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Full text of "A Course of Lessons in Public School Music, 51-75"

A Course of Lessens ir* 

Public School Music by 

Frances E, Clark 

81EGEL-MYERS CORRESPONDED SCHOOL OF MSIG 

Nos. 51 - 75 



THIRD GRADE SERIES 



SIEGEL- MYERS 
Correspondence School of Music 



Chicago, 111. 



A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 
PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 
BY FRANCES E. CLARK 



Lesson N9 51 



The Divided Beat 



In Lesson No 43 W e learned that the first note in each measure receives a 
stronger impulse, or accent, than the others which are used in that measure. To give 
emphasis by means of accent, lends life and color to our music, and likewise to our 
speech. The words in our language which are commonly used, are divided into one, 
two, three, or four syllables, as necessary; those containing two or more being gen- 
erally accented upon the first syllable. For instance, such words of two syllables, as 
wit-sic, ac-cent, run-nmg, talk-ing, singling, etc: such words of three syllables, as 
mel-o-dy, beau-ti-fu\, qui-et-\y } r^-u-lar, ^i-er-cise, #£?- pie- tree: and such words of 
four syllables as /worf-er-ate-ly, com-pro-mis-ing, deau-ti-MAy, etc., are so accented. 

No matter what meter signature is used in our music, whether it be 2, 3, 4, or 
any other, the first note of the measure is accented; or in other words, the bar -line 
tells us to sing the note following it a little stronger than the other notes iik the 
measure. 

To be sure that you thoroughly feel the swing, or rhythm, of these different ac- 
cents, it is a good plan to try a walking, or marching exercise, counting the steps as 
follows: 

!One, two; One, two; One, two. 
One } two, three; One, two, three; One, two, three. 
One j two, three, four; One, two, three, four; One, two, three, four. 
Strictly speaking, there should be a very slight secondary accent upon "three* 
in the last group, but this is not always observed. 

Sometimes, we may wish to give a very short sound, so that there are two notes 
to one count, or beat. To illustrate this divided beat, let us walk and count at the 
same time, giving two counts for each step. Use the word "and" to represent the 
second count of each ste^or the second half of one count. Walk slowly and count 
"One and, hvo^and; one and, two and;" giving two words to each step. 

Copyright MCMXII by Sieg-el -Myers Correspondence School of Music 



Sometimes we shall want the short notes in only one part of the measure, so 
we can march and count "one and, two; one and ; two;' or "one, two and;one,twoand',' 
according to the location of the short notes in the first or last part of the measure. 

If, in three-part meter, the notes are all short notes, we then count "ene and, 
twojmd, three and; one and, two and, three and? taking three steps. 

If the short notes come only in the last part of the measure, we then count 
"one, two, three andj one, two, three and," taking three steps. 

If the short notes come only in the first part of the measure, we shall then 
count "one and two, three; one and two, three," taking three steps. 

If the short notes come only in the middle part of the measure, we can show 
them by counting "one, two and, three; one, two and, three." 

These short notes are represented by eighth notes in the measure; since the 
eighth notes are just half as long as the quarter notes; therefore, two will be sung 
to one full beat. The form in which the eighth notes appear is shown in 111. N? 1. 

111. N9 1 



jrjrjrjrj 



When we read exercises containing these short eighth notes, two of them. are 
to be sung on one beat, count, or press, and so we must learn to sing them very 
quickly and smoothly, so that the steady flow of the melody is not interrupted. We 
shall press only once for the two notes together, because they have, combined, only 
as much value as one quarter note. 

In presenting Exercise N? 1, or similar material, to the class, look it through 
first very carefully. Mark the measure in which the eighth notes come, and then, 
pointing to each of the notes, go through the exercise, counting slowly and clearly, 
"one, twojmd; one, two and;" etc. In repeating the exercise, mark the rhythm with 
the syllable La, as "La, la-la," "La, la-la," etc. Then complete your study of the 
exercise by singing the notes with their syllable names in strict time. 



Ex. N? 1 



ff^a 



^# 



fc##a 



2 & 1 2 1 2 & 



¥=&. 



P. S.L. No. 51 



1 2 & 1 2 & i 2 & 12 1 2 & 1 2 & l 2 & 12 
La la-la La la-la La la-la La La la-la La la-la La la- la La 
Do do-do Re re-re Mi fa-fa Sol Sol fa-mi Fa mi- re Mi re- re Do 




In Exercise N9 2, read the words aloud, first, in perfect rhythm, scanning them 
as follows-. " John come and | play with our | nice new | sled." II Now,singthe notes 
with their syllable names in perfect rhythm, and then add the words to the melody. 



Ex. N? 2 



=2= 



J^^rW 



P 



zst. 



John, come and play with our nice new sled. 

In Exercise N9 3, read the words, as indicated for Exercise N9 2, in perfect 
rhythm, as follows: "Gent-ly now the I rain is fall-imr I 6-ver hill and | plain and town»|| 
Ex. N9 3 

Gent- ly now the rain is fall -ing, O-ver hill and plain and town. 

The following exercises are to be studied and presented in exactly the same 
manner. You may either use words of your own invention with them, or they may 
be sung simply with the syllable names, as in Exercise N? 1. 

Ex.N9 4 



&^m& m*n i ff it r 




j^Pp pp^p i \nr 



Ex.N? 5 



Ex.N? 6 



^6=^=^ 



p p" r e m r m 



a 



i 



^^ rrrrn^ ; ^ ' J - * 






The songs given below are also to be taught in this manner, the accent being prop- 
erly observed and emphasized, notice in the second one, "The Boy and the Bird," 
that we have eighth rests as well as eighth notes. 



THE SPARROW'S LOSS 



H. Von FALLEHSLEBEN 

Andantino 



An*, from L. Von BEETHOVEN 




2.1 tt 



spar - row, tell me why you flut - ter round and round your 

Dear child, in yon-der 

The boy had tak - en 

ly did not stop to think, dear spar - row, par - don 



emp 


- ty nest you 


see a 


moth - er's 


out 


the birds, and 


now his 


heart is 



I 



real 




nest? You nev - er cease your 

woe, For some - one stole my 

sore; So home -ward straight he 

me; J Twas wrong to take your 



plain - tive 

bird - lings 

quick - ly 

lit - tie 



chirp, What 



dear, 

runs, 
ones, 



A 

And 
And 




grief is in your breast?" 
(Omit ) 

soon is back once more; 
(Omit ) 



lit - tie while a 
here they are, all 

THE BOY AND THE BIRD 



J. W. Von GOETHE 



- go." 
three!" 



C. REINECKE 




1. A boy once caught a torn - tit gay, Hm, hm, so, so; And 

2. He laughed a - loud in sil - ly glee, Hm, hm, so, so,- Put 

3. The bird flew high and sang for joy, Hm, hm, so, soj And 



poco rit 




in a cage he put his prey, Hm, hm, so, so, Hm, hm, so, so. 

in his hand right clum- si - ly, Hm, hm, so, so, Hm, hm, so, so. 

laughed to scorn the stu-pid boy, Hm, hm, so, so, Hm hm so so. 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 51 



\ T ame . 



( CJass Letter and No. 
( Account No 



Town. 



.State Percentage. 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 



1. Discuss the value of accent in music and speech., 



2. Where does the strongest accent come in music?. 



3, Where does the strong accent frequently come in words?. 



4. Give original examples of words of two, three and four syllables, in which the accent 
comes on the first syllable .... 



Outline the exercises prescribed in the lesson, for developing the swing or rhythm of 
2-4 3-4, and 4-4 time 



I , Discuss fully the use of the word "and/' in counting, and describe the exercise which 
can be used to develop the divided beat 



7. What is the relation of the eighth note to the divided beat?. 



8. Explain how to count the measure given below 




9. Explain how to count the measure given below. 

Mbs — ^ 



$k r rrr i i 



10. Explain how to count the measures given below.. 





11. Give a model lesson on the exercise in the staff below, showing how the rhythm exer- 
cises and the divided beat should be presented 

at 





Pip 



12. Write two original exercises which use the divided beat ; write one in 2-4 time and 

one in 3-4 time 

13. Which of the two songs given in this lesson have you memorized ? 

If yon are teaching: at the present time, answer the question below which pertains 
to your Grade, in order to secure a percent a fie. If you are not teaching^ It Is not neeessary 
to answer either question. 

14. If yon are teaching in the Third Grade, and can put the lessons in this particular 

part of the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions 
given, as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular 
lesson, indicate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained. 



Intermediate and Crammer Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 

15. a. Explain, fully the manner in which you presented the subject of the divided beat 

to your class, after studying this lesson. 



b. Describe in detail the rhythm exercises you have used in connection with this study. 



c. Do you M that the class has any difficulty in learning to sing the divided beat? 



In the spaces below, marked "Q. 1," "Q. 2," etc., you may ask question* 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer." 

Q. 1 



Answer 



Q- 2.. 



Answer 



Q. 3. 



Answer 



Q. 4.. 



Answer 



Q. 5.. 



Answer 






THIRD GRADE SERIES 



SIEGEL- MYERS 

Correspondence School of Music 



Chicago, 111. 



A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 
PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 
BY FRANCES E. CLARK 



Lesson N9 52 



Song Material for Third Grade 

By the time the Third Grade is finished, the children should have studied thorou^i- 
. ly all of the songs and exercises in the Primer, or First Book of the music course pre- 
scribed by your School Board. The Primer of almost any of the courses, or sets of 
music books now in general use in the public schools, studied in connection with these 
lessons, will supply ample material to enable the children to read both quickly and 
accurately. 

The choice of songs should to some extent follow the seasonjthat is,the chil - 
dren will best enjoy singing flower songs in May and June; songs of Jack Frost and 
Santa Claus in the winter time; songs of autumn and the Thanksgiving season in the 
. fall; and songs of the budding plant life in the early spring. Of course, many songs 
of especial interest, such as flower songs, have such intrinsic value that the children 
will love to sing them the whole year through; but, in general, the taste and desire 
for these special songs will, naturally, not reach into other seasons of the year. Patriot- 
ic songs are, of course, to be sung at all times, but especially in connection with pub- 
lic days, memorial days, flag days, etc. The first stanza of "America" was memo- 
rized in the First Grade, the second stanza in the Second Grade, and now, in the 
Third Grade, the last two stanzas should be completed. 

At the close of theThird Grade, therefore, much time will be required in singing 
those songs which pertain to the season, and particularly in preparing songs for the 
closing exercises. There are many simple little cantatas of fairyland, in which the 
music is not beyond the abilities of Third Grade children. These may be costumed 
very simply in tissue, or crepe paper, and will lend variety to the school routine. 
When they are prepared, there may be a special afternoon entertainment to which 
the parents of the children are invited, and, if for no other reason, this fact alone 
will make the time well spent. 

/j^ere are many flower songs by Gaynor and Riley in the "Lilts and Lyrics," 
published by Clayton F. Summy & Co., and "Songs of the Child World" (Books 1 
and 2) published by John Church & Co. All these are excellent for such special en- 
tertainments. The bird songs from the same books are also splendid. Some of these 
have been given in former lessons of this course, and they may be used again and 
again with much benefit to the pupils. 

•Copyright MCMXII by Sieg-el-Myers Correspondence School of Music 



2 

There are many bright little action songs, cantatas and musical drills which 
may be used for embellishing- the music study. Some of the best of these are found 
in the catalogue of the Eldridge Music House, Franklin, Ohio. 

A beautiful arrangement of recitations and songs for the closing day is found 
in"Welcome,Spring"by Gaynor and Riley, published by Clayton F. Summy& Co., Chicago. 
"The Flower Queen," by Barri, edited by Walter Aiken and published by the Amer- 
ican Book Co., is also excellent material for the special afternoon entertainment. 

The following songs and song stories will give the children great delight. They 
can be accompanied by short explanatory remarks which will sketch the setting and 
make the story clear. 



SING, SING, LILY BELLS RING 

Allegretto - . 



F. J. St. JOHN 




1. Sing, sing, 

2. Sing, sing, 

3. Sing, sing, 



Lil - y bells ring! The blossoms are com-ing to town; 
Lil - y bells ring! The blossoms are com-ing to town: 
Lil - y bells ring! The blossoms are com-ing to town; 




Daisies and lil - ies and daf- fy-down-dil- ies, Each in a fresh, new gown. 
Lilacs andro-sesand other sweet posies, Each in a fresh, new gown. 
Pansy and mignonette, mar - i-gold, vio-let, Each in a fresh, new gown. 




From u Song- Stories for Children'.' Permission of American Book Co. 
V S. M. No. 52 



PUSSY WILLOWS 



F. J. St. JOHN 




1. See 

2. You 



the pret - iy puss - y wil - lows, From their hous-es brown; 
are wel-come, puss - y wil - lows. In your sil - v'ry gown. 




fj^^ ^EEJE i> J. J' | I- 1 | ,|J» J'' J- 1 



All 
For 



the win - ter they've been sleep - ing In their beds of down . 
yoursmil - in g, cheer - ful glan - ces Ban-ish win-ter's frown. 




Now 
Hark! 



f T 

the warm spring sun -shine bright- ens Earth and sea and skies, 
I hear a blue - bird sing - ing. In his joy- ous flight 




Soft - Iy call - ing-" Wake, dear puss - ies, It is time to rise!' 
And the cro - cus - es are spring- ing Up-ward to the light 




From "Song- Stories for Children" Permission of American Book Co. 



THE ROBINS AND PUSSY WILLOW 1 



Wm. HOWARD MONTGOMERY. 



jjiJ i i 



1. Two mer - ry lit - tie build - ers Were bus - y side by side. 



And 



i n i j- j j j i J uuj_l 



r 

Red -breast, The oth - er was his bride. 



one was Rob - in 



.2. But gentle Mistress Robin 

Was filled with sudden fear; 
She heard some children whisper. 
"Miss Puss is very near." 

3. She listened , faint and breathless, 
And wild her terror grew; 
So to the skyward branches 

With throbbing heart she flew. 



Her husband quickly followed. 

And laughed with all his might; 

He knew the funny blunder 

That caused her such a fright. 

Said he, "We're miles from Catville, 
And have no cause to fear,- 

The only pussy near us 
Is Pussy Willow, dear." 



The final work of the song study in the Third Grade, should be the thorough 
and accurate memorizing of the third and fourth stanzas of "America',' given below. 



AMERICA* 



S, F. SMITH 



J I I | J I g p 



HENRY CAREY (?) 



^m 



3. Let mu - sic swell the breeze, And ring from all the trees, 

4. Our fa - thers' God to Thee, Au - thor of lib - er - ty 




Sweet free-dom's song; Let mor - tal tongues a-wake ; Let all that 
To Thee we sing; Long may our land be bright, With free-dom's 



Jk 



M ' r 



^^ 



p 



T 

breathe par-take; Let rocks their si - lence break, The sound pro - long, 
ho - ly light; Pro - tect us by Thy might, Great God, our King. 



* From "Sonjr Stories for Children" . 
^ From "Harmonic Fourth Reader" 



Permission of American Book Co. 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 52 

t Class Letter and No r - 

Name J 

f Account No 



Town State Percentage. . . . 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 

1 _ Give an outline of the work which should be accomplished by the singing class, by 
end of the Third Grade 



2. What success in sight reading should the teacher reasonably expect at this time?. 



3, In choosing song material, what should be the general precaution observed?. 



4 Why is lX not advisable to use the songs of one season, at another season of the 



year? 



c Why 1S '* important to have the pupils' enthusiastic interest in the songs?. 



i" 



6. What in general will be the character of the songs at the end of the year in the 
Third Grade ? 



7. What is the benefit to be derived from the afternoon entertainment in the school 
room ? Discuss fully 



' 



8. Give a typical program for such an afternoon entertainment. 



9. Give a list of the song material available for Third Grade. 



10. a. How many stanzas of "America" should the children be able to sing at this 
time? 



2 



b. Discuss the importance of this". 






If you nre teaching at the present time, answer the questional below which pertain 
to your Grade, In order to secure a percentage. It you are not teaching. It Is not necessary 
to answer either question. 

11. H you are teaching in the Third Grade, and can put the lessons in this particular 
part if the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions 
given, as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular 
lesson, indicate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtaned. 

Intermediate and Grammer Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 

12. a. Give an outline of the song material which is used in your grade *. 

b. What Cantatas, or afternoon entertainments have you given f 

c. Have you found that the children respond more quickly to appropriate songs of 
the seasons, than to those which can be sung all through the year? 

d. Can your class sing the four stanzas of "America" from memory? 

3 



In the spaces below, marked "Q 1 " "Q 2," etc, you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer." 

Q. l 



Answer 



Q. 2. 



Answer 



Q. 3. 



Answer 



Q. 4. 



Answer 



Q. S. 



Answer 



FOURTH GRADE SERIES 



SIEGEL- MYERS 
Correspondence School of Music 

Chicago, m. 



A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 
PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 
BY FRANCES E. CLARK 






Lesson N<> 53 



Review Preliminary to 
Fourth Grade Work 

The situation which confronts the teacher of music in the Fourth Grade will 
vary considerably, the work to be done depending- entirely upon whether the children 
have had systematic work in the grades below. One condition which you should bear 
in mind, is that the fundamental principles must certainly be worked out if there 
has been no previous study, or only a small amount. If this condition confronts you 
it will be necessary to beg-in at the beginning* with the rote songs and ear training, 
following the course of study outlined in these lessons, from the First Grade to the 
present time. The material, of course, will be presented in a different way, suitable 
to the children of the advanced class, but the actual steps must be thoroughly estab- 
lished before the teacher can hope for satisfactory work in the advanced Grades. 

The first work will, of course, depend upon the condition of the voices in the 
class. If the voices are untrue, if there has been but little ear-training, and if the 
children have had no experience in singing songs, then we must, first of all, teach 
them by rote a half dozen little interesting songs. Follow the usual plan of teaching 
the rote song, as explained in earlier lessons of this Course; that is, tell the story 
of the song, and develop the thought contained therein. Then sing the entire song 
for the class once, and again a second time, with the children humming. Let 

the children hum two or three times while you sing the song, and then sing softly by 
themselves as many words as they can remember. Let them hum again, listening 
while you sing the words very distinctly. After this, let the class sing the words alone, 
while you assist only when they make a mistake. Finally, let them sing the song alone 
to the best of their ability. The material to be used in these early songs will be 
either some of the early familiar songs which have already been given in this course 
of lessons, or those which you consider to be particularly attractive in the course 
which is prescribed by your school board. They must always be tuneful and bright, 
with a decided rhythm and interesting words. 

If there has not been previous work in tone-placing, begin with the shaping 
f the mouth for the different vowel sounds, as explained in the First Grade lessons 

Copyrig-ht MCMXI1 by Sieg-el - Myers Correspondence School of Music 



2 

of this Course. Put much emphasis on the pure enunciation of the vowel sound itself, 
and have the children imitate very closely your position of the lips. The tone must 
be placed well in the front of the mouth, and be light, soft and smooth. You will 
find conditions a little different from those in the previous grades, as there will be 
some of the larger boys whose voices are beginning to grow hoarse. Insist that they 
always sing softly. This point cannot be emphasized too strongly in the general 
class work,butitis particularly necessary for these children. 

The next step is the presentation of the scale syllables. If you find that the class 
is not familiar with the syllable names, you must teach them to use the scale ladder and 
open note-head drill (see Lessons Nos. 31 and 32.). Teach the intervals from the 
scale ladder, and give plenty of practice in singing all the easy interval skips. 

The staff should be presented in the simple fashion indicated in the Second 
Grade Lessons of this Course. There should be plenty of written and oral dicta- 
tion, beginning with the simple diatonic progressions, using later the interval skips, 
as outlined in Lessons Nos. 37-40 on these subjects. Permit the children to go to 
the board, and, with their own fingers, write out the scale in various positions on the 
staff, and, later, write groups of notes and little melodies, as you direct. 

The next step will be the reading of notes from the printed page. It will be 
necessary to begin with simple exercises like those assigned in the Second and Third 
Grades (see Lessons Nos. 44- 46), and gradually develop the children's skill in sight 
reading from this foundation. Allow them to point to the printed notes on the page 
and "press" the counts with the finger. This is an aid in concentration, as well as 
an assistance in developing the rhythmical sense. 

In presenting the meter signatures follow the method given in Lessons Nos. 46- 
48, and make the subject simple and interesting. 

This suggestion of simplicity must be fundamental with all of the review work. 
While there may be a good deal to do, the children will grasp the new ideas much 
more readily than the children in the lower grades; you will soon find that the music 
lesson can be made an attractive part of the day's program. However simple the re- 
view may be, it must, at the same time, be very thorough. 

In meeting the conditions in the class, give considerable attention to the new 
children who may have joined the grade from other cities or other schools, or from 
the country or parochial schools where music has not been taught, or if taught, has 
not been presented properly and thoroughly. These new comers may have been well 
grounded in other things, but in music they will feel very timid, and may, indeed, be 
at a loss to know just what to do. For a few days, allow them simply to grow ac- 
customed to their new surroundings, not requiring them particularly to join in the 
class work. Then, by inquiry and test, try to find out just how far along they are. 
If they have not had any instruction at all, it will be well to give them special help 
after school hours. You will find that they can progress more rapidly with individ- 
ual instruction, and soon you will be able to teach them the scale, and present the 

p. S. L. No. 53. 



staff in the manner which we have indicated. When this foundation is Iaid ; you may 
call in from the class some of the children who are the brightest and quickest music- 
ally, and make them little helper teachers. Let half a dozen stay after school once 
or twice a week to teach the new children their songs. This will be a great compli- 
ment to the little helpers, and you will find the strangers respond very readily to 
this additional work. In the little rote songs and reading exercises, let each little 
assistant drill his own pupil. 

The ear training may be helped along by tone maching exercises, like those 
given in the Kindergarten and First GradeLessons of this Course. You can suggest 
these to your little assistants. Let them also use scale syllables, intervals and scale 
drill. All of this new work for the recuits in the class may be done outside of school 
time, or perhaps at some special hour when these children may be spared from a reci- 
tation. Each teacher will find it possible to fit in these suggestions to her own program. 

In the early part of the year all exercises and songs must be simple until the 
class is well organized, and the music study is again under way. 

Such exercises as the following will indicate to you the kind of material which 
should be used for the first two months. 




i H J ^ if p ip mp r^Tr ^ 




^ 



tTJ~hj~T I ff Iff i 1 11 



32 




mmM 



$m 



mm 



a m 



±=z=c 




I JJJ l JJJ 



rrr ' r n| rrr 



£ 



I 



SF=F 



w 



1 



nJrf i ff fifr ^^ 




^^rH i rrr ' r' i rrnrrr i fH 1 ^ 1 



The song "Summer's Over" is very good for the first days of the school year. 



summer's over 



TENNYSON 



M. M. 120 ; jl 

Semplice 



FREDERIC A. LYMAN 



1. O - ver the sweet sum- mer clos 

2. - ver the sweet sum -mer clos 



es, The reign of 
es, And nev- er 



the 





ro - ses is 
flowV at the 



done,- 

close; 



- ver and gone with the 
- ver and* gone with the 




4^ Ji i j i i i j> - h i ^.jluui^ 



ros - es, And o - ver and gone with the sun. 

ros - es, And win-ter a - gain and the snows. 




From "Silver Song 1 Series" Permission of Silver Burdette & Co. 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 53 

t Class Letter and No r 

Name J 

( Account No 




Town State Percentage. . * 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in tlie grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 

1. What conditions will the Fourth Grade teacher probably find in her class in the first 
of the year? 






2. Make a careful outline of the subjects which must be presented, if the training in 
nuisic has been deficient, in order to get a thorough foundation for the rest of the 
year's work 



3. Explain what is the value of rote songs in this review work. 



4. Explain how the scale and staff should be presented ' 

* • •- • A 

; 

p ; ••;* \ 

5. Give several exercises, jon the staves below, which are typical of those' to be used in 

the early presentation of sight reading. 



6. Give a brief model lesson as for this review work, presenting 2/4 meter. 



7. Why must the review be made as simple as possible?. 



S. What provision should be made by trie Fourth Grade teacher for those pupils who are 
deficient in previous music study ? 



9. Explain how their progress may be helped by pupil teachers from the class. Discuss 
fully 



2 



10. Why must all the songs and exercises, in the early part of the year, be very simple? 

; 






11. Write one original exercise which may be used in the review study of the use of 
rests . - 



12. Have you memorized the song, "The Boy and the Moon?' 5 



If you are teaching at the present time, answer the question below which pertains 
to your Grade, lu order to secure a percentage. If you are not teaching, it is not necessary 
to answer either question. 

13. If you are teaching in the Fourth Grade, and can put the lessons in this particular 
part of the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions 
given, as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular 
lesson, indicate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained. 






Intermediate and Grammar Grade teachers only , should answer the following questions: 
14. a. Do you have any particular difficulty in adjusting the various degrees of advance- 
ment of your pupils ? . 



b. How long does it usually take at the beginning of the school year before you an 
able to get good class singing f , 



c. How much time do you allow for review zvork in the class, and what does this 
revieiv work cover? , 



d. Do you use rote songs as the first song work of the year? , 






In the spaces below, marked "Q 1 " "Q 2" etc., you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer." 

Q. 1 



Answer 



Q. 2. 



Answer 



Q. 3. 



Answer 



Q. 4. 



Answer 



Q. S. 



Answer 



FOURTH GRADE SERIES 

SIEGEL- MYERS 

Correspondence School of Music 

Chicago, Dl. 

A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 

public school music Lesson N9 54 

BY FRANCES E. CLARK 

Marking the Rhythm 

The review suggested in Lesson N9 53 should not be permitted, even in cases 
where it is most necessary, to continue for more than two or three months. 
The children are older and will grasp the facts presented very readily. It may be 
.necessary, for a time, to read from the primer assigned to the Third Grade, but 
this ground should be covered as quickly as possible,and you should press forward to 
the regular work of the Fourth Grade, in order to bring your class, and the school, 
up to the required standard as soon as possible. 

Go through the same course in individual work as outlined in Lesson N9 47, 
and be very sure that no child slips through without understanding thoroughly, both 
:what you are doing, and what he is doing. The teacher should spare no effort to 
make sure that the topics studied by her pupils are thoroughly understood at every step. 

In the Fourth Grade, it becomes necessary for the child to /think and feel 
the rhythm a little more definitely than heretofore. We have studied the subject 
from the very first in the rote songs, and by pointing to the notes and pressing 
the finger on the page. This was carried through the Second and Third Grades, 
and as care has always been taken to sing the songs and exercises in the proper 
rhythm, a good general foundation has been laid. It now becomes desirable, how 
ever, to indicate more definitely the time, or rhythm, of a song. 

Copyrig-ht MCMXII by Sieg*el- Myers Correspondence School of Music 



2 

Many devices have been tried by Music Supervisors to indicate the rhythm of 

songs, and to develop the rhythmic sense in the pupils. The object of these systems 
is generally to avoid the conventional method of beating time with the hand. While 
some of the ideas advanced have been unique, they have, in the opinion of the author 
of this Course of Lessons, all failed to bring the desired result. This result must be 
to differentiate sharply between the accented and unaccented beats of the measure, 
and any method which does not accomplish this, fails in its purpose. 

Of the many methods of beating time, the one described herein has been found 
by the writer to be the best, because the most effective. The right arm and wrist of the 
pupil is placed at rest on the desk, with the fingers slightly curved. The second 
finger is used to mark the time, and a slight pressure is made with the finger-tip 
to indicate the beatsof the measure. The first finger is the pointing, or working 
finger of the hand, and is slightly calloused at the tip. The second finger has a 
soft and sensitive cushion, and a slight pressure with that finger-tip instantly indi- 
cates to the mind a slight accent in the voice. The motion required is made from 
the wrist only. The relation between the finger pressure and the voice accent is 
exact, and this simple device brings about the desired result of the proper accent 
on the proper notes. 

Chief among other methods which have been used is that of tapping the rhythm 
on the back of the book with the first finger. This is imperfect, since there is no 
distinction between the accented and the unaccented beat. The slight pressure with 
the second finger brings a much better response. In using this method of counting 
time, no sound should be heard. If there is a slight noise, you will know that some 
child has made a stroke with the finger nail. This conveys no meaning of accent 
to the mind, and is therefore worse than no motion at all. The movement of the 
hand and arm required by the finger pressure, is so slight that it does not distract 
the child's interest from the reading, but rather aids him in keeping up the proper 
tempo and rhythm. The writer of this Course of Lessons has f ound^in her own prac- 

P. S. M. N° 54. 



tice, that beating* of time with the hand should be begun in the latter part of the 
Third Grade, by means of note-pointing* and finger pressure, carried through to the 
Fourth and Fifth Grades, and dropped, as completed, in the Sixth Grade. 

The following* exercises indicate the kind of work which should be given at 
this point. They may be used as reading* exercises, and at the same time as materi- 
al for practice in marking* the rhythm. 




