one pint of flour. Mix well and 
bake in a quick oven. 



BREAD AND YEAST. 97 

CORN BREAD. 

MRS. A. L. PRISBIE. 

One and one-half pints of sour milk or buttermilk, one 
^^'^t one teacup of sugar, one cup of flour, a little salt, one-half 
teaspoon of soda, corn meal enough to make a thick batter. 
Bake in a steady oven from one-half hour to an hour, according 
to the thickness of the loaf ; this may vary from one-half inch to 
two inches. 

NICE JOHNNY-CAKE. 

MRS. A. Y. RAWSON". 

Three teacups corn meal, one teacup of flour, two teacups 
sweet milk, one teacup sour cream, one Q^^., one teaspoon soda, 
one teaspoon salt.. \ 

SALLY LUNN. 

MRS. C. H. SWEENEY. 

Two well beaten eggs, one-half cup of sweet milk, one-half cup 
of melted butter, one-half cup of yeast, two tablespoons of white 
sugar, one pint of flour, saltspoon of salt. Mix at night; pour 
into baking-pans and let rise. Bake in quick oven for breakfast. 

SALLY LUNN WITHOUT YEAST. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

One quart of flour, two eggs, two cups of new milk, large spoon 
of butter, one-half cup of sugar, pinch of salt, three teaspoons of 
baking powder Mix baking powder well with flour; warm but- 
ter and milk together, stir in flour and eggs, beat well and bake 
half hour in a hot oven. 

MUSH. 

E. A. C . 



Mix corn meal with cold water and stir into a pot of boiling 
water till stiff enough to let the paddle or spoon stand in it. Salt 
to your taste, and boil one or two hours, being careful not to let 
it burn. Pour it into a dripping-pan, and when cold, slice thin 
and fry brown on griddles with a little lard. 

7 



98 BREAD AND YEAST. 

FRIED MUSH. 

MES. BALDWIN, STEWART, IOWA. 

Cut mush into pieces one inch thick and three inches long; 
dip in well beaten egg-, roll in pounded cracker and fry as 
doughnuts. 

CORN MUFFINS. 

MRS. GEO. H. LEWIS. 

One pint of corn meal scalded with three pints of boiling water 
(if possible scald night before); when cold, add two-thirds of a 
cup of melted butter and six eggs. Bake in rings. 

CORN MUFFINS. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART, 

One quart of sour milk, one small teaspoon of soda, one small 
teaspoon of salt, four tablespoons of lard, six eggs, yolks and 
whites beaten separately; corn meal to make just thick enough 
to run. Bake in a hot oven. 

MUFFINS. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

One quart of sour milk, one dessert spoon of salt, one teaspoon 
of soda, three tablespoons of melted butter or lard, five eggs, 
whites and yolks beaten separately. Make a thin batter and put 
the whites in last. Butter the rings or pans and have hot before 
putting into the oven. 

CAROLINA MUFFINS. 

MRS. J. P. POSTER. 

Melt in a quart of milk a piece of butter the size of an egg, stir 
in one quart of meal, one-half gill of yeast, one tablespoon of 
molasses. Let them rise five hours and bake in muffin rings. 

MUFFINS. 

MRS, CLEGHORN. 

One quart of sweet milk, two eggs, one tablespoon of butter, 
one teacup of yeast, flour to make a stiff batter, a little salt. 
When light bake quickly. 



BREAD AND YEAST. 99 

MUFFINS. 

MRS. T. E. BROWN. 

Rub a piece of butter the size of an egg in two quarts of flour, 
add three ^^^'^ well beaten, a little salt, one teacup of yeast, one 
pint of milk, one pint of water. Beat the eggs and milk together, 
then add the water, stir in the flour and butter, add the yeast 
and let it stand until morning. Place rings in dripping-pan, fill 
and bake in slow oven. 

* MUFFINS. 

MRS. BELLOWS, PEPPERELL, MASS. 

One quart of flour, one and one-half pints of warm milk, one- 
half tea-cup of yeast, .two tablespoons of melted butter, two 
eggs, one teaspoon of saleratus. Set the batter in a warm place; 
when light, bake in rings. 

MUFFINS. 

MRS. M. J. WELLSLAGER. 

One ^^^., well beaten, one large spoon of sugar, one and one- 
fourth cups of flour, one cup of milk, one teaspoon melted butter, 
a little salt. Put two teaspoons baking powder into the flour. 
Bake in rings. 

MUFFINS. 

MRS. C. B. WILLIS. 

Melt one ounce of butter in a pint of milk; add a little yeast 
and two eggs, well beaten; stir in flour enough to make a stiff 
batter. Set it to rise and, when quite light, add a little salt. Bake 
in rings on a hot griddle, filling the rings half full of the batter. 

GRAHAM MUFFINS. 

MRS. G. M. HIPPEE. 

One quart of sweet milk, warm, one-half tea-cup of yeast and a 
little salt; stir in flour and let rise; when light, add four well 
beaten eggs, one-half cup of sugar, one-half cup of butter or lard, 
let rise again, and then bake in muffin rings. 



100 BREAD AND YEAST. 

GRAHAM. MUFFINS. 

MES. F. M. MILLS. 

Two eggs, one teaspoon of soda, one tablespoon of molasses or 
sugar, one pint of sour milk, or one-half pint of milk and one-half 
pint of cream. ^ 

GRAHAM CAKES. 

MRS. G. H. LEWIS. 

One cup sweet milk, with a large spoon of sour milk, small 
lump of butter, one egg, one fourth spoon of soda, teaspoon of 
sugar, flour enough to make a batter. 

RICE TEA CAKE. 

MRS. C, W. NELSON. 

Two cups of rice flour, two heaping cups of wheat flour, four 
teaspoons of cream tartar, two teaspoons of soda, two tablespoons 
of butter, two tablespoons of sugar, a little salt, one and one-half 
pints of milk. Bake thin and eat while hot. 

ECONOMY CAKES. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. ' 

Bread that is sour can be made into good breakfast cakes. Cut 
it in small pieces, and, if not wanted for immediate use, it can be 
kept a number of weeks by drying the pieces in a moderately hot 
oven; care must be taken that it does not burn. When you wish 
to make cakes for breakfast, soak the bread over night in cold wa- 
ter; in the morning, drain off all the water, mash the bread fine, 
and to every three pints put one teaspoon of salt, three eggs, one 
teaspoon of soda dissolved in milk, one pint of wheat or rye flour; 
add sufficient milk to enable you to fry them as you would buck- 
wheat cakes. If the flour which is used is mixed over night with 
a large spoon of yeast, the eggs may be omitted. 

SWISS BUNNS. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHARD. 

One and one-half cups of flour, one ^^^i one-half cup of sugar, 
one teaspoon of butter, two teaspoons of cream tartar, one tea- 
spoon of soda, one cup of sweet milk, added last. Bake in a quick 
oven. 



BREAD AND YEAST. 101 

BUNNS. 

MES. C. W. NELSON. 

Two and one-half cups of milk, one cup of sugar, one cup of 
yeast. Stir these together in the evening and let the mixture 
stand over night; in the morning add one cup of butter, one cup 
of sugar, small half teaspoon of soda, and let it rise again. Mold 
and put into pans, and let it rise a third time. 

RICE CROQUETTES. 

MRS. C. H. SWEENEY. 

One cup of rice boiled tender in one quart of ne-w milk, piece 
of butter size of a walnut, two eggs, a little salt. Make into a roll 
and, when perfectly cold, cut in slices, dip in egg^ then in crack- 
ers rolled fine, and fry brown in butter and lard, mixed. 

POP-OVERS. 

MRS. W . 

Four eggs, four cups of flour, four cups of milk, piece of butter 
size of a walnut (melted), pinch of salt. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

"grandma, smith," MT. CARROLL, ILL. 

Four small tea-cups of sour milk, three tablespoons of shorten- 
ing, three tablespoons of molasses, salt, two teaspoons of soda, 
Graham flour to make it just thick enough to drop from a spoon. 
This will fill two sets of gem pans. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

MRS. T. E. BROWN. 

One tea-cup of milk, one even cup of Graham flour, a little salt, 
one egg. Bake in gem pans. 

OAT MEAL GEMS. 

MRS. F. L. C. 

Two cups of sour milk or buttermilk; stir in three cups of oat 
meal; then add one teaspoon of salt, and one teaspoon of soda dis- 
solved in a little cold water. Bake in gem pans or in a sheet. 
The oven should be hot enough to bake in fifteen minutes. 



103 BREAD AND YEAST. 

WHEAT GEMS. 

MRS. T. E. BROWN. 

One tea-cup of milk, one full cup of wheat flour, a little salt, 
one ^^^. Bake in gem pans. 

OAT MEAL GEMS. 

MRS. L. K. 

Soak two cups of oat meal in two cups of cold water and a little 
salt, over night; in the morning add two cups of sour milk or one 
cup of milk and one of cream, one-half cup sugar, two teaspoons 
soda, flour enough to make a stiff batter. Have gem pans hot and 
bake in a quick oven. 

PEARL GRIT GEMS. 

MRS. HART. 

Stir the grits into hot water, and boil half an hour. When cold, 
take three cups of grits, and the same of either white or Graham 
flour, one pint of milk or water, and a little salt. Put into hot 
gem pans, and bake half an ^our, or until brown. Baking pow- 
der can be used, though it is unnecessary. 

VIRGINIA PONE. 

MRS. KETCH UM, CHICAGO. 

Twelve tablespoons of corn meal, add a piece of butter the 
size of a Brazil nut, and one-half teaspoon of salt. Pour in a 
little hot water, then add cold water enough to prevent scalding 
the eggs, two in number; these must be well beaten before put- 
ting in. Beat the whole together five minutes. Bake in iron 
gem-pans in a moderately quick oven, thirty minutes. 

RICE GEMS. 

MRS. WALLACE. 

One teacup of cold, boiled rice, one pint of corn meal, scalded, 
with sufficient water to make a thin batter, one tablespoon of 
butter, pinch of salt, three eggs well beaten, two teaspoons of 
baking powder. Put the rice into the scalded meal, add the but- 
ter, salt and the baking powder last. Have the gem-pans hot 
and bake quickly. 



BREAD AND YEAST. 103 

RICE GEMS. 

MES. W. S. PEITCHARD. 

One half pint of corn meal, scalded, one cup of rice, three eggs, 
salt to taste; enough milk to make a batter the consistency of 
griddle cakes or gems. 

FRUIT GEMS. 

MRS. HART. 

Take gem batter and add chopped raisins, dates and figs, 
together or separate; roll the fruit in dry flour. Suit your taste 
as to proportions of fruit. If a little sweet cream is used in mix- 
ing dough, the cakes will be nice enough for dessert or a lunch 
for traveling. 

APPLE GEMS. 

MRS. HART. 

Rich flavored, tart apples, pared, cored and grated, mixed with 
gem dough, are nice if one wants a simple fruit cake. Take three 
good sized apples to one mold of gems; make the dough nearly 
thick enough to roll. 

RICE GEMS. 

MRS. HART. 

Put to soak at night a cup of cold, boiled rice, in a pint and a 
half of milk or water. In the morning, add Graham flour until a 
moderately stiff batter is formed. Put into hot gem pans and 
bake quickly. 

MUSH BISCUIT. 

MRS. WHITE. 

One pint of well boiled mush, one pint of new milk, one-half 
pint of yeast, two tablespoons of lard. Prepare flour with a little 
salt, put in the mush and milk while hot, then let it cool before 
adding the yeast. Knead in sufficient flour to prevent the dough 
adhering to the hands. It is improved by being frequently 
kneaded. Roll, and cut as biscuit, and let them rise one-half 
hour before baking. 

BEAT BISCUIT. 

MRS. MARY WARREN, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

One quart of flour, one tablespoon of lard; mix with water very 
stiff and beat well one hour. 



104 BREAD AND YEAST. 

FAIRY BISCUIT. 

LELAND HOTEL, SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

Rub two ounces of butter with one-half pound of flour, add 
four ounces of sugar and a few drops of almond flavoring, the 
white of an ^^^ and one tablespoon of milk, two ounces of sweet 
almonds well pounded; work well into paste. Take up pieces 
the size of half a dollar and bake a few minutes on buttered 
paper. 

BAKING-POWDER BISCUIT. 

MRS. KETCHUM, CHICAGO. 

K novel way of baking them makes a very pleasing variety. 
(Use any baking-powder receipt.) Roll the dough thinner than 
ordinarily; spread it well with butter that has been softened; 
dust a good sprinkling of white sugar over and roll it up. Cut 
slices off from the end the usual thickness, allowing for consid- 
erable rising. They ought to be light and flaky. 

SODA BISCUIT. 

MRS. C. H. SWEENEY. 

Take four teaspoons of cream tartar, rub it well through two 
quarts of flour, one teaspoon of salt, butter the size of a goose 
0.^^ also rubbed in the flour. Take three coffee-cups of sweet 
milk, dissolve two teaspoons of soda in the milk and mix all 
together soft. Bake in a quick oven. 

BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. . 

E. A. C . 

Mix three heaping teaspoons of baking powder thoroughly, 
with one quart of sifted flour, add one large spoon of lard, 
one teaspoon of salt, and cold water or sweet milk enough to 
mix soft. Bake in a quick oven. Be careful not to work more 
than necessary in mixing the ingredients together. 

« SOUR MILK BISCUIT. 

E. A. C . 

Two quarts of flour, one even teaspoon of soda; pulverize it 
very fine with a knife, and mix thoroughly in the flour; two large 
spoons of lard rubbed in the flour, sour milk to mix soft, and salt. 
Roll thin, and bake quickly. 



BREAD AND YEAST. 105 

UNLEAVENED BISCUIT. 

MRS. S. P. WISNER, CEDAR RAPIDS. 

Five cups of Graham flour, one quart of water, a little warm, 
white of one ^^g-, well beaten. Bake in a quick oven in small 
tins. 

MRS. HODGES' BISCUIT. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHARD. 

One cup of milk, one pint of flour, cream tartar in flour or 
three teaspoons of baking powder, lump of lard the size of an 
egg, three teaspoons of cream tartar to one of soda. Dissolve the 
soda in a little hot water and stir in after mixing, using a spoon 
entirely. 

BROWN BISCUITS. 

MRS. J. M. SWEENEY, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Mix together Graham flour, one teaspoon of salt, one pint of 
sour cream and one teaspoon of soda. Roll out, cut into biscuit 
and bake in a moderate oven. 

BATTER CAKES. 

MRS. J. M. OTIS. 

One quart of sweet milk, one-half tablespoon of salt, whites of 
four eggs, two and one-half teaspoons of baking powder. Stir 
the salt in the milk, add the flour till you have a pretty stiff bat- 
ter, next stir in the baking powder and add the whites, beaten to 
a stiff froth the last thing, mixing the whole gently. 

BATTER CAKES. 

MRS. PAGE, IOWA CITT. 

One pint of sour milk, one teaspoon of soda, two eggs, the 
whites and yolks beaten separately, two tablespoons of butter or 
lard or one of each, a little salt. Stir in the whites of the eggs, 
beaten light, the last thing, with flour sufficient to make a batter. 

BATTER CAKES. 

MRS. G. R. OSGOOD. 

One-half pint of sour cream, one-half pint of sweet milk, two 
eggs, one teaspoon of soda, nearly one quart of sifted flour. 



106 BREAD AND YEAST. 

RYE DROP CAKES. 

MRS. G. E. OSGOOD. 

Two cups of rye, one cup of flour, one pint of milk, two eggs, 
a little salt, two tablespoons of sugar, one teaspoon of soda, one 
teaspoon of cream tartar in flour. 

FARINA CAKES. 

MRS. WALLACE. 

Take one pint of sweet milk and let it come to a boil; stir in 
enough farina to make a stiff batter and let it cool, then stir in 
eight eggs, well beaten, small piece of butter, salt to season well. 
A little chopped parsley improves the taste. Cook as batter 
cakes. 

AUNT RACHEL'S FLANNEL CAKES. 

MRS. A. y. RAWSON. 

One quart warm water, a little more than lukewarm, one cup 
yeast, one cup corn meal and flour enough to make very stift'. 
Let it rise overnight for breakfast, or mix at noon for tea. When 
light, or just before baking, put in one Q^g., one scant cup of 
milk or cream, one teaspoon soda and one of salt. The batter 
will be very thin. Bake on griddles as pancakes. 

RICE GRIDDLE CAKES. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

Two cups of rice in three pints of water; boil until perfectly soft; 
mash fine with a spoon and add a little salt. When cool, add two 
eggs beaten very light, then one and one-half pints of milk; beat 
in by degrees six tea cups of flour. Beat all thoroughly together, 
then stir in one tablespoon of soda. Bake on a griddle in small 
cakes. Eat with butter and sugar. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES WITH SOUR MILK. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

One quart of sour milk, and flour enough to make a batter, not 
too stiff, one even tablespoon of salt, one teaspoon of soda 
(if the milk is very sour, add more). Bake in small cakes. They 
are very nice. 



BREAD AND YEAST. 107 

YEAST BUCKWHEATS. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE, 

Take three pints of warm water, even tablespoon of salt; stir 
in buckwheat flour enough to make a thin batter. Beat it thor- 
oughly, then add one-half pint of yeast. Set the batter in a warm 
place to rise over night. Put in a small teaspoon of soda just be- 
fore baking. 

NICE GRIDDLE CAKES. 

JENNIE M. CHASE. 

One pint sour cream, one pint of sour milk, one teaspoon of salt, 
four eggs, flour enough lio make a thin batter, one teaspoon or 
more of soda. Bake on griddles well greased. 

CORN GRIDDLE CAKES WITH WATER. 

MRS. C. H. SWEE^TEY. 

One pint of corn meal, one tablespoon of lard. Pour boiling 
water (be sure the water is boiling), to make a stiff mush, then thin 
with cold water, add two well-beaten eggs, and a large pinch of 
salt; also tablespoon of syrup. 

CORN GRIDDLE CAKES. 

CARRIE BECK. 

One pint of sour milk, three eggs; meal enough to make a thin 
batter, one teaspoon of salt, one small teaspoon of soda, or less, 
according to the sourness of the milk. 

STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Two quarts of sifted flour, one even teaspoon of soda, and a 
little salt thoroughly mixed in the flour, one-half cup of but- 
ter or lard rubbed in the flour, one pint of sour cream, and, if nee • 
essary, sweet milk sufiicient to mix a soft dough. Mix the dough 
as lightly as possible, and avoid kneading more than necessary. 
Bake in a quick oven. When "done, split the cake and spread 
with sweet butter; sugar the strawberries, and put a thick layer 
between the parts. Serve with sweetened cream. , 



108 BREAD AND YEAST. 

RASPBERRY SHORT CAKE. 

MRS. E. A. C. 

One quart of flour, three teaspoons of baking powder, and a 
little salt thoroughly mixed in flour, one half cup of butter or lard 
rubbed in the flour. Mix with water, soft. Roll in cakes and 
score the top in squares or diamonds. Bake in a quick oven. 
When done, split the cake open and spread with butter. Mash 
and sweeten the raspberries, adding one-half cup of water to make 
more juice. Put the berries between the two parts of the cake, 
^d serve with sweetened cream. 

SHORT CAKE, 

MRS. M. A. CARPENTER, RYE, N. Y. 

One quart thick sour cream, two teaspoons of soda, a little salt, 
flour enough to make a soft dough. 

CREAM TOAST. 

MRS. E. A. C. ♦ 

One quart' of rich milk, one-half cup of butter, one teaspoon of 
salt, two tablespoons of flour. Mix flour in a little cold milk, and 
stir in the boiling milk; add the butter and salt, and take from the 
fire. Toast the bread brown and dip in the cream; lay in a deep 
dish and pour the remainder of the cream over it. 

SARATOGA TOAST. 

MRS. E, A. C. 

Take one or two eggs, beaten very light, one pint of milk or 
water, pinch of salt. Slice stale bread, dip in the mixture and fry 
brown on griddles well greased with lard and butter mixed. 

BREAKFAST GEMS, 

DR, W. H. DICKINSON. 

Beat two eggs thoroughly, and mix with a pint of sweet 
milk. Add a teaspoon of baking powder to flour enough to make 
a stifi" batter. Stir into the batter a tablespoon of melted lard or 
butter, and bake in gem pans, first well heated. 

This receipt makes first-rate cakes with corn meal instead of 
flour. 



BREAD AND YEAST. 109 

NICE BREAKFAST CAKES. 

MRS. C. C. HOWELL. 

Three tablespoons of melted butter, three tablespoons of hot 
water. Put these into a coffee-cup, and fill to overflowing with 
molasses; add two teaspoons soda, one tablespoon ginger, and a 
little cinnamon. Mix soft and roll out. 



BREAKFAST CAKEjS. 



MRS. HARKNESS. ^ 

'.C'' 

One pint of meal, one pint of sour milk, one spoon of soda sift- 
ed in the meal, two eggs, one teaspoon of sugar, all thoroughly- 
beaten. Bake quickly. If preferred, sweet milk and baking 
powder can be used. 

LArt.AND CAKES. 

MRS. PHILLIP SKINNER. 

Beat very light five eggs with a pint of sweet cream, then beat 
in well one and one-half pints flour; bake in tins or cups in quick 
oven. 

WAFFLES. 

MRS. J. G. SPRAGUE. 

One quart of flour, one teaspoon of salt, one quart of sour 
milk with two tablespoons of melted butter in it, five well-beaten 
eggs, saleratus enough to sweeten milk. Bake in waffle irons. 

WAFFLES. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART, 

One quart of sour milk, one teaspoon of soda, three eggs beaten 
separately. Make a little stiffer than pancakes. 
# 

RICE WAFFLES. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

One and one half tumblers of boiled rice; warm it in one pint 
of milk, stir till smooth, take from the fire and stir in one pint of 
cold milk, four eggs, salt and flour for a thick batter. 



110 BREAD AND YEAST. 

WAFFLES. 

MBS. W. S. PRnCHARD. 

One cup of milk, one cup of sour cream, one teaspoon of salt, 
two eggs, one-half teaspoon of soda, one teaspoon of cream tartar, 
flour to make a batter rather stiffer than pancakes. 

FRITTERS. 

MES. WiM. II. EAT, EUSHVILLE, ILL. 

One cup of sour milk, one ^^^^ one teaspoon of soda, one-half 
teaspoon of salt, flour to make batter thick enough to drop from 
spoon. Drop in hot lard and fry a light brown. Eat with cream, 
sugar and nutmeg for sauce. 

FRITTERS. 

MES. F. V. STOWE. 

One pint of milk, five eggs well beaten, pinch of salt, flour 
to make a thin batter. Drop from a spoon into boiling lard, and 
fry quickly. - Serve hot, with melted sugar, flavored with lemon 
or vinegar. 

RICE FRITTERS. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

Two cups of boiled rice, four eggs, a little flour, pinch of salt. 
Drop the batter in hot lard, and keep stirring all the time. Serve 
with sauce. 

CORN FRITTERS. 

MRS. C. H. SWEENEY. 

Twelve ears of corn, good sized, three heaping tablespoons of 
corn meal, one ^^^i and salt to taste. Fry brown in butter or 
lard; drop in medium sized spoonfuls on the griddle. 

FRUIT FRITTERS. 

MRS. TIIEO. CARPENTER. 

One pint of milk, one pint of cream, six eggs, one and' one-half 
pints of flour, a little salt. Mix with this any kind of berries 
or sliced apples or peaches, and fry in small cakes in hot lard. Serve 
with sauce or butter and sugar. 



BREAD AND YEAST. Ill 

PUFFETS. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER, 

One quart of flour, two teaspoons of cream tartar in the flour, 
butter the size of an ^^^., whites and yolks of two eggs beaten 
separately. Put all together and mix with one pint of milk; add 
a teaspoon of soda the last thing. This makes nice dumplings 
for pot-pie, or soup. 

WHIGS. NO. 1. 

One quart of milk, five eggs, one and one-fourth quarts of flour, 
butter the size of an ^^^ in the flour, salt. Bake in cups, three- 
fourths full, for one hour. Nice for tea. 

WHIGS. NO. 2. 

ANNA ALLEN, BROOKLYN. 

Three-fourths cup of butter, one-half cup of sugar, one cup of 
milk, three eggs, three and one-half cups of flour, salt, one tea- 
spoon of soda, three teaspoons of cream tartar. 

CRUMPETS. 

MRS. CLEGHORN. 

One quart warm sweet milk, one teacup of yeast, salt, flour to 
make a batter not very stifi". When light, add one-half cup of 
melted butter or cream. Let stand twenty minutes. Bake as 
muffins. 

DES MOINES CRUMPETS. 

E. A. C . 



Three cups of raised dough, one-half cup of butter beaten to a 
cream, three eggs, one coflFeecup of milk. Pour in buttered pans 
and let rise one-half hour. Bake till done. 

ROYAL CRUMPETS. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

Three teacups of raised dough, four tablespoons of melted but- 
ter, three eggs, one teacup of sugar; knead butter, eggs and 
sugar well into the dough. Put in buttered tins; bake twenty- 
minutes. Serve with susrar. 



112 BREAD AND YEAST. 

BEST MODE OF COOKING OAT ME-AL. 

MRS. KETCHUM, CHICAGO. 

Mush. — Put one pint of oat meal to soak in warm water (just 
enough to cover it), a few hours before cooking; then put this 
mixture into boiling water, salted a little, and let it cook 
slowly for half an hour or longer. To be eaten hot or cold with 
butter and sugar or with cream and sugar, 

A Heartier Dish is made by cooking it with the water in 
which meat has been boiled, skimming off the fat and serving 
with the meat the same as a vegetable. 

Soup. — Cook meat until very tender, removing it from the 
bones; chop very fine and cook with oat meal. 

Pudding. — Take eggs, milk, sugar, raisins and cinnamon, the 
same as for other puddings. 

For the Invalid — have it thin, like gruel, and serve with sugar 
and milk, or cream if it can be* taken. In oat meal are the ma- 
terials for growth of muscle and bones and substance for the 
brain and nerves. 

CRACKED WHEAT. 

Put in a tin pail and set in a kettle of boiling water. Cover 
closely and let it boil half or three-quarters of an hour. Soak it 
previously the same as oat meal, stirring the mixture into boiling 
water. 

ANOTHER WAY. 

Prepare same as above, and boil from two to three hours. 



fl^&. 



.^ 





^N making paste, use ice water. Have the lard and but- 
ter cold and hard. Do not knead the dough, but mix it 
,^4* ^^ ^'g^tly as possible. 
^[p* One tablespoon of molasses in fruit pies is a great im- 
provement. 

PASTE. 

MRS. H. D. FOSTER. 

Two large cups of flour, one cup of water, a half cup of butter, 
a half cup of lard and a little salt. This will make two pies. To 
make crust look rich, take the white of an egg, well beaten, and 
spread it upon the pies lightly, with a feather, just before putting 
them into the oven; one egg to five pies. 

PUFF PASTE. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

One pound of butter, washed and frozen, and one pound of flour; 
mix half the butter with most of the flour, and use as little (ice) 
water to mix with as possible ; roll out and put the rest of the but- 
ter on in pieces; double and roll again; then bake in a quick oven; 
pack away in tin. This makes one hundred tarts. 

CREAM PASTE. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHARD. 

Take one pint of sour cream, buttermilk or sour milk; beat into 
it one pint of flour; then stir into it one teaspoon of finely pow- 
dered soda; add as much more flour as will be required to make 
a dough stiff enough to roll; put into it, the last thing, one even 
tablespoon of salt. The yolk of an egg, beaten very light, makes 
it richer. Good for chicken pie. 

8 113 



114 PIES. 

MINCE MEAT. 

MES. W. BURTON. 

Three pounds of suet, four pounds of beef, eight pounds of 
chopped apples, three pounds of currants, three pounds of raisins, 
seeded, two pounds of citron, six pounds of sugar, two lemons, gra- 
ted, one ounce of cinnamon, a fourth of an ounce of cloves, a fourth 
of an ounce of mace, four nutmegs, three pints of syrup off sweet 
pickle (spiced grapes are good); add the apple as you bake. It 
it excellent. 

MINCE MEAT. 

MRS. C. A. PARROTT, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Three bowls of beef, three bowls of apples, one bowl of citron, 
chopped fine, two bowls of raisins, four bowls of sugar, one bowl 
of molasses, one bowl of vinegar, two bowls of currants, two bowls 
of suet, one bowl of syrup off sweet pickles, and cinnamon, nut- 
meg and cloves to suit the taste. 

MOCK MINCE MEAT. 

MRS. C. B. SMITH, MT. CARROLL, ILL. « 

Six soda crackers, rolled fine, three cups of cold water, two cups 
of molasses, one cup of brown sugar, one cup of sour cider or vin- 
egar, one cup melted butter or chopped suet, a half cup of raisins^ 
seeded and chopped, a half cup of currants, two eggs, beaten light, 
one teaspoon each of cinnamon and cloves, salt, and a little nutmeg; 
eight or nine apples, chopped fine, and two cups of beef broth. 
I use this in preference to the old way, and no one has detected 
the imitation. 

MINCE MEAT. 

MRS. CARPENTER. 

Four pounds of beef, boiled in salted water till very tender, 
and,when cold, chopped fine, eight pounds of apples, chopped, three 
pounds of suet, three pounds of currants, three pounds of raisins, 
two pounds of citron, six pounds of sugar, a fourth of an ounce of 
cloves, a fourth of an ounce of allspice, one ounce of cinnamon, 
nutmegs and orange peel; moisten with sweet cider. 



PIES. 115 

SUMMER MINCE PIE. 

MRS. F. J. FISHER, BROOKLYN, L. I. 

Five soda crackers, rolled fine, one and a half cups of water, 
one and a half cups of cider, one cup of sugar, one cup of mo- 
lasses, a third of a cup of melted butter, one cup of raisins, cinna- 
mon, nutmeg and cloves, and two eggs, to be put in the last thing. 

MINCE PIE. 

MRS. E. S. SPEED, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Five pounds of beef, three pounds of suet, eight pounds of ap- 
ples, six pounds of raisins, six pounds of currants, two pounds of 
citron, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and orange peel, a half gallon 
of cider, a quart of molasses, a pint of vinegar, and syrup off 
sweet pickles. Sweeten to the taste. 

POOR MAN'S PIE.. 

MRS. F. A. PARKER, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Put your bottom crust into the pan; sprinkle over the crust one 
large teaspoon of flour; add one large coffee-cup of sugar, one 
very large teaspoon of cinnamon, one tablespoon of butter, cut in 
pieces, two tablespoons of molasses, and enough water to wet the 
sugar; bake with or without top crust as you prefer. 

DELICATE PIE. 

MRS. HETTIE SPRAGUE, OSHKOSH, WIS. 

To one large tablespoon of corn starch dissolved in a little cold 
water, add one cup of boiling water, and, when cool, one Q^'g., 
one lemon (rind and juice), a little salt, and one cup of sugar. 
Bake between two crusts. 

CHEESE CAKES. 

MRS. M. A. RICH, STERLING, ILL. 

One pound of curd, (twelve ounces to the pound), eight ounces 
of butter, fourteen ounces of sugar, six eggs, and seven drops 
of lemon. Stir together; line some patty pans with rich paste, 
then fill. 



116 PIES. 



CHEESE CAKES. 

MRS. HENKY SCRIBNER. 



A half poujid of butter, a half pound of sugar, three eggs, and 
a little flavoring. Put a slice of citron in the bottom of the pan, 
after lining it with good paste. 



COCOANUT PIE. 

MRS THEO. CARPENTER. 

One cocoanut grated, one cup of sugar, three eggs, and one 
quart of milk. Bake in an under crust. 

VINEGAR PIE. 

MRS. HENRY SCRIBNER. 

Four tablespoons of vinegar, five tablespoons of water, one tea- 
spoon of flour, a half teacup of sugar, and butter the size of a 
hickory-nut. 

APPLE FLORINDINES. 

MRS. THEO. CARPENTER. 

One quart of milk, three eggs, two fall pippins grated, and one 
grated lemon. Sweeten to the taste. No top crust. 

APPLE CUSTARD PIE. 

MRS. MARY WARREN, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Six apples, stewed, sweetened and flavored to the taste, a 
half cup of butter, one cup of cream and four eggs, whites and 
yolks beaten separately. 

APPLE CUSTARD PIE. 

MRS. R. T. WELLSLAGER. 

Grate four sour apples, beat with two eggs, grate in one nut- 
meg, fill up with cream; add raisins and sugar. 

WASHINGTON PIE. 

MRS. HENRY SCRIBNER. 

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, one cup of milk, three 
cups of flour, one teaspoon of soda, and two teaspoons of cream 
tartar. Bake in thin cakes and spread thick layers of fresh 
apple-sauce between. Better eaten warm. 



PIES. 117 

WASHINGTON PIE. 

MRS. S. P. WISNEE, CEDAR RAPIDS. 

One cup of sugar, one cup of flour, butter the size of an ^^^^ 
three eggs, one-half teaspoon of cream tartar, one-fourth of a tea- 
spoon of soda; flavor to the taste. Bake them in round tins, and 
spread raspberry jam between the two layers. 

CREAM PIE. 

Instead of baking a Washington pie in two layers, bake it in 
three, and spread cream between. The pie must be entirely cold 
before putting together. Make the following cream for filling: 
Scald one pint of new milk; mix together and add two table- 
spoons of corn starch, one cup of sugar, a little salt and two eggs; 
flavor with lemon. A piece of butter the size of an q^^ im- 
proves it. When nearly cold, spread between the cakes, using 
all the cream; sift sugar over the top, when all together. To be 
eaten the day the cream is put in. 

CREAM PIE. 

MRS. HAKKNESS. 

One pint of cream, white of one ^^^^ and one heaping tea- 
spoon of flour. Sweeten and flavor to the taste. > Paste as for 
custard pie. 

CREAM PIE. 

MRS. H. SPRAGUE, OSHKOSH, WIS. 

One pint of milk, one cup of sugar, three eggs, one tablespoon 
of corn starch, and one cup of cream. Boil the milk and add the 
corn starch until it thickens, then take off and add the eggs and 
sugar. Bake in an under crust. 

CREAM PIE. 

MRS. P. CORNING. 

Four eggs, one cup of sugar, one cup of flour, one and a half 
teaspoons of baking powder and a little salt. Bake in two pie- 
tins. To make cr'eam for the above, take two eggs, one cup of 
sugar, a half cup of flour, two-thirds of a pint of milk, and a small 
piece of butter. Flavor with vanilla, and put between the cakes. 



118 PIES. 

CREAM PIE, 

MRS. WM. CHASE, KOSEMOND, ILL. 

Six eggs, two cups of sugar, two cups of flour, two teaspoons 
of cream tartar and one teaspoon of soda, dissolved in two teaspoons 
of cold milk. This makes three pies. When cold, split them 
and put in the cream, made as follows : One pint of milk, one 
cup of sugar, a half cup of flour and two eggs. Beat all together 
and pour into the milk, when boiling; flavor to the taste. 

CREAM PIE. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Three pints of rich cream, five eggs, and One cup of sugar. 
Flavor with nutmeg or grated rind of one lemon; cover a deep 
pie-tin with rich paste and fill with the cream. This quantity is 
sufficient for two pies. 

CREAM PIE. 

MRS. T. E. BROWX. 

Yolks of two eggs, two tablespoons of corn starch, two table- 
spoons of sugar, and one pint of milk. Flavor to the taste; 
put the yolks and whites together, or, spread the whites over the 
top of the pie. 

MARLBOROUGH PIE. 

MARY ALLEN, RYE, N. Y. 

One cup of stewed apples, sifted, one cup of sugar, one cup of 

milk, a fourth of a cup of butter, two eggs, and a little nutmeg. 

No top crust. 

CRACKER PIE. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHARD. 

Three crackers, for a small pie; one large teacup of water, one 

teacup of sugar, and one small teaspoon of tartaric acid. Roll 

the crackers, and throw them into the water. Flavor with 

lemon. 

LEMON CUSTARD. 

, MRS. W. S. PRITCHARD. 

One lemon, one pound of white sugar, one quart of new milk, 
and six eggs. Bake in a rich crust. 



PIES. 119 

CUSTARD PIE. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

One quart of new milk, five eggs, well beaten, and one small 
teacup of white sugar. Beat the eggs and sugar together; pour 
in the milk and flavor with nutmeg; line pie-tins with rich paste 
and fill with the custard. This will make two pies. 

LEMON PIE, WITH THREE CRUSTS. 

MRS. PUTiSTA-M. 

Two lemons, two cups of sugar, two eggs. Grate the rind of 
the lemon; take off the white skin and chop the inside. Mix all 
together; then put a layer of thin paste upon the plate, then a 
layer of the lemon, another layer of paste, another of lemon and 
the top crust. 

LEMON PIE. 

MISS EMMA HOWELL. 

Grated rind and juice of two lemons, tvvo cups of sugar, four 
tablespoons of melted butter, a half cup of water, and the yolks 
of six eggs. Mix well, and bake slowly; when done, beat the 
whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, add two tablespoons of sugar, 
and one teaspoon of lemon; spread upon the top of the pie, return 
to the stove, and brown quickly. This will make three pies on 
ordinary sized plates. Very nice. 

LEMON PIE. 

MRS. T. E. BROWN. 

Juice and grated rind of one lemon, one cup of sugar, one cup 
of water, one &^^, one tablespoon of corn starch, and a piece of 
butter the size of an ^^^. Boil the water; then wet the corn 
starch with a little cold water and stir it into the boiling water; 
pour it upon the sugar and butter; when cold add the lemon and 
^SS- This will make one pie with one crust. 

LEMON PIE WITH TWO CRUSTS. 

One lemon, two cups of sugar, one ^^'g., one cup of water and 
two tablespoons of corn starch. This makes one large pie. 



120 PIES. 

LEMON PIE. 

MBS. J. CARPENTER. 

Two lemons, five eggs, two tablespoons of melted butter and 
eight tablespoons of sugar. Squeeze the juice of both lemons, 
and grate the rind of one; stir together the yolks of three eggs 
and white of one, with the sugar, butter and lemon; beat well, 
then add one coffee-cup of sweet cream and beat two or three 
minutes. This will make two pies. Bake until the crust is done, 
theli beat the remaining whites of the eggs with four tablespoons 
of sugar; spread on the pie, and return quickly to the oven before 
the &^^ is set, which will cause the pie to fall, when taken from 

the oven. 

LEMON PIE. 

MRS. G. M. HIPPEE. 

Grated rind and juice of three lemons, a half cup of melted 
butter, one tablespoon of corn starch, one cup of water, three 
cups of sugar, and nine eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately. 
Stir all together, beating the whites in well, the last thing. Bake 
with one crust. Will make three pies. Delicious. 

LEMON PIE. 

For one pie, take one lemon, two eggs, one cup of sugar, one 

tablespoon of corn starch and one cup of boiling water. Put the 

starch into the water with a piece of butter the size of a large 

nutmeg; grate the lemon; leave the whites of the eggs for 

the top. 

LEMON PIE. 

MRS. HENRY SCRIBNER. 

