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Full text of "Antioch News 02/06/1998"

Jil^fi^t^f-.sa Pages .......__™?AY .FEBRUARY 6, 1998 

'We made it work with what we had' 



A j-akeland Newspaper /7S cents 



Building 




police 



services 

Antioch seeks modernization 

of police facility 
to protect in a high tech world 




By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



There are 18 Antioch police offi- 
cers, 10 civilian employees, and sev- 
en immediately available buckets in 
which to catch water that leaks 
through the police department roof 
during storms. 

A proposed March 17 village ref- 
erendum to construct a new public 
safety building for the police depart- 
ment could be expected to have a 
mighty fine roof. However, reasons to 
pay for other improvements may be 
more difficult to reach agreement 
upon. Low enforcement has 
changed more than Antioeh's law- 
abiding taxpayers see. 

During the pnst few dccndcs, 

computers, comutmC'ruitiM of «rv1-' J " 

dencc, state and federal laws, mixed 
gender staffing, public privacy and 
safely issues, and the need for con- 
stant training to withstand court case 
challenges have created a new world 
for police officers. 

"We made it work with what we 
had," Antioch Police Chief Charles 
Watkins said about the past facilities 
of the department 





However, time, laws, and tech- 
nology have resulted in a physical 
structure that is no longer suitable 
for professional police work. As law 
enforcement continues to absorb 
available technology into crime 
fighting and public safety, old police 
stations become less suitable for fu- 
ture police work- 
Police ChiefWatkins said that the 
Antioch building was not built for 
police work. It is a structure that has 
been remodeled and modernized 
over the years as necessary to ac- 
commodate officers, programs, 
equipment, and police. "For what wo 
had, ft wasn't too bad, "Watkins sold 
of die 1970s era. 

Rcmodclfnaand modernization 
have nltowrd officers to do their job - 
' and ia kcepup WlUrvtUaye Industri- 
al, business, and population growth. 
However, jail security always has 
been a factor. "As the building has 
been added on to, the cells were al- 
ways the problem," said Watkins. 
Now, state and federal laws restrict 
the options available to local village 
officials for modernization of the ex- 
isting facility. 

Movement of prisoners through 
the Antioch police station does not 
meet professional standards for pub- 
lic or police officer safety. Police in- 
formation, evidence, and interview 
procedures are vulnerable. State law 
now requires that if police jail cells 
arc moved, they must comply with 
federal laws. 



iTceChfefWa^terf t^ltT^ ^^^ a p0lice squad car a^r many year's delay. Po- 
ice Chief Walter I. Scott, above, had used his own car for many years.— Photo courtesv of the 
lakes Region Historical Society, reprinted with permission from Antioch; A Pictorial Hteto" 



"We incarcerated 
people overnight 211 
times in 1997," Watkins 
said. That was 21 1 ar- 
rested people who 
passed through station 
areas where the public 
may be seated while 
they make general re- 
ports, file complaints, or 
ask questions. "It's been 
a safety problem." 
Sometimes, people ore 
asked to leave while 
prisoners are brought 
through for -'evidence 
cmd Tjookmg—pfoee- 
d tires. 




Watkins: 'if we 

are to be 

successful In 

keeping crime 

down, wo have to 

ne trained ar.3" 

t mined proper 1y" 

Safety Is one of the biggest Is- 
sues we have to address," said 
Watkins. 

Another major Issue Is protec- 
tion of information and evidence ob- 
tained by police officials. People 
come to the department to discuss 
domestic conflicts or provide assis- 
tance for investigations. They do not 
want to conduct those discussions In 
public areas. "The area where we 
take those people is seven feet from 
the first cell," Watkins said of existing 
arrangements. Detectives might in- 
terview people a few feet from cells if 
private offices, including that of the 
police chief, were not otherwise 



available. Watkins said, "It's 
just not laid out so it has 
places to conduct everyday 
business." 

Training facilities are an- 
other area of deficiency. 
"We don't have anywhere 
for a training facility," 
Watkins said. It is a criUcal 
matter related to police 
crime solving success; He 
sold that one of the first 
questions asked of police 
officers In court cases Is 
about their training and 
preparation ■ to* do poiu-c? 
work." 

The absence of local 
training facilities con- 
tributes to the cost of training and 
limits the amount that can be done. 
"Dennis Vbllinghas been very kind to 
us In loaning his training room," 
Watkins said of the Fire Chief. It does 
not, however, permit the department 
to focus on police training at a level 
necessary to stay current. The rules of 



evidence have had an effect on that. 
Watkins said that In the early 
1970s, a police officer could do it all. 
Now officers have become special- 
ized and are frequently recertified in 
their specializations. "Police work has 
become very high tech," he said. "It's 
(now) a very specialized career." 

"If we are to be successful In 
keeping crime down, we have to be 
trained and trained properly," 

Watkins said. By making training cos- 
ier, cheaper, and more convenient. It 
Increases the time that police officers 
are In the community. 
- — Over the ycar«,womcrt have en- 

"tered police work and demonstrated 
strong professional commitment to 
police service. "We nre glad to have 
them," Watkins said of the depart- 
ments female officers. "That Is the di- 
rection law enforcement is going in." 
The Antioch facility, however, is not 
designed to provide male and female 
officers privacy when necessary. 

Please see POLICE IA3 



Love Fest sets sail Saturday 



The Antioch Chamber of Com- 
merce and Industry's Love Fest sets 
sail Saturday, Feb. 7, from 7 p.m. to 



midnight at the VFW Hall on North 
Ave. For more information, sec page 
All. 



Antioch mourns patrolman's Sergeant 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



BORN FOR 

A BARN 

Writer prints book, raises 
funds for bam preservation 
—PLEASE SEE PAGE Bl 

GEniNGMADD 

Sister of drunk driver's 
victim starting first 
Lake County chapter 

—PLEASE SEE PAGE CI 

INDEX 



finance ........ C9 

Business C7 

Classified .... C12 

County ..CI 

Crossword ... B12 

Editorial -.C4 

Healthwatch 613 
Horoscope .. B12 



Hot Spots B7 

Lakelife Bl 

Legals CU 

Upservice ..... C6 

Movies Bd 

Obituaries ... CIO 
Valentine ...„.B10 



Popular Antioch Police Officer 
Bob Lange, 49, died Sunday, Feb. I of 
a heart attack in Nevada. 

Mayor Marilyn J, Shineflug an- 
nounced his death to the communi- 
ty at the Feb. 2 village council meet- 
ing. She said that he had retired from 
the department last fall after 20 years 
of community service. 

Lange was hired as an Antioch 
Police Officer In July, 1977. He had 
been promoted to Corporal in Oc- 
tober 19B5 and then to Sergeant in 
1991. He was a Sergeant when he re- 
tired from the department. 

"He was well liked," said Anti- 
och Police Chief Charles Watkins. 
"He would help anybody do any- 
thing." 

Lange served as one of Lake 
County's most committed juvenile 
officers. He enjoyed working with 
young people and helped develop 
the Antioch Police Department's ju- 
venile services programs. 




Lange: 'Would 

help anybody do 

anything' 



Watkins said, 
"He helped 
us reform 
how juveniles 
and parents 
were handled 
as the laws 
changed." 

"He's 
the only offi- 
cer who re- 
quested the 
midnight 
shift," 
Watkins said. Lange liked to work 
that shift and did so for more man a 
decade. 

"I think, at one time or another, 
he helped everybody in the depart- 
ment move," he said. "He would help 
anybody do anything." 

Lange was a strong advocate of 
the concerns and ideas that officers 
under him bjpught to their work for 
the Village. "He was like a 'Patrol- 
man's Sergeant,"' said Watkins. "He 
was liked by the people who worketl 
for him." 




Lange: Joined the APD In 1977 



Post Office 
due in May 

Antioeh's new post office is ten- 
tatively set for a May 15, 199B occu- 
pancy date at the former McDon- 
ald's restaurant location, 420 Or- 
chard Street. 

"This has been a long, long 
process," said Mayor Marilyn J. 
Shineflug of the effort to improve 
community access to postal services. 
"We have been working with them 
for four years," she said. 

Shineflug made the announce- 
ment at the Feb. 2 village council 
meeting. 

She made the announcement 
that the postal service will occupy 
the site with a 3,823 square foot fa- 
cility called a finance station. It is ex- 
pected that the new facility will offer 
better parking, mail drop-off ser- 
vices, and retail sales of merchan- 
dise. 

The U.S. Postal Service will con- 
tinue to occupy its current site. It will 
be used for mail sorting operations. 



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COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A3 



Fish derbies kick 




By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Two weekend fishing derbies of- 
fer families a chance to bring excite- 
ment into (he lives offish stuck un- 
der ice all winter. 

Loon Like Sportsman's Associa- 
tion will sponsor its 13th annual ice 
fishing derby Feb. 7 and 8 from 7 
a.m. to 3 p.m. out of the Loon Lake 
Resort, 40132 North Route 83. 

The 29th Lake Shangri-La Ice 
Fishing derby is Feb. 7 and 8 from 6 
a.m. to 4 p.m. out of the community 
center at 22112 121st Street. 

Loon Lake derby Chair Geoffrey 
Ziemann stated, "There will be over 
$10,000 in tagged fish as well as 
prizes awarded for the largest fish in 
each of the categories: Northern- 
Muskle, Walleye, Bass and panfish." 
There Is a $10 entry fee each day, or 
$15 for two days. Children under six- 
teen are free with an adult. A dona- 
tion to "Chef Mickey" between 6 and 
1 1 a.m. yields a Sportsman's Break- 



fast. During the day, chiti and hot- 
dogs arc sold. Information is avail- 
able from Ziemann at 847-395-8472. 

Shangri-La bills itself as the 
"Biggest Little Fishing Derby in the 
World." There are refreshments, 
food, hourly door prizes, and fishing 
prizes. The first place winner will re- 
ceive $1,000, second will receive 
$500, and third place will receive 
$100. Breakfast is served from 6 to 
9:30 a.m. and lunch and dinner are 
served at 1 1 a.m. The fishing and 
cash prizes will be drawn at the com- 
munity center on Sunday at 5 p.m. 

On Valentine's Day weekend are 
two more area fishing derbies. 

Lake Villa Township Republican 
Club's first ice fishing derby will be 
Saturday, Feb. 14 from 7 a.m. to 2 
p.m. on Crooked Lake. 

Northern Illinois Conservation 
Club's 38th Annual Chain O' Lakes 
Fishing Derby and Winter Festival 
will be Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 14 
and 15. It is the 38th consecutive der- 
by sponsored by the organization. 




LOCAL DIGEST 



Antioch sets 
April Arbor Day 

Village trustees voted to set April 
25, 1998 as Arbor day in Antioch. 

Arbor Day activities this year will 
include a special planting of trees as 
part of the William E. Brook Memor- 
ial Wetland Sanctuary and Enter- 
tainment Center. Trees will be plant- 
ed at the entrance to the memorial 
site at Orchard and SkJdmore Streets. 

their work tills year," Mayor Marilyn 
I. Shineflug (old village trustees. 

Antioch has been recognized as 
a Tree City USA by the National Ar- 
bor day Foundation. 

Arbor day was established in Ne- 
braska in 1 872 as a day to plant trees. 
Trees provide environmental, aes- 
thetic, and economic values, ac- 
cording to the council resolution. 

"I urge all citizens to plant trees to 

FROM PAGE Al 



gladden die hearts and promote the 
well -being of present and future gener- 
ations," said Shineflug in die resolution. 

Civic Club carnival set 

Village trustees voted Monday, 
Feb. 2 to permit die Annual 885 Civic 
Club Days carnival on Thursday, 
May 7 through Sunday, May 10. 

The Village granted permission 
for use of the parking lot behind Hen 

I-runLIin I limui Acnmlt Klftro arid 

near the I'lggly Wiggly grocery store. 
Windy City Amusements will pro- 
vide games, food, and rides at the car- 
nival. They will arrive in Antioch May 
3 and complete set-up of rides and 
concession stands on May 7. The car- 
nival is dismantled Sunday evening, 
May 10. Safety guidelines will be fol- 
lowed. Dumpsters and portable toilets 
will be used. Lake County Sheriff He- 
serves will be present. 



POLICE: Will ask voters 
for new building in March 



Antioch's police department 
building is not wired for technology 
and has no proper facilities to ac- 
commodate computers. "We're now 
getting Internet violations," Watkins 
said. "Everything is computerized." 
Records and dispatch is by comput- 
er. Possible law violators stopped on 
local village streets are frequently 
checked through regional, state, and 
federal records. 

"Computers let us access infor- 
mation that five years ago just wasn't 
available to us," he said. Even finger- 
print identification is now comput- 
erized. Fingerprints took several 



months to process a few years ago 
and now are available virtually in- 
stantaneously. Suspect booking pro- 
cedures now include fingerprinting, 
and they are checked. It improves 
public safety and criminal catching, 
but it also requires appropriate facil- 
ities and equipment. 

Chief Watkins stated that there 
are two major factors in successful 
police work. The first is public input, 
and the second is information, in 
each case, the existing building hin- 
ders professional police officers who 
seek to protect the people and prop- 
erty of Antioch. 



Antioch News 

Vol. 1 13 No. 6 A Lakeland Newspaper Founded 1886 

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Publisher 

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Ek fl y§5IB£B RHONDA HETRICK BURKE 



Antioch Community High School sophomore Jennifer Kerner will travel to Australia and New Zealand 
this summer with the People to People program. and hopes to raise $4,500 for the trip.— Photo by 

ACHS soph seeks Aussie experience 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



High School students who re- 
ceive Printshop Suite™ computer 
software for Christmas boot-up to 
get themselves into Australia. At 
least, Antioch Community High 
School sophomore Jennifer Kerner 
has done that. Maybe. 

Kerner was notified that she 
had been selected as a student am- 
bassador of the People-to-People 
program. "They told me the day be- 
fore Christmas break," she said. 
Then she received Printshop 

- SullO™ co i it j>ti t cr tvo Hwm o <*» U glf t 
for Crirlsrmn.n. 

"I just love the computer," Kern- 
er sold. So. she put Printshop Sidle™ 
to use to create a four-color fund- ' 
raising brochure. She is using the 
brochure to introduce herself to peo- 
ple and to raise money to meet costs 
for the three-week program to Aus- 
tralia. 

People to People Student Am- 
bassadors travel to countries around 
the world (www.studentambas- 
sadors.org/). The program emerged 
during the President Dwight D. 
Eisenhower administration. Student 
travel opportunities were added in 
1963 when the first 16 students set 
forth to visit and learn about other 
lands. 

In 1995 there were 8,500 student 
participants, and during the past 30 
years there have been 80,000 young 
people traveling. The program is one 



of the few that offers both high 
school and college credit for the ed- 
ucational experience it provides. 

"I'm very excited about going be- 
cause I've never been anywhere out 
of the country. Australia is just an in- 
credible place," she said. She talked 
with program alumni and they were 
very enthusiastic about the experi- 
ence of travel to Australia and New 
Zealand. 

Kerner is doing other things to 
raise money. She works in Bristol, 
Wis., at the Red School Cafe. Antioch 
Evangelical Free Church members 
are saving aluminum for her to rccy- 

-cU> (or money. Sho al*o expect* to. 

participate In nma-ralntntx ttcttxttten" 
done by all students accepted Into 
die program. Garage sales and car 
washes may help her obtain money 
that way. 

"The whole mystery of Australia 
is intriguing to me." She is learning 
more about the country prior to her 
trip. When there she will meet gov- 
ernment officials, stay with host fam- 
ilies, attend local schools, and tour 
the country. After Sydney, students 
will explore smaller Australian com- 
munities. Then they go to New 
Zealand. 

"I don't know a whole lot (about 
New Zealand)," she said. 

Before then, however, she has to 
earn some money. The brochure de- 
scribes herself and invites contribu- 
tions be sent to her at Post Office Box 
1 15, Antioch, 60002. "1 am asking for 
support from business organizations 



in my surrounding communities," 
she said in her brochure. Others may 
donate also. She is trying to raise 
$4,500 tuition by April 30. 

Kerner is a product of the Anti- 
och school system. "1 like Antioch," 
she said of her hometown. "1 know 
so many people." 

In school she serves on the stu- 
dent council, is president of the 
Sophomore Class, sings in the 
Madrigal Choir, and is active in her 

church youth group and Bible study. 

Basketball is her sport. "I've been 

playing it since 6th grade," she said. 

She's only been playing the piano 18 

llvomYl*. 

" ■■■ - Kerrtertatmrotltnt In ftwr/ K/nnfw 

level courses. Currently, she is in the 
lop lO percent of her class gtade 
point averages. "J used to be big into 
math and sciences," she said. "Now, 
it is law, English." 

"I Jove to write," she said. "I love 
to write about anything." She likes 
writing about experiences of people 
and what is happening. She enjoys 
words. Some of her articles were 
published in the Antioch Upper 
Grade School newspaper, Apache 
Arrow. 

Her mom is Chen! Lento and 
her dad is Robert Kerner. She has a 
younger sister named Rachel Kerner. 
There are two cats, Smokey and 
Fluffy, and two dogs, Moe and But- 
tons, in her life. 

What do her folks think of her 
going away on the program? "They 
think it's wonderful," Kerner said. 



Deli goes polish, customers love it 



Antioch is gradually acquiring a 
very real and enthusiastically pro- 
moted Polish and German deli- 
catessen according Patty Ryan of 
the Okie Tyme Deli, 389 Like Street. 
Sale-to-date of her potato salad has 
been previously noted in this space. 
Now her total sales tonnage is 3,730 
pounds. A good amount by any 
measure. 

"We were going to be Italian, but 
there are more Polish people 
around here," she said. The result is 
that she now brings fresh foods up 
from Chicago to sell. She said that 
her Polish customers love it. "All 
our Polish stuff is from Chicago." 
Cheese is from Wisconsin. "We do 
the fresh kiszeka and smoked kiszc- 
ka, hard cheese, smoked butt, and 
jellied tongue." 

Ryan gets fresh piroghi from 
Chicago. She said her German cus- 
tomers arc enjoying it too. "Any- 
thing that people want we can or- 
der." 

She must be doing some things 
correctly. Olde Tyme Deli is on its 



OUR 
TOWN 



,-i~* 



— / ! Ken Patchen 



thirdsub marine sandwich give 
away, She expects to continue to 
give them away. Already she is pro- 
moling her briskets. "We're having 
the corn beef brisket for St. Patrick's 
Day brought from Chicago." 

Antioch Junior Women's Club 
has available their S500 Community 
Scholarship Award application 
form. Copies are available at Village 
Hall. They are due April 1 5. 

Any eligible Township resident 
wiio is or will he a full-time two or 
four year student at college can 
submit the completed form to the 
Club's Scholarship Committee. 

Recipient's arc selected on the 
basis of scholastic ability, merit, 



and financial need. Three character 
references, a one-page autobiogra- 
phy, and official transcripts must be 
provided. Recipients are notified in 
early May. 

Anna Maria Soria, of Antioch, 
is an Outstanding Young Woman of 
America. Her biography will be in- 
cluded in the 1997 edition of "Out- 
standing Young Women of Ameri- 
ca." She was nominated for consid- 
eration for this award. 

Since 1966. the program has se- 
lected people between 21 and 40 
who have provided distinguished 
service. This can include service to 
their communities, professional 
leadership, academic achievement, 
business advancement, cultural ac- 
complishments, and civic and polit- 
ical participation. 

If you have interesting infor- 
mation or anecdotes to submit for 
"Our Town" call staff reporter Ken 
Patchen at 223-8161, ext. 131 or 
e-mail, edit @lnd.com." 



If your teeth 

were this 

beautiful, you'd 

smile too. 




A4 J Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 6, 1998 



ACHS drama students creating 'Alice in Wonderland' 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



A fabulous smile is always in style. 
And with today's new techniques, 
there's no reason not to have one. 
We can brighten dull teeth, close 
spaces, repair chips, and improve 

crooked teeth with porcelain 

veneers. Ir/s more affordable than 

you might think. So call today for 

a personal consultation. 

Family & Cosmetic Dentistry 
Dr. Brian Gniadek 

2056 E. Grand Ave. 
Lindenhurst 

265-9070 



(847) 



Sometimes the language to di- 
rect "Alice in Wonderland" sounds 
like the pun-filled word-play of the 
script. Antioch Community High 
School drama students know exact- 
ly where they are anyway. 

It is Jan. 29 and 22 days to open- 
ing Knight, 

Drama students will present six 
performances of "Alice In Wonder- 
land" as their winter production Feb. 
19, 20, 21, and 22, 

The cast plays character roles as 
well as scenery, such as a table, door, 
tree, croquet wickets or even a hall- 
way. 

"It's going very well," said Direc- 
tor Donna Shehorn of rehearsals. 
She is also the person who adapted 
the play from the Lewis Carroll nov- 
el. She said that it is a production in 
-tune with the lovely, innocent days 
of childhood. No smoking Cheshire. 
Tli is production's cat smirks. 

"It's not a children's show, but 
more a family show," Shchom said. 
Children arc expected to love the 
playfulness of the production's 
scenery and characters, and adults 
will enjoy the rich language in the di- 
alogue. 

"We had a lot of people turn out 
for the show. It was difficult to cast," 
Shehom said. However, she has se- 
lected a cast of both veteran per- 
formers and new arrivals. "It's a 
strong ensemble show. It will be a 
fun experience for the audience." 

Thursday, Jan. 29 was a night to 
rehearse act two. Part of the scene is 




Antioch Community High School Students rehearse a garden tea scene in the Winter play produc- 
tion, "Alice in Wonderland." From left: actors Chelsey Mortensen (Alice), Nicholas Vandrush (Mad 
Hatter), Erin Boodey (Dormouse), and Ubby Moss (March Hare). Serving as tables are Brian John- 
son and Lindsay Burke. The play opens Feb. 19 for six performances over four days.— Photograph 
by Kenneth Patchen 



a tea party and part is a lobster be quiet when you are the wallpaper/ 



quadrille. MockTurtle Amanda Gan 
non sings and the scenery swings. 
Lobster drills have never been so . . . 
well, this rehearsal was noisy. 

"It is absolutely essential that 
when you are running this, you run 
silent," said Shehom. "You've got to 








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Later on she told the marching 
actors, "It's a regal procession. You're 
all cards." What a deal. 

Earlier Shchom told narrator Vita 
Gold, "Once they have achieved holi- 
ness, then you can say your line." Au- 
dra Waylander is the other narrator. 

This was a night to adjust stage 
positions and scenery that moves. 
"We're beginning to incorporate 
props and set pieces and that always 
slows things down," said Director 
Shehom. 

Why pick this play? "I liked it," 
she said. "It's a nan- realistic, non- 
reprcsefKotlona] play. We haven't 

done that in a while," She picks per- 
former's plays to stretch them in new 
directions with challenges. 

Through the evening she has 
more dialogue with her actors that 
sounds like dialogue from her adap- 
tation of Carroll's work. 

"That is your cue," Shehom said 
to the White Rabbit. 

"I can't hear," said Bob Rogers. 

"That's because everyone is talk- 
ing," replies Shehom. 

The rehearsal, three weeks be- 
fore opening night, shows spirit, 
playfulness, loose limbs, and a sense 
of humor. Shehorn says they are 
working to sustain those values. "I 
think they'll keep this Improvisation - 
al feel throughout the show," She- 
horn said. 



At the end of rehearsal, the cast 
is asked if they think they can sustain 
their evident sense of enjoyment for 
what they arc doing with the stress of 
an audience watching. They arc all 
convinced that they will be just as 
entertaining. 

It Is a large group effort both be- 
hind and before the lights. Staccy 
Parrlsh Is the stage manager and is 
assisted by Tim Gustafson. Dawn 
Fuller Is responsible for the lighting 
and set design. Rich Meltzcr is the 
technical director, and Steve Keown 
serves as an assistant technical di- 
rector. Clint Ludden Is on the tech- 
nical crew. »*■■' ' 

Chelsey Mortenson, of Lake Villa, 
has the title role, Alice. There arc two 
narrators, Audra Waylander, of Anti- 
och, and Vita Gold, of Linde nhurst. 

Cast members who live in Anti- 
och arc: Adam Armstrong, Lindsay 
Burke, Amanda Gannon. Clare 
Gaynor, Jennifer Groth, Brlgctte Hef- 
fernan, Nikki Krupa, Bob Rogers, 
Nicholas Vandrush, Briana Walsh, 
and BenWoodcll. 

Lake Villa area students In the 
play are: Josh Archer, Erin Boodey, 
Ben Garrison, and Brian Johnson. 

Cast members who live in Lin- 
denhurst are: Dan Emskamp, Eric 
Uebcrt, Lance Llebert, Libby Moss, 
Mike Nowak, Esther Scheurer, Jen 
Schuemclfedcr, Kyle Scott, Katie 
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February 6, 1998 



POLICE & FIRE 




Lakeland Newspapers/ A5 



Senior housing may 
open in summer '99 

Antioch Village Board approves 
38-unit development 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Construction of the 38-unit 
Tiffany Road Senicr Apartments 
building will begin mid-summer if fi- 
nancing by private and publicsector 
agencies is received. First tenant oc- 
cupancy maybe earlysummer, 1999. 

Antioch village trustees voted 
Feb. 2 to accept a recommendation 
to grant a requested zoning variation 
that will permit senior housing at 885 
Tiffany Road. 

"Senior housing is really needed 
in the Antioch area," said Trustee 
Wayne Foresta during discussion of 
the recommendation before the 
council. 

The Plan Commission and Zon- 
ing Board of Appeals voted Ian. 22 to 
recommend the variation request to 
the council. 

Council action was based on a 
series of agreements recommended 
by Village Attorney Kenneth Clark 
and Planning Director Robert Siihan 
and accepted by Rick Baschetti of 
T&S Builders, developer of the pro- 
posed project. 

Siihan reported to the council 
that he had reviewed the 1966 Village 
Zoning Map. He said that the prop- 
erty for Tiffany Road Senior Apart- 
ments was zoned R-5, a multiple 
family zoning classification at that 
time, "So, it's been zoned multiple 
family for over 30 years," Siihan said. 

Siihan reviewed public hearing 
testimony and agreements reached 
with the property owner. "There was 
a considerable amount of discus- 

• !•><%," )>« •n><l, Ttio <lt»CMlMtO(t WU 

about financing, deed restrictions, 
status of senior housing, and adja- 
cent property impacts. 

Builder Baschetti restated his in- 
tent to share costs to construct a 
sidewalk from his senior housing site 
to Lake Street. Village Engineer John 
Boldt will be asked by village staff to 
prepare a cost proposal for sidewalks 
in the affected area, tt wilt serve as a 
basis for discussion and negotiation 
with T&S Builders. 

Baschetti also said that he would 



work to resolve drainage problems 
that effect multiple property owners. 
His lights will have timers and 
shields to direct safety lighting to 
traffic areas and shield nearby resi- 
dential properties. 

Siihan 's amended list of recom- 
mended conditions and those of Vil- 
lage Attorney Clark were discussed. 
They are contained in a Jan. 30 letter 
from Chair Barbara Johnson of the 
Planning and Zoning Board. 

The village motion included 
conditions in the Jan. 30 letter, addi- 
tional agreements related to the Vil- 
lage Engineer's sidewalk cost pro- 
posal, attention to area drainage, and 
light impacts on nearby homes. 



POLICE BEAT 

Persons charged with a crime are Innocent 
unlit pro ven guilty In a court of law. 



ANTIOCH 

Charged with Dili 

Antioch Police Officers 
stopped George S. Van Dyke, 45, 
of Antioch, on Jan. 29 at 1:24 a.m. 
traveling south bound on Route 
59 at Hillside Avenue in a brown 
1983 Lincoln. He was charged 
with DUI. Van Dyke refused an 
opportunity to take a breathalyz- 
er test. He was released on $100 
bond and his drivers license' 
pending a court date of Feb. 10 in 
Waukegan. 

Minor Consumption 

Antioch Police Officers stopped 
MiguealAlvores, 17, of Kenosha, 
and Christopher G. Roggy, 17, of 
Undenhurst, Jan. 23 at 9:52 p.m. at 
750 West Route 173, 



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Alvores was charged with dis- 
orderly conduct, consumption of 
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and resisting arrest, and battery. 
He took a breathalyzer test (0.20). 
He was released on personal rec- 
ognizance pending a court date 
of Feb. 25 at 10:30 a.m. in 
Grayslake. 

Roggy was charged with disor- 
derly conduct He was released on 
personal recognizance pending a 
court date of Feb. 25 at 1030 am In 
Grayslake. 

LAKE VILLA 

Charged with DUI 

Lake Villa Police Officers 
stopped Brian ]. Berg, 21, Linden- 
hurst, on Jan. 28 at 12:44 p.m. trav- 
eling east bound on Route 132 east 



of Route 83 in a gold 1992 Chrysler. 

He was charged with speed- 
ing, improper lane use, DUI, and 
DUI with blood alcohol level 
over 0.08 (0.16). 

He was released on a personal 
recognizance bond pending a Feb. 
20 court date at 9 a.m. in 
Waukegan. 

Runs red light 

Lake Villa Police Officers 
stopped Daniel M. Borrelli, 63, of 
Trevor, on Jan. 3 1 at 12:17 am. trav- 
eling west bound on Route 132 near 
Deep Lake Road in a gold 1993 Mer- 
cury Cougar. He was charged with a 
red light violation, driving off a 
roadway Into a ditch, and DUI. 

Borrelli was released on $3,000 
bond pending a court date of Feb. 
27 at 9 am In Waukegan. 




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A6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 6, 1998 



Antioch Community High School names honors 



The Antioch Community High 
School announces honor students 
for the first quarter. They are: 
Freshmen 
High honors 

Lawrence Addison, Frederick Anhnlt, 
Joshua Archer, Nicole Astar, Michael Baba, 
Michelle Barbie, Valerie Bcdnar, Stephanie 
Ilium, Robert Bock, Mary Bocrman, Nathan 
Bowen, Alon Boycs, Matthew Brandt, Katie 
Hregcnzcr, Amanda Bristow, Aurora Bris- 
low, Becky Bums, Jacqueline Carpenter, 
Jacqueline Cerncy, Mike Chlnski, Daniel 
Christcnscn, Steven Collet ti, Ryan Collins, 
Kristophcr Colson, Daniel Crews, Brian Cz- 
crvionkc, Anna Davis. 

Shannon Day, Natalie Dear, Brian 
Dckind, Kortncy Delcon, Timothy Diemer, 
Tiffany Divis, Christopher Doles, Ryan Dus- 
sault, Sarah Effingcr, Andrew Eisen, Megan 
LJigclmann, Michael Fccht, Alan Fcttlnger, 
Kyle Fielder, Meghan Flood, Corinne 



Gordcll, NatJian Cass, Shannon George, Pe- 
ter Gillette, Jennifer Glcason, Kelly Gofron, 
Rebecca Graham, Juliana Green, Amy 
Grolcau, Scott Gucnlhcr, Erin Gulsmlcdl, 
Scan Hackney, Usa Haley, PatrickHaley, Al- 
lison Hansen, Robert Hucbncr, Kristina 
Janusz, Jcssfca JcndrzcjcwskJ, Jayna Jensen, 
Krisicn Jensen, Courtney Johnson, Carolyn 
Kacncr, Kimberly Kaiser, Kurt Kampendahl, 
Michael Ketlcy. 

Justcn Kent, Lynsey Kettcrilng. Travis 
King, Jamie Knutli, Ryan KoczorowskJ, Erika 
Kocsling, Kristina Komarchuk, Jennifer 
Kowalcwsld, Nicole Krakora, Daniel Krockcr, 
Robert Kurtz, Eric Langncr, Joseph I jcffclman, 
Michael Lcncloni, Leah Loef, Rebecca Lol- 
mnugh, Jack Lorang, Jason Love, Ryan Luct- 
zow, Amanda Marcscalco, Michael 
Markovics, Rachael Masters, Shannon McNi- 
chols, Kccly Myslinski, Claire Napier, Justin 
Nauseda. Erica Ncttnin, Emily Nilcs, Jordan 
Nobler, Michael Nowak, Jennifer O'Brien, 
Klrstcn O'Neal, Jessica Ortiz, [jcanna Ortman, 



On The Home Front 




with 

Larry Fales, GRI 
Broker/Owner 

DON'T TAKE IT 
PERSONALLY! 



The better your home in Antioch looks while it's on the market, the more 
likely it is to sell quickly, and for top dollar. When you have a listing 
appoinfonent with a Realtor, the agent will provide a detailed market 
analysis, along with the advantages of listing with his or her company. He 
or she will Ihen go through your home with you and make suggestions 
about cosmetic repairs that will help to present your home at its best. 
These recommendations can make some sellers uncomfortable and a 
little defensive because they are reminders of the "little" projects they have 
postponed. We occasionally encounter a housekeeper who has it "all 
together", but that's rare! Most sellers need suggestions about repairs that 
will make their home show well, and providing these is an important part 
ol a Realtor's job. 

For professional advice on all aspects of buying or selling real estate, 
consult mo at RE/MAX Advanlago Really, Please call (B47) 395-4395. 

£&fc RE/MAX Advantage Realty 
*jjgjaf 532 Lake St., Antioch, IL 60002 



Jeffrey Oupcr, Parita Palcl, Kntianne 
Pcchauer, flcgina Pclz, Michael Podus, Scan 
Fondcll, Bryant Popp. 

Zachary Pratt, Lauren Reynolds, 
Alexander Schcrer, RyanSclimfdl, Bethany 
Shore, Justine Slnkus, Carrie Spicgl 
Danielle Stalil, Crhlstine Strom, Nicole Stu 
parlts, Vanessa Taulbcc, Abigail Thomas, 
Leah Tobiasld, Jason Tnideau, Blake Vance, 
Justin Waltshlcld, Michelle Wat I crs, Bran 
don White, Eric White, Lindsay Whilchurst 
Elizabeth Witbrod, Shelley Wolfgram 
Amanda Younger. 
Honors 

Nicole Abbate, Brian Backc,Adricnnc 
Beard, Laura Belize!, Pctrina Bcrtlni, Valeric 
Blough, Michael Brady, Joseph Cooper, 
Alex DeLaUz, Erica Dcmeyer, Jessica Dcnl- 
son, Hyan Dcrkson, Jennifer Dziki, Christine 
Eaton, Scth EcJccrt, Tyler Edgcll, Lindsy Er- 
fcJcscn, Nicole Ezcll, Ambrosia Fcltncr, Cas- 
sandra Gaulin, Rebecca Gillcngcrtcn, Tara 
Glceson, Laris I Jazncrs, Bethany I Jcitmann, 
Amanda Uoran, Erik Hudson, Leah Huff, 
Amanda Hughes, Nicholas Jadrich, Tracy 
Japuntlch, Jacob Johnston, Jacquclyn Kalb, 
Jenny Keel, Kristine Kenny, Vanessa Kilzc- 
row, Sara Kohlcr. 

Lauren Konralh, Laura Kram, Stcfanle 
Lambert, Krystal Lnric, Angela Ixonc, Grace 



Lcwandowsld, Eric I Jebcrt, Robert Lodcsky, 
Corina Madriles, Rebecca Madscn, Kcri 
Malcolm, Sasha Mika, Patrick Moore, Kicr- 
an Moran, Crystal Murawski, Lara Naskrcnt, 
Mary O'Ncil, Michael Pcdcrson, Jeffrey Pe- 
tersen, Matthew Peterson, I leather Pilchcr, 
Bradley Porch, Mark Pumcll, Christopher 
RJchardson, Krisicn Richardson, Christo- 
pher Rogalla, Gillian Savage, Ryan Smart, 
Gemma Spaso, Lesley Stclnburg, Amanda 
Stewart, Jonathan Tindall, Valcntina Urn* 
lauf, Stephanie Vo Igt Jeremy Warner, Jesse 
Watson, Steven Welch, Maloric Williams, 
Christopher Wojtkicwlcz, Christopher 
Wold, Lisa Woltzen.- 

Sophomores 

High honors 

Conrad Adldns, Paul Arnold, Jacquc- 
lyn Barkc, Lauren Bcalty, Erin Beineckc, 
Ticmcy Bcnscn, Joy Bcrzanskls, Jill Blass, Jill 
Boomer, Timothy Brattan, Kari Braun, 
Danielle Buchanan, Jllllan Cardls, Anthony 
Casapao, Laura Cedcrqulst, Timothy Clut- 
ter, David Cone, Jacob Cox, Megan Craync, 
Carrie Cybul, Andrew Dalgaard, Kathleen 
Dalton, Lucas Dcnoma, Eric Drozc, Kevin 
Edgcomb, Elizabeth Elscn, Albert Eng. 

Sarah Englcr, Elizabeth Fallon, Guin- 
evere Fckctc, Margaret Rschcr, Christopher 



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Mfe'ff raft The 
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Hext Print Ml! 



966 Victoria St. • Antioch 



Fries, Jeffrey Fuller, Gina Gallnls, Brandon 
Gay! or, Claic Gaynor, Jeffrey Gicmoth, Hor- 
ry G linos, Gary Gooch. Nicholas Gorskl, 
Nlchollc Graham, James Gramliofcr, Kllnt 
Green, Amber Gusiafson, Timothy 
Gustafson, Cam! Hackney, William Hazel, 
Ryan Hlinak, Aaron James, Timothy 
JankowskJ, Nocll Juola, Joseph Kennedy, 
Jennifer Kcmcr, Adam Kerr, Thomas Kiol- 
bain, Nicholas Koctnskl, Megan Katlarz, 
Tanya Kuffcl, lance Uebcrt, Timothy LI nd, 
John Logan, Jessica Mcnzcr. 

Ethan Metzgcr, Kristy Meyer, Rebecca 
Meyer, Matthew Miclca, Nicholas Moore, 
Chclscy Mortcnson, Adam Nllcs, Nealcy 
O'Brien, David Ostmann, Christine Pahnke, 
Rachel Paschall, Ryan Perks, Jourdan 
Phillips, Nicholas Placko, Laura Plcsc, Dana 
Prouty, Aaron Raftcry, Justin Reiner, Jen- 
nifer Rogers, Jennifer Rosen, Stephanie 
Schmidt, Heidi Schramm, Brady Schultz, 
Silvia Skripkauskalte, Jennifer Snyder, 
Eileen Slack, Erin Store, Kathryn Stout, 
Nicholas Strnad, Paul Studec, Kathcrinc 
Suhar, Jessica Sweeney, Lyncttc Thlclc, 
Amanda Thomas, Courtney Tripp, Kris Van- 
dcrkooy, Elizabeth Vanlcrbcrghe, Briana 
Walsh, Rebecca Watson, Christopher Weg- 
ncr, Theodore Weirich, Jessica Wells, Patri- 
cia Wcnszell, Jennifer WieoblckL 
Honors 

David Ano, Bradley Bard, Andrew Barr, 
Michael Bcnncckc, Christopher Bock, 
Diaries Boddcn, Reed Bogacrts, Tryston 
Bonhivcrt. Duslyn Bono, Yvcttc Bujak, 
Michelle Butler, Andrew Butlcrbrodt, Brit- 
tany Cable, Dana Cain, Rebecca Clarke, 
Brandon Clutts, Colin Crockett, Jason 
Darflcr, Jennifer Decker. Olcksandra Didyk, 
Samantha Dole, Carrie Dunfrund, Jonathan 
Eisslcr, Lindscy EUfs, I lolly Fates, Steven Fox. 

Josephine Gaffrig, Kristcn Gamlln, 
Cindy Gchrke, William Gcrlock, Timothy 
Good, Mclany Green, Sara Groh, Bradley 
Groth, Jillian Gundcrson, joy I lobson, HIs- 
abcth I lubcr, Natasha Humburg, Jessica Ja- 
cobs, Melissa Jnnkc, Gregory Kalschcur, 
George Katris, Karl Koepkc, Michael Krai, 
Don lackey III, Jamie Laudcnslagcr, 
Christopher lawrcncc, Amanda Leonard, 
Christian Ulkc, Jason Loncrgan, Clinton 
l.udden, Robert Makela, Jessica Mayer, 
Sarah McConncll, Ryan McMcnamln, 
Kristin Mcngyan. 

Melissa Mitchell, Tamer Nasr, Lucas 
Ncuhaus, Ron Nisscn, Kaclecn O'Conncll, 
Michael Outincn, Nikld Padcn. Nilay Patd, 
Alejandro Perez, Christina Plolz, Chandra 
Potopslngh, Ryan Roggy, Danielle Rudnlck, 
Tony Sanders, Vararat Sangwomrachasab, 
Daniel Schneider, Jennifer Schucmclfodcr, 
Eric Sinkovoc, Gail Slimp, Emily Sobczak, 
Tiana Song. Mary Stringer, David Swan, 
Michael Thomas, Kyle Tikovftsc|i, Anjp-ln 
Toumis, Dino Vrnkns, Itobin Walcuk, 

Ronald Walsh, Sarah Wegener, Emily Wilcox. 
Elizabeth Yoakcm, Nathan Zellcr, Heather 
Zcmfln, Trade Zersen, Jamie Xidek. 

Juniors and Seniors will appear in 
next week's edition. 





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February 6, 1998 



NEIGHBORS 



Name: Kaja Milovanovic 

Home: Antioch 

Occupation: I'm a student at 
Grass Lake School in the 6th 
grade. 

When I enter the work- 
force, I Intend to be: A 

dance teacher for all kinds of 
dance. Maybe I will sell cloth- 
ing. 

I Will graduate: In the year 
2000 from eighth grade. 

My family consists of: Mom Cathy, my father Lee, and 
brother Kyle. 

My pets are: We have a dog named Butch, 12. He is half-poo- 
dle and half-sheep dog. I have a cockatiel named Shades and an- 
other one named Fresh Princess. Also, we have a 55-gallon tank 
offish. 

What I like best about Antioch: The fun activities they 
have, like the Halloween Howl event, and hanging out with my 
friends at the roller rink— Valerie, Melissa, Andrea, Tiffany, Brit- 
tany, Jessy, and Cassie. 

What I like best at school: You get to hang out with your 




friends. I like spelling and math. Math Is a good subject for me. 

t am involved with out of school activities like: Foot- 
prints. It is a tap company. We do tap dancing and we perform. 
We just did a show at Disney World in January from the 1st to 
the 7th. It was called "Footprints Tap Ensemble— Something 
Afoot." It was the same show we did at Carmel In November. I do 
tap and jazz and lyrical. But, I like lyrical the best. 

I relax by: I go to the Antioch pool. I watch television, and I 
read. 

Last book I read: "The Giver" by Lowis Lowry 

Favorite TV show is: "Beverly Hills 90210." I like the actors 
and actresses on the show. 

Favorite movie Is: "Beverly Hills Ninja" with Chris Farley. 

Favorite restaurant: "Ruby Tuesday" at Gurnee Mills. I like 
the salad bar. 

Favorite band or musician: Metaliica. They're heavy met- 
al, they're fast, they're cool. 

If I could meet anyone, I would meet: The cast of 

90210. 

If I had a plane ticket to anywhere, I would go to: 

California. A lot of famous people are there and it's easy to meet 
them there. It is warm there. 



If you have a "Neighbor" that you would like to see profiled in 
this column, call Claudia Lenart or Rhonda Hetrick Burke at 
223-8161. 



BIRTHS 



Samantha Noel Mizowek, a 

daughter, Samantha Noel, was bom 
Dec. 17, at Lake Forest Hospital to 
Mary and Glenn Mizowek of Round 
Lake Beach. Her other siblings arc 
Ashley Nicole, age 7; Glenn Jr., age G. 
Grandparents are Mickey Willing- 
ham, Rick Freeman, Roscmarie and 
Edwin Mizowek. 

Allison Love Rose, a daughter, 
Allison Love, was bom Dec 20 at 
Lake Forest Hospital to Krista and 

Cite nbn of Auiloch. Orandparcnta 

are Paul and Bonnie Biehl of Liber- 
tyvillc; Jeff and Michelle Plumridge 
of Bear Lake, Mich, and Bill and Judy 
Rose of Highland, Mich. Great 
grandparents are Marie Biehl of 
Venice, Fla.; Robert Elliott of Mt. 
Healthy, Ohio; Vernon and Lorraine 
Plumridge, Northvillc, Mich, and 
James and Helen Winnie of Livonia, 
Mich. 

Benjamin Mark Hermes, a son, 

Benjamin Mark, was bom Dec. 23 at 



Lake Forest Hospital to Vicki and 
Mark Hermes of Antioch. He has a 
brother, Jacob Henry, age 16 
months. 




Us Out 





tMlfi illiMM BftIS 

CONSUMER 

pnEFcnm t> 



tteTVeet 



JW^ 



395-3*76 







Service, 
Quality & Fair Value 

FEATURED ON YOUR 

WHITE & GREEN PHONE 

BOOK COVER 




Talking 
Health 



by Dr. Scott Reiser, D.C. 



ADJUSTING YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE 



One of the off shoots of increasing 
heal Hi consciousness is a greater 
awareness of blood pressure. Most 
people know whether they are hyper- 
tensive and that less salt and more 
exercise can help reduce high blood 
pressure. Chiropractic treatment can 
play an important role in the treat- 
ment of hypertension. 

Blood pressure can be affected by a 
variety of factors, including heredity, 
lifestyle, diet, and illness. Structural 
problems can also lead (o hyperten- 
sion. Abnormal cranial-sacral func- 
tion, for example, decreases the flow 
and pressure of the cerebrospinal 
fluid. The body's natural response is 
to increase blood pressure to elevate 
mechanisms, resulting in blood pres- 



sure returning to a lower level.- Not 
all cases of hypertension arc the 
result of a structural imbalance, but a 
chiropractic examination may be in 
order if you suffer from high blood 
pressure. 

// maintaining your health and car- 
ing for your heart arc important to 
you, call Round Lake Beach 
Chiropractic at 847.740.2800 to make 
an initial, no obligation consultation 
with Dr. Scott G, Reiser. Dr. Reiser has 
senvd the Lake and McJIenry County 
area for over 10 years. Let his knowl- 
edge and experience serve you. Dr. 
Reisers clinic is located at 314 
Rollins Road, Round Lake Beach 
(Eagle Creek Plaza - corner of Cedar 
Lake and Rollins Roads.) 



Remember - February is "Save a Heart Month 



tr 



One call does it all! 
/ Home / Auto 
• Life > Health 

Depend on your hometown 
professionals for all your 

insurance needs' 




Timothy H. Osmond, CIC 

Osmond Insurance Service Ltd. 

976 Hillside, Antioch, Illinois 60002 

395-2500 




nil 



mxmm 



Come Worship With Us 

A Directory Of Antioch Area Churches 



Greceiand Baptlat Church. 258 (da St.. Antioch, IL 
Sunday School II am , Morning Worship Ham., 
Sunday Evening 7pm. Robert Williams, Pastor. 

First Church of Christ. Sciential 4 Reading Rm. file 173 and 
Harden, Antiocn. Phone [W7) 395- 1 196. Sunday School. 
Sunday Church Service 1030am, Wednesday, 8pm 

Beautiful Savior Evangelical Lutheran Church. 554 Parkway. 
Arftcch. Phone (847) 265-2450 Sunday Worsh*> at 9am, Sunday 
School, rtgh School 4 MA &bk> Classes 1030am, 

Si Ignatius Episcopal. 977 Man Si Phono (547) 395-0GS2 tow 
Mass 730am . Mgn Mass 930am Sunday School 4 Nursery 930am. 

ArrUoch Evangelical Free Church. 750 Hghview O. Phono 
(6477 395-4117. Sunday School 9.45am, Sunday Worsrip R30. 
11:00, CWdron's Church 11am. Nursery both services Awana 
Oub Server Pastor David M. Grcteau. 

St Stephen Lutheran Church. Htodo & Ffle. 59 Phono (847) 
39S3359. Sunday Worstvp. a 915 A 1030 Church School 
9am , Sunday Rev. Charles E. MJer, Pastor. 

Christian Lrfe Fellowship Assemblies of God Church. 41625 
Deep Lake Rd . Arftcch. Phone (847) 395-8572. Sunday School 
(al ages) 9am., Sunday Morrtng Worship 10am, ChMren'a 
Church 10am.. Surday Evervng Worship 630pm . Wednesday 
Worship 4 ChMrons Program 7am , Tues. Women's Fetowshrj 
& Btte Study 9- 1 1 30am Jell Brussary, Pastor. 



Faith Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Mam SL, Phone 
(647)395-1600. Sunday Worship B 4 10 30am .. Sunday 
School 9 25am., Sal. 7pm., Rev. Gregory Hermartson. 
Pastor. Christian Day School (847) 395-1664. 

Millbum Congregational United Church of Christ Grass 

Lake Rd. al Rio. 45. Phone (847) 356-5237. Sunday Service 

10am. Children - j Program 10am. Rev. Paul a Mctaec, 

Pastor. 

United Uethoditt Church ©I Antioch. B48 Main St Phone 

(847) 3S5- 1259. Worshp 8 30 4 1 0am , Feiowsrvp Time 

930am. Sunday School 10am. Rev Kurt A Gamfcn, Pastor 



St Peter's Church. 557 W. Lake St.. Antioch. Phone (847) 
395-0274. Masses weekdays, 7 30am; Sunday 6 30, 8. 
930, 11am 4 12:15pm. 4 Saturday 530pm Rev Father 
Ronald Anglim. Pastor. 

Chain ot Lakes Cornmunlty Bible Church. 23201 W. Grass 
Lake Rd, Antioch, Phone (847) 838-0103. Sunday WorsrvpBI5 
and 1045 Sunday School 9 45 ChJdrens Church 10*5. Youtn. 
Women's. Awana 4 Smal Group mnstnes. Pastor. Pad 
McMrimy. 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod). 
251 0OW. Grand Ave. (Rie. 59 4 132). Lake VJla. (847) 
356 5158 Sunday Worship 8 15 4 10 45am, Sunday 
School [3 and up) and BiWe Study 930am Christian 
Pieschoot. Rev John Zellmer. Pastor. 




Dan Dugenske, Director 

This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 



Calendar 



Friday, Feb. 6 

On this date in 1919: 
As written in the Antioch News- 
Trie various ice companies are 
making preparations to begin filling 
their Ice houses.,. At Loon Lake cut- 
ting began this morning with a good 
quantity of eight Inch ice..." 
Courtesy -Lakes Reg, Hist Society 

8 p.m. "A Streetcar Named Desire," 
at PM&L Theater, box office open 
90 mins. before curtain, 395-3055, 
Saturday night also. 

Saturday. Feb. 7 

Baha'i Feast Day of Dominion 

Meeting of Antioch Library Friends, 
Library meeting room 

7 a.m.-3 p.m. 13th Annual Loon 
Lake Sportsman's Assoc. Ice 
Fishing Derby, Loon Lake Resort, 
info, at 395-8472, Sunday also 

9 a.m.-3 p.m., "2nd Annual Youth 
Expo *98', a showcase for young 
business people (ages 9-17) with a 
service, talent, or product to pro- 
mote, at Bch Park village Hall, 
11270 West Wadsworth Rd., 
Beach Park, for more info, call 
746-1770 or 876-6931 

11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fun Fair at Antioch 
Lower Grade School, 395-0845 

7 p.m.-Midnight, LoveFest '98, 
Chamber of Commerce and Indus- 
try, at VFW Hall, North Ave. more 
information at 395-2233 

Sunday. Feb. 8 

2:30 p.m. "A Streetcar Named De- 
sire," PM&L Theater, box office open 
90 mins. before curtain, 395-3055 



Monday, Feb. 9 

12:45 p.m. Bingo at Antioch 
Senior Center, Info, at 395-7120. 

7:30 p.m. Lakes Area Community 
band at ACHS, info, at 395-5566 

Tuesday. Feb. 10 

Antioch Library Friends Meeting 

9-11 a.m. Ladies Bible Study at 
Antioch Evangelical Free Church, 
child care provided, call 395-4117 

9 a.m. - Noon Antioch United 
Methodist Church holds Parents 
Day Out, call 395-1362 

11 a.m. AARP (for adults 55 and 
older) meets at Antioch Senior 
Center, for info, call 395-7030 

6:45 p.m. Antioch VFW Bingo, 
information at 395-5393 

7 p.m. "Program: "Attracting and 
Feeding Wild Birds," Antioch Junior 
Women's Club, comm. bldg. 

Wednesday. Feb. 11 

9 a.m. - Noon Antioch United 
Methodist Church holds Parents 
Day Out, call 395-1362 for info. 

1:30 p.m. Antioch Women's Club 
meeting at United Methodist 
Church of Antioch, 395-4210 

6:30 p.m. A.C.E. Meeting at ACHS 

6:30 p.m. CPR classes sponsored by 
the Rescue Squad, call 395-5511 

Thursday, Feb. 12 

Lincoln's Birthday, no school 

9-11:30 a.m. MOPS (Mothers of 
Pro-Schoolers) meets at Ant. Evang. 
Free Church, $5, (414) 877-2725 

7:30 p.m. Planning and Zoning 
Board, Antioch Village Hall 

7:30 p.m. Antioch Twp. meeting 

GOT SOMETHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14 -day notice is needed 
for all calendar requests. 
Ask for Cristina Femdt 
223-8161, ext. 104. 



ran 



A8/ lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



Februarys, 1998 



7 



*:. * 



Fish derbies kicks-off winter fun 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Two weekend fishing derbies 
offer families a chance to bring 
excitement into the lives of fish 
stuck under ice all winter. 

Loon Lake Sportsman's 
Association will sponsor its 13th 
annual ice Fishing derby Feb. 7 and 8 
from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. out of the Loon 
Lake Resort, 40132 North Route 83. 

The 29th Lake Shangri-La Ice 
Fishing derby is Feb. 7 and 8 from 6 
a.m. to 4 p.m. out of the community 
center at 221 12 121st Street. 

Loon Lake derby Chair Geoffrey 
Ziemann stated, "There will be over 
$10,000 in tagged fish as well as 



prizes awarded for the largest fish in 
each of the categories: Northern- 
Muskie, Walleye, Bass and panfish." 
There is a $10 entry fee each day, or 
$15 for two days. Children under 
sbtteen arc free with an adult. A 
donation to "Chef Mickey" between 
6 and 1 1 a.m. yields a Sportsman's 
Breakfast. During the day, chili and 
hotdogs are sold. Information is 
available from Ziemann at 847-395- 
8472. 

Shangri-La bills itself as the 
"Biggest Little Fishing Derby in the 
World." There are refreshments, 
food, hourly door prizes, and fishing 
prizes. The first place winner will 
receive $1,000, second will receive 
$500, and third place will receive 



$100. Breakfast is served from 6 to 
9:30 a.m. and lunch and dinner arc 
served at 11 a.m. The fishing and 
cash prizes will be drawn at the 
community center on Sunday at 5 
p.m. 

On Valentine's Day weekend 
arc two more area fishing derbies. 

Lake Villa Township Republican 
Club's first ice fishing derby will be 
Saturday, Feb. 14 from 7 a.m. to 2 
p.m. on Crooked Lake. 

Northern Illinois Conservation 
Club's 38th Annual Chain O' Lakes 
Fishing Derby and Winter Festival 
will be Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 
14 and 15. It is the38lh consecutive 
derby sponsored by the organiza- 
tion. 



Candidates Forum set for Dist. 1 and 2 



A "Candidates Forum" for all 
candidates running for the County 
Board seats in District 1 and 



District 2 will be held on 
Wednesday, Feb. 1 1 at 7:30 p.m. at 
the Millburn Congregational 



Yury M. Shklyar, M.D. 

FAMILY PRACTICE 
BOARD CERTIFIED 

(847) 548-5063 

NOW TREATING ACUTE/CHRONIC PAIN WITH 
MATRIX • NON-INVASIVE TREATMENT 




Specialty Includes Treatment Of: 
Adult & Pediatrics School & Sport Physicals 



Migraine Headaches 
Back Problems 
Joint Diseases 
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome 



Vaccinations 

Obesity 

Varicose fit Spider Veins 

Various Skin Lesions 



PHYSICAL 
THERAPY 

Accupressure 

Manual- ; 

Manipulation 
& More 



Laboratory a. rid X-Ray on Site 

fjjjj |L Conveniently Located at 

Appointment The New Condeil Medical Buifdfng 
Evoiinz ft Sifaniij t 1 7Q Eas , B elvidere Rd., Suite 202 
aSKc 11 " Grayslake, Illinois 60030 



In Case Of 
Emergency - 

24 Hour 
Availability 



Church, Grass Lake Rd. and Route 
45, MHburn. 

The forum is being sponsored 
by NEAT an organization which 
represents approximately 130 prop- 
erty owners in an unincorporated 
area straddling Northwest Newport 
Township and Northeast Antioch 
Township. The area lies in both 
County Board District 1 and District 
2, and is comprised of residential 
acreage, as well as large tracts of 
undeveloped land. The Lake 
County Planning and Zoning 
Committee has referred to this area 
as "one of the last largely undevel- 
oped areas left in Lake County;" an 
area where M we can learn from past 
mistakes." 

The forum will give each can- 
didate an opportunity to intro- 
duce themselves through an 
opening statement, answer two 
questions prepared by NEAT and 
present a closing statement. 
Following the format pari of the 
forum, candidates have heen 
invited to stay and visit with the 
audience. 

This forum is free and open to 
the public. We invite you to come 
and meet the candidates from 
District 1 and District 2. 



Can't medicine taste good? 



With all the latest tech- 
nological advances 
science has made in 
all fields of medicine, 
can anyone out there please tell me 
why none of these so-called genius 
inventors have been able to come 
up with a medicine that children 
actually like the taste of? 

They have created liquids, 
tablets, gel caps and inhalers that 
provide instant relief for all symp- 
toms of a child's common cold, flu 
or fever, but how can we parents 
possibly get these treatments to 
work if we can't get them Into the 
child to begin with? 

The Pringle household contains 
a medicine cabinet full of every 
name brand, as well as generic 
brand, of cough syrup, suppressant, 
and decongestant known to man, 
and yet according to the Pringle 
children, there isn't a single one that 
"tastes good." In order to get the 
stuff even near the child's mouth, 
you have to water it down so it 
resembles weak tea of Kool-aid and 
then it is about as affective as a sin- 
gle electrical bug zapper in the 100 
acre woods. Or you try to disperse it 
in their favorite beverage, and it will 
come back at you across the table 
quicker than you can duck. 

And, when it comes time to 
sticking to your guns, playing the 
bully, and actually making your 
child take the medicine, you had 
better have a bucket in one hand 
and the medicine dispenser in the 
other, because it's a guarantee that 
as soon as it even touches their lips 
the theatrics, the drama and the dry 
heaves will begin. 

Remember, as kids we never 
fussed when it came to medicine. 
We were given that syrupy Vicks 
Formula 44 for coughs, St. Joseph's 
Children Aspirin for fever, and Vicks 
Vapor Rub was smeared on our 
chests and covered with a t-shlrt for 
every other ailment whether It he an 
ear infection or an in-grown toe nail. 
And wc never said a thing. We just 
endured the form of treatment and 
went on our merry way, because wc 




JINGLE 

FROM 

PRINGLE 

Lynn Pringle 



knew if we grumbled, we would be 
eating the stuff. According to our 
moms that was even better than the 
external method. 

Nowadays, kids arc so dam 
spoiled if it doesn't taste like bub- 
ble gum or cotton candy, there is 
no way they are going to swallow it 
down their precious little throats. 
Of course, we parents certainly 
would take great joy in ringing 
those little throats from time to 
time, but that would just mean 
more medical bills and a visit from 
DCFS. About the only modem day 
medicine that tastes any good is 
Amoxicillin which Is a pink liquid 
used to treat car infections. But give 
your child Pepto-Btsmal for a 
tummy ache just one time and you 
will never again have any luck giv- 
ing that child the pink car stuff. 
They won't believe you for one 
minute when you promise them 
the ear medicine is not the pink 
stuff that tastes like a chalky 3 year 
old candy cane. 

So, after awhile, you give up. You 
have to just let the cold, flu, or virus 
run it's course and maybe If the child 
gets miserable enough they will con- 
sent to taking something that is sup- 
pose to make them feel better even 
though it tastes like its been stored in 
the bottom of an old shoe. 

So wc endure their night lime 

coughs, sniffles and fevers. And 

when wc feci our tempers are about 

to explode and our compassion has 

run out, we have grandma visit — 

because grandma's never leave 

home without a full JarofVlck's 
Vapor Rub and a spare t-shlrt. 

Readers with information for 
"jingle from Pringle" should call 
Lynn Pringle at 395-6364. 




p r 5SS^*gSSS®SS:^=;S£^^ 



Laura Bianconi, MP 

BOARD CERTIFIED IN PEDIATRIC MEDICINE 



Dr. ISianconi was educated and 

practiced medicine in Ohio. 

She has won awards for her medical 

education and behavioral pediatric work. 

She has also provided pediatric services 

to many Lake County families 

for several years. 



"My patients are individuals. 

I treat each one in the way 
that is most comfortable 
, and effective for them. " 




OLD OUDEv 



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(847)973-1572 % 



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Antioch Office Hours: Antioch Office 



Monday: 9am to 5pm 

Tuesday: I pm to 7pm 

Wednesday: 9am to 5pm 

Thursday: 9am to 1 2:30pm 

Friday: 9am to 5 pm 

Every other Saturday: 9am to 1 2 noon 



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Antioch, IL 

(847) 838-1470 

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THE 
CUPBOARD 

Brendan O'Neill 




'Hoops on the 
Oakwood' 
needs teams 



Lakeland Newspapers, in 
conjunction with Oakwood 
Racquet and Health Club, is 
starting up a new recre- 
ational basketbal league. 

The league, called "Hoops on 
the Oakwood," will begin play in 
late February and run through 
April, with dates and times still to 
be determined. The level of play will 
vary some, but for the most part the 
league will revolve around recre- 
ational-level players. 

The league will be made up of 
eight teams, with six to eight players 
per team for an eight-week season. 
The cost is $200 per team, which 
works out to around $25 per per- 
son. The league will get coverage in 
all 1 1 editions of our newspapers, 
with the champions earning a 
plaque and spot on Oakwood's wall 
of fame, where a team photo will 
will be displayed. 

All proceeds raised with the 
Hoops on the Oakwood will go to- 
ward the family of Alex Paris, a little 
iWauconda girl battling cancer. Ref- 
lerce's are already in place, so please 
call me at 223-8161 (ext. 132) for 
ore information about how you 
Scan enter a team in our league. 



