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Full text of "Antioch News 01/22/1999"

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ANTIOCH PUBLIC LIBRARY DISTRICT 

ORTIJ 





County and state officials will work together on transportation, 

education, stormwater management 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Two years ago, Judy Martini 
could not get appointed 
county representative on a 
bi-state watershed 
planning board that no one else 
wanted. 

Today, she writes the rules. 

Having spent some time in the 
political cold, the Lake County 
Board Member, who represents 
Antioch in District 1, now works to 
make sure that other people and 
representatives have a fair shot at 
knowing what is happening in their 
county government. 

It is a new political climate for 
Martini. 

"I feel good about it," she said. 
"I've been as busy as I've ever been 
and enjoying it" 

"It's very fulfilling," she said. 

"I love the people in my ic 
district," she'said. "I truly have 'the 
heart of gold' district in Lake 
County." 

They're caring; they're giving—- 
even if they didn't vote Tor me," she 
said. 

One diiTerence is that James 
LaBelle was elected County Board 
Chairman by members. Martini is -.'. 
part of the group that elected him to 
the leadership post 

"It all started with the waterway 
agency," she said of her start in 
politics. "Suzl Schmidt and Norm 
Geary talked me Into it" 

She ran for a seat on the Fox 








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Waterway Agency and she liked that 
type of public service. The result 
was that she worked as a precinct 
committee worker, and she ran for 
the County Board. 

She obtained the enmity of 
many elected leaders for her 
opposition to riverboat gambling. 
However, it was her belief that that 
style of economic development 
would hurt many organizations. 
Many community organizations, 
fraternal groups, churches, and 
others use a state gambling license . 
to bolster their fundraising efforts. 

Martini was re-elected by voters 
to the County Board in November. 

She now serves as chair of the 
Rules Committee and of the Legisla- 
tive and Intergovernmental Affairs 
Committee. She is the vice-chair on 
the Law and Judicial Committee. 

When she sits on the Lake 
County Forest Preserve, she Is a 
member of the Enteiprise Commit- 
tee. '",, 

"It's in charge of the country 
club and economic development of 
the forest preserves," she said. 

"We're revitalizing the Fox River 
Grove Preserve, " she said of that 
committee. "We're going to mate it 
a top-notch marina and forest 
preserve with trails." 

Martini asked to be chair of the 
Rules Committee. When she had 
been assigned to it two years ago, 
she found that the opportunity for 
people to speak was sent to the 
back of the agenda. 

"We opened up the process to 
make it fair to everybody." . 

. The initial task for the Rules 
Committee was to revamp the rides 
by which the county board does its \ 
work. 

"We added sorhe housekeeping 
rules," she said. "We completely 
restructured it with an index and 
glossary." * 

Please see COLD I AS 



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f£\![S?i?i?. n . s .-.?. 4 ..R?l??. FRIDAY, JANUARY 22, 1999 \ ^ tt ro miM ' 

, 1161 BAYSHDtt BR 

I truly have 'the heart of gold' district in Lake Com *<>«<">*' 



Coming in from the cold 



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rspaper /75 cents 




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Springfield 



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Antioch 
businessman 
sworn in as state 
representative 

By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Timothy 
H. Osmond 
was sworn In 
as Illinois 
District 62 
State Repre- 
sentative on 
Wednesday, 
Jan. 13, in 
Springfield, 
m., in. 

ceremonies 
that , reflect 
the' promise 
'of anew start 




Osmond: 

Awaiting 
committee 

assignments 



Lake County Board Member Judy Martini shows her beautiful view 
of Lake Catherine from, her Antioch home.— Photo by Sandy 
Bressner 



in state and local relations. 
. . nhe mood isT«b Hipllftfog," he 

said. "It's a new beginning." 

Governor George Ryan pledged 
to work to get things done and to 
work with both Republicans and 
Democrats on his legislative agenda. 
Speaker of the House Michael J. 
Madigan and Minority Leader Lee A. 
Daniels also pledged to work togeth- 
er in a bi-partisan manner, accord- 
ing to Osmond. 

Osmond has hot been assigned 
to committees yet and does not 
expect that to happen until late 
January. 

"My first inclination is to do 
something in the business commit- 
tees," he said. However, his specific 
assignments will-be based on many 
factors, "only one of which is his 
personal preference. 

Osmond will maintain a district 

Please see OSMOND /A3 



Village may reconsider Deercrest 





ges 



Developer to reduce density 
of home project; add roadway 



By. KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Deercrest development officials 
have reduced the' size of their 
proposed Planned. Unit Develop- 
ment for the eastern edge of Antioch 
by 20 tdwrihome units. 

An eastern fence along the 
proposed development, requested by 
opponents, could be added, accord- 
ing to property owner Otto Sprenger. 

Some members of the Combined 
Plan Commission and Zoning Board 
of Appeals* expressed more positive 
evaluations of the proposal based on 
the information presented by consul- 
tants for Deercrest LLC. 



Commission members 

expressed' continuing concerns 
about density, traffic, and impact on 
community character. 

The comments, changes, and 
concessions occurred during a 
workshop session attended by Village 
Board trustees, Mayor Marilyn Shine- 
flug, village officials, members of the 
plan and zoning commission, Otto 
Sprenger and Deercrest LLC 
consultants. 

The public meeting was on 
Tuesday, Jan. 12. More than 12 area 
residents. attended the session but 
were not allowed to comment 

Similar session have been held in 
the past for developments proposed 



by Ryland Homes and Tiffany Farms. 

Deercrest is proposed for 231.8- 
acres north of the Savage Road and 
Route 173 intersection. It was 
proposed as a residential develop- 
ment featuring a variety of home 
styles, such as townhomes and single 
family homes, with large areas of 
open space. 

The Combined Plan Commis- 
sion and Zoning Board voted Oct. 
8, 1998 to recommend to the 
Village Board that the development 
be denied. Deercrest developers 
may bring their PUD before the 
village board or the plan commis- 
sion later. 

The workshop session was 
hosted by the village to learn more 
, about nine areas of concern that were 
the basis for denial of the original 
petition voted by the Plan Commis- 
sion and Zoning Board of Appeals. ■ 



These Included concerns about: 
enforcement and maintenance of 
conservation easements along Red 
Wing Marsh, a lack of open space In 
some townhouse areas, townhouse 
area density, and the lack of. a 
western, connecting road. Also 
discussed were concerns about: 
completion of park improvements, 
sewer and water bond funding, 
density and lot size, and protections 
. for adjacent land owners. 

Marc Neuerman discussed 
protection for the Red Wing Marsh 
area.:"We have double the buffer 
area," he i said. The Illinois Depart- 
ment of Natural Resources request- 
ed 300 feet of buffer area and 
Deercrest will provide 600 feet It 
includes both 1DNR land arid 
Deercrest property. 

Please see DEERCREST / A3 



For homejlelivery, call (847) 740-4035; For ads, call (847) 223-8161 






A2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



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January 22, 1999 



COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A3 



! 



■ 






FROM PAGE Al 






Planners 
nt changes 



The conservation area will be 
maintained by an outside organiza- 
tion. "We will supply at least three 
names to village staff for its consider- 
ation," Neuerman said. 'This is some- 
thing we will fulfill as we go through 
the (development review) process," 

He further said that there will be 
homeowner enforcement obligations 
to protect the buffer area. 

Neuerman said that they will fo- 
cus on the.need.for larger park areas 
hear townhouse areas. 

Markftirenslcy,aIandplannerfor 
consultant -HKM Architects + Plan- 
ners, Inc., said, "The word 'town- 
house' can take on a lot of life." He 
demonstrated how the proposed de- 
signs for Deer crest would be viewed 
as single family homes and 'live like' a 
single family home. 

Conceptual designs showing how 
the techniques to be used at Deercrest 
will work were presented to workshop 
participants. The designs shown had 
an estimated range of value from 
$200,00 to $280,000 or $310,000. Pre- 
vious estimates of townhouse costs at 
Deercrest started at $130,000. , 

The staff recommendation for a 
western road extension will be ac- 
commodated. "That will be put in as 
part of their plan," Village Manager 
Tim Wells said. 

Were another residential devel- 
opment to be created to the west of 
Deercrest, the road will serve as a con- 
necting link between the two areas. 

The cost to install park improve- 
ments will be protected by a letter of 
credit issued by a bank to the village 
on behalf of the Deercrest developer. 
Wells said that this is the first time that 
a developer has provided park prop- 
erty to the village with improvements 
already.in place. Typlcalfyonly vacant- 
land is donated and the village must 
pay for improvements. 

"From day one, Deercrest indi- 
cated that they would be willingto put 
the (sewer and water) .infrastructure 
in," Wells said. Village officials and 
bond counselors have reviewed the 
need for sewer and water in that area. 
If Deercrest builds the sewer and wa- 
ter lines, they can recapture their 
costs. If the village builds it, the village 
can earn; possibly, $2 million a year. 
That is a tentative estimate. 

If the village builds the sewer and 
water system, it would also create the 
future possibility of a cheaper con- 
nection to Lake Michigan water. 



"That (is) a big plus from our 
standpoint," Wells said. 

"Once we put that in, we do have 
control of the system." Control of sew- 
er and water allows the village to man- 
age density of future property devel- ' 
opment , 

"There is riot a big supply of water 
out there to tap into," Wells said. 
"There's water out here if you want to 
goto 1,500 feet," he said. 

As a result, village-owned water 
service will be important to future de- 
velopment 

Directprof Planning, Zoning, and 
Building Robert E; Sllhan presented a 
comparison of what can be built to- 
day on the Deercrest property under 
existing zoning regulations, possible 
alternatives, the original Deercrest 
proposal, and the revised Deercrest 
Planned Unit Development. 

The proposal discussed at the 
workshop (495 dwelling units) had 
lower gross density, lower population, 
lower school population and impacts, 
and fewer park needs but more do- 
nated dedicated park area than did 
the original Deercrest proposal sub- 
mitted a year ago (515 dwelling units). 
Were Deercrest to develop on the ba- 
sis of existing zoning (672 dwelling 
units permitted), gross density would 
be greater, school population and im- 
pacts would be greater, park land 
needed would be greater, and there 
would be no donated dedicated park 
acreage. 

"I feel the concerns were ad- 
dressed," said Chairman of the Com- 
' bincd Plan Commission and Zoning 
Board Barbara Johnson near the end 
of the workshop session. TmsatisGed 
with what was presented here this 
evening." 

Commission member Nancy 
•Binder said, "I'm pleased to see he's 
done a 4 percent reduction in the 
number of townhouse units and done 
it all in the townhouse units." 

Binder was critical of other as- 
pects of the information presented. "I 
agree with Curt (Denny). Where is the 
sense of community? Where will the 
children play" 
. Commission members also iden- 
, tified areas of remaining concern. The 
Deercrest development team was told 
they have not addressed the issue of 
Impacts to the character of Antioch as 
a small town. Deercrest density works 
against the self-image of the village for 
many commissioners. 



OSMOND: Takes seat 



office at 976 Hillside, in Antioch, with 
hours from 8:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
during the week. Linda Pedersen will 
be available at the office to answer 
questions and help with matters re- 
lated to the district. The telephone 
number is 838-6200, which reflects 
his legislative district number. 

"We're exploring (having) an of- 
fice on the east end of the district, 
possibly in Zion," Osmond said. No 
details are available at this time. 

Osmond was joined by-friends 
and family at his inauguration. His 
immediate family was present, in- 



cluding brother Bob Osmond and his 
family and sister Mary Ellen Osmond 
Gardino and her family. Former An- 
tioch resident, Allan Osterlund, of Al- 
bion, Ind„ was therewith his family. 

Antioch Village Manager and 
Community Development Director 
Claude LeMere, in Springfield for 
mandatory meetings about village 
grants from the Illinois Department 
of Natural Resources, were also able 
to attend the ceremonies. 

Antioch Township Trustee Steve 
Smouse was present as well as Lake 
County Clerk Willard Helander; 



Antioch News 

Vol. 1 14 No, 4 A Lakeland Newspaper Founded 1886 

(USPS 027-060) ■'!.-: Editorial Oflk»: Mai*«ofliH'Ki«PfM*AMO& 

30 South Whitney St., Grayslake.IL 60030 Look for us on the Internet at 

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O1AC0 of PubtoSioo: 30 Sooth Whitney St, OieyUake, IL6OCO0, Ptxxie (047)223-6101. 

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Homo OeUwy Pals* W< SO per yw In UM. Cook, Kanoiha if* McHwvy Counllw; 
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Pottna*!*: S*nd idd/en tf*()0« to totodh tiwf% 30 Sootn Whftwy SM*. P.O. Bo* 286, 0/iyiUks, ItawJi 60030. 



WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

Publisher 

KAREN OTOOLE 

• Circulation Mor, 

BOBULMER 

Display Advertising Mgr. 

MAUREEN COMBS 

Classified Advertising Mgr. 



M.R. SCHROEDER 

FourideM904-1986 



NEAL TUCKER 

Composition MgrjExecvOw Editor 




WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

President 

MIMI KOOB 

Comptroller . 

CORKEY GROSS 

, . Puttie Relations Manager . 

y£M!i^R H0NDA HETRICK BURKE 

^wlMNaZw" Managing Edlor 




Family time 

Allison Daniels, 4, of Undenhurst ice fishes with her mom Christine during the Mike Jackson 
Outdoors Annual Family Ice Fishing Derby on Channel Lake in Antioch Saturday.— Photo by Sandy 
Bressner 




ge 






Dist. 34 seeks 
$11.8 million on 
April 13 ballot 

By KENNETH PATCHEN ' 
. Staff Reporter 

Antioch Village trustees voted to 
support the April 13 school building 
bond referendum proposal at their 
Monday council meeting. 

The vote came at the end of a 
presentation by Antioch Communi- 
ty Consolidated Elementary School 
District 34 officials. Dr. Daniel Burke 
described the proposed school con- 
struction and building moderniza- 
tion program. It is intended to cope 
'with projected student enrollment, 
growth. 

District officials encouraged vil- 
lage trustees to tell people, organiza- 
tions, neighborhood groups, and 
block clubs to contact District 34 to 
arrange a presentation about the 
school building bond referendum 
proposal. District officials would also 
be available to answer questions at 
the meetings. 

School Board President Dr. Bud 
Newton asked the village board to 
pass a resolution in support of the 
District 34 referendum proposal. 

All village trustees present ex- 
pressed strong support for the refer- - 



endum proposal. Voting for the reso- 
lution were Village Trustees Wayne 
Foresta, Ron Cunningham, Dorothy 
Larson, and Mayor Marilyn Shineflug. 

Two trustees told district officials 
that they did riot believe Uan appro- 
priate role for one taxing body to 
urge taxpayers to vote in favor of a 
referendumjprpROsdbyanpthertax.-> 
fiig^pHyJ Trustees Mabel Lou Weber 
and Marvin Oldenburger voted 
against the village resolution. 

Trustee Taso Marayelas was ab- 
sent from the council meeting in or- 
der to attend to matters related to his 
catering business. He later stated 
that he supports education, and he 
supports the district's school bond 
referendum. 

Mabel Lou Weber stated that 
she, personally, very much support- 
ed the district's proposal as a mem- 
ber of the community and thought 
that voters should support the refer- 
endum proposal. 

Marvin Oldenburger said, "I sup- 
port the referendum." He too did not 
think It was an appropriate role for 
the village board to support a school 
bond referendum proposal. 

Ron Cunningham said to district 
officials, "All the members are in fa- 
vor of the referendum." 

"I strongly support the referen- 
dum," said Mayor Shineflug. "I think 
for the good of the community, it is a 
good thing." 

Presenting the school board pro- 



posal to village officials were Presi- 
dent Newton, Vice-president Mike 
Perrone, and member Steve Turner. 
Also present were district Superin- 
tendent Dr. Daniel 11 Burke and Di- 
rector of Business Dr. Paul Hai n . 

Buike said that as of last week, 
there were 2,150 students In the four 
i,schoolspf the district, "Within five 
years, we will increase that number 
50 percent" 

"The children are definitely 
coming," Burke told the village 
board. 

Using Power Point presentation 
software, Burke described the need 
for the bond referendum, how it 
would be spent, school, improve- 
ments that would be made, how 
state financing reduces local taxpay- 
er impacts, and the consequences of 
hot improving the schools, 

Burke said that all students in ; 
the district will benefit by the build-, 
ing program. 

District 34 officials are scheduled 
to receive $7.1 million of State ofllll- 
^nois Capital Development Board 
funds which will reduce the total 
project cost ($18.9 million dollars) to 
$11.8 million. The state funds are a 
one-time opportunity for the April 
referendum for the district's pro- 
posed improvement plan. 

"If we don't pass the bond issue, 
we go to the bottom of the list (for 
state funding assistance)," said 
school board member Steve Turner. 





Rescue 



t about 3 p.m. Saturday, 
Jan. 16, there was a bus ac- 
cident on Route 173 east 
of Lake Street. "It was a ski 
bus- trip with kids from the suburbs 
of Chicago," said Antioch Rescue 
Squad Chief Wayne Sobczak. 

There were a few more than three 
dozen 13 to 16 year olds in the 
bus.One child had to be taken to a 
hospital because of some minor in- 
juries. 

"The other 30-plus kids were tak- 
en back to our rescue squad building 
where our squad members treated 
them to a pizza party and some 
videos until another bus came from 
the suburbs to pick them up," 
Sobczak said. "They were with us for 
about three hours." 

"The kids had a good time." 

Members of the Antioch Worn- 



members show heart 




OUR 
TOWN 

KenPatcheri 



an's Club worked with Santa Claus 
through the 1998 holiday season to 
help raise money for their scholarship 
programs. "We had over 48 members 
helping this holiday season," said 
President Carol Pagetoid. 

With the leadership of Bernlce 
Cordis, club members took 1,049 
plcwres of children with Santa. They 
greeted 1,714 children. Pavelski was 
one member who worked at the En- 
chanted Castle. In her 2.5 hour shift, 
there were 92 children visiting Claus. 



The result of the club's efforts was 
$1,574 for their scholarship funds. 

Last Tuesday, club members 
hosted their annual birthday party for 
residents at Winchester House in Lib- 
ertyville. Betty Schneider, Mabel 
Lou Weber, and Nancy Zitkus 
worked with the club's special com- 
mittee on this event The. club has 
hosted this annual party since 1973. ' 



Drama students at Antioch Com- 
munity High School are working on 
their next production, The Little 
Prince." The play opens to the pub- 
lic Thursday, Feb. 18 and may include 
a Sunday performance on Feb. 21 . 



If you have interesting infor? 
matton or anecdotes to submit for 
■ "Our Town" call staff reporter Ken 
Patchen at223 : 8161,exL 131 or 
e-mail, edit@lnd.com. 









I 



A4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



January 22, 1999 



Ipsen, Boarini join Antioch Chamber of Commerce board 



Vivian Tauscheck 
receives special 
award for service 

By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Antioch Chamber of Commerce 
and Industry members installed new 
directors, recognized members for 
special efforts, and prepared them- 
selves for a new year of community 
and economic development activi- 
ties. 

"The role of the chamber is to 
promote civic, commercial, and in- 
dustrial growth," said President Bar- 
bara Porch. 

"We get better every year," 

Porch told members that oppor- 
tunities to volunteer to help with 
Lovefest '99 and Business Expo were 
still available. 

Lovefest will be at 7 p.m. on Sat- 
urday, Feb, 6 at the Sequoit Post of 
the Veterans of Foreign Wars hall on 
North Avenue 

"It's a big party atmosphere," 
she said. "It's our second largest 
fund-raiser." 

"We also have the Business Expo 
coming up," she said. 

This year's Business Expo will 
feature the sale of merchandise by 
local businesses that is directly relat- 
ed to their primary business. This is 
the first time that vendors will be 
able to do this. It will be held at Anti- 
och Community High School on Sat- 
urday and Sunday, March 27 and 28. 

Two newly elected directors of 
the Antioch Chamber of Commerce 
and Industry were introduced to the 
more than 100 members attending 



the luncheon. There is a total of 12 
directors, 

The two new directors are Brad 
Ipsen and Dr. Dan Boarini. 

Directors who will continue to 
serve include President Porch, Dee 
Dee Palmer, first vice-president, 
Mary Ann Kuhn, second vice-presi- 
dent, Karen Dunham, treasurer, and 
Randy Nolan, secretary. 

Other directors are Dan Sills, Al- 
ice Wegener, Bob Lindblad, Jan 
Lyons, and Melonnie Hard. 

■ Vivian Tauscheck was presented 
with a special award for her dedicat- 
ed service to the chamber. Previous 
recipients have included Village 
trustee Mabel Lou Weber and Lakes 
Region Historical Society President 
Bob Lindblad. 

Special awards of appreciation 
were given to members of the cham- 
ber. Bob Lindblad was recognized 
for his work on.the chamber's Easter 
Program. Alice Wegener was recog- 
nized for her work on the Chamber's 
golf outing and Mary Ann Kuhn for 
her work on the Holiday Lights of 
Antioch program. 

Larry Hanson was recognized for 
his work on Halloween Howl. John 
Kaperka was recognized for his work 
as a delegate to the Lake County 
Convention and Visitors Bureau and 
Randy Freeman for his work as co- 
chair of the Taste of Antioch. 

Dee Dee Palmer was recognized 
for her work on the Taste of Antioch 
and the Business Expo. Randy Nolan 
was recognized for his work on Anti- 
och Magazine and the chamber's 
Golf Outing. Jan Lyons was recog- 
nized for her work on the 1998 Holi- 
day Program and the Chamber's 
newsletter. 

Melonnie Hard was recognized 
for her work as chairman of W.E.T. 




The Antioch Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors includes: front row from left: Jan Lyons, Al- 
ice Wegener, President Barbara Porch, Mary Ann Kuhn. Back row from left: Bob Undblad, Randy 
Nolan, Dr. Dan Boarini, Dee Dee Palmer.— Photo by Lynn Gunnarson Dahlstrom 



Dan Sills was recognized for his work 
with the village's spring and fall arts 
and crafts fair and Karen Dunham 
for her work as co-chair of the Taste 
of Antioch. 

Dee Dee Palmer presented 
Barbara Porch with an award "in 
grateful appreciation for the time 
and effort you have given to the 
Antioch Chamber of Commerce 
and Industry." 

Also attending the luncheon 



were Mayor Marilyn Shineflug, State 
Senator Adeline Geo-Karis and State 
Representative Tim Osmond. (R- An- 
tioch). 

Antioch Community Develop- 
ment Director Claude LeMere spoke 
briefly at the luncheon. 

"Here in Antioch it is a privilege, 



rather than an obligation, to be on 
the Antioch Chamber of Com- 
merce," he said. LeMere said that at 
meetings throughout Lake County 
that he attends, business leaders are 
aware of the strong support the busi- 
ness community gives the chamber 
in Antioch. 



CHRISTIANS THINK!_ 

y2K: DILEMMA OR^DALitif ANCE? " 

On Saturday January 30th at 7:00 p.m., the 
Antioch Evangelical Free Church. will host a 
Y2K Seminar. The primary presenter will be 

Christian Computing Magazine 

Editor-in-Chief, Steven Hewit. Tom Qroleau, 

Ph. D., who teaches business and computer 

systems, will share his insights, as will 

Marie Rollene, an astute follower of 

the millennium bug situation. 

Come and listen to the various viewpoints 

that,will be presented, and bring your 

own "questions to ask the presenters 

during this open-forum evening. 

Space is limited. To insure a seat, RSVP to 

Antioch Evangelical Free Church 

@ (847)395.-41 1 7. 



T 



CHPJSTIANS HAVE £tIN! 

~3bin-usjo£pur. annual 

SUPERBOWL PART9 

N ^, E ~. : ':'--r ■■>'*••' - 

January 31 st - Spfm. 
(hosted by Scandal for Christ, 
our Sr. Hi Youth Groupjt§| 

Come watch the game ori 
an 1 8-foot screen 

Snacks and beverages will 6|| 
available at concession stand-Tun 





drive, Saturday 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



by Scandal members 



/"•:;.'- 



- ■„ 






; « ns&e* 



(Chairs and sofas will be available;. but ; you 

may want to bring your^wtelawhlcnairs 

blanJ<ets"oY pillows:) ; 



Antioch Evangelical Free Church' ~ 750 Highvicw Drive, 'Antioch; IL 60002 r (847) 395-4117 
Located one block north of Rt. 173 @ the corner of Tiffany & Highvicw 



Lakeland Newspapers 




Rarin Kovell 

Account Executive, 14 Years of Experience 

Serving Antioch, Lake Villa, Undenhurst 
& Wisconsin 

PHONE (847) 223-8161, ext. 105 
PAGER (847) 237-0611 



A community blood drive to- 
morrow, Saturday, Jan. 23 starts in 
Father Hanley Hall at St. Peter's 
School between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. 

Sheila Devorak and Ellen Ipsen 
are coordinating the blood drive for 
UfeSource Blood Services. Life- 
Source is the company that actually 
collects the blood. 

People who can donate blood 
must be 17 years old or older and 
weigh at least 110 pounds. They 
should be free of major cold, allergy, 
and flu symptoms. They can not 
have had hepatitis. Donors may not 
have had risk factors or behaviors as- 
sociated with AIDS. 

The average person has 10-12 
pints of blood. Within 72 hours, the 
body replaces the plasma portion of 
blood. Plasma is the fluid in which 
blood cells and platelets are carried. 
The other parts of blood are restored 
by the body in a few weeks. 

The needle used to collect blood is. 
new, sterile, and thrown away after a do- 
nation is taken. Needles are not reused 



Giving blood does not cause AIDS. 

Donors should eat a good meal 
before donating. 

Of the eligible population, only 4 
percent donate blood. The lifetime 
chance that a person will need blood 
is one out of five. 

People who are not able or pre- 
pared to donate blood tomorrow can , 
consider a donation in the down- 
stairs community room at the First 
National Bank— Employee Owned 
blood drive on Saturday, Feb. 20 
from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

"They can call me to make an ap- 
pointment, and they can come in on 
a walk-in basis," said Kubin Kubin at . 
the bank. People may call Kubin at 
838-2265 to make an appointment 

The blood drive at Father Hanley 
Hall also will take walk-ins as well as 
accept appointments, according to 
Ipsen. The intent is to spread the do- 
nations through the day rather than 
have long lines. 

"Anyone who is willing to donate 
we are very happy to have walk-in," 
said Ipsen. 

The blood drive occurs during. 
National Blood Donor Month. 



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January 22, 1999 



POLICE & FIRE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A5 



m 



FROM PAGE Al 

COLD: Politician finds voice 
of warmth in people she serves 



"It's a much better document." 

The Public Service Committee 
was renamed the Transportation 
and Public Works Committee. A new 
committee was formed, the Eco- 
nomic Development Committee. 

"The main goal of the committee 
should be the economic betterment 
of the entire county," she said. It also 
will work to revitalize certain areas. 

The Intergovernmental Com- 
mittee was renamed the Legislative 
and Intergovernmental Affairs Com- 
mittee. "That one works on legisla-' 
tion issues on the local, state, and 
federal level," she said. 

As Chair of this committee, she 
reports that they have moved for- 
ward on the county's legislative 
agenda for the Illinois state legisla- 
ture. The agenda serves as a guide to 
focus local and state legislative atten- 
tion on Issues of concern to Lake 
County. 

Some of the issues on which 
county and state officials will work 
together include transportation, ed- 
ucation, youth gangs and violence, 
health care costs, and stormwater 
management. 

"We came up with a compre- 
hensive transportation bill that seeks 
a more equitable distribution of mo- 
tor fuel tax," Martini said. If it were 
passed, it would help Lake County. 

"We're looking at the possibility 
of a gas tax," she said. "McHenry 
County has a gas tax." 

"I'm still opposed to the gas tax," 
she said. "1 feel we should be getting 
our fair share back, first, before im- 
posing an additional gas tax." 

"We're looking at getting addi- 
tional funding for schools," Martini 
said. She noted that new Governor. 
George Ryan is interested in educa- 
tion. Therefore, Martini is hopeful 
about efforts seeking more money 
for education and for construction 
funds. 

According to Martini, Lake 
County has a growing population of 
youth gangs and violence. "We're 
looking to hire 14 more people at the 
detention center," she said. She Is 
hopeful that there is a way to get a 
handle on the growing cost of the de- 
tention center. 

Although the Idea of a University 
in Lake County is appealing, the ex- 
pectation that Lake County will pay 
for it is not. "We have to figure out 
how we're going to help pay for it," 
she said. 

"We're asking the State to give 
the counties back some money from 



the tobacco settlement," she said. 
County elected officials would like 
reimbursement for the health care 
costs that have been provided to 
smokers through the Lake County 
Health Department and other agen- 
cies. 

"We're asking for authority to 
start a user fee to help fund 
stormwater management," Martini 
said. Many of the board members 
feel that it is better to manage water- 
shed development than to pay for 
. flood damage in future years. 

On the Law and Judicial Com- 
mittee, there Is much to consider. 

"Our jails are almost full," she 
said. 

"What we need to figure out is 
how to fund a minimum security fa- 
cility to hold people awaiting sen- 
tencing arid first time offenders," she 
said. These would not be serious of- 
fenders, according to Martini. 

Another issue for this committee 
will be the increasing amount of pa- 
perwork that needs to be managed. 
The county's increasing population 
brings with it greater case loads in all 
areas of life, divorce, and small 
claims. That means more paper- 
work. 

, One thing that will be done by 
the county board is to try to make it- 
self a more cooperative working 
group. 

"We're future planning," Martini 
said. County Board members will 
have their first group goals-setting 
session at Illinois Beach State Park 
on Friday and Saturday, Feb. 5 and 6. 

This type of future planning has 
not been done before, 

i "I've been in Antioch for over 20 
years now," she said. "1 like being out 
in the country, and I like all the wa- 
terways." 

No one else in her family has 
been involved in politics. "I'm the 
first to venture forth," she said. For 
her, politics is people. 

"I like helping people." 

"You've got to have really thick 
skin," she said of political life. "I en- 
joy whatl am doing. 1 knowl am 
making a difference." 

"I guess I'm a political junkie." 

She also considers herself a 
smart growth advocate. 

Martini believes that it was the 
sentiments of Lake County voters 
who put people into office who want 
smart growth and environmental 
protection. "We must not make ex- 
treme choices," she said. "People 
want progress, not stalemate." 



****** 



tee Throw Cot^ 

^GXg^ 10-14 

^ ^^ tion 12:30-1:9 

at 



\; 





St. Peter's SchooTGym 

1st Plac^e^^e^ttaque and 
Advanc€S*te^^^d Playoffs 

Knigmsjgf^brambus 

Father Henderson Council #3800 



POLICE BEAT 

Persons charged with a crime are Innocent 
un til proven gu tlty In a court of la w. 

ANTIOCH 

Charged with DUI 

Antioch Police Officers stopped 
to help William L Lacy, 42, of Anti- 
och, on Monday, Jan. 11 at 2:12 
p.m. on Deport Street west of Anita 
Avenue In his red 1984 Toyota pick- 
up truck. 

He was charged with driving 
under the influence. 

Lacy was released on bond 
pending a court date of Tuesday, 
Feb. 2 at 9 a.m. 

Cited for DUI 

Antioch Police Officers stopped 
James N. Tatum, 44, of Lake Villa, 
on Sunday, Jan. 17 at 7:03 p.m. trav- 
eling northbound on Route 83 near 
First Street in a blue 1991 Buick Re- 
gal. 

He was charged with driving 
under the influence. He was re- 
leased on bond pending a court 
date of Tuesday, Feb. 9 at 9 a.m. 

LIND ENHURST 

turn, DUI 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Donald W. Doerge, 58, of 
Lindenhurst, on Sunday, Jan. 17 at 
4:30 p.m. traveling east bound on 
Grand Avenue at Douglas in his 
gold Ford Explorer. He was charged 
with disobeying the "no left turn" 
sign at the new Eagle Country Mar- 
ket, driving under the influence, 
and driving under the influence 
with a blood alcohol content 
greater than 0.08 (0.19). Doerge 
was released on bond pending a 
court date of Tuesday, Feb. 9 at 9 
a.m. in Waukegart. 



Illegal 





Nothing but air 

Oakland School Principal Stephanie Stoneberg grimaces as a 
member of the Jesse White Tumblers Performance Team flies 
above her head, while she stands on a tumbler's shoulders, dur- 
ing a performance at the Antioch school Jan. 15. — Photo by 
Sandy Bressner 




Three Village of Antioch trustee 
positions will be up for election on 
Tuesday, April 13. Only orie.trustee 
has announced that he will not seek 
re-election. 

Candidates may file petitions for 
the election starting Monday, Jan. 25. 
The last day to file is Monday, Feb. 1 
by 5 p.m. 

Seats held by trustees Taso 
Maravelas, Mabel Lou Weber, 
and Wayne Foresta are up for 
consideration. Maravelas has an- 
nounced that he will not seek re- 
election. Weber will not seek re- 
election 

Trustee Wayne Foresta will seek 
re-election. 

According to Antioch Village 



Clerk Candl Rowe, petition forms 
had been requested by four people. 

as of Friday, Jan. 0, 



Petition forms may also be ob- 
tained from the Lake County Clerk's 
office. 



CAR ACCIDENT RECENTLY? 



Free Report reveals what the insurance companies don't want 
you to know. 

Was your car injured? Yw aay be too!! 

It may be weeks, months or even years before you experience 
pain, stiffness, headaches, even arthritis! 

Don't settle your case until you read our free report . 



For Your FREE Report Call 1-888-887-2061 

Toll Free 24-hour Recorded Message 



Come Worship With Us* 

A Directory Of Antioch Area Churches 



Graceland Baptist Church. 258 Ida St., Aniioch. IL 
Sunday School Ham., Morning Worship 11am.. 
Sunday Evening 7pm. Robert Williams, Paslor. 

First Church ot Christ, Scientist* Reading Rm. Ris 173 and 
Harden, Antioch, Phone (847) 395-1196. Sunday School, 
Sunday Church Service 1 0:30am, Wednesday, 730pm. 

Beautiful Savior Evangelical Lutheran Church. 554 Parkway, 
Antioch. Phone (847) 265-2450 Sunday Worship al Sam, Sunday 

School, High Schools Adult Bible Class«3 1Q3Qam. 

St Ignatius Episcopal 977 Main Si Phone (847) 3950662. Low 
Mass 730am, rtflh Maas930am Sunday School &Nureery 930am. 

Antioch Evangelical Free Church, 750 Wghview Dr. Phone 
(847) 396-4117. Salurday Evening Service 530 p.m. Sunday 
School 9:45am, Sunday Worship 830, 11:00, ChMran'a Church 
1 1 am. Nursery botti services Awana Club. Senior Paslor David M. 
Grdeau. 

St Stephen Lutheran Church, 1155 HabWe Ave. Phone (847) 
3950359. Sunday Worship, 8, 9:16 & 1030. Church School 
9:15am., Sunday. Rev. Robert Trendel. Interim Pastor. . 

Christian Ufa Fellowship AsaembUea of God Church. 41625 
Deep Lake Rd., AnBcch, Phone (647) 396-8572. Sunday School 
. (all ages) 9am., Sunday Morning Worship 10am., Children's 
Church 10am.. Sunday Evening Worship 630pm.. Wednesday 
Worship & Ch3dren"a Program 7am., Toes, Women 1 * Fellowship 
& Bible Study 9-1 1 30am. Jell Brussary. Pastor. 



Faith Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main St., Phone 
(847) 395-1600. Sunday Worship 8 & 10:30am., Sunday 
School 9:25am., Sat 7pm„ Rev. Gregory Hermanson, 
Pastor. Christian Day School (847) 395-1664. 

Mlllbum Congregation*! United Church ot Christ Grass 

Lake Rd. at Rte. 45. Phone (847) 355-5237. Sunday Service 

10am. Children's Program 10am. Rev. Paul R. Mettter, 

Paslor. 

United Mtthodlal Church ot Antioch. 848 Main SL Phone 

(847) 395-1259. Worship 830 & 10am., Fellowship Time 

930am; Sunday School 10am. Re* KurtA. Gamfin, Pastor. 

SL Peter's Church. 557 W. Lake SL, Antioch. Phone (847) 
395-0274. Masses weekdays, 730am; Sunday 6:30, 8, 
9:30, 11:30am & Saturday 5:30pm. Rev. Father Ronald H. 

Anglim, Pastor. 

Chain ol Lakes Community Bible Church. 23201 W. Grass 
Lako Rd, Antioch, Phone (847) 8380103. Sunday Worship 8:15 
and 10:45, Sunday School 9:45. ChlUren'a Church 1 0.45. ttutft, 
Women's, Awana 4 Small Group'mmrstries. Paslor, Paul 
McMinlmy. 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod). 
25100 W. Grand Ave. (Rte. 69 & 132), Lake Villa. (847) 
356-5158, Sunday Worship 8:15 & 10:45am; Sunday 
School (3 and up) and Bible Study 9:30am. Christian ' 
Preschool. Rev, John Zellmer, Paslor, 



Dan Dugenske, Director 
This Director/ Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 




$ '■•■ 



A 6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



January 22, 1999 



SCHOOL DIGEST 



School roof 
repairs required 

Antioch Community High 
School has three roof areas that 
require repair, although a decision 
on the type of roof needed has not 
yet been determined. 

"They will need to be ad- 
dressed with a total roof replace- 
ment," said Business Manager Bill 
Ahlers. 

. He discussed the proposed re- 
pairs at the Thursday, Jan. 7 meet- 
ing of the school board. 

"The whole process of getting 
our roofs back in shape is going to 
cost us a million dollars," Ahlers 
told the board. The work will in- 
clude improvements that have be 

The board voted approval for 
preparation of specifications and 



release for bids. 

CLC Credits 

Antioch Community High School 
students now earn academic credit for 
classes taken at the Lake County Tech- 
nology Campus, in Grayslake, at the 
level recommended by technology 
campus administrators, 

"We are (now) in line with what the 
recommendation was," said District 
Superintendent Dr. Dennis Hockney 
at the January school board meeting. 

"We are now consistent with other 
schools," said Principal Dr. James 
Love. 

In the past, Antioch students re- 
ceived 2.5 credits in regular programs 
and 3 credits in cosmetology courses. 
Students will now receive 3 credits in 
regular programs and 4 in cosmetol- 
ogy. 



Faux paint program at library 



The Antioch Public Library will 
host a program on faux paint finish- 
es on Monday, Jan. 25 from 6:30 to 
8:30 p.m. 

The program will cover how to 
rag roll, sponge paint and glaze. Be- 
cause this program will be hands-on, 
with participants practicing the 
techniques, a $10 materials fee is 



due at the time of registration. 

The class size will be limited to 
15. 

To register, patrons can stop by 
the reference desk of the library. 
There will be no telephone registra- 
tions for this program. 

Questions can be answered by 
Amy Blue at 395-0874. 




A roaring donation 

The Antioch Lions Club contributed $20,000 to the Village of Antioch Saturday, Dec. 12 to help 
build the William E. Brook Wetland Sanctuary and Entertainment Center. Community Development 
Director Claude LeMere, left, and Mayor Marilyn Shineflug accepted the check from Lions Adam 
Zakroczymski, Jack Miller, and Jim Lafontaine.— Photo by BHIie Horton 




Victory Cares About Your 



At Victory Health Services, we want you to get 
as much out of life as possible. That's why we 
offer a variety of on-going programs, health 
screenings, seminars and workshops. 



STROKE RISK SCREENING 



Wednesday, February 10 • 4-8 p.m. 

at Victory Health Care Center, Grayslake 
At this free screening, find out your risk potential for 
stroke. Learn about risk factors, lifestyle changes and 
treatment options. Call 1-800-THE-CHOICE 
(1-800-843-2464) to register. Space is limited. 



PLANNING AHEAD: 
END OF LIFE DECISIONS 



Thursday, February 11 • 7 p.m. • 

at Victory Memorial Hospital, Waukegan 
At this free program, our hospital attorney and our 
chaplain will discuss the durable power of attorney for 
health care, the living will, organ and tissue donation 
and funeral arrangements. Call 1-800-THE-CHOICE 
(1-800-843-2464) to register. Space is limited. 



VICTORY COMMUNITY ElderCARE" EDUCATION SERIES 



Medications and the Elderly: Avoiding Dangerous Interactions 
Monday, February 22 • 7 p.m. 

at Christ Episcopal Church, 410 Grand Avenue, Waukegan 

Registration is required. For further information or a complete list of programs, contact 

Victory Community ElderCARE* at 3604004. 



HEALTHY EATING, HEALTHY LIVING 



4-class program: Wednesdays- 
February 24, March 10, March 24 and April 7 • 6:30 p.m. 

at Victory Memorial Hospital, Waukegan 
Take charge of your weight by learning healthy eating habits. The $25 fee 
includes a best-selling book to help motivate you towards a healthy lifestyle. 
Call 1-800-THE-CHOICE (1-800-843-2464) to register. Space is limited. 




Winter weather slows 
ACHS addition work 



Remodeling of Antioch Commu- 
nity High School was affected in ear- 
ly January by late delivery of steel. 

Business Manager Bill Ahlers 
said, "The schedule has not changed 
appreciably except for the west addi- 
tion." The west addition is the area 
at the former front entrance to the 
school. It has not been possible to 
place a roof on that portion of the 
building and enclose it. 

"With the snow, it has become a 
major problem, "-he said. 

There are limitations to working 
with steel during cold weather for 
safety reasons, Ahlers told the board. 
Both Ahlers and the construction 
manager have discussed the issue 
with the fabricator. 

A plumbing contractor working 



on the school remodeling project 
since the beginning is running be- 
hind schedule. As a result, that con- 
tractor may not be able to keep 
ahead of mason workers. Quality of 
the plumbing work has bee^vgood, 
Ahlers told the school board. 

A second plumbing contractor 
working on the east addition is doing 
well, according to Ahlers. Collette 
Ario Plumbing Co., Inc.; of Antioch, 
is working on the east addition. 

The school board voted to ap- 
prove a change order for electrical and 
carpentry work for the east addition. 

"We have held out the cabinetry 
work," Ahlers told the board. The art 
rooms will need cabinets. That work 
may be done by the school or in 
some other manner. , 



Fund-raising guide 




Htt^ 



Call 1 -800-THE-CHOICE for a complete listing of programs. 



Those physically challenged and/or in need of an ASL interpreter 

may contact us up to one week before a community program to 

determine how Victory can facilitate their attendance. 

ff nemos dlsponibles hs scnidos de traduccidn at Espaflol. 




Victory 

Health 

Services 

/ 



Feb. 6, Lovefest '99: The Roaring. 
Twenties-, sponsored by the Antioch 
Chamber of Commerce and Industry 
at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post, 
75 East North Avenue. 

April, Comedy Night, Antioch 
Junior Woman's Club. 



July 14, Sequoit Pride Golf Out- 
ing. 

On-going, William E. Brook 
Memorial Fund, various-sized per- 
sonalized, bricks and plaques, $50, 
$175, and $50U Order-form from 
Vickie Axton at 395-1309. 



BILLER PRESS 

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January 22, 1999 




NEIGHBORS 




Lakeland Newspapers/ A7 





Name: Carl Sand 

Home: Fox Lake. 

Occupation: Owner of Carl Sand Tax and 
Accounting Service, 404 Lake Street, Anti- 
och; 

I'm originally from: The southwestern- 
central Illinois town of Abingdon. At one 
.time It had the distinction of being the 
mousetrap capltol of the country. 

I graduated from: I graduated from 
Bradley University. 

My family consists of: Wife, 
Madeleine, and one daughter, MaryBeth. 

My pets are: We have four cats, 

What I like best about Antioch: It is a thriving community.and 
very resident minded. They seem to do a lot of things for the residents. 

What I like best about my job: I just love doing Income tax. I've 
done it for more than 30 years. I like the challenge, meeting people, and 
solving their tax problems. I am an enrolled agent/which means I can 
represent my clients before the Internal Revenue Service. 

The secret to my success Is: I enjoy meeting people. 

I relax by: Surfing the Internet and collecting coins. 

Favorite TV show Is: "JAG" on channel 2. 

Favorite movie Is: The StarTrek Movies. 

Favorite restaurant: The Whistle Stop in Fox Lake. 

My life's motto is: Do the best I can. 

If I could be anyone in history, I would be: Bill Gates. I hap- 
pen to be Interested in computers and he had a lot to do with that, even 
though I don't agree with him all the time. 

If I won the lottery, I would: I would continue working. 

My pet peeve is: Slow drivers on the highway, particularly men who 
wear hats. 

Most famous or the most interesting person I ever met 
was: Harry S Truman. I had gone to Military Junior College. We had a 
trip into Independence. I happen to be a photographer and got to take 
his picture and meet him at the Truman Library. 

My dream job would be: What I am doing. 

If I had a plane ticket to anywhere, I would go to: Someplace 
warm, possibly Hawaii, 

If you have a "Neighbor" that you would like to see profiled in 
this column, call Rhonda Hetrick Burke at 223-8161. 



BIRTHS 



Joshua Brian Vogt, a son, Joshua 
Brian, was bom Nov. 18 at Condeli 
Medical Center, LibertyvUle to Brian 
and Sandra and Brian Vogt of Antioch. 
He has other siblings, Jason Wold, age 
17; Chris Wold, age 15; Brandon Wold, 
age 9 and Sarah Wold, age 14, Grand- 
parents are Leonard and Carolyn Vogt 
of WUdwood; Margaret Dalziel of Anti- 
och. Great grandparent is Monecia 
Vogt of Wayne, Mich. 

Alice Rose Pierce; a daughter, Al- 
ice Rose, was born Dec. 2 at Condeli 
Medical Center to Jeffrey and Ann 
Pierce of Antioch. Grandparents are 
Junior and Bonnie Bamett of Lake Vil- 
la and Roy and Judith Pierce of Plover, 
Wis. Great grandparents are Robert 
and Nan Christcnson of Stevens 
Point, Wis. and Anna Lebron of Rock- 
ford. 

William George Reid III, a son, 

William George, was born Dec. 2 at 
Condeli Medical Center to William 
and Renee Reld of Zion. Grandpar- 
ents are William and Peggy Reid of 
Zion and Bruce and Patricia Cheskeof 
Antioch. Great grandparents are 
George and Barb Reid of Oak Lawn 
and Trudy Putz and Richard Walker 
both of Antioch. ^• 

Nicholas Richard Brnot, a son, 
Nicholas Richard, was bom Dec. 21 at 
Condeli Medical Center to Richard 
and Karen Brnot of Antioch. Grand- 
parents are Richard and Gladys Sher- 
man of Winthrop Harbor and Richard 
Sr. and Georgia Brnot (both de- 
ceased). 

Kristen Margaret Haling, a 

daughter, Kristen Margaret, was bom 
Dec. 22 at Condeli Medical Center to 
John and Maureen Haling of Antioch. 
She has sisters, Megan, age 11 .and 
Carly, age 21 months. Grandparents 
are Charles and Marilyn Haling of An- 
tioch and James and Lois Tatum of 
Grayslakc. Great grandparent is Jacob 
Sieger of Grayslake, 
Brock Nathan Irwin, a son, Brock 
Nathan, was bom Dec, 24 at Lake For- 



est Hospital to Melissa and Mark Ir- 
win of Antioch. He has a sister, Emily,* 
age 2. Grandparents are Mary and 
Larry Mohr of Normal and Doris and 
John Irwin of Beason. Great grand- 
parents are Edna Mohr of Normal; 
Marie And Roy Campbell of Clinton. 



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Community members 
ating life 




Well the Old Retired 
Lizard asked that a lit- 
tle tidbit be put iri the 
paper welcoming her 
e latest addition to the Schmehl- 
Filips-Bergl-Okblita family. That's 
right, little Daniel James Fllips made 
his grand entrance into the world on 
Deq 20, weighing in at? pounds 5 
ounces. Grandma Liz, or Mi Mi, and 
grandpa Jim or Pop pop Jim, are do- • 
ing just fine, and oh, by the way, so 
are mom Barb and dad, Daniel. - 

" Baby Daniel will have lots and 
lots of extra hands to help in his 
care and upbringing as his arrival 
was anxiously.awaited by his two 
older sisters, Alyssa who is 63/4 
years old and Lindsey who Is4 3/4 
years old. (Grandma Mi Mi was very 
specific when giving me the ages of 
the two sisters, you know how 
women can be so touchy when the 
subject of "age" is put down in 
print.) There is also a smattering of 
other family members ready and 
waiting in the wings to fill in for one 
of those two a.m. feedings. Auntie 
Donna (Bergl) and Auntie Karen 
(Okolita) are close by to lend a hand 
or two, Uncle Jim oh the other hand 
might be okay for those feedings, 
but that diaper change business is 
something he will leave for those 
adept at such an undertaking. 

Barb and Daniel enjoy baby 
Daniel while you still have the 
chance, because, before you know 
it, he will be asking to borrow the 
car, and $20 for gas. 

Heather Rose turns '8 f 

Miss Heather Rose Bednar, of 
Antioch, turned the big 8 years old 
on Jan. 14, Now granted thatwas 
last week, but Heather Rose, dear 




JINGLE 
FROM 



LynnPringle 



mom figured it was better late than 
never to publicly humiliate, I mean, 
wish you a Happy Birthday. 

Now seems to me that seeing 
as dear old mom extended your big 
day by another week, there should 
be a present or two to make the 
wish a little more authentic— what 
do you say mom? Hope you had a 
great day Heather Rose. 

Miss Sheila '85' 

One more personal note: Sarah 
and Ryan Prister* of Antioch, would 
like to extend a warm welcome to 
their 85 year old great grandmother 
who traveled all the way over here 
from England for a visit and to spend 
the Christmas holidays with them. 

Miss Sheila, of the infamous 
Camp Crayon, says grandma will re- 
main underfoot, oh, I mean, under 
their roof, until sometime in Febru- 
ary. That's one thing about those re- 
tired folks, they never seem to be in 
a hurry to go anywhere. Well grand- 
mother, we hope your visit to our 
little "burb of Antioch" is pleasant, 
and we sure hope Miss Sheila brings 
you in to Camp Crayon for show 
and tell before you leave. . 

And so goes another "Jingle 
from Pringle. 

Readers with information for 
"Jingle from Pringle" should call 
Lynn Pringle at 395-6364. 



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Calendar 



Friday, Jan. 22 

6:30-9 p.m., Teen Canteen at 
Antioch Upper Grade School 

Saturday, Jan. 23 

8 a.m,-3 p.m., Community Blood 
Drive at Father Hanley Hall, St. 
Peter Church, 557 Lake St, walk- 
Ins are welcome 

Sunday, Jan. 24 

7-9 p.m. Open Gym at ACHS, cost 

$2 (adults only) 

Monday, Jan. 25 

School District #34 report cards 
for. Kindergarten through 8th grade 
are'distributed 

,, it, ,4***4 * M..l t IIMlH,MM M4M.MWHI 

Evening, Antioch Lions Club meet 

12:45 p.m. Bingo, at Antioch 
Senior Center, Info, at 395-7120 

6:30-8:30 p.m., Program on 
"Faux Paint Finishes" at Antioch 
Public Library, prior registration is - 
required, call 395-0874 for details 

7 p.m., Parent Teacher meeting at 
Antioch Upper Grade School 

7-9 p.m. Post-high Men's Basket- 
ball at Antioch Evangelical Free 
Church, call 395-4117: •' 

7 p.m. Bingo at Antioch Moose ' 
Lodge, Rte. 173 west of Antioch 

7:30 p.m. Antioch Jaycees meet 
at Regency Inn, call 395-8035 

7:30 p.m., Village of Antioch 
Board meeting at Village Hall 

7:30 p.m. Lakes Area Community 
Band at ACHS, info, at 395-5566 

Tuesday, Jan. 26 

9-11 aim. Ladies Bible Study"at 
Antioch Evangelical Free Church, 
child care provided, call 395-4117 

11 a.m. Antioch AARP Chapter 
387 (for adults 55 -aha" older) 
meets at Antioch Senior Center, 
817 Holbeck Dr., for nformation 
call Sharon Nowak at 395-5068 

6:45 p.m. Antioch VFW Bingo, 
refreshments available. Doors 
open at 4:30 p:m. f call 395-5393 

7 p.m., Tne independence Day 
Celebration Committee holds first 
meeting at Community Building, 
Information at 395-6342 

7 p.m. Antioch Public Library 
District Board meets 

Wednesday, Jan. 27 

A Safe Place/Lake County Crisis 
Center, free support group for 
women victims of abuse meets In 
Round Lake, call 249-4450 

6:30 p.m. Antioch Rescue Squad, 
offers CPR classes, call 395-5511 

Thursday, Jan. 28 

8:45-11 a.m. MOPS (Mothers of 
Pre-Schoolersj meets at Antioch 
Evangelical Free Church. $5 
covers craft and child care, call 
395-4117 for. information 

7 p.m., First Grade Music Program 
at Antioch Lower Grade School 

7:30 p.m. Lakes Region Historical 
Society meets at the museum, 
817 Main St., Antioch for info, call 
Robert Undblad, 395-0899 or 
Nancy Binder, 395-1453 

7:30 p.m. Irish American Club 
meets at State Bank of the Lakes 
In Antioch, call 395-3942 _ 

GOT SOMETHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14-day notice is needed 
for all calendar requests. 
AskforCristinaFeindt 
223-8161, ext. 141. 






mm 



A8/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



January 22, 1 999 



fc 



&£> 



WC^DIGEST 

Unbury hydrants 

Buried fire hydrants should be 
dug out of snowbanks by neighbor- 
hood residents. 

"We would encourage folks to 
dig out fire hydrants/' said Village 
Manger Tim Wells at the Monday, 
Jan. 4 Village board Meeting, 

"We have a master list of all fire 
hydrants," he told village trustees. 
That list helps the Antioch Fire 
Department First Fire Protection 
District locate hydrants near fires. 
Hydrants already exposed are faster 
to find and use. 

Wells said that even if all 
hydrants are not dug out in a neigh- 
borhood, a few exposed hydrants 
will help firefighters find- the others. 




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Windmill Creek Signs 

Signs to direct people to- 
Windmill Creek will be erected at 
Depot Street and Deep Lake Road. 

St. Ignatius Episcopal Church 
will rent out space at that corner for 
three years for an 0-foot by 8-foot 
sign. 

Village Director of Planning, 
Zoning, and Building Robert E. 
Silhan recommended approval of 
the request. Village trustees 
approved the request at their 
Monday, Jan. 8 council meeting. 

The length of the lease is the 
expected amount of time to sell out 
homes in Windmill Creek. 

Parade chairman 
needed 

The Independence ■ Day 
Celebration Committee will meet 
for the first time Tuesday, Jan. 26 at 
7 p.m. in the Maplethorpe Room of 
the Community Building, 884 Main 
Street. 

The Committee is seeking a 
Parade Chair for the July 4 parade. 

Candidates who would like to be 
responsible for die parade are asked 
to contact Claude LeMere or Billie 
Horton at the Community 
Development Department, 395-6342. 

The purpose of the committee 
meeting is to start planning this 
year's celebration. 




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A Caribbean Island Reachable by Road 

by JIM WARNKEN, 

President, North Star Travel, Inc. 

It's where Highway I begins and Flagcrs railroad ended. It's the southernmost part of 
the United States, (though its residents did try to claim their independence back in the 
1930s). It's also quickly becoming one or the hottest new ports-of-call for the shorter 
cruises leaving from Tampa. 

We're talking about Key West, Florida, known to the locals as the "Conch 
Republic." 

My sister, a former "Wisconsinitc", could not face another northern winter and 
headed south to Key West a couple of months ago. Being a good brother, 1 hopped a 
plane last week to see how she was doing (the 80-degree, sunny weather of Key West had 
nothing to do with it!) 

The first thing we did was head to a seaside cafe called South Beach for breakfast. 
Looking out at the bikini clad sunbathcrs enjoying some early morning rays sure made me 
forget the snow back home. 

Afterwards, we took a ride on the Old Town Trolley. I highly recommend the 90- 
minute tour for a Quick overview of the island. You can then go back to sites at which you 
may want to spend more time. 

While many people choose to visit Hemingway's house, or the original Sloppy Joe's 
where he spent much of his time, we decided to head back to the old lighthouse and 
climbed the 88 stairs for a breathtaking view of the island. 

From there we took a walk down Duval Street, where among the many T-shirts 
shops is the Wyland Art Gallery. Wyland is famous for his many murals depicting ocean 
creatures, particularly the whale. ■ 

Our next stop was a bayside bar called Turtle Kraals, which looked very much like 
the bar featured on the short-lived TV show "Key West." We had a lunch of conch fritters 
and key lime pie. 

. At the end of the day, everyone gathers at Mallory Square to watch the sunset, as 
well as some first-rate street entertainers. One act consisted of several trained cats, a feat 
any cat owner would appreciate. Refreshingly, these entertainers are not allowed to go 
among the crowd and ask for tips. If you do appreciate their work, you must bring your 
tips to them. — 

I found Key West to be a safe, clean island full of U.S. history and laid-back 
residents and a good choice for a short cruise. 



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Lindenhurst 

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356-2000 




Mabel Lou Weber and Nancy Zitkus of the Antioch Woman's Club point out some of the articles in 
a display about the history of the club at the Antioch Public Library.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 

AWC history collection at library 

Collection gives insight into work 
of club through village's history 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Members of the Antioch 
Woman's Club placed some of their 
historical records on display at the 
Antioch Public Library District dur- 
ing the December holidays. 

This is the first time the records 
of the club have been displayed, 
although they always are available 
for inspection at the library upon 
request. 

"They asked us if we would like to 
display it," said Mabel Lou Weber, 
club member and immediate past 
president. Nancy Zitkus, also a past 
president, and Nancy Preston, a club 
member, helped create the library 
display. 

The Antioch Public library 
District, 757 Main Street, serves as 
the depository for club records. Alice 
E. Smith, a school teacher, provided 
the initial club records that start in 
1920 when the club was founded. 

"She was the president at the 
time," said Weber. 

Minutes, photographs, program 
booklets, club yearbooks, scrap- 
books, special history records, and 
newspaper clippings are held by the 
library. 

Participation in the Antioch 
Woman's Club has provided both 
social occasions and community 
improvement opportunities for 
members, 

"There's always been activities," 
said Weber. Meetings were also a 
regular opportunity for members to 



gather socially and talk about the 
community. 

One of the consistent styles of 
historical record for the club has 
been preparation of club scrap- 
books. The scrapbooks hold both 
clippings and photographs of each 
year, although the scrapbook record 
is not complete. 

Scrapbooks also document spe- 
cific community improvement pro- 
jects undertaken by the club. For 
example, the trees planted on the 
east side of Toft Street were a club 
improvement project:The club doc- 
umented implementation of that 
project. 

Today, the club is working on 
another community improvement 
project, and they are also preparing a 
record of its development and imple- 
mentation. The project will be a win- 
ter recreation facility for children at 
the William E. Brook Wetland 
Sanctuary and Education Center. 
Member Sue Allen is working to help 
fund that project. 

Not only has the club always kept 
their history at the public library, the 
club was instrumental in the creation 
of the Antioch library. According to 
one history of the club, "The library 
organization was formed at the insti- 
gation of the Antioch Woman's Club 
during the 1921-1922 term, under the 
Presidency of Mrs. Dayton. Books 
were donated by the community and 
shelves were rented in Walter Chirm's 
store, next to the State Bank Building.," 
Eventually the library was moved 
to the town hall where a table, chairs, 



and shelving were provided. "A huge 
party, at the home of Mrs. W. H. 
Horve on Lake Catherine, raised 
money for the project" Club mem- 
bers served as unpaid librarians. 

In 1926, "the club hired Miss 
Mary Stanley as librarian." In 1929, 
"the library moved to' the grade 
school." 

Although the entire history of 
the club is handwritten in composi- 
tion books, bound record books, 
and scrap books, it is very legible 
due to the clear, Palmer Method 
writing style. 

The written record Identifies the 
community contributions of the 
club. 

For example, on Feb. 7, 1955, 
Recording Secretary' Helen -Nelson i- 
summarized a few of the contribu- 
tions made by the Antioch Woman's 
Club to the community. 

"We sponsored the first boy 
scout troop in Antioch and orga- 
nized one of the early bands," she 
wrote. "We contributed the first 
table and chairs, used by our village 
fathers, and they are still being used 
by them today. The Antioch Rescue 
Squad finds us on their list at all 
times. One of our large gifts to the 
scout home was the piano." 

The handwritten record of the 
club in journals and scrapbooks is 
filled with details, dates, and names 
that reflect upon the cultural and 
everyday social life of Antioch dur- 
ing the past eight decades. To call 
attention to their existence, club 
members placed them on display. ■ 

"(People) can go to the library 
and ask to see them," said Weber. 
According to her, the collection is a 
record the community life like no 
other in Antioch. 



7 



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THE 
CUPBOARD 



- LeeFilas 



News and 
notes from 
Lake County 

From under the paper-clutter 
of stats and figures, three 
things for this week deserve 
mention. So, without further 
adieu... 

Regional seeds for the high 
school girls basketball tournament 
were released this week, with little 
surprises to note. 

Of course, heading the list is 
Lake Zurich, which could be listed in 
the "no-brainer" of the month por- 
tion of your programs. It wouldn't * 
shock me a bit if LZ wandered into 
Springfield ranked number one. 

Stevenson at two with Liber- 
tyville at number three is a little bit 
of a shock. Didn't Libertyville beat 
the "University of Stevenson" once 
this year, and looking to make It 
twice? I think that Libertyville will 
shock the world and do it again on 
Feb. 2., in the rematch.. 

From there, it's Warren 4 and 
Waukegan 5, before Grayslake 6. If 
it doesn't shock Grayslake coach 
Mike Muldrow that he's ranked 6th, 
then it shouldn't shock me. 

Next is Deerfield, followed by 
Round Lake. I know, they have a 13 - 
5 record and all with a nine game 
winning streak, but let's be honest 
The winning streak, no matter how 
impressive it was, was against teams 
that were either below .500 or teeter- 
ing on the edge. So, until they can 
prove some dominance against a 
team with a winning record, they 
should be in the middle. ./ •>ni! . 

Rounding out the list is 
Mundelein, Carmet at 10, then Lake 
Forest, Antioch (a little shock at be- 
ing ranked so low), Highland Park, 
Zion-Benton, Grant, Wauconda 
and North Chicago. 
Good luck everyone. 



B> 



'iggest wrestling quad of the 
year will be at Grant High School on 
Saturday, and anyone who loves 
wrestling should check it out. 

The Grant grapplers, with what 
could be argued as the best mid- 
dleweight squad in the state, will 
face off against Antioch, who has 
one of the best top weight squads In 
the area. v 

Then, throw Grayslake and 
Round Lake into the mix, and you 
have a quad that could feature 
some very high-quality wrestling. 

The box score for the Antioch girls 
basketball game on Thursday, Jan. 14 
read Libertyville 76 - Antioch 41, and 
on Saturday, Mundelein 40 - Antioch 
17, but the real story is that a great 
loss, one that isn't found in a box 
score, touched Antioch for those two 
games, as well as the rest of the year. 

On Tuesday, Jan. 12, Douglas 
Carlberg, father of Antioch senior 
basketball standout Amie Carlberg, 
died tragically from injuries he re- 
ceived during a snowmobile acci- 
dent in Rhinelander, Wisconsin. 

The former Naval officer was 
well known and well respected . 
throughout Antioch and Linden - 
hurst from his numerous voluntary 
activities, which include volunteer- 
ing as a Linderihurst girls softbali 
coach and a coach for numerous 
Antioch boys baseball teams. , 

The people at Lakeland 
Newspapers would like to express 
their deepest condolences to the 
entire Carlberg family during this 
tragic time." 

Lee Filas can be reached at 
(847) 223-8161, ext. 130; fax (847) 
223-8810; or e-mail at 
edit@lncl.com. 




January 22, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A9 



Antioch boys on a roll 



Sequoitsface 
tough tests ahead 

By BRENDAN O'NEILL 
Sports Editor 

The Antioch boys basketball 
team has been flirting with .500 ail 
year. The past week was the time that 
the boys were finally able to get over 
that hump. The Sequoits beat North 
Suburban rival Ubertyville 66-54, 
then. came back handed indepen- 
dent Grant a 61-56 loss to improve to 
9-8 overall, 2-4 in the NSC. 

• The Sequoits, which had been 
relying on junior forward Don Lack- 
ey too much of late, got a team-high 
19 points from Eric White last Friday 
night, including 11 in the second 
quarter as Antioch led the Wildcats 
30-24 going into halftime. 

Lackey, the team's leading scor- 
er, sat out with bronchitis, while 
White, Soldano (15 points), sopho- 
more Adam Durham (11) and Brett 
McCollum (10) kept the Antioch of- 
fense afloat. 

The Sequoits win dropped Lib- 
ertyville to 5-10, 2-4 NSC. 

The Antioch boys continued, 
their winning ways Tuesday night In 
the win over Grant The key for Anti- 
och: height In the paint 

The combination of Lackey (6- 
4), Soldano (6-5). and center Matt 
Koss (6-7) stifled the undersized 
Bulldogs, who are accustomed to 
scoring at will against most teams. 

Against Antioch however, the 
Bulldogs could not get enough of- 
fense in the paint (11 total points) 
and the perimeter game was not 
clicking either. 

Those two factors contributed to 
a slow start for the Bulldogs, as Anti- 
och jumped out to an early lead. 

"We were slow off the blocks 
again/' said Tom Maple, coach for 
the 8-5 Grant Bulldogs. "We've tried 
everything to change that We've 
tried to change defenses, give differ- 
ent pre-game talks and install new 
strategies to change that, but noth- 
ing has seemed to work." 

"When we start off 10 points be- 
hind to a good team and have to play 
catch up, it's hard for us to come 
back in the game," Maple said. "If we 
continue to do that, it's going to be 
difficult to win games against quali- 
ty opponents." 

Lackey led the Sequoits offense 
with a team-high 19 points. Also 
pitching in for Antioch was sopho- 
more Adam Durham with 10 points 




Above; AntlocJVs 6-7 post Matt 
Koss leans in for a lay-up in 
the Sequoits' 66-54 win over 
Libertyville last week. Right: 
Antioch junior Jordan Phillips 
puts up a shot against the Lib- 
ertyville girls last week in the 
Lady Sequoits loss. — Photos 
by Sieve Young 



and sophomore Eric White with 
nine. 

- For Grant, guard Aaron Behm 
led the Bulldogs with a game high 
20 points, while forward Brandon 
Borror scored 13 and leading scor- 
er Wayne Bosworth scored 12 
points. 

The Antioch boys have a chal- 
lenge in front of them, as the Se- 
quoits play at NSC third-place 
Mundelein Friday, then travels to 
conference leader Zion-Benton Sat- 
urday.. 




Antioch girls suffer losses on and off court 



By BRENDAN O'NEILL 
Sports Editor ( 



Last week was a tough one for 
the "Antioch girls basketball team, 
both on and off the court. On the 
court, the Lady Sequoits were overrun 



by Libertyville (76-31) and Mundelein 
(40-19), but that may have been a 
symptom of the off the court situation 
which affected the girls. 

Amie Carlberg, a standout mem- 
ber of the Sequoits basketball team, 
did not dress for the Mundelein game 



ATHLETES OF THE WEEK 



1 

km 
i 

m 


i 

i 
| 

1 

■% 





White 



Name; 

Eric White 

School: 

Antioch 

Sport; 

Basketball 

Year: 

Sophomore 

Last week's 

stats: Scored 

19 points in the 




Girten 



Name:* 

Sheila Girten , 
School: Antioch 
Sport: Bowling 
Yean Senior 
Last week's stats: 
.Averaging a 165 for 
the. Lady Sequoits 
bowling team this 
year. 



Sequoits 66-54 win over Libertyville 
last week. * 



Saturday, and played sparingly 
against Mundelein as she was coping 
with a personal loss. 

Her father, Douglas Carlburg, 
died from injuries received in a snow- 
mobile accident last week in 
Rhinelander, Wise 

Amie, as well as the rest of 
the girls team, was visibly shak- 
en during the two games. 

The girls clearly had th-» 
minds somewhere else, under- 
standably, as they scored just four 
points in the first quarter and 10 in 
the second against Libertyville, 
trailing the Wildcats 50-14 at half- 
time. 

• The girls could never recover, 
but were led by Katie Gofron's nine 
points, and sophomore call-up Sasha 
Mika also added for the Antioch girls. 

Against Mundelein, it was more 
of the same, as the two teams are fam- 




ily evenly matched, but the Antioch 
girls were still in shock over the events 
of last week. 

The girls could not get any of- 
fense going, and seemed to be going 
through the motions after a quick 
t as they outscored Mundelein 
7-4 in" the first quarter, were 
outscored 11-4 in the second ; 
4 in the third and 15-4 in the 



iwUi U*i 



Gofron again led the girls in scor- 
ing with nine points, and sophomore 
Justine Sinkus chipped in five. ■ 
.'. The girls host independent Wau- 
conda Thursday, then play at North 
Suburban powerhouse Stevenson 
Saturday night, before hosting - 
league-leading Warren Tuesday 
night. . 

See next week's edition for a 
memorial feature for the Carlberg 
family. 