One lemon, one cup of sugar, three teaspoons of corn starch, 
three eggs, and one cup of sweet milk. Use the yolks in the 
pie; beat the whites to a stiff froth; add three tablepoons of 
sugar to each white and spread upon the top. 

LEMON TARTS. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHARD. 

One cup of sugar, one lemon, one cup of water, two eggs and 
a little butter. 



PIES. , 131 

LEMON PIE. 

MKS. J. B. STEWART. 

One cup of sugar, three eggs, three- fourths of a cup of water, 
one lemon, and one spoon of corn starch. Beat the sugar and 
grated rind of lemon with the yolks of eggs, juice of lemon, water 
and corn starch; cook in hot water until it thickens; fill the pie and 
bake. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, add sugar, 
spread over the pie, when baked, then bake a light brown. 

LEMON PUFFS. 

MRS. WOOLSEY, ROSEMOND, ILL. 

Make a rich paste; roll out and cut with a biscuit cutter; in the 
center of every other one, cut a hole with a wineglass and put it on 
one uncut. Before putting them into the oven, brush over with 
the white of an i^^g\ then sprinkle with sugar. 

Filling of the Puffs. — Six well beaten eggs, grated rinds of 
three lemons, one pound of white sugar and a fourth of a pound 
of butter. Stir butter and sugar to a cream; add the juice of the 
lemons and the other ingredients except the eggs, and simmer; 
when hot, turn in the eggs, stir quickly for five minutes, then 
remove the pan and put it into cold water. This can be kept in 
jars for months and used when desired. 

LEMON APPLE PIE. 

MRS. HUDSON, NEW BEDFORD, CONN. 

Three lemons, three large apples and three eggs. Squeeze the 
juice of the lemons and grate the rind of one and a half. Chop 
the apples fine and put them into a pan; add the lemons, and stir in 
two cups of sugar; beat together the eggs and a third of a cup of 
sugar, till very light; then stir all together. Make a rich paste; 
bake with an upper and under crust. This will make three pies. 

CHOPPED APPLE PIE. 

MRS. HUDSON. ' 

Fourteen good-sized greening apples, chopped fine, one pound 
of raisins, six eggs, one tumbler of sweet cider, one cup of butter, 
two cups of sugar, salt, nutmeg and cloves. 



122 PIES. 

PEACH COBBLER. 

MRS. E, P. CUASE. 

Make a rich paste; roll out; line a deep, square baking-pan, 
and fill the pan with peeled peaches; sweeten to the taste j* add a 
piece of butter the size of a walnut, and one tablespoon. of syrup; 
put on an upper crust, and bake a half hour, or until done. Very 
srood with or without cream. 

SQUASH PIE. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

One quart of stewed squash, three pints of rich milk, six eggs, 
three tablespoons of cinnamon, a half nutmeg and Ih'ree large 
cups of sugar. Mix the above, pouring the milk in last. 

NEW ENGLAND PUMPKIN PIE. 

MRS. A. Y. RAWSON. 

Peel and cut your pumpkin into small pieces and put into a 
kettle with a very little water; cook from six to eight hours, stir- 
ring frequently to prevent burning. - When done, rub through a 
colander. One quart of pumpkin, tlipee pints of. rich milk, four 
eggs, three cups of sugar, one scant teaspoon of ginger and 
four teaspoons of cinnamon. 

SLICED SWEET POTATO PIE. 

AUNT RACHEL. 

Boil sweet potatoes and slice into lower crust like apples; add 
three or four tablespoons of vinegar, and sugar and spice to the 
taste (allspice is best); put in more butter than for apple pie, 
and cover the upper crust. 

SWEET POTATO CUSTARD PIE. 

Like squash pie, only using sweet potatoes, boiled and rubbed 
through a colander, instead of squash. Add a little butter. 



wDDixa^. 




™'^ OIL puddings in a mold or bag (a small tin bucket, set 
in boiling water, answers very well.) Grease the mold 
or pail with lard. Dip the bag into boiling water, and 
flour it well, before putting the pudding into it. In tying 
• ^ bags, always leave room for the puddings to swell. Have 
the water boiling before you put them into it, and be sure 
to add boiling water, if necessary to add any. Put a small 
plate or tin in the bottom of the kettle to prevent sticking. Have 
water enough in the kettle to float the pudding, so that it can be 
turned often. When the pudding is done, plunge it suddenly 
into cold water; turn out quickly, and serve immediately. Never 
let custards bake too long, or they will be watery. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

Two cups of beef suet, two cups of chopped raisins, a half cup 
of citron, one cup of molasses, a half cup of sugar, and spices. 
Mix all together and chop fine; take two cups of water; thicken 
with flour enough to make a stift' batter; break in three eggs, 
beat well; butter the tin pudding-boiler and boil three hours. 

BOILED ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 

MRS. J. PARMELEE. 

One pound of flour, one pound of beef suet, chopped fine, two 
pounds of raisins, stoned and chopped, two pounds of currants, a 
fourth of a pound of citron, chopped fine, eight eggs, one pound 
of brown sugar, one teacup of molasses, salt, and spice to the 
taste. Boil five hours and serve with the following sauce: One 
large tablespoon of flour, a half cup of butter and a little salt. 
Boil a few minutes; then add sugar and flavor to the taste. 

123 



124: PUDDINGS. 

BAKED ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Three pints of new milk, one pound of bread crumbs, one 
cofiFee-cup of brown sugar, a fourth of a pound of suet chopped 
fine, six eggs, one pound of raisins, a half pound of dried currants, 
a fourth of a pound of citron, two tablespoons of cinnamon, one 
teaspoon of cloves, and the grated peel of one lemon. Bake 
three hours. This pudding is better when cooked the day 
before it is used and then warmed over. Serve with the follow- 
ing sauce: Two cups of sugar, one cup of butter and one tea- 
spoon of vanilla. Beat till very light and grate nutmeg over 
the top. 

BOILED PLUx\I PUDDING. 

MRS. HENRY SCRIBNER. 

One pound of raisins, one pound of currants, a half pound of 
suet, chopped fine, six eggs, a pint of sweet milk, two teaspoons 
of cream tartar, one teaspoon of soda and flour enough to make 
it like fruit cake. Boil three hours. 

CRACKER PLUM PUDDING. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

Eight Boston crackers, five pints of milk and twelve eggs. 
Make a very sweet custard; split the crackers, and butter them 
well; put a layer of raisins into a large dish, then a layer of 
crackers; pour on a little of the custard, when warm; after soak- 
ing a little, put on a thick layer of raisins, pressing them into the 
crackers with a knife; then another layer of crackers, custard and 
fruit, till there are four layers; then pour over enough custard to 
rise even with the crackers. Make over night so that the crack- 
ers will soak. Bake one and a half hours; add a little more 
dressing the first half hour; pour over a little custard at three 
different times, to prevent the top from getting too brown, and 
cover with paper. 

BOILED FLOUR PUDDING. 

MRS. S. P. WISNER, CEDAR RAPIDS. 

Twelve tablespoons of flour, nine eggs, one quart of milk, and 
a little salt. Put into a bag and boil one hour. Serve with sauce. 



PUDDINGS. 125 

BAKED FLOUR PUDDING. 

MRS. STAPLES. 

One quart of milk, two eo^gs, and two tablespoons of flour. 
Wet the flour with a little milk, then add the eggs; beat all well 
together, adding a little salt; boil the rest of the milk and pour 
over the flour and eggs; after it is in the oven, stir it two or 
three times before it begins to brown, so that the flour will not 
settle. Serve with sauce. 

CHRISTMAS PUDDING. 

MRS. T. A. PARKER. 

One teacup of molasses, one teacup of sour milk, one teacup of 
suet, chopped fine, one teacup of chopped raisins, one teacup of 
currants, three eggs, three cups of flour and one teaspoon of 
soda. Steam two hours; serve with boiled sauce. 

SUET PUDDING. 

MRS. TVM. H. RAY, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

One coffee-cup of suet chopped fine, one coffee-cup of raisins, 
chopped, one coffee-cup of molasses, one coffee-cup of cold water, 
one teaspoon of cream tartar, a half teaspoon of soda and flour to 
make a stiff batter. Boil, in a pudding bag,- three hours; serve 
with sauce. 

SUET PUDDING. 

MRS. R. T. WELLSLAGER. 

One coffee-cup of chopped suet, one cup of molasses, one cup 
of milk, three and a half cups of flour, one cup of stoned raisins, 
a half teaspoon of soda, one teaspoon of salt, one teaspoon of 
cloves and one teaspoon of cinnamon, or more. Steam two 
and a half hours. 

SUET PUDDING. 

MRS. J. B. MILLER AND MRS. S. JOHNS. 

One cup of suet, one cup of molasses, one cup of sour milk, a 
half teaspoon of soda, or instead, one cup sweet milk with one 
spoon baking powder, one ^^'^., three cups of flour one cup of 
raisins, a half teaspoon of salt, one spoon of cinnamon and one 
spoon of cloves. Steam two hours over a hot fire. 



126 PUDDINGS. 

BLACK PUDDING. 

MRS. C. B. WILLIS. 

One cup ot suet, chopped fine, one cup of molasses, one cup of 
milk, three and one-half cups of flour, one teaspoon of cloves, one 
teaspoon of soda, one teaspoon of cinnamon, one teaspoon of nut- 
meg, one cup of raisins, and salt. Steam three hours. 

GINGER OR BLACK PUDDING. 

MRS. HENRY SCRIBNER. 

One tea-cup of molasses, one teacup of warm water, three tea- 
cups of flour, one tablespoon of soda, in water, one tablespoon 
of melted butter, fruit to the taste and ginger. Sauce. 

BLACK PUDDING. 

MRS. CLEGHORN". 

One cup of molasses, one cup of warm water, two tablespoons 
of melted butter, one teaspoon of soda, three cups of flour, one 
cup of raisins, one cup of currants and spice to taste. Steam 
three hours. Serve with sauce. 

PEACH PUDDING. 

MRS. HARRY WEST. 

Peel some nice peaches; put them into a dish till half full; 
nearly cover (not quite) with water; add a half cup of sugar. 
Make a crust of one pint of flour, one heaping teaspoon of baking 
powder, butter the size of an egg; mix with water; roll out the 
dough, and cover the dish; set it on the top of the stove, and cover 
with another dish of the same size. Let it cook thirty or forty 
minutes. Serve with sugar and cream. This is excellent. 

DELMONICO PUDDING. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

One quart of sweet milk, one cup of sugar, and one stick of 
cinnamon; let ttese boil; add four tablespoons of corn starch 
dissolved in milk, and six eggs, well beaten; stir till thick and 



PUDDINGS. 127 

boil twenty minutes. Beat whites to a stiff froth and add six 
tablespoons of fine su^jar; put this over the pudding and bake a 
light brown; flavor with lemon and vanilla. Serve cold with 
sweet cream, sugar and nutmeg. 

ICE FARINA PUDDING. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

Boil one quart of milk; stir into it four large tablespoons of 
farina, dissolved in part of the milk; boil a half hour; when done, 
flavor, turn into a mold, and place upon ice. Eat with sugar 
and cream. 

BERRY PUDDING. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

One and a half cups of sugar, butter the size of an ^^^., a half 
pint of milk, one teaspoon of soda in the milk, two teaspoons of 
cream tartar in the flour, three eggs and one pint of berries. Make 
as stiff as pound cake and boil two hours. Serve with sauce. 

WHORTLEBERRY PUDDING. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

One pint of whortleberries, one cup of molasses, a half cup of 
water, three cups of flour, one teaspoon of soda and one teaspoon 
of salt. Boil three hours or bake one. 

PLAIN STEAMED PUDDING. 

MRS. DE. COLTON. 

One cup of molasses, three cups of flour, two cups of raisins, 
one cup of sweet milk, a half cup of butter, three eggs, two tea- 
spoons of baking powder and spice to taste. 

FIG PUDDING. 

MRS. GEO. BAKER. 

A half pound of figs, a quarter of a pound of beef suet, three 
eggs, three-fourths of a cup of butter, one teaspoon of yeast pow- 
der, a half cup of milk; mix to a stiff batter with flour. Boil two 
or three hours. Serve with sauce. 



128 PUDDINGS. 

GERMAN PUDDING. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

One pint of new milk, three eggs, well beaten, and three table- 
spoons of sugar. Mix all together; take one loaf of baker's bread, 
cut in slices, dip the slices into the mixture and fry brown on 
griddles, well greased with lard and butter mixed. Serve 
with this sauce: Two cups of sugar, one cup of butter and 
the white of one ^^^\ beat all together till very light; flavor with 
lemon or vanilla; spread thin on each slice of toast, and set into 
the oven for five minutes. Serve with the remainder of the sauce. 

CITRON PUDDING. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Yolks of sixteen fresh eggs, beaten till very light and thick, 
three-fourths of a pound of sugar stirred and beaten in and three- 
fourths of a pound of melted butter, with salt washed out. Line two 
deep pie plates with puff paste, cover the bottom with a layer of 
preserved citron, sliced thin; then fill with the mixture and bake 
in a moderately hot oven, keeping the temperature about the same; 
when baked, sift over them pulverized sugar. Good either hot or 
cold. If a third of the quantity is desired, take six Q^'g'^ this will 
make enough for a small family, as it is very rich. 

WEDDING CAKE PUDDING. 

SrPvS. F. TALCOTT, ROCKFOED, ILL. 

One cup of molasses, one cup of milk, a half cup of butter, four 
cups of flour, one nutmeg, two teaspoons of cinnamon, two tea- 
spoons of cloves, one teaspoon of allspice, a half teaspoon of soda 
and a half teaspoon of rose-water. Steam three hours. Serve 
with sauce. 

BAKED PUDDING. 

MRS. T. A. PARKER, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Take paste (not too rich), putting yeast powder into the flour; 
roll the thickness of quarter of an inch; take peaches, apples, 
blackberries, or any kind of fruit, sweeten, if you prefer, spread 
them upon the crust; roll it up; place in a pan and make a rich 



PUDDINGS. 129 

sauce of butter, sugar, flour and water, and essence of vanilla 
or lemon; pour this over the pudding and bake it till done. If 
the sauce bakes away, make more upon the top of the stove and 
serve hot. 

CHERRY PUDDING. 

MKS. E. P. CHASE. 

Take one pint of pounded crackers, pour hot water enough over 
to make them soft, and add one tablespoon of butter, four eggs, 
salt, one cup of sugar, one teaspoon of cinnamon, and one quart 
of stoned cherries. Bake in «i hot oven. Serve with sauce. 

BERRY PUDDING. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Fill a dish half full of berries, cover with a paste made of three 
cups of flour, two cups of milk, butter the size of an ^^'g^ one tea- 
spoon of soda and two teaspoons of cream tartar. 

BERRY PUDDING. 

MRS. F. TALCOTT, ROCKFORD, ILL. 

One tablespoon of butter, two cups of sweet milk, one cup of 
sugar, four cups of flour, two eggs, one pint of berries and three 
teaspoons of baking powder. Put into a tin and steam one hour. 

QUICK PUDDING. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Three eggs, three cups of milk and three cups of flour. Bake 
in patty-tins or cups and serve with hot sauce. A little preserve 
or jam in the bottom of the cup, is an improvement. 

STATES SHIP PUDDING. 

MRS. M. M. SWEENEY, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

One cup of molasses, one cup of suet, one cup of water, three 
cups of flour, one cup of raisins, one cup of currants, one teaspoon 
of cloves, one teaspoon of cinnamon, one teaspoon of salt, and 
nutmeg. Scald the cloth and flour it; leave a little room to swell; 
boil or steam it three hours. Serve with sauce. 
9 



130 PUDDINGS. 

SUNDERLAND PUDDING. 

MRS. R. T. WELLSLAGER. 

One quart of milk, one cup of boiled rice, the yolks of three 
eggs, a third of a cup of sugar and the grated rind of one lemon. 
Bake it, and beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth ; add a 
half pound of powdered sugar and the juice of a lemon. This 
makes an icing to spread over the pudding after it is baked; then 
brown it. Eat cold. 

SUNDERLAND PUDDING. 

JNO. W. CHASE. 

One pint of milk, six eggs, six tablespoons of flour, and salt. 
Serve with the following sauce: One ^^^., one cup of sugar and 
a half cup of butter. Beat all together fifteen minutes and grate 
nutmeg over the top. 

MACCARONI PUDDING. 

MRS. P. H. CARPENTER. 

Soak two ounces of maccaroni in cold water eighteen minutes, 
then strain it and put into one i3int of boiling milk, with one 
ounce of butter; when the maccaroni is tender, add two eggs, 
sugar and flavor. Steam one hour in a buttered tin or stewpan. 

BREAD AND BUTTER PUDDING. 

MBS. H. SCRIBNER. 

Stew tart apples as for sauce; if the apples are not sour enough 

add a little citric acid; sweeten to taste. Cut some light bread 

into thin slices and spread with butter; cover the bottom of a 

pudding-dish with the apple sauce, over that place a layer of the 

bread and butter, then another layer of apple sauce, and so on till 

he pudding is of the desired thickness, having the apple sauce 

on top. Nutmeg or other spice may be added to each layer if 

desired. 

BOILED BREAD PUDDING. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

Moisten three cups of grated bread with milk and soak till soft; 
add three eggs, one cup of sugar, fruit, and spices. Boil two or 
three hours. Eat hot with sauce. 



PUDDINGS. 131 

BREAD PUDDING. 

CORA CHASE, ROSEMOND, ILL. 

Take one pint of fine bread crumbs, pour over them one quart 
of sweet milk, stir in the yolks of five eggs, one cup of sugar, a 
half teacup of suet, chopped fine, and one cup of raisins. Flavor 
with lemon. Bake and, when cool, spread over a layer of jelly 
or preserve. Beat the whites of five eggs very light; add five 
teaspoons sugar, flavor with vanilla and put it upon the pudding. 
Brown slightly. Serve with cream sweetened and flavored. 

BREAD PUDDING. 

MRS. J. BARKER, NEW YORK CITY. 

Take one loaf of baker's bread, cut into thin slices; line the 
dish with this; fill with apples, cut in quarters, if not too large; 
cover with bread, dipped in milk, and place a dish over all to 
keep it down; bake. Eat with sauce. 

QUEEN OF PUDDINGS. 

MRS. W. B. MACK, CEDAR RAPII>S. 

Into one quart of milk put one pint of bread crumbs, butter 
the size of an ^^^t and the yolks of five eggs, well beaten. 
Sweeten and flavor as for custard, and mix well together. Beat 
the whites to a froth and add a teacup of powdered sugar. 
Spread a layer of jelly or preserve over the pudding, and then 
this frosting. Set into the oven and let it brown. 

QUEEN OF PUDDINGS. 

MRS. C. P. HOLMES AND MRS. J. G. SPRAGUE. 

One pint of fine bre'ad crumbs, one quart of milk, one cup of 
sugar, yolks of four eggs, grated rind of one lemon, and a piece 
of butter the size of an ^^^. Bake until done, but not watery, 
and spread with a layer of jelly. Whip the whites of the eggs to 
a stiff" froth and beat in one teacup of sugar and the juice of one 
lemon, then spread upon the top and brown. Good with or with- 
out sauce. Very good to be eaten cold. 



133 PUDDINGS. 

QUEEN OF PUDDINGS. 

F. E. HASKELL. 

A half pint of bread crumbs soaked in a little milk, yolks of 
six eggs, one tablespoon of butter, one quart of new milk, a little 
lemon and sugar to taste. Bake in a moderate oven. Beat the 
whites with a cup of white sugar and a little lemon extract. 
Spread over the pudding, when done, and bake a light brown. To 

be eaten cold. 

QUEEN OF PUDDINGS. 

MRS. M. R. KELLOGG. 

One pint of bread crumbs, four eggs, one cup of sugar, one 
lemon, one cup of raisins and one quart of milk. Beat the whites 
of two of the eggs to a stiff froth, add .sugar and spread over the 
top, then bake a light brown. 

BOILED PUDDING. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

One cup of molasses, one cup of water, three cups of flour, 

three tablespoons of melted bvitter, one small tablespoon of soda, 

spice to taste and use raisins and currants, if desired. Boil in 

pudding molds, from two and a half to three hours. Eat with 

sauce. 

BAKED BATTER PUDDING. 

MRS. C. H. SWEEN^EY. 

One quart of sweet milk, five tablespoons of flour, three table- 
spoons of butter, three tablespoons of sugar and three eggs. 
Scald the milk and stir in the flour; after it i.s cool, add the other 
ingredients, with spice to suit the taste. Bake about three quar- 
ters of an hour. 

BAKED BATTER PUDDING. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHARD. 

Beat six eggs, whites and yolks separately, till very light; sift 
into a pan oev o n ^ large spoons of flour, pour over this enough 
milk to make a smooth batter, then stir in the yolks, a little salt, 
and the remainder of the milk, which in all must be a quart; then 
add the whites. Butter a baking-dish, and bake in a quick oven 
three quarters of an hour. Serve with sauce or cream. 



PUDDINGS. 133 

BOILED BATTER PUDDING. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

One quart of milk, twelve tablespoons of flour, nine eggs, and 
a little salt. Beat the yolks, add the flour, stir in the milk 
slowly, beat the whites to a stiff froth and add the last thing; 
pour into a floured bag, put into boiling water, and boil two 
hours. Allow room in the bag for the pudding to swell. Serve 
with sauce. 

THANKSGIVING PUDDING. 

MRS. THEO. CARPENTER. 

Two-thirds of a cup of butter, one cup of molasses, two cups 
of milk, one teaspoon of soda, fotir eggs, two pounds of raisins, 
stoned and chopped, one pound of currants, a fourth of a pound 
of citron, a little salt, and flour to make as stiff as pound cake. 
Steam six hours. Serve with sauce. 

PERSIAN PUDDING. 

MRS. THEO. CARPENTER. 

To the pulp of six baked apples, add one ounce of rice, previ- 
ously boiled in milk and beaten smooth, one ounce of sugar, 
grated rind of one lemon and one tablespoon of the juice. Mix 
well together; then take the whites of four eggs, beaten to a stiff 
froth, put them into the other ingredients, boil up quickly, 
and pour into a warm mold. Place in a quick oven and, when 
perfectly set, turn it out and pour a custard over it, made from 
the yolks of the eggs. 

STEAMED PUDDING. 

MRS. HUDSON, NEW BEDFORD, CONN. 

Two tablespoons of butter, rubbed into three cups of sugar, 
two eggs, one cup of milk, one quart of flour, and one and a half 
teaspoons of soda dissolved in another cup of milk. Steam two 
hours, then set into the oven fifteen or twenty minutes. Make a 
stiff frosting, flavored with lemon, and turn it over the pudding, 
just before sending it to the table. One cup of chopped raisins 
is an improvement to the pudding. 



134 PUDDINGS. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

MRS. J, A, OAELISLE, ELGIN, ILL. 

Two eggs, two cups of milk, one cup of butter, two heaping 
teaspoons of soda in the milk, four even teaspoons of cream tar- 
tar in one quart of flour, and a little salt. Bake, as cake, three 
quarters of an hour; when done, and cool enough to cut without 
making heavy, split into three parts, spread with any kind of 
tart sauce or berries, and replace the layers. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

MES. J. B. STEWART AND MRS. J. P. POSTER. 

Three and a half tablespoons of butter, one cup of sugar, rub- 
bed to a cream, one egg, one pint of flour, two teaspoons of cream 
tartar, one teaspoon of soda dissolved in one cup of milk, and 
nutmeg. Bake half an hour. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

MRS. J. PARMELEE. 

One cup of sugar, one cup of sweet milk, a half cup of melted 
butter, one ^^^^i two small spoons of cream tartar, one small 
spoon of soda, and one pint of sifted flour. Bake three quarters 
of an hour. Eat with sauce. Excellent. 

FLORENTINE PUDDING. 

MRS. ROUNDS. 

Scald one quart of milk; and add the yolks of three eggs, two 
tablespoons of corn starch and three tablespoons of sugar. When 
thoroughly cooked, pour into a deep dish and flavor with lemon. 
Beat the whites to a stiff froth, add three tablespoons of sugar, and 
flavor with vanilla. Spread this over the custard, and brown 
slightly. 

SALLY LUNN PUDDING. 

MRS. KETOUUM, CHICAGO. 

Sift together one quart of flour and three teaspoons baking 
powder; rub into the flour a piece of cold butter the size of an 
^^'g^i four tablespoons of sugar, two teacups of sweet milk, two 
eggs, and salt. Serve with the following sauce: Into one and a 



PUDDINGS. 135 

half cups of hot \yater, stir a thin paste, made with two full 
tablespoons of flour, and boil five minutes; then add two cups of 
brown sugar and let it boil; stir in two spoons of butter and a 
glass of vinegar, with a good sprinkling of nutmeg, and take it up 
at once. 

AN EXCELLENT INDIAN PUDDING, WITHOUT EGGS. 

MKS, KETCHUM, CHICAGO. 

Take seven heaping tablespoons of Indian meal, a half teaspoon 
of salt, two tablespoons of butter or sweet lard, three-fourths of a 
cup of molasses, and one teaspoon of ginger. Pour into these one 
quart of milk, boiling hot; mix well, and pour into a buttered dish. 
Just as you set it into the oven, stir in a teacup of cold water, 
which will produce the same effect as eggs. Bake three-quar- 
ters of an hour in a dish that will not spread it out thin. Stir a 
few times as it begins cooking, to prevent the meal from settling. 

INDIAN PUDDING. 

MES. C. W. SIBLEY. 

Boil one quart of milk; thicken it with meal and cook like 
mush; thin it with milk, sweeten to the taste, add three eggs, 
and fruit, if desired. Bake till done and serve with sauce. 

INDIAN PUDDING. 

PHCEBE A. CARPENTER. 

One scant pint of corn meal, two handfuls of bread crumbs, a 
lump of butter the size of an ^^^^ one cup of molasses^ two table- 
spoons of brown sugar, one quart of milk, not quite a pint of 
cold water, two eggs, one cup of raisins, and a little salt. Bake 
three hours. Delicious. 

INDIAN PUDDING. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

Thicken one quart of hot milk to stiffness with meal, take off 
and stir in a piece of butter the size of two eggs, then add an- 
other quart of cold milk, then four well-beaten eggs, molasses, 
sugar, spice, and raisins, if you like. Bake three hours. 



136 PUDDINGS. 

BAKED INDIAN PUDDING. 

ANNA SCKIPPS, EUSUVILLE, ILL. 

Over two cups of white corn meal, sifted, pour slowly, one quart 
of boiling milk; when cool, add the beaten yolks of six eggs, one 
cup of sugar, one teaspoon of salt and, the last thing, the beaten 
whites of six eggs. Stir well together and bake an hour and a 
half. Serve with the following sauce: Sugar and butter, beaten 
to a cream, and flavored with lemon. 

INDIAN PUDDING. 

MES MILES. 

One cup of sifted meal, one cup of sugar, two quarts of milk, 

two tablespoons of butter or chopped suet, one cup of raisins, 

one teaspoon of mixed spices, one egg and one teaspoon of salt. 

Scald the milk and stir in the meal, cook five minutes, then take 

off the stove and add the other ingredients. If this seems too thin, 

add a little more meal the next time, according to your judgment. 

Very good. 

RHYME PUDDING. 

MES. G. M. HIPPEE. 

One quart of milk, one pint of flour, 

Salt, four eggs, and bake one hour. 

Serve with sauce. 

BOILED APPLE DUMPLINGS. 

MES. E. P. CHASE. 

Use tart, mellow apples, pared, remove the core and fill the 
place with sugar; then take one quart of flour, three teaspoons 
of baking powder, and one tablespoon (small) of shortening. Mix 
soft with sweet milk or water, and roll it out; cut into squares of 
sufficient size to roll the apples in, put each dumpling into a piece 
of old white muslin and drop them into boiling water or set them 
on a plate and place in a steamer. 

BAKED APPLE DUMPLINGS. 

MES. E. P. C. 

Make a paste not quite so rich as pie paste; pare and core fine, 
ripe cooking apples; roll out the paste, fill the apple, where the 



PUDDINGS. 137 

core was taken out, with sugar, and enclose it as in any other 
dumpling. When the desired number are made, place them in 
the baking pan, pour over one pint of boiling water, and set in a 
moderately hot oven and cook till done. Serve with hard sauce 
or sugar and cream. 

APPLE PUDDING. 

MRS. C. H. GETCHELL. 

One pint of sour milk, one tablespoon of lard, one teaspoon of 
soda, and flour to make a stiff batter. Pare and cut the applet 
fine, into a buttered dish; pour on the batter and bake until well 
done. Serve with cream and sugar or sauce. 

DELICIOUS APPLE PUDDING. 

MRS. JENNIE CARPENTER. 

Pare and chop a half dozen apples; grease a dish, cover the 
bottom half an inch deep with bread crumbs, add a lump of but- 
ter, then a layer of apples and sugar with a little nutmeg. Repeat 
this until the dish is full; then pour over the whole one teacup 
of cold water. Bake thirty minutes. No sauce is needed. 

MINUTE PUDDING. 

E. A. C. 

Put some milk over the fire, let it boil, add a little salt, and stir 
in sifted flour (like meal in mush), until thick enough. Let it boil 
two or three minutes, stirring it all the time, take from the fire, 
and flavor with lemon or vanilla. Dip a bowl into cold water and 
pour the pudding in when it is a little cool. Serve with pulver- 
ized sugar and rich cream. 

OXFORD PUDDING, 

MRS. PHILIP SKINNER. 

One-half pint of bread crumbs, one pint of milk, six eggs, two 
ounces of butter, a half pint of cream, a half pound of currants, and 
sugar and nutmeg to the taste. Beat the yolks of eggs light, add 
them to the bread, milk and sugar, then the cream and fruit; lastly 
whip the whites to a stiff froth, and stir in gradually. Serve with 
sauce. 



138 PUDDINGS. 

JELLY PUDDING. 

MES. PHILIP SKINNER. 

Two cups of sugar, two cups of flour, six eggs, a half cup of 
milk, one teaspoon of soda and two teaspoons of cream tartar. 
Bake in a long tin; when done, spread with jelly and roll up. 
Serve with boiled sauce. 

APPLE PUDDING. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Pare and quarter, or slice, enough tart apples to fill two-thirds 
of a stew-pan. ]\lake a crust as for baking powder biscuit (only 
a little richer); roll it half an inch thick and spread over the ap- 
ples, which should have enough water to keep from burning; then 
put a tin basin over the top to keep in the steam and allow the 
dough to rise. When done, turn out upon a platter and eat with 

sauce. 

APPLE PUDDING. 

MRS. JENNIE CARPENTER. 

Pare and core six tart apples; cook them in a half teacup of 
water till they begin to soften; place them in a pudding dish, 
putting sugar in the apples where the cores were taken out. 
Beat eight eggs with four tablespoons of sugar, add three pints 
of milk, pour over the apples and bake a half hour. 

APPLE PUDDING. 

MRS. CARPENTER. 

Rub one-fourth of a pound of butter into one pound of flour, 
and add sufficient water to make a paste. Sprinkle the pudding 
bag with flour, roll out the paste and lay inside of the bag. Fill 
the crust with apples, pared and cored, draw the crust together, 
cut ofi" any extra crust about the folds, tie the bag tight and put 
into boiling water. Boil two hours. Serve with sauce. 

EVE'S PUDDING. 

MRS. JENNIE CARPENTER. 

Six apples chopped fine, six ounces of suet, six eggs, six ounces 
of crackers, six ounces of sugar, six ounces of currants, a little 
salt and nutmeg. Boil three hours. Serve with sauce. 



PUDDINGS. 139 

AMHERST PUDDING. 

MRS. HUDSON. 

One cup of molasses, with soda enough to ferment it, one cup 
of milk, one cup of suet, three cups of flour, two cups of raisins, 
a little salt, cinnamon and cloves. Boil from two to three hours. 

RICE PUDDING. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHAED. 

Boil a half pint of rice, drain off the water, let the rice dry and 
cool; then mix with it two ounces of butter, four ounces of sugar, 
a quart of rich milk, and one tablespoon of nutmeg and cinna- 
mon. Beat four or five eggs very light and add to the mixture. 
Bake one hour in a deep dish. Eat when cold. 

RICE PUDDING. 

CPajlI^ ^^^' ^' ^' HOLMES. 

XiBCO very small cupf of rice, one cup of butter, one cup of su- 
gar, one cup of raisins, one quart of new milk and a little nutmeg; 
put all together, bake very slowly three hours and stir often. 

RICE PUDDING. 

MRS. STRICKLAND. 

Wash one cup of rice, put it into cold water; when scarcely 
half done, stir in three pints of milk, two eggs, butter the size of 
a walnut, and a tea-cup of raisins; flavor with lemon. Pour into 
pudding dish and bake forty-five minutes, or till it will not leave 
a knife blade milky. 

RICE MORINGO PUDDING. 

MRS. S. P. WISNER, CEDAR RAPIDS. 

One tea-cup of rice, boiled in one -fett^-^ofmilk, three tablespoons 
of sugar, the peel of one lemon grated, the yolks of four eggs, a 
small piece of butter and a little salt. Pour the foregoing into 
a dish and bake. Take the white of four eggs beaten to a stiff 
froth, with nine tablespoons of sugar and juice of a lemon; spread 
this over the rice, and set into the oven long enough to brown. 



140 PUDDINGS. 

RICE PUDDING. 

MES. JAMES m'cLURE, BEAEDSTOWN, ILL. 

' ■ ;r ' * 

One quart of milk; one tedcup of rice, a little salt, raisins and 
flavor. Stir occasionally (to keep the rice from settling) till you 
wish a crust to form. 

RICE CUPS. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Put one pint of rice, swelled till quite dry, into three pints of milk, 
and boil till quite soft; just as it boils add a piece of butter the 
size of a walnut and two tablespoons of rose or peach water. 
Wet the cups and fill them. When cold, turn out and serve with 
boiled custard or sugar and cream. 

POOR MAN'S PLUM PUDDING. 

One cup of molasses, one cup of sweet milk, a half cup of melt- 
ed butter, one pound of chopped raisins, one teaspoon of saleratus, 
a little salt arid flour enough to make it of the consistency of 
pound cake. Boil four hours, or steam it. Serve with the follow- 
ing sauce: A half pint of boiling water, a half tea cup of butter, 
one teacup of sugar and the grated rind and juice of one lemon. 

PUFFS. 

MRS. CLEGDORN. 

One quart of milk, eight tablespoons of flour, and four eggs; 
mix yolks, flour and milk together, add a little salt and stir in the 
whites, beaten to a stiif froth, the last thing. Bake in teacups, 
in a quick oven, and serve with sauce, as follows: One cup of 
sugar, a half cup of butter, the yolk of an egg and one teaspoon 
of corn starch. Beat to a cream; then add one pint of boiling 
water, the beaten white of the egg and the grated rind and juice 
of one lemon. 

PUFFS. 

MRS. M. ANDREWS. 

Three cups of milk, three cups of flour, and three eggs. Bake 
in cups, in a hot oven. Serve with sauce. 



PUDDINGS. 141 

PUFFS. 

MRS. C. W. NELSON". 

Three eggs well beaten, one tablespoon of flour, one pint of 
sweet milk. Bake in cups in a quick oven. Serve with sauce. 

SAGO PUDDING. 

MRS. C. P. HOLMES. 

Soak one cup of sago,' in warm water, two or three hours; then 
pare and core eight or ten tart apples, of medium size; lay them 
in a pudding-dish and pour the sago over them. Steam till the 
apples are tender and serve with sugar and cream. 

SAGO PUDDING. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

Soak six tablespoons of sago two hours in cold water, then boil 
soft in one quart of milk and add four spoons of butter, six eggs, 
six spoons of sugar, currants and raisins. Bake, in a buttered 
dish, three quarters of an hour. 

APPLE SAGO PUDDING. 

MRS, HUDSON, NEW BEDJFORD, CONN. 

Pare and core the apples, put them in a dish with sugar and 
strew over them the rind of one lemon. Wash six tablespoons of 
sago in cold water, drain it dry, then pour on one quart of boiling 
water, adding a piece of butter; place the sago on the back part 
of the stove, where it will keep a little warm; let it stand one 
hour, then pour it over the apples and bake till the apples are 
done. Serve with sauce, or cream and sugar. 

BIRDS' NEST PUDDING. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

Pare and core eight or ten large apples, fill the middle with 
sugar, and make a batter of one quart of milk, six eggs, five 
spoons of flour, and a little salt. Pour it over the apples and 
bake three quarters of an hour. Eat with sauce. 



143 PUDDINGS. 

POP-OVER PUDDING. 

S. D. WARING.* 

One quart of milk, one pint of flour, and five eggs. Bake in 
oups. To be eaten with sauce. 

GREEN CORN PUDDING. 

MRS. H. SPRAGUE, OSHKOSH, WIS. 

Three cups of grated corn, two eggs, three tablespoons of sugar, 
one quart of milk, salt and butter. Bake two hours. 

BAKED CORN PUDDING. 

MRS. ,T. CARPENTER. 

One dozen ears of young corn grated, six eggs and one quart 
of milk. Beat the eggs very light, then add the milk; season the 
corn slightly with salt; mix all together, with two ounces of but- 
ter; butter the pudding- dish, and pour in the batter. Bake in a 
quick oven and eat hot with butter and sugar. 

POTATO PUDDING. 

MRS. .lOSEPH KUHN. 

Grate a large soup-plate of cold, boiled potatoes; beat one cup 
of sugar and the yolks of eight eggs together, and mix with the 
potatoes; beat the whites to a froth and stir in lightly; flavor to 
the taste. Bake one hour or boil two hours. 

BOILED POTATO PUDDING. ' 

MRS. .1. CARPENTER, 

To eight potatoes, boiled and mashed, add, while warm, a 
fourth of a pound of butter, and when cool, four eggs, one gill of 
milk, flour enough to make a stifi" batter and a little salt. This 
will make a large pudding. Flour the inside of the pudding-bag; 
put in the pudding, which must be as stiff" as soft dough; leave 
two or three inches at the toj) for the pudding to swell. Boil two 
hours; dip the bag into cold water; turn out and serve with 
sauce. 



PUDDINGS. 143 

BAKED POTATO PUDDING. 

Two pounds of potatoes, boiled and mashed, one pound of 
sugar and three-fourths of a pound of butter beaten together, 
seven eggs, juice of one orange and the rind, grated, and a half 
pound of currants. Bake in a crust. 

UNION PUDDING. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

One cup of sugar, two cups of milk, three tablespoons of flour, 
one tablespoon of butter, two eggs, one nutmeg, and fruit if you 
wish. Bake like tarts, without an upper crust. 

CUSTARD TAPIOCA. 

MRS. J. PARMELEE. 

Soak six tablespoons of tapioca in one quart of milk three 
hours; add a little butter and four eggs, well beaten; bake in a 
buttered dish fifteen or twenty minutes. Serve with sauce. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

MRS. C. H. GETCHELL. 

Boil one cup of tapioca, soaked over night in cold water, with 
one cup of jelly or preserve, until thoroughly mixed together. 
Cool in molds and serve with cream. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

MISS FANNIE PAGE, IOWA CITY. 

