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Full text of "1994 charter school applications"

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UMASS/AMHERST 





31EDt>b01btfll3DL 







THE NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE 
CHARTER SCHOOL 




utC 9 1994 

EXECUTIVE OFFICE 
OF EDUCATION 



Executive Offices 

232 Centre Street 

Dorchester, MA 02 124 

617/282-5034 

Fax: 265-6020 



FEDERHED 



d c r c h e s t e 
ne gnbc-hoo 
houses, inc 



Agencies and Programs 

Bartholomew Family Day Care 

Camp Denison 

Denison House/ 
At Home in Codman Squar 

Dorchester Center ibr Adult Education 

Dorchester House 

Harbor Point Community Youth Center 

Kit Clark Senior Services 

Log School Settlement House 

The Little House 

Board of Directors 

Peter Read, President 

Virginia Addai 

Charles C. Cabot, Jr. 

Shirley Carrington 

Thomas Casey 

William Coughlin 

William H. Darling 

Brian DeLorey 

Ann Donner 

David Hani fin 

Patrick Lee 

Catherine Marston 

Kevin McDermott 

Dolores Miller 

Michad J. Owens 

Tyra Sidberry 

Helen Waldren 

Kristen J. McCormack, 
Executive Director 



February 14, 1994 

Ms. Piedad F. Robertson 

Secretary of Education 

Room 1401 McCormack Building 

One Ashburton Place 

Boston, MA 02108-1696 



Dear Ms. Robertson: 

On behalf of Federated Dorchester Neighborhood Houses, Inc. (FDNH) 
I am pleased to submit this application for The Neighborhood House 
Charter School, a K - 8 school located in Dorchester. We are seeking 
Charter School status in order to open a school in the Fall of 1995. Our 
conmiitment to lifelong education provided in a nurturing, community 
atmosphere has been demonstrated through our 100 year settlement house 
tradition where the individual is viewed in the context of family and the 
family in the context of its surroundings and neighborhood. 

The proposed Neighborhood House Charter School is a natural outgrowth 
of our experience providing educational programming to school age youth 
coupled with a 20 year history of providing alternative education to 
Boston's at risk middle school students. We believe that the 
underpinnings of change in any system rely on the creation of a learning 
conmiunity, where everyone has something to learn and something to 
teach. It is in this spirit that we are compelled to begin a new school 
where change is possible and learning inevitable. 

We do not propose to merely expand our existing programs. Rather, we 
are taking the lessons learned over the past two decades in our schools and 
settlement houses, and creating something entirely new and powerful. We 
believe that Charter School stams will grant us the opportunity of being 
able to do what we have always dreamed of doing ~ to combine the best 
lessons, best advice, best theory, best experience and best common sense 
in the interests of children and their families. 



cma 



UnfcedWtoy 

ry Uassact>us«^s Bay 



We ask that as you review our application, you consider how we might collaborate with other 
Charter School applicants. Specifically, we are interested in working with a 9 - 12 grade 
Charter School. This would allow the two ventures to create a feeder system and provide 
opportunities for other types of collaboration. We also are interested in meeting one or more 
individuals who, if not granted a charter of their own, may be interested m becoming the 
principal of our school. We would appreciate your attention to these possibilities as you review 
the applicant proposals. 

Thank you for your thoughtful consideration of our application. 



Sincerely, 



Kristen J. McCormack 



FEDERATED 



d r c h e s t e r 
neighborhood 
houses, inc. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PARTI 



Mission Statement 1 

School Objectives 2 

Statement of Need 4 

School Demographics 7 

Recruiting and Marketing Plan 8 

Admissions Policy 9 

Profile of Fomiding Coalition 10 

Timetable 11 



PARTE 



Evidence of Support 14 

Educational Program 14 

Student Perfonnance 19 

School Evaluation 21 

Human Resources 24 

School Governance 25 

Building Options 27 



PARTm 



Code of Conduct 29 

Special Needs Students 29 

Funding 29 

Accountability 30 

Transportation 31 

Liability and Insurance 31 

Governance Documents 31 



APPENDIX 1 

Five Year Budget 33 



CHARTER SCHOOL APPLICATION: 



PARTI 



Mission Statement 

Federated Dorchester Neighborhood Houses serves the community as a catalyst for action and 
change, helping to build a community of caring individuals. Through a new kind of settlement 
houses tradition, we are helping to build a dynamic conmiunity ~ where the strength of diversity 
is valued and where families and individuals have possibilities for personal growth and an 
improved quality of life in and around Dorchester. 

The aim of the settlement or neighborhood house is to bring about a new kind of community life. 
It is the home of friendly neighbors, and a center of information, organization and service. The 
house should be the center where the neighborhood can find its own self-expression in thought 
and action. 

-Mary Kingsbury Simkhovitch, 
Greenwich House, 1926 

What is the connection between a Charter School and a settlement house? The proposed 
Neighborhood House Charter School is a natural outgrowth of over 100 years of the settlement 
house tradition. Settlement house programs view the individual in the context of family and the 
family in the context of its surroundings and neighborhood. We believe that the underpinnings 
of change rely on the creation of a learning community, where everyone has something to learn 
and something to teach. It is in this spirit, coupled with our 20 year history of providing 
alternative education to Boston's middle school students, that we are compelled to begin a new 
school where change is possible and learning inevitable. 

The mission of The Neighborhood House Charter School is to develop in each child the love of 
learning, an ability to nurture family members, friends and self, the ability to engage in critical 
thinking and to demonstrate complete mastery of the academic building blocks necessary for a 
successful future. 

The joining together of classroom education, intensive social services and parent involvement 
has long been advocated by leading educators and child psychologists including Dr. James 
Comer, Lisbeth B. Schorr and Marian Wright Edelman. The Neighborhood House Charter 
School takes this model one step further by ceasing to distinguish between classroom education, 
social services and parent involvement. We will create an environment where children and their 
families learn how to identify, understand, and celebrate each child's strengths, learning style, 
and special abilities. 

In a recent report, "Increasing Educational Achievement", the National Commission on Children 
recommended that, "elementary schools emphasize shared decisionmaking, child development, 
cultural sensitivity and social support to educate children with serious and multiple needs. As 
part of this process, schools should consider bringing support services such as health care, 
recreation, after school activities, employment counseling and family counseling into the 
schools." In fact, a settlement house is home to all of the referenced support services. The 

1 



Neighborhood House Charter School will bring this continuum of care under one roof in the 
neighborhood of Dorchester. 



The establishment of The Neighborhood House Charter School in Dorchester will help us realize 
a broader vision for the future. We at Federated look ahead with hope to the 21st century as 
a time for iu"ban centers to flourish, where people develop an expanded sense of community, one 
which values our differences as strengths and ensures that everyone will have the same 
opportunity for quality education, jobs and economic independence. A complete Mission 
Statement and Vision Statement for FDNH appears in Appendix A. 



School Objectives 

1) To promote the love of lifelong learning in each student 

2) To develop positive self-concept and self-esteem in all family members 

3) To ensure that students demonstrate mastery of skills in the following areas of study: 

• Language Arts • Mathematics 

• Science • Cultural Studies 

• Greography • History 

• Fine Arts & Music • Physical Education 

To ensure that students demonstrate competency in the following skill areas: 

• Family & Community Life Skills (peacemaking, nurturing, violence prevention) 

• Self-Development Skills (ethics, self-assessment, community service, choosing a high 
school) 

• Critical Thinking 

• Life Skills (nutrition and cooking, hygiene, safety, transportation) 

• Pre- Vocational Skills (career exploration, apprenticeship, job applications) 

4) To create a safe, orderly, respectful and nurturing school environment, establishing 
routines that discourage disorder and disruptions 

5) To establish a common vision among principals, teachers, students and parents for the 
school; establishing agreement on the goals, methods and content of schooling 

6) To employ teachers with high expectations that all their students can and will learn 



7) To create a recognition among the teachers, staff, parents and students of the importance 
of an integrated, coherent curriculum, of promoting a sense of school tradition and pride, 
and of protecting school time for learning 

8) To conduct regular and frequent reviews of student progress, making adjustments of 
instructional practices in light of information about student progress 



YEAR I AND YEAR H OBJECTIVES 

a) To develop an integrated curriculum encompassing each of the defined skill standards 

b) To define standards and competencies for each academic and non-academic skill area 

c) To develop Individualized Learning Plans for each student 

d) To enter into family learning contracts with 100% of families enrolled at the school 

e) To enroll 120 students in the school by the erui of Year II 

f) To maintain a 90% retention rate of enrolled students 

g) To achieve a student! staff attendance rate of 95% 
h) To achieve an 85% parent participation rate 

i) To establish an effective School Council which meets monthly 

j) To establish a Family Cooperative in Year I 

k) To implement the process of Continual Quality Improvement 

I) To maintain an average teacher to student ratio of 1: 10 



Community Environment 

The Neighborhood House Charter School will be a community of caring individuals, dedicated 
to creating a learning community. The learning community is one that is continually expanding 
its capacity to create its future. Essential to the creation of a learning conununity are the 
following principles: 



We leam from and build on our experiences 

We nurture leadership capability 

We create a shared vision of the future 

We create a structure for each individual to be a resource 

We recognize that everyone has something to leam and something to teach 

We create many opportunities for involvement 

We use all available resources wisely 

We engage in ongoing dialogue among all involved with the school 

We continually find ways to improve what we do 

One of the practical applications of the learning conmiunity at The Neighborhood House Charter 
School will be realized through the establishment of a Family Cooperative at the school. Each 
family enrolled at the school is required to participate in some way in the Family Cooperative - 
- a practical exchange of services and information. The purpose of the Family Cooperative is 
to create a social infrastructure among families, breaking down the barriers to social isolation 
and assisting our parents in feeling less isolated and more connected to each other and to the 
broader community. Core services available through the Family Cooperative include emergency 
food, a clothing exchange, GED (General Education Diploma) and ESL (English as a Second 
Language) classes, drop-in child care and the Nurturing Program. (The Nurturing Program is 
described in detail under the Educational Program section of the application.) Additional 
services may be identified and added by the School Council (see School Governance) over time. 
The Family Cooperative services are based on site and, in some instances, at a nearby settlement 
house. The highly successful family co-op model, including the Nurturing Program, is currently 
in use at three of FDNH's settlement houses ~ the Log School, the Dorchester House and 
Denison House. 

We will create an environment at The Neighborhood House Charter School where each 
individual who enters the Neighborhood House Charter School will gain a clear understanding 
that s/he is coimected to other neighbors and parents in Dorchester and beyond. Finally, those 
who enter the school will feel a connection to their own neighborhoods and a sense of their 
contributions to the world around them. 

Statement of Need 

There is no lack of evidence when it comes to pointing out that poor, minority children living 
in the inner city don't have much of a chance at succeeding in the educational and business arena 
these days. Volumes of literature, hundreds of studies and thousands of articles point blame at 
the public school system, government, teachers, parents and even the children. Nationally, the 
indicators of school failure include: 

• Drop out rates exceeding 50% in some urban neighborhoods 

• The "slippage" of educational attainment during summer months 

• The excessive number of high school graduates who are illiterate 

• Declining test scores 



• Increase of violence in the schools 

"In today's world, a youngster who leaves school unable to read, write, and do simple arithmetic 
faces a bleak future. When a substantial proportion of boys and girls leave school uneducated, 
the rest of us face a bleak future." (Schorr, 1990) 

Increasing evidence supports the notion that it is the early elementary grade experience that later 
contributes to underachievement, truancy and dropping out. "For an astonishingly high 
proportion of youngsters in serious trouble as adolescents.... most had had many years of 
unrewarding and unhappy school experiences before they ever got to high school. TTieir school 
difficulties had begun in the elementary grades. School failure and poor reading performance 
as early as third grade, truancy, poor achievement, and misbehavior in elementary school, and 
the failure to master school skills throughout schooling are among the most reliable predictors 
of early childbearing, delinquency, and dropping out of school." (Schorr, 1990) 

This evidence is consistent with our experience running two alternative middle schools over the 
past 20 years, the Lx)g School and Little House Alternative Schools. The typical profile of one 
of our students in the alternative school is that of a 13 year old who has not attended school for 
three months or more. The individual has been involved with the criminal justice system 
charged with possession of drugs, or assault and battery. Many were victims or perpetrators of 
violence in their previous school. Nearly every student lives in a single parent family or with 
a guardian or foster parent. Some are homeless, living with friends or moving from house to 
house. The parent is usually ill or involved with some level of substance abuse including 
alcohol. TTiere is no history in the household of recognizing or rewarding academic 
achievement. 

"Children come from families that can not provide them with elementary things like how to say, 
"Good Morning, (and) Thank You".... On the other hand you have staff that often doesn't 
understand that that is the problem. The children are in foreign territory." (Comer, 1990.) 

The majority of our alternative school students live in Dorchester, Roxbury or South Boston. 
The majority live in North Dorchester. The family poverty rate in Dorchester is one of Boston's 
highest at 34%; this number jumps to over 43% for youth below age 18. Last year, teen 
homicides were up 16% over the 1992 rate, and frequent incidences of gang violence have 
created a sense of hopelessness and fear among our young people and their families. On 
Bowdoin Street, for example, many children and teens have witnessed shootings, drug sales, and 
arrests within their neighborhood this year. In Uphams Comer, another Dorchester 
neighborhood, residents cited "Public Safety" and "Youth" as their top priorities in a recent 
survey of community needs. 

Waiting lists at both the Log School and the Little House Alternative School are long and the 
calls from principals, probation officers, DSS workers, and youthworkers are frequent. Last 
spring and this fall the Little House received (7) nine year old referrals from the Boston Juvenile 
Court. All were CHINS children. We also received a referral from DSS for a 12 year old girl. 