J J j j i j j 



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3 Bh JjJ i JJJi rrr if'Hr r Ji r r r iJJ^ 



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p rr i JJ u J i rr i rr 



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JtflU F F=0=m- 



j rrr l r -l r -|jjj^ 



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1 



THE BIRDS 



ALFRED SCOTT GATTY 



^ 



mm 



ppp 



?SE 



1. "O lit - tie bird up - on the tree,What will you sing* to - day? Now 

2. That lit - tie bird up- on the tree, Then sang both loud and clear, "Tho ? 

3. "Tho' win-ter is a drear - y time, And cold and frost I dread, And 



m 



i=i 



^ 



r r r 



» F 

spring has 

spring 1 has 

hard it 

ft: 



gone, and sum-mer gone, And swallows flown a - way, Full 
gone, and sum-mer gone, And win-ter draw-eth near, I 

is when snows lie deep, For bird - ies to be fed, I 



i 



i 



p^pp 



p 



of re-gretsyour song will be, A sad and mourn -ful lay," 

sing* of hope, for well I know; They'll all come back next year, 

cheer my - self with this glad thought, There's springtime on a - head? 

"Rote Song- Book" Permission of American Book Co. 



The song* "The Boy and the Moon" is particularly attractive, and one in which 
there is more than the usual interest. It is written in the old Gaelic mode, begin- 
ning on Re, or the second note of the scale. It will be interesting to review Les- 
son N? 26 in this connection. 



THE BOY AND THE MOON 



Trans, from FROEBEL by 
EMILY HUNTINGTON MILLER 
M. M. J = 80 

Tenderly 



OLD GAELIC SONG 
Arr. by F. A. LYMAN 



i 



■*-. — 

1. Pret 

2. Yel 

3. Bring 



m 



m 



ty moon, your face I see 

low moon, so bright, so near, 

the lad - der strong and new, 



ISE 



m 



i==* 



i 



r\ 



^5 



P i P ' } P 



£ 



a -bove the gar - den treej Are you smil - ing 



Just 

In the sky so 

Now I know what 



soft and clear. 



I 



I 



will do; 

£\ 



I 
I 



can al - most 
will climb and 



n\ 



§ 



m^m 




now for me?- Moon, so bright 
reach you here— Moon, so soft 
sail with you_ Moon, so slow 



ly smil - ing I 
ly shin - ingl 
ly sail - ingl 




Permission of Silver Burdette & Co. 



FOURTH GRADE SERIES 



SIEGEL- MYERS 

Correspondence School of Music 



Chicago, HI. 



A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 
PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 
BY FRANCES E. CLARK 



Lesson N? 55 



Marking the Rhythm (Continued) 

One of the difficult problems which confronts the teacher of music in the grades 
is training the class to beat the time with the hand. This involves the same principles 
as marking- the rhythm, but, whereas we use the method described in Lesson N9 54 
primarily to mark the accent, we are now met with the necessity for establishing* a 
clear and definite system of mar king time ? in every possible division of the beat. 

In teaching the beating of time with the hand, it will economize effort if you 
"take the bull by the horns," as it were, presenting the subject as if it contained no dif- 
ficulties whatever. If you explain it clearly at the very first, and show the children 
with your own hand exactly how it should be done, a large percentage of them will 
beat time correctly from the very start. However, you will find that there are al- 
ways a few awkward ones who cannot control the motions of their hands with exact- 
ness, a few laggards whose reactions are slow, or even some who are not attentive, 
and who insist on looking at you, instead of watching your hand and following the 
the motions you make. If the children are permitted to do it incorrectly even for a 
day, you will find it extremely difficult to overcome their mistakes. It is better to 
work slowly, than to take time later to correct errors which are very difficult U: 
eradicate, when once made. ■ 

You should learn to beat time with the left hand, so that, as you stand in front 
of the children, it will look correct to them, and they can follow your motions ex- 
actly. Whether you use the right hand or the left, you must reverse the motions 
made by the class; thus, when you say "left," you, yourself, must move your hand to 
the right; when you say "right;' you must move your hand to the left. This may be 
a little confusing at first, but by practicing persistently, and before a mirror you 
can soon accustom yourself to these motions. 

In four part f 4 J rhythm the motions are down, left, right, up, for the counts 1, 
2, 3, 4. They are shown in Illustration No.l, where the arrows indicate the direction 
in which the hand moves. 



111. No. t 



4 



Left 2 



X 



3 Ri ff ht r 

Copyright MCMX1I by Sieg«l~ Myers Correspondence School of Music 



See that the children take the position described in Lesson N? 54,with the fore- 
arm and wrist resting lightly on the desk. The hand is raised from the wrist three 
or four inches, waiting to begin. At the command, the hand descends, and the sec- 
ond finger should press firmly on the desk for "down? skin lightly over the desk for 
"left" and "right? and lift sharply upward on the word "up? 

After you have satisfied yourself that the children understand the motions 
thoroughly, and are not apt to become confused, you may begin the exerciseby count- 
ing slowly, as follows:- "Down" and see that the finger of every child is down on 
the desk; "left," see that every finger moves to the left and stays there, without 
lifting,- "right" see that every hand moves to the right and remain quiet, without 
wavering; at the word "up" see that the hand rises sharply upward as far as pos- 
sible, without moving the forearm. Now count again slowly, and watch carefully 
to see that every child responds instantly to each command: "Down, left, right, up, 

1 Down, left, right, up." With sufficient practice, it soon becomes a jolly game to 

make the motions entirely in unison. Count slowly, and emphasize the counts with 
sufficient distinctness so that all the children feel the rhythm at the same moment. 

In two part [4 J time, the rhythm is more simple, and the motions are merely 
"down" and "up." The movement of the hand is shown clearly in Illustration N? 2. 
The rhythm should be clearly marked by making all movements sharp and definite. 

1 A 



III. No. 2 



Y 

Three-part (^) rhythm is indicated by the motions "down," "left" and "up." 

On the latter count, we simply make a diagonal movement toward the point at 
which the hand begins to beat time. This is shown in Illustration N? 3. After 
practice with four-part rhythm, the motions for two-part and three-part will be 
found comparatively simple. y( 




When this preliminary practice is completed, it is well to sing a familiar song, 
in \ time, and permit the children to beat the time. Since they know the song, full 

P. S ; L. No. 55, 



attention may be given to the motions of the hand. While they are singing, you 
should go to the side of the room and look across the rows. In this way you can 
find out who are making mistakes. Search also for those who are doing it well, and 
when you find a group of eight or ten who can mark the time successfully, ask 
them to stand and show the class how nicely they can do it. Now, try to find an- 
other group who can do it as well, and, finally, give individual help to the few who 
seem to have no sense of rhythm whatever. You will soon find that the class is 
making rapid strides in this quite difficult subject. A little time spent at the be- 
ginning will save a great deal of work later on. 

o 
Review some easy exercises and sing a familiar song in 4 rhythm and let 

the children beat the time. Review a simple exercise in 4 time, allowing the chil- 

dren again to indicate the beats. Sing a new exercise in 4 rhythm, beating the 

time. Sing a familiar song in 4 rhythm; review a simple exercise of the same kind, 

and read some new exercises in T time. In all of this work, the children will, of 

course, sing and mark the rhythm at the same time. 

Now take up those exercises which formerly seemed difficult. Let the children 
beat the time while you sing, then let them both count and sing. Follow this by sim- 
ple exercises in all three kinds of time. There is no necessity for dwelling long upon 
the two part rhythm, before beginning the three part, or the four part. The last two 
may follow the first very closely. 

This method, if properly and thoroughly taught, will bring to the class an ab- 
solutely perfect sense of rhythm. There will be no dragging or lagging in the class 
work, and no haphazard singing, but all will sing together with remarkable precision. 

Such exercises as the following may be taken as a type of the material to be 
used in teaching the class to beat time, as outlined in this lesson. 



1 i hh J r l J ^Ja ^ 




P^P 



Mrr i ff if 



\ F 1 F 



m 



1 



m 



1 rrr'r» ' Tr | r** l r l ' r| r > * | r^^ 



H i -!JJ» i.JJ i pff^irrff ippJJ i J J i"i 



The songs "October" and ' The Squirrel" can be used at the appropriate time 
in the school year. 

OCTOBER 



Author and composer unknown 



4 



h 



£ 



S=5 



m 



£ 



1. Oc to - ber's woods 

2. They're bring - ing in 

3. Come let us to 



are bare and brown, Oc - 

their win - ter's store, For 

the woods a - way, And 



Wmm 



m ji J 



ik 



33 



to - ber's leaves are fall - ing down, And brown nuts cov - er 

when the wild winds rave and roar, With - in each safe and 

sly - ly watch them at their play; Then 'neath the sha - dy 




all the ground,While mer - ry squir - rels scam - per 'round, 
co - zy nest, They'll set tie down for win - ter's rest, 
trees we'll rest, In all their au - tumn splen - dor dressed. 



THE SQUIRREL 



From "WELL PRING" 

Allegretto 




¥ 



1. The squir- rel has- tens to and fro, With wal- nuts and with corn, His 

2. The hap-py har-vest time,heknows,Will ver - y soon be past; So 




store to 



ere comes the snow, And au - tumn fields are shorn. 



gai - ly at his work he goes; Cold win -ter's com - ing fast. 



w New Educational Music Course." First Reader. 
Permission of Ginn & Co. 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 54 

. , l Class Letter and No 

Name J 

( Account No 



Town State Percentage. 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 



1. How long should the review described in Lesson No, 53 continue?. 

2. What is the new topic which is taken up in Lesson No, 54?.. 



3. What general foundation has been laid for the study of rhythm?. 



4. Why is it necessary to indicate, in some visible way, the rhythm of songs and 
exercises ? 



5. What is the characteristic of the methods of beating time in general use?. 



6. Wherein do they fail to secure the desired results?. 



7. Describe fully the method of beating time given in this lesson 

. f 

i 

8. Wherein is the advantage of this method over others? Discuss fully 

9. Why is the method of tapping the first finger on the back of the book an imperfect 

way of beating time ?..... 

10. What grades should use the beating of time with the hand ? 

11. Describe the musical effect, or quality, of the Gaelic mode in which the song, "The 

Boy and the Moon," is written. Compare with our minor mode 

■ zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz 


2 



If you are teaching at the present time, answer the question below which pertain* 
to your Grade, in order to secure a percentage. If you are not teaching, it is not neeessary 
lo answer either question. 

12. If you are teaching in the Fourth Grade, and can put the lessons in this particular 
part of the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions 
given, as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular 
lesson, indicate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained. 



Intermediate and Grammar Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 
13. a. Describe the method you have used in your class work for marking rhythm 



b. Give a report of the success you have had with your method. 



c. Compare with this the results obtained after using the methods described in this 
lesson • 



In the spaces below, marked "Q. I," "Q. 2" etc., you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer." 

Q. 1 



Answer 



Q- 2.. 



Answer 



Q. 3.. 



Answer 



Q. 4., 



Answer 



Q. 5.. 



Answer 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 55 

( Class Letter and No 

Name J 

( Account No 



Town State Percentage. 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 

1 Explain the difference between the principle described in Lesson No. 54 and that treated 

in this lesson, with regard to marking the time with the hand 



I 



2 Why is it necessary to have a system which can be used in every possible division of 
the beat? 



3 How can the teacher make this subject simple and easy for the class?. 



4 Why is it difficult to overcome errors in this system of beating time, after an incorrect 
beginning? 



5 (a) Why is it important that the pupils should have a model for their work, in the 
motions of the teacher ? 



(b) In what way should the teachers motions be altered, when presenting the subject 
to the class? 



6 What are the four motions made for counting 4/4 time?. 



7 Describe carefully the way in which the pupils are to mark this rhythm on their desks. 



8 What motions are used for 2/4 time?. 



9 What motions are employed for three part rhythm?. 



10 How can the teacher detect the pupils' mistakes, while they are learning to count time? 



11 Outline the course of instruction (exercises, songs, etc.), which should be used by the 
teacher, in teaching rhythm 



2 



12 What should be the result of careful work in teaching this system of marking time? 






If you are teaching; at the present time, answer the question helow which pertains 
to your Grade, In order to secure a percent age. If you are not teaching;, It Is not neces- 
sary to answer either Question. 

13 If you are teaching in the Fourth Grade, and can put the lessons in this particular 
part of the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions 
given, as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular lesson, 
indicate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained. 



Intermediate and Grammar Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 
14 (a) Describe fully the method which you would use with your class, in case they have 
been taught to beat time incorrectly 



(b) Give an account of the system previously used in your grade, and the methods which 
you would employ in establishing the system outlined in Lesson No. S5 



: 



" 



In the spaces below, marked "Q 1 " "Q 2," etc., you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer." 

Q. l 



Answer 



Q. 2. 



Answer 



Q. 3. 



Answer 



Q. 4. 



Answer 



Q. S. 



Answer 



FOURTH GRADE SERIES 



SIEGEL- MYERS 

Correspondence School of Music 



Chicago, 111. 



A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 
PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 
BY FRANCES E. CLARK 



Lesson N9 56 



Counting the Divided Beat 

We have studied the divided beat in songs and sight reading exercises, and have 
indicated the rhythm by marching and counting the time. We come now to the more 
difficult work of singing the divided beat, and, at the same time, marking the rhythm 
with the hand. If the lesson is presented in the following manner, the teacher should 
get good results. 

Now, children, let us sing the scale downward, from the Do on 
the fourth line of the staff. Instead of singing one note to each step 
of the scale ladder, we are going to sing two Do's, two Ti's, two La's, etc.. 
We will sing each of these two notes on one beat; that is, there will 
be two notes on the down beat, and two on the up beat. It will sound 
like this. {Teacher dhd then the class sings as in III, N9 1.) 



IILNOI 




Do -do 



la sol - sol fa - fa mi - mi re - re do - do 



Now, this time let us sing every other beat with one note, and the 
alternate beat with two short notes. Thus, we will sing it. Do Ti-Ti, 
La Sol -Sol, etc.. (Teacher and then the class sings as in III. N9 2 t ) 



I11.N9*2 




do - do. 



Do ti - ti, La sol -sol, Fa mi -mi, Re 

Now, let us turn it around the other way, and sing two short 
notes and along one, like this: Do-Do Ti, La-La Sol, etc.. {Children 
sing as in Ml. N9 &.) 



iii.No 3 ^yfc 



mm 



1 



1 



Do- do ti, 



La - la sol, Fa - fa mi, Re - re do. 



Copyrig-ht MCMXH by Sieg-el- Myers Corre&jwndence School of Music 



This time we are going to vary it even jnore, and we will sing 
four short notes on two beats, and one very long note on two beats 
also- this way: Do-Do-Do-Do Te-e, La-La-La-La So-1, etc.. {Children 

si?ig as in IU.N9 4) 




111. N? 4 ^ 

Dodo-do-do te-e, La-la- la- la sol, Fa-fa-fa-fa mi-i, Re-re- re-re do-o. 

Now, let us try to imitate the clock, and see if we can find out 
in what rhythm it ticks. We know the clock says "tick-tock" "tick-tock" 

and we find that we Can beat time with it. {Teacher counts eight measures^ 
saying a tick-tock" on the down beat and "tick-tack" on the up beat) Now, let US 

all try to imitate the clock in this way. We will say "tick-tock" when 
the hand goes down, and "tick-tock" when the hand goes up, for 
eight measures. (Children beat time with the hand } saying "tick-tock" u tick- 
tock" as indicated } continuing for eight measures) 

Next, let us try to learn what the little rain drops on the window 
say. If we listen, we shall hear them say "pit-patter," "pit-patter." 
Let us count time while they say it, thus: (Teacher beats "down/ 1 "up? 



.down up 
" pit pat-ter, 



down up 
"pit pat-ter." 



and says) 

~Now the rain changes to "drip-drip drop" and this is the way 

u down up down up 

we count it. (Teacher beats"down" "up" a?id says) Drip-drip drop" "drip-drip drop? 

Now let us listen to the old rooster, and count while he says his 

"Cock-ar-doo-dle-doo." We count it this way: (Teacher beats "down" "up" 

down up down up down up down up 

u down" "up" and says,) "Cock-a-doo-dle - doo" Cock-anloo-dle -door 

I wonder if we can find out what kind of notes we must use to 
write out this new kind of rhythm. Let us draw the staff and put in 
the clef, and write \ for our meter signature;* this is in preparation 
for writing out the notes. Now, if we want to write notes to 

represent the "Tick-tock" of the clock, how would we write them to 
sound like "tick-tock" on the down beat, and "tick-tock" on the up 
beat? Notice that there are two words for each beat. What kind of 
notes would we use? (Child answers } "eighth notesv) Why, eighth notes, of 

course, and they look like this. (Teacher writes as in IILN9 5.) 



111. N? 5 



P. S. M. No. 56. 




Tick- tockjfcck- took. 



And now for the "pit-patter" of the rain. How shall we do this? 
(Teacher counts the phrase and shows that there is one long" note and two short ones to 
each beat. A child answers," one quarter and two eighth notes .") Tes; that is 
right. We will write one quarter and two eighth notes, like this. 

(Teacher writes as in III. N9 6.) 

3sk 



111. N? 6 



pm 



Pit - pat -ten 



How do we Count the "drip-drip drop?"('V^iY^ answers a two ai^hthnotes 

and one quarter note.")Yes } there are two eighth notes and one quarter note. 

(Teacher writes a:; in III. N9 7.) 



111. N? 7; 



fe^^ 



Drip-drip drop. 
And how many notes for "cock-a-doodle-doo?" (Child answers "four 
eighth notes and a half note") Yes; that is right, there will he four eighth 
notes and a half note. (Teacher writes as in JIL N9 8.) 



111. N9 8 



~f'i J» J> J> J> 



Cock- a - doo-dle doo. 

Now, let us try to make up some little tunes and write them out 

in this new way. I will write on the board a rhyme you all know. 

"Jack and Jill went up the hill, 
To fetch a pail of water," 

Class, you may read the words aloud, and now, once again. (Children 
respond.) Where are the accented words? (Class reads again with stronger ac- 
cent.) Now, make a motion with the hand when the loud words come,or 
rather, do it just before we say them. Johr^you may come and mark 
these bars in the verse on the board. (John does as directed and finds there 
are four measures in the rhyme. The teacher then asksi) How many measures 
are there? How many syllables in the first measure? How many notes 
must we have, then? How many syllables in the last measure and how 
many notes in it? (The children answer each question accurately } and the teacher 
writes notes as in Rl.NQ 9 } to represent their answers) 



111. N9 9; 



h h h a I h a h h i h h m 



Jack and Jill went up the hill, To fetch a pail of wa - ten 
Now, who can sing a tune for these familiar words? Mary, you 

Jliay try, (Mary sings her own tnelody) 



That is very good. Now all may sing Mary's tune just the way 

she sings it. {Children sing as Mary writes as in HI. NQ 10) What are 

the notes? Give the syllable names of the notes which Mary has just 
sung. {Children respond) Let us now put the bars where the words make 
them come 5 and then we will sing it again, beating time. {Children 
write and sing as in III. N° 10) 



in.N? ia 



m 



^ 



=& 



^^ 



HM-4-LfLg 

up the hill. To fetch a 



Jack and Jill went up the hill, To fetch a pail of wa - ter. 

After such a drill as this, you should turn to some easy exercises containing 1 the 
divided beat in 4 meter, and have the class sing" them at sight. Develop the divided 
beat in three part and four part time, in the same way that you did the two-part 
meter. Use the scale as a melody and sing it in the different rhythms , putting the 
shorter notes on various counts of the measures. A little experimenting on your part 
will show you a great many ways in which this can be accomplished. With thorough 
drill of this kind, it will be easy to develop skill in reading and counting the divided 
beat. Study many exercises and songs which involve this rhythm, and you will find, if 
the subject is presented in the proper way, that you will have very successful results. 

We thus find that we have followed the perfectly natural method of developing 
the divided beat. We first learn to beat the time with words which require a given 
rhythm. We follow this by writing- a measure on the blackboard which will repre- 
sent the same swing or rhythm, containing* notes of various time values. This prep- 
aration is followed by reading at sight those songs and exercises which contain the 
divided beat. If this method is thoroughly carried out, you will find that the class 
has no difficulty in singing and counting correctly in perfect time and rhythm, exer- 
cises which contain the divided beat, in two-part, three -part or four part -meter. 

The song "The Snow Bird" will bring great delight to the children in the 
winter time. 

THE SNOW BIRD 



HEZEKIAH BtTTTERWORTH 

Allegro 



M. B. WILLIS 



£ 



£ lil J) JH-frJ* 



KJH }> b J>i« M^ 



3= 



p§ 



ita 



1. In ro - sy light,trills the gay swal-low,The thrush in the ros-es be 

2. The blue mar -tin trills on the ga-ble,The wren in the bird house be 



i j oi J) luhtjwbhjj pup s 

ad-ow-lark sing's in the mead- ow.But the snow-bird sings in tin 



BE 



low, The mead-ow-lark sings in the mead- ow,But the snow-bird sings in the 
low, On high in the elm flutes the rob - in, But the snow-bird sings in the 




snow, Ah me! Chick-a-dee! Chick-a-dee! The snow bird sings in the snow, Ah, 




me! Chick-a-dee! Chick-a-dee! The snow bird sings in the snow. 

From "New Educational Music Course ? Second Reader. Permission of Ginn & Co. 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 



Name. 



Examination Paper for Lesson No. 56 

( Class Letter and No 

( Account No 

Percentage. 



Town State 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 



1 What is the divided beat?. 



2 Why is this subject generally regarded as difficult to teach?. 



3 Describe fully the first step used in teaching the divided beat?. 



4 Give a short model lesson incorporating* this point. 



5 Give a short model lesson on the second step in the process, including the original 
words to be used to illustrate the rhythm 



6 How is it possible to teach the children to beat time with these phrases?. 



7 What is the third step in this same process?. 



8 What success should the teacher have, after giving the work outlined in the previous 

questions, in requiring sight reading of songs and exercises containing the divided 

beat? 



9 Give an original couplet, which can be set to a group of notes containing the divided 
beat - 



10 On the staff below, write these same words, and the music indicated in Question No. 9. 



If you are teaching at the present time, answer the question below which pertatnsl 
to your Grade, in order to secure a percentage. If you are not teaching, it Is not neces- 
sary to answer either question. 

11 if you are teaching in the Fourth Grade, and can put the lesson in this particular 
part of the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions 
given, as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular lesson, 
indicate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained. 






Intermediate and Grammar Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 

12 (a) In what way can you use in your class tvork the ideas incorporated in this lesson? 



(b) Give an outline of the exact steps to be followed, in teaching the divided bea 
to your class 



In the spaces below, marked "Q. 1/' "Q. 2" etc., you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer." 

Q. 1 



Answer 



Q. 2.. 



Answer 



Q. 3. 



Answer 



Q. 4. 



Answer 



Q. 5. 



Answer 



FOURTH GRADE SERIES 



University Extension Conservatory 



Chicago, I1L 



A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 
PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 



Lesson N9 57 



Six- Eight Rhythm 
The Dotted Quarter 

The long, swinging measure which is characteristic of ^ time, is the most beauti- 
ful of all rhythms. Our lullabys and boat-songs, or barcarolles are almost all written 
in this rhythm. Many teachers have found difficulty in presenting | time to their 
classes. If treated in the proper manner, the subject is not only easy, but extremely 
interesting to the children. Analyzing the meter signature, as suggested in Lesson 
N? 51, we find that the figure "8" indicates that the eighth note is the unit of the 
count, and the figure "6" tells us that there are six of these eighth notes, or their 
equivalent, in every measure. We mark the rhythm as though it were a double 
measure of ^ time (review Lesson N? 5S\ and after analyzing the six beats care- 
fully, count two beats to the measure, marking 1,2,3 on"down"and 4,5, 6, on "up." 

In Lesson N9 56, on the divided beat, we learned that it is just as easy to 
sing two notes to one beat, as to sing one note to a beat. We have learned to sing 
the scale with two "Do's," two "TVs" two "La's" etc., with perfect ease, and we 
found many exercises and songs containing two notes to the beat in which it was 
easy, both to sing and to beat time. We found that we could do this in either, two 
part, three part or four part rhythm. These steps being accomplished, it is simple 
enough to follow exactly the same process of development, with three notes to one 
beat. Follow closely the suggestions contained in Lesson N9 56, and sing the scale 
downward as before, using three Do's, three Ti's, three La's etc., instead of two. 
The effect would be like that shown in Illustration N9 1. 

III. N? 1 

Do-do-do, ti - ti - ti , la-la-lajSol-sol-sol ,fa- fa- fa T mi-mi-mi , re -re-re,do-do-do . 
After this exercise, change the arrangement of the notes somewhat, and tie 
two of the eighths together, leaving one shorter note by itself. Mark the rhythm in 
the air, and show the pulse clearly, as indicated in Illustration N9 2. 



111. N9 





Sing the descending scale in this way, giving the group of one long note and 
a short one, to each beat. Sing such exercises many times, in order to establish thor- 
oughly the swing of this rhythm. After this becomes perfectly simple, youcan vary 
the exercises by tying the three notes together, making the tone three beats long, 
as shown in Illustration N? 3. 

^ o r 

¥ til til 



III. N? 3 




When this is clear to the class, you can alternate measures, using these vari- 
ous rhythms, as shown in Illustration N? 4. 



Ill, N? 



If the subject is developed in the same way as the divided beat, that is, using 
rhythm studies, metrical verses, and notes to illustrate the rhythm of the verse, as 
outlined in Lesson N9 56, the teacher will find no particular difficulty in showing 
the class how to sing this swinging rhythm. Sing many lullaby s and barcarolles in 
g meter at this time, to impress the musical value and swing of this rhythm upon the 
class. 

One of the most troublesome problems in the study of music, is that of teach- 
ing the note of a beat and a half in value, as, for instance, the dotted quarter note. 
The development of this topic is perfectly simple, if the rhythm is correctly heard 
and sung, before we attempt to read it from the printed page. 

The time value of this note is derived from the use of the dot. The dot al- 
ways represents one half of the value of the note to which it is attached. Thus, if 
we have a note of two beats in length, and the dot is added to it, the total value 
of this note would be three beats, or two beats plus one beat. If we have a dot ad- 
ded to a note which is one beat in length, the value of the dotted note will be one 
and one half beats, since the dot adds one half to the value of the note. This rule 
always holds good, even where there is a. double dot used, in which case the second 
dot is equal to one half the value of the first dot. 

The above is, of course, solely for the information of the teacher. The sub- 
ject will be presented to the children in the following manner: 

Children, we are going to study a new kind of time, and we shall 

use the scale for our exercises. Let us put the Do on the fourth line 

of the staff, and sing the scale downward with four eighth notes in 

a measure. We will use four Do's, four Ti's, four La's, etc., and beat 

two-part time, which brings two notes to one beat. (Children sing as in 
IlL No 5) 

111. No S 




Now, let us see if we can tie some of these little notes together. 
First, let us sing them on Miss Snow's fingers. {Teacher shows four fin- 
gers of left hand) holding the palm toward the class and the fingers separated.) 
Now, Miss Snow will tap with the right hand, each separate finger, 
and you may sing down the scale with four Do's, four Ti's, etc. 
{Teacher does as indicated) Now, I will close three fingers together and 
leave the little finger all by itself. This time you may sing Do-o-o, 
for these three tied fingers, in perfect time, as we did before, and 
sing an extra Do for the little finger. {Teacher holds three fingers to- 
gether as indicated, with the fourth apart. She points to each of the three joined 
in the one group y and then to the fourth separately. Children sustain the tone for 
the value of the three tied ?wtes } and sing an extra tone for the fourth,) Now, 
let us go down the scale and sing Ti-i-i-Ti, La-a-a-La, etc., while 
Miss Snow points to her fingers each time. {Children sing as in EI.N9 e) 



111. N? 6 




Do-o-o-do,Ti-i - i-ti, La-a-a-la,Sol-l -l-sol,Fa-a-a-fa,Mi-i- i-mi, Re-e-e-re DoH>o-do. 
In this way the children instantly see the relation of the tied note of three 
eighths' value, to the one single eighth note. You can show now, that one quarter 
note is equal to two of these eighth notes, and the little dot equals the other one 
of the three; so, written in another way, the dotted quarter is exactly the same 
thing as the three eighth notes which they have been singing. This is shown in 
Illustration N? 7. 
111. m 7 



y > i J. J' i J. i 



ii , i . 



Call attention to the fact that the dotted quarter note is always followed by .the 
short eighth note, and that this latter must be brought in smoothly at the end of the 
beat, and so quickly that the pupil is ready to sing instantly with the beginning of 
the next beat. Tell them that the long note contains three of the little eighth notes, 
and must be held three times as long as the little, single eighth note. At first, we 
should hear plainly the little extra jerk in the tone, for the vowel sounds of the 
component eighth notes that are tied together in the first note. This is useful in 
the first few lessons on the subject, but must be discontinued when no longer necessary. 

If the effect of the dotted quarter is heard and studied carefully, and the phrases 
sung smoothly and evenly, there should be no trouble in learning this rhythm. Review 
a familiar Rote song containing the dotted quarter, and call attention to the charact- 
eristic holding of the note beyond the beat, and the short note that always follows. 
Give much scale drill as before, in three part and four part meter, and then show 
again on the blackboard, how the dotted quarter equals three eighths,tied together, 



and the fourth eighth note is left by itself. Explain this in both two three and four 
part meter. Always revert to singing the scale with this dotted quarter rhythm 
before attempting any lesson where the dotted quarter note occurs, and,by review- 
ing} y° u w iU see tnat the class finds it perfectly easy to sing this rhythm in any metei 
without hesitation. 