■ 



BOYS 




BASKETBALL 


I STANDINGS 




^ L North Suburba 


ii 

19-1 




$£k Zion-Uenton 


(7-1) 


Libertyville 


10-10 


(6-3) 


Lake lores* 


11-10 


(6-3) 


KMundelefn 


14-7 


(5-4) 


|?Antioch 


12-7 


(5-4) 


■y&rrcn 


11-8 


(5-4) 


jeStcvenson 


5-15 


(1*8) 


■North Chicago 


0-14 


(0-9) 


jfFoxValtex 






CL Central 


14-5 


(10-1) 


Jacobs 


12-8 


(9-2) 


Grayslake 


10-9 


(9-2) 


jHK Carv-Cirovc 


11 -8 


(6-5) 


n Lake Zurich 


9-9 


(6-5) 


■ Dundee-Crown 


6-12 


(3-8) 


■ CL South 


6-14 


(3-8) 


E Woodstock 


5-13 


(3-8) 


I McHcnry 


5-13 


(3-8) 


Hi Prairie Nidge 

■ J 1 


4-14 


(3-8) 


1 East Suburban Catholic 




H Noire Dame 


13-6 


(7-1) 


H St. Joseph 


12-5 


(7-1) 


H St. Viator 


14-6 


(6-2) 


St. Patrick 


11-7 


(6-2) 


Marian Catholic 


9-10 


(5-4) 


! M;irist 


8-10 


(4-4) 


I Carmel 


8-13 


(3-6) 


Bene! 


9-10 


(2-6) 


loliet Catholic 


2-16 


(1*7) 


Holy Cross 


5-14 


(0-8) 


Blc North -Red 






Burlington Central 


16-2 


(7-0) 


Marengo 


17-2 


(5-1) 


H Byron 


13-6 


(3-2) 


H Johnsburg 


7-9 


(3-3) 


Harvard 


4-13 


(1-4) 


Oregon 


6-12 


(1-7) 


Independents 






VVauconda 


6-12 




Grant 


6-13 




Bound Lake 


2-18 




'May not include la te ga mes * 


I LAKELAND 




1 LEADERS 





Name 

iKcUj-wantlowiU.WllS 

liric Lcvcmicr, MHS 
Wayne Bos worth, GHS 
limOboikowitch. UIS 
Chris Groth.ACI IS 
Hrian Hamlell, LHS 
Douu Hipphcrger, Mi IS 
Jourdaln Milot, WT11S 
limichaelSiaby.RLK 
Tom McMahon. CHS 
Hill Sian K , GLK 



G 


PtS AVg. 


16 


326 


20.4 


21 


419 


20.0 


20 


396 


19.8 


20 


314 


15.7 


17 


266 


15.6 


19 


295 


15.5 


21 


322 


15.3 


19 


276 


14.5 


19 


274 


14.4 


19 


23fl 


12.6 


19 


237 


12.6 




February 6, 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers /A9 



Antioch grabs 
second place 



Triplett's strong 
finish key for 
Sequoits wrestlers 

By STEVE PETERSON 
Staff Reporter 

When a second or third-place 
finish is on the line, Antioch 
wrestling coach Ted Sleckowski feels 
good when Justin Triplett is deciding 
his team's fate. 

Antioch secured 
runner-up honors 
in the North Subur- 
ban Conference 
when Triplett, a se- 
nior, won the 275 
pound-weight class. 

"Justin sprained an ankle and 
came back and won the champi- 
onship. He is about 90 percent. He 
wrestled well and did not give the 
opposition opportunities. This is the 
second time in two years his win put 
us over the top," said Sieckowsld. 

He beat Antwan Mackins of 
North Chicago in a pin in 258. Triplett 
brings a 14-7 mark with seven pins to 
the VVaukegan regional Feb. 7. 

ACHS finished the NSC meet 

with A fiQ nnlntc. caconcl . to Llbor- 

tyvllle's 215 and four better than 
Stevenson. 




The championships started with 
Ryan Hlfnak winning at 119 pounds. 
He is now 25-2 with eight pins. 

Senior Jeff Ultes was the other 
ACHS winner, at 171 pounds. He is 
30-3 with a team high 15 pins. He 
beat Chad Blomgren of libertyville 
9-3 for the crown. 

Several underclassmen came 
through as place winners. 

Brian Backe was runner-up at 
103 pounds. The freshman beat se- 
nior Mandy Thompson of Liber- 
tyville in double overtime in the 
semi-finals. He lost to Adam Ulrich 
of Stevenson in a close 4-3 battle in 
the championship. 

"When you wrestle someone as 
good as you are, sometimes it goes 
back and forth. It could have gone ei- 
ther way. Mandy and Brian have 
squared off i n tight matches before," 
said Sleckowski. 

Bob Grasser won second place at 
130. He is now 9-8 with four pins. 

Joe Brandimore took runner-up 
honors at 135 for a 27-4 mark with 
nine pins. He lost to Angelo Zografos 
of Libertyville 9-3 In the finals. 

Nate Carden, a senior, Is 23-5 af- 
ter his second-place finish at 215 
pounds. Art Brueggeman of Lake 
Forest won the weight class with an 
11-4 win. 

Steve Smart won a third-place 
battle at 189. He has also topped the 
20- win mark with a 23 -11 record. 




Joe Brandimore of Antioch. fends off Grayslake's Martin Shrieder 
during a match at 130-pou nds. Antioch took second at the NSc 
conference tournament.— Photo by Steve Young 



Jason Bogaerts, a substitute, was 
fourth at 125 pounds. 

"For a team with four freshmen 
We did pretty well," said Sleckows- 
ki, 

He believes Grayslake, the Fox 



Valley Conference champion, Is the 
favorite for the team tide at 
Waukcgan. 

Antioch V Dave SobokowuJci is 
19-9 at 125 and Mike Bardzinski is 
16-16 at 135. 



may hot Include tale games 




Antioch cagers turn back Stevenson 



Antioch's Chris Groth, above, 
eye's up the jumper in the Se- 
quoits* 64-59 win over Steven- 
son. Antioch fans, right, show 
their support with the letters 
ACHS painted on their chests. — 
Photos by Steve Young 



Increased intensity at both ends 
of the floor paid off for Antioch in se- 
curing a key North Suburban Con- 
ference win. 

Antioch improved to 12-7 over- 
all and started the week in a three- 
way tie for fourth with a 64-59 home 
win over Stevenson. 

The Sequoits erased an early 
nine-point lead by the Patriots (4-15, 
1-8). 

"We adjusted on offense and we 
held Stevenson to without a point for 
a long time in the third quarter," said 
ACHS coach Jeff Dresser. 

Senior Chris Groth lopped his 
season average by seven with a 22 
point outing. Sophomore Don Lack- 
ey had another strong game with 21 
points with nine field goals. 

"He is averaging 12.5 points and 
10 rebounds a game. Sometimes it ts 
easy to forget he is just asophomore. 
He is playing better and belter," said 
Dresser. 

Brian Soldano tallied eight 
points and had nine rebounds to 
lead the inside game. 

Antioch built a double digit lead 
by the fourth quarter. Stevenson fell 
victim to a 23-10 Antioch run in the 
third quarter. Pete Ogilvie led the 
way with 14 points, none in the sec- 
ond half. Darren McMahon had 13 
for ihe visitors. 



"They pressed and we worked 
the ball around well," said Dress- 
er. 

Antioch had a key clash at War- 
ren Tuesday, the day before the sec- 
tional seeds were announced. 

ACHS hosts North Chicago Feb. 
7. 

"We have 12 wins, but I do not 
expect us to stop there," said Dress- 



er. 




START THE NEW YEAR OFF WITH A 
FEW STEPS INTHE RIGHTDIRECTION, 

NOW GO LEFT, THEN GO FPRWARD... 



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ATHLETES OF THE WEEK 



r 



Name: Justin Triplett 
School: Antioch High 
Sport: Wrestling 
Yean Senior 

Last week's stats: Won 275- 
pound weight class as Antioch 
finished second in the North 
Suburban Conference meet. 



Nome: Amber Swiderek 
School: Antioch High 
Sport: Bowling 
Yean Senior 

Last week's stats: Led Anti- 
och to third-place finish in 
North Suburban Conference 
meet. 



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February 6, 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A 



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ife: 



Starts Friday; Feb* 6 • 5pm- 1 1pm 
& Saturday; Feb. 7 • 8:00am-9:30prn 

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Februarys, 1998 



ANTIOCH LOVE FEST 



Feb. 7-7 p.m. to Midnight 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A^ 1 



LoveFest's S.S. Antioeh sets sail on North Avenue 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Southern Tropical Island habitat 
in Antioeh in February is as close as 
Saturday night on North Avenue. 
Who could want for more after the 
cloudiest January ever? 



"It's a great way to take away the 
winter blues, " said Barbara Porch, 
President of the Chamber of Com- 
merce and Industry. "It's Rood clean 
, fun." 

"It is a party evening for the com- 
munity and the Chamber where you 
will have entertainment, food, a silent 




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auction, and horse races,** Porch said. 
"The restaurants are being great 
about donating food," 

Wear cruise wear. LoveFcst is not 
a formal event "We'll have a funkiest 
cruise wear contest," she said. 

LoveFest is a combined Chamber 
and community event and Porch 
hopes that people will give it a try and 
experience it "You don't have to be a 



couple to attend," she said. 

LoveFest sets forth on the S3. An- 
tioeh, a cruise ship with a license to 
gamble, on Saturday, Feb. 7 from 7 
p.m. until midnight at the VFW Hall 
on North Avenue in Antioeh. 

Six people will win a Weekend 
Get Away prize. Tickets are sold as 4 
for $10, or S3 each. Area banks and the 
Chamber of Commerce and Industry 



office also have tickets available now. 
A mini-roulette wheel and VFW Hal- 
l's lucky chance pull tabs will also be 
available. 

A Starlight Lounge will feature 
music by the Scotch Lads in a return 
performance. 

There is Palmer's ShipwreckTav- 
em for those who wish to buy bever- 
ages. 



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LIFE'S ABEAR 

in Washington, it's 
'good to be the king' / B5 



GIFTS OF THE HEART 

Valentine's Day history, 

hidden message of flowers / B10 



MOVIE REVIEW 

'Great Expectations' 
is mediocre / B6 




Lakeland 
Newspapers 

February 6, 

1998 




Barns speak of life 

Long Grove photographer teams up with Liberty Prairie Foundation 
to help save Lake County's barns and their heritage 




By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Above, photographer Nancy Burgess outside a barn at the Long 
Grove Country School. She is writing and illustrating a book on the 
barns of Lake County in an effort to preserve their heritage. Pro- 
ceeds from a poster and the book will be used to provide grants 
to owners of the barns to help preserve them. Top of the page, a 
Lake Forest barn which is one of six on the poster available from 
Save-A-Bam.— Photos by Sandy Bressner, Nancy Burgess 



Lake County barns do not talk, 
but they have much to say. 

Nancy Burgess has set forth with 
her camera and pen to record what 
barns say about life in Lake County. 
By holding still, the bams have con- 
tributed photographs to her effort to 
save their lives. 

"My point is to help preserve them 
in some way," said Long Grove pho- 
tographer and writer Nancy Burgess. 
To achieve that goal, she has pub- 
lished six photographs as a poster of 
Lake County Bams. Revenue from 
poster sales and a subsequent book, 
'The Bams of Lake County," will be 
used to provide grants to owners of 
bams to help preserve them. 

Initial financial support for the 
Lake County Save-A-Barn program 
has been provided by the Liberty 
Prairie Foundation. Copies of the 
poster are available for S15 from 
Save-A-Bam, 5603 RFD, Long Grove, 
Illinois, 600*17. Barns shown on the 
poster arc from Gumec, Lake Forest, 
Long Grove, Barrington Hills, 
Wadsworth, and Lincolnshire, 

"I started this project because I 
was taking photographs for the Long 
Grove calendar," Burgess said. She 
decided to do barns and then just 
kept going. When she started the 



project, she realized that she wanted 
to benefit more than just a publisher. 
She wanted to help the barns. 

She gives another Lake County 
bam historian, Rick Bott, credit for 
helping her to hear what bams say. 
"They all have their own character," 
she said. Bams were built by families 
or by the community. "They were 
built with care." 



To obtain a 

LAKE COUNTY 

BARN POSTER 

Mail a $15 check 

or money order to: 

SAVE-A-BARN 

5603 RFD 

Long Grove, Illinois 

60047 



"With each bam comes all the 
hopes and dreams of the families," 
Burgess said. "There is a spirit in 
them, even the crumbling ones." 

When she tells people about her 
work widi bams, they have a special 
interest in her work. She has found 
this to be true even for people who 



live in cities. "(Barns) definitely in- 
spire emotions in everybody." 

Rick Bott, of R&B Enterprises in 
Libertyville, has 20 years experience 
as a bam preservation specialist. 
Burgess said, "He is my architectural 
expert," He has helped her to learn 
how to read some of the history of a 
bam. 

"Rick Bott told me that when the 
family goes, the bam begins to de- 
cay." She said that something is 
missing from the life of the barn. 
There are no cats around, there are 
no animals. There is no use of it. 
Bams were used for food storage, 
crop storage. Farm equipmeni was 
stored in them. Children would play 
in them. "There were plenty of ad- 
ventures." For children, she said, it 
was a main source of entertainment. 

Burgess said that families origi- 
nally put their money into creating 
and maintaining a barn. Then they 
would invest in the home. The bam 
was most important. The bams were 
built on the best ground. Water 
drained away from them. Roofs were 
kept up. Foundations were kept up. 

"It's generally the foundation or 
the roof," Burgess said. Roof holes 
can begin to rot within five years. 
Foundations crumble and the stress 
on the building causes them to sag. 

Please see BARNS i B12 



HKSU 




././WJ . 



B2,/Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Februarys, 1998 



KID'S FARE 



Bears: Imagination and Reality is new exhibit at Milwaukee zoo 



The newest special exhibit to 
open at the Milwaukee 
County Zoo has arrived. 
"Bears: Imagination and 
Reality" sponsored by Wisconsin 
Electric/A Wisconsin Energy Com- 
pany, runs through May 3. 

"Bears: Imagination and Reali- 
ty" was produced by the Science 
Museum of M inncsota. This is the 
nation's first major traveling exhibit 
to highlight grizzlies and black bears 
as North America's most powerful 
symbols of wilderness. The exhibit 
examines both the myth and reality 
surrounding bears by presenting an- 
imal behavior, medicine, natural 
history and wildlife management. 
I mages of the bear in different 
cultures of the northern hemi- 
sphere, from prehistoric limes to the 
present, will be contrasted with the 
current science and natural history 
of the bears. Bear objects, speci- 
mens, interactive displays, film, 
video and contemporary research 
findings are brought together, 
uniquely in the exhibit. 

Twenty-six mounts arc dis- 
played in a natural, fun and educa- 
tional manner. Life-like recreations 
include: Grizzly bear mount in rock 
surround, Grizzly bear behavior 
Sudden Encounters, A Black bear 
habitat, Black bear mother and 
cubs, Hibernation, Wilderness and 
People: A Grizzly bear habitat. 

Other highlights include: Ameri- 
can Indian bear artwork, objects 



and artifacts, Mcsquaki grizzly bear 
necklace, Kwakiutl transformation 
dance costume, grizzly habitat man- 
agement games, examples of our 
culture's fascination with fanciful 
bear images and objects, bear hides, 
skulls, teeth and paws, videos on 
bear behavior and food habits. View 
a bear trap, a grizzly bear rug, a set 
gun, historical photos and replicas 
of the first teddies created. 

For the youngsters or young at 
heart, the biggest highlight is to 
take a seat on the nine-foot long 
by eight-foot high "teddy bear 
couch." 

"Bears: Imagination and Reali- 
ty" is open daily at no additional fee 
and is located in the Otto Borchert 
Family Special Exhibits Building. 

Zoo hours are 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
daily. Beginning May 1, 9 a.m. to 5 
p.m. Monday through Saturday, un- 
til 6 p.m. Sunday and holidays. Reg- 
ular zoo admission rates apply. 

For more information, call the 
Public Affairs and Services Division 
at (414) 256-5412. 

Papai Players present 
"Utile Red Riding Hood' 

Papai Players, a professional 
live theater company that has 
been entertaining children for 
over 20 years, proudly pre- 
sents a humorous adaptation of a 
well known fairytale, "Little Red Rid- 
ing Mood." 

The world is very whimsical and 



clever as he puts Ills make-up on in 
front of the audience and develops 
his character. 

The cast includes Kevin Peter- 
son (the wolf), Jo Ann Minds 
(Grandma), Victoria Vcrhoven (Lit- 
tle Red Riding Hood), and Pat Cot- 



sakis (pianist). 

Performances arc held at Cutting 
Hall, 150 East Wood St., Palatine. 

Performance dates and times 
are: Feb. 16, Feb. 19, and Feb. 21,10 
a.m. at Cutting Hall. 

Ticket price is $5.50 prepaid and 



$6.50 at the door. Ticket discounts 
for groups are available. 

The theater opens one half- 
hour before showtime for seating. 
For more information or to re- 
serve tickets in advance, call 
359-9556. 



Creating a private garden 



As you may have already 
guessed, 1 have a passion for the 
garden. One \hlng I Yuwe nVwnys 
longed for, is a totally private space 
that I can go to and get away from it 
all, and hide there, among my flow- 
ers. Up until now, it's been a huge 
fiat rock that 1 have propped against 
my shed facing the wildfiower and 
perennial garden. The rock is okay, 
but not very comfortable. So, the 
plan is to create my own private gar- 
den retreat this coming spring. 
I feel fortunate because I do 
have quite a bit of space that 1 can 
work with, but you can create a qui- 
et spot easily, a hammock or comfy 
chair propped under a large tree, 
will do. If you have an inviting deck 
presently, you can make it even 
more so by incorporating many of 
your favorite plants to thrive there. I 
like to grow herbs that I use fre- 
quently in pots rifdit outside my 
kitchen door. This way if the weath- 
er is foreboding or I'm tired, and do 
not feel like walking out into the 
garden I can snip the herbs I need 
for cooking without any effort at all. 

To gel back to that special 
place — 1 have a weathered garden 
bench, that has been sitting in my 
garage collecting dust, because I 
just wasn't sure where I wanted it. It 
will be part of my garden nook. Be- 
hind my garage is where I grow my 
vegetables, and I have added a 
perennial and annual flower garden 
there. 1 also have a few apple trees 
there, in which I have hung garden 
chimes, 1 think this would be a great 
place for my garden retreat. I am 
going to set up some bird feeders 
there also, and I'm thinking of 
putting a bird bath in as well. I seri- 




GARDEN 
JOURNAL 

Lydia Huff 



ously cannot think of a better way to 
relax, than spending a few moments 
or (if lime is available) a few hours 
among plants and birdlifc. 

When you are planning your 
own special garden retreat think 
about when you will be able to 
spend time there, and what you 
would like to do. It can be as simple 
as just relaxing and soaking in the 
beauty of nature, a place for sipping 
coffee and reading a greal book, or a 
place for you and your friends and 
family to gather. Do you want to in- 
clude outdoor furniture and a grill 
and entertain there? Or is ii going to 
be a few comfy chairs and a pagoda 
in which to retreat? List your priori- 
ties and go with them. 

Use flowers and herbs that give 
off fragrant scents, investigate 
which ones are soothing to your 
senses and use them. There are cer- 
tain times of the day when certain 
species give off their fragrance. Find 
out about them, and use those that 
you like and work with the time you 
will be there the most. Have fun 
with the whole plan, do what ap- 
peals to you, and gives you the most 
serenity. 'Rial's what it is all about, 
this should be a place that gives you 
enjoyment and pleasure. I never feel 
closer to God and to who I really 
am, anywhere else, as I do while re- 
flecting upon my garden. Peace. 



,.,,;., : :.;;OVD";"JOHSCeOMiaK 




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HOW THEY 
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ENGLISH: JFJVE 
SPANISH! CINCO 



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FRENCH: CINQ 

GERMAN: FUNF 

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Her Something 
I Extra Sweet 
With Her 

Jewelry 



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February 6, 1998 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B3 



1 



THEATRE 



m^X wm 




Karla Kostinen is 
"Madwoman of Chaillot." 



the 



*o 



'Madwoman off Chaillot' 

Tlic Drake Theatre presents Jean 
Gtrndoux's "The Madwoman of 
Chaillot" as adapted by Maurice 
Valency, at Barat College. 

"Tlic Madwoman of Chaillot" Is 
directed by JoAnncZielinski, producer 
of Shakespeare on the Green, and 
Tlicatre Professor at Barat College. As a 
special guest artist, Karla Koskincn, the 
artistic director for Shakespeare on the 
Green and I lead of the Acting/Directing 
program at Barat College, is featured as 
the "Madwoman." 

Called a fantasy by many, 
"Madwoman" Is a comic talc by the 
Trench playwright, lean Giradoux. 
When the Madwoman hears of a group 
of promoters who plot to dig up Parish 
In search of oil, she devises a plan to rid 
Chaillot ofthc villains, and bring joy 
and happiness to the world again. With 
a cast of more than 20, a spectacular scl, 
and the ambiance of Paris, this produc- 
tion promises to be one of the best 
shows to ever grace (he Drake stage. 

"Madwoman" opens on Feb. 20 at 8 
p.m. and continues for two more per- 
formances on Feb. 21 ot B p.m. hnd o 



-i 



Long Grove is Lake County's Valentine spot 



For Valentine's Day, many of the 
shops in Long Grove's historic downtown 
district will be offering unique food and 
gift items that could turn a trek out in the 
cold into a heart-warming experience. 

Warm up to the holiday by "Taking 
Tea" with ten expert Vein DuPlain on 
Thursday, Feb. 12, at 2:30 p.m. at Seasons 
Restaurant. The Crystal Lake resident will give tips 
on the history of tea and the etiquette surrounding 
its enjoyment. The guest presenter has traveled the 
world to study the custom of tea-making and tea- 
taking. 

During the program, the restaurant will be con- 
ducting its regular afternoon tea which features pas- 
tries, sandwiches, and 11 varieties of teas. The cost 
of the program and tea is $13.95. For reservations, 
call 634-9150. 

No surprise, the Long Grove Confectionery will 
have its usual array of Valentine's Day treats for 
candy lovers as well as specialty items. The Apple 
Haus will be offering heart-shaped apple pies in 
addition to its fresh-baked line of pastries and shelf 
goods. Farmside Grocery and Winery will be selling 
"Wine for Lovers'* along with heart- and cupid- 
shaped cheeses, crackers, and pastas. Above the 
grocery and winery, Lofty Gourmet Gifts will be 
preparing personalized Valentine gift baskets con- 
taining a complete dinner for two. 

During the entire month of February, Landall 
Coffee Company will serve up cherry chocolate kiss 
coffee, and for the holiday, Long Grove Coffee 



:ck 



CHE 
IT QMT! 



Merchants wilJ be brewing up hot rasp- 
berry cocoa and white chocolate Jatte with 
peppermint sprinkles. 

At Colette's Table, a store specializ- 
ing in French imports, shoppers will 
find heart-shaped floral potpourri, 
Limoges heart-shaped lockets and col- 
lectible miniature boxes, heart-shaped 
porcelain dishes, and pink and red silk floral 
arrangements. 

Selected handcrafted jewelry pieces will be on 
sale throughout February at Arkwright & Friends. 
Dakota Expressions will have all of its men's and 
women's silver jewelry on sale during the month. 
Olivia's Past will hold a jewelry sale as well in 
February and also feature complimentary Valentine 
treats from Feb. 6 through Valentine's Day weekend. 

Visitors to Long Grove's downtown shopping 
district will also have the opportunity to make their 
own Valentine's Day gifts. 

At Long Grove Soap & Candle, shoppers can 
create personalized Valentine gift baskets, or turn a 
sweatshirt into a sweetshirt with an "Easy 
Sweetheart Design" kit from Prints Charming. A 
stamp demonstration will be held on Saturday, Feb. 
7, from 1 to 3 p.m. on how to make personalized 
Valentine cards at Nickelby's Rubber Stamp 
Emporium. "Basic Cake Decor," a class, will be 
offered on Monday, Feb. 9, from 630 to 830 p.m. at 
Edible Work of Art. 

For further information, call the Long Grove 
Merchants Association at 634-0888. 



matinee on Feb. 22 at 3 p.m. Admission 
is $9 for patrons and $7 for students and 
seniors. For more information, call GOl- 
6344. 

'Elmer Gantry' 

Marriott's Lincolnshire Theatre 
presents the Chicago premiere of a 
major new musical, Elmer Gantry. The 
show runs through March 22. The show 
stars Broadway's Tom Zemon (Les 
Miserablcs) and Kerry O'Malley (Cyrano 
the Musical). 

F.lmcr Gantry Is based on Sinclair 

Lewis' Pulitzer Prize-winning novel 

and Academy Award-winning Him. In 
the misty feWeKWhtcY toWnsDT ttfe 



Midwest in th 1930s, Sister Sharon 
Falconer's two-bit traveling salvation 
show struggles to save souls and 
meet expenses. Enter the fast talking, 
good looking Elmer Gantry, salesman 
and con man. He turns Sister 
Sharon's world upside down and 
starts saving souls with showbiz 
savvy and greedy know-how. Out 
what he really wants, money can't 
buy. His smoldering desire for the 
beautiful Sister Sharon ignites Into a 
blazing inferno threatening to con- 
sume them both. The only thing left 
to save is his own soul. 

Performances are Wednesdays at 2 
■"arWH'pTmliThursda'ys'at 8p.m.; 



Saturdays at 5 and 8:30 p.m.; and 
Sundays at 2:30 and 7 p.m. Tickets are 
$33, with $5 off to senior citizens and 
students for certain pcrfonnances. 
Reservations can be made by calling the 
box office at 634 -0200. 

'Delancey' auditions 

Auditions for "Crossing Delancey" 
by Susan Sandler arc being held at the 
PM&L Theatre, 877 Main St., Antioch on 
Monday, Feb. 9 at 7:30 p.m. There are 
roles for two older women, one woman 
In her 20s to early 30s, and two men In 
their 30s to early 40s. 

Tom Hausman from Antioch will .. 
direct this delightful romantic comedy. 



Productions are weekends from March 
20 to April 5. For more information, call 
395-7489. Anyone interested in working 
on the production staff Is welcome to 
audition or talk to the director. 




Peter PIntozzi (left) is Stanley, 
and Colleen Jordan is Blanche 
du Bois in PM&L's "A Streetcar 
Named Desire." 

'Streetcar* 

PM&LTheatre presents "A 
Streetcar Named Desire" by Tennessee 
Williams as the third show in Season 37 
at the theatre, 877 Main St., Antioch. 
Directed by Dcane Jones from Round 
Lake, this drama ranks as one ofthc 
greatest in American theater. 
Production dates arc Feb. 6, 7, 13 and 
14 at 8 p.m. and Feb. 1, 8 and 15 at 
230 p.m. 

The talented cast has a great deal 
of theatrical experience. Colleen 
Jordan from McHenry stars as 
Blanche du Bois, and Peter Pintozzi 
from Island Lake plays Stanley (the 
role that Marlon Brando made 
famous in the movie). Leslie Meyer 
from Trevor is Stella, and Phil Jaeger 
from Zion plays Mitch. 

Other cast members arc Chris 
Jones from Undenhursi, Eunice; Bruce 
Wcise from Antioch, Steve; Janice Ferri 
from Undenhurst, the nurse; and Scott 
Badtkc from Genoa City, Wis., the 
young collector. 

Reservations can be made by call- 
ing 395-3055 or by coming to the box 
office. Box office hours are Mon.-Th.ure. 
5:30 to 730 p.m., Sat. 1 1 ajn. to 230 
p.m., and 1-1/2 hours before curtain 
time on production dates. Ticket prices 
are 510 for adults and SB for students 
and senior*. 

Please turn to next page 





NEWS 1 220 




Presents the BEST in 
ih School BASKETBALL!!! 



THE TALK OF LAKE COUNTY 



• Friday, Feb. 6th 

Libertyville at Warren (Girls) 



• Friday, Feb. 13th 

Libertyville at Warren (Boys) 



Sponsored by WKRS Sports Boosters . . . 



Choo Choo's Restaurant-Fox Lake 
Where Great Food 6\ Nostalgic Past Come Together! 

Taylor Rental-Gumee 
The ONLY Place To Go For All Your Rental Needs! 

North Shore Trust & Savlngs-Waukegan 
We're More Than Bankers...We're Your Neighbors! 

Hucker Electric-Waukegan 
Call the Fast Response Teaml 

Balmes Florist-North Chicago and Gumee 

The Flower and Garden Pros for Over 43 Years... 

The Place to Go for Things That Growl 

Hillary's Rlbs&BBQ-North Chicago & Waukegan 
The ONLY Cure for a Rib or BBQ Attack! 

Brunswick Lakehurst BowVWaukegan 
Brunswick MEANS Bowling! 







All-Star Family Martial Arts-Li bertyville 
Let Them Discover the Greatness in Youl 

State Bank of the Lakes 

Antioch, Grayslake and Undenhurst 

The Art of Community Banking 

Counterfitters-Grayslake 

For Custom Counter Tops & Others... 

They're the Real thing! 

Waukegan Savings and Loan 
The Tradition of Excellence for Over 75 Years! 

People's Choice Video Express 
Waukegan, North Chicago and Zion 
The Home of the One Dollar Vktaol 

Ron & Brian's Suzukt-Waukegan 

Award Winning Sales & Service for 

Motorcycles, Snowmobiles and ATVsl 




A! Rodriguez of A.G. Edwards & Sons 
Take the Confusion Out of Your Financial Future 

Wizard Computers-Round Lake Beach 
For Computers... Listen to the Wizard 

The Shop-Waukegan 

Repairing Lake County's Ourdoor Power 

Equipment the Right Way for Over 26 Years! 

ERA-CBS Reality-Waukegan 
If They Donl Sell Your House, ERA Will Buy III 

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For the Best Value... Shop the Plgt 

Thanks to all our sponsors! 







B4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



February 6, 1998 




i i 



Legends in concert 

The Fireside Restaurant and 
Playhouse In Fort Atkinson, Wis., Is 
proud to present an exclusive Midwest 
engagement, direct from Las Vegas, of 
John Stuart's Award Winning "Legends 
In Concert." The Fireside's production 
features live re-creations of Uberace, 
Doily Parton, Kenny Rogers, The 
Andrews Sisters, Diana Ross, and (he 
King himself, Elvis! 

Legends in Concert runs until 
March I, with 10 performances weekly 
Wednesday through Sunday. A Los 
Vegas style Casino Buffet is served 
prior to each performance. The 
Fireside complex includes several gift 
shops with an extensive selection of 
unique merchandise including many 
popular collectible lines. It is located 
on Business I Iwy. 26 on the south side 
of Fort Atkinson. 

For tickets or more information, 
call 1-000-477-9505. 

Steeping Beauty 

The Northbrook Theatre for Young 
Audiences presents the musical tale of 
"Sleeping Beauty," Saturdays, through 
Feb. 14 at 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. at their 
theatre located at 3323 Walters Avenue, 
Northbrook. 

"Sleeping Beauty" is presented by 
Northbrook Theatre's professional adult 
children's company. The suggested age 
for this production is kindergarten 
through 5th grades. All seats arc reserved 
and can be purchased in advance for S5 
by using a Visa or MasterCard. Tickets 
purchased at the door are S6. There are 
party packages and group rates available. 
The Northbrook Theatre offers field trip 
packages to schools and groups on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays, arranged in 
advance. To purchase tickets, call 291- 
2307, 



SPECIAL EVENTS 




Needleworking classes scheduled 

Classes presenting the art of Needlepointing and 
Smocking, taught by Monica Larson, will be held at 
Gorton Community Center, 400 East Illinois Road, 
Lake Forest. 

"Introduction to Needlepoint" will be held on 
Tuesday, Feb. 10 from 1-4 p.m. for $30. Students will 
learn about a variety of canvases, yarns, fibers, and 
frames; and, will learn to do the basic "tent" stitch in 
both continental and basketweave styles. A small 
piece of canvas, some yam, and a needle will be pro- 
vided; bring embroider)' scissors. 

"Introduction to Smocking" will take place on 
Thursday, Feb. 12 from 9 a.m. to noon for S30. 
Students will learn to "make waves" as well as cables 
and trellises, and learn embellishment techniques 
using rosettes or bullions as they learn basic stitches. 
Pleated fabric, floss, and a needle will be provided; 
bring embroider)' scissors. 

Interested participants should register and pay 
in advance. For further information, or to receive a 
program brochure, call 234-6060 between 9 a.m. and 
4:30 p.m., weekdays. 

Celebrate Valentine's with music 

David Paul and his Quartet will be appearing at 
Duke O'Brien's Restaurant and Bar, HON. Main St., 
on Valentine's night, Saturday, Feb. 14 from 9 p.m. 
to 1 a.m. Included in his quartet will be Ken 
Champion, pianist and guitarist, formerly with the 
group Dr. Hop and the hcadliners, drummer Jay 
Payette, formerly of the Stanley Paul Orchestra in 
Chicago, Bassist Adam Johnson, a main talent in the 
Chicago jazz scene, and Craig Burgess, tenor sax, for- 
merly with Maynard Ferguson's band. While swing is 
king that night, don't be surprised to hear a few licks 
from the '50s as well. Call (815) 356-9980 for reserva- 
tions. 

Winter Fest '98 is Feb. 7 

Arc you coming down with cabin fever? Break 
out of the winter doldrums and come to Waukegan 
Park District's Winter Pest 1998. 

Winter Fesi 1998 is scheduled for Feb. 7, from 1 1 
a.m. to 3p.m. at Bevier Park (at the southeast comer 
of Yorkhouse and McAree Rds.). Admission is free. 

Erijby traditional winter activities like ice skating, 



snowball throwing, a hockey puck shootout and 
snow painting. There will also be cross-country ski- 
ing equipment available. 

Participants can try their hands at a lesser 
known sport of broombali. Broomball fs a unique 
hybrid of soccer, basketball and hockey. Brooms, 
serving as sticks, will be provided by the park district. 

Hot chocolate and winter snacks arc available 
to keep participants warm. For more informa- 
tion, call 360-4700. 

Take a carriage ride in Long Grove 

In celebration of Lincoln's birthday, the Long 
Grove Carriage Co. will be offering tours of the his- 
toric village of Long Grove in the carriage used by 
Abraham Lincoln as he traveled the Illinois lawyer 
circuit from Springfield to Chicago. 

The restored 18'10s two-seater Rockaway 
Carriage will be in the village Saturday, Feb. 14 and 
Sunday, Feb, 15 from 1 1 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Monday, 
Feb. 16 from 1 1 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cost is S20 for 20 min- 
utes, leaving from the village crossroads, 

Lee Brockway, owner of the Long Grove Carriage 
Co. has had the brougham rcuphalstercd and 
repainted, and has replicated the side lanterns as 
close to the originals as possible. "Hie carriage is 
available for weddings and other special occasions, 
and according to Brockway, can be hired for a 
romantic Valentine evening. 

For more information, or to make a reservation, 
call 634-3368. 

Winter jewelry art workshops set 

Pliers and Wires is a new workshop using cop- 
per, brass, and aluminum wire with findings to be 
run Thursday, Feb. 7 at the Suburban Fine Arts 
Center. Recycle your old jewelry, charms and beads 
to create something special. 

"Titanium Coloration" adds a special dimension 
to your jewelry design. Try it on Wednesday, Feb. 10 
and 25 at the Suburban Fine Arts Center from 7 to 
9:30 p.m. Or try "Low Tech Photo Etching" for use in 
jewelry. Use a photocopier and an iron to transfer 
black and white images to metal for etching silver, 
copper or brass. 

For more Information on any of these workshops, 
call the Suburban Fine Arts Center at 432-1888. 



A scene from Walt Disney's 
masterpiece, "Pinocchio." 

Art of Disney 

On Feb. 7 in I9<10, Disney's master- 
piece Pinocchio made its U.S. Theatrical 
debut and is widely regarded as the best 
animated feature film ever made. Then, 



just nine months later, on Nov. 13, 19-10. 
Walt Disney Studio released the 
groundbreaking animated feature film. 
"Fantasia." Two monumental ground* 
breaking animated films, released in 
one yeari 

Stay Tooned Galleries has 
announced that its 7th Annual Vintage 
Disney "Cabin Fever" exhibition enti- 
tled "The Art of 1910...Disney's 1910 
"Pinocchio" and "Fantasia." 

On Friday, Feb, 27 from fi to 9 p.m. 
the premier of this year's "Qibin Fever" 
Vintage Disney exhibit will take place at 
Stay Tooned Animation Gallery located 
at the prestigious Ice House Mall in 
downtown Harrington. The show runs 
through April 15. Over 100 never before 
seen Wall Disney Studio hand painted 
production cells, animated drawings, 



concept drawings and storyboards, as 
well as Disney Studio Animators model 
sheets will be on display from these two 
historic films. Also included in the 
exhibit will be rare, never before seen 
artworks from Snow While, Uambi, 
Song of the South, Cinderella, Peter Pan 
and Lady and the Tramp. 

Admission to the premier is free, 
but reservations are recommended by 
calling 382-2357. 

For more information, call 3B2-2357. 

Gallery opening 

Hrucefc Susan Niemi of Niemi Fine 
Art Gallery & Sculpture Studio will have 
a gallery upening on Saturday, Feb. 7, 
from 2 lo 7 p.m. and Sunday, Feb. 
from 2 to 5 p.m. The show feaiures 
artists Joseph Folise (Morion Grove), 




Unthnni Harrier (lugtntdc), sup Wicws 
(Waukegan), along with returning nrilMs 
Gail Collier (Bnrrington), Hart Horn 
(Wadsworth). Lorri &. Kelly (Drown 
Deer, Wis.], Al Lachman (Grayslakc), 
Stephanie Nodolski (Barrington), Janet 
O'Neal (Santa Fc, New Mexico), Peter 
Patterson (Iliverwoods), and Bruce 
Niemi (Lake Villa). 

The gallery is located al 39370 N. 
Hie. 59, Unit B, lake Villa. Hours are 
Monday through Friday 1 to 5 p.m., and 
weekends by appointment. For more 
infonnaiion, call 265-2343, 

Member exhibition 

The Community Gallery of Art 
Members Exhibition al the College of 
lake County run*, through Feb. 22. 

Tills group show feaiures ljike 
County artists who have joined the 
"Friends of ihe Caller)'.* Works on view 
include a wide variety of styles and 
media. Gallery hours arc 8 a.m. to 10 



p.m. Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. 
lo 4:30 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 430 p.m. 
Saturday, and 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday. 
For more Information, call 543-2405. 



MUSIC 



: J 



'All Jazz is Modern* 

The acclaimed Lincoln Center Jazz 
Orchestra, with Wynton Marsalls, con- 
ductor, will brings Its "All Jazz is 
Modern" 199B World Tour to Orchestra 
Hall, 220 South Michigan Ave., Chicago, 
on Sunday, Feb. B at p.m., as part of 
Ihe Symphony Center Presents concert 
series, presented in association with the 
Ravinla Festival. 

The "All Jazz is Modem" tour will 
offer the Orchestra performing the music 
made famous by Count Basle; exploring 
Duke Ellington's incomparable legacy of 
works; grooving to Dizzy Gillespie's 
rarely- heard bebop and Afro-Cuban 
charts; and showcasing the compositions 
of Marsalis himself. 

Tickets range from S2Q-S42. Single 
tickets may be purchased by calling 
PhoncCharge at (312) 294-3000. For 
more information, call (312) 294-3093, 

Concerts closing out 

Like County Comm unity Conccn 
Association is dosing outs its 1997-98 
series with three outstanding programs. 
On Feb, 7 and 8, Brassissimo Vienna, a 
brass quint cl, will perform. On April 4 at 8 
p.m., Khcnany, a Latin American native 
music ensemble, will perform. On April 26, 
at 3 p,m., the Bulgarian Children's Chorus 
will perform. All concerts will be held in 
die Waukegan High School auditorium, 
Hrookside and McAree. 

Tickets for the series arc $50 ($25 for 
students through high school age) and can 
be purcliascd at the door or by calling 
Donna ftmney at 244-7465. Family sub- 
scriptions (two adults and all students at 
same address) arc $125. 



DANCE 



Square dancing 

The Buoys and Belles Square Dance 
Club presents "My Funny Valentine" 
square dance session on Feb. 6 at First 
United Methodist Church. 128 N. Utica 
St., Wmifcejjnn. Plus Works! top is from 6- 
I'.-.'.Uj p.m.. wilh Main Stream aiul Hound 

Dancing from 830-10-30 p.m. Plus Tip is 
at 1030 p.m. Cost is $330 per person. 

Also, beginning square dance 
lessons will be offered at First United 
Methodist Church beginning Feb. 9 
from 7-930 p.m. For more Information, 
call S6601 96 or 223-8426. 



SINGLES 



Valentine's dance 

All singles arc Invited to a Combined 
dub Super Valentine's Dance at 8 p.ra 
on Saturday, Feb. 14, at die Wyndham 
Hamilton Hotel, 1-290 and Thomdale 
Road Fast, Itasca. DJ music will be pro- 
vided. Admission Is $8, The event is co- 
sponsored by the Northwest Singles 
Association, Young Suburban Singles, 
and Singles & Company. For more infor- 
mation, call 209-2066. 




YEARS OF SERVICE 





IMPLEMENT 
COMPANY i 

OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE SINCE 1923 

HY. 83, 5 ML NORTH OF ANTIOCH 

SALEM, Wl • 414-843-2326 • HOUH3 7 - 5 MON. - SAT. 




Friday, February 6 • Saturday, February 7 



JD Day Movie: ^Bs&SB) 9 am. to 5 p.m. 

NEW EQUIPMENT EXHIBITS • SPECIALS • DISCOUNTS 



February 15, 1998 < 

LAKE COUNTY SPORTSMEN & GUN COLLECTOR'S SHOW 



Illinois' Largest 

Gun Show! 

Over 650 

Exhibitors 



TABUS 

AVAILABLE 

[FOR 0EAl£RSI 




Feb 15, 1998 

BUY • SELL • TRAM 

Firearms & Related Items, 
Military Surplus & Antiques & Collectibles 

Held at 

LAKE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS 

Rte. 1 20 at Rte. 45 

I CM - E>A liom W West on Rio. 120- r«»grtMK)» a«xo».3 nAftW.onflio 1/ 
Ertw Fvgrouncte from Rie. (20 c* Confer SI 



r^ 



WttSSKW 
fcOOACULTS 




SHOW ALL 
INDOORS 



OPEN TO THE 
PUBLIC 8 A.M.-2RM 



r^ 



For Information, call Lake County Gun Collectors 



847/517-8180 



P.O. Box 1667 
Arlington Hts., IL 






February 6, 1998 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



IC 



IS 



8 

IG, 
a 



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an 



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a 
8- 

(is 



As they say in Washington, It's good to be the king' 



i 



king. 



n keeping with the upcoming 
Valentine holiday, today's 
subject matter is: How to 
make your man feci like a 



And while we're on the subject 
of the White House (oops - how 
did that happen?), I feci it's time I 
made a public statement In order 
to prevent any possibility of my 
receiving a subpoena from Mr. 
Starr. For those of you who just 
woke up from a coma and haven't 
heard of him, he is the indepen- 
dent counsel who Is currently 
holding a "Stan Search" for any 
woman the President has ever 
come within 200 feet of. I believe 
he also just signed on as the lead 
actor in the upcoming film, 
"Ernest Goes Undercover in the 
White House." 




LIFE'S A 
BEAR 



,...*i »v 



&& Donna Abear 



Come to think of it, he may 
also be the man who invented the 
game, "The Seven Degrees of 
President Clinton." This game is 
based on the belief that by start- 
ing with any woman's name 
("Linda Tripp," for example), and 
connecting her with someone 
else, in no more than seven con- 
nections it will lead to the name 
of a woman who has allegedly 
had a sexual encounter with 



IN THE KITCHEN 

Meatballs are perfect 
as party appetizer 



This week's recipe comes from 
Diane Bank from Mclienry, who 
makes her Saucy Meatballs for 
appetizers. 

SAUCY MEATBALLS 

Ingredients: 

3 lbs. frozen meatballs 

(Bank suggests Sam's Club's 

Italian meatballs) 
1 - 1 6 oz. can sauerkraut & juice 
1 C. brown sugar 
1 can whole cranberry sauce, jellied 



6 oz. water 

Directions: 

Put frozen meatballs in a crock 
pot. Combine remaining ingredi- 
ents, pour over meatballs and stir 
well. Cook on tow all day. 

If you have an interesting and 
delicious recipe to share with 
readers, send them to In the 
Kitchen, do Lakeland 
Newspapers, 30 S. WliitneySt., 
Crayslake, 11. 60030. 



Antiques, collectibles exhibit set 



Hundreds of exhibitors from 
several states will be selling their 
collections from the past at the 
Antiques & Collectibles Exhibit on 
Sunday, Feb. 8 at the Like County 
Fairgrounds, U.S. 45 & Illinois 120 
in Grayslake. 

From the largest Items to 



the smallest, this established 
and well-recognized show is for 
both the serious and casual col- 
lector. 

Viewing hours are 8 a.m. to 3 
p.m. Adult admission is S3. 

For more information, call 223- 
1433 or 356-7499. 



The Poconos, Pennsylvania's 
Honeymoon Hills 

by JIM WARNKEN 
President, North Star Travel 

Way back in the I930's the first resort exclusively for honcymooncrs opened in 
the Pocono Mountains. This setting of low hills, meandering streams and cool 
waterfalls have attracted ncwlywcds for over 50 years, But what would our 
grandparents, who may have spent their own honeymoon here, think of the private in- 
room swimming pools, translucent champagne glass shaped bathtubs, mirrored 
ceilings and heart shaped hot tubs found in the Pocono Resorts of today? I believe 
mine would have loved it! 

With anything from Swiss chalets with canopied beds and braided rugs to sexy, 
mulli-lcvctcd suites with round, velvet-covered beds and crystal chandeliers, you may 
never want to venture outside. But even on a honeymoon, that would be a mistake 
with all the Poconos have to ofTcr, 

You may wish to explore the winding paths leading to cool mountain brooks and 
waterfalls. Hop in a paddle boat or canoe to explore the several lakes. Take your pick 
oftennis courts or a round of golf. 

It really doesn't matter what time of year you decide to honeymoon. The Poconos 
have something to offer year round. Summer is warm enough for water sports, but the 
mountains always provide a cooling breeze, Autumn is ideal for hiking or horseback 
riding through a rainbow of forest colors. In the winter snowmobiling, tobogganing, 
sledding, and of course super skiing on the slopes at Camclback. 

One great advantage of the Pocono Resorts is that they arc all inclusive. That is, 
you pay one price before you get there which includes your meals, your 
accommodations, and all sorts of land and lake sports and the equipment you need to 
enjoy them. Your bar bill is, however, not included. 

So if Hawaii or a cruise may be out of your budget, give the Poconos a try and 
save the more costly vacation for a first anniversary. 

NORTH % STAR 



CRUISES 

www.northstartravel.com 

(847) 356-2000 



President Clinton. I hear this 
game's a big hit with the 
Republicans right now. 

Anyway, for the record, here's 
my statement: 

I, Donna Abear, was in Seattle 
in 1996 during the President and 
Vice President's campaign visit. 
However, at no time did I get any 
closer to the President than 200 
hundred feet. Make that 201 feet. 
And while my hotel room was 
directly across the street from his, 
he never so much as winked in 
my direction. This despite the 
fact that 1 was hanging out the 
window, trying to attract him by 
wearing a McDonald's hamburg- 
er in my cleavage. Gust kidding, 
sir.) 

Of course, I can't be 100 per- 
cent sure whether or not a wink 
occurred, because when you're my 
age, it's difficult to see anyone wink 
unless you're wearing prescription 
glasses. In fact, I can't even be sure 
I saw President Clinton - maybe it 
was Vice President Gore, in which 
case I definitely wasted that ham- 
burger. He's more the frozen food 
type. 

In closing, let me state emphat- 
ically — I don't think we had a sex- 
ual relationship. 



There. That should put any 
doubts about me to rest so that we 
can concentrate on our real subject 
- How do you make a man happy, 
not only on Valentine's Day but the 
whole year through? 

The answer Get him an Intern. 

No, sorry, that's not the answer. 
It was just a slip of the tongue, 
something the TV newspeople 
would call a "CRISIS IN MY 
BRAIN". 

The real answer, the thing that 
is guaranteed to make your man 
happy is.. .A RECLINER. But not for 
the reason you might think. 

While we women see a recliner 
as a place for our man to enjoy imi- 
tating a slug on downers, men see it 
entirely different To the average 
man, a recliner is a THRONE And 
when a man sits in his throne, he 
feels like a KING. 

Of course, kings had it a lot bet- 
ter in the old days. They'd sit up 
there on their throne, and whenev- 
er they wanted a woman or felt like 
throwing someone to the lions, 
they'd just snap their fingers and it 
would be done. 

Unfortunately, women's libera- 
tion has robbed the average man of 
his power base. Men who can snap 
their fingers and make women do 



their bidding have become rare 
since "Happy Days" went off the 
air. 

And that is why a recliner, 
complete with a remote control 
in the side pocket, is so impor- 
tant to a 90's man's ego. It instills 
in him that old feeling of POWER. 
There, from his throne, he can 
control, if not his wife, at least his 
television, by simply pushing a 
button: "Click - Be gone General 
Hospital - 1 want Sports Channell 
Click • Give me an Old John 
Wayne movie! Now!" 

So, take my advice - buy your 
husband a recliner this Valentine's 
Day. As any man will tell you, "it's 
good to be the king". 

Unfortunately, I don't think 
that will help Hillary. It's obvious 
the President already has too many 
rediners. 

Instead, she may want to get 
his remote control repaired. I 
think it's stuck on The Spice 
Channel". 



Questions or comments for 
humorist Donna Abear can be 
sent to Lakeland Newspapers, 30 
S. WliitneySt., Grayslake, IL 
60030. 




^Welcome aboard 
^The S.S. i^ntioch 




flntioch !llllie§ HI 

* - !■■.!,. " . t 

Saturday, February 7, 1998 
7 p.m, to 12 Midnight 

AntiochVFW Hall, 75 North Ave., Antioch ( 

; ♦ Hors d'Oeuvres • Games 
• Dancing to the Music "of.' the "Scotch Lads" 
'.;• Prizes, Prizes and Surprises • Silent Auction 
• Enter Raffles to Win 6 Great Get-Away Weekends 

$ 15/person 

■ '_., | Sponsored by: ., 

VrAnti^ WXLC 






B6 /Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



February 6, 1998 



Cruise at LoveFest 

LoveFest sets forth on the S.S. 
Antioch, a cruise ship with a license 
to gamble, on Saturday, Feb. 7 from 
7 p.m. until midnight at the VFW 



GURNEE CINEMA 

GURNEE MILLS SHOPPING MALL ;. 
• : 847'855-9940 :.':.'.. 



8RC3T, SPfCUL &» WSB t FRJ MTOWOON. 

BARGAIN MATINEES ■ ADULTS UJO BEfORE 5 JO 
OflUJRDI UNHn I HOT WWTTtD TO TT RATED fUTU»CS 

'*' No pntn or Mo™ Fui TleWU Accapted 
FEATURES AND SHOWT1ME3 FOR FF11DAY. 
FEBRUARY THRU THUIIS. FEBRUARY 13 



BE THERE 

Hall on North Avenue in Antioch. 
Six people will win a Weekend 
Get Away prize. Tickets are sold as 4 
for $1 0, or $3 each. Area banks and 
the Chamber of Commerce and In- 



1 1:45 ISO, Z.M, 3 : 41. 6QO, MO, T:45. IKW, hOQi TtSA) 



IJLUES BROTHERS 2000 Mil Steioj-nc in^ion) 
i i 45, gag, jiga, Tao, iftoa 



REPLACEMENT KILLERS RS^M<v 

liroo. J-oo, ««i. a«i, aflo, ifroo 



SLAPPY & THE STINKERS po 

1:00,3:00,6 00, 7.00 



DOOOIE NIGHTS Ft 

1:1S,4J0, B:00 



+ GREAT EXPECTATIONS R 

1130. 2;«0, 435, TgB, MO 



AS QOOD AS IT GETS POi3 

I £50. 3.10. 8:*S. *40 



HARD RAIN R 

1:08, 3:15. flJS.7Ji.fc4g 



GOODWILL HLWTINQ RSMumSMrgiOvario^ 

1130, 4:15. 7:00, 9-.40 



AMISTAD R 

11:48,3.03, 0:15. ».» 



WAG THE DOG R 

12JS. i45, 4^6, 7i1B. *30 



DEEP RISING R 

1233, 2:43, 6:06. 7.23, MB 



SPICE WORLD PO 

t£23, M5, 4:4S, 7:10, fl-.iO 



DESPERATE MEASURES n 

1£40. i55, 5:10. 730. »50 ■ 



DECEIVER R 

1S4S, MM 



PHANTOMS R 

5:30. 730, ».5S 



MOUSEHUNT pa 

1 8:30. 2M. 5:1 & 



HALF BAKED R 

TJO. »15 



STAR KID pa 

t£OS, fc2S, 4:40 



FALLEN R 

r-.x, imp 



TOMORROW NEVER DIES PQ13 

fcSO . 



GURNEE CINEMA ART 
THE BOXER R 



&HOWPLACE8 

VERNON HILLS 

Milwaukee Ave-2nd Light S of (ED 
ft 847/247-8958 & 



allseats" s 2? "Fri"& Sat 
s 1. 50 Sun- thru Thurs 



Showtima Good Thru 

Thunday, 21 12198 

Sat./Sun. Matinees in [Brackets] 

STARSIIIP TROOPERS (R) 

[12:10 3:00] 7:00 9:50 DIGITAL 
[12:40 3:30] 7:40 10:20 DIGITAL 

KISS THE GIRLS (R) 

[12:30 3:30] 7:10 9:45 DIGITAL 

HOME ALONE 3 (PG) 

[1:45 4:10] 6:40 9:15 DIGITAL 

7 YEARS IN TIBET (PG-13) 

[12:20 3:10] 7:15 10:10 

FOR RICHER OR POORER {PG-13) 

[1:15 4:00] 7:20 9:55 DIGITAL 

MIDNIGHT IN THE GARDEN 
OF GOOD AND EVIL (R) 

[12:00 3:20] 6:50 10:00 DIGITAL 

AIR FORCE ONE (R) 

[1:00 3:40] 7:30 10:15 DIGITAL 



viiitourwrtattoit www.tortwtw.com 



Free Refill on Popcorn &. Soil Onnks! 
I"™"! . ALL ' revr 



DIGITAL SOUND 



\^f/ Presents \S^jj 

A Streetcar Named Desire 

By Tennessee Williams 

In one af the most remarkable plays of our time, Marlon Brando 

shot to fame by screaming, "Stella!" 

Directed by Deanne Jones 
January 30 through February 15 

Fri. & Sat. 8 p.m.; 'Sunday Matinee 2:30 p.m. 
Adults $10; Students & Seniors $8 

Call for Reservations 

(847) 395-3055 

Box office opens January 19th. 
PM&L Theatre, P.O. Box 23, 877 Main St., Antioch 

SB 



Dai Olfcc Hours Wort. Uwu Thufs 5 30-7,30 p m : Sal. 1 1 2, 
1 1/2 tire Bokxc srtcwimw Reserved Seating V1SA.WC 



#.€#tf#©:^e«©*o«efteft© 



*47lDEO QCaKE 3CwO 

82 CENTER STREET 
DOWNTOWN GRAYSLAKE 

(847) 223-8273 






Where 

Service Is 

Our No. 1 

Priority 



WEDNESDAY ONLY 



WTTH THIS AD. 



I 



ALL MOVIE RENTALS! 

$100 



EXPIRES 4/30/M.I 



I VT2-Z/98 

I LIMIT 3 MOVIES PER COUPON AT II OO EA. 

CANNOT BE USED WITH RESERVATIONS 

I COUPON PEH VISIT. REGULAR LATE FEES APPLIES, 
CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER SPECIALS OR PROMOTIONS 






dustry office also have tickets avail- 
able now. A mini-roulette wheel 
and VFW Hall's lucky chance pull 
tabs will also be available. 

'Hearts & Flowers' 
luncheon planned 

A "Hearts and Mowers" luncheon 
is being planned by the Northwest 
Suburban Christian Women's Club 
on Feb, 12. Loveable Gifts; Colette's 
Table from Long Grove will present 
their French imports. 

Love Songs; there will be special 
music sung by Jeanninc Weintz. 

Love Notes; Betty Larson will 
come and speak about how to live 
well, laugh often and love much as 
she goes through the ups and downs 
oflife. 

The luncheon is from noon to 2 
p.m. at Concorde Banquets on Rand 
Road (just north of Quentin) in 
Kildeer. Cost is S10, with free baby- 
sitting available for pre-schoolers. 

For more infonnation, or for 
reservations no later than Feb. 9, call 
438-0197 or 526-3043. 

Fireside chat with FDR 

American history will come to 
life at a special program on Thurs- 
day, Feb. 12 at 7 p.m., at the Civic 
Center in Libertyville. The Friends of 
Cook Memorial I ibrary have invited 
historical dramatist R.J. Undsey who 
will do an informal portrayal of 
Franklin D. Roosevelt, touching 
upon many aspects of the Presiden- 
t's life. Registration is required by 
calling the Library at 3G2-2330. 



I* ANTIOCH '(847) 395-021 6 1 
• 378 Lake St. Antioch 



CAM SENIORS (QYEHKJ1, CHILDREN 
*/ m (UNDER 11| & ALL SHOWS BEFORE 
fc 6PM KM ADULTS AFTEH 6PM 



Spice World <«) 

Fri. 7s00, MO; SaL 230, 4:30, 7:00, MM 
Sim. & Thur. 230, 430, TOO, MoaWed. 7:00 



LIBERTY (847)362-3011 
• 708 N. Milwaukoo Ave., Libcrlyvillo • 



kfui StHlORSi CHILDREN 11 lUNOEfl 

' W ALL SHOWS BEFORE 6PM 

• AOUUStUO SHOWS AFTER 6PM 



Tomorrow Never Dies m-m 

Fri- 0:30, BOO, Sat. 1:30. 4 OO. DO. BOO 
Sun. 1:.*). 4:00, 7:00-, Mon.-Thu*. 74)0 

Mouse Hunt c«]i«.»i«mv<x 

Half Baked ci 

fn 1 a*L 0:*S, n *5, Sun.-Ttw. 7:1 S 



: Mchenry 1 & 2 (61S) 385-0144 : 

* '.*. 1204 N. Green St.* * 



i 



5Q SEHORS4 CHILDREN 11 A UNDER 
ADULTS 1100 AFTER 6PM 



Hard Rain cm 

rnJSA « JO. 1 4* &A-TH*. 7 OO 

Star Kid ■«> 

Oat. a. Bun. 2.O0, 4:1S 

Half Baked i«i 

Fa im. ko. Sjl zaa on, 7o\ sm 

Sm. 230, WQ, W ii Uov-Ttii 7.1 J 






General Cinema 

LAKEHURST 



IROUTE 43 near ROUTE 120 
473-4200 



1AKOAIH WLATlMOl IVIBY OAT 
AU SHOW I BIJOM 6 r>M 



SHOWTIMES FOR 2/6 THRU 2/12 



BARGAIN MATINEES ALL SHOWS BEFORE 6PM 
'IHD1CATES VIP TICKET RESTRICTIONS APPLY 



STAR KID (Pd 

Fft-Sm 200. 430; Moa-Tru. 430 



HALF BAKED n 

Ffl-SmJia720.t.tav-Thi7a) 



SPICE WORLD (PO) 

Fa-Sai1O3,3O5,S:10.M5,920 
Mon.Tt»/.S;lQ,MS.520 



GOOD WILL HUNTING n 

FfL-Sua 1:15. 400,635, 9.15 
MDn-Tru.400.635.915 



PHANTOMS MO-VWUlio 
FALLEN m 

Fft-Sn 1:15.400,640,915, Mcn-Thj 400,640.915 



HARD RAIN m 

j Ffl-Sft l(TJ.5l5.»3D.MTn-Thr 515 9X 



I TITANIC (Ponj 

Fn -Mai 1 203. 4 00. 8 00 Tue •Thur. 400.BOO 



AS GOOD AS IT GETS tw«3j 

Fn -Sui 2.00. 503. BOO Mon-Tru 503. B 00 



GREAT EXPECTATIONS* n 

Fn.Swi1;4S.4:15,645,915 
MonTrw. 4 15.645.915 



DESPERATE MEASURES 4 m 

FflSin 12 45, 2*5, 503. 7:15,930 

Mcn-Tru500.M5.930 



DEEP RISING* tm 

| Fn. 4 Sjl 130. 400, 645. 9 10, 1130 

I &*v 130 400.645,910; Mon-TTu 400.645.910 



BLUES BROTHERS 2000* -*<4 

Tn i 5jL 1 20. 4 03. 6 O 9X. 11 45 

Sui 1 70. 4 00. £ *0. 920. Mon-Tru 4 03. 6*0. 920 



REPLACEMENT KILLERS* r*u 

Fn I S* I Ja 330. 5 30. IX. 933, 1 1 30 

Sji 130 330, 530, '30. 9J0t McnTru 530. 730, 930 



Saturday Only ROCKY HORROR 11:30 PM 



GIFT CERTIFICATES ON SALE 



MOVIE PICK 



'Expectations' not great 



Wlien will Hollywood stop fool- 
ing with the perfection of literature's 
classics? We suffered through 
U'onardo DiCnprio's punk rock 
"Romeo and Juliet," and now they've 
updated one of Charles Dickens' 
most enjoyable works "Great Expec- 
tations" to please the young crowd. 

This murder of terary king of 
England's 19th century changes the 
plot and the characters to such an 
extent that if we hadn't been in- 
formed of the connection by the pre- 
publicity and the name we would 
have never recognized one of our fa- 
vorite stories. 

No more do we have a poor lad 




Gwyneth Paltrow and Ethan 
Hawke star in "Great Expecta- 
tions." 



I 

named Pip who tries to rise above his 
poor class, seek his fortune In Lon- 
don and win his childhood love. He 
is aided by money he thinks comes 
from a Miss Havisharri, only to find 
out later it's a very scary character he 
helped as a child. 

In the new version we have a 
poor artist, Finn, played by Ethan 
Hawke leaving the fishing village he 
was raised in to seek success in the 
"Big Apple." He spends too many 
years mourning the loss of his child- 
hood love played by Gwyneih Pal- 
trow and when he finally gets a 
gallery show he regains her love 
amidst a lot of craziness and de- 
bauchery. 

Robert DiNiro, who plays the 
convict Finn, whom he helped when 
a child and who turns out to be his 
benefactor later, is the only character 
in the new version that shows any 
depth at all. Anne Bancroft, today's 
version of the bitter Miss Havisham, 
borders on the vulgar, a performance 
not worthy of art actress of her cal- 
iber. 

Hawke, who Is no stranger to 
good acting, turns in a weak and 
whiny performance and in trying to 
be all "today," Paltrow's character is 
much too commercial. 

The real star of the show is the 
camera that turns out scenic master- 
piece after masterpiece, whether it's 
file quaint fishing village or the glit- 
tering island of Manhattan. 

We give this renovated "Great 
Expectations" 2.5 out of five stars on 
the basis of its great cinematogra- 
phy.— By Gloria Davis 



Win free dinners for kno 

your presidential history 

Ftatlandcr's Restaurant and 
Brewery, Uncolnshirc, is using his- 
tory to offer $20 In food coupons for 
President's Day, Feb. 16, to four 
people who accurately answer all of 
the ten questions below about 
George Washington and Abraham 
Lincoln. 