A1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



January 22, 1999 



. 



s 



I 



I 



r 



Bowlers to improve down stretch 



ByLEEFUAS 
Staff Reporter 



The Antloch girls bowling team is 
on a roll.. 

"Right now, were shooting at 
about .500 in our record," said Steve 
Haenchen, Antioch girls bowling 
coach. "We are good enough to beat 
the people we should be beating, but 
we just can't get over that hump and 
beat the bigger squads." 

Pulling a 21st at the Fenton tour- 
nament, Haenchen knows that there 
is room for improvement, but also re- 



alizes the competition that he faced in 
the tournament was higher than ever 
before. 

"We looked okay at the tourna- 
ment," Haenchen said. "We tried 
hard, but it just seems that when 
someone bowls a great game, anoth- 
er girl on the team has a bad set which 
hurts us in the end." 

With Sheila Girten bowling an av- 
erage of 165, and both Stefanie For- 
resta and Amanda Phelps bowling at 
a 160 clip, the girls have the power to 
beat other teams handily, but consis- 
tency is the biggest issue. 



"We have a balanced team," 
Haenchen said. "If everyone shoots 
their average, then we can do some 
damage." 

With Warren on deck against An- 
tioch, as well as regionals rolling in 
around the comer, Antioch is looking 
for consistency to get ahead. 

"If we beat Warren this week, 
then we will be 5-3 in the conference 
and look to do some damage in re- 
gionals," Haenchen said. "We are def- 
initely looking to upset some people 
at the conference tournament, then 
use that momentum into regionals." 



ACHS looking to earn bragging rights 



By LEE RLAS 

Staff Reporter 



No one is denying that the Grant 



Bulldogs and the Antioch Sequoits 
have two of the best wrestling teams 
in the area. 

However, the question of which 




ACHS athlete of the week 

Antioch Community High School named Justine Sinkus Athlete of 
the week for the week ending Dec. 27 for her outstanding play 
as a member of the Lady Sequoits varsity basketball team. She 
is among team leaders in scoring and rebounding. From left, Jody 
Dowell of First Chicago Bank of Antioch, Justine Sinkus and coach 
Dave Woods. — Submitted photo 




ACHS athletes of the week 

Antioch Community High School named Don Lackey and Brian 
Soldano Athletes of the Week for the weeks ending Dec. 20 and 
Jan. 3, respectively. They were named Athlete of the Week for 
their outstanding play as members of the Antioch boys varsity bas- 
ketball team. From left, coach Duffy, Brian Soldano, Don Lackey and 
Jody Dowell of First Chicago Bank of Anrioch.^Subm/tted photo 



one is better could be answered this 
weekend when the two meet at 
Grant this Saturday morning. 

Also in the middle. of the quad 
battle will be Hound Lake and 
Grayslake, each of which has been 
better than in year's past. 

"We'll find out more of where we 
stand this Saturday," said Dave 
Kapraun, Grant wrestling coach. "We 
have a pretty good line-up, and we're 
still not running at full strength." 

The big question mark in Grant's 
line-up falls on the injured shoulder 
of 130 pound Joe Michniewicz. 

Michniewicz has been out for over 
two weeks because of ashoulder injury, 
but is expected back this weekend. 

"He has been cleared to wrestle 
by his family physician," Kapraun 
said. "He needs to take astrength test 
with our trainer before he's set to go, 
but he should pass that and be back 
this weekend." 

, With Michniewicz back, Grant 
should again be strong enough to roll 
through the middle weights in the 
contest, but hitting the heavier 
weights will prove to be a problem as 
Antioch posts the best heavier divi- 
sion in the county. ' 

Antioch's Nate Carden is walking 
around sporting one loss on the year, 
and is considered one of the best 
heavyweight wrestlers in the state. 
Also, 189 pound Steve Smart has had 
a great year despite a 2-2 record over 
the past weekend. 

"The meet is going to come 
down to who gets pinned and does- 
n't get pinned, J believe," Kapraun 
said. "It's going to be close." 

The best match of the afternoon 
should be in the 135 pound category, 
with Antioch's Ryan Hlinak against 
Grant's Charlie Jasinski. Hlinak has 
only one loss on the year, which is 
equaled by jasinski. Also, with the 
way it's working out, the two could 
meet in regionals and state before 
the year is done. 






v - 



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OPEN REGISTRATION 



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Be a part of the* 
inaugural season at the 

NEW Sun Lakes 
Baseball Complex. 

APPLICATIONS BEING TAKEN ON A 
FIRST COME FIRST SERVED BASIS 

Thursday, January 28th 7pm-9pm 
Saturday, January 30th 9am-Noon 

at State Bank of the Lakes, Lindenhurst 

For more information call 

Russ Hoogerhyde at 356-1345 or 

Jeff Pietka at 356-0214 



GYMNASTICS FACTORY RESULTS 



Oswego GIJO 
Gymnastics Meet 

Age8 

Kacie Holop (Gages Lake) 
Vault 8.90; Bars 9.10; Beam 8.60; 
Floor 9.10; AA 35.70, 1st place. 

Jessica Bashaw (Lindenhurst) 
Vault 8.00; Bars 9.20; Beam 8.30; 
Floor 8,50; AA 34.00, 2nd place. 

Cody Ksiosczk (Lake Villa) 
Vault 8.20; Bars 8.60; Beam 7.20; 
Floor 8.20; AA 32.20, 3rd place. 

Heather Docherty (Round 
Lake Beach) Vault 7.80; Bars 8.00; 
Beam 8.10; Floor 7.60; AA 33.50, 
4th place. 

Melanie Verenski (Waukegan) 
Vault 7.70; Bars 7.70; Beam 7.40; 
Floor 7.60; AA 30.40, 5th place 



Age 9 

Nicole VHtz (Grayslake) Vault 
8.80; Bars 9,00; Beam 6.70; Floor 
8.00; AA 32.50, 1st place. ' 

Amanda Schweer (Gurnee) 
Vault 8.00; Bars 8.50; Beam 7.00; 
Floor 7.90; AA 31.40, 2nd place. 
Age 10 

Kelly Campbell (Grayslake) 
Vault 9.00; Bars 9.20; Beam 8.30; 
Floor 8.80; AA 35.30, 1st place. 

Lyla Browning_ (Round 
Lake) Vault 8.30; T3ars 7.60; 
Beam 8.50; Floor 8.70; AA 33.10, 
2nd place. 
Age 11 

Rebecca Kalinowski (Lake 
Villa) Vault 8.10; Bars 7.40; Beam 
8.70; Floor 8.10; AA 32.30, 1st 
place. 



Ice racing championship 
to be held at Lambs Farm 



Race fans won't want to miss the 
excitement of the Third Annual Mid- 
west Motorcycle Ice Racing Champi- 
onship being held Feb. 6 and 7 at 
Lambs Farm. Spectators will witness 
speeds of 70 to 90 mph as motorcy- 
cles equipped with metal studded 
tires rip across Lambs Lake. Races 
will take place from 10 a. m. to 4 p.m. 
both days. 

More than 150 of the fastest am- 
ateur and pro riders are expected to 
race throughout the event. Racers, 
ranging from 7 to 50 years old, will be 
riding various types of motorcycles 
creating a full race program for race 



fans. Spectators can view the races 
from Lambs Farm's heated pavilion. 
Parking and admission are FREE. 

Hot food and drinks will also be 
available to take off the chill. Picnic 
baskets and coolers are prohibited as 
all concession proceeds benefit pro- 
grams developed for the more than 
260 men and women with mental 
disabilities of Lambs Farm. The 
Lambs Country Inn Restaurant and 
several Lambs Farm shops will also 
be open for visitors. The event is 
sponsored by WIIL 95:1 FM. For 
more information, call the Lambs 
Farm hotline at 362-6774. 



Lake County Races set for April 



The 19th annual Lake County 
Races will be held on Sunday, April 
25, and will include the Jenny Span- 
gler Trustmark Marathon (26.2 
miles) Moore Half-Marathon (13.1 
miles) Provena St. Therese Medical 
Center lOKRun (6.2 miles) andTen- 
neco Fun Run and Walk (3.5 miles). 
The events are anticipated to attract 
over 5,000 people, making it Lake 
County's largest running event. The 
events begin at 8:15 a.m. in Zion and 
finish at various locations including 
Waukegan, Lake Bluff and Ravinia 
Park, Highland Park. 

OMNI Youth Services of Buffalo 
Grove and The Lake County Haven 



of Libertyville have been selected, 
once again as the official race bene- 
ficiaries. Last year, Marathon Charl-* 
ties, Inc.— the producers of the Lake 
County Races— donated $20,000 to 
these two worthy causes. Since its Iri- 
ception in 1981, Lake County Races 
has donated nearly $500,000 to area 
charity organizations. 

For information about training 
or entry into the 1998 Lake County 
Races, call 266-RACE, E-mail re- 
quests to: runIakeco@aol.com or 
send a self-addressed stamped enve- 
lope to: Lake County Races, 3100 
Skokie Valley Road, Suite 2N, High- 
land Park, IL 60035. 



CLC's 9th annual Cheerleading 
Competition a success 



The College of Lake County held 
their ninth annual Grade School 
Cheerleading Competition at the 
Grayslake campus. 

Last year's seventh grade cham- 
pion, Lake Zurich Middle School 
South, was back to try to defend their 
title in the eighth grade division this 
season. Some tough competition 
came from: 

St. Gilbert School, Grayslake; Lake 
Zurich Middle School North, Lake 
Zurich; Woodland Middle ( School, 
Gurnee; St. Francis de Sales School, 
Lake Zurich; West Oak Middle 
School, Mundelein; Woodland Mid- 
dle School, (White Squad) Gurnee; 
St. Mary's School, Mundelein; West- 



field Middle School, Winthrop Har- 
bor; Northwood Junior High School, 
Highland Park; Shepard Junior High 
School, Deerfield; Viking Junior High 
School, Gurnee. 

Competing for the title in the 
seventh grade division was: 

West Oak Middle School, 
Mundelein; Woodland Middle 
School, Gurnee; Woodland Middle 
School (White Squad) Gurnee; Lake 
Zurich Middle School North, Lake 
Zurich; Lake Zurich Middle School 
South, Lake Zurich; St. Gilbert 
School, Grayslake; Northwood Ju- 
nior High School, Highland Park; St. 
Francis de Sales School, Lake Zurich; 
Viking Junior High School, Gurnee. 



GRASS LAKE SCHOOL - GIRLS 
BASKETBALL TOURNEY RESULTS 

First round 

Grass Lake 25, Big Hollow 18 
Prince of Peace 27, Emmons 14 
Antioch Upper Grade 21, 
Spring Grove 20 
'Palombl 26, St. Gilbert 25 



Second round 

Grass Lake 21, Prince of Peace 10 
St. Gilbert 32, Spring Grove 16 
Palombl 35, Upper Grade 25 
Emmons 14, Big Hollow 13 

Finals 
Fourth place 



St. Gilbert 16, Emmons 5 
Third place 

Upper Grade 41, 
Prince of Peace 37 (overtime) 
First and second place 

Palombl 30, Grass Lake 21 

All tournament team selections 

Katherine Renyolds-Emmons 
Dina Izenstark-Grass Lake 
AlexMlka-PalombI 
Megan Lick-St Gilbert 
Jenna Martin-Palombi 
Jenny Dewar-Upper Grade 
Ashley Russ-St. Gilbert 
Krisilna Gopp-Prince of Peace 



i 









*> 



-*' 



A1 2/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HEALTH & FITNESS 



January 22, 1999 



Lack of potassium can cramp exercise routines 



- If you're cramping up while vigorously 
exercising, it may have more to do with a lack 
of potassium than over-exerting previously 
under-used muscles. 

Seriously depleted through sweat, potas- 



sium assists with a number of body func- 
tions, including muscle contraction, which 
offsets the occurrence of cramps. It also pro- 
motes a regular heartbeat. 

During a strenuous two-hour workout, as 



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much as 300 to 800 milligrams of potassium 
could be lost by sweating. And while it is dif- 
ficult to develop a long-term deficiency of 
potassium in the body, replenishing it on 
daily basis is imperative. 

Consuming potassium-rich fruits and 
vegetables, such as bananas (450 milligrams), 
baked potatoes (800 milligrams), cantaloupe 
and watermelon, is one way to replace lost 
potassium in the diet. Another way is to 
"drink" potassium. 

Eight ounces of orange juice provides 496 
milligrams, a cup of milk 370 milligrams, and 
for those households that soften their water, 
potassium can be easily replenished by using 
potassium chloride crystals instead of the tra- 
ditional sodium crystals in the water soften- 
ing process. • 

According to Elmar Goldsmith, director 
of research at IMC Kallum, households that 
soften their water with potassium chloride 
crystals, such as K-Life and Nature's Own, 



instead of their sodium counterparts can 
add, depending on the hardness of the water, 
from 120 to 500 milligrams of potassium to 
each quart of water softened. This benefit of 
drinking potassium-enriched water extends 
to beverages, such as coffee/tea and juices, 
where liquid or powder mixes have been 
combined with the water. 

The recommended daily requirement of 
potassium is 2,700 to 3,500 milligrams - an 
amount that 15 to 25 percent of the popula- 
tion fail to consume, according to Dr. David 
McCarron, professor of medicine at Oregon 
Health Sciences University. 

Nature's Own is sold in select grocery 
stores, hardware stores, home centers and 
other mass merchants. For consumer ques- 
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available at Gurnee Mills 



Strike "1 don"t have the time" and "it's 
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Every Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., no 
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at the Cancer Resource Center in Gurnee 
Mills Mall, located at Entrance H, next to JC 
Penney. Just walk in, sign the appointment 
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Cost for a mammogram is $49, including 
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To make an appointment or for more 
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January 22, 1999 



HEALTH & FITNESS 



Lakeland Newspapers /M 3 



This New Year's, r 

Cost, fear of pain lead reasons for not visiting 




veto 




dentist 



If you're one of those persons who has 
neglected your oral care during the past few 
years, Jan. 1 Is a wonderful time to make a 
commitment to get your teeth checked by a. 
dentist, 

"During January, I get a lot of people who 
have made a resolution to come to the den- 
tist and I applaud their commitment," says 
David Fulton, DDS, a general dentist who 
practices in Waukegan. He also serves as 
president of the Chicago Dental Society. 

"It's important for people to know that 
they can make an appointment and not feel 
guilty about the last time they saw a dentist. 
We understand! We see patients ail the time 
who do not visit the dentist as often as we'd 
like." 

A recent Gallup poll cites 10 reasons why 
patients neglect to see the dentist. Dr. Fulton, 
who has heard every excuse on the list, has 
an argument to counter each alibi. 

1. Dental visits cost too much. "Dental 
costs are stable; the average amount spent on 
dental care by each American has risen little 
since 1979, according to the National 
Institute of Dental Research," says Dr. Fulton. 
"Besides, avoiding the dentist costs more in 
the long run when a major problem occurs 
that could have been avoided with regular 
visits." 

2. Fear of pain. "New technology has dra- 
matically decreased the amount of discomfort 
patients feel," he says. "New techniques 
include hypnosis, anesthesia, electronic seda- 
tion, use of lasers, air-abrasion, and others." 

3. Not necessary to go until a problem 



occurs. "Prevention is the best medicine. 
Your mouth is a mirror of health for the rest 
of your body and your dentist is among the 
first to detect signs of illness in other parts of 
the body. If you don't go for regular exams, a 
small problem can only get worse, hurt more, 
and cost more." 

4. Uncertainty about cost. "Discuss costs 
with the dentist before treatment. We do this 
all the time. Don't be embarrassed." 

5. Not knowing a good dentist, "Lame. 
Good dentists are everywhere." Family, 
friends, coworkers, physicians and pharma- 
cists are. all good sources for recommenda- 
tions." 

6. Length of time kept waiting. "Dentists 
don't like patients to wait because it's just not 
good business. If patients don't wish to have 
any delays, they can schedule the first 
appoin tment of the day before anyone else 
sees the dentist." 

7. Inconvenient office hours. "More and 
more dentists have hours on weekends and 
evenings, making visits more convenient." 

8. A previous bad experience vrfth a den- . 
list. "Put it in the past where it belongs. You 
can't neglect the future." 

9. The look/smell/sounds/ of a dental 
office. "This sounds like a phobia and can be 
handled best by a clinic that specializes in 
treating patients who are fearful." 

10. More important things to do. "You 
mean, like going to the grocery store for baby 
food, because that is what you'll be eating 
when you don't have any teeth." 

Dr. Fulton says that a trip to the dentist 



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people all the time who have returned for 
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A1 4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HEALTH & FITNESS 



January 22, 1999 



Water, water everywhere; remember to drink enough 



Maintaining good 
hydration is as 
important in 
winter as summer 

Most of us know that hot 
weather means we need more water 
and other fluids for our health. What 
many people don't realize is that 
good hydration is equally important 
for good health in the winter. Cold 
weather, well-heated homes, illness- 
es such as colds and flu, and even 
the soothing warmth of a hot cup of 
Java can ail be very dehydrating. 

According to Susan M. Kleiner, 
Ph.D., R.D., a nutritionist and fitness 
expert, the body does not have a 
strong thirst mechanism to tell you 
when you arc dehydrated, so a con- 
scious program to drink at least 
eight B- ounce glasses of water daily 
is the best way of ensuring that we 
stay well hydrated. "It's especially 
important during the colder 
months," says Kleiner. "We're less 
thirsty when temperatures drop and 
even less aware of the importance of 
getting enough of the fluids we need 
for optimal health." 

Studies have shown that many 
people drink less water and fluids 
than their body requires, notes 
Kleiner. "The body and mind can be 
affected by even a small water 
deficit. It can cause fatigue, minor 
headaches and a general sense of 
not feeling mentally sharp," she 
says. 

While any nonalcoholic or non- 
caffeinated beverage will help, most 
nutrition experts recommend water 
as the best means for hydration — 
water is inexpensive, readily avail- 
able and has no calories. 

According to research conduct- 
ed by The Brita Products Company, 



most people believe water is essen- 
tial for good health and feel the need 
to drink more, but report one of the 
major reasons they do not do so is 
the taste of tap water. This 
explains why sales are soaring for 
filtration pitchers that quickly fil- 
ter tap water to improve its taste 
and odor and eliminate some 
common chemicals. 

Kleiner notes that you can tell if 
you are getting sufficient water by 
simply checking the volume and 
color of your urine. It should be 
clear to pale yellow in color, and 
there should be lots of it The darker 
it is, and the less frequently you uri- 
nate, the more dehydrated your 
body likely Is. 

Here are some simple dps on 
how to ensure good hydration in 
cold weather months. 

Drink before you get thirsty. 
This is the most important thing you 
can do to stay well-hydrated. If you 
wait until your body tells you that 
you're thirsty, it means you're 
already slightly dehydrated and not 
drinking enough. One way to 
remind yourself to drink enough 
water is to keep handy a full glass of 
water or a full filtration pitcher, such 
as that made by Brita. A Brita pitcher 
simply and quickly filters tap water 
to reduce chlorine taste and odor as 
well as sediment. It greatly improves 
the taste of tap water and its pres- 
ence serves as a reminder to drink 
our eight glasses daily. 

Drink a glass of water before as 
well as after vigorous activity or 
exercise. We sweat less when it's 
cold out and aren't as conscious of 
our body's need for fluids. The dry 
air outside or at many workout facil- 
ities increases dehydration as well. 

For every cup of coffee or tea, or 
each glass of an alcoholic beverage, 
drink a glass of water. Caffeine and 



alcohol are diuretics and contribute 
to dehydration by causing us to 
excrete water, so you need to bal- 
ance them by drinking more water. 
Soft drinks containing caffeine will 
also contribute to dehydration. 

Drink an extra glass or two of 
water daily if you are dieting. For 
many people, winter means cutting 
down on calories. When our bodies 
are breaking down fat, we need even 
more water to help eliminate the 
extra waste that we are producing. 
And if your diet plan has caused you 
to cat more foods high in fiber, 
increased water intake will help your 
body process the extra fiber. 

Increase water consumption 
when ill. Winter is synonymous with 
colds, sore throats, flu and other ill- 



nesses. Chicken soup may have a 
special healing mystique, but its pri- 
mary value is increasing the amount 
of fluids we take in. Drinking lots of 
water is one of the best protections 
against getting sick and one of the 
best means of healing when we're 111 
or just plain run down. 

Winter hydration tips: 

Drinking ample amounts of 
water and other fluids will help you 
stay healthy and feel better during 
the cold winter months. Here's 
some good basic hydration prac- 
tices offered by The Brita Products. 
Company. 

- Drink at least eight 8-ounce 
glasses of water daily. (Don't count 
beverages containing caffeine or 



alcohol.) 

- Space water consumption 
throughout the day. Keep a full 
pitcher or glass handy to remind 
yourself. 

- Increase water consumption if 
you are dieting or If you have the 
cold or flu. 

- Drink an extra glass of water 
for each cup of coffee or tea and for 
each glass of an alcoholic beverage 
that you drink, 

- Make sure your children, espe- 
cially very young children, are get- 
ting ample fluids, especially if they 
are heavy consumers of caffelnated 
softdrinks. 

Courtesy of Article Resource 
Association, wwtu.aracopy.com, 
email: info@aracopy.com. 




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A1 6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



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'Time out' may not 
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LIFE'S A BEAR 

A 'Bear' says good-bye 
to a Bull /B4 



MOVIE REVIEW 

'The Thin Red Line': 
Contrasting images/ B5 





Lakeland 
Newspapers 

January 22, 
1999 



Section 



ANTIOCH PUBLIC LIBRARY DIS 
757 NORTH MAIN 
ANTIQCIi, IL 60QQ2 




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Wauconda. resident Jon Mfkrut rides his 
snowmobile along the trails In Lakewood.For- 



est Preserve near Wauconda Saturday. 
Pnofo by Sandy Bressrier. ' 



' 








snow 



Snowmobile clubs offer routes, safety and friendship for dedicated riders 



By KORRINAGROM 
Staff Reporter 



There are legate" and there 
are "renegades". . . In the 
world of snowmobiling, 
that Is. 
Frank Meisner considers himself 
a "legal." 

"ffhe renegade) doesn't want to 
belong, and gives snowmobilers 
bad press," said Meisner. 

The 61-year-old Meisner is a 
member of the "Harmony Club," 
which is one of the oldest snowmo- 
bile clubs in Illinois, 

Meisner was once the president 
of the club, a position which has 
been filled by Bob Andronowitz. 
The McHenry-based club' belongs 
to the Illinois Association of Snow- 
mobile Clubs, a state organization 
consisting of more than 80 clubs 
and 3,500 members. 

According to Jane Austen, a 
representative from the state orga- 
nization, region five has the most 
clubs, and includes DeKalb, Kane, 
DuPage and Cook counties. M e is - 
ner's dub is part of region two, 
within the boundaries of McHenry 
County. 

The "Harmony Club" is one 6f 



16 clubs in the 
McHenry Coun- 
ty Snowmobile' 
Association, 
whose member- 
ship includes 
residents of 
both Lake and 
McHenry coun- 
ties. 

An impor- 
tant aspect of 
the clubs,' ac- 
cording to Meis- 
ner, is safety. 
The clubs 
create trails and 
maintain them 
for the safety of 
the members, 
providing self- 
insurance for 
landowners 
whose property 
is used for the 
. trails. 

The clubs, at one time, support- 
ed a "Rescue 50" "ride, raising mon- 
ey and donating It to local rescue 
squads. Several fund-raisers would 
be held, with a rider collecting 
pledges and then receiving money 
based on the number of miles he.or 




Rick Delolmo of Lake Barrington and JonMiknit of 
cuss their snowmobile routeprior to taking to the 
by Sandy Bressner 



she completed. The money was 
then used to fund the rescue squad" 
which would provide safety and as- 
sistance for dub members. 

However, monetary assistance 
is no longer given to the rescue 
squads, Meisner said, because 



"they became 
part of the tax 
. rolls." 

Still, safety 
for snowmobil- 
ers did not sub- 
side: The "sher- 
. ifFs patrol" pro- 
vided assistance 
for snowmobile 
emergencies. 
, The patrol con- 
sisted of trained 
volunteers: 
However, the 
sheriffs patrol, 
.no longer exists. 
Donald Schae- 
fer, president of ., 
the Northeast- 
em Illinois As- 
sociation of 
Snowmobile 
Clubs and Wild- 
wood resident, 
made an at- 
tempt last year to re-establish the 
patrol, but efforts were unsuccess- 
ful; 

Forest preserves In the area 
now offer a "ranger patrol," which 
provides assistance for riders, 
Schaefer said. 



Wauconda dis- 
tralls. —Photo 



According to Meisner, certain 
points are stressed to all riders 
which will help maintain safety. He 
said frozen waters are to be avoided 
at all costs. With the recent aeddent 
involving snowmobilers in Lake Vil- 
la who fell through the ice, water 
safety is particularly important 

"Some people just venture out 
and go," Meisner said. "None of the 
clubs' trails (in Illinois) are on 
frozen waters, while they are in 
Wisconsin. If people stay on the le- , 
gal marked trails, they should not 
have problems." 

Most problems occur, Meisner 
said, when people venture off of the 
marked trails. There have been inci- 
dents when riders have gone off the 
trails and hit boulders or other un- 
seen objects, covered by snow. 

Many of these problems can be 
avoided by taking safety daises. 
Even Meisner's grandchildren have 
taken safety dasses, and were re- 
cently given snowmobiles by Meis- 
ner. 

According to Schaefer, snow- 
mobile education classes are re- 
quired for children ages 12 
through 16,for them to drive 

Please see SNOW /B4 



' 



B2/ Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



January 22, 1999 



Planning your garden for food and flavor 



To many it seems too early to 
be thinking about planning 
a vegetable garden, or any 
garden for that matter. In 
reality, though, it is never too early 
to plan a garden, especially one for 
flavor. In our northern climate, our 
planting season is pretty short, so 
early planning helps extend our gar- 
dening time. 

If you have been.readtyg/rry coir , 
umn, you know I love a variety of 
gardening. Flowers bring me great 
joy. I have to admit though, my soe- \ 
cialty is vegetable gardenfng.1 have' ' 
always found it very rewarding to go 
out to the garden and pick supper. 
Growing vegetables and herbs are 
not that hard to grow. Please, if you 
have not tried a veggie garden, give 
it a chance this upcoming season. 
Vegetable gardens do not have to 
take up a lot of space, I grow mine in 
beds, rather than long rows. If you 
mix herbs, and Dowers among the 
vegetables, it will look lovely. Believe 
me anyone can do vegetables- 
It is important to find a sunny 
location on your property to grow 
your vegetables. Veggies do best 
with six to eight hours of sun a day. 
Leafy greens, such as lettuce and 
spinach, however, can thrive with 
less. Remember, too, trees that are 
leafless in autumn, will create shade 
in mid-summer. If you can, locate 
your garden, so it can be easy to get 
to from y our kitchen. That is the 
ideal situation. Also, the ideal gar- 
den location has loose soil that has 
good drainage. Remember com- 
posting your kitchen waste for en- 
hancing your soil. 

You do not have to have a very 
big plot to start. If you have never 
gardened, it is wise to start small. A 
20 by 16 foot plot is a good size. You 
can grow a good variety of greens, 
some herbs, peppers, cucumbers, 




GARDEN 
JOURNAL 



■« LydiaHuff 



beans and tomatoes. You can plot 
,out your garden on graph paper. 
Outline the'be'ds in pencil and then 
fill in the plant names. 
• Ygu can begin ordering the veg- 
etables you will grow from seed cat- 
alogues now. This is a good time to 
order. Some companies even offer 
early bird discounts. If you are 
thinking about starting all your veg- 
etables seed, this is the time to order 
them. You need to plan early for 
that, as peppers need to be started 
six to eight weeks before the last 
frost date. That frost date is the key 
for planning your garden. While 
frost may not always kill your young 
plants, it is damaging to most kinds' 
of vegetables. I use May 15 for my 



guide, I have done well never to 
plant any tender vegetables before 
that date, in fact I do not set out 
tomatoes or peppers until May 30, 
Lettuce and root crops can always 
go in the garden earlier. 

Some of the easiest crops to 
grow are beans, lettuce, beets, cu- 
cumbers, summer squash, parsley 
and tomatoes. They seem to adapt 
well in various situations and ell- , 
. mates. Do not buy seed that is more 
than a year old. Seed that has been 
treated with fungicides (many com 
varieties are) say so on the label.. 
Treated seeds cannot be eaten, and 
you will need to wash your hands af- 
ter handling them. 

You can start growing herbs 
now on a sunny window sill, and 
when spring rolls around they can 
be set out and be ready for a great 
growing season. 

Have fun with it, peace. 

Garden questions may be sent to 
Garden Journal, do lakeland News- 
papers, 30S,WItitney SL, Grayslake, 
IL 60030: 



Papai Players presents 'The Wizard of OZ J 

This one-hour musical adven-. 

ture is sure to please all who attend. 

The Papai Players is an ensemble of 

professional performers from the 

greater Chicago area, located in 

Palatine. Scheduled performances 

are Monday, January 25 through 

Friday February 26. Tickets are 

$5.50 (pre-paid), $6.50 (cash at the 

door), and $4.50 (groups of 20 or 

more pre-paid). Theatre opens for 

seating one-half hour prior to show- 
time Tom Detogne: Uon; Sara 

For further information please Minton: Dorothy; Ryan McVic- 
call 359-9556, 501 E. Providence ka: Scarecrow. — Submitted 

Road, Palatine, 11. 60067. Photo 




— .■! I've .**• 

^^ a is the 9< eatea .- discou»» s ' 




\ 



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HOROSCOPE 



. Aries - March 21/Aprll 20 , 
You have'tbiiake theieaa when it I 
comes to a family problem late in 
the week, Aries. Loved ones are 
counting on you to set things right. . 
Keep your mind on the task 'at hand, 
and you're sure to help the situation, 
You run Into an old friend on Thurs- 
day. Spend some time with him or 
her. You'll learn some Interesting In- 
formation. 

Taurus - April 21 /May 21 
Don't back down when It comes to 
something that you really want, Tau- 
rus. Acquaintances will try to hinder 
you, but your diligence wilfwln out. 
. A loved one has a personal problem 
and turns to you for help. Be sup- 
portive, and do what you can to 
remedy the situation. Leo plays a 
key rofe. 

Gemini- May 22/June 21 

.You finally have the time to focus on 
a personal goal that you've been Ig- 
noring for quite some time, If you 
work diligently, you can make great 
strides toward achieving it. If you 
need support, turn to loved ones. 
They're always on your side. That 

,. special someone asks you an Im- 
portant question. Be honest. 

Cancer- June 22/July 22 

When it comes to an Important 
meeting, don't let your face show . 
what's on your mind. Try not to let 
those involved know what you're 
thinking until you present your argu- 
ment. This will give you the upper 
hand. A loved one volunteers you 
for a family project. While you're not 

j looking forward to it, you have to get 

' involved. 

Leo - July 23/August 23 
Don't let difficulties at work Inter- 
fere with your personal life, Leo. 
Leave these problems where they 
belong — at work. Quality time with 
loved ones is too precious to lose 
because of your job. A close friend 
wants to spend some time wllh 
you. Say yes; It's sure to be great 
fun. 

Virgo - Aug 24/Sept 22 
A family situation has you worried . 
about a loved one. Don't lose sleep 
over It. He or she is more than ca- 
pable of handling the situation. A 
business associate asks you out. 
Say no; starting a relationship with 



him or her only will cause problems 
Sfor"you. Cancer Is Involved. 

Libra- Sept 23/Oct 23 
Even though a personal situation 
has you angry, don't start an argu- 
ment.' This only will create more 
problems — and It won't even make 
you feel better. Just bite your 
tongue, and go about your busi- 
ness. That special someone offers 
you a gift. Say yes. 

Scorpio - Oct 24/Nov 22 

You have a tough week ahead of 
you, Scorpio. Don't get over- 
whelmed. You can handle It If you 
just stay organized. Turn to a close 
■ business associate "for help if you ; 
need It. A loved one calls you with 
good news. Help him or her cele- 
brate. Pisces plays an Important 
role. 

Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 

You stick your foot in your mouth at 
an Important meeting early In the 
week. Don't try to talk your way out 
. of this mess. Just explain what hap- 
pened. While you may look foolish, 
those Involved will respect your hon- 
esty. A relative needs your help. 
While you two aren't very close, do 
what you can for him or her. 

Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 

Try to stay calm when you get into 
some hot water this week, Capri- 
corn. Getting upset only will make 
the situation worse. Think clearly, 
and ask loved ones for advice If you 
need It. A close friend reveals his" or 
her true feelings for you. Think 
about how you really feel before an- 
swering. 

Aquarius- Jan 21 /Feb 18 
Don't overanalyze an encounter, 
with an acquaintance. Take It at 
face value, and don't read a lot Into 
it. He or she doesn't have any ulteri- 
or motives. A loved one has a prob- 
lem and needs a shoulder to cry on. 
Be there for him or her. 

Pisces - Feb 19/March 20 

While you're generally an easygoing 
person, you are very determined 
this week, Pisces. You have a per- 
sonal goal that you really want to 
achieve. Work hard to attain It, but 
don't get carried away. Sagittarius 
and Libra play important roles at the 
. end of the week. 



1 




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23 














24 






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ACROSS 



■ 



1 . Shakespeare 




8. Stirs 


• 


9. Thou do it 




. 10. Jalopy, slang 




11. Interpret 




14. Obeyed 




15. Electrodes 


• , 


17. Tanning result 


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19. Chop up 

23. Grassy plain 

24. dashery 

25. "You shall not crucify mankind 
upon a cross of gold," author 

DOWN 

1 . Toss but 

2. Give forth 

3; Overpowered 

4.. Moved by running 

5. Camps , 

6: Wheeled vehicle 

7. Essential characters 
12; Newman movie 
13: Finnish seaport 
1 4. Metal cutter 
16. Deprive 

18. Pierre _, executed 

French premier 

20. Vestment 

21. Wading bird' 

22. European freshwater 
game fish 






January 22, 1999 



FORYOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B3 






Woodstock Mozart Festival 
will host benefit concerts 



The Woodstock Mozart 
Festival will host a weekend of 
benefit concerts on Saturday, 
Feb. 13 and Sunday, Feb. 14, 
featuring Das Thuringer 
Salonqulntett, a group of extra- 
ordinary German 

musicians on tour In s 

this country. 

Sunday's event 
Is "Serenade 
D'Amour," a 
Viennese Garden 
party with "cafehaus 
muslk" from 2 to 4 
p.m. at the Holiday 
Inn, Rt. 31 and Three Oaks 
Road, in Crystal Lake. Tickets 
are $40 each and Include a 
dessert buffet, coffee, hot 
chocolate and tea.' Proceeds 
benefit the Woodstock Mozart 
Festival. For Information, call 
Marsha Portnoy at 765-4733. 

Das Thuringer Salonqulntett, 
founded in Germany In 1973, 
has performed in some of the 
great music halls In Europe. 
They will appear at Carnegie 





The Thuringer Salonqulntett features 
Georg Fritzsch, Ralner Eichhorn, Egbert 
Funda, Andreas Haertmann and Peter 
Nelson.— Submitted photo 



■ j 



Hall this month as part of their 
American tour, and can be 
heard on NPR's "Performance 
Today" on Wednesday, Jan. 20. 
"The romantic melodies of 
cafehaus musik have been 
winning the hearts 
of audiences for 
over 200 years,'' 
says Marsha 
Portnoy, event 
chairperson. "It was 
a lucky coincidence 
that the musicians' 

s itinerary brought 

them to this area in 
time for Valentine's Day." 

A Family Concert features 
Das Thuringer Salonqulntett 
In Camllle Salnt-Saens 1 The 
Carnival of the Animals at 2 
p.m. on Feb. 13 at the new 
Marian Central Catholic High 
School Auditorium, 1001 
McHenry Avenue, Woodstock. 
Mozart Festival orchestra 
members will assist, along 
with General Director Anita 
Whalen as duo pianist. Elgin 
resident and 
columnist Betty 
Brown wills 
serve as narra- 
tor. $12 
General 

Admission tick- 
ets are avail- 
able exclusively 
through the 
McHenry ■ 
County Youth 
Orchestras 
office at 815- 
356-6296. One 
third of the 
, proceeds form 
these sales will 
benefit the 
Youth . 
Orchestras. 



"■ ' ■■ y)!;:.- ' . ! . Vf lll j I H (I H.H )t,H | +tf ■ ■ 1 111^ 1 



SINGLES 



Dream Date Auction set 

The Midwest Chapter of the 
Starlight Children's Foundation will 
present its 8th annual Dream Date 
Auction on Friday, Feb. 19, at 6 p.m., 
at the Park West, 322 W. Armltage in 
Chicago. 

The event Will feature the auction 
of 26 bachelor and bachelorctte date 
packages, food from over 30 of 
Chicago's favorite restaurants and a 
raffle and auction offering internation- 
al, deluxe trip packages. Cost Is $30 in 
advance, $35 at the door. To order 
tickets or for more Information, coil 
(312)251-7827.- 

Dance set for Friday 

The Solo Singles Club meets 
every Friday at 8 p.m. at the Gale 
Street Inn, 906 Diamond Lake Road 
in Muntlelein. The age range is 40 
plus and admission is free. For 
more information call 746-6818. 



KIDtfTUFF 



Culture kids 

Kids in grades 2-5 ore Invited to 
explore different cultures through 
stories, crafts and activities. 
Saturdays Feb. 13. Register by colling 
the Children's Department of the 
Waukegan Public Library at 623 - 
2041, ext 280. 



!*rv > 



For more information, call 546- 
8086. 

t 

Book Presentation 

Renowned illustrator and artist, 
Thomas Locker will appear at Shlmer 
College on Saturday, Feb. 6, 1999 at 
noon to present a program entitled 
"Children's Books and Nature." 

Locker, a former faculty member 
has illustrated over 20 children's 
books, winning awards such as the 
New York Times Book Review's 10 
outstanding picture books of the 
year, Booklist Editor's Choice and 
Parent's Choice Award. 

This even Is open to the public, 
with no admission fee. Adults and 
children are welcome. The program 
will be held in the Prairie House 
Great Room at 445 North Genesee 
Street in Waukegan. The program 
will be followed by a reception where 
limited copies of his recent works 
will be available for sale and auto- 
graphing. 

Although walk-Ins are welcome, 
RSVPs are requested. To register, call 
the Development Office at Shlmer 
College, 249-7176. 



DANCE 



YMCA programs 

"Kids Day Out Program" dates for 
this school year are as follows: Feb. 
12 (Lincoln's Birthday), March 1 
(Coslmir Pulaski Day), and March 29, 
30, 31, April 1, 2 & 5 (Spring Break). 

Each day of the program will take 
place from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Activities 
will Include archery, hiking, teams 
course, outdoor education, sports, 
foozball, crafts, and boating. Winter 
weather will provide opportunities 
for ice skating, sledding, Ice hockey, 

djwinterjsoorts^ 



Square dance club 

Buoys and Belles Square Dance 
will present 

Send in the Clowns Dance given by 
caller, Jody Serriick, Friday, Jan. 29 
from 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Cost Is r 
$3.50 per person at the First United 
Methodist Church, 128 N. UUca St., 
Waukegan. • 

For more Information call 362- 
0130 or 566-0196. 



ART 



Art Members Exhibition 

The College of Lake County will 
be hosting the Community Gallery of 
Art Members Exhibition. This group 
show features Lake County artists 
who have joined the "Friends of the 
Gallery." Works on view Include a 



wide variety of styles and media. 

The exhibition will take place 
January 15 through Feb. 21, 1999. The 
reception for the artists will be held on 
January 22 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

This is free and open to the pub- 
lic. 

For more Information or to 
become a "Friend of the Gallery" coil 
543-2405. 

Preview of the Gustave 
Moreau Show 

The Waukegan Public Library wel* 
comes back Art Historian, Jeff Mishur 
to give an overview of Gustave 
Moreau, French Symbolist painter 
(1826-1898). Mishur will appear at 
the llborary on Tuesday, Jan. 26 from 
7-0:30 pm. Moreau's paintings will , 
be on a display at the Art Institute of 
Chicago Feb. 13-April 25. Moreau's 
art offers visualizations of dream, 
myth, fantasy and religion. Moreau 
was a key Influence on late 19th and 
early 20th century writers and 
painters, such as Rene Magritte and - 
henri Matisse. Although walk-Ins are 
always welcome, we encourage you 
to sign up for this program at the 
Adult Reference Desk, or by calling i 
623-2041. , 

ANTIOIES; ; 

Appraisal Days 

"Antique Appraisal Days," Gorton's 
own version of the popular PBS program 
"Antiques Road Show," will continue at "• 
Gorton Community Center, 400 East 
Illinois Road, Lake Forest. Dates are set 
for the first Thursday of each month, and 
the next is scheduled for February 4, 
from llam-4pm.The focus will be on 
Silver, Porcelain, Textiles, and Paintings. 
The cost is $20 for three or fewer items, 
and the appraisers will be available on a 
first-come, first-served basis'. 

Interested participants need not 
register In advance, attendees simply 
sign In when they arrive. For further 
information, or to receive a program 
brochure, contact or stop by the Gorton 
office at 234-6060 between 9am- 
4:30pm, weekdays. 



LCVCf E$T *99 




i£33U?>i»f;£ 



^ Enjoy the 
"Big Band" Music 





February 6, 1999 
7:00 p.m. - Midnight 



The ^carina 2€ 9 % Style run 
i§ About tc Begin ... 

Gome, Sail with us 
and Al Capone's Little Brother - Claude Capone 

Prizes for Best Dressed 
Gangster & Flappers 

Enter thru the Green Door 

at 75 North Avenue (Antioch V.F.W. Hall) 

And Don't Forget Your Password! (It's on Your Ticket) 

LoveFest Tickets- $15,00 Per Person 

Cash Bar Hors D'oeuvres 

Lots of Loot will be Auctioned Off in the Silent Auction during Ihe evening 



- RAFFLE — 6 Prizes 

6 winners Win a Hideout Weekend For 2 6 winners 



Tickets Available at Chamber Office, First National Bank-Employee Owned, 
State Bank of the Lakes and First Chicago 






Call Chamber Office for More Sponsored by 

Information - (847) 395-2233 ^kelond Publishers, Inc. 



LoheLand 



Saturday, January 30, 1999 

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

Brae Loch Golf Course & Banquet Facility, Grayslake 

JOn Route 45, just north of Route 120) 

1 1 aum. Exhibits open 

I p.m. Fashion Show by Priscilla's Bridal Boutique.Wauconda; 

& Gingiss Formalwear,Vernon Hills & Waukegan 

Music by Memory Makers Deejay Service 
$2 Admission (No Reservations Required) 

Other Exhibitors: 
KTR Video Productions, Libertyville 

GJQ Photography, Antioch 

Prunella's Flower Shop, Fox lake 

Jandee Family Hair Care, Gumee, 

Grayslake & Lindenhurst 

Libertyville Bakery, Libertyville 

Studio West, Libertyville 

Big John's Limo Service, Waukegan 

The Enchanted Attic, Waukegan 

Premier Designs Jewelry, Wildwood 





Grand Prizes Awarded! 
LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES 









■ ::.i. :,^ 



B4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



January 22, 1999 



A bear says 'good-bye' to a Bull 



Dear Michael: 
Now that you're retir- 
ing, I hope my readers 
won't mind ifl admit 
that you are one of my personal 
herps. 

Not this will surprise them. 
Nor will it surprise any of my 
friends and family, some of whom 
don't think a basketball player, no 
matter how talented, qualifies as a 
"hero." 

So I looked up the definition of 
that word. It said that a hero is: 1. 
a man admired for his achieve- 
ments and qualities; or 2. a leg- 
endary figure of great strength or 
ability. 

Seems to me you qualify on 
both counts. 

Which is why it is so hard to 
find the right words to say "good- 
bye" to someone who has provided 
■ me with so much entertainment 
and inspiration. 

Probably as hard as it was to 
find the right words to say "hello" 
when I met you back in 1994 at the 
Cha Cha Coconuts bar in Florida. 
The difference is that this time I'm 
hoping I can come up with some- 
thing slightly more intelligent to say 
than, "Are you Michael Jordan?" 

But don't bet on it. 

Of course, I don't think too 
many folks could blame me for 
having been momentarily intimi- 
dated by your physical presence. 
There are quite a few talented, pro- 
fessional basketball players who 
know just how I felt at that particu- 
lar moment, when I stood next to 
you and my brain suddenly did its 
best imitation of an amoeba. 

And it could have been worse. I 
could have said, "Are you Horace 
Grant?" 

But it is the moment before 




LIFE'S 

A BEAR 



'•#* Donna Abear 



that one, when I first spotted you 
across the crowded bar that, for 
me, defines the inspiration you 
gave to us all, young and old. 
Because ifl learned anything from 
you, Mike, it was to go ahead and 
"take my shot." 

Believe me, much as I wanted 
to meet you, it was not easy to find 
the courage that day to approach 
you. You were (and are) one of the 
most famous people in the world. 

Yes, I was scared. Yes, I faced 
possible humiliation (and found it). 
Yes, I was dressed like a hopelessly 
dorky tourist. 

And yes, 1 was out of film, 
dammit! 

But I went for it anyway. I 
"took my shot." 

And I'm glad I did. You were 
charming, funny and patient with 
my intrusion on your privacy. As a 
man and a human being, you did 
not disappoint me. 

Just as you never disappointed 
me or any of your fans whenever 
you stepped on the basketball 



court. You made us believe that ' 
you could do anything. And then 
you did it - over and over again. 

When you said you would bring 
us a championship in 1996, 1 
believed you. When you promised 
another in 1997, 1 believed you. 
And when you held up six fingers, I 
had no doubt that a sixth champi- 
onship would happen. ' 

And now you have promised to 
retire, once and for all. You say 
you're 99.9 percent sure. 

And 99.9 percent of me believes 
you. 

The rest of me will keep on 
hoping for that .1 percent. 

In the meantime, I have to 
admit that I find your retirement 
even more depressing than when 
Secretariat was put out to pasture. 
After ail, when you smile, there's 
never hay in your teeth. 

Still, I wish you all the best, just 
like you gave to us for so many 
years. And I hope you don't mind if 
I offer you a little advice as you step 
back into the everyday world: 

Life!s not a sport 

Life's a bear. 

But I believe you'll do just fine. 
After all, you were wise enough to 
stock up on . . . honey. 



Questions or comments for 
humorist Donna Abear can besent 
to P.O. Box 391, Antioch, IL 60002 



Classmates sought for class of 1939 



The J. Sterling Morton High 
School of Cicero, Illinois, class of 
1939, is planning a 60th anniversary 
reunion. Classmates are seeking 



interested alumni you would be 
interested in attending a reunion. 

For more information, Contact 
Olga Chodl Lindahl at 587-0831. 



Save up to 70% on 

"EVERYTHING 



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9:30 am to 3 pm In the 

LAKE COUNTY FAIRGROUND'S EXHIBIT HALL 

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FREE PARKING! Admission $6, or 

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SPECIAL EVENTS 

Edward the Second by the Journeymen 

The Journeymen announce their production of Christopher 
Marlowe's Edward II will be performed Friday and Saturday night at 8 

pm and Sunday at 7 pm 
through Feb. 28. The perfor- 
mances will take place In the 
Sanctuary of the Holy 
Covenant Church located at 
925 West DIversey in Chicago. 
All rickets are $12 and can be 
ordered by calling (312) 494- 
5720. 

This historical & morality 
play begins in 1307 England 
when the King dies on the bat- 
The Journeymen present tlefield and his son, Edward U 
Edward II Friday and Saturday receives his crown. Edward II, 
at Holy Covenant Church.— an unnatural soldier and' 
Photo by Michael Brosllow leader makes his first com- 

mand; that Piers de Gaveston, 
a good-looking Gascon who had been his close friend since childhood 
return to the realm. 

England gets torn in two as we see passion, loyalty, rage and revolu- 
tion tossed in the air and landing with the downfall (and murder) of 
England's King. 

Snow sculpting in January 

Snow sculpting teams from around the world will compete in the 
14th annual U.S. International Snow Sculpting Competition on the 
grounds of the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts Jan. 26-31. The 
Marcus Center is located at 929 North Water Street In the heart of 
downtown Milwaukee. The is event is free and open to the public 

For more information contact, Gene Kempfer at (414) 476-5573 or 
Matthew Perta at (414) 273-7121 ext 218. - 






FROM PAGE Bl 




SNOW: Snowmobilers 
preach safety first on trails 



snowmobiles legally. 

"Most people who have gone 
through safety courses probably 

accident, Meisnersaid. 

The Wildwood Park District 
often offers classes about safe sno'w- 
mobiling. The classes , being taught 
by the Illinois Department of 
Natural Resources, teach people the 
correct way to snowmobile, includ- 
ing hand signals, laws and emer- 
gency procedures. Those 12-years- 
old or older receive a certificate. 

A class will be held on Jan. 30, 
from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m., at a cost of 
$5 for residents and $6 for non-resi- 
dents. A 50-question test will be 
given at the end of the day. More 
information can be received from 
the park district. 

"There have been unfortunate 
accidents with club members. But 
we preach safety, knowledge, and 
then give (members) a place to 
ride," Meisnersaid. 

When a place to ride is what 
people are looking for, they need 
look no further than local snowmo- 
bile clubs, Trails for members are 
chosen and created by snowmobile 
clubs in the Lake and McHenry 
areas. 

The clubs create the trails, mark 
them, and then maintain them. 
According to Schaefer, trails are cho- 
sen based on permission from 
landowners. He said the clubs try to 
interconnect their trails with the for- 
est preserve trails. 

Often, clubs offer a dual-county 
membership which allows members 
to use trails in both McHenry and 
Lake counties. The "Harmony Club," 
for example, has a link trail between 
McHenry and Lake counties. 

"You may have to 'ditch ride' 
from point 'a' to point 'b,' but some- 
one can ride from here to Wisconsin 
if they want to," Meisner said. "We 
try to fill in the middle, from where 
one club is and the next begins," 
Meisner said the linking trails allow 
snowmobilers to ride from Lake 
County to Delavan, Wis., going 
through McHenry, Walworth and 
Lake Geneva. 

Meisnersaid grant money is 
made available to clubs by the state 
association, When members pay 
dues to the local clubs, fees are then 
paid to the state association, 



Therefore, if a club needs a bridge or 
other apparatus for a trail, the club 
can apply for a grant to pay for the 

Wnlle the clubs and trails have 
flourished in some areas, the Fox 
Lake-area clubs appear to have 
diminished. 

"When the clubs started over 30 
years ago, there used to be a lot of 
strong clubs in Fox Lake," Meisner 
said. "You used to see trails going 
through town/' 

• Meisner, who has been a snow- 
mobile enthusiast since the 1960s, 
said the social aspect is one thing 
which makes people want to join a V 
snowmobile club. As he pointed but, 
the clubs do not nourish only when 
powder covers the ground. Most 
clubs have year-round activities for 
their members, ranging from com 
roasts to World's Fair getaways. 

"We do a lot of neat things," 
Meisner said. "We have bus trips, 
and we go to the dog track. We also 
have a summer com roast" 

Snowmobile clubs offer people : 
the opportunity to ride in a safe envi- 
ronment with many designated trails 
and the ability to meet people who 
share the same interests. Meisner 
said couples sometimes get together 
and ride for dinner. Snowmobile ■ 
conventions are also held. 

"It puts people on the same 
plane, and educates everyone," 
Meisner said. Speakers from all over 
the state make presentations at the . 
conventions, providing interesting 
and informative material for the 
snowmobilers. 

Most of these events are funded 
from membership dues, which 
range from $25 to $45 per year for a 
family membership. If the club is 
part of the state organization, the 
dues provide the member with a 
subscription to trie Illinois 
Snowmobiler magazine. Some clubs 
use their funds to make donations 
to needy children. 

Most of all, the clubs provide 
families the chance to be together. 

"It's a family-beneficial thing," 
Meisner said. "It gets the family 
involved in the winter, when it used 
to be 'blah.'" 

, For more Information about 
snowmobile clubs, call Don 
Schaefer at 223-5240, or Frank 
Meisner at (815) 305-3233, 



■ 



■ 



■ 



1 



; 
J 

I 
I 



January 22, 1999 






YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers / B 



5 



'The Thin Red Line' tells vivid tale of 





OS 



T lie Thin Red Line" opens ' 
with a slow, silent vision of 
a serene tropical paradise. 
A crocodile slides into the 
water, vibrant birds sit perched on 
a limb and the jungle vines end at a 
sandy beach rippled with ocean 
tides. This is not the typical begin- 
ning to ah epic war film. 

A vivid collage of contrasting 
images is delivered methodically 
throughout the film creating a 
sense of confusion and conveying 
the chaos of the wax it so poignant- 
ly depicts. 

The obvious comparisons to 
"Saving Private Ryan" hold no real 
bearing. 

In contrast to "Ryan's" explo-. 
sive opening sequence "TlieThin 




sBannts m nx: \m raw rams. m% 

CtOMA(R).'X 1220, 300, 520,745,1005 

A SIMPLE PLMt (llf.X . 105,M5,M5,945 

FLBflW K HEWT (I)X US, 350, 70S, MS 

teas or evil (rcnjx 1200,220,440,710,90s 

THUr UD UK (RKX 1230,215.400.545.730.910 

WSITTBUJES (IKX. 1236,255,515.735,955 

a nisi siort twnx i2is,3io,eo,830 

nrimxS(»X 1215,230,445,706,920 

VIKB WX 1230,245,500,715,936 

CIVIL ACT10K (PCIJ)X. , 1145,220,455.730. 1000 

SHAKESPEAM DILCVB (I) X 100,340,710,950 

srawf IPC13) X ,. • 130,410,700,940 

HICOTT JDE YCUC IK) X 130.4O0.7lX> 
FKCH UWB (rail) X 1210,240.505,730,925,955 

WQVi KED DEVIKE (EC] .X '1240,250,510,720,930 

100'VE GOt KAIL (PCI X 1200,225,455,725,950 

PUBCE Of BCTPT (PCJX 1205,220,435,650,905 

A BUGS LM! ICK ' 1145.155,400,700 

•raw nanrr-wtr «» 

DfOff or the srvre m* 655,940 



■■ 



^A\ General Cinema 

<%) LAKEHURST 



ROUTE 43 n«ar ROUTE 120 



J847L 



■FILM 



#870 



tMOWf II 



war oat 

II4MI 



SHOWTIMES FOR 1/22 THRU 1/28 



BARGAIN MATINEES ALL SHOWS BEFORE 6PM 
INDICATES VIP TICKET RESTRICTIONS APPLY 



GLORIA m 

Iftl. 4:45. 7:15, 9:45 Sat & Sun. 2:15, 4:45, 
|7:15, 9:45 Moa-Thur, 4:45, 7:15 



PLAYING BY HEART W 

|Fft- 4:45. 7:15, fc5G Sat 4 Sua 2:15, 4:45, 
^:15, 9-JO MofL-Trmr. 4:45, 7:16 



CIVIL ACTION (km 3) 

.. 4:30. 7:00, 9:30 Sat & Sun. 2:00, 430. 
r ;00, 930 Moa-Thur. 430. 7 «J 



, E FACULTY « 

|Fd 9:50 Sat & Sun. 9:50 
Mort-Thur. 7:45 



[IN DREAMS W 

|Fff. 5:30, 7:45, 10.00 Sal & Sua 1:00, 3:15, 
1530. 7:45, 10:00 Moa-Thur. 5:30, 7:45 



FIRST SIGHT pa-13) 
rl. 4:15. 6:45, 9:30 SaL A Sun. 1:15, 4:15. 
1:45, 930 Moa-Tnur, 4:30, 7:tO 



>WNIN THE DELTA ro-Mj 
. 4:40, 7:10. 9:40 SaL & Sun. 2:15, 4:40, 
7:10,9:40 Mon.-Thjr. 4:40, 7:10 



IMIQHTY JOE YOUNG KU 

i 430, 650 Sit & Sun. 1:45, 4:15, 6:50 
.•Tnur.430 



IENEMY OF THE STATE po 

' ■ Sun. 9:1 5 Moa • Tnura. 6:50 



iNCE OF EGYPT (KU 

Fri. 530, 7:45 Sat & Sun. 1;00, 3:15, 530,7:45 
..Thur.530 



MRSTTY 



930, 



iMon. 



BLUES m 

430, 7.-00, 9:30, 1 1:45 Sat 2:00, 430, 7:00, 
\ 11:45 Sua 2.D0, 430, 7:00, 930 
Thur. 430.7:00 ■■ .__ 



Rusm 

650, 730, 9-.40,' 11:45 SaL 1:00. 3:10, 650, 
|730, 9:40,11:45 Sua 1:00, 3:10, 6:20, 730, 
40 Moa-Thut 6:20. 730 



ITCH ADAMS (Kmj) 

... 4:45, 7:1 5, 9:45 Sat & Sun. 2 
:15, 9:45 Moa-Thur. 4:45, 7:15 



PMOMPQ.U) 

|Fa 430, 7:10, 9:50 SaL i Sun. 1:45, 4:30, 
10:9:50 Moa-Thur, 430, 7:10 



at 11:15 



HORROR PICTURE SHOW n 



movie review 





John Kmitta 




Red Line" delivers the slow, eu- 
phoric look at the lush surround- 
ings." 

The two films depict vastly dif- 
ferent campaigns In World War II. 
"Ryan" is set during the Invasion of 
Normandy while "The Thin Red 
Line" takes place during the 1942 
attack against the Japanese on 
Guadalcanal, an island in the south 
pacific. ' 

Based on James Jones' epic ' 
novel, it Is a film which delves into 
the hearts and minds of the men of 
"C-for-Charlie Amiy rifle compa- 
ny" as they make their advance on 



TV/O DAY 

ADVANCED 
, TICKETS 



jr/* m t TWO DAY 

K-Vlf+Lm ADVANCED 



CINEMAS 



ROUND LAKE BEACH 18 

Rollins Fid Oi.-.n ni B3 4 Cedar La«c Fid 847-5^6-4983 

BARGAIN !.'ATl\EES ALL SHOV/S STARTING BEFORE 6P'J 

CHARGE TICKETS BY PHOrjE |B77) 66-REGAL 




*GL0RIA(R) • (1254:00)7^ IttOSDW 

THE THM RED UNE (R) (1 SO 230 430) 7.00 fcOO 1 030 on 
•VARSITY BUUES(R) (1:15 1:45 4:15 4:45)7:10 7:40 

9:40 1O.10 Dto 

• IN DREAMS (R) (1354:35)7:50 10.05 on 
vmum<m . - ,. ■•(1.204ao)7;4a,10:iBno 
AT RBST SIGHT (PO-13) (1:30425)720 10: 15 on 
A CIVIL ACTION (PO-13) (1:104:10)7:15 1020 DtQ 
aTEPMOM(PO-is) . (1:004:05)7:009:40D» 
PATCH ADAMS (PO-13) (12:55 3:55) 7:05 O.50 wo 
MIGHTY JOE YOUNQ(PO)(J:40 4:40)7:30 1000 wo 
YOLTVE GOT MAIL (PG) (52:50 3:50) 7:1 5 9:45 raa 

* THE PRWCE OF EGYPT (PG) (12*0 MO 5:15) 720 St45 «Q 
A BUG'S LIFE (O) (1Z45 3:00 5:05) 7:20 9:35 DM 
THE FACULTY (R) (12:404:00) 6:50 9:30 on 
JACK FROST (PG) (12:503:10 5:25) on 
THE RUQRAT3 MOVIE (G) (1:053:05 5:10) on 
ENEMY OF THE STATE (R) 7:35 1020 no 
THE WATERBOY (PO-13) 7:45 9:55 on 



♦ No Passes * tia Passes or Super Savers 

OlO - DlGllAMOUHO SlBMiSiO DOl -. OOIBT Stl«(0 
firm--. V.ilui 1 01 I rul.iy. J.iiui.irv ??, Onry 9 VJ'J"* 




CLASSIC J CINEMA 



FOX LAKEi!E; $ 3 

847-973-2800 rc 9 . adult $ 

115 Lakeland Plata aUct 5 pm 

Jjmtfton el Rfe, 132 & Rollins Rd. Fox Lake 

DDL" ••' ■:'n-L"J In .ill auditoriums • DIGITAL 



SHOWTIMES— FRIDAY, JAM. 2? 
THRU THURSDAY, JAM. 28 

GLORIA* [R] Fri 7:10 9:40 

Sat a-00 2:15 4:30 7:10 9:40 

Sun/Wed 12:00 2:15.5:50 8:20 

Mon/Tue/thur 550 8:20 

STEPM0M(poi3) DIGITAL 
Fri 6:50 9:35 
Sat 12:25 3K)S 6:50 9:35 
Sun/Wed 12:25 3:05 5:40 8:15 
Mon/Tue/Thur 5:40 8:15 

YOU'VE GOT MAIL cr* 

Fri 655 9:40 

Sat 1 2:15. 3KJO 655,9:40 

Sun/Wed 12:15 3:00 5:40 8:10 

Mon/Tue/Thur 5:40 8:10 

PATCH ADAMS -&, 

.Fri 7:00 9:45 

Sat 12:35 3:15 7^)6 9:45 

SunTrVed 12:35 3:1 5 550 8:20 

Mon/Tue/Thur 5:50 6:20 

CIVIL ACTION n 

Fri 7:05 9:45 

Sat 12:30 3:10 7:05 9:45 

Sun/Wed 12:30 3:10 5:45 8:15 

Mon/Tue/Thur 5:45 8:15 

• No puiei or couponi 

FREE REFILLS 

POPCORN & SOFT DRIHKS 

» tfcldrtt uuk I oMM ta l-fotei merits dm 4 PM 




Sean Penn, as First Sergeant Eddie Welsh, leads the men of C-for-Charlie company into battle in 
The Thin Red line." 



the island. 

' Terrence Malick, directing his 
first film in the past 20 years, floats 
in and out of the psyche of C com- 
pany's men. 

"It's all about property,? is one 
of the most blatantly true state- 
ments of war the film delivers. 
V Using this conscience type of 
narrative we hear the thoughts of 
nearly a dozen different men, in- 
cluding a dead Japanese soldier, as 
they reflect on the livesthey once 
led and try to make sense of the 
hell that has' changed who they are. 

Malick's return to film making 
reportedly had every star In Holly- 
wood chomping at the bit to work ' 
for him. 

The result is a fiJm which 
boasts trje likes of Sean Penn, John 
Travolta, Woody Harrelsori, George 
Clooriey, John Cusack, and Nick ' 
Nolte, • 

Most of the stars however play 
minor roles, with the exception of 
NoltCWe see most of them for 
only a few moments and never re- 
ally find out who they really are or 
what they think. 



THE THIN RED LINE 

Rated R 

Director 

Terrence Malik 

Starring 

Nick Nolle 

John Travolta 

George Clooney 

Sean Penn 

Woody Harrelson 

John Cusack 

lim Caviezel 

Ben Chaplin 



Instead, the true impact of the 
film comes from relative newcom- 
ers Jim Caviezel and Ben Chaplin. 

It is not revealed to any extent 
who Caviezel's Private Witt is, but* 
his thoughts on war are deeply en- 
grossing. 

Chaplin's Private Bell on the 
other hand is the one 'mart we are 
given a glimpse of in flashbacks of 
his life before war. 

In the end, however, the film 
may be top introspective. Malick 



MOVIES AND TIMES START JANUARY 22, 1999 

:" # 1VkVzURICHJ8*4^ : 

755 s. Rand Rd. _^ 378 Lake St. Antioch 



* m M SEMORS (OVER «* * CHLDRS4 

5£ °° {1 1 ft UNCJ&) ADUIX3 J7JS0 AFTER 8PM 






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A SIMPLE PLAN W 

Daily 1:05, 3:40, 6:15, 8:50 

GLORIA (B) 

Daily 11:50 v '2:10,.4:30 f - 
6:50, 9:10 

PLAYING BY HEART <"> 
Daily 1:15, 3:50, 6:25, 9:00 

AT HRST SIGHT (pg-i3» 
Daily 12:20, 3:00, 5:40, 
8:20 

VIRUS (R) _ 

Daily 12:30, 2:45, 5:00, 
7:15,9:30 

THE THIN RED UNE m 

Dally 1:15, 4:45, 8:15 

A CIVIL ACTION >*"> 

Daily 11:45, 2:10, 4:35, 
7:00,9:30 

PRINCE OF EGYPT (•*> 

Daily 11:50, 2:00, 4:10, 
6:25,8:40 

YOU'VE GOT MAIL <k> 

Dally 11:40, 2:05,-4:30, 
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PATCH ADAMS (■*-«> 

Daily : 12:15, 2:35, 4:55, 
7:15, 9:35 

STEPMOM ^ 13 >_ 

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8:05 

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JAQA SENIORS (OVEH 6ft WWBi 
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708 N. Milwaukee Ave., libertyville 



SO00 SO(«R3(0VraiCI| t CHllDfla 
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Fri., Mon. - Thurs. 6^0 
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Sat & Sun. 2:15, 4:30, 

6:45, 9:00 

WAKING NED DEVIHE (Pfi) 
Fri.. Mon. - Thurs. 8:45 

Sat & Sun. 6:30, 8:45 



McHENRY 1 & 2 (815} 385-0144 
1204 N. Green St 



RUGHATSro. 
Sat & Sun; 2:15, 4:15 

TOE FACULTY m 

Fri. 8-^0, 8:45 Sat 6JX>, 8:45 
Sun. 7:15 Mon. - Thurs, 7: 1 5 

A BUG'S LITE CO 

Fri. 6:45, 9:00 Sat 2^0, 4:30, 6:45, 

9KW Sun, 2:30, 4:30, 7:00 

Mon. - Tnura. 7:00 



touches upon so many lives, but 
floats along in a voyeuristic style . 
that looks into each soldier's win- 
dow to their mind then closes the 
blinds before we truly learn who he 
Was, 

Part of that may stem from the 
fact that Malick had reportedly 
shot a six-hour film then cut it 
down to the how three-hour run- 
ning time. 

Perhaps some of the more hv. 
yolved stories were left on the edit- 
ing room floor in exchange for the 
barrage of. nature shbls Malick de- 
livers of the tranquil paradise Is- 
land that has been invaded by 
man's wrath. 

He_shows us a "National Geo-: 
graphic" amount of wildlife and the 
peace wliich ironically envelopes 
these men of war. 

As he follows the men, often in • 
drawn-outperiods of silence, we. 
are left without any real sense of 
how ^ong they are on the island, 
and we are left with many other 
questions. 

Maybe it was done on purpose 
to leave us as confused and ques- 
tion-laden as the men whose lives 
we are watching. I give "The Thin 
Red Line" three out of five popcorn 
' boxes. 




ShowPlace 8 

VERNON HILLS 

Milwaukee Ave-2nd Light S of<SD 
fT : 847/247-8958 & 



ALL SEATS S 2?° FRI & SAT 

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Showtlmw for Fri, I/22 Thru Thuri, 1/28 
*Sat.-Sun. Matinees in | Brackets) 

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THERE'S SOMETHING 
ABOUT MARY (R) 

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HOME FRIES (pg-13) 

f*2:00 +4:30] 7:10 9:30 DIGITAL 

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BABE: PIG IN THE CITY (G) 

[♦1:45 ,*4:06] 6:50 9:20 DIGITAL 

MEET JOE BLACK (PG-13) 

[* 1 2:30] 4: 1 8:00 : DIGITAL 

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[*l:50 *4:20] 7:50 10:15 

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YOU BID LAST SUMMER (R) 

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|vt<hoofO*b»nnt wtfwJmntomxom I 







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UBpM«^ H ifs»i'Mj'<(*f.*i 



-a^--*. .*>-«-,.,__ 



B6 /.Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 



January 22, 1999 



January 22, 1999 



■ 



HOT SPOTS 




land Newspapers J B7 



« 




ADVERTISEMENT 






SPOTLIGHT: 



Location: 

2816 Route 120, McHenry 

Telephone: 
(815)385-5278 

Hours: 

Sunday through Thursday from noon to 
1 a.m. and Friday and Saturday, from 
noon until 2 a.m. 

Menu: 

Best burgers in town plus steak, prime 

rib, chicken and pork dinners. 



Monaco's 



i D £M Kl.is • 



111 






iha a chance at 




Anyone in search of a comfortable atmosphere where. the finest, all individually made and served with a variety 

they can enjoy a drink, good food and pleasant compan- of special toppings. For the hardy appetite, there's 

ionship can bet that's what they'll find at Monaco's, located Monaco's pound-and-a-qiiarter-burger or the just right 

at 2816 Route 120 in McHenry. junior half pound burger. 

After 23 years in the restaurant business^ over 1,1 of One Sunday a -month, Monaco's features a special 16"- 

them in McHenry, owner and operator Ron Monaco ounce butt steak dinner with a baked potato soup or salad 

"'' ** promises all that and much more, served by a most compe- and rolls for a mere,$1 1.95. 

tent and courteous staff. There are different homemade dinner specials every 

Everyone bves a good burger and Monaco's features week such as pork chops, prime rib, chicken or pot roast. 



Monaco's also offer four or five cigar smokers a year. 

Whether its a fast paced game of darts you're looking 
for, or the ear-pleasing tunes of guitarist Jim Sieg on tap 
every, Surtciay rr Monaco's aims to please. 

