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Full text of "Antioch News 02/19/1999"







Four Sections Kr 78 Pages 



FRIDAY^ .FEBRUARY 19, 1999 




w 

AN0757 12/27/?? xxCOOi 

AHTIQCH TOWNSHIP LIBRARY 

757 HAIN STREET 

Antioch IL 40002-1398 fonts 



AGHS leaders, board say 

modernization project 

shows skill of many 

hometown tradesman 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Tradesmen of union contrac 
tors are creating a public 
high school that is not only 
good looking but is built 
well. Their effort to modernize 
Antioch Community High School 
on time and on 
budget has 
received regular 
praise at public 
meetings. 

There are five 
general reasons 



'Tlie/re getting a lot of 
value for their money 



why this has 
occurred, 

Gino Ricchio, 
Executive Vice- 
President of Seater Construction 
Co., Inc., provides regular monthly 
reptirts to the'Antioch school board 
» about constructiph.progress and 
delays. Consistently, his report to 
the board has included comments 
about the high quality of the work 
done by union contractors. 

Quality construction work is 
done even in places where It may 
never be seen by the taxpayers who 
pay for it This includes such areas 




as the quality of the concrete, the 
ductwork, and the pipes that go into 
the building. 

"That's why I talk about it/' 
Ricchio said. He has seen a good 
deal of construction In his career, 
and he knows that work this good is' 
not what always happens with a 
building put out for bid, 

"You have to 
take who bids the 
job and work with 
them," he said. In 
the case of the high 
school moderniza- 
tion project, Ricchio 
said that the school : 
authorities got good 
prices from top-of- ~ 
the-profftssion ;«„ 
contractors and the result is a high 
quality team of professional 
builders. 

Most recently, Ricchio has been 
pointing at the work of masonry 
contractors Esche & Lee. "Their 
work is beautiful," he"sald. "They're 
cooperative; they're neat; they've 
been on time. I can't say enough 
about them." 

For the next few decades, 
students and taxpayers can look at 
walls of rooms and corridors and 
a see that block facings are not 
chipped and patched, they are 



Gino Ricchio 

Executive Vice-President of 

Seater Construction Co., Inc., 

project builders, 



An old air conditioning unit Is suspended over Aritioch. Communi- 
ty High School after they replaced it witii a new unit Feb: 12 as 
part of the addition to the school.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



precisely aligned, and the mortar 
between them is of uniform thick- 
ness. 

" Air Con Refrigeration is 
installing the heating, ventilation, 
and air conditioning duct work, 
something that almost no one will 



ever see. "They have been creative, 
cooperative, and ahead of sched- 
ule;" Ricchio said. "Their work has 
been beautiful — excellent crafts- 
manship." 

Please see QUALITY /A6 



I u u surfrSS 

volunteer 
Involvement 
to voters, his 
campaign for 
a village 
trustee 
position is 
focused very 
much on the 
future... 

"What I'd like to make sure is 
that we keep going in a positive way/' 

Please see HANSON / A3 



Hanson:. Wants 

to bring a fresh 
look at youth ' . 
recreation needs 
In the community 



Opponents 




; ART ON THE MOVE 

Fox Lake artist 'takes 
hobby to the tracks ■";,■. ■;'•: 
— PLEASE SEEPAGES* 



Village Board to vote on 
LakeAntioch development, 
in March 15 public hearing 



• m t ^ / wV-i 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



ELECTED AT LARGE; 
. Bill .to elect; Lake County. x - 
. Board, chairman gains 
support 



CI 



ACAOBpr^iwms ■ 

j Lakeiand Critics $cWnprn 
theOscar-lrh^v - 

.: ^PLE*SiSffiPAfi€8S 



i 



The moment was as rare as it 
must have been unexpected. 
- Barbara Johnson, chair of the 
Antioch Planning and Zoning Board, 
had just asked if there was any public er adoption of the 
' comment about the proposal before 
the commission members. 



At the end of the evening, the 
Antioch Planning and Zoning Board 
voted to recommend to the village 
board that Antioch accept his 
proposal. Village trustees are expect- 
ed to conduct a hearing on Monday, 
March 15 to consld 



• fc*ta*US»cD 








ClQHMQra ^. C2 • ■ Omuvm.. 

GEftCpNNECTED 
Look for us on the Internet at 
.WWW.LPNEWS.COM 



There was a comment by former 
opponents. 

On Thursday evening, Feb. 1 1, in 
the village council chambers, 
Michael Doran, president of 
Landmark Homes, had completed 
his presentation for a proposed 
design of Landmark Pointe,' a 
planned unit, development on 
Antioch Lake. Because of Intense 
public opposition to his original 
proposal in 1998, Doran had 
withdrawn an earlier petition jind 
was now submitting a new design. 



commission's 
recommendation. 

