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Full text of "Antioch News 01/16/1998"

A «<T I0CH 





t1H0?57 12/27/95 »*Ct<01 

i-'.HTIDCH TfJUHSHI? LIBRARY 

75? ttftlH STREET 

flntiocfi TL A0002-137G 




Three Sections — 48 Pages 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1998 



A Lakeland Newspaper /75 cents 



'A memorial to his great interest in and respect for nature' 




memorializing native son 







Downtown wetland sanctuary, entertainment center 

to be named for Bill Brook 



>By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Antioch Village officials will 
name a down town natural area 
restoration project for the late 
William H. Brook, a man revered for 
his community-minded leadership 
and his love for the outdoors. Brook 
died June 22, 1992. 

Owner of the State Bank of Anti- 
och, established in 1894 by his father 
and grandfather, Brook was honored 
in life form's tireless, unselfish efforts 
to improve Antioch. The naming of 



the under-construction wetlands 
restoration and entertainment center 
east of the downtown area is viewed 
as a comprehensive memorial to his 
love of the community, his loveof na- 
ture, and his support for the educa- 
tion and entertain men t of people. 

Village officials have named a 
fund-raising committee to accept do- 
nations from the public Donations are 
to help meet matching-fund require- 
ments for state and federal program 
grants available to build public wetland 
restoration and education projects. 

Presentations about the restora- 



Left, Bill Brook was an avid outdoorsman. Below, Antioch Mayor 
Marilyn Shineflug and Community Development Director Claude 
LeMere display plans for the William E. Brook Memorial Wetland 
Sanctuary and Entertainment Center to be located in downtown 
Antioch. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 




lion project will be made to the Anti- 
och Chamber of Commerce and In- 
dustry, Jan. 22, and the Antioch Lions 
Club, Jan. 26. Village community de- 
velopment officials also wish to hear 
from volunteers who want to help 
implement the restoration project. 
Substantial donations have already 
been committed or received towards 
the project. 

"Eversincehe passed away, there 
has been a desire to do something to 
honor him,* said Mayor Marilyn 
Shineflug. "This seemed like an ap- 
propriate project because it's not only 
downtown, which represents his 
civic-mindedncss, but it is also a na- 
ture preserve, which is a memorial to 
his great interest in and respect for 
nature." 

The name for the completed pro- 
ject will be "William E, Brook Memo- 
rial Wetland Sanctuary and Enter- 
tainment Center." 

t In 1971, Brook. was presented an 
award from St. Peters Catholic 
Church foroutstandingleadership in 
community service. Then-Pastor Al- 
fred Henderson is reported lo have 
said, "Certainly, there is no one who 
has worked more tirelessly and un- 
selfishly to improve the quality* of life 
for everyone in our community. An- 
tioch is indeed fortunate in having 
such an outstanding native son." 

A 1970 article about Brook in the 
"Antioch News" said of him, "Bill's 
major interest outside of banking and 
education has always been in hunt- 
ing and fishing and the basic conser- 

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IDNR moves to protect Deer Lake Preserve 

Hearing for Deercrest development 
continued to March 12 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Bonk. 

On a snowy night, citizens turned 
out to examine a new 1,680 petsun 
Deercrest planned unit development 
for eastern Antioch. 

Everything bumped into the Illi- 
nois Department of Natural Re- 
sources' six-page single-spaced typed 
letter distributed the day of the hear- 
ing. 

Developer team leader James 
Follensbec proceeded to set forth the 
idea of Deercrest anyway. 

More .than three hours later, 
everyone was told to come back 
TUesday, March 12. The hearing was 
continued. 

Deercrest is proposed for 234- 
acrcs with a maximum of 515 
dwelling units north of Savage Road 
at Route 173. The development will 
include areas of detached single fam- 
ily homes, detached zero lot line sin- 
gle family homes, and townhomes. 
Almost 31 percent of the pioperty is 
allocated open space and a little 



more than 55 percent is allocated 
housing development. 

Consideration of the preliminary 
plan for Deercrest included presenta- 
tions by four members of the devel- 
opment team, and evaluation by sev- 
en members of the Planning and 
Zoning Board, by approximately 37 
audience members, and by about 
eight county and village officials in- 
forming themselves about future de- 
velopment. 

The single letter from IDNR was 
a basis for Committee Chair Barbara 
Johnson to announce at the start that 
the hearing would be continued to 
another date. 1NDR stated: "Although 
the proposal is a preliminary plat 
which lacks many details, the draw- 
ing reviewed by the Department is an 
adequate basis for IDNR to express 
its opinion the proposal has the po- 
tential to profoundly and adversely 
impact the Deer Lake-Redwing 
Slough State Natural Area. Therefore 
this consultation must remain open 
at this time." 

Follensbec said, "We're here to 
get into the community response." 



He said that it was his belief that if 
they plan the proposal in an open 
manner and involve people, Deer- 
crest will turn out well. "We believe in 
good design." 

The presentation touched upon 
wetland preservation, the impor- 
tance of Deer Lake to the north, site 
topography, park land donations, a 
target start date of late in 1998, the 
negotiability of all concerns raised by 
village engineering and planning 
professionals, site sewer locations, 
and stormwaterdetention conceptu- 
al designs. 

Village Planning Director Robert 
Silhan presented an analysis of Deer- 
crest. It was his opinion the develop- 
er had considered the natural re- 
sources as positive features which are 
incorporated into the site design. He 
said, "The property is in compliance 
with the (Antioch) comprehensive 
plan in terms of usage." He noted his 
surprise that site lownhouse density 
was less than permitted by local reg- 
ulations. "1 think that's rather signifi- 
cant." 

Silhan said, "1 believe a modified 
plan at a continued hearing can be 
approved." 

Milage Engineer John Boldt said 
that water to the site will be provided 
by the Village of Antioch. Sewer ser- 



vice will be provided from the Mill 
Creek Treatment Plant. He expressed 
questions about traffic management 
issues. 

Residents spoke about their 
concerns. "You're in control of den- 
sity," said Wayne D, Blake, "1 hope 
you can tone it down." Mike Rux- 
ton said, "I pretty much concur 
with Mr. Blake and the comments 
he made." Ruxton said, "At this 
time, 1 feel a semi-rural atmos- 
phere needs to be maintained.... 
Otherwise, we're going to promote 
another Grayslake." 

Lake County Board Representa- 
tive Judy Martini {Dist. 1- Antioch) 
said she was concerned with wetland 
issues, construction on hydric and 
crodable soils, and depth of deten- 
tion pond areas. Martini suggested 
the developer talk to property owners 
near the proposed development 
again. She asked if this was density 
that people want to see in that area 
and is it good to have it around sensi- 
tive natural resources. 

Farmer Tom Doolittle only ex- 
pressed initial concerns he had re- 
garding drainage tile and offsite wa- 
ter management. He also expressed 
concern about people and offroad 

Please see IDNR I A3 






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COMMUNITY 



January 16, 1998 



ACHS dance team NYC trip to lights: Fantastic! 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Aritioch Community High School 
Dance Team members characterize 
their final four days of 1997 in New 
York City as a strong professional ex- 
perience. They expect their exposure 
to its professional dance community 
to help sustain their attitude during 
the next two weekends of competi- 
tive dancing with other schools. 

"It was one of the most worth- 
while trips I've been on," said Varsity 
Captain Meagan Tripp. "It was a lot of 
good professional dancers, and we 
got to see them perform as well," said 
Junior Sam Griffin. "It was better be- 
cause the (dance) teachers were 
Broadway professionals," said Kor- 
byn May, another team member. 

"They came away with a lot of 
knowledge," said Dance Team Coach 
Joy Edge. The dance team members 
had classes for two days to cover such 
styles as ballet, musical theater, funk, 
modern, jazz, and advanced dance. 
"It was like a huge music learning 
convention," she said. 

Dance Team members on the 
trip included; Tripp, Griffin, May, Jes- 
sica Jacobs, Nicole Ginascol, Katie 
Dalton, and Molly Meyer. Meeting 
with the group for the visit was for- 
mer ACHS student and Dance Team 
member, Melissa Hague, now work- 
ing with Showstoppers Camps of 
America, the tour sponsor. 

Dance Team members pay for 
trips, such as this, through sales of 
sweatshirts and sponsorship of dance 
camps for Antioch area children in- 
terested in competitive dancing. "We 
earned quite a bit of money from the 
October kid's camp," said Edge. 
"Sweatshirts are still available forS35. 
These are the 'Champion' sweat- 



shirts." Contact team members for 
team clothing. 

"We have a competition at 
Stevenson on Jan. 18 and Jan. 2*1 in 
Palatine," Edge said. "We arc at- 
tempting to qualify for supcrseclion- 
als or state." 

May said that the Dance Team 
State Championships are March 21. 
Tripp said, "We do about five compe- 
titions before we go on to supersec- 
tionals and state." This is a large 
amount of dancing. 

"I love to dance," said May. She 
said that she likes to invest her ener- 
gy in doing something and profes- 
sional dancing has become n strong 
interest of hers. "Very much so." Her 
Tennessee mother helped move May 
towards dance. "My mother is a 
dancer,' she said. She danced with 
the Tennessee ballet. As a result, May 
is interested in professional modern 
dance and ballet. Trips to New York 
City help her obtain lessons about 
stage dancing in theaters and what 
the professional dance community is 
like. 

Tripp Liked the dance classes 
better than other events they attend- 
ed. "It was one of the most worth- 
while trips I've been on." she said. 
She learned from two master teach- 
ers on two days worth of classes. Bob 
Rizzo was one teacher known for his 
choreography, musical, commer- 
cials, and national teaching. A 
teacher by the professional name 
Gino taught them funk. Funk is like 
hip-hop in a Jazz style. Tripp said that 
it's street dancing with more style to 
it. This kind of exposure is important 
to her jazz and modern dance educa- 
tion. "Different teachers teach differ- 
ent styles and they have different 
ways of teaching skills and concepts 
and performance." 




Antioch Community High School Dance Team members during post-holiday trip to attend profes- 
sional dance classes and learn stage techniques In New York City. Former ACHS team captain and 
employee of Showstoppers Camps of America, Melissa Hague worked with team dancers in New 
York City. Back row, from left: Hague, Korbyn May, Molly Meyer, and Jessica Jacobs. Bottom row, 
from left: Sam Griffin, Meagan Tripp, Katie Dalton, and Nicole Ginascol.— Photograph by Joy Edge 



For Griffin, the trip offers expo- 
sure to a professional dance com- 
munity. "It was a lot of good profes- 
sional dancers, and we got to see 
them perform as well." Jazz dance, 
ballet, tap, and funk arc her personal 
favorites. "I like all different kinds of 
dance," she said. A trip like this, after 



her eight years of studies, helps her 
sec what a professional dance com- 
munity is like. 

They had a lot of fun loo. Edge 
said, "They got to sec the musical 
'Grease,' 'Sleeping Beauty,' and the 
Hockeltes (at Radio City MusicHall)." 
May said, "We were right on Times 



Square." The energy of the city was 
something they could experience as 
they went to learn and went off on 
trips to stores. "We had some free 
time for shopping and to do some 
tours," Griffin said. They always had 
to be with part of the group, but they 
could explore. 











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January 16, 1998 



COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A3 



FROM PAGE Al 



. I MM :."- 



MEMORIAL: Wetland 
restoration project to be named 
for Bill Brook 



vation of these sports," 

"This project is something 
that just has 'Bill Brook' written 
all over it," said Community De- 
velopment Director Claude 
LeMere. By being in the down- 
town area, LeMere said that it 
serves as a civic improvement 
project. The restoration of the 
wetlands will enhance wildlife 
opportunities. The lawn area will 
provide people a place to enjoy 
entertainment and festivals. . 
LcMerc said that the entire pro- 
ject is behind the PM&L Theater 
which Brook helped to establish. 
A walkway through the wetlands 
area will provide educational op- 
portunities for adults and school 
children to learn about wetlands 
and their function and value. 

"We are trying to recreate (the 
area) as it was in the past," said 
Shineflug. 

"In the early 1900s, there was 
a pond excavated for the kids to 
ice-skate on.... So, it relates back 
to the history of the community," 
LeMcre said. 

Brook was one of the found- 
ing members of the Lakes Region 
Historical Society. 

"We are putting together a 
fund-raising committee," said 
LeMcre. Members of the commit- 
tee include: Dan Dugcnskc, Prcs 
Reckers, Bob Diemcr, and Ted 
Costoff. "Our plans are to apply 
for numerous matching grants. 
So, the village is trying to raise mon- 
ey to match the grants," said LeMcre. 
"We've just received an 
anonymous donation of $5,000 
townrdi the project." he snici. 
"Another person pledged $1,000 

today." LeMcre said, "We have- 
already, about 556,000 commit- 
ted to the project," That amount 
includes (he value of both finan- 
cial contributions and donated 
services to implement the pro- 



ject. 

A subcommittee of the fund- 
raising committee also has been 
named consisting of Jim Fields, 
Steve Newcomb, Aaron Bern au, 
and Rich Meltzer, three owners of 
Lakes Area Music Center, 911 
Main Street. "These young men 
have stepped forward and volun- 
teered to head-up the building of 
the entertainment center and the 
acquisition of the sound equip- 
ment, which is tremendous," said 
LeMere. 

Other fund-raising by the vil- 
lage will includes state and feder- 
al sources as well as foundations 
in Lake County. The Village of 
Antioch has already contacted the 
Illinois Department of Commerce 
and Community Affairs for assis- 
tance. LeMere will soon meet 
with John Rognerof the U.S.. Fish 
and Wildlife Service. "John Rogn- 
cr is. very enthused about this 
project," said LeMere. "We're go- 
ing to talk to him about applying 
for a Liberty Prairie Foundation 
grant which would have to do 
with restoration of wetlands and 
education of the public as to how 
wetlands work." LeMere said that 
restoration of wetlands is impor- 
tant, but it Is now known to be 
Important to educate people 
about what is involved in wet- 
lands and why it is important to 
preserve them. "(This project) is 
easily accessible and, therefore, it 
lends itself to be a good educa- 
tional site," said Shineflug. 

Financial contributions may 
be made by check to the William 
E. Brook Memorial Fund and 

mailed to Chairman Dan Du- 
jenskc, in care of the Antioch 
Community Development De- 
partment, 884 Main Street, Anti- 
och, Illinois, 60002. People who 
wish to volunteer to assist the 
project may call 847-395-6342. 




IDNR: Puts snag in 
development plans 



vehicles in crop fields. "We'll satisfy 
you," Follensbce said of Doolittle's 
concerns. 

Chair Johnson asked zoning 
board members to list initial con- 
cerns with Decrcrest. Of members 
who spoke, concerns were expressed 
about the need for home and site de- 
sign details, phasing of construction, 
park dedications, fee assessments 
for public services, fire department 
response times, school population 



Impacts, wetland buffer areas, ar- 
chaeological issues, housing style 
mixes, issues related to precedents 
set by this initial east Antioch devel- 
opment proposal, and concerns 
about traffic. 

"They're all entirely appropri- 
ate," said Follensbce about the 
laundry list of concerns. Earlier, 
he also had said, "The environ- 
mental issues (of concern) will be 
solved." 



CORRECTIONS 



In the Jan. 9 edition of the Anti- 
och News In a story about Town- 
ship Funding Unlikely," Kenneth 
Patchen reported that a letter from 
Lake County Public Works Superin- 
tendent Martin Galantha stated 



that $11- 12,000 of missing inter- 
ceptor sewer costs were not includ- 
ed in cost calculations. Galantha 
was misquoted. The amount he 
wrote in his letter was 51 1-12 Mil- 
lion. 



Antioch News 

Vol. 1 13 No. 3 A Lakeland Newspaper Founded 1886 

(USPS 027-060) Zmoh* One*. Uamba- at lira Piau Alloc 

30 South Wliiinoy St.. Graystako, IL 60030 Look tor us on the Internet at 

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Home Datvary Rata*: 124 Wpar »»» m Lata. Coot. K»no»fu» ant MtHanry Counbat; 

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PoatmaHar: Sand wMati Chang** 10 AnbOcii Haw*. 90 Souh Wnanay Saaai. P.O. 801 M». Qiayttait. Hn» 60000 

WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER M.R. SCHROEDER WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

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Welcoming the gander 

Beckett Gandolfi, 9, feeds geese that have migrated to the front yard of his Antioch home on Lake 
Catherine in the Chain of Lakes.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



UHAUA nears sewer fund goal 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



United Homeowners Associa- 
tions of Unincorporated Antioch is 
nearing its goal to raise funds to dis- 
tribute information about a town- 
ship area sewer study. 

Antioch Township officials 
voted Jan. 8 not to contribute money 
to help mall the survey-fact sheet" 

UHAUA will add information to 
their fact sheet which Lake County 
Superintendent of Public Works 
Martin Galantha recently malted to 

them- Th« n«w Information ques- 
tions the financial feasibility of pro- 
viding sewer service. Omission of the 
Information Is one basis for the 
township decision not to help fi- 
nance mailing the UHAUA survey- 
fact sheer. 

"We're not sending that fact sheet 
out without anything that isn't true,* 
said Carol Jonites, President of 
UHAUA. 

"We're not trying to con anyone," 
said Jonites. "We can add the two lines 
from Mr. Galantha," she said. "We 
want people to get a clear picture." 

Antioch Township Supervisor 
Tim Osmond said that the funding re- 
quest by UHAUA was turned down at 
the Jan. 8 board meeting. The basis of 
the decision was three concerns: 

* the letter from the County Pub- 
lic Works Department, 

' the absence of control over the 
mailing by the township 

* the lack of citizen support urg- 
ing funding. 

"I did get some phone calls in 
here,' said Osmond. However, he 
said that many callers who were up- 
set the township would not provide 
a contribution were understanding 
of his cautious attitude towards the 
survey-fact sheet content. 

UHAUA's survey-fact sheet dis- 



cusses the need for sewers in unin- 
corporated areas of the township. It 
is based on a county-financed study 
by Devery Engineering, Inc. in 1996 to 
identify sewer feasibility for 30 subdi- 
visions in thfr township who peti- 
tioned for county sewer service. 
UHAUA has not made the fact sheet 
public. 

A letter from Galantha stated: 
"While the fact sheet contains select- 
ed information from the July, 1996 
Devery Engineering Feasibility Re- 
port, it also presents the most opti- 
mistic .capital cost figures. As l*ve 

mnntloned on majveral occmlon*. 

there are two major unanswered 
questions that will significantly Im- 
pact project feasibility: 

"Under either 'Plan,' only about 
30% of the interceptor sewer costs 
are included; how is the remaining 
$11-12 million to be paid for? 

"What legal and institutional 
means are available to ensure that 
everyone pays their fair share? 

"It may be quite a while before 
we have those answers and the fact 
sheet should clearly indicate the 
missing information." 

Osmond said Jan. 12, "I'm going 
to meet with Mr. Galantha this 
week." The meeting will discuss is- 
sues of sewer extensions and financ- 
ing options. 

"I think sewers are good for An- 
tioch Township, but whose going to 
pay for it?" Osmond asked before the 
Jan. 8 meeting. "We can't send out 
information to people so they think 
that they can get sewers for $1 0,000." 

"There is no source for federal 
grant money anymore," Osmond 
said Jan. 12. His meetings in Wash- 
ington, D.C. as a township official re- 
vealed to him that the U.S. Environ- 
mental Protection no longer funds 
sewer extension projects. Their pri- 
mary focus is, to upgrade existing 




treatment 

plants. "No 

body knows 

of any grant 

to apply for," 

he said. "No 

body knows 

of any 

source." He 

said that the 

county and Jonites: 'We're 

state do not not sending that 

have funds. f act sne€t o^ 

, ° S S?i? , without anything 
oJsosaidthM that isn't true* 

board voted Jan. 8 to express their 
view that a survey, such as (he one 
UHAUA seeks to distribute, should be 
undertaken by Lake County. There 
was consensus on that view. 

Jonites said of the UHAUA sur- 
vey-fact sheet, "We asked Galantha 
to review our survey form and our 
form is what he looked aL He called 
me on the phone and told me ver- 
bally the fact sheet was O.K." 

Jonites is optimistic that the citi- 
zen group can raise the remaining 
money needed to print and mail the 
survey-fact sheet to property owners 
even without township participa- 
tion. "We've collected almost all ol 
the money," she said. "That's just 
been from people." 

Jonites said that in the past both 
Illinois Senator Adeline Geo-Karis 
and Illinois State Representative 
Robert Churchill had indicated tc 
her that they would try (o find fund- 
ing if people were interested in sew- 
er construction. 

Once the survey forms an 
mailed and returned, UHAUA woulc 
be willing to take the unopened sur 
vey forms to Antioch Township ant 
open them there for tabulation. "Wi 
are trying to be very open," Jonite: 
said. 



A 'Street Car' is pulling into town 



The PM&L Box office opens 
Jan. 19 to sell tickets for 
Tennessee William's dra- 
ma, "A Street Car Named 
Desire." The box office is managed 
by Ailccn Biel and is open Monday 
through Friday, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., 
847-395-3055. Ticket sales (SIO) 
tend to be strong for PM&L produc- 
tions, even before they are heavily 
publicized. Theater professionals 
characterize this as a most remark- 
able play. 

In December, Betty S mouse 
said of the anticipated production, 
"It is something we can sink out 
teeth into." Round Lake's Deane 



OUR 



-^ TOWN 



L'H-H 



« Ken Patchen 



Jones is directing the production. 
The fact that it is near DIMarco's 
Restaurant, Lakeside Restaurant, 
Vault Restaurant, Las Vegas Restau- 
rant, or the Village Pub should have 
no bearing on your decision to at- 
tend, even if the play Is performing 
Feb. 14, Valentine's Day. 



"A Street Car Named Desire" is 
also performing the same night as 
the Antioch Chamber of Commerce 
and Industry's evening of romance 
at the transformed VFW Hall on 
North Avenue. LoveFest '98 is Feb. 
7 from 7 p.m. to midnight A couple 
could watch a play, play some 
roulette, and enjoy good food, mu- 
sic, and dancing all in the village 
limits of a smalt town in the space 
of five hours. _^ 

If you have interesting infor- 
mation or anecdotes to submit for 
"Our Town" call staff reporter 
Ken Patchen at 223-8161, ext. 131 
ore-mail, edit @lnd.com." 



1 






/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



January'16, 1998 



Calendar 



Friday, January 16 

No student attendance at ACHS 

Saturday, January 17 

9 a.m., Antioch Chapter of Aglow 
Int'I meets at Mentone's Restau- 
rant, for info, call 815-648-2166 

Sunday, January 18 

On This Date In 1893: As written in 
the Antioch News, "The real estate 
market is booming here." Courtesy 
of: Lakes Region Historical Society 

11 a.m. Shut-In mass for the Hand- 
icapped at Father Hanley Center 

1-4 p.m. Antioch Youth Baseball 
Registration at Antioch Village Hall 

Monday, January 19 

Martin Luther King Jr. Day 

No School, Antioch Lower Grade 
School, ACHS 

Baha'i Feast Day of Sovereignty 

Tickets on Sale for PM&L's 

"A Streetcar Named Desire", call 

395-8150 for information 

12:45 p.m. Bingo at Antioch 
Senior Center, info, at 395-7120 

6 p.m. Police and Rre Commission 
meets at village hall 

7-9 p.m. Post-high Men's Basket- 
ball at Antioch Evangelical Free 
Church, call 395-4117 

7:30 p.m. Antioch Village Board 
meets at village hall, 874 Main St. 

7:30 p.m. Lakes Area Community 
Band at ACHS, info, at 395-5566 

7:30 p.m. Antioch Coin Club 
meets at Antioch Public Library 

Tuesday, January 20 

9-11 a.m. Blood Pressure Screen- 
ing at Antioch Piggly Wiggly 

2 p.m. Lake Villa Dist. Library's 
reference staff host a hands-on 
demonstration of resources that 
can help home schoolers, sign up 
at the ref. desk or call 543-8150 

6:45 p.m. Antioch VFW Bingo, 
395-5393 for more information 

7 p.m. School Board meeting, 
Grass Lake District #36 Board of 
Education at Grass Lake School 

Wednesday, January 21 

Petty School Band Concert at AUGS 

9 a.m. - Noon Antioch United 
Methodist Church holds Parents 
Day Out for infants to 5 year olds, 
call 395-1362 

6-9 p.m. Antioch Youth Baseball 
registration at Antioch Village Hall 

7 p.m. Antioch Park Board meets 
at community bldg. 

7:30 p.m. The Republican Club 
meets at Twp Hall, 395-1670 

Thursday, January 22 

11:30 a.m. -4 p.m. $5 ticket, 
St. Peter CCW Annual Card and 
Bunco, Frawley Hall, for more 
information call 395-2354 

7:30 p.m. Lakes Region Historical 
Society meets at the museum, 
817 Main St., info, at 395-0799 

7:30 p.m. ACHS District #117 
Board of Education meeting in 
Dist. #34, at Oakland School 

7:30 p.m. Irish American Club 
meets at State Bank of the Lakes 
In Antioch, call 395-3942 

GOT SOMETHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A J 4 -day notice is needed 
for all calendar requests. 
Ask for Cristind Feindt 
223-8161, ext 104. 



NE3GHBORS 




Name: Candl L Rowe 

Home: Antioch 

Occupation: Village Clerk, Antioch 

I'm originally from: I was born in 
Chicago, but I've lived in Antioch most 
of my life. 

I graduated from: Antioch Commu- 
nity High School 

My family consists of: I have three 
sons: Chris, 19; Erich, 17; and Kevin, 
14. 

What I like best about Antioch: 1 like the smalt town atmos- 
phere. 

What I like best about my job: I enjoy working with people. I 
like meeting with residents when they stop by Village Hall. 

I relax by: Reading or listening to music. 

Last book I read: "Diana, Princess of Wales" 

Favorite TV show is: M E.R." 

Favorite video is: "Ghost" 

Favorite movie Is: "My Best Friends Wedding" 

Favorite restaurant: JT's Road House is one of my favorite local 
restaurants. 

Favorite music: I like most kinds of music. I usually listen to light 



rock or country. 

Favorite band or musician: Rod Stewart, Michael Bolton, and 
Collin Raye . 

My life's motto Is: Life— you can cry your way through It or smile 
your way through it. I choose to smile. 

If I won the lottery, I would: Share my winnings with friends 
and family; and then, I would take my sons on a long deserved vaca- 
tion. 

My greatest accomplishment Is: Raising my sons as a single 
parent. 

I want to be remembered as: A person who tried to do the best 

she could. 

Most famous or interesting person I ever met was: Just be- 
fore he passed away, I had the opportunity to meet Cardinal Joseph 
Bcmadin while staying in Chicago. 

If I could have met anyone, I would have met: Princess Di- 
ana 

My dream Job would be: The job 1 have now. 1 enjoy working 
with the Mayor and village staff. It has been a great learning experi- 
ence. 

If I had a plane ticket to anywhere, I would go to: Las Ve- 
gas, to visit my family. 



If you Itavca "Neighbor" that you would like to see profiled in this col- 
umn, call Rhonda lletrick Burke at 223-8161. 




Compassion- 

the Victory difference. 

Victory Memorial Hospital is a not-for-profit hospital. We're concerned about costs, 
of course. But we're not just "big business." For over 100 years, we have put our 
patients and the community first. 

Our primary concern is taking care of you in sickness and in health. When you're 
in pain or feeling ill, we understand. We recognize your desire to get better, but 
also your need to have quality health care delivered with a human touch. 

Our nurses and other caregivers, in fact every member of Victory's staff, have a 
common goal-to treat each patient and visitor to Victory Memorial Hospital with 
compassion, courtesy, respect and excellent service. 

Choose Victory. You'll recognize the difference. 






\vj' 



VICTORY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

J 1324 North Sheridan Road • Waukegan Illinois 60085 
A Nol-For-Profii Hospital 



F<ma ctirreht ^ 
an informational packet on services- 'tall 



Riverport 
Chorus seeks 
competition 
singers 

Women interested In four-part 
barbershop harmony arclnvited to a^ 
special guest orientation Tuesday, 
Jan. 27 from 7 to 10 p.m. at Wilmot 
High School's cafetorium. 

Riverport Chonis encourages in- 
terested women 18 years and older 
to sing with the more than 100 mem- 
bers of the competitive and show 
chorus. The chorus includes the 10th 
place International Riverport Cho- 
nis of Sweet Adelines International. 

For interested women, voice 
classes will be conducted and new 
singers introduced to barbershop- 
style harmony. After a six-week ori- 
entation, interested singers will au- 
dition. Anyone coming to the six 
weeks of classes and passing their 
audition will be eligible to compete 
with the chorus at the Regional 
Competition in early May in 
Oshkosh, Wisconsin. 

The Riverport Chorus is com- 
mitted to performing, traveling, cho- 
rus and quartet competitions, chore- 
ography, and music education. 

Information is available at 847- 
356-6919. Additional information 
and transportation is available from 
047-587-7995 in Ingieside and 414- 
551-7217 in Bristol, Wis. 

AARP meets 
Jan. 27 

The January meetings for Anti- 
och AARP, Chapter 3876, will be held 
at the Senior Citizen Center, on Hol- 
beck next to the Fire Station. Social 
gathering about 10 a.m. with lunch 
at noon, and meeting at 1 p.m. After 
the meeting adjournment Bingo and 
Cards will follow. 

The second meeting of the 
month will be held on Jan. 27. 

For more information, call 
Sharon Nowak, president 395-5068. 

New faces and friends are need- 
ed-come join. 



Affi 740-4035 



January 16, 1998 



POLICE & FIRE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ AS 



POLICE BEAT 

Persons charged with a crime arc innocent until proven guilty in a court of la w. 



LAKE VILLA 



Vehicle taken 
without consent 

Lake Villa Police Officers assisted 
Lake County Sheriffs on Jan. 10 at 
9:25 p.m. to recover a vehicle taken 
without the owner's consent. Offi- 
cers Initially saw Michael C. Clarke, 
27, of Lake Villa, (n a white 1986 
Pontiac Grand Am at Route 83 and 
Mono villc Road. Clarke was charged 
with failure to signal when required, 
speeding in a residential zone, dis- 
obeying a stop sign, driving in the 
wrong lane, having a revoked drir 
vers license, driving an uninsured 
motor vehicle, failure to yield to an 
emergency vehicle, fleeing and at- 
tempting to elude police officers, 
and reckless driving. Clarke was as- 
signed a court date on Feb, 1 1 at 
1:30 p.m. in Grayslake. On Jan. 1 1 at 
5:30 p.m., Lake Villa Police officers 
drove him to the Lake County Jail. 

Invalid drivers license 

Lake Villa Police Officers 
stopped Kenneth L Rataczyk, 34, of 
Lake Villa, on Jan. 3 at 450 p.m. in a 
gold 1981 Chevrolet pick-up truck. 
He was charged with no rear regis- 
tration plate light and not having a 
valid drivers license. Rataczyk had a 
registered driving permit with re- 
strictions. He was released on 
SI ,000 bond pending a court date of 
Feb. 1 1 at 1:30 p.m. in Grayslake. 

Invalid license 

Lake Villa Police Officers stopped 
Gcrardo Palacios, 22, of Chicago, on 
Ian. 8 at 6:39 a.m. traveling west on 
Route 132 fromOITield Drive in a 
red 1983 Datsun wagon. He was 
charged with not having a valid dri- 
vers license and driving an unin- - 
sured motor vehicle. Palacios was 
released pending a Feb. 11 court 
date ui 3 p.m. in Grayslake. 



No valid license 

Lake Villa Police Officers 
stopped Esteban Colon, 39, of 
Waukegan, on Jan. 9 at 457 p.m. 
traveling north on Route 83 at Petite 
Lake Road in a blue 1986 Chevy 
van. He was charged with having a 
loud muffler and not having a valid 
drivers license. Colon was issued a 
notice to appear for Feb. 11 at 130 
p.m. in Grayslake. 

Warrant 

Lake Villa Police Officers 
stopped Denise M. Strantz, 34, of 
Round Lake Beach, traveling on 
Cedar Lake Road near Monaville 
Road on Jan. U at 7:19 p.m. in a red 
1986 Dodge Aries. Strantz was 
found to be wanted on a warrant for 
her arrest. She was transported to 
the Lake County Jail by officers. 

UNPENHURST 

Suspended license 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped two people in separate in- 
cidents and charged them with hav- 
ing suspended licenses. 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped James K. Furman, 24, of 
Lake Villa, on Jan. 11 at 1 1:50 p.m. 
traveling on Route 132 east of 
Hawthorn Drive in a silver Ford. He 
was charged with driving with a 
suspended license, suspended reg- 
istration, and having no proof of in- 
surance. Furman was released on 
$3,000 bond pending a court date of 
Feb. 4 at 10:30 a.m. in Grayslake. 

Lindenhurst Police Officers also 
stopped Stephen P. Baer, 35, of 
Lake Villa, on Jan: 5 at 7:4 1 p.m. in a 
blue Toyota pick-up truck in the 
37000 block of Columbus Drive. He 
was charged with driving with a - • 
suspended license. Baer was re- 
leased on bond pending a court 
date of Feb. 4 In Grayslake. 



r 8 ^ 




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ANTIOCH 



lid licenses 

Antioch Police Officers charged 
three people In separate Incidents 
with driving violations that includ- 
ing npt have a valid license. 

Antioch Police Officers stopped 
Ismael Z. Camacho, 35, of Trevor, 
Wis., on Jan. 4 at 4:28 p.m. in a 
white 1978 Chevrolet truck on Lake 
Street near Henry Street. He was 
charged with not having a valid dri- 
vers license, operating an unin- 
sured vehicle, and not having a 
valid vehicle registration. Camacho 
was released on a $200 cash bond 
pending a court date of Feb. 11 at 9 
a.m, in Grayslake. 

Antioch Police officers also 
stopped Donna C. Erwin, 22, of 
Antioch, on Jan, 5 at 1 1:18 p.m. in 
a brown 1986 Oldsmobile at Anita 
and Depot Streets. She was 
charged with operation of a vehi- 
cle with an expired registration 
and not having a valid drivers li- 
cense. Erwin was released on bond 
pending a court date of Feb. 1 1 in 
Grayslake. 

Antioch Police Officers also 
stopped Victor M. DeAnda-Ruble- 
do, 25, of El Paso, Texas, on Jan. 6 at 
9:40 a.m. In a blue 1987 Dodge van 
traveling cast bound on Route 173 
west of Tiffany Road. He was 
charged with speeding and not hav- 
ing a valid drivers license. DeAnda- 
Rubledo was released on bond 
pending a court date of Jan, 28 at 9 
a.m. in Grayslake. 

Possession of cannabis 

Antioch Police Officers stopped 
Kurtis VV. May, 22, of Antioch, on 
Jan. B at 1:40 p.m. in a white 1983 
Toyota traveling east bound on 
North Avenue west of Route 83. He 
was charged with improper lane 
use and possession of cannabis. 
May was released on bond pending 
a Jan. 228 court date at 9 a.m. in 



^Graysjakg 



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Intoxicated pedestrian 
beats head into cell wall 



A Round Lake Beach patrol offi- 
cer observed a man walking near the 
roadway on Rollins Rd. while Intoxi- 
cated. 

Keith A. Falk, 31, of Round Lake 
Beach, was stopped by the officer 
who noticed that he was bleeding 
from his chin. 

The officer took Falk Into cus- 
tody for pedestrian under the influ- 
ence. While Falk was in the squad 
car, he began to kick at the doors and 
the windows and became abusive 
toward officers during booking. 

Falk was then placed into a cell 
for observation. Whfle in the cell, Falk 



began to beat on the glass which cov- 
ered an observation camera, disrobed 
while standing on the bed and began* 
to urinate on the floor of the cell. 

The state's attorney's office ap- 
proved a felony charge of criminal 
damage to state supported property 
and Falk was also charged with re- 
sisting a peace officer and pedestri- 
an under the influence. 

After being treated for his chin 
wound and minor head wounds Falk 
obtained while beating his head 
against the wall of the cell, he was 
booked and held to await a bond 
hearing. 



Man stabbed at Dizzy's 



What promised to be a fun 
evening for those who turned out to 
see radio personality Terd" from the 
Mancow Morning Madhouse Show, 
ended with a downward turn of event 
for a 28-year-old Fox Lake man who 
was stabbed in the shoulder at the bar- 
According to Sergeant Mark 
Voykin the victim became involved 
in a verbal altercation with the of- 



fender. During the argument the of- 
fender stabbed the victim. 

The stabbing occurred in the 
parking lot of the bar located at 403 
S. Route 83 at approximately 1 1:50 
p.m. Jan. 9. 

The victim said he didn't know 
the offender but described him as a 
white male with collar length hair. — 
by Elizabeth Eaken 




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A6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



January 16, 1998 



ACHS senior Vanderkooy competing for National Award 



Amy Vanderkooy, an Antioch 
Community High School senior, has 
been nominated to compete in the 
national Principal's Leadership 
Award Scholarship Program (PLA), 
sponsored by the National Assn, of 



Secondary School Principals 
(NASSP). 

Dr. James R. Love, principal, 
Antioch Community High School 
nominated Vanderkooy to the na- 
tional competition. PLA will choose 



150 scholarship winners will be 
chosen this spring to receive $1,000 
college scholarships. According to 
Love, "Amy Vanderkooy is one of 
the most visible, hard-working, and 
effective leaders in our high school. 




* -*' 



I was afraid my health 
plan limited my choice of 
physicians. 






Until I learned about the 
doctors who are. 
members of Health 
Options of Illinois. 



Choice- 

The Health Options difference. 

Choosing a doctor you can trust and feel comfortable wilh is an important part of caring for your 
family's health. 

HeaUh Options ot imnote, a physldanmospUal organization that Includes some of Lake County's 
finest doctors and Victory Memorial Hospital, offers you a choice of over 45 primary care physicians. 
And, should you need Ihe care of a surgeon, obstelrician or other specialist, your choice is even 
greater with Health Options. 

These are doctors thousands of Lake County families put their trust In every day. You can, |oo. 
During your company's open enrollment sessions, choose a healthcare plan that includes one of the 
doctors listed below and Victory Memorial Hospital. (If you don't find these doctors listed in your 
company's health plan, talk to your benefits manager or health plan coordinator.) 

Choose a Health Options physician. You'll recognize the difference. 



Primi 


dry Care Pr 


lysicians 


Guy Abdorholdon, M.D. 


Charles Holmberg, M.D. 


Luis Salozar, M.D." 


Nicholas Bellios, M.D 


Yoginder Kumor, M.D. 


Chin-Yung See, M.D. 


Gopol Bholala, M.D. 


Mira Kupisek, M.D." 


Ditip Shah, M.D. 


Albino Bismonle, M.D.* 


Young Lee, M.D." 


Monoochehr Shorifi, M.D.*," 


Tien Cheng, M.D." 


Frank Leung, M.D." 


Mohammed Siddique, M.D. 


Renuko Desoi, M.D.* 


Moo-Ung Lim, M.D." 


Morlene Tanquilut. M.D.* 


John Dunlop, M.D. 


Kang-Yann Lin, M.D. 


AlanThain, M,D. 


C. David Engstrom, M.D. 


Wendy Lotts, M,D.\" 


Dennis Thain, M.D. 


Gerald Frank, M.D. 


Sheila Moliekel, M.D." 


Robert Thoin, M.D. 


Bruce Fraiin, M.D. 


Dennis McCreary, M.D. 


MarkTucci, M.D." 


John Frealand, M.D. 


James Monohan, M.D. 


Nondini Upodhyay, M.D.* " 


Danto Gabriel, M.D/," 


JaiNho.M.D." 


Glynis Vashi, M.D. 


Oscar Giron, M.D. 


Pedro Palu-Ay, M.D. 




Barry Goldman, M.D,'," 


Sara Parvinian, M.D.*," 


'Pediatricians 


Wilfredo Granada, M.D. 


Roshmikant Patel, M.D. 


"Mtmbtn, PPO parwl only 

The above doctors are immlxii of 


Dovid Herman, M.D. 


Valentino Pnlyak, M.D. 


Health Options of Illinois 



\Vy 



VICTORY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

J 1324 North Sheridan Road • Waukegan Illinois 60085 
A Not-For-Profit Hospital 



' For; a cbmp.eie^ d 
: ;/ H ea.j t h , O pi i b lis b V V\ Ki ri o is an d i n f o r m a tl o n o n tN e s e r v j ces. 
provided/by Vict^ 



Amy is involved with so many ac- 
tivities inside and outside of school 
that I have a hard time thinking of a 
student activity that she is not in- 
volved in." While at Antioch Com- 
munity High School, Vanderkooy 
has been president of the senior 
class, treasurer for student council, 
and secretary for National Honor 
Society. 

Principals In high schools 
throughout the country are permit- 
ted to nominate one of their student 
leaders for consideration in the PLA 
Scholarship Program. Selected can- 
didates are chosen based on their 
participation in service organiza- 
tions, clubs, and athletics; achieve- 
ments in the arts and sciences; em- 
ployment experience; and academic 




record. They 
also were re- 
quired to 
write an es- 
say. 

"Van- 
derkooy has 
demonstrat- 
ed exem- 
p 1 a r y 
achievement 
In her work 
and partici- 
pation in her 
school and 

community," said Dr. Timothy J. 
Dyer, NASSP executive director. "She 
is a fine example of the outstanding 
caliber of young people in America's 
high schools." 



Vanderkooy: 

'One of the most 

effective leaders' 

at ACHS,' 



Will someone please 
answer the phone 



There is nothing more irri- 
tating than being elbow 
deep in dish water or dirty 
diapers when suddenly the 
phone rings—it always rings at the 
most inappropriate time. We rustle 
with whatever task we arc in the 
middle of to pause, for a moment, 
to answer the jangling apparatus. 
Of course it's never Ed McMahon 
saying we won the Publisher's 
Clearinghouse, in fact it's probably 
not anybody we even know. 

No, it's usually the annoying 
voice of a telemarketer reading to 
you from a well-worn, much re- 
hearsed, script. Most likely they are 
trying to sell you new windows, 
doors, siding or a pre-approved 

visa Card. And, it wouldn't be on af- 
ternoon without receiving a call 
from somebody wanting you to 
switch to their telephone service. It 
is a household policy that we never 
buy anything over the phone, and it 
is a little unnerving when being so- 
licited by people claiming to be af- 
filiated with the local sheriffs office, 
In the event that we ever need their 
services, will our address appear on 
the computer screen with a big as- 
terisk next to it meaning "Never 
bought any raffle tickets or circus 
tickets from our telemarketers," and 
will this hamper their response time 
in any way? 

Totally annoyed with these 
calls, which come in at about three 
a day, I have been known to stretch 
the truth just a little when the voice 
on the other end of the phone asks 
to speak to the man or woman of 
the household. I either deny we are 
there, or pretend to be the house- 
keeper who doesn't speak English. 
Fortunately most of the time 1 can 
divert even having to talk to these 
fools when there is no immediate 
response to my "hello"— dead give 
away it's somebody trying to sell 
you something— instant hang-up 
on my part. 

Recently, 1 came across some 
rather interesting styles people 
have adapted in dealing with these 
home invaders. One acquaintance 
actually begins carrying on a com- 
plete conversation with the tele- 




JINGLE 

FROM 

PRINGLE 

Lynn Pringle 



marketer as if they were long lost 
friends. He inquires as to the 
health of their parents, the 
scholastic achievements of their 
children, orthc nitty gritty details 
of their significant other. This usu- 
ally generates total astonishment 
on the part of the telemarketer, 
which results in a quick telephone 
disconnection. Another person 
handles the situation with even 
greater tact. When asked, "Is Mr. or 
Mrs. So-and-so home?" she simply 
replies, "Just a minute," places the 
receiver down on the counter and 
walks away with absolutely no in- 
tent what-so-cver to find the Mr. or 
Mrs. Eventually the solicitor gets 
the hint and hangs-up. 

Of course, with the invention of 
answering machines and "Caller 
ID" it docs make it a bit easier to 
avoid being surprised by whoever 
seems to feel the impulse to call 
your home, but how often are you 
in the same room as those little 
mechanism when the phone rings? 
Who wants to run up or down a 
flight of stairs to see whose calling 
before you answer the phone? And 
after all that exertion, who has any 
breath left to answer the phone in 
the event it is somebody you want 
to chat with? 

So what's the answer to this an- 
noying little worm that eats away at 
us like termites in wood? I don't 
know, but I don't think this is what 
Alexander Graham Bell had in mind 
when he invented the talking-ma- 
chine— but who am I to say, I'm just 
the housekeeper that no speak Eng- 
lish. 

And so goes another "jingle 
from Pringle." 

Readers with information for "Jin- 
gle from Pringle" should call Lynn 
Pringle at 395-6364. 



Library to offer program 



The Antioch Library will be of- 
fering two children's programs be- 
ginning in February. The first one is 
"Spring Into Books," our weekly sto- 
rytimc for 3, 4 and 5 year olds. Once 
a month, we will offer a 2 year old 
mom and tot storytimc. Also once a 
month we will offer walk in crafts for 
first grade through fourth grade. Reg- 
istration will be taken Jan. 19 through 
Jan. 31. You must register in person. 

A singer will be made available to 
children who need communication 
in sign language. Call ahead, a three 



week notice is needed. 

The second program is "Warm 
up with a good book" Antioch's win- 
ter reading program. Tills program 
begins Feb. 9 through March 16. 

Each child who signs up to read 
one book a week for six weeks, will 
have a chance to win weekly prizes, 
such as Chicago Wolves pennants, 
tickets and hockey pucks. 
Registration begins Jan. 12 through 
Jan. 26. 

For more Information, call 395- 
0874. 




THE 
CUPBOARD 

Brendan O'Neill 




b-ball league 
starting up 
soon 



Lakeland Publishers is spon- 
soring "Hoops on the Oak- 
wood," a recreational bas- 
ketball league at Oakwood 
Racquet and Health Club. 

The league will consist of eight 
teams, with 6-8 players per team, 
and games will be played Thursday 
nights and Sunday afternoons. The 
league will feature 5-5 basketball 
over an eight-week season, with 
proceeds going to Charity. 

Lakeland will have a team In the 
league, and if you'd like to test your 
skills against Lakeland's own sports 
editor, register immediately, be- 
cause spots are going fast. 

For those interested in register- 
ing a team, see the full-page ad in 
this paper, and check out the want 
ad in the classified section if you'd 
like to earn $25 an hour as a referee. 
For more Information, please call 
Brendan O'Neill at 223-8161, ext. 
132. 



Brendan O'Neill can be reached 
at (847)223-8161, ext. 132; fax 
(847) 223-8810; or e-mail at 
edit@lnd.com. 



BOYS 

BASKETBALL 

STANDINGS 



North Suburban 

Zion -Benton 
Mbertyvillc 
Antloch 
Mundclcin 
Warren 
[jike Forest 
Stevenson 
North Chicago 

Fox Vallev 

Jacobs 

CL Central 

Crnyslake 

Cary-Grove 

Lake Zurich 

Dundee-Crown 

CL South 

Prairie Ridge 

Woodstock 

Mcllcnry 



13-1 
8-6 

■5 

-4 

■6 

•8 
10 

■n 



B- 
9- 
G- 
7- 
4- 
0- 



9-6 

9-6 

7-8 

9-5 

5-8 

5-8 

5-10 

3-10 

3-10 

2-11 



(4-1) 
(4-1) 

(4-2) 
(3-2) 
(3-2) 
(2-3) 
(1-5) 
(0-5) 



(6-1) 
(6-1) 
(5-1) 
(4-2) 
(2-4) 
(2-4) 
(2-4) 
(2-4) 
(1-5) 
(1-5) 



East Suburban Catholic 




Notre Dame 


10-3 


(4-0) 


St. Patrick 


8-4 


(4-0) 


Marian Catholic * 


7-7 


(4-2) 


St. Joseph 


6-5 


(3-1) 


St. Viator 


8-6 


(2-2) 


Nfarist 


6-6 


(2-2) 


Denct 


6-7 


(1-3) 


lolfet Catholic 


3-7 


(1-3) 


Carmel 


5-11 


(1-4) 


Holy Cross 


4-6 


(0-4) 


BlK North -Red 






Burlington Central 


12-1 


(4-0) 


Marengo 


11-2 


(2-1) 


Johnsburg 


4-7 


(2-1) 


Uyron 
Hap/ard 


7-2 


(1-U 


4-8 


(1-D 


Oregon . 


3-3 


(1-4) 


Independents 






Wauconda 


3-6 




Grant 


3-10 




Round Lake 


2-10 





LAKELAND 
LEADERS 

Nome G Pts Avg. 

Jack LcwamJowskl. WHS 12 257 21.4 

Wayne Uosworth.GI IS 14 282 20,1 

fricLcvcmicr.MIIS 15 299 19.9 

Itrian Hunlcli, UIS 12 I9C 16.3 

limQbolkowilcli.UIS 12 182 1S.I 

JimlclMcl Slaby, 1UJC ; 12 170 14.2 

DouglUppbcrgcr.MMS 15 201 13.4 

Nick Leidcr. CHS 13 171 13.1 

Aaron Evans, MHS 15 193 12.9 

Mike Urundow, WntS 12 151 12.G 




January 16, 1998 




Lakeland Newspapers* 



ACHS girls gain momentum 



By STEVE PETERSON 
Staff Reporter 




With some tough conference 
challenges ahead, Antioch High girls 
basketball coach Dave Woods hoped 
his team would be playingtheirbesL 

. That appears to be 
the case as the Se- 
quolts (8-7) bested 
Carmel 43-33. 

"We want a lev- 
el of consistency. The 
last four out of five games we have 
seen that at both ends of the floor. 
That 1 Is what pleases me the most. 
With games coming up against Lake 
Forest and Libertyville, we better 
maintain it," said Woods, 

"It was a real good effort in all 
areas of the game. We executed 
our half-court offense as one of 
our better games of the year. A 
concern was their height. As soon 
as they went zone from man-for- 
man, we opened the floor up," said 
Woods. 

Aja Drown scored IB points. 
Nicole Langley chipped in with 12 
when the defensive pressure was on 
Brown. 

"We played good half-court de- 
fense and we slowed it down on of- 
fense. At halftlme, the score was right 
where we wanted it to be," said 
Woods. 

After a 10-9 lead after one, Anti- 
och led 24-17 at halftlme and by 
eight after three quarters. The largest 
lead was 1 1 points. 

Beforc'facmgMiic'ScoUfc? In a 

tough North Suburban Conference 
task on the road, the Sequoits were 
hoping they could try and find away 
to stop Round Lake (5-11) star Kristy 



Nichols. 

"Not one defensive player can 
beat a team concept. The player who 
will be guarding Nichols, who Is a 
fine player, will have help," said 
Woods. 



That clash will have to wait for 
another day, as it was postponed due 
to a snowstorm. 

Lake Forest easily handled Anti- 
och 49-21 on Saturday. Langley led 
the Sequoits with seven points, in- 



cluding their only three pointer. A 
25-10 halftime deficit was too much 
to overcome. 

Antioch is at Libertyville Jan. 15 
and hosts Mundelein Jan. 17 in NSC. 
action. 




Antioch's Erin Riepe and Aja Brown look oh as Round Lake's Krlstlna Peterson scrambles for a loose 
ball. Antioch travels to battle Libertyville Jan. 15. — Photo by Steve Young 



ACHS, LHS grapplers 
to clash for NSC lead 



By STEVE PETERSON 
Staff Reporter 



Keeping pace with Libertyville 
was at stake as Antioch and Lake For- 
est clashed in a North Suburban 
Conference dual meet. 

Antioch won 42-24. That set up a 
showdown with the Wildcats at 
home Jan. 16. 

ACHS winners against the 
Scouts included; 

At 1 03: Brian Backe won 

by fall in 5:52; 

At 1 12: Chris Richardson won in 
a fall in 1:21. 

At 125: Ryan HIinak won 5-0. 

At 130: Dave Sorokowski won in 
a 7-6 decision. 

At 135: Joe Brandimore won 5-0. 

At 140: Mike Bardzinski won in a 
fall in 3:18. 

At 152, Matt Carpretz won by 
forfeit. 

At 171: Jeff Ultes won by fall in 
5:45. 

At 2 15, Nate Garden won a 17- 13 
decision. 



Antioch won two of three match- 
es at the dual meet at Lincoln Way. 

A 56-18 win over Shepard in- 
cluded Antioch wins in contested 
matches by: Bob G rasser in a techni- 
cal fall in 6:00; Bradimore in a fall in 
:53at 135; Bardzinski with a 15-1 de- 
cision at 140; Eric Meyers with a fall 
in 1:26 at 145; Ultes with a fall in 3:05 
at 171;StcveSmartwithafallin3:19 
at 189 and Garden with a fall in 2:18 
at 215. 

Managing wins against Lyons in 
a 44-18 loss were: Backe with an 8-4 
decision at 103; HIinak with a 7-5 de- 
cision at 119; Bardzinski with a 3-1 
win at 140; Ultes 3-0 at 171 and Car- 
den in a fall in :27 at 215. 

ACHS pulled out a 38-29 win 
over Metamora. 

Contested matches included 
ACHS wins by: HIinak with a fall in 
3:43 at 1 19; Sorokowski an 18-16 win 
at 125; Robert Grasser a 7-3 win at 
130; Brandimore a 14-9 win at 135; 
Myers a fall in 1:11 at 145; Ultes a 
technical fall win in 5:46 at 171 and 
Smart by fall in :28 at 189. 



ACHS gymnasts look to improve 

By STEVE PETERSON '; The Sequoits finished the meet 

Staff Reporter with 1 15.75 points. NoAntioch team 

member placed, however. 

Senior Amber Gore competed in 
the vault, bars and floor exercise af- 
ter coming off an ankle injury. 

Antioch is at the Lake County 
meet hosted by Stevenson Jan. 17. 
ACHS hosts the North Suburban 
Conference meet Jan. 31. 



Antioch High's gymnastics team 
earned a ninth-place finish at the 
Lake Forest Invite and some experi- 
ence as well. 

"We did well at Lake Forest. It was 
our second highest team score of the 
year," said coach Susan Shrader. 



Groth's shooting saves 
ACHS; Wildcats up next 



By STEVE PETERSON 
Staff Reporter 



Chris Groth's timing could not 
have been better for Antioch. 

The senior scored 18 of his 22 
points in the fourth quarter as the Se- 
quoits (8-6, 4-2 NSC) pulled away 
from Lake Forest 55-47. 

"Up until the fourth quarter, he 
was not shooting so well," said ACHS 
coach Jeff Dresser. "He is an explo- 
sive player. He elevated his shot 
well." 

Groth bettered his average of 15 
points per game with the strong fin- 
ish. 

Teammates Mike Nielsen (eight 
points) and Don Lackey (seven) tried 
to pick up the slack in the previous 
three quarters. Three Sequoits nailed 
three-pointers. 



The Sequoits were expecting 
Lake Forest standout. Tyler Smith 
to play until the morning of the 
game. 

"We practiced like he would 
play. The kids found out about it lis- 
tening to the radio the morning of 
the game. It was a little letdown be- 
cause he is one of the better players 
in the county," said Dresser. 

"Defense kept us in the game. 
We did not let them get many three- 
point shots and run loose on the 
perimeter. Without Smith, you can 
do that," said Dresser. 

Antioch fought to a 20-16 half- 
time lead but could not shake the 
Scouts. Lake Forest trailed by two be- 
fore Groth led the ACHS offensive 
blitz. 

Antioch is at Libertyville Jan. 
16. 