Her caseworker chose the Little House because she thought that the girl could bring her 3 month 
old infant to the day care center there. These examples and many others underscore the need 
to establish an option outside of the Boston Public School system for elementary and middle 
school children. Five years ago our students ranged in age from 14 -16; today they range in age 
from 1 1 to 15. Court probation officers concur that the average age of the children in their keep 
is decreasing every year. Kids, who by the age of 10 or 11 are drug and court involved have 
already experienced years of failure. The intense alienation and sense of failure in children so 
young diminishes greatly their chance of success later in life. "Consequences of alienation 
become most apparent when... children reach the age of about eight. Around this age they are 
expected to progress academically at a rate that begins to exceed their level of development. " 
(Comer, 1988.) 

Charter Schools: Addressing the Need 

Schools today do not reflect the avalanche of research that demonstrates the degree to which 
children differ in their learning styles. The rigidity of the traditional mode of teaching and 
schooling precludes us from addressing the true educational and emotional needs of the child. 

The ways in which The Neighborhood House Charter School can effectively address the needs 
of children living in poverty or experiencing alienation from their current school setting are 
summarized below: 



Status Quo 



Charter School 



Large class size 

Grouping by ability 

Parental estrangement from the school 

Lack of support services 

180 school days 

Lack of staff development 

Decisions made centrally 

Low teacher expectations 

Low pupil performance 

Inconsistent standards unevenly applied 

Lack of school improvement mechanism 

Limited personalized instruction 

Textbook learning 

Classroom learning 

Assumes one learning style 

School is isolated 

Educational needs identified 

Student as passive learner 



Small class size 
Grouping by interest 
Parental involvement 
Support services on site 
227 school days 
Staff development high priority 
Decisions made at school level 
High teacher expectations 
High pupil performance 
Consistent standards applied evenly 
Continual Quality Improvement 
Greater personalized instruction 
Integrated Curriculum/ Activities 
Learning in and out of classroom 
Recognizes many learning styles 
School is part of community 
Educational/emotional addressed 
Smdent as active participant 



School Demographics 

The Neighborhood House Charter School will be located in or around North Dorchester, 
probably in the Fields Comer, Codman Square, or Uphams Comer neighborhoods. The Log 
School and Little House settlement houses, each satellite sites of the Neighborhood House 
Charter School, are located in North Dorchester. The two satellite sites have been secured and 
currently house alternative education programs for middle school students. Several building 
locations have been identified for the main school building. These sites are described under 
Section 15, Building Options. 

While the general concept of our school could be transferred to any urban community. The 
Neighborhood House Charter School needs to be located in Dorchester, preferably in North 
Dorchester. One of the basic tenets of the school is the belief that the school and the 
neighborhood community are one. Education takes place in the context of community. The 
Neighborhood House grew out of the FDNH settlement houses, all of which are located in 
Dorchester. Our expertise, experience and commitment lies in the Dorchester community. The 
settlement houses, will serve as learning laboratories for the majority of young people who enroll 
in the school, making close proximity and sameness of neighborhood essential to the operation 
of the school. 

Unique Characteristics 

Sadly, the characteristics of many of our students are not unique. The majority will be poor, 
and live in neighborhoods plagued with the fear of violence and the presence of gangs and dmgs. 
The majority will live in families where the needs of the adults often outweigh the needs of the 
child. Dmg and alcohol abuse is present in some form among half of the families of the 
students we intend to serve. Many of the students served by The Neighborhood House Charter 
School will have been failed by the public school system, failed by their parents and failed by 
programs designed to help. Some of our smdents as young as nine years old will not have 
attended school for more than half of the scheduled days during preceding academic year. 
Though the school will strive to serve the needs of an underserved population, our policy is not 
to exclude students because of this goal. Please refer to our Admissions Policy. 

Enrollment 

The Neighborhood House Charter School will enroll 135 smdents beginning September 1995 and 
maintain 135 students through August 31, 1999. An amendment for an expanded number of 
students may be forthcoming during that time period. 

The Neighborhood House Charter School will enroll children at the K-8 levels of education. 
The school will have the ability to serve older children up to the age of 16 who have not 
completed the eighth grade. 



Planned Enrollment Fall 1995 

Kindergarten 15 

First Grade 15 

Second Grade 15 

Third Grade 15 

Fourth Grade 15 

Fifth Grade 10 

Sixth Grade 10 

Seventh Grade 10 

Eighth Grade 10 

Sixth-Eighth Grade 20 (ages 14 - 16) 

Total = 135 



Recruiting and Marketing Plan 

Currently, our two alternative schools (40 seats) are filled and keep a sizable waiting list. 
Students are currently referred by probation officers, the Department of Social Services, 
neighborhood youth workers and Boston Public School East Zone principals. 

The Neighborhood House Charter School will announce its open enrollment period (December - 
January 1995) in the Boston media including newspapers, radios, direct mail and small posters. 
Annoimcements will be sent to the Dorchester Commimity News, Bay State Banner, Dorchester 
Argus Citizen, Dorchester Reporter, South Boston Citizen, Roxbury Community News, La 
Semana and the local Vietnamese and Cape Verdean newspapers. Announcements will also be 
mailed to a citywide list of over 200 community based organizations. This list, which is updated 
regularly, is currently used by FDNH in recruiting new employees. 



Potential students and their families include a broad spectrum of students including those 
whose needs are not being met in their current school environment, those who believe a 
charter school alternative would provide an even better opportunity than their current 
situation and those who may be struggling with academic, emotional or behavorial problems 
in their current school and family setting. Students must demonstrate interest in applying to 
the Neighborhood House Charter School and must demonstrate some interest in the core 
curriculum and special programmatic offerings of the school. A concerted effort will be 
made to recruit these individuals. 

In addition to the general marketing plan described above, we will elicit applications from 
youth workers, DSS case workers, the Department of Youth Services, Boston Juvenile court, 

8 



Boston Police Area C Community Youth Services Officer, family advocates at FDNH settlement 
houses, social workers at child welfare agencies and Boston Public School teachers and 
principals. A personalized letter will be mailed to the above individuals and a follow up call 
will be made by school personnel. 

It is our hope that the Boston area Charter Schools will meet and work together on a regular 
basis. In this context, the Charter Schools could collaborate on a general information piece to 
be distributed citywide, while each school could conduct its own specific outreach to its targeted 
population. 

Admissions Policy 

The Admissions Policy is designed to identify and reach out to children and families in the 
greatest need of an alternative to the schools available to them. A brief summary of the 
admissions process is outlined below. There are four action steps that the family must take prior 
to the beginning of the school year. (Informational meeting, application, orientation, and contract 
signing) 

December/Jan: Informational Meeting (strongly encouraged but not required) 

February: Application Completed 

February: Lottery held; Notification of Status; Wait list established (February) 

March - May: Intake, Assessment and Orientation 

April - June: Intake, Assessment and Orientation of Wait List families 

August: Family member/guardian signs contract 

October or March: Family enrolls in Nurturing Program 

Informational meetings will be held in English, Spanish, Cape Verdean and Vietnamese. 
Multi-lingual, multi-cultural school personnel will be available to assist families with filling out 
the application for those speaking a language other than English or lacking basic literacy skills. 
In Year One, applications, available in multiple languages, will be mailed to inquiring families 
or may be picked up at the Log School, Little House or the FDNH Central Office. (During 
Year II, applications may be picked up at the main school site.) 

Applicants should meet one or more of the following criteria in order to be eligible to apply to 
The Neighborhood House Charter School: 

Reading or math achievement can be at, above, or below grade level 

History of frequent absenteeism 

Victim of violence at school or on the bus 

Involvement of family or student with DSS or DYS 

Victim or witoess of violence in the home 

Developmental issues/problems not addressed in current school setting 

Boston resident 

Interest and commitment of the student in building a strong foundation of basic skills 



• Interest in science and technology as a means to strengthen the student's academic 
development 

• Interest in the Creative Arts as a framework to assist his/her development 



In addition, families must acknowledge their willingness to participate in family initiatives (such 
as the Nurturing Program) which have been established by the Neighborhood House Charter 
School to promote the unity of family, community and school. Please refer to Appendix B for 
more infonnation on the Nurturing Program. 

A family member or guardian must also acknowledge his/her willingness to sign a contract with 
his/her child's teacher that includes standards for attendance and homework. 

Because one of the basic objectives of the school is to create a learning community in the 
broadest sense, we will encourage Dorchester and Boston residents to apply to the school. The 
students will be selected through a lottery that is consistent with Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 71, section 89. 

Profile of Founding Coalition 

The original founding coalition represents a dynamic and eclectic group of teachers, youth 
workers, social workers, family ecologists, educators, artists and managers. Many of the 
individuals envisioning the school have worked together with families and youth in Dorchester 
over the past two decades. 

The initial group was convened by Kristen McCormack, Executive Director of Federated 
Dorchester Neighborhood Houses. Ms. McCormack earned her undergraduate degree from 
the University of Massachusetts College of Public and Community Service in Community 
Planning and Himian Services Management. She also holds a Masters Degree in Business 
Administration from Boston University. Prior to earning her degree in Community Planning, 
Ms. McCormack majored in Urban Elementary Education at the U-Mass/ Amherst School of 
Education. She completed her one year teacher training at the Cambridge Alternative Public 
School teaching fourth and fifth grade students. Ms. McCormack is also a middle school and 
high school graduate of one of the first public "free schools" in Massachusetts, the Bent Twig 
School. This K-12 experiment (later transformed by the local School Committee into the 
"Independent Learning Center") was sponsored by the School of Education at the University of 
Massachusetts Amherst and Princeton University. Ms. McCormack is a member of the Board 
of Directors of the Boston Private Industry Council and the Metropolitan Boston Housing 
Partnership. She lives in Dorchester with her husband and three children. 

Biographies of the members of the founding coalition and those who will lend their 
administrative or program services to the school appear in Appendix C. Key members of the 
coalition who will form the core group working together over the next year include: 

10 



Joseph Carpineto, Director, Log School Settlement House 

Anne Nee, Director, The Little House 

Sharon Shay, Ph.D., Dorchester CARES Project Director 

Lyle Kirtman, Educational Consultant 

Deborah Aspen, Ph.D., Director, Surround Care Collaborative 

Ron Homer, Education Coordinator, Log School 

Marianne Kimball, Education Coordinator, The Little House 

Glynn Lloyd, Teacher, Log School 

Mary Gerdes, Teacher, Little House 

Wilbur Brown, Youth Worker, Log School 

Noemia Mendes, Family Coop Manager, Log School 

Maria Fontanez, Family Advocate, Dorchester House 



While these biographies include a number of individuals who will be involved with the school 
on a full or part time basis, we have not yet recruited all of the teachers or the Principal. As 
requested in the cover letter, we are hopeful that through the Charter School selection process, 
one or more candidates might be identified and referred to us for consideration. 

The founding coalition is most closely affiliated with Federated Dorchester Neighborhood 
Houses and Dorchester CARES, a five year federally funded demonstration project aimed at 
curbing the incidence of child abuse and neglect in the Bowdoin Street neighborhood of 
Dorchester. FDNH, including the Log School and Little House, are affiliated with an extensive 
array of nearly 100 collaborating schools, educational programs and non-profit organizations. 
Appendix D includes a full listing of entities that currently collaborate with Federated Dorchester 
Neighborhood Houses. It is expected that we will call on many of these organizations while 
further developing the school. 

If Charter stams is granted, the founding coalition will immediately begin to recruit the 
Administrator/Principal and remaining teachers in order that they be fully involved in the further 
development of the school. There are no plans to expand the founding members or organizers 
beyond those described in the Appendix. However, we expect to gain the insight and support 
of local youth workers, neighborhood merchants, civic organizations, youth services police 
officers, and other neighborhood leaders as we move forward with the planning process. This 
will occur through focus groups and the attendance of school organizers at planned business, 
civic and neighborhood meetings. 

Timetable 

A timetable of events leading to the opening of the Charter School in the fall of 1995 is included 
in Appendix E. 

The Neighborhood House Charter School will formally open its doors in the fall of 1995. We 
will operate our two middle schools in 1994 using it as a transition year. This means that the 

11 



teachers currently affiliated with the alternative school sites will be involved with the planning 
of The Neighborhood House Charter School. We will also pilot some of the curriculum ideas, 
gain input from the students and parents on curriculum and activities and enable the students to 
assist with planning (i.e. the Code of Conduct, facility planning). 



12 



CHARTER SCHOOL APPLICATION 



PART II 



13 



Evidence of Support 

To date. Federated Dorchester Neighborhood Houses has gained deep and broadbased support 
in the community for founding The Neighborhood House Charter School. Over thirty letters of 
support appear in Appendix F ranging from local elected officials to the local merchants 
association to current students and parents. The Judge Baker Children's Center; Dr. Barry 
Zuckerman; Georgette Watson of the Governor's Alliance Against Drugs; Suffolk County 
District Attorney Ralph Martin; Linda Carlisle, Commissioner of the Department of Social 
Services; Judge Poitrast; City Year and the College of Public and Community Service at U-Mass 
as well as many other individuals and organizations have written letters of support for our 
current and proposed educational work in Dorchester. Many have pledged to provide services 
(counseling) as well as technical assistance (evaluation). 

The Fields Comer/Bowdoin Street Healthy Boston Coalition has pledged its support. The 
purpose of the coalition is to bring together neighborhood institutions, organizations, residents 
and merchants to tackle common problems. It is expected that the Principal would attend 
meetings of the coalition on a regular basis and that coalition members will become involved 
with the school. 

