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Full text of "Antioch News 01/02/1998"

ac b. IL 600Q? 











/ 



5l^-!^f5itr-?-?J?!*?? _™?^^!? UA ? Y % ,199 ? A Lakeland Newspaper /75 cento 

'if /go f/zere, / represent this country, my home, and my school' 

Teen immigrant sets sights on Australia 

13-year-old selected for people to people program, 

working to raise funds 







Zoran Stijovic, 13, of Antioch, has been chosen to participate in 
the People to People program. The seventh grader is hoping to 
raise $4,200 for a trip to Australia this summer. —Photo by Lynn 

Gunnderson Dahlstrom 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Young people leave small towns 
all the time. Zoran Z. Stijovic Jr., left 
Yugoslavia for Antioch three years 
ago and wants to leave Antioch Up- 
per Grade School for Australia and 
NewZealandinJuIy. 

If he lias a chance to leave, he will 
be coming back to Antioch, however. 

Between now and the end of 
April, Stijovic, 13, will try to raise 
about 55,000 to take advantage of an 
invitation to travel to Australia and 
New Zealand as a Student Ambas- 
sador with People to People. He has 
to raise the funds himself for pro- 
gram expenses and spending money. 

Hanka Stijovic said that her son 
was selected as a program partici- 
pant in November. "They chose him 
through his performance on a test," 
she said. "They called us for an inter- 
view."* He did well in the interview 
and is now one of 40 children from 
Illinois selected to participate in the 
program, if he can raise the funds 
needed to travel. "1 think he is the 
only one from Antioch," Hanka Sti- 
jovicuidL 

Zoran Is a seventh grader at Anti- 
och Upper Grade School. "I like math 
and science classes," he said of his 
academic interests. 

He also has some strong sports 
and artistic talents. Although current- 
ly healing strained ligaments in his 
knees, he likes to play soccer, run 
track, and cross-country . "This year I 
will do volleyball in the spring," he 
said. "I'm pretty good at running the 



mile I ran in the Antioch Run for Free- 
dom two years in a row, I haven't been 
running for awhile because of the 
knee." He is also an award-winning 
student of Tae-Kwon-Do at Song's 
Martial Art Institute in Antioch. 

"I like to play the piano," Zoran 
said. He has been playing for a little 
more than two years. His mother 



'If I go there, I represent 

this country, my home, and 

my school 'It would he 

a great trip.' 

Tjoran 7~ Stijowcjr. 



said that he is a high honor student. 
"He does very good on the comput- 
er," she said. "I enjoy it a lot," he said. 

People to People Student Am- 
bassadors travel to countries 
around the world (www.studentam- 
bassadors.org/). The program 
emerged during the President 
Dwighl D. Elsenhower admlntslra- 
tlon.-Sttidejjt- travel opportunities^ 
were added in 1963 when the first 16 
students set forth to visit and learn 
about other lands, in 1 995 there were 
8,500 student participants, and dur- 
ing the past 30 years there have been 
80,000 young people traveling. The 
program is one of the few that offers 
both high school and college credit 
for the educational experience it pro- 
vides. 

Zoran has now set out to raise the 



money needed for the program, be- 
tween 54,200 and $5,000, depending 
on spending money and expenses. 
People to People places the fund- 
raising responsibility on the future 
student ambassadors, "They said I 
can try to raise money from spon- 
sors," Zoran said. 

Right now, when possible, he is 
doing fund-raising by shoveling snow 
from driveways. "I am going to solic- 
it contributions from companies 
here in Antioch. I am going to ask rel- 
atives. I am going to work," he said, 
"I'm still working on the letters that I 
will give out. I just got started," he 
said. If he is successful, he leaves for 
Australia in July. 

Two teachers helped him meet 
application requirements with ref- 
erences. An Antioch Police Officer 
also gave him a helpful letter of ref- 
erence. 

The Stijovic family is quite famil- 
iar with travel. "We came from Bel- 
grade, Serbia, three years ago." Han- 
ka Stijovic said. The family arrived In 
the United Stales with very little. The 
war created many hardships for peo- 
ple there. "The economy was going 
r down so we had to move," she said of 
their decision to leave Yugoslavia. 
Relatives helped them become es- 
tablished here in the Chicago area. 

Zoran hopes that people will re- 
spond to his fund-raising efforts by 
sending contributions to his family at 
223 Bridgewood Drive, Antioch, 
60002. 

"If I go there, I represent this 
country, my home, and my school," 
he said. "It would be a great trip." 




Sprenger Farm zoning hearing, Jan. 8 




Development could include 515 housing units 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Antioch Planning Commission 
and Zoning Board members will 
conduct a public hearing Jan. 8 at 
7:30 p.m. in Village Hall to evaluate 
die proposed Dcercrest planned unit 
development on the Otto and Mary 



Jane Sprenger property north of 
Route 173 at Savage Road. 

Dcercrest is proposed for 234- 
acres with a maximum of 515 
dwelling units. The development will 
include areas of detached single fam- 
ily homes, detached zero lot line sin- 
gle family homes, and townhomes. 
Almost 31 percent of the property is 



allocated open space use and a little 
more than 55 percent is allocated 
housing development. The remain- 
ing percent is allocated to roads and 
highway right of way. Of the slightly 
more than 72 acres of open space, 
about 12 acres are identified wetland 
acres. Two parks are proposed with- 
in the development 



A preliminary estimate of final 
population for the new residential 
development is 1 ,680 persons. Hous- 
ing construction is expected to take 
five to seven years to complete, start- 
ing in late winter, 1999. Site prepara- 
tion work is proposed for summer, 
1998. 

The property is currently zoned 
for R-l uses, and it is now used for 

Please see SPRENGER I A3 



LAOY0FTHELAKE 

Mineola hotel owner plans . 
restoration 

—PLEASE SEE PAGE Bl 







• 



WAR STORIES 

Ubertyville author recounts 
first hand experience of 
World War II 

) —PLEASE SEE PAGE CI 



INDEX 



Business C6 Hot Spots B6 

Classified .... CIO Lakefrfe „...,... Bl 

County CI Legate .......... C9 

Crossword ..... B2 LlpservJce ..... B9 

Editorial ........ C4 Movies .......... 36 

HeathwBtch B10 Obituaries ..... C8 

Horoscope .... B2 

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Twp. studying UHAUA funding request 

Group wants help with distributing study on sewers 



By KENNETH RATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 






Unincorporated Antioch Town- 
ship residents have submitted a re- 
quest to township officials for a fi- 
nancial donation to help distribute 
results of a county-financed study. 
The fact sheet discusses the need for 
sewers In unincorporated areas of 
the township. 

The request of township officials 



was not answered at the meeting, 
however. 

Township Supervisor Tim Os- 
mond said the request for a financial 
donation was not on the agenda to 
be voted on. However, it was accept- 
ed for consideration at the meeting. 
Township officials will look at it, he 
said. 

A letter dated Nov, 17 was sent to 
Osmond by Carol Wenlnger, a mem- 
ber of United Homeowners Associa- 



tion of Unincorporated Antioch, no- 
tifying trustees of her intent to attend 
the meeting to request financial help 
to distribute the results of the Anti- 
och Township Sanitary Sewer Feasi- 
bility Study prepared by consultants 
for the Lake County Public Works 
Department 

The letter stated: 

"The Antioch Township Sewer 
Information Committee has pre- 
pared a non-binding information 



fact sheet with a response survey 
which is ready for distribution to 
5,200 property owners. United 
Homeowners Association of Unin- 
corporated Antioch (UHAUA), a 
nonprofit organization, has collect- 
ed $700 from donations towards 
postage fees, ($1,600) and the cost for 
copies, ($250). Additional contribu- 
tions are urgently needed in the 
amount of $1,200 in order to get this 
information out to the people." 

The letter sent prior to the meet- 
ing further stated, "On behalf of the 
township property owners I would 
like to request some help by way of a 
contribution from your office," 

Please sec REQUEST I A3 



■ 



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H'irart-rrr i 



A2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



January 2, 1998 



'I hoped it would 
become publicly owned* 

On the path 
to history 

Wadsworth was home to Lake County 
Museum ofHistoiy 




Trie Lake. County Museum of History, was located in the northeast corner of Wadsworth Road and 
Rte. 41 on Valley View Farm. The museum was the dream of Bob Vogel, who had collected many 
of the artifacts as a child. The museum was opened from 1957-1965. 



By ELIZABETH EAKEN 
Staff Reporter 



It was Bob Vogcl who made sure 
the history of Lake County was pre- 
served. Because of his vision, future 
generations will have the opportuni- 
ty to learn what Lake County was like 
hundreds and even thousands of 
years before they lived. 

Vogel's dream, of creating a 
county historical museum, took night 
in an old dairy barn in Wadsworth. 

"The Lake County Museum of 
History," was located on the north- 
east corner of Wadsworth Road and 
Route 41, on Valley View I : arm. The 
farm belonged to the Winter family 
and was situated near a watering hole 
used by travelers for their horses. 

Vogel said he chose the barn be- 
cause it offered the large amount of 
space needed to house his collec- 
tion. The barn was destroyed during 
a storm in Sept. 1972, but by then 
the collection was safely ensconced 
in a former Nike missile site in Like 
Zurich. 

A little fact known fact, he said, 
is that the collection nearly went 



up in flames. 

"My stepson, Tom Hill, put out a 
fire in the fuse box and possibly saved 
the museum in one stroke," he said. 
Hill now lives in Round Lake. 

The current museum is located 
on the former Lakewood Farm in 
Wauconda, now known as Lakewood 
Forest Preserve, 

The original museum opened its 
doors in April, 1957. Lawrence Qual- 
mann later became a partner in the 
endeavor. 

Vogel began the museum after a 
heart attack forced his retirement 
from advertising sales while he was 
still in his 30s. He had amassed a 
large collection from a hobby which 
started when he was a young boy. He 
used to go comb the grounds of 
OPhair Park in Zion with an older 
friend by the name of Jim Ingalls 
from Lake Bluff. There they found 
many Native American arrowheads. 

Vogel, 72, now lives in Iowa and 
is currently recovering from a bout 
with cancer. 

Talking with him over the phone 
his passion Tor history is still evident, 
but he said the road to creating the 



museum was a lough one. 

"It's terrible to have a vision be- 
cause it required so much work and 
effort," he said. 

According to old 
newspaper accounts, Vo- 
gel founded the museum 
with the intention of it 
one day becoming pub- 
licly owned. He recounted 
a statement made to the 
media back in 1957. 

"Nine days before the 
museum opened I said, I 
hope someday it will be- 
come publicly owned," 
Vogel recounted. 

The Wadsworth mu- 
seum operated as a non- 
profit institution and was only open 
seven months a year, because the 
bam wasn't healed. All along the mu- 
seum struggled financially. 

In 1961 the museum was incor- 
porated as a non-profit organization 
and 14 trustees were appointed. A 
fundraising drive in 1965 to purchase 
a fireproof building failed, and the 
museum closed. 




Vogel: 'Museum 

was boyhood 

dream.' 



seum closed, the county board estab- 
lished ihe public museum by purchas- 
ing Vogel's collection for $154,000. 
After this the artifacts remained 
in limbo for some lime at 
the Lake Zurich Nike 
Missile base. The muse- 
um at Lakewood, wasn't 
opened until 1976. It is 
operated by the Lake 
County Forest Preserve 
to which the collection is 
deeded. 

According to 
museum archivist Diana 
Dretske the majority of 
the collection they cur- 
rently possess came from 
Vogel's Wadsworth mu- 
seum. Only approximately 10 per- 
cent of (he collection is on exhibit at 
anytime. 

Director of the museum Janet 
Gallimorc said, M Wc wouldn't be 
here today without the work they 
(Vogel and Qualmann) did." 
"The original collection is signifi- 
cant," emphasized Gallimorc. 
It would be impossible to asscm- 



days, because ihe cost would be out 
of reach. During the years Vogel was 
collecting, the items were more plen- 
tiful and people didn't value things 
which were old, he believes. 

Among the costly items he ac- 
quired arc Native American artifacts, 
turn of the century textiles and Civil 
War momentos. 

"It really wouldn't have been 
possible without them. . .they had 
the vision," Gallimore said of Vogcl 
and Qualmann. 

Vogel said even when he was still 
in possession of the collection the 
value of many items was known. 

"The Smithsonian and the Hen- 
ry Ford Museum asked for use of 
some of the artifacts," he recalled. 



In 1965, five months after the mu- . ble something like Vogel did nowa 



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January 2, 1998 



COMMUNITY 




r ewspapers/A3 



FROM PAGE Al 



SPRENGER: Development 
could bring 1,680 new residents 

agriculture and contains a residence, idem is James Follensbee of James 
It is east of, but not contiguous to, Follensbee & Associates, Ltd. It is a 
Redwing Marsh and south of Deer company of architects, planners, and 
Lake Conservation area. engineers. Wetland delineations 
Copies of the Deercrest PUD ,were prepared by EnCap, Inc., 
proposal are available for review at DcKalb, 111., in the summer of 1993. A 
the Ready Reference Section of the traffic Impact analysis was prepared 
Antioch Public Library, 757 Main byycnlg,Llndgren,0'Hara,Aboona, 
Street, from the Village Clerk at VH- Ind, Rosemont, III., in Nov. 1997. The 
lage Hall, 874 Main Street, and from Late County Soil and Water Conser- 
the Department of Planning, Zoning vation District submitted its Natural 
and Building, 885 Toft Avenue. Resource Information Report in Dec 
Village Director of Planning, /1997. The Illinois Department of Nat- 
ilngTand Building Robert Silhan "^ ural Resources was requested to pro- 
found the proposal in compliance pare an Endangered Species Report 
with the Village of Antioch general in Nov. 1997 since thesitc drains into 




plan since the plan proposes resi- 
dential uses for the Sprenger proper- 
ty area. Also, he advised the Com- 
mission that the development densi- 



thc Deer Lake Conservation area. 
Consulting engineers Pearson, 
Brown & Associates, Inc. will meet 
with the Village Engineer, John Bolt, 



ty is appropriate for the anticipated . to address drainage engineering is- 

sewer service available as a result of sues on the site. 
an expected June, 1998 Lake County The Deercrest LLC has commit- 

t rent merit plant expansion. Silhan's ted to the village to seek traffic signals 

review comments for the Village said, for Route 173 at Deercrest Drive and 

"Generally, the proposal Is an excel- Savage Road. The village will support 

lent example of a Planned Unit Dc- such an authorization by the Illinois 

vclopment." Department of Transportation. A 

Deercrest, as currently proposed, comprehensive soil erosion and sed- 

will contain 108 cluster single family imentation control and stormwater 

lots, 271 single family lots, and 136 management plan will be prepared 

townhousc units for a total gross by Pearson, Brown & Associates as 

density of 2.2 dwelling units per acre, part of the final plan engineering 

Silhan has previously evaluated a submission. A landscaping plan has 

conceptual plan for the proposed de- been prepared for the proposed site, 
velopmcnt. In response to his com- The developer does not intend to 

ments, the present proposal has mitigate any existing wetland areas 

been prepared by the developer and on the site. The developer told the 

submitted to the Village for consider- conservation district that it will be 

ation and approval. their intention to provide wet dcten- 

Deercrest Is to be developed by tion areas (ponds) for all site deten- 

Deercrest LLC, Lake Forest,Thc pres- tion. 



REQOEST:UHAUA seeks 
township help with survey 




"We thought we'd get coopera- 
tion, but now (Osmond) wants to de- 
fer it and review it after the results be- 
ing available from over a year ago," 
Wenlnger said the day after the meet- 
ing. "If they postpone It too long, the 
figures will be too old to be accurate." 

UHAUA would like to mail the 
survey to people who own property 
but do not live on it or are not around 
all the time. Property owners outside 
the Antioch area, Wenlnger said, 
need to learn about this information 
so they can express support or indif- 
ference. She said that if UHAUA gets 
a response back that people are not 
interested in sewer service, then 
"we'll go away." 

Wenlnger said that Osmond 
wanted a copy of the fact sheet so 
that he could discuss it with Martin 
Galantha, Lake County Public Works 
Superintendent "There was no dia- 
logue," she said of the township 
meeting. 

Osmond said the day after the 
meeting that he had requested 
copies of the fact sheet prepared by 
UHAUA a few months ago. At that 
time, Osmond said that the township 
would entertain sharing some costs 



on the project but that he had sever- 
al concerns. Osmond was concerned 
about who it would be mailed to, 
what information was to be mailed 
out, and if he would be able to see a 
copy of the information. Osmond ex- 
pressed these concerns to a member 
of UHAUA, but no one responded. 

"I did receive a copy last night," 
Osmond said. 

The Lake County Public Works 
Department received results of their 
Antioch Township Sanitary Sewer 
Feasibility Study by Devcry Engi- 
neering, Inc. in 1996. The study of 30 
subdivisions in the township who 
had petitioned for county sewer ser- 
vice grouped them around eight wa- 
ter features to study service feasibili- 
ty. These arc: Channel Lake, Lake 
Catherine, Fox River, Lake Marie, 
Grass Lake, Bluff Lake, Petite Lake, 
and Loon Like. 

"There were about 10 people In 
support for (the request of a dona- 
tion)," Weningcr said. "We've done 
our work; we're almost there," 

Also present In the audience at 
the meeting was District 1 County 
Board Member Judy Martini (R-Anti- 
och) 



Antioch News 

Vol. 113 No. 1 A Lakeland Newspaper Founded 1886 

(USPS 027-060) E<Mvt4 Offc* M«nt»f ol i»™ P»m Auoc. 

30 South WTirtnoy St., Grayslake, IL 60030 Look for us on the Internet at 

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Pubtelwj Mttlf, pwuAdl m/j i-Miteo* pwd m GrayiWif. IL 60030 

Hon* Dttowy Flu**: 12* SO p* yw " U* ». Cook. Xtnottvi and UcHtry Count* i . 

•iuwtiMt tSSOOpm ft by mtt pad n advara. 

PmtmJitw. Sm)«*k»t»ifuvig*tl0ArtMxnH*«i. SO SouO W»*wr 5t;»»l. PO Bo. JM, Gi»y»l«k«. tire* 60030 

WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER M.R. SCHROEDER WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

Publisher Founder-! 904-1 986 President 



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Comforting gifts 

Students from Chris Mors and Linda Landrum's class at St. Peter's School in Antioch surround the 
toys they donated to the Antioch Rescue Squad to use to comfort children involved in rescue situ- 
ations.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



Residents oppose senior housing 



Zoning hearing 
continues Jan. 22 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Petitioners seeking a variance to- 
build senior housing at 885 Tiffany 
Road were confronted with approxi- 
mately three dozen area residents 
and with a request for more infor- 
mation from the members of the 
Planning and Zoning Board. 

The hearing will resume Jan. 22 
at 7:30 p.m. at Village Hall. The de- 
veloper, of the proposed three floor 
senior citizen residential building of 
38 dwelling units, was asked to pro- 
vide more Information as were the 
petitioners, Sandra Baschctti and 
Susan F. Moore, who were not pre- 
sent at the Dec. 1 1 hearing. 

Village Director of Planning, 
Zoning, and Building Robert Silhan 
recommended approval to the Vil- 
lage Planning and Zoning Board of 
the requested zoning variation con- 
tingent on conditions summarized 
in his evaluation of the proposal. 

One of his seven conditions for 
approval included a request that the 
petitioners "provide a storm sewer 



and inlet(s) designed to accept the 
stormwater from the adjacent sin- 
gle-family residential properties east 
of the site." Attorney for the petition- 
er Andrew C. Lynch said, "We have 
no problem with any of these rec- 
ommendations." 

Information requested by the 
Zoning Board includes all docu- 
ments related to construction-fi- 
nancing for the project that discuss 
resident eligibility criteria, a legal 
memorandum about case law con- 
cerned with agreements to zone 
property for senior citizen housing, 
management study criteria for re- 
viewing resident applications, and 
information about transportation 
services to be provided residents. 

Also requested were: statements 
that describe the economic hardship 
of constructing senior housing in 
Antioch within existing zoning re- 
quirements and the need for varia- 
tions; a traffic study; a marketing 
study to demonstrate the need for 
additional senior housing; and, a 
statement about why a 19-unit se- 
nior housing development is not a 
feasible project but a 38-unit one is 
feasible. 

Lynch said that the proposed 
building is designed specifically to 
appeal to senior age residents. It will 
contain 30 units with a single bed- 



room and 8 units with two bed- 
rooms. There will be an elevator, a 
community room, a central laundry, 
kitchen, 48 parking spaces, library, 
and atrium. There is a screened 
porch area on the second floor. 

"We believe that there is a need 
for this type of facility," Lynch said, 
for the petitioner. "I see no adverse 
•-iaxtfmpacta) of this pared." The pe- 
titioner did not request a waiver of 
impact fees related to (he schools, 
parks, and library. Petitioners also 
agreed to pay $76 for their share of 
the Tiffany Road and Route 173 in- 
tersection improvement study. 

vigorous discussion focused on 
the likelihood that the project would 
remain a senior housing facility for 
the life of the building. "We can put 
covenants on the property that it will 
be occupied by seniors 62 years of age 
and older," offered Lynch. Village At- 
torney Kenneth Clark said that such 
stipulations for zoning consideration 
were not acceptable to courts. 

Rick Baschetti, part of the devel- 
opment team, said, "We're building 
thisbuildihgstrictly for senior hous- 
ing.... It will be this from now on." 
Rick Baschetti said that he expects 
most people living in the building to 
be former Antioch residents who 
have left the community but now 
wish to return. 



Quick Wash spreads holiday cheer 



Don and Sheri Miller, once 
again, hosted a Christ- 
mas parry for their cus- 
tomers and employees 
on Sat., Dec. 20 at their Family Pride 
Quick Wash, 340 West North Av- 
enue. 

They have been doing this for 
the last four or five yearsof the 18they 
have been In business. "We're got 
snacks, pop, and punch, and a few 
finger foods," he said. The evening's 
two dozen customers also participate 
to a raffle that is drawn for a boy and 
giri up to 1 years of age. The winners 
arc drawn in the course of the evening 
so parents can come to pick up their 
child's gift. 

Don Miller said he has been en- 
joying every minute of the business. 
They have the usual laundry ser- 
vices as well as a drop-off, wash- 
dry-fold service. Also, people can 
drop off their dry cleaning and pick 
it up there. Of the Chrisunas Part)', 






OUR 
r # TOWN 

i\i£j*m KenPatchen 



Miller said, "The customers enjoy iL" 

Nancy Brown, of Antioch Li- 
brary Friends, said, "We're going to 
have our first daytime library 
friends meeting." It is Tuesday, Jan. 
13 at 10 a.m. in the library board 
room. The daytime meeting date 
may attract people who have not 
otherwise been able to get to the 
group's night meetings. 

Scott Cimngllo, 25, graduated 
Summa Cum Laude in Chemistry 
from Northeastern Illinois Universi- 
ty last month. He was a member of 



the Antioch Community High 
School class of 1990. "I'm working 
as a chemist at U.S. Gypsum in Lib- 
ertyville," he said. He did it the hard 
way. "At Northeastern, ! was work- 
ing full-time and taking classes. It 
took me seven semesters," he said. 
"My job here involves analytical 
chemistry." 

He reconstructs the chemical 
nature of various compounds and 
formulated materials. He does this 
to determine if the raw material 
meets specifications of laws or 
company product standards. "It's a 
great job," he said. "Antioch is a 
pretty good school for preparing Its 
students. The same goes for College 
of Lake County." 

If you liave interesting infor- 
mation or anecdotes to submit for 
"Our Town " call staff reporter Ken 
Patchen at 223-8161, ext. 131 or 
e-mail, edit (B>lnd.com." 



1 1 \ 

■ j 






.■■ 
T 



;• 









A4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



January 2, 1998 



Club raises $5,500 for charity 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Successful silent auctions to help 
people and organizations in Antioch 
arc based on the help of many silent 
donors. Antioch Woman's Club 
raised $3,300 from two fund-raising 
efforts, a silent auction and Unparty 
Raffle, Dec. lOatMaravcla's Restau- 
rant in Inglcside with the aid of raffle 
ticket sales and of donations from 20 
area businesses. 

"Monies raised by the Antioch 
Woman's Club are used for local 
scholarships to help local schools 
and the community," said club 
member Carol Pavelski. She said that 
other funds arc used for the preven- 
tion of child abuse, A Safe Place for 
battered families, the American Can- 
cer Society, Brain Research Founda- 
tion, burn camps, and other causes. 

The Unparty Raffle by the Club is 
one of the fund-raising events at 
their annual Christmas luncheon. 



"Winner of the Unparty Raffle $500 
first prize was Mabel Lou Weber," 
Pavelski said. Winner of the $200 
second prize was Elsie Higgins. 
"Poinsettias were won by Belinda 
Ditman and John LaSorba," she said. 
"An angel figurine was won by Ken 
Nordstrom." Tickets were sold for 
the Unparty Raffle at $5 each or 3 for 
$ 1 during the fall. Potnscttia center- 
pieces were donated by Carol Ham- 
lin. 

Pavelski gave credit to many 
businesses who helped to make the 
silent auction a success. 

Antioch businesses that helped 
include: two $30 bowling cards from 
the Antioch Bowling Alley, a $40 gift 
certificate and two poinsettias from 
Antioch Floral, 18 holes of golf for 
two with a cart from Antioch Golf 
Course, a $10 gift certificate from 
Ben Franklin, a $25 gift certificate 
from DiMarco's Restaurant, a 1997 
uncirculated coin set and individual 
table favors from First National 



Bank-Employee Owned, an angel 
figurine from Flo's Family Hair Care 
Center, a $20 gift certificate from 
Golden Panda Chinese Restaurant, 
and a Christmas bowl from Pickard 
China. 

Hastings Lake YMCA, in Lake 
Villa, provided a one-year full fam- 
ily membership for the silent auc- 
tion. 

There were four Gurnce busi- 
nesses that contributed merchan- 
dise to the club auction. Boston Mar- 
ket provided two individual meals, 
Applebee's Neighborhood Grill & 
Bar provided dinner for two, Einstein 
Bros. Bagels provided one dozen 
bagels and coffee, and Paisan's Ris- 
torante Italiano provided a $15 gift 
certificate. 

Dover Straits in Mundelcin do- 
nated a $20 gift certificate. 

In Libcrtyville, Mickey Finn's 
Brewery donated a $20 gift certificate 
and Tavern in the Town donated a 
$30 gift certificate. 



Come Worship With 

A Directory Of Antioch Area Churches 



Graceland Baptist Church. 256 Ida St.. Aniiocfi, IL 
Sunday School Ham,, Morning Worship 11am., 
Sunday Evening 7pm. Robert Williams, Paslof. 

Flmt Church of Christ. Scientist 4 Heading Bm. Bio 173 and 
Harden. Afrtoch, Phono (64 7) 395-119G Sunday School, 
Sunday Church Sefwa 1 0.30am, Wednesday 6pm. 

Beautiful Savior Evangelical Lutheran Church. SSA Parkway, 
Anuoeh. Phono (847) 265-2450 Sunday Worship at 9am, Sunday 
School, High School A Aouit B*to Classes 1030am 

St Ignatius Episcopal. 977 Mar Si Phono (847) 39S06S2. Low 
Mass 7:30am. . Hgh Mass 930nm Sunday School & r4rcory 930am. 

Aniioch Evangelical Froe Church. 750 Hiohvtow Or. Phono 
(847) 395-4117. Sunday Schoot 9.45am, Sunday Worshp 8 JO, 
1100, Children's Church Itam. Nirasry both servtaos Awana 
Out). Senior Pastor David M. Groioau. 

St Stephen Lutheran Church. IWsloo a ffle. 53. Ptwrwi (647) 
390-3359 Sunday Worship, 6, 915 & 1030. Church School 
9am , Sunday Rev, Charles E. Mrflor, Pastor. 

Christian Lire Fellowship Assembllw ol Cod Church. 41625 
Cwp LaKe fid.. Arftoch, Phong (847) 395-6572. Sunday School 
(aB ages) 9am , Sund3y Morning Worship 10am., Children's 
Chuch 10am , Sunday Evening Worship 630pm., Wednesday 
Worship & ChMrofl's Program 7am., Tuos. Women's Fellowship 
& &bto Study 9.11:30am. Jeff Brussaly, Paste*. 



Faiih Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main St., Phone 
(847) 395-1600. Sunday Worship 8 & 10:30am., Sunday 
School 9:25am.. Sal. 7pm., Rev. Gregory Hermartson. 
Pastor. Christian Day School (847) 395-1664. 



Mlllbum Congregational United Church of Christ. Grass 

Laho FW. at Rte. 45. Phono (647) 356-5237. Sunday Sorvico 

10am. Children's Program 10am. Rev. Paul R. Mofizer, 

Pastor. 

United Methodist Church of Antioch. 646 Main St Phono 

(647) 395-1259. Worship 830 4 10am., FetamhipTirno 

930am; Sunday School 10am. Rev. Kurt A. Gamlm, Pastor. 

St. Peter's Church, 557 W. LaVo St., AnUoch, Phono (647) 
395-0274. Masses weekdays, 7:30am; Sunday 630, 8, 
9:30, 11am 4 12:V5pm. & Saturday 5:30pm. Rev. Father 
Ronald Anglim, Pastor. 

Chain of LtVn Community Bible Church. 23201 W. Grass 
Laho Bd., Antioch, Phono (847) KJO-0 1 03 . Sunday Worship 8:15 
and 10:45. Sunday School 9:45. Children's Cnurch 10.45. Youth, 
Women's. Awana 4 Small Group ministries. Senior Pastor. Rev. 
Don Sweeting. 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod). 
25100 W. Grand Ave. (Rie. 59 4 132), Lake Villa (647) 
356-515a. Sunday Worship 6:15 & 10:45am; Sunday 
School (3 and up) and Bible Study 9:30am. Christian 
Preschool. Rev. John Zellmor, Pastor, 




Dan Dugenske, Director 

This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 



Victory Lakes. . . The Natural Choice 

Victory Lakes provides family-centered, quality long-term care in a natural, 
home-like environment. We realize that when a loved one must separate from the 
family, it can be a difficult experience for everyone involved. At Victory Lakes, we try 
to make this transition a little easier by having open visiting hours and encouraging 
family and friends to stop by and join in our many resident activities and holiday 
gatherings. 

Victory Lakes offers comfort, convenience and concern. From the raised, out- 
door flower beds for our wheelchair-bound gardeners to the cozy dining room to our 
in-house beauty parlor and colorful aviary to the sparkling clean living areas, loving care 

is evident every where. 

Come visit any time. Meet our professional staff. Get to know 

firsthand what you can expect from a quality nursing home 

environment. 

We offer: ♦ Long-term nursing care 

♦ Rehabilitation/Medicare Unit - short term 

♦ Alzheimer's and Related Disorders Unit 

♦ Respite Care Program - overnight to 30 days 

♦ Assisted Living 

Call 356-5900 and discover the 
natural choice in nursing care 




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NEIGHBORS 



Name: John Edgell 

Home: Antioch. I moved here 
when I was 13. 

Occupation: Manager of Pood 
Service at Condell Medical Center 
in Libertyvillc 

Community i.ivolvement: I'm 

a member of the Antioch Rescue 
Squad. 

I'm originally from: Chicago, 
Illinois 

I graduated from: Antioch Community Nigh School, Class 
of 1976. I'm a Bicentennial graduate. I was one of the many stu- 
dents who worked on the mural, a summer school art project, in 
the park by J.J. Blinkers. 

My family consists of: My wife Janet and two boys, Steven, 
18, and Tyler, 15. One has graduated ACHS already. 

My pets are: We have a chinchilla, Barley, and two dachs- 
hunds, Heidi and Lucky. 

What I like best about my town: I still consider it a small 
town where people care for one another. 

What I like best about my job: In 18 years I've been 
here, there have never been two days alike. 

The secret to my success ts: Just keep a positive attitude 
and anything can be possible. 

I relax by: My wife says "he's happiest when he's not re- 
laxed." I tend to agree with her. 

My perfect day In Antioch would be: So many things. I 
Just enjoy walking the streets. There's something on every street 
corner from the sawmill to. . .anything else. 

Favorite movie Is: "It's a Wonderful Life." 

Favorite restaurant: The most frequently visited is the Las 
Vegas Restaurant. I'll eat anything and everything, especially 
bowlful after bowlful of the chicken dumpling soup. 

Favorite music: lust about everything. 

My life's motto Is: Just never go through life saying you can 
not do something. 

If I could be anyone In history, I would be: I would 
have liked to have grown up a teenager in the 1950s. It's an era 
that has always fascinated me. I had young parents and liked the 
music and movies of that era. 

My greatest accomplishment was: BuiJdJminur dream 
home, a fog cabin. My family and I bulk 90 percent offt our- 
selves. It took us two years to put the financing together, and we 
built it in five months once we got the permits. People and other 
contractors really helped us out in building it. 

If I could meet anyone, I would meet: Jack Nicholson, 
the actor. He is one of my favorites. I always wonder what he 
would be like in person. 

If you have a "Neighbor" that you would like to sec profiled in 
this column, call Rhonda Hetrick Burke at 223-8161. 





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Lakeland Newspapers/ AS 






t 
9 




POLICE BEAT 



Persons charged with a crime are Innocent u ntlt proven guilty In a court of la ur. 



ANTIOCH 



The Antioch Garden Club tree won "best overall" honors In the Chicago Botanical Garden holiday 
decorating contest. It is the first year the group has entered. With the winning tree are from left, 
Joann Dugenske, Nancy Zitkus, Doris Miller. 

Garden Club Tree 'Best All-around' 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Tire Chicago Botanic Garden Dugenske is the vice-president. The 



Antioch Garden Club decorated a 
tree for the Chicago Botanic Garden 
which was awarded a "Best All- 
around" ribbon. This was the first year 
the club has decorated a tree for dis- 
play at the botanic garden in Glencoc. 

"We were awarded Best All- 
around," said DorisMillcr of the Anti- 
och Garden Club. The tree also re- 
ceived a second award for best use of 
natural materials. "We used all natur- 
al materials from the woods," she said 
of the tree's decorating theme. Pine 
cones, acorns, rose-hips, Maple seed 
pods, and milkweed are the type of 
materials used by club members to 
create the decorations for the tree. 
Under the tree were seeds, acorns, 

. ■ ■Im i -w«t«I <J<ict,- ni>l!<Tt>. ""We ronlly 

stuck to (the natural theme)," she 
said. "We used a few red ribbons." 
Miller said, "We had an angel on top 
made of pheasant feathers." Tire an- 
gel was made by Meredith Schnelle. 



places the trees indoors and on dis- 
play. "They had 20 trees decorated 
by garden clubs from the Chicago 
area," Miller said. 

Antioch's award-winning tree 
was created by the club's three 
dozen members in the Maplcthorpe 
Room of the Community Building 
during an evening worksession. "We 
had cooperation from all the mem- 
bers," Miller said. There were many 
people who worked hard on it." 

The Antioch Garden Club was 
created three years ago. Monthly 
meetings Include field trips and pre- 
sentations about special topics. 
Members are both flower and veg- 
etable growers. "We have cared for 
the rose garden at the historical soci- 
ety," Miller said. "We have a garden 

'•"walkoveryycar." Tliejdrr. 3 meeting - 

at 7 p.m. at the Maplethorpe Room 
will feature a presentation about at- 
tracting birds to gardens. 

President of the Antioch Garden 
Club is Suzi Hetzel. Joanne 



Antioch Garden Club is a member of 
the Garden Club of Illinois, District 9. 
Members are from Antioch, Lake Vil- 
la, and Lindenhurst. 



Underage drinking 

Antioch Police Officers 
stopped a party on Longview Drive 
at which underage teenagers were 
drinking alcohol Dec. 20 at 8:30 
p.m. Charged with consump- 
tion of alcohol by a minor and 
possession of alcohol by a minor 
were three people: Bryan W. Koch, 
19, of Antioch; KristofferC. Fendel, 
19, of Lindenhurst; and, William E 
Lennon, 18, of Antioch. All three 
took breathalyzer tests and regis- 
tered 0.00 except for Koch who 
registered 0.01. Charged by offi- 
cers with possession of alcohol by 
a minor was Nicklaus J. Kirichkow, 
18, of Lake Villa. 

Revoked license 

Antioch Police Officers 
stopped Daniel S. Davis, 29, of An- 
tioch, on Dec. 23 at 5:47 a.m. trav- 
eling east bound on Route 173 east 
of Route 83 In a black 1993 GMC 
pickup truck. He was charged with 
driving with a revoked drivers li- 
cense. Davis was released on per- 
sonal recognizance pending a 
court date on Jan. 28, 1998 at 9 
a.m. in Grayslake. 



Suspended License 

Antioch Police Officers 
charged two separate drivers with 
driving with a suspended license 
violations. 

Antioch Police Officers 
stopped Robert Brian Young, 2G, ol 
Clearwater, Fla., on Dec. 24 at 1:49 
a.m. traveling north bound on 
Route 83 south of Grimm Road in 
a red 1992 Dodge pickup truck. He 
was charged with speeding and 
driving while his license is sus- 
pended, 

Antioch Police Officers 
stopped Tommy L Riddle, 29, of 
Waukagan, in a white 1989 Ford 
on Dec. 23 at 10:07 a.m. traveling 
west bound on Route 173 east of 
Savage Road. He was charged with 
driving with a suspended drivers 
license. 

LINDENHURST 

Theft at nursing home 

Lindenhurst Police Officers are 
conducting a theft investigation of 
$181 at Victory Lakes Nursing Cen- 
ter that may have occurred Dec 19. 
It was reported to the Police De- 
partment Dec 22. 



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qmHealth Makes a 
g of Difference 

At Victory Memorial Hospital, 

we want you to get as much out 

of life as possible. That's why 

we offer a variety of on-going 

, .programs, health screenings, 

seminars and workshops. 

A II programs ore held at 

Victory Memorial Hospital 

unless otherwise listed. 



Free LIVING WITH DIABETES Class: "Diabetes - What is it? 1 * 
6:30 - 8 p.m., Thursday, January 8, 1998 

Join others in learning how to stay on top of diabetes. Call 360-4 148 for a schedule of 
additional classes. 

EARLY PREGNANCY CLASS 

6:30 - 8:30 p.m., Tuesday, January 13, 1998 Call 360-4121 to register. 
This class is intended for expectant parents in their first months of pregnancy. Discussion 
includes nutrition, physical changes and discomforts of pregnancy, among others. $10 fee. 
Registration is required. 

Free SIBLING CLASS 

9 - 10 a.m., Saturday, January 17, 1998 Call 360-4121 to register. 

Children learn how special it is to become a big brother or sister. Registration is required. 

CHILDREN'S IMMUNIZATION CLINIC 

4 - 6 p.m., Tuesday, January 20, 1998 Call 360-4127 for information. Note Time Change 

Immunizations offered are Oral Polio, Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis (DPT). Measles, Mumps. 
Rubella (MMR) and Haemophilus Influenza Type B (HIB). Shots are just $6 each, but no one 
will be turned away because of inability to pay. Bring previous immunization records. 

Free ALZHEIMER 'S SUPPORT GROUP 

4-6 p.m., Wednesday, January 28, 1998 

Call Chris Mendralta at 356-5900 for more information 

This support group is for family members and friends of those experiencing this disease. Meets 

at Victory Lakes Continuing Care Center, 1055 East Grand Avenue, Lindenhurst. 

Free HEART HEALTH RISK FACTORS Seminar 

7 p.m., Tuesday, February 3, 1998 

Dr. Norman Weinstein, Board Certified Cardiologist, will discuss lifestyle and treatment options 

for people at risk for heart disease. Registration is required. 

Your health is the most important thing in the world to us. 




—7 
Victory Memorial Hospital 

1324 N. Sheridan Road, Waukegan, IL 
J 



Call 

1-800-THE-CHOICE 

to register, u-m-m-iw) 



Those physically challenged and/or in need of an ASL interpreter may contact us up to one week before a 

community program to determine how Victory can facilitate their attendance. 

Tenemos disponibtes las senicios de iraduccion at Espaftol, 



m 



A6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



January 2, WVH 



Calendar 



Friday, January 2 

End ACHS Winter BreaK 

Tickets go on sale at Antioch Parks 
and Recreation Dept. p Village Hall, 
for February 21st "Daddy Daughter 
Date Night." 7-9 p.m., $10 

Sunday, January 4 

7-9 p.m. Open Gym at ACHS, 
cost $2, adults only 

Monday, January 5 

12:45 p.m. Bingo at Antioch 
Senior Center, info, at 395-7120 

7-9 p.m. Post-high Men's Basket- 
ball at Antioch Evangelical Free 
Church, call 395-4117 for info. 

7 p.m. A.LL meeting at Commons 
at Antioch Comm. High School 

7 p.m. Northwest Educational 
Group meets at Lake Villa 
Administrative complex 

7 p.m. Network of Friends, Multi- 
ple Sclerosis support group meets 
at Antioch Moose Lodge 

7:30 p.m. Lakes Area Community 
Band at Antioch Community High 
School, information at 395-5566 

Tuesday, January 6 

9-11 a.m. Ladies Bible Study at 
Antioch Evangelical Free Church, 
call 395-4117 for information 

6:45 p.m. Antioch VFW Bingo, 
refreshments avail., doors open 
4:30 p.m., info, at 395-5393 

7 p.m. ACHS A.M.P.S. meets in 
ACHS auditorium 

7:00-8:00 p.m. Weigh to Win 
program held at Calvary Christian 
Center, Monaville Rd., west of Rte. 
83 in Lake Villa, call 356-6181 

7-9 p.m. Antioch Boy Scout Troop 
92 meet at Antioch Scout House, 
Williams Park 

7:30 p.m. St. Peter Council of 
Catholic Women meet at parish 
hall, call 395-0274 for information 

Wednesday, January 7 

Sequoit Board of Directors meets 

Antioch Senior Center holds Line 
Dancing at 9:00 a.m., Crafts at 
9:00 a.m., Exercise Class at 
10:00, Sing-a-long at 10:30, call 
395-7120 for information 

6:30-8:15 p.m. AWANA Club 
(3 yrs. thru 6th grade) meets at 
Antioch Evangelical Free Church, 
for information call 395-4117 

7-9 p.m., Northern Lake County 
Quitter's Guild meets at State Bank 
of the Lakes in Lindenhurst, for 
info, call Valerie at 838-2126 

7:30 p.m. Sequoit Pride at ACHS 

Thursday, January 8 

9-11:30 a.m. MOPS (Mothers 
of Pre-Schoolers) meets at Antioch 
Evang. Free Church. $5/craft and 
child care (birth to kindergarten), 
call (414) 877-2725 or 395-4117 

6 p.m. TOPS Weight Loss meets 
at Antioch Manor Apartments, 
additional Info, at 395-8143 

6:30 p.m. Board of Education 
meeting at ACHS Library 

7:30 p.m. Antioch Twp. Regular 
meeting, at Township Office 

7:30 p.m. Public Hearing: Deer- 
crest Planned Unit Development, 
Antioch Planning and Zoning 
Board, Antioch Village Hall 

GOT SOMETHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14-day notice is needed 
for all calendar requests. 
Ask for Cristina Feindt 
223-8161, ext. 104. 



Fun begins now the holidays are over 



Well, the holiday season 
has come to an end, 
but we still can't relax. 
This is the day we find 
ourselves pumped up and ready to 
stick to our guns and fulfill all those 
unrealistic New Year's resolutions 
we vowed to keep. Why do we put 
ourselves through this self-mutila- 
tion and torture? We seem to pur- 
posely set ourselves up for failure- 
it's the American way. 

Now, I have a few resolutions 
of my own, tucked away In the back 
of my mind, to try and follow this 
year. Don't think for one minute 
that I am naive enough to publish 
them for all of Antioch to see and 




JINGLE 

FROM 

PRINGLE 

LytinPringle 



watch me fail miserably at— Oprah 
I am not. 

Of course, if we all gave up our 
vices and became the model citi- 
zen, the perfect person, the epitome 
of civilization, just think of how 
many professions in this world 
would be out of jobs. Speeding, 
burglary, murder, and crime in gen- 



START THE NEW YEAR OFF 

WITH A FEW STEPS ; 
IN THE R IG H f D I R E C T I O N , 

. NOW GO LEFT. 
THEN GO FORWARD... 



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Did You Know The 
Recently Passed Tax 
Law May Affect You? 




The tax legislation which 
was signed into law earlier 
this year impacted several 
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eral would be non-existent, there- 
fore eliminating the need for those 
much feared IRS Auditors. 

If everyone ate healthy, fast 
food stocks would plummet putting 
a lot of wealthy CEOs in soup 
kitchen food lines. What would 
happen to Fanny Mae, Famous 
Amos, Sara Lee and Mrs. Smith? 
Picture a world full of Martha Stew- 
arts—now that's frightening. If all 
the world was fit and trim, health 
clubs, personal trainers, and 
Richard Simmons would be put out 
to pasture— well, maybe that isn't 
so bad. But you gel my drift here. 