ATHLETES OF THE WEEK 



Name: Aja Brown 

School: Antioch 

Sport: Basketball 

Yean Senior 

Lost week's stats: Scored 1 8 

points In 43-33 win over 

Carmel 

Name: Chris Groth 
School: Antioch 
Sport: Basketball 
Yean Senior 

Last week's stats: Scored 22 
points, 18 in fourth quarter, in Anti- 
och's 55-47 win over Lake Forest 




Brown 



Groth 



m 






A8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



January 16, 1998 




Come Worship With Us 

A Directory Of An Hack Area Churches 



Graccland Baptist Church. 258 Ida St., AnUoch. IL 
Sunday School Ham.. Morning Worship 11 am,, 
Sunday Evening 7pm. Robert Williams, Pastor. 

First Church of Christ, Scientist & Reading Rm. Rto 173 and 
Harden, Antioch, Phono (647) 395-1 196. Sunday School. 
Sunday Church Service 10:30am, Wednesday, Bpm. 

BwiUful Savior Evangel lest Lutheran Church. 554 Partway, 
Antoch. Phone (847) 265-2450 Sunday Worsrup al Sam. Sunday 
School, High School a Adutt Bible Classes 1 0:303m, 

St Ignatius Episcopal. 977 Man St Phone (B47) 3350652. Low 
Mass 7 :30am., Ugh Mass 930om Sunday School & NursoryMOam. 

Anlloch Evangelical Freo Church. 750 Hghview Dr. Phone 
(847) 395-4117, Sunday Schod 9.45am, Sunday Worship 8:30, 
11:00, Children's Church Ham. Nursery both services Awana 
Club. Senior Pastor Daw! M. Grdeau. 

St. Stephen Lutheran Church. Hillside & Rto. 59. Phono (847) 
395-3359. Sunday Worship, 8. 9:15 & 10:30. Church School 
9am., Sunday. Rev. Charles E. MiBcr, Pastor. 

Christian LHe Fellowship Assemblies of God Church. 4I62S 
Deep Lake Rd. Antoch. Phono (847) 395-8572. Sunday School 
(al ages) 9am., Sunday Morning Worship 10am,, Chiicvens 
Church 10am„ Sunday Evening Worship 6'30pm., Wednesday 
Worship & Chddren's Progrom 7am„ Tuos. Women's Fellowship 
& BiUfl Study 9-1 1:30am. Jeff BrussaJy. Pastor. 



Faith Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main St., Phono 
(847) 395-1600. Sunday Worship 8 & 10:30am., Sunday 
School 9:25am., Sal. 7pm„ Rev, Qrcgory Hermanson, 
Paslor. Christian Day School (847) 395-1664, 

Mill burn Congregational United Church of Christ. Grass 

Lako Rd. at Rto. 45. Phono (847) 356-5237. Sund3y Service 

tOam. Children's Program 10am. Rev. Paul R. Meteor, 

Pastor. 

United Methodist Church ol Antioch. 848 Main SL Phono 

(847) 395-1259. Worship 8:30 & 10am., Fellowship Time 

930am; Sunday School 10am. Rev. Kurt A Gamlm, Pastor. 

St. Peler'a Church. 557 W. Lake St., Antioch. Phono (847) 
395-0274. Masses weekdays, 7:30am; Sunday 6:30, 8, 
9:30. Ham & 12:15pm. & Saturday 5:30pm. Rev. Father 
Ronald Angiim, Pastor. 

Chain of Lakes Community Bible Church. 23201 W. Grass 
Lako Rd, Antioch, Phono (847) 838-0103. Sunday Worship 8:15 
and 10:45. Sunday School 9.45. Children's Church 10:45. Youth, 
Women's, Awana & Small Group mostrtes. Pastor, Paul 

McMinimy. 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod), 
251 00 W. Grand Avo. (Rto. 59 & 132), Lake Villa. (847) 
356-515B, Sunday Worship 8:1 5 a 10.45am: Sunday 
School (3 and up) and Bible Study 9:30am. Christian 
Preschool, Rev. John Zollmor, Paslor. 



Dan Dugenske, Director 

This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 




ur good health is important to us. 



>. 




January - March, 1998 

$50 off 

Osteoporosis Screening 

(out-of-pocket expenses) 



Let 





ctory 

you stay 



We try to eat right, exercise and get regular 
check ups. But that isn't always enough. 
Early detection is the best way to prevent 
the crippling effects of Osteoporosis. That's 
why Mom talked to her doctor and was 
referred to Victory for a baseline bone 
densitometry screening*. " 

Victory Memorial Hospital 
wants to help! 

Victory knows how important it is for 
women over 40 to talk to their doctor 
about Osteoporosis — a bone-weakening 
disease that causes bones to break easily 
and can lead to deformity. 

Start out the new year 
right with Victory. 

During January, February and March 
we're offering up to $50 off of any 
out-of-pocket expenses for our premium, 
CT-based Osteoporosis test. 

Depending on your insurance coverage 
you may not have to pay anything! 

Call your doctor today to ask if you 
should take advantage of this great offer 
for a low-cost osteoporosis screening. 

For more information about the test 
and a list of risk factors, call Victory's 
Community Relations Department at: 

1-800-THE-CHOICE 

(1-800-843-2464) 




Victory 

Memorial 

Hospital 











1324 N. Sheridan Road 
Waukcgan, Illinois 60085 

*Bone Densitometry is a painless, CT-based 
scan, with 96% accuracy for detecting 
osteoporosis, It takes only 10 minutes and is 
covered by Medicare and most other insurance 
plans. Women over 40 should discuss the test 
with their doctor and ask to be referred for a 
baseline' screening. 



;X . 



Bowlers to regain momentum 



Amanda Phelps finished well with 
her best game of the day as she led An- 
tioch in a non-conference match with 
Grant's bowling team. 

Phelps had a 1 34 game to start but 
had a 191 and 204 for a 529 series. 

The Scquolts ran into an improv- 
ing Grant squad in a 2,618 to 2,347 
loss. 

"Amanda started slow, but she 
came back strong," said ACHS coach 
Steve Hacnchcn. 

- Amber Swiderek contributed a 
515 series- 
Senior Stephanie Martz had a 488 
series with a 173 high game. 

"It was one of her most consistent 
performances," said Haenchen. 

Junior Sheila Girlen had a 420 sc- 
ries, 150 high game. Diana Bandman 
had a 395 series. 

The Scquoits bad a tough day al 
the Prospect tournament Saturday, 
finishing 29th of 34 teams. Phelps had 



a 920 series. 

"The tournament was at a differ- 
ent location with a different shot. We 
had trouble adjusting to it," said 
Haenchen. 

Antioch was off this week from 
duals due to final exams. The Scquolts 
are at the Fenton meet at Benscnville 
Jan. 17. 



LV Baseball 
registration soon 

The Lake Villa Township Baseball 
League will be holding open registra- 
tion for the 1997 baseball season on 
Thursday, Jan. 22 from 7-9 p.m., and 
Saturday, Jan. 24 from 9 a.m.- 12 p.m. 
at the State Bank of the Lakes located 
on Grand Ave in Lindcnhurst 



Lazers win 5-3 in Wisconsin 



Starting slowly, the Lindcnhurst 
Lazers soccer team began its 1998 
season on Jan. 7 at the Milwaukee 
County Sports Complex in Franklin, 
Wis. Putting together some good of- 
fensive surges, the Lazers failed to 
score in the first half of the game and 
trailed 3-0 at the end of the first half. 
But the night was still young as the 
Lazers took the field for the second 25 
minutes of play. 

Led by Andy Marker and 



Cameron Marshall (two assists) Un- 
denhurst scored its first goal a 
minute and a half into the second 
half. Three minutes later, Marker tal- 
lied his second goal of the evening. 
Three more Lindcnhurst goals would 
bn scored before the game would 
end; one each by Marc Miller, Jim 
Koppa and Bill Ersler. In end, work- 
ing together as a team, the Lazers 
prevailed 5-3, notching their first vic- 
tory of the young new year. 



BILLER PRESS 

"We're Your Type" 

FAST, TURNAROUND 

TIME! 



Hours: 
Monday thru Friday 
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Sat 8 a.m.-12 p.m. 



(847)395-4111 

(847)395-1203 

Fax (847) 395-4232 



OOWCfl 



t 

ANTIOCH g 



a 



Mill "III I 



in 



m 



in in 




j«m 



966 Victoria • Antioch 



Wxr you nocd it VetitflJif' cJ u$ Wiy. 

COMPLETE PfWING 1 DUPUCAJWG SERVICES 

•BAW Phoboopies Ohd Prong •TypoMing I Design 

•Ertaigenwtt 1 Redwtora<^lng;B«Jngfloting 




Talking 
Health 



by Dr. Scott Reiser, D.C. 



What is Chiropractic Health Care? 



. 



iructic health care is a healing 
art and science which docs nut rely 
on drugs or surgery, but focuses 
instead on the nervous system and 
how it influences the body's organic 
and physiological functions. 
Doctors of chiropractic arc trained 
to observe symptoms in order to get 
to the underlying cause of the dis- 
ease or disorder. 

Chiropractic utilizes the body's 
inherent recuperative powers and 
the relationship between the muscu- 
loskeletal structures and functions 
of the body. By paying particular 
attention to the spinal column and 
nervous system, chiropractors 
remove vertebral subluxations us a 



means of restoring and maintaining 
good health. Our training enables us 
to help you to maintain your body's 
structural balance and functional 
tone. 

If maintaining your health and 
reducing stress is important to you, 
call Round Lake Beach 
Chiropractic at 847-740-2800 to 
make an initial, no obligation con- 
sultation with Dr. Scott G. Reiser. 
Dr. Reiser has served the Lake and 
McHcnry County area for over 10 
years. Let his knowledge and expe- 
rience serve you. Our clinic is locat- 
ed at 314 Rollins Road, Round Lake 
Beach (Ragle Creek Plaza - corner 
of Cedar Lake and Rollins Roads.) 



Remember - January is "Stress-Relief Month 



mvam&i- 



, 






GARDEN JOURNAL 

Lydia Huff lets you know the 

hot new flowers for the year / B1 



PARENT'S PLACE 

Dr. Singer gives advice on 
learning programs /B14 



*\i 



PICK 




Lakeland 

-Newspapers 

Jaiflryie 

1998 



Section 




Getting 
in Shape 

Local YMCAs offer fun programs for entire family 



By BRENDAN O'NEILL 
& KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporters 



We all have the same 
New Year's Resolution: 
get in better shape. 
Well, the new year is 
upon us and many of us have done 
little or nothing to make that empty 
promise a reality. The Hastings Lake 
and Like County YMCAs are offer- 
ing great programs for all ages, In- 
cluding programs for the entire 
family and all skill levels. 

Hastings Lake YMCA is looking 
forward to the summer peak 
months, as membership surges now 
for use through the spring and sum- 
mer. 

"This summer promises to be 
the best ever, with new programs, 
new equipment, updated cabins 
and a brand new outdoor swim- 
ming pool," said Stacey Siwek of 
Hastings Lake Camp. 

The Lake County YMCA expects 
similar results for this summer, and 
both have started new programs for 
the winter months. 

"We have an open house Janu- 
ary 18th and we offer personal 
training for everyone who wants to 



stick to their new year's resolu- 
tions," said Marie Garcarz, mem- 
bership and marketing director for 
Lake County YMCA- "We suggest 
cross training to prevent injury or 
boredom, and we really stress per- 
sonal attention." 

Both YMCAs are offering new 
and improved programs this year, 
With each facility concentrating on 
different types of activities. Lake 
County YMCA is working toward a 
family-oriented atmosphere, where 
kids who are waiting for their par- 
ents to finish their workouts aren't 
bored and just hanging out. 

"We've created a program 
called W.EAT.Ys. Weekend 
Evenings At The Y. We offer pro- 
grams for kids ages 5-11 who would 
just be hanging out otherwise,'' said 
Garcarz. 

The kids can play volleyball, 
walleyball, or can learn how to play 
basketball from the teen volunteers 
in "Buddy Ball." 

"It really gives the teenagers a 
chance to get Involved and teach 
the younger kids how to play." 

Hastings Like, on the other 
hand, is more of a camp-oriented 
facility, already geared toward chil- 
dren and young people. 



"There have been many cabin 
renovations," said Siwek, "There are 
new bunks, painting, and new 
floors. We have a new In-ground, 
outdoor swimming pool." 

Hastings Lake YMCA also offers 
a variety of programs for older kids 
as well. 

"New programs this year in- 
clude skill camps, which include 
such interests as chcerleading, mar- 
tial arts, cooking, baby-sitting certi- 
fication, fishing, sculpture and 
dance," said Siwek. "Ninth and 
tenth graders can participate in a 
counselor-in-training program." 

I^ake County YMCA offers more 
of a health club atmosphere, and 
membership includes use of every- 
thing— racquetbali, basketball, vol- 
leyball, walleyball, free weights, 
nautilus machines, treadmills, stair- 
climbers, aerobic and fitness class- 
es, swimming, and many more fit- 
ness activities. 

"We have more that 5,000 
members, and it's very easy lo get 
into a (dull) routine." said Garcarz. 
"We work hard on personal follow- 
ups and try to give personal atten- 
tion to keep people interested." 

Please see SHAPE/ B2 




Above left, Gurnee resident Patti Brettell escapes the cold weath- 
er while working a stair machine at the Lake County YMCA in 
Waukegan. Above right, Harry Lauritsen of Waukegan, a charter 
member of the Lake County YMCA, works out with Paul Bouchard 
of Beach Park on some of the machines available at the facility. 
Above, Tony Brock, 11, catches a big one at Hastings Lakes YMCA 
in Lindenhurst during summer programs at the site. —Photos by 
Sandy Bressner 



. 



' 






32,/Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



January 




KID'S FARE 



Museum of Science and Industry makes splash with 'Whales' 



Follow the journey of blue, 
humpback, orca, right 
whales and dolphins and dis-. 
cover the underwater magic 
of "Whales," the new large-format 
film to open Jan. 30 in the Henry 
Crown Space Center's Omnimax 
Theater at the Museum of Science 
and Industry. 

This important film, produced 
by the National Wildlife Federation, 
Destination Cinema and Zephyr 
Productions, brings a stunning com- 
bination of art and science together 
to create a new perspective on these 
mysterious marine mammoths. 
Filmed in OMNIMAX®, the engulf- 
ing large-format technology of 
"Whales" captures the wonder of 
being among the creatures and re- 
sults in what critics have called a 
"breathtaking" and "dazzlingly po- 
etic" experience. 

Audiences discover how the un- 
derwater dimension of sound influ- 
ences and guides their feeding, 
breeding, navigation and socializa- 
tion. "Whales" will immerse audi- 



ences in the dramatic sights and 
sounds that surround whales and 
dolphins through their amazing lives. 

Created by noted marine scien- 
tists, Emmy award-winning produc- 
ers, and the cinematographer who 
brought audiences "The Abyss," 
"The Deep," and the television se- 
ries "OceanQuest," "Whales" res- 
onates through the theater in an ex- 
ploding panorama of color. 

The producers traveled through 
the coastal waters of Alaska, New- 
foundland, California, Patagonia, 
Hawaii and Colombia to capture the 
amazing grace of gargantuan 
whales. The film offers surprising in- 
sights into the lives of these colossal 
mammals. In one scene, whale 
watchers discover the largest mam- 
mal that has ever lived on earth — 
the blue whale — at least twice as 
heavy as the largest known di- 
nosaur, and a creature whose heart 
is the size of a small car containing 
blood vessels large enough for a 
child to crawl through. 

"Whales" is the newest feature to 



be shown as part of the Museum's 
new alternating film schedule. The 
oilier exciting Omnimax film, "Thrill 
Ride," will also be shown several 
times a day. Show times are every 50 
minutes, 10a.m.-3 p.m. Additional, 
shows are at 3:50 p.m. and 4:40 p.m. 
on weekends and holidays. 

Adult general admission and 
one Omnimax film ticket is $1 1 . For 
adult general admission and two 
Omnimax films, the ticket price is 
$15. Discounted ticket prices for 
children and seniors arc also avail- 
able. Check with a ticket sales repre- 
sentatives for prices for children, se- 
niors and members. 

The Museum of Science and In- 
dustry Chicago, is the nation's pre- 
eminent center for informal science 
and technology education. Located 
at 57th Street and Lake Shore Drive, 
the Museum is open every day of 
the year except Christmas Day. Reg- 
ular hours are 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Monday through Friday and 9:30 
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on weekends and 
holidays. For more information, call 



FROM PAGE Bl 



SHAPE: YMCAs offer family fun 



The Lake County YMCA is also 
involved with other areas of devel- 
opment and expansion. It is looking 
to become a part of the Grayslake 
Community Center development, 
and is working toward a 95ih birth- 
day celebration for Harley-David- 
son in early June. Vice President of 
Membership and Children's Ser- 
vices Gussie Monks said that the 
Like County Y is looking into more 



youth programming. 

"We are actively looking to de- 
velop more youth programming in 
local communities," said Monks. 
"We're developing programming to 
meet their needs, and cither link 
with park districts to develop pro- 
grams or start new ones that no one 
has done before." 

The Hastings Lake YMCA will is- 
sue a brochure for the summer 



camp programs and offers an open 
house Sunday, June 7 at 1 p.m. To 
receive the brochure, for summer 
camp schedules or for more infor- 
mation, call 35G-4000. 

The Lake County YMCA offers 
memberships for $49 down, $39 
per month and has many other 
activities planned for the near fu- 
ture. For more information, call 
360-9622. 



'Welcome aboard 
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Sponsored by: 
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(773) 684-1414. Outside Chicago, 
call 1-800-468-6674. 

The Museum is supported In 
part through the generosity of peo- 
ple of Chicago through the Chicago 
Park District. 

Papai Players present 
"Little Red Riding Hood' 

Papai Players, a professional 
live theater company that has 
been entertaining children for 
over 20 years, proudly pre- 
sents u humorous adaptation of a 
well known fairy tale, "Little Red 
Riding Hood." 

The world is very whimsical and 
clever as he puts his make-up on in 
front of the audience and develops 
his character. 

The cast includes Kevin Peter- 



son (the wolf), Jo Ann Minds 
(Grandma), Victoria Verhoven (Lit- 
tle Red Riding Hood), and Pat Cot- 
sakis (pianist). 

Performances are held at Cut- 
ting Hall, 1 50 East Wood St, Pala- 
tine, with one performance on Jan. 
19 at Schaurriburg Prairie Center, 
201 SchaumburgCt.,Schaumburg. 

Performance dates and times 
arc: Jan. 16, 17, Feb. 16, Feb. 19, and 
Feb. 21, 10 a.m. (Cutting Hall); and 
Jan. 19, 10:30 a.m. (Schaumburg 
Prairie Center). 

Ticket price is $5.50 prepaid and 
$6.50 at the door. Ticket discounts 
for groups arc available. 

The theater opens one half- 
hour before showtime for seating. 
For more information or to reserve 
tickets in advance, call 359*9556. 



JUST FOR KIDS! 

FuwrACTORy 




CLUES ACROSS 

1 . January rings in the begin- 
ning of this 
3. Extremely 

6. Healthy drink 

7. Relatives 



CLUES DOWN 

1 . At no time 

2. Had on clothes 

4. Adores 

5. Roman numeral for eight 



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STARTS 
FRIDAY/ 



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THEATRE 



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January 16, 1998 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B3 



THEATRE 



fake 6 performs 

Symphony Center presents, tn 
association with the Ravinia Festival, q 
double bill of uplifting and electrifying 
music featuring a cappella group Take 6 
and legendary singer/songwriter Mavis 
Staples on Monday, J tin. 19 at 8 p.m. 

Using spirituality as their founda- 
tion, Take G began as an a cappella 
gospel group from a small Southern col- 
lege. Now, 17 years later, the group has 
had an unparalleled influence on mod- 
em pop, gospel, Jazz and rhythm and 
blues music. Willi their richly layered 
harmonies, Take 6's recent recording, 
Brothers, focuses on the vibrancy of 
their faith. 

Dedicating her Symphony Center 
performance to another Influential 
gospel singer, Mavis Staples Is joined by 
a special guest blues keyboardist, Lucky 
Peterson, for a Tribute to Mahalia 
Jackson.'' With the roots in gospel, 
Staples' distinctive voice and style have 
defined modem rhythm and blues, 



Lake Geneva hosts snow sculpting event 




The drama of the United States National Snow 
Sculpting Championship returns to Lake Geneva, 
Wis., Feb. 4-8. The competition will be 
the centerpiece.of Winterfest 1998, the 
area's third annual winter celebration. 

The National Snow Sculpting 
Championship features 15 teams from 
nine states. Participating teams come 
from around the country to vie for the 
national title. Each team consists of three 
members who spend three days using a variety of 
hand tools to carve a 6'x6'xl0' block of snow. The 
public is invited to attend and encouraged to view 
the exciting transformation of snow blocks to art 
at Riviera Park (Wrigley Drive and Geneva Lake). 
Weather permitting, competitors will be on-site 
Feb. 4-7, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., and 2 p.m. until dark. 
Competition ends at noon on Saturday the 7th; 
the finished snow sculptures can be viewed 
through Sunday the 8th. Admission is free. 



CHECK 
STOUT! 



Last year's Snow Sculpting Championship 
winner will represent the United States at the 1998 
Olympic Arts Festival in Nagano, Japan, 
where snow sculpting is a medal-award 
event. Nagano will be the fifth Olympiad 
to feature snow sculpting as a competi- 
tive event. 

The Olympic Snow Sculpting team 
will make a guest appearance at this 
year's Championship on Friday and 
Saturday. 

First, second and third place honors will be 
selected by the competitors, themselves, in secret 
ballot voting beginning Saturday, the 7th. Judging 
criteria includes skill, beauty, difficulty, originality 
and design. A "People's Choice" award will be 
given to the team receiving the most votes cast by 
event visitors. Voting will lake place Saturday from 
noon to 2 p.m., with awards announced at 3 p.m. 
in the Riviera Ballroom. 



Tickets for Take 6 and Mavis . 
Staples with Lucky Peterson are $15- 
$25, box seats $40. For more informa- 
tion, call (312) 294-3000. 

'Hercules' 

Tickets are now on sale for Disney 
on Ice-r-"Hercules," Feld Entertainment's 
latest on-lce blockbuster that's hotter 1 
than Hades and cooler than Zeus. 
Chicago-area audiences can feast on this 
skating action-adventure, an arena expe- 
rience fit for the gods, at the Rosemont 
Horizon, Jan. 21-25, and the United 
Center, Jan. 27-Feb. 8. 

This timeless tale of deceit and des- 
tiny takes on a modern twist of love, 
laughter and world -class ice skating, 
featuring an international cast of top- 
notch competitors-turned performers. 
Like the Disney movie, the ice spectacu- 
lar features inspirational music by 
Oscar-winning composer Alen Menken, 
and unforgettable characters voiced by 
Tate Donovan (Hercules), Susan Egan 
(Meg), James Woods (Hades), Hip Tom 

Please mm to next page 



I 




January 15-19 

Thursday - Monday 

Big savings mail-wide on 
your favorite things. 



Lakehurst Mall 

Rts. 120 (y 43 • Waukcgan, IL • (847) 473-0234 
Shop Daily 10-9 • Saturday 10-6 • Sunday 11-6 






B4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



January 16, 1998 



(Zeus), Paul Shaffer (Hermes), Bob 
Gold ilnvaii (Pain) and Matt Frewcr 
(Panic). 

Tickets for Disney on Ice— Hercules 
are available at the Roscmont Horizon 
Box Office, 6920 North Mannheim Road, 
the United Center Box Office, 1901 West 
Madison Street, and all TickctMastcr 
locations. Prices range from $12.50 to 
$22.50. Children under 12 save $2.50 off 
regular ticket prices at selected perfor- 
mances. To order tickets by phone, call 
(312) 559-1212. For more information, 
call the Horizon at 635-6601, or the 
United Ccnicr at (312) 455-4500. 

Hercules auditions 

Pcld Entertainment's "Disney on 
Ice®— Hercules" Is looking for talented 
local figure skaters to Join the show's 
international cast. Auditions wilt be held 
on Thursday, Jan. 29, beginning at 3 
p.m., at Chicago's United Center, 1901 
VV. Madison. 

Interested male and female skaters 
should call Judy Thomas, artistic talent 
coordinator, at [94 1) 349-4848 to reserve 
a spot at the audition. Skaters chosen to 
perform with die show should be at 
least 17-years-old or high school gradu- 
ates and available to travel for extended 
periods of (line. Personality, appearance 
and ability to learn intricate routines 
will be considered. Audiiioners should 
arrive at 2:30 p.m. and enter through 
(he Gate 4 entrance on the east side of 
the United Center. 

The show wilt travel to 82 U.S. cities 
over a three-year period. 

Legends in concert 

The Fireside Restaurant and 
Playhouse in Fort Atkinson, Wis., is 
proud to present an exclusive Midwest 
engagement, direct from Lis Vegas, of 
John Stuart's Award Winning "Legends 
in Concert." The Fireside's production 
features live re-creations of Libcracc, 
Dolly Panon, Kenny Rogers, The 
Andrews Sisters, Diana Ross, and the 
King himself, HI vis! 

The show is directed by Legends 
creator John W. Stuart with choreogra- 
phy by Bobby Holing. In addition to the 
Legends stars, there is a supporting cast 
of eight singers and dancers that were 
selected from The Fireside's New York 
auditions. 

Legends in Concert runs until 



SPECIAL EVENTS 



Chili Open Golf Tournament returns 

Cabin-fever golfers of all abilities can escape the 
winter blahs during the Lake County Forest 
Preserves' annual Chili Open Golf Tournament at 
Brae Loch Golf Course on Saturday, Jan. 17, Tee-off 
for the shotgun, nine-hole scramble tourney is 10 
a.m. 

Participants will play nine holes of golf and then 
warm up with an all-you-can-eat chili lunch. Prizes 
will be awarded in various categories, including for 
"Most Creative Pull-Cart." Again this year, a special 
prize will be given to the "Best Dressed Dapper and 
Daffy Duffers," I hose who wear the most stylish and 
funniest costumes. 

Pre-regislralion and pre-payment is required. To 
reserve a foursome, call Brae Ijoch at 223-5542. Cost 
is $25 per person, which includes a buffet lunch. 

Chili Open golfers play on temporary greens and 
tees. If there is snow, it will be packed on tees, fair- 
ways and greens as part of the attraction and fun. 

Brae Loch Golf Course is located on Route 45 
just north of Route 120 in Grayslake. For more infor- 
mation, call 223-5542. 

Three fishing seminars offered 

Attention all fishermen! The Northbrook Park 
District will host three informative seminars in 
January and February to enhance knowledge of fish- 
ing techniques. An Introduction lo Game Fishing is . 
scheduled on Thursday, Ian. 22, 7 p.m., at 3323 
Walters Ave. Participants, ages 13 and over, will 
study the best ways to find and catch all types of 
fresh water fish, with an emphasis on bass. A brand 
new rod and fishing tackle will be raffled. Additional 
classes will highliglit basic fishing techniques (Feb, 
5) and the arty of fly fishing ( Feb. 12). A $7 fee will be 
assessed for each class. For more information, or to 
register, call 291-2980. 



Get your history 'caught up' 

"Getting Caught Up" is the presentation of the 
Burlington Genealogical Society on Wednesday, Jan. 
21 at 7 p.m. The holiday rush is over, and this may 
be a good time of year to organize and catch up on 
the odds and ends in your genealogical research. 

Election of new officers will be the first item on 
the agenda, so members will want to attend. Then 
the meeting will focus on genealogical research. 
Bring research questions and/or problems and the 
society will try to help point attendees in the right 
direction. 

There are free brochures and catalogues from 
genealogical bookstores, computer programs, and 
miscellaneous genealogical research material. 

Anyone interested in genealogy or family history 
is welcome to attend this free meeting at the 
Burlington Historical Society Museum, corner of 
Perkins Blvd. and Jefferson St., Burlington, Wis. 

For more information, call (414) 763-6981. 

Ski for Leukemia Research in Vail 

The Davidson/ Brin Chapter of the Leukemia 
Research Foundation (LRF) is accepting reservations 
for its 12th annual Men Only "Ski for Research" 
fundraiser, Feb. 5-10. in Vail, Colo. 

Cost is $1,325 and includes: round-trip airfare 
from Chicago-O'Hare to Denver plus luxury ground 
transportation to Vail; lodging for five days/five 
nights with ski -in /ski -out availability at Uon's 
Square Condominiums; five-day lift ticket; Nastar 
race; mountain picnics; and farewell dinner and auc- 
tion. Rental equipment provided courtesy of 
Chartered Sports of Vail, Colo. 

All skill levels are welcome and all proceeds ben- 
efit the Leukemia Research Foundation. For more 
information and to make reservations, contact 
Gerald Brin at 566-5470. 



March I, with 10 performances weekly 
Wednesday through Sunday. A Las 
Vegas style Gisino buffet is served prior 
to each performance. The Fireside com- 
plex includes several gift shops with an 
extensive selection of unique merchan- 
dise including many popular collectible 
lines. It is located on business I Iwy. 26 
on the south side of Fort Atkinson. 

For tickets or more Information, 
call 1-H00-477-9505. 



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Hawaii's Valley 
Of Paradise 



by JIM WARNKEN 
President, North Star Travel 

Would you like to find a lush tropical valley where oranges grow to the 
size of grapefruits, where avocados grow wild, where orchids are as common 
as weeds? Whore is this land of Paradise'.' 

It's known as Waipio Valley and you'll find it on the Island of Hawaii, the 
largest island in the I lawaiian chain (The "big" island). 

On the northeast coast of the island at the end of Route 24 you'll come to 
a lookout point where you can see down into the valley. You can hike down 
the very steep dirt road into the valley or take the "Waipio Valley Shuttle." 

The shuttle is actually a jeep ride you'll long remember. Your guide will 
take you down an awesome looking road for an hour-and-a-hal flour of the 
valley. If you're lucky enough to get David as a guide, you'll also leant of the 
many legends about the Hawaiian royally, said to be buried in the valley. 

David was born here. At one time, there were over 4,000 people living in 
the valley. Now, his father is one of its few residents. 

You will visit a black sand beach nt the mouth of the valley. Then, ride up- 
river to the 1,000 foot llillawe Falls. You'll find plants found nowhere else but 
in this valley, one of which wilts immediately if touched by a human hand. In 
the river itself is found a type of freshwater shrimp, again very rare. Wild fruit 
and flowers abound everywhere! 

When you do visit Hawaii's big island, a visit to Waipio Valley is a must. 

NORTH ^f STAR 

CRUISES 
Lindenhurst 

www.northstartravel.com 

(847)356-2000 



Sister act performs 

The Chenille Sisters, the modem- 
day Andrews Sisters, who explode with 
pure harmonics, eclectic wit and good 
old-fashioned showwomanship, will 
appear at the I'abst Theater, 144 E. Wells 
St., Milwaukee, Wis. on Jan. 31 , at 8 p.m. 

For more information, call (414) 
286-3663. 

CLC auditions 

Auditions for Ariel Dorfman's 
"Death mid the Mntdcn" and Ulllnn 
I iellman's "The Children's Hour," will 
be held slaning at 7 p.m. on Jan. 21 and 
22 in the Studio Theatre In CLC's 
Performing Arts building, located on the 
Grayslake Campus, They ore open to 
anyone interested. 

An informaiional session on the the- 
atre program at CLC will precede the 
auditions. Those wishing to audition are 
asked to bring with them a prepared 
monologue from any play of their choice. 
For more information, call 543-2245. 

Sleeping Beauty 

The Northbrook Theatre for Young 
Audiences presents the musical tale or 
"Sleeping Beauty," Saturdays, through 
Feb. 14 at 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. at their 
theatre located at 3323 Wallers Avenue, 
Northbrook. 

"Sleeping beauty" is presented by 
Northbrook Theatre's professional adult 



children's company. The suggested age 
for this production Is kindergarten 
1 1 trough 5th grades. All scats arc reserved 
and can be purchased In advance for $5 
by using a Visa or MasterCard. Tickets 
purchased at the door arc $6, There arc 
party packages and group rates available. 
The Northbrook Theatre offers Field Trip 
packages to schools and groups on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays, arranged In 
advance. To purchase tickets, call 29 1 • 
2367. 

Directing class 

"Directing I," a three-credit hour 
class at the College of Lake County this 
spring, will introduce students to the 
theory and practices related to directing 
for the stage. The IB- week class will be 
offered from 10 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. on 
Fridays beginning Jan. 23. 

Theatre Instructor Robert Coscarelli 
will cover different aspects of directing. 
Including script selection, interpreta- 
tion, stage composition, rehearsal tech- 
niques and performance. Students will 
apply the theories (hey learn in the 
classroom in a hands-on workshop. 

The tuition and fees for the course 
are $51 per credit hour for in -district stu- 
dents. For course information, call 543- 
2G23. To register by phone, call 223- till. 

Wild workshops 

Arc you fascinated with Degas, 
Itcnoir, Cassatt? If you are intrigued by 




January 18, 1998 

LAKE COUNTY SPORTSMEN & GUN COLLECTOR'S SHOW 




Jan. 18, 1908 

Bit Y • SELL • fRAm 

Firearms & Related Items, 
Military Surplus & Antiques & Collectibles 

Held at 

LAKE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS 

Rte. 120atRte.45 

Noai I « Em Itom 04 West on Rle. 120- Fakpounds »pprait 3 mJos W, on Rio. 
Entcf Faig/oundi hom lite. 120 of Center St. 



ADUiS&ON 

1SC0ADUU5 

anLDfttNUtiDtfllzntU 



SHOW ALL 
INDOORS 



OPEN TO THE 
PUBLIC 8 AM.-2P.M 



TFor Inforrnationcall Lake County Gun Collectors 



P.O.Box 1667 
Arlington Hts., IL 



84 J/5 7 7-8 3 80 



pastels and have some previous draw- 
ing experience, sign up for this special 
"Pastel Workshop" on Jan. 24 from 10 
a.m. to 4 p.m. Instructor Nina Weiss 
currently Is doing workshops for the Art 
Institute Renoir exhibit. 

Three Dimensional FcltmokJng 
Investigates various techniques for mak- 
ing wool Into flat and three dimensional 
felled forms. Hats, bags, vessels, and 
sculpture are all possible on Saturday, 
Jan. 24, from 10 a.m. to 4p.m. 

For more information about these 
workshops, or to sign up for winter 
classes, call 432-1888. 



ART 



Artists needed 

The atudliary of Good Shepherd 
Hospital is encouraging area artists to 
apply for participation in the 2-1 th 
Annual Juried and Invited Exhibition, 
"Art In the Bam 1990," scheduled for 
Sept. 26 and 27, 1990. All proceeds go to 
the hospital. To obtain an entry form, 
write to: Good Shepherd Hospital, 450 
West Highway 22, Art In the Bam, 1998, 
Harrington, III. 6001 0, Attn: Artists 
Committee. For more information, call 
381-0123. Deadline Is April 1, 1990. 

Member exhibition 

The Community Gallery of Art 
Members Exhibition at the College of 
Lake County through Feb, 22. Reception 
for the artists Is Jan. 23 from 7-9 p.m., 
and Is free and open to the public. 
There will he music by Steel Express. 

This group show features Lake 
County artists who haw Joined the 
"Friends of the Gallery." Works on view 
Include a wide variety of styles and 
media. Gallery hours arc 8 a.m. to 10 
p.m. Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. 
to -1:30 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Saturday, and 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday. The 
gallery Is closed Jan. 17-19. 

For more information, call 543- 
2405. 

Recycle art 

Ring In the new year by recycling 
your unwanted art and art objects. The 
Suburban Fine Ans Center's annual 
Recycled Art Sale and Benefit is just 
around (he new year comer and paint- 
ings, prints, frames and unwanted art 
supplies arc needed. 

In exchange for donations, donors 
gel wall space or closet room nntl since 
the Suburban Fine Arts center is n non- 
profit organization, a charitable deduc- 
tion as well. The Suburban Fine Arts 
Center is located at 1913 Sheridan Road 
in downtown Highland Park. Hours arc 
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through 
Saturday. 

Art class 

The College of Lake County will offer 
an art class in the spring semester that 
offers a creative experience for both 
parents and children. 

"Art far Elementary Teachers Fart I 
and II" Is primarily designed for teach- 
ers but can benefit parents and children; 
too. The class will'mcet from 9 a.m. to 
12:30 p.m. on Saturdays for 16 weeks 
starting Jan. 24. 

Students in the two-credil-hour 
course will create a portfolio of fun 
and entertaining projects designed to 
leach basic art principles to children, 
lite course is ideal for parents and 
their children, teachers, elementary 
educaiion majors and teachers' assis- 
tants, and parents may bring their 
children to class free of charge, Cost is 
S51 per credit hour, plus $20 for class 
supplies. 

For more information, call Bob 
Lossmann at 543-2436. To register by 
phone, call 223-1111. 



m PSYCHIC FAIRS 




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FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers/ E 



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What's next- llamas with lawyers? 



I am an animal lover. 
For example, I have a dog 
(Foxy) and a cat (Whiskers). . 
To give you an idea of how 
well I think I treat them, let me 
just say that when I die, I would 
iike^to be reincarnated as my own 
pet. 

Why? Because in exchange 
for doing basically nothing, other 
than providing me with their 
furry presence, my pets receive 
love, protection, transportation, 
food, exercise, grooming, free 
medical care, clean indoor hous- 
ing, and entertainment. I should 
be so lucky. Tell me where an 
adult can find that kind of 
lifestyle arrangement outside of 
Congress. 

So, as an animal lover, while I 
abhor the thought of cruelty to 
animals (I still sniffle when I 
watch "Bambi"), our modern soci- 
ety may be taking things just a lit- 
tle too far in the other direction. 

Take these increasingly fancy 
pet motels or "spas" as they now 
like to call them, where you can 
leave your pets while you go on 
vacation. While 1 wholeheartedly 
agree with the need for tender 
care for our furry friends while 
we're away, including adequate 
food, walks and playtime, I have 
to question the value of their lat- 
est options - doggie "pupcorn" 
and a couple of videos?!? 

Personally, 1 have yet to see 
Foxy stay awake through a single 
video, even if it features an 
extremely handsome German 
Shepherd. I suppose next thing 
they'll offer will be selective videos 
based on the pet's age and 
lifestyle - "101 Dalmations" for 
puppies, and maybe something a 
tittle more risque for the adult, 




LIFE'S A 
BEAR 

-'** Donna Abear 



un-neutered male - like "Lady and 
the Tramp", or one of those 
wildlife videos that features frogs 
mating. 

If that isn't weird enough, we 
now have pet psychiatrists. How 
exactly does one receive a degree 
in that field, I want to know? 
(And if they specialize In domes- 
tic duck psychiatry, would it then 
be okay to refer to them as 
"quacks"?) 

As you can tell, I am just a tad 
skeptical about this sort of thing. 
While I do believe that pets have 
more emotion and intelligence 
than some folks give them credit 
for, you have to wonder exactly 
how a pet psychiatrist can make 
an accurate diagnosis. How are 
they going to say "Tell me how 
you feel" to a dog? And when the 
dog tells them, how do they know 
what he/she said? For instance, is 
it one "woof" for a traumatic pup- 
pyhood and two "woofs" for 
cheap dog food? 

But wait - there's more. Not 
only do we now have "pet psychi- 
atrists", there are even "pet psy- 
chics". Many of you may have 
watched that episode of "Prime 
Time" where Diane Sawyer had a 
woman on who claimed to be a 
pet psychic She supposedly used 
her psychic abilities on Ms. 
Sawyer's dog, telling Diane all 
about the dog's childhood fears 



and traumas. i 

Well, I don't know about you, 
but if this is for real, it makes me 
awfully nervous. Does this mean 
that dogs think in English? 
Because if they do, I'm going to 
have to stop letting my pets hang 
around the bathroom when I'm 
taking a shower. I'd hate to think 
that someday their thoughts 
might be picked up by a pet psy- 
chic; "Ha! You think a drowned rar 
looks funny? You should see my 
owner naked! I almost choked on 
my chewbone!" 

Considering all these develop- 
ments, I suppose it's only a matter 
of time before we're no longer 
laughing at movies like "Ace 
Ventura, Pet Detective." Soon we'll 
be hiring real-life pet detectives to 
find out which neighbor's dog got 
"Queenie" pregnant. Then we'll 
have to bring in an "animal attor- 
ney" to file a lawsuit for pup sup- 
port- 
Wait - now that I think about 
it, "animals with attorneys" is not 
a thing of the future - it's already 
here. Just ask Oprah, who is cur- 
rently facing a lawsuit because she 
alledgedly slandered cows on 
national television. Her remarks 
apparently took the "bull" right 
out of the beef market. 

Poor Oprah. Just by daring to 
say she was not going to eat any 
more hamburgers, she has given 
new meaning to the phrase, 
"Where's the beef?" 

I can't wait for the trial. It 
should be very mooo-ving. 

Questions or comments for 
Humorist Donna Abear can be 
sent to Lakeland Newspapers, 30 
S. WliitneySt,. Graystake, IL 

60030. 



THE KITCHEN 

Let the kids help with this 

easy dessert 




If you're a parent, you know 
kids are anxious to help mom or 
dad in the kitchen. And as a par- 
ent, you know that's not always 
practical. The following recipe is 
the perfect dish to let the kids help 
with, and it's a delicious dessert or 
snack that can slip right into the 
lunch boxes: 

MAGIC COOKIE BARS 
Ingredients: 

1 stick margarine 

Graham cracker crumbs 

1 can sweetened condensed milk 

Flake coconut 

Semi-sweet chocolate chips (or 
your favorite chips, such as 
butterscotch, peanut butter, etc) 



Directions: Melt margarine 
in the microwave and pour into 
rectangular baking pan (9-inch by 
12-inch). Pour enough graham 
cracker crumbs in to soak up the 
butter and pat down evenly. Pour 
approximately 3/4 of the chips onto 
crust Spread a generous handful of 
coconut on top of the chips. Pour 
condensed milk on top of chips 
and coconut, making sure to cover 
evenly. Spread more coconut on 
top of condensed milk (use a little 
more than the first layer of coconut 
Place in 350 degree oven and bake 
for approximately 30 minutes or 
until top is slightly brown and bub- 
bly. Let cool and cut into squares. 
Delicious! 



BAND APPEARANCES 



Friday, Jan. 16 

Black Alley Blues, blues, 
will be performing at Waverly 
House on the Square in 
Woodstock. For more informa- 
tion, call 973-0128. 

Plum Waxy, rock, will be 
performing at Duke O'Brien's, 
1 10 N. Main St, Crystal Lake. 
Cover charge is S3. Call (815) 
356-9980. 

Big Daddy Roaches, rock, 
will be performing at Durty 
Nellie's, 55 N. Bothwell, Palatine. 
For more information, call 358- 
9150. 

BUI Perry, blues, will be 
performing at Beale Street Blues 
Cafe, 1550 N. Rand Rd., Palatine. 



Cover charge is $7. For more 
information, call 778-9850. 

Saturday, Jan. 17 

Hot Rocks, Rolling Stone 
Tribute, will be performing at 
Duke O'Brien's, 110 N. Main St, 
Crystal Lake. Cover charge is S3. 
Call (815) 356-9980. 

Rollover, rock, will be per- 
forming at Durty Nellie's, 55 N. 
Bothwell, Palatine. For more 
information, call 358-9150. 

AX. Reed & The 
Sparkplugs, blues, will be per- 
forming at Beale Street Blues 
Cafe, 1550 N. Rand Rd.. Palatine. 
Cover charge Is $7. For more 
information, call 776-9850. 




II offer 

lhat 

ih 

'art I 



fSTALS 
INN 



UBAVT, 



i^1177 

Adv 








NEWS 1220 




) THE TALK OF LAKE COUNTY 



Presents the BEST in 
High School BASKETBALL!!! 



v /Friday, January 16th /Saturday, January 17th 

Glen Brook South at Waukegan (Boys) Libertyville at North Chicago (Girls) 



Sponsored by WKRS Sports Boosters... 



Choo Choo's Restaurant-Fox Lake 
Where Great Food & Nostalgic Past Come Togetherl 

Taylor Rental-Gurnee 
The ONLY Place To Go For All Your Rental Needs! 

North Shore Trust & Savings-Waukegan 
We're More Than Bankers...We're Your Neighbors! 

Hucker Electric-Waukegan 
Call the Fast Response Teaml 

Balmes Florist-North Chicago and Gurnee 

The Flower and Garden Pros for Over 43 Years... 

The Place to Go for Things That Growl 

Hillery's Ribs&BBQ-North Chicago & Waukegan 
The ONLY Cure for a Rib or BBQ Attackl 

Brunswick Lakehurst Bowl-Waukegan 
Brunswick MEANS Bowling! 



All-Star Family Martial Arts-Ubertyville 
Let Them Discover the Greatness in You! 

State Bank of the Lakes 

Antioch, Grayslake and Lindenhurst 

The Art of Community Banking 

Counterfitters-Grayslake 

For Custom Counter Tops & Others... 

They're the Real thingl 

Waukegan Savings and Loan 
The Tradition of Excellence for Over 75 Years! 

People's Choice Video Express 
Waukegan, North Chicago and Zlon 
The Home of the One Dollar Video! 

Ron & Brian's Suzukl-Waukegan 

Award Winning Sales & Service for 

Motorcycles, Snowmobiles and ATVs! 




Al Rodriguez of A.G. Edwards & Sons, 
Take the Confusion Out of Your Financial Future 

Wizard Computers-Round Lake Beach 
For Computers... Listen to the Wizard 

The Shop-Waukegan 

Repairing Lake County's Ourdoor Power 

Equipment the Right Way for Over 26 Years! 

ERA-CBS Reality-Waukegan 
If They Dont Sell Your House, ERA Will Buy It! 

Grayslake Piggly Wiggly 
For the Best Value... Shop the Pig! 

Thanks to all our sponsors! 




















&&ILakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



January 16^1998 



Solo Singles to meet 

The Solo Singles Club meets 
every Friday at 8 p.m. at Gale Street 
Inn at 906 Diamond Lake Road in 
Mundelein. Admission is $3. For 
more information, call 407-5659. • 

Community group for 
disabled meets 

For those who are disabled and 
are looking for a group of people to 
discuss new ideas, old experiences, 
future advocacy possibilities, or 
just emotional support, the Com- 
munity and Self Awareness for 
People with Disabilities group is 
there. The group meets every sec- 
ond and fourth Thursday of the 
month from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the 
Lake County Center for Indepen- 
dent Living, 706 E. Hawley St., 
Mundelein. For more information, 
call Sheila at 949-4440. 

Knitting Guild 
seeks members 

A new knitting guild, the Nifty 
Knitters Knitting Guild, affiliated 
with the Knitting Guild of America, 
has been formed. The purpose of 
the guild is to promote the advance- 
ment of the craft of knitting through 
education and charitable works. In- 
terested knitters with any level of ex- 



ShowPlaceS 

VERNON HILLS 

Milwaukee Ave-2nd Lights oKED 
,7 ' B47/247-8958 & 



ALL SEATS s 2. 00 FRI & SAT 

. s 1. 50 Sun thru Thurs 



Showtimes Good Thru 
Thursday, 1122198 

Special Holiday Matinees 
Fri./Sit./Sun./Mon. Matinees in [Brackcts| 

FOR RICHER OR POORER (PG-i 3) 

[12:00 3:00] 6:40 9:15 DIGITAL 
[1:15 3:50] 7:00 9:40 DIGITAL 

ANASTASIA (G) 

[1110 2:15 4:30] DIGITAL 

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I yjtttour wotto it www.taraiotot.coni | 



BE THERE 

perience should fall, 362-8133 or 
362-5433 for information. 

Mother of Twins 
plan meeting 

The Lake County Mother of 
Twins Club is currently meeting the 
third Thursday of each month at 
7:45 p.m. Club members provide 
support and outreach services to 
mothers who are raising multiples. 
Call Lynn Quist for further informa- 
tion and directions the the meeting 
site at 223-7570. 

Drop-in bridge * 
continues at Gorton 

Bridge instructor Ginny Schuett 
will continue leading drop-in bridge 
sessions, "Bridge Plus," at Gorton 
Community Center, 400 E. Illinois 
Rd., Lake Forest. The sessions are 
held on one Wednesday of each 
month. Players can practice bridge, 
have fun and earn masterpoints, 
Come alone, with a partner, or a four- 
some. A 15- minute lesson will be giv- 
en before actual play begins at 1 p.m. 
No advance registration is required, 
fee is $4 per person, For the next 
drop-in bridge date, or for more in- 
formation, call the Gorton office at 
234-6060 before 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., 
weekdays. 



GURNEE CINEMA 

GURNEE MILLS SHOPPING MALL 
847-855-9940 



SLOT, SPECUL SLX WEDS i TO AfTEHNOON. 
BARGAIN MATINEES • ADULTS U JO BEFORE 530 

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V No paiv*3 or Moil* Fin Tlck«t» AtcrpliK) 

FEATURES AND SHOWTIMES FOR FRIDAY. 

JANUARY 10 THRU THUnS. JANUARY SI 



+ HARD RAIN fl Soe*unSw«ig4Dgif«IS<x#id 
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FALLEN R 

1t:45. £15, *JSO. 7:25, 10:00 



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FIRESTORM R 

1:10. 3:2Q. 530, 7:40, D:50 



free Refill on Popcorn &'5oM Drinks! 

~\ ■■ ALL . 
1 DIGITAL SOUND 



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12:35, 2:45, 4:55, 7:15. 0:30 



11:45, jflg MS. US. i.OO, 6:10, 7,4i,fcO0 Fl&A 10:01 



tfrqll 

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11:45,300,6:15,0:20 



THE FULL MONTY R 

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TOMORROW NEVER DIES P013 
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1 2*0, 330, 6:45, 8:15. 0:40 



JACKIE BROWN R 

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pins, 4:10, 7*5. 830 



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# GRAYSLAKE 

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VT2-1/90 



EXTIRES 3/31/9QJ 






Woman's Club 
meets monthly 

The Lake County Woman's 
Club offers a chance to meet new 
friends and enjoy social activi- 
ties. For further information, 
call Peg at 356-1512 or Sue at 
072-2016. 

Network Lake County 
has business contacts 

Network Lake County meets 
every Thursday at 8:30 a.m. at In- 
Lavvs Restaurant in Gurnee. Guests 
arc invited and breakfast will be 
provided. Network Lake County is a 
non-profit networking organization 
that provides the growth of mem- 
bers' businesses by providing edu- 
cation and sources of referrals 
through shared contact. For more 
information or reservations, call 
Kathy Fontana, at 244-2272. 

Home educators 
plan support group 

The Christian Home Educa- 
tors Assn. of Round Lake is a 
home school support group. The 
group meets monthly. For more 
information, call Tcrri Clark at 
587-7268. 

mu & TIMES START WEDNESDAY 11 



rANTIOCHli847)"395-0216": 
I 378 Lake St Antioch • 



: CAfirt SENIORS (OVER 60}. CHILDREN 
■ 9 / m (UNDER It) i ALL SHOWS BEFOflE 
fc 6PM $4.00 ADULTS AFTER 6PM 



Mouse Hunt <«-«» 

Fri, Tue.-Thur. 6:30; SaL-Mon. 2*0, 4:15 

Tomorrow Never Dies i«-«i 

Fri, Tue.-Thur. 9.-00-, SaL-Mon. 6:30, WM 



LIBERTY (847)362-3011 

708 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libert yvillo 



i 2 



00 



SENIORS 6 CHILDREN 1 1 a UNDER |- 
ALL SHOWS BEFORE 6PM 
ADULTS U.0O SHOWS AFTER 6PH 



Home Alone 3 i«> 

Sal-Moo. 200, 4:15 

Rubber i«> 

| Frt 6:45, WO Sat & Sun. 2:1^430, &«,(«»; 
Moa 215, 430, 7:15; Tue,-Thur. 7:15 

Scream 2 to 

1 Fd 630, 8*5; Sat-Mon 630, MS Tue.-Thur. 7J00 



• McHENRY 1& 2- (815) 385-0144 
1204 N. Green St. 



1 



50 SENIORS & CHILDREN 1U UNDER 
ADULTS $430 AFTER 6PH 



Anastasfa to 

Fri., Ti».-Thur. 6:45; Sat-Mon, 2:15, 4:15 

Scream 2 m 

Rt, Tiw.-Thur. 8:45; Sat-Mon. 6:45, 8:45 

. Rubber <k) 

FfL Tut-Thx 701 801 SaL-Mon. 231 430, 731 933 






General Cinema 

LAKEHURST 



[ROUTE 43 neor ROUTE 120 
473-4200 



BfttOWM MAT1HE1S IVltT DAY 
All SNOWI llfORl 6 PM 



SHOWTIMES FOR 1/16 THRU 1/22 



BARGAIN MATINEES ALL SHOWS BEFORE 6PM 
•INDICATES VIP TICKET RESTRICTIONS APPLY 



STAR KID* IPO) 

| Fft-Moa 130,3:15. 530; Tue.-Thur. 530 



HALF BAKED* w ' 

Hi &Sl 130. 333. 533, 73a 930, 1133 

Su\-Mn 1 3U 33a 531, 731 930.U-TIU 533. 731 930 



JACKIE BROWN m 

I Daily 8:00 



I AMERICAN WEREWOLF im 

Fd-Mon. 230. 430, 7.03, 930 

Tia-Thu: 430. 703, 930 



FIRESTORM* n 

Fa 1S3L 1.30, 305, 5:10,7:15,920, 1130 
Sun. 4 Mon. 130, 335, 5:10, 7:15. ft20 
Tua.-Thur 5.10. 7.15.930 



GOOD WILL HUNTING* n 

Fri.-Mon. 1:15.400.645,925 
Tue.-Ttu403,545,925 



WAG THE DOG* w 

Fit -Mon. 130, 400.045,9:15 
Tue.-Thu: 433.545.9:15 



SCREAM 2* WDdyMO 



MOUSEHUNT («) 

, FfL-Mon. 1.03, 300. 530. 7.00, Tua-Th*. 530. 700 



FALLEN* m 

I Frtltai 1:15. 403. 545, 920, Tua-Ttu 400, 6*5. 920 



HARD RAIN* w 

Fd k S1 1 33, 110, 520, 730, 940, tl 30 
I Stn-fctaiiaUIO.SflUX.SiiHuE-rru jgl 730,940 



TOMORROW NEVER DIES (wis» 

FtL-Mon. 1;15, 400,6.45. 9.15 

Tue-Ttu. 400.6 45*15 



TITANIC IW3| 

Fa-Moi. 1233. 403, 800 Tue -Th/. 403. 800 



AS GOOD AS IT GETS pci3] 

1 Ftl-Mgn. 233, 503, 3 00 Tue Ah* 503, 8 00 



Saturday Only ROCKY HORROR 11:30 PM 



■ GIFT CERTIFICATES ON SALE., 



MOVIE PICK 

The Boxer' another 
good Irish film 



Irish script writer and director 
Jim Sheridan and the award-win- 
ning Irish actor that tops his list, 
Daniel Day- Lewis, have come up 
with another one of their well-writ- 
ten and acted films about Irish life, 
in "The Boxer." 

This Is the story of "The Fighting 
Irish," and we aren't talking football 
or Irish pub brawls as in "The Quiet 
Man." This starts with Irish fighting 
in its biggest way, with Day-Lewis 
playing Danny Flynn who docs 14 
years in prison for the IRA and 
comes out to get back into the 
Belfast boxing ring where both sides, 
Catholics and Protestants, can yell 
and knock each other around. Day- 
Lewis hopes that the slam of a punch 
will bring his "dead" self back to feel- 
ing once more. 

Speaking of feeling, he also 
comes out to be reunited with his 
old girlfriend played by Emily Wat- 
son. She has since married his best 
friend and has the friend's 14-year- 
old son. The friend is also in jail. 