Support for our existing alternative schools, the Little House and Log School, was clearly 
demonstrated when the schools were threatened with closure due to lack of funds three years 
ago. The students, parents, teachers and the community rallied to save the schools (See press 
clips in the Appendix L) The students garnered the support of local elected officials, child 
advocates, and others and successfully petitioned the Commonwealth and the City of Boston to 
keep the schools open. Today, funding is still sought year to year and is subject to the vagaries 
of state and city funding priorities. 



Educational Program 

Educational Philosophy 

"All children learn best when parents and teachers share similar visions, when there is a sense 
of constancy between home and school," says sociologist Sara Lawrence Lightfoot. " A 
generation ago, schools didn't have to work as deliberately and self-consciously at developing 
that relationship as they do today." 

The Neighborhood House Charter School is committed to implementing a curriculum thai 
integrates subject matter, skill areas and activities appropriate to each child's stage of 
development and learning style with the support and participation of the family. While this may 
sound challenging (and it is!), our experience at the settlement houses shows that when school 
services and activities are relevant to the whole family and serve to reduce stress, parental 
participation will be high. 



14 



Emphasis on applying skills, deep understanding and cohesive knowledge will be combined with 
the traditional building blocks of reading, writing and math. Learning activities will be 
challenging and engaging. Varied grouping arrangements that extend beyond conventional age- 
based groups will promote smdent interaction and cooperative efforts. 

"The benefits of preschool education for disadvantaged children often fade by the time children 
enter 3rd grade. One reason is that many elementary schools break sharply with the princ^les 
of good preschool education.... The preschool emphasis on play, exploration, and imagination 
is replaced in elementary school by an emphasis on rote learning and basic skills instruction. 
The latter approach.... can permanently push disadvantaged children into the educational slow 
lane. A growing body of research shows that elementary school practices which reflect and 
reinforce the principles of high-quality preschool education have lasting benefits for children at 
risk." 

- National Commission on Children 
Increasing Educational Achievement, 1992 



Standards and Competencies 

While flexibility will be maintained about where, when and how the child learns, the "what" will 
be clearly established in the form of standards and competencies. Standards and competencies 
will be set and measured in the following skill areas: 

Basic Skills: (math, language arts, science, geography, cultural studies, current events, art, 

music, physical education) 
Family & Community Life Skills: (peacemaking, nurturing, violence prevention) 
Self-Development Skills: (ethics, self assessment, conmiunity service, choosing a high school) 
Life Skills: (nutrition and cooking, hygiene, safety, transportation) 
Pre- Vocational Skills (age 12 and up) (career exploration, apprenticeship, job applications) 

Standards set in the Basic Skills areas will meet or exceed the standards set by the State Board 
of Education. 



Curriculum 

While the full curriculum has not yet been developed, it is expected that the teachers and staff 
will work together to complete an integrated educational experience spanning grades K - 8. The 
curriculum will integrate academic skill areas with non-academic skill areas within a particular 
grade. Each year the curriculum builds on the learning experiences from the previous year- 
Self development skills are emphasized throughout the curriculum. Students learn at an early 

15 



age how to assess their own strengths and weaknesses, how to set goals and measure their own 
progress against these goals. Self-assessment is a constant and ongoing process for the students. 
This process is supported by the journal writing requirement beginning in the first grade. 



Practicum 

Each student at The Neighborhood House Charter School is expected to complete one full year 
of education outside the school at the Log School Settlement House or the Little House (satellite 
school sites). This practicum will usually occur during the 7th or 8th grade. The purpose of 
the practicum is to achieve certain competencies in a broader, more diverse setting. Students 
spend a substantial portion of their day outside of the classroom, working in the day care center, 
participating in a student run food business, helping out with the food pantry, planning evaits, 
participating in conmiunity coalition efforts, meeting with local elected officials and working 
with the media. Lauren B. Resnick has pointed out that there are major differences between 
learning in and our of school, differences that prevent many otherwise bright youngsters from 
succeeding in school. (Lauren B. Resnick, Learning in School and Out, Educational Researcher, 
December 1987 pp 13-20). Mastery of certain standards within academic and non-academic 
areas must be achieved by the student prior to selecting a practicum site. 

Town Meeting 

Town meeting is an integral part of every morning in each Charter School classroom. The adult 
version of "Circle Time," the purpose of the Town Meeting is to foster community, cooperative 
learning and integrate the affective elements of each child's learning process. The regular 
meeting time is a place to set a common vision for the classroom, agree upon rules of behavior 
and solve problems. 

The Nurturing Program 

The Nurturing Program is a core requirement for families and children at the school. The 
Nurturing Program is a series of classes for families to take together. Sometimes these classes 
are brought to one family in their home. Most often, they are held at a central meeting place, 
in this case, the school. Parents and children attend the Nurturing Program together and learn 
the same skills. The overarching goals of the Nurturing Program are to: 

To develop positive self-concept and self-esteem in all family members 

To build empathetic awareness of the needs of others 

To teach alternatives to hitting and yelling 

To increase awareness of self needs, strengths and weaknesses 

To increase family communication and expressiveness 

To substitute nurmring parenting behaviors for abusive parenting practices 

To build family support and cohesion 

To learn to have fun as a family 

16 



"Key to academic achievement is to promote psychologic development in students, which 
encourages bonding to the school. Doing so requires fostering positive interaction between 
parents and school staff, a task for which most staff people are not trained." (Comer, 1988.) 
For this reason, every staff member at the school will be required to participate in a 16 week 
session of the Nurturing Program. Approximately 30% of the staff and parents will also become 
trained facilitators after completing the initial Nurturing Program sessions. 

High School 

During the 7th and 8th grade students explore options for high school. Our goal is to ensure 
that graduates seek out the most appropriate high school for their learning style and interests. 
The education provided at The Neighborhood House Charter School will prepare students for 
a wide variety of high school experiences. Students will be equally well prepared to enter an 
academic, vocational, apprenticeship or school to work program. 

Teaching Methods 

If there's a single bet we've missed over the years, it's making kids sit quietly at their desks 
instead of letting them work with each other. 

-Joel Thomley, Superintendent, 
Hay ward Schools, California 

Some students need more time to complete a task than another, and most leam better through 
one method than another. Some leam best by reading chapters in a book, others by watching 
and listening to a videotape, and still others by direct experience. Some children comprehend 
new material most readily when they analyze it in a teacher led seminar, others when they teach 
it to younger students or when they grapple with it alone. 

- Albert Shanker 



We believe that all students will leam, but not all in the same way. The Neighborhood House 
Charter School will employ teaching strategies that meet the needs of the children. However, 
this doesn't mean that we will "wait and see" who shows up on the fu-st day of class. Knowing 
our student population so well provides us with some clues about what will work and what 
won't. The Neighborhood House Charter School will employ teaching methods which engage 
students in activities in the classroom and in the community. Lauren B. Resnick has pointed out 
that there are major differences between leaming in and out of school, differences that prevent 
many otherwise bright youngsters from succeeding in school. (Lauren B. Resnick, Learning in 
School and Out, Educational Researcher, December 1987, pp 13-20.) It is essential that our 
students have the opportunity to leam by doing and leam by teaching. These opportunities will 
be afforded through several methods including: 



17 



* Cooperative Learning 

* Confluent Education 

* Team Teaching 

Cooperative Learning 

As described in great detail in Thomas Lickona's book, Educating for Character J 992. the 
benefits of cooperative learning are these: 

1. Cooperative learning teaches the value of cooperation 

2. Cooperative learning builds commimity in the classroom 

3. Cooperative learning teaches basic life skills 

4. Cooperative learning improves academic achievement, self-esteem, and attitude toward 
school. 

5. Cooperative learning offers an alternative to tracking. 

6. Cooperative learning has the potential to temper the negative aspects of competition- 
Specific classroom applications of cooperative learning include but are not limited to Cluster 
Group Seating, Team Testing, Whole Class Projects and Learning Partners. 

Confluent Education 

Confluent education refers to the integration of the affective (emotional) and cognitive 
(intellectual) elements in individual and group learning—sometimes called humanistic or 
psychological education. Though hardly a new style of teaching, it's potential is extraordinary 
given our current circumstances in the inner city. Increasingly, students are exposed to violence 
on the street, on the bus, in the home and in the classroom. One out of three children under the 
age of 16 have witnessed a shooting or stabbing in their lifetime in the City of Boston. Violaice 
is a primitive response in a person—often the last response when all else has failed. "When a 
breakdown in communication is complete, those involved are so frustrated that violence may 
well break out, especially when the issues are felt to have deep personal relevance." (George 
Isaac Brown, Human Teaching for Human Learning: an introduction to Confluent Education. 
1971) 

Confluent teaching recognizes that students are both thinking and feeling individuals. Whenever 
a student learns intellectually there is an accompanying emotional dimension. Where current 
schooling fails is in its inability to acknowledge the emotional dimension. Without thai 
acknowledgement it becomes nearly impossible to engage the student in cognitive learning. The 
relevance of combining emotional and intellectual learning becomes increasingly apparent as 
students arrive at school emotionally charged by episodes of domestic violence, gang violaice 
and the loss of loved ones. All too familiar is the teacher's lament, "I can't teach these kids. 
They have so many other problems that get in the way. " 



18 



Complementary Teaching Styles 

When hiring teachers, the Principal and the School Council will seek teachers whose teaching 
styles complement one another while being consistent with the overall philosophy of the school. 
For instance, a teacher who has experience teaching cooperative learning may be paired with 
someone with more apprenticeship or community learning experience. 

Our teaching strategies will actively engage students in critical thinking rather than expecting 
rote learning through passive roles. 

Teachers will work in teams. The teaching teams will determine how children will be grouped, 
use of resources in and out of the classroom, how the school day will be organized, how much 
time to devote to each subject, who will serve on the School Council, etc. 



School Calendar 

The Neighborhood House Charter School will operate year roimd or a total of 227 school days. 
Vacation schedules will be determined by the School Coimcil (whether or not to take vacations 
during the same time as the Public Schools). The summer program will differ in activity level, 
though the curriculum is still teaching to the standards and competencies of the school. 



Student Performance 

Student assessment must not only reflect mastery of basic skills, but also of social, behavioral 
and higher order skills. This presents a challenge to educators used to choosing between 
standardized testing and competency based evaluation of student performance. 

Portfolio 

We believe a combination of testing and demonstration of competency in each skill area will 
objectively measure the student's performance against his/her goals. A permanent record of the 
child's work and progress will be maintained through a Portfolio which travels with the child 
from grade to grade and school to school. 



Individualized Learning Plan 

The Teacher and Family Advocate will develop an Individualized Learning Plan (IIP) for each 
smdent and his or her family enrolled at The Neighborhood House Charter School. The ILP 
documents the academic and non-academic goals for the student for the school year. A 
baseline ILP including a detailed description of core competencies will be developed for common 
academic and developmental stages of children K - 8. However, during the intake and 

19 



assessment process, specific individual goals will be developed and agreed upon by the Teacher, 
Family Advocate and Parent/Guardian. If a family counselor or individual counselor is involved 
with the child at the time of enrollment, s/he will be involved in this process as well. 
Involvement of the student and at what age is still under discussion. Students age 10 and up will 
most likely be involved in developing their ILP as well. 

It is at this point in time (September) that the parent will also commit to a Family Learning Plan. 
Standards of support for the child agreed to by the parent might include: 

• Making sure their child attends school on time every day. 

• Ensuring that the child has a quiet place to study away from the television (or the 
television is turned off). 

• Ensures that the child reads or completes homework at least on hour each evening. 

• Visits their child's teachers or classes at least once each semester. 

• Enrolling in the Nurturing Program with the other members of the family for either 4 or 
16 weeks. 

• Participating in the Family Coop (Family Cooperative includes emergency food and 
clothing, drop in child care, GED or ESL classes and the Nurturing Program. Parents or 
guardians exchange their volunteer time for services.) 

Support services will be present at all times to assist parents with meeting the requirements of 
their learning contract, (i.e., transportation, drop in child care, food and in some cases stipends 
for Lead Volunteers.) 

Frequency of Review 

Progress on the goals set forward in the ILP will be reviewed quarterly by the teacher, parent^ 
family advocate and, in some cases, the child. If a family or individual counselor is involved 
with the child at the time, s/he will participate in the meeting as well. 

The Individualized Learning Plan will reflect goals and objectives in each of the following skill 
areas: 

Basic Skills (math, language arts, science, geography, cultural studies, current events) 
Life Skills (nutrition and cooking, hygiene, safety, transportation) 

Pre- Vocational Skills (age 12 and up) (career exploration, apprenticeship, job applications) 
Family & Conmiunity Life Skills (peacemaking, nurturing, violence prevention) 
Self-Development Skills (ethics, self assessment, community service, choosing a high school) 

Lack of Progress 

Several options are available to students who are not meeting their goals: 

• Altering the teaching team to which the student is assigned; 

20 



• Re-evaluating whether or not the school has the capacity to meet the needs of the student; 

• Individual tutoring; 

• Reviewing the original goals that were set to ensure they remain appropriate (have 
circumstances changed that would affect the achievement of specific goals); 

• Reviewing history and current performance to detect an undiagnosed learning disability; 

• Reviewing the teaching style and altering accordingly. 

It will be determined during the quarterly review whether or not the student is or is not 
achieving his/her goals and the follow-up action steps to be taken. 



School Evaluation 

The Neighborhood House Charter School will be guided by the process of Continual Quality 
Improvement (CQI). This philosophy considers "every defect to be a treasure" where we 
continually identify our weaknesses and learn from our mistakes. This process allows the 
management and staff of the school to ask: 

Is the organization doing the right things? 

Is the organization doing these things well? 

Is the organization continuously improving its performance of important functions, including its 

results? 