There would be no news to re- 
port because who wants to hear 
good news. Give us those stories on 
abuse and Bronco chases, that's 
what the public wants to hear— it 
makes our own life seem that much 
more sane. 

So, as much as we try to fool 
ourselves and fool those around us, 
we all pretty much realize, come the 
year 2001, we will still be overeating, 
overworking, neglecting our kids, 
and filling our plates with too many 
entrees. Sure some of us may stop 
smoking orstart exercising, but for 
the most part our personalities and 
traits arc pretty much set in stone 



and come hell or high water, we 
won't be making any major attitude 
adjustments any time too soon. Boy, 
doesn't that thought make you want 
to jump out of bed tomorrow and 
blaze a new trail across the bed- 
room floor into the bathroom. Who 
wants to start next week? 

Line dance update 

As we start this New Year those 
crazy line dancing folk want you to 
know they are alive and kickin' it. 
The Antioch Parks and Recreation 
Dcpt. is once again sponsoring Line 
Dance Lessons for anyone who 
wishes to attend. The new session of 
lessons starts Wednesday, Jan. 7 at 
Grass Lake School from 7 to 8:30 
a.m. To register for the lessons or if 
you need more information, con- 
tact Laurie Stahl, the Parks and 
Recreation Director at 395-21 60 or 
visit her at the Village office at 874 
Main St. And it wouldn't be a Line 
Dance update without the always 
ending— Yee ha. 

And so goes another "Jingle 
from Pringle." 

Readers with information for 
"Jingle from Pringle" should call 
Lynn Pringle at 395-6364. 



Tree, card recycling 
reduces waste 



Antioch residents can help re- 
duce waste by using free Christmas 
tree pick-up and greeting card recy- 
cling programs. Trees go to the curb 
or forest preserve. Holiday cards 
may be recycled by sending covers to 
St. Jude's Ranch for Children. 

In Antioch, waste management 

will.coHc.ct trees during ihcwcek of. 
Ian. 5th on regular collection days 

according to Monica Duebbcrt, pub- 
lic Information coordinator for the 
Solid Waste Agency of Lake County. 
Trees discarded after those 
dates will be collected by the Antioch 
Public Works Department, chipped 
for mulch, and offered to residents 
for use. Additional information is 
available from Antioch Village Hall at 
847-395-1000. 

"Recycling Christmas tress into 



Don't second- 
guess your 



FUTURE 




It's a fact! Crystal balls 
don't workl But, a visit to 
your local PeWn Insurance 
Agent wllll Your Pekln Agent 
can help you plan for your 
future with the right 
Insurance plan for your 
particular needs. Don't take 
a chance with your future, 
throw away that crystal ball 
and see your professional 
Pekin Insurance Agent 
todayl 

Life • Health • Auto 
• Home • Business 

Depend on your hometown professionals 

Timothy H. Osmond, CIC 

( >,rr,:rj iruurancr Smvt, Ud. 

976 Hillside 
Antioch, Illinois 60002 

395-2500 



vmai 



mulch and compost creates a valu- 
able, useful product and conserves 
landfill space," Duebbcrt said. 

"St. Jude's Ranch for Children 
accepts greeting card covers, which 
they recycle into new cards. The chil- 
dren earn spending money and fund 
trips from the proceeds achieved 

throuah this oroJecLZDurhluut said.. . 
Efforts to acquire card cover fronts Is 

assisted by an appeal to newspapers 
to publicize the card front recycling 
program by Ed McMahon, a televi- 
sion personality. 

Holiday trees for recycling pro- 
grams must be placed at the curb 
free of all tinsel, lights, garlands, or- 
naments, and hooks. All trees must 
also be untied and removed from 
any plastic or fabric bag. 

Duebbcrt also suggests other 
ways to manage future holiday 
waste. "Changing gift wrapping 
habits can significantly cut down the 
mountains of holiday trash," she 
said. "Use old newspaper inside 
packages to cushion breakables." 

People may prefer to donate 
trees to the Lake County Forest Pre- 
serve District. Duebbcrt said that the 
district operates an annual Christ- 
mas Tree Roundup. "Tills year the 
Roundup starts Dec. 26 and runs 
through Feb. 1, 1998," she said. 
Trees may be dropped off in the des- 
ignated areas at the following loca- 
tions from 6:30 a.m. to sunset: 
Greenbelt {North Chicago), Half Day 
(Vernon Hills), Lakcwood (Waucon- 
da), Old School (Ubertyville), Van 
Patten Woods (Zion), and Kyerson 
Woods (Deerfield). Trees will be 
chipped and used for trails and land- 
scaping. Additional information is 
available from 847-367-6640. 



iflSR 10-4035 





BARK N' TOWN 
KENNELS ra 



Boarding 
• Grooming • Pot Supplies 
Toys & Bones (or Your "Best Friends' 

27607 W. Brandenburg Rd. 

Inglosldc 



(815) 385-0632 



Hour*. P.HVI 

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O i in ■ I k ■ yi 
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:.i 




THE 
CUPBOARD 

Brendan O'Neill 



Winter break is 
over, time for 
play to heat up 

The upcoming week will see 
the local schools again Till up 
with students and athletes as 
the holiday beak is now com- 
ing to a close. This also means thai 
the schools' sports will now be back 
in full action, with more than just the 
basketball teams competing. 

Tills first weekend of 1998 fea- 
tures many wrestling, swimming, 
bowling, and gymnastics meets and 
tournaments. It's a good time to 
check out some of these local teams 
as they make the stretch run toward 
post-season play. 



A, 



lexDeGroh, a 14-year-old 
freshman wrestler at Grayslake 
High School, is using his consider- 
able size to his advantage for the 
up-start freshman Rams. DcGroh, 
standing over G'O" and weighing be- 
tween 160-171, recorded three falls 
in Grayslakc's prc-hollday tourna- 
ment. He recorded one fall in just , 
28 seconds, and has seen some ac- 
tion on the juniorvarsity. Look for 
him to be a big part of Grayslake's 
wrestling future. 

Registration for spring and/or 
fall soccer for the Mundclein AYSO 
will be held in the Mundclein High 
School cafeteria at the following 
times: Saturday, Jan. 10 from 9 
a.m.- 12 p.m.; Thursday, Jan. 15 
from 630-830 p.m.; and Saturday, 
Jan. 17 from 9a.rn.-12 p.m. 

— ■•"AiitnKli'Vniiin tiMHtttnir«'i Tfitn 

registration will be held Saturday, 
Jan. 17 from 1-4 p.m.; Sunday, Jan. 
18 from 1-4 p.m.; and Wednesday, 
Jan. 21 from 6-9 p.m. at the Antioch 
Village Hall, Toft Ave. entrance. 

Brendan O'Neill can be reached 
at (847) 223-8161, ext. 132; fax 
(847) 223-8810; or e-mail at 
edit@lnd.com. 



Lakeland's 
Basketball Records 

Boys 

North Suburban 

Mundclein 9-4 (2-2) 

Antioch 7-5 (2-2) 

Libcrtyvillc 6-5(3-1) 

Warren 5-3 (3-0) 
Independents 

Wauconda 3-7 

Grant 3-9 

Round Lake 2-8 

Johnsburg 1-6 
Fo x Val l ey 

Grayslake 5-7(4-1) 
Easl Suburban Catholic 

Carmel 5-8(1-3)- 

Glrls 

North Suburban 

Warren 12-2 (3-0) 

Ubcrtyville 6-5(2-1) 

Antioch 6-4 (1-2) 

Mundclein 3-8(1-2) 
Independents 

Wauconda 9-3 

Round Lake 3-8 

Grant 2-6 

Johnsburg 0-7 
Fox Valley 

Grayslake 8-2(4-2) 
Fast Suburban Catholic 

Carmel 4-8(1-1) 

"IjjIc tournament panics not included" 

LAKELAND LEADERS 

(BOYS) 

Name 
Avg. 

lack Li'wandovvskJ, Wl IS 
Urlci.cvernIcr.MllS 
llriitnllamlciMJIS 
JlmOlKjikowltch. UIS 
HmlchnelSlaby. H1.K 
Mik« Brnndow.WTI IS 
Nick U-ider, CIIS 
Ho ub Hippbcrgcr, Ml IS 
tourdaln Milot, WT11S 
TomMcMahon.CHS 



G IMS 



7 


ISB 


22.6 


12 


210 


1(1.2 


10 


1G0 


16.8 


10 


149 


14.11 


11 


157 


14.3 


a 


108 


135 


12 


154 


12.8 


IZ 


152 


12.7 


a 


100 


12.5 


12 


MB 


12.3 




January 2, 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A7 



Sequoits reach tourney finals 

Antioch boys win 
four but fall to St. 
Mel in Rockford 
title game 



By STEVE PETERSON 
Staff Reporter 




Some steady defense, strong re- 
bounding and a long shot all added 
up to a chance for Antioch to take 
home the big trophy 
from the Rockford, 
Holiday Classic. 

Providence St. 
Mel stood in the Se- 
quoits way, but the championship 
test could not take away from 
memories of four-straight wins. 
The Sequoits lost in the title game 
to St, Mel by a score of 65-49, but 
felt good about reaching the finals 
and winning four of their Ave 
games. 

ACHS coach Jeff Dresser had a 
confident feeling when sophomore 
Don Lackey's 25-footer first went air- 
borne in the closing seconds against 
Rockford Guilford. 

"I had no doubt it would reach 
nothing but net. He shot it right in 
front of our bench. Don doesn't 
smile often, but he had a wide grin 
after that shot," said Dresser. 

The three-pointer turned back a 
Rockford Guilford rally and gave An- 

-.~ffu*.'lt-n oa-DtwIn. n«n tin on Satur- 
day, the Sequoits survived a 55-53 
decision over Rockford East. 

Antioch took control for a time 
against Guilford in the second half, ' 
before Guilford mounted a rally 
starting in the later stages of the third 
period. 

Early tourney wins came over 
Rockford Auburn 63-58 and Rock- 
ford Harlem 50-44. 

"We have played fairly steady de- 
fense and kept our poise at the end of 
games. We have fixed the things that 




Antioch senior Chris Groth goes in for a layup against Harlem in the Rockford Holiday Classic. An- 
tioch reached the finals of the tourney, but lost 65-49 to Providence St. Mel.— Photo by Steve Young 



were broken and the kids have re- 
sponded well. Our rebounding has 
been very good," said Dresser. 

The scoring has been^bjdanced. 
listens' tmproved~la~7 -5 overall." 
That takes the pressure off Groth. 

Against East, Mike Nielsen was 
6-of-l 1 shooting in a 17 point game. 
He made six of Antioch's final eight 
points. 

Brian Soldano has had a con- 
sistent tournament. He led the Se- 
quoits with 18 points in the win over 
East after a 13-point effort against 
Harlem. Groth led that effort with 17 
points. 

"We got off to a good start 
against Harlem and we played good 



defense. We thought we should have 
scored more, but they kept changing 
their defenses," said Dresser. 

m Ant [och. ha% enjoyed p l,pejcc nj 

^shooting! fronf the field while holding 
the opposition to 41 percent. 

"We have had four Individuals in 
double figures. That really helps our 
balance," said Dresser. 

Providence St. Mel had too 
much rebounding and overall ath- 
letic talent for the Sequoits to stay 
close in long stretches. St. Mel de- 
fended its Rockford Holiday Clas- 
sic Tournament title with a 65-49 
win. 

The second-place finish was Anti- 
och's best finish here after four fourth 



place finishes in earlier years and three 
straight sixth-place finishes. 

"The positives are that we won 
\ four games, in a row here," said 
Dresser. 

"We learned we can actually beat 
somebody, and I don't mean that in 
a negative way. We just started to 
play better. This should help us gain 
confidence for the conference sea- 
son," said all-tournament selection 
Chris Groth. ' 

"Chris can settle things down. 
He plays a very steady game. We 
need to work to get him a few more 
shots," said Dresser of Groth, who 
finished with 13 points to lead the 
Sequoits against St. Mel. 



Antioch girls win McHenry tournament 



By STEVE PETERSON 
Staff Reporter . 



Brushing off a sub-par per- 
formance in the tournament opener, 
Antioch improved in areas coach 
Dave Woods 



<#» 






stressed. 

Tire result 
was a 3-1 tourna- 
ment record and 
a McHenry tour- 
nament champi- 
onship. After a third-place trophy 
last year, the Sequoits took home the 
big trophy this year. 

Antioch downed Immaculate 
Heart of Mary 36-26 in the champi- 
onship game. Prior to the champi- 
onship game, the girls held off a 
comeback by Trinity for a 42-4 1 win 
after edging Prospect 44-40. 

"There were a lot of positives. 
We started playing better as we ex- 
ecuted our half-court offense and 
we played much better defense. 
Those were two things we really 
concentrated on," said ACHS coach 
Dave Woods. 

It was a good two days for Anti- 
och basketball. The boys team 
reached the championship game of 
the Rockford tournament with four 
wins. 



At McHenry Friday, Trinity 
closed an 1 1 -point Antioch lead 
with a 13-3 fourth quarter run but 
the effort ran out of time. Aja Brown 
had 15 points and Nicole Langlcy 
12. 

Antioch out-battled a taller IHM 
team for needed rebounds in the 
early going of the title game as a key 
in the victory. 




"We played good defense. IHM 
had us on size. They played a 2-3 
zone and we got the lead early. We 
used the clock to our advantage," 
said Woods. 

The Brown and Langlcy combi- 
nation led the offense with 15 and 12 
points, respectively. But it was 
clutch three-point shooting by 
sophomore Katie Gofron and a bas- 
ket by Amie Carlberg which gave the 
Sequoits the edge. 

Against Prospect, it was a case of 



ACHS majoring in defense. 

"Lisa Ipsen shut down their lead- 
ing guard. The key to the game was 
Ipsen and Carlberg stopping their 
guards," said Woods. 

Antioch heads into the second 
half of the season above .500 at 7- 
6. 

"What we needed was some 
consistency and we are beginning to 
show that at both ends of the floor. 
There is still a lot to work on," said 
Woods. 



ATHLETES OF THE WEEK 



Name; Chris Groth 
School: Antioch High 
Sport: Boys Boasketball 
Year: Sophomore 
Last week's stats: Scored 1 8 
points in Antioch's 63-58 win 
over Rockford Auburn and 17 
points in a 50-44 win over 
Harlem en route to touney finals. 

Name: Aja Brown, Nicole Langlcy 
School: Antioch High 
Sport: Girls basketball 
Year: Seniors 

Last week's stats: Scored 1 5 
and 12 points, respectively, in fi- 
nal two wins as Antioch won 
McHenry girls basketball crown. 





Langley 



Brown 














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STATE FARM 




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wonntfErs 



Let's join together and make the designated 



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too many lives at stake for us not to succeed. 





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71 ^Wni- 

6 J *3*J<*J 







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Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. 

State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company 

Home Office: Bloomington, Illinois 



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LIFE'S ABEAR 

Donna Abear waxes 
philosophical on 1997 / B5 



ANTI0 CH 



PARENT'S PLACE 

Sherri Singer advises on the 
^BLto^^aJw Question /B11 

Ant,0c *> IL 60002 



75 



MOVIE PICK 

'Good Will Hunting' 
should earn awards / B6 



Section 




Lakeland 
Newspapers 

knmtl 
1998 



It was the place to be' 



Our Lady of the Lake 

Owner hopes to realize dream of restoring Mineola Hotel to its days of grandeur 




Above, the Mineola Hotel as it appears in files for the National Register of Historic 
Places, circa 1980. — Photo courtesy of the Lake County Museum. 



Pete Jakstas, Sr. ( says the view overlooking Fox Lake from the veranda of the 
Mineola Hotel is one of the most scenic in Illinois. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 



ByLEONFILAS 
Staff Reporter 



As I drove up the long road leading to 
the Mineola Hotel, I remembered 
the sudden feeling ormy jaw hitting 
the floor. Like something out of 
"Gone with the Wind," it rests in splendor 
looking over Fox lake, the crown jewel of the 
county. 

With it's 250-foot veranda, one could just 
Imagine it in Its hey-day, with men and 
women dancing the night away, overlooking 
the lake. 



"The Mineola was built in 1884," said Pete 
Jakstas, Sr. , owner of the Mineola Hotel, Bar, 
and Marina. "It was built by five members of 
the Chicago Board of Trade as a clubhouse." 

In 1903, tiie Mineola went through reno- 
vations and opened for public use, and the 
Mineola Hotel was born. 

"It was the Lady of the Likes," Jakstas 
stated. "It was the place to be in the Chain 
O'Lakes region." 

With a 240-foot long porch and more than 
100 rooms, the Mineola Hotel was considered 
the baby lo the Grand Hotel of Mackinac Is- 
land in Michigan. It was the weekend retreat 



for many sports figures and politicians, as well 
as a few notorious mob figures who have trav- 
eled it's corridors. 

"This was, indeed, the weekend retreat for 
Al Capone." Jakstas stated, as he showed off 
his prized artifact, Al Capone's hat. "This was 
the truce land for a lot of goodfellows. They 
came out here to relax. They did their busi- 
ness in the city, but out here, they didn't 
touch each other." 

Al Capone, aside from other things, was 
famous for his escape routes. 

"Gov. Thompson was out here for a fund 
raiser, and the secret service came early to 
check the place out." Jakstas stated. "There's 
two ways out, by the water or the road. 
There's enough doors and hallways to protect 
those mat needed to be protected." 

Over the years, however, like all good 
things the hotel has come into disrepair. With 
modernization of hotels coming in the 1960s, 
the Mineola closed it's doors in 1963. 

"There were huge holes in the floor and 
the roof was leaking," Jakstas stated. "It was 
really bad." 

That's the way the hotel stood for 16 
years, until through the combined efforts of 
Jakstas and the grand lady of the chain of 
lakes, Margaret Tuck, the Mineola was placed 
on the National Register of Historic Places 
through the State of Illinois and the United 
States Department of the Interior National 
Park Service. Since then, Jakstas has made it 
his duty to restore the Mineola back from it's 
decaying form and return the Lady of the 
Lakes to Fox Lake. 

"We put a new roof on her in 198 1 ," Jakstas 
stated. "And since then, we are replacing the 
veranda columns and roofing, and have fully 
restored the Grand Ballroom of the hotel" 



As the ballroom opens, the history in the 
room is enough to knock, someone over. With 
the hugeness of the room, the solid wood 
floors and the restored veranda overlooking 
the lake, the beauty of the hotel once again 
comes back to life. 

"This is why they called it the Lady of the 
Lake," Jakstas states, still in awe of the room. 
"If I live long enough and don't go bankrupt, I 
will reopen this hotel." 

"Some people say it's Pete's pipe dream, 
but just look at it, and you'll know why I'm 
doing it," Jakstas states. "Every time someone 
states it can't be done, it makes me work a lit- 
tle harder to get it done." 

Jakstas does shy away from help from 
other sources when it comes to the hotel 
restoration. "It's an expensive project, but I'm 
too proud of a man to set up a fund-raiser or 
anything. If people offer, sure I'll take it, but 
I'll never ask for it." 

In the meantime though, Jakstas is content 
with how the project is moving along so far. 

"By next year, we'll have the entire veran- 
da finished." Jakstas stated. "Then, we can get 
to work on other areas." 

Jakstas, then, opens a door leading to the 
veranda, which over looks a half frozen lake 
and some of the most beautiful scenery locat- 
ed in the state of Illinois. 

He walks out, looks over the lake that he 
has looked over a thousand times before, and 
with a twinkle in hi j eye, like a new kid on 
Christmas looking over his presents under the 
tree, just simply smiles. 

"Thank God for mother nature." 

Yes, thank God for mother nature. But 
also, thank God for Pete Jakstas, Margaret 
Tuck and five guys from Chicago, for building, 
keeping and restoring the Lady of the Lakes. 



i 

I 

I 




Itt 




B2/Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



January 2, 1998 



KID'S FARE 



PrimeCo Personal Communications gives kids a voice 



Everyone's got one. Chidlren 
hear adults espousing them 
all the time. And in an elec- 
tion year, they dominate the 
news. What are they? Opinions, of 
course, and this year PrimeCo Per- 
sonal Communications is enabling 
an important but often unheard 
audience — children — to express 
theirs through an innovative new 
exhbit at the Chicago Children's 
Museum. 

A four- way alliance of the na- 
tion's leading wireless telecom- 
munications providers— Bell At- 
lantic, NYNEX, Air Touch and U S 
WEST Media Group— PrimeCo 
will be launching a breakthrough 
wireless telecommunications net- 
work in Chicago and 10 other 
markets later this year. As part of 
its commitment to community re- 
lations, the company is sponsor- 
ing the wireless component of the 
Info-Tech Arcade; Where Kids 
Connect, the Chicago Children's 
Museum's newest permanent ex- 
hibit. 

This interactive display, called 
the PrimeCo Survey Station, en- 
ables children to speak their minds 
on issues of the day through a tool 
they're used to seeing adults use — 
wireless phones. PrimeCo is sup- 
plying state-of-the-art digital 
phones for the exhibit. 

For more information, call 
(312) 527-1000. The Chicago Chil- 
dren's Museum is located at Navy 
Pier, 700 East Grand Ave., Chica- 
go. 



'Star off Wonder 1 sky show 
is an Adler tradition 

Discovei the story behind 
the 'Star of Wonder.' Who 
were the Magi.or Wise 
Men? Where did they 
come from? And what did they wit- 
ness in the sky that prompted them 
to travel to Jerusalem? Could it have 
been an exploding star? Perhaps a 
brilliant comei? Or an unusual 
grouping of the planets? 'Star of 
Wonder' explores these questions 
carefully and comes to a surprising 
and dramatic conclusion, based on 
ancient Chinese astronomical 
records and modern computer pro- 
jections of planet positions. 

Much of the 'wonder' of the 
show is created by adjusting the 
Zeiss planetarium projector to sim- 
ulate the skies of 2000 years ago. The 
audience is then able to view the 
stars and the moving planets just as 
they appeared in the sky during the 
likely time of the Magi's travels. 

Adler Planetarium and Astrono- 
my Museum's enduring holiday sky 
show 'Star of Wonder' has become a 
tradition for many families who re- 
turn each year to experience the re- 
markable story of the Magi and gaze 
in wonder at the skies that shone 
over Bethlehem long ago. The show 
is running through January A th. 

Kids Day Out programs 

Make plans now for the 
upcoming school holi- 
days by attending one of 
the YMCA Camp Duncan 



"Kids Day Out" programs. 

Kids Day Out Program dates are 
as follows: Winter break; Jan. 19: 
Martin Luther King Day; Feb. J 2: 
Lincoln's Birthday; March 2: 
Casimir Pulaski Day; and March 30, 
31, April 1, 2, & 3: Spring break. 

Each day of the program will 



take place at 7 a.m. and end at 6 
p.m. Activities include archery, hik- 
ing, teams course, outdoor educa- 
tion, sports, foozball, crafts, and 
boating. Winter weather will provide 
opportunities for ice skating, sled- 
ding, ice hockey, and winter sports. 
Camp.Duncan offers opportuni- 



ty to learn new skills, develop new 
friendships, renew old friendships, 
and just have fun. 

The same team that leads and 
implements the summer program 
will successfully direct the "Kids 
Day Out Program." For more infor- 
mation, call 546-8086. 



JUST FOR KIDS! 

FumF ACTORS 



**&£&■&? 



t^^*%^ ^r 



CANINE QUIZ 

How much do you know about dogs? Learn more about this popular pet by 
taking the quiz below. Circle the answers you think are correct. 



word 



INSIST 



DEMAND OR 
REQUIRE 




1. Mixed-breed dogs tend to be 
healthier than purebred dogs. 

True 
False 

2. A dog's withers is the area of its 
body between the front legs below 
the chest. 

True 
False 

3. Some breeds of dogs only should 
be bathed a few times a year to pre- 
vent loss of natural coat and skin 
oils. 

True 
False 

4. Blow drying is the most thorough 
way to dry a dog with a long coat. 

True 
False 

5. It is OK to feed a dog chicken 
bones. 

True 
False 

6. The basset hound is a popular 
family dog, known for its calm, 
friendly disposition. 

True 
False 

7. A dog with a coat color called blue 
merle is blue-gray mixed with white. 

True 
False 

8. An owner can help prevont a dog 
from developing gum disease by 



■ brushing its teeth once a week. 
True 
False 

9. An owner should not worry if a 
dog develops a dull coat, because 
that doesn't Indicate health prob- 
lems. 

True 
False 

10. Crabbing is when a dog lands 
heavily on its front legs when it is 
running. 

True 
False 

11. A dog with long, low-hanging 
ears has pendulous ears. 

True 
False 

12. Greyhounds are the fastest 
breed of dog, reaching speeds of 
more than 40 mph. 

True 
False 

13. The beagle is the most long-lived 
breed of dog, often reaching 20 
years of age. 

True 
False 

14. When they are eight to 10 weeks 
old, puppies generally enter a "fear 
period," when they are easily fright- 
ened. 

True 
False 




enjjL-n asiej et enji'si enjx*u asiej *ot Bsjej *6 erui 
"8 esiej -z enji*9 es|ej g enjj/fr emj. e ©siej z enJiH :sjomsuv 



HOW THEY 
SAY IT IN... 



ENQLISHl WHEEL 
SPANISH! RUEOA 

ITALIAN: RUOTA 

FRENCH) ROUE 

GERMANS RAD 

LATINi ROTA 



■'\ 



HOROSCOPE 



Aries - March 21/Aprll 20 
It's a long week for you, Aries. 
There is so much for you to do, 
and you just don't have the time 
to get everything done. Don't 
panic. Take your time, work to 
your full potential, and everything 
will work oul fine. A close friend 
asks for your advice about a re- 
lationship. Be honest, but not 
cruel. He or she really needs 
your help. 

Taurus -April 21 /May 21 
You're on the go early in the 
week. You've got a lot of things 
to get done, so don't let others 
distract you, A loved one wants 
to spend some quality time with 
you. Don't say no; it's sure to be 
fun. That special someone fi- 
nally asks you out. Say yes. Li- 
bra plays a key role late in the 
week. 

Gemini - May 22/June 21 
You've got a stressful week In 
front of you. Every time you think 
you can relax, something else 
comes up. Don't get upset; just 
work through it. Things will start 
to calm down by Friday. A friend 
gets involved in a risky venture 
and wants to bring you Into it. 
Don't be fooled. Things are not 
as they seem. 

Cancer - June 22/July 22 
Your sense of humor wins the at- 
tention of some important people 
early In the week. Don't overdo it. 
Just be yourself, and you're sure 
to win the recognition that you 
deserve. The person you've 
been seeing wants to end the re- 
lationship. Don't get upset. You'll 
soon realize that he or she was- 



n't the person for you. 

Leo - July 23/August 23 
A business decision wins you the 
praise of your superiors. Don't be 
embarrassed; you deserve it. 
That special someone takes you 
on a romantic journey late in the 
week. Enjoy it. A loved one asks 
your opinion about a family prob- 
lem. Be honest. Sagittarius plays 
an important role on Wednes- 
day. 

Virgo - Aug 24/Sept 22 

You're on your own this week, 
Virgo, and that's just how you like 
it. You're able to get everything 
done. Enjoy it while it lasts, be- 
cause things will get hectic by the 
end of the week. That special 
someone has a surprise for you. 
Get excited, because it's just 
what you've been asking for. 

Libra - Sept 23/Oct 23 
You can't seem to make a deci- 
sion early in the week, Every 
time that you're ready to decide, 
you have doubts about what to 
do. Take some time for yourself 
to clear your mind. It's the only 
way to remedy the situation. A 
loved one needs your help with a 
family event. Do all that you can. 
A close friend monopolizes your 
time at the end of the week. 

Scorpio - Oct 24/Nov 22 
Don't be afraid of a business as- 
sociate. The bark is worse than 
the bite. Stand up for what you 
believe in, even if it means hav- 
ing to explain yourself. Some 
friends lake you out for a night on 
the town. Enjoy yourself; there's 
no need to worry about anything. 



Aquarius and Leo play key roles. 

Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 
A friendly relationship is about 
to become a romantic one. 
Think about what you really 
want before you make a com- 
mitment. Your loved ones and 
close friends will support your 
decision. Your family needs 
your help with a gathering. Give 
your input, but don't volunteer to 
take charge. You just don't 
have the time. 

Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 

Don't be stubborn when it comes 
to a business venture early in the 
week. You are not the only one 
who understands the situation. 
Listen to other people's opinions, 
and take them into consideration 
before making any decisions. A 
loved one turns to you for advica. 
Bo supportive. 

Aquarius - Jan 21 /Feb 18 
You've got to be realistic this 
week, Aquarius. Don't let visions 
of grandeur cloud your judgment. 
You meet an intriguing stranger 
at the end of the week. Be your- 
self, and you're sure to attract his 
or her attention. Gemini plays an 
important role. 

Pisces - Feb 19/March 20 
Show compassion for a friend in 
need. He or she is in a difficult sit- 
uation and needs all the support 
possible. A family member re- 
minds you of an important event 
that you'vo forgotten. Don't try to 
cover up your forgetfulness. Just 
admit it, and move on. That spe- 
cial someone has a question for 
you. 



CROSSWORD 




answers: 



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SjBQ >Z 

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sojov 'iZ 
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sores Ct 
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umbs "5 
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KMOO 

snoluyios 



jaowoe 

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sosuy *0Z 
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sNOiimos 



Clues ACROSS 

1 . Type of fruit 
3. Moved freely 
5. Malay people 
7. Defeat 
9. Turn away 

1 0. Man with an ark 

1 1 . Ethnic music 

14. Shade 

15. Word of farewell 

17. More reasonable 

18. Theater partition 

19. Central Florida city 

20. Tears down 



23. Mollusk genus 
25. Fastening 

27. Coaches 

28. Without (French) 

29. Female sibling 

30. Jan VanDer , 

Dutch painter 

Clues DOWN 

1 . Large, extinct Euro- 
pean wild ox 

2. Japanese waist 
pouch 

3. Nephritic 



4. Shove 

5. Separated, in a 
way 

6. American state 

7. Ostentatiously lofty 
in style 

8. Proposes, in a way 

1 1 . More abject 

12. Arm bones 

13. Gulf of , in the 

Aegean Sea 

14. City in the European 
part of Soviet Russia . 
16. Fiddler crabs 

21 . Land 

22. Good gosh! 

23. Roles 

24. Stumblebums 

25. Crease 

26. Bert , Oz Lion 



January 2, 1998 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



THEATRE 



Ijakeland Newspapers/ B3 







Looking every inch the hero, 
Hercules stands tall In Disney 
on Ice. 

'Hercules' 

Tickets arc now on sale for Disney 
on Ice— Hercules, Fcld 
Enicrtalnmcnt's latest nn ■ Ice block- 
buster that's hotter than Hades and 
cooler than Zeus. Chicago-area audi- 
ences can feast on this skating aciion- 
adventure, an arena experience fit Tor 
the gods, at the Roscmont Horizon, 
Jan. 21 -25, and the United Center, Jan. 
27-Fcb. 8. 

This i imelcss (ale of deceit and 
destiny takes on a modern twist or 
love, laughter and world-class Ice skat- 
ing, featuring an international cast of 
top-notch competitors-turned per- 
formers. Like the Disney movie, the ice 
spectacular features inspirational 
music by Oscar-winning composer 
Men Menken, and unforgettable char- 



Put on snowshoes for Snowshoe Challenge 



Runners of all ages: trade in your sneakers and 
strap on a pair of snowshoes for The Runner's 
Edge Snowshoe Challenge on Sunday, 
Jan. 1 1, from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., at Half 
Day Forest Preserve near Vernon Hills. 

In cooperation with the Lake County 
Forest Preserves, race sponsors, The 
Runner's Edge, Inc. and Redfeather 
Snowshoes, have created a unique win- 
ter sports event that will take shoers 
through the scenic views of Half Day Forest 
Preserve. 

Runners and walkers will enjoy.traveling along 
the Des Piaines River trail as they work their way 
over flat terrain on a three-mile, out-and-back 
loop course. Walkers have the option to choose a 
short course. Race-day registration begins at 8:15 
a.m. at Half Day Forest Preserve, Shelter A. 
Snowshoes are mandatory to participate in the 
three-mile run/walk. 

Register in person for the Snowshoe Challenge 
at The Runner's Edge, Inc., located at 1211 Wilmctte 
Avenue in Wilmette, through Saturday, Jan. 10. All 



CHECK 
IT OUT! 






mail-in entries must be postmarked no later than 
Jan. 3. Packets may be picked up in advance at The 
• Runner's Edge on Friday, Jan. 9, from 10 
a.m. to 6 p.m.; or Saturday, Jan. 10, from 
930 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Participants In the Snowshoe Challenge 
wfll receive a race number to be worn dur- 
ing the event A limited number of snow- 
shoes, provided by Denver-based 
Redfeather Snowshoes, will be available 
for rent. Snowshoe rental is on a first-come, first- 
registered basis and a credit card is required for 
rental deposit. No phone registrations for snowshoe 
rental will be accepted. 

Entry fees for the three-mile run/walk are: S20 
(pre-registered, includes snowshoe rental); S20 
cash only (race day, no snowshoe rental). 
Half Day Forest Preserve is located on 
Milwaukee Avenue (Route 21), just north of Half 
Day Road (Route 22), near Vemon Hills. For more 
information or to register for the Snowshoe 
Challenge event, contact The Runner's Edge at 
853-8531. 



acters voiced by Tate Donovan 
(Hercules), Susan Egan (Meg), lames 
Woods (Hades), Rip Torn (Zeus), Paul 
Shaffer (Hermes), Bob Gotdthwait 
(Pain) and Matt Frcwcr (Panic). 

Tickets for Disney on Ice— -"• 
Hercules are available at the 
Rosemont Horizon Box Office, 6920 
North Mannheim Road, the United 
Center Box Office, 1901 West 
Madison Street, and all TIcketMastcr 
locations. Prices range from $12.50 to 
$22.50. Children under 12 save S2.50 
off regular ticket prices at selected 
performances. To order tickets by 
phone, call (312) 559-1212. For more 
information, call the Horizon at 635- 
6601, or the United Center at (312) 
455.4500. 

Urban Bush Women 

Urban Bush Women will run an 
Ian. 17 at 8 p.m. at Pabst Theater, 144 
East Wells Street, Milwaukee, Wis. For 
more information, call the box office at 
(414)286-3663. 



Sleeping Beauty 

The Nonhbrook Theatre for Young 
Audiences presents the musical tale or 
"Sleeping Beauty," Saturdays, Jan. 10 
through Feb. 14 at 10:30 a.m. and 1 
p.m. at their theatre located at 3323 
Walters Avenue, Nonhbrook. 

This classic talc is of a king and 
queen who make the mistake of 
offending a powerful, but evil fairy, for 
which the price for their mistake is 
their beautiful daughtcr.Shc must prick 
her finger on a spinning wheel and fall 
asleep for a hundred years. Only the 
kiss of a handsome Prince can awaken 
her. But, he must fight a fire-breathing 
dragon to rescue the Princess from her 
dream-filled slumber. 

Sleeping Beauty is presented by 
Nonhbrook Theatre's professional 
adult children's company. The suggest- 
ed age for this production is kinder* 
garten through 5th grades. All seats are 
reserved and can be purchased in 
advance for $5 by using a Visa or 
MasterCard. Tickets purchased at the 



door are $6. There are party packages 
and group rates available. The 
Nonhbrook Theatre offers Field Trip 
packages to schools and groups on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays, arranged in 
advance. To purchase tickets, call 29 1 - 
2367. 

'Guys and Dolls' 

The classic musical fable of broad- 
way, "Guys and Dolls," will appear at 
Marriott's Lincolnshire Theatre now 
through Ian. 18, 1998. "Guys and 
Dolls" will be directed by Dominic 
Missimi, with musical direction by 
Terry James and choreography by 
Kenny Ingram. 

TTie performance schedule Is: 
Wednesday at 2 and 8 p.m.; Thursdays 
(which Includes a steak dinner) and 
Fridays at 8 pm.; Saturdays at 5 and 830 
p.m.; and Sundays at 230 and 7 p.m. 
Tickets to all performances arc $33, 
senior citizens and students receive a 
$10 discount off the regular ticket price 
for Wednesday at 2 and 8 p.m.. and 



Sunday at 230 and 7 p.m. perfor- 
mances. Children under age 6 are not 
admitted. For tickets call, 634-0200. 

*Vlnce' 

Vlncc, The Life and Times of VTnce 
Lombard!, will run on Jan. 9 and 10 at 8 
p.m. at Pabst Theater, 144 East Wells 
Street, Milwaukee, Wis. For more Infor- 
mailon. call the box office at (414) 286- 
3663. 

Open auditions 

The Conference of Jewish Women's 
Organizat ions of Metropolitan Chicago 
Program Service Department Invites 
vocalists, musicians, book reviewers, 
dancers, lecturers, speakers, and drama- 
tists to apply for its preliminary audlfion. 

An umbrella organization made up 
of 200 constituent women's organiza- 
tions, the Conference showcases as 
wide an array of talent as possible to the 
member organizations, while present- 
ing a platform to the rising, new and 
changing talent on the Chicago scene. 

The preliminary audition will be 
heid on Wednesday, Feb, 1 1, at Temple 
Shalom. 3480 North Lake Shore Drive, 
Chicago. For an application to appear at 
the preliminary audition, call Judy 
Walder.pi 2) 943-8610. 

■ 

'Security' auditions 

Highland Park Players holds open 
auditions from 7-1 p.m. Monday, Jan. 
12 and Tuesday, Jan. 13 for its March 
production of "Social Security," at the 
Highland Park Community House, 1991 
Sheridan Road, Highland Park. Call- 
backs will be on Wednesday, Jan. 14. 

Pons are available for on urban 40- 
something couple, on "uptight" 40- 
something couple, an archetypical 
Jewish mother and an elderly gentle- 
man, the "world's greatest living artist" 
Actors will be asked to do cold readings 
from the script 

Performances will be on March 13, 
14, 20, 21 at 8 p.m. and on March 15 
and 22 at 2 p.m. "Social Security" is 
directed by Donna Uibow and pro- 
duced by Nancy Smaller. For more 
information, call 604-4771. 

Directing class 

■Directing L* • three-credit hour 

i'Uax* turn to rwu page 



Attention Business Managers! 

IT'S OFFICIAL! ! 

The radio ratings have been released! 



XLC 



lln« mos t conniirnial liv«" imisM*'. 



In Lake County, 102.3 WXLC-FM reaches the MOST 

persons 12 to 54 on an average quarter hour throughout 

the week than any other radio station...ANYWHERE! * 

Businesses trust WXLC-FM to 
deliver RESULTS in advertising! 

Reach the most ADULTS with your 
advertising messages...economicallyl 

WXLC-FM Delivers RESULTS! 

* Arbitron Radio Ratings - Summer 1997, Chicago Survey, Lake County Illinois 
Average Quarter Hour Persons 1 2 to 54, Mon. thru Sun. 6am to Midnight 



n 



r^tsssr" 



-<Wi>iS 



B4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



January 2,1998 



class at the College of Lake County this 
spring, will introduce students to the 
theory and practices related to directing 
for the stage. The 16-week class will be 
offered from 10 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. on 
Fridays beginning Ian. 23. 

Theatre instructor Robert Coscarclli 
will cover different aspects of directing, 
Including script selection, Interpretation, 
stage composition, rehearsal techniques 
and performance. Students will apply 
the theories they learn in the classroom 
in a hnnds-on workshop. 

The tuition and fees for the course 
are $51 per credit hour for in-dislricl stu- 
dents. For course information, call 543- 
2623. To register by phune, call 223- 1 1 1 1. 



ART 



Artists needed 

The auxiliary of Good Shepherd 
Hospital is encouraging area artists to 
apply for participation in the 24 tli Annu- 
al Juried and Invited Exhibition, "Art in 
the Born 1990," scheduled for Sept. 26 
and 27, 1998. All proceeds go to the hos- 
pital. To obtain an entry form, write to: 
Good Shepherd Hospital, 450 West 
Highway22,Art in the Barn, 1990, 
Darrington, Illinois 60010, Attn: Artists 
Committee. For more information, call 
381-0123. Deadline is April 1, 1998. 

Hall of Mirrors 

Hall of Mirrors: Art and Film Since 
1945 will run through Ian. 25 at the 
Museum of Contemporary Art, 220 E. 
Chicago Ave,, Chicago. Hall of Mirrors is 
the first major exhibition in the United 
States to focus on the dynamic relation- 
ship between cinema and the visual arts. 

Composed of nearly 200 works, 
Including art objects, films, and film 
excerpts, this national louring exhibi- 
tion, organized by the Museum of 
Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, 
explores the ways in which art and film 
have influenced each older, resulting in 
a blurring of boundaries and oftentimes 
a fusion of the two. 

In the works of artists and filmmak- 
ers such as Andy Warhol and Jean-Luc 
Godard, for example, viewers can see 
the flow of ideas between art and cine- 
ma. In conjunction with Hall of Mirrors 
the MCA Is presenting an array of 
screenings, lectures, and performances 
exploring the reciprocal Interactions 
between cinema and die visual arts. For 
more information, cnli(3)2) 280-2000, 

Toshio Shibata 

Toshio Shibata, the Japanese pho- 
tographer known internationally for his 
large-format prints of landscapes, has a 
solo exhibition at the Museum of 
Contemporary Art, 220 E. Chicago Ave., 
Chicago, running through Jan. 4, 1998. 

A museum-sponsored artist's resi- 
dency in the western United States pro- 
vided the Tokyo-based photographer 
with the resources to produce a new 
body of work: his first series depicting 
the American landscape. The 25 black- 
and-white photographs, depicting dams, 
ditches and reservoirs chat seem at odds 
with nature in their attempt to control 
such powerful forces as rivers and land- 
slides, have been accessioned into the 
museum's permanent collection. For 
more information, call (312) 280-2660. 



SPECIAL EVENTS 



Winter ecology hike at Volo Bog 

Where are all the animals? What signs do they 
leave? Where do they sleep? What are those 
funny little balls on the goldenrod? Dormant 
trees, snow fleas and things like these will high- 
light this hike at Volo Bog State Natural Area on 
Sunday, Jan, 4 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Ages 7 
to adult are welcome. Reservations are required. 
For more information, call (815) 344-1294 or 
T.D.D. (217)702-9175. 

Wild Orchids photo/art exhibit set 

Wild Orchids— A Photographic and Artistic 
Exploration of the Native Orchids of North 
America will be featured Jan. 10 through March 
29 at Chicago Botanic Garden, 1000 Lake Cook 
Road, Glencoe. For more information, call 835- 
5440. 

Three fishing seminars offered 

Attention all fishermen! The Northbrook Park 
District will host three informative seminars in 
January and February to enhance knowledge of 
fishing techniques. An Introduction to Game 
Fishing is scheduled on Thursday, Jan. 22, 7 p.m., 
at 3323 Walters Ave. Participants, ages 13 and 
over, will study the best ways to find and catch 
all types of fresh water fish, with an emphasis on 
bass. A brand new rod and fishing tackle will be 
raffled. Additional classes will highlight basic 
fishing techniques (Feb. 5) and the arty of fly 
fishing ( Feb. 12). A S7 fee will be assessed for 
each class. For more information, or to register, 
call 291-2980. 

Classes for January at Long Grove 

The shops in historic Long Grove are open 
throughout the winter months, and three of them 
will be offering interesting classes during 
January. 

Prims Charming, Ltd., 2321 Robert Parker 
Coffin Road, will have three Quilting classes for 
first-time quitters. These include Simon Says, a 
baby quilt class; a class for single or double Irish, 
chain; and a wall hanging quilt using Bargcllo 
designs (suitable for quitters of all stages). Prints 



Charming will also have an AppHqucd Sweatshirt 
class. For schedule information, call 634-1330. 

Edible Work of Art, a pastry shop and wed- 
ding cuke gallery, 144 Old McHenry Road, will 
have four Monday evening classes from 6:30 to 
8:30 p.m. For complete information, call 793- 
0202. 

^Ickelby's Rubber Stamp Emporium, 219 
Robert Parker Coffin Road, will have classes on 
Beginning Stamping, Embellishments, Precious 
Metals, and Brass Stenciling. For schedule infor- 
mation, call 634-6552. 

Long Grove is at the intersection of Routes 53 
and 83 in Lake County. There is ample free park- 
ing for the over 100 shops and restaurants offer- 
ing unusual and unique merchandise. 

Polar Dome has public sessions 

Whether you find a shiny new pair of skates 
under the Christmas tree or are just looking for 
something fun to do, the Polar Dome Ice Arena 
has expanded Its public session schedule to 
include weekdays. 

In addition to the regularly scheduled ses- 
sions on Fridays from 8:30 to 10:30 p.m., 
Saturdays 1:30 to 3;30 p.m. and 8:30 to 10:30 p.m. 
and Sundays 1:30 to 4 p.m., public sessions will 
also be offered on Jan. 1 and 2. Admission for 
public skating sessions is S4.75 per person and 
skate rental is S2. 