Day-Lewis and Watson find 
they feel the same about each other, 
a worse no-no In Belfast then being 
Protestant or Catholic. The nemesis 
of their love is a bad fellow named 
Harry who expects all IRA widows to 
stay faithful to their spouses no 
matter how long their prison term. 

Although plenty of violence en- 
sues, the film preaches tolerance for 
all since we have to coexist, like 
boxers in a ring, wc can settle prob- 
lems by standing up for our ideals 
and then live with one another after 
the battle. 

A beefier Day- Lewis turns in his 
usual award-winning performance 
and Watson gives his love the most 
winning of ways. 

Although the film has its dreary 
side befitting an Irish drama set in 
the last half of the 20th century, it's 
outcome is less harsh and brighter 
and lighter than most of its genre. 

We give "The Boxer" 3.5 out of 
five stars, a good but not a great 
movie. — By Gloria Davis 




Daniel Day-Lewisand Emily Watson 
directed and acted film about Irish 



star in "The Boxer," a well 
life. 



MUNDELEIN CINE MA 

'•l 1 ) 155 N. SEYMOUR, MUNDELEIN 

(847) 566-2490 



AN ASTASIA 



Fri. 5:00; Tuei.-Thur*, 5:30; 
Sot./Sun./Mon. 1:03, 3:00, 5:00 



FOR RICHER OR POORER 



Fri./Sat. 7:00, 9:15; Sun./Mon. 7:00; 
Tues.-Thurs. 7:30 



ALL SHOWS $1.50 




(PG13| 



Lukchuul Newspapers Is 

Interested to hem- news of 

locul Evcuts,Cluhs t and 

Organizations. 

Please send news items to: 

Rhonda Ilctriclc Burke, 
30 S. Whitney St 
Grayslakc, 60030 

Tel. 2238161 
Fax 223;8810 

Photos ace also welcome. 



General 
Admii.tlon 



ftLASSICifCINEMAS 



mumiu 



FOX LAKE THEA 

115 Lakeland Plaza - Fox Lake 



SCREAM 2 (o 

FRI 5:05. 7:25, 9:55 
SAT/SUN 12£0. 2:40. 5:05, 7:25. 9:55 

MON/WEO 12:20, 2:40, 5:05, 7:25 
TUEnnun SM, 7:2S 



RE 



(708) 973-2800 

OEN ADMISSION '5 



TITANIC (pen) 

FRI 5:10, 9:00 SAT/SUN 1;15, 5:10, 9:00 
MON7WED2.-00 ( 6:45 TUt/THUR 6:45 



AS GOOD AS IT GETS otm) 

FRI 7:00, 9:45 

SAT/SUN 1:10, 4:00, 7:00, 0:45 

MON/WED 1:45, 5,05 8:00 

TUE/THUR 5:05, 8:00 



MOUSE HUNT (pg) 

FRI 735 

SAT/SUN/MON/WED 12:50, 3:00, 7:35 

TUE/THUR 7:35 



TOMORROW NEVER DIES w 

FRl/SAT/SUN 5:15, 9:50 
MON/THUR 5:15 



1 



FIRESTORMS 

FRI 5:20, 7:15, 9:15 

SAT/SUN 1:05, 3:15. 5:20, 7:15, 9:15 

MON/WED 1:05, 3:15, 5:20, 7:15, 

TUE/THUR 5:20, 7:15 



•NO PASSES OR COUPONS • D OLBY SURR OUND SOUND ON ALL SCREENS 

ra re- -rw-r i aa 



Where mouieffioiflfi :is fun 8c affordable! 



January 16, 1998 



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LAKELIFE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B7 



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ApL_ City. 



Zip. 



PLEASE CHECK METHOD OF PAYMENT YOU PREFER 
□ Check D Visa □ Mastercard Q Discover Card# 



Exp. Date. 



AmounL 



Signature. 






B8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 





January 16, 1998 



January 16, 1998 








Lakeland Newspapers/ B9 





Eating and meeting in the Lakeland area 



i 



I 

::: 

I 

I 
1 

i 






The Best Chinese Food 

InTlteArea... 

And Our Customers 

Are Tlte Critics 




Chinese Kcstmirant 



Plenty of Free Parking 



• Dine In • Carry Out • Cocktails 
The Chinese Restaurant That Everybody's Talking About 
Conveniently Located Across From Fairgrounds 
111 S. Hwy. 45 Grayslake 
(847)548-8882 Fax: (847)548-2822 



Free Delivery 
Gill for Details 



i^ja^t3^nar^jr j r;-jra^^ 



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. # WA FAMILY 

f » RCSTAIIB 



RESTAURANT 



OPEN 7 DAYS 



SENIOR 

MENU 



GBS^S 



CHILDREN'S 
MENU 



I: 



Hours: 6 am to 11 pm 

356-4440 

1910 E. Grand ♦ Llndcnhurst 



Breakfast. Lunch, Dinner 
Homemade Soups and Dally Specials 

4 "Signature" Entrees 

4 Broiled Steaks, Chops. Seafood, Chicken, etc., 

* Fabulous Desserts and Fountain Creations 

♦ Cocktails, Domestic & Imported Beer, Wine 



Rigby's 

Top Ten Winter Specials 
"Platters" 

• Roast Prime Rib of Beef Platter 

• Broiled Porterhouse (over 1 pound) 

• Full Slab BBQ Baby Back Ribs 

• Half-slab BBQ Ribs and Half BBQ Chicken 

• (2) Extra-Thick Center-cut Pork Chops 

• Petite Ribeye Steak and (3) Jumbo Shrimp 

• Petite New York Strip and (3) Jumbo Shrimp 

• Rigby's "Land and Sea" Platter (Broiled Orange 
Roughy, Char-broiled Boneless, Skinless 
Chicken Breast, Shrimp Linguini) 

• Broiled Whitefish and (1) Broiled Pork Chop 

• Baked Scrod and Petite New York Steak 
Pi Petite Ribeye Steak 



8?U«95 (Complete Dinner) 
All Above Entrees Include: 



•Soup -Tossed Dinner Salad 'Potato 
Vegetable • Dinner Rolls • Dessert Selection 
from our Pie Case and •Coffee or Hot Tea 

(Sates Tax & Gratuity not included) 
Limited time offer. Not valid with any other offer or coupon 



- — -FRIDAY 5 pm: 
All You Can Eat 

Seafood & Rib Buffet 

.■ -is ■ 

only : '■■■:* 

Buffets include 30 item salad bar & non-alcoholic beverage |, 

ALSO ~ — —■—•—»—•—•—•— ■• — -■— '— ■— ; •— ■•■ 

All You Can Eat £ 

Hot luncheon Buffet 



Oliver's • 305 S. Route 83 • Grayslake 




Sunday Parties 
Available 




of 

RESERVE YOUR 



• Private Parties • Luncheons. 

-0R- 

Have Us Caier Any Occasion 
-Call for more information 

602 N. Milwaukee Ave. 
Libertyville, 1L 60048 

(847) 247-2208 



Gift Certificates Atvtabk Ttos.-Thurs. 11-9; Fri.-Sat. 1 1-10 




BAKERY 



SOMETHINGS BREWING, 36 S. 

Whitney Street, Downtown 
Grayslake, 548-4600. , Fresh baked 
pastries, all occasion decorated 
cakes, handmade chocolates, espres- 
so/coffee bar, bulk beans, gourmet 
sandwiches, homemade salads, 
soups, hand sliced deli meat and 
cheeses. Gift baskets, gift certifi- 
cates. 1 6 flavors of premium hand- 
dipped ice cream. Outdoor cafe. 
Somethings Brewing is open Sunday 
through Thursday from 5:30 a.m. lo 
9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday until 10 
p.m. $ 



FOOD & DRINK 



JESSIE OAKS, For comfortable & 
casual family dining at its best, amid 
the wooded scenery of Lake Count)-, 
it's Jessie Oaks Food & Drink, locat- 
ed at 81490 W. Old Gages Lake 
Road, Gages Lake, 223-2575 
For parties up to 50 there is an 
attractive dining room. Jessie Oaks is 
open Monday-Thursday from 10a.m. 
to 2pm, Friday & Saturday 9am to 
2a.m., and Sunday 9a.m. to 1 1p.m. 



MEXICAN 



TERRY'S MEXICAN RESTAURANT, 

325 N. Seymour, Mundelein, 566- 
9530. Terry's Mexican Restaurant 
offers the best in Mexican food and 
American cuisine sure to delight any 
palate. From delicious margaritas to 
seafood and more, you're sure to 
come back to Terry's. Open Monday 
through Friday 1 1 a.m. to 10 p.m.; 
Saturday noon to 10 p.m. Closed 
Sunday. $$$ 



MICRO-BREWERY 



BREWMASTERS PUB & RESTAU- 
RANT, 401 7 80th Street, Kenosha/ 
Wl, (414) 694-9050. A casual, 
friendly atmosphere where even the 
beer is homemade. Lunch and din- 
ner served daily. Open daily at 1 1 
a.m., with average lunch prices 
54.25. and dinners, $9, Open daily 
at 1 1 a.m. for lunch. $ - $$$ 



To Advertise Here, Call Your 

Account Executive At 

(847) 223-8161 



Visit all the 

HOT SPOTS 

on the Web at 
www.lpnews.com 

■ 



NOW OPEN! 

iiiliiiiiil 

^©CHARHOUSE® ^ 



*fe» 



lrt v'R°°? 



Ife 




Charbroiled Steaks & Chops, Wood Roasted Chicken, 
Ribs, Fresh Fish, Pasta, Burgers and More 

^--^(847^549-9900-^—— 

1413 Peterson Rd. (Rte. 137 & Butterfield Rd.) 

Libertyville 



M M O *?|g * 7T* ^fjjv 

MingS of china 

The Finest in Mandarin and Szechwan Cuisine 

Elegant Dining u>l'/t a Casual Atmosphere 

Sunday Buffet - 11:30-2:30 , A 2S °7 

$<\95 4AppeHzers 



Children Under 12: *4> s 



12 Entrees 
4 Desserts 



5572 Grand Ave., Gurnee, IL 60031 
Phone (847) 662-2929 • Fax (847) 662-6099 




'rand Burning How * tngms! 




Lake County's Newest Dining Experience- 

•GreatFood •Great Service •Great Location 
Italian - American Cuisine 



tank you for supporting our award winning 
sister restaurant - 



itkitlif SbitnJt Sfieeinfi & 
Comhlimtntixvy 

wtckJotji at 4:30 fun 



Catering • Private Dining Space • Casual Dining 

Bagglo's Bistro and Bar 

1590 S. Milwaukee Avenue • Ubertyvllle 

573-8800 • Hilltop Executive Plaza 




ADVERTISEMENT 



SPOTLIGHT 



Rigby's Family Restaurant 



Location: 

1910 E. Grand Ave., • 

in Lindenhurst. 

Telephone: 

(847)356-4440 

Hours: 

Seven days a week 

from 6 a.m. to 1 1 p.m. 

Menu: 

Breakfast: eggs, 
waffles, pancakes and 
French toast. Lunch: 
burgers, hot and cold 
sandwiches, home- 
made soups and 
salads. Dinner steaks, 
seafood, ethnic entrees 
and homemade 
desserts. 




Rigby's - Food for 
the entire family 

It is Irrelevant whether you are 90 or nine. 
Rigby's restaurant has it all! When they say it is a 
family restaurant, they are not kidding! Rigb/s has 
separate menus for both children and seniors, as 
well as an adult menu which includes breakfast, 
lunch, and dinner. Don't forget Rigby's appetizers! 

Start off your day at Rigb/s with their "egg- 
straordinary, egg-stravaganza, egg-ceptional" 
breakfast. You can have your eggs any way, or 
Rigb/s has 23 different omelets to choose from. 
Rigby's does not stop at eggs, they also offer pan- 
cakes, waffles, French toast or crepes. Any steak is 
available with breakfast as a side order. 



Lunch is a treat at Rigby's where they use only 
1 00 percent beef in all their burgers. The Rigby's 
Burger is topped with your choice of cheese 
(American, Swiss or Cheddar), and served with 
French fries or fresh fruit, plus the choice of a bowl 
of soup, or a tossed salad. For lighter appetites, try 
the 1/3 pound burgers. 

There are just too many sandwiches on Rigb/s 
menu to mention; steak and chop sandwiches, 
savory salad sandwiches, the "melt shop," and 
many hot sandwiches, chicken, pita and even 
croissant sandwiches. 

Rigby's also has a wide variety of salads, 
including Julienne Salads with turkey, ham, 
American and Swiss cheeses, hard boiled eggs/ 
tomatoes, green peppers, cucumbers, sliced onion, 
green olives, over fresh lettuce. Other "must try" 
salads include the Olympic Salad, the Cajun 
Salad, and the Caribbean Salad. 

Soups are homemade at Rigb/s where they 
also offer daily specials, fresh seafood, and a num- 
ber of ethnic dishes. Dinners include steaks, seafood, 
as well as Mexican, Oriental and Italian dishes. 

Rigb/s offers cocktails, domestic and imported 
beers and house wines by the glass or half-carafe. 

There are just too many delicious items on the 
menu, so it's hard to choose the best Instead, drop 
in for breakfast, lunch and dinner and find out for 
yourself at 1910 E. Grand Ave., Lindenhurst. 

Rigby's is open seven dayS a week from 6 a.m. 
to 1 1 p.m.. For carry-out orders or for more infor- 
mation, call (847)356-4440. 




Our Chef's 

Specialty: I 

Cheese! oss 1 

Fresh Vcge table I 

Grille Pam Pizza ■ 



50% off any food order &S2SsS$ 



HOUSSc 

MTh llAm-IOpm 

FH-Sat If *m E 

MWnJsht I 

Sun4fnn-10pm ■ 

NotVaJttwtti ( - 

any cfott otw a 




3«I 



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-» i L-O* 



Rt. 176, Lake Bluff 
, (847) 234-6660^ 



* 



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RT. 176 



Specials; 



©CHAR HOUSE® 



•Botfi Sped* Served with Choice 
of Potato and Soup or Salad 




Charbroiled 

T-Bone Steak 

(Oven Lb.) 

Charbroiled 
Sea Bass 

(Served Grecian Style) 

$ 14 



Prices valid 1/16/93 thru 1/23/98 



1111 N. Milwaukee Ave., 

Rfverwoods 



(847) 465-9300 



Great Specialties 



• Ribs • 1/2 lb. Burgers 

• Steaks • Broasted Chicken 

• Italian • Large Salad Bar 

• Mexican • Friday Fish Fry 

• Pizza - Thin/Thick/Double Decker 

Full Service Menu 



LINDENHURST OPEN 11 AM DAILY 




-J 






i *i|i II ~li«fc nil *IViMb — I p_M »— *,• 






B1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



January 16, 1998 



Hot flowers-picks for the New Year 
L 



ast week we talked about 
all the new catalogues for 
1990. After looking 
through a whole bunch 
more, 1 have picked some real 
winners to try in the garden this 
season. The Wayside Garden cata- 
logue is offering quite a few selec- 
tions, that make it hard to choose 
just a few additions for this com- 
ing year. 

Thc"BcllcofWoking"isa 




GARDEN 
JOURNAL 

Lydia Huff 



large (lowered clematis that looks 
absolutely stunning. It bears 
fluffy, fully double, four inch pom- 



pons that look like a peony. The 
color is one of the palest pinks I've 
ever seen, that fades to a silvery 
mauve. Another beauty is the 
"Multi Blue," a new Dutch hybrid 
that has 3-4 "flowers, with an en- 
dearing "fuzzy bear" form, each 
are blue at the base, lit with white 
along the edge, and then fired 
with yellow at the tip. The overall 
effect is like a soft starburst of 
bluefire. I've always loved the 




Eating and meeting 

in the lakeland area 



THE HECK WITH 

DRINK AND BE MERRY. 

EAT, EAT, EAT. 



STEAKHOUSE 



Hope you're hungry. 



ff * 



99 Townline Road • One quarter mile west oj Hawthorne Mall 
(847) 362-7390 • Vernon Hills 



a 



LN 



THE BIG EATER SPECIAL 

FREE APPETIZER 

Enjoy one of these delicious appetizers free with the purchase of any entice. 
Just circle your selection and give this coupon to your server when you order. 

PAUL BUNYAN ONION BUFFALO WINGS POTATO CANOI5 CHEESE STICKS 

Coupon valid only ai the Vernon I lllls Timber Lodge Sieakhotisc. Coupon not valid wiili other discounts or coupons. 
One free npnciizcr per tabic per visii. Dinc-in only Noi redeemable for cash. Offer expires 2./INH 



clematis vine, and in full bloom 
they are one of the prettiest vines 
out there. 

This catalogue offers some 
outstanding varieties of flowers 
from top performers to the very 
unique. A unique hibiscus called 
"blue bird" which is an azure blue 
like that of the summer sky is 
quite breathtaking. This hibiscus 
is one of my favorites. They bloom 
for an extremely long period- 
four months or so. They love heat 
and perform best in full sun. Mine 
do very well on my sunny deck. I 
will add this unusual one to my 
collection. 

Wayside also offers many ros- 
es for the rose lover. One that I 
added to my garden last year was 
the "Desert Peace," a hybrid tea 
that performed beautifully for me 
the very first year that I planted it. 
It is much bolder in color than it's 
parent the traditional "Peace." It 
exhibits all the colors of a desert 
sunset. From cream to a brilliant 
yellow, from orange to Scarlet. I 
would highly recommend this 
one. 

The "Fairy" rose Is also a win- 
ner, it has always done well for 
me, with no real effort on my part. 
It has teeny, abundant pale pink 
flowers, and it blooms all season 
until frost. There are many old 
fashioned varieties of roses also, 
that you may like to try. 

Whatever you would like to 
add (o your garden, I should think 
you can find it in this particular 
catalogue. Even if you choose not 
to order from the catalogue, it is a 
very useful source of information, 
and you will get many ideas for 
your garden plan. For a free cata- 
logue call, 1 (800) 845-1 124 or 
write The Wayside Gardens, 
Hodges, SC, 20695-0001. 



'Bogie' festival 
scheduled at 
Gurnee Cinemas 

Three seminal films starring 
Humphrey Bogart are featured at 
Marcus Cinema at Gurnee Mills dur- 
ing a festival beginning Jan. 23. 

"The festival features Treasure of 
Sierra Madre,' 'Key Largo/ and the 
rarely seen 1945 version of The Big 
Sleep/ These films showcase Bogie's 
best work with two legendary direc- 
tors— John Huston and Howard 
Hawks," said Daniel Chapp, Bogart 
festival coordinator. 

The original director's cut of 
"The BigSlecp" restores 18 minutes 
excised for the second film's release 
in 1945. Under Hawk's direction, 
Bogart and Lauren Bacall give career 
defining performances. 

"Treasure of Sierra Madre," 
which co-stars John Huston, and 
"Key Largo," with Edward G. Robin- 
son and Lauren Bacall, show Bogart 
at his peak form. 

"Gurnee Cinema is very proud to 
present these films on the big screen 
as they were meant to be seen. With 
plush stadium seating, state-of-the- 
art sound and projection and all the 
comforts today's moviegoers de- 
mand there is no better way to see 
Bogart's greatest films," Chapp said. 

The festival begins Jan. 23 and 24 
with screenings of "Treasure of Sierra 
Madre." Following on Jan. 25 and 26, 
"Key Largo." The festival's finale Jan. 
27, 28 and 29 is the uncut version of 
"The Big Sleep." Showtimcs for "Sier- 
ra Madre" and "Key Largo" are 1:30, 
4:15, 7 and 9:45 p.m. "The Big Sleep" 
will screen at 1:30, 5 and 8:15 p.m. 

A special advance Bogart Festival 
ticket good for all three films Is now 
on sale at Gurnee Cinema for $10. 
Tickets for individual features arc 
also available. For further informa- 
tion, call the theatre box office at 855- 
9945. 



Free guide available 
for selecting a school 



North Side and north suburban 
parents looking for a school for their 
children will be interested in a new- 
ly published directory to private, 
non-parochial schools, many of 
which arc in the northern suburbs 
and the North Side of Chicago. 

Copies of "A Guide to Chicago- 
Area Independent Schools" are 
available free by writing Indepen- 
dent Schools Directory, Room 199, 
University of Chicago Laboratory 
Schools, 1362 E. 59th St., Chicago, IL 
60637. 

The schools offer a wide range 
of programs, including classical cur- 
riculums and those using innova- 
tive methods of teachings. 

"We have expanded the listings 
in tills directory to better serve fam- 
ilies," said Michael Kennedy, admis- 
sions officer of the Latin School of 
Chicago and a representative of the 
Chicago Area Admissions Directors, 
the group that publishes the direc- 
tory. "We have also added new fea- 
tures to the guide to make it easier 
for parents to find the schools In 
which they are interested," he 
added. The guide was first pub- 
lished In 1993. 

In addition to listing informa- 
tion on individual schools, the 
guide also provides suggestions 
for parents in narrowing their 



search for a school. 

Among the schools listed in the 
booklet are these on the North Side: 
Bernard Zcll Anshe Emct Day 
School, The Chicago Academy for 
the Arts, Chicago City Day School, 
Chicago Waldorf School, Francis W. 
Parker School, The Latin School, 
North Shore School, and Sacred 
Heart Schools. 

North suburban schools listed in 
the directory arc the Baker Demon- 
stration School; Chiaravelle Montes- 
sori School, and Royccmore School, 
all in Evanston; Creative Children's 
Academy, Palatine; Lake Forest 
Academy, Lake Forest Country Day 
School, and Woodlands Academy of 
the Sacred Heart, all in Like Forest; 
The North Shore Country Day 
School, Winnetka; Northridge 
Preparatory School, Niles; and Sci- 
ence and Arts Academy and The Wil- 
lows Academy, both in Des Plaines. 

Oiher Chicago schools In the di- 
rectory are The Ancona School, The 
Harvard School, Morgan Park Acad- 
emy, and The University of Chicago 
Laboratory Schools. Also in the di- 
rectory are Avery Coonley School, 
Downers Grove; Chicago Junior 
School and Elgin Academy, both In 
Elgin; Marmion Academy, Aurora; 
Keith School, Rockford; and La Lu- 
miere School, LaPorte, Ind. 



Four Seasons presents bridal attire 



Fashion presentations of 
wedding attire for brides, wed- 
ding attendants, mothers, moth- 
ers-in-law and guests takes place 
Saturday, Jan. 17 in Seasons 
Lounge at the Four Seasons Hotel 
Chicago. Flowers accompanying 
dresses will be designed hy Vir- 
ginia Wolff Gorgeous Flowers. 

Mlrn Couture is the featured 



boutique during tea from 3 to 5 
p.m. Full tea is $16,50 per person 
plus tax and Four Seasons Tea is 
$20,75 which includes the same 
full tea menu alaong with a glass of 
sparkling wine. 

Reservations are suggested by 
calling Seasons Lounge, located at 
120 E. Delaware Place, at (312) 280- 
8800, ext. 2401. 



January 16, 1998 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers/ ' B1 i 



& 



HOROSCOPE 



Aries - March 21/April 20 
An argument with a business associ- 
ate has you upset early in the week. 
Try to stay focused. There's a lot you 
have to get done; this week. A loved 
one needs your input on a family situ- 
ation. Don't avoid giving him or her an 
answer. He or she is not going to stop 
asking. Virgo plays a key role. 

Taurus - April 21/May 21 
Keep your temper under control, 
Taurus. Getting angry only will cause 
a lot of problems with, family and 
friends — and it won't make you feel 



any better either. Instead of yelling, 
calmly discuss difficulties with those 
Involved. It's the only way to get 
things done. A friend reveals his or 
her true feelings for you. Don't bo 
alarmed. 

Gemini - May 22/June 21 

You can't seem to make up your mind 
about anything this week, Gemini. 
You have so many options that you 
just can't decide which Is best for you. 
Take a break, and try to relax. This 
will give you the time to set your pri- 
orities In order. A loved one needs 



CROSSWORD 



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Clues DOWN 




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1. Bribery 




8. Novice 


2. Egg-shaped instrument 


9. Antic 


3. Cook 




10. Shadow 


4. Procession 




1 1 . Dramatizing, in a way 


5. Acquired 




14. Calculator 


6. Take by theft 




15. Long flag 


7. Idol 




17. Make a copy 


12. 007's creator 




19. Matter 


13. Head of a religious 


23. Caribbean resident 


community 




24. Having the wind against 


14. Blimp, for example 


the forward side 


16. Stem 




25. Useless bureaucrat 


18. Way to utter 

20. Type of leaf 

21. Creator 

22. Sports interval 
















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your advice. Try to help as much as 
you can. 

Cancer - June 22/JuIy 22 
You've got a relaxing week ahead of 
you. Enjoy it — splurge a little; go 
shopping; spend time with friends. 
That special someone you've been 
seeing doesn't call a lot Don't be 
alarmed. He or she is just busy. 
Pisces plays a key role late in the 
week. 

Leo - July 23/August 23 
Be sympathetic to a friend in need 
this week, Leo. He or she has made 
a huge blunder and really needs a 
shoulder to cry on. Be there for him or 
her. The person youVe been seeing 
has a question to ask you. Don't get 
nervous! However, think about what 
you truly want before you answer. 

Virgo - Aug 24/Sept 22 

Be punctual for an appointment.early 
in the week. You will miss out on a 
rewarding opportunity if you are late. 
Don't let a family event distract you 
from completing a personal project; 



you've been working on it for too long 
to just let it go. A friend needs your 
help with a personal problem. 

Ubra - Sept 23/Oct 23 
Your good nature is exactly whafs 
needed In your professional life. Co- 
workers are feeling down, and your 
upbeat personality helps them get 
back on track —and makes you look 
good with your superiors. A romantic 
situation comes to a halt late in the 
week. Try not to let it get you down. 
He or she didnl make you truly 
happy. Gemini and Cancer play 
important roles. 

Scorpio - Oct 24/Nov 22 

Trouble between some friends caus- 
es you to choose sides. While you 
hate to do it, you realty have to make 
a choice. Think about what you 
believe in and what you know is right 
before you make your decision. A 
loved one reveals a family secret 
Keep it to yourself; it's not your place 
to tell anyone. 

Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 
You really say the wrong thing at the 
wrong time when it comes to your 
career this week, Sagittarius. Don't 
try to cover up the blunder. Admit 
your mistake, explain yourself, and 



work from there. It's the only way to 
save face. An acquaintance wants to 
get to know you better. Say yes. 
What have you got to lose? 

Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 
Let your admiration for a loved one 
guide you as you make an important 
financial decision during the middle of 
the week. Don't make any rash judg- 
ments. A friendly relationship intensi- 
fies — much to your chagrin. Dont let 
it get too far before you say some- 
thing. Be true to yourself. 

Aquarius - Jan 21 /Feb 18 
Your calm nature serves you well this 
week, Aquarius. There are a lot of 
things going on around you and a tot 
of people who want your help. Don't 
get in over your head — you know 
what you can handle. A loved one 
has a present for you. Let him or her 
know how much you appreciate iL . 

Pisces - Feb 19/March 20 

Don't be impetuous this week, 
Pisces. Look before you leap when it 
comes to a financial matter. A quick 
decision could cost you a lot of 
money. A close friend wants you to 
join him or her in a business venture. 
Don't do it — there are too many 
unknowns. 











Wfpw&Jm 

'{^// Presents ^]' 

" A Streetcar Named Desire 

By Tennessee Williams 

In one of the most remarkable plays of our time, Marlon Brando 

shot to fame by screaming, "Stella!" 

Directed by Deanne Jones 
January 30 through February 15 

Fri. & Sat. 8 p.m.; 'Sunday Matinee 2:30 p.m. 
Adults $10; Students & Seniors SB 

Call for Reservations 

(847) 395-3055 

Box office opens January 19th. 
PM&L Theatre, P.O. Box 23, 877 Main St., Antloch 

(mil,. Box Offce Hours Mon. thru Thurs. 530-7.30 P m ; Sot. 1 1 •?. 

t 1/2 hr s bebre showtime. Reserved Seating vlSA"C 




A 






WE KNOW HOW 

TO GET YOU THE 

STATS ON YOUR FAVORITE 

SPORTS. THE SCORES, PLAYERS 

AND ALLTHE HIGHLIGHTS ON THE 

LATEST GA/WES AND EVENTS ARE 

WITHIN YOUR REACH. 







I . 



Lakeland netDIRECT Would Like To Remind You: 

We Still Have Friendly Service 
T^Z.. We Still Have Low Monthly Rates 

$19.95 OR LESSf 



{ y 

Local Phone Call For 30 Prefixes* ■ Unlimited Use • E-Mail • Hat Fee of $19.95 
• Chat Groups • News Groups • Supports 33.6 Modems • World Wide Web Access 
• Internet Relay Chat • Personal Web Pages Posted Free • Discount Rates Available 

• Low Rate on Business Web Pages 



rSDDEGF 



(847) 223-8199 

E-Mail: service@lnd.com 

Visit us on the Internet: http://uwvJiid.com 



' Lakeland netDIRECT offers local phone charges to most of the Lake County area. Call for information about your prefix. 



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— J 



B*l 2 /Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 



January 16, 1998 



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GOOD SHEPHERD 

Blood Drive 

Good Shepherd Hospital will 
host a community blood drive from- 
8:30 a.m. tp 3:30 p.nv on Tuesday, 
Jan. 20, at the hospital, The blood 
drive is sponsored by lifeSource and 
Good Shepherd. 

Blood donors must be between 
the ages are 17 and 80 and weigh at 
least 110 pounds. At the time of 
donation, the donor receives a 
mini-physical to be sure that the 
donor's blood pressure, tempera- 
ture and hemoglobin (Iron con- 
tent) arc satisfactory. It takes only 
5 to 8 minutes to donate blood and 
donor's give only one pint or 450 
ml. of blood. The blood is easily re- 
placed In the body after 48 hours, 
and red blood cells are replaced 
over 4 to 8 weeks. 

Walk-ins to the hospital blood 
drive on Jan. 20 are encouraged, but 
scheduled appointments can be 
arranged by calling HeallhAdvisor at 
1 (800) 323-8622, 

'Twins or More' 

Parents expecting twins or other 
multiple births can build confidence 
and learn parenting skills necessary 
for caring for multiple babies in a 
new prenatal class offered by Good 
Shepherd Hospital. 

"Twins or More: What to Expect," 
is designed to explore the unique as- 
pects of multiple births including 
what to expect during pregnancy, 
childbirth and beyond. The class gives 
parents practical tips for managing 
the daily care of multiple babies. 

The first class will be held 
from 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday, 
Jan. 31. The cost is S25 per couple. 
Classes are scheduled every other 
month. Expectant parents should 
plan to take the class early in the 
second trimester, however, any- 
time during pregnancy is appro- 
priate. To register, Call Good 
Shepherd's HcalthAdvisor line at 
1 (800) 323-8622. 

Volunteers recognized 

The following volunteers have re- 
ceived awards from Good Shepherd 
Hospital for their donated services: 

June Fleming, Algonquin; 500 
hours. 

Barrington: Maureen Ahmcs; 
100 hours; Lyla Chamy, 4,500 hours; 
Ann Dunk, 3,500 hours; Kathryn 
Mupfcr, 100 hours; Margaret Lced- 
strom, 500 hours; Delores McCarthy, 
1,500 hours Ann McVinnie. 2.500 
hours; Marion Miller, 3,500 hours; 
Lillian Ward, 1,500 hours. 

Mabel Alex, Cary, 3,500 hours. 

Dorothy Drufke, Fox River 
Grove, 1,500 hours. 

Christine Salte, Hawthorn 
Woods; 100 hours. 

Diana Gollwiizer, Uke Zurich; 
100 hours. 

Darlene DcWitt, Palatine; 100 
hours. 

Good Shepherd Hospital, is 
grateful to all its volunteers for the 
time and effort given to the pa- 
tients and staff of the hospital. 
Area residents interested in more 
information are invited to call the 
hospital volunteer office at 381- 
0123, cxt. 5093. 

CONPELL 

Living free 

U\ing Free, the Outpatient Ad- 
diction Recovery Program at Condcll 
Medical Center, 801 S. Milwaukee 
Ave., Libertyvillc, provides an inten- 
sive outpatient program to help you 
understand the addiction and to de- 
velop and implement your own indi- 
vidualized program. Adhering to the 
strictest confidentiality, the program 
olTers all counseling and treatment in 
a non-hospital location. Call Living 
Free at 8 1 6-7867 for further details. 

Adult asthma 

Adult Asthma Management Pro- 
gram at Condell Medical Center, 801 
S. Milwaukee Ave., Ubertyville, offers 
a two-session program to help adults 
learn about taking control of their 
asthma and becoming an active 
partner with their doctor in their 
treatment. Call Respiratory Services 
at 362-2905, ext. 5175 for further in- 
formation. 



January 16, 1998 




Lakeland Newspapers/ B 1 3 



Poison Center changes means better service 



New computer and telephone 
systems at the Illinois Poison Center 
(IPC) are enabling the staff to more 
quickly ascertain trends in poisoning 
cases and to alert the public. These 
improvements are just a few of the 
changes that have dramatically ex- 
panded the scope of the IPC, which 
operates a 24-hour, toll-free 800 
number, dispensing advice to the 
public and health care professionals 
about the treatment of poisonings, 
overdoses, drug interactions and 
venomous bites. 

The Metropolitan Chicago 
Healthcare Council (MCHC), an as- 
sociation of more than 115 hospitals 
and health care organizations, as- 
sumed administration of the poison 
center late in 1996 from Rush-Pres- 
byterian-SL Luke's Medical Center in 
Chicago; the poison center had 
served residents of the nine-county 
Chicago area since 1953. 

When the state's only other poi- 
son information center in Rockford 
closed in July of 1996, there was an 
urgent need for Chicago's poison 
center to serve all residents of Illi- 
nois. In 1997, MCHC expanded the 
center's services to the entire state, 
so people throughout Illinois could 
use a single, toll-free number, which 
is operated 365 days a year by a staff 
of pharmacists, physicians, nurses 
and certified specialists in poison in- 
formation. 

The IPC moved its call center to 
MCHC's offices in August. New 



equipment was added, including a 
telephone triaging system. Calls 
coming in lo the center's toll-free 
number now are answered on the 
first ring and callers immediately are 
allowed to push "1" 
to be connected 
with a poison infor- 
mation specialist, 
"2" for information 
on poison preven- 
tion literature, or 
"3" for administra- 
tive matters. 

A * new, net- 
worked computer 
system allows in- 
formation from 
each of the more 
than 300 inquiries 
the center receives 
each day to be recorded immediate- 
ly into a data tracking program, 
which can generate reports that in- 
clude the age of victims, the nature of 
the poisoning and whether or not the 
callers.were advised to seek emer- 
gency treatment. 

"Our updated equipment is al- 
lowing us to serve the public more 
efficiently arid document cases more 
accurately," said IPC Director John 
Dellinger, Ph.D. "We'll also be able to 
quickly track trends and warn the 
public when necessary." 

To keep up with increased call 
volume, staff size at the center has 
doubled this year. The center current- 
ly is staffed by 16 full-time equivalent 




Foundation for Education receives 
contribution from Midwestern 

Regional Medical Center 



Roger C. Cary, president and 
CEO of Midwestern Regional Med- 
ical Center, Zion, recently presented 
a $5,000 contribution to E Steven 
Townscnd, O.D., chairman of the 
Foundation for Education, to sup- 
port educational programs not cur- 
rently funded by the Beach Park 
School District #3 general budget. 

The Foundation's mission is to 
provide resources to be used by the 
Beach Park School District #3 to en- 
hance and enrich learning opportu- 
nities for students, staff and commu- 
nity. 

"Helping our schools maintain 
high-quality and challenging oppor- 
tunities for our children is a very 



worthwhile effort, and Midwestern 
Regional Medical Center is pleased 
to support the Foundation for Edu- 
cation by making a charter donor 
contribution," says Cary. 

The Foundation for Education is 
an autonomous, not-for-profit 
501(c)(3) corporation separate and 
distinct from the Board of Education. 
The Foundation is seeking gifts in die 
form of cash contributions, memor- 
ial and tributes, and gifts-in-kind to 
help finance innovative classroom 
projects and programs. All contribu- 
tions arc tax-deductible. 

For more information about the 
Foundation for Education, call 263- 
2141. 




E. Steven Townsend, OD, left, chairman of the Foundation for Ed- 
ucation, accepts a contribution to support educational programs 
with the Beach Park School District #3 from Roger C. Cary, pres- 
ident and CEO of Midwestern Regional Medical Center. 



employees who determine the cir- 
cumstances of the exposure, identify 
the poison involved, recommend a 
treatment plan and make follow-up 
calls. Physician back-up also is avail- 
able when needed. 
By dispensing this 
information over 
the phone, the IPC 
helps save millions 
of dollars in unnec- 
essary emergency 
room and physician 
visits each year. 

The expansion, 
which added staff 
and upgraded 
equipment at the 
IPC, was made 
possible by a SI 
million grant from 
the Illinois Department of Public Aid, 
funding from MCHC, support from 
health care networks and organiza- 
tions throughout the state, as well as 
contributions from the city of Chica- 
go, Cook County and various other 
donors. 

"With support and leadership 
from MCHC-member hospitals, me 



Council is glad we can contribute to 
preserving mis service and widening 
its reach throughout the state," said 
MCHC President Earl Bird. "The poi- 
son center has proven its value to the 
people of Illinois, especially parents 
of small children, who are most like- 
ly to need its services. It provides a 
reassuring source of information to 
anyone who needs immediate assis*-^ , 
tance regarding potential poisoning 
problems." 

The poison center's toll-free 
number Is 1-800-942-5969 (TDD: 
312-906-6185). 

The Illinois Poison Center (IPC), 
operates a toll-free 800 number to dis- 
pense advice to Illinois residents and 
health care professionals about the 
treatment of poisonings, overdoses, 
drug interactions, venomous bites 
and other poison-related concerns. It 
is administered by the Metropolitan 
Qiicago Healthcare Council (MCHQ, 
a membership and sen/ice associa- 
tion composed of more tlian 1 15 lios- 
pitals and health care organizations 
working together to improve the 
quality of health care services in the 
metropolitan Chicago area. 



ILLINOIS POISON CENTER 
FACT SHEET 



• Offers telephone information 
to health professionals and die pub- 
lic (1-800-942-5969; TDD number is 
312-906-6185). 

• Provides state-of-the-art toxi- 
cology information using a number 
of current reference sources, includ- 
ing POISINDEX®, a computerized 
system that provides cross-refer- 
ences oh one million poisonous sub- 
stances and treatments. 

• Operates 24 hours a day, 365 
days a year. 

• Serves entire state of Illinois, 
approximately 1 1.8 million residents 
as ofjan. 1,1997. 

• Staffed by pharmacists, physi- 
cians, nurses and poison informa- 
tion specialists. 

• Maintains a list of antidote de- 
pots that store and distribute rare 
antidotes. 

• Works with physicians at local 
medical centers, allowing for clinical 
toxicology back-up on medically 
complex cases. 

• Designated as a Regional Poi- 
son Control Center by the Illinois 



Department of Public Health. 

• Established as the nation's first 
poison control center in 1953, it is 
the only remaining poison control 
center in the state of Illinois. 

• Administered by the Metropol- 
itan Chicago Healthcare Council 
(MCHC). 

• Provides toxicology training for 
pharmacy students, medical stu- 
dents, medical residents and pedi- 
atric fellows. 

• Distributes "Mr. Yuk" poison 
stickers to the public to warn chil- 
dren of toxic substances; also sells a 
chart on antidotes to health care 
providers. 

• Received 49,436 exposure and 
inquiry calls in 1996 and handled 
57,086 cases as of SepL 30 in 1 997. 

• Handled 72 percent of human 
exposures in 1996 without referring ^ 
them to an emergency dcpartmenL 

• Saved more than $3.5 million in 
unnecessary emergency room and 
office visits in 1996 (for each SI spent 
for the IPC, more than $5 in unnec- 
essary medical costs are saved). 



Armed with good nutrition, 
people are ready to fight disease 



Popeye the Sailor Man had the 
right idea when he fortified himself 
with spinach to battle die bloated vil- 
lain, Bluto, as well as other forces of 
evil. 

At Gumee's Cancer Resource 
Center, Lake County residenLs are 
learning about adopting a diet heavy 
in spinach, bell peppers, broccoli, can- 
taloupe, tomatoes, carrots, green leafy 
lettuces and sweet potatoes, as well as 
animal, fish atvd vegetable proteins. 

On-Jan. 21 . visitors lo the Cumec 
Mills Mall from 1 to 4 p.m. can find 
out which vitamin supplements are 
beneficial, how vegetables should be 
cooked so that they will retain their 
nutritional value, and what can be 
done to remove chemicals and 
residues from the skins of fresh fruits 
and vegetables. 

Answers to these and other nu- 
trition-related questions will be pro- 
vided by a registered dietitian, who 
will either speak to visitors in person 
or lake calls at a special number, 1- 
800-940-2822. 

If spinach doesn't excite your 
taste buds, maybe hearing about 



some of the dishes served at the 
Zion-based Midwestern Regional 
Medical Center's food service de- 
partment will. 4 

Food doesn't have to be bland 
and uninteresting lo be healthy. Pa- 
tients at the hospital eat tasty meals 
like lemony baked stuffed whiting (or 
perch, salmon with cucumber-dill 
sauce, lemon turkey cudcts, chicken f 
breasts with lemon and capers, tangy 
barbecued chicken, pork chops and 
apples, wine country chicken and 
more. 

Sweets are okay, too, as long as... 
they're not made with fat-laden dairy 
products. 

Proper diet is a lifelong choice, 
whcdier you're fighting cancer or 
simply giving yourself the nutrition- 
al foundation for a happy, healthy 
and less stressful existence. 

Tile Cancer Resource Center is 
located at Gurnee Mills, Entrance H, 
next to I.C. Penney and is affiliated 
with Cancer Treatment Centers of 
America. 

For more information, call 872- 
6367. 



t& 




. 



B 1 4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HEALTHWATCH 



January 16, 1998 



How do I pick a learning program for my child? 




ear Dr. Singer, 

Hope your holidays 
I were great! I have a 
■ - question about the 
programs that are out there to- 
day to help kids with learning. 1 
know I've seen you write about 
a program you run, a few times. 

Here's my problem. I'm a 
concerned mom and my son 
has something going on with 
his learning. It doesn't seem to 
click fast enough for him. I have 
been to many specialists and It 
seems that each specialist al- 
•*- ways refers right to themselves 
or their program Immediately. I 
have a problem with tills be- 
cause It seems that there Is 
probably more than just one 
thing going on with my son. I 
have been recommended now 
for three different programs 
and I don't know which way to 
go. There arc so many pro- 
grams out there! Can you help 
me a little bit to understand 
more about how to make an In- 
formed decision on tills? I'd re- 
ally appreciate it. F.F. 

Dear F.F., 

You arc very correct. There are 
many programs out there. Some of 
them are legitimate and some of 
them arc not. The way that I nor- 
mally tell if someone is for real or 
not is by how they recommend their 
program. 

Most of these learning problems 
that I've seen arc multi-sympto- 
matic. In other words, there can he 
visual issues, auditor)' issues, pro- 
cessing speed issues, etc. There can 
be more than one at a time. Going 
even deeper than that, there can l)e 
mechanical issues involved. In other 
words, beneath the processing level, 




PARENT'S 
PLACE 

Sherri Singer, 
Psy.D. 



*> 



there can be problems with the me- 
chanics of the eyes, ears, hands, etc. 
A program that assumes a process- 
ing problem prior to checking out a 
mechanical problem, in my opin- 
ion, is one to be careful of. 

A good, quality program is going 
to look at the big picture of your 
child's issues and make sure that 
even if their program doesn't come 
first in terms of order of treatment, 
they still refer you to the appropriate 
place for other treatments needed 
prior to theirs. If there are no other 
problems, then referring to their 
own program isn't necessarily a 
wrong thing to do, but if you feel like 
you are being handed a line, defi- 
nitely gel a second opinion. 

For example, my program deals 
with auditor)' and visual processing . 
as well as memory and processing 
speed. When I do testing on a child 
and 1 see that there may be some 
red flags in the visual or auditory 
processing area, I do not automati- 
cally take them into my program. I 
always refer for the mechanics of the 
eyes and ears to be checked first. 

Additionally, manyoftliesc 
learning problems are accompanied 
by constant, severe headaches. 
There are not many programs that 
deal specifically with that symptom, 
yet I myself have met many people 
who have been taken into a pro- 
gram that doesn't deal with those 
headaches, only to fail later because 
only one symptom was focused on 



instead of all of the symptoms. 

If I test a child who clearly has 
symptoms that need to be dealt with 
prior to my services being helpful, I 
refer immediately. I guess what I'm 
trying to say to you is beware of the 
professional who tries to rush you 
into his or her program based on 
one symptom when you know that 
other symptoms exist. There are 
many legitimate professionals out 
there who focus on only one symp- 
tom area and that, in itself, is not a 
problem. 

The responsible professional will 
make sure that any and all other 
symptom areas that he or she does 
not deal with are also being dealt 
with and not just left hanging. 

Additionally, in general, regard- 
ing these programs, I would also ask 
each and every professional you go 
to, for references of other people 
who have gone through their pro- 
grams. Written testimonials are 
nice, but it's much nicer to actually 
speak to people who have been suc- 
cessful with the program. It also 
gives you some idea of/whether or 
not the program is legitimate and 
actually docs exist. 

If the professional you are ask- 
ing for a reference or references gets 
defensive or suggests that it is not 
necessary, if it were nie, I would get 
another opinion and check further 
for other programs. Some profes- 
sionals feci it is not appropriate to 
give out names and phone numbers 
of clients. When you are speaking 
about a Psychologically based thera- 
py, that is perfectly appropriate. If, 
however, you are speaking about a 
learning based program, there really 
should be no reason why references 
would be a problem. Certainly, the 
reference would need to give written 
permission to the professional to al- 




Life Skills Series 



1/21/98 
LAKE VILLA 



• X 



V 



t 



2/4/98 
WAUKEGAN 



All presentations arc FREE of charge and arc held at the 
location indicated from 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. 

Sealing is limited, registration is required, call 1-888-869-1118. 



Are You Stressed Out? An OverView Of Effective Stress 
Management Strategies & Techniques 

John Jochem, Psy.D., CA.D.C. 

Who doesn't have stress Lhcsc days? Dr. John Jochem, a clinical psychologist 
and director of behavioral medicine at Provcna Saint Thercse Medical 
Center, will give a general overview of what we know about stress, how to 
identify sources of stress in your life and, most importantly, tips on gaining 
control over stress through proven stress management techniques. 



Medical Approaches To the Treatment of Attention Deficit 
Hyperactivity Disorders 

Michael Grccnbaum, M.D. 

This presentation, by Provcna Saint Thercse Medical Center child 
psychiatrist Dr. Michael Greenbaum, will provide a general introduction to 
the signs, symptoms and treatment of ADHD as a medical disorder helping 
participants to make informed choices about when and wberc to go for help. 



WAUKEGAN - Provcna Saint Thercse Medical Center, 2615 Washington St., 
Waukcgan, Illinois 60085. One block cant of Green Bay Road on Washington Street. 

LAKE VILLA - Provcna Saint Thercse Area Treatment Satellite, 37809 N. Route 50, 
Lake Villa, Illinois 60016. One block south of Route 132 on Route 59. 






Provena Saint Therese Medical Center 



low that information to be given. 

In my practice, the people who 
have gone through my program 
have been all too happy to sign a re- 
lease of information for me to give 
their names to other interested peo- 
ple. Of course, I also have the Inter- 
ested party sign a release to agree 
that they will only use the name and 
number for the purpose of that ref- 
erence and will keep the client's 
name confidential. It really has 
worked very well and people tend to 
abide by and respect this agreement 
so there really is no problem. Again, 
having that real person to speak 
with about the program is always a 
very good way to approach any pro- 
gram. 

One last thing. Be careful of 
something. There are a lot of terrific 
programs coming out that are little 
heard of. There is constant research 
going on in the area of learning and 
attention and many new findings 
arc indicating that there arc other 



ways besides what has been done 
up until now, to do. Don't think that 
just because a program has a huge 
advertising budget, andT.V. com- 
mercials, that it is the right one for 
your child. 

Also, don't mink that just be- 
cause you haven't seen a T.V. com- 
mercial for a program that It isn't a 
very useful and terrific program. 
Gather as much information as pos- 
sible. Try and use some of the guide- 
lines I've given you here and it may 
become easier to make your deci- 
sion. Good luck! 



litis column is for entertain- 
ment purposes only. Information in 
this column cannot and should not 
replace proper Psychological treat- 
ment. Dr. Sherri Singer tsa Li- 
censed Clinical Psychologist, child- 
hood behavior specialist. Call in 
your questions and comments'. 
(630)415-0974. 



Victory offers 'Problem 
Solver' breast imaging test 



Victory Memorial Hospital Is one 
of only two hospitals in lake County 
to offer the recently PDA approved 
Miraluma™ breast imaging test, 
"lite test is for women who have had 
mammograms or ultrasounds with 
difficult to interpret results because 
of dense breast tissue, implants, scar- 
ring due to previous biopsies, multi- 
pic lumps or calcium deposits in 
their breasts," says Liwrence Zarian, 
MD (Board Certified, Radiologist). 
This nuclear medicine test, allows 
the physician to examine the image 
of the breast, regardless of these 
characteristics. Beingable to read die 
correct results from a mammogram 
or advanced breast imaging can 
eliminate unnecessary procedures, 
decrease patient anxiety and assist in 
early diagnosis of cancer. 

Patients find this breast imaging 
test to he a relatively painless experi- 
ence. A small amount of clear ra- 
dioactive liquid (called Miraluma™) 
is injected into the blood stream. It 
travels through the body, attaches 
only to cancerous cells (if present) 
and emits invisible gamma rays. A 
nuclear medicine technician uses a 
gamma camera (the same equip- 
ment used in some cardiac testing) 
to take a picture of the breast. Re- 
sults show an image of the breast 
with a black spot (spots where the 
material has attached to cancerous 
cells) or a breast image without any 
black spots. A board certified radiol- 
ogist examines these results to iden- 
tify where the radioactive material 



has concentrated. 

"Although Miraluma™ uses ra- 
dioactive material, the exposure to 
radiation is very low," says Arman- 
do Salliel, MD (Board Certified, Ra- 
diologist). Il has a very short half- 
life and leaves the body in a matter 
of hours. Tills test is especially good 
for women who have implants, be- 
cause implants may obscure the re- 
sults of a mammogram or ultra- 
sound. 

Because of the nature of the test, 
results arc quick and provide more 
information as to whether a woman 
has breast cancer. "Miraluma™ 
solves problems that didn't have so- 
lutions before," says Dr. Saltlel. "Ul- 
trasounds and mammograms were 
not always conclusive, and this test 
gives us one more bit of evidence be- 
fore considering a biopsy." 

"Miraluma™ is non-invasive 
and gives us better clues to the na- 
ture of the breast tissue," says Sean 
Flynn, MD (board certified-RadioIo- 
gist). "It will also preclude some 
women from the need for further 
surgical biopsies." 

"Miraluma™ is not a screening, 
but a second or third level test used 
after a mammogram if the mammo- 
gram cannot give definitive results," 
says Dr. .Salliel. 

The Miraluma™ test is given 
upon doctor referral and is covered 
by Medicare and most insurance 
plans. For more information on the 
test call Diagnostic Services al Victo- 
ry Memorial Hospital at 3G(M190. 



WON of Lake County 



Widowed Outreach of Like 
County, an organization of widowers 
and widows of all ages, sponsored by 
Condell medical Center, meets on 
the fourth Sunday of each month at 
Condell Medical Center Conference 
Center, 700 Garfield Ave., Liber- 
tyvillc. Meetings begin at 2 p.m. after 
refreshments. The next program will 
be on fan. 25 and will be a special 



film. Newly widowed men and 
women will be made welcome. The 
group also has a monthly social 
event, casino boat trips, potlucks and 
attends plays. Dinner at a local 
restaurant after the meeting is op- 
tional. 

Next meeting is Jan. 25 at 2 p.m. 

For further information, call 362- 
2900, ext. 6275. 



Diabetic? 



INSULIN CONTROLLED? 
STILL PAYING FOR SUPPLIES?WHY? 



CALL 1-800-678-5733 

FOR MORE INFORMATION 



EXPRESS 



3592 Corporate Drive 
Columbus, Ohio 43231 



January 16, 1998 



HEALTHWATCH 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B 1 5 



Dream Date 
Auction to benefit 
Starlight Children's 
Foundation Feb. 15 



The Starlight Children's Foun- 
dation of Chicago, American Trans 
Air CATA) and 105.9/ WCKG will pre- 
sent the 7th annual Dream Date 
Auction on Friday evening, Feb. 13, 
at the Park West, 322 W, Annitage in 
Chicago. 

The event will feature bachelor 
and Bachelorette auctions, food 
from over 30 of Chicago's best 
restaurants and a raffle offering 
deluxe trip packages. 

Bachelors and bachclorettes to 
be auctioned have put together their 
versions of a "dream date" and these 
terrific date packages are included 
when the bidding commences. 

More that 700 people attended 
the event in '97 and helped to raise 
over $60,000. The highest bid was for 
a bachelor whose date package in- 
cluded round-trip airfare to San 
Francisco, accommodations at the 
San Francisco Ritz-Carlton and an 
emerald and diamond ring. 

Cost for the auction is $30 in ad- 
vance; $35 at the door. To order tick- 
ets or for more information call (31 2) 
251-7827. 

The Starlight Children's Foun- 
dation of Chicago provides educa- 
tional and entertainment services to 
seriously ill children. While the orga- 
nization is best known for its wish 
granting program, it also provides 
extensive support to Chicago-area 
hospitals and pediatric care facilities. 

Founded in 1986, the Chicago 
Chapter's support includes the de- 
velopment of pediatric playrooms, 
placement of Nintendo Fun Centers 
and on-line computer learning cen- 
ters, monthly entertainment pro- 
grams, holiday parties and toy dis- 
triution. Over 7,000 children in Illi- 
nois alone benefit from this founda- 
tion's programs each month. 



Ramsey Lewis to. 
serve as honorary 
chairman for 
Leukemia Research 
Foundation 

Legendary jazz musician Ram- 
sey Lewis has accepted the position 
of Honorary Chairman for the first 
African American Chapterof the Lin- 
colnwood-bascd Leukemia Research 
Foundation. 

Lewis, who earned Grammy 
Awards for such songs as "The In 
Crowd" and "Hang on Sloopy", fills 
the honorary chairmanship position 
for the Charles A. Crosby Chnpter, 
established in memory of Diaries A. 
Crosby, a Dolton resident who lost 
his battle to leukemia in August, 
1996, at the age of 20. 

"Charles was an avid fan of Ram- 
sey's music and we know that he 
would be overwhelmed to know that 
his favorite jazz performer is now a 
part of the Chapter," said Crosby's 
mother, Jacqueline Garrett. Lewis 
met and spoke with Charles just pri- 
or to his death. 

The Charles A. Crosby Memorial 
Chapter is one of 18 local chapters 
which make up the Leukemia Re- 
search Foundation. LRF is com- 
prised of more than 1,000 volunteers 
who have joined together to conquer 
leukemia by funding research into its 
causes and cures, and to enrich the 
quality of life of those touched by the 
disease. More that $16 million has 
been raised since the Foundation's 
inception in 1916. 

For information on the Charles 
A. Crosby Memorial Chapter, call 
Nov . & Mrs. Thomas A. Garrett at 
(700) 8.19-8206, the Leukemia Re- 
search Foundation at (B'17) 982- 
M80, or click on the world wide web 
atwww.leukemia-research.org. 