Soak one cup of tapioca in one cup of cold water, over night; 
in the morning, add three cups of cold water; set it on the stove 
and soak slowly till transparent; slice very thin one-half of a large 
lemon; boil separately in a little water till tender; add this to 
the tapioca, with sugar and salt to suit the taste. Beat the whites 
of three eggs to a stiff froth, adding a half pound of powdered 
sugar and the juice of a half lemon. Spread this over the top of 
the pudding; set it into the oven to brown and serve cold with 
cream. Fine for Sunday dinner. 



144 PUDDINGS. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

MRS. W. H. SIBLEY. 

Soak a teacup of tapioca in one and a half pints of water over 
night; pare six tart apples, take out the cores and fill the holes 
with sugar; flavor with nutmeg and pour in one teacup of water; 
bake till soft, then pour the tapioca over them and bake all one 
hour. Eat with hard sauce. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

One cup of tapioca, soaked in two quarts of water over night, 
juice and rind of one lemon, one cup of raisins and one quart of 
apples. Cook the apples till tender, mash them smooth; put the 
raisins in when nearly done. Eat cold with sweetened cream. 

PARADISE PUDDING. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

Three eggs, three apples, a fourth of a pound of bread crumbs, 
three ounces of sugar, three ounces of currants, salt, and the juice 
and rind of a half lemon. Pare the apples, core and chop them; 
beat the eggs, then beat them thoroughly with the apples. Mix 
all together; pour the pudding into a buttered mold; tie down 
with a cloth and boil one and a half hours. Serve with sauce. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

MRS. n. SPRAGUE, OSHKOSH, WIS. 

Boil one quart of milk; add, while boiling, two ounces of grated 
chocolate, stirring a few minutes; cool, and put in six eggs, except 
three whites. Sweeten to the taste and flavor with vanilla. Bake 
like a custard. Cool and frost. 

COCOANUT PUDDING. 

MRS. H. SPRAGUE, OSHKOSH, WIS. 

One quart of milk, four eggs, eight butter crackers rolled fine, 
one cup of sugar and one cocoanut. Bake till done. 



PUDDINGS. 145 

COCOANUT PUDDING, 

MRS. T. W. CARPENTER. 

One cocoanut, three pints of milk, sugar to the taste, two soda 
crackers, four eggs and a little salt. Roll the crackers and mix 
them with the grated cocoanut; boil the milk and pour over the 
cocoanut and crackers. 

COCOANUT PUDDING. 

MRS. IICrDSO>f, NEW BEDFORD, CONN. 

Grate half a cocoanut, stir it into a good custard and bake in a 
buttered pan. Make the custard of four eggs to one quart of 
milk; sweeten to the taste. Serve with sauce. This may be 
baked with an under crust and requires from thirty to forty min- 
utes in a quick oven. 

LEMON PUDDING. 

MRS. F. A. TALCOTT, ROCKPORD, ILL. 

Two large lemons, one pound of sugar, four ounces of butter, 
one pint of milk and eight eggs. Grate the rind and squeeze the 
juice of the lemons; stir the butter and sugar to a cream; add 
the yolks well beaten, part of the whites beaten to a stiff froth, 
then the milk and, at last, the lemons. Bake in a moderate oven 
three-fourths of an hour; then frost with the remaining whites, 
into which stir a little sugar; brown the whole. Serve cold, 
without sauce. 

LEMON PUDDING. 

MRS. C. H. SWEENEY. 

Five eggs, a half pound of white sugar, four ounces of butter, 
two-thirds of a pint of new milk and the grated rind and the 
juice of a lemon. Put paste in a deep pie-tin and bake half an 
hour. 

LEMON PUDDING. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

A half pound of butter, half a pound of sugar, two ounces of 
stale sponge cake rubbed fine, five eggs, and grated rind and the 
juice of one lemon. Beat the butter and sugar together, then 
add the cake, eggs, and at last the lemon. Line your dish with a 
rich paste and bake in a quick oven. When done and cool, sift 
sugar over it. 

lO 



146 PUDDINGS. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 

MRS. F. Y. STOWE. 

Pare and cut in small pieces six oranges; sprinkle over them 
from a half to a whole cup of sugar. Take a pint of milk and 
let it come to a boil; take the yolks of three eggs, two tablespoons 
of corn starch and a half teacup of sugar; mix together and pour 
into the boiling milk, stirring until it is very smooth and well 
cooked. When cool pour it over the oranges, and upon this put 
the beaten whites with enough sugar to make a thick frosting. 
Put on ice until ready to be served. 

FRUIT PUDDING, WITHOUT EGGS. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Take two pounds of sifted bread crumbs, two tablespoons of 
flour, two teaspoons of ground allspice, two of cloves, four of cin- 
namon and one pound of hrown sugar; chop one pound of suet 
very fine and mix all thoroughly; add one and a half pounds of 
nice seeded raisins, also one and a half pounds of well washed 
currants; "in'oisten the whole with a little milk — about a teacupful 
— and mix well. If desired to have it all in one pudding, butter 
a three quart tin pail and press the mixture in tightly, or it will 
not turn out again in good shape; then spread some flour over 
the top, lay on a wet cloth and put on a tin cover; place the pail 
in a kettle of boiling water and let it boil rapidly for four hours, 
then take it up but do not turn it out; the next day, or when 
wanted, put the pail in a moderately warm oven for two hours, 
then turn on the dish in which it is to be served. This can be 
divided and make two puddings. Sauce: One-half pound of but- 
ter, one large tablespoon of flour and a little salt; boil in a pint 
of water; sweeten and flavor to the taste. 

WASHINGTON PUDDING. • 

MRS. C. H. SWEENEY. 

One cup of sugar, one cup of flour, whites of four eggs, yolks of 
two, and one teaspoon of baking powder. Bake this in a shallow 
pan; when done and very hot, split the cake, spread with a hard 
sauce, made of butter and sugar, flavored with the grated rind 
and juice of one lemon; spread the top also; put upon a platter, 
set into the oven for five minutes and serve. 



PUDDINGS. 147 

CRACKER PUDDING. 

MRS. WM. A. ROLLINS. 

Six crackers, soaked in one quart of milk, one cup suet, one 
cup raisins, one cup sugar, and the yolks of four eggs; salt, and 
flavor with cinnamon; bake an hour and a half ; beat the whites 
of four eggs with one cup of powdered sugar and set into the 
oven to brown. Make the sauce as follows: Two cups sugar, 
melted to a syrup, the juice of a lemon and the white of an ^^^.^ 
beartento a froth. 

TELEGRAPH PUDDING. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

One cup of sugar, one large spoon of butter, two eggs, one cup 
of sour milk, three cups of flour and a half teaspoon of soda. 
Bake in a buttered tin twenty minutes. Serve with hard sauce. 

HOME PUDDING. 

J. p. F. 

Six crackers powdered fine, one spoon of flour, one cup of 
brown sugar, six eggs, raisins, currants, and mixed spices to the 
taste. Bake, and serve with sauce. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

MARY E. HARRIS. 

Dissolve three tablespoons of corn starch in a little cold water; ^ojiir 
pour one pint of boiling water over it; stir in -the whites of 
three eggs, beaten stiff, and steam ten minutes. Serve with 
sauce made as follows: Yolks of three eggs, one cup of su- 
gar, one cup of milk and a piece of butter the size of a walnut. 
Boil and flavor. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

MISS MINNIE SCRIBNER, 

To one box of Cox's gelatine put one pint of cold water (in cold 
weather two pints); let it stand till dissolved, with the juice and 
rind of three lemons (lemons sliced) ; add one quart of boiling water; 
strain through a jelly bag and turn into a mold. When cold, cover 
with very light frosting. Eaten with or without cream. One 
lemon and citric acid can be used instead of three lemons. 



148 SAUCES FOR PUDDINGS. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

MRS. COSKERY AND MRS. U. SPRAGUE. 

Soak a half box of gelatine in one cup of cold water one hour; 
squeeze the juice of two lemons and grate the rind; pour one pint 
of boiling water over the gelatine, stir it up, then add the lemons 
and two cups of sugar; stir it up again and strain it through a 
jelly bag or sieve. Beat the whites of three Q^^r^ lightly; when 
the gelatine is cool, stir them in and beat till thick, perhaps one 
hour. For sauce, make a custard of yolks of five eggs, the whites 
of two, one quart of milk, and one cup of sugar; flavor with va- 
nilla. 



^^ude^ ioi f^uddiqg^. 




HARD SAUCE. 

^^g^lj^NE cup of very light brown sugar, one half cup of butter, 
half the grated rind and the juice of one lemon. Beat 
until very light. Vanilla may be substituted for the 
lemon. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

MRS. J. B. LYMAN, ROCKFORD, ILL. 

Stir butter and sugar to a cream, with a little corn starch. Pour 
boiling water over and flavor. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

MRS. W. S. PEITCHARD. 

Three-fourths of a cup of butter and one cup of sugar beaten to a 
cream, one cup of boiling water and one heaping teaspoon of flour, 
made into starch. Let it boil and, just before serving, pour slowly 
into the butter and sugar, stirring continually, until it is of the 
right consistency. Flavor to the taste. 



SAUCES FOR PUDDINGS. 149 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

MRS, G. R. OSGOOD. 

One cup of sugar, a piece of butter, and a tablespoon of flour, 
wet in cold water. Add boiling water, set it on the stove and 
boil. Flavor to the taste. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

MRS. COSKERY. 

One cup of sugar, one e^^., one tablespoon of butter and one 
cup of milk scalded and turned over. Put it upon the stove and 
scald again. Flavor to the taste. 

FOAM SAUCE. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

One and a fourth cups of sugar, a fourth of a cup of butter, and 
the yolk of one Q^g- Beat well together, then add the white of the 
Qg,g., beaten to a stiff froth. Flavor to taste. Put in one cup of 
boiling water the last thing. 

FOAM SAUCE. 

MRS. E. T. WELLSLAGER. 

A half cup of white sugar, a fourth of a cup of butter and one 
tablespoon of corn starch; mix together and beat to a cream; set 
upon the stove, and add boiling water until it is of the right con- 
sistency. Flavor with lemon or anything preferred. 

HOT SAUCE. 

V 

MRS. E. S. SPEED, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

One tea-cup of sugar, a half cup of butter, one even tablespoon 
of flour, and one egg; beat till very light; then add one pint of boil- 
ing water and let it scald; flavor with lemon or vanilla. Grate 
nutmeg over the top. 

CREAM SAUCE. 

MRS. M. D. STRICKLAND, MT. CARROLL, ILL. 

One cup of sugar and a half cup of thick sour cream. Beat 
ten minutes and grate nutmeg over it. Good for Indian puddings. 



150 SAUCES FOE PUDDINGS. 

EXCELLENT SAUCE FOR BOILED RICE. 

MRS. G. R. OSGOOD. 

Beat the whites of three eggs with sufficient sugar to make them 
quite sweet; add one teacup of cream, and the juice and peel of 
two lemons. If lemons cannot be had use tartaric acid. 

LEMON SAUCE. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

One and a half cups of sugar, three-fourths of a cup of butter, 
one egg, and the grated rind and juice of one lemon. Stir a tea- 
spoon of flour into one cup of boiling water; mix the egg^ butter 
and sugar together thoroughly; add them to the above and put 
in the juice and rind of the lemon last. 

LEMON SAUCE. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

Mix together some melted butter and water; add three ounces 
of sugar and the juice and grated rind of a half lemon — the other 
half, free from skin, sliced thin and cut into quarters. Let it boil 
up; then serve. 



C^KS^g SjSfiD idiKG^^. 



^[^^WLWAYS have good flour, and sift it. Be careful to have 



11 



!f fresh eggs, and beat them light. Use good sugar and 
^^ °^ sweet butter, as poor butter will give the cake a bad 
flavor. Beat cake in an earthen bowl, with a wooden spoon, 
or paddle. Have the oven at the right heat when it 
1 is ready to put in — too cold an oven will- make cake heavy. 
Wash currants (after picking them over) in a sieve set in a large 
pan of water; rub them well with the hands, changing the water 
two or three times; drain dry, then pour them on a coarse towel, 
and rub well; put back into a sieve and set out to dry. A quan- 
tity of currants can be prepared at once, and used whenever you 
wish. Raisins should be stoned before using. Citron should be 
sliced very thin for cake, and put in alternate layers with the 
dough. 

For fried cakes, dissolve the sugar in the milk, to prevent the 
cakes from absorbing the fat. In using baking powder, sift it in 
a half-cup of flour; mix well and sprinkle in the last thing. 

ICING. 

MBS. G. K. OSGOOD. 

White of one egg, nine teaspoons of sugar and one teaspoon 
of corn starch. Beat till stiff. 

BOILED ICINGS. 

MKS. E. S. SPEED, RCSHVILLE, ILL. 

To one egg well beaten, take one tumbler of sugar in lumps^ 
and two tablespoons of water. Boil the sugar and water together 
till the water boils out. Beat this syrup into the white of the 
egg. Flavor with vanilla or lemon, 

151 



152 



LOAF CAKES. 



FROSTING. 

MKS. PARKS, GRAND HAVEN. 

I have found an improvement on the old method, which takes 
much less sugar and labor. The white of one egg is sufficient for 
a cake. Break it into a bowl; add one-half cup of sugar and 
beat till very stiff, then flavor; stir in a little corn starch and 
sugar until it is just firm enough to hold its own and spread over 
Ihe cake quickly, finishing as you go. 

FROSTING. 

MRS. R. T. AVELLSLAGER., 

Two eggs, one cup of coffee sugar and (M*© tablespoon of cold 
water poured over the sugar; whip the whites of the eggs to a 
froth, mix the sugar and water in a deep bowl and add the eggs; 
beat until stiff. 

FROSTING. 

E. A. C. 

One cup of sugar and four tablespbons of water boiled togeth- 
er; after taking from the fire stir in the whites of two well-beaten 
eggs; beat well together, then frost the cakes. 



JL<Ocif Ccike^. 



ELECTION CAKE. 

^§1'^ OUR pounds of flour and enough warm milk to make a 
^ stiff batter, one and a half pounds of butter and two and 
^^ a half pounds of sugar. Stir butter and sugar well to- 
gether; take half the mixture and beat into the batter and 
one pint of good yeast; beat thoroughly and let it stand 
one night; in the morning add the remainder of the butter 
and sugar and six eggs, beaten very light, then a half 
pound of flour, two pounds of raisins, one pound of currants, 
grated lemon peel, cinnamon, mace and a small teaspoon of cloves. 
Let it rise twice before putting it into pans. The more this cake 
is beaten the lighter it is. 




LOAF CAKES. 153 

ELECTION CAKE. 

MRS. WM. FINCH. 

One cup of yeast, one cup of sweet milk, one cup of lard, one 
cup of sugar, one egg and flour enough to make a stiff batter. 
Mix these at night and in the morning add two cups of sugar, 
two eggs, one cup of butter, one teaspoon of mace, one table- 
spoon of cinnamon, flour enough to make it as stiff as other cake, 
raisins and currants. This makes three good sized cakes. Let 
it rise in the pans an hour or more; bake in a moderate oven and 
ice when done. 

MRS. CAPENTER'S WEDDING CAKE. 

Fifteen e^gs, whites and yolks beaten separately, one and a half 
pounds of butter, one and a half pounds of sugar, one and a half 
pounds of flour, three pounds of seeded raisins, three pounds of 
currants, one and a half pounds of citron, a half pint of molasses, 
one ounce of ground mace and one ounce of cinnamon. Very 
fine. 

WEDDING CAKE. 

MRS. HENRY SCRIBNER. 

Ten eggs, one pound of butter, one pound of sugar, one pound 
of flour, four pounds of raisins after stoning, four pounds of cur- 
rants after washing, two pounds of citron, one ounce of nutmeg, 
one ounce of cinnamon and a fourth of an ounce of cloves. 

MRS. DODGE'S WEDDING CAKE. 

MRS. A. Y. KAWSON. 

Four pounds of flour, three pounds of brown sugar, twenty- 
seven eggs, five pounds of stoned raisins, five pounds of currants, 
one pound of citron, a half pound of preserved orange peel, 
allspice, cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, mace and three teaspoons of 
soda. 

MRS. HARMON'S FRUIT CAKE. 

One coffeecup of sugar, two-thirds of a teacup of butter, two- 
thirds of a teacup of molasses, one teacup of buttermilk, spice 
and fruit of all kinds, one ^^^ and the white of another, one tea- 
spoon of soda and flour to make a stiff batter. 



154 LOAF CAKES. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

MRS. C. A. PAEROTT, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Two and a half pounds of flour, two and a half pounds of sugar, 
two and a half pounds of butter, twenty-five eggs, three pounds 
of raisins, six pounds of currants, one pound of citron, one and a 
half ounces of nutmeg and three-fourths of an ounce of mace. 
Mix like pound-cake; rub the fruit into flour. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

MRS. DR. HAMILTON, DARLINGTOX, WIS. 

Two cups of brown sugar, one cup of butter, one cup of lard, 
one cup of sweet milk, four eggs, four cups of flour, two teaspoons 
of cream tartar, one teaspoon of soda, one cup of molasses, one 
pound of raisins, a half pound of citron, one tablespoon of cin- 
namon, a half teaspoon of cloves and one nutmeg. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

MRS. T. A. PARKER, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

One pound of butter, one pound of flour, one pound of sugar, 
ten eggs, three pounds of raisins, three pounds of currants, one 
pound of citron, one pound of sliced figs, one pound of blanched 
almonds sliced, three tablespoons of cinnamon, one teaspoon of 
cloves, one nutmeg, one teaspoon of mace and three large tea- 
spoons of baking powder. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Twelve eggs well beaten, one pound of butter, one pound of 
brown sugar, one pound of sifted flour, a half cup of molasses, 
three pounds of stoned raisins, three pounds of currants, one pound 
of citron, two tablespoons of cinnamon, a small teaspoon of cloves, 
grated peel of one lemon, a half nutmeg and rose essence. Beat 
the yolks of the eggs, butter and sugar together until light; whip 
the whites to a stiff froth and stir in alternately with the flour; 
add the spices, currants and raisins; put a layer of dough into the 
pan, next a layer of citron sliced thin, and so alternately until .all 
is in. Bake four hours. 



LOAF CAKES. 155 

FRUIT CAKE. 

MRS, K. T. WELLSLAGEE. 

One pound of butter, one pound of brown sugar, twelve eggs, 
two pounds of raisins, two pounds of currants, one pound of cit- 
ron, a tablespoon of mace and cinnamon, a teaspoon of cloves and 
nutmeg, extract of lemon or rose and one pound of flour. Dredge 
the fruit in one-half the flour and brown the remainder. 

CHEAP FRUIT CAKE. 

MKS. F. CORNING. 

One ^^'g., one cup of sugar, one and a half cups of flour, a half 
cup of butter, two-thirds of a cup of currants, one cup of raisins, 
a half teaspoon of soda, three tablespoons of sour milk, two table- 
spoons of yeast, one teaspoon each of cinnamon, cloves and nut- 
meg. 

WHITE FRUIT CAKE. 

MRS. C. C. HOWELL. 

Two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, three-fourths of a cup of 
sweet milk, two eggs, one teaspoon of soda, two teaspoons of cream 
tartar, one pound of raisins, one pound of currants, nutmeg, and 
flour to make quite stiff". Bake slowly. 

WHITE FRUIT CAKE. 

MISS KITTY ALLEN. 

Whites of sixteen eggs, one pound of white sugar, one pound 
of butter, one pound of flour, one teaspoon of extract of bitter 
almonds, one pound of blanched almonds (sweet), two ounces of 
bitter almonds, one pound of citron cut fine, one cocoanut grated; 
pound the almonds in a mortar with a little rose Avater to prevent 
oiling. Whisk the eggs until they will stand alone; cream the 
butter, into which stir the flour until quite stiff"; then add alter- 
nately egg, sugar and flour, reserving a little for fruit, till all are 
well combined; flavor with vanilla or extract of bitter almonds; 
flour the fruit, and stir it in last. Bake in a slow oven, using great 
caution not to burn it. Frost. 



156 LOAF CAKES. 

BLACK CAKE. 

MRS. J. B. MILLER. 

One pound of flour, one pound of butter, one and a half pounds 
of sugar, three pounds of raisins, two pounds of currants, ten eggs, 
two nutmegs, a half ounce of cloves, a half ounce of mace, three- 
fourths of an ounce of cinnamon and a half teaspoon of saleratus. 

HARRISON CAKE. 

MRS, C. B. WILLIS. 

One coffecup of molasses, one and a half cups of butter, one and 
a half cups of milk, two teaspoons of soda, four eggs, two cups 
of sugar, a fourth of a pound of citron, a half pound of raisins, 
one spoon of cloves, one teaspoon of nutmeg, one teaspoon of cin- 
namon and six cofFeecups of flour. This will make two large 
loaves. Bake two hours. It will keep a year. 

HARRISON CAKE. 

MISS F, E, HASKELL. 

Two cups of sugar, one cup of molasses, one cup of butter, one 
cup of sweet milk, five cups of flour, four eggs, one teaspoon of 
soda, spice and all kinds of fruit. 

BRIDGEPORT CAKE. 

MRS. HART. 

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three and a fourth cups 
of flour, four eggs, one cup of milk or cream, juice and rind of 
one lemon, two teaspoons of baking powder and two cups of 
currants. 

RAISED CAKE. 

MRS. A. Y, RAWSON, 

One coflfeecup of sponge, two eggs, one cup of sugar, a half cup 
of butter, a half cup of cream, one cup of raisins, a half teaspoon 
soda and spices to the taste. Mix quite stiff with flour. 

RAISED CAKE. 

MRS. HUDSON, NEW BEDFORD. 

Five cups of bread dough, three cups of sugar, one cup of but- 
ter, three eggs, one bowl of raisins and spice to taste. 



LOAF CAKES. 157 

MRS. SIBLEY'S RAISED CAKE. 

One pint of new milk, a half cup of good yeast, one cup of 
shortening, three eggs, two cups of brown sugar, spices of all kinds, 
and fruit. Stir stiif with flour; let it rise; and bake slowly for 
one hour. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

MRS. R. T. WELLSLAGER. 

Four eggs, two coffeecups of sugar, two coffeecups of molasses, 
one coffeecup of butter, one cofi"eecup of strong cofi'ee, five coffee- 
cups of flour, two teaspoons of cloves, two teaspoons of nutmeg, 
two teaspoons of cinnamon, two teaspoons of baking powder, 
three-quarters of a pound of raisins and three-quarters of a pound 
of currants. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

MRS. C. D. SPRAGUE. 

One cup of sugar, one cup of butter, one cup of molasses, one 
cup of cold coffee, five cups of flour, one ^^^., one teaspoon of 
cloves, one teaspoon of nutmeg, one teaspoon of cinnamon, one 
teaspoon of soda and one pint of raisins. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

MRS. E. S. SPEED, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

One coffeecup of molasses, one coffeecup of coffee, one and a 
half coffeecups of brown sugar, one coffeecup of butter, five eggs, 
four cups of flour, one teaspoon of soda, one pound of raisins, one 
pound of currants, one pound of citron, three tablespoons of cin- 
namon, one teaspoon of cloves and one nutmeg. 

RICH COFFEE CAKE. " 

MRS. T. A. PARKER, RUSUVILLE, ILL. 

One and a half cups of butter, two cups of sugar, four cups of 
flour, one cup of cold coffee, four eggs, one nutmeg, two table- 
spoons of cinnamon, one teaspoon of cloves, one teaspoon of soda 
mixed in flour, one cup of molasses, one pound of raisins, one 
pound of currants and one-half pound of citron. 



158 LOAF CAKES. 

PORK CAKE. NO. 1. 

MRS. C. B. WILLIS. 

Pour over one pound of pork chopped fine, one cup of boiling 
water, and add two cups of molasses, one cup of sugar, two tea- 
spoons of soda, spices to the taste, one and a half or two pounds 
of raisins, one pound of citron, two eggs and flour to make as 
stiflP as pound cake. 

PORK FRUIT CAKE. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHARD. 

Pour over one pound of fat pork cut fine, one pint of boiling 
water, and add two and a half cups of molasses and one cup of 
brown sugar or three cups of molasses, raisins, currants and cit- 
ron, one tablespoon of ground cinnamon, one tablespoon of ground 
cloves, one small teaspoon of soda and, if you use the cake imme- 
diately, two eggs. 

FRENCH LOAF CAKE. 

MISS EMMA DEPUB, GENOA, ILL. 

One pound of sugar, a half pound of butter, one pound of flour, 
one cup of new milk, five eggs, one pound of raisins, and spice to 
the taste. 

LEMON CURRANT CAKE. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

One pound of sugar, one pound of butter, one pound of flour, 
nine eggs leaving out two yolks, the juice of one lemon and the 
grated peel of two and two cups of currants. Rub the butter and 
sugar together till very light, then add the yolks of the eggs well 
beaten, and a part of the flour; beat the whites to a stiS" froth 
and add them with the remainder of the flour; beat well together; 
cover the bottom of the pan with white paper and butter; 
bake in a rather slow oven. 

ALMOND CAKE. 

MRS THEO. CARPENTER. 

Beat one pound of sugar with the yolks of twelve eggs; whip 
the whites of nine eggs to a stiff froth and add to the above; then 



LOAF CAKES. 159 

add one pound of flour, a half pound of sweet almonds, a half 
pound of bitter almonds, blanched and pounded with rose water 
to a cream, and six tablespoons of thick cream. Use the reserved 
whites of the eggs for frosting. This makes one large or two small 
cakes. 

CITRON OR ALMOND CAKE. 

MRS. K. T. AVEl.LSLAGER. 

Whites of ten eggs well beaten, a half cup of butter, a half cup 
of milk, one cup of sugar, two small teaspoons of baking powder, 
two cups of flour. Put citron or almond in layers of about one- 
half pound (scant weight), 

WALNUT CAKE. 

MISS EMMA DEPUE, GENOA, ILL. 

One pound of flour, one pound of sugar, three-fourths of a 
pound of butter, one and a half pounds of stoned raisins, one nut- 
meg, a half cup of milk, six eggs, the meats from two quarts of 
walnuts and a half teaspoon of soda. Beat the whites to a stiif 
froth and add them the last thing. Bake in a quick oven, but 
not too hot. 

HICKORY-NUT CAKE. 

Miss EMMA DEPUE, GENOA, ILL. 

Whites of eight eggs, three cups of sugar, one cup of butter, 
one cup of sweet milk, two and a half cups of flour, one cup of 
corn starch, two teaspoons of baking powder in a little milk and 
a large pint of hickory- nut meats stirred in the last thing. 

HICKORY-NUT CAKE. 

MRS. M. m'cAIN. 

Whites of twelve eggs, three large coffeecups of white sugar, 
one coiFeecup of butter, one coff'eecup of milk, five and a half 
coffeecups of flour, two teaspoons of baking powder and a pint 
of nut meats. Bake in layers as for jelly cake, with icing between, 
or in a large cake. If baked in a loaf, the cake will be much im- 
proved by adding a pound of raisins. 



160 LOAF CAKES. 

HICKORY-NUT CAKE. 

MRS. L. A. PRITCHARD. 

One and a half cups of sugar, one cup of butter, two cups of 
flour, three-fourths of a cup of sweet milk, whites of four eggs, 
one heaping teaspoon of baking powder and one large cup of nut 
meats. 

SHREWSBURY CAKE. 

MRS. S. P. WISNER, CEDAR RAPIDS. 

Two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, a half cup of milk, four 
eggs, one-third of a teaspoon of soda and three cups of flour. 
Bake in flat tins and use frosting flavored with peach water. 

CLOVE CAKE. 

MRS. HENRY SCRIBNER. 

One pound of flour, one pound of sugar, a half pound of butter, 
four eggs, one cup of sweet milk, one teaspoon of baking powder, 
one teaspoon of cloves, one nutmeg and one teaspoon of strong 
cinnamon. • 

SPICE CAKE. 

MRS. HUDSON". 

One cup of sugar, one cup of butter, four cups of flour, one cup 
of molasses, two eggs, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves and one tea- 
spoon of soda. Put in the molasses the last thing before baking. 

POUND CAKE. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

One pound of butter, one pound of sugar, one pound of flour, 
nine eggs leaving out two yolks, grated peel of one lemon. Beat 
the whites to a stiff froth and the butter to a cream; add the su- 
gar and the yolks and beat till very light; then the flour and whites 
of eggs, alternately. Bake in a moderate oven. 

POUND CAKE. 

MRS. J. PA RM ELBE. 

Rub one pound of sugar and three-fourths of a pound of butter 
to a cream; add the well beaten yolks often eggs, then the whites 
beaten to a froth. Stir in gradually one pound of flour. 



LOAF CAKES. 161 

BOSTON POUND CAKE. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

One pound of sugar, three-fourths of a pound of butter, one 
pound of flour, six eggs, one cup of cream or rich milk, one tea- 
spoon of soda and the grated rind of one lemon. Put in the soda 
the last thing. 

LEMON CAKE. 

MRS. LANSING MORRISON. 

Stir to a cream one teacup of butter and three cups of pulver- 
ized sugar; add the yolks of five eggs well beaten, one teacup of 
sweet milk, one lemon grated, whites of five eggs, four and me- 
half cups of flour and one teaspoon of soda. Bake in two tins 
half an hour. 

LEMON CAKE. 

MRS. J. B. MILLER. 

Three cups of sugar, one cup of milk, one cup of butter, five 
eggs, four cups of flour, one-half teaspoon of soda and the juice 
and grated peel of one lemon. 

LEMON CAKE. 

MRS. D. O. FINCH. 

One cup of butter, one cup of milk, three cups of pulverized 
sugar, four cups of flour, whites of ten eggs, two teaspoons of 
cream tartar in the flour, grated rind and juice of one lemon, and 
one teaspoon of of soda the last thing. 

MARBLE CAKE. 

MRS. F. M. MILLS. 

Spice Part. — A half cup of butter, a half cup of molasses, one 
cup of brown sugar, yolks of four eggs, a half cup of sweet milk, 
two cups of flour, one teaspoon of baking powder, one teaspoon 
each of allspice, cinnamon and nutmeg and a half teaspoon of 
cloves. 

White Part. — One and a half cups of white sugar, a half cup 
of butter, whites of four eggs beaten light, a half cup of sweet 
milk, two cups of flour and one large teaspoon of baking powder. 
II 



162 LOAF CAKES. 

MARBLE CAKE. 

MISS JENKIE DICKERSON. 

One cup of butter, three cups of sugar, one cup of milk, two 
teaspoons of baking powder, five cups of flour and the whites of 
eight eggs. 

Sjyice Part. — One cup of butter, two cups of brown sugar, one 
cup of molasses, yolks of three eggs, white of one Qg^-, one tea- 
spoon of each kind of spice and three teaspoons of baking powder. 
Put them into the pan alternately; a white layer on the bottom and 
top. 

WHITE CAKE— MARBLED. 

MRS. F. A. PARKER, RLTSHVILLE, ILL. 

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three cups of flour, whites 
of eight eggs, two-thirds of a cup of sweet milk and one teaspoon 
of yeast powder. After the cake is made, take out one large tea- 
spoon of the mixture, and drop two drops of fushiene, mixed 
with alcohol (four drops if 3'ou like it darker colored) iuto the 
tablespoon of cake; mix well, and then put a layer of the white 
cake at the bottom of the pan, and streak the red around in rings; 
add more white, and more red, till the white is all gone. Bake 
in a slow oven. 

GOLD CAKE. 

MRS. G. R. OSGOOD. 

Beat the yolks of eight eggs with one cup of sugar and three- 
fourths of a cup of butter, previously beaten to a cream; add two 
cups of sifted flour, a half teaspoon of soda dissolved in one-half 
cup of sweet milk, and, when well mixed, bake in shallow pans. 

WILLIE C.'S BIRTHDAY CAKE. 

MISS JENNIE CHASE. 

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, one cup oT water, whites 
of four eggs, yolk of one, three cups of flour, two heaping tea- 
spoons of baking poAvder, vanilla flavor, and a fourth of a pound 
of citron cut in very thin slices. Reserve a half cup of flour to 
mix with the baking powder, and put that in the last thing. 



LOAF CAKES, 163 

SILVER CAKE. 

MRS. C. P. HOLMES. 

Two cups of fine white sugar, a half cup of butter, one cup of 
sweet milk, three cups of sifted flour, whites of eight eggs, two 
teaspoons of baking powder, and flavor to the taste. 

SIX EGG CAKE. 

MRS. WM. H. RAY, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Six eggs, two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, one-half cup of 
new milk, three and one-half cups of flour, two teaspoons of 
cream tartar, a half teaspoon of soda, and flavor. This is as good 
as pound cake. 

MRS. MASON'S CAKE. 

MRS. ROUNDS. 

Four cups of flour, two cups of sugar, one and a half cups of 
sweet milk, put in one cup of butter and, while boiling, add one 
teaspoon of soda. Spice and fruit to taste. 

ST. NICHOLAS CAKE. 

MRS. S. P. WISNER, CEDAR RAPIDS. 

One cup of sugar, two-thirds of a cup of butter, a half cup of 
sweet milk, two eggs, not quite two cups of flour, a half teaspoon 
of cream tartar and a fourth of a teaspoon of soda. 

CREAM CAKE. 

MISS F. E. HASKELL. / ,^- 

One cup of sugar, one cup of sour cream, '<rwo cups of flour, 
piece of butter the size of a walnut, a half teaspoon of soda, and 
flavor to the taste. 

LILY CAKE. 

MISS EMMA HOWELL. 

Two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, one cup of water, one 
cup of corn starch, two cups of flour, whites of six eggs, one and 
a half teaspoons of baking powder. Beat the water, starch and 
baking powder together, and flavor to the taste. 



164 LOAF CAKES. 

MADISON CAKE. 

MKS. THEO. CAKPENTER, 

A half pound of butter, three-fourths of a pound of sugar, one 
pound of flour, three-fourths of a pound of raisins, three fourths 
of a pound of currants, eight eggs and one gill of cream. 

RAILROAD CAKE. 

MRS. JOY, TRENTON FALLS, N. T. 

One cup of sugar, one cup of flour, three eggs, one tablespoon 
of butter, two tablespoons of milk, a half teaspoon of soda, one 
teaspoon of cream tartar, and flavor. Very good. 

RAILROAD CAKE. 

MRS. C. H. ATKINS. 

Beat well one ^^^ with a cup of sugar; add one cup of sweet 
cream and e»e nutmeg. Mix two teaspoons of baking powder 
with two cups, of flour and add to the above. Bake in shallow tins. 

UNCLE ROBERTSON CAKE. 

MRS. J. G. SPRAGUE. 

Three cups of sugar, one cup of butter, four eggf , a half pint 
of milk lukewarm, one teaspoon of soda, four cups of flour, and 
spice and raisins to taste. 

YANKEE CAKE. 

MRS. SACKETT, STERLING, ILL. 

Two cups of sour cream, two and a half cups of sugar, two eggs, 
a piece of butter the size of an ^s,^., and three teaspoons of baking 
powder. Beat the eggs; add the sugar, butter and cream, and 
beat again; then stir in the flour and bake in two pans three- 
fourths of an hour. 

TEA CAKE. 

MRS. M. A. RICH, STERLING, ILL. 

One cup of sour milk, one cup of raisins, one cup of sugar, a 
half cup of butter, one ^^g., one teaspon of soda, one teaspoon of 
spices, and two and a half cups of flour. 



LOAF CAKES, 165 

FRENCH CAKE. 

MRS. C. T. SAVERY. 

Two cups of'sugar, three cups of flour, one cup of milk, a half 
cup of butter, three eggs, two teaspoons of cream tartar, one tea- 
spoon of soda, one cup of raisins, two teaspoons of cinnamon and 
one of cloves. 

DOVER CAKE. 

MRS. J. M. OTIS. 

One pound of brown sugar, a half pound of butter, six eggs, 
one teaspoon of cinnamon, one nutmeg, a half wine-glass of rose 
"water, one wine-glass of molasses and one pound of flour. nxK- 

\ 

NUMBER CAKE. 

MISS EMMA L. DEPUE, GENOA, ILL. 

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three cups of flour, four 
eggs, or whites of seven, a half cup of sweet milk and two tea- 
spoons of baking powder. Beat the whites to a stiff" froth and 
flavor to the taste. 

WHITE CUP CAKE. ' 

MRS. P. CORNING. 

Two cups of sugar, a half cup of butter, a cup of sweet milk, 
three cups of flour, whites of four eggs and three teaspoons of 
baking powder. 

CUP CAKE. 

MISS F. E. HASKELL. 

One and and a half cups of butter, three cups of sugar, five cups 
of flour, five eggs, one cup of sweet milk, one teaspoon of soda 
and two teaspoons of creani tartar. 

CUP CAKE. 

MRS. C, H. SWEENEY. 

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three and a half cups of 
flour, four eggs, one cup of cold water, lemon flavor, and one tea- 
spoon of baking powder mixed well in the half cup of flour and 
put in the last thing. Excellent for layer cakes. 



lOZ LOAF CAKES. 

RICH CAKE. 

MRS. C, P. HOLMES. 

Onpi coffeecup of butter, three coffeecups of sugar, four coffee- 
cups of flour, a half pint of sweet cream, four eggs, one nutmeg, 
one cup of raisins, one cup of currants and two teaspoons of bak- 
ing powder. 

WHITE CLOUDS. 

MRS. BYRON ADAMS. 

One and a half cups of white sugar, a half cup of butter, a half 
cup of sweet milk, whites of four eggs, a small half-teaspoon of 
soda, one teaspoon of cream tartar and two and a half cups of 
flour. Flavor with almond or rose. 

BLACK CLOUDS. 

One cup of brown sugar, a half cup of molasses, a half cup of 
butter, a half cup of sour milk, two cups of flour, a half teaspoon 
of soda, yolks' of five q^^ and white of one, two teaspoons of cin • 
namon and a half teaspoon each of cloves and nutmeg. 

' WASHINGTON CAKE. 

MRS. J. PAEMELEE. 

One and a half pounds of sugar, one and a half pounds of but- 
ter, seven eggs, one pint of milk, one and three- fourths pounds 
of flour, two pounds of raisins, two pounds of currants, mace, 
cinnamon and cloves, 

COMPOSITION CAKE. 

MRS. THEO. CARPENTER. 

Two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, five eggs, three cups of 
flour, lemon and a little soda. 

COCOANUT CAKE. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHARD AND MRS. RICHMOND. 

One pound of sugar, a half pound of butter, six eggs, three- 
fourths of a pound of flour, and one pound of grated cocoanut, 
put in just before baking. 



LOAF CAKES. 167 

DOUGH CAKE. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three cups of light dough, 
a half teaspoon of soda dissolved in a little water; raisins, cur- 
rants and spices to the taste. 

ECONOMY CAKE. 

MRS. S. P. ATKINS. 

Make a sponge with one pint of water and one cup of yeast; 
when light, add one cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three eggs, 
spices, and flour until it is as thick as you can well stir it. 

ECONOMY CAKE. 