The heated, indoor rink is the longest, con- 
tinuously operating facility in the Chicago area to 
offer cool ways for novice, expert, and even non- 
skaters to have fun on and off the ice. Adult 
skaters can relax with a warm drink beside the 
cozy fireplace in the renowned Alpine Lounge. 
There's also darts, pool tables, and televised 
sporting events to provide heated competition. 
Teens and children can grab a quick bite from 
the Snack Bar before playing the latest games in 
the Video Arcade. 

Providing family skating fun since 1963, 
the Polar Dome Ice Arena is located inside 
Santa's Village Theme Park at Routes 25 and 72 
in East Dundee. For more information, 
call 426-6753. 



Recycle art 

Ring in the new year by recycling 
your unwanted art and art objects. The 
Surburhan Fine Arts Center's annual 
Recycled An Sale and Benefit Is just 
around the new year comer and paint- 
ings, prints, frames and unwanted art 
supplies are needed. 

In exchange for donations, donors 
get wall space or closet room and since 
the Suburban Fine Arts center Is a non- 
profit organization, a charitable deduc- 
tion as well. The Suburban Fine Arts 
Center is located at 1913 Sheridan Road 
in downtown 1 ligliland Park. Hours arc 9 
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday. 

Art class 

Hie College of I-ake County will offer 
an art class in the spring semesiert hat 
offers a creative experience for both par- 
ents and children. 

"Art for Elementary Teachers Pan 1 
and II" is primarily designed for teachers 
but can benefit parents and children 
too. The class will meet from 9 a.m. to 
12:30 p.m. on Saturdays for 1G weeks 



starting Ian. 24. 

Students In the twocredit-hour 
course will create a portfolio of fun and 
entertaining projects designed to teach 
basic art principles to children. The 
course is ideal for parents and their chil- 
dren, teachers, elementary education 
majors and teachers' assistants, and par- 
ents may bring their children to class 
free of charge. Cost is $51 per credit 
hour, plus $20 for class supplies. 

For more Information, call Bob 
Lossmann at 543-2436. To register by 
phone, call 223-1 111. 

Dorian Gray 

Michael Halberstam, the renowned 
artistic director of the Writers Theater of 
Glencoe, will present a reading of Oscar 
Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray with 
actors from the Theater at the Suburban 
Fine Arts Center on Sunday, Feb. 1 ot 2 
p.m. The reading will be followed by a 
discussion with the actors, Halberstam, 
and Dr. Arnold Tobin of The Institute of 
Psychoanalysis. Tickets for this event, 
which will include audience participa- 



tion, arc $20 In advance or $20 at the 
door. For more Information, call 
432-1BG8. 



MUSIC 



Nordic Choir performs 

The Luther College Nordic Choir, 
one of the top a cappclla college choirs 
In the nation, will perform Tuesday, Jan. 
13 at 730 p.m. in Our Saviour's Lutheran 
Church, 1234 N, Arlington Heights Road, 
Arlington Heights. 

The concert Is open to the public. 
Tickets arc $10 for adults, $8 for students 
and senior citizens and can be pur- 
chased by calling 255-8700. 



Music to be performed will Include 
"Jubilate Deo" by Hasslcr, "Sing Yc" by 
Dadi, "I Love die Lord" by Hamcy, 
"Praise the Name of the Lord" by 
Rachmaninoff, "Prayer of the Children" 
by Bcstor and "O Lord God" by 
TschcsnokoIT. 

For more Information, call (319) 387- 
1865. 

Music competition 

The North Suburban Symphony of 
Lake Forest is accepting requests for 
applicants for the 1998 Young Artists 
Music Competition. Instrumental, key- 
board, and vocal students of high school 
age may apply. Inquiries should be 
made to James R. Slocking, at 362-0472. 

Finalists will perform In a competi- 
tion concert May 8, 1998, In the chape] 
of the First Presbyterian Church, Maple 
and Douglas Avenues, In Libertyvillc, 

Opera In Focus 

Opera In Focus will present Hansel 
& Grctcl, a complete opera In English, 
on Jon. 3, 1998. Performance times are 
Saturdays, 130 and p.m. Opera In 
Focus Is located at Park Central, 3000 
Central Road, Rolling Meadows. Tickets 
arc adults $9, children $6, and seniors 
$8. For more Information, call 818-3220, 

Ravinia '98 highlights 

Ravinla's Executive Director 
Zarin Mchla and Music Director 
Chrlstoph Eschcnbach have 
announced upcoming highlights of 
the 63rd Festival seasion (June 14- 
Sept. 7, 1998). The 1998 season will 
encompass 85 days of wortd-class 
performances of symphonic music, 
jazz, popular events, dance, world 
music and children's events. The 
world -renowned Chicago Symphony 
Orchestra will be Inrcsidencc from 
July 10 through Aug. 27. 

"Jazz at Ravinia" will run from 
f.iru' 25-28 and will feature such dis- 
tinguished artists as Wynton 
Marsalas with the Lincoln Center Jazz 
Orchestra, Oscar Peterson, and the 
Count Daslc Orchestra. Visiting dance 
companies for 1998 Include The 
Joffrcy Ballet of Chicago (June 17-20) 
and Hubbard Street Dance Chicago 
(Sept. 2-5). 

Ravinia will release full details on 
the 1998 season In late March. To be 
placed on the mailing list or to 
receive a 1998 season brochure, call 
266-5100. 



SINGLES 



Singles dances set 

All singles over 45 arc invited to 
the the St. Peter's Singles Club dances 
on Friday, Jan. 2 at Polynesian Village, 
6845 W. Addison at 8:45 p.m., and 
Saturday, (an. 3 at Golden Flame, 6417 
Higgins at 8:45 p.m. Cost Is $6. Live 
bands are avalalblc. Coat and tie are 
required. For more Information, call 
1312)337-7814. 



^Welcome Aboard <The S-S. Antioch 

Come Cruise 'With lis! 

54ntioch <Love<Fest '98 

Saturday, February 7, 1998 

7 p.m. to 12 Midnight 

Antioch VFW Hall, 75 North Ave., Antioch 

• Hors d'Oeuvres • Games 

• Dancing to the Music of the "Scotch Lads" 

• Prizes, Prizes and Surprises • Silent Auction 

• Enter Raffles to Win 
6 Great Get-Away Weekends 




$ 



15/person 



Sponsored by: 
Antioch Chamber of Commerce and Antioch News-Reporter 




Health Tip for a Healthy Trip 

byJIMWARNKEN 
President, North Star Travel 

There isn't anything more disappointing than getting sick on your vacation. 
Here arc some tips to help avoid illness while traveling. 

Prc-trip planning is your first step to a healthy trip. 

Immunizations, though seldom required anymore, should be gotten well in 
advance. Certain shots can cause adverse side c fleets which arc better chanced 
while still at home, than on your trip. 

Stock up on frequently used pharmaceutical products such as aspirin, stomach 
aids, etc. Band-Aids arc not only valuable for cuts, but also for the inevitable 
blisters which will occur on feet not used to excessive walking. 

If you take medication on a regular basis, check with your doctor Jo sec if the 
dosage should be adjusted for altitude, long plane flights, or unusual climates. 

If you suffer from motion sickness, your doctor can prescribe a type or patch 
worn behind the car. However, 1 have had excellent experience with a non-drug 
item called a "Sea-Band." It's a band worn around the wrist and exerts pressure on 
an acupressure point. 

"Don't drink the water" is still good advice even if the trip is just to Florida. 
Sensitive stomachs will find normally harmless bacteria in certain water supplies 
will do some real nasty things. This also applies to ice cubes in bar drinks. 
Freezing docs not kill bacteria, nor docs alcohol. 

Canned pop, hot coffee and tea are your safest drinks. Avoid dairy products in 
any form. Pasteurization is still not practiced worldwide. 

What health problem has ruined more vacations than any other? Sunburn. 
The sun is much stronger in Florida than back in the Midwest. Higher altitudes can 
also play a factor in sunburn, something to remember in Reno, 

Common sense and a little planning will assure a healthy vacation. 



<0*AV££ 

NORTH ^^ STAR 

CRUISES 

Ltadcnhurst 

- www.nor1h5tartravel.com 

(847) 356-2000 



■ 



■ 



January 2, 1998 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers! B5 



Ghosts of fing 




past: the year 1997 



New Year's Day is a time 
when many of us wax 
philosophical about the 
events in the year just 
past. Some, of course, just prefer to 
wax— that would be my mother-in- 
law, for whom waxing Is not so 
much a philosophy as a religion. 
("Look over there— a fingerprints 
on the hall paneling from one of 
the grandchildren. How did I miss 
that? No wonder I couldn't sleep 
last night Where's my five gallon 
spray can of polish?" 

As for me, I think that before 
cleaning up the mew from last 
year's events, we should take a 
closer look at 1997's "ghosts of fin- 
gerprints past," and see how we 
might leam from them or at least 
learn to live with them in the com- 
ing year. Here are some of 1997s 
mbst memorable "fingerprints:" 



■ iarl.» * 




LIFE'S A 
BEAR 

Donna Abear 



1. As a mother, I am appalled at 
how many famous sports figures 
have been biting, kicking, choking 
and otherwise abusing their oppo- 
nents, their coaches or even inno- 
cent bystanders. Maybe the team 
owners need to consider some- 
thing new for 1998— a "mother's 
Advisory Board." We'll whip those 
young ruffians into shape before 
you can say, "Go to your room 
young man." or "Why can't you be 
more like Mike?" 



2. Speaking of motherhood, 
this past year has seen changes 
that make me feel glad that I'm 
retired from the "Procreation 
Club." There was Dolly, the sheep 
who gave birth to herself, and of 
course, there was the mother who 
recently gave birth to seven (eeek). 
babies, who will surely never again 
know the meaning of the word 
"time for herself." I don't know 
about you, but I will be looking 
suspiciously at any and all pre- 
scriptions that my gynecologist 
provides for me in the near future. 

3. One can't talk about 1997 
without mentioning the word 
"Oprah," who has taken her show 
to new heights in the past year. 
Not only does Oprah have many 
of us reading books just so we 
might get a chance to hang out at 
a pajama party with her and Maya 



Angelou, but she even has people 
out there doing good deeds, as 
part of her new "Oprah's Angel 
Network." Let's hope that her 
biggest competitor, Jerry "the dark 
side" Springer, doesn't decide to 
compete with Oprah's success by 
taking her ideas and giving them 
his own slant, something like 
"Jerry's Devil Network," where 
people can win the chance to be 
on Jerry's show by acting like 
depraved, ignorant fools (never 
mind— come to think of it, he 
does this already). I don't think 
Oprah has to worry that Springer 
will start his own book club — I 
don't think any of the guests on 
his show can read. 

4. And then there was Princess 
Diana, whose untimely death at a 
young age this year marks us all 
with sadness— we would have pre- 



ferred to believe in a happy ending 
for Diana, whom we considered 
our very own "fairy tale princess." 
And for me, 1997 was rilled with 
many other untimely deaths, on a 
far more personal note— my broth- 
er Frank, and my dear friends, 
Linda B., Frank M. and Joyce B. 

But while loss unquestionably 
takes something away, it makes 
us cherish even more all that we 
have left. And that, in itself, is the 
gift I wish to take with me into 
1998. 

Happy New Year to my family, 
my friends and my readers. 



Questions or comments for 
Humorist Donna Abear can be 
sent to Lakeland Newspapers, 30 
S. Whitney St., Grays lake, IL 
60030. 



IN THE KITCHEN 



On the go? Try quick, easy lasagna casserole 



Now that the holidays are 
over, it's time to settle back into 
the routine of work, school, etc. 
Sometimes this can cause a let- 
down and a delayed, energy-sap- 
ping reaction is not uncommon. 
For those times, and those nights 
when "cook" is a four-letter word, 
try the following quick and deli- 
cious lasagna casserole recipe. 

Suggested side dishes include 
any combination of salad, corn, 
french bread slices with butter, 
applesauce, garlic brcadstlcks and 
green beans. You can even try a 
vegetable version If so desired. 



LASAGNA CASSEROLE 
Ingredients: 

1 lb. ground chuck 

1 mcd./ large jar spaghetti sauce 

1 box rotini or mostaccioli noodles 

Garlic powder 

Italian spices 

I small container of ricotta cheese 

1 small container of sour cream 

3 cups shredded mozzarella cheese 

1 can french fried onions 

Directions: Cook ground 
chuck until crumbly. Add spaghetti 
sauce and simmer on low. Boil 
noodles undl half-done, drain and 
pour into lasagna pan. Add 1 /4 of 



the french fried onions and mix. Pat 
down noodles until even. Spread 
evenly half the spaghetti sauce onto 
noodles. Mix together ricotta 
cheese, sour cream, garjic powder 
and spices to taste. Spread mixture 
over layer of sauce. Spread remain- 
ing sauce over cheese mixture. 
Bake at 375 degrees for 40 minutes, 
then take out and spread mozzarel- 
la cheese on top. Sprinkle rcmainig 
onions on top. Return to oven and 
bake 10 minutes or until cheese is 
melted and onions are crisp. 

Let casserole stand for 10 min- 
utes before slicing. Enjoyl 






»*».,. 



Space is limitecL. Ycmre not. 








01 HO ITOROT 

Lakeland netDIRECT Would Like To Remind You: 

We Still Have Friendly Service 

We Still Have Low Monthly Rates 

...AND WE CONNECT YOU WITH NO WAITING!!! 

•Local Phone Call For 30 Prefixes* • Unlimited Use • E-Mail • Flat Fee of $19.95 

• Chat Groups • News Groups • Supports 33.6 Modems * World Wide Web Access 

- Internet Relay Chat • Personal Web Pages Posted Free • Discount Rates Available • Low Rate on 

Business Web Pages 

(847) 223-8199 

E-Mail: service@lnd.com 

Visit OS on the Internet: http://wvj-w.lnd.com 



lakeland W^S 



net 




•Upland nelDlRIiCT offer* local phone charges to most of the Lake County area. Call for information aboul your prefix. 



Houseplants need plenty 
of TLC in the winter 



I hope your holidays were 
happy and you rang In the 
New Year with a joyous spirit. 
Now that they are over, we 
return to normalcy and perhaps the 
monotony of winter. Start musing 
over the gardening catalogues 
which are arriving weekly. 
Daydream about getting out in the 
dirt again. As fast as time flies, you 
will soon be out there, 1 promise. 
Until we can resume our gar- 
dening plans outdoors, we can sat- 
isfy the need to plant, and get dirty 
" by tending to our Indoor plants. 
Plants usually suffer somewhat In 

tlic- winter monUis. I bettcvv (here 

are quite a few reasons. Among 
diem: the fact that we don't see the 
sun much these days, (so neither 
do our plants have the benefit of 
sunshine), the dryness of the winter 
heat, also the dustiness of winter. 

I find my house is dustier now, 
then in the summer months, even 
with changing the furnace filters 
monthly, or sooner. Plants suffer 
when their delicate leaves are lay- 
ered with a coating of dust. It's a 
good idea to take a wet rag and 
wipe them weekly or as needed. I 
like to take mine and give them a 
warm shower, I place them in the 
shower, and let a fine mist drench 
them like a summer rain. They real- 
ly respond to this treatment, they 
always look healthier. Also, to com- 
bat the dryness of winter, it is a 
good idea, along with their weekly 
watering to mist them with a mister 
also. Another old trick, to add mois- 
ture is, to place pebbles in their 
saucers that hold the excess water 
beneath them. 

Remember also to prune them 
and clip away any dead or yellow 
leaves. This makes them look bet- 
ter, and also the dead leaves take 
away energy from the plant Check 
to see if any of your plants are root- 
bound. I have a fern that is so root- 




GARDEN 
JOURNAL 

Lydia Huff 



bound it can stand on its* own 

without its container. 

My Job this week Is to repot it. . 

When repotting your plants use 
plenty of peat In your potting mix- 
ture. 1 also like to add pcrtile or vc t- 
mlcultto to keep the soil sweet ond 
light. Repotting Is oi*o n good time 

for a light fertilizing. I fertilize my 
plants throughout the winter, just 
not as heavily as in the spring and 
summer. 

I was really worried about my 
hibiscus this year, because I 
allowed them to be hit be frost (by 
mistake, I assure you) before bring- 
ing them in for the winter. I placed 
them downstairs in my work room, 
which is much cooler than the rest 
of my home, under fluorescent 
lights, and they are making a come- 
back. 

This is the first time that I can 
remember having geraniums 
blooming at Christmastime, in 
years. The plants seem to really 
love that room. I've had my hus- 
band install another light fixture 
above a huge table 1 have, and have 
placed my plants from the deck 
there. 

They all look very healthy and 
are thriving under the artificial light 
They serve as my winter garden. 

1 am going to start some herbs 
soon, and place them there, I'm 
sure they will come along just fine. I 
love fresh herbs, for cooking and 
making aromatic mixtures for med- 
icinal purposes. 

Have a productive and healthy 
New Year. Peace in gardening. 



BAND APPEARANCES 



Friday, Jan. 2 

Kralg Kenning & 

Company, pop rock, will be 
performing at Slice of Chicago, 
36 S. Northwest Hwy., Palatine. 
Cover charge is $5. Call 991-2150. 

Willie Kent & The Gents 
with Bonnie Lee appear at 
Bealc Street Blues Cafe, 1550 N. 
Rand Rd.. Palatine. Cover charge 
is $6. Call 776-9850. 

Howard and the 
Whlteboys, blues, appear at 
Durty Nellies, 55 N. Bothwell, 
Palatine. Call433-0825. 



Saturday, Jan. 3 

Tom Carey Band, playing 
"Buffet and more," will be per- 
forming at Slice of Chicago, 36 S. 
Northwest Hwy., Palatine. Cover 
charge is $5. Call 991-2150. 

Mighty foe Young, 
blues/R&B, will appear at Beale 
Street Blues Cafe, 1550 N. Rand 
Rd., Palatine. Cover charge Is $7. 
Call 776-9850. 

The Jenkins Band, classic 
rock , will perform at Duke 
O'Brien's, 1 10 N. Main St., Crystal 
lake. Cover charge is $3. Call 
{815)356-9980. 



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B6 I Lakeland Newspapers 



HOTSPOTS 



January 2, 1998 



January 2, 1998 



HOTSPOTS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B7 




Ealing and meeting in the Lakeland area 





• 1 tor Deep' 
Ol.h PIix* In 
Lake County. 

^ S\ *? 



Our Chef's 
Specialty: 

Taco Deep Dish Pizza 



50% off any food order diSSffi 



+ 



^ S H O 

«^^ * ™ ^ ^^ Mm 4pm- lOpm , 

•**• 176, Lake Bluff rt. 176 NotvnWwiih 

. |847) 234-6 6 60 any oinor offer | 

^™ ■■■ ^™ ^™ ■■ ■« i"" ■■■ i^ ^™ h mmm ^h ^b wi mm «J 



"I 



HOURS: | 

M-Th llam-IOpm 

rri Sat lUm 

Midnight 

Sun 4pm- lOpm 




SENIOR 
MENU 



SB 



CHILOREN'S 
MENU 



): 



Hours: 6 am to 11 pm 

356-4440 

1910 E. Grand ♦ Undcnliurst 



Breaktal, Lunch, Dinnci 
Htmcirade Soups and My Specials 

♦ "Sigrulurc* Entices 

♦ Broiled Sleeks, Chops, Sralood, Chicken, etc 

♦ Fabulous Desserts and Fountain Creations 

♦ Cocktails, Domestic fit Imported Beer, Wine 



Rigbys 

Top Ten Winter Specials 
Platter 



<*(,! 



.*• 



• Roast Prime Rib of Beef Platter 

• Broiled Porterhouse (over 1 pound) 

• Full Slab BBQ Baby Back Ribs 

• Half-slab BBQ Ribs and Half BBQ Chicken 

• (2) Extra-Thick Center-cut Pork Chops 

• Petite Ribeye Steak and (3) Jumbo Shrimp 

• Petite New York Strip and (3) Jumbo Shrimp 

• Rigby's "Land and Sea" Platter (Broiled Orange 
Roughy, Char-broiled Boneless, Skinless 
Chicken Breast, Shrimp Linguini) 

• Broiled Whitefish and (1) Broiled Pork Chop 

• Baked Scrod and Petite New York Steak 
pi Petite Ribeye Steak 



P0i0S (Complete Dinner) ' 
All Above Entrees Include: 

•Soup •Tossed Dinner Salad • Potato 
Vegetable • Dinner Rolls • Dessert Selection 
from our Pie Case and • Coffee or Hot Tea 

(Sales Tax & Gratuity not included) 
Umited timo offer. Not valid with any other offer or coupon 



BlfBiarJMGIBMt^g^^ 



1 
I 

1 







lite Best Chinese Food 

InTfteArea... 

And Our Customers 

Are Tfie Critics 



Chinese Restaurant 



Happy New Year! 

Extended Hours 

New Year's Eve to 

11:00 p.m. 



•Dine In ■ Carry Out 'Cocktails 
The Chinese Restaurant That Everybody's Talking About 

Conveniently Located Across From Fairgrounds 

111 S. Hwy. 45 Grayslake 

(847) 548-8882 Fax: (847) 548-2822 



Free Delivery - 

Call for Details 



B[iBfaaMrJJi?Jgrr%2faJBfB^ 



1 



! 
i 

I 



a 



Don't Miss 

The Following 

Opportunities 

To Advertise 

Your Establishment: 

Waukegan Business Focus . .• Publishes 1/16/98 

Grayslake Coupon Book Publishes 1/23/98 

Libertyvioe Coupon Book Publishes 1/23/98 

LAKELAND AllTORAMA Publishes 1/23/98 

Forefronts Publishes 1/23/98 

Antioch Community Guide ' Publishes 1/30/98 

Home Marketer Publishes 1/30/98 & 2/27/98 

- . .a 

Call Your Lakeland Account Executive 
at (847) 223-8161 

for Advertising Information 





Fresh 




Casual Dining \^# 

©CHARHOUSE® 

New Year's Resolution: 

Visit Jimmy's! 

Fish, Pasta, Steaks, Chops, and Prime Rib 

(847) A65-9300 

1111 N. Milwaukee Ave., 
Rlverwoods 




<A 




RESERVE YOUR 



Sunday Parties 



• Private Parties • Luncheons. 

-0R- 

Have Us Cater Any Occasion 
-Call for mow information 

602 N. Milwaukee Ave. 
Libertyville, IL 60048 

(847) 247-2208 

Tucs.-Thurs. 11-9; Fit-Sat. ll-IO 




AMERICAN CUISINE LAKEFRONT DINING 



JOHN'S GARAGE, Hawthorn 
Shopping Center, Vernon Hills. For 
over 15 years, John's Garage has 
been providing full service dining to 
Lake County. Start your engine at 
our award-winning salad bar, and 
get revved up with nachos, buffalo 
wings, or another of our appetizers. 
Fill your tank with a wide variety of 
entrees, from a Philly Cheese Steak 
sandwich to a New York Strip Sirloin 
dinner. Or select from our 
Unleaded, lighter style entrees. We 
know you'll drive away satisfied! 



BAKERY 



SOMETHINGS BREWING, 36 S. 

Whitney Street, Downtown 
Grayslake, 548*4600. Fresh baked 
pastries, all occasion decorated 
cakes, handmade chocolates, espres- 
so/coffee bar, bulk beans, gourmet 
sandwiches, homemade salads, 
soups, hand sliced deli moat and 
cheeses. Gift baskets, gift certifi- 
cates. 1 6 flavors of premium hand- 
dipped ice cream. Outdoor cafe. 
Somethings Brewing is open Sunday 
through Thursday from 5:30 a.m. lo 
9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday unlil 10 
p.m. $ 



FOOD 8c DRINK 



JESSIE OAKS, For comfortable & 
casual family dining at its best, amid 
the wooded scenery of Lake County, 
it's Jessie Oaks Food & Drink, locat- 
ed at 81490 W. Old Gages Lake 
Road, Gages Lake, 223-2575 
For parties up to 50 there is an 
attractive dining room. Jessie Oaks is 
open Monday-Thursday from 10a.m. I 
lo 2pm, Friday & Saturday 9am lo 
2a.m., and Sunday 9a, m. to 1 1 p.m. ' 



GALE STREET INN, 906 Diamond 
Lake Road, Mundelein, 566-1090. 
Located on beautiful Diamond Lake 
in Mundelein, Gale Street Inn offers 
a fine reputation for food, spirits, 
and hospitality. Dancing and enter- 
tainment is in the lounge five nights 
a week, Tuesday through Saturday. 
Open for lunch Tuesday through 
Saturday, 1 1 to 3; dinner 3 to 10 
p.m. weekdays; Friday and Saturday 
i p.m. to 12 a.m.; Sunday 3 lo 10 
p.m. $$$ 



MEXICAN 



TERRY'S MEXICAN RESTAURANT, 

325 N. Seymour, Mundelein, 566- 
'J530. Terry's Mexican Restaurant 
offers (he best in Mexican food and 
American cuisine sure to delight any 
palate. From delicious margaritas to 
seafood and more, you're sure to 
come back to Terry's. Open Monday 
through Friday 1 1 a.m. to 10 p.m.; 
Saturday noon to 10 p.m. Closed 
Sunday. $$$ 



STEAK HOUSE 



BACKYARD STEAK PIT, 1818 
Grandwood Drive, Gurnce, 356- 
5200. Sleak dinners start at $8.95. 
Family casual dining where you can 
watch the chef cook your meal. 32 
oz. porterhouse or sirloin, also chick- 
en, prime rib, lobster tails, shrimp, 
fish, pork chops, children's menu 
available. Open at 4:00 p.m. $$$ 



To Advertise Here, Call Your 
Account Executive Af 

(847) 223-8161 



ClieclTiTfi Section Every Week For 
Dining Out Specials And Information! 




* * 



Visit all the 



HOT SPOTS 

on the Web at 

www.lpnews.com 




* > 



...Ham & Swiss Sandwiches...Gourmel Coflce...Tuna Salad/Honey Wheal Pita... 

You Can Have It All! f 

• A Delicious Lunch 

• A Cheerful Setting 
• A Two-For-One Offer 

Too Good To Pass Up! 

I 



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MesAmis 

(My Friends) 



Coupon 

Expirr* I/M/9B 

You and your guest are invited lo enjoy one 

complimentary entree wtien a second entice of 

equal or greater value is purchased. 

Cafe Mes Amis 

Open Mon.-Sai. 9 am - 4 pm 
549 N. Route 83, Grayslake 



CO 

S 



Wsm Uta SI ml Wnfirtfon (f>na di tm w* la 0*t Cr*d| . 

(847) 543-1480 



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ADVERTISEMENT 



-•.. -i .. "!■ -. | 



SPOTLIGHT: 



John's Garage 



Location: 

On the upper level in 
Hawthorn Center, 
Vernon Hills, between 
Marshall Fields and 
J. C. Penny 

Telephone: 
(847) 367-4704 

Hours: 

From 1 1 a.m. to 1 1 
p.m. daily, from 1 1 
a.m. to midnight on 
Friday and Saturday, 
and from 11:30 a.m. 
to 9 p.m. on Sunday 

Menu: 

Award-winning salad 
bar including 70 
delicious items, 
hamburgers, 
sandwiches galore, 
pork ribs, steaks and 
rotisserie chicken 




Visit John's 
Garage's award- 
winning salad bar 

It's been many years since owner John 
Crivas decorated a restaurant in Woodfield 
with colorful automotive signs and other flot- 
sam and jetsam, plus rustic booths and tables, 



set out a wonderful salad bar, and called it 
John's Garage. 

The restaurant has two other locations, one 
in Hawthorn Center in Vernon Hilis and another 
in Ford City, Chicago. 

Located at 506 Hawthorn Center on the 
upper level between Marshall Fields and J. C. 
Penny for the last 17 years, John's Garage con- 
tinually boasts of the * 1 salad bar in the area, 
chock full of 70 delicious items. 

If you want an excellent 10 oz. hamburger, a 
crunchy club sandwich extraordinairre, or if 
your waistline-wise and prefer a salad with fat 
free dressing or a fat free pasta salad, both from 
the salad bar, John's is the place to head for. 
Don't mind it there's a line, the food is good 
enough to wait for. 

Everything at John's is fresh including the 
list of scrumptious appetizers that includes 
nachos, chicken fingers, flowered onions and 
much more. 

Try the fabulous steaks, pork ribs and don't 
forget the great rotisserie chicken. 

John's has a kids menu filled with children's 
favorites served in fitting proportions. 

John's Garage is open from 1 1 a.m. to 1 1 
p.m. daily, from 1 T a.m. to midnight on Friday 
and Saturday, and from 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. 
on Sunday. Call (847) 367-4704 for more 
information. 



Smoke On/if The. Be&f Cigars, 

from i 



Senior 

DtseountA 




All you Can Eat 

Hot Luncheon Buffet 




l ACCESSORIES 



Desktop Humidors 

Ci&mr A*h Trmy m 

Cigar Cutters 

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Clove Cigarette* 

Magazines 

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FREE CIGAR 1 



WITH PIRCIttS 



Fiu lm Smoke Shop Featuung The Fmst In Gouts & Acccssobjes 

552 Main St. (ill Rl. 83 & North Ave.) * Anlioch 

. (847)838-5334 




ihcludes 
30 item salad bar 
;- Bi beverage 



ALSO -.. ( 

flHMY 5 pm Seafood & Rib Buffet omy" , 



OHvefS • 305 S. Route 83 • Grayslake 





Our 

Famous 

Pizza-Still 

Your Best 

Family 

Value 



FREE 

ELJVERY 



Try These 
Great Specialties 



•Ribs 

• Steaks 

• Italian 

• Mexican 



• 1/2 lb. Burgers 

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• Large Salad Bar 

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Pizza - Thin/Thick/Double Decker 

Full Service Menu 



S5 



Lakeview Dining 



faiHg'lHsO^irW^M? 



356-2300 



SB mm 1913 E. GRAND AVE., LINDENHURST OPEN 11 AM DAILY 




**s^ 



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B8/Lflfce/awrf Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



January 2, 1998 



Woman's Club 
meets monthly 

The Lake County Woman's Club 
offers a chance to meet new friends 
and enjoy social activities. For fur- 
ther information, call Peg at 356- 
1512 or Sue at 872-2016. 

Home educators 
plan support group 

The Christian Home Educa- 



GURNEE CINEMA 

.GURNEE MILLS SHOPPING MALL 
B47-855-9940 ; 



SftCJT. SPECIAL EJOWEDSIFTUAfTERNOON. 

BARGAIN MATHEES - ADULTS tUO BEFORE 530 
CHLDflO UNDO) I NOT ADMrTTCO TO *W (UTID rtATWM 

'4' No puiH w MwW Fi*i TWwU Acc*frt*d 
FEATURES AND SHOWTIMES FOR FRIDAY, 
OECEMOER 23 THRU THURa. JANUARY 1 



BE THERE 

tors Assn. of Round Lake is a 
home school support group. The 
group meets monthly. For more 
information, call Terri Clark at 
587-7268. 

4-H Explorers 
looking for members 

The Round Lake Explorers 4- 
H Club is looking for new mem- 
bers, age B to 18. The new season 



+TTTANIC PO 13 3 SCREENS S*«S«tlQj0Sirt 

IMS, 1:00, 2:15, 3:45, 5,-00, &10, 7:45, M0 

FRt I SAT 10*» 



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1230,230, 330, aaO.E45.fc1 5, MO 



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MOUSEHUNT PO ^ass; 

1230, 230. SMS, 730, MS 



+AMISTAD R zdA&rftw w 

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11:41 

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1:15, 4:43. (LIS 



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GURNEE CINEMA ART 
WASHINGTON SQUARE PO 

1115. 2:45. 4:10, T35.1WJ0 



Gl 

K 



OOD WILL HUNTING R advam* show 

,T.OHLY»30 



ShowPlaceS 

VERNON HILLS 

Milwaukee Ave-2nd Light S of<SS) 
2 847/247-6958 & 



ALL SEATS s 2?° FRI&SaT 

s 1, 50 Sun thru Thurs 



Showtlmcs Good Thru 
Thursday, 118198 

Special Holiday Matinees Fri. 1/2 
Fri./Sat./Sun. Matinees in [Brackets] 

AIR FORCE ONE (R) 

[12:15 3:15] 7:00 9:45 DIGITAL 
[1:00 3:45] 7:30 10:10 DIGITAL 

VSf AND OUT (PG-13) 

[12:50 3:30] 7:10 9:30 

[1:30 4:10] 7:50 10:00 DIGITAL 

LITTLE MERMAID (G) 

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[12:30 2:30 4:30] DIGITAL 

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computers, electronics, reading 
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Network Lake County 
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Network Lake County meets 
every Thursday at 8:30 a.m. at In- 
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Guests arc invited and breakfast 
will be provided. Network Lake 
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MOVIE PICK 



'Good Will' is great 



It isn't often that a budding 
young actor can start walking away 
with award nominations, not only 
for his acting, but for his writing, 
just as audiences are beginning to 
recognize his name and his face. 

This is what is happening to 
handsome young Matt Damon, 
fresh from his success in "The Rain- 
maker," who has been nominated 
for Golden Globe Awards for his act- 
ing and his writing of the screenplay 
for "Good Will Hunting," along with 
chum Ben Affleck, who also plays in 
the movie. 

Also up for a Golden Globe for 
"Best Supporting Actor" is Robin 
Williams who took a supporting role 
in "Good Will," quipping, "Come 
and see 'the Funniest Man Alive' 
not being funny." 

Not since his great dramatic 
emoting in "Dead Poet's Society," 
and "Awakenings," has Williams 
turned in as arresting a perfor- 
mance as he does playing the singu- 
lar therapist who helps bring Da- 
mon to his true worth. 

Damon, hiding from that true 



worth because he just doesn't be- 
lieve in himself and his capabilities, 
works as a janitor at the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology. The 
catch is instead of cleaning those 
classrooms, he has a brilliant math- 
ematical mind that should be nur- 
tured in those classrooms. 

Damon is eventually drawn out, 
not only by Williams, but also by his 
relationship with Minnie Driver, his 
very attractive love interest. 

Fellow screen writer Affleck is 
rather typecast in this movie, 
playing Damon's best friend, 
since both grew up together in 
real life. 

Damon, who has quickly 
proven himself to be one of our 
finest young actors, should be 
around filmdom for a long, long 
time. "Good Will Hunting," should 
not only be on many Best Flicks 
lists, but also one of Oscar's "Best 
Pic" maybes. 

We're giving this "R" rated 
movie five out of five stars. Put it on 
your "Must See" list.— By Gloria 
Davis 




Matt Damon and Robin Williams star in "Good Will Hunting, "a su- 
perb movie about a mathematical genius that should walk away 
with some award hardware. 



CRITIC'S CHOICE 



Mason's latest revue 
a goldmine of laughs 



Jackie Mason, a standup comic 
from the old school, says the un- 
speakable. 

His bullet-fire spiel flows easily, 
blending fresh material with old 
standards. And he never seems at a 
loss for a politically incorrect opin- 
ion. 

In "Much Ado About Every- 
thing," his latest revue, Mason takes 
merciless potshots at politicians, 
from Clinton and Reagan to Bush 
and Nixon, and the snobbishness 
(hat marketers have latched onto 
that dictates that if it's "French" it 
can sell for an outrageous premium 
(a case in point: the pricey caftf latte 
at Starbucks). He also blasts the 



sushi craze: "If it wasn't called 
sushi, who would eat it? What if I 
said 'here's a piece of raw fish— I 
forgot to cook it'?" 

Then Mason builds on the jest, 
saying sushi was really created by 
two Jews who asked themselves the 
question: "How could we open a 
restaurant without a kitchen?" 

His gibes spare no one—blacks, 
Italians, Puerto Ricans, Poles. And 
he's an old hand at impersonations, 
from Frank Sinatra to [id Sullivan, 

The revue runs through Jan. G at 
the Park West, 322 W. Armitage in 
Chicago. Ticket information is avail- 
able by calling (312) U31-2933.— By 
Tom Witom 



LIPSERVICE 



January 2, 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers I B9 



Get it off your chest (847) 223-8073 



Take a little more pride in your job 
and clean up!. 



Upservi^ Is a phone-In column pnmted as a feature or lakeland Newspapers. Lake- ThrnW the book at em 

land Hewspapsrs mikes no claim to tha authenticity of Uib statements. Ukeliuid News- 
papers does not claim the content or the subject matter as fact, but as the personal 
opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to edit copy or to refrain 
from printing a message. Call in at 223-8073 and leave your message 24-hours a day. 
Callers must leave their name, phone number and village name. Names and phone num- 
bers will not be printed; however, callers may be called for verification. 



Bad judgment 

I'm calling to question the judgment 
of the administrator at Dig Hollow 
School, On Monday, Dec. 15, they 
chose not to send the children home 
instead of calling it off, even though 
they had no power, water or heat. 
They kept the children there the en- 
tire day in those conditions. They 
had to walk to the middle school as a 
group to use the bathroom. It was 
miserable conditions. Was this just 
so they wouldn't have to go an extra 
day in the spring? 

Zero tolerance? 

I'm a student at Round Lake High 
School and I was walking down the 
hall and saw a poster that said "zero 



tolerance, no drugs, no gangs, etc." 
That's funny, because if one person 
gets into a fight five br six times, that 
person Is still in school. In Grayslake, 
the first time is a warning and the 
second time is expulsion. If Round 
Lake is going to put up these-posters, 
they ought to follow up their own 
rules. If there really was zero toler- 
ance, we should be able to wear 
hooded shirts. 

Clean it up 

This is to the director of public works 
in Round Lake Beach. It's pretty sad 
when a homeowner has to clear dirt 
and mud off the street left behind 
from a water break as it went down 
the hill and the public works staff 
won't clean up after themselves. 



Just when you think you can't be 
shocked, these two scumbags from 
Wisconsin come along and keep one 
kid In a dog cage in the basement, 
beat the other ones, throw them out 
of the house, and do disgusting 
things to them. These two pieces of 
trash don't deserve to live. I hope 
they get the 95 years they can be sen- 
tenced to and they'll be behind bars. 

Silent majority 

I'm calling in response to all the 
hoopla about "Offsides." I think it's 
great we have adult entertainment 
somewhere. With all the morality po- 
lice, why do the politicians bow to 
them? They're forgetting the silent 
majority. Most of them don't care. 
The person from Ingleside last week, 
who is die "we" that they're talking 
about? Three cheers for Offsides! 

Ingleside 

Day of enlightenment 

Dunng this season of celebration, Dec 
15 should be celebrated as a national 



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•CoifMn mitt KcomfMny pad a<imt k> ikwv* 30 ewd OB* ©otd on ad** po»Mn*HJ tftw Nov. IStft. 1W/. No «Vim *uounu «pp*r. Wfw «|wm F<*. St. 19W 



holiday, the birthday of our Bill of 

Rights, the day of true enlightenment] 

Wauconda Twp. 

No noise for mayor 

Mayor Krischke a year-and-a-half 
ago promised us that the City of 
Chicago would be installing noise 
monitors to detect low-flying air- 
planes that wake us up in the middle 
of the night. Apparently he doesn't 
have noise, or we would have had it 
by now. He's in a part of the village 
where he's not woken up. It seems 
our new board and mayor only care 
about their issues on hat side of die 
village. 



America's real team 

To "Don't forget," in the last 
Lipservice, you're right Veter- 
ans should be recognized and 
Pearl Harbor remembered. 
But you should remember, al- 
most every Sunday is Pearl 
Harbor day for the Bears. Per- 
haps you*d be better off 
switching your allegiance to 
America's real team, the 
Green Bay Packers. 

Lake Villa 



Boeing not to blame 

I just read a nasty cartoon in another 
newspaper in regard to Flight 800, 
the plane accident where all the peo- 
ple passed away. It was kind of a 
slam toward Boeing. 1 don't think 
that's true. It depicted someone ask- 
ing someone from a junk shop to fix 
their airplane. There's been a lot of 
747s that are good airplanes and do- 
ing a good job. They don't want to a 
blame it on the pilot. They're blam- " 
ing everything but their own mainte- 
nance.. Picking on Boeing is nasty. 
We'll never know truly exactly what 
happened. I think they should leave 
it atone. 

Round Lake Park 

Needless worry 

If you people worried as much about 
child molesters, child pornogra- 
phers, gang activity, and simple 
reading scores as you did about pick- 
eting a topless dance dub which only 
adults attend, I think our children 
would be a lot better off. Thank you, 
Mundelein P.S. Thank you for taking 
their liquor license. Now they went 
from being a topless bar to full nudi- 
ty. 

Mundelein 

Pay for mailing 

In response to "No to sewers," who 
stated, "what do we have to do to get 
them to acknowledge we don't want 
sewers?," the UAHUA has been try- 
ing for over a year to allow you a 
chance to vote on sewers. They con- 
tacted the township last year to have 
the question put on the ballot, but 
Supervisor Tim Osmond did not 
want to vote on it at that time. Now 
we have asked Osmond again to help 
pay for the postage for a mailing to 
allow you the chance to vote on the 
issue. Oddly enough, Mr. Osmond 
still remains unresponsive. Only the 
township board understands that we 
want to get an answer from all, if 
people want sewers. The question 
will remain unanswered, Please call 
your township board to encourage 
them to pay for the mailing so we can 
put this issue to rest. 

Antioch Township 

So much talent 

We have so much talent in this town. 
The production of "Joseph and the 
Amazing Technicolor Drcamcoat" 
was almost as good as the one in 
downtown Chicago. Also, themadri- 
gal dinner at the high school was 
wonderful and the St. Peter's choir 
were very professional. I just want to 
send my praises to all these groups. 
They did a wonderful job. 

Antioch 



Congrats, Mary Ann! 

I'm calling to congratulate Mary Ann 
Amman in her fight against the Pen- 
guin Development Group in Round 
Lake. Good for her! She's a one- 
woman band and she's trying her 
best to fight big business. She prob- 
ably won't win, but I want her to 
know that people are on her side. 

Jealousy 

Concerning "Rude smooching," if 
the creation of a life was not present- 
ed to other patrons as a main course, 
I don't see what your problem is. 
With all the hate, violence and rude- 
ness in the world, one should cherish 
the sight of young love and should 
think good thoughts instead of neg- 
ative. One gathers from your com- 
ments that you wish it could be you. 
Apparently you have no life. Kudos 
to lovers in love. 

Where's fence? 

What happened to the fence that used 
to be alongside the bicycle trail in Fox 
Lake? Was it stolen? Where did it go? 

Fox Lake 

Politicians/diapers 

I think politicians are like dirty dia- 
pers. You have to change them fre- 
quently. I'm going to be votingforAl 
Salvi, who's not afraid to interact 
with the people or the constituents 
in his district 

Antioch 

Look on Channel 30 

I was just calling for the person who 
said he wanted their comedy, re- 
garding TCI Cable. If they read the 
statement they got, they would no- 
tice that the Comedy Channel was 
changed to Channel 30. It was not 
removed. Maybe people should pay 
"inorc attention to what's sent lo 
them. 

Do a better job 

I would like to know why the railroad 
goes along clearing trees along the 
tracks, especially the trees from 
bridge to bridge on Route 12. to State 
Park Road. What a disgrace. They 
didn't even cut them. They just used 
a boom to break them in half. It 
looked like a runaway train hit them. 
Why doesn't the railroad clean up 
their projects? If they're being paid to 
do a job, do it the right way, not de- 
stroying trees like that. 

Resign or be impeached 

How would Trustee Alberta Meyer 
know if the village is running worse 
than it ever has, if she's missed half 
the meetings the village has had? 1 
think she should resign or be im- 
peached as trustee. 

Great reporting 

Congratulations to the new reporter, 
Mr. Filas. The front page story on 
Trustee Meyer was a real interesting 
piece of reporting. It's time the vil- 
lage board took action on this mat- 
ter. Her self acknowledgement that 
she is not doing her duty, yet fully ac- 
cepting the funds as salary for being 
a trustee is a travesty. If Meyer does- 
n't have the interest or the lime to 
participate in the village government 
anymore, she should resign her post. 
Or the board should offer her the op- 
portunity to resign. If not, I'd like to 
see something in writing as to what 
is involved in the impeachment 
process. How do we remove a trustee 
from office? It's obviously a detri- 
ment to the community. 

Down like dominoes 

Thanks for the use of Lipservice! I 
just wanted to let you know, we live 
in Pine Hills subdivision in Antioch 
and it bugs me that all these beauti- 
ful 20-30-40 ft. pine trees are being 
mowed down one after the other like 
dominoes with all the new develop- 
ment going on, 

Antioch 



r 



i 



i 



Good Shepherd 



Child immunization 

Good Shepherd Hospital, Bar- 
rington, will host a child immuniza- 
tion clinic from 5 to 7 p.m., Tuesday, 
Jan. 6 in the Lakeview/Prairie rooms 
of the hospital. The cost of each im- 
munization is $6. Parents should 
bring their child's immunization 
record with them to the clinic. 