Monaco's" is open, Sunday through Thursday from noon 
until 1 a.rri; and on Friday and Saturday, from noon to 2 
a.m. 

For more information, or reservations for banquet ser- 
vice up to 200 people, call (815) 385-5278. 



:'Jk 



Sue Kelly 




Antioch 
Favorite Restaurant: 

Beetle Beach ^ 




Mings o 



ffl 



f china 



The Finest in Mandarin and Szechwan Cuisine 
Elegant Dining with a Casual Atmosphe/e A 

Banquet Fxillllcs 
Available up to 300 





5572 Grand Ave,, Gtirnee, IL 60031 

Phone (847) 662-2929 • Fax (847) 662-6099 

All Major Credit Cards Accepted 




monthly drawing to win a ^5 gift certificate. 

Name: 



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Address; a 
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Mail to: Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 • Grays fake, IL 60030 




BAR& 
GRILL 



SUPER BOWL SUNDAY 

Jan. 31 
$1.50 Domestic Bottles 
• 75C Drafts 

FREE HALF-TIME BUFFET 

25c Hot Wings 
50C Mini Burgers 



MONDAY 

$1.00 Domestic Boors 

TUESDAY 

Taco Night - 53.00 AIMJ-Can-Eat 

WEDNESDAY 

Woonlo Boonio Night 
$3.0O All-U-Can-Eat 

THURSDAY 

SOC Drafts 

FRIDAY 

Alf-U-Can-Eat ,; 
F1»h'Fry $5.93 • Crab Legs $16.95 

SATURDAY £\' 

All-U-Can-Eat 
Prime Rib $12.95 

SUNDAY 

All-U-Can-Eat 
Breakfast Buffet $3.99 

Sxuip. Jl UppeiizcxA Svcxy. WqfiL 

Open Mon.-Jhurs. 1 lom-Midnight; 
fri. &Sot. Uom-Jam: Sunday Sam-Midnight 

26375 W. Rt. 173, Antiqch, IL 

847-395-1707 

2 1/2 Miles West of Rt. 59 




aacl beers^^eff^fiBi^Luthentic 
Mexican food made fresh, to bur. order. 



F « t . . ■ 



DINNER (*n 

plates ^Wmtm 



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i| • flU dinners i^M^/ f^^F 1 
! tomato, rice, beans, guacarnole | , 
and sour cream. .!*** 

Expires 2-12-99 



I 




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with every order 



idehPlazzft 



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GAME ROOM OPEN 




Jesse ^aks 

Food & Drink 



mum arm mi. &sai to mourn 

mm wsm wswmM 

18490 W. Old Cages Lake Rd„ Gages Lake 

223-2575 




JOIN US FRIDAY 

Walleye Fish Fry ,$ 8 96 

All-U-Can-Eat Cod* $6,93 

JOIN US SATURDAY 

Prime Rib 

AlaCarlelQoz.: $9.95- Entreel0oz.:$11.97 

' A la Carte 14 oz.:' $11.97 Entree 14 oz.: $13.94 

OPEN FOR BREAKFAST 
9 am Saturday & Sunday 





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Bacon "Sausage • Breakfast Potatoes. 
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Soup'i&SaladBar v 

^Homemade Soups 
CAJUN & CREOLE Specialties 

ftJt Elaborate i Assortment Of Fine Delicate Dessert Pastries 
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All NEW WDSBUFFET& Much^Much S|ore % £jl 



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ADULTS $12.95 

CHILDREN 

(4-12) $7.95 

UNDER 4 FREE 



* &R RESERVATIONS, PLEASE CALL 
X 847-33fa3<HtEXL3p 

6161 W. Grand Ave,rGumeW 
• j (Across Frorrf Gurnee Mills)i? . 




MONACO 

Fine Foods - Cocktails 

2816 Rt. 120 • McHenry, II 60050 

(815) 385-5278 




Steak • Prime Rib 
Chicken and Pork Dinners 



ome of McHenry's 



, pinner Special every Sunday night 
accompanied -with music t?y 



I 



Tfie Best Chinese Food 

In The Area... 

And Our Customers 

Are The Critics 



FREE 

DEUVERY! 

Call foe details! 



Chinese Restaurant 




. Plenty of Free Parking 

• Dine In • Carry Out • Cocktails 

The Chinese RESTAURAhrr.THAT.EvERYBODY's Talking About 

Conveniently Located Across From Fairgrounds 

111 S.Hwy.45 Grayslake 

(847) 548-8882 Fax: (847) 548-2822 

FREE DELIVERY -CALL FOR DETAILS 



mm nmmnum » •* 








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JANUARY31 
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356-2300 











n*. %».«»»^v-**^ 



B6 /^Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 



January 22, 1999 January 22, 1999 



HOT SPOTS 



Lakeland Newspapers 



/B7 








ADVERTISEMENT 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Location: 

2816 Route 120, McHenry 

Telephone: 
(815)385-5278 

Hours; 

Sunday through Thursday from noon to 
1 a.m. and Friday and Saturday, from 
noon until 2 a.m. 

Menu; 

Best burgers in town plus steak, prime 

rib, chicken and pork dinners. 



Monaco's 



.. - i ■ 




Anyone in search of a comfortable atmosphere where 
they can enjoys drink, good food and pleasant compan 



the finest, all individually made and served with a variety 
of special toppings. For the hardy appetite, there's 



they can enjoy.* drink, good rooa ana pieasam Lumpen- «. ^— • ^r^-. ; ouarte r-buraer or the just right 
ionship can bet that's what they'll find at Monaco's, located \fi^^^^^-^f^ *. 



at 2816 Route 120 in McHenry. 

After 23 years in the restaurant business, over 1 1 of 
them in McHenry, owner and operator Ron Monaco 
promises all that and much more, served by a most compe 
tent and courteous staff. 

Everyone loves a good burger and Monaco's features 



junior half pound burger. 

One Sunday ^flionth, Monaco's features a special 16 
ounce butt steak dinner with a baked potato soup or salad 
and rolls for a mere$11.95; 

' There are different homemade dinner specials every 
week such as pork chops, prime rib, chicken or pot roast. 



at Monaco's 

Monaco's also offer four or five cigar smokers a year. 

Whether its a fast paced game of darts you're looking 
for, orth'e ear-pleasing tunes of guitarist Jim Sieg on tap 
every .SunaW- Monaco's aims to please. 

Monaco's' [s.open, Sunday through Thursday from noon 
until. 1 aj&ana on Friday and Saturday from noon to 2 

For more information, or reservations for banquet ser- 
vice up to 200 people, call (815) 385-5278. 




Sue Kelly 

Antioch 

Favorite Restaurant: 

Beetle Beach * 



Win A s 25 



m 




of china 



...... 




lj§ your favorite HOT^F^ 



■ ■ i. ■ 



f 






Address: _^__i__ 
ity/State/Z»p; 



The Finest in Mandarin and Szechwan Cuisine 

Elegant Dining with a Casual Atmosphere 

Banquet FiclUlles 
^ Available up lo 300 

/Business 

Luncheon^ 

Specials! 

starting at 
$J95 

5572 Grand Ave., Gurnee, IL 60031 
Phone (847) 662-2929 • Fax $47) 662-6099 

All Major Credit Cards Accepted 










Favorite Restaurant; 



- 



w& 



Mai! to: Lake/and Newspapers 
RO. Box268*Grayslake,fL 60030 



BARS 

GRILL 



SUPER BOWL SUNDAY 

Jan. 31 
$1.50 Domestic Bottles 
. 75C Drafts 

FREE HALF-TIME BUFFET 

25c Hot Wings 
50$ Mini Burgers 



MONDAY, 

$1.00 Domestic Boors 

TUESDAY 

Taco Night • $3.00 All-U-Can-Eot 

WEDNESDAY 

Woenlo Boonto Night 
$3.00 AH-U-Can-Eat 

THURSDAY 

50C Drafts 
FRIDAY 

Fl»h Fry $5.95 - Crab Logs S16.93 

SATURDAY 

All-U-Can-Eat _ 
Prime Rib $12.95 

SUNDAY 

AH-U-CaivEat n 
Breakfast Buffot $3.99 

Soup <£ (Lppetize** Cvcxu J\fJ^M 

Open Mon.-Jhurs. Ham-Midnight: 
Fri.SSat. Itam-3am; Sunday Sam-Midnight 

26375 W. Rt.'l73, Antioch, IL 

847-395-1707 

Miles West of Rt. 59 



JOIN W ! 




96 



Food & 




mum am m & sa. ra mmm 

m(Dta a °giatt a ■ 
18490 W. Old Gages Lake Rd, Gages Lake 

(847) 223-2575 



JOIM US FRIDAY 

Walleye Fish Fry * $ 8 
AU-U-Gan-Eat Cod • $6.93 

JOIN US SATURDAY 

Prime Rib 

A la Carle IO.01: $9.95. Entree 10 oz.:' $11.97 
" A la Carte 14 oz.:' $11.97 Entree 14 oz.: $13.94 

OPEN FOR BREAKFAST 
9 am Saturday & Sunday 



sauu 
rnmnaam 



SAT ONLY THUR & SAT 

ArausWrneRIf) Alaskan Snow Crab Legs | 



_mtheritic 
Mexican, food iinade fresWour brtler; 




#»-"* , . • ■ ■ 



DINNER 
PLATES 

!$1.00*>FF^ 

j . A,ll dinners include lettuce, ;. f 
j tomato, Hce/l^ans, ^acamole J 

and sour cream 
! Expires 2-12-99 




i. • 



Tree Clnps; : & Salsa .;.._, 
ivith every order 






ER 
II 

JANUA 
GIANT 6' TW&&Q 
ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET 
OPEN BAR 




PER PERSON 




Fine Foods - Cocktails 
2816 Rt. 120 • McHenry, II 60050 

(815) 385-5278 



Steak • Prime Rib 
Chicken and Pork Dinners 



Home of McHenry's ' l 



i 



Ttte Best Chinese Food 
In The Area... 1 
And Our Customers 
Are The Critics 



FREE 

DELIVERY! 

Call for detaiM 




Chinese Restaurant 




den PlazS 
^PSeid^t^ 






. Plenty of Free Parking 

• Dine In • Cany Out • Cocktails 

The Chinese Restaur That Everybody's Talking About 

Conveniently Located Across. From Fairgrounds 

lllS/Htvy.45 Gra y^^ 

(847) 548-8882 Fox: (847) 548-2822 

FREE DELIVERY rCALL FOR DETAILS 



j»r*WW 



ISV-VIV'' 



mi{ 



■111 



DIXIELAND 
MUSIC 1 

, -v = ^0' 

*' Made To Order Omelets^ 



JMARDi-GRAS SUNDAY 

CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH 

BUFFET 



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rviaae io ujuei wiucrew -, -y- 

. ; Bacop : ' Sausage • Breakfast Potatoes 
^y French Toast / '^,° 

V/ ' Freshly Baked Muffins & 1 Danish £-^ 
V Soup'&Salad Bar * ^yf 

Wflomerhade Soups 
/| CWUN & CREOLE Specialties 



■ ■I 



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Cf Elaborate Assortment Of'Rne Delicat^p| 

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Dessert Pastnes 



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ADULTS $12.95 

CHILDREN 

(4-12) :f $7.95j 

UNDER 4 -FREE 



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(for reservahons, mid c*u 



.N. 



847-336-6300, EXT. 3 

6161w:GranfAve. p Gu'rheeA 
^(Across. Fram v j6urnee Mills)^ 



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VICTORY MEMORIAL 
HOSPITAL 

Bathing easier 
at Victory 

The Bath Program at Victory's 
AduJt Day Care Center, 2000 West- 
ern Ave., Waukegan, provides a 
comfortable, secure bathing experi- 
ence for individuals who require as- 
' ststance with personal hygiene or 
who can no longer safely use the 
' standard tub or shower in their 
home due to physical or health lim- 
itations. The program offers a spe- 
cially designed whirlpool tub with 
easy side access. For more Informa- 
| Uon, call 360-9860. 

Asthma awareness 

Asthma Awareness is a unique 
i one-on-one program which brings 
; a person with Asthma together with 
a professional asthma counselor. 
Together, they work to manage the 
'disease on a daily basis, identifying 
personal triggers for attacks, devel- 
oping healthy activities and learn- 
ing about medications. Asthma 
Awareness is offered through the 
Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation 
Department at Victory Memorial 
Hospital, 1324 N. Sheridan Rd., 
Waukegan. For more information, 
call 360-4131. 

Respite program 
• provides needed break 

People who provide daily care 
for older or chronically ill relatives, 
| occasionally need a break to* care 
for themselves. The Respite Pro- 
gram at Victory Lakes Continuing 
Care Center, 1055 East Grand Ave., 
Lindenhurst, offers short-term care 
for stays from 24 hours to 30 days. 
This allows the care giver to take 
care of personal business, enjoy a 
vacation, attend a wedding with * 
peace of mind that their loved one 
is being Well taken care of in a. 
friendly, comfortable, secure set- 
tling. Call Judy Gentry at 356-5900 
for more information. 

Quit smoking 

Smokers who are serious about ■ 
quitting can now have the help of a 
trained professional: Victory's One- 
on-One Quit Smoking Counseling 
,Sesslons are scheduled to meet- . 
; their Individual needs. A combina- 
tion of successful techniques to 
change behaviors and quit smoking 
are used. The sessions are offered 
by Victoryls Cardiopulmonary Re- 
habilitation Department, 1324 
North Sheridan Rd., Waukegan. For 
more information, call 360-4131. 

Assistance with 
.Medicare claims 

Senior Passport provides assis- 
tance with Medicare claims and 
medical bill processing. The pro- 
gram is for people aged 65 years 
and older who have supplemental 
health insurance in addition to 
Medicare coverage. There is a $20 
membership fee. Senior Passport is 
offered by Victory Memorial Hospi- 
tal, 1324 North Sheridan Rd., 
Waukegan. For more information, 
call 360-4222. 

Assisted living 
offers independence 

People who can no longer live 
independently because they need 
help with activities of daily living 
may choose the Assisted Living pro- 
gram at Victory Lakes Continuing 
Care Center, T055 E. Grand Ave., 
■Lindenhurst Assisted living resi- 
dents enjoy the friendly, active at- 
mosphere at Victory Lakes; delicious 
meals and snacks; activities and 
companionship; and assistance in 
those areas in which they need help. 
'Call Judy Gentry at 356-5900 for 
more information on assisted living. 

CONDELL MEDICAL 
" CENTER 

Pre/Post-Natal 
Exercise Program 

* Centre Club Pre/Post-Natal Ex- 
ercise Program meets at 10:30 a.m. . 
Tuesday, Thursdays and Saturdays 
, at Centre Club. Participants may ':'• 
;bring babies tip to six months. For 
registration information, call the 
front desk at Centre Club, affiliated 
with Condell Medical Center, at 
i 816-6100.. 



B8 / Lakeland Newspapers 




January 22, 1999 



Cold can be life threatening to Alzheimer's patients 



The recent cold weather and 
record snow challenges all of us liv- 
ing in the Midwest. This weather 
can bring an extra concern for 
those families that have a loved 
one with Alzheimer's diseaseor 
some other related dementia. If 
a loved one suffering with a 
memoryrimpairment wanders 
away in this weather, it can be 
life threatening. 

.After a diagnosis of Alzheimer's 
disease (or other related dementia) 
is made, family members often ad- 
just to the day to, day challenges of 
this fatal disease. However, one of 
the main concerns remains, what 
will happen if their loved one 
walks away while their back is 



turned. Will the individual with 
the disease remember how to get 
back home, will he/she remember 
their phone number, arid will they 
remember their name? This Is 
complicated by the fact that care- 
givers often move the individual 
with the disease to a new resi- 
dence in closer proximity. 

"More than half of the people 
with Alzheimer's disease will wan- 
der and get lost sometime during 
the course of the disease," states 
Kent Barnheiser, Executive Director 
of the Alzheimer's Association - 
Greater Chicagoland. Safe Return is 
the only nationwide program that 
assists in the identification and safe, 
timely return of individuals witti 



Alzheimer's disease or related de- 
mentia who wander and become 
lost. Program registrants receive a 
stainless steel identification 
bracelet or necklace, clothing la- 
bels, and wallet cards. These identi- 
fication products are inscribed with 
the Safe Return 24-hour crisis num- 
ber and alert others that the indi- 
vidual is memory-Impaired and 
may need assistance. 

When a wanderer is found, the per- 
son'who finds him or her can call the 
Safe Return toll-free number located 
on the wanderer's identification wal- 
let card, jewelry, or clothing labels. 
The Safe Return operator immediate- 
ly alerts the family members or care- 
giver listed in the database so the per- 



son who has wandered can be reunit- 
ed with their family. 

There are currently 4 million 
Americans with Alzheimer's dis- 
ease, 120,000 residing in the 
Chicagoland/Northern Illinois 
area. However, this number is ex- 
pected to grow to 14 million in the 
next fifty years. The Alzheimer's 
Association - Greater Chicagoland 
provides information, programs, 
and support for those with 
Alzheimer's disease, their families, 
caregivers, arid professionals. 
For more information about the 
Alzheimer's Association's Safe 
Return Program or Alzheimer's 
disease, please call the Chapter's 
Helpline at (847) 933-1000. 



Spieeup 

your life - 

without salt 



Over the centuries humans 
have had a passion for ■ 
salt-that humble yet 
nearly universal flavor 
enhancer in our food, and a neces- 
sary component in our metabolism. 
The Romans used salt as a form of 
currency. In the Renaissance, arti- 
sans created magnificent, ornate 
containers of gold and silver to hold 
this precious substance. 

But medical research is revealing 
that we may be loving salt too 
much, and it's affecting our health. 
One of every five Americans is sen- 
sitive to dietary salt, and for those 
with hypertension or osteoporosis, 
the impact of sodium on health can 
be significant. 

For example, some studies sug- 
gest that the more sodium a mid- 
dle-aged woman consumer, the less 
calcium she can reabsorb; Higher 
salt intake may be associated with 
reduced hip bone density. 

Hypertension, characterized by 
sustained elevated blood pressure, 
is currently experienced by a quar- 
ter of the population in the U.S., 
and since blood pressure tends to 
rise with age, the sheer number of 
people affected will .most likely in- 
crease as the population ages. How- 
ever, numerous studies over the 
past 25 years have documented that 
lifestyle changes, including exer- 
cise, weight control and reducing 
sodium intake, can lower blood 
pressure and reduce the probability 
of stroke and heart disease. 

Yet in our busy lives/reducing 
sodium intake sometimes offers a 
bit of a challenge. Health experts . 
recommend that the amount of salt 
consumed in a day not exceed 3,000 
, milligrams (mgs), which is slightly 
more than a teaspoon. That would- 
n't seem too difficult except that 
sodium pops up nearly everywhere- 
•microwave meals, fast food lunch- 
es, even some bottled water. 

Breakfast? That toaster pastry, 
coffee and juice will start the day 
with only 325 mgs of sodium. Not 
too bad. But if you decide to grab a 
quarter pounder with cheese and 
some fries for lunch, you'll instantly 
add about 1,300 mgs right there. 
Nibble some nuts orabag of chips 
in the afternoon and you'll be 
bumping up against 2,000 mgs be- 
fore dinner and any bedtime snack. 

How can you avoid so much 
sodium? "Become a savvy reader of 



product labels," says Bill Rodgers, 
president of RCN Products, Inc., . 
makers of NoSait, the leading salt 
substitute. "Look for sodium chlo- 
ride on any label; that's salL" 

Health professionals and dietary 
supplement manufacturers like 
NoSait urge customers to consider " 
the impact of the recent Dietary Ap- 
proaches to Stop Hypertension 
IDASH) study. This study docu- 
mented how paUents with mild to 
moderate hypertension lowered 
their blood pressure through a diet 
rich in fruits, vegetables and low-fat 
dairy products. 

Here's how it works. With a daily 
. base of seven servings of grain . 
products, nine servings of fruits and 
vegetables and three servings of 
low-fat dairy products, along with 
lean meat, poultry or fish, the DASH 
diet provides the right fat balance, 
the right amount of fiber, adequate 
vitamins and, no less important, 
antioxidants, which have been 
shown to help ward off various can- 
cers. . 

The diet limits sodium while' 
providing calcium and potassium' 
levels that optimize blood pressure. 
. In fact, some intriguing medical re- 
' search suggests that potassium, 
which is a key ingredient in NoSait, 
actually has a beneficial effect on 
blood pressure. A series of studies 
involving more than 2,600 partici- 
pants showed that potassium not 
only lowered blood pressure in pa- 
tients with hypertension, but also 
helped prevent the onset of hyper- 
tension. '. 

That's particularly good news for 
African Americans who tend to de- 
velop hypertension at a younger 
age, and anyone who may be un- 
able to maintain a low-salt diet. 
One study reported decreases iri 
both systolic and diastolic levels- 
the two components of blood pres- 
sure- -for African Americans taking 
potassium supplements. 

"Shaking the salt habit" can in- 
deed be the first step toward a 
healthier lifestyle. Here are some 
easy-to-practice tips: 

• Eat fresh vegetables when pos- 
sible. Canned vegetables tend to 
have higher sodium levels as part of 
the processing. 

• Read food labels when shop- ■ 

- ' ping. Sodium content is required by 
law to be listed. 

• Explore new ways to flavor your 






■ ■ 



^^*«. 



?%, - 










cMm 



One of these diners* health will be hurt by common table salt. 
What can you do to protect your health from the negative Impact 
of salt in your diet? 



meals. NoSait and Seasoned NoSait 
salt alternatives offer easy and high- 
ly flavorful ways to provide tasty salt 
alternatives. 

•Avoid processed foods. 

•Use unsalted butter or mar- 
garine and low-sodium condi- 
ments. 

•When dining out, ask that your, 
meal be prepared without salt. 



For a free, easy-to-read educa- 
tional pamphlet that includes more 
flavor tips, Information on the 
DASH diet, NoSait salt alternative, 
and helpful information on hyper- 
tension control, call toll free 1-800- 
284-2023. 

Courtesy of Article Resource Asso- 
ciation, www.aracopy.com, email: 
info@aracopy.com'. 



I 



American Lung Assoc, 
offers 'A is for Asthma' 



The American Lung Association 
of Illinois' Lake County and the 
YWCA Child Care Resource and Re- 
ferral of Lake County is offering 
training for child care providers on 
Jan. 27th from 6 to 7 p.m. in an 
asthma program entitled J A is for 
Asthma/ 

The workshop (s based on the 
Sesame Street A Is for Asthma kit. 
The kit was put together by; Ameri- 
can Lung Association, Children's 
Television Workshop and the Pru- 
dential Foundation. The kit is com- 
prised of three media component in 
both English and Spanish: one 
Sesame Street video (15 minutes), a 
care givers guide with asthma 
awareness information and activi- 
ties for child care providers that in-, 
eludes take-home information for 
families, and a colorful Sesame 



Street educational asthma action 
plan poster. 

"Asthma is a serious chronic ill- 
ness - which means it doesn't go 
away, even when a child is not 
showing symptoms" states Karl 
Kopp, director of the Lung office in 
Lake County. * 

"Ijt's important child care 
providers learn more about asth- 
ma and how to help the families 
who leave the asthmatlcchil- 
dren in that center's care." Adds 
Kopp. 

The training will take place at 
the YWCA Chid Care and Resource 
Center in Waukegan on Belvidere' 
Road. 

For more information on this 
and other asthma programs, call 
the Lung office In Lake Bluff at 
847/295-LUNG(5864). 






Janua 



C 



HIDr 
W 
ages 
beha 
homi 
selor 
been 
slum 
oner 
age. 
and\ 
OlOU; 

Dear 

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thatr 

chlldi 



■ 






January 22, 1999 



HEALTH WATCH 



Lakeland Newspapers/SB ~ 




time out 








HI Dr. Singer, 

We have children who are 
ages 9, 7 and 5. We have some 
behavior problems hi our 
home. We've been to coun- 
selors about behavior and have 
been told that "tune out" 
should be no more time than 
one minute for each year of 
age. We think this is garbage 
and wondered what your 
thoughts are. B.B. 

DearB.B., 

I have also never believed in 
that notion. I have had 9-year-otd 
children smirk at me and tell me 




PARENT'S 




. — '.'•• .:-. 



Sherri Singer, 
Psy.D, 



. , 



that they sit longer In their classes 
at school longer than they do in 
"timeout." 

I've heard children call their 
parents, "wimps" based on very 
short time limits. I have also seen 4 - 
year-olds tell me that they don't 
even remember their last stay in 
"time out," which could have been 



an hour ago. 

Now, answer me this ... if a 
child isn't remembering what hap- 
pened with "time out" or other dis- 
cipline, how are they to ever be able 
to consciously think about their de- 
cisions before they decide to do it 
again? 

The answer is . . . they don't, 
and behavior happens again and 
again and again, turning parents 
into ranting and raving people. 
Have you ever heard the saying, 
"Those that forget are doomed to 
repeat?" I believe this is the philos- 
ophy that behavior change needs to 
go by. Also, there is a much easier 



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in Arms or Legs 





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way! 

My biggest problem with this 
notion is the idea that when 1 have 
seen it used, behavior continues to 
happen repeatedly, making "time 
out" necessary on a permanent ba- 
sis. If a behavioral intervention 
works, behavior will stop happen- 
ing, It's that simple. It shouldn't be 
continuing over and over again. 
That is an indication that what you 
have done is not working. 

People get too comfortable with 
the idea of doing "time out" as a 
regular thing. It shouldn't be that 
way. Targeting a behavior, working 
on it and making sure your disci- 
pline method is appropriate to the 
situation should eradicate that be- 
havior. If it hasn't you need to do 
more research! 

Now, just because I don't be- 
lieve that the one minute theory 
works, doesn't mean that I want 
you to leave a child in "time out" for 
five hours because they will re- 
member that so much better. Addi- 
tionally, any type of violent punish- 
ment is also not appropriate; just to 
make a permanent memory out of 
it. 

The amount of time is usually 
not the key to "time out" success. 
Some of the problems in defining 
the parameters of "time out" come 
from a definition problem. Many 
people look at "time out" as a mo- 
ment away from things. I don't be- 
lieve that this view accomplishes 
much with regard to behavior 
change. As a matter of fact, I've seen 
that philosophy used successfully in 
creating some of the worst behav- 
ing, ingratiated kids I've ever met. 
Once mat train leaves the station, 
you wish it never didl 

To me, "time out" is about dls- 
ciDline,and.cuidance.It's about _ 
learning to control your own behav- 
ior. It is a punishment! Yes, a pun- 
ishment! I know that our society 
has developed a terrible allergy to 
that word and concept, but folks, 
I'm here to tell you that without 
those boundaries and unless some- 
thing causes a child more problem 
than gain, the behavior won't 
change. 

It will grow and be nurtured by 
the very things that we think might 
stop it. Appropriate punishment is 
not only something good for a 
child, but also if not present, can 
destroy a child's life and future! 
The key here is the term, "appropri- 
ate." 

Besides incorrectly defining 
"time out" and using time limits 



which are below what a child deals 
with in other parts of his or life, 
there is one other killer of "time 
out." This one makes it fail more of- 
ten than any other I have seen. This 
is the scenario. ..Child acts out 

Parent puts the child in "time 
out" and sets the timer for whatever 
amount of minutes, The child pro- 
ceeds to scream, call names, yell, 
cry, etc, Now, this is all happening 
in the chair while the timer is tick- 
ing! 

The parent responds to the 
child by telling the child to quiet 
down over and over again. Minutes 
later, the timer goes off and this 
screaming child is allowed to leave 
"time out" because the time is up . 
(and also, if we're honest with our- 
selves, because the parent is sick . 
and tired of dealing with the 
screaming!) That child has not been 
asked to take responsibility for the 
original behavior or the "time out" 
chair behavior at all. That child has 
learned that his horrid behavior Is 
acceptable, even in "time out" That' 
child has learned to scream in a 
chair successfully. Now, if that was 
the parent's goal, I'd say it was well 
done. Somehow, I don't think that 
any parent wants to help their child 
improve his or her screaming quali- 
ty! "Time out" should be a flexible 
thing and behavior like that should 
demand further behavioral inter- 
ventions*. 

Appropriate punishment or dis- 
cipline should teach. Punishment 
should not only include something 
to stop the behavior or break the cy- 
cle, but then it also needs skill 
building (teaching children what to 
do) to happen right then and there 
so that permanent learning can 
take place. Most of us do discipline 
„ . tojstopjhe.behavtor.bu^neypkgq . 
any further to teach kids how to ' 
think before they act and create 
permanence of learning so the be- 
havior stops permanently. 
* Behavior program referred to in 
this column is a structured specific 
program offered by Dr. Singer and is 
far more detailed than what is men- 
tioned in this column. For best re- 
sults, full program should be used 
Tiiis column is for entertainment 
purposes only. Information in this 
column cannot and should not re- 
place proper Psychological treat' 
metit Dr. Sherri Singer is a Licensed 
Clinical Psychologist, childhood be- 
havior specialist and author of the 
book, "Wiiy Time Out Doesn't 
Work.." For an appointment, please 
call (708) 962- 2549. 



Home exercise can be the real 
thing, if you do your homework 






Exercising at home can be the 
perfect alternative to noisy, crowd- 
ed fitness clubs, but doing your 
equipment homework is the key. In 
fact, it could determine whether 
your exercise machine collects 
sweat or dust 

According to one industry group, 
consumers spent roughly $4.8 bil- 
lion for home-exercise equipment 
in 1996. Studies show that after only 
30 days, many people abandon 
their home-exercise routines. 

"Everyone has needs that are 
specific to their own bodies," says 
Tom Campanaro, founder of Efi To- 
tal Gym, which has manufactured 
home- and clinical-exercise equip- 
ment for 24 years. "Knowing how to 
pick exercise equipment that is 
right for your needs is the key." 

Featured in a popular infomer- 
cial with Chuck Norris and Christie 
BrinUey, Total Gym promotes 
strengthening, stretching and a car- 
diovascular workout. 

"Follow a few simple guidelines," 
says Campanaro, "and home exer- 
cise can produce optimal health 
benefits." 



• Assess your goals and reasons 
for wanting to work out What is ■ 
motivating you? How long are you - ' 
willing to commit to training each ■ 
week? 

• Talk to a fitness professional or • 
personal trainer to solicit his or her 
advice on the equipment that's 
right for you. 

• What do the pros say? Look for ■ 
endorsements from professional 
trainers and credible fitness experts. • 

• Assess your space needs. Where 
will you keep the equipment? How ' 
much space will it take up? Does it *-j 
pose a safety hazard? 

•How long has the company J 
been around? You want to be as- 
sured that the company has a track 
record that shows it is credible and - 
reputable. 

To receive a free brochure on how 
to set up an exercise program that's 
right for your needs, call 1-80.0«541- 
4900, or request it through the com- 
pany's Web site at http://www.to- 
talgym,com. Or, send a self-ad- • 
dressed, stamped envelope to Efi ; 
Total Gym, 7755 Arjons Drive, San 
Diego, CA 92126. 



*t 



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!(.-.♦_-■.■:■ - 



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Januc 



. B 1 0/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HEALTHWATCH 



January 22, 1999 



Lake Forest Health and Fitness Institute receives achievement award 



Lake Forest Health & Fitness Insti- 
tute, affiliated with Lake Forest Hos- 
pital, recently received a Distin- 
guished Achievement Award from 
the Medical Fitness Association 
(MFA). 

Awards were given to exceptional 



hospital-based fitness and wellness 
facilities, and to healthcare profes- 
sionals who have contributed signifi- 
cantly and consistently to the ad- 
vancement and recognition of the 
medical fitness industry. 
To be considered for the Distin- 



guished Achievement Award, MFA s 
members nominated facilities across 
the country and submitted informa- 
tion on membership, financial per- 
formance, programming and clinical 
services. Awards were given in four 
categories based on the size of the 



facility and its length of operation. 
"We are extremely proud of the 
recognition we've received from one 
of the industry's most respected or- 
ganizations — the Medical Fitness 
Association," said Marti Derleth, vice 
president and chief operating offi- 



cer, LFHFI. "We are dedicated to 
providing a wide variety of programs 
to help people make positive lifestyle 
changes. We look forward to contin- 
ued success In the future with the 
openingof our new fitness facility In 
theLlndenhurstareainJan. 2000." 






! 









"1 



The Aetna U.S 
Golden 





Plan: 



Unlimited Annual Generic Prescription Drug Benefit 
- $1,000 Annual Brand Prescription Drug Benefit 



$5 Primary Care Doctor Visits 




$10 Specialists Visits 



$15 Monthly Plan Premium 



What More Can We Offer? 



Call This Number And Find Out. 



(TDD: 1-800-628-3323) 



There's never been a heller lime for yon lo 
compare your Medicare I IMC) or -supplement 
coverage l<> our 1999 benefits. We're convinced thai 
once you do, you'll agree will) us there is no 
comparison. l : or starters, there is an unlimited 
annual g ( .| KT j ( prescription drug benefit and a 
SI, 000 annual maximum brand-name prescription 
drug benefit. And, il's available with our $15 
monthly plan premium. (You must continue lo pay 
your Medicare premiums and copaymenls for 
prescriptions. Restrictions apply.) Copaymenls lo 
your network primary care physician are only S 1 ), 



and if you are referred to a specialist, copayments 
are only $10. 

There's so much lo feel good about in the 
Aetna U.S. Healthcare Golden Medicare Plan, we 
invite you lo compare it benefit for benefit with 
those plans you may be considering or already 
have. We'll be holding special informative meetings 
over the next few weeks to tell you more. 
Ifind out why so many people are switching to the 
comprehensive benefits we offer. 

Raising the quality of healthcare" in America. 



C/Etna 

US Healthcare 

Golden Medicare Plan 



iiuvv.iwituuii.i in approved .tii vn i <m <!.>.• /u i }wi ii- uumiu in iviiuiuiir r<n ./v.uiui rnruiiru IVIllg 1 l'-OOK; l/UI'age, W III 

Kane and Lake Counties in -Illinois and Lake County in Indiana, may apply. As with other Medicare HMO plans, benefits, service areas 
and premiums are subject lo change on lahuary I of each year. 



IK IA# 7-IIUrill. i.IVW Arliu i\<lhVilllH,in-' nl (Kinds tiM. 



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January 22, 1999 



LAKELIFE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B1 1 




^ JASH CjONVERTER^ trade yottf Unwanted 








■ ' ,: iy' v " -"■'■ '- 



CASH ON THE SPOT 



lownlinc Shopping center at 
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B12 / Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 



January 22, 1999 



Get It Done Right! 



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D 1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



www., we 



January 22, 1993 




ANTIOCII PUBLIC LIBRARY DISTRICT 

757 NpRf II MAIN 

ANTIOCH, IL 60002 



A 

A 



t a time when even luxury car 
makers are getting into the 
sport utility market, the 1999 
Tahoe stands put as a tried-and- 
true symbol of on-and off-road sport util- 
ity function and performance, with a lad- 
der-type truck frame, a choice of four- 
wheel-drive systems and more standard 
engine power than any other SUV in Its 
class. 

Chevy Tahoe has benefited from explo- 
sive growth in the sport utility market. 
While almost all sport utilities have bene- 
fited, Tahoe is perfectly placed because of 
size. This authentic SUV answers custom 
demands for a big, powerful, roomy vehi-. 
cle with impressive towing capability — . 
but still able to fit the average garage. The 
prodigious towing capability of Tahoe is 
due, in part, to the fact that it's the most 
powerful SUy anywhere (based on stan- 
dard horsepower; excluding other GM ve- 
hicles), j ' 

Tahoe is also available with a Police' 
Package, equipped with locking differen- 
tial, heavy-duty. suspension and "V" 
speed- rated tires.' 

With more than 1.17,000 units sold in 
the 1997 model year, Tahoe captured five 
percent of the entire luxury sportutility 
segment's total sales. . 

THE CHEVROLET SPORT 

UTILITY FAMILY 

Chevrolet approaches the sport utility 
market the way a customer would. In- 
stead of;viewIng the vehicles by their tra-.: 
dittohairEPA'classtncatlons'.'there^'ir^--^ 
"family strategy" that segments' the full , 
lineup by individual customer needs. 
And, Chevrolet offers the widest sport 
Utility lineup" in the industry 

TAHOE 2-DOOR One of the few full- 
size 2 -Door sport utilities available. 

TAHOE 4 DOOR - A full size sport util- 
ity which does hot sacrifice garage ability 
for huge cargo capacity. 
' Adding to the appeal of this sport utili- 
ty is the new.- for- 1999 Tahoe Z71. \ 



1999 



PI 



2-DOOR 
TAHOE LS 4X4 

ENGINE: Vortec 5700 V8SR 
std. L31 (gasoline) 
TRANSMISSION: Electronically 
controlled. 4-speed automatic 
w/overdrive (4L60-E) ' . 
FUEL ECONOMY; 14 city/ 18 
highway , 

FUEL TANK CAPACITY: 30 gal. 

DIMENSIONS: Length: 188.6 • 
in,; Width; 70.8 in.; Wheelbase, 
. in.: 111.5 in. 
1 BRAKES: Vacuum power, front 

dsc/rear drum, 4-wheel ABS 
i YOWWW WEIGHT! 6500lte. (max) ; 
MSRP BASE PRICE: 
$26,500 

1999 FEATURE 
HIGHLIGHTS 

• Engine enhanced radiator 
. mater for longer life 

• New starter motor on Vortec 
5700 V8SR engines 

• 4L60-E automatic transmis- 
sion enhancements 

• Daytime running lamps turn ; . 
: on automatically when the ig- 
nition is on 

• Next generation driver and 

. right front-passenger air bags 



"While some folks look at sport utilities 
as status symbols, we've found that Tahoe 
buyers are just a little different," said 
Steve Ramsey, CheyyTahoe brand manag- 
er. "For them, their first Tahoe isn't as 
much a status symbol as it Is a merit 
badge."- 

. Part of the reason for Tahoe's strong 
reputation among sport utility buyers is 
the 255 horsepower Vortec 570Q.V8 engine 
(standard on all Tahbes). Tahoe also fea- 




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1993 Jeep Orand Cherokee United 

Sdc#MM2iL.W :_St2.995 

1995 Bulek Riviera 

sfe«m 



1992 Solum 6L1 
SfcfPWft 



1991 Ford Cargo Van 

Sfr#lOOSU_ 



1992 Dodge Dakota P/U 

S*#P*IMB_ 



1993 Toyota Land Cruiser 

S*#1Q2TSL 



.$15,995 
-$11,995 
_$7.995 
-$3,995 
.$24,495 



1996 Chivy Tahoe LT 4X4 

Sft#WfiL 



. 1989 Lincoln Continental 
Sft *P4US6l_ 



.$24,995 
J$4.995 



: 1995 Butck LeSabre UmHed ,.. 

I5K Ha Stk #f 4196 $t7.495 

1996F0rdWlndetarGL 

$4#P«2238. 



199S Chevy S-10 Blaier 4-D« k - - 

^S&mZk $14,995 

1990 Chevy Cavalier Z*24 

S4#P3337B 

<M994 0ldeCleta 

mwm 



.$4,995 
.$9,995 



1995 Otde Aurora 
Sft#10im 



Safc#P420LL_ 
1988 Ford Bronco 

stk#iimsa 



1994 Ponllac Sunblrd Coupe 

S4 iMBt— $6995 

1994 Codlllac Sedan DeVllle :•;, ■ 

S4#MHJL $14,995 

1994 Ford F-150 XLT 
SfcttOttiB 



.$14,495 



1996 Chevy K15Q0XCab4X4 . 

SMHOlffi/L- ; — $20,995 

; 1996 Chevy Tahoe LT 4X4 
.Sft #WHW : 



.$24,995 



.$14,495 

_J$16.995 

i9?6Jeep Grand Cherokee 4X4- 

_$5,995 
.$16,995 
.$21,995 
_$6.995 

3»95 



1996 Okie Intrigue 
Sft#99S3IL 



1997 Camaro 6& 6 8pd 

stk#iazm 



1986 Cadillac Eldorado 

S*#P*062A66K»tt. 



1993 Ford Bronco 4X4 Eddie 

S4 #92218 : 



1994 GMC Jimmy 4-Dr 4X4 
SfctJKU — ; 

1993 Ford TBird 
Ttfil WT 

1994 Chevy K2500 Ext 4X4 
SJ«tlt» — ^_ 
,1991KozdaRX7 

sniB^stttnre 



.$13,995 
_$7,995 
.$17,995 
_$6.995 



1996 Dodge Ram BUT 4X4 

MTUM — — — $1 B.995 

1994 Chevy Astro Conversion Van ... 

s*#fbmil — --— —$12,995 

1994 Chevij Blazer LT.4X4 

stkffirm 



1994 Hercury Cougar XR7 

»*S09ta ; — ^i- 

1992 Olds Detla 88 Royal 

skmaii. 



1988 Ford Bronco II 4X4 

!k«S50B2 



1993 Chevy Blazer 2WD 

Mtom — ^^^, 



.$14,995 
-J$7,995 
_$9.995 
_$3.995 
.$10,895 



1991 Cadillac Eldorado Barritr 

summ- ._. • »9.995 

_$7.995 
.$10,995 



1991 Ford Ranger 6TX 
SkttmL- — — 

1992 Chevy 0500 ; 

SfttnuikL 



1996 Jeep Cherokee 



$20,995 

1993 Plymouth Grand Vo U°9^fcfUo 5 

.$9995 



P2G3JL 

1992 Chevy C1500 

sifsraL 



1994 Chevy GI20 Converelorv _ 

Minziu ■- —$13,995 

1991 Nleeon Ext 4X4 
S*#SN«L 



iskii 



^/GQLD 



-a Both Stores Feature IQO's 

| Of Drastically Reduced 

' Pre-Orivens. Most Are 

f Gold Check CeitilieiJ. 

J We Also Cany GM 

J Certilied Used Vehicles! 




1995 Chevy Astro Conv 

skmw. 



_$6.995 
.$15,995 



'1994 Geo Tracker 4X4 *- ;„- 

St*CT» • — $7.495 

1995 Chevy Aetro Convertloa,. ook 
atPHW $15,995 

1994 6 uboai Legacy 
SktfltMl 



1998 Dodge Neon Sport 

steTOA 



_$8.995 
.$13,995 



vehicles subject to prior sales. 



details. 



Ymt Uz Ori-Jm iiitetitehM v/v/v/.fay^cars.ccji/j ( 







-, ,■ -■ 



Chevy/Olds, 



Winner 
Of me 
1998 Timo 
Magazino 
Quality 
Dealer 
A-^arcl 



utM 



*^& / 



Chevrolet 



:eran§ 



(847)395-3600 ^^^ n ^^ 

Ant'lOCh ^-^^ Pans M rd 5 -yn?.,,, •.. o - 
^^^- Body ©nop ?+F .A S, So* (Jam t*c«an g 




tjoie noufa. 
H-F9-9 So* 9-6 

*3-.T. .'^ t* I-- 



39 N. Route 12 
Fox Lake 



. 






/ Lbkelane Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



January 22, 1999 



M|>~iT...vV*'\ 1 



- - v I 






?ff 



-* 1 ,/? 



iLaki 

iBlHlt 



Deorpath 
1 Rood 



nto.|60 





iU\ 



ffeV-!'-: 



WW 



■ iijfe^v. 



• >*S?5g 



t - jj 



1 .>:*-■>,- 



V .'* 



iS 



Townllne FW. \ » 

LAKEV uycc' 
FOnESn^c^Q^ 



Rial 22 *\MlBhliiid\? 

Parti 



Half Day Rd, 

m Ditrtleld 

i 
Lnke-Cookfld 




KNAUZ Chr 

99 Neon Coupe 98 Concorde Sedan 





. - 






: Stock '#96084. MSRP $16~200.00 1 

Packafte Discount $ ftO 

Knauz Clearance Discount $ 1,154 

Consumer Rebate $ WjW; 

Recent CbUeJeGrad. $ 400 



Stock #8661 6. MSRP $25,21 5,00. . 

'90 Clearance Discmint -$4;218 



Stock #86628. MSRP $27,595.00. '. 

Clearance Discount -$3, 793 
Consumer Rebate -$1,500 

Recent College Grail. * A00 



CLEARANCE PRICE 

c $12316 



Ask for RON 






'98 CLEARANCE PRICE 



'98 CLEARANCE PRICE 



$20,597 



Ask for RON 









$21,902 



Cu& 



Ask for 



Disclaimer: TAXE? ARE EXCLUDED. 

All rebates applied. Term restrictions, may apply. 

Credit approval required - see dealer for "details. 



BLACK PROWLER 
IN STOCK! * 



" -. • . - ' '• '• 









Vlslt«or' 
.knauzxoml 



1 044 N. Western Ave. Lake Forest 

847- 





- 



'- ; » '.>:.: ■,'^»vi'- 



KNAUZ Buick 



1 044 N. Western Ave. Lake Forest 

847-234-2800 



'98 Park Ave. Ultra '98 Park Ave. Ultra 98 Regal GS Sedan 






unMttmH 



Stock #5859.-MSRP $38,180.00. 

'98 Clearance Discount $4,903 
Consumer Rebate $3,000 



'98 CLEARANCE PRICE 



Stock #85915: MSRP $37,485.00. 

'98 Clearance Discount $4,791 
Consumer Rebate -$3,000 



'98 CLEARANCE PRICE 



■'ivK€c'stbck'#P505B 

"■ I. v ',--■■..- 

Pre Driven, Leather & Loaded, 
Less Than 2K Miles 



$30,277 




mm 

up 



$29,694 



Ask for JIM 



ONLY 

$19,780 



* 



Disclaimer. 



j^gg arf EXCLUDED. All rebates applied. Term restrictions may apply. Credit approval required - see dealer for details. 



USED CAR SPECIALS 



•89 Chrysler Lebaron GT Convertible Low Miles, 

Stk#6262A, Ask For Mario or George - $3,495; 

■91 Dodge Caravan Leather, Loaded, Stk#9611:1A, 

Ask For Mario or George - $5,995 

•89 Lincoln Continental Signature Series Must Go, 

Stk#5833B, Ask For Mario or George - $5,595 . 

•88 Mazda 626 Must See To Be Believe, 57K Miles, 

Stk#962!l3B; Ask For Mario or George - $2,995 

•■•84 Mercury Cougar Only 42,700 Miles, Stk#5872A, 

Ask For Mario or George - $3,595 



Habla 



la 












1 






■91 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme Red & Ready 

To <Go, Stk#96i37B, Ask For Mario or George - $4,295 

'92 Toyota Camry 

Must Find New Home, Stk#86536A, Ask For Mario or George - $4,495 

•94 Buick Lesabre Sedan . *„ rtrtC 

Great Everyday Driver; Stk#5832A, Ask For Mario or George - $6,995 

'89 podge Daytona Affordable Sports Car, Stk#9621 3BB, 
Ask For Mario or George -$1,99^ ^ 

•84 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe ■'•■■>'■■*- c « c 

36K Miles, Auto, Red, Stk#6395RA, Ask For Mario or George ; $9,595 



January 22, 1999 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



Lakeland Newspapers I D3 




i 






i 





MRYSLKR, 

Vlymoutfi 

Dodge 

Dodge Truchs 




COUNTY'S LARGEST VOLUME 

(HRYSLER-nYMOUTH-DOIHiE-DODOE TRIM DEALER 



SANDY McKIE & STAFF THANKS YOU (OUR CUSTOMERS) 

FOR RATING US #1 DEALER FOR SATISFACTORY 

SALES, SERVICE AND CUSTO MER REFERRALS IN LAKE COUNTY 




BELOW INVOICE 




ON ALL 




VANS 




fiACK..ML CARAVANS, ORAND BRAWNS VOYAGERS GRAND 
"t, TOWN 'H COUNTRY, T OWN 'N COUNT RY„lX*-UU 




i^O GAMES, 
YOU DON'T HAVE 1 

All Prices C 



/. ******* 

J**** mil 

S/CO»Dr 



Svtf 

J20Q0 2J 



tffl/Cf, 




' : "- " • 



S9 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN l£ 

• Slk. #10-66841 
Nice Van 




L 



'96 FORD RANGER 

Slk. #8-65951 CLEARANCE 
GrealWorkTnjcl 




'97 DODGE NEON 

6io. r 

Load 
$ 



) CLEARANCE- 




970LDSACHIEVASDN, 

STk.#8-6^4..CLEARANCE 
AT>Cy[,PW,Pl,Ti;CC 




y 96 DODGE DAKOTA SLT 



St. #8-65901 CLEARANCE 
Like New Cap 

*1 1, 



'97 CHRYSLER LHS 

SMB-6576. 
diiy>la'! Besl, Isathef, loaded 

*l.6;~'~~ 



'95 PLYMOUTH NEON 

Slk. #7-6516, ClfARANCE 

jpd., A/C, Sunrcoi 




'91 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN IE 

Stk. #9-66581 CLEARANCE 
leel Drive 




'95 CHEVY CAVAUER 4-DR 

Slk. #10-6690. CLEARANCE 
Auto/ A/C 

$ 




98 DODGE NEON 

Slk.#8-66n.C^AI^NCE 



'91 NISSAN STANZA 

Sjlc #8-6625. CLEARANCE 

Loaded, Moon Root 

$ 




'96 CHEVY CORSICA 

Slk. #8-6568. CLEARANCE 
AT, A/C 




14 FORD RANGER SUPER CAB 

Slk. #9-66361 CLEARANCE 
Nice Truck, V-6 





98 DODGE STRATUS 

4 TO CHOOSE FROM 
AT, A/Q Loaded 

II 2/475 




'97 CHEVY 4X4 Kl 500 

Slk.#8-6i89T.OEARANCE- 
Silverado, PW,n. Till 

$ 17,995 



'97 PONTIAC SUNFIRE 

' ' '62/' ' 

AT, 



Srk. #8-6624. CLEARANCE 
'T,A/C 



$ 




94 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE 

■ Stk. #8-65711 CLEARANCE 
. AT, PW, PL, Tili;.CQ Sunroof 

$ 12, 




PONTIAC SAFARI 

loose From. Rear Air & 
PW,FtJii» ( CC 




'95 FORD ESCORT 

Slk. #7-6514 CLEARANCE 
PW,PL,Tilt,CC 




'95 CHEVY CAVAUER 2-DR 

Stk. #9-6667. CLEARANCE 
AT, A/C 




'96 PONTIAC SUNFIRE 

Slk..#8*6592. CLEARANCE 
AT, A/C 




'95 CHRYSLER SEBRING IX 




'96 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE 

; Sk #10-66691. 
loaded, PW, PI, Till, CC 

.*! 3,995 



¥CHEife^X4 SILVERADO 

"50.V-8, 

$ .l 8>l- #5 



'94 DODGE SHADOW 

Slk. #9-6641. CLEARANCE 
Auto, A/C 




'97 DODGE NEON 

Slk, #8-6561. CLEARANCE 
AT, A/C 




'96 CHRYSLER CIRRUS 

Slk. #9-6674. 
Loaded>6 

M 



'96 DODGE CARAVAN 

Slk. #9-66601; 
Basic Trans. . 

II 0,9?5 



'98 PONTIAC SAFARI 

Slk.#8-6588T.CLEAIWKE: ! 
Rear Air, PW.Pt, Till' 

11 6,595 



'96CHROTI0- 

Slk. W-67U. load 
Rear Air 

$ 19, 






Call Today and Drlva Awayt. 

(800)501-9702 

u, HHiht • No Ptp*r_aib 
• Ha [bh«hw»i 



.,,,,,,. -No -, 

Judgements • 1st Time Buyer 

Or for a personal Extension J?JtV 

inZrJiey** call tB47> 587-6473 




BURLINGTON 

r ^LAKE GENEVA V .ft PAPP0C* i»«" 

^ _ .■ '. - '>-' I SALFM 1 : 



fifENQSHA 
IZIOM 



•AU REMUS 
APPLIED fLUS 

• TAX. UC 
IIILE 
Hi DOC FEE 
APR IN LIEU Of. REBATE 



CHRYSLER 
Vlymoutfi 

Dodge 



(847) 

91 S. Route 12 in Fox Lake 



"Se Habla EspanbC 




D4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



January 22, 1999 



FROM PAGE Dl 



TAHOE: Heart of the sport utility market 



cures an electronically controlled four- 
speed automatic transmission, 4 -wheel 
antilock brakes, a shift-on- the-fly four- 
wheel drive system (4x4s) and front recov- 
er hooks (4x4s). 

Four-wheel-drive models feature the 
optional Autotrac system, which senses 
slippage at the rear wheels and automati- 
cally transfers power to the front axle. 

In addition, Tahoe is one of the only 
full-size sport utilities to offer a Two-Door 
model (under 10,000 lbs. GVWR) — espe- 
cially attractive to outdoor enthusiasts 
who need a rugged vehicle and tend to 
carry more cargo than passengers. 

For 1999, Tahoe features minor engine 
and transmission changes designed to im- 
prove the truck's durability. But the big 
news should turn heads among the out- 
doors enthusiasts Tahoe is designed to at- 
' tract — for 1999, Tahoe is available in a 
Z71 model designed specifically for off- 
road use. 
NEW TAHOE Z71 MODEL 

Tahoe Z71 is a specially equipped ver- 
sion of the current Tahoe. It will be avail- 
able for the '99 model year as a Four- 
Door, four-wheel-drive model, 

"This bold new Z71 is a great example of 
chasing the customer, not the competi- 
tion," added Ramsey. "It's an enhance- 
ment our buyers told us they were looking 
for in a Tahoe-size vehicle." 

According to Ramsey, Tahoe Z71 has 
the rugged touches that full-size sport 
utility buyers are looking for, such as: Col- 
or-keyed grills and bumpers that provide 
a distinctive look; a graphite brush guard 
and front foglamps for harsh conditions; 
graphite assist bars that allow for easier 
step-in to the vehicle and add to the 
rugged appearance; unique 16-inch 
chrome wheels and color-keyed wheel 
flares; Two-toned leather bucket seats for 



durability and comfort; New "Tahoe" car- 
peted floor mats; Graphite leather door 
trim pad insert; Embroidered Z71 head re- 
straints; Z71 badging. 

in addition to offering specialty models 
like the -Z71, Chevy is reaching out to 
Tahoe buyers through such affinity part- 
ners as Quail Unlimited and Ducks Un- 
limited. 

"These groups are populated by men, 
women and children who love the out-, 
doors, and who use sport utilities to carry 
themselves and their gear to outdoor ac- 
tivities," Ramsey noted. 

Chevy is also involved in outdoor 
events, such as the Chevy Tahoe Wildlife 
Challenge Sporting Clays Tournament se- 
ries, of which Chevy Tahoe is the official 
sponsor. 

"Tahoe buyers are doers," said Ramsey. 
"They're outdoors people. And Wherever 
families are gathered in outdoor recre- 
ation, we want to be there with the trucks 
they need " 
HERITAGE PLAYS A KEY ROLE 

Chevrolet's research indicates that more 
than 40 percent of all Tahoe buyers re- 
place their vehicles with another Tahoe. 

According to Ramsey, Chevrolet's truck 
heritage is a major reason forTahoe's pop- 
ularity. 

"Tahoe is an authentic SUV, with a his- 
tory that goes back more than three 
decades," said Ramsey. "Full-size sport utility 
buyers tell us that if they are going to go off- 
road, they'd rather be driving a Tahoe more 
than anything else. Off-roaders and outdoor 
enthusiasts look to Chevy." 

INTERIOR FEATURES 

Used by someowriers as a work vehicle, 
the Tahoe 2-Door, with standard trim, in- 
cludes features such as rubber floor cov- 
ering and vinyl front bucket seats that 
clean up easily. 



Largest SAAB Dealer In The Midwest! 



Our Goals, 
Are Your Gain! 

We must sell as many new SAABs as possible 
between now & January 31st to raise 1999 
allocations to meet increased demand! 




Hundreds of new 1999 

SAABs at incredible 

year-end discounts. 



You can drive a new 
1999 SAAB for the lowest 

lease payments ofUic 
year with our incredible 

year-end incentives. 



'jmeznz?.. *m 




J1»W 



^jf^^^^^^^^i^^V^^/sii u. v 



@^T^® 



If you are currently 

leasing a luxury car, 

we can terminate 

your lease. 



THE^EXCHANGE 

2300 Skokie Valley Rd • Highland Park • (847) 432-9300 

Internet: vv\vu.saabexeliun(*e.cani 

A Division 01 Scmersky Enterprises. Inc. 



. 



^•■**3»mL. 



■-.y 




■.--.: 



^2m 







'■■' ll ^■^tf^fc-rV' 



Ducks Unlimited Tahoe Z71 designed for off-road use. 



CHEVROLET 



CLASSIC CHEVROLET/TOYOTA 

425 N. Greenbay Rd., Waukegan 

336-4300 

ROCKENBACH CHEVROLET 

1000 E. Belvldare Rd., Qrayilake 

223-8651 



RAY CHEVROLET 

39 H. Route 12, Fox Lake 

587-3300 



GARY LANG AUTO CENTER 

1107 S. Route 31, McHenry 

815-385-2100 



RAYMOND CHEVROLET 

120 W. Route 173, Ant loch 

395-3600 










Premium Certified Used Cars -the finest selection in the area! 



87 Lincoln Park Avenue 
Extra Nice 

88 Ford Mustang Convertible 

Ready to go! 

8B Lincoln Town Car 
Extra Clean 

89 GMC Conversion Van 

Loaded 

92 Pontlac Grand Am 

AT, Clean 

94 Nissan Pickup 

Ready for work! 

94 Chevy Cavalier 

Extra Nice 

91 Crown Victoria 

Very Clean 

94 Pontlac Sunblrd 
Ready to go 

94 Dodge Intrepid 

All the extras 

95 Pontlac Sunfire 

A/T, PW, PL 

94 Chevy Camaro 
Very Clean 

95 Dodge Avenger 
AT, Loaded 

96 Chevrolet S10 

Stow and go 



'1 ,895 
'2,195 
'2,995 
*3,995 
'3,995 
'3,995 
'4,995 
'4,995 
'5,995 
'5,995 
'8,995 
'8,995 
«9,495 
'9,695 



97 Chevy Cavalier 
Like New 

96 Ford Contour 

- AT, PW. PL. PD 

96 Toyota Corolla 

Loaded, Nice, 25.000 Miles 

95 Jeep Cherokee Sport 4 Dr 

• Nice Car 

95 Mazda Mlata 
Special, White, Low Miles 

96 Honda Accord 

A/T, PW, PL, Loaded 

- 97 Dodge Work Van. 
Like New, A/T 

96 Honda Accord 
5spd, PW, PL. Loaded 

95 Dodge Dakota 4x4 

. A/T, Loaded 

i 98 Saturn SL2 
A/T, AC, PW, PL, Cass. 

95 Pontlac Bonneville SSE 

Loaded 

94 Dodge Dakota 4x4 
A/T, Extra Clean 

96 Cadillac Sis 

. Loaded, Low Miles. Dark Green 

98 Ford Expedition XLT 

All Wheel Drive, Rear Heat 



'9,995 
'9,995 
'11,495 
'11,995 
'11,995 
'13,995 
'14,495 
'14,995 
'14,995 
'14,995 
'15,995 
'16,995 
'25,995 
'29,495 



Saturn of 



K»»o*i 



\ DIVISION 01 I ill BOB ROHRMAN GROUP 



(847)360-5000 



is***..; 



MMMOM , 



QnY*J*fc* 



-s^*..^ 



HOURS 

Mori. - Fri., 8am - 9pm 

Sat., 8am - 6pm 



1500 



Green 



BiV 



Boad) 



Onty 



feffi! 



■il 

I 



trorn 



Gumee 



MMW 



fr 



If 



1 






' 



January 22, 1999 




NEW 1999 FORD 

EXPLORER 




MSFtP 

FOX LAKE DISCOUNT 



S23 5/0 
• SI-O'lB 



lakeland Newspapers I 05 




*$0 .'.Mercury jggjgjgj 



■ 






I 






% k 



• Kfced 






:" .- iz-l . \] -'■,. '-.■ ■■■■ ■- : •.'■-.- '-■: 



NEW 1999 FORD 



1 



NEW 1999 FORD 

EXPEDITION XLT 



< 



IB 



MSRP 

FOX LAKE DISCOUNT 



S32730 
-S3J57 




":^_ 



.■ y i i 

41 ff) 









■ 



I I 



ne 



$ fir) 

NEW 1999 FORD 

F-150 4X4 



MCOp 

FOX LAKE DISCOUNT 
REBATE 



S16 175 

. . -S717 

• SI 000 



. 



NEW 1999 FORD 

TAURUS 











■•-— ••" >JV t 


w 


^"♦."''■■' "'■: : ^. 





.;.."", •"' 



FORD 
i.X 4-DR 





, MSRP 

FACTORY WSCOUHT 

FOX LAKE DtSC0UNT-_41 1 4M 



t 



MSRP— — — — 
FOX LAKE D«SCCHWT_-$1 
REBATE 



a '16.270 




NEW 1999 FORD 

CONTOUR 



R£BATE_ — -—tfjMO 




MSAP_ 

. FOXUKEDtSCOUNT- 
REBATE 41^00 



'98 FORD ESCORT ZX2 

- Au1o f 4cylp p/s, p/b, a/c, cass, 

denim blue, factory warranty 

nun 



'97 FORD ESCORT WGN 

Auto,4cyl,p/s 1 p/b,a/c, 

AM/FM teal green 



Full Luxury Options 

F'95 FORD RANGER SUPER CAS 



'94FORDM50 

■ ficyl, auto, stereo 
Iberglasstop 



f'S? CHEVROLET CAV&UER f ^FORDFUMeEASUPERCUB 



.Auto. 

Air 




*96 POKTIACSUNF IRE CONVT 





4x4,XLTmodel,6cyli 
a/p, p/w a titt/cmlsa 



► i\"* 




. *s*v isB» 




f W FORD F150 SUPER CAB : 



XLT model; 
4X4. 





i 



AfeMpfl.- 
H!t/cnilSB 



WW 



* 



Buy now A Save! 
24K miles 



'93 FORD TAURUS 

.3 To Choose -Your choice! 
Loadedl 



n.m I m.m 



r *95 FORD F150 SUPER CAB 

V8, auto, aVc,jpM tlttfcr ' 

' cap, 14K miles 





1 FORD ESCORT WGN 

p/b.wrilte 

1 




•96 FORD CONTOUR 

' , 4 cyt, auto, p/s, p/b, p/dl, l 
t/crulse, a/c, tan, Sharp Ci 

J £M£ 

'96 SATURN 

4 dr, 4 cyl auto, p/s, p/b, p/w, 
. ult/cfuiae.a/c 



mm mS&mSI wmmM Juanm I ■«!" 



f 



Cassette, 
a/c, purple 



J.W* 



4x4. 6 cyl, auto, p/s, p/b, 
t/crulse, a/c, cast 



V8, XLT model, 
auto, a/c 



4 cyl, auto, p/s, a/c, 
' csss.,j 



Auto, p/s, 
pfosfe 




auto, a/c M ■cm.gott-.. ■ ■ ^ 




rK^W 



r*» V h» 




[^MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE 

,'a/icass,whlts ) fic^wsnwty 



«NN1HH» 

vaaui^iV^^iVdti^p^ate, 

ilsa» casvblut custom interior 

I 



tm/crulse^casSnblut custom Intel 



•*^«asgsB*- 



*94 BUICK CENTURY 

6 cyl, auto, p/s, p/b t p/dl, pM, 
tiH/cniise.a/c.cass, 






"93FORDAEROSTARXL] 

Includes 
XL Plus package 



^KRSp^lsTK 




4dr, 4 cyij'autOpL.- 

stereo, a/c, tow miles; blue 



19K miles, loaded, balanced 
.; factory warranty 

- 



Ve, Loaded, 
Bright Red 



*97 FORD E150 XLT GLUS WGH 

Loaded 



Airto.i&p/u.iMift, 
tilt/ cruise, a/c cass, rUv.bteck 

m.m 

*97 UHCOLH TOWH CAR 

Exec. Series, 
CwTiageRoof 




NOT AVAILABLE WITH ANY OTHER OFFER 




Mercury 



ROUTE. 12 

DOWNTOWN FOX LAKE 



HOUBtSi 

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D 6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



January 22, 1998 




marketing' 

At Liberty Auto City, customers lead way 



BY BILL HENRY 



As the automobile tastes change on the 
part of the public, so has one of Lake 
County's largest and oldest auto dealer- 
ships adapted to change, 

Liberty Auto City, 1000 E. Park Ave., 
LibertyvlUe, where six different automo- 
tive brands are on display, stands as a re- 
flection of current buying tastes of the 
motoring public. 

General Manager Joe Massarelli says 
customer preferences to a large extent 
have served to guide how Liberty Auto 
Center has evolved in the past five years. 
That and a philosophy of retaining cus- 
tomers as "family"- members throughout 
their driving lives. 

From these two concepts, Massarelli 
has developed what can best be described 
as "generational marketing" where young 
people can get fitted with an automobile 
that fits their needs and price range, where 
young families can obtain a vehicle that suits 
their lifestyle and where seniors can be assured 
of achieving their desire for comfort and de- 
pendability in the car they drive. 

"We want to be able to serve the entire 
family," exclaimed Massarelli, who started 
with the dealership 14 years ago. Today, 
Liberty Auto City is owned by Sy Oko, co- • 
founder with Joe's father, Mike. Massarelli, 
34 years ago.- 

Not long ago, Liberty completed an 
extensive remodeling and expansion pro- 
gram that provides individual identity to 
each of its brands. Rather than starting 
out with a grand plan, Massarelli said Lib- 



erty built on its successes of the past with 
Bulck, an American standard for luxury, 
and the phenbminal success of Jeep for 
utility and off-road uses. 

With Buick and Jeep-Eagle as a founda- 
tion, Liberty entered the foreign market to 
give its ever expanding customer family 
greater choice. 

. Acquisition of Hyundai is a good ex- 
ample of how Liberty aims to offer well- 
rounded choice. Massarelli says 
Hyundai's compact features appeal to 
young families. "We regard Hyundai as a 
lower price alternative to a used car," 
Massarelli commented. 

Mazda became a part of the Liberty 
picture to respond to the segment of car 
buyers who prefer imports. Suzuki is an 
acknowledge^ leader in the compact utili- 
ty field. Subaru has proved to be a wise 
addition to the Liberty Auto City menu as 
an alternative to four wheel drive trucks, 
according to Massarelli. 

"Large, small, pick-ups, minis, vans, 
sport utes, luxury. Liberty offers choice," 
exclaimed Massarelli. At all times Liberty 
maintains an inventory of 700 units. Ap- 
proximately 150 quality used vehicles can 
be viewed at any one time. 

Another customer-friendly touch was 
the installation of an automatic car wash. 
Members of the Liberty Auto City cus- 
• tomer family have a standing "offer to stop 
in anytime at their convenience for a 
complimentary car wash. 

With a grin, Massarelli described how 
customer preferences directed the adop- 
. tion 'of an informal dress code for all per- 




• Craig Huber, Bob Yanca, .Elmer Hansen, Art Aceves, Kirill Ruditskiy and John Carow 
help make up the sales team at Liberty Auto City located on Park Avenue in Ub- 
ertyville. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 



sohnel. ."We discovered people feel less 
pressure when talking to a salesman in 
casual wear rather than a suit," Mas- 
sarelli related. 



So suits and ties have been out for a 
long time and polo shirts and sweaters 
sporting the Liberty Auto City logo are In 
because customers like it that way. 



». . 



: 



Miles and dollars ahead with the old car 



If car repair bills have infected you with new 
car fever, "sticker shock therapy" could be a' 
quick cure. Car Care Council suggests that the 
down payment on a new (or newer) car may 
more than cover the cost of fixing up the old one. 
You'll have acquired a car you know from its pre- 
vious owner (that'syou), someoneyou can trust 

When considering this option, be objective.' 
Visit with a mechanic who can do a compre- 
hensive inspection Of the old car. He can com- 
pile a list of its mechanical needs and prices to 
put it back in good shape. Then, sharpening 



your pencil, figure how much you'll save each 
month by giving the car a new lease on life. 
Withproperrepairand maintenance the car can 
be serviceable for another few years, during 
which time you can be saving toward its- re- 
placement When you're ready to make a deal 
you'll have a better car to trade. 

For more information on this subject, send a 
stamped, self-addressed envelope to the Car Care 
Council, Department SS7-3Q, One Grande Lake 
Drive, Port Clinton, OH 43452. Ask for their free 
pamphlet on giving your car a good "physical". 








' 



January 22,1999 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



Lakeland Newspapers /D7 



a 
ie 



J 



• 







Auto Marketplace Classifieds 



Can for Sale 



•00 MAZDA RX7 GXL, rod, 
loaded, leather Interior, new 
motor, pampered garargo 
kept, low mileage, $7,000. 
Call (847) 223-2085 

OLDS 1987 CUTLASS ■ 
CIERA V8, automatic, low 
mlleago, power stoor- 
Ing/brakea, A/C, perfect leath- 
er Interior,. dream car, must 
so© to appreciate, 
$3,000/bost, Call Judy or 
Chuck (847) 587-1759,' 

FORD 1088 TAURUS QL, 
over $1,000 worth of new 
parts Installed last summer, 
runs excellent, 51,500/bost. 
Celt .Judy or Chuck (847) 
587-1759, 

1080 RED CAMARO with 
new engine, new tires and 
new battery, all power, T-tops, 
$3,750. (847).746-2690. 

1090 .MITSUBISHI GAL- 
.ANT LS, automatic, all power 

options, CD, 96,000 miles, 1- 
owner, $3,800. (847) 
S4B-7104. ■ ■ . 