MRS. P. C. BULKLEY. 

One teacup of sugar, one teacup of milk, three teacups of flour, 
one f'^^-) one tablespoon of butter, a half teaspoon of soda, one 
teaspoon of cream tartar, and flavor to the taste. Bake immedi- 
ately. 

CHERRY VALLEY CAKE. 

MRS. C H. SWEENEY. 

Three-fourths of a cup of butter, one cup of milk, two cups of 
sugar, three fresh eggs, three cups of flour, two teaspoons of 
cream tartar and one teaspoon of soda; flavor with vanilla. 

WHITE CAKE. 

MRS. F. M. MILLS. 

Whites of fourteen eggs, one pound of sugar, a half pound of 
butter, a half cup of milk, one pound of flour, two teaspoons of 
baking powder. Flavor to the taste. 

WHITE CAKE. 

MRS. M. P. TURNER. 

Whites of seven eggs, one cup of butter, two cups of sugar, 
one cup of corn starch, one cup of milk, two teaspoons of baking 
powder, one cup of flour. Dissolve the corn starch in the milk; 
beat the butter and sugar to a cream, and after all is well beaten 
mix in the whites lightly. 



168 LOAF CAKES. 

CORN STARCH CAKE. 

MRS. G. K. OSGOOD. 

One cup of sugar and a half cup of butter beaten to a cream, a 
half cup of corn starch, a half cup of sweet milk with one -half 
teaspoon of soda, whites of four eggs beaten to a stiff froth, one 
cup of flour with one teaspoon of cream tartar, and flavor to the 
taste. 

CORN STARCH CAKE. 

MRS. DR. HAMILTON, DARLINGTON, WIS. 

One cup of butter, tvvo cups of sugar, one cup of sweet milk, 
one cup of corn starch, two cups of flour, whites of six eggs beaten 
to a stifi" froth, two teaspoons of cream tartar and one teaspoon of 
soda. Flavor with lemon. 

CORN STARCH CAKE. 

MRS. M. A. BOURNE. 

Two cups of sugar, two cups of sifted flour, one cup of corn 
starch sifted in flour, one cup of butter beaten to a cream with 
sugar, one cup of sweet milk, two even teaspoons of baking pow- 
der sifted in flour, and the whites of eight eggs beaten to a stiff 
froth and added the last thing. Flavor to the taste. Bake in a 
slow oven three-quarters of an hour. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

MRS. MEAD. 

Whites of nine eggs, two cups of powdered white sugar, a half 
cup of butter, three cups of flour and one teaspoon of baking pow- 
der. Flavor with almond or rose. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

MRS. C. P. HOLMES. 

One cup of sugar, a half cup of butter, a half cup of sweet 
milk, two cups of flour, whites of six eggs, one teaspoon of baking 
powder and flavor to the taste. This is always good. 



LOAF CAKES. 169 

DELICATE CAKE. 

MRS. J. MYERS. 

A scant half cup of butter, one and a half cups of pulverized 
sugar, a half cup of water, whites of six eggs, two cups of flour 
and one teaspoon of baking powder. Flavor with bitter almonds. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

MRS. M. A. BOURNE. 

A half cup of butter, one and a half cups of white sugar, a 
half cup of sweet milk, one and a half cups of flour, a half cup of 
corn starch, one teaspoon of baking powder and whites of six 
eggs well beaten together. Beat the sugar and butter to a cream, 
add the whites of the eggs, after which the milk, and lastly the 
flour. Mix the corn starch and baking powder well in the flour. 
Flavor with vanilla or lemon. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

One cup of butter, one cup of sweet milk, three cups of pulver- 
ized sugar, five cups of flour, one teaspoon of soda, two teaspoons 
of cream tartar and the whites of twelve eggs. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

MRS. J. M. OTIS. 

Whites of eighteen eggs, one pound of sugar, nine ounces of 
butter, a half cup of sweet milk, a half teaspoon of soda, one tea- 
spoon of cream tartar and flour enough with two eggs to weigh 
one pound. Mix butter and sugar till very light, add flour, then 
milk, and the whites the last thing. 

LADY CAKE. 

MISS CORA CHASE, EOSEMOND, ILL. 

Whites of sixteen eggs, one pound of sugar, three-fourths of a 
pound of butter, one pound of flour and one teaspoon of extract 
of bitter almonds or vanilla. Beat the butter and sugar to a cream, 
mix in flour till very stifi", then add the other ingredients, and 
frost. 



i;0 LOAF CAKES. 

LADY CAKE. 

MRS. GBISWOLD. 

One cup of butter, three cups of sugar, one cup of sweet milk, 
whites of eight eggs, four cups of flour and two heaping teaspoons 
of baking powder. 

FIG CAKE. 

MRS. T. E. BROWN. 

Whites of eight eggs, one and a half cups of sugar, one cup of 
butter, one cup of sweet milk, two and a half cups of flour, three 
teaspoons of baking powder and two pounds of chojDped figs. 

MOUNTAIN CiVKE. 

MRS. A. L. FRISBIE. 

One cup of sugar, a half cup of butter, a half cup of milk, two 
cups of flour, whites of two eggs, one teaspoon of baking powder 
and flavor to the taste. This makes one loaf. 

MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

MRS. J. E. STEWART. 

Three cups of sugar, one cup of butter, a half cup of milk, the 
whites of ten eggs, four and a half cups of flour, a half teaspoon 
of soda, one teaspoon of cream tartar sifted with the flour and 
flavor to the taste. 

FEATHER CAKE. 

MRS. J, P. FOSTER. 

Two cups of sugar, three cups of flour, a half cup of butter, two- 
thirds of a cup of milk, two eggs and two teaspoons of baking 
powder. 

FEATHER CAKE. 

MBS. J. B. MILLER AND MRS. HART. 

One cup of sugar, two cups of flour, two-thirds of a cup of 
milk, one teaspoon of butter, one ^%'g., one teaspoon of cream tar- 
tar and a half teaspoon of soda. 



LOAF CAKES. 171 

FEATHER CAKE. 

MRS. C. P. HOLMES. 

Whites of three eggs, one cup of sugar, a half cup of butter, a 
half cup of sweet milk, two cups of flour, one and a half teaspoons 
of baking powder and flavor to the taste. 

LINCOLN CAKE. 

MKS. M. R. KELLOGG. 

Two cups of sugar, two eggs, a half cup of butter, one cup of 
sweet milk, four cups of flour, two teaspoons of baking powder 
and flavor to the taste. 

SNOW CAKE. 

MRS. COL. STE-SA'AET. 

Sift flour and sugar before measuring, then take one tumbler 
of flour, one and a half tumblers of pulverized sugar and one tea- 
spoon of cream tartar. Mix the above thoroughly and sift into a 
bowl; beat the whites of ten eggs with one spoonful of vanilla to 
a stiff froth and pour over the flour, mixing as lightly as possible. 
Bake in a moderate oven. 

SNOW CAKE. 

MRS. G. M. HIPPEE. 

Whites of ten eggs whipped to a very stiff froth, one and a 
half tumblers of sifted flour, one and a half tumblers of pulverized 
sugar, a half teaspoon of salt and one even teaspoon of cream 
tartar; flavor with one teaspoon of almond. Sift the flour, sugar, 
cream tartar and salt into a bowl, mix thoroughly and add the 
flavoring. Beat the eggs very light in a large platter, then with 
one hand sprinkle the above ingredients into the eggs, dipping 
slowly and lightly with your egg-beater barely enough to mix; 
avoid stirring more than necessary. Bake as soon as possible. 

CREAM SPONGE CAKE. 

» MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

One cup of sugar, one cup of flour, a half cup of cream and two 
eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately. Flavor with vanilla 
and beat well before the flour is put in. 



173 LOAF CAKES. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Take the weight of ten eggs in fine, white sugar, and the weight 
of six eggs in sifted flour; break twelve eggs, putting the whites 
into the cake bowl; beat them to a stiff froth and add the sugar, 
stirring briskly. Have the yolks beaten v^ry light, and mix the 
whole thoroughly, adding two tablespoons of fresh cold or ice 
water, and flavor as desired, and, lastly the flour, working it as 
lightly as possible. Turn into square cake pans, lined with but- 
tered paper, and bake immediately in a moderately hot oven; if 
too hot, a crust forms on the top, which crumbles and disfigures 
the cake. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

MRS. F. M. MILLS. 

Four eggs, two coffeecups of sugar, two coffeecups of flour and 
one heaping teaspoon of baking powder. Beat the eggs and su- 
gar well together and stir in all the flour they will take; then add 
a half cup of boiling water. Put the baking powder into the re- 
mainder of the flour and stir in. Bake quickly. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

One and a half cups of white sugar, four eggs, yolks and whites 
beaten separately, two cups of flour, three tablespoons of cold 
water, the juice of one lemon, and two teaspoons of baking pow- 
der sifted into one-half cup of the flour and add the last thing. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

MISS ADDIE V. HAMILTON, DARLINGTON, WIS. 

One cup of sugar, one cup of flour, five eggs, one teaspoon of 
cream tartar and a half teaspoon of soda. Flavor with lemon. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

MRS. C. A. PARROTT, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Two eggs, two cups of sugar, two heaping cups of flour and 
two-thirds of a cup of boiling water put in the last thing. 



LOAF CAKES. 173 

SPONGE CAKE. 

MRS. M. A. BOURNE. 

Eight eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately, two cups of su- 
gar, two cups of flour, two teaspoons of cream tartar and one 
teaspoon of soda. Mix the cream tartar in the flour; dissolve 
the soda in a teaspoon of warm water; beat the yolks and sugar 
together; stir the whites in lightly, then the flour in the same 
way, adding a little salt. Flavor with lemon and bake imme- 
diately in a moderate oven twenty minutes. If made strictly by 
this receipt, it will be excellent. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

MRS. J. LAIRD AND MISS JESSIE SWEENEY. 

Two cups of sugar, a half cup of water, six eggs, one and a half 
cups of flour and one teaspoon of baking powder. Separate the 
eggs and beat the yolks and sugar to a cream, then put in the 
water; mix the baking powder with the flour and stir in, a little 
at a time, until thoroughly mixed; beat the whites to a stifi" froth 
and mix as lightly as possible through the cake, just before placing 
it in the oven. The oven must not be too hot when the cake is 
first put in. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

CARRIE BECK. 

Beat three eggs well with one cup of white sugar and one table- 
spoon of cold water; add one cup of flour, with two teaspoons of 
baking powder mixed through, and flavor with lemon. Bake in 
a shallow pan. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

MRS. G. W. PARROT, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Two cups of sugar, two cups of flour, a half cup of water: and 
one teaspoon of yeast powder. Beat the whites to a stiff froth, 
pour the water over the sugar and stir in the whites, put in the 
yolks lightly, add the flour and yeast powder and mix just enough 
to make smooth. 



174 FANCY CAKES. 

ICE-WATER SPONGE CAKE. . 

MRS. SACKETT, STERLING, ILL. 

One and a half cups of sugar, one and a half cups of flour, three 
eggs, one a«d-a half cup^ of ice-water and one and a half tea- 
spoons of baking powder. Beat yolks and sugar with one table- 
spoon of water, thoroughly. Better than any ten-egg cake I ever 
ate. 

BERWICK SPONGE CAKE. 

MRS. HART. 

Beat three eggs two minutes; add a cup and a half of sugar 
and beat five minutes; then add one cup of flour, one teaspoon of 
baking powder mixed in the flour, a half cup of cold water, another 
cup of flour, a little salt, the grated rind of a lemon and half the 
juice. 



^ki\dy dake^ foi^ f^ai^tie^. 



SILVER CAKE. 
&<?^s^^L HITES of twelve eggs, five cups of flour, two and a half 






cups of white sugar, one cup of butter, one cup of cream 
"llgRF?-^ or sweet milk, one teaspoon of cream of tartar, a half 
■M,^^ teaspoon of soda. Beat and mix as the following 



m 



p' GOLD CAKE. 

Yolks of twelve eggs, five cups of flour, three cups of white 
sugar, one cup of butter, one and a half cups of cream or milk, a 
half teaspoon of soda and one teaspoon of cream tartar. Beat the 
eggs with the sugar, then stir in the butter, softened by the fire; 
dissolve the soda, and sift the cream tartar with one cup of the flour; 
mix all together, then sift and stir in the rest of the flour. i3ake 
in a deep loaf pan. These, baked as " Marbled Cake," give 
another variety. 



FANCY CAKES. 175 

PINK CAKE. 

MRS. H. H. BENSON, BELOIT, WIS. 

One cup of sugar, a half cup of butter, two cups of flour, whites 
of five eggs, two teaspoons of baking powder and analine the size 
of two grains of wheat; tie the last in a thin cloth and pour over 
it a half teaspoon of hot water. The analine can be put in one- 
half the mixture and dropped into the pan with alternate spoons 
of the white, making a marbled cake which is very ornamental. 
The effect is better to have the mixtures put together in small 
quantities. 

ANOTHER PRETTY CAKE. 

Bake white cake in three layers, with pink frosting. Cut it in 
small squares of about two inches and alternate it in the basket 
with chocolate cake made as follows: 

Bake the above gold cake in corresponding thin layers. Scrape 
fine two tablespoons of chocolate; put it into a tin cup and pour 
over it just enough hot water to dissolve it into a cream, setting it 
on the stove for a moment. Stir this into the frosting, making it 
just a pretty shade of brown. Cut this cake into diamonds. I 
always bake my thin cakes in square tin pans. Half the receipt 
for gold cake makes two thin ones. The white of one ^^'g is 
enough for one cake. The amount of chocolate given is intended 
for two. 

LAYER FRUIT-CAKE. 

MRS. W. BURTON". 

' Whites of eight eggs, three cups of sugar, one cup of butter, 
one cup of sweet milk, three full cups of flour, and two teaspoons 
of baking powder. 

Icing. — One pint of sugar and the whites of three eggs beaten 
to a stiff froth; add sufficient water to the sugar to melt it, boil to 
a thick syrup, pour a little at a time boiling hot into the whites, 
stirring rapidly, and beat until smooth. Take a pound of rais- 
ins and a half pound of dates, stone the raisins, cut the dates 
into small pieces and mix together; spread one layer of the cake 
with icing rather thick, cover the icing with fruit, add a little 
more icing, then another layer of cake and ice the cake all over. 
This makes two large cakes. 



i 



176 LAYER CAKES. 



NEAPOLITAN CAKE. 

MKS. T. A. PARKER, RUSUVILLE, ILL. 

niWiif ^^^"^ make the dark cake after the following recipe: 
i^ir ^^® ^"P ^^ butter, two cups of brown sugar, one cup 
5^^=^^ of molasses, one cup of strong coffee, four and a half 
\i5 teacups of flour, four eggs, two teaspoons of soda, two tea- 
y ^!^ spoons of cinnamon, one teaspoon of cloves, one teaspoon of 
J mace, one pound of raisins, one pound of currants and a 
fourth of a pound of citron (more fruit makes the cake hand- 
somer, but this quantity will do). Bake the cake in round pans 
with straight sides. The loaves should be one and a half inches 
in thickness after baking. 

The white cake is made as follows: One cup of butter, four 
cups of powered white sugar, two cups of sweet milk, two cups of 
corn starch mixed with the flour, four and a half cups of sifted 
flour, whites of eight eggs and six teaspoons of baking powder; 
flavor slightly with bitter almonds. Bake in the pans used for the 
black cake, making the light and dark loaves of the same thick- 
ness. 

After the cake is all cold, each black loaf should be spread with 
a thick frosting: made as follows: White of one egg beaten light, 
graced rind of two and the juice of three lemons, and powdered 
sugar enough to make a thick frosting. Lay the white and black 
loaves alternately ; frost all over as you would any other loaf; be 
particular to use no other flavoring than lemon in the frosting. 
This makes an elegant cake, equally tempting to the eye and the 
palate. 

RAISIN CAKE. 

MRS. M. ETHRIDGE. 

Three small cups of sugar, one small cup of butter, one small 
cup of sweet milk, whites of eight eggs, two and a half cups of 
flour, one cup of corn starch and two teasx)oons of baking powder; 



LAYER CAKES. 177 

bake in four cakes. Make an icing and spread on the top and 
bottom of each layer; seed and chop one pound of raisins and put 
them between the layers after icing. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

MRS. G. E. OSGOOD. 

One good cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three and a fourth 
cups of flour, five eggs leaving out two of the whites for icing, 
one small cup of milk and one and a half teaspoons of baking 
powder. Bake in a dripping-pan and leave it in until used, as it 
is too light and soft to be removed. 

Chocolate for filU>%g. — To the whites of two eggs beaten to 
a froth, add sufficient powdered sugar and grated chocolate to 
make a light, delicate icing, and two teaspoons of vanilla. Ice 
the cake while hot. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

MISS JESSIE SWEENEY, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, whites of eight eggs, a 
half cup of sweet milk and one teaspoon of baking powder in 
three cups of flour. 

Icing. — A fourth of a pound of German chocolate and a half 
cup of milk; grate the chocolate and mix with the milk, thicken 
with sugar; boil the mixture till it candies, then spread between 
the layers. 

COCOANUT CAKE. 

MRS. J. PARMELEE AND MRS. CHASE. 

Three cups of sugar, one cup of butter, four cups of flour, one 
cup of Avater, whites of eight eggs and three teaspoons of baking 
powder. Before mixing the cake, make the frosting, as follows: 

Pour over one and a half cups of cocoanut sufficient good, sour 
cream to' thoroughly mix it, add sugar to sweeten it, let it stand 
until the cake is cool, then put it between the layers. The cream 
must be free from any bitter taste and very thick. Blanched 
almonds chopped fine are excellent instead of cocoanut. 



178 LAYER CAKES. 

COCOANUT CAKE. 

MISS E. M. PAEKOTT, KUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Two cups of sugar, a half cup of butter, one cup of milk, three 
cups of flour, whites of ten eggs and three teaspoons of yeast 
powder. 

Icing. — Twelve teaspoons of pulverized sugar and one egg 
beaten to a stiff froth, one large, fresh cocoanut grated and sprink- 
led between the layers on the icing. 

COCOANUT CAKE. 

MKS. HAEKNESS. 

Whites of six eggs, one and a half cups of sugar, a half cup of 
butter, a half cup of cold water, one and a half cups of flour, 
a half cup of corn starch and one teaspoon of baking powder to 
each cup of flour. 

Frosting. — Whites of three eggs, six tablespoons of pulverized 
sugar and one ctjp of cocoanut. Bake in four round tins. 

COCOANUT CAKE. 

MES. J. B, LTMAK, ROCKFOED, ILL. 

One cup of sugar, two cups of flour, three- fourths of a cup of 
butter, one-fourth cup of sweet milk, two teaspoons of baking 
powder and the yolks of eight eggs; bake in three cakes; then 
take the whites of four eggs beaten to a stifi" froth with pulver- 
ized sugar, add one cocoanut (grated) and spread between the 
layers; frost the top. 

WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

MISS F. E. HASKELL. 

One pound of sugar, a half pound of butter, six eggs, one tea- 
cup of milk, one pound of flour, one small teaspoon of soda 
and two small teaspoons of cream tartar. This will make six or 
seven cakes. 

Frosting. — Into one-third of a box of gelatine, dissolved in a 
teacup of boiling water, stir two pounds of sugar; flavor and 
spread over the top and sides of each cake. 



LAYER CAKES. 179 

WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

MISS JESSIE SWEENEY, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Two cups of sugar, a half cup of butter, one cup of milk, three 
cups of flour, whites of ten eggs and three teaspoons of yeast pow- 
der. 

Icing. — Six cups of sugar and the whites of six eggs beaten to 
a froth. Boil the sugar till it candies in a half cup of water, then 
add the whites of two beaten eggs. 

WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE. 



Two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, three cups of flour, al- 
most one cup of sweet milk, three-quarters of a teaspoon of soda, 
one and a half teaspoons of cream tartar and the whites of eight 
eggs (six will doj; flavor with lemon. Bake in layers in square 
tin pans. Put together with the following 

Frosting : Whites of six or seven eggs beaten to a stiff froth, 
and nine full teaspoons of pulverized sugar to one egg, flavor 
with lemon and beat to a stiff froth. A pleasant change is made 
by stirring in one cup of dessicated cocoanut. 

CUSTARD CAKE. 

MISS BAILEY, ROSEMOND, ILL. 

Two cups of sugar, four eggs, one tablespoon of butter, a half 
cup of water, two and one-half cups of flour and two teaspoons 
of baking powder; flavor with lemon. 

Custard.-— Tvfo eggs, one cup of sugar, one cup of sweet milk 
and two teaspoons of corn starch; flavor. 

ALMOND CUSTARD CAKE. 

MRS. J. B. LYMAN, ROCKFORD, ILL. 

One pound of butter, one pound of sugar, one pound of flour, 
the whites of twelve eggs and the yolks of seven. 

Custard. — One pint of sweet cream, one pound of soft shell 
almonds blanched, whites of four eggs beaten to a froth with 
four spoons of sugar. Beat the cream to a froth with four spoons 
of sugar; then mix cream and eggs; chop almonds and add them 
the last thinof. Flavor with almond or vanilla. 



180 • LAYER CAKES. 

MRS. SHERMAN'S ALMOND CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, two cups of flour, six 
eggs, one cup of milk and three teaspoons of baking powder; 
bake in layers. 

Icing, — One coifee-cup of thick sour cream, two eggs, one 
pound of almonds blanched and chopped, sugar to taste (make 
rather sweet), flavor with vanilla and spread between the layers. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, one cup of sweet milk, 
three and a half cups of flour, yolks of nine eggs and three tea- 
spoons of baking powder. 

Cream for cake. — Whites of three eggs and two and a half cups 
of pulverized sugar, put the sugar on the stove with a few drops 
of water, let it come to a boil and get a little candied; then re- 
move from the fire and stir in the whites beaten to a stifi" froth; 
beat thoroughly and flavor with vanilla. 

ICING CAKE. 

MISS CORA CHASE, ROSEMOND, ILL. 

Ten eggs, one pound of sifted sugar and a half pound of 
flour, flavor with the grated rind and half the juice of one lemon. 
Make into sponge cake batter, bake in jelly pans. 

Icing. — Whites of three eggs, one and a half pounds of pul- 
verized sugar, grated rind and juice of a sour orange and the 
juice of the half leition left from cake. Make into icing and 

spread between the layers of cake. 

w 

ORANGE CAKE. 

MRS. W. H. MEREITT. 

Two and a half cups of sugar, one and a half cups of better, 
one cup of milk, five cups of flour, seven eggs, omitting the yolks 
of three, and two teaspoons of baking powder; bake in four layers. 

Frostmg. — Beat the whites of two eggs stifi", add sugar for a 
very stiff frosting and the grated rind and juice of four oranges; 
beat thoroughly and spread between the layers. 



LAYER CAKES. 181 

ORANGE CAKE. 

MISS HATTIE m'mANUS. 

One half cup of butter, one and a half cups of sugar, a half cup 
of water, two heaping cups of flour, whites of four eggs, yolks of 
three, grated rind and juice of one orange, two teaspoons of bak- 
ing powder. 

Frosting. — Whites of two eggs, sugar sufficient to stiflfen and 
the grated rind and juice of one orange. 

ORANGE CAKJE. 

MRS. OAKS, MT. CARROLIi, ILL. 

Two cups of sugar, two cups of flour, a half cup of cold water, 
a pinch of salt, two teaspoons of baking powder, four eggs, reserv- 
ing the white of one for frosting, and two oranges — the whole of 
one chopped fine and stirred in the cake, the juice of the other 
put into the frosting. Bake in three layers. This is just as good 
with lemons. 

LEMON OR ORANGE CAKE. 

MRS. m'wILLIAMS. 

Eight eggs, two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, a half cup of 
milk, two teaspoons of baking powder and four cups of flour. 
Use only the yolks. Bake in layers. 

Icing. — Beat the whites to a stiff froth and put into a coffee 
cup of dry powdered sugar, the juice of three lemons and 
the grated rind of two. For orange cake, make the icing with 
oranges. 

LEMON JELLY CAKE. 

MRS. G. R. OSGOOD. 

A half cup of butter, two cups of sugar, one cup of sweet milk, 
three and a half cups of flour, four eggs and two teaspoons of 
baking powder. 

Jelly. — Grated rind and juice of one lemon, two-thirds of a cup 
of sugar, one Qgg and one tablespoon of cold water. Set on the 
stove and stir till it boils; when cool, put between the layers of 
cake. 



183 LAYER CAKES. 

LEMON JELLY CAKE. 

MISS JENNIE M. CHASE. 

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three and one-half cups 
of flour, whites of eight eggs beaten to a stiff" froth, two-thirds of 
a cup of cold water, and one teaspoon of yeast powder. Beat 
butter and sugar together till very light; pour in the water, add 
the flour and whites of eggs alternately, reserving the half cup of 
flour to mix thoroughly with the yeast powder, and stir in the last 
thing. 

Lemon Jelly. — Grate t*wo lemons, one cup of white sugar, one 
tablespoon of corn starch, two eggs and a lump of butter the size 
of a walnut. Separate the eggs — beat the whites to a stiff' froth, 
the yolks till very light, add the sugar and the lemons to the yolks, 
mix the corn starch with a little cold water, pour in a half pint of 
boiling water, mix all together, let it scald, and stir in the whites 
just before taking it from the stove. Let it cool before putting 
it between the layers. This jelly is very good between layers of 
sponge cake, leaving out the eggs. 

LEMON JELLY CAKE. 

MRS. C. P. HOLMES. 

One and a half cups of sugar, two tablespoons of butter, a half 
cup of sweet milk, one and a half teaspoons of baking powder, 
five eggs, saving two of the whites for jelly, and tlwee^ cups of 
flour. *- 7 *^ 

Jelly. — Whites of two eggs well beaten, one cup of sugar and 
one lemon. 

JELLY CAKE. 

, MRS. J. B. MILLER. 

Yolks of eight eggs, a half cup of butter, a half cup of milk, 
one cup of sugar, two cups of flour, one teaspoon of cream tartar 
and a half teaspoon of soda. Bake in layers and spread jelly be- 
tween. 

JELLY CAKE. 

MRS. GEO. COOPER. 

Three eggs, one cup of sugar, one heaping cup of flour, one 
tablespoon of melted butter, two tablespoons of sweet milk and 



LAYER CAKES. 183 

one and a half teaspoons of baking powder. Bake in two tins 
with buttered paper on the bottom; turn out when done, spread 
jelly on the bottom and roll. 

ROLL JELLY CAKE. 

MRS. GILL. 

One cup of sugar, three eggs, one cup of flour and one tea- 
spoon of baking powder. Do not beat the eggs separately; mix 
all together as quickly as possible, and bake in a quick oven. 
While hot, spread on the jelly, which is to be well beaten before 
putting on the cake. Roll in a napkin. 

MRS. SPEED'S LAYER CAKE. 

Four eggs, two cups of sugar, two cups of flour, two teaspoons 
of baking powder and three-fourths of a cup of boiling water. 
Beat the yolks and sugar till very light, add flour and whites al- 
ternatel}^ and, just before putting in the oven, stir in the boiling 
water. Bake in a large bread pan; have the cake one inch thick 
when done; then cut into pieces. 

Icing. — White of one Qg^, large cup of sugar, and the grated 
rind and juice of one lemon. Spread between the layers and ice 
over the top. This is excellent. 

CREAM CAKE. 

MRS. FRED. GETCHELL. 

Three eggs, one cup of sugar, one and a half cups of flour, two 
tablespoons of cold water and two teaspoons of baking powder. 

Cream. — One pint of sweet milk, two eggs, two-thirds of a cup 
of sugar, two large tablespoons of corn starch and a half cup of 
butter; flavor with lemon. Cook the cream well and let it cool 
before putting in the cake. 

CREAM CAKE. 

MRS. GILL. 

One cup of sugar, three eggs, one cup of flour, one teaspoon of 
baking powder and one tablespoon of butter. Bake in layers. 

Cream. — Scald a half pint of sweet milk; add one ^^'^ beaten 
with a heaping teaspoon of sugar and one teaspoon of corn starch, 
and boil until quite thick. Let the cream cool before putting to- 
gether. 



184 LAYER CAKES. 

CREAM CAKE. 

MRS. H. C. DEPUE, BUSHNELL, ILL. 

Four eggs, one cup of sugar, one cu^d of flour, one teaspoon of 
baking powder mixed in the flour, and one tablespoon of water. 
Bake the cake in two pie-tins; while hot split the cake and put 
in thi"s 

Cream: Boil one cup of milk or cream, add three tablespoons 
of sugar, one Q^^., one large tablespoon of corn starch mixed in a 
little milk, and when nearly done one tablespoon of butter and 
flavor to the taste. 

CREAM CAKE. 

MRS. STEWART, LYONS. 

One cup of sugar, one cup of flour, four eggs, butter the size of 
an Q.^s^ and one teaspoon of baking powder. Bake in jelly-cake 
pans. 

Cream. — Scald one goblet of milk and add the whites of two 
eggs, one tablespoon of corn starch, a half cup of sugar and fla- 
vor to the taste. 

CREAM SPONGE CAKE. 

MISS JESSIE SWEENEY, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Four eggs, one coffeecup of flour, one cup of sugar and one 
tablespoon of water. 

Cream. — Put one pint of cream or sweet milk on the stove and 
let it scald; mix thoroughly together one Q^^-, one tablespoon of 
flour, a half cup of sugar and a half cup of butter and add to the 
scalding milk or cream; stir until the custard is quite thick; fla- 
vor to the taste. Bake the cake in layers in mountain-cake pans 
and spread the cream between. 

CREAM SPONGE CAKE. 

MRS. J. PARMELEE. 

Make a sponge cake, bake it in three or four layers, and have 
ready the following cream for filling : Boil one pint of milk, beat 
two eggs, add one cup of sugar and one half cup of flour; stir all 
into the milk and let it boil till it thickens, then flavor. Put this 
between the cakes; ice the top. 



LAYER CAKES. 185 

BOSTON CREAM CAKES. 

MES. M. E. KETCHUM, TOLEDO, OHIO. 

Boil one-fourth of a pound of butter in one tumbler of water; 
stir in one and a half tumblers of flour while boiling; take it from 
the fire, and when cool add five eggs, then add a half teaspoon of 
soda. Drop by spoonfuls on buttered tins and bake in a quick 
oven fifteen minutes. When done, make a hole in the side of the 
cakes and put in the following 

Cream: Two tumblers of milk, one and a half coflFeecups of 
sugar, a half coffeecup of flour and two eggs. Beat the sugar, 
eggs and flour together; add a little flavor and stir in the milk 
while boiling; let it boil until of the consistency of custard. 

BOSTON CREAM CAKES. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE, 

■ A half pound of butter, three-fourths of a pound of flour, ten 
eggs, one pint of water, and one small teaspoon of soda. Boil 
butter and water together, sprinkle in flour while boiling; let it boil 
for two or three minutes, stirring all the while. When cool, add 
eggs and soda; beat well together. Drop the batter on tins, a ta- 
blespoon at a time, and bake in a quick oven. 

Cream for filling. — One quart of milk, four eggs, one cup of 
white sugar and one cup of flour. Boil the milk. Beat eggs, 
flour and sugar together and stir in while boiling. Flavor with 
vanilla. When cool open one side of the cakes and fill with the 
cream. 



186 



SMALL CAKES. 



^nikll dake^. 




FRUIT DROP CAKES. 

MRS. J. CAKPENTER. 

WO pounds of flour, one pound of butter, one pound of 
sugar, one pound of currants and three eggs; flavor with 
lemon. Strew tin sheets with flour and powdered sugar 
and drop in small cakes. Bake in a quick oven. 

LITTLE PLUM CAKES. 

Make a dough as for pound cake, then add raisins and currants. 
Bake in patty pans. 

SPICE CAKES. 

MRS. HENRY SCRIBNER. 

One cup of molasses, one an^-arhalf cup| of butter, a salt-spoon 
of cloves, a salt-spoon of cinnamon, a salt-spoon of allspice, one 
teaspoon of soda dissolved in sour milk and flour sufficient to roll. 

CLOVE CAKE. 

MISS KATIE B. SPRAGUE. 

One cup of molasses, a half cup of sour milk, two cups of flour, 
one ^%^., one teaspoon of soda and one tablespoon of ground 
cloves. 

SPONGE DROP CAKES. 

MRS. C. P. HOLMES. 

One cup of sugar, one cup of flour, three eggs and one small 
teaspoon of baking powder in the flour. Beat the yolks of eggs 
and sugar thoroughly together, then add the whites beaten to a 
stiff froth, sprinkle in the flour and stir just enough to wet it. 
Flavor to the taste. Bake in gem-pans or small tins. 



SMALL CAKES. 187 

BAKERS' LEMON SNAPS. 

W. H. C. 

Two pounds of sugar, twelve ounces of lard, a fourth of an 
ounce of hartshorn, eight eggs and two and a half pounds of flour. 
Flavor with lemon; roll thin and cut into small, round cakes. 

LEMON SNAPS. 

MRS. G. R. OSGOOD. 

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, four teaspoons of water, A. ^^-p^^ 
one and a half teaspoons of baking powder, rind and juice of one / ' 

lemon and flour sufficient to roll. After they are cut out put on 
the white of an ^^^ and sprinkle with sugar. 

JUMBLES. 

MRS. POST, SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

Five cups of flour, two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, two 
eggs, a half cup of sweet milk and two teaspoons of baking pow- 
der. Flavor with caraway seed, lemon or nutmeg. Mix the in- 
gredients together and work in flour till it will roll nicely. Very 
fine. 

■ JUMBLES. 

MRS. SACKETT, STERLING, ILL. 

Two cups of pulverized sugar, one and a third cups of butter, 
four eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately, one teaspoon of 
soda dissolved in two tablespoons of sweet milk, and flour suffi- 
cient to roll out soft. Sprinkle white sugar over them before 
putting them into the oven. 

JUMBLES. 

MRS. PRANK PORTER, CHICAGO; 

One cup of butter, three-fourths of a cup of sweet milk, three 
cups of sugar, four eggs and three teaspoons of baking powder; 
mix very soft, roll and cut out; have a plate of cofi'ee sugar ready 
and drop each cake bottom side up .on the sugar, and immedi- 
ately transfer to the baking-pan. Bake in a moderately quick 
oven. 



188 SMALL CAKES. 

JUxMBLES. 

MRS. W. S. PEITCHAED. 

Three-fourths of a pound of butter, three-fourths of a pound of 
sugar, four eggs, one nutmeg and a fourth of a pound of flour. 
Roll in* fine sugar and flour mixed and bake in a quick oven. 

CAROLINA CAKES. 

MRS. WOOLEY, ROSEMOND, ILL. 

Four eggs, two cups of sugar, a half cup of butter, one cup of 
cream, thicken with flour, two teaspoons of cream tartar in flour, 
add one teaspoon of soda the last thing. Flavor with lemon and 
drop from the spoon. 

LADY FINGERS. 

MRS. R. A. BUNKER, SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

Four eggs, two cups of butter, three cups of flour and two cups 
of sugar; flavor'to the taste. If made into a paste for fingers, 
add just enough flour to bring it into a roll the size of a finger. 
They are nice dipped in icing. 

SAND TARTS. 

MRS. M. A. RICH, STERLING, ILL. 

One pound of flour, one pound of sugar, a half pound of butter 
and two eggs, leaving out one of the whites. Work the butter to 
a cream, add the sugar, flour and eggs; make a stifi" paste, roll 
very thin and cut in forms. Have ready some powdered sugar 
and cinnamon; wash the tarts with the beaten white of one Qg^.^ 
sprinkle the sugar and cinnamon over them, lay a few blanched 
almonds on the top, and bake. 

SCOTCH CAKE. 

MRS. M. S. BILLINGS, JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 

Two and a half pounds of butter (salt thoroughly washed out) 
and one pound of powdered sugar; stir butter and sugar to a 
cream, add four pounds of sifted flour, roll a fourth of an inch in 
thickness and cut in squares; caraway with candy mites on the 



SMALL CAKES. 189 

top. Turn your hake-pans upside down, cover with white paper, 
lay the cakes on with a knife and bake in a moderate oven. They 
will keep good for months. 

COOKIES. 

MKS. C. D. SPKAGUE. 

One cup of butter, one cup of sugar, one ^^'g., four tablespoons of 
sour milk, one teaspoon of soda, and nutmeg. Mix soft and roll 
thin, bake in a hot oven. 

COOKIES. 

ALICE HART, EOSCOE, MISSOURI. 

One pound of butter, one pound of sugar, four eggs, one gill 
of sweet milk, two teaspoons of cream tartar and one teaspoon 
of soda. Dissolve the soda in the milk and put the cream tar- 
tar in the flour. Mix soft, roll thin and cut into strips or squares 
with a jagging iron. 

SPICED COOKIES. 

MRS. E. S. SPEED, EUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Three heaping cups of brown sugar, two eggs, one cup of lard, 
one teacup of sour milk, one teaspoon of soda, three tablespoons 
of cinnamon, even teaspoon of cloves, one nutmeg, add flour 
enough to roll. Bake in a very quick oven. 

COOKIES. 

MRS. C. H. GETCHELL. 

One cup of sugar, a half cup of butter, three eggs, one table- 
spoon of sour milk, a half teaspoon of soda, nutmeg, and flour to 
roll as soft as possible. 

COOKIES. 

MRS. C. P. HOLMES. 

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, four eggs, one small tea- 
spoon of soda and a little nutmeg; mix soft. Put a cloth lightly 
over the paste-board and rub it well with flour; this will prevent 
the dough from sticking. 



190 SMALL CAKES. 

MOTHER'S COOKIES. 

Mils. G. COOPER. 

Three eggs, one cup of butter, two cups of sugar, one teaspoon 
of soda in one half cup of sweet milk, spice, and flour enough to 
roll thin. 

CHRISTMAS COOKIES. 

MRS. A. T. RAWSOJSr. 

Three and a half pounds of flour, one and a half pounds of 
sugar, three-fourths of a pound of butter, a half pint of water 
and one teaspoon of soda. Excellent. 

NEW YEAR'S COOKIES. 

MRS. HENRY SCRIBNER. 

Beat three-four.ths of a pound of butter and one pound of su- 
gar to a cream and add three eggs, one teacup of sour milk, 
one teaspoon of soda, a half cup of caraway seeds and flour 
enough to roll nicely. Very fine. 

COOKIES. 

MRS. C. C. HOWELL. 

One cup of sugar, a half cup of butter, a half cup of sweet 
milk, three eggs, two teaspoons of baking powder and flour 
to mix soft. Break an ^^^ before baking them and spread them 
with it; then sprinkle with sugar and bake. 

COCOANUT COOKIES. 

MRS. EANNIE TALCOTT, ROCKFORD, ILL. 

One and a half cups of sugar, one small cup of butter, a half 
cup of sweet milk, tivo eggs, one teaspoon of baking powder, 
one cup of cocoanut and flour to roll nicely; flavor with vanilla. 

FRIED CAKES. 

MRS. DR. ANTHONY, STERLING, ILL. 