People who want to enter 
should get their entry coupon at the 
restaurant, 200 Village Green, Lin- 
colnshire, ILG0069 and return it by 
Feb, 1 f> (or mail this article with the 
answers to the above address). 

The questions are: 

I. What was the name, city and 

MUNDELEIN cine ma 

*%7 155 N. SEYMOUR, MUNDEUIH 

(847) 566-2490 

Showtime* (on 2/6 thru 2/12 



STARSHIP TROOPERS 



Fri.: 5:50, B:30; 

Sot.: 3:10, 5:50, 8:30 

Sun.: 3:10, 5:50; 

Mon.-ThuTs,: 7:00 



ALL SHOWS $1.50 




location of the building where Abra- 
ham Lincoln was nominated for 
president? 

2. Did George Washington own 
slaves? 

3. When Lincoln was nominated 
for Presidcnt.what city was he in? 

A. Washington on a wintcry 
night with his soldiers crossed what 
river to win an important battle 
against the English army? 

5. Lincoln made a speech of only 
a few hundred words that will go 
down in history. What is this speech 
called? 

6. Legend says that Washington 
cut down a tree that upset his father. 
What kind oftree was it? 

7. A Milwaukee and Illinois 
newspaper reporter wrote the fa- 
mous biography or Lincoln that won 
the author the Pulitzer Prize. Who 
was the author? 

U. Washington on what date and 
under what kind of tree took com- 
mand of the Continental Army? 

9. What three slates did Lin- 
coln live in before becoming pres- 
ident? 

10. Did Washington fight with 
the British? 



fldmluion 



toj&siciffaNmA^ 



m imii i i m 



FOX LAKE THEATRE , 

115 Lakeland Plaza - Fox Lake , 

PLAYING FEB 6 -FEB 12 



[708) 973-2800 gjg 

OEM ADMISSION '5. 5 P.M. 



BLUES BROTHERS 2000* ( N u> 

FMI 7:00, S>:*0 

BAT 1:30, 4:15. 7:00. 0.40 

SUN/WED/T>WR 1:30, 5:15, 7:50 

MON/TUE 5:15. 7:50 



ITANICogu) in dolbt DiGrtti 

FRI 5:05, W30 SAT 1:00, 5:05, WX) 
SUH/WEDmtUR 1:00, 6:45 MON/TUE 6:45 



AS GOOD AS rr GETS trou) 

FRI 6:00, 0:45 

SAT 1:15, 4:05. 6:50, 0:45 

SUN/WED/THUR 1:15, 5:05 7:45 

MON/TUE 5:0';. 7:45 



DESPERATE MEASURES* « 

FRJ 5:10, 7:25, 9"55 

SAT 1235, 255, 5:10, 7:25, £55 

SUN/WEDmWR 1235, 255, 5:10, 7:25 

MON/TUE 5:10, 725 



SPICE WORLD M 

FRI 5:15, 720, 9"-35 

SAT 12:40, 3:00, 5:15, 720, 9:35 

SUN/WED/THUR 12:40, 3:00, 5:15, 720 

MON/TUE 5:15, 720 



'NO PASSES Oft COUPONS • DO LBY SUR ROUND SOUND ON ALL SCREENS 

axsse^s)^a a 



iWhere movie going is fun 8c affordable! 



m 



I 



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1- 

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id 
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own 

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what 

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I Lin- 
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fc55 
10,7^5 



fi) 

9:35 
1:15,7:20 

SCflECWS 



Februarys, 1998 



HOT SPOTS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B7 




Eating 
and 
g J meeting 

in the 

lakeland 

area 




884-3900 

1149 Coif Rd, West. Hoffman Estates 




949-1550 

890 East Route 45 
Mundeleln, IL 60060 

WHERE fRESHNESS IS A SPECIALTY 

& ^Unique 

'Experience in 

Seafood 'Dining 

Mlso an excellent selection 
of fine meat entrees 



Make Your Valentine's 
Day Reservation 



Featuring; 

Uve Entertainment - Tues. thru Sat 
Music by State Street 

Dally Specials 

Private Party Facilities 

Ample Parking 

Early Bird Menu Everyday 

Gift Certificates Available 

Open Dally: 

Monday thru Friday, 11 am 

Saturday, 4 pin 

Sunday, 2 pm 

All major credit cards accepted 



Jesseffiks 

Food & Drink 

18490 W. Old Cages Uko Rd, Cages Lake 
(847)223-2575 

Brrakfut Now Send • Saturday Ic Sunday - Full Menu 

-r^mrffift Valentine's Day 
I0P BP February 14th 

Surf & Turf with 
Champagne Split Special 



s 25 00 / 



person 




SWEETHEART SPECIAL 



#1 for Deep 
Dish Pizza In 
Lake County 



Shrimp Tempum 

with juicy steak 

-or- 

NorwesUn Salmon 

with soup or uUd 

Including paesano loaf J 

Desserts Gooey 

Ultimate Chocolate 

Cake L Chocalato 

Candy Ups 

$25.95p*rcoupl« 




ll ounce Rnk Drink Spedais 



50% off any food order ^^t?.oo 



■\ 



v^c 



a i L_V> 



Rt. -176, Lake Bluff 
(847) 234-6660 



* 



"I 



BT. 176 



HOUKSc 

M-Th llam-lOptn 
Frt-Sat Itam- 

Sun4pm-IOpm 

riot Valid with 
any othef otfef 




Reserve Now For 



VALENTINE'S DAY! 



at the Princess Tapas Restaurant 

*~r,vv Fl0U?er Frida y or Saturday: 

<;necifll s P end lhe evening by the fireplace 
for YoUT !>P ( with light music by popular 

Valentine- Chicago artists 

Don't forget our famous Sunday Brunch Buffet y 

featuring Carved Prime Rib, Poached Salmon, Lax & ir' e flfiJle 

Bagels, & Fresh Fruit - You'll Love W S PCCia} S I 
Adults $9.95; Children $4.50; Children under 3 Free 



THE 



(847) 362-1290 

1290 S. Milwaukee Ave., 

LlBEHTYVlIXE 




Hidden Ciovc . 

926 E. Milwaukee Ave. 
Libeityville • 367-0021 



^P Vafen/ine's Spec/a/ ^ 

New York Strip Steak & 
Twin Lobster Tail $19.95 

OR 

1 lb King Crab Legs $19.95 

Other Specials A vailablc 



[ 



Reservations recommended* for 
four people or more. 



Specials Everyday 

Friday 

All You Can Eat Fish Fry S6.95 

also other fresh fish 

available and Lake Perch 

Saturday 

King Cut Prime Rib $13.95 

Sunday Brunch 

Starting at 8:30 

Breakfast Buffet $4.95 

Children Under 10 $3.00 

Open for Lunch 
Everyday 

Lunch menu including Soups, 

Salads, Chops, Chicken, Pasta 

and Sandwiches 



Also visit 
us at 



Friday Fish Fry $6.95 




VALENTINE'S SPECIALS 

Prime Rib of Beef $11.95 

N.Y. Steak & Shrimp 

De Jonghe $12.95 

B.B.Q Ribs $10.95 



Check Our Dinner Specials 
&■ PIZZA Menu Available for Carry-out 

34028 N. Highway 45 • Gages Lake, IL 60030 » 223-6587 



FRIDAY! 5 pit*: 

Alt You can Eat 

Seafood & Rib Buffet 



Buffets include 30 item salad bar & non-alcoholic beverage 
ALSO--- -.-.—.———.. -.■-.-.■-,« 
^TAH You can Eat ,,:.Z{:' 

Hot Luncheon Buff et 



Oliver's • 305 S. wiiffll Grayslake 



Reserve Now! 



Valentine's Weekend 

^ Champagne Brunch 
* at the Peacock 



Sot & Sun., 
Feb. 14 & IS 



$995 

Adults 



Everyday Features: 

* Tandoori Khebhra (Giant Blue Crabs] 

V Tandoori Jinga {Jumbo Prawns) 

Tandoori Mela Clay Oven Festival 

V Tandoori Lobster (A Delicacy) 

V Tandoori Machi (Whole Pomfret Fish) 



¥ ¥ ¥ ¥ ¥ 

You Ho\ok 
Wk Cobki 








Jumbo 
Prawns 



Indian 
PofiBirf fish 



Lobster 



Crab 



■<: 'i — . ' 



1>£§\C0CK 



Peacock India Restaurant 
(847)816-3100 

701 H. Milwaukee Ave., Vernon Hills 

Please visit our website: www.peacock.ipmedlo.net 





. 



Celebrate Valentine'sDay Italian Style*. 




Join us for a 
Romantic Lunch or Dinner 




Special menu for 
Valentine's Day 



Complimentary 
Rate for 

Your 
.Valentine, 



602 N. Milwaukee Ave. 



Reserve Your 
Private Parties 
• Luncheons 
^WeCater Any Occasion Ubert*Be, IL60MB 

(847) 247-2208 
Gift Certiftcaies Available ^ Tues.-Thurs. 1 1-9; Fri.-Sai. 1 1-lQ 



Ceiehating, 50 tycox*, CU 5M& £acatien 





I 



i ■■■■'. . 

And Frigate Lounge 

CATCH OUR BIG 
FRIDAY FISH FRY 

yewt Choice dp 

• Beer Battered Haddock 

• Broiled Scrod Dejonge 

• Popcorn Shrimp 
OUty Jnclutks: Unlimited Soup, Homemade Bread 
Table, Salad Ban Dessert Table, Choice of Potato 

ALL YOU CAN EAT.. $7L95 

Lake Perch Platter. $8.95 

Broiled Swordfish. $9.95 

House Special: 
Baked Walleye Pike Almondi ne.... ._». .. $10.95 

Sotwtdatf, Mite ^*s5$&' W 

Roast Prime Rib of Beef....!?^rjr?r^r. ..$12.95 

Alaskan "Sno" Crablegs (all you can eat)...$17.95 

All Dinners Include Soup, Salad Bar, Potato & 

Homemade Bread. 

C847) 587-321 1 * Rollins Road • Ingleslde 
Between Wilson Road & Fairfield On 






-^rtssssi 




B8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 



February 6, 1998 







Ealing and meeting in fie Lakeland area 



^ 



TRIPLET 



STEAK IIOUS g 



lilted on Rte. 83 • 1/2 mile North of Aiitiocli 
(414) 862-9886 

Tues.-Thurs. 4-9 pm: Fri.4 Sat. 4-10 pm 



^ 



SEAFOOD SERVING PRIME STEAKS 

I>rl nU Specials from 4 to 6 pm 

G oz. Fillet, 4 OZ. Lobster Tall 

&4 Jumbo Shrimp 

S2G.95 

A Complimentary Rose (or the Lady 



PASTA 





Live Music Every Saturday at 8:00 pm In the Lounge 

WEEKLY SPECIALS 

Wednesday; AII-YothCnn-Ert Crab Letf* 

Thursday; Ffljitns 

Saturday: Prime Rib - Regular Cut: Ut.95; Special Cut: *M.95 



Gurnee Mills 



February 14, 1998 

Valentine's Da 

fc at Planet Hollywood 

Out Of Tin's J 

mm*! 



% 



COMING SOON: Piano Bar • Martini Bar • Cigars Available 




I MENU | — a 



Hours: 6 om to 11 pm 

356-444© 

1910 E. Grand ♦ Lindenhurst 



B«aklasl, Lunch, Dinrwi 
Homemade Soujk and Daily Specials 

♦ "Signature" Entrees 

♦ Broiled Steaks. Chops, Seafood, Chicken, eic. 

♦ Fabulous Desserts and Fountain Creations 

♦ Cocktails, Domestic & Imported Boer, Wine 



Itigby's 

Top Ten Winter Specials 

"Flatters" 

• Roast Prime Rib of Beef Platter 

• Broiled Porterhouse (over 1 pound) 

• Full Slab BBQ Baby Back Ribs 

• Half-slab BBQ Ribs and Half BBQ Chicken 

• (2) Extra-Thick Center-cut Pork Chops 

• Petite Ribeye Steak and (3) Jumbo Shrimp 

• Petite New York Strip and (3) Jumbo Shrimp 

• Rigby's "Land and Sea" Platter (Broiled Orange 
Roughy, Char-broiled Boneless, Skinless 
Chicken Breast, Shrimp Linguini) 

• Broiled Whitefish and (1) Broiled Pork Chop 

• Baked Scrod and Petite New York Steak 
or Petite Ribeye Steak 

®1K95 (Complete Dinner) 

Ail Above Entrees Include: 

•Soup •Tossed Dinner Salad • Potato 

•Vegetable • Dinner Rolls • Dessert Selection 

from our Pie Case and • Coffee or Hot Tea 

(Sates Tax & Gratuity not included) 
Limited time offer. Not valid with any other offer or coupon 



♦as** 



Choose From One Of The Following Packages: 

Dinner For Two and a Movie in our Adventure Room 

$ 55 00 



Choice of Entrees; 

!4 oz. Prime Rib 

Filel of Salmon 

Pomodoro Pasta 

Oven Roasted Half Chicken 

Dessert will feature a choice of 

Strawberry Shortcake for Two or 

our own libony and Ivory Brownie 

Eadi entree includes a dinner salad 



v r v r v 

Special Sweetheart Treats 

Will Be Offered During The 

Movie As Well As A Long 

Stemmed Rose For Each Lady 

Dinner includes a bottle of our 
house wine or champagne 

(ScWikm of While Zinfjndrt, Oiirdonruy. 

I* Dnmiirx Bnil CtumrwpwJ Nonalcoholic 

ch»m p Jf.nn aval libit. 



per couple 

Tax A paiutty aft additional 

Tlic Swrrthcaru Paduge (i alio 

Available in our Main Dining 

Room. Includes 2 mum, dessert 

and choice of wine or champagne 

$ 48 95 

■*■ v jwr couple 
Tax A tra\uiiy art additional 



Regular Menu Available As Well, 11:00 am to Midnight 
Please phone ahead for reservations - Limited seating available: (847) 856-1020 



GURNEE MILLS MALL ENTRY B 



n/VA. 



jitso, 




Sunday, February 8th, 8:30pm - 10:30 pm 

Ml tfto UndqG 

With Live Music Featuring: 

Johnny Payne 
and the Good Tine Junkies 

playing "Rockin' Vintage Blues" 






LAKEFRONT DINING 



GALE STREET INN, 906 Diamond 
Lake Road, Mundelein, 566-1090. 
Located on beautiful Diamond Lake 
in Mundelein, Gale Street Inn offers 
a fine reputation for food, spirits, 
and hospitality, Dancing and enter- 
lainment is in the lounge five nights 
,1 week, Tuesday through Saturday. 
Open for lunch Tuesday through 
Snturday, 11 to 3; dinner 3 to 10 
p.m. weekdays; Friday and Saturday 
3 p.m. to 12 a.m.; Sunday 3 to 10 
p.m. $SS 



MICRO-BREWERY 



RREWMASTERS PUB & RESTAU- 
RANT, 401 7 80th Street, Kenosha, 
VVI, (414) 694-9050. A casual, 
friendly atmosphere where even the 
beer is homemade. Lunch and din- 
ner served daily. Open daily at 1 1 
a.m., with average lunch prices 
$4.25 and dinners, 59. Open daily 
at 1 1 a.m. for lunch. $ - $5$ 



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•U.S.D.A. Choice Aged Steaks 
•32 oz. Porterhouse Steaks 

• Apple Wood Smoked Chops 
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1818 N. Grandwood Dr., Gurnee 

(1 mUcW. of Gurnee Mills) 



(847)356-5200 



Voted #1 

Stealc Joynt in Lake Country, 
For 4 Years Straight! 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Tang's 



Loccrtjon: 

111 S. Hwy. 45, 

Schoolhouse Plaza, 

Grayslake 

Telephone: 
(847)548-8882 

Hours: 

Open seven days a 
week: Mon.-Thurs., 
11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m., 
Fri. and Sat., 11:30 
a.m. to 10 p.m., Sun., 
2:30 to 9 p.m. 

Menu: 

Carry-out, dine-in and 

delivery. Finest Chinese 

cuisine served in the 

area. 




Tang's best 
Chinese dining 
around 

If you are among the many customers who vis- 
ited Tang's Chinese Restaurant during its first year, 
you will know why owner Peter Tang has already 
expanded the most popular Chinese restaurant in 
the area 

Tang feels that this higher customer volume 
will help give his loyal guests even better service. 



From day one, Peter has had the goal of offer- 
ing the best Chinese dining, focusing on freshness, 
quality food, service and the most value for the 
money without any compromises. 

Tang's Chinese Restaurant is easily accessible, 
located at 1 1 1 S. Hwy 45, in the Schoolhouse 
Plaza, in Grayslake. There is plenty of free parking 
in front of the restaurant. 

During the Chinese New Year, everyone is 
invited to come to Tang's and enjoy the widest 
variety of the finest Chinese food served in a 
casual setting. Try some of Tang's off the menu 
authentic specialties such as our Peking Style 
Pork Chops. 

Tang's brand new dinning room is available for 
private parties, seating up to 80 people. Make your 
reservations early so that you and that special 
someone can celebrate Valentine's Day experienc- 
ing the adventure of dining on our delicious 
Chinese cuisine together. 

Tang's is open seven days a week, Monday 
through Thursday from 1 1 :30 a.m. to 9 p.m., 
Friday and Saturday from 1 1:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., 
and Sunday, from 2:30 to 9 p.m. Dine-in, carry-out 
or delivery available. Call today at (847)548-8882. 




rjjaaaaagjaagteaBic^ 



I7ie Best Chinese Food 

In The Area.,. 

And Our Customers 

Are Vie Critics 

•; loinU*Val«n!in«'iD*y "2, 
S«tiird*yFfb.14'-T* *S- 



Chinese Restaurant Plenty of Free Parking 

• Dine In • Carry Out ■ Cocktails 
The Chinese Restaurant That Everybody's Talking About 
Conveniently Located Across From Fairgrounds 
111 S. Hwy. 45 Grayslake 
(847) 548-8882 Fax: (847) 548-2822 



Free Delivery 

Call for Details 




Valentine's 
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Specials: 

at Jimmy's Charhouse 

|A Rrvefwoods Orty 



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' Both Sped* Served wtttiChoce 
of Potato and Soup or Sabd 




Twin Lobster Tails 

and 
Top Sirloin Steak 

(Served With Drawn Butter) 
«A and ^f 

Charbroiled 
T-Bone Steak 



(Oven Lb.) 

Prices ira/W 2/12/98 tttrv 2/15/98 

1111 N. Milwaukee Ave., 

Riverwoods 



(847) 465-9300 



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Valentine's Day Only! • ^ 
Filet Mignon ** 



^ with Salad, Choice of Potato, j$ 

fe Sourdough Bread, & ^ 

4> Glass of Champagne &, 



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■^W^l«^lll— WtW*^*«iWl>*B 







VALENTINE GIFTS OF THE HEART 



B 1 0/ Lakeland Newspapers 



Februarys, 1998 



Valentine's Day has been celebrated since the days of the Romans 



Hearts and flowers, cupids 
and candy — today's symbols of 
Valentine's Day are well re- 
moved from the circumstances 
which launched this annual dis- 
play of overt affection. Estab- 
lished as a religious holiday, the 
Feast of St. Valentine honored 
the Christian martyr who lost his 
life during the reign of Roman 
Emperor Claudius II. 

According to various histori- 
cal accounts, Valentine, a holy 



priest In Rome, was persecuted 
for his Christian faith and exe- 
cuted on Feb. 14, approximately 
270 A.D. His crimps against the 
Roman Empire differ depending 
upon the source, but some be- 
lieve he was arrested for secretly 
performing Christian marriages 
despite Claudius' orders to the 
contrary, while others cite his 
penchant to assist Christian 
martyrs in their escape from Ro- 
man prisons as his primary of- 




A Real Treat - Get Away From It All! 

Valentine Special 



"Complete Your Evening by Spending The Night wilh Your Sweetie 

Hitch-Inn Post 
Available February 13 k 14 

l'lu*-I,u ft 

Deluxe Room for Two-Includes • Pool u T[}^ n ^' 1 ' 

Sauna • Whirlpool • HBO Rawvatfon* Only 
Chilled Champagne in Room NAA't 

Candlelight Swimming v-i j*.. fa 




Complimentary Continental Breakfast 



- W 



$ 



(847) 362-8700 

Rle. 137 & 21 (Milwaukee Ave.), Libcrtyvillc, Illinois 




K^upicl J _Xr/ 
id pointina to 




£, 



•■ ■< 



njoy champagne and chocolate-covered 
strawberries upon arrival to your spacious two- 
room suite. Relax in our indoor pool, whirlpool 
and sauna. Then wake up to a complimentary 
full cooked-to-order breakfast. 

Call for Reservations 
847/945-4500 

orl-800-EMBASSY 




EMBASSY 
SUITES® 

CHICAGO NORTH SHORE 

1*145 Like Cook Rood 

Deerfiuld, Illinois 60015 

ttoics bttscdupon availability, 2/t3 A 2/l-t/Vli. 
King-bedded suites only. Tax not included. 



fense. 

Either way, Valentine be- 
came a symbol of love and com- 
passion and was conveniently 
plucked from obscurity several 
hundreds of years later when the 
Christian church gained a 
stronger foothold In Europe and 
set about eradicating pagan ritu- 
als. 

Again, depending on the 



source, we're told that the Feast 
of St. Valentine came to replace 
a mid-February fertility festival 
called Lupcrcalia or that it was 
established to abolish a heathen 
village custom of boys drawing 
the names of girls on the 15th of 
the month In honor of the god- 
dess Februata Juno. Still others 
claim that sending greetings to 
loved ones on Feb. 14 dates to 



the middle ages when It was be- 
lieved that this day marked the 
beginning of the mating season 
for birds. 

So there you have It — crime, 
passion, forbidden displays of 
affection— all the makings of a 
great love story. No wonder it 
endures to this day! 
Courtesy of Article Resource Asso- 
ciation, www.aracopy.com 



Tailor your message of flowers 



Ori the most romantic day of 
the year, you can send a perfect- 
ly-tailored, personal message of 
"amour" with carefully selected 
flowers. Sure, roses arc the tradi- 
tional blossom of love, but why 
not expand creatively on that 
theme by adding Baby's Breath, 
which signify a pure heart, or 



Blue Violets, which Indicate 
faithfulness. 

Below arc a sampling of oth- 
er flowers and their meanings 
from which you can design a de- 
tailed testament of your affec- 
tion. 

Carnation, red — Admiration 



















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Tulips are said to mean the recipient is the perfect lover. 



Artwork By: 

H. Hargrove 

N.A. Noil 

Brm Lou Walt 

Kaihueen Cope Ruoss 

ctnaia^t Barb Jackson 




L Pa/rJc i'a } s 




Furniture 
Giftware 



Quality Furniture Made The Old World Way. 

Oik, Chert); Hickory A Atopic. 1 J Different Sfjins lh Wood. Custom Work Available. 

395 LAKE ST., ANTIOCH 

f¥ (847) 395-4780 ^^ 

Northern Illinois' Second Largest 

YANKEE CANDLE DEALER 



OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 

HOURS: Mon.-Thurs. 10-6; Fri. 10-7; 
Sat. 10-5; Sun. 11-4 



Family operated 

since 1991 
Please call if you 
need directions. 



Carnation, white — Pure and ar- 
dent love 

Chrysanthemum — Friendship 
Daisy — Loyally, gentleness 

Forget-me-not — True love 

Forsythla — Anticipation 

Globe Amaranth — Unfading 
love 

Ivy— Fidelity 

Primrose — Young love 

Rose, pink — Perfect happiness 

Rose, while — Charm and inno- 
cence 

Rose, red — Love and desire 

Rosebud — Beauty and youth 

Stcphanoits — Happiness In 
marriage 

Tulip — You arc the perfect lover 

Courtesy of Article Resource 
Association, www.aracopy.com 

Celebrate 
Valentine's 
with music 

David Paul and his Quartet will 
be appearing at Duke O'Brien's 
Restaurant and Bar, HON. Main St., 
on Valentine's night, Saturday, Feb. 
14 from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. 

Included in his quartet will be 
Ken Champion, pianist and gui- 
tarist, formerly with the group Dr. 
Hop and the headliners, drummer 
Jay Payette, formerly of the Stanley 
Paul Orchestra in Chicago, Bassist 
Adam Johnson, a main talent in the 
Chicago jazz scene, and Craig 
Burgess, tenor sax, formerly wilh 
Maynard Ferguson's band. While 
swing is king that night, don't be 
surprised to hear a few licks from 
the '50s as well. Call (015) 35G-99B0 



MRINT ALUS 



436 Lake Street • Antioch, IL 
(847)838-0001 • Fax (847) 838-0003 

[ VOLUME DUPLICATING 




Business Cards * Letterhead • Newsletters • Brochures 

FREE PICK-UP &DELDVERY 

For Order* Over $50.00 



') 



■ 



■ 
I 






February 6, 1998 



VALENTINE GIFTS OF THE HEART 



Lakeland Newspapersl&'i 



J 



Brookfield Zoo offers purrrr-fect Valentine's Day Gift 



Brookfleld Zoo has the piirrrr- 
fcct gift for you to give your 
main squeeze this Feb. 14th. 
Adopt Anastasia, a 3 1/2 month- 
old Siberian tiger cub, through 
the zoo's Parents Program and 
your valentine will be "feline" 
fine. 

The $35 adoption package fea- 
ture an attractive 3-inch by 3- 
jnch decorative box (appropriate 
for a man or woman), handcraft- 
ed from mango wood, A hand- 
tooled, aluminum tiger design 
adorns the box lid. Each box is 
finished in either natural color 
stains or uniquely textured 
acrylic paint. 

In addition, your "one and 
only" will receive the following 
Shared Care benefits; a person- 
alized adoption certificate, a 5- 
inch by 7-inch color photograph 
of Anastasia, a fact sheet about 
Siberian tigers, an update on 
Anastasia sent later in the year, 



and an Invitation to the Parents' 
Evening at the zoo on Aug. 15, 
1998. (An adoption package with 
the Shared Care benefits, ex- 
cluding the box, is also avafiable 
for $25). Your contribution to 
the Parents Program will help 
Brookfield Zoo care Anastasia 
for one year. A gift card carrying 
your name and a Valentine's Day 
message can accompany the 
adoption package. 

If you would like to adopt 
Anastasia or any of Brookfield 
Zoo's animals for your signifi- 
cant other this Valentine's Day, 
call the Parents Program at (708) 
485-0263, ext. 341. 

Siberian tigers are highly en- 
dangered due to their natural 
habitats being destroyed 
through deforestation and the 
spread of agriculture. To help 
ensure the survival of this 
species, Brookfield Zoo and oth- 
er North American zoos cooper- 



atively manage Siberian tigers 
through a Species Survival Plan 
(SSP) of the American Zoo and 
Aquarium Association. Under 
this plan, zoos strive to protect 
the Siberian tiger from extinc- 
tion through long-term captive 
breeding. Anastasia's sister, 
Sheeba, who was born at Brook- 
field Zoo, was transferred to Lin- 
coln Park Zoo due to a recom- 
mendation made by the SSP. She 
and her mate also are available 
for adoption this Valentine's Day 
through its A.D.O.P.T. program. 

Open every day of the year, 
Brookfield Zoo is located at First 
Avenue and 31st Street in Brook- 
field, IL, just 14 miles west of 
downtown Chicago, The zoo is 
accessible via the Stevenson (I- 
55) and Eisenhower (1-290) ex- 
pressways, Tri-State Toilway 
(1294), Burlington Northern 
commuter line, and PACE bus 
service. 




The Siberian tiger Is one of many animals available for adoption 
at Brookfield Zoo. 




A heart shaped box for men makes 
for a his and her Valentine's Day 





Nearly 250,000 of the 500,000 
heart shaped boxes Fannie 
May® Candles sells are sold on 
Feb. 1 4th. And this year, ladies 
can give their man a version of 
[the same gift they have loved re- 
* clving for years: a heart shaped 

ox for men. 

According to Fannie May® 

andies, when cupid comes eati- 
ng, more than 80 percent of 
shoppers on Valentine's Day are 
men and they arc also the 
biggest spenders. For men look- 
ing for a gift to make her swoon, 
Fannie May® has a unique twist 
on the hearts and flowers theme. 

he Floral Heart Box, Is designed 

ith colorful spring flowers, 
[while the inside is filled with 

annic May® Candies popular 
Colonial Assortment. The price 
for this gift: $17.50. 

And if you want to give a gift 
that will be remembered long af- 
ter the candy is gone, Fannie 
May® Candies also offers the 
Floral Heart Tin. The heart 
shaped tin is covered with pe- 
onies and roses and filled with 
an assortment of Fannie May® 
favorites. The one pound tin, 
costs $17.95 and can also be cus- 
tomized with her favorite choco- 
lates. 

Although the heart shaped box 
is traditionally a feminine icon, 
Fannie May® Candies has devel- 
oped a gift just for the men. The 
Masculine Heart Box is a one 
pound assortment of Fannie 
May® Candies famous Pixies®, 
nut clusters, rich buttercrcams, 
caramels and more. Expecially 
designed for him, the antique 
styled box features sports and 
other male hobby memorabilia. 
This gift is priced at $16.95 and 
can also be customized with any 
assortment. 

For those still searching for 
the perfect gift, there is always 
the timeless and classic, Red 
Heart Box. Fannie May® offers 
more than 25 different Valen- 
tine's Day heart assortments lo 
choose from, starting at 1 1 A 
pound to 8 pounds and ranging 
from $3.95 to over $100 in price. 
Customers can select any size 
heart box and customize it with 
their true love's favorites. 

Also available arc novelty milk 
chocolate items such as long- 

temmed red roses and foil 
rapped milk chocolate mini 

Ipsnnd hearts. 

Fannie May® Candies retail 
stores will be open Sat., Feb. 

14th and selected locations will 






Fannie May offers 
heart shaped candy 
boxes for men and 
women. 



have extended hours for those 
who forgot to plan ahead! For 
those who do plan ahead, Fan- 
nie May® Candies can be or- 



dered and sent by mail by call 
1-800-333-3629, or visit their 
website at www.fanniemaycan- 
dies.com. 



WELCOME TO 
Celebrate with us on our 

6th Anniversary 

hnnrvcrtaty 6pcc»U ore available rebnmry 9* through rcbruwy \3f 

1-titM fV:«MiV: tcup cr Gup AshJ ¥iii Arasr^ fjoLs.1 Potato" nd DcmoI 
(lx CrcasL doc Pudii$ or Tapco) fbJole* Ho DcUo it fcrwd when Dec c* Pvij sr «cncJ) 

* 7 9S VbtKetA 

New York filrip 6lcak • Bull 6tcak • Pork Chops • Lamb Chops 
Whitehall • Jumbo Culf French Fried 6hrirop 

* 4 9S T>iK«VtA 

baby beef liver iwth bocon or «***») 
Chicken Danac«in* (»th fx&c\n or mc*. «ucci . 
breaded Veal Oitlet (*ih brom grnvr md avicd pdaloc*) 
lirodcd breast of Chicken (on pb bread rti-. kn± Ihc cr at**) 

6pOgheUJ (with nest taucc) • Hot Dog (»*h Trench fne*) 
1/2 lb. burger (»Ah Trench Trie*) • Grilled ChcCSS (**L french fne*) r~y>f 
oerved **h .Small (Soft Drmk 

804 Barron Blvd. (PL 83) • Cmvalakc. IL 60030 * (847) 548-1008 






0€6> 



€*>s*e. 



Instead of candy and flowers. Treat your valentine and yourself with our 
two-for-one heart Screen at the Heart Center of Lake County. 

The thorough screening includes a variety of tests designed to identify 
your cardiac risk factors: 

• Sub-maximal exercise tolerance test 

• Lung spirometry 

• Total cholesterol/HDL ratio 

• HDL andLDL cholesterol 

• Total blood cholesterol 

A single screening is just $49.00, but our Heart Month Special is 
just $79.00 for two people. Limited appointments available. 

The screening lakes only 45 minutes to complete. 

Call now for an appointment, 1-888-869-11 18. ..because... 

tJ^ofje &o/-/ie£- feossi /Ae Uveas'/. 



/ 



• Triglycerides 

• Glucose 

• Blood Pressure 

• Coronary risk profile 

• Personalized coronary risk report 



Mti Provena 



Saint Therese Medical Center 

2615 Washington Streel 

Waukegan. It 60085 
847 249-3900 



Treat your Valentine to 
dinner in our bedroom. 




^Romantic Valentine weekend dinners served in the 
bedroom suites of the restored Sears mansion on 13 acres 
of winter wonderland. 

vA secluded, seductive setting with fireplaces, flowers, 
candlelight and other amorous amenities. 

^Choose from specials like Chateaubriand or Rack of 
Lamb for 2 ($2250 per person) or Alaskan King crab legs 
($22.50), each with a split of champagne. Or order from 
our regular continental menu. 

*"Most romantic restaurant" — North Shore magazine. 

vMake Feb. 13 or 14 reservations now. 



Qlmmtrg Squirt 



Kis. 120 & *5, Gravslakc 

(5 miles west or 1-94) 

(8*7) 223-0121 

Your cupids: Bill, Kris, & Cms Govas 




B12 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



February 6, 1998 



CROSSWORD 




23. Brute 

24. Gramineous plant 

25. Secure 

CLUES DOWN 

1. Mr.Tibbs 

2. Doctors* group 

3. Grading 

4. Express pleasure 

5. Kidnaps 

6. Stagnated 

7. Eventually 
11. Restraint 
13. Conspicuous 

15. Had his own army 

16. Saturday 
18. Edge 

20. Compartment 
22. Portable computer 
screen material 



answers: 



CLUES ACROSS 

1 . Gets healthy again 
4. Gums 

8. Episode 

9. Spanish noble 
10. Raptors 



12. Ask for and get free 

14. Birth swine 

15. Stimulates 

17. "97 money winner 
19. Sound unit 
21. Country 





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■■ '■»■- .-> ;■: ....■•■■ ■■■- 



J©tre»HEAurH Makes a 
WPM^p of Difference 

I At Victory Memorial Hospital, 





WMl 

we want you to get as much out 

of life as possible. That's why 

we offer a variety of on-going 

programs, health screenings, 

seminars and workshops. 

All programs are held at 

Victory Memorial Hospital 

unless otherwise listed. 



Free LIVING WITH DIABETES Class: "Eye Care/Foot Care" 

6:30 - 8 p.m., Thursday, February 5, 1998 

Join others in learning how to stay on top of diabetes. Call 360-4148 for a schedule of 

additional classes. 

EARLY PREGNANCY CLASS 

6:30 - 8:30 p.m., Tuesday, February 10, 1998 Call 360-4121 to register. 
This class is intended for expectant parents in their first months of pregnancy. Discussion 
includes nutrition, physical changes and discomforts of pregnancy, among others. $10 fee. 
Registration is required. 

Free STROKE RISK SCREENING 

3 • 7 p.m., Tuesday, February 10, 1998 

Are you at risk for stroke? Find out with this free stroke risk screening and learn about risk 
factors and treatment options. 

Free COPING WITH LOSS 

7 p.m., Tuesday, Febuary 17, 1998 

Chaplain George Franke will discuss the grief process and suggest how to cope. This program is 

designed for anyone who has experienced a loss. 

CHILDREN'S IMMUNIZATION CLINIC Note Time Chance 

4 - 6 p.m., Tuesday, February 1 7, 1998 Call 360-4127 for information. 
Immunizations: Oral Polio; Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis (DPT); Measles, Mumps, Rubella 
(MMR); Haemophilus Influenza Type B (11 IB); and Hepatitus B (for infants and children 
entering 5th grade only) are offered. Shots are just $6 or less -- no one will be turned away 
due to inability to pay. Bring previous immunization records. 

Free HEART HEALTH RISK FACTORS Seminar 

7 p.m., Tuesday, February 24, 1998 

Presented at Victory Lakes Continuing Care Center -- Lindenhurst 

Dr. Norman Weinstein, Board Certified Cardiologist, will discuss lifestyle and treatment options 
for people at risk for heart disease. Registration is required. 

Your health is the most important thing in the world to us. 

Call 

1-800-THE-CHOICE 

to register. (i8ooto3-2W) 




Victory Memorial Hospital 

1324 N. Sheridan Road, Waukegan, It. 
J 



Those physically challenged and/or in need of an ASL interpreter may contact us up to one week before a 

community program to determine how Victory can facilitate their attendance. 

Tcnemas disponibles tos servicios de traduccidn at EipaHul. 



HOROSCOPE 



Arfos - Mnrch 21/Aprll 20 
A financial windfall comos ot Jusl Iho right 
llmo. Howovor, don'l bo n Bpondlhrlfl, Aftor 
you pay off your bills, put somo monoy 
away, You'ro going lo nood ll In Iho near fu- 
ture A closo friond has a problem and 
noods your holp, Bo supportive and do what 
you can, Gornlnl plays nn Importonl rolo at 
Iho boglnnlng of tno weak. 

Taurus- April 21/May 21 
A projoct that youVo boon working on hits a 
snag. Don'l got discouraged. Think rational* 
fy, and you can solve the problem, A family 
gathering thai you roally don't want to attend 
actually ends up bolng a lot of fun, All of your 
worrios nro for naught. That special some- 
one has a surprise for you. Enjoy ill 

Gemini - May 22/June 21 
YouVo got a rolaxing week In front of you, 
Gemini. There are no deadlines to meet, 
and no one Is piling responsibility on top of 
you. Enjoy it while you can, because things 
will got hectic soon. A loved one asks for 
your advice about a family problem. Be hon- 
est, and say what you really think. 

Cancer - June 22/July 22 
You are on edge this week, because you 
have so much to do and not enough time to 
get it all done. Don't get nervous. Just prior- 
itize your schedule, and stick to it. Youll be 
surprised at what a little organization can do. 
Some friends take you out to celebrate an 
important event. This is your time to relax 
and have fun. 

Loo - July 23/August 23 
Be true to your ideals this week, Leo, as you 
face a challenging problem. Stand up for 
what you believe in, and you will come out 
ahead. A loved one reveals an interesting 
family fact to you. Don't let it throw you — 
and keep it to yourself, Capricorn and Pisces 
play key roles later in the week. 

Virgo- Aug 24/Sept 22 
Your error puts an important business pro- 
ject In jeopardy. Remedy the situation as 
quickly as possible, but think before you act. 
The higher-ups are watching you. Thai spe- 
cial someone has a question for you. Don'l 
get nervous; he or she is not putting you on 
the spot. Just be honest. 



FROM PAGE Bl 



Libra -8opt23/Oct 23 
You ' pleasant naturo oavoa the day early In 
Iho wook, Libra. Thoso around you are on 
odgo, and you calm thorn down and keep 
thorn focused, A loved one gets Into trouble. 
Don'l got Involved —youll only end up get- 
ling hurt, Tho person you've been seeing 
stops calling, Don't get upset; he or she was- 
n't tho right ono for you anyway. 

Scorpio - Oct 24/Nov 22 
Don't be loo aggressive when you meet an 
Interesting porson early in the week. You 
don't want to push this person away, be- 
cause ho or she has a lot of connections thai 
could help you with your career. A close 
friend confides In you. Be supportive, but be 
truthful. Leo plays a key role. 

Sagittarius - Nov 23/Doc 21 
You're on the go this week, Sagittarius. 
There's a lot to gel done, and you can do it 
all if you stay focused. Don't let your re- 
sponsibilities lag just because you want to 
have some fun. There'll be plenty of time lo 
celebrate once you finish everything. Loved 
ones are more than willing to help you if you 
need it. 

Capricorn - Doc 22/Jan 20 
Be honest with yourself, Capricorn. Don't get 
involved in something that you don't agree 
with just to make others happy. You have to 
Ihink about yourself. You run Into an old 
friend at (he end of the week. Take some 
time to reminisce. YouVe got a lot to catch 
upon. 

Aquarius -Jan 21/Fcb 18 
You're on lop of the wortd early in the week. 
Everything is going well at work and in your 
personal life. Even family problems are 
working out. Enjoy it. An interesting person 
asks you out to dinner. Say yes, but don'l 
expect this to be the beginning of a long re- 
lationship. Just have a good time. 

Pisces - Fob 19/March 20 
This is your week to shine, Pisces. You do 
well at work and make a good impression on 
your superiors. As for romance, your rela- 
tionship with that special someone is going 
strong. A loved one needs your help plan- 
ning a family event. Do all that you can 10 
help. He or she will appreciate your efforts. 



BARNS: Tell story of 
Lake County's heritage 



"Some just need paint, but they're so 
big they need 200 gallons." For some, 
she said, "The weathered wood could 
stand to have some seasoning done, 
some linseed oil." The costs for roofs, 
foundations, and paint are such that 
people will not make the investment. 
Harming itself, in Like County, 
docs not generate the type of money 
needed lo pay maintenance costs 
such as $20,000 for a foundation or 
$10,000 for a roof. 

Burgess said the Save- A» Barn 
program can help preserve barns. "If 
you'd like to repair the roof, this pro- 
gram can help you obtain the money 
to do that." It is a program for grants 
to barn owners. Save-A-Bam hopes to 
make its initial grants in 1999. 

There are barns in Lake County 
that speak of diversity, history, and so- 
cial class. There is an unverified report 
of a bam built in Barrington by Native 
Americans. "This was around 1833," 
she said. Supposedly, a German barn 
builder taught his techniques to Na- 
tive Americans as they built four struc- 
tures. She said that bam is in danger 
from a crumbling foundation. 

An early 1900s industrialist built a 
bam for his dairy cattle. "Itwasthecpit- 
' ome of gentleman farms," she said. The 
bam had a cork floor, central healing, 
and running water — although regula- 
tions did require running water. "1 le 
put in electricity as soon as he could." 
Burgess said, " ! 've never seen anything 
so catering to the comfort of cows." 

"There is one (bam) in Harrington 
with a star carved in front of It," 
Burgess said. 

The work on her book is a 1 title 
more than half done. She estimates 
that she may finish in another eight 
months. "I've taken 63 rolls of film so 
far." She estimates there is another 30 
to go. "I want to be thorough." There 
arc 00 barns (hat she has document- 
ed, and about another 00 to work on. 



Some counts suggest there were 2000 
barns in lake County at the turn of the 
century, and there are now 200 re- 
maining. "Now people are pointing 
me in the right directions." 

Her work involves research on the 
bam and the property on which it sits. 
She obtains permission from people 
10 photograph the bam. "I 'm compil- 
ing these stories into a book about 
families and the bams." It is a unique 
history of the County. History many 
times will focus on industry, but she 
wants to write about everyday people 
who build lives here. 

"I'd tike it to be out next fall," she 
said. 

Books arc already part of her 
background. She is the author of 
"Gardens and Other Sanctuaries in 
Long Grove, Illinois" which was pub- 
lished last year arid is for sale at Barnes 
and Noble. "It's doing well," she said. 
Another publisher is reviewing 
her book about the lives and defining 
moments of spirituality for some Ar- 
lington Heights nuns. They worked in 
missions across the United States. The 
title is "Gentleness Kiss the Earth." 

Burgess has lived in Long Grove 
since 1991. Active in her community, 
she has also been a writer and pho- 
tographer for area publications such 
the Daily Herald, Like Zurich and 
Libertyvillc Hometown Magazines, 
and Lakeland Publishers. Her pho- 
tographs have been exhibited at the 
Like County Museum and on the 
Oprah Winfrey Show. 

Burgess has spent many hours in 
bams and finds them to be a special ex- 
perience. "It is unusual lo be in a room 
that large, alone, that is not (painted) 
white," she said. A person can look out 
from a bam opening. "The landscape 
stretches before you." She said, "You 
can imagine the prairie landscape." 

"There is'a sense of your small 
place in a big universe," she said. 



B 



n 
e 



VICTORY MEMORIAL 
HOSPITAL 

Victory offers free 
stroke screening 

Stroke, the third leading cause of 
death and disability in the United 
States, occurs when blood flow to the 
brain is obstructed. While the risk of 
stroke increases for everyone with 
age, men, African Americans, and 
people with diabetes or heart disease 
are at higher risk for sustaining a 
stroke. 

To help prevent stroke, the in- 
tensive Care Unit at Victory Memor- 
ial Hospital is sponsoring a free 
"Stroke Screening" from 3 to 7 p.m., 
Tuesday, Feb. 10 at the hospital, 1324 
North Sheridan Road, Waukegan. 
The screening includes a risk factor 
questionnaire, blood pressure and 
pulse check, and an EKG for partici- 
pants with an irregular pulse. 
Screening results will be forwarded 
to your doctor for follow-up. Ap- 
pointments for this screening arc 
limited. If you are concerned about 
the possibility of having a stroke, call 
1-800-843-2464 for an appointment. 

Respite program 
provides needed break 

People who provide daily care 
for older or chronically iil relatives, 
occasionally need a break to care for 
themselves. The Respite Program at 
Victory Lakes Continuing Care Cen- 
ter, 1055 East Grand Ave., Linden- 
hurst, offers short-term care for stays 
from 24 hours to 30 days. This allows 
the care giver to lake care of person- 
al business, enjoy a vacation, attend 
a wedding with peace of mind that 
their loved one is being well taken 
care of In a friendly, comfortable, se- 
cure setting. Call Judy Gentry at 356- 
5900 for more information. 

Quit smoking 

Smokers who are serious about 
quilling can now have the help of a 
trained professional. Victory's One- 
on-One Quit Smoking Counseling 
Sessions arc scheduled to meet their 
individual needs. A combination of 
successful techniques to change be- 
haviors and quit smoking arc used. 
The sessions are offered by Victory's 
Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation 
Department, 1324 North Sheridan 
Rd., Waukegan. For more informa- 
tion, call 360-4 131. 

Assistance with 
Medicare claims 

Senior Passport provides assis- 
tance with Medicare claims and 
medical bill processing. The pro- 
gram is for people aged 65 years 
and older who have supplemental 
health insurance in addition to 
Medicare coverage. There is a $20 
membership fee. Senior Passport is 
offered by Viclory Memorial Hospi- 
tal, 1324 North Sheridan Rd., 
Waukegan. For more information, 
call 360-4222. 

Blood pressure 
screenings offered 

On Friday, Feb. 6, from 10 a.m. to 
noon, and Monday, Feb. 9, from 4 to 
6 p.m., Victory Memorial Hospital 
will offer free blood pressure screen- 
ings and recordings at Cub Foods in 
Waukegan. For more information, 
call 360-4246. 

On Monday, Feb. 9, from a.m. 
until noon, free blood pressure 
screenings and recordings will be of- 
fered at Victory Lakes Continuing 
Care Center, 1055 E. Grand Ave., Lin- 
denhurst. Call 356-5900 for more in- 
formation. 

CONDELL 
MEDICAL CENTER 

Outpatient addiction 
recovery program 

Living Free, the Outpatient Ad- 
diction Recovery Program at Condelt 
Medical Center, 801 S. Milwaukee 
Ave. at Condell Drive, Libertyville, 
provides an Intensive outpatient 
program to help understand the ad- 
diction and to develop and imple- 
ment your own Individualized pro- 
gram. Adhering to the strictest confi- 
dentiality, the program offers all 
counseling and treatment in a non- 
hospital location. Call Living Free at 
816-7867. 




■'■ '. '..I.- ;.. --v. 



HEALTHWATCH 



February 6, 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B13 



Albert honored for outstanding service 

Albert receives award for her 
compassion, dedication to patients 



Compassion, devotion to family 
and community, and a commitment 
to making a difference in the lives of 
people who have cancer are qualities 
demonstrated daily by staff mem- 
bers at Midwestern Regional Medical 
Center and Cancer Treatment Cen- 
ters of America in Zion. But each 
year, one staff member is selected as 
someone who is truly special. 

In 1997, that 
honor was be- 
stowed to Bar- 
bara Albert, a 
resident of Zion 
and member of 
the materials 
management de- 
partment who 
has been a hos- 
pital employee 
since 1973. 

"Barb is sim- 



agement department, Albert is ac- 
tive in the community through her 
parish. She is a Midwestern am- 
bassador, and is currently presi- 
dent of the Assistance in Health- 
care Foundation, a not-for-profit 
charity which raises and distrib- 
utes funds to family members of 
patients at Midwestern who need 
financial assistance. 

"Barbara's gen- 
erosity and will- 
ingness to help 
in any situation 
are so important 
to our patients 



'Barbara's generosity and 

willingness to lielp in 
any situation are so 
important to our patients ^Zn$££i 

and family members J bers," says 



Arthur £ Fossland, president 

of the Midwestern Regional 

Medical Center board of trustees 



ply the most pa- 
tient-focused person we know," said 
Roger C. Cary, Midwestern president 
and CEO, just before Albert was 
named recipient of die Arthur E Fos- 
sland Award during the hospital's 
annual holiday celebration recently. 
"She routinely reminds us of our 
commitment to treat each and every 
patient need as if that person were 
our mother." 

In addition to her position 
with the hospital's materials man- 



Arthur E Foss- 
land, president 
ofthe Midwest- 
ern board of 
trustees, and for- 
mer mayor of 
Winthrop Harbor. The award— an 
engraved plaque and a vacation ex- 
cursion to the destiny of her 
choice— is named in behalf of Foss- 
land because it is his vision of pa- 
tient-focused care which guides the 
mission and philosophy of the hos- 
pital. 

For more information about 
Midwestern Regional Medical Cen- 
ter and Cancer Treatment Centers of 
America, call 872-4561. 





Barbara Albert of Zion receives the Arthur E. Fossland award from 
Midwestern Regional Medical Center's Board of Trustees Presi- 
dent and the award's namesake, Arthur E. Fossland. 



Charlotte Libov to speak on heart disease at Condell 



If someone asked you to name 
the number one killer of American 
women, what would you say— breast 
cancer? You would be wrong. The 
number one killer of American 
women is heart disease. It kills five 
times more women in this country 
than breast cancer, and only one out 
of five women know it, according to 
a Gallup survey. 

Charlotte Libov, author, founder 
of Women's Heart Health Day, 
award winning medical journalist, 
and former heart paiient wilt open 
Condell Medical Center's 1998 
Women's Pearl of Health Communi- 
ty Education Series on Tuesday, Feb. 
17 at 7:30 p.m. 



The first 1998 presentation in 
Condell's Women's Pearl of 
Health Series will be held at the 
Allen Conference Center on the 
medical center campus, 700 
Garfield Ave. in Libertyville. The 
cost of tickets is $5. Reservations 
can be made by calling Condell's 
Community Education Depart- 
mental 362-2905, ext. 5770. 

"Men's heart attacks just seem to 
get more attention than women's. 
That's my pet theory for the reason 
heart disease in women has been 
overlooked for so long," says Libov. 
"Women who have heart attacks 
tend to be older, retired or home- 
makers, so they don't have visible 



roles in society." 

Yet, according to the American 
Heart Association, heart disease is 
the number one killer of American 
women, and has been since 1908. 
About 485,000 women die of cardio- 
vascular disease in this country every 
year. Thai's twice the number of 
American women who die of all can- 
cers combined. 

Libov, who underwent open 
heart surgery in 1 990 at age 4 0, was a 
consultant for "Women's Hearts at 
Risk," a public television special. She 
co-authored "The Woman's Heart 
Book" and "50 Essential Things To 
Do When The Doctor Says It's Heart 
Disease." And, she is founder and ed- 



itor of Women's HealUi Hot Line, an 
electronic newsletter rated one of the 
Internet's top sites. 

Her latest book, "Conquer the 
Odds: Protecting Yourself from the 
10 Top Killer Diseases of Women," 
was published by Dutton in 1997. 

Condell Medical Center opened 
a new, fully digitized diagnostic Car- 
diac Catheterization Laboratory last 
year. It was the first hospital in Lake 
County to offer a Cardiac Rehabilita- 
tion Program. Condell's Cardiology 
Services has grown into a compre- 
hensive service for Lake County res- 
idents. 

For more information and reser- 
vations, call 362-2905, ext. 5770. 



Physicians arm teens with facts about sex, AIDS and disease 



According to the Centers for Dis- 
ease Control and Prevention, AIDS is 
no longer the number one killer of 
people between the ages of 25 and 
44. It has dropped— but only to 
number two. Illinois doctors have a 
plan to further reduce the fatality sta- 
tistics by helping young people avoid 
the disease. 

"Straight Talk to Teens About: 
Sex, AIDS and Disease" is a pro- 
gram designed by physician mem- 
bers ofthe Illinois Slate Medical So- 
ciety to arm teens with facls to help 
them make informed decisions 
about behaviors that could put 
them at risk. This program, offered 
free of charge to Illinois schools and 
teen centers, consists of three com- 
ponents: educational brochures 
(available in English and Spanish), 
an award-winning MTV-style video 
(encoded with closed-captloning) 
and a physician speakers bureau. 
Members of the speakers bureau 
are available to view ihe program 
video with teen groups and answer 
any questions they may have. 



"Education is the best means of 
prevention," said ISMS president 
lane L Jackman, M.D. "By providing 
leens with answers to their questions 
about HP/, AIDS and sexually trans- 
mitted diseases, we can help make 
them aware ofthe activities that put 
them at risk and can potentially save 
them from contracting these life 



threatening diseases." 

Many of those who die of AIDS at 
a young age are infected as teens. 
Symptoms of HIV, the virus that 
causes AIDS, can go undetected in 
the body for up to 10 years. For ex- 
ample, someone dying of AIDS at the 
age of 25 could have been infected at 
the young age of 15. 



While HIV/AIDS is a focal 
point of the program, other sexual- 
ly transmitted diseases are also ad- 
dressed. 

To inquire about the program, 
obtain program materials or 
arrange for a speaker, call the Illi- 
nois State Medical Society at 1-800- 
782-ISMS. 



Correct use of child safety seats reduces risks 



Recent research shows that the 
correct use of child safety seats can 
reduce the risk of auto deaihs in chil- 
dren by 71%, hospitalizations by 67% 
and minor injuries by 50%. 

When using a child car seal, the 
Lake County Health Department 
recommends the following: 

• Have the children ride in the 
back seat, whenever possible, and 
not in the front passenger seat. Also, 
never fasten a rear-facing baby seat 
in the front seat of a vehicle that has 



a passenger side air bag. 

• If children must ride in the 
front seat, try to have the largest child 
in the front passenger scat, and 
move the scat as far back from the 
dashboard as possible. 

• Never use pillows or cushions 
to boost hyour child. If the car is hit, 
the pillow mayh cause the child to 
slide under and out of the safety belt. 

• Never put luggage or other 
hard objects on live back window 
shelf of the car. In the event of asud- 



den stop, the items could fly forward 
and hit passengers. 

The correct use of child car 
seats, as well as seat buckles, is ex- 
tremely important for any parent to 
remember," urged Dale Galassie, Ex- 
ecutive Director ofthe Lake County 
Health Department 

For more information on car 
safety for children, please call the 
Lake County Health Department 
Health Educator at (847) 360- 
6716. 



ia^^^mmtmtamm 







B 1 4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HEALTHWATCH 



February 6, J 998 



Seventh-grade love can be 'crushing' 



Dear Dr. Singer, 
My daughter Is hav- 
ing a very hard time 
right now. She Is In 7th 
grade and lias a crush on this 
boy who Is very popular. My 
daughter Is not very popular, 
but has some friends. Anyway, 
she tried to let this boy know 
that she liked him and In a very 
mean way, he has been tor- 
menting her with his friends 
since he found out They arc 
teasing her a lot and she Is very 
distraught. She doesn't want to 
go back to school. Anything you 
can suggest? F.D. 

Dear F.D., 

Aren't kids cruel sometimes? I 
know that what you are going 
through as her mother watching 
this happen is equally as hard if not 
harder than what she is going 
through. 

What you're describing is not 
that unusual a situation for that age 
group. It's one of the rites of pas- 
sage. I also went through it as did 
many people 1 know. How \-ou deal 
with it depends on your own 
strength and your own ability to 
bounce back. 

J don't know your daughter 
specifically so I cannot comment 
on how fast she will bounce back or 
how strong she will be. if you feel at 
any time she is so depressed that 
she may be wanting to take it out 
on herself, you need to gel profes- 
sional help immediately. 

If you feel, however, that "this 
loo shnll p.iss." then you will want 
to let her know that you are there 
for her if she wants to talk. I would- 
n't forte her or pressure her to talk 
lo you since sometimes it is equally 
as cvnViarrtVssm^ lo \iour over Vhe 




PARENT'S 
PLACE 

Sherri Singer, 
Psy.D. 



details of the situation with a par- 
ent. Certainly, if she lets you talk to 
her about it and you have any sto- 
ries to share from your own life, it 
would probably help her lo know 
thai she isn't the only one who has 
ever gone through it and survived. 
Here is a personal tidbit from 
my life that you can share with her 
that may make her feel better. 
When 1 was in 7lh grade ! was head 
over heels in love with a certain 
guy. He was just so cute and so 
popular. Everyone in school, knew 
htm and liked "him. He ran with the 
*"in crowd." I was in a situation 
close to what you describe your 
daughter to be in -had some friends 
but not really popular and definite- 
ly sensitive about it. 

In those days, the big show was 
"Happy Days," and I was an avid 
watcher. In one of the episodes, 
Joanie fell in love with Potsic and 
was afraid to tell him so she left 
him secret admirer notes. 1 decided 
to do the same thing with my love 
interest but made the fatal mistake 
of letting a very nasty girl see mc 
put it in his locker. He got the note, 
she told him who it was from and 
for the next several months, life 
became a nightmare. Merciless 
teasing. Constant haranguing. 
Certainly it hurt me and it was hard 
to go to school, hut it became a 
vendetta with me. I wasn't going (o 
lol them know ihuy hurl me and 



low and behold, when I strongly 
faced up to their teasing, it went 
away. 

They got bored because I was- 
n't responding anymore so they 
went on to the next exciting event 
and left mc alone. I remember how 
much that hurt, but when I look 
back, 1 realize that I got a lot of 
good out of that situation. I learned 
how to face my fears. I learned 
how to stand in the face of adversi- 
ty and 1 truly feel that I am far more 
confident today because of facing 
that battle. I learned that people 
will usually show you their true col- 
ors fairly quickly. This guy was 
extremely immature and mean. 
Those characteristics did not 



deserve me! 

Your daughter will also look 
back one day at all of the things she 
got out of this bad situation. She 
has avoided a group of people that 
are obviously also immature and 
mean. She learned something 
about judging character. This is a 
positive thing. There is always 
good that comes out of bad. I 
remember hearing someone once 
say that you need an awful lot of 
fertilizer (for lack of a better word) 
to make a beautiful garden grow. 
It's really true. like I said, if you 
feel your daughter is in dire need 
and in danger of doing something 
harmful to herself over this than 
you need to get professional help 



immediately, but if it is something 
that just needs to be dealt with 
until it gets better, hopefully my 
story can help In some way. Good 
luck! 



This column is for entertain- 
ment purposes only. Information 
in this column cannot and 
should not replace proper 
Psychological treatment. Dr. 
Sherri Singer is a Licensed 
Clinical Psychologist and child- 
hood behavior specialist. For an 
appointment, please call (70S) 
962- 2549. You can also email 
questions to Dr. Singer at 
Kiddoc5925@aol.com. 



Simplifying life can make arthritis less painful 



When the hectic pace of day-to- 
day living increases the pain of 
arthritis, choosing a simplified 
lifestyle can help case that pain, 
according to the Arthritis 
Foundation. The March-April issue 
of Arthritis Today, the Arthritis 
Foundation's national consumer 
magazine, outlines techniques for 
those seeking simplicity at home 
and work to better manage their 
arthritis. 

"Many people with arthritis say 
they are overwhelmed by trying to 
juggle the demands of each day and 
ask for suggestions to simplify their 
lives. This issue of Arthritis Today 
addresses this request in an effort to 
improve the quality of life of those 
affected by the pain and fatigue of 
arthritis," said Dr. Walter Bnrr, vice 
president, Arthritis Foundation, 
Greater Chicago Chapter Board of 
Directors. 




Life Skills Series 



2/18/98 
WAUKEGAN 



3/4/98 
WAUKEGAN 



All presentations arc FREE of charge and arc held at flic 
location indicated from 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. 

Seating is limited, registration is required, call 1-888-809-1118. 



Teaching Kids Useful Skills to Solve Everyday Problems 

PSTMC Child & Adolescent Intensive Outpatient Program Staff 
it's easy to overlook the fact that many of the problems which children and 
iidolosccnls experience may he duo lo a lack of basic skills in handling 
conflicts, controlling impulsivity and expressing thoughts and feelings 
through words instead of action. This presentation will review ways in which 
kids can he helped to develop their own problem-solving abilities and gain 
mastery over the difficulties they face in everyday living. 

Don't Panic! Effective Medical and Psychotherapeutic 
Treatment of Panic and Anxiety Disorder 

Steven Lammcrs, Ml). & John Moss, L.O.S.W. 
Approximately one in four of all Americans will suffer from an anxiety 
disorder at some point in their lifetime. The gooil news is that very effective 
treatments are available, Steven hammers, a board-cerlifmd psychiatrist and 
medical director of the Provena Saint Tlierose adult, psychiatry program, and 
John Moss, a licensed clinical social worker, will provide an overview or 
current approaches to the diagnosis and treatment, of anxiety disorders, 
highlighting when and whore to seek help. 



WAUKEGAN - Proveaa Saint There.se Medical Center, 2615 Washington St., 
Waukegan, Illinois 60f)S5. One block eant of Green llay Road on WaHhimjton Street. 



ftil Provena 



Saint Therese Medical Center 



To help people with arthritis 
simplify life at home and work, 
Arthritis Today suggests the follow- 
ing: 

• Acknowledge your limitations. 
Carefully choose the activities thai 
are most meaningful in your life and 
begin to discard the rest. 

• Clear the clutter from your life. 
Cleaning out closets and drawers 
and hauling clutter to a thrift shop 
may cost extra energy in the short 
term, hut the payoff will he worth it. 
Remember when reorganizing your 
home and work space to place fre- 
quently used items within easy 
reach. 

• Get in the practice of writing 
your choices, thoughts and ideas in 
a simplicity journal. This is a great 
way of making you more aware of 
the ways your life gets complicated 
and what options you can come up 
with to simplify things. 

• Learn to say "no." Remind 
yourself that true friends and loving 
family members don't want to see 
you overworked and overwhelmed. 
This will help you belter manage 
your disease. 

• Look realistically at your bud- 
get and determine how much 
money you need to live on. 
Determine how much money it 
would lake to make lifestyle 
changes, such as working part-time 



instead of full-time or moving to a 
small town for a slower pace. 

• Learn to control spending. 
Creating a financial cushion will 
increase your confidence in making 
big changes in your job or in choos- 
ing where you want to live in order 
to simplify your life and reduce the 
pain and stress of arthritis. 

Conlact the Arthritis 
Foundation for free arthritis infor- 
mation and local quality-of-life ser- 
vices that can make a difference. 
Call (312)616-3170. 