1091 BUICK PARK AVE. ■ 
Good condition, ' white with 
burgandy Interior. $5,400 ■ 
(847) 975-3799. 

1092 CORVETTE CON- 
VERTIBLE white with white 
top, garage kept, 55,000 
miles. Excellent condition. 
(815) 385-8488. 

1093 HONDA DEL SOL 
CONVERTIBLE, $6,365. (847) 
018-1943. ' 

1093 SATURN SL2, au- 
tomatic, loaded, must see, ex- 
cellent condition, $5,950/bost. 
(847) 263-9043 leave mes- 
sage. 

BUICK 1985 CENTURY 
WAGON Clean and reliable. 
Asking $1,500/best, (414) 652- 
7952. , 

BUICK 1987 SOMERSET, 
2-door, white with black trim, 
$1. 000/best. (414) 652-6973. 

BUICK 1090 CENTURY, 
$3,995. (847) 234-2800. 

BUICK 1094 LESABRE, 4- 

.door, AM/FM cassette radio, 
-40,000 miles, asking $8,100. 
(414)877-7526. 

BUICK 1008 LESABRE, 
$12,595. (847) 234-2B00. 

BUICK 1097 SKYLARK, 
$9,795. (847) 234-2800. 

CADILLAC 1995 SEDAN 

DEVILLE, $16, 495. (847) 234- 

" 2600.' 

CADILLAC 1008 

'DEVILLE, $23,990. (815) 
385-2100. 

CARS $200 & UP Police Im- 
pounds. 1980's-1997's Hon- 
das, Chevys, Jeeps & Sport 
Utility.-. Must sell. 600-772- 
' 7470 ext. 7040 (SCA Net- 
work). 



CHEVROLET 1980 CAM- 
ARO, power steering, power 
. brakes, all automatic, nice 
shape, runs good, .$1,500, 
(815)385-6865. . 

CHEVROLET 1087 ES- 
TATE WAGON, 3rd. seat. VS. 
loaded, over 100K mites. (414) 
694-6423. ' . 

CHEVROLET 1001 BE- 
RETTA GTZ, new tires, 
brakes, muffler, with premium 
stereo, $5,000/besl. (414) 
942-1676. ';'■.' 

CHEVY 1090 CAVALIER 
Z24, $4,995. (847) 395-3600. 

CHEVY 1991 CAMARO 
■ RS, $4,388. (847) 587-6473. 



CHEVY. 1003 SUBURBAN 

SILVERADO, 2x4, 454. towing 
package, 5-passenger, trlt. 
break control, dependable, 
many options; $14,500. (847) . 

397-9985. ■ 

CHEVY 1095 LUMINA LS,' 
$7,575. (847) 587-6473, 

CHEVY 1007 CAVALIER, 

$7,690. (615)085-2100. 

CHEVY 1997 CORSICA, 
$7,990. (815) 385-21 00. 

CHEVY 1097 LUMINA/ 
$10,990. (815) 385-21 00. 

CHEVY 1097 LUMINA, 4-. 
door, white,' maroon Interior, 
fully loaded, tow mites, A/C, ex- 
cellent condition. Must sell. 
Asking $12,500/besL Please 
call (647) 223-3161 after 5pm 
or leave message. 



CHEVY, FORD PICK-UP 
Bodies, Factory-new guar- 
anteed from $1300.00. Doors 
from $89.00 Fonddrs'- from 
$50.00 Beds from $800.00, 
Bedllnere $169.00. Bumpers, 
Grills Reparl Panels, Paints. 
Abrasives, windshields, radia- 
tors, Delivery, Marx (217) 824* 
6184. 

CHRYSLER 1087 LEBAR- 
ON COUPE, good condition, 
runs good, asking $1,800. 
(B47) 682-8838, 

CHRYSLER 1095 CIR- 
RUS, $8,990. (815) 385-2100. 

DODGE 1986 DAYTONA, 

daily, driver, needs very little 
work, SBOO/best. (414). 
843-3171 after 5pm, 

DODGE 1004 INTREPID, 
black,; ABS,: V6, 74K miles,-. 
$6,OO0/besL (S47) 487-24B3." , 

DODGE ' 1995 INTREPID,: 
red, power windows/locks, 
113,000 -highway^:, miles, 
- $e.QO0/best<(414) 057-6611. 

DODGE T996 ' AVENGER 
black & .sporty, Fully loaded, 
2yr. warranty, $12,700/best. 
(647) 625-6530. : £H 



'. 


To 
advertise 

i 




in this 




section, 




call (847) 

■ 
223-8161 



~J- 



DODGE 1998 STRATUS, 
$11,595.(847)587-6473. 

EAGLE VISION 1994, 
$9,995. (847) 234-2800. 

EXPRESS AUTO 
EXCHANGE 

USED CARS 

We take consignment cars. 

No charge. 

Too busy to sell your car? 

Let us do It far you. 

(847)740-1400 

1 19 W. Rollins Rd. 

Round Lake Beach. 

(Across from Burger King). 

Ask for Mike or Norm. 

FORD 1988 THUNDER- 
BIRD, 5.0 engine, runs but 
needs work. Asking $700/besL 
(414)942-9839: 

FORD 1088 CROWN. VIC- 
TORIA, 9-passenger station v 
wagon, low mileage, no rust, 
garaged, $3,000/best. (815) 
675-1248 leave message. 

FORD • 1003 T-BIRD, 
$7,995. (847) 587-3300. 



FORD 1994 
WAGON, $6,695. 
1300. 



ESCORT 

(847) 249- 



FORD 1994 MUSTANG, 
35,000 miles, loaded, clean, 
$10,000. Chris (414) 
694-4774. 



FORD .1005 ESCORT LX 1- 
owner, 49,000 miles, . A/C, 
am/fm, stick shift, excellent 
condition, $5,800/best. (847) 
680-3031. 

FORD 1095 MUSTANG 
COUPE, V8, 3.8L, 5-speed, 
41,000 miles, excellent condi- 
tion, . 510,500/best. (414) 
652-5517. 

FORD 1996 CONTOUR, 
, $9.995. (647) 360-5000. 

FORD TAURUS SHO 1989, 
manual transmission, good 
condition, must drive, a steal 
- at $2,200. (847) 740-9574, 

HONDA 1003 ACCORD 

SE, $9,900. (847) 623-1492. 



HONDA 1095 ACCORD 
EX, $11.995. (847)234-2800. 

HONDA ACCORD 1993, 
$8.995. (847) 249-1300, 

HYUNDAI 1987 EXCEL, 4- 
door, nice looking car. No rust. 
Motor runs 'great. Transmis- 
sion needs work. First $200 
takes it. (414) 654-0522. 

HYUNDAI 1090 ACCENT, 
$3,795, (847) 249-1300. • 

INFINITI 1993 G 20,- FULLY 
LOADED, LOW. MILES, 
$9,995. (847) 362-9200, 

INFINITI 1005 J30'S, 6 TO 
CHOOSE WITH SIMILAR 
SAVINGS, LEATHER. SUN- 
ROOF, $16,995. (847) 362- 
9200. : . 

INFINITI r Q45'S, 4 TO 
CHOOSE WITH SIMILAR 
SAVINGS, $16,495. (847) 362- 
9200. ■■ 

JEEP 1995 GRAND CHER- 
OKEE , LAREDO, red, 21 K. 
extra clean, 4x4, $17,690. 
(847)776-2863. 

LEXUS 1004 ES300, 

PEARL WHITE, LOAOED 
TRACT. CONTROL, $14,995. 
(847) 362-9200, 



LINCOLN CONTINENTAL 
1001,- wife's car who Is on the 
road a lot, 150,000 miles but Is 
Impeccable -condition. Must 
•see to believe. $5,40O/best. 
(815) 676-4268. 

MERCURY 1068 COLONY 
PARK STATION WAGON, 6- 
passenger, • tow package, 1- - 
owner, leather, looks good, 
$2,500, make offer. (847) 
604-6224, 

MERCURY 1990 GRAND 
MARQUIS LS, smoke free car, 
exceptionally clean, 

$3,400/firm. (414) 657-0765. 

MERCURY 1993 COUGAR 
XR7, $6.995. (647) 587-6473. 

MERCURY 1994 /COUGAR 
XR7, $7,995: (847) 567-3300. 

MITSUBISHI 1996 

ECLIPSE copper, low mile- 
age, ' fully loaded, 

Si 3, 000/best or can take over ' 
payment. (847) 599-0054, 

MOVING OUT OF STATE. 
MUST SELL 1997 Black Pon- 
tlac Sunlire, 5-speed, 2-door 
sedan, A/C, cassette. Asking 
$9,900.(847)438-4180. 

NISSAN 1990 SENTRA, 
A/C, excellent condition, origi- 
nal owner,- highway • miles,- 
$2,400/bost. (847) 913-8880 
days, (647) 680-4773. 

NISSAN 1991 . STANZA, 
,$4,995.(847)687-6473. 



OLDS 68 LSS 1994, leath- 
er, all extras, mint condition, 
39K, black/tan, $11,000. (847) 
265-6034. 

OLDS 1992 DELTA 88 
ROYAL, $9,995. (847) 587- 
3300. : 

OLDS 1996 CIERA, $9,995. 
(847)395-3600. 

OLDS 1907 ACHIEVA SE- 
DAN, $10,995. (647) 587- 
6473. 

OLDS MOBILE 1086 CUT- 
LASS SUPREME. 76,000. 
miles,- many new parts, 
$1,700/best (847) 546-1025. 

OLDSMOBILE ' 1005 CUT- 
LASS CONVERTIBLE, RED, 
19K MILES, $13,995. (847) 
362-9200. 



PLYMOUTH 1998 

BREEZE, $6,995. (847) 234- 
2800. ; ' 

PONTIAC 1986 PARI- 
SENNE, $2,200/best, excel- 
lent condition. (847) 
265-6840 after 6pm. 

PONTIAC 1992 GRAND 
AM, $3,995. (847) 360-5000. 

PONTIAC 1994 SUNBIRD 
COUPE, $6,995. (847) 395- 
3600. 

PONTIAC 1905 GRAND 
AM" GT, $10,995. (847) 395- 
3600. ' 

PONTIAC 1997 GRAND 

AM, $11,990. (815) 385-2100. 

PONTIAC 1997 GRAND 
AM GT, V6, 14K, 2-door, load- 
ed, excellent condition, 
$15,998/best. (847) 
247-6139. ■ 

SAAB 1995 000S CVT., 
$17,950. (847)432-9300, 



For More 
Classifieds, 
See Page 10 




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a toll-free call 

Mention CODE 5763C when calling 

http://www.us-netdirect.com 



accept: 



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— *T.> 



1 



D8 /Lakeland Newspapers AUTO MARKETPLACE January 22, 1999. 

Anthony Pontiac/Buick/GMC 
anticipates record sales with 
help of new Vice President, 
General Manager 




Anthony Pontiac/GMC/Buick has 
just announced the addition of 
Trent Tobias'as new Vice Presi- 
dent and General Manager. 
Trent brings with him over 17 years expe- 
rience of automotive experience. Tony 
Augelli, President and Owner of Anthony 
states, "We are extremely excited about 
Trent's arrival. We needed someone with 
his depth and understanding of our busi- 
ness to come in and take our already out- 
standing team to the next level. We feel 
Trent is our man." 

"For the last 17 years I have worked 
my way through the ranks," says Trent, 
"and along the way I have really gained 
an understanding of what it takes to be 
successful... a team.that works together., 
to make the customer happy and keep 
the customer happy, it's as simple as 
that!" 

The addition of Trent as Vice Presi- 
dent and General Manager is one of the 
final pieces to the Anthony puzzle as they 
prepare to move into their brand new 
state-of-the art facility in Gurnee. "I 
couldn't ask for a more perfect situation." 
Tobias adds, "Anthony is already one of 
.the most successful dealerships in the 
area, they are well respected in the com- 
munity and the staff is one of the finest 
around. Our competition should be very 
afraid!" 




"Trent's enthusi 
asm and excitement 
seems to be 'rubbing 
off on everyone here 
at Anthony.' As you 
walk through the 
dealership you can 
sense a buzz in the 
air. I have a very 
good feeling that 
our costumes are 
going to be extreme- 
ly happy with the 
choice we've made!" 
exclaims Augelli. 

"1 was born and Trent Tobias 
raised in Lake 

County and still live there with my wife 
and 2 children," says Trent, "I.take pride 
in my community. One of the reasons I 
came to Anthony is because of their dedi- 
cation to the community. Not many deal- 
erships contribute back to the communi- 
ty but Anthony makes- a point of it. After 
all, if it wasn't for our community and the 
people in it, we wouldn't exist at all. I am 
proud and honored to be part of the An- 
thony Pontiac/GMC/Buick family. 

Stop in and say hi to Trent anytime 
at Anthony Pontiac/GMC/Buick. Locat- 
ed at 2727 Belvidere Rd. in Waukegan. ' 
They can also be reached at 847-244- 
1010. 



Insurance agents are held 
responsible for auto repair quality 



More often than not, insurance agents are 
held responsible by their customers for the" 
quality of car repairs by an auto body firm 
even if the agent did not recommend a repair 
shop, • 

Nearly 80 percent of the 250 people polled 
resented it when their agent refused to recom- 
mend a body shop. As accident victims, they 
were looking to their agent for guidance and 
to help facilitate the repair process. 

This was one of many interesting findings 
in a survey conducted for Fender Menders, an 
auto and truck body repair company in 
Wheeling and Elk Grove Village, Illinois. The 
survey stated: 

"There is a direct correlation between the 
level of satisfaction customers feel with the re- 
pairs done to their automobile after an acci- 
dent and the customer's willingness to remain 
with the insurance agent who wrote the auto 
policy." 

Agents were viewed by their clients as 
people who are involved in the repair process 
everyday and should be knowledgeable about 
repair facilities. Customers approved of insur- 
ance agents who provided a body shop rec- 



ommendation and made follow up calls dur- . 
ing the repair process. 

Another survey result, according to Fend- 
er Menders, is that customer loyalty to the in- 
surance agent increased when a good repair 
job was done. 

Customer perception of the quality of the ■ 
repair job is based on many factors other than 
the Work itself. These factors include the atti- 
tude of the employees at the body shop as 
well as their customer service. This included 
cleanliness of the shop, free pick up arid drop 
off of their vehicle, timeliness of repair and as- 
sistance in arranging for rental vehicles at in- 
surance rates. 

Additionally, the survey showed that cus- 
tomers who had a good experience with a 
body shop will consider their agent for addi- 
tional insurance work. 

Jim Rosenfield, president of Fender 
Menders, said agents in recommending repair 
shops should select ones that are sensitive 
to customer needs and like his own firm, 
represent a large number of insurance 
companies as a direct and preferred ser- 
vice provider. 



Chicagoans test their lip 
power in unique 'Kiss the RV ? 



Lots of lip bairn will be on hand (and on lips) 
during the fiirst-ever/'KIss the RV" contest start- 
ing Wed., Jan. 20th at 9 a.m.'as part of the 
Chicago Boat, RV & Outdoor Show in the North : 
Building of McCormick Place, 

Ten contestants will be qualified by . 
Odi.es 104.3 FM to compete in this 
marathon kissing competition.. The con- 
testant who>stays lip-locked. the longest 
will walkaway wlth.a Bernard. Bungalow 
.Travel Trailer worth $10,000 which is be- 
ing provided by Bernard Chevrolet/ RV 6f 
Libertyville. 

." We can't wait to see who has the 
.Strongest lips.In Chicago," said show man-' 
ager, Susan Lind. "We hope lots^of people 
come down to cheer on these brave* con- 



testants in their pursuit to own a brand 
new recreational vehicle," 
' . "When we heard about this idea, we 
jumped right on it," said Van Meyer, sales 
manager for Bernard Ghevrolet/RV. "I've 
sold these travel trailers to thousands of 
people, but I've neyer'seen anyone actual- 
ly kissing them before. This should be a 
lot of fun." 

. The "Kiss the RV" Contest is part/of the 
69th annual Chicago Boat,.RV & Outdoor 
Show, Jan. 20-24 at the North Building of 
McCormick Place, It features more than 
900 boats, 300 RV's,, resorts, accessories, 
and services, plus lots of other, fun special 
;, events for families. Call (312) 946-6262 for 
-more.inforrriatioh on theshow. •'•.'. 



® 



ACURA 

. * 

Acura of Libertyville 

1620 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 

680-7333 

Pauly Agura 

Routes 41 &' 22, Highland Park 
433-8200 



© 



Karl Knauz Motors 

407 Skakie Volley Hwy.,, Lake Bluff 
604-5000 



DUICtC 



Anthony Pontiac/ 

GMCTruck/Buick 

2727 Belvidere Rd. (Rte. 120), Waukegan 

244-1010 

Knauz of Lake Forest 

1044 N. Western Ave., Lake Forest 

234-2800 

Liberty Auto City 

1000 E. Pork Ave., Libertyville 

362-2683' 

Mitchell Buick-Oldsmobile & 

GMC Truck . 

903 N. Front Street, McHenry 

(815)385-7200 

Country Buick/Pontiac 
645 Main St, Antioch 
395-4400 




Weil Oldsmobile Cadillac Inc. 
1050 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
362-4100 

Gary Long Pontiac- 
Cadillac Subaru 
1107 S. Route 31, McHenry 
(815) 385-6000 . • 



CHEVROLET 

• Bernard Chevrolet/I suzu 

1001 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
362-1400 

• Boehmer Chevrolet/Geo 

• 416 W. Liberty (Rte. 176) Wauconda 
526-2424 

• Classic Chevrolet Inc. 

425 N. Green Boy Rd,, Woukegon 
336-4300 

• Gary Long Chevrolet/Geo 
1107 S. Route 31, McHenry 
(815) 385-2100 

• Ray Chevrolet Inc.. 
39 N. Route 12, Fox Lake 
587-3300 

• Raymond Chevrolet/ 
Oldsmobile Inc. 

120 W. Lake St. (Rte. 173), Antioch 
395-3600 

• Rockenbach Chevrolet 
1000 E. Belvidere Rd., Grayslake 
223-8651 

• Shepard Chevrolet 

930 Carriage La, Lake Bluff . 
234-7900 



rnmsuit 



• Knauz of Lake Forest 
1044 N, Western Ave., Lake Forest 
•234-2800 

• Lake County Chrysler-Plymouth 
540 5. Green Bay Rd., Waukegan 
336-4500 

• Lake Villa Chrysler-Plymouth 
Jeep/Eagle 

130 Cedar Ave,, Loke Villa 
356-2530 

■ Sandy McKie & Sons 
Chrysler-Plymouth Dodge Truck 
91 S. Route 12, Fox Loke 
587-647.1 

• .Sunnyside Dodge-Chrysler- 
Plymouth 

4810 W. Elm St., McHenry 
(815) 385-7220 




• Antioch Dodge 

' 105 Rte. 83, Antioch 
395-0200 

• Fohrman Auto Mart 

■ 2725 Belvidere Rd., Waukegan 
336-3510 

• Miiler-Krueger Dodge 

119 N. Milwaukee Ave., Ubortyvllle 
362-3800 

• Sondy McKle c* Sons 
Chrysler-ply mouth' Dodge Truck 
91 S. Route 12, Fox Loke " 
587-6471 

• Sunnyside Dodge-Chrysler- 
Plymouth 

4810 W. Elm St., McHenry 
.(815) 385-7 220 



FORD 



• 8uss Ford 

3925 W. Route 120, McHenry 
(815) 385-2000 

• Fox Lake Ford-Mercury Inc. 
90S. Route 12, Fox Lake 
587-3400 

• Lyons-Ryan Ford 

. 104 W. Roote 173, Antioch 
395-3900 

• Celozzl Ford 

3100 Grand Ave. (Rte. 132), Waukegan 
336-2340 

• Sassier Ford Inc. 

10105. Milwaukee Ave., Lberryville 
362-4550 

• Victor Ford 

' Route 12 (N. of Rte. 176), Waueanda 
526-5541 

GMC, 

• Anthony Pontiac/GMC/Buick 
2727 Belvidere Rd., Waukegan 
244-1010 

• Mitchell Buick-Oldsmobile & 

• GMC Truck 

903 N. Front Street, McHenry 
(815)385-7200 

• Patrick Pantiac-GMC Truck Inc. 
1120 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
680-5000. 

• Pedersen GMC-Truck 
Corners of Rtes. 45 & 173, Antioch 
395-3700 




Pouly Honda 

1111 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 

362-4300 

Rosen Honda 

Rte. 132 (Grand Ave.), Gurnee 

623-7673 




Liberty Auto City 

1000 E. Park Ave. (176), Libertyville 

360-2683 

Gurnee Hyundai VW-Olds 

Rte. 41 & Washington St., Gumet/Wc-ukegan 

249-1300 ~ 

I N F I N I Tl . 

Fields Infiniti 

1121 5. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 

362-9200' ' 



ISUZU 



• Bernard Cheyrolel/lsuzu 
1001 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
362-1400 

Jim M'Lady Oldsmobile-lsuzu & Nissan 
5656 NW Hwy., Crystal Loke 
(800) 566-5239 



Jeep.. 



Country Jeep-Eagle 

3017 W. Route 120, McHenry 

(815) 363-9999 

Delf'sJeep 

1521 Belvidere Rd., Waukegan 

623-1492 • 

Loke Villa Chrysler-Plymouth Jeep Eagle 

130 Codar Ave., Lake Villa 

356-2530 

Liberty Jeep Eagle 

1000 E. Park Ave., Libertyville 

362-2683 



ROVER 



Land Rover of Lake Bluff 
375 N. Skakie Hwy, Loke Bluff 
604-8100 



• Fox Lake Ford/Mercury 
90 S. Route 12, Fox Lake 
587-3400 

• Libertyville Lincoln/Mercury Inc. 
- 941 5. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 

367-1700 

• Lyons Ryan Ford-Uncoln-Mercury Inc. 
104 W Route 173, Antioch 
395-3900 

■ Don McCue Llncoln-Mercuryjnc. 
660 W. NW Hwy., Borrington * 
382-5600 

• Mitchell-Potts Lincoln/Mercury 
907 N, Front St., McHenry 
(815)385-0403 

• Rosen Lincoln-Mercury 

100 N. Green Boy Rd., Waukegan 
623-7673 



Libertyville Auto City . 
1000E. Park Ave., Libertyville 
362-2683 

Rosen Mozdo 

100 N. Green Boy Rd, Waukegan 
662-2400 



® 



Knauz Continental Motors 
407 Skokie Hwy., Lake Bluff 
234-1700 



A 



Libertyville Mitsubishi 

11 19 S. Milwaukee Ave-, liber tyvillt 
816-6660 

# - 



• Liberty Nissan Kia Volkswagen 
921 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
680-8000 

• Union Nissan 

3315 Grand Ave. (Rte. 132), Waukegan 
244-8000 . 

CZ!> Oldsmobile 

• .Gurnee Olds VW/Hyundai 

Rlt. 4 1 & WoihingUn St, Gumee/Wbuttgan 
249-1300 

• Mitchell Buick-Oldsmobile & 
GMC Truck 

903 N. Front Street, McHenry 
(815) 385-7200 

• Raymond Chevrolet/ 
Oldsmobile Inc. 

120 W. Route 173, Antioch 
395-3600 

• Weil Oldsmobile/Cadillac Inc. 
1050 S. Milwaukee Ave., libertyville 
362-4100 

■ yPON TTAC 

• Anthony Pontiac/GMCTruck/Bukk 
2727 BtMdere Rd. (Rte. 120). Woukegon- 
244-1010 

• Gary Long Pontiac Cadillac 
& Subaru 

1107 S. Route 31, McHenry 
(815)385-6000 

• Patrick Rontloc GMC Truck Inc. 
1120 S. Milwaukee Ave, libertyville 
680-5000 

.• Country Pontiac/Buick 
845 Main Street, Antioch 
395-4400 



d@6 



The Saab Exchange 
2300 Skokie Volley Rd. (Rte. 41) 
Highland Park 
432-9300 




SATUW. 

Saturn of Libertyville 

1160 S. Milwaukee Ave., libertyville 

362-6600 

Saturn of Woukegon 

500 S. Green Bay Rd., Woukegon 

360-5000 




Gary Lang Pontiac Cadillac Subaru 
1111 S. Route 31, McHenry 
(815)385-6000 

Liberty Subaru 

1000 E, Park Ave., Libertyville 

362-2683 



SUZUKI 

A\k Jin mvw hit imm inn-." 

• Liberty Auto Gly 

1000 E. Park Ave., (176) Libertyville 
362-2683 

■ 

® TOYOTA 

• Classic Toyota 

425 S. Green Boy Rd., Woukegon 
336-4300" 

• Pauly Toyota 

5417 NW Hwy., Crystol Lake 
(815) 459-7100 



w® 



. FAHftVERGNUGtN , 

Liberty Nissan Volkswogen/Kio 
921 S, Milwaukee Ave., libertyville 
680-8000 

Gurnee VW Olds Hyundai 
Rte. 41 & Washington St, Gurnee/Waukwofl 
249-1300 

VOLVO 

Fields Volvo 

1121 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 

362-9200 



■ 



. 1": 



— . — __„,.-.— . -- 



—»' "■ '" • •' ■ »■ ■* 



.«i '-. ; ... 



January 22, 1999 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ Q9 




/CHEVRnLET 



WINTER 




TOYOTA 



STOCK REDUCTIONS 

SUPER 








WAcresW 

$ 500t6 $ 3O00 TattaryCasfoJm are^burs! 

Chevrolet, Toyoia 

PUT YOUR ORDER 
IN NOW! 



NEW 1999 Cavalier 

List Price:... 412,381 

CLASSIC Savings....,..; «$982 

Manufacturer Rebate .....-...$1000 

Recent College Grad Rebate $400 

(must qualify) 

BUY FOR ^rJJJ 




NEW 1999 S-10 Pickup Reg Cab 

i \ List Price: ; — ..$12,158 

CLASSIC Savings... .$1013 

Manufacturer Rebate ~ $750 

Recent CoHege Grad Rebate .$400 

(must qualify] 



BUY FOR 777i 





NEW 1999 Toyota G AMRY 



Stk#F2526 



$ 17,495 



$ 179 



lor 2 
mot. 



or 

($2000 customer down + 1st payment $179 = $2179 total due at signing plus 
Sle. license & doc fee) Must be qualified Encore lessee. 




PUT YOUR ORDER 

IN NOW! . 



NEW 1999 Malibu 

List Price: .....'.i;............. '!&££ 

CLASSIC Savings.... ;~ $1590 

Manufacturer Rebate 5750 

Recent College Grad Rebate $400 

(must qualify) 

BUY FOR j-u^ 





NEW 1999 Blazer 2-Dr 



""List Price: 

•\ CLASSIC. Savings 



...........$19,265 

$2270 



jgs 

RecentCoIlege Grad Rebate ....$400 

(must qualify) 



BUY FOR 



16,595 



Uij 



Nobody 
Walks! 

Everybody 
Drives Home 
1 a Vehicle! 



r rT* 





NEW 1999 Toyota 

COEOILA 

S0dftT1714 

$• 




See the All New 1999 

tANDCRUISER! 

LARGEST SELECTION 

WCMCAGOLAND 

AREA!! 



■ 







'95 Chevrolet 3/4 Ton 
4x4 Pickup 

SD2181A 



'92 Plymouth Duster 

-I2050A 

149S 

'93 Chevy 
Cargo Van 

#D°955A 



'95 Chevrolet 
Astrovan Hi-Top Conv. 

#2118 

s 14,995 



'95 GMC Yukon 

ID1845A 

'21,995 



'94Pontiae 
Bonneville SSE 

#2119 

* 10,995 



'93 Ford 
Aerostar 

IF1930B 

4995 

'98 Saturn 
SU 

. #D1409A 

$ 12.995 

'94 Chevy 
Blazer 

- #T9854A .. 

$ 1Q,995 

'95 Plymouth Grand 
Voyager • 

#F1526A 

11 



'92 Hyundai Sonata 

#F1564A 



'95 Chevrolet S-10 

#1279A 



'96 Toyota 



Camry 

#F2059A 

s 13,995 



'95 Geo Tracker 

#1207B 



'93 Honda Accord 

#F1914A 



'94 Chevrolet 
1/2 Ton P/U 4x4 

#D1919A 



'93FordF150 

I1890A 

s 10,995 



'95 Pontlac Sunblrd 

Convertible 

#D1232A '\ 
Si 



'94 Honda 
Accord LX 

#F2056A 

*1Q,99S 



'99 Chevrolet Corvette 

' #1B84 

S 39,99S 

'92 Honda 
Accord EX 

#F1549A 

$ T995 



'96 Mercury 



Cougar 

#09979 



'90 Ford Probe 

'#D1492A 
S' 



'97 Chevrolet Corvette 

#1498 

s 34.995 



'98 Chevrolet 
Malibu 

#1281 

s 12,995 



■96 Chemfet Moile Carlo 

ID3207A 
$4 



'95 Chevrolet 
Cavalier 

#8424A 



'97 Toyota Camry 

$1441 

* 15,995 



'95 Jeep Grand 
Cherokee 

#C9845B 

15, 



'93 Ford Aerostar 

#D1079B 

4995 



*94 Oldsmobile Bravada 

#D1604A - 

*1Q,995 



•96 Plymouth 
Voyager 

#DfB29A 

* 14,095 

'96 GMC Jimmy 

#1895 

* 16,995 



'98 Toyota Corolla LE 

#2049 

s 12,995 



'95 Nissan Quest 

- #1807 , 

S 1Q,995 



'95 Chevrolet 
Sport Van 

/D1124A ' 



•96 Nissan 
200 SX 

#F1707A 



'94 Saturn SL1 

■ #1752A 
SI 



<95 Chevrolet Cavalier 

IF2227A 



'94 Mercury Sable 

#1298A 
S| 



'96 Bulck Regal 

<#1685 

S 1Q,995 

•96 Chevrolet Corsica 

#1193 

m 



•97 Chevrolet 630 
Cargo Van 

I01414A 

15,995 



•91 Honda Civic 

#F1689A 

*199S 



'96 Hyundai Accent 

#1510A 

s 4995 



'94 Chrysler 
New Yorker 

#F1468A 



'91 Chevrolet Cavalier 
RS Wagon 

#C9947A 
S' 



'96 Chevrolet 
Monte Carlo 

#C8755A 

* 12,995 



■97 Chevrolet S-10 Pickup 

■■; .#1515A 

s 



LOCATION ""* 

ON GREEN BAY RD. SE HABLA 

IRTE.131) ESPANOL 

SOUTH of GRAND AVE. 
(RTE. 132) 

WAUKEGAN 



W Toyota Paseo 

21 K Miles, #F1754A 

* 10,995 



www.classicdirect.com 



'83 Mercedes Benz 380 

. #D115Q8C 
S 



'97 Nissan AHima 

• #F1659A 

* 11,995 



9 



<90 Lincoln 
Town Car 

IF1877A 



'86 Cadillac 
Sedan deVille 

#C7645B 

$ 1995 



'97 Chevrolet 
Suburban 

#1883'. 

*24,995 

'96 Chevrolet 
LumlnaAPV 

#D1 538A19K Miles' < 

$ 12,995 



'94 Olds Delta 88 

- #1186- 



'96 Chevrolet Monte 
Carlo 

D1168A 

*11,995 



TOFordWindstar 

. #1086 
$« 



■$8CNoitt$-10 

>- #D1240B 

*8995 



CHEVROLET 

® TOYOTA j 



asss 



D10 /Lakeland Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



N. 



January 22, 1999 



J>s 





I 



W*e<3VIOTORS 

*V^ Oldsmobile • Hyundai • Volkswagen 

Park City's Used Car 



With our quality used 
vehicles you may want 
to ask 

Why 
Buy 

New? 




Thursday, January^ 
Friday. January^ 

saturdayjja^^ 



97 VW Jetta GL 

AC, 25,000 Miles 

1 3,995 




A Minimum 6 Month/6,000 Mile 
Warranty Available on all Used Cars 



Gurnee Motors Used Car Headquarters 



^H m t ttk Z 't m t f^ fif'tr^^'t' ■<■■ 



90 Hyundai Accent 

A/T, 2S.0OO Miln 

93 Ford Escort Sedan 

A/I 

95 Chevy Cavalier 

96 Geo Metro LSI 

A/T.AC 

96 Hyundai Accent 

A/T.AC 

94 Ford Escort Wagon 

93 Toyota Corolla 

94 VW Jetta 

98 Hyundai Ei antra 
93 Honda Accord 

A/T 



•3,795 
•4.595 
•5,995 
•5,995 
•5,995 
•6.695 
•6,995 
♦7.995 
•8.495 
•8.995 



91 Ford Ranger Pick-Up 4x4 

94 Ford Probe GT 

30.000 MilM 

95 VW Jetta 

93 VW Passat GLX 

94 Plymouth Grand Voyager 

95 Eagle Talon , 

94 Nissan King Cab 4x4 

BCvt.A/T 

96 Olds Cutlass Coupe 

A/T 

96 VW Jetta 

94 JMC Jimmy 4 Dr. 4x4 



•8.995 

•9,195 

♦9,995 

•9,995 

•9.995 

•9,995 

•10.995 

•11.795 

•11.995 

•12,995 



£»£ TZa&i-uut-l 



U»A/££ 

■ MOTORS 



Sales Hours: 

Monday Friday 8am - 9prn 
Saturday 9am 6pm 

100 Old Slcokie Road 
Park City, IL 

"On Route 41 al the 
Washington Street East exit" 



6.5% tales tax' 
.forLsks County 
cuatonwsl. 



Service Hours 

' in Fn 1 'Ui.vn 'i iUj.m 
SjI H.ir'i li"i'i'i 



"All pru driven cars wild if.'SS than '!> 




Wtthrqlal Bit— ll 



;€"?^€9-1300 



SAAB 1997 9000 CSE, 
$25,950. (847) 432-9300, 

SATURN 1997 SL2 SEDAN. 
$10,795.(847)234-2600. 

SUBARU 1994 LEGACY, 
$8,995. (B47) 597-3300, 

TOYOTA 1989 CRESSI- 
DA, sllvor/groy, loalhar, ABS, 
all options, $6,900. (414) 
B57-30B5. 

TOYOTA COROLLA 1993, 
$6,995. (847) 249-1300, 

VOLVO 1997 V70 GLT 
WAGON, LOADED, $26,995. 
(847)362-9200. 

VOLVO 1998 SELECT 
S70'S, 10 TO CHOOSE WITH 
SIMILAR SAVINGS, LEATH- 
ER. SUNROOF, $24,995. 
(B47) 362-9200. 

VW 1995 JETTA GL, black. 
Moving, must sell. Groat con- 
dition, $9,000, (B47) 
746-2690, __^^ 

VW JETTA 1996, $11,995. 
(647) 249-1300. 



Qassic/AnllqucCan 



FORD 1977 F-160, 

chopped, lowered and short- 
ened, 460 C6 & 9*, fun driver 
and fast, $3,000/best. (847) 
551-9021. 



Service & Parts 



454 CHEVY BIG BLOCK EN- 
GINE, 2 sets of pistons and 
rods, heads done, crank In- 
take manifold, like new, (847) 
244-7616. __ 

ATTENTION SNOWPLOW- 
ERS SNO-JO snowblower, 
IShpBrlggs & Stratton, hooks 
to a Western or Meyers hook- 
Up. (847) 83B-0221. 

BMW WHEELS SET OF 
FOUR, to fit 3, 5, 6, 7, 8 ser- 
ies. Millo Mlglla 5 spoke 
wheels with Yokohama AVS 
tires. 50% tread (eft, wheats In 
good shape, $700. (647) 548- 
1115. „,■ 

SPEAKERS 12" JVL, 

500watls, with Soberlc boxes, 
$450. 10' Pioneer, 350watts, 
150walt Pioneer, $275. 3-way 
6x9, $150. (414) 551-9002. 

TRANSMISSIONS 

•REBUILT "" 

•WARRANTY 

•GREAT PRICES. 

(847) 549-6649. 



Vara 



Win. •» i you '"'d tlJ 



All atiovtf prn.i-, plir. 



.- G month 6 000 uidtes f* 
and doc fee 



1 uii-i pl.M'.i,' Uun l buck Up Thanks, "Tor <|ualiliurl huyurs 



CHEVROLET 1995 
ASTRO VAN, super sharp, 
custom wheels, new Ores, air, 
power windows and locks, CD, 
cruise, tilt, ABS, privacy glass; 
tow package, $13,800/best. 
(414)942-8870. . 

CHEVY 1992 LUMINA 
APV, $6.995. (847) 395-3700. 

CHEVY 1993 CARGO VAN, 
$3,995. (847) 336-4300. 

CHEVY 1994 LUMINA M1N- 
IVAN, $8,990. (815) 385-2100. 



CHEVY 1997 ASTRO VAN, 
20,000 miles, 8-passenger, 
loaded, A/C, 7yrj70 extended 
warranty, asking $18,500. 
(B47) '762-0298 after 6pm. 

CHRYSLER 1694 TOWN & 
COUNTRY, $11,995. (847) 
234-2600, ■ 

CHRYSLER 1996 TOWN & 
COUNTRY WAGON, $17,995. 
(847) 234-2800. 



DODGE 1995 RAM 2500. 
full size 6-passenger, well 
maintained, good condition, 
114K highway miles, 
$10,500/best. (615) 

363-6008, (815)455-3592. 

DODGE 1996 CARAVAN, 
$11,685, (847) 5B76473. 

FORD 1988 E-150 VAN, au- 
tomatic transmission, 
300cu.tn., 6-cyUnder, 98,000 
miles, asking $3,000. (815) 
728-1832. 



FORD 1993 AEROSTAR, 
$4,995. (B47) 336-4300. 

FORD 1993 CARGO VAN, 
3/4 ton, power steer- 
ing/brakes, new trans., excel- 
lent condition, $8,4S0/best. 
(847) 361-5536, 

PLYMOUTH 1992 VOYAG- 

. ER; $3,995. (847) 395-3600, 

PLYMOUTH 1995 VOYAG- 
ER, $8,995. (847) 3953700. 

VW EUROVAN 1993, 

$9,995. (847) 249-1300. 



Four Wheel Drive, 
Jeeps 



1904 GMC SUBURBAN 
4x4, Interior and exterior al- 
most mint, towing , packago 
O.OOOIbs., chrome perfect. 
150K, In from Texas 1997, 
only 1 year In enow, fresh 
transfer case and water pump, 
1 year old transmission, oil 
pump, front and roar seals, ra- 
diator, brakes and power 
steering pump. Musi see, Ask- 
ing $7,000. (847)356-2490 
evenings. 

CHEVY 1994 BLAZER, 
$10,995.(847)336-4300. 

CHEVY 1989 BLAZER, 
$4,900. (847) 623-1492. 

CHEVY 1991 BLAZER F-10 
SPORT 4X4, new engine, 
$7,990; (847) 438-6180. 

CHEVY 1993 BLAZER LT. 
$6.950. (847) 432-9300. 

CHEVY 1993 BLAZER LT 
Gray, all power,, new tires, 
very clean 62K, V6, 
$B,SO0/bost. (647) 390-7477. 

CHEVY 1995 BLAZER LX 

4X4, $12,990. (815) 385-2100. 

CHEVY 1996 BLAZER LT, 
$15,950. (847) 432-9300. 

CHEVY 1996 S-10 BLAZ- 
ER, $15,900. (847) 395-3700. 

FORD 1991 EXPLORER, 
$6,575. (847) 587-6473. 

FORD 1992 EXPLORER 4- 
DOOR XLT, $8,990. (815) 
385-2100. 

GEO TRACKER 1995, 

$5,995. (847) 336-4300. 

GEO TRACKER 4X4 1994, 
$7,495. (647) 587-3300. 

GMC JIMMY 1996, 

$16,995. (647) 336-4300. 

GMC JIMMY 4-DOOR 4X4 
1994, $13,995. (847) 567- 
3300. 

GRAND CHEROKEE 1993 
LAREDO 4X4, $10,900. (847) 
623-1492. 

GRAND CHEROKEE 1995 
LAREDO 4X4, X-PACKAGE, 
$15,900. (847) 623-1492. 

GRAND CHEROKEE LAR- 
EDO 1994, very clean, full 
power. $14,995. (847) 362- 
9200. . -■-- 

GRAND CHEROKEE LIM- 
ITED 1995. LOADED, 
$16.900. (847) 623-1492. 

ISUZU AMIGO 1993, fully 
loaded, $5,500/best. (847) 
973-0128 or voice mall 1-800- 
255-4659 oxl.4689, 

JEEP 1995 GRAND CHER- 
OKEE. $15,995. (847) 336- 
4300. 

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 
LIMITED 1993, $12,995. (847) 
395-3600. 

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 
LTD., 1996, $22,595. (647). 
362-9200. 

JEEP WRANGLER 1994, 
$9.900. (847) 623-1492. 

JEEP WRANGLER 1995, 
$10,995. (847) 587-6473, 

OLDSMOBILE 1694 BRA- 
VADA, $10,995. (847) 336- 
4300. ■■ • 

TOYOTA 1997 PASEO, 
$10,995. (847) 336-4300, 



TnJckVTrailen 



1994 NISSAN XE PICKUP, 
with cap/bedliner, 5-speed, 
air, ONLY 23,000 MILES, 
$7,600. (647) 83B-6044. 

CHEVROLET 1994 1/2 
TON P/U 4X4, $8,995. (847) 
336-4300. 

CHEVROLET 1996 S-10, 
$9,695. (847) 360-5000. 

DODGE 1992 DAKOTA LE 
EXTENDED CAB, $8,990. 
(815)365-2100. 

DODGE 1993 DAKOTA, 
$5,995. (847) 395-3700. 

DODGE 1995 3500 V10, 
duals, 2yd, dump, 84K miles, 
$14,500,(414)657-1369. 

DODGE 1996 RAM 1500 
CLUB CAB, heavy duty serv- 
ice package, power locks, 
$15,000. Transferable warran- 
ty 111 2002. (615) 759-0441. 

FORD 1990 F1 60 XLT AND 
FORD 1992 RANGER, A/C. 
best offer. (647) 872-3696. 

FORD 1 990 F1 50 XLT LAR- 
IAT, 4x2, ,6-cyilnder, 90K 
miles, no rust, mechanically 
perfect, $7,500. (414) 
637-4101. : ■■'■■■■■'. '.''' 



FORD 1993 F-150, 

$10,995. (847) 336-4300. 

FORD 1966 F-160 XLT 
20K, 2-door, V6, automatic, 
loaded, power mirror, power 
seals, ABS, tinted glass, key- 
less entry, lumbar support, 
cap, like new. Forged alumi- 
num wheels, sliding roar wind- 
ow, chrome rear slop bumper, 
$15,500. (647) 742-4269. 

FORD 1996 RANGER XLT, 
$7,095. (847) 587-6473. 

FORD F-150 1992, 6-cylln- 
dor, slick, with air, AM/FM cas- 
sette, low mlleago, 
$6,600/best. (647) 356-5949.. 

NISSAN 1994 PICKUP, 
$3,995. (647) 360-5000. 

TILT TRAILER, CAR. haul- 
er, dual axles, $1,500. (414) 
652-1475. 



Motorcycles 



KAWASAKI 1996 KX125, 
excellent shape, many extras, 
$2,750. (414) 654-0753. 



Wanted To Buy 



USED CARS AND TRUCKS. 
Cars up to $300. Trucks up to 
$500. Running condition pre- 
ferred. (647) 740-6245. 



Boat/Motors/Etc. 



1995 RANGER CHERO- 
KEE BASS BOAT, excellent 
condition, custom teal cover, 
many extras. Done ftshin*. 
$10,500/bost. (815) 675-1248. 



. 1 

Snowmobfles/ATVsl 



1991 POLARIS RXL 650cc, 
fuel Injected, $2,100. (847) 
5B7-0044. 

ATV 4-WHEEL, 1992, Su- 
zuki King Quad, $2,000. (647) 
672-5227. 

SNOWMOBILE 1992 V- 
MAX IV, low miles, $3,800. 
(847)395-1649. 



1! ^^1 



I 
1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

I 

1 
1 

Glj 

& 

1 

1 

I 

I 

I 

s 

I 

i 

i 



Selling 

Your 

Car? 

Let 
Lakeland's 

Auto 

marketplace 

kelp you! 



Call 

(847) 

223- 

8161 

for more 

info! 



1 
I' 

I 

1 

I 

s 

I 

1 

I 

1 



BlIBfBigjBIBlEUElIBI 






IS 



January 22, 1999 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ Lf 



FIELDS MATTERS — 




MSRP: 537,295 

J(eas&: 




PER MO. 

39 MO. 



$1,150 due at inception. tndudfcg a $400 rrfimdaUeseoirity 
deposit pU» S4S0 acquisition fee, plus tax, tide & Rcense. 



Ove 



I QX4 Luxury Features Include: 

Uatlter • Sunroof • Electronic 4-JVD • CDBose 
Audio System • Air Bags •Keyless Entry 9 
Automatic Climate Control •Power Driver & 
Passenger Seats •Steering Wheel Mounted 
Cruise Control • SideWindow'Defpggers • 
Full Size Spare • 16" Alloys • 60/40 Fold Down 
Bear Seats '• Pouter Windows/Lochs/Mirrors 



■&trc6a*ee $^ O OOR 

*tf|77V 

!&•■ jr. 




FINANCING FOR UP TO 24.MONTHS+ 

Leather and Convenience Pack 



I FIELDS I 

llNRMml 




1121 S. Milwaukee Ave. Libertyville • 847.362.9200 
I N F I N I T I » Visit Us on the Web : www.fieldsauto.com 



MM*i 



? *Plu$tax, title & license .423% financing 



„ ^ rnr, m! Q24 -ttfa 3. W frW**fr » » 36 ™* «•»> fa"** "»** * " » 6 ° """* * ^ ^' "^ '*i!g^^^ 



1 9 
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Lakeland 
Newspapers 

Unary 22, 
1999 




Cops seize 'date-rape' 

Mills 




Three Lake County residents 
charged with delivery; largest 
seizure in Illinois history 



Three Lake County men and a 
Kenosha County resident have been 
charged in the largest seizure to date 
in Illinois of the "date-rape" drug, 
Gamma Hydroxybu trate, or GHB. 

Antioch residents Travis Rader, 
27 and Mark A- Crawford, 42, as well 
as Gurnee resident Michael Castel- 
lano, 29, were arrested Jan. 14. 
Michael D. Brothers, 33, of Kenosha 
was charged Jan. 15. ITiey will ap- 
pear in Lake County Court Feb. 2, for 
a preliminary hearing. 

The arrests were the result of a 
three-week undercover operation 
conducted by the Cook and Lake 
County Metropolitan Enforcement 
Groups (MEGs) along with the Anti- 
och and Gurnee police departments. 

The arrests occurred* when 
Castellano met undercover agents at 
Gurnee Mills, Jan. 14 at approxi- 
mately 4:20 p.m. and sold them 4.5 
gallons of GHB for $1,500. The street 
value of the GHB sold to police was 
estimated at $55,000. 

Rader accompanied Castellano 
to Gurnee Mills to complete the sale. 

Earlier this month, Cook County 
MEG officers became aware of 
Castellano as a potential source of 
GHB, : through intelligence gathered 
by their agents, according to Lt War- 
ren Millsaps, .director ;bf Cook Coun- 
ty MEG. Castellano -Was /reportedly 
selling the drug in; Lake and Cook 
counties. 

' MEG: agents were able to get 
close enough to Castellano to pur- 




WEEK 



GASBAGS 

County gas tax issue 
heats up again 

PLEASE SEE PAGE C2 



HOME BUYS 

Who's buying what, where 
In Lake County 

PLEASE SEE PAGE C8 



!&£>. 






& 



S- - 



'T t 

r } 



GET THE NET 

Internet service provider 
sports new leader 

PLEASE SEE PAGE C7 



chase one gallon of GHB on Jan. Tin 
Bartlett for $400. The street value of 
the drug was estimated at $10,000. 
Each gallon of GHB contains 12,000 
hits, according to police. 

"These arrests were the result of 
an ongoing investigation," said JiriT 
Alexander, director, Lake County 
MEG. "It took the cooperation of the 
Cook and Lake County MEG units, 
States Attorneys office, Federal agen- 
cies and the Gurnee and Antioch po- 
lice departments." 

Subsequent to the arrests of 
Castellano and Rader at Gurnee 
Mills, police executed a search war- 
rant at the home of Crawford, 43376 
North Forest in Antioch, with the as- 
sistance of Antioch Police. 

Crawford was taken into custody 
after agents seized approximately 
three gallons of liquid GHB, with a 
street value of $30,000. Also seized 
during the search were computer 
records, which detailed the purchase 
of certain chemicals necessary for 
the production of GHB. MEG of 
Cook County also seized the chemi- 
cals for the production of GHB, 
$1,200 and two shotguns. .. 

The agents also obtained a con- 
sent to search the residence of 
. Castellano and seized a small 
amount of anabolic steroids and ap- 
proximately 100 grams of GHB. . 

The agents obtained a consent to 
search Rader s residence, which re- 

Please see DRUG IC2 




task force 
under fire 

Close ties to 
CLC concerns 
municipal group 

ByJOHNROSZKOWSKI 
City Editor 

Some members of the Lake 
County Municipal League have 
raised concerns about the makeup of 
the task force that will decide where 
the new University Center of Lake 
County will be located. 

Tom Adams, president of the 
Lake County Municipal League and a 
member of the University CenterTask 
Force, outlined those concerns in a 
letter to Task Force Chairman Robert 
Grever last week. 

Adams said some municipal 
league members had expressed con- 
cern about a potential "conflict of in- 
terest" because of the close ties some 
task force members have with the 
College of Lake County. The College 
of Lake County in Grayslake is one of 
four remaining sites being consid- 
ered for the University Center. 



PleaseseeTASK FORCE IC2 



ANT I OCH PUBLIC LIBRARY DISTRICT ' 
1 5 7 NORTH MAIN 




Reverend Percy McCray talks with cancer patient Barbara Swartiey during one of his many daily vis- 
its at Midwestern Regional Medical Center In Zioh.—Photd by Sandy Bressner 





Pastor helps patients fight cancer throughfaith 



By LESLIE PIOTROWSKI 
Staff Reporter 



A medical center in Zion is 
fighting cancer with an in- 
novative treatment- spiri- 
tuality. Along with its staff 
of oncologists, radiologists and sur- 
geons, Midwestern Regional Med- 
ical Center provides a minister to 
bring a new dimension to helping 
patients; 

Visiting between 80 and 100 pa- 
tients a week, the Reverend Percy 
McCray is in as great a demand as 
any staff physician. Patients eagerly 
await his visits for . 
prayer and consolation. 

"We hear from pa- 
tients across the U.S. 
that the big missing 
piece (in cancer treat- 
ment) is lack of a strong 
spiritual program," said 
McCray. "We have the 
most aggressive pro- 
gram for allowing spiri- 
tual care." 

At the onset of a patients arrival, 
at the center, McCray works to es- 
tablish a relationship and personal- 
ize a program that fits their needs. 
Some patients simply want to talk 
for 20 minutes a day, others ask for 
Bible study or prayer. When pa- , 
tients receive' test results, Rev, Mc- 
Cray is there to provide support and 
empowerment, arid help them work 
through stress and anxiety. 

"Many people die when a doc- 
tor says they will die," said McCray. 
"We need to speak hope and life 
into people. Imagine the type of 
emotional response that can be 
generated by mat It's very power- 
ful." 

McCray, a native of Chicago, 
was ordained in 1989. As a non-de- 



nominational Christian minister, he 
has served as a youth and associate 
pastor for several churches in the 
South, where he provided ministry . 
to a prison, homeless shelter and a 
drug rehabilitation'group. 

His main source for inspiration 
and direction was Rhema Bible 
Training Center in Broken Arrow, 
Oklahoma, 

"Through Bible school, I 
learned to tap into believing that 
God is a healer and wants to heal 
you," said McCray. "From a hospi- 
tals standpoint, that was not a 
widely embraced principle at all." 



'We hear from, patients across the U.S. that 
the big missing piece (in cancer treatment) 

is lack of a strong spiritual program. 
We have the most aggressive program 

. for allowing spiritual care' 



Percy McCray 
hospital Pastor 

But Midwestern Regional Med-- 
ical Center, which McCray joined in . 
1997, embraces this principle. Its 
cancer program, managed by Can- 
cerTreatment Centers of America, 
has long emphasized the need for a 
spiritual foundation in cancer treat- 
ment that transcends science and 
nutrition. 

"All our doctors have respect for 
spiritual care," said McCray. "Its a 
partnership in which disciplines in- 
terface with each other. Doctors un- 
derstand they're not the first and 
last of what happens with a pa- 
tient." 

It doesn't matter what particular 
faith a patient is, McCray will do his 
best to meet their spiritual needs, 
whether that means bringing in a 
Catholic priest or a Rabbi. While 



working with CTCAsTulsa facility, 
McCray arranged for a medicine 
rnarUo visit a Native American pa- 
tient 

For patients who are non-reli- 
gious, McCray supports them any 
way he can. 

"Everyone wants compassion 
and loving care," he said. 

He has seen patients who were 
given only two months to live thrive 
for two years and longer. One of his 
patients was pronounced dead , 
twice, but eventually recovered to 
the point where he was able to leave 
the hospital and go home to his : 
family. 

A major challenge in 
cancer treatment is help- 
ing patients get beyond 
depression, contends 
McCray. 

"Depression keeps a 
persons body from fight- 
ing the invasion of sick- 
ness," he said. "Aperson 
needs to see that God is 
working through them and empow- 
ering them." 

McCray works with a team of 
professionals, including oncolo- 
gists, surgeons, radiologists, occu- 
pational therapists, massage thera- 
pists and nutritionists, as a way to 
fight cancer on numerous fronts! A 
typical hospital lacks such variety, 
said McCray. 

He takes pride in the fact that 
the center is designed in such a way 
that he Is 'being paid to love people. 1 

"I cut through cultural bound- 
aries," he said. "I see people heart 
to heart and meet the raw needs of 
a human being. I can give them 
something that helps them even if . 
they don't recover. There's no 
greater feeling than being able to do 
that" 



EXERCISE WITH YOUR HAIR / C5 



■ 









02/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



January 22, 1998 



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Gas tax issue heats up agai 



ByJohnRoszkowskl 
City Editor 



With traffic bottlenecks becoming an in- 
creasing nightmare for Lake County residents, 
officials are once again exploring the possibili- 
ty of a 4-cent county gas tax to pay for road im- 
provements. 

In its 1999 legislative package to Spring- 
field, county officials urged more equitable 
state funding for roads In Lake County. Leg- 
islative Committee Chairman Judy Martini 
(Oist.l-Antloch) said out of 19 cents a gallon 
residents contribute In state motor fuel tax, 
only about "1 / 10 of a penny is used for road im- 
provements" in Lake County. 



"The current statewide motor fuel tax allo- 
cation formula is not equitable to Lake Coun- 
ty, and does not meet the transporatlon needs 
of Lake County," states the county's 1999 Leg- 
islative Program, which Martini helped draft 

The legislative proposal asks the General 
Assembly to grant the county the authority to 
consider the imposition of a local option gas 
tax to help fund road improvements. Other sur- 
rounding counties, such as DuPage, Kane and 
McHenry, already have been granted such au- 
thority. 

State Sen. Adeline Geo-Karis said she op- 
poses granting the county authority to impose 
a gas tax because public input her office has re- 
ceived has been overwhelmingly against it. 



FROM PAGE CI 




UG: 4.5 gallons seized 



suited in the seizure of more than $20,000 
worth of anabolic steroids and $6,600. 

Castellano was charged with two counts 
of delivery of a controlled substance and one 
count of possession with the intent to deliv- 
er a controlled substance. He was remand- 
ed to the Lake County fail on $30,000 bond. 

Rader was charged with one count of de- 
livery of a controlled substance and one 
count of possession. He was remanded to 
Lake County Jail on a $30,000 bond. 

Crawford was charged with one count of 
manufacture of a controlled substance. He 
was remanded to Lake County Jail on "a 
$50,000 bond. 



All three Lake County individuals posted 
10 percent cash bond on the day of arrest. 
Each faces six to 30 years in prison, if con- 
victed. According to MEG, none of the Indi- 
viduals has a prior record. 

On Jan. 15, agents arrested Kenosha res- 
ident Brothers in the parking lot of the Domi- 
noes Pizza on Sheridan Road in Zion. . 

He was found in possession of a half-gal- 
lon of GHB, along with 10,000 dosage units 
of anabolic steroids. 

Agents obtained a search warrant for his 
home, where they found 400 grams of GHB 
along with chemicals used to manufacture 
the drug, according to reports. 



TASK FORCE: Members questioned 



College of Lake- County President 
Gretchen Naff is a member of the 15-mem- 
ber task force along with two College of Lake 
County Board members, Patricia Jones and 
Millicent Berliant. Jones was the former 
; chairperson for the College of Lake County's 
Board of Trustees. 

"Some of our (municipal league) board 
members raised the issue," Adams said. "I 
told my board I'd write a letter to Bob Grev- 
er and express their concerns." 

Adams said the Lake County Municipal 
League board as a whole has taken no official 
position on the matter "but some board 
members did raise the issue." The league 
represents about 40 villages and towns in 
Lake County. 

Personally, Adams said he is not sure it is 
a major concern. 

"I'm not personally sure it's a big issue, 
really. This task force is made up of a lot of 
responsible people and decisions have to be 
made on some very specific criteria," he said. 

Still, Adams said it is "probably a valid 
question" that municipal league members 
raised. 

"Obviously, everybody has an interest in 
this matter," he said. "There's also very 
strong feelings from our board and member- 
ship that wherever it's located it's going to be 
positive for Lake County." 



Naff said she thinks all the committee 
members will try to do what's best for the 
residents of Lake County, and that alone will 
be the basis for their decision, not personal 
preferences. . .,, Xt ; 

"I think we have a good group of people 
who very much support the concept of the 
University Center and they want to do 
what's best for the people of lake County," 
she said. 

Naff said it's Important for the College of 
Lake County to be Involved in the decision 
making process because it acts as a "feeder 
institution" to various colleges and universi- 
ties. Many students who attend junior col- 
lege at CLC will ultimately be completing 
their education at the University Center. 

"The College of Lake County certainly 
should be involved in helping a University 
Center happen in Lake County," she said. 

Task Force Chairman Robert Grever said 
he is "somewhat surprised" this issue has 
come up. When the task force was formed, 
he said the State Board of Higher Education 
had indicated the College of Lake County 
was going to be "a major part" of the siting 
process. 

Grever said all of the members of the task 
force are responsible people who will base 
their decisions on what's best for the coun- 
ty, not personal biases. 



r 5 ^ 



NOTICE OF 
APPRENTICESHIP OPPORTUNITY 

THE LAKE COUNTY JOINT APPRENTICESHIP AND 

TRAINING COMMITTEE IS PLEASED TO OFFER AN 

APPRENTICESHIP OPPORTUNITY IN THE 

TELECOMMUNICATION INDUSTRY. 

We will provide classroom training and on-the-job training 

in a real work environment The apprenticeship consists of 

3 years classroom training in the evenings along with 

3 years of on-the-job training. The apprenticeship will 

start in JUNE of 1999 and applications will be accepted 

from FEBRUARY 1, 1999 - FEBRUARY 12, 1999 on 

MONDAYS, WEDNESDAYS, THURSDAYS & FRIDAYS 

8:00AM - 4:00PM and TUESDAYS 8:00AM - 6:30PM 

Applicants will be afforded equal opportunity without 

regard to race, creed, color, sex or national origin. 

Applications must be filled out in person. 

DON'T MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY. 

CALL 847-566-2200 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. 

<h - ■■■■■"• 






.; ; 






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January 22, 1999 



COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers / 03 



AT A GLANCE 



A DIGEST OF STORIES MAKING HEADLINES THROUGHOUT OUR REGION 



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Twp. appoints clerk, trustee 

Wauconda Township— Patri cf a Smith, Wauconda 
.Township trustee, was appointed clerk to fill the vacancy cre- 
ated by the death of Gerald L Beyer, 71, who died Jan. 6. 

Smith resigned as trustee at the Jan. 19 board meeting, 
and was immediately appointed clerk, followed by the ap- 
pointment of Glenn L Swanson as trustee. 

Swanson, 39, had run for trustee in 1997, only to lose by 33 
votes. "I look forward to serving the people of the township 
where I have lived my whole life," he said. 

Bernardin query on ballot 

Wauconda Township— Voters will have the opportuni- • 
ty to tell state legislators if they want universal health care to 

be a basic right In Illinois. 

The township board voted 4-0 at its Jan. 19 meeting to 
place the Bernardin Health Care Amendment on the April 13 
ballot " 

The advisory referendum question will ask voters if they 
favor adding the Bernardin Amendment to the Illinois Consti- 
tution, which would establish health care as a basic right of 
Illinois citizens. 

' The amendment is based on the teachings of the late Car- 
dinal Joseph Bernardin, and is taken from a pastoral letter 
called "A Sigh of Hope" he wrote shortly before he died two 
years ago. 

Gundelach running for board 

Chain 0' Lakes— The former project coordinator of the 
Fox Waterway Agency is planning to reclaim his seat on the 
board of directors. 

Roy Gundelach, 52, of Ingleslde, served on the board for 
eight years from 1985 to '93, and was the project manager for 
a year and a half in 1997 and '98 before being fired in the fall 
by a 4-3 vote of the board. 

Gundelach said he wants to be elected to support the 
dredging of channels he was responsible for, saying he com- 
pleted 40 projects during his tenure, while the agency has 
done none since. 

Librarian to retire 

Lake Villa— On Friday, Jan. 29, Marilyn Ward will retire 
from the Lake Villa Public Library as Support Services Coordi- 
nator. 

The library district will host an open house for Ward on 
■ Tuesday,' January 26 from 1 io 3 p.m;'' 

"I definitely have enjoyed working for die Lake Villa library 
for these past 20 years," she said. ' ' V : 

! During those years, she helped the library move four 
times, helped introduce new types of materials that patrons 
wanted, and watched the entire field evolve and change in re- 
1 spohse to technology that did not exist when she started. 

Last year, for the fourth time, Ward helped move the li- 
brary back to its present location on Grand Avenue at the end 
: of Deep Lake Road. 

Meeting hosts pond plant author 

Lake Villa— Land Conservancy of Lake County hosted its 
tenth annual meeting and elected new directors Thursday, 
Jan. 14 at the Lake Villa District Library. 

Elected to three-year terms were Tim Phelan, David Gene, 
and JerlKoziel. Kevin DuPont was elected to fill the remaining 
year of a vacated term. 

President Fran Metzger reported to the members that 
1998 had been an especially productive year for the organiza- 
tion. ... 

Metzger reported, "During 1999, the land conservancy will 
continue with property negotiations and property manage- 
ment activities, pursue additional funding mechanisms, ex- 
pand our community outreach program, concentrate on our 
environmental education commitment, and strengthen com- 
munity involvement" 

Township seeks limited bond issue 

libertyville— The Libertyville Township Board of 
Trustees passed a resolution Jan. 14 which will limit the bond 
issue to $37 million. 

The way the referendum will be worded states ... to is- 
sue bonds for open space purposes in an amount not to ex- 
ceed 5 percent of thevaluation of all taxable property In the 

Township." ■ . 

David Williams, bond council from Chapman and Cutler, 




Winter wonderland 

Dashing through the snowv;Carol Koshkarian and her 
horse, Matlock, show oh what fun it Is to ride In a one- 
horse open sleigh near Lazy C Stables In Round 
Lake. — Photo by Lynn Gunnarson DahJstrom. 

said this is not ah authorizatiori to use the maximum. "They 
can borrow less, they just can not exceed the 5 percent" 

By adopting a resolution the township would be putting a 
cap on the amount it can borrow,- Williams said. 

Pat Connors, a member of the Association of Libertyville 
Township Property Owners/said a resolution is not a binding 
contract and argued that this or any subsequent township board 
could override the resolution and issue bonds for the full 5 per- 
cent which would be in excess of $76 mulioii. 

He suggested to the board to change the wording on the ref- 
erendum question to an amount not to exceed 2.43 percent 
which equals the $37 million the township claims it is asking for. 

Three arrested for armed robbery 

Vernon Hills— Three men were arrested last week in con- 
nection with an armed robbery. 

Clarence D, Hardison, 20, of 219 Court of Shorewood in 
Vernon Hills; Lamar D. Ellis, 22, of 1414 E. Wimpole, 
Mundelein; and Pablo Rodriguez-Cruz, 27, of 1445 Canterbury 
in Mundelein, were all arrested for the robbery and battery of a 
man in Vernon Hills Jan. 14. 

The victim was driving his vehicle on Plymouth Farms 
Road. When he stopped for a stop sign at Butterfield Road he 
was approached. One of the suspects then pointed a revolver at 
the victim and ordered him out of the car; 

While he was standing outside his car the victim complied 
with orders to hand over his money and was then hit over the 
head with the gun. , 

The three were later arrested and Hardison was positively 
identified. 

Door-to-door thieves repeat 

libertyville— The Libertyville Police Department has ex- 



perienced another impostor burglary, also known as "Gypsy 
Ruse Entry Scam." 

There have been four reported incidents between Oct of 
1998 and Jan. 1999. Bderly people are the targets of these 
scams. 

The incidents have involved one Individual coming to the 
front door of a residence. He identities himself as a village 
employee or some type of contractor who has been hired by 
the village to perform some type of work. 

The homeowner is led to the rear of the house or the base- 
ment and kept occupied while other individuals enter the' } 
house and steal money and jewelry. 

Some of the cover stories which might be used include . 
the suspect claiming to be trimming trees for the village, 
checking water pipes, or inspectlhgthe roof from the inside 
for leaks. 

Board tables traffic police decision 

Wadswofth-The Wadsworth Village Board Tuesday, 
night tabled a plan to contract Winthrbp Harbor police for 
traffic regulating duties. 

Village Attorney John Mullen advised the board the word- 
ing of the proposed contract needed to be "Ironed out." 

The village currently employs the services of the Lake 
County Sheriff's Department for the traffic control duties at a 
rate of $51 an hour for eight hours per week. 

Wlnthrop Harbor has offered its services for the eight 
hours per week at a cost of $40 an hour. 

Village President Don Craft said to clear up any confusion 
people should know that no matter what decision is made the 
Lake County Sheriff's Department will still be the primary 
policing unit The discussion is strictly regarding the hiring of 
units for traffic control. 

Bernarndin Amend, on referendum 

libertyville— The Libertyville Township Board of 
Trustees voted Jan. 14 in favor of putting an advisory referen- 
dum on the April 3 ballot. 

The advisory referendum will give voters a chance to say 
whether they are in favor of adding the Bernardin Amend- 
ment to the Illinois Constitution. 

The amendment is based on the teachings of the late Car- 
dinal Joseph Bernardin and would read "Health care is an es- 
sential safeguard of human life and dignity, and the re Is an . 
obligation for the State of Illinois to ensure that every citizen 
is able to realize this fundamental right. O n or before lury 4, 
2000. the General Assembly bylaw shall enact a plan for uni- 
versal health care coverage that permits everyone In Illinois to 
obtain decent health care on a regular basis.--—. -<•- *-»** 

Cookbook-of-Death man arrested 

Fox Lake — According to Fox Lake Police Chief Ed ward 
Gerretsen, Kevin John BJottiaux, 21, of 156 Forest Drive in Fox 

Lake, was arrested Jan. 16 at 12:54 p.m. after a disturbance 
call was phoned into the police saying a man was threatening 
people from his car. 

He is now In Lake County Jail facing several charges in- 
cluding: unlawful possesion of a weapon by a known felon, 
criminal damage to property, battery to a police officer, re- 
sisting a peace officer, being a fugitive of justice, theft of a 
firearm, defacing Identification marks on a firearm, and a 
second count of criminal damage to property for breaking a 
police radio during the scuffle with police. 

During the search of the car, police discovered a copy of 
"The Anarchist's Cookbook" and "Improved Munitions Black 
Book Volume One through Three" in the trunk. 

PrimeCo monopole rejected 

Foot Lake— After four and a half hours of discussion, the 
first ever joint meeting of the Fox Lake village board and the 
Fox Lake village planning and zoning board decided to deny 
PrimeCo. Inc. the right to build a 150 foot monopole digital 
cellular antenna at the comer of Route 12 and Route 59. 

The village planning board unanimously voted late 
Wednesday night to deny the request for a special use permit 
needed for the B-3 zoned property to erect the mono-pole at 
855 South Rand Road In Fox Lake. 

Immediately after the planning board decision, the Fox: 
Lake village board of trustee's, under orders of a federal judge, 
issued opinions on why they voted for or against the erection 
of the mono-pole at what Is being called the "gateway" into 
Fox Lake. 