Rose Sajuaii's granctkids 
Helped her overcome cancer. 



When Rose Sajuan of Waukejjan, III., found 
out she had breast cancer in 1996, she knew 
right away she was going to fight and win, 
lx*cause she had to lx j here for her grandchildren. 

"My family is the most imponant part of my 
life, and not l>eing here for them just wasn't in 
my plans," Rose says. 

Rose's family doctor referred her to the 
Ginccr Treatment Centers of America program at 
Midwestern Regional Medical Center. 

"I was very impressed with how open the 
doctors were. I wanted to be involved in 
choosing the right treatment for me, and 



they welcomed that. I especially appreciated 
having support groups and prayer meetings. 
That helped me keep a positive attitude, and 
kept me focused on why I wanted to get well 
- so I could be here for my family." 

The cancer program at Midwestern combines 
advanced medical treatment with diet planning, 
vitamin and mineral supplementation, support 
groups, prayer, and lots of tender loving care. 

Find out how we make a. difference. FMease 
call Cancer Treatment Centers of America today 
at 800/940-2822 for more information or to 

schedule an appointment for a consultation. 



»•: v-c 






.-&• ;<3 




Wig SCE™ ' 



800/940-2822 

www.publiconline.com/-mrmc 

Midwestern Regional Medical Center 

2520 Elisha Avenue, Zion, Illinois 60099 

Rated one ol Americais finest hospitals by ttte Joint Commission on Accreditation ol Healthcare Organizations. 



" 



».«. 



.1 




B16 / Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 



January 16,1998 





Original 




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) THE TALK OF LAKE COUNTY 



Presents the BEST in 
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• Friday, January 16th /Saturday, January 17th 

Glen Brook South at Waukegan (Boys) Libertyville at North Chicago (Girls) 








Sponsored by WKRS Sports Boosters . . . 




Choo Choo's Restaurant-Fox Lake 
Where Great, Food & Nostalgic Past Come Together! 

Taylor Rental-Gurnee 
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North Shore Trust & Savings-Waukegan 
We're More Than Bankers...We're Your Neighbors! 

Hucker Electric-Waukegan 
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The Flower and Garden Pros for Over 43 Years... 

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Brunswick Lakehurst Bowl-Waukegan 
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All-Star Family Martial Arts-Ubertyville 
Let Them Discover the Greatness In You! 

State Bank of the Lakes 

Antioch, Grayslake and Lindenhurst 

The Art of Community Banking 

Counterfitters-Grayslake 

For Custom Counter Tops & Others... 

They're the Real thing! 

Waukegan Savings and Loan 
The Tradition of Excellence for Over 75 Years! 

People's Choice Video Express 
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Ron & Brian's Suzuki-Waukegan 

Award Winning Sales & Service for 

Motorcycles, Snowmobiles and ATVsl 




Al Rodriguez of A.G. Edwards & Sons 
Take the Confusion Out of Your Financial Future 

Wizard Computers-Round Lake Beach 
For Computers... Listen to the Wizard 

The Shop-Waukegan 

Repairing Lake County's Ourdoor Power 

Equipment the Right Way for Over 26 Years! 

ERA-CBS Reality-Waukegan 
If They Don't Sell Your House, ERA Will Buy It! 

Grayslake Plggly Wiggly 
For the Best Value.. .Shop the Pig! 

Thanks to all our sponsors! 




































*HTt 0i 




t LlB *AFtY n/o~ UVEhtvi 
Main St, ~. • Ne*?papers 




Section 



c '^ 't ac 






16, 



1998 




Referees: 
Are Standards Too Low? 



Referees can make mistakes, but are they 

held accountable for consistent errors? 

The screening and evaluation process is not 

as tough as you might think 



ByANDYWEINER 
Correspondent 







Ever see a boy's basketball 
referee miss a call? Maybe 
a player takes three steps 
instead of the allowed 
one-and a half, but play continues. 
Or perhaps a player goes in for a 
lay-up, gets hacked and ends up 
sprawled on the ground only to see 
the action continue without a foul 
call. 



Boys' high school basketball in Illinois 
sees situations like these almost every week- 
end, yet currently there seems to be very little 
In the way of relief for the problem. 

In Illinois, the Illinois High School Associ- 
ation is in charge of licensing all officials. In 
order to become an official, an applicant 
needs to fill out an application, pay a S35 fee 
and pass a National Federation Official's test, 
of which 80% correct out oflOO questions will 
cam an applicant an IHSA license. 



"Only needing 80% on the test seems 
quite low," said Scott Williams, Head Boys* 
Basketball Coach at Round Lake High School, 
who believes the official's test needs to be 
looked at. "Just as the rest of society is held to 
higher standards, the officials need to be also." 

Besides the application and the test, offi- 
cials need to attend an officiating clinic over a 
three-year period. "The officials definitely 
need more on-the-court training than they 
are now getting," said Williams, who added 
that some officials take it upon themselves to 
gain experience by refereeing some Round 
Lake scrimmages. 

Even though the IHSA licenses all officials, 
it is not in charge of assigning officials to indi- 
vidual games. That job belongs to Bob Brown, 
the Officials Assignment Chairperson for 
Boys' Basketball and Wrestling in the North 
Suburban Conference. 

Brown handles 100 boys' basketball refer- 
ees out of roughly 4,000 throughout Illinois. 
For the 174 games played in the North Subur- 
ban Conference, Brown assigns two to each 
game. 

Brown said that he decides who to assign 
to each game based on the referee's experi- 
ence and the feelings of the coaches towards 
certain officials. 

"If a coach dislikes an official's perfor- 



mance during a game, I won't assign that offi- 
cial to that particular school again," said 
Brown. "I want to avoid those type of prob T 
lems between the official and the coach." 

Should a coach have a problem with a cer- 
tain official, the coach can fill out a special 
form. These forms, which are sent to Brown, 
are reviewed, after which Brown speaks with 
the coach and the official in question. 

"I have seen referees black-balled," said 
Len Chimino, Athletic Director at Warren 
Township High School. "I've never heard of 
anyone being formally suspended for poor 
performance, but if Bob receives more than a 
fewbad reports, he will just not assign that ref- 
eree to games." 

Carolyn Waldschmidt, in the IHSA Offi- 
cial's Department, said her office is supposed 
to receive the special forms. After review, 
Mary Struckhoff, Head of the Official's De- 
partment, takes whatever action shesees nec- 
essary. 

"The IHSA doesn't usually hear about our 
problems," said Brown, indicating a commui 
nlcation break-down. "1 handle all of our per- 
formance-related issues in the North Subur- 
ban League." 

Please see REFEREES IC2 




Referee Peter Alvino of Mundelein 
awaits the start of a high school boys 
basketball game between Round Lake 
and Mundelein. In the eyes of many par- 
ents and spectators, the quality of ref- 
ereeing has come into question. On the 
other side, no referee in Lake County 
has ever been suspended.— Photo by 
Lynn Gunnarson Dahlstrom 







TOPLESS BAR WILT 

Officials together can build 



wonders 
PAGEC4 







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BE A LEADER 

Do you have 
what it takes? 

PAGE C7 



Family loses nearly everything in trailer fire 

Friends pitch in to help rebuild homelife 



ByJASONJ.KJNG 
Staff Reporter 



SERVING THE 
COMMUNITY 

Lakeland bank opens 
second branch 

PAGE C7 



A Round Lake family nearly lost 
evcryth ing they had after a fire swept 
through their home on Thursday, Jan. 
B. 

When the Round Lake Area Fire 
Department arrived on the scene the 
home of Samantha Weidner and her 
boyfriend Scott Home, in thcTtmber 
CreekTrailcr Court was fully involved. 

Weidner, who works at Lakeland 
Publishers in the circulation depart- 
ment, was at work when she received 
the call telling her her home had 
burned down. The family had lived in 
the home for three years. 

Home, Weidner's children, Taylor, 
3, Miranda, 6 and Nick, 7 and the 
family dog all made it out of the home 
in time. The Weidner's cat did not. 

Weidner said her insurance 
should cover most of the items, but 
added she has to pay for the removal 
at»d disposal of the burned out trailer 
— a cost of around $3,000. 

Friends, neighbors and co-work- 
ers have come to the aid of the Weid- 
ner family, collecting clothing and 
other items to replace what has been 
lost. 

"It's unbelievable how much has 
been donated," said Weidner. 

Weidner has spent the last two 
days at Catholic Charities and the Sal- 



vation Army and is planning to go to 
Avon Township in die next few days. 

Weidner said that despite cur- 
rently living in a furnished apart- 
ment, the family still needs various 
household items, including small ap- 
pliances, hangers, anything most 
people take for granted, all of which 
were lost in the fire, in addition to 
food. 

Weidner believes a candle 
sparked the blaze when the glass the 
candle was in shattered. 



Weidner has already returned to 
work, saving she needed to make 
money, which she is saving as much 
of as possible, to rebuild the homelife 
the family has lost. 

Items arc still being collected for 



the Weidner family. Donations can be 
made at the Lakeland Newspapers 
building, 30 S. Whitney St., in 
Grayslake. For more information on 
what specific items the family needs, 
call Sue Loftus, at 740-4035. 



DONATION 
INFORMATION 

Donations can be 

made at the 

LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 

BUILDING, 

30 S. WHITNEY ST., 

IN GRAYSLAKE. 

For more information on 

what specific items the 

family needs, 

call Sue Loftus, 

at 

740-4035. 




The Weidner children, including from left, Nick, 7, Taylor, 3, and 
Miranda, 6 all made it out safely when a fire ravaged their Round 
Lake mobile home. Everything else was lost including the family 
cat. The family is accepting donations of clothing, household items 
and food. 



i .. . 



MrtrMKEltTTJ 





i 




C2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



January 16, 1998 



Expansion plans key 
to Six Flags' goals 



Six Flags Great America Is "100 
percent" in support of the expansion 
plans for the long haul as outlined by 
Prism Development. 

The 136 acre parcel of land west 
of the present theme park is under 
consideration as "Entertainment Vil- 
lage". The blue ribbon committee 
considering the plan met Tuesday to 
leam the fiscal impact from Alan Kra- 
cower, consultant. 

Recommendations could come 
from two meetings with the next Jan. 
20 at Gurnee Village Hall. 

"It will be a focus on family ori- 
ented entertainment. We are 100 
percent committed to the plan with 
an investment in terms of money In 
the land. We are excited about bring- 
ing this low density development to 
Gurnee," said Kathy Krenger, Six 
Flags spokesperson. 

The expansion could .include 
more of the theme park, a destina- 
tion hotel, a 12,000 seat events cen- 
ter, employee housing and 28-acre 
conservation area. 

"We are especially proud that 
this new development fits so well 
into the Village of Gurncc's compre- 
hensive plan"! Consistent with 
Gurnee's long-range vision, the Six 
Flags Entertainment Village will help 
benefit support existing businesses 
in Gurnee by providing proper facil- 



ities that the business community 
has identified as being important to 
their future growth and develop- 
ment," Six Flags officials said in a pre- 
pared statement. 

A seasonal water park at the site 
may bring an additional 500,000 per- 
sons to the theme park. The theme 
park generally draws about three mil- 
lion guests a year. A performance 
center and events center are also 
contemplated, which could bring an 
additional $616,854 in amusement 
tax. 

"Traffic congestion is not in the 
best interest of Six Flags Great Amer- 
ica, now or in the future. We know 
that the success of the new project 
depends on getting our customers to 
the Entertainment Village safely, 
quickly and efficiently. That is our 
primary goal: to provide composite 
solutions that will benefit village res- 
idents, local business, Six Flags Great 
America and the proposed new de- 
velopment," Six Flags officials stated. 

Tax revenue would significantly 
benefit local schools totaling $.5.5 
million a year, Warren-Newport Pub- 
lic Library, Like County Forest Pre- 
serve and other taxing bodies. 

The total estimated property tax 
benefit for local taxing bodies is 
$8,270,247 annually with an estimat- 
ed assessed value of $ 12 1 .7 million. 



FROM PAGE CI 



REFEREES: Training questions 



Next year, the IHSA is imple- 
menting a new program in which it 
will be required that all coaches fill 
out official's evaluations towards the 
end of the season. Brown said that 
once the program is officially put into 
place, he thinks the IHSA will begin 
to hear about all of the problems 
rather lhan only a few. 

"Instead of just hearing 



things such as an official missing 
a game, they will begin to get the 
performance reports," said 
Brown. 

"Everyone else, from players to 
coaches, have penalties on-the-court 
like technical fouls," said Williams. 
"Under this system, referees don't 
seem to be held as accountable as 
everyone else." 



Bill Schroeder's 

DATEBOOK 

Events to Remember 

GOT AN EVENT? 
LET US KNOW!!! 

This column rs designed lo help you take o peek ot (hoje 
events ond happenings around t/ie county wfiic/i may be of 

portiatlar interest to you. The following groups ond 

organizations need your support to further their causes, 

so please take time to reach out to others. 

Library Resources for 
Home Schoolers 

Lake Villa District Library 

901 E. Rollins Rd„ Round Lake Beach 
2:00 pm 

Learn about homo schooling internet sites and see a 

demonstration of the many online resources providing 

articles and information on school topics. 

Sign up in advance or call the reference desk av 
(847) 740-5010 






Free Diabetic Eye Screenings 
Provena Saint Thercse Medical Center 

1 :00 - -4:00 pm 

Free eye screening for people with diabetes to check 
for diabetic retinopathy. 

To secure an appointment, call: 
(888) 869-1118 



, Las Vegas Night 

American Legion Post 703 

703 N. Route 12, Fox Lake 

6:30 pm - Midnight 
Proceeds will help support both hospitalized veteran 
and community service programs. Admission: $1.00. 



Mail Your Events & Happenings To:" Lakeland'* Newspapers' Qatebook, 
' • 30 S.VVhitney SwGr^s!ake;lLUo03d |#i 




DIVORCES 



Nov. 27-Dec* 3 

Amy and Marc Edwards; 
.Heather and Richard Senior; Cyn- 
thia and John Donmyer; Guadalupe 
Hernandez and Richard Villalobos; 
Elnora and Gregory O'Bryant; Mau- 
reen and Kenneth Koehlcr; Jayne 
and Martin Vidclka; Karajane and 
Jeffrey Dcmpsey; Jeanette and 
Robert Adam; Nikki and Kent Voga; 
Constance Lee and Frederick 
needy; Linda and Martin Lucassen; 
Lauren and John Tesch; Carolyn 
and Douglas Putnam. 

Catherine and Daniel Burner; 
Dawn and Gregory Shumski; Lisa 
and Daniel Mandujano; Tina and 
Rick Woods; Marta and Thomas 
Menia; Vick( and Shawn Davis; 
Deborah andTlobcrt Booker; Kath- 
leen and Stanley Main; Sherrie and 
John Evcrding; Patricia and John 
Shogren; Traccy and Joshua Kcnzle; 
Francis and Michael Bartelhcim; 
Carolyn and Richard Robertson; 
Karen and David Montano. 

Dec. 4-10 

Gillian and Stephen Hulsc; 
Belly and Michael Milanovich; 
Jacqueline and Michael Irons, Don- 
na and Charles Dubsky; Catherine 
and Wayne Kos; Sara and Gerald 
Dykes; Bonnie and Todd Mason; 
Gail and David Marlin; Deborah 
and Martin Andrews; Candiccand 
David 1 Innsman; Carmen Hernan- 
dez and Juan Rodriguez Vaca; Bar- 
bara and Jay Lockbaum; Tama and 
Kevin Johnson; Saturnina and Pe- 
dro Solano; Christina and Keith An- 
derson; Susan and Abel Morales; 
Roberta and M. Daniel Frank. 

Margie and Robert Holzknmp; 
Gerilynn and David Buyca; Norma 
and Serge Sicard; Jennifer and Al- 
fonso Sandoval; Victoria and J. V. 
Culbcrtson; Danicla and Victor 
Zara; Kathleen and Wilbcrt Nichols; 
Julie and Bruce Brandcn; Kathleen 
and Bonville Elliott Jr.; Wendy Wolff 
and William Blair; Regina and Scott 
Jorgcnscn; Colleen and Patrick 
Glandon; Lucy and Joel Wilson; 
Maria and Russell Tennyson; 
Bcrnadinc and Jeffrey Rowlctt; La- 
tanya and Stanley Taylor Jr.; Car- 
men and Jose Ramirez; Sharon and 
John Kunath; Barbara and J. Brian 
Grcis; Carol and Hcrshcl Blnckard; 
Kathy and Joseph Wojton. 

Dec. 11-17 



Did You Know The 
Recently Passed Tax 
Law May Affect You? 









I 



3 



The tax legislation which 
was signed into law earlier 
this year impacted several 
areas of the tax code includ- 
ing: 

•IRAs 

•Capital Gains 

•Estates 
Are you taking advantage of 
all of the changes that could 
help you and your family, 
now and in the future? If 
you'd like more information 
on how the new Lix law can 
benefit you, call the MetLife 
representative listed below. 

Gerald Bye, l-u-t-c-f 

135 N. Grccnlcaf 

Suite 222 
Gurnee, IL 60031 

662-2540 
MetLife 

HELHNG YOU MAM SEH5E OF IT ALL 

Metropolitan Lite Insurance Company, New Yofk, NY 
970KWT{<rL,UT|MUCLO 



Dorothy and Richard Fiedler; 
Judith and Lloyd Stobcr; Bonne and 
Larry McCarty; Barbara and Danny 
Runions Sr.; Kimbcrly and Robert 
Bingham; Patricia and Marc Ka- 
plan; Tandy ond Charles Reeves; 
Adele and Todd Klngan; Susan and 
Dennis Rosenthal Jr.; Natasha Alex 
and Tom Alexopoulos; Kimbcrly 
and James Marker; Patricia and 
Richard Mc'Crary; Marlcne and Bar- 
ry Mcnary; Shanda and Ricky Tor- 
res; Amy and James Miller; Jessie 
and Bernard Bayncs; Carrie and 
James Swan; Denisc and Lewis 
Michaclson; Cindy and Michael 
Flynn; Kirstcn and Kenneth Stein. 

Karen and Michael Rigoni; Ter- 
ry and Kurt Kuss; Nempha and Ter- 
ry Safranck; Diane and Raymonnd 
Simnick; Gail and Bruce Schiff; 
Pamela and Jason Pickard; Lidia 
and Jaqcek Chadzcn; Valeric and 
Sieve Merman; Susannc and George 
Hayden; Mattic and James Hancrt; 
Mary and Robert Larson; Leslie and 
Bruce Cicero; Jennifer Bracher and 
Sloven Sampson; Deanna and 
Darold Wajcicchowski; Virginia and 
Kenneth Schlichter; Olga and 
Leionid and Grossman; Beverly and 
Richard Crispo; Lesley and Larry 
Sicgcl; Carolyn and James Rybar- 
czyk. 

Lori and Miguel Cardenas; 
Paula and Thomas Golgovsky; Silvia 
and Jose Quiroga; Jennifer and 
Mark Clearwater; Martha and In- 
ocencio Saldlvar Jr.; Jeanette and 
Miguel Rodriguez; Cynthia and L. 
Rile Cherrey; Roberta and William 
Nichols; Roberta and Charles Davis; 
Mary and Edgar Rivera; Linda and 
William Snyder; Erika and Jeremy 
Cole; Mary and John Kohlmclen Lu- 
cia Stcltato and Torrance Patton; 
Mary and Peter Haas; Vcrcna and 
Robert Burns; Dawn and Gregory 
Shales; Jennifer, and Joseph 
Thomas; Cheryl and Edward Niziol; 
Regina and John Bach; Jessica and 
Peter Frankcl; Carol and Jon Merrill 
Jr. 

Dec 18-24 

Patricia and Jackie Moore; 
Karen and David Liddcll; Verncs- 
tlne and Joseph Cooper; Anita and 
Jay Watanabe; Mary and Daniel El- 
der; Ginger and Pedro Salle; Susan 
Slater and Bernard Cithers; Shcrrl 
and Keith Leber; Lori and Matthew 
Spaney; Paula and Laurence Mono- 
ski Jr.; Jennifer and Keith Wolsko; 
Anna Villacrcses and Phillip Hall; 
Brooke and Steve Ffdan; Antonia 
and Richard Hofticzcr; Geralyn and 
Sanford Shutman; Tonia Knowles- 
Saunders and Alan Saunders. 

Cynthia and Timothy Cole- 
man; Sharon and Brian' Gibbons; 



Rosemary and Timothy Hartnctt; 
Gina and Robert Musgrove; Sriwan 
and Avery Borders; Edith and 
William Crcagen Thcrese Candclar- 
ia and Luis Hernandez; Mongodom 
On and Van Ran; Beverly and 
Lawrence Simon; Carol and Dennis 
McCauley; Tcrri and Bradley Kurth; 
Lori and John Anderson; Charllynn 
and Clarence Cane; Irma and Pedro 
Martinez; Linda and Joe Dezoma; 
Belly and Roland Miller; Martha 
Conaghan (aka Martha M. Legate) 
and James Conaghan; Marilyn and 
Roger Anderson; Jana and Ray- 
mond Trayes Jr.; Ingrid and Donald 
Ross; Genevieve and Philip Mc- 
Cann; Robin and Clarence Barker. 

Diane and JohntD'Connon Vic- 
toria and Michael Valentino; Susan 
and Jesse Barnes; Virginia and 
Howard McKce; Barbara and Jeffrey 
Newyear; Llscttc and LeTreal 
Ballinger; Lisa and Kurt Ruiz; Sally 
and Benedict LaChance; Julie and 
Juan Ayllon; Ruth and William 
Freer; Sandra Gcrali and Donald 
Wilkins; Gloria and Ricardo Olaes; 
Joan and Timothy Meek; Rosario 
and Albino Blsmonic Jr.; Susan and 
James Fricilone; Lisa and Kurt Rut/.; 
Amanda and Todd Gruchalla; Pen- 
ny and John Yancey; Julie and 
Steven Thiclscn. 

Susan and John Lumpkin; Lori 
and Louie Luitzc; Chcri and Joseph 
Scarnato; Ellen and Tommy Jack- 
son; Audrey and Rusvel Ramon; 
Shcrri and Edmund Ojenus; Cyn- 
thia and James Miller; Huaiqin Wu 
and Shudong Luo; Sop and Jose 
Pineiro; Angela and Earl Marshall; 
Leoia and Nigel Jarvis; Donna and 
Brian Lauritscn; Sharon and Carlos 
Stephens; Mary and George Nista. 

Dec. 25-31 

Sharon and Gregory SwidcrskJ; 
Rachacl and Dominique Latta; 
Veronica and Steven Baskin; 
Michcle and Keith Artclt; Marjorie 
Kujawinski and Dominic Perino; 
Elizabeth and James Rcnde Jr.; 
Tammy and Peter Kaszuba; Chris- 
tine Taylor and Carnell Wesson; 
Nallnl and David Mahcsh; Elizabeth 
and Donald Kcltum; Gicnda Lcwis- 
Colllns and Robert Collins Jr.; 
Michelle and Michael Etcrno. 

Deborah and Phil Martinez; 
TamI and Robert Gil Iman; Michelle 
and John Brunker IV; Sylvia and 
Alan VIdoky; Dale and Alan Ander- 
son; Wendy and Dan Arcnt; 
Michelle Cooney and Mel Bramble; 
Sandra and Gregory Edwards; Su- 
san and William Farrar, Troycc and 
Tyrone Parker Jr.; Cassandra and 
Clinton Webb; Dina and Mark Mad- 
dox; Barbara and William Hocking; 
Deborah and John Kudas; Cathy 
and Robert Flanneryv Bcatc and 
Gregg Welch; Kathleen and Scott 
Cobb. 




■ 






: 



_/ 



t 



January 16, 1$98 



COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers COUNTY / C3 



AT A GLANCE 



A DIGEST OF STORIES MAKING HEADLINES THROUGHOUT OUR REGION 






■ 



Man stabbed at Gray slake bar 

Graysiake— A 28-ycar-old Fox Lake man was stabbed in 
(lie shoulder at Dizzy's bar , 403 S. Route 83 at approximately 
11 :50 p.m. Ian. 9. 

According to Sergeant Mark Voykin the victim became In- 
volved in a verbal altercation with the offender. During the ar- 
gument the offender stabbed the victim and then fled. 

The stabbing occurred in the parking lot.. The victim was 
transported to Condell Medical Center and where according to 
the police report four staples were applied to suture his 
wound Condell reported it had no record of the victim's being 
treated there. 

According to the victim he didn't know the offender but 
described him as a white male with collar length hair. 

Lovef est '98 Builds on Romance 

An tioch— LovcFest in 1998 is romance coddled in the am- 
biance of theS.S. Antioch, a cruise ship with a license to gam- 
ble. 

"Because of last year's success, it has been easier to find 
people to donate their time and energies towards LovcFest '98, 
which will be held Saturday, Feb. 7 from 7 p.m. until midnight 
at the VFW Hall on North Avenue In Antioch, " said Barbara 
Porch, Vice-President of the Antioch Chamber of Commerce 
and Industry. 

Six people will win a Weekend Get Away prize. Tickets are 
sold as 4 for $10, or $3 each. Area banks and the Chamber of 
Commerce and Industry office also have tickets available now. 
A mini-roulette wheel and VFW Hall's lucky chance pull tabs 
arc also to be available. 

A Stariight Lounge will feature music by the Scotch Lads in 
a return performance. "Passengers enjoyed the music of the 
Scotch Lads and the great ambiance we created," Porch said. 
"They are great at getting everyone involved whether it's a bit 
of rock and roll or swaying to the music of legend greats." 

Patty Ryan of OldcTymc Deli, Billie Horton from the Vil- 
lage Community Development Department, Shirley Ziontek of 
the Gift Basket, Wendy Maston and Robin Kessell of Quiltcr's 
Dream, Inc., and State Bank of the Lake's DccDce Palmer are 
each involved in special features of the evening. 

Vet's van visits homes 

Lake Villa— Home health care for animals is now a hu- 
man's telephone call away. Lake Villa Veterinarian Dr. Lori A. 
Blackwcll has started a full-service mobile veterinary clinic ser- 
vice for animal companions In north central Like County. 

"We're one of the few that do It full lime," said Blackwcll of 
her just established mobile practice. She has served patients as 
a veterinarian In northwestern Lake County for more than a 
decade. Now she is on her own En a 26-foot mobile veterinary 
clinic built for her. She set forth with her mobile medical prac- 
tice Jan. 1. Forsome furry-faced patients, however, Blackwell 
will be a familiar face. 

"I've been in the area ten years," she said. Blackwell has 
worked at area clinics with other professional veterinarians 
both in the Antioch and the Graysiake area. "I'm going to try 
to do just pets." Tills would include cats, dogs, birds, ferrets, 
and others. 

She is current with technology also. She has cellular 
phones (847-533-VETS) with voice mail and a pager for emer- 
gencies. She keeps her van in Lake Villa when it is not on the 
road. Blackwell Is a veterinarian trained by the University of 
Illinois College of veterinary medicine in Champaign. 

Graham to help pay national debt 

Ubertyvllle Township — Fearing the United States 
might become a "second rate world power" because of its 
soaring national debt, Libcrtyville Township Supervisor F.T, 
"Mike" Graham has decided to try an make a dent, albeit a 
small one, in that national debt. 

On Dec 29, 1997, Graham sent a $3,007.20 payment to the 
U.S. Department of Treasury's Bureau of the Public Debt, to 
put toward the repayment of the $4.9 trillion debt. 

The money, Graham said, is equal to his Social Security 
benefits for the months of October, November and December 
of 1997. 

Amahl's Night Visitors' performance 

Undenhurst— "Amahl and the Night Visitors" will be pre- 
sented at the Trinity United Methodist Church In Lindenhurst 




Snow ride 

Katie Vanderweel, 16, of Lake Villa trudges through 
the snow while pushing her bicycle on Route 83 in 
Lake Villa Thursday. The weather, unfortunately, did 
not cooperate with her mode of transportation.— Pho- 
to by Sandy Bressner 



Jan. 17 at 7 p.m. A free-will offering will be collected at the door. 

Reservations are needed. Interested people should call the 
Church office at 356-7200 to provide their name, telephone 
number, and the number of people who will attend. 

Gian Carlo Mcnotti's play is the story of three Kings who 
spend a night at a primitive hut with a mother and her handi- 
capped child, Amahl . The Kings are on their way to Bethlehem 
to see jesus Christ. "The happenings that take place are heart 
warming and magical," said Betty Smouse of Festival Arts of 
Antioch, sponsor of the production. "The story of Amahl tells a 
simple tale in song," she said. "'Amahl and the Night Visitors* 
will appeal to all ages." 

Trinity United Methodist Church, 101 South Beck Road, 
Lindenhurst. 

Residents' parking addressed 

Ubertyvllle— The success of a new Libcrtyville dining es- 
tablishment has caused a major headache for residents in the 
neighborhood surrounding the eatery. 

Residents who live on East Ellis Ave., which butts up against 



the parking lot of the Ristorante Bottalo, 946 N. Milwaukee 
Ave., recently presented the village with a petition requesting 
village action to deal with the overflow parking on Ellis, from 
the restaurant. Thirty Ellis Ave. residents, representing 79 per- 
cent of the households on the street, signed the petition. 

Residents met with iibertyville Police Chief Patrick Carey 
on Nov. 14, to voice their concerns and share their opinions on 
the matter. - ■ 

Carey presented an ordinance establishing resident permit 
parking along East Ellis, which the village board approved on 
Monday night. 

Dinner to benefit gang unit 

Round Lake Area— The villages of Round Lake, Round 
Lake Beach, Round Lake Heights, Round Lake Park and 
Hai nesvil le are sponsoring a spaghetti dinner to benefit the 
Round Lake Area Special Operations UniL 

The unit was established In October 1997 to help 
combat the area's gang problem and represents a unique 
agreement between the five community's police depart- 
ments. 

The dinner will be held at Frigate's, 25250 W. Lake 
Shore Dr., in Ingleside, on Monday, Feb. 9, from 4:30 - 
8:30 p.m. 

Tickets for the dinner are $6 a piece or $5 a piece for two or 
more tickets. Children 12 and under will eat free with a paid 
adulL 

Entertainment Village discussion 

Gurnee— The proposed Six Flags Entertainment Village, a 
136 acre expansion of the theme park, could bring more than 
$300 million in economic benefit and 1,000 jobs. 

If successful, the plan could be a windfall for local taxing 
districts such as Warren Township High School, Warren -New- 
port Public Library, Gumee DisL 56 and the village, boosting 
the annual revenue stream. 

That was the picture painted by Prism Development and 
Sue Rags officials at the fifth blue ribbon citizens panel 
investigating the project's potential. Committee recommen- 
dations are expected to be discussed at a Jan. 20 meeting. Late 
February is the earliest to begin village consideration of ex- 
pected zoning requests. 

Tax base benefits would come from property tax, amuse- 
ment and sales tax. He described the various land uses in 
terms of cost to local government. 

Singe-family homes are the most costly, with industrial 
uses at the oiher end of the spectrum. He described the Enter- 
tainment Village as a "hybrid of uses which from the begin- 
ning would be user favorable," he said. 

Plans call for a summer-time water park, expansion of the 
theme park, a destination hotel and smaller hotels, and 
employee housing for Six Flags Great America staffers. 

Woodland Dist. 50 could benefit to the tune of 
$322,237,397 a year. WTHS, whose boundary encompass- 
es the entire project, could see a $365,4 10,600 windfall. 
Gurnee Dist. 56 has only a small percentage of the pro- 
ject in its boundary and would receive an estimated $43 
million. In terms of assessed value, Gurnee Dist. 56 could 
benefit $14.3 million, Dist. 50 $107 million and the high 
school $121 million. 

Carmel names new football coach 

Mundelein— f-r Robert Carroll, principal of 
Carmel High School, announced that the Search Com- 
mittee has selected Andrew Bltto as the new head foot- 
ball coach. Bitto is the current athletic director at 
Carmel and has been part of the Carmel football pro- 
gram for 13 years. He served for 1 1 years as defensive 
coordinator of the varsity team. During that time he 
coached six playoff teams and two teams that made ft 
to the quarter finals. 

Bitto, a Carmel graduate, actually began his foot- 
ball experience as a member of the Carmel team. He 
continued on to Ball State University where he earned 
a scholarship as full back from 1981 until 1985. Bitto 
joined the Carmel faculty as a business education 
teacher in 1990. 

His experience and skill at football as well as his energy, 
enthusiasm and talent as a motivator were some of die rea- 
sons Bitto was selected from the pool of applicants. 









STAY TUNED 

Pick up any of Lakeland Newspapers 11 editions in coming weeks for: 




JUST ONE OF 
THE GUYS 

Libertyville's Mandy Thompson 
is making waves as a wrestler 
who happens to be female 



SSSSSE" 





FOREFRONTS 



Ten of Lake County's 
most interesting people and events 






FUNDING RELIEF 

Lake County Board persues legislation 

to increase impact 

fees for schools 





LAKE COUNTY PROGRESS 1998 



C4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OPINIONS 



January 16, 1998 



r 



Lakeland Newspapers 

William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 



William M. Schroeder 

Presidont/C.E.O. 



Neal Tucker 

Composition Mgr./Execultve Editor 



Rhonda Hetrick Burke 

Managing Editor 

30 South Whitney St., Gray slake, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (847} 223-0161. E-mail: cdlt@lnd.com 



EDITORIALS 

Economic growth 
best shepherded 
by private sector 

Members of the Lake County Board deserve plaudits for 
taking steps to dissolve the Lake County Economic De- 
velopment Commission and turn over its mission to 
the Lake County Economic Development Corporation. 

The corporation, which has been operating as an adjunct to the 
commission, is being privatized with funding coming largely from 
private industry. Because it is legally able to raise money and in 
turn make loans, the corporation's accomplishments long have 
overshadowed in productivity and purpose the "parent" commis- 
sion, which evolved basically into a sounding board. The corpora- 
tion currently has S3 million in outstanding loans and is processing 
funding applications for several new businesses. By summer, the 
corporation should be weaned away from county government en- 
tirely. 

As one businessman opined, the commission had become a 
breakfast group with good intentions and no tools for meaningful 
economic development. The commission was subject lo political 
pressure. There was no accountability. The commission was open 
to criticism, despite its well-meaning membership, for insufficient 
disclosure. Staff beholden to officialdom called the shots. For all 
practical purposes, significant economic development was handled 
by the politicians. The commission was window dressing. 

With only loose ties to government, members of the refocused cor- 
poration board have high hopes for providing significant leadership, 
particularly where larger employers are concerned. David Young, 
acting corporation director, has a goal of raising S2.5 million in the 
next five years and already has pledges. Thinking, and rightly so, is 
that local chambers of commerce, appropriately should be engaged 
in economic development for businesses with 50 or less employees. 

Rep. Al Westerman (H-Waukegan), a member of the Planning, 
Building and Zoning Committee which had oversight responsibility 
for activities of the commission, correctly described what has hap- 
pened with the dissolution of the commission: "The taxpayers will 
be out in July." What Westerman didn't say is that the dissolution is 
an effort to take politics out economic development. The commis- 
sion won't be missed and the corporation offers a fresh opportunity 
for economic development unfettered by influence peddlers and 
ambitious politicians. This is as it should be. 

Tourism continues 
expanding in Illinois 

Illinois hasn't vaulted to the upper eschelon of tourism states 
with timid leadership. With the state's tourism industry pro- 
ducing approximately S 19 billion currently in annual revenues, 
tourism leaders now have set a goal of S29 billion in annual 
tourism revenues by the turn of the century. 
Tourism leaders are buoyed by General Assembly passage of legis- 
lation allocating 29 percent of forecasted state hotel/motel tax re- 
ceipts for Illinois Bureau ofTourism programs. Significant new rev- 
enues will be available to elevate Illinois among the top five tourism 
revenue-producing states in the nation. 

There no longer is any doubt in the minds of state political leaders 
that tourism is big— huge; — business. Tourism stands with the top 
10 Illinois corporate giants. It is significant that bike County, where 
tourism among the leading employers, is among the most aggres- 
sive counties in promoting tourism. Unlike the stale I HOT, the Luke 
County Convention & Visitors Bureau is a privately funded enter- 
prise, no less dedicated to industry advancement. 

Feb. 3-5 will see the unveiling of the new History/ Heritage Market- 
ing program at the 1990 Illinois Governor's Conference onf Tourism. 
It may not be apparent in our everyday lives, but we here in bike 
County are sitting on a hotbed of tourism with international traffic 
adding a new dimension to local tourism. Catering to visitors is a 
worthwhile endeavor. We heartily endorse tourism in all its aspects. 



Guest commentaries welcome 

Lakeland Newspapers welcomes guest columns by our readers on top- 
ics of general Interest. Anyone Interested in writing a column can contact 
Publisher W.H. Schroeder at (847) 223-81 61 . Submissions may be mailed 
c/o Lakeland Newspapers, P.O. Box 268, Grayslake IL„ 60030 or fax to 
(847) 223-8810. Deadline is Friday at noon. 



VIEWPOINT 



Topless bars wilt 
when officials unite 



Working in consort, 
county government 
has the tools to deal 
with vulgarians out to 
test the limits of public outrage 
where morals and good taste are 
involved. 

Case in point: The topless bar in 
unincorporated Mundclein (hat 
had been operating within a stone's 
throw of Diamond Lake Congrega- 
tional Church and a residential 
neighborhood. 

Because of a civil dispute over 
ownership of the property, the 
nudy club has been closed. Call 
that a stroke of luck. But while the 
courts unravel ownership, county 
officials have had a chance to re- 
group and throw off the shroud of 
timidity imposed by First Amend- 
ment rights claimed by the seamy 
operators. 

The county building department 
has red-lagged the joint with safety 
code violations. States Atty, 
Michael Waller is investigating ille- 
gal liquor sales despite attempts of 
operators to pose as a gentlemen's 
club where nude dancers serve cola 
drinks. County officials also are 
working with a Chicago zoning 
consultant to draft new ordinances 
that would restrict adult clubs to 
industrial areas, for example. All 
pretty technical stuff, but it might 
work. 

The main thing is that county of- 
ficials all are on the same page, 
which, surprisingly takes some do- 
ing. Another case in point: Some 
years ago, neighbors were dis- 
traught when a motorcycle gang 
took over a barn on Fairfield Rd. in 
west Lake County. Liquor, sex and 
drugs was being served with aban- 
don. One of the more mild forms 
of entertainment was drunken bik- 
ers in the hayloft urinating on be- 
soiten unlookers below. 

While citizen anger mounted, fin- 
gerpointing was going on in the 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



County Building as to which de- 
partment had jurisdiction. Offi- 
cials complained about inter-de- 
partment communication prob- 
lems until this columnist asked the 
question, "Don't you guys ever 
bump into each other at the water 
cooler? " 

Almost by magic, County Build- 
ing Officer Bob Streiclier, who still 
is on the job; the late SherilT Mickey 
Babcox and then State's Atty. Fred 
Foreman got together and formu- 
lated unified action against the 
weekly convention of motorcy- 
clists, which sometimes ran to 
nearly 100. In short order, the hik- 
ers were run out of Lake County. 
The "invitation" to hit the highway 
was legal and it stuck. 

The scum of society can't stand 
up to decent citizens who have 
support from their government 
and elected officials. That might be 
an oversimplification. But it's true. 

Documentary 

A rapidly disappearing rural 
lifestyle is the subject a documen- 
tary being filmed by freelance pro- 
ducer-director Dean Howe entitled, 
"Old McHenry Had a Farm," how 
McHenry County is experiencing 
rapid urbanization. 

Rowe, a resident of Hebron, ex- 



pects to have die film ready for air- 
ing on PBS later this month or early 
February, McHenry County fell be- 
low 1 ,000 farms in 1992. Farming as 
an economic enterprise continues 
to erode, the number of dairy farms 
shrinking from 1 13 to 93 last year 
alone. 

McHenry County land planner 
Jim Hogue suggests that traditional 
farming might be replaced with "al- 
ternative agriculture" like ostrich 
ranches or ginseng farms. Ann 
Sorensen, director of the American 
Farmland Trust's Center for Agri- 
culture and Environment at North- 
ern III. University, thinks that there 
still arc some things that can be 
done to preserve a rural past. 
"Don't walk away," she said furtive- 
ly. 

GOP tag team 

After a successful appearance 
before a group of women lawyers, 
look for more joint appearances by 
Illinois Comptroller Lolcta Didrick- 
son and lieutenant governor candi- 
date Corinne Wood, a stale repre- 
sentative from Lake County. The 
two GOP candidates spoke at the 
National Forum forWomen Corpo- 
rate Counsel. 

Auction at Field's 

One of Lake County's rapidly 
dwindling roster of homes of the 
wealthy will be sold at auction Feb. 
5. Willow I.ake Farm, Lake Forest, a 
20 acre parcel including the former 
estate of Marshall Field, Chicago 
newspaper and publishing magnet, 
Is on the block to the highest bid- 
der. Built in 1955, the place is con- 
sidered a "modern mansion," 
mostly because it contains only 16 
rooms. Among the features are a 
temperature-controlled wine cellar, 
a six person sauna, a 20 by 60 foot 
swimming pool and a lighted ten- 
nis court. 



Always a battler, 
still 'Amazing grace 



? 



At the end of the year, the 
media always selects per- 
sons of the year, people 
who made the news in a 
big or unique way, sports standouts, 
and others in every walk of life who 
may have impacted the times. In 
Lake County, there is a friend who 
has been champion in everyway. 
Grace Mary Stern started her 
political life on the Lake County 
Board when township supervisors 
and assistant supervisors doubled as 
members of the board. She wrote a 
regular col- 
umn called 
"Wilh a 
Stern Eye" 
which often 
tweaked the 
"regulars" on 
the county 
board. She 
wouldn't al- 
ways go 
along, so she 
was some- 
times re- 
ferred lo as a maverick, which en- 
deared her to her growing con- 
stituency. 

My first active association with 
Grace Mary came when she decided 
to take on the entrenched political 
machine and run as a Democrat for 
bike County Clerk. Truman Gerret- 




SEEING 
j THROUGH 

John S. Matijevich 






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Stern: 

Amazing Grace 



sen was the incumbent clerk having 
succeeded Gar b'af, a popular and 
politically savvy long-term clerk. 
Truman, nicknamed "Skippy," was a 
nice guy, a great bowler, but politi- 
cally naive. 

The Republicans were so strong 
that they always won in bike County 
by totally ignoring the Democrats. 
But, there was no way that you 
could ignore Grace Mary Stern. She 
campaigned around the county in a 
brightly painted yellow van embla- 
zoned in red lettering with her polit- 
ical trademark— "she's not one of 
the boys." The people loved it— and 
her. 

Gcrretsen contributed by mak- 
ing a major blunder in his office. The 
punch- type ballot was in its infancy, 
and he designed a ballot page which 
gave tiie Republicans an unfair ad- 
vantage as to straight ticket voting. 
Grace Mary effectively pointed out 
(he flaws and 1 introduced a series of 
bills to correct the ballot form and 



procedure. The ballot snafu was on 
the front pages, and Gerretsen, far 
from ignoring this upslart Democ- 
rat, found himself on the defensive. 

Given Ihc huge GOP numbers in 
the county and in spile of Grace 
Mary's exciting campaign and the 
ballot issue handed lo her, Gerretsen 
was still considered a heavy favorite. 
Some said that being a Democrat 
and a woman in Lake County were 
obstacles she couldn't overcome. 
Well, Grace Mary did the impossible 
and, in a very close race, was elected 
Lake County Clerk in 1970. 

The rest is political history. 
Grace Mary Stern became a popular 
vote-getter. She gathered Republi- 
can cross-over votes lo win ensuing 
elections, serving 12 years as Lake 
County Clerk. 

After a losing effort for state of- 
fice when she teamed as a Lt. Gover- 
nor candidate with Adlal Stevenson 
111 in one of his gubernatorial bids, 
Grace Mary began a career in the 
state legislature. It was an honor to 
be a colleague when she served wilh 
distinction in the Illinois House of 
Representatives. 

Grace Mary wasn't always "one of 
the crowd" in Springfield either. Her 
seat on the House floor was near the 
front of the chamber. Rather than 

Please see SEEING /C5 



t • 




I 



i 

i 



f 



PARTY LINES 



PARTY LINES, THE LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS' COLUMN OF POLITICAL OPINION, 

. IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS. 




rimary-team 



G retch en Schalk, an expe- 
rienced hand In grassroots 
campaigning, has returned 
from her Sunbelt retreat, to 
assist Mike Graham's quest for a 
County Board nomination. 

Graham, the father of the Open 
Space Movement in Lake County,' is 
telling friends, "Don't even think" 
about him withdrawing as has sur- 
faced since his positions on land use 
policy are virtually identical to in- 
cumbent Rep. Carol Calabresa (R- 
Libertyville). 

Independent event 

Sunday, Feb. 22. has been set as 
the date for a regional fundraiser at 
Brae Loch Golf Club, Route 45, for 
independent Republicans. 

One of the attractions will be 
music by the Scotch Lads, the band 
led by County Board Rep. Larry 
Leafblad (R-Highland Lake). Leaf- 
bind retained his seat in the 199G 
election. 

Campaign finance 

Only a few taxpayers in LJber- 
tyville High School district have 
raised the question about helping 
launch the political career of retiring 
Supt. Donald Gossett, a challenger 
for a Republican nomination for the 
Lake County Board. 

Gossett won't step down from 
his school post until summer yet 
he'll need time for politicking If he's 
o serious candidate. 

More walking 

County Board Rep. Al "Giant 
KJIJer * Westermaji (R-Wadsworthl 
vows to visit more than 4,000 homes 
on foot this winter to garner a nomi- 
nation in the March 17 primary. 1\vo 
years ago he went door to door for 
seven weeks in fashioning an upset 
that toppled the sitting County 
Board chairman. 

He is allotting an extra two 
weeks this year for doorstep cam- 
paigning. 

Conditioned response 

A young audience member final- 
ly put in to words what many Libcr- 
tyvilleTownship audience members 
have always wanted to know. 

Why township trustee lynne 
Moron is the only person on the 
board with anything to say7 

Moran, the only holdover from 
the previous township administra- 
tion, always has plenty to say while 
Graham's running mates, Tom 
lynch and Terry White, much like 
well-trained dogs, speak only when 
Graham solicits comments from 
them. When Mike speaks, both al- 
ways back up Graham's assertions 




Westerman: Giant 
killer plans more 
walking. 




From the doghouse 
to White House 




Kaiser: Has Mayor 
Craft's vote 



without blinking an eye. 

Sounds a lot like Pavlov's dog — 
conditioned response. 

Fundraistng 

"Tis the season for fundraising 
for the St. Patrick's Day primary. 

GOP Secretary of State hopeful 
Bob Churchill will be the benefit 



of a bash at the Country Squire in 
Grayslakc, Friday, Jan. 23. The event 
lasts from 5£0 - 730 p.m. Tickets 
arc $50. 

Gaining momentum 

Peter Fitzgerald, GOP candi- 
date for U.S. Senator, has received 
endorsements from both the Bar- 
rington and Schaumburg GOP orga- 
nizations. 

Northwest suburban Republi- 
cans cited Fitzgerald's record on 
fighting taxes in the general assem- 
bly. 

The Barrington Twp. vote was 
11-2 and the Schamburg vote was 
47-5. 

Meeting voters 

County Board Member Dlst. 2 
hopeful Lorry Jones will be greet- 
ing voters at the old Wadsworth post 
office, Friday, Jan. 16. The event will 
also be a fundraiser. Suggested do- 
nation is $20. 

Jones has opened a campaign 
headquarters in the former mail of- 
fice. 

Misplaced comma 

And, speaking of the Dist. 2 race, 
some readers said that the place- 
ment of commas in an item on the 
Dist. 2 race last week may have left a 
false impression. 

For the record, Larry Jones is 
being backed by current Dist. 2 
I board member Bob NeaL 

Betty Rae Kaiser is being sup- 
ported In the race by Wadsworth 
Mayor Don Craft 

Most Wadsworth residents know 
thai Craft and Nea! don't often see 
eye-to-cye. 



merica is sleeping easier 
now, feeling more secure; 
the Clintons have brought 
a guard dog into the 
White House. 

Well, actually, he's just a frisky, 
playful little puppy, a chocolate 
Labrador named Buddy. 

Leave it to President Bubba, he 
of the famous sweet tooth, to pick 
out a CHOCOLATE lab. 

It was an important political 
move by the Clintons. Fifty-five mil- 
lion dog owners will identify with a 
president who likes pooches. Almost 
all of our First Families, dating back 
to George Washington, have had a 
First Dog; some have had several. 

Until now, the Clintons' only pet 
has been Socks, the mostly black cat 
with the white feeL Remember the 
hoopla when he moved with the 
family from Arkansas to the White 
House? His picture was on all the 
front pages; the newsmongers used 
catnip to lure him into camera 
range. Photographers slithered 
along the ground to zoom in at his 
level. Reporters poked microphones 
in his whiskers so the world could 
hear him say, "Meow." 

Buddy the dog has caused a 
similar commotion, and that's how 
It's been throughout our history. 

Franklin Roosevelt's famous 
dog, Fala, received more mail than 
the president. Now, Fala lives on as a 
crossworld puzzle answer. Another 
FDR dog, Winks, was a bad dog; he 
gobbled up 18 breakfasts that had 
been laid out. 

When Gerald Ford's golden re- 
triever Liberty gave birth to eight pups 
theWhite House had a rubber stamp 
of her paw p rint made to "autograph" 
the photos the public demanded. 

Calvin Coolidge's several collies 
and Airedales were dressed in bon- 
nets for the annual White House 
Easter egg hunt, and Ronald Rea- 
gan's spaniel Rex was fitted up in a 




THE 

PFARR 

CORNER 

Jerry Pfarr 



doghouse with red drapes and 
framed pictures of Mr. and Mrs. Rea- 
gan on the wall. 

George Bush's dogs, J. Fred and 
Millie, wrote "wag-and-tcll" books 
about life in theWhite House "(with 
some help from Barbara Bush). The 
book sales raised more than a mil- 
lion dollars for charities. 

That country bumpkin Lyndon 
Johnson, however, offended dog 
lovers everywhere when he was pic- 
tured in Life magazine playfully 
holding his two beagles, Him and 
Her, aloft by their ears. 

Clinton said he was only heed- 
ing Harry Truman's advice: "If you 
want a friend in Washington, get a 
dog." Every leader can use a little 
unconditional loyalty. 

Buddy sleeps in a little dog- 
house in the kitchen and will have 
the run of the presidential mansion. 
I suppose that's okay with us taxpay- 
ers, who just happen to own the 
White House. 

I can think of only two unhappy 
campers. One would be Socks, who 
was shown on TV being introduced to 
his new "brother." Buddy was bounc- 
ing around, trying to slobber Socks 
with affection but the cat was arching 
his back, hissing and warning die dog 
to keep a decent distance. Socks no 
doubt knows that cats are smarter 
than dogs. Hey, you can't get eight 
cats to pull a sled through snow. 

Quipped Hillary Clinton: "We're 
working on detente." 

The other unhappy camper, 1 sus- 
pect, will be die Secret Service agent 
who has to cany the poopcr-scooper. 



LETTER TO THE EDITOR 



Would you buy into this tax scheme? 



Would you buy into 
this tax scheme? In- 
herit a $100 million 
dollars, and legally 
live out your entire life in the Unit- 
ed States without paying'a dime to 
support the national government. 
But get a job greeting customers at 
Walmart and your first hour on the 
job will send more taxes to Wash- 
ington than the inheritor of great 
wealth will send in a whole life- 
time. 

It is hard to believe that any 
serious person would propose 
such a system. But this is exactly 



how the "Flat Tax" proposed by Re- 
publican House Majority Leader 
Dick Armey (TX) would work. 

Our own 16lh district con- 
gressman, the eminently conserv- 
ative Republican Don Manzullo, 
has scheduled a series of meetings 
in the district to sell wholesale re- 
vision of our tax code. He wants to 
abolish the IRS and replace it with 
a Flat Tax or National Sales Tax. 
His own preference is reportedly 
the flat tax. If a fiat tax should be 
adopted the Armey-Shelby flat tax 
is the likely one. 

The Armey-Shelby Flat Tax 



form does fit on a large postcard. It 
is breathtakingly simple as it 
should be since the only personal 
income that will be taxed is pen- 
sions, wages, and salaries. That's 
right, only pensions, wages and 
salaries get taxed. 

Here is just a partial list of 
income which the flat tax would 
exempt from all federal income 
taxes (such income is already ex- 
empt from the 15.3 percent So- 
cial Security tax): all interest in- 
come, dividend income, pro- 
ceeds from stock options, all in- 
come from speculation in the 



stock or commodities markets, 
and all capital gains income 
from any source. 

This is too important to take 
anyone's word or to assume you 
know what "Flat Tax" means. Take 
a few minutes and drop a card to 
Congressman Dick Armey, 301 
Cannon Office Bldg. Washington 
DC 20515. He will be glad to send 
you information on the Rat Tax. 
Examine it first, then decide. 

Don Gaines 
Gaines will be Don Manzullos 
Democratic opponent in next 
fall's election. 



FROM PAGE C4 



SEEING: Amazing Grace 
continues the fight 



facing the podium, like everyone else 
did, when she spoke she would turn 
around, looking directly at die mem- 
bers, moving back and forth, cover- 
ing everybody, When she saw some- 
thing wrong with a bill, she would 
start by saying, "Now listen, fellows, 
you ought to take another look at 
this hill." At a time when too many 
things were "cut and dried" in 
Springfield, Grace Mary Stern, as al- 
ways, hroughl a breath of fresh air to 
the scene and to politics. 

After a stint in the House, Grace 
Mary went on to win election to the 



Illinois Senate, another first for a 
woman Democrat from Lake Coun- 
ty. She was a target In the GOP 
remap engineered by Robert 
Churchill. About the only part of 
Highland Park that was included in 
her new district was her home. As we 
know, Grace Mary is a battler, and 
she heat the odds and a ton of mon- 
ey and her ultra-conservative in- 
cumbent opponent Roger Keats She 
drew a two year term and they finally 
beat her (he next time around in 
what, at that time, was thecostlicst- 
ever slate senate campaign. 



Grace Mary Stem has always 
been a fierce battler and now she is 
waging a baulc she knows that she 
can't win. She has a malignant brain 
tumor and all of our prayers are 
with her. Grace Mary is handling 
this adversity with as much courage 
as any other that she has faced. 

For many year, Grace Mary and 
a bunch of mavericks that she met 
when she served on the county 
board have been meeting before 
each Christmas for lunch. About 
five years ago, tiiey asked me to join. 
In the group are Mike Graham, Sam 
Smith, John Balen, Millie Berliant, 
and Norm Geary. . 

It was a year ago, after one of 
the annual lunches when Grace 
Mary was diagnosed with the tu- 
mor. We tnct again just before this 
Christmas. We all know about Grace 
Mary's wit and humor. In fact, she 
and the late Eunice Tobin put on 
some song and comedy routines 



that bordered on Saturday Night 
Live. 

At our lunch, Grace Mary said, 
"I'm having a hard time finding a 
woman Tor Hub; you know it's not 
easy finding one that short." We 
laughed, when we could have 
cried. Hub is Herbert L Stern, her 
husband, and a great person, too. 

Also at the lunch, someone 
talked about the fact that they are 
remaking many old movies. Millie 
Berliant mentioned the movie 
King Kong that she saw when she 
was young and has been afraid of 
gorillas ever since. Grace Mary put 
her arms around Mike Graham 
and John Balen and said, "Not 
me." Now, that is courage when 
you can be witty when you hardly 
have enough strength even to be 
there. In fact. Betty Ann Moore, 
who brought Grace Mary to the 
lunch, told me afterward that 
Grace Mary just about passed out 



in the car on the way home. 