"These suggestions are among 
the many given in Arthritis Today to 
help people feel more in control of 
their lives and their disease. By 
reducing stress and simplifying 
their lives, people can begin to man- 
age their arthritis instead of the 
other way around," said Dr. Barr. 

For more information, includ- 
ing n free copy of the brochures 
Managing Your Activities, Managing 
Your Fatigue, or Managing Your 
Stress. Contact the Arthritis 
Foundation at (312) 616-3470. 

The Arthritis Foundation is the 
source of help and hope for the 
nearly 40 million Americans affect- 
ed by arthritis. The foundation sup- 
ports research to find ways to cure 
and prevent arthritis diseases, and 
seeks to improve the quality of life 
for those affected by arthritis. 



PEOPLE IN THE NEWS 



Schotzinger promoted 

Dr. Robert Schotzinger has been 
named director, international 
affairs, in the international division 
of Abbott laboratories. 

Previously Schotzinger was 
director, new product evaluation, in 
the same division. He joined Abbott 
in 1995 as an associate director, 
clinical research. 

Schotzinger holds a B.S. in phar- 
macy from Ohio State University in 
Columbus, a Ph.D. in phamiacology 
and a M.D. from Case Western 
Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. 

I le resides in Gumec with his 
wife and two sons. 



Salazar is certified 
as family specialist 

Dr. Luis I. Salazar of Grayslake 
has been named a Diplomate of 
the American Board of Family 
Practice (ABFP), the certifying 
entity of the family practice spe- 
cialty. 

Salazar, a family physician, 
earned Diplomate status by passing 
the ABI-P's certification examina- 
tion, an intensive written test of the 
physician's abilities in pediatrics, 
internal medicine, surgery, obstet- 
rics, gynecology, psychiatry, pre- 
vention and other aspects of family 
practice. 



Shaku Chhabria, M.D. 

Neurology / Child Neurology 
Clinical and Ncurodiagnosis 




Neurologic Disorders: 

• Seizure* (Epilepsy) • HejuUcho*/Dtrrlnois 

• Neck SL Back l\dn •Sttoko* 

• ItafclroonUm ' All Neurodl*sm»Hc Technique* 






Member of multiple managed care, HMO & woriunan's comp programs. 

2645 Washington St. 100 N. Atkinson 

Suite 320 Suite 100 

Waukegan Grayslake 

llabln Espanol * Phone (847) 360-0299 

— ■ i. .^ M, i. | J ,, I i i r i , „ 






]February6,1998 




HEALTHWATCH 



spapers/B15 



iDon't let 
thumb-sucking 
affect your 
child's smile 

February is National Children's 
Health Month. For new parents who 
are concerned about their baby's 
Ihumb-sucking, the Illinois State 
Dental Society offers the following 
advice. 

Sucking is one of baby's natural 
reflexes. As infants grow, sucking 
serves many purposes. Infants and 
young children may suck on 
thumbs, fingers, pacifiers or toys be- 
cause it makes them feel secure and 
happy and helps them learn about 
their world. 

Young children may find that 
placing a finger or thumb into their 
mouth provides them with a sense of 
security at difficult periods such as 
after a scolding or when separated 
from their parents. Because thumb* 
sucking is relaxing, it may Induce 
sleep. For this reason, young chil- 
dren may often do this in the 
evenings or when they are tired. 

The Illinois State Dental Society 
notes that prolonged thumb-sucking 
can cause problems. Once the per- 
manent teeth erupt, sucking may 
cause problems with the proper 
growth of the mouth and alignment 
of teeth. 

One factor that determines 
whether a dental problem may result 
is the intensity of sucking. Children 
who rest their thumbs passively in 
their mouths arc less likely to have 
difficulty than those who vigorously 
suck their thumbs. In the later case, 
when a parent removes the thumb 
from the child's mouth, a "popping" 
sound is often heard. 

The Illinois State Dental Society 
notes that some aggressive thumb- 
suckers may cause problems for 
their primary (baby) teeth. If you no- 
tice changes In the baby teeth, con- 
sult your dentist. 

Usually, children stop thumb- 
sucking between the ages of 2 and 4. 
Sucking gradually lessens during this 
period as they spend more of their 
waking hours exploring their sur- 
roundings. They should cease suck- 
ing by the time the permanent front 
teeth are ready to erupt. Peer pres- 
sure causes many school-aged chil- 
dren to stop. 

Sucking a pacifier is not neces- 
sarily less harmful for a child. Paci- 
fiers can affect the teeth essentially 
the same way as sucking fingers and 
thumbs. It is often an easier habit to 
break. 

The society says to keep these 
tips in mind when helping your 
child: 

• Instead of scolding children for 
sucking, praise them when they are 
not. 

• Remember that children often 
suck their thumbs when feeling inse- 
cure. Focus on correcting the cause 
of anxiety, instead of thumb-suck- 
ing. 

• Children who arc sucking for 
comfort will feel less of a need when 
their parents provide comfort. 

• Reward children when they re- 
frain from sucking during difficult 
periods, such as when being sepa- 
rated from their parents. 

• I f these approaches don't work, 
remind the children of tlieir habit by 
bandaging the thumb or putting a 
sock on the hand at night. In extreme 
cases, your dentist or pediatrician 
may prescribe a bitter medication to 
coat the thumb. 



Please Send Community 
Calendar Information To: 

LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 

c/o CHRISTINA FEINDT 

30 S. WHITNEY ST. 

GKAYSLAKE, IL 60030 

Phone 223-8161 



* 



1998 HeMy HMs 

A L E Hr D A 



t 



At Midwestern Regional Medical Center 



Mammogram: $49 

All month, by appointment 

A mammogram can help detect cancer before you can sec or feel 
anything. Our caring and conscientious imaging specialist will fully 
explain the procedure, answer your questions, ana complete your 
mammogram, usually in less than 30 minutes. Results will be sent to 
your personal physician. For an appointment, please call 847/731-4100- 

Free Screening: Blood Pressure Check 

All month, by appointment 

Have your blood pressure checked by a healthcare professional at one 
of the physician offices listed below. Call the physician closest to you 
to make an appointment. 

Support Group: Breast Cancer Support Group 

Monday, February 2 7 - 8 p.m. 

A support group for women affected by breast cancer. Share 
experiences, explore ideas, and express vour feelings among a group of 
women who know what you're going through because they've been 
there too. For more information ana to register, please call 847/746- 
3158. 

Free Clinic: Children's Immunization Clinic 

Saturday, February 14 ......«.......«.....u. 9 - 11 a.m. 

Midwestern and the Lake County Health Department team up to m 
provide low-cost immunizations for children during a walk-in clinic at 
the hospital. For more information, please call 847/872-6062. 

— — ■ At Cancer 

Mammogram: $49 

Walk-in Wednesday or by appointment 

Every Wednesday, no appointment is necessary for a mammogram at 
the Cancer Resource Center. Just walk in, sign the appointment book, 
and in less than 30 minutes your mammogram will be completed by a 
caring and conscientious imaging specialist. Cost is $49 t including 
reading and interpretation by a Board-certified radiologist. 
Appointments arc also available throughout the week. TIcase call 
8007940-2822. 

Free Talk: Managing Everyday Stress 

Monday, February 2 7 - 8 p.m. 

Everyone experiences positive stress and negative stress everyday. This 
program helps you understand why you experience stress and how 
your body reacts to it. Learn practical relaxation and stress reduction 
techniques to help you stay in control. Presented by Michael Wil}iams, 
Psy.D. Space is limited. To register, please call 800/940-2822. 

Free Talk: Alternative Medicine in Cancer Treatment 

Wednesday, February 4 7 - 9 p.m. 

Dr. R. Michael Williams, MD, PhD, senior medical director and chief 
medical officer of Cancer Treatment centers of America, recently 

fircscnted this lecture to a capacity crowd of 1,000 people in Tokyo, 
apan. Come hear the English version of this fascinating overview of 
the latest in alternative cancer treatments - sesquiterpene gamma 
lactones, antincoplastons, enzymes. Revici therapy, traditional Chinese 
Medicine, and green tea. Please call 800/940-2822 to register. 

Free Screening: Cholesterol and Blood Pressure 

Thursday, February 5 8 - 10 a.m. 

This simple finger stick method provides results for a total cholesterol 
screening. Fasting is recommended but not required. To register, 
please call 800/940-2822. 



CPR doss: $25 

Monday, February 1 6 , ^ -.6 - 10 p.m. 

Cardiac arrest, breathing interruption and choking are life-threatening 
situations which require fast, skillful intercession by a trained person. 
Learn how to initiate CPR and other life-saving techniques during an 
evening class presented by a certified American Red Cross Instructor. 
Class size is limited. To register, please call 800/940-2822. 

Free Talk: How N utrition Lowers Cancer Risk 

Wednesday, February 18 .„.............«„™.«.4 :30 - 5:30 p.m. 

Eating the right foods, knowing how to cook foods to retain their 
nutritional value, and taking the right vitamins and supplements may 
help some people lower their risk of getting cancer. Find out what you 
can do for yourself and your family by attending this program 
presented by a registered dietitian who specializes in cancer prevention 
and treatment. Class size is limited. To register, please call 800/940- 
2822. 

Free Screening; Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) 

Saturday, February 21 .........«,.......«..«-,...«9 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

If you are over 50 and experience leg pain when walking, tingling, 
numbness or coldness in vour legs or feet, you may have a blood 
circulation disorder called peripheral artery disease (PAD). This 
condition is highly treatable if detected early by a simple, non-invasive 
ultrasound screening. To make an appointment for the screening, 
please call 800/940-2822. 



Resource Center — - 

Free Talk: Guidelines for Healthy living 

ivioncinyj i curuurj id*********** *»*«*«***..«•. »..».*x ** J p.m. 

This program will review the fundamentals for a healthy balance among 
the spiritual, psychosocial, physiological and environmental aspects of 
your life. The class will be lea by a registered dietitian who will talk 
about healthy eating and exercise habits. Bring a lunch and work this 
special program into your schedule. To register, please call 800/940- 

Free Advice: Ask the Nutritionist 

Wednesday, February 18. „ „....„„.«...„.„...-„ 1 -4 p.m. 

Walk in or call in! A registered dietitian will be available at the Cancer 
Resource Center to answer your nutrition-related questions. If you 
have high cholesterol, want to lose weight, or just want to eat better, 
this is your opportunity to "Ask the Nutritionist!" Please call 800/940- 



Free Screening: Colorectal Cancer Home Test 

Tuesday, February 24 ........................... 10 a.m. - 12 noon 

Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers 
affecting men and women over the age of 40. A simple do-at-home test 
detects one of the early warning signs - hidden blood in the stool. 
Receive a screening kit and have your questions answered by a 
healthcare professional. To register, please call S0G/94G-282'2. 

Free Talk: Cancer and Antioxidants 

Thursday, February 26.....«...„....„..„„..„..„....6:30 - 8 p.m. 

Vitamin A and carotenes. Vitamin C. Vitamin E. Selenium. Green tea. 
What arc the latest research findings on these antioxidants and cancer 
risk? What is the best way to get these antioxidants? How much is 
safe? Diannc Parsons, from the Natural Web food store in Deerficld, 
will provide answers to these and many other questions. Taste a sample 
of green tea from China. To register, please call 800/940-2822. 



For more information and to register for a Healthy Habits program, 

please call 800/940-2822 
Locations: 

Lake Villa 
Family & Internal Medicine 



Gurnee 

Cancer Resource Center 

Gurncc Mills, Entrance H 

6170 W. Grind Ave. 

800/940-2822 



Dr. Pedro Palu-ay 

Dr. Lubna Miruf 

Dr. Daisy Aruhlcon 

300 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

847/156-6602 



Lindenhunt 

Family Medicine 

Dr. Scrnyon Maslovsky 

2045 E. Grand Ave. 

847/356-6131 



Waukcgan 

Family Medicine 

Dr. Phillip Ruiz 

1020 Glen Flora Ave. 

847/249-3322 




HECIOSAl MEDICAL CENTER 



Park City 

Internal Medicine 

Dr. Glynis Vashi 

401 S. Grccnlcaf Ave. 

847/263-9900 



Waukcgan Zion 

Family & Internal Medicine Family & Internal Medicine 



Dr. Pedro Palu-ay 
Dr. Daisy Andaleon 

Dr. Lubna Maruf 

2504 Washington Ave. 

847/249-1733 



Dr. Pedro Palu-ay 

Dr. Daisy Andaleon 

Dr. Luona Maruf 

1911 27th Street 

847/872-4558 



Zion 

Midwestern Regional 

Medical Center 

Cliff r Treatment Centen 

of America 

2520 Eltsha Ave. 

847/872-4561 




<^^™^TM~T, CTNTCR S 



or A M t % i C A 



\vww.publiconIine.com/ = mrmc 




Bi6 l Lakeland Newspapers 



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Lakeland 
Newspapers 

1998 



Section 




Filling a void 

Sister of drunk driver's victim 
doesn't get even, she gets MADD 



By JASON J. KJNG 
Staff Reporter 



This is a club of emotion and de- 
spair that no one applies to." 

Those were the words used by 
Karen Demos-Rosenthal, of Lake 
Zurich, to describe the pain and an- 




The events leading up to her flashing, 
brother's death play out like a work of Down the road, long before the 

fiction. scene of the crash, a driver observed 

David Demos, a deputy sheriff a car in front of him weaving and dri- 

with the Milwaukee County Sher- ving erratically. He called it in on his 

iff's Department, was not supposed cellular phone in hopes that a state 

to be on duty that day. He should trooper would pull him over before 

have been home with his wife, their any incident. 

De mos- Rosen thai said the driver 



'Mistakes are when you add 

one and one and get three. 

This isn't a mistake* 

Karen Demos-Rosenthal, 

starting first MADD chapter 

in Lake County 



guish she and her family suffered af- 
ter her brother was killed by a drunk 
driver last year. 

Demos- Rosen thai has decided to 
try make the most of a devastating 
situation. 

"I had a little brochure, I don't 
know where I got it," she said. "I 
called MADD and I found out there 
wasn't a Lake County chapter." 

She hopes to All a void she expe- 
rienced after her brother's death. She 
hopes to start a Lake County chapter 
of Mother's Against Drunk Driving. 

MADD's mission is simply staled. 

M Thc mission of Mothers Against 
Drunk Driving is to stop drunk dri- 
ving and to support the victims of 
those violent crimes," reads the orga- 
nization's mission statement. 



THIS 
WEEK 

CRACKING DOWN 

Curfew is good plan for 
restraining gangs 

PAGEC4 



& 




HELPING HANDS 

Great Lakes Credit union 
raises funds for Baptist home 

PAGE C7 



1 



PRIVATE PLACE 

Book examines workplace 
privacy controversy 

PAGE C7 



was encouraged when he saw 
Demos' squad lights on along the side 
of the road. 

"He thought, "oh good, they're go- 
ing to stop him/" said Demos-Rosen- 
thal. 

Instead, the driver, and his two 
children, were subject to the awful 
scene as it played out before them. 

The man's car swerved, across 
numerous Janes of traffic, ramming 
tv/o children and other family Demos' squad. Demos was thrown 
members, watching his beloved into the air, cartwheeling along the 
Green Bay Packers, win their first side, hitting both the car he was as- 
Super Bowl in manyyears. sistingandhissquadcarbeforecom- 

Instcad, he found himself on ingtoastop. 
the job. Demos' injuries were massive. 

While on duty, Demos spotted "His spine was broken, his head, 

a vehicle in the emergency lane, the bone structure was separated 
and pulled off to aid the driver. 

His squad lights were on and Please see VOID IC2 



Crack down„if stime 

to stop the nudity 

County board to create adult use licenses 



By SPENCER SCHE1N 
Staff Reporter 



Officials arc taking a hammer to 
adult entertainment establishments 
in Lake County, with a focus of 
knocking them down a peg while al- 
lowing them to stay in business. 

Lake County Board Members 
will vote at the Feb. 10 board meeting 
to create an adult entertainment use 
license, giving the county more con- 
trol over the sexually oriented busi- 
ness industry than it has ever had be- 
fore. 

If approved, no businesses will 
be allowed to feature nude dancing, 
and all adult entertainers would have 
to perform on a stage separated from 
customers by at least 3 feet. Lap 
dancing would be banned, and any 
tips would have to be placed in a sep- 
arate receptacle and not In a dancer's 
garter, said Lake County Board Mem- 
ber Diana O'Kelly (R-Mundelein). 

Women dancers would have to 
wear pasties and g-strings, as nipples 
and pubic hair cannot be shown, 
O'Kelly said, reading from the ordi- 
nance, which will create a license, 
and a license board, to be chaired by 
the Lake County Board Chairman. 

The ordinance was created in re- 
sponse to the nude dancing club 
which was briefly open in unincor- 
porated Diamond Lake near 
Mundclein toward the end of 1997. 
Offsides Sports Bar/Scores has been 
closed as of Dec 31, when a Lake 
County judge determined the opera- 
tors did not have full control over the 
business. 



"What we are doing is trying to 
protect the other communities from 
being put into a situation like the Di- 
amond Lake area was," O'Kelly said. 

Mitchell Hoffman, Lake County 
chief deputy states attorney for the 
civil division, thought the ordinance 
went a long way to limiting the abili- 
ty to operate such businesses, "but 
still allow them to operate, since they 
arc protected by the First Amend- 
ment 

"It will require all operators of 
adult use establishments to apply for 
and obtain a license from the county 
and in order to maintain that license, 
they will have to comply with all of 
the regulations set forth in the ordi- 
nance," Hoffman said. 

Hours of operation would be 
limited from noon to midnight Mon- 
day through Saturday only. "They 
must be closed on Sunday," O'Kelly 
said. The language appearing on 
signs would also be closely moni- 
tored, with anything about nude or 
"XXX" or silhouettes of women not 
allowed, she said. 

Flashing or beacon lights would 
also be banned, something which 
O'Kelly said she received 50 calls 
from residents after Offsides used it 
to attract customers. Liquor and 
gambling would also be banned. 

As the ordinance is written, 
adults ages 18 and over would be al- 
lowed into such businesses, but 
county officials arc researching to de- 
termine if the age limit can be raised 
to 21. Some Mundclein High School 

Please see NUDITY IC2 



Murky leadership 
at Soil and Water 
may lead to lawsuit 

Citizens, directors question who 
is in charge; election Tuesday 



ByLEONFlLAS 
Staff Reporter 



According to the by-laws of the 
Lake County Soil and Water Conser- 
vation District, Joe Sbarboro may be 
illegally in control as chairman of the 
estranged board. 

Citizen concern about the unrest 
at the Grayslake district may result in 
a class action lawsuit being filed lat- 
er this week, according to sources. 

This latest action comes on the 
heels of the Feb. 10 election in which 
citizens residing in the district will be 
asked to vote on three new directors 
for the board. There are five names 
on the ballot. 

The question of whether or not 
Sbarboro Is legally chairman of the 
board steps from a motion passed at 
a Dec. 9 board meeting in which the 
controversial chairman was asked to 
step down. Sbarboro stepped down, 
momentarily, releasing the meeting 
to Otto Sprenger, vice-chairman of 
the board. 

At the next monthly meeting, 
however, Sbarboro stepped forward, 
announcing to the board of directors 
that h c refused to step down because 
the motion Was wordod incorrcctVy. 

"According to the motion, he was 
asked to resign as chairman, which 
he later refused to do," said Dave 
Richards, a director of the soil and 
water district "The motion was In- 
correct" 

However, according to the by- 
laws of the soil and water district, 
Sbarboro may be illegally sitting 
upon the top of the throne in the dis- 
trict. 

The bylaws state: "The directors 
shall elect one of their members as 
chairman to hold for such a time as 
the directors may determine." Ac- 
cording to the by-laws, the unani- 
mous motion to have Sbarboro re- 
moved from office would stand, as 
the members have voted him down. 

"This is something that should be 
discussed with our attorneys," 
Sprenger stated in a phone interview. 
"All litigation refers back to the attor- 
ney." 



Soil and water district attorney, 
Bernard Wysocld, stated that he has 
been recently hired and has no 
knowledge of the situation. He re- 
ferred the situation to Lake County 
States Attorney Mark Hoffman, who 
also has never been contacted. 

"I don't have anything to do with 
that," Wysocki stated. "I was contact- 
ed about the election and gave them 
my opinion on that" 

The election could also be in 
jeopardy, as Sbarboro, who is still act- 
ing as chairman, is reviewing peti- 
tions of other entrants in the election. 
This could be considered a conflict of 
interest as Sbarboro is running in the 
same election. 

"This is not a good practice," 
Wysocki stated about the reviewing of 
the petitions. "They should get a legal 
opinion to review the petitions. My 
recommendation was to let the De- 
partment of Agriculture review it" 

Unfortunately, no one wants to 
step up to rule on the situation. 

"The Lake County Soil and Water 
Conservation District will be locally 
administrated and the courts should 
decide the outcome of the events," 
Patrick Hagan, spokesperson from 
the UUnoU t>«pt- of AvkuUuta Uv 

Springfield, stated. "We arc not nor 
will be planning on stepping into this 
and It should be handled in the local 
election." 

"If that is indeed the cose, then 
the proper method in my opinion 
would be to have the Lake County 
Board of Elections decide who should 
be on the ballot" Wysocki stated. "A 
disinterested group should review the 
petitions and decide." 

"We have no authority over that, 
it's not in our jurisdiction," said 
Daphne Dcadrick, of the Lake Coun- 
ty Clerk's office, stated. "That's di- 
rectly from the Lake County States At- 
torney. The Soil and Water District is 
one of only two types of public gov- 
erning districts in the state that don't 
fall understate election code guide- 
lines, currently, 

Sbarboro would not return 
phone calls and was therefore un- 
available for comment 



Boundaries continues to 
trouble soil, water district 



By RHONDA HETRICK BURKE 
Managing Editor 

It has been a year of controversy 
at the Lake County Soil and Water 
Conservation District 

Beginning with the question of 
the district's boundaries by the new- 
ly seated board last March. 

Following the Feb. 1 1 , 1996 elec- 
tions, three individuals sent letters to 
the Illinois Department of Agricul- 
ture expressing their concerns with 
the way the elections were adminis- 
tered. 

At the heart of the issue is under- 
standing where the district's bound- 
aries lie. The district was formed in 



1957. At that time, incorporated 
municipalities and platted subdivi- 
sion made a decision as to whether 
or not they wanted to belong to the 
district. The boundaries have not 
been altered since then and to do so 
will take an act of the state legisla- 
ture. 

Individuals interested in voting 
in the Feb. 1 1 election for directors 
should contact the Soil and Water 
District at 223- 1056 to find out if they 
reside in the district. 

On the Feb. 1 1 ballot are: Pam 
Kerpec, Robert Maraviglia, Randy 
Reid, Joseph Sbarboro and Robert 
Smyth, Nancy Gariand is running as 
a write-in candidate. 



IS THE! LOttERy A 1AX FOR STUPIIX PE0PtE?/e5 






^ immrr 



C2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



Februarys, 1998 



Carmel High School names honor students 



These students of Carmel High 
School have achieved academic hon- 
ors for the second quarter. 

Seniors 
Superior Honors 

Jessica Ambcrg, Edmec Cam- 

Edesuner, Elizabeth Gage, Drew Gib- 
ons, Jane Kalista, Stephanie Kane, Erwin 
Mangubat, Robert Moslcr, John O'Mal- 
Icy, Stcphany Rechsteincr, Silvana Ro- 
driguez, Erika Ryglowski, Jonathan 
Schmitz, Julie Stamatakos, Dcnlse Sulli- 
van, Rachacl Sztcllc, Charlcnc Yaneze. 
High Honors 

Anfssa Adams, Michelle Anilao, Alex 
Barnctt, Emily Bautista, Chris Ikmiquit, 
Marcella Borgman, Kevin Brandl, Juliet 
Brophy, Nicholas Burke, Erika Callahan, 
Marc Casarrubias, Caroline Castcn, Julie 
Ciembronowicz, Ryan Clcry, Ricardo 
Davis, Kevin Dbc, Kristin Durrant, Kelly 
Feathers, Michael Florentine, William 
Fusz, Heidi Hacgcrich, Matthew Hamil- 
ton, James Manna, Shiva Harris, Julie 
Hattas, Michael Horist, Greta Janiszcws- 
ki, Kristin Kalitowski, Nicole Kanclos. 

John Koch, Timothy Koenig, John 
Koltse, Christopher Leonard, Kathleen 
Lynch, Erie Lyons, Timothy Mathewson, 
Kelly McElroy, Kelly McGiil, Kevin McK- 
inncy, Brian McMurrougli, Kristin Mor- 
ris, Patrick Nguyen, Abigail Olson, Brian 
Ondrako, Mary Ostcr, Aurelio Pcna, Lind- 
say Pepping, Elizabeth Pizano, Adam 



Raftcry, Andrew Ringa, Casey Rivard, 
Monica Roach, Karyn Ryg, Lindsay 
Sawyer, An drew Schmlts, Ashley Schulcr,' 
Kevin Schummcr. 

John Scully, Douglas Shook, Bib- 
lana Slhoc, Megan Smith, Molly Stahl, 
Trissa Stanton, Julie Stickier, Lauren Stre- 
tcher, Dena Sullivan, Kylcnc Szyszka, 
Nicholas Tanguay, Joseph Tapper, Sarah 
Trcu, Lisa TyminskI, Erin Uloth, Andrea 
VanRcngcn, Caroline Vowels, David 
Waidzunas, Patrick Waller, Laura 
Wcimcr, Melissa Wells, Kristy Werchck, 
Andrew Wcstcrman, Patrick Williams, 
Ijjurcn Wilson, Jennifer Ycllin, Samuel 
Yingling,BrieZabor. 
Honors 

Michael Bruckmann, Karolina Ci- 
chocka, Mary Catherine Cotcy, Laura 
Dickinson, Moran Gaskin, Michael 
Kruse, Kristin Locke, Katie MacCallum, 
Lisa Ostovits, Timothy Savage, Valerie 
Schulicn, Christopher Shaifcr, Elcni 
Sncll, Jason Wagner, Dana White, Cheryl 
Wilson. 

Juniors 
Superior Honors 

Nicholas Garzonctti, Jillian 
Houghton, Kimbcrly Meyer, Matthew 
Michel, Elizabeth Ostcr, Michael Pavin, 
Matthew Pctkus, Cara Putignano, Rebec- 
ca Reilly, Kcnne Trahan, Erin Walsh, 
Katherine Zlmmer, 
High Honors 

Joseph Andrukaitis, Molly Bench, 



Eric Boarini, Diana Bradburn, Christo- 
pher Bragado, Ricky Bryant, Molly Buck- 
man, Jennifer Bunker, Bridget Bush, 
Sarah Chew, Colin Clancy, Justin Colht, 
Robert Czcrwinski, Brooke Daus, Kristi- 
na Davis, Elizabetii Dax, Mary DclOlmo, 
Lauren Dcnofrio, Jason Doll, Barbara 
Drennan, Kevin Drew, Erin Duffy, Amber 
Dusak, Roxann Ferguson, Ncal Fowler, 
Joseph Fusz, Timothy Gorski, Rachel 
Grimm, Grant Hendricks, Eric Herman, 
Emily Holzman. 

Gwendolyn Ming, Amy Ishcrwood, 
Patrick Kasarski, Sarah Kennedy, Michael 
Klopack, Margaret Knicst, Crystal Larson, 
Rebecca Lindsey, Michelle Lucas, Kristin 
Lynch, Nicole May, Anthony Mon- 
telcone, Claire Muda, Gregory New, Jes* 
da Nlramltvijit, Maura O Brfen, Karina 
Ochoa, Kristin Olson, Brian Payant, Mca- 

Sjan Petraitis, Nicklas Pfanzcltcr, Michael 
ionkoskc, Anthony Schaefcr, William Sc- 
bcrgcr, Gregory smith, Joshua Smith, 
Kristen Smith, Heather Succch, Matthew 
Tate, Joseph Taylcr, Mia Walter, Latisha 
Younger, Edward Zclfcrt 
Honors 

KristJnc Balagot, Jacquclynn Banks, 
Matthew Bing, Heather Carter, Craig Cit- 
ro, Thomas Lnncssy, Mark Fijalkicwicz, 
Bridgid FoyTina Gattuso, Kathleen Grif- 
fin, Blake Hand, Lindsay King, Colleen 
Lepper, Jennifer Ludwig, Jessica Meland, 
Maureen O'Lcary, Justin Pawlowski, 
Steven Rictz, Joshua Rivera, Brian Ry- 
glowski, Kristin Schultc, Julie Stitli, 



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Rachel Trimarco, Benjamin Zimmer, 
Joanne Zlotck. 

Sophomores 
Superior Honors 

Christopher Chapman, David 
Chillcki, Nicholas Elisseou, Kelly Grocn, 
Jennifer HannaJ Christopher Horist, Pe- 
ter Jones, Lawrence JQcfn, Elaine Krato- 
hwil, Michael Kwiatt, Elizabeth O'Brien, 
Kelin O'Donncll, Sarah Oplawsld, Mary 
Plciryga, Christine Ryndak, Steven 
Tschanz, Julie Wcilcr, Keith Zomchck. 
High Honors 

Katherine Blank, Shannon Boyle, 
Nicole Braun, Kelly Briscoe, Katherine 
Budris, Rebecca Caplstrant, Lisa Casar- 
rubias, Allison Clark, Michael Crane, 
John Dam, John Foley, Christine Fusz, 
Kathryn Gucwa, Molly ilalvcy, Amy Han- 
son, Ashley Hodge, Kevin Kalitowski, 
Megan Kaspcr, Ryan Kenton, Stephen 
Kracmcr.AmicKristan, Jennifer Krizman, 
Nathan Kucera, Molly Larson, Andrew 
LcBocuf, Kevin Lcmanski, Erin LoBue, Jill 
Lynch, Lowell Mangubat, Alexandra 
Miller, Jessica Mullen. 

Karen Nakon, Ansel Narikkattu, 
Shannon Nashf Paul Niziolek, Kevin Pas- 
soil, Adam Petersen, John Plcscia, Tiffany 
Pundzus, Michael Items, Melissa Roa, 
Lindsay Ryg, Megan Savickis, Matthew 
Schocn, Danisc Schrocder, Sophia Ster- 
giou, Kelly Stulginskas, Kevin Tekampc, 
Mcllnda Urban, David VanSpankcrcn, 
Torri Vetera, Michael Waldcck, Jessica 
Wclntritt, Katie Wcrchek, Klri Wolf- 
Lewis, Jacqueline Woodward. 
Honors 

Janinc Bernhardt, Anne Borling, 
Evelyn Carrera, Megan DcThomc, Ben- 
jamin Fltzharris, David Flynn, Marie 
Grimaldi, Kirstcn Hasdal, Joseph Hcaly, 
Kristlna Kaspcr, Ramsey Lama, Amy 
Landsbcrgcr, Philin Latter, Brian Lynch, 
June Marasigan, Katherine Markham, 
Maria Mctropulos, Edwin Obennuf, 



Sarah Purdy, Diana Rawls, Jcnilynn Rcdl- 
Ia, Jennifer Rohajlo, Zachary Smole, 
Matthew Thomson, Shawn Welch, Lisa 
Ycllin. 

Freshmen 
Superior Honors 

Nicole Bonlqult, Christopher Cole, 
Blair Daus, Karric Koch, Robert Magcc, 
Douglas Matiasck, Carl Schmidt, Bryan 
Smith, Jacqueline Wilson. 
High Honors 

Alex Aldridge, Avery Amorcs, 
Matthew Andrukaitis, Laura Bchr, Jen- 
nifer Boarini, Brittany Brown, Ncii 
Brysiewicz, Matthew Buckinghasm, Eric 
Buckman, Joseph Budy, Stephanie Bun- 
nell, Mark Castillo, Victoria Davis, Brian 
Dolan, Allison Dowc, Theresa Federcr, 
Carla Freeman, Kristin Groff, Janice Hen- 
derson, Jcnilcc Houghton, Andrew Idri- 
zovic, Andrew 1m, Kelly Kcndzlorski, 
Patrick Laud, Patrick McMahon, Kcllcy 
Mechan-Cousscc. 

Anthony MIstrctta, MaryBcth Mo- 
roncy, Bonnie Muran, Matthew Muto, 



Teresa Napolf, Meghan Oclcrich, Edward 
>, III 
Rygi< 
Stephanie Shelley, Brian Sherman, Tim 



Ogunro, Jill Pokryfkc, Michael Ryan, 
William Rygicl, Jessica Schmitz, 



Sommcrvillc, Karen Swlat, Stephen Swl- 
cton, Sabrina Talarovich, Jonathan Turk- 
ington, Tara Turner, Jason Wastag, Dan 
Wcintritt, Kevin Williams, Nolan Wilson, 
Juliana WodzinskL 
Honors 

Frederick Ang, Laura Badcr, Jen- 
nifer Ballard, Patrick Cummings, Gfna 
DcStcfano, Jeffrey Gricb, Alexander Hef- 
fcrnan, Daphne Kakalya, Kevin Kccgan, 
Sheila Kennedy, Jonathan Kolb, Ben- 
jamin Lawrence, Sandi I Jnlcwicz, Nicole 
Miramonti, Kelly Noonan, David Pazcly, 
Katherine Rhcdin, Kyle Richard, Kimbcr- 
ly Roth, Matthew Stiles, BcmadcttcTcr- 
rado, Danielle VanRcngcn, Liza Vowels, 
Andrew Wilson, Eric Zicmann. 



FROM PAGE CI 



NUDITY: County board to 
create adult business ordinance 



students who were 18 years old did 
attend Offsides when it was open. 

A main feature of the ordinance 
is requiring operators of sexually ori- 
ented businesses apply Tor a use li- 
cense, paying a $200 license fee and 
putting up a $5,000 bond, O'Kclly 
said. All employees of such busi- 
nesses would have to be registered 
with the county. 

Adult bookstores would not be 
allowed to have doors on any booths, 
and only one person would be al- 
lowed in any booth, O'Kelly said. 
Adult video stores that have separate 
viewing areas will also have to be li- 
censed by the county. 

All existing sexually oriented 
businesses will have to apply for 
these licenses by May 11, or else 
cease all operations, O'Kelly said. 

"Existing facilities must apply for 
a permit by that date and obtain the 



permit by Nov. 1 1," Hoffman said. 

The county board will take two 
votes Feb. 10 regarding the issue — 
one to create the license and one to 
schedule public hearings for the zon- 
ing of where sexually oriented busi- 
nesses will be allowed. 

The ordinance was put together 
by the Chicago law firm Burke, 
Weaver and Prell in a way that will 
not violate the owners and operators 
rights under the U.S. Constitution, 
O'Kelly said. 

"We spent $10,000 on this ordi- 
nance," she said during the Feb. 2 
Mundelein Board of Trustees meet- 
ing, where she presented the board 
with copies of the ordinance. Village 
officials had been active in the fight 
to get the topless dance club closed, 
as was Ellen Whcldn, an area resident 
who formed the Citizens for Com- 
munity Standards organization. 



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VO I D : Sister of drunk driver's 
victim creating MADD chapter 



from his spine and his body was sev- 
ered at his pelvis like a wish bone," 
said Demos-Rosenthal. 

"All Dave was doing was his job." 

The driver of the car, an Arling- 
ton Heights man, kept driving and 
wasn't stopped for a few miles down 
the road. 

"He didn't think anything was 
wrong," said Demos-Rosenthal. "He 
said, 'well I knew I hit something but 
I didn't think it was anything major.'" 

Demos-Rosenthal said two 
hours after the crash, the man's 
blood alcohol content was. 18. Police 
estimated his B AC. at the time of the 
crash was .24. 

The man refused to plead guilty. 

"He made us go through a trial," 
said Demos-Rosenthal. 

He was convicted after the trial 
and sentenced to 10 years in prison, 
500 hours of community service. The 
man also has to speak quarterly to 
students about alcoholism, visits 
Demos' grave yearly and attend dai- 
ly Alcoholics Anonymous meetings. 

The punishment was just, but 
did not heal the scars. 



"There arc no words to describe 
the unyielding anguish and pain this 
creates," said Demos Rosenthal. "It's 
still surreal to me, 

"Mistakes are when you add one 
and one and get three. This isn't a 
mistake," she continued. "The illegal 
act occurs when you get in a car and 
turn the ignition. 

"You don't have to be .08 to be 
legally drunk." 

Demos-Rosenthal said she is do- 
ing research, putting together a re- 
port on the number of DUls,. prose- 
cution rates and other related statis- 
tics. She will then submit a lengthy 
questionnaire, and if she drums up at 
least 20 people willing to join, the 
chapter will be chartered. 

"My intent is to educate," she 
said. "The mission of MADD Is to 
change the perceptions and altitudes 
of people who think it is OK." 

Demos-Rosenthal said her hope 
is to hold the first informal meeting 
within the next month or two and 
added she is willing to appear before 
various groups to speak and get her 
message out. 



COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers COUNTY /C3 



I 



, 



-*; 



AT A GLANCE 



A DIGEST OF STORIES MAKING HEADLINES THROUGHOUT OUR REGION 



Local's film to air on PBS 

Island lake— Lisa Raymond, formerly of the village and a 
1982 Wauconda High School graduate has achieved her goals 
of making It in Hollywood. Raymond has worked in the film 
industry for five to six years, as a director, assistant director, 
script supervisor or editor on commercials and films. 

Her award-winning film, "The Unknown Soldier," will air 
this weekend on the PBS show "Image Union" on WTTW- 
Chicago Channel 1 1, at 10 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 7, and 130 
a.m., Sunday, Feb. 8, and the director encourages everyone to 
tunc in. 

The film is about the effects a raped and murdered woman 
has on society, something based on a true scenario En Chica- 
go. 

Pride president resigns 

Mundelein— Three years was enough for John Maguire, 
who last week resigned as president of Mundelein Pride. 
Maguire made his decision to resign as leader of the down- 
town revitalization group in order to put his name in the hat of 
applicants for the newly created executive director's position. 

"In the past year, when the discussion of an executive di- 
rector position came up, I though I might be interested," he 
said. "Basically I just wanted to remove myself from the day 
to day operations so this is an open job search," Maguire said. 
Maguire's announcement was made at the end of Pride's Jan. 
27 board meeting, at which time Pride Vice President Lynnea 
Hansen was appointed his replacement 

Pride is walling to hear from Illinois Lt. Gov. Bob Kustra If 
it made the cut and was accepted into the Illinois Suburban 
MainStrect program. Pride officials have said notification was 
expected as early as the first of the year, and are now hoping to 
have a formal announcement by the end of this week. 

Sunday dance, lunch benefit 

Lake Villa— Lake Villa United Methodist Church will host 
their fifth annual Valentine's Lunch and Tea Dance at the 
Country Squire Ballroom on Sunday, Feb. 15 from 1230 to 
4:30 p.m. 

Advanced reservation only tickets are now available from 
847-356-3820 and 8-17-356-2661 and cost S25 a person. 

The luncheon is served at 12:30 p.m. 

Music will be provided by "The Windy City Groove," The 
band plays a wide variety of music from Big Band to Disco 
styles. They are well known for their 'Blues Brothers' recre- 
ations and costumes. 

All proceeds arc to benefit the Lake Villa United Methodist 
. Church. '■•■•• 

February Faschings Ball set 

AntJoch — Festive costumes, music byTallsmann, and 
dancing are featured attractions of the German-American 
Club of Antioch Faschings Ball February 14 at the Antioch Golf 
Club. 

"it's a Mardi Gras," said President Karl Pokomy. 

There are larger, more expensive German-American balls 
in Chicago. For Lake County residents however, this is a good 
evening of entertainment and meeting with friends, according 
to Pokomy. The hall will be decorated in a theme that evokes 
Valentine's Day. 

"There are quite a few prizes for the best costumes, male 
and female, and the most original," he said. 

"it's an evening event," Pokomy said. The doors open at 7 
p.m. and the dance itself starts near 8 p.m. There is an $8 ad- 
mission charge that can be paid at the entrance. 

Trustees question post office site 

Gumee— While pleased the village may be receiving a 
new post office some two decades behind the need, Gumee 
officials are questioning the site selected by the U.S. Postal 
Service. 

The site is five acres at the northwest comer of Washing- 
ton Street and Cemetery Road. 

"We will stress our concerns about traffic but we are in 
such a dire need of a new post office we do not want to delay 
it," Gumee Mayor Richard Wclton said. 

In February, 1997, developer Jeffrey Green and Post Office 
officials met with plan commission members to discuss a site 
near Kensington Homes offO'Plalne Road. 

According to Post Office spokesman lames Kinnc, the de- 
veloper withdrew that offer last fall. 




Olympic dreams 

Jeffrey Paul holds the Mexican flag high with his 
Wndorgarton classmates at Avon School In Round 
Lake during their opening ceremonies for the Winter 
Olympics Monday. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 



"There had been a considerable amount of time spent on 
a village center location and the owner had worked with staff," 
James Hayner, village administrator, said. 

"Arc they included in further discussions with improve- 
ments to Washington Street," Mark Ratfelders, Gumee 
tnistec, said. 

A proposed expansion of Six Rags Theme Park would be 
located to the east. 

"Twenty years ago we told the Post Office this (O'Plaine 
Road) site would not be adequate. Our population has out- 
stripped Ubertyville's, yet we do not have an adequate post 
office. We are not happy with their deliberations," Rocheleau 
said. 

KJnne said two sites were looked at off O'Plaine Road. 

Gundelach acquitted of OUI 

Round Lake— Roy Gundelach, the Fox Waterway Dredg- 
ing Coordinator who was arrested last May for OUI, operating 
a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol, was acquitted 
of the charges against him by a Lake County Jury on Friday, af- 
ter nearly 9 hours of deliberations. 

Gundelach, 50, of Inglcside was arrested after he ran into 
another boater on Lake Marie. He refused to take a breatha- 
lyzer test upon the arrest, which led to a suspension of boating 
privileges for two years. He was acquitted of the accident be- 
cause the 16 foot vessel that was rammed by Gundelach did 
not have his running lights on. 



Norton's arrest upheld by judge 

Grayslake— Evidence and the arrest Assistant Liber- 
tyville Fire Chief Kenneth Norton will be admitted in his trial 
set to begin March 9. 

Judge Stephen Walter denied the request of Norton's at- 
torney Thomas Briscoe to have his arrest quashed and sup- 
press evidence seized the evening Norton allegedly struck bi- 
cyclist Mark Capistrant citing lack of a valid warrant to search 
Norton orhis vehicle. 

Walter denied the request of Norton's attorney Thomas 
Briscoe, at a pre-trial hearing Jan. 29, to have the arrest 
quashed and suppress evidence seized the evening Norton al- 
legedly struck Capistrant 

Norton, 41, of Grayslake has been charged in connection 
with the death of Capistrant, who was struck while riding on 
the shoulder of Route 120, the evening of July 30, 1997. 

Norton's next scheduled court appearance is Feb. 24 for a 
pre- trail hearing. Norton faces one count of reckless homi- 
cide, and two misdemeanor charges for failure to stop after an 
accident involving death and failure to render aid following an 
accident involving death. 

During the pre-trial hearing Jan. 29 Grayslake officer Rita 
Stang, the first officer respond to the scene of the accident, re- 
vealed during questioning she didn't knowa person suspect- 
ed of driving under the influence could be made to submit to a 
blood test 

Senior housing may open 1999 

Antioch— Construction of the 38-unit Tiffany Road Se- 
nior Apartments building will begin mid-summer if financing 
by private and public sector agencies is received. First tenant 
occupancy may be early summer, 1999. 

Antioch village trustees voted Feb. 2 to accept a recom- 
mendation to grant a requested zoning variation that will per- 
mit senior housing at 885 Tiffany Road. 

"Senior housing is really needed in the Antioch area," said 
Trustee Wayne Foresta during discussion of the recommenda- 
tion before the council. 

The Plan Commission and Zoning Board of Appeals voted 
Jan. 22 to recommend the variation request to the council. 

Council action was based on a series of agreements rec- 
ommended by Village Attorney Kenneth Clark and Planning 
Director Robert Silhan and accepted by Rick Baschctti of T&S 
Builders, developer of the proposed project. 

Silhan reported to the council that he had reviewed the 
1966 Village Zoning Map. He said that the property for Tiffany 
Road Senior Apartments was zoned R-5, a multiple family 
zoning classification at that ilme."So, U*» been zoned mi ' 
family for over 30 year*," Stthnn said.- 

Libertyvilfe man catches thief 

Ubertyville — A former Libertyvilfe man turned his fundi 
break into a foot chase after a man stole his colleague's purse. 

Rob Lang, 29, a lawyer in downtown Chicago, was having 
lunch with a female senior partner in his company's firm last 
Friday, Jan. 30 at the Wall Street Deli. 55 East Monroe, when a 
man entered the delicatessen, maced Lang's colleague and 
stole her purse. 

Rather than stand by and wait for police to show up and 
take a report on the stolen purse, Lang gave chase. 

The suspect, Daryi Bowman, ran into an alley where Lang 
continued to chase him. Lang was maced four or five times 
during the chase and finally tackled Bowman in the alley be- 
tween Clark and LaSalle. ablock-and-a-half from the deli. 

Lang held the man down and a Chicago police officer in 
the area took Bowman into custody. 

Warfield case tough nut to crack 

Ubertyville — Over the last few weeks, staff members at Ub- 
ertyville Community High School's student newspaper, Drops of 
Ink, got a taste of just how tough journalism can be at times. 

The students decided to cover the story of Andrew 
Warfield, a former English teacher at the school, who was dis- 
missed by the school board in November for alleged improper 
behavior with a juvenile female student 

Warfield, a controversial teacher who was popular with his 
students, is currently appealing the firing and will also appear 
in Lake County court on misdemeanor battery charges. 

The students, Kelly Rain, Drew King and Libby Connelly re- 
cently sat down with the Libcrtytnllc News to talk about the ex- 
perience. 



STAY TUNED 

Pick up any of Lakeland Newspapers 1 1 editions in coming weeks for: 



SEX OFFENDERS 

A series with In-depth 
views of victims of sex 
crimes and some 
of the predators 




assess 



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PRINCESSES OF POOL 



ELECTION GUIDE 

Your guide to all of the local primaries 





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Antioch billiards 

team continues 

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C4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OPINIONS 



Februarys, 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers 

William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 



VIEWPOINT 



William M. Schroeder 

Prosldont/C.E.O. 



Neal Tucker 

Exocutlvo Editor/Compoiltlon Mgr. 



Rhonda Hetrick Burke 

Managing Editor 

30 South Whitney St., Grayslakc, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (847) 223-8161. E-mail; cdll@lnd.com 



EDITORIALS 



LCHS should 

trust demographic 

predictions of leader 

The Libertyville Community High School Board of Education 
should place Us trust In the 10-year reign of Superintendent 
Donald Gossett and not spend an additional $5,000 plus of 
taxpayer money on a demographic study designed to en- 
sure projected student attendance numbers are accurate. 

The board is considering a proposal by renowned demographer 
Dr. John Kasarda of North Carolina to complete a new demographic 
study of the district's future enrollment projections. 

The catch, LCHS staffers would compile the information and 
send it to North Carolina for review by Kasarda. If the board opts to 
have Kasarda visit LCI IS in person, the cost of the study would by 
raised by more than $1,050. 

Sounds like a waste of money. 

Four board members are calling for a new demographic study 
because Gossett's projections for 1997-98 were off by 50 students. 
The reason— Gregg's Landing has developed slower than anticipat- 
ed. 

Board members want to ensure the district's second campus 
and renovations to the Butler Campus are completed with the most 
accurate numbers possible. 

A worthy notion. 

But, no one can predict the future. How many students will re- 
side in the mega-Gregg's Landing development can only be project- 
ed, not assured. 

Gossett has proven himself to be a good demographer over the 
years. During his nearly two decade tenure at the helm of LCHS, 
Gossett's predictions in this far from exact science have been accu- 
rate within 1 percent. 

The board should trust his numbers and move ahead with the 
project of building the schools. Furthermore, a new demographic 
study will not cause an alternation in plans for either the new high 
school or renovations to Butler Lake. Tax payers have approved a 
referendum for S48.5 which will provide for an equitable education 
for all the students in the district. 

Show taxpayers the money — in a savings account. 

Curfew crackdown 
benefits cut in crime 

A case can be made for a strong curfew ordinance providing 
law enforcement with a formidable tool for cracking down 
on gang activity. F.very municipality can benefit from 
comprehensive ordinances designed to keep school-age 
children in class and off the streets. 

Waukegan received a glowing report on how effective a reener- 
gized ordinance combining curfew and truancy provisions has 
been in reducing crime and combating gang activity. Police Chief 
Scott Burleson credits a decision by the city council in 1996 to 
toughen an old curfew law with a healthy reduction in crime in 
1997 

The statistics back up Burleson's claim. With vigorous enforce- 
ment last year, curfew arrests almost tripled. Overall juvenile ar- 
rests for the same period almost doubled. Directly related, 
Burleson believes, is a 21 percent reduction in burglaries and a 13 
percent drop in thefts from 3,090 lo 2,692. Police had the support of 
volunteers and parents combing the community for youths out after 
10 p.m. weekdays and midnight on weekends. 

While Waukegan may be burdened with the highest amount of 
gang activity in Like County, curbing gangs has a high priority in a 
number of other county towns. A crackdown on curfew violations 
and intense enforcement of truancy rules goes hand-in-hand with 
making a safer community. 



Guest 
commentaries welcome 

Lakeland Newspapers welcomes guest columns by our readers on top- 
ics of general interest. Anyone Interested in writing a column can contact 
Publisher W.H. Schroeder at (847) 223-8161. Submissions may be mailed 
c/o Lakeland Newspapers, P.O. Box 268, Grayslake IL, 60030 or (ax to 
(847) 223-8810. Deadline is Friday at noon. 



Salvis capitalize 
on old misfortunes 



A I and Mike Salvi are find- 
ing that even when you 
lose in politics you can 
gain — in name recogn- 
tion.TIie brothers Salvi achieved 
enough awareness in the minds of 
voters in losing efforts in 1996 to 
give them a bump in the early go- 
ing in the 1998 primary where they 
are gunning for nominations again. 

At least one early poll gave Al Salvi 
an edge in his contest with Stale 
Rep. Bob Churchill (R-Lake Villa) 
for the Republican nomination for 
secretary of state. Mike Salvi is re- 
garded the early leader in the four- 
way contest for the GOP nomina- 
tion to succeed retiring State Rep. 
Verna Clayton (R-Buffalo Grove) in 
a south Lake County legislative dis- 
trict. 

Both Salvis acknowledge quickly 
that losing is not exactly the way to 
gain valuable name recognition 
with electors. Call it a residual for a 
persistence. 

Mike Salvi, a Lake Zurich attorney, 
is tussling with Buffalo Grove May- 
or Sidney Mathias, Ray Ivancic, a 
Schaumburg Realtor, and Mark 
Riefenberg, a Barrington resident 
and collections manager of Great 
Likes Credit Union headquartered 
in North Chicago. Debate over 
limiting campaign spending 
sparked the early going in this con- 
test without any agreement The 
four candidates are expected to 
spend freely. Mike spent $48,000 in 
a losing effort two years ago and 
was part of Al's successful shootout 
a decade ago with Nancy Master- 
son where both candidates spent 
more than a combined $200,000 to 
get nominated for a west Lake 
County seat, a record at the lime 
that still might be standing. 

The Al Salvi-Churchitl battle is 
getting off to a slow start. Salvi's 
strategy appears to be regrouping 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



the force he forged in 1996 to pull a 
surprise victory for the Republican 
nomination for U.S. senator while 
banking on a late television blitz. 
Churchill has had to do some staff 
retuning. As a party regular, 
Churchill will align his efforts with 
George Ryan and Loleta Didrick- 
son. 

Churchill and AJ Salvi arc old pro- 
tagonists going back to the early 
1990's when Churchill was gaining 
his spurs as a solid organization 
man and Salvi was establishing a 
reputation as an independent, al- 
beit conservative Republican. 

Salvi and Churchill clashed 
countless times in the lawmaking 
process. In those days, Churchill 
characterized Salvi is an unde- 
pendable, legislative "Lone 
Ranger." Salvi viewed his fellow 
Lake Countian as devoid of princi- 
pal, a slavishly ambitious self seek- 
er. 

How these differences play out 
mark the secretary of state race for 
special interest, not only in Lake 
County but all of Illinois. 
Churchill-Salvi has the ingredients 
of a grudge match, the likes of 
which are not seen often in modern 
politics. Two candidates have a 
distinct dislike for each other. 



Don't expect to hear any references 
to "my worthy opponent." 

Earning dividends 

I received a check the other day 
for $1 1.43 cents from the 5th Hour 
Company, a Junior Achievement 
Applied Economics Company at 
Lake Zurich High School. The 
check represented the return on 
three shares of $2 par value stock 
purchased last fall. 5th Hour Com- 
pany went into the T-shirt business, 
obviously running at a profit. Pret- 
ty nice return. 5th Hour was spon- 
sored by Kemper Insurance ofLong 
Grove. 

For love's sake 

A downtown Chicago hotel has 
put together a sweetheart of a 
Valentine's Day package for young 
lovers. Hie price tag is 
$306,426.75. No typographical er- 
ror. Besides a suite at the Fairmont 
swimming in red roses and cham- 
pagne, the package includes a 1998 
Lamborghini Diablo VT Roadster 
with snow corn leather interior 
piped in blue. 

Family business 

The Cortcsi family launched its 
fourth location, Sunset Poods Lib- 
ertyville, with an impressive open 
house Wednesday evening. 
Besides high quality food products, 
the Cortcsi's pride themselves on 
personal touches like helping un- 
load grocery carts ai check-out mul 
then placing shopping bags lit your 
car. The Cortcsi family Is one of the 
most durable supermarket opera- 
tors in northern Illinois, serving 
county families for more than 50 
years, first with their flagship store 
in I iighland Park and later with 
stores in Like Forest and North- 
brook. 



T word hounds candidates 



The world's worst kept secret 
is that the Lake County 
Board is considering that a 
referendum be held in No- 
vember calling for a quarter cent 
sales tax increase. The reason that it 
is trying to be kept a secret, is thai 
too many County Board members 
face primary challenges on March 
17 and they'd rather not talk about 
taxes. Most of them feel that they're 
"home free" if they win their prima- 
ry contests. 

The first one to really let "the 
cat out of the bag" was Sheriff Gary 
Del Re when he, early on, said that 
there was an urgent need to build a 
new minimum security facility in 
Lake County. He showed that he's 
never run for election before, and 
he was coached quickly by some on 
the board, that such comments can 
be translated to mean "tax in- 
crease." The sheriff has been more 
careful in choosing his words when 
he's been asked about the need for 
a new correctional facility. He's 
learned to use the politically cor- 
rect phrase, "talk of thai would be 
premature." 

The first County Board mem- 
ber lo venture out and bring up the 
subject of the quarter cent sales lax 
was Angelo Kyle, who is the Chair- 
man of the Ixiw and Judicial Com- 
mittee. He made some favorable 
comments in behairof a sales tax 
increase that would lead you to be- 
lieve that only tourists pay sales 
taxes. Of course, when Kyle opened 
his tax mouth, he never dreamed 




SEEING 

IT 

THROUGH 

John S. Matijevich 



that, as an incumbent, he would 
face a primary challenge. After 
Waukegan Alderman lohn Balcn 
threw his hat in the ring to chal- 
lenge Kyle for the District 12 seat, 
Kyle has begun to use the operative 
phrase, that any discussion of die 
jail or tax increase "is too prema- 
ture." 

The nexi County Board mem- 
ber to walk on the plank was Jim 
Stanczak. He didn't say a word 
aboul laxes; instead openly came 
out in favor of turning the aban- 
doned Karcher Hotel on Washing- 
ton Street into a minimum security 
jail. With absolutely no fads to 
back up his conclusions, he said 
lhal selecting the Karcher site 
would save the taxpayers money. 
With no more facts to go on than 
Jim, my gut feeling is that rehab- 
bing that fire-scarred hotel will cost 
mega-bucks. That's not to say that a 
committee studying the feasibility 
of the site wouldn't come up with 
an opposite conclusion. Consul- 
tants always come up with the con- 
clusion first, and then manufacture 
figures lo back it up. 

Since Stanczak doesn't have 



any primary opposition and his 
race for the District 8 seat is Demo- 
crat Robert Sabonjian Jr., why 
would he so quickly latch on to (his 
issue? By the way, he was cautjoned 
by none other than Kyle that any 
talk of the jail was "premature" and 
everyone should "hold their fire." 
But, Stanczak's position may be po- 
litically motivated, too. 

Jim is known to be friendly 
with some in the city administra- 
tion. 

I'm sure that he is well aware 
that the owner of the Karcher 
building is Waukegan businessman 
Al Mini. I'm sure that Stanczak 
knows that Mini is a "buddy" of 
Waukegan Director of Government 
Services Donald Weakley. He's been 
accused of making mayoral deci- 
sions before, so it was no surprise 
when he said that Mayor Bill 
Durkin was approached and "had 
no objection." 

The Karcher Hotel has been 
vacant for 14 years and it can be 
classified as a "white elephant." 
Mini doesn't have to worry about 
the city going after him to do some- 
thing about the building consider- 
ing (he relationship. 

So, along comes Jim Stanczak, 
in the name of criminal justice, 
with this scheme to bail out Al 
Mini. Of course, he hasn't come up 
witlt the figures on how much the 
taxpayers will foot for this bailout. 

Jim— Repeat after me— any 
talk of a minimum security facility 
is "premature." 



I 



Februarys, 1998 



PARTY LINES 



v 






PARTY LINES, THE LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS' COLUMN OF POLITICAL OPINION 

IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS. 



Simpso 



county 



Competition for chairman 
of the Lake County Centra] 
committee is shaping up 
for a two year term that 
will be following the March 17 pri- 
mary. 

Glnnle Wood, long time Lib- 
ertyville Township precinct work- 
er with Lake Forest ties, and War- 
ren Township Supervisor Sue 
Simpson are being mentioned to 
contest Dr. John Schullen, 
County Board representative who 
has served as GOP chair for six 
years. 

Back in town 

Former Lake Zurich Mayor 
Jim Kay spent a few days in Lake 
County recently, returning for a de- 
position in a complicated land 
case. Jim is enjoying life in his new 
home in South Carolina where he 
reports local politics isn't as heated 
as he remembers Lake Zurich. Kay 
officially is semi-retired, although 
he works in retail several days a 
week. 

Willie connects 

Backers of former Undersheriff 
Willie Smith say his "up from the 
ranks" career in law enforcement is 
connecting with Republican voters 
who'll be selecting a nominee for 
sherifT in a few weeks. These same 
voices contend that Sheriff Gary 
Del Ite started *at ihe'ibp." Which 
they view n$ contrary to Republican 
tradition. After years in a command 
position in the Buffalo Grove police 
department, Del Re was named un- 




Cole; 'Campaign 
literature reflects 
'green' views 




Smith: Says he's 
connecting with 
voters 



dersheriff three years ago to the, 
(hen Sheriff Clinton Giinnell. 

Who's supporting who? 

Word around town is that County 
Board Dist. 10 challenger Mary 
Fltzglbbons was recruited by the 



man incumbent Diana O'Kelly 

downed four years ago — Colin 
McRae. Fitzgibbons is facing first- 
termer O'Kelly in the Mundelein area 
primary, March 17 for the GOP nomi- 
naU'on. Word has it that fellow board 
member John Schullen, party 
chairman for the GOP in Lake Coun- 
ty, doesn't want the credit for recruit- 
ing Fitzgibbons. Privately, he is a fan 
of O'Kelly, despite the fact, that they 
are aligned with different factions. ' 

Marks snubbed 

County Board Rep. Martha 
Maries (R-Riverwoods) said she 
wasn't surprised when Vernon Re- 
publican committeemen endorsed 
her opponent, Dr.AndyAltman, a 
Highland Park dentist. "Just makes 
me want to work harder," Marks 
replied coolly. Shades of the GOP 
Central Committee's past snubbing 
of incumbent Republicans. 

Dr. Andy will be feted at a 
Thursday, Feb. 12 fundraiser 
dubbed, "Two Great Men in Histo- 
ry," which has prompted some po- 
litical jokesmiths to wonder if he's 
one of them. The fundraiser will be 
held at Half Day Inn. 

Share, think alike 

County Board Reps. Sandy 
Cole (R-Grayslake) and Al Wester- 
man (Warren Township) share the 
same philosophies about re- 
st mined growth and protcctlo n of 
the environment. They also shared 
the same photographer for a fresh 
shot for new political literature, a 
leafy scene in a forest preserve. 



Lottery a tax o 



stupid people* 




A meek, mild-mannered 
player of the Illinois State 
Lottery won $200 the oth- 
er day on a $1 Little Lotto 
quick-pick. Out of the clear blue, he 
matched four of the five numbers; 
matching all five would have been 
worth $40,000. - 

Ah, so close and yet so far — so 
our friend's natural greed wasn't 
satisfied. Forty thousand would 
have come in handy. 

Anyway, the lousy $200 was the 
first money this particular Milque- 
toast of a gambler had won in four 
years of playing Lotto and Little 
Lotto. (I don't want to embarrass 
the chump by using his full name, 
so let's call him by his initials, J.R) 

Since J.R reluctantly but reli- 
giously spends a handful of dollars 
every week on this state-sponsored 
rip-off, he figures it cost him about 
SI ,000 to win the paltry S200. As 
one critic of this despicable way for 
Illinois to generate revenue re- 
minded us recently, "The lottery is 
a tax on stupid people." 

I use the word religiously be- 
cause we know that if Somebody 
Up There wants to help us, he or 
she can't do it unless we at least 
participate. Of course, it's just pos- 
sible that Somebody Up There has 
more important concerns than the 
Illinois lottery'. 

As the Bible says, money is the 
root of all evil. But perhaps equally 
true is George Bernard Shaw's foU 
low-up observation: "The lack of 
money is the root of all evil." 

The chances for lotto lightning 
to strike us remain remote, current- 
ly six million to one, about the 
same odds that the Cubs will win a 
pennant some year soon. 

Apparently, If some of us ever 
are going to become wealthy, we 
will have to make our money the 




THE 

PFARR 

CORNER 

Jerry Pfarr 



old-fashioned way — marry it. 

We may imagine that most mil- 
lionaire lottery winners are now on 
some Caribbean beach, lighting 
their cigars with 10-dollar bills. But 
some of those who fell into a pot of 
jam have met with misfortune. Sto- 
ries abound about how winning the 
lottery ruined people's lives. 

A few years ago, a Pittsburgh 
man called Buddy won $16 mil- 
lion in the Pennsylvania Lottery. 
Afterwards, he was convicted of 
assault on a business partner, his 
sixth wife left him, his brother 
tried to kill him to gain access to 
his money, and his landlady, say- 
ing they shared the winning ticket, 
successfully sued him for one- 
third of the jackpot. 

Buddy bought himself a man- 
sion but made bad business ven- 
tures and wound up bankrupt. 