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Pick up any of Lakeland New spapers 1 1 editions in coming 







QUIITERS'RUS 



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^Everything at this expo is 
sold f6r,charityv 
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CANCER 

" ; Wqrnen who defeated a killer/ 1 
antf : lived to-talk about It ^ Court 



FOREFRONTS 

Lakeland'p 
10 of the most 
interesting people In 
Lake County In this, 
annual special issue 



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04/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OPINIONS 



January 22, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers 

William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 



William M. Schroeder 

Pretldent/C.E-O. 



Neal Tucker 

Executive Edltor/Compot Itlon Mgr. 



Rhonda Hetrick Burke 

Managing Editor 

30 South Whitney St., Grayslake, Illinois 60030 
lei: (647) 223-8161. E-mail: edlt@lnd.com 



EDITORIALS 

Third airport push 
puts Rte. 55 in limbo 

Like his Republican predecessors, Gov. George Ryan is en- 
thralled with plans to build a third airport. In his inaugural 
pronouncements, Ryan made a regional facility at far south 
Peotone a centerpiece of his plans for the future of Illinois. 

Ryan's support buoyed spirits of airport supporters while at the 
same time galvanizing opponents to renew their effort to derail the 
controversial project The chairman of STAND (Shut This Airport 
Nightmare Down) is gearing up to fight prospects of the Illinois Dept. 
of Transportation (IDOT) banking land for the airport opposed by en- 
vironmentalists, Mayor Richard Daley, major airlines and countless 
citizens in the south suburbs. 

Land banking is a keystone of IDOT "planning" for the future and 
a major reason why the scheme to extend Rte. 53 into central Lake 
County refuses to die. The state already has made significant land 
purchases of right-of-way for a road building plan that has been lan- 
guishing on the drawing boards for more than 40 years. 

In the public works arena, Gov. Ryan also voiced his determina- 
tion to untangle the "Hillside Strangler" which has snarled west sub- 
urban traffic at the west end of the Eisenhower Expressway for years. 
Coupled with the linkage of 1-355 to the third airport, it doesn't seem 
likely that the Ryan team will get agitated about pushing for the Rte. 
53 extension. 

The new governor's penchant for deal making likely will be satiat- 
ed with tussling over pressure to bring casino gambling to Cook Coun- 
ty and the state's desire to keep Meigs Field open beyond an agreed 
upon 2002 closing. No one has argued with Gov. Ryan's promise to 
devote 51 percent of Illinois revenue growth to education and require 
criminals using guns to face life in prison if they injure or kill some- 
one.: 

Gov. Ryan's menu doesn't include Rte. 53 as a main course or even 
as a side dish. That doesn't trouble us one bit. The watch will be 
whether the governor's appetite has room for some dessert in the 
form of another tollway In Lake County. 

Thank you, 
Michael 

As a new era in sports begins in Chicago, fans everywhere are 
pausing to thank Michael Jordan for bringing class to the 
floor each time he took to the court. 
Jordan set the standard for the way America's high-paid 
athletes should conduct themselves, on and off the court. 

When he paused during his retirement announcement to remem- 
ber the family of a slain Chicago police officer, he put professional 
sports into perspective. 

He put the magic in the game of professional basketball. 

And he was ours. 

Let's hope all sports stars seek to follow In his graceful footsteps. 



VIEWPOINT 



Trifecta near miss 
marks county politics 



But for the whims of the 
electorate, Lake County 
missed a rare "trifecta" 
where three residents serve 
in high level state government po- 
sitions. 

The magical number of three 
would have been achieved had riot 
a majority of voters preferred Jesse 
White of Chicago over AI Salvi of 
Wauconda for secretary of state. 
As it turned out, electors chose 
Corinne Wood of Lake Forest-as 
their lieutenant governor and Dr. 
Max MaGee of Barrington was ap- 
pointed Illinois schools chief. Al- 
though born and raised in the 
western suburbs, MaGee is by 
choice a Lake Countian. He held 
superintendencies in Aptakisic- 
Trlpp School and Deerfield before 
accepting appointment to the 
state post. 

Lake County has been the 
home of four governors (three De- 
mocrats and one Republican) , but 
only one cabinet level officer, 
William J, Stratton oflngleside, 
who was elected secretary of state 
in 1928. His son, William G. Strat- 
ton was a two-term Republican 
governor in the 1950s. 

John Steinke, College of Lake 
County political scientist, calls it 
the "irony of all ironies" that GOP 
dominated Lake County has been 
home to three Democratic gover- 
nors, Adlai Stevenson of Liber- 
tyville, Otto Kerner, Antioch sum- 
mer resident, and Dan Walker of 
Deerfield. 

Steinke has a theory why pop- 
ulous and wealthy Lake County 
hasn't spawned more state-wide 
leaders. 

Firstly, the dominance of Du- 
Page County Republicans has 
squeezed out other suburban GOP 
aspirants. Then, Gov. for Life Jim 
Thompson and his connections to 
Cook County overshadowed the 
rest of the state during his 14 years 
in office. Lastly, and perhaps 
most important in Steinke's opin- 
ion, is the fact that Lake County 
Republican leadership historically 
is parochial. 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



"If Lake County Republicans 
have influence in Springfield and 
can get favors, they prefer to tend 
to business at home," Steinke stat- 
ed. The CLC political sage sees 
this as politics of the "old boy net- 
work. 

Prime practitioners were the 
late W.J. Murphy, Mickey Babcox, 
coroner and later sheriff, and 
"Bulldozer" Bob Depke, a former 
County Board chairman and long- 
time Warren Township supervisor. 

This could also be described as 
the "Canvasback Mentality" of re- 
cent vintage Republican leader- 
ship, a reference to a west Lake 
County outdoors club that includ- 
ed a number of GOP county lead- 
ers. 

Maybe Wood and MaGee will 
open the doors to more state-wide 
leaders from Lake County. 

Rockwell seeks home 

Lake County is on the short list, 
this column has learned, for the new 
home of Rockwell International 
Corp., the one-time aerospace giant 
that is pulling up stakes from its cur- 
rent home in Costa Mesa, Calif. An 
ideal spot would be along the Tri- 
State Tollway. Lake County might 
have an edge due to proximity to 
Milwaukee and a key Rockwell divi- 
sion at the former Allen-Bradley Co. 
where chairman and CEO Don H. 
Davis once worked. Addition of 
Rockwell and its 200 jobs would be a 
plum for the Lake County corporate 
lineup. 



Slash and bum 

It has come to light that a com- 
bine of union teachers, union sym- 
pathizers, the board of education 
of Woodland School and Supt. 
Dennis Conti conducted a 
scorched earth information cam- 
paign to undercut approval of the 
Prairie Crossing Charter School. 
As it was, the Illinois State Board of 
Education approved the Prairie 
Crossing application 5-3 and the 
school will begin teaching younger 
children this fall in a replica school 
building off Rte. 45. 

Conti and school officials main- 
tained all along that Prairie Crossing 
will draw away approximately $1 
million a year. State Rep. Andrea 
Moore (R-IJbertyville) said the bud- 
get impact will be only $257,000. 

While calling the sum "appropri- 
ate," Moore will be working to pro- 
vide additional state funding to dis- 
tricts where charter schools exist 
Prairie Crossing School also will be 
drawing pupils from Fremont Com 
solidated Dist. of rural Mundelein. 

Real competition 

Long-time Waukegan business 
and civic leader Jack Blumberg re- 
called the "Great Genesee St. Pie 
War" of post World War II in a talk 
about the history of downtown 
Waukegan. Competition between 
variety stores was so Intense that the 
price of a slice of 5 cent pie at the 
fountain food counter got down to 1 . . 
cent during loss leader promotional 
events. "Atone point," Blumberg re- 
lated, "one of me stores got to giving 
away pennies to shoppers to buy pie 
from a competitor." 

One man's family 

The message came through loud 
and clear that an important piece of 
kitchen furniture for a long time, a 
high chair, was extra baggage. All 
and Nikki have taken a place at the 
dinner table like big girls. ;, So the 
high chair has been relegated to the 
store room to be used again who 
knows when. 




Guest commentaries welcome 

Lakeland Newspapers welcomes guest columns by our readers on topics of general Interest. Anyone inter- 
ested in writing a column can contact Publisher W.H. Schroeder at (647) 223-8161. Submissions may be mailed 
c/o Lakeland Newspapers, P.O. Box 268, Grayslake IL, 60030 or fax to (847) 223-8810. Deadline Is Friday at 
noon. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Farm Bureau survey basis toward past decisions 



I found the results of the recent 
survey taken by members of 
the Lake County Farm Bureau 
fascinating. 

Dick Raftis, Lake County 
Farm Bureau manager, chal- 
lenged others to survey their or- 
ganizations. 

That, Mr. Raftis, has already 
been done. The past two Lake 
County Board elections were con- 
sidered reflective of the general 
population's opinion. 

Lake County citizens voted for 
representatives who support our 
Lake County Forest Preserves and 
those who continue to support the 
alternative Route 53 plan. 

What baffled me about the 
Farm Bureau survey was their hot- 
button topic of "reducing the size 



of the Lake County Board." 

Was this issue referring to the 
size of the board's ego or the num- 
ber of board members it takes to 
run a county? 

In past years, some thought It 
only took a couple of good ole' 
boys to run a county. 

However, the John Gotti 
"Darth Vader" approach to con- 
trolling county government does- 
n't work very well. Any authentic 
election or survey will tell you 
that. 

KimEudy 

Co-chdir Impact Coalition of 

Western Lake County ana 

McHenry 

Hypocrisy reins 

Hypocrisy reins when it comes 



to F.T. Graham's pleas to save the 
land via me Libertyville Township 
Open Space referendum for "our" 
grandkids. 

The choice made in his own 
family was to sell the family farm 
and reap the monetary profits for 
his grandkids. 

Is this a case of don't do as I 
did, but do as I pontificate? 

Dorothy Connors 
Libertyville 



Mall is radical 
development 

Hawthorn Woods Village Pres- 
ident John Clery has stated that 
he is pursuing the proposed 
Taubman Mega Mall project only 



because if he doesn't, either 
North Barrington or Lake County 
will do so. His argument is that if 
this were to happen, a mall would 
literally be in Hawthorn Woods' 
back yard, yet Hawthorn Woods 
not obtain any benefit from it. 
Clery has stated this several times 
in town meetings and personal 
letters. 

As it turns out, recent news- 
paper articles and letters confirm 
that Lake County board Chair- 
man Jim LaBelle is against such 
radical development. Additional- 
ly, North Barrington Village Presi- 
dent George Larrain said that he 
would be willing to discuss alter- 
natives uses of the land. As a re- 
sult, the basis of Clery's argument 
Is eroding— If not gone complete- 



ly. Yet, Clery continues to state 
that he thinks the proposed mall 
is the best use of the property. I 
wish that John Clery would allow 
the residents of Hawthorn Woods', 
North Barrington, and the sur- 
rounding area to decide what 
type of development should take 
place at the proposed mall site, 
rather than personally decide 
what he thinks is best for those 
communities. 

If, on the other hand, John 
Clery is concerned about a pro- 
jected deficit in Hawthorn 
Woods, then the residents of 
Hawthorn Woods should have 
the opportunity to address that 
issue directly. 

Dave Clasen 
Hawthorn Woods 



January 22, 1999 



OPINIONS 



Lakeland Newspapers I C5 



11 




PARTY LINES 



PARTY LINES, THE LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS' 
COLUMN OF POLITICAL OPINION, IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS. 



Two 




want trustee role 



A state for the spring election 
materialized in Lake 
Zurich with the decision of 
Village Clerk Karen Stef- 
f ens to try for a trusteeship on a 
team with incumbent trustees Julie 
Jarmondy and JohnToIemel. 

Village Clerk in Lake Zurich is 
basically a non-involved ceremonial 
post Steffens reportedly has the zest 
for policy making. Supporters of the 
slate say Steffens will resign as vil- 
lage clerk if successful so the council 
can appoint a new clerk to serve un- 
til the 2001 election. 

Back in village 
government 

Former Vernon Hills Village 
Clerk Kathy Ryg will be running for 
village trustee in the upcoming elec- 
tion. Ryg left village government 
two years ago when the position was 




Steffens: Seeks role 
on Lake Zurich 
board. 



changed from mil-time to part-time. 

Ryg says she is anxious to be 
part of the policy making process on 
the board. 



She is currently deputy to Lake 
County Recorder of Deeds Mary 
Ellen Vanderventer. 

Lame but no pain 

At public gatherings these days, 
Waukegan Mayor BUI Durkln in- 
troduces himself In a whimsical 
style as H Lame Duck" Mayor Durkin ■> 
loves what he's doing, but it sounds 
like he'll love even more what he'll 
be doing when his term is up in 
2001. 

Choosing in or out 

With Police Chief John Debe- 

vtc leaving for retirement in a few 
weeks, Lake Villa Mayor Frank Lof - 
fredo is weighing the merits of pro- 
moting from the ranks or conduct- 
ing a search. The trend is for county 
municipalities to seek chiefs from 
outside candidates. 



The latest 'do,' 
hair in the eyes 



Jaclyn Smith of "Charlie's An- 
gels" television fame, an ac- 
tress who also portrayed 
Jacqueline Kennedy, was on a 
talk show the other day plugging 
her current movie. 

Her abundant hair was styled 
so that some cascaded down her 
forehead to her right eye. Those are 
called brow-brushing, sideswept - 
bangs, I am told; 

In a six-minute Interview, Ja- 
clyn felt the need to brush the 
bangs away from her eye nine 
times/and five other times she 
flipped them aside with a toss of 
the head. 

Let's do the math. Kept up for 
an hour that would require 90 
brushing asides and 50 head toss- 
es. Assuming it was her "do" of the 
day, for 16 waking hours that 
would total 1,440 brushing asides 
and 800 tossings of t he-head. 

That can't be good for the 
brain, the old gray matter, can it? It 
would drive me crazy if I wore my 
hair like that, assuming 1 could. 

I was counting Jaclyn Smith's 
coiffure copings only because it 
has bothered me that so many peo- 
ple these days wear their hair in 
front of their eyeballs, whether it 
be in super-bangs or stray tendrils 
that are supposed to enhance sex 
appeal — if you like kissing hair. 

Normally, I mostly avoid our 
dreadful daytime television, unless 
there's a good movie, or a really in- 
teresting celebrity visiting with 
Regis and Kathie Lee, Donny and 
Marie, Howie Mandel, Oprah or 
Rosie O'Dbnnell. 

Also; February is supposed to 
be Cabin Fever Month but it came 
early this year because of Old Man 
Winter's humongous snow job. 1 
find myself identifying with that 
old song: "Counting flowers on the 
wall, it don't bother me at all ... 
watching 'Captain Kangaroo,' don't 




THE 

PFARR 

CORNER 

Jerry Pfarr 



tell me I've nothing to do." 

Others celebs seen recently 
with those hairdos that bother me 
included Hillary Clinton, Cameron 
Diaz, Martha Stewart, Meg Ryan, 
Leonardo Dl Caprlo and Juanita 
Jordan (Michael's wife). 

Would Michael Jordan, he of 
the shaved head, have become the 
greatest basketball player ever had 
he performed with hair in front of 
his eyes?! don't think so! 

Would the mighty Samson, 
whose hair was his strength, been 
destroyed by Delilah had he been 
able to see past his tresses that.she 
was wielding a scissors? Of course 
not! 

I hate my own hair, never had 
much, and what Is left can best be 
described as wispy and woebe- 
' ""gone! Way back when 1 was young, 
pals called me "Few Hairs Pfarr." 

Every day is a bad hair day. 
There is little left on top but I still 
visit my barber every six weeks 
'whether I need to or not. My wife 
says, "As soon it starts getting inter- 
esting, you have it cut." 

A few years ago I did some oth- 
er math and announced to my . 
wife, "If I should live to beSO (a 
lofty goal), I'll be getting 225 more 
haircuts." 

She rolled her eyes at that, but 
it did give us a measuring stick. 
Now, whenever 1 Wonder if I should 
do something wild and crazy, some 
madcap adventure, she says: 

"Why not? How many haircuts 
do you have left, anyway?" 



Letters welcome 

Letters to the editor are welcome. They should be on 

topics of general interest, 

•approximately 250 words or less. All letters must be signed, 

and contain a home address and telephone number. 

The editor reserves the right to condense all letters. 






Dennis Hastert-A good man for a tough job 



The famous and feisty 
baseball player and man- 
ager, Leo Durocher, was 
credited with saying, 
"Nice guys finish last." That may 
be true, but for every rule, there is 
an exception. There is one such 
exception right here in Illinois. 

Since I served in the state leg- 
islature with Dennis Hasten, and I 
have been asked by some, what 
kind of guy he was when he served 
there, I thought that I should write 
about him. By now, just about 
everyone knows .that U.S. Repre- 
sentative Dennis Hastert has been 
elevated to the position of Speaker 
of the House in Congress. 

I can say with certainty that 
Dennis Hastert is as nice a guy as 
you can meet. Every once in 
awhile you come across a person 
who nobody has a bad word to say 
against. That is the type of person 
that he is. Everyone likes him and 
everything about him. 

First of all, Hastert comes 
across as a person who would nev- 
er be consumed by his own im- 
portance. His rural upbringing 
and his family work experience in 
farming may have something to 
do with that, but it doesn't take 
you long to know that he is down- 




SEEING 

IT 

THROUGH 

JohnS.Matijemch 



to-earth and home-spun. You like 
his warmth. 

To everyone, he is known as 
Denny. Even in format type of dis- 
cussions, there is something casu- 
al about Denny, and you like him 
for it. 

It is no secret that Denny's as- 
cent to one of the most powerful 
positions in the country didn't 
come about in normal fashion, 
coming after the quick resigna- 
tions of Newt Gingrich and his 
supposed successor, Bob Liv- 
ingston. I believe that the House 
Republicans looked to Hastert in 
what turned out to be an uncon- 
tested selection because he wasn't 
the controversial "lightning rod" 
and he was the type of person who 
could mold together the disparate 
factions of House Republicans. 

Hasten claims that his experi- 
ence as a successful high school 



wrestling coach may be why he is 
able to work with persons who 
have different ideologies but be- 
long on the same team. He said 
that as a coach you learn that you 
just can't rely on one or two stars to 
be able to win'; that everyone on 
the team has something to offer. 

To those who asked me what 
kind of guy Hastert is, I didn't just 
say thr. ' he was a nice guy, I said 
that he was an excellent choice to 
be Speaker of the U.S. House. To 
some, being Speaker and being a 
-nice guy don't go together at all. 
They think that you have to be a 
ruthless to control the often un- 
controllable legislative body. Gin- 
grich had the reputation of being 
ruthless, and it may have led to his 
downfall. 

Being Speaker means that you 
are not only the titular leader of 
your own political party, you are 
the leader of the whole House. 
That means that you' have to man- 
age the legislative affairs of the en- 
tire body. There is a lot of "give- 
and-take" in the deliberations, . 
and if you're not careful, there can 
be chaos. What that means is that, 
even though the Speaker is from 
the Majority party, if he and the 
House trample over the Minority, 



trouble usually brews out, the 
agenda is stalled, and nothing 
good comes from it. 

The quality that Dennis 
Hastert has that can avoid such a 
mess is a simple one, Hastert is a 
good listener. He listens to both 
sides. He has the common sense 
to know when compromise is best 
for everyone. Good law doesn't 
come from one side of the aisle. It 
comes from both sides working 
together. 

Like a wrestling team, you 
never know on a given day who 
will come up with a "clutch perfor- 
mance." So it is with the legislative 
process. I have seen in commit- 
tees and on the floor, you never 
know who might come up with an 
idea to improve your bill. But, it 
can't be done if one side is muz- 
zled or if there isn't an air of coop- 
eration. 

Knowing Dennis Hastert and 
having read his comments after be- 
ing elevated to Speaker, 1 believe 
that the U.S. House will not be as 
divisive as it has been and there 
will be a closer spirit of working to- 
gether to come to agreement on 
important issues. If there is one 
thing that people are mad about, it 
is the petty partisanship that is 



dominating government. Hastert 
also alluded to that, and I am 
hopeful that his leadership will 
bring a stop to the bickering. 

One of the persons who asked- 
me about Hastert wondered how I 
could praise him when his voting 
record is so conservative. I an- 
swered that what makes govern- 
ment work is that you have repre- 
sentatives from all political per- 
suasions and you "hear all sides" 
and come up with a "consensus." 
After all, the thrust of our democ- 
racy is that "the majority rules." 
With Dennis Hastert, too, you al- 
ways know where he stands, and 
you always appreciate that in a 
legislator. What I could never tol- 
erate was a "phony" or those who 
wouldn't keep their word. On 
those scores, I never had to worry 
about him. 

Political observers are saying 
that Hastert will "have his hands 
full" in holding the House togeth- 
er. They say that his problems 
won't come as much from Democ- 
rats but from within his own Party.' 
My assessment is that Denny is a 
nice guy, but he can be firm, too. ' 
He'll gain everyone's respect. If 
anyone can do it,' Dennis Hastert 
can, and he has my best wishes, 



LIPSERVIGE 



C6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



■ 



January 22, 1999 



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LAST WEEK'S QUESTION WAS: 

Will you watch basketball without MichaelJordon? 
THIS WEEK'S QUESTION IS: 

Do your road crews do a good job with snow removal? 



Dist.118 snowblowers 

I wonder if Wauconda School Dis- 
trict 118 ever thought about invest- 
ing in snow blowers, so they could 
clean the sidewalks? All of my 
neighbors had their driveways 
cleaned, but the kids couldn't go to 
school because the sidewalks 
weren't cleaned. A couple of snow- 
blowers, could do the job. 

Island Lake 

TIF abuse 

The Village of Antioch is once again 
abusing the basic intent of certain 
revenue sources for their down- 
town improvement buddies. This 
time they have awarded two down- 
town businesses with TIF money so 
they could upgrade their store- 
fronts. The problem is that TIF in- 
centives are meant for economically 
destitute areas and not for suburban 
downtown beautification projects. 
Some state agencies should start 
monitoring this administration. 

Antioch 

Sr. services director 

In reply to the complaints about the 
director of senior services in Wau- 
conda. These complaints started 
when a certain male bus driver was 
asked to quit. This is his way of get- 
ting revenge. I am a bus rider and a 
volunteer with Wauconda Town- 
ship Senior Services. These accusa- 
tions against the director are un- 
true. He constantly tries to get us to 
try new places to go and lets us 
make our own choices. Therefore, 
we the riders are responsible for 
where we go. I have never seen the 
director smoke on the bus. As for 
the drug test, and physical exami- 
nation, they have been done. Our 
director probably didn't think it was 
necessary to discuss these tests with 
fellow workers. Many people know 
who is writing these complaints 
about the director of senior ser- 
vices, as well as the mayor and 
township supervisor. So why don't 
you just "grow up" and accept 
things the way they are. 

Wauconda 

Where is the plan? 

I would like to know why Stormwa- 



ter Management and the Water- 
shed Management Board have not 
come up with a plan to deal with 
the massive problem of storm water 
run-off in Lake County. Local mu- 
nicipalities continue to build more 
and more developments and where 
is all the storm water going? It is be- 
ing mercilessly dumped on the peo- 
ple who live at the bottom— in the 
low lying areas. The water is not di- 
verted, directed or managed in any 
way, shape or form. 

It just flows down to the bot- 
tom and the people who are living 
there are left to deal with it with no 
help at all from these watershed 
boards. Meanwhile, the planners 
figure out ways to funnel in a few 
more gallons so that their project 
can be built. 

The Slocum Lake watershed is 
THE NUMBER ONE problem in 
Lake County and the only solution 
the people of Williams Park have 
been offered is a FEMA buyout. 
They are willing to spend $1.8 mil- 
lion to get some of the people to 
move away from the problem, but 
they do not want to spend any 
money on a solution. 

What happens to the people 
who are not part of the buy-out and 
choose to remain in Williams Park? i 
Seems like these watershed man- 
agers do not really care about that 
small detail. 

Stormwater Management 
needs to look at the big picture and 
come up with a plan that will work. 
They need to actually start trying to 
manage some storm water. 

Williams Park 

Rude neighbors 

I'm calling about rude neighbors, 
especially my rude neighbors. 
These people are shoveling their 
snow into my yard right over our 
fence and up against my house. 
They aim their snowblower right at 
our side. I would never do such a 
thing, I am so careful not to pile the 
snow on my other neighbor's side 
but these people don't even think. 
They are very rude. Wake up an re- 
alize that this is not your property 
and you have no right to do that. 
Keep your snow in your own yard. 

Lindenhurst. 



Cheer Bulldogs 

I am a Grant Basketball Bulldog fan. 
At the first four boys varsity basket- 
ball games, I have been to this sea- 
son, the crowds have been very qui- 
et. I would like to challenge the stu- 
dent body. Let's get active in what 
our team is doing. Let's make it 
tough on our opponents. Let's pack 
the place on the 22nd of this month 
for the game against Fox Valley. I 
want to HEAR the Grant cheering 
section when we have games. Grant 
basketball-fans are the most knowl- 
edgeable, most understanding be- 
cause they know what they want. 
Winning is what they want, and that 
's what I want, winning basketball. 
Lake Villa township 

County commended 

I'd just luce to add to the comment 
about poor plowing in the big 
storm. The county shouldn't be 
blamed for it. It wasn't the county 
that plowed Hawthorn Mall on 
Routes 21 and 60. That was the 
state. The county actually did a 
phenomenal job, Libertyville did an 
incredible job through downtown 
Libertyville. Warren Township also 
did a fantastic job on the Warren 
Township roads. The state should 
be given their due, they didn't do 
anything, Routes 21 and 60 were 
terrible and still are terrible today, a 
week after the storm. 

Libertyville 

Kudos young people 

I'd like to commend a young man 
that was very courteous to me this 
morning at 5:30 a.m. I went to the 
Amoco gas station on Cedar Lake 
Road and Route 120. 1 tried to 
pump my gas but I had problems 
with my card. I went into the station 
and tried a couple times, but could- 
n't get it to work. The young man 
came out and said "Let me help 
you. Give me the card, you stay 
here." He did the transaction for 
me. I just thought he was so nice 
and thoughtful. I just want people 
to notice that there are still young 
people out there that are willing to 
help senior citizens. Thank you. 

Round Lake 

Less enthusiasm 

Regarding "Watching basketball 
without Michael Jordan." Yes, I will 
watch it, but not with the same en- 
thusiasm. It's going to be hard to 
get a replacement for Michael Jor- 
dan. Not only on the basketball 
court, but also with his personal de- 



meanor. He was a man that every- 
one admired, both on and off the 
court. We* re gonna miss him, but 
basketball still goes on. 

Gurnee 

Revenge 

Inconsiderate. People who own 
snowmobiles, that won't respect 
other people's property. I'm sorry, I 
own a quad and also a snowmobile. 
I can tell you from living on a hill in 
the middle of Fox Lake that the 
drunks go down at noon and the - 
drunks come back to land. They are 
super loaded. Nobody knows what a 
muffler Is. Even on 4-wheelers now. I 
watch you go down and I watch you 
come back. I know where you live. . 
You destroy my property. I'll make 
sure I do donuts on yours. 

Fox Lake 

Root home team 

In answer to the question "Watch- 
ing basketball without Michael Jor- 
dan." At first I said "No", no reason 
to. We're not sure who's on the 
team at all. In all fairness to them, 
I'll watch, to give them some sup- 
port. God knows they are stuck in a 
horrible situation, without getting into 
the lockout Whatever. I wish them 
luck. I'm kind of glad I won't have to 
watch TV late in the summer, because 
I really never cared about that I'm al- 
ways for the home team. It's not im- 
portant for the whole sport 

Antioch 

Boycott Jewel 

I agree with the people who have 
been calling to complain about the 
outrageous prices at the Fox Lake 
Jewel. When I read that the person- 
nel there stated, "that since they are 
the only game in town, they can 
charge what they want," is infuriat- 
ing. I intend to boycott the Fox Lake 
Jewel until they come back with 
reasonable prices. Until then, I will 
shop in Round Lake Beach. . 

Round Lake 

Love Antioch 

In response to "Antioch warning." 
My husband's son and 2 year old 
daughter, moved to the same 
neighborhood eight years ago, until 
we found a house to buy close to 
Emmons School. We stayed in the 
same neighborhood, because of the 
people who were, and are, not only 
friendly, but very helpful and kind. 
As for children 4 and 6 years old, 
running through the neighborhood. 
Shouldn't they stay in their own 



yard until they are older? Also, a 
homeowner, is entitled to have or 
not have anyone they want on their 
property. My husband is also dis- 
abled and he never whined about 
people not helping him. Life Is what 
you make it 

Antioch 

Add fresh voices 

After more than a few years of tur- 
moil, within the village board of 
Grayslake, we have a chance to add 
fresh voices to the upcoming elec- 
tion. The three presently on the 
board and running again, Russell 
Mule', and Rafferty are prime ex- 
amples of lockset brains, no longer 
making independent decisions. I 
have attended many board meet- 
ings, and saw each look over to the . 
village boss and Manager Michael 
Ellis, to watch his expression on a 
vote just made. More than half of 
the Lake County board consists of 
women. Our board could have bet- 
ter representation. 

Grayslake 

Don't care 

In response to the question of the 
week "Will you watch basketball 
without Michael Jordan." Well 
considering, 1 didn't watch it with 
him, I guess the answer is obvious. 
As far as sporting events in general 
are concerned, I think it consists 
mostly of men who are being 
childish about something that has 
no world significance on win or 
lose. For the most part, athletes 
are overweight, oversexed, and 
overpaid. That includes Michael. 

Round Lake ' 

Miss 'Yellow Rose' 

We were so sad to see Yellow Rose 
and Restaurant had closed its doors, 
after so many years. It was such a 
good place to be and the food was 
always so good there. However, we 
were happy to see that the same 
style of food is being served at Tav- 
ern on the Lake in Grayslake. We 
checked it out and were glad to find 
the Yankee Pot Roast that we always 
enjoyed. They have a nice menu 
and atmosphere. They have some 
of the same personnel working 
there. Thanks Yellow Rose for keep- 
ing your food alive. As for "Watch- 
ing the Bulls without Michael Jor- 
dan," I love the Bulls. I love 
Michael, but I definitely have to 
give the other guys a chance. So, 
Yeah, I'll watch it. 

Round Lake 




PERSONAL INJURY 
AND 

workers compensation 

The Law Offices of 
Douglas Rallo 




-«-fc 




6n South Milwaukee Avenue 
Libertyville, Illinois 60048 

TEL 847-816-8780 
FAX 847-8:6-9001 



Concentrated in 

Auto Accidents 

Workers' Compensation 

Wrongful Death 

Medical Malpractice 

Product Injuries 

Slip and Fall 

Dog Bites 

All Serious Personal 
Injury Cases 



—The Chicago Tribune has reported that 
Doug Ratio's "pioneering legal theory" on 
valuing the lost enjoyment of life, "is credited 
with winning millions of dollars for people 
severely injured or for the survivors of those 
killed by the negligent conduct of others". 

—Newsweek Magazine has written that 
Rallo is "on the cutting edge of an idea 
taking hold across the country," and, that 
his concept is being used in court "to win 
large damage awards for accident victims" 

Douglas Rallo 

Mr. Rallo has nearly 20 years experience In 
helping injured parties. He Is listed in 
Who's Who In American Law, and is a past 
chairman of the Medical/Legal Committee 
of the LakeCounty Bar Association. 




LICENSED IN ILLINOIS AND WISCONSIN 



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MINDING 
YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 

Don Taylor 



How I got to 
be the President 
and G.E.O. 



I'm sorry, but I can't share the 
name with you. Many of you 
in business might recognize 
the source. I only got these 
thoughts to share with you by 
promising anonymity. 

I often Wonder why some folks 
achieve success in the corporate 
world and reach the top. What fac- 
tors, circumstances, skills; knowl- . 
, edge or ability allows an average 
person to become the President 
and C.E.O. of a large company. 

So when I have the opportunity, 
I ask. When I heard this executive's 
response, I asked to write about it. 
Yes, 1 could write what he told me, 
but no I couldn't write anything 
that would identify him or his com- 
pany. I agreed. 

I think you'll find this column 
contains sound advice. It applies 
equally well to small -business own- 
ers and corporate officers. You can . 
apply this advice to all areas of your 
life. 

Four Words of Wisdom 

When I asked Floyd (fictitious 
name) how he got to be President 
and CEO. of a very successful and 
profitable company, he replied in 
four words. He didn't hesitate, 
pause to think or beat around the 
- bush. He simply replied, "I'm the 
best salesman." 

Floyd went on to tell me that he ■ 
sells vendors and suppliers because' 
his company is a great firm to do 
• business with, He sells the stock- 
holders on new ideas, products and 
efficient use of profits. He sells his 
associates on the idea of doing 
more with less, keeping a positive 
attitude and serving customers 
well. He sells customers on the val- 
ue and benefits they receive. 

Yes, Floyd, is a great salesman. 
I'm sold that the following ideas will 
help you, too. 

Some tips from Floyd 

• Everywhereyougo,sell 
everything you got Most com- 
panies have more than one product 
to sell. Point that out. Discuss your 
complete product line. Even if you 
only have two products and you feel 
certain that your prospect is only 
interested in product "A," mention 
"B" as well. 

Floyd told about a time early in 
his selling career when he casually 
mentioned a product to a customer 
who bought only one line. The cus- 
tomer had no interest at all. How- 
ever, the next time Floyd called on 
this customer, he got a referral to a 
sister company that did need die 
product. The resulting sale generat- 
ed Floyd's largest ever commission 

check. . 

• Learn the Power Phrase. 

The power phrase according to 
Floyd is: "The benefit to you is..." 
Folks don't buy features, facts or 
statistics; They buy benefits. Too 
many salesmen sell features with- 
out adding the power phrase. 

If Floyd were selling a minlvan 
to a young family, he would talk 
about the fuel-injected V-6 engine 
and automatic transmission with 
overdrive, then he'd say, "The 
benefits to you are more power, 
better acceleration and greater 
fuel economy." He'd point out 
the two sliding rear doors with 
power locks. Then he'd say, "The 
benefits to you are how easily you 
can get the children into their car 
seats, greater safety and conve- 

Pleasesee TAYLOR /Cfl 




January 22, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers C7 



Can an MBA jump-start your career? 

Survey of executives points to value of advanced 
business degree for accounting, finance professionals 



Will a master's degree in busi- 
ness administration (MBA) give 
you a boost up the corporate lad- 
der? It can "certainly provide the 
advanced business knowledge 
that Is helpful in accounting and 
finance, suggests, a new survey. 
Seventy-percent of chief financial 
officers (CFOs) polled said it is 
valuable for accounting and fi- 
nance professionals to earn MBA. 

The survey was developed by 
Accountemps, the world's first 
and largest temporary staffing ser- 
vice for accounting, finance and 
•bookkeeping professionals. It was 
conducted by an independent re- 
search firm and includes respons- 
es from 1,400 CFO's from a strati- 
fied random sample of companies 



with more than twenty employees. 
"Companies today expect 
their accounting and finance staff 
to pay a more strategic role than 
ever before, and therefore seek 
professionals with not only spe- 



cialized accounting skills, but with 
broad-based business expertise as 
well," said Max Messmer, chair- 
man of Accountemps. "Accoun- 
tants who possess MBAs have also 
"gained knowledge in such diverse 



CFO's were asked, "How valuable is it for 

accounting and finance professionals to earn 

an MBA?" Their responses: 

Very valuable.. 15% 

Somewhat valuable.. .....55% 

Somewhat valueless....... 11% 

Not at all valuable 17% 

Don't know/ no answer.. ....2% 

100% 



areas as marketing, operations 
and management, all of which can 
enhance one's value to an organi- 
zation." 

Messmer pointed out, howev- 
er, that while an MBA can acceler- 
ate job opportunities, other fac- 
tors such as experience, job per- 
formance and dedication can be 
equally or more effective in career 
advancement;', 

Fred Getz, Accountemps area 
manager, said, "Accounting and 
finance candidates with solid 
problem-solving and communica- 
tion abilities are at an advantage, 
whether they have developed 
these skills in an MBA program or 
on the job." 

Accountemps has more than 
200 offices 'throughout the United 
States, Canada and Europe, the 
internet address is www.accoun- 
temps.com. 




provider gets new leadership 



A native of Lake County Is the 
new leader of netDIRECT, and an 
equity partner of the full service In- 
ternet provider and web developer. 

Steve Wadh wa, 39, said his imme- 
diate aim is to expand netDIRECT's 
client and subscriber base throughout 
the enure Chicago metro area for the 
Grayslake based company. 

Initial efforts to attract new cus- 
tomers already ore meeting with 
success, reported Wadhwai* who 
joined the company two months ago 
after spending his career with 
Hewlett-Packard, Inc. and Moore, 
Inc. In the areas of product manag- 
ment as well as management con- 
sulting with Fortune 500 corpora- 
tions. 

Spurred by the adoption of dig- 
ital technology, netDIRECT has ex- - 
perienced a 30 percent increase in 
subscribers. "At the same time, 
service problems have been virtu- 
ally, eliminated with new equip- 
ment," reported Wadhwa, who 
grew up in Highland Park. Wad- 
hwa majored in marketing and fi- 
nance at the University of Illinois 
and obtained an MBA at the Kel- 
logg Graduate School of Manage- 



ment at Northwestern University. 

Wadhwa has arranged for netDI- 
RECT, founded in 1995, to become 
the official sponsor of Computer 
Country Expo, a monthly event 
staged at the Lake County. Fair- 
grounds for more than 80 vendors 
displaying the latest equipment, 
software demos and workshops 
available to computer users. 

Along with the installation of 
new 'equipment for an outbound' 
call center capable of reaching the 
entire Chicago area market, Wad- 
hwa said netDIRECT will expand 
web site . service incorporating 
state-of-the-art design,' hosting and' 
maintenance. 

Wadhwa said he is anxious to 
extend netDIRECT's unique affili- 
ate program to the large number of 
minority owned and operated 
newspapers in and around Chica- 
go as well as general interest 
newspapers serving Chicagoland. 
Lakeland achieved national recog- 
nition last year with the creation of 
ISP programs sponsored by sub- 



Please see INTERNET / C8 




Steve Wadhwa, leader of NetDlrect Internet service company, 
works with colleagues Dave Dudick, Alex Maxwell and Mike Lan- 
caster In their Grayslake office.— Photo by Sandy Bressnerp 



Loyola's Mundelein college in partnership with Motorola 



Loyola University Chicago's 
Mundelein College and Motorola, 
Inc., have formed a partnership that 
brings course offerings to the com- 
pany's Schaumburg headquarters 
beginning this past spring. 

The certificate program in 
Spanish was created by Loyola's 
Mundelein College and the com- 
pany's in-house. education and 
training arm known as Motorola 
University. Employees enrolled in 
the program are required to com- 
plete six courses in Spanish in or- 
der to receive a certificate. Any em- 
ployee who successfully completes 
the program and wishes to pursue 
a college degree will be able to ap- 
ply the six courses toward a minor 
In Spanish. 

"Motorola is looking to increase 
its presence in Latin America/and 
with Loyola's strong modem lan- 
. guages department, we are in posi- 
tion to help those expansion efforts," 
said Ned Laff, associate dean for cur- 
ricular affairs at Mundelein. 

'• "In working with Motorola, the 
importance of being a good corpo- 
rate neighbor was raised as an addi- 



tional component of the program. It 
was decided to open the course to 
people living and working in the 
Northwest Suburbs. As the 
Mundelein and Motorola partner- 
ship proceeds for- 
ward, we hope to 
continue this prac- 
tice," he said. 
A wide spec- 



Loyola's Mundelein College. 

"This is a terrific first step for- 
ward in our. efforts to create partner- 
ships with local companies and pro- 
vide their employees with an excel- 
lent education," he 
added. 

The new Mo- 
torola program is 
the second part- 



' We are delighted to be 

partners with such an 

internationally renowned 

trum of employees company as Motorola, Inc., nership Loyola's 

ranging from cus- and to be able to provide Mundelein College 

them with high 
quality courses. 



tomer service repre- 
sentatives to engi- 
neers are enrolled in 
the spring session. 
The successful 
launching of Span- 
ish 101, the first cer- 
tificate course, has 
spurred interest in additional course 
offerings tackling such topics as cul- 
tural diversity and global work is- 
sues. 

"We are delighted to be partners 
with - such • an internationally 
renowned company as Motorola, 
Inc., and to be able to provide them 
with high quality courses," said 
Stephen Freedman, Ph.D.. dean of 



Stephen Freedman, PhD., 

dean of Loyola's 

Mundelein College. 



has formed. The 
college has also 
started a program 
leading to a busi- 
ness management 
certificate for 
Werner Co., a 
manufacturer of 
aluminum and fiberglass ladders 
and climbing equipment, located in 
Franklin Park. 

"This partnership, stemmed 
from the company's desire to offer a 
wider universe of educational choic- 
es to its employees and the excellent 
reputation of Mundelein's adult ed- 
ucation programs," said Vincente L; 
Herrero, Werner's personnel spe- 



cialist and on-site education coordi- 
nator. 

According to Herrero, 18 Werner 
employees are enrolled in the seven- 
course certificate program and no 
one is under the age of 30. "This cer- 
tainly demonstrates a desire on the 
part of our employees to further en- 
hance their career paths," he said. 
"We anticipate that these two part- 
nerships with leading-edge compa- 
nies are just the beginning of our 
network of corporate alliances," said 
John Byrne, Loyola University 
Chicago's Mundelein College direc- 
tor of admissions. 



Mundelein College, Loyola's adult 
and continuing education branch, 
'specializes in helping adult learners 
overcome a variety of obstacles so tliat 
they are able to return to the class- 
room. Classes are taught at Loyola's 
four metropolitan Chicago campus- 
es: Lake Shore Campus in Rogers 
Park, Water Tower Campus on North 
Michigan Ave., Mallinckrodt Cam- 
pus located in north suburbanWil- 
mette, and the Medical Center Cam- 
pus in Maywood. 



II* ifc '''^ ' » « 



. ;<»»u-^' l ^*>' ( 



C8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE 



January 22, 1999 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Below are real estate transactions for villages in and around the Lakeland 
Newspapers circulation area. Listed are the property address, property buyer, 
and purchase price. 



Antioch 



1607 Eagle Ridge Dr, Sanjay Sehgal, 
$305,500 

334 Hazelwood, Reed Ano, $83,000 
361 Joren Trail, Jercmie & Molly 
Schultz, $122,250 
22925 Lakevlew Ave, Frederick A & 
Carolyn Scollay, $128,250 
39957 N Hidden Bunker Crt, James 
M Gray, $115,900 
38147 N Lakeside Place, Chert Joy 
Godek, $190,000 

39815 N Long Grove, Linda M Far- 
rell, $147,275 

42534 N Pederson Ln, Larry & Kath- 
leen Hoyle, $287,900 
41220 N W Lake Ave, Michael & 
Theresa Raymond i, $220,000 
135 Orchard, Jolui & Barbara 
Uchienauer, $135,500 
939 Robin Crt, Patrick Rieben, 
$209,330 



23126 W Lake Shore Dr, Diane Os- 

ter, $50,000 

221 19 W North Dr, David E & Tara E 

Sala, $142,000 

26206 W Rt 173, James Czerlanis, 

$127,000 

Fax Lake 

7114 Concord Circle, Robert Tono, 
$78,000 

7101 Lexington Ln #165f, Irene W 

Lehamnn, $75,000 

48 10 Oak Hill Colony, Christopher J 

Metzer, $36,000 

511 Park Avenue, Andy Voytovich, 

$120,000 

30 W Grand Ave, Norine Hileman, 

$45,000 

Grayslake 

1521 Amos Bennett St, William M 
Carpenter & Diana Soto, $235,379 



394 Ashford Ln, Stephen & Kather- 
ineLitkowiak, $241,321 
1271 Berkshire Ln, Atush P & 
Nimlsha A JoshI, $235,150 
1 1 18 Blackburn Dr, Lambert A & 
Pauline A Wagner, $153,500 
8 Brigantine Ln, Keith & Pam Le- 
wi tzke, $270,000 
1285 Chesterfield Ln, Kazi K& 
Ahmedl S Farooqui, $230,310 
800 Durham Ln, John Norton & 
Maryann Mason, $153,000 
99 Harvey, Michael J Eldridge & 
Beth A Richards, $147,000 
1012 Highgate Ln, Mohammed & 
Nasreen Nasir, $200,000 
1015 Highgate Ln, Jeffrey R B au - 
man, $219,011 

972 Highgate Ln, Raul B & Sandra J 
Hurtado, $218,634 
975 Highgate Ln, Don J & Sheryl M 
Anderson, $229,852 
703 Highland Ct, Katherens Timo- 
thy & Lupe Gallardo, $223,159 
38 Highland Rd, John Hedan, 
$224,979 

44 Highland Rd, Michael & Pamela 
Hrabak, $215,726 

50 Highland Rd, Scott & Carol Sant- 
mier, $196,247 



Advantage 
Realty 



McHenry & 
Lake Counties 

Neighborhood 

Profiles/Buyer Pricing 

Info. <fc Seller Market 

Profiles FREE 

Call Lydine Burke Today! 

800-677-9394 



•j> 



Better 



JL~ Land Gardens® 



1 ■■"■■ -*- -*-and Gardens 

803 N. Front St #D 
McHenry, IL 60050 



E-MAIL ME! 

HOME BUYING or SELLING 

MADE CONVENIENT! 

Experienced Realtor will E-Mail listings 

and provide you with answers at your 

convenience. Immediate appointments are 

available for serious buyers and sellers. 

Lydine Burke - Realtor 

lburke(« advantngerealty.com 

or call 

800-677-9394 x!30 




STOP 




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For more information visit our web site 
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495 Riverside Dr., Suite #212, Gurnee 

(Across from Six Flags) 



9 Highland Rd, Mark A Ruby, 

$225,064 

181 Hillside, Katie Jo & Joseph D 

Bitterman, $135,000 

430 Lawrence Ave, Eda E Schroeder, 

$125,000 

1594 Levi Baxter St, Martin & Di- 

anne Stansbury, $293,419 

1 086 Manchester Cir, Jason & Karen 

Dederich, $139,500 

130 Parker Dr, Howard Schwartz, 

$266,000 

1550 Portsmouth, Donald & Jill 

Danley, $165,000 

18457 Springwood Dr, Patrick J 

Byrne, $213,035 

860 Stratford Crt, Dolores Buten- 

schoen, $121,000 

18537 W Aspen Ct, Heather D 

Strauss, $251,000 

1 8422 W Springwood Dr, Anthony 

Dopescez & Linda Doncscez, 

$227,140 

18469 W Springwood Dr, Michael P 

Sweeny Sweeny & Mary R Sweeny, 

$208,456 

182161 W Springwood Ln, John & 

Kristi Czerwionka, $239,990 

Green Oaks 

31 147 Prairie Ridge Rd, Andrew S 
Bitta, $365,303 

14320 W Burton Crt, Richard B Eas- 

ton, $512,600 

Gurnee 

1983 Adams St, BennetZager, 
$187,500 

1482 Almaden Ln, 21 & Jing Chong 

Zhang, $215,000 

154 1 Auburn Ln, Karen Gate, 

$120,000 

7674 Cascade Way, Michael E & 

Laura LTinsley, $272,834 

1553 Cedarwood Crt, Freddie Jr & 

Carolyn Walker, $132,500 

3415 Country Club Ave, Mary All- 

wardt, $90,284 

470 Cross Rd, William Cobe, 

$233,500 

5750 Delaware Ave, Brad 

Jenksjenks, $135,000 



6429 Eagle Ridge Dr, Michelle 
Sanchez, $159,500 
179 Knobb Hill, Brian T Crow, 
$201,500 

4150 Lake Park Aye, Robert C & 
Joanne M Heiser, $72,500 
3417 Lee St, Gail Palmer, $148,000 
36159 N Banbury Ct, Don E Wheat, 
$164,000 

37020 N Belle Plaine, Gary & Re- 
becca Stutts, $97,000 
36443 N Beverly, Isaac Gonzales, 
$138,500 

34046 N White Oak, Flordellza 
Acosta, $120,500 
5124 Pembrook Ct, Jeffrey S Ro- 
man Ahlgrim, $111,500 
316 Penny Ln, Rebecca M & 
Stephen F Conklin, $333,240 
36486 Traer Terrace, Raymond & 
Margaret Polster, $114,900 
18705 W Ash, John Farano, 
$104,000 

17913 WElsbury St, Lyn Pederson 
& Todd Sanders, $189,000 ' 
14241 W Lawn Ave, Charles Su- 
urmeier & Deann Pennella, 
$175,000 

Halnesville 

606 Emerson, David Benjamin 
Quigley, $130,500 

Hawthorne Woods 

189 Boxwood Dr. Jose & Nancy 
Hernandez, $385,000 

1 Bruce Circle South, Thomas Fen- 
tress, $335,000 

Ingteside . 

100 Quail Path, Kristi L McmUJan, 
$315^000 

34137 Single Oak C, Wesley & Dale 

Hayes, $270,000 

26256 W Vista Crt, Scott L Sperling, 

$158,000 

26289 W Vista Crt, Dawn M & 

Michael W Morgan, $186,526 

Lake Villa 

1432 Carriage Ln, Jacob & Aji 
Thomas, $141,000 



FROM PAGE C7 



INTERNET: Technology 
paves way for expansion 



urban newspapers. 
"netDIRECT is poised for a new era 
of growth," exclaimed Wadhwa, who 
pointed out that custom Internet 
service is available to Lake County 
businesses and residents for as low 
as $17.95 per month. 

Wadhwa and his wife, Monica, 



are the parents of two daughters, 
Natasha, 5, and Marissa, 3. They re- 
side in Grayslake. Wadhwa serves on 
the Computer Information Science 
(CIS) Advisory Board for College of 
Lake County and he is a member of 
the technology committee at 
Grayslake High School. 



TAYLOR: Words of wisdom 



nient entry and exit" 

• Don't forget to ask- Yes, 
you have to ask for the business. 
The Reverend Billy Graham was a 
Fuller Brush salesman. One of the 
things Rev. Graham does better 
than anyone else in the field of 
evangelism is close the sale. His 
sales presentations are short, clear 
and visual. Then he asks for a deci- 
sion. 

If Billy and Floyd ever got to- 
ft 



gether, Billy might end his next ser- 
mon like this: "The benefit is that 
you escape eternity in hell and get 
to live a life of peace and joy on this 
earth." I'm sold on Floyd's secrets 
and I hope you are, too. 

Don Taylor is the co-author of 
Up Against the Wal-Marts. You may 
write to him in care of Minding Your 
Own Business, PO Box 67, Amarillo, 
TX 79105. 



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Lakeland Newspapers I C9 



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DEATH NOTICES 



BRENNAN 

Alberta C. Brennan, age 82 of Grayslake 
An: Kristan Funeral Home, PC, Mundeleln 



REINDL 

Barbara Ann RelndJ, age 66 of Mundeleln 
An: Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, Ubertyville 



GERNHARDT BEE 

Mary Lou Gemhardt, age 66 of Ubertyville Mary Ward Dee, age 83 ofWadsworth 
An. Bumeit- Dane Funeral Home, Ubertyville Am Salata Gumec Funeral Home, Gumee 



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Newspapers 



JUSTEN'S ROUND LAKE FUNERAL HOME 

222 N. Rosedale Court (Rosedale at Cedar Lake Road) 

(847) 546-3300 

Nancy Justen & Mark Justen, Directors 

Additional Locations in McHenry and Wonder Lake 

K.K. HAMSHER FUNERAL HOME, LTD. 

• 12 N. Pistakee Lake Rd., Fox Lake, IL 
(847)587-2100 
Kenneth K. Hamsher, Debra Hamsher Glen, Directors 

RINGA FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2146 

Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

Dan Dugenske, Director 

(847)395-4000 

SPRING GROVE FUNERAL CHAPEL 

8103 WilmotRd., P.O. Box 65, Spring Grove, IL 60081 

Kurk P. Paleka, Director 

(815) 675-0550 or Toll Free (888) 394-8744 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL AND CREMATORIUM, LTD. 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake, IL 

(847) 223-8122 

David G. Strang and Richard A Gaddis, Director 



Semple Stiflman Scott Jr. 

Age 93, a resident of Ingieside for the past 48 years, for- 
merly of Chicago, died Wednesday, Jan. 13, 1999 at home, He 
was bom on May 17, 1905 In St. Louis, Mo. to Semple and 
Louise (nee Johnston) Scott, and had attended the University 
of Illinois In Champaign, and Northwestern University. Mr. 
Scott was a member of the Phi Kappa Theta Fraternity. He had 
been employed with Time Insurance Co. In Milwaukee, Wis, as 
Home Office representative, until his retirement. 

Survivors indude: three daughters, Unda E Scott of Eric, 
Colo., Cynthia G. Scott of Jacksonville Beach, Fla., Patricia A. 
Scott of SmithsvilJe, Mo. He Is preceded In death by his par- 
ents, his wife, Naomi (nee Roberts) Scott In 1989 and by one 
son, David Scott In 1980. 

Private services were arranged by K K. Hamsher Funeral 
Home, Fox Lake (The Chapel on the Lake) 

Dennis B. Besaw 

Age 54 of Round Lake passed away Wednesday, Jan. 13, 
1999 at Highland Park Hospital. He was bom Nov. 8, 1944 In 
Elmhurst and had been a resident of Round Lake the past 20 
years, formerly of Antioch. A member and Deacon of Calvary 
Presbyterian Church of Round Lake. Retiring in 1998 from 
Commonwealth Edison where he was employed as a supervi- 
sor. 

He leaves his wife, Karen (nee Troy) whom he married on 
July 22, 1978. Also surviving are his children, Pamela (Gerald) 
Altaian otGrayslake, Kevin (Ruthann) Stateler of Round Lake, 
Andrea (Don) Weber of Burlington, Wis., Keith (Sandra) 
Stateler of Round Lake, Fred (Heidi) Troy of Mundeleln, Scott 
(Kristen) of Kenosha, Wis., Kirk Stateler of Round Lake, Lisa 
Troy and Charlene Troy or Gumee; grandchildren, Undsey, 
Patrick, FJisha, Kayia, Savannah, Erika, Austin, Selena, Amelia, 
and Katherine; his parents, Gerald (Pat) Besaw of Maywood; 
sister, Pat Krysa and brothers, Roger, Kerry and Gordon Besaw. 
He Is preceded in death by his mother, Joe Anne In 1947. 

Funeral Services were held at the Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake with the Pastor Linda 
Philabaun, Associate Pastor of the United Protestant Church 
of Round Lake, officiating 

Interment was privately held. 

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be given to the 
Oncology Research DepL, c/o Highland Park Hospital, 718 
Glenview Ave., Highland Park, IL 60035. 

Bcrnice M, Erickson 

'Age 91 of Fox Lake passed away Jan, 12, 1999 at her resi- 
dence: She was bom Aug 31, 1907 in Chicago and had made 
her home in Fox Lake the past five years, formerly of Round 
Lake. A member of the RoundLnlap, "Happy Seniors," 

She leaves her step-daughter, Donna J. Sass of California; 
brothers,". William lEvcryn) Abramovste of- North '.Riverside; 
nephews, William (Sherry) Ab'errnpske or Ingieside and Arthur 
(Lou) Ingfirman. of Marcn^;^nJece,Ma^ilyn"UMy:^5daK.ot 
Douglas, Mich, and several great nieces and nephews. She is 
preceded in death by her husbands, George Minium in 1950 
and Nels Richard Erickson. ' t 

Private services were held 

Arrangements were entrusted to the. Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium, Ltd, Grayslake. 

Memorials may be given to the Salvation Army in her 
memory. 

Florence Marie (Pencak) Stolarik 

Age81,passedawayunexpectedlyonJan. 10, 1999 at Lake 
Forest Hospital. She was bom on Oct 12, 1917 In Chicago and 
has resided in North Chicago for 50 years. She retired from 
Fansteel Corp. after 25 years, member of the Loyal Order of 
Moose and a member of the Queen of Peace Church. 

Florence is survived by her children, Kenneth (Nancy) 
Stolarik, John (Wonnc) Stolarik, Beverly (Donald) Becker. 
Dennis Stolarik, Candlce (Gregory) Vole, Sharon (Jerry) 
Thomas, Roger (Dianne) Stolarik, Wayne (Cindy) Stolarik, 
Derrick (Insuk) Stolarik, Lisa (Ken) Creamer, her sisters, Mary 
Krempotic, Julia (Stanley) Pencak; sister-in-law, Lorraine 
Pencak; brother, Joseph (Tina) Pencak; 30 grandchildren; 44 
great grandchildren and two great, great grandchildren. She is 
preceded in death by her husband, John Stolarik to whom she 
was married to for 57 years; son, Joseph Stolarik; brothers, 
John Murowski and Walter Pencak. 

Mass of the Resurrection was celebrated at St. Gilberts 
Catholic Church, Grayslake. 

Friends and family visited at the Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ud, Grayslake. 

Interment was at Ascension Cemetery, Ubertyville. 

Ruth Anne Bocox 

Age 71 of Lake Villa, passed away on Monday, Jan, 11, 1999 
at Pebble Brook Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Lake 
Bluff. She was bom in New York, NY on Sept. 10, 1927, the 
daughter of the late Edna and Arthur Gilibert. She was a mem- 
ber of the Lake Villa United Methodist church in Lake Villa, 
where she participated In the church choir. She was a member 
and past president of the Ladles Auxiliary of the Lake Villa VFW 
Post 4308. 

She is survived by her husband, Paul, to whom she was 
married for 51 years; her sons, Glen (Susan) of Moline, Roger 
(Frances) of Des Moines, Iowa, William (Janet) of Lake Villa 
and Robert (Julie) of San Clemente, Calif.; her grandchildren, 
Benjamin, Daniel and Joseph, Paul and Bradley, William Jr., 
David, Mark, Valerie and Gregory and Andrew. Also surviving 
are her sisters, Grace, Edna, and Edith. She Is preceded In 
death by a sister, Alice. 

Funeral Services were held at the Ringa Funeral Home, 
Lake Villa with Rev. Patricia Allen-Stewart, officiating. 

Interment was at Norlhshorc Garden of Memories 
Cemetery in North Chicago. 

Mildred M. Schultz (nee Haupert) 

Age70or Round Lake Park, passedaway Monday, Jan. 11, 
1999 at her residence. She was born April 24, 1928 in Chicago 
and had made her home In Round Lake Park the past 41 years 
and was a member of St. Joseph Catholic Church of Round 
Lake. 

She leaves her daughter, Judy (Edwin) Johnson of Gumee; 

. son, William M. Schultz of Waukegan; three grandchildren, 

Jennifer, Megan and Amanda. Also surviving are three sisters, 



Eleanor (Irving) Reed of Tennessee, Marcella Mueller of 
Barrington and Janice (Wayne) Gray of Streamwood; brother, 
Theodore (Debra) Haupert of California, She Is preceded In 
death by her husband, William on Sept 20, 1996 and her sister, 
Katherine In July of 1996. 

Mass of the Resurrection was celebrated at St. Joseph 
Catholic Church in Round Lake. 

Friends and family visited at the Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake, 

Inte rment was at Ascension Cemetery in Ubertyville. 

Memorials may be given to the charity of your choice in 
memory of Mildred 

Dorothy M. Staral (nee Ducat) 

Age 74 of Round Lake Beach/passed away Thursday, Jan. 
7, 1999 at Winchester House In Ubertyville, She was born, 
March 26, 1924 hi Two Rivers, Wis. arid had made her home in 
Round Lake Beach since 1957. Dorothy was an avid Bingo 
player. 

She leaves her sons, Raymond (Mary) of lola, Wis., Dennis 
(Diana) of Lake Villa, and David (Saleeta) Staral of Ingieside; 
seven grandchildren and six great grandchildren. Also surviv- 
ing are her sister, WUma (Wesley) Stlgen of Galloway, Wis. and 
brother, Nelson (Viola) Ducakof lola, Wis, She Is preceded in 
death by her two brothers. 

Mass of the Resurrection was celebrated at SL Gilbert 
Catholic Church In Grayslake. 

Friends and family visited at the Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ud„ Grayslake. 

Interment was at Ascension Cemetery, Ubertyville. 

Memorials may be given to the Winchester House in 
Ubertyville in her memory. 

Theresa Mihoviiovich i 

Age 92 of Antioch, passed awayThursday, Jan. 14, 1999 at 
her home. She was bom SepL 14, 1906 In New York, NY, the 
daughter of the late Joseph and Marian na (Wach) Klarich. 
Before moving to Antioch In 1970, she had lived in Chicago for 
many years. She was a member of St. Peter Church In Antioch, 
The Family Club Solta and the Woodman of the World On Oct 
11,1 925, she married John Mihoviiovich In St. Jerome Church, 
Chicago and he preceded her in death on June 8, 1979. 

Survivors Include her daughter, Rose M. (the late Charles) 
Kubush of Oak Lawn; and her son, John (Betty) Mihoviiovich 
of Cape Coral, Fla.; 12 grandchildren, John (Donna), James 
(Mary), Joseph (Carol), Jerry (Kim), Jeffrey (Natalie), Michael 
(Cheri), Mary Ann (Michael) Kalodziej, Bonnie (Rich) Panerall, 
Bob Bode, CUff Bode, Tracy (Rafael) Valdcs, and Lester Shaffer 
and 22 great grandchildren; one sister, Josephine Bolln of 
Chicago Ridge. In addition to her parents and husband, she Is 
preceded in death by one brother, Stanley tChrisiine) Wartch . 
and one sister, Ann (the late Shirley) Davis. 

Funeral Services vrith Mass bt Christian Builoi was held at 
- St-PeterChurdl, ArtUoc.h. . ■ •^S^jaS^Z&tex 

' ~ Friends and family visited arthe Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch. 

interment was at St. Mary Cemetery, JEvergreen Park. 

Those desiring, may make contributions to the Antioch 
Rescue Squad In her memory. 

Cynthia L KaminsJd 

Age 37 of Round Lake, died Monday, Jan. 18, 1999 at her 
home. She was bom on Oct. 29, 1961 In Evanston to Ned and 
Donna (Flury) Gate Formerly of Evanston, she moved to Fox 
Lake with her parents, and later to the Round Lake area where 
she met her husband. She is a former employee ofTriad Circuit 
of Round Lake, where she worked as a screen printer for eight 
years. 

Cynthia is survived by her husband, Kevin J. Kamlnskt of 
Round Lake; a son, Christopher Kaminskl, at home; a daugh- 
ter, Jennifer Kamlnski, at home; a step-son, Nicholas Kaminskl 
of Round Lake; a step-daughter, Leana Marie Reynolds of 
Manasas, Va.; a step-grand daughter, Monique Mason, also of 
Manasas, Va.; her parents, Ned and Donna Cate of Fox Lake; 
her maternal grandmother, Margaret Cate of East Moline; her 
mother-in-law, Lorraine Forcien of Round Lake Beach; two 
brothers, Ned (Marilyn) Cate ofTwin Lakes, Wis., John Cate of 
Fox Lake; a sister, Cheryl (Kevin) Fisher of Elk Grove Village; 
two nieces, Tara and Casey Kaminskl; and three nephews, 
Donald and Jeremy Cate and Eric Fisher. She is preceded In 
death by her father-in-law, Benjamin Kamlnski. 

Friends may meet the farnilyThursday, Jan. 21 , from 6:30 

Please see page C10 



Strang Funeral Chapel 
& Crematorium, ltd 







FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED 

100 YEARS 

OF DEDICATED SERVICE 

1898-1998 

410 East Belvidere Road 

Gravslake, IL 60030 



(847) 223- 




David G Strang • Richard A, Gaddis 
Directors 




C10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



OBITUARIES/LEGAL NOTICES 



January 22, 1999 



Jan 



(Continued from page C9 

to 7:30 p.m. at Justcn's Round Lake 
Funeral Home, 222 N. Roscdalc Ct. 
(Roscdolc Court and Cedar Lake Road), 
Round Lake. 

A funeral blessing will be said at 7:30 
p.m. at the funeral home, with the Rev. 
Robert Fltzpatrick officiating. 

Interment will be private. 

Memorials In Cynthia's memory to 
St. Judo Children's Research Hospital, 501 
St. Jude Place, Memphis, Tenn,* 3B105- 
1905 would be appreciated by (he family. 

Calvin A* McEntire 

Age 93 of Lake Villa, formerly of 
Hominy, Okla. passed away Saturday, Jan. 
16, 1999 at Condcll Medical Center, 
Ubcrtyville. He was born July 25, 1305 In 
Dixie, Okla. which was part of Indian 
Territory at the time. He was the son of the 
late Thomas A. and Nell M. (Livczey) 
McEntire and lived in Hominy, Okla. most 
of his life, moving to Lake Villa recently. 
He was a member of the Hominy Masonic 
Lodge 350 AF and AM and was qualified 
to teach lectures. Before his retirement he 
had operated a service station in Hominy 
for 23 years. On June IB, 1927, he married 
Agnes V (Virgic) Qisscls in Cleveland, 
Okla. and she preceded him In death on 
July 18, 1997. 

Survivors include, two daughters, 
Irene (Duke) Weber of Lake Villa and June 
(Billy) Fannin of Folsom, Calif.; one sister, 
Juanila (Polil) Nclll of Cleburne, Tex.; 11 
grandchildren, Shanda, Aniia, Bill, Julie, 
Linda (Richard) Lisa, Tom (Becky) Brcnda 
(George) Shcryla, Gayla (Dale) and Calvin 
(Lynn); 19 great grandchildren, Robert, 
Aaron, Sara, Ryan, Cristina, Jason, Trina, 
Amanda, Adam, Matthew, Paul, 
Samantlia, Rebecca, Terra, Travis, Jcannie, 
Jill, TJ and Joshua; two great, great grand- 
children, Cassandra and Jacob; five nieces 
and nephews, Pahla (Donnic), Paul Jr., 
Earle (Dorothy), Kenneth (Barbara) and 
James. In addition to his parents and wife 
he is preceded in death by one daughter, 
/can I ludsonpillcn one brother, Emmctt 
and one sister Rosalie ScheU; three grand- 
children, Carola, Jim and Robin and one 
great grandchild, Brandon. 

Friends and family visited at the 
Strang Funeral Home of Antioch with Rev. 
Patricia Allen-Stewart of the Lake Villa 
United Methodist Church, officiating. 

Final funeral services were held in 
Hominy, Okla. with burial In the AJ. 
Powell Cemetery in Hominy, Okla. 

Helen ill. Vanderspool 

Age 86, passed away on Jan. 17, 1999 
at the Dr. John Warner Hospital In 
Clinton. Helen was bom on July 19, 1912 
in Harris and was a resident of Farmer 
City, formerly of Grayslake. Helen was a 
former employee of Admiral Corp., 
Mcllenry.; Brown Paper Bag Co., of 
Ubcrtyville; and the Hcppncr 
Manufacturing Co,, Round Lake. 

She leaves her children, Leroy H. 
Vanderspool of Farmer City, Barb 
Vandcrspool of Farmer City, Margaret 
Barrett of TeUico Plains, Tenn.; grandchil- 
dren, Marsha Rccm, Brcnda Todd, Joe 
Gerali. Robert Gcrali, Anthony Gerali, 
Michael Gerali. Denna Vandcrspool, 
Luna, Shelly Vanderspool and Leroy 
Vandcrspool; sisters Margaret Miller or 
Prudenvillc, Mich, and Betty lies of 
Saginaw, Mich. She is preceded in death 
by her husband, Hilbert 'Doc' 
Vanderspool; three brothers and two sis- 
ters. 

Funeral services will be held at 11 
a.m. on Friday, Jan. 22 at the Strang 
Funeral Chapel and Crematorium, Ltd., 
Grayslake, 

Interment will follow at Highland 
Memorial Park Cemetery, Libertyville. 

Visitation will be at the funeral 
chapel on Thursday, Jan. 21 from 7 to 9 
p.m. 

Esther B. Finlcel 

Age 89 of Gurnec, passed away 
Monday, Jan. 4, 1999 at Victory Memorial 
Hospital, Waukegan. She was bom March 
26, 1909 in Rosccrans, the daughter of the 
late Andrew C. and Lena (Dixon) Winters, 
and was a lifelong resident of Lake 
County. Mrs. Finkel was a homemaker 
and caregiver and was very active with the 
Mt. Rest Cemetery Association. On Aug. 
26, 1929, she married Oscar C. Finkel in 
Waukegan, and he preceded her in death 
on Nov. 11, 1995. 

Survivors include four sons, Jack 
(Peggy) of Llndenhurst, Wayne (Mary) of 
Lexington, Ky„ Robert (Lois) of Glen Ellyn 
and Gordon (Sharon) of Gurnce. She was 
the grandmother of 13 and great grand- 
mother ofl 1. In addition to her parents 
and husband, she is preceded in death by 
. five brothers and sisters, of which she was 
the youngest. 

Memorial Funeral Services will be 
held at 1 1:30 am., Saturday, Jan. 23, 1999 
at the MUibum Congregation Church, 
Mlllburn, with Pastor Paul Meltzer, offici- 
ating. 



In lieu of flowers donations may be 
made to the Mt. Rest Cemetery 
Association, 43264 N. Kenosha Rd., Hon. 
11,60099, in her memory. 