Immunizations offered include 
the early childhood diphtheria/per- 
tussis/tetanus (DPT) scries, 
Measles/Mumps/Rubella (MMR) 
initial and booster, Oral Polio series, 
Hepatitis B-infants, Hepatitis B-to 
older children or teens to complete a 
series already underway and H-In- 
fjuenza series. 

No appointments arc necessary 
and walk-ins are encouraged. For 
clinical information about the im- 
munizations, call the Lake County 
Health Dept. Immunization Clinic 
staff at 360-31 14. 

'War on Weight' 

"Win the War on Weight With 
Common Sense" is the topic of the Jan- 
uary Senior Breakfast Club meeting at 
Good Shepherd Hospital. The presen- 
tation will be held on Thursday, Jan. 8, 
from 8:30 to 10 a.m. in the Lakeview 
Boom of the hospital. A free continen- 
tal breakfast will be part of the program. 

Senior citizens are invited to join 
Linda Green, MS, RD of Good Shep- 
herd's food and nutrition depart- 
ment and learn how to'manage your 
weight for life; the psychological fac- 
tors to eating; and the components 
to changing behavior- 
Registration for the program 
may be made by calling HcalthAdvi- 
sor al 1 (800) 323-8622 by Jan. 5 as 
space is limited. 

Good Shepherd Hospital, locat- 
ed on Highway 22, two miles north of 
Barrington, provides a full reach of 
community outreach and health ed- 
ucation services/flic hospital is part 
of Advocate Health Care, one of the 
Chicago areas largest health care or- 
ganizations. 

CPR Training 

Good Shepherd Hospital's 
Health Evaluation Lifestyle Programs 
(HELP) department will sponsor two 
separate cardiopulmonary resuscita- 
tion (CPR) classes in January. The 
first will be held on Thursday, Jan. 8 
from 6 to 10 p.m. The second will be 
held on Saturday, Jan. 24 from 8 a.m. 
to noon. Bodi sessions will be held in 
the lakeview Boom of the hospital. 

The four hour course, taught by 
certified American Heart Assn. in- 
structors, includes a lecture, film and 
hands-on experience in administer- 
ing artificial breathing and blood cir- 
culation. There is a S25 fee. 

The CPR class also can be offered 
as an onsite employee education 
program at area businesses and in- 
dustries. 

For more information or to reg- 
ister, call HcalthAdvisor at l (BOO) 
323-8622. 

Infant/Child CPR 

A four hour infant and child CPR 
certification class is being offered by 
Good Shepherd Hospital's Health Eval- 
uation Lifestyle Programs (HELP) on 
Saturday, Jan. 10, from 8 am to noon 
in the Meadow Room of the hospital. 

Taught by a certified American 
Heart Assn. instructor, the class in- 
cludes CPR practice techniques and 
a discussion of infant and child safe- 
ty. The cost for the course is $25. 
Space is limited and reservations 
may be made by calling Health Advi- 
sor at 1 (800) 323-8622. 

. Tai Chi class begins 

Tai Chi, an ancient Chinese ex- 
ercise that features a formalized sc- 
ries of movements designed to elicit 
a relaxed, mindful state is being of- 
fered by the Behavioral Health Dept. 
of Good Shepherd Hospital. The 
class will be held on Wednesdays 
from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in the Prairie and 
Lakeview Rooms at hospital, starting 
Wednesday, Jan. 14 and continuing 
through March 1 1. The cost for the 
program is $10 per session, which 
must be paid in full, in advance. 

For more information on the Tai 
Chi course or to register, call 
HealthAdvisorat 1 (800) 323-8622. 



HEALTHWATCH 



B10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



January 2, 1998 



Scientific brain study finds depression clue 



Scientists have found a severe 
depletion of key cells in the brains of 
people who died with depressive ill- 
ness. The finding is the first physical 
evidence that depression and manic 
depression may be triggered by a 
specific abnormality in the brain. 

Dr. Wayne Drcvcts, a researcher 
at the University of Pittsburgh, said 
that he and his colleagues have stud- 
ied brain tissue from seven people 
with either depression or manic de- 
pression, and found that anywhere 
from 40 to 90 percent of glial cells 
were gone. Glial cells arc support 
cells in the brain. They provide 
growth factors and nutrients to neu- 
rons, which are brain cells. Three 
brains of people who were not de- 
pressed, studied as controls, did not 
showany abnormality in this region. 

The area of the brain analyzed is 
a sliver of tissue in the prefrontal cor- 
tex called the anterior cingulatc. 
Drevets reported last year a signifi- 
cant decrease in blood flow in this re- 
gion in living patients with manic de- 
pression and depression. 

"It didn't go away with treat- 
ment, and we thought that maybe 
something in the anatomy was caus- 



ing this problem," Drevets told col- 
leagues and others during the annu- 
al meeting of the 'National Alliance 
for Schizophrenia and Depression 
Research, held in Manhattan. 

Drevets said Utat he and his col- 
leagues were surprised when they 
found that these depressive condi- 
tions may be associated with an ab- 
normally low 



number of glial 
cells. In research, 
glial cells have tak- 
en a back seal to 
neurons, brain 
cells that allow all 
of the cognitive 
functions of life to 
proceed. Glial cells 
provide the neu- 
ron with chemical 
fuel that allow 
such communication to take place. 

The anterior cingulate has been 
associated with emotional process- 
ing, specifically how a person de- 
cides whether a certain behavior, 
thought or feeling will be rewarding. 
People with mania, for instance, can 
be impulsive. One theory is that they 
don't know what effect their behav- 



ior may have on themselves or oth- 
ers, Drevets said. 

This study was done in collabo- 
ration with Washington University 
doctoral student Dost Ongur and 
Joseph L Price, professor of anatomy 
and neurobiology at the St. Louis, 
Mo., school. Drevets did his earlier 
work at Washington University. 

Price and Ongur 
.'„, looked at the an- 

'We were stunned... We terior cingulate 

think this is the single under the micro- 

most importantflnding in SC0 P e ; thinly die 



mood disorders.' 

Dr. Wayne Drevets 

University of Pittsburgh 

researcher 



ing tissue from 
autopsicd brains 
of people who 
died with the ill- 
ness. Not only 
was there reduc- 
tion in the vol- 
ume of the cingu- 
late, but it turned out the glial cells 
were missing. "We weren't even go- 
ing to count the glial cells because 
we thought that the neurons them- 
selves would be down In number," 
Ongur said. 

"We were stunned," Drcvcts 
added. "We think this is the sin- 
gle most important finding in 



mood disorders." 

Drevets suspects that glial cell 
loss contributes to the loss of brain 
volume noted on brain scans, caus- 
ing an abnormality in the brain's 
ability to process emotional tone. 

Researchers at the University of 
Mississippi have already confirmed 
the finding in their own study of tis- 
sues culled from manic deprcssives, 
he said. 

' The researchers still have no idea 
whether this glial loss is the result of 
a lengthy disease process or a devel- 
opmental abnormality that set the 
disease in motion. That neurons 
were found unharmed suggests that 
a developmental problem is at the 
heart of the finding, Drevets said. 

The question remains whether 
the finding can lead to new treat- 
ments for familial forms of depres- 
sion and manic depression. 

Drevets said that the fact that 
these cells regulate glutamatc could 
mean that supplying the brain with 
this neurochemical may be the 
equivalent of replacing dopamine in 
Parkinson's patients' brains. 

Article reprinted from Tlte Brain 
In the News," Oct. 21, 1997. 



Sweetgall repeats 'Walking Off Weight' program 



Back by popular demand, Rob 
Sweetgall, nationally recognized au- 
thor, fitness walker and speaker, will 
present "Walking Off We ighl" a FREE 
community wcilness prognim from 
7 to 8;30 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 13 at the 
Barrington High School Auditorium, 
616 W. Main. The program is spon- 
sored by Good shepherd Hospital, 
Community Unit School District 220 
and the Healthier Community Pro- 
ject of the Barrington Area. 

If you've ever said, "I really need 
to get some exercise,"— this program 
is for yon. Rob Swcetgall's presenta- 
tion includes how walking impacts 
cardiovascular health, weight and 



stress levels; how to get motivated; 
how to start a personal cross-training 
program and how to get the most 
from exercise In a small amount of 
time. 

Since 1982, Rob Sweetgall, 
known as the Pied Piper of American 
Walking, has walked across the Unit- 
ed States seven times covering 
22,000 miles of U.S. highways, stop- 
ping at schools to present motiva- 
tional assemblies on' walking, car- 
diovascular health and wellness. He 
is also recognized in the Guinness 
World Book or Records for his 10,608 
mile fout journey along the U.S. 
perimeter between 1992-93. He has 



appeared on NBC Today, CBS Morn- 
ing News, Evening Magazine, and 
numerous television and radio talk 
shows. He also is the author and co- 
author of eight books on walldngnnd 
wellness. 

In his former life, Rob Sweetgall 
was an overweight Brooklyn boy, 
high school valedictorian and 
DuPont Chemical Engineer. Moti- 
vated largely by the death of his fa- 
ther (heart attack), Rob gave up 
cheesecake and his 1 1 year career at 
DuPont to take his message across 
America on foot in 1982. 

This program Is an initiative of 
the Healthy Community Project of 



the Barrington Area. The Health 
Community Project brings together 
individual community members, 
representatives of area civic groups, 
agencies and govornmonU to dis- 
cuss, coordinate and plan ways to 
improve the qualify of life in the Bar- 
rington area. The Healthy Commu- 
nities movement is gaining momen- 
tum, throughout the United States 
with over 150 communities nation- 
wide currently involved— several of 
which exist in the Chicago suburbs. 
For more information about the 
Health Community Project of the 
Barrington Area, contact David Chi- 
dley at 381-0084. 



Rejuvenate with the North Shore 
Spring Running program 



Reach your New Year's goals to 
get active and fit this winter with 
the North Shore Spring Running 
Program. "I Think I Can Fitness 
Training" will be conducting a 16- 
wcek training program to help 
runners prepare for Lake County 
Races 10K, Half Marathon and 
Marathon scheduled for Sunday, 
April 26, 1998. New and experi- 
enced runners are encouraged to 
participate. 

The program, geared to all levels 
of runners new and seasoned, in- 
cludes six learning seminars, weekly 
buddy fun runs, and Saturday morn- 
ing long runs. 

Seminar topics will include win- 
ter gear tips, training tools for run- 
ners, injury prevention, nutrition 
and weight control, exercise and 
your health and pre-post race strate- 



gies. Seminars will be held on Jan. 6, 
19, 27, Feb. 3 t 9 and April 7 at the 
Condell Conference Center in Libcr- 
tyville. 

The program kicks off at 7 p.m. 
Tuesday, Jan. 6 with the training pro- 
gram overview and tips on running 
shoes and winter running apparel 
from Running Bight to be held at 
Condell Conference Center. 

Training runs will begin Satur- 
day, Jan. 10 at 7:15 a.m. at the east 
Lake Forest train station. Runners 
will be grouped by pace and running 
goal. 

Program participants will receive 
a training headband, handouts and 
schedule and log, and will be eligible 
to win awards at weekly raffle draw- 
ings. 

For more information, call I 
Think I Can, Inc., at 604-3033. 



How much life insurance 
do you think you need? 



Hospice of Illinois seeks volunteers 



Hospice of Illinois is currently 
seeking volunteers. Volunteering 
with hospice allows someone a 
unique opportunity. Volunteers are 
needed in many areas: those willing 
to attend to (he needs of patients and 
family, perhaps by reading, running 
errands, or helping with household 



chores; those willing to support fam- 
ilies and friends during the grieving 
process; office volunteers; those will- 
ing to make phone calls, send notes, 
assemble craft projects or send 
baked goods. 

Volunteer training is provided. 
For more information, call 296-281 1 . 



You want to know that your loved 
ones will be provided for if you should 
die prematurely, but how do you ar- 
rive at the magic number? According 
to the Illinois CPA Society your lifestyle 
requirements and your financial cir- 
cumstances are the most important 
factors to consider when detennining 
the right amount of insurance. 

Who needs life Insurance? 

Keep in mind that life insurance 
is not for you, it's for your survivors. 
So, unless you're leaving behind 
someone who is financially depen- 
dent on your income, you probably 
don't need life insurance. For exam- 
ple, if you're young and single and 
have no children, you're probably 
better off investing your money else- 
where. On the other hand, If you're 
supporting a family, paying for the 
mortgage, and planning to send your 
kids to college, it's important to have 
adequate coverage. Later, as your 
family grows older and children 
move out, your need for protection 
will likely lessen. 

How much is enough? 

The next most important ques- 
tion you need to address when buy- 
ing life insurance or evaluating your 
current coverage is: How much in- 
surance do you need7 Unfortunate- 



ly, there are no pat answers. Old rules 
of thumb said you would need any- 
where from five to 10 times your an- 
nual salary, but these are not accu- 
rate measures because so much de- 
pends on your personal circum- 
stances. CPAs point out that the 
amount of protection your family 
needs is more likely to be affected by 
the number of dependents you have, 
how you would like to provide for 
them, and your family's other assets 
and income. 

The first step in determining the 
amount of insurance you need is to 
estimate your family's future living 
expenses and determine what in- 
come and assets will be available to 
replace your income if you should die. 

Once you've determined your 
family's financial needs, tally your 
own resources. Begin by factoring in 
any life insurance your employer pro- 
vides. If your spouse works, add in this 
income or consider the amount he or 
she could reasonably be expected to 
earn if they entered the work force. 

Although few people like to think 
about life insurance, the reality is 
that you must— and not only when 
you buy it. CPAs recommend that 
you review your coverage every few 
years, particularly if there is a change 
in your family status, such as a mar- 
riage, birth, or divorce. 












January 2, 1998 





At Midwestern Regional Medical Center 



Mammogram: S49 . 

All month, by appointment 

A mammogram can help detect breast cancer before you can sec or feci 
anything. Our caring anJ conscientious imaging specialist will fully 
explain the procedure, answer your questions, and complete your " 
mammogram, usually in less than JO minutes. Results will be* sent to 
your personal physician. I : or an appointment, please call 847/73 1 -4 100. 

Free Screening: Blood Pressure Check - 

All month, by appointment 

I lave your Hood pressure checked by a healthcare professional at one 
ot i he physician offices listed below. Call the physician closest to you 
in make .in appointment. 

Support Group: Breast Cancer Support Group 

Monday. January 5 ». 7 - 8 p.m. 

A support group for women affected by breast cancer. Share 
penences, explore ideas, and express vour feelings among a group of 



Free Clinic: Children's Immunization Clink 

Saturday, January 10 «„«.......*.».^......... .....9 - 11 a.m. 

Midwestern and the Lake County Health Department team up to 
provide low-cost immunizations for children during a walk-in clinic at 
the hospital. For more information, please call 847/872-6062. 

Free Class: Smoking Cessation (three sessions) 

Monday, January 12.. 6 - 7 p.m. 

ivj unuuv y jj 3 nu up y i /hh 4»u iiiui.iHtMMHMti.tO — / p*m. 

Monday, January 26 6 - 7 p.m. 

This three session stop smoking class is based on the American Cancer 
Socictv's "Fresh Start program. Space is limited. To register, please 
call 800/940-2822. & Y 



ex 



vc been 
847/746- 



Resource Center 



women who know what you're going through because thcv'vt 
there too. For more information andto register, please call 84 
3158. 

AT C ANCER 
Mammogram: $49 

Walk-in Wednesday or by appointment 
Every Wednesday, no appoint mem is necessary lor a mammogram at 
the Cancer Resource Center. Just walk in. sign the appointment book, 
.irui in less than 30 minutes your mammogram will be completed by a 
caring and conscientious imagine specialist. Cost is $49, including 
reading and interpretation by a Board-certified radiologist. 
Appoint merits are also available throughout the week. Please call 
800/940-2822i 

Free Health Talk: Guidelines for Healthy living 

Wednesday, January 7. ».. — 2 - 3 p.m. 

This program will review the fundamentals tor a healthy balance among 
the spiritual, psychosocial, physiological and environmental aspects of 
vour lil'c. The class will be led by a registered dietitian who will talk 
about hcalthv eating and exercise habus. Space is limited. To register, 
please call 803/940-2822. 

Free Talk: Mind-Body Medicine and Your Good Health 

Monday, January 12 .........7-8 p.m. 

Vour mind has a powerful impact on your health and well being. Find 
out how vnu can improve or better manage your health by tapping into 
the inner'resources of the mind. Presented Bv Leo Boumeuf, Psy.D. 
Space is limited. To register, please call SCO/940-2822. 

Free Talk: The Art of Yoga Shiatsu 

Wednesday, January 14 .......6:30-8 p.m. 

1 his \t\ le of Shiatsu releases blockage and stagnation of energy 
throughout the bodv, and strengthens the immune system. Presenter 
Sharon lullington, on staff with Shiatsu Bodyworks, will explain 
shi.u>u, demonstrate techniques on participant volunteers, and lead a 
group si retching exercise. "I o register, please call 800/940-2822. 



For more information and to register for a Healthy Habits program, 

please call 800/940-2822 
Locations: 



Free Screening: Blood Pressure Check 

Thursday, January 15....— 8:30 - 10 a.m. 

Have your blood pressure checked by a healthcare professional at the • 
Cancer Resource Center. No appointment necessary, just walk in. 

Free Talk: Massage for Therapeutic Benefits 

Tuesday, January 20 6:30 - 8 p.m. 

Massage has a profound effect on some people's ability to heal and 
maintain wellness. Learn all about the therapeutic benefits of massage 
from Laura Eiscnberg, a certified massage therapist on staff at Partners 
in Healing, Northbrook. 

Free Advice: Ask the Nutritionist 

Wednesday, January 21 I - 4 p.m. 

Which vitamin supplements are beneficial? How do you know what to 
buv in a nutrition store? What can be done to reduce chemicals and 
other harmful substances sprayed on fruits and vegetables? Answers to 
these and other nutrition-related questions will be provided by a 
registered dietitian. Walk in and visit, or call with your questions - 
800/940-2822. 

Free Talk: Overcoming Lymphedema 

Friday, January 23, 6 JO - 7:30 p.m. 

Lymphedema is a condition which many women who have had breast 
cancer surgery experience. Learn how to effectively treat lymphedema, 
what causes It, and how it can be prevented. Presented bv Colleen 
Bowers, OT. Space is limited. To register, please call 800/940-2822. 



Gurncc 

Cancer Rewmte Center 

Gurncc Milk, Entrance II 

M70W. Grand Au\ 

802/94 D-28J2 



I'ark City 

Internal Medicine 

Dr. Glyiiiv Vaslu 

■101 S, GrVenhif Ave. 

847/2M-9923 



Lake Villa 

Family 6 Internal Medicine 

Dr. Pedro Palu : av 

Dr. l.ubiu M.uul 

Dr. Dam Aruhicnn 

300 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

Waukcgan 

family i Interval Medicine 

Dr. Palm Palu-ai 

Dr. Dam Amlaletm 

Dr. Luhiu Marul 

2504 Washington Ave. 

847/249-I7J3 



l.irulenhurM 

Family Medicine 

Dr. Scinvun Maslmtkv 

2045 L'. Grand Ave, 

84//J56-6U1 



/ion 

Family C Internal Medicine 

Of, Pedro Palu-a> 

Dr. Dais v Andalcon 

Dr. l.ufma Marul 

191 1 27ih Street 

847/K72-455S 



Waukcgan 

family Medicine 

Dr. Phillip Rui^ 

1020 Glen iWa Ave. 

847/249-3J22 



Zton 

Midwciiern Regional 

Medical Center 

Cancer Treatment Center* 

of America 

2520 Llisha Ave. 

847/872-4561 



Midwestern^ 

H I f, I O N V L Ml DlfU C I S T f R 




C-ANCKR-n^i-yi^-rC^NTHKS 



V H I K I ! 



www.publiconline.com/ = mrmc 



Is there sue 
a thing as th 
Tooth Fairy? 





PARENT'S 
PLACE 

Sherri Singer, 
Psy.D. 



Dear Dr. Sherri, 

My daughter recently lost 
her first tooth. We were all very 
excited about the "tooth fairy" 
coining to visit her. She saw her 
friend the same day who told 
her that there Is n t any such 
thing as the "tooth fairy. 1 * It Just 
about crushed her. I want to 
help her with this, but am un- 
sure II It Is better to teach chil- 
dren the fantasy or the reality 
around these issues. Any help 
would be appreciated! 
SlgnecLToothless in Grayslake. 

Dear Toothless, 

You mean she doesn't exist? I'm 
crushed too! Fantasy is good for 
kids! Much of their play and devel- 
opment revolves around fantasy. In 
my opinion, there is nothing at all 
wrong with holding onto those little 
pieces of magic for a bit 

Reality comes all too soon and 
we have our whole lives to spend 
with it. Who's to say that the "tooth 
fairy* doesn't exist She does! She's 
you! It is still a fun thing, and as far 
as I know, for decades hasn't de- 
stroyed any kid's views of reality or 
their futures. In fact, my experience 
says that the kids who know reality 
too soon are the ones who normally 
have more stress and trouble. 

1 can remember being 6 years 
old and having a kid in my neigh- 
borhood tell me about death, killer 
bees and that there was no such 
thing as the 'tooth fairy." I just 
about lost my ability to breath at 
that moment and that little brat got 
such enjoyment out of it. 

Who's sicker, the one who be- 
lieves in the "tooth fairy," or the 
one who gets enjoyment out of 
hurting someone else based on 
their beliefs? If anything, we should 
be teaching our kids what it means 
to be considerate of someone else's 
opinions and feelings. We should 
teach our kid's that it's o.k. for peo- 
ple to believe in different things 
than we do. 

Believing in things you can't 
necessarily touch or see also hap- 
pens to be the cornerstone of reli- 
gion. All of our religions are about 
faith and believing in magic of one 
kind or another. Take a close look 
at some of the stories that religions 
are based on. They make the 
"tooth fairy" look tame. Yet we still 
believe. Believing in those things is 
o.k. Certainly, when your child 
reaches the age that he or she nat- 
urally begins to question these 
things, you can talk to the child 
about how some people believe in 
it and others don't 

It is the child's choice whether 
the child will continue to believe or 
not and no one should be judging 
that Certainly, If your child has 
packed a bag and is about to make a 
trip around the world in search of 
the "tooth fairy," make sure to stop 
the child and explain the reality, 
however, I haven't met any child 
who is ready to go that far. We all 
have our pieces of magic that are 
beyond what we see and feel in real- 
ity. They help us to take reality in an 
easier way. Hope this helps. 



77its column is for entertain- 
ment purposes only. Information in 
this column cannot and should not 
replace proper Psychological treat- 
ment Dr. Sherri Singer is a Li- 
censed Clinical Psychologist, child- 
hood behavior specialist Call in 
vour questions and comments: 
'(630)415-0974. 




JKBfflBJBtHTMflWimrnffl 



A 



I* 



B 1 2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 



January 2, 1998 



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Section 



Welcome to 
my war 

Libertyville author illustrates 
war from the front lines 



ByBILLSCHROEDER 
Publisher 



Bill Maxey probably never gave 
thought to whether the world needs 
another book about World War II. 

What he assigned himself four 
years ago was the task of setting 
down his personal experiences from 
an up front view of America's historic 
march from Normandy to a point 
east of the Rhine River where the 
once mighty German war machine 
capitulated resulting in VE Day, the 
end of hostilities in Europe. 

With the fates providing him a 
front row seat ail the way, William W. 
Maxey, Major, C.E., USAR Retired 
produced a very readable little book 
(only 175 pages), "Come with Me to a 
War: 'Hie Story, of VII Corps U.S. 
Army In Europe from D-Day to VE 
Day." . ' 

Maxey is not a slick writer. He 
doesn't pretend to be. The Illinois 
small town boy was trained as an ar- 
chitect, a profession he practiced un- 
til his retirement, interspersed with u 
stint as Lake County's chief building 

officer. He and his wife, whom he 
i mum led only a short time before be- 
ing shipped to Europe, have lived in 
Libertyville for more than <10 years. 

World War II buff will appreciate 
Maxcy's attention to the details of an 
army on the move, like regiment and 




u u 



OPEN SPACE 
DEBATE 

Issue sure to dominate 1 998 



PAGEC4 



NEW YEAR 
PREDICTIONS 

Party Lines goes out on a limb 
in forecasting the future 



PAGE C5 



FUNKY YEAR 

Pfarr bids fond 
farewell to 1997 

PAGE C5 




ADOPT A FAMILY 

Baxter staff plays Santa to 
Woodland families 

PAGE C6 



battalion identities, objectives taken, 
casualty statistics— the mechanics of 
war that tend to read like an official 
history. 

But if you don't allow technical 
data to become distracting, Maxey 
provides an unforgettable view of (he 
human side of war, or if you will, the 
inhuman side of war. It's all there 
from the mangled bodies of both 
friend and foe, smelly uniforms im- 
pregnated with anti-chemical war- 
fare solutions, cowardly officers, how 
tired combat troops become with re- 
sulting uncaring dysfunction, to the 
importance of a fox hole to a rifle- 
man. "Digging in" is the way to save— 
or prolong— your life. 

Maxey, a quiet, mild-mannered 
man in civilian life, clearly enjoyed his 
military experience, which started in 
1938 as an enlistee to play trumpet in 
an Army Reserve band. Whether it 
was to test himself, experience dan- 
ger, or whatever, he joined the ar- 
tillery and trained as a forward ob- 
serve, one of the most hazardous jobs 
In the Army. He jumped at a chance 
to go to jump schoot and still be- 
moans the fact that an injury on his 
nnnl Jump prevented him from get- 
ting his parachute wing. 

Instead, Maxey's commitment 
and intelligence stamped him for of- 
ficer's training which opened the 
door to becoming one of the Army's 



Ubertyyille author Bill Maxey stands in front of his collection of photos from World War II Maxev a 

oehfnd' he Kne^r ffi WarT "^ T1 ** V? * ^ ab0Ut hiS <« S"»S 
Denina tne lines in World War II.— Photo by Lynn Gunnarson Dahtstrom 



most expendable commodities— a 
young officer. Instead, he was select- 
ed to become a general's aide, later 
becoming on Intelligence liaison, find 

finally a public relations officer when 

die war began winding down. . 

Being at the aide of Gen. Willis t on 
B. Palmer, a much admired key V7I 
Corps commander, wasn't without 
danger because Palmer was a stickler 
for information, first hand informa- 



tion. Keen-eyed German marksmen 
relished taking out general's aides. 
Describing how one general lost three 
aide*, Maxey related how "I felt like a 

cava! ry horse." 

'Straight -laced and not afraid to 
admit he prayed a lot, Maxey de- 
spised soldiers who were untrue to 
their wives and who risked disease 
fraternizing with Belgium and French 
women. After carrying important 



maps to the front during Christmas, 
1944, Maxey recited the 23rd Psalm 
after lor was It before?) relaying fire 
direction Information tor th* ■inh>iy_ 
Tniswns during the lamed Battle 
of the Bulge, one of the greatest bar- 
ties of all lime where out-manned 
American forces repulsed the fnuitlc 
German counterattack. Weni indebr- 

Pleoscsce WELCOME tC2 



The tangled 
road they weave 

Studies upon studies still needed 
for Rte. 53 approval process 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



State tollway and highway offi- 
cials will prepare comprehensive 
studies of Lake County transporta- 
tion problems that they now expect 
to complete by winter of 2001. The 
studies will include preparation of 
draft and final environmental impact 
statements and preliminary engi- 
neering design to support any rec- 
ommended transportation projects. 

Consultants and state officials 
will work on the study in an office in 
Lake County that the Illinois Depart- 
ment ofTranspoi tation and StateToll 
Highway Authority will open in unin- 
corporated Mundelein in mid-Janu- 
ary. 

The work to be undertaken by 
transportation engineers also will in- 
clude an extensive program of public 
involvement, including public meet- 
ings, public hearings, and a project 
web site. A public relations firm also 
will be hired as part of the study team. 

This new study will include engi- 
neering and environmental studies to 



support an alternative that improves 
the transportation network of Lake 
County. 

The multiple alternatives to be 
studied with new environmental and 
demographic data both include and 
exclude construction of a north ex- 
tension of Illinois Route 53. 

State and tollway officials will cre- 
ate a new Alternatives Advisory' 
Group of elected officials, transporta- 
tion officials, and Lake Count)' public 
officials to assist the project team to 
reach consensus on the best trans- 
portation solutions. 

"We are now ready to proceed 
Willi the next step of our study," said 
Ralph Wehner, executive director for 
the tollway. "We will take a look at the 
latest projected growth trends for 
Lake County and proceed with a de- 
tailed evaluation of how to best im- 
prove the transportation system to 
meet the diverse travel needs of the 
region, be sensitive to environmental 
resources, and be fiscally practical." 

Please see TANGLED iC2 



LHS teacher appeals 
firing; student 
defends mentor 

Warfield believes incident with 
student was not grounds for firing 



By JASON J. KING 
Staff Reporter 



The attorney representing a fired 
Libertyville Community High School 
English teacher said his client will ap- 
peal his dismissal. 

AndrewWarfield, 45, of Evanston, 
a married father of threcwas fired last 
week by the LCHS board of education 
for allegedly kissing a 16-year-old fe- 
male student he took off campus. 

Last week, in a statement re- 
leased to Lakeland Newspapers, 
Warfield said he "unwittingly broke 
the rules, wrote her a pass to get out 
of photo class, brought along my gui- 
tar and we had our outing, along the 
bike trail by the river," (see accompa- 
nying story). 

Joshua Sachs, Warfield 's attorney, 
said he has filed for a hearing with the 
Illinois Department of Education on 
the firing. The independent hearing 
officer will then either support or 
overrule the decision made by the 
board. 



Sachs also questioned whether or 
not the incident merited a criminal 
charge. 

Warfield was arrested and 
charged with misdemeanor battery. 
He will appear in Lake County Circuit 
Court on Jan. 2. Warfield is also cur- 
rently under a 60-day investigation by 
the Department of Children and 
Family Services, 

Warfield was a tenured teacher 
who taught at the high school for 11 
years before his firing, and has been 
criticized in the past for his unortho- 
dox teaching methods. Warfield also 
was the school's debate coach. 

One of Warfield's former stu- 
dents, Joe Ramagli, 18, a senior at 
LCHS, came to Warfield's defense at 
last week's school board meeting, 
presenting petitions asking the board 
not to fire the teacher. 

Ilamagli continued to support his 
"friend" and "mentor" this week In 



Please see DEFENDS/ C2 





C2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



Januarys, 1998 



FROM PAGE CI 



TANGLED: More Route 53 
road studies requested 

"What we see and know from our porate engineering and environmen- 

prior studies is that Lake County wilt tal studies completed during die past 

face substantia] transportation chal- seven years, 

lenges in the coming years," said Workproposed for consultants in 

State Secretary of Transportation Kirk the new studies includes basic data 

Brown. "We know we]l that there Is collection, geographic information 

no single solution to transportation system data compilation, prepara- 

deficiencies in Lake County. IDOT tion of any required supplemental 

and the Tollway stand committed to environmental field studies, develop- 

work with the region's transportation ment of alternative transportation 

agencies and leaders to adequately network solutions and associated 

serve the county's transportation computer modeling, and preparation 

needs." of a geographic information system 

Tollway and IDOT transportation based alternatives analysis to evalu- 
planning and engineering profes- ate engineering, social, economic, 
sionals said that the new studies will and environmental issues, 
incorporate up-to-date forecasts of A second set of studies to be un- 
regional growth and transportation dertaken by officials and consul- 
demand. Forecasts have just recently tants will be prepared to support 
become available with completion of one of the transportation alterna- 
a new 2020 Regional Transportation tives recommended for implemcn- 
Plan prepared by the Chicago Area tation. These studies may include 
Transportation Study agency and the updating and supplementing envi- 
Northeastem Illinois Planning Com- ronmental field studies, studies of 
mission. highway location, and drainage 

In addition, state officials want studies previously done for the- 
the new studies to build upon recent Route 53 extension. It may also in- 
work on the proposed Lake County elude developing conceptual de- 



Mundelein concerned 
about Route 53 plan 

Extension still may not be built * 



WELCOME: 

Author recounts 
WWH frontline 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Proposed studies of transporta 



have always stated that if 53 is need- 
ed, it is needed further west." He said, 
"From the 1970s, we have recom- 
mended that IDOT address the state 



tion issues In Lake County by State of highways in and around central Lake 



extension of Route 53 and to incor- 



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Antioch 

Linda 
838-01 51 



Gray slake 

Wildwood 

Kim 
566-9536 

Linda 
223-1607 



Gurnee 

Marylyn 
336-3258 



Lake Villa 
Lindenhurst 

Rosemarie 
725-2375 

Eileen 
740-3770 



signs of intersections and inter- 
changes, traffic maintenance stud- 
ies, landscape designs, and other 
work necessary to complete a final 
EIS and preliminary design report. 

Studies will look at the follow- 
ing issues: wetlands, ground and 
surface water quality, flood plains, 
biological, and other natural re- 
sources. Also to be studied, as nec- 
essary, arc threatened and endan- 
gered species, historical and ar- 
chaeological resources, social and 
economic issues, topography, soil, 
park and recreation property im- 
pacts, existing and proposed land 
use and zoning, and noise and air 
quality impacts. 

AJJ studies are to be completed 45 
months after consultants arc told to 
proceed with their work. One set of 
studies will be done in 24 to 30 
months and the second set of studies 
in 15 to 21 months. 

Consultants will be selected to 
work with state officials on January 
26. The first meeting between con- 
sultants and state transportation offi- 
cials to discuss the scope of services 
and negotiate hours to complete as- 
signments will be February 2. 

Hie Illinois State Toll Highway 
Authority maintains a web site 
(www.illinoistollway.com). There are 
two toll authority e-mail addresses 
(info@illinoistollway.com or 

istha@aol.com). 



Illinois highway officials are expected 
to yield major, positive benefits for 
coping with transportation needs. 

Stale highway and tollway offi- 
cials are seeking new consultants to 
prepare a comprehensive study of 
county transportation issues and will 
open an office in Mundelein where 
those studies will be done. 

Selected transportation and engi- 
neering consultants will begin work in 
Spring, 199B to study transportation 
improvement alternatives for Lake 
County. Those alternatives will include 
mass transit improvements, arterial 
road network improvements, con- 



County prior to going ahead with 
Route 53." 

Highways about which 
Mundelein village officials have ex- 
pressed concern include routes 176, 
60, 83, 45, as well as Midlothian Road. 
"All of which need significant atten- 
tion," he said. 

"We in Mundelein welcome a 
full-fledged evaluation of what the 
needs are and what the alternatives 
are to meet those needs," Marabella 
said. Does he see the proposed new 
studies as a positive event? "Ab- 
solutely. Absolutely," he said. "Tills is 
the opportunity for legitimately con 



structing Route 53, not building any- cemed people to get involved in de- 
thing, and not-constructing Route 53. termining the specific problems and 
Illinois State Toll Highway Au- the alternatives to correcting them." 
thority Executive Director Ralph Marabella said, "If the tollway 
Wehner met with Mundelein Mayor and IDOT arc going to give us this op- 



Marilyn Sindles and Village Adminis 
trator Kenneth Marabella on Dec. 12 
to inform them of the anticipated 
new studies. Other communities 
along the recorded alignment of 
Route 53 were also informed of the 
proposed new studies. 

"This could be one of the most 
significant opportunities to enhance 
the quality of life in Lake County that 
has come up in many years," said 
Marabella of the proposed new trans- 
portation alternatives studies. 

David Loveday, Press Secretary 
for the Toll Authority, said, "There is 
not a set figure on how much this 
study is going to cost, but it is going to 
be a very thorough study." 



portunity, then we need to respond 
actively and positively." 

Loveday said that there will be a 
new consultant (cam on the Route 53 
project. In addition, IDOT and toll- 
way officials arc moving into unin- 
corporated Lake County. They will 
open an office on Midlothian Road in 
the Midlothian Center Office Com- 
plex just south of Gilmer Road. "We 
plan to open the office in mid-Janu- 
ary," he said. 

"It is important to provide project 
information and a lot of communica- 
tion between the residents and elect- 
ed officials with the project team," 
Loveday said. To achieve this level of 
communication, the project mating 



Loveday said that the purpose of er, two people from the tollway au- 



thc new studies is "to help the project 
in reaching a consensus on the best 
transportation solution in Lake 
County." 

"This is a comprehensive review 



thority, and two people from IDOT 
will work at the Midlothian office. 
The project manager has not been se- 
lected. "It will be a brand new per- 
son," Loveday said. The office will 



of regional transportation needs of have displays about the project and 



Lake County, which is long overdue," 
said Marabella. "1 really see a lot of 
potential for good tilings happening 
here." 

Mundelein is one of a dozen 
units of government affected by state 
proposals to construct a new toll 
highway through south central Lake 
County. The village, however, has not 
taken a position for or against the 
proposed project. "We've never tak- 
en a position pro or con on the issue 
of Route 53," Marabella said. "We 



people will be able to come in and ask 
questions. The comprehensive 
transportation alternatives studies 
will be done there. A project web 
page will also be created. 

"We are going to create an Alter- 
native Advisory Group composed of 
elected officials, transportation offi- 
cials, and Lake County Public offi- 
cials," Loveday said. He said that the 
project office and the advisory group 
were a good faith effort to keep peo- 
ple informed. 



8T 



Lake Zurich 

Anne 
540-5790 



Libertyville 

Jessae Art 

586-7213 970-9247 



Mundelein 

Failh 
872-1672 



Vernon Hills 

Doris 
680-7276 



You are entitled to a 
complimentary subscrip- 
tion from your home- 
town newspaper. To re- 
ceive your paper, contact 
your Welcome Wagon 
representative or call 
Lakeland Newspapers at 
(847)223-8161. 




Keith Scott, Mike Shannon & Nancy Carbis 
know what it's like to work hard to be the 
best. They started The Backyard Steakpit 
thirteen years ago with just seven employees 
and a goal; To create a family owned busi- 
ness with a friendly atmosphere and the best 
charcoal grill steaks, prime rib & seafood in 
Lake County. One of the first things they did 
was choose First National Bank - 
Employee Owned to provide them with full 
range of products and services by a friendly 
knowledgeable staff. Since then, FNBEO has 
helped Keith, Mike and Nancy with every- 
thing from lending to establishing personal 
and business accounts. Not worrying about 
the safety and security of their finances 
allows them to spend more time doing what 
they do best: providing their customers 
with friendly atmosphere, great service and 
the best charcoal grilled steaks 
in Lake County! 




Stephan lipoid (Standing) FNBEO Branch Manager with Back 
Yard Steakpit owners Keith Scott, Nancy Carbis and Mike 
Shannon. Backyard Steakpit fs located at 1818 N. Grandwood 
Drive {1 1/2 miles west of Gurnee Mills). Phone (847) 356-5200 



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ed to Bill Maxcy's honesty and keen 
sense for the correct version of Gen. 
McAuliffe's famed widely reported 
one word reply for the demand to 
surrender, "Nuts."' 

Maxcy explained that it wasn't 
one word, but two, including one em- 
phatic personal pronoun "you." 

You don't need much imagina- 
tion to determine McAuliffe's other 
word, 

It's this kind of realism and hon- 
esty that Maxey brings to "Come with 
Me to a War," a tide that at first hand 
sounds misleadlngly like an invita- 
tion to a tea. But Maxcy's straightfor- 
ward, at times gutsy approach, quick- 
ly dispels doubts about authenticity. 
This Is the real stuff, how war In- 
evitably brings out both the best and 
worst in human beings. 

Given the abbreviated format, 
Maxey does an admirable job of giv- 
ing the reader an up front look at the 
sometimes heroic side, the typically 
day-in-day-out struggle of merely 
staying alive, and, unfortunately, the 
dark side of men in combat 

An historical footnote: Dill Maxcy 
has both mental pictures and photo- 
graphic evidence of Nazi death 
camps, vividly describing how tears 
come to his eyes to this day has he re- 
calls vicwing3,000 civilian corpses at 
a buzz bomb factory near Nord- 
hausen that had been liberated by 
America's fighting men. 

And a final poignant note: Max- 
ey reaches Leipzig in Spring, 1945, 
and the lilacs are blooming. The 
young officer is overwhelmed by 
homesickness. He realizes that he has 
been in Europe four years and 10 
months. 



DEFENDS: 

LCHS Teacher 
appeals firing 

light of his dismissal. 

M He had a way of relating to us 
and our problems," said Ramagli, 
"He was a really caring person, It was 
wonderful to have a teacher treat you 
as a friend." 

Ramagli said out of school friend- 
ships were normal for Warfield and 
his students, mostly in an effort to 
help students dealing with personal 
problems, as in the current situation. 

"His style of teaching provoked 
us to think and feel about what we 
were reading," said Ramagli. "I have 
never experienced more of a change 
in my behaviors, my personal life or 
my writing. 

"I'm a totally changed person, for 
the better, and I owe it all to this 



man. 



Ji 



I^ukclond Newspapers 

is Interested to hear 

news of local 

Evcnts,Clubs, and 

Organizations. 

Please send 
news items to: 

Rhonda Ilctrlck Burke, 
SOS. Whitney SL 
Gruyslakc, 60030 



Tel. 223-8161 
Fax 223-8810 



Photos ore 

also welcome . 



. 



'': 



i 



/lMi>Um. 



January 8, 1998 



COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers /G3 



AT A GLANCE 



A DIGEST OF STORIES MAKING HEADLINES THROUGHOUT OUR REGION 



Church holds final service 

Island Lake— This past Sunday marked many different 
things for different people. It was the Sunday after Christmas, 
the last Sunday of 1997, the third day of Kwanza, the sixth 
night of Hanukah, the final day of the NFL Wild Card Playoffs 
and the last service of the First Congregation Community 
Church of Island Lake, 

Fifty years have gone by since the little country-style 
church opened its doors at 217 W. State Road (Route 176), 
serving residents of Island Lake, Wauconda, and even Wonder 
Lake and McHenry. 

When the church hold's its next service Sunday, Jan. 4, it 
will be known as the Faith Community United Church of 
Christ, and for about one year be housed in an old building on 
property once used by the Prairie Grove School. It hopes to 
build a new church on the property. 

Sports games at your request 

Mundeleln— Watching professional and college sports 
from around the country has become a lot more easier to do, 
with the proliferation of satellite dishes and DDS systems on 
the market. But for those us who simply rely on cable, or an 
old fashioned antenna for their television needs, the athletic 
programs available is out of our hands. 

Soon, Mundelein will have an establishment that will cater 
to the sports fan need to watch sports, whatever they may be 
and where ever they may be played. Tom Gangas, owner of 
Slammcrs Sports Grill in Westmont, is building a newSlam- 
mers in the empty building at 330 Townline Road that once 
housed Pondcrosa several years ago. 

If all ofhls plans work out, Gangas intends on opening for 
business Jan. 12. 

Student raising funds for trip 

AnUoch— Between now and the end of April, Stijovic, 13, 
will try to raise about $5,000 to take advantage of an invitation 
to travel to Australia and New Zealand as a Student Ambas- 
sador with People to People. 

Zoran Z. Stijovic Jr. is a seventh grader at Antioch Upper 
Grade School. "I like math and science classes," he said of his 
academic interests. He also has some strong sports and artistic 
talents. People to People Student Ambassadors travel to 
countries around the world. The program is one of the few 
that offers both high school and college credit for the educa- 
tional experience it provides. 

People to People places the fund-raising responsibility on 
the future student ambassadors. "They said I can try to raise 
money from sponsors," Zoran said. 

The Stijovic family is quite familiar with travel. "We came 
from Belgrade, Yugoslavia, three years ago," mother Hanka 
Stijovic said. The family arrived in the United States with very 
little. The war created many hardships for people there. "The 
economy was going down so we had to move" she said of 
their decision to leave Yugoslavia. Relatives helped them be- 
come established here in the Chicago area. 

Zoran Z. Stijovic Jr. hopes that people will respond to his 
fund-raising efforts by sending contributions to his family at 
223 Bridgewood Drive, Antioch, 60002. 

Warfield asks for firing hearing 

LIbertyville— The attorney representing a fired Liber- 
tyville Community High School English teacher said his client 
will appeal his dismissal. 

Andrew Warfield, 45, of Evanston, was fired last week by 
the LCHS board of education for allegedly kissing a 16-year- 
old female student he took off campus. 

Last week, In a statement released to Lakeland Newspa- 
pers, Warfield said he "unwittingly broke the rules, wrote her a 
pass to get out of photo class, brought along my guitar and we 
had our outing, along the bike trail by the river," (see accom- 
panying story). 

Joshua Sachs, Warfield's attorney, said he has filed for a 
hearing with the Illinois Department of Education on the fir- 
ing. The independent hearing officer wilt then either support 
or overrule the decision made by the board. 

O'Reilly bounced off ballot 

Woukegan— The race for the District 18 Lake County 




Grinch steals Christmas 

Cora Adelizzi holds up the remains of the wooden 
Grinch that was stolen off the garage roof of her Lin- 
denhurst home. The piece was part of an elaborate 
Christmas display Adelizzi shows off every year. Police 
are looking for suspects in the vandalism which oc- 
curred,Friday, Dec. 26 between noon and 2:30 p.m. 
—Photo by Sandy Bressner 



Board seat has cooled before it ever had a chance to heat up. 