Two cups of sour milk, two cups of sugar, two-thirds of a cup 
of lard, two eggs, one teaspoon of ginger, salt, one teaspoon of 
soda and flour sufiicient to roll. Fry in hot lard. 



SMALL CAKES. 191 

FRIED CAKES. 

MRS. JULIA SCEIPPS, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Two cups of sugar, two cups of sour milk, one egg, one table- 
spoon of lard, two teaspoons of soda, a little allspice, and flour to 
roll nicely. Fry in hot lard. 

FRIED CAKES. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

One cup of sugar, three eggs, six tablespoons of melted lard, a 
half pint of sweet milk, three teaspoons of baking powder, one 
teaspoon of mace, one teaspoon of salt and flour to mix soft. 

RICH CRULLERS. 

MRS. CORNELL. 

One and a half pounds of sugar, one pound of butter, four and 
one-half pounds of flour, eight eggs, one teacup of milk and one 
teaspoon of soda. Crullers should be rolled very thin, cut with a 
jagging iron into oblong blocks three or four inches wide, slit 
lengthwise two or three times, fried in hot lard a few minutes only 
and taken out when a light brown. 

CRULLERS. 

MRS. S. HARTMAISr. 

Six eggs, twelve tablespoons of sugar, four tablespoons of cream, 
a quarter of a teaspoon of soda, a little salt and flour sufficient to 
roll out. 

CRULLERS. 

MRS. G. R. OSGOOD. 

Three eggs, three tablespoons of sour cream, four tablespoons 
of sugar, one quarter of a teaspoon of soda and flour to thicken. 
Roll thin. 

CRULLERS. 

MRS. T. 5;. BROWN. 

One ^^'g., two tablespoons of sugar, one tablespoon of melted 
butter, and flour sufficient to roll. Fry in hot lard. Fine. 



193 SMALL CAKES. 

RAISED DOUGHNUTS. 

MRS. G. R. OSGOOD. 

Three cups of unsifted flour (sift after measuring), a half cup of 
butter, a fourth of a cup of lard rubbed into the flour, a half cup 
of good yeast and one cup of milk« Set in a warm place to rise; 
when light, mix in one and a half cups of sugar and one ^^^., pre- 
viously beaten together, and cinnamon to the taste; add flour 
enough to mold, and let it rise again; after the second rising, do 
not work the dough. Roll out and fry. 

RAISED DOUGHNUTS. 

MRS. HART. 

One cup of sweet milk, one-fourth cup of sugar, one cup butter 
or lard, one cup of yeast, three eggs; spice to taste. When the 
sponge is light, add soda and salt; mold, roll out and cut; then 
let stand on the board till light. 

RAISED DOUGHNUTS WITHOUT SUGAR. 

M. L. R. 

One medium sized bowl of sponge, three tablespoons of melted 
butter, one teaspoon of salt and flour to mold soft. Let it stand 
till very light; cut and twist and fry brown. They are very good 
when fresh to eat with coffee. 

RAISED DOUGHNUTS. 

MRS. M. E. KELLOGG. 

Three cups of sugar, four eggs, one pint of milk, one and a half 
cups of lard, a half cup of yeast, one nutmeg and salt to taste. 
Set a sponge at night; in the morning add the other ingredients. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

MRS. A. Y. RAWSO>i AND MRS. C. D. SPRAGUE. 

Two eggs, one and a half cups of sour milk, a half cup of thick 
cream or three tablespoons of melted butter, one cup of sugar, a 
half teaspoon of soda (if the milk is very sour a little more), and 
flour enough to mix soft. When butter is used instead of cream, 
mix the butter, sugar and eggs together first. Good. 



SMALL CAKES. 193 

DOUGHNUTS. 

MRS. E. S. SPEED, BUSHYILI^, ILL. 

Three large cups of sugar, a half teacup of butter, four eggs, 
one pint of buttermilk, two teaspoons of soda, two tablespoons of 
cinnamon and flour enough to make a nice dough. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

MRS. F. CORNING. 

Three eggs, one cup of sugar, one cup of sweet milk, seven ta- 
blespoons of butter or lard, a little salt, three teaspoons of baking 
powder and flour sufficient to mix soft. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

One cup of sugar, one cup of sweet milk, two eggs, two table- 
spoons of melted butter, two teaspoons of baking powder and 
flour enough to mix soft. 

SNOW BALLS. 

MRS. C. B. WILLIS. 

One cup of sugar, two eggs, four tablespoons of milk, one tea- 
spoon of cream tartar, and one teaspoon of soda if the milk is 
sour, if not, a half spoon, spice to taste and flour enough to make 
into balls. Fry in hot lard and dip them in the white of an Q^'g., 
then in powdered sugar until white. 

TANGLE BREECHES. 

MISS CORA CHASE, ROSEMOND, ILL. 

Six eggs beaten very light, one pound of sugar, a fourth of a 
pound of butter and add enough flour to roll. Cut in square 
blocks, slit them and fry in lard. Drain and sift a little sugar 
over them. 

MATRIMONY. 

• MRS. C. C. HOWELL. 

Whites of three eggs beaten to a stiff" froth and flour to knead 
a stiff" dough. Roll as thin as a wafer; cut into fancy shapes; 
drop into hot lard for a moment; turn and take out; then roll in 
pulverized sugar. 

13 



194 



GINGER BREAD. 



GERMAN CAKES. 

MBS. THEO. CARPENTER. 

Two pounds of flour, one pound of sugar, one pound of but- 
ter, three eggs, one teaspoon of cinnamon and one wine glass of 
rose water. Roll the dough thin; cut into cakes and cover with 
almonds, blanched and cut in halves. 

ROCK CAKE. 

MRS. JENNIE CARPENTER. 

Three-fourths of a pound of sweet almonds blanched and cut 
fine, one pound of pulverized sugar and the whites of five eggs. 
Beat the whites to a stiff froth, stir in the sugar then the almonds, 
and drop on white buttered paper in small cakes, making them 
cone shaped. Place them in a cool oven until they can be remov- 
ed from the paper without breaking. 

MACAROONS. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

One and a fourth pounds of almonds blanched and pounded 
with a little rose water, one pound of sugar and the whites of 
three eggs beaten very light. Add the sugar gradually, stirring 
all the time, then the almonds, and make them up with a teaspoon. 
Bake gradually a light brown. 



G[ii\^ei^ Sfekd. 




SOFT GINGER BREAD. 

I NE cup of molasses and one tablespoon of lard, heated 
together until hot; add half a cup of sour milk, a tea- 
spoon of ginger and flour to make a stiff batter; dis- 
solve one large teaspoon of soda in hot water and mix in 
the last thing. Bake in rather a slow oven. 



GINGER BREAD. 195 

SOFT GINGER BREAD. 

MRS, E. T, WELLSLAGEE. 

Two-thirds of a cup of molasses, two-thirds of a cup of sugar, 
a half cup of sour milk, one egg, a piece of butter the size of an 
^^•g^ one teaspoon of ginger, two large cups of flour and one tea- 
spoon of soda. 

SOFT GINGER BREAD. 

MES, C. H. ATKINS. 

' One cup of molasses, one of cream, two eggs, two cups of flour, 
one teaspoon of ginger, two teaspoons of baking powder mixed 
with the flour, and one teaspoon of soda. 

SPICED GINGER BREAD. 

MISS E. E. HASKELL. 

Two cups of molasses, one cup of butter, one cup of sweet 
milk, four cups of flour, two eggs, two teaspoons of soda, one table- 
spoon of ginger, one tablespoon of cinnamon, one teaspoon of 
cloves, one cup of currants and one cup of raisins. 

GINGER BREAD, (PLAIN). 

MES. A. E. OSGOOD. 

One cup of molasses, one heaping tablespoon of butter, one 
^KSi one teaspoon of ginger, a little salt, a half cup of sweet cream, 
half a teaspoon of soda and flour enough to mix soft. Roll in 
sheets, score with a knife in squares or diamonds, and bake. 

GINGER BREAD. 

MES. W. H. BAY, EUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Three eggs, one cup of molasses, one cup of brown sugar, one 
cup of sour milk, one cup of butter, four cups of flour, one ta- 
blespoon of soda and one teaspoon of cream tartar. Bake half 
an hour. 

GINGER SPONGE CAKE. 

MES. P. COENING. 

Two-thirds of a cup of sugar, a half cup of molasses, a half 
cup of butter, a half cup of sweet milk, two cups of flour, two 
eggs, two teaspoons of ginger, and one teaspoon of soda. 



196 GINGER BREAD. 

GINGER CAKE. 

MRS. HARKNESS. 

Beat one and a half cups of sugar and a half cup of butter to a 
cream and add two eggs, one small tablespoon of ginger, one 
heaping tablespoon of cinnamon, one cup of sour milk, one heap- 
ing teaspoon of soda and flour enough to make it as stiff as cup 
cake. 

DROP GINGER CAKES. 

MRS. C. H. GETCHELL. ^ 

One pint of molasses, a half pint of buttermilk, one teacup of 
butter and lard, four eggs, two tablespoons of ginger, one table- 
spoon of soda and flour sufficient to make a stiff batter. Drop 
into a shallow pan. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

One pint of syrup, one pint of sugar, one pint of butter, a table- 
spoon of lard, a half cup of milk, one teaspoon of soda, one 
tablespoon of ginger, cloves and cinnamon, and flour for stifi" 
dough. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

MRS. C. D. SPRAGUE. 

One and a half cups of molasses, one cup of shortening, one 
teaspoon of soda dissolved in boiling water, one tablespoon of gin- 
ger, mix stiff and roll thin. Bake in a hot oven. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

GRANDMA SI'EED, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Three pints of molasses, two-thirds of a pint of lard, two-thirds 
of a teacup of ginger and one-third of a cup of soda. Mix with 
flour and roll thin. 

GRAHAM SNAPS. 

MRS. W. A. COLTON. 

One cup of molasses, a half cup of sugar, a half cup of butter 
and one teaspoon of soda. Sift the Graham flour and mix them 
stiff enough to roll. 



GINGER BREAD. 197 

GINGER SNAPS. 

MES. J. LAIRD AND MES. C. W. SIBLEY. 

One cup of sugar, one cup of molasses, one cap of butter and 
lard mixed, two teaspoons of ginger, one teaspoon of soda and a 
little salt. Heat sugar, molasses, butter and lard to boiling, stir 
in ginger and soda while hot, mix rather stiff and roll thin. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

MRS. T. E. BROWNi 

A fourth of a pound of butter, a fourth of a pound of lard, a 
fourth of a pound of sugar, one pint of molasses, two tablespoons 
of ginger, one wine-glass of milk, one large teaspoon of soda in the 
milk, and flour sufficient to roll|thin 

GINGER COOKIES. 

MRS. S. JOHNS. 

Three teaspoons of melted lard or butter, three teaspoons of 
boiling water in a teacup, filling the cup with molasses, one tea- 
spoon of ginger, one teaspoon of soda, a little cloves and flour to 
roll. 

GINGER COOKIES. 

MRS. W, R. STEWARD. 

One cup of sugar, one cup of molasses, one cup of melted lard 
and butter, one Q^g., one tablespoon of ginger, three tablespoons 
of water, one tablespoon of soda and flour to mix soft. 

GINGER COOKIES. 

MRS. E. S. SPEED, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

One teacup of molasses, one teacup of butter, a half teacup of 
sugar, a half teacup of water, one tablespoon of ginger, one table- 
spoon of soda, flour sufficient to roll. 



dfJ^^M^ ^X® ^^Kc^Y f)igS]^0. 



TAPIOCA CREAM. 

MRS. KETCHUM, CHICAGO. 

"^i^fe^ OAK one small teacup of tapioca in a pint of milk over 
"lll^^r ^^S^^' ^^ *^^ morning add one quart of milk. Set the 
Jjr^P?^^ pail in which it is made in a kettle of boiling water; 
/in, beat and stir in the yolks of three eggs; add sugar 
' to the taste and three teaspoons of flavor. It is very- 
well to use one part lemon and two parts vanilla (or vice 
versa). Cook until smooth, like a soft custard; beat the 
whites thoroughly and stir in after it is done. Served cold, it 
makes a most delicate dessert. 

TAPIOCA CREAM. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

Soak two tablespoons of tapioca for two hours; boil in one quart 
of milk; add the yolks of three eggs well beaten with one cup of 
sugar; let this boil up, then set it away to cool. Beat the whites 
of the eggs, add a little sugar, pour over the top and bake a light 
brown. Eat cold. 

TAPIOCA CREAM. 

MRS. C. H. GETCHELL. 

Four tablespoons of tapioca soaked four hours, yolks of five 
eggs, four tablespoons of sugar, one cup of raisins and flavor to 
the taste. Boil one quart of milk and add the eggs, sugar, tapi- 
oca and raisins. Cook a few minutes, pour into molds, and put 
the beaten whites of eggs and sugar on the top. 

199 



200 CREAMS AND FANCY DISHES. 

TAPIOCA CREAM. 

MRS, PwOUNDS. 

Four tablespoons of tapioca, one quart of scalded milk, four 
eggs and eight tablespoons of sugar beaten with the yolks. Boil 
like custard, flavor, frost and brown. 

EGG CREAM. 

MRS. CLEGHORN. 

Scald three pints of new milk; take nine eggs, leaving out the 
whites of six; sugar the remainder to the taste and beat well; turn 
the milk over them and set in a kettle of boiling water; when of 
the consistency of cream, turn into a dish to cool. Take the whites, 
add six dessertspoons of fine sugar, three of currant jelly and fla- 
vor to the taste; beat very stift' and spread over the whole. 

RICE CREAM. 

MRS. EVA BRYCE. 

Three-fourths of a cup of rice, two quarts of sweet milk, and 
sugar and nutmeg to taste. Cook slowly about four hours, stir- 
ring occasionally; then bake. A good dish to prepare Saturday 
and serve cold for Sunday dinner. 

FRUIT CREAM. 

Take a half ounce of isinglass dissolved in a little cold water, 
add one pint of good cream sweetened to the taste, and boil it. 
When nearly cold, lay some apricot or raspberry jam in the bot- 
tom of a glass dish, and pour it over. This is excellent. 

ITALIAN CREAM. 

MRS. E. S. SPEED, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Three pints of milk and cream, yolks of eight eggs, one cofi'e- 
cup of white sugar and six sheets of gelatine. Flavor with va- 
nilla. Put the gelatine in the milk when cold; heat slowly and 
make as you would boiled custard; then pour into the molds. It 
should be made some twelve hours before wanted for use, as it 
will not jelly sooner. If in a hurry, add more gelatine. 



CREAMS AND FANCY DISHES. 201 

LEMON CREAM. 

MRS. M, J. WELLSLAGEE. 

To a half box of Cox's gelatine put one pint of cold water; let 
it stand ten minutes; then add one pint of boiling water and one 
cup of sugar; flavor with lemon or acid; boil it three or four min- 
utes, then let it cool, and slowly stir in the yolks of three eggs 
well beaten; again set on the stove and let it come to a boil; 
then stir in the whites, beaten to a froth, and turn into a mold. 

HAMBURG CREAM. 

MRS M. A. RICH, STERLING, ILL. 

Beat the yolks of ten eggs with one pound of powdered sugar 
and the juice of one lemon; stir it over the fire a few minutes, 
being careful not to cook it too much; take it off and stir in the 
whites beaten to a froth. 

VANILLA CREAM. 

MRS. F. M. MILLS. 

To a half box of gelatine put a pint of cold water and let it 
stand an hour; then add a pint of boiling water and one cup of 
sugar; let it cook until it will jelly; then stir in slowly the yolks 
of three eggs beaten light and flavor with tartaric acid to the taste. 
Take from the stove, stir in the whites of the eggs beaten to a 
stiff froth, flavor with vanilla and pour into molds. 

SPANISH CREAM. 

MISS HATTIE STOWE. 

Put a half box of gelatine into a half pint of cold milk; after it 
is dissolved set it on the stove and let it come to a boil; beat the 
yolks of two eggs and stir them in ; when it comes to the boiling 
point again, take it from the stove and stir in the beaten whites 
of the eggs. Flavor to the taste and put on ice to cool. Serve 
with cream and sugar. 

THOMPSON'S ICE CREAM. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

Boil three quarts of milk, one and a half pounds of sugar and 
twelve eggs. Simmer all together, strain and, when cool, add three 
pints of well beaten cream and flavor. 



203 CREAMS AND FANCY DISHES. 

ICE CREAM. 

MRS. J. PARMELEE. 

One quart of milk, six eggs and a half pound of sugar. Mix 
thoroughly; and only heat until it begins to thicken. Strain well 
after taking from the fire, and when cool add the flavor. 

ICE CREAM. 

MRS. SARAH m'cLURE, BEARDSTOWN, ILL. 

One gallon of milk, six eggs, one pound of sugar or more, and 
eight tablespoons of corn starch. Boil one half the milk, add the 
corn starch and boil again, then the yolks of eggs, but do not boil 
(only cook), then strain it over the whites of eggs beaten to a 
stiff froth, and beat thoroughly; put in the remainder of the milk 
with the sugar dissolved in it and when cold the flavor. Beat fre- 
quently during the process of freezing. 

LEMON SHERBET. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Two pounds of white sugar, two quarts of water, the juice of 
six lemons. Strain through a wire sieve and freeze like ice cream. 

ORANGE SHERBET. 
Is made in the same way by substituting oranges. 

WHIPS. 

MRS. A. Y. RAWSON. 

• /I - 

One pint of cream, one cup of sugar and the whites of two or 
three eggs, according to the thickness of the cream. Beat cream 
and whites separately, then mix, flavor with vanilla and beat up 
together just before putting into glasses for the table. 

SYLLABUB. 

MISS CORA CHASE, ROSEMOND, ILL. 

Whip a half pint of rich cream and two tablespoons of fine 
white sugar to a froth, remove the foam and add the juice and 
half the grated rind of a lemon. 



CREAMS AND FANCY DISHES. . 203 

FRENCH CUSTARD. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHAED. 

One quart of milk and twelve eggs. Beat the whiles to a froth; 
when the milk boils lay them in for a moment, turn them over 
and take them out. Beat with the yolks sufficient sugar for a 
custard, flavor to the taste, pour them into the boiling milk, turn 
into the dish and lay the whites over. 

BOILED CUSTARD. 

MRS. E. A. C. 

One quart of new milk, five eggs and sugar to the taste. Put 
the milk into a tin pail and set in boiling water. Beat the yolks, 
one white and sugar well together; pour them into the boiling 
milk, stirring all the time until it thickens; then take it from the 
stove and add vanilla or lemon, and set it in a cool place. Just 
before tea whip the other whites to a stiff froth with a large 
spoon of powdered sugar and lay on the top of the custard. 

FLOATING ISLAND. 

MRS. WILLARD. 

Beat the whites of two eggs to a stiff froth, pour this on a quart 
of milk previously set to boil, and when the milk boils remove 
the foam. Beat the yolks of five eggs and the whites of three 
together with sugar and salt to taste; stir this into the boiling milk. 
Let it boil, then pour into a glass dish with the foam floating. 
Flavor with lemon or vanilla. 

FLOATING ISLAND. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHARD. 

Sweeten one pint of rich cream with loaf sugar and stir into it 
sufficient currant jelly to color it a fine pink. Put it in a glass 
bowl and place in the center a pile of sliced sponge cake, every 
slice spread thickly with jam and laid evenly one on another. 
Have ready another pint of cream flavored with the juice of two 
lemons and whipped to a stiff froth. Heap it all over the pile of 
cake so as to entirely cover it; beat the whites of eggs to a very 
stiff' froth and spread over the top. Both creams must be made 
very sweet. 



304 . CREAMS AND FANCY DISHES. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

MES. T. A. PAEKKE, EUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Makfe a boiled custard of a pint of milk and four e^gs, flavor 
with vanilla, make it very svpeet and set it away to cool. Put half 
an ounce of gelatine into a gill of hot milk, when dissolved pour 
it into a quart of rich cream and whip to a froth. When the cus- 
tard is cold stir in the cream gently. Line a mold with thin 
slices of sponge cake or sponge fingers, pour in the mixture and 
set in a cool place. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

MES. KETTIE DODGE, KOSEMOND, ILL. 

Make a pint of rich custard with three eggs, one pint of milk 
and vanilla to the taste. Dissolve ,nearly a half box of Cox's gel- 
atine in a little warm water, pour it into the custard when nearly 
cool and, while congealing, stir in a quart of whipped cream. 
Line a glass bowl with strips of sponge cake and pour the mix- 
ture over it. Flavor with vanilla or rose and grate rose candy 
over the top. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

MES. J. PAEMELEE. 

Stir six eggs, well beaten, into one quart of boiling milk, add 
one pint of white sugar, then dissolve one box of Cox's gelatine 
in one pint of water, stir this" into the custard while hot, strain 
through a sieve and set it away to cool. When thoroughly cold 
add three pints of sweet cream churned to a froth and flavor. 
Line a dish with sponge cake, fill with the charlotte and cover 
with a piece of cake if you like. 

CHOCOLATE BLANC MANGE. 

MES. J. CAEPENTEE. 

Mix one square of chocolate grated fine with four large spoons 
of corn starch, make into a paste with a little milk, pour it into 
one quart of boiling milk and stir until it thickens; pour into 
molds and when cold eat with cream sweetened and flavored. 



CREAMS AND FANCY DISHES. 205 

CORN STARCH BLANC MANGE. 

MISS JENNIE CHASE. 

One pint of milk, two tablespoons of corn starch and one even 
tablespoon of sugar mixed well in a little extra milk, butter the 
size of a hickory-nut and a little salt. When the milk scalds 
stir in salt, butter and corn starch, and let it boil three minutes, 
stirring all the time; then take it from the stove and flavor with 
vanilla; pour into a mold previously wet with cold water and set 
away to cool. Serve with sugar and cream, flavored. 

JELLY BLANC MANGE. 

MRS. C. P, HOLMES. 

Take currant, or any tart jelly, and dissolve in a sufficient 
quantity of water for the amount you wish to make, enough of it 
to make it taste nicely; put it in a pan over a kettle of boiling 
water; when hot, dissolve corn starch in cold water and stir in 
until thick enough to mold. Serve with sugar and cream. 



C!0XS^5<C^I0X^^Y. 




CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

^ NE and a half pounds of sugar, one-fourth of a pound of 
s butter, one-fourth of a pound of chocolate, one cup of 
milk; boil twenty minutes, stirring all the time; add 
vanilla; spread thin on buttered tins. 

j CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

Mix a half cup of grated chocolate and one cup of milk to- 
gether until perfectly smooth; put one cup of molasses and three 
cups of brown sugar on the stove in a greased pan, stir twenty 
minutes (try by dropping a little into a glass of water — ?f it hard- 
ens it is done); then put in the chocolate and milk and a piece of 
butter the size of a walnut; boil fifteen minutes more, stirring all 
the time; pour into buttered tins, and when cool mark with a 
knife. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

One cup of molasses, one cup of sugar, one cup of grated choco- 
late, one cup of milk, a half cup of butter; use vanilla or lemon 
for flavor. Boil about fifteen minutes, or until it will harden in 
cold water or on snow, and cool in shallow pans. Syrup should 
never be used in candy making. Candy should be pretty con- 
stantly stirred to prevent burning and the pans always well 
greased. 

207 



208 CONFECTIONERY. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

MISS LIZZIE SMITH, MT. CAKKOLL, ILL. 

Two cups of sugar, one and a half cups of molasses, one cup of 
sweet milk, one cup of chocolate and one tablespoon of butter. Boil 
until it becomes brittle in cold water; pour out in shallow pans, 
and, when it begins to harden, cut it in squares with a knife. 

CARAMELS. 

MRS. C. C. HOWELL, 

Two pints of sugar, one tablespoon of butter, a half pint of 
cold water, one tablespoon of vinegar and one tablespoon of lem- 
on extract. Boil until it candies, but do not stir it. Pour into 
buttered plates, let it stand until cool enough to pull, and be sure 
to flour the hands. Chocolate or cocoanut may be mixed with it. 
Any flavoring will do. 

HICKORY- NUT DROPS. 

MISS CARRIE WEAVER. 

One pound of white sugar, one pound of nuts chopped fine, 
whites of five eggs and three tablespoons of flour; beat whites of 
eggs to a stifi" froth, add sugar, nuts and flour together; drop on 
buttered tins, and bake in a slow oven. 

MOLASSES CANDY. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

One cup of mola&ses, a half cup of sugar, one teaspoon of 
vinegar and a small piece of butter. Boil just ten minutes, stir- 
ring all the time; cool it, and pull. 

• 

VINEGAR CANDY. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

Two cups of sugar, one cup of vinegar and a fourth of a cup of 
butter; boil until it will harden in water, and flavor just before 
removing it from the fire. 

COCOANUT CANDY. 

MISS CORA CHASE, ROSEMOND, ILL. 

One pound of sugar, a half cup of water, one teaspoon of cream 
tartar and one cup of cocoanut. 



CONFE CTIONER K 209 

FRENCH CREAM CANDY. 

Set two and a half pounds of granulated sugar and one pint of 
"water on the stove and stir until it begins to boil, but no longer; 
after it boils well add one- fourth of a teaspoon of pure cream tar- 
tar; boil rapidly ten to twenty minutes; try a little in a cup of 
cold water and if it has a soft, waxy appearance it is done. Set 
away to cool, and when nearly cold stir it with a flat piece of 
wood until it has a snowy, white appearance. 

CREAM CANDY. 

MKS. JOr, TRENTON FALLS, N. T. 

One pound of lump sugar, two-thirds of a tumbler of water, one 
teaspoon of vinegar, a piece of butter the size of a walnut and a 
half teaspoon of cream tartar. Boil twenty minutes without stir- 
ring; pull when cgol. 

WHITE TAFFY CANDY. 

MISS LIZZIE SMITH, MT. CARROLL, ILL. 

Two cups of sugar, a half cup of water and one tablespoon of 
vinegar; boil until it will harden in cold water, pour on but- 
tered plates and pull as soon as it is cool. It is better not to 
cook more than double this amount at a time. 

BUTTER SCOTCH. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

One cup of butter, one cup of sugar and one cup of molasses. 
Boil until it will harden in water, and spread it thinly in pans. 

BUTTER SCOTCH. 

MRS. C. H. SWEENEY. 

Three tablespoons of silver drip, one pound of sugar, butter the 
size of an egg and the juice of one lemon. Mix well before boil- 
ing; when done pour on buttered paper and cut into squares 
before it cools. 

KISSES. 

MRS. HENRY SCRIBNEK. 

Beat the whites of five eggs with two pounds of sugar, and a 
little citric acid. Flavor with lemon and drop on buttered paper. 
14 



210 CONFECTIONERY, 

KISSES. 

MRS. C. B. WILLIS. 

Beat the whites of four eggs to a froth; add the juice of one 
lemon or a little rose-water; sift and roll a half pound of white 
sugar and beat with the eggs; spread white paper on buttered 
tins; drop the mixture on the paper, a tablespoon at a time, and 
put them into an oven only moderately hot. When the tops be- 
come hard take them from the oven, have a solution of gum ara- 
ble, dip the lower sides of the cakes into it and join them to- 
gether. 

COCOANUT KISSES. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Take the same weight of sugar and of grated cocoanut, being 
careful before grating to remove the brown skin inside the shell; 
allow the whites of two eggs to one nut, beat them to a stiff froth, 
mix with the cocoanut, place on the fire and stir till it boils and 
looks clear; then remove it, wet your hands in cold water and 
make little pyraijiids. Put them on white paper greased with fresh 
lard, and bake in a moderate oven until the tops are a little brown. 
Take them from the paper while warm to prevent breaking. 

COCOANUT CAKES. 

MRS. C. B. WILLIS. 

Take equal parts of grated cocoanut and powdered white sugar; 
add whites of eggs beaten to a stiff froth, six to a pound, or 
enough to wet the whole; drop the mixture on buttered tins in 
cakes the size of a cent, and several inches apart. Bake imme- 
diately in a moderate oven. 

COCOANUT CAKES. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

Grate fine one cocoanut, and add two cups of sugar and the 

white of one q^^ beaten to a froth. Drop on flat buttered tins, 

and bake slowly. 

COCOANUT CAKES. 

MRS. J. PARMELEE. 

One pound of sugar, one pound of grated cocoanut and whites 
of six eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Drop on buttered paper. 



f f{l/.l¥B, JE(I<I<I5<g S]v[f) f^f}S^gi^?vVS^g. 



'ill PORCELAIN kettle is the best to cook fruit in. Use 

~ fjr nice sugar for jellies and preserves. Take off the scum 

^||^^ that rises to the top in boiling fruits. In stirring fruit 

^ use a wooden spoon or j^addle. Strain jelly through a flan- 

Ij?^ nel bag. Marmalade and jam must be stirred constantly 

I while boiling. 

Before tying up fruits, cut a paper the size of the vessel, dip 

in brandy and lay on the top. If a mold forms all over this the 

fruit will keep well, but if in spots, it must be scalded. Jellies 

and preserves keep better in -small jars or glasses than in large 

ones, as frequent dipping into them causes them to ferment. 

Suggestion. — Put up jam while hot. Fruit and sugar which 
have been boiled together for some time, keep better if the pots 
into which they are poured are tied while hot. 

STEWED AND BAKED APPLES. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

Pare and core some firm, acid apples, stick cloves in them, fill 
the vacancy left by the core with sugar and some thin strips of 
lemon-peel, if convenient, and put them into a baking-pan with 
just water enough to keep them from burning. Bake until ten- 
der, but not until they break. Eat cold, with whipped cream 
heaped over them, for dinner, or with plain cream for tea. 

CODDLED APPLES. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Peel twelve apples and set them in a pan, slice in one lemon, 
add one pint of wbite sugar and one quart of water or more, cover, 
arid boil slowly until the apples are clear. 

211 



212 FRUITS, JELLIES, PRESERVES. 

BOILED APPLES. 

V MES. SIBLEY, CHICAGO. 

Take a number of large, tart apples; pare them or not, as you 
choose; extract the core, taking care to keep the apples whole; 
place in the bottom of a deep dish, fill each cavity with sugar, 
and add enough more to make a rich syrup; put in enough water 
to make the syrup; cover close and stew slowly a couple of hours. 

PRESERVED APPLES. 



Cut vap a quantity of pippins; take the parings and cores and 
boil alone for an hour, strain off the water, add it to the sliced 
fruit, put it into a sauce-pan and let it simmer till the apples are 
done; then add a pound and a half of sugar to each quart of fruit, 
and boil gently for an hour and a half, taking care that it does 
not burn. 

CUT APPLES. 

MRS. C. M. CARPEKTEB. 

Boil down sweet cider a little more than half; chop the apples 
and two or three lemons and put into the boiling cider; add 
enough sugar to make palatable. Fine. 

APPLE SNOW. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Stew one quart of apples with one lemon till very tender, press 
them through a sieve and sweeten; just before serving stir in the 
well-beaten whites of four eggs, sweetened, and pile upon a glass 
bowl. Eat with rich cream. 

CRYSTAL APPLES. 

MRS. F. V. STOWE. 

Pare twelve good eating apples and boil them in a quart of 
water with a pint of white sugar until tender clear through, taking 
care not to break them; take them from the syrup and place in 
a dish; boil the syrup down until it is thick, then pour it over 
the apples; place them on ice and eat with rich cream. 



FRUITS, JELLIES, PRESERVES. 213 

APPLE MERINGUES. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Fill a small, deep dish half full of stewed apples, or any pre- 
served acid fruit, (peaches are very good), and pour over an icing 
of the beaten whites of six eggs and six tablespoons of white 
sugar; bake slowly from one to two hours. It can be eaten cold 
or hot. 

A DELICIOUS DISH OF APPLES. 

MRS. S. SIBLEY, CHICAGO. 

Pare and core two pounds of apples, slice them into a pan, add 
one jDOund of loaf sugar, the juice of two lemons and grated rind 
of one; let these boil slowly about two hours; turn into a mold, 
and serve when cold with custard or cream. 

APPLES TO BE EATEN WITH MEAT. 

MRS. W. H. SIBLEY. 

Take good, tart apples, slice them without paring into a pie-tin, 
sprinkle sugar over them, put in a small piece of butter and a 
little water and bake until tender. 

AMBROSIA. 

MRS. B. S. SPEED, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Six sweet oranges, peeled and sliced, one pineapple, peeled 
and sliced, and one large cocoanut, grated. Place alternate lay- 
ers of orange and pineapple, with grated cocoanut between, and 
sprinkle pulverized sugar over each layer. This is delicious. 

AMBROSIA. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHABD. 

Two cocoanuts, six lemons and six oranges; pare and slice the 
lemons and oranges and grate the cocoanut; place layers of or- 
ange and lemon alternately with cocoanut, and sprinkle powdered 
sugar over each layer. 



214 FRUITS, JELLIES, PRESERVES. 

AMBROSIA. 

MR. C. E. CHASE. 

Peel twelve oranges and slice them thin; grate one fine, large 
cocoanut; put in a glass dish alternate layers of orange and coca- 
nut, and sprinkle sugar over each layer. 

CANNED PEACHES, OR OTHER FRUIT. 

MRS. G. R. OSGOOD. 

Make a syrup of two pints of water and four pints of sugar; let 
it boil; put in the peaches and cook till tender, then fill the can. 
Add more sugar as the syrup thins by putting in fruit. 

CANNING FRUIT. 

MRS. J. G. BLAKE, MT. CARROLL, ILL. 





TIME FOE BOILING FEUITS. 


SUGAB 


: TO QTTAET, 


Cherries, 


5 minutes. 


6 ounces. 


Raspberries, 


- 6 


tt _ . 


4 


(C 


Blackberries, 


6 


ct . _ 


6 


(( 


Strawberries, - 


- 8 


" - 


8 


U 


Plums, ... 


10 


a . . 


8 


(( 


Whortleberries, 


- 5 


" . . - 


4 


u 


Pie Plant, sliced. 


- 10 


« _ 


10 


(( 


Bartlett Pears, halved, - 


20 


" - 


6 


(C 


Quinces, sliced. 


- 15 


u . 


10 


u 


Ripe Currants, - 


6 


" - 


8 


(( 


Peaches, 


8 


4t _ _ 


4 


(( 


Peaches, whole - 


- 15 


" - 


4 


(( 


Siberian Crab Apples, - 


25 


a . 


- 8 


(C 


Sour Apples, quartered. 


- 10 


cc 


5 


(( 



SUGGESTION. 

MRS. HOWELL. 

While canning fruit, put a table knife all around inside of the 
jar, moving slowly, until the bubbles do not rise; then fill again 
and seal. 

PEACH BUTTER. 

Peel the peaches, and boil the peelings in water one hour and 
skim out, then put in the peaches and make like apple butter. 



FRUITS, JELLIES, PRESERVES. 215 

APPLE BUTTER. 

MES. E. P. CHASE. 

Boil twelve gallons of cider down to four; pare, core and quarter 
the apples; put them into the cider and boil them three or four 
hours. It is best to have two kettles on the stove at once so as to 
keep one filled up; as the apples boil down in one, fill from the 
other, and then keep adding fresh apples to the one you fill from, 
stirring continually or it will burn. To five gallons of the butter, 
add ten pounds of sugar and boil together one hour. Just before 
taking from the fire, put in a little ground cloves or cinnamon if 
you wish. Pour into gallon jars and seal with beef suet tried out 
and poured over hot. 

LEMON BUTTER. 

MRS. HAEKNESS. 

Three lemons, one pound of pulverized sugar, six eggs and but- 
ter the size of a walnut. Squeeze the lemons, being particular to 
use only the juice, add the sugar, the yolks of six eggs and the 
whites of four; beat well; add the butter; let it boil up and pour 
it into a dish. 

LEMON BUTTER. 

MISS S. BLANCHAED, POET B., PA. 

The grated rind and juice of one lemon, two cups of sugar, one 
cuiD of water and two eggs. Stir sugar and eggs together, put in 
the water and lemon, let it get luke warm, then strain the whole 
and boil it about a minute. Good for pudding sauce or cakes. 

CIDER APPLE SAUCE. 

MES. DE. EAWSOX. 

Take tart apples, pare and quarter them and spread on a plate 
to dry; they are better if dried only a short time, not more than 
forty- eight hours, and even less will do. Take sufficient cider 
for the quantity of sauce desired, and dilute it with water one 
half or more, if the cider is very rich and strong; set it on the 
stove and let it simmer slowly, put in a few pieces of the apple 
at a time and let them just cook through but not enough to 
break, take them out carefully and put them into a dish; continue 
this until all are cooked, then pour the juice over them. 



216 FRUITS, JELLIES, PRESERVES. 

TOMATO MARMALADE. 

Two pounds of tomatoes, two pounds of sugar and the juice 
and grated rind of one lemon. Take oif the skins of the tomatoes, 
mix the sugar with them, boil one hour, then add the lemon and 
boil half an hour; a few pieces of ginger root may be used. 

JOHN THOMAS. 

MRS. C. H. SWEENEY. 

Plunge fine, ripe tomatoes into boiling water, skin and slice 
them and remove the seeds. Put wild plums into a kettle with 
sufficient water to keep them from burning, boil until soft, and 
rub through a colander, then take an equal weight of plums and 
tomatoes, add a pound of sugar to a pound of fruit and boil twenty 
minutes, stirring constantly. 

RASPBERRY JAM. 

MRS. HENRY SCRIBNER. 

To one pound* of currant juice take five pounds of raspberries 
and five pounds of sugar. Put the sugar and berries in layers, 
mash them and let them stand one hour, then add the currant 
juice and boil a half hour. Blackberry jam is made in the same 
way. 

BAKED PEACHES. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Take twelve pounds of good, fair cling peaches, scald them 
and remove the doAvn with a coarse towel; put them in a milk 
crock with four pounds of sugar and one cup of water, cover and 
bake four hours; then put into quart jars. They will keep all 
winter — try it. 

BAKED QUINCES. 

MRS. C. H. SAVEENEY. 

Pare and halve equal quantities of quinces and sound sweet 
apples. Place them in a milk crock, first a layer of quince, then 
of sugar, a layer of apples, another layer of sugar and repeat the 
layers as you wish; nearly cover with water and put a plate on 
the top. Bake thtee hours. 



FRUITS, JELLIES, PRESERVES. 217 

BAKED PEARS. 

MRS. C, H. SWEENEY. 

Pare, halve and core six pounds of sound, ripe pears, put them 
into a milk crock and add three pounds of fine white sugar, and 
one cup of water. Bake three hours in a slow oven. These are 
excellent. 

PRESERVED QUINCES. 

MRS. J. PARMELEE. 

Throw the quinces into cold water as you peel and quarter 
them; boil them gently in sweetened water until they are soft; 
then take them out of the liquid and put them into a jar with 
their weight of white sugar, and let them stand two days; then 
scald them with the sugar and bottle tight. 

PRESERVED PEARS OR QUINCES. 

MRS. J. PARMELEE. 

Put the fruit when prepared into a steamer, having first laid a 
napkin on the bottom. Place it over boiling water and steam un- 
til tender; then put it into bottles and pour over it a hot syrup, 
which must be in readiness. 