Arrangements were entrusted to the 
Strang Funeral Home of Antioch. 

Virginia P. Thornton (nee 
laylor) 

Age 69, a resident of Fox Lake for the 
past 31 years, died on Saturday, Jon. 16, 
1999 at the Sherman Hospital in Elgin. 
Mrs. Thornton was bom in Springfield, on 
March 13, 1929. Prior to Mrs. Thornton's 
death, she worked for Catholic Charities. 

Survivors include, two sons, William 
Thornton of Fox Lake and Michael 
(Kathleen) Thornton of Washougal, 
Wash.; four daughters, Deborah 
Thornton of McHenry, Pamela Leff of Fox 
Lake, Nancy McKInney of Twin Lakes, 
Wis. and Mary Thornton of Ingleside; six 
grandchildren, Jessica, Lcsa, Kaitlin, 
Rachel, Brittany and Hallcy; one great 
grandson, Ricky. She is preceded in death 
by a grandson, Butch. 

A Memorial Service for the family 
was conducted at the K. K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home, Fox Lake (The Chapel on 
the Lake) 

Private interment followed the 
memorial services. 

Myrtle M. Wilkerson 

Age 89 of Round Lake Beach, died 
Friday, Jan. 15, 1999 at her residence. She 
was bom Feb. 28, 1909 In Martin, Tenn. to 
Ike and Mary (Smothers) Melton. 
Formerly of live nonhside of Chicago, she 
lived in Round Lake Beach for the past 
four years. She was employed in the stock 
room at Magnccraft Electrical in 
Northbrook for 13 years before she 
retired. She was affiliated with the Faith 
Baptist Church in Round Lake Beach. 

Mrs. Wilkerson is survived by five 
daughters, Mary (the lole Kenneth) Doran 
of Martin, Tenn., Louise (James) Evans of 
Marengo, Patricia (Ronald) Smith of 
Round Lake Beach, Shirley (Jack) 
Schrocdcr of Round Lake Beach, and 
Kathy (Bob) Burnett of Chicago; a son, 
Buddy (Missy) Melton of Bono, Ark.; 26 
grandchildren; 40 great grandchildren; a 
sister, Peorlie Wray of Gates, Tenn. and a 
brother, Jesse Melton of Dyersburg,Tenn. 
She is preceded in death by her parents; 
her husband, Leo Wilkerson in 1977; a 
son, Charles in 1997 and two grandchil- 
dren, Jimmy Smith and Jimmy Doran. 

Funeral Services and visitation was at 
Justcn's Round Lake Funeral Home, 
Round Lake 

Interment was at Elmwood 
Cemetery, River Grove. 

Memorials to the American Cancer 
Society would be appreciated by the fam- 
ily. 

Magdalen Lcwandowski 

Age 79 of Llndenhurst, died 
Wednesday; Jan. 13, 1999 at Hillcrest 
Nursing Center in Round Lake Beach. She 
was bom April 20, 1919 in Pittsburgh, 
Penn. Formerly of Hoffman Estates, she 
was a resident of Undcnhurst since 1994. 
She was employed by Centel Telephone 
Co. Tor 26 years, and served as supervisor 
for the last 12 years, prior to her retire- 
ment in 1931. 

Mrs. Lcwandowski is survived by 
two daughters, Kathleen jacobsen of 
Charlotte, NC. and Corinne (Thomas) 
Hepncr of Round Lake Beach; three 
grandchildren, Kenneth Jacobsen, Karen 
VonderLlnden and Greg Gcrage; five 
great grandchildren, Lucas, Emily, 
Zachary, Zocand Dylan; and a sister, Ann 
Keating of Elmhurst. She Is preceded in 
death by her parents, her husband, 
Edward Lcwandowski In August 1996; a 
grandson, Jeffrey; and two sisters, and 
two brothers. 

Visitation and Funeral blessing was 
held at Justcn's Round Lake Funeral 
Home, Round Lake. 

Interment was private. 

Memorials to the American Cancer 
Society would be appreciated by the 
family. 

John E Uscila 

Age 82 of Round Lake Park, died 
Friday, Jan, 15, 1999 at Condell Medical 
Center In Libertyville He was bom Dec. 
16, 1916 in Chicago to Joseph and 
Marcclla (Paulauskas) Uscila. He was a 
resident of Round Lake Park since 1943. 
He was employed by the Grand Think 
Railroad for 20 years in the freight divi- 
sion, and later employed by Anchor 
Coupling In Libertyville for 20 years. He 
also served in the Civilian Conservation 
Corps. He was a retired member of the 
United Auto Workers Union 1755. He 
enjoyed classical music. 

He Is survived by four children, 
Richard (Rosemary) Lee Uscila of Round 
Lake Park, Roger Lee Uscila of Milwaukee, 
Wis,, Nancy Jean (Don Moreno) Arcndt- 
Moreno of Lake Villa, Marcy Jean (Jim) 
Friedte of Muncie, ind,; seven grandchil- 
dren; live great grandchildren; and a sis- 
ter-in-law, Daisy Uscila of Chicago. He Is 



preceded In death by his parents; his wife, 
Bonnie Jean (Gentry) Uscila In December 
1985; a grandson, Richard Lee Uscila Jr. In 
1906; and two brothers, Anton and 
William "sella. 

Visitation was at Justcn's Round Lake 
Funeral Home, Round Lake. 

Interment will be at a later date in 
Hammond Cemetery in Hammond. 

Memorials made in John's name to an 
organization of the donor's choice would 
be appreciated by the family. 

Arthur Richter J 

Age 78 of Antloch, passed away 
Friday, Jan. 15, 1999 at his home. He was 
bom May 8, 1920 in Chicago, the son of 
the late Adolph and Natalie (Phillips) 
Richter, moving to Antloch in 1967. He 
served in the U.S. Navy during WWII and 
was a tool and die maker at Intermatlc 
Corp. of Spring Grove, for 19 years retiring 
In 1985.HewasamcmberoftheAAREOn 
Aug. 3, 1987, he married Betty Lowrey in 
Viroqua.Wis. 

Survivors Include his wife, Betty; two 
sons, Gary (Marie) of Fox Lake and Donald 
(Pam) of Fox Lake; four grandchildren; 
and three great grandchildren. In addition 
to his parents he Is preceded in death by 
his first wife, Florence and his brother, 
Edward. 

Funeral Services were held at the 
Strang Funeral Home of Antloch, with Rev. 
Charles Miller, officiating. 

Interment was at Hillside Cemetery, 
Antioch. 

Maude Ann Giernolli 

Age 54, passed away Saturday, Jan. 16, 
1999 at home after a lingering illness. 
Maude was bom on Aug. 16, 1944 In 
Chicago, before becoming a resident of 
Grayslake. Maude was a graduate of 
Illinois Masonic Hospital School of 
Nursing, late practicing as a rehabilitation 
nurse with Libertyville Manor. Maude was 
also a member of St. Gilbert Catholic 
Church, Grayslake. 

She leaves her husband, Andrew to 
whom she wed on Nov. 13, 1976; son, Lee 
Giernoth; her mother, Roberta; sisters, 
Peggy (Ron) McQuarters of Boltngbrook, 
Kay (John) Gribble of Melrose Park and 
numerous nieces and nephews. 

Mass of the Resurrection was cele- 
brated at St. Gilberts Catholic Church, 
Grayslake, with the Rev. Robert Bcaven, 
officiating. 

Friends called at the Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake. 

Interment followed at Avon Centre 
Cemetery, Grayslake 

Douglas It Carlberg 

Age 48 of Undcnhurst, passed away 
Tuesday, Jan. 12, 1999 on arrival of the 
Howard Young Medical Center, Woodruff, 
Wis., from injuries received in a snowmo- 
bile accident. He was bom, March 1, 1950 
in Evanston, the son of Roy and June 



(Anderson) Carlberg. He served In the U.S. 
Navy and moved to Llndenhurst In 1985. 
He was the owner and operator of the 
Carlberg Construction Co, and was on 
avid snowmoblier, Harley Davidson rider 
and sports fan. His activities Included vol- 
unteering as a coach for the Llndenhurst 
girls softball teams and the Antloch boys 
baseball teams and was proud to have 
built the scoring tower for the Antloch 
High School Soccer team. Oh Aug. 26, 
1978, he married Barbara Gillman in 
Evanston. 

Survivors include his wife, Barbara; 
his daughter, Amle and his son, Erik, his 
parents Roy and June Carlberg of Antloch; 
his brother, Steve Carlberg of Hoffman 
Estates and his sister, Diane (David) 
Ehrcnprels of Harrison, Va. 

Funeral Services were held at the 
Strang Funeral Home of Antloch with the 
Rev. Kurt Garni in of the United Methodist 
Church of Antloch, officiating. 

Those desiring, may make contribu- 
tions to the Doug Carlberg Memorial 
College Fund, P.O. Box 728, Lake Villa, IL, 
60046. 

Arney Armstrong 

Age 77 of Lake Villa, passed away 
Tuesday, Jan. 12, 1999 at the Lutheran 
General Hospital, Park Ridge, from 
injuries received in a traffic accident on 
Jan. 9, near Lake Villa. He was bom April 
27, 1921 InAntioch.theson of the late Sam 
and Minnie (Bumhlgh) Armstrong and he 
has lived most all of his life In the area He 
served in the U.S. Army during WWII and 
was a member of the VFW Post 4308 of 
Lake Villa. Amey worked as a mail carrier, 
a well driller, a gas station manager and 
presently managed his own properties. He 
enjoyed camping and hiking. On Sept, 2, 
1945, he married Mildred Salzman in 
Waukegan. 

Survivors include, his wife, Mildred; 
three sons, Artey (Norma) of Round Lake 
Park and Michael and Lorry both of Lake 
Villa; one brother, Leonard (Bemice) of 
Lake Villa and one sister, Lovine (Ralph) 
Livingston of Waukegan. He was the 
grandfather of three and great grandfather 
of four. 

Funeral Services were held at the 
Strang Funeral Home of Andoch with die 
Rev. Kurt Gamlin, officiating. 

VFW services were also held at the 
Funeral Home. 

Interment was at Highland Memorial 
Park, Ubertyville. 

In lieu of flowers, donations may be 
made to the Lake Villa Rescue Squad or 
Fire Department, In his memory. 

William G. Runge 

Age 71 of Ingleside, passed away 
Tuesday, Jon. 12, 1999 at his residence He 
was bom April 12, 1927 in Chicago and 
had made his home in Ingleside the past 
21 years. A veteran of the U.S. Army serv- 
ing in the Artillery Division. Member of 



the Alumni Association of Lane Tech High 
School hi Chicago, the American Legion of 
Fox Lake Post 703 and DePaul University 
Alumni Association, a volunteer of the 
Lake County Museum Association, 

He leaves his wife, Mary, Ann (nee 
Brendle); children, Steve (Lorraine) Runge 
of Chicago, Barbara Clarke of Hoffman 
Estates, Brcnda (James) Harvey of 
Memphis, Tenn., Laura Cruz of Des 
Ploines, Dawn (Curtis) King of Yale, Mich., 
and Edward (Susan) Durkin of Urban a; 14 
grandchildren. Also surviving are his 
brother, Robert (Debbie) Runge of Florida; 
niece, Lynda Runge of Florida; nephew, 
Frank (Kelly) Lato of Chicago and great 
niece, Gabriel Runge of Florida. 

Cremation services and interment 
were privately held. 

Arrangements were entrusted to 
Strang Funeral Chapel and Crematorium, 
Ltd., Grayslake 

Memorials maybe given to the chari- 
ty of choice In memory ofWilllom. 

Lorraine Solberg 

A Big Lake, Alaska resident, Lorraine 
Solberg, age 73, died Jan. 4, 1999 at home, 
from complications of a stroke. Mrs, 
Solberg was bom Jan. 15, 1925 In Chicago. 
She completed the eighth grade of educa- 
tion. She lived in Grayslake from 1954 to 
1998, at which time she come to Big Lake, 
Alaska. She was 
employed by 
Jewel Tea co. (a 
midwest gro- 
cery store 
chain) from 
1968 to 1982, 
and by the Lake 
Zurich High 
School cafete- 
ria in 1990 and 
1991. She was a 
member of St 
Gilbert's 

Catholic Church in Grayslake, and she 
enjoyed camping, cross country skiing, 
miniature golf, ceramics and her family. 
Family members said, "Lorraine was a 
dedicated wife and mother, and she lived 
her life for her family." 

Survivors include her husband,, 
Marshall of Big Lake, Alaska, formerly of 
Grayslake; children, Patricia (Marshall) : 
Symbol of Big Lake, Alaska and John 
(Vickie) Solberg of Grayslake; grandchil- 
dren, LeRoy Symbol, Lolly Symbol, Laura 
(Harry) Snodgrass; Katie Solberg and 
Annie Solberg and great grandchildren, , 
Colton Symbol, Charity Snodgrass arid 
Shea Snodgrass. 

Funeral services were held at the 
Faith Bible Fellowship in Big Lake, Alaska, 
with Pastor Ethan Hanson, officiating: 

Pallbearers were Marshall Symbol, 
LeRoy Symbol, Charlie Bare, Robert 
Ko ttre, Les Rexford and Tom Stocltlng. 

Cremation arrangements were made 
by Valley Funeral Home and Crematory. 




PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: R&L Trucking 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 24017 
Petils Lake Rd., Lake Villa, IL 60046. 
(847) 356-3386. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Leman L Pendley, 24017 petita Lake 
Rd., Lake Villa, IL 60046. (847) 356- 
3386. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locatlon(s) indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name (s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Leman L Pendley, January 7,1999 
The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 7th day of January, 1999. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Barbara J. Erskin 

Notary Public 

Received: January 7, 1999 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0199C-2364-LV 

January 15, 1999 

January 22, 1999 

January 29, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
. NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Antloch Auto 
Detailing 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 284 Main 
St. SW 12, Antloch, IL 60002. 
(847)395-3190. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 



PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Michael Burm, 299 Joanna Ct. #104, 
Antloch, IL 60002. (847)838-5845. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
lntend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locatlon(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/MIchael Burm, December 24, 1998. 
The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 24th day of December, 1 998. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Barbara J. Erskin 
Notary Public 
Received: December 24, 1998 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
01 99 8-2 350 -AN 
January 8, 1999 
January 15, 1999 
January 22, 1999 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: LM & 

Associstss 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 230 
Wethlngton, Suite D, Wauconda, IL 
60084. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Linda A. Martorano, 230 Wethlngton, 
Suite D, Wauconda, IL6O0B4. (847) 
487-5276. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the !ocatlon{s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
dueling or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 



/s/Unda Martorano, January 13,1999 
. The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 13th day of January, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Cheryl M. Kllndera, Notary Public 
Received: January 14, 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199D-2377-WL 
January 22, 1999 
January 29, 1999 
February 5, 1 999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Nancy Schorn 

Trucking 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE.CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 42269 Elm 
St., Antioch, IL 60002. (847)838-3829. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Nancy T. Schorn, 42269 Elm St., 
Antioch, IL 60002. (847)838-3829. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locatlon(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
'name(s) of the person(e) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Nancy T Schorn, January 9, 1 999 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 9th day of January, 1899. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Maria Veronica Heth 

Notary Public 

Received: January 12, 1999 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0199D-2376-AN 

January 22, 1999 

January 29, 1999 

February 5, 1999 






January 22, 1999 



LEGAL NOTICES 




Lakeland Newspapers/ 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
Pursuant to Sec. 6104 of I. B.C. 
notice fs hereby given that the May 31, 
1998 annual report of Reglna Coell 
Foundation la available for Inspection 
at the principal office during the regu- 
lar businoss hours upon request of 
any citizen within 1 80 days of this pub* 
llcatlon. Rev, John Hoffman, Prin.Mgr., 
739 N. Lake Street, Mundoleln, IL 
60060. 

0199C-236B-MN 
January 16, 1999 



• PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Coupon 
Connections . 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1359 W._ 
Maple Ave., Apt, 117, Mundeletn, IL 
60060. (847-566-3631). (street) P.O. 
Box 563. Mundoleln, IL 60060. (886) 
527-4263. (mailing) 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR* 
RESIDENCE ADDHESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Mary E. Murphy, 1359 W. Maple Ave., 
Apt. 117, Mundelein. IL 60060, 
(047)566-3631. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend (s) to conduct ihe above named 
business from the location (s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(e) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Mary E. Murphy, January 11, 1999. 
The foregoing^ instrument was 
acknowledged before me by Ihe per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 1 1 th day of January, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/a/Barbara J. Erskln, Notary Public 
Received: January 11, 1999 
Willard R, Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199D-2383-MN 
January 22, 1999 
January 29, 1 999 
Februarys, 1999 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Illinois 
Interactive Advertising 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1012 
Hickory Street, Waukegan, IL600B5. 
(847) 662-3339. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, - CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Peter P. Potuopoulos, 1012 Hickory 
Street, Waukegan, IL 60085. (847) 
662-3339. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that Ihe undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business Irom the location(s) indicat- 
ed and that the (rue or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Peter Potuopoulos, December 29, 
1998. 

The foregoing ' Instrument was 
acknowledged before mo by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 29th day of December, 199B. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Llnda M. Wright, Notary Public 
Received: December 29. 1998 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199B-2357-WL 
January 8, 1999 
January 15, 1999 
January 22, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Branch & 

ADDRESSES) WHERE BUSINESS IS 
TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANSACT- 
ED IN THIS COUNTY: 28955 Niblick 
Knoll Ct.Jvanhoe, IL 60060. (647) 837- 
0153. (street) P.O. Box 750, Mundelein, 
IL 60060. (847) 837-0154. (mailing) 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Kennelh A. Branch, Sr. P.O. Box 750, 
Mundelein, IL 60060. (847) 637-0154. 
Dana L, Branch, .P.O. Box 750, 
Mundelein, IL 60060. (847) 837-0154. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify .that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the localion(s) indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name's) of the person's) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Kenneth A Branch, Sr. , January 4, 
1999, - 

/s/Dana L. Branch .January 4, 1999. 
The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged belore me by the per- 
son^) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 4th day of January, 1999. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Vernadail M. Sorrentino 

Notary Public 

Received: January 4, 1999 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0199C-2373-MN 

January 15, 1999 

January 22, 1999 

January 29, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
Notice Is hereby given that on 
February 5, 1999 at 11:00 a.m. a sale 
will be held at 133 Sayton Road,' Fox 
Lake, IL 60020 to sell the following 
article to enforce a lien existing under 
the laws of the State of Illinois against 
such articles for labor, service, skill or 
material extended upon a storage fur- 
nished for such articles at the request 
of the following designated persons, 
unless such articles are redeemed 
within thirty days of the publication of 
this notice. 
1990 Kawasaki 
VINtf: KAW52936D090. 
Owner: Joseph Salerno 
Amount owed: $1996.77 
1990 Kawasaki 
VIN/J : KAW52927DO90 
Owner: Lewis Borsellino 
Amount owed: $1998,77 

0199B-2358-FL 

Januarys, 1999 

January 15, 1999 

January 22, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Chan] Is 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 68 



Ambroglo Dr., Gurnee, I L 60031. 
(847)782-0978. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Cynthia Palbicko, P.O. Box 1, Genoa 
City, Wl 53128. (414) 279-5465. 
Jeanne Clzon, P.O. Box 1 , Genoa City, 
Wl 5312B. (414) 279-5465. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location (s) indicat- 
ed and that the true "or real full 
name(8) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Cynthla Palblcke, December 28, 
1998. 

/s/Jeanne Clzon, December 28, 1998. 
The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per* 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 6th day of January, 1999, 

/s/Debbra Brown 

Notary Public 

Received: January 11,1 999 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0199C-2372-GP 

January 15, 1999 

January 22, 1999 

January 29, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 
Advertisements for Bids 
The Lake Villa District Library Invites seated Bid Proposals for the landscaping of 
the Lake Villa District Library located at 1001 East Grand Ave., Lake Villa, IL 60046, 
until 1:00 p.m. prevailing time on Wednesday, February 17. Sealed Bid Proposals for 
this work wlil be received at Lake Villa District Library located at the above-mentioned 
address on or before the specified closing time addressed to Ms. Nann Blaine Hilyard, 
Director. All bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Interested contractors may 
obtain sets of Contract Documents, for a non-refundable fee of $25.00, to cover print- 
ing expenses, in the form of a check payable to Lake District Library at: 1001 East 
Grand Ave., Lake villa, IL 60046, Tel. 847-356-7711. Copies of the Contract 
Documents are available for Inspection during the bidding period at the above-men- 
tioned location. 

0199D-2382-LV/LN 
January 22, 1999 

PUBUC NOTICE 
NOTICE OF AMENDMENTTOTHE RULES AND REGULATIONS OFTHE 
BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS OFTHE VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH, 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
Notice is hereby given that the Board of Police Commissioners adopted an amend- 
ment to the Rules and Regulations of the Board of Police Commissioners of the 
Village of Antioch, State of Illinois, on January 4, 1999, 

The Board amended Chapter II, Applications, Section 2, Application Blanks, to 
include an Anti-Nepotism Policy. ; 

A copy of the proposed amendment Is available for Inspection at the Village Hall of 
the Village of Antioch, 874 Main Street, Antioch, Illinois. 
Said Amendment will become effective February 1, 1999. 
DATED at Antioch, Illinois ihls 22nd day of January, 1999. 

Isl Sherry Smith 
Secretary 
: 0199D-2379-AN, 
January 22, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 
Notice Is heroby given that Shur-Lock Self Storage, Inc., 35865 N. Route 45, Lake 
Villa, IL 60048 will sell the personal goods from: 

UNIT 56 belonging to Cobra Davis. The goods consist of 1-hand truck, crutches, 
typewriter, garbage container and misc. boxes, 

UNIT 505 belonging lo C. Heuser.The goods consist of 1-foldlng table, 1-tool box, 
1- radio, 1-CB radio, assorted compact discs, and misc. boxes. 

UNIT 440 & UNIT 85 belonging lo Jeff Jones. The goods consist of 1-Ford pick-up 
truck (outside) unit, 2-propane tanks, 1-gas grill. Mire wtlh wheel, 1 •radiator, misc. 
auto parts & tools, and misc. boxes. 

UNIT 421 belonging lo T. Kukuk. The goods consist of 1 -damaged Honda Gold 
Wing (color-red) motorcycle and damage to unit. 

UNIT 718 belonging to Craig McKee. The goods consist of 1-rug, misc. chairs, 
misc. furniture, 2-chlIdren's toys, and misc. boxes. 

UNIT 31 6 & UNIT 74 belonging to Manual Perez. The goods consist of a black race 
slock car-no engine (outside unit), 4-tlres with wheels, exhaust manifold, automobile 
parts, 2-remote toy cars, misc. children's toys, end misc. hand tools. 

UNIT 432 belonging to G. Pflugardt. The goods consist of 1-box ol stereo equip- 
ment, 1-step ladder, 1-safo, 1 -basketball net & stand, 1 -computer w/monilor & key- 
board, and household Items. 

Sale will take place on the premises on Saturday, January 23, 1999, at approxi- 
mately 9:00 AM. 

We reserve the right to accept or reject all bids. 
Not responsible for accidents. . 

ROGER BRODERS 
, President 

35865 N, Rt. 45 

Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Phone: 847-223-2400 

0199C-2370-LV 

January 15, 1999 

January 22, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ZAMPARO and GOLDSTEIN, P.C. 

Attorneys for Plaintiff 
899 Skokle Boulevard, Suite 300 
Northbrook, Illinois 60062 
(847)564-3100 
STATE OF ILUNOIS, COUNTY OF LAKE, SS. CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINE- 
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS, LaSALLE NATIONAL 
BANK, AS TRUSTEE FOR AFC MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET BACKED CERTIFI- 
CATES, SERIES 1995-4, UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT 
DATED AS OF SEPTEMBER 1, 1995, PLAINTIFF V. ALBERT BASLAAL, PHYLLIS 
FALIBENE BASLAAL, UNKNOWN OWNERS and NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, 
DEFENDANTS, NO. 97 CH 1343, 

Public nollce Is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment made and entered in 
said Court in the above-entllled cause, the Sheriff of Lako County, Illinois will, on 
Monday. February 8, 1999, at the hour of 9:00 a.m. (C.D.T.) at 25 South Utica, 
Waukegan, Illinois, sell at public auction the following described premises and real 
estate mentioned In said Judgment, situated in Lake County, Illinois, or so much 
thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy the Judgment, to-wlt: 

LOT 113 IN PEMBROOK UNIT 5B. BEING A SUBDIVISION OF THE SOUTH- 
WEST QUARTER OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 45 NORTH. RANGE 11 EAST OF 
THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS, ACCORDING TO 
THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED OCTOBER 6, 1986, AS DOCUMENT NUMBER 
2490442, AND CORRECTED BY CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION, RECORDED 
AS DOCUMENT NUMBER 2518163, IN LAKE COUNTY. ILLINOIS, commonly know 
as: 1925 Gatowood Drive, Gurnee, Illinois 60031 . Improved with a single family resi- 
dence. 

Sale shall bo under the following terms: 10% down, balance within 24 hours. 
Premises will not be open for Inspection. 

For information contact: Laurence J. Goldstein, ZAMPARO and GOLDSTEIN, P.C, 
Plalntill's Attorney, 899 Skoklo Boulevard, Suite 300, Northbrook, Illinois 60062, 
Telephone (847) 564-3100. 

Dated: December 14, 1998, Waukegan, Illinois. 

0199B-2353-GP 

January 8, 1999 

January 15, 1999 

January 22, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAMEAPPUCATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Beyond 2000 
Computer Center 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 36874 N. 
Stanton Point Rd., Ingiesldo", IL 
60041.(847)973-1919. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Kenneth M. Bratz, 36874 N. Stanton 
Point Rd., Ingtealde, IL 60041. 
(847)973-1919. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that the undorslgned 
Intend (s) to conduct the above named 
business from ihe locatlon(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full. 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Kanneth M. Bratz, December 30, 
1996. 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 30th day Of December, 1 998, 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Unda M. Wright 
Notary Public 
Received: December 30, 1998 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199B-2354-FL 
Januarys, 1999 
January 15, 1999 
January 22, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAMEAPPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Sigma 
Financial Services 

ADDRESSES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 62 E. 
Grand Ave., Fox Lake, IL 60020. (847) 
587-1040. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Robert J. Bulow, 24920 W. Cedarwood 
Ln„ Ingteside, IL 60041. (847)740- 
3176. 

STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
intond(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locatlonfs) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Robert J. Bulow, December 29, 
1998. 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 29th day of December, 1998. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/ThomasV. Carroll 
Notary Public 
Received: January 8, 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199D-2380-FL 
January 22, 1999 
January 29, 1999 
Februarys, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ANTIOCH COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL 

DISTRICT 117 

The District 117 Board of Education will hold a public hearing on February 18, 
1999 at 7:30 p.m. at Grass Lake School, 26177 West Grass Lake Road, Antioch, 
Illinois. The purpose of the hearing wilt be to receive comments on an Application for 
Waiver or Modification of State Board Rules and/or School Code Mandates, specifi- 
cally to modify 105 ILCS 5/24-2 of the School Code to allow the District to operator a 
normal school day on required legal school holidays. 

/s/Dennls Hockney, Superintendent 

January 19, 1999 

0199D-2381-AN/LV/LN 

January 22, 1999 

PUBUC NOTICE 
STATE OF ILUNOIS ) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH 
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILUNOIS 
IN THE MATTER OFTHE PETITION ) 

OF Jacqueline R. Bowles ) 

F<" ■■[ ) 

CHANGE OF NAME ) 

> 

NOTICE OF P UBLICATION ■< 

. Public notice Is hereby given that on March 1, 1999, being one ol the return day* 
In the Circuit Court ol the County ol Lake; t wttt nto my Petition in said Court praying 
' for the change of my name from Jacqueline R. Bowles to that ol Jacqueline R. Lopez, 
pursuant to the Statute In such case made and Provided. 

Dated at Round Lake Beach, Illinois, January 8. 1999. 

/«/ Jacqueline R. Bowles 

•>?0199C-2371-RL 

January 15, 1999 

January 22, 1999 

January 29, 1999 

PUBUC NOTICE ' 
PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
FOX LAKE, ILUNOIS 

Public notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Preliminary Site Plan on file In the 
Village Clerk's office of the Village of Fox Lake, that a public hearing will be held on 
February 10, 1999 at 7:30 p.m. in the Village Hall, Fox Lake, Illinois, to hear the 
Petition of Perry Birbllis, owner of the following described real estate to-wit: 

Of the South 313.12 Feel of the West 208.67 Feet, the North 104.36 feet of the 
South 417.5 Feet of the West 208.67 Feet, and the North 208.8 Feet of the South 
626.3 Feet of the West 208.67 Feet, All in the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast 
Quarter of Section 22, Township 45 North, Range 9 East of the 3rd, P.M. In Lake 
County, Illinois. 

Location of property is: Northeast Corner of Route 134 and Route 12. 
The common address is: 27470 W. Route 134. 
Petitioner is requesting the following: Special Use for Auto Sales. 
Said Preliminary site plan is available for examination in the Village Clerks office 
at the Village Hall In Fox Lake, Illinois. 
All Interested persons are Invited lo attend said hearing and be heard. 

Respectfully submitted, 

] Ron Stochl, Chairman 

Fox Lake Zoning Board of Appeals 

Dated at Fox Lake, Illinois 

this 1 3th day of January, 1 999 

0199D-2375-FL 

January 22, 1999 

PUBUC NOTICE 
Bid Notice 
Subsidized Trannportntlon Program 
Grant Township and the Village of Fox Lake announce the availability of funds for 
the year 1999 for a subsidized Transportation Program. All Interested qualified trans- 
portation for hire firms are encouraged to apply to either Grant Township or the Village 
of Fox Lake before the 3rd day of February, 1999 In order to request participation in 
this program. 

Pursuant lo Ihe terms of the funding agreement between Grant Township, the 
Village of Fox Lake and Pace, the Suburban Bus Division of the Regional 
Transportation Authority, reimbursement Is available for one half of the meter rate up 
to a maximum of $8.00 per trip ($4.00 reimbursement per one way trip); any charges 
over $8,00 to be paid 100% by the rider. 

Qualified transportation for hire firms must show valid operating licenses for all dri- 
vers and proof of Insurance as stipulated In the agreement with Grant Township, the 
Village of Fox Lako and Pace. Service hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday 
through Friday, excluding certain holidays. Firms must sign an agreement with the 
Township of Grant, the Village of Fox Lake and Pace, stipulating adherence to all 
terms and conditions set forth in the agreement between Grant Township, the Village 
of Fox Lake and Pace. Copies of these agreements, and the Pace Paralransit Manual, 
are available for review at the Township or Village offices. All prospective applicants 
are strongly encouraged to review these agreements and In particular the Pace 
Paratranslt Manual. 

An application lo be considered for participation In this Subsidized Transportation 
Program Is available from the Grant Township Office or the Village of Fox Lako Office 
by contacting anyone at those offices between the hours ol 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., 
Monday through Friday. Grant Township and the Villago of Fox Lako reserve the right 
to, In their judgement and discretion, select one or more applicants to provide the 
transportation services required by the Pace Agreement. 

Kay Starostovic 

Grant Township Clerk 

0199D-2384-FL 

January 22, 1999 



\ ] 






. 



j 



C 1 2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY/LEGAL NOTICES 



January 22, 1999 



I 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

PLANNING & ZONING BOARD 
VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH 
FILE NO.: PZB98-07R 

PETITIONER: M.W. Doran, Inc., an Illinois Corporation d/b/a/ Landmark Homes, 
Inc.; 4474 Cornoll Ave, Gurneo, IL 60031; phone: (847) 283-0990 
OWNER: Lulsa V. Andrae, Kurt E. Andrae and William M. Andrae as Tenants In 
Common; c/o Lulsa V. Andrae; 2160 Falrhaven Blvd.,; Elm Grove, Wl 53122 
PROPERTY: Property consists of approximately 26 acres; Is situated South and 
East oi the Falcon Hills Subdivision and along the westerly shores of Lake 
Anttoch; Is Identified on the Lake County Tax Maps as the following Permanent 
Index Numbers. (PIN): 02-18-200-019; 02-18-200-017; 02-18-400-004; 02-18- 
200-026; 02-18-200-027; 02-17-101-027; and 02-17-301-060; and is legally 
described as follows: 

Parcel 1: That part of Lot *B": In Antloch Hills Subdivision together with parts 
of the Northeast Quarter and of the Southeast Quarter of Section 18, Township 
46 North, Range 10, East of the third Principal Meridian, bounded and described 
as follows: Beginning at the Northwest corner of Lot "B" bounded and described 
as follows: Beginning at the Northwest corner of Lot "B" In Antloch Hlils: being a 
subdivision in the Northwest Quarter and the Southwest Quarter of Section 17, 
Township 46 North, Range 10, East of the Third Principal Meridian, according to 
the plat thereof recorded October 2, 1924 as Document 246684, in Book "M' of 
Plats, page 94; Running thence due South (being an assumed bearing for the 
benefit of this legal description) along the west line of said Antloch Hills 662.84 
feet, deed, 661.18 feel, measured, to an intersection with the North line of the 
East 8 acres of the South Halt of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter 
of Section 18, aforesaid; also being the Southeast corner of Falcon Hills Estates 
recorded as Document 2835192; Thence south 88 Degrees 40 Minutes 22 
Seconds West, along said North line of the East 8 acres 526.5 feet, deed, (526.71 
fee, measured) also being the South Line of said Falcon Hills Esiate to the West 
line of said East 8 acres; Thence South 00 Degrees 06 Minutes 01 Seconds West, 
along said West line of the East 8 acres, 599.53 feet to an Intersection with a 
point being 4 rods North and parallel with the South line of the Northeast Quarter 
of Section 18, aforesaid; Thence South 88 Degrees 33 Minutes 50 Seconds West, 
along said parallel line, 769.20 feet to an intersection with the centeriine of 
Highway known as State Route NO. 59; Thence Southerly, being a curved line, 
convexed to the West, having a radius of 2868.93 feet, an arc length of 67.08 feet 
(the chord of said arc bears South 8 Degrees 51 Minutes 34 Seconds West, 67.08 
feet) to an Intersection with the South line of the Northeast Quarter of said 
Section 18 aforesaid; Thence North 88 Degrees 33 Minutes 50 Seconds East 
along said South line of Northeast Quarter, 779.42 feet to an intersection with the 
Northerly extension of the East line of Deer Ridge; being a subdivision of part of 
the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 18, Township 46 
North, Range 10, East of the Third Principal Meridian according to the plat there- 
of recorded September 19, 1978 as Document 1947538; Thence South 00 
Degrees 09 Minutes 46 Seconds East, along said East line of Deer Ridge 
Subdivision and the Northerly extension thereof, 395.22 feet to an Intersection 
with the North line of Sabrina Manor; being a subdivision of part of the Southeast 
Quarter of Section 16, and of the Southwest Quarter of Section 17, in the 
Township and Range aforesaid; Thence North 89 Degrees 13 Minutes 06 
Seconds East, along said North line of Sabrina Manor, 757.06 feet to an inter- 
section with the waters edge of Lake Antloch (as located on December 12, 1986); 
Thence North 05 Degrees 00 Minutes 21 Seconds East, along said waters edge 
44.64 feet; Thence North 18 Degrees 54 Minutes 33 Seconds West, along said 
waters edge 73.01 feel; Thence North 43 Degrees 30 Minutes 24 Seconds West, 
along said waters edge 60.24 feet: Thence North 43 Degrees 01 Minutes 44 
Seconds West, along said waters edge 77.96 feet; Thence North 35 Degrees 56 
Minutes 13 Seconds West, along said waters edge 96.00 feet; Thence North 16 
Degrees 33 Minutes 08 Seconds West, along said waters edge 130.48 feet; 
Thence North 14 Degrees 10 Minutes 43 Seconds West, along said waters edge 
107.19 feet; Thence North 31 Degrees 40 Minutes 31 Seconds West, along said 
waters edge 149.83 feet; thence North 38 Degrees 42 Minutes 07 Seconds West, 
along said waters edge 51.17 feet; Thence North 70 Degrees 49 Minutes 25 
Seconds East, along said waters edge 31.93 feet; Thence North 80 Degrees 53 



Minutes 40 Seconds East, along said wators odge 85.19 feet; Thence North 80 
Degrees 17 Minutes 58 Seconds East, along said waters odge 86.16 foot; Thence 
North 64 Degrees 46 Minutes 03 Seconds East, along said waters edge 100.70 
feet: Thence North 46 Degrees 57 Minutes 26 Seconds East, along said waters 
edge 86.16 foot; Thence North 37 Degrees 42 Minutes 23 Seconds East, along 
said waters edge 116,47 foet; Thence North 25 Degrees 35 Minutes 37 Seconds 
East, along said waters edge 128.17 feet; Thence North 37 Dogrees 24 Minutes 
38 Seconds East, along said water edge 170.45 feet; Thence North 27 Degrees 
41 Minutes 52 Seconds East, along said waters edge 83.71 feet; Thence North 
00 Degrees 47 Minutes 14 Seconds West, along said waters edge 50.38 feet; 
Thence North 27 Degrees 18 Minutes' 40 Seconds West, along said waters edge 
63.22 feet; Thence North 31 Degrees 21 Minutes 27 Seconds West along said 
waters edge 1 1 1 .71 feet; Thence North 1 7 Degrees 06 Minutes 55 Seconds West, 
along said waters edge 90,09 feet; Thence North 34 Degress 46 Minutes 39 
Seconds West, along said waters edge, 56.48 feet; Thence North 09 Degrees 19 
Minutes 58 Seconds West, along said waters edge 86.24 feet; Thence North 09 
Degrees 23 Minutes 16 Seconds West, along said waters edge 42.93 feet, to an 
Intersection with the North line of Lot "B" in said Antloch Hills, being also the 
North line of the South Half of Lot "B" In said Antloch Hills, being also the North 
line of the South half of the Northwest Quarter of Section 17. aforesaid, Thence 
South 89 Degrees 22 Minutes 00 Seconds West, along said North line 342.91 feet 
to the point of beginning, In Lake County, Illinois. 

Parcel 2. Lot "B" (except that part thereof falling In the following: First Addition 
to Antloch Hills recorded as Document 644562; 2nd Addition to Antloch Hills 
recorded as Document 654479; Sunset Ridge recorded as Document 973402) 
and (except that part of the said Lot "B" that lies between Lot 44 In Sunset Ridge, 
recorded as Document 973402 and low water mark of Lake Antioch and between 
the Westerly line extended Northerly and Southeasterly line extended 
Northeasterly of said Lot 44) In Antloch Hills, as subdivision In the Northwest 
Quarter and the Southwest Quarter of Section 17, Township 46 North, Range 10, 
East of the Third Principal Meridian, according the the plat thereof recorded 
October 2, 1924 as Document 246684, In book'M' of Plats, page 94, and except 
any part of Lot "B" aforesaid falling within Parcel 1 herein, In Lake County, Illinois. 

Parcel 3: the South 426 feet of the South Half of the Southeast Quarter of the 
Northeast Quarter of Section 18, Township 46 North, Range 10, East of the Third 
Principal Meridian, which lies Easterly of (he centeriine of Illinois Route #59, and 
West of the West line of the East 8.0 acres of the said Half of said Southeast 
Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 16, except the East 425 feet of 
the North 360 feet, and except the North 33 feet and the South 66 feet thereof, In 
Lake County, Illinois. 

REQUEST: Petitioner requests that the premises be classified In the R-1 Zoning 
District as a Planned Unit Development, pending annexation to the Village of 
Antloch. 

PROPOSAL: The petitioner has revised the proposal from that last heard on 
September 24, 1998. The revised P.U.D. plan depicts 31 single-family residential 
lots. Drawings submitted include: Preliminary (entitlement) Plat and related engi- 
neering, (3 sheets), revised 1-8-99, and Building Box Plan dated 1-8-99, prepared 
by Charles W. Greengard Associates, Inc., Lincolnshire, Illinois; and Landscape 
Plans, (3 sheets), date-stamped received on January 11, 1999, prepared by 
Scheel & Associates, Woodstock, Illinois. Copies of the petition, drawings, and 
related documents may be viewed at the Office of Village Clerk, 874 Main Street, 
Department of Planning, Zoning & Building, 885 Toft Ave,, and the Ready 
Reference Section of the Antioch Public Library, 757 Main Street. 
DATE: Thursday, February 11, 1999 
TIME: 7:30 P.M. 

PLACE: Board Room, Village Hall 
874 Main Street; Antioch, IL 60002 

All persons desiring to appear and be heard thereon for or against said petition 
may appear at said hearing and be heard. 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION - 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Fastrak 
ADDRESSES WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 529 West 
Liberty Street #307, Wauconda, IL 
60084. (847) 487-4765. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Norman L Rlngler, 408 Channel 
Drive, Island Lake, IL 60042. 
(847)526-3819. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
intand(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Norman L Rlngler, December 31, 
1998. 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 31st day of December, 1998; 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Carol Trucko 
Notary Public 
Received: January 4, 1999 
Wlllard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199B-2359-WL 
January 8 , 1999 
January 15, 1999 
January 22, 1999 



Barbara Johnson, Chairman 
Planning & Zoning Board 



0199D-2378-AN 
January 22, 1999 



the deadline; 
for legal 

NOTICES 

IS 
TUESDAY 
AT 10 A.M. 



XLC 




NEWS 12 2 




l In* most ''oinnirmal live iiiu-ic! 



THE TALK OF LAKE COUNTY 






WXLC-FM and WKRS-AM are Lake County's Leading Radio Stations. As a result of our 
significant growth, we are expanding the ranks of our advertising sales and marketing leant 
This is a unique employment opportunity, and deserves to be filled only by career minded 
professionals. 

Do you love selling? Are you a focused, organized professional, who practices stron;j 
customer service? If so, come grow with us! 

We offer excellent compensation with unlimited potential, plus great benefits, in a 
dynamic and positive working environment. We are an equal opportunity employer, and die 
strongly committed to community service, customer service and our employees. 

To apply, send your resume, references and a cover letter to: 

John L. Peroyea 

Vice President/General Manager 

WXLC-FM & WKRS-AM 

3250 Belvidere Rd. 

Waukegan, IL 60085 



. 



January 22, 1999 



<*ms*l<ti%i£tcd €mfmde 






i " ' ~ 



imtatmctmtnl 



Notices . ; . , , ,1 10 

Lost & Found 115 

Free .120 

Personals 125 

Auctions , i ...130 

Business Personals ';,'. ,135 

Financial 140 



Help Wanted Part-Time . . . 
Help Wanted Full-Time . . , 
Employment Agencies . . . 
Business Opportunities ... 
Situations Wanted ....... 

Child Care , 

Scliool/Instruciion 



»•' t • • ,#.*>•. *'•'•-* #^ • « » •' 4 .jL\ J 
» * 1 t'-f *'l 11 t'« t t t r'i'i . -Z./U 

221 

. ■ - * ■ p * ft *- • # *.• ■ ***4 *Sm4iJ 

...228 

240 



Antiques .301 

Appliances .304 

Barter/Trade 308 

'Bazaars/Crafts .' ,310 

Building Materials .314 

Business/Office Equipment 318 

Electronics/Computers 320 

Farm Guide .324 

Firewood .328 

Garage/Rummage Sales .330 

Good Things To Eat 334 

Horses ATack 338 

Household Goods/Furniture .' 340 

Lawn/Garden 348 

'Clothing 349 

; Miscellaneous 350 

Medical Equip/Supplies 354 

Musical Instruments 358 

Pets & Supplies .... 360 

Restaurant Equipment v. ; 364 

Tools & Machinery 368 

Wanted To Buy \ .370 




Homes For Sale .500 

Homes For Rent 504 

Homes Wanted .508 

Homes Builders 510 

Condo/Town Homes .514 

Mobile Homes ...............'... .518 

Apartments For Rent .320 

Apartments Wanted .524 

Apt/Homes To Shore 528 

Rooms For Rent 530 

Buildings . . . 533 

Business Property For Sale .534 

Business Property For Rent . .538 

Investment Property . .540 

Mortgage Services'* .".""ft*'.'? 544 

Farms '••••-• ■ 548 

Vacant Lots/Acreage .560 

Resorts/Vacation Rentals .564 

Out Or Area Properly 568 

Cemetery Lots 570 

Real Estate Wanted . ........................... .574 

Real Estate Misc . ■ '. ■ . ■' 578 

- ~~ M8GHB3HT 







Recreational Vehicles ' • • • -704 

Snowmobiles/ATVs .708 

Boots/Motors/Elc. • .710 

Camping ... . . * 7 * 4 

Travel/Vacation ■ • • **718 

Sports Equipment - • • • -720 

Airplanes -724 



Cars For Sale 804 

Rental/Leases 808 

Classic/Antique Cars 810 

Services & Parts . . , 814 

Car Loans/Ins urunce • . • • 818 

Vans 824 

Four Wheel Drive/Jeeps .828 

Trucks/Trailers • • 834 

Heavy Equipment . .. 838 

Motorcycles S 44 

Wanted To Buy ' < •" * • ■ ■ • -848 




Appliances Repair .... . '. • • •■ -S03 

Blacktop • S06 

Builders S09 

Carpentry — SI2 

Carpet Cleaning ' . . : S15 

Concrete/Cement ■ S18 

Dry Wall • s21 

Education/Instruction • • • ■ • -S24 

Electrical '. S27 

Firewood . . "• ^30 

Handyman < * * •■ -S33 

Heating/Air Conditioning S36 

Housekeeping '■ - <S39 

Landscaping ^42 

Laundry/Cleaning • > •. * • -S45 

Legal Services S48 

Medical Services • S51 

Moving/Storage ■ 

Painting Decorating • ■ 

PurulcgaUTyping Services 

Plumbing • • • • 

Pools ,.,......: ' 

Pressure Washing 

Professional Services . . . .' .S72 

Radio/TV Repair . . , S75 

Remodeling S78 

Resumes ■ S81 

Roofing/Siding - ■ S84 

Storage S8 J 

Tax Service S9 ° 

Trees/Plants • ■ ■ S9 ? 

S96 

S99 



S54 
S57 
S60 
S63 
S66 
S69 



Wedding 



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Kenosha 
County 




Twin Lakes Stiver Uk*; 



6rtitol 



Richmond 



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John* burg 



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HOW TO PLACE A 
CLASSIFIED AD 



• BY CALL 

PHONE (847)223-8161 

py Lakeland Newspapers 
RO..Box268 





MAIL 



Grayslake, IL 60030 



■Loofi:- ; ' 



PiUiilrtV*****""*" Buttilo Qrov* V\ 

Northbroolc \ 
County * 



Cook County 



Lakeland Newspapers' Classifieds Appear in 11 Newspapers! 

Antioch News • Round Lake News "Lake Villa Record 

Mundeleln News • Wadsworth News •Grayslake Iknes 

Fox Lake Press • Gurnee Press • Iindenntirst News 

Wauconda Leader • Libertyville News 





'N 30 S. Whitney St. 

PERSON Grayslake 

BY 
FAX (847)223-2691 



Direct Line lues. 5pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party...Wed. 10am 

IURS 

8am-8pm Mon.-Thurs: 

8am-5pm .....Friday 




i - £• - Jto Lakeland 

lilSSijfi^^l Newspapers 



110 


Notices 



110 


Notices 



115 



Lost & Found 



ERRORS: 

We slrivo^to^eOmShate l 

^enprs, builfooB s/hwW 

: oaxw; pfease report fl - 

Immediately as we can be 

responsible far the first two 

(2)maksonty: 

Nb^DJUSTMENftsICA^ 
BEMADEUNtlESSTHE^ 
AFFECT THE MATERIAL 



HYPNOSIS 

WHY DO THOUSANDS 

OF PEOPLE SAY 

TRY HYPNOSIS FIRST 

NOT LAST? 

(1) BECAUSE IT WORKS. 

(2) rr WILL SAVE YOU A 

LOT OF MONEY 

BECAUSE YOU WILL GO 

INTO THE RIGHT 

DIRECTION RIGHT 

AWAY. 

(3) m SAVES YOU TIME- 
NO NEED TO KEEP 

COMING BACK. 

WHAT IS HYPNOSIS? 

DURING HYPNOSIS 

YOU'RE RELAXED AND 

GIVEN POSITIVE 

SUGGESTIONS. ITS 

THAT SIMPLE IN THE 

HANDS OF A TRAINED 

HYPNOTIST. THERE IS 

NOTHING MYSTERIOUS 

ABOUT IT. ANYONE WITH 

NORMAL INTELLIGENCE 

CAN BE HYPNOTIZED. 

YOU ARE ALWAYS IN 

CONTROL 

THE CENTER FOR 

HABIT CONTROL 

128 NEWBERRY 

AVE., 
LIBERTYVILLE, 

ILL. 60048. 

(847)816-4951. 

DAVID E. WOLD 

CHT. 



SURROGATE MOTHERS 

WANTED 

Fee plus expenses for 

carrying a couple's child. 

Musi be 16-35 and previously 

had a child. 

Steven C/Utz, Attorney 

(317)89&-2Q00. 

, WRITE FOR YOUI , 

" *X-Mas Cards 

* Wedding invitations 

•Showor/Party Invitations. 

'Handwritten. 

* Reasonable rates. 

Call (615) 363-5330. 



DID YOU FIND Someones 
PET or Special Lost Artlde7 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dept., and get your 
results, FOUND ads are 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
{847)223-8161. 



125 


Personals 



140 


Financial 



120 



Free 



HEAU1IY WOMEN 

MEMDIEID) 

$3500.00 Compensation 

Healthy women, age 20-33, 

needed to serve as anonymous 

egg donors. Donors will be 

required lo take medication, 

blood screening and undergo 

minor surgical procedure. We 

are interested En all ethnic 

backgrounds. Multiple locations 

available. If Interested coll 

ARR77J-327-7J15 

Serious Inquiries Only. 



/h your pat a sUrT 

Send us a picture and maybe 

your pet will be (he next 
PIT OF TMi WilKl 




Publishers, Ann: OaurfW PET OF 



THE WEEK,' r\Q, Box; ZM, Gnytaks, 

niretoMW,SonY _ 
photoacan«tbefelunwdA» 
intonation o »ub)ect to editing. > 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you have placed classified 
ndvcrtlslttg with the Lake 
land Newspapers you may re- 
ceive n misleading statement 
from- another firm request- 
ing payment for this advertis- 
ing. To receive proper cred- 
it to your account, all pay- 
ments for your Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

must be made as invoiced 
mid directed to: 

LmkcUnd Newspapers 

FO Box 268 

30 8, Whitney St. 

Orsytlske. IL 00030-0368 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 
FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 
UMN. For more Information, 
please contact tile Humane 
Society. 

DONT THROW AWAY 
YOUR OLD COMPUTER 
EQUIPMENT, I will come and 
pick it up for FREE. Call (847) 
566-2819 alter 5:30pm. 

FREE LUXURY BUS RIDE 
• TO POTAWATOMI 

BINGO. 
BRAND NEW 1999 BUS! 
Monday-Tuesday- 
Thursday. 
Pfck-up 4:15pm at 
Hampton Inn, Gurnee. 
Ride 10 times and get a 
free package of specials. 
Every Monday Spin 
The Wheel For 
Double or Triple Payoffs. 

Hollywood Casino, 
Tuesday January 19th. 
4:00pm., pay $15 and get 

$15 back, 2-sesslons. 

Menominee Casino Hotel 

Over Night February 6th & 

7th. Pay $100 end get 

$50 back. 

Calf for Information 

(847) 831-1094. 

(847) 473-1263. 

GIVEAWAY DISHWASH- 
ER, SINK and garbage dlspo- 
sal. (847)543-0145. 

ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad In the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are run at NO 
CHARGEI (We discourage 
any pet ads). Deadlines: 10am 
Wednesdays. (847) 

223-8161, ext.1 40. 



125 


Personals 



Be 



Happy 18th 
tirthday Jerem\ 

Love Aisha 
moxoxoxoxo 



A BABY TO ADORE 

ADOPTION 

A wonderful future,, .filled with 

love, opportunity and 

tun...awaits your baby. 

We enjoy our home on a tree 

lined street, travel, outdoor 

activities, and our lively 

extended family. Mike Is a 

successful business owner 

and Julie will mostly 

be home with baby. 

JULIE & MIKE 

at home 

1-888-844-LOVE 

toll free. 



ADOPTION WANTED 

BABY BROTHER OR 
SISTER. You won't feel lone- 
ly because i'm adopted too. 
Mom and Dad can provide a 
loving and secure home. We 
have a big house and a big 
yard with lots of toys. We have . 
lots of love to give. Mom stays 
at home. Please call Tim or 
Kathy. Call collect anytime 
alter 5pm. V847-395-8084. 

ADOPTION: CARING, 
SUPPORTIVE home with 
love, fun and happiness Is 
ready to welcome your baby. 
Good things can happen for 
us all. Anet & Chris' 1-800-920- 
5921. 

NEW YEAR'S 

RESOLUTION 
LOOK GOOD, FEELGREATI 
EARN EXTRA INCOME WITH 

HERBALIFEI 

TOLL FREE 
(877) 500-SLIM. 

LOOK GREAT! 
LOSE WEIGHT1 
MAKE MONEY! 
(847) 940-9689. 

LOSE WEIGHT 

LOOK & FEEL 

GREAT 

EARN EXTRA INCOME 

AND DISCOUNTS 

ON PRODUCTS. 

HERBALIFE 

Call Kathy...(847) 395-8053 

LOSE UP TO 29 LBS. 

In 30 Days. 

Dr. Recommended. 

100% Natural. 

(815) 455-7339. 

1-888-373-7527. 

WE PAY YOU TO LOSE 

WEIGHTI 

METABOUFE356ry 

Natural diet supplement. 

Lose Weight & Feel Great 

As advertised on local 

TV and radio- 
Independent distributor 
(847) 263-3876. 

METABOLIFEra356 

For Discount Pricing 
Call (815) 479-9168 

D & E Enterprises 

Ind. Dlslribulors. 

PLEASE HELP US 

ADOPTI Musical mom, athle- 
tic dad, married 1 1 years, lov- 
ing parents to 2- adopted pre- 
schoolers hoping to adopt 
your precious baby. We livo In 
an activity-filled comfortable 
home with 2 lovable mutts In a 
close-knit neighborhood full ol 
children (many adopted). Med- 
ical, legal, counseling and 
court approved living expens- 
es paid. Confidential. Please. 
call our attorney at (708) 957- 
6833. 



BANKRUPTCY S78+, 
STOPS garnishments. Guar- 
anteed valid since 1991. Di- 
vorce 599+ Low caost Debt 
Reduction and Foreclosure. 
Avoidance services available 
without bankruptcy: Fresh- 
Start B88-395-8030 

. LOANS-LOANS-LOANS 
YOU QUALIFY, $ ,1or any 
reason, fast. tow payments. . 
Toll Iree 1-888-902-5511. 
(SCA Network). . 

MAXEDOUT? 

Buried In Debt? 

Behind on your payments? 

Living paycheck to paycheck? 

You're not alone. 

But the good news is, 

we have a REAL solution 

Debt Crisis Solutions. 

Confidential. 

Call Today (847) 740-9178. 

Ext. #3. 

SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS 



INSTANT 
CASH 

We hold the title 

to your car- 

You keep the can 

(Set skis, 

motorcycles & 

snowmobiles toot!) 

* Ho Credit Check 

• IS Kiln Approval 



$ (847) 249-5500 1 

SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS 



219 



Help Wauled 
Part-Time 



AVON 

EARN EXTRA INCOMEI 

To buy or sell call Terri 

(847)785-9041. 

Ind. Rep. 



a*.ir/i 




ai 



Expanding 
Mocitessori School 
seeks cred five, 
self- motivated 
individual for after 
school program, 
ages 6-12 ' 
. Monday, Tuesday & 
Thursday or* 
Mon. thro Fri. 
3:00 - 6:00 prn. 
for more information 
call- 
oY7-223-9606. 



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C1 4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 22, 1999 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



DENTAL HYGIEUIST 



Part Time 
Position Available 
Ubertyville Office 

Mondays, 

Wednesdays & 

2 Saturdays/Month 

Please call Penny for 

more Information 

847-367-5252 



£Mnke money to 

pay those 
'Holiday 'Bills! 

'We are looking for highly 

energetic individuals to work 

In a fast paced friendly 

environment preparing 

newspapers for delivery. 

Thursday from 5 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Qrayslake/Ttound "Lake area. 

This job is perfect for anyone 

looking to make extra eashlll 

C'JI'Diant for hterviewll 

[Bft7)7'nV H>35 



* 

I 

* 

* 

* 
c 



Teacher or Aid 

6t30AMTO12t30PM 
OR 

12)30 PM TO 61OO PM 

Apply la person 

Peppermint Stick 

848 Main St. 

Antloch 

Ptpptodxt Stick ~* StleoL 



Interested in special 
education? Work as 
therapist In home- 
based program for 
sweet 6 yr-oldl boy 
with PDD/autlsm. 

Will teach academic, 

social A play skills In 
child's Wauconda- 

area home. 
Training provided. 

Flex, hours, fun work 

StO/hr. 

847-526-1558 
ooooooooooooo oo ooooood 



SSSS9SS33SSSSSSS 

I Earn Extra income I 

Weekly paychecks 

working from home. 

Your choice of 

evenings and/or 

weekends. Scheduling 

appointments to pickup 3 

discarded household s 

I items for well known j 

1 charitable organization. s 
$ Minimum 4-6 hours a 8 

2 week. Please call | 
I (630)515-5752 | 
SSSSS89S3S3SS8SS 



5 RECEPTIONIST 

Busy DK* office 

seeks P/T 

receptionist. 

Typing find 

phone skills 

a must. 
847/662-3800 



Calling anyone who 
I needs extra money II] 

"We »re locking for highly 

rncrgttic indrviduib to work in i 

Cut pctd friendly environment 

preparing ncwjpjpers fordclivrry. 

ITiiiradiy from 2:30 l.m. to 7 im. 

QnyiUkt/'Round like un. 

I This job will give you plenty of time J 

| to get to i fulltlme job, home before| 

the kidi get off to school or hive 

the rest of the eUy to yourself! 'No 

special skills needed, students snd 

retirees ire uxlcomtf Applicant 

must be chysicilly ible to lift 

smsil hindjes of paper. 

Call Ulsne for Interview!! 

(3*7)7404035 



[Helper/Assfsfanf 

for disabled 

person in 

Industrial setting. 

Mechanical 

experience 

helpful. 

Permanent 

part'tlme 

mornings. 

847-680-3064 



TELEMARKETING 



PART-TIME 

Upto$l0/Hour 
Plus Commissions. 
Flexible Schedule. 

Call Tom 
847-918-0707 



ia 




Flexible Hours 

Ubertyville Location 

Knowledge of 

Microsoft Works. 

WordPerfect, 

Dictaphone Preferred 

Call Mike 








HASTINGS LAKE YMCA 
CHILD CARE 

IS SEEKING APPLICANTS FOR THE 
FOLLOWING POSITIONS: '+• 

BEFORE AND AFTER SCHOOL TEACHERS Cc AIDES 

VAN DRIVERS 

PART TIME OFFICE ASSISTANT 

We offer a competitive salary and a fun working environment. I ' 
THESE POSITIONS ARE PERFECT FOR STUDENTS 
AND SENIORS! 



CALL STACEY TO SET UP AN INTERVIEW AT: 
(847)356-4000. 



ARTISTS 

PT FOR CHILDREN'S 

DRAWING PROGRAM 

PRIMARILY 

AFTERNOONS 

EXP. W/CHILDREN 

PREFERRED 

ALL MATERIALS *, 

CURRICULUM 

PROVIDED 

CALL JILL 
815-338-8232 




J 




Builder seeks outgoing 

and detail minded 

individual to assist with 

tovvnhomc and single 

family community 

in Lake County area. 

Part-time position 

available. Will train. 

Weekends a must, 

career opportunity. 

Call (847)548-2400 

or fax resume to: 

(847)548-5450 

for immediate 

consideration. 



^ 



d 



• Full Time & Part Time 
Tremendous Growth ■ 40+ Positions ridded II 220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



•■i\ 



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M 



netDIRECT, Chlcagoland's premier Internet service 

provider Is experiencing tremendous growth in 

1999, located in Grayslake. 



OtmpUND^ 

Weajeia search 'of individuals; for various sW (Is. , 
■','• Must have management experience:" 
OCITBOUHD <flli CEHTEr^^REPS 

-, We or? searching for individuals for various shifts,/- ' ;>V 
Must be able to communicate effectively overthe telephone. 



WE OFFER: 

• Aggressive Compensation Plan 

• Six-Month Salary Review 

• Paid Training Program 

• Flexible Hours 

• Medical, Dental & Life Insurance 

• Tuition Reimbursement 

• Generous 401K Salary Savings Progran 

• Employee Recognition Awards 

Please forward all inquires to: 




CHICAGO WND-S PREMIER INTERNET SERVICE PROVIDER 



30 S. Whitney Street, Grayslake, IL 60030. 

Fax to: skw at (847) 223-8810 

or e-mail: skw@us-netdlrect.com 



220 



IlelpWanlcd 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



AVON PRODUCTS- 

START a iiomobasod busi- 
ness. Work flexible hours. 
Enjoy unlimited earnings. Call 
Toll Froo (BBS) 561 -AVON. 

DRIVER - ATTENTION: 
TIRED OF LONGHAUL? 
Gel home weekly. Run region- 
al and earn 37c/milc including 
bonuses. Owner/O peralars 
earn 85c/milo loaded or emp- 
ty. Call 600-859-4524 or B00- 
564-6262. 

DRIVER BUD MEYER 
Truck Linos Refrigerated Haul- 
ing '$1,000 sign-on bonus for 
experienced company drivers 
"Soto drivers start up to 33c 
solos drivers and contractors 
CALL TOLL FREE 877-283- 
6393 GRADUATE STUDENTS 
1 -600-338-6428. 

DRIVER: UP TO $70Q/weok 
orientation pay. Up to 35e/mlle 
to start. Great hometlme. As- 
signed, all conventional fleet. 
Lease Purchase Options. 
BOYD BROS. 800-543-8923 
EOE. .; ; ; 

DRIVERS • OWNER Ops 
Feel Uke your in Neutral? No 
Canada, NYC or NE, Mln. 
23yr. with 1yr. OTR CDii with 
Hazmat. Paschall Truck Lines 
800-348-0405. 



DRIVERS WANTED: PRO- 
FESSIONAL OTR (1YR. 
EXP.) T/T DRIVERS. ONLY 
THE HIGHLY MOTIVATED, 
SAFETY ORIENTED NEED 
APPLY. WE OFFER: BIG 
TRUCKS, BIG HOODS, BIG 
MILEAGE AND MORE. FOR 
MORE INFO ON OUR 48 
STATE OPERATION: CALL 
ELITE EXPRESS AT (800) 
441-431B, 



EARN EXTRA MONEY 
Work one weekend a monlh 
and two weeks a year and re- 
ceive 100% college tuition, the 
Montgomery G.I. Bill and an 
excellent paycheck. You may 
also qualify for a cash enlist- 
ment bonus. Call your local 
National Guard representative 
today at 1-800-OK-GUARD. 



EASY WORK) 

NO EXPERIENCE 

S500-S t ,000 part-time at 

home stuffing envelopes. 

For free Information send 

self-addressed, 

stamped envelope: 

R&J Enterprises 

Mailing Services, Inc. 

P.O. Box 402 
Inglesfde, III. 60041. 



W* 



■*» 



Building Maintenance 
. Lake Bluff 

3rd Shift 

Full Time & 

Part Time 

For more Information 

Please call 

(847)295-1100 

ex t. 362 



Sm 



*£ 



MEDIA SALES 
New Advertising Co. 

looking for a Proven 

Portormor to corns grow 

with ut. FT/FT but Hlvy, 

oxcol. comm., strong 

mngmL opportunity. 

Health Insurance bonoftts. 

Explosive earning potentJall!! 

Call (047)360-1937 Shall 

Fax (847) 360-1 (37 



$1000 BONUS - Run solo 
regional. Get home weekends. 
90% No Touch Freight. Full 
benefits package. Call Deb 
Scholl @ 1-800-553-2778 Ext. 
2742 

1000 ENVELOPES=S4000 
AT HOMEI Receive $4 for 
every envelope you stuff with 
our sales materials. Gur- 
anteed. Free Info, 24hr. 
recording. (310) 851-2152. 
(SCA Network). 

AIM HIGH FIND your future 
with the Air Force! Training, 
travel, educational assistance 
and financial security. Plus en- 
listment bonuses up to 
$9,000 to those who qualify. 
Age requirement 17*27. For a 
free Information packet, call 1- 
800-423-USAF or visit 
www.airforce.com 

ASSEMBLE ARTS, 

CRAFTS, Toys In your sparB 
time. Earn CASHI Phone work, 
typing, sewing, electronics, 
more. Great Pay. CALL 24 
hour Information. 1-600-795- 
0380 Ext. 21. (SCA Network) 



ATTENTION!! 

Loss ell those 

unwanted pounds. 

All Natural, 

Dr. Approved. 

Free shipping. 

(702)881-2198. 



SUBSTITUTE 
DIRECTORY 

The following schools need 
substitutes on a continuing basis, please .contact the 

. names Usted below for further information. . 

'.-■ ■■ " -■'■• . ~' 

Adlal P.. Stevenson High School District #125 
T\vo Stevenson Drive, Lincolnshire, IL 6OO69 

Contact.' Personnel , (847) 6*34-4000 

Aptakisic - Tripp School District #102 
1231 Weiland Rd, Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 

Contact: Laurel Karolczak (847) 634-5338 

Big Hollow School District #38 
34699 N. Hwy 12, Inglesfde, IL 60041 

Contact: Ms. Bucliner (847) 587-6800 

Day School / Northbrook 

3210 Dundee Road, Northbrook IL60062 

Contact: Ede Snyder (847) 205-0274 

Dcerileld School District #109 
517 Deerfield Rd. Deerfield, IL 60015 

Contact: Phyllis x-222 (847) 945-1844 

Grass Lake School District #36 
26177 W. Grass Like Road, Antioch, IL 60002 

Contact: Pat Reed or Sue. (847) 395-1550 

Grayslake School District #46 
450 N. Barron Blvd., Grayslake, IL 60030 

Contact: Jan Fabry x-1100. . . . '. (847) 223-3650 

Hawthorn School District #73 

201 Hawthorn Parkway, Vernon Hills, IL60061 

Contact: Shari Keena (847) 367-3279 

Lake Forest Elementary Schools 
95 W. Deerpatlv, Lake Forest, IL 60045 
Contact: Karen Allie (847) 604-7423 

Lake Forest High School District #115 

1285 North McKinley Road, Lake Forest, IL 60045 

Contact: Wendy Antrim x-118 (847) 234-3600 

Lake Villa School District #41 

131 McKinley, Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Contact: Kalhy. (847) 356-2385 

North Chicago Community Unit School Dlst. #187 

2000 Lewis Arc., North Chicago, IL 6*0064 

Contact: Mona Armstrong ' (847) 689-8150 

Northern Suburban Special Education District 

760 Red Oak Lane, Highland Park, IL 60035 

Contact: Bill Charts (847) 831-5100 

Old School Montcssori 

144 Commerce Drive, Grayslake, IL 60030 

Contact: Marilyn. (847) 223-9606 

Waukegan Public Schools District #60 

1201 N. Sheridan Rd., Waukcgan, IL 60085 

Contact: Personnel (847) 360-5404 

Woodland School District #50 

17370 Gages Lake Road, Gages Lake, IL 60030 

ContactMchcttQ (847) 856-3605 

Young at Heart Center 

610 Peterson Road, Ubertyville, IL 60048 

Contact:U$a or Leslie (847) 367-61 10 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



GET PAID $15-$30 pot 
hour processing Insurance 
claims for local doctors office. 
Complete training provided. 
Computer and modem re- 
quired. Call BOO/942-8141 
EXT. 82. 



MEDICAL BILLING NA- 
TIONWIDE Company seek- 
ing blllers. PC reaqufred, no 
experience necessary, Poten- 
tial earnings of $31,500+ In- 
vestment required. Call 800- 
524-1478, 



OTR CLASS A Drivers: Wo 
pay you for your best. Come 
earn what you deserve. Up to 
35c/ml!o plus bonus and bene- 
fits. Easy no $ down lease pur- 
chase program available. Call 
800-843-8308 or 3384. 



PET CAREI ENERGETIC 
dependable person, various 
dul'es Involving pels. Must be 
flexblo and available 7 
day.r/waek Including wee- 
koncs and holidays. Call only 
between 10am-5pm, Monday- 
Friday. Shel-Ray Pet Shatel 
(114)857-2163. 



DRIVERS AND TEAMS: 
Starting pay 0pto'37c/mlle. As- 
signed Frelghtllnor conven- 
tion's, improved speed 
stance, excellent miles, time- 
home every 7-10 days In most 
areas and more. Experienced 
drivers call Heartland Express 
toll-free 1-87-PRO-DRIVE, 
Owner Operators ask about 
BBe/mlle. Call 1-e-PROFIT- 
PRO.E.O.E. 