The framework for continually improving performance at The Neighborhood House Charter 
School appears in Appendix G. 

The overall performance of the school will be judged using four tools: 

Method Party Evaluating 

Self-Assessment Management Team; Teacher Focus Groups 

Objective Checklist Management Team 

Parent Focus Groups Third Party Evaluator 

Overall Evaluation Third Party Evaluator 

Peer Evaluation Non-Competing Charter School 

Each method is weighted evenly toward an overall grade or score of performance. 

Self-Assessment 

The self-assessment tool will be developed within the context of CQI reflecting the goals, 
objectives and standards set by the staff and approved by the Board of Directors during 1994. 
The self-assessment tool will consist of broader open ended question to which one written 
response from the School Council is required. The Council will be provided with internally 

21 



generated baseline and comparative data to review prior to completing the Self-Assessnaeni 
Narrative. Typical questions may include: 

What are the strengths of the school? What are the weaknesses? 

What worked this year? What didn't work this year? 

What changes will be made next year to achieve goals that were not adequately met this 

year? 

Are physical facilities adequate? How could they be changed next year? 

What was learned from other Charter School experiences that we might adopt at our 

school? What could we offer other Charter Schools? 

Are we holding true to our mission? Did we hold true to our stated priorities? 

Did we always know what they were? 

When taking steps to make improvements the following questions will be asked: 

What is the aim of the improvement? 

How will we know a change is an improvement? 

What changes can we make that will lead to improvement? 



Teacher Focus Groups 

Teacher focus groups will be facilitated by a third party interviewer selected by the teachers; the 
facilitator will tape the focus groups and transcribe and sunmiarize the assessment. The teachers 
will then review the sunmiary before it is submitted to the School Council. 
Focus group questions will be determined during 1994. 

Outcome Checklist 

The outcome checklist will measure quantifiable accomplishments against prestated goals or 

standards. Examples include: 

Student enrollment 

Student retention 

Analysis of school dropouts (who and why) 

Average % of individual ILP goals successfully completed (i.e., students achieved 92% of all 

goals/standards stated in their ILP's) 

% of students achieving standards by subject area (i.e., 87% achieved their math standards; S3 9^ 

achieved their Life Skills standards) 

Test Scores (when applicable) 

% of Family Contracts signed 

# of families/individuals enrolled in Nurturing Program 

# of families/individuals completed Nurturing Program 

# of families enrolled in the Family Co-op 

22 



# of parent/guardian volunteers 

# of parent visits to classrooms 

Parent attendance at School Council meetings 

Parent attendance at FDNH Board of Directors meetings 

Physical facility standard checklist complete (this is a separate checklist which measures facility 

cleanliness, safety, usefulness, friendliness, adequacy of equipment, etc.) 

Number of graduates 

Number of graduates gaining admission to high school of their choice 

% of eligible smdents obtaining summer jobs 

% of eligible students obtaining summer apprenticeships 

% of eligible students obtaining year round part time employment 

% of eligible students obtaining internships 

# of students completing community service projects 
Attendance rate of students 

Attendance rate of teachers 

Attendance rate of staff 

Average "whole school" attendance rate 

Number of school events held 

Community attendance rate at events 

Parental attendance rate at events 

Turnover rate of teachers 

Turnover rate of staff 

Number of complaints filed 

Lawsuits Pending 

Number of injury and incident reports 

This list is not inclusive, but is meant to give the reader an idea of what objective measurements 
can include. The fmal self-assessment checklist, developed by the teachers and staff and 
approved by the Board of Directors, will reflect the goals, objectives and standards of the 
school. 

Parent Focus Groups 

Parent Focus Groups will be conducted by a third party facilitator selected by the parents. The 
purpose of conducting parent focus groups is to determine whether or not the school is meeting 
the needs of the parents; whether or not the parents voices are being heard; how to improve 
parental involvement. It is important that the parent focus group be facilitated by a third party 
and that comments are not attributed to specific parents. 



Outside Evaluation 

The Overall Evaluation refers to a third party, independent evaluator determining whether or not 
the school has met its stated goals and objectives, including the achievement of smdent 

23 



performance. A third party evaluator has not yet been chosen but possible candidates include: 
the College of Public and Community Service at the University of Massachusetts, the Judge 
Baker Children's Center, the Child Welfare League of America, an evaluator selected by the 
Executive Office of Education, or another third party evaluator. It is expected that the 
evaluation component will be funded separately or contributed on a pro bono basis. 

Peer Evaluation 

The Peer Evaluation component, where Charter Schools are paired with each other, has not yet 
been developed. The purpose of the Peer Evaluation is to lend and accept expertise at a 
"comparable level. " In other words, there is no other group that will better understand what is 
going on at the school than a group that is trying to do something similar in another location or 
with another population. The assessment tool will be developed during 1994. 



Human Resources 

The Principal will be hired by the Trustees of the Neighborhood House Charter School. 
The Interview Committee for final candidates will include members of the FDNH and Charter 
School Board of Directors, the FDNH Executive Director, teachers, smdents, parents and an 
FDNH House Director (satellite site.) The Committee will be chaired by the President of the 
Board of Directors of FDNH or his designee. 

The Principal, with participation from the School Site Council, will hire staff. 

Teachers, counselors, family advocates and other staff will be recruited through advertising in 
Boston papers, regional and national educational publications, community mailings and direct 
recruitment from colleges and universities. 

As a general rule, full time teachers will be required to hold Massachusetts Teacher certification 
in elementary education. A minimum number of teachers certified in Special Education will 
be recruited. This number will be determined during 1994. Kindergarten teachers must meet 
Office for Children standards. In some cases, secondary education certification may be 
substituted for elementary certification (in recognition of the fact that some smdents may be 16 
years of age). Out of state certification will be accepted depending on the experience of the 
applicant. Extraordinary abilities or experience in a particular subject matter combined with 
elementary school teaching experience may be substimted for certification in the case of part 
time specialists. Counselors will be required to hold an MSW, LICSW or LISW depending on 
the job description. Again, exceptions may be made in the case of demonstrated experience and 
exceptional accomplishments. There is no formal education requirement for the position of 
Family Advocate. Family Advocates should be exceptionally familiar with the community, 
speak another language in addition to English, and have a driver's license. Formal job 
descriptions stating minimum requirements will be developed during 1994. 

24 



The staff size will vary widely based on how many staff are present in the school on loan from 
other organizations, how many are part time, whether or not staff who interact with students at 
the settlement houses are included in the count, etc. The exact number will be determined 
during 1994. However, the student/teacher ratio in the classroom at any given time will range 
from 1:5 to 1:15 depending on the activity, class, and student population. 

Teachers will be evaluated annually in January. This date provides for an early review of all 
the teachers within the first year. In following years it is a date that allows significant 
improvement to be made and monitored prior to the commencement of the summer program. 
Multiple methods will be employed when evaluating teachers. These are outlined below: 

Method Party 

Written Evaluation Principal/Teacher 

Peer Evaluation Fellow Teacher 

Parent Evaluation Parent to Principal (confidential) 

The Principal/Teacher evaluation is weighted at 50%; Peer Evaluation at 25% and Parent 
Evaluation at 25%. 

Employees of The Neighborhood House Charter School will abide by the personnel policies of 
the corporation. These policies will be the same as the personnel policies of Federated 
Dorchester Neighborhood Houses. However, it is understood that there may be idiosyncracies 
of school employment that should be carefully defined and clearly delineated in the personnel 
policy. To this end, the FDNH personnel policy will be revised during 1994 in anticipation of 
additional school employees in 1995. The current Personnel policy is included in Appendix H. 

Staff Development 

Teachers and other staff will be evaluated annually by the principal. The evaluation process will 
include a staff development plan for the faculty member. The individualized plan will state the 
professional and personal goals of the staff person. Specific goals should be developed and 
pursued in the context of the school goals ~ teacher development should contribute to the 
achievement of school goals. Steps will be taken to accomplish the goals including: mentoring, 
education outside the school setting, sabbatical or simply taking on a special project at the school 
to learn about a new subject or skill area (fundraising, child mental health, etc.) Adequate time, 
to be determined by the School Council, will be dedicated to professional development of 
teachers and staff. 



School Governance 

The Neighborhood House Charter School will be incorporated as a 501 (C) 3 corporation with 
by-laws which are consistent with MGL Chapter 71, section 89. Federated Dorchester 

25 



Neighborhood Houses, Inc. will be the sole corporation member of the Neighborhood Charter 
School. Federated Dorchester Neighborhood Houses, Inc. (FDNH) was founded in 1965, 
merging three settlement houses (Dorchester House, Denison House and The Little House) firom 
the mm of the cenmry. Since 1965 FDNH has founded additional sites, including the Log 
School Settlement House in 1974. Today FDNH serves 38,000 individuals annually through its 
settlement houses and programs. FDNH is one corporation with the settlement houses operating 
under its umbrella. Administrative and fiscal operations are centralized, while program planning 
and program operations are decentralized. Our Houses are directed by House Advisory 
Councils. Each Advisory Council nominates one member to join an equal number of at-large 
members on the FDNH Board of Directors. This model would be replicated for The 
Neighborhood House Charter School, with the School Council taking the place of the House 
Advisory Council. 

Using this model, programming decisions, goals and objectives, hiring and all day to day 
operational decisions are made at the local level, in this case the school site. FDNH is a strong 
proponent of school based management and will maintain a structure which support the most 
educationally important decisions being made at the school site. The Neighborhood House 
Charter School will be managed on a day to day basis by the Principal with the School Council 
serving in a strong advisory role. The roles and responsibilities of each partoer are outlined 
below. We expect these may change during the course of our plaiming year. 

Role of the NHCS Board of Directors or its Designee 

Approve budget in consultation with the teachers 

Approve Strategic Goals (3 year) 

Approve Annual Goals & Objectives/School Improvement Plan 

Approve curriculum in consultation with the teachers 

Supervise Principal 

Supervise preparation of budget 

Contribute skills and expertise of the Development Office in fundraising 

Provide administrative services (human resources, payroll, finance) 

Approve hiring recommendations from Principal 

Approve Principal hire 

Role of the Principal 

Provide vision and leadership at the school site 

Organize and manage the School Council 

Supervise and evaluate teachers and staff at the school site 

Oversee all programming, curriculum development, and special projects 

Recruit and hire staff (with support from FDNH) 

Participate as a member of the Senior Management Team at FDNH 

Role of the School Council 

26 



The School Council will be made up of the Principal, teachers, parents, paraprofessionals and 
community residents. 

Advises the principal on the recruitment and hiring of staff 

Develops the Strategic Plan & Goals and Objectives for the school 

Monitors progress of the school in meeting goals and objectives 

Organizes school wide events 

Develops and approves new programming ideas 

Conducts grassroots fundraising efforts 

Advises in the selection of a Principal 

Advises in the evaluation of the Principal 

Reviews annual budget prior to submission to FDNH 

In order for the School Council to fulfill its role, members must participate in School Council 
training and development programs. These sessions will include group skills training and 
technical training in the areas of education, child development and community organizing. 



Building Options 



Federated Dorchester Neighborhood Houses is currently negotiating to locate at the University 
of Massachusetts Harbor Campus for the 1995 academic year. We are also negotiating a 
permanent site at 1210 Dorchester Avenue (the Baker Chocolate Administration building.) The 
latter building is currently owned by the Department of Environmental Management. 

FDNH is seeking to secure construction funding from a variety of sources including MIFA, 
commercial banks and the City of Boston. 



27 



CHARTER SCHOOL APPLICATION: 



PART III 



28 



Code of Conduct 

A. Discuss any rules or guidelines governing student behavior which will be incorporated 
into a student handbook. 

It is the intent of The Neighborhood House Charter School to comply with all state mandated 
guidelines governing student behavior. The Neighborhood House Charter School smdent 
handbook will incorporate some existing language from the Boston Public Schools student 
handbook as well as incorporate selected elements from other western suburban schools. The 
final draft will go before the NHCS school council for final approval and adoption. 

B. Describe your school's policies regarding student expulsion and suspension. 

It is the intent of The Neighborhood House Charter School to adopt a school policy of 
suspension and expulsion that is consistent with other local public schools and state 
regulatory requirements. 

Special Needs Students 

Describe how your school will accommodate special needs students. 

The Neighborhood House Charter School will accommodate the needs of all our students 
which include those with special needs. We will apply those requirements specified by the 
students' Individualized Educational Plans into our educational programming. We believe 
that our low teacher/student ratio will allow us the flexibility to meet the needs of our 
students. Based on our experience of r unning two alternative school programs that presenfly 
exist at Federated Dorchester Neighborhood Houses (FDNH), we believe we have the 
expertise to meet those needs effectively. Additionally, one of the requirements of our 
school will be to hire staff which is both formally trained and certified in the area of special 
needs education. 

Funding 

A. Devise a start-up budget covering the planning stage before school opening. 

FDNH has hired a full-time Project Director and has allocated $7,900 of its unrestricted 
resources to bring closure to the site selection process and begin the planning for the opening 
of The Neighborhood House Charter School. To date the site selection process has yielded 
three finalist sites which are being analyzed and a final selection made shortly. As part of 
this selection process a facilities start-up budget will be prepared which will outline the 
resources necessary to acquire the site and make it ready for the school program. 

B. Devise a 5-year budget covering projected income and planned expenditures. 



29 



The attached 5-year budget is based on the per pupil equivalency cost provided by the 
Department of Education for our district. This budget will need to be revised when the 
actual per pupil equivalency cost is calculated for our district by the Executive Office of 
Education. 

C Include all sources of anticipated income, including per pupil tuition and private or 
public grants. 