The following songs will help you to illustrate the two rhythms discussed in this 
lesson. 

BOAT SONG 

KATE LOUISE BROWN ( GIOVANNI PAESIELLO 

Andante con moto 

is 




1. The sun is shin - ing bright -ly, The waves are tipped with foam, 

2. Our bon - ny boat is glid - ing Up - on the bil - lows' crest, 

3. Blow! gen - tie breeze, so light - ly, And bear us from a - far, 




The laugh - ing breeze, so light - ly, Will bear us 

To where the young moon's hid - ing, All in the 

Where sun -set clouds gleam bright-ly, Be-neath the 



KATE LOUISE BROWN 

) ft mf Alle ^° 



SANTA GLAUS 



far from home, 
gold - en West. 
Eve- ning Star. 



LEONARD B. MARSHALL 




1. Cornel sing a song for San-ta Claus, For bells and rein- deer -sleigh, 

2. Come! sing a song for San - ta Claus,The dear old jol - ly elf, 

3. Come! sing a song for San-ta Claus,For sleigh and rein -deer, too, 





fh — i 






cresc 
























t 


? tt ■ 




L-J 




J 




* 










— 









And bags of toys for girls and boys;He's sure - ly been your way; 

Like win- ter rose, his red cheek glows;Come, see him for your self; 

And thank him for the Christ-mas joys He kind - ly brings to you; 

dim 



cresc 




He makes his trips on Christ-mas night,When all the worlds a - sleep, 
Just He a -wake on Christ-mas night,When all the world's a - sleep, 
Some peo-ple say, he's all a joke, We'll nev-er think them right, 




And down the chim-ney, so they say, The jol 

And down the chim-ney, so they say, The jol - ly saint will creep. 
We'll stay up late, some time, our-selves, And watch on Christ-mas night. 



ly saint will creep, 
ly saint will creep. 



i 






: 



FOURTH GRADE SERIES 



SIEGEL- MYERS 
Correspondence School of Music 

Chicago, III. 



A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 
PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 
BY FRANCES E. CLARK 



Lesson N9 57 



Six- Eight Rhythm 
The Dotted Quarter 

The long, swinging measure which is characteristic of ^ time, is the most beauti- 
ful of all rhythms. Our lullabys and boat-songs, or barcarolles are almost all written 
in this rhythm. Many teachers have found difficulty in presenting | time to their 
classes. If treated in the proper manner, the subject is not only easy, but extremely 
interesting to the children. Analyzing the meter signature, as suggested in Lesson 
N? 51, we find that the figure "8" indicates that the eighth note is the unit of the 
count, and the figure "6" tells us that there are six of these eighth notes, or their 
equivalent, in every measure. We mark the rhythm as though it were a double 
measure of 5/ time (review Lesson N? 55), and after analyzing the six beats care- 
fully, count two. beats to the measure, marking 1, 2, 3 on"down"and 4,5, 6, on "up." 

In Lesson N° 56, on the divided beat, we learned that it is just as easy to 
sing two notes to one beat, as to sing one note to a beat. We have learned to sing 
the scale with two "Do's," two "Ti's" two "La's" etc., with perfect ease, and we 
found many exercises and songs containing two notes to the beat in which it was 
easy, both to sing and to beat time. We found that we could do- this in either two 
part, three part or four part rhythm. These steps being accomplished, it is simple 
enough to follow exactly the same process of development, with three notes to one 
beat. Follow closely the suggestions contained in Lesson N° 56, and sing the scale 
downward as before, using three Do's, three Ti's, three La's etc., instead of two. 
The effect would be like that shown in Illustration N9 1. 







111. N9 1 

Do-dodo, ti - ti - ti , la- la-la^sol-sol-sol ,fa- fa- fa ? mi-mi-mi , re-re-re,do-do-do . 
After this exercise, change the arrangement of the notes somewhat, and tie 
two of the eighths together, leaving one shorter note by itself. Mark the rhythm in 
the air, and show the pulse clearly, as indicated in Illustration N? 2. 



111. N? 




Copyright MCMXII by Sieg-el- Myers Correspondence School of Music 



Sing the descending scale in this way, giving the group of one long note and 
a short one, to each beat. Sing such exercises many times, in order to establish thor- 
oughly the swing of this rhythm. After this becomes perfectly simple, you can vary 
the exercises by tying the three notes together, making the tone three beats long 
as shown in Illustration N? 3 . 



111. N? 3 



m 



mm 




When this is clear to the class, you can alternate measures, using these vari- 
ous rhythms, as shown in Illustration N? 4. 



III. N? 



If the subject is developed in the same way as the divided beat, that is, using 
rhythm studies, metrical verses, and notes to illustrate the rhythm of the verse, as 
outlined in Lesson N9 56, the teacher will find no particular difficulty in showing 
the class how to sing this swinging rhythm. Sing many lullaby s and barcarolles in 
§ meter at this time, to impress the musical value and swing of this rhythm upon the 
class. 

One of the most troublesome problems in the study of music, is that of teach- 
ing the note of a beat and a half in value, as, for instance, the dotted quarter note. 
The development of this topic is perfectly simple, if the rhythm is correctly heard 
and sung, before we attempt to read it from the printed page. 

The time value of this note is derived from the use of the dot. The dot al- 
ways represents one half of the value of the note to which it is attached. Thus, if 
we have a note of two beats in length, and the dot is added to it, the total value 
of this note would be three beats, or two beats plus one beat. If we have a dot ad- 
ded to a note which is one beat in length, the value of the dotted note will be one 
and one half beats, since the dot adds one half to the value of the note. This rule 
always holds good, even where there is a double dot used, in which case the second 
dot is equal to one half the value of the first dot. 

The above is, of course, solely for the information of the teacher. The sub- 
ject will be presented to the children in the following manner: 

Children, we are going to study a new kind of time, and we shall 

use the scale for our exercises. Let us put the Do on the fourth line 

of the staff, and sing the scale downward with four eighth notes in 

a measure. We will use four Do's, four Ti's, four La's, etc., and beat 

two-part time, which brings two notes to one beat. (Children sing as in 
IlL No 5.) 
I11.N9 5 




Do 

P. S. L. N» 57. 



Now, let us see if we can tie some of these little notes together. 
First, let us sing them on Miss Snow's fingers. {Teacher shows four fin- 
gers of left hand } holding the palm toward the class a?id the fingers separated.) 
Now, Miss Snow will tap with the right hand, each separate finger, 
and you may sing down the scale with four Do's, four Ti's, etc. 
(Teacher does as indicated.) Now, I will close three fingers together and 
leave the little finger all by itself. This time you may sing Do-o-o, 
for these three tied fingers, in perfect time, as we did before, and 
sing an extra Do for the little finger. (Teacher holds three fingers to- 
gether as indicated, with the fourth apart. She points to each of the three joined 
in the one group } and then to the fourth separately. Children sustain the tone for 
the value of the three tied notes, and sing an extra tone for the fourth.) Now, 
let us go down the scale and sing Ti-i-i-Ti, La-a-a-La,etc., while 
Miss Snow points to her fingers each time. (Children sing as in BLN9 6) 



III. N9 6 




Do-o-o-dOjTi-i - i-u", La-a-a-la,Sol-l -l-sol,Fa-a-a-fa,Mi-i - i-mi, R^^e^e Dono^o-do. 

In this way the children instantly see the relation of the tied note of three 

. eighths' value, to the one single eighth note. You can show now, that one quarter 

. note is equal to two of these eighth notes, and the little dot equals the other one 

of the three; so, written in another way, the dotted quarter "is exactly [the^same 

thing as the three eighth notes which they have been singing. This is shown in 

Illustration N? 7. 

111. N9 7 



P i Mi j 



Pf=P 



E 



Call attention to the fact that the dotted quarter note is always followed by the 
short eighth note, and that this latter must be brought in smoothly at the end of the 
beat, and so quickly that the pupil is ready to sing instantly with the beginning of 
the next beat. Tell them that the long note contains three of the little eighth notes, 
and must be held three times as long as the little, single eighth note. At first, we 
should hear plainly the little extra jerk in the tone, for the vowel sounds of the 
component eighth notes that are tied together in the first note. This is useful in 
the first few lessons on the subject, but must be discontinued when no longer necessary 

If the effect of the dotted quarter is heard and studied carefully, and the phrases 
sum; smoothly and evenly, there should be no trouble in learning this rhythm. Review 
a familiar Rote song containing the dotted quarter, and call attention to the charact- 
eristic holding of the note beyond the beat, and the short note that always follows. 
Give much scale drill as before, in three part and four part meter, and then show 
again on the blackboard, how the dotted quarter equals three eighths,tied together 



and the fourth eighth note is left by itself. Explain this in both two three and four 
part meter. Always revert to singing the scale with this dotted quarter rhythm 
*be*fore attempting any lesson where the dotted quarter note occurs, and,by review- 
ing, you will see that the class finds it perfectly easy to sing this rhythm in any meter 
Without hesitation. 

The following songs will help you to illustrate the two rhythms discussed in this 
lesson. 

BOAT SONG 



-KATE LOUISE BROWN 

Andante con moto 



GIOVANNI PAESIELLO 




1. The sun is shin - ing bright -ly, The waves are tipped with foam, 

2. Our bon - ny boat is glid - ing Up - on the bil - lows' crest, 

3. Blow! gen - tie breeze, so light - ly, And bear us from a - far, 




The laugh - ing breeze, so light - ly, Will bear us far from home. 
To where the young moon's hid - ing, All in the gold - en West/ 
Where sun -set clouds gleam bright- ly, Be-neath the Eve-ning Star. 



'KATE LOUISE BROWN 



SANTA GLAUS 



LEONARD B. MARSHALL 




1. Come! sing a song for San-ta Claus,For bells and rein-deer- sleigh, 

2. Come! sing a song for San - ta Claus,The dear old jol - ly elf, 

3. Come! sing a song for San-ta Claus,For sleigh and rein- deer, too, 



4 



eresc 



s 



* 



i 



£ 



^m 



m 



m 



And bags of toys for girls and boysjHe's sure - ly been your way; 

Like win - ter rose, his red cheek glows;Come,see him for your self; 

And thank him for the Christ-mas joys He kind - ly brings to you; 

dim 



crese 



m 



^^ 



=£ 



r r r t 



E£ 



He makes his trips on Christ-mas night,When all the world s a - sleep, 
Just lie a -wake on Christ-mas night,When all the world's a - sleep, 
Some peo-ple say, he's all a joke, We'll nev-er think them right, 




And down the chim-ney, so they say, The jol - ly saint will creep. 

And down the chim-ney, so they say, The jol - ly saint will creep. 

We'll stay up late, some time, our-selves, And watch on Christ-mas night. 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Musi 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 57 



k ." 



Name. 



. Class Letter and No. 
Account No 



Town State Percentage. 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 

1 What is 6/8 time? 



2 What kind of songs generally employ 6/8 time?. 



3 Why is this subject generally considered difficult? 



4 What is the natural division of a measure in 6/8 rhythm?. 



) What is the fundamental principle, on which is based the easy teaching of 6/8 time? 



Give a short model lesson on the presentation of 6/8 time, showing clearly the tying 
of the notes 



7 Give on the staves below, two original two-measure exercises showing various com- 

binations of rhythm in 6/8 time 

1 

8 Summarize briefly the three steps' to be used in teaching this subject. 

9 What is the fundamental principle (as shown in the study of the divided heat and 6/8 

rhythm), on which is based the teaching of the dotted quarter? 

10 Discuss the importance of this pedagogical principle 

11 Give a short model lesson presenting the subject of the dotted quarter rhythm. 

12 (a) Why should emphasis be placed upon the effect of this rhythm? 

(b) In what way will this simplify the work of the teacher in presenting it? 

ESEEE I 



13 Have you memorized the two songs given in Lesson No. 57?. 



If you are teaching at the present time, answer the question below which pertain* 
to your Grade, in order to Kectire a percentage. If you are not teaching. It is not uecea- 
«ary to aiiNwer either question. 

14 If you are teaching in the Fourth Grade, and can put the lesson in this particular 

part of the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions 
given, as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular lesson, 
indicate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained. 

Intermediate and Grammar Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 

15 (a) In zvhat way are you able to use in your class work the instruction an 6/8 rhythm 

and the dotted quarter f 

(b) Give a statement of the important pedagogical principle upon which is based the 

presentation of these subjects 

EEEEEEEEEEE. 

(c) How can the study of the effect of these two rhythms be used to simplify the 

work of the teacher , 

=::::::::: 



In the spaces below, marked "Q 1," "Q 2," etc., you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer." 

Q. 1 



Answer 



Q. 2. 



Answer 



Q. 3. 



Answer 



Q. 4. 



Answer 



Q. 5. 



Answer 



FOURTH GRADE SERIES * 

SIEGEL- MYERS 
Correspondence School of Music 

Chicago, HI. 

A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 

public school music Lesson N9 58 

BY FRANCES E. CLARK 

The Pitch Names of Notes 

In our first lesson on the presentation of the staff (Lesson N9 35) we named 

the lines and spaces of the staff in numerical order. As you remember, we had the 

1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th lines, and the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th spaces. It is now time that 

the children should learn to know the real, or letter, names of these lines and spaces, 

since we must soon begin to talk of the key names of the exercises and songs which 

ve learn. You should review Lesson N9 SO in this connection, since you were given 

lere the facts concerning the letter notation of the staff. This lesson will show you 

le manner in which this subject is to be presented to the pupils. You can proceed 

somewhat as follows: 

Now, children, we are going* to learn the real, or letter, names 
:>f the notes we have been writing on the staff. You remember that 
/e have called them by their number names and syllable names, but 
low we are going to learn them by their pitch names^as they are gen- 
erally used. The new names we shall give them are the first seven let- 
3rs of the alphabet: A,B,C, D,E, F and G, and the notes which come 
:>n these lines and spaces are called by the same names. After the 
sventh note in order from A, we repeat the same names for the high- 
er or lower series of notes- 
Let us begin with the added line below the staff, and name this 
le 0. Tones called A and B come below this, but they are a little 
)o far down for us to sing at present. This tone, C,is called Middle 

Conyrlg-ht MCMXII by Sieg*l Myers Correspondence School of Music 



2 

C, because it represents about the middle of the range which is pos- 
sible to the singing voice. Women and children generally sing from 
Middle C to the top of the staff, and men generally sing lower, and 
use a different staff, 

The first space above Middle C we shall call D, This will be in 
the space just below the staff. The first line of the staff is called 
E, and the first space has been named F. The second line of the 
staff is called Gr, and then, when we come to the mext note, it is 
necessary to begin our alphabet of seven letters all over again, call- 
ing the note in the second space, A, the third line of thestaff,B,and 
the third space of the staff, C. The fourth line of the staff we call 

D, and the fourth space has been named E. The last line of the 

staff is called F. There are two other notes above this, on the first 

space above the staff and the first added line above the staff. These 

are called Gr and A. With A, as you see, we begin our alphabet 

names all over again, repeating the same seven letters. {Teacher draws 
the staff and clef on the board) and writes the letter names of the notes as given in 
IlL N° i, as she speaks about them.) 



111. N? t 



Now, let us study the notes on the staff and compare these names 
with each other. We know that there are two C ? s, two D's, two E's tv/o, 
Fs, two G's, and two A's, because we have repeated the names. Notice 
that the first C comes on the line below the staff, and the second C 
comes in the third space. Here we have the same name,but the loca^ 
tion of the notes is so different that there is no danger of confusing 
them. (Teacher points to the two C's.) 

Now, here are two D's. The first one comes in the space below 
the staff, and the second one on the fourth line. (7fe^A?r points to the two i?s) 

P. S. M, No 58. 



3 

Again, although the two notes have the same name, they are not con- 
fused because they do not come in the same places on the staff™ 

(Teacher continues the exercise with the names of other notes which are duplicates in 
pitch-names.) 

Now, let us see who can give me the letter name for the first. 

. line. {Child .answers U M) What is the name of the third space? 

The second line? The fifth space? The fourth line? The second 

space? The space above? The space below? etc. (Children answer each 

quest to n accurately. ) 

Now, let us turn the question around, and see who can tell us where 
to find the note D? Where is G? Where can I find B? Where are there 
two D's? Who can show me two E S? etc, (Children answer each question ac- 
curately. ) 

Drill on letter names of line and space must be very careful and thorough. Do not 
let the subject drop until you feel absolutely sure that every child knows the name 
of every line and every space. Let the children go to the board, and write on the staff 
the name of any line, or space, which you may dictate. Ask them to put D in two 
places; to put G in the right place; to write A in two places; C in two places; E 
in two places; etc. 

Now, let the pupils write the letter names of the notes of the entire staff. Die 
tate the five lines or spaces in any order, and require them to write these on the 
board. Also make tests of this work, and require the pupils to write the pitch names 
on paper, handing it in to you as writttii work for grading. 

The names of the keys can be presented as follows; 

Whenever we place Do on a line or space, class, we say that 
we are singing in a certain key. We give the name of that key the 
same letter name which belongs to the line or space of the first Do. 
Thus, if we place Do in the first space, as we often do, we shall be 
singing in the key of F. If we put Do on the second line, we say 
that we sing in the key of G, or if Do comes in the first space below 
the staff, we call it the key of D. 



Now, John, if I put Do on the first line and in the fourth space, 
what will be the name of that key? {John answers, "key of EV) Amanda 
may go to the board and put Do on the second space of the staff. 
(Amanda writes as i?idieated.) Now, class, what is the name of the key 
that her song would be in? (Class answers/ 1 key of AD Suzanne, if I 

write Do on the fourth line, what will be the name of thekey?Os««*wa* 

answers } u key of DP) 

This knowledge of pitch names must be very complete and exact. It will not 
do to have a few in the class know them, and others get only a hazy knowledge. This 
is information which must be carried through life, and so it is most important for 
the teacher to lay a very thorough foundation for the subject. 

The following song can be presented as suggested in Lesson N9 57 and this 
lesson, with reference to the meter and key signatures; 

BYE-LO-LAND 



THE OUTLOOK 



CLARK 




1. Ba - by 

2. Oh, the 

3. Sweet is 



is 

bright 

the 



go - 
dreams 
way 



to 
in 
to 



Bye 
Bye 
Bye 



lo - land, 
lo- land, 
lo - land, 



Go - ing to see the sights so grand; Out of the sky the 

All the lov - ing an - gels planned; Soft lit - tie lashes down- 

Guided by moth - er's gen - tie hand; Lit - tie lambs now are 



P r f r - i i 1 i I Mi i i 



wee stars peep. Watch -ing to see 

Ward close, Just like the pet 

in the fold, Lit - tie birds nes 
i CHORUS 



her fast a - sleep, 
als of a rose. 
tie from the cold. 




Swing so, bye - lo, swing so, bye - lo, swing so, bye - lo, 




Swing so, bye - lo, swing so, bye - lo, swing so, bye - lo. 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 58 

I Class Letter and No , 

Name } 

( Account No ,. 



Town State Percentage 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 

1 Discuss the importance of teaching the pitch names of notes, as well as the syllable and 
number names 






2 In what way is the material in this lesson correlated with that in Lesson No. 49? 



3 Give an extended model lesson, showing the presentation of the letter or pitch names 
of notes 



4 Why is there no need of confusing notes of the same name occurring on different 
degrees of the staff ? 



5 What is the value of written tests in giving the drill on letter names?. 



6 What is the relation between the names of keys and the staff lines or spaces? 



7 Give a rule for establishing the name of the key. 



8 Why is it most important that the knowledge of pitch names should be complete? ) 



It you are teaching at the present time, answer the question helow which pertains 
to your Grade, tn order to secure a percentage. It you arc not teaching, It Is not neces- 
sary to answer either question, 

9 If you are teaching in the Fourth Grade, and can put the lesson in this particular 
part of the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions 
given, as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular lesson, 
indicate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained. 

2 



Intermediate and Grammar Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 
10 (a) Do you find a definite knowledge of pitch names of notes among the members of 
your class?. 

(b) What ideas can you draiv from this lesson by which to strengthen the pupil's 

knowledge of this important subject? 

(c) In zvhat way can you use the principles of naming the keys, suggested in this 

lesson, in your class work? 

3 



In the spaces below, marked "Q. 1," "Q. 2," etc., you may ask questions 

in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer." 

Q. 1 



Answer 



Q. 2., 



Answer 



Q. 3., 



Answer 



Q. 4., 



Answer 



Q. 5. 



Answer 



FOURTH GRADE SERIES 1 

I SIEGEL- MYERS 

Correspondence School of Music . 

Chicago, 111. 

A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 

public school music Lesson N? "59 

3Y FRANCES E. CLARK 

Rule for Sharp Signatures 

Up to this point in the Fourth Grade, we have simply told the children where to 
Hnd the Do in each song, or exercise. In these early years of the school training, em- 
phasis has been placed upon the training of the eye to read quickly in any key, rather 
; han upon actual and painstaking knowledge about the keys. Now, however, the 
children are getting old enough to want to use their knowledge of reading notes, in 
le music books they may pick up at home, or in the hymns of the Sunday School or 
hurch service. In order to make their knowledge useful when outside of the School - 

• oom, they must now be able to locate the position of Do for themselves. We are not, 
- ven yet, quite ready for the technical drill on key signatures which will come later, 
j*-ut at this point we can teach thoroughly simple rules for finding Do in any song or 

• xercise. 

We have often observed the sharps and flats- placed at the beginning of songs 
and exercises, and although we have simply called them sharps and flats without fur- 
ther explanation of their use, the children will know what they are when you speak 
::f them. Take up the subject as follows;- 

Children, you are getting old enough to be able to know how to 

find Do in your songs and exercises for yourselves. If you can do this 

; ou will know how to sing the notes, if you want to read a hymn in 

::hurch, or some song at home with your friends. I have always told 

you where Do was to be found. Now, there is one little rule which 

yon can memorize in a minute, and it will always tell you where to 

nd Do, whenever there are sharps in the key signature. This rule 

:- "The last sharp put in the signature is always Ti of the 

.sale," or, to put it another way, "Do is the next staff degree {line 

Or space) above the last sharp." 

Copyright MCMXII by Sie^el- Myers Correspondence School of Music 



2 

Now, who can tell me this rule? Let us all say it. (The class recites 
in concert the rule as given the last time.) This row may say it. Now the 

last row can give it. I wonder if all the girls can say it, — and now 
let all the boys try to say it better than the girls 6id.(The class responds 
as indicated.) 

Now, let us see how it works. When we have one sharp in our 
key signature, we always find it hung up on the fifth line of the staff. 
Applying our rule, high Do should come in the space above the staff, 
as that is the next degree above the sharp. We find this is the case, 
and if you count down eight notes, the low Do will fall on the second 
line. That is where Do always is, when we have one sharp for the 
signature. What is the name of the second \ine?(Chiidren answerW) And 
what key are we in, when this is the signature? (Children answer "key of &*) 

When we have two sharps, the first one is always found on the 
fifth line, and the second one on the third space of the staff. Apply- 
ing our rule, where shall we look to find Do? Yes; that is right,onthe 
fourth line, or D. If we count down, we find that lower Do is in the 
space below the staff. Now, what is the name of the fourth line and 

the space below? (Children answer"!)?) What key is it ? (Children answer, 
"key of DV) Yes,- that is right. Two sharps, then, is the sign, or sig- 
nature of the key of D. 

When we have three sharps,we find the new sharp in the first 
space above the staff. Applying our little rule, where shall we ex- 
pect to find Do? It will be found on the added line above the staff, 
or A. Counting down, the low Do falls in the second space. What 
is the name of the second space? What is the name of the key?. 
What, then, is the sign of the key of A? (Children answer each question 
accurately^ 

When we have four sharps, the last sharp is on the fourth line. 
Where,then,is Do? According to the rule, we shall find it on the fourth 
space. This note is E, Counting down, low Do falls on the first line. 

P. S. M. No. 59. 



When we have five sharps, the last sharp is in the second space, 
and we shall look for our Do on the third line, or on B. 

Give plenty of drill on finding- Do in these different keys. Let all the children 
have the opportunity to place the Do with any given number of sharps as the signa- 
ture. Make a game of the exercise, seeing how many can run to the blackboard and 
place Do properly, using for signatures any number of sharps you may dictate. Then take 
up the song book, find a song or exercise with sharps in the signature, and say: 

Turn to page Who can tell where Do is, in the first exercise? 

Turn to page In the second Exercise, where is Do? Who answers 

first? etc. 

Apply the rule on all occasions and make it alive with meaning, not just a jumble 
of words which are simply to be memorized and soon forgotten. This, also, as well as 
the pitch names of notes, is knowledge which the children will carry through life with 
them, and the teacher should do everything in her power, to make them realize the 
importance and value of it. 

The following exexcises embody the principles of both rhythm and key signature, 
which are explained in this and the preceding lessons, and should serve as a type of 
the kind of material to be used constantly by the teacher, at this point in the Fourth 
Grade music study. 



4 



? JTJ i IJIj 



ft ^JTj i jTV trrj-ixfi^ ^ 



J ii i ' i i 



s 



fr j j.j i r j s m 



+ — i -^ 



J' i iM'iniiiiii irJ'iiifpifiJJrir^ri^ 



|' li )i [r; friJ-- i TO ii lujqjimrmnp 



The song given below is excellent material for your work at this time in the 
school year. 

CRADLE SONG 



KATE LOUISE BROWN 

In a swinging MyU 



LEONARD B. MARSHALL 




1. Rock-a - by bee in the HI - y bell, Swung by thebreezeso light, 

2. Rock-a - by bird in the co - zynest, Safe in the ma - pie bower, 

3. Rock-a - by, dear, in your era- die nest, Rock - a - by, lit - tie one- 



i' h -I' J' J J' Ji Ji I J j, J ^rjr^Fp^fj 



We a - ry with la - bor thro' Sum-mer hours, Dear lit - tie bee, good - night; 
Wan - der - ing night winds will stir thy bed, Sleep till the sun -rise hour; 
Long were the hours for your bus- y play, Un-der the gold- en sun; 




O - yer the pine tree the eve-ning star Smiles as a gold- en eye; 
Sleep till the eye of the morn- ing star Peeps o'er the brood- ing hill, 
Yours was the song that made glad my day, You were my sun -shine bright, 




Pur -pie and yel - low and ten -der rose Fade from the eve-ning sky. 
Dream of your song that made glad the day, Dream of a sweet -er still. 
You were my HI - y, my sweetest flowY, You were my heart's de - light. 



km \ I a l a «h Ji J a I f ^? 



Rock-a - by, bee, in the Iil - y bell, Swung by thebreezeso light, 
Rock-a- by, bird, in the co - zynest, Safe in the ma - pie bower, 
Rock-a - by, dear, in your era -die nest, Rock-a - by, lit - tie one; 




Wea - ry with la - bor thro' Sum-mer hours, Dear lit - tie bee, good -night. 
Wan-der- ing night winds will stir thy bed, Sleep till the sun -rise hour. 
Longwere the hours for your bus- y play, Un - der the gold- en sun. 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 59 

( Class Letter and No , 

Name. J 

f Account No 



Town State Percentage 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching In the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 

1 Upon what principle do we base the music training in the early years of the Public 
School ? 



2 Why should this principle be expanded to include unfamiliar music?. 



3 Why is it necessary to be able to locate any Do?. 



4 Why should technical drill on key signatures be delayed until later lessons?. 



5 Why have the sharps and flats incorporated in the signatures, been used heretofore 



without explanation? 



, 



• 



6 What is the rule for determining the names of the sharp keys?. 




7 Give a short model lesson, presenting the application of this rule to the signature of one 
sharp, and to the signature of three sharps 



3 Xamc three original games, or methods by which the teacher can impress this rule on 
the class 



9 (a) Give, on the staves below, two original exercises in sharp keys. 



(])) Give a short model lesson, presenting both the rhythm and key signatures of these 
exercises 



If you are teaching at the present time, answer the question below which pertains 
io your Grade, iu order to secure a percentage. It you are not teaching, it is not neces- 
sary to answer either question. 

JO ]f you are teaching in the Fourth Grade, and can put the lesson in this particular part 
of the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions given, 
as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular lesson, indi- 
cate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained 



Intermediate and dram mar Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 
, 11 (a) Do your pupils understand how to determine the signature of sharp keys? 



(b) What is the most definite rule which they can give you on this subject?. 



(c) What three suggestions can you draw from this lesson for presenting sharp key 
names clearly and definitely to your class 






In the spaces below, marked "Q 1," "Q 2," etc, you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer". 

q. i 



Answer 



Q. 2.. 



Answer 



Q. 3., 



Answer 



Q. 4.. 



Answer 



Q. 5.. 



Answer 



J-frvdL 



JTFTH "CRAPE SERIES 1 

SIEGEL-MYERS 

Correspondence School of Music 

Chicago, IU. 