"Money didn't change me," he 
said. "It changed people around 
me. I thought they cared a little bit 
about me, but they only cared 
about the money. Money draws 
flies." 

Similar stories about "the lot- 
tery albatross" keep popping up in 
the press. Obviously, some folks 
just can't handle instant riches but, 
you know, 1 think our dear friend 
) .P. may be ready to disprove the 
old adage thai money can't buy 

happiness. 

At the very least, i think he de*. 
serves a shot at it. 



COMMENTARY 



Media frenzy distorts 
presidential obligations 



LETTER TO THE EDITOR 



David whips Goliath with facts 



By H.O. Peters 



It Is embarrassing to see the 
majority of the American pub- 
lic glued to all the news media 
with salaciously salivating 
"talk show" mentalities, especially 
if they feel that our chief executive, 
President Clinton, can be found 
guilty of what he has been accused 
of. 

Media hype creates specula- 
tion in a public in a public willing 
to believe before all the facts are in. 
Hut a vast majority love to feed on 
these reports. Before any person 
may form an opinion, let all the 
facts surface before condemna- 
tion. I do not know whether he is 
guilty or not; that is not the impor- 
tant issue on my mind. 

Any person, including the 
President of the United States, is, in 
a court of law, innocent until 
proven guilty. The news media has 
turned this into a clownish circus. 
Let the lynch mobs put down their 
noses. 

The Presidential meeting with 
PLO leader Yassir Arafat proved be- 
yond a doubt that some of the 
White House invited correspon- 
dents and interviewers were about 
as responsible as the banjo player 
on "Deliverance." The meeting was 
to be about the hot and continuing 
Mid East issues and as I sat down 
to see what would transpire in 



these American and Pan-Arabic 
talks, 1 was stunned by the first five 
questions from these allegedly re- 
sponsible interviewers as they 
seemed to focus mainly and solely 
on the President's alleged sordid 
and seamy dark side— in front of 
PLO leader Yassir Arafat. 

Finally, the sixth question, by a 
more responsible, jaw-clenching, 
journalist surfaced and did lend a 
saner side by addressing the more 
important Mid-East and other 
world issues. 

Hather than concentrate on 
any personal foibles that Clinton 
is belabored with, which would 
be totally counter productive in 
the national interest, it would 
seem to me that the attention 
should be directed to something 
of more vital importance like 
world affairs. 

In the end, the truth will have 
emerged, but in the in-between 
time I would rather be prepared in 
the event (not too far-fetched) that 
a global escalation can be prevent- 
ed. I'd rather spend my time 
preparing for the defense of my 
country than by wasting time pe- 
rusing licentious tabloids. 

Editor's note: H.O. Peters is a 
retired employee of North Shore 
Gas Co. A Wildwood resident, he 
served in the Navy during the Ko- 
rean conflict. 



Letters to the Editor, Lake- 
land Newspaper, Jan. 30, 
1998 edition from James 
Magee and Ray Wolfel, at- 
torney and building commission- 
er for the Village of Round Lake, 
respectively are not only unethical 
but are inaccurate. Fortunately for 
village residents, that's the case or 
they would be paying for a lawsuit 
for invasion of privacy. The per- 
sonal information is exempt from 
release by the Freedom of Infor- 
mation Act. Here are the facts with 
documentation available upon re- 
quest: 

I bought my property and 
easement in 1992. The cost was 
more than $70,000. This is totally 
irrelevant to the issue. 

I have an casement for a pri- 
vate road, Document #2869424, 
Jan. 16, 1990, 8:30 a.m. The road is 
over 78 years old. Penguin Group 
bought the property in 1994, 
aware of the easement. The village 
received documentation Dec. 29, 
1996. Mr. Magee's opinion the fol- 
lowing day was "her easement, if 
it exists, would not seem to pre- 
sent an issue—" The village ap- 
proved the development in 1997 * 
without clear title on the property. 
1 do pot bellied pig rescue, not 
a "hog farm." My pigs aren't for 
sale. I got my first pig in 1992 
shortly after buying the property. 
My first pig, Peanut, was in the pa- 
per for graduating dog training. 
The recent addition of 1 5 pigs was 
from ]oe Sbarboro due to inhu- 
mane conditions they were in. I'm 



zoned Countryside which allows 
livestock and a sign. There is no 
sign— yet. 

The Nov. 24, 1998, letter from 
Mr. Magee with attached quit 
claim mentions no money except 
the S10 consideration. On Dec. 9, 
1997, my attorney informed the 
village my easement wasn't for 
sale but negotiations with Pen- 
guin Group were offered. I never 
offered my property to the village. 
If I didn't respond to the village, 
how did I make this offer? 

Why would anyone give up a 
private road for a public one? I 
don't want to live at the end of a 
cul-de-sac. I believe that allowing 
public access to my property 
compromises the safety and wel- 
fare of my animals, my property 
and myself. 

Abutting property owners to 
this parcel have recently had 
"anonymous" complaints with 
Lake County Building and Zoning 



Letters 
welcome 

Letters to the editor are 

welcome. They should be on 

topics ot general interest, 

approximately 250 words or less. 

All letters must be signed, and 

contain a home addi ess and 

telephone number. The editor 

reserves the right to condense 

all tetters. 



and Health Dept. I have voluntari- 
ly requested a Health Dept. in- 
spection of my well, septic and 
general conditions of my property 
and Dept. of Agriculture inspec- 
tion of runoff from my "hog farm." 
More of our tax dollars at work. 
The village should be concerned 
about erosion, runoff and Army 
Corps of Engineer violations from 
the Pritzker project on unstable, 
hydrous soil with wetlands 
throughout than 18 pigs on 5 
acres. 

I don't embarrass the village 
and the developer. They've been 
doing a great job of that them- 
selves. 

Round Lake could belter 
spend their time and taxpayer 
money doing their jobs and look- 
ing over laws that they seem to 
ignore rather than devising ways 
to harass non-residents. I suggest 
that Penguin, of the multi-billion 
dollar Pritzker family, pays a 
price commensurate with the 
gain of my property and ease- 
ment coupled with the loss they'd 
, experience without it. The money 
spent on legal expenses and lost 
on down time is adding up fast 
along with poor public opinion of 
their "living in harmony" with the 
neighbors. I will continue to fight 
for my rights and property in 
spite of the untruths and pres- 
sures by the village and develop- 
er. 

Marianne Amann 

Ingleside 



LIPSERVICE 



C6 /Lakeland Newspapers 



February 6, 1998 



Get it off your chest (847) 223-8073 Kiss and tell 



Upservice is a phone-in column presented as a feature of Lakeland Newspapers. Lake- 
land Newspapers makes no claim to the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland News- 
papers does not claim the content or the subject matter as fact, but as the personal 
opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to edit copy or to refrain 
from printing a message. Call In at 225-8073 and leave your message 24-hours a day. 
Callers must leave their name, phone number and village name. Names and phone num- 
bers will not be printed; however, callers may be called for verification. 



Mail delivery 

This is about mail delivery in Fox 
Lake. Fox Lake has house to house 
delivery, yet on Round Hill, people 
have mailboxes in front of their 
houses. Why can't they have deliv- 
ery to their houses, also? 

Fox Lake 



Keep off! 



Hey, snowmobilcrs, keep off of per- 
sonal property and tearing up sea 
walls. We're out here to start bust- 
ing your butts or something. Fur- 
thermore, you're spoiling it for oth- 
ers who are abiding by the rules. We 
ought to pass another law, as usual, 
to keep you off the property. 

Antloch 

Driving lesson 

There are two rules of the road 1 
wish drivers would follow. #1: 
Right-hand turn on red. Would you 
mind waiting for a safe interval? I've 
seen people dart out into a space I 
couldn't spit into. #2: If someone is 
parked in your lane and you have to 
go around them, could you wait un- 
til the oncoming traffic, who has 
the right of way, passes by? I don't 
think I should have to go onto the 
shoulder because you're ignorant 



of the law. 

Senior harassment 

I'm calling about harassment of se- 
nior citizens. I'm a 65-year-old re- 
tired senior citizen residing in an 
apartment complex near the rail- 
road station. Since 1992, I've paid 
my rent on time without fail. Dur- 
ing the last two years, the manage- 
ment attitude toward seniors has 
changed to one of resentment, ha- 
rassment, intimidation, and threats 
of violence, If a senior makes a 
complaint, the management will 
carry threats forward. To be looked 
on with scorn by the younger pop- 
ulation, creates an environment of 
fear through management intimi- 
dation and tactics. The premise of 
the problem lies in a reduced level 
of rent, which is not profitable 
without high turnover. 

Antioch 

Pleads for dog 

I would like the people who let 
my yellow lab out of their dog 
run to know that my baby needs 
surgery. I am not happy with 
this. If you want something from 
me come and explain it to me. 
Please don't take it out on my 
baby dog. She might need an am- 
putation now. 



This is to the woman who called the 
police on two men kissing in the 
Jewel parking lot in Antioch. I was 
calling to say that she should not 
have called the police for that rea- 
son. Would she have called the cops 
if she saw a boy and girl kissing? 
And for the police to do a DNA 
sample on the back seat doesn't 
make any sense either. 



Next time, I'll call 

Wake up, Grayslake resi- 
dents! There's a leash law. 
Every day when I walk my 
dog, mostly between Haryan 
Farms and West Trails, I have 
a problem with dogs running 
out. Even when the owners 
are standing there. Maybe if I 
call the police next time, 
you'll get the hint. 

Grayslake 



No news is... 

I have been watching the paper 
each week for news of the riverboat. 
Until just recently, all was quiet. I 
am not in favor of a riverboat for 
Fox Lake. My husband and I have 
lived here for many years and 
raised our family here. Over the 
years, we've watched the lakes be- 
come overcrowded with people 
who don't care about preserving 
them or the land around them. I 
don't think a riverboat will help the 
situation. Have you ever tried to en- 
ter Route 12 on a Friday, Saturday 
or Sunday in the summertime? It's 
almost impossible. By adding a 
rivcrboat.thc traffic will Increase 



It's Time For The 

'98 Health 
and Fitness 



• Exhibitors 

• Demonstrations 

• Booths 



^M 



Saturday, March 28, 1998 

10:00 am to 3:00 pm 
College of Lake County 

C Module Auditorium 

(Blue Sign in Front of Entrance) 

1 935 I Washington, Grayslake 

Sponsored by: 

Lakeland Newspapers 
and College of Lake County 



(SIfla 



- gg,gn »- 



even more. What will the town of 
Fox Lake gain to possibly justify 
more traffic and adding to over- 
crowded lakes, to say nothing of the 
crime It will bring. I should think we 
would want to add something to 
benefit the town and people in it, 
something to benefit families like a 
water park or beach , 

Fox Lake 

Is he afraid? 

I thought our Township Supervisor 
Mr. Tim Osmond, wanted to help 
the unincorporated area. It seems 
like he's against everything they're 
proposing. Is he afraid his laundro- 
mat would lose a lot of customers if 
sewers come in? 

Antioch 

What's going on? 

I'm wondering ifanyone out there 
knows what's going on at Harts Hill. 
There's nowhere to go sledding 
around here and that's the best 
place for kids. My kids went there 
recently on a beautiful sledding day 
and it was closed. It's been closed 
for a week. Does anyone know 
what's going on? Our kids want to 
go sledding. 

Thanks for the memories 

Love ya, Antioch. Thank you for all 
your kindness and encouragement 
during my recent transition to an- 
other Jewel location. It has been my 
pleasure to have known and served 
you the last 17 years.— Sandy 

Awards, schwards 

How come the Lake Zurich police 
department keeps getting awards 
for silly things like scat belts and 



HOMEOWNERS-INSURANCE 



We've got 

youKstyle 




Apartment, mobile home, 
condo or castle . . .you won't 
be In the doghouse with 

American Family 

homeowners Insurance. 

Call or stop In today. 



Jim Ccrmak Agency 
64 E. Grand Avo. 
Fox Lake. IL 
(847) 587-6900 




AMERICAN FAMILY 



INSURANCE 



AUTV HOMt KSH.SS HlAWt Ufl *»*£Bf~ 

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child safety car scats when we in 
the village don't get our speed lim- 
it enforced? Do you think these 
fuzzy awards are making us feel 
better? We want to feel safe for our 
children In our residential streets. 
That's the least we should expect 
from our police force. 

Lake Zurich 

Take care of dogs 

We live In Antioch In Heron Harbor 
subdivision. This is the second 
week in a row that two Bassett 
hounds have been running around. 
This is very careless. One day 
they're not going to come back. You 
people had better keep track of 
your animals! 

Antioch 

Disappointed 

In response to "Riverboat water dis- 
placement" on Jan. 30, If you were 
making soup and the vegetables 
were boiling over, what would hap- 
pen when you add the roast? We 
were hoping for an intelligent an- 
swer. We're disappointed. 

Fox Lake 

Excuuuse me! 

In his letter to the editor, zoning ad- 
ministrator Ray Wocffel characterizes 
the efforts of those of us living around 
the Valley Lakes subdivision to modi- 
fy the dcssimaiion and destruction go- 
ing on around us as a "quixotic foray 
into other communities and an affront 
to the neighbors' lives Into which they 
arc Intruding." 

Excuse me, Mr. Wocffel, your rich 
developer friends are Intruding Into 
our lives. It is the Village of Round 
Lake who is an outsider in our neck 
of the woods. It is my yard, not 
yours, that will flood every spring 
due to uncontrolled development 
across the street, my ears that are 
assaulted by the "beep, beep" or 
construction vehicles, and the 
•j- peace and serenity of my environ- 
ment destroyed forever. 

Your me-first, to-hell-wlth-the- 
other-guy attitude Is the problem, 
not the legitimate concerns of those 
of us who have to live every day 
with the consequences of the self- 
ish, short-sighted and greedy deci- 
sions of politicians who live on the 
other side of town, far removed 
from the mayhem and congestion 
that they are creating. 

Unincorporated Round Lake 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
PRIVATE FOUNDATION 
ANNUAL RETURN 
Pursuant to Section 6104(d) of iho 
Intornal Rovenuo Code, notice is here, 
by given that iho onnual return tor Iho 
fiscal yoar ended September 30, 1997, 
of Iho Wagner Family Foundation, a 
private foundation, is available at the 
foundation's principal offico for inspec- 
tion during regular business hours by 
any citizen who requests it within 180 
days afior Iho dato of tfiis publication. 
Tho foundation's principal oflico is 
located at 600 Contral Avenue, Suite 
365. Highland Park. IL 60035. Tho 
principal manager ol iho foundation is 
Susan Wagner at (847) 432-3666. 

0298A-1577B-GEN 
February 6. 1998 




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t 525 Atkinson Road, Grayslake 847-223-7541 ♦ 





MINDING 
YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 

Don TaykT 



The number 
you have 
reached... 



On March 10, 1876, Alexan- 
der Graham Bell hooked 
up the first two tele- 
phones and made the 
world's first phone call. Today, tele- 
phone users place more than a bil- 
lion calls every day In America. 
Small-business owners are 
heavy telephone users. Some are 
abusers and misusers. Like other 
technology, the telephone can in- 
crease your productivity and prof- 
itability if used properly. However, 
it can cost you time, frustration and 
customers if used incorrectly. Here 
are some tips for improving your 
business on the telephone. 

21 Telephone Tips 

• Answer the phone prompt- 
ly. Answering on the first or second 
ring is fine. Answering on the third 
ring is sloppy, and four rings or 
more is annoying. 

• Identify yourself. Whether 
you are making the call or answer- 
ing the phone, let people know who 
you are. It is professional and cour- 
teous. 

♦Put a smile In your voice. 
You'll win friends and boost your 
company's image. 

• Speak slowly and clearly. 
Speak distinctly and never talk with 
food in your mouth. 

• Be willing to help. Take 
time to ensure that each caller finds 
what he or she is looking for. 

• Be a good listener. Stay 
alert and ask for clarification if there 
arc any points you don't under- 
stand. 

• Give the caller your undi- 
vided attention. Don't try to do 
two things at once. Paying attention 
can help you gain new customers 
and retain old ones. 

• Keep a pad and pen handy. 
Take good notes: Did you quote a 
price? Make an appointment? 
Promise a delivery? Write it down. 

• Take messages effectively. 
Train everyone who answers the 
phone to get at least the following 
basic information every lime: the 
caller's name, company and phone 
number, the time and date, the 
message and any required action. 

• Return calls promptly. A 
quick return increases the odds of 
completing the call. It also shows 
interest on your part. 

• Place your own calls. This 
saves time. It also makes the other 
person feel that you value his or her 
lime. 

• Place each call carefully. 
Look up the number, jot it down 
and dial deliberately. 

• Answer your own calls. 
There may be times when urgent 
priorities prevent you from taking 
calls. However, if you are accepting 
calls, answer your own phone. 

• Prepare for Important 
calls. Ust critical points to cover, 
questions to ask or information to 
gain. You waste time, and may ap- 
pear foolish if you have to call back 
because you forgot to ask a ques- 
tion. 

• Choose your words care- 
fully. Know how to say what you 
want to say. Practice how you want 
to tackle tough topics. 

■ Avoid " turn-ofT" phrases: 
Instead of "You have to..." say, "If 
you will..." Always be positive and 
polite. 

• Keep a "hot Ust" We all have 
numbers we call frequently. Keep a 
short list of those numbers you 
need frequently, but don't have 
memorized. 

Please see J/KYtOH /C8 



Februarys, 1998 




Lakeland Newspapers / C 




Book examines workplace privacy controversy 



What privacy rights to employ- 
ees have on the job? Do employers 
have the right to search desks, read 
an employee's E-mail, or monitor 
telephone calls? Can an employer 
tell employees who to date or how 
to dress? How far can employers go 
when conducting workplace 
searches, surveillance or investiga- 
tions? The answers to these ques- 
tions and many more are covered 
in a new book released by AMA- 
COM Books, division of American 
Management Association, entitled 
•"The New Battle Over Workplace 
Privacy," written by management 
consultant and author William S. 
Hubbartt 

Hubbam Is president of Hub- 
bartt & Associates, a St. Charles hu- 
man resources management con- 
sulting firm and author of four man- 
agement books. 

Workplace privacy issues pit em- 
ployees against their employers in a 
tug-of-war over where employer 
rights to control the business end 



and employee privacy rights begin. 
"The NewBattle Over Workplace Pri- 
vacy" provides critical Information to 
sort out the delicate legal and com- 
plex human resource Issues of work- 
place privacy. 

"The NewBattle Over Workplace 
Privacy" exposes examples of outra- 
geous employer conduct found to be 
an invasion of employee privacy 
rights, such as: 

• Requiring an employee to strip 
to her underwear in a store rest room 
to satisfy a customer complaint 
about lost cash; 

• Firing an employee because of 
a dating relationship; 

• Conducting surveillance of an 
employee's affair in a motel room; 

• Refusing to promote a woman 
because of her dress and appear- 
ance; 

• Blocking employee exit from a 
company parking lot to conduct a 
search of employee cars for drugs; 

• Revealing an individual's pri- 
vate medical information to co- 



workers; and, 

• Installing a listening device in 
an employee break room and listen- 
ing to employee conversations. 

Hubbartt's new book examines 
privacy issues related to searches 
and surveillance, drug testing, use of 
psychological and polygraph tests, 
employer intercepting of E-mail 
messages, supervisor monitoring of 
employee telephone calls, employer 
handling of personnel and medical 
records, employer dress codes, and 
management attempts to control 
employee dating, secondary em- 
ployment and other off work activi- 
ties. In all, some 39 workplace priva- 
cy issues are examined in 262 easy to 
read pages. 

In "The New Battle Over Work- 
place Privacy," over 55 actual em- 
ployee privacy invasion cases are 
used to reveal the human side of em- 
ployer intrusions into private lives of 
their employees. The book identifies 
what privacy rights employees actu- 
ally have by providing highlights of 



federal laws, state laws, common law 
privacy invasion concepts, and limi- 
tations imposed by the U.S. Consti- 
tution. 

Complex privacy Issues arc ana- 
lyzed In a practical manner identify- 
ing just how far management can go. 
"The New Battle Over Workplace Pri- 
vacy" contains numerous check lists, 
sample policies, forms, and suggest- 
ed employee communications tips 
to minimize conflict, confusion, and 
litigation. 

Author Hubbartt provides the 
reader with numerous management 
guidelines and recommended poli- 
cies and suggested procedures to re- 
solve complex privacy Issues in a way 
which avoids costly legal liabilities 
and promotes good employee rela- 
tions. 

The New Battle Over Workplace 
Privacy" is available at a list price of 
$27.95 through book stores and di- 
rectly from AMACOM Books, 
SaranacLake, N.Y., 1 -800-262-9699 
or by fax at (5 18J 89 1-3653. 



Great Clips 
now making 
waves in Round 
Lake Beach 



Great Clips, the fastest growing 
haircarc franchise, is now cutting Its 
way to Round Lake Beach. 

Bryncorpz, Ltd., Franchisee^) of 
Great Clips, arc pleased to announce 
the rcccn t opening of their new salon 
Rollins Crossing, next to Super K- 
mart and Hollywood Video. 

"Our goal at Great Clips is to pro- 
vide our customers with the very best 
service and value in the hair care in- 
dustry without the unnecessary high 
cost," said Baruk Toledan, who al- 
ready owns a salon in Algonquin. 

"Our stylists and managers are 
not only licensed by the state, but 
they have completed advanced 
training at our local training cen- 
ter, where we emphasize the im- 
portance of giving customers what 
they want." 

This salon is the 64th in the Great 
Clips Chicago market and one of 
over 1,000 in the Great Clips system. 
The successful Minneapolis, based 
company expects to have between 
300 and 400 units In operation by 
year end. 




Power Breakfast 

Lake County Recorder of Deeds Mary Ellen Vanderventer, right, answers questions from the audi- 
ence as Lake County Coroner Barbara Richardson and Clerk of Lake County Salty Deadrick Coffelt 
listen on during the February Lake County Power Breakfast featuring women in politics at Midlane 
Country Club in Wadsworth Tuesday.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



Great Lakes Credit Union fundraiser a success 



Thanks to the added support of 
its members, Great Lakes Credit 
Union (GLCU) made a record- 
breaking contribution of over 
$2,800 to the Central Baptist Chil- 
dren's Home this past holiday sea- 
son. For the past 20 years, GLCU 
and its employees have raised 
funds to provide holiday gifts and 
everyday necessities for the kids. 
Credit union members responded 
generously when GLCU asked them 
to help "brighten a child's holiday." 

Great Lakes Credit Union em- 
ployees, eager to volunteer, shopped 
for gifts on the wish lists of 75 chil- 
dren during the holiday rush. Links 



were displayed in GLCU branches 
for every dollar donated by a mem- 
ber. GLCU raised other contribu- 
tions throughout the year with alu- 
minum can and paper recycling re- 
bates, candy bar sales and employee 
donations. Great Lakes Credit Union 
also donated $500. 

Located in Lake Villa, the Central 
Baptist Children's Home provides 
residential and foster care, adoption 
services, community based youth 
services, and counseling for children 
and families in need. 

Established in 1938, Great Lakes 
Credit Union has $277 million in as- 
sets and over 100,000 members. 



8th annual Construction Safety Conference set 



The Construction Safety Council 
will sponsor the 8th Annual Construc- 
tion Safety Conference on Feb. 17-17 
at the Holiday Inn O'Harc Interna- 
tional, 5440 N. River Rd., Rosemont. 



Registration and continental breakfast 
begins at 6a.m. Feb. 17 and on Feb. 18 
and 19, registration begins at 7 a.m. 

For more information, call (708) 
449-0200. 




Great Lakes Credit Union employee Debbie Flores (left) presents 
Central Baptist Children's Home Executive Vice President for Fund 
Development, Ron Ovitt, a check while delivering holiday gifts for 
the children.— Submitted photo 



C8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



February 6, 1998 



PEOPLE IN THE NEWS 



Graham named 
assistant director 

Samuel Graham, Jr. of North Chica- 
go has been named assistant director 
of financial aid at Ripon College in 



Ripon, Wis. 

Graham has previous experience in fi- 
nancial aid as the loan coordinator at Clark 
Atlanta University in Georgia, among other 
positions. 




Graham 



WeIcome 
WAqoN 

Has useful gifts and helpful 
information for you... 

ALL FREE! 

Just Engaged? 
New Parent? Moved? 



Grayslake 
Wlldwood 

Kim Linda 

566-9536 223-1607 



Gurnee 

Marylyn 
336-3258 



Lake Zurich 

Anne 
540-5790 



Libertyville 

Linda 
573-9522 



Vernon Hills 

Doris 
680-7276 



You arc entitled to a complimen- 
tary subscriplbn from your 
hometown newspaper. To 
receive your paper, conlact your 
Welcome Wagon representative 
or call Lakeland Newspapers at 
(847)223-8161. 




MR 




Own your own 
Sears store 

Forget the rest.. .own the best! 

Sears Dealer Stores-one of America's fastest growing 

retail chains with more than 450 stores nationwlde- 

is now looking for an exceptional individual to 

own and operate a new store in 

Insert Market Name Here 

• America's top brand names in 
appliances, electronics, hardware and 

lawn & garden equipment 

• Top-notch professional training 

• Extensive market and advertising support 
•Outstanding income potential 



For additional information, 
interested parlies should call toll free 

1-888-259-2616 

Interviews will be held in 
the near future 




**The store you ktiovc 
is note close to /ionic" 



COUPON 



[Family Meal Deal 

X-Large Thin Crust Pizza 

2 Toppings 

Family Salad 

2 Order's of Spaghetti or 

Mostaccioli with Meat or 

Marinara Sauce and a 

6 pack of Soda 

S4A95 



19 



Meatball *t50 extra 

Sausage U.75 extra 

Valid Grayslake Only 



50% off 

Max. * 5 off 

Any Pizza 

Any Style 

Pick Up or 

Delivery Only. 

Lunch or 

Dinner. 

Not to be used with any other 
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One coupon per order. 



Dinner Meal Pea fi 1 

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X-Large Thin 

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2 Toppings 

Family Salad for Two 

8 pack of Soda 
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Not to be used with any other 

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_ _coupon p.qrj>rder _ 



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now Serving Beer and Wine In Our Dining Room 




Restaurant & Pizzeria 



Established In Shohlc In 1958 
Fine Kalian family Dining • Mow Serving You In Two Locations 
Open 7 Days • We Deliver • Open for Lunch * 1 1 am to I I pm 

Except Sunday 10pm 



Featuring, our famous stuffed, pan * thin crust pUras. all homemade Hat 
Call for discount Fatty and ISuslncss Qathcrings, and different 
All awHl cnnls ncccptcd for delivery. Cntifxicts valid at cither 1oc.il km. unlove noted. Musi 



r In Honor of LaRosa's 
New Grayslake 
Location 

Any Competitor's 

Coupon will be 

honored for 
Lunch or Pinner. 

Pick UPs Delivery or Pine la 

As Grand Opening Special 

Not to be used with any other 
discounts or coupons. 
One coupon per order. 



Up To 
$6 Off 

with Purchase 
of 2 Dinners. 

Dinner Time Only. 

Not to be used with any other 
discounts or coupons. 
One coupon per order. 



'an specialties and sauces. 

lightly Specials. 

mention coii|>oii when onlrrlitij. 



2 Chicken Vesuvio 

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Si 295 



13 



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FINANCIAL FOCUS 

Be responsible with 
your 401(k) 



The 401 (k): It might sound like a 
top-secret code name, but in fact, it's 
one of the most popular and well- 
known ways to save for retirement. 

With -101 (k) plans, wage earners 
can contribute boforc-tax dollars to a 
retirement account. Employers like 
401 (k) plans because they're not sub- 
ject to many of the federal regulations 
and penalties imposed on tradition- 
al retirement plans. Employees like 
<101(k)s because they provide more 
investment flexibility. 

Along with flexibility, however, 
comes responsibility. Employees — 
many of whom have limited invest- 
ing experience — face important de- 
cisions with their 401 (k) plans. 

One of the biggest mistakes indi- 
viduals make with 401(k) plans is 
treating them like short-term trading 
vehicles. Because of 40l(k}s* tax- 
sheltered status, some individuals 
use them in an attempt to jump out 
of equities at the top of the market 
and hop back in at the bottom. Pro- 
fessionals call it market timing but 
know it's almost impossible to do. 

Besides, market timing is a tech- 
nique based on short-term expecta- 
tions— yet theobjective of 401 (k) in- 
vesting is retirement. That alone in- 
dicates a long-tenn focus. 



It's also important to remember 
that your 401 (k) is only part of your 
portfolio. As such, it should be in- 
cluded in your overall investment 
plan when considering the proper al- 
location of assets. A balanced portfo- 
lio includes a mix of equities, bonds 
and money market funds. Some of 
these investments arc more appro- 
priate for401(k) plans than others. 

For example, growth stocks, eq- 
uity mutual funds and corporate 
bonds that can add capital gains and 
income to a portfolio are typical in- 
vestments to shelter within a 401 (k). 
Cash investments such as money 
market funds and CDs can better 
serve you outside a 401 (k). These are 
shorter-tenn vehicles that allow you 
to withdraw cash for emergencies or 
other needs. 

While 401 (k) plans are not de- 
signed for short-term needs, some 
plans allow employees to borrow 
from their 401 (k)s. Before you make 
such a move, be sure you understand 
the true cost of doing so. 

When it comes to saving for re- 
tirement, 401 (k) plans are one of the 
best deals going. They offer flexibili- 
ty and choices, but it's important to 
be well-informed and responsible in 
making those choices. 



Employees want the reviews 



For most employees, no news is- 
n't necessarily good news. Today's 
workers want feedback, even though 
it may only come in the fonn of job re- 
views. According to the results of a 
new nationwide consumer survey, 
employees vtiluc performance ap- 
praisals, as 6G percent of respondents 
said that these sessions have a "favor- 
able impact" on their job motivation. 

Hie survey was developed by Of- 
ficeTeam, the world's leading 
staffing service specializing in highly 
skilled temporary office and admin- 
istrative professionals. It was con- 
ducted by an independent research 
firm and includes responses from 
685 men and women, all 18 years of 
age or older and employed. 

Survey respondents were asked: 
"In general, how do perfonnance ap- 
praisals impact your level of motiva- 
tion at your job?" Their responses: 

• Very favorable impact: 25 per- 
cent; 

• Somewhat favorable impact; 4 1 
percent; 

• No impact: 21 percent; 

• Somewhat unfavorable impact: 



3 percent; 

• Very unfavorable impact: 4 per- 
cent; and, 

• Don't know/ no answer: 6 per- 
cent. 

Diane Doincycr, executive director 
ofOmccTeajn, Slated Ihut mahrigerv 

sbould noi wait for year-end perfor- 
mance appraisals to provide this need- 
ed input. "Open and regular commu- 
nication is a major ingredient in creat- 
ing a positive corporate culture, which 
is paramount to many workers today. 
Retention of valued staff and improved 
productivity usually follow." 

Jennifer Agha, OfficeTeam's di- 
vision director, said, "Employees 
should capitalize on performance re- 
views as a forum to outline profes- 
sional goals and suggest how their 
departments might operate more ef- 
ficiently. In addition, they should be 
proactive In seeking feedback from 
supervisors on an ongoing basis." 

There are more t ban 175 Of- 
ficeTcam locations in the United 
Stales, Canada and Europe. The Of- 
ficeTcam web site is located at 
www.officeteam.com. 



NEW BUSINESSES 



Congratulations to the fol- 
lowing new Lake County busi- 
nesses: 

• Air So Pure, owned by Maire 
Moyer, 5791 Regency Ct., Gurnee. 



Call 247-1741. 

• To The Source Drapery Work- 
room, owned by Julia Woodruff- 
Chang. 7672 Camay Ct., Gurnee. Call 
548-2029. 



FROM PAGE C7 



TAYLOR: Tips for telephone use 



• Keep a phone book handy. 
Have a phone directory within 
reach for your own use as well as 
helping a caller find a number. 

• Use the hold button care- 
fully. If you have lo leave the line lo 
help a caller, let the person know 
why. Remember, the caller can't see 
what you're doing. If it takes more 
than 30 seconds, return to the line 
and update your progress. Offer to 
call back if you need to. 

• Leave good messages. 
When you must leave a message, 
make it as complete as possible. In- 



clude your name, work number, 
home number if appropriate and a 
good time to reach you. 

• Use the fox to request In- 
formation. When I have difficulty 
i caching something, I send a fax. I 
include the questions I need an- 
swers to, and request a fax back. It 
usually works. 

Don Taylor is the co-author of 
"Up Against the Wal-Marts." You 
may write to hint in care of "Mind- 
ing Your Own Business," P.O. llox 
67,Anmrilto. Tex., 70105. 



i-'ti 



M 



February 6, 1998 



BANK & FINANCE 




Lakeland Newspapers/ G9 



New 1998 tax laws could affect tax planning 



A number of Important tax 
changes were enacted that take ef- 
fect in 1998 and tax planning for 1998 
and future years. 

You may be able to claim a tax 
credit of $400 for each of your 
qualifying children under the age 
of 17. It might be a good idea for 
you to fill out a new Form W-4 and 
give it to your employer so you 
can get part of that credit In your 
paycheck instead of waiting until 
next year. 

More detailed information on 
this and other changes can be found 
in Publication 553, Highlights of 1 997 
Tax Changes. This publication is 
available free by calling 1-800-829- 
3676. 

A number of educational bene- 
fits also become available In 1998. 
These include: 

The Hope Scholarship credit will 
let people claim a credit up to S 1 ,500 
a year for a qualified student's first 
two years of post-sec ondary educa- 
tion expenses. Tills amount is based 
on 100 percent of the first $1,000 of 
tuition and fees (not books) and 50 
percent of the next SI ,000. 

Available after June 1998, the 
Lifetime Learning credit lets people 
claim 20 percent of the first $5,000 of 
post-secondary education expenses 
each year. The education includes 
graduate courses and any training to 
get or improve job skills. 

Dependents and married per- 
sons filing separate returns can't 
claim either credit. Both credits 
might be claimed in one tax year, but 



not for expenses related to the same 
person. For example, qualifying par- 
ents might claim me Lifetime Learn- 
ing credit for their own educational 
expenses and the Hope Scholarship 
credit for their child's second year In 
college. 

In addition to these new cred- 
its, people will be able to deduct in- 
terest paid after 1997 on higher-ed- 
ucation loans. The maximum de- 
duction is $1,000 in 1998, increas- 
ing $500 a year until it reaches 
$2,500 in 2001. People can take the 
deduction for interest paid on edu- 
cation loans for themselves, their 
spouse or dependents, but only for 
the first 60 months of loan pay- 
ments. 

Beginning in 1998, the adjusted 
gross income (AG!) used to phase 
out the EITC is changed. People will 
add to their AGI tax-exempt interest, 
nontaxable distributions from pen- 
sions and I RAs, and 75 percent of net 
losses from businesses (up from 50 
percent). 

Beginning in 1998, you will not 
have to make estimated tax pay- 
ments if you expect to owe less than 
$ 1 ,000 on your taxes. This is up from 
$500 in previous years. 

Starting in 1998, the estate tax ex- 
clusion will increase to $655,000, up 
from $600,000. It will step up to 
$650,000 in 1999, and keep on 
climbing until it tops off at $1 million 
in 2006. Each amount is the maxi- 
mum value of an estate that's tax free 
for that year. 

Special estate tax treatment ap- 



plies to qualified family-owned busi- 
nesses when the family owned busi- 
ness interests comprise more that 50 
percent of thevalue of the estate. For 
1998, the new provision excludes up 
to $675,000 of value in qualified fam- 
ily-owned business interests from a 
decedent's taxable estate. 

Other provisions kick in for 1999 
tax planning. Inflation adjustments 
will be made for the $10,000 annual 
gift tax exclusion, the $750,000 ceil- 
ing for the alternate valuation of 
farmland, the $1 million generation- 
skipping transfer tax exemption, and 
the $1 million eligible for the low-in- 
terest rate for extended payments on 
a closely held business. 

The "Roth IRA" features '^de- 
ductible contributions, wiuV.kx-free 
distributions if they begin at least ilve 
years after the initial contribution 
and you are at least age 59-1/2, or 
disabled, or a beneficiary, or the pro- 
cedure used for a first-time home 
purchase. 

If you have an AGI under 
$100,000 you can roll over a non- 
Roth IRA into a Roth IRA. You will 
have to pay tax as though they had 
withdrawn the funds, but there is 
no early withdrawal penalty. If the 
rollover takes place in 1998, the 
taxable amount is spread out over 
four years. That is, one-quarter of 
the taxable rollover is included in 
income in 1998, 1999, and so on. 
Married couples filing separate re- 
turns can't roll over into a Roth 
IRA. 

The "Education IRA," is not a 



retirement savings vehicle, but one* 
used to pay for qualified higher ed- 
ucation expenses of a designated 
beneficiary. It features nonde- 
ductible contributions up to $500 a 
year per beneficiary, with no tax on 
the earnings when used for higher 
education expenses. The beneficia- 
ry must be under age 18 when the 



contribution Is made. 

For people who want to tap into 
their non-Roth IRA s to help pay for 
qualified higher education expenses, 
they are allowed to do so. And first- 
time home buyers can withdraw up 
to $10,000 from their IRAs. In each 
case, they'll pay tax on the amount 
withdrawn, but no penalty. 



Where's my refund? 



By now, many of you have filed 
your 1997 Federal tax return and 
are patiently waiting for your re- 
fund. Generally, you should receive 
your refund within six weeks from 
the date your return is filed. The 
amount of time varies based on the 
method you used to file your return 
and how early you filed. 

For example, if you file a paper 
return in February, you'll usually 
receive your refund in about five 
weeks. File in March, and the time 
increases to six weeks. But if you file 
in April, the heaviest filing period, 
you may have to wait about eight 
weeks. 

Filing your return either by tele- 
phone, through an on-line comput- 
er service, or by using a computer- 
generated form called the 1040PC 
means faster processing of your re- 
turn, and faster processing means 
your refund arrives sooner. 

If it's been eight weeks since 



your return was filed, you can check 
on the status of the refund by call- 
ing our toll-free automated refund 
line at 1-800-829-4477. Be sure to 
have a copy of your tax return 
handy before you call so you can re- 
spond to questions. Refund infor- 
mation is updated once a week, so 
please wait seven days before call- 
ing again. 

I'm often asked why people 
have to wait eight weeks before call- 
ing to check on their refund. Let me 
explain. 

The best way to avoid the 
problem of lost or stolen refund 
checks, and to speed up a refund, 
is to request that your refund be 
directly deposited into your bank 
account. No matter how you file, 
it's easy to select Direct Deposit. 
Just check that option on your re- 
turn and provide the necessary in- 
formation. — by Robert VV. Brock, 
IRS District Director 



Svoeet \Deals 




% 

APY 



93 

Friendship CD 

17 Months • $1,000 Minimum 

Annual Percentage Yield (APY) Subject to Change without notice. 





— ^ 



LAKE COUNTY'S 





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Would you like lower } 
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one of our experts & you can find out 



Allows two free withdrawals per month. $5,000 minimum balance to ivoid icrvicc charge. APY may be affected 
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EOUU. HOUSHO 
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249-6312 



Mortgage Specialists Since 1919. 
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FIRST FEDERAL BANK, ®, 

Wholly Owned Subsidiary, Northern States Financial Corporation 




Highway 45 at Washlngtc 



iGrajslakc 847/548-3000- 



MAI N OFFICE LEWIS AVE. OFFICE GU RNEE OFFICE 

Madison at County St. 1428 North Lewis 5384 Grand Avenue 
Waukcgan, IL 60085 Waukcgan, II. 60085 Gumee, IL 60031 
(847) 623-0084 (847) 249-6307 (847)249-6312 



i«SE»nH^;a 8 t » 3 ia BMi«aaaaai«dK«w^>fcw w a * » q js»»gttgM* 



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C10/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OBITUARIES 



Februarys, 1998 



$&\ 



K.K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home Ltd. 



"■^t 




„ ..— —^•«>». ~ 



Excellent Service 

With Genuine 

Compassion and 

Sincerity Has Always 

Been a Tradition At 

The K.K. Hamsher 

Funeral Home. A 

Family Owned and 

Family Staffed 

Funeral Home... 

It's like having a friend.., 



12 N. Pistakee Lake Road, Fox Lake, 
1 Block West of Rte. 12 - 1/2 Block North of Grand Ave. 

".flff C/a/M'/on //(• Doit" 



(847)587-2100 



(815)385-1001 



DEATH NOTICES 



FOLK 

Thomas Folk, age 50 of take Villa 
Arr: Ringa Funeral Home, take VilUt 

NEMMERS 

Eugene Nemmcrs, age 03 of l.ake Villa 
Arr; Marsh Funeral Home of Undenhurst 

BALDWIN 

Vincenl C. Baldwin, age 95 of Libertyville 
Arr: Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, 
Libertyville 

BREIDEL 

Ernest R. Breidcl, age 65 of Antioch 
Arr: Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 

O'HALLORAN 

Devetra 'Pat' M. O'Halloran, age 00, of 

Hound Like 

Arr: Justen's Hound Lake Funeral Home 



BURENS 

Richard M. Burcns, age 57 of Gurnec 
Arr: Krlstnn Puncrnl Home, PC, 
Mundelcin 

BUDRIS 

Gerry M. Budris (nee Davis) age 55 of 

Libertyville 

Arr: McMunough Chapel, Libertyville 

DODGE 

Patrick W. Dodge, age 6! of libertyville 
Arr: Burnett -Dane Funeral Home, 
Ubertyville 

TUINSTRA 

Daniel Tuinstra, age 37 of Lindcnhurst 
Arr: Ringa Funeral Home, Lake Villa 

SABO 

Martin Sabo, age 70 of take County 
Arr; Ringa Funeral Home, Like Villa 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 

Funeral Directory 

K.K. HAMSHER FUNERAL HOME, LTD. 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Rd., Fox Lake, IL 

(847)587-2100 

Kenneth K. Hamsher, Debra Hamsher Glen, Directors 

RINGA FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2146 

Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL, LTD. 
AND CREMATORIUM 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake, IL 

(847) 223-8122 

David G, Strang and 

Richard A Gaddis, Director 

MARSH FUNERAL HOME 

1840 East Grand Ave., Lindcnhurst, IL 

(847)265-6611 

Gene J. Morani, Director 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

Dan Dugenske, Director 

(847) 395-4000 



James R. Couch 

Age 60 of Round Lake, formerly of Grayslake, passed 
avvny Thursday, Jan. 29, 1998 at Condcll Medical Center, 
Libertyville, He was bom in Polk County, Tenn. on Oct. 15, 
1937 and had made his home in Grayslake and Hound Lake 
areas over 43 years. He had been employed as an auto 
mechanic for many years and in later years he was a concrete 
carpenter In the building trades over 15 years. He was an avid 
stock car racer prominent in Illinois and Wisconsin circuits. 

He leaves his wife, Marilyn, (nee Foley), his son, Thomas 
(Debbie) Couch, Rockford; his aistcrs, Evelyn (Gil) Snell, 
Flagstaff, Ariz., Betty (Bob) Wells, S. Pittsburg, Tenn.; his 
brother, William (Barbara) Couch, Pcnsacola, Fla.; and his 
three grandchildren, Tiffany, Michelle and Tommy. He is pre- 
ceded in death by his parents John and )an Couch, his broth- 
er, Frank and his first wife, I jx Verne. 

Funeral services were offered at Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake widi the Rev. Scott Carey, 
Undenhurst, officiating. 

Interment was at Avon Centre Cemetery, Grayslake. 

Bernice 'Auntie' Sedlacek 

Age 79 of Mc Henry, died Jan. 24, 1990 at Heartland 
Nursing Home, Kalamazoo, Mich. Mrs. Sedlacek was born 
July 23, 1918 in Chicago, the daughter of Hannibal and 
Donatta (Manfredo) Greco. She worked for Zenith for 25 
years and was a member of the local catholic church. She 
enjoyed gardening, cooking and her dogs. . 

Surviving are, one sister, Carolyn Connena; one brother, 
Fred Greco, both of tas Angeles, Calif, and 18 nieces and 
nephews. She is preceded in death by her husband Joseph 
"I'ep", one sister and three brothers. 

There was no public visitation. Cremation took place. 

A memorial service will be held at a later date in McHenry. 

Memorials may be made to the donors choice. 

Arrangements were made by Bctzlcr Funeral Home, 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Bill J. Hentschel 

Age 78 of Spring Grove, passed away Wednesday, Jan. 20, 
199Q at Northern Illinois Medical Center, McHcnry, He was 
bom Aug. 20, 1919 in Chicago, die son of the late Oscar and 
Meta (Alwart) Hentschel. He moved to Antioch in 1969 and to 
Spring Grove in 1983. He was a member of St. Stephen 
Lutheran Church of Antioch He served in the \JS. Army 63rd 
Division during WWII and m as a life member of the VFVl Post 
4308 of Like Villa, a member and past commander of theVFW 
I\)st 2245 of Grayslake and a member of die Military Order of 
Cooties. He was very active widi die Antioch Senior Center and 
also a member of die council. Mr. Hentschel retired in 1975 as 
Display Manager after 35 years of service widi Scars Roebuck. 
On Oct 26, 1940, he married FJizabcdi Grcsens in Chicago. 

Survivors include his wife, Betty; two children, Diane 
(Bryan) Krausc of Beach Park and Bill (Char) Hentschel of 
Hampshire. He was the grandfather of Bill, Mark and Heather. 

Funeral services were held at .the Strang Funeral Home 
of Antioch, Antioch with Pastor Clmrles Miller of St. Stephen 
Lutheran Church, Antioch, officiating. 

Interment will be private. 

In lieu of flowers, those desiring may make contribu- 
tions lo the Antioch Senior Center in his memory. 

Esther J. Andersen 

Age 72 of Antioch, passed away Thursday, Jan. 29, 1998 at 
her home. She was bom May 9, 1925 In Winter, Wis., die 
daughter of die late Louis and Victoria (Hubcr) tangly. She 
has lived in Antioch area since 1930. Mrs. Andersen was a 
member of St. PeterChurch of Antioch and die AARR She had 
worked for 30 years as an assembler in die purchasing depart- 
ment at the Benedictine Monastery at Benet Lake, Wis. On 
Nov. 21 , 1943, she married Gorman Andersen in AnUoch. 

Survivors include her husband, Gorman; one daughter, 
Mary (diaries) Lchmann of Lake Vtlla and one brother, Bill 
Horton ofWaukegan. She was die grandmodicr of Barliara and 
Charles. She is preceded in deadi by one daughter, Barbara Ijcc 
Andersen on Aug, 17, 1 96 1; one brodier, Lester tangly on March 
23, 1 983 and one sister, 'Ihelma Purdom on March 13, 1952. 

Funeral services were held at the Strang Funeral Home 
of Antioch. 

Interment will be at Mt. Carmel Cemetery, Antioch. 

Those desiring may make contributions to the Antioch 
Hcscue Squad in her memory. 

Margaret Mary Schamal 

Age 92 of Grayslake, passed away Wednesday, Jan. 28, 
199B at the Winchester House Care Facility In libertyville. 
She was bom Nov. 17, 1905 in Buckman, Minn, and had 
made her home in Grayslake. She was a member of the St. 
Gilbert Cadiolic Church in Grayslake. 

She leaves four daughters, Marjoric (Wallace) Morrell of 
Zephyr Hills, Ha., Florene Bohan, I'ark City, Marian (David) 
JwinaofCrestwood, Ky, Mildred (William) Dean of Flgin and 
her sons Rrvin (Hcdy) Schamal of Mundelcin and Morris 
(Mary) Schamal of Hound take Beach; 19 grandchildren and 
eight great grandchildren. She is preceded in death by her 
husband, Henry G. In 1978; six sisters and her parents. 

Mass of the Resurrection was held at St. Gilbert Cadiolic 
Church, Grayslake widi Rev. August Bclauskas, officiating. 

Friends visited at the Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake 

Interment was held at Ascension Cemetery In libertyville. 

Irma A. Kazmierczak (nee Novatna) 

Age B4 of Wildwood, passed away Sunday, Jan. 25, 1998 
at the St. Thcrese Medical Center in Waukegan, She was born 
Jan. 13, 1914 in Yoakum, Tex. and had made her home in 
Wildwood the past 20 years. Itirmeriy of Gmndwood Park 
and Dearborn, Mich. 

She leaves her daughter, Fileen (John) Kicrna of 
Wildwood; her son, IjouIs (Nancy) Phillips of Oregon City, 
Ore. nnd grandchildren, Shelley and Johnny Kierna. She Is 
preceded in death by her husband, Henry J. in 1974. 

Funeral blessing was held at the Strang Funcrai Qwpel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake widi the Rev. Tom Hefermat 
of die St. Gilbert Catholic Church of Grayslake officiating. 

Interment was privately held at the St. Hcdwig 
Cemetery, Dearborn, Mich. 

Memorials may be given to the St. Gilbert Catholic 
Church in her memory. 



Gertrude Julia Adldns (nee Lund) 

Age 79, a longtime resident of Inglesidc, formerly of Dcs 
Piaincs, died Tuesday, Jan. 27, 1998 in Woodstock, She was 
bom on May 9, 1918 in Chicago to Otto and Louisa Lund, 
and had been a housewife in her home. She had been a for- 
mer member of the Hound Lake Community Church and 
had been a member of the Church's Women Club. 

Survivors include, one son, Otto (Liesa) Adkins of 
Richmond; one daughter, Jean Lund of Inglcside; three 
grandsons, Jeffery (Kim) Swem of Ihiddock Lake, Wis., Lorry 
Fcldton of Dcs Plaines, and Patrick Adkins of Richmond; six 
grand daughters, Tammy (Tim) Conklln of Trevor, Wis, 
Kimbcrly (Darrcll) Dodd of Beach Park, Sherry, Barbara and 
Heather Fcldton all of Dcs Plaines, Meghan Adkins of 
Richmond. Also three great grandsons, Timothy, Daniel 
Conklln and Jacob Swem of Paddock Lake, Wis.; three great 
grand daughters, Stephanie and Jessica Dodd of Beach Park 
and Amber Swem of Paddock Lake, Wis,; one brother, Harry 
Ixind and one sister, Florence Nelscn, both of Like Mary, Fla. 
She is preceded in death by her late husband, Harvey B. 
Adkins Jr., Feb. IB, 1987 and by two daughters, Barbara 
Hansen in 1971 and by Shirley Fcldton in 1993. 

Friends called at die K. K. Hamsher Funeral Home, Fox 
Lake (The Chape] on the Uke) with the Rev. Nathan 
Anderson, officiating. 

Interment was at Oakridge/Glcn Oak Cemetery in Hillside. 

Jerry B. Templeman 

Age 70 of fox \jakc, passed away Friday, Jan. 30, 1998 at 
Condell Medical Center in libertyville. He was bom, June 30, 
1927 in Oak Park, the son of John and Bertha Templeman, and 
had been a resident of Fox Like since 1972. He was a busi- 
nessman and owner oFTcmplcman Industries, North Chicago. 

He is survived by his wife, Helen (ncc Bell); son, Scott 
(Mlria) Templeman, of Waukegan three grandchildren, Sean 
Templeman, Sarah and Bobby Sweets ir. He is preceded in 
death by his parents. 

Funcml services were held at the Strang Funeral Qiapd and 
Crematorium, I Jd, Grayslake with the Rev. lisle J. Kaufhnan of 
Calvary Presbyterian Church, Round I jike, officiating. 

Interment was at Highland Memorial Park, Ubertyville. 

Bessie R Garnsey 

Age 95 of Lake Forest, died Friday, Jon. 31, 199B at her 
home. She was bom July 15, 1902 in Milwaukee, Wis. Mrs. 
Garnsey was a retiree of Marshall Field and Co. of Chicago, 
where she had been employed for over 40 years. 

She is survived by her daughter, Barbara (Ronald) Adkins 
of Uke Forest; her grandson, Reid (Mary) Adkins of Omaha, 
Neb.; her nephew, Robert (Virginia) Turner of Lake Forest and 
her great niece and nephew, Rhonda and Raymond. 

Funeral services were held at McMurrough Chapel 
Ubertyville 

Interment wa« nt Forest Home Cemetery, Foreu Pnrlc 

tn Ucu of flowers, contribution's were rcque»ieu »« ■*-- 
made to tathcran Church of the Holy Spirit; Attn: Church 
Organ Fund, 30 RJvcrwoods Rd., Uncolnshlrc, IL. G00I5. 

Wallace IL Eden 

Age 77, a resident of Fox I^ke for the past 23 years, for- 
merly of Chicago, died Thursday, Jan. 29, 1998 in Zion. He 
was born on Oct. 5, 1920 and was a Veteran of the U.S. navy, 
having been in the Sea Bee's during WWII, and was a mem- 
ber of die VFW of McHenry, a member of the Moose Lodge 
691 of McHenry, a member of the Lutheran Church of All 
Saints in Fox take. Mr. Eden had served an apprenticeship 
widi Delta Star and had been employed with Jurin and Assoc, 
in Franklin Park, for over 20 years as a Sales Engineer before 
his retirement in 1987. 

Survivors include, his wife, Ullle Eden (nee Lundman) of 
Fox Lake; two sons, Scott Eden of McHenry and Mark 
(Sandy) Eden of Chicago; two grandchildren, James Wyatt 
Eden and Amanda EliTabcdi Eden, both of Chicago; one 
brother, Alvin (Betty) Eden of Flippln, Ark. Many nieces, 
nephews and cousins also survive. He Is preceded in death 
by his parents, and by two brothers, Jnmes and Orville Eden. 

Friends of die family may call Saturday, Feb. 7, 1998; 1030 
a.m. at die Iiitheran Church of All Saints, 5800 State I'ark Rd., 
Fox luke, IL 00020, where Memorial Services will be conduct- 
ed at 1 1 a.m. widi the Rev. Nadian Anderson, officiating. 

Memorials for die Ludieran Church of All Saints, or for 
the American Cancer Society, 1300 N.Skokic Hwy, Suite 104, 
Gurnec, IL, 60031-2145, will be appreciated by the family. 

Arrangements were completed by die K, K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home, Fox Lake (The Chapel on the Lake). 



Strang Funeral Chapel 
& Crematorium, Ltd. 




FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED 

100 YEARS 

OF DEDICATED SERVICE 

1898-1998 

410 East Belvidere Road 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

847-223-8122 

David G. Strang • Richard A. Gaddis 

Aaron G. Stincr 

Directors 



XB3 



February 6, 1998 



LEGAL NOTICES 



Lakeland Newspapers/ 01 1 




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PUBLIC NOTICE 

FISHER AND FISHER RLE NO. 3242S 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 

FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 

EASTERN DIVISION 

Dank of America, FSB, 

Plaintiff, Case No. 97 C 501 8 

Judge GOTTSCHALL 
VS. 

Stephen P. Sirevicius and Linda M. Pinkus, 
Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR RLE NO. 32426 

(IT 13 ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement entered in the above entitled 

cause on Octobers!. 1997. 

I. Thomas Johnson and Tina Douglas, Special Commissioner for this court win on March 
18, 1998 at the hour of 1 JO p.m. at the front door of Lake County Court House, 18 N. 
County Street. Waukegan, Illinois, sen to the highest bidder for cash, the following 
described premises: 

Lot 350 Except that Part Described as Follows: Beginning el the Southwest Corner of 
said Lot; Thence North 17 Degrees - 14 Minutes- 00 Seconds East along the West Una of 
said Lot, CO. 54 Feel; Thence South 72 Degrees • 46 Minutes • 00 Seconds East along a 
Line that Extends Through the Confer of a Common Wad, 1 10.02 Feet to the Easterly Line 
of said Lot; Thence Southerly along said Easterly Line, Being a Curved Line Concave 
Easterly and having a Radius of 330.00 Feet an Arc Distance of 48.17 Feet to the Southeast 
Corner of said Lot (the Chord of said Arc Bears South 13 Degrees - 55 Minutes - 01 
Seconds West, 48.13 Feet); Thence North 80 Degrees - 05 Minutes • 29 Seconds West, 
along the Southerly Lino of said Lot, 1 13.82 Feet, to the Place of Beginning, In Country 
Walk Unit 9, Being a Subdivision in the Southeast 1/4 of Section 8 and the Southwest 1/4 
of Section 9, Township 45 North, Range 10, East of the Third Principal Meridian, According 
to the plat Thereof Recordod July 1 5, 1993 as Document Number 3365571 and Certificate 
of Correction Recordod December 28 . 1 993 as Document 3460661 in Lake County, Illinois, 
c/k/a 28 W. Honeysuckle Lano. Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 
Tax ID* 00-09-310-054 

The improvements on the property consist of single family, wood frame, two story and 
attached garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, certified funds. No 
refunds. The sale shall be subject to general taxes and to special assessments. 
The property will NOT be open lor inspection. 
The judgmonl amount was S147.41 1 .55. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser wiS receive a Certificate of Salo which will entitle 

the purchaser to a Doed on a specified date unless the property is redeemed according io law. 

Fa Information cal the Sate Officer at PlaintsTs Attorney. Fisher and Fohcr, 30 North LaSallo, 

CNcago, flnoto. (31 2) 372-4764 from 1 :0O p m. to 300 p/n. Under EInoe taw, the Sales Officer 

is QQl required to provide additional W ormation other than that set forth in thb Notice. 

/s/ Thomas Johnson and Tina Douglas 

Special Commissioner 

0298A-1562 - RL 

February 8, 1998 

February 13, 1998 

February 20, 1998 

February 27, 1998 

PUBUC NOTICE 
PUBLISHERS CERTIFICATE 
10413 
Account Number 

CONSOLIDATED REPORT OF CONDmON Including domestic and foreign subskHanea 
and foreign branch** of Stale u*fik ol the t_nw*» located in Antioch, Hanoi* at the data o< 
tx/OTM4 D*c«HT>twr 31. 1007. Pubfahad tn Rmpoom to Cal of the OFFICE OF BANKS 
AKO REAL ESTATE of the SUla of Illinois. 

BALANCE SHEE T 

(THOUSANDS) 
ASSETS 

1. Cash and balances due from depository instrtutiona: 

a. Noninteresl' bearing balances and cunency and coin ...7,917 fa. 

b. Interest-bearing balances. „. „33 l.b. 

2. Securities: 

o. Hekl-lo-mdiurity securities „ 19,401 2 it. 

tx Available for- salo securities ......63,192 2.0. 

3. Federal funds sold and securities purchased 

under agreements to resell „ .....6.000 3 

4. Loans and lease financing receivables: 

a. Loans and leases, net of unearned income 

(Irom Schedule RC-C) 179,343 4a. 

b LESS: Allowance tor loan and lease losses. „ 1,787 4.h. 

c. LESS: Allocated transfer risk reserve J.c. 

d Loans and leases, net of unearned income, allowance 

and reserve (Hem 4.a. minus 4b. and 4.a).. 177,556 4.d 

5. Trading Assets „.„.„„.„„„..„._.....,.„„...„. .0 5. 

6. Premises and lixtui assets (including capitalized leases) 5,706 6. 

7. Other reel estate owned ... 26 7. 

8. Investments In unconsolidated subsidiaries & 

associated companies .......0 8. 

9. Customers' liability to this bank on acceptances outstanding 9. 

10. Intangible assets 239 10. 

11. Other assets - 3.121 11. 

1Z o. Total Assets (sum of items 1 through 11) 283,193 12.a. 

b. Losses deferred pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1S23Q) ........ .0 t2.b. 

c. Total assets and losses dolerrod pursuant 

10 12 U.S.C. 1B23Q) (sum of items 12.a. and 12,b) 283,193 12.c 

LIABILITIES 

13. Deposits: 

o. In domestic offices — 244.195 I3.a. 

(1) Nonlnterostbeartng 28.467 13.&(1) 

(2) Interest-bearing , „ .215.728 I3.a.(?) 

b. In foreign offices, Edge and Agreement 

Subsidiaries, and IBFs - f3.b. 

(1) Nonlmeresl-beajing '3-0.(1/ 

(2) Interest-bearing „... f 3b (?) 

14. Federal funds purchased and securities sold 

under agreements to repurchase „,„ .. 10,785 14. 

15. a. Demand notes issued to the U.S. Treasury 15 a 

b Trading liabilities , ~ 1S.tx 

16. Other borrowed money (includes mortgage 
indebtedness and obligations under capitalized leases): 

a. With remaining maturity of one year or less „ .....0 16.0. 

b. With remaining maturity of more than one year 

through three years ....0 16b. 

c. With a remaining maturity ol more than three years ...0 NJ.c. 

17. Not applicable 

18. Bank's liability on acceptances executed and outstanding 18. 

19. Subordinated notes and debentures . 

20. Other liabilities..... - 2.163 

21. TOTAL LIABILITIES (sums of 13 through 20) 257,143 

22. Not applicable 

EQUITY CAPITAL 

23. Perpetual preferred stock and related surplus 

24. Common stock 993 

25. Surplus (exclude all surplus related to preferred stock)...... .........16,507 

26. a. Undivided profits and capital reserves ....8,212 

b Not unrealised holding gains (losses) on 

available 'for- solo securities .......338 

27. Cumulative foreign currency translation adjustments „ 

28. a. Total equity capital (sum of Hems 23 through 27) ........28.050 

b Losses deferred pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1823Q) -.0 

c. Total equity capital and losses deferred pursuant 

to 12 U.S.C. 1823(j) (sum of items 28 o, end 28b) 20.050 

29. Total kabitrties, equity capital, and losses deterred 

pursuant to 12 USC. 1823(fl (sum of items 21 and 28 C.J283.193 29. 

I, Roger V. Manderscheid, Ewcutrve VP, of the above-named bank, do hereby certify that this 
report of condlon is correct and complete to the best of my knowledge and beief. 

Correct - Attest: /s/Rogcr V. Manderscheid 

0298A-1570-AN 

February 6, 1998 



26b. 
27. 
28a. 
28b. 

28.C 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 

ON AVON TOWNSHIP 

ROAD DISTRICT BUDGET 

Notice Is hereby given that a Tentata* 

Budget & Appropriation Ordnance for the 

operations of Avon Township in the County 

of Lake. Slate of Illinois, for (he fiscal year 

beginning March 1, 1MB and ending 

February 28, 1999 to on We and convenient. 

ty available to public inspector! at Avon 

Township Center, 433 E Washington, Round 

Lake Parte, Illinois between the hours of 0.00 

a.m t io 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. 

Further notice is hereby given that the 
final public hearing and action on this orov 
nance wiU be taken at a meeting to be held 
at Avon Township Center at 3:00 p.m. 
Monday. March 9, 1998. 

Kathleen M. Lennon 

Avon Township Clerk 

0296A-156e-RUGL 

February 6, 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 
NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 
ON AVON TOWNSHIP BUDGET 
Notice Is hereby given mat ■ Tentative 
Budget & App ro priation Ordnance for Road 
Purpose of Avcn Township h Ihe County of 
Lake, State of tlnois. for the fiscal year begin- 
ning March 1, 1996 and endng February 28. 
1909 to on fie and conuenierafy avaiabie to 
puMc inspection at Avon Township Center, 
433 E Washington, Round Lake Park, Dnoto 
between the hours of 9:00 am. to 4 00 pm. 
Mcndoy through Friday. 