The attached budget includes student entitlements due for eligible children under the Federal 
school meals program. No amounts have been estimated for other Federal entitlements such 
as Chapter One and State transportation reimbursements. When final negotiations on these 
issues are completed a revised budget will be created. Other anticipated income includes 
grants from private and public sources and fees to cover the costs of family and extra 
curricular activities. 

Accountability 

A. How will you handle the process of compiling and disseminating the annual report, as set 
forth in M.G.L. c.71, s.89? 

1 . The Neighborhood House Charter School shall issue an Annual Report. 

2. FDNH has extensive experience in disseminating annual reports and other public 
information including information related to the progress of the school toward academic 
goals and financial statements. 

B. Discuss your plan for regular review of school finance and accounts. 

The Neighborhood House Charter School fmancial services will be provided by FDNH. As 
a major service provider in Dorchester, FDNH has a skilled finance team headed by the 
Chief Financial Officer who is a CPA. All invoices will be reviewed and approved by the 
Chief Financial Officer to ensure compliance with all corporate internal controls. Monthly 
financial statements are reviewed by the Project Director, the Chief Financial Officer and the 
Executive Director. The Board structure of FDNH includes an active Finance Committee 
that reviews Financial Statements on a monthly basis and makes reports the Board of 
Directors. 

C. Describe your system for maintaining school records and disseminating information 
required under public school law. 

All children will have on file in the Charter School office a record of all educational, health 
care and social service information and any other information required under public school 
law. 



30 



Transportation 

A. Discuss plans for transporting students within the local district to and from school. What 
arrangements, if any, will be made with district transportation? 

It is our understanding that the issue of transportation still requires discussion with the 
Executive Office of Education and we are therefore unable to provide a definitive plan in this 
area. Because our school will not operate on the typical Boston Public School daily 
schedule, it is our intent to ask the state to provide us with reimbursement for our own 
transportation services. The Neighborhood House Charter School has already entered into 
discussion with the private transportation services of FDNH (Kit Clark Senior Services) and 
we will also entertain the possibility of contracting with outside services and/or use of Boston 
Public Schools transportation. 

B. How will students who live outside the local district be transported? 

The majority of our student body will be drawn from the local community. Students who 
live outside the Dorchester community will be provided with all necessary transportation to 
the extent that they reside within the Boston Public Schools district. If they reside outside 
this perimeter, however, they will be asked to provide their own transportation. 

Liability and Insurance 

A. Describe your school's insurance coverage plans. 

Until a site for The Neighborhood House Charter School has been acquired, plans for 
insurance coverage will not be final. Presently FDNH purchases its risk management 
program through Kaler, Carney, Liffler and Company, Inc. , a fuU service insurance broker. 
The insurance coverage currently in place includes 1) Commercial Multi-Peril coverage in 
the following areas: real and personal property; bodily injury and property damage; personal 
injury and advertising injury; premises medical pay; professional liability; and employee 
benefits, 2) Boiler and Machinery coverage, 3) Directors and Officers Liability coverage, 4) 
Crime Coverage, and 5) an additional Umbrella which increases general coverage. 

Governance Documents 

Before a school may open, founders will be required to submit copies of the by-laws, 
contracts and all incorporation papers. 

The organization's counsel and leadership, have met with Ms. Ginny Greiman and we have 
pursued extensive discussion with regard to incorporation. FDNH Legal Counsel is prepared 
to submit all documents of and pertaining to by-laws, contracts and incorporation after final 
approval by FDNH board is obtained. 



31 



CHARTER SCHOOL APPLICATION: 



APPENDIX 1 



32 



Federated Dorchester Neighborhood Houses, Inc. 
The Neighborhood House Charter School 

Five Year Budget Projection 



Basic Academic Budget 



Academic Program 

The basic academic program will encompass all regular 
classroom instruction. This narrative and the attached line item 
budget is based on, and reflects the basic academic programs at 
a per pupil expenditure of $6,100.00 dollars 



Assumptions 
REVENUES 



Per Pupil Tuition 



Student Entitlements 



Fees 



This projection assumes a starting per pupil reimbursement rate 
of $6,100 which was increased on an annual basis by a 2% 
inflation factor. The projection also assumes smdent enrollment 
for years one to five to be 135 respectively. 

The projections include food reimbursements from the 
Federal school meals program. No amounts have been 
estimated for other Federal entitlement such as Chapter 
One and State transportation reimbursements. 

Fees will be charged to parents for family and extra curricular 
activities. 



EXPENSES 



Supplies 



Includes food costs for breakfast, lunch and afternoon snack. 



Insurance Expense 



The commercial and professional liability insurance expense was 
calculated using the current rate of 35 cents per child per day. 



33 



Five Year Budget Projection 
Assumptions 



EXPENSES (continued) 



Salaries-Teachers 



Assumes an average salary of $29,000 in year one with an 
approximate teacher student ratio of 1 to 15. Years two to five 
assumes a 3% salary increase in each year. 



Salaries-Educational 
Support 



Salary for industrial and fine arts coordinator. 



Rent 



Calculated at $8 per square foot assuming a total of 18,000 
square feet. 



Maintenance 



Assumes use of a cleaning/maintenance contractor. 



Equipment Rent/Main. 



Includes up-front cost of purchase age appropriate furniture. 



34 



Federated Dorchester Neighborhood Houses, Inc. 
The Neighborhood House Charter School 
Five Year Budget Projection 



Description 


Year 
One 


Year 
Two 


Year 
Three 


Year 
Four 


Year 
Five 


Per Pupa Tuition 
Student Entitlements 


$823^00 
22^5 


$846,450 
22,275 


$868,050 
22,275 


$892350 
22,275 


$918,000 
22,275 


Total Public Revenue 


$845,775 


$868,7Z5 


$890325 


$914,625 


$940,275 


Direct Student Costs 


$40,000 
5,000 
5,000 
6,000 
1,000 
21,500 


$44/X)0 
5,200 
53X) 
6,000 
1,020 
21,900 


$48,400 
5300 
5300 
6,200 
1,040 
22,400 


$53,240 
5,400 
5,400 
6,400 
1,060 
22,800 


$58,564 
5,500 
5,500 
7,419 
1,100 
23300 


Transportation 
Supplies 
Library Services 
Media Services 
Computers and Materials 
Field Study 
Insurance E?cpense 


Total Direct Student Costs 


$78,500 


$83320 


$88,640 


$94300 


$101383 


Personnel 


$52,000 
290,000 
30,000 
30,000 
15,000 
91,740 
5,000 


$53,560 
298,700 
30,900 
30,900 
15,000 
94393 
6,903 


$55,200 
307,661 
31,800 
31,830 
15,000 
97,128 
7,000 


$56300 
316391 
32,800 
32,785 
15,000 
99,941 
8,000 


$58,500 

326398 

33,750 

33,770 

15,000 

102332 

9,000 


Salaries - Headmaster 

Salaries - Teachers 

Salaries— Educational Si^port 

Salaries — Secretaries 

Salaries -Substitute Teachers 

BeneGts 

Staff Development 


Total Personnel 


$513,740 


$530356 


$545,619 


$562,216 


$579,250 


Occupancy 


$150,000 

35,000 

8,000 

5,000 


$150,000 

35,000 

8,200 

5,000 


$150,000 

35,000 

8300 

5,000 


$150,000 

35,000 

8,500 

5,000 


$150,000 

35,000 

8,700 

5,000 


Rent 

Maintenance 
Utilities 
Debt Service 


Total Occupancy 


$198,000 


$198,200 


$198,300 


$198,500 


$198,700 


Office 


%1,50Q 
2,000 
8,000 

40,000 
2,000 
2,035 


$1,575 
2,080 
8,000 

40,594 
2,000 
2,100 


$1,600 
2,100 
8,000 

41,628 
2,000 
2,100 


$1,650 
2,160 
8,000 

42,751 
2,000 
2,100 


%1,675 
2,200 
8,000 

43,967 
2,000 
2.100 


Supplies 

Equipment Rent/Maint. 
Telephone 

Accounting & Payroll 
Printing & Copying 
Postage & shipping 


Total Office 


$55,535 


$56349 


$57,428 


$58,661 


$59,942 


Other 


$0 


$500 


$338 


$948 


$1,000 


Travel 


TOTAL EXPENSES 
EXCESS(DEFICIENCY) 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 


$845,775 


$868,725 


$890,325 


$914,625 
($0) 




$940,275 
$0 

(0) 


$0 


($0) 



$0 
(0) 


ENDING FUND BALANCE 


$0 


f$0) 


$0 


($0) 


$0 



Examiner 



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ONE ASHBURTONPIJVG^OSTOK^ASSACHUSETTS 02108 









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ARTICLE I ^ , , : , 






:^-|;;?Thc name of the corporation is: 












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^he Neighborhood jHousesGhartervschooi, Inc . 

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The purpose of the corporationis to engage in the following activities: 

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Note: If the space provided under any article or item on this form is insufficient, additions shall be set forth on separate S'/i x II sheets of pafK 
leaving a left hand margin of at least I inch. Additions to more than one article may be continued on a single sheet so long as each article requirin 
each such addition is clearly indicated. 



DRAFT 




If the corporation has one or more elasaes of meml 



the quilification and fights,^including voting ri^ts; pfthe ntaibencitieh 



tariiMrti6nofOTrhHaMfi,^thcinaniicrofdection of appoiBtments, the duration of membership and 



be wt forth m the by<4ain of the corpmatiott orjnay be act forth below: 











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* Other lawful provisions, if any. for the conduct and regulation of the bittiness and affairs of the corporation, for its voluntary dissolution, or for limiting. 

defining, or regulating the powers of the corporation, or of its directors or jnembers, or of any class of m em b er s, are as follows: fii^^^^is^^-^^/j w^: ^ 



See Continuation 




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* If there aie no provisions, state "None". 
Note: 'niepreccdiacioar(4)af1iclmai 



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ONLY he 



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By-laws of the corporation have beejfdtily adopted and the initi^dufecton;prendeat, treawrera^ ^k or other presiding, financial or recording ofiicen. whose ^. 

jiames are setout below, have been duly ekcted.>o^?^>,:?/:^^^^^^ ■\^i^^!^ ._/:-:>■ 

The efi^edlve date of organizafibnjofSic«)riio 



(not more than 30 days after date drfiling).7:?cf|l^^^t^^;^^^|?3?^^^5|?:^^ . ;■ V'-HsiS vr:>-- -, ^ -TfS-- -/'■:- vv-■-^--•^ ' . • -'^^ ^--r^^ V--^^S^' 



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The information contained in ARTICLE YliuNOTaPERMAljEr^ be changed ONLY by fiUng the appropriate if^ 

form provided therefor. ' '^^ '^^!v?isVxi^%-'^^Sr#^"r'?^^ -"^''"'^^-" ■■■-:.-- ^ • -v.- — . 

a. The street address of the ooq)ontion IN MASSACHUSEnSisfXpM 

b. The name, residence and post office address of <Mch ofthelmtial directors and following offioen of the corporation areas follows: - ■:*^^^^-i<irJ^.f^ 




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NAME * :-'■ ' ?^^?S; : ^RESIDENCE ;i^S. >;:.;^ .sr^:;^^POST OFFICE ADDRESS 



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c. The fiscal year of the corporation shall end on the last day of the month of: Septieinber 

d. The name and BUSINESS address of the RESIDENT AGENT of the corporation, if any, is: 

I / We the below-signed INCORPORATORS do hereby certify under the pains and penalties of peijury that 1/ We have not been convicted of any crimes relating 
to alcohol or gaming within the past ten years. I / We do hereby further certify that to the best of my/ our knowledge the above-named principal officen have not 
been similarly convicted. If so convicted, explain. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF and under the pains and penalties of perjury, 1/ WE, whose signature(s) appear below as incorporator(s) and whose names and 
business or residential address(es) ARE CLEARLY TYPED OR PRINTED beneath each signature do hereby assodate with the intention of forming this 
corporation under the provisions of General Laws Chapter 180 and do hereby sign these Articles of Organization as incorporator<s) this day 

of November, '994 . 



NOTE: If an alrcady-ezisting coqtoratioii it acting as jn co tpo rato r, type in the exact wamt of the corpontion, the Mate or 
inoofporated, the name of the pcfwm sigoiDg oa bclidr of Mid corpofitkM aMl tiK tMk he/she holdi or other aotlM^ 



DRAFT 



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%^^v„^ THE COMMONWEAUTH OFiMASSACHUSETTS,5. > 



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•"'■-K- ':■:- ■''\'l:'^:.^:-:<'^^ .1 hcrcby ccitify that, upoD 811 examuiation of the within-written articles of '-■ [iT:''->;:^'^'-:^^^^0^^si^)t 



■'.•j¥i^&^/ relative to the organization of corporations have been compliea with, and I hereby ;- ^, -t-^.f%M^*^^^4^}^, 

^t::^^^^^:i0r^^s:p^ast said iarticles; and the filing fee in the amount of $35.00 having been paid, said ? rci^^^^S^iC -t l^^^^^i^ 

'' ^'-^'i- ^-^i^i^articles arc deemed to have been filed with me this .\ ^ ';' ":V .■ •^4s^,;ji;;i^,K^>. .; '^i^^;-^-- '■'■''yC^'y''^y^-^'^^'-:i^^^:£^ 



-^*tr"^-;^<rrC--? -day of 



19 






:\, .<. ; ,3?. ;>,; ■ Eflfectjve date 






■^Sj^tl^'^S^J:'^ 



MICHAEL J. CONNOLLY 

Secretary of State 






-^1 j^:'^f.-l a i-.';3"^ 



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A PHOTOCOPY OF THESE ARTICLES OF ORGANIZATION SHALL BE 
RETURNED 



TO: 



Telephone: 



DRAFT 



Article II: Purpose 

1. To establish, maintain and operate an educational 
organization for the purpose of establishing a charter school: 
(i) to stimulate the development of innovative programs within 

public education; (ii) to provide opportunities for innovative 
learning and assessments; (iii) to provide parents and students 
with greater options in choosing schools within and outside their 
school districts; (iv) to provide teachers with a vehicle for 
establishing schools with alternative, innovative methods of 
educational instruction and school structure and management; (v) 
to encourage performance -based educational programs; and/or (vi) 
to hold teachers and school administrators accountable for 
students' educational outcomes, all as provided in Section 8 9 of 
Chapter 91 of the General Laws of The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts ("Section 89"); and to conduct any other programs, 
policies or activities by which the corporation can pursue the 
aforementioned purposes not inconsistent with the lawful 
purposes, objectives or powers of a corporation organized under 
Chapter 180 of the Massachusetts General Laws, with Section 89 or 
with the charter to be issued to the corporation thereunder (the 
"Charter") and which may be permitted a corporation exempt from 
federal income tax under Section 501(c) (3) of the Internal 
Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (or corresponding provisions of 
any future United States Internal Revenue Law) (the "Internal 
Revenue Code " ) . 