A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 

public school music Lesson N9 60 

BY FRANCES E. CLARK 

Rule for Flat Signatures 

The companion rule to the one which was given in Lesson N? 59, is that for 
finding* the Do of a key, when there are flats in the signature. Before presenting this 
lesson to the class, it is well to review the rule given for the sharp keys, and give 
some exercises on the subject. This subject may then be taken up as follows: 

Now, children, you remember the rule we had in the last lesson 
for finding the signature, or sign of the new sharp keys. Who can 
give this rule? Arthur, you may tell it to the class. (Arthur recites t/ie ruled 
That is right. Now, we are going to learn a new rule, and this one 
will apply when we have flats in the signature. We have already 
seen flats and know what they look like, and often have found more 
than one flat placed at the beginning of each line of the music. The 
rule we are going to learn is this: "Call the last flat Fa, and count 
down to Do" or, putting it another way, "Do is on the same staff de- 
gree (line or space) as the last flat but one!' Who can recite this 
rule for me? (Some child gives the rule) Tommy, can you give it? Now, 
John, you may say it. Now, let all the boys give the rule, and then 
the children in this second row may tell me what the rule is. (Children 
answer as indicated) 

Let us examine the application of this ride. When we have one 
flat in the key signature, it will always be found on the third line of 
the staff. Calling it Fa, let vfe count down, Fa, Mi, Re, Do. (Teacher 

counts and points to the lines of a staff drawn on the board.) Do falls in the 

first space, does it not? What is the name of the first space? ((7Mldrm 

Copyright MCMXH by SUffel' Myers Correspondence School of Music 



2 

answer, u F. n ) Then, what is the name of the key wh en we have one flat? 

(Child answers, a Xe// of -*°'> Whd can gQ to the hoard and write Do in 

this key? Who can write the Whole scale up from F, showing the 

proper signature? (So we child wspands accurate?//.) 

When we have two flats in the signature, the second flat will be 
in the fourth space. Let us follow the rule and call it Fa, and then 
count down, Fa, Mi, Re, Do. (Teacher points to the staff and counts doumj 'our 
stajf degrees.) We see that Do falls on the third line, or B; but because 
the first flat cancels the pitch of that third line, and substitutes B flat, 
we must call the key B flat. 

When we have three flats, the last flat will be found in the 
second space. Let us call it Fa, and count down to Do. Do falls on 
the first line, and high Do we shall find in the fourth space. This 
pitch is also cancelled, because the second flat in the signature shows 
that we have E flat. Therefore, we must call this key, the key of E 
flat, since it starts on that pitch. 

When we have four flats, the last flat is found on the fourth 
line. Again count down; we have Fa, Mi, Re, Do, and we see that 
this time Do falls on the second space. The key is,therefore, called 
the key of A flat, because, as you remember, A flat is included 
in the signature. 

When we have five flats, the last one falls on the second line. 
Let us again count down four notes from this second line, and we 
find that Do falls in the first space below the staff. Therefore, the 
name of this key will be D flat, since D is cancelled and D flat sub- 
stituted, according to the signature. 

As with the sharp signatures, give very careful drill in making certain that each 
child understands how to find the Do when the signature contains any number of Hats, 
from one to five. If he can do this, he can tell, by himself, where to begin singing a 
given song with any signature, since after the Do is established, he can tell instantly 
whether the song begins on Mi or Sol, etc. It is most important that this drill be 
made thorough, as it is information which the child carries through life. 



\t> M) 



Give many exercises at this time which shall incorporate these newly discovered 
key signatures, and make each a test of the pupil's working knowledge of these rules 
for the flat and sharp keys. Such exercises as the following can be used for thi> 
purpose. 



i3S 



j mfrr 



M 



P 



kfcs 



m 



35 



w 



p 



fet 



s A ^-j-^-^Up i f r r 



i 



p 



Test the children carefully on the signature names of the keys in the following 



songs. 



A SONG OF SPRING 



Smooth?//- lightly 



ELSIE M. SCHWARTZ 




1- Sun-beams kiss the ti - ny bud, Whisp-ring "O - pen! Spring is here! " 
2. Wak-end by these joy- ful sounds, Lit - tie leaf- let lifts its head; 




Rain-drops tap it on the head, Say - ing "Come, you need not fear." 
Shy an dwon-d ring peeps a-round From his cos - y win - ter bed. 




Rob - in Red-breast swells his throat, Sings," How glad, how glad am II* 
South wind gent - ly rocks the limb, Leaf- let o - pens wide in glee, 




E - ven frog - gies hap-py note Sounds from pond near by. 

Joins in Na - tures glo-ri-ous hymn, "Spring, we wel - come thee!" 



SONG OF THE APPLE BLOSSOMS 



i 



Daintily 



^ 



EMMA A. THOMAS 



;S 



P^P 



^2 



1. In the bright Spring*- time, on an old 

2. I watched and loved it, the bees 

3. A light wind came one fair morn 



ap - pie tree, 

loved it too, 

ing in May, 




Came a sweet lit - tie blos-som and whisp-ered to me 
It was full of sweet hon - ey, its whis - per came true 
And blew my sweet lit - tie blos-som a - way. 



But a 



Softly 




" Daint - y and fair and ro - sy am I, An 

" Daint - y and fair and ro - sy am I An 

lit - tie round bod - y seemed soft - ly to cry " An 



Slower 



Jf J 




















#* 


ap 


• pie 


i'ii 


be 


some 


day, 


by 


and 


J — „j 
by." 




ap 


- pie 


i'ii 


be 


some 


day, 


by 


and 


by." 




ap 


■ pte 


I'n 


be 


some 


day, 


by 


and 


by." 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

Bu FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 60 

l Class Letter and No 

( Account No 



Town State Percentage 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 

1 State clearly the rule for determining the name of a key when flats are used in the 
signature 






2 Give a short model lesson presenting the application of this rule to the keys of B flat 
and E flat - • • 



: 



3 Give the names of the keys from one to five flats, and explain how the names of these 
keys are determined 



4 Give the n&mes oi tnc keys from one to live sharps, and explain how the names of thes 
keys are determined 






5 Give very short model lessons on the signatures of the songs contained in Lessons Nos. 
43, 46, 53 and 58. 

Lesson No. 43 



Lesson No. 46. 



Lesson No. 53. 



If you are teaching at the present time, answer the question below which pertains 
to your Grade, in order to secure a percentage. If you are not teaching, it is not neces- 
sary to answer either question. 

6 If you are teaching in the Fourth Grade, and can put the lesson in this particular part 
of the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions given, 
as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular lesson, indi- 
cate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained 



Intermediate and Grammar Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 
7 (a) Does your class have any difficulty in determining the names of the Hat keys? 



(b) State tivo zvays in zvhich the rule for determining the names of flat keys can be 
presented 



(c) Name two specific suggestions that you get from this lesson, in giving drill on the 
key names 



In the spaces below, marked "Q 1," "Q 2," etc., you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer". 

q. i 



Answer 



Q. 2. 



Answer 



Q. 3. 



Answer 



Q. 4. 



Answer 



Q. 5. 



Answer 



FIFTH GRADE SERIES 1 

SIEGEL -MYERS 
Correspondence School of Music 

Chicago, 111. 

A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 

public school music Lesson N° 61 

BY FRANCES E. CLARK 

The Effect of Chromatic Signs 

The use of occasional sharps and flats inserted in a song, apart from the signa- 
ture, has by this time probably attracted the attention of the more observant pupils, 
and you can, therefore, now take up the explanation of these chromatic signs with- 
out fear of confusing the pupils. The subject can be introduced as follows: - 

In many songs which we have learned, we have often seen a sharp, 
ora flat placed before a note. It has always seemed to modify,or af- 
fect the original sound of the note before which it appears, and cause 
us to sing a different tone from the one we should sing if the sharp, 
or flat were not there. We are now going to learn more about these 
chromatic signs and to discover just what is the effect of a sharp or 
a flat which is not used in the signature. 

We used to say that a sharp placed before a note "sharped" that 
note, and raised its pitch a half step. This is not strictly true, since 
it is impossible to change or alter in any way the pitch of a given 
tone. The sharp sign does not "sharp" or change the tone before which 
it is placed, but it indicates a new tone a half step higher. 

The same principle is true of the use of flats. When a flat is 
placed before a note it tells us that we must sing a new toneahalf step 
lower, since it is impossible to"flat"the pitch of the original tone. In 
the case of either the sharp or the flat, we simply let the original tone 
alone, and sing another one according to the sign. 

Copyrig-ht MCMXII by Sieg-el- Myers Correspondence School of Music 



The note most frequently affected in this way, is Fa. We often 
find a sharp placed before Fa, and we sing the new tone ahalf step 
higher. The tone is then called Yi(pronounced Fee). It is usually ap- 
proached from Sol, the note above, and sung as Sol, Fi, Sol.(Teacher 

sings.) This sounds exactly like Do, Ti, Do. (Teacher sings same tones 

with these syllables.) Since they are so much alike, we shall easily know 
just how to sing the new tone, Fi. 

We often find a flat placed before Ti, and we know we are not 
to sing Ti, but atone ahalf step lower. This is called Te (pro- 
nounced Tag.) This is usually approached from Do, and may be fol- 
lowed by La. Now, Do,Te,La {teacher sings) sounds exactly like Sol, 
Fa, Mi. {Teacher sings same tones with these syllables.) Now, youmay sing 
Do, Te, La exactly like Sol, Fa,Mi. (Children sing as indicated) 

Another note in the scale which is often affected, is Re. A sharp 
placed before Re makes us sing anew tone a half step higher. This 
new tone is called Ri (pronounced Bee). Now, Mi, Ri,Mi, sounds exact- 
ly like Do,Ti,Do, and like Sol, Fi, Sol. Now, children, sing, Do, Ti, 

Do. (Children sing.) Now, sing Mi,Ri, Mi, exactly like it. (Children sing 

same tones with these syllables.) Thus, you see, that we only go a little 
way from Mi to Ri, and back again, just as we did from Do to Ti. 

Sometimes we have a sharp before Do which would make us 
sing Di (pronounced Dee) instead of Do. Now, Re, Di, Re also sounds 
like Do, Ti, Do, and so this need give us no trouble. (Children sing 
as indicated.) 

Now, I will write these new tones on the blackboard so that you 

can see just how they look. Here we have Do,Ti,Do.— A&- 

111. n? 1=#S== 



{Teacher writes as in III. N9 1, and class sings.) 

V Do Ti Do 
Now, this sounds just like Sol, Fi, Sol. (Teacher writes and class sings f 
as in III. N9 2.) 



111. N? 2 



is 



P. S. M. No. 61. 



Sol Fi 



Sol 



Or, it will sound just like Mi, Ri, Mi. (Teacher writes, and class sings, 
as in III. N° 3.) 



111. N9 3 



m 



$ 



Mi Re Mi 
Or, again, we find that Re,Di,Re, sounds just like this also. 
(Teacher writes and class sings, as in IU.N9 4.) 



111. N? 4; 



** 



Re Di Re 

We shall find out more about these new notes later on. All we 
want to do now is to sing them, so that we know how they sound. But 
before we go oil, I want, you to memorize this table. (Teacher writes on 

the board the following tableland requires the class to recite on it at the next lesson) 

A sharp before Fa makes us sing Fi (pronounced Fee). 
A sharp before Re makes us sing Ri (pronounced Ree). 
A sharp before Do makes us sing Di (pronounced Dee). 
A flat before Ti makes us sing Te (pronounced Tay). 
A flat before Mi makes us sing Me (pronounced May). 

Such exercises as the following- should be used at this time to impress the use of 
these accidental sharps and flats upon the minds of the children. 



M 



m 



731 



3=PP 



3P 



wm 



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P 



;:?■==£ 



itJi J j ihi j r 



^ 



ijJi^iJ i rH 



-6M- 



m 



mm 



^s 



HE 



iiii'iiinriYiri'iii^nrr 




Songs which contain these chromatic tones are best taught by rote at present the 
serious study of such tones being delayed until later lessons on the subject. Use such 
songs as the following, at the appropriate season of the year. 

THE CORN SONG 

JL 




1, Heap high the farm - ers win - try hoard! Heap high the gold - en 



2. Let oth - er lands ex - ult - ing glean The ap - pie from the 

3. Thro' vales of grass and meads of flow rs Our ploughs their fur- rows 

4. All thro' the long bright days of June Its 1 eaves grew green and 

5. Let vap - id id - lers loll in silk, A - round their cost * ly 




corn] 

pine, 



tumn poured From 



The or - ange 



made, While on the 

fair, And wavd in 

board; Give us the 



from 
hills 
hot 
bowl 



its glos 
the sun 
mid - sum 
of samp 



■ sy green, 
and showVs 
mers noon 
and milk, 



The 
Of 
Its 
By 




out her 
clus - ter 

change - ful 
soft and 

home - spun 



from 
A - 
yel 
beau 



ish horn! 



the vine; 

pril played, 

low hair. 

ty poured'. 



the 



good 



We bet - ter love 

We dropped the seed 

And now, with Au - 

Where'er the wide 



old 



the 

o'er 

tumns 

old 




crop a - dorn The hills 

hard - y gift Our rug - 

hill and plain, Be - neath 

moon - lit eves, Its har - 

kitch - en hearth Sends up 



our fa - thers trod; Still 

ged vales be - stow, To 

the sun of May And 

vest - time has come, We 

its smok - y curls, Who 




let us, for his gold - en corn, Send up our thanks to God! 
cheer us when the storm shall drift Our har - vest fields with snow, 
fright-ened from our sprout -ing grain The rob - ber crows a - way. 
pluck a -way the frost - ed leaves, And bear thetreas-ure home, 
will not thank the kind - ly earth, And bless our far - mer girls! 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 61 

*- ( Class Letter and No. 

( Account No 



Town State Percentage 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching In the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 

1 Should the teacher at this point give any special explanation of the occasional sharps, 
or flats found in a song ? 






2 Why should this explanation wait upon the observation of the pupils?. 



3 What appears to be the effect of a sharp, or a flat on a note?. 



4 Why is it impossible to raise, or lower the pitch of a given tone?. 



5 Explain fully what is done when a sharp is used before a note. 



6 Explain fully concerning the effect of a flat on a note 






7 Which tone of the scale is most frequently affected by these chromatic signs? 



8 What is the name of the syllable Fa when a sharp is placed before it? 



9 Give the name of the scale syllable most frequently used with a flat. 



10 In what way is the syllable Re generally affected ?. 



11 When we rind a sharp before Do, what is the effect?. 



12 Give, on the staves below, three groups of syllables containing chromatic tones which 
sound like Do, Ti, Do in the key of C. Be careful to write the exact signatures as 
well as the correct syllable names 






13 Write, in the space below, a table of the altered names, and pronunciation, of the sylla- 
bles Fa, Re, Do, Ti and Mi 



If you are teaching: at the present time, answer the Question below which pertains 
to your Grade, In order to secure a percentage. If you are not teaching:, It Is not neces- 
sary to answer either question. 

14 If you are teaching in the Fourth Grade, and can put the lesson in this particular part 
of the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions given, 
as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular lesson, indi- 
cate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained. 



Intermediate and Grammar Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 
15 (a) Explain the exact facts in connection with the effect of the use of sharps and Hats. 



(b) What suggestions from this lesson can be utilized immediately in your work/. 




FOURTH GRADE SERIES 1 

j SIEGEL- MYERS 

Correspondence School of Music 

Chicago,IH. 

A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 

public school music Lesson N9 6*5 

BY FRANCES E. CLARK 

Part Singing 

We have,by this time, learned to read notes very well. We can beat the time 
in any kind of meter without difficulty. We have learned the pitch names of notes, 
and can find the Do in any song" or exercise. With this splendid foundation already 
laid, we are ready to begin to learn to sing with two parts,- or with two separate 
and independent groups of voices. 

The principal difficulty in part singing lies in the development of the musical 
ear. It is hard to sing one tone and hold it strictly in pitch, while others are sing- 
ing another tone. Indeed, to be able to hear both tones and hold one or the other 
at will, is a real achievement. To accomplish this, we must approach the subject 
gradually and with very simple means. 

In the Fourth Grade, there is no difference whatever between the quality of 
the voices of the boys and the girls, and it is not necessary to divide the class 
into upper and lower parts at this time, upon any basis of voice development. There 
is no reason why a boy should sing alto exclusively at this age, and it is not only 
unwise, but often harmful (in producing a coarse, harsh quality of tone) to require 
boys to sing the alto part too frequently. The splendid ear training resulting from 
singing the lower part, should be given to all, while the care of the voice demands 
that every child shall sing the upper part some of the time, for the sake of keeping' 
the tone quality clear and high. It is, well therefore to change about the parts fre- 
quently. This is not necessary for every exercise, but you can permit one division 
to sing the lower part in one exercise, and the upper part in the next,and vice versa. 

In the first lesson on the subject of part singing, a splendid drill is found in 
singing the successive scale steps in thirds. Arrange the class in two groups, either 
across the room, with a front and a rear division, or laterally, with two side divisic.is 
When the class is thus arranged, the lesson may proceed as follows: 

Now, children, we are going to learn to sing two parts at one 
time. Everybody sing Do, Mi. {Children sing) Now, the front of the 
room may hold Mi while the rear division drops back to Do. Let us 
hold these tones both together, and hear how nice it sounds. {Children 
sing.) Now let us change sides, and those at the back of the room may 

Copyright MCMXII by Sieg*el -Myers Correspondence School of Music 



hold Mi, while those at the front drop back to Bo. (Children sing as di- 
rected.) 

Now, everybody sing Re, Fa. (Children sing.) This division hold Fa 
and that one drop back to Re. Hold both tones together. Now, let 
us change sides and sing it again in the same way. 

Again, children, let us sing Mi, Sol. The front children may hold 
Sol, and the others drop back to Mi. (Reverse and repeat.) 

Now, everybody sing Fa, La. This division should hold La, and 
that side drop back to Fa. (Reverse and repeat.) 

Everybody sing Sol, Ti. The back division hold Ti, and the front 
drop to Sol. (Reverse and repeat.) 

Now sing La,Do, and hold the two tones as we did before. 

This time, we will sing Ti, Re, and hold the two tones as before, 
and then all sing Do together. (The children, throughout this exercise, will 
sing as indicated in III. N9 l) 



Ili.N? 




Mi Mi ; Re Fa Fa; 



Mi Sol Sol;FaLaLaj So1 Ti Ti ;La Do Do ; Ti Re Re- Do 



' FrrF Frf 




M 



CQ 



Do Mi Do; Re Fa Re;Mi Sol Mi,- Fa La Fa; Sol Ti Soli La Do La; Ti ReTi ; Do. 

A further development of this same principle, but using the intervening notes in 
skips of thirds, are shown in Illustrations Nos. 2 to 6. Present these in the same man- 
ner, as already indicated, and emphasize the singing of the syllable names, as a guide 
to the notes which the pupils sing in their independent parts. 



111. N? 2 



^N 



Do Re Mi 



Ill.N? 3 



Do Re Do 



111. N9 4 



Do Re 
111. N° 5 



f 



Do 
Do Mi Fa Re Do 



WPP #^ 



Do Re Mi Re Do 



DoTi Do 



111. N? 6 




Do Mi Sol Fa 



Do Re Do Ti 

Re Mi Do 



R¥ 



Do 



Pmmm 



Do Do Re Ti 



Do Do Mi Re Ti Ti Do 
The study of part singing in songs is most easily introducedby means of 'Rounds? 
The "round" is a very old musical device, dating back to an early period in the develop- 
ment of the art, but it is just as interesting and pleasing now as it was hundreds of. 
years ago, and it can be adapted to our purpose very successfully. The "catch" or 
"glee" was also a favorite form of composition among singers of long ago. The 



P. S. M. No. 62 



3 

characteristics of these compositions, is that the melody starts in one voice, and 
then, at the end of the phrase, or rhythmical division, the same melody is " caught 
up" by another voice, while the first voice continues with the second phrase ina har- 
monious manner. This idea of the frequent repetition of the same melody in dif- 
ferent voices or parts, has been developed in instrumental writing-, and the outcome 
of this method of composition is known as the"Fugue"of modern times. The name 
was taken from the Latin verb "fugere" which means "to fly." This name seemed 
appropriate, as one part appeared always to chase, or flee, after another, 

A very familiar example of the round is the old song, "Three Blind Mice." 
The first group of children starts with the phrase given in Illustration N? 7, singing 
"Three blind mice" three times. Then the second group of children starts in, and 



I11.N9 7 




^ 



i^ 



3m 



Three blind mice, Three blind mice, Three blind mice, 

sings the same thing, while the first group continues singing, "See how they run". 

three times as in Illustration N° 8, the rest of the song is sung in similar fashion. 
1st group 



Ill.N? 8 




w r i r p p r ' r ^^ 



See howtheyrun, Seehowtheyrun, See how they run, 
2nd group 



¥^=^ 



J J J i J J 



^ Three blind mice, Three blind mice, Three blind mice, 

When you are studying a round, you should teach it first as one continuous song 
When all are thoroughly familiar with the tune, let the children sing it as a song, 
independently and without your aid. Then divide the class into two, three or four 
sections, as the round may indicate, and let each section of the class practice the 
round straight through as one complete song, the other pupils being silent. (It is 
better at first to confine the work to two parts.) When you are sure that each sec- 
tion can sing its part entirely through as an independent song, then let the first 
section begin at the beginning, and start to sing the song through twice. When 
section one of the class has finished singing the first phrase of the round, as indica- 
ted by the words or music, section two begins at the beginning, so that section two 
sings part o?w of the round, while sectio?io?ie sings part two of the round. Sing 

the round through twice in this manner. Such class work is great fun, and a splendid 
beginning for part singing. 

The next step in the introduction of part singing, is virtually the same as the 
first one; that is, we have the singing of parts that are exactly alike, one section be- 
ginning a measure or two after the other section, without waiting for the natural end 



of the phrase, as in the case of the round. The second voice follows the first voice 
exactly as if it were a game of "musical tag." Such exercises are called "can ons!' A 
short example of this form is given in Illustration N° 9. 



111. N? 9 



'i n rp JJ 



# 



p 



E# 



m 



Wt 



The same methods of study are employed for the canon as for the round al- 
though in the canon, the parts come closer together, and it is perhaps a little more 
confusing on that account. In beginning the study of two part canons, always read 
the lower part first: the upper part is the melody and when once heard, it stays in 
the mind and makes it the more difficult to hold the lower part true to pitch and 
melodic outline. Let all the class learn the lower part together, and then the upper 
part. Only after this is done, should you divide the class into two sections, that is 
either separate it into those at the front and those at the rear of the room, or else 
divide the class into sides. Then, let one section sing the lower part and one the up- 
per, and afterwards change the arrangement and reverse the parts, singing the 
canon again. In this way, each section has the opportunity to sing both the upper 
and the lower parts. 

The two melodies given in Illustrations Nos. 10 and 11 may be combined. After 
learning each part independently and thoroughly, it is possible for the pupils to sing 
them together correctly. The combination of the two melodies is shown in Illustra- 
tion N9 12. *.iIll.N9 10 , /iii 111. N9 11 



p 



4 



rrnvi 



m 



i 



Ill.N? 12 



#*^ 



The following exercises can be used to show how two melodies may be put to- 
gether, and how, although each is just as important as the other, they can be com- 
bined with good musical effect. 




i 



¥ 



1 'iiij l Wi| l l 'i, l ,'i,iSa 




' fl'i i ' iJii ' i ' i, ', 



f 



Do not fail, in the song study in the Fourth Grade, to require the pupils to commit 
to memory the song "Red, White and Blue? with all its verses and to teach many songs 
that are appropriate in this grade, both in literary and musical value. 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 62 

I Class Letter and No 

( Account No 




Town .State Percentage 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these Questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 

1 What foundation has been laid, by this time, for the successful study of part singing? 



What is the principal difficulty in teaching part singing? 



3 What important condition should be observed at this time, with reference to the quality 
of the voices of the boys and girls ? 



4 What is apt to be the result if the boys of the Fourth Grade sing the alto part exclusively? 



5 What is accomplished by alternating the upper and lower parts between the boys and 
girls ? 



6 What is the particular benefit resulting from singing the lower part?. 



7 What is the first step in part singing? 






8 What division of the class should be made in part singing?. 



9 Give a short model lesson presenting Illustration W,. 6, 



10 (a) What is a "round?". 



(b) What is a "catch," or "glee?" 



11 What is the origin of the "fugue?" 



12 Explain fully the methods by which rounds can be taught most successfully 



13 Do pupils generally find it difficult to sing the round: 



14 What is a "canon?". 



15 How should the canon be taught?. 



16 How should the teacher first take up a part-song?. 



If you are teaching? at the present time, answer the question below which pertains 
to your Grade, in order to secure a percentage. If you are not teaching:, It is not neces- 
sary to answer either question. 

17 If you are teaching in the Fourth Grade, and can put the lesson in this particular part of 
the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions given, 
as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular lesson, indi- 
cate any changes you made, and give an account. 



Intermediate and Grammar Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 
18 (a) State fully what diMculties you have had in teaching part songs to your class 






(b) Name three part songs ivhicft you have used. 



(c) In what way can you use the study of rounds and canons to facilitate your study 
of part songs t . • 



3 



In the spaces below, marked "Q 1," "Q V etc, you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer". 



Q. 1. 



Answer 



Q. 2. 



Answer » ; 



Q. 3. 



Answer 



Q. 4.. 



Answer 



Q. 5.. 



Answer 



FIFTH GRADE SERIES ^ 

SIEGEL-MYERS 
Correspondence School of Music 

Chicago, Dl. 

A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 

public school music Lesson N° 63 

BY FRANCES E. CLARK 

Review Preliminary to 
Fifth Grade Study 

In schools where music is not systematically taught, it will be quite impossible for 
the pupils to move directly into the regular work of the Fifth Grade without some re- 
view of previous topics. 

If the children have not had those principles of music study which should be 
presented in the lower grades, the teacher has no alternative but to present these 
principles anew to the pupils in a briefer, more condensed manner. This work will be 
more or less like that prescribed in previous lessons devoted to the review necessary 
for the Third and Fourth Grades, but, in addition, we must include the subjects which 
have been taught in the Fourth Grade Series of Lessons of this Cuur: < . 

If the Fifth Grade class has never had any music study before coming into that 
grade, they will, of course, have little idea of tone, pitch and rhythm, and must first 
of all be brought into the "singing attitude" of mind by means of rote songs. In the 
regular course of procedure, it should not be necessary to teach many rote songs, but 
still it is welljbefore starting on the otner topics which the children must take up, to 
have a fairly good repertoire of songs by which they can enjoy, and develop enthusi- 
asm for y the singing lesson. These songs, however, must be selected carefully to 
meet the taste of the children of this more advanced grade, and must in no wise be 
the little rote songs that were given in the primary grades. In general taste and in 
mental development, those children who have had no special singing work are as 
mature as other children of the Fifth Grade, and the same songs will appeal to both 
classes. Choose, then, for these rote songs, material which is suitable for Fifth Grade 
children, even though the equipment of the class in actual musical knowledge may be 
that of only the First Grade. Almost all the songs which are suitable, can be taught 
readily by rote, and this should be the first material which the teacher uses, in start- 
ing the work of the Fifth Grade. 

The next step, is, of course, learning to read notes, and the review outlined in 
Lesson N9 53 must be covered, in teaching the scale, the staff, meter signatures and 
note reading. In addition to this, we must give a brief review on learning to beat time 

Copyright MCMXII by Sieffel- Myers" Correspondence School of Music 



2 

as explained in Lessons Nos. 54 and 55. All of this work can be taught most effect- 
ively from the blackboard, without reference to the printed page. 

It is a great mistake to put in the hands of Fifth Grade children a primer which 
is intended for the First or the Second Grade. The songs found in such books are 
generally too simple to please these older children, and while the exercises areas dif- 
ficult as they can well master with their limited knowledge, still they will take no 
interest in the singing lesson because they will feel that they have been given "baby 
books." It is better to use a book not more than one year behind their grade, and 
make up the preliminary work by teaching all the necessary principles and illustra- 
tive exercises from the blackboard. 

Begin the study of note reading with easy exercises, and then^n connection with 
the blackboard work, take up in order the problems of meter, the divided beat, the 
dotted quarter note, pitch names, the rules for finding Do, and the simple chromatics, 
according to the instruction that has been given earlier in this Course on those sub- 
jects. Later, you can begin the singing of "rounds" and "canons," as explained in 
Lesson N? 62, in preparation for part singing. 

For those children who have had good musical training in the previous grades, 
the Fifth Grade is the place where sight reading should be at its best. Building 
on the foundation which should have been well laid, we find that the average child 
of eleven or twelve years of age is at the very zenith of his powers in quickness 
of perception and alertness, and has not yet reached the age of self-consciousness, 
which will inevitably impede his powers of expression to a certain degree. 

If your class has had good drill in sight reading, you can give the children 
many sight reading exercises, and not always easy ones. The children love to try 
their skill at hard exercises and difficult musical problems, and thus their aptitude 
increases with practice. If they do not read readily, you should give them a great 
number of easy exercises, but insist that they must read them at sight without mis- 
take. Correct any habit of stammering, or hesitation at the very outset, and in- 
duce the pupils to concentrate their whole attention on the work in hand. Insist 
upon their looking sharply at the exercises, and reading them promptly and fluently. Skill 
in doing this is largely the result of eye training, which we learned was the foundation 
of the early work in sight reading. With concentration of attention, you will find that 
the pupils develop remarkable aptitude in reading their exercises. 