Further notice to hereby grven that the 
Trial public hearing and action on this ordi- 
nance wtl be taken al a meeting to be held 
at Avon Township Center at 3:00 p.m. 
Monday, March 9, 1998. 

Kathleen M. Lennon 

Avon Township Clerk 

0298A-1S65-RUOL 

February 6, 1996 



PUBUC NOTICE 
Tax Deed No. 95 TX 2 January 9, 1998 

TO: Wltard Helander, County Clerk of Lake County; Village of Round Lake Beach; Johansson 
Buiders, Inc., an llinoto corporation; Unknown owners and other parties interested in or in pos- 
session of said land or tots. 

TAKE NOTICE 

COUNTY OF LAKE, STATE OF ILUNOI S 

Date premises sold December, 1995 

Sold tor General Taxes of 1994 

PIN • 06.17-306-004 and 06-17-308-005 

THIS PROPERTY HAS BEEN SOLD FOR DEUHQUENT TAXES 

Property located at: 61 1 and 613 Pheasant Ct„ Round Lake Beach, Illinois 

Permanent Index No. 06-17-308-004 and 06-17-308-005 

This notice to to advise you that the above property has been sold for delinquent taxes and that 
ttw period of redemption from the sale has been extended and wft expire on May 12, 1996. The 
amount to redeem to subject to increase at 6-momh intervals from the date of sale and may bo further 
increased ■ the purchaser at the tax sale or his assignee pays any subsequertfy accruing Uues or 
special assessments to redeem the property from subsequertfbnetures or tax soles Chock with the 
County Clerk as to the exact amount you owe before redeeming. 

Thb notice to also to odvtoe you that on January 9, 1 998. a Petition was Ned for a tax deed 
which wD transfer title and the right to possession of this property if redemption to not made on 
or before May 12. 1098. 

This matter to set tor hearing in the Circuit Court of this county in Woukegan, injnois on May 
21. t996. Ybu may be present at this hearing but your right to redeem wtf already have expired 
at that time. 

YOU ARE URGED TO REDEEM IMMEDIATELY 
TO PREVENT LOSS OF PROPERTY 
Redemption con be made al anytime on or before May 12, 1998 by applying io the County Cterk 
of Lake County. Illinois at the County Court House in Woukegan. Illinois. 
For further information contact the County Clerk 

Gold Seat Group. Inc. 
Purchaser or Assignee 
Howard I. Bass 

650 Frontage Road, Suite 2755 
NortMWd.IL 60093 
(M7) 501-2777 

OT 980-1 535-RL 
February 8. 1098 

PUBUC NOTICE 
PUBLISHER'S CERTIFICATE 

23ZZQ 
Account Number 
CONSOLIDATED REPORT OF COHDCTtON Inctudtog domaaile and foreign autakkarka*. and 
bison branches of Frst State Bank of Round Lake located tn Round U*e, !«»»*» ■« m« ciow 
of buaeWM December 3 1. 1997. Pubttohed in Response to Calf of the OFFICE OF BANKS AND 
REAL ESTATE of the State of Ifinoto. 
BALANCE SHEET 



1. 

2. 

3. 
4. 



5. 
6. 
7. 
B. 

9. 
10. 
It. 
12. 



13. 



14. 
15. 

16. 



17. 



20. 


19 


21. 


20 




21 




22 


23. 
24. 


23 
24 


25. 
26a. 


25 
26 



ASSETS 
Cash and balances due from depository Institutions: 

a. Nonlnterest-bearing balances and cunency and coin ........ — - 

b. Interest-bear rig balances ...,.„...„...........„_....„ 

Securties: 

a. Hekf-to-maturity securities ...'..::.— .....— '■■- 

b. Avaiabie- tor-sale securities „....„, 

Federal funds sold and securities purchased 

under agreements to resel . .. — ,.,„.„ 

Loans and lease financtig receivables: 

a. Loons and leases, net of unearned income 

(from Schedule RC-C) — . — ,51,322 

b. LESS: Allowance tor toon and lease tosses .755 

c. LESS: Alocated transfer rtok reserve „,„„„_„„. — — 

d. Loons and leases, net of unearned income, olowance 

and reserve (item -La minus 4b. and 4,c.) . ....* „._,.„. 

Trading Assets ^.... ...,....„..,. .._.._. _....,. _ 

Premises and toed assets (including capitalized leases) „ 

Other real estate owned ,..„„..„„„„.„„_.. — _ 

Investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries & 

associated companies...... „_ , 

Customers' liability to this bank on acceptances outstanding ....0 

Intangible assets.. — , 

Other assets...... . .~««» 

a. Total Assets (sum of Hems 1 through 11)......... ,..„..., 

b Losses deferred pursuant to 1 2 U.S.C 1 623 (j) ™. 

c. Total assets and tosses deterred pursuant 

to 12 USC. 18230) ("J™ of I**" 3 12.0. and 12.b.) ..... 

LIABILITIES 
Deposits: 

a. In domestic offices — „. ....................-..—._——— — .. 

(1 ) Noninlerest-bear ing — - „..„„,..... ..„ ..... 1 0,075 

(2) Interest -bearing.. „ 63,546 

b. In foreign offices. Edge and Agreement 

Subsidiaries, and IBFs _. ~. . — ..." 

(1) Nonhterest-bearrig... — „..„„„„„.___ -..— .0 

(2) Interest-bearing - ! U^»~m — 

Federal funds purchased and securities sold 

under agreements to repurchase 

a. Demand notes tosued to the U.S. Treasury 

b. Tradng liabilities ..„.. -..-.. — ..........„_„_. 

Other borrowed money (includes mortgage 
indebtedness and obligations under capdaiued leases): 

a. With remaining maturity of one year or less... - 

b. With remaining maturity of more than one year 
through three years... .... _. .... 

c. Witn a lemaximg maturity of more than three years ...... 

Not applicable 

Bank's liability on acceptances executed and outstanding 

Subordriated notes and debentures « — , 

Other Uabiiues ™. , • . — — - 

TOTAL LIABILITIES (sums of 13 through 20).... 

Not applicable 

EQUITY CAPITAL 

Perpetual preferred stock and related surplus — 

Common stock . - ..,.. — _.«„'-. 

Surplus (exclude ol surplus related to preferred stock) .... 

a. Undivided profits and capul reserves _ .,.««.-... — 

b. Net unrealued hotdng gains (tosses) on 
available -tor -sole securities -. - 



(THOUSANDS) 



,..3,063 




„„, 

,....17,391 

.......6,151 



....50,567 



.2,477 

.344 



9. 

„ 

,.-...1.634 
„„.81.627 




Lb. 

2a. 
2 b. 



4 a 
4.P. 
4.C 

4.4. 

5. 
0. 
7. 



10. 
11. 

12. a 

izb. 



.81.627 12.C 



,73.621 



.0 



...0 





—.0 



13.M. 

13.a.(l) 
13M.pl 

13.0. 

13.b.(1) 

TJ.b.0 

14. 
15 a 
f&P 



16 a. 

16b. 
16c. 



.0 



,.., . — ,10m 

. 484 

.74,105 





..1,000 
..4,000 
..2.456 



27 
28 



29 



66 

— 

,7.522 
.0 



Cumulative foreign cunency translation adjustments ...„.—. 

a Total equity capiat (sum of Hems 23 through 27) . _.„... 

b. Losses deteired pursuant to t2 USC. I623fj) 

c. Total equty captal and tosses deferred pursuant 

to 12 U.S.C. 18230) (sum ot Hems 20 a. and 28 h) ....7,522 

Total liabMics. equty capcal. and tosses deteired 
pursuant to I2U.SC. lB23fl) (sum crl ■ems 21 and 2B c)8 1,627 29. 



19. 
20. 
21. 



23. 

24. 
25. 

26a. 

26.b. 
27. 
28a 
28b. 

20.C. 



I, Jd A Gross. Exec Vice Pres 4 Cashier, of (he above-named bonk, do hereby certify tat this 
report of condtion is correct and tcmplete to lh* besl of my knowledge and betel 

Cored -.Attest: ,VJil A. Gross 

0298A-1576-RL 

February 0. 1098 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
Gavtn School District 37 

25775 W. Highway 134 
Inglemlde, IL 60041 
The Gavin School District to accepting 
bid quotations for approximately ilwrty 
(30) multimedia PC computers to be 
placed on a NT network. Bid specifica- 
tions are avaiabie at the District Office al 
(647) 5+6-991 3. 

Bios must be received in the District 
Office al the above address no later than 
1 p.m. on Friday, February 27, 1998. 

0298A-1568-GEN 
February 6,1998 

PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Virtual 

Success 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 24046 N. 
Lakeside Dr.. Lake Zurich. IL 60047, 
(B47) 438-0868. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Philip Tompson, 24046 N. Lakeside 
Dr., Lake Zurich. IL 60047. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) io conduct the above named 
business from the locauon(s) indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Phiiip Tompson, January 22. 1996 

Trie foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 22nd day of January, 1 996. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/S/Judrrh, F. Smith 
Notary Public 
Received: January 22. 1998 
Willarrj R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0198E-1559-WL 
February 6, 1998 
February 13. 1998 

PUBUC NOTICE 
ANTIOCH SELF STORAGE WILL 
DISPOSE OF GOODS FOR NON 
PAYMENT FROM; 

On* No. IIS taeaonginoj to AndtM 
Nawrocke, Antioch. IL 60002, consist- 
ing of household & rmsc. items. 

Unit No. 46 belonging to Nick 
BakJassano, Fox Lake, IL 60020, con- 
sisting of household & misc. items. 

Unit. No. 137 belonging lo 
Christopher Norton. Bristol, W1 53104. 
consisting of household & misc. hems. 

Unit No. 39 belonging to Robert 
Sobofek. Waukesha. Wl 53186, con- 
sisting of household & misc. Hems 

Unit No. 150 belonging to 
Rosemary Sireiar. Undenhursl, IL 
600401 consisting of household & 
misc. Items. 

Unit No. 18 belonging to Daniel 
Jokubik. Mundeiein. I L 60060. consist- 
ing of household & misc. items. 

Unit No. 196 belonging to Joshua 
Miller. UndenhursL IL 60046, consist- 
ing of household & misc. items. 

Unit No. 142 belonging to Rene 
Howard. Antioch, IL 60002. consisting 
of household & misc. items. 

Unit No. 19 belonging to Mark 
HoSub. Grayslake, IL 60030, consist- 
ing of household & misc. items. 

Unit No. 149 belonging to Erica 
HekJman. Antioch, IL 60002. consist- 
ing of household & misc. items. 

Unit No 4 belonging to Billie Jo 
Deem, Antioch. IL 60002, consisting 
cf household & misc. items. 

Unit No. 10 belonging lo James 
Given Jr., Trevo, Wl 53179, consisting 
of household & rmsc. Hems. 

Unit No. 103 belonging to 
Christopher Rinaidl, Round Lake, IL 
60073. consisting of household & 
misc. Hems. 

Unit No, 70 belonging to 
Christopher Smatley. Trevor, Wl 
53179, consisting of household & 
misc. Hems. 

Unit No. 124 belonging to Paula 
Kutzke, Burlington, Wl 53105. consist- 
ing of household & misc. items. 

Units No. 219 and 221 belonging 
to Ron Zeman, Antioch, IL 60002, 
consisting ol household & misc. Hems. 

Unit No. 160 belonging to Steven 
Muellar, Lake Zurich. IL 60047, con- 
sisting of household & misc. Hems. 
All ot the Herns stored in above units 
will be sold to highest bidder for cash. 
ANTIOCH SELF STORAGE reserves 
the right lo withdraw any or all of the 
items stored In the above mentioned 
units prior to sale, 
Lien sale will be held: 
Date: February 13, 1996 
Time; 10:00 a.m. 
Location: ANTIOCH SELF STORAGE 
284 Main Si. 
Antioch, IL 60002 
(847) 395-4960 
/s/ Elaine Wert* 
President 

0198E-1551-AN 
February 6, 1998 



1 1 Hi in » i i inrmiilnHMiTtinMMirMiHrl 



!»«*.*«*» 



?Kusa>mKaiei»4j«.v»jiiw*o«*B*jt*»<-«M*«. 



*w«ivevsnu jssm- z 



C12 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 6, 1998 




as si 



fled 




>* 



wmotMncements 



Nolk« 110 

Icnli round IIS 

rree 120 

ftrwroii 12S 

Auclloni , , U0 

Builnctt Pcrwiuts US 

financial HO 



mpioyment 



Help Wanlcd rait-Tlme 215 

Help Wanted Tull-Tlmc 220 

tmplcymcrit Agencies , 221 

Buttons OppotlunllM 22S 

Sllugtlom Wanted 228 

Child Care 240 

School/lnitruction 2J0 

Anllojici 301 

Appllanccv ..' J CM 

Barter/Trade J08 

lUKUii/Craflj 110 

Building Material! J 14 

Dullness/Office Eqsilnmenl J IS 

IkcUonlcVComputm 320 

rarm Guide 324 

firewood 328 

Garaje/Rummage Sales , ,...., 330 

Good Thlnp lo tal 334 

Hori« & Tad 138 

Household Goodi/Tuwilurc ....,.,, 340 



& 



istrslfution 



**: 



Kenosha 

County 



Kenosha 




lewctfy J44 

lami/Garden 348 

MlKtlbneous , 3S0 

Medical tquip/Supplies 3S4 

Musical Instruments 3S8 

Mj & Supp(.« 360 

Restaurant tQulpmcnl 364 

Tools A Machinery 368 

Wanted To Buy 370 



^A^Edt 



%tc*te 



Homes lot Sale S00 

Homes for Renl 504 

Homes Wanted SOB 

Homes Builders SI0 

Condo/Totvn Homes S 14 

Mobile Homes SI8 

Apartments for Rent S20 

Apailments Wanted S24 

AplAlomcs To State SJ* 

Rooms for Rem 510 

Buildings S33 

Business Property for Sale • S34 

Business Property for Rent 53ft 

Investment Property 5*0 

Mortgage Services , 544 

farms HB 

Vacant LotsVAcreage 560 

Resorts/Vacation Rentals 564 

Out of Area Properly 568 

Cemetery Lots 570 

Real Estate Watned S7-) 

Real tilalc Misc 57fi 

Recreational Vehicles 704 

Snowmobilcs/ATVs .; 708 

Boats/Motors/Elc 710 

Camping .,..714 

TravelA'acatlon r. 718 

Sporls tqjilpmenl 720 

Airplanes 7M 



ran%f*ortation 



Cars for Sale 8<H 

Rental/leases. 80S 

Classic/AnllQjie Cars 810 

Service & Parts 814 

Car Loans/lnsurante 818 

Vans 824 

four Wheel Drive/jeeps &2& 

Trucks/Trailers 834 

Heavy loulpmenl , 838 

Motorcycles 844 

Wanted To Buy 848 




ervice 



ircctory 



Appliances Repair SOI 

Blailtop S06 

Builders S09 

Carpentry SI 2 

Carpet Cleaning SIS 

Coociete/Cemenl SIB 

Dry Wall S2I 

Educatlon/lnstrucllofi „,..,.... S24 

Electrical S27 

Firewood S30 

Handyman 533 

Heat Ing/AIr Conditioning , S36 

Housekeeping S3? 

Landscaping S42 

Laundry/Cleaning ...S4S 

Legal Services S48 

Medical Services SSI 

Moving/Storage ,.,,, SS4 

Palnllng/Dccoratlng SS7 

ParaLegaVTypIng Services ...S&O 

Plumbing S63 

foots * 566 

Pressure Washing , S69 

Professional Services 572 

Radio/TV Repair S75 

Remodeling S78 

Resumes t. 581 

RooTlng/Skllng :. ; . 584 

Storage ........587 

Tan Service 590 

Trees/Plants S93 

Wedding .-. S96 

Miscellaneous S99 




Lakeland Newspapers Classifieds Appear in I I Newspapers! 

Antioch News • Round Lake News • Lake Villa Record 

Mundelein News • Wadsworth News • Grayslake Times 

Fox Lake Press • Gurnee Press • Lindenhurst News 

Wauconda Leader • Liberlyville News 



HOW TO PLACE A 
CLASSIFIED AD 

BY CALL 

PHONE...(847) 223-8161 

ny Lakeland Newspapers 
D ' P.O. Box 268 

MAI L. Grayslake. IL 60030 




30 S. Whitney St. 

PERSON... Gra * s,akc 



BY FAX...(847) 223-8810 



I 



DEADLINES 

Direct Line 

Classified 
Business & Private Party 
HOURS 

8am-8pni 

8am-6pm 



. .Tucs. 5pm 
.Wed, 1 0am 

.Mon.-Thurs. 
Friday 



dl 




Lakeland 

i Newspapers 



110 


Notices 



110 


Notices 



120 


Kite 

- 



219 



Help Wanted 
I'art-Timr. 



219 



HelpUanieJ 
Part-Time 



ERRORS: 

We strive to eliminate 

errors, but if one should 

occur, please report il 

immediately as we can 

be responsible for the 

first two (2) weeks only. 

NO ADJUSTMENTS CAN 

BE MADE UNLESS THEY 

AFFECT THE MATERIAL 

VALUE OF AN AD. 



DIET MAGIC 
Lose up to 30lbs. 
30 day programs. 

Start at $30. 
(815)675-9237 
leave message. 



HYPNOTHERAPY 

•Lose Weight 

'Stop Stress 

'Stop Smoking 

"Much-Much More! 

Single or group visits 

available Learn lo relax and 

enjoy your life to its fullest. 

The Center for Habit 

Control. 

Dnvld E. Wold 

Master Hypnotherapist. 

(847)810-4951, 

IF YOU HAVE 

FURNITURE TO SELL. 

A car, or appliances, if 

you are having a Garage 

Sale or If you have a 

house to soli or aparlmont 

lo rent. 

Call Lisa before 10am 

Wodnosday to place 

your ad hero, 

(847)223-8161 

ext. 140. 

PEOPLE THAT CARE Is in 
need of clothing, toys, ap- 
pliances, furniture and olhor 
household Hems, to help 
needy families In Lako County. 
If you wish yo make a dona- 
tion, leol free to call us al 
(847) 918-2476 so lhal we 
can arrange a limo for pickup. 
Also, if you know ol someone 
who is In need, please call us 
at (847) 918-2476. 



COLLOIDAL MINERALS 
OF the lypo doscribod on 
"Dead Doctors Don't Lie" tape. 
Direct from tho Clark Mine. No 
membership. S1 1 .95/quart, 
sold in gallons. 1*800-470- 
B63B. 

ROUND LAKE 

HIGH SCHOOL 

CLASS OF 1988 

10 Years isalmosl up!! 

It's nearing reunion time... but 

wo need some help with 

addresses. Plcaso help us 

and spread Iho wordll 

Sond your name (including 

maiden name), your address 

and friend's addresses and 

phono numbers to: 

RLHS Class of '88 • 

Reunion Committee 

c/o Cindy ( Veiling) Blue, 

1415 Coral Reel Way, 

Lako Zurich, 111. 60047. 

SHARE A DREAM HOST 
SCANDINAVIAN, GER- 
MAN, EUROPEAN. SOUTH 
AMERICAN, ASIAN, RUSSIAN 
HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS 
ARRIVING AUGUST. BE- 
COME A HOST FAMILY/AISE. 
CALL 1-800-SIBLING 
WWW.SIBLING.ORG 

WRITE FOR YOUI 

*X-Mas Cards 

* Wadding Invitations 

•Shower/Party Invitations. 

•Handwritten. 

* Reasonable rates. 

Call (015) 363-5330. 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 

FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 

UMN. For moro information, 
please contact tho Humano 
Socloty. 

FREE PICK UP SERVICE: 
I WILL HAUL away your un- 
wanted row boat, canoo, out- 
board motors, or fishing gear 
FREE. (B47) 566-2819 after 
5:30pm. 



HOUSE CLEANINGl 

Residential Houses! 

Daytime, flexible hours. 

Good salary. 

(047) 487-1155. 

tllllllMlttlllllll 

I PERSONAL 

I HOUSEKEEPERS \ 



125 


Personals 



115 



Lost & Found 



HEALTIIVWOMEri 

Excellent Compensation 
Healthy women 33 and under 
and with j history of previous 
pregnancy needed lo strve a 
anonymous egg donors. Donors 
will be required to take indica- 
tion, blood screening and under- 
go minor surgical procedure. 
Substantial compensation will 
be given. If interested call ARR, 
773-3227315. 
Serious inquiries only. 



I 



$150 REWARD FOR infor- 
mation loading lo or the return 
of "Buck" missing family mem- 
ber, 3-1/2 yr. old male Yellow 
Lab. Last seen December 
30lh, al Pelito Lako Rd, & Rt. 
83, was wearing blue collar 
and tags. B-1/2yr. old daugh- 
ter heart broken. Please call 
(847) 356-8256. 

DID YOU FIND Somoonos 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dept., and get your 
results, FOUND ads aro 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
(847)223-8161. 



120 



Free 



A BABY COMING? Adop- 
tion an Option? AflocHonale 
educated couple will devote 
ENTIRE lives lo baby, pro- 
vide Itfo's best and treat you 
with RESPECT, Debbie & 
Mike 688-690-2229. 

ADOPTION A WONDER- 
FUL life awaits your newborn 
in our loving, financially so- 
curo homo. Expenses paid. 
Call shori and Chuck 1-800- 
391-6642. 

ADOPTION IS LOVE 
Happy Family with adopted 3 
year old daughter wants to 
shower a now baby wilh love. 
Artistic full-time mom, athletic 
lawyer dad, and a sister to 
play wilh. Frionds on the 
swingsot. trips to Iho zoo, 
grandma, ptay groups, lulla- 
bies, loo. This is a homo 
whore wishos como truo. Wo'd 
liko to get to know you. Call 
Shawn & Mog 800-767-4257 
Legal/Medical/Allowable ex- 
penses paid. 

NEVER FORGET AGAIN! 

$39.00. 

Call toll free 

1-B80-574-B382. 

THE SOLUTION TO 
YOUR NEW YEARS 

RESOLUTION!! 

LOSE WEIGHT tho 

HEALTHY way-Wo DID! 

30 day SSS-bnck 

guarantee. 

Natural) 

Dr. Rocommondedl 

Call Melody 

(647) 548-4191 

Independent 

Horbollfe 

DISTRIBUTOR. 



I'erm, part-lime. Earn 

$8-10+/Hr. Mornings 

and/or afternoons. 

Adv. Opp. 

Car/Vac req. 

(847) 361-8771 or 

(847)487-8771 



SSSSSSSS t S5S5 SSSS5S 



< Upbeat Grayslakc eom-> ; 
spany is looking for af - 
^permanent part-timer 

^employee "il"- McnlF 
3 candidate would pos-J;- 

5sc\ss personable phone? i 

^.skills, Ik* well organized. £' 

^lakc pride in their work^ 

^ and basic computer ^ 

i skills would be a plus.> 

{Salary based on t*xrx*ri-> ,, 

<ence. ff you match (hese) 

$ requirements and pos-fc 

jjsess these skills please £ 

Jcal! Carol at 5JB-6800. f 
vwwwwvwvv 



IIIIlIllllIJIIIlllIIll^ 



GENERAL OFFICE ASSISTANT 
Flexible 

TPC Training Systems, a Buffalo Grove, IL-bascd 
► company is seeking part-time General Office! 
: Assistant for sales assistance, data entry and litera-t 
jture fulfillment. Competitive wages, flexible sched- 
uling. Ideal for moms! Call for more information 

847-808-4000, ext. 4041. 

moo t 



^T"TTTT"'"'" T '""'' "" T """ r "*" lr '^" T ^'"~"»'' fT, " r " Tr 



Telemarketing Professionals Wanted! 

Develop your own new subscription pro- 
gram. Result oriented & can take charge. 
Unlimited earning potential. 

Permanent RT. Management Position 
Primadonna Need Not Apply 

Send to P.O. 188 Grayslake, IL 60030 



ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING77 GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad in tho 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are run al NO 
CHARGE! (Wo discourage 
any pet ads). Deadlines: 10am 
Wednesdays. (847) 

223-8161,0x1.140. 



140 


Financial 



L— - 



"FAST LOANS" HOME- 
OWNERS S20.000-S100.000 
cash for any reason. Consoli- 
date bills, 125% of homo's val- 
ue. No equity needed. Simple 
phono application. Nothing out 
ol pocket. No obligation. Donl 
delay. IMCC Financial is an Illi- 
nois Residential Mortgage Li- 
consoo. 1-RO0-9-18-0514, 



Senwr €itizen& 
IWelcame/ 

Do you have a sales background? 
Do you like talking on the phone?. 

This is an opportunity to continue 

using your skills. No physical work. 

We offer flexible hours, generous 

hourly wage & commission at 

Lakeland Newspapers. 

Call Maureen at 
(847) 223-8161 ext. 109. 



February 6, 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C 1 3 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuU-Tlme 



CALLING ALL LAKE 
COUNTY MOMSIII Bright 
Beginnings Family Day Caro 
Network is looking for nurtur- 
ing, responsible), creative Indi- 
viduals who would liko to start 
tholr own businoss whilo stay- 
ing homo with their children, if 
you livo In Lako Villa. Undon- 
hurst, Gurnoo, Groyilake or 
Round Lake and would like as- 
sistance in gelling licensed, 
ongoing technical assistance, 
and child referrals, this pro- 
gram is lor vou. For more Infor- 
mation on how to become a 
quality Infant and toddler day 
caro provider In your home, 
call Dona Thompson (847) 
3564112. 

DRIVER OTR CANT rost 

and relax with your family be- 
cause of Money Worrios? 
CALL COVENANT TRANS- 
PORT Experienced Drivers 
and Owner Operators 1-800- 
441-4394 Graduate students 
1-800-338-6428 Bud Moycr 
Rofrigoratod Truck Line Solo's 
and contraclorB 1-B88-867- 
3729. 

DRIVER-START UP TO 
32C/MILE*B0HUSES With 
USA TRUCKI Late-model, 
assigned convonttonals, satel- 
lite communications. 10,000 
rml a/month average. Weekly 
pay. 600-237-4642. EOE. 
M/F/H/V. 



219 



Help Warned 
Part-Time 



(DtPGXDafu^GOQfira 

CWD@!2S 

Short Hours, BIG 

Rewards. Earn up 

to $500 per week 

part-time. 
Flexible hours. 

Call 
Matt Walsh at 
(847) 427-4412 



I GENERAL OFFICE 

l£MALL friendly 

IoFFICR IK NEED OF 
■CLERK/TYPIST TO 
IDO GENERAL OFFICE 
DUTIES. PART-TIME. 
JMON-FRI. 9AM-JPM. 
|IF QUALIFIED, 

(PLEASE CALL RARIN 
I ATI 
(847) 367-830O 

(Ojjic* \ocaUd lutmr 
Lambt Fmrm) 



rnrrmtrr 



GREETER 

Mature, depenrjaote per- 
son wanted to greet and 
help customers, of busy 
auto dealership Musi be 
able to work i hours per 
day plus every other 
Saturday. 

JAniTOR 

Reliable person needed to 
do daily cleaning, routine 
maintenance, and run 
errands for busy auto deal- 
ership, no heavy lilting, 
live hours per dag. Mon- 
rri. 
Call Joanne Dawson at 

Victor Ford In 
Wauconda 

(847) 526-5541 
Ext 102 



RECEPTIONISiS 
Monday-Friday 
8 am- 1 :30pm 

Enterprise Root A-Car. the 
nation's II car rental compa- 
ny, b tcoUng a pari une 
Roccp< oont to managa tno 
mufti-ano phono sysiem ni 
our last paced roQtonal hoad- 
quartem in Wauhogan. Tno 
professional wo Mrioct wi« 
possess previous recepbon 
and customer torvtuo experi- 
ence as wel as oxcoSent 
teiopnono etiquette and out- 
standing coovnuracalion and 
organizational skins. For a 
confidomidJ Interview, please 
cal. 
Margaret CookUn 

Pb: 847-625-8900 

UnHPRBERDfr-A-CAR 



fcs. 



3030 Washington 

Waukogan. it. 60085 

EOE 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



DRIVERS...EARN UP TO 
34.5cpm. Dry van & flatbed. All 
conventional tleot. No slip 
seating, groat rrnlos. Anderson 
Trucking Service 800-241- 
6787. ' 

DHtVERS/OTR-CRST 
OFFERS TUITION-FREE 

training and a guaranteed job, 
NO EXPERIENCE NECES- 
SARY! Earn up to $30,000 first 
yea/. Min. Ago 21, no felonies. 
Call CRST 1-800-504-2778. 
EOE/mf. 

EARN EXTRA MONEY' 
Work ono weekend a month 
and two weeks a yoar and re- 
ceive 100% college tuition, 
the Montgomery Q.I. Bill and 
an excoiionl paycheck. You 
may also qualify for a cash en- 
listment bonus. Call your local 
National Guard representative 
today at 1-800 OK- GUARD. 

GET A GOOD JOB In doc- 
ironies, computers, machine 
repair, HS grads under 34, witl- 
ing to rekxato. Paid training 
with full benefits. Call 1-800- 
4696289 lor info. 

LIVE-IN CARETAKER 

NEEDED for 34yr. old femalo 
cancer patient and 28/month 
old daughter. Must have driv- 
ers license and references, No 
smokers. (815) 678-7411 
after 5pm. 



219 



Hdptfanied 
Part-Time 



Office Cleaners 
to Clean at 

Night 
Waukegan 

Area 

$7 * $io/hn 

to start 

(815) 344-O120 



HELP WARTED 

Part Time 

Hygienist for 

Pediatric Dental 

Office in 

Grayslake. 

(847) 223-1400 



Call or Apply at: 

UT McKinley 
Lake Villa, IL 

60046 



nfl 



Part Time 

Afternoons/ 

Evenings/Saturdays 

Metflcal Receptionist 
and Medical Records 

Orchard Medical Center 

Antlodi, Illinois 60002 

Contact 

Terry at 

847-395-8217 

extension 10 



PT SOCIAL SERVICE 
NICASA has a position 

available for an 

enthusiastic self starter 

to assist in a county wide 

diversionary program for 

adolescents. Approx. 10 

lirs. per week. 
Requirements: Degree 

in criminal 

justice, substance abuse 

or related field and 1-2 

years experience. 

Send resume to 

NICASA, c/o Julie 

Schwarabach, 31979 N. 

Fish Lake Rd. Round 

Lake. IL 60073 



220 



Help Tinted 
Full-Time 



220 



Udp Wanted 
Full-Time 



DRIVERS WANTEO: PRO- 
FESSIONAL OTR T/T DRIV- 
ERS. ONLY THE HIGHLY MO- 
TIVATED, SAFETY ORIENT- 
ED NEED APPLY. WE OFFER: 
BIG TRUCKS. BIG HOODS, 
BIG MILEAGE, BIG BUCKS 
AND MORE. FOR MORE 
INFO ON OUR 48 STATE OP- 
ERATION: CALL ELITE EX- 
PRESS AT: (BOO) 441-4316. 

PET CAREI ENERGETIC 
dependable person, various 
duties Involving pets. Must be 
flexible and available 7 
days/week including wee- 
kends and holidays. Call only 
between 10am-5pm, Monday- 
Friday. Shel-Ray Pel Shalet 
(414) 857-2163. 

WHAT GOOD IS time with- 
out money, what good is 
j money without time? Wo offer: 
Largo first year income poten- 
tial, qualified training with top 
sales reps, S2.000-S4.000 first 
month qualified draw. Friday, 
Saturday and Sunday • your 
free time, exceptional proven 
product, overnight travel re- 
quired. To schodulo a person- 
al interview, call Inter-State 
Servico at 1-800-395-9690. 



: BEHeftTEft : 

LAKELAND 
; NEWSPAPERS has • 
: an opening on its I 
• expanding editorial • 
5 staff. Experience • 



preferred with 






• background in phr>; 
S tography helpful. ; 

• Will handle a vari- ; 
i ety of assignments. 5 

• Will be working • 

with a varied 
i schedule and be ; 

• able to work under • 
; deadline situations.; 

For Interview 
appointment fax S 

• resume to: • 
" Rhonda Burke • 

• Editor In Chief * 

at 

j (847) 223-8810 • 



^1 



o| 



if 



S3 



^MMmmmm 



12 MONTH TECHNOLOGY 
NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR 

Associates Degree In an Information 
Technology area. 3 years experience In 
maintenance, configuration, repair, lnstal- 
Lillon of Information Technology equip- 
ment and software essential, Novell 
CNE/CNA/ Microsoft NT Certification 
desirable. Must be able to work coopera- 
tively with staff, teachers, and students. 
High level of troubleshooting and task 
analysis skills are required. 

Send cover letter and resume by February 
13, 1998 to: 

BUI Chapin, Director of 

Educational Technology 

Warren Township High School 

SOO N. O'Plainc Road 

Gurnee, IL 60031-2086 

Resume's accepted as attached 

Microsoft Word flics via c-mall at 

btchapln5rmail.wa.Ten. lake. k 12. 11. us 

Job f>r.irr(p(ions nra liable at 
httpx/ tunvui.utorm.lakm. k 1 'J.u.u* 



oDD| 

m 

m 



i 






How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 



Dear Sea ch, 

f have been working as a secretary for 21 years with the same 
company. I was the President's assistant and started when I was 
fresh out of secretarial school The owner has sold the company and 
here 1 am jobless, as the new owner has no place for me. Upon my 
leaving I was earning a salary of $30,000 per year, which I haw 
worked irony yean to build up to that level. My problem is in these 
past 21 years the company has always operated manually, which 
leaves me with no computer experience I am one month into the 
job search and haw found it Impossible to find a comparable posi- 
tion anywhere within my salary range without computer experience. 
No company wants to lake lime to train me, and I feel as though I've 
been in a Time Warp*. Please give me an idea as to what I can do to 
get the experience 1 need to keep up with the times. 
S.M.-FoiUke 

DearS.M„ 

Don't Panld One day training seminars are available to you in a 
wide variety of programs such as Introduction to Computers, 
WordPerfect. Lotus and many more. These programs can do won- 
ders for boosting your career. You can walk away from training feel- 
ing computer literate. From that point, once you feel comfortable 
and you will, the doors are wide open. Set your mind to it and give 
me a call (244-0016). There Is no need to be frightened of the world 
of computers. It's like riding a bicycle, once you team, you never for- 
get. I hope to hear from you and further help you to get back in the 
work force. 

Dear Search, 

I have this terribly embarrassing problem when it comes to inter- 
viewing. I get so nervous that every time I reach out to shake the 
employer's hand, my hands are so incredibly sweary. I want to avoid 
shaking hands at all cost, yet I don't want to appear disrespectful by 
not doing so. I'm sure that my problem is not uncommon. Help! 
S.D. • Llndenhurst ■ 

DearS.D., 

You are not alone by any means. Some hints to solve that problem 
may be to hold a handkerchief in either your pocket or hands while 
Interviewing to absorb the perspiration, or to purchase a small rosin 
bag (used most often by bowlers) and keep that In your pocket. 

NOTE: Let's poll the readers out there_.Wrile me about your most 
embarrassing moment in Interviewing and how you overcame it! 

Note: Nancy Sakol is a licensed personnel professional and 
President of Superior Personnel in Gumee. 

Letters can be senl to Nancy Sakol c/o lakeland Newspapers, 
P.O. Box 26fl, Grayslake. IL6C030 



220 



Hdp Wanted 
Pull-Time 



CUSTOMER 
SERVICE REP 

Immcd Opening. Why 
Stay in lite Cold When You 
Can Come to Sunny 
Orlando, FL! If you're 
looking io get out of the 
cold, join Central PL's 
leading comm'l printer as 
CSR. We seek cxp'd prof! 
for lech & customer sve 
support to our sales staff. 
Min 5 yrs printing exp 
dealing w/corporatc clients 
req'd. Must be computer 
literate in Windows, Excel 
&. Word; MAC exp a plus. 
Not only can wc add 
warm l h to your days, but 
we also provide a comp sal 
& exc bnfts. Submit 
resume w/ sal reqs: Central 
Florida Press, Attn: 
HPJCSR. 4560 LB 
McLcod Rd, Orlando, FL 
32811; Fax 407-843-1856. 
Drug free workplace. EOE 



At Quilt, wt'fi m cne o( ihc leading J 
| iitvd Bui trtrn of hmiacu pfaJaOL J 
I Thn kiarf of matM dnoal tuppca | 
i vidua! raaafabtt aaciuoa u out on- 1 
I (Omcl'l ncfrfj. TkB'l why wt'rt tooi- 

luf lor prtipfc bit jo* fmpU » nS t«l- 
I r m. unbiuoa, and the dcurt Io be (he J 
Ibcu 

| Wt vc lowlctUBf: 

DATA ENTRY CLERKS 

I Yon will pnxza aad camde ill cbtxi I 
tuldia n ar rt d Irons civet pftptfj- 1 
\ 6cm cieiix iadwiiaf lie d«u tatty el J 
Irnwuacc iaioranoM tod p*qunnj | 
[ Aod bauDcinc diilf httk drpouo. 

I The KkeVd cinrlidne will poncul 
cictlkm orpBiououI tad MaJfticat ] 
j Uilb ibag *kb 1 > ft in dm tMry I 
I eipaieacz is ■ ktga tolume »«V emi- 1 
I ronmeoL 10-lrj alctLiic* uuib ud I j 
I llija School dejpn n tqwnVat mi>- 1 
' icr requited, rmira eipcricacc with ' 
| lac irnHUacc pncaiiflf cquipmeM > J 
. *0h!V»VM-K. 

, MAIL PROCESSING CLERK I 

I Yoa will onci aad ion iH brnmiat I 
i Bud, neier ouipMif nut tad prraarc . 
liavoicxa, citdii man tad f*» 4vr I 
I i u h h m la auilta^ 

Itw hWW nit 1 ai »iu amnai ■ I 
I nlid dnrti - ! Wttm wJ km t»« ■*.!,- 1 

I iy u IQ m to aapnvaaatdj 50 inadt / 

I A1k> m^ictd a 1 1 tiga Sohiwl drfnc I 
[ r» ihe tqanifeal in nrbtnl Iriiaiaf « ' 
I vori nnrriracE. 30 hrCaL, SaranUf 

i rt^uirTo. 

I Wi r.(!<i i ennpetitnt uLuj. eittOeai I 
| hcatfjt»fuel»ie p »(uca inrtuJet hutiua | 
. tttfrtunctncoL, aroTii and pu uWinf. i 
I aad conpleU Iniaiaf lt> help jt* 
' achieve tour carrei (oah. Pkaw loe- 
j miti ltl Ukjuino to: Quitl CotputaCua. J 
1 100 Scbcltrr RJ . Oept MK/AS, 
t inrrilaiairt. IL Wi *,1 Or t»> to (M7) ] 
4i4-5KO. ha phone e»IU fkxe [.,.il[ 
I Opponmitjr Eavptorer WF<Ti>V. 

muiix 



DISPLAY 

ADVERTISING 

SALES 

Flexible Hours 

Do you like meeting 
new people? 

Do you like solving 
problems? 

Do you provide good 
customer service? 

If this is you, we 

would like to hear 

from you, 

Unleash your 

earning potential 

with this growth 

driven publisher. 

Call 

847.223.8161 

ext. 113 

or fax your 

resume to 

Vince Saputo 

at 847-223-8810 

TODAY! 

GROUP HEALTH 

BENEFITS, 401 K 

& MORE! 



220 



IWp Tinted 
ruD-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Time 



Education 

SGUIhlaAKECDUCATIGri 
CCfilCR ASSlSTArtf 

RESPONSIBLE FOR ocerrtorts. 

educabofta! support tor students 

and speoal cornrruaty-teHd prt> 

jocti and proor arris. 

A BACHELORS DEGREE and 

erperience in commraty outnsxr; 

or aftjai prtxyartmng and oQce 

managemert anj rarjUrarj. 

SUBMIT A COUPlfTED appfiea- 

l«n. let! er of rtsf csi and ivsitm la 

Hunan Reacxaxes by Feonory 23. 

1991 

PLEASE CONTACT Humin 

R«ourc«. (047) 5*3-2216 and 

TDW (M7) 223-5615. tor more 

trJor matron. 

COULEOE OF LAKE COUHTf, 

19351 W. Washingtcn Si. 

Grayslaaa. IL 60030-1 133 

AAjEOEAMttV 



VACATION 
VILLAGE 

Now accepting 
applications for 
full & part lime 

UFEGU/VRDS 

Must be certified. 

Apply In person 

between 10am-4pm, 

Mon - Fri 

State Park Rd. 

Fox Lake, IL 

DRUG FREE 

WORKPLACE 



ENGINEERING LAB TECHNICIAN 

Transformer manufacturer located near the 
tiiinois/Wlsconsin border seeks an individual with a basic 
electronics background. Duties will include constructing 
and testing simple transformers. Ideal candidates will have 
a mechanical aptitude. Comprehensive benefits package. 
Equal Opportunity Employer. 

Send resume with Salary Requirements to: 

Personnel 

Actown-Electrocoll, Inc. 

P.O. Box 248 
Spring Grove, IL 60081 



POWER ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN 

V/ANTEd Ior CHALLENGING AssiqNMENi. 

CERlifiCAIION ANfJ 5 VtARS EXpERiENCE. 

Must be Able to woRk wtiltom cIose supervision. 

MUSI bE DONrJAblE ANfJ bE aHe TO dRIVE. 

Good possibility of loNq term career 

Ior il«E Riqht person. 

Ma// resume to: S. A. Power Corporation USA 

P.O. Box 50 1, WauconcIa, IL 60084 



SERVICE TECH/INSTALLER 

A manufacturer in the hot meft glue feti "a seeking an incjr/dual to 

[inalall our laminalof rnachbe end train customer personnel about t's 

operations nationwide. Yx wi also be responsible for service cans 

to existing customers and work in trie shop when not on the road. 

We have competitive wagestjenefts and profit sharing. 
Starting pay Sl2/hr. ? to start 

Must have mechanical S electrical exp. including 3 phase £ PLCs 

with good people skats. Must have valid driver's license 

KMT. MANUFACTURING, INC 

2313 Commonwealth Ave. 

North Chicago, IL 60064 

or Fax Resume (847) 473*1349 



v.-- v >:>• >:>v»:>">v-: >: -.■vr-TV VV^ 



T7TV 



: SPRING MAKERS WANTED \ 

j Career positions available on both 1st and 2nd ) 

' shifts with established, friendly, growing ;< 

I spring manufacturer in northern Illinois. > 

\ Candidates must have at least 1 year CNC £ 

\ spring set-up experience and a professional £ 

! altitude. Tool making ability a plus. I 

{ Experience on Shinko, Itaya, Herdon or other V 

\ quill machinery will command top pay and i 

\ full benefits! We will invest time and training 

i in qualified new employees willing to make 

.; serious long-term commitments. 

815-675-1350 

■ '■■■■ ■■>■■■■-■."■ -.A -■ ", ■-. ■-■>-. '..-. .-, AA-Ar. ,---.-".■-■■-■■■■-..*'•■-. .iQC 



JOB FAIR 



HOUDAY INN 
? «j0--i MUNDELEIN 

^r^February 6. 3pm-9pm it February 7, 5am-3pm 

ffili^sCluh 

Wt tie eunrnlry looting lo fill Food Service pc»«tjorain»ddirion 1 
Io other hold opportunities. We arTer competitive wages with 

CKrllrnibcTi(-fj!miiichinduikfi«-mplo)«mati. 

Apply in Person 

Holiday Inn Mundelein* 

51 East Route B3 • Mundlelin, IL 60060 



(847)949-5100 



■ ■ ■-.-■'■ ._■<..-. ::-■--- ■ -.'>':'■ k >>.' 



->; 



C 1 4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



Februarys, 1998 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Tlmc 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Timc 



220 



Help Warned 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-ITiiie 



/Afl'-V ! E,!rt(F'U'R'E, mM 



FRONT DESK 
APPLY IN PERSON ONLY 

37ft0 GRAND AVE - GURWBE, IL 



To Place Your Medical 

Opportunities Ad Here Please 

Call Travis or Darrell at 

847.223.8161 



Medical Opportunities 



Modcal 

NURSES & CNA's 
Owatonno, MN 

Now Mmg' Cwp- w$& & b^re. flex- 
bio sctiociting. Col lor an appicalcn 
or send your ream: Cwalonna lie oltn 
Caro Center. 201 18th Si. SW. 
Owatonna, MN 550G0, 507-451-6600 
lor tar 507-451 -6067. EOE 




MEDICAL 
ASSISTANT 

Full or Pan-Time needed 
for family practice able 
to give injections, immu- 
nizations, do 
EKG's/Phlebotomy 
knowledge of front 
office/insurance. 
Call Rita 
847/336-7424 or 
Fax Resume 
847-336-8776 



NURSE, VISITING: The 
Navy-Marine Corps Relief 
Society Great Lakes Auxiliary 
is actively recruiting for a part 
lime (20 hrs/wk) RN with cur- 
rent active II. lie. and Cf'R cer- 
tification. Musi have reliable 
transportation. Background in 
OH peds, med/sur, geriatrics 
nd home health educ. pre- 
ferred. Working knowledge of 
military pcrs. service org. high 
ly desirable. Salary: S15K/yr, 
Closing dale: February 19, 
I99K Send resumes, including 
cover letter and references to: 
NMCRS, Great Likes 
Auxiliary, Uldg .12, NTC. 610 
Farragut Ave, Great IjLcs, II. 
60088-5034 or FAX to (K47) 
688-2658, B.O.E, 




VICTOKV LAKES CONTINUING 

CAKE CENTER Invites you to take a look ut us 

(He Prepared To He Impressed) 

- Personal Tours of our Modern and Beautiful Facility. 

- Refreshments will be served. 

- On the spot Interviews. 

Victory Likes has Full-Time, Part-Time, Casual, and Float 
positions with flexible Day. Evening and Night Hours. 

We offer Full and Part Time Employees Paid Vacations and 
Holidays, Company Paid Life Insurance. Pension Plan, Health 
and Dental Plan AND MUCH MOKE! 

2 VICTORY LAKES 

cai 1 1 Hums tA.li cm tn 

10SS KmI Grand Ave.. Undcntium, II. (yiXMfi 

1w Direction* or more information, call: 847.JJfi.S9O0 

eoc 




r 



MEDICAL/SUHGICAL 
CLINICAL NURSE SPECIALIST 

Immediate Opening 
Lynchburg General Hospital, Lynchburg, VA 
He p;irt of Central VA h enjrry the lx:'iiit]fijl Blue Ridge 
Mtns, Hie seasonal changes t* a diverse cultural comm. 
We would like to offer you the nppry to make Lynchburg 
your home h at the nam* tim*:, become a key member 
here at Lynthrmrp; Onwl I (nuptial. We are a progressive 
270 bed H6sp offering high quality patient care w/ lead- 
ing edge technology. A* a Med7SurgJeal Clinical Nurse 
Specialist, you will become a part of our mullidisciplinary 
team approach, work collaboratively with selected 
patient populations incl pulmonary & renal clients, and 
provide consultation & educational scrv. In addition, the 
CNS will contribute to the development, maintenance, 
and change of Health Cure Delivery System to provide 
high standards of excellence. If you would like to become 
a valued member ofour team, you will receive a crimp sal 
& comprehensive bnfts, Need to know more? Please con- 
tact Janet Hundley, UN, Recruitment & Retention, 
Lynchburg General Hospital, 1901 Tate Springs Hd, 
Lynchburg. VA 24501 or ph B04-947-320B. MSN req. At 
least 5 yrs of Medical/Surgical exp pref. Fax: HG4-U47-4892 
F.-mail:jackxtieagtevTcentralhealih,com. 

EOE 



V 



medical 

BRING OUR WORLD INTO YOURS 

$2,000 Living Expense Fund/Kcloculion Assistance 

Open up a woild of opportunity by joining one of our energetic teams at 
Providence Health Systems in Alaska. Our cost-of-living is comprablc to 
any major city, and Alaska has no slate income tax. Our world of beautiful 
parklands, serene waterways and majestic mountains invites you to explore 
the many wonderful outdoor and career opportunities in the stale of Alaska. 

Providence Health System In Alaska is more than a collection of hospitals, 
We arc a unique, full-service nclwuik, working with physicians and health 
arc providers throughout ihc state. It is a philosophy of extending into the 
community and into the family; it is an experienced team of medical profes 
sionals utilizing some of the most advanced equipment and treatment systems 
available; it is a flexible system of training, education and advancement 
Providence Health System in Alaska currently has the following positions 
available. 

CLINICAL NURSE SPECIALIST 
OR, PEDS/PICU, NICU, MEDISVRGIRFMAB 

In this position, you will function as a professional tole model by pioviding 
quality patient care, educational itsouiccs, and developing and maintaining 
an orientation program in your area. To qualify, you must have at least 2 years 
experience in Ihc area which you are applying for, a Master's degree in nuts 
ing. graduated fnim an accredited school of nursing, PAIS, ACLS, NKP, as 
appropriate, requisite computer skills, and obtain Alaska licensure prior to 
date of hire. 

We offei a competitive salary, and excellent benefits. To find out more aluul 
these outstanding opportunities, Call I jnda Duwa, KN or Ullian Ttsli, RN at 
(800) 478-994(1 cxt. 5tW7 or 5679. If you prefer, you may fax a copy of your 
resume to (907) 2fil-.l609or yuu may mail it to Providence Health System in 
Alaska. Human Resources, Job Code MCNI27, PO Box l9An(M, Anchorage, 
AK 99519-6604. AA/fiOE. Applicants will he required to pass a drug screen- 
ing prior to employment. Drug-tree workplace. Committed to a Culturally 
Diverse Workplace. 

PROVIDENCE HEALTH SYSTEM IN ALASKA 



NIGHT AIDE 

Immediate 

opening for 

Part-Time 

LPN/CNA at 

Retirement 

Home for 

Sisters. 

if Interested 

contact: 

Sister Marilyn 

Queen of Peace 

847-438-5470 



j CNA'S 

FULL/PART 

TIME/ALL SHIFTS 

COME JOIN 

OUR TEAM! 

- Must be Certified & 

Registered in . 

State of Illinois^ 

• S6.50/hr to start 

• Good Benefits 

• Excellent Working 

E nvironment 

". Apply In Person; 

NORTH SHORE 

TERRACE 

2222 W. 14th Street 
Waukogan, IL 60085 ■ 



iMrdcaJ 

DIRECTOR OF 
CLINICAL RESEARCH 

Nashville, TN 

National Cardiology PPM sccUnr, 
an indrvVJual to oversee & cnordi 
rule clinical research In Multi-State 
Cardmlojy practices. Responsible 
for ohuinmr, & processing informa- 
tion about availability of lesraich 
projects, preparing research appli- 
cations & ensuring comptantc wlh 
research protocols. Qualifications: 
RN w/Richelors Degree, 5+ yrc. 
op. in cmitokin, 5 + yrs. op. in 
clinical research activities. Travel 
rcojJ. Musi be willing to rekxale In 
favlcrn United Slates. Please send 
resume A salary rcqnVls in conn. 
dence to: CARDIOLOGY 
PARTNERS Or AMERICA. 
102 Woodmonl Blvd.. Sit. 
#(.10. Nashville. TN3720S. 
TOE 



Medical 
A RECOGNIZED IEADER 

Highland I'.irL llospital's IIOMI 
SUITORI SfRVICf Out. is cur- 
ritilly wTking dtthcattd profes- 
SKKiaU to piuvirlc private duty 

• NURSES AIDES • 
Candidate must he CtRllFltD and 

hjvp own Irjmporljlllin. 

Opfiurtiinilit-s t-mst to provide pif ■ 
u -r.it rare for i variety til cjm-s 
from newborns to the eldrily, 
asstvhng with Af)t at well a* light 
bousi-keeping Theofilioo ol Irwin 
f -j if is alto .it ,ii l.i I ilr. 

We offer: 

• f lexible schedule-*, with llie 
atiihly In choose shifls/d.iys 
of your preference 

• Short shifts or fl/12 hour 
shifts .ivailahle 

• Shift differentials available 

• Ojilion to care for patients 
in home or htnpit.il selling 

• Wide range of cases to 
choose froin 

• Orientation and nuising 
supervision for all cases 

Please call or forward your 
resume to; Dulot.it, HIGH- 
tAND PARK HOSPITAL 7 1 II 
Clenview Ave., Highland I'jik, 
it f.(>0i5. Phone; |*W) 4H0 
37J.9. Fa*:'B47) -1110. I'M I. 
(«*! m/TAl/v) 

HIGHLAND PARK 

HOSPITAL 
A Mcmixf of Nmtltwcilcm 

Hc.ilthcjrv 



Healthcare 



CNA'S 

You've tried Ihc rest, now 

try working with Ihc best! 
Our highly compclcnl stafT 
is looking for more team 
members, Wc arc a 108 
bed, skilled nursing facility 
In Ihc far NVV suburbs. Wc 
pay for your expertise. 
Starling salary at $*LO0/hr 
plus Sl.OO/hr JifTcrcntlals. 
Please call 847-SZ6-S55 1. 
Ask for lean or Alona 

Care Centre of 
Wauconda 

1 76 Thomas Court 
Wauconda. IL 60084 



RN MARKETING 
DIRECTOR 

Outgoing RN with nursing 
home experience and knowl- 
edge of lake County & sur- 
rounding area to be a market- 
ing Director for skilled, pro- 
gressive nursing facility. Must 
be available for occasional 
weekend or evening functions. 
Additional responsibilities will 
Include quality assurance. Send 
your resume In confidence to: 

Kim Kohls at 

Cam Ccmu or Wujccmda 

176 Thomas Ct 

Wauconda, IL 

Fax 847/526-7549 

Ph 847/526-5551 



QMRP 

Immediate lull time posi- 
tion availabia in our Lake 
Zurich Intermediate 
Care Facility. Will be 
responsible for planning, 
developing, implement 
ing and supervising 
case managemcnl activ- 
ates lor MR/DD women 
Bachelors Degree and 
one year experience 
with MR/DD population 
required. 

Contact Gail Becker 

Mount Saint Joseph. 

Lake Zurich 

847-438-5050 



PHARMACIST 

Madison 
Wise/Immediate 

Opening 

If you arc interested in 
expanding your knowl- 
edge base in geriatrics 
pharmacotherapy & infu- 
sion therapies & looking 
to work w/encrgetic 
group of Pharmacists, wc 
encourage you to apply 
for our positions in 
Madison, Wise. Wc arc a 
fuilhnfts Co. 401 K, stock 
purchase plan, luilion 
reimbursement, health & 
denial ins., dependent 
care plan, disability & life 
ins. relo. bnfts. Please 
apply by faxing res to 
«)8-27l-92l6ortallJim 
Lien 800-177-5171. 
PharMcrica. 2K0I Syene 
Hd. Madison. Wl 5371.1 
Affirmative Aclion/liOlf 



220 



llelpVanlcd 
Pull-Time 







220 



. Help Wanted 
Fuli-Tbnc 



Hairstylists 
and Manager 

Guaranteed salary 

+ commission. 
Full-Timc & Part- 
Time in Fox Lake. 

(847) 913-9560 



FiniTlME/ 

PAR.T1TME 

Teacher or Assistant 

Needed for a 

Grayalaiic Eb.y Care 

Cenrcr. If interested 

call: 

(647) s*&-y*ss 

Ask for Wendy 



OOOOOOCKXKXXXlOOOCWOOOOOp 

BUnsCrafters has open-H 
fiings for full and part-J! 

time Sales People and;; 

; Optometric Techs for they 
S Doctors offices. You pro-H 
8 vide the enthusiasm andfi 
8 desire to help people see, 8 
owe provide full training, p 
^competitive salary and8 
Hbenefits and careerB 
oopportunities. Stop byp 
Hand apply atf 



LensCrafters 



in:: 



oLakehurst 
oWaukegan, IL 

(847) 689-2244 % 



Mail.:: 

'o 

(i 



WAITRESSES; 

i Full Time/ 
\ Part Time 
\ Apply in Person: I 

I Rlgby's j 

Restaurant; 

j 1910 E. Grand Ave. j 
Lindenhurst, IL > 



cxxxxxxK.xxxxxxxxxxxyjoooo 



Orncri School Bui 



Men Ifou flbb h iip... 



7«ii-t1m« qth<tin+ 

aV«M»l y H*i*i f9.6f+ 

P*ii I.*i»iM/ T Vfl(i(}*,* + 

JdCfctllf* f70«Hf^ 

Cttdit h«tp« + 
floik Pn>chtit "fit*%* 

. T«ii)0. At*+ 



A4*ui ?0i J>»i«l*| ft* hht>iti! 



Lake Bluff, Lake Forest 
and Libertyville Routes 

Anyone who enjoys children is invited 
lo apply! Working for Ryder, you'll 
enjoy convenient flexible muring and 
afternoon scheduling! 

NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! 

Applicants must be at least 21 years old 
with a good driving record. Drug screen- 
ing required. Call today to schedule an 
interview. 

847-680-9305 




SUBSTITUTE 
DIRECTORY 

The following schools need 
substitutes on a continuing basis, please contact 
the names listed below for further information. 

Antloch Community High School District ft 117 
1133 Main Si, Aiilioch, 11.60002 

Contact: Marie. (847.) 395-1421 x224 

Aptaklslc - Tripp School District #102 
1231 Wciland Rd, Buffalo Grow, 11.60089 

Contact: Uurcl Karolczak (847) 634-5338 

Beach Park School Dlst #3 
11315 W. Wadsworth Rd„ Zfon, II. 60099 

Contact: Kaa-n C8-i7) 623-9300 

Grayslake School District #46 
450 N. Barron Blvd., Grayslake, II. 60030 

Contact: Jan Fabry. (847) 223-3650 x 1 100 

Grass Lake School District #36 
26177 W. Grass Like Road, Antioch, IL 60002 

Contact: Pat Reed or Sue (847) 395-1550 

Hawthorn School District 73 

201 Hawthorn Parkway, Vernon Hills, II.6OO6I 

Contact: Mary Tell (847) 367-3279 

Like Villa School District #4 1 
131 McKiuIey, Lake Villa, 11,600-16 

Contact: Katliy (847) 356-2385 

Round Like Area Schools 

316 S. RosedaJe Ct., Round lake, II. 60073 

Contact: Maureen (847) 546-5522 x 3010 

Wlnthrop Harbor Schools 
309 9th Street, Winlhrop Harbor, IL6OO96 

Contact: Dr. Hud Marks (847) 746-147 1 

Zlon Elementary School Dlst. #6 

2200 Iklhesda Blvd., Zlon, IL 60099 

Contact. Karen (847)872-5455 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Timc 



DRIVERS 

lOTR/Rcgloncl. Immcd! 
J Openings. Join the win- 1 
jnlng team! Drive fori 
'JoTiff Transportation &) 
jrecelve up to $23001 
I bonuses the 1st yeor.j 
Great bnfts, 000-073- 
5G53 Mon Oo-Sot noon. 



" — — ' — - — — - — "- — — -n 



BMANCIB 

Amcrian Wireless, a leading eel- 
ular phone diuribuior has an 
ripening for a finance Awistinl. 
Rcsponiiiiititin include account 
receivable maintenance, file 
reviews and sales department 
interaction for a 37-stale region. 
Qualified candidates will possess 
at least 2 years finance experience. 
College degree preferred will con 
sider related work experience 
Must possess strong finance com 
muniaiion, customer service, 
computer and organizational 
skills. Competitive salary, 401k, 
and excellent work environment. 
Fax or mail resumes to: 



American Wireless 

45 Albrccht Dr. 

Lnkc Illiirr, IL 60044 

Attn: Ted 

Fax: 800-726-2343 



w i wi ■■■■»»■ mmm rr t ■ ■■ n 



RfcJTAURArVI 

fHAfVACEfHErVT 

STEP OUT 

From Behind the Counter 

If you've had enough of Ihc 
favt food/diner game and are 
looking to join an organiza- 
tion that rewards hard work 
and experience, we'd like to 
talk to you. Wc arc a nation- 
al, well-known ' family 
restaurant chain with imme- 
diate openings. Qualified 
candidates should have some 
managemcnl experience. 

Our compensation package 
afferi: 

• Incentive bonuses for 

ALL managers 

• Full bene fits 

(dental, vision, 

401 (k), tuition reim- 

burKmenL and mure) 

• Promote from 
within policy 

• 5-Day work week 

* Kucellcnt, 

comprehensive 

training program 

If you're icady lo make a 
great career move, send 
your resume and salary 
requirements today in con- 
fidence to; Denny's, 
Human Resources, 10300 
S. Cicero Ave., #163, Oak 
Lawn, IL 60453 or fax: 
630-971-2165. 

EOKMtFtDtV 



PROFEtllONAL 
<DL DRIVERS 

Looking lo moke a 
change, join us at 
Dirchwood Transport, 
Inc. 

Applications arc now 
being accepted for our 
over the road division. 

Out fMy /ucLigi* include*: 

•Mill-age payvd off the hub 
•Slop p.iy 
•Unloading pay 
•Fueling pay 
•Drop and hook piy 
* I Vc forma nee Bonus Pay 

Our bate fit pjchge contains.* 

•Rild Holidays 

'I'jld Vacations 

•Heallh, Vision jnd Dental 

Insurance 

MO IK I'rogram 

'Safety Ilonus 

Do not delay apply 
today at: 

BIRCHWOOD 
TRAHtPORT# 

31 It -152nd Ave. 

Kenosha, Wl 53144 

Phone a 414-059-3010 



February 6, 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C 1 5 



i 












220 



llelpWinled 
Full-Tune 



OTVi Tlffi DOOR TO DDEWEH- . 
_A tai«i MMbowi ofatfcrfc* wa- 
fer* tad doon wrrtatfi mil a 
(tnpl'iwiu »ut ^JivWd trkficxK 
il^a»^Uo»laip,<adipro(>v 
utni] IT*-** 

_JU*D OrEH THE DOOR TO 
REWWID 

Vi .rrwd ( n r fe m m ct *ki I a «spcu • 
tM til«T •«! t ir t IV a be tc ffl f<M Ij p 
u t flinty, ta» ori** K iii i —ril 
Gel jurt fool u Ik 4xn *ila 
lOEWDLfa eseudrniiorj, Hok tad 
rsuttw, 

U0EWKN WINDOWS 

U0 1.ilr.irw Put* «jr 

WmrMHIiilL. II. 60061 

PkM7-UM6Cn 

fOE 



ORDER 
ENTRY/SALES 

Full time ixttiUon 

with full pucknRc l>cn- 

eflls plus profit slutr- 

lug. Job en falls 

Customer Service, 

Computer Order 

Entry, Quotes, nnd 

ruing. Apply in 
Person at: 

Pnyrvoii t A^ttr*. Inc. 

fc32«1 OcLuiy Road 

Gnmcc, IX GOO.ll 

or /or jTSume lo 

Kathy ali 

(847) 336-05*2 



Area 

Representatives 

International 

Student 
Exchange provides 

training, travel opportunity 
and supplemental income 
for placement and supervi- 
sion of exchange students, 

their host families and 
schools. BONUS for previ- 
ous experience as Area 
Rep. Send resume UK 
Mr*. Kay Walker, 32 15 

Garr RtL, Berrien 

Spring*, Ml 49103 Of 

Cafl 816*473.4809 



[ACCEPTING ArrUCATlONS 
Fou Professional 

TRUCK DRIVERS 
car offers; 

• New Company-Owned 

Equipment 

• Suning Pay $13.05/1 lour; 
Top Rjic SIK.60/Ilour 

' Company-I'aid Ikncfiu 

Package (including I'nifil 
Siating for Regular Employee!) 
No Layover* 

Employment with Profitable, 
Financially Stable Company 
CCX REQUIRES: 
•ClauACOL(HorXand 
T crtdorKmenu.) 