The Lake County Electoral Board removed Roberta 'Hob- 
hie" O'Reilly from the ballot of (he March 1 7 Republican pri- 
mary for failing to number the pages of her petition. 

O'Reilly, of Long Grove, said she was upset by the decision, 
but acknowledged her oversight. 

"I'm certainly not pleased that I gave them the bullets to 
shoot me with," said the former county board member. 

Garden Club tree is winner 

Antlocli— Antioch Garden Club members decorated a . 
tree for the Chicago Botanic Garden that was awarded a "Best 
All-around" ribbon. This was the first year the club has deco- 
rated a tree for display at the botanic garden in Glencoe. 

"We were awarded Best All-around," said Doris Miller of 
the Antioch Garden Club. The tree also received a second 
award for best use of natural materials. "We used all natural 
materials from the woods," she said of the tree's decorating 
theme. Miller said, "We had an angel on top made of pheasant 
feathers." The angel was made by Meredith Schnelle. 

The Chicago Botanic Garden places the trees indoors and 
on display. "They had 20 trees decorated by garden clubs from 
the Chicago area," Miller said. "They open that room on ^ 
Thanksgiving Day and continue to the fourth of January," 
Miller said. The trees are taken down on Jan. 5. 

The Chicago Botanic Garden holiday display features 
wreaths decorated by professional florists. There are profes- 
sionally-created room and table settings available for inspec- 
tion. "They also have a long hall with doors from various 
places in Chicago," she said. The doors are also decorated. 



STAY TUNED 

* 

Pick up any of Lakeland Newspapers 11 




PRESERVING 
THE PAST 

Mundelein's Fort Hill 
Hertitage Museum 
looks to expand 
in 1998 



Forefronts 



. , . ■ i * r **+ *«+****■ *■*!«•••**•* #♦*«***••* •' 



Lake County Progress 1998 



FpREFRONTS 

Ten of Lake County's most 
interesting people and events 



Sprenger land for development 

Antioch— Planning Commission and Zoning Board mem- 
bers will conduct a public hearing Ian. 8 at 7:30 p.m. in Village 
Hall to evaluate the proposed Decrcrest planned unit develop- 
ment on the Otto and Mary Jane Sprenger property north of 
Route 173 at Savage Road. 

Deercrest is proposed on 234-acres with a maximum of 
515 dwelling units. The development will include areas of de- 
tached single family homes, detached zero lot line single fami- 
ly homes, and townhomes. Almost 31 percent of the property 
is allocated open space use and a little more than 55 percent Is 
allocated housing development Of the slightly more than 72 
acres of open space, about 12 acres are identified wetland 
acres. Two parks are proposed within the development. 

The property Is currently zoned for R-l uses, and it is now 
used for agriculture and contains a residence. It is east of, but 
not contiguous to, Redwing Marsh and south of Deer Lake 
Conservation area. 

■ Village Director of Planning, Zoning, and Building 
Robert Silhan found the proposal in compliance with the 
Village of Antioch general plan since the plan proposes 
residential uses for the Sprenger property area. Also, he 
advised the Commission that the development density is 
appropriate for the anticipated sewer service available as 
a result of an expected June, 1998 Lake County treatment 
plant expansion. Silhan's review comments for the Vil- 
lage said, "Generally, the proposal is an excellent exam- 
ple of a Planned Unit Development." 

The fire bell rang on Christmas 

Grayslake— It was 10 am Christmas Day, the time when 
most people are knee deep in gift wrap. This year it was every- 
one with the exception of the Grayslake Fire Department . 

The on duty members and approximately 18 paid on call 
firefighters were summoned to duty. 

"They showed up with bows on their heads," joked Deputy 
Chief Greg Formica. 

The department was called to a shed fire behind Landmark 
Liquors, 490 E. Belvidere Road. 

They didn't waste time extinguishing the fire which de- 
stroyed the old wood shed, leaving a few Umbers standing and 
not much else, according to Formica, 

The cause of the blaze is unknown. It will be Investi- 
gated. 

Slate grant to finance park 

Cnrnee— The development of a park, nlie off Hum Club 
Road will be financed with funds from a Illinois Dept. of Nat- 
ural Resources grant. 

Gumcc Park Dfst. ivon a $200,000 grant from the DNR. 
Thts combined with local funds will mean $430,000 will be 
spent on the project this year. 

"The grants" are always competitive. We arc pleased 
to receive one. More than half of the agencies who ap- 
ply do not receive a grant," said Charles Balling, direc- 
tor. 

The neighborhood park side is located north of Wash- 
ington St. and west of Hunt Club Road, south of Rte. J32. 
It will serve the communities of Aberdare, Stonebrook, 
Woodside Park, North Lake Farms, Concord Oaks and 
others. 

Santa gives grant to Grant Twp. 

Fox Lake— Gordy Kiesgen's Christmas wishes have come 

true. 

For the last five years, Grant Township has been trying to 
get some form of money together to try and build a com- 
munity center for the residents of Fox Lake. 

On Dec. 23, the Grant Twp. Supervisor's wish came 
true. 

The Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources issued Grant 
Township the OSLAD Grant for the sole purpose of devel- 
oping and 18 acre recreation area in Grant Park. The 
OSLAD grant, which stands for open space land acquisi- 
tion and development, was applied for on Oct. 9th. The 
grant will match funds with the money raised from Grant 
Township for the recreation center. 



in coming weeks for: 



CASE 
CONTINUES 

State's Attorney may 

rule on fate 

of fired LHS teacher 




C4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OPINIONS 



January 2, 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers 

William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 



William M. Schroeder 

Proslrfent/G.E.O. 



Neal Tucker 

Composition Mgr./Exocutivc Editor 



Rhonda Hetrick Burke 

Managing Editor 

30 South Whitney St., Grayslakc, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (847) 223-8161. E-mail: cd1t@lnd.com 



EDITORIALS 



Railroad's safety 
held up to question 

Illinois and Wisconsin hold two widely different views of Wis- 
consin Central Ltd., an Illinois based railroad operating in four 
states and part of Canada. In our midst, Wisconsin Central is 
seen as a bustling freight line and provider of trackage for North 
Central Service, the new Melra commuter line linking Antioch and 
intermediate points south to Chicago. 

While the Illinois perspective casts Wisconsin Central in a positive 
light, more and more Wisconsin residents are viewing the railroad 
with suspicion and concern after two major derailments in less than 
two years. One source in Wisconsin found the railroad involved in 
29 accidents in the past year. A federal agency found Wisconsin 
Central's accident rate nearly double other U.S. railroads. 

Even while the railroad works on fulfilling a federal compliance 
agreement to improve safety over its 3,000 mile network, we believe 
Wisconsin Central owes it to the 3,000 or so commuters using North 
Central Service daily that its trackage in Lake County and the Cook 
County portion of Mctra, is in tip-top shape. We find the line's ques- 
tionable safety record in Wisconsin more than disconcerting. 



Coyotes thrive 

on suburban life 



VIEWPOINT 



K 

time. 



eep an eye peeled for a coyote. You're liable to see one of 
the wily creatures, especially if you live near a wooded or 
nature area. Coyotes are like people. They like it around 
here, even if Lake County is getting more crowded all the 



Northeastern Illinois is one of the areas of coyote concentration. 
State officials vouch for that on the basis of archery deer hunter 
sightings, nuisance calls and radio collar monitoring. They esti- 
mate the Illinois coyote population ranging between 20,000 and 
30,000. One coyote created quite a stir last summer with the attack 
of a pet in a Liberlyvillu subdivision. Coyote sightings are common 
in west Lake County rural areas. 

Bob Bluett, manager of the Dept. of Natural Resources' furbearer 
program, said coyotes gel used to people, although the rise in nui- 
sance complaints is more a result of increasing contact with hu- 
mans than an increase in the number of animals. It's illegal to keep 
a coyote in captivity under the Illinois Dangerous Animals Act, but 
they occasionally interbreed with domestic dogs, producing hybrids 
known as "coydogs." 

Bluett debunked theories that coyotes attack people. They're usu- 
ally on the prowl for rabbits, mice, rats or berries. Only 1 6 cases of 
humans being attacked by coyotes in North America have been re- 
ported in the last 30 years. Basically, they're loners, even while they 
adapt to suburban living. 



Airport's growth 
triggering dilemma 

Plans to expand Waukegan Regional Airport, a mainstay of 
the Lake County economy, are running contrary to private 
home and environment interests. As many as 100 homes 
and 90 acres of Forest Preserve stand in the way of expand- 
ing the main runway from 6,000 to 7,500 feet. 
The airport is home base for corporate aircraft utilized by Abbott 
Laboratories, Baxter Healthcare and Case Corporation of Racine, 
Wisconsin and a number of smaller businesses. Waukegan Region- 
al handles about 100,000 flights per year, some of them DC-9s and 
727s. Walter Jones, executive director of the parent Waukegan Port 
District, says it is important to keep the airport moving forward. We 
agree wholeheartedly. 

The rub comes from doing away with all those homes and elimi- 
nating a beautiful wooded area. When expansion of other vital ser- 
vices like hospitals, fire stations and schools are at stake, officials 
typically follow a policy of paying above market rates for real estate, 
providing full disclosure of plans and needs to all interested parties 
and the public at large, and proceeding at a slow, but deliberate 
pace. With the gTeater good at stake, no less should be expected of 
airport officials. 



Open space debate 
heating up for 1998 



The coming 12 months will 
be a defining period in 
Lake County for the future 
of open space. As an elec- 
tion year, particulary with 15 Coun- 
ty Board seats up, Lake's perennial 
pro-development vs. anti-develop- 
ment debate will be more intense 
than ever. That's a given. 

In Lake County, the litmus test for 
election to the County Board is 
land use policy, a hot button ques- 
tion akin to abortion and gun con- 
trol for state and federal level can- 
didates. 

Added for 1998, though, will be 
inquiry whether electors want to 
put their check books directly on 
the line for open space acquisition. 
In the talking stage is a proposition 
to float bonds to expand the Lake 
County Forest Preserve District; 
also being talked about arc open 
space questions in Warren and Lib- 
ertyville Township, where voters pi- 
oneered open space purchase in 
1985 with the passage of a $22.6 
million bond issue. The township 
now has 1 ,490 acres, just a few hun- 
dred acres more than what is left in 
Warren, according to Supervisor 
Sue Simpson. 

The township open question will 
be new to growth-happy Warren 
Township. Following through on a 
campaign pledge, Simpson wants 
to give voters a chance to pass 
judgment on a township open 
space program, possibly as early as 
the November general election. 
Simpson raises a blunt question: 
more open space or more cars on 
local highways. 

The Warren Township question 
poses an interesting twist: after 
years of underwriting the costs of 
wild growth and funding corrup- 
tion in a previous administration, 
Warren voters could well discover a 
trade off that open space acquisi- 
tion won't be expensive at all. 
A closing question: Why aren't 
voters in the county's other town- 
ships pressing their town boards 
about open space? They won't 
have to go very far to get some de- 
finitive answers. 

Guessing game 

Lake County's most political cou- 
ple, Frank and Verna Clayton of 
Buffalo Grove, are keeping every- 
one guessing about their plans for 
the future. State Rep. Verna says 
only that she won't be running for 
reelection March 17, which means 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



she'll be out of office Jan. 1,1999. 
But Frank is just getting started on 
a new term as road commissioner . 
of Vernon Township. His term 
won't be up until 200 1. Two years 
ago Verna was talked out of retire- 
ment. Then Frank was elected in 
1997. Role reversal maybe? 

Not so odd 

Thanks to sharp-eyed reader Phil 
Carrigan, this column has another 
candidate to add to the list of office 
seekers who are unusually qualified 
for the office they seek by ed uca- 
tion and experience. 

As Carrigan correctly pointed out 
by fax, Lynda Paul, an accountant 
and CPA, is a candidate for Lake 
CountyTrcasurer. Paul is a Demo- 
crat. Carrigan responded after we 
noted the "political oddity" of ac- 
countant and CPA Chris Lauzcn 
running for Illinois comptroller. 
Lauzcn also is a state senator so he 
has less time these days to practice 
his profession than Paul. 

Thanks, writers 

For this first column of 1998, we'd 
like to public acknowledge and 
thank all the readers and citizens 
who took the time and effort to 
write letters to the editor and com- 
mentaries during in 1997. We are 
indebted to you. Your viewpoints 



make these pages more Interesting 
and meaningful. Newspaper read- 
ing and letter writing is under as- 
sault by other forms of mass media 
so the viewpoints expresses by 
readers are lifcblood both to this 
newspaper and our community. 
Keep'em coming. 

Henry counting 

Henry Krippner, the personable 
and energetic president of the Lib- 
crtyvillc-Mundelein-Vernon Hills 
Chamber of Commerce Is on the 
countdown to retirement some- 
time this summer. Krippner, a life- 
long county resident, built the L-M- 
V Chamber into the largest busi- 
ness organization In Lake County. 

Ryan to speak 

Illinois Atty. Gen. Jim Ryan, on the 
trail for reelection, will visit Lake 
County Saturday, Feb. 7, to address 
the annual Grant Township Lincoln 
Day dinner. This year's dinner will 
be the 50th anniversary of one of 
the county's major political events 
of the year. Chairperson Nancy 
Kubalanza also is talking about the 
appearance of a "special guest" lo 
spice interest. 

One man's family 

Who says only the little ones be- 
lieve in Santa? St. Nick in person 
thrilled the sprouts as expected 
during our Dec. 24 gathering. But 
the surprise was the reaction of the 
adults, some whom admitted to 

getting a bit choked up. Only Gal- 
lic was unimpressed. She's suspi- 
cious of all male strangers, whether 
they're dressed In brown, blue — or 
red! 



BillSchroeder offers editorial 
commentary every Tuesday on 
Lake County Live presented by 
STAR Channel 3/ TCI Cable at 
5:30 and 7:30 p.m. 



Guest 
commentaries welcome 

Lakeland Newspapers welcomes guest columns by our readers on 
topics of general interest. Anyone interested in writing a column can 
contact Publisher W.H. Schroeder at {847) 223-8161. Submissions 
may be mailed c/o Lakeland Newspapers, P.O. Box 268, Grayslake 
IL, 60030 or fax to (847} 223-8810. Deadline is Friday at noon. 




* 



I fi ,«""**ni*i*rt •axsrKsserjmawea^iaye^t inKWJESMagUgij 



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January 2, 1998 



OPINIONS 









Road to St. Paddy's day 
primary riddled with pot holes 

A SFathcrTirrmiVflcrirurinrr f n km i m L « « , Inr . ... 



Lakeland Newspapers I C5 



As FatherTime was ringing 
the bell New Year's Eve to 
welcome 1998, political 
forces throughout Lake 
County and the state of Illinois, were 
already beginning the mad dash to- 
ward toasting victory with a green St. 
Pat's cheer in the March 1998 primary. 

Because, despite a great deal of 
effort on the part of the Lake County 
Democratic Party to gain ground in 
the past year, the primary still is the 
election in Lake County as Republi- 
cans go head to head in a battle of 
wit, money and influence. 

Some predictions for St. Paddys 
day party planners: 

Churchill -Salvi 

Despite AJ Solvi's name recogni- 
tion throughout the state, don't ex- 
pea a rousing Lake County party to 
celebrate his victory. If Salvi stuns the 
party regulars again and the moon is 
blue that night, his party will likely be 
held in a downstate pub. 

Salvi will have to pull off the Re- 
publican Party's second biggest up- 
set in recent history to carry the 
state, without carrying his home 
county, which will undoubtedly go 
to Lake Villa's Bob Churchill in the 
Secretary of State race. 

As likable a politician as Salvi is, 
one doesn't often get a chance to 
upset the powers that be and to do it 
twice in two years, is unprecendent. 
It's not Salvi's year. Besides, many 
voters in Lake County are itching to 
have a new stale representative. 

Neal's successor 

Bob Neal's legacy to the Dlst. 2 
county board seat may Just be the 
number ofpcoplc who have been 
motivated to replace hffh. there are 
two Democrats mid four Republicans 
vying to be Neal's successor. 

Don't expect die Deins to make 
headway in this race. Look for this to 
be a battle between former Neal sup- 
porters, Larry Jones and Betty Hac 
Kaiser. But don't count out Chuck 
Johnson or Loretta McCarley. 




Safvi: Can he stun the 
party again? 




Graham: Get out 

the microfiche 

The Beach Park residents could 
gain steady ground by pounding on 
doors and taking advantage of the 
well-known split factions in 
Wadsworth lead by Mayor Don 
Craft, a known supporter of Kaiser, 
and Neal, who is backing Jones. This 
may be one of the most publicized 
county board races in years. 

County board upsets 

Both mainstream Republicans 
and independents will likely have 
something to cheer about as they 
celebrate the luck of the Irish that 
night. 

Party Lines will take a bold stand 
and say that at least one of two well- 
known fenrnle Lake County board * 
members In the southern part of the 
county will be defeated. But, take 
comfort, ladies, we see AI 



Westennan retaining his seat on 
the board, despite behind-the- 
scenes work to get him ousted. With 
an open mind and roll-up-his- 
sleeves style, Westerman has made 
friends on the board from all three 
factions. 

We also predict the luck of the 
Irish will be with Diana O 'Kelly as 
she easily wins a second term. Just 
like Westerman, she is respected by 
her fellow board members for taking 
each issue on its merit and not tak- 
ing poliu'cal sides. 

We also see at least one Democ- 
rat losing his seat on the county 
board. 

Microfiche headache 

Look for political writers 
throughout Lake County to be hov- 
ering over microfiche trying to sort 
out comments made by Mike 
Graham and John Balen during 
the campaign. 

With service on the Lake County 
board going back 20 years, even the 
most astute political followers arc 
going to have to do some research to 
write intelligently about the skele- 
tons these two are likely to bring up 
in the campaign. 

Making lessons from the past vi- 
able to the future may aid these two 
senior statesman in their bids to re- 
turn to county board duty. 

If voters can be convinced life 
was better in Lake County in the 
late 70s and early '80s, than Baien 
or Graham may just make a come- 
back. 

Limelight nausea 

The easiest political prediction of 
the year — Wlllnrd Helander and 
Linda Ilea* will be counting the 

' days to the November general elec- 
tion as the limelight becomes nau- 
seating. Look for this to be the 
most reported race or the season. 

Come November if any Lake 
County voter doesn't recognize the 
name of either Hess or Helander, ask 
them what rock they have been un- 
der. 



A fond farewell 
to a funky year 



A glance over the shoulder, 
along with a wink and a 
smile, at another yo-yo of 
a year. It was mostly fun, 
and here are some of the things we 
heard or read that may be worth re- 
calling: 

Months before Princess Diana 
was killed in an auto'crash and 
then was all but canonized, British 
actress Helen Mirren had offered 
this observation of the now much- 
exploited princess: "She's incredibly 
stupid." 

Actor Michael Douglas: "In all 
due respect to Princess Diana, 
when someone like MoiherTeresa 
dies, will we have anywhere near 
that kind of outpouring for her?" 

Other quotable quotes from 
1997, the year that was: 

Michael Feldman of Wisconsin 
public radio: "Winters here are like 
childbirth; if you could remember 
the previous one, you'd never go 
through another one," 

Former President Bush's son, 
Texas Gov. George W. Bush, after his 
wife asked him to buy new formal 
wear for special occasions: "Read 
my lips: no new tuxes." 

Edith Haisman, who died at the 
age of 100, was the oldest survivor 
from the sinking of the Titanic in 
1912. At age 15, from a lifeboat, she 
saw her father standing on the deck 
with a brandy in one hand, a cigar 
in the other and waving. 

"I'll see you in New York," he 
shouted, but he went down with 
the ship. 

Sen, Bob Dole, after losing the 
election and being Invited to the 
White House to receive from Bill 
Cllnion the Presidential Medal of 

Freedom: % Robert J. Dole, do 
solemnly swear ... Oops, sorry. 
Wrong speech." 

Dole, commenting on Democ- 
ratic presidential contenders AJ 
Gore, Gill Bradley and Richard 
Gephardt; "I wouldn't say those 
three are charismaticaily chal- 




PFARR 
CORNER 

Jerry Pfarr 



lenged, but they make me and 
Lamar Alexander and Steve Forbes 
look like wild and crazy guys." 

Hillary Clinton, graciously 
chatUng with author Bob Wood- 
ward after his recent book revealed 
the First Lady held imaginary con- 
versations with FDR's wife: "Next 
time I talk to Eleanor, Bob, I'll tell 
her you said hello." 

Columnist Arianna Huffington's 
advice to Stanford University fresh- 
man Chelsea Clinton: "If you're 
right on the line between a B-plus 
and an A-minus, mention to your 
professor that your father is looking 
for a new secretary of education." 

President Clinton, saying he 
would like Tom Hanks to portray 
him should there ever be a movie 
about Clinton: "We don't look alike, 
and we're not the same size or 
shape or anything, but 1 know him 
and respect him as a person and as 
an actor." 

Former Beatle Paul McCartney 
upon attaining knighthood: 
"George Harrison and Ringo Starr 
now call me 'Your Holiness.' " 

We can always count on those 
witty, wacky Wisconslnites to 
amuse us, can't we? When theTam- 
pa Bay football team came to play 
In Green Bay. Packer fan* greeted 
them with a huge banner that said. 

"Welcome, Tampa Bay. Come and 

smell our Dairy A/r." 

And after the Packers defeated 
Dallas, as the dejected visiting team 
shuffled ciTche field, the Green Bay 
band struck up the country-west- 
ern tune, "Mamas, don't let your 
babies grow up to be Cowboys," 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



There are options to extending Route 55 



Everyone seems to think the 
only way to improve traffic 
is to bring in the 53 exten- 
sion. I am not in favor of 
the 53 extension and I feel we have 
other options. 

The destruction of our wet- 
lands and the uncontrolled growth 
it will bring will ruin the character 
of our county. 

Imagine for a moment, 
Grayslake looking like Schaumburg 
with 30 story glass towers at the 
corner of 53 and -120 (where 45 and 
120 are now). Imagine looking out 
on the horizon and seeing these 
towers instead of the open sky. It 
breaks my heart to think of this. Re- 
member, if that road comes here it's 
here forever and the character of 
our county is gone forever. 

First of all, let me say that even 
if 53 comes roaring through the 
county, the arterial east-west routes 
are insufficient. Many of the roads 
are outdated and if we expect them 
to handle more traffic we have to 
expect longer delays. A good exam- 
ple is northern Cook County. They 
already have 53, 294 and 94 and 
heaven help you if you have to trav- 
el cast-west between them during 
rush hour. 

The solution is to improve the 
arterial routes. We can do this in 

stages. 

Stage one is to target the worst 
intersections in the county (like 



Routes 45 and 120) and add right 
and left turn lanes as needed. This 
can be done without breaking the 
bank. The people deserve some ac- 
tion on this matter. We're not only 
asking commuters to live in their 
cars, but we've also created a dan- 
gerous situation in our neighbor- 
hoods. Anxious drivers are using 
subdivisions as routes to get back 
and forth to work. 1 shudder to 
think of one of our children being 
hurt or even killed by this unneces- 
sary traffic. 

The second stage is to widen 
the arteries to four through lanes 
with right and left turn lanes as 
necessary. The improvement to 
Route 83 south of Mundelein is an 
excellent example of how our roads 
could be throughout the county. 
These upgrades along with thcToll 
Authorities decision to tear down 
the DecrfieldToIl Plaza would really 
give our current road system a 
chance to work. 

The final stage is really a plan to 
revitalize our current urban areas. 
This can begin right now. The case 1 
will make here is forWaukegan. In 
the old days, Waukegan was the 
commercial and industrial center 
of the county. People traveled there 
to work and shop. The county was 
laid out to travel east-west not 
north-south so why not try to get 
our people to do this again. IT the 
Toll Authority would connect the 



Amstutz Expressway with 1-94 via 
Buckley Road, Waukegan would 
flourish and so would all the sur- 
rounding areas in the county. An 
event and convention center could 
be built on the lake front. This 
would bring concerts, trade shows 
and sports teams to an area that 
would welcome it with open arms. 
We need to think through how 
we approach every aspect of our 
county because they are all inter- 
connected now. The issues of traffic, 
economic development and the en- 
vironment are all woven together. 
We must move very carefully to pre- 
serve the character of our county. 

Paul Schmidt 

Republic Candidate 

District Uf County Board 

Growth doesn't pay 

"Spectacular growth in 
Grayslake," thus reads the head- 
lines in the News Sun. The article 
proceeds to tell us that Grayslake's 
population has almost doubled in 
the last seven years. It's the largest 
percentage of increase in Lake 
County. 

"The Last seven years." 
Does anyone eLse besides me 
see the correlation of this informa- 
tion and the defeat of (then County 
Chairman) Norm Geary as Avon 
Township Supervisor, who was the 
champion of open lands? 
^ In case not, let me remind you 



of his accomplishments to control 
growth in Grayslake when he was in 
office on the County Board and Lake 
County Forest Preserves, 

He personally stopped the an- 
nexation of the massive Heartland 
development to Grayslake with an 
estimated 35,000 population. He 
also stopped the annexation of the 
Alter property south of Grayslake 
that would have required use of our 
sewers. 

Add to that Grayslake's attempt- 
ed annexation of the Picket Fence 
Farm (now Rollins Savanna Forest 
Preserve) that would have added 
•1,000 more homes plus business 
and commercial along Route 83 and 
Lake St. in Grayslake. 

He also stopped the sale for de- 
velopment of the Brae Loch Golf 
Course and kept it forever in open 
space and in the public domain as a 
public golf course. 

Yes, in our wisdom, we defeated 
Norm Gear)', which cleared the way 
for Bulldozer Bob Depke and his 
pro-growth county board to take 
over in 1990, giving developers free 
reign in Lake County. 

1990, Geary falls on his political 
sword. 

Next seven years, Grayslake 
doubles in population. Think what 
could have been had we believed 
the message Geary was sending in 
19B9. 

Look at our tax bill. And, we're 



just getting started building new 
schools ("well, we don't have the tax 
baseofLibertyville.") 

Think about declining quality of 
life. Traffic. Congestion. Road rage. 
Cost of living: All the benefits of 
growth, growth, and more growth. 

Yet, I see Hainesville (500 more 
homes to say the least) and Round 
Lake (1800 more homes for openers) 
do not see what has happened in 
the last seven years to their neigh- 
bors. Village government will bank- 
rupt the schools and they will bank- 
rupt YOU. 

When are they going to learn? 

You know the answer. They'll 
learn after we see the damage in the 
NEXT seven years. And, we have no- 
body to blame except those voters 
that allowed a man like Norm Geary 
to be defeated in 1990 by the big 

money lobby. 

Arnold 'Bud' Clausen 

Lifelongresident 
Grayslake 



Letters welcome 

Letters to the editor are welcome. 

They should be on topics ot 

general interest, approximately 

250 words or less. Ail letters must 

be signed, and contain a home 

address and telephone number. 

The editor reserves the right to 

condense all letters. 




MINDING 
YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 

Don Taylor 




A New Year 
is like an 
empty screen 

Reluctantly, I enter a new age. 
Technology is catching up to me. 
Actually, it has been nipping at my 
heels for a few years now. However, 
this year— a new year— I'm going to 
wrap my arms around technology. I 
will embrace change. I will enter a 
new era. I will at least use a high- 
tech analogy. 

This year is like an empty com- 
puter screen. There are 365 lines on 
this screen titled simply, " 199B." 
Each line contains a sub-file 
marked "Today." The compulcr is 
on. The software is running. All 1 
must do is begin. 

Today, I will write a page in my 
life story. I will create a piece of per- 
sonal history. Will it be a page wor- 
thy of being rend? Will it be a history 
to make a mother proud? 

What goes on my screen is up 
to me. I fill the screen and create my 
life one moment at a time. 

Your screen is 
empty, too 

Each year we have a new op- 
portunity. We have a chance to start 
over. We have an empty screen on 
which to write our future. 

I once heard a motivational 
speaker say, "Don't take care, lake 
charge!" ! lis point was that people 
who lake care often don't do any- 
thing for fear they will do some- 
thing wrong. On the other hand, 
people who take charge assume 
control and make things happen. 

Make this a year of action, ac- 
complishment and success. Vour 
screen is empty. Take charge of 
what you write, and make 1990 
your most valuable and rewarding 
year ever. 

Take charge and 
gain control 

• Take charge of your In- 
come. Each new year is a good 
time to establish new direction. 
What do you really want to accom- 
plish this year? Write down your 
goals. Make them specific, achiev- 
able and measurable. 

Then get moving. Actions speak 
louder than words. Action can cre- 
ate a fortune, scale the highest ob- 
stacle and turn dreams into reality. 
John Locke said, "The actions of 
men are the best interpreters of 
their thoughts." 

• Take charge of your 
thoughts. Marcus Aurelius wrote, 
"Our life is what our thoughts make 
it." Our thoughts are like little 
strands: when woven together they 
become strong habits. 

Our strong habits chart the 
course of our personal history. 
Good habits help you achieve. Bad 
habits cause dysfunction. Concen- 
trate both your thoughts and your 
efforts on achieving your goals. 

• Take charge of your 
health. A 90-year-old man was 
asked if he would change anything 
In his life. "Yes," he replied. "If I had 
known I would live this long, I 
would have taken better care of my- 
self." 

In 1998, eat sensibly, exercise 
regularly, get plenty of rest, avoid 
tobacco and alcohol, eat more fmit, 
visit your doctor, laugh more, sit up 
straight, breathe deeply, and smile. 

• Take charge of your time. 
Some folks believe time is money. 
However, 1 can personally assure 
you that no amount of money can 
ever buy back one wasted moment. 

Use your time wisely. You won't 

Please see TAYLOR IC7 



C 6 /La keland Newspaper s 



January 2, 1998 



Alra Labs gains new trial in judge's ruling 



Alra Laboratories, Inc., a generic 
drug manufacturing and sales com- 
pany in Gurnee will have a new day 
in court. 

A federal judge's ruling on Dec. 
16 voided a Feb. 1996 jury decision 
finding the defendants guilty of adul- 
teration of Lactulose Syrup manu- 
factured in 198G and sold in 1988. 
Judge John R Grady of the U.S. Court 
for the Northern District of Illinois is- 
sued the ruling for a new trial on Dec 
16, charging prosecutors with will- 
fully misleading the jury by with- 
holding evidence favorable to the de- 
fense. 



Grady concluded that Alra met 
criteria cited in a key standard, 
"Brady vs. Maryland." That 1963 fed- 
eral case grants relief to a defendant 
upon establishing the prosecution 
suppressed favorable evidence 
which may have changed the result 
of the trial. 

Grady pointed out the key evi- 
dence omitted was the stability of 
Lactulose based on its pH range as 
proposed by the U.S. Pharma- 
copoeia was uncompromiscd at the 
time of the sale and posed no health 
threat to the public. The U.S.P. rec- 
ommendation is predicted on stabil- 



ity data made available to it by the 
drug's manufacturers. 

"Had the stability data been 
made available, it is likely the gov- 
ernment's presentation on the 
dangerousness issue, if made at all, 
would have been quite different 
than it was, The jury could well 
have reached a different conclu- 
sion as to whether the defendants' 
had to motive to jiggle the pH of 
their product," said Grady in his 
finding. 

Alra executives called the ruling 
"powerful and good" in a press re- 
lease. 



The prosecution had con- 
tended the Alra Lactulose lots in 
question were expired, degraded 
and medically ineffective and 
that the company's motive for. 
continuing to market the product 
was profit. 

"My interest now is to reassure 
past and present customers that af- 
ter all is said and done the evidence 
shows that nothing was wrong. Our 
customer base is very sophisticated 
and we want them to fully under- 
stand the court's judgment," Alra 
owner and president Raj Bhutan! 
said. 



1997 closes 
strongly; can 

1998 continue? 

We close out another extraordi- 
narily strong year in U.S. and devel- 
oped international equity markets. 
The question as we enter 199B and 
look to the future is whether these 
records of strong performance can 
continue. 

On the positive side, the follow- 
ing arc causes for the hull market to 
continue: 

Low price inflation: inflation has 
historically been a nemesis to equity 
and the fixed income market world- 
wide. We believe that global compe- 
tition and other factors, including 
Europe's convergence to a single 
common currency In 1999, will con- 
tinue to contribute to very low Infla- 
lionnry pressures in 199U. 

Low interest rates: Agninsl that 
backdrop of low inflation, we expect 
interest rates to remain low and po- 
tentially to move lower. Lower inter- 
est rates can be one factory con- 
tributing to expansion in equity 
prices and price multiples. 

Rising productivity: With the 
rapid expansion of technology and 
with corporate management desires 
to p reduce at lower costs, we believe 
investment in technology will con- 
tinue to be strong. 

Increased consolidation: One fac- ■ 
tor contributing to lliis long bull mar- 
ket has been consolidation. Mergers 
and acquisitions nil! continue as in- 
dependent enterprises find they can 
more effectively compete in the glob- 
al market place through complemen- 
tary consolidations. 

Please sec CONTINUE /Q? 




IMC Global plays Santa 

IMC Global's Gerri Drake (left) presents a check for $100,000 to Doug Weber, president of United 
Way of Lake County. Observing the presentation are (left to right) Sam Hull, a United Way of Lake 
County loan executive, and Lynn White, Senior Vice President, Corporate Development at IMC Glob- 
al and the company's 1997 United Way Campaign Chairman. The presentation of IMC Global's cor- 
porate gift occurred recently at the company's Bannockburn offices. IMC Global is one of the world's 
largest producers and suppliers of agricultural products and services. — Submitted photo 



Baxter staff helps families 
in 'Adopt a Family' program 



five families from Woodland 
Dist. 50 were happier this Christ- 
mas due to the generosity of hun- 
dreds of contributing employees 
in the "Adopt a family Program" 
at the Baxter Laboratories in the 
Renal Division at McGraw Park. 

They collected thousands of 
dollars in contributions during the 
holiday season to purchase food, 
food certificates, clothing, mer- 
chandise, and toys for selected fam- 
ilies at Woodland and other Lake 
County schools. 

"A lot of people have the per- 
ception we don't have needy fami- 
lies in the district. We know there 
are families in the district who reg- 
ularly access the local food 
pantries. This program by Baxter is 
a great way to help our neighbors," 



said Penny Dagley, Woodland pupil 
personnel director, said. 

The names of families in need 
comes through a variety of social 
agencies and social workers in the 
county. The agency develops a list 
of wants and needs for the individ- 
ual family members. Baxter em- 
ployees then purchase from an 
Itemized list. This prevents dupli- 
cation. 

"Sometimes there may be as 
many as nine family members in a 
single family dwelling, often with a 
teen-aged mom with a baby living 
there, loo. Through ihe specialized 
purchasing we do we can help meet 
every person's needs. The Baxter 
employees really enjoy helping 
those less fortunate," Julie 
demons, Woodland parent, said. 




Baxter Laboratories Renal Division employees Julie demons, Pat 
Hartman and Sherry Fancq deliver bags of gifts to Woodland Dist. 
50 Central office. 



BgRr 



January 2, 1998 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C7 



m 

■ 



93 



Arthur Andersen names Matthew Gonring 
of Libertyville managing partner 



Arthur Andersen, the global mul- 
tldlsciplinary professional services 
firm, announced that Libertyville 
resident Matthew P. Gonring has 
been named Managing Partner- 
Communications and Integrated 
Marketing. As the firm's top com- 
munications executive, he will report 
directly to Jim Wadia, worldwide 
Managing Partner of Arthur, and be 
responsible for internal and external 
communications, and Integrated 
marketing. 

Gonring, 42, had been vice pres- 
ident of corporate communications 
for USG Corp. 

"We are pleased to have a com- 
munications executive of Malt's cal- 
iber joining Arthur Andersen," said 
Wadia. "Me will play a key role in 
communicating the Arthur Ander- 
sen brand to the marketplace." 

Gonring brings 20 years of com- 
munications management experi- 



NEW BUSINESSES 



Congratulations to the following 
new Lake County businesses: 

• Wrights Painting, owned by 
Sidney Wright, 315 N. Prairie Ave., 
Mundelcin. Call 949-7972. . 

• Imperial Cleaning, owned by 
Heidi Schwab, 3400 Ted Ave., 
Waukcgan and Michael Schwab, 
3400 Ted Ave., Waukcgan. Call 624- 
2402. 

• DSDlnvestment Advisors, 
owned by David S. Da vies, 419 
Donin Dr., #104, Antioch. Call 830- 
4808. 

• PhoneStar Marketing, owned 
by Yan He, 1B93 Sprucewood Ln., 
Gurnec. Call 625-9020. 



encc to Arthur Andersen including 
executive assignments at USG, 
United Airlines and Northwest Air- 
lines, He also served in state and 
federal government en- 
vironmental protection 
agencies early in his ca- 
reer. 

Gonring holds a 
master's degree from 
American University's 
Kogod College of Busi- 
ness in public rela- 
tions, and undergradu- 
ate degrees from the 
University of Wiscon- 
sin-Stevens Point in 
communications and political sci 
ence. He is a member of the grad 
uate faculty at Northwestern Uni 
vcrslty's Mediil School of Journal- 




Gonring 



ism in the Integrated Marketing 78 countries 



Communications Program. He Is 
also a member of the board of di- 
rectors of the Chicago Children's 
Museum, Youth Guidance of 
Chicago, the Arthur W. 
Page Society and Liber- 
tyville Little League. 

Arthur Andersen is a 
global multidisciplinary 
professional services firm 
that helps its clients im- 
prove their business per- 
formance through assur- 
ance and business adviso- 
ry services, business con- 
sulting, economic and fi- 
nancial consulting, and 
tax and business advisory services. 
With more than $5 billion in rev- 
enues, Arthur Andersen serves 
clients in more than 350 locations in 



Martin R. Simonian, CLU 
receives national award 



Martin K. Simonian, CLU with 
the Northwestern Mutual Life Insur- 
ance Co. has been awarded the na- 
tional Quality Award by the National 
Assn. of Life Underwriters, (NALU). 
The NALU, located In Washington, 
D.C. confers this award to promote 
and recognize excellence in client 
and customer representation. 

The National Quality Award 
which Martin K. Simonian, CLU was 
awarded is his 31st since he began 
his office in 1959. The National Qual- 
ity Award was created In 1944 and 
recognizes an agent's ability to pro- 
vide long-standing Insurance prod- 



ucts and services to clients. 

Only 10 to 15 percent of the na- 
tion's insurance agents receive one 
of these annual, prestigious NALU 
industry awards. The National Assn. 
of Life Underwriters was founded in 
1890 and represents over 110,000 
professionals in the life, health, prop- 
erty/casualty insurance and other fi- 
nancial services. NALU is affiliated 
with the Lake County Life Under- 
writers Assn. - 

Martin K. Simonian, CLU has his 
office in the Hilltop Executive Center 
located at 1580 S. Milwaukee Ave, 
Suite 220, In Libertyville. 



■ANTIOCH N17.WS 
Ltv.'s drvam.< 



treunfii' 



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City: __ 



State/Zip: 
Phone: 



To Order: 

Call or Send Coupon Below to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 188 
Grayslake, IL 60050 



'847) 740-4035 



• Pteaie choose one; 

□ Antioch News D Undenhurst News 

□ Fox Like Press □ MundeWn News 

□ Grayslake Times □ Round lake News 

□ Gumee Press □ Vernon Hills News 
D Uke Villa Record D Wadsworth News 

□ Lake Zurich Enterprise □ Wauconda Leader 



FROM PAGE C6 

CONTINUE: The year 

finished strong, will 1998? 



On the negative side, the fol- 
lowing factors might derail this bull 
run: 

Rising wage inflation: wage in- 
flation has begun to rise higher and 
is approaching growth rates that 
leave many market participants 
and central bankers uncomfort- 
able. Unemployment will remain 
low and potentially move lower, 
possibly testing four percent by 
third quarter 1998. A rising cost 
structure in the face of a slowly ris- 
ing revenue structure Implies 
tighter margins and weaker earn- 
ings. 

Growing trade deficit: The po- 
tential for a growing trade deficit 
exists in response to the likelihood 
of more imports from Asia and re- 
duced exports to the rest of the 
world. Currency devaluations have 
made the relative price of Asian 
goods cheaper that U.S. goods, and 
the strength of the dollar against 
virtually every world currency has 
lessened the appeal of U.S. goods 
in world markets. 

Asian collapse: We concerned 
about the effects of an Asian mar- 
ket collapse. We are not simply re- 
ferring to currency devaluation's 
in relatively minor countries, but 
to more significant events such as 
devaluations in Hong Kong or Chi- 
na, economic or political upheaval 
in China, or a collapse of the 
Japanese financial system under 
the weight of problem loans, low 
capital levels, and stalled econo- 
my. 

Best places to Invest 

Given lhat these ate the factors 

that will set the stage for investment 
In 1998. where are the most oppor- 
tunc places to invest? We have de- 
veloped four primary recommen- 
dations for Investment in 1998 In- 
cluding: 

Domestic fixed income: In a 
low inflationary environment, fixed 
income securities tend to perform 
well. With real interest rates in the 
U.S. at 3.5 percent to 4 percent, we 
believe that is a potential for fixed 
income price appreciation to a lev- 
el where real interest rates more 
closely approximate 3 percent. We 
do not forecast higher interest rales 
from the Fed as global equity mar- 
ket volatility, slowing economic 
growth, and negligible price infla- 
tion persists. 



Small cap equities: We have 
stated in the past lhat small cap eq- 
uity securities offer better value, 
and wo continue to believe that is 
the case. 

Selected large cap sectors: By 
selected large cap equity securities 
we are referring to those market 
sectors which have attributes in- 
cluding increased consolidation, 
lower international exposure, sta- 
ble growth rates, or dominant mar- 
ket positions. These sectors include 
but are not limited to the following: 
regional banks, transportation, util- 
ities, telecommunications and se- 
lective health care, 

European equities: European 
equities (non U.K.) currently look 
attractive to us based upon a num- 
ber of factors. First, we believe that 
the conversion to a common cur- 
rency in 1999 throughout continen- 
tal Europe will be a positive force in 
the restructuring of many Euro- 
pean economies, regulations, and 
trade practices. Second, we believe 
that inflation and interest rates will 
remain very low throughout conti- 
nental Europe. Third, we are ex- 
pecting that Europe will experi- 
ence, a consolidation wave similar 
in nature and magnitude as that 
being experienced by the United 
States. Fourth, European export 
should be stronger in the wake of 
weaker domestic currencies rela- 
tive to the U.S. dollar and the 
British pound. 

Thus, we believe that there ex- 
ists considerable Investment op- 
portunity regardless of the uncer- 
tainty and volatility in world fi- 
nancial markets. Further, we be- 



lieve that over the longerterm, the 
fundamental restructuring and n 
form that the world Is experienc- 
ing now till prove highly reward 
ing to equity and fixed income in 
vestors. 

We will structure client portfo- 
lios to take advantage of the sec- 
tors which we think have the 
brightest prospects. World finan- 
cial markets are volatile by nature, 
and investors can benefit from 
that volatility by exploiting the op- 
portunities and challenges lhat 
arise out of it. 

Mat Kelchum is Senior Econo- 
mist at Essex LLC, a national 
money management firm. 

Ketchum can be reached direc tly al 
(847) 969-6619. 



' 




TAYLOR: 1998 is an empty 
screen, all we have to do is begin 



make many footprints in ihe sands 
of time by sitting in front of the TV. 
Spend time doing instead of dream- 
ing. Use time creating instead of 
complaining. Utilize time by 
achieving instead of arguing. 

• Take charge of your finances. 
Any fool can make money, but it 
takes wisdom to spend ii well. In- 
vest in your future. Save more, 
spend less. 

Money is a tool lo use, not an 
object to seek. Don't fall in love with 



money. Instead fall in love with the 
good it can do. 

Remember, your screen is 
empty. You can write 1998 any 
way you choose. Make it your 
besi year ever! 



Don Taylor is the co-duthor of 
"Up Against the Wal-Marts." You 
may write to him in care of "Mind- 
ing Your Own Business," P.O. Box 
G7 t Amarillo,TX7dW5. 



Princess Beanie Babies bring 
bucks for Lambs Farm 



102.3 WXLC would like to con- 
gratulate Jim Terra of Gumee. who 
was the highest bidder on Tuesday, 
December 23, with Michael and 
Heather of a Princess Diana Beanie 
Baby auctioned for SI ,33.00 all pro- 
ceeds to Lambs Farm in Libertyville. 
After the Tuesday morning auction 



Gumee donated another Princ ess 
Diana Beanie B aby to Lambs Farm 
and WXLC which was auctioned ofT 
by Nick Faarella. The second 
Princess Diana Beanie Baby went to 
Nancy Da cy of Lake Forest for 
SI, 600.00 all proceeds to benefit 
Lambs Farm. WXLC rasied $2,900. 
for Lambs Farm by this event. 



wm 



C8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



OBITUARIES 



January 2, 1998 



K.K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home Ltd. 