PRESERVED QUINCES WITH APPLES. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Pare, core and quarter an equal weight of sweet apples and of 
quinces; put them into a kettle and nearly cover with water; 
^ boil them until they can be pierced hy a straw; take them out, 
add the sugar, allowing a pound of sugar to a pound of fruit, and 
boil to a syrup; then put the fruit in and boil from three to five 
minptes. Put into jars and set away for use. 

QUINCE JELLY. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Take the parings and cores of the quinces, put them into the 
kettle and boil ten or fifteen minutes; then take oif and strain in 
a jelly bag; add one pound of sugar to a pound of juice and boil 
a few minutes until it jellies. 



218 FHUITS, JELLIES, PRESERVES. 

CURRANT PRESERVES. 

MRS. T. E. BROWN. 

Put pound to pound of sugar and fruit. Let the sugar stand on 
the fruit over night. Pour off the juice and bring it to a boiling 
heat; then add raisins in the proportion of one pound of raisins 
to four pounds of fruit, and boil five minutes; then put in the 
currants, boiling five minutes; skim out the fruit and boil the juice 
until it will jelly. 

PEACH PRESERVES. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Peel the peaches; take equal weights of sugar and fruit; sprin- 
kle the sugar over the peaches and let them stand over night. In 
the morning, put all in the kettle together and boil until the 
peaches are clear; then skim out the fruit and boil the juice until it 
is a rich syrup. Put the fruit in again and boil together five min- 
utes; then put up in small jars. 

PRESERVED DAMSONS. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Take one pound of sugar to one pound of plums. Put the su- 
gar in a preserving kettle with water sufficient to dissolve it; boil 
to a syrup, and pour over the plums; let them stand over night 
and repeat the same next morning. The third day, put all in the 
kettle together and boil until the plums are cooked through; take 
out the fruit with a skimmer and boil the syrup until thick; pour 
it over the fruit and put in small jars for use. 

PINE-APPLE PRESERVE. 

MRS. HENRY SCRIBNER. 

Pare the fruit and slice it very thin; then take one and a fourth 
pounds of sugar to one pound of apple; place a single layer of 
the pineapple and a layer of sugar in a dish alternately, and let it 
stand over night. In the morning, drain off the sugar, which will 
be a syrup, into a porcelain kettle and let it boil; then put in the 
slices carefully and boil till clear; skim out the fruit and boil the 
syrup until thick; then pour it over the fruit. 



FRUITS, JELLIES, PRESERVES. 219 

GRAPE PRESERVES. 

MRS. T. E. BROWN. 

Take the grapes between the thumb and finger, squeeze out the 
pulps, put them into a kettle and set them on the stove; boil 
ten or fifteen minutes and strain through a colander; put the skins 
with the juice and pulps, add a pound of sugar to a pound of fruit 
and boil ten minutes. 

PRESERVED WATERMELON. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

Take the thick rind of a ripe watermelon, cut it into small strips, 
cut oiF all the red part and scrape the outside. Boil the rind with 
peach leaves and saleratus — twelve leaves and one teaspoon of sal- 
eratus to two quarts of water; this will turn them green; when 
tender, take them out and put them into cold water Avith a half 
tablespoon of alum dissolved in it to make them brittle. Let 
them soak one hour; then rinse them in clear water and boil fif- 
teen or twenty minutes in a syrup of equal parts of sugar and 
water, adding lemons cut into small pieces, allowing one lemon 
to two pounds of rind. When cool, add a little extract of ginger. 
Let them stand three or four days; then pour the syrup off, boil it 
till very rich, and just cover the rinds; pour on boiling hot. 

QUINCE MARMALADE. 

MRS. HENRY SCRIBNER. 

Pare and core the quinces, cover with water, boil until tender, 
and rub through a colander; then take equal weights of the quince 
and sugar and boil twenty minutes, stirring constantly. Pour into 
cups and tumblers. 

,PLUM MARMALADE. 

After the juice is taken from the plums, rub the pulp through 
a colander; to this add an equal weight of sugar and boil twenty 
minutes. Put up like jelly. 

GREEN GRAPE JELLY AND MARMALADE. 

Make like plum, only do not use as much water; one pint of 
water to a peck of grapes is sufficient. 



220 FR UITS, JELLIES, PRESE R VES. 

ORANGE MARMALADE. 

MRS. SNYDER, KEW YORK. 

Buy, in January or February, small sour oranges; put them into 
a kettle and cover with cold water; when they begin to boil, pour 
off the water and cover again with cold water, and when it boils, 
pour off as before; do this three or four times; the last time let 
them boil until they can be pierced with a straw; then put them on a 
platter, let them stand over night, then peel them. Chop the peel as 
fine as mince meat; rub the pulp through a colander and mix it with 
the chopped peel; add their weight in sugar; then put all this into a 
kettle and boil till thick enough. 

CRAB MARMALADE. 

After the juice is taken from the crab apples, add a quart of 
water to the pulp and rub it through a colander. To this add 
a half pound of sugar to one pound of fruit, and the lemons left from 
the jelly. Boil twenty minutes, then put up like jelly. 

PLUM JELLY. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

To one peck of plums add three pints of water, boil until soft, 
pour into a jelly bag and let it drip, but do not squeeze. Take 
equal weights of juice and sugar, and boil fifteen or twenty min- 
utes or until it jellies. 

PIE PLANT JELLY. 

G. H. 

Take the pie plant when young and juicy, cut it up, add a lit- 
tle water and boil till tender, being careful not to scorch it. Strain 
through a flannel bag, without squeezing; add lemons to suit the 
taste, and to three pints of juice put two pounds of sugar. 
Boil until it jellies nicely. 

QUINCE JELLY. 

MRS. HENRY SCRIBNER. 

Boil down an equal quantity of water and quince to one-half, 
then take one pound of sugar to one pint of juice and boil a few 
minutes until it jellies. 



FRUITS, JELLIES, PRESERVES. 221 

SIBERIAN CRAB JELLY. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Put one peck of crab apples into a preserving kettle, and cover 
them with water, boil till soft, pour into a jelly bag and let them 
drip. Take equal weights of the juice and sugar, and into this, 
slice two lemons. Boil ten minutes, and just before taking up, 
dip out the slices of lemon and reserve them for the marmalade. 
If you wish your jelly very clear, strain again. 

ORANGfe JELLY. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

Strain the juice of seven oranges and add sugar till very sweet. 
Take four and a half pieces of isinglass, break it into small 
pieces, put into a kettle with one and a half pints of water, boil 
till half the quantity; then mix the juice and water, pour into 
molds, set in a cool place and eat soon. 

CURRANT JELLY. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Put the currants into the kettle with about a half pint of water 
to keep them from burning; when they boil, strain through a flan- 
nel bag; take equal weights of the juice and sugar and boil ten 
or fifteen minutes or until it jellies nicely. Do not squeeze the 
fruit when you strain it. 

CURRANT JELLY. 

MRS. A. Y. EAWSON. 

Pick the fruit from the stems and put it into a small mouthed 
stone jar, tie over it a thick brown paper, set it into a kettle of 
water and let them cook one hour after the water begins to boil. 
Then strain through a flannel bag; pour the juice into a porcelain 
kettle and let it just come to a boil, take it from the stove and 
stir in the sugar slowly, that it may have time to dissolve. Pour 
into glasses and let it cool; when cold cover with white paper 
dipped in brandy and laid on the top of the jelly, and tie or seal 
over a larger piece of paper. This jelly is of a beautiful color 
and there is less danger of burning than when the sugar is cooked, 
which pays for the extra labor of picking over the berries. 



222 FRUITS, JELLIES, PRESERVES. 

LEMON JELLY. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

Take one package of Cox's gelatine, six lemons sliced, one pint 
of cold water, let them stand one hour, then add two pounds of 
white sugar and one quart of boiling water. Stir till well dis- 
solved and pour into molds previously wet with a little cold 

LEMON JELLY. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

One quart of water, one box of gelatine, three lemons, one 
orange and oile pound of sugar. 

PINE-APPLE JELLY. 

MRS. HARRY WEST. 

Dissolve a half box of Cox's gelatine in one pint of water, put 
it on the stove and let it come to a boil, add one cup of sugar, 
take off and put all the juice and part of the pine-apples in 
one can. Pour into a mold and set away to jelly. 

SNOW JELLY. 

MRS. CARPENTER. 

Soak a half package of gelatine in one teacup of cold water 
for a half hour, add one quart of boiling water, three teacups of 
loaf sugar and the juice of two lemons. When nearly cold, add 
the whites of three eggs beaten to a froth. Beat constantly for 
three quarters of an hour; set on the ice and let it stand till fro- 
zen enough to cut with a knife. 

GELATINE. 

MISS HATTIE ST0"\VE. 

Dissolve a half box of gelatine in one quart of cold water; place 
it on the stove and let it just boil; strain through a cloth and add 
a little vinegar to make it tart, flavor with lemon. Serve with su- 
gar and cream. 

GELATINE JELLY. 

MRS. M. ANDREWS. 

Four ounces of Cooper's gelatine, three pints of water, two 
lemons, juice and peel, one pound of sugar, and cinnamon. 



FRUITS, JELLIES, PRESERVES. 223 

LEMON SPONGE OR CUSTARD. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

Take the lemon jelly after it is cold and beat it thoroughly in- 
to the whites of six well beaten eggs. Be sure to beat it until it 
is white clear through. Turn it into molds and serve with boil- 
ed custard. 

RASPBERRY CHARLOTTE. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Beat five eggs to a quart of milk, sweeten well and flavor with 
vanilla. Put all in a tin pail, set in a kettle of hot water and stir 
till at the boiling point; when cold, pour it over sponge cake 
spread with raspberry jam. The same custard is good, when hot, 
to pour over cold boiled rice. 

CANDIED ORANGE PEEL. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

Cut your oranges lengthwise and take out the pulp; put the 
rinds into a pretty strong solution of salt and hard water for six 
days, then boil them in a large quantity of water till tender, take 
them ovit and drain in a sieve. Make a thin syrup of fine loaf 
sugar, one pound to a quart of water, put in the peel and boil a 
half hour, or until they look clear. Have ready a thick syrup 
made of fine loaf sugar with as much water as will dissolve it, put 
in the rinds and boil slowly until you see the sjrup candy about 
the rinds. Take them out, grate sugar over them, drain until well 
dried before the fire, and keep in a dry place for use. 



f>ldKI<i^g. 




Is^: 



&N order to have good pickles you must use good vine- 
gar — pure cider or white wine vinegar is considered 
• i-vf''^*^ best. Vinegar should not be boiled in metallic vessels, 
■^lly' as the salts produced by such contact are poisonous. 
Stone-ware jars (not glazed) should be used to keep pickles 
in. In making a large quantity at a time it is best to seal 
up a part — in such cases use green glass jars. 

BRINE FOR CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

MRS. S. P. WISNEE, CKDAR RAPIDS. 

A half pound of alum, three quarts of salt, one gallon of vine- 
gar and three gallons of water. 

BRINE FOR CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

MRS. C. P. HOLMES. 

One pail of soft water, one quart of salt, one tablespoon of salt- 
petre and two tablespoons of alum; pour over the pickles boiling 
hot; after a few days pour off the brine, scald and skim. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

MRS. J. B. MILLER. 

To one gallon of water put two cups of salt; let this come to a 
scalding heat and pour over the cucumbers; let them stand over 
night and turn off in the morning; scald vinegar and pour over 
them, and let them stand in this vinegar twenty-four hours; then 
take two teaspoons of pulverized alum to a gallon of fresh vinegar, 
heat it and pour over the pickles; add one tablespoon of sugar 
and spices to your taste. These pickles will keep a long time. 
15 225 



226 PICKLES. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

MRS. CURTIS BATES. 

Soak the cucumbers two days in a weak solution of salt and 
water, then cover them with boiling vinegar and let it remain two 
days, then put them in jars with whole spices among them and 
cover with a nno vinegar, boiling hot, and sweetened in the pro- 
portion of a teacup of sugar to a gallon of vinegar. The vinegar 
in which the pickles are kept one year will do for \}a.Q first vinegar 
the next. Use for spices black pepper, allspice, cloves and cin- 
namon; but the pickles are good and will keep without spices. 
If the pickles are to be kept through the following summer, it is 
safer to seal them up. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

MRS. A. Y. RAWSOK AND MRS. HOWELL. 

Put the cvicumbers into rather strong salt and water over night, 
then rinse and lay in a jar, and pour over them scalding vinegar 
every day for three days; the third day take a teacup of English 
mustard seed, a handful of allspice, half as much cloves, a teacup 
of broken cinnamon and half a cup of whole black pepper; put 
them into a small, thin muslin bag and boil in fresh vinegar an 
hour; put two or three red pepper-pods and some strips of horse- 
radish among the pickles. Use vinegar enough to cover the 
pickles; put into it a pound of brown sugar, let it scald, and pour 
over the pickles; let the bag of spices remain in the jar, and when 
ready to put away pour over a coffeecup of molasses, letting it 
settle gradually. This receipt will pickle a three gallon jar of 
cucumbers. 

NEW CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

MRS. W. BURTON. 

To one gallon of water allow one tumbler of salt, and soak the 
cucumbers twenty-four hours; change this three times; drain off 
the salt water and put them in a brass kettle and cover with good 
vinegar; cover the whole with horseradish leaves; let them boil 
until the cucumbers have taken the green from the leaves. If 
you cannot get horseradish leaves grape leaves will do. 



PICKLES. • 227 

RIPE CUCUMBERS. 

MRS. S. P. WISNER, CEDAR RAPIDS. 

Pare and core the cucumbers, and cut them into any shape you 
like; lay them in weak brine over night; make your vinegar as 
sweet as you wish and boil a few at a time until clear; then boil 
down the syrup a little and turn over them. Watermelon rinds 
are good prepared in the same way. 

FRENCH PICKLES. 

MRS. WITHROW, CHICAGO. 

Take one peck of green tomatoes sliced, and six large onions 
sliced; throw over them a teacup of salt and let them stand 
.twenty-four hours; drain, and boil in two quarts of water and one 
quart of vinegar twenty minutes, then drain again and take four 
quarts of vinegar, two pounds of brown sugar, a half pound of 
white mustard seed, two tablespoons of ground allspice, the same 
of cloves, cinnamon, ginger and mustard, and a half tablespoon 
of Cayenne pepper; put all together with the tomatoes and onions 
and boil fifteen or twenty minutes, or until the tomato looks clear. 
Very fine. 

FRENCH PICKI.es. 

MRS. C. P. HOLMES AND MRS. CALLANAN. 

One peck of green tomatoes sliced, fifty cucumbers sliced, 
two quarts of little onions, two heads of cauliflower cut in pieces, 
one handful of horseradish, one box of cinnamon, one box of 
cloves, a fourth of a pound of black pepper, a half pound of ground 
mustard and three pounds of sugar; salt the vegetables twenty- 
four hours, then rinse in cold water and put them into the kettle 
with the spices, cover with vinegar and cook half an hour. 

HIGHDEN PICKLES. 

MRS. R. T. AND M. J. WELLSAGEE. 

Chop fine equal quantities of green tomutoes, cucumbers, onions 
and a few green peppers, and when mixed sprinkle with salt; let 
them stand S day, then pour the water off and pour on boiling 
vinegar, with mustard and spices. 



228 » PICKLES. 

PICKLED TOMATOES. 

MRS. S. MERRILL. 

"Wash green tomatoes and slice them rather thin. Weigh them 
and to eight pounds of tomatoes allow three or four sliced onions, 
four pounds of sugar and one gallon of cider vinegar. Put the 
vinegar in a porcelain kettle with the sugar; stir, and when it boils 
remove it and let it stand a few minutes until you can remove the 
scum without wasting the vinegar; then add the onions, two tea- 
spoons of salt, one teaspoon of powdered cinnamon, one teaspoon 
of powdered cloves and one grated nutmeg; then set it upon the 
fire and add the tomatoes. When the vinegar begins to simmer, 
press them gently down; let them boll two or three minutes and 
put them into covered jars or, when cool, into wide-necked bottles. 

PICKLED TOMATOES. 

MRS. C. B. SMITH, MT. CARROLL, ILL. 

Take small, smooth tomatoes, not very ripe, scald them until 
the skin will slip off easily, and sprinkle salt over them. After 
they have stood twenty-four hours, drain off the juice and pour on 
a boiling hot pickle composed of one pouad of sugar, two tea- 
spoons of cinnamon and two teaspoons of cloves to every quart of 
vinegar. Drain off the liquid, scald it and pour on them again, every 
other day for a week. They will require no further care. This 
is excellent. 

GREEN TOMATO PICKLES. 

MRS. A. Y. RAWSON. 

Slice one peck of green tomatoes; add one cup of salt, and let 
them stand over night; drain the water from them and add one 
gallon of vinegar, one large spoon of allspice, one teaspoon of 
cloves, one tablespoon of cinnamon, a half teaspoon of ground 
mustard, four cups of sugar, one cup of grated horse-radish, and 
simmer together ten minutes. 

GREEN TOMATO PICKLES. 

MRS. J. B. STEWART. 

Take one peck of green tomatoes sliced, and one dozen onions 
sliced; sprinkle them with salt and let them stand ufitil the next 
day; then drain them and use the following spices: One box of 



PICKLES. 339 

mustard, one and a half ounces of unground cloves, one ounce of 
yellow mustard seed, and one ounce of allspice. Wet the mus; 
tard before adding it. Put into a kettle a layer of spices and one of 
tomatoes and onions alternately, and cover with vinegar. Boil 
the whole for a few minutes. 

PICKLED CABBx\GE. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Slice white and red cabbage very fine, put into a jar alternately, 
sprinkle salt on each layer; also whole black pepper, black mus- 
tard seed, and cinnamon broken fine; then cover with cold vine- 
gar. It will be ready for use in twenty-four hours, 

PICKLED CAULIFLOWER. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHARD. 

Take the whitest full-grown cauliflower, cut off the thick stock 
and split the flower into eight or ten pieces, spread them on a large 
dish and sprinkle with salt; let them stand twenty-four hours, 
then wash off the salt, drain them, put them into a flat jar, scald 
with salt and water (allowing a quarter of a pound of salt to a 
quart of water), cover closely and let it stand until next day; after- 
wards drain them in a hair sieve and spread in a warm place to 
dry for a day and night. Then put them in a glass jar and pour 
over them a pickle that has been prepared as follows: Mix to- 
gether three ounces of coriander seed, three ounces of turmeric, 
one ounce of mustard seed and one ounce of ginger. Pound the 
whole to a fine powder; put it into three quarts of cider vinegar, 
set it by the fire in a stone jar and let it infuse three days. These 
are the proportions but the quantity of pickle must depend on the 
quantity of cauliflower, which must be well covered by the liquid; 
pour it over the flower and secure the jar closely from the air. 

GREEN PEPPER MAI^GOES. 

MRS. E. P. C. 

Secure nice large peppers; cut a slit in them and take out the 
seed. Slice a head of cabbage very fine, salt it as for slaw, and 
mix very thick with black mustard seed; fill the peppers with this 
dressing and sew up the slit. Lay them in a jar and pour over 
enough cold vinegar to cover them. 



230 PICKLES. 

MANGOES. 

; MRS. E. S. SPEED, EUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Take small nutmeg or musk-melons, peel them, cut out a slice 
and remove the pulp and seed; take three heads of cauliflower, 
one peck of small cucumbers, one quart of small onions, one quart 
of nasturtiums, one quart of small green tomatoes, one quart of 
green beans, one pint of radish pods, six or eight carrots cut in 
rings and a half pint of mustard seed; cut the cauliflower into 
bunches, leaving a small head on each; put the vegetables in a 
large jar, pour over them a brine made of two gallons of boiling 
vi^ater, one and a half pints of salt and a lump of akim the size of 
a walnut; leave them in the brine two or three days, then wash 
clear in water, drain, and fill each melon, adding a teaspoon of 
mustard seed; adjust the piece taken out and tie a cord around; 
place them in a jar, and if any of the ingredients remain fill the 
space with them. Take six quarts of good cider vinegar, three- 
fourths of a pound of mustard seed, two ounces of allspice, a half 
ounce of mace, two or three roots of ginger, two or three red 
peppers and one tablespoon of pulverized alum. Boil all together, 
and pour while boiling hot over the pickles. 

PICCALILLI. 

MRS. E. M. PARROTT, RUSHYILLE, ILL. 

Mix tomatoes, chopped and drained, with chopped onions, red 
and green peppers and horseradish; add spices, salt, sugar and a 
little curry powder; cover with vinegar and boil one hour. 

PICCALILLI. 

MRS. HENRY SCRIBXER. 

Take one peck of full grown tomatoes, sliced, and one pint of 
salt, cover them and let them stand twelve or fourteen hours, 
then squeeze them out into a pint of fresh water and let them 
stand a few hours. Take twelve green peppers and seven small 
onions, put them with the tomatoes and chop all pretty fine, then 
put them into a brass kettle, cover with a weak vinegar, let it re- 
main over the fire till quite -hot, then strain ofi" the vinegar. Take 
some good old vinegar, add one pint of white mustard seed and 
some grated horseradish; scald it, with one tablespoon of sugar, 



PICKLES. 231 

one tablespoon of mace, one tablespoon of unground cloves and 
a half cup of broken cinnamon. Pour it over the tomatoes in a 
stone jar and it is ready for use. 

PICCALILLI. 

MRS. MILES. 

Two dozen green tomatoes, two dozen large cucumbers, one 
dozen small cucumbers, one dozen onions, one cabbage, six 
bunches of celery and six large green peppers; chop and mix well, 
stir in one handful of salt and let stand two hours or more, then 
drain in a colander. Pour one quart of water and two quarts of 
vinegar into a porcelain kettle and, when boiling, put in the mix- 
ture, a part at a time, and scald ten minutes; skim and drain 
again, place in small crocks or jars and pour on the following, scald- 
ing hot : One gallon of vinegar, three pounds of sugar, a half 
pound of white mustard seed, two tablespoons of ground mustard, 
one tablespoon of black pepper, one tablespoon of cayenne pep- 
per, three tablespoons of cinnamon and one tablespoon of cloves. 

CHOW-CHOW. 

MBS. T. A. PARKER, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

One pint of nasturtiums, one pint of small onions, a half peck 
of small cucumbers, one quart of string beans, one quart of small 
green tomatoes, four small carrots cut into rings, two heads of 
cauliflower, two ounces of white mustard seed, two ounces of 
black mustard seed, a half pint of salt, a half pound of ground 
mustard, mixed with eight tablespoons of olive oil, a fourth of an 
ounce of celery seed and a fourth of an ounce of turmeric. Mix 
well and cover with boiling vinegar. 

CHOW-CHOW. 

MBS. GEO. NOLTE, ST. LOUIS, 

One cauliflower cut in small pieces, one dozen small white on- 
ions, two dozen small cucumbers, one quart of string beans, one 
ounce of black mustard seed, one ounce of white mustard seed, 
one teaspoon of Cayenne pepper, a quarter of an ounce of turme- 
ric, pieces of horseradish cut fine and a half gallon of vinegar, or 
more. Scald the spices and vinegar together and pour over the 
vegetables boiling hot; after it is cold mix one pound of mustard 
in vinegar and add to the pickles. 



232 SWEET PICKLES. 

CHOW-CHOW. 

MRS. D. O. FINCH. 

Two heads of cauliflower, two dozen small cucumbers, a half 
peck of string beans, *afe roots of celery, six green peppers, one 
quart of small white onions and a fourth of a peck of small green 
tomatoes, cut into small pieces; sprinkle with salt and let them 
stand twenty-four hours, then drain. Take one gallon or more of 
vinegar, one-fourth pound of mustard seed, two pots of French 
mustard, one ounce of allspice, one ounce of cloves, one ounce of 
ground pepper, two ounces of turmeric and two ounces of cinna- 
mon; pour the vinegar and spices into a kettle and let them come 
to a boil, then add the vegetables, and let them scald till yellow 
and a little tender. 



^weet f^idkle^. 



SWEET PICKLE. 

MRS. C. B. SMITH, MT. CARROLL, ILL, 

'HERE are many ways of making sweet pickles of fruit, 
all of which are complicated and tedious. The following 
answers equally for damsons, cherries and peaches; 
'(sle) serves every purpose of an elaborate method; has good 
keeping qualities, and the advantage of giving little trouble: 
Prepare your fruit as you would for preserving. To three 
and a half or four pounds of clean brown sugar, allow one quart of 
vinegar, a half ounce of cinnamon in the stick, and cloves. Put 
the fruit in a jar; boil the vinegar and spices and pour over it, 
letting it stand for two days; then pour the vinegar off, and boil; 
when hot pour in the fruit, and boil it till clear and transparent. 
This does just as well as the repeated scalding usually recom- 
mended. 




SWEET PICKLES. 233 

SWEET TOMATO PICKLES. 

• ■ MES. C. H. GETCHELIi. 

Eight pounds of ripe tomatoes, four pounds of sugar, a half 
ounce of cloves, a half ounce of allspice and a half ounce of cinna- 
mon. Peel the fruit and boil one and a half hours; when partly 
cold add a half pint of vinegar. Put away in jars. 

SPICED CHERRIES. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

To seven pounds of fruit allow three and a half pounds of su- 
gar; let them boil fifteen minutes or a little more, then skim out 
the fruit and add to the syrup one pint of vinegar, one ounce of 
cinnamon and a half ounce of cloves. Put the spices into a bag 
and let them boil one hour in the vinegar; then pour over the 
cherries. 

SPICED CURRANTS. 

MRS. W. H. MERRITT. 

Five pounds of fruit, four pounds of brown sugar and one 
pint of vinegar; add cinnamon and cloves (unground) to the 
taste. Boil two hours. 

SPICED CURRANTS. 

MRS. J. M. OTIS. 

Five pounds of currants, four pounds of sugar, two tablespoons 
of ground cloves, two tablespoons of ground cinnamon and a half 
pint of vinegar. Scald the vinegar and spices together and pour 
over the fruit; the next day pour ofi" and scald again; the third 
day scald together. 

SPICED GRAPES. 

MRS. A. Y. RAWSON. 

Squeeze the pulps from the skins, cook them till tender, put 
them through a colander to remove the seeds, then put pulps and 
skins together and make according to the following receipt: 
Seven pounds of grapes, three pounds of sugar, spice to the taste 
and one pint of vinegar. Boil till the grape skins are tender and 
the compound thick. 



234 SWEET PICKLES. 

SPICED APPLES. 

MRS. M. K. KELLOGG. 

Five pounds of sweet apples, two pounds of sugar, one quart 
of vinegar, three nutmegs, cloves, cinnamon and a little salt. 
Boil the fruit in the syrup until soft. 

SPICED PLUMS. 

MKS. W. COLTON. 

One peck of sorted plums, one quart of good vinegar, six 
pounds of brown sugar, tvvo ounces of cinnamon, a half ounce of 
cloves and a half ounce of mace. Boil the sugar with the vinegar 
and spices, then add the plums and boil until they begin to be 
soft. 

SPICED PEACHES. 

MKS. G. M. HIPPEE. 

Eight and a half pounds of peaches, three pounds of sugar, 
one pint of vinQgar, cloves, cinnamon stick and ginger root. Tie 
the spices in a bag and boil with the vinegar and sugar, and pour 
over the fruit. Repeat this six successive mornings. 

PICKLED PEACHES 

MRS. W. COLTON. 

Seven pounds of peaches, four pounds of sugar and one quart 
of vinegar and spices. Boil the vinegar, sugar and spices togeth- 
er; then put in a few of the peaches, if too many are put in at a 
time some of them will get too soft. When they begin to be 
soft take them out and put more in, till all are done; then pour 
the syrup over the peaches. If they begin to be sour, scald the 
vinegar and pour it over the fruit for several successive days. 

PICKLED PLUMS. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

Three-fourths of a pound of sugar, one pound of fruit and vin- 
egar sufBcient to dissolve the sugar. Boil the vinegar and sugar 
together; skim it and put in the cloves, mace and cinnamon; 
scald the plums till tender, then take them out and boil down the 
syrup and pour it over the fruit. 



SWEET PICKLES. 235 

PICKLED PEARS. 

MRS. C. D. SPRAGUE. 

Pare and halve the pears, put four pounds of sugar to one gal- 
lon of vinegar and boil with cloves and cassia buds, pounded and 
tied in a rag. Scald the pears a little, if hard, as pouring the 
vinegar on does not soften them. 

PICKLED GRAPES. 

MRS. C. D. SPRAGUE. 

Cut bunches of not over ripe grapes and lay in a jar with grape 
leaves between the layers. Pour over the whole a cold syrup 
made as follows: One quart of vinegar, four pounds of sugar, and 
cloves, cinnamon and mace tied in a bag and boiled in the vinegar. 

PICKLED RAISINS. 

MRS. M. m'cAIN. 

Boil two pounds of raisins till tender in vinegar enough to cover 
them. Skim the raisins out and add to the vinegar one pound 
of sugar. Cloves and cinnamon to taste. Pour the syrup, boiling 
hot, over the raisins. 

WATERMELON PICKLES. 

MRS. W. H. SCRIPPS, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Cut the melon rind into strips or whatever shape desired; make 
a weak solution of alum and pour over; let it stand twenty-four 
hours; then scald in clear water and drain. To seven pounds of 
rind, take one quart of good cider vinegar, four pounds of sugar 
and a half pint of ginger root; put in the rind and boil till it looks 
clear; then remove the fruit to a jar and boil the liquid until it 
is a rich syrup. 

WATERMELON PICKLES. 

MRS. GRISWOLD. 

Boil the melon until you can stick a fork through it readily. 
To seven pounds of fruit take three pounds of sugar, one quart of 
vinegar and one ounce each of cinnamon, cloves and allspice. 
Scald the vinegar, put sugar and spices in, and pour over the 
melon. Do this for three mornings. 




f)f(l]vfK^. 



COFFEE. 



'OCHA and Java are considered the best, but with care, 
good coffee can be made of cheaper kinds, as it is much 
^._ ?^ improved by age. It is best to procure a large quantity 
^^^^ of that which you have proved to be good. All coffee. 
> needs to be looked over before roasting. If roasted in a 
stove oven, let it heat gradually, that the coffee may dry 
a while, but when it begins to roast it should be browned 
quickly and stirred often to prevent burning. Kernels should be 
brittle and of a bright brown color when <lone; if allowed to get 
black the coffee will not be good; and when done should be put into 
a canister and covered up close. It is better to brown but two 
pounds at once; never grind more than is to be used at one time. 
Too great care cannot be used in cleansing the coffee-pot in which 
the coffee is made. 

TO MAKE COFFEE. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Take half a pint of brown coffee and half a beaten egg; mix 
well together in a little cold water, then pour in a quart of boiling 
water, or stir it in boiling water in a coffee boiler. Stir from the 
sides as it boils up. Let it boil ten minutes, pour in a little cold 
water to settle it, and set it where it will keep warm and not boil. 

TO MAKE A LARGE QUANTITY OF COFFEE. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Take one and one-fourth pints of ground coffee and one egg 
to a gallon of water. This makes strong coffee. Where coffee is 
to be made in large quantities, the coffee can be put into bags, 
allowina: room for it to swell, and boiled in the water. 

237 



238 DRINKS. 

SUBSTITUTE FOR CREAM IN COFFEE. 

Beat an egg to a froth, add to it a piece of butter the size of a 
walnut, and turn the coffee on it gradually from the boiling pot 
into the one for the table, in which it should be previously put. 
It is diflficult to distinguish the taste from fresh cream. 

COFFEE FOR FIFTY CUPS. 

MRS. W. CARPENTER. 

Two quarts of coffee, four eggs, shells and all; mix this with two 
quarts of cold water and pour on ten quarts of boiling water. Let 
this boil five minutes. Take off and pour in one cup of cold water 
to settle it. 

TEA. 

- It is impossible to give an exact recipe for making tea. It 
varies so in strength that one must be guided by that as to the 
quantity used. The common method of making green tea is to 
pour boiling water on the leaves and let them steep without boil- 
ing for five or ten minutes. The tea-pot should be well scalded 
and the tea sent to the table hot. Some think heating the tea- 
leaves in the teapot when dry and then pouring boiling water on 
is a superior way of making tea. It only needs to stand a mo- 
ment or two before using. Black tea, being coarser than green, 
a larger quantity is required, and it is better for boiling a few 
moments. This is as much improved by cream as coffee is. 
Keep your tea in tin, close, warm and dry. 

CHOCOLATE. 

MRS. M. ANDREWS. 

Put four ounces of chocolate in a sauce-pan, with enough cold 
water to prevent burning. Let it simmer gently a few minutes. 
When it comes to a boil, add one quart of boiling milk and one 
gill of cream. Let it boil gently five minutes. 

GINGER BEER. 

MRS. T. A. PARKER, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Two ounces of tartaric acid, two pounds of white sugar, three 
quarts of water and the juice of one lemon. Boil these together 



DRINKS. 339 

five minutes; when nearly cold, add the whites of three eggs, well 
beaten with a half cup of flour and a half ounce of essence of 
wintergreen or of lemon. Bottle and keep in a cold place. Take 
two tablespoons of this syrup and a quarter of a teaspoon of soda 
for a tumbler of water; stir violently and drink. Use any essence 
for flavoring instead of wintergreen that you may prefer. 

GINGER POP. 

MRS. J. OARPEISTTER. 

Three-fourths of a pound of white sugar,, one ounce of cream 
tartar, one ounce of ginger and one lemon. Put all into a pan 
and pour over it four quarts of boiling water; let it stand until 
lukewarm, then add one tablespoon of yeast, and essence of win- 
tergreen or sassafras. Let it stand twenty-four hours and bottle. 

ROOT BEER. 

MRS. THEO. CARPENTER. 

Mix three gallons of molasses with ten gallons of water; let it 
stand two hours, then pour into a barrel and add a half pound of 
bruised sarsaparilla root, a half pound of bruised sassafras, a half 
pound of wintergreen bark, one pint of yeast and water to fill the 
barrel. Ferment twelve hours and bottle. 

EFFERVESCING JELLY DRINK. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

When jellies become too old or acid for the table, take one 
large spoon of jelly and two of vinegar in a tumbler, mix smooth, 
and add two-thirds of a glass of water with a fourth of a teaspoon 
of soda dissolved in it. A very pleasant drink in hot weather. 

CREAM NECTAR. 

MRS. J. PARMELEE. 

One pint of water, one pound of white sugar, one ounce of tar- 
taric acid, fifteen drops of lemon and the whites of three eggs; 
beat the eggs to a froth and add to the other ingredients, then 
bottle. Put a tablespoonful into a tumbler and fill up with water; 
add a little soda to make it foam. This is a delightful drink for 
summer. 



240 DRINKS. 

CREAM OF NECTAR. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Two quarts of water, two pounds of sugar, two ounces of citric 
acid, two tablespoons of corn starch and the whites of four eggs, 
beaten to a froth. Mix the water, sugar and acid and, when near 
boiling, add the corn starch made smooth in a little cold water; 
as it boils up have the eggs ready and stir in just after it is re- 
moved from the fire; when cold, skim and bottle for use; it may 
be flavored when bottled. Two or three large spoons of this in a 
glass of cold water, with about a fourth of a teaspoon of bi-car- 
bonate of soda, makes a pleasant, cooling drink for summer. It 
will keep some weeks in a cool place. 

TO KEEP CIDER SWEET. 

MRS. S. P. WISNER, CEDAR RAPIDS. 

To one barrel of cider add a half pound of white mustard seed 
and a half ounce of oil of sassafras. 

• TO KEEP CIDER SWEET. 

DR. E. M. m'aFEE, MT. CARROLL, ILL. 

Allow two and a half pounds of rock candy and a half pound 
of rare beefsteak to one barrel. Put them in when it has reached 
the point at which you wish to keep it. 

RASPBERRY SHRIJB. 

Put raspberries into a pan and scarcely cover them with strong 
vinegar, adding one pint of sugar to a pint of juice. Scald, skim 
and bottle when cool. 

RED RASPBERRY VINEGAR. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHARD. 

Pour one pint of white wine vinegar over two quarts of rasp- 
berries; mash the berries with a spoon; let stand over night, then 
strain through a jelly bag. To each pint of the liquor take one 
pound of loaf sugar; boil five minutes, skim and bottle. 



^of\ ^M^ ^idK. 



OYSTER TOAST. 

— M|0 SIX OYSTERS take a half teacup of their own liquor 
^j l and the same amount of milk, boil one minute, season 
}^\^ ^ with butter, pepper and salt, and pour over a slice of 
•SSc buttered toast. 

f CORN MEAL GRUEL. 

Two quarts of boiling water, one cup of meal, one teaspoon of 
flour, and salt to the taste, or sugar and nutmeg. Wet the meal 
and flour to a smooth paste with cold water and stir it into the 
water while it is boiling. Boil slowly half an hour, keeping it 
well stirred to prevent burning. 

OAT MEAL GRUEL. 

Mix two tablespoons of oat meal with a little cold water, stir it 
into a pint of boiling water and let it boil fifteen minutes; add a 
little salt and sugar to the taste. 

SAGO GRUEL. 

Two and a half cups of water, two tablespoons of sago, three 
teaspoons of white sugar, one tablespoon of lemon juice or nut- 
meg to the taste, and a little salt. 

WHEAT GRUEL. 

Tie one teacup of flour in a thick cotton cloth, boil it five hours, 
then dry the lump. Prepare by grating; mix in a little cold 
water and pour into boiling milk or water, adding salt to the taste. 
This is excellent for children with diarrhea. 

1 6 241 



242 FOR THE SICK. 

MILK PORRIDGE. 

Mix flour to a paste in a little cold milk; stir it into boiling 
milk and let it boil five minutes, adding a little salt. 

RICE JELLY. 

Boil a fourth of a pound of rice flour with a half pound of loaf 
sugar in one quart of water until it becomes one mass; strain off 
the jelly and let it cool. 

BEEF TEA. 

MIJS. E. P. CHASE. 

Take a lean, juicy steak, cut it into small pieces, put it into a 
large-mouthed bottle or glass jar, with two tablespoons of water; 
cork, and set in a kettle of cold water over the fire and boil three 
or four hours. If in a hurry, chop the meat fine and the juice 
will be sooner extracted. 

PANADA. 

Roll cracker fine, pour over it boiling water add a small piece 
of butter, wine and nutmeg, and sweeten to the taste. 

EGG POP. 

\ 

MES. SETH MACY, NEWPORT, R. I. 

Beat the white of one ^^^ to a stiff froth, put it into a bowl 
and add a teaspoon of fine sugar, one tablespoon of wine or bran- 
dy and a half glass of milk; beat well together. This is very 
nourishing. 

ARROWROOT. 

Mix one teaspoonful in cold water and pour into boiling water; 
add a little salt and sweeten to the taste. Some think a little 
lemon juice or nutmeg an improvement. 

WINE WHEY. 

Take equal quantities of milk and water, set on the stove, add 
wine until it curdles, let it stand till it separates, then strain and 
sweeten to the taste. 



FOR THE SICK. 243 

WINE JELLY. 