Give plenty of attention to vocal drill and dictation, both oral and written, but 
dwell mostly upon sight reading of both songs and exercises. The Fifth Grade is the 
place to bring to a focus all the previous training in sight reading. If the opportunity 
afforded at this time is neglected, you will find that the children will never become 
ready readers; therefore, throughout the work in the Fifth Grade, emphasize sight 
reading at all times. 

P. S, L.No.63. 



The simple exercises given below, can be used for the early drill of those pup 
who have had little training 1 before taking' up the tvork of the Fifth Grade. 



i 



l 



mm 



fc^ 



p? 



^ 



p 



^ 



ffP 



r^rT 



i 



i 



wm 



w^ 



±& 



Jjj uJ [-ifJJj^jjj^irJJ iJrf ^ 



|^^-j i r rrr i rrrri J ^j i r rrr i rr^ i JfF 



The Fifth Grade is also the place where we must teach many patriotic songs. The 
pupils should be made familiar with all of our national songs, and the time is well spent 
which is devoted to such study. 

COLUMBIA, THE GEM OF THE OCEAN 



DAVID T. SHAW 

Maestoso 

35E 



DAVID T. SHAW 



f 



■^—^-Ji 






J=P 



fy. 



fejE 



s 



1. Oh! Co - lum - bia, the gem of the o - cean, 

2. When war winged its wide des - o - la - tion, 

3. The star - span - gled ban - ner bring hith - er, 



w 
The" 
And 
Oer Co 




home of the brave and the free, The shrine of each pa - triots de - 

threat-ened the land to de - form, The ark then of free-donfsfoun- 

lum-bias true sons let it wave; May the wreaths they have won nev-er 




vo-tion, A 

da- tion, Co 



world of - fers horn -age to thee, 
lum - bia, rode safe thro' the storm; 



Thy 
With 



with-er, Nor its stars cease to shine on the brave. May the 



i\ s. M. N? 63 



Hfl 



i 



^^= 



man 


- dates make 


he - 


roes 


gar • 


• Jands of 


vie 


- fry 


serv 


-ice u - 


nit 


ed 



ne er 



li — J^TT 



as - sem - ble, 
n - round her, 



sev - er, 



£=^ 



When 
When so 
But 



4 



£ 



B 



i^F rrT^ ^^ 



t r ru 



33e 



Lib - er - ty's form stands in view; Thy ban-ners make tyr - an - ny 

proud- ly she bore her brave crew; With her flagproud-ly fl oat-tog be- 
hold to their col - ors so true; The ar-my and na - vy for ■ 




trem - ble, 
fore her, 



When borne by 
The boast of 

Three cheers for 



the red, white, and blue, 
the red, white, and blue, 
the red, white, and blue, 



CHORUS 



h 



*=*=* 



mm 



3^Ez 



1. When borne 

2. The boast 

3. Three cheers 



by the red, 
of the red, 
for the red, 



white, and 
white, and 
white, and 



blue, 
blue, 
blue, 



When 
The 
Three 



mm 



<r- 



s=£= 



3=£z 




borne by the red, white, and blue; Thy ban-ners make tyr - an-ny 

boast of the red, white, and blue; With her flag- proud -ly float-in^ be - 
cheers for the red, white, and blue; The ar-my and na - vy for- 




trem-ble, 
fore her, 

ev - er, 



When borne by the red, white, and blue. 



The 
Three 



boast 
cheers 



of the red, 
for the red, 



white, and 
white, and 



blue, 
blue. 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 63 



Name. 



i Class Letter and No 
Account No 

Percentage. 



Town State 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 



1 What conditions will the teacher probably find in the Fifth Grade music class at the 
first of the year? 



2 Give a list of the topics which must be treated in the review, if one is made necessary 
because no previous music study has been given in the school 



3 What is the first step toward enlisting the pupils' enthusiastic interest in the music 
lesson ? 



4 Why should particular care be taken in the selection of songs?. 



5 Why is it necessary for the teacher to be tactfully observant of the pupils' taste in 
the Fifth Grade song material ? 






6 Name three songs which can be used as rote song material in the Fifth Grade. 



7 Why is review work better taught from the blackboard, than from text books?. 



8 Why is it particularly necessary to use advanced music readers in the Fifth Grade? 



9 How can the preliminary work be made up, if it seems desirable to use only advanced 
music readers ? 



10 When there has been considerable musical teaching in previous grades, on what point 
should emphasis be laid in the Fifth Grade music study? 



11 Why can the teacher expect rapid progress at this point?. 



2 



12 What precautions should the teacher observe in the matter of sight reading?. 







13 Why should this method of drill be developed to the utmost?. 



14 What particular kind of songs should be taught in the Fifth Grade?. 



If you ore teaching at the present time, answer the question helow whleh pertains 
in your Grade* In order to seeure a percentage. If you are not teaching, it is not neces- 
sary to answer either question. 

15 If you are teaching in the Fifth Grade, and can put the lesson in this particular part of 
the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions given, 
as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular lesson, indi- 



cate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained. 



Grammar Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 

16 (a) What conditions do you find in your class at the beginning of the school year? 



(b) What suggestions for review contained in this lesson do you find particularly valu- 
able, and applicable to your work ? 



; 



(c) Do you find it difficult to arouse enthusiasm for the music lesson in your classf 



In the spaces below, marked "Q 1," "Q 2," etc., you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer". 

Q. 1 



Answer 



Q. 2. 



Answer 



Q. 3. 



Answer 



Q. 4. 



Answer 



Q. S. 



Answer 



FIFTH GRADE SERIES 1 

SIEGEL- MYERS 

Correspondence School of Music 

Chicago, III; 

A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 

public school music Lesson N9 64 

BY FRANCES E. CLARK 

How To Maintain Interest 
The Unequal Divided Beat 

The most essential thing in the music study of the Fifth Grade is to make it so 
interesting-, that the children will love their singing 1 lesson, and long for the music 
period to come. No matter what is done, or what is left undone, this must be the 
important feature. Nothing can be accomplished if the children do not like their sing- 
ing, or look upon it as a drudgery. This is more likely to happen in the Fifth Grade 
than at any other point, because they are coming to see their progress in other stud- 
ies; and if, as frequently happens, there is much review work to be done in the mu- 
sic study, the pupils are very apt to find it tiresome. For this reason, until they have 
learned to make a play of their sight reading in various drills, you will need many rote 
songs to keep up the interest, while you are quietly inserting the necessary amount 
of drill. 

In those classes where there has been no previous training in music, especially 
in the Fourth Grade work, it may be necessary to devote the work of the entire 
year to the development of tone quality, ear training, and the other fundamentals 
which have already been treated in this course of lessons. The Fifth Grade offers 
practically the last opportunity of the teacher to do this essential work in the Grades 
and therefore it must be thoroughly done. It may be necessary for you to work a 
long time with the untrue voices to get them into satisfactory condition. Mean- 
while, however, it is most desirable to get up a good repertoire of suitable rote 
songs through which to keep up the interest, while the review work is being done. 

If the class has already had some training, you will be able to conduct a re- 
view in a shorter period of time, including only such features as have not previously 
been presented, and can probably take up the new work, which properly belongs to 
the Fifth Grade, in the second semester of the school year. 

In presenting the problems of the staff, meter signature, etc., use the black- 
board and colored crayon constantly. Give daily drill on the old, and now familiar, 
scale ladder, and make the work quick,short and full of vim. For instance, draw 
a staff on the board, and write the key signature and Do in colored crayon. Now, 
write quickly on the staff a round open note, for instance Mi, and tell the class 

Copyrig-ht MCMXII by Sieg-el-Myers Correspondence School of Music 






to give instantly the syllable name of the note. Write with lightning* quickness, 
other notes in all the various lines and spaces of the staff, and demand instant 
responses from the pupils, pausing only long enough after each, for the class to 
give the name. Of course, this will result immediately in sharpening the eye 
power and attention to a wonderful degree, but it will also result in a few nimble 
witted and quick- tongued pupils answering, while the slower ones fall behind. 
After a minute or two of such drill, or play, (for it is really great fun and produces 
much competitive interest among the children), ask the leaders, or those who al- 
ways answer, to be silent and give the others a chance. Then continue the ex- 
ercise by calling on all the boys, and all the girls, in groups, or choosing certain 
ones from certain rows, and in other ways which are interesting and stimulating. 
Continue this until the exercise has served to reach every pupil. 

Such a miscellaneous series of notes, as those given in Illustrations Nos.l and 
2, can be used for this sight reading, but you should give such exercises with great 
speed, securing an immediate response with the syllable name's of the notes. ■ A- 
void any regularity in choosing those who answer, so that the keenest, most alert 
attention may constantly be stimulated. 
111. N? 1 



n il 


^^ 




Z ]/ fti 


4T* 4> tf> ** ° 


41 


it p i 


° c> ° n ** 


fm t 


41 *> ^ *> 4* ^ 




vy 




*> v *> _* 


*- O 



111. N? 2 



Do,Sol, etc. 



4 



33C 



ZSSZ 



" 4% « *= 



^gPCC 



ts=&z 



"O" 



Do,Mi, etc. 



Such exercises as those in Illustration N? 3 can be used for sight reading. Di- 
vide the class into rows, and strive always to gain fluent reading, without hesitation 
or stumbling. 

111. Nq 3 

(a) 



J l rr UJ l llj^^ENM * 

Mi, Sol, etc. 

a (d) 



Do. Mi, Sol, 
(O)i" . a .. rt. W i I 

*j r ir r Jr r i n i JKi r r i j-f= ^ ^ 



Mi, Sol, La, etc. 

Further drill of this kind can be given, with such exercises as those in Illustration N? 
4. It is a good plan to divide the class in halves, and ask one half to sing these ex- 
ercises with Loo, and the other half to sing the syllable names of the notes as the 
same time. Always make this part of the lesson bright and stimulating, and leave 

7*. S. L. No. 64 



no room whatever for flagging- interest, or hesitating responses. 
111. N? 4 



(a) 



1st Group Loo,Loo, Loo,Loo, Looloo, Loo. 



(b) 




3 




etc. 



£ 



ps^ 



f 



^6*wp Do > Sol > D °> Mi > Re > Re > Do - " 

.(c) Loo,Loo,etc. , i A i (<!) 



te2= 



s 



3EEC 



^ 



^ 



^ 



Mi ; Mi, etc. 

Give especial attention to the letter names of notes, continue also to speak of the 
lines and spaces by their letter names, encouraging* the children to do the same. 
Occasionally ask the class for the letter names of the notes of a single exercise, 
and sometimes it is well to sing an exercise using the letter names. With thorough 
drill of this kind, you should, in two or three months, find that the class can give 
ready and accurate answers with either the letter names or the syllable names of the 
notes. 

It is now time to teach the unequally divided beat in our rhythm studies. This 
consists of a dotted 8th note followed by a 16th, as shown in Illustration N? 5. 



111. N9 5 



fei 



m 



The use of the dot in this case is exactly the same as it is with the dotted quarter 
note and eighth, which we studied in Lesson N9 58. The same principle of counting 
the time holds good, that is, the dot adds one half to the time value of the note. Since 
an 8th note is equal to two 16th notes in time value, we find that the dot will add one 
16th to it, thus making three 16ths in all. The fourth 16th note is written out as a 
companion note in this rhythm, as shown in Illustration N? 6. This rather jerky 
rhythm brightens materially many of our songs and exercises, but if used continu- 
ously, it produces an unmusical effect. Present it in exactly the same manner as 
that used for the evenly divided beat. (See Lesson N? 56.) First, sing four Do's, 
four Tis, four La's, etc., each one representing a 16th note ? as shown in Illustra- 
tion N? 6. 



111. N9 6 




JULas 




Do - - - Ti - - - La - - - Sol - - - Fa - - - Mi - - 

Then show how three of the four sixteenth notes in a quarter note are to be 

tied together in one long note, and the final sixteenth just barely touched upon. Sing 



the scale downward as shown in Illustration N? 7, using- the dotted eighth and six- 
teenth figure in this manner. The sixteenth note must be sung with extreme light- 
ness and deftness, in order to give the right effect. 



111. N? 7 



$> u m n 



w 



Do Do Ti Ti La La Sol Sol Fa Fa Mi Mi Re Re Do Do 
The scale song in Illustration N? 8, shows the use of this rhythm. 
111. N? 8 



ffrt.F p.nijn? ] pi. 1 '■' j ii 



Jin- gle, jin- gle, jin- gle, jin - gle,Ring the bells on San-ta's sleigh. 

The following song will also serve for this purpose, although here the dotted 
eighth and sixteenth note are used in | rhythm. The time values of the notes and 
effect of the rhythm are similar to two part time. 

THERE IS EVER A SONG SOMEWHERE 



JAMES W, RILEY 



F. E. C. 




There is ev - er a song some - where, my dear; There is 



5*= 



Z=k 



f^ m 



f ^m 



mm p 



p 



ev-er a some-thing sings al-ways: There's the song of the lark,when the 




skies are clear/There's the song of the thrush,when the skies are gray. The 

"5" 




sun-shine show- ers a - cross the grain, And the blue -bird trills in the 
/7\ 




or-chard tree; And in and out, when the eaves drip rain The 




swal-lows are twit-ter-ing cease-less4y The swallows are twittering ceaselessly. 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



Ac 



A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 64 

( Class Letter and No 



^T 






Name 

( Account No 

Town State Percentage. 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 

1 Discuss fully the importance of keeping up the interest in the singing lesson.. 



2 Name two ways in which this can be accomplished. 



3 Why is it so important that the work in the Fifth Grade should stimulate the 
pupils* interest ? • 



4 What two points in the method of presenting the lesson must be observed most 
carefully by the teacher ? 



5 What two results are apt to follow rapid dictation work?. 



6 How can the teacher overcome any detrimental tendencies in such exercises?. 



7 Give on the staff below, a series of notes which may be used for rapid dictation?. 



# 



8 Name a good method of ear training to be derived from the sight reading exercises. 



9 Why should the use of the letter names of notes be encouraged?. 



10 Write, on the staff below, an example of the unequally divided beat. 



11 Explain the value of the dotted eighth note. 



12 Give a short model lesson, presenting the dotted eighth and sixteenth rhythm. 



13 Write an original rhyme and a melody for it, using the dotted eighth and sixteenth 
rhythm — 



# 



If you are teaching at the present time* answer the question below which pertains 
to your Grade, in order to secure a percentage. If you are not teaching, It Is not neces- 
sary to answer either question. 

14 If you are teaching in the Fifth Grade, and can put the lesson in this particular part 
s of the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions given, 
as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular lesson, indi- 
cate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained 



Grammar Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 

*ariA 

IS (a) Give a report of the results of using interesting and stimulating methods in sight 

reading, basing your report on actual experience in your class work. 

;:#\a 



■::,■.'/. 



(b) Give a short model lesson, presenting the dotted eighth and sixteenth rhythm. 



., I 



3 



In the spaces below, marked "Q I," "Q 2," etc, you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer". 



Q. 1- 



Answer 



Q. 2.. 



Answer 



Q. 3- 



Answer 



Q. 4., 



Answer 



Q. 5. 



Answer 



FIFTH GRADE SERIES 



SIEGEL- MYERS 

Correspondence School of Music 

Chicago, IU. 



A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 
PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 
BY FRANCES E. CLARK 



Lesson N° 65 



The Names of Keys 



The next subject which we are to take up is that of naming the keys, or key 
signatures. It has already been treated from the Normal standpoint in Lesson N? 49, 
but it should be presented to the children somewhat as follows: - 

Now, children, we have already learned how to find Do in the keys 
that have sharps in the signature, and we have also learned how to 
find Do when flats are used. Now, who can give me the rules for 
finding the Do's? John, give the rule for finding Do in the sharp keys. 
{John answers) Ye s, that is right. The last sharp is always" Ti," and 
we count up to Do. 

Mary, can you give me the rule for finding Do when there are 
flats in the signature? {Mary answers?) Yes, that is right also. The 
last flat is always "Fa" and we count down to Do. 

Now, we want to learn the names of the keys, so that we can tell 
at a glance just what the name of the key is, when we see a signa- 
ture of, for instance, three sharps, or two flats, etc. When a compo- 
sition has no signature at all, we say it is in the key of C,from the 
fact that the scale begins on that note, and the half steps between 
Mi and Fa, and Ti and Do, fall upon the half steps which have the 
pitches of E and F, and B and C, respectively. When we place Do 
on any other tone than C, changes are made in the pitch of the other 
tones. Of these changes we shall learn more later. It is sufficient 
now if we simply commit to memory the signs of the keys, just as 
we memorize the multiplication table, and then we can know instantly 
the narne of the key in which we are singing, by looking at the signa- 
ture^ well as by finding the Do from the last flat or sharp. 

Copyright MCMXII by Sieg-el- Myers Correspondence School of Music 



Two sharps 


}) » 


Three 


» 


« » 


Four 


» 


jj » 


Five 


it 


» » 


Six 


n 


» » 



Two flats 


}) 


}} 


» » 


Three „ 


« 


J} 


» » 


Four „ 


)> 


» 


» J> 


Five „ 


V 


» 


» >J 


Six „ 


» 


Jl 


» » 



(The teac/wr writes on the board, in a convenient place the folio whig table of 

signatures,) 

One sharp is the sign of the key of G. 

» » » D. 
» )> » A. 
» jj » E. 
» » » 1>. 
M )) >, Fj?. 

John, you may read this over for us. (John reads.) Now we must 
try to memorize this table for tomorrow's lesson. 

You may learn the flat signatures in the same way. 
One flat is the sign of the key of F. 

r y) n Ah. 
i » » Dfc 
p » » G^- 

Harry, you may read the table of flat signatures for us, and 
then see if you can tell us what the name of the key with four flats 

is. (Harry reads and answers correctly.) 

Thorough drill on these tables of key signatures should be given, to stamp them 
in the memory. Require the children to write the tables on the blackboard many times. 
Also draw a staff and write various key signatures. In turn, ask the children to write 
on the board, the upper and lower Do of these key signatures. Call attention con- 
stantly to the position of the sharps and flats on the staff. When the children are 
able to fix the Do, having once given the key signature, then reverse the question, 
and ask them to write the Do and then add the key signature. You may make a very 
interesting game of writing these key signatures and placing the Do, by following the 
plan of the old fashioned " Spell Down? Divide the class into sides, and in the usual 
way, test the sides or rows to find out which knows the most key signatures. This 
simple plan is productive of much competitive interest and never fails to bring good 
results. 

Draw a staff on some unused place on the blackboard possibly at the top, and 
place it on the letter names of the lines and spaces. Then write the sharp and flat 
signatures successively, and give for each signature, the high and low Do. The 

P S. M, N°. 65. 



manner in which this should appear on the board, is given in Illustration N? 1. 



Key of C 

A Do 



111. N? I 



3E 



Key of Q Key of J> Key of A Key of E 




Allow these illustrations to remain on the board for some time, while you are teaching 
the subject of key signatures, and, when necessary, refer to them. Jn this way the 
children imbibe the knowledge of key signatures unconsciously, as well as consciously. 

Make a daily drill of asking for the key signatures in quick succession. Thus, 
ask such questions as: "One sharp is the sign of what key? Where is Do? Tvvoflats 
is the sign of what key? Where is Do?" Or, turning the questions about, "What is 
the sign of the key of D? Where are the sharps placed?" This will bringa quick and 
keen familiarity with the key signatures. Do not lose any opportunity to impress the 
use of the signatures on the pupils. Having the staff with the groups of sharps and 
flats on it before their eyes daily, helps to fix these things in mind. Drill regularly 
at the music lesson on key signatures, until every pupil can write every signature 
properly and without hesitation. 

In giving such exercises as those below, begin the work by close questioning as 
to the signature and name of the key used, the time signature, and other questions 
concerning the note values, etc., until these facts become simple and familiar sub- 
jects for the class. 




Observe the same suggestions as given for the exercises, in teaching the song 
"When the Wind Blows." 

WHEN THE WIND BLOWS 

Briskly 




1. Oh, the danc - ing of the leaves 

2. Oh, the com - fort of the fire 




A 



When the wind blows, Oh, the danc - ing of the leaves 
When the wind blows, Oh, the com - fort of the fire 



j Ji J. I J. ^p 



m 




*$ 



When the wind blows; And the rush-ing of the trees, Shout -ing, 
When the wind blows;While we hear the song and chat, Of the 



a ji i 



^s 



^ i j. i j. . ^p 



2k 



eresc 



tL. 



m m r mi 1 1 i ' I ^ ^ 



* 



shriek-ing on the leas, Like the sound of seeth-ing seas, 
ket - tie and the cat, And the crick - et on the mat, 



i^^i 



| J^ 1 ]t J> | 



m 



£ 



cresc 




When the wind blows, When the wind blows, When the wind blows. 




From "Harmonic Second Render." 
Permission vf American Book Co. 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 65 



Name. 



Class Letter and No. 
Account No 



Town State. Percentage. 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching In the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 



1 Give again the rules for finding Do in the sharp keys and the flat keys. 



: 



2 Explain of what use these rules should be to the pupil. 



3 Discuss the necessity for knowing the names of the keys. 



4 in the regular (major) scale, between what steps of the scale-ladder do the semi-tones 
occur ? 



5 (a) When Do is placed on any other pitch than C, what is the effect on the pitch of 
the notes of the original C scale ? 



(b) Does the order of the half steps in the scale change, or does it remain the same? 



6 Write on the staff below, the table of the signatures of the sharp keys. 



# 



7 Write on the staff below, the table of the signatures of the flat keys. 



# 



8 Name four ways in which the teacher can give drill on the key names. 
1 



2. 



3. 



4. 



9 Discuss the value of having the table of key signatures written on the blackboard, for a 
period of time 




10 How much time should be given to this subject in each lesson?. 

*•••»•• •••••••• •• •■ ■• •• •••• •••• *••»*•••••••••«••• • • • * • • • •••••••••• « •••••••••• • • • » • • * • • • • • 



11 What is the value of continued drilling on key signatures until they are thoroughly 
learned ?. . . . 



If you arc teaching at the present time, answer the question below which pertain* 
to your Grade, in order to secure a percentage* If yon are not teaching?, It Is not neces- 
sary to answer either question, 

12 If you are teaching in the Fifth Grade, and can put the lesson in this particular part 
of the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions given, 
as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular lesson, indi- 



cate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained. 



Grammar Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 
13 (a) Do you find any difficulty in teaching the key signatures by the method outlined in 
Lesson No. 65 ? 



(b) What is the relation between key signatures and the pitch names of notes?. 



In the spaces below, marked "Q 1," "Q 2," etc., you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles .contained in these lessons;, your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer". 



Q. I. 



Answer 



Q. 2. 






Answer 








Q. 3. 



Answer 



Q. 4. 



Answer 



Q. S. 



Answer 



FIFTH GRADE SERIES 



SIEGEL- MYERS 
Correspondence School of Music 



A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 
PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 
BY FRANCES E. CLARK 



Chicago, 111. 



Chromatics 



Lesson N9 66 



In presenting the subject of chromatic tones to your pupils, you must not con- 
fuse their minds by a discussion of the "whys" and "wherefores" of chromatic alter- 
ation, but simplify your explanation by reference once more to the scale with its tone 
ladder, which they learned in the Second Grade. Introduce this subject in the lesson 
previous to the one you intend to use for the full explanation , by telling" the children 
that there are some "between tones" or intermediate tones, between the regular steps 
of the scale ladder. This hint is enough to stimulate their interest in the first lesson. 
Then, in the next lesson, say to them: 

We learned at the last lesson, that there were some "between tones," 
or intermediate tones, found in between the regular tones of the scale. 
Let us now investigate and find out more about I11.N91 

them. {Draw the tone ladder given In Lesso?i NQ 32.) 



JDo_ 



_TL 



_La_ 



-Sol. 

.Fa. 

_Mi_ 



Notice, children, that the distance between Fa 
and Mi, and Ti and Do, is only half as great as the 
distance between the other tones.( Point to spaces of ladder) 5 
As we look at the ladder, does it not seem reasona- 4 
ble, that, if we can sing tw r o tones to one space, a 
half step apart, there might be room between the 
other steps of the ladder for another tone, half 
way between each of them? 

Let us see if our ears can distinguish this difference. (Blow the 
pitch D from the pitch pipe.) Let us call this note,Do. Class, sing Do. 



.Re. 



iL 



_Do_ 



Copyright MCMXI by Sieg-el - Myers Correspondence School of Music 



Ti 



La 



Sol 



Fa 



Mi 



Re La 



La 



(Children sing.) Sing lower Do. (Children sing.) Sing Do -Re.Cflfwtf pointer 
to Do, Re, tvhile children sitig.) Now let US sing these tones withLa. (Chil- 
dren sing.) Notice how far the voice* seems to travel. Now sing with 
La again. Now, without changing the tone for either Do or Re, sing 
the same tones with La, and put a tone half way between, (sings) 
La-La-La. (Children sing.) There it is. Now we know that it is pos- 
sible to sing a tone half way between Do and Re. 111. N9 2 

We will draw a line with red crayon half way a - 
between Do and Re, to represent this new tone. 

(Insert red line as in III. No 2.) 

If we can sing a tone half way betweenDoand 
Re, do you hot think that we can sing one between 
Re and Mi? Let us try it. Sing Re-Mi, and listen 
very carefully. (Children sing.) Sing it once more 
with La. (Children sing.) You see how far the voice 
goes to reach the top tone. Now, without changing 
either Re or Mi, put one tone in between, like this (sings'* La-La-La. 
Now, you sing it. (Children sing.) There it is, sure enough, a new tone. 
We will draw a line with colored crayon between Re and Mi. (Teacher 
inserts red line between Be arid Mi, as in 171. NQ 3.) 

There is not room enough between Mi and Fa for another tone, 
as you see there is only a short distance between these steps of the 
ladder,* but there will be room between Fa and Sol, since you see 
there is a wide step in the ladder, Sing Fa-Sol. (Children sing.) Now 
sing it with La and listen carefully. (Children sing.) Now sing one tone 
in between; (sings) La-La-La. (Children sing.) That is good. Now we 
will draw a colored line between Fa and Sol, to show the new tone 
we have discovered. (Teacher insert$ red line between Fa and Sol, as in ULN9 3.) 
We will find one more new tone, between Sol and La. Children, 

P S, M. No. 66 



Do La 



8 
7 

6 

5 
4 



111. N? 3 
Do 



Ti 



] 



La 



Sol 



* 



-E£L 



Mi 



Re 



sing Sol -La. {GMidren sing.) Now, see, we will put the colored line be- 
tween these two rungs of the ladder. (Teac/ier inserts red line between Sol 
*tnd La era in IILN9 3) 

There is only one more space left in the ladder where we can 
possibly insert another "between tone" since you see that the space 
between Ti and Do is small, just as it is between 
Mi and Fa. This last tone will come between La 
and Ti. Now, children, let us sing- La-Ti, and then 
with La,La,La;and then we will put in the last 
colored line that we can insert in the scale ladder. 
{Children sing as directed y andteaclber inserts red line as in M.N9 3.) 

Now, how many new tones have crept into our 

scale this morning? Five. They have been there all 

the time, but we did not need to use them, and so 

we have said nothing about them until now. At the i 

next lesson,! shall want you to tell me how many "between tones" 

we can put into the scale ladder, and where they come. 

In beginning* the work with Chromatic tones, it is advisable, to have a thoroug-h 
review in oral and written dictation on the diatonic tones of the scale. The children 
in this grade should be able to give readily any interval occurring within the scale, 
or a half octave above or below In dictating the various tones, or intervals, it is best 
to call for them in groups, with the numeral names, "the pupils giving back the same 
groups in syllable names. For example, you might say, "Class, sing 1-3-5-3-1" and 
the pupils will respond with Do, Mi, Sol, Mi, Do. It is also excellent practice in stimu- 
lating alertness in the class, to call the numerals one at a tt7ne } so rapidly that the syl- 
lable names which the class gives back to you, form a melodic group; but this must 
be done very quickly so that one tone follows another instantly. Thus, the following 
numerals might, represent your dictation, and the syllables would be the pupil's im 
mediate respdnse: 

1-Do, 3-Mi, 4-Fa, 5-Sol, 3-Mi, 2-Re, 1-Do. 



-Dfi- 



It. is also a good plan for you to write out a series of groups of numerals which 
you wish to give, and have the memorandum in your hand, so that you need not hesitate 
in calling- for them. 

Occasionally you should have a written lesson. Sing* the tones to the pupils with 
the neutral syllable La or Loo, and ask them to write what you have sung-, giving- to 
them beforehand the key position, and writing 1 at first without meter. These melodic 
phrases should ordinarily be seven tones in length. You can use the following fonrate, 
or any others which may occur to you. at the time of giving the lesson. 

(8-7-6-5-6-7-8 (1-8-5-6-4-1-5 
Jft-5- 3- 5-8-2-1 (1-4-2-6-5-7-8 

(l -3-5-6-4-2-1 V8 -3-8-5-7-2-8 



1 -7-6-4-2-7-1 

1-5-3-8-6-2-8 



Teach the following part song to the class according to the methods given in Les- 
sons Nos.61 and 62. 