V7.'." 




Excellent Service 

With Genuine 

Compassion and 

Sincerity Has Always 

Been a Tradition M 

The KM. Hamsher 

Funeral Home. A 

Family Owned and 

Family Staffed 

Funeral Home... 

It's like having a friend. 



12 N. Pistakee Lake Road, Fox Lake, 
1 Block West of Rle. 12-1/2 Block Norlh of Grand Ave. 

"Jht V ma fief tin Hit L-akt " 



I 



(847)587-2100 



(815) 385-1001 



DEATH NOTICES 



CAJVTAGAIXO 

Joscpl i /. ContagnlJo, age 79 of Miindelein 
Arr. Kirstan Funeral Home, PC, MunceJeln 

IUY 

James It. Hay, age 75 of Mundelein 

Ait: Krlstan Funeral Home PC., Mundelein 

SAIAZAR 

Roberta A. Solazar (nee Corny) age 62 of 

Mundelein 

Arr: Kristan Funeral Home PC, Mundelein 

SCIIEID 

Zclla I. Scheid (nee Dowcll) age 98 of 

Wauconda. 

Arr: Kisselburg-Wauconda Funeral Home 



FEIGEl 

Dorothy A. Felgei, nge07 of UbertyvilJe 
Arr: Burnclt -Dane Funeral Home, 
UbertyvilJe 

FESCEIJA 

Hnrrict Ruth R'scclla, age 86 of Guniee 
Am Marsh Funeral Home ofGurnec 

CAMELLING 

Michael L Gimellino, ago 38 of Round liike 

Park 

Am McMurrough Chapel, I jbcrtryville 

ST. JOHN 

. James Robert St. John, ago 52 of Mundelein 
Arr: Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, 
Uberryville 



► 









S 

1 
: 






V. 



Ii- 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 

Funeral Directory 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main Si., Antioch.1L 

Dan Dugcnskc, Director 

(847) 395-4000 

K.K. HAMSHER FUNERAL HOME, LTD. 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Kd., Fox Like, IL 

(847)507-2100 

Kenneth K. Hamsher, Dcbra Hamsher Glen, Directors 

RINGA FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2146 

Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL, LTD. 
AND CREMATORIUM 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake, IL 

(847) 223-8122 

David G. Strang and 

Richard A Gaddis, Director 



Harriet II. Bcrntsen 

Age 79 of Wildwood, passed away on Dec. 28, 1997 at 
Victory Memorial Hospital in Waukegan. Harriet was born 
on April 30, 191B in Racine, Wise and has been a resident 
of Wildwood since 1951, formerly of Chicago. 

Harriet leaves her husband, Robert to whom she was 
married on July 15, 19k children, Judith (Herbert) Mcssner 
of Gurnce, Glenn (Ruth) Bcrntsen of I.lndcnhurst; her four 
grandchildren, Scott (Stacy) Mcssner of Undcnhurst, Lisa 
(Mel) Ahrcns of Grand Rapids, Midi., Christopher (Jenifer) 
Mcssncrof Fort Wayne, Ind. and Jeffrey (Sarah) Bcrntsen of 
Howell, Mich. She is preceded in death by her parents, two 
brothers and a sister. 

Services were held at the Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake with the Rev. Paul Meltzer, 
officiating. 

Interment followed at the Millburn Cemetery, 
Millburn. 

Memorials are suggested to a favorite charity. 

Tyler Robert Yeager 

Age I year of Gages take, passed away Sunday, Dec. 
21, 1997 at Children's Memorial Hospital in Milwaukee. He 
was born June 6, 1996 in Kissiinmec, Fla., the son of 
Sylvester Yeager and Michelle Cantley, and had spent six 
months in Florida, before moving to (he Gages Lake area. 

He leaves his parents, brother, Coty; two sisters, Ashley 
and Samanthn; grandparents, tanore Wayne of Detroit, 
Mich, and Robert (Susan) Johnson of Gages take; four 
uncles, Kevin tawis, William Johnson, Jay Colberlson, and 
Lee Yeager; one aunt, Vickie Markham, and many loving 
friends at the Woodland School district. He is preceded in 
death by his great grandparents, J. Melvin and Alice 
Johnson. 

Funeral services were offered at the Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake with Rev. lisle J. 
Kauffman, from the Calvary Presbyterian Church, Round 
Like, officiating. 

Interment followed at Highland Memorial Park 
Cemetery, Ubertyville. 

Stella B. Weeks 

Age 76 of Antioch, passed away Tuesday, Dec. 23, 1997 
at her home. She was born, Nov. 1 5, 1 92 1 in Evanston to dic- 
tate William and Bertha (Kohler) Buthmann. Slip moved to 
Antioch in 1965 where she was active with the AARP and 
the Senior Center. She was a member of St. Stephen 
Lutheran Church and the Women of the Moose Lodge 735, 
in Antioch. Stella had attended teachers college and had 
practice taught and received her teachers certificate. 

Survivors include three sons, Robert (l.lnrin) of Kent, 
Wash., William ofTrcvor, Wise, and Kevin (Connie) oftake 
Villa; two daughters, Knlhy (Tom) Flessner of Orange, Calif, 
and Dcidre (Dean) Hardy of Bristol, Wise, nine grandchil- 
dren and one great grandson. Beside her parents she is 
preceded In death by two sisters, Esther and Marion. 

Funeral services were held at St. Stephen Lutheran 
Church, Antioch, with Pastor Charles Miller officiating. 

Friends called at the Strang Funeral Home of Antioch, 
Antioch. 

Private Interment was in Memorial Park, Skokie. 

Those desiring may make contributions to the Antioch 
Senior Comer, in her memory. 

Carlylc D. Mott 

Age 88, a longtime resident of Spring Grove, formerly 
of Chicago, died Wednesday, Dec. 21, 1997 at the Good 
Shepherd Hospital of Harrington. He was born on June 3, 
1909 in Danville to Jesse and Kathryn (nee Vaughn) Mott. 
He was a longtime employee with Intermatic in Spring 
Grove, in the Shipping Dept. and had attended St. Peter's 
Church in Spring Grove, for many years. 

Survivors include, his daughter, Kathleen (Dennis) 
Schaer of Island bike; his grandchildren, Stephen (Dawn) 
Swanson of Twin takes, Wise, Gregory (F.ilcen) Schaer of 
Harrington, Bradley (Shiela) Schuer of Mcllonry, Denise 
(Scott) Welch of Evansvillc, Ind. Cynthia (James) Sheppard 
of McHenry and Julia Schaer of Island take; his groat 
grandchildren, Brian na Swanson, James and Rohyn 
Sheppard, Stephanie and Joseph "Joey" Schaer, and 
Nicholas and Ashley Schaer. I le is preceded In death by his 
wife, Eleanor P. Mutt (nee Lcnard) by his daughter, 
Maureen Gasiurand by two brothers, Calvin and Jess Mott. 

Funeral services wore held at the K. K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home, Fox take (The Chapel on the hike) with the 
Rev. Father James Plesa, officiating. 

Interment followed at the Grant Cemetery, Inglesido. 

Elmer W. Meicrdirk 

Ago 70 of Antioch, passed away, Wednesday, Dec. 24, 
1997 at Victory Memorial I lospital, Waukegan, after a brief 
illness. He was born April 30, 1927 in Chicago, the son of 
the late Arthur and Mabel (Baldwin) Mcicrdirk, moving to 
Antioch in 1917. He served in the U.S. Navy during WWII 
and was a member of the VFW Post 4551 of Antioch. Elmer 
owned and operated Elmer's Service on Route 173 in 
Antioch for several years and later retired as a Paint Tech at 
Intermatic in Spring Grove, where he worked for 30 years. 
On June 14, 195] , ho married Doris I. Frozcth In tang take. 

Survivors include his wife, Doris, two sons, Wayne 
(Lisa) of Spring Grave and tarry (Shell!) or Antioch; one 
doughter, Cindy (Ken) Gerken of Haywood, Wise; two 
brothers, Arthur (Norma) of Antioch and Chuck (Betty) of 
Pardeeville, Wise, and one sister, Doana (Hob) lluckstadt 
of Antioch. I lo was the grandfather of nine. Beside his par- 
ents lie is preceded in death by one son, Gary and one sis- 
ter, Marie Becvar. 

Funeral services were hold at the Strang Funeral 
Home, Antioch with the Rev. Kurt Gamlin of the United 
Methodist Church of Antioch, officiating. 

Sorvices were also held at the VF*W, Antioch. 

Interment was private. 

Those desiring, may make contributions to the 
Antioch Rescue Squad in his memory. 



Pearl Alshouse 

Ago 02 of Antioch, passed away Saturday, Dec. 27, 1997 
at Victory Memorial hospital In Waukegan. She was born 
Aug. 15, 1915 in Wadsworth, the daughter ofthe late Frank 
and Dora May (Odom) Lucas. Mrs. Alshouse was a life long 
resident of the area. On April 10, 1937 she married Paul 
Everett Alshouse in take Villa and tic preceded her In death 
on April 12, 1973. 

Survivors Include four sons, Wayne (JoAnn) of 
Cookcvillc, Tenn., James (Wanda) of Church Hill, Tcnn., 
Kenneth (Bev) of Wauconda and John of Antioch; two 
daughter, Darlene (Dennis), Dretske of Antioch, and 
Barbara Briggs of Colorado Springs, Colo.; two sisters, 
Margaret Pollen and Anna May (Darnell) Alshouse both of 
Antioch; one brother, John Waller "Bud" (Maxlne) Lucas of 
Evansdalo, Iowa and one sister-in-law Ada Alshouse of 
Strawberry Point, Iowa. She was the grandmother of 17 and 
the groat grandmother of 23. Besides her husband, she is 
also preceded in death by one brother, Albert tacas, one 
sister l.ydia Edwards and a grand daughter, Vicki Briggs, 

Funeral services were held at the Strang Funeral Home 
of Antioch, Antioch with the Rev. Kurt Gamlin ofthe United 
Methodist Church ofAntioch, officiating. 

Interment was at Millburn Cemetery, Millburn. 

Please omit flowers. 

Rachel Ellen Crane 

Passed away. Dec. 26, 1997 nt the National Institutes of 
Health (Nil!) after a long battle against cancer. Shu Is the 
daughter of Congressman Philip M. Crane and his wife, 
Arlene. 

Rachel Crane is survived by her parents; sister, 
Catherine Hott and her husband, David of Ashburn, Va,, 
Susanna Crane of McLean, Va., Jennifer Crane of Burbank, 
Calif., Robckah Crane of Hcrndon, Va., George Crane of 
Nashville, Tenn., Sarah Crane of Ashburn, Va. ond Carrie 
Crane of Scottsdalc, Ariz. Radiol Is also survived by her 
maternal grandmother, Marie Johnson of taGrangc Park; 
two nieces, Jessica and Jennifer Hott and three nephews, 
Joshua, Jacob and Jordan Hott of Ashburn, Va. 

Services wore held at Quentin Road Bible Baptist 
Church in take Zurich with Senior Pastor, Dr. James 
Scuddcr, officiating. 

Visitation and funeral services were held at the 
Hillsboro United Methodist Church, Hillsboro, Ind. 

Interment was at Rose Hill Cemetery, Hillsboro, Ind. 

Memorials may be sent to the NIH, earmarked for 
Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma research, at 9000 Rackvillc 
Pike, Bcthosda, Md. 20092. 

Thank You 

To the friends and relatives of Linda Bcrsie 

Dana, liobyn, and J would like to thank alt of you 
for your prayers, kindness and generosity through 
Linda's illness and death. Words alone cannot fully 
cotwey to you what your compassion has meant to 
us. It is comforting to know how much Linda ivas 
loved. We would like to share with you a poem we 
received that expresses our feelings about Linda's 
passing. 

God saw she was getting tired 

and a cure was not to be. 

So He put His arms around her 

and whispered "Come with Me." 
God bless you. 

Larry Benie 



oomelimes an oiO'fashionedsonq 

Jjrinqs us a Inouqn/ofuou; 

uomelimes a power as we pass afona } 

Or a slit/ inal is azure ofue } ' 

Or a stiver 

lininq in ine clouos, 

when (he sun ispeepinq tinman. 

Jill of these Ininys, made us Ininiojuou. 



THE DEADLINE 
FOR 

LEGAL NOTICES 
IS TUESDAY 
AT 10 A. M. 



-j»wi»— »mB(r«Hia»j7»»?flgt*0-<MwWP 1 H ^* Wlg WBgHqiTagrei.y 



it%^*fl cr- iii "ji3*"**wiji | n i^fcw - **^*- 



tUXVBSV&lSVktr* <• 



January 2, 1998 



LEGAL NOTICES 



Lakeland Newspapers/ CB 






PUBLIC NOTICE 

TK f^i 1 ??!" ■«, RLE NUMBER 33107 

In Iho United States District Court, for tho Northern District of Illinois, Eastern 
Division, Bank of America, Plaintiff, -vs- Rubon Ortega, Jr. and Sebastian Estudillo 
aA/a SobasUan C. Estudillo, Maria Ortega, et al. Defendants, Case No. 97 C 7284 
involving a mortgage foreclosure concerning the following described property; 
Lot 9 and 10 In Block 32 in Frederick H. Bartlett's Third Addition to Northwoods 
being a Subdivision in Section 23 and 24, Township 45 North, Range 11, East of the 
Third Principal Meridian, According to the Plat Thereof, Recorded July 31 1925 as 
Document 262351 in Book "0* of Plats Pages 36 and 27, in Lake County. Illinois, 
c/k/a 415 Gould Street, Gurnee, IL 60031 
Tax ID! 07-24-127-009 

QBQEfl 

THIS MATTER coming to be beard on the motion of the Plaintiff tor an Order 
directing the Defendants. Ruben Ortega, Jr. and Sebastian Estudillo a/k/a Sebastian 
C. Estudillo and Maria Ortega, to appear and file their Answer or otherwise plead to 
tho Complaint to Foreclose Mortgage heretofore filed in this matter and it appearing 
that an Affidavit of NonVresldence Petition for Order of Publication having been filed 
horeln, and tho Court being fully advised in tho promises; 

fT IS HEREBY ORDERED that the Defendants herein, Ruben Ortega, Jr and 
Sebastian Estudillo a/k/a Sebastian C. Estudillo and Maria Ortega file their answers 
to otherwiso plead to tho complaint of Foreclosure Mortgage heretofore filed by 
Plaintiff on or before January 14, 1996. 

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that notice of this order be published In the Lakeland 
Nowspapor once a week for six (6) consecutive weeks. 

ENTER: JUDGE WILLIAMS DATED: NOVEMBER 19, 1 997 

Elizabeth F. Kaplan 
Renee F. Meltzer 
Michael S. Fisher 
Susan R. Rosen 
FISHER AND FISHER 
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, P.C. 
120 N. LASALLE STREET 
SUITE 2520 

CHICAGO, IL 60602 1 197D-1436-GP 

(773)854-6055 January 2. 1998 



FILE NO. 29560 



PUBUC NOTICE 
FISHER AND FISHER 

IN THE UNrTED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 
EASTERN DIVISION 
FT Mortgage Companies d/b/a FTB Mortgage 
Sorvicos f/k/a Carl I. Brown & Companies, 

Plaintiff. Case No. 97 C 4103 

Judge Plunked 

VC7. 

Matthew J. Evert and Pamela Evert, Claudetlo 
R. Albrecht and Tho Board of Managers of ttie 
Pleasant Hill Homeowners, 
Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR RLE NO. 29560 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement entered In the above enti- 
tled cause on October 1. 1097 . 

I, Max Tyson, Special Commissioner for this court wilt on January 23, 1996 at the 
hour of 9:00 a.m. at Lako County Court House, Waukegan, Illinois, set) to the high- 
est bidder for cash, the following described promises: 

Lot 10O In Wlndwood Unit 1, being a Subdivision of part of tho Northeast 1/4 of 
Section as. Township 45 North. Range 11; East of tha Third Principal Moridian. 
according to the Plat thereof roccoded November 30, 1994. as Document 3619016 
in Lake County, illinoi*. 
cA/a 1030 S. Waukegan, IL 00005 
Tax ID I 07-35-204-015 

Tho Improvements on the property consist of single family dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, certified 
funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to general taxes and to special assess- 
ments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. 

The judgment amount was SI 62.336.13. 

Upon Ihe sale being made tho purchaser will rocervo a Certificate of Sale which 
will enlitlo the purchaser to a Deed on a specified date unless the property is 
redeemed according to law. 

For Information caH the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney. Ftsher and Fisher, 30 

North LaSallo. Chicago. Illinois. P12) 372-4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under 

Illinois taw, tho Sales Officer is dqI required to provide additional information other 

than that set forth in this Notice. _ 

/•J Max Tyson 

Special Commissioner 

1297B-1475-GP 

January 2, 1997 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Kessler 

Consulting 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
1299 Almadon Lane. Gurnee, IL 
60031, (647) 263-4512. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OB TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
R.Benjamin Kossler, 1299 Almadon 
Lane, Gurnee, IL 60031, (647) 263- 
4512; Maria K. Kessler, 1299 Almadon 
Lane, Gurnee, IL 60031, (847) 263- 
4512. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is lo certify that tho under- 
signed intond(s) to conduct tho above 
named business from the locaiion(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
namo(s) ot the person (s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
/s/R. Benjamin Kessler, December 22, 
1997. 

/s/Marla Kossler, December 22, 1997. 
Tho foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 22th day of Decembor, 1997. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
AvaM.Wint 
Notary Public 
Received: December 23, t997 
Willard R. Hoiander 
Lake County Clerk 
0196A-1506GP 
January 2, 1998 
January 9, 1998 
January 18, 199B 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: UNDER- 
GROUND ELECTRONICS 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 351 Cherry 
Cove Ln., Round Lake Beach, IL 
60073. (647) 265-6574. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Keith Schreitor, 351 Cherry Cove Ln., 
Round Lake Beach, IL 60073, (647) 
265-6574. 

STATE OF ILUNOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) lo conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
namo(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting tho business 
is/aro correct as shown. 
/s/Keith Schreiter, December 17, 
1997. 

/s/Martone Schreiter, December 17, 
1997. 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged botore me by the por- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 17th day of December. 1997. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
Sandra A. Riley 
Notary Public 
Received: December 17, 1997 
Willard R. H eland er 
Lake County Clerk 
1297D-1504-LV 
January 2, 1996 
January 9, 1996 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Imperial 

Cleaning Service 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTEO OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 3400 Ted 
Ave., Waukegan, IL 60065, (647) 824- 
2402. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESSfES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Heidi Schwab, 3400 Ted Ave., 
Waukegan, IL 60085 (847) 824-2402. 
Michael Schwab, 3400 Ted Ave., 
Waukegan, IL 60085, (647) 624-2402. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
intend (s) lo conduct the above named 
business from the location (s) indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
narne(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Heldi D. Schwab, December 12, 
1697 

/s/Michael G. Schwab, December 12, 
1997 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by Ihe per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 12th day of December, 1997. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Marie Lynn Boothe 

Notary Public 

Received: December 12, 1997 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1297C-1494-WL 

January 2, 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: ...and Sew 

Much Morel 

ADORESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTEO OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY; 1194 
Ballanl/ae Place, ME, Mundelein, IL 
60060; (847) 362-6414. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Doris M. Hanson, 1194 BaHantrae 
Place, »E, Mundelein, IL 60060; (647) 
362-6414. 

STATE OF ILUNOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location (s) indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Doris M. Hanson, December 12. 
1997. 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) intending to conduct tho busi- 
ness this 12th day of December, 1997. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
Nancy T. While 
Notary Public 
Received: December 15, 1997 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
1297D-1505-LB 
January 2, 1996 
January 9, 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMEO BUSINESS 
NAME APPUCATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: OSD* 
Investment Advisors 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 419 Donin 
Dr., *104, Antloch, IL 60002, (847) 
838-4608 (pnys/cal). P.O.Box 791, 
Antiocb, IL 60002-0791, (847) 838- 
4608 {mailing). 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
David Scott Oavies, 419 Donin Dr. 
#104. AntkXh, IL 60002 (847) 838- 
4606. 

STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This is 10 certify that the undersigned 
intend (s) 10 conduct the above named 
business from the location (s) indicat- 
ed and that Ihe true or roal full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
/s/DavkJ S. Davtes, December 9, 1997 
The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intef idiDg to conduct the busi- 
ness this 9th day of December, 1997. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Adclme \bung 
Notary PubGc 
Received: December 11, 1997 
Wtflard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
1297C-1489-AN 
January 2, 1996 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPUCATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Soccer Plus 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY; 325 
Surryse Rd., Lake Zurich. IL 60047; 
(847) 436-4568. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESSfES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Robert J. Naughtrlp. 180 Vista Rd„ 
Lake Zurich, IL 60047; (847) 550- 
0556. 

STATE OF ILUNOIS 
COOMTY OF LAKE. 

Thta H to certify that tha unoaralgnod 
intend (s) to conduct ihe above named 

bt_i»ino»» from tha locaflonO) JndJcer- 
ad and that lha trua or roal lull 
rutme(s) of tho p«rson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting tho business 
is/aro correct as shown. 
/s/Robert J, Naughtrip. December 8, 
1997. 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by tho per- 
son(s) intending lo conduct tho busi- 
ness this 8th day ol December, 1997. 
Rosalia Greenfield 
Notary Public 
Received: December 16, 1997 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
1297D-1503-WL 
January 2, 1998 
January 9, 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPUCATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Vinekeepers 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- ' 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 655 
Rockland Rd-Ste. 204, Lake Bluff. IL 
60044; (847) 482-1226. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
James M. Vottman, 163 Whiting Ct, 
Vernon Hills, IL 60060; (847) 816- 
6187. U(| 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 
Tn>« Va to canity mot tha unawv^rwd 

inter id (s) to conduct the above named 

busirxnu from tha tocni<ori(») indicaf- 
ad and that tha trua or raaf tuii 
nornofs) of tha por 300(3; owning, con- 
ducting or transacting tha busina** 
is/aro correct as shown. 
/s/James M. Vettman, December 13, 
1997. 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 1 3th day of December. 1 997. 
Diane Plokopiak 
Notary Public 
Received: December 16, 1997 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
1297D-1502LB 
January 2, 1998 
January 9, 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: PhoneStar 

Marketing 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1893 
Sprucewood Lane, Gurnee, IL 60031, 
(847) 625-9020. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADORESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSONIS) OWNING. CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Van He, 1883 Sprucawood Ln, 
Gu»rKMi. IL 6003H&4T) C2S-9020. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OT LUUl) 

Ttm « ta comty trwt w>« unawwrjneci 
mfood(s> to conduct the above named 
buamasa from iha kjcauonta} indieml- 
md and that tha ttuo or roal tuU 
fiamo(%) ot tttm parsonfs) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting nw bu*ino*s 
is/are correct as shown. 
/s/>bn He. December 8, 1997 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son (s) inlending lo conduct the busi- 
ness this 8th day of December. 1997. 
/s/Tanya Hungsberg 
Notary Public 
Received: December 10. 1997 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
1297C-1498-GP 
January 2, 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 

LEGAL 

PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

FOX LAKE, ILUNOIS 

Public notice is hereby given pursuant to a Preliminary Site Plan on file in the 

Village Clerk's office ol the Village of Fox Lake, that a public hearing will be held on 

January 14. 1998 al 7; 30 p.m. in the village Hall. Fox Lake, Illinois, to hear the Petition 

of Andrew Morrison and Vicki Morrison, owner ot the following described real estate 

to-wit: ■■ '• , 

Parcel A: That Part of the Northwest Ouarter of lha Southwest Quarter of Fractional 
Section 3, Township 45 North. Rango 9. East of the Third Principal Meridian, 
Described as Beginning at a Point on tho South Line of and 66 Feet West Rom the 
Southeast Corner ol Lot 4 in Anderbergs Subdivision, According lo the Plat Theroof, 
Recorded in Book "F" ol Plats. Page 67 as Document 95353; Thence South 42.25 
Feet; Thence West Parallel to Said Souih Line ol Lot 4, 1 65 Feet More or Less, To the 
Shore of Nippersink Lake, Thence Northerly Along the Said Shore ol Ntppersink Lako 
To tho SakJ South Lino of Lot 4; Thence East 165 Feet. More or Loss. To the Place of 
Beginning. In Lake County, Illinois 
Location of tha property is: End of Arthur 
Tho common address is: 151 Arthur 
Petitioner is requesting Ihe following: Reioning to R-2 

Said Preliminary site plan is available lor examination in the Village Clerks office at 
the Village Hail in Fox Lake, Illinois. 
All Interested persons are Invilod to attend said hearing and be heard. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ron Stochf. Chairman 

Fox Lake Zoning Board of Appeals 

Dated at Fox Lake, Illinois 

This 5th day of December. 1 997 

1297D-1507-FL 

January 2, 1997 



r~ 



THE DEADLINE 

FOR LEGAL NOTICES IS TUESDAY 

AT 10 A.M. 



IIP 

SERVICE 

Get 

"IT" 

off 

your chest 

It's the 

talk of the 

town 

223-8073 



!s 



if 




C 1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 2, 1998 



h 



I./ 

i 



v 




laaified 
MBfuide 

S^lnnoiMrice merit* 

Nolkcs , 110 

L«l & found , IIS 



free 



.120 



Personal* „ I2S 

Awllorti .' . 1 30 

[linincsi Personal!., , US 

riruncljl ... 140 



rnploy merit 



Help WjnlttJ Part-Time .,. 217 

Help Wanted lull-Tlmc 220 

Empkymenl Agentl« , 22 1 

BuslnMt Qppofluntltt ,,.. 225 

SMwlkMis Ubnlcd 228 

Child Care 240 

Schoot/lnt|rutllon 250 

Anltqjin 301 

Apptlsrtcn .. 304 

BartctfTradc )08 

BjMJrVCralll J10 

Dulldfng Malertali JH 

Buslneu/OFTke Equipment ,...., ,.,,,,,,,.118 

FJettronfcj/Cornpuleu 320 

Farm Guide 124 

Firewood 328 

Garage/Rummage Salei 330 

Good Thing! to Eat 334 

Honei&Tack 338 

llouiehold Goodi/Furniiure ..,,,.., , 340 

lewetyr 344 

LavmiGarden , .....348 

Miscellaneous , , 3S0 

Med4cat F-Qjiip/Supplitt 354 

Musical Invlrumcnl! 358 

lYtii Suppliti '. 360 

ReMauranl Equlpmenl ,...364 

TooH & Machinery.. 368 

Warned To Buy 370 



eet 



I 



state 



Homei For Sale 500 

llomcvrof Rent ..504 

Horn« Warned SOS 

Hornet Builders ,5)0 

Conduanwn Home* SH 

Mobile Home* -51* 

Apailmenti for Renl -520 

Apaftmenls Wanled 524 

Apt/Homo To Share .528 

Rooms f Of Renl 5 30 

Building; -5JJ 

IVutlntvs Property lor Salt 

nuttnm Property Tor Rent 

Imeilmcnl Property 

Mortgage Sen-tees 

farms 

V'jcaul lots/Acrrai-.c 

RfSOrtsA'acalion Rrnlals 

Oul of Area Properly 

Cemetery U«s 

Real Ulate Watncd 

Real IMate Mitt 

^Recreational 



SJ4 

.518 
.540 
.544 
.548 

i'.o 
.564 
.568 

570 
.SM 
.578 



Recreational Chides 
S nowmobiles/ATVs . 
Boalv/MolorsAlC. ... 

Camping 

Trave location 
Sports Equipment . . , 
Airplanes 



...704 
...708 
...710 
.714 
. 718 
,...720 
....724 



rcinsporfcitfori 



Can for Sale .. »04 

Rcntal/leasn *08 

Classlc'Anllojje Cats , -810 

S« vice A Parti — *H 

Car Loans/I nsurante ■■ 118 

Vint M* 

Four Wheel Drht/letps 828 

TrucU/Trallm S34 

lleaiy Equipment 838 

MolOfcytlet 844 

Wanled To Buy ..848 




ervice 



f rectory 



Appliance! Repair , so ' 

Blacktop S06 

Builders '■' so ' 

Carpentry s, 2 

Carpel Cleaning SIS 

Concrele/Cemcnl •■■ SIS 

Dry Wall i 521 

Educallon/lnniuttlon -■■- ••S2i 

Ckcttlcal S27 

rirewood ■ S30 

Handyman -■• 513 

Healing/Alt Conditioning S36 

Housekeeping SJ9 

Landscaping - . s< ? 

Laundry/Cleaning 54 5 

Legal Service! • 548 

Medical Service! 551 

Moving/Storage 554 

Palntliig/Decorallng - "557 

Paralegal/Typing Services 560 

Plumbing • 563 

Pools 566 

Preuure Washing 569 

Professional Services 5^2 

Radio/TV Repair , 

Remodeling 

Kewmc* '. 

Roofing/Siding 

Storage ■ 

Tan Service - •••■■ 

Trees/Plants i9J 

Wedding 596 

Miscellaneous ••• • *'' 



S7S 
S78 
SB I 
S84 
587 
S90 



& 



iitritfution 



Kenosha 
County 



Xtnoiha 




Lakeland Newspapers Classifieds Appear in I I Newspapers! 

Antioch News • Round Lake News • Lake Villa Record 

Mundelein News • Wadsworth News • Grayslake Times 

Fox Lake Press • Gurnee Press • Lindenhurst News 

Wauconda Leader • Liberlyville News 



HOW T© PLACE A 
CLASSIFBED AS 

BY CALL 

PHONE... (847) 223-816 

BY 




Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 
MAIL. .Grayslake, IL 60030 



IN 30 S. Whitney St. 

PERSON... Gra -y slakc 



BY FAX...(847) 223-8810 



DEADLINES 

Direct Unc .Tires. 5pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party Wed. 10am 

HOURS 

8am-8pm Mon.-Thurs. 

8am-6pm Friday 






A 




we 



A 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



110 


Notices 



110 


Notices 



125 


Pergonals 



125 


Personals 



219 



I fdp Wanted 
Part-Time 



ERRORS: 
Wc strive to elimin.ite 

errors, but if one should 
occur, please report it 
immediately as we can 
be responsible for the* 

first two (2) weeks only. 

NO AD|USTMENTS CAN 

BE MADE UNLESS THEY 

AFFECT THE MATERIAL 

VALUE OF AN AD. 



DIET MAGIC 
Lose up to 30lbs. 
30 day programs. 

Stan at S30. 
(815)675-9237 
leave message. 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

li you have plncrr! clii»*lflnl 
.nlwiiisiii)! with Die I, like 
bind Ncwapaper* you may re> 
celvt n misleading Mniement 
from nnotlier flitn request- 
w\\\ payment (or ihiH ndvcriin 
inR. To receive pro|>er crcil 
ii in your iiccount. nil pay 
nicnu for your Lakeland 
New»piipers itrlvcriislnj; 

miikl Ire made «.s Invoiced 
nrnJ dlreclrd l<>: 

Lakeland Nnripapera 

PO Dos 268 

30 6. Whitney fit. 

Grayilakc. IL 6003002QB 



COLLOIDAL MINERALS 
OF Ihe type described on 
"Dead Doctors Don! Uo" tape. 
Direct from the Clark Mine. No 
membership. $11.85/quart, 
sold in gallons. 1-800-470- 
863B. 

IF YOU HAVE 

FURNITURE TO SELL, 

A car, or appliances, II 

you aro having a Garago 

Salo or If you have a 

houso to soil or apartment 

1o ront. 

Call Lisa batoro 10om 

YVodnosdoy to ploco 

your ad horo. 

(847) 223-8161 

oxt. 140. 

WRITE FOR YOU I 

•X-Maa Cards 

' Wadding Invitations 

*Showor/Porty Invitations, 

•Handwrllton. 

* Reasonable rntos. 

Call (815) 363-5330. 



SAVE ON LONG DISTANCE 
Ono ol tho (nsiosi growing 
long dtstanco companies 
wanis you to save on long dis- 
tance. Call today and loam 
how to save 30% to 50% off 
our low basic rales. Call Mtko 
tor more information (847) 
587-221B. 

ROUND LAKE 

HIGH SCHOOL 

CLASS OF 1988 

10 Years is almost up!l 

H's nearing reunion lime,. .but 

wo need some help with 

addressos. Please help us 

and spread ihc wordll 

Sond your name (including 

maidon name), your address 

and friend's addressos and 

phone numbers to: 

RLHS Class of '86 

Rounion Commitloo 

c/o Cindy ( Vol ling) Bluo, 

1415 Coral Reel Way. 

Lake Zurich, III, 60047. 



115 



Lost & Found 



REWAR01 LOST GHAY 
Main Coon Cat, in tho vicinity 
of Linden Ln. & Witt Rd., Chain 
O'Lakes, 12/15/97. Please call 
(847) 395-0B02. 

DID YOU FIND Someonos 
PET or Special Lost Articlo? 
Call Lakeland Nowspapors 
Classifieds Dopt.. and gol your 
results, FOUND ads aro 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
(847)223-8161. 



120 



Free 



HEALTHY WOMEN 

GtllSlKQDlSID 
Excellent Compensation 

Healthy women 33 and under 
and with a history of pievious 
pregnancy needed to serve a 
anonymous ej>g donors. Donors 
will be required to lake tncdica 
lion, blood screening and under- 
go minor surgical procedure. 
Substantial compensation will 
be given. If interested call ARR, 
773-327.7315. 
Serious inquiries only. 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 
FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 
UMN. For more Inlormalion, 
please contact tho Humane 
Soctciy. 

ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad in tho 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways aro run at NO 
.CHARGEI (Wo discourage 
any pel ads). Deadlines: 10am 
Wednesdays. (847) 

223-8161, oxt.140, 



Call Travis 

or Nick to 

place your 

ad here 



A BRAVE DECISION 
ADOPTION. Financially se- 
cure couple, enjoying a happy 
and supportive marriage, long 
to share our doep commit- 
mem and love with your pre- 
cious baby, Wo love the out- 
doors, reading, and KIDS! Can 
wo holp each oifvor? MARCY 
ANO TOM WELCOME 
YOUR CALL 1-800-363- 
41B8. 

ADOPTION 
Lake County couple wants to 
give newborn a wonderful 
homo lull of love, laughter and 
respect. Considering an adop- 
tion plan? Please call so we 
can talk. Alt legal and confi- 
dential . 

Kim & Gerry 
t -800-286-8088. 

ADOPTION-DOWN TO 

EARTH couple longs to offer 
your baby stay al homo mom, 
big family full ol aunts, uncles, 
lots of lirtie cousins, gontlo dog 
and pcacelul suburban com- 
munity full of parks and excel- 
. lent schools. We'll holp you 
anyway wo can. CALL LINDA 
AND STEVE 1 -BOO 529-9557. 

ADOPTION. CINDY AND 
JAY enjoy on oxcitmg tile to- 
gether lilled wilh love, alfec- 
tion, and good times. It would 
be an honor lo share our live- 
ly, cheerful homo wilh your 
precious baby. Wo'd love to 
talk with youl CALL CINDY 
ANDJAYVBO0-5B6-1935. 

DRUMMER WANTED 
STYLES-Punk, Metal. Hard- 
core. Must live in Lake County 
Area. High School Band. Call 
Jell (847) 356-4384. Antonio 
(B4 7) 356-0517. 

PLEASE HELP US 
ADOPT. WE NEED YOUII 
Our heart aches for a child. 
For 6yrs. woVo dreamed ol 
becoming parents. Now, 
through Adoption and the Mir- 
acle only you can make hap- 
pen, we pray you'll provide us 
with tho solulion. Wo promise 
to givo unconditional love, 
laughter and dreams to your 
child. Medical, legal, counsel- 
ing and court approved living 
exponses paid. Confidential. 
Please call our attorney al 
(708) 957-6835. 

NATURAL 

ALTERNATIVES 

TOFEN-PHEN&REDUXII 

Got thin (ho 

HEALTHY waylt 

Wo did. 

30 day $SS-back guarantee*, 

Dr. Recommended. 

FREE SAMPLES. 

Call Melody today!! 

(847) 548-4191. 



ADOPTION: FULL-TIME 

MOM and professional dad 
long to give your baby a lov- 
ing, socuro Christian homo 
with education, books, music, 
and sports, Sharon/Jim 800- 
717-1401 P.n65. 



135 



Dunne** Personals 



BE YOUR OWN BOSS. 
Work from homo, Nood holp 
immediately. $5O0*week part- 
time. For a Ireo booklet sond a 
SASE Legal sizo to: MMF En- 
terprises. 912 E. Rollins Rd.. 
Suite 1 36, Round Lako Beach, 
111. 60073 



*R-OOGS» Lako villa. Mon- 
day-Friday Irom 10am-2pm. 
Inquiro Within. (847) 

356-0047. 



DRIVERS 



Phone Persona 
Roman Coin Pizza 

2722 22nd Street 
N.Chicago 

or 
1419 N. Lewis 
, Waukegan 



140 


Kin an etal 



BANKRUPTCY *79+ E-Z 
lik; system stops creditors/gar- 
nishments. Guaranteed valid. 
Ends debt/credit card slavery. 
Divorco $129+. Fast, cour- 
teous sorvice. FreshStnrt 
America 1-888-395-8030 lot! 
free. 



FREE CASH GRANTS I 

; College. Scholarships. 
Business. Medical Bills, 
! Ne\'cr Repay. Toll Free 
1-800-218-9000 
Ext. G-11634 



219 



HelpVanlcd 
Part-Time 



DAILY HERALD 

Be an independent con- 
tractor lor tho newspaper 
Associated Press voted 
ft 1 in Illinois. 

Sot your own hours; 
days, evenings or week- 
ends. Work in our new 
Vernon Hills office. 

All telemarketing leads 
provided. 

Competitive compensa- 
tion based on your abili- 
ties. 

Contact our telemar- 
keting manager at 

(847) 573-2751 



| Get an "A" for Success!! 

I TAKE THIS QUIZ! 

»1 . Do you like to earn money? u 

« 2. Do you like people? g 

•J 3. Do you have a pleasant phone voice? | 
§ 4. Do you want part-time work in a 

friendly environment? S 



a 

UJ 

g If you answered yes to any or all of the g 



u 

a 



above, you can start earning dollars 

plus commission in LAKELAND'S 

Client Services Department. 



Please send letter of interest to: 

Attn: Maureen Combs 

c/o Lakeland Publishers 

| P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 § 

or fax to | 

B (847) 223-8810 | 

S a 





January 2, 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C 1/1 



219 



Help Wanled 
Pan Time 



tsif t»t it ntiiittt 
PERSONAL 

HOUSEKEEPERS « 

Perm, part-time. Earn * 

$8-10+/Hr. Mornings \ 

and/or afternoons. * 

Adv. Opp. 

Car/Vac rcq. 

(847) 361-8771 or I 

(847)487-8771 I 
sttcttttitissftift 



Immedi ait. Opening 
for Part Time 

Bookkeeper 

for Fox Lake 

Law Office. 

Contact Nary at 

<S47> 5S7-2551 



■*t 



Progressive, groui- 

Ing Denial Office in 

the Graysiake area 

Is looking for .an 

Front Office 

person. 
Part-time position 

available. 

If interested call: 









^~ 



■— »■• 



Part Time Payroll and Data 
Entry Assistant, Duties 
Include coding time cards 
and data entry of dally pay- 
roll hours, along with Data 
Entry of various A/R and A/P 
Items, Prefer experience In 
data entry and basic book- 
keeping, flexible hours may 
be arranged. 
Send resume ttx Mead 
Electric Company, Inc. 
34S4 Washington St., 
Park City, IL 60085 
(847) 662-0892 f AX 
EOE 



Library Assistant 

circulation 
Information 

Wan co n d a Area 

Library 

Must be libit 1 to provide 
prof'l and courteous 
customer service. Hours 
include 2 evenings and 
some weekends. 

Automated system. 
Friendly staff. 

Hxperfcnee in cuslomer 
service pref'd. Must 
apply by January 9, 1998. 
Phone B47-487-274G x 
207 for more informa- 
tion or stop by the library 
for an application. 801 N. 
Main Street, Wauconda. 
EOE. 



Earn a 

Minimum of 

$10.Q0lhr. 

We arc looking 
for outgoing 
aggressive indi- 
viduals with pre- 
vious telemarket- 
ing/customer ser- 
vice experience 
for outbound 
Sales Clerk. 
Mon-Thurs late 
afternoon & 

evenings base 
rale plus gener- 
ous commissions. 

Call Sue for 
more info at: 
(847) 740-4035 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



220 



Help Tinted 
Full-Time 



DOGGY 

DAYCARE 
PART TIME HELP 

Flexible Hours, AM/PM 
i Shifts, Must have 
] experience with 

Dogs... 

, Contort: KaihjlKris. 
| (847) S66-l%Q(c%i 



SCHOOL BUS 
DRIVERS - 

Substitute bus drivers 
needed. All training pro 
vided. Good pay. Part- 
time hours on school 
days only. Apply 
Wauconda School 
District 118. 
Transportation 
Department, 225 Osage 
Street, Wauconda. 
847/526-6672 



fM®@9@ 
Call or Apply at: 

131 McKinleu 
Lake Villa, IL 

60046 



INVENTORY TAK1RS 

Call now to work to 

pay those bills that 

will arrive! 

Regular Part-Time 

Excellent Second 
Income 

S7.50/hr. to start. 

Call RGIS Inventory 

(847)662-9277 

EOE 



( j 

Family owned company ; 
seeking committed, 
service-oriented per- » 
son for 20-23 hours 
per week for clerical, • 
telephone, and com- 
puter work. This per- • 
son will also be trained ; 
In the areas of project ; 
management and sales.' 
Potential for growth 
Into f utl-llme position. | 
Send resume to P.O. 
Sox 787, Wauconda, \ 
Illinois 60084 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



"DRIVERS** Opportunity 
start* hare. 'Performance 
Bonus *Comp. Pay 4 Miles 
•Teams & Solos 'O/O Encour- 
aged 1-800-294-3550. 

DRIVER OTR TOP Milos 
Top Pay Leader in Miles tor 
Five Years Running. COVEN- 
ANT TRANSPORT 1-800-441- 
4394 Experienced drivers and 
Owner Operators 1 -800-338- 
4394 Graduate Students Bud 
Mover Relrigoratod Truck 
Line Solo Driver s and Conlrac- 
10TS 1-886-667-3729. 

DRIVER-START UP TO 
32C/MILE+B0NUSES with 
USA TRUCK) Late-modef. 
assigned conventionals. satel- 
lite communications. 10,000 
mile/month average. Weekly 
pay. 800-237-4642. EOE. 
M/F/H/V. 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Kdp Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Hdp Wanted 
FuB-Timt 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time. 



DRIVER. EXPERI- 
ENCED/INEXPERIENCED 
OWNER Operators needed. 
Relocation Services, High 
Value Products. Blanket Wrap 
Divisions. Tractor Purchase 
Program. Call NorthAmofican 
Van Lines: 1-800-34B.2147 
Depl. ILS. EOE. 

DRIVER: 100% NO- 
TOUCH freight. Groat 

Pay/ Be no I it s Regional or 
OTR. 23 with CDL-A. Hai-Mat. 
6-months experience. Start 
Immediately! 0/0's Wolcomel 
LANDSTAR/POOLE 888- 
662-5037. 



CALUNQ ALL LAKE 
COUNTY MOMSIII Bright 

Beginnings Family Day Care 
Network is looking lor nurtur- 
• log, responsible, creative indi- 
viduals who would like to start 
their own business while stay- 
ing home with their children. II 
you live in Lake Villa. Unden- 
hurst, Gumee, Grayslake or 
Round Lake and would like as- 
sistance in getting licensed, 
ongoing technical assistance, 
end child referrals, this pro- 
gram is (or you. For more infor- 
mation on how to become a 
quality intant and toddler day 
care provider in your homo, 
call Dena Thompson (847) 
356-4112. 

CAREGIVER LIBERTY- 
VILLE/LAKE VILLA, moti- 
vated, attentive, caring person 
for total care of young man, 
opening tor night shift 7P-7A, 
must remain awake, English 
speaking and references re- 
quired, SlO/hour. 
(847)356-5017. 

COMPANY DRIVERS AND 
Owner Operators Yesl We are 
changing! The best place to 
drive Is getting even better. Is 
top pay, fleet management, 
excellent equipment, and 
flexible home time important 
to you? Call now for details. 
(600) 441-4953 Heartland Ex- 
press. 

DRIVER S.35, NEW PAY 
PROGRAM! 3,000 miles 
available. Drive newer 
Fretghtliner condos. Average 
850 miles per run. Home often. 
Studont grads welcome. Call 
GIX 868-382-0331. 

DRIVER S44.000. START 
out earning .28c to .29c. Get 
homo most weekends. Drive 
loaded conventionals and run 
great miles. Excellent benefitst 
Call Doug. 888-866-0331. 