DRIVERS ARE YOU looking 
to make a change? Look no 
further. G.F. Lacaeyso Trans- 
port has the miles, the equip- 
ment and the experience to 
make you successful, Call 800- 
645-3748, ' 

TURF AND FERTILIZER 

sales "Act Immediately.* S50K 
(Minimum). 100% health, dls- 
abi'lty, car, expenses. Must be 
sell-starter, knowledgeable 
and experienced. Inquiries 
confidential. AGRA PLACE- 
MENTS LTD. Call Gary Mc- 
Donald 217-735-4373. 

WE DON'T JUST recruit 
you, we watch over you. No 
experience • No problem. No 
Cost COL Training If qualified 
$30,000 a year & benefits. 1- 
800-553-1044. 



DELIVERY 

Want to earn up to $200 per 

week and be your own boss? 

The Daily Herald is looking for 

(adult, independent personnel fori 

newspaper delivery in the Lake' | 

County area. 2-3 hour routes 

available between the hours of 

2am & 6am, Monday thru 
Friday; 2am-7am, Saturdays, 

Sundays and Holidays. 

For more information call.. 

(847)427-4333 



1 


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How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 



Q: I have sent out my resume to several corporations over the 
past 3 months with a cover letter explaining what my objective 
[s. I have received only one response back over (hat time and 
was turned down for an Interview. While I think my resume Is 
quite good, my spouse feels otherwise'. It Is her reeling that per- 
haps It Is too long. I am enclosing a copy to you for viewing. II 
you would not mind, please take a look and fell me what you 
think. We seem to disagree about what should actually be on a 
resume. Please tell mc what you think. J.G. - Round Lake 

A: What belongs on a resume? 

Your name, current address, area code'and telephone number. 

An objective describing briefly the position you arc looking to 
obtain. (You may choose to make more than one resume with 
different objectives). 

Your work experience beginning with your most recent 
employer and a brier description of job title and responsibili- 
ties. 

Your education and any additional training or seminars rela- 
tive to your work experience. 

Indicate that references will be furnished upon request. 

Do not include personal Information such as height, weight or 
date of birth as these do not belong In a resume. 

Listing hobbles and outside interests Is not necessary. 

Keep in mind when preparing your resume, that "less is 
more", meaning not to. go tnto'too much detail that your 
resume reads like a book. It may give the reader the appear- 
ance that you arc fishing for things to say. Stick to the facts. 
Allow the resume recipient to become Intrigued by what they 
sec on paper, thus leaving them wanting to meet and speak 
with you directly. If the resume reads long and drawn out, you 
may lose the attention of the reader. The final word of 
advice,. .proofread, proofread and then proofread! A resume 
with errors Is not well regarded. 

Your local library can offer you numerous books on creating a 
resume.' Find an outline that best suits you and go for It. 

With regards to your resume...! believe that you can and 
should cut yours down to one page Instead of three. 

Li'ilvr* cnn l>o svnt lu Nnncy Sakol 

c/<) l.ttkHimi! iSY\vs|>;i)Si'f a, 
P.O. Uox 2Cii, Grnyslnke, ILIUHUO 



January 22, 1999 , 



CLASSIFIED 



■ ■ ' ~ ■■■■•■ 



Lakeland Newspapers / C15 




71 Help Wanted 



Full-Time 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



TOOL DESIGNER/ 

PROJECT ENGINEER 

CM Product*, Inc. Is a 

promlo r mot at and foil 

mangtoctumr. . Wo are looking 

an curporiorcod Too* 

Designer/Project Engineer to 

notk In our Lake 

Zurich plant 

The qualified candidate must 

havo 3 yrs. cxp, In aluminum (oil 

tool & product design. Tho, j 

position is rosponsMo lor 

rrtanegjng products ranging from 

product doslgn to customer 

trials. TravoJ Is required. CAD I 

mpiisapius, 

Woottoracomptote 

bonotlis package Inducing: 

• Medico), Dental, and 

VToion Insurance 

• 40l(k)Ptan 

• Employee Slock 
Ownership 

•Excellent Wages 

Please mall or fax 

resume to: 

CM. Products, Inc. 

Human Resource* OepL 

SOOEURd. 

Laka Zurich, It- 40047 

FAX: (M7)T2e-3257 

EOE 



SECRETARY 

Leave It to Allstate for 
a Great Career 
Opportunity... 

I Alstata Ure auataoce, looted si 
I Vernon Kits, hu an Immediate 
I operJh j In our Humm Resources 
I Department for a cjiuiKW 
I Secretary. 

I We need a person with excellent 
I computer jifli (preferabry MS 
I CWce 97 are! Wtxxljartl previous 
[ experience In a busy HR 
I ckptftroent woukJ be preferred. 
iRepDrOr^tacwHRMawgesyou 
IwUptovtdcsupportlbrAstaffor. 
1 6 and Aiitrt In the processing of 
I appfleanti and new tmployeo. 
I You must be wrikirganLttd and 
1 have the iWfy to prtodte your 
work. 

We offer a broad range of beneiti 
LxJucargUfe/MedlciVDenul 
riarAiVjoJoni, Profit Sharing 
and competitive salary, for 
I consideration, please 
|iAX{M7-Z47-7l70)orauI 
mbm tot HsBsaii Resources 
| Departsstat 

AUSTATl Ure rnwnuKe 

ro Box 94211 
raladac, a 60094-9954 



Rera I 



What You Should Be 



Shopping For: 




Sometimes people shop for necessities and other 
times they shop for treats. At Jcwel-Osco, we offer 
a lot of both. As a leading food and drug retailer, our 
career opportunities are loaded with benefits ,that 
' resemble a variety pack' of goodies. 

Management 
Trainees 

If you're a high energy Individual looking for a recall 
management position, you'll feel right at home In our 
four-step training program that can put you In charge 
of a $1.2 million score operation within six months to 
a year. . 

In addrdoh to promotion from wtthrn,we offer one of the best 
cornpensaoorvoeneiit pekages In the Industry. For aTrrwcTo.ee 
Interview, forward your resume in confidence tec Osco 
Drug, Attn: Marty, 3030 CuBerton Drive, Franklin 
Park, IL 60 1 3 1 . FAXt88«4 1-5793. B0E M/RD/V 

Jewel-Osco 



wv/w.-imurioindrugi torus. com 



Banking 




[here's Only One Environment 
That's Best for Your Lifestyle! 




Harris Bank Client Contact Center, located In 
Buffalo Grove, Is seeking the following Individuals to 
Join its team: 

TELEPHONE BANKING 
REPRESENTATIVES 

You must possess a professional demeanor and out- 
standing customer service/sates skills, as welt as enjoy 
Siroblem solving and a fast paced environment. The abll- 
ty to handle a high volume of calls from our Retail Bank 
customers and excellent communication and organiza- 
tional skills also required. IRA experience, keyboardlng 
skills, and bilingual a plus/ ' 

After successful completion of 90 doys 

of employment, you will receive d 

$500 SIGN-ON BONUS! 

Wo offer an excellent salary and compensation pack- 
age, Including state-of-the-art technology, tuition reim- 
bursement for full-time positions, and ample opportuni- 
ty for advancement. For consideration, forward 
resume, Including salary history, to: Human 
Resources, BGR733, Harris Bank Card Center, 
700 E. Lake Cook Rd., Buffalo Grove, IL 60089. 
Fax; (847)520-6491. EOE. 



K^S HARRIS 
jy| BANK. 



HOPING YOU MAJOt BtTTCB CHOICES, 



^™^"'™ 



T| J'elp Wanted 
JJ FuU-Ttnie 




220 



Help Wanted 
Rill-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-lime 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Tlme 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuU-Tlme 



SJBJM 



HfilA^nl v, AZ . 



cs'is.a 



', full web & sheet-fed ;■ 
'■",, ,printeriy/a fJ 




qualified iprinHng'ProJ/ 



t to fill the 

- ;|-w 



'positions! 'Pressroom* 
: -Pi^mfelirjad; 



j'qreMttSf for Harris , 



yrsexp 



; j'.'rBdFanium/ .1 1' 
■I.VftFax 602^37^2321 






■ i 




Luciano 

Refrigerated 

Transport 

OfftTai 

♦ Home Often 

♦ 3 Of per mile to 
company drivers/teams 
start at 3 4< 

♦ '97 Volvo Conventlonals 
with Big Block Engines 

GET MILES... 

BUT GET HOME, TOO! 

We're big enough to pay 

well, but small enough to 

ore about people! 

Call Jim In Chicago 

at 800-637-5154 

or 

Call M J. In Recruiting 

at 800-753-8165 



OFF FIFTH 

SAKS FIFTH 

AVENUE 

Is looking for friendly, 
energetic people to fill 

the following: 
Full Time, Fart Time and 
Weekend Only Positions: 

• Sales Associate* 

• Fitting Room 

• Manager 

(wo mens dept) 

• Loss Prevention 

• Customer Service Desk 

»l»rUng 19.00 tht. 

Our positions Include night 

and weekend hours and we 

require flexibility when 

scheduling. 

Please apply la Ferwa 

at the Gmra« rVULU MaD 

Salt* 421 

{right acme fron Waccamaw) 

Caul B47-4624988 

FAX 847-662-0674 

WtareEOBM/F 



I 



Healih Care 

MEDICAL 

TRANSCR1PT10NIST/ 

SCHEDULER 

Full-Time 

9:00am - 5:30pm 

We are seeking a flexible, 
confident Individual to Join 
our medical office. 
Proficiency with medical 
terminology & radiology 
required; PC skills & 50-60 
wpm a must. Spanish a 
plus. 

We offer a competitive 
salary & benefits package 
In a leading edge environ- 
ment. Forward resume or 
apply In person to: 

M.R. INSTITUTE 

OF LAKE COUNTY 

Attn: Joe Coll . 

60 S. Greenfeaf 

Gumee, IL 60031 

EOE M/F/D/V 



E®MDIiMK>Bi 







fcv'i 



Coleman Cable 5ystefra 

Corpora*? Marketing Dopt. seefcs 

an Import Coorcfirakx. RSgtrt can- 

cBdite wi bo professional, detail 

oriented, and capabio of handing 

multiple tasks simultaneously. 

Individual wfl work dosety with 

International suppSers. A working 

knowtedeje of asloms brokers 

and Irriemational freight logistics 

is destaWe. iftgri school rJptorna 

or equivalent is required 

(colege degree a pins). 

Must haw PC skfis with word 

processing and spreadsheet 

expertise. Competitive pay and 

benefits ixibdng 40K and 

tuJlion teirrtburscmerrt. 
Please nul or nx resume tx 

Coleman Cable Systems 

AttmKeri 

1586 South Lakeside Dr. 

VVaukegan.1 60085 

Fax:(847)689-8741 

[tpul Opportunity tmphytr 



RECEPTIONIST/ 

SCHEDULING 

•Bilingual (Spanish)* 

2nd Shift 

II you ara a fkndblo, confident 
seif-starter who can easily adapt 
10 chanoo, you may quafify lo 
|oin our ctynarne toam & help 
support our growing modes! 
office You wil do rasponsUe lor 
answering phones, scheduling 
oxams & much morel Our Idoal 
canddaio wil havo good PC 
& typing skits as wsl as knowf- 
adge of mocfical lormlnology 
Mfcual (SpanbtVEnglish) 
requrcidScHcctodcancWalowill 
bo oxpoctod la work Monday- 
Friday Iran 2OTPM-10-.30PM 
with one day off, and every other 
Saturday until &30PM. We offer 
an orcoitont benefits packaoa. 
Forward resume or apply In 
person toe 

M.R. INSTITUTE 

OF LAKE COUNTY 

Attn; Joe Coil 

60 S. GroorJcaf 

Gurnee, IL 60031 

equal ocoofWry employer ml 



■■■■■■■■■I 



Administrative 



9999999999 



Why do some people 
look forward 
to 





It could be the pay. The people. The atmosphere. Of 
course at Quill, it's all of the above and more. We treat our 
people right. And, we make sure (hey always have a lot to 
look forward to. Take a look for yourself. 

CHECK PREPARATION CLERK - You will open 
and sort Incoming customer mall Into appropriate payment 
processing groups, research account numbers on the com- 
puter system and (lie and rotate accounting Invoice batch- 
es. In addition, you will perform a variety of administrative 
functions such as sorting/distributing mall, making photo- 
copies, etc. A general office background and good people 
skills are required. We have 3 part-time openings. Hours 
are 7:30am - 2:00 pm, working 5 days per week with 
Monday & Saturday required and flexible hours available 
for evenings & Saturdays.. 

DATA ENTRY CLERK - You will process and encode 
all check batches received from check preparation clerks, 
Including the data entry of remittance Information and 
preparing and balancing dally bank deposits. The selected 
candidate will possess excellent organizational and 
analytical skills along with 1+ years numeric data entry 
experience In a high volume work environment 10-key 
calculator skills and a High School degree or equivalent 
training required. Previous experience with remittance 
processing equipment a plus. Hours: Monday through 
Friday, 9:00am - 5:30pm. 

MAIL PROCESSING CLERK - You will sort and 
open mall, prepare invoices and past due statements for 
mailing and handle metering. The selected candidate will 
possess a valid driver's license, the ability to lift 50 lbs and. 
a High School degree or equivalent training required. 
Hours are 6:30arn - 3pm Mon, Tues, Thrs, Fri & Sat. 

Full time positions offer a competitive compensation pack- 
age as well as an environment for professional growth. 

Forward all Inquiries with salary requirements to: Quill 
Corporation, 100 Schelter Drive, Dept. KL/ACCT, 
Lincolnshire, IL 60069. FAX 847-634-5820. Equal 
Opportunity Employer M/F/D/V. 



® 




General Office/ 

Administrative 

RYDER 

Park city 

• Rte/Dlspatch 

Coordinator 

Responsibilities Induce afl 
aspects of dispatching daily 
routes kx student transportation 
In Waukogan & North Chicago 
area. Requires knowledge of 
North ChicagoyWaultegafi area 
A good onjanLtational skins for a 
150 bus location. Customer 
Service & safety oriented 
Wpnor cSspaleh routing axp. 4 
strong people skills required 
BIDngusi Big/lsh/Spantsh a 
plus. Computer skills desirable 
w/ability to obtain a CDLAcnoot 
bus permit. Salaried position 
w/berwfits pkg. Send/fax 
(847-244-5705) resumes to: 
Daniel Marchess. 3825 W.r 
Washington St, Park City, IL 
60005. Drug Testing Required. 
EEO/AOA 



' Multi-Spindle * 
Machine Operators 

Immed Opcnings-Aruoni, 
Tired of cold weather A shov- 

eling snow? MIn 3-5 yrs 
Multi-spindle midline opera- 
tion exp needed In beautiful 
, suniry. AZ, Set-up, Crew 
leaders, Machine Mtdunlrs 
& Operators. Exp 
w/CTldctnetotr ft Anne 
prefd. Knowledge In 
calculation of fwdi, speeds t 
plus. Exc tmfts ft working 
conditions. Rrfo isstsvait 
Pay depending on crp. 

Resume: 

Lexington Machining, 

AttJKHR 

3181 N.Lear Ave, 

Casa Grande, AZ85222 

Fax 520-316-5597 

. - Ph 520-316-5562 



■■■■bshM 




Ambitious person for 

various service related duties 

National Manufacturers local 

distributors. Pay scale based on 

performance, advancement possible. 

Send resume to: 

Box AAA 

Lakeland Publishers 

30 S. Whitney 

PO Box 268 

Grayslake, IL 60030 




m 1 ««A ,,cissw 



0*0 



m 



Jasco Uniforms Is a leader In the catalog distribution 
Industry and YOU can share in our success, We 
offer profit sharing, major medical, paid benefit 
time and a professional environment. Applications 

are being accepted for iho following team members'. 



Customer Service 
Representatives 






Entry Level . 
We Will Train YOU! 

Put your communication skills and commitment to 
quality to work where It can make a difference. 
Positions start at $10,00/hr. We have flexible 
schedules Monday through Friday, 9a.m. to 7p.m. 

Please respond to Ruth Erbach, 847-821-7755, 
700 Corporate Woods Parkway, Vernon Hills, IL 
60061, or fax to 847-821-8885. EOE 



' 



■r rMpw i ^»H^» i' y. y v . ^v^' ' ^'" !' t "'- '' ^^'- y ^ 



Banking 

IVIAKE OUR SUCCESS YOUR SUCCESS!! 

ATTEND OUR OPEN HOUSE 

Success National Bank 

1020 Milwaukee. Deerfietd. IL 60015 

Saturday, January 30, 1999 

10;00a.m.-2;00p.m. 

On-Slte Interviews wil be conducted. 

Success National Bank Is one of the fastest growing 
banks in the Chicago area with no slowdown In 
sight Here are Just a few of the positions available: 

Commercial Lenders, Mortgage Underwriters, 
Mortgage Loan Processors, Loan Closer, Tellers, 
Teller/New Accounts Rep., Branch Managers, 
Assistant Branch Managers, Teller Supervisors, 
Notetellers, AdmhUstaauve Assistants, 
Secretaries, General Services, Switchboard 
Operators. 

We offer an outstanding career opportunity, com- 
petitive salary and benefits package. 

Work dose to home at any of our numerous locations: 
Lincolnshire, lincolnwood, UbertyvUIc, 
Deerfleld, Lincoln Park, Northbrook, Skokle 
I and Chicago - Loop 

| If you can't attend our Open House, . 
Please mall or fax your resume, along wluY 
| salary requirements to* 

FAX: (847)634-2138 

Attn: Human Resources 
MAIL: One Nlarrtott Drive 

Uncolnsftlre, IL 60069 

EOE M/F/V/D Smoke-Free Work Place 









C1 6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 22, 1999 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Tfmc 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Office Clerical 



Taking. 

Communication 
In A Whole 



New Direction 



DIRECTORY 



OPERATORS 



Full Time Openings in Waukegan 

Provido Information to callers requesting business, 
government or residence telephone numbers. This 
position roqulres strong communication end 
koyboardlng skills along with customer contact 
experience. Must bo available to work varied days and 
hours. 

Ameritech offers training and starting wages from 
$273.00 to $443.50 a week depending upon experience. 
Comploto benefits after six months of successful 
employment. For Immediate Interview, 

give us o callTOOAY 
(Yes, oven Sundayl! 

1-800-966-3241 
Ask for ext. EAC-A4A 

Accepting phone cells 7 days a week 
from 7AM to UPMOST. 



eritech* 




Large Ltbertyvllle dealership seeking 

• SERVICE ADVISOR - Good organizational skills 
combined w/great customer service required. 
Good salary, benefits, commission &. more. 

• SHOP HAND - Duties Include pickup & 
deliveries, customer service tv shop maintenance. 
Good salary i*. benefits. Ask for Corey or Mark. 

• SALESPERSON - Good communication &. 
organizational skills combined w/great customer 
service required. Good salary, benefits, 
commission &. much more. Ask for Jerry. 







0H9P01 

HwmHiiMttwua 



ylr 



(847) 362-71 10 

611 N. Milwaukee At*. 
llbertyi'lll* 



In a world of technology, 
people make the difference.™ 



An equal opportunity employer 
committed to a diverse work force. 



nooooooaoBaooaHna BonaaBBBonanMonBaBoonnooBaBno bo 

CODE INSPECTOR 

Tlic Village of Round Lake Beacli, a growing community of 
24,000, Ij seeking a full time Code Inspector. Responsibilities 
include building Inspections, limited plan review, property 
maintenance Inspections and cede enforcement. To qualify, 
candidates must possess a higli school diploma or CEO; 
minimum experience of one year in construction or a related 
field; certificarion as a CABO or BOCA Building Inspector (or 
i lie ability ro achieve ihe same within the 5 month probation- 
ary period); and a valid Illinois driver's license. 

The Ideal candidate also will possess an associate degree in 
building technology, architectural technology, or a related field; 
additional certifications through BOCA; and knowledge of the 

NEC. 

The salary begins at $30,000 (increasing to JJI,000 upon 
successful completion of the five-month probation period flNP 
Building Inspector certification by CABO and BOCA), plus an 
excellent benefit package. Salary Is negotiable for a candidate 
possessing a valid Illinois Plumbing license. 

Qualified candidates must submit a completed Round Like 
Beach application form (call 847-546-2351 Ext. 231), resume, 
work related references and a cover tetter to the Community 
Development Director, 224 West Clarendon Drive, Round Lake 
Beach, Illinois 60073, by 5:00 p.m., Friday, February 5, 1999. 

Equal opportunity employer. 

uyywyyyyuu B BB BBBgBBa B BBOBOBa Byuuuua BuaBQOB By gyaBHt 



ItFrTLlI 



(Medical Receptionist 
Offlre Coordinator 

MulUSptdalty Riystctaai group is 
cunrnuy mUn4 ■ Medtcsl 
RtxzVUonlil ORke CaunUnatDf. 
-< Duties kndude Medical-' " 

Rtccpuonlat duties, plus 

supervtatng of office. Chosen 

candidate mil be customer driven 

and possess past health care and 

supervisory experience. Your efforts 

will be rewarded with compcUUvt 

pay and attractive benefits. 

Send/fax resumes to: 

Human Resources 

71 Waukegan Rd.Ste. 900. 

LaXe Bluff. n 60044 

Fax (847)295-1547 

or call (6471535-8080. EOE. 




Oilier 

*15-*35 PER HOUR 

Easy medical billing. 

Full training. 
Computer required;-- 
1-800-259-6661 
oxt. 222 




LPN/RN 

PART TIME AND 

FLOAT POOL 

"NURSES NEEDED 

ATOURJ5BED 

ICF DD FACILITY 

LOCATED IN 

GURNEE. 

CONTACT 

LONA HARRAH 

(847)855-9450 






1 

. if 



REGISTERED NURSE 

Round Lake Area Schools, District 116 

Certified in Hearing & Vision testing and Adult & Pediatric CPK 

or willingness lo become certified 

Duties include: 

Oversee school health services 

Provide First Aid/CPR training to staff 

Maintain school health records 

Administer & monitor medication & treatment 

$35,000 plus benefits - 1 1 months 

Send letter and resume to: 

Round Lake Area Schools 

316 South RosedateQ 

Round Lake, IL 60073 



HEALTH CARE 
OPPORTUNITIES 

Drcrpjlh Medical b 
currently seeking full time can- 
didates who are detailed and 
customer service oriented. 
Chosen candidate will be 
responsible for applying 
Insurance payments, 
cashiering, and balancing cash 
receipts. Ideal candidates will 
possess past experience In a 

medical facility. For 
confidential consideration 

send /fax resumes to: 
Dccrpath Medical Assoc, 
Attn: Human Resources 
71 Waukegan Rd.,Ste 900 

Ute Bluff, 1L60OU 

Fax: (847)295-1547 or call 

(847)5354060. EOE. 



CHARGE RN- 
N1GHTSHIFT 

lmmed Opening. 
■ Need a change] Looking for a J 

slower lifestyle In a ,. ' 
fast-paced hospital? Small 

rural hospital, trauma 

designated ED & nursing 

home has Immed openings 

for 2 F/T RNt. Oregon lie 

reqti. ACLS & TNCC/TEAM 

S pref'd. Sign on bonus & relo 

allowance. Comp wage & 

bnft pkg. New gradi 

welcome, Pioneer Memorial 

Hospital & Nursing Home is 

locti in Heppner, OR. 

Centrally loc/d to many 

recreational opptys. Treat 

yourself to a change. 

Resume: PO Box 9 

Heppner, OR 97836 

541-676-2939 



r 



■** 



o 



AURORA HEALTHCARE 
NEW HOSPITAL OPENING 



^ 



REGISTERED NURSES 

Part-time 

2nd & 3rd Shifts 

• Medical/Surgical RN 

• Emergency RN 

Full-lime & Part-lime 
2nd & 3rd Shifts 

• Obstetrics RN 

• Intensive Care RN 

Full-time 

• Operating Room RN 



Part-time 
•Unit Clerks 

• Nurse Assistants 

• Respiralory Therapists 

Full-time & Part-time 
•Cooks 

• Food Service Workers 

• Medical Records Clerks 

• Radiographers 

Full-time 

• Transcriptionist 

• Pharmacist 

• Pharmacy Technician 

• Pharmacy Supervisor 
We offer a competitive salary and benefit package and 

encourage service-oriented professionals to visit or submit a 

resume and/or fa* lo: 

Human Resources. I04OO 75ih Street. Suite 302. 

Kenosha. Wl 5.1142 

Fax:414-697-6703 

#<i Aurora 
Wm KealthCare 1 ' 



jflkV* t ^lWI J Hfc 



hnp-/Avmy:niror,ilie;ilthc:trf.orc 

tMIIV 






<,> 




■ HEALTH CARE ■ 
FINDER 

FULLTIME 
GREAT LAKES 

Yuu may nol know the 1ICSC 
name,,, bui you certainly have 
known of our service for 60> years! 
We're currcnily seeking a moiivaied 
professional to join in our success. 
Tlii i key poiiilon performs 
odmiislon review functions and 
authorizations Tor medical and 
surgical referrals as well u 
coordinate i referral ocllvilies lo 
ensure paiieni continuity of core 
wllhln the Ci I AM PUS program. 
Requiremeau Include a Bachelor's 
Degree In Nursing or Its equivalent 
with a current Illinois License, 2-4 
years of medical surgical experience 
and 2-3 years experience in hospital 
or commercial Insurance utilization 
review. Knowledge of Inicnnial 
criteria a plus. 

You will be rewarded wlih an 
outstanding compensation package. 
Forward resume with salary 
hiilory to; 

Human Resources [Justness Group 

HCSC. 300 a Randolph Si, 

Hilt Floor. Depi 18, 

Chicago, IL 60601 

E-mail: bretta9bcbsil.com 

HCSC 

(Committed to our employees, we 

provide a drag & smoke free work 

environment & are an Equal 
Opportunity Employer fM/F/D/V) 



MrdlCAl Oppomrdba 

•UN's* 

$2,000 HIRING BONUS for 

FT exp, RN's 

We've Taken Care 

of Everything 

• On-Slte CbSd Ore cL 

Fitness Center 

• Beautiful 30O+b«J hospital 

• Easily accessible location 

Provena Saint Theresc Medical 

Center seeks tt licensed IN*5 

for these openings: 

MEDICARE CASE 
MANAGER 

Requires 3-5 years of adult clinical &. 
managed care exp. A EtSN along 
with case management U/R &. 
discharge planning exp. are highly 

desiraUe. 

•STAFF RN's* 

HOStiatLHOMErEALIH 
.IT, Days 

2* yra. Med/Surg exp. with back" 
ground In IV high tech &. home 
health requited. 

CRITICAL CARE 
FT, Eves. &. Days 

ACLS Ceaitaaon &. Critical Care 
exp. preferred 

EMERGENCY SERVICES 

FT, Days 4V Nights 
2 yrs. in or CCU exp, &. ACLS 
CestUlcation lequlted. BUS ft. 
Trauma Course Specialist 
CtaUJlcadon preferred. 

PER DIEM - ALL AREAS 

Pled* *nd your resume to: Human 

Resourcts-RJtT, 

PROVENA SAINT THLRESE MEDICAL 

CIMR. MIS Washington St., 

Waukegan, 1L 60065. 

fax: 847-360-9656, [101 M/f/D/V) 

FtOVlNA 
Saint Ibexes* 

Medical Center 



220 



EIcJp Wanted 

Full-Tlme 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fiill-Tlmc 



220 



WILDLIFE JOBS 

to$21.60/HR 

Inc. Benefits. Game 

wardens, security, 

maintenance, park 

rangers. No exp needed. 

For app. and exam Info 

call 1-800-813-3585, . 

ext 2407. 8am-9prn, 

7 days, fds Inc 



Secretary 
needed for 
law office. 

Flexible 
hours/days. 

fax 

847-816-9001 

phone 
847-816-8780 



mxmmmMeim. 



ARE YOU PERSISTENT, 

DEPENDABLE, OUTGOING, 

RESPONSIBLE & ORGANIZED? 

Lakeland Newspapers has the perfect career 

opportunity for you in our exciting sales 
department. This job involves sales calls out- 
side .the office so a dependable car is necessary. 

We offer great benefits! 

• Salary plus Commission 

• Health Insurance 

• Dental Insurance 

• Disability & Life Insurance 

• A Matching 401 K Plan 

• Gas Allowance 

• Phone Reimbursement 

So if you're self-motivated, highly organized, 
and very personable, you*re sure to be a success. 

Experience a plus, but will train the right 

person. For an interview appointment call 

Bob Ulmer 

Lakeland Newspapers 

(847) 223-8161 x 113 




OT83BSS5C5 



CNA'S 

ADVANCEMENT - 

NEW SALARY SCALE! 

IF YOU LIKE 

WORKING WITH OLDER 

ADULTS AND KNOWING 

THATYOUR JOB MAKES 

A DIFFERENCE IN THEIR 

UVES EVERYDAY, THEN 

COME AND JOIN OUR 

UPBEAT AND POSITIVE 

TEAM BY CALLING PAM 

BONDAN. D.O.N. 

OR APPLY AT: 

LEXINGTON HEALTH 

CARE CENTER 

900 SOUTH RAND ROAD 

LAKE ZURICH, IL 60047 

PHONE: (847) 726-1200 

FAX: (847) 726-1265 



MecficaJ Opportunities 

The Heart & Soul 
Of Health Care 
At Proven* Saint Therein 
Medical Center, o sophisticated 
300+ bed facility serving ihe 
Lake County area, wo recognize 
& reward the special talents ol 
caregivers who lorm the heart & 
soul ot our hospital. 
MEDICAL 
TRANSCRIPTIONIST 
91.000 SIGN-ON BONUS! 
Must be a well organized, detaii- 
oriented Individual lo transcribe 
a variety ot medical reports. The 
ideal candidate should possess 
a minimum ol 1 year medical 
transcription & dictation exp., 
proficiency In medical terminolo- 
gy with the ability lo type 70-75 
WPM as well as exp. w/Windows 
95 & WordPerfect lor Windows. 

CODER/ABSTRACTOR 
Responsibilities will entail enter- 
ing In-patient & out-patient cod- 
ing. Must be an accredited 
Record Tech., have exp. In cod- 
ing using ICD 9 CM & CPT. Exp, 
w/a computerized encoding sys- 
tem Is highly desirable. 

CANCER REGISTRAR 
Responsible for Identifying & 
abstracting cancer cases as well 
as following up & coordinating 
cancer committee meetings & 
the cancer program report 
Chosen applicants will be self- 
starters with the ability to work 
Independently. CTR (or eligibili- 
ty) & a certification are a plus. 

Your expertise will be rewarded 
with an outstanding compensa- 
tion packago Including: 
comprehensive Insurance 
options, tuition reimbursement, 
an on-site day care & Illness 
cenleri 

Please apply in person or send 
your resume to: PROVENA 
SAINT THERESE MEDICAL 
CENTER, Human Resources * 
MK, 261 5 Washington St; 
Waukegan, IL 60085, 
FAX: 647-360-9856. (ooo rrVt/d\) 

PROVENA 
Saint Thereto 
Medical Center 



iSNurtJ 




J ,-. I mlrde^i Oxkii fcbgi-5^ 

S.Callf£mar4%' 

Palomar Medical % 

\ Center' £t:TSiiiieKH<0 

San Diego Co. have 
Rimmed. openings for 
■:■: RN» in foUerwihgif 
areas: 

•Emergency !>Hght»^' 

fwirj;.-"" ,'' - '■ - -■ ■ -'i'(M 




*% 



/? Palomar MR 



% 



* Center, ^SSlE. 



CrVi» 
760-7'^ 
760-739-37" 
yPomerattosHb 







fRecycJe 



Medical Opportunities 

■ PSYCHOTHERAPISTS ■ 

Yau> ilwiyi wulal to help people 

rulize their druna It imbiiioru, Thil'i 

*hy you bruriM ■ health are profet- 

itonil. Al Prartnt Silnl Theme 

Medical Center, we're proud to 

provide our cmployeei with pro- 

freiilve rtiourcci & in nmotphere 

which emblei you lo achieve per- 

iodiI tt. profenlonil frowih. 

The (elected ctndiditei will poi- 

mi a Mnitr'i Dcfrce In a Human 

Service! related Field (I.e. Piych. or 

Social Work Couriielini). poiteu 

human tervlcci experience, a 

menial health prolcuIoDil llcemure 

& ouutaadini commuuicailoa 

ikllli. A Degree In Nurilnf 

is highly dcilrable. 

Enjoy a convenient locallon & an 

ouitlindlDf compeoiiilon package 

Including: comprcheniive Iniurance 

opiioni, tuition relmbuncmenl, an 

on-iilc day care It (linen cenlcrl 

Please apply In person or tend your 

resume to; PROVENA SAINT : 

THERESE MEDICAL CENTER, 

Human Rtsourcci-RRT, 

2»1S Waihlngton Si., 

Waukegan, IL (0015 

PAXt 14T-M0-9fiS< 

(tot m/r/d/v) 

PROVENA 

Salnl Tbereie 

Medical Cetiter 



Help Wanted 
Puli-Tunc 



SRICEPTIOnisT ... 
Uttlwtu aiood Servkti utkt trlrnrju 
5 perion le grret i asw^l dorwrt, ichrd 
U ipplLi»rvtrttrthmntt,4ndrtstKk 

Swppiaii tor our IMHVVIU I uurx 
■OT Doner {enliri. fjre. cmrVctnt t vc 
, UtUt rro/d. tiberlyvtiK Tun t Th, 
V IMII-tJlRUM Hull: woo. i M«3. 
hi ItMl-tllp i rvrrg ether Sit. 
H cm tffUl Tttt tot 



iRestfluront 

lanffki Pay and B awa Wtal 

The Vill ao'o al Victory Lakes has 

Jan exdilng opportunity tor a 
dependoblo Indrvldual lo serve 
our senior dlorttolo In a laid back, 
relaxed atmosphere. 
COON 
This pan time position works 
evenings and weekends and 
requires al toast 1 year of fine 
dining or banquet cooking 

exporionco. 
EvsnlnryweelumoVhollday 
promlume. Full benefits package 
available II you work al least 40 
hrs. In a two-week period - Paid 
vacations and holidays, modkal 
and dental plans, dtscounla on 

Victory Memorial Hospital 

services, company-sponsored 

pension plan, tax-shettered 

annuities, and MUCH MORE 

Please apply In person betwaon 

73Oem-7:G0pm Mon-Sun al the 

Continuing Care Center, 1055 

Grand Avenue Quel oast ot Deep 

Lake Road), Undenhunt, IL 

(847)350-4551. 

Fax (347)356-4699. EOE. 



3DIUTSTE3RS 




I 

Mi 



School Bus i 
Drivers-ill 

needed Ml S J 
Fantastic Opportunity 
for 

MHJTARY 
SPOUSES 

and all others 

You can transfer your CDL lo 

jther states when you transfer. 

There are MANY Ryder 

locations in different states! 

# Bring your kids ro wotk- 
ihcy may ride with you 

■' on rouie • 

4 AM/ PM route driven 

(guaranteed hrs) . , 
fr College tuition relmb. 

* Free local employee shuttle 

• Charter Driven -2:30 p.m. 

• Raid Life Insuranee-J5,00Q 
all Medical Insurance Avail, 
Ki Company Assisted 401 (It) 

* Weekly paychecks 

* Safety Bonuses- J7I5 
aji Summer & Extra 

Work Available 
& Paid Training 
« Paid Holidays 

Three Great Locations 
Near You! 

Lake Forest call " 

847-680-9305 

Park City call 
. 847-244-5690 

Northbrookcall 
847-724.7200 



Xgydi 



er 

rutuc 

TXAitsroatTAmn 

lesrvKxs 



9JPOWflS0UNfJllNC.ISTHE 
HONESTS WRTiEST/UTC*trjnVE 

AHERMARKET ACCESSORIES 

DISTHBUTOaANO 

VOE STILL GROWlNa 

WoirocurmtlysooJgftg 

sel-motValod hdhiduah who vxi to 

bocorrw part ol one rj the tubal growtig 

lioKa In Iho aulomotVe hdusiry: 



LEARN MOBILE VIDEO, 
REMOTE STAHT SYSTEMS, 

. Automotive SECuniTY' 

AND MUCH, MUCH MOR^j 

We NOW have openings at our 

Schaumburg, Northbrook, 

Mundotefn, Usle, and 

Crystal Lake locations. 

Must have reliable, transportation 

and a vaid driver's Hcerm Ws 

oiler excellent earnings, a 

comprehensive Insurance 

package, profit sharing, 401K, 

paid vacation and free unilorms. 

Take aoVanlage ol these potential 
career yielding opportunities 

by calling: 

Ht GREEN 
WO-323-1006 

FAX: 708-633-1006 

SUPERIOR 

SOUND, NC. 

EOE 



BEGIN AIM EXCITING 
CAREER IN THE 

FASTEST GROWING 
FIELD OF THE 
AUTOMOTIVE 

^ INDUSTRY! - 



We will train you to cam 

$2,000 to $3,000 plus 

PER MONTH 

and 

PAY YOU... 

While you leam to become a 

complete and competent 
AUTOMOTIVE TECI 1NIOAN1 



M. 



January 22, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C17 




220 



Help Warned 
Full-Tlme 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



DRIVERS/OWNER OPERATORS 
Warned for local deliveries of 

bulk petroleum products, 

FT year round woik. Mini have 

CDL & 2 yn 'verifiable 

'* tractor trailer e*p. 

Call 1-BOO-892-G945 or 

815-962-4026. 

Ask for Gary or Dan, 

Monday- Friday flam-Spm 



' CA W kOKir enBNShm 

-EXPANDWQTiGAINr- 

Wo Need Qualified Union Installers 

FoflmmodlalaFuB-Tlmo 

Enjoyment. 

Must have own loo)* and buck. 

PtaasscalRayJacobaxilwspcoirtrmi 

(847) 357-0275 



Start a Home-Based Business, 

Work Flexible Hours, 

Enjoy Unlimited Earnings, 

AVON 

Call Toll Free (800) 735-8867 



adS 



DENTAL RECEPTIONIST 

Our Lake Forest dental practice needs a 

new full-time (32-36 hrs) tenni member. 

If you are seelcing a challenging and 

fun experience and you have a great 

personality and attitude we would like 

to meet you. . Previous office experience, 

especially dental office, would be 

very helpful. We offer competitive 

salary and benefits. 

Please call (847) 234-8608. 



Accounting 



Our 



GROWTH 

Has Room For You! 

Jaico Uniforms is a loader in ihe catalog distribution 
industry and YOU can share in our success. We offer 
profit. tnarlng, major medical, paid benefit lime and a 
:> professional environment. Applications are being 
accepted for Ihe following loom member: 



Accounts Payable Clerk 



The selected candidate will possess strong accounts 
payable background with problem solving ability and 
attention lo detail; Associate's degree or commensurate 
preferred. Responsibilities include processing ell 
accounts payable, reviewing all vendor invoices, 
troubleshooting and follow-up an all invoicing 
discrepancies, and bank account reconciliations. 

Please respond to Ruth Erbach, 847-821-7755, 
700 Corporate Woods Parkway; Vernon Hills, 
IL 60061, or fax to 847-821-8885. EOE 




Full Time & Part Time 
Tremendous Growth ■ 40+ Positions Added 



nelDIRECT, Chlcagoland's premier Internet service 

provider Is experiencing tremendous growth In 

1999, located In Gray slake. 



. . : ,We are in search of individuals for various jshi fts. j r ■■. ' 

R;? jfe^ shifts. 

Pvlust beabie ib'Voinmunicai'd effectively over uSe telephone, 



WE OFFER: 

• Aggressive Compensation Plan 

• Six-Month Salary Review 

• Paid 'Draining Program 

• Flexible Hours 

• Medical, Dental & Life Insurance 

• Tuition Reimbursement 

• Generous 401K Salary Savings Program 

• Employee Recognition Awards 

Please forward all inquires to: 

netDIlE 

CHICACCXANDS PREMIER INTERNET SERVICE PBCVtOEfi 

30 S. Whitney Street, Grayslake, IL 60030. 

Fax to: akw at (847) 223-881 

or e-mail: skw@us-netdlrect.com 




220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time. 



Receptionist/ 
Processor 



Full Time/ Part Time 

Position available at 

Grayslake 

Day-Care Center, 

flexible hours. 
Please call Shannon 

(847)548-3455 



Fox Lake Tax Office 

Seeking organized, 

pleasant seasonal 

fall-time person. 

Call 
847-587-^333 




restaurant new opening 



c>|N ,Yeor! 

Stail this 

year with a 
fun and festive = 
opportunity.,* 



3 



GflOfU 

GRILL 



Opening soon in Deerfield! 



earn up to earn up to 

$500+ per week $9 per hour 

(totil ukry A tips) • (pm tips) 

FLEXIBLE SCHEDULES - FULL & PART TIME - 

GREAT BENEFITS including: tuition assistance program, 

health club membership, car buying assistance, free 

employee meals, day care discount, paid vacations, 

insurance plan, training, growth potential & morel 

APPLY IN PERSON Mon-Fri 9am-4pm & Sat Sam-Noon 
at: 667 Lake Cook Road, right next to the 

Deerfield Metra Station! m*.mif 



I 

2 



jua smw 



Adlai Stevenson High School 

Lincolnshire, Illinois 

Support staff positions available 98/99 

Certified paraprofcHiomal/Applicd Aits — 10-month 
permanent position to start in January. Tutor students in 
business education curriculum. Certification and com- 
puter/technology background required. 
Salary: $1155/hour plus benefits. . 
. .Certified paxaprofcssional/ESL- 10- month perma- 
nent position starting second semester. Will serve as ESL 

liaison to teachers of mainstream content area courses 
whose ESL students arc experiencing academic difficulty. 
BA (preferably in English or reading), teaching certifica- 
tion and native English proficiency required. Word pro- 
cessing skills desirable. Salary: $U55/hour plus benefits. 
Locker room supervisor - 12-month, part-time position 
to start immediately. Responsibilities include supervising 
pool locker room plus some clerical duties. Hours: 3:30 to 
930 p.m. Monday through Friday. Salary: $930/ hour. 
Bos drivers/school services - 10-month, full-time, 
permanent positions driving bus route combined with 
work in other school areas such as food and custodial 
service, security, and clerical services. Flexibility in hour 
and responsibilities. Salary: $930/hour plus benefits. 
Resume to: Victoria Helandep-Heiser 
Director of Personnel 
Adlai IL Stevenson High School 
Two Stevenson Drive 
Lincolnshire, IL 60069 
847)634-4000 cxt. 320 



RESTAURANT 




Some Careers lake Years to Establish. 
All We Ask for is 5 Minutes. 

RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT 

OPENHOUSE 




Thursday, January 28 

10:00AM - 6:00PM 

890 S. Milwaukee Ave. 

Vernon Hills, IL 

Denny's, America's #1 full service family restaurant Is 

seeking to hire restaurant managers In the Lake County 

area. We offer our managers excellent benefits which 

Include: 

• Growth opportunities (Promotion from within) 

• Full corporate support 

• BonUMft it ill levils of minag i meni 

• HeiltWD«nUIAflslon/40l(Sc} 

•5DiyworkwMtt 

We also have several Full & Part Time positions available for the 
following positions lo work on ALL SHIFTS In Lake County: 

• Servers * Host Staff 
•Cooks »Bussers 

These positions offer top pay and vacation time. Stop by 

the address above on Thursday, January 28, for a 

Guaranteed Interview, and see all Denny's has to offer 

you. If you are unable to attend our Open House fax your 

resume to 847-462-1405 or call Jan at 847-516-1877, 

EOE M/F. 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Tune 



220 



Help-Wan tcxl 
Full-Time 



MACHINIST 

Growing manufacturer 
; In Lake Bluff looking 

• for 5 years minimum 
| experience In lathe, 
1 NC programmer/ 

operator, 4 Axis & 
mill turn centers. 

• Hands-on. Excellent . 
I benefits, friendly work 

environment 

5 Plsasetsend resume to: 

35 Baker Road 
; Lake Bluff, IL 60044 
or fax 847*549-9714 



: 



: 
: 



WAREHOUSE 

Major plumbing supply 
house has Immediate open- 
ing. Warehousc/forUift e«p. 
helpful, but will train. CDL 
. (Class C or B) a plus for 
occasional deliveries. 
Competitive wages and 
excellent benefit package. 
If you have the right atti- 
tude, take pride In your 
work & are looking for an 
opportunity with a growing 
company, fax/mail resume 
or apply Iii person: 

Kevin Daly 

Builder Plumbing Supply Co. 

1424 Armour Blvd. 

Mundeleln,tL 60060 

Fax: S47-362-B527 

eoe nVf/dV 



WiftrcuM 



We are looking for responsible, motivated 
Individuals who enjoy working in a a fast 
paced environment, are attentive to detail 
and nave Ihe ability to lift 70 lbs. 



WAREHOUSE 
OPPORTUNITIES 

Full & Part-Time Positions 



• Full Time Hours - 1 pm - 9:30pm M-F 

• Flexible Part-Time Hours - to fit your 
schedule 

• New Increased Starting Wage - 

• Salary Flange of $9.00 - $10.0Q/hour 
depending on position 

We are an equal opportunity employer. 
Apply In person or fax resumes to: 
Quill Corporation 
lOOSchelterDr., Lincolnshire IL 60069 
Fax: 847-634-5820 

MUl/W 

Where Potential Meets Opportunity. 



JOIN THE Jl/OE TEAWI! 

Be Part Of A Winning Team! 



• Accounts Payable 



WE'RE GROWING OUR COMPANY. Positions 

available at our Ubertyvllle location. The 

positions are full time. Computer skills are helpful. 

We will train the right person. Organizational 

skills, attention to detail, ability to meet 

deadlines and set priorities and a willingness 

to succeed will be characteristics of the 

right person who fills these openings. 

Benefit package includes Insurance, discount, 

401 k/Profit Sharing, vacation pay and more. 

Apply In person or call: 

Ace Hardware 

155 Peterson Road 

Ubertyvllle, IL 60048 

(847)362-3391 




^ uTJDSfM® Sate * 



Chicagoland's 
premier Internet 
service provider 
and web 
developer is in 
search of inside 
sales reps. 
Excellent 
commission 
structure. 

We offer flexible hours: 
8:30 am- 12:30 pm, 
12:30pm-4:30 pm or 
4:30 pm-8:30 pm. If you are 
interested In creating a future in 
a rapidly growing organization, 
fax resume to SKW 
(847)223-8810 or e-mail: 
skw@us-netdirect.com 

NetDirect 

Grayslake, IL 60030 
(847)223-8199 XI 74 




V 



J 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time I 



Experienced 

SALES 
help wanted 

for floor 

covering store. 

Call John at: 

AMERICAN 

FLOOR SHOW 

(847) 662-7900 



NEED "DAY CARE 1 ' 
EMPLOYMENT? 



Needed: 

Teacher & 

Teacher's Aide 

"BENEFITS 
AVAILABLE" 

CALVARY CHRISTIAN 

LEARNING CENTER 

134 Monaville Rd. 

Lake Villa, IL 
Ph: (847)265-0580 
Fax: (847)356-6524 



Social Services 
NIGHT MONITOR 

A leader In behavioral 
healthcare is recruiting 
for its drug treatment 

program for teenage 
girls. Provide overnight 

adult supervision. 
Benefits include health/ 

dental/life insurance 
and paid time off. Call 

or send resume to; 

Interventions/Contact, 

•PO Box 341 

WaucondaJL 60084 

PH: 847-516-0404. eoe 




Set-up 
• Shipping/Receiving 

American 

Industrial 

Co. 

Relocating to Gurnee, IL 

Ph. 847-6784848 
Fax 847-678-4545 



nLEIMKEiTR WWTED 

Telemarketing position leading 

to regional sales position. 
Wil perform cold cads, follow 
up with emotes and generate 

new business. 

This position requires a proven 

track record in telesales. PC 

skils, an aMity to interact wen 

with others, and strong 
organizational sJuHs. We offer 

competitive wages, 

health/dental/llfe insurance 

401K. and profit sharing. 

Send resume t* 

Peer Bearing company 
241 W. Palatine Road 

Wheeling. IL 60090 
. Fac 847-870-3337 
EOEM/F/D/V 



MANAGER TRAINEE 
EARN UP TO $35K-55K 

'IN MANAGEMENT 
+ BENEFITS 

Company will provide in-class 
expense-pmd training. 

To qualify: 

• Willing lo work long hours 
iT necessary, 

• Travel In local area. 

■ Legal age with access to 
reliable car. 

FOR CONSIDERATION 

FAX RESUME TO: 

8l5.547.99f» 

ATTN: 

SUB-REGIONAL MGR. 



J 






i ii T i TM^T ffljiSmgSC^B* 1 * M uLUMf I * btr? .w * * 'i . 




C18 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 22, 1999 



I 



*. 



; 



( 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Receptionist 

H0WDY1 20-22K/YR 
Anw. phones plus 

much more! 

Last 2 people have 

been promoted. 

Great oppty! 

Gurnee 

(847) 336-3700 

UbertyvtUe 
(847) 367-1117 



Full & 
Part Time 



!• Front Desk • § 

% All Shite & 

S Must be computer lileralo. K 

h, Experience praforred ^ 

i but wilt train. - N 

5 Apply In person % 

\ ADVENTURE INN | 

6 3740 Grand Ave. « 
Gumeo.IL 60031 § 



Drivers 

Immed openings, [f 
you have a CDL - A 
lie, clean MVR 6 cur- 
rent D.OT. Gunlhers 
Transport wanhs youl 
Join our team. 
Single or teams, 
95% no touch freight. 
Liberal home time. 
Plenty of miles. 
800-999-1980 



SERIOUS ABOUT 
CLEANING? 



[ team needs #1 people. 

TOP PAY 

M-F Hours 

Need Car - Paid Mileage 

Please Call 

merry marts 



300A N. Seymour 

Mundeleln 

847-970-5380 



iiiiuiiiiirmimimiiiiintitmiuimmiimtiiumuiBiiiiLi 
PERSONALITY PLUS7 

Customer Support - 

7 new positions now 

available $8-l0/lir 

plus incentives 

Superior Personnel 

244-0016 

Gurnee 

or 549-0016 

Vernon Hills 



© 



uperior 
Personnel 



luanninpiuninniiJiiiinniuiiiinnnmiiiHiiiiBnn 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



START YOUR YEAR OFF RIGHT 
FULL AND PART 71AAE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 
•GENERAL OFFICE 
COMPUTER SKILLS 

• OFFICE BOOKKEEPING 
COMPUTER SKILLS/ 
QUICKBOOKSAPLUS 

• RVSERVKETEGIS 
EXPERIENCE PREFERRED 

• SltOPHEtP/ClEANUP 
SllFSTARnR/MUSTHAVE 
VALID D.L 

GREAT PAY/BENEFITS/ 

FLEXIBLE HOURS 

CALL BOB OR BRIAN TODAY 

DRV.MUNDELDN 

S47-5tt4IBJ 



INSTALLERS 

Immed 

Openings-Sunny 

Phoenix, AZ. 

Progressive, 

expanding co. 

w/lst class 

cqpmt seeks 

qualified, 

motivated 

♦Installers 

* Me tal 
Fnb rlca tors 
602-269-6887 



• CUSTOMER SERVICE 
REPRESENTATIVE 

Loading Mia. oi sort good compo- 
nents Is searching lor a customer 
service rap. lo deal wtoxtornal & 
bilomal customers while handling 
customer invoicing & backup 
switchboard/phono covoraga Idea! 
candidate will have: 
•2-3 yrs. cusL sve, oxp. (pro! in 
manufacturing) 
•computer knowlodgo 
•outgoing/pleasant personality 
team ptayor approach 
Fax resume with cover letter staling 
position of interest to: 
J.Hill 647-491-1730. 






rJJ ^ JW-- ■ w»w»www»»-M-»* 



TEACHER & 
ASSISTANT 

YWCA School-Aged 

Program is seeking an 

energetic, fun-loving 

DCFS qualified 

teacher & assistant. 

Experience preferred. 

Afternoon hours. 

Call Jcralyn. 
(847)662-4624 



nn ■ ■ ■ i¥i 



cooO 



Administrative Assistant 

QUEST FOR THE BEST! 

32-36K/YR 

Looking for right hand 

person to "partner" 

w/new Sr. V.P.I 

Excellent Oppty! 

Gurnee 
(847) 336-3700 

Ubertyville 
(847)367-1117 




Growing church in Lake Zurich is 

looking for a full-time building 

maintenance manager. We are 

i looking for someone who is handy ' 

A at a multitude of building oriented 

r tasks. If you are interested and 
woLild enjoy working in a church, 
call Felix Mathew at 
847-540-8280 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Local builder has an 

Immediate opening 

for a full time office 

assistant. Duties 

Include phones, 

typing, data entry 

and general office 

work. Word Perfect 

experience a plus. 

Call Erin at 

(847)543-1134 



Mtip Warned 

Software Support 
Specialist. Full knowl- 
edge of Windows 95 
a must. Knowledge of 
NT helpful. Full bene- 
fits. Fast growing con- 
cern. Put your knowl- 
edge to work. 

Apply In parson: 
Inacomp Computer System* 
620 LakMlde Drive, Suit* 6 
Gurnet, IL 60031 



'lllll,MI,«,,»l<l,»,<»ltl«tl.,«,,|MII«IM»»l 

OFFice PosItIon 

Ant you mlUbli, 
i ii w,tiic am| \m 10 wook uriili? 
If you Iiavc LvmIc coMpvrce ildllt, 

miiUcaI on uYniaI of lie c upmitNcc 

v>d qood AtrtMi'oN io uWH, our 

bevy ohaI suRf,r Ry oilier. MAy bt 

ilic pUct Ion >wl Ifik fami office 
pothioN ftiQulnti full-riwt Ikxiki 

(ito ufliktftdf) And ufoy It b*ud 

tpON Up(pj(SC(. 

Otl 

(847)62?-5915 

ro find out mom. 

I •mi lull iMiinini >■ 



*Ai .imal Lovers ; : 
Needed* 

Immed Openings. ■ 

Exotic wildlife 
handlers needed to * 
bottle-feed infant 
; big cats, lesser cats, 
; primates & more, 
for educational, 
TV & film work. 
Relo to central KY. \ 
Live on premises. : 
616-733-1201 



Olive Garden 


Italian Restaurant 


* Servers 


* Bartenders 


* Hosts - Hostess 


all 


847-6S3-2317 


to set up an appointment 

for an Interview with the 

manager on duty 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Help Wanted FT/PT 

SERVERS, HOSTS 

fit RETAIL 

PERSONNEL 

No experience 

necessary, we will 

troln.Apply In person. 

Cracker Barrel 

5706 Northridge Dr. 

Gurnee, IL 



J- * - ... 

based business 

has a full time 

WAREHOUSE 

POSITION. 

Must'Keable.to 

lift heavy items. 

Salary, plus 

benefits. 

Gall 
847-526-1380 



Insulation 

Installers 

Needed 

experience 

preferred, but will 

train If needed. 

Southern Wl & 

Northern IL area 

Builders 

Insulation 

815-675-0085 



Employment 
Opportunities: 

Fox Lake Grade 
School District 
114 vacancies: 

Kindergarten aide 

full-time; 

general office help 

full-time; 

librarian or library aide, 

playground supervision, 

substitute teachers. 

For more 
information phone: 

847-587-8275. 



OFFICE 



Full time positions. 

Flexible hours. 

Vacation and 

benefits. 

$8-$15/HR 

Wauconda 

Call (847) 487-7000 

or fax resume to: 

(847)487-7003 




: CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE: 



GROWING LAKE COUNTY MANUFACTURING CO. 
HAS AN IMMEDIATE OPENING FOR FULLTIME 
CUSTOMER SERVICE RER DUTIES INCLUDE CUS- 
TOMER TELEPHONE CONTACT, SALES/ORDER 
ENTRY, AND UGHT DUTY TELEPHONE OPERATOR/ 
RECEPTIONIST. EXCELLENT STARTING WAGES AND 
.BENEFITS AVAILABLE FOR CANDIDATE WITH 
EXPERIENCE AND STEADY WORK RECORD. 
APPLY IN PERSON OR SEND RESUME TO: 
AIR-DRIVE, INC, 
4070 RYAN ROAD, GURNEE, IL 60031. 



Banking 

$500 SIGN-ON BONUSIH 

FIRST BANK OF HIGHLAND PARK 

Do you have previous cash handling, customer service, 
and/or general office experience? Do you enjoy serving cus- 
tomers? Are you looking to enhance your current skills? If so, 
an entry-level career In banking could be waiting for youlll 
First Bank of Highland Park Is seeking energized team players 
to Join their organization In a number of entry-level full & 
part-time positions. 

In you are Interested In starting a career In banking, why not 
start with First Bank of Highland Park? For more Information 
regarding career opportunities, please contact Human 
Resources at (847) 432-7800 X483. EOE 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Construction 



TlANH SURVEYOR 



■ Lund surveying co. books Party 
V Chiof, Instrument poraon ami rod 

poraon. Exportonco noodod 
5 Send rosumo to: Attn: Bryan. 31 
y S. Stussor. Grayslako, IL 60030 
»J ottaxloMT-223-MM.EOE 



MEAT CUTTER 



A family owned supermarket In 

Glfiuoe ifcking Full time AArat 

Cutter, erp. prtfrrmJ/ntellcnt 

bcnrfia.*OIK.H*jlihadrntJ.I. 

IVul vacation!. Come Join our 

fa miry. Call Dan or Mark 

M7-835-2842 



POSTAL JOBS 

lo$18.35/HR 

INCBENEFfTS 
NO EXPERIENCE. 

FOR APP. 

AND EXAM INFO, 

CALL 1-800-813-3585 

EXT 2406 

8AM-9PM 

7 DAYS fds, Inc 



• Resolution 1999 • 
New Job! 

Interviewing Now! 

Schaumburg, Notthbrook 

Processors, Closers, U/W, 

Auditors, Clerical Support 

Long Term, Temp/Perm 

SRS GROUP 

888-829-1160X79 



225 



Business ' 
Opportunities 



250 



School/Instruction 



320 



Electronics 
Computers 



LEARN SPANISH IN MEXI- 
CO hU p;/Avwvy.slpuqblB.com - 
Enjoy botlor jobs, exciting trav- 
el, business opportunities and 
a new language. Complete Im- 
mersion 4-weok programs. 
Within the U.S. Call 1-800-596- 
.3240 for brochure. Outside of 
U.S. e-mail: InfoOsloue- 
bJajojpJSCA Network). 

PIANO LESSONS 
I give lessons In my 
Grayslake home. 
11 yrs. experience. 
Please call Hanlie 
(847) 543-9023. 

PIANO LESSONS 

IN MY LAKE VILLA HOME 

OPENINGS 

Now for students 

6yrs. to adult.' 

Over 25yrs. experience. 

REASONABLE RATES. 

(847) 356-2780, 



MS OFFICE '97 WORD, EX-. 
eel, Power Pt„ Access Out- 
look, sealed, $79. (800) 
BOt-5345. 

OAK FINISH COMPUTER 
DESK AND CANNON BUB- 
BLE JET COLOR PRINT- 
ER with two now color ink 
tanks, excellent condition. 
Best olfor. (847) 740-4264. 

PENTIUM-120, CD-ROM, 
SPEAKERS, fax/modem, 
14ln. flatscreen VGA monitor, 
$450. 486-66, speakers, 
fax/modem, CD Rom, 14in. 
(lalscreen VGA monitor, $225. 
14ln, flatscreen VGA monitors, 
$40/ea. (847) 356-6950. 



324 



Farm Guide 



301 


Antiques 



SUPERB 1930'S AN- 
TIQUE BAR, 20ft. front and 
back glass doors, for your 
home or business, expertly fin- 
ished to match, $3,500. Cra- 
ted to ship local. Call Greg 
f847)336V»871. 



JOHN DEERE TRACTOR 
35HP, $3,000. Now Holland 
7lt, hay mower, $450. John 
Deere grain wagon and hoist, 
$850. John Deere end, gate 
seeder, $250. (630) 
232-6566. 



328 


Firewood. 



304 


Appliances 



HIGH CAPACITY WASH- 
ER AND ELECTRIC DRYER, 
white, 'no place to keep them,* 
$350 for pair or best offer. 
(847) 838-1 2B8. 



FIREWOOD 2 YEAR sea- 
soned Firewood, delivered. 
Mixed wood, 1-face cord, $65; 
1-full cord, $185. Oak, 1 : face 
cord, S75; 1-full cord, $195 
(220 pieces in face cord). Stak- 
Ing available. (847) 546-0656. 

FIREWOOD SEASONED 
HARDWOODS. Mixed- 

S65/F.C. Oak-S75/F.C. Prompt 
free delivery. (847) 247-1700. 



310 


Bazaars/Crafts 



$20,000 
IN FOUR MONTHS 

No selling. 

Will Train. 

800995-0798 

ext. 1255 

2-1 hrs. 

$5,000 -$10,000 

MONTHLY POTENTIALI 

No experience necessary. 

Work own hours. 

Economy booming. 

Home workers needed. 

Guarantee plus free bonuses. 

(847)963-2666 Ext. 11B 
24hrs. ■ 

CALLING ALL LAKE COUN- 
TY MOM'SMI Bright Begin- 
ning's Family Day Care Net- 
work Is looking for nurturing, 
responsible, creative individu- 
al's who would like to start 
their own bulsness while stay- 
ing at homo with their children. 
If you live In Lake or McHenry 
County and would like assis- 
tance In getting licensed, on- 
going technical assistance, 
training, equipment lending, 
and child referrals this pro- 
gram Is for you. For more in- 
formation on how to become a 
quality infant and toddler day 
care provider in your home 
call Dena Thompson at (647) 
356-4112 

BECOME A MAIL ORDER 

INVESTMENT BROKER. 

Earn thousands, like us. 

We'll tell you who pays best. 

Act now to secure your future. 

For FREE Information, write: 

WM Enterprises, 

P.O. Box 462, 

Lake Bluff. III. 60044. 

NEED EXTRA INCOME?? 

Start off the New Year. 

Becomo a Homemaker's Idea 

Company Consultant, 

•Unlimited Income* 

■Bonuses* 

•Flexible Hours* 

•Be Your Own Boss* 

Perfect for stay at home 

moms 

Call Todaylt 

1-600639-4516. 

OWN YOUR OWN APPAR- 
EL, shoe, westernwear, linger- 
ie, bridal, gift or $1.00 store. In- 
cludes Inventory, fixtures, buy- 
ing trip, training. Minimum In- 
vestment $16,900. Call Paul at 
Liberty. 1-501 -327-8031. 

SPEND TOO MUCH $$$$ 

ON CHRISTMAS??7III 

Earn Excellent Income 

$500-31500 Part-Time 

$2000-34000 Full-Time. 

CALL NOW 

(888) 382-5507. 

WANT TO REACH 8 MIL- 
LION HOUSEHOLDS? You 
can now place your ad in more 
than 600 suburban newspa- 
pers reaching more than 8 mil- 
lion households around North 
America with one simple call at 
a low, low cost. For details call 
800-356-2061. (SCA Not- 
work). 



330 



Garage 
l?unnn;i|>t' Sale 



BEANIE BABY SALE 

Best Inn 

1809 N. Milwaukee 

Ubertyville. 

Thursday 1/21. 

11am-7pm. 
Free Admission. 



BEANIE BABY SALE 

Holiday inn Gurnee, 

6161 Grand Ave. 

Friday, 10am-10pm. 

Saturday, 10am-7pm. 

Sunday, 9am-7pm. 

Free Admission, 

BEANIE BABY SHOW 
. Great Lakos Youth Center, 
Forrestal Village, 
Friday, January 22nd. 

5:30pm-9:30pm. 
In Recroom next to gym. 

CRAFTERS WANTED 

SELL your crafts to the world 
through our craft mall on the 
Internet. For more Information 
call Handmade by Val (630) 
463-1945. 



CALVARY 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

510 Cedar Lake Rd. 

Round Lake. 

January 21st. & 22nd, 

.9am-6pm. 

January 23rd. 

' 9am-12noon. 

AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIG SALE, 'and there 
Is still things that' just did not 
go.... Call us at LAKELAND 
Newspapers and run It 
under the "FREE or Givea- 
ways" classified column. FREE 
ADS are NO CHARGE) 
(847)223-8161. oxt: 140. 



338 



. Horses &. Tacks 



314 


Building Materials 



BUILDING SALE...NO 

SALESMAN. Go direct and 
save, Final clearance. 20x26 
$2,600. 26x30 33,145. 30x40 
$4,750. 35x50 $6,100. 40x60 
$7,800. 48x90 $12,000. Olh- 
ers. Pioneer 1 -800-300 J 2470. 



16.1H 5YR. OLD Bay TB 

Gelding, $2,500. 16.2+H, 7yr. 
old Black TB gelding, 33,000. 
15.3H APHA solid color 7yr. 
Sorrel gelding, sound, sane, 
uphill build, nice gaits, $6,000. 
16.3H Grey Syr. TB gelding, 
big boned, big stride, quiet, 
shown dressage, started over 
X'S. $8.000. (414) 889-4700. 

HORSE/DAIRY HAY, ALL 
types, cornstalks and straw, 
round/square. (414) 

275-2251. 

MIXED HAY FOR SALE 
$2.00/bale. Clean wheat 
straw, $2.50/bale. Can deliver. 
(630)232-6566. 

TWH 10YR. OLD Mare, reg. 
bik, gentle and broke, $2,500. 
(847) 623-2723, 




CALLING ALL WORKING 
PARENTSItt Winter Is Just 
around the corner, have you 
planned your children's day 
care yet? Immediate openings 
for children ages 6 weeks and 
up are available In Bright Be- 
ginning's Home Day Care Net- 
work. For more Information on 
how to enroll your child In a 
conveniently located, quality 
day care home please call 
Dena Thompson at (847) 356- 
4112. SPACES ARE LIMITED 
SO CALL IMMEDIATELY. • 

CHILD CARE CERTIFIED, 
references, 1st and 2nd shift. 
Full or part-time, snacks pro- 
vided, 2019 45th St. (414) 
656-1486. 



CHILD CARE GRANT 
School area, 1st or 2nd shift. 
Meals, references. (414) 
652-1569. 



CHILD CARE IN a loving 
and educational home day 
care. Call Rebecca (847) 
546-4330, ■ . 

CHILD CARE WORKED all 
week? Get a life, a night life. 
(414)942-0368.' 



FOSTER. HOMES NEED- 
EDI Wanted good, nurturing 
Individuals to provide tempo- 
rary homes for children ages 
birth to adolescent. Training, 
support, compensation, day 
care provided. Contact Cathol- 
ic Charities/Lake County. 
(847) 782-4242 or (847) 782- 
4243. ' 

HAPPY, CARING MOM 
looking to watch children after 
school, Gurnee School Dis- 
trlct, $25/week. please Call 
Cathy (B47) 249-4833 . 

LINDENHURST MOM HAS 
openings. Excellent care In 
Ideal home, ages 2 & up," (847) 

356-6748. 

MCHENRY/JOHNSBURG 
MOM FT/PT opening, rea- 
sonable rates. (615) 
363-6801, ' V ' 

MOM WITH DAY CARE 
TEACHING EXPERIENCE 

has openings In her Wildwood 
home. Part/FulMlme, Monday- 
Friday. 6am-6pm, Meals and 
snacks Included. Lots of TLC 
and Fun. (847) 548 -0890. ' 

NEED A SITTER? Mother of 
4 looking to babysit In my 
=iound Lake home, (847) 
546-2884. * V 



I) 



January 22, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C 1 9 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



BEDROOM SET, SOLID 
oak, no bed, drossor, chest, 
night stand, excellent -condi- 
tion;- $500/bost., (847) 
546-4599. , ' ■ 

BRASS BED QUEEN deluxe 
maitross set, with framo, sacri- 
fice $250. (414) 453-0072 Ke- 
noa ha. T , • 

DESIGNER MODEL 

HOMES FURNITURE 

.CLEARANCE! 

Sola/lovosoat sot, 
hunter greon, $495. 
Sofa, white, $350. 

Sofa/lovoseat, 

earth tones, $595, 

. Also: Plaids, Florals, 

Leathers and More. 

Dlnlngroom sets, 10-plece: 

Cherry, $1 ,395, 

Mahogany, $2,395, 

Oak $1,695. 

. Other sets available. 

Also; Bedroom Sols, 

from $995. 

(647) 329-4119. 

www.modelhomofurnilure.com 

DESK, LEOPOLD CIRCA 
1910, oak, glass top 6x3ft., 
$300. 90 hardcover books, 
most 1940's, $100. Italian Pro- 
vincial china hutch, glass 
doors, $200. (630) 671-3256. 

FORMAL DININQROOM 
TABLE, 6 navy blue uphol- 
stered chairs, 1 in. thick bev- 
eled glass top with dark hard- 
wood base. $2,400 new, ask- 
ing $700. Excellent condition. 
Must see to appreciate. (647) 

973-0460. 

FURNITURE FOR SALE 
TWO INTRICATE DE- . 
TAILED WHITE IRON 
DAYBEDS, WITH CANO- 
PY AND POCELAIN AC 
CESSORIES, BEDDING 

INCLUDED. - LITTLE 

TYKES LARGE BOOK 
CASE AND CHEST, 
WOODEN HOPE CHEST. 
HEAVY WICKER DRESS- 
ER WITH FORMICA TOP. 
OTHER FURNIUTE. ALL 
FURNITURE IN NEW 
CONDITION. WAUCONDA 
AREA (615) 344-1678. 