HEIUH-HO! DAISIES AND BUTTERCUPS 



JEAN ingelow 



1. Heigh 

2. Heigh 



MV LAUGH LIN 



ho! dais - ies and but - ter - cups, Fair yel - low 
ho! dais - ies and but - ter - cups, Fair yel - low 






n%=> 




, 
























[ — i 


» 




— R 




p— i 
dan 


ce wit! 


n 


th 


e cuck - oo birds, 


slen - der 


and 


sm 


all. 


-+- 


4 


fresh hearts 


un - con - scious of 


sor - row 


and 


thrall. 






ffir— 








\ 














-41 


H^ 


r — ■ 


M « 


1 


9 


i 


' 4 


U ■ 


3 




I — # 


1 * 








1 i 


i 


—f- 


=41 



Permission <>f Ginn * Co 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 



i Class Letter and No. 




Examination Paper for Lesson No. 66 

Name 



( Account No. 



Town , State Percentage 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 

I. In presenting the new "between tones" to the class, should the teacher give a defini- 
tion for Chromatics, or should the class be allowed to "discover" theiti? 



Can you distinguish with your own ear that the distance from Mi to Fa is less than 
that from Fa to Sol ? 



3. If the pupils have difficulty in placing the tone half way between Do and Re, (using the 
syllable La), should the teacher sing the notes for them, or allow them to make re- 
peated attempts until successful ? 



4. Why should the teacher allow the children to discover the new chromatic tone, instead 
of telling them about it? 




5. When all of the chromatics have been added to the scale ladder, how many new tones 
are found ? 



6. Why should it stimulate the interest of the pupils to know that the new tones have 
been in the scale ladder all the time? 

7. If you have had any previous experience in teaching chromatics, report below the 

success of your instruction 

8. What should he the benefit to the class of the review on diatonic intervals? 

9. Write five groups of numerals which the teacher should use in oral dictation 

10. Should the teacher have better success in dictating notes singly or in groups?... 

ir. Give two reasons for your answer. 

1 . 

2. , 

2 



If you are teaching in the Fifth Grade and can now put the Model Lesson for this 
particular part of the course to immediate, practical use, you should memorize the 
sequence in which the instruction is given in each lesson, and follow this order 
in your own teaching, only varying from the Model Lesson as may be absolutely 
necessary. 

If you can use this Model Lesson in this way, state below how closely you followed this 
particular lesson, enumerate any changes you made in giving it, and give an account 

of the results you obtained from its use 






In the spaces below, marked "Q 1," "Q 2," etc., you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer". 



Q.l. 



Answer . 



Q.2. 



Answer . 



Q.3. 



Answer 



Q.4.. 



Answer . 



Q. 5 



Answer . 



FIFTH GRADE SERIES J 

SIEGEL-MYERS 
Correspondence School of Music 

Ghicago,Hl. 

A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 

public school music Lesson N? 67 

BY FRANCES E. CLARK 

Names of Chromatic Tones 

The naming of the new notes which were described in Lesson N? 66 is the next 
step to take in order to become thoroughly familiar with chromatics. After learning 
to sing them, thus training the ear, we are now to add their names. This is best ac- 
complished in the following way. 

We learned in our last lesson that five new tones have moved in- 
to our scale. These little strangers must have names. To distinguish 
them from the regular tones of the scale, we drew a colored line in 
our scale ladder for each of these new tones, and this is how they 
looked. (Teacher points on the board to the scale ladder, as given in IlLNQ 3, Zes- 
son N9 66.) Notice that the new tones are marked by the colored lines, 
and that they come half way between each of the syllable names, ex- 
cept Mi and Fa, and Ti and Do. 

The name "chromatic" was given to these between tones by the 
Greeks, who thought that the slight difference in pitch between them 
and the regular scale tones, affected the quality, or color of the tone. 
Hence they named them from the Greek vrov$*chroma" meaning color. 
Now, these little colored tones, or chromatics, when placed between 
two of the regular scale tones, have two uses and two names. If they 
take the place of the tone below, and are written on the same line or 
space, they take the name of this tone. When they take the place 
of the tone above them, they are then named for that tone. We change 
the vowel sounds in the syllable names to / (which sounds like EE) 
when the names of the tones below are used (or in ascending the 
scale), and we substitute the vowel sound E (which sounds like AF) } 
in all of the original syllable names in the descending scale. That 
is, in the between tones used when singing up the scale weliave Di 
-not Do, Hi - not Re, etc., and in singing down the scale, starting 
from high Do, we have Te- not Ti, etc. 

Copyright MCMXII by Sieg-el- Myers Correspondence School of Music 



Now, let us learn these new chromatic names. We take them 
first in ascending* order. [Teacher writes on the board the following table.) 

The intermediate tone above Do is called Sharp 1, or Di. 

)j )) » >> ^^ »? n v "y » -til. 

There is no intermediate tone above Mi, as the next note is Fa. 
The intermediate tone above Fa is called Sharp 4, or Fi. 

J) 1) V )> OOl » » V ?) )) ol. 

» v >j « ^ a )j j> » Oj ,, Li. 

There is no intermediate tone above Ti, as the next step is Do. 

Now, in descending the scale, the table is as follows: - 

The intermediate tone below Ti is called Flat 7, or Te. 

j) jj n » *-*& j) » » Oj „ Ije. 

j) )j ) } j, feoi „ „ ,, 5, „ be. 

There is no intermediate tone below Fa, as the next step is Mi. 
The intermediate tone below Mi is called Flat 3, or Me. 

„ „ n „ Ra'„ „ „ 2, ;, Ra (since 

the syllable Re sounds like those already given.) 

In these two tables we have the entire tone-family of the scale. 
How many tones do you find, when counting either up or down? 
{children answer "thirteen?) Yes, there are thirteen tones altogether in 
this so-called chromatic scale. You can always recognize the chro- 
matic scale by the fact that it moves by these short half steps, or 
between-tones, from one Do to the next Do. 

Visible presentation of the chromatic tones, by means of the scale ladder, makes, 
the whole matter a very simple one. The use of the scale ladder and the dotted col- 
ored lines is the key to the situation. 

The children have proved for themselves that it is possible to sing" the inter- 
mediate tones between the regular scale tones, and on the ladder they see the exact 
relation Of these new chromatic tones to each other and to the old tones of the scale. 
They have already learned, even before this, to sing "Sharp 4" and "Flat 7" (see 
Lesson N? 61), and, understanding- that the new tones are sung quite often, they 
see readily that the subject must be mastered. The proper presentation of the sub- 
ject, as outlined in this lesson and Lesson N9 66, should result in making the chil- 
dren perfectly secure in singing chromatics. What this accomplishment means may 
be inferred from the fact that not one choir- singer in ten is sure and accurate in 
sight-reading when chromatics occur, hence the teacher should make every effort 
to give a most thorough and complete drill on the subject. 
p. s h, N? 67. 



3 



When the scale ladder is drawn on the board, and has become thoroughly famil- 
iar to the students, and they have learned the names of the chromatic tones, it is well 
to write, at the ends of the dotted colored lines, the syllable names of the new tones. 
Place the sharp names at the right of the scale ladder, and the flat names at the left. 
Now, with the pointer, indicate the dotted colored line between scale steps 1 and 
2, and ask the children its syllable name. As it is written on the board, the pupil 
can see it and will answer accurately. Continue this with all the other syllable 
names, both sharps and flats, using regular and irregular order, until the children 
become familiar with reading the names of the new tones. Call attention to the fact 
that Sharp 1 and Flat 2 are exactly^ the same tone, as shown by the fact that the two 
names are used at the ends of the same line. Compare also the names of Flat 3 and 
Sharp 2, Sharp 4 and Flat 5, and so on throughout the scale, and make them see 
clearly that one set of names is used in an ascending progression, and that the oth- 
er set is employed in a descending progression. 

Still referring to the scale ladder on the board, ask questions about it of the 
boys and the girls separately, or of certain rows which seem to be slow in deter- 
mining the note names. Ask the leaders to be silent and get a response from the 
dull or backward pupils. In every way, make the brief period in the lesson serve 
as a thorough, systematic drill on the names of the chromatic tones of the scale, 
and produce, if possible, a thorough familiarity with every tone, while reading 
them from the board. 

Now, erase the names from the board and continue the drill, the children re- 
lying on their memory for accurate answers. Keep this drill up for a few minutes 
every day, until you know that every child in the room can instantly give the name 
of every tone in the scale. 

The rounds which were studied in Lesson N9 62 should form an important 
part of the daily lesson, as in no better way can the teacher establish, independence 
and accuracy in part singing. Divide the class into two or four sections, according 
to the nature of the round, and continue the drill as suggested in Lesson N9 62. The 
following rounds are excellent for this purpose. 

^ Scientifically j these two to?ies are not strictly identical in pitchy yet for practical 
purposes they are the same. 



4 



& 



MERRILY, MERRILY 

BOUND FOR TWO PARTS 



^ 



M j\j\j\ J* J>J>1 J J JT 



t r M cr 



Mer-ri-ly, mer-ri-ly, greet the morn; Cheer-i-ly, cheer- i-ly, sound the horn, 




Hark! Hark! the ech-oesplay O-ver the hill, and far a-way. 



^^^ 



who'll buy my posies? 

ROUND FOR FOUR PARTS 

2 













~0 * r- 

Who'll buy my pos - ies,Fresh lil - ies, and ros-es, With 
3 4 




cow-slips and prim-ros - es? La - dies, who'll buy? 



The song "A Bird is Sweetly Singing" is bright and effective, and contains in 
the last two lines a suggestion of the "canon form" which was also studied in Lesson 
N? 62. 



A BIRD IS SWEETLY SINGING 



FRANK VON HOLSTEIN 




A bird is sweet-ly sing - ingWith - in the leaf -y wood; I 




hear the car - ol ring - ing ? With spring's de - light im - bued, With 



gj j r r g jp J 



$£t 



P j j j.j j i j. * iji ■>■ m i ' ' i - 1 j. 



spring's de-light im-bued. O come and dwell with me, Be-neath the green-wood 



» ^- w O come and dwell wil 



^ 



i 



* 



zz= 



and dwell with me, Be - neath The 



^ 



=E=jE 



tree, 



O come and dwell with me. 

5C 



greenwood tree; O come and dwell with me. 

From "New Second Reader" Permission American Book Co. 



Siegel - Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 



, 



Came. 



Examination Paper for Lesson No. 67 

l Class Letter and No. . . . 
( Account No 



own. 



State Percentage. 

Write liaise, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 



1 . Why is it important to learn first to sing the chromatic tones before learning their 
names ? Discuss fully. . . . ? .,..,,... 



How can the teacher best present the regular and chromatic scale tones?. 



What is the value of using the colored line to indicate the chromatic tones on the scale 
ladder ? 



Between which two groups of syllable names is the chromatic tone omitted, and why? 



What is the origin of the word "chromatic"?. 



6 Explain the fact that eacli chromatic tone may have two names 






. • • 



7. Give the rule for the double use of the chromatic syllable names, in the ascending and 



the descending scale. 



8. Give the chromatic syllable names used in the ascending scale. 






9. Give the chromatic syllable names used in the descending scale. 



10. How many tones are there in the chromatic scale?. 



11, Explain why visible presentation of the chromatic tones simplifies the subject. 






12. Discuss the use of the names, "Sharp 1," "Sharp 2," "Flat 6/' "Flat 7," etc., instead of 
the letter names, as F sharp, A flat, etc 



13. Give a short model lesson presenting the fact that Sharp 1 and Flat 2, and similar 
groups, are used for the same pitch , 



14. Name two ways in which the teacher can be sure that the pupils understand the drill 
on the names of the chromatic tones. 



IS. Give a report of the success you have had in teaching "rounds" as an aid to part 
singing 



16. Have you memorized and presented to your class the song "The Bird Is Sweetly 

Singing" ? 

If you are teaching at the present time, answer the anestlon helow which pertains 
to your grrade. In order to secure a percentage. If you are not teaching;, It Is not neces- 
sary to answer either question. 

17. If you are teaching in the Fifth Grade, and can put the lesson in this particular part 

of the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions 

given, as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular 

lesson, indicate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained.. 



Grammar Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 
18. (a) In presenting chromatics to your class, have you in the past followed the methods 
outlined in Lessons Nos. 61, 66 and 67? If not, state fully what your jnethod has been. 



(b) Give a report of the result of your work in following your own line of develop- 
ment ....,...,...., • 






(c) Do you use '"rounds" as part of your daily training in part singing? 



In the spaces below, marked M Q 1/' "Q 2,'* you may ask questions in regard to teaching 
the principles contained in these lessons; your questions will be answered in the spaces 
marked "Answer". 

Q. 1 






Answer 






Q. 2 



' 






Answer . 






FIFTH GRADE SERIES J 

SIEGEL- MYERS 

Correspondence School of Music 

Chicago, 111. 

A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 

public school music Lesson N? 68 

BY FRANCES E. CLARK 

Singing the Chromatic Scale 

We must now learn to sing accurately the scale which includes all the chromatic 
tones which we have learned in our previous lessons. Take up the subject with the 
class in somewhat the following manner :- 

We have found on our familiar scale ladder, that there are thir- 
teen tones to be included between low Do and upper Do. Eight of 
these tones are in the series of tones which we learned a long time 
ago, and constitute what is called the "Major Scale"We are going 
to study more about this major scale later on, but now we must turn 
our attention to learning to sing these new tones.We will first sing 
them in groups, and then finally, putting the different groups to- 
gether, we will sing the entire chromatic scale of thirteen tones. 

We have surig a few of these new tones before, but now we must 
learn to sing them all. Let us begin by singing Do, Re, Mi. {children 
sing.) Now sing Do -Mi, and listen closely for the tone, or pitch of 
Mi. (Children sing.) Now let us put in the new tones you have learned, 
that is, Di and Ri, and sing the group all together. Now sing Do > 
Di, Re, Ri, Mi, and be very sure that when you finish, you have the 
same tone for Mi that you had before, (children sing as directed) Now > 
to test this, sing Do -Mi once more. Was this last Mi the same in 

pitch as the first one you sang? (Children sing Mi } and find it is accurate. 
Teacher repeats the exercise) 

Now, let us sing Mi, Fa, Sol, and then Mi-Sol. Now, we will put 
in the new intermediate tone, and sing carefully Mi, Fa,Fi, SoL 
Are you sure that this last Sol is the same in pitch as the first one? 

(Childre?i sing as directed; teacher tests the last tone } and tlten repeats the exercise 
a second time* the third time she may use the syllable" Loo" instead of the actual syl- 
lable names. This gives further ear training.) 

Copyrig-ht MCMXII by Sieg-el- Myers Correspondence School of Music 



2 

Now, let us finish the scale by singing La,Ti,Do,and then Sol- 
Do. Now, sing Sol -Do again, and listen very carefully for the pitch 
of Do. Now, let us put in the new intermediate tones, which we have 
learned, between Sol and Do, and sing Sol, Si, La, Li, Ti, Do. Again, 
are you sure that you have the same tone for Do as before? (Children 

sing exactly as directed, and the test is repeated } as indicated in paragraph above. 
The teacher should repeat this exercise in its entirety ; with careful drill on these 
groups , and giving especial attention to the test of the final tones in each group.) 
Now, we are going to begin this exercise all over again, and 
this time we will use the pitch pipe to test ourselves at the end of 
each group, to see if we are absolutely right. (Teacher blows the pitch 
"<7" on the pitch pipe.) Now, children, sing upper Do; now; lower Do. (67^7- 
dren sing.) Now sing all the intermediate tones from Do to Mi, paus- 
ing on Mi. The pitch pipe will then give us the tone for Mi to see if 

we are right. (After the children sing the group, the teacher blows a E» on the 

pitch pipe and tests for pitch.) That is right. Now go on 3 singing the new 
tones all the way up to Sol. Now let us see if we are right for Sol. 
(Teacher blows the tone u C ,y on the pitch pipe a?id tests for accuracy.) Yes, that 
is right. Now go on to upper Do with all the little chromatic tones 
between Sol and Do. Now the pitch pipe will tell us if we sing in 
tune on Do. (Teacher biotas upper C on the pitch pipe and compares the pitch 

with the tone sung by the class.) Now let us sing the whole scale again, 

and see if we come out right Oil upper Do. (Exercise is repeated with 
careful testing for pitch.) That was good. 

Now, let us sing down the scale in the same way. This is Do. 
(Teacher blows upper C on the pitch pipe.) Now sing Do, Ti, La. Now 

Do-La, and then put in the intermediate tones, Do, Ti Te La. (Chil- 
dren sing and teacher tests for pitch.) Now, La, Sol, Fa, Mi,- La-Mi and 
then La, Le, Sol, Se, Fa, Mi. (Children sing,) Now, Mi, Re, Do, then 
Mi -Do, and then with the intermediate tones, we will sing Mi, Me, 
Re,Ra,Do. (Tests tvith pitch pipe.) Now let us sing the scale all the 
way down from top Do, and pause at La and Mi for the pitch pipe 
to tell US if we are right. (Teacher tests on syllables La and Mi } with the 
notes "A" and U E" on pitch pipe) 

V. S. L. No. CS 



Drill on these groups of tones in the chromatic scale for just a few minutes at 
a time in each lesson period, but keep it up until it becomes very easy for the chil- 
dren to give any succession of tones and come out on exactly the right pitch at the 
end of a group. A chromatic pitch pipe (Congdon) is absolutely necessary to give 
this drill accurately. 

Make the pupil understand that these chromatic tones are not at all difficult if 
learned in this way, and that they are as easily mastered as the regular scale tones. 
Make the work fun, and strive to keep up the competitive spirit. Let the children 
consider these drills as tricks, acrobatic feats, or musical gymnastics, which it is 
simply sport to do. The drill should be short, sharp and exact, and the pitch of 
tones, when tested, should be absolutely perfect. 

To give variety to these exercises, pitch the scale in different keys than that 
of C, and figure out for yourself how you can give the class the tone required for 
testing. For instance, in the key of D, A will give you Sol, but you cannot give Mi 
in that key, since F# is not found on the pitch pipe. The key of Ebis especially good 
for singing. In this key, blow the upper Eb on the pitch pipe for Do, Bt> for Sol, 
and G for Mi. C gives you La, Afc is the pitch for Fa, and if you wish to use it, 
Fi comes on the pitch of A natural. 

The following exercises embody the principles contained in Lessons Nos. 66, 
67 and 68, and they can only be taught without difficulty by following closely the 
material in these lessons. Great care should be exercised in the presentation of 
chromatics, as it is a subject full of difficulties unless approached in the right way. 




ijj i JujJ 



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J pj iUgg jgiiiiB|pp pp 



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Preface the study of "The River Song-," with a short drill on the following two- 
part round. 

BE TO OTHERS KIND AND TRUE 

ROUND FOR TWO PARTS 




Be to others kind and true, As you would have them be to you, And 




nev-er do or say to men, What you would not re-ceive a -gain. 



In giving the song below, teach it with a brisk swinging rhythm, and with at- 
tention to the chromatic notes contained therein, as well as to the independence of 
the two parts. 



THE RIVER SONG 



KATE LOUISE BROWN 

Briskly 



LEONARD B. MARSHALL 




1. Lo! the hoar - y mount - ain 

2. To it -self it gath - ers 

3. Beau-ti -ful, broad riv - er, 

4 



To the sun - ny plain 

Oth - er rills as bright, 

Child of showV and sun. 




7 

Gives a thread of sil - ver, 
Like a moth-er folds them 
Nev - er i - dly rest - ing 



Child of sum-mer rain; 
Dim-pling with de - light; 
Till thy work be done; 




On it wand - ers, sing -ing, 

On theywand-er, sing- ing. 

Fields grow green to meet thee, 



With the flow'rs at play, 

Clasp - ing hand in hand, 

Gone their thirst and pain 




f t r t T 7 

tfurm-ring in the dark 



Mtirm-V&g in the dark-ness, Laugh -ing in the 

Till the gra-cious riv - er, Glad -dens all the 

Many a grate - ful harv - est Waves up - on the 



day. 

land. 

plain. 



From "Silver Song" Series" Permission of Silver Burdette & Co. 



Siegel-Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 68 

XT ( Class Letter and No 

Name... .. J 

( Account No 



Town. , State. Percentage. 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as fax as possible. 



1. How many tones are there in the chromatic scale? . . . 

2. What syllables are used for the regular major scale tones?. 

3. What syllables are used for the chromatic scale tones? . 



4. Why does the regular, or diatonic, scale lie at the foundation for the correct singing of 

the chromatic scale? . . . . 

5. Why is it necessary to learn to sing the chromatic scale in small groups of tones, rather 

than to attempt the entire scale at once ? 



6. What is to be gained by singing the diatonic scale tones with special emphasis on the 

interval between the two outer tones of the group before inserting the chromatic 
tones? 

7. Give a short model lesson for singing, the chromatic scale between Sol and Do, giving 

particular attention to the testing of the pitch 







8. Why is the use of the pitch pipe necessary in the chromatic scale drill?. 



• •••• 



9. What must be the spirit of the music lesson in order to sustain interest in the chro- 
matic work until the pupils have mastered the subject?. 



10. Give the pitch names for the following tones. If you have a chromatic pitch pipe, 
state whether you can get these tones on it 



(a) In the key of D, what is the pitch for the syllable Sol?. 



(b) In the key of Ab, what is the pitch for the syllable Mi?. 



(c) In the key of F, what is the pitch for the syllable Fa?. 



(d) In the key of B&, what is the pitch for the syllable La?. 



If jou are teaching at the present time, answer the question below which pertains 
to your grade, tn order to secure a percentage. If you are not teaching, It Is not neces- 
sary to answer either question. 

11. If you are teaching in the Fifth Grade, and can put the lesson in this particular part 

of the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions 
given, as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular 
lesson, indicate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained. 

Grammar Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 

12. (a) How much greater degree of accuracy can you secure in singing the chromatic 

scale by emphasising the diatonic tones ? 

(b) Give a complete report of your success in applying the methods for presenting 
the chromatic scales embodied in Lessons Nos. 66, 67 and 68 

3 



In the spaces below, marked "Q 1," "Q 2," etc., you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer", 



Q. 1. 



Answer 






Q. 2.. 






Answer 



.Q..1. 



Answer 



Q. 4., 



Answer 



Q. 5. 



... 



Answer 



*■••••••••■ 



FIFTH GRADE SERIES J 

SIEGEL- MYERS 

Correspondence School of Music 

Chicago, 111. 

A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 

public school music Lesson N? 69 

BY FRANCES E. CLARK 

Relation between Accidentals and Key Signatures 
Comparison Exercises in Chromatic Drills 

We learned in Lesson N9 60 that a sharp placed before a note indicates that 
we should substitute another tone which is a half step above that tone, and that a 
flat placed before a note indicates that we should sing a tone which is a half step 
below the original one. We have learned these intermediate tones in the scale very 
thoroughly, and so we can now take up a closer study of the use of sharps and flats. 

The effect of an occasional sharp or flat placed before a note in a given meas- 
ure, extends only throughout that particular measure, and concerns only the pitch of 
the note on the particular line or space of the staff on which it is written. Because 
. the effect of these occasional sharps and flats is only temporary and limited, they 
. are called accidentals. This characteristic use of accidentals, in which their effect 
does not extend into the next measure, is shown in Illustration N9 1. 



111. N? 1 



^LlhJ^ 



Sing F# 'Sing F$ 

The sharps or flats which are used in the key signature, that is, those placed 
. at the beginning of each line of the composition, cause the substitution of new pitches 
. for the original notes on those lines and spaces on which they occur throughout the 
entire composition. For example, when one sharp is used as the sign of the key of G 
(see Lesson N? 65), it is placed on the 5th, or F line. This means that the tone of 
F in that particular piece will be cancelled every time it is employed, and instead the 
pitch of F sharp will be used throughout. This is true of both the first space and 
the last line of the staff, as shown in Illustration N° 2, and is observed throughout 
the composition , unless the sharps are specifically cancelled. 



111. N? 2 



ft » ■ - 

/L -^^Sing F# throughout. 



When there are three sharps in the signature, which is the sign of the key of A, 
we find that the first sharp comes on the F line, the second in the C space, and the 
third on the G line. These sharps are grouped on the upper part of the staff, simply 

Copyright MCMXII by Sieg-el- Myers Correspondence School of Music 



, 



because they look more orderly in this place, but they govern all pitches of these 
names, as shown in Illustration N? 3. 

111. N? 3 

Hfca+— 



Sing F$ throughout.- 



ft* l ---^ > S Mg Gff throtighout. 



Sing Off throughout. 



The fact that the signature causes the substitution of other tones for the unalt- 
ered staff degrees should not give the class the least trouble, since all scale tones 
are in the same relation to each other. In view of this unchanged relationship of 
the scale steps, it matters little in actual singing what the key signature is, but it 
becomes most important to know how to sing chromatic progressions produced by 
the use of accidentals, and how to sing them readily and without error. 

It will help very much in mastering the more commonly used accidentals, if 
we can fortify ourselves by some helpful comparisons between these new tones, and 
those found in the now familiar major scale. This subject can be presented some- 
what as follows: - 

Now, children, we are going to see if we cannot find some pro- 
gressions in our regular scale which are exactly like the new ones 
with accidentals, which we have been learning to use. 

You all know how to sing Do,Ti,Do, do you not? Singit for me. 

{Children sing "Do, Ti, Do? correctly^ Now this is exactly like Sol, Fi, 
Sol, which is a very common progression, and which we shall find 
often in bur chromatic exercises. Sing Do, Ti, Do, then Sol,Fi, Sol. 
{Children sing as in III. N9 4) 



111. N9 4 



f r7 r ^rw 



Do Ti Do Sol Fi Sol 

Now all other notes with sharps when approached from the 
tone above, as Re,Di,Re,- Mi, Ri, Mi,- La, Si, La, and Ti,Li,Ti, sound 
just the same as Do,Ti,Do. 

Now, children, sing what I am writing on the board, and notice 
that the same effect is produced by each one of these groups as by 
the original Do,Ti, Do. {Teacher writ es as in III, N9 5.) 
111. N9 5 




ffJ/Ji^J^J 



ittJ J li fe 1, J ill s 



% 



DoTi Do 

R S.LfNo. 69 



Mi Ri Mi 



Re Di Re La Si La 



Ti Si Ti 



Children, sing for rrie the syllables Mi, Fa, Mi. (Children sing correet- 
ig) Now this series of tones sounds just exactly like Do, Ra,Do,- Re, 
Me, Re,- Fa, Se, Fa,- Sol, Le, Sol, and La, Te,La. Now you may sing 
this same progression, using all of these different syllable names. 

{Teacher writes as in Illustration N9 6 and children sing.) 
111. N? 6 




Mi Fa Mi Do Ra Do " Re Me Re Fa Se Fa Sol Le Sol LaTeLa 

There are many other likenesses which will help us to sing these 

new tone relations correctly. For example, Do, Te, La, is just like Sol, 

Fa, Mi. {Teacher writes and children sing as in III. JV9 7.) 



111. N9 T- 



■fl I 1 ?! I 



Sol Fa Mi Do Ti La 

Mi, Fi, Sol is just like La,Ti, Do. {Teacher writes and children sing as in 
IH.m 8.) 



111. N9 8 



I J r r 4 J % P 



La Ti Do Mi Fa Sol 

Do-Me sounds like La-Do, and Mi, Si, La, is like Sol, Ti,Do.(reacher 

writes and children sing as in IU.N9 9.) 
111. N? 9 





p 



m 



m 



W 



PP 



La Do 



Do Me 



Sol Ti Do 



Mi Si La 



Thus, we find that the simplest and most obvious way of mastering- the use of 
accidentals is, to find for each interval in which one is used, a parallel in the more 
familiar major scale, and then to drill again and again on the sound of that interval 
in which the ear is trained. Then, we can turn to the training of the eye,as shown 
in the use of chromatics, and substitute the correct syllable names, and the problem 
is greatly simplified. Do not allow the pupils to get the idea that these chomatic 
tones are impossible or even hard to sing, but help them by all means and devices 
to a clear understanding of the subject. Do not skip the exercises in your book which 
contain chromatic tones, but by means of the scale ladder, colored lines, syllable 
names, and the pointer, make clear in every instance just what the interval really 
is. Study this interval, as suggested, from a parallel passage in the major scale, and 
you will soon find that it becomes very easy for the children to grasp the principle 
involved, 



The exercises given below can be taught best when the intervals which they 
contain are prepared by some such specific study as outlined in the Model Lesson. 
Use exercises which are illustrative of these points immediately after each fresh 
group of chromatic intervals has been learned, and in this way fix the matter more 
firmly in mind. 