DRIVERS - ILLINOIS 'DOM- 
ICILE - $2000.00 SIGN ON 
BONUS. HOME EVERY 7-10 
DAYS. REGIONAL OPPOR- 
TUNITIES. PAY UP TO 
35CPM MEDICAL/DENTAL • 
401 K ■ PAID VACATION - 
RIOER PROGRAM. Ohio's lar- 
gest rotrigeraiod carriers Is 
looking for drivers w/HAZMAT 
& S month* roconi CfTR ex- 
perience CALL DAVE OR 

USA Sl4.n70-4OOa or 000- 

pgr-oor. eoe. 

DRIVERS-ARE YOU 
TIRED OF LONG HOURS 
A LOW PAY7 ROEHL has a 
Top 10 pay package per The 
National Survey ot Driver 
Wages by SgnPost. Groat 
homo lime. 95% no touch, 
Solo or loam; 48753' van or 
tlatbod. Talk to our drivers. 1- 
800-467-6345 
WWW.ROEHL.NET 

HIRING EXPERIENCED & 
INEXPERIENCED DRIV- 
ERS! Training & Trainee Pay 
Available. Regional, OTR, 
Dedicated Runs. Excellent 
Pay and Benefits. Assigned 
Equipment. Switt Transporta- 
tion. 1-800-331 -7221 [eoe- 
nVf) 

OWNER-OPERATORS RE- 
GIONAL FLEET Openings, 
Home Regularly. Paid Woekty 
Steady, Refrigerated Loads. 
Top Percentage, Run Midwost 
Region or to Southeast, Paid 
Permits. No Up Front Cost 
SUNCO CARRIERS, INC. 1- 
600-237-8268 Tony. 

PET CAREI ENERGETIC 
dependable person, various 
duties involving pets. Must be 
flexible and available 7 
days/week including wee- 
kends and holidays. Call only 
between 10am-5pm. Monday- 
Friday. She! -Ray Pet Shalot 
(414)857-2163. 

IICFNSFD LIFE & HEALTH 

ducts, high commissions with 
advance before issue and 
benefits. (Must qualify for ad- 
vances & benefits) Call: 1-800- 

252-2581, 

SEEKING MATURE 
ADULTS as part-time repre- 
sentatives for teenage ex- 
change program. Place and 
advise students (or summer 
month programs and/or se- 
mester/year school homo- 
slays. 1-800-757-3891 Pin 
03139. 

SHAFFER TRUCKING 

INC. ANNOUNCING NEW 
PAY PACKAGE 4 BENEFIT5 
EFFECTIVE 12725/97. DRIV- 
ERS START UP TO 33 CPM! 
FOR DETAILS CALL BGO-669- 
9160. 



DRIVER8/OWNER OP- 

ERATORS...BE YOUR own 
boss & choose your own pay, 
percentage or mileage. 95% 
NO touch. Liberal Transfer 
between divisions 4 MOREt 
888-2^iQINBT. 

ELECTRICAL/ELECTRON- 
ICS TRAINEES. No experi- 
ence roquired. High school 
grads, ages 17-34. Good sal- 
ary, bono fits. Paid relocation. 
For interview, call 1-800-469- 
6289. 



DENTAL ASSISTANT/ 
ORAL SURGERY OFFICE 

Full Time and Pan Time 

positions. General dental or 

surgery experience. 

Competitive salary, paid 

vacation, and pension 

bene fits. 

Calljill 
(847) 623-3794 



High 
Top 




ast paced 
top talent 



-H 



upenor 

Personnel 



%<QQ=>®m® ®(?®9©«®®fl® 



1 4 > 



I 



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■- 
I 

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I 



Global Manufacturer of electromechanical compo- 
nents has a unique opportunity Tor dependable, detail- 
oriented individuals in our Manufacturing Support 
department: 

INJF.CT10N Mold Operator 

Must have experience wi:*- thermostat injection mold 
machines, be mechanically inclined, be able to work inde- 
pendently, assure all pans arc of acceptable quality, com- 
plete tooling changeoven, maintain a constant flow of pro- 
duction, and properly record production and quality data. 
The ideal candidate will exhibit exceptional troubleshooting 
skills and safe work habits. 

Machine Set-Up Operators 
Must be mechanically inclined, able to work independently, 
assure all pans arc of acceptable quality, complete tool 
changeover*, be concerned with safety, maintain a constant 
flow of production and properly record production charts. 

Wc hire only highly motivated individuals who 

enjoy working in a team environment. Wc 

offer a challenging environment, competitive 

salary, and extensive benefits. Please apply in 

person, send your resume to: 

K&B - Mundelein, Inc., 675 Tower Rd. r \* 
Mundelein, IL 60060. , 

Fax: (847) 949-4250, or call at • 

(847) 949-8501, cxt. 58. 



I 




How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 



Dear Search—, 

I have been 16 years with the same company in the capacity of staff 
accountant. Approximately 3 weeks ago the president of the compa- 
ny announced that he was selling the company and that the staff in 
my dcpanmcnl was to be phased out by November 1 of this year. I 
obviously am In need of other employment and therefore have been 
sending my resumes out and interviewing wherever possible. My 
salary at this time is 517,000, and I have been used to living a com- 
fortable lifestyle. I am now finding that I am having difficulty finding 
a position that comes close to my salary. I haw run arrays compa- 
nies that deal in the same type of business as 1 am knowledgeable of 
figuring I could basically walk right in and have no problems, but 
these positions are offering starting salaries which are substantially 
less than I am currently used to. The most recent interview I went on 
was for a competitor of the company I am with now, only to find that 
after the second interview the salary range was offering in the high 
20 *$ to low 30"s. I should further mention that although I have 16 
years with this company and 3 years of college in my field of 
accounting 1 am non-degreed Individual for that matter. I am sure 
that this is why my salary is going to be a problem. What do you think 
I can do to convince these employers that I know my stuff? 
H.S. - 1 Jbcrtyville 

Dear U.S., 

Realize that you have been 16 years with the same company where- 
by you have over the years, received merit increases as w ell as cost of 
living increases. This is important to recognbe because one can 
quickly place themselves out of the market after all that time. The 
average person does not stay in a position nearly that long Keep in 
mind that although you believe in yourself and your employer obvi- 
ously has for all these years does not mean that everyone you Inter- 
view with will stand up and take notice to more than your longevity. 
So much goes in to the hiring process these days. Corporations have 
strong criteria especially in high end accounting positions. In an 
accounting position where you want to command a higher salary 
and title recognition, degrees are almost always expected especially 
where your $47,000 salary is concerned. Your lack of degree may well 
be the reason that the new owners of the company arc not asking 
you to stay on. Many companies have a 'degree necessary" indicator 
In their job descriptions. My advice is to either set your sights on fin- 
ishing up your undergraduate studies with the hope that this will 
help you get ahead, or if this is not an up i ion for you (for some it is 
not), then you may start thinking of lowering your salary expecta- 
tions until you land that golden company thai will once again bring 
you up the salary ranks to which you have grown accustomed. 
They're out there! Good LucU 

Note: Nancy Sakol is a licmscd personnel professional and 
President of Superior Personnel in Gumee. 

litters can be sent to Nancy Sain! do i akeUnd Newspajwrs. 
P.O. llox 26B. Grayslake, IL 60030 



^TrWEY'S 
>^ENVICCS 



UNUMTTEO 



Fast growing North Shore 

services company has F/T and 

PIT openings for quaTrfied 

employees for the following 

positions: 



' WINDOW WASHERS 
•MOVERS 



* HOUSECLEANERS 

• VAUET PARKERS 



• CATERING SERVICE & BARTENDERS 

* SNOW PLOW DRIVERS & SHOVELERS 

Competitive wage and opportunity 

for advancement 

Phase call Pam at 847-61 5^800 x 141 



Global Manufacturer of 

electromecrvinicxal components 

has a unique opportunity for 

dependable, detail oriented 

individuals in our Manufacturing 

Support department: 



MACHINE MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN 



Experience in machine repair, hydraulics, pneumat- 
ics, boutteshooting. and some electronics in a man- 
ufacturing environment are requirements for this chal- 
lenging position. 



ELECTRICIAN 



► Will be responsible for planning the wiring and Instal- 1 
tation ol equipment and fixtures; ensure wiring and J 
m fixtures conform to company specirtcalions and local ^ 

► electrical codes; interpret specibcauons. blueprints ^ 
and work orders; and repair and maintain machines* 
and equipment. 

We hire only highly motivated individuals who 
enjoy working in a team environment. We offer 
a challenging environment, competitive salary, 
and extensive benefits. Please apply in per- 
son, send your resume to: 

K&B - Mundelein, Inc., 675 Tower Rd., 

Mundelein, IL 60060. 

Fax: (847) 949-4250, or call at 

(847) 949-8501 , ext. 58. 





SUBSTITUTE 
DIRECTORY 

The following schools need 
substitutes on a continuing basis, please contact 
the names listed below for further information. 

Adlal E. Stevenson High School District #125 
Two Stevenson Dr., Lincolnshire, IL 60069 

Contact- Personnel (847) 654-4000 x320 

Antioch Community High School District #1 17 
1 133 Main St. Anlioch, IL 60002 

Contact: Marie. (847) 395-142! x224 

Apiakisic - Tripp School District #102 
1231 Wetland Rd, Buffalo Grove, II. 6O0S9 

Contact: Laurel Karotaak (847) 634-5338 

Deer-Held School Disi. 109 
517 Decrfield Rd. Decrfield, IL60015 

Contact: Pliyllis ext 222 (847) 945-1844 

Diamond Lake Elementary School 
25807 Diamond Lake Rd., Mundelein, IL60060 

Contact: Ellen Mauer ! (847) 566-6601 

Grayslake School District #46 
450 it. Barron Blvd , Gra«Iate, IL6OO3O 

Contact Jan Fabry. (847) 223-3540 xl 100 

Hawthorn School District 73 

201 Hawthorn Parlooy. Vernon Hills, 1L6O061 

Contact: Man 1 Tell (847) 367-3279 

lalergertcraiional Day Care Center, Condcll Medical Center 
801 S. Milwaukee Ave.. Libertyrille, IL60O48 

Contact: Human Resources ext 5230 (847) 362-2900 

Lake Bluff School District 065 
121 E. Sheridan PL, Lake Bluff, IL 60044 

Contact: Jean at 14 (847) 234-9400 

Lake Villa School District #4 1 
131 McKinley, Lake Villa, II, 60046 

Contact: Kalhy • (847) 356-2385 

Mundelein School District #75 
330 N. California, Mundelein, IL6OO6O 

Contact: lots Fine (847) 949-2700 

North Chicago Dist 187 

2000 Lewis A\e., K Chicago, IL 60064 

Cb^f/.Mrs.A.Sherrod. (847)6S9-8150x254 

North Shore School Dist. 112 

530 Red Oak Lane, Highland Park, II. 60035 

Contact: Elaine Ext. 328 (847) 831-4370 

Round Lake Area Schools 

316 S, Rosecble a, Round Lake, IL 60073 

Contact: Maureen (847) 546-5522 x 3010 

Trevor State Grade School * 

26325 Wilmot Rd, (Hwy C), Trevor, VH 53179 

Contact, Donna Momian (4 14) 862-2356 






\<: 



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■ja.^JW W .»iw* J^ " Ww» m« *»< 









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« CI 2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 2, 1998 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Timc 



HOUSECLEANERS 
WANTED 

DAYS ONLY 

MON-FRI OR TUE-FRI 

$7.00 - $9.00 PER HOUR 

PLUS BENEFITS. 

MUST HAVE CAR. 

(847) 587-9385 

A CLEAN SWEEP, INC. 
FOX LAKE, IL 



IMMEDIATE QPEniuG 
FOR FULL TIME LEGAL 
SECRETARY FOR FOX 
LAKE LAW OFFICE; 
SECRETARIAL EXPERI- 
ENCE REQUIRED; COM- 
PETITIVE BEDEFITS. 
CONTACT MARy AT 
(8M7) 587-2551. 



Tax Professional or Recent 

Tax Course Graduate 

Our Grayslake Tax Service Is Growing! 

We are seeking a tax preparer, for the 

upcoming tax season. 

Flexible work schedule. 

Call (847) 223-7222 



Ouality Assurance lab Tech 



\ Major manufacturer ol electromechanical components has an 
Vi opening far a Quality Technician. The candidate tor this 
) position Mr! Implement standards and methods far ecuip- 
v merit and gago calibration, identify and record nencontor- 
r/ mances, schedule measuring equipment far calibration, and 
T pertorm inspection, testing and evaluation ol product at various 
stales ol the production process. Good computer s>ils and tamiianty N 
' measuring equipment are desirable. We otter a challenging environ- \\ 
merit, competitivo salary, and extensive benefits. Plea w apply In ptrton, V 
wnd your return* to: K4B - Mundtleln, Inc., 675 Towtr Rd, Mundeleln 
IL 60060. Fax: (047) W9-4250, or call at (847) 94 J-SSOi, exi w, 





PATIENT CARE 
COORDINATOR 

Assist in the nursing 

1 department on the 3- 
11 pm or 1 1 pm - 7 
am shift in non-direct 
I care activities. No 
experience neces- 
sary. Witt train quali- 
fied candidates. 
Must be caring, com- 
passionate and reli- 
able. Great for nurs- 
ing students. Superior 
starting salary $8/hr & 

excellent benefits. 

CARE CENTRE OF 

WAXKONDA 

176 Thomas Court 

Wauconda, IL 60084 

<847) 526-5551 



DIETARY AIDE PfT 



9 AM - 1 PM and 

4 PM - 8 PM 

Perfect hours for 

Housewives & 

Students. 
No experience 

necessary. Will Train. 

Care Centre of 
Wauconda 

176 Thomas Court 
Wauconda, IL 60084 
(847) 526-5551 



iiiiinniiLnJiii . 



immniixiiiniinin 

1 DON/RN 



! 



HEOHATAL 
NURSING 

Bonus Offered! 

Immed Openings-Start 
the New Year Right! 
Tired of cold & snow? 
Spectrum Healthcare 
Resources seeks 

Neonatal Nurses to 
work in the NICU unit at 
Darnalt Army 

Community Hospital in 
the warm climate of 
Killeen, TX. 'Neonatal 
Nurse Practitioner- F/T 
opptys. Req current TX 
ic or willingness to 
obtain one. For consider- 
ation, contact/fax res: 
Mike Caimi 800-325- 
3982 x9305; Fax 314- 
919-8919. 'Neonatal 
Registered Nurses-F/T, 
P/T, on-call opptys. Req 
at least 2 yrs Level II or 
Nursery exp & current 
TX & CPR lie. For con- 
sideration, contact/fax 
res: Lynn Bindbeutel 
800-325-3982 x93l6; 
Fax 314-919-8919. Exc 
sal/bnft pkg incl'g $3000 
sign on bonus. $500 
referral bonus also being 
offered for any RNs 
referred to us & hired, 



1 Immed Opening-Start | 
|the New Year Right In! 
'Colorado! 21-bed rural j 
|hosp > loc'dlnLColo.,2j 
|hre to Denver S Colai 
| Springs, seeks PON.! 

IACLS S 3 yrs mgmti 
exp desired Also seek! 
| Staff RN. Sal for both j 
i positions DOE.; 

i Mary/Susan 719- 1 
£743-2421; Fax 7W-1 
1743-2861 E0E | 



nmmnimiiiinin 



Call Travis 

or Nick to 

place your 

ad here 



DIRECT 
CARE 

Direct Care Workers for 
MR/DD women in resi- 
dential setting. Full or 
part time is available. 
Primarily afternoons, 
evenings and weekends. 
We arc committed to 
quality residential care. 

Contact 
Gail Becker 

Mount Saint 

Joseph, Lake 

Zurich 

l 847-438-505 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wauled 
Full-Time 



CUSTOMER SERVICE 
REPRESENTATIVES 

Begin Your Career 
With Seigie's 

Wc have an entry-level 
opportunity for a well orga 
nized individual with good 
clerical and interpersonal 
skills to process orders, 
assist builder customers and 
work with our sales force. 
Willing lo train the righl 
candidate. Mundelcin loci 
lion. Benefits include 
health, life, 401 K plan and 
more. 

Please call our Corporate 
Office ah 

847-742-2000 
Seigie's 

f qiul Opportunity f mployw 




MANA6EMEHT £ 
CREW MEMBERS 

WE'RE LOOKING 

FOR MANAGEMENT 

& CREW MEMBER 

POSITIONS ON SITE 

AT115S. RT. 83 IN 

GRAYSLAKE, IL 

8AMT0 4PMMON-SAT 

APPLY IN PERSON 

ONLY 




raphic 
lesigner 



We're looking for tt 

"sruphlc designer" to join our 'team. 

Do you have experience with 

computers and graphic design 

programs? If you do, 

then we can teach you I he 

rest in this entry level position. 

[Send your resume ^fAl\TUCKERat: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

or fax to 223-8810 



f 



EVStDE SALES 

Do you enjoy variety? Do you enjoy a 
challenge? Do you thrive in a fast 
paced, dynamic environment? If so, 
you could be the person we're looking 
fori 

lakeland Newspapers is seeking the 
right person to join our exciting Sales 
Department. You will be a success if 
you possess good organizational skills, 
communication skills, and arc self- 
motivated. If you arc looking for a 
rewarding career, Investigate this posi- 
tion todayl 

Please fax or mail resume to 
Attn: Maureen Combs 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 

RO. Box 268 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

Fax: (847) 223-8810 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




Help Wanted 
Full-Tltnc 



EH 



LANDSCAPE DESIGN 
AND SALES 

FULLTIME McKijf Nwwj i» wlty i 
pmfnviiMl to fill ito poiiiwi. 6nl em- 
mufliatwi ilith ind Die iMlj lo vot\ 
indtpenkmlj art asraiiL TJ* (ohi'bo 
rcqviio Imntliw doipi iliflt will tirong 
k«lhiliuil ind via inacsl. EiuMhhal 
otci 100. « Ian ptnlud. ftpieii'roa ind 
tijwiena lo im*t juot u;ra 
Sttd rntmt Ik MtKij Nintn 
Cewpiij. P.O. Bo i I If, Wiltrtw. VH 
U1H.AM Eiul OffafrnlJ £mflaj*r. 



SHIFT COOKS 
SECOND COOKS 

Institutional expert 

ence preferred 

Immediate openings 

for weekends, full 

lime in the summer. 

5 miles north of 

Antioch. 

Contact: 

WONDERLAND CAMP 

(414) 889-4305 

f« Of rut fUeitaaranl. J| 
A Opening h 

x Jimmy's i 

I Charhouse I 

|Q LfBERTYV/LLE £ 

A All Positions h 
h wanted, apply jj 
2 in person 
1413 Peterson 
Rd. or call for 
Information 

(847) 549-9900 



Looking tor a part time 
|ob or a second career 

after your eniisimonl ends? Do 
you know what Iho restaurant 
industry has lo otter? 
Sl0 t 8OO-$l6,0O0 

starting salary w/5 
day work week. Froo 

employee medical insurance, 
Whoto Lil" insurance, disability. 
1-2 week paid vacation, bonuses 
& Co. Financed Franchising. 

It you're ambi- 
tious, fast paced & 
enjoy high levels oE 
responslbiliry & 
accountability a want 
to Insure your future with our 
highly productive, quiduY Cow- 
Ing team, FAX your resume lo 
&47-C89-0I 1 1 or appty In person 
to Roman Coin Plua, 2722 
22nd St, North Chicago or 1418 
N. Lewis, Wauhegnn 






'TCaftpjj 



V 

I 



STREET 
SUPERINTENDENT 

Village of 9,500 persons 
seeking Department 
Manager .to supervise 
and direct maintenance 
of following: roads and 
R.O.W., snow removal, 
buildings, equipment, 
storm water. Manager 
budget of $500k and up 
to 10 full and part time 
staff, 5-7 years of pro- 
gressive supervisory, 
construction and mainte- 
nance experience. 
College trado school or 
other formal training pre- 
ferred. Starting salary 
range $36,600-$43,000 
Excellent benefit pack- 
age. Send resume and 
salary requirements to 
Village Administrator 
2301 E. Sand Lake Rd, 
Undenhurst, IL 60046 by 
1/09/98. EEOC/ADA 



r i iii ii m iuiiiHiiiinllllllHIHIIUT 



SNOWPLOW & 
OWNER OPERATORS 

Needed for snowptowing. 

Northshorc area. 

TOP PAY! Work today-pay tomorrow. 

Lots of hours. 

(847) 272-1747 



Qcxs 



IB»« » »I 



fi ntin 



ASSISTANT MANAGER 

Hawthorn Center 

LPQQIFJfliEK 003 (Ei^MJEIBtllES 

If you're looking for something a little different where 
you can show off your creative side and sparkling 
personality in a retail business, then we've got the 
perfect opportunity. We will train you lo manage a 
professional business and sell beautiful reproduction 
art and customized framing. This entry-level position 
provides salary plus bonuses, medical/dental cover- 
age, paid vacation and advancement opportunities 
for those showing dedication, reliability and an 
eagerness to learn and excel! For consideration send 
resume lo: 

Director of Slorc Operations 

3M1 Mat -Arthur Blvd. 

Northorooh. IL 60002 

Fax: 847-272-4014 



r 



GREAT WAGES & BENEFITS. 
HIRING BONUS. 

PLEASE APPLY AT 

mm ©tymnet; 

- GURNEE MILLS 

CINDY 847-855-9956 
-ZBON, 1311 21 ST ST, 

(Across from Jewel) 
CINDY 847-746-5350 



Help Wanted 
FuIHimc 



ACCOUNTING 

A/P,A/R-lake 
Forest/libertyvillc area. 

Growing manufacturer of 
architectural products 

offers an excellent oppor- 
tunity for a responsible, 
detail-oriented person 

with cood communication 
skills. Windows based 

computer experience pre- 
ferred. Pleasant environ- 
ment and good benefits. 
Flex-time or Rirt-time is 
optional. Please forward 

resume with salary req. to 

28662 N. Ballard Drive, 

Lake Forest, IL 600*15 or 

fax847-ai6-i064, 



REMBITEft : 

LAKELAND 
NEWSPAPERS has • 

an opening on Its S 
expanding editorial j 
staff. Experience 
preferred with 
background In pho-I 
tography helpful. 
Will handle a varl- • 
cly of assignments. • 
Will be working • 

with a varied 

schedule and be ; 

able to work under* 

deadline situations.: 

For Interview • 

appointment fax S 

resume to: * 

Rhonda Burke • 

Editor In Chief • 

at : 

(847) 223-8810 ; 



DRIVER/WAREHOUSE 

DitlrikiUr if imliilit £ 
jdkniMi U mini) a fill 
lim trim/tfirihitti itr- 
iii. Mill tiiJIi'iU will 
hi«i i villi COL Menu 

irifmblf Kill iinrOtl 
ntlirltl iiiViinial, h 
Riiitf, lit Hilt Iniertiit- 
If DEPENDABLE! OilUi 
Mill [icliti dilimiu, n 
fill it puril vinliitti 
futtltit. Efktrltiei ii 
i*ii»li| at nc(Mi| Wit 
fil. Hut bi lili to lllll 
lit rilt iijliik. Afflf it 
ptttB* Mti-fri It twin 
9:00 tm tid 4:00 §m. 

WALMARK 
CORPORATION 

101 W. BiMJin fti. | (Hi. f!0| 
Rml Uli fir*, IL 6007! 

(847) 546-0400 



PRINTING 
OPPORTUNITIES 
in Lake Forest 
• Press Operators 
• Customer Service 
* Finishing 
• Warehouse 
Opportunities on 1st & 
2nd shifts for advance- 
ment PLUS great pay 
PLUS benefits that 
include health &. dental 
coverage, 40 J (k), two 
weeks paid vacation 
after 1st year. 

Apply in person or 
mail/fax 847-549-8888 
resume or qualifica- 
tions letter: 13795 W. 
Polo Trail Drive, Lake 
Forest, I L 60045 

NIERMAN 
PRINTING 






January 2, 1998 




CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers I C 



Help Wanted 
Full-Tlme 



MORE THAN 80% 

OF OUR JOB/ 

ARE REAL AND 

FULL-TIME!! 

•ADMINISTRATIVE 
- ASSISTANT 
•DATA ENTRY 
•ASSEMBLERS/PACKERS 

CALL ACCENT 
(847) 918-8367 
(847) 726-8367 



CASINO 

MARKETING 
MANAGER 

Immcd Opening-Star! 
the New Year Right! 
Argosy Casino seeks 
Casino Marketing Mgr. 
This position will over- 
see all aspects of Special 
Events &. Promotions, 
Customer sve skills a 
must. Exc bnfLs & comp 
sal. Tax resume: Argosy 
Casino in Lawrcnccberg 
\8 1 2-539-8059. EOE 



225 



Btainesj 
Opportunities 



ABSOLUTE 

INDEPENDENCE! 

00% PROFIT! 

5-l0K/monlh part-limo lrom 

[homo. Outstanding on-going 

] suppon. training and loads. 

NotMLM. 

1 .800-995-0796. 

"EXT. 0393** 

ABSOLUTE 
INDEPENDENCE! 
90% PROFIT! 
[ 5-lQK/month part-limo from 
. Outstanding on-going 
[support, training and loads. 
NotMLM. 
1-600-995-0796. 
*EXT.Q393* 

EARN 120,000 
POS/MO/PT. 

Helping people to 

become iron. 

Homobasod 

Endless loads/support. 

NoMLM. 

1-600-995-0796 

art. 1255. 

GET PAID 2X WEEKLY! 

Prepaid Legal Casually Inc. 
provides logal insurance 
$2S/month, Indopondont As- 
sociatos needed, expanding 
m your area. Min. investment 
$65. Call your independent As- 
sociate 800-995-0796 x4103. 

HUGE OPPORTUNITY! 
Capitalize on Utility Deregula- 
tion NOW; Trio biggest in U.S. 
Nstory. Full training and sup- 
port. 

DON'T MISS ID 
CALL NOW 1-600-760- 
5039. (SCA Network) 

NEARLY 9 MILLION 

HOUSEHOLDS around 

North America and hun- 
dreds ot thousands ol In- 
ternet usors around tho 
world can sea your adver- 
tising messago when you 
advertise In tho Suburban 
ClasatNod Advertising Net- 
work-SCANl It's an oasy-to- 
use one and inexpensive or- 
der/ono invoice sorvico that ro- 
ally works. For Irtlormalion, 
Call 312-644-6610 x473t. 
(SCA Network) 



228 



SiIuiibm Wanted 



MATURE LADY AVAIL- 
ABLE as caregiver tor sick or 
oldorly person. Also oxpori- 
encod in cftlldcaro. (647) 
265-9642. 



240 



GtMCare 



240 



Child (jut 



DEPENDABLE BABYSIT- 
TER WANTED in my Mundo- 
loin homo preferably, lor lyr, 
old, 2-ovonings/wook and 
Saturdays. Grandma typo pre- 
ferred, loons need references. 
Transportation provided if 
needed (647) 970-9901. 
(647) 223-6333. 

FOSTER HOMES NEED- 
ED! Wanted good, nurturing 
individuals to provide tempo- 
rary homos for children ogos 
birth to adolescent. Training, 
suppod, compensation, day 
caro provided. Contact Cathol- 
ic Chnritlos/Lako County. 
(647) 782-4242 or (847) 782- 
4243. 



C ALU NO ALL LAKE 
COUNTY MOMSIII Bright 
Beginnings Family Day Care 
Network Is looking for nurtur- 
ing, responsible, creative Indi- 
viduals who would like to start 
their own business while slay- 
ing home with their children. II 
you live in Lake Villa, Linden- 
hurst, Gurnoe. Graystako or 
, Round Lake and would like as- 
sistance in getting licensed, 
ongoing technical assistance, 
and child referrals, this pro- 
gram is for you. For mora Infor- 
mation on how to bocomo a 
quality infant and toddler day 
care provider In your home, 
call Dena Thompson (847) 
356-4112. ;■ 

CALLING ALL WORKING 
MOMSIII Fall is just around 
Iho comer, have you planned 
your children's day care yet? 
Immediate openings for child- 
ren ages 6/woeks & up aro 
available in Bright Beginnings 
Homo Day Care Network. For 
more information on how to 
enroll your child in a conven- 
iently located, quality day caro 
home, please call Dena 
Thompson at (847) 356-4112. 
SPACES ARE LIMITED, SO 
CALL IMMEDIATELY. 

CHILD CARE IN MY 
WADSWORTH HOME, 
part/full-time, lyr. & up, meals 
and snacks provided, lots of 
TLC. (847) 395-4254. 

CHILD CARE PROVIDED 
In my Round Loko Home, 
$20/day, 2-day minimum, or 
575/woek. Moats and snacks 
included, or before and after 
school care, Villago School 
Kids. For more info, please call 
(847) 740-0308. 

UCENSED CHILDCARE 

IN MY HOME, vicinity Rl. 83 & 
Englo in Lake Villa. (847) 
356-4231. 



304 


Appliance* 



USED APPLIANCE SALE. 
All recondrtl6nod & guar- 
anteed. Refrigerators, rang os, 
was hers/dry or 5 & freazors. 
Delivery & installation avail- 
able. 

Wihl Appliance Cantor 

1209 Court St root 

McHanry. IL 

(61 5)385.1 872. 



314 



Building MMlaUk 



STEEL BUILDINGS SALE: 
30x40x10, $4,337. 40x60x14, 
$7,911. 50x75x14. $10,902. 
50x100x16. $14,654. 

60x100x16, $17,142. Mini- 
storogo buildings. 30x160. 32 
units, $13,944. Froo 
brochures. Sentinel Buildings, 
800-327-0790. Extension 79, 



320 


Reclrorucs 
Gsmputcn 


PLAYSTATION NEW 
SONY with games, $200. Or 
games sold separately. (414) 
658-8427. 


TWO FAST 4BB COMPUT- 
ERS, each with 8MB of Ram. 
$325 or bost ottor. (847) 
356-0248. 


330 


Garage 
Rummage Sale 



AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIG SALE, and thoro 
is stai things that |ust did not 
go... Call us at LAKELAND 
Nawspapsra and run it 
under the 'FREE or Givea- 
ways* classified column, FREE 
ADS are NO CHARGE! 
(847) 223-8161, ext. 140. 



338 



Horsei & Tacks 



CHRISTMAS SADDLE & 
TACK SALE. English & West- 
ern, now and used. Tons of 
quality name brand Saddles & 
Tack up to 50% off. BMB blan- 
kets. $40 off. UPS Daily! 1 mile 
E. of Hwy, 12/67 on Hwy. 20. 
Open 10am-6pm daily. (414) 
642-4272 West 20 Saddle 
Co 

SHAVINGS! 

Hay, slraw, horse food. 

Purina Dog & Cat Food. 

Chicken Feed and 

Much more. 

(414) 857-2525. 

WE DELIVER! 

M-F6-5 

Sat 8-3. 



Call (847) 223-SI6I 

to place your 

help wanted ads In 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 

Classified Section 

ft» m 



340 



Household Goodj 

Furniture 



344 


Jewelry 



349 



Clothing 



350 



Miscellaneous 



AVAILABLE NOW-NEW 
YEARS SALE! Nov/ Matt/ess 
Sets, Beds wholesale to you. 
New Queen Size Beds- War- 
ranty! Price Includes Mattress, 
Box Frame and Brass Head- 
board, Extra Firm Set $249. 
Black Textured Iron Canopy 
Bed Including Queen Size 
Extra Firm Monros's Set $350. 
Pillow-Top Deluxe Extra Thick 
Sot $450. While and PorcrHin 
Daybed Set with Trundle and 
2 Twin Mattresses $340. DE- 
LIVERY : AVAILABLE. 
(847)459-5275 or (847)459- 
5436. 

BRASS BED QUEEN with 
now deluxe never used mat- 
tress set, $240. Delivery avail- 
able. (847) 374-9882. 

COMFORTER WITH 
SHAMS and drapes, 1 -wind- 
ow, 42x85, queen size revers- 
ible comforter, mauve/cream. 
$65. (414)694 5979. 

CUSTOM MADE BED ■ 
SPREAD, full size, with 
drapes, 2-paIr, 61x93, 
poach/cream background. with 
floral shades blue and dnna- 
rnon. (414)694-5979. 

ELECTRO LUX VACUUM 
WITH powerhead and attach- 
ments. Excellent working con- 
ditjon. $75. (414) 694-5979. 

FOR SALE 25* COLOR 
CONSOLE TV, $125. Mi- 
crowave oven, $75. Sorry Ster- 
eo, $75. Zenith color TV, 15', 
$95. VCFWHS, $95. AMF 
Orange, womens l o- speed 
biko, S20.TI computer system. 
Solid Oak GE stereo console. 
(847) 216-2172. 

HOT TUB, 2-PERSON, ex- 
cellent condition, $750. (847) 
266-2562 days. (847) 
395-4428 evenings. 

IF YOU HAVE 

FURNITURE TO SELL, 

A car, or appliances, If 

you are having a Gorogo 

Sale or If you have a 

housa to Mil or apart mont 

to rant. 

Call Usa before 10am 

Wednesday to place 

your ad hara. 

(647) 223-4161 

ext. 140. 

MOVING IN JANUARY 
. MUST SELU Blue Lono Ro- 
diner $100, Cherry End and 
Coffee Tables Si SO, Cherry 
Desk $1 50. Solid Oak End and 
Coffee Table* $225, (2) Rose 
Wingback Chairs $350, A 
Flex st eel Couch and Lovesoat \ 
$500. AR90 Tower Speakers 
$250.(847)223-6261. 

QUEEN SIZE SLEEPER 
SOFA, liko new, $700. (847) 
587-5117 alter 4:30pm. 

QUEEN WATERBED with 
Drawers $200 and SUPER 
SINGLE " WATERBED 
$10O/bast. (647) 

546-3091 ' Plaasa Leave 
Massage. 



WOLFF TANNING BEDS. 
TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT 
and SAVEI Commercial/home 
units from $199. Low monthly 
payments, FREE color cata- 
log. Call today 1-600-642- 
1310. 



354 



Medical Equip 
Supplies 



MEDICARE RECIPIENTS; 
ARE you using a NEBULIZER 
MACHINE? STOP paying full 
prlco for Albuterol, Alrovenl. 
etc. solutions. MEOICARE will 
pay for them. We bill Medicare 
for you and ship directly to 
your door. MED-A-SAVE 1- 
600-538-9849. 



358 



Musical Instruments 



ELECTRIC ORGAN, PAD- 
DED bench, music rack, in- 
struction books. Play tunes im- 
mediately. Great for all ages. 
$60. 34'w)t15-1/2*dx32-1/2*h. 
(647) 566-0990. 

LOWREY ORGAN WITH 
Magic Genie Keys, excellent 
condition. A must see. 
$450/best. (414)694-5979. 




DISTINGUISH COMBO 

WEDDING/ENGAGEMENT 
RING SET, 1/4 carat dia- 
mond with 4-diamonds ar- 
ound main diamond. Brand 
now, nover worn. Paid 
51,000, asking $700/bcst. 
(B47) 740-0380 ask for Nick, 

WEDDING SET: SOU- 
TARE 3/4kt. round diamond 
in plain setting. Appraised at 
$2,000. Best offer. Call after 
7pm (847) 746-3452. 



DOG BOARDING 
Vacation In your 

schedule? 

I can watch your dog/pup In 

my home. 

Lois of affection for your 

*Compank)n•. 

Convenient from RL41/Edens 

or your OHare flight schedule 

More comfortable than a 

kennel. Reasonable 

Call Florence or leave 

message with dates needed. 

(647)966-6319. 

AKC ROTTWEILER PUP- 
PIES FOR SALE. $350- 
$375. Shots and wormed. Par- 
ents on premises. Bom Octob- 
or 18th. (847)265-6651. 

BOXER PUPS GRAYS- 
LAKE family raised. Parents 
on premises. AKC, 5-males, 4* 
females. Bom November 17th. 
$450-S600. (647) 223-9063. 

Chocolate Labrador Fe- 
male, 2 years spayed, shots 
current, wonderful temper- 
mom, loves people and child - 
ron, no cots, house broken, 
eraia trained, know* basic 
obedience. $150.00. 
(047)431-8734. 

DO YOU ENJOY working 
with animals? Do you havo 2 
hours per week to spare? Assi- 
si Animal Foundation, one of 
'tho area's no-kill shelters Is 
seeking volunteers for work 
that Is highly rewarding and 
fun! Wo need men and 
women who: can work with 
cats and dogs, do light repair 
work and can answer phonos 
and other office duties. We are 
located in Crystal Lake. For 
more information please call 
(615)459-0990. 

FISH TANK 90 gallon, com- 
plete sot-up, $430. R & R 
PETS. (847) 249-5444. 

PET SITTING AND 

BEYOND. We come to your 
home, with TLC. Bonded and 
insure d. (847) 4735776. 

YORKIE PUPPIES AKC, 
baby doll faces, sweet tem- 
peraments, pre-spoiled, ready 
January 1 4th.. taking deposits, 
$500.(847)872-6931. 



370 


WanledToBuy 



WEDDING DRESS DIA- 
MOND COLLECTION, bri- 
dal dress, size 16. White, 
cathedral length train, off tho 
shoulder dross. Long slueves. 
beautiful with sequins and 
pearls. Brand new headpiece 
and voil. Paid $2,000. first 
$500 takes all. Call Melodi 
(414) 689-8414. 



350 



Miscellaneous 



FOR SALE FIVE SING 
AND SNORE ERNIES. Best 
offer. Can Marytin. (647) 622- 
0721 loavo message. 

GET A COLLEGE DEGREE 
IN 27 DAYS: 
BS/MS/MBS/Ph.D etc. indud- 
ing graduation ring, Iranscript. 
diploma. Yos, it's real, logal, 
guaranteed and accredited. 
For Iroo packol call: 1-800- 
689-8647. 

GRAVELY LAV/N MOWER 
and snowblower, neods work, 
bost offer. (847)740-1364. 



ALL WAR SOUVENIRS. 
Nazi. Japanese, & US. Local 
private collector in need of all 
types of helmets, daggers, 
medals, steins, war toys + Sa- 
murai swords. Top cash paid 
and will - pickup. (847) 
438-3191. 

BATHROOM STALL PAR- 
T1TIONS COMMERCIAL 
GRADE WITH DOORS. 
(647) 74O-03O6. 

Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
Paris. Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BpXES, Nlckelo- 
doon and Coko Machines. 
Paying CASH! Call 
(630)985-2742. 



500 


Homes For Sale 



•BY OWNER* 
Paddock Lake 3 Bedroom 
home, close to Kenosha, 
minutes from IL, on 3 lots-i 
build able, city sewer, private 
well, needs some inside work, 
priced thousands below mar- 
ket value. Priced to sell fasti 

414-537-4645. 

414537-3679. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



ATTN: FOR SALE WILL 
ALSO RENT or. RENT' 
WITH-OPT10N TO BUY, a 
1 -Bedroom home, close to 
schools, trains and shops. 
Available immediately. Call for 
details (647)837-9250. 

B0KNER3 LAKE BRAND 
new 3-bedroom, 2-bath, easily 
expandable, attached garage, 
large lot, sewered, tako rights. 
$119,900. Possible rent with 
option. (414) 763-5175. 

BY OWNER GREAT LOCA- 
TION-READY TO MOVE- 
IN. 2-story house with finished 
basement, 3-Iarge bedrooms 
(2-up, I -down), main floor liv- 
irvgroom, large eat-in kitchen. 
shtingroom upstairs, 3-baihs, 
2-car detached garage. Ideal 
location-Hubbard's Woods 
Subdivision, Wauconda, Illi- 
nois. Within walking distance 
to all three schools and stores. 
$160,000. (647) 526-2984 
Leave message. 

COUNTRY WALK IN 
ROUND LAKE BEACH, 4- 
bed rooms, 2-car garage, 3- 
1/2 baths, hid finished base- 
ment, hardwood floors, fire- 
place, fenced yard, back to 
farm patio. SUPER UP- 
GRADES. 5155,500. By owrv 
or. Appoint moot only (847) 
356-0411. 

DUPLEX-319 59TH 

PLACE. 3 Bedroom upper, 2 
lower. $84,900. Call 1 Month 
■ Realty. (414)657-1171. 

GAGES LAKE, LAKE- 
FRONT, 3-bedroom, 2-bath 
tri-leve! with 1-1/2 car de- 
tached garage. New exposed 
aggregate patio and sidewalk. 
Deck over waler with shore 
station, $214,000. (847) 
548-6650. 

HOFFMAN- ESTATES 

OPEN Sunday ipn>6pm. 690 
Lakevicw Lane. Beautiful 3- 

bodroom, 1-1/2 bath, upgrad- 
ed tri-leve), hardwood floors, 
oak kitchen, famifyroom, 
cedar fenced yard. Walk to 
grade school and park. 
$159.900. (847) 885-7336, 

HUGE WINDOWS! SPA- 
CIOUS ROOMSI 3-bed- 
room. 2-bath, hillside ranch, 
noar Fox Lake. 2,oo0sq.rt., 
woodod neighborhood. 

, SlZO-a. (847) 587-8520. 

INGLESIDE WATER- 

FRONT 2 LOTS 'Be con- 
nected to the Chain. 2-bed- 
room. 1-bath bungalow, with 
full basement, concrete boat 
well, flagstone patio, central 
air conditioning, 2-car garage, 
large parking lot. $120,000. 
(B15) 759-0069. (847) 265- 
1690. 



500 


Homes For Sale 



500 




Homes For Sate 



PISTAKEE LAKE 4-BED- 
ROOM, 2- bath, $229,000. 
(615) 363-6220. 

SELL A HOME/BUY A 
HOME. If setting, we have a 
number of interested buyers. If 
interested in purchasing you 
may qualify for as little as 3% 
down. Servicing II. & Wi. Jim 
Davis. (BOO) 747-5547. 

TAX BREAK RENTING 
doesnl do H so why not get out 

ot an apartment into your own 
home? You may qualify for as 
little as 3% down. Servicing IL 
& Wi. Jim Davis (800) 747- 
5547. 

THREE BEDROOM 2- 
BATH home with dual level 
deck and wood burning fire- 
place. Located in the Galena 
Territory Resort, Galena, Illi- 
nois, Walking distance to the 
new General Golf Course. 
Spacious garage and black 
top driveway. Excellent for 
year round living or rental 
property. $139,900. (847) 726- 
0219. 

TIRED OF RENTING? A 

home is in your reach with as 
little as 3% down for qualified 
buyers. Servicing II. & Wi. Jim 
Davis (800) 747-5547. 

TWIN LAKES AREA DU- 
PLEX, 2-bedroom, large 
kitchen and dintngroom, fun 
basement, 2-1/2 car garage 
each side, all appliances, C/A, 
lyr. old. Asking £185.000. Tim 
(414) 539-3314, Chris (414) 
539-3174. 



LOOKING FOR A TAX DE- 
DUCTION IN 19967 The 
best one may be your own 
home. Wo service II. & Wi. You 
may qualify tor as little as 3% 
down. Jim Davis (800) 747- 
5547. 

MCHENRY 
Small 1 Bedroom house. New 
roof/siding and carpet. Nice 
yard, lake rights. $51,900. 
(815)344-4278. 

MUNDELEIN 2-3 BED- 
ROOM HOUSE, fenced yard, 
newer appliances, newly re- 
modeled, $950/manth. (847) 

NIPPERSINK COUNTRY 
CLUB setting nestled among 
lakes and oaks. This charming 
2-bedroom, 1-1/2 bath coun- 
try home ts unique with fire- 
place and beamed living coil- 
ing is a must to see. New from 
lop to bottom! $87,500. (414) 
895-7280. (414) 695-2819. 



INTEREST BREAK HOME 
owners use equity to pay off 
high interest obligations. Bet- 
ter than paying high rates on 
credit cards or other bins and 
get the tax benefit. Jim Davis 
(800) 747-5547 Servicing IL & 
Wi. 



JOHNSBURG 3-BED- 

ROOMS, 1-BATH, 2,5 ga- 
rage, central air. recently re- 
modeled, large wooded lot, 
$109,000. (815) 363-8220. 






PUBLIC NOTICE 
FISHER AND FISHER M FILE NO. 29580 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 
FT Mortgage Companies d/t/a FTB Mortgage 
Services f/k/a Carl I. Brown & Companies. Plaintiff, 
VS. Case No. 97 C 4103 

Matthew J. Evert and Pamela Evert, Judge Plunkatt 
Claudette R. AJbrecht and The Board of Managers of the 
Pleasant Hill Homeowners, Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 29S9Q 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

QWH ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 

entered in the above entitled cause on October 1. 1997 . 

I, Max Tyson. Special Commissioner for this court wilt oi 
January 23, 1998 at the hour of 9:00 a.m. at Lake County Court 
House. Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, 
the following described premises: 
c/Wa 1039 S. Waukegan, IL 60085. Tax ID • 07-35-204-015 

The Improvements on the property consist of single family 
dwelling.. 