QUEEN SIZE ORTHOPE- 
. DIC ^MATTRESS SET " and 

frame. Never used still In pies-' 
tic. Cost $1,000, sell $300. 
(815)547-8157., 

SLEEPER SOFA, MAT- 
TRESS Included, beige 
design, good condition, $150. 
Hotpolnl gas stove, works 
well, $150. (847)223-8031,' 

SOFA AND LOVESEAT, 
Santa Fe" design, burgundy, 
grey, evergreen, saoo/bost. 
(847) 244-2353. ___ 

SOFA WILLIAMSBURG 
CAMEL- back, off white, 
6/months old, $500. (647) 
656-1 092 alter 6pm. 

THREE PIECE SECTION- 
AL SOFA, off white, Includes 
2-pillows, excellent condition, 
S6Q07best. (847) 549-6128. ' 



349 




FOR SALE BEAUTIFUL 
RACOON SHORT JACK- 
ET.' Excellent , condition. 
$200/best, (647)356-1148. 

FUR COATS MINK.' and 
leather, 3/4 length, $500/ea. 
Red Fox. 3/4 length. $500. 
(630)289-^211. 




1991 CAMARO 350 CHIP 
SHIFT KIT, $6,000. Sony tape 
deck, $100. Kenwood CD play- 
er, $200. Compaq Presarlo 
1610 laptop, $2,500. Hewlett 
Packard Desk Jet 670C, $200. 
Black thick futon, $250. New 
Laz-Boy recliner sofa, $650. 8' 
Bazooka Bass Tube, $250. 
Hamster and cage, $20. Make 
offers. (815) 675-3051. 

BEANIE BABIES, TEENIE 
Beanie, Sammy Sosa Bamm 
Beano, Mark McGuire Bamm 
Beano and Barbies. (847) 
731-2021. 

BEANIE BABIES SOME 
RETIRED Including Manny, 
Ubearty, Garcia, many others, 
also set of 4 Brown Bears, 
Bamm Beanos, The Kings of 
Baseball: Sosa, - McGwire, 
Marls, Ruth. RLB area (847) 
543-0416 alter 5 pm; 

BED SET, PINE, king size, 
4-poster, Mac LC with person- 
al laser writer. - (847) 
295-8677. ■ 

HORSE FIGURINES EX- 
CELLENT reproductions. 12 
breeds, limited quantities. 
(847)934-1190, 




ORNAMENTAL ANIMAL 
CONCRETE MOLDS, 7 for 
$600, (847) 392-7366. 

QUARTER SCALE STOCK 
CAR, ready lo run, includes ra- 
dio, 3 bodies, 4 spare tiros, 
tools and extra parts, $1,250. 
(615)399-0664. 

SKIS, 35MM CAMERA, van 
rack, glass shade,, fax, bike, 
Nordic Track Ab, (847) 
382-0720. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS. 
TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT 
and SAVEi Commercial/home 
units from $199. Low monthly 
payments. FREE color cata- 
log. Call today 1-800-042- 
1310, 



354 



Medical Equip 
Supplies 



ELECTRIC HOSPITAL 

BED with 6 settings, hospital 
table and > walker included, 
5900/firm, Excellent condition. 
(8471 623-8342. 



360 



Pets & Supplies 



AIREDALE 
10/MONTHS 
great with 
857-7665. 



old, 
kids. 



AKC, 

female, 

(414) 



COCKATIELS, HANDFED, 
ALL colors. Sun Conures. Par- 
rats. -Cages available also, 
(414)857-2915. 

DOG SITTING 

IN MY HOME. 

State licensed, 

Reasonable Rales. 

Call Florence (847) 966-6319. 

DUTCH- MALE RABBIT, 
6/months, $15. Mini Rex fe- 
male rabbits, lyr., $15. Pedi- 
grees. (815)675-9200, 

FOR A FEW pennies more, 
get latest technology in liquid 
wormers. HAPPY JACK UQUI- 
VICT delivers actives better 
than older formulas. Feed and 
hardware stores. (WWW.HAP- 
PYJACKINC.COM) 

GERMAN SHEPHERD 

PUPPIES AKC, born 
11/19/98, $400. (815) 
943-8062 after 4:30pm. 

GERMAN SHEPHERD 

PUPPIES, AKC, Import lines', 
shots, wormed, see parents, 
males only, $250: Guar- 
anteed. (414) 835-4618. 



GOLDEN RETRIEVER 
AKC PUPS, shots, wormed, 
males $200, females, $450. 
Cocker puppies AKC, shots, 
wormed, S200-S400. (920) 
825-7487, . 

GOLDEN . RETRIEVER 
PUPS AKC. dewclaws re- 
moved, all shots. Must see. 
Mates $350, females $400. 
(414)884-0119. 

GOLDEN RETRIEVER 

PUPPIES AKC, 5375, ready 
now, (414)656-0898. . 



GOLDEN RETRIEVERS 

AKC, 2- males, 13/weeks old, 
father OFA. Parents on site. 
$200/ea. (414) 24B-7688. 

GREAT PYRENEES PUPS 
AKC, farm raised, wonderful 
wilh children. Ready to go, 
$350, (815) 743-5760. 

PINSCHERS, MINIATURE 
AKC REGISTERED, born 
10/6/98. All shots, black and 
tan, 1 male, 1 female. (414) 
740-0126. 



ROTTWEILER/LAB PUPS, 
7/WEEKS old, $20/ea. (847) 
546-0951. : 

ST. BERNARD PUPS AKC, 
guaranteed, adults also, pay- 
ments OK, $300-5500. (315) 

569-2907, ■ 

THE SCOOP 
COMPANY 

Pet Clean-Up Service 

Affordable Rates. 

Weekly service. 

(847) 548-4633. 



__H 



Tools & 
Machinery 



POWER WASHER VALUE 
over $3,000, will sell $1,200. 
Like new. 4200 PSI, 13hp. 
(847) 731-3239. 

TWO HORIZONTAL 

BANDS AWS, 16inx4ln. ca- 
pacity. Bridgeport mill, 1hp mo- 
tor, 32in. table with 2 access 
read out display. Misc. Collets. 
15in. drill press on stand, Beit 
disc sander, 10in. disc and 
48ln. belt. (847) 381-7524. 



370 



Wanted To Buy 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For Sale 



BEANIE BABIES BUYING 
all retlreds. We pay top dollar. 
(414) 697-7923 Konosha, 

Wisconsin. 

COUNTRY BOUTIQUE AN- 
TIQUES (Established since 
1966) Is Interested In buying 
silver, china, paintings, jewel- 
ry, glassware, furniture and 
other old objects of Interest. 
(847) 546-4295. 

LOOKING TO BUY 2 graves 

in Antloch Hillside Cemetery, 
section 7. (847)546-0161. 

BUYING RETIRED BEAN- 
IE BABIES. Please call Mike 
after 7pm weekdays or all day 
weekends 1-868-291 -4932, 
pin #6104, Ubertyville area. 

Slot. Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
Parts, Alio JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coke Machines, 
Paying CASHI Call 
(630)985-2742. 

SOMEONE WHO VIDEO 
taped "Jag* on December 15, 
■Jangles'. (647) 438-5060. 

STEINWAY PIANO WANT- 
ED11I Grand or upright type. 
Any age or any condition. Will 
pay cash and pick-up. Call 1- 
888-627-1079 anytime. 

WANTED ANTIQUES, 

DESPERATELY needed, 
Old furniture, marble' top ta- 
bles, dressers, dlnlngroom 
and living room sets, sofas, 
stain glass lamps, rugs, oil 
paintings, clocks and anything 
interesting. Please call (847) 
587-5848. 

WANTED TO BUY TRAC- 
TORS and attachments, any 
condition. (414) 767-9023. 



NO DOWN PAYMENT Per- 
fect bachelor or get away 
house, 1-2 bedrooms, cedar 
shako exterior, new carpet 
and paint throughout, 
100x120 size lot/trees, quiet 
lot 5 blocks to Paddock Lake 
Beach. $65,000/$2,000 homo 
docoratlng allowance. (414) 
767-9023. ; 

SALEM SPECTACULAR 
LAKE views. New construc- 
tion, 3-bedrooms, targe mas- 
ter bedroom with lake view, 2- 
baths, fireplace, attached 2- 
car garage. Lake and boat 
rights. $159,900. (414) 
894^-0089 evenings or woo- 
kends. 

THIS IS IT!" Round Lake 
Nice 3+bedroom trl-level, A/C, 
2+car garage, $113,900. 
(647) 740-2654. 

THREE BEDROOM 

RANCH, hardwood floor In liv- 
Ingroom and bedroom, 
fenced-in yard, on a quia I 
street In Round Lake Park, 
$65,900. (847) 497-3559. 

VA/HUDREPOS! 

New lists weekly. 
Call Ryan & Co., Realtors 
■Your Repo Specialists.' 

(847)526-0300. 

WHITE BRICK RANCH, 4- 
bedrooms, 2-1/2 baths, 2 
blocks from Grade. Junior 
High and High Schools. Locat- 
ed In cul-de-sac, very private. 
On 4th fairway. McHenry 
Country Club. No agents or 
brokers. (815) 385-8162. 

ZION 3-BEDROOM, 2- 
BATH, basement, ' deck, 
fenced yard, attached garage, 
$109,900. (847) 746-6225 
leave message. 



BEAUTIFUL 3-BED- 

ROOM, 2.5 bath ranch with 
oversized 2.5 car garage and 
full finished basement. Knotty 
pins cathedral beam, wood 
burning fireplace, skylights, 
wet bar, too much to list, on a 
beautiful partially wooded lot. 
Asking $159,000. Call (or ap- 
polntment (847) 265-1 111. 

DEER PARK OWNER moth 
vated. New, reduced S635K, 
4/5 bedrooms, 2-fireplaces, 3- 
car garage, finished walk-out, 
1st floor master suite, gour- 
met kitchen, 1 acre," 4-1/2 
'baths, security system. (630) 
773-4089; 

FOX RIVER GROVE, 3- 
bedrooms, 2-story, open floor 
plan in Foxmoor. Must see. 
$179,500. (847)516-9206, 

GRAYSLAKE CHESA- 
PEAKE FARMS 6yrs. old 
and looks brand new, 4-bed- 
rooms, 2-1/2 baths, gas fire- 
place, bay window, arches, pil- 
lars, neutral decor, master 
bedroom with volume celling, 
mature trees and lots more. 
$184,900. NO REALTORS. 
(847) 548-7718, 

HOFFMAN ESTATES 4- 
BEDROOMS, 2-1/2 baths, 
1st. floor den, hardwood 
floors, cathedral ceilings, fire- 
place, Barrtngton School Dis- 
trict, $318,900. (847) 
468-0255, 

LAKEVIEW OF GAGES 
LAKE In private subdivision. 3- 
bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, at- 
tached 2-1/2 car garage, large 
family room, oak kitchen, fire- 
place, deck overlooking beach 
across street, Woodland and 
Warren schools, $132,000. 
(847) 223-4259. 

LIKE NEW RAISED 
RANCH, Indoor pool/jacuzzl. 3- 
bedrooms, 1-1/2 baths, fin- 
ished basement with fireplace, 
newer carpet, ceramic tile, all 
appliances, fenced yard, 
$159,900. (847) 546-8145. 

MCHENRY 2YR. OLD, 2- 
story home, open floor plan, 
brick and aluminum exterior, 2- 
car garage, tile floors, cathe- 
dral ceilings, 2-fireplaces, 3- 
bedrooms, 2-1/2 baths, dl- 
nlngroom, sittlngroom, kitch- 
en, llvingroom, English base- 
ment with family and tiled play- 
room, cedar deck, 2 levels and 
gazebo. Asking $184,900. 
(815)363-8253, 

MUNOELEIN A MUST SEE 
1 -bedroom, famllyroom or 
second bedroom, everything 
new In the last eight years; 
windows, roof, etc. 2-1/2 car 
Insulated garage,, fenced 
yard, excellent condition. Per- 
fect for single or busy couple; 
REDUCED $115,900. (847) 
566-7690. 



Lake Villa- Beautiful 

3 BRTH-Level. 

NOMONEVDOWNt 

Quiet tree-lined 

community. 24 hr 

recorded msg. 

i-888-436-7308 

Ext. 92202, 

Panorama of 

Homes, Inc. 



~MundeIeln-3BR 
Garden Home. 

NO MONEY DOWN. 

Quiet, tree-lined 

community. 24hr. 

Recorded Msg. 

1-888-436-7308 

Ext 92192. 

Panorama Of 

Homes, Inc. 



All-Subs 

REPO S 

Low down! 

••CALL- 

A. company you can trust 

•MEMBER BETTER BUSINESS* 

Liberty Re. Inc. 

.630-539.6200 



REPOS 

Ciry 476,725 

Lake InTha Hilli ..490,000 

Laka Villa $55,000 

McHenry $83,000 

Wonder Laka ...... $57,000 

Woodstock fM.OQO' 

Mundelcln 41 68,600 

, Member of the 
Better Builneu Bureau 

Call Liberty RE Inc 

63O-S39--6200 



Gov't Foreclosures 

Beach Park 3 BR Newer 

$115,700 

Zlon3/6 BR $69K& I53K 

N. Chicago 6 BR $70,650 

Round Lake TH 3 BR 

$46,550 

Mundeleln 3 BR 

$90,250 & ¥166,800 

UkeVlllaZBR $72,350 

low down; 

make offer 

western realty 

630-495-6100 
847-778-2962 




Call Usa at 




504 



Homes For Rent 



11TH AVE., 6322-NICE, 
roomy 3-bedrooms, 1-bath, 
no pets, available January 
15th, $750/monlh plus securl- 
ly. (414) 694-5129. 

BURLINGTON, WISCON- 
SIN. LAKEFRONT house, 3- 
bedrooms, 1-1/2 baths, 
$950/mon1h, 1st & last plus 
security, deposit. Available 
January 21. (414) 537-2361, 

.CAPE COD STYLE 3-bed- 
room, 2-bath, basement, ga- 
rage, laundry hook-ups, 

stove/refrigerator provided, 
$995/monlh plus deposit. Call 
Wendy today (414) 537-2905. 

THREE BEDROOM APART- 
MENT, laundry facilities, large 
famllyroom, In downtown Mu- 
ndeleln above store. 
. SSSO/month. (847) 568-4021, 

ROUND LAKE BEACH UP- 
DATE 3-bedroom ' 1 bath 
ranch on double lot. Eat-In 
kitchen. New appliances and 
carpeilng. Freshly painted. 
Full basement. Available Fe- 
bruary 1st. $995/month. (847) 
945-5217. 



ROUND LAKE BEACH 
Newly updated 4-bedroom, 1- 
bath trl-level. New carpeting, 
flooring, paint and appliances. 
Available January. 15th. 
$1.049/monlh. (847) 
945-5217. . 

SMALL 1-BEDROOM 

HOUSE, big yard, naw carpet 
and pafnt, $575/rnonth plus 
security. (414) 767-9023. 

TWIN LAKES, WISCON- 
SIN (2) 3-bedoom homes, 
$895/month. (414) 537-4410." 



TWO BEDROOM, 2-BATH 
home, on Plstakee Lake, In 
Johnsburg. No pets. Security 
deposit and references re- 
quired, (B47) 234-8900, 

VERNON HILLS DEER- 
PATH, 4-bedrooms, 2-1/2 
baths, fireplace, CAC, 2-car 
garage, new carpel- 
ing/palnt/UIe, available Febru- 
ary. (847) 387-6109. 



WATERFRONT FOX LAKE 
at 50 N. Lake Ave,, 3-bed- 
room, 2-bath house, 
$7O0/month. Available Febru- 
ary 1st. Call Gregg (847) 
835-0709. . 

WILDWOOD RANCH 3- 
BEDROOM, 1-bath, full 
basement, garage, fenced 
yard, short" walk to lakes, 
Sl.iOO/month. More details 
call (847) 604-2124. 

WONDER LAKE CUTE but 
very small 2-bedrOom. Ideal 
for single or couple, 
$625/month. No pets. (815) 
653-9964. 





Wriilt to the train! 

1 BR Duplex ■■- 2nd 

Floor. 

No garage. 
Long Term Lease, 

$475/mo> 
utilities & sec dep. 




514 



Condo/Town Homes 



GRAYSLAKE TOWN- 

HOME 2-BEDROOMS, plus 
loft, 1,5 baths, livingroom, dl- 
nlngroom, den, A/C, wash- 
er/dryer, cathedral ceilings, 
skylights, large balcony, eat-In 
kitchen, all appliances, gas, 2- 
car garage, $t,050/month 
plus deposit. (847) 548-7973. 

GURNEE 2-BEDROOM, 

DEN, 2-balh, 1 -car. garage, 
'A/C, washer/dryer, 

$1,100/month Includes water, 
gas; Available 2/1. No pets. 
Terl (847) 735-1 258. 

HANDYMAN ROUND 
LAKE BEACH 551 MEADO- 
WHILL LN. 3-bedrcom 1-1/2 
bath, fireplace, 1-car garage, 
private yard, $81,900. Wan- 
land '& Associates (773) 
545-3134, 

UBERTYVILLE 2-BED- 

ROOM CONDO for rent, 
$925/month. (847) 362-5366. 

PLUM RIDGE 6621 Mariner 
Dr., 2- bed room, 2-balh upper. 
Exceptionally clean, beautiful- 
ly decorated. Pool view. De- 
tached 1-car garage. .Optional 
chalriift and all household fur- 
nlshings. (414)637-4852. 

VERNON HILLS MOTI- 
VATED. Georgetown Square. 
New 2-bedroom, 2-bath ranch 
townhouse. Many upgrades, 2- 
car garage, $197,900. (847) 
478-9738. 



ELK GROVE BY OWNER 
Deluxe 1995 Skyline 2-bed- 
room, 14x56, all appliances, 
bay window, C/A, skylile, ceil- 
Ing fan. (847) 640-0384. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

OVER 55 COMMUNITY. 

New 1907 

Manufactured home 

1-bedroom, 1-bath" 

with garage and recroom. 

Includes: washer/dryer, 

stove/refrigerator, 

oft street parking. 

$54,900. 

1988 2- bed room, 2-bath, 

carport, shed and deck, 

$39,900. 

1996 2-bedroom, 2-bath , 

with garage, $50,900. 

Available immediately. 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message, 

MODULARS - DOU- 
BLEWIDES - SINGLEW1DES 
-ILLINOIS LARGEST DIS- 
PLAY OF MODEL HOMES. 
FOUNDATIONS, BASE- 

: MENTS, GARAGES, SEPT- 
ICS - WE DO IT ALU! FREE 
STATEWIDE DELIVERY/IN- 
STALLATION. RILEY MANU- 
FACTURED HOMES 1-800- 
798-1541. 

SUPER CLEAN MOBILE 
HOME. New furnace and 
water heater, cabinets galore, 
larger bath. Must sell, 
$a,000/best. (847) 249-2805. 





FABULOUS 
2-3 BEDROOM 

TOWNHOME 



a; 



Cm/ 

th 1.5 baths, 

fireplace, basement, 

C/A & 2 car garage. All 

appliances Included, no 

pets. Affordable $950 

per month. 

Available now!!! 

Call Rick O'Connor 

RE/MAX 

Traditions 

800-383-5721 



55TH ST. 2424, 2-bedroom 
upper, spacious, clean, 
$475/month plus deposit. 
(414) 697-4143. 

FOX LAKE AREA-ON 134, 
newer 1-bedroom apartment, 
1st. floor. No pets. 
$600/month. (647) 297-5018. 

FOX LAKE STUDIO located 
on Nippersink Lake. Heat and 
water Included. 5400/month 
plus security. (847) 587-7406 
leave message. 

GAGES LAKE SMALL 2- 
bedroom ' apartment above 
garage, 1 -adult preferred. No 
. pets. Available end ol Febru- 
ary. $500/month. (847) 
223-4277. 

GURNEE/WAUKEGAN 
NORTH SHORE 
APARTMENTS 

N At Affordable Prices. 
Spacious. 
Luxury Living. 
Elevators. - 
On Site Staff. 
Good Location. 
Easy to Toll Roads. 
IMPERIALTOWER/MANOR. 
(847) 244-9222. 



Scout 

405- 




Alajidtnark 



The Scout (405-28) follows traditional style brick wainscoting and a columned entry with 
contemporary touches, like the octagon window in the master bath and the doorway windows in the entry. 
Inside, this well-appointed plan provides excellent traffic flow from the guest entry, as well as the garage 
entry, into the rest of the home. The entry also offers a unique alcove (o display collectables or a 
favorite painting. 

The master suite is located on the opposite side of the home from (he secondary bedrooms. This design 
is becoming increasingly popular wilh parents wanting to give their children more freedom to play their 
music and have friends over without being disruptive. A full bath is located at the end of the hall, close to 
the bedrooms, while a large linen closet is just across the hall from the utility room. A window in the 
utility room, and the counter space below it, make the task of folding clothes more enjoyable. 

The kitchen is integrated very welt into this open plan. Ample cabinet space and a large pantry are 
balanced by an open peninsula with the sink and dishwasher on one side and a raised eating bar on the other. 
More than enough room lies beyond the eating bar for a large family dining table. 

The great room is brightened along the rear wall of the home with large windows, and a patio door leads 
outside for enjoying nice weather, The space is targe enough for many furniture arrangements, accommo- 
dating a family's constantly changing needs. 

To the right of the entry is the den with a door entry near the master suite. The spacious room could serve 
as a formal entertaining room, a movie room or an office. 
The master suite at the end of lite hall is quite large, and ' 
features double sinks in the dressing area, separated from the 
rest of the bath by a pocket door. 

The Scout is a plan welt-suited for many families because 
of its versatile, spacious design. ■'• 

For a study kit of the SCOUT (405.28LP60) send $14.95, 
lo Landmark Designs, 33127 Saginaw Rd, E, Cottage GroYc.rj^? 
OR 97424 (Specify plan name & number for kit). For a col- 
lection of plan books, send $20.00, or save by ordering the kit 
and collection together for $29.95, or call 1 -800-562- 1151. 




_J^S_lf 





"31 '^SZZZZ^i'iS'YnmZimi'T'K .yvnaW»M^ 



a=t*--. 



-=r 



C20 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 22, 1999 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



LAKEVIEW TERRACE 

APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA, Largo 1 & 2 bedrooms, 
$610-S745/monlh. Heat, wa- 
ter, air Included. (847) 
356-5474. 

SPACIOUS NEWLY RE- 
MODELEO 2-bodroom, dish- 
washer, heat Included, quiet 
building, $58E/monlh. (847) 
336-2917. 

VACATION VILLAGE 

LARGE studio apartment, 
2nd floor, laundry facilities, so- 
cured entrance, access to 
Chain 0' Lakes. (847) 
336-4733. 



VACATION 


VILLAGE 


FURNISHED 


STUDIO, 


ovailabio 


Feb 1st., 


$460/monlh. 


Largo studio, 


available 


Fob 1st., 


$480/month. 


1-bodroom, 


available 


Fob 1st., 


S625/month. 


(847) 438-6200 


Remax HNW Ftoyd Edwards. 



WAUKEQAN 1 & 2 bed- 

room apartments, plus utlll- 
ilos, Section 8 Welcome, (847) 
604-2981. 

ZION LARGE 2-BED- 
ROOM, appllancos Included, 
5600/monih plus security. No 
pets. (647) 872-0200, (847) 
204-0376. 



1 
1 


WESTWIND 
VILLAGE 




APARTMENTS 


' 


2200 Lewis Ave., Zlon 




1,2 & 3 BEDROOMS 


' 


FREE HEAT 


i 


Appliances • On Site 




Manager • No Pets 


V 


Starting from 


r 


$495/mo. 


. 


Call Martha & Isaac 




(847) 746-1420 


| 


or BEAR PROPERTY 


' 


MANAGEMENT 


\ 


(414)697-9616 



UliEWOod VilUqE Apartments 

In IsIancI IaIie an<J CiuysUkt 
Offtniisiq AffondAblE lioushq fort purtlifiEd ApplicANis. 

NOW ACCEpiiNC, AppliCATIONS foR OUR: 

• 7,2 And } bediiooM apartments 

PIease caII For more iNfoRMAiioN or appoIntment at: 
(847)225-6644 TDD# (800)526-0844 

UkEWood VilUqE ApAimuNt is pnofEKioNAlly f£y 
MAruqcd by MtRtdiAN Group, Inc. 1^1 




OAKRIDGE VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 



Offering Affordable Housing for 
Qualified Applicants. 

Currently Accepting Applications on our 

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments 

Stop in at: 

299 Oakridge Court in Antioch 

Or call: 

847-395-4840 
f=T 1-800-526-0844 TDD 

rrr.Trr: Managed by Meridian Group, Inc. 






THE RIGHT CHOICE IS HERE 



DEEP LAKE HERMITAGE APARTMENTS 

H? 15 Acres Of Country Beauty. Patios And 
Balconies To Watch Spectacular Sunrises 
Over Deep Lake 
$ Great Schools 
% Well Manicured Grounds 
* Friendly And Attentive Management 
1* A "Great Value" For Our Location 
1* Beautifully Cleaned One And Two 

Bedroom Units Await You 
i* Offering Flexible Leasing 
$ Convenient To Major Expressways 

Anyone wishing to And out more- 
call our rental office at 847-356-2002 

Hours: Mon.-Fri 8:00 a.m.-Noon & 1-5 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-Noon 




528 


ApiTllomcs 
To Share 



538 



Business Property 
lor Item 



538 



RENTER WANTED TO 
SHARE 6RAYSLAKE HOME, 
tomato preferred, $475/monlh 
plus 1 -month security deposit. 
Utilities included. No drugs.. 
Call for details. (847) 
223-3235. 

ROOMMATE WANTED 

Non-smoking lemale to sharo 
brand new 2-bedroom, 2-bath 
towsnhouso in Undonhurst, 
$525/moMh plus 1/2 utltitlos. 
Pool, exercise room, and ten- 
nis courts on site. Call Chris- 
tine (847) 356-5765. 



530 



Rooms For Rent 



J 



ALL NEW ROOMS AVAIL- 
ABLE, on Fox Lake. Private 
bath, private entrance, A/C. 
Available Immediately. Only 
S110/week. {847) 356-2747, 
(414) 862-6066 allor 6:30pm. 

ROUND LAKE PARK, largo 
furnished room, private bath- 
room, laundry facilities, cablo 
TV, kitchen privileges, female 
preferred, $85/wook. (847) 
740-3428. 




_ Business Property 
For Sale 



PORTLAND, OR- 

Seafood & 

Steakhouse For 

Sale by Owner. 

With Jazz Club, hi. 

volume, est'd since 

1972. 

$500K. 

503-309-8275 



2.500SQ.FT. IN NEW build- 
ing In Genoa City, Wise. Heat- 
ed with auto-opened 12x12 
overhead door, 2-servico 
doors, office, and bathroom. 
Black top drivo with amplo 
parking. $890/month, (1) yr. 
lease required. (414) 
279-9700 7:30am-4pm, (847) 
395-5294 evenings. 

FOX LAKE OFFICE/RE- 
TAIL SPACE avail oblo, on 
Hwy. 12, groat parking, 
3550/month. (847) 587-3193. 



STORE OR OFFICE FOR 
RENT located In Rollins Road 
Shopping Centor, Round Lake 
Beach, newly painted and car- 
peted. (847) 223-4900 

SMALL MODERN OFFIC- 
ES FOR RENT IN BUR- 
LINGTON, 258 S. Pino, 
450sq.ft. Excellent location 
on main thoroughfare. All utili- 
ties and snow removal Includ- 
ed. Immediate occupancy. 
Call Rick at (414) 763-7686 
days, (414) 534-5258 even- 
ings. 



WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

700/a00sq.li. Industrial space 
wilh regular overhead door, 
pay own utilities, $395/month 
each, plus security. (847) 
526-5000 leavo message. 

WAUCONDA AREA IN- 
DUSTRIAL AND SHOP 
SPACE FOR RENT 

I.OBOsq.fl. unit, $695 plus se- 
curity. Avallablo Immediately. 
2400sq.lt. POLE BARN 
with concreto floor. Heal, elec- 
tric, outside storage can be 
added. Office trailer available. 
$495 as Is. Avallablo Imme- 
diately. (847) 526-5000, 
leave messaqe. 



Richmond Car 

Lot or Your 

Business Use 

Brick Bldg.onRt 12, 

Shop with overhead 

door, office, additional 

storage garage 

& sates lot. 

Excellent visibility. 

$79S/mo 

Land Mgmt. 
815/678-4334 



RJCHMOISD 

Fountain Head 

Corporate Center, 

Rt 12, 

New Superior 

2500 to 7630 sf. 

units, for Industry 

or Business, a/c 

ofc, Common or 

Private Dock. 

$4.95/s.f. 

LandMo/nt 
815/678-4771 



/it your pet a star? 

Send us a picture and maybe 

your pet will be ihe ucit 

PMT OF TOi WIIKl 

Send us your fevaila ptoto and aw ' 
inbirrflbon about tfiepelyou wukJ w 

to tee mentioned lo UJujUnd 

PubtiHwi, Attn: CUulfM PET OF 

THE WE EK. P.O. Box 268, Gnyibto, 

Ullnoit MX. Sony. 

photos cannot be relumed. Al 

V. Inbrmeboft fa subject to editing, 



544 



Mortgage Services 



NO DOWNPAYMENT7 
PROBLEM CREDIT? Own 
the home you need now, with- 
out a big downpayment. Com- 
plete financing if qualified. De- 
George Home Alliance 1-800- 
343-2BB4, 

SAVE S50,000-S100,000 

ON your mortgage with Free 
Mortgage Manager Software. 
Send $4.99 chock or moneyor- 
der for S & H to: Charles, J. Win- 
nie ky, 20 Paula Dr., Long Val- 
ley, N.J. 07853. (SCA Net- 
work). 




DO YOU HAVE 

SOMETHING TO SELL 

FOR $75 OR LESS? 

Place your ad In (his section 

for only $3,00 for 10 words or. 

less. Must bo prepaid. 

Call Lisa (847) 223-8161 

ext. 140 or send the ad with 

wilh your payment to; 

Lakeland Publishers, 

P. 0. Box 268, 

30 S. Whitney Si, 

Grayslako III. 60030. 

Atten: Usa. 



568 



Qui Of Area Proper!) 



KENTUCKY LAKEFRONT 
15 acres - $39,900. Lake 
property on beautiful undis- 
covered lake. Small town, 
country living. Meadows, 
woods, views and sunset. 4 
seasons, year round boating 
and fishing 800-816-5253. 



SO. COLORADO RANCH. 
54 acres • $34,900. Bring your 
horses and ride out to one of 
the last great ranches In CO. 
Nice fields with outstanding 
Rocky Mm views. Yr. round ac- 
cess, tel/elec. Excellent financ- 
ing. Call now 719-676-6367 
Halchel Ranch. 



SO. COLORADO RANCH. 
54 acres - $34,900. Bring your 
horses and ride out to one of 
the last great ranches In CO. 
Nice fields with outstanding 
Rocky Mln views. Yr, round ac- 
cess, tel/elec. Excellent financ- 
ing. Call now 719-676-6367 
Hatchet Ranch. 



SOUTHERN COLORADO 
RANCH SALE. 92 acres - 
$59,900. Borders BLM. Enjoy 
panoramic view and sensa- 
tional sunsets over the Rock- 
ies from this gently rolling 
acreage. Ideal for horses. Ex- 
cellent financing. Call now 719- 
676-6367. 



BROKER OF 
PROPERTIES IN 

WESTERN 1LS. 

Investment & 

Recreational 

www.BetsyBurns.com 

1-970-622-7426 



Arizona Best Buyl 

Beautiful historic ranch 

property In icenlc NW Aril. 

Private 40-ac/e ranch parcels 

now available from only 

$695/*cl Near Colorado 

River, Ashing, boating. 

gambling. Stunning sunsets 

&. mtn views. Pristine, lush 

high desert covered with 

jaguar os, yuccas, palo 

verdes. |oshuas. No qua), 

low down, xlnt terms. 100% 

water rights. Title Insured. 

surveyed, good access. 

. Selling fasti I Must see. 

Open dally. 

Stagecoach Trails 
1-800-711-2340 



704 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



1997 NOMAD TRAVEL 
TRAILER, 30ft. used 3 times, 
queen bed, 2-bunks, sleeps 8, 
$12,000. (847) 526-9222. 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you hnve placed classified 
advertising wilh (he Lnke- 
lmul Newspapers you may 
receive n inlslemllug sintc 
iiicul from niiolhcr firm re 
questing payment for this 
advertising. To receive prop 
er credit lo your account 
nil payments for your Lake 
Uiiul Newspapers advertising 
must be made ns in voiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Newapapera 

PO Box 368 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Gray ■lake. IL 60030-0388 



708 



Snowmobllcs/ATV's 



710 



Boats, Motors, 
Inc. ■ 



804 



Cars For Sale 



1995 ARCTIC CAT ZR700, 
over $1,000 In upgrades, 
under 2,000 miles, excellent 
condition. Asking $3,500. 
(847) 855-1625, (847) 269- 
4610 loavo mossogo. 

1999 SKI-DOO MX2- 
670HO, 250 miles, 96 picks, 
$6,000. Dirt bike, 1999 CR125 
FMF Factory motor work, 
pipe, siloncer and suspension 
work, black excell rims, 2-sets, 
Fox gear wilh everything, rid- 
den once, all for $5,000. (047) 
223-3132. 

ARCTIC CAT 1995 Wildcat 
700EFI low miles, mint condi- 
tion, many extras, $3,500. 
(847) 537-5874. 

POLARIS 1995 INDY 
STORM 800, 1200 miles, ex- 
cellent condition with 2. place 
trailer, $4,700. (847) 
289-9577. 

POLARIS SNOWMOBILE 
1997 ULTRA TOURING, 2up, 

6 90 cu. In., 500 miles, like new, 
$5,400. (414) B57-9213. 

SNOWMOBILE 1992 V- 
MAX IV, low miles, $3,800. 
(B47) 395-1649. 

SNOWMOBILE 1993 V- 
MAX 4, excellent condition, 
$3,200 or trade. (414) 
857-7994. ■ 

SNOWMOBILE POLARIS 
INDY 400, great condition, re- 
bujllt, $1,500/best. (815) 
759-91 OB. 

YAMAHA 1987 SRV, good 
condition, many new parts, 
$1,600.(847)259-0970. 



NORTHERN WIS. 

BUY WHERE YOU USE 
YOUR BOAT! ' 
-CROWNLINE- 

-LUND- 
-ALUMACRAFT- 

• PREMIER* 

- PARTI-KRAFT - 

■ HONDA - 

• SUZUKI • 

- MERCURY - 

GREAT PRICES, 

PERSONAL SERVICE 

PLOWMAN'S 

MARINE INC. 

WOODRUFF, WI 

715-356-9545 

PLOWMAN«NEVVNORnLNCT 



720 



Sports Equipment 



1997 KS KAWASAKI PRO 
CIRCUIT 125, $3,800/best. 
(B47) 358-5949. 



804 



Cars for Sale 



710 


Boal/Moiors/Klc. 



1995 RANGER CHERO- 
KEE BASS BOAT, excellent 
condition, custom teal cover, 
many extras. Done fishln'. 

$10.500/bost. (815) 675-1248. 

FISHERMANS DELUXE 

PACKAGE 14ft. aluminum V- 
Hull, 3-passenger, depth find- 
er, 15 Johnson with Bonus 7- 
1/2 Merc, 30# electric trl., mtr. 
H.D. trailer, all accessories In- 
cluded. 52,300. (8471 
524-2723. 



1991 BUtCK PARK AVE. 
Good condition, white with 
burgandy Interior. $5,400 
(847) 975-3799. 

1992 CORVETTE CON- 
VERTIBLE while with white 
top, garage kept, 55,000 
miles. Excellent condition. 
(815) 385-8468. 

1992 MAZDA MX3, mint, 
62K, 1 -owner, non-smoker, 
power windows/locks, A/C, 
new tires, muffler, brakes, bat- 
lery, $5,995. (847) 548-2873. 

BUICK 1985 CENTURY 
WAGON Clean and reliable. 
Asking Sl.500/best. (414) 652- 
7952. 

BUICK 1991 REGAL, blue, 
65,000 miles, new tires, excel- 
lent condition, $5,500. (414) 
859-2201. . 

BUICK 1994 LESABRE SE- 

DAN. $6.995. (847) 234-2800. 

BUtCK 1994 LESABRE, 4- 
door, AM/FM cassette radio, 
40,000 miles, asking $8,100. 
(414) 877-7526. 



CARS $200 & UP Police Im- 
pounds. 1980'Sf1997's Hon- 
das, Chovys, Joops & Sport 
Utility. Must sell. 800-772- 
7470 ext. 7040 (SCA Net- 
work). 

CHEVROLET 1984 COR- 
VETTE COUPE, $9,595. 

(B47) 234-2800. 

CHEVROLET 1991 BE- 
RETTA GTZ, new tires, 
brakes, muffler, with premium 
stereo, $5,000/best. (414) 
942-1676. 

CHEVY 1978 CAPRICE, 

new tires and brakes, runs 
groat, good condition. Solid re- 
liable car, $1,300.' (815) 
363-9748. 

CHEVY 1986 NOVA, 4- 
door, AM/FM cassette stereo, 
runs great, clean, $1,000. 
(647)433-1995. 

CHEVY 1993 SUBURBAN 
SILVERADO, 2x4, 454 towing 
package, 5-passonger, irit. 
break control,' dependable, 
many options, $14,500. (847) 
397-9985. 

CHEVY 1995 CAVALIER, 
4-door, automatic, air, $7,595. 
(847) 587-6471. 

CHEVY 1997 LUMINA, 4- 

door, while, maroon interior, 
fully loaded, tow mites, A/C, ex- . 
coiient condition. Must sell. 
Asking $12,500/best. Please 
call (847) 223-3161 after 5pm 
or leave message. 

CHRYSLER 1989 LEBAR- 
ON GT CONVERTIBLE, 
S3.495. (647) 234-2800. 

CHRYSLER 1996 CIR- 
RUS, $9.595. (847) 5B7-6471. 

DODGE 1988 DAYTONA, 
daily driver, needs very little 
work, SOOO/best. (414) 
843-3171 after 5pm, 

DODGE 1989 DAYTONA, 
$1,995. (847)234-2800. .. 

DODGE 1994 INTREPID, 

£5,995. (847) 360-5000. 

DODGE 1995 INTREPID, 
S8.998. (847)336-3510. 

DODGE ,1997 NEON, 
$7,595.(847)587-6471. 



I 



NEED A WAY TO SELL THAT 
INEXPENSIVE ITEM? 

Fill out this form for 

Lakeland's New 

IBMECBMKT SEKDIPIPMR 

10 words or fewer gets you an 

ad for $3.00. Take advantage of 

this new section by filling out 

the form & sending payment to: 

Attn: Lisa 

c/o Lakeland Publishers 
P.O. Box 360 
Grayslake, EL 6003Q 
or call with credit card 
(847)2238161 ext 140 

Must be prepaid 

Please fill in the blanks, no more 
than 10 words. 








January 22, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C 




I 



804 



Cars For Sale 



EXPRESS AUTO 

EXCHANGE 

USED CARS 

Wo take consignment cars, 

No charge. 

Too busy to sell your car? 

Let us do it for you. 

(847)740-1400 

1 19 W. Rollins Rd. 

Round Lake Beach, 

(Across from Burger King), 

■ Ask for Chris. 

FORD 1966 THUNDER- 
BIRD, 5.0 engine, runs but 
needs work. Asking $700/bost. 
(414}942-9B39. 

FORD 1988 CROWN VIC- 
TORIA, 9-passenger. station 
wagon, low mileage, no rust, 
garaged, $3,000/best. (01 5) 
675-1 246 leave message. 

FORD 1992 TAURUS, 
90,000 miles; very good condi- 
tion, $3,200/best. (815) 
365-2846. " 

FORD 1992 TEMPO, 
$4.688. (647) 587-3400. . 

FORD : 1993 T-BIRD, 
$7,995. (847) 587-3300. 

FORD 1994 MUSTANG, 
35,000 ' miles, loaded, clean, 
$10,000. Chris (414) 
694-4774. y 

FORD 1995 ESCORT, 
$4,395. (647) 587-6471. 

FORD 1995 MUSTANG 
COUPE, V6, 3.8L, 5-speed, 
41,000 miles, excellent condi- 
tion, $10,500/best,; (414) 
652-5517. 

FORD 1996 CONTOUR, 
$9,938. (847) 587-3400, 

FORD 1996 ESCORT LX, 2- 
door hatchback, 19,954 miles, 
excellent condition, $7,500, 
(414)767-1110. 

FORD 1997 ESCORT 
WAGON, $8,768. (047) 587- 
3400. ___ 

FORD ESCORT WAGON 
1994. $6.695. (847) 249-1300." 

GEO STORM' 1995, 

$3,968: (847) 587-3400, 

HONDA' 1695 ACCORD 

LX, $13,398. (847) 336-3510. 

HONDA 1996 ACCORD, 
$13.995. (847) 360-5000. 

HONDA CIVIC 1990 4- 
door, am/fm stereo, air, excel- 
lent condition; $3,300/best. 
(847) 772-6418. 

HYUNDAI 1990 ACCENT, 
$3,795, (647) 249-1300. 

INFINITI 1993 G20, FULLY 
LOADED, LOW MILES, 
$9,995. (847) 362-9200. 

INFINtTt 1995 J30'S, 6 TO 
CHOOSE WITH SIMILAR 
SAVINGS, LEATHER, SUN- 
ROOF, $16,995. (847) 362- 
9200. . 

INFINITI Q45'S, 4 TO- 
CHOOSE WITH SIMILAR 
SAVINGS, $16,495. (847) 362- 
920p; 

JEEP 1995 GRAND CHER- 
OKEE LAREDO, red, 21 K, 
extra clean, 4x4, $17,990. 
(847)776-2863. 

LEXUS 1995 ES300, 
$21,650. (847) 432-9300. 

LINCOLN 1989 CONTI- 
NENTAL SIGNATURE SER- 
IES, $5,595. (847) 234-2800. 

LINCOLN CONTINENTAL 
1991, wife's car who Is on the 
road a lot,. 150,000 miles but Is 
impeccable condition. Must 
see to believe. $5,400/best. 
(815)678^1266. 

MAZDA 1996 626LX, 
$10,998. (847) 336-3510. 

MAZDA 1996 626LX, 1- 
OWNER, VERY' CLEAN, 
$11,995.(847)362-9200, 

MAZDA 626 1988, $2,995. 
(847) 234-2800. 



MERCURY 1984 COU- 
OAR, $3,595, (847) 234-2800, 

MERCURY 1986 COLONY 
PARK STATION WAGON, 8- 
passenger, tow package, 1- 
ownor, leather, looks good, 
$2,500, make offer. (847) 
604-8224, i 

MERCURY 1990 GRAND 
MARQUIS LS, smoke free car, 
exceptionally clean, 

$3,40Q/flrm. (414) 857-0765, 

MERCURY 1992 GRAND 
MARQUIS LS, light blue, all 
power, loaded, clean, 1 -own- 
er.. Sell quickly, $6,900/best. 
(047) 459-5690. 



804 



Cars For Sale 



MERCURY 1993 TRACER 
WAGON, $4,988. (847) 587- 
3400. 

MERCURY 1994 COUGAR 
XR7, $7.995. (647) 587-3300. 

MITSUBISHI 1996 

ECLIPSE copper, low mlle- 
ago, fully loaded, 

$13,000/best or can take over 
payment. (847) 699-0054. 

MOVING OUT OF STATE. 
MUST SELL 1997 Black Pan- 
(lac Sunflre, 5-apeod, 2-door 
sedan, A/C, cassette. Asking 
$9,900. (647) 438-41 BO, 

NISSAN 1988 MAXIMA 
GXE WAGON, 4-door, V6 
3.0L, A/T, A/C, power steer- 
ing/windows, tilt, cruise, 
am/fm cassetet with equalizer,: 
sliding sunroof, alloy wheels, 
red with pinstripes, new tires, 
great condition, $4,300. (815) 
. 356-6456. 

NISSAN 1990 SENTRA, 

A/C, excellent condition, origi- 
nal owner, highway miles, 
$2,400/best. (847) 913-8880 
days, (847) 680-4773. 

NISSAN 1991 STANZA, 
$3.795,(847)587-6471. 

OLDS 1996 CIERA, $9,995. 
(647) 395-3600. __ 

OLDS 1997 ACHIEVA 
SDN, $9,995. (847) 587-6471. 

OLDSMOBILE 1986 CUT- 
LASS SUPREME. 76.000 
miles,, many now pans, 
$1,700/best. (847) 546-1025. 

OLDSMOBILE 1991 CUT- 
LASS . SUPREME, $4,295. 
(847) 234-2800. 

OLDSMOBILE 1995 CUT- 
LASS CONVERTIBLE, red, 
19K miles, $13,995. (847) 362- 
9200. 

PONTIAC 1986 PARI- 

SENNE, $2,200/best, excel- 

■ lent condition. (647) 

265-6840 after 6 pm. 

PONTIAC 1995 GRAND 
AM GT, $9,998. (847) 336- 
3510. 

, PONTIAC .1996 SUNFIRE, 
$8,995. (847) 587-6471. 

PONTIAC 1998 GRAND 
AM GT, purple, excellent con- 
dition, 27K miles, ., asking. 
$1,500. 1997 30ft. Yellow- 
stone Capri Model 5th wheel 
travel trailer wilh slideout and 
deck. Already sel-up at Fox 
River Recreation.- 'Asking 
$22,500.(847)576-0133. 

SAAB '1995 900 S CVT. 
$17,950. (847) 432-9300. 

SATURN 1996, $10,988, 
(847)587-3400. 

SUBARU 1994 LEGACY, 
$8.995. (847) 587-3300. 

TOYOTA 1989 COROLLA 
SR5, black/gray, $1.600/best. 
(847) 263-7656, 

TOYOTA 1992 CAMRY, 
$4,495. (B47) 234-2800. 

TOYOTA 1993 COROLLA, 
$6,995.(847)249-1300. 

VOLVO 1992 740 WAGON. 
$9.498. (847) 336-3510, 

VOLVO 1997 V70 GLT 
WGN, LOADED, $26,995. 
(647)362-9200. 

VOLVO 1998 SELECT 
S70'S, 10 TO CHOOSE WITH 
SIMILAR SAVINGS, LEATH- 
ER, SUNROOF, $24.995/ 
(847) 362-9200. 

VW JETTA 1994, $7,995. 
(647) 249-1300. 



810 



Classic/Antique Cars 



FORD: 1977 F-150, 

chopped, lowered and short- 
ened, 460 C6 & 9', fun driver 
and fast, $3,000/best. (847) 
551-9021. 



814 



Service & Parts 



BEDLINER, FITS 6FT. bed 
for early 1990's Flairslde Ford 
pickup, $99, (815) 385-0658. 

BMW WHEELS SET OF 
FOUR, to fit 3, 5. 6, 7, 8 ser- 
ies. Mllle Miglta 5 spoke 
wheels with Yokohama AVS 
tire3. 50% tread left, wheels In 
good shape, $700. (847) 548- 
1115. 



TRANSMISSIONS 

•REBUILT 

•WARRANTY 

♦GREAT PRICES. 

(847)849-6649. 



804 



Cars For Sale 



CLASSIC QUARTER 

PANEL SALE. Mustang. Cam- 
aro, Nova, C ho vol I o, Cuilass, 
Mopars, Ponllac, Chevrolet, 
more! TRUCK PANS, FLOOR 
PANS. DOORS, FENDERS, 
BUMPERS. Now and Califor- 
nia. Rust tree. MARK'S PLAT- 
ING & SUPPLY 217-824-61 84, 



824 


Vans 



1994 CHEVY CONVER- 
SION VAN 6-cyllnder, low 
miles, runs great, $11,000, 
(847) 740-4942. 

CHEVROLET 1995 
ASTRO VAN, super sharp, 
custom wheels, new. tires, air, 
power windows and locks, CD, 
cruise, tilt, ABS, privacy glass, 
tow package, $13,800/best. 
(414) 942-6870. 

CHEVY 1990 FULL SIZE 
CUSTOM VAN, all options, 
$6,OQQ/besl, (414) 678-4304. 

DODGE 1989 GRAND 
CARAVAN LE, $2,795. (847) 
587-6471. 

DODGE 1991 CARAVAN, 

$5.995. (647) 234-2800. 

DODGE 1895 RAM 2500, 
full size 8-passenger, well 
maintained, good condition, 
114K highway miles, 
$1O,500/best. (515) 

363-6008, (815) 455-3592. 

DODGE 1997 CONVER- 
SION VAN, remote start, 
10.000 miles, $14,500. (815) 
675-2451 after 5pm. 

FORD 1991 CONVER- 
SION VAN, full power 351V8. - 
rear air/heat, excellent condi- 
tion, $4,900/best. (847) 
742-6462. 

FORD 1992 E-150 CON- 
VERSION VAN, $10,988. 
(847) 587-3400. 

FORD 1993 AEROSTAR 
XL, $6,995. (847) 587-3400. 

FORD 1993 AEROSTAR, 

$4,995. (847) 336-4300. 

FORD 1993 CARGO VAN, 
3/4 ton, power steer- 
ing/brakes, new trans., excel- 
lent condition, $8,450/best. 
(847) 361-5536. 

PLYMOUTH 1991 VOYAG- 
'. ER', 7-passehger, good'eondi-' 
lion, handles well in snow, low 
miles, and extras, $5,000. 
(847) 680-9063, 

PLYMOUTH 1992 VOYAG- 
ER, $3,995. (647) 395-3600. 

PLYMOUTH 1996 VOYAG- 
ER, $14,695. (647) 336-4300. 



■ Four Wheel Drive 
i Jeeps 



EH3 

1994 FULL , SIZE CHEVY 
BLAZER 4x4 Silverado Pack- 
age, teal blue and quick silver, 
fully loaded, 91 K, excellent 
condition, $16,000. (815) 
653-5910. " ' 

CHEVY 1987 K-5 BLAZER 
4x4, new engine, transmission 
and exhaust, 2-1/2in. lift, 
33x12.50 American Racing 
wheels, CD player, soft top 
and stock wheels/tires Includ- 
ed, $4,800. (647) 662-5944. 

CHEVY 1989 S-10 BLAZ- 
ER, $4,798, (647) 336-3510. 

CHEVY 1993 BLAZER 
2WD, $10,895. (847) 587- 
3300. 



CHEVY 1993 BLAZER LT, 
$8,950, (847) 432-9300, 

CHEVY 1994 BLAZER, 
$10,995, (847) 3364300. 

CHEVY 1998 BLAZER LT, 
$15,950. (847) 432-9300, 

FORD 1938 BRONCO, 
$5,995, (847) 395-3600. 

GEO 1994 TRACKER 4X4, 
$7,495. (847) 587-3300, 

GMC JIMMY 1996, 

$16,995.(847)336-4300. 

ISUZU 1994 RODEO 4X4, 
$10,998. (847) 336-3510. 

ISUZU AMIGO 1993, fully 
loaded, $5.500/best. (847) 
973-0126 or voice mall 1-800- 
255-4859 ext.4689, 

JEEP CHEROKEE SPORT 

1992, $9,988. (847) 567-3400. ' 

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 
LIMITED 1993, $12,995. (847) 
395-3600. 

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 
1995, $15,995. (847) 336- 
4300. 

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 

LTD. 1996, LEATHER, FULL 
POWER, $22,595, (847), 362- 

9200. 



828 



Foorftab 
Drncrjecpi 



JMC JIMMY 1994 4-DOOR 
4X4, $12.995. (847) 249-1300. 

NISSAN 1994 PARH- 
RNOER, $12,995, (847) 587- 
6471. ____ 

OLDSMOBILE 1994 BRA- 
VADA, $10,995, (847) 336- 
4300. 



SUZUKI SIDEKICK 1996, 
$12,998. (847) 336-3510., 



834 


1 Trucks/Jrailers 



844 


Motorcycles 



S78 


Remodeling 



834 


Tnicta/IhiileB 



1980 INTERNATIONAL, 

DIESEL, 5.2 trans,, 14ft. con- 
tractors dump bed. Ready to 
work. $2,500/bost, (414) 
279-5243. 

1994 NISSAN XE PICKUP, 

wilh cap/bedliner, 5-speed, 
air, ONLY 23,000 MILES, 
$7.600.(847)838-6044. 

CHEVROLET 1995 S-10 
PICKUP, $7,995. (847) 336- 
4300. 

CHEVROLET 1996 S-10, 
$9,695. (847) 360-5000. 

CHEVROLET 1998 S-10, 

$8,995. (847) 336-4300. 

CHEVY 1993 1500 PICK- 
UP, $9,998. (847) 336-3510, V 

CHEVY 1994 3/4 TON 4X4 
wilh 7-1/2ft. Western plow, 
32K, like new, $18,500. (847) 
395-4477. 

DODGE 1992 DAKOTA 
PICKUP, $3,995. (847) 395- 
3600. 

DODGE 1994 RAM 1500, 
1 -owner, very clean, $11,995. 
(847) 362-9200. 

DODGE 1996 RAM 1500 
CLUB CAB, heavy duty serv- 
ice package, power locks, 
$15,000. Transferable warran- 
ty til 2002. (815)759-0441. 

DODGE 1998 DAKOTA 
New V6, automatic, A/C, bed- 
liner, warranty, 12K, 
$16,900/best. (847) 
869-1196. 

FIBERGLASS TRUCK 

CAP for 1997 Ranger, black, 
Yakima Bike Rack, sliding 
wl rtdows, excellent .condition, 
$300.(847)254-8666. 

-> -. ■■■ 



FORD 1990 F1 60 XLT AND 

FORD 1992 RANGER, A/C, 
best offer. (647) 872-3696. 

FORD 1990 F150 XLT LAR- 
IAT, 4x2, 6-cyllnder, 90K 
miles, no rust, mechanically 
perfect, $7,500. (414) 
537-4101. . 

FORD 1991 RANGER STX, 
$7,995.(847)587-3300. 

FORD : 1993 F-150, 

$10,995. (647) 336-4300, 

FORD 1994 F-150' XLT, 
$14,495. (847) 395-3600. 

FORD ' 1995 RANGER 
SUPER CAB, $9,988. (647) 
587-3400. 



FORD 1996 F-150 XLT 
20K, 2-door, V8, automatic, 
loaded, power mirror, power 
seats, ABS, tinted glass, key- 
less entry, lumbar support, 
cap, like new. Forged alumi- 
num wheels, sliding rear wind- 
ow, chrome' rear step bumper, 
$14,800. (847) 742-4269, 

FORD 1996 RANGER, 
$5,995. (847) 587-6471. 



FORD F-150 1992, 6-cylln- 
der, stick, with air, AM/FM cas- 
sette, low mileage, 
$6.50O/best. (847) 356-5949. 

NISSAN 1994 KING CAB 
4X4, $10.995. (847) 249-1300. 

NISSAN PICKUP 1994. 
$3.995. (847) 360-5000. 

TOYOTA 1995 T100 PICK- 
UP, $9.998. (847) 336-3510. 

TRUCK CAP WITH over Ihe 
cab ladder rack. Uke new, fits 
Dodge pick-up trucks, $565. 
(414) 857-7999. 



MOTORCYCLE 1982 

CB760 HONDA 2,100 miles. 
runs good looks like new; four 
into 1 pipe, new tires, just 
tuned up, $2,600. Call daytime 
(847) 473-1007 10am-4pm, 
ask for Greg. (847) 244-9546 
evenings 5pm-9pm. 



848 



Wanted To Buy 



USED CARS AND TRUCKS. 
Cars up to $300. Trucks up to 
$500. Running condition pre- 
fened. (647) 740-6245, 



S33 



Handyman 



DC TILE WE install floor and 
wail tiles of all kinds. Remodel 
alt bathrooms ! and kitchens, 
Free estimates. (847) 395- 
0777. 

JACK'S 

REMODELING 

*Basement Finishing 

•Famllyrooms & Officerooms 

"Electrical & Plumbing 

•Kitchens & Baths 

•Vinyl Replacement Windows 

*Soffit Fascia. 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(847) 546-3759, 



S87 



Storage 



THE HANDYMAN NO job 
too small. Painting, carpentry 
and repair work. Reasonable 
rates and free estimates. 
(847) 223t7724. 



STORAGE RENT 

'750SQ.FT. outbuilding 

and/or commercial storefront 
available, Fox Lake. Call Matt 
(847) 587-3022. ■ (847) 
973-2869. 



S39 


Housekeeping 



EXPERIENCED MATURE: 

ENGLISH SPEAKING 
WOMAN will CLEAN your 
home, weekly or bi-weekly, 
honest, dependable. ' (847) 
838-5852, pager . (847) 225- ■ 
0901. 

MAD CLEANING SERVICE 
Making a difference In quality 
service, 15yrs. experience. 
Free estimates. (847) 
249-2451. 

TIDY-UP HOUSECLEA- 
NINGFREE ESTIMATES. 
Call Carla (847) 487-4702, 
(847) 526-1714, pager (847) 
996-3332. 

WOMAN WILL DO HOUSE 
CLEANING. Very dependable. 
Reasonable rates, (847) 
546-2108. 



- 



838 


Heavy Equipment 



S72 



Professional 
Services 



IRRIGATION PUMP & MO- 
TOR, model: 6203 A, 40hp, 
phase 3. Peerless pump, 4in. 
Ductal falanged,- 20hp. motor. 
$650. (847) 740-7360 alter 
5pm, 



WRITE FOR YOUI 

*X-Mas Cards 

* Wedding Invitations 

*Shower/Party Invitations. 

•Handwritten. 

* Reasonable rates. 

Call (815) 363-5330. 




Qmvdca 
dean! 



■'.'." w9 ' '■ 



f?s?s%srrf!ir.scT- ,¥ 3c 



cJvertise your enria cam 

■ ■-■■■'- ; ■'■■,'. -." " , '■ ,-!.; , 





CHILD CARE in my home. 
Excellent references. 6:30am 
to 8;30pm. 847-555-0000 




LOVING CHILD 
CARE IN MY 
GRAYSLAKE 
HOME. Hot lunch, 
nutritious snacks, educational 
toys and lots of TLC. 34 years 
experience. Will take 6mo to 
6yrs, Please call for many ref- 
erences or to visit and 
observe.' . 

647-555-0000 




McH e n r y / 
Johnsburg mom 
of 2 will watch your 
child In my home. 
Big, fenced backyard, large 
playroom, no pets, non smok- 
ing, and plenty of love. 
Available Monday-Friday 6am 
to 6pm. Breakfast, lunch and 
snacks will be provided. 
Please call Sue 
847-555-0000 



CHILD CARE In your home, or 
mine. References available. 
847-555-0000 



UCENSED DAYCARE in my 
home. Excellent references. All 
ages are welcome. Also will 
watch your school aged child 
before and after school. 847- 
555-0000 

NEWBORN TO 5 YEARS 
5:30am to 8:30pm. 847-555- 
0000 . 

CHILD CARE IN YOUR 
HOME OR MY HOME. Let 

your child (ren) spend their day 
learning, exploring and having 
fun. Certified in CPR. 847- 
555-0000 



Word Rate Ads 

15 words $9.75 

1 50 for each 

additional word 

(pre-paid) 

Ad with border 
and logo 

15 words $14.75 

150 for each 

additional word 

(pre-paid) 

private; party 



Classified Order Blank 

Use the handy coupon below. Count words. 

Phone numbers and hyphenated words count 

as one word. Write copy below. 



I 
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Enclose check & mail to: Lakeland Publishers^ 30 S. Whitney P.O. Box 268, 

Grayslake, IL 60030 or fax (&47) 223-2691. To place an order by.phone call 

Lisa at (847) 223-8161 ext. 140. We also accept Visa & MasterCard. 



. * t * *- 



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I Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 22, 1999 






Lakeland Newspapers is your 










To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



To Place 
Your Ad Here 

Call 
223-81 






(Direct J£ink 



Significantly Increase your 

monthly citsh (low - 

payment lum around lime, 7-18 days! 

• Dim*, electronic cltlmi mbmiiilon In NEIC't Network 
or Piycn, Including Admlnbtir, Aitiu, Bwtkrri life, 
Benefit Trial, ROBS, Champiu, Clpu, Equkor, 
Gml Wei, Human*, Mtdluft, Medicaid, MelUfe, 
■Vudenlli). ud nuny othen. 

• Complete inaljrti I of CFT »nd ICD-9 coda. 

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• AM ml rutknt lUttmeitU for inull pnctlm. 

Call Electronic Claims Services 
Today! 847-265-5575 




m 



THOMAS 

&HH CLEANING^ 

a? SNOW REMOVAL '* 
' off Roofs, Gutters & Downspouts 4fr 
* ANY SIZE HOUSE- ANY ROOF £ 
^gjf We also do window cleaningTf& 
Zfe & power washing £f 

M FREE ESTIMATE ft 

'-*' Insured & Bonded 



FREE ESTIMATE 

Insured & Bonded 

(847) 404-3390 



* 
* 



INSTALLATIONS, INC 

• Custom Remodeling 

• Basements • Kitchens 

• Baths • Stairs 

• Railings • Decks 

• Aluminum Vinyl 
& Wood Siding 

No Job Too Big or Small 

Free Estimates 

847-356-1602 




New Ideas Daily. 

Ad Campaigns, 

Logo Design, 

Identity Pieces for 

Communicating In 
the New Millennium. 

(harbinger's 

Graphic Art & Design 

(847) 265-0986 



t THE SCOOP COMPANY I* 

Z Pet Clean-up Service 2 




S Affordable Rates » 
Weekly Service 

j 847-548-4633 • 






DIRECTORY 



ATCWEGGE,LTD. 

Enrolled Agents • CPA 

IRS Representation 

Established Since 1960 

265 Center St • Grayslake 

(847) 223-0777 

COMPREHENSIVE 
ACCOUNTING SERVICE 

Free Electronic Filing wl pd: return 

564 N. Route 83 • Grayslake 

Daniel E. Coulon, EA 

(847) 223-4040 



H&R BLOCK 

474B W. Liberty • Wauconda 

(847)526-8877 

2 W. Grand • Fox Lake 

(847)587-9333 ■ 

426 Lake • Antioch 

(847)395-6230 

629 W. Rollins • Round Lake 

(847)546-4862 



Is your pet a star? 

Send us a picture and maybe your 
pet will be the next 

PET OF THE WEEK! 



Sencfus your favorite photo and any Information about the 

pet you would like to see mentioned to Lakeland 

Publishers, Attn: Classified PET OF THE WEEK, 

P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, Illinois 60030. Sorry, photos 

cannot be returned. All information Is subject to editing,^ 




| When people look for a job in the 
| classified section, sometimes it can 
| look like a big word search puzzle 



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employees will notice. 



January, 1999 



help you set up an ad that potential * 

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1 847-223-8161 



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PUBLISHERS 



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VeadUvU - 1i4esda\r|@ 5:00 pm 
e*U4(4A @ (847) 223-8l|l ext 140 >£« Sfieei*tK<tfe 



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January 22, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C23 






( 



Lakeland Newspapers is your 





To. Place 





To These 



Area Business & Services 



Call 

847-223-8161 




"affordable 
home repairs 



HANDYMAN SERVICE 



Save money by using America's 

largest handyman service. 
Insured, bonded, guaranteed. 

(847)726-1061 




OFFICES IN 30 STATES 



I 



•Sid 



T. LAZZARETTO 

CON STRU CTION 

OFFERS: 

•Genera* Contracting 
•Interior Trim • Remodeling 
" Ing, Soffit, Fascia "Addition* 

• Satement Finishing . 
• Deckt/Screen Porebc* 
•Window Replacement ' 

• DrywH & Fainting,, 

QuAurrr Work 

GUARANTEED!!! 

Call 1047} 837*0677* 

Aak. for Tony 

Fully lnmred 





| Painting* 



apenng 
axt>ert.TnsdBfiSon 
abne^Vu 




£ 



o#e **••*= a •■ 



fRE 

95-8428 j 

****** *»***^****i ** 



MARTY'S 
LANDSCAPE MAINT 
_ GUTTER A TREE SERVICE 

Spring & Fall Clean-up 

Residential Snow 

Removal 

Lawn Care & Fertilizing 

Senior Discounts 

Licensed & Insured 

FREE ESTIMATES 

Call Marty 
(815)759-1503 



I Semn^niToOO 1 
FMM3000 266 MMX 



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Wffi&L 



• 3.2GDHD 
•266 MMX 
•5GKV.90 Voice 
Fax/Modem 
•32 MB SDRAM 
•36XCDROM 
•...and more 



I 
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Fostec Computers, Inc. 

L46S5 Old Grand, Gum'ee 360-0340 i! 
imm mm mm ami mm mml 



Deborah W. Anzelc, CPA c^S 

Cofpof ire md Indhrkkul Ut ind Actountmj 

Tt I WT) 361-M81 1 876 Sooth Oprtf Unt 

F» (M7» J6MM2 VhtttpUt, Itlinol* U04S 

A IocaI Ctntilttd Public Accownlw Hw i wonklnq 

u,iili null Wneuh «*d indivfdudi offtww, 

dlom ptrtwxttlizcd stmiccs m coupon bit mib 

Oun iinvicti IncIikJei 

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• Niw btrUnttt tMM'Up Mthuncc 
•PmpAMlloH of butinCH t« nciuttrn 

•PMpAMltoN of DCMONAt UX HMUIHOT 

•Accounilw) »l nuuu livu tt 






i TREE £ STUMP j 
REMOVAL 

Land Clearing , 

Wholesale Seasoned 

Hardwood 

Nordstrom 
Tree Experts Co. 

; (Fully Insured} 

(847) 5264)858 




DONT THROW AWA 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR 
LAMP DOCTORS 
FOR REPAIRS. 

WARREN ELECTRIC INC. 
33261 IL HIGHWAY 45 
WILDW00D f IL 60030 
(847)223-1 




.Bsmmsn mam. 



3 ioSrirs, including yuuf\ 
mortgage; on the money 

you are now making. 

For free information call 

(847) 243-564$ 




GROUND UP CONSTRUCTION 



INSURED SNOWPLOWING 



AND SALTING 



COMMERCIAL - RESIDENTIAL - INDUSTRIAL 

24 HOURS A DAY - 7 DAYS A WEEK 

GALL NOW FOR QUOTE • ACCOUNTS AVAILABLE 



CALL NOW FOR 
BEST RATES! 



10% OFF WITH THIS AD 



MOBIL: (847) 514-9770 
OFFICE: (847) 548-9261 



5ROUND UP CONSTRUCTION 

"CempUU -B«iaiH0«*) TZtmebttlnq <3^em < Zk€ 'tfaM U?" 
CARPENTER / GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

UCEHSBD • BONDED • INSURED • RELIABLE • QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP 



SPECIAL ON ROOFS fe BASEMENTS NOW. 
~AU Work Guaranteed** 



REGISTERED 

FRAISER HAMUN, 3RD GENERATION CONTRACTOR '^Set^ 
MOBIL: 847-514-9770 • OFFICE: 847-548-9261 • PAGER 708-701 -BUILD 







Complete Small Engine 
Repair Service 

• Tiine-Ups • Repair. 
• Overhaul 



Offering prompt, courteous service on 

your 2-cycle or4-cycle engine. 

Welding also available 

S.LM.C.0. 

1423 N- Oak Ave., Round Lake Dwell. It 

847-740-3729 



FIREWOOD 
UNLIMITED 

CLOSE-OUT SALE' f 

MENTION THIS AD AT TIME OF ORDER 

• MIXED HARDWOODS: S58.00/F.C. 

• CHERRY, BIRCH & HICKORY 

MIX: $78.00/F.C,HB 

• SEPARATED: S10O.0O/F.C. 

FREE DELIVERY 
CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED 

1-800-303-5150 




DECKS PLUS 

••CONSTRUCTION 
• GENERAL CARPENTRY 

• Custom Decks 

•Porches •Room Additions 

• Basement" Remodeling 

•Bathrooms - Kitchens 
■Custom Carpentry 
-Improvements & Repairs! 
INSURED « BONDED 




C4X4) 

Please CtH Cary Kolluu 



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STEFFENS COMPUTER 
f SERVICE 

JCOMPUTTiRS 
fe REPAIRED | 

"^^rcusTOMTBtiiUr 

DL^OP^PiiuSHING 
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Hit holistic approach to good health 

STOP SMOKING - LOSE WEIGHT 

Stop irrational fears - manage stress - 

focus your life 

FREE CONSULTATION 

Tlie one-time therapy that works 

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847 550-0943 (WILLIAM) 

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EVERYTHING MUST GO! 



Washington 



Center 



Rte.120 



LociiedtnftaHMri 
of Uk* County 



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erehandise -Orastical ly Reduced! 

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STORE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 1 0-8: SAT, Of; SUN. 1 1 i: ; 

iiiil! STANLEY II SUMTER II UNIVERSAL 



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