Whereas . the 
original Landmark 
Pointe proposal 
contained 47 lots, 
the new plan 
contains 31 lots. The average lot size 
is now twice the minimum require- 
ment of 12,000 square feet Street 
changes and sidewalk additions are 
proposed. The developer will create 



Planning, Zoning and Building, had 
reviewed the plans for the requested 
26-acre annexation, for the residen- 
tial planned unit development He 
had given it a positive recommenda- 
tion with conditions. ' 

Silhan requested "relatively 

minor" engineering modifications. 

Other conditions were related to 

stormwater detention, erosion 

control, an extension for Bowles 

Road, compatible "architectural 

facade designs, lot coverage that- 

does not exceed 30 

rn i *.-#-n^«„ percent of lot area, 

Thankyou for talking r Dec ifics of language 



to your neighbors' 



Nancy Binder, 
Antioch plan commission 



related to the 75-foot 
buffer area, tree 
protection, manage- 
ment, of construc- 
tion traffic, size of a 
cul-de-sac/: impact 
fee payments to schools and the 
parks department, and other techni- 
cal recommendations. 

Michael Doran had completed 
his presentation and answered 



a 75-foot rear-yard easement as a questions from the commission 

buffer along the Antioch Lake shore- members, 
line. Johnson asked for public 

Bob Silhan, Antioch director of comment 



Leonard Mattspn stood to speak. 

Mattson noted that the Alliance 
for Sensible' Development had 
expressed opposition to the 
proposed : Landmark Pointe PUD 
and annexation during past hearings 
about the proposal. The Alliance had 
presented comments on behalf of six 
subdivisions around Antioch Lake. 
They are: Antioch Hills, Falcon Hills, 
Hennings Court, Mystic Cove, Sabri- 
na Manor, and Sunset Ridge. 

Mattson said that there 
remained some individual outstand- 
ing issues about the proposed devel- 
opment by people who were in the 
subdivisions. He then read his 
remarks from a letter signed by 
himself and Bernard Jasmer repre- 
senting the Alliance and conveyed to 
the planning and zoning board. 

: "Based on this proposal for 31 
homes with accompanying condi- 
tions and recommendations, it was 
the consensus of the Alliance to 
thank the village planning and 
zoning board, for withholding, its 
approval of the original proposal for 
the benefit of the community at 

Please see PUD I A3 



For home delivery, call (847) 740-4035; For ads, call (847) 223-8161 



H 





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A2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



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February 19, 1999 







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February 19, 1999 



COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A3 



FROM PAGE Al 



PUP: Jteelopment gains nod 
of Antioch plan commission 



large," said Mattson.' 

He said that they also thanked 
Silhan for his review oitthe propos- 
als and his detailed recommenda- 
tions. 

Mattson thanked Doran "for 
his willingness to :hear the past 
concerns and respond with a re- 
vised and vastly improved propos- 
al " • ■ • i r 

"The Alliance believes that the 
revised, plan, without variances 
and with Mr. .Sjlhan'srecommen- 
dations added,' w'hTenhance our 
Lake' Antioch community.'' 

It was a rare pffer of support for 
an improved development design 
by previous opponents. 

Other "members of the audi- 
ence opposed to the original pro- 
posal also spoke of the developer's 
revisions favorably. ' 

Bruce Gardner said the original 
proposal was a bad deal. He said, 
"If something is going to be built 



down there, I'd like to see Doran 
do it because I think he is going to 
do a good job." 

Robert Schmelzer was less sup- 
portive. "It's still just a little bit too 
tight," he said. "You're almost 
there." 

Schmelzer identified a way.to 
remove six homes to eliminate the 
"wall of houses" effect. He said that 
he would favor a 25-home devel- 
opment proposal. 

Of special interest to people in 
the audience was a proposal by devel- 
oper Doran to create an association to 
protect the lake. Maiiy lake residents 
expressed interest in the idea. 

At the end "of the meeting, 
commission member Nancy 
Binder said to developer Doran; 
"Thank you for talking to your 
neighbors." 

She then told members of the 
Alliance for sensible development, 
"We appreciate your input." 



HANSON: Seeks to return to 
village trustee seat 



he said. "I'd rather be In a proactive 
than a reactive state. " 

Hanson is a downtown retail 
merchant at BJ's Fashions for Men, 
931 Main Street. He' has worked 
there almost two dozen years, since • 
he was 16 years old. As a result, he al- 
■ ways has had a strong interest in eco- 
nomic development issues. ' 

"I've seen the blighted times, the 
: 1980s when we've gone through 
rough times,'.' he^aid.Hanson said 
that the village and the Antioch 
Chamber of Commerce and Industry ' 
1 have worked hard and made many 
improvements. 