^rrr |J « JJ|JJJl - mj jJ J|J||Jj | ffPP 




^ 



m^ 



$ 



^* 



m m 



E=S 



3^S 



W^* 



» 



te J J tf J J i j kJ I i J g J J i ^ 



a^JJirrnrrVi r'r'rr^ 



The following" song- can be used freely after such chromatic study as is contained in 
this lesson, 

FAREWELL TO THE FARM 

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON DANIEL PROTHEROE 



£ 



1. The coach is. at the 

2. "To house and gar - den, 
3. "And fare you well for 
4"Crack goes the whip, and 



door at 

field and 

ev - er 

off we 



last, The 
lawn, The 
more, O 

go; The 

0\ 



ea - ger chil - dren 
mead-ow gates we 

lad-der at the 
trees and hous - 



es 




mount-ing fast, And kiss- ing hands in chor-us sing-, Good-bye, good-bye, to 

swangup-on, To pump and sta - ble, tree and swing," Good-bye, good-bye to 

hay-loft do or, O hay-loft where the cob-webs cling," Go od-bye, good-bye,' to 

smal-ler grow;Last,round the wood -y town we swing/'Good-bye, good-bye, to 




ev - 'ry-thing, Good-bye, — 
ev - 'ry-thing, Good-bye, — 
*xt - Vy- thing, Good-bye, — 
? ry-t^ing, Good-bye, — 



ev 
ev 



good-bye, 

good-bye, 

good-bye, 

good-bye, 



good - bye, 
good - bye, 
good - bye, 
good - bye, 



to_ 
to__ 
to_ 
to ev 



ev 
ev 
ev 



_ ) 



Vy- 
*y- 

>ry- 




thing, Good - bye, __ good-bye,_ good-bye, to ev - 'ry ■■ thing, 

thing, Good - bye,— good-bye, — good-bye, to ev - Vy - thing, 

thing, Good - bye,_ good-bye, — good-bye, to ev - >ry - thing. 

thing, Good - bye,_ good- bye, _ good-bye, to ev - 7 ry - thing." 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 69 

( Class Letter and No 

Mame J 

( Account No 



Town State Percentage 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 

1. Give again an exact statement of the process which takes place when a sharp or a 
flat is placed before a note. (See Lesson No. 61.) 



I. When a sharp is placed in the signature, what effect does it have upon notes of the 
same pitch names ? 



3. (a) Define an accidental. 



(b) What is the effect of the accidental sharp or flat placed before a note in a given 
measure ? 



1 Explain the difference between the effect of the accidental and the effect of the signa- 
ture on notes of the same pitch names 



5. Give on the staff below an illustration of the difference in effect between an accidental 
sharp and a sharp contained in trie key signature. (Refer to Illustration No. 1.) 

§ j 

6. Give a reason for the use of the signature group 

7. State clearly why scales in all keys may be sung with equal ease 

8. Why is it important to know how to sing chromatic progressions with definite cer- 

tainty of pitch ? 

9. How and why is it helpful to use comparisons in pitch between the new and unfamiliar 
progressions and those with which the pupils are already acquainted ? 

10. Give on the staff below, as in Illustration No. 5, four groups of chromatic alternations 

which are equivalent to the series "Do, Ti, Do" in the key of B 

2 



11. Give on the staff below five groups of chromatic alternations which sound like the 

series Mi, Fa, Mi, in the key of D, as shown in Ilustration No. 6. 

I 

12. Give a brief resume of the steps necessary to master the singing of chromatic alter- 

nations 



13. Have you learned and used the song, "Farewell to the Farm" ? 

• If you are teaching at the present time* answer the question below which pertains 

to your grade* In order to secure a percentage. If you are not teaching* It In not neces- 
sary to answer either question. 

14. If you are teaching in the Fifth Grade* and can put the lesson in this particular part 

of the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions 
given, as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular lesson, 
indicate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained 

Grammar Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 

15. (a) State three ideas gained from this lesson, which you have successfully adapted to 

your class work 

(b) What is the principle underlying the substitution of familiar syllable groups for 
the unfamiliar chromatically altered progressions? 

(c) Are you able to make clear to your class the difference between the effect of 
sharps or flats in the signature and when employed as accidentals? 

I ' 3 



In the spaces below, marked "Q 1," "Q 2," etc., you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer". 

Q. 1........ 



Answer 



Q. 2. 



Answer 



Q. 3. 



Answer 



0. 4. 



Answer 



Q. 5. 



Answer 






FIFTH GRADE SERIES 



SIEGEL- MYERS 

Correspondence School of Music 



Lesson N9 70 



Chicago, 111. 

A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 
PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 
BY FRANCES E. CLARK 

The Natural, Double Sharp 
and Double Flat Signs 

We learned in Lesson N° 69 that all keys are more or less alike to the singer, 
because the order of tones or scale steps is always uniform throughout all major 
scales. However, it is necessary to know very thoroughly about key signatures and 
the effect of their flats and sharps, because sometimes the pitch' of a note may be 
temporarily cancelled by an accidental . 

We have learned that if an accidental sharp or flat is used, before- a note 
we find a new tone is substituted, which lies a half step higher or a half step 
lower than the original tone. There are still three other kinds of accidentals which 
are used. They are the natural) or cancel, the double sharp, and the double flat, 
and we are going to learn about these signs in this lesson. You can present the 
subject to the class in somewhat the following manner. 

Now, class, we have already learned that when an accidental 
sharp or flat is used, we substitute a new tone for the note before 
which the accidental is placed, during the entire measure in which 
it occurs. In the next measure, this accidental has no longer any in- 
fluence, and it must be written again if it is to affect the tone in 
any way. 

There is still another kind of accidental whichwecanuse,which 
has the effect of cancelling a sharp or flat occurring either in the sig- 
nature, or previously in the same measure. Thus, if we are singing in 
the key which has the signature of two flats, that is, in the key of 
B[?, we find that Fa falls naturally upon the pitch of Eb, since this 
flat occurs in the signature. Now, if we wish to sing Fi, or Sharp 4> 
we must cancel the Eb in the signature. We do this by means of 
the "cancel" or"natural" mark which, like other accidentals,whether 
sharps of flats, is effective only throughout the measure in which it 
is written. The cancel mark looks something like this {teacher writes 
as in JIL m i) r and you will notice that it is something like an abbrevi- 
ated sharp sign. al 

111. N? 1~ 

Copyrig-ht MCMXII by Sieg-el- Myers Correspondence School of Music 




2 

In the illustration I am going to write, the use of the natural sign 
cancels the pitch of the note that is flatted in the signature, and gives 
us the original pitch of E, or a tone a half step higher. This is called 
Sharp 4 of the scale. Therefore, when we are asked to sing Sharp 4 
in the key of B]p,we shall sing E natural. {Teacher writes as in IU.N9 2,) 




111. N? 

*r Fi 

If we are singing in the key of G, with one sharp as the signa- 
ture, and we wish to sing Flat 7, as Do,Te,La, we must cancel the 
F#, as it occurs in the key. signature, hy using the natural. This time 
it cancels a sharp, restores the original pitch a half step lower, and 
so gives us Flat 7 of this scale. In the key of G major, therefore, 

Flat 7 WOUld look like this. (Teacher writes as in III. N° 3.) 



,)|4 

111. N? 3~ 



4 



d: 



Te 

The natural is also used to destroy the effect of the accidental 
sharp or flat which is used previously in the same measure as the 
natural. In this measure (teacher writes as in ill. N9 4), we see that 
the note At, itself an accidental, is cancelled, and, instead, we sing 
A.kl for the rest of the measure, after the use of the natural sign. 



111. N? 4 ggB 



&&& 



m Do Me Mi Re Mi 

I want you to memorize this ru\e:When a natural cancels a sharp, 
either an accidental or a sharp used in the key signature } we sing a 
new fitch a half step lower; and when the natural cancels a flat either 
an accidental or aflat used in the signature, we sing a new tone a 
half step higher. 

Sometimes it is necessary to sing a tone a half step higher or 
lower than the sharp or flat indicated in the key signature. This is 
done hy means of the double sharp and the double flat signs. For 
instance, if we are singing in the key of E, with four sharps in the 
signature, we may wish to sing Sharp 2, or Ri. If we should place a 
sharp before the note, it would indicate to us F$, but this in turn 
would mean nothing, since F$ already is indicated by the signature. 
To really sing Sharp 2, we must sing a tone a half step higher than 

P. S. M. N<> 70 



3 
the Fjt already included in the signature, This will be called "F 
double sharpf The pitch of Ri will, therefore, be the same as G 
natural, but it will be written in the first §p&0# as double F sharp, 
because the G line is already affected by the §hmf in the signature, 
and is used as Mi of the scale. This double sharp §ign Ipoks some- 
what like a conventionalized letter X, 




111. N? 

Ri 

In the same key, and for the same reason, if we wish tp sing Li. 
or Sharp 6, we would sing C double sharp, which has the same sound 
as the actual pitch of D. 

In similar fashion, if we were singing in the key of Ap, with the 
signature of four flats, and we wished to sing Flat 2 or Rah, we should 
have to put two flats before the note in order to accomplish this, ^ince 
one flat is already in the signature, and it is neopss&ry tp use t\yp flats 
to give us the pitch for Rah. The double flat sign consists sifltipjy &i 
two flats instead of one, and looks like this; ifmcher writes m tft ///.* 

111. N? 6 - Aj> \ » W 




^o- 



Rah 

Whenever we see a double sharp, or double fiat in OUT exercises, 
let us remember to look at the key signature, and compare this acci- 
dental with what we already see there. You will find every time ; that 
the note which the accidental influences, is already placed in the sig- 
nature as either a sharp or flat, and, therefore, the new pitch to be sung 
must come a half step higher or lower than even this already affected tone. 

When we find a natural sign, we must look quickly to see if the 
pitch has been affected previously in the same measure by an acciden- 
tal sharp or flat. In part singing, this often appears in some other part, 
and, therefore, it is necessary to give careful attention to the notation 
in previous measures. If there has been no accidental in any part, the 
natural maybe considered as affecting the sharp or flat which oc- 
curs in the key signature. This we have already discovered in the rule. 

Now, who can give me the rule for the use of a cancel^ or natural 
sign? {Children recite the rule m given on Page 2.) And who can draw the 
double sharp sign on the board, and tell us the effect of it? {Some child 
answers.) Who can draw the double flat sign, and explain how it is 
employed? (Some child responds.) 



The teacher should continue the lesson by close questioning on the use of the 
accidentals, the extent of their effect, and a full explanation of the manner of can- 
celling the pitch of notes. In such exercises as the following 1 , use great care with ref- 
erence to the accurate pitch of all the notes, whether accidentals or otherwise. 



^J ii JJttJiJJJiJyr^Yf-irrr'r i rVri^r^ 



Kj rrVrlWMJJJ 



^pH-Uni 



2r££ 



jjjj^i^jjjif' ^a^ 



* i *gi 



SE 



m 



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3^ 



WW 



Pf 



4 J: :&t$± 



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fa 



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Z2ZtI 



»u jJJl,JJJ|J.|f ^ 



Continue the drill in part singing by the frequent use of rounds. The one given 
below can be employed to good advantage. 

GOOD-NIGHT TO YOU ALL 

ROUND FOR THREE PARTS 




i 



Good - night to you all, And sweet be your sleep! May an-gels a- 

3 



i 



$ 



-6 w— 1 — z) p— — v 



round you Their vig - ils keep! Good-night! good-night! good-night! good-night! 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 






ame. 



A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 70 

( Class Letter and No 



( Account No. 



... 



own. 



.State Percentage 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 

I. When an accidental is used, is the pitch of the note changed, or is a new tone substi- 
tuted for the original tone? 





Name the five accidentals which are used in music notation. 



J. Explain fully the effect of each accidental. 



\. What is the rule governing the effect of an accidental within a measure?. 



>• On the staff below write Sharp 4, or Fi, in the key of B&. 



$ 



>• On the staff below write Sharp 4, or Fi, in the key of Efc. 



* 



7. On the staff below write Sharp 4, or Fi, in the key of F. 

8. On the staff below write Flat 7, or Ti, in the key of G 

9. On the staff below write Flat 3, or Mi, in the key of E 

10. On the staff below write Sharp 6, or Li, in the key of E 

1 i 

11. On the staff below write Sharp 6, or Li, in the key of B 

• ■ {> i 

12. On the staff below write Flat 2, or Rah, in the key of E flat 

I i 

113. On the staff below write Flat 2, or Rah, in the key of A flat 
14. Should the singer refer to the signature or the previous measure to determine the effect 
of a natural sign? , 
2 



It you ore teaching at the present time, answer the question below which pertains 
1° Tour grade, In order to secure a percentage. If you are not teaching, It Is not neces- 
sary to answer either question. 

15. If you are teaching in the Fifth Grade, and can put the lesson in this particular part 

of the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions 

given as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular 

lesson, indicate any changes you made, and give an account of results obtained. 



Grammar Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 
16. (a) Write on the staff below, one exercise which you have used in teaching chro- 
matics 



$ 



(b) Do you continue to use "rounds" as a means of drill in part singing? If so, give 



a report of the results obtained. 



In the spaces below, marked "Q 1," "Q 2," etc., you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer". 

ai..... 



Answer 



Q. 2., 



Answer 



Q. 3. 



Answer 



Q. 4. 



Answer ; 



: 2.8. t 2 



Q. S.. 



Answer 



FIFTH GRADE SERIES 1 

SI EGEL- MYERS 
Correspondence School of Music 

Chicago, 111. 

A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LeSSOll N9 71 

BY FRANCES E.CLARK 

Oral and Written Dictation 

We have been having a series of lessons dealing with the difficult subject of 
chromatics. As in the case of the presentation of the scale and sight reading, this 
material has been grouped in cionsecutive lessons, but in practical work it should be 
spread over a considerable period of time. In the regular daily routine, attention 
must be given to the consistent development of the subject of chromatics, in the 
logical order outlined in Lessons Nos. 61 to 70, but too much stress cannot be 
given to this at any one time, as it would surely weary the pupils. In each recita- 
tion, a certain amount of time must be given to reading exercises involving one 
or more of these problems, but we must not forget at the same timethe consistent 
development of voice culture and ear training beginning in the early lessons. There 
should be daily, or at least frequent, drills in the oral dictation of scale tones, and 
once a week there should be written dictation, as suggested below. 

The children should now be able to give any interval contained in the scale, 
including, as well, five tones above the upper Do, for the lower keys, and four or 
five tones below the lower Do, in the middle pitched keys. In giving oral dictation, 
the teacher should dictate the notes by number name, giving one at a time, so rapidly 
that the singing is almost continuous. The teacher gives the number of the note, 
as 1, 3, 6, etc., or sings the various notes with the syllable "La." The children re- 
spond with the syllable name, singing the note in correct pitch. Such exercises as 
those in Illustration N9 1 can be used for this purpose; in these exercises the teach- 
er gives first the pitch of Do, then dictates the number name, and the children in- 
stantly respond with the proper tone and the syllable name, 

(8-1-3-5-6-2-1. ffi££ 8 -4*-l. 

111. N9 Jl-6-4-2-7-8. h-5-1-2-7-8-1. 

18-3-2-7-6-4-3-1. (1-3-6-7-6-2-4-3-3-6-4-2-7-5-8. 

(3-3-6-5-5-8. v 

Copyrig-ht MCMXII by Sieg-el- Myers Correspondence School of Music 



2 

To vary these exercises, write groups of notes, which contain all possible 
intervals on the blackboard, using their number names. . Sing them in different keys, 
after first giving the correct pitch of Do from the pitch-pipe. After the number dic- 
tation, it is well to sing (with the syllables La or Loo), or play on the piano, little 
groups of notes involving all possible intervals, allowing the class to respond with 
the proper syllable names. In case you are not able to sing to the class, you can 
write out on a slip of paper some short groups, and ask one of the more musical 
pupils of the class to sing them aloud with the syllable La. At times you can per- 
mit the class to respond as a group, and again you can make it individual work. 
The lesson may be carried, on in the class in the following manner: 

Now, class, I want you to sing this melody: 8-3-4-2-1. Who 

can do it? Mary may sing it to US. {Mary sings the melody as dictated 

with the syllable names,) Here is another: 1-4-3-6-5. Who can do it? 

George, you may sing it. (George sings the melody with the syllable names.) 

Here is another and longer one: 8-3-4-5-7-8. Who can sing that? 

No one? Listen again, (Teacher repeats) Now who can get it right? 

Lucille may try. (Lucille sings inaccurately with the syllable Loo) No, not 

quite right. Who else can do it? Marion? Yes, that is right. Now, 

take another: 8-6-7-5-4-2-1. Who can sing that one?Katherine, 

you may sing it. Yes, that is exactly right. 

The subject of written dictation follows logically the ear training given in the 
oral work. All the pupils should be provided with staff-ruled music paper, which is 
usually furnished in blocks. On this they should draw the clef sign, write the sig- 
nature for the key of. E-fiat, or any other key, and write what you sing for them. 
Sing the melodies as given in Illustration N? 2 or similar material, with the sylla- 
ble Loo. It is not necessary at present to concern ourselves with different note val- 
ues, so the notation will be merely the open note heads. In the first exercises on 
written dictation, you should strive merely for accurate representation of the notes 
of the melody, regardless of rhythm., 

P.S.L. NO 71. 



111. 



N? 2( 



Ke,y of'El: 

1-3-2-1. 
1-3-4-2-1. 

2-4-2-1. 

3-4-6-5. 



I 1 " 

\l-c 



Key of D: 

5-6-4-5-3. 
13-1-2-7-8. 
(1-3-5-3-1. 
^3-6-4-2-1-6-5-2-2-5-3-1. 



Oral or written dictation of this kind should occupy a few minutes of every les- 
son. The children must absolutely master the scale tones through this means, if sight 
reading is to be brought to the proper standard. To test the children's understanding 
of the work, it is well to use the written dictation lesson often, if only for a few 
minutes in the lesson period. When given regularly once a wee!:, this work should 
be graded, and a record kept of the progress of the pupils. Require the key signa- 
tures to be properly placed, and the notes correctly written on the staff. 

Occasionally, and in the latter part of the study of written dictation, it is well 
to give a few measures of melody in strongly marked rhythm, in which the notes 
have various time values. Require the pupil to write accurately the proper note val- 
ues of the melody. They should be able, by beating time in the proper way, to deter- 
mine instantly whether the rhythm is two part, three part or four part; whether 
there are one or four sounds to the count, and whether dotted notes are used or not. 
They should be able to recognize and write the dotted quarter, and also the rhythm 
of the dotted eighth note followed by the sixteenth note. Sing, also, a few meas- 
ures of several familiar songs for this written dictation, and allow the class to de- 
termine the rhythm, by beating time in the usual way and then express it on their 
music paper. Such songs as "America" "Star Spangled Banner," "My Old Kentucky 
Home" "Dixie," etc., are sufficiently familiar to be excellent material for this purpose. 

The song "Gentle May" can be used appropriately toward the end of the school 
year. 



GENTLE MAY 



MOZART 



r j j b i 1 I \ \ ~L J S \~L 1 k I 1 \\ ~ J hi £5 k 1 I \ \ ~ = ~L fi 

"ft ) \ ~~ J' " \) *' J = + : d d' g g d'\ J ~* f = -P — J) g ? 



Come, gen-tle May, with flow-ers That just be-gin to grow, And bring the brightest 
A song! a song for May-time! Let hap-py voic-es sing, And tell of joy and 



It,, J i -^-4-j > rn H i n h i J K n J>| J- h* p 



hours, That make us love you so. The fair- est month of spring-time, For 
beauty Like birds up -on the wing. O May, so fair and gen - tie, For 



J D w P* I d* J r n y u \ ^ P» » ' i 



you we 11 choose a queen, And hold a fair-y par ty Up -on the grass so green. 



Teach the songs "Waiting 1 to Grow" and "Lovely May" with due regard to the 
accuracy of pitch of both parts, and proper attention to the expression marks and 
rhythm. 

WAITING TO GROW 

Words by E. 



m 



Moderate* 



By M. 



:^^5 



pp^ 



h )i h m 



¥ 



t=^ 



i-t-$-*-f =* 



t^=2 



1. Lit -tie white snow- drop, just 

2. Think, too, what hosts of queer 

3. Think of the roots all read 



wak- ing up, 
lit - tie seeds, 
- y to sprout, 



Vi -o-let,dai-sy and 

Soon to make flowers and 

Reaching their slender brown 



fp^£ 



£ 



J, Jl | j | J M JEEJ^E 



sweet but - ter - cup* Think of 

moss- es and weeds', Un * der 

fin-gers a -bout, Un-der 



the flow-ers all un-der the snow, 

the leaf- lets and un-der the snow, 
the ice and the leaves and the snow, 



*, 



±±±± 



£ 



M^M^^ 



IE 



Y - — -*- 

Wait - ing to grow, wait 
Wait - ing to grow, wait 
Wait - ing to grow, wait 

fa 



-ing 



to grow. Think of the flow-ers all 
to grow. Un - der the leaf- lets and 
to grow, Un - der the ice and the 



u l-J' i j i j | j | j i i I ii 



grow. Y 

grow. 

grow. 



un - der the snow, 

un - der the snow, 

leaves and the snow, 



WaU 

Wait 
Wait 



ing, wait - ing to 
ing, wait - ing to 
ing, wait - ing to 



March time 



LOVELY MAY 



H. WERNER 




L Come 
2. Come 



a - way! 
a - way! 



Love - ly May, love - ly May Decks the world with 
Light ^ ly pass, light -ly pass, Through the nod- ding 




blos-soms gay; "Come ye all, come ye all!" Thus the flow-ers call, 
mead- ow grass; Wood-landsbright,wood-landsbright,Wake from win-ter's night. 




par- 



SpaV-kle r s now the sun - ny dale, Fra-grant is the flow-'ry vale; 
Where the sil - ver brook- let flows, Rip -pling soft - ly as it goes, 




Song 
Will 



f 
the grove is 

green moss - y 



heard 
nest. 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 71 

( Class Letter and No. ..• 

Name J 

( Account No. . .„ , 



Town State Percentage. 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 

1 What use should be made of the material in Lessons Nos. 61 to 70? 






2 What are the arguments against too much consecutive drill on the subject of chromatics? 



I 



3 Discuss the general value of oral and written dictation at this time. 



4 What proportion of the work should be devoted to dictation exercises?. 



5 Whai is the correct method for giving oral dictation?. 



6 Give three groups of numerals which can be used for oral dictation. 



7 Give a short Model Lesson on one of these groups. 






8 Name three different ways in which it is possible to present the oral dictation lesson. 






9 (a) Outline the manner in which the written dictation should be given to the pupils. 



(b) Why is the rhythmical element ignored in the early lessons in written dictation? 






10 Why is it important to use ruled music paper for written dictation?. 






11 Outline fully the manner .in which the rhythmical element in written dictation is to 
be presented \ 



12 State which of the three songs in Lesson No. 71 you have memorized and used, and 

~=?r^SS£=Si : 



If you are teaching at the present time* nnswer the question below which nerl » i 11 * 
to your Grade, In order to secure a percentage. If you are not teaching, it Is not neces- 
Har y to answer either question. 

lo If y OU are teaching in the Fifth Grade, and can put the lesson in this, particular part 
of the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions given, 
as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular lesson, 

indicate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained 



Grammar Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 

*4 (a) To what extent have you used written and oral dictation, and with what success? 



(b) After using the methods outlined in this lesson for determining rhythmical values 
in written dictation, give a full report of the results obtained . . . 



(c) State two songs which may be used for rhythm studies in written dictation. 



3 



In the spaces below, marked "Q 1," "Q 2," etc., you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer". 

Q. l 



Answer 



Q. 2. 



Answer 



Q. 3. 



Answer 



Q. 4. 



Answer 



Q. S. 



Answer 



FIFTH GRADE SERIES l 

SIEGEL- MYERS 

Correspondence School of Music 

Chicago,Ill. 

A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 

public school music Lesson N9 72 

BY FRANCES E. CLARK- 

How to Keep Up the Interest of the Boys 
Special Song Material 

The Fifth Grade is a most important time in the school curriculum for hold- 
ing" the attention of the boys of the class. If the music lesson is not skillfully 
handled, the boys at this age may decide that singing- is only fit u for girls," and 
is quite beneath, and unworthy of, their attention. Two ways have been found by 
which to overcome this tendency. The first way is by singing many patriotic and 
seasonable songs of vigorous style, and part songs wherein the boys clearly dis- 
tinguish themselves singing the lower and more important part. The second way 
is by having them do such written work, assigned from time to time, as appeals 
to their sense of reason and logic, and seems, indeed, to be something like a 
"man's jobj' because of its difficulty. By stimulating their sense of accomplishment 
and natural interest in vigorous expression, we can, to a large extent, overcom3 
the tendency to inattention so often characteristic of this grade 

Throughout the part singing in the Fifth Grade, the upper and lower parts in 
songs and exercises should be changed frequently from one side of the room to the 
other, as explained in previous lessons. By this means we accomplish complete in- 
dependence in singing, since with practice, it becomes easy for every child to holh 
accurately the part assigned; but, if particular difficulty is encountered in certain 
measures it can easily be remedied by special drill on these measures, in the man- 
ner suggested for such work in previous lessons. The only exception to this system 

Copyrig-ht MCMXII by Sieg-el- Myers Correspondence School of Music 



2 

of changing the parts, is when there are older boys in the class whose voices are 

beginning" to break, or change. Such voices should be placed permanently in the 
lower part, no matter where they sit. In fact, it is well to permit them to change 
seats often during the singing hour, in order that their voices may always be grouped 
with the lower part, and thereby gain the advantage of consecutive training. In the 
meantime, however, do not permit the younger boys and girls to sing the upper or 
lower part continuously. The voices need exercise throughout their entire range, 
and require the development of the richness and depth of the lower register, as 
well as of the clear, high tones of the upper register. 

There should also be much unison singing in this grade, so as to smooth 
out the unequal voices of the boys. Many old familiar songs, such as My Old Ken- 
tucky Home" "Suwanee River," and "Old Black Joe," should be sung in unison at 
this time; and later, when the harmonized version is taught in the upper grades, the 
old songs will be doubly familiar and, therefore, the more interesting. 

There are many beautiful unison songs in all music books in common use which 
may be nicely correlated with the work in the nature- study, history and geography 
classes. These unison songs should also be used as a means of cultivating a 
greater nicety of speech, and it will repay you well to use extreme care in re- 
quiring the vowels to be carefully articulated, and the consonants well and clear- 
ly sung. 

Certain patriotic songs should be committed to memory and held ready for 
frequent use. "America" which was completed in the Third Grade, should be 
sing very often. "The Red, White and Blue" which was committed to memory 
in the Fourth Grade, should be sung on all patriotic occasions. "The Battle Cry 
of Freedom" (revised version), with all the verses, should be committed to mem- 
ory in the Fifth Grade; and other flag songs and patriotic songs should be sung 
on all patriotic days. Sailor songs, too, and songs of the sea always appeal to 
boys of this age, and in fact anything that gives expression to vigorous and di- 
rect action, or manner of thought. 

?» S. L. No. 72 



3 



The following* unison songs can be taught with success, and wili give much pleas - 
ure to the boys of the class if suggestions are made for the appropriate interpre- 
tation of the various verses. 



OUR HEROES 



Andante 



METHFESSEL 




1. We love the he -roes of our land,Whose names shall live in sto - ry; The 

2. Brave hearts who conquer d tho' they died; Their lives they free - ly gave us; Who 

3. And those for bright-er days who wait, And toil in wise as - sur- ance; Who 




wise of heart, the strong of hand, Whose life and death was glo - ry. 
'mid the foes that Vound them rose,Marchd, fought, and bled, to save us. 

win the fight of truth and right, By strength and calm en - dur - ance. 



I AM A BRISK AND SPRIGHTLY LAD 



Arr. by JOHN HULL AH 



Vivace 




mf ^~ 

1. - I am a brisk and spright-ly lad, But just come home from 

2. But when our coun - try's foes are nigh, Each has -tens to his 

3. Our foes sub-dued, once more on shore We spend our cash with 



S •— ^ 



sea, Sir; Of all the 

gun, Sir; We make the 

glee 3 Sir; And when all's 



lives 


I 


ev - 


er 


boast - 


ing 


French - 


man 


gone, 


we 


drown 


our 



led, A 

fly And 

care, And 



REFRAIN 




sail - or's life for me, Sir.x 
bang thehaught-y Don, Sir. j Yeo, yeo, yeo, yeo, yeo, yeo, yeo, yeo, 
out a - gain to sea, Sir.) 




Whilst the boat swain pipes all hands, with yeo, yeo, yeo, yeo, yeo, Sir, 



Observe in the song*, "The Bright Moon is Shining*" that we have a broken rhythm, 
or alternate entrances for the lower part. Notice also that the words differ in the two 
voices, which gives added interest to the independent singing* of the parts. 

BRIGHT THE MOON IS SHINING 



A?idante 




1. Bright the moon is shin - ing, Clouds with sil - v'ry lin - ing, 

( 2. Moonbeams on themoun- tain. For - est, field and foun - tain, 




1 . The sil - v'ry clouds 

2. With her bright wand 



In beau - ty 
The moon is 




Slow - ly wan-d ring* by her side, 
Mak - ing hill and val - ley seem 



Thro' the night 
Like a fair 



glide. 
dream. 



r r r r ■ ' 



slow - ly wan-d' ring by her side, Far, far they glide, 

mak - ing hill and val - ley seem Wrapped in a dream. 

Educational First Reader. Permission of Ginn & Co 



Sing the song, ' My Bark is Bounding to the Gale" with strongly marked, brisk 
rhythm and particular emphasis on the importance of the lower part. 