Pleav ipr I)- in person, Monday 
through Friday between Ram A 
5pm al: CCX. W7 Tower Road, 

Munddtln, 11.60060 

CCX CON-WAY 

CENTRAL EXPRESS 
CCXbtm 



llducatkn 

COUJECE OF IAKE COUNTY 
(GreaM-'aedtd ftnhlom) 

WORKPIACE TRAINING 

COORDINATOR 

Primarily mpomibte f tw workplace 
contract* and «hct employee devet 
ufKncnl uiwmi |m>(tuiu- A 
Uacric|or'* Degree in IWiincu, 
Adult t-ducatian or a related liaci- 
pJitvc and two (I) yean ulea (u>f po- 
int training uwini] cipcrienct 
• re required. Knowledgeable in LSI. 
training program* and (rani writing 
ability art aim require J 

CORPORATE 
SERVICE SPECIALIST 

Primarily lopunuhle for C«porate 
Scrvicci training contract, employ 
ee development contract progfanii 
and wkucd wtnUrtorn and Him- 
nan. A Bachelor '» Degree in 
llunneiv AJull I ■Juration i>i i relal- 
(d diiciplrnc, tw> (Z) jean ulcl 
(axpoulc training ciml/acu) experi- 
ence and grant willing ability are 
requite J Knowledgeable of tommy 
nil; cnllrge rule la contract training 
la irquirtd. 

Submit a completed application, let- 
ter of initio! and rcturnc to Human 
Rcmuroti by February W, IVXI. 
Pleave contact Human RcwuiaaE. 
(WT) MV22I6 and TOD* (M7J 
223-561), for more infuiraaliori. 
COLLET.E OK LAKE COUNTY, 
IfJSI W. Watnlnglon St., 
OrayilaWt. II. KKJ.Ui.||»g, 
AA,t0EMv*drV 



220 



ffdp Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



HdpWnied 
FuD-Timt 



] 



Full or Part-Time. 

Busy Lake Villa 
Full Service Salon. 
(847) 356-2200 



HOTEl/MOITL 

Applicalions now being 

accepted for 

Front Desk Personnel 

Experience preferred 

M-F8to4 

apply In person 

3207 Buckley Rd (Rt 137) 

North Chicago 




otf-w* 41 



t 



You'll love working at Six Flags Great 
America. We're hiring thrill-makers for 
the 1998 season right now. 

Great pay. Great benefits. Flexible 
schedules. For more information 
stop by our Job Fair or call us at 
847-249-2045. 



Six Flags Great America 
• Employment Off ice 
542 N. Rt 21 

(Milwaukee Avenue Employee Entrance) 



Wc will be conducting future job fairs 
on February 14 & 21, 1998. 



i 




GREAT AMERICA 



A Trna Wam*r Efltartamwil Companr 

EOE; Drug Free Wofk Place 



INSIDE SALES 

Do you enjoy variety? Do you enjoy a 
challenge? Do you thrive in a fast 
paced, dynamic environment? If so, 
you could be the person we're looking 
for! 

Lolcclond Newspapers Is seeking the 
right person to Join our exciting Sales 
Department You will be a success If 
you possess good organizational skills, 
communication skills, and arc self- 
motivated. If you arc looking -for a 
rewarding career, Investigate tills posi- 
tion todayl 

Please fax or mail resume to 
Attn: Maureen Combs 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 

RO. Box 268 

Gra* slake, DL 60030 

Fax: (847) 333-8810 



220 



HdpWinied 
FuH-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuD-Time 



WAREHOUSE 

Major prumbing supply house 
has immediate) opening on 930 
am to 6:00 pm shift 
Wa«jhouse/tefWift exp. helpful, 
but wilt train. Must have COL 
(Class 8) lor occasional deliver 
ics. CompetJuvo wages and ox. 
benefit package, if you have (he 
right attitude, take pride in your 
work and are looking lor an 
opportunity with a growing com- 
pany, faxfrnai resume or apply 
In person: 

Jim Munch 

Builders Plumbing 

Supply Co. 

1424 Armour Blvd. 

Mundotoin, I L 60060 

Fax: B47-362-6527 

eoem/t/drV 



SEWING 

Seamstress Wanted 
"S< auceshao ceitmrraj" 

Paid Training. Day shift. 
hourly pay plus bonus 
incentives and premium 
OT. Heallh Benefits. Paid 
Vacations and Holidays. 
Clean, well lit. AC. pleas- 
ant surroundings. 
Apply In person: 

CYkE Fashions 

28250 Ballard Drive 

Lake Forest 

(S47)o16-I(60 



- 

i: . 



rOri- 



y 






if 

i 

i ■■■ 
I 

! 

\ 
I 

h 

h 

■ 



Global Manufacturer of electromechanical compo- 
ncnts has a unitjuc opportunity for dependable, deiail- 
orienled individuals In our Manufacturing Support 
department: 

Injection Mold Operator 

Must have experience wiih thermostat injection mold 
machines, be mechanically inclined, be able lo work inde- 
pendently, assure all parts arc of acceptable quality, com- 
plete tooling changeovers, maintain a constant flow of pro- 
duction, and properly record production and quality data. 
The ideal candidale will exhibit exceptional troubleshooting 
skills and safe work habits. 

Machine Set-Up Operators 

Must be mechanically inclined, able to work independently, 
assure all parts are of acceptable quality, complete tool 
changeovers, be concerned wiih safely, maintain a constant 
flow of production and properly record production charts. 

Wc hire only highly motivated individuals who 

enjoy working in a team environment. Wc 

offer a challenging environment, competitive 

salary, and extensive benefits. Please apply in 

person, send your resume lo; 

K&B 



1 

■ 

I 

i 

'! 
■ii 

i 

< 



Mundclein, Inc., 675 Tower Rd., 
Miindclcin, IL 60060. 
Fax: (847) 949-4250, or call at 
(847) 949-8501, cxL 58. 



I 
i 

i 



* i .- - 



»^^i 



"A^m 



Uniforms Unlimited, !nc, is a direct mail order company spe- 
cializina in uniforms for the allied health care professions. 
Wc pride ourselves in the delivery of outstanding customer 
service through a team oriented approach. 

Our employees enjoy a clean and professional working en- 
viroruncnt, competitive wages, major medical benefils, profit 
sharing, and the experience of growing wiih a rapidly ex- 
panding company. The following opportunities are available 
to join Ihc Uniforms Unlimited, Inc. team. 

Customer Service 



^szzznzzzr. 



Take incoming customer calls for new and existing orders. 
Familiarity with a computer keyboard and excellenl commu- 
nication skills arc necessary, Wc ship our customer orders in 
24 hours! 

Our customer service center is open from 7am - 7pm, A flex- 
ible, full lime, position is available during these hours with 
part lime positions in Ihc mornings or evenings. Every other 
Saturday is required. These posilions start at S9/hr. 

Seamstress jas d^~^"., '~~. 4 

Work with single-station automatic embroidery machines for 
custom orders. Attention to detail and basic literacy is re- 
quired. Wc will [rain. 

Full time shifts arc 6am - 2:30pm with part time shifts from 
6am • 10:30 or 10:30 to 7pm. These positions start al $8/hr. 

www— 



Warehouse 

Service cuslomer orders by pulling and packing stock with a 
computerized scanner. Wc will train. 

Full time positions available from 7am - 3:30pm, or Sam - 
4:30pm. These positions start al $7.5Q7hr. 

Please respond to Ruth Erbach, B47-82V-7755, 700 Corpo- 
rate Woods Parkway, Vernon Hills, IL 60061, or rat to 847- 
821-8885. EOE 

II uniforms unlimited, inc. II 




Summer, Joes!!! 

US CHALLENGE yOU!!! 

Now Is the time to start thinking about your ultimate spring 

and/or summer job experience! 

Are you motivated? Outgoing? 

A team player? Do you love to Travel? 



m 

INVESTMENTS 



*Santa Clara, CA *Houston, TX 

'Cincinnati, OH 'Chicago, IL 
'Jackson, NJ 



CVC has over eight years of experience working in theme parks throughout ihe country selling various products such as Cotton 
Candy Sodas and Water al Iho various shows and ride lines in the theme parks. Full-time employees can gross between $4000- 
S6000'in a given summer! Housing and transportalion are providedl An excellent opportunity to build your resume while meeting 
and working with studonts from across the nation, make great money and be in great shape by the end ol the summer! Flexible 
hours for part/full time positions. Out-of-state and local positions available (at our Six Rag's Great America locabon). 

Interested??? Call 800/CVC-9957 

E-MAIL cvcinvest@aol.com 

You Won't Regret It!!! 

tt A Little Bit of Hard Work for an Experience of A Lifetime!" 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



DEVtaOPiVnnVTAL TRAINERS 
Gtefifcirx helps people with rievetoeirriertaJ tfsaWrl^ 
rvty Ihe. Positions are avadabfe at our vocational training centers in 
Arwcton Heights and Mundetem teaching vatuatta work traits to adults 
with drsatoarues. Hour* are Monday thru Friday SarrMpm. Applicants 
must be 21 years old with a high school c5pfoma and valid driver's 
ficenso. Ho experience necessary. Ask about fuB and part-time posi- 
lions avaJabfc al our smal group homes in Lake and northwest Cook 
Counties. 
For Immediate interview contact; 

BoJph Robinson - R*crUtlng Coortflnotor 

B47-Z7Z*m «xt. TSO 

eoerrvt/drV 



'r^^gi^c^jr^-y^^^S^Te^Tg^-r^IC^^g^ItSi 



Major Lake County Corporation 
seeks high energy career minded 

Individual to join our customer 
service department. Future man- 
agement potential. $25K. 

For interview: 

244-OOlb 

perior 
Personnel 




5^!S T JSS^J]t55^T2^y?STTSS!7S T I^^S7: 




,T*- -r- i; - n*f « . * A -^ 



ASSISTANT MANAGERS 

Hawthorn Center • Northbrook Ct. 
(Other Suburban Locations) 

IPn(2ffimBIB HjfS @,fiMimiTTO 

jChlcagoland's largest retailer and framing: 
chain has openings at several locations for 
those interested in putting- their creative 
skills to work! We will train yon to manage 
a professional business selling beautiful 
reproduction art and customized framing. 
T3ils entry-level position offers 1 7K starting 
salary, bonuses, medical/dental. Paid vaca- 
tion & advancement opportunities. 
I Send/fax resume tot 

Director of Store Operations 

3141 Macarthur Blvd. 

Northbrook, IX 60062 

FAX: 847-272-4614 



PMVERS 



Immcd Openings. S1000 Hiring Bonus (Must 
slay on Job 90 days). Our Drivers avg S40K +. 
yrty! Luciano needs: 'Tractor Trailer Drivers: 
must have at least lyr tractor/trailer exp & a 
good working & safety record. Single Drivers 
usually home every 10-12 days. We Offer. 

'28C-29C per mile (single) 

*S20 per delivery (after 1 st) 

'Layover & break down pay 

'Group hlth/life/disability insurance 

'Paid hldys & vacas 

'401 K retirement plans 

'Assigned convenlionals 

•Rider program 

'Weekly payroll 

'Credit Union 
Gel Home Oflen! We have brand new Volvo 
Condos to fill] Call Luciano Refrigerated 
Transport 800-753-8165 



Global Manufacturer of 

electromechanical components 

has a unique opportunity for 

dependable, detail oriented 

individuals in our Manufacturing 

Support department: 



MACHINE MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN 



Experience in machine repair, hydraulics, pneumat- 
ics, troubleshooting, and some electronics in a man- 
ufacturing environment are requirements tor this chal- 
lenging position. 



ELECTRICIAN 



k Will be responsible for planning the wiring and instal- A 
^ iation ol equipment and fixtures; ensure wiring and ] 
k fixtures conform to company specifications and local 4 

► electrical codes; interpret specifications, blueprints a 
and work orders; and repair and maintain machines * 
and equipment. 

We hire only highly motivated individuals who 
enjoy working in a learn environment. We offer 
a challenging environment, competitive salary, 
and extensive benefits. Please apply in per- 
son, send your resume to: 

K&B - Mundelein, Inc., 675 Tower Rd., 

Mundeleln, IL 60060. 

Fax: (847) 949-4250, or call at 

(847)949-8501,0X158. 




:j.\ :. \ ..-.'_". ,\ , '.::' : . . -I '.v.'.'&v^-J 



C 1 6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 6, 1998 



220 



Help Wanled 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wailed 
Full-Time 



J 



'Housekeeper/ 
Laundry Aide 

Full Time & Part Time 
positions available. 

Competitive salary & ben- 
efits. Must be reliable, 
have own transportation 
and be willing to learn. 
Some weekends required. 
Call Gene or Arlene at: 

Care Centre 
of Wauconda 

176 Thorn** Ct. 
Wiiufxmda, IL 0OO84 

847/526-5551 
Fax 847/526-7549 



h— — weo a i ■ ■ ■ ■ mew m a ■ i — 1 1 



instructor 

Computer Aided Drafting 
(AutoCAD) 

Electronic* Technology 

Immediate openings 
available for the right 
candidate. Position 
requires dedication and 
a commitment to teach- 
ing. If your military/civil- 
ian experience and edu- 
cation qualifies you, 
apply today. Send or fax 

your resume to: 

nTTechnlcal Institute 

6300 W. Layton Avo. 

Greenfield, Wl 

53220-4612 

Attn: Director of 

Education 

Fax: 414-282-9698 

email: soibner@caeqic.com 



MACHINISTS (CNC) 

Liquid Controls, LLC. a leading manufacturer of flow mclcrs and tlcctrumc 
cquiptncnl, is looking for experienced machinists (2nd or 3rd shift); must 
be knowledgeable in scl-up and operation of CNC machines and interpreta- 
tion of blueprints. MuM be ahlc lo pass Machinist's exam. 

We offer a tcam-oricntcd workplace with a full range of healthcare, pension 
plan, -mill) and 13 paid holidays. 

If interested, please visit our office al 105 Alhrcchi Dr., Lake Bluff, IL 

60IM4 (east of Rl. 43 and south of Ri. 176) from 8:1X1 am to 4:30 pm, Mon 

ihru Fri. to fill out an application, or fat resume lo 847-295-1399. 

EOE M/I7V/D 



HUMAN RESOURCE ASSISTANT 

CM. (Win !v, Int. n a (xiWKf nmjl jrvi (ml lulnwir mjnu(,tt finer, Vt'e itc strline 
an npcrimcwIMunun Resource IVison TJw qualified candidate will hhr 2-t >«rs of 
UK rtpcrfeice in a nunuUluiinj; rmmmmifil fhiv ruiwtiun h <«pt»wl»lf lor admin- 
tiltJlum i if all Jrcji eii I IK (uw rum* with an rmpruus m bmrfos, »« ruilmctil, vmpiif 
it- rrljtiiim, cnmrxuutnin jml ioining. IT tvninkny, mdudins VVikH. Furl and in 
HRIS. prrfrraWy Al3KA. a [>lnv f nrllrrt out and wtitltii lummunnalHio jlitk with a 
hi|h antfition Id drUil 

We offer .i complete lnwfiH package including; 

* Mwlic.il, Dental, and Virion Insurance 

• 401 Ik) I'lan • frnpliiyif Stock Owncnhtp 

• I vifllrnl \\'aw> 

Apply in person, ninil or fax resume to: 

Humeri Resources 

CM. Products, Inc. 

800 f .l.i Kd. • Lake Zurich, II (.00-17 
fax: (847) 72fr-5257 




Quality Assurance Ub Tech 



i 



r^?^ M.i/of minuiicturw or etoctromecnamcal components has an 

opening tor a Qualify Techmam The cartddaic- tw tins /& 
i posjlton wiD implement standards arv) meifads br equip- 
ment and gage eal<bra*iort, identify arid record nonconlor 




0/ with measuring equipment are desirable We oner a challenging enwein- Y>-] 
U menl, competitive salary, and extensive benefits Please nppty In person, " 
i send your resume lo:K4B-Mundetein, Inc., 675 Tower Rd.,Mundelein, 
IL 60060. Fax: (M7) W9-42S0, or call at (W7) W9-&M1 , cxt. 58. 



GREAT WAGES & BENEFITS. 
HIRING BONUS. 

PLEASE APPLY AT 

©©sir ©ymriiai; 

- GURNEE MILLS 

CINDY 847-855-9956 

-ZION, 1311 21 ST ST, 

(Across from Jewel) 
CINDY 847-746-5350 



i 



J 





i 



fci! 



IDCIJL/M2 

Dollar General, one of the nation's fastest 

growing retail chains with over 3000 
stores is currently hiring for our new loca- 
tions in Grayslake, Fox Lake, anil 
Atuioch. Qualified applicants will he hard 
working and enjoy a fun atmosphere. We 
offer competitive wages, benefits and 
bonuses. Interested applicants should 
apply in person on Sat., February 7lh and 
Mon., February 9ifi from °am-3pm at our 
Grayslake location at: 
61 Center Street, Grayslake, IL 
EOF 




225 



Business 
Opportunities 



$75,000 SIX MONTHS 

WILL TRAIN. 

NO EXPERINCE 

NECESSARY, 

1-800-322-6169 

ext. 8030 24hra. 

A BUSINESS OPPORTUN- 
ITY TO BE THE STAR OF 
YOUR OWN SHOW. (847) 
432-2681. 

ABSOLUTE 

INDEPENDENCE) 

90% PROFIT! 

5-10K'mcn1h part-lime from 

homo. Outstanding on-going 

support, training and leads. 

Not MLM, 

1-000-995-0796. 

"EXT. 0393" 



CAREER 

FRUSTRATIONS? 

NEED ADDITIONAL 

INCOME? 

Earn Serious Monoyl 

WorK from home. 

1-800-9950796 

oxt. 3526. 

FULUPART-TIME IN- 

COME OPPORTUNITY. 

The Pampered Chef is looking 
for kitchen consultants. Work 
from homo. Local training. In- 
credible income. Call (B47) 
918-1550. 

MAKE SERIOUS MONEY) 

Your own business with 

unlimited income. 

Free 24hr. message. 

1 ■688-574-9683. 

NASCAR LICENSE PRO- 
DUCTS - No selling, restock 
established accounts dal- 
ly/ovening, Pari or full-lime 
business. Local area, invest- 
ment required 515,900 so- 
cured 1-800-351-4885, oxt. 
2616650. 

NEARLY 9 MILLION 
HOUSEHOLDS around 

North America and hun- 
dreds Of thousands of In- 
ternet users around the 
world can soo your adver- 
tising message when you 
advertise in the Suburban 
Classified Advertising Not- 
work-SCAN! It's an easy-to- 
use one and inexpensive or- 
der/ono invoice service that re- 
alty works. For information, 
Call 312-644-6610 x4731. 
(SCA Network) 



228 


Situations Vanlrtl 



HOUSECLEAN1NG DE- 

PENDABLE, FREE ESTI- 
MATES, Phono Marci (414) 
942-8825 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



SALES HNS IDE 

Wt ix Vtlinj u ,(j !:v..f imlft k) tell 
olilt, uwecim A inrwmrt hi (he tmuJ- 
uJ rr.Jilrt Quliticd u.-iitiiw rid tint 1 
)i\ idtfW ukt ctp. k ■ iccfciuol 

mtttwiul jfiilusk Cunftnwn* umwikh- 
tuttlc w>). Sllwj, l"iiui r.lir,, a.rar. 
htiBKlkiuL 1 «JIK- CiH MI-Wi-VM at 

til rev.™ tJ CUlt W,![ A ( j'.lc. M T-'JCI. 

tm. I JH Anwwi lllid , Munldon. IL 



DEVELOPMENT I 

DIRECTOR 

Catholic high school seeks 
development pro with HA 
and 5+ years cxpr, in 
rnndraising, supervision, 
finance. Fax resume with 
references lo: 847-56o- 
8-165. Or mail to: Search 
Committee, Carmcl High 
School, I Carmcl Parkway, 
MUndclcin,[Lf>G06(). 



^ixi mxm i ruri rrrrmxi r 

HOUSEKEEPERS 

1ST SHIFT 

PRNs (As Needed) 

Highland Park Hospital, a well 
respected 250 bed facility, is 
currently seeking dedicated 
individuals lo join our learn! Will 
provide daily cleaning/supply- 
ing ol patient rooms, lounges, 
labs, bathrooms and other 
| areas in accordance wilh stan- 
dard operating procedures. 

Must possess the ability lo to) 
low instructions, loam to opcr 
ato cleaning devices as well as 
manipulate patient beds for 
checkout cleaning. 

For consideration, please apply 
in person between 8.00 am 
4:30 pm at: Human Resources 
HIGHLAND PARK 
HOSPITAL 

L71B Glenview Ave. 
HIGHLAND PARK 
(ooo m/l/dM 



240 


Child Care 



CALLING ALL LAKE 
COUNTY MOMSI1I Bright 
Beginnings Family Day Caro 
Notwork is looking (or nurtur- 
ing, rosponslblo, creative indi- 
viduals who would liko lo start 
their own business while stay- 
ing homo with their children. II 
you live In Lake Villa, Linden- 
hurst, Gumeo, Grayslako or 
Round Lake and would liko as- 
sistance In getting licensed, 
ongoing technical assistance, 
and child referrals, this pro- 
gram is for you. For mora infor- 
mation on how to become a 
quality infant and toddler day 
care provider in your homo, 
cad Dona Thompson (847) 
356-4112. 

CALLING ALL WORKING 
MOMSIII Fall Is just around 
Iho corner, have you planned 
your children's day caro yet? 
Immediate openings for child- 
ren ages 6/weoks & up are 
available in Bright Beginnings 
Homo Day Caro Network. For 
more information on how to 
enroll your child in a conven- 
iently located, quality day caro 
home, plcaso call Dona 
Thompson at (847) 356-4112. 
SPACES ARE LIMITED, SO 
CALL IMMEDIATELY. 

•CHILD CARE IN MY 
WADSWORTH HOME, 

part/full-time. meals and 
snacks provided, lots of TLC. 
(847) 395-4254. 



COMFORTABLE CARE 
YOU CAN COUNT ON. 

Grayslako homo daycare, has 
1 opening. Infants welcome. 
References available. (847) 
223-7581. 

EXPERIENCED NANNY 

NEEDED 3-days/week, Mon- 
dayAVedncsday/Thursday, in 
Grayslake homo, 4-kids. Must 
have car. (647) 223-2408 

FOSTER HOMES NEED- 
ED! Wanled good, nurturing 
individual to provide tempo- 
rary homes for children ages 
birth to adolescent, Training, 
support, compensation, day 
caro provided. Contact Cathol- 
ic Chariiies/Lako County. 
(847) 782-4242 or (847) 782- 
4243. 

GRAYSLAKE LICENSED. 
LOVING homo daycare. Rl. 
83 at Shorcwood. Flexible 
rales and schedules. (847) 
543-9691. 

LOVING CHILD CARE 
AVAILABLE In my homo. 
Playroom, meals, activities. 
FT/PT. references. (847) 
625-1938. 

NANNY NEEDED 

FULUPART-TIME. Cheery 

disposition, playful nature, 
loves children, live in/out, 
drive, references. Competitive 
salary. (647) 634-8636, 

RELIABLE EXPERIENCED 
WAUKEGAN mother will pro- 
vide quality daycare for your 
child, infants welcome . 1st & 
2nd snilt openings available. 
(647) 782-8608. 

STAY *N PLAY HOME 
DAYCARE has 2-openings in 
my Round Lako Park homo. 
References included. First 
Aido Certified. Any questions 
call (847) 546-2047 and ask 
lor Mary. 

SWEET NANNY NEEDED 
lor happy lyr. old boy in my 
home part-time Groat pay, 
flexible hours, some ovenings, 
Lako Villa. (847) 356-6685. 

THE KIDS KOTTAGE has 

lull-timo openings tor toddler 
2yrs. & up in my liconsod Fox 
Lako daycare home. Struc- 
tured environment. Reason- 
able rates. Plenty of TLC. 
Ploaso call for interview. (847) 
SB7-0543. 

WINDY PRAIRIE DAY- 
CARE openings for FT/PT, 
newborn thru school ago. 2- 
playrooms, big yard, 2 meals 
and snacks, games, reading, 
preschool activities, puzzles, 
crads, computer games, fiold 
trips, parties, lots of fun and 
TLC. Excellent rolerencos. 
Hours of oporatton 6am-6pm. 
Call anytime (815) 675-655G. 



FOSTER HOMES 
NEEDED 

Wanted good nurturing indi- 
viduals to provide temporary 
homes for children, ages birth 
lo adolescent. Training, sup- 
port, arid compensation provid- 
ed. Cunlacl Catholic Charities 
in Like County at (H47) 782- 
4243 or (847)782-1241 



301 


Antiques 



LOOKING TO BUY AN- 
TIQUES, completo estatos or 
single Items. Specializing In 
40*8 furniture, (847) 

263-8562. 



304 



Appliances 



USED APPLIANCE SALE. 
All reconditioned & guar- 
anteed. Relrigorators, rangos, 
washers/dryors & froezors, 
Delivery & Installation avail- 
able. 

Wahl Appliance Center 

1209 Court Street 

McHonry, IL 

(815)365-1872. 

WHIRLPOOL REFRIG- 

ERATOR now condition, 
white, ico maker, I7.9cu.ft, 
$450. (847) 548-5688. 



314 


Building Materials 



STEEL BUILDINGS SALE: 
30x40x10, $4,594. 40x60x14, 
$8,155. 50x75x14. $11,195. 
50x100x16, $14,953. 

60*100x16. $17,603. Mini- 
storage buildings. 30x160, 32 
units, 513.944. Freo 

brochures. Sentinel Buildings, 
80O-327-079O. Extension 79. 



330 



Garage 
Rummage Sale 



AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIG SALE, and thero 
is still things that just did not 
go... Call us al LAKELAND 
Newspapers and run It 
under the 'FREE or Givea- 
ways* classified column. FREE 
ADS are NO CHARGEI 
(847)223-8161.0x1. 140. 



338 



llorsej&Tacki 



EQUINE INTERIORS, 
STALLS, tackrooms. con- 
crete work, barns, barn ropair. 
(414) 537-3158. 

SHAVINGS! 

Hay. straw, horso food. 

Purina Dog & Cat Food. 

Chicken Feed and 

Much more 

(414) 857-2525. 

WE DEUVER1 

M-F8-5 

Sot. 8-3. 



340 



I lou it-hold Goods 
Fumilurr. 



DECORATOR MOVING 
SALE! EASY CHAIR, 
SOFA and Lovcscat. Blue, 
Mauvo, Cream. $595. 
LEATHER sofa and love- 
seat. $950. Excellent condi- 
tion. MUST SELLI (847)548- 
1045. 

DECORATOR MOVING 

SALE! QUEEN ANNE 
STYLE bedroom, completo 
$1,100. Dining room set, 
$1,500. OAK bedroom sot 
$1,200, Ook dlnlngroom set 
$1,980. ALSO Sleigh bod- 
room sel, $1,745. All in PER- 
FECT condition. MUST 
SELLI (647)548-1045. 

16CU.IN. UPRIGHT 

FREEZER, perfect condition, 
$250. Original Ovation 12 
string guitar, with hard case, 
S700. (847) 356-3036. 

DABY CRIB AND dresser, 
excellent condition, S2O0/best. 
(847) 548- 8829. 

COMFORTER WITH 
SHAMS and drapes, 1 -wind- 
ow, 42x85. queen size rovers- 
ibio comforter, mauvo/crcam, 
565. (414) 694-5979. 

CUSTOM MADE BED 
SPREAD, full sizo. with 
drapes, 2-pair, 61x93, 
peach/cream background with 
lloral shades blue and cmna- 
mon. (414) G94-5979. 

CUSTOM MADE HOPE 
CHESTS, baby rockers, 
kitchen cabinets, country stylo 
hutch, Very reasonable. Call 
Mario Evonings (414) 
B62-2429. 

FOR^ SALE 25" COLOR 
CONSOLE TV, $125. Mi- 
crowavo ovon, $75, Sony Ster- 
eo. S75. Zenith color TV. IS*. 
$95. VCRA/HS. $95. AMF 
Orange, womens 10-spced' 
bike, $20.TI computer systom. 
Solid Oak GE stereo consolo. 
(847)216-2172. 

IF YOU HAVE 

FURNITURE TO SELL, 

A car, or appliances, If 

you arc having a Garage 

Sale or If you have a 

house lo soil or apartment 

to rent. 

Call Lisa before 10nm 

Wednosday toplaco 

your ud hero. 

(847) 223-8161 

oxt. 140. 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



DESIGNER MODEL 

HOME 

FURNITURE SALE 

Sola/Iovesoat sol. hunter 

green and cranberry, $595. 

Sofo/lovosoal set, 

earth tones, $695. 

Oilier sets, plaids, 

florals and toothers, otc. 

Dlnlngroom set, 

10-pioco, $1,595. 

Bedroom sot 

6- piece, $995. 

(B47) 329-4119. 

ELECTROLUX VACUUM 
WITH poworhoad and attach- 
ments. ExcoHont working con- 
dition, $75, (414)694-5979. 

MODEL HOME 

FURNITURE. 

Excoss and unclaimed 

sofas, lovoseals, 

chairs, tables. 

DININGROOM SETS, 

BEDROOM SETS, 

LEATHERS, etc. 

(630)778-3433. 

MUST SEEI SOLID OAK 
ENTERTAINMENT CEN- 
TER. Antique, one piece unit, 
custom made, ono of a kind. 
Asking $800/best. (847) 
872-1672 ask for Todd. 

TRADITIONAL ITALIAN 

PROVINCIAL 9-pieco cherry 
diningroom sot, 6-chairs, 
breakfronl, table. buffet. 
$3,900/besL (847) 948-9271. 



344 


Jewelry 



WEDDING SET: SOLI- 
TARE 3/4M. round diamond 
In plain setting. Appraised at 
S2.000. Best otfor. Call after 
7pm (847) 746-3452. 



349 


Clothing 



WEDDINQ DRESS DIA- 
MOND COLLECTION, bri- 
dal dross, sizo 16. Whlto, 
cathedral length train, off tho 
shoulder dress. Long sleeves, 
boautiful wilh sequins and 
pearls. Brand now hoadpicco 
and veil. Paid $2,000. first 
$500 lakes all. Call Melodi 

(414) 889 8414. 



350 


Mbcellaneou! 



AEROBIC RIDER WITH ris- 
er, excellent condition, liko 
new. Original $300, asking 
$200/best, (847) 625-7391 
after 6pm. ^_^^__ 

COMPLETE SET (78) of 
original Star Trok TV series, 
minus No. t. (847) 540-0083. 

DRESS YOUR KIDS 

FOR EflEfill 

YES FOR Efl££ll 

Brand Name & Designer 

Clothing! 

Complete System Only 

$9.95. 

Call Toll Froo 

1 888356-1 979. 

GET A COLLEGE DEGREE 
IN . 27 DAYS: 
BS/MS/MBS/Ph D etc. includ- 
ing graduation ring, transcript, 
diploma. Yes, it's real, legal, 
guaranteed and accredited. 
For Ireo packet call: 1-BOO- 
689-8647. 

GRAVELY LAWN MOWER 

and snowblower, needs work. 
best offer. (847) 740-1364, 

NEW BEL AIR 5 tier chande- 
lier. 188 pieces, $250/hrm. 
Call Jolt (847) B5G-1 109. 

OVER 100 HEAVY DUTY 
PACKING BOXES, with 
packing material, Priced lo sell 
quickly. Compare to moving 
company and save. $99/bosl. 
Call Kevin or Linda (047) 
223-1748. 

SOLID OAK PATIO DOOR. 
9)1., still In box. Will sett and in- 
stall for 50% of original price. 
Call today, (847) 543-81 13. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS. 
TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT 
and SAVE! Commercial/homo 
units from $199. Low monthly 
payments, FREE cotor cata- 
log. Call today 1-800-842- 
1310. 



354 



Medical Equip 
.Supplies 



MOTORIZED 
WHEELCHAIR 4-WHEEL 

reeling back, removable parts, 
baltory charger, including oto- 
vatod leg rosl. $4.950/bost. 
(847) 623-2067. 



To Place Your 
Classified Ad 

Here Call 
847*223.8161 



354 



Medical Equip 
Supplies 



MEDICARE RECI>IENT8; 

ARE you using a NEBULIZER 
MACHINE? STOP paying full 
price (or Albutorol, Alrovent, 
otc. solutions. MEDICARE will 
pay for thorn. Wo bill Medicare 
for you end ship directly to 
your door. MEO-A-SAVE 1- 
800-538-9849. 



358 



Musical Instruments 



ELECTRIC ORGAN, PAD- 
DED bench, music rack, In- 
struction books. Play tunes im- 
mediately. Groat for all ages. 
560. 34'wx15-1/2*dx32-1/2*h. 
(047) 5660990. 

LOWREY ORGAN WfTH 
Magic Gonio Keys, excellent 
condition. A must soo. 
$450/best. (414) 694-5979. 



360 



Pets & Supplies 



DOG BOARDING 
Vacation In your 

schedule? 

1 can watch your dog/pup in 

my homo. 

Lots of affection for your 

'Companion*. 

Convoniont from RL41/Edens 

or your O'Haro flight schedule 

Moro comfortable than a 

kennol. Reasonable. 

Call Florence or leavo 

message with dates needed. 

(847) 966-6319. 

COCKER SPANIEL, 

MALE, 1 l/months old, neu- 
tered. Looking for loving 
homo. (847) 637-1823. 

DO YOU ENJOY working 
with animals7 Do you havo 2 
i hours per week to spare? Assi- 
st Animal Foundation, ono of 
tho area's no- kill shelters is 
seeking volunteers for work 
thai is highly rewarding and 
fun" We need mon and 
women who: can work with 
cats and dogs, do light repair 
work and can answer phones 
and other office dutios. Wo are 
located in Crystal Lake, For 
moro information plcaso call 
(815)459-0990. 

EIGHT YEAR OLD FE- 
MALE GERMAN 
SHEPHERD AKC. Cham- 
pion Sirud. OFA hips, lo Qood 
homo only: (414) 837~2tS3. | 

HAPPY JACK LIQUI-VICT 
is not just a DIFFERENT LIQ- 
UID VVORMER. it's remark- 
ably BETTER than older liquid 
wormors. At TRACTOR SUP- 
PLY STORES. (Vuit 
WWW.HAPPYJACKINC.COM). 

LLHASA APSO MALE lyr. 
old. lo good home. (847) 

838-0236. 

VACATION? 

PET SITTING AND 

BEYONDI 

Wo como to your homo, 

with TLC. 

Bonded and insured, 

(647) 473-5776. 

POODLE PUPPY, FE- 
MALE, black, AKC Regis- 
tered. $400. (414) 843-3056 
ovenings, (414) 862-4900 
days, ask for Kalhy. 

ROTTWEILER PUPPIES 
GERMAN bloodline, good 
tomporamont. $300. Taking 
doposlts. Ready 1/26/98. 
(847) 244-4125. 



370 


TTanied To Buy 



ALL WAR SOUVENIRS. 
Nazi, Japanoso, & US, Local 
private collector in need of alt 
lypcs of helmets, daggers, 
medals, steins, war toys ♦ Sa- 
murai swords, Top cash paid 
and will pickup. (847) 
438-3191. 

BEANIE BABIES BUYING 
all retirods. Wo pay top dollar. 
1-800-296- 1197 Konosha, 
Wisconsin. 

CASH FOR TRAINS, Lion- 
el, American Fly or. Marx and 
access. Call Brad (847) 662- 
0447, (847) 336-6989, 

LOOKING TO BUY RE- 
TIRED BEANIE BABIES. I 
also sell or trade. Pam (647) 
362-6346. 

Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
Parts. Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coko Machines. 
Paying CASH! Call 
(630)965-2742. 

• *• ••• 



Recycle 



r j 



February 6, 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C 1 7 







500 


Homo For Sale 



*BY OWNER* 

Paddock Lako 3 Bodroom 
home, close to Kenosha, 
minutes from II., on 3 lots-i 
bulldable, city sewer, private 
well, needs somo inside work, 
priced thousands below mar* 
kot value. Priced to soil fast) 

414-537-4845. 
414537-3679. 

BY OWNER 4 BEDROOM, 
2.5 BATH Beautiful 2,100 
square M. HOME, family- 
room with firoptaco, dining- 
room, updated kitchen, fin- 
ished walk-out basement, 
largo screened dock. Profes- 
sionally landscaped, large 
yard with beautiful oak trees. 
Cioso to forest proscrve and 
playground with tennis and 
baskotbalt courts, $189,900. 
(BAT) 356-0275 

ATTENTION HOBBIESTS! 
STARTER homo offers 2- 
bedrooms, ifvingroom, dining- 
room, kitchen, freshly painted 
brand now flooring through- 
out, ho a led garogo for hobbi- 
es!, 10ft. walls. 29x30, sits on 
double lot In Fox Lako. Sewer 
and water, $79,900. (847) 
3SG-3898. 

WINTHROP HARBOR 

SPACIOUS 6-rooms, L- 

rancri, 3-becf rooms. 1-1/2 
baths, 2-1/2 car attached ga- 
rage, island, skylight, vaulted 
ceilings, trac-lighting, custom 
dock, huge rocroom with bar 
plus much more. Call Geri for 
appointment. (847) 715-2374 
days, (847) 724-0407 even- 
ings. 

FORECLOSED GOVERN* 
MENT HOMES. Save up to 
50% or more on repossessed 
homos. Uttlo/no down pay- 
ment. Bad credit OK. Toll freo 
1-80O-69O-9O73 oxt. 500. 
(SCA Network). 



GOUT 
FORECLOSURES 

Round UktPk, 160 .....ISt.000 

WwkrpMBD -$104,000 

Ro«J Ul. Hu. SBO . . ■ . J79.7SO 

Bttth PwV. 3 BO 4I0O.7SO 

Round UVeJBO .J4S.7SO 

ZiwOBD MS.1SQ 

Low Down Payment 

Make an Offer 
Western Realty 

(630)495-6100 



FOX LAKE/SPRING 

GROVE B0x168 lot, 2-1/2 car 
heated garage, first floor laun- 
dry, hardwood floors In living- 
room and master bedroom, 
eat -in area with patio doors to 
foncod-ln yard. $104,900. Call 
Sue RE-MAX ADVANTAGE 
(847) 356-7182, 



1 BUY HOUSES 

Also 

Money to Buy, 

Build or Refinance 

Your Homo/Income Property 

Lender Flexible. 

Fast Closings. 

(847) 872-4047. 



LAKE VILLA A touch of 
Country! Nico homo in quiet 
neighborhood with woods in 
your backyard. Your 3-bod- 
room tri- level features vaulted 
ceiling frvingroom & country 
kitchen. You wilt enjoy 2-fuii 
baths, main level laundry, full 
basement with oak cabinets 
throughout Barbeque on your 
largo deck while watching the 
weeds wild life or snuggle by 
the brick fireplace in your 
largo famiryroom. This move- 
in condition home with many 
extras can bo yours. Priced to 
sell at $179,000. Call for pri- 
vate showing. 25 Monica 
Drive. (847) 265-9220. 

WAUCONDA BANGS 
LAKE, 908 Madison, 2-bod- 
room summer cottage, city 
sewers, natural gas installed. 
private beach, boat launch 
and anchoring. $62,900. (708) 
562-2033. 

LAKEFRONT MILLION 

$$$ VIEW!! WatorskJ, snow- 
mobile, ice fish from this 130 
aero take. 3-bodroom, t-baih. 
1-1/2 car garage. Close to 
schools and shopping, yet so- 
eluded Great year round fry- 
ing. Super weekend homo. By 
appointment (847) 223-8075. 
$135,900. 



ISLAND LAKE WATER- 
FRONT, 2-car garage, 2-1/2 
baths, 3/4 bedrooms, firo- 
ptaco, famiryroom, lots of ex- 
tras, $167,000. (847) 
526-0429 loavo message. 

ITS NOT TOO EARLY TO 
THINK OF THAT SUMMER 
HOMEI 3-bedroom ranch lo- 
cated less than 45 minutes 
from tho Wisconsin/Illinois bor- 
der. Private beach rights on 
popular Browns Lako. 1-1/2 
baths, famiryroom wilh natural 
fireplace, newly, remodeled 
kitchen and bath. For sale by 
owner. SUO.OOO's. • 2401 
Coder Dr., Burlington, Wiscon- 
sin. (920) 894-4150. 

INGLESIDE GORGEOUS 
CUSTOM built, 5-bcdroom, 
3.5 bath, master whirlpool. 
solid 6 panel doors, custom 
mantel/stair. 1st door 9ft. ceil- 
ings, hardwoods, office, for- 
mal living room and dining- 
room, large famiryroom, kitch- 
en, vaulted ceilings, skylights, 
finished basement, 3-car ga- 
rago, wrap around porch, 
deck, professionally decorat- 
ed and landscaped, almost 
3/4 acre in great subdivision. 
Must sell. Our loss, your gain. 
$225.900. (847)587-5411. 

OPEN HOUSE BY OWNER, 
Saturday, l2noon-4pm, 2yr 
old builder home, tri- level, 3 
bedrooms, 3-baths, 2-car at 
(ached garage, great neigh 
borhood, $140,000. 1003 Bar 
berry La, Round lake Beach. 

(847) 740-4664. 

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 
12pm-2pm, 1107 Chesa- 
peake Blvd., Charming Grays- 
lake 4 -bedroom house In Che- 
sapeake Farms, perfect family 
homo with brick fireplace and 
custom cabinetry . in family- 
room. (847) 548-2678. 

ANTIOCH-SPRING 
GROVE 2.00OSQ.FT., 3- 
bedroom. 2-bath, $127,900. 
(847) 587-8520. Photo @ 
www.forsalebyowncr.com 
(code 781 84 11). 



uummjuu 



WADSWOItni: 1 10 Kit csuie pir- 
ctl-nuy be divided 5040, nothing 
uiuIIct. Zoned for 2-tat but cvrtat- 

I j uvc J Tw crop. l&ntUOQ. 

ZION: i «cre wooded bomesite b> 
nrtuine nual-dc«)opaKM- Cratntlf 
locjicd tetwt** Oikip" A 
Mi!«iiAm ; duac to fural pretenc 

A miriiu III'?.'*" 

CENTURY 21 

RUSS GWALTNEY 

(847) 223-4800 




Ski/Fish, 90' Waterfront, 
Dock/Pier, 4 txlnn. 2 bath, fam- 
ily room, fplc, basement, 3 car 
garage, porch, patio, faru. 
fenced yard, plus MUCH 
MORE'. Asking below appraisal 
SI 55. MX). 

&47-546-7023 



•SECTION 8 DESIRED 
* APPROVED* 

2404 Elisha, Zion, 

Huge 4 Bd r 

IBd. &. studios 

from $325-1 Bd.504 

]0ih Si, Wkgn from 

$350 • 1446 Kristan 

3 Bd. N.Chi. '1517 

Lyons 3 Bd. Wkgn. • 

426 Liberty 2& 3 

Bd.Wlcgn. 

Lake Cook 

Property Mngt. 

1-312-837-0600 




BURROWS 



ALandmark 
Designs 



3P 



t_inp 










's' 



BURROWS 

Brickwork, enjoins, cut stono arches over the windows, aicrig wim IJio hamxxici^ brk* arcf^ 
garago begin trw majestic thorre. Tho acccm^^ 

tor working , afford many outstanring features to be shared with famiy and guests afca. A large lot or acreage is 
needed b contain this home of 3.453 square feet 

An arched transom window above double doors opens into the entry, where windows look into a bright skytght 
hied spa rcoii. Cti the Wl les a ha^ bath and an oflk^ 
traffic flow by a hallway. 

The first opening in tho hal leads into the kitchen arxjfam*yrocmTrie V-snarjcdkjtdienc^ 
extras kke a mixing center, secondary sink, and walk-in pantry. The eaung bar makes an informal transition into the 
family room Patio doors lead into the spa room from this area, wbio two other doors lead to the separate docks. At 
the back of tho spacious tamfly room, a corner bay window, and an angled (replace emt both Eght and warmth. 

Across the ha! from the kitchen is the dring room. Its location allows a torrul touch, away fr^ 
ration, as wel as an unobstructed view of the fireplace from the table Trear^aDentfcvingrcom makes the area per- 
iod for entertaining guests or dents. 

Further down tho hal are two large bedrooms with walk-in closets, shamg a ccnimen hi bath. Across the hal 
s a utility room wrth a deep sink, lofcing center, and Inon storage Near the garage entry, a generous guest state 
with outside access, also includes a M bath and walk-in closet. 

At the opposite end of the home, a luxurious master surte welcomes each morning and right with al the finest 
amenities. This private domain has room for exeroso equipment as wt* as a kjrig sue bed Entcmg the rre^ 
a sky&ght brightens up the double sink vanity area, as wd as the deep waft-in deset Up two steps, tne dover 
shaped tub gfows with dispersod kjht from glass block near the coding. 

For a study kit ol the BURROWS (405-16LP601 send $1455, to Landmark Designs, 33127 Saginaw Rd E, 
Cottage Grove, OR 97424 (Specify plan name S nuntfwr tor kit). For a Dream Itome plan book foatunng our most 
popular homo plans, scrd $7.95, or caH 1-800-562-1151. 



500 



Homo For Safe 



LAKEFRONT HOME 
HOME on Bluff Lake (Chaln- 
O-takes), 2-bedrooms. fire- 
place, C/A, loft, full basemem, 
2-car garage, pier, appliances 
Included. Single owner. New* 
carpeting, roof, and dishwash- 
er. For appointment call (847) 
395-5439. Priced to sell 
$193,400. Will tower price 
$300 each Thursday until 
h ouse is sold. 

UNDENHURST $108,900 
2308 Sunset Lane. Updated 
2-bedroom ranch with big 
foncod In yard, 1-car attached 
garage, separate laundry- 
room, C/A. By appointment. 
(347) 265-1287 leave mes- 
sage. 

SHARRON WELL KEPT 5 
aero farmene, 3-bodrooms, 2- 
baths. 27ft. pool, lots of stor- 
age area. Horses O.K. 
$199,900. (414) 736-4345. 



500 


Homes For Stle 



NIPPERSIHK COUNTRY 
CLUB setting nestled among 
lakes end oaks. This charming 
2-bedroom. 1-1/2 bath coun- 
try home ts unique with fire- 
place and beamed Irving ceil- 
ing is a must to see. New from 
top to bottom! $87,500. (414} 
895-7280,(414)895-2819. 

OPEN HOUSE BY OWNER 
Saturday & Sunday. lpm-4pm 
or by appointment. Enjoy a 3- 
bedroom brick home, field 
stone fireplace, appliances, 
now dock lo enjoy the wooded 
yard, winding creek, tots of 
storage and access lo forest 
preserve, $116,900, 36235 N. 
Eagle Ct., Ingteside. (847) 
740-2716. 

NEW WASAU HOME, 
raised ranch, 1481 sq.ft., 
100x100ft. tol" Wisconsin & Hi- 
nols border. S87.000. (414) 
495-2718. 



Case No. 97 C 2003 
Judge CONION 



FISHER AND FISHER RLE NO. 31532 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 

NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 
Norwest Mortgage Inc.. A California 
Corporation, 

Plaintiff, 
VS. 
Bobby D. Sanders and Donna Sanders, 

Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OURFILEN0.31S3 2 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement entered 
in the above entitled cause on June 26. 1997 . 

I, Michael Poleile, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
March 16, 1998 at the hour of 9:30 am. at front door, Lake County 
Court House, 1 8 N. County Street, Waukegan. Illinois, sell to the 
highest bidder for cash, the following desenbed premises: 
c/k/a 617 N. Cedaiwood Circle, Round Lake Heights, IL 60073 
Tax ID I 06-17-105-012 

The improvements on the properly consist of single family 
dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 

The judgment amount was $86.171 .97. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney. 
Rsher and Fisher, 30 North LaSaTle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer ts Qpi required to provide additional information other than 
that set forth in this Notice. 



(Case No. 95 C 1187 
| JUDGE GETTLEMAN 



RSHER AND FISHER - RLE NO. 773»1 
IHTHE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF tUJNQtS EASTERN DIVISION 

Chemical Residential Mortgage ) 

Corporation, a New Jersey Corporation ) 
|/K/a Margareflon and Company, Inc., 

Plaintiff, 
VS. 

Dwayne V. Jernigan and Marcel L 
Johnson, North Shore Sanitary Dtstrid 

Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 
OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 
Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgment entered in 
the above entitled causa on October 22, 1997. 

I Thomas Johnson and Tma Douglas, Special Commissioners 
lor "this court win on March 4, 1998 at the hour ol 130 p.m. al the 
Iront door ol Lake County Courthouse. IB N. County St.. 
Waukegan. Illinois, sell to the highest bidder tor cash, the following 
described premises: 

cA/a 2043 Winter. North Chicago, IL 60064 
Tax IDU 12-05-113-024 and 12-05-113-043 

The improvements on the property consist ol single family, wood 
frame, one stcry and attached garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. Tho sale shall be subject lo gen- 
eral taxes and to special assessments. 
Tho property will NOT bo open for inspection. 
Tho Judgment amount was $106,556.60. 
Upon the sale being mado the purchaser will receive a Certificate 
of Sale which wiB entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a specified 
date unless tho property Is redeemed according to law. 

For information call tho Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney, Fisher 
and Fisher, 120 North LaSafio. Chicago. Knob. (312) 372-4784 
from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p,rn. Under Illinois law. tho Sales Officer is 
Not required to provide additional information other than that set 
forth in this Notice. 



RSHER AND HSHER RLE NO. 30847 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 

NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 
Home Savings of America, FSB i/k/a Home 
Savings of America, FA, Case No. 96 C 8578 

Plaintiff, Judge Norgte 

VS. 

Laura L Kertoo, First of America Bank- Northeast. 
Illinois, HA. and Mchael A Kerton, 
Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

QU&flLE-NQJQftlT. 

(TT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement entered 
in the above entitled cause on A pril 16. 199 7- 

I, Max Tyson, Special Commissioner lor this court will on 
February 27, 1998 at the hour of 900 a.m. at Lake County Court 
House. Waukegan, Illinois, sell to tho highest bidder lor cash, tne 
following desenbed premises: 
c/k/a 375 Fox Run, LibertyvtSle, IL 60043 
Tax ID I 11-14-401-039 

The improvements on the property consist of single family 
dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open lor inspection. 

The judgment amount was $109,038 02, 

Upon the sate being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 

For information call tho Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Ftsher, 30 North LaSalte. Chicago, IL'inois. (312) 372- 
4784 Irom 1.00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under BBrtob law. the Sates 
Officer ts not required to provide additional mlormatwn otner than 
that set forth in this Notice. 



500 


Hornet For Sale 



500 


Homes For Sale 



PRICED TO SELL 

$144,900. 5- bedrooms. 2-full 
baths. Low taxes and great lo- 
cation with lake rights. Great- 
room and familyroom, C/A. Lo- 
cated nght off Rt. 45 between 
Washington and Rollins. Call 
to see. (847) 548-6973. 

WATCH THE SUN RISE 
OVER CROOKED LAKE 
while warming your toes in 
front of your gas fireplace. 
Beautiful, almost new 3-bed- 
room. 2-1/2 bath in Linden- 
hurst. For sale by owner. Brick 
and vinyl siding. Attached 2- 
car garage. Electronic security 
system. Professionally land- 
scaped. Hardwood foyer, 
kitchen and famiryroom, vault- 
ed ceilings. Owner MOTIVAT- 
ED. 298 Crooked Lake La Call 
(847) 356-6148 for appoint- 
ment SI 62.500. 



INGLESIDE WATER- 

FRONT 2 LOTS Be con- 
nected to the Chain. 2-bed- 
room, 1-bath bungelow, with 
full basement, concrete boal 
well, flagstone patio, central 
air conditioning, 2-car garage, 
largo parking lot. $120,000. 
(815) 759-0069. (847) 265- 
1690. 



HOME 
FOR 

SALE? 

I lace your ad here by 

culling f "Invilflccl al 

BV7.22tt.8l61 



Case No. 97 C 4526 
Judge SHADUR 



RSHER AND RSHER RLE NO. 32244 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 

NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 
Norwest Mortgage Inc., A California Corporation, 

Plaintiff, 
VS. 

Joseph E. Monte and Concetta A 
Monte, The Board ol Managers of the 
Library Hill Townhome Association, 
Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR RLE NO. 32244 

VT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

Qm ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Pubic Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement entered 
in the above entitled cause on November 14. 1997 . 

I, Thomas Johnson and Tina Douglas. Special Commissioner 
for this court will on March 1 8. 1 998 at the hour of 1 :30 p.m at the 
front door of Lake County Court House. 18 N. County Street, 
Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the follow- 
ing described premises: 
c/k/a 122 Vrsta View Dr„ Wauconda. IL 60084 
Tax IDf 09-23-401-053 

The improvements on the property consist ol Townhouse, brick 
construction, two story and attached garage. 

Sale Terms: 10W down by certrfad funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. 

The judgment amount was Si 84 .2-8. 60. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Rsher and Fisher, 30 North LaSatie. Chicago, fflmois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer is dqi required to provide additional information other than 
that set forth in this Notice. 






FISHER AND FISHER RLE NO. 32426 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 
Bank of America, FSB, 

Plaintiff, Case No. 97 C 501 8 

VS. Judge GOTTSCHALL 

Stephen P. Sirewcius and Linda M. Pmkus, 

Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR RLE NO. 32428 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

OWM ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby grven pursuant to a Judgement entered 
in the above entitled cause on October 31. 1997 . 

I, Thomas Johnson and Tina Douglas. Special Commissioner 
for this court wirt on March 1 B. 1 998 at the hour of 1 :30 pm. at the 
front door of Lake County Court House. 18 N. County Street, 
Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the follow- 
ing desenbed premises: 

c/k/a 28 W. Honeysuckle Lane, Round Lake Beach. IL 60073 
Tax ID! 06-09-310-054 

The improvements on the property consist of single family, 
wood frame, two story and attached garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance withjj 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 

Tho judgment amount was $147.41 1.55. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sate which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 

For information call the Sates Officer at Plaintiff* Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher. 30 North LaSalte. Chcago. Hlmots. P12) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 300 pm. Under IHmcus law, tne Sales 
Officer is sx& required to provide additional information other than 
that set form in this Notice. 



FISHER AND FISHER RLE NO. 31537 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 

NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 
Norwest Mortgage Inc., A California Corporation, 

Plaintiff. caa« No. 97 C 2001 

VS. Judgt AJesia 

Ke9y W. Devereaux and Patricia D. 
Devereaux, 

Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

QJJfiBLEJiflL3l53I 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

QYfH ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Pubfc Notce is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement entered 
in the above entitled cause on Decemb er 2. 1997 . 

I, Max Tyson, Special Commissioner for this court win on March 
10, 1998 at the hour ol 9.00 am. at Lake County Court House. 
Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the follow- 
ing desenbed premises: 
c/k/a 105 E. Aspen Circle. Hainesvitle. IL 60030 
Tax ID I 06-28-200-O23 

The improvements on the property consist of single family 
dwelling 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sate shall be subject lo 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. 

The judgment amount was $1 71.21057 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sate which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 

For mlormaucn carl the Sales Officer at Ramtiffs Attorney. 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalte. Chicago. Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784" from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois lav/, me Sates 
Officer is dqi required to provide additional information other than 
that set lorth in this Notice. 



I 



,.; .; ', ; -:-" . I 



C18 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 6, 1998 



> • 



504 


Homes For Rent 



504 


Homes For Renl 



514 



Gondo/TowTi Homes 



514 



Condo/Town Homes 



4-BEDBOOM LAKE- 
FRONT HOUSE, Petite 
Lake, Sl,200/monlh plus se- 
curity deposit, No pots. (847) 
265-6270, 

ALANWOOD 

ASSOCIATES 

(047) 223-1 141 

OPPORTUNITY IS 

KNOCKING IN 

ROUND LAKE HEIGHTSI 

Lease/option to purchase this 

3. bedroom homo with 

basement. You'll lovo tho 

neighborhood. Call for dotails. 

$800 + security. 

ANTIOCH 3-BEDROOM 
HOUSE, 1-bath. 1-car ga- 
rago, $B60/month plus securi- 
ty and utilitios. (847) 
838-5244. 

ANTIOCH LAKE CATHER- 
INE CHALET Furnished, 
vaulted ceilings, carpeted, 
now fridge and stove, air, now 
balh, fireplace, awesome view 
of the lakes, balcony, patio fur- 
niture, boat slip with shore sta- 
tion, electric included. Want 
quiet, non-partying, single. 
$700/month. Available March 
1st. (647)395-5530. 

BEACH PARK 3-BED- 
ROOM, lull basement, 
fenced-in backyard, 
5875/month plus utilities, 
Available immediately. Ask for 
Jim (847) 949-3948. 

CHARMING EARLY 

1900'S 3-bodroom house. 
Updated, hardwood floors, on 
bike path, walk lo train, school, 
heritage area. Great neighbor- 
hood. S1,250/monih. (847) 
680-7845. 



NEW ROUND LAKE 
BEACH HOME FOR 
RENT, 3-bedrooms, 1-1/2 
baths, large kitchen, living- 
room, dlnlngroom, family- 
room, fireplace. A/C, 2-V2 car 
garago, $1,l75/monln, or 
lease option. (847) 223-2408 
ovonlngs, (847) 223-5225 
days. 

ROUND LAKE PARK 
2,000sq.lt., 3-bedrooms, 2,5 
baths, loft, lormal diningroom, 
lonced yard, garage, C/A, 
walk lo school/train, 15 miles 
lo Groat Lakes NTC. Non- 
smokers only. Available now. 
S1,30O/month. (847) 546- 
5010, or e-mail; )tlt@a ol.com 

THREE BEDROOM TP.I- 
LEVEL, 2-1/2 car, Lake Vil- 
la/Llndonhursl. C/A, all ap- 
pliances. No Smokers/dogs or 
Section B. 51,240/monlh. 
(414)605-9096. 

WADSWORTH 2-BED- 

R0OM+, FULL basement, 1- 
acre. Dilleys Rd., $850/month. 
HAINESVILLE 2-bedroom 
apartment, 2nd lloor. Highway 
120, S650/month. DOWN- 
TOWN GRAYSLAKE 1 -bed- 
room. 2nd floor, $550/monlh. 
Efficiency apartments, $125- 
5165/wcokly. Sleeping rooms 
resort, S90-$100/weokly. 
Vouchors and Scclio 8 accept- 
ed. Pager (847) 335-4800, 
(847) 367-1360. 



GRAYSLAKE 


3-BED- 


ROOM HOUSE, 2-car ga- 


rago, close to 


tram, 


Sl.OOO/monlh. 


(847) 


223-1693. 




INGLESIDE NEW 


2-BED- 


ROOM duplex, large 


masler 


bedroom (20'xlO'J, atlached 


garage. C/A. S850/month. 


(847) 356-3898 




LIBERTYVILLE 


3-DED- 


ROOM, 1-BATH 


ranch, 


C/A. S950,'month plus deposit 


Available 3/15/98. 


(630) 


36B-Q966. 





PADDOCK LAKE 
- SALEM 

Lovely 2 BK, J BA 

home with deck. 

Lircic, open kitchen. 

Mo yar. or bsmt. 2 yr+ 

lease. $G34/mo + 

Sec. Dcp. Land Mgmt 

815-678-4334. 



514 



ConrkvTown Homes 



UHOEHHUOST 3-liED- 

ROOMS, 1-1/2 baths, new 
carpeting, buill-tns. 

SI,185/monm Available fm- 

niedtaiely. 2208 Briar In. 

T773)235 B-111 

WINTHROP HARBOR DU- 
PLEX cute 2-bedroom in quiet 
neighborhood, basement, ga- 
rage, fenced yard in back, 
$675/monih plus utilities. No 
pets No Section B. (847) 
223-6269. 



BUILD A DOWN PAY- 
MENT WHILE YOU RENT. 
25% goes toward down pay- 
ment on this groat 3 story 
conao in the woods. 2/3 bed 
rooms, 2,5 baths, 2-car ga- 
rage, C/A. so much morel 
W200/monUv Round LnV.o. 
K.ithy (847) 291-5444 or 
«M7J 587-9623. 

GRAYSLAKE TOWN- 

HOUSE 3-BEDROOM, 1.5 

balh, newly remodeled kitch- 
en, all appliances included. Iiv- 
mgroom, dmingroom, finished 
basement with bar, trac & re- 
cessed lighting throughout, 1- 
car dctachod garage, low 
maintenance pano Dack yard, 
$115,000. (847)223 4412, 



EASY BUDGETING). 
S550/MONTH, utilities In- 
cluded. No maintenance 
condo living. Call Kon (708) 
667-0031. 

GRAYSLAKE TOWN- 

HOME BEAUTIFUL 3yr. end 
unit, 2-bedrooms, + loft, 2.5 
bath, 2-car garage, largo kitch- 
en and balcony, family room, 
dlnlngroom, overlooks park, 
S138,OO0, (847) 548-6356. 

GURNEE 5-ROOMS, 2- 
LARGE BEDROOMS 
PLUS DEN/THIRD BED- 
ROOM, 2-BATHS, FIRE- 
PLACE, EAT-IN KITCHEN, 
APPLIANCES, WASH- 
ER/DRYER, 24HR. SE- 
CURITY PATROL, PATIO, 
GARAGE. NO PETS. 
AVAILABLE NOW. 
S1.050/MONTH. (847) 
680-6484. 

ON PISTAKEE IN FOX 
LAKE BY OWNER 2-bod- 
room, 2.5 bath townhouso. 
Builders model, all upgrades, 
master balh Jacuzzi, walk-in 
closels, fireplace new carpel, 
washer/dryer, all appliances 
stay, deep 1-1/2 car garage 
plus 2 parking spots, boat slip, 
city sower/water, low assess- 
ments. $115,900. (847) 
587-4945. 