"Ithink the downtown is well on 
its own way," 

Hanson has lived in Antioch all 
his life. When he was a member of 
the village board, he served on the 
Public Safety Committee. He also has 
served as president of the Antioch 
Retailer's Association and served two 
years as president of the Chamber of 
Commerce. 

He now hopes to bring strong 
representation to the village board 
for ideas that he believes residents 
want discussed and implemented. 
For example, Hanson wants to bring 
a fresh look at youth recreation needs 
in the community. 

Being a retailer, Hanson knows 
that young people today are involved 
in different types of recreation activ- 
ities, such as in-line skating and 
skateboarding. They are his cus- 
tomers and he has many opportuni- 
ties to talk with them. For him, there is 
a need to look beyond the roadblocks 
offered by liability issues and to seek 
out ways, to keep the community's 
children interested in a life here. 

He praised the contributions of 
Community Development Director 
Claude LeMere and Parks and Recre- 
ation Department Director' Laurie 
Stahl.' "They are doing good jobs," he 



said. He wants to support their efforts 
to make a place for children in the 
community. 

"If you're going to make your 
roots in a community, you're going 
to want to give back," he said. He has 
very positive feelings for the commu- 
nity and believes that Antioch has a 
strong future. 

"Good planning is the key," Han- 
son said. For him, the village has to 
', be. sure, that it provides the same 
rqualityTof services^en'th'o.ugh'ihc 
community is growing and develop- 
ing. 

He has been a part of many of the 
changes that have unfolded during 
the past few years that benefit the 
community. Hanson mentions his 
work with CAN, the Orchard Street 
Extension, and redevelopment work 
that has sparked a downtown rebirth. 

'•'CAN was developed as an off- 
shoot of the Chamber," he said. 
These days "Community Action 
Now" is part of the overall Chamber 
of Commerce program and contin- 
ues to help local merchants and 
downtown business interests work 
together for mutual improvements. 

Hanson said, "The whole goal in 
village government is that you are 
representing (the people)." He wants 
to represent Antioch residents, and 
he wants to represent the energy of 
bringing new ideas before the people 
for consideration. 

"Being away allows you to come 
back to it fresh again," he said, "I had 
a Iot.of fun running for mayor," he 
said. "I learned a lot." 

Hanson now Wants to bring his 
previous political experience, his ex- 
perience as. a businessman, and his 
volunteer commitment to the Cham- 
ber and economic redevelopment 
action before the voters. 

"The challenges are ahead," he 
said. 






Vol. 114 No. 8 A Lakeland Newspaper Founded 1886 

(USPS 027 : 080) Editorial OHk*: Mwnbw oHiimoU Flw *»**. 

30 South Whilnsy St.. Grayalake.IL 60030 ■.. • Look tor us on the Internet at 

(847) 223-8161 WWW.LPNEWS.COM 

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Display Advertising Mgr, 

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Composition MgrJExeoilltve Editor 









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->— ..^>fjntv< 



Claude LeMere, Director of Community Development for the Village of Antioch, updates members 
of the Antioch Women's Club on the progress of the William Brook Memorial Wetlands and Enter- 
tainment Center.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 




By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

The Antioch Woman's Club has 
undertaken a major community im- 
provement project at the William E. 
Brook Wetland Sanctuary, and Enter- 
tainment Center. 

The Winter Recreation Project 
will improve cold-weather recre- 
ation resources for community par- 
ents and children. 

The club has scheduled major 
fund raising activiUo&rUnd»evexiU . 
during the year to obtaln'support for.' 
the project, according to club mem- 
ber Sue Allen. 

The Winter Recreation Project 
will require construction of a sled- 
ding hill with lighting, padded poles, 
and protective fencing.There will be 
a warming shed for skaters and chil- 
dren using sleds. 

"It's for children and their fami- 
lies," Allen said. . 

• Use of the Brook memorial area 
by children during winter when 
plants are dormant is not expected to 
harm the sanctuary values of the 



ponds and wetlands. 

The Antioch Woman's Club will 
sponsor a community-wide Mas- 
querade Ball on Saturday, Oct. 30 at 
Maravelas Banquet Facility to raise 
money for construction costs. . 

"Details are not completed," 
Allen said. However, some decisions 
have been made. 