S«)»T«m»-. 10% down by certified Hmd*. balance wtthln 24 



I hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 
The property wilt NOT be open for inspection. 
The judgment amount was $182,336.13. 
Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which wilt entitle the purchaser to a Deed on 
a specified date unless the property is redeemed according to 
law. 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Ftsher, 30 North LaSafle, Chicago. Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 pjn. Under Illinois law. the Sales 
Officer is QQl required to provide additional information other 
than that set forth in this Notice. 

/s/ Max Tyson. Special Commissioner 







Landmark 
Designs 



f - r 






L— " S 



ANDREA LYNNE 

The Andrea Lynne is perfectly designed for the famiry with young chikiren triat rK«d lo be do^ 
parents at night. The steeping area for the e/itire famty is located at the rear of this 1^ 
home with the master suite in the middle. 

The master suite has a lame walk-in closet that can be dosed off from the rest ot the room by a 
pockel door, There is a counter containing "his* and 'rxx' sirto. This area is separate titxn the tub and 
toilet area. Next to the master bath rs the other bathroom for the rest of the home. !t also has a tub, 

sink and toilet. _ ._ 

The two bedrooms, one on each side of the master surte, have wall dosets. The utility room with 
the washer and dryer is located beside the bedroorrfi to make laurxlry easier. There is also a door off 
theulity room to the garage. 

The Irving room and ti« dining rixm are cccnr^ 
owners Kr^bbeagreatroom,afarr^room.oranycc^ 

ed ceilings. It has a fireplace designed into the wal wim windows on either skfe There are r^fo 
opening out onto a circular patio area. 

Storage is vital with young children. In order to help with this problem, a largo storage doset h3S 
been located inthohallonlhewallnextlothe pantry, The door to the pantry rs around the comer in 
the kitchen area. The kitchen has been set up rjurt-in wrth appliances arxJ r>er^ 

On the Iront d the rxxr^ with numerous windcv^ 
ft rm skylights fa added lighting, h^ 
hot cup of coffee. '■ , 

The oarage s a three car unit, deep enough to have a wortt bench in the rear or down the side. 
Storaoe of bikes, bicvcies, tms, and sports e^ 

Fora study kit ol the ANDREA LYNNE (4O5-25LP60) send $14.95, to Landmaik Designs, 33127 
Saginaw Rd. E., Cottage Grove, OR 97424 (Specify plan name & number for kit). Fora Dream Home 
plan book featuring our most popular home plans, send S7.95, or cai 1 -600-562-1 151 



I 



»HE!^^!.. . ■' " •-- 









\ I 



C14 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 2, 1998 



504 



Homes For Rent 



GRAYSLAKE CHESA- 
PEAKE FAHMS, 4-bod- 
room, 2-1/2 bath, living* 
room/dlningroom, full case- 
ment, fireplace, fenced yard, 
2-car garage. Spacious, new, 
decorated. $2.l00/manth. 
Good credit a must. (847) 
465-8052. 

ONE BEDROOM YEAH 
ROUND LAKEFRONT COT- 
TAGE, washer/dryer, a/c, 
$650/monlh plus security do- 
posit, all utilities paid, No pels. 
(847) 526-7847. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
NEW ADULT COMMUNI- 
TY. New 1-bodroom, 1-balh, 
(amilyroom, i-car attached ga- 
rage, includes all appliances, 
cable TV and trash. 
$695/monlh plus utilities. No 
pets. (847) 526-5000 loavo 
message with all phone 
numbors on recorder. (847) 
526-0420 evenings. 

W1NTHR0P HARBOR DU- 
PLEX cute 2-bedroom in quiet 
neighborhood, basemonl, ga- 
rage, fenced yard in back, 
$675/month plus utilities. No 
•pets. No Section 8. (847) 
223-6269. 



508 



Homes Wanted 



I NEED TO BUY A HOUSE 
ANY CONDITION 

MUST BE REASONABLE. 
(847) 587-4355. 



514 



Condo/Tcwi Homes 



520 



ApartmenU For Rent 



520 



ApartmenU For Rent 



BUILD A DOWN PAY- 
MENT WHILE YOU RENT. 
25% goes toward down pay- 
ment on this great 3 story 
condo in the woods, 2/3 bed- 
rooms, 2.5 baths, 2-car ga- 
rago, C/A, so much morol 
S1,200/month. Round Lako, 
Kathy (847) 291-5444 or 
(847) 587-9623. 

GREAT STARTER HOME 

2-bodroom lownhomo, full 
basement, cathedral ceilings, 
Genoa City, Wise. $86,900, 
NO MAINTENANCE FEESI 
(815) 675-6360. (414) 
279-333 1. 

ISLAND LAKE 2-BED- 
ROOM lownhomo. Cornet lot 
in Fox River Shores. Vaulted 
ceilings, liroplace, attached 
garage, dishwasher, wash- 
er/dryer. S900/montfT, 6-12 
month lease, 1 month security. 
(B4 7) 526-6331. 

ONE BLOCK FROM UW 
PARKSIDE, 184Bsq.il., 2- 
bodroom. 2-bath. large |ac- 
cuzzi, cathedral ceiling, gas 
fireplace, garage, central air, 
pond view, spacious. Must 
see. St 45,000-51 64.900. 
(414)552-7833. 

TOWNHOUSE 3-BED- 

ROOMS, 3-BATHS, Gurnoo 

School District, $96,000. (847) 
249-5442. 

VERNON HILLS CONDO 
FOR RENT, 5-minutos from 
Hawlhorno Mall. 2-bodrooms, 
1-bath. alt new appliances, 
washer/dryer. microwave. 
Newly remodeled. Neutral 
decor. Ceramic tile. 1-car ga- 
rage with door opr-nor. Avail- 
able February l. $950/monlh 
plus security deposit. Call 
(847) 548-8553 evenings. 

VERNON HILLS CONDO 
FOR RENT In The Willows, 
2-bedroom. 1-1/2 ball), living- 
room, diningroom, cat-in kitch- 
en, washer/dryer, A/C. over- 
looks pool and lake, 
SOOO/month. (847) 816-0869. 

VERNON HILLS CONDO In 
The Willows, 2-bedroom. 1- 
1/2 bath, livingroom, dining- 
room, oal-in kltchon, wash- 
or/dryor. A/C, overlooks pool 
and lako, $72,000. (847) 
816-0869. 

WAUCONDA CONDO FOR 
SALE OR RENT, 2-bod- 
room, 2-bath, 1-car garage, 
A/C, $950/monlh. (847) 
526-1375. 



ANTIOCH CLEAN 1-BED- 
ROOM aparlmonl, near lako, 
ideal for single person, non- 
smoker, $400/month plus se- 
curity deposit, includes utili- 
ties, references. No dogs. 
(847)395-2172. 

IMPERIAL TOWER A 
IMPERIAL MANOR 
QUIET BUILDINGS 
URGE SPACIOUS 

APARTMENTS 

AtR CONDITIONING 

PRIVATE BALCONIES 

LARGE CLOSETS 

PRIVACY WALLS 

CONVENIENT LAUNDRY 

FACILITIES. 

CALL (847) 244-9222. . 

LAKEVIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA, Largo 1 & 2 bedrooms, 
$590-$720/mnnlh. Heal, wa- 
ter, air ir eluded. (847). 
356-5474. 

LARGE 1 BEDROOM 

APARTMENT wilh formal din- 
ing-room, hardwood floors, 
large closets, laundry-room, 
parking. No pots, $450/month 
plus security, plus utilities. 
(847)336-9654. 

ROUND LAKE APART- 
MENT FOR RENT, all utilities. 
$650/month, first and last 
months rent and references, 
Pets OK. (847)566-1775. 



Center Street 
Apartments 

Two bedroom 

with patio, 

utilities 

included 

847-395-0949 



Pox lah 

Harbor View Apartments 

One Bedroom 
apartments near lake on 

qufet street Newly 

decorated and carpeted. 

Cable available. 

No dogs. 
I Bedroom $525 
847-295-5105 



To Subscribe Please 
Call 847/223-8161 



it Wishing ■'* 
9 youjl ft 
•5 Wonderful q 

I Jloliday I 

it , /r ii 

ana„jfl 



*? Joyous «j 



J* Water's Edge*,, 
$ Apartments |f 

ft 250 s. m 59 a 

| Fox Lake/ 9 
•$! ingleside ty 

& 847/587-6888 & 

• . ^*±. T* 
*. J^ •* 



OAKRIDGE VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 



Offering Affarttablc Housing for 
Qualified Applicants, 

Currently Accepting Applications on our 

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments 

Stop in at: 

299 Oakridge Court in Antioch 

Or call: 

847-395-4840 
f$Y 1-800-526-0844 TDD 

ES&SS9 Managed by Moridtan Group, Inc 



G.P. MANAGEMENT 




t $ 2 Bedroom Apartmenh In Antioch £ Lake Villa 
Antioch Manor Apartments r ^j , 

445 Donin Dr., Antioch antiocii 

847-395-0949 '".f."?, 1 

Deep Lake 
Hermitage Apartments 

,149 N. Milwaukee Ave.. Lake Villa 
847-356-2002 




« $m mmmmm^m. 



^&Sre*.?^£fe 



^ HOLIDAY MOVE-IN SPECIAL 



ONE & TWO 
BEDROOM 




518 



Mobile Homes 



520 



ApartmenU For Rail 




Luxunr atamments 
KENOSHA - 1/2 mile 
! from 1-94 on Hvvy 50. 
Jusl a short drive fo lux- 
ury living. Brand new 1 
& 2 Harm Affordable 
Luxury Apis. - 
Washer/Dryer & panlry 
in every unil.JExercise 
room, clubhouse, pool 
& pond. Sunrooms & 
underground parking 
available. Pets consid- 
ered. Call lo reserve 

yours now. 
414-652-RENT 



WESTWIND 

VILLAGE 

APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave., Zion 

\, 2 & 3 BEDROOMS 

FREE HEAT 

HOLIDAY CASH SPECIAL 

$200," GXSH BACK 

WHEN MOVE IN BY 

DEC ii - 

Appliances * On-Site 

Manager * No I'd* 

Starling from *-495/mo. 

Call Marlha & Issac 

IB47) 746-T420 

or BEAR PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

(414)697-9616 



530 


Room* For Rent 



FOX LAKE women pro- 
torred, $75/wk, $150/soc. do- 
posil, all utilities included. 
Background chock. (847) 
587-6360. 

LAKESIDE ROOM ON FOX 
LAKE, private bath/entrance, 
only $100/wook. (847) 
356-2747. (414)862-6066. 

SPACIOUS FURNISHED 
SLEEPING ROOM. Rent 
$85/wook. 1-week escrow. 
Utilities, cable, kitchen, laun- 
dry, bnlh prtvilogos Included. 
No pots-alcohol-drugs. Ro- 
sponsibio mature person de- 
sired. Rent can bo reduced in 
exchange for light housokoop- 
Ing. (414) 654-7905 after 6pm. 

WAUKEGAN LADIES 

ROOM, sconic homo, $80 per 
week. (647) 623-9064 or 
(847) 207-6337 Days. 



LAKESIDE INN 
AND RESORT 

Fox Lake Area 

Rooms for rent. Heat 
& util. incl. Private 
shower. $90.00 week- 
ly plus sec. tlep. req. 

No pels. Gill 

5n7-Ofi35, if no ans. 

leave message. 



538 



Bujincn Property 
lor Rent 



SUB-LEASE 9.000SQ.FT., 
18FT. ceiling, twin load level- 
or docks. Porfocl for dry stor- 
age or other. Good Grayslakc 
location. Available immediate- 
ly. Very reasonable. Call Karen 
(847) 740-4035, 



•wwwwvwv 

iilUCIIMC 



CAMPGROUND MEMBER- 
SHIP. Camp from Coast to 
Coast. Over Eleven 
Hundred quality resorts, only 
$4.00 to $1 1 .00 per night. Paid 
$3,600. Sacrilico $595. Call 
1-G00-438-1944. (SCA Net- 
work) 



520 



Apartmcnls Fcr Renl 



ARLINGTON HEIGHTS 2- 
BEDROOM, hall month se- 
curity deposit, heal, $755. 
(847) 392-4998. 



j£ BEDROOM J 
jjC APARTMENTS 3 

j£ • Flexible Leasing "Quiet fjj 

^* • Free Credit Check Setting" ^ 

to*' dE^L An,i,N:h -V,A 

Vn3Rn r— • j$ 

1 i 

847-395-0949 £ 

M Hwy.83& ^ 4 

JJV North Ave. lasso* \% 



RICHMOND CAH 

uorr or your nusi- 

NliSS USE Hrick Hldjr 
on Hi. 12, 1 hay, office, 
garage & sales lot. 
Excellent visibility. 
Alternate use OK-J 
$795.00/mo. 

Land Mgmt 
815/678-4771 



568 



Out Of Anra Property 






ANTIOCH 
MANOR 



'X APARTMENTS 



NihiIi Avi 



NORTHWEST WISCON- 

SIN 45 minutes wool of Hay- 
wurd. Year round cnbiri ori 
4.11 woodrjd acres. ?-bvd> 
(oon«, i-biilli, modern kuch- 
on wilh mlaowavo. now walk, 
uui basomerrt wilh slider, 2nd 
bain roughed in. Screened 
porch. Lake fighls with nrtvato 
bench and pior on a crystal 
clear private lake wilh wjgar 
nnnd Miorolmo. Area is portnet 
(or all types year round aclfvi 
ty, $50,000. Call Sandy Swan- 
son nl Vacnliorilrinrf Hoalty 
(715)480-2233, 



SO. COLORADO ROCKY 
MTN. FRONT RANGE. 55 
acr6o-$34.90O. Ride off into 
the sunset on this perfect 
horso property. Gently rolling 
meadows w/ boauliful juniper 
ipino trees. Spoclacular 
views, abundant elk, deer & 
turkoy, Minutos to lake & Na- 
tional Forest. Power and 
phono. Owner and financing. 
Coll now 719-564.9387. 
Rod Crook Ranch at 
Hotchot. 



Griffith, IN - For 

Sate by Owner-4 
Plex, Exc Income. 
$179KFirm, 
219-864-0198 



GREATLAND 
INVESTMENTS 

Loc'd In Western Iowa. 
Investment opportunity with 
high rent return: 586 acres 
of excellent crop land. 
Improvements include cen- 
ter pivots, equipment stor- 
age buildings & grain bins, 
Asking $950,000. (71 2)423- 
9952 or (712) 423-3672. 



708 



Snawmobiles/ATVs 



1981 SKI-DOO 4500 two 
soator. Oil injection, 1,700 
miles, mint condition. Excel- 
lent for kids or cabin. Asking 
$495. Must soil. (847) 
356-0275. 

1S93 EXCITER SX. Both 
groat condition. Vory low 
miles. Must sell lor $3, GOO. 
(847) 566-1 199. 

1995 SKI-DOO FORMULA 
III, low miles, $4,000/best. 
1990 Mach 1, $2.000/bost. 
Both sleds in excellent condi- 
lion. (847) 587-5311. 

1997 STORM V-NOSE on- 
closed snowmobilo trailer , tie- 
downs, electric brakes, ramp 
doors, fully finishod inside, 

$5.000/bost. (847) 395-0038 
homo. (647) 206-4440 pager. 

FOR SALE 1079 POLARIS 
CENTURION SOOcc triple 
•used not abusndWory clean 
and RELIABLE, good runner. 
Carbides end studs. Run-up 
stand and belts. Includes 1989 
Snobird galv. two place trailer. 
$1,775 lor all. Must soo. Fox 
Lako, IL (847) 937-5967 
days, (B47) 587-4031 after 
Spm. 

SNOWMOBILE TRAILER 
1995 Triton, 4-place, brakes, 
salt shiold, ski glides and 
spare. $2,600. (847) 548- 
1654. 



SNOWMOBILE, 440 ARTI- 
CAT Jag, with electric start 
and cover. Now Graphite and 
plastic shields. 1995. 250 origi- 
nal miles. $3,000. Man's hel- 
met size L (847) 266-2562 
days, (847) 395-0269 oven- 
ir.gs. 



SNOWMOBILES 
Polaris XLT & XLTSKS. like 
now. ready to ride, hand 
warmers. Ihumb warmers, 
covers, low mileage, both 
have electric start. 
(414)539-3153. 



SNOWMOBILES POLARIS 
1990 Indy 500SP. $2,000. 
1D92 650RXL, $2,500. (847) 
526-9062 alter 4pm. 



710 


lloat/Molors/Elc. 



1080 WELL CRAFT BOAT, 
cuddy cabin, AJpIno storoo, 8- 
cylinder engine, sundetfc, ox- 
cetlunt condition, low Iksus on 
motor. $9,500.bosl. Pagor 
(847)216-2172. 



$2,500 1985 ELDO.CADIL- 
LAC (no A/C), gray in color, 
good shape. (414) B62-64S2. 

1979 FIREBIRD Super Sport, 
Classic Arizona Collectors car, 
58,000 original miles, good 
condition, fully loaded, glass T- 
tops, mag wtiools, automatic. 

Pagor (847)216-2172. 

1904 MERCEDES 
WAGON 2B0TE, $5,500. 
Must soo. (847) 234-3675. 

1084 PONTIAC PARI- 
SIENNE, 92K miles. V8, A/C, 
cruiso, power windows, lilt, 
looks and runs groat, $4,400. 
(647) 740-8957. 

1986 NISSAN STANZA 
MINI VAN, excellont en- 
gine/transmission, 2.0, brand 
now brain box, parting out. 
Must Soo! Many other good 
parts. (815) 653-5030 After 
6pm. 

1980 AUDI MODEL 90, 
groat shapo, black loathor in- 
terior, power sunroof, cruiso, 
great storoo, no rust. Peppy lit- 
tlo rod car. Asking $5,000. 
(414) 763-3248 otior 5pm. . 

1092 PONTIAC BONNE- 
VILLE, am/Tm cassette, loath-, 
or Interior, 12 position lumbar 
scats, heated in winter, A/C In 
summer, dual air bags, A/C, 
heat, moonroof/sunroof, koy- 
loss entry. Hems loo nu- 
merous to list. Asking $10,500. 
Call Dawn (847) 604-8502 or 
(847) 223-8502 loavo mes- 
sage 

1092 SATURN SC, 2 door, 

5 speed, power steering. 
power brakes, air, $5,000. 
(847) 970-9709. 

1004 TRANS AM GT LT1 
V8, 6-spood, 35,000 (lilies. 
$14,900/bcst. (414) 652-7957. 

1905 RIVIERA EXTRA 
dean, low milos, lots of oxtras, 
ralloy wheels, Vog tiros, 
$17,900. t991 Probo, au- 
tomatic, low miles, rough load- 
ed. $4,950. (414) 877-9085. 

BARRACUDA-1068-FOR- 
MULA S FASTBACK, 340 4- 
speod, original paint, interior 
and spare tiro, 45K. rod linos, 
spool lasi 20 years In storage. 
Serious inquires only. 
$13.800. (815)653-2920. 

HONDA 

CARS FOR $100111 

Seized & Sold locally this 

month. Trucks, 4x4's. etc 

(BOO) 522-2730 

0*1. 2292. 

CHEVY 1088 CELEBRmr* 
STATION WAGON, 125K. 
perfect vehicle for family or 
tradesman. Can Til 4*0 sheets 
In back. Over $3,000 of work 
done. Asking $2,000. (847) 
934-6141. 

CHRYSLER LEBARON 

1979, 6-cylmdor, 4-door, au- 
tomatic, A/C. power, good 
shape, 68,000 original miles, 
$1,200/bOSt. (847) 740-13B4. 

DONATE AUTOS? 
BOATS, Free phono card. to 
donors with ad #2248. Tax de- 
ductible, Freo towing. Herllago 
lor tho blind. Helping mo 
blind/vision impaired. 800-2 
DONATE. 

FLORIDA CAR 1977 Mus- 
tang Mach I, 302. automatic, 
A/C, lots of new parts, very 
fresh body, $2,500. (847) 
662-7060. 

IF YOU HAVE 

FURNITURE TO SELL, 

A car, or appllnncot, If 

you nro having a Gsrago 

Solo or If you havo a 

houso to soli or apartmenl 

to ront. 

Call Lisa boforo 10am 

Wednesday to placo 

your ad horo. 

(847)223-8161 

oxi. 140. 

MITSUBISHI 1994 DIA- 
MANTE LS, excellent condi- 
tion. $14,000/bost. (414) 
889-4166. 



804 



Can for Sale 



NISSAN 1905 SENTRA 4- 
door, 35,000 miles, fully' 
equipped, perfect shape, au- 
tomatic power, black, $9,950. 
(847) 623-3666. 



814 



Scnfce& Parti 



1964-1077 CHEVELLE, 
GTO, Cutlass, Monte Carlo, 
Nova, Skylark, Firebird, Cam- 
aro, imp a la. 'From tho pedal 
to the metal, I've got all tho 
parts to restore your clas- 
sic. .your parts placet* (030) 
679-1600. ' 

CLASSIC QUARTER 

PANEL SALE. Mustang, Com- 
oro, Nova. Chcvoilo, Cutlass, 
Mopors, Ponllac, Chovrotol, 
moref TRUCK PANS, FLOOR 
PANS. DOORS, FENDERS, 
BUMPERS. Now and Colifor- 
nia, Rust freo. MARK'S PLAT- 
ING & SUPPLY 217-824-6164. 



824 


Vans 



1964 CHEVY CONVER- 
SION VAN, runs groat, 

S i, 500/1) on t. Call after 7pm' 
(847) 746-3452. 

1060 DODGE VAN 130K 

used for delivery, 2-soais only, 
all regular maintenance and 
records, AM/FM. runs and 
drives oxcoDont, $1,750/bost. 
(647) 740-4035. 

GRAND VOYAGER LE All 
wheel drive, loadod with all 
goodies. It's a 1992, but In out- ' 
standing condition and well 
cared for by slnglo owner. 
Traitor hitch. Noeds NO work 
or repairs. $8,700/best. CoM 
Jim (847) 336-6100 ext.201 
days, (647) 244-9086 after 
6pm. 



828 



Four Tbetl Drive 
Jeeps 



1087 BRONCO 
Great mechanical, good body, 
never plowed. $3,500/best. 
1065 K5 BLAZER 4x4 
Rebuiti motor, transmission, 
transfer case $3,500. 

(847) 74Q-A826. 

1002 DODGE DAKOTA 
CLUB CAB, VB, automatic, 
4WD, loadod. $9,700/1)051. 
(847) 5B7-200B. 



834 



Trudo/Tntikn 



1904 CHEVY FULL SIZE 
PICKUP CI 500, Work truck 
package, standard cab, fleet- 
sido bod. Good condition. 
$9.5O0/best. (647) 382-2656. 

CHEVY PICKUP DIESEL 
FULL SIZE 1061, 1 Ion. au- 
tomatic, 91,000 miles, 
$1.500/bOSl. Ski-Doo ca- 
booso, $125, Sido doors for 
Chevy Van. 396-350hp rebuilt 
heads. Used small Chevy 
block header, $80. New big 
block headers, fits 'Comoro & 
Nova. Two roar doors for 
1971-1996 Chovy/GMC van * 
t front rider sido door, 
$100/ea. Left side mskdo door 
handle for 1964 Olds Cutlass 
Suprome. Munsey 4-spood 
transmission, $375. And much 
more. Too much to morrtion. 
Pager (847)216-2172. 

ONE OWNER-WELL MAIN- 
TAINED 1978 Dodgo Pick- 
up truck, $475. Excellent en- 
gine. Mechanically sound, 
dual oxhausl, glass packs, 
King Club Cab, standard trans- 
mission. Needs paint job and 
minor floor board work (rust). 
Call after 6pm, ask for Mr. Co- 
leman. Just over State lino in 
Kenosha (414) 654-7905. 



838 



Hcmy Equipment 



BRAND NEW 7-1/2FT. 
WESTERN UNI-MOUNT PRO 
PLOW, $1,750. (647) 
740-7838. 




January 2, 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C 1 5 



844 


Motorcycles 



S30 



Firewood 




m 



(Miscellaneous 
Services 



TWO 1098 HONDA Z50R 
MOTORCYCLES, like new, 
good Christmas present, 
5875/flach/bost. 1995 Triton 
aluminum trailer with lights, 
$675/bosi. Call Steve (847) 
740-0890. 



848 



Wanted To Buy 



WANTED TO BUY Mini or 
Class A motor homo. Pay 
cash. Need soon. {847} 
679-0481. 



.FANTASTIC 

FIREWOOD 

2yr. old seasoned hardwood. 

Oak, ash. maple, cherry. 165.00 

per lace cord mixed $75.00 

per tace cord 100% oak. 

Free stacking and dehery. 

Baj the wood ibtt'i 

gutrantcrd to barn. 

fM7)&4M6l3' (815) M4-9522 

1-60C-43O4?fi? 

Credit Cards Accepted 



Special services tor land- 
lords/managers. We provide 
complete cleaning/documen- 
tary services tor future legal 
action after 'problem tenants' 
vacate apartments and 
homes. For additional details 
caD: (847)223-2103 
COLEMAN SERVICES 



Call (847) 225- 
8101 to place 

your 

Help Wanted 

ads in lakeland 

Newspapers* 

Classified 

Section 




S15 



Cupel Cleaning 



S39 



Housekeeping 



DO YOU SUFFER FROM 
ALLERGIES? DOES 

YOUR CARPET NEED 
CLEANING? U.S.C, SERVIC- 
ES wilt guarantee the lowos! 
overall prico on oxpert carpet 
cleaning I Compare our prices 
and save. Our cleaning In- 
cludes a soil guard, deodoriz- 
er and static guard that others 
charge extra for. Also.no extra 
charge tor spoi romoval, 
stairs, hallways, or travel time. 
Just 1 low price ol $.20 per 
sq It., for ocluat carpel sizes. 
With our 5 stop method, wo 
still scrub your carpet with a 
machine, (not just vacuum), 
with a chemical treated water. 
For a healthy homo, wo re- 
movo dust, pollen, mold, bac- 
teria, and dust mites. Wo loavo 
your homo fresh of smelling, 
enhance its appearanco and 
extended carpet hie. Call 
today for your appointment 
and breath easy again. (847) 
546-5600. Recommended by 
the world's bost carpet manu- 
facturers, 30VT5. experience. 



HOUSECLEANING DE- 

PENDABLE, LOW rates, 
$10/hr, Phono Marcl (414) 
942-8825. 



S57 




"DOMINOE" 



Painling/Decoraling 



PRECISE PAINTING 

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR. 

•Now construction or wo 

can make It look Ilka newt 

'Expert Wallpaper 

Romoval 

•Wall Repair. 

•Roady to be painted 

or papered. 

Call ua about 

Reasonable Rates. 

CALL ABOUT SPRING 

DECK SPECIAL!) 

(847) 395-0490. 



S72 



Professional 
Services 



WRITE FOR YOU1 

•X-Mas Card* 

• Wedding Invitations 

•Showor/Pnrty Invitations. 

•Handwritten. 

* Reasonable rates. 

Call (815) 353-5330. 



"Dominoc" is a larger mid-size, 
sturdily built mostly lib/pointer 
mix. lie b a handsome dog with 
a shiny black, short coat, and a 
while Maze on his chest. Just 
three years old, Dominoc is a 
neutered male with a terrific personality. Labs are known for their 
outstanding temperament and ability to blend well into a family. 
Dominoc is a smart dog full of responsive allcnlivcncss and he has 
a playful, outgoing disposition. Dominoc is eager to learn and will 
train easily. This wonderful dog has been overlooked here at 
Orphans far too long. He first came to the shelter in August of 1996 
and should have been adopted into a loving home long ago. If you 
arc looking for a terrific companion animal who will be a loyal and 
enthusiastic friend, please come and see Dominoc. This fine dog 
deserves a family In call his own. 

ALL DOGS BENEFIT FROM BASIC 

HOUSEBREAKING/OBEDIENCE TRAINING WHICH HELPS 
BOND DOG TO OWNER. CRATING IS RECOMMENDED 
THE FIRST YEAR WHEN THE OWNER ISAWAY IFNEEQED. 

Cash SSS donation includes frecspay/nculer, collar, tag, leash, first 
shots, follow up care and much more. 

Orphans of the Storm is located at 2200 Rivcrwoods Rd., 
Dcerfield. 1 lours are 1 1 am • 5 pm, seven days a week. Call (847) 
945-0235 for further information. 






t 



!€>op£L Hie, eoniuuj near- ix a 

rejoiuidhitf juieeeix for all On* friend^ 

both old and new. We'll never forget 

tjonr. land of mppoeL Willi tltanlu. ami 

warm whiles, from all of uL 

Your Lakeland Classified Reps. 

Jttaufeeit, Qfojovl Si QUek. 

(847) 223-8161 



t 






>i ■ ■» ■ ■ 



i ■>' i l WI— i 




MALL 




•fit 



WV4M 





M 



W 



Walgreens 

845 Rollins Rd. 

Round Lake Bch. IL. 

60073 

(847) 223-6677 


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Woodfield Mall 

Golf Rd at Route 53 
Schamburg.IL 
(847) 330-1 537 


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Gurnee Mills Mall 
61 70 W. Grand Ave. 
Gurnee, IL 
(847) 263-7500 


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Vernon Hills, IX 

C847) 367-OOX9 

Now accepting 

applications For 

all positions 




832 ROLUNS ROAD 
ROUND LAKE, ILLINOIS 60073 

(847) 546-7790 



Happy Holidays 




JFRIDAY'SY 

Wanted: Walter* & Waitresses )) 
ISIETbwnlJneRd. // 

_VernonHIh l IL 6DWI/ 



Lakelaxtd Ne\ 

And 





-¥* 




r, 

4 



\ 



,„-*i^mBWh«cse:.- - 



C1 Si lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 2, 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers is pleased to present our 1998 






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Spring Edition 

Lakeland Newspapers will be publishing a special Employment 
Guide on Friday March 13, 1998. You won't want to miss out on 
this special pullout section. It will be inserted in all 1 1 Lakeland 

Newspapers, covering 90% of Lake County. 

This is the perfect opportunity to recruit from Lake County's finest job applicants! 
Or let people know about your resume service! This informative section will fea- 
ture articles and information on the employment situation here in Lake County. 




Ad sizes and prices are as follows: 

Full page , . .01165 



3/4 page 
^ 1/8 page 
H 1/4 page 

1/8 page 



0925 
0616 

0325 
0151 




; -^si 






HURRY! 



Call your Classified 

Advertising Account 

Executive today at 

(847) 223-8161 

ext. 110 or 112 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



EO. Box 268 

30 South Whitney 

Gruyslake, Illinois 60030 

(847) 223-8161 

Fax (847) 223-8810 



NWH 



■«■ 



January 2, 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C 1 7,'- 



Live in Lakeland Newspaper's 
world of 





Lakeland Newspapers 




ynamite 
ining & 
iscounts 



<84tT) 740-4035 



b> Good for "4 USES" at Each of 9 Locations = 36 OFFERS -4 



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Pay for your 

Lakeland Newspaper subscription TODAY 

for 1 or 2 years and receive the 

BRAND NEW, AWESOME, LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS' 3D CARD!! 





URiNG 



36 Money saving offers 

*■ ■ *«■■*.*, , , . - ■ , 

From locally owned and operated businesses 

Card Value over $150, and you get it for FREE 

just by subscribing today to your local Lakeland Newspaper ! 






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OPTION NUMBER 1 

d $45.00 for 2 years - Pay for 2 years and receive the 
spectacular Lakeland Newspapers' 5D card (which is an 
additional 10% savings off the already low 1 year rate) plus 
receive a valuable Lakeland Newspaper classified ad 
coupon good for use on any private parly Classified ad! 

Option 1 Value = $248.00* 



OPTION NUMBER 2 

□ $24.50 for 1 year - Pay for 1 year and receive the in- 
credible Lakeland Newspapers' 3D card! That's a saving 
of 40% off the newsstand price and it's delivered to your 
mailbox every Friday! 

Option 2 Value = $189.00* 



SEND Lakeland Newspapers Circulation Dept. 

PAYMENT * P "°" Box 188 

*Gr ay slake, Illinois 60030 

TO: *(847) 740-4035 



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PLEASE CHECK METHOD OF PAYMENT YOU PREFER 
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•Coupon must accompany paid order to receive 3D card. Offer good on orders postmarked after Nov. 15th, 1997. No other discounts apply. Offer expires Feb. 28, 1998. 



G1'8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 2, H99B 




-To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



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AURSEN & 
LACKMAN<h. 

Window & Door Replacement 

Service You Can Trust 
Free Estimates 

i*"* *^ (847)838-5300 



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Miracle 
■Winters g 

"Fully Insured" 
Residential/Commercial 

(Deck sealing available) 
(847) 210-7159 
(847)247-1676 



FREE Estimates * Ask for Mark 



\-%* 3P@te " 



yxyrr 



ryyvYyvy>r*rr<rvyyv?ryyirr 



'DcfefclV 



' Specializing in hand-raising baby parfots 

• Tropical & marine fish 

• Large variety of small animals & reptiles 
Mon-Wed 10:30^; Thurs-Frl 10:30-9; 

Sat 10:30-6; Sun 11:00-5, 
Closed on Tuesdays 

101 Lakeland Plaza • Fox Lake, IL 
847-973-8950 




IS THERE A 
DIVORCE 
IN YOUR 
FUTURE? 



If so, 
call us 
today for 
information! 

SIMPLE • FAST • NO ATTORNF. YS 

(A Homey available on request) 

SWOOSH 

$125 

We The People Business Center 

835 l:. Rollins, Round Lake Beach 

(847) 548-1300 




•Since 




CjiIi For 

• Aluminum Cans 

• All Other Scrap Motnls 

Industrial Accounts Wolcomo 

Chicago Surplus 

11304 200tti Avonuo 
-ryewor, wi 

Uwnliwi Tknw. Wl (5 rrmtn Worth ol AmiocM Taks 

Hwy C on nAs w* ol Rou(e 83. Tu'n Hoith on 259lh 

Si V«>f to left to 2 t*x*,s (n**l Id Tcjy s T?rt*n) 

Mor\. - Fri. 0:30am - 5pm 

Saturday 8:30am - 3:30pm 

(414)862-2517 

(414) 862-2554 



Let Us Do Your 
Honey Do List 

METROPOLITAN SERVICES, INC. 

1 959 •Fully Insured *24 Hour Emergency Service 

■ Painting, Interior & Exterior * ,i _ 

■ Wallpaper Removal {..J 

Dry-wall Repairs 
■ Rotted Wood Replacement \ 
■ Carpentry ^ 

■ Duct Cleaning 
- Carpet Cleaning 

Drapery Cleaning 



Smoke & Water Restoration 



■ And Much More 




^r„ 



CALL US TODAY FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE 



(847) 367-8500 

729 East Park Ave. • Libertyvllle. Illinois 60048 




****************** 

* P.-iintlng, Wallpapering 

Expert Installation 
J Paper* Fabrfe'Vlhyl J 

I«lc30onalfll 

j DECORATING * 

* ^ 

$(847)395-84285 

****************** 



Licensor] 

Insured 

FREE 

EGllmntcs 



ROOFING 

SIDING & TRIM"' 

SEAMLESS GUTTERS 

WINDOWS • DOORS 

DECKS* AWNINGS 

Repair & Insurance Work 

(847) 438-6634 



Quality 

Craftsmanship 

Guaranteed 



-.'40 years of 
i nllty prrsmml service 

addock 

r .. I .' '-^construction inc. 

• custom homes * Imsi'iiienLs 

• design services • decks 

• additions 

Hilly Insured (847)526-1500 
FREE Estimates Wnuconda 

General Contractors 



BUYERS OF WMEMN)SMEttl.fi 

-. INDUSTRIAL SCRAP 



* 
* 



Wrftt Htmr. W& far 

tjttur ffihrtij /tun if ttttei t 

I CAN HELP. 

rvrnintu A Hhtlttmh. <itti linr 

hti, lam II f'rrHfi'ni 'Hurt in i) 

thihhint (CNA/. 7 tan he 

ttathttl alt 

(847) Slb-0710 

tw timttter, feiute ittpjsaijt 
nit iwirr mil it. 



IN OVER YOUR HEAD? 



Call us today for a 
no-obligation 
consultation. 

(847) 670-3395 



Wo will make your credit 

problems dleappoar liko 

magic and you can get 

cosh back. 



• COPPER • BRASS • ALUMINUM • 

LEAD •STAINLESS' 
• AUTO RADIATORS • CATALYTIC CONVERTERS • 

• BATTERIES • IHSULATED WIRE • 



Mc t^JtrjAC*. 
fctfiWjIJtCjjSiiKn 



J PROMPT PICK UP] 
| »fl(l DELIVERY 




TOP PRICE 
PAID 

We pay more for old or 
scrap gold. No amount 
too small or too large! 

(847) -Mv 
438-0125 





Absolutely no out-of-pocket expense. 
Fast, friendly, confidential service. 
Bad credit - OK 



Special Often 

• No application fee 
No mortgage payment 
before Christmas 



S&W FINANCIAL 

(847) 670-3395 

U'oodficld Area office 

Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee 

SAVEM0\EY!!& 



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Jack's 

REMODELING 

BASEMENTS 

Kitchens • Bathrooms • Decks 
Fascia • Soffit • Windows 

FREE ESTIMATES 
plus references 

CALL JACK AT 

(847) 546-3759 



SALT DELIVERY 

W.itn SifiiK-T SaIi f'trrioi in To Your Sofina' 

Wc Sell and Install., 

• Water Soflnm 

* R.O. & U.V. System* 1 

• Whole House Fillers 

* Iron Fillers iirui More, 

AM/PM Sales, Inc. 

(847) 671-3130 

S-HV.V. Waior Analysis uml Consutiatton 




All American Home Improvements 

fatt S facial ■ Kitchens • limits • Electrical 

•Basements -numbing 

• Additions •Carpentry 

•Decks -nrywnll 

•Remodeling •I'iiinfirtj; 



l-'iirrwice Keplncetl 

llumiriinrr 

l-irc ri.ici- insitill. 

20 |niiiil (U'lKiir Ot-itn KOvnt 

Air lifters 

20MiAKS I.OCAIJ.Y 



LICENSED > liONDEO • INSURED 



Quail ly work, dependable 
Call US TOClay 847-548*5 t l o 



MA.iDU c;m;p|T Ca»DS MASTERCARD/ VIS A 



Pro hi ems? 



Professional Solutions 
Reasonable Prices 

_ Call 

Heatwave 

SALES AND SERVICE 



ERA. Certified - Insured 
Free Est. - Senior Dis. 

(847) 740-4127 




W 



rXoVo 



KtTCHENf/BASEMENTS 

CARPENTfty - TILE 

SMALL JOBS Ok. 

TOM KIOLBASA 




KM 



(847) J95-1898 




WOL10AY 

DPaqwhtbir <a 

Point Minimum 3 Rooms and Receive 

1 Room FREE Of Your Choice 

Alto, call for FREE ESTIMATES and Specials 

on Industrial and Commercial Painting 

D&G PROFESSIONAL PAINTING 




TjMJndin 




tttaJMl 

^tOuti'dfU.y And Carwcd By A.CL. 
" .urer--^ T— Si* " it '_ A * •- 




TJfe^Eeowafejr^fore 



*Bmm* 



'&%**.,< 







PET SITTING SERVICE 
LoWng Can for When Youn Notlben 

IrttndniVML.ChKmrbl Serf* indDtifCir* 

Profcukvoty Trained Soun 
Bondcd-lnturtd 

M*ftlbff Of 

NottanofAaocof 
Prof-uioAo/ Art Stttan 
S*rvinf B-jrtoigton. Cjlt>; ItUftd L»ke, Luiot 

Zurich, WmjcotkU 
ASK ABOUT OUR SAVINGS PROG RAM I 

(847)487-1651 




Drive ShaR Service 

Drive Axle and Supply 

Complete drive shaft service, custom 
made, front wheel drive axles, 
computerized 
balancing, free 
delivery ind more. 

(414) 639-2100 



®*<£- 



•*" 



Wa 



DONT THROW AWAY 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR 
LAMP DOCTORS. 
FOR REPAIRS. 

WARREti ELECTRIC INC. 

33261 N. Highway 45 

VVilr.wood. IL 60030 

(F47) 223-8691 




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January 2, 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers / C 1 9 



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LAKE ONLINE 

www.lake-online.com 

Lake County's Hot Spot on the WWW! 
Target Local Exposure' on the Web! 



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1 CONTRACTORS ELECTRIC SERVICE, INC. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 
"Call Us For Fast Courteous Service" 

33265 N. Rte. 45 
• Wildwood, IL 60030 

(847) 223-4682 
RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL/ 




£j 



ZrzZ3!G^iK&SS&S&X&J&&t?!S:- 



FIREW009 



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FANTASTIC 

2-m* OLD SEASONED HARDWOOD 

OAK, ASH, MAPLE CHERRY $65 
100% OAK $75 (FC) 
(847) 546-3613 
1815) 344-9522 



(FC) 









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I-80Q-43 0-6262 gOTCD 



BEAl 

face conn 

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FIREWOOD ttNUKITEO 
JANUARY SPECIA1 

Mixed Hardwoods $50 FC 

Oak $65 FC 

Cherry, Birch, Hickory Mix $75 FC 

Separated $90 FC 

FREE DELIVERY 

STACKING AVAILABLE 

CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED 

(BOD) 3D3-S1S0 



CLEAN CUT PREMIUM 
SEASONED HARDWOOD 

GUARANTEED TO BURN 

Face Chord (4x8) $75.00 
Full Chord $210.00 

Delivered & Stacked l 
when you want it 

Call Today 

(847)816-TREEor 

1-800-300-8730 





I-f^ff Remodeling 
^W &Home 
Construction Improvements 

REMODEL NOWL...EAY. NOTHING 
TIL FEBRUARY 1998! 

KITCHEN, BATHROOM AND 
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-5AVE10%KSKKts- 

Ask about our OFF-SEASON prices for: 
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free in-home 1-888-33-TRIKO 

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,j^ r ,tU >r i U.ViW i | 'i) ) 'nt» ^ 'yffp^ ^ 




I TREE e STUMP 

REMOVAL 

Land Clearing £&&■ 

Wholesale Seasoned jSS«i 



Hardwood 

Nordstrom 
Tree Experts Co. 

(Fully Insured) 

(84?) 526-0858 



«S5T'Jr 



HOME REPAIRS 



HANDYMAN SERVICE 



Savo money by using America's 

largest handyman service. 

Insured, bonded, guaranteed. 

(847) 726-1 061 




OFFICES IN 30 STATES 



Paul's Firewood 

Satisfaction CJHAtanUtb 



Mixed Hardwood 869 (FC) «■—■ 

Oak 879 (FC) ■■* 

Cherry/Hickory $89 (FC) €3 

•Free Stacking he 

•Free Delivery Hi 

com j m-asn 






JSJflrewood 

*70 per face cord i 
*200fuJlcord 

(847) 680-7326 

Pry £ Guaranteed to $wn 
Free Pcftvery and Stacking 





NEED A WAY TO SELL THAT 
INEXPENSIVE ITEM? 

^ Fill out this form for 

■BMaPp Lakeland's New 

10 words or less gets you an ad for #3.00. Take advantage of 
this new section by filling out the form & sending payment 

to: 

Attn.: Lisa 

c /o Lakeland Publishers 

EO. Box 360 

Grayslake, II, 60030 

ox- call with credit card 

(847) 223-8161 ext 140 

Must be prepaid 

Please fill in the blanks, no more than 10 words 





(ck-photic iiiinitxrr 

i i 'i ii iii minium 



Travel 

v • 

f rice ©/ a f \®M call ! 




Get your feet wet! Take your vacation 

without leaving borne 'go through the 

Internet! Let Lakeland netDIRECT 

take you where you want to go. 

The trip of your dreams 

fis only a click away! 



SDIRE£F^ 




(847) 223-8199 
E-Mail: senice@Ind.com 

Visit iii on the Internet: hup.//wnvInd.com 



*UUttr*l imiJfUCl ifliti l»J pi"** - iluf>v» •<> m "I <* llur IjU' Own) MV9. CJI ft* -J. «.i« a J>«4 y«* ["V<u 










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COLOR THIS PAGE AND ENTER TO 
WIN TICKETS TO THIS SHOW! 



HERE'S HOW TO WIN: 

• Color this page, fill out the form to the right, and send it to Lakeland Newspapers 

• All entries must be received no later than Friday, January 16, 1998, 5:00p.m. — 

• Winners will be notified by phone 

• First and Second place prizes will be awarded in the following age groups: 

Ages 4-6* Ages7-9»AgeslO-12 

• No purchase necessary. Employees and families of Lakeland Publishing are not 
eligible to participate. 



Performance Schedule 



Rosemont Horizon January 21-25,1998 
United Center Jan. 27 - Feb. 8, 1 998 

Sponsored by Lakeland Publishers, Inc. 



COLORING CONTEI 



NAME 



ADDRESS 
CITY 



PHONE 
AGE 



SEISTD YOUR ENTRY TO: 
Hercules Coloring Contest 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers 
30 S. Whitney Street P.O. Box 26S • Grayslake / IL 60030