MY BARK IS BOUNDING TO THE GALE 



FELIX MENDELSSOHN (1S09-1847) 




My bark is bound- ing to the gale, The sea is foam - ing 




round her, A - dieu to thee, my na - tive vale, A - dieu to 




thee, my na - tive vale, And thee for whom I wan - der, and 




thee for whom I wan -der, and thee for whom I wan 



der. 







From "Har Fourth Reader" Permission of American Book Co. 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES & CLARK 



Examination Paper for Lesson No. 72 

v ( Class Letter and No , 

( Account No , 



Town State.... Percentage 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 

1 Discuss the importance of holding the attention and interest of the boys in the 
singing class . . 






2 Describe fully the two methods suggested for accomplishing this. 



3 What is the ' principle underlying your treatment of these children?. 



4 discuss fully the value of changing the assignment of parts frequently. 



■ 



How can mistakes in especially difficult measures be remedied under this system of 
rearrangement of parts ? 



6 What should be the only exception to this system ? 

• 



7 Discuss fully the treatment to be given the changing voices which may appear in the 
latter part of the Fifth Grade year 



8 (a) Give a general outline of the kind of songs which are to be used throughout 
the Fifth Grade . , 



(b) Mention four songs, apart from those given in the lesson, which can be used 
successfully in the Fifth Grade 



9 What kind of songs appeal particularly to the boys of the class?. 



10 


Discuss 


the 


value 


of Unison 


Singing. 




**" *• ».,...,.••#. . • / 






2 



11 In Part Singing, what element should be particularly brought out in the presentation 



of the song?. 






If you are tend-lnf? nt the pre*ent time, answer the qu< stlon below which pertnlnn 
*o your Grade* In order to secure n percentage* If you are not teaching:, It In not uecew- 
Mary to nntiwer either question. 

12 If you are teaching in the Fifth Grade, and can put the lesson in this particular part 
of the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions 
given, as far as possible. State below how closely you follow this particular lesson, 



indicate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained. 



Grammar Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 
^ (a) Give a report of the success you have in holding the attention of the boys in 



your class 



(b) Give two devices which you use to hold their interest. 



< c ) Name three kinds of songs which you are using in the song study in your grade. 



(d ) How many patriotic songs is your class able to sing from memory?. 






In the spaces below, marked "Q 1/' "Q 2," etc., you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer". 

q. i 



An*wer 



Q. 2.. 



Answer 



Q. 3.. 



Antwer 



Q. 4., 



Answer 



Q. 5., 



Answer 



FIFTH GRADE SERIES } 

SIEGEL- MYERS 
Correspondence School of Music 

Chicago, 111. 

A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 

public school music Lesson N? 73 

BY FRANCES E. CLARK 

The Care of the Voice 

The proper care and development of the voice must always remain the most 
important feature of our work. No matter what the class may be singing*, we 
must learn to watch at every moment the quality of tone which is used 

The singing tone can be produced only by perfect relaxation of the throat. 
There must be no tightness or tension whatever in the muscles of the throat or 
neck. Ask the children to shake the head gently from side to side^to be certain 
that the muscles of the throat and neck are entirely relaxed. There must be ab- 
solute freedom from tension everywhere, and the tone should float out, without 
being forced or strained. 

When a child wrinkles his forehead or sings with a frown, you may know that 
he is tightening the muscles of his throat or is otherwise forcing the tone. Like- 
wise, the boys must not be permitted to shout in their singing, as in their play . 
Every moment of singing with a forced, or throaty tone make just that much more 
incorrect tone production to be overcome. Remember that"the ounce of preven- 
tion's worth many times"the pound of cure" in the study of singing, and so we 
must endeavor at all times to secure absolute freedom of tone production and a 
light, forward tone quality to prevent any tendency in the wrong direction. It is 
wrong to say that some children must sing loudly always. As a matter of fact, 
good tone quality is simply the result of correct training, and this training must 
take the voice out of the throat, place the tone well forward on the lips, and thus 
give the child complete control of the quality of tone which he wishes to use. 

There are many ways by which we can cultivate this light, floating tone. The 
drills which are outlined in this lesson are valuable for this purpose, and will serve 
to suggest to the earnest student many others of similar efficacy. Frequent drills 

Copyright MCMXII by Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 



2 

on the vowel sounds "Oh" and "Oo" will keep the tones well to the front of the 
mouth. Emphasize the fact that the vowel "O" in all the words in which it occurs, 
must be properly articulated when sung or spoken, and you thereby take advan- 
tage of every opportunity to improve the quality of tone. 

Have the pupils sing the scale slowly down and up, with the word "No" on 
each tone. Let them sing softly, with the lips pursed out almost as for whistling, 
and have them shake the head gently from side to side, to insure complete free- 
dom from muscular tension. Sing again in the same manner with the syllable"Coo! r 
There is great difficulty in the Fifth Grade in getting clear enunciation and 
correct pronunciation of words, both in singing and reading. This is largely be- 
cause the children do not open their lips and teeth sufficiently to enunciate clear- 
ly. A good exercise to overcome this is to sing the scale down and up with the 
German word ( Ja" (pronounced "Yah"); hold the muscles of the face and jaw re- 
laxed, and move the jaw freely for each syllable, letting it drop down as far as 
possible. This very effectively breaks up the stiffness of the jaw. 

Now turn your attention to the proper shaping of the mouth for the vowel 
sounds. In this connection, review Lessons Nos. 13, 14 and 15, and observe the 
suggestions therein, studying the illustrations very carefully. Take particular pains 
to get the proper placing and position of the mouth for the vowel sounds. For 
long "Ee" draw the lips back in easy smiling position, with the teeth separated 
just enough to admit the first finger placed flat upon the teeth. Now withdraw 
the finger tip and then, with the tone placed directly between the teeth, sing the 
long "Ee"on the pitch middle C,with an easy, unforced tone. Now sing"Mi,Mi, Mi" 
on this same tone, and see that every tone is focused squarely between the teeth, 
but sung softly. Now sing the syllable "Wee'on middle C as lower Do, then skip to 
high Do, and sing carefully down the successive scale tones. Extend the lips for 
each"W," and then, drawing them back, focus the vowel sound "Ee" sweetly and 
clearly, right between the teeth on each tone. 

In the next exercise, open the teeth just a little wider, and on the pitch D 
sing the vowel sound "Ay." This produces a tone just like the vowel sound "Ee" 
but it is not quite so closely focused. Sing the words "day," "may? "way," "play,", 
and "ray," on this same pitch of D. Then, using each of these words on success- 
ive scales, sing the upper Do, and then down the scale softly, with the tone in the 
front of the mouth, and without any tension or tightness of the throat, 
p. s. L. No 73. 



Next, use the vowel sound "Oh!' Give the pitch of Eb and sing it witha long 
Oh," the lips pursed out and rounded as in pronouncing the letter. Sing the words 
"go," "slow," "low," "mow," and "flow," keeping the tone well in front of the mouth 
and perfectly soft and sweet. Sing the scale from upper Eb downward with these 
words. The vowel sound "Oo" is the best of all the vowels for getting the for- 
ward tone, and the vowel sound "Oh" is next in value. 

Practice the following exercises daily for developing purity and flexibility of 
tone. Insist upon an easy, relaxed throat and forward tone, and always make the 
children sing lightly. These drills should precede the regular singing lesson for 
a period of five minutes, more or less. Do not attempt to cover all of them in 
oach lesson, but let the work be progressive from day to day. 

In Exercise N? 1, sing with the syllables "Oo," "Coo," and "Loo:' 




In Exercise N? 2, use the syllables "Moo" and "Boo." 



Ex * N9 2 : < fo»\> - L° ° " o „ = 



4» O 



-x r~ 



-&- 



zsz 



Moo_ 
Boo_ 



In Exercise N? 3, use the syllable "No" on each tone. 



Ex. N9 3 



m 



No- 



In Exercise N? 4, sustain the first and second tones and then sing quickly 
down the scale to the lower Do. Use the syllable "Ro " 



Ex 



,N9 4 Egg 



/7\ 



Ro_ 






rsr 



:xn 



33C 



In Exercise N9 5, use the word "Away." Sustain the tone on the lower and 
upper Do s, and then slide the tone, from upper Do to lower Do, *\ e. do not sing 
the separate and distinct tones of the scale, but "draw" the tone down from 
the upper to the lower tone much as you would draw a curved line with a pencil. 

Ex.N? 5 



Z 






~CT~ 



~n~ 



=or 



A - way. 



Sing Exercises Nos e 6, 7 and 8 as articulation exercises, insisting upon a 

complete and thorough enunciation of each vowel sound. Dwell upon each one long. 

enough to secure a perfect result. 

Ex.N9 6 Ex.N? 7 Ex,N9 8 



^^ 



IEC 



TV 



~Q~ 



~rr~ 



-€J^ 



-©- 



~^s~ 



33Z 



O say. Beau - ti - ful night. Bring us sweet dreams. 

Exercise N? 9 is to be sung with the vowel sounds indicated, each exercise 
\ being repeated twice. Sing this exercise rather slowly, and pay great attention to 
the proper shaping of the mouth for each individual vowel sound. 
Ex, N9 9 



« 



<k 



i 



*» s ** 



«* o 



o iv 5 a =&z 



Ee. 



Ay. 



Oh_ 



i 



i 



iv ° *tz 



jq: 



*> o 



-€V 



33= 



*> O 



Oo. 



Ah. 



Aw. 



• Exercise N9 10 is to be sung a little more rapidly than Exercise N? 9, the 
same vowel sound being sustained throughout each measure. Repeat this five times, 
using the vowel sounds "Ee," "Ay," "Ah," "Oh," and "Oo," as indicated, 
Ex. N9 10 



Ee„ 

Ay. 
Ah_ 
Oh. 
Oo_ 



Ee. 
Ay_ 
Ah- 
Oh_ 
Oo. 



Ee. 

Ay- 

Ah. 
Oh. 
Oo. 



Ee. 

Ay. 
Ah. 
Oh. 
Oo. 



Ee. 

Ay- 
Ah. 
Oh. 
Oo. 



JE 



Ee 


Kn 


Ee. 


Ay 


Ay 


Ay. 


Ah 


Ah 


Ah. 


Oh 


Oh 


Oh. 


Oo 


Oo 


Oo, 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 73 

Name { ^ Jass better anc * No. ,,...., 

( Account No 

Town 



Percentage. 



State 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 

What is the most vital consideration throughout all the music study in the public schools? 



: 



Wow does it repay the teacher to be watchful of tone quality at all times?. 



n ^t is the primary condition necessary for the development of the singing tone?. 



£ 



y what indications can the teacher tell when the pupil is forcing the tone in singing? 



What 



quality in the tone should be criticised? 



6 Discuss fully the importance of establishing correct habits of voice production and 

tone placing 

7 What is the relation between good tone quality and correct training in the use of the 

voice ? 

8 What should be the result of correct voice training ? . 

9 Discuss the value of the systematic use of vocal drills 

10 Give three original exercises covering the following points: 

(1) To get complete freedom from muscular tension in the throat and neck 

(2) To break up stiffness of the jaw ... . 

(3) To gain easy, free and exact pronunciation of the vowel sounds Ee, Ah and Oo. 

2 




Arranged in the order of importance, what are the vowel sounds which assist good 
tone-placing ? 



•Practice Exercises Nos. 1 to 10, yourself, and give a special report on the results of 
your study of Exercises Nos. 1, 4, 7, 9 and 10, with reference to improvement in tone 
Quality 



to you "re teaching at the present time, answer the question below which pertains 

sarv * V ** ra,le » in °*<ler to secure a percentage. If you' are not teaching, It Is not neces- 
" to answer either question. 

** you are teaching in the Fifth Grade ,and can put the lesson in this particular part 
°f the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions 
given, as far as possible. State how closely you followed this particular lesson, 
indicate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained 



Qtntnar Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 

( a ) Name three points which you have learned from this lesson which you have 
applied directly to the problem of tone improvement in your class work 



(b) Outline the methods which you \\ave- formerly used in the care and development 
of the voices under your charge, and describe three vocal drills employed 



(c) Give a careful report of the actual conditions of tone quality in your class. 



In the spaces below, marked "Q 1," "Q 2" etc., you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer". 

q. i .:::."- 



Answer 



Q. 2.. 



Answer 



Q. 3.. 



Answer 



Q. 4.. 



Answer 



Q. 5.. 



Answer 



SIXTH GRADE SERIES J 

SIEGEL- MYERS 
Correspondence School of Music 

Chicago, 111. 

A COURSE OF LESSONS IN 

public school music Lesson N9 74 

BY FRANCES E. CLARK 

Review Preliminary to Sixth Grade Study 

The Sixth Grade teacher is often confronted with a serious problem of ad- 
justment in her class work. In many cities, where music is taught as a regular 
study in the curriculum and the children enter the Sixth Grade with splendid abili- 
y in ear training* and sight reading, there will often come into the class children 
rom other schools where singing has not been taught. In some cities there are 
a large number of parochial and private schools where the singing consists of only 
a few desultory rote songs, and small attention is paid to quality of tone, ear 
raining or. sight reading. The children from these schools often enter the public 
schools at the Sixth Grade, which causes considerable confusion in all classes, par- 
icularly in the music work. In some cases there are whole classes of these chil- 
re n who are totally unprepared in music, and in other cases half the class, or 
smaller number are unqualified, to proceed with the others, 

With such conditions it is impossible to take up the work where the regular 

^ixth Grade students are, and equally impossible for the music teacher to give 

ar iy special lessons. It will be absolutely necessary, however, to give some help 

the children who have not been properly trained, if they are to participate in any way 

ln tne r ^gular music work. They must be taught the scale and its intervals, the 

t ) and the various key positions which have been studied so far in these les- 

s °ns. upon -this foundation, they should then be allowed to build up as fast as 

Possible by outside study, with as much help from some of the other better trained 

P u Pus and the teacher, as can be conveniently arranged. In time they will grad- 

Uall y come up to the standard of the other pupils, and, at least, not be a hind- 

n oe in the class work. The earlier lessons of this course explain fully how each 

e of these various subjects should be taught. in the review class. 

Copyright MCMXII by Sieg*el- Myers Correspondence School of Music 



2 

Whatever the condition in the class at the beginning* of the Sixth Grade 
year, there should be a thorough review of the principles developed in the Fifth 
Grade. The problems of key signatures, chromatics and accidentals were pre- 
sented in that grade; but it is just as necessary to review them in the Sixth 
Grade, in the light of the future development of these topics. This sort of ready 
knowledge :s what the child needs now, to go into his Sunday School, or his home 
and be able to represent creditably, the music instruction which he has received 
in the Schools. The review of the key signature, for instance, may be presen - 
ted in the following manner: 

Now, class, I am going to open my music book to a certain 
page. {Teacher opens the book at random.) I find the signature of this 
song is two flats. The first note of the soprano is in the first 
space. Who can tell me what the syllable name is? (Some child 
sa^'Sol! 1 ) On the next page my key signature is three sharps. The 
first note of the alto is on the added line below. On what syllable 
must I begin to sing? In the next song, the signature is one flat, 
and the first note of the soprano is in the third space. Someone 
tell me the name of the syllable for this note. On the next page, 
I find the signature is four flats, and the first note of the sopra- 
no is in the first space. What is the syllable name? 

Review in like manner the problem of the meter signature, first outlining brief- 

2 
ly the principle facts, to recall them to mind. Then write the meter signature, 4, 

on the blackboard and continue as follows: 

o 
John, you may fill in four measures in 4 time, and write each 

one differently. (John writes.] Yes, that is good. Now, I will write 

Q 

the signature, 4, on the board, and Mary may fill in four measures 
in £ time, making them as different as possible. Now over here I 
I will write the signature, 8, and next to it the signature,^. Sarah 
may fill in four measures of 6 time, and Henry may write four 

P. S. L . NP 74. 



measures of \ time. Let each measure be different from the oth- 
ers, and see who can do this the quicker and more accurately. 

All may think of a familiar song in \ meter. Who has one? 
{Some child responds.) Harry, you may tap the rhythm on your desk 
with the ruler and then the class can guess the song, {John taps 

a $ indicated } and a child gives the name of the song. ) 

Now we are going to sing one stanza of a familiar song, some- 
thing that we learned last year perhaps. Let us now try to think 
°f the syllable names of it. Then we will sing the song with the 
syllables, and afterward we will sing it with La. Who can tell 
what meter the song is in, and now who can say what the name 
°f the key is? Can anyone write the first phrase in notes on the 
staff? That is very good. Now who can give me the second phrase, 
a *ld then the third and the fourth? {To all questions the children respond 
correctly) 

Give frequent and copious reviews of £he scale tones. Write on the staff the 
scale tones in every position, and require the class to name them instantly, after 
you have given them the key. Now change the key signature, and name the same 
Se ries of tones again by their new syllable names. Do much melody writing at the 
b °ard, and require the class to sing these melodies at sight, fluently .and without 
hesitation. Give a great deal of individual work in this brief review study, and try 
to make every -moment count in developing the efficiency of the class and the individual. 

The review outlined in this lesson may be continued by such familiar songs as 
those given in the following exercises . Write these melodies on the blackboard and 
th en ask questions about the key, meter, kinds of notes, etc. Let the children name 
tn ® familiar airs, and then with the ruler or pencil, tap the rhythm on the desk for 
the m, asking them to tell which song you tap. Sing the melodies for the children 
wi th the syllable "Loo," and ask them to sing back the syllable names. Sing again 
wi th "Loo" and let the class write the notes on the staff, fixing the proper key 
Sl gnature for each one, 











£ 






p juJr^ft^J'U^ J i^ i i 



ikiJUJJ 



pa rrrr'rpr 




p| l AKk4 = 



3 



a rirr j cric/crr i 



i 



JJ|JJilJ.JjJlrJ ^ 



SteEiS 



Call particular attention to the clear enunciation of all words in the song-, "My 
Psalm." 

MY PSALM 



F E. C. 




1. No long- er for-ward or be -hind, I look in hope or fear, 

2. I plough no more a des-ert land, To har-vest weed and tare; 
3. ' I break my pil grim staff, I lay A - side the toil - ing oar; 
4, All as God wills, who wise - ly heeds To give or to with - hold, 
5 And so the shad-ows fall a - part, And so the west winds play; 




But grate -ful, take the good I find, Gods bless - ing now and here. 

The man - na drop -ping from Gods hand, Re-bukes my pain and care. 

The an - gel, sought so far a - way, I wel-come at my door. 

And knoweth more of all my needs/Then all my prayVshave told. 

And all the win-dows of my heart, I o - pen to the day. 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 74 

Name ( Class Letter and No 

{ Account No 

Towtl Rf af a Percentage 



. . State 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching In the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 

What are the general conditions to be found in the Sixth Grade? 



How should the Sixth Grade teacher meet the conditions which probably exist in her 
class ? 



How much regular work should be given to those pupils who are decidedly deficient 
in their previous musical training ? 



4 Ho 



w may the additional work be made up?. 



In case conditions in the Sixth Grade are normal, what review should be given before 
taking up the regular study for the year ? 



6 Give a short model lesson on the review study of the naming of chromatic tones. 



7 Give a short model lesson on the review presentation of the singing of chromatics 



8 Give a short model lesson on the review presentation of the use of accidentals. 



9 Give the names of the melodies, parts of which are found in Exercises Nos. 1 to 8 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5.... 

6 

7 

8 



. 



^ " you are teaching at the present time, answer the question below which pertains 
sa Ur ** rmlc * ,n °i'<1er to secure a percentage. If you are not teaching, It Is not neces- 
to answer either question. 

tt you are teaching in the Sixth Grade, and can put the lesson in this particular part 
°f the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions given 
a s far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular lesson, indicate 
a ny changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained 






ent h and Eighth Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 
^ a ) What conditions make it necessary for you to review in your class, and what 



, 



suggestions do you find in this lesson of most value to you? . 



{") Which of the subjects previously taught do you find most difficult to present to 
your class f 



3 



In the spaces below, marked "Q 1," "Q 2," etc., you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in. the spaces marked "Answer". 

q. i 



Answer 



Q. 2. 



Answer 



Q. 3. 



Answer 



Q. 4. 



Answer 



Q. S. 



Answer 



SI *TH GRADE SERIES J 

SI EGEL- MYERS 

Correspondence School of Music 

Chicago, 111. 

A . COURSE OF LESSONS IN 

p ublic school music Lesson N9 75 

BY FRANCES E. CLARK 

Vocal Drills 

The children of the Sixth Grade are apt to grow a little self-conscious. The 
tlr st appearance of this tendency is shown in the interference with the natural, free 
wreathing- so characteristic of childhood. Up to the present time, we have not 
round it desirable to call attention to this, or to give breathing exercises, as, by so 
doing, we are apt to make the child conscious of the way in which he breathes^ 
a nd thereby cause certain muscular tension. - Even at this period, breathing 
e xercises are likely to do more harm than good, by interfering with the natural 
banner of breathing; therefore it will be sufficient simply to give directions for 
the proper sitting positions (as suggested below), and tell the child to breathe 
deeply, not going into the subject any further. 

Many boys, at this age, fall into the habit of slouching in their seats. This 
*s sometimes because the seat is too large, or too small, but more often because 
*t is the boys' growing period. The child is often restless, and seems not to know 
What to do with himself. This is evidenced in carelessness of carriage and man- 
ner of sitting at his desk. This slouching position is ruinous to good singing, and, 
hence must be corrected at the outset. Give the children thefollowing direc- 
tions for sitting at the desk, and see that they always take this position during 
the singing lesson. 

Sit in the middle of the seat; place both feet flat upon the floor, 

pushing the hips back as far as possible; lean back until the shoulders 

Copyrig-ht MCMXII by Sieg-el- Myers Correspondence Schoul of Music 



rest comfortably against the back of the seat. Now, come forward until 
the chest touches the desk. Move half way back in the seat, sitting bolt 
upright, without touching the desk in front or in back. Relax the mus- 
cles and sit easily, holding the book nearly perpendicular ly, the lower edge 
resting on the- desk. No one can sing well with the book lying flat on 
the desk, since it necessitates bending the head forward to see the page. 
This means a double d-up and cramped throat, and a corresponding hind- 
rance to the free use of the voice. 

When the children have all taken this correct position, ask them to breathe 
deeply through the nostrils, filling the lower part of the lungs. The shoulders 
should not rise at all, but should remain perfectly quiet, the lower part of the 
lungs being expanded. Now tell them to inhale through the nose, keeping the 
lips closed, while you count five; to hold the breath for five counts, and then to 
exhale silently through the parted lips for five counts. Now have them repeat 
the exercise, inhaling through five counts, holding the breath for five counts, and 
then (changing the exercise slightly) tell them to exhale slowly for five counts, 
with the sound of "sh" as in "hush." 

Now, blow the pitch of E flat. Have the children sing down the scale on the 
syllable "No," with the mouth round shaped, and the vowel clearly articulated. 
Sing again with "Loo," and then with the syllable "Ya? Sing down the scale with 
"Mee," placing the vowel sound "Ee " squarely between the teeth, but singing 
softly. The "Ee" should be sung with the teeth just wide enough apart to 
permit the first, or index, finger to enter flatwise on the teeth. Sing down 
the scale with the syllable "Sweet!' Again sing down the scale with the syl- 
lable "May," for the vowel sound "Ay." See that the teeth are open far enough 
for the front finger to be inserted sidewise, and the lips drawn back in a smiling 
position. Repeat both these drills frequently, and take care that the quality of 
the tone is light and unforced. 

\\ S. M, No. 75 






Blow the pitch G; have the class take a deep breath, hum this tone and ex- 
hale. Then, when the tone is placed well forward on the front teeth,stop the hum, 
J nhale and chant very softly, in one breath, the letters of the alphabet as far as the 
letter L; that is, enunciate with a singing- tone the letters A, B, C, D, etc., on 
the pitch of G. Repeat the exercise on the pitch of A, chanting the letters of the 
al phabet as far as the letter P, Sing both of these chants very softly. Next, raise 
the pitch to B flat, and chant the entire alphabet through, from A to Z, without 
taking a new breath. The chant must be soft and like musical speech. Tell the 
children that it "sounds like singing when you talk, or talking when you sing"They 
Wj H soon get the idea, and you will find a marked improvement in the quality of 
°th their speech and their singing tone. 

The following vocal drills are to be used for a short period each day during 
the work of the Sixth Grade. In this way, we preserve the tone quality of the 
v °ice, and bridge over the break in the voices of the boys, which begins to appear 
at this period. Review Lesson N? 73, observing all the suggestions contained 
he rein, both in. the manner of presenting these drills and in the quality of tone 
be obtained. Have each word and each vowel-sound carefully and clearly enun- 
Ia ted, and try to get a musical, soft, and floating quality of tone. 





Ee_ 
Ay_ 
OfiZ 

— o- 



53= 



/T\ 



Hel-16 A- 



men 



. Beauti-fulstar of the night. No_ 

Toe 



Hos-an-na. 



o 



o 



/7\ 



o 



o 



Ech - 6 Ech - 6 Hoo hoo hoo. 



The following songs, written for unison and part singing, should be presented 
with careful attention to the principles outlined in the previous lessons. In the 
song "Sunrise" the sign u D t G to /^"means to repeat^from the beginning (the Ital- 
ian words Da Capo) to the measure marked /C\"at the end of the second line. 

MAY SONG 



Moderate l \y fast 



S 



i 



ERNST RICHTER 



* 



^ 



r • f r 



r t 



\. All hail to the May, With blos-soms so 
2* En - joy the sweet May! The birds seem to 
3. The woods are so fair, And fresh is the 



gay! 
say, 
air; 



The 
The 
The 



birds, swift - ly wing-ing, Are joy- ful - ly sing - ing, All 

danc - ing and shout - ing! En - 
skip-ping to - geth-er, Come 



m 



sea - son 
lambs on the 



i 



wing - ing, Are 
of sprout -ing, Of 



heath - er Are 



mm 



m 



f 



hail 


to. 


j°y 


the 


join 


the 



r 



the May, With bios - soms so 

sweet May, The sea - son so 
gay throng With danc - ing and 



gay! 
gay! 
song! 



SUNRISE 



MOZART 




1. See, where 

2. Fair is 



the 
the 



ris - ing sun In splen - dor decks the skies, 

face of morn; Why should your eye - lids keep 

Fine n\ 




His dai - ly course be -gun; Haste, and a 
Closed, when the night is gone? Wake from your 



r 

rise, 
sleep! 




Oh, come with me,where vi-oletsbloom, And fill the air with sweet perfume, And 
Oh, who would slum-ber in his bed When darknessfrom his couch has fled -And 

D. G. 'to /Ts 




where, like dia-monds 
when the lark is 



to the sight, 
soar - ing high, 



Dew-drops spar-kle bright . 
War-bling songs of joy? 



Siegel- Myers Correspondence School of Music 






CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

A COURSE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC LESSONS 

By FRANCES E. CLARK 

Examination Paper for Lesson No. 75 

^ame % , ; ; ( Class Letter and No 

( Account No 

own 

State Percentage. 

Write name, address and numbers plainly. 

If you are teaching in the grade to which this lesson refers, please answer these questions 

from your own experience, as far as possible. 

J scuss fully why it is inadvisable, at this time, to give special attention to breathing 
exercises 



Wh 



y are breathing exercises at this point apt to do more harm than good?. 



^ lv e some of the reasons why children are often restless and careless in their way of 



Sitting at the desk. 



Gl ve full directions for the correct position when sitting at the desk... 



: 



Wh 



y should the singing book be held in a perpendicular position? 



6 What is the correct manner of breathing? 






7 Give two directions for breathing, to be given at this time. 



8 Give two reasons for the value of exercises employing the syllable "Ya." 



9 Discuss fully the value of the chanting exercises. 



:::::::::::::::;:::;::: 

10 Give on the staves below six vocal drills, either original or those which are found 



■in the lesson, which yon have tested and found to be of value. 






# 






l 



11 Give the meaning of the sign "D. C. to O 



• 

j 12 Which of the two songs in the lesson have you memorized and used in class? 






: 



*3 After using the exercises in Lesson No, 73, give a full report of the improvement 
tone quality which you find in the class singing 



114 Give a report of your progress in the lessons you have received to date, and state two 
or more ways in which the lessons have been of special benefit to you 
SiiiiiliS 

trv yot,r Grade, lit order to secure a percentage. If you are not teaching, It la not necessary 
answer cither question. 

If you are teaching in the Sixth Grade, and can put the lesson in this particular part 

I of the course to immediate and practical use, you should follow the suggestions given, 

as far as possible. State below how closely you followed this particular lesson, indi- 
cate any changes you made, and give an account of the results obtained, 

ev enth and Eighth Grade teachers only, should answer the following questions: 

( a ) After using the directions for correct position given in this lesson, do you find 



that the children still slouch in their seats? If so, how do you correct them? 



(b) Have you used chants in your vocal drills? 



(c) After using the drills in this lesson, give a report of the results obtained in im- 
provement of tone production. , . .' 



In the spaces below, marked "Q !," "Q 2," etc., you may ask questions 
in regard to teaching the principles contained in these lessons; your questions 
will be answered in the spaces marked "Answer". 

Q. 1 



Answer 



Q. 2. 



Answer 



Q. 3. 



Answer 



Q. 4. 



Answer 



Q. S. 



Answer