"We've got our. meals already 
planned. It's going to be a nice din- 
ner," sr^e said. "It wUlbefdetrrilgnon 
and shrimp scampi,'' 
• ■v. — ".Maravelas has.heervwQndiir£uL. 
to help us," Mien said. "Maria (DeifF 
. giannis) wasabsolutelywonderml to 
deal .with'." 

"We'd like to have the whole 

community come," Allen said. 

K Young marrieds should come too.". 

"We have enough room for 300 

people," she said. "And I want to fill 

. it." 

The evening also will feature 
dancing, a silent auction, and a 50-50 
raffle. 

.."And, we will raffle-off the quilt 
too," Allen said. 

Members of the woman's club 



have started work on "The Wetland's 
Quilt" which will evoke natural fea- 
tures of the downtown memorial 
wetland sanctuary. 

"There will be several different 
scenes," she said. "It will look like 
several different framed pictures." 

. Some of the pictures will be done 
in an appliquS style and will show 
scenes such as tree plantings, wet- 
land'rjlants, workers creating, the 
sanctuary area, and ducks. 

"The -fabrics' are, wonderful," 

RotolrvKcssell andWcnayivlnm- 
ton at Quitter's Dream Inc., 902 
Main Street, have helped woman's 
club members select fabrics and 
quilting materials. Kesseli and Mas- 
ton will provide guidance for cre- 
ation of the quilt. 

Allen expects that the club's 
work on the quilt, the community 
improvement project, the Masquer- 
ade Ball, and fund raising eventsto 
be a multi-year major commitment 
of resources and personnel. 

"It should be fun," she said. 
"This has been a joy for me to do." 



St. Peters to serve seniors dinner 



Senior citizens are invited to a 
free spaghetti dinner Satur- 
day, Feb. 27 from 4:30 to 7:30 
p.m. sponsored by the St : Pe- 
ter Parish 1999 Confirmation Class. 
Sarah McConnell said that there 
will be 75 children serving the meal 
and helping out 

"They will be doing the whole ■ 
thing," said McConnell. 

The spaghetti mealincludes 
bread, salad, cookies, and spumoni. 
"If they're interested incoming, 
they should call St. Peter Religious 
Education; 395-0246," McConnell . 
said. She will also take reservations 
■at 395-2194. 

The meal is in Father Frawley 
Hall and has elevator access. . 

"This is the first time we've ever 
done this," she said. 






■l*£* 






Al*- 



OUR 
TOWN 

KenPatchen 



man said. 



Four local artists will have, a 
show at Books Etc., 901 Main Street, 
on Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 20 
and 21. Pen and ink, watercolors, 
photographs, and oils and acrylics 
will be displayed. Dale Perryman 
said that the four local artists are: 
Gale Mondi, of Antioch, Tom Kon- 
rath, of Ingleside, Beth Johnson, of 
Salem, Wis., and Mindy Langer, of 
Round Lake. 

"Entertainment will be provided 
by Lakes Area Music Center," Perry- 



Village trustees approved ap- 
pointment of Don Janski to the An- 
tioch Planning and Zoning Com- 
mission. He will replace member 
Sheila Dvorak. "She has taken a 
job which will conflict with her time 
(on the board) ," Mayor Marilyn 
ShlneOugsaid. 

* janski has a degree in environ- 
mental engineering. "He has had 
some experience working with the 
Lake County department of plan- 
ning," Shineilug said. 

' .The New Year Weekend bliz- 
zard did generate three sets of kind 
yvords for village employees who 
clean roads and sidewalks. ; 

President Scott Pierce of the 
Oakwood Knolls Association called 
Mayor Marilyn Shineilug afterwards 
to let her know what a great job the. 
village was doing on snow removal. 
He said that he had been around 



the midwest and Antioch was one 
of the best. 

Metra Executive Director 
Philip A. Pagano wrote: " I would 
like to congratulate your municipal- 
ity for the Herculean effort made to 
clear the commuter parking lots 
during the recent record-breaking 
snow-fall." 

Pagano also wrote: "Thank you 
again for the outstanding efforts 
made by your staff throughout mis 
substantial clearing effort." 

The President of the Antioch 
Chamber of Commerce and Indus- 
try, Barbara Porch, wrote a note to 
loe Huber at the Department of 
Streets and Sanitation: "You and 
your staff have done a wonderful- 
job in clearing the streets and side- 
walks so quickly after our 'Blizzard . 
of'99." 

Porch also wrote:."Traffic was 
not brought to a halt. Merchants 
were able to return to their busi-,' 
nesses much sooner than the high . 
snow banks would lead one to be- 
lieve, and the town was allowed to 
carry oh business as usual." 