I have always liked Grace Mary 
Stem because she "told it like it is" 
She never minces words, whether 
she agrees with you or not. 

Grace Mary has another quality 
especially rare in politicians. She 
has never been afraid of saying that 
she made a mistake. No one is per- 
fect. Grace Mary understood that 
and she knew that voters would 
forgive her for her imperfections as 
long as she was truthful with them. 

Grace Mary has always been a 
loyal Democrat — big D, But before 
that, Grace Mary believed in democ- 
racy— litde d. She always believed 
in, and likes people. She scribbled 
off notes time and again to so many, 
no matter the political party. And 
her notes always started with "Good 
Friend:" 

Grace Mary— you are, and al- 
ways have been, a Good Friend to all 
of us— You are AMAZING GRACE. 



C6 / Lakeland Newspapers 




January 16, 1998 



Get it off your chest (847) 223-8073 

LipservlcB is a phone-in column presented as a feature of Lakeland newspapers, Lake- 
land newspapers makes no claim to the authenticity or the statements. Lakeland news- 
papers does not claim the content or the subject matter as fact, but as the personal 
opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to edit copy or to refrain 
from printing a message. Call in at 223-8073 and leave your message 24-hours a day. 
Callers must leave their name, phono number and village name. Hames and phone num- 
bers will not be printed; however, callers maybe called for verification. 



Welcome additions 

Did you read John Matijevich's 
"Seeing it through" column in the 
editorial section of the Dec. 26 
paper? This old pro has focused 
on county politicians with in- 
sight uncommon around here. It 
does my heart good to see politi- 
cians a little nervous. Keep it up, 
John, and you'll become a hero to 
us, the ones who keep tabs on the 
sheep in wool's clothing. After 
reading your words, I then kepi 
the Pfarr Comer column for a 
good chuckle. These two guys 
have added much to the editorial 
pages. 

Grayslake 

18's the limit 

For all the kids that think when 
they're 23 years old, that daddy 
should buy them their own new 
car, why don't you go to work for 
awhile? As long as they're not men- 
tally or physically handicapped, I 



think daddy should stop paying for 
them at 18. 

Good job, officer 

Recently 1 read in the police blot- 
ter where a police officer arrested 
two teenagers for having cans of 
spray paint in their vehicle. I want 
to congratulate the police officer 
.for a job well done. Now I just 
hope that the judge gives these 
vandals the maximum punish- 
ment. 

Round Lake Beach 

There's honest people 

I would like to thank the person 
who found my wallet in the Jewel 
parking lot and turned it into the 
store. With all the bad things hap- 
pening today, it's a wonderful feel- 
ing to know we have many honest 
people in our area. Thank you and 
God love you. 

Thanks a lot 

The family of Harold and Diane 



Rothery would like to thank the 
Round Lake Fire Dcpt. for their won- 
derful, courteous, professional ser- 
vice on New Year's Day* Thanks, 
again guys, you really helped us a lot. 

Thanks for sharing 

Many thanks to Donna Auear for her 
sobering pre-Christmas column of 
her brother's drug ordeal. It had to 
be hard to bring out those family 
skeletons publicly. I respect her for 
doing that, and for showering us all 
is not rosy for everyone. 



Let us enjoy it 

I am furious. We all know that 
gambling is alive and well in 
most taverns in Lake County. 
Hie machines are, and always 
will be, doing very good. What 
I want to know is why not' 
bring a casino boat to Fox 
Lake or Waukegan? Some of 
us don't like going to taverns. 
You're never going to get rid of 
gambling, so why not let some 
of us enjoy it? 



Here's the facts . 

In response to the Jan. 2 sports sec- 
tion article, Sequoits Reach Tourney 
Finals. Maybe you don't realize how 
much seeing your name in print 
means to some of our athletes. They 
work every day in practice and most 
of them put forth everything they 



l 
3 



824 NEW CHANGES 

CALLED "TAX 
RELIEF". 

(And you didn't think the government had a sense of humor.) 

Real tax relief comes when you sit down with 

us. Last year we got over 10 billion dollars back 

for our customers. Working together, we'll help 

you get everything you have coming. 



H&R BLOCK 

Someone You Can Count On 



ANTIOCH 
420 LAKE ST. 

(847) 395-6230 

FOX LAKE 

2 W. GRAND AVE. 

(SUITE 106) 

(847) 587-9333 



McHENRY 

5102 W. ELM 

(815) 385-8630 



ROUND LAKE 

629 W. ROLLINS RD. 

(847) 546-4862 



WAUCONDA 
474-B W. LIBERTY 
(847) 526-8877 



HOURS: Mon.-Thurs. 9 am - 8 pm 
Fri. & Sat. 9 am - 5 pm; Sundays by Appt. 






have during a game. If your staff is 
covering an event, they should get 
the facts accurately. In this article, it 
wasn't sophomore Don Lackey 
shooting a 25-footcr to win the Gil- 
ford game, it was senior Chris Gross. 
So where the quote came in from 
Dresser, I have no idea where you got 
those facts. Chris is a true leader on 
the team and this shouldn't be taken 
away from him. You owe him an 
apology and need to get the facts 
straight in the future. 
Editor's Note: An apology has been 
extended to the family. Tlie error is 
deeply regretted. 

Still don't have it 

I'm calling to respond to the person 
who said to look on Channel 30 for 
Comedy Central. Where I live, in 
Round Lake Beach, we don't have 
Comedy Central on any channel. 
You must have a different system. 
I'm still mad that TCI doesn't offer 
Comedy Central for us. 

Hound Like Beach 

Park City's great 

I want to congratulate and let every- 
one know that Park City is a good 
place to live and the only place 
where crime is very low. It's a small 
place, but it's one of the best places I 
know in Lake County to live. Con- 
grats to the mayor, police depart- 
ment, and the council. 

Cats starving 

To the people who left the two cats to 
fend for themselves in Hound Lake 
Park. They moved away and the cats 
are starving. May God have mercy on 
your soul. 

A real opinion 

I would like to respond to "Down 
like Dominos" comment in Jan. 2 
Llpscrviee. First of nil, you have to 
realize that the condemnation of 
beautiful and natural land will 
continue to be razed by hedonistic 
councils, and the engineers will 
jump at the chance to proclaim 
that all the harborial inhabitants 
will not be affected by the disap- 
pearance of their natural dwelling. 
My true opinion of these people 
cannot be printed. 

Wildwood 

Can you sleep? 

This is for the lady who hit my side 
donr at McDonald's parking lot in 
Lindenhurst on Jan. 6. I hope you 
can sleep well at night. You did about 
$400 worth of damage to the right 
side of my black car. 

Did Santa do it? 

I'd like to know who came into my 
yard and chopped down my 7-foot 
blue spruce evergreen on Christmas 
Eve. Could it have been Santa? 

Antioch 

Their own interests 

It's amazing how the Lake Zurich Vil- 
lage Board has all these cozy things 
at their meetings and only talk about 
development. We still can't get the 
speed limit enforced on our street. 
And development is happening in 
our village from the communities 
around us. They're not protecting us 
from development and all this traffic. 
Obviously, they're only looking out 
for their own interests. 

Lake Zurich 

Challenge to Alberta 

I'm calling because I'd like to throw 
out a challenge to Fox Lake Trustee 
Alberta Meyer. She's been absent, 
but she's failed to give any type of 
reason to the village taxpayers as to 
why. At the least, she owes us an 
apology. Those of us who work hard 
to pay our taxes need to see trustees 
who can stand up and perform work. 
She's complained in the press that 
she can't perform her work because 
they won't give her work to do. If 
she's not a leader or someone who 



can take initiative and chart -the 
course of our village, she needs to 
step down. She's obviously a follow- 
er who needs to be told what to do. 
So, Alberta, if you are reading, why 
don't you call in and reply, because 
you're obviously avoiding everyone 
and skirting the issues. Why don't 
you please resign? 

Give it to opponent 

I'm calling in response to. the 
comments made by "Special elec- 
tion" and "Leaders wanted," al- 
though the term should be leaders 
needed. I agree with what's been 
said about Mr. Osmond. I think the 
position should be turned over to 
the opponent or we should have a 
special election. We need to do it 
now. 

AntJoch 

All or none 

Why should Round Lake Beach vil- 
lage employees get a SI, 500 holiday 
party? Teachers, who are also mu- 
nicipal employees, don't receive 
anything for Christmas. Either give 
all employees an equal share, or no 
one! 

What a coincidence 

This is in response to Josh and Justin 
stealing lights. There's no doubt in 
my mind that their real names arc 
Josh and Justin. They were caught by 
two different people In two different 
areas, and they told us their names. I 
doubt they gave us false names. If 
your children were out on that 
evening in Countrywalk subdivision, 
it would be a huge coincidence if 
they're not the ones involved. Of 
course they would deny doing this to 
their parents. I should have called 
the police and their parents right 
away, but I thought I wns being nice 
Please ask your kids again. 

Hound Like Beach 



Big deal 



What's the big deal about human 
cloning? If a doctor can give fertil- 
ity drugs to a perfectly healthy 
woman who already has one 
healthy child, and then that treat- 
ment results in seven babies, why 
can't a doctor take a DNA from a 
husband and wife and make a 
baby for an infertile couple? Either 
ban all fertility procedures, drugs, 
birth control and abortion, or le- 
galize it all. Let's face it, rich peo- 
ple will get what they want any- 
way. P.S. I love Lipservice. I'd nev- 
er have the nerve to say this in 
mixed company. 

Get a cherry tree... 

This is in regard to the three Pox Lake 
village trustees who voted no on all 
the bills at the last meeting. The one 
can't even remember when the 
board meetings are. Tlie second one 
was our finance director years ago. 
The third one accepted a check that 
no one in the village knew about and 
had to repay it. It looks like they're all 
trying to be George Washington, ex- 
cept they can't find a cherry tree to 
knock down. 

Do you want it? 

I'm calling about the riverboat 
dreams in the Fox Uke Press on Jan. 
9, My question is to the residents of 
Fox Lake: do we really want a river- 
boat gambling casino in our beauti- 
ful lake? I would much rather look at 
the lake as a natural resource than 
look at a casino that will look like the 
Titanic. I was also wondering about 
our natural resources. What toll will 
this take on our lake? What will hap- 
pen to the water displacement with 
a boat that big? Why don't we take 
the money and make a private beach 
where residents can go to swim? 
There's a lot of issues here. I want to 
live where other people want to live, 
not in a place that just wants to bring 
in business. 

Fox Lake 



r 




MINDING 
YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 

Don Taylor 



Do you have 
what it takes 
to be a leader? 

Your success in life often de- 
pends on your leadership skills. 
Leadership Is the ability to show the 
way and direct the course. Leader- 
ship is a way of thinking- It is a set of 
behaviors and a group of skills that 
cause others to want to sail on your 
ship. 

Talented leaders are both rare 
and valuable. They not only receive 
monetary rewards, but also respect, 
cooperation and a high level of self- 
accomplishment. 

Leaders must have the courage 
to create change, the wisdom to dis- 
cover the best paths to improve- 
ment and the tools to motivate oth- 
ers to become part of the mission. 
No'one is bom a great leader. You 
must develop and cultivate the 
skills and habits required. 

If you wish to check your leader- 
ship skill level, take the quick quiz be- 
low. Answer each question yes or no. 

The Leadership Quiz 

1. Do you listen carefully to the 
ideas of your associates without in- 
terrupting them? 

2. Do you spend most of your 
time away from customers and key 
employees? 

3. Do you often request help 
from others just so they can gain ex- 
perience? 

4. Do you often find youreelf 
Immersed in details you shouldn't 
hove to deal with? 

5. Do you read at least four dif- 
ferent business publications each 
month to learn about new trends 
and get new ideas? 

6. Have you ever taken credit 
for others' ideas or work? 

7. Do you review and revise 
your mission statement and goals 
annually? 

B. Arc you the only one in your 
business who fully understands its 
operation? 

9. Do you always include others 
in the goal setting process when it 
impacts their work? 

10. Do you often have meetings 
with others where you have no writ- 
ten agenda? 

1 1. Would you be completely 
comfortable if all of your recent 
business decisions were reported in 
your local newspaper? 

12. Do you wail for problems to 
come to you? 

13. Are you the one driving 
change in your business? 

14. Do you often make quick 
judgments without all the facts? 

15. Do others look to you as the 
team leader? \ 

16. Are you frequently the last 
one to work or the first one to leave? 

17. if you left your business for 
six months— without prior warn- 
ing— would your team be able to 
carry on? 

1 8. Do you talk to your co- 
workers and employees about your 
fears and failures? 

19. Do you want to do business 
with other firms that have your 
company's integrity and values? 

20. Do you conect inappropri- 
ate behavior right on the spot even 
if others are present? 

Scoring the quiz 

Give yourself one point for each 
"yes" answer on odd numbered 
questions. Score one point for each 
"no" answer on even numbered 
questions. Compare your total to 
the ranges below. 

If you scored: 

• 18 or more correct answers: 



Please see TAYLOR /C8 




January 16, 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers C7 



Lakeland Bank comes to Fox Lake 




By LEON FILAS 
Staff Reporter 




If you look to the corner of Big 
Hollow Road and Route 12, you may 
notice a few changes. 

Where there was once a huge 
cornfield, now rests a Menards and a 
Jewel. 

In front of the Jewel, which will be 
holding their grand opening on Jan. 

29, another 
grand open- 
ing occurred 
as Lakeland 
Community 
Bank opened 
their doors to 
the public. 

This is 
Lakeland's 
second bank 
to open, the 
first one has 
shown assets 
of nearly S80 
million. The new facility will feature 
a country like atmosphere, including 
a fireplace in the lobby and a play 
area for children, and a community 
room in the basement. 

"We feel that the mega-banks 
from Wisconsin, Michigan and other 
parts of Illinois do not share the same 
interest in our community as those 
who live, work and raise our families 
here do," Gerald O'Sulliyan stated, 
president of Lakeland Bank said. 

Attending the ribbon cutting and 
VIP open house at the bank were 
Lake County Board Member Bonnie 



Thomson Carter (Dist.S-Ingleslde), 
Grant Township Supervisor Gordy 
Kiesgen, Grant Township Trustee 
Linda Tabers Kwak, Assessor Betty 
Niemi, Fox Lake Rotary President- 
elect Matt Dabrowskl, President of 
Fox Lake Chamber of Commerce 
President Bill Linning, Fox Lake 
Chamber Directors Pam King, Bud 



Scott, Carol Cermak and Sue 
Glashagcl, McHenry County States 
Attorney Gary Pack, and Illinois State 
Rep. Mark Beaubien Jr.(R-Bam*ng- 
ton). 

The success is not far fetched, as 
O'Sullivan stated that the success of 
the bank is the direct result of its 
commitment to "service the area we 



live in" by the banks share holders, 
directors, officers and employees. 

Wirn a look to the future, yet with 
a feeling of being from the country. 
Lakeland Community Bank is poised 
for huge growth in the future. 

For more information, contact 
Lakeland Community Bank at (847) 
973-2265. 



O'Sullivan: 

Lakeland Bank is 

successful 
because of service 




Lakeland Community Bank's Fox Lake location is now open on the corner of Big Hollow Road and 
Route 12. With Its commitment to "service the area we live in," Lakeland Community Bank is poised 
for huge growth,-— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



Air Canada adds 
service to Mitchell 
International Airport 



Air Canada recently began pas- 
senger to General Mitchell Interna- 
tional Airport. The inaugural flight 
was welcomed in style with a cele- 
bration featuring a traditional bag- 
piper and the Canadian-style brass 
sou ih!s of the Great Lakes Chamber 
Brass. 

Air Canada marks the 17th air- 
line serving Mitchell International. It 
will operate three daily nonstop 
flights between Milwaukee and its 
Toronto hub where passengers can 
connect to many other cities in 
Canada and Europe. 

"As the airport continues to 
grow and service the greater Mil- 
waukee and Chicago region, we arc 
pleased to be welcoming new inter- 
national carriers such as Air Cana- 
da," said Pat Rowe, public relations 



manager for Mitchell. 

Mitchell International, which is 
often referred to as "Chicago's Third 
Airport," is already second only to 
O'Hare in use among northern Illi- 
nois (Lake and McHenry counties), 
frequent flyers. 

About 10-minutes south of 
downtown Milwaukee, and a 50- 
minute drive from the Illinois Toll- 
way's Lake Forest Oasis, the airport 
is easily accessible from Interstate 94, 
with southbound and northbound 
exit rampr. 

General Mitchell International 
Airport, 5300 S. Howell Ave., serves 
more than 5.5 million passengers an- 
nually. Mitchell has <I2 gates and 
more than 200 daily flight departures 
witih nonstop and direct service to 
90 cities via its 1 7 airlines. 




Mark Rosenberg, Air Canada vice President, Sales and Product 
Distribution, presents Milwaukee County Executive F. Thomas 
Ament with a leaded crystal Air Canada wing in recognition of the 
airline's inaugural service to Mitchell International Airport. Airport 
Director Barry Bateman stands to the right. 



Dance Pounds Away opens Aerobics and Fitness Studio in Antioch 



If you had your fill of the same 
old fitness and weight loss fads, and 
the thought of going to the gym 
seems like a chore— it's time you 
consider Dance Pounds Away. Ask 
any doctor and he'll tell you that an 
effective weight loss program must 
include regular exercise. He won't 
tell you, however, that you can't have 
fun doing it. That's where Gurnee's 
Dance Pounds Away comes in. In the 
six years since opening the business, 
owners Lory Charncy and Debra 
Lopez have revolutionized the 
weight loss world. 

Dance Pounds Away offers pro- 
grams that stress aerobic exercise and 
group motivation to affect not only 



weight loss, but a change in lifestyle 
that keeps the weight off. It does this 
by offering many different programs 
geared toward an individual's needs. 
What it doesn't do is offer the same old 
step-toning and aerobic routines. 

"If people don't have fun, they're 
not going to continue; if they don't 
have variety, they get frustrated; and 
if they don't get results quick 
enough, they fall ofT," said Lopez. We 
comer the, market by psychological- 
ly getting them out of the gym envi- 
ronment, and one of the ways we do 
that is by offering a music program 
that is awesome." The music in- 
cludes all types of popular music, 
from Top 40 to R & B to Motown. The 



music is combined with heavily re- 
searched regimen of the best fat and 
calorie burning aerobic techniques, 
including cardiovascular and toning 
steps. You don't have to wait for ex- 
ercise equipment in this club, and 
you're in and out in one hour. 

But it doesn't stop there; the fit- 
ness pros at Dance Pounds Away 
help you change your lifestyle as well 
as your physique. 

"It's our job to monitor them 
every 30 days to make sure they're 
losingat least 6 to 12 total body inch- 
es and/or pounds," said Lopez. "As 
professionals, we know that in order 
for someone to change their lifestyle 
they have to make a iifelong com- 



mitment. Most people don't want to 
work that hard. They want to see (the 
weight) come off. It takes 60 to 90 
days to form a habit, and we get 
them there." Patrons are required to 
attend at least three classes per week, 
but once they get going they get 
hooked, and many want to dance 
pounds away five to seven times per 
week, many burning as much fat and 
calories in a week as they normally 
would in 30 days. 

Dance Pounds Away js located at 
401 N. Riverside Dr., Gurnee and is 
expanding into the Antioch area, 
opening their second aerobics and 
fitness studio at 496 Orchard St. (Or- 
chard Plaza). 



'■■• 



C8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 




January 16, 1998 



National President Slater is guest at 
NAWBO member recruitment event 



The Chicago Area Chapter of the 
National Association of Women 
Business Owners (NAWBO) will kick 
off the celebration of its 20th year 
with its annual membership recruit- 
ment gala at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 
20 at the Palmer House Hilton, 17 E. 
Monroe St., Chicago. 

Featured guest will be Phyllis 
Hill Slater, president of National 
NAWBO and of Hill Slater, Inc., an 
engineering and architectural sup- 
port systems firm based in Long Is- 
land, N.Y. 

The event is sponsored by Bank 
One and Ameritech, two of Chicago 
NAWBO's leading corporate partners. 

"The Chicago Are a Chapter has 
always been one of NAWBO's 
strongest leaders and a major con- 
tributor to helping our organization 
achieve its mission of supporting 
women business owners on the eco- 
nomic, public policy and social 
fronts," said Slater. "I'm honored 
that I was selected to help kick off a 
celebration of the Chapter's 20 years 
of advocacy for women business 
owners." 

In addition to her other roles, 
Slater is the chair and co-founder of 
the Women Business Owners Cor- 
poration, a NAWBO-affiliated orga- 
nization. She is a three-time delegate 
to the White House Conference on 
SMall Business and has testified be- 



fore the House Small 
Business Committee. As a 
major contributor to the 
business community, 
Slater has been recog- 
nized by presidents 
Carter, Keagan, Bush and 
Clinton for her efforts. 

The Chicago Area 
Chapter was one of the 
first three NAWBO chap- 
ters — along with Min- 
nesota and Los Angeles. It 
was launched in 1970 af- 
ter the group's Washing- 
ton, D.C. office contacted several 
leading Chicago women business 
owners and issued a news release 
announcing a meeting to explain 
NAWBO's mission. 

"About 100 women attended the 
meeting," said Judi Schindler, presi- 
dent orSchindler Communications, 
who was among them. She was 
elected the Chapter's third president, 
and currently chairs the Awards and 
Appointments Committee. "If you 
wanted to be on the board, you 
raised your hand, I raised my hand, 
and 20 years later, look, I'm still in- 
volved. And I was only going to ask a 
question!" 

The initial meeting drew in 27 
members to help launch Chicago 
NAWBO. Currently, the Chapter has 
a membership of more than 600. 




Slater: National 
NAWBO president 

to speak at 
recruitment gala 



To qualify for mem- 
bership in NAWBO, 
women must have 
some percentage of 
ownership in a compa- 
ny as well as a role in its 
day-to-day manage- 
ment and a voice in its 
policy decisions. Annu- 
al dues arc $250; 
prospective members 
who join at the Jan. 28 
event will receive a S25 
discount off their first 
year's dues. 
Admission is $25 for both NAWBO 
members and non-members. For in- 
formation or reservations,- call the 
Chicago NAWBO office at (312) 322- 
0990.. 

The Chicago Area Chapter is 
among the largest of NAWBO's 72 
chapters in the U.S. Its more than 
600 members represent businesses 
in all major industrial, service and re- 
tail sectors. Chicago NAWBO pro- 
vides women business owners with 
leadership, education, procurement 
and networking opportunities. It also 
serves as a voice for its members on 
economic, social and public policy 
issues. Information about area 
women-owned businesses is avail- 
able through the NAWBO chapter at 
(312) 322-0990, or through its web 
site, http://www.nawbonet.org. 



TO PL ACE AN AD IN 
THE CLASSIFIED SECTION 

Call Maureen Combs at 223-8161 Ext. 109 Weekdays From 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. 

Deadline is 10 A.M. Wednesday 




'On my honor../ 

Unda Baskln-Wilson of Gurnee leads a multi-council conference 
on Diversity at the new Illinois Crossroads Council Girl Scout head- 
quarters in Vernon Hills. The dedication of the new facility, known 
as "The Hub," drew over 1,000 community leaders, Girl Scouts, 
volunteers and families. In addition to formal dedication cere- 
monies and a visit from the national president of Girl Scouts, 
U.S.A., Elinor Johnston Ferdon, workshops for volunteers, staff 
and girls were held in the building. Baskin-Wilson Is a member of 
the council's Board of Directors. — Submitted photo 




&=j 






a ^-/ Mk 



Wayne Moran 
(815) 363-2453 

Date: 1/18/98 Sunday 
Time: Noon - 4 p.m. 

Directions: Rt 12 W. to State Park 
Rd. Turn right Go north to Kohl 
turn left House on the right 
300 Kohl, Spring Grove, 60081 




Household help or hassle at tax time? 



£* 



ADJACENT TO FOREST PRESERVE 

Rustic ranch in the woods. 5 Ixtircoms, 2 twins, dream kitchen with hickory cabinets, quarry lilc 
and accent lighting. 2 stone fireplaces, walk-out lower level and a large lot .' $1M,900. 



Real Estate Auction 



RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES 



5 DELUXE T0WNH0MES IN FOX LAKE 



2 T0WNH0MES TO BE SOLD ABSOLUTE, 
REGARDLESS OF PRICE 

Developer closeout in the Rainier Woods 
subdivision. Units leature up to 1,756 sq. 
It. with 2 or 3 bedrooms, 1.5 or 2.5 baths, 
gourmet kitchens, designer interiors, lire- 
place, walk-out basements, 2-car garage & 
much more, Orig, priced up to S21 0,000. 
Suggested opening bids from $75,000. 
From Rt. 12/59 North on 12 to Grand Ave.; 
east on Grand to Rollins Rd.; south on 
' Rollins to Rainier Woods on Ictt. 



Did you hire someone to do your 
yard work, babysit or clean your 
house? In Ihis day and age of lost 
time, thousands ofpcoplc hire inde- 
pendent workers so they can recap- 
ture their free time. The nightmare 
happens when the convenience be- 
comes a nuisance at tax time. 

You could be at risk. According 
to the Internal Revenue Service, a 
household worker (maid, babysitter, 
nanny, health aide, private nurse or 
yard worker}, is your employee if you 
control what and how work is done 
and provide the supplies necessary 
to get the task completed. 

The 1997 Household Employ- 
ment Tax Guide says, with some ex- 
clusions, that if you pay wages of 
Si ,000 or more to any one household 
employee, you must withhold and 
pay social security and Medicare tax- 
es. And, if you paid cash wages of 
S 1 ,000 or more in any quarter during 
this year or a previous year to a 



household employee, you must pay 
federal unemployment tax. 

Protect yourself and your repu- 
tation by following these tax tips pro- 
vided by the IRS and THE MAIDS, 
one of the nation's oldest and largest 
professional maid services. 

Keep wage and tax records 

On each payday, record the dale 
and amounts of: 

1.) Your employee's cash and 
noncash wages, 2.) Any social secu- 
rity or Medicare tax you withhold or 
agree to pay for your employee, 3.J 
Any federal income tax you with- 
hold, 40 Any advance Earned In- 
come. Credit (EIC) payments you 
make, and 5.) Any stale employment 
taxes you withhold. 

Get an Employer 
Identification Number 

You must include your E1N 
number on the forms you file for 



r 




ptfLpi 



Open Houses: 

1-3 pm, Jan 25. 31, Feb. 1, 7, 8 & 14, 

Auction Date: Feb. 15, (998. 




6 NEW LUXURY TO WNHOMES IN WOODSTOCK 



2 T0WNH0MES TO BE SOLD ABSOLUTE , REGARDLESS OF PRICE 

Developer closeout ol brand new Hidden Valley Townhomes. Units feature up 

lo 1,662 sq. It. with up to 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths + 2-car garage & lull basement. 

Located In an Idyllic selling wilh scenic vista views ot the surrounding natural 

landscape. Many wonderful amenities & top-quality construction. 

From Rt. 47 & 120, N on Rt. 47 to St. Johns, E lo Powers, S to properties. 

Originally priced up to $254,000. Suggested opening bids from $75,000. 

Open Houses: 1-3 pm, Jan. 25, 31, Feb. 1, 7. 8 & 14 Auction Dale: Feb. 15, 1998. 

Rick Levin & Associates, inc. 

H Call tor brochure 312. /15« 1500 wtrw.rlrtlwln.com y 



Today's Manufactured Home Is 
Waiting For You 







With the cost of site-bulk housing continuing to rue, more DBnobans are choosing to own ■ 

modem manufactured home. 

Today's manufactured homes are buit win sold cwisttucton a«i offer a va«ty of (to 

and exterior designs lo meet the housing needs that home buyers .want 

1/ you are thinking ri purchasing a home, but are faced with the high cost of 

site-built housing, think about a manufactured home. You wS discover that the 

dream home you have been waiting for is a modem manufactured home. 

For an LMHA member near you, please call the 

Illinois Manufactured Housing Association at 1-800-252-9495. 




your household employee. Use 
Form SS-4 to gel your number. 

File the appropriate forms 

Porm W-2, Form W-3, and 
Schedule H (Form 1040). It is impor- 
tant to note, that you file a separate 
W-2 for each household employee 
you pay social security and Medicare 
wages or wages from which you 
withhold federal income tax. 

Be aware of the law. Most pro- 
fessional maid services withhold tax- 
es for their employees— check to 
make sure the service you hire docs. 

For more information, or if you 
have questions, contact the IRS at 1 - 
000-029-1010. 



FROM PAGE C7 

TAYLOR: 

Are you a 
good leader? 

you're a Sir Winston Churchill in 
the making. Don't be too proud of 
yourself, good leaders are also 
humble. 

• 14 to 17 correct answers: 
you're out in front and most folks 
are happy to follow you. 

• 10 to 13 correct answers: you 
need to add to your leadership in- 
ventory. You can improve and in- 
crease your value lo others, 

• 9 or fewer correct answers: If 
you are in a leadership position you 
may wish to read "Mutiny on the 
Bounty." Take every opportunity to 
increase your leadership skill level. 



Don Taylor is the co-author of 
"Up Against the WaUMarts. " You 
may write to him in aire of "Mind- 
ing Your Own Business," P.O. llox 
67, Amarillo.TX 79105. 



^J 






January 16, 1998 






Lakeland Newspapers/ 



K.K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home Ltd 




Excellent Service 

With Genuine 

Compassion and 

Sincerity Has Always 

Been a Tradition At 

The K.K. Hamsher 

Funeral Home. H 

Family Owned and 

Family Staffed 

Funeral Home... 

It's like having a friend.., 

12 N. Pislakee Lake Road, Fox Lake, Illinois 
1 Block West of Rte. 12-1/2 Block North of Grand Ave. 

"7/k ( 'Jeptfoti tfrtEoi*" 



(847) 587-2100 



(815)385-1001 



DEATH NOTICES 



BROSEAU NOIXE 

Pearl G. Droscau *Ek', age *M of Rolling Mabel D. Nolle, age 90 of LlbcrtyviJJe 

Meadows Am Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, 

Am Ahlgrim and sons Funeral Home, 'Lake Libertyvillc 
Zurich 

FRIEL WACIISMUIH 

|. Dennis Fricl, age 70 of Fox Uke Bertha M.Wachsmuth, age 86 of Libertyvillc 

Am Strang Funeral Chapel and Am Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, 

Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake Libertyville 



Mary Catherine Ftke (nee Walsh) 

Age 77, a resident of Fox Lake, for the past 40 years, for- 
merly of Bamboo, Wis. died Sunday, Ian. 11, 1998 in 
Undenhurst She was bom on May 2, 1 920 In Lyndon Station 
Wis. to Edward J. and Mary Ellen (nee Green) Walsh, on July 
1 , 1942, she married Norman E Fike at Sacred Heart Catholic 
Church In Reedsburg, Wis. She was a 1973 graduate of 
' Whitewater College with a B.S. Degree in Education, and in 
25 years of teaching, she taught In one room schools, as well 
as at St Bede Catholic Grade School in Ingleside, before her 
retirement. She was a longtime member of St. Bede Catholic 
Church. 

Survivors Include, her husband, Norman E. of Fox Lake 
with whom she had celebrated over 55 years of marriage; 
one son, Robert Fike of Fox Lake; two daughters, Rita 
(Harold) Ness of Round Lake and Ellen (Cary) Knapcik of 
McHenry; six grandchildren, Michelle Jordan and Nichole 
Ness of Round Lake, Scott (Belh) Fike andThomas Fike, all of 
Woodstock, Jennifer and Mark Knapcik of McHenry; four 
great grandchildren, Brittany and Kelsey Jordan of Round 
Lake, Gary and Katclyn Fike of Woodstock and other rela- 
tives. She Is preceded in death by her parents and by one 
brother, Raymond Walsh. 

Friends of the family called at the K. IC Hamsher Funeral 
Home, Fox Lake (The Chapel on the Lake). 

A Catholic Funeral Mass was held at St Bede Catholic 
Church in Ingleside. 

Interment was at St Mary's Fremont Center. 

In lieu of flowers, memorials for the Mary Fike Memorial 
Fund c/o Victory Lake Continuing Care Center, 105S E 
Gnmd Ave., Undenhurst, IL 60046, will be appreciated by the 
family. 



Ernest A. DeGraw 

Age 68 of Fox Lake, died Sunday, Jan. 1 1 at Rush • 
Presbyter inn -St. Luke Hospital in Chicago. 

He was bom, Oct 13, 1929 in Chicago. He was the son of 
Leonard and Evelyn (Margetts) DeGraw, they precede him In 
death. He was a Marine Corp. veteran -Korean war. He was a 
retired Commercial Salesman for Crystal Lake Tire Co. He 
was a member of Calvary Chapel Church-Lake Villa. A mem- 
ber of the Fox Lake Post 9655 VFW. He was a coach for the 
Crystal Lake Raiders Football Team. 

He Is survived by his wife. Marguerite (Cooke) DeGraw, 
a daughter, Evelyn (Wayne) liska of Crystal Lake; four grand- 
children, Elizabeth (Timothy) Chendnski, Jason liska, Keith 
Uska, Tim othy liska; four great grandchildren, Michael Blair, 
Bradley Blair, Ryan Chendnski and Jessica Chendnski He is 
also preceded in death by a daughter, Peggy Blair. 

A Memorial Service was held at Holy Cross Lutheran 
Church, Cary. 

Interment was private. 

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Salvation 
Army, 404 S. Butrick St, Waukegan, IL 60085 or Calvary 
Chapel Church, 38451 N. Fairfield Rd., Lake Villa. IL 60046 

Arrangements were made by Kahlc-Moore Funeral 
Home, Cary. 



The Deadline for Obituaries & Death Notices 
is 10 a.m. on Tuesdays. 




— »»rl — 

- 1 Mgi 



Newspapers 

Funeral Directory 

RINGA FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2146 

Robert J, Ringa, Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL, LTD. 
AND CREMATORIUM 

410 E. Belviderc Grayslake, IL 

(847) 223-8122 

David G. Strang and 

Richard A Caddis, Director 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

Dan Dugenske, Director 

(847) 395-4000 

K.K. HAMSHER FUNERAL HOME, LTD. 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Rd., Fox Lake, IL 

(847)587-2100 

Kenneth K. Hamsher, Debra Hamsher Glen, Directors 



Lore tta A. McKillip 

Age 85 of Bristol, Wis., passed away Monday, Jan. 12, 
1998 at her home. She was bom July 26, 1912 in Burlington, 
Wis. the daughter of the late Stanley and Bertha (HaeuserJ 
Jung. She had lived in Chicago and Antioch before moving to 
Wisconsin 20 years ago. She was a member of the Westosha 
Senior Center and was an avid bowler. Mrs. McKillip worked 
for Up Town Federal Bank as a clerk before her retirement 

Survivors include her daughter, Susan (Robert) Knourek 
of Antioch, and her son, Robert M. (Judy] McKillip of 
Ingleside. She was the grandmother of five and the great 
grandmother of six. She is preceded in death by her husband, 
Alton E McKillip In 1965, one brother, Stanley Jung and one 
sister, Opal Hoffman. 

Funeral services were held at the Strang Funeral Home 
of Antioch. Antioch. 

Interment was at Maryhill Cemetery, NUes. 

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the 
Kenosha Hospice Alliance, in her memory. 

Margaret May Hook 

Age 83, formerly of Grayslake, died Saturday, Jan. 10, 
1998 at Medina Nursing Home in Durand. Bom in Gages 
Lake, May 10, 1914 to Fred and Viola (Edic) Van Zandt. 
Married in 1939 to R. Orviilc Hook. She was a beloved home- 
maker and mother, grandmother. She also worked for many 
years at the State of III. Vocational Rehabilitation depart- 
ment. She was also a Founding Member of the United 
Protestant Church In Grayslake. 

Survived by one son, Van Hook of Rockton; wife, 
Michelle; two grandchildren, Vanessa and Richard Hook of 
Rockton. She is preceded in death by her parents; husband, 
R. Orvilie. Aug. 23, 1982; five sisters, Frances, Evelyn, Eleanor, 
Betty and Alice. 

Arrangement were trusted to the Difulk Funeral Home In 
Rockton. 

There was no visitation. 

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the United 
Protestant Church, Grayslake 

Jean C. Rybicki 

Age 74 of Antioch, passed away Sunday, Jon. 1 1 , 1998 at 
St. Thercse Hospital, Waukegan. She was bom May 9, 1923 in 
Giicago, moving to Antioch in 1970,ShewasamemberofSi. 
Peter Church and the VFW Post 4SS1 Ladies Auxiliary*. Mrs. 
Rybicki had been o secretary for many years and had worked 



fortheAntloch New5-Reporterbeforeherredrement.OnJuIy 
19, 1948 she married Walter J. Rybicki In Chicago. 

Survivors indude her husband, Walter, one daughter, 
Karen (David) JablonskJ of Burlington, Wis. and one grand- 
son, David Jablonski of Madison, Wis. She is preceded In 
death by one brother, Walter Tatarczylc 

Funeral services with Mass of Christian Burial was held 
at St. Peter Church, Andoch. 

Friends called at the Strang Funeral Home of Antioch. 

Interment was at Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. 

Those desiring may make contributions to the family. 

Charles A. Pall, Jr. 

Age 53 of Antioch, passed away suddenly Wednesday, 
Jan. 7, 1998 on arrival at Victory Memorial Hospital, 
Waukegan. He was bom Jan. 10, 1 944 In Oak Park, the son or 
the late Charles and Ruth (Link) Pall. He moved to Grayslake . 
in 1975 and to Antioch in 1968. He was a member of St Peter 
Church of Antioch; the Army Reserve and worked as a 
mechanic at Highland Park Ford. On May3, 1974, he married 
Janine Kurzeja in Chicago. 

Survivors include, his wife, Janine; one daughter, 
Carolyn; one brother, Allan (Susan) of River Forest* his broth- 
er-in-law, Edward (Elizabeth) Kurzeja and two sister-in-laws, 
Slanislawa fjurek) Demsld and Antonlna Kurzeja and many 
nieces and nephews and aunts and uncles and cousins. 

Funeral Services with Mass of Christian Burial was held 
at St. Peter Church, Antioch. 

Friends called at the Strang Funeral Home of An tioch. 

Interment was at Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. 

Marjorie M. Andrews (nee Griffin) 

Age 84 of Cedarburg, Wis,, formerly of Hon, passed away 
Jan. 1. 1998 in Cedarburg, Wis. 

She was the wife of the late James E Andrews; mother of 
Norman (Barbara) Andrews of Minnesota City, MN and 
Marcia (Jerry) Crapo of Willjts, Calif.; sister of Paul (Edna) 
Griffith of Fairfield Bay, Ark. Also surviving four grandchil- 
dren; four great, grandchildren; nieces, nephews and many 
other relatives. 

A Memorial Service will be held on Saturday, Jan. 17, at 2 
p.m. at North Prairie Methodist Church, comer of 9th and 
Kenosha Road In Zion. 

In lieu of flowers, memorials to the church In Marjorie's 
name would be appreciated. 

Arrangements were entrusted to the Schramka Funeral 
Home, Cedarburg, Wis. 

Bernard J. Waters 

Age 80 of Twin Lakes, Wis., passed away Friday, Jan. 9, 
1998 at Buriington Memorial Hospital, Burlington, Wis. He 
was bom in Andoch, Sept 11, 1917, had made his home in 
Grayslake over 37 years and retired to Wisconsin for the past 
20 years. He was an active musician with the Golden Tones, 
Lake County for over 30 years and later founded the Past Due 
Notes, a musical group in Twin Lakes, Silver Lake and 
Kenosha Wisconsin areas. He was employed as an engineer 
with the Grayslake Gelatin Co. over 30 years. He was united 
in marriage to Evelyn Craft, June 22, 1940. 

He leaves his wife, Evelyn; four daughters, Le Raye (Jake) 
Szcmala. Chandler, Ariz., Jo Anne (Raul) Guerrero, Round Lake 
Beach, Vfcma Lynn BergJund, Twin Lakes, Wis, Kathdeen E 
Monroe, North Chicago; one son, Bemle J. Waters, Kenosha, 
W1S4 one sister, Bessie Bauman, Grayslake; 14 grandchildren; 
10 great grandchildren; two great, great, grandchildren. He is 
preceded in death by 12 sisters and brothers. 

Funeral services were offered at the Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake with the Rev. 
Richaid Rubietta, pastor of United Protestant Church, 
Grayslake officiating. 

Interment was at Northshore Garden of Memories, 
North Chicago. 

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Bernard 
J. Waters Memorial Fund. 

William Patrick Herda 

Age 14 ofWheadand Township. Wis, passed away Jan. 4, 
1998 at Memorial Hospital Burlington. Burlington, Wis. He 
was bom Oct. 26, 1983 in Buriington, Wis. to John Bernard 
and Patricia Kay (McDonald) Herda. He attended St. 
Alphonsus Grade School; Catholic Central High School in 
Burlington, Wis. He was a member of St. Alphonsus Catholic 
Church, New Munster, Wis. and a former Altar Boy of that 
Church, William was a member of the Catholic Central High 
School Junior Varsity football team; the Wheadand "Willing 
Workers" 4-H Club and an avid Green Bay Packer's fan. 

Survivors include his parents, John and Patricia Herda of 
Wheatland Township, Wis.; grandparents, Mary K. 
McDonald, I-ake -Placid, Fla. and Martin J. Herda of 
Burlington, Wis. Also surviving are one sister, Rachael E 
Herda, Wheadand Township, Wis.; two brothers, John M. 
Herda. Wheatland Township, Wis. and Ben J. Herda, 
Wheatland Township, Wis.; aunts, uncles, cousins, other rel- 
atives and friends. He is preceded in death by a grandfather, 
John J. McDonald and grandmother, Rachael M. Herda. 

A Mass of Christian Burial was held at St. Alphonsus 
CaUvolic Church, New Munster, Wis. with Rev. Tom Biersack, 
officiating. 

Friends visited at the Schuette-Daniels Funeral Home, 
Burlingion.Wis. 

Interment was at St. Alphonsus Cemetery, New Munster, 
Wis. 

(Please see page CIO) 






C 1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



OBITUARIES/LEGAL NOTICES 



January 16, 1998 



(From page C9) 

Scharon Lynn Alters (nee Patrick) 

Age 55, a resident of Spring Grove, for over seven years, and a former long- 
time resident of Antioch, died Monday, Jan. 5, 1998 at the St.Therese Medical 
Center in Waukegan. She was born in Jacksonville and had been formerly 
employed with the Fox Lake Sears Dept. Store in the shipping and receiving 
dept. and by St. Therese Hospital as a secretary. She had attended St. Peter 
Catholic Church in Antioch. 

Survivors include, one son, Michael (Maureen) Papp of McHenry; her 

mother Gcraldine (Harold) Adams of Spring Grove; her brother, Michael 

. (Linda) Patrick of Alaska; two grand daughters, Meagan Ratajczyk and Mallori 

Papp, both of McHenry and oilier relatives. She is preceded in death by her 

father, William E. Patrick. 

Friends of die family called at die K, K. Hamsher Funeral Home, Fox Lake 
(The Chapel on die Lake) 

Funeral services were conducted with Fr. Jack Heffcran, officiating. 

A private interment was held. 

Memorials for the American Lung Assn., UAO W. Washington Blvd. 
Chicago, 60607 or for the National Kidney Foundation of III, Inc. GOO S. Federal 
St., Suite 201, Chicago, IL 60605 will be appreciated by the family. 

Emily M. Bensen 

Age 80 of Round Lake Beach, passed away Wednesday, Dec. 31, 1997 at 
Winchester House in Libcrtyville. She was bom Feb. 18, 1917 in Chicago to 
Thomas and Catherine (Zimny) Lukaszewski. Formerly of Chicago, she was a 
resident of the Round Lake area since 1974. She was employed in die shipping 
and receiving department of Illinois Tool Works in Chicago for over 25 years. 
She was a member of St. Joseph Cadiolic Church in Round Lake. 

Survivors include a daughter, Carol (Victor) Zmijewski of Round Uke 
Beach; a son, Harry Bensen of Round Lake Park; six grandchildren, Richard 
(Anne) Zmiejewski, Deborah (Daniel) Caraher, Jennifer Zmiejewski, Thomas 
(Rose) Bensen, Tammy (William) Wlialcy and Sheri Bensen; five great grand- 
children; and two brothers, Edward (Marie) I-ukaszewski of Chicago and 
Leonard (loanne) Laniewsfci of Lakewood, NJ. She is preceded in death by her 
husband, Clarence on Dec. 6, 1977; and a sister, F.vclyn Lukaszewski. 

Visitation for family and friends was at Jusien's Round Lake Funeral Home, 
Round Lake. 

Funeral Mass was at St. Joseph's Cadiolic Church, Round Lake. 

Interment was at Ascension Cemetery, IJbcrtyville. 

Masses would be appreciated by the family. 

C. Darnell Alshouse 

Age 97 of Antioch, passed away, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 1998 at the Crown Manor 
Nursing Home, Zion. He was born, Nov. 5, 1900 in Walnut, the son of die late 
Virden and Effie (Clayton) AJshouse. He lived in Iowa and South Dakota before 
moving to Wadsworth, in 1 925. Mr. Alshouse had farmed for many years in the 
area and most recently on Cemetery Rd., in Gurnee. On Aug. 1 5, 1928, he mar- 
ried Anna May Lucas at her home in Lake Villa. 

Survivors include his wife, Anna May, his son, Charles (Sharen) Alshouse of 
Grandwoud Park; three grandchildren, Linda (Edward) Grcnnan and Melissa 
Alshouse bodi of Freeport and Dale Alshouse of Libertyvtlle; two great grand- 
children, Hill and Rachel Grennan. Beside his parents, he is preceded in death 
by five brothers, Charles, Paul, Milfred, Clarence and Samuel and one sister, 
Viola Hansen. 

Funeral services were held at Strang Funeral Home of Antioch, with the 
Rev. Paul Meltzerof the Millbum Congregational Church, officiating. 

Interment was at Millburn Cemetery. 

Please omit flowers. 

Wilfred E Jennrich 

Age 80 of Lake Villa, passed away Thursday, Jan. 0, 1998 at Rolling Hills 
Manor Nursing Home in Zion. He was born, Sept. 26, 1917 in New Lisbon, Wis., 
the son of the late Emile and Ida (Hutz) Jennrich. He had lived in Chicago and 
Antioch, before moving to Lake Villa in 1955. He was a U.S. Army veteran serv- 
ing during WWII. Mr. Jennrich retired in 1981 from lllinuis Bell as a lineman 
after 35 years of service. On April 2, 1947, he married Ethel Kohl in Uhertyville. 

Survivors include his wife, Ethel; six children, Karen (Philip) Knudsen of 
Harvard, Karl (Cynthia) of Wonder Lake, Edward of Salt Lake City, Utah, 
Warren (Lisa) of Trevor, Wis., Thomas (Cathy) of Lake Villa and Steven (Mary 
Kay) of Lombard; one brother, Arthur (Greta) of New Glarus, Wis. He was die 
grandfather of Andrew, Adam, Amy, Katie, Michael, Paul, Danniel, Patrick, 
Alexander, Hannah and Alivia. 

Funeral services were held at the Strang Funeral Home of Antioch, with the 
Rev. Charles Miller of St. Stephen Lutheran Church, Antioch, officiating. 

Interment was at Highland Memorial ftirk, Ubertyvillc. 

In lieu of flowers, those desiring may make contributions to the 
Alzheimers Assn., 919 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 1000, Chicago, IL 6061 1 or 
American Parkinson Disease Assn., 033 N. Orleans, Chicago, IL 60610 in his 
memory. 

Catherine E. Knoll 

Age 90 of Lake Villa, passed away on Thursday, Jan. 8, 1998 at Resurrection 
Medical Center, Chicago. She was born in Allegany, NY on May 1 8, 1 907. 

She is survived by her children, Pauline Hart and Charles (Patsy) Vanseglii, 
her grandchildren, Donald (Laurie) Hart, Charles (Robin) Hart, Paul Hart, 
Thomas (Mary) Hart, Kathleen Hart, Theresa (F.rwin) Michel, Merry Sue (John) 
Hall and Timodiy Vanseglii. She is preceded in death by her husband, John 
Knoll. 

Funeral services were held at Ringa Funeral Home, liikc Villa 
Funeral Mass was held at St. Peters' Church, Antioch 

Interment was at Mt, Carmel Cemetery in Antioch. 

Arrangements were made by Baran Funeral Home, Ltd., Chicago. 



Sometimes an ofd-fashioned song 

Curings us a tnougfit of you; 

Sometimes a flower as u>e pass along y 

Or a sAy tnat is azure ofue; 

Or a sifoer fining in the cfouas ) 

when the sun is peeping through. 

CMff of these things, ma/te us 

thinhofuou. 



PUBUC NOTICE 

SECTION 00030 
MEDIA ADVERTISEMENT 
PROJECT AND LOCATION! 
Interior Furnishings Furniture 4 Equipment (or 
Lake Villa District Library 
1001 East Grand Avenue 
Lake Villa, Illinois 60046 

ARCHITECTS; 
Brown Hoaley Slone & Sauer 
Architecture Planning Interior Design 
600 First Avenue N.E. 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52402-5078 
Telephone: (319) 365-9426 
BID OPENING: 

Separate Lump Sum Proposals lor the branches of work indicated will be received by 
the Owner at the place, date and time below stated and there publicly opened and 
read. 

PLACE: Lake Villa District Library 
(Former TJ Maxx Store) 
901 Rollins Road 
Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 
Round Lake Commons Shopping Center 
DATE: Thursday, February 19, 1998 
TIME: 2:00 PM CST 
Separate Proposals are requested for the following branches of work: 

tt\ Interior Woodwork (end panels & casework) 

02 Library Bookstacks 

#3 Office chairs & systems furniture 

#4 Library Furniture 

#5 Systems Furniture 

#6 Tables, Chairs and Miscellaneous items 
Any proposal received after time and date above staled will bo returned to the bidder 
unopened. The Owner reserves the right to reject any or all bids, to waive minor Infor- 
malities in any bid, or to make award in the best interests of the Owner. 
BIDDER QUA LIFICATIONS: 

A Bid Security will be required in the amount of 5% of the Bid. 
Bid Security shall be agreed upon as the measure of liquidated damages which 
Owner will sustain by failure, neglect or refusal of bidder to deliver a signed Contract 
stipulating performance of the Work In unqualified compliance with Contract 
Documents or furnish the required 100% Conlract Performance and Payment Bond 
within ten days after receipt of Notice of Award. 

All prime bidders shall submit a fully completed Contractor's Qualification Statement 
on an original A1 A Form A305, 1986 Edition with the submission of their bid as stat- 
ed in the instructions to bidders, Failure to submit the completed Qualification 
Statement with iho bid will be cause for rejection of their bid. 
LOCATION OF BIDDING DOCUMENTS: 

Bidding Documents may be examined at the Architect's offico and at the following 
locations: 

lllowa Builders Exchange, Inc., P.O. Box 4930, Rock Island, Illinois 61204, 520 24th 
Street, Rock Island, Illinois 61201, Phone: 309-786-9260, FAX: 309-794-0568 
F.W. Dodge Corporation, 1411 Opus Place, Suite 100, Downers Grove, Illinois 

60515-1163, Phono: 708-971-6742. FAX: 708-968-291 9 
Dodge Reports, 1910 East Kimberly Road, Suite 13, Davenport, Iowa 52807. Phono: 

319-359-1316 
DODGE/SCAN, 5700 Broadmoor, Suite 100, Mission, Kansas 66202, 

Phone: 913-3B4-4900, FAX: 913-677-3709 
Minneapolis Builders Exchange, 1 123 Glenwood Avenue, Minneapolis, Minnesota 

55405, Phone: 612-377-9600, FAX: 612-377-3411 
Greater Peoria Contractors & Suppliers, P.O. Box 5727, Peoria, Illinois 61601, 512 

West Main, Peoria, Illinois 61606, Phone: 309-676-5710, Fax; 309-676-4825 
Sioux City Construction League. 1414 Jackson Street, Sioux City, Iowa 51 105, 

Phone: 712-255-9730, FAX: 712-255-3915 
Construction Market Data, 2400, East Devon, Suite 268. Des Plainos, Illinois 60018. 

Phone: 847-699-8640 
Lake County Contractors Association, 1312 Washington Street, Waukegan, Illinois, 

60085. Phono: 847-623-2345 
COPIES OF BIDDING DOCUMENTS- 

Prime bidders may obtain Bidding Documents from Brown Hoaloy Stono 4 Sauor. 
Architecture Planning Interior Design, Cedar Ropids, Iowa. Prime Bidders may obtain 
ono (1) set of Bidding Documents upon deposil of $50.00. Checks shall be payable 
to Brown Mealoy Slone & Sauer. 

Subbidders and suppliers may obtain sets or parts of sets and primo bidders addi- 
tional sets by paying the cost ol reproduction, and handling. 
RF.FUND OF DEPOSITS: 

Full refund of deposits will be made to prime bidders upon return of iho Documents 
in good condition to the Architect's office not later than 15 days otter bids are 
received. Postage and handling is not refundable; 
FORFEITURE O F DEPOSITS: 

Bidders who do not return the Documents within 15 days or in a usable condition will 
forfeit their deposit. Thero will bo no refund of reproduction costs paid to obtain sots 
or parts ol sets, but the Documents oro the property of the Architect and must be 
returned^ 

Although it is recognized lhat marking of drawings during the bidding process bene- 
fits both the Owner and the Contractor, this plan deposit will bo forfeited should the 
markings prevent effectives reuse of the drawings and specifications. It is recom- 
mended lhat such markings be done in c ra sabjo Pencil - 
FORM OF BID: 

Each bid shall be submitted on form provided by the Architect as set forth in the 
Instructions to Bidders, Section 00100. 

No Bidder may withdraw his Bid within 30 days of the dale ohhe Bid Opening. 
Published upon the order of Board ol Library Trustees of The Lake Villa Public Library 
District and dated January 15, 1998 
Lake Villa District Library 
901 Rollins Road 
Round Lake Beach, Illinois 60073 
End ol Section 

019BC-1525-GEN 
January 16. 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 

Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will bo received by (he Antioch Township 
Board ol Trustees for the sale of the following vehicle: 

1. 1992 Ford F-150 Custom with 46,891 miles, 6 cylinder Automatic Transmission 

Vehicle will be available for inspection during the day, Monday through Friday 
between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. at the Township Hall. 99 W. Rt. 173, 
Antioch, IL 60002. 

Bids shall bo addressod to Kathleen M. Smith, Township Clerk, and shall bo in her 
hands on or before February 12, 1998 at 7:30 p.m. at the Antioch Township Hall, 99 
W Rt. 173, Antioch. IL 60002. The Board of Trustees reserves the right to roject any 
and all bids, to waive any informalities in any bid and to accept any considered advan- 
tage to the Township of Antioch. 

This advertisement is made pursuant to iho direction of the Antioch Township 
Trustees on the 12 day of January 1998. 
Kathleen M. Smith 
Antioch Township Clerk 
January 9, 1998 

0198C-1522-GEN 
January 16. 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 

That on Feb. 16th, 1998 @ 9:00 a.m. a sale will be held at Northern Illinois Mack, 
Inc., 22570 Hwy. 60. Grayslako. IL 60030, to soil tho following article to enforco a lien 
existing under the laws ol the State of Illinois against such articles lor labor, sorvices, 
skill or material extended upon a storage furnished for such articles at the request of 
tho lollowing designated persons, unless such articles are redeemed within thirty 
days of tho publication of this notice. 