2. To do, exercise and perform any act, thing or power 
necessary, suitable or desirable for the accomplishment of any of 
the foregoing educational purposes, or the attainment of any 
objectives or the furtherance of any powers which are (i) lawful 
purposes, objectives or powers of a corporation organized under 
Chapter 180 of the Massachusetts General Laws; (ii) which may be 
permitted a corporation exempt from federal income tax under 
Section 501(c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code; and (iii) which 
are not inconsistent with Section 89 or the Charter. 

3 . The foregoing clauses are to be construed both as 
purposes and powers, and it is hereby expressly provided that the 
enumeration herein of specific purposes and powers shall not be 
held to limit or restrict, in any manner, the exercise and 
enjoyment of all the general purposes and powers of a corporation 
organized under Chapter 180 of the Massachusetts General Laws and 
which may be permitted a corporation exempt from federal income 
tax under Section 501(c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code and 
which are not inconsistent with Section 89 or with the Charter. 



II-l 



DRAFT 



Article IV: Other Lawful Provisions 

1. The corporation shall have, and may exercise in 
furtherance of its corporate purposes, the powers set forth in 
Section 89, including without limitation the powers specified in 
Chapter 156B and Chapter 180 of the Massachusetts General Laws 
that are not inconsistent with Section 89, and the power to pay- 
pensions, establish and carry out pension, savings, thrift and 
other retirement, incentive and benefit plans, trusts and 
provisions for any or all of its trustees, officers and employees 
and for any or all of the trustees, directors, officers and 
employees of a corporation of which the corporation is a member 
and which is exempt from federal income tax under Section 
501(c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code, provided that no such 
power shall be exercised in a manner inconsistent with Section 
89, the Charter, Chapter 180 or any other chapter of the 
Massachusetts General Laws and provided further that no such 
power shall be authorized which would not be permitted a 
corporation exempt from federal income tax under Section 

501(c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code. 

2. Pursuant to Section 9A of Chapter 156B and Section 
6 of Chapter 180 of the Massachusetts General Laws, the 
corporation may be a partner in any lawful activity it would have 
power to conduct by itself, provided that no such power shall be 
authorized which would not be permitted a corporation exempt from 
federal income tax under Section 501(c) (3) of the Internal 
Revenue Code . 

3 . Provisions for the determination of membership in 
the corporation, the powers of the members, and the conduct and 
regulation of the affairs of the corporation shall be set forth 
in the By-laws of the corporation, to the extent they are not set 
forth in these Articles of Organization. 

4 . The Board of Trustees is authorized and empowered 
from time to time, in its discretion, to make, amend, or repeal 
the By-laws in part or in whole, except with respect to any 
provision thereof which by law, these Articles of Organization, 
or the By-laws requires action by the members. 

5. Without limiting the powers set forth in 
paragraph 1 of this Article 4, (i) the corporation shall have the 
power to purchase, receive, take by grant, gift, devise, bequest, 
or otherwise lease, or otherwise acquire, own, hold, improve, 
employ, use and otherwise deal in and with, real or personal 
property, or any interest therein, wherever situated, in such 
manner as in the judgment of the Board of Trustees will best 
promote the purposes of the corporation; (ii) the corporation 
shall have the power to sell, convey, exchange transfer. 



IV- 1 



DRAFT 



license, lease or otherwise dispose of, or mortgage, pledge, 
encumber or create a security interest in, all or any of its 
property, or any interest therein, wherever situated, in such 
manner as in the judgment of the Board of Trustees will best 
promote the purposes of the corporation; (iii) the corporation 
shall have the power to contract for or otherwise engage such 
professional services as the Board of Trustees may deem best to 
promote the purposes of the corporation; and (iv) the corporation 
shall have the power to lend money, invest and reinvest its 
funds, and take and hold real and personal property as security 
for the payment of funds so loaned or invested in such manner as 
in the judgment of the Board of Trustees will best promote the 
purposes of the corporation. 

6. Meetings of members may be held within or outside 
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts at such location within the 
United States as the By-laws may provide. The books and records 
of the corporation may be kept (except as otherwise required by 
law) within or outside The Commonwealth of Massachusetts but 
within the United States, at such place or places as may be 
designated from time to time by the Board of Trustees or in the 
By-laws of the corporation. 

7. Except as may be otherwise provided herein, the 
corporation reserves the right to amend, alter, change, or repeal 
any provision contained in these Articles of Organization in the 
manner now or hereafter prescribed by statute. 

8. The corporation shall not discriminate on the basis 
of race, religion or sex in administering its policies and 
programs . 

9. No part of the net earnings, properties or other 
assets of the corporation shall inure to the benefit of, or be 
distributable to, any private person or individual, including any 
incorporator, -member, employee, officer or trustee of the 
corporation, except that the corporation shall be authorized and 
empowered to pay reasonable compensation for services rendered 
and to make payments and distributions in furtherance of the 
purposes set forth in Article II hereof. 

10. No substantial part of the activities of the 
corporation shall be the carrying on of propaganda, or otherwise 
attempting to influence legislation, and the corporation shall 
not participate in, or intervene in (including the publishing or 
distribution of statements) any political campaign on behalf of 
any candidate for public office. 

11. Notwithstanding any other provisions of these 
Articles of Organization, the corporation shall not carry on any 
activities (i) not permitted to be carried on (a) by a 
corporation exempt from Federal income tax under Section 



IV- 2 



DRAFT 



501(c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code, (b) by a corporation, 
contributions to which are deductible under Section 170(c) (2) of 
the Internal Revenue Code, (c) by a corporation organized under 
Chapter 180 of the Massachusetts General Laws; or (ii) that are 
inconsistent with the Charter or Section 89. 

12. Except as otherwise provided by law, a petition 
for voluntary dissolution of the corporation may be filed only 
upon a vote of a majority of the Board of Trustees. In the event 
of liquidation or dissolution of the corporation, the Board of 
Trustees shall recommend to the court of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts having jurisdiction over the liquidation or 
dissolution another charitable organization (or organizations) 
having purposes similar to those of the corporation, and the 
Board shall, after paying or making provisions for all debts and 
obligations of the corporation, dispose of all the assets of the 
corporation to such other charitable organization as said court 
may approve (if such approval shall then be required by statute) , 
and as qualifies at the time as an exempt organization (or 
organizations) under Section 501(c) (3) of the Internal Revenue 
Code . 

F:\WJC\SW105\CHARTORG.MAS: 11/02/94 



IV- 3 

DRAFT 



F : \CCC\DOCaJ^liiAI>||sMW: 11/03/94 



tlimPt 



'■^feU 



BY-LAWS 

Of 

THE NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE CHARTER SCHOOL, INC 

* • • • * 

ARTICLE I. 



NAME 

The name of this Corporation shall be The Neighborhood House 
Charter School, Inc. 



ARTICLE II. 
PURPOSES 

As set forth in the Articles of Organization, the purposes 
for which the Corporation is formed are those set forth in 
Section 89 of Chapter 71 of the General Laws of The Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts. -'-■-« 

The Corporation is organized and shall operate exclusively 
for charitable, educational and scientific purposes. No part of 
the net earnings or assets of the Corporation shall be 
distributed to or inure to the benefit of any of its members or 
any other individual. No substantial part of the Corporation's 
activities shall consist of carrying on propaganda, or otherwise 
attempting, to influence legislation, and the Corporation shall 
not participate or intervene (including the publishing or 
distributing of statements) in any political campaign on behalf 
of any candidate for public office. In the event of dissolution 
of the Corporation, none of its assets shall be distributed 
except to any organization qualifying as a tax exempt charitable, 
educational or scientific organization under applicable Federal 
revenue statutes . 



ARTICLE III 



MEMBERSHIP 



Section 1. Member . The sole member of this Corporation 
(the "Member") shall be Federated Dorchester Neighborhood Houses, 



-2- 

Inc, a Massachusetts corporation organized under Chapter 180 of 
the Massachusetts General Laws. 



ARTICLE IV. 
SPONSORS. BENEFACTORS. CONTRIBUTORS. 
ADVISERS. FRIENDS OF THE CORPORATION 

The Trustees may designate certain persons or groups of 
persons as sponsors, benefactors, contributors, advisers or 
friends of the Corporation or such other title as they deem 
appropriate. Such persons shall serve in an honorary capacity 
and, except as the Trustees shall otherwise designate, shall in 
such capacity have no right to notice of or to vote at any 
meeting, shall not be considered for purposes of establishing a 
quorum, and shall have no other rights or responsibilities. 



ARTICLE V, 



MEMBERS S MEETINGS 

Section 1. Annual Meeting . The annual meeting of the 
Member shall be held each year for the purpose of electing the 
Board of Trustees and transacting such other business as may 
properly come before the meeting on the second Tuesday in June 
unless such day is a legal holiday, in which event it shall be on 
the next succeeding day which is not a legal holiday, at a time 
and place within The Commonwealth of Massachusetts as the 
President or Board of Trustees may determine. If in any year the 
annual meeting is not held, a special meeting may be held in lieu 
thereof at a later time, and any elections held or business 
transacted at such special meeting shall have the same effect as 
if held or transacted at the annual meeting. 

Section 2. Special Meetings . A special meeting of the 
Member shall be called by the Clerk upon the request of the 
President or of the Board of Trustees. A special meeting of the 
Member shall be called by the Clerk or, in the case of the death, 
absence, incapacity or refusal of the Clerk, any other officer 
upon written application of the Member, which application shall 
be signed by an officer of the Member and shall state the time, 
place and purposes of such meeting. 

Section 3 . Notice. Notice of meetings of the Member shall 
be given by the Clerk to any officer of the Member by leaving 
such notice with such officer or at such officer's residence or 
usual place of business or by mailing the same, postage prepaid, 
addressed to such officer at such officer's address as it appears 
upon the records of the Corporation, not less than seven days 
before the meeting. No notice of the time, place or purposes of 
any annual or special meeting of the Member shall be required to 
be given to any Member who is present at the meeting or who 
waives notice thereof before or after the meeting by a writing 
which is filed with the records of the meeting. 



DRAFT 



-3- 

Section 4 . Quorum . At any meeting of the Member, any 
person who is an officer or director or both of the Member shall 
constitute a quorum for the transaction of business. In the 
absence of a quorum, or when a quorum is present, any meeting may 
be adjourned from time to time, without notice other than by 
announcement at the meeting, and without further notice. At any 
adjourned meeting at which a quorum shall be present, any 
business may be transacted which might have been transacted at 
the meeting as originally called. 

Section 5. Voting. At any meeting of the Member, the 
representative or representatives of the Member each of whom 
shall be either an officer or director of the Member shall 
collectively be entitled to one vote. The Member may vote either 
in person or by proxy given in writing to the Clerk or other 
officer of the Corporation and dated not more than six months 
before the meeting at which proxy is to be used. 

Section 6. Consent in Lieu of Meeting . Any action required 
or permitted to be taken at any meeting of the Member may be 
taken without a meeting if the Member consents to the action in 
writing and such consent is filed with the records of the 
meetings of the Member. Such consents shall be treated for all 
purposes as a vote at a meeting of the Member. 



ARTICLE VI 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Section 1. Number and Election of Trustees; Qualifications . 
The Trustees shall be elected by the Member of the Corporation at 
the annual meeting of the Member or at a special meeting in lieu 
thereof, at which meeting the Member shall determine the number 
of Trustees for the ensuing year. At least a majority of the 
Trustees shall at the time of their election be residents of 
Dorchester. Members of the paid staff of the Corporation may not 
be a Trustee of the Corporation. Each Trustee shall serve until 
the next succeeding annual meeting of the Member or special 
meeting in lieu thereof, and until such Trustee's successor is 
duly elected and qualified, or until such Trustee sooner dies, 
resigns or is removed. 

Section 2 . Vacancies. Vacancies created by the death, 
removal or resignation of one or more Trustees, or otherwise, may 
be filled by vote of a majority of the Trustees remaining in 
office or by vote of the Member. 

Section 3 . Powers . The management of the affairs of the 
Corporation shall be vested in and exercised by the Board of 
Trustees, who shall pursue such policies and principles as shall 
be in accordance with law, the provisions of the Articles of 
Organization and these By-Laws. The Board of Trustees shall be 
considered as having the powers of trustees in accordance with 
the provisions of Chapter 180 and applicable provisions of 
Chapter 156B of the General Laws of The Commonwealth of 



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Massachusetts, limited or expanded, as the case may be, by any 
applicable provision of Section 89of Chapter 71 of said General 
Laws and by the charter issued pursuant thereto. To the extent 
permitted by law, the Board of Trustees may, by general 
resolution, delegate to the Principal of the charter school or to 
officers of the Corporation such powers as they may see fit. 