If you have interesting infor- 
mation or anecdotes to submit for 
"Our Town"-.call staff reporter Ken 
Patchen at 223-8161, ext.131 or 
e-mail, edit@lnd.com." 






■-7 



A4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 19, 1999 





Going fishin' 

Antioch resident Jim Breen totes his fishing equipment toward the ice Saturday during the North- 
ern Illinois Conservation Club's annual fishing tournament. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 




ACHS opens 
Prince,' Thursday 



, > i « ■ ■ 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 




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West on Orchard) 





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Comes to America 

byJIMWARNKEN, 

President, North Star Travel, Inc. » 

The tenn "barge cruising™ probably brings ilmujjhis of a 1 luck Kinn adu'niure where you catch a ride on 
(hose coal carrying llai boats common on the Mississippi. 

Nothing could be further from the irutli. 

Barge cruising is actually a very luxurious way of traveling, common in liurype for many years. Now a 
company called RiverDarge Excursions is bringing thai experience to America, but on a much larger scale. 

While European barges carry on average about 20 passengers. Riv erHarge Excursions' "River Explorer" 
has a capacity of I9S. 

The River Explorer consists of two barges, one for passenger cabins anil one for the public rooms, and a 
towboal which actually pushes the barges. (Tugboats pull and tow boats push). 

Since the engine of the twin-barge unit is located in the towboal. there's no vibration or noise in the 
passenger barge. 

The passenger barge has iwo levels of •)') staterooms each, for a total of 198. The staterooms are named 
after a state and arc numbered in the order of when the slate joined the union. The upper and lower cabins are 
named after the same slate. For example staterooms I IK and 21 K arc both known as the Louisiana Room, since 
Louisiana was the I9ih stale. (Sorry. Hawaii, only room for -J slates). 

The slaierooms are all 200 square feci and decorated according to ihe slate ihey are named aficr wiih 
prims of the appropriate stale capital, bird and flower. The upper level staterooms also boasi a private 
verandah. 

On the second barge is ihc Spraguc Show Room which feature* jarz. country, Cajun or blucgrass music, 
depending on ihe ship's location vv hich could be anywhere on the Mississippi. Cumberland. Missouri, Ohio, or 
any other great American river. 

Also on the second barge is Ihe dining room, where meals are also reflective of the area, Meals consist of 
a buffet breakfast and lunch and family-style sen ice at dinner with (he self-sen ice snacks available 24 hours a 
day. Meals, as life in general aboard this barge, ate very informal. 

Large wraparound picture windows ihroughout die public areas allow for panoramic views of ihe 
constantly changing countryside. 

.All meals, port taxes and even gratuities, as well as all shore excursions are included in die upfront price 
whic*h is still much less ilian the riverboat cruises currently being offered on die Mississippi. I've even worked 
oui a deal where pickup and return right lo your home is included. 

NORTH 



TAVERN & GRILLE 



FEBRUARY 20th 

KARAOKE 

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9:30 p.m. - ? 



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* Blind Draw 
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* Play begins at 
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* $5.00 entry 

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Antioch Community High 
School drama students will present 
director Donna Shehorn's adapta- 
tion of "The Little Prince" this week- 
end. 

The play also may be a last op- 
portunity to see performances by a 
few graduating Seniors who have ap- 
peared in previous school produc- 
tions. 

The play opens Thursday, Feb. 

18 with a performance at 7:30 p.m. 
There will be additional perfor- 
mances on Friday and Saturday, Feb. 

19 and 20. A matinee performance is 
scheduled for 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, 
Feb. 21. Tickets for students and se- 
nior citizens are $2. Adult tickets are 
$3. The play is in the ACHS auditori- 
um. 

"It's based on the children's sto- 
ry by Anlione De Saint-Exupery," 
Shehorn said. "I think it will be a 
charming, sweet, and tender show." 

"It's very different from what 
we've done before," she said, "It's 
not a comedy." 

"The Little Prince" is a story told 
from the point of view of a man who 
six years earlier had been a pilot, He 
crashes in the Sahara Desert. Out of 
nowhere, he meets a little prince. The 
prince proceeds to tell the pilot about 
his adventures. The prince has met 
people who have taught him things. 

It is a fantasy story. 

"There are 23 in the cast," said 
Shehorn. The four leads in the play 
are Bennie Woodell, Kyle Scott, 



Chelsey Mortenson, and Vita Gold. 

Woodell is the pilot. He has. pre- 
viously appeared as the King of 
Hearts in "Alice in Wonderland" and 
asTully Bascum in "The Mouse that 
Roared." 

"He's doing a nice job, a really 
nice job," Shehorn'' said.: "He has 
grown so much since his freshman 
year. He is