Name of Person/Co 
NOREX EXC. & TRENCHING 



Description of Articlo 

HEIL SEMI-DUMP TRAILER 

S/N# 20083 



Amount ol Uen 
S12.122.B3 

0I98C-1528-GL 
January 16, 1998 
January 23, 1998 
January 30, 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Between 

Successes 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 18627 
West Sterling CI., Gray slake, IL 
60030.(847)543-1051, 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Victoria Anderson, 18627 West 
Sterling CI., Grayslako, IL 60030. 
(847) 543-1051. 
STATE OF IUJNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify lhat the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
businoss from the location (s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
namo(s) of tho porson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting ihe business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/sATictoda Anderson, December 31, 
1997 

Tho forogolng Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 31st day of December, 1097. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Judith F. Smith 
Notary Public 
Received; December 31, 1997 
Wiliard R. Hofander 
Lako County Clerk 
0198B-I514-GL 
January 18, 1998 
January 23, 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Kessler 

Consulting 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
1299 Almadon Lano, Gurnee, IL 
60031, (847)263-4512. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
R.Benjamin Kessler, 1299 Almoden 
Lano. Gurnee, IL 60031, (847) 263- 
4512;MarlaK. Kessler, 1299 Almadon 
Lano. Gurnee, IL 60031, (847) 263- 
4512. 

STATE OF ILUNOI8 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

ThJs Is to certify thai the under- 
signed intcnd(s) to conduct the above 
named businoss from the location (s) 
indicated and that the truo or real full 
name(s) of )ho pofson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting tho business 
is/are correct as shown. 
/s/R. Benjamin Kessler, December 22, 
1997. 

/s/Marla Kessler, December 22, 1997, 
Tho foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before mo by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 22th day of December. 1997. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
Ava M. Wint 
Notary Public 
Rocch/od: December 23. 1997 
Wiliard R. Helandor 
Lako County Clerk 
0198A-1506GP 
January 16. 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 
PRIVATE FOUNDATION 
ANNUAL REPORT 
Pursuant lo Section 6104(d) of tho 
Internal Revenue Code, notice is here- 
by given thai tho annual report of the 
undersigned private foundation, is 
available for inspection at tho founda- 
tion's principal office during regular 
business hours upon request by any 
citizon within 180 days after the dato 
of this publication. 
Fiscal year ended Nov. 30, 1997. 
Tho Schroeder Foundation, 410 
North Michigan Ave., Room 590, 
Chicago, Illinois 60611. Principal 
Manager Charles E. Schroeder. 

0198C-1520-AN 
January 16. 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL 
Mundeleln Elementary School 
District 75 will be accepting RFP's for 
network wiring and hardware for 3 
schools (no) installation). Wiring and 
hardwaro specificalions may be 
oblainod on or after January 16, 1998: 
District 75 Ptiono U; 847-949-2700, 
FAX #: 847-949-2727 
Address: 330 N. California Ave.. 
Mundelein, IL 60060 
RFP submitted deadlino: January 26, 
1996 

019BC-1526-GEN 
January 16. 1998 



■'--;. 








January 16, 1998 




Lakeland Newspapers/ C 1 1 



STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA 
COUNTY OF AIKEN 
South Carolina Department 
of Social Services, 

Plaintiff, 

vs. 
Deniso Madigan and 
Robert White. 

AND 
Kyloigh Michelle Madigan, 
(DOB: 06-18-90), 

Defendants 



PUBUC NOTICE 



IN THE FAMILY COURT 
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 
97-DR-02-2350 



SUMMONS AND NOTICE 



TO DEFENDANT ROBERT WHITE: 

YOU 'ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the complaint for termi- 
nation of your parental rights In and to tho minor child in this action, the original of 
which has been filed in the Office of the Clerk of Court for Aiken County, on tho 7 day 
of November, 1997, a copy of which will be delivered to you upon request; and to 
servo a copy of your answer to tho complaint upon the undersigned attorney for the 
plaintiff at: Harlow Law Office, RA, P.O. Box B25. Aiken, South Carolina 29802 with- 
in thirty (30) days following the date of service upon you, exclusive of the day of such 
service; end if you fail to answer the complaint within the time stated, the plaintiff will 
apply for judgment by default against tho defendant for the relief demanded In the 
complaint 

South Carolina Department of Social Sorvices 

' /s/ Gregory P. Harlow, 

Attorney for plaintiff 

Harlow Law Office. PA 

Post Office Box 825 

Aiken, South Carolina 29802 

(803)642-1938 

Aiken, South Carolina 

December 5, 1997 

0198B-1513-WD 
January 16, 1998 
January 23, 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 

Tho Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations will conduci 
an accreditation survey of the Condell Acute Core Centers on February 16, 17 A 18. 
1998. The purpose of tho survoy will be to evaluate tho organization's compliance with 
nationally established Joint Commission standards. Tho survey results will be used to 
dotormino whether, and the conditions under which accreditation should be awarded 
tho organization. 

Joint Commission standards deal with organizational quality of care issues and the 
safety of the environment in which care is provided. Anyono believing that ho or she 
hads pertinent and valid information about such matters may request a public infor- 
mation Interview with the Joint Commission's field representatives at the timo of the 
survey. Information presented at tho interview will be carefully evaluated for relevance 
to the accreditation process. Requests for a public information interview must be 
mode in writing and should bo sent to the Joint Commission no later than five work- 
ing days before tho survoy begins. Tho request must also Indicate tho nature o( the 
information to bo provided at tho Interview. Such requests should be addressed to: 

Division of Accreditation Operations, Organization Liaison 

Joten Commission on AcCToditntroo ot Hontthcjuo Organizations 

1 Ronaistono* IWvd. 

Oakbrook Terrace, 1L 601 81 

Tho Joint Commission will acknowledge suet, requests in writing or by telephone 
and will inform tho organization of tho roquost lot any Interview. Trio organization will, 
in tur a notify iho interviowoo of the date, timo. and ptaco of tho mooting. 

TNs notice is pa s tod In accordance with tho Joint Commission's requirements. 

0198C-1516-GEN 
January 16, 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 
FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 3229P 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILUNOIS 
EASTERN DIVISION 
Norwest Mortgage, Inc., a California ) 

Corporation, ) 

Plaintiff. ) t 

) Case No. 97 C 4789 
VS. ) 

) Judge Eucklo 

William Keys, Theresa Keys, ) 

Defendants. ) 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OUR FILE NO. 32290 
(TT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 
OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 
Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement entered in the above enti- 
tled cause on Octo ber & 1997. 

I, Thomas Johnson & Tina Douglas, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
February 18, 1998 at the hour of 1 :30 p.m. at the front door of Lake County Court 
House, 18 North County Street, Waukegan, Illinois, sen to tho highest bidder for 
cash, the following described premises: 

Lot 7 In Resubdrvision of Lake County Gardens, Unit No. 4, a Subdivision of Part 
of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 5. Township 45 North. Range 12, East of the Third 
Principal Meridian According to tho Plat of the Resubdrvision Recorded May 28, 
1955 as Document 866901 in Book 33 of Plats, Pago 34, in Lake County, Illinois. 
cA/a 2628 North Elmwood Avenue, Waukegan, IL 60087 
Tax ID • 08-05-417-003 

Tho improvements on the property consist of single family dwelling. 
Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, certified 
funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to general taxes and to special assess- 
ments. 
The property will NOT be open for inspection. 
The judgment amount was $99,714.70. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser wilt receive a Certificate of Sate which 
will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a specified date unless the property is 
redeemed according to law. 

For Information can the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney, Fisher and Fisher, 30 
North LaSalle, Chicago. Illinois. (312) 372-4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under 
Illinois law, the Sates Officer is ogj required to provide additional information other 
than that sot forth in this Notice. 

(if Thomas Johnson & Tina Douglas 

Special Commissioner 

0198B-151O-GP 

January 16, 1998 

January 23, 1998 

January 30. 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
That on Feb. 16th, 1998 @ 9:00 a.m. a sale will be held at Northern Illinois Mack, 
Inc., 22570 Hwy 60. Grayslake. IL 60030, to sell the following article to enforce a lien 
existing under the laws of the State of Illinois against such articles for labor, services, 
skill or material extended upon a storage furnished for such articles at the request of 
the following designated persons, unless such articles are redeemed within thirty 
days ot tho publication ot this notice. 



Name ot Person/Co 
HOFFMAN HAUUNG 



Description ol Artcfo 
MACK RWS7B6LST 
S/N* RWS706LST5O669 



Amount ot Lion 
$14,198.39 

0198C-1527-GL 
January 16, 1998 
January 23, 1998 
January 30, 1998 




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*Grayslake, Illinois 60030 
*(847) 740-4035 



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January 16. 1998 



CLASSIFIED 




Lakeland Newspapers / C 1 3 




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Norfcn - IIO 

icnt ™ round ,.«». tuM, . ... ^^ xitM..^....! I) 

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lYiwruh '. 1 25 

AottKXH no 

Bunnell Per KKuli,...: US 

riruncU) , MO 



mjployment 



l4dpW»nt(d P*1-Tkr* 219 

llclpWinlctf rull-TIm 220 

troploymerU Afctnclej 221 

[hnlnciY Opportufitio ; .....225 

SJlwtlcm Wanted .......' 17a 

Child Cwe.. '. 240 

Sthoot/tintructJon 250 

Artiqpc* JOI 

Af^untn MH 

BiHtf/Tf»de 105 

Buun/Cntu J 10 

Bulking MjtcrUh ... JH 

fltninovOnite t<gi*pmert JIB 

lletlrantaATomptrfm 120 

Firm Gukx ................A.... .1... ,. J m 

firewood J2« 

Cir ly&ummiy: Siln 3 JO 

Good Thlnji to LU JJ< 

Hone* i. 1*1 —US 

IkxneMdCooA/rornflure ....J40 

JO*t*Jf I.ltl (I ....... ......*.-t.. ...... ...... .........J*" 

IwvCirden .348 

Mntcttjncouf J 50 

Mcdol tojitp/Supplio JS4 

MuwjI Imtrumenti JS3 

ftUdSufifJio J60 

Rrttlufint EoijlptTiCiK -J64 

loolt 4 MuNnerjr... .....J6A 

VVwtleil To Bur J70 



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Horxri Tor Sate 

Hornet For Ktr.i 

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BuiiiCH Property To* Sale SJ4 

Ekiunni Property Tor (ton " SJ5 

InveUrwnt Ptoperl/ , S40 

Mortice Senkn... 544 

FVm* ; $48 

Vk*« lriu'Acinr,e 560 

RnortWKitlort Rcntih. ', „„.„ ,.,,„.,. S64 

Ovt of Aia Propcrt/ SM 

Cemtltfjf lott $70 

R«l EU.M Wjtned , .574 

Rcit Fujic M>k S7« 

^Recreational 

Rtcinliorul \thtck-l . 704 

SrtmwTwWci.'Am 70S 

BaitVMcrfOfvtlc , 710 

Camping ...714 

TfJwvVnjtion 718 

Sporti Iquipmrrd 720 

A*pUw 724 



reimportation 



Ciri Tor 5* 804 

RrtxUcwi _ 808 

CLmWAnUjve 0*v 810 

SmKeaParU 814 

Cv lowiulnwtance 818 

V>n$ .... 824 

row WSerl t>ht/|erpi .... 828 

Truciv/TtiiSm 8J4 

lk*y toju»pment , ..i. 8J8 

Motoajtlo 844 

KVtfnJToBuy 848 




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Apphmcn RfpJit S0J 

Btxlfcv 506 

BuJdcri S07 

Cxpcnty ....SI 2 

C» pet Cleaning 515 

Cotxtrte/ConcTtt ,.SI8 

D)/WaH S2I 

t djouoiYlmUuciion ....S24 

L leiuKil ...... ........... a...... ..•>*•• ...J*/ 

firewood SJO 

(UnOtmin , SJ J 

Hcjti'r-f,'^i Cond.lkv-.wir, SHi 

IlouxLccplng SJ9 

I jrVv j-».-if, , , , , ,....542 

lajudij/ClearUnj ._ S4S 

legal Scr*ei .'. S48 

MrdtulSctvKn SSI 

Mowrg/Stonge SS4 

I'jinlirg/Oeeoraling S57 

PinlegilTjptng Servkn S60 

Plumbing , S6J 

Pool* -SW 

Ptnwre Wnhlng .-$69 

rWcsikxul ScriKO S'2 

FUJlo/TV Repair. S75 

Remodeling S78 

Rfiumet SH 

Roofing/Siding S84 

5lorage J.; 587 

Tai Servkc S90 

TrecVPUAlt ....5) J 

VVrddjtg ,....,.., S9& 

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Kenosha 
County 



Kenoiha 




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CLASSIFIED AD 

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Lakeland Newspapers Classifieds Appear in i I Newspapers! 

Anlioch News • Round Lake News • Lake Villa Record 

Mundelein News • Wadsworth News • Grayslake Times 

Fox Lake Press • Gurnce Press • Lindenhurst News 

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IN 30 S. Whitney Si. 
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BY FAX...(847) 223-8810 



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Penonals 



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ERRORS: 

Wc «riw (o eliminate 

crrot », bill If one should 

occur, please report U 

immediately at wc can 

be responsible for the 

first two (2) weeks only. 

NO ADJUSTMENTS CAN 

BE MADE UNLESS THEY 

AFFECT THE MATERIAL 

VALUE OF AN AD. 



A WONDERFUL EXPERI- 
ENCE. SCANDINAVIAN. 
GERMAN. EUROPEAN, 
SOUTH AMERICAN. ASIAN, 
RUSSIAN EXCHANGE STUD- 
ENTS ATTENDING HIGH 
SCHOOL, BECOME A HOST 
FAMILY/AISE. CALL 1-OCO-SI- 
BUNG. WWW.SIBUNG.ORG 

COLLOIDAL MINERALS 
OF the typo described on 
"Dead Doctors Donl Lie* tapo. 
Diroct from the Clark Mine. No 
membership. $tl.95/quart, 
sold in gallons, t -600-470- 
6638. 

DIET MAGIC 
Loso up to 3016s. 
30 day programs. 

Start at $30. 
(815)675-9237 
leave message. 

DRESS YOUR KIDS 

FOR FREE H 

YES FOR FREE H 

To get your information 

' packet for only $9.95 

Call Toll Free 

t 888-356-1 979. 

HYPNOTHERAPY 

•Loso Weight 

'Stop Stress 

•Stop Smoking 

•Much-Much More! 

Single or group visits 

available. Learn to relax and 

enjoy your Mo lo its fullest. 

The Conior for Habit 

Control. 

David E. Wold 

Mister Hypnotherapist. 

(847) 816-4951. 

IF YOU HAVE 

FURNITURE TO SELL, 

A car, of appliances, If 

you aro having a Garage 

Solo or If you havo a 

house to Mil or apartment 

to rent. 

Call Lisa beforo 10am 

Wednesday to place 

your ad here. 

(B47) 223-8181 

ext. 140. 

KARAOKE D J 

FOR HIRE) 

Great for businesses, parties, 

any occasions. 

Excellent quality. 

Very reasonably priced. 

(847) 263-3887. 



ROUND LAKE 

HIOH SCHOOL 

CLASS OF 1 083 

10 Years Is almost upll 

It's nearing reunion time... but 

wo need some help wtui 

addresses. Please help us 

and spread the word!! 

Send your name {including 

maiden name), your address 

and friend's addresses and 

phone numbers to: " 

RLHS Class Of *88 

Reunion Committee 

c/o Cindy ( Voiling) Btue. 

1415 Coral Reef Way, 

Lake Zurich. ID. 60047. 



WRITE FOR YOUI 

•X-Mas Cards 

* Wedding Invitations 

•Shower/Party Invitations. 

•Handwritten. 

* Reasonable rates. 

Call (815) 363-5330. 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 
FREEJGtVEAWAY COL- 
UMN. For more information, 
please contact the Humane 
Society. 

ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING7? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad in the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are run at NO 
CHARGE! (We discourage 
any pet ads). Deadlines; 10am 
Wednesdays. (847) 

223-8161. Bit 140. 



125 


Personals 



Surrogate 

Mothers Wanted 

Fee plus exftenscs for 
carrying a couple's 

chili!. Musi be 
18-35 and previously 

had a child. 

Sieven Litz, Attorney 

(317) 996-2000 



HEALTHY WOMEN 

Excellent Compensation 
Healthy women 33 and under 
and with a history of previous 
pregnancy needed lo serve a 
anonymous egg donors. Donors 
will be required lo tale medica- 
tion, blood screening and under- 
go minor surgical procedure. 
Substantial compensation will 
be given. If interested call ARR, 
773-317-73 IS. 
Serious inquiries only. 



115 



Lost & Found 



FOUND YELLOW PARA- 
KEET, Thursday 1/8/98. 
Loon Lake Area. (847) 
B38-4134. 

DID YOU FIND Somoones 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakeland Newapapors 
Classifieds Dcpt., ana get your 
results, FOUND ada are 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
(847)223-8161. 



A BABY DESIRED 
ADOPTION 
We're an energetic couple, 
married 6 years and still best 
friends! We will surround your 
baby with love and laughter, 
family and friends, security 
and a bright future. Well help 
.you any way wa caa 

Ploasu Call SUE & GREG 
1-800-525-8397. 

ADOPTION AFTER 
YEARS of infertility, our 
dreams and hopes turned to 
adoption. Wo longed lor a 
baby to guide, comfort and 
love. We both work In the fami- 
ly business, but Marie plans to 
stay homo with the baby. Well 
help you in any way wo can. 
Call Marie and Greg 1-800- 
456-1775. 

ADOPTION IS LOVE 
Happy Family with adopted 3 
yoar old daughter wants to 
shower a new baby with love. 
Artistic full-time mom, athletic 
lawyer dad, and a sister to 
play with. Friends on the 
swingset. trips to the zoo, 
grandma, play groups, lulla- 
bies, too. This is a home 
where wishes come true. We'd 
bke to get to know you. Call 
Shawn 4 Meg 800-767-4257 
Legat/Medical/Allowablo ex- 
penses paid. 

ADOPTION: A BABY IS 

OUR DREAM! Happy couple 
(30's) want to share love, 
laughter, lifo's finest with baby. 
Call Katie and Adam. 1-800- 
820-6105. LegaL'Expenses. 

ADOPTION: WE CAN give 
your baby love, laughter and a 
secure future. Expenses paid. 
Please call Mark and LuAnn at 
1^00-662-0886. 

DRUMMER WANTED 

STYLES-Punk, Metal, Hard- 
core. Must live in Lake County 
Area. High School Band. Cat! 
Jeff (847) 356-4384, Antonio 
PM7) 356-0517. 



A #1 FAT BURNER Loose 
weight, feel great Jump start 
the new year. Free sample. 
(847) 263-9868. 



LOVE CANDLES? LOOK- 
ING for new homo decora- 
tions? Would you like lo get 
mem for free? Call me and ask 
me how. (847) 263-5009. 



PLEASE HELP US 

ADOPT. WE NEED YOUtl 
Our hear', aches for a child. 
For 6yrs. weVe dreamed of 
becoming patents. Now, 
through Adoption and the Mir- 
ade only you can make hap- 
pen, we pray you'll provide us 
with the solution. We promise 
to give unconditional love, 
laughter and dreams to your 
child. Medical, legal, counsel- 
ing and court approved Irving 
expenses paid. Confidential. 
Please call our attorney at 
(708) 957-6835. 



THE SOLUTION TO 
YOUR NEW YEARS 

RESOLUTION!! 

LOSE WEIGHT the 

HEALTHY way-We DID! 

30 day SSS-back 

guarantee. 

Natural! 

Dr. Recommended I 

Call Melody 

(847) 548-4191 

Independent 

Horballfe 

DISTRIBUTOR. 



HOUSE CLEANING! 

Residential Houses! 

Daytime, flexible hours. 

Good salary. 

(647)487-1155. 



PT COUNSELOR 

NICASA has a 

position available for a 

bilingual (Spanish) 
counselor certified In 

substance abuse 

treatment for high risk 

groups. Groups would 

meet on week nights 

and/or Saturdays for 

approximately 6 hours. 

Send/fax resume to 

NICASA, c/o Anne 

Splctt, 31979 N. Fish 

Lake Road, Ftound 

Lake, IL 60073. 

FX 847-546-6760 



140 


Fuuncal 



"FAST LOANS" HOME- 
OWNERS 520.000$ 100.000 
cash for any reason Consoli- 
date bills. 125% of homes val- 
ue. No equity needed. Simple 
phono application Nothing out 
of pocket. No obligation Oont 
delay. IMCC Financial is an Illi- 
nois Residential Mortgage Li- 
censee. 1-800-948-0514. 

BANKRUPTCY $79* E-Z 
file system stops creditors/gar- 
nishments. Guaranteed valid. 
Ends debt/credit card slavery. 
Divorce Si 29+ Fast, cour- 
teous service. FreshStart 
America 1-888-395-8030 toll 
free. 



iHi i imi i iii imm m i inu i 

FREE CASH GRANTS! 

| College. Scholarships. 
Business. Medical Bills. 
[ Never Repay. Toll Free 
1S0O-218-90Q0 
Ext. G-11634 

liiiiiiinininiinmnwiii 



Mown 

PART-TIME 
CHICAGO AMD 

SUHROUNDIHG 
AREAS 

An coportunrty exists with the 
Proctor & Gamble Cosmetic 4 
Fragrance Products Division. 
The primary job rcsporufolitjes 
mc!ude the in&af and ongoing 
resets for the Cover Girl and 
Max Factor outlets. Thrs is a 
great opportunity for people re- 
entering the work force. Prior 
retail merchandising experi- 
ence is preferred. 

• Independence & Flexible 
Work Schedule 

• Candidates Must Be 
Available At Least 3 Fu9 

Days Per Week 

• Good Hourly Pay. 
$9 Per Hour 

• Drive tbur Own Car 

(we reimburse) 

• Valid Drivers License 

• Prool 01 Insurance 
Please write/send resume lo: 

PROCTOR & GAMBLE 

Cosmetic Division 

Attn: Recruiting Specialist 

REF #008A. Mall Slop 2B 

11050 York Road' 
Hunt Valley, MD 21 030-2098 

Equal Opportunity t'mpfoyw 



■ 
...» 






C 1 4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 16. 1998 









!. 









219 



Help Wanted 
Part Time 



219 



HdpWunicd 
Part-Time 



INVENTORY TAKERS 

Call now to work to 

pay those bills that 

will arrive! 

Regular Part-Time 

Excellent Second 
- Income 

$7.50/hr. to start. 

Call RGIS Inventory 

(847)662-9277 

EOE 



aft/ 



For Nights 
& Weekends. 
Must have own trans- 
portation. S6.50/hr to 
start. Bonoflts avail- 
able. Apply In person: 
StoU OU Co*HftM*f 

'tfatAtouje. and Vc/axy 

(f<?7) 336-7060 



M I I II MMM W ««M * 



ll MH«M «4 «Hlt* II HI 



Part Time 

DENTAL 
ASSISTANT 

20-30 hrs. per week 

MON-THURS 
Busy, fun, orthodon- 
tic group needs 
enthusiastic assis- 
tants looking for a 
rewarding career 
w/ great potential for 
personal & profes- 
sional growth. 

847-223-2876 



I 



I HOUSEKEEPING 

jVinoity VtVi CoMiMjisr, Gist 
CiVis h UstJiNk'itsi Ins k lluiliti 
[wri iim[ t|%y amJ f\iMif, Imr 

pfftilKK AVAll«>l( \t OIK I KK.-S4 k( f j>- 

iv/tiMh iIi|hkimisis II lis fiosiik/t 
is iliyf.sid io Mill >(*» |»rvaaI 
Mids i* nil HimIiIi liotm iIi.m 

hlll'ltl IMk'V OlIllR ttllllMl 
JPWSKW |Xpfrf|NC( Is iSSllJUIK/i- 

i*l/l»spii*l Ikh-siIiiims^ is pRi- 

llmiil 

i 

Wt (kaakJi *s iuiIIim s.\l*By nvlj 
IxmIiis Pluv Apjily i\ [««*■, r»| 

iCAll: 

847-J56-5900 
i VICTORY LAKES 

I CoMiNuiNr, One CtNirn 

IO&5T. Ch.wIAh 
j ItsdiNkftM, |L oO046 

Lk* J<';i<hiiMik U'ji^u MJ 



MEDIA MANAGEMENT 
CLERK 

9-1/2 Month Position (4 Hour Day) \ 

Duties include scheduling, operation of nudio/visunlj 
equipment nnd performing clerical tasks for thu 
A.V. Dept. Applicant must hove strong computer, 
communications, and interpersonal skills. 



Please apply lo Bill Chnpin, 
Director of Kduc. Technology, 

Warren Township High School, 
r.00 N. O'Ploine Road, 
Gurnce, IL60031-268G 
by January 21, 1998. 





#5 an Hour? 

Doing What? 

Stuffing 

Envelopes? 

NO!... 

Wc Just need you to 

referee a couple of 

charity basketball games 

on the border of Gumee 

on Grand Ave. between 

Feb. 12 to Apr. 30. Call 

Brendan O'Neill 

at 223-8161 x132 

JMMBjAmVS 

Games will be played on 
Thursday between 7-9pm and 
Sunday between 12- 2pm 
at Oakwood 



■HaaaaaaaauaaaaHaaBaHaaaHaaauaaaaaaHaiiaaB 

| Get an "A" Sor Success!! 



ITAKE THIS QUIZ! 

a 

Si . Do you like to earn money? 

g 2. Do you like people? 

|j 3. Do you have a pleasant phone voice? 

| 4. Do you want part-time work in a 

g friendly environment? 

g If you answered yes to any or all of theg 
I above; you can start earning dollars 
8 plus commission in LAKELAND'S 
Client Services Department. 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



""*'""--— "---—"-"— — ii 



EMTC 

Work Part 

Time and Barn 

Full Time Pay. 

Call (847) 

949-5660 



Hiiiiiiii i ii ii ii i i nun 



EHXSCSS 

Short Hours, JUG 

Rewards. Earn up 

to $500 per week 

part-time.. 

Flexible hours. 

Call 
Matt Walsh at 
(847) 427-4412 






PT SOCIAL SERVICE 
NICASA has a position 

available for an 

enthusiastic self starter 

lo assist in a diversionary 

program for adolescents. 

Approx. 10 hrs. per 

week. Requirements: 

Degree in criminal 

justice, substance abuse 

or related field and 1-2 

years experience. 

Send resume lo 

NICASA, c/o Julie 

Sell warzbach, 31979 N. 

Fish Lake ltd. Round 

Lake. IL 60073 



r n 

\Vatl-Timt | 

MEDICAL 
\ RECEPTIONIST I 

jl'or our Gurnec center, j 
■ Part-time position for an I 
j organized individual in our J 
laut-paiicnl Physical I 

J Therapy clinic. ( 

I Competitive salary. Must I 
I he able lo work in a fast | 
'paced environment, 

i Contact Ellen Hughes i 

i HEALTHSOUTH | 

Sports Medicine & 
J Rehabilitation Center J 

J 4343 Grand Ave. Sic 119 j 

I Gurnec, I L 60031 i 

■ I 

PHONE 630-655-8785 ■ 

FAX 630-655-2759 

I I 

I Pre-Employment Credit I 

Check Required 



u 
a 

a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 

a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 



a 

| Please send letter of interest to: 
| Attn: Maureen Combs 

a 



c/o Lakeland Publishers 
| P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 § 

i or fax to 1 

I (847) 223-8810 | 

a a 

BaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaauaaaaB 



Earn a 

Minimum of 

$10.00/hr. 

Wc are looking 
for outgoing 
aggressive indi- 
viduals with pre- 
vious telemarket- 
ing/customer ser- 
vice experience 
for outbound 
Sales Clerk. 

Mon-Thurs late 
afternoon & 

evenings base 
rate plus gener- 
ous commissions. 

Call Sue for 
more info at: 
(847) 740-4035 



219 



Help Wanted 

part-Time- 



Pampered Chef 

needs more consultants 
to demonstrate quality 
kitchen tools at home 
kitchen shows. Average 
$!5/$20 hour commis- 
sion. No experience 
necessary. Call Linda 
(847)249-1015 



SSS5SSSSSSSS5SSSSSS 

t PERSONAL 

I HOUSEKEEPERS 
I Perm, part-time. Earn 



$8-10+/Hr. Mornings 

and/or afternoons. 

Adv. Opp. 

Car/Vac rcq. 

(847) 361-8771 or 

* (847)487-8771 

ssssssssssssssssss 



DOOGY 

DAYCARE 

PART TIME HELP 

Flexible Hours, AM/I'M 

Shifts. Must have 
! experience with 

Dogs... 
1 Contact: KathylKris^ 

(847) 566-1960< 

)OOooooonoo(JC 



OFFICE 
ASSISTANT 

FAKT-TIME 

Office Assistant to 

answer phones aixl a 

variety of office duties. 

Flexible hours. 

Call (847) 816-1160 

Contact: Marlcitc 



DEHTAL ASSIST AHT7 
ORAL SURGERY OFFICE 

Part lime position. 

General denial or 

surgery experience. 

Compel itivc salary. 

Calljill 
(847) 623-3794 



r 






I 



call or Apply at: 

131 McKinley 
Lake Villa, IL 

60046 



PART TIME 
INSURANCE 

1 CLERK/RECEPTIONIST 

2 For busy Medical 
■ Office to perform 

various office 

duties. M, T, 

Th, F lpm-6pm, 

mil train. 

S Call: 

■ (S47) 587-6333 

I Between 10am - 6pm 

j , i i i , i 1 1 1 I hi ■ i j . i ji t i > ri k 1 1 1 I 

GENERAL 

OFFICE 
ASSISTANT 

Part Time, Flexible 

WC Twining Systems, a 
Buffalo Grove, II. -based 
company is seeking part- 
time General Office 
Assistant for sales assis- 
tance, data entry and lit- 
erature fulfillment. 
Competitive wages, flexi- 
ble scheduling. Ideal for 
moms! Call for more 
information 047-008- 
4000,0X1.4041. 

hnurriiiiiniilliiiiiiliiiii' 




Help Wanted 

Full-Tlme 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Immediate Opening 
for Part Time 

Bookkeeper 

for Fox Lake 

Law Office. 

€cniacl Mary at 

<847> 587-2551 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuU-Time 



EASY WORKI 

NO EXPERIENCE 

$500-$1,000 part-time ot 

home stuffing onvolopos. 

For freo information send 

soil- addressed, 

stamped envelope: 

R8J Enlorprisos 
Mailing Services, Inc. 

P.O. f^ox 402 
Inglosldo, III. 60041. 

CALLING ALL LAKE 
COUNTY MOMSIII Bright 
Beginnings Family Day Care 
Notwotk is looking for nurtur- 
ing, responsible, creative indi- 
viduals who would liko to start 
their own business wnilo stay- 
ing homo with their children. K 
you live in Lnko Villa, Linden- 
hurst, Gurnoo, Grayslake or 
Round Lake and would liko as- 
sistance In getting licensed, 
ongoing technical assistance, 
and child rotorrals, this pro- 
gram is tor you. For moro infor- 
mation on how to become a 
quality Infant and toddler day 
caro provider In your homo, 
call Dona Thompson (B47) 
356-4112. 



DRIVER OTR TOP Miles 
Top Pay Leader In Mtlos for 
Five Years Running. COVEN- 
ANT TRANSPORT 1 -800-441 • 
4394 Experienced drivers and 
Owner Operators 1-800-338- 
4394 Graduate Students Bud 
Moyor Refrigerated Truck 
Lino Solo Drivers and Conlrac- 
lorsl -BBS 607-3729. 

DRIVER: UP TO 35c/mi. to 
start. Up to S7O0Avock orienta- 
tion pay. Groat homo time/as- 
signed, all conventional float, 
O/O's welcome, Boyd Bros. 
800-543-8923. EOE. 



yWCA SCHOOL 

AGE PROGRAM 

Immediate Openings for 

Teachers L Assistants. 
Full t. Pari Time Positions. 

Excellent salary t, bene- 
fits. Experience/qualifica- 
tions required. Please call: 

(847) 662-4624 

EOE 




TELEMARKETERS 
& CUSTOMER 
SERVICE REPS 

ARE YOU 
LOOKING FOR... 

F/T, P/T FLEXIBLE 
HOURS? 

A PROFESSIONAL, 

FUN CROWING 

ORGANIZATION? 

CDW Compulcr Cenicri. Inc. 
an olfcr you ill thai AND 
MORE! We're wtking nulgo- 
ing individiuU with cuxllcnl 
>fihal atmmunicaiiun skills in 
be a part (if our new televcr- 
vices team. You will be con- 
tacting cxi&ling A potential 
C[)W cuvlomcr* (busine-wes) 
to gather maikclin g data. These 
positiuns offer hourly rales 
(MH-S12) and monthly bonus- 
es as well as scheduling lo 
meet your needs. I nil lime 
bcnefin available, NO SF.U.- 
ING REQUIRED! 

Stop by today to complete an 
application or forward your 
resume/lcilcr of interest to: 

COW Compute* 

C Em tens. Inc. 

Attn: IIR Reckuiieh 

200 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

Vi.KNOsllit.t.s I1.W>061 

LFAX: 847-465-385H 
ROE 



DRIVERS...OWNER OP- 
ERATORS, START your 
Now Year olf with Wostway 
Express • Guaranteed 10K 
miles. Great bonofits & more. 
Call AJ at B00-321-9734. 
www.wwexpress.com 

DRIVERS: COMPANY 
DRIVERS/OWNER Ops. 
$500-$ 1000 Sign on Bonus. 
Van, flatbed, dedicated. Sin- 
gles or Teams. No experi- 
ence? No problem. Training 
available. Builders Transport. 
1-8O0-762-1B19. 

HIRING EXPERIENCED & 
INEXPERIENCED DRIV- 
ERSI Training a Trainee Pay 
Available. Regional. OTR, 
Dodicatod Runs. Excellent 
Pay and Benefits. Assigned 
Equipment. Swill Transporta- 
tion. 1-800-331-7221 (COO- 
nVT) 

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS: 
REFRIGERATED carrier is 
seeking experienced drivers 
for our Midwest and West 
Coast traffic lanes. Wo offer: 
Competitive pay (practical ro- 
ute}, No east coast, Into model 
oqufpmont, Hazmot not re- 
quired, Health and lifo In- 
surance and much more. Coil 
our recruiters loday 800-247- 
1010 (Teams welcome). 

DRIVER: 100% NO- 
TOUCH froight. Groat 
Poy/Benofits. Regional or 
OTR. 23 with CDL-A, Haz-Mat. 
6-months oxporionco. Start 
immediately! 0/0's Wolcomol 
LANDSTAR/POOLE 888- 
662-5037. 

DRIVER SOLO/INDEPEN- 
DENT CONTRACTOR 
CRST .8tc a mile. Great miles 
Baso Plates PAID) Permits 
PAID! Fuol Taxes PAIDI Call 
Bob or Tami at: 1-800-553- 
2778. 

ARE YOU SATISFIED with 
your current income? Are your 
goals being mot? If not and 
you have a burning desire for 
success, are teachable, and 
will follow our provon market- 
ing system, wo'ro prepared to 
commit our oxporionco lo your 
succoss Wo offor full training, 
4 day work week, largo first 
yoar Incomo potential, $2- 
$4,000 first month qualified 
draw. Overnight travel ro- 
quired. To nr range o confiden- 
tial interview call 800-395- 
9690. 



DRIVERS - ILLINOIS DOM- 
ICILE - $2000.00 SIGN ON 
BONUS. HOME EVERY 7-10 
DAYS. REGIONAL OPPOR- 
TUNITIES. PAY UP TO 
35CPM MEDICAL/DENTAL - 
401 K - PAID VACATION • 
RIDER PROGRAM, Ohio's lar- 
gest refrigerated carriers is 
looking for drivers w/HAZMAT 
& 9 months recent OTR ex- 
perience CALL DAVE OR 
USA 614-876-4008 or 800- 
927-0431. EOE. 

DRIVERS . TAKE HOME 
MORE., .BE HOME MORE 
Company drivers - Roehl, your 
local Wisconsin carrier, has a 
lop 10 pay package per the 
National Survey of drivers. 
Great homo timo. CUT training 
avails bio. Owner Operators • 
New program • Excellent in- 
surance, discount fuel, 2500+ 
milesAvook. Solo or team, 
G5% no touch, 48753' van or 
flatbed. Talk lo our drivers 1- 
600-467-6345. 

JOB OPENINGS WILL train 
in electronics, aviation me- 
chanics, other loebrvcat fields. 
No experience necessary. 
Ages 17-34. Paid rotocaikxi, 
Call lotl freo. 1-800-4C9-62B9. 

OWNER OPERATORS 
Daily Express, a specialized 
flat bod earner offers paid car- 
go/liability insurance, pakl par- 
mits, excellent rates witn co. 
traitors. Requires I.Syr. OTR 
experience 4 clean MVR. 800- 
669-64 1 4/800-788-5 1 88. 

PET CAREI ENERGETIC 
dependable person, various 
duiies involving pots. Must be 
flexible and available 7 
days/wook including wee- 
kends and holidays. Call only 
boiweon 10am-5pm. Monday- 
Friday. Shel-Ray Pot Shalet 
(414)857-2163. 

UCENSED UF E & HEALTH 
AGENT NEEDED. Quality pro- 
ducts, high commissions with 
advance before issuo and 
bonofits. (Must qualify for ad- 
vances & benefits) Call: 1-800- 
252-2581. 

DRIVER/OWNER OPERA- 
TORS...FREE 

PLATES/PEPUrrS. No up 
front moooy roqutrod. Dry Van 
& Flatbed. Groat lease oppor- 
tunity. Anderson Trucking 
Service. 800-241-8787. 



TRAVEL AGENT 

FT & PT experienced Sabre 
agents for growing Lake 
Bluff agency. Hours and Ik 
flexible, ail 847-295-810X1 
or fax 847-295-3960 



P6STAL MBS 

Start S14.08/7H. plus 

benefits. For exam and 

application info, call 

800-280-9769 

Ext. IL195.8am-10pm. 

7 days. 




SUBSTITUTE 
DIRECTORY 

The following schools need 
substitutes on a continuing basis, please contact 
the names listed below for further information. 

Antloch Community High School District 0117 
1133 Main St., Antioch, II. 60002 

Contact: Marie (847) 395-1421 x224 

Aptaklsic • Tripp School District # 102 
231 Weiland Rd, Buffalo Grow, 11.60089 

Contact: Laurel Karolaak (847) 634-5338 

Grayslake School District » 16 
450 N. Barron HlwI., Grayslake, 11.60030 

Contact; Jan Fabry. (847) 223-3540 xl 100 

Grass Like School District #36 
26177 W. Grass Like Road, Anlioch, 11.60002 

Contact: Pal Reed or Sue (847) 395-1550 

Hawthorn School District 73 

201 Hawthorn Parkway, Vernon Hills, Il.6006l 

Contact: Mary Tell (847) 367-3279 

Lake Bluff School District #65 
121 E. Sheridan PI., Like Bluff, IL 60044 

Contact: Jean Kxt: 14 (847) 234-9400 

Lake Villa School District #41 
131 McKinley, Lake Villa, 11,60046 

Contact: Kathy (8-17) 356-2385 

Mundelcin School District #75 
330 N. California, Mundelein, II. 6OO6O 

Omtact: lois Fine (847) 949-2700 

Round l,akc Area Schools 

316 S. Roicdale Ct., Round Late; II. 60073 

Contact: Maureen (847) 546-5522 x 3010 






January 16. 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C1 5 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Time 



GREAT WAGES & BENEFITS. 
HIRING BONUS. 

PLEASE APPLY AT 

- GURNEE MILLS 

CINDY 847-855-9956 

-ZiON, 1311 2 1ST ST, 

(Across from Jewel) 
CINDY 847-746-5350 



220 



Kelp Wanted 
Full-Time 



DATA ENTRY/ 
CUSTOMER SERVICE 

North Chicago Scholarship 
Research Firm seeks experi- 
enced DATA ENTRY LEAD 
OPERATOR-FullTime (Mon- 
Fri) & Full & Part-time CUS- 
TOMER SERVICE REPRE- 
SENTATIVE (Mon.-Frl). 
Salary Commensurate with 
experience. 

Apply (n Person: 
FartWSE.COM, LLC 

2550 Commonwealth Ave. 
North Chicago, Illinois 

Or call 
(847) 
785-8000 
ext.200 




220 



Help Wanted 
Rill-Time 



I beat -nin cold sNowir ; 

flmmcd Openings. Join thej 
\ FORD/TOYOTA dealership J 
;fo the Caribbean! VAMPtJ 
f MOTORS LTD on the beauti- ', 
J fuj iitond of Grand Cayman j 
j needs the following: 'Ccrt'd? 
j ncctrical & Air Conditioning! 
/Tech: min 2 yrs cxp.j 

r 4 

J Tnuumusion Tech: min 3r 
iyn exp w/ ability to repair} 
Jail types of . transmissions. \ 
/Write to: General Mgr.j 
JVampI Motors Ud, FOBoxJ 
jG86, Georgetown, Grand J 
JCaymcn BWI; 345-349- \ 
\ 2245; Fax 345-349-Z2Z4. J 



220 



Hdp Wanted 
Pull-Time 



USE YOUR XHUYWdflf) 
VISION TO SEE A FUTURE 

CAREER WTTrL 

COMPttl MIMICAL OXTER 
has full-time and/or part-time 
Rad Tech positions open at 
CondeH'i Acute Care Centers 
in Gumee and Round Lake. 
We arc looking for full-time 
ancVor part-time rad lechs to 
work various hours including 
rotating weekends. The appro- 

Iprrate candidate will be flexi- 
ble, AART and IDNS licensed, 
certification in mammography 
is desirable. 

Qualified candidates may coo- 
tact CondtH Melted tutor. 
30*3 Cleveland Ave,, 
Ubertyvillc in person between 
9:00 am and 3:30 ptn &47- 
362-2905 ext 5238 or by tax 
alB47-91B-83OT.EOE. 



220 



IlclpWanjod 

Full-Tune 



220 



Hdp Wanted 
Full-Time 



SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS 

I Full/Part-Time Tellers I 

| Anchor Bank, an independent commu-| 
s nity bank, has immediate openings for s 
| experienced tellers. We are offering a| 
s flexible work schedule along with as 
| competitive salary. Part-time day shifts f 
s available. Perfect for individuals withs 
| children in school. Recent teller or s 
| banking experience preferred. Cash| 
s handling and customer service 
| skills required. 



Please contact 
Scott Hamerat 
(847) 548-3000 
or apply in person. 



s 
s 
s 

S 

s 

s 

SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS 




CuUanw S*vr« 



• : 



Order Processors & 
Customer Semite Reps 



Direct Placement 

$ 25K/VEAR 



Moore" Document-Solutions is in need ol full-time 



Processors and Customer Service reps in U....V.. 



Moore olfers'excellenl benelits package including 
401 K. tuition reimbursement, mpdical. dental, life. 
vision and much" more. Fax resumes to Shannon. 
al B47-362-226B or call 847-367-1183 lor 
Moore Intel ■■..'■ 



tSj 



Kaiy 

. SERVICES 

Never an applicant fee. 
An Equal Opportunity Employer. 



INSIDE SALES 

Do you enjoy variety? Do yon enjoy a 
challenge? -Do you thrive in a fast 
paced, dynamic environment? If so, 
you could be the person we're looking 
fori 

Lakeland Newspapers is seeking IJie 
right person to Join our exciting Sides 
Department. You will be a success if 
you possess good organizational skills, 
communication skills, and arc self- 
motivated. If you ore looking for u 
rewarding career, Investigate tills posi- 
tion today! 

Please fax or mail resume to 
Attn: Maureen Combs 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 

PO. Box 268 
Grayslakc, TL 60030 
(8*7) 223-8810 



raphic 
'esigner 



We're looking for a 

"graphic designer" lo join our team. 

Do you have experience with 

computers and graphic design 

programs? ir you do, 

then we can teach you the 

rest in this entry level position. 

[Send your resume to NFAL TUCKER at: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 
Grayslake,IL 60030 
or fax to 223-8810 



f. ■ 



CUSTOMER SERVICE 



♦ 

•*• 

♦J* 
•J* 
%♦ 



•5* 



PC TECHNICIAN 

BS in Computer Science or related field or equivalent 
business experience required. Must be strong trou- 
bleshooler. 



St 



TELEMARKETERS - PART TIME 

_ S7.50/hr. + bonus. 15-19 hours/wk. {flexible hours). 
& Invokes taking customer surveys and requires no cold 
v calling. 



♦*♦ 

♦♦* 

♦.♦ 
♦♦♦ 

*> 



SECRETARY 

Requires strong customer service and verbal communi 
cation skilLs, typinq 40 wpm; Excel experience a must, 






**♦ 



♦*♦ 
st 

♦♦♦ 

♦♦• 
*»♦ 

♦*♦ 

♦ 



jj* Word and Power Point experience preferred, ability to jjij 
*l* work in a deadline environment, and excellent organi- ♦♦♦ 

S minnal <lilk « 






*♦* 
>• 

%♦ 
g 



*♦♦ 
••* 

I 



♦•* 

**♦ 
♦♦♦ 

♦•* 

X 

service g 



PROCESSING SPECIALIST 

Requires 10-key by touch, typing 40 wpm, organiza 
tional/communication skills and customer 
background. 

Wc provide an environment where your efforts count ♦§ 
and offer competitive salaries and excellent benefits. w£ 

>t For consideration call (800) 323-5771 exl 668 or fax Z?l 

:♦: your resume to (847) 948-1186 

WESTERN DIVERSIFIED 

510 Lake Cook Rd. 
Decrficld, IL 60015 

EOEmifdlv 



♦5» 

•v 



**♦ 
♦ 

•> 



•MACHINE OPERATORS & 

•GENERAL FACTORY 

WORKERS 

tf*J-WAY SPEAKEH PROD- 
UCTS, a leading marutadurer of 
components lor the loud speaker 
industry is seeking individuals 
thai are sefl starters who wart to 
share & partxipale in Nu-Wa/s 
bright tuturel 

■WE NEED MACHINE OPERA- 
TORS & GENERAL FACTORY 
WORKERS tor 1st & 2nd shifts 

No experience 

needed...]ust a 

positive attitude & 

solid work ethic! 

■WE OFFER a compettivB 
compensation pkg, indudmg a 
starting wage ot S6Ar PLUS 
Medical Insurance PLUS Pax) 
Vacation PLUS a 401 (k) plan. 
■PLEASE APPLY in person 
MON-FRI. 8anv5pm a:. 90S 
Anita Ave. Antech, IL 60002 or 
lor moro into, call James 
Weisgal, Human Resources at 
647-395-5141. (eoe.} 
SE HABLA ESPANOL 

^NuWay 



RIGHT HERE! 

RIGHT NOW! 

RIGHT CAREERI 

Start the New Year out right 
with COW Computer Centers, 
(nc Imm-dlate posHtons are 
available for; 

• SHIPPING 

• STOCKING 

• RECEIVING 

• WILL CALL 

• BtLLER 

Earn S9-SI0/HR 
rlUS MONTHLY BONUS 

CDW Computer Centers. Inc. 
is seeking dependable indi- 
viduals for various ware- 
house positions. Fork lift 
experience a must. These full 
time opportunities offer 
great starting pay, competi- 
tive benefits and room for 
growth. We're hiring now so 
stop by today to complete an 
application! 

CDW COMPUTER 
CENTERS, INC. 

Attnr HR Recruiter 

200 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

Vernon Hills. IL 60061 

FAX: 847-46S-38S8 

EOE 



■ > 







Summer. Jobs!!! 
us challenge }jou!!! 

Now is the time to start thinking about your ultimate spring 

and/or summer job experience! 

Are you motivated? Outgoing? 

A team player? Do you love to Travel? 




INVESTMENTS 



*Santa Clara, CA 'Houston; TX 
^Cincinnati, OH /Chicago, IL 



'Jackson, NJ 



CVC has over eight years ol experience working in theme parks throughout the country selling various products such as Cotton 
Candy Sodas and Water at the various shows and ride lines in the theme parks. Fulltime employees can gross between $4000- 
$6OO0'in a given summer! Housing and transportation are provided! An excellent opportunity to build your resume while meeting 
and working with students from across the nation, make great money and be in great shape by the end ol the summer! Remote 
hours lor part/lull time positions. Out-of-state and local positions available (al our S« Flag's Great America location). 

Interested??? Call 800/CVC-9957 

E-MAIL cvcinvest@aol.com 

You Won't Regret it!!! 

"A Little Bit of Hard Work for an Experience of A Lifetime!" 



' i 

i 
> 

> 
i 



Global Manufacturer of electromechanical compo- 
nents has a unique opportunity for dependable, detail- 
oticnted individuals in our Manufacturing Support 
department: 

Injection Mold Operator 

Musi have experience with thermostat injection mold 
machines, be mechanically inclined, be able to work inde- 
pendently, assure all parts are or acceptable quality, com' 
pletc tooling changcovers, maintain a constant flow of pro- 
duction, and properly record production and quality data. 
The ideal candidate will exhibit exceptional Uoublesbooting 
skills and safe work habits. 

Machine Set-Up Operators 

Must be mechanically inclined, able to work independently. 
assure all parts arc of acceptable quality, complete too! 
changcovers, be concerned with safely, maintain a constant 
flow of production and properly record production charts. 

Wc hire only highly motivated individuals who 

enjoy working in a team environment. Wc 

offer a challenging environment, competitive 

salary, and extensive benefit. Please apply in 

person, send your resume to: 



« 

I 

n 



K&B - Mimdelein, Inc., 675 Tower Rd., 

Mundelcin, IL 60060. 

Fax: (847) 949-4250, or call at 

(847) 949-8501, exL 58. 



i 

< 
I 

'i t 
r 







How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Naiicv Sakol 



Dear Search: 

I am actively seeking employment after many years. I have 
been self employed in the home and dierefore out of touch 
widi the in lervkrw process as 1 once knew i i. Friends have told 
me to be prepared to answer questions asked of me during the 
interview. 1 was hoping you could offer some Insight as to what 
types of questions arc often asked and a tip or two. Thank you 
in advance. 
RR- Lake Forest 

DearR.B: 

Todays job market is wry competitive and therefore 
requires more than just showing up for an Interview. Prepare 
yourself in any way that you can. 1 lere isalistofsomeolthe 
most common asked questions we have found. Keep in mind 
that they are not in any particular order and not guaranteed to 
be asked since no two interviews are the same. I, What are 
your strengths? 2. What arc your weaknesses? 3. Why arc you 
interested in working for this company'? 4. Do you have refer- 
ences? 5. What did you like best about your last job? a What 
did you like least about your last position? 7. Why did you leave 
your last employer? I have always found it best before answer- 
ing any question during the interview, stop briefly, pull your 
thoughts together, take a deep bread) and be sure what comes 
out is what you want the mtervicwer to hear. After the inter- 
view it is always wise to make some notes about what took 
place. The reason for this fa that quite often it may be days or 
weeks before you are contacted by the company. If you've 
been avidly interviewuigytw may forget details or be confused 
as to which details belong to which interview. This includes 
the name of the person vvito interviewed you. You will want to 
remember the name of course because you don't want to for- 
get that follow- up letter or card dial you should send out to 
each prospective employer. The sole purpose of this letter or 
card is to thank them for taking ihe time to meet with you and 
al the same time, allowing vou the opportunity to express your 
further interest in their company. I hope these dps help. 

Dear Search: 

While on un interview recently 1 asked die person inter- 
viewing me for his business card. A friend told me dial I was 
wrong for asking for iL I don't sec any harm in it do you? 
Ell*LilxTt>\nUe 

DearE-H: 

Ask away! It b the professional thing to da if someone 
doesn't want you to have their canL.thcyTl just say no2 

Note: Nancy Sakol is a licensed personnel profes- 
sional and President of Superior Personnel in 
Gumee, 

Ix'tters can be sent lo Nancy Sakol c/o Lakeland 
Newspapers, P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 



. ... ...... 



C 1 6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Warned 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fuli-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fntl-Time 



POSTAL 
WORKERS 

No Experience 

Necessary, $13.61/hr lo 
start, plus benefits. 
Applicalion/cxnm info 
available'. Call H:(M) am - 
8:00 pin only. Open 7 
days/week. 1-800-267- 
5715, cxt. 230. 



FULLTIME/ 
PAR.TTIME 
Teacher or Assistant 
Needed for a 
Grays&ke Da.y Care 
Center. If interested 
call: 
(84-7) Ste-MSS 
Ask for Wendy 



H.V.A.C 

New Construction 

Installer 

EXPERIENCED ONLY 

V. 0LSEN Heating & 

Air Conditioning, Inc. 

Lake Villa, IL 
(847) 356-3581 



BtMl— »- in i '■■'■■' 



Sign Manufacturing / 
Service / Installation / 
Good Benefits/ Wages 

North Shore Sign Co. 
Libertyvifle,IL 
847-816-7020 

ii nm - '■'"' ™ 



Banking 

sum ©m iB©raiykD?23 

FIRST BAJVK OF HIGHLAND PARK. 

Do you have previous cash handling and/or general office expe- 
rience?^ you enjoy serving customers? Are you looking lo 
enhance your current skills? II so, an entry-level career in banking 
could be waiting for you!!! First Bank cf Highland Park is 

seeking energized team players lo join their organzation in a number 
ot entry-level full & part-time positions. 

If you are interested in starting a career in banking, why nol start wilh 
First Bank «f Highland Park? For more information 
regarding career opportunities, please contact Human Resources at 
(847) 432-7800 x483. EOE 



• • • CHILD CARE • • * 
HASTINGS LAKE YMCA CHILD CARE IS ACCEPTING 
APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS: 

Before and Allorschool Teachers 
Kindergarten Enrichment Teacher 

Preschool Group Worker 
Allerschool Teacher's Assistants 

APPLICANTS MUST MEET MINIMUM DCP3 REQUIREMENTS 

Please call Slacoy to set up an interview at 356-4000 

or send resume lo: 

Hastings Lake YMCA 

Staccy Srwek, Child Cam Director 

21 155 West Gelden Road 

Lako Villa, IL 60046 




m ii^imn iifiniinrimiiimiiiiir 



SNOWPLOW & 
OWNER OPERATORS 

Needed for snowplowing. 

Northshorc area. 

TOP PAY! Work today-pay tomorrow. 

Lots of hours. 

(847) 272-1747 



IHIIIMIIllHllIimifTtiiiiiii.TrtTr 



DEVELOPMENTAL 

TRAINERS 

Immediate Openings. 
Monday-Friday, clay 
hours, entry lever, will 
train. You train 
MR/DD Adults in per- 
sonal care, prework, 
communicalion & 
domestic skills. 

Contact 
GaU Becker 

Mount Saint 

Joseph, Lake 

Zurich 

847-438-5050 



To Place 

Your Medical 

Opportunities 

Here, Please 

Call Travis 

or Nick at 

847.223.8161 



We have an immediate opening for an individual for 
our M.LS. operation. The ideal candidate will Iwve at 
least one year's programming experience using 
RPGA100 or RPG3 on an IBM AS/400 or System 38 in a 
manufacturing environment. Familiarity with' MAPICS is 
desirable. Experience in LAN environment a plus. 
Qualified candidate may apply at or send/fax resume 
to: 

Dannhcr Controls 

1675 Delany Road • Gurnee, II. 60031 

F : ax: 847-662-6033 

coc 



DO YOU'W4'NXiTO J »Oni< IN A. 