Section 4 . Compensation and Expenses . The Board of 
Trustees shall have the power and authority, in its discretion, 
to contract for and to pay Trustees compensation for unusual or 
special services rendered to the Corporation, provided , that any 
such compensation shall be reasonable and appropriate to the 
value of the services rendered by the Trustees, and further 
provided that any such payment shall be disclosed to the Board of 
Trustees . 

Section 5. Resignation of Trustees . Any Trustee may resign 
from the Corporation by delivering a written resignation to the 
President, the Clerk, or to a meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

Section 6. Removals. At any meeting called for the 
purpose, the Member may remove from office any Trustee with or 
without cause. The Board of Trustees may, by affirmative vote of 
a majority of the Trustees in office, remove any Trustee from 
office with cause. Any Trustee may be removed for cause only 
after reasonable notice and opportunity to be heard before the 
body proposing to remove such Trustee. 

Section 7. Meetings of the Board of Trustees . 

The Trustees shall hold an annual meeting immediately 
following the annual meeting of the Member. No notice of such 
meeting need be given and any business may be transacted thereat. 

Regular meetings of the Board of Trustees shall be held at 
least quarterly without call or notice at such places and of such 
time as the Board may from time to time determine. 

Special meetings of the Board of Trustees may be held at any 
time and at any place when called by the President, or three or 
more Trustees, upon reasonable notice, stating the time and place 
of said meeting. Such notice shall be given to each Trustee by 
the Clerk, or, in the case of the death, absence, incapacity or 
refusal of the Clerk, by the President or Trustees calling the 
meeting. Special meetings may be held at any time without call 
or formal notice, provided all the Trustees are present or waive 
notice thereof before or after the meeting by a writing which is 
filed with the records of the meeting. 

Notice to a Trustee of any meeting shall be deemed to be 
sufficient if sent by mail at least three days prior to such 
meeting, addressed to such Trustee at such Trustee's usual or 
last known business or residence address, or by facsimile or 
telegram at least twenty-four hours before the meeting, or if 



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given in person, either by telephone or by handing such Trustee a 
written notice at least twenty-four hours before the meeting. 

Section 8. Quorum . One-third of the Trustees in office at 
the time a meeting is duly called and held shall constitute a 
quorum. When a quorum is present at any such meeting, the vote 
of a majority of the Trustees present shall be necessary and 
sufficient for election to any office or for a decision on any 
matter, except as otherwise required by law, by the Articles of 
Organization or by these By-Laws. Whether or not a quorum is 
present, any meeting may be adjourned from time to time by a 
majority of the votes cast upon the question, without notice 
other than by announcement at the meeting, and without further 
notice to any absent Trustee. At any adjourned meeting at which 
a quorum shall be present, any business may be transacted which 
might have been transacted at the meeting as originally called. 

Section 9. Consent in Lieu of Trustees' Meeting . Any 
action required or permitted to be taken at any meeting of the 
Trustees may be taken without a meeting if all Trustees entitled 
to vote on the matter consent to the action in writing and the 
written consents are filed with the records of the meetings of 
the Board of Trustees. Such consents shall be treated for all 
purposes as a vote at a meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

Section 10. Committees of Trustees . The Board of Trustees 
shall appoint from among its members an Executive Committee and 
such committee shall have all the powers of the Board of Trustees 
with respect to the management of the current and ordinary 
business of the Corporation between meetings of the Board of 
Trustees. The Executive Committee shall consist of not fewer 
than four persons and shall include the President of the 
Corporation and such other persons as the Board of Trustees may 
appoint. The Executive Committee shall report all actions taken 
by it to the Board of Trustees at the next meeting thereof and 
shall be subject at all times to the direction and control of 
said board. 

Either the Board of Trustees, by vote of a majority of the 
Trustees then in office, or the President, with the approval of 
such majority of the Board of Trustees, may at any time appoint 
such other committees of the Board of Trustees as are deemed 
desirable, and may from time to time designate or alter, within 
the limits permitted by this Section, the duties and powers of 
such other committees or change their membership, and may at any 
time abolish such other committees. 

Any committee shall be vested with such powers of the Board 
of Trustees as the Board may determine in the vote establishing 
such committee or in a subsequent vote of a majority of Trustees 
then in office, provided , however, that no such committee shall 
have any power prohibited by law, the Articles of Organization or 
the power: 

(a) to change the principal office of the Corporation; 



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(b) to amend or authorize the amendment of the Articles of 
Organization or these By-Laws; 

(c) to elect officers required by law or these By-Laws to 
be elected by the Member or Trustees, to fill vacancies 
in any such office or to supervise the performance of 
the Principal; 

(d) to change the size of the Board of Trustees or to fill 
vacancies in the Board of Trustees; 

(e) to remove officers or Trustees from office; 

(f) to authorize a sale or other disposition of all or 
substantially all the property and business of the 
Corporation; or 

(g) to authorize the liquidation or dissolution of the 
Corporation; 

and provided further , that the fact that a particular power 
appears in the foregoing enumeration of powers denied to 
committees of the Board of Trustees shall not be construed to 
override by implication any other provision of these By-Laws, 
limiting or denying to the Board of Trustees the right to 
exercise such power. 

Each member of a committee shall hold office until the first 
meeting of the Board of Trustees following the next annual 
meeting of the Member (or until such other time as the Board of 
Trustees may determine, either in the vote establishing the 
committee or at the selection of such member) and until such 
member's successor is elected and qualified, or until such member 
sooner dies, resigns, is removed, or is replaced by change of 
membership, or becomes disqualified by ceasing to be a Trustee, 
or until the committee is sooner abolished by the Board of 
Trustees . 

A majority of the members of any committee shall constitute 
a quorum for the transaction of business, but any meeting may be 
adjourned from time to time by a majority of the votes cast upon 
the question, whether or not a quorum is present, and the meeting 
may be held as adjourned without further notice. Each committee 
may make rules not inconsistent herewith for the holding and 
conduct of its meetings, but unless otherwise provided in such 
rules its meetings shall be held and conducted in the same 
manner, as nearly as may be, as is provided in these By-Laws for 
meetings of the Board of Trustees. The Board of Trustees shall 
have the power to rescind any vote or resolution of any 
committee; provided, however, that no rights of third parties 
shall be impaired by such rescission. 

Section 11. Principal. The Board of Trustees, by vote of a 
majority of the Trustees then in office, may appoint a Principal 
of the charter school for such period of time and upon such terms 



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and conditions as the Board may determine. The Principal shall 
have such powers and duties as may be prescribed from time to 
time by law, the Board of Trustees or the President. 



ARTICLE VII. 



OFFICERS 



Section 1. Officers. The officers of the Corporation shall 
consist of a President, one or more Vice Presidents, a Treasurer, 
a Clerk and such other officers as the Board of Trustees may, in 
its discretion, elect or appoint. The Board of Trustees shall 
have power at any time to create additional offices and to 
appoint persons to hold the offices so created. 

The Corporation may also have such agents, if any, as the 
Board of Trustees may, in its discretion, appoint. The Clerk 
shall be a resident of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts. So far 
as is permitted by law, any two or more offices may be held by 
the same person. 

Subject to law, the Articles of Organization and the other 
provisions of these By-Laws, each officer shall have, in addition 
to the duties and powers herein set forth, such duties and powers 
as the Board of Trustees may from time to time designate. 

The President, one or more Vice Presidents and the Treasurer 
shall be elected annually by the Board of Trustees from among 
their own number. The Treasurer shall give bond to the 
Corporation, if required by the Board of Trustees, in such sum as 
it may require, for performance of the Treasurer's duties. The 
Clerk shall be elected annually by the Board of Trustees and 
shall be sworn to the faithful performance of the Clerk's duties. 
Such other officers of the Corporation as may be created in 
accordance with these By-Laws may be filled by vote of a majority 
of the Trustees present at any meeting at which a quorum is 
present . 

Each officer shall hold office until the first meeting of 
the Board of Trustees following the next annual meeting of the 
Member or until such officer's successor is elected or appointed 
and qualified, or until such officer sooner dies, resigns, is 
removed, or becomes disqualified. Each agent shall retain his or 
her authority at the pleasure of the Board of Trustees . 

Any officer, employee, or agent of the Corporation may be 
required, as and if determined by the Board of Trustees, to give 
bond for the faithful performance of such person's duties. 

Section 2. President and Vice Presidents . The President 
shall perform the duties customarily pertaining to the office of 
President of a non-profit corporation such as the Corporation. 
The President shall preside at all meetings of the Member and of 
the Board of Trustees at which the President is present except as 
otherwise voted by the Board of Trustees. Any Vice President 



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shall have such duties and powers as shall be designated from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees. In the President's 
absence or inability to act, the Vice President or, if there be 
more than one, the Vice President designated by the Board of 
Trustees shall have the powers and duties of the President. 

Section 3 . Clerk; Assistant Clerk . The Clerk shall record 
all proceedings of the Member and the Board of Trustees in books 
to be kept therefor, and shall have custody of the Corporation's 
records, documents and valuable papers. In the absence of the 
Clerk from any such meeting, the Assistant Clerk, if any, shall 
record the proceedings thereof in the aforesaid books, or a 
temporary clerk may be chosen by vote of the meeting. 

Unless the Board of Trustees shall otherwise designate, the 
Clerk or, in his or her absence, the Assistant Clerk, if any, 
shall have custody of the corporate seal and be responsible for 
affixing it to such documents as may required to be sealed. 

The Clerk shall have such other duties and powers as are 
commonly incident to the office of a corporate clerk of a non- 
profit corporation such as the Corporation, and such other duties 
and powers as may be prescribed from time to time by the Board of 
Trustees or by the President . 

Any Assistant Clerk shall have such duties and powers as 
shall from time to time be designated by the Board of Trustees or 
the Clerk and shall be responsible to and shall report to the 
Clerk. 

Section 4 . Treasurer . The Treasurer shall be in charge of 
the Corporation's funds and the disbursements thereof, subject to 
the Board of Trustees, and shall have such duties and powers as 
are commonly incident to the office of a corporate treasurer of a 
non-profit corporation such as the Corporation and such other 
duties and powers as may be prescribed from time to time by the 
Board of Trustees. The Treasurer shall, subject to such 
conditions and restrictions as may be made by the Board of 
Trustees, have custody of all monies, debts, obligations, 
contracts, documents and other papers of a financial nature 
belonging to the Corporation and shall be responsible for 
collecting all monies from time to time due and owing to the 
Corporation and disbursing the same pursuant to the contracts and 
obligations of the Corporation or to the order of the Board of 
Trustees. The Treasurer shall prepare an annual statement in 
detail of the finances of the Corporation and an estimate of the 
receipts and expenditures for the next fiscal year. The 
Treasurer shall execute and deliver, on behalf of the 
Corporation, all such instruments under its corporate seal as may 
be ordered by the Board of Trustees and shall perform such other 
duties as the Board of Trustees may from time to time require. 

Section 5. Assistant Treasurer . Any Assistant Treasurer 
shall have such duties and powers as shall be prescribed from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees or by the Treasurer, and 



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shall be responsible to and shall report to the Treasurer. In 
the Treasurer's absence or inability to act, the Assistant 
Treasurer or, if there be more than one, the Assistant Treasurer 
designated by the Board of Trustees shall have the powers and 
duties of the Treasurer. 

Section 6. Resignations . Any officer of the Corporation 
may resign at any time by giving written notice to the 
Corporation by delivery thereof to the President, the Clerk, or 
to a meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

Section 7. Removals . The Board of Trustees may, by 
affirmative vote of a majority of the Trustees in office, remove 
from office the President, the Clerk, the Treasurer or any other 
officer or agent of the Corporation with or without cause. Tmy 
officer may be removed for cause only after reasonable notice and 
opportunity to be heard. 

Section 8. Vacancies. If the office of any member of any 
committee or any other office becomes vacant, the Board of 
Trustees may elect or appoint a successor or successors by vote 
of a majority of the Trustees then in office. Each successor as 
an officer shall hold office for the unexpired term and until 
such officer's successor shall be elected or appointed and 
qualified, or until such officer sooner dies, resigns, is removed 
or becomes disqualified. 

Section 9. Compensation . The Board of Trustees shall have 
the power and authority, in its discretion, to contract for and 
to pay officers compensation for unusual or special services 
rendered to the Corporation provided , that any such compensation 
shall be reasonable and appropriate to the value of the services 
rendered by the officers. 



ARTICLE VIII. 
BOARD ADVISORY COMMITTEES 

Either the Board of Trustees, by vote of a majority of the 
Trustees then in office, or the President, with the approval of 
such majority of the Board of Trustees, may at any time appoint 
such advisory committees to provide advice or other guidance to 
the Board in respect of such matters as are deemed desirable 
(each a "Board Advisory Committee") . The Board may from time to 
time designate or alter, within the limits permitted by this 
Article, the duties of any Board Advisory Committee or change its 
membership, and may at any time abolish any Board Advisory 
Committee . Any Board Advisory Committee may include members who 
are not Trustees . 



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ARTICLE IX. 