MRS. "W. H. KAY, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

Pour one pint of cold water over one box of gelatine; let it stand 
three or four houi-s, or over night; add to this one and a half 
pounds of crushed sugar, juice and the grated rind of two lemons, 
one quart of boiling water and one pint of wine (Sherry is best). 
Strain through flannel and set to cool, near or on ice in warm 
weather. If liked sweeter use a quarter of a pound more of sugar. 

WINE JELLY. 

MRS. P. H. CARPENTER. 

Pour one pint of cold water on one box of gelatine; let it 
soak twenty minutes, then add one pint of boiling water, one pint 
of Madeira wine, juice of two lemons and one and three-fourths 
pounds of powdered sugar. Put it on the stove and let it boil 
five minutes, stirring it occasionally; let it stand three minutes, 
strain through a thin muslin bag into molds and set away to cool. 

WINE JELLY. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

Pour on one box of gelatine a quart of cold water; let it stand 
until dissolved, then add one pint of hot water, one pint of wine, 
grated rind of one lemon, juice of two and one pound of sugar. 

TOAST WATER. 

Toast two thin slices of bread a nice brown, put them into a 
quart pitcher and fill with cold water; cover and let it stand a few 
miziutes before it is used. 

BLACKBERRY CORDIAL. 

MRS. F. R. WEST. 

To a half bushel of blackberries well mashed, add two ounces of 
cinnamon, two ounces of cloves and one nutmeg. Pulverize 
well, rnix and boil slowly about a half hour; then strain or squeeze 
the juice through flannel and, to each pint of juice, add one half 
pound of loaf sugar. Boil another half hour, cool and add a 
half gallon of the best brandy. Dose for an adult, a half gill; 
for a child, one teaspoon or more according to age. 



24A FOR THE SICK. 

BLACKBERRY SYRUP. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCnARD. 

Take berries perfectly ripe, set them over a moderate fire, let 
them simmer until they break in pieces, then strain through a 
flannel cloth. To each pint of juice put one pound of white 
sugar, a half ounce of powdered cinnamon, a fourth of an ounce 
of powdered mace, two teaspoons of powdered cloves. Boil the 
whole fifteen minutes, strain and cool, then add to each pint of 
syrup one wine glass of brandy. Bottle, cork and seal it, keep 
it in a cool place. 

BADEN BADEN CREAM. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

One coffeecup of wine, one coifeecup of sugar, two-thirds of a 
box of gelatine dissolved in a half cup of water and a half pint of 
milk; mix all together and let them come to a boil, strain through 
a sieve and when cool add one pint of rich cream; beat it thor- 
oughly and turn into molds. 

DRINK FOR THE SICK. 

Put one ounce of gum arabic and a lump of ice into a large glass, 
and fill it with water. 

SHERBET. 

Mix and freeze one pint of new milk and one quart of strong 
lemonade well sweetened. 

TAMARIND DRINK. 

Pour boiling water over tamarinds and let it stand till cold. 
This makes a good drink for the sick. 

Another is made by dissolving a teaspoon of currant or other 
jelly in a glass of water. Ice improves it. 



>i5{!)idiKSi< f{]^diP5{g. 



ENGLISH CURE FOR DRUNKENESS. 



HIS recipe comes into notoriety through the efforts of 
John Vine Hall, who had fallen into such habitual drunk- 
[t^2T^^ eness that his most earnest efforts to reclaim himself 
'(M^ proved unavailing. He sought the advice of an eminent 
Iv) physician who gave him a prescription which he followed for 
I several months, and at the end of that time had lost all de- 
sire for liquor. 
The recipe is as follows: Five grains of sulphate of iron, ten 
grains of magnesia, eleven drachms of peppermint water and one 
drachm of spirits of nutmeg; to be taken twice a day. This prep- 
aration acts as a stimulant and tonic and partially supplies the 
place of the accustomed liquor, and prevents that absolute phys- 
ical and moral prostration that follows a sudden breaking off 
from the use of stimulating drinks. 

EYE-WATER RECIPE. 

MES. C. D. REINKJNG, 

Cut a fresh hard-boiled egg into halves while hot, remove the 
yolk, fill the cavity with white vitriol, close the egg again, place 
in a vessel and cover tight to prevent the steam from escaping. 
Let it stand ten minutes, then take off the shell and strain the 
other part through a cloth. Add one teaspoon of sugar, one tea- 
spoon of salt and a gill of rain water. 

FOR A FELON. 

Spread strong mecurial ointment on a linen cloth and apply 
when the sore first appears. 

245 



246 MEDICINAL RECIPES. 

FOR FELONS. 

Take a portion of the bark of sweet elder, or hops will do; then 
put it with some sweet cream into a cup, and boil a short time; 
then put in a lump of saltpetre twice as larg^e as a pear; let it 
slowly dry away to the consistency of a salve, which apply to the 
felon. The salt petre is the cure, but the elder bark and sweet 
cream aid in easing the pain. By putting in enough saltpetre, 
any felon can be cured in 48 hours, and the pain will cease al- 
most immediately. 

FOR SORE NIPPLES. 

MRS. E. A. C. 

Put one teaspoon of quince seed into a fourth of a glass of 
brandy. Let it stand a few hours till it forms a mucilage; then 
rub it on. It is very soothing and heals by using a few times, 

FOR SALT-RHEUM. 

MRS. D. D, B., CHICAGO, ILL. 

Get sweet fern; if it does not grow in your locality you can 
procure it at the druggist's. Steep and use it for a common drink; 
also bathe the parts affected and it will cure you. It is far better 
than any doctor's medicine. 

RING WORM. 

Put a penny into a tablespoon of vinegar, let it remain until it 
becomes green, and wash the ringworm with this two or three 
times a day. 

FOR CORNS. 

The strongest acetic acid applied night and morning, will cure 
hard or soft corns in a week. 

CHILBLAINS. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Place red-hot coals in a vessel and throw upon them a handful 
of corn meal. Hold the feet in the dense smoke, renewing the 
coals and meal till the pain is relieved. This has been known to 
make very marked cures, when all other remedies have failed. 



MEDICINAL RECIPES. 247 

CALENDULA SALVE FOR CAKED BREAST. 

MRS. DR. H . 

Two teaspoons of calendula, two tablespoons of lard and a piece 
of beeswax the size of a hickory-nut. Melt beeswax and lard to- 
gether, remove from the fire and put in the calendula while hot. 
Keep it covered tight. Spread on a cloth large enough to cover 
the breast, with a flannel over it, cutting a place in it just large 
enough for the nipple to go through. Keep on two hours or more, 
then let the child nurse before removing the cloth, and the swel- 
ling will go down. 

TONIC. 

One drachm of pulverized Colombo, one drachm of rasp. d. quar- 
tia, two drachms of peruvian bark, one drachm of orange peel, 
one drachm of ginger, two ounces of loaf sugar and a half pint of 
liquor. Let it stand twenty-four hours and then add a half pint 
of water. 

ALL-HEALING OINTMENT. 

C. W. SIBLEY. 

One part white rosin, one part beeswax, one part turpentine 
and two parts of mutton tallow. 

LINIMENT FOR MAN OR BEAST. 

MRS. J. CARPENTER. 

Two ounces of spirits of turpentine, two ounces of spirits of 
camphor, two ounces of sweet oil and one and a half ounces of 
cedar oil. Apply twice a day; shake well before using. 

FOR RHEUMATISM. 

Take equal parts of the best oil of Juniper and spirits of tur- 
pentine, and rub the parts afflicted thoroughly. Particular care 
should be taken to use only the best oil and spirits. 

POTATO POULTICE. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Peel, boil and mash the potatoes fine; put them in a thin mus- 
lin cloth and apply quite moist. It is considered better than 
bread as it will hold the heat and retain the moisture longer. 



248 MEDICINAL RECIPES. 

COUGH SYRUP. 

MISS VERA REINKING. 

One cup of hops, one cup of wild cherry bark, one cup of hoar- 
hound, one and a half gills of tar, one gill of brandy and a half 
pound of loaf sugar. Soak the cherry bark in one pint of water 
twenty-eight hours; put the hops and hoarhound in two quarts of 
water and keep at a temperature below (but near) boiling for two 
hours; boil tar with one pint of water one hour; strain the hops 
and hoarhound; pour oiF the tar into the same vessel; add sugar 
and one pint of water; boil until you have> a rich syrup; then add 
the cherry and brandy, and make up for the water that has been 
lost. 

Caution. — Do not boil the cherry. 



COUGH REMEDY. 



MES. C. C. HOWELL. , ^ / 



Four drams of syrup of squills, one ounce.of wild cherry, two 
ounces of paregoric and five ounces of wine of tar. Take one 
teaspoonful three times a day. Shake well before using. 

COUGH MIXTURE. 

Two quarts of rain water, one pound of raisins, five cents worth 
of licorice, a fourth of a pound of rock candy. Boil this to one 
quart and strain it. Take two tablespoons three times daily; add- 
ing a little vinegar. 

FOR HOARSENESS. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Beat the whites of two eggs with two spoons of white sugar, a 
little nutmeg and a cup of warm water; mix well and drink often. 

TO PREVENT QUINSY. 

MRS. CURTIS BATES. 

Drop one drop of oil of pennyroyal on a lump of sugar and 
take it just before going to bed, also rub the throat with the oil. 
If done when the symptoms first appear, it is very sure to prevent. 
If one application does not cure, repeat it the next night. 



MEDICINAL RECIPES. 249 

CROUP LINIMENT. 

MRS. M. A. RICH. 

Equal parts of camphor, olive oil and tincture of arnica. 

SICK HEADACHE. 

One teaspoon of finely powdered charcoal in a a half tumbler 
of water. 

TOOTH ACHE. 

Take equal parts of alum and salt pulverized together; put on 
a small piece of cotton and insert in the tooth. 

LOCK JAW. 

Apply a poultice of scraped beet. 

DIARRHEA. 

A teaspoon of flour mixed in a tumbler of water and taken at 
intervals of the day will cure diarrhea. 

FOR CANKER SORE MOUTH. 
Burn a corn cob and apply the ashes two or three times a day. 

CURE FOR DYSPEPSIA. 

Mix together equal quantities of bran and sugar, brown like 
coffee, and take two or three times a day. 

CURE FOR A WEN. 

Wash it in common salt, dissolved in water, every day and it 
will be removed in a short time. 

MUSTARD PLASTER. 

Use whites of eggs to mix a mustard plaster and it will no* 
blister. 

TO RELIEVE FROSTED FEF 

To relieve the intense itching of frosted ff 
of alum in a little water, and bathe the part 
before the fire. One or two applications is i 



250 MEDICINAL RECIPES. 

FOOD FOR BABIES. 

MRS. W. CARPENTER. 

Make a thin gruel (which can be thickened as the child grows 
older), of Graham flour thoroughly cooked and strained through a 
very fine sieve or cloth. To one quart of gruel add one tablespoon 
of lime water; mix with this,yresA condensed milk in the propor- 
tion of a teaspoonful to one quart while the child is quite young, 
which should be increased to a full tablespoonful as early as four 
months and afterwards as the child may require. 

LIME WATER. 

To a piece of lime as large as a walnut pour over one pint of 
boiling water; let it settle and then bottle. Cork tight. 

FOR WORMS FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 

DR. EVERETT. 

Stew pumpkin seeds, make a strong liquid, and give a table- 
spoonful once a day. 

Paroxysms of coughing may be prevented or cured by swallow- 
ing a little dry salt. 

TO CURE A BURN. 

MRS. CURTIS BATES. 

Steep tea leaves, and bind on cold. 

FOR BURNS— GOOD. 
In one pint of linseed oil mix as much lime water as it will cut. 

SALVE FOR BURNS. 

MRS. CARPENTER. 

Two ounces of Burgundy pitch, a half ounce of bees-wax and 
■ ons of lard. Melt all together, spread on a cloth 
burn; do not take it off till the burn is well. 

^OULTICE FOR BOILS. 

r beer makes an excellent poultice for boils. 



MEDICINAL RECIPES. ^u^ 

CURE FOR BOILS. 

MES. C. H. SWEENEY. 

Isaiah, thirty-eighth chapter and twenty-first verse. Go thou 
and do likewise. 

TO PREVENT STYES. 

Bathe the eye every fifteen minutes in quite warm water; if 
applied when the soreness first appears, it is a sure preventive, 
otherwise it will greatly relieve. Also moisten green tea leaves 
and bind on the stye. 

GRANDMOTHER'S SALVE FOR EVERYTHING. 

MRS. CARPENTER. 

Two pounds of rosin, a half teacup of mutton tallow after it is 
hard, half as much bees-wax and a half ounce of camphor gum. 
Put all together into an old kettle and let it dissolve and just 
come to a boil, stirring with a stick; then take a half pail of warm 
water (just the chill off), pour it in and stir carefully until you can 
get your hands around it. Two persons must each take half and 
pull like candy until quite white and brittle; put a little grease 
on your hands to prevent sticking and keep them wet all the 
time; wet the table, roll out the salve and cut it with a knife. 
Keep in a cool place. * 



SiK'i'^ ^Ofy ¥fis^ i<SiJK®i^Y. 




TO PREVENT COLORS FROM FADING. 

MRS. J. PARMELEE. 

.« iii5f«ay:5||^ ISSOLVE an ounce of sugar of lead in one bucket of 
ijip" Avater. Put the dress into the water and let it stay 
^"^ about a half hour; then wring it out and dry it before 
washing. Hay water cleanses and stiffens brown or buff 
linen. One large spoon of beef's gall to two buckets of 
suds, improves calicoes and prevents their fading. Make 
starch for black calicoes of coffee water to prevent any 
whitish appearance. Glue is good for stiffening calicoes. Never 
let your calicoes freeze when drying. 

To prevent calico from fading while washing, infuse three gills 
of salt into four quarts of water; put the calico in while hot and 
leave it till cold. In this way the colors are rendered permanent, 
and will not fade by subsequent washings. 

BRAN WATER. 

This is excellent for washing a delicate material without fading 
it; if not too much soiled, the article can be cleansed without soap. 
Prepare it by boiling bran in a bag in the proportion of one quart 
to a gallon of water. Let it cool, and add another gallon of 
water. This will answer for soap and starch. 

TO WASH SWISS MUSLIN. 

Dissolve one teaspoon of gum Arabic in a half pint of water and 
add it to your starch when boiling. Wash the Swiss, put it 
through the starch, and clap it till dry enough to iron. It will 
look as well as new. 

253 



354 HINTS FOR THE LAUNDRY. 

CLEAR STARCHING. 

Many persons clear starch their clothes. That is, after starch- 
ing and drying, they rinse quickly through cold water. This does 
not remove the stiffness of the starch, but makes them glossier 
and more pliable. 

STARCH. 

MRS. E. A. C. 

Mix with cold water; pour on boiling water till it thickens; then 
add two teaspoons of sugar and butter the size of a nut. This 
gives a good gloss. 

STARCH POLISH. 

MKS. W. S. PEITCHART). 

Take equal parts of white wax and spermaceti; melt them to- 
gether and run into thin cakes on plates. A piece of this the size 
of a cent added to a quart of prepared starch gives a lustre to the 
clothes and prevents them from sticking. 

TO REMOVE STARCH OR RUST FROM FLAT-IRONS. 

Have a piece of yellow beeswax tied in a coarse cloth. When 
the iron is almost hot enough to use, but not quite, rub it quickly 
with the beeswax, and then witii a clean, coarse cloth. This will 
remove it entirely. 

TO REMOVE FRUIT STAINS FROM ANY WHITE GOODS. 

MRS. A. Y. EAWSON. 

Take chloride of soda and rub on the spots; wash out with clear 
water as soon as the stain disappears, to prevent the soda from 
eating the fabric. This is unfailing. For grass stains, rub fresh 
lard on the spots before washing and let them lie a little while 
that the lard may penetrate the cloth. 

TO REMOVE IRON RUST AND INK FROM WHITE 

GOODS. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Hold the cloth over a vessel of boiling water, place on the spot 
two or three crystals of oxalic acid and pour on boiling water. 



HINTS FOR THE LAUNDRY. 255 

TO REMOVE GREASE SPOTS FROM SILKS OR WOOLENS. 

MRS. C. P. HOLMES. 

Scrape French chalk, lay it on the spot and put it away for 
twenty- four hours; then rub lightly with a clean cloth and, if it 
still shows, repeat the process. 

TO RAISE THE SURFACE OF VELVET. 

Warm a flat-iron moderately, cover it with a wet cloth and 
hold it under the velvet; the vapor arising from the heated cloth 
will raise the pile of the velvet, with the assistance of a rush- 
whisk. 

TO REMOVE MILDEW FROM LINEN. 

MRS. E. A. C. 

Wet linen with soft water and rub it well with white soap. 
Scrape fine chalk to a powder and rub it well into the linen; lay 
it on the grass in the sunshine and be careful to keep it damp 
with soft water; repeat the process next day and the mildew will 
entirely disappear. 

TO REMOVE INK STAINS. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHARD. 

Apply lemon juice and salt and lay the article.in the sun. 
LIQUID BLUING. 

MRS. A. Y. RAWSON. 

Mix thoroughly one ounce of pulverized Prussian blue, a half 
ounce of pulverized oxalic acid and one quart of soft water. 

TO COLOR COTTON BLUE. 

MRS. C. W. SIBLEY. 

Put into a tin vessel two boxes of indigo, let it dissolve, then 
put in the goods and boil them; they will take all the color out of 
the water and will not fade. 

TO PREVENT FLANNEL FROM TURNING YELLOW. 

MRS. CROM. BOWEN. 

Pieces of white wax laid in the folds of white flannel or Swiss 
muslin will prevent them from turning yellow. 



256 HINTS FOR THE LAUNDRY. 

TO CLEAN AND STIFFEN SILK. 

MRS. E. P. CHASE. 

Grate two or three large potatoes and add one pint of soft wa- 
ter; let it stand one hour, pour off the liquid and strain it through 
a sieve; put in a half pint of alcohol and it is ready for use. 
Apply the liquid with a clean sponge, rubbing the soiled part well; 
fold and iron. Be careful not to have the irons too hot. 

FOR WASHING OIL CLOTHS. 

Wash them with soft flannel and lukewarm water, and wipe 
thoroughly dry. To make extra nice, drop a few spoonfuls of 
milk over them and rub them with a dry cloth. Kerosene rubbed 
on oil-cloth or zinc with a dry cloth, after washing, is also good. 

PREPARATION FOR WASHING. 

One pound of potash, two pounds of sal-soda and six quarts of 
boiling water. Take two-thirds of a quart to three pails of water 
and add one cup of soft soap. 

COMPOUND FOR WASHING FLUID. 

MRS. C. C. HOWELL. 

One pound of unslacked lime and three pounds of sal-soda. 
Boil in six quarts of rain water, pour the whole in a tub, add four- 
teen quarts of water, stir thoroughly and allow it to settle; then 
bottle. For washing, use one teacup for the first boiler, for each 
succeeding boiler a half teacup. 

WASHING FLUID. 

MRS. HASKELL. 

A half pound of unslacked lime (or one teacup), one pound of 
sal-soda, one ounce of borax and one gallon of rain-water. Use a 
half teacup of the fluid to one boiler of water. Soak the clothes 
over night in clear water; put the fluid into the water and let it 
come to a boil; soak the clothes and pour the mixture over them; 
boil in clean water and rinse twice. The water the clothes are 
boiled in may be used for washing coarse flannels, calicoes, etc. 



HINTS FOR THE LAUNDRY. 257 

HARD SOAP. 

MRS. S. JOHNS. 

Pour four gallons of boiling water over six pounds of washing 
soda and three pounds of unslacked lime; stir the mixture well 
and let it settle until perfectly clear, then drain off the water, 
add six pounds of grease and boil for two hours, stirring most of 
the time. If it should be too thick, pour more water over the 
lime and add it to the boiling mixture; it is well to add a handful 
of soajD. Perfume as you please. 

HARD SOAP. 

MRS. CARPENTER. 

To six pounds of grease take six pounds of sal-soda, three pounds 
of unslacked lime, four gallons of water and a fourth of a pound 
of borax. Put the lime and soda into a kettle, then add the wa- 
ter; as soon as it boils take it off and let it settle, then pour the 
lye off. Put the grease into an empty kettle and melt; when it 
is hot add the borax and clear lye, boil it a half hour, dip up a 
little and if it is as hard as tallow when cool, it is done. 

COLD WATER SOAP. 

MRS. N. BAKER. 

Fourteen pounds of rosin bar-soap, three pounds of sal-soda, 
one pound of rosin and eight ounces of salt. Put these into six 
or seven gallons of soft water on the fire until dissolved, then 
pour into a barrel and fill it with soft water, add two ounces of 
spirits of turpentine and stir well. 

17 



Mi^Cie^i<i<S]s[^oU^ ^^e^d^etif^'i^g. 



RAG CARPET. 

MRS. EMMA MICHAEL. 

^^^ EN POUNDS of fine XXX chain will make twenty-eight 



i^ 



yards of carpet. Allow one and a half pounds of woolen 
'^T^ rags to the yard,' and, of cotton rags, one and a fourth 
v^.e)"^ pounds. 

I TO VENTILATE APPLES. 

Bore holes in barrel heads to allow the moisture to pass off. 

TO PRESERVE STOVE-PIPES. 

Rub them well while warm (not hot) with linseed oil, before 
putting them away in the spring. 

TO PREVENT FLIES FROM INJURING PICTURE 
FRAMES. 

Boil three or four onions in one pint of water; brush the frames 
over with the liquid and no fly will touch them. It will not in- 
jure the frames. 

TO RESTORE GILT FRAMES. 

Take one ounce of cooking soda and beat it thoroughly with 
the whites of three eggs; brush out the dust with a feather duster, 
then dip a small paint brush into the mixture and rub it all over 
the gilding into every tiny crevice, and it will render it fresh 
and bright. 

259 



360 MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. 

TO TAKE OUT GREASE. 

To erase sewing-machine oil from muslins, soap the spots and 
wash them in cold water. 

TO CLEAN CARPETS. 

Salt, sprinkled upon the carpet before sweeping, will make it 
look bright and clean. This will also prevent moths. 

TO CLEAN FLOORS AFTER TAKING UP CARPETS. 

Take a dust-pan of damp earth and sprinkle over the floor, then 
use the broom as when scrubbing, after which brush the dirt up 
and very little dust will rise. 

TO CLEANSE A NEW WOODEN PAIL. 

Fill the pail with boiling water and let it remain until cold, 
then empty it and wash the inside with a solution of soda (having 
the water warm) and a little lime; after that scald it well with 
hot water and rinse with cold. 

SEALING-WAX FOR FRUIT JARS. 

Take eight ounces of rosin, two ounces of shellac and half an 
ounce of beeswax; melt the rosin, then add the shellac slowly, 
and afterward the beeswax. 

TO KILL COCKROACHES. 

Mix equal parts of red lead, Indian meal and molasses to a paste, 
put it on iron plates and set it where they congregate. 

TO PREVENT BEDBUGS FROM REMAINING EITHER 
IN THE HOUSE OR BEDSTEAD. 

MRS. M. A. TURNER. 

Take two tablespoons of lard and one ounce of quicksil- 
ver; beat the white of an ^^^^i then stir them all together. With 
a small brush or stick put this mixture in every crack or crevice 
where vermin can hide; do this after cleaning house and you will 
never be troubled with vermin. If you have them already, use 
corrosive sublimate first. Take off your rings while applying 
this preparation as it injures gold. 



MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. 261 

TO CLEAN BRASS ORNAMENTS. 

Wash them with alum boiled in strong lye, one ounce to a pint, 
and afterwards rub them with strong tripoli. 

TO CLEAN BRASS STAIR RODS. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTBR. 

First wash the rods in strong soapsuds, then rub them with rot- 
ten stone moistened with alcohol. Let the mixture dry on, and 
rub it off with a dry woolen cloth. 

FOR CLEANING FURNITURE. 

MRS. SNYDER, NEW YORK. 

One quart of lard oil or olive oil, one pint of linseed oil, three 
quarts of rain- water, one teaspoon of spirits of ammonia or enough 
to make the oil and water unite, and one ounce of borax dissolved 
in warm water. Apply with a woolen cloth and rub the articles 
perfectly dry. 

A CLEANING POLISH FOR FURNITURE. 

One pound of olive oil, one pound of rectified oil of amber, one 
pound of spirits of turpentine, one ounce of oil of lavender and a 
half ounce of tincture of alkanet root. Saturate a piece of cotton 
batting with this and apply it to the wood, then with a soft rag 
rub well and wipe off dry. This will make old things new. It 
must be kept tightly corked. 

TO TAKE GREASE OUT OF SILKS. 

MRS. GRAHAM. 

Take a lump of magnesia and rub it (wet) over the spot, let it 
dry; then brush the powder off, and the spot will disappear. Or 
take a visiting or other card, separate it, and rub the spot with 
the soft internal part, and it will disappear without removing the 
gloss from the silk. 

TO CLEx\NSE CLOTHES, CARPETS, ETC. 

MRS. M. A. RICH, STERLING, ILL. 

Three and a half quarts of soft water, a fourth of a pound of 
salt-petre, a fourth of a pound of barbers' white soap, a fourth of 
a pound of alcohol and a half pound of ammonia. 



262 MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. 

TO CLEAN STRAW MATTING. 

Use a coarse cloth dipped in salt and water; wipe dry. The 
salt will keep the matting from turning yellow. 

TO CLEAN ZINC. 

MRS. D. D. B., CHICAGO. 

Wash the zinc with soap suds and wipe it dry. Mix three spoons 
of clear water and one teaspoon of oil of vitriol. Take a clean cloth 
and rub it thoroughly with the vitriol water, being careful not to 
drop any on the carpet; then take clear water, wash it and wipe 
it dry, and you will have not only a clear but a bright zinc. 

TO EXTRACT STAINS FROM SILVER. 

Sal-ammoniac one part, vinegar sixteen parts. Mix and use 
this liquid with a piece of flannel, then wash the plate in clean 
water. 

TO REMOVE PIMPLES AND MAKE THE SKIN SMOOTH. 

Make a tea of red clover blossoms and wash the face with it 
two or three times a day. 

TO PRESERVE POTATOES TILL SPRING. 

Put a quantity of powdered charcoal on the bottom of the potato 
bin; it will preserve their flavor and prevent the sprouts from 
shooting out so early as they otherwise would. 

TO KEEP THE CURCULIO FRO.AI PLUM TREES. 

DR. J. N. SPEED, RUSIIVILLE, ILL. 

Every morning take wood ashes and with a large spoon throw 
them up into the trees while the dew is on. They make a lye 
that will destroy the curculio and secure a good crop of plums. 
Try it. 

COLOGNE WATER. 

Two drams of English oil of lavender, two drams of oil of 
cloves, two drams of oil of bergamot, twenty drops of otto of rose, 
twenty drops of oil of cinnamon, one dram of essence of musk and 
one dram of rectified spirits. 



MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. 263 

CAMPHOR ICE. 

MRS. C. GETCHELL. 

A half ounce each of gum camphor, white wax, spermaceti and 
almond oil. Mix them together over a gentle fire until dissolved, 
then pour into pans to cool. 

PRIME VINEGAR. 

MRS. W. S. PRITCHARD. 

Mix one quart of molasses, three gallons of rain water and one 
pint of yeast. Let them ferment and stand four weeks. 

DIAMOND CEMENT. 

MR. JOHN SCRIPPS, RUSHVILLE, ILL. 

A half pound of white glue, a fourth of a pound of dry, white 
lead and a quart of rain-water. Put all in a vessel, set it in an- 
other of boiling water till the glue is dissolved, then add a half 
pint of alcohol and boil till all is well mixed; bottle it and cork 
well. Before using it place it in warm water to soften, also warm 
your crockery or glass, and after affixing it set away the articles 
affixed for twenty-four hours. 

STOVE POLISH. 

Mix stove lustre with turpentine, apply it in the usual manner, 
and the stove will look like new. 

VARNISH FOR GRATES. 
Asphaltum pitch dissolved in turpemtine. 

DEATH TO INSECTS. 

Two pounds of alum diss^jlved in three or four quarts of boiling 
water and applied to all cracks and crevices, will keep out ants, 
roaches, spiders, bedbugs, etc., etc. 

UNFAILING CURE FOR COLIC IN HORSES. 

MR. P. J. M. 

Take one dessert-spoon of copperas, put it in a piece of paper, 
tie on a stick and put down the horse's throat, punching until the 
paper breaks. It will give relief in a few minutes. 



264 MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. 

TO PURIFY CISTERN WATER. 

MRS. CROM. BOWEN. 

A small sack of charcoal dropped into the cistern every spring, 
will purify it, and keep the water sweet and clean. 

ORRIS ROOT. 
Nibble orris root when going to singing school. 

TO REMOVE GREASE FROM COAT COLLARS. 
Wash with a sponge moistened with hartshorn and water. 

DIFFERENT USES FOR AMMONIA. 

No housekeeper should be without a bottle of spirits of ammo- 
nia, for besides its medical value, it is very desirable for house- 
hold purposes. It is nearly as useful as soap, and its cheapness 
brings it within the reach of all. Put a teaspoon of ammonia into 
a quart of warm soap-suds, dip in a flannel cloth and wipe off 
the dust and fly specks, and see how much labor you can save. 
No scrubbing will be needful. 

It will cleanse and brighten silver wonderfully. With a pint of 
suds mix a teaspoon of the spirits, dip in your silver spoons, forks, 
etc., rub them with a brush, and polish with a chamois skin. 

For washing mirrors and windows, put a few drops of ammonia 
on a piece of paper and it will readily take off every spot or finger 
mark on the glass. 

It will take out grease spots from every fabric. Put on the 
ammonia nearly clear, lay a blotting paper over the place and 
press a hot iron over it a few minutes. A few drops in water will 
clean laces and whiten them, and muslins also. 

Then it is a most refreshing agent at the toilet table. A few 
drops in a basin will make a better bath than pure water, and, if 
the skin is oily, it will remove its glossiness and disagreeable odors. 
Added to a foot bath, it entirely absorbs all obnoxious smell so 
often arising from the feet in hot weather; nothing is better for 
cleansing the hair from dandruff and dust. 

For cleansing hair and nail brushes it is equally good. Put a 
teaspoon of ammonia into a pint of warm water and shake the 
brushes through the water; when they look white, rinse them in 



MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. 265 

cold water and put them in the sunshine or a warm place to dry; 
the dirtiest brushes will come out white and clean. 

For medical purposes it is unrivalled. For the headache it is a 
desirable stimulant; and frequent inhaling of its pungent odors 
will often remove catarrhal cold. There is no better remedy for 
heart-burn and dyspepsia, and the aromatic spirits of ammonia is 
especially prepared for these troubles; ten drops of it in a wine- 
glass of water is often a great relief. The spirits of ammonia can 
be take in the same way, but it is not palatable. 

AMMONIA FOR PLANTS. 

The eifect of ammonia on vegetation is beneficial. If you desire 
roses, fuschias, geraniums, etc., to become more flourishing, try it 
upon them by adding five or six drops to every pint of water you 
give them, but do not repeat the dose oftener than once in five or 
six days, lest you stimulate them too highly. 

TO REMOVE RUST FROM STEEL. 

MRS. W. . 

Cover the steel with sweet oil well rubbed on; in forty-eight 
hours use unslacked lime powdered very fine; rub it till the rust 
disappears. To prevent rust mix with fat oil varnish four-fifths 
of well rectified spirits of turpentine; apply it by means of a 
sponge and the articles will retain their brilliancy and never con- 
tract any stains of rust. 

CLEANING HAIR BRUSHES. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

Take a cup of corn meal and fill the brush, rubbing gently with 
the hand; as it absorbs the grease and dirt shake it out, and use 
fresh meal till the brush is thoroughly cleaned. This is better 
than ammonia, as there is no water to injure or loosen the back 
of the brush. 

FOR CLEANING HAIR. 

MRS. MARIA LAIRD. 

Make a thick suds with castile soap and one pint of soft water; 
add one 'd^'g well beaten, two tablespoons of ammonia and two 
teaspoons of pulverized borax. Bottle it; pour a little on the 
hair and rinse it ofi" with clean water. 



266 MISCELLANE O US RE CEIPTS. 

TO PRESERVE AND STRENGTHEN THE HAIR. 

MRS. J. P. FOSTER. 

One ounce of bi-carbonate of soda, two drams of tincture of 
cantharides, two ounces of spirits of rosemary, and a half pint 
of rosewater. Mix the bi-carbonate of soda with the rosewater, 
and add the other ingredients. Apply it with a sponge, rubbing 
it well into the roots of the hair until a lather is produced; then 
rinse with water, and dry on a coarse towel. 

TO CLEAN MARBLE. 

MRS. W. . 

Make Spanish whiting into a paste by moistening with water in 
which a piece of washing soda is dissolved; spread in a piece of 
flannel and rub it well on the marble, repeating the process. It 
should be washed off with soap and water and the marble after- 
wards polished with a soft duster. 

CLEANSING VARNISHED PAINT. 

In cleansing paint which has been varnished there is nothing 
better than weak tea. All the tea leaves from several drawings 
should be saved and boiled over early in the morning of the paint 
cleansing day; if boiled in an old tin pail or pan, the tea can be 
easily strained off for use. Wet a flannel in it and wipe the oak 
grained paint and you will be surprised at its brightness. No 
soap is needed and no milk. The tea is the most capital deter- 
gent ever invented. Wipe the paint with a soft cloth; you will 
find that very little elbow grease is needful. White varnished 
paint is cleansed as rapidly as the grained. 

SOLUTION FOR CLEANSING SILVER. 

MRS, W. S. PRITCHARD. 

Two quarts of rain water, two ounces of cyanuret of potash, 
one ounce of alcohol, one half ounce of Glauber's salts, one half 
ounce of blue stone pulverized, one ounce of ar. water spirits of 
ammonia; shake well before using. Before you begin to clean 
3'our silver, have ready a basin of hot soap suds and a basin of 
clean hot water. Tie a sponge on the end of a stick, then pour a 
small quantity of the solution into a bowl, dip the sponge into the 
mixture and apply to the article of silver, rubbing it over quick- 



MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. 267 

ly, (to avoid streaks), wash the silver in the soap suds, then rinse 
in the clear water and dry thoroughly with a soft cloth. As the 
solution is a rank poison, avoid getting it into the spouts of coifee 
pots or any place where it cannot be easily removed. It is best 
to pour out but a small quantity of the mixture at a time as it 
is very volatile. 

TO MEND CHINA. 

Take a very thick solution of gum arable in water, and stir in 
plaster of Paris until the mixture becomes of the proper consist- 
ency. Apply it with a brush to the fractured edges of the china, 
and stick them together. In three days the article cannot be 
broken in the same place. The whiteness of the cement renders 
it doubly valuable. 

WASHING WINDOWS. 

MRS. CHAS. H. GETCHELL. 

Wash the dressing from a new chamois skin, it will then be 
found very convenient for washing window and picture glass and 
mirrors, using clean, warm rain-water. Wring out dry and wipe 
the glass after washing, and it will need no further polishing. 
When done using wash clean and hang up to dry. With care 
one skin will last a long time. 

PENNYROYAL AND POTASH. 

If mosquitoes or other bloodsuckers infest our sleeping-rooms 
at night, and we uncork a bottle of the oil of pennyroyal, these 
animals will leave in great haste, nor will they return so long as 
the air in the room is loaded with the fumes of tha.t aromatic herb. 
If rats enter the cellar, a little powdered potash, thrown in their 
holes, or mixed with meal and scattered in their runways, never 
fails to drive them away. Cayenne pepper will keep the buttery 
and storeroom free from ants and cockroaches. If a mouse makes 
an entrance into any part of your dwellings, saturate a rag with 
Cayenne, in solution, and stuff it into the hole, which can then be 
repaired with either wood or mortar. No rat or mouse will eat 
that rag for the purpose of opening communications with a depot 
of supplies. — Scientific American. 



368 MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. 

CHAPPED HANDS. 

Take common starch and grind it with a knife until it is re- 
duced to the smoothest powder. Take a tin box and fill it with 
starch thus prepared, so as to have it continually at hand for use. 
Then every time the hands are taken from the suds, or dish-water, 
rinse them thoroughly in clean water, wipe them, and while they 
are yet damp, rub a pinch of the starch thoroughly over them, 
covering the whole surface. We know many persons formerly 
afflicted with hands that would chap until the blood oozed from 
many minute crevices, completely freed from the trouble by the 
use of this simple remedy. 

To rub the hands thoroughly, when damp, with wheat bran 
will have the same effect as the starch. It is also an excellent 
remedy for tetter on the hands — will stop the itching at once and 
effect a speedy cure. 

TO DESTROY MOTHS IN CARPETS. 

MRS. E, P. CHASE. 

Wring a coarse towel out of clean water, spread it smoothly over 
the carpet and iron with a hot iron changing the iron often; re- 
peat on all parts of the carpet suspected of having moths. It is 
not necessary to press hard. The color of the carpet will not be 
injured and the moths will be destroyed by the steam from the 
hot iron. 

GOOD CEMENT. 

Alum and plaster of Paris well mixed with water, and used in 
a liquid state, will form a very useful cement. It will be found 
quite handy for many purposes. It forms a very hard composi- 
tion, and for fixing the brasses, etc., on lamps, nothing could be 
better. 

TO PREVENT A DOOR FROM CREAKING. 

Rub on the hinges a bit of soap, or two or three drops of ma- 
chine oil. 



I^^f)•I^x. 



Page 

BREAD AND YEAST— 87 

Apple gems 10.3 

An unfailing yeast 88 

Aunt Rachel's flannel cakes . . ]0G 
Another way, for cracked wheat 112 

Batter cakes 105 

Baking powder biscuit 104 

Beat biscuit 103 

Best mode for cooking oat meal .112 

Bread— 89, ^0 

Drown 94, 05 

Boiled corn 90 

Corn 96, 97 

Graham 93,94 

Sweet 92 

Salt rising 90 

Biscuit— . . . 93, 103, 104, 105 

Fairy 104 

French 93 

Imperl.tl 93 

Milk 93 

Sour milk 104 

Soda 104 

Unleavened l05 

Breakfast cakes 109 

Breakfast gems l08 

Brown bread 94, 95 

Brown biscuit 105 

Buckwheat cakes .... 106, 107 

Bunns 100, 101 

Cakes— . . . 105, 100, 107, 109 

Carrie's jug yeast 87 

Carolina muffins 98 

Corn bread 96, 97, 98 

Corn muffins 98 

Corn griddle-cakes 107 

Corn fritters 110 

Cracked wheat 112 

Cream toast 108 

Croquets 101 

Crumpets Ill 

Des Moines crumpets Ill 

Des Moines rusk 92 

Dry yeast 88 

Egg roll - . 92 

Fairy biscuit 104 

Farina cakes 106 

Flour 87 



Page 

French biscuit 93 

French rolls 90, 91 

Fried mush 98 

Fruit gems 103 

Fritters 110 

Gems 101, 102, 103 

Graham bread 93, 94 

Graham yeast bread 94 

Graham cakes 100 

Graham gjms 101 

Graham muffins 99, 100 

Indian brown bread 94 

Imperial biscuit 93 

Johnny-cake 97 

Jug yeast 87, 88 

Lapland cakes 109 

Milk biscuit 93 

Mrs. Hodge's biscuit 105 

Muffins 98, 99, 100 

Mush 97, 98, 112 

Mush biscuit 103 

Nice Johnny-cake 97 

Nice griddle cakes 107 

Nice breakfast cakes 109 

Oat meal gems 101, 102 

Oat meal, mode of cooking . .112 

Parker House rolls 91 

Pearl grit gems 102 

Pop-overs 101 

Raspberry shortcake 108 

Rice gems 102, 103 

Rice griddle cakes 106 

Rice fritters 110 

Rice croquets 101 

Rice waffles 109 

Rice tea cake 100 

Roval crumpets Ill 

Roils 90, 91 

Rusks 91, 92 

Des Moines 92 

Sweet 92 

Rye drop cakes 106 

Salt rising bread 90 

Saratoga toast 108 

Sally Lunn 97 

Without yeast .... 97 

Short-cake 108 

Soda biscuit 104 



270 



INDEX. 