Smibirc vou 



iOWlOjqn\ 



VOL 



Do you want to have *Ok 

with management tliat **~V 

actually listens to YOU 11 

RJs Eatery is looking for people j 

who like to have fun at their \ 

fob while they tvorl£ 

Look in ii for:i 



Daytime Bartender * 
Evening Waitstaff 



llcallhuic 

CNA'S 
Night PosiUon 

You've tried the rest, now 
try working with the bcMl 
Our highly competent stall 
Is looking lor more team 
members. We are a 108 
bed, skilled nursing facility 
In the Tar NW suburbs. We 
pay for your expertise. 
Starting salary at S'J.OuThr 
plus Sl.OO/hr differentials* 
Please call 8<17-52fV555 1. 
Ask for Jean or Alona 

Care Centre of 
Wauconda 

1 76 Thomas Court 
Wauconda. II. 60084 



CNAfe 

FULL/PART: 

TIME/ALL SHIFTS 

COME JOIN 

0URTBAMI 

• ■ .-■ s 

• Must bo Certified & 

Registered In ' - 
State of Illinois 

• * Above Avera go 

. Starting Wage- . . 
■' • Sood Benefits 
•Excellent Working' 
• Environment; .' 

.; Apply. la Person;..-.. 

NORTH SHORE 
TERRACE 

2222 W. 14th Street 

VWaukegan, IL 60085 : 



w 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



DRIVERS 

fmmed Openings. 
Shaffer Trucking, Inc. 
Announcing new pay 

pkg/bnfts. Must be 
23 yrs old. 

33«/milc lo start. 

For details call 
800-669-9160 



CHIROPRACTIC 

ASSISTANT 

Office in Libcrtyville 

looking for friendly, 

dependable person. 

Will Train. 

847/680-3138 



High enerpy^fast paced 
Top $&ior top talent 



upenor 

Personnel 



&®&>®m® ©t? ©^©«®@t]© 




* 



*i. 



EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT/LOAN SECRETARY 

Independent community bank is seeking a well 
organized individual to provide support to the 
President and Loan Dcpt. Responsibilities 
include secretarial duties as well as customer 
interaction. Typing and organizational skills a 
must. Experience with Dictaphone system a plus. 
Banking experience desirable but not required. 
We areoffcringa competitive salary along with an 
excellent benefit package. Please send a resume & 
salary requirements to Human Resource 
Manager, P,0. Box 270, Grayslake, IL 






Quality Assurance tab Tech 



K-JX Major manutaca*c» o( dcctromocfiafKal ccrnponerts has an pC 
OOVi opemng tor 3 Ou.il.ry Todrwan The carddale tor Us fQ. 
J^^V) t position wd implement standards and metroes lor equp- /gp*jj 
t^J^y' mrtertQ^cah&rabon.ttenfyardtcarinvariu- VSj' 1 
y( ^y, manc(l *. scheduto niaMiilnfl aaj t fe w nl hr j a M y rfo n,*«id \i? 
C,"/^ perform nspocioa using and evaluation dt produa at various 
Vl' states ot the production process Good composer sUs and bmlanfy '<"! 
W win mcasumg eqwpmenl mo dcsrarJc. Wo ofter a tfiaBcncsng erwron- W 
'I mont, compcttvo siary, and crterart benefits. Pt*a» appty in p«fwn, \j 
send your rtlunvt to: K*B • UurxtoWn, Int. 67STowtf Rd, Uunddttn, 
IL 60060. Ftx: (847) WSM2M, or on it (847) 9IMS01, nt M. 




• Cany Out 
Personnel 



t«B>SfiAH© AVI • UM&IHHUKS? 



ASSISTANT MANAGER 
llciivthorn Center 

IPUCCiraaililB QiiS (El^tLLlMIiaiES 

If you're looking for something a little different where 
you can show off your creative side and sparkling 
personality in a retail business, then we've got the 
perfect opportunity. We will train you lo manage a 
professional business and sell beautiful reproduction 
art and customised framing. This entry-level position 
provides salary plus ixjnuses, medical/dental cover- 
age, paid vacation and advancement opportunities 
for those showing dedication, reliability and an 
eagerness to learn and excel! Tor consideration send 
resume to: 
Director of Store Operation* 
3111 Mat Arthur Blvd. 
NorClitrroolt. IL 000112 
Fax: 1117-272- 101 1 



v 
v 

¥ 



¥ 



CNA's 

• $7.25/ Hr. to Start 
• Great Benefits 
Excellent Working Conditions 
• Fantastic Opportunity 

Apply in Person: 

1740 N. Circuit Dr. 

ILLCREST Round Lake Beach. IL 

(Behind Burger King on 

Rollins Rd.l 




Nuitin|l'ii»ii 



'YTT' 

Global Manufacturer of 

electromechanical components 

has a unique opportunity for 

dependable, detail oriented 

individuals in our Manufacturing 

Support department: 



MACHINE MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN 



Experience in machine repair, hydraulics, pneumat- 
ics, troubleshooting, and some electronics in a man- 
ufacturing environment are requirements lor this chal- 
lenging position. 



ELECTRICIAN 



k Will be responsible for planning the wiring and instnl- J 
^ tation of equipment and fixtures; ensure wiring and j 
y fixtures conlorm to company specifications and local ^ 

► electrical codes; interpret specifications, blueprints^ 
and work orders; and repair and maintain machines i 
and equipment. 

Wo hire only highly motivated individuals who 
enjoy working in a team environment. We offer 
a challenging environment, competitive salary, 
and extensive benefits. Please apply in per- 
son, send your resume lo: 

K&B - Mundelein, Inc., 675 Tower Rd., 

Mundelei.n, IL 600G0. 

Fax: (847) 949-4250, or call at 

(847) 949-8501 , ext. 58. 





FIELD 

SERVICE 

TECHNICIAN 

A major manufacturer of air compressors is seek- 
ing an Independent, sell-starter with good me- 
chanical and electrical skills to inspect, service 
and repair Atlas Copco air compressors. The 
successful candidate will bring good people skills 
and have a solid understanding of customer ser- 
vice. 

The ideal candidate will have live years experi- 
ence working on industrial air compressors and 
enjoy traveling. The position Isbased in thegrea tar 
Chicago area. 

The Company offers an excellent salary and 
benefits package Including 401(k), pension and 
an educational reimbursement plan. Please sub- 
mit resume to: Regional Service Manager, Alias 
Copco Compressors, Inc., 590-A Telser Road, 
Lako Zurich, IL 60047 

Equal Opportunity Employer UF 




January 16. 1998 



EM 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Legal Secretary 
with mome 
ex per ience and 
goad organiza- 
tional skills. 
Call Chris at 
(847) 244-0770 
between 9:00 am 
and 4:30 pm 




Cmaai 

IF YOU'RE LOOKING 

FOR A JOB- 

YOU'RE IN THE 

RIGHT PLACE! 

CDW Computer Centers, 
Inc. is experiencing 
tremendous growth. As a 
result, we have the fol- 
lowing opportunities 
available for; 

HR RECRUITER 
HR ASSISTANT 

TELEMARKETERS 
FuliJt Part Time 

SWITCHBOARD 
• OPERATOR 

ORDER 
PROCESSORS 

ACCOUNTING 
ASSISTANT 

BILLER 

VENDOR 
COLLECTIONS 

WAREHOUSE 

PERSONNEL 

Shipping, Stocking, 

Receiving, Will Call 

Fork Lift P rt fd 

We offer great starling 

pay, competitive benefits 

and room for growth. 

We're hiring now so stop 

by today to complete an 

application! Don't miv, 

this opportunity to make 

199K the bcM year for 

your career! 

COMPUTER 
DISCOUNT WAREHOUSE 

Attn: HR Recruiter 

200 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

Vernon Wilt, III 60061 

FAX: 847-46S-385H 

EOE 




SENIOR PRODUCT 
LIABILITY ENGINEER 
Immcd Opening 

Ainehain Water tlesiter 
Co., a hlRli volume, 
mulii toe mfr iKvirkind in 
Joitnson City, IX seeks 
Sr. Product Liability 
Engineer, Hcqs DSME 
(k.'M Sv/MSME do*? prefd. 
tixp in iHOJcct mtiiiit n 
must which lotls inter- 
fiitinp, w/iiii ilii] itr <lcpis 
Specific cxp rctj'tl in Hk: 
following areas: 

*DingnosiS of field prod- 
uct installation relation to 
jHiicnii.il tcn.it action 
"I 'rep and research 
Discovery Un peiKlinp, 
IcUiil action •Panldiiote 
a act as iCxfK*n Witness 
tor product liiihtlity suits 
a depositions. 

KiiowiedRe in the follow- 
ing areas desired: 
•lailure modes e* effects 
iuuuy.sis 'Finite elerhcni 
anniysis *Compointk>naJ 
fluid dynamics "Design 
of experiiiieni a 
ncii. it hhiy engineering 
•lamiliariiy w/ ANSI & 
ll standards a The Natl 
Fuel c«ts Code as related 
to gius A electric water 
heaters nr similar appli- 
ance desirable. Offer exc 
coinj)ensailon/l)n(i pkg. 
Rix/mall resume: 

American water Heater 
Co. i»o Uox 1378, 
Johnson City. TN .17(505' 

t:»7H. Alt: Director oM lit: 
Pax 423-.434dGfKi. EOR 
M/l-A' 



January 16. 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



LEGAL SECRETARY 

Wanted for Grayslake 
Law Firm. Must be 

proficient in 

WordPerfect for . 

Windows 6.1. Salary 

commensurate with 

experience. Fax resume 

to: (B47) 223-1700, or 

send resume to: 

J. RJthtrnan 

P.O. Bar 254 

Grayslake, IL 60030 



IN-ST0RE BANKING 

Anchor Bank has immedi- 
ate openings for managers 

and personal bankers. 
Sales orientation a must for 



both. Great earnings and 
advancement opportunities. 
Irvstore banking experience 
desirable, but not required. 

Fax resume to Spahn & 
Assor.847-604-5182. 



Manufacturing 

Growing Company 2 miles 
Wen of 294 has several 
opportunities. PRO DO C- 
rroH SUPERVISORS 

Three poshJoni, looking for 
goil oriented & positive indi- 
vidual! to increase production 
& emptore* moral. 2-5 m b 
Supervision Punch Press, 
Welding & Metal Fabrication. 
BilinguaUSpanlsh a plus. 
DRAW/HYDRAULIC 
PRESS OPERATOR - 
One position, 1*3 yrs w/ press 
operating skills. Great 
sal/bens. Inckfj dental. Appr/ 
in person, send letter or fix to: 
HA, General fire Extinguisher 
Corp., 1685 Shermer Rd., 
Northbrook, IL 60062, Fax: 
847-272.7286 



Wrto CQeitnitrartt 
Opening 

Jimmy's 
Charhouse 

LlBERTYWLLE 

All Positions 
wanted, apply 

in person 

1413 Peterson 

Rd. or call for 

Information 

(847) 549-9900 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



: CDL TRUCK 

; DRIVER TRAINING: 

[Now offering a $5501 
".Retention Bonus for; 
■Inexp'd Drivers. Exc Pay! 
•& Bnfts. Inexp'd start at; 
j$.25/mi *1 yr expl 
j$.295/ml 'Make up to; 
[$.325 plus bnfts. Fori 
■more Info, call H.O.; 
'WOLDING today 800-; 

•950-0054, or visit our- 1 

• • 

".suebsllc vvww.h-o-w.com. ; 



WAITRESSES j 

Full Time/ 
Part Time j 
-Apply In Person: ] 

Rigby's 
Restaurant; 

1910 E. Grand Ave. | 
' Lindcnhur.st, IL 



Immcd Openings. Got! 
the Winter Blues? Ever} 
thought of moving! 
South? Henry VVurst, Inc.J 
a leading comm'l primer ■ 
In the Raleigh. NC arca.J 
seeks the following. Expi 
reo/d. 'BINDERY: ScitcxJ 
Ektajct 5100 & 5120i 
Oprtrs; Baum, Cleveland J 
& Stahl Folder Oprtrs;! 
McCain St AM GraphicsJ 
Stitcher Oprtrsi 

•BINDERY MAINTj 

MECH 'WEB OFFSET! 
PRESS OPRTR 'MAINTj 
ELECTRICIAN. Offer ■ 
exc bnft pkg, comp sol. B 
Call 800-545-8835 ■ 
xl35; Resume: HR Mgr." 
Henry Wurst, he, 810 S.J 
Lufkin Rd., Apex, NCj 
27502. EOE 



Crew Members 

Looking for people to join 
our learn, we offer compet- 
itive pay, benefits & flexi- 
ble hours for our two 
Libcriyville locations. 

Pttase contact: 

James 
(047)367-8909 

or Us* 
(847) 362-8919 






Social Services 

HAB TECH-DIRECT CARE 

CILA 

Progrim In Park City lo pro- 
vide" support services lo peo- 
ple with Autism. The follow- 
ing positions arc available: 
• Mon. -Thurs. 
11:00 pm -9:00 am 

• F/T 3:00 p - 11:00 p 

• P/T Weekend Shifts 
Need Valid drivers license. 
We provide a comp salary 
and benefits. EOE. 

To apply call: 

BLARE, INC 

(847) 292-9445 or 
FAX Resume to: 
(847) 299-7495 



LAKELAND 



ftEe»e*TEfii 



; NEWSPAPERS has • 

1 an opening on Its ; 
; expanding editorial ; 
t staff. Experience 2 
; preferred with 

S background In pho-j 
5 tography helpful. : 

• Will handle a varl* • 

2 ety of assignments. 2 

• Will be working • 

with a varied 

• schedule and be ; 
! able to work under • 
5 deadline situations.; 

For Interview 
appointment fax 

• resume to: • 
Rhonda Burke 

• Editor In Chief • 

: at 



; (847) 223-8810 ; 



GnLee-vee&ee a must: 
Lake dfurv LcTadeg.. Top 

$PLM& + COMM + FULL 6£W£FTrS 



upenor 

Personnel 



244'OOl6 ot 549-OQI6 d 




220 



Help Wanted 
FuO-Time 



220 




Must have own 

tools. Must be ASE 

certified. $l6/hr. 

per book hour 
plus commission. 

Good benefits. 

Call Randy at 

Whltmore's: 

(847) 623-7080 



SECURITY OFFICERS 
1&S0/S8.75 Per HR. 

Prestige Uberiyvilk, 
Harvard, Woodstock loca- 
tions. Full lime, til thins 
available. Uniforms provid- 
ed. Free training for PER 
card. Exc fringe benefits. 
Call anytime for appoint- 
ment. Interviews conducted 
at the above locations. 

Call Now! 

(530) 852-5588 ext. 100 

or 113 aficr 5 p.m. 

(630)852-6264 

EOE 



RECEPTIONIST/ 
GENERAL OFFICE 

rjiiBy Irvtl position. 
Rispottibiliilrs *ill i v luti 

ttrSMHIVj pltOMS, thW„ lil^ll 

typi-tr,, (ic. CoMpartyolhss 

III I IxmIiis p*rLw,i. 

PIea« caII 

DYNASTY MOLD 

BUILDERS 

(847) 5260400 

ro wr up a coftfkii m U! 



FASTSIGNS 

Natfons leader In 
Betan Sign industry 

Is looklnH for 

Computet Operator 

foe c-a. sHin Design, 

DOS computer, 

famluartryHtth 

Cord, iniistraior 

Design Software. 

Design; Graphic 

experience a plus. 

Call 

Ask for 
RlchorjoAnn 



Full Time 

ADMINISTRATIVE 

ASSISTANT 

NICASA 

Has a position available in 

a small office selling for 

an individual with strong 

people and organizational 

skills and 50 wpm typing 

ability. Duties include 

reception, filing, light 

bookkeeping and copy 

nor*. Call or send/fax 

resume to: 

NICASA 

c/o Rl ten Sorenson 

2900 Main Street 

Prairie View, IL 60069 

(847) 634-6422 
Fax (847) 634-6775 



I lei? Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Data Entry / Cust Svc 

Need accurate detailed ori- 
ented person F/T-P/T. 

Libertyville area. Benefits 
and competitive wages. 

Call: Bonnie/VTcki 
M-Fri 

8am- 5:30pm 

MedSmart 

(847) Sr%0789 



SALES/OPTICIAH 

FULL TIME HEEDED 
Competitive wages, 
benefits, experience 
preferred, but wilt 
train right individual 

APPLV in PERSom 

Sears Optical 

730 E. Rotuns Rd 
Round Lafca BeacJi, B. 60073 
(Matiara Creek Shopping Plaza) 

.jiitiiiXirpMnntiiiniiiTiiminiiiiiiinir 

PUBLIC SAFETY 
OFFICER 

Vacation Village 

Association now 
taking applications 
for full/part-time offi- 
cers - rotating days 
- excel lent benefits. 

Apply in person. 

6800 State Park 
j Road, Fox Lake, IL 



H II H I I II IMI I IlMlMMIIUti 

MACHINE SHOP 

lob Shop in Round Lake Park 
has opportunities in the follow- 
ing areas: 

• Brown & Siurpe Screw 
Machine Setup & Operation 

•Estimator 

• Quality 

Assurance/Inspection 

* Machinists-experienced 

A entry level 
• Tool Room Machinist 

Company offers a complete bene- 
fit package including 40 IK pro- 
gram. Drug test & pre-emptoy- 
men! physical required 

B. Radlkc & Sons, Inc. 

101 VV. Main Stmt 

Round Lake Park, IL 

847-546-3999 



i i ii ii iii i ii i i ii iniiii 



RADIATOR 
REPAIR TECU 

Immcd Opening. Large, 
clean, modern, wcll-cqppd 
radiator repair shop .seeks 
F/T exp'd Radiator Repair 
Tech. 3-5 yrs cxp pref'd, 
but will train the tight per- 
son. Uniforms, paid 
hldys/vacas. If you're ready 
lo come work at one of (he 
leading radiator repair 
shops in the stale, mail/fax 
resume/call/stop in today! 
Pickart's Radiator 

"Cooling System 

Specialists for over 50 
years", 341 W. Scott Si, 
Fond du Lac, WI 54937; 
920-922-9578; Fax 920- 
922-8772 



DIRECT CARE WORKERS 

CkfiluL hrlpt jdulti Mtih dovi-lopmcrul dutxlilin adapt lo nrightw' 
hood Irving. ClcnUrfe has hilj-timc 3r<d and 3rd ihih a* «*ll a* pan-time 
notilions teaching valuatile living UilK a! run small-Kroup h<.rr»^ in 
Mum*. -Ifin. lltiOftyvillr, tlichUrtit RuV ami tJitifidd. Applicants >m»vl be 
1 ft >r jii oid with a high scnuul 'd'plonu (or cquivalml) and valid tit r-i t 'v 
ticpfti*. Suning wage is J7.SO an hour. All atom full-lime wrdutiy pevi- 
tiom available at our vocational (raining centers in NorlMwool and 
Mundrfeih, 

Tor immediale inlrniet* contact: 
Ralph Robimon-Sccniiling Coontinaloc 
A47.272.Sltt eit. 130 
roe m/f/d/v 



flrip Warned 
Full-Time 



Drivers 
OWNER OPERATORS 

Company drivers & city dri- 
vers. Dedicated runs from I he 
midwest to the west coast. 
Reefer trailer exp. Clean 
MVR. 303-798-1578. Ask 
for Mark Aaron. 



-> 

<■> 

% 

-> 

I 



Full Time 

Propane company seeks dependable 
and energetic person for miscellaneous 
plant duties. No experience necessary. 
Some heavy lifting required. Must be 18 
years of age. $8/hr. to start with oppor- 
tunity for advancement. Apply in person 
8am-5pm, Mon-Sat at: 

SUBURBAN GAS SERVICE 

207 Main St.(Rt. 134) « Round Lake Park.IL 



<- 

1 

<« 
<- 
<- 

■ - 

<« 
<i 
<- 
<3 






Customer Service 
RING IN THE NEW YEAR 
WITH SUCCESS!! 

Ameria's fistest growing mgm*i 

consulting company a looking for 
customer service reps for immedi- 
ate employment as nurktdng spe- 
cialists Continued expansion & 5 
yr. growth rate of 7200% mean 
potential for rapid advancement. 
Realistic first year earnings to 
30K+. Biwtomm/Bonuva. M- 
F daytime hrs in Northwest sub- 
urbs. For consideration call: 800- 
531.9585 at 179. 



CUSTODIAN r 

Full'TIME 

posiTioN/NiqMi shih 

fon WAUCONdA 

Sctiool Disrnia. 

S9.56/MOUR + bENE 

His. Apply at DisiRia 

OfficE, 555 N. Main 

Street, Waucon(ia. 

(847) 526-7690 



225 



Business 
Opportunities 



$$$ DEALERS WANTED 
S$$ Pan-time Dealers Can 
Earn Over $5,000 per mo. 
Fast Growing Manufacturing 
Co. Will train Part or Full-time. 
Info Package 1-800-41 4-2705 
(24hrs.)(SCA Network). , 

$51 NEED HELPltt 

OVERWHELMED 

WITH LEADS1 

HOME BASED.. 

NOT MLM. 

SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY! 

(800) 322-6169 
X7059. 

ABSOLUTE 

INDEPENDENCE! 

0O%PROH71 

5-lOKnrontn part-time from 

home. Outstanding on-going 

support, training and leads. 

Not MLM. 

.1-800-005^)790. 

"EXT. 0393** 

BUSINESS IS BOOMINGI 
30 Second Commute] 

Not MLM. 

High Income potential. 

1-800-322-6169 

ext4316. 

GET PAID 2X WEEKLYI 
Prepaid Legal Casually Inc. 
provides legal insurance 
$25/month. Independent As- 
sociates needed, expanding 
in your area. Mm. investment 
£65, Call your independent As- 
sociele 800-995-0796 x4 j 03. 

MAKE MONEY BY FAX 
Easy automated homo based 
business. From fax machine 
call FREE 1-800-783-7363 
Ext. 728. When prorppted, 
enter 604-597-8264. NO 
SELLING! NO MEETINGSI 
(SCA Network). 

NEARLY 9 MILUON 
HOUSEHOLDS around 
North AmorlcE and hun- 
dreds of thousands of In- 
tomot uaors around tha 
world can im your adver- 
tising message whan you 
advertise In the Suburban 
Classified Advertising N«t- 
woric-SCAN! Ira an easy-to- 
use one and inexpensive or- 
der/one invoice service that re- 
ally works. For information, 
Call 312-644-6610 x473l. 
(SCA Network) 

NEED A FLEXIBLE JOB? 

Own your own business. No 
initial investment. Call me and 
ask mo how. (847) 263-5009. 

OWN YOUR OWN apparel, 
shoe, lingerie, bridal, gift or 
SI. 00 store. Includes inven- 
tory, fixtures, buying trip, train- 
ing. Minimum Investment 
$18,900.00. Call Dan at Liber- 
ty Opportunities, 501-327- 
8031. 



PLACE YOUR. 

CI-VSSIFrED 

AD KERB. 
CALL TRAVIS 

OR NICK AT 




228 



CNA/NURSE 

Fun/Part-time. 

I will care for your loved one 

as my own. $12/hr. 

Small price lor best TLC. 

Great references. 

tOyrs. experience. 

Most dependable. 

(847) 566-7438. • 



240 



OlfldCjUT 



K 



Camclot Care Centers is seek- 
ing therapeutic foster parents 
for our expanding foster home 
program in Lake County. We j 
provide in-home treatment' 
services to emotionally trou- 
bled children who base been 
j abused and neglected. 
I Excellent training and 24 hour 
i support. Compensation of 
$1,000 per month plus respite. 
Call Kanur Tolliver at (847) 
981-1151 or (708)936-9017 
to learn more about the pro- 
gram and our informational 
breakfast on Jan 24th & 31 si. 



301 


Antiques 



SCOTT ANTIQUE MAR. 
KET 1,200 Exhibitor Booths 
JAN. 24 & JAN. 25. Monlhly, 
November thru June Ohio 
Expo Center, Columbus, Ohio, 
1-71. Exit 17lh Ave. (614) 569- 
4112. 



CALLING ALL LAKE 
COUNTY MOMS!!! Bright 
Beginnings Family Day Care 
Network is looking for nurtur- 
ing, responsible, creative indi- 
viduals who would like to start 
their own business while stay- 
ing homo with their children. If 
you live in Lake Villa, Linden- 
hurst, GurneG, Grayslako or 
Round Lake and would like as- 
sistance in getting licensed, 
ongoing technical assistance, 
and child referrals, this pro* 
gram is for you. For more infor- 
mation on how to become a 
quality infant and toddler day 
care provider in your home, 
call Dena Thompson (B47) 
356-4112. 

CALLING ALL WORKING 
MOMS!!! .Fall is just around 
the comer, have you planned 
your children's day care yet? 
Immediate openings lor child- 
ren ages 6/weeks & up are 
available in Bright Beginnings 
Homo Day Care Network. For 
more information on how lo 
enrol! your child in a conven- 
iently located, quality day care 
home, please call Dena 
Thompson at (847) 356-4112. 
SPACES ARE LIMITED, SO 
CALL IMMEDIATELY. 

CHILD CARE IN MY 
WADSWORTH HOME, 

part/full-time, meals and 
snacks provided, lots of TLC. 
(B47) 395-4254. 

EXCEPTIONAL QUALITY 
CHILD CARE OFFERED 
IN MY LAKE VILLA HOME, 
Monday-Friday, ages 2 & up. 
(847) 265-1068. 

EXPERIENCED MOTHER 
OF 1 with University Degree 
can otter excellent child care 
in her Ubertyvilte home. Un- 
surpassed references. Call 
Netty (847) 816-1647. 

FOSTER HOMES NEED' 
ED! Wanted good, nurturing 
individuals to provide tempo- 
rary homes for children ages 
birth to adolescent Training, 
support, compensation, day 
care provided. Contact Cathol- 
ic Charities/Lake County. 
(847) 782-4242 or (B47) 782- 
4243. 

GRAYSLAKE FAMILY 

NEEDS high energy person 
to care for three children. Mon- 
day-Friday, 8am-5pm. (847) 
548-9232. 



LOOKING FOR A CARING 
AND QUAUFIED DAY- 
CARE PROVIDER FOR 
YOUR SMALL CHILD- 
REN? Well look no further! 
Mundelein mom has imme- 
diate openings in her daycare 
home for your child. Lots of ac- 
tivities and family like at- 
mosphere. Call Tami (847) 
637-1089 tor information and 
rates. 

MOM WITH YEARS OF 

EXPERIENCE win MI up your 
child's day with lots of TLC and 
activities. Full-time, Monday- 
Friday. Lunch/snacks provid- 
ed. Reasonable rates. (847) 
356-7954. 



I 



WFl Super Bow! XXV 

Leather Jacket - For 

Sale by Owner. 

Handmade silver 

anniversary, 1 of a kind 

Jacket. XL Perfect 

condition »30IC cash 

off en. 716-663-4644 

Of 723-0536. 



314 


Building Materials 



STEEL BUILDINGS SALE: 
30x40x10, S4.594. 40x60x14, 
$8,155. 50x75xJ 4, *1 1.195. 
50x100x16, $14,953, 

60x100x16, $17,603, Mini- 
storage buildings. 30x160, 32 
units, $13,944. Free 
brochures. Sentinel Buildings, 
800-327-0790. Extension 79. 



330 



Gxnge 

fuimmagc Sale 



AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIG SALE, and there 
is stai things that just did not 
go.:.. Can us at LAKELAND 
-Newspapers and run i! 
under the 'FREE or Givea- 
ways" classified column. FREE 
ADS are NO CHARGE! 
(847) 223-8161, ext. 140. 



334 



Good Things To Eat 



ORGANIC EGGS FROM 
range freo chickens, $2-50/dz- 
(647)973-0971. 



338 


Horses & Tacks 



HAY 1ST CUT grass 4 alfal- 
fa, $325. 2nd cut available. 
(847) 395-8747 before 9pm. 

HORSE HAY, STRAW, con- 
struction cover hay. Delivery 
available. (414)657-3127. 

MUST SELL 2-HORSE 
Kiefer, excellent condition, 
bumper pull, ramp load, 
$3,50Q/best. (414) 279-3020. 

RICK'S FARRIER SERV- 
ICE Halter and Periormance. 
Horses. Rick Brazite (414) 
877^4406. 

SHAVIhGSl 

Hay, straw, horse feed. 

Purina Dog A Cat Food. 

Chicken Feed and 

Much more. 

(414) 6S7-252S. 

WEDEUVERI 

M-FS-5 

SltB-3. 



340 



Household Good* 
Furniture 



DECORATOR MOVING 
SALE! EASY CHAIR, 
SOFA and Loveseat, Blue, 
Mauve, Cream, $595. 
LEATHER sofa and love- 
seat, $950. Excellent condi- 
tion, MUST SELL! (847)548- 
1045. 

DECORATOR MOVING 
SALE! QUEEN ANNE 
STYLE bedroom, complete 
$1,100. Dining room set, 
$1,500. OAK bedroom sat 
$1,200. Oak dlnlngroom set 
$1,960. ALSO Sleigh bed- 
room set, $1,745. AD in PER- 
FECT condition. MUST 
SELL! (847)546-1045. 

ANTIQUE DUNCAN FIFE 
DINING TABLE, with 4-em- 
broidered chairs, $500. An- 
tique buffet, $400. Custom 
sofa, $250. Oak drop leaf di- 
nette table, $250. (847) 
970-5920. 

COMFORTER WITH 
SHAMS and drapes, 1 -wind- 
ow, 42x85, queen size revers- 
fole comforter, mauve/cream. 
S65. (414) 694-5979. 

CUSTOM MADE BED 
SPREAD, fun size, with 
drapes. 2-pair, 61x93, 
poach/cream background with 
floral shades blue and cinna- 
mon. (414)694-5979. 

DININGROOM SET, HI- 
BRITEN table, 2-leaves, 6- 
chairs, china cabinet, server, 
$2,750jbest. (414) 652-4298. 

ELECTROLUX VACUUM 
WITH powerhoad and attach- 
ments. Excellent working con- 
dition. $75. (414) 694-5979. 

FOR SALE 25* COLOR 
CONSOLE TV, $125. Mi- 
crowave oven, $75. Sony Ster- 
eo, $75. Zenith color TV, 15*. 
$95. VCR/VHS, $95. /VMF 
Orange, womens 10-speed 
bike, S20.TI computer system. 
Solid Oak GE stereo console. 
(847)216-2172. 



. 



C 1 8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 16. 1998 



*-*^ 



340 



Household Goods 
Kumilurc 



350 


Miscellaneous 



360 



. Pels & Supplies 



IF YOU HAVE 

FURNITURE TO SELL, 

A car, or oppllancoa, II 

you aro having a Garago 

Sola or If you have a 

houso to soil or opnrtmont 

to rant. 

Call Lisa boloro 10am 

Wednesday to placo 

your ad horo. 

(847) 223-8161 

oxt. 140. 

KENWOOD 2 FLOOR 
SPEAKERS with STAND 
and STEREO CABINET 
3200. Coll (847) 
482-0924. 

MODEL HOME 

FURNITURE. 

Excess and unclaimed 

sofas, loveseats, 

chairs, tables. 

DININGROOM SETS, 

BEDROOM SETS, 

LEATHERS, olc. 

(630)776-3433. 

PRACTICALLY NEW FUR- 
NITURE AND APPLIANC- 
ES FOR SALE. Solid oak en- 
tertainment center, S380. 
Solid oak table, leaf, 4-chairs, 
$350. Oak end table, £50. Oak 
night lablo, $50. Oak full 
length mirror. $50. Designer 
sofa, $285. Kenwood receiver. 
$180. Techniques Speakers, 
$50. Microwave, £50. Va- 
cuum. £50. (847) 662-5916, 

SOFA QUEEN SIZE 

SLEEPER with matching love- 
seat. Black with gray paint 
brush olfocl. Soft material. 
$400/bost. (847) 263-1646. 



WOLFF TANNING BEDS. 
TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT 
and SAVEI Commercial/homo 
units from $199. Low monthly 
payments. FREE color cata- 
log. Call today 1-000-842- 
1310. 

WOOD BURNING AN- 
TIQUE STOVE, noods ro- 
patrs to burn wood $100. 
2- FORMICA OAK FINISH 
CONFERENCE TABLES 
$75 for both. 2GG-IBM 
COMPUTER FREE. (847) 
381-5322. 



354 



Medical Equip 
Supplies 



MEDICARE RECIPIENTS: 
ARE you using a NEBULIZER 
MACHINE? STOP paying lull 
price for Albuterol, Atrovcnt, 
otc, solutions. MEDICARE will 
pay lor them. Wo bill Mcdicaro 
lor you and ship directly to 
your door. MED-A-SAVE 1- 
800-538-9849. 



358 



Musical Instruments 



344 


Jewelry 



BALDWIN SPINET PIANO, 
excellent condition, $1,200. 
Call (847) 548-6933 aflor 
7pm, 

ELECTRIC ORGAN, PAD- 
DED bench, music rack, in- 
struction books. Play tunes im- 
mediately. Groat for all agos. 
$60. 34-wx15-1/2"dx32-1/2*h. 
(847) 566-0990. 

LOWREY ORGAN WITH 

Magic Genie Keys, excellent 
condition. A must see. 
£450/bost. (414)694-5979. 



DISTtNGUISED' COMBO 
WEDDING/ENGAGEMENT 
RING SET, 1/4 carat dia- 
mond with 4 -diamonds ar- 
ound main diamond. Brand 
now, novor worn. Paid 
$1,000. asking S700/bost. 
(847) 740-0380 ask for Nick. 

WEDDING SET: SOLI- 
TARE 3/4kt round diamond 
in plain setting Appraised at 
$2,000. Best olfor. Call alter 
7pm (847) 746-3452. 



EM 



Pels S Supplies 



349 


Clothing 



WEDDING DRESS DIA- 
MOND COLLECTION, bri- 
dal dross, size 16, White, 
cathedral length train, oil the 
shoulder dross. Long sleeves, 
benulilul with sequins and 
pearls. Brand new headpiece 
and veil. Paid $2,000, lirsl 
$500 Mkes all. Call Molodi 
(414) 869-8414. 



350 



Miscellaneous 



FOR SALE FIVE SING 
AND SNORE ERNIES. Best 
oiler Call Maryfm. (847) 622- 
0721 leave message. 

GET A COLLEGE DEGREE 
IN ?7 DAYS; 

BS/MS/MBS/Ph.D otc. includ- 
ing graduation ring, transcript, 
diploma. Yes, it's real, legal, 
guaranteed and accredited. 
For Iroo packet call; 1-B00- 
689-8647. 

GRAVELY LAWN MOWER 

and snowblowor, neods work, 
best offer. (8 47) 740-1384. 

SPIRIT STEPPER with 
ARMBARS $100, CALF 
MACHINE by BODY 

SMITH $100. Call (847) 
r 482-0924. 



DOG BOARDING 
Vacation In your 

schodulo? 

I can watch your dog/pup in 

my homo. 

Lots of affection lor your 

"Companion*. 

Convenient from Rt.4UEdens 

or your O'Haro flight schodulo 

More comfortable than a 

kennel. Reasonable. 

Call Florence or Icavo 

messago with dales needed. 

(847)966-6319, 

AKC BOXER FAWN colored 

female, excellent wilh children 
and othor animals, $300. 
(847) 546-1567. 

BABY COCKATIELS AND 
PEACH FACED LOVE- 
BIRDS, hand fed. Great first 
birds, many colors. £40-£100. 
(847)407-0047. 

COLLIE PUPPIES AKC 
male, lemato, sable/while cyo 
certified, vet checked, shots, 
excellent temper and disposi- 
tion (847)223-7641, 

DO YOU ENJOY working 
with animals? Do you have 2 
hours per week to spare? Assi- 
st Animal Foundation, one of 
the area's no-kill shelters is 
seeking volunteers for work 
(hat is highly rewarding and 
tunl Wo need mon and 
womon who: can work wrth 
cats and dogs, do light repair 
work and can answer phones 
and other office duties. We are 
local od in Crystal Lake. For 
more Information please call 
(815)459-0990, 

IRIDESCENT AND RAIN- 
BOW SHARKS. $1/oa. A 
novel and easy addition to our 
community lank. R&R PETS. 
(847) 249-5444. 




'-ADORABLE DORA" 

"Dora" is a very young, small mid-size, 
mostly shepherd mix female. Just a year 
old, she is Mill a puppy at heart and pos- 
sesses all the charm and playfulness that 
accompanies a puppy-like 'temperament. 
Dora has a rich, short hrown/hlack brindlc 
mat, perk cars and a sweet face. Eminently 
trainable and smart. Dura will quickly learn whatever you 
want to teach her and she will provide the loyal and lively 
companionship thai shepherd mixes arc known and luved 
for. Because Dora is lively and active, we recommend a 
fenced yard so she can run and play and fetch to her heart's 
content. If you like shepherds but want a smaller version, 
Dora may be what you have been hoping for. This terrific 
dog has been at Orphans since February of 1997, and she is 
lail-wagging anxious lo find the loving home and family 
she needs. 



ALL 



DOGS 



BENEFIT 



FROM 



BASIC 



I lOUSEBREAKING/OllEDIENCE TRAINING WHICH HELPS 
BOND DOG TO OWNER. CRATING !S RECOMMENDED 
Tl IE FIRST YEAR WHEN THE OWNER IS AWAY IF NEEDED. 

Cash $55 donation includes free spay/neuter, collar, lag, 
leash, first shots, follow up care and much more. 

Orphans of the Storm is located at 2200 Riverwoods Rd., 
Decrficld. Hours are 1 1 am - 5 pm, seven days a week. Call 
(847) 945-0235 for further information. 



370 



Wanled To Buy 



ALL WAR SOUVENIRS. 
Nazi, Japanese, & US. Local 
pnvaio collector In need of oil 
types of helmets, daggers, 
medals, steins, war toys -♦ Sa- 
murai swords. Top cash paid 
and will pickup. (847) 
438-3191. 

Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
Parts. Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coko Machines. 
Paying CASH! Call 
(630)985-2742. 

WANTED ACTION FIG- 
URES from CO's & 70s also 
Star Trek memorabilia comics 
and toys. (847) 336-8466. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



4 BEDROOM, 2.5 BATH 
Well Molntnlnod 2,100 
squaro ft. HOME, family- 
room wilh fireplaco, dining- 
room, updated kiichen, fin- 
ished walk-out basement, 
largo screened desk. Profes- 
sionally landscaped, large 
yard wilh beautilut oak trees. 
CIoso lo forest preserve and 
playground wilh tennis and 
basketball courts. $189,000 
(847) 355-0275 

ATTN: FOR SALE WILL 
ALSO RENT or RENT- 
WITH-OPTIOH TO BUY a 
1 -Bedroom fiom*. t.Vi%H to 
school* , i/aini tttjfi ttiops. 
Availably intnvia&At, C»3 frx 
details (847jtfl7-&2'/) 

BARRINGTOM BY OWN- 
ER, 3 -bedroom rx^k tnr/Ji, 2* 
balh, fmisnod bawrw-nl, red- 
wood floors, new roof, *r/cet. 
lenl In town location (647) 
428-4055 Ken. 

BRIDLEWOOD SUBOIVI- 
SION GURNEE, 4yrs. old, 3- 
bedrooms, 2-1/2 balhs. family- 
room, fireplace, central vac, 
full finished basement. Crea- 
tive Financing Accepted. (312) 
041-1529. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



JACK RUSSELL PUPPIES, 
tri-colorecJ. excellent blood- 
lines, Parents on promise. 
Males & females. (847) 
680-7421. j 

ORANGEWING AMAZON, 
5/MONTHS old, $800. Prlco 
includos big California cago. 

Call Christy (847) 244-1 193. 

PET SITTING AND 

BEYOND. We como to your 
homo, with TLC. Bonded and 
insured, (B47) 473-5776. 

PUPPIES AKC 

DACHSHUNDS, 3-females. 
1-malo, 14/weeks old, first 
shots, wormed. Also mother 
for safo, 3/ycars old. Needs 
shols. (847) 731-2943. 

PUPPIES BLACK LAB AND 
SHEPHERD MIX. 1-mole, 2-fO- 
malos, born Thanksgiving 
Day. $125/oa. (847) 
2S5-99B3. 

PUREBRED RED NOSE 
PITBULL PUPPIES, parents 
on premises, read/ to go 
homo 1/23/98. No papors. 
$t00. (847) 872-0755. 

TO GOOD HOME mnlo cat 
noulcred and declawed, 3yrs. 
old. Femalo cat, 2yrs. old, 
spayed and declawed. (847) 
263-8233 after 5pm., or (847) 
688-5550 exl. 379 before 
3:30pm. 



BY OWNER GREAT LOCA- 
TION-READY TO MOVE- 
IN. 2-siory houso with finished 
basement, 3-largo bedrooms 
(2-up, 1-down), main floor liv- 
ingroom, largo oai-in kitchen, 
sittingroom upstairs, 3-baths, 
2-car detached garago. Ideal 
location-Hubbard's Woods 
Subdivision, Wauconda, Illi- 
nois. Within walking distance 
to all three schools and storos. 
$165,000. (847) 526-2984 
Leavo messago. 

COUNTRY WALK IN 
ROUND LAKE, BEACH, 4- 
bedrooms, 2«r garage, 3- 
1/2 balhs, full finished base- 
ment, hardwood floors, tiro- 
placo, fenced yard, back lo 
farm palio. SUPER UP- 
GRADES. $155,500. By own- 
er. Appointment only (847) 
356-0411. . 

FORECLOSED GOVERN- 
MENT HOMES. Save up lo 
50% or more on repossessed 
homos. Lilllo/no down pay- 
ment. Bod credit OK. Toll freo 
1-800-690-9073. (SCA Not- 
work). 

GAGES LAKE, LAKE- 
FRONT, 3-bedroom, 2-bolh 
tri-lovol with 1-1/2 car de- 
tached garage. New exposed 
aggregate palio and sidewalk. 
Dock over water wilh shore 
Station, $214,000. (847) 
548-6650. 

GREAT FAMILY VALUE 

Boautiful 4-bodroom homo in 
desirablo Oaklroo, Grayslako 
Schools. Ovor 2,200sq.lt., 
opon floor plan, Bi-lcvel wilh 
walk-out lower level, brick (no- 
place In lamilyroom, vaulted 
ceilings in Irvingroom and mas- 
ter bedroom. Promium corner 
lot next to pond and wetlands, 
landscaped mature trees. 
Walk to shopping, Moira. 
park. Great price $167,900. 
(847) 223-8213. 

HUGE WINDOWSI SPA- 
CIOUS ROOMS) 3-bed- 
room. 2-both, hillsido ranch, 
near Fox Lake, 2,000sq.ft,, 
wooded neighborhood. 

S120's. (647) 587-8520. 

INGLESIDE WATER- 
FRONT 2 LOTS Be con- 
nected lo the Cham 2 bed- 
room, 1-bath bungelow, wilh 
full basement, concrete boal 
well, flagstone palio, central 
air conditioning, 2-car garage, 
large parking lot. $120,000. 
(B15) 7590069, (847) 265- 
1690. 

INTEREST BREAK HOME 
owners use equity to pay off 
high interest obligations. Bai- 
lor than paying high rates on 
credit cards or other bills and 
get the lax benefit. Jim Davis 
(000) 747-5547 Servicing II. & 
Wr 

JOHNSBURG 3-BED- 
ROOM, 2-BATH, tri-lovol, > 
1/2* car garago, -1 aero. 
Chain Access, $149,000. 
(847) 497-3525. 

LOOKING FOR A TAX DE- 
DUCTION IN 1M67 Tho 
best one may be your own 
homo. We aorvice II. & Wi. You 
may qualify lor as litile as 3% 
down. Jim Davis (800) 747- 
5547. 

MCHENRY 
Small 1 Bedroom houso. Now 
roof/siding and carpet, Nico 
yard, lake rights. $51,900. 
(815)344-4278. 



FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 30847 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 
Homo Savings of America, FSB f/k/a Home 
Savings of America. FA, Case No. 96 C 8578 

Plaintiff, Judgo Noigio 

VS. 

Laura L Kerton, First of America Bank -Northeast. 
Illinois, N.A. and Michael A. Kerton, 
Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

PUHFILENO.30B47 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement entered 

in the above entitled causa on Apri l 18. 19 97. 

I, Max Tyson, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
February 27. 1998 at the hour of 9:00 a.m. at Lake County Court 
Houso. Waukegan, Illinois, sell to Ihe highest bidder tor cash, tho 
following described promises: 
cA/a 375 Fox Run. bbertyville, IL 60048 
Tax ID* 11-14-401-039 

The improvements on the property consist of single family 
dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, batanco within 24 
hours, certihod funds. No refunds. The sale shall bo subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 
The property will NOT bo opon for inspection. 
Tho Judgment amount was $109,038.02. 
Upon tho sate being made tho purchaser will recoivo a 
Ccrtiltcalo of Sale which w:ll entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified dale unless the property is redeemed according to law, 
For information call tho Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSaEo. Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
47B4 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officor is QQl required to provide additional information other than 
that sot forth in this Notice. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For Sale 



NEW WASAU HOME, 
raised ranch, 1 481 sq.ft., 
100x100ft. lot. Wisconsin & Hi* 
nols border. $87,000. (414) 
495-2718. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH BY 
OWNER nowly remodeled 
Capo Cod with 3-bodrooms, 2- 
full balhs and fomllyroom with 
hardwood floors, new carpet, 
paint, cabinets and more, 
Largo custom storage shod. 
All appliances including wash- 
er and dryer. $85,500. For op- 
polntmont (847) 740-2036. 

SELL A HOME/BUY A 
HOME If selling, wo have a 
number of Interested buyers. If 
interested in purchasing you 
may qualify lor as little as 3% 
down. Servicing II. & Wi. Jim 
Davis. (BOO) 747-5547. 

TAX BREAK RENTING 
doesn't do il so why not got out 
ol an apartment Into your own 
home? You may quality lor as 
little os 3% down. Servicing II. 
& Wi. Jim Davis (800) 747- 
5547. 

TIRED OF RENTING? A 
homo is In your reach with as 
little as 3% down lor qualified 
buyers. Servicing II, & Wi. Jim 
Davis (800) 747-5547. 

WAUKEGAN BRICK 

RANCH HOME, 3-bedrooms 
wilh hardwood floors, 2-full 
baths, 2-car garago, large fin- 
ished lamilyroom downstairs, 
patio, nico area. Lots ol star- 
ago and closet space. Wash- 
or/dryer, 2-slovos includod. 
Must sod to appreciate. 
$123,000. (847) 662-7415. 



FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 31818 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 
Norwesl Mortgage, Inc., a California Corporation, 

Plaintiff, Case No. 97 C 2852 

VS. Judge Norgle 

Den i so M. Antablian and William C. Nelson, 
The Board of Managers of the Bright Meadows, 
Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO- 31B1B 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement entered 

in tho above entitled cause on October 17. 1997 . 

I, Max Tyson, Special Commissioner for this court wilt on 
February 11, 1998 at tho hour of 9:00 a.m. at Lake County Court 
House, Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cosh, tho 
following described promises: 
c/k/a 219 S. Tanglewood Court, Round Lake, IL 60073 
Tax ID* 06-29-400-403-013 

The improvements on Ihe property consist of single family 
dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall bo subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 
Tho property will NOT bo open for inspection. 
The judgment amounl was $149,043.16. 
Upon the sals being made tho purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified dato unless the property is redeemed according to law. 
For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalkj, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer i3 ooi required to provide additional information other than 
that set forth In this Notice. 



504 


Homo For Rent i 



ALANWOOD 

ASSOCIATES 

(847)223-1141 

GET THE MOST FOR 

THE MONEYI 

3-bedroom m-tovcl almost 

now homo on cut-da- sac. 

Round Lake Beach with 

Lake Villa Schools. 

$1,400 ♦ security, 

ALANWOOD 

ASSOCIATES 

(847) 223-1141 

Many 3-bedroom homes 

available In tho Round lako 

area, starting at $80Q/month. 

Call lor details. 

AVON AND GRAYSLAKE 
SCHOOLS, 3-bodroom, 1- 
bath homo, C/A, appliances, 2- 
car garage. $850/momh plus 
utilities, $1,000 security do- 
posit, rotoronces required. 
1425 Williams, Round Lako 
Boach. (847)680-0211. 



500 



Homo For Sale 



FISHER AND FISHER RLE NO. 32290 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 
Norwesl Mortgage, Inc., a California Corporation, Plaintiff, 
VS. Case No. 97 C 47B9 

Wiiham Keys, Theresa Keys. Defendants. Judge Oucklo 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
QUB_FJLE_NQJ2230 
(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 
OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 
Public Notice is horeby given pursuant to a Judgement entered 
in the above entitled cause on QclQber_3._Jfl8Z. 

I, Thomas Johnson & Tina Douglas, Special Commissioner for 
this court will on February 18, 1998 at the hour of 1:30 pm at tho 
front door of Lako County Court House, 18 North County Street, 
Waukegan. nimois. sell to tho Nghest bidder for cash, the follow- 
ing dosenbod premises: 

cA/a 2628 North Elmwood Avenue, Waukegan, IL C0087 
Tax ID ■ 08-05-417-003 

The improvements on tho property consist of single family 
dwelling. 

Saks Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. Tho sale shall bo subject to 
general taxes and lo special assessment*. 
The property will NOT be open lor inspection. 
The judgment amount was $99,714.70. 
Upon tho sale being made tho purchaser will receive a 
Certificalo of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless Ihe property is redeemed according to law. 
For information cat) the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher. 30 North LaSaAe. Chicago, tfonoa. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 pm. to 3D0 p.m. Under Utnots law, the Sates 
Officer is not required to provide additional information other than 
that sot forth in this Notice. 




ALandmark 
Designs 



SMALL 



The country-styled two story Smafl meets tho reeds of a growing tamfy, as wefl as the parents whose chidren come 
(o veil. It has 2,484 square led ol Wing space on two floors wrth a storage area of 405 square led, and a two car garage. 
The c »ienor has dormers across the front and a covered porch. 

InsxJe the large entry an archway beckons towards Ihe kving room To the left of the entry o a coat cted with bypass 
doors, and an archway bating to the private quarters of the home. U-shaped stars on the nghl toad upstairs to bedrooms 
and storage anas. The kving room, wrtn trench doors toadWtgomo the a^ is separated from tho bn 
arch. 

A bay s^ncok with throe windews open up tho Mche^^ 
taming guests on on nlormai basis, with a cenvosoten/oating by opposite the range. The Mchon has an efficient work 
twgiewithpkntyolrulurallKjntrKXxJ^ 

the clothes center, three quarter bath, and garage entry. A kxmal lining room near Ihe front of the home offers a txA-in 
storage cabinet, to/ window, and a pocket doer aaxss to tho washroom and utirty, 

The master suite 6 located on the opposite sxle oi Ihe home from the garage. It has frcnchccorsopenrgc^ 
(i back, a large walk-in deed, too vanity sinks, a large wak- in shower, and a knen dosct The library, bcated opposlethe 
suto entry is klcal lor i coaxing and reac^ ones lav^ 
could be combined with the master suite. 

Upstairs, mem are two bedroorra with a 
bedrooms are uniquely shaped wrth corner wtadows lor extra lght. There Is a skytght in the hal area near the stairs. 
Storage is necessary and there are two finishrxi 
through a door. 

A hcrrxi needs to rrikKt ycur sh/e d Irvirxj a^ 
ntss. This openness, with little effort, could be expanded lo make this home wboeichar accesstie. 

For (• study kit ol Ihe SMALL (407-4SLPM) send $14,95, to LaxJrnark De<^, 33127 SagjrvMRd-E.Cdtarxj Grove, 
OR 97424 (Specify plan name 4 lumber lor ML For a &eomHcmo plan boc^leatunrxj our r^ 
S7.95,orcal 1-800-562-1151. 




January 16. 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C.19. 



504 



Homes For Rent 



ALANWOOD 

ASSOCIATES 

(B47) 223-1141 

OPPORTUNITY IS 

KNOCKING IN 

ROUND LAKE HEIGHTS! 

Loasc/oplion to purchase this : 

3-bodroom home with 

basement. You'll tove the 

neighborhood. Call for details. 

$800 +■ security. 

ALANWOOD 

ASSOCIATES 

(847)223-1141 

A FRIENDLY 

LITTLE HOME IN 

ROUND LAKE PARK 

3 -bedroom, eat-in kitchen, 

fenced yard. $775 + security. 

FOR RENT WITH OPTION 
TO BUY LAKE COMO 2 
miles West of Lake Geneva. 
New horns for rent with option 
to buy. 3-bodrooms, 1-1/2 
baths, largo livingroom, Wtch- 
on with dining area, patio . 
door to wood deck, full base- 
ment, attached 2-car garago, 
100ft.xl20ft lot. lake rights. 
Opibn is $5,000 down $600 
first month rent. $600 security 
deposit and $600/month 
thereafter. If option is exer- 
cised the $5,000 down pay- 
ment and years rent will be de- 
ducted off salo price of homo 
$134,900. (414) 248-7926 ask 
for Cindy. 

FOX LAKE HOUSE 4-bed- 
rooms, 2-baths. $1,000. LB. 
Anderson & Co. (647) 
381-9090. 

GRAYSLAKE CHESA- 
PEAKE FARMS, 4-bod- 
room. 2-1/2 bath, living- 
room/diningroom, full base- 
ment, fireplace, fencod yard, 
2-car garage. Spacious, now, 
decorated. $2.l00/month. 
Good credit a must. (847) 
465-6052. 

IN TOWN OF ANTIOCH. 3- 
bodroom, 2-story houso with 
fireplace, walk to train and 
shopping. $925/monih plus 
utilities. (8471 S67-233B. 

UNDENHURST 3-BED- 
ROOMS, 1-1/2 baths, now 
<M>ri>oilng. buirt-lns, 
s l. 165/month., Available im- 
mediately. 2206 Briar Ln. 
(773)235-6411. 

NEW ROUND LAKE 
BEACH HOME FOR 
RENT, 3-bodrooms. 1-1/2 
baths, large kitchen, fireplace. 
A/C. garage. $i,200/month. 
(847) 223-2408. 

ROUND LAKE SMALL 
HOUSE FOR RENT. Now 
kitchen, 1 -largo bedroom, re- 
frigerator, stove, washer/dryer 
hook-up, SGOC/montn plus 
$600 security. Six month or 
lyr. lease. Call (70S) 
344-3158 leave message or 
ask for Susan. 

ROUND LAKE PARK 3-bed- 
room, 1-bath ranch, 1-1/2'car 
attached garago, storago 
shed, fenced backyard, alt ap- 
pliances Including washer/dry- 
er, window A/C, $825/month 
plus security deposit. No Sec- 
lion 8. (847)740-3317. 

WAUKEGAN NORTH 
AVAILABLE 1/15/98, im- 
maculate 2-bodroom duplex, 
completely romodeled, now 
carpot/lilo/woodwork, full 
basement, washer/dryer hook- 
up. (847)336-8155 

WINTHROP HARBOR DU- 
PLEX cute 2-bodroom in quiet 
neighborhood, basement, ga- 
rage, toncod yard in back, 
S675/month plus utilities. No 
pots. No Section 8. (847) 
223-6269. 



PADDOCK LAKE 
- SALEM 

Lovely 2 UR, I UA 

home with deck. 

Large, open Kitchen, 

fio gar. or bsmt. 2 yr+ 

lease, $634/mo + 

Sec. Dcp. Land Mgmt 

815-678-4334. 



514 



Condo/TowTi Homes 



BUILD A DOWN PAY- 
MENT WHILE YOU RENT. 
25% goes toward down pay- 
ment on this great 3 story 
condo in the woods. 2/3 bed- 
rooms. 2.5 baths, 2-car ga. 
rage, C/A, so much morel 
S1,200/month. Round Lake. 
Kathy (847) 291-5444 or 
(647) 587-9623. 