INDEMNIFICATION OF TRUSTEES, 

OFFICERS. EMPLOYEES, OR OTHERS 

1. The Corporation shall indemnify any person who was or is 
a party or is threatened to be made a party to any threatened, 
pending or completed action, suit or proceeding, whether civil, 
criminal, administrative or investigative (other than an action 
by or in the right of the Corporation) and whether or not made or 
commenced prior to the adoption of this Article and whether or 
not based on any fact or omission antedating such adoption, by. 
reason of the fact that such person is or was a trustee, officer, 
employee or agent of the Corporation, or is or was serving at the 
request of the Corporation as a director, officer, trustee, 
employee, or agent of another corporation, partnership, joint 
venture, trust or other enterprise in which this Corporation 
directly or indirectly owns shares or of which it is a creditor, 
and each person who shall, at the Corporation's request, have 
served in any capacity with respect to any employee benefit plan, 
whether or not then in office or then serving with respect to 
such employee benefit plan, against expenses (including 
attorneys' fees) , judgments, fines and amounts paid in settlement 
actually and reasonably incurred by such person in connection 
with such action, suit or proceeding if such person acted in good 
faith and in a manner such person reasonably believed to be in 
the best interests of the Corporation, and, with respect to any 
criminal action or proceeding, had no reasonable cause to believe 
his or her conduct was unlawful, or to the extent that such 
matter relates to service with respect to an employee benefit 
plan, in the best interest of the participants or beneficiaries 
of such employee benefit plan. The termination of any action, 
suit or proceeding by judgment, order, settlement, conviction or 
upon a plea of nolo contendere or its equivalent, shall not, of 
itself, create a presumption that the person did not act in good 
faith and in a manner which such person reasonably believed to be 
in the best interest of the Corporation, and, with respect to any 
criminal action or proceeding, had reasonable cause to believe 
that his or her conduct was unlawful, or to the extent that such 
matter relates to service with respect to an employee benefit 
plan, in the best interest of the participants or beneficiaries 
of such employee benefit plan. 

2 . The Corporation shall indemnify any person who was or is 
a party or is threatened to be made a party to any threatened, 
pending or completed action or suit by or in the right of the 
Corporation to procure a judgment in its favor, whether or not 
made or commenced prior to the adoption of this Article and 
whether or not based on any action or omission antedating such 
adoption, by reason of the fact that such person is or was a 
trustee, officer, employee or agent of the Corporation, or is or 
was serving at the request of the Corporation as a director, 
officer, trustee, employee or agent of another corporation, 
partnership, joint venture, trust or other enterprise in which 
this Corporation directly or indirectly owns shares or of which 
it is a creditor, and each person who shall, at the Corporation's 



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request, have served in any capacity with respect to any employee 
benefit plan, whether or not then in office or then serving with 
respect to such employee benefit plan, against expenses 
(including attorney's fees) actually and reasonably incurred by 
such person in connection with the defense or settlement of such 
action or suit if such person acted in good faith and in a manner 
such person reasonably believed to be in the best interests of 
the Corporation or to the extent that such matter relates to 
service with respect to an employee benefit plan, in the best 
interest of the participants or beneficiaries of such employee 
benefit plan. 

3. To the extent that a trustee, officer, employee or agent 
of the Corporation, has been successful on the merits or 
otherwise in defense of any action, suit or proceeding referred 
to in paragraphs (1) and (2) , or in defense of any claim, issue 
or matter therein, such person shall be indemnified against 
expenses (including attorneys' fees) actually and reasonably 
incurred by such person in connection therewith. 

4. Any indemnification under paragraphs (1) and (2) (unless 
ordered by a court) shall be made by the Corporation only as 
authorized in the specific case upon a determination that 
indemnification of the director, officer, trustee, employee or 
agent, is proper in the circumstances because such person has met 
the applicable standard of conduct set forth in paragraphs (1) 
and (2) . Such determination shall be made (1) by the Board of 
Trustees by a majority vote of a quorum consisting of Trustees 
who were not parties to such action, suit or proceeding, or (2) 
if such quorum is not obtainable, or, even if obtainable, if a 
quorum of disinterested Trustees so directs, by independent legal 
counsel in a written opinion, or (3) by vote of the Member of the 
Corporation. 

5 . Expenses incurred in defending a civil or criminal 
action, suit or proceeding may be paid by the Corporation in 
advance of the final disposition of such action, suit or 
proceeding as authorized by the Board of Trustees in a specific 
case upon receipt of an undertaking by or on behalf of the 
director, officer, trustee, employee or agent, to repay such 
amount unless it shall ultimately be determined that such person 
is entitled to be indemnified by the Corporation as authorized in 
this Article. 

6. The indemnification provided by this Article shall not 
be deemed exclusive of any other rights to which those seeking 
indemnification may be entitled under any statute, agreement, 
vote of members or disinterested Trustees or otherwise, both as 
to action in his or her official capacity and as to action in 
another capacity while holding such office, and shall continue as 
to a person who has ceased to be a director, officer, trustee, 
employee or agent, and shall inure to the benefit of the heirs, 
executors and administrators of such a person. 



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7. The Coirporation may purchase and maintain insurance on 
behalf of any person who is or was a trustee, officer, employee 
or agent of the Corporation, or is or was serving at the request 
of the Corporation as director, officer, trustee, employee or 
agent of another corporation, partnership, joint venture, trust 
or other enterprise in which this Corporation directly or 
indirectly owns shares or of which it is a creditor, and each 
person who shall, at the Corporation's request, have served in 
any capacity with respect to any employee benefit plan, whether 
or not then in office or then serving with respect to such 
employee benefit plan, against any liability asserted against 
such person and incurred by such person in any such capacity, or 
arising out of such person's status as such, whether or not the 
Corporation would have the power to indemnify such person against 
such liability under the provisions of this Article. 

8. For the purposes of this Article, references to "the 
Corporation" include all constituent corporations absorbed in a 
consolidation or merger as well as the resulting or surviving 
corporation so that any person who is or was a director, officer, 
trustee, employee or agent of such a constituent corporation or 
is or was serving at the request of such constituent corporation 
as a director, officer, trustee, employee or agent of another 
corporation, partnership, joint venture, trust or other 
enterprise in which this Corporation directly or indirectly owns 
shares or of or which it is a creditor, shall stand in the same 
position under the provisions of this Article with respect to the 
resulting or surviving corporation as such person would if such 
person had served the resulting or surviving corporation in the 
same capacity. 



ARTICLE X. 
CONTRACTS AND DEALINGS WITH CERTAIN OTHER CORPORATIONS OR FIRMS 

The Trustees and officers of this Corporation may be 
connected with other companies with whom from time to time this 
Corporation may have business dealings. No contracts or other 
transactions between this Corporation and any other corporation 
or firm, and no acts of this Corporation, shall be affected by 
the fact that the Trustees or officers of this Corporation are 
pecuniarily or otherwise interested in or are directors, trustees 
or officers of such other corporation or firm. Any Trustee 
individually, or any firm of which such Trustee may be a member, 
may be a party to or may be pecuniarily or otherwise interested 
in any contract or transaction of this Corporation, provided that 
the fact that such Trustee or such firm or corporation is so 
interested shall be disclosed or shall have been known to the 
Board of Trustees prior to the meeting at which, or prior to the 
Trustees executing their written consents by which, action to 
authorize, ratify or approve such contract or transaction shall 
be taken. Any Trustee of this Corporation may vote upon or give 
such Trustee's written consent to any contract or other 
transaction between the Corporation and any affiliated 
corporation without regard to the fact that such Trustee is also 



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a director, trustee or officer of such affiliated corporation. 
Any contract, transaction, or act on behalf of the Corporation in 
a matter in which the Trustees or officers are personally- 
interested as members, directors, trustees or otherwise shall not 
be violative of any proscriptions against the Corporation's use 
or application of its funds for private benefit of the Member. 
In no event, however, shall any persons or other entity dealing 
with the Trustees or officers be obligated to inquire into the 
authority of the Trustees and officers to enter into and 
consummate any contract, transaction, or other action. 



ARTICLE XI. 
EXECUTION OF PAPERS 

Except as the Board of Trustees may generally or in 
particular cases authorize or direct the execution thereof in 
some other manner, all deeds, leases, transfers, contracts, 
proposals, bonds, notes, checks, drafts, and other obligations 
made, accepted or endorsed by the Corporation shall be signed or 
endorsed on behalf of the Corporation by the President, or 
Treasurer, or their designees. 



ARTICLE XII. 
SOURCE AND INVESTMENT OF FUNDS 

Funds for the operation of the Corporation and for the 
furtherance of its objectives and purposes may be derived from 
grants and allocations from governmental or private agencies or 
bodies, donations from public and private organizations, 
associations and individuals, bonds or notes issued for the 
benefit of the Corporation and such other sources as may be 
approved by the Board of Trustees. Except as otherwise provided 
by law or lawfully directed by any grantor or donor, the 
Corporation may retain or dispose of all or any part of any real 
or personal property acquired by it and invest and reinvest any 
funds held by it according to the judgment of the Board of 
Trustees, without being restricted to the class of investments 
which fiduciaries are or hereafter may be permitted by law to 
make. 



ARTICLE XIII 



PROHIBITION REGARDING THE USE OF FUNDS AND 
DISTRIBUTION OF ASSETS ON DISSOLUTION 

No part of the net earnings or receipts of the Corporation 
shall inure to the benefit of any Member, Trustee or officer of 
the Corporation or any private individual, provided, however, 
that this prohibition shall not prevent the payment to any person 
of such reasonable compensation for services actually rendered to 
or for the Corporation in conformity with these By-Laws. No 
Member, Trustee, or officer of the Corporation, or any private 
individual, shall be entitled to share in the distribution of any 



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of the corporate assets on dissolution of the Corporation. The 
Member of the Corporation shall be deemed to have expressly- 
consented and agreed that upon such dissolution or winding up of 
the affairs of the Corporation, whether voluntary or involuntary, 
the assets of the Corporation then remaining in the hands of the 
Board of Trustees shall be distributed, transferred, conveyed, 
delivered and paid over to such charitable, scientific or 
educational organization or organizations as the court of the 
Commonwealth having jurisdiction thereof may approve (if such 
approval shall then be required by statute) , and as shall at the 
time qualify as an exempt organization or organizations under 
Section 501(c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code, as the Board of 
Trustees shall determine, and upon such terms and in such amounts 
and proportions as the Board of Trustees may impose and 
determine, to be used by such organizations for such similar or 
kindred purposes as are set forth in the Articles of 
Organization, these By-Laws and any and all amendments thereto. 

ARTICLE XIV. 
SEAL 

The seal of the Corporation shall, subject to alteration by 
the Board of Trustees, consist of a flat-faced circular die with 
the word "Massachusetts," together with the name of the Corpora- 
tion and the year of incorporation, cut or engraved thereon. An 
impression of the seal impressed upon the original copy of these 
By-Laws shall be deemed conclusively to be the seal adopted by 
the Board of Trustees. 



ARTICLE XV 



FISCAL YEAR 



The fiscal year of the Corporation shall be from the first 
day of October through the last day of September, or such other 
fiscal year as the Board of Trustees of the Corporation may from 
time to time select. 



ARTICLE XVI 
AMENDMENTS 



The By-laws may be added to, amended or repealed, in whole 
or in part, by the Member of the Corporation, by a majority vote 
at any meeting at which a quorum is present, if notice of the 
proposed addition, amendment or repeal has been given to the 
Member in the notice of such meeting. 



DRAFT 



Board of Trustees 



Neighborhood House Charter School 



Mr. Charles Cabot 
Sullivan & Worcester 

1 Post Office Square 

Boston, MA 



Ms. Cecelia DeLeon 
100 Florida Street 
Dorchester, MA 02124 

(617)436-4809 



Ms. Catherine Marston 
22 Sumner Street 
Dordiester, MA 02125 



(617) 436-7932 



Ms. Virginia Addai 
37 Edson Street 
Dorchester, MA 02124 

(617) 265-4490 



Mr. Brian DeLorey 

Boston Redevelopment Authority 

Boston City Hall 

Boston, MA 02201 

(617) 722-4300 x4265 



Mr. Kevin McDermott 
18 Elm Street 
Dorchester , MA 02122 

(617) 825-4324 



Mr. Shirley Carrington 
137 Wood Avenue 
Hyde Park, MA 02136 



Ms. Ann Dormer 
5 Newhall Street 
Dorchester, MA 02122 



Ms. Dolores Miller 
259 Savin Hill Avenue 
Dorchester, MA 02125 



(617) 361-2837 
(617)423-3755 



(617) 695-0644 



(617) 282-5763 



Mr. William Coughlin 

Greater Boston Chamber of Commerct 

One Beacon Street 

Boston, MA 02108 



Mr. David Haiufan 
11 Roanoke Avenue 
Jamaica Plain , MA 02 



Mr. Michael Owens 
Cuddy, Bixby 

One Financial Center 

Boston, MA 02111 



(617) 557-7330 



(617) 727-0060 x329 



(617) 348-3600 



Mr. William Darling 

294 Washington Street, Suite 310 

Boston, MA 02108 



(617)423-6488 



Mr. Patrick Lee 
Trinity Financial 
40 Broad Street 
Boston, MA 02109 
(617) 282-8425 
(617) 482-0230 



Mr. Peter Read 

249 Marlborough Street 

Boston, MA 02116 

(617) 262-5502 



Board of Trustees 



Neighborhood House Qiarter School 



Mr. Jesus Rosa 
60 Gibson Street 
Dorchester, MA 02122 



(617)282-5312 



Ms. Tyra Sidberry 
31 Boumeside Street 
Dorchester, MA 02124 

(617) 282-3246 



Ms. Helen Waldron 
St. Mary's Epsicopal Church 
14 Gushing Avenue 
Dorchester, MA 02125 
(617) 282-0930 



Mr. William Gurry 
Sullivan & Worcester 

One Post Office Square 

Boston, MA 02109 

(617) 338-2976 



Ms. Kathleen Miskiewicz 
Sullivan &Worcester 

One Post Office Square 

Boston, MA 02109 



(617)338-2967