Sour milk biscuit 104 

Steamed corn bread 95 

Strawberry short-cake 107 

Sweet bread 92 

Sweet rusk 92 

Swiss bunns 100 

Unleavened biscuit 105 

Vir£;inia pone 102 

Waffles 109, 110 

Wheat gems 102 

Cracked*. 112 

Whigs Ill 

Yeast— 87, 88, 89 

An unfaiUng 88 

Carrie's jug 87 

Dry 88 

Jug 88 

Yeast buckwheats 107 

CAKES AND ICINGS— 151 

Boiled icings 151 

Frosting 152 

General directions 151 

Icings 151 

CONFECTIONERY- 207 

Butterscotch 209 

Candy 208, 2U9 

Caramels 208 

Chocolate caramels .... 207, 208 

Cocoanut candy 208 

Cocoanut cakes 210 

Cocoanut kisses 210 

Cream candy 209 

French cream candy 209 

Hickory-nut drops 208 

Kisses 209,210 

Molasses candy 208 

Vinegar candy 208 

While taffy candy 209 

CREAMS AND FANCY DISHES— 199 

Blanc mange 204, 205 

Boiled custard 203 

Charlotte russe 204 

Chocolate blanc mange .... 204 
Corn starch bianc mange . . . 205 

Creams 199, 200, 201, 202 

Egg 200 

Fruit 200 

Ice 201, 202 

Hamburg 201 

Italian 200 

Lemon 201 

Spanish 201 

Tapioca 199 

Vanilla , ... 201 

Egg cream £00 

Floating island 203 

French custard 203 

Fruit cream 200 

Hamburg cream 201 



Page 

Ice cream 201, 202 

Italian cream 200 

Jelly blanc mange 205 

Lemon cream 201 

Lemon sherbet 202 

Orange sherbet 202 

Spanish cream 201 

Svllabub . , 202 

Tapioca cream 199,200 

Thompson's icecream 201 

Vanilla cream 201 

Whips ..'.... 202 

DRINKS— 237 

Chocolate 238 

Coffee 237,238 

Cream nectar 239, 240 

Effervescing jelly drink .... 239 

Ginger beer 238 

G;nger pop 239 

Raspberry shrub 240 

Red raspberry vineger .... 240 

Root beer 239 

Substitute for cream in coffee . 238 

To keep cider sweet 240 

To make coffee _. . 237 

To make a large quantity of 

coffee 237 

EGGS— 57 

Another way 58 

Baked eggs 58 

Baked omelet 69 

Boiled eggs 58 

Anotlier way 58 

Fried eggs 57 

Fried omelet 69 

How to select and pack eggs . . 57 

Omelet 69 

Baked 59 

Fried 59 

Pickled eggs 58 

Poached eggs 68 

Scrambled eggs 68 

FANCY CAKES FOR PARTIES— 174 

Another pretty cake 175 

Gold cake 174 

Layer fruit cake 175 

Piiik cake 175 

Silver cake 174 

FISH— 17 

About selecting fresh 17 

Baked 18, 19 

Baked halibut 19 

Broiled 17, 20 22 

Smoked salmon 20 

Boiled 17, 21 

Boiled cod-fish 21 

Boiled mackerel 20 

Canned salmon 20 



INDEX, 



271 



Page 

Chowder 18 

Cod-fish balls 21 

Cod-fish on toast 21 

To prepare for table ... 21 

Boiled 21 

Fried "22 

Fresh, how to broil 17 

Boil 17 

Bake 18 

Chowder 18 

Fry 17 

How to cook cod-fish 21 

How to boil fresh 17 

To choose a salt mackerel . 20 

To cook cod-fish 21 

To choose a fresh fish ... 17 

To pot fresh fish 18 

To choose . 17, 20 

Bake fish IS 

Boil fresh 17,20,21 

Broil fish 17, 22 

Smoked salmon .... 20 

To fry fresh cod-fish 22 

To prepare cod-fish for the table. 21 

Salmon trout 19 

Shad 19 

Shell-fish 22 

Smoked Halibut 19 

Soused mackerel 20 

FOR THE SICK— 241 

Arrow root 242 

Baden Baden cream 244 

Beef tea 242 

Blackberry cordial 243 

Blackberry syrup 244 

Corn meal gruel 241 

Drink for the sick 244 

Egg pop 242 

Milk porridge 242 

Oat meal gruel 241 

Oyster toast 241 

Panada 242 

Rice jelly 242 

Sago gruel 241 

Sherbet 244 

Tamarind drink ........ 244 

Toast water 243 

Wheat gruel 241 

Wine whey 242 

Wine jelly 243 

FRUITS, JELLIES, PRESERVES— 211 

A delicious dish of apples . . . 213 

Ambrosia 213, 214 

Apples 211, 212,213, 215 

Apple butter 215 

Apple meringues 213 

Apple snow 212 

Apples to be eaten with meat . .213 

Baked apples 211 

Baked peaches 216 



Page 

Baked pears . . . . • 217 

Baked quinces 216 

Boiled apples 212 

Candied orange peel 223 

Canning fruit 214 

Canned peaches, or other fruit . 214 

Cider apple sauce 215 

Coddled apples 211 

Crystal apples 212 

Crab marmalade 220 

Cut apples 212 

Currant jelly 221 

Currant preserves 218 

General directions 211 

Gelatine 222 

Ge'.atine jelly 222 

Green grape jelly and marmalade 219 
Jellies— ....211,217,221,222 

John Thomas 216 

Lemon butter 215 

Lemon jelly 222 

Lemon sponge or custard . . . 223 

Orange jelly 221 

Peach butter 214 

Peach preserves 218 

Pieplant jelly 220 

Pine-apple preserves 218 

Plum marmalade 219 

Preserves— 211,212,217,218,219 

Preserved apples 212 

Preserved damsons 218 

Preserved pears or quinces ; . . 217 

Preser\'ed quinces 217 

Preserved quinces with apples .217 

Preserved watermelon 219 

Quince jelly 217, 220 

Quince marmalade 219 

Raspberry charlotte 223 

Raspberry jam 216 

Siberian crab jelly 221 

Stewed and baked apples . . .211 

Snow jelly 222 

Suggestions 211, 214 

Tomato marmalade 216 

GINGER BREAD— .... 194, 195 

Drop ginger cake 196 

Ginger bread, plain 195 

Ginger cake 196 

Ginger cookies 197 

Ginger snaps 196,197 

Ginger sponge cake 195 

Soft ginger bread 194, 195 

Spiced ginger bread 195 

HINTS FOR THE LAUNDRY— 253 

Bran water 253 

Clear starching 254 

Cold water soap 257 

Compound for washing fluid . . 256 

For washing oil cloths 266 

Hard soap 257 



272 



INDEX. 



Page 

Liquid blueing 255 

Preparation for washing .... 256 

Starch 254 

Starch poMsh 254 

To clean and stiffen silk .... 256 

To color cotton blue 255 

To prevent colors from fliding . 253 

To remove ink stains 255 

To remove iron rust and ink from 

white goods 254 

' To remove fruit stains from white 

goods 254 

To remove starch or rust from 

flat irons 254 

To wash Swiss muslin .... 253 
To prevent flannel from turning 

yellow 265 

To raise the surf ice of velvet . . 255 
To remove grease spots from silks 

or woolens 255 

Washing fluid 256 

LAYER CAKES— 176 

Almond custard cake 179 

Cake 180 

Boston cream cakes 185 

Chocolate cake 177 

Coco.inut cake 177, 178 

Cream cake . . . . . . . 133, 184 

Cream sponge cake 184 

Custard cake 179 

Icing cake 180 

Ice cream cake . 180 

Jelly cake 182, 183 

Lemon jelly cake 181,182 

Lemon or orange cake . . . . 181 
Mrs. Sherman's almond cake .180 
Mrs. Speed's layer cake . . . .183 

Neapolitan cake 176 

Orange cake 180, 181 

Raisin cake 1 76 

Roll jelly cake 183 

White mountain cake . . . 178, 179 

LOAF CAKES— 152 

Almond cake 158 

Berwick sponge cake 174 

Black cake 156 

Black clouds 166 

Boston pound cake 161 

Bridgeport cake 156 

Cheap fruit cake 155 

Cherry Valley cake 167 

Citron, or almond cake .... 159 

Clove cake 160 

Cocoanut cake 166 

Coffee cake 167 

Composition cake 166 

Corn starch cake 168 

Cream cake 163 

Cream sponge cake 171 

Cup cake 165 



Page 

Delicate cake 168, 169 

Dough cake 167 

Dover cake 165 

Economy cake 167 

Election cake 152, 153 

Feather cake 170,171 

Fig cake 170 

French cake 165 

French loaf cake . „ 158 

Fruit cake 153, 154,155 

Gold cake 162 

Harrison cake 156 

Hickory-nut cake . . . . 159,160 

Ice-water sponge cake 174 

Lady cake 169, 170 

Lincoln cake 171 

Lemon cake . . 161 

Lemon currant cake 158 

Lilly cake 163 

Madison cake 164 

Marble cake 101, 162 

Mountain cake 170 

Mrs. Carpenter's wedding cake . 153 
Mrs. Dodge's wedding cake . . 153 
Mrs. Harmon's fruit cake . . . 163 

Mrs. Mason's cake 163 

Mrs. Sibley's raised cake . . . 157 

Number cake 165 

Pork cake No. 1 158 

Pork fruit cake 168 

Pound cake 160, 161 

Railroad cake 164 

Raised cake 156, 157 

Rich cake 166 

Rich coffee cake 157 

Shrewsbury cake 160 

Snow cake 171 

Spice cake 160 

Sponge cake 171, 172, 173 

St. Nicholas cake 163 

Washington cake 166 

White clouds 166 

White cake 167 

White cake, marbled 162 

White cup cake 165 

White fruit cake 155 

Willie C.'s birth-day cake . . 162 

MEATS— 35 

Balls 42 

Beef— 35 

A la mode 38 

Balls 40 

Baked tongue 41 

Broiled steak 38 

Beef-steak roll 39 

Beef-steak for the old 40 

Beef and mutton pie ... .43 

Beef omelet 40 

Brine for curing beef 55 

Brine for curing pori: and ham . 55 

Brine for ham 55 



INDEX. 



itn 



Page 

Broiled ham 52 

Boiled tongue 41 

Care of meat and drippings . . 36 

Corned beef 40, 54 

Fried ham 52 

Fried liver 41 

Fried salt pork 53 

Ham and eggs 62 

Ham sandwiches ...... 53 

Ham toast 53 

Hash 43 

Hash on toast 43 

Hash with potatoes 43 

How to fry dried beef .... 42 
How to keep hams through sum- 
mer 56 

Irish stew 48 

Lamb with rice 48 

Lard 54 

New England sausages .... 54 

Mutton— 36 

Chops 47 

Croquets 48 

Fillet of 47 

Fricassee 48 

To cook a leg of 47 

To roast a shoulder of . . 47 

Fork steaks 50 

Baked with apples .... 53 

Chops 60 

Sausages 53 

Pig's head roasted 50 

Pressed head 51 

Roast pig 49 

Roast leg of pork 49 

Roast spare-rib 50 

Scrabble 51 

Steamed ham 52 

Stewed lamb with green peas . 48 

Souse 60 

To cook ham . . ... 51 

To boil ham 51 

To glaze ham 52 

To cook dried beef 42 

To cure hams ....... 55 

To fry tripe 42 

To make tough beef tender . . 41 

Tomato steak 39 

To warm over cold meats ... 42 

To warm ham 62 

To prepare lard 54 

Veal— 36 

Roast 44 

Loaf 45 

Omelet 46 

Pot-pie 46 

Sausages 47 

Mottled veal 46 

Roast veal 44 

Spiced veal 45 

Scalloped veal 46 

i8 



Page 

Shoulder of veal 44 

To fry veal steak 44 

Veal or lamb patties 45 

MEDICINAL RECIPES- 245 

All-healing ointment 247 

, Babes, food for 250 

Boils, poultice for 250 

Burns, salve for 250 

Caked breasts, calendula salve for 247 
Calendula salve for caked breasts 247 
Canker sore mouth, salve for . . 249 

Corns, for 246 

Chilblains 246 

Cough medicines 248 

Croup liniment 249 

Cure for boils 251 

Cure for burns 250 

Cure for dyspepsia 249 

Cure for drunkenness, English . 245 

Cure for a wen 249 

Diarrhea 249 

Dyspepsia, cure for 249 

English cure for drunkenness . . 245 

Eye water recipe 245 

For burns, good 250 

For canker sore mouth .... 249 

For corns 246 

For felons 245, 246 

For sore nipples 246 

For salt rheum 246 

For hoarseness 248 

For rheumatism 247 

Frosted feet, to relieve . , . . . 249 

Food for babes 260 

Grandmother's salve for every- 
thing 251 

Headache, sick 249 

Hoarseness, for 248 

Lime water 250 

Liniment, croup 249 

Liniment for man or beast . . . 247 

Lock-jaw 249 

Mustard plaster 249 

Ointment, all-healing 247 

Plaster, mustard 249 

Potato poultice 247 

Poultice for boils 250 

Quinsy, to prevent 248 

Relieve frosted feet, to ... . 249 

Rheumatism 247 

Ringworm 246 

Salt rheum, for 246 

Salve for burns 250 

Salve for caked breasts, calendula 247 
Salve for everything, grandmoth- 
er's 251 

Sick headache 249 

Sore nipples, for 246 

Sore mouth, canker 249 

Styes, to prevent 251 

Tonic 247 



274 



INDEX. 



Page 

Toothache 249 

Worms, for children for . . . . 250 

Wen, cure for a 249 

Water, lime 250 

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS— . 259 

After taking up carpets, to clean 

floors 260 

Ammonia, different uses for . . 2(54 

Ammonia for plants 265 

Apples, to ventilate 259 

Bed-bugs, etc., to prevent . . . 200 
Brass ornaments or stair rods, to 

clean 261 

Carpet, rag 259 

Carpets, to destroy moths in . . 26S 

Camphor ice 263 

Cement, diamond 26;^ 

Cement, good ... 26S 

Chapped hands 268 

Clean carpets, to 260 

Cleaning polish for furniture . . 261 
Cleaning hair brushes, for . . . 265 

Clean marble, to 266 

Cleansing varnished pain . . 266 
Coat collars, grease from . . . 264 

Colic in horses 26:^ 

Cologne water 262 

Death to insects 263 

Diamond cement 263 

Different uses for ammonia . . 264 
Door creaking, to prevent . . . 268 
Extract stains from silver . . . 262 
For cleaning hair brushes . . . 265 

For cleaning furniture 261 

Good cement 268 

Grates, varnish for 263 

Grease out of silk, to take . . . 261 

Grease, to take out 260 

Gilt frames, to restore 259 

Hair, for cleansing 266 

Hands, chapped 268 

Insects, death to 263 

Kill cockroaches 260 

Make the skin smooth and re- 
move pimples 262 

Marble, to clean 260 

Mend China, to 267 

Motlis in carpets, to destroy . . 268 
New wooden pail, to clean a . . 260 

Orris root 264 

Pennyroyal and potash .... 267 

Prime vinegar 263 

Rag carpet 269 

Sealing wax for fruit jars .... 260 
Solution for cleaning silver . . . 266 

Stove polish 263 

To clean carpets 260 

To clean brass stair-rods . . 261 
To clean brass ornaments , . .261 
To clean floors after taking up 
carpets 260 



Page 

To clean furniture 261 

To clean marble 266 

To clean straw matting .... 262 

To clean zinc 262 

To cleanse clothes, carpets, act . 261 
To cleanse a new wooden pail . 260 
To destroy moths in carpets . . 268 
To extract stains from silver . . 262 
To keep the curculio from plum 

trees 262 

To kill cockroaches ..... 260 

To mend china . 267 

To prevent bed-bugs in the house 260 
To prevent flies injuring picture 

frames 259 

To prevent a door from creaking 268 
To preserve potatoes till spring . 262 
To preserve and strengthen the 

hair 266 

To preserve stove pipe 259 

To purify cistern water .... 264 
To remove grease from coat col- 
lars 264 

To remove pimples and make the 

skin smooth 262 

To remove rust from steel . . 265 

To restore gilt frames 259 

To take out grease 260 

To take grease out of silk . . . 261 

To ventilate apples 259 

Unfailing Cure for colic in horses 263 

Varnish for grates 263 

Washing windows 267 

PICKLES— 225 

Brine for cucumber pickles . . . 225 

Cabbage, pickled 229 

Cauliflower, pickled 229 

Chow-chow 231, 232 

Cucumber pickles 225, 226 

Cucumbers, ripe 227 

French pickles 227 

Green tomato pickles 228 

Green pepper mangoes 229 

Highden pickles 227 

Mangoes • • 230 

Mangoes, green pepper .... 229 

PiccahlH 230. 231 

Pickled cabbage 229 

Cauliflower 229 

Tomatoes 228 

Ripe cucumber pickles 227 

Sweet pickles 232 

Tomatoes, pickled 228 

PIES— 113 

Apple pie, chopped 121 

Apple custard pie 116 

Apple florindines 116 

Apple pie, lemon 121 

Cheesecakes 115,116 

Chopped apple pie 121 



INDEX. 



275 



Page 

Cobbler, peach 122 

Cocoanut pie ... 116 

Cracker pie 118 

Cream pies 117, 118 

Cream paste Wi 

Custard pie 110 

Custard apple pie 116 

Custard lemon 118 

Custard, sweet potato 122 

Delicate pie 115 

Florindines, apple 116 

Lemon pie 119,120, 121 

Lemon apple 121 

Lemon pie with two crusts . .119 
Lemon pie vvilh three crusts . . 119 

Lemon custard 118 

Lemon puffs 121 

Lemon tarts 120 

Marlborough pie 118 

Mince meat 115 

Mock mince meat 114 

Mince pie 115 

New England pumpkin pie . . . 122 

Paste ....." 113 

Paste, cream 113 

Peach cobbler ; . 122 

Poor man's pie 115 

Pumpkin pie. New England . . 122 

Puff paste 113 

Sliced sweet potato pie 122 

Sweet potato custard pie .... 122 

Squash pie 122 

Summer mince pie 115 

Vinegar pie 116 

Washington pie 116, 117 

POULTRY— 27 

A dressing for chicken ...... 32 

Boiled turkev 28 

Broiled chicken 29, 30 

Broiled praire chicken . . . . 32 

Chicken pie 30 

Chicken pudding 31 

Smothered 30 

Tellied 31 

Broiled 29 

Fricasseed 29 

Fried 30, 32 

Dressing for 32 

Duck roast 33, 34 

Boiled 33 

Smothered 34 

Fricasseed chicken 29 

Fried chicken 3(1, 32 

Jellied chicken 31 

Other ways (to warm over turkey) 29 

Roast turkey 28 

Roast chicken 29 

Roast duck 33, 34 

Roast pigeon 33 

Roast quail 33 

Smothered chicken 30 



I'Rge 

Smothered duck 34 

Stewed prairie chicken .... 32 

To select and prepare poultry . 27 

To roast a turkey 28 

Turkey, how to select 27 

Boiled 28 

Roasted 28 

Warmed over 28, 29 

To warm over a turkey .... 28 

To fry chicken 30 

To make an old fowl tender . . 31 

To dress a prairie chicken ... 32 

To fry prairie chicken 32 

To roast pigeons 33 

To boil duck 33 

PUDDINGS— 123 

Amherst pudding , 139 

An e,\cellent pudding without 

eggs 135 

Apple pudding 137, 138 

Apple sago pudding .' 141 

Apple dumplings 136 

Baked batter pudding 132 

Baked pudding 128 

Baked apple dumplings .... 136 

Baked English plum 124 

Baked flour pudding 125 

Baked Indian pudding .... 136 

Baked potato pudding 143 

Berry pudding 127, 129 

Birds-nest pudding 141 

Black pudding 126 

Boiled pudding 132 

Boiled batter pudding 133 

Boiled bread pudding 130 

Boiled English plum 123 

Boiled flour pudding 124 

Boiled plum pudding 124 

Boiled potato pudding 142 

Bread pudding 131 

Bread and butter pudding . . . 130 

Cherry pudding 129 

Chocolate pudding 144 

Christmas pudding 125 

Citron pudding 128 

Cottage pudding 134 

Cocoanut pudding .... 144, 145 

Corn, green 142 

Cracker pudding 124, 147 

Custard tapioca pudding .... 143 

Delmonico pudding 126 

Dumplings, apple 136 

Eve's pudding 138 

English plum pudding . . . 123, 124 

Baked 124 

Boiled 123 

Farina pudding, ice 127 

Fig pudding 127 

Florentine pudding 134 

Flour baked pudding 125 

Flour boiled pudding 124 



276 



INDEX. 



Page 

Fruit pudding without eggs . . 146 

General remarks 122 

German pudding 128 

Ginger or black pudding . . . .126 

Green corn pudding 112 

Home pudding 147 

Ice Farina pudding 127 

Indian puddmg 135, 136 

Indian pudding without eggs . . 135 

Jelly pudding 138 

Lemon pudding 145 

Maccaroni pudding 130 

Minute pudding 137 

Orange pudding 146 

Oxford pudding 137 

Paradise pudding 144 

Peach pudding 126 

Persian pudding 133 

Plain steamed pudding 127 

Plum pudding .... 123, 124, 140 

Baked 124 

Boiled 123,124 

Cracker 124 

English 123 

Poor man's 140 

Pop-over 142 

Potato 142 

Baked 143 

Boiled . 142 

Puffs 140, 141 

Queen of puddings .... 131, 132 

Quick pudding 129 

Rice cups '. . . 140 

Rice pudding 139, 140 

Rhyme pudding 136 

Sago pudding 141 

Sago apple pudding 141 

Sally Lunn pudding 134 

States ship pudding 129 

Steamed pudding 133 

Steamed plain pudding 127 

Snow pudding 147, 148 

Suet pudding 125 

Sunderland pudding 130 

Tapioca pudding ... .143, 144 

Tapioca custard 143 

Telegraph pudding 147 

Thanksgiving pudding 133 

Union pudding 143 

Washington pudding 146 

Wedding cake pudding .... 128 
Whortleberry pudding 127 

SAUCES FOR PUDDINGS— . . 148 

Cream sauce 14!i 

Excellent sauce for boiled rice . 151! 

Foam sauce 14'.' 

Hard sauce 148 

Hot sauce . . . ; 14'.) 

Lemon sauce 15(i 

. Pudding sauce , 148, 149 



Page 

SAUCES AND SALADS— .... 61 

Asparagus salad fi7 

Bean salad 68 

Bread sauce 62 

Burnt butter 62 

Cabbage salad 68 

Catsups 64, 65, 66 

Celery sauce 64 

Chicken salad 66, 67 

Chili sauce 63 

Cranberry sauce ,- . 63 

Cucumber catsup 66 

(Jiirrant catsup 64 

Currant soy 65 

Drawn butter 61 

Dressing for chicken salad with- 
out celery 67 

Essence of celery 64 

Egg sauce 63 

Grape catsup 65 

Gooseberry catsup 65 

Lobster salad 67 

Mint sauce for lamb 62 

Mustard sauce for lettuce or cab- 
bage 64 

Oyster sauce 63 

Parsley sauce 62 

Potato salad 68 

Sauce for boiled meats .... 62 

Salads 66, 67, 68 

Sauce for broiled fish 64 

Sauces 61, 62, 63. 64 

Salad dressing 68 

Shirley sauce 62 

To make curry powder .... 64 

Tomato catsup 65 

Walnut catsup 66 

White sauce 61 

SHELL-FISH— 22 

Another oyster pie 25 

Broiled oysters 24 

Clam fritters . 25 

Fried oysters" 24 

Lobster croquettes 25 

Oysters fried 24 

Escalloped 23 

Pickled 23 

Roasted 25 

Stewed 24 

Steamed 24 

Oyster fritters 25 

Patties 23 

Pie 22, 25 

Pickled oysters 23 

Roasted oysters 25 

Steamed oysters 24 

Stewed oysters 24 

To fry oysters 23 



V 



INDEX. 



277 



Page 

SMALL CAKES— 186 

Bakers' lemon snaps 187 

Carolina cakes 188 

Christmas cookies 190 

Clove cake 1S6 

Cocoanut cookies 190 

Cookies 189, 190 

Carolina IBS 

Christmas 190 

Cocoanut 190 

Mother's 190 

New Years 190 

Spiced 189 

Crullers 191 

Rich 191 

Doughnuts 192, 193 

Raised 192 

Without sugar 192 

Fried cakes 190, 191 

Fruit drop cakes 186 

German cakes 194 

Jumbles 187, 188 

Lady-fingers 188 

Lemon snaps 187 

Little plum cakes 186 

Maccaroons 194 

Matrimony 193 

Motlier's cookies 190 

New Years cookies 190 

Raised doughnuts 192 

Rich crullers 191 

Rock cake 194 

Sand tarts 188 

Scotch cakes 188 

Snow balls 193 

Spiced cookies 189 

Spice cakes 186 

Sponge drop-cakes 186 

Tangle-breeches 193 

SOTJPS- 9 

An excellent, without meat . . 11 

Balls, force-meat ^ 15 

Barley, egg 10 

Bean 12 

Beef, plain 9 

Broth, Scotch 16 

Cauliflower 11 

Chicken .... 14 

Chicken and oysters 14 

Common meat 10 

Corn, green 13 

Dumplings for 15 

Egg barley 10 

Force-meat balls 15 

Green pea 13 

Green corn 13 

Gumbo, ochre or 16 

Meat, common 10 

Mock turtle 14 

Noodle 15 

Ochra or gumbo 16 



Page 

Oyster 13 

Oyster, chicken and 14 

Pea 12, 13 

Portable 15 

Potato 12 

Sago 10 

Scotch broth 15 

Tomato 11 

Without meat, an excellent . . 11 

SWEET PICKLES— 232 

Apples, spiced 234 

Cherries, spiced 233 

Currants, spiced 233 

Directions for making sweet 

pickle 232 

Grapes, spiced 233 

Grapes, pickled 235 

Peaches, spiced 234 

Peaches, pickled 234 

Pears, pickled 235 

Pickled grapes 235 

Peaches 234 

Pears 235 

Plums 234 

Raisins 235 

Watermelon 235 

Raisins, pickled 235 

Sweet tomato pickles 233 

Spiced apples 234 

Cherries 233 

Currants 233 

Grapes 233 

Peaches 234 

Plums 234 

Watermelon pickles 235 

VEGETABLES— 69 

Artichokes 69 

Asparagus 70 

Another way to cook ... 70 

Another way to cook beans ... 71 

To cook egg plant 78 

To cook parsnips 79 

To cook turnips 86 

Baked beans 72 

Without pork 72 

Baked onions 78 

Baked potatoes 81 

Baked winter squash 83 

Beets 70 

Beet greens 70 

Beans— 70, 71, 72 

Lima 71 

String 70 

Bean pods for pickling .... 71 

Boiled cabbage 73 

Boiled potatoes 81 

Cabbage— 72, 73, 74 

Boiled 73 

Cooked in milk 73 

Cold-slaw 73 



278 



INDEX. 



Cabbage dressing 73, 74 

Cream 74 

Fried 74 

Hot-slaw 74 

Cauliflower 74, 75 

Corn fritters 76 

Corn pudding for meats .... 76 

Cooking vegetables 69 

Cucumbers 77 

Cucumber relish 77 

Egg plant 77 

Another way 78 

Fried cabbage 7-1: 

Green corn 77 

Green corn for winter use ... 76 

Green corn cakes 76 

To boil 77 

Greens 78 

Hulled corn 76 

Jerusalem artichokes 69 

Lima and butter beans .... 71 

Another way 71 

Mashed parsnips 80 

Mashed potatoes 80 

Mashed turnips 85 

Another way 86 

Onions— 78, 79 

Baked 78 

Boiled 79 

Fried 79 

Stewed 79 

Parsnips— 79, 80 

Fritters 80 

Mashed 80 

Another way 79 



Page 

Potatoes— 80, 81, 82 

Baked 81 

Boiled 81 

Cakes 81 

Fried 80 

Mashed 82 

Stewed for breakfast .... 81 

Sweet 82 

Potato balls — a breakfast dish . . 82 

Pressed corn 75 

Raw tomatoes 83 

Rules applicable to cooking all 

vegetables 69 

Salsify, or vegetable oyster ... 84 

Salsify fried 85 

On toast 85 

Saratogas (fried potatoes) ... SO 

Scalded tomatoes 84 

Scalloped tomatoes 84 

String beans 70 

Spinach 85 

Stewed carrots . 75 

Stewed potatoes 82 

Stewed tomatoes 82 

Stuffed tomatoes 84 

Succotash 71 

Summer squash 82 

Sweet potatoes 82 

To boil green corn 77 

To cook cauliflower 75 

To dry Lima beans 71 

To preserve corn 75 

Tomatoes 83, 84 

Tomato fritters 81 

Young potatoes 81 

Young turnips, boiled whole . . 85 

Winter squash 83 




XJSE] TiaiiB :be]st. 



OSWEGO 




GIVES A PURE WHiTE AND GLOSSY FINISH TO LINEN. 



joldl Tcpy ailE €3-iro<[3<3i:"g 



O^we^o rufe ^tkfcli, 



FOB hAWEB&lEBi MOTE%B ANiB MAmWFAQW^&EMB. 



Has always taken the Premium for Merit over ALL OTHER Manufactures, 



gold by kll G^fodei^^ 



KINGSFORD'S 



For Puddings, Jellies, Custards, Blanc Mange, Etc., Etc. 



SOLD BY ALL GROCERS. 



Sole Agent 

^-vj^j^^. ^ 506 Walnut Street, Clapp's Block, 




'^ ^ E Ml N ^^ '^®^P "^^ largest Stock, and make the 

Burt's Boots & Shoes. Lowest Cash Prices in the City. 

Jfl2 WALJVUT STREET, 

PARTIES SUPPLIED ON SHORT NOTICE. 
Orders by Mail for Cake or Ice Creatn promptly attended to. 

MRS. M. M. CLARK'S 

210 FIFTH STREET, 

IDES 3ynOIlsrii]S, - lOW-A.. 



Latest Styles always to be found and every Article warranted as Represented. 



One of the most essential points in making Cakes or Fancy Pastry is to be sure 
and get a good article of Baking powder. TONE Bro.'s BAKING POWER is used by 
all the Hotels of the City, and is pronounced by hundreds of Cooks throughout the 
State, to be the healthiest and best in the market. 

It contains no Hartshorn, Ammonia, Tartaric Acid, Alum, Terra Alba, or any of 
those adulterations used in cheap Baking powder. 



Xj^e ¥one Si'o.'^ Sakir\^ f^owdei', 
THOMAS NAYLOR, 



DEALER IN 



AND PROVISIONS, 

IDES n^^OII^ES, IO"V7"A.. 



Do you want nice sweet Bread? If so, use the 

©^'bs'^i.l ^@a@t Oa^@, 



These Cakes are made from the finest materials that can be 
obtained, and are 

Wmi 



m giw@ 



MANUFACTURED BY THE 






The wants of the people demand the finest and best goods in the market; and to 
this end, I shall endeavor to furnish Standard Goods. It is well known among deal- 
ers that in Baking Powder, Canned Fruits and Flavoring Extracts, there are two or 
more grades manufactured by the same firm — especially is this true of Baking Pow- 
der — in which cheap and worthless ingredients are used in compounding the lower 
grades. I deal only in Standard Goods, making a specialty of Price's, Royal, Dool- 
ey's, and Tone Brothers'; while in 

1 handle Curtis Brothers' & Mack's which have no superior in the market. In 

Burnett's, which are not excelled in the World, constantly on hand. 

In fine drawing Teas, I make a specialty, buying direct from importers in Boston 
and New York. Lovers of this delicious beverage will find in this House, all grades 
of Oolong, Young Hyson, Gunpowder, Japan, &c., from the cheapest to the best 
found in the market. 

St. Louis and Quincy Flour, the joy and pride of all lovers of good bread, on 
hand and fully warranted. 
Soliciting a continuance of patronage, 

Respectfully, 

GXJS. SIVEITII. 

STANDARD FLAVORING EXTRACTS 

"Pre-eminently superior." - Parker House, Boston. 

"The best in the World." - - Fifth Avenue Hotel, N. V. 

"Exclusively used for years." - Continental Hotel, Fhila, 

"We use them exclusively." - Sherman House Chicago. 

"We find them the best." - Southern Hotel, St. Louis. 

"We find them excellent." - Occidental Hotel., San Fran- 

\cisco. 



TO ZIOXTSEIICEISPDERS 

The superiority of these Extracts consist in their 

figpl^d f toI% mi ©rial Stetiill 

These Extracts are warranted free from the poisonous oils 

and acids w^hich enter into the composition of the 

factitious fruit flavors now in the market. 



A full line of the above Extracts to be found with 

G^us. gii]itl), ¥l|e G^i^odei', 30g Walnut gti^ 



"MONITOR STOVE HOUSE." ESTABLISHED IN 1858. 



Why are the Monitor Cook Stoves the best 
Coal Cook Stoves in use? 



DEALER IN 

Table and Pocket Cutlery, and House Furnishing Goods. 

f The Quickest Bakers, 
1 f Economical, 

They are -^ „„„„ J Convenient, 
I MOS'T i Cleanly, 
'^^ [ Durable. 

Buy the Monitor Stove and don't take any other kind. Every Stove warranted and sold by 

SIO. 1. Dllllff , §0^ liKeriry St., opp. Goirfe iQise. 

BOOTS a,r:LC^ SIEIOES- 

LARGE STOCK TO SELECT FROM. 

ALL THE LEADING MAKES AND STYLES. 

In Ladies' Shoes, Burts, Pingree & Smith, Holbrook & Ludlow, Reynolds "Bro's and 

other manufacturers. In Children's Shoes, Dunbars, SoUers & Co., 

Pingree & Smith, and several other makes. 

C-A-3L.I^ ,A.mD se:e3 tjs. 
523 Walnut Street, McCain^s Block. 

IDES nvcoin^Es, iow^a.. 



M 

O 



H COMPARET & STARK, 



P, DEALERS IK 

g HOUSE FURNISHING HARDWARE, g 

p^ I^IiJ^TZEHD OOOIDS, ^ 

1-4 03 
<I Ice Ci\eam -Freezers. Bird Cages^ p 

^ s 

S And all kinds of Kitchen Hardware. S 

H '^ 

^ 515 TFJiiV^FT STREET, § 

;>> o 

^ IDES nycoiisrES, xo^w^^. g 



KNIGHT BROS., 






Silks, Laces, Cloaks, Shawls, Dress Suits, 

KID GLOVES, 4-c, 
820 Court Avenae, DES MOINES, IOWA. 

DEALER IN 

PURE FLAVORING EXTRACTS, CHOICE PERFUMES, HAIR 

BRUSHES, TOOTH BRUSHES, COMBS, FRENCH 

PLATE MIRRORS and TOILET ARTICLES, 

Fiftli Street, 3iid Door Nortli of Post- Office, 

To the Patrons of the Ladies' Cook Book. 




Please remember that the 
Best Place in the West 

TO BUY 



HCOTJSEHOXjD 








CARPETS, MIRRORS, LAMBREQUINS, 
UPHOLSTERED FURNITURE, BED ROOM SUITES, 

And, in fact, everything needful in furnishing a Home, is at 

g. # It. MAEBJLGM'M, 



SAMUEL MERKILL, J.H.MERRILL, J. G. ROUNDS. 

President. Vice President. Cashier. 

IDES IMIOin^ES, lO^SAT-^^. 



Ciapital, $150,000. - • Sm^Ihs, §50,000. 



IDII^IECTOI^S : 



J. H. MERRILL. H. L. WHITMAN. J. R. ROLLINS. SAMUEL MERRILL. 
J. M. OWENS. C. D. REINKING. A. LEDERER. 

Chicago Cor reDiwndents.— Union National Bank. H. Grecnebaum & Co. 

N. T. Correspondents.— Importers and Traders National Bank. Gilnian, Son & Co. ' 

the; btgst GrRA.r)KS ow 

Pianos and Organs, 

Furnished at reasonable prices for CASH, or on terms of easy 
monthly payments, by 

TME BW. L&WM MEMQAMTmE ©&,, 

x)ES ^ynoiiTES^ io"w^ft_. 



PLUMB BROTHERS, 

DEALERS IN 

Silverware, Clocks, Spectacles and Ornamental Goods, 
417 WALNUT STREET, 

3DES IMZOinsTES. 

OSaOOD,AV^Y]V^i^N & HARRIS, 

313 and 315 Walnut Street, Des Moines, Iowa, 

DEA.LERS IN 

House Furnishing Goods and White Goods. 
MsQt ail kim^a FQweigm aaiS OQmmtiG Dress Qqq^s^ 



DR. ^BORN, 

list, Airist, Catarrli, f Iiroat ^ Liig Plysidain 



AND SPECIALIST FOR CHRONIC DISEASES GENERALLY. 



Offices and Laboratory: Fourth St., South of Aborn House, Des Moines, la. 



All who have been afflicted for years or a life-time, are invited to call for a free consul- ' 
tation. 

Dr. Aboin airas to make his medical establishment in every respect worthy of the 
national reputation he has established by his extraordinary success. Des Moines being 
centrally located and very accessible by railroad to the five or six adjoining States, the 
Doctor will establish at the capital of Iowa an Institute where the afflicted can apply 
and receive the best medical aid for a class of maladies which often resist the ordinary 
routine of practice. 

Dr. Aborn has the pleasure of referring to some of the most prominent men of the nation. 







No. 519 V^alnut Street, 

DEIS 3V[OIN£:S, - - lOTWA.. 



Residence. 919 Third Street. 



Mills & Company, 

PUBLISHERS AND BOOKSELLERS, 

PRINTERS & LITHOGRAPHERS, 
Des Moines, low^a. 

Visitin<^ Cards Wedding Cards, Invitations, etc.. Printed or Lithographed in 
'^ style equal to anything done in Chicago or New York. 



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