514 



Condo/Town Homes 



CONDOS-5LOW %50'S. 
LOCATED In sunny Phoenix, 
Arizona. * Single level (solid 
block construction), secure 
gated community, 2 -bedroom, 
1-bath. Mint condition. Rick 
Brandt Brokor. 1-602-433- 
9486. www.doit* 

now.com/~rbrandt. (SCA Not- 
work). 

GREAT STARTER HOME 

2-bodroom townhome, full 
basement, cathedral ceilings, 
Genoa City, Wise. $86,900.' 
NO MAINTENANCE FEESt 
(815) 675-6360. (414) 
279-3331 . 

GURNEE 5-ROOMS, 2- 
LARGE BEDROOMS 
PLUS DEN/THIRD BED- 
ROOM, FIREPLACE, EAT- 
IN KITCHEN, APPLIANC- 
ES, WASHER/DRYER, 
24HR. SECURITY PA- . 
TROL, PATIO, GARAGE. 
NO PETS. AVAILABLE 
NOW. $1,050/MONTH. 
(847) 680-6484. 

GURNEE DELUXE 3-BED- 
ROOM. 2-bath, diningroom, 
all appliances, washer/dryer, 
garago, fireplace. Immediate 
occupancy. $1,100/month 
plus utilities. (847) 336-0862. 

ON PtSTAKEE IN FOX 
LAKE BY OWNER 2-bed- 
room, 2.5 bath townhouse. 
Builders model, all upgrades, 
master bath Jacuzzi, walk-in 
closets, fireplace, now, carpet, 
washer/dryer, at! appliances 
stay, deep 1-1/2 car garage 
plus 2 parking spots, boat slip, 
city sower/water, low assess- 
ments. SI 15.900. (847) 
587-4945. 

ONE BLOCK FROM UW 
PARKSIDE, 1848sq.lt, 2- 
bodroom, 2-bath. largo |ac- 
cuzzi. cathedral ceiling, gas 
fireplace, garage, central air, 
pond view, spacious. Must 
see. $145,000-$! 64,900. 
(414) 552-7833. 

OWNER TRANSFERRED! 
MUST SELL] Now construc- 
tion: Townhouse In unique 
woodod court yard. 3 -bed- 
rooms, 2-1/2 baths. 2-car at- 
tached, C/A, gas fireplace, in 
bay window. Oak trim through- 
out, upgraded flooring and GE 
appliances stay. Includes self 
cleaning oven, dishwasher, 
disposal, side-by-stde refrig- 
erator with water service in 
door, and large capacity wash- 
er/dryer. Cathedral ceiling in 
large master bedroom with 
bay window, balcony, walk-in 
doset and alcove loft. Over- 
sized tub in master bath. Ceil- 
ing fans with dimmer fights in 
master bedroom and second 
bedroom. End unit with cus- 
tom patio oft front deck. Walk 
to Metro. Extras include: wind- 
ow treatments, chamber 
doors and extra shelving in fin- 
ished garago. Please call for 
appointment. Assumablo 30 
years FHA ARM at 7.5%. 
$135.500. (847) 74CK)266. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 
TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT, 
2-story, 1-1/2 bath, 2-bed- 
room. 1-car attached garage, 
all appliances, $725/month. 
Section B O.K. (630) 
782-2133. 

VERNON HILLS CONDO 
FOR RENT In The Willows. 
2-bodroom, 1-1/2 bath, living- 
room, diningroom, eat-in kitch- 
en, washer/dryer, A/C, over- 
looks pool and lake, 
$800/month. (847) 816-0869. 



514 



Condo/Town Homes 



514 



Gondo/Town Homes 



ALANWOOD 

ASSOCIATES 

(847)223-1141 ' 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 

$850 A BIG 

OPPORTUNITY! 

Lease/option this 3-bodroom 

townhouse. Call for details. 
— ^— — j 

TOWNHOUSE 3-BED- 
ROOMS, 3-BATHS, Gurnee 
School District, $96,000. (847) 
249-5442. 

VERNON HILLS CONDO 
FOR RENT, 5-minutes from 
Hawthorne Mall, 2-bedrooms, 
1-bath, all new appliances, 
washer/dryer, microwave. 
Newly remodeled. Neutral 
decor. Ceramic tile. 1-car ga- 
rage wiih door opener. Avail- 
able February 1, $950/month 
plus security deposit. Call 
(847) 548-8553 evenings. 

VERNON KILLS CONDO In 
The Willows, 2-bedroom, 1- 
1/2 bath, livingroom, dining- 
room, eat-in kitchen, wash- 
er/dryer, A/C, overlooks pool 
and lake. $72,000. (847) 
816-0869. 

WAUKEGAN-2200 RIDGE- 
LAND. 2 Bedroom, full base- 
ment, partial third bedroom, 
$700/monlh + security re- 
quired, No pots. Call (847) 
249-3048. 



518 


Mobile Homes 



520 



Apartments For Roil 



FOX LAKE 5-ROOMS 2- 
bedrooms. fully applianced, 
private off street parking, lake- 
front view. Available imme- 
diately. $650/month. Deposit 
required. (847)526-3341. 

FOX LAKE STUDIO, very 
clean, ideal for single, on wa- 
ter, tennis and pool. No pets. 
Available now. $395/month 
plus utilities. 
(647)587-5301. 

GRAYSLAKE 2-BED- 

ROOM, A/C, cable available. 
No pets. $560/monlh plus 
lease and security deposit. In- 
cluding heat/water. Available 
March 1.(847) 223-2745. 

GURNEEAVAUKEGAN 

NORTH SHORE 

APARTMENTS 

At Affordablo Prices. 

Spacious. 

Luxury Living. 

Elevators. 

On Site Staff. 

Good Location. 

Easy to Toll Roads. 

IMPERIAL TOWER/MANOR. 

(847) 244-9222. 



514 



Condo/TcwTi Horn a 




GURNEE 

AFFORDABLE TOWNHOMES 

3 BR; 1-1/2 Bnlh; Attached Garage 

847-856-0309 

Assistance Available for Qualified Buyers Based On 
Household Size And A Maximum Annual Income. 

SPECIAL OFFER 

For the Next Four Buyers! 



520 



Apartments For Rent 



520 



Apartments For 



For Bent 



1BR. APT. NEAR NORTH 
WAUKEGAN, 5 minutes to 
train. Registered Historical 
Building $485. (847)244-4260. 

ANTIOCH THREE ROOM 
APARTMENT, utilities Includ- 
ed, $525/month plus security 
deposit. Available immediate- 
ly. (847) 265-6270. 

LAKEVIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA, Largo 1 & 2 bedroom's, 
$590-$720/month. Heat, wa- 
ter, air included. (847) 
356-5474. 

NORTH CHICAGO 

AREA,(1) 1 -BEDROOM, (1) 
2-BEDROOM APARTMENTS, 
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY! 
SECTION 8 O.K. (847) 
688-1415. 



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WAUKEGAN & 2ION 14 2 
bedrooms, free heat, water, 
gas, coin laundry. Background 
check required. (847) 
587-6360. 

WAUKEGAN 730 WAL- 
NUT, clean, large, 3-bed- 
room, basement, C/A/C, 
$735/morrth. (847) 662-8614, 
(847)334-8614; ' 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 
APARTMENT FOR RENT, 
all utilities, S650/monlh. first 
and last months rent and refer- 
ences. Pets OK. (847) 
566-1775. 

WAUCONDA 1 -BEDROOM 
APARTMENT, newly deco- 
rated, heat and hot water in- 
cluded, $545/month, lease 
and security deposit. No pets. 
Available immediately. (847) 
433-0891. 



1066-2 BEDROOM LO- 
CATED In Park City. Financ- 
ing uvollablo. Good 
terms, all appliances stay. 
$5.990. (847)319-6368. 

CAMPGROUND MEMBER- 
SHIP. Camp from Coast to 
Coast. Over Eleven 
Hundred quality resorts, only 
$4.00 to $1 1 .00 per night. Paid 
$3,600. Sacrifice $595. Call 
1-800-438-1944. (SCA Net- 
work) ' 

FOR SALE BY OWNER 
1991 Liberty Mobile Homo. 
2x6 energy efficient with vinyl 
siding. 3-bodrooms, new ap- 
pliances, woodburnlng tire- 
place In liyingroom. large eat- 
in kitchen, new 8x8 storage 
shod. Motivated soller. (414) 
697-6322 leave message. 



• Spacious 2 Bedroom Apartments. 

• 1 or 1-1/2 Bath Available. 

•Patio or Balcony with Individual Storage. 

• Short Term Leasing Available. 

REALTY SERVICE 




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(847)395-7997 jgft 



On Sat &Suit Call (630) 232-6084 <j 



OAICRIDGEVILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 



Offering Affordable Housing for 
Qualified Applicants. 

Currently Accepting Applications on our 

] & 2 Bedroom Apartments 

Stop in at: 

299 Oakridge Court in Antioch 

Or call: 

847-395-4840 
fSfr 1-800-526-0844 TDD 

feSsn ■ a Manaood by Meridian Group. Inc. 



Take a New Look at 

MEMPLAME 

Mii&MinrAra 

Spacious 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments 

• Fully Carpeted • Located on Deep Lake 
• Balcony/Patio • Heal, Water & Cooking Gas Included 

(847) 356-2002 gt 

♦..» i.i. •..-»..," 149 ft. Milwaukee Ave, Lake Villa' 



G.P. MANAGEMENT, INC, 

1 £ 2 Bedroom Apartments 
In Antioch fr lake Villa 

Antioch Manor Apartments 

445 Donin Dr., Antioch 
847-395-0949 

Pccd Lake 
«e*~- Hermitage Apartments 

49 N. Milwaukee Ave,, Lake Villa 
847-356-2002^^^ 

CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION m 



ANTIOCH 
MANOR 



truiulvli 



TvidVE-lN 
SPECIAL 



ONE & TWO 



BEDROOM 
Ipj^^ APARTMENTS 

• Flexible Leasing "Q uiet 

• Free Credit Check Setting" 



Ar.U.vh 

Minor 



ANTIOCH 
MANOR 



AfARTMENTS 



North Ave. 




528 



Ap! /Homes 
To Share 



TWO BEDROOM, 2-BATH 
apartment, in Lake Bluff, close 
to Abbott. Great Lakes. 
1013sq.ft.. 2nd floor, vaulted 
ceiling, washer/dryer, parking, 
club house, pool. Available im- 
mediately, $50O/month. Call 
Mike (847) 615-9404 home, 
(312) 432-2933 ex!. 263, 
work. ' 

RESPONSIBLE ROOM- 
MATE WANTED to share 
large home in upscale area. 
$400/month plus utilities, 
(847) 356-5095. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH, 

looking for responsible 'open 
minded person, lull privileges, 
$350/monlh, $250 deposit. 
Rob or Frto (B47) 546-2550. 



530 


Rooms For Rent 



FOX LAKE women pre- 
ferred, $75/wk, 5150/sec. de- 
posit, all utilities included. 
Background check. (647) 
567-6360. 

FURNISHED SLEEPING 
ROOMS, Mundelein area. 
No pets. $90/per wee*. Refer- 
ences. (847) 566-2885. 

GURNEE EMPLOYED 

OENLTEMEN SLEEPING 
ROOM, WITH HOUSE 
PRIVILEGES. (£47) 

662-2802 LEAVE MES- 
SAGE IF NECESSARY. 

LAKESIDE ROOM ON FOX 
LAKE, private bath/entrance, 
only $ioo/week. (847) 
356-2747. (414) 862-6066, 

SPACIOUS FURNISHED 
SLEEPING ROOM. Rent 
$85/week. 1-week escrow. 
Utilities, cable, kitchen, laun- 
dry, bath privileges included. 
No pets-alcohol-drugs. Re- 
sponsible mature person de- 
sired. Rent can be reduced in 
exchange for light housekeep- 
ing. (414) 654-7905 after 6om. 



533 


Buildings 


Steel Building 

Dealerships In Select 

Open Markets. 


Huge Profit Potential, 
Call Mr. Stone 
003) 758-4135 


520 


Apartments For Rent 



fox Lab 

H32C8Z Vkw AfSOfalaLUkJ 

One Bedroom 
apartments near lake on 

quiet street Newly 

decorated and carpeted 

Cable available. 

No dogs. 
I Bedroom $525 
847-2955105 



WESTW1ND 

VILLAGE 

APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewii Ave., Zion 

1,2 & 3 BEDROOMS 

FREE HEAT 

NEW YEAR'S CASH SPECIAL 

$200 - CASH BACK 

WHEN MOVE-IN BY 

JAN. 31" 
Appliances • On-$ite 

MjfMgtl • No Pets 
Starting from $4<J5/mo. 

Call Martha & Issac 
(847) 746-1420 

01EAR PROPERTY 
iANAGEMENT 
114) 697-9616 



LUXUH.T AfAHTMlNTS 

KENOSHA - 1/2 mile from 
-94 on Hwy SO. Just a 
short drive to luxury living. 
Brand new 1 & 2 Bdrm I 
Affordable Luxury Apts. - 
Washer/Dryer & pantry in 
every unil. Exercije room, 
clubhouse, pool &pond. 
Sunrooms & underground 
parking available. Pels 
considered. Call to reserve 
yours now. Now Open Sat 
& Sun 1 2 to 5 pm 
414-652-RENT 



534 



Business Property 
For Sale 



43RD. AVE. 14 unit apart- 
ment building, excellent condi- 
tion, good cash flow, priced 
right (414) 694-3232. 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



ROUND LAKE BEACH. 913 
West Rollins Road. High traf- 
fic. Retail Space. 1 ,000-5,500 
square feet. Will divida. $5- St 2 
per square foot. Call (847) 
740-4596. ' 

SUB-LEASE 9,000SQ.FT., 

18FT. ceiling, twin load level- 
er docks. Perfect for dry stor- 
age or other. Good Grayslake 
location. Available immediate- 
ly. Very reasonable. Call Karen 
(B47) 740-4035. 



RICHMOND 
LOT or YOUR BUSI 
NESS USE Brick 
on Rt. 12, 1 bay, office, 
garage & sales lot. 
Excellent visibility, 
ternate use OK. 
S795.00/mo. 

Land Mgmt 
815/6784771 \ 




DO YOU HAVE 

SOMETHING TO SELL 

FOR $75 OR LESS7 

Place your ad in this section 

for only $3.00 for 10 words or 

less. Must be prepaid. 

Call Usa (B47) 223-8161 

exL 140 or send the ad with 

with your payment to: 

Lakeland Publishers, 

P. O. Box 2C8, 

30 S. Whitney St.. 

Grayslake 111. 60030. 

Atten: Lisa. 



560 



Vacant lot/Acreage 



FOR SALE BY PRIVATE 
OWNER, TWO-1/2 Acre Lots 
in Arboretum Woods of Salem. 
Wl. 1-Mile North of Antioch on 
Rta.83. city sewer with well- 
water. Lol 2-$49,500, Lot 
11«$49.000. Build your own - 
custom homy? 
(815)344-5972. 

JOHNSBURG CORNER 

LOT 3/4 acre in area of newer 
homes, doso to high school, 
$46,000. (815)344-6324. 

ONE ACRE LOT with sewer. 
Burlington area. Access to 
highway 36, 11, 142. $37,500. 
(414)767-9162. 



564 



Resort/Vacation 
Rentals 



SAINT MAARTEN VILLA 
DELIGHTFULLY DUTCH 
FANTASTICALLY 
FRENCH For an affordable 
"alternative to hotel vacation- 
ing. Starting SI, 000 per week. 
Call 410-398-3793. E-Mail wil- 
lisml@atl.com. (SCA Network). 



568 



Out Of Area Property 



SO. COLORADO ROCKY 
MTN. FRONT RANGE. 55 
acrea-S34.900. Ride off into 
the sunset on this perfect 
horse property. Gently rolling 
meadows w/ beautiful Juniper 
&pine trees. Spectacular 
views, abundant elk, deer & 
turkey. Minutes to lake & Na- 
tional Forest. Powor and 
phone. Ownor and financing. 
Call now 719-564-6367. 
Red Crook Ranch at 
Hatchet. 



MISSOURI - Get out of the City! 
Great Retirement Property, 140 ac. 
farm on Niangua River nr Builala, 
Mo.. 35 mi. Sonngfekl. Pasture, 
bromc & Red Ctaer hay. all elec 
home. 3 br, M/2 bth. CAc, 2 cat 
Ue/hay bams, mach shed & shop. 1 
mi. mer frontage. May divide, 
S350K. Owner 417345-7153. 



WYOMIHG - 213 Acres irri- 
gated approx. 2-1/2 mi. of 
Big Horn frontage (good fisrn 
tag), exc. development 
prop,, homesitcs. Call, for 
details WYO-West Real 
Estate, 307 864-5588, other 
fine props also avail. 




C20 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 16. 1998 



568 



Qui Of Area Property 



TEXAS , Houston 

Apartment Complex, 75 
Units 98% Occupied. 
$850,000 - 10+ CAP, 
Others available. Target 
Realty, Inc., Call 281-440- 
9110 for info./ddtails. J 



ARKATISAS- II yw want on a lishing 
take, thft K the home tor you. loe'd 
in Central Arkansas. This 2,500 St, 
home has U6 acs w/m tl. water 
frontage t too It. ol highwag 
(rootage tor only im.wo.oo. Call 
Cecil or Pat [soil huoii, Hervy 
llawk t, Associates Real [stale. 



ARIZONA • Showlow. 
5,000 si. ranch house. 
New 4-plcx. 110 ara. Lake 
with gjuoho backs to 
Stlfjricvos Nal'l Forest. 
$1.2 Million. Cull 602- 
872-8907 for details. 



MISSOURI- Row Crop Farm, 
169 nc, wheal, corn, milo base, 
2br, Iblh older home, 9" capped 
well. Mack River A Hwy 
Business 60 frontage, loins city 
of l\>plar Bluff, $220tVac. Call 
nLUMENB[RCLANDCO„S73- 
857-2603 for details. 



CALIFORNIA - Pacific Ocean 
View, 230 ac, on Mendocino 
County Coast. 5,300 sf, 4 bed- 
room residence, enclosed 37 ft, 
swimming pool. see 
www.eurekahill.com. Bruno & 
Evelyn Pills 707/882-2719 



p_______ — _| 

j IT.XAS, SAINT )0 - H25 Acrcj 
'kjiuIi Home, oak lire*, vcnlc' 
| views, (leer, turkey, hegj 
■ Information on tlii% or other ]>rop- 1 
\crt\c\ JU37AV, Joe Young, K1J.J 
■972-250-07WJ, !>72-fi<;i-:»twl 
|m.\<. dr., COUWJOJ. HANKER | 
•RMJLA STfUNCOt REALTORS. 



DANVILLE, VIRGINIA 
Currently 70° 

\ at Like front estate. Mahogany 
doors A a soaring two story (oytr 
welcome you into ihis 5 BR man- 
sion. Formal nns, tulwd (Ire, 3 
Irplcs. separate MRR, kitchen has 
cherry cabinets & granite counter 
lops, v^-m o( tlic sunset from 
fiom the sunrootn or deck. 
S879.000. ERA Holley & Lewish 
RlJy, (.SOI) 791-2400 



COLORADO 
ESTES PARK 

Magnificent view & Iwmc w/all 
amenities. Incl'ds over 6,(100 sf. 
with moms individually healed, 
3 acs, city water, borders Rocky 
Mountain National l*ark, 2,tXX) 
lb. capacity commercial clev.i 
tor. Parking on both levels. This 
House Has Everything! 
S6I5JVM1. (561) 334M1985. 

i imin w u r n 



n w m i iw w wn| ifw ^'i rt wwi 



BRAZIL 

Salvador-Bahia 

Sell urgent. 45 minutes out ol the 
city, 30 minutes from the airport 
Lots 100 ft. from the ocean. Very 
private Ixuch. If you can afford In 
build a million dollar house, dial's 
your place for vacation. The best 
of the best, even as an invest 
men), 90&-2B'J-3S99 ( Katrus. 



NEW MEXICO RANCH 

Development Opportunity fur 

•OLD WEST DREAM" nround 

243 EXISTING HOMESTEADS 

on the 16,020-ocre Thornton 

Ranch. Mopiificcnl,.DivtTsc 

Tbrrain & Expansive- Views just 

19 miles south of the 

Santa Fe Plaza. Call Jim 

Haworth 5067192-3713, 

E-mail gfxxi('>WTeaHy.com 



568 



Out Of Area Property 



OHIO - 10 Acres Ohio River 
Front Property. Great for retire 
ment or retreat, in Lawrence 
County Ohio wai once 
approved for river shfrsptng 
facility sand A' gravel rights, 
S16J,000. By Owner [611) 777- 
1766 or |S00) WVto fur details 



IOWA - By Ownor. S. 
Conlraf IA. 3br, lbth, 
l/2bsmt, adjaconl to 
appiox. 3600 ocs. ol public 
wildlife hunting area. Ideal 
weekend retreat- or todgo 
for a hunting ctub.Coli any- 
tlmo 712-423-9952. 



HlONTANA Ut'tST KAKC1I • WiUlcrnai 
Gd AW*jl Nr IV* Minhill Wikkmcn 
CrcJl Cwp/lnJiv. Kdrcil/Rcliremcrii 
Pwrvrty, 50 wl Miwub liipjrt. *W 
if. Utiff k S 1*/, Ohm, pmtcf, wikllifc, 
'JO*- fci on bli i 1 .25 Million. hsdiurr, 
Oil Dinor, Crwl Pear hxfctliea, 40C- 
tnsSMctM 677-2174 fiTdVtoik 



NEVADA • PfliVATt TAMOE ESTATE. 

Quid, 37 Mk Incline Villji.Yni Reno 
4 iki Jfcjs. 1200 sf., RfKim to Cimr, 
JU, J.jbth, J k-uls, lilcheti, jacuwi, 
shop, home officr, mini condition. 
niip/A»el>lrtt(i.ncit«irxje,rilm 
email ijhncHv.tWetiei.nct 

$620,000. 
Hy owner, 702-831-3938. 



ifiilliililliiiillilillllllliirulill 

^FLORIDA mrr 170 

ROLLING ACRES. Great 
jRclircmcnt/Rclreal Property, 
j North Honda On Paved Rtwd. 2 
jLaktt, Guest & Tenant House, 20 
8 mi. II ol Tallahassee. $850,000, 
R Owner financing avail. Call 
B 904/997-2555 for details 

'I ,|,|ll,,Hir|lMIIIII.II.IMII 



IDAHO • Splendid In loun living 
within walking distance to ski lifts 
at Sun Valley Ski Resort, 4 brs, 2- 
1/2 bth home w/rooflop. hottuh, 
ideal for full lime or vac. resident. 
Offered al $545,000. Video * 
brochure avail. Sun Land 
Investments, (200] 726-18 10 






TEXAS ■ 21 B0 ocs. w/1. maoj ol 
spcukkng tpftfj lod erect, some 
o*nen sneo "3S. 2 Oorns horn 
t»out. lotos to fen 4 swm, 2 homes. 
boms, pens, gfeot comoo ol gross 
land 4 hts la wlcftlo.fiiofo oi '<« 
sloct Mnny posiWitiCSl Utopia 
tetos W country oreo, $8$Q/oc I- 
dO>375B723.t Corpcnler/ogl. 



MISSOURI - Builders Estate 
7+ ac, 3350 sf. brand new 
home, 6 br, 3bth, 2 & 3 car 
garages, w/ boat slip on Lake 
Ozark. Great Corp/tndiv. 
Retreat. $269,000, By owner. 
Call 573-345-3888 for details. 



708 



Snowmobiles/ATV's 



1SB5 SNOWMOBILE YA- 
MAHA PHAZER, good condi- 
tion, 2,700 miles, SI. 100, 
(847) 395-9490. 

1993 EXCITER SX. Both 
groat condition. Very low 
milos. Must soil for S3. GOO. 
(B47) 566-1 199. 

1996 YAMAHA V-MAX 600, 
674 milos, cover, oxcotlont 
shape. (815)344-9038. 

SNOWMOBILE TRAILER' 
1995 Trilon, 4-placo, brakes, 
salt shield, ski glides nnd 
sparo, S2.600. (847) 548- 
1854. 



710 


Boai/Molors/Ktc. 



1909 WELL CRAFT BOAT, 
cuddy cabin, Alpino storoo, 0- 
cylindor ongino, sundock, ex- 
cellonl condition, low hours on 
motor. $9,500.bosl. Pogor 
(847) 216-2172. 



ARIZONA 
DIRT CHEAP! 

; Formerly owned by Santa, 

Fc RR for 100 yrs. Pristine 

40ac ranch parcels now 

: priced for i mined sate lo 

: general public from only 

|$395/acl Nr Colorado: 

; River. Guar. fin. w/Jo dn,; 

exc terms. 100% mineral & j 

water rights incl'd. Going ■ 

fast! Stagecoach Trails, ask ; 

for Gordon or Angela; 

Hardy 800-711-2340. 



720 


Snorts Equipment 


WEIDER WEIGHT BENCH 
AND WEIGHTS, $145. (847) 
356-0275. 


804 


Can for Sale 



1979 FIREBIRD Super Sport, 
Classic Arizona Collectors car, 
56,000 original milos, good 
condition, fully loaded, glass T- 
tops, mag wheels, automatic. 
Pager (047)216 2172, 

10B4 CAMARO T-TOPS, 
now exhaust, stall convenor, 
transmission, built 350 en- 
gino, needs carburator, 
$750/best. (815) 653-7056 
ovonings. 



804 


. Cars for Sale 



$2,500 1985 ELDO CADIL- 
LAC (no A/C), gray In color, 
good shape. (414) 862-6452. 

1984 DODGE DAYTONA 
TURBO, good condition. 1- 
owner, 72,500 miles, Si, 100. 
(847) 244-0736. 

1984 MERCEDES 
WAGON 280TE, $5,500. 
Must soo, (847) 234-3675. 

1985 F1ERO SE, 6 cylinder, 
A/C, cruiso, now liros, mint 
condition, runs like now, 
$3,200. Call (847)548-6933 
altor 7pm. 

1988 DELTA 88, very cloan 
inside/out, fully loaded, needs 
motor, $400/bost. (847) 
740-2263. 

1966 FLEETWOOD 

BROUGHM, showroom con- 
dition, rebuilt ongino with only 
16,000 miles, new $3,000 
paint job with Special Gold Edi- 
tion. Runs and looks great. 
Sacrifice $7,500. Call Bob 
(847) 855-2131 Gurneoarea. 

1909 AUDI MODEL 90, 
great shape black leather In- 
terior, power sunroof, cruiso, 
groat stereo, no rust. Peppy lit- 
tlo rod car. Asking $5,000. 
(414) 763-3246 afler 5pm. 



804 



Can for Sale 



1990 FORD PROBE LX, 
Only 87,400 miles, 6-cylinder 
airtomntic, fully loaded, power 
everything, white with rod In- 
terior, excellent condition, ap- 
plied rust proofing annually. 
S5.500, (647)263-6150. 

1990 HONDA CIVIC LX, 
automatic, 97,000 milos, deal- 
er maintained, oxcellont condi- 
tion. Great car lor spouse or 
student. $4,400/bost. (847) 
265-8434 ollor 6pm. 



814 


Service & Parts 



1992 ACCURA LEGEND 
LS, 4-door, black, leather, 
loaded, very good condition, 
92.000 miles. $11.0000. (847) 
BSS-0509. 

1994 TRANS AM GT LT1 
VB, 6-speed, 35,000 miles, 
$14,900/b0St. (414) 652-7957. 

1995 SATURN SL2, 4 door, 
fully loaded with power sun- 
roof and 10 disk CD changer, 
plum wilh gray interior. 
S11.900/bosi. (847) 247-0663 

HONDA 

CARS FOR $100111 

Seized & Sold locally this 

month. Trucks, 4x4"s, otc. 

(BOO) 522-2730 

oxt. 2292. 

CHEVY 1989 CELEBRITY, 
VC, 4-door, automatic, de- 
pendable, economical, good 
condition, $1 ,550. (847) 
487-0561. 

DONATE AUTOS? 
BOATS. Free phono card lo 
donors with ad #2248. Tax de- 
ductible. Froo towing. Heritage 
for the blind. Helping iho 
blind/vision impaired. 800-2 
DONATE. 

FORD 1991 PROBE, runs 
great, good condition, loaded, 
$2,500,0)051. (414) 862-9508. 

FORD 1995 ESCORT LX 
WAGON, 32K, automatic, air, 
cassette, now tiros, great con- 
dition. $8,700. (847) 
265-2913. 

HONDA 1990 CRX/HF, 

55,000 miles, air, 5-speod. 

Asking $5,000. (414) 
658-1496. 

IF YOU HAVE 

FURNITURE TO SELL, 

A car, or appliancas, II 

you ara having a Garngo 

Sale or It you hnvo a 

houso to soil or apartment 

10 rent. 

Call Lisa beloro 10am 

Wodnosday to ptaco 

your ad horo. 

(847)223-8161 

oxt. 140. 

LINCOLN 1977 TOWN 
COUPE, now timo chain, re- 
built transmission, $750/best. 
(414) 249-9433, 

LINCOLN 1990 TOWN 
CAR CARTIER. loaded, all op- 
lions, 7BK, $10.900/bosl. 
(630) 834-3989. 

PLYMOUTH 1988 SUN- 
DANCE, great runner, 
$1.295/bos1. 19B3 CHEVY 
VAN. $1,00O/bost. (414) 
605-9431. 

SATURN 1994 SW 2 WAG- 
ON, automatic, ABS, traction 
control, new tiros. Beautiful! 
$9,250. (414) 551-9093. 

TREAT YOURSELFI 1993 
Cavalier Convertible RS. Qua- 
sar Blue wilh bright while top 
and silvor trim, 3.1 liter V6 on- 
gino with automatic transmis- 
sion, power brakes/anti-lock, 
powor windows/stooring/top. 
air, till steering wheel and 
cruiso control, immaculately 
maintained, oil changed ovory 
4,000 miles and stored in win- 
tors, all now Eagle tires, 
brakes and shocks, 70K easy 
milfcs, $7,900. Check tho Blue 
Book, then come and tako a 
took. (847) 265-9464. For 
photo soo: www.inlor- 
green.com/treaf 



1964-1977 CHEVELLE, 
GTO, Cutlass, Monte Carlo, 
Nova, Skylark, Firebird, Cam- 
aro, Impala. 'From tho pedal 
to the metal. IVe got all Iho 
parts to restore your clas- 
sic... your parts place!" (630) 
879-1600. 

•DRIVE SHAFT SERVICE* 

Drlvo Axle and Supply Co. 

- COMPLETE DRIVE 

SHAFT SERVICE. 

'Custom Made. 

• Front Whool 

Drlvo Axloo. 

* Computerized 

balancing. 

•FREE DEUVERYI 

And more. 

(414)639-2100. 

HARD TOP FOR 1993 Jeep 
Wrangler, with roar wipers, 
mint condition, $900. (B47) 
740-1853. 



824 


Vara 



1984 CHEVY CONVER- 
SION VAN, runs great, 
$1,500/besl. Call after 7pm 
(847) 746-3452. 

1989 DODGE VAN 130K 
used lor delivery, 2-scats only, 
all regular maintenance and 
records, AM/FM, runs and 
drives oxcellont. $1.750/besl. 
(847) 740-4035. 

ATTENTION CONTRAC- 
TORS 1979 CHEVY STEP- 
VAN, V-8, aulo, cargo ladder 
rack, shelving recent new 
motor & transmission, MUST 
SELL $2,000. (847) 
587-5598. 

DODGE 1987 RAM LE cus- 
tom 250, B-passonger van, au- 
tomatic, lull powor, $3,500. 
(414)652-4129. 

DODGE 1989 CARAVAN, 
2.5L, now liros, must sell. 
$1,495. (414) 942-1407 oven- 
inns. 



828 



Four Wheel Drive 
Jeeps 



1975 JEEP CJ5 liborglnss 
body, many new parts, 
S2,900/bost. (815) 653-4060. 

1388 FORD BRONCO II 

$3,000/best. (847) 514-4183. 

1995 CHEVY SUBURBAN 
4x4, 4-door, VB, automalic, 
air, full powor, alloys, extra 
cloan, 50,000 miles. (847) 
249-6447. 



834 


TruckVTnulcrs 



1987 FORD RANGER 
LONGBED, 6-cylindor. 5- 
spoed stick, S3,000/negoti- 
ablo. (B47) 546-8793. 

1997 DODGE RAM 4x4, ex- 
tended cab wilh Swiss Cap, 
loaded with many extras, in- 
cluding remote start and door 
locks, excellent condition, 
14.500 milos. Asking $23,900. 
(414)694-3506. 

CHEVY FORD PICK-UP 
BODIES. Factory-new. guar- 
anteed from $1300.00. Doors 
Irom $89.00. Fenders (rom 
$50.00, Bods Irom $800.00, 
Bodlinors from $169.00. 
BUMPERS, GRILLS, REPAIR 
PANELS. PAINTS, ABRA- 
SIVES, WINDSHIELDS, RA- 
DIATORS. Delivery, MARK'S 
(217)824-6184. 

CHEVY PICKUP DIESEL 
FULL SIZE 1981, 1 ton, au- 
tomatic. 91,000 miles, 
$1.500/bost. Ski-Doo ca- 
booso, $125. Side doors lor 
Chevy Van. 396-350hp robuilt 
hoads. Used small Chevy 
block hoader, $80. New big 
block headers, fits Camaro & 
Nova. Two roar doors (or 
1971-1996 Chovy/GMC van* 
1 front rider side door, 
$100/0 a. Left side insido door 
handle lor 1984 Olds Cullass 
Supremo. Munsoy 4-spood 
transmission, $375. And much 
more. Too much to mention. 
Pager (847)216-2172, 

FORD 1979 WITH cap, runs 
groat, 3-spood, no rust, 
$1,875.(414)694-0784, 



838 


Heavy Equipment 


743 BOBCAT DIESEL, runs 

good, oxcellont shape. Asking 
$10,O00/bosl. (414) 
248-1331. 


844 


Motorcycles 



S15 


Carpel Cleaning 



S30 



Firewood 



1 



1998 YAMAHA SRX 600, 
EXCELLENT SHAPE, MANY 
EXTRAS. ASKING $8,500. 
(847) 625-1056. 



845 



Miscellaneous 
Merchandise 



DESIGNER MODEL 

HOME 

FUHNITURE SALE 

Sofa/lovesoal set. hunter 

groen and cranberry, $595. 

Sofa/Iovoseal set, 

eanli tones, $695. 

Other sets, plaids, 

florals and leathers, etc. 

Dlnlngroom sot, 

10-piece, $ 1,595. 

Bedroom sot 

6-pioco, $995. 

(847)329-4119. 



DO YOU SUFFER FROM 
ALLERGIES? DOES 

YOUR CARPET NEED 
CLEANING? U.S.C. SERVIC- 
ES will guarantee tho lowost 
overall prico on export carpet 
cleaning I Comparo our prices 
and save. Our cleaning In- 
cludes a soil guard, deodoriz- 
er and static guard that others 
charge extra for. Also no extra 
charge lor spot removal, 
stairs, hallways, or travel timo. 
Just 1 low prico of $.20 per 
sq.ft., for Ddual carpet sizes, 
Wilh our 5 step method, we 
still scrub your carpet with a 
machino, (not Just vacuum), 
with a chemical treated water. 
For a healthy home, wo re- 
move dust, pollen, mold, bac- 
teria, and dust miles. Wo loavo 
your homo fresher smelling, 
enhance its oppcaranco and 
extended carpel life. Call 
today lor your appointment 
and breath oasy again. (847) 
546-5600. Recommended by 
tho world's best carpet manu- 
facturers, 30yrs. experience. 



NORDSTROM 
TREE SERVICE 

Seasonal Hardwoods 

$70 per face cord 

Delivered 

(847) 526-0858 



FANTASTIC 

FIREWOOD 

2 yr. old seasoned hartfwood. 

Oak, ash, maple, cherry. $65.00 

per taco cord mixed $75.00 

per bee cord 100% oak. 

Free stacking and defvery, 

Buj the wood ihit'i 

lUinnttcd to barn. 

(847) 546-3613 • (815) 344-9522 

1 -8004306562 

Credit Cards Accepted 



** 




Take your vacatiomvithout leawng, 
fr—j Seethe Eiffel Toive^Uhmtt evenm 



: 

SdJJL - 



J L 




stepping on aplam L 




you where you want to go. Tile iifr/^ 
at 



; 



Dofyourdreanisis only d } clickdway! 



- : 




.!• 1 




^DIRECT 



(847) 223-8199 

E-Mail: service@lnd.com 

Visit us on the Internet: http://ww.lnd.com 

•Lakeland nciDlllliCT offcis local phone charges lo most of the 
Lake County area. Gill for information alxnn your prefix. 



■M*»WW 



January 16. 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers I C2 1 



Lakeland Newspapers is pleased to present our 1998 





<Diamt 





mt Omtto© 




Spring Edition 

Lakeland Newspapers will be publishing a special Employment 
Guide on Friday March 13, 1998. You won't want to miss out on 
this special pullout section. It will be inserted in all 1 1 Lakeland 

Newspapers, covering 90% of Lake County. 

This is the perfect opportunity to recruit from Lake County's finest job applicants! 
Or let people know about your resume service! This informative section will fea- 
ture articles and information on the employment situation here in Lake County. 




Ad sizes and prices are as follows: 

.... .01165 r 



page 
1/8 page 



$925 

. . . . .0616 

. . . . .$5t5«o 

3151 




HURRY! DEADLINE FOR AD SPACE IS FRIDAY, MARCH 



Call your Classified 

Advertising Account 

Executive today at 

(847) 223-8161 

ext. 110 or 112 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



EO. Box 268 

30 South Whitney 

Grayslake, Illinois 60030 

(847) 223-8161 

Fax (847) 223-8810 



! J. (> 



S»mxjufim - hi 



IW 



C22 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 16, 1998 




To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



LAKE ONLINE 

www.lake-online.com 

Lake County's Hot Spot on the WWW! 
Target Local Exposure on the Web! 



- and - 



Internet Studio 
www.theistudio.com 

Masterful Web Architecture 

Distinctive Design 
Strategic Internet Marketing 



"A Company you can trust Fn ah 
industry whore experience will 

do tormina your success." 



847-395-9115 

391 Lake Street Downtown Antloeh 



riREWDDD UNUNITED 
JANUARY SPECIAL 

WITH THIS AD 

Mixed Hardwoods $50 FC 

Onk $65 FC 

Cherry, Birch, Hickory Mix $75 FC 

Separated $90 FC 

FREE DELIVERY 

STACKING AVAILABLE 

CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED 

(BQQ) 303-5150 



r 



CONTRACTORS ELECTRIC SERV1CEJNC. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 
'Call Us For Fast Courteous Service" 
33265 N. Rte. 45 • 
Wlldwood, IU 60030 
(847) 223-4682 
( \ RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL/, 



W 



FANTASTIC FIREWOOP 

2-YEAR OLD SEASOJYEP HARPWOOP 

OAK. ASH. MAPLE, CHERRY $65 JFCJ 
100% OAK $75 (FC) 
(847) 546-3613 
(815) 344-9522 
1 -800-430-6262 y 




All American Homes 



Specialty V ^Additions 

Kitchens, BafhsV •Remodeling 

& Basements \ 'Windows/boors 

' -Home imp 

20 YEARS LOCALLY • LICENSED 



Quality work, Dependable, Free Estimates 

847-548-5 1 lO 









•Electrical 

Plumbing 

•Ciirpenlry 

BONDED ■: INSURED 



TRU-CO "fffi*« 

Construction improvements 

REMODEL NOWL... PAY NOTHING 
TIL FEBRUARY 1998! 

KITCHEN, BATHROOM AND 
BASEMENT REMODELING 

SAVF m°/ OFF LABOR A 
- SAVt I U /o OFF MATERIALS- 

Ask about our OFF-SEASON prices for: 
Windows, Siding, Soffit/Fascia & Roofing! 

Consolidate your high 

interest credit cards & 

loans into one low monthly 

payment! Credit Problems 

Understood! 

• ALL WORK GUARANTEED • 
FULLY LICENSED, BONDED & INSURED 

FREE IN-HOME 1-888-33TRIKO 

CONSULTATION (1 -888.338-7826) 



2 



, *tnmir*rwR'lww*w^^t<'irtW l j&, 



lit HMIOTUIjtfc' 



^r-.'.-.JiUiw 




I 

,■ 



■ 




NEED A WAY 

TO SELL THAT 
INEXPENSIVE 



Fill out this form for 
Market Journal's New 



*<** 




? 



Ill Mil 



1D 



£ '» 




10 words or less gets you an ad for 33-00. Take advantage of this new section by fdling out die form & sending payment to; 

Attn: Lisa/Market Journal • c /o Lakeland Publishers 

E0. Box 360 • Grayslake, IL 60030 

or call with credit card • (847) 223-8161 est 140 



SaaazHomnsfln 



telephone iiiiiiilwr 



fetfe prepaid 
Please 1 in tlie 



(8, no more 



than 10 words 




gaBBBBBBBBBBEBnEHBBSB 




bridal directory 




BAKERIES 



JCftm 's 'liakcru 

206 N. Hi 83 • GttysUlt 

¥ Jl«« i\ in llic tiir ▼ Cnmrmcrl urn I he 

[UkUl Show • IVW-.) *l AMkirh • SmU) l/K/VH 

847/548-9920 



«s 



/jjvin'Ovcn Cakciy 

Itiilrnul Avr. IKi. 13-1) • Rimml likr 




847/710-6836 - 1-800/708-7100 



ANQUET HALLS 



(irae Jj)t:h Golf Course 
*§* 'flanqttct ,/acilitij 

Hl45>C»plikt 

thy nil \iitnif* Iff itiPjtfMj* inlntttf.tt ytjf t**ifm 

V ntitifl i,i} »i •m •(:■>• 

8-17/223-5512 
The Country Squhti 

lln 120 A 15 • Gntpt&6 II. 

The JQkemoar 

2KK7I Ki 120 - I ak.-in.Kpr 

I ■jynurfi'i'. U,l tj« r ►'«■■'' ■/ Hi'*- 1 «i 

815/385-9869 815/385-0999 

Slititjord fianquets 

I . iittfi*t,r (l.tr/iwr. 1 ^/*< i-i.liti • 

|)<mn!imii (~>ti\^\*ki- 

817/223-6900 



BEAUTY SALONS 



f boll j Umtiv ficautq •Salon 
95 W. Grand Aw., SuiiP 116 • \jihc Villa 

lWiM<p>::;p.r>i.( ./.i.inliw< 

8-17/356-8394 
Givai Clips 

II 16 W. M.pk Ave lit!. 1761 • Miinp1.-l.-in 

847/566-7600 
A !( try \ J lair Gallery 

I ,,, jt,-,l lii the Nk-ttcti Mm* III. H3 • I jkr Mill 
847/265-2188 



BRIDAL REGISTRY 



•Target Gnathtitd 

< iroml Am*. • (.huipt 
,//(!■ dull il ../</, no mm«tiHltil)flfl ftfriui)) 

ttm liti tl tit lUt ft ..up -,/./■. •■ -. r 

Orf/irf-ftrifir mi /7m jpptMr tt,f*ntmtltt*t 

817/244-1990 



CATERING 



/Y/r. G'« Caurhig 

35372 N. Wlwn kd • Inttk^k- 
(tt'iuniifif luuliil (»«!..■/. ■ p.inilpM. 

U r .-..(- t.l/ ih../*i# 1 flirt! . ...i I* 

847/587-9362 



FLORISTS 



fiatmc.s Jhm-cr •Shop 

1<m W. CuikI Ait-Cuinw847/2.19 V »6.J.| 

1720 Ciccn lljy Kit. • Ntwih (^ikacn 

H\7M9-mi 



'Southtawn ,'Horint 

TO. S. Ukr Sl. • Muwl.-l.-in 
•trtr tr ii^fntL' ii.iitiii'iii/i-.'ii 

847/466-9090 



INVITATIONS 



Classic 'Printer}/, Inc. 

336 W. Miln Sl. • Kntod Lake 

ftrvrfui/ijuf w»f *rt /i*f iMMir unit hi *^ ****** 

8-17/546-6555 
Invitations, Etc, 

Wr dnOMittl w iil> 1 1 in mL 

II ..l.^.. ? *» f .l/l'L'»i'/.l'.'; (Jk.MMi.^/jl.*^ 
flrtr M.l;i (Jit, /lirth f titti*,UH,nHKt, 

8-17/680-3395 



LIMOUSINE SERVICES 



//Irlistty.r^nioitsinc 

(liirn.-.- ■ ',\,<i.ti,,;t \,. ,,.,i,. i, 

8-17/244-2900 

CI i ic(tgt) h tctmpaiitdi i 
JSiiwusihe Service, Inc. 

'.'OIHIIHH S j*l\*( ltj't !> /lUfH 

817/362-1101 




■ 



//o/ r/ftss TmnsixtrttiiitHi Xnriirs 

I 

■ 



I'jrlc-v S|« -1 ill t-n-riu. Wi-.kl.rifi 

815/356-1988 
888/88-4-A-CAR 



NUTRITION 



J Urbalifc 

( Ut tttmlif Jrtr (f Hi* I'inu if* it, --. 
C«ll IkUHC fur |HlntlM is 

8-17/5-18-4995 



PAMPERING 



tSlary JCtiff FkJakcoi-rr 

i — .i- r/i^i' I- •! '.'i -;^ii imJ.-'ii.^.' -V» i r / Ktf'i 41 
r.jm/Wifj). u'iifI/ ttmlfn trt*J ( mttff TlMUMItltl 

i'^Wlat in jiif n-iiilnn nl 

8-17/487-7713 



PHOTOGRAPHY 



CffQjPhotograpl uj 

AnlioHi 

(}tt€,tittl i. •■!. Int|.' /./j.m«^'i»i/H.(( 111 l*[I'**ititMl ;..«!• 

817/395-92-12 



RENTALS 



Titular f{cntat 

.Vfi2l i.uii.i Aw, * (lurnii- 
( ..// i.iy.M- ,.■-! p./ ./..(,. ir4#Afr>iff rffiJtHiiMili 

847/662-0005 



TRAVEL AGENTS 



^f/r*t ./.Vj/i fri^ff Traid./lgdKtj 

Hil S. I J. Li iii v • (, linn .■ 

\ /f rf..i.riul \fM..it..J. 

817/249-1994 

/J/jm /Vi/i.A'o/7/i 7*wr r /,//«?! im 
277U'.lti.t73.rAnitorb 

847/395-9050 
tNbrih 'Star Travel 

223 1 ) < ,r jpmI Am 1 . • I iiKl.i, In if -( 

Vff.r/.ff* *■/-. i- ».'■■( 

817/356-2000 




wary 16. 1998 



kSSSFI 



i 



1 
I 



Lakeland Newspapers /, C23 




-To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 





AURSEN & 
LACKMAN<b. 



Window & Door Replacement 

Service You Can Trust 
itgth 
You Can 

jvitfob*. (847)838-5300 



Free Estimates 



Miracle 
Painters a 

"Fully Insured" 

Residential/Commercial 

(Deck sealing available) 

(847) 210-7159 

(847) 247-1676 




IRuisarani <& 



mssmsmssm 



Paint Minimum 3 Rooms and Receive 

1 Room FREE Of Your Choice 

Also, call for FREE ESTIMATES and Specials 

on Industrial and Commerriat Painting 

D&G PROFESSIONAL PAINTING 




TREE £ STUMP 
REMOVAL 

Land Clearing jUtjfc 

Wholesale Seasoned 2S»* 

Hardwood g^: 

Nordstrom J_ 
Tree Experts Co. 

(Fully insured) 

(847) 526-0858 






SALT PEUVERV 

W*ier Sortncf Sill Curled in To Your Softool 

We Sett and Install.. 

• Walcr Softncts 

• R.O. & U.V. Systems 

• Whole House Fillers 

• Iron Filters and More, 

AM/PM Sales, Inc 
(847) 671-3130 

FREE Wiicr An»Iy»is tnd ConHilUtion 




Cash For 

• Aluminum Can* 

• All Other Scrap Motata 
Industrial Accounts Wclcomo 

Chicago Surplus 

11304 2GOth Avonuo 
Trow or, WI 

LocatotTfewor.WI (5 mrtfes Monfi of Araiocfcj.Tak* 

h**y C on fries west of Route 83, Turn North en »Oft 

Si Veer to led tar 2 boda (red to fan/i T»em). 

Mon. - Fri. 8:30am - 5pm 

Saturday 8:30am - 3:30pm 

(414) 862-2517 

(414) 862-2554 




years of 
rsonai service 



[dock 

.construction inc. 

• custom homes • basements 

• design services • decks 

• additions 

Fully insured (847)526-1500 
FREE Estimates Wauconda 

General Contractors 



BUYERS. OF flON-EERROUS METALS- 
INDUSTRIAL SCRAP 



•COPPER. BRASS .AWUMU« 

L£ADt$TAM£$S« 

• AUTO RADWOfiS > CtfAWlC COfrVBITBB* 

'•BffTBES*HSUUOEOWfE*'-- 




UhrfJilGuSxan. 



id .„^ 

l* ,.;,; i.'.i -. i , 



Jack's 

REMODELING 
BASEMENTS 

Kitchens i Balhrooms • Decks 
Fascia • Soffit * Windows 

EREE ESTIMATES | 

plus references 

CALL JACK AT 

(847) 546-3759 





»Since 




{BrT. 



Let Us Do Your 
oneyDoList 

* 

METROPOLITAN SERVICES, INC. 

1959 •Fully Insured *24 Hour Emergency Service 

■ Painting, Interior & Exterior 
■ Wallpaper Removal 
Drywall Repairs 
■ Rotted Wood Replacement 
■ Carpentry 

■ Duct Cleaning 
■ Carpet Cleaning 

. ■ Drapery Cleaning 

Smoke & Water Restoration | ■ find Much More 




CALL US TODAY FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE 

(847)367-8500 

729 East Park Ave. • Ubertyvllle, Illinois 60Q48 




****************** 

4> Painting, Wallpapering J 

J Expert Installation 

J Papcx-E&bric^Vlnyl; >. J 

•DECORATING* 
j (847)1)1-8428 J 

****************** 



*mmm*mmtemm 



MBQfOHas* 






Licensed 

Insured 

FREE 

Estimates 



ROOFING 

SIDING &TR1M* 

SEAMLESS GUTTERS 

WINDOWS -DOORS 

DECKS >'AWNINGS. 

Repair & Insurance Work 

i&T) 436^6634 



Quality 

Craftsmanship 

Guaranteed 



(Heed itime WJ§ /or 

year elderly toned ottti? 

I CAN HELP. 

tZtitninqi A TOrrkrnth. Qio llflt- 

itti. r7 am a (Unified Ol tt fling 

ffjihtant fCN A/. <7 ean be 

rtaefttd ah 

(847) 516-9710 

no aauwer, ieaoe. menage, 
on ooiee. mail. 



TOP PRICE 
PAID 

We pay more for old or 
scrap gold. No amount 
too small or too large! 

(847) 
438-0125 



IN OVER YOUR HEAD? S-"WSS 



Call us today for a 
no-obligation 
consultation. 

(847) 670-3395 




magic and you can get 
cash back. 

Absolutely no out-of-pocket expense. 

Fast, friendly, confidential service. 

Bad credit - OK 



Special Offer 

• No application fee 
No mortgage payment 
before Christmas 



S&W FINANCIAL 

(847) 670-3395 

Woodficld Area Office 

Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee 

SAVE MONEY!! & 



A+ LANDSCAPING 

JSJRrewood 

*70 per face cord 
*200 full cord 

(847) 680-7326 

Pry & Guaranteed to Bum , 
Free Pe&very and Stacking 



Herat inu 
Problems? 



Professional Solutions 
Reasonable Prices 

„ Call 

Heatwave 

SALES AND SERVICE 



E.RA. Certified - Insured 1CS 1 
Free Est.- Senior Dis. Jf\ 

l~(847) 740-4127^ 



| KITCHENS/BASEMENTS 

CARPENTRY - TILE 

SMALL JOBI 0k, 

TOM KIOLBASA 
(847) J9S-1898 

- AFFORDABLE 
HOME REPAIRS 



HANDYMAN SERVICE 



Save money by using America's 

Largest handyman service. 
Insured; bonded, guaranteed. 

(847) 726-1 061 



Xx* 




OFFICES IN 30 STATES 






■ Corrtclioiijjr*.*-- 



Amfl 



'-.; - 



The-Ecqwater^fdre^ 



mmgwm 




PET SITTING SERVICE 

Lownj Cat ForWhenYourt: Not There 

Extnvi«J Vtiitx Owrvjht Sop and DiJjr Ore 
ProfcutoralyTrilntd Stten 
Bondcd-tnsund 

fnttn09F Of 

Netfenof Aoocof 
PlufrafanaJ Prt SftUn 

Scrvinf Barrin jton, Ou-y, Wind Lake, Lake 

Zurich. Waucooda 
ASK ABOUT OUR SAVINGS PROC RAMI 

(847)487.1651 




Drive Shaft Service 



Drive Axle and Supply 

Complete drive shaft service, custom 
made, front wheel drive axles, 
computerized 
balancing, free 
delivery and mere. 

(414) 639-2100 



QBt^Sr"" 



^DONT THROW AWAY 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR 
LAMP DOCTORS, 
FOR REPAIRS. 

WARREN ELECTRIC INC, 
332C1 N. Klflhway 45 , 
Wllcwood, IL 60030 
(£47) 223-8691 




• ■a 












is the Best Basketball Team in Lake County? 



CQ0®OP3 



on the 




Brought to you by: 

Lakeland 



Newspapers 



OAkwoob "RAcqwct & Health Club 




Mandatorv 
Team Captains 

Feb. 10- 



Tues 



i 









For Only $200 per Team (6 to 8 Players), Your Team Will 

Compete for a Seven Game Season (With Possible Playoff if 

Needed) To Determine the Best Team in 

Lake County. Each Player Must be 18 Years of Age. 

With the Best Part Being... 

a $ 500 Donation 

Benefitting the Family of Alex Paris, a 
Five- Year-Old Wauconda Girl Battling Cancer. 
The Community is Offering Donations 
to Offset the Cost of 
Alex's Medical Bills. 

^"~" Games will be played on 

^fekt Thursday between 7 - 9 pm and 
^* Sunday between 12 - 2 pm at 

0*kwoob K«\cqwet & Health Club 

351 Oakwood Ave., Waukegan 

(1 Block West of Green Bay Rd. - South on Oakwood off Grand Ave.) 

(847) 336-7444 

This Is How If Works: Call Lakeland Newspapers' Sports Editor, Brendan O'Neill to Reserve 
Your Space at (847) 223-8161, ext. 132. You Will Be Given Information About Where to 
Send a Check to Hold Your Spot. If the Check is Not Received Within Exactly One Week of 

Registration, Your Team Will Go on a Waiting List - No Exceptions. 

CALL FIRST!!! First 8 Teams ONLY Will Be Accepted. 





Lakeland 

Newspapers 



RESERVE TODAY! 

223-8161 

EX!* JL v<£ 
Remember, The Money Is For Charity 



(847) 



Captain (Phone): 
Team Members: 

(Phone): 

(Phone): 

(Phone): 

(Phone): - 



I 



(Phone): 
(Phone): 
(Phone): 



Mail To: Lakeland Newspapers, Attn; Brendan O'Neill, P.O. Box 268. Grayslakc, 1L 60030 



slake, IL 60030