OWNER TRANSFERRED! 
MUST SELLI Now construc- 
tion: Townhouse In uniquo 
wooded court yard. 3-bod- 
rooms, 2-1/2 baths, 2-car at- 
tached, C/A, gas fireplace in 
bay window. Oak trim through- 
out, upgraded flooring and GE 
appliances stay, Includes self 
cleaning oven, dishwasher, 
disposal, sldo-by-sido rofrlg- 
cralor with water service In 
door, and largo capacity wash- 
er/dryer. Cathedral ceiling in 
large master bodroom with 
bay window, balcony, wafk-ln 
closol and atcovo loft. Ovor- 
sized lub in master balh, Ceil- 
ing lans with dimmer lights in 
master bedroom and socond 
bedroom. End unit with cus- 
tom patio o(l front dock, Walk 
to Molra. Extras include: wind- 
ow treatments, chamber 
doors and extra shelving in fin- 
ished garage. Please call (or 
appointment. Assurnablo 30 
Vents FHA ARM at 7.5%. 
$135,500. (84 7) 740 0266 

ROUND LAKE BEACH Sec- 
tion 8 Deluxe 2-story town- 
homo, pool, garage, 
S750/monlh. (847) 516-5352, 
beeper (847) 506-4569. 

VERNON HILLS CONDO 2- 

bedroom. 1-bath ranch, 1-car 
garage, pool. $78,000. (847) 
816-8829 



518 



Mobile Homo 



1991 MANUFACTURED 
HOME, Park City, 2-bed- 
rooms, 2-full bains, largo clos- 
ets, C/A, all appliances, shod, 
deck. Karen (312) 222-9350 
oxl.6182. 

MOBILE HOME YEAR 

round or vacation in Park on 
Silver Lako. Private pier, fish- 
ing, water sports, 5 minutes to 
Wilmot Ski hill, 2-bodrooms, 
new kitchen and carpet. 
$27,000. (414) 889-8197. 

MODULARS • DOU- 
SLEWIDES • SINGLEWIDES 
- ILLINOIS LARGEST DIS- 
PLAY OF MODEL HOMES. 
FOUNDATIONS, BASE- 
MENTS, GARAGES, SEPT- 
ICS - WE DO IT ALU! FREE 
STATEWIDE DELIVERY/IN- 
STALLATION. RtLEY MANU- 
FACTURED HOMES 1-800- 
798-1541. 

MUST SELL NOW! 1979 
Windsor Mobile Homo, 14x70. 
groat condition. 2-bedroom, 2- 
full baths, laundryroom, largo 
kitchen, C/A. largo yard with 
shed. Reasonable offers ac- 
cepted. Asking S16.000 (847) 
623-0384, Located in Park 
City. 

OWNER MUST SELL MO- 
BILE HOMEI FINANCING 
AVAILABLE! 1986 12x70, 2- 
bedroom, located in Park City. 
Low down payment. Low 
monthly payments. Asking 
S0.9OO. (647)319 6368. 

TV/O BEDROOM OAK- 
BROOK 12x60 In Tlmbor 
Ridge, Kenosha. Just North of 
Illinois border. $7,000/bost. 
(414) 633-2492 aftor 5pm. 
(414) 657-3339 days. 



Place Your Ad Here 

Call Travis or Darrell 11 

847.223.8161 



500 



Homes For Sak 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes Tor Sak 



LOOK WHAT'S COMING 
UP IN Lakeland 

"HOT REAL ESTATE HOMES WAITING FOR YOU" 
REAL ESTATE SECTION 

2x3 WITH PROPERTY PHOTO 

only $ 66°° 

(Regular price for a 2x3 $1 1 7.00) 

You Save $51.00 

2x1 WITH PHOTO 
Only <^0 You Save $14.00 

CALL YOUR ACCOUNT 
EXECUTIVE TODAY AT 

223-8161 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 



ra 



'a 



This 4 br, 2.5 ba, huge family room 

w/fi replace, dining room, large kitchen 

w/ breakfast nook. Huge bonus room and 

so much more! „ 

Sooo.ooo 

Lakeland Realty 

847-000-000 



520 



j Apartments For Rent 



520 



Apartments For Rent 



VACATION VILLAGE/FOX 
LAKE 2-bedroom condo, ex- 
cellent condition, C/A. coiling 
fans, updated kitchen, dish- 
washor, updated balh, all now 
windows, storage shed. Call 
for moro details. $59,000, 
(70B) 343-2367. 

VERNON HILLS CONDO 
FOR RENT, 5-minutos from 
Hawlhorno Mall. 2-bodrooms, 
1-bath, all now appliances, 
washer/dryer, microwave. 
Newly remodeled. Neutral 
decor. Coramic tile, 1-car ga- 
rage with door openor. Avail- 
able February 1. $950/month 
plus security deposit. Call 
(847) 54B-6553 evenings. 



FOX LAKE 1-BEDROOM 

apartment, $S50/month, gas 
included, free heat, you pay 
electric. Call Mike (647) 
973-2042. 

GRAYSLAKE 2-BED- 
ROOM, OFF street parking, 
newly decorated, near every- 
thing, S675/monlh plus utili- 
ties, (047) 205-1684. 

GURNEE SCHOOLS. 2- 
BEDROOM, 2-bath. 1-car at- 
lached garago, laundry hook- 
up, largo kitchen, dock, roc- 
room, No Section 8 or pots. 
5950/monlh plus security. 
(847) 662-1 677, 

ONE BEDROOM APART- 
MENT, Lake Villa Township, 
socond floor In secluded area. 
$650/month plus electric. 
Send application to: P.O. Box 
1 1 85, Lako Villa, III. 60046, Se- 
curity deposit required. 



GURNEEAVAUKEGAN 
NORTH SHORE 
APARTMENTS 

At Affordable Prices. 

Spacious. 

Luxury Living. 

Elevators. 

On Site Staff. 

Good Location. 

Easy lo Toll Roads. 

IMPERIAL TOWER/MANOR, 

(847) 244-9222. 

LAKEVIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA, Largo 1 & 2 bedrooms, 
S590-S720/monlh. Heal, wa- 
ter, air Included, (847) 
356-5474. 

UNDENHURST/GURNEE 
AREA, LARGE 1 -bodroom 
apartment, vory private, ap- 
pliances included. Available 
Immediately. 5575/month. 
(647) 356-5360. 



T 



BUH 



Take a New Look at 

wimw lam 



i 



Spacious 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments 

• Fully Carpeted • Located on Deep Lake 
Balcony/Patio • Ileal, Water & Cooking Gas Included 



^(847) 356-2002 |gi 



• m.m.|. 149 N. Milwaukee Ave, Lake Villa 




dAKRIDGE VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 



Offering Affordable Housing for 

Qualified Applicants. 

Currently Accepting Applications on our 

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments 

Stop in at: 

299 Oakridge Court in Antioch 

Or call: 

847-395-4840 
fof 1-800-526-0844 TDD 

tSiZZr, Monogod by Meridian Group, Inc. 




•» . 

ii 

ii' 

ii 

I!' 

»>• 

ii . 

I* 

ii 

ii 

!; 

i 

i 



• Spacious 2 Bedroom Apartments. 

• 1 or 1-1/2 Bath Available 

• Patio or Balcony with individual Storage, 

• Short Term Leasing Available. 

LEHMANN REALTY SERVICE 

(847) 395-7997 # ! 

On Sat& Sun Call (630) 232-6084 



G.P. MANAGEMENT, INC, 

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments 
In Antioch fr Lake Villa 

Antioch Manor Apartments 

445 Donin Dr., Antioch 
847-395-0949 

Peep Lake 
n^ Hermitage Apartments 

49 N. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa 
847-356-2002 

CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION m 



ANTIOCH 

MANOR 



«r *■ I mi >i r i 



SvKUAl. KATKS 

ON SELECT 

MODELS 



ONE & TWO 



- BEDROOM 

Iffl^n^ APARTMENTS W 

! V • Flexible Leasing "Quiet $ 

* • Free Credit Check Settin S " I 

Antioch 
Manor N 




ANTIOCH 
MANOR 



APARTMENTS 



Nonh Ave. 



847-395-0949 

83 & North Ave. 




520 



Apartments For Rent 



lent 



1BR. APT. NEAR NORTH 
WAUKEOAN. 5 minutes lo 
train. Registered Historical 
Building $475. (847)244-4260. 

FOX LAKE 1 & 2 bedrooms, 
free heat, water, gas, coin 
laundry. Background chock re- 
quired, (B47) 587-6360. 



FOX LAKE 

HARBOR VIEW 

APARTMENTS 

One Bedroom Apartments 

Near Lako On Quiet StroeL 

Newly docoratocJ and car* 

poted, Cable available. No 

dogs. / bodroom $525. 

847-295-5105 



Place Your 

"Apartments 

For Rent" 

Classified Here 

Call 
847.223.8161 



LUXUHT ABUTMENTS 

KENOSHA . 1/2 mile from 
1-94 dn Hwy 50. Juvt a 
shod drive to luxury living. 
Brand new 1 & 2 Bdrm 
Affordable Luxury Apis. - 
Washer/Dryer A pantry in 
cwry untl. Exercise room, 
clubhouse, pool A pond. 
Sunrooms A underground i 
parking available. Pets 
considered. Call to reserve ' 
yours now. Now Open Sal , 
A Sun T2 to 5 pm 
414-652-RENT 



WESTWfNO 
VILLAGE 

APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewi* Aw., Tion 

1,2 & 3 BCDROOMS 

FREE HEAT 

NEW YEAR'S CASH STCCIAL 

$200." CASH BACK 

WHEN MOVE-IN 8Y 

FEB. 28th 

Applijocc* • On-Site 

Mjrugcf • No IVtt 

Surting from 1495/mo. 

Call Martha & Issac 
(847) 746-1420 

or BEAR PROPERTY 
MANAGEMENT 
(414) 697-9 &1 6 



530 



Rooms For Renl 



FOX LAKE $75/wk, 
$150/soc. deposit, all utilities 
included. Background chock. 
(B47) 587-6360. 

ROOM FOR RENT In largo 
4-bodroom homo. Off Rt. 59 & 
Grand. $375/month utilities in- 
cluded. Pay own phono. Voice 
mall 1-000255-4859 exl. 
4689. (847) 973-0t28. 

SPACIOUS FURNISHED 
SLEEPING ROOM. Rent 
$85/wook, 1-woek escrow. 
Utilities, cable, kitchen, laun- 
dry, bath privileges included. 
No pets-alcohol-drugs. Re- 
sponsible maturo person de- 
sired. Rent can be reduced In 
exchange for light housekeep- 
ing. (414) 654-7905 after 6pm, 



534 



Dunnes* Properly 
ForSnJe 



ARIZONA - Industrial 
Properly For Sale. 
Upscale 1-story bklg, 
investor/owner occu- 
py. 13.500 sf, 1 ac In 
Scottsdale/Tcmpe 

Uusn Corridor. 1 ml to 
frwy, 10 mln to airport. 
Zoned M. Used as auto 
body facility. S885K. 
Call Hev, Realty 
Executives. 
602-820-8578 



■»■ 






February 6, 1998 




CLASSIFIED 








Lakeland Newspapers I C19 



^i 




Businea Property 
For Sale 



560 



Vacant Lot/Acreage 



568 



OutOfArtaPropcrt) 



MOTEL: Amish 

Country Inn, next to I- 
57, Areola, IL - less 
than 200 ml S. of 
Chgo,35mlS.oftheU 
of I. Offers 73 rooms 
plus swimming pool, 
on approximately Sac. 
$1 Mil obo. Areola is 
the N gateway to Lake 
Shelbyville & largest 
Amish settlement In IL 
Call Vic J. Stenger 
Broker 217-268-3464; 
Owner 217-268-3031 



538 



Bujincsi Property 
For Rcnl 



OFFICE FOR RENT On 
Grass Lake Rd., near Linden- 
hurst. III., 750sq.ft. with 2-prl- 
vata offices New, modem and 
carpetod, wired (or 4-phono 
linos and computers. 
$47S/month. (847) 356-1641. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH. 913 
West Rollins Road. High traf- 
fic. Retail Space. 1.000-5,500 
square foot. Will divido, $5-512 
per square foot. Call (847) 
740-4596. 

SUB-LEASE 9,O00SQ.FT„ 
1BFT. coiling, twin load level- 
er docks. Perfect for dry stor- 
ago Of other. Good Grayslako 
location. Available Immediate- 
ly Very reasonable. Call Karen 

1647) 740-4035. 



ABANDONED CAMPSITE 
IN the woods on a private 
road in Central Wisconsin. 
$12,900, Ownor/Llcensoe 1- 
8S0-465-2345. 

LAKE GENEVA AREA, 

8+ acres, ponds, creek, horses 
OK. Must see. (414) 
279-5823, 1-800-242-1560 
8anv4pm. Monday-Friday. 

LOOKING FOR WATER- 
FRONT? 4.5 acres buildablo 
on Fox Lake (Chain O'Lakos), 
$480,000. (847) 356-7893 
(No R oallors). Ask for Fred, 

TWIN LAKES LOT BY 
OWNER Enjoy Lake Rights to 
beautiful Lake Elizabeth. This 
area is very quiet. Level lot 
95* 135', with wetlands behind 
you, so no buildings, just wil- 
dlife. City sower. $33,000. 
(847)740-2716. 

VACANT LOT, 1 acre. 
Wadsworth, 550.000/best. 
(847) 362-5673. 



FLORIDA? I HAVE the 
place for youl Orlando area. 
(414)857-2454. 



ARKANSAS^ DOWN). Bttutiful 
5 it bomaHa ia Ozark Mires. Join 
II /JOO >c u lie wildlife cipn't ire*. IS 
mile* to 40,000 at lilt. J 14,950 00 - 
120 morthljr payment! of $196.92 • 
10% APR. ARKANSAS MOUNTAIN 
REAL ESTATE, l-ffiO-254-2296. 



tutu, st KTuwK-otn ui- 
beat *ntr, tMuwt l*t**i Mm. 1 
vionj unttmp in galtd watfrfrenl 
CofnmurtW. 1M, IS Hit, on**, mar- 
bia tin, Mis tt, »c w. atrirv 
poot/ipa, dock i boat nil. Open 
tjrtoa lav view. iu«,i». larliara 
latcaria. PrvOtnCn norfeu Itatlu, 
in-»f-tiii/uMSt-nu. 



564 



Resort/Vacation 
Rentals 



ARKANSAS FISHING, golf- 
ing special Spring. Fall rates. 
20 miles south of Hot Springs, 
DeGray Laxo, DeGray Cottag- 
es, Rt. 3, Box 450. Bismarck. 
Ar. 71929. 501-865-3389. 



7EYNES5EF - For Sale by 
Owner. 1996 Modular 
home on 4 wooded ac in 

Bethel Springs, 3BRV2RA, 
28x48. Pond stocked 
w/flsh. Quiet S65K cash 
offers accepted or par- 
tial finc'g avail 
901-934-0704 



568 



OutOfArtaPropcrt) 







1*1 




■ -5*S 








SBE 


ill 


[m 


n 


M^^^ME 









SPXUGtoVA, Ft • For 
Sole bq Owner. 

2BRVJBA. new carpet, 
roof, new tie, 2c-qor. 
fenced uord. enclosed 
Flo, room. S5CTC cash 
offers accepted. 
BJ5-35S-7322 



N.W. INDIANA 
198 ft river frontage! 
Over 5,000 ft living area, 
Nanny or Maid quarter, 
3.5 BA, 3 F.P. new 24x32 
workshop. Inground 
pool/quiet end of Street 
near S. Bend. Only 2 hrs 
to "Cold Coast" Sccor 
Realty 219-294-6666. 



DO YOU HAVE 

SOMETHING TO SELL 

FOR $75 OR LESS? 

Place your ad in this section 

tor only S3. 00 tor 10 words or 

less. Must be prepaid. 

Call Lisa (G 47) 2 23-01 Gl 

©xl. 140 br'servd Ihb ad wilti 

with your payment to: 

Lakeland Publishers, 

P. O. Box 268, 

30 S. Whitney St.. 

Grayslake III. 60030. 

Atten: Lisa. 



Mcrrillvillc, IN - 
Office Space For Lease 

• Hi profile, Corp 

Hdqtrsfor rent. 4000- 

20,000 sf. avt 711/98. 

Call 219-988-1341 




560 



Vacant LM/Acreajc 



9.1 ACRES WESTERN KE- 
NOSHA COUNTY, part 
wooded. S90.000, terms avail- 
able. (414) 279-6008 attcr 
6pm. 



AMELIA ISLAND 
PLANTATION, FL - 
For Sale by Owner. 
Gorgeous 2000sf 

ocean front town- 
house. Tri-lcvcls, 
2.5BA/2 Ig BR. Eleg 
open DR & LR. Rcc 
rm w/mirrorcd bar & 
walk-out patio. 

Sundccks off other 
floors, partially furn. 
Great features. For 
more info 904-321- 
0904. 



.. Galena^ 
{State Hwy 80. All tillable* 
\Uv\d. Exc 4BR brick ranch.} 
&70 mature trees, att. 2c- J 
Igar, 2 truck shed, 2.5BA.J 
{whirlpool, frpl, Taxes* 
5$ 1 929. S3S0K. Call/fax! 
$608-744-2765. 



CHETBC, Wl - For Sale 
by Owner. Total secJu- 
tion w/lajus aecett 2100 
if home only 7 yn old 
on 4*6 of wooded prop- 
erty. 3BR, 1 level ranch, 
loaded all appliances, 
24x30 garage $ep, 
chain of 6 lake:, 2 dif- 
ferent tcbool districts to 
choose from. <1 50(C 
715-924-3954 



NEED A WAY TO SELL THAT 

INEXPENSIVE ITEM? 
Fill out this form for 




&** Lakeland's New 

10 words or less gets you an ad for #3.00. Take advantage of 
Litis new section by filling out the form & sending payment 

to: 

Attn: Lisa 
c /o Lakeland Publishers 
EO. Box 360 
Grayslake, IX 60030 
or call with credit card 
(847) 223-8161 ext 140 
Must be prepaid 

Plcnsc fill in the blanks, no more than 10 words 







telephone number 



568 



OulCH Area Property 



MISSOIU F • 20GB K. */fknUtfC 
an Truman \a)u.. Huteublc Urn- 
t k i. Dot riewi on Truman Lxkc 
Great laraimetit/Cofp M 
ImiMdnal RrtraL Ootj Irg. tract 
left In mm. Call Saxt. RE/MAX 
OF TRUMAN LAKE, 888«&4aU 
(ur details. 



NORTH CAROLINA • too 
ACRE ESTATE. Golf count 
manicured property Wei re taker 
avail, pasture A woods, main hse 
w/4bf, IJtith, full tnmnt. old 
homc6lcad-guat home w/8 rmv, 
play heme, worbhop, barn, tennU 
court, a creek, 2 ponds, convenient 
to Asbcville, Mcraknwrvillc. S13 
Million. PIONEER REALTY. 
WiyoewilJe. NC 1-800-923-3025, 
Mik« Valley, NC 1-800-923- 
6025. 



708 



SnottTnobtlcs/ATVi 



1993 EXCITER SX. Both 
groat condition. Very low 
miles. Must soil for $3,600. 
(647)566-1199. * 

1993 ARCTIC CAT EXT 
580 Z, clean, low miles. (815) 
675-1399 after 5pm. ' 

1996 POLARIS XCR SP. 
600cc, studs, carbides, cus- 
tom paint. Best offer. (847) 
244-4821. 

POLARIS 1996 800 Storm, 
300 miles, excellent condition. 
Must sell. $4,S00/best. (815) 
759-Q837. 

SNOWMOBILE 1989 PO- 
LARIS Indy 400 with cover, 
very good condition. Must sell, 
S1.600/besl. (847) 623-3977. 

SNOWMOBILE 1896 
600XCR POLARIS, only 
BOO miles, with cover, like 
new, extra 10 suspension, 
S3.200. (414) 877-3402 after 
Spm, 

SNOWMOBILE TRAILER 
1995 Triton. 4 -place, brakes. 
salt shield, ski glides and 
spare, 52,600, (847) 548- 
1854. 

TWO 1985 SKI-DOO FOR- 
MULA SS SNOWMOBILES. 
under 3K, ready to go. 
S9SO/OA. (847) 438-2229 

evenings. 



710 


BoafcWotorc/Etc. 



1989 WELL CRAFT BOAT, 
cuddy cabin. Alpine- stereo. 8- 
cylinder engine, sundeek, ex- 
cellent condition, low hours cm 
motor. $9,500. best. Pager 
(847)2162172. 

CABIN CRUISER 1994 
Rinkor Fiesta 265 with custom 
trailer, all available options, 
very low hours, oxlrcmely 
good condition. Asking 
$33,000.(815)759-9187. 



720 


Sports Equipment 



AEROBIC RIDER WITH ris- 
er, excellent condition, like 
new. Original $300, asking 
$200/bSSt. (847) 625-7391 
afier 6pm. 

BIKE, S250/BEST. 
195ELS BMX racing bike, 
quick, light, great condition. 
(847) 746-1872. 

FOR SALE GOLF CLUBS, 3 
thru SW, Tour Classic 858, 
2yrs. old, steel shaft, over- 
sized, with golf bag. $200. 
(847) 872-5080. (847) 688- 
2924. 



804 



Can for Safc 



1927 T-BUCKET ROAD- 
STER, Indy framo, 4 wheel 
disc brake, dual down draft 
Weber carburetors, too much 
in car to mention, $6,000/besl. 
VW trike. Harloy front-end. 
custom fiberglass body, en- 
gine all chrome, many extras. 
$5,000/ftrm. (847) 487-8602. 
pager (847) 617-0011. 

1979 FIREBIRD Super Sport. 
Classic Arizona Collectors car, 
56,000 original miles, good 
condition, fully loaded, glass T- 
tops, mag wheels, automatic. 
Pager (847) 216-2172. 

1984 CAMARO T-TOPS, 
now exhaust, stall converter, 
transmission, built 350 en- 
gine, needs carburator, 
$750/best. (815) 653-7056 
ovomngs. 

1984 MERCEDES 

WAGON 280TE. $5,500. 
Must see. (847) 234-3675. 

1987 BUICK GRAND NA- 
TIONAL, 52,000 miles Make 
offer. (414) 763-6519 after 
5pm or leave message. 



804 


Cot for Sale 



1988 LEBARON TURBO 
COUPE, SlISOO/besL (815) 
675-2755. 

1088 LINCOLN TOWN 
CAR, 113.000 miles, black 
with Cordoba lop, red leather 
Interior, runs and looks great, 
hate to part with but not using, 
Call for details. $4,500. (847) 
587-9509. 

1088 MERCURY SABLE 
LS WAGON, loaded, only 
66K, runs well, needs starter, 
dean inside and out. $3,300. 
(847) 973-61 14 evenings. 

1990 FORD T-BIRD, power 
windows/locks, A/C, excellent, 
condition, $3,700. (847) 
487-5990. ._ 

1990 MERCEDES 300E, 
white with gray leather, 79K, 
sunroof, phone, mint condi- 
tion, 516.000/best. (847) 
680-9399. 

1993 GEO STORM, 5- 
speed, great interior, 105,000 
miles, mostly highway. Must 
sell. Asking $4,000. (B47) 
244-0549. 

1994 TOYOTA PASEO, ex- 

collent condition, loaded, 
64,000 miles, $8,000/best. 
(414) 537-3530. (414) 889- 
8200. 

1994 TRANS AM QT LT1 
V8, 6-speed, 35,000 miles. 
$14,900/best. (414) 652 7957. 

1996 DODGE INTREPID, 
power window/locks. A/C, 
37.000 miles. $13,500. (414) 
843-3544. 

1996 OLDSMOBILE CUT- 
LASS SUPREME SL, 4-door. 
A/C, loaded. leather, 
$15.000/bost. (847) 
265-6559. 

HONDA 

CARS FOR $100!!! 

Seized & Sold locally this 

month. Trucks, 4x4*s, etc. 

(800) 522-2720 

ext. 2292. 

CHEVY 1991 CAVALIER, 
red, power steering, power 
brakes, new tires, many new 
parts. $4,500/best. (847) 
689-6831. 

CHRYSLER 19B8 LEBAR- 
ON, A/C. cruise, am/Tm cas- 
sette, high miles, clean car, 
$1.500. (647) 336-2846. 

HONDA 1908 CIVIC 

CRXHF. 5-speed, light blue, 
seat covers and bra included. 
92K, 2nd owner. Asking 
S3,000/best. (847) 872-0137. 

IF YOU HAVE 

FURNITURE TO SELL, 

A car, or appliances, If 

you are having a Garage 

Sale or If you have a 

house to sell or apartment 

to rent. 

Call Lisa before 10am 

Wednesday to place 

your ad here. 

(847) 223-6161 

oxt. 140. 



804 



Can for Sale 



MITSUBISHI 1988 4- 
WHEEL drive Mighty Max, 
68,000 miles. Good condition, 
S2.S00. (414) 657-1151. 

NEED RELIABILITY? 
1989 Honda Civic LX, 4-door, 
automatic, power everything, 
CD player, 1 -owner, very 
clean, must sell. Asking 
$2,400. (414) 279-3309. 

TREAT YOURSELFI 1993 
Cavalier Convertible RS. Qua- 
sar Blue with bright white top 
and silver trim, 3.1 liter V6 en- 
gine with automatic transmis- 
sion, power brakes/antl-lock, 
power windows/steering/top. 
air, tilt steering wheel and 
cruise control. Immaculately 
maintained, oil changed every 
4,000 miles and stored in win- 
ters, all new Eagle tires, 
brakes and shocks. 70K easy 
miles, $7,900. Check tho Blue 
Book, then come and take a 
took. (847) 265-9464. For 
photo see: www.inter- 
greenxorrvtreat 



814 



Service & Parts 



BANSHEE PARTS 

WHEELS, exhaust, bumpers 
and more. (414) 657-6637. 

CLASSIC QUARTER 

PANEL SALE. Mustang, Cam- 
aro. Nova, Chevelle, Cutlass, 
Mopars, Ponliac, Chevrolet, 
more! TRUCK PANS. FLOOR 
PANS. DOORS. FENDERS, 
BUMPERS. New and Califor- 
nia. Rust free. MARK'S PLAT- 
ING & SUPPLY 217-824-6164. 

•DRIVE SHAFT SERVICE* 

Drive Axle and Supply Co. 

COMPLETE DRIVE 

SHAFT SERVICE, 

'Custom Made. 

• Front Wheel 

Drive Axlas. 

* Computerized 

balancing. 
•FREE DELIVERY! 
And more, 
(414)639-2100. 

PONTIAC 400-455'S, 400 
& 455 Street and race motors. 
Ported Heads and much, 
much more. Built by P.P.E. 
Racing. Call Dave (414) 
889-4708, 



824 


Vans 



1984 CHEVY CONVER- 
SION VAN, runs great, 
$i.500/best. Can after 7pm 

(847) 746-3452. 

1989 DODGE VAN 130K 

used for delivery, 2-seats only, 
all regular maintenance and 
records, AM/FM, runs and 
drives excellent, $l,7507best. 
(847) 740-4035. 



828 



FourUlieelDme 
Jccp» 



1991 CHEVY S-10 BLAZ- 
ER 4x4, 4.3L. AT. AyC. PYV. 
POL, AM/FM cassette, mag, 
alarm. * extras. Excellent 
condtlon. $4.900/best. (847) 
487-4516. 



828 



Four Wheel Drive. 
Jeeps 



1988 JEEP COMANCHE 
PICKUP, mint condition, now 
paint, $4.200/best. (847) 
395-6377. 



834 


Trucks/Trailen 



1971 DODGE PICKUP, 
Camper Spooal, 318 V8 en- 
gine, automatic transmission, 
power steering , cap. body In 
good shape, 99K miles, 
$1,600. (815)344-6112. 

1991 FORD F150, cap and 

bedliner, V8, 1 -owner, high- 
way miles, like now. Must see. 
S5.000/beM. (847) 265-0353 

1996 CHEVY S-10 EXT 
CAB PICKUP, air, cruise, tilt, 
Airdam fog lights, am/fm cas- 
sette, bed mat and topper, LS 
trim level. $l3,300/besL (847) 
838-5923. 

CHEVY PICKUP DIESEL 
FULL SIZE 1981. 1 ton, au- 
tomatic. 91,000 miles, 

Si.500/bcs!. Ski-Doo ca- 
boose, $125. Side doors for 
Chevy Van. 396-350hp rebuift 
heads. Used small Chevy 
block header, $80. New big 
block headers, fits Camaro & 
Nova. Two rear doors for 
1971-1996 Chevy/GMC van ♦ 
1 front rider side door, 
StOO/ea. Left side inside door 
handle for 1984 Olds Cutlass 
Supreme. Munsey 4-speed 
transmission, $375. And much 
more. Too much to mention. 
Pager (847)216-2172. 

DARK BLUE GMC 1985 
SUBURBAN, new radiator, 
starter, alternator, brakes, cat- 
taktic converter, exhaust sys- 
tem, carburetor, shocks and 
' tune up. Excellent runner, 2- 
wheel drive. $2,500. (414) 
654-781 7 ask for Georoe. 



844 


Motorcycles 



1995 HARLEY ELECTRA- 
GLIDE, black, radio, CB, 
Mustang studded seat, many 
leatner and chrome additions. 
Excellent condition. 11,500 
miles. $14,900. (847) 

265-6241 after 7pm. . 

1995 KAWASAKI 750 VUL- 
CAN MOTORCYCLE, teal 
blue, only 500 miles, very 
sharp, $3,800. (847) 
587-8608. 

1995 YAMAHA YZ-125. 

1996 Honda CRBO Expert. 
1993 Suzuki DR-250S. 1993 
Honda Z-50. All toys must go. 
(847) 223-7838 after 5pm. 



859 



>!isc..Mrrchandae[l{ 






ROBOTS 2/EA. 40LB. ca- 
pacity. Use one as spare. Both 
work. Books and teach pend- 
ant included. 55,000. Horizon- 
tal CNC Mill 40 plus tools 4th 
axis. $6,750. (847) 896-2251 
Bill. 




VfikWXWS 





'JLoveL, inesl 



Show your loved ones you care with a [~ 



Valentine's Day Lev* Line! [ 



Choose from one of 3 
bordered ads with aril 



Please, payment must 
accompany your order 



(A) 



I 



L 




(C) 



Use t his co upon & mail pay ment t o: Lakeland Newspapers, Attn: Valentines 

P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 



I Name 



Please Print Your Message Below: 



Address. 



Zip. 



I 
I 
I City — 

! Phone 

I Total Enclosed S 

I "Valentine's Love Lines" 

1 -----.i-i. » -j 

Love Unea will appear In our February 12th Issue In Lakeland Newspapers! 
Copy must be received by S p.m., Monday, February 9th, 1998. 



\ 



Indicate: 



B 



" 



C20 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 6, 1998 



S15 



Carpel Cleaning 



PROFESSIONAL CARPET 
CLEANING U.S.C. SERVIC- 
ES will guarantee Iho lowest 
overall prico on expert carpel 
cleaningl Compare our prices 
and save. Our cleaning In- 
cludes a soil guard, deodoriz- 
er and sialic guard lhal othors 
charge extra for. Also no extra 
chargo for spot removal, 
stairs, hallways, or travel time. 
Just 1 low price of S.20 per 
sq.ft., for actual carpet sizes. 
With our 5 stop method wo 
power vacuum, pre-lreal. ma- 
chine shampoo, power extract 
extra moisture and groom car- 
pel. For a healthy homo, wo 
remove dust, pollen, mold, 
bacteria, and dust miles. We 
leave your homo fresher 
smelling, enhance its ap- 
pearance and extended car- 
pet lile. Call today for your ap- 
pointment or free estimate 
(647) 546-5600. Recom- 
mended by Iho world's best 
carpet manufacturers, 31yrs. 
experience. 






Dr. Trask 



Ask The Vet 

Ask The Vet-Dr. David Trask is 
part of a group of northern Lake 
County veterinarians who pooled 
their money and expertise to start 
All Creatures Emergency Hospital 
in Grayslake providing emer- 
gency care to pets nights, week- 
ends and holidays. During the 
day he can be reached at 
Lindenhurst Animal Hospital. 



Question: 

I have one cat that purrs and one cat that 

never purrs, why Is that? 

Answer: 

All cats seem to have the ability to purr, some 

seom to choose not to. Extensive research 

has been done on this topic but no ono seems 

to have been ablo to come up with an answer 

on exactly why this lakes place. It has been 

found that cats seem to purr more frequently 

when they are relaxed or content, but this is 

not to say that if your cat doesn't purr that it is 

not happy and conlont. 



♦ I M W* W I I * » *«WHMI I I I MmMtHl i mi l 



EE1TT 



Firewood 



NORDSTROM ; 

TREE SERVICE • 

Seasonal Hardwoods 1 
570 per face cord 

Delivered ; 

(847) 526-0858 : 



FANTASTIC 

FIREWOOD 

2 yr. old seasoned hardwood. 

Oak. ash, maple, cherry S65 00 

per bee cord rmicd J75 00 

per bec cord 100V oak 

hoa sladung and defevery 

Buj the wood thtt'i 

guaranteed to burn. 

(847) S46-36I3 • |BI5) 344-9522 

J-«XM3WS262 

Credit Cards Aeceplod 



S33 



I landman 



RWR HANDYMAN SVC, 

carpentry, plumbing, eteclnr> 
ty, painting, donning Low 
rates. (847) 625-29B5 



S3& 



UouvVet^inj!, 



WILL CLEAN YOUR 

HOME CONDO, APART- 
MENT, OR OFFICES, Have 
excellent references. 20yrs 
experience. (8-17) 83B-OG-18. 



S57 



I'ainiirtfi/DMoratiriR 



PRECISE PAINTING 

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR. 

'New construction or wo 

can make It look like newt 

'Export Wallpaper 

Removal 

•Wall Repair. 

'Ready to bo painted 

or papered. 

Call us about 

Reasonable Rates, 

CALL ABOUT SPRING 

DECK SPECIAL!! 

(847) 395-0490. 



S72 



Professional 
.Services 



WRITE FOR YOU! 

•X-Mas Cards 

'Wedding Invitations 

•Shower/Party Invitations. 

•Handwritten. 

* Reasonable rales. 

Call (815) 363-5330. 



S78 



Remodeling 



T. LAZZARETTO 

CONSTRUCTION 

OFFERS: 

•General Contracting 

•Interior Trim 

•Remodeling 

'Siding, Sotru, Facia 

'Basement Finishing 

•Decks/Screen Porches 

•Additions 

•Window Replacement 

•Drywall a Painting, 

QUALITY WORK 

GUARANTEED!! 

Pteaso call (847) 8370677 

Ask (or Tony. 

Fully Insured. 

**••• 




• Ti 



Miscellaneous 
•S'civices 



D&C TILE CO. Wo can do all 
kinds of tile work for your 
homel We've been a family 
businoss for 25yrs. For a free 
oslimate call (847) 548-7639, 
(708) 988-850.1 pagar. 







BATMAN 

What a charmer this young 
fellow is! At just about seven 
months, he's still a youngster. 
He's a mix of Black Lab and 
Airdale with a shaggy muzzle 
that makes him look as though 
he's wearing^ Batman mask. 



He is gentle, intelligent and affectionate. A little 

training will make a wonderfully responsive 

household companion of him. He is very clean 

and well mannered. 

For adoption information on BATMAN, other 

quality AAF pets, or becoming a needed and very 

welcome volunteer, please call the ASSISI 

ANIMAL FOUNDATION at (815) 455-941 1. 




Learn te 
Grccm 



Dogs & Cats 

Professional Program, 

two nights per week. 

Gill for Information 

(414)857-2163 

Shel-Ray Pet Shalet 
12005 Bristol Rd. 
Bristol, Wl 53104 







A Pair to Love 

"CLEO & MIMI" arc an adorable pair thai 
' were raised together until a no-pcts apart- 
'^mcnl caused them to lose their home. As 
V; different in appearance as two dogs can be, 
-3 these opposite* are definitely attached and 
ViPmust not be separated. CLEO is a 
fj black/cream A yr. old female shep/rot- 
tweiller mix. A mid-size dog, Cleo has a 
beautiful face, a short coal and a wonderful, outgoing, loving dispo- 
sition. MIMI is a very small female 3 yr. old cocker spaniel with a red 
semi-long coal. And this little girl does not take a back seat to her big 
sister! Both dogs are houscbroken and wonderful with children. Cleo 
& Mimi have been wailing patiently since 1/97 for the home and the 
love they once knew. If you are looking for a compatible twosome for 
your family, come and see Cleo & Mimi in Cage 52. 

ALL DOCS HENEriT FROM BASIC HOUSEBREAKING AND OBEDI- 
ENCE TRAINING WHICH HELPS BOND DOG TO OWNER. CRAT- 
ING IS RECOMMENDED THE FIRST YEAR WHEN THE OWNER IS 
AWAY, IF NEEDED. 

Cash $55 donalion includes free spay/neuler, collar, tag, leash, first 
shots, follow-up care and much more. 

Orphans of the Storm is located at 2200 Rtverwoods Rd., Deerfield. 
Hours are llam-Spm, seven days a week. Call (847) 945-0235 for 
further information. 

Thank you!!! 








ACTWEGGE,LTD. 

Enrolled Agents • CPA 

Established Since 1960 

265 Center Si • Grayslake 

(847) 223-0777 

COMPREHENSIVE TAX SERVICES 

Free Electronic Filing wl pd. return 

564 N, Route 83 • Grayslake 

Daniel E. Coulon, EA 

(847) 223-4040 

JOHN KARMEL & CO., CPA 

1641 N. Milwaukee • Libertyville 

Individual & Business Taxes 

Reasonable Rates 

(847) 367-5600 

STEWART M. GRANT & ASSOC 

28 E. Grand Ave. • Fox Lake 

Individual • Partnerships • 

Corporations • Tursts & Fiduciary 

(847) 587-9555 



even 



; 



Take your vacation any place you want to visit this : • 
summer through the Internet. See tbe;BJfelT(^'^tlinU ' 
stepping on a plane: Let lakeland neffllRECt take 
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"^^acmawa^i /77&Lm 



^DIRECT- 





(847) 223-8199 

E-Mail: service@Ind.com 

Visit us on the Internet: http*//www.lniicom 



'Lukrland ikiDIKRCT offer?, local phone charges in tnosi of ilic Lake Diuniy area, Call for information alxnu your prefix. 




■•• \ -■ • 



February 6, 1998 



CLASSIFIED 




-»<■■« ■ i 



Lakeland Newspapers I 02. 1 



Lakeland Newspapers is pleased to present our 1998 





mt ©tatib 





Lakeland Newspapers will be publishing a special Employment 
Guide on Friday March 13, 1998. You won't want to miss out on 
this special pullout section. It will be inserted in all 1 1 Lakeland 

Newspapers, covering 90% of Lake County. 

This is the perfect opportunity to recruit from Lake County's finest job applicants! 
Or let people know about your resume service! This informative section will fea- 
ture articles and information on the employment situation here in Lake County. 



Ad sizes and prices are as follows: 

Full page .01165 

3/4 page 0925 

1/2 page 0616 

1/4 page 0325 

1/8 page .:;;. .0151 

HURRY! DEADLINE FOR AD SPACE IS FRIDAY, MARCH 6th AT 5PM 





Call your Classified 

Advertising Account 

Executive today at 

(847) 223-8161 

ext. 110 or 112 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



P.O. Box 268 

30 South Whitney 

Giayslake, Blinois 60030 

(847) 223-8161 

Fax (847) 223-8810 



jflflflg^i^ q^aMMi^ 



C 22 / lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



Februarys, 1998 




-To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



bb 



LAKE ONLINE 

www.lake-online.com 

Lake County's Hot Spot on the WWW! 
Over 1,000.000 Hits in 1997! 



- a ttf/ - 



Internet Studio 

www.theistudio.com 

Effective Solutions 
Without the Techno-Babble 

•^Web Site Production 
^Servers @ $49/Month 
''local 56K Access! 



The moit luccesifu! butlnaii pet ion 

It the one who holds on to the old Juit 

□ j long o» It It good and grab* the new 

Juit at soon as It l> better." 



847-395-9115 

391 Like Street Downtown Antioch 



I CONTRACTORS ELECTRIC SERVlCpT 
/ ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 
/ "Call Us For Fast Courteous Service" 
33265 N. Rte. 45 • 
■ Wildwood, IL 60030 

(847) 223-4682 
( \ RESIDENTlAL^ COMMERCIAl/, 




VA 





FANTASTIC FIREWOQP 

2-YE M CLP SEASONED MR1WOOP 




OAK, ASH, MAPLE, CHERRY $65 (FC) 

W kaa 1° 0% 0A K $ 75 f c ) ^telw 
^k/v/VVL imii MM6IS «S8g*. 

(815) 344-9522 **** ' ■ 
I-8O0-43 0-6262 



— — — »- 



ZET7 



■■^W^fe^ 



riHEWDDD UMIMITED 

WITH THIS AD 

Mixed Hardwoods $50 PC 

Oak $65 FC 

Cherry, Birch, Hickory Mix $75 FC 

Separated $91) FC 

FREE DELIVERY 

STACKING AVAILABLE 

CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED 

(300) 303-5150 




GEORGE (847) 548-5110 
VOICE MAIL (847) 674-8875 

/iit /tmeticatt *i¥o*He / )mfisio<(Aemettt<L 

• Kitchens - Baths • Electrical 

• Basements • Plumbing 
■ Additions • Carpentry 

• Decks • Drywall 

• Remodeling • Painting 
20 YEARS LOCALLY - LICENSED ' BONDED • INSURED 

FREE ESTIMATE (847) 548-5110 



/ 



m 




TRU-CO R TH d om" 8 

Construction Improvements 



REMODEL NOW!....P£Y NOTHING 
TIL FEBRUARY 1998! 

KITCHEN, BATHROOM AND 

BASEMENT REMODELING 

cavp mo/ orf labor & 

" 3 AVE IU /o Off MATIRIAIS" 

Ask about our OFF-SEASON prices for. 
Windows, Siding, Soffit/Fascia & Roofing! 

Consolidate your high 

interest credit cards & 

loans into one low monthly 

payment! Credit Problems 

Understood! 

• ALL WORK GUARANTEED • 
FULLY LICENSED, BONDED & INSURED 

FREE IN-HOME 1-888-33-TRIKO 

CONSULTATION (1 -888-338-7826) 



z 





GRAYSLAKE 

o4NTIQUES 

at 

COLLECTABLES 

Lake County 

Fairgrounds 

Grayslake, IL 

IL 120 & US 45 

8:00 am to 3:OOpni 
February 8, 1998 

Lake county 

Promotions, Inc. 

P.O. Box 46i 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

(647) M3-1431 

or (847) 3SO-7499 



HAWTHORNE ANTIQUES 

(~v~\ Shop For Yolit O^ 

^s/^ Veilontine Mere ^n^ 

Booth Space Available 



Discount on 1st Month 

2 1 iiil<-.r- WUttl of I— t>«t- oi\ 
I Iwy SO In Bristol, Wl 

414-857-2226 
Opon IO to 5 Daily 



INTIOll-S 



Sintiques £MalI 
of&Madison 

'New 'Longer 'Weekday 'Hours 

JMnnduy^ucsdny-HVcdncsduy^Frldiiy 10nm-6pm 

Thursday 10-9, Saturday 10-5, Sunday 'Noon-5pm 

474H Calt.igL' Grave Kd. Madison, Wl 

(1/4 mi. East nf R|. 51) 

(6O8) 222-202*9 




Miniature Villa 
Dollfiouses 

Some Dolls 
1/2 Price 

173S • SOtft 5r • Kenoafea, Wl 

1000-3C3-0100 
Mon-5al IOanv5pm 



g« 







& 




Creations By 
Wally's Gal <m 

Grand Opening 
February 7th and 8th 



V 



yy Homespun Crafts * Ceramics 
.jy. Floral <& much, much more 



Si 



f ^^ Open Wed thru sun l lam - 3pm 
630 Walworth Si • Genoa city, Wl 

4I4.379.0023 

Off* ii wy 12 near Richmond 

Next to This 6. That Antique 

Shoppc 



■■ 



ANTIQUE 



m 



). 



WANTED TO BUY 



ALL Antiques, and old furniture, old clocks, 

Clocks, toys, old Nimpv glASSWAtc, Art sIass, 

rugs. Advertising Items ft* mllltAry Hems. 

Buy one piece, oi entire estate I 

Call Joe 

I -414-877-2432 
or 
Law™ 1-800-628-9255. 






S^C^ 



iSSfc 









ZASSi^l 



♦WAREHOUSE 
75 Dealer Mall 

Cp Sweetheart of a Sale 
Q^> February 9th thru 
February 15th Qj 
15% off participating booths 

2 S. Lake Street • Grayslake 
223-9554 

M.ni.1 10-S • Sun 12-5 

2nd Sun IO-SiJO 
Shop our mall on-line O 

www.tnlIqurwtiK.com 




na maiua ■ ■Tntawm aaaaann 



Cnlna/nosa iMnh'aues 



WE BUY & SELL 



•Furnlturo 'Clocks "Toys -Rugs 

•Jowolry 'Glassware *Sllvor -Rugs 

•Paintings -Porcelain "Dolls 



SERVICES INCLUDE 



•Estato Sottlomont 
•Auction Sorvlco 



■Cloanout Sorvlco 
•Appraisals 




(847) 356-0832 



Open 1)aify 10-5 • Cfosecf OlConJays 



J9036 70). <s/anc/C7I< 



ua. 



f 9i*s/ ThJus/ of 9?/ -/JT an 3?/ J 32 

3 tnin 7i?Ja.i/ of 

Quince 3IGm WTaff 




k 




WftTM MM 



mm 



February 6, 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



lakeland Newspapers f C23 




\ TRIAftlELE 
DUCT CLEANING 

Residential • Commercial • Industrial 



Major reasons to Clean Your Air Ducts 
with our Power Vacuum Systemi 

* Reduce* Contaminant! (Mildew, Dust. Bacteria, Dust Mites) 

• Reduces Odors • Boosts Efficiencies 

• Protects Family Health • Reduce Allergy Symptoms 

All Work Guaranteed & Free Estimates 



SPECIAL 

Most Homes 
$199!!! 

(Includes Sanitizing) , 



(847) 740-4571 




TREE £ STUMP 
REMOVAL 

Land Clearing <*£&. 

Wholesale Seasoned Igg-ii 
Hardwood 



Nordstrom 
Tree Experts Co. 

(Fully Insured) 

(847) 526-0858 






SA1T BEMVEHY 

Water Sofiner Sail Cirricd in To Your Softncr! 

We Sett and Install... 
■ Water Softncrs 

• R.O. & U.V. Systems 

• Whole House Filters 

• Iron Filters and More. 

AM/PM Sales, Inc. 

(847) 671-3130 

FRIiG Water Analysis and Consultation 




Miracle 
Painters v 

"Fully Insured" 

Residential/Commercial 

(Deck sealing available) 

(847) 210-7159 

(847) 247-1676 



FREE Estimates • Ask for Mark 



Paint Minimum 3 Rooms and Receive 
1 Room FREE Of Your Choice . 
Also, call for FREE ESTIMATES and Specials 
on Industrial and Commercial Painting 

D&G PROFESSIONAL PAINTING 




CaahFor 

• Aluminum Cans 

• All Other Scrap Metals 

Industrial Accounts Welcomo 

Chicago Surplus 

11304 2Q0th Avenue 
lYovor, Wl 

Location: Trevor. Wl (5 minutes North 0* Artoch). Take 
J+wy C on tries west o< Route 83, Turn Uortti on 259th 
Si Veer to left br 2 ttods (red to Fcay's Tavern). 

Mon. - Fri. 8:30am - 5pm 

Saturday 8:30am - 3:30pm 

(414) 862-2517 

(414) 862-2554 



Ovbt;40 years of 
aJJty pcrsonn! service 




ddock 

A~u construction inc. 

• custom homes • basements 

• design services • decks 

• additions 

(847) 526-1500 
Wauconda 

General Contractors 



Fully Insured 
FREE Estimates 



BUYERS OF NOrl-FERROUS METALS 

' INDUSTRIAL SCRAP § > 



• COPPER »EWSS«ALUMJNUU« 

LEAD<SM££$S» 

• AUTOfWXATOftS • CAlALrTlCWNVErTTERS < 

<BATTcB£S«JNSUUTEDWR£» 



JM Pant Steel ■ Cnttt u»*. 1 
temtJiiGuSsxai 



\ PROMPT PICK UP I 

*nd DELIVERY 



1'nont ■ jv., jyi jjto 

■ . . ,H*a ■■.'■' 

.v.„.u,-rr,..i, t 
liiw.t..-'-. t , 



" ' -> ' - . '■■'■ " ■ ' 1 II . . I I I . 1 . , .. 



Jack's 

REMODELING 

BASEMENTS 

Kitchens * Bathrooms • Decks 
Fascia • Soffit • Windows 

FREE ESTIMATES 

plus references 

CALL JACK AT 

(847) 546-3759 



i 






j 



Let Us Do Your 
Honey Do List 



METROPOLITAN SERVICES, INC. 

1959 •Fully Insured »24 Hour Emergency Service 

■ Painting, Interior & Exterior 
Wallpaper Removal 
■ Drywall Repairs 

■ Rotted Wood Replacement 
■ Carpentry 

■ Duct Cleaning 
■ Carpet Cleaning 

Drapery Cleaning 




Fire, Smoke & Water Restoration 




■ find Much More 
CALL US TODAY FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE 

(847)367-8500 

729 East Park Ave, * Libertyville, Illinois 60048 




■ESS 



* Painting, Wallpapering "',♦ 
T Expert Installation J 

^ Paper- Fabirfc-Vlnyl J 










•DECORATINGS 

******************* 

; OUed tome. W^ foe \ 
Z ijour elderly tooed ones? Z 
Z I CAN HELP. I 

J fanning* A Wrektmts. Ofa line- * 
Z int. Dam a Certified Qlitrxlng $ 
Z otuhlanl (CSX). D tan be JJ 
Z readied alt J 

; C847) 5I6-97IO Z 

Z no anxwer, leaoe, menage. J 
Z on tfo/t'e mail. Z 



Licensed 

Insured 

FREE 

Estimates 



ROOFING 
SIDING&TRIMV" 

-SEAMLESS GUTTERS 

WINDOWS •DOORS 

DECKS ♦AWNINGS 

Repair & Insurance Work 

<847) 43a-6634 



Quality 

Craftsmanship 

Guaranteed 



TOP PRICE 
PAID 

We pay more for old or 
scrap gold. No amount 
too small or too large! 

(847) 
438-0125 




Need To Get The Job 

Completed? 

Look In Lakeland 

Newspapers Direct 

Line To Help You 

Find The Services 

You May Need. 




Pant's Firewood 

Satisfaction tfmtmtitb 

2S 



Mixed Hardwood $69 (FC) 
Oak $79 (FC) 

Ctierry/Klckory $89 (FC) 
•Free Stacking 
'Free DeliveMy 





A+UNDSCAPIN&V 
JSJftrewood 

*70 per face cord 

#00 full cord 

| (847) 680-7326 « 

n Pry S Guaranteed to Bum 
i\ Free Peflvery and Stacking 



ProbltMiis? 



Professional Solutions 
Reasonable Prices 

__ Call 

Heatyvcwe 

SALES AND SERVICE 



E.PA Certified - Insured JCSi 
Free Est. - Senior Dis. 

(847) 740-4127 




mm 





KITCHENS/BASEMENTS , 

CARPENTRY - TILE 

SMALL JOBS OlC 

TOM KIOLBASA 



(847) J9S-1898 



AFFORDABLE 
HOME REPAIRS 



HANDYMAN SERVICE 



Save money by using Americas 

largest handyman service. 
Insured, bonded, guaranteed. 

(847) 7*6-1 061 

A. 



Sri* 




OFFICES IN 30 STATES 



*Tbe Bodies La** Contcthn"^ -.-_ 
jaukitefVM?And Outned By A.C1_ 



^1:L8O0j£97.a4gO 

r B*9ttu. 







PET SITTING SERVICE 

IsMvrg Care For When VtwVe Not 77wre 

Ertended Vhki,Ov*m%rK Sayi »nd D*3y 0« 

Bondcd-innnd 

AwftlOCf Of 

NattoMtAnecof 
Professional Pit Sitter? 
Serving Bvrtnftort, C*ry, liUnd Laltc, Late 

Zurich, Wiucood* 
ASK ABOUT OUR SAVINGS PROGRAM! 

J (847)487-1651 




Drive Shaft Service 

Drive Axle and Supply 

Complete drive shaft service, custom 
made, front wheel drive axles, 

®M&~- «™P«eraed 

balancing, free 

delivery and more. 

(414) 63*2100 



DONT THROW AWAY I 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO oirnl 
LAMP DOCTORS^ 
FOR REPAIRS, 

WARREN ELECTRIC INC. 

33261 N. Highway 45 

WIlGwood, IL 60030 

(647) 223-8691 



RB BW W— W W yinn iii w ' .. t 






C24 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 6, 1998 



Space is limited. You're not. 





SXTIID YOUR RSACH 01 



Lakeland netDIRECT Would Like To Remind You: 

We Still Have Friendly Service We Still Have Low Monthly Rates 

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E-Mail: service@lnd.com 

Visit us on the Internet: http://www.lnd.com 



'Lakeland netDIRECT offers local phone charges to most of the Lake County area. Call for information about your prefix. 



NO.SfiCHll 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
STATE OF ILLINOIS ) 

) ss 

COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 
LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
GRAND NATIONAL BANK, o National 
Banking Association, 
Plaintiff, 
V, 
GUY J. DELLARIA. KATHLEEN J. 
DELLARIA. HARRIS BANK BARRINGTON 
l/k/a THE FIRST NATIONAL 
BANK AND TRUST COMPANY OF 
BARRINGTON, AS TRUSTEE UNDER 
THE PROVISIONS OF A TRUST DATED 
THE 25TH DAY OF APRIL. 1975 
AND KNOWN AS TRUST NUMBER 926 
LASALLE BANK, FSB f/k/a ALLIANCE 
SAVINGS 'AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, 
ROLAND R. ZBILSKI AND NINA JILL 
ZBILSKI. MIDWEST FUNDING 
CORPORATION. AN ILLINOIS 
CORPORATION. INDEPENDENCE ONE 
MORTGAGE CORPORATION, NORWEST 
MORTGAGE, INC.. A CAUFORNIA 
CORPORATION. NATIONAL CITY 
MORTGAGE COMPANY. AN OHIO 
CORPORATION. UNKNOWN OWNERS 
AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, 
De fondants. 

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION 

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT 

TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE 

USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. 

Tho requisite Affidavit lor Publication having been fifed, notice Is horeby given you. 

UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS. 

Unknown Owners and Hon- Record Claimants, Defendants in the abovo entillod suit, 
thai the said suit has been commenced in Circuit Court ol Iho Nineteenth Judicial Circuit. 
Lake Illinois, by the said Plaintiff against you and other Defendants praying lor tho fore- 
closure ol its Mortgage and for foreclosure and sale of the property commonly known 
and described as 204 East Main Street, Lake Zurich, Illinois 60047. Tho premises con- 
veyed by tho Mortgage and tho corpus of said are described as follows to wit: 

PARCEL t: LOT THREE (3) IN MIONSKE'S SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE 
SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 43 NORTH, RANGE 10. EAST 
OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF. 
RECORDED MAY 24, 1941 IN BOOK 28 OF PLATS. PAGE 41, AS DOCUMENT 
495682, IN LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 

PARCEL 2: LOT 1 IN FROEUCH'S SUBDIVISION, A PART OF SECTION 17, TOWN- 
SHIP 43 NORTH, RANGE 10. EAST OFTHE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN ACCORD- 
ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED SEPTEMBER 11. 1927 AS DOCUMENT 
305531 IN BOOK 5 OF PLATS, PAGE 11. IN LAKE COUNTY. ILLINOIS 
Common address: 204 East Main Street, Lake Zurich. Illinois 
Tax Parcel Numbor: 14-17-404-016 and 04-17-404-017. 

Notice is also hereby given you lhat said Complaint also prays for other roliol; that 
Summons was duly issued out of tho said Court against you as provided by law. and that 
tho said suit is now pending. 

Now, therefore, unless you, tho said above named Defendants, file your answer to tho 
Complaint in the said suit or otherwise make your appearance therein. In the Offico of 
the Clerk of Iho Circuit Court of the Nineteenth Judicial Circuit ol Lake County, Illinois, 18 
N. County Street, Waukegan. Illinois 60085, on or before February 27, 1 998, dotault may 
bo entered against you at any time after that day and a judgment entered in accordance 
with the prayer of said Complaint. 

Dated, Waukegan, Illinois, January 15, 1998. 

/s/Sally 0. Coffoll. 

CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
FISHER AND FISHER RUE NUMBER: 33236 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT, for tho Northern District of Illinois, 
Eastern Division, Crown Bank, FSB, Plaintiff, ■ vs- Camilla A. Bergeron, ot a). Defendants, 
Cose No. 97 C 7940 involving a morlgage foreclosure concerning tho following described 
property: 

Lot 43 in Lakeview Estates Subdivision, Being a Subdivision of Part of the Northwest 
1/4 of tho Southeast 1/4 of Section 21, Township 45 North, Range 10, East ot tho Third 
Principal Meridian. According to the Plat Thereof Rocordod November 17, 1992. as 
Document 3243746, In Lake County, Illinois. 
c/k/a 848 Watorview Drive. Round Lake Park, IL 60073 
Tax ID* 06-21-420-014 

2BEEB 
THIS MATTER coming to bo hoard on the motion of the Plaintiff for an Order directing 

tho Defendant, Camilla A Bergeron, to appear and file their Answer or otherwise plead to 

iho Complaint to Foreclose Mortgage heretofore Hied in this matter and it appearing that 

an Affidavit of Non-Resldonce Petition for Order of Publication having boon filed herein, 

and Iho Court being fully advised In the premises; 

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED that tho Defendant heroin. Camillo A. Bergeron file their 
answers to otherwise plead to tho complaint of Foreclosure Mortgage heretofore filed by 
Plnintrfl on or bofo.o February 12, 1998. 

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that notice ot this ordor be published in the Lakoland 
Newspaper onco a week lor six (6) consecutive weeks. 
ENTER: JUDGE MAROV1CH DATED: Deocmbor IB, 1997 



Elizabeth F. Kaplan 
Renoo F. Mottier 
Michael S. Fisher 
Susan R. Rosen 
FISHER AND FISHER 
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, P.C. 
30 N. LASALLE STREET 
CHICAGO, IL 60602 
{312)372-4784 



0198B-1509-RL 
February 6, 1998 
February 13, 1998 



Richard J. Nakon & Associates 
121 E. Liberty Street, Suite 3 
Wouconda, Illinois 60004-1929 
(847) 5260626 



0198D-1539-WL 
February 6, 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 
FISHER AND FISHER FILE NUMBER: 33025 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT, for the Northern District of Illinois, 
Eastern Division, Homo Savings ot America, FSB, Plaintiff, -vs- Scott D. Martin, 
Elizabeth A. Martin and Gabnelte Griffith. Amorican General Finance, Rogors and 
Hollands, Thomas G. Piatt ond Arleno S, Piatt, ot al. Defendants, Caso No. 97 C 7526 
involving a mortgage foreclosure concerning tho following described property: 

Lot 50 (Except Iho West 10 Fool Thereof) and Iho Wost 20 Feel of Lot 51 In S.S. 
Berry's Gardens. Boing a Subdivision ol Part of the Northwest 1/4 of tho Southoasl 1/4 
ol Section 36. Township 43 North, Range 9, East ol the Third Principal Meridian. 
According to the Plat Thereof Rocordod April 14, 1927 as Document No. 297306 in Lake 
County, Illinois. 

c/k/a 419 Drury Lane, Barrington. IL 60010 
Tax ID* 13-36-403-000 

QBSEB 

THIS MATTER coming te bo heard on Iho motion of tho Plaintiff for an Order directing 
Iho Defendant, Gabrtolle Giilfilh to appoar and file their Answer or otherwise plead to tho 
Complaint to Foreclose Mortgago heretofore filed in this matter and il appearing that an 
Affidavit of Non-/rosidence Petition lor Order of Publication having been filed heroin, and 
the Court boing fully advised in Iho premises; 

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED that Iho Defondanl horoin, Gabriollo Griffith file their 
answers to otherwise plead to Iho complaint of Foreclosure Mortgage heretofore tiled by 
Plaintiff on or before March 6, 1998. 

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that notice ol this order be published in the Lakeland 
Newspaper onco a week tor six (6) consecutive weeks. 

ENTER: JUDGE SHADUR DATED; JANUARY 9. 1998 

ELIZABETH F. KAPLAN 
RENEE F. MELTZER 
MICHAEL S. FISHER 
SUSAN R. ROSEN 
FISHER AND FISHER 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW, P.C. 0198D-1532-WL 

120 N. LASALLE STREET . February 6, 1998 

SUITE 2520 Fobfuary 13, 1990 

CHICAGO, IL 60602 February 20, 1998 

(773)654-6055 February 27, 1998 



PUBUC NOnCE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Outsource 

Technologies. 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS IS 
TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANSACT- 
ED IN THIS COUNTY: 809 Grace Ln. 
LokO Villa, IL 60048, (847)265-0455. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCTING 
OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
William R. Bmtton. 809 Grace Ln., Lake 
Villa. IL 60048. (B47)2650455. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Inlend(s) to conduct tho above named 
business from tho locatton(s) Indicated 
and that tho true or real full name(s) of 
tho person(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting Iho business is/ore correct 
as shown. 

/sAVilliam R. Bratlon, January 29, 1998 
Tho foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before mo by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct tho busi- 
ness this 29th day of January. 1998, 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Barbara J. Erskin 

Notary Public 

Rocofvod: January 29, 1998 

Willard R. Holander 

Lake County Clerk 

0298A-1567-LV 

February 6, 1998 

February 13, 1998 

February 20, 1 998 



PUBUC NOTICE 

Notico Is hereby given that Tho 
EXTRA CLOSET, 849 Anita Street, 
Antiocn, IL. 60002, will sell tho person- 
al goods from tho following units lo sat- 
isfy tho lion ol Tho EXTRA CLOSET 
(Seller) for rental and other charges 
duo. 

UNIT K 1105x10. OCCUPANT - John 
Nouwirlh. CONTENTS • Dresser, ond 
tables, fish tank and filters, couch, weed 
eater, lamp, ice auger, toolbox and 
many boxes. 

Those items and all Hems stored in 
Iho above units will bo sold to tho high- 
est bidder for cash. Removal of all items 
from the promises must be within three 
days from date of sale and a security 
bond posted to cover same. 

Sale will bo hold on February 14, 
1998, on Iho promises of Tho EXTRA 
CLOSET, 849 Anita Street. Antioch. IL, 
(Depot & Anna Sis.) at approximately 
9:00 to 12.00 a.m. Tho EXTRA 
CLOSET reserves Iho right to withdraw 
any or all of ttie above mentioned Hems 
prior to salo. 
Not responsible for accidents. 

0198E-1557-AN 
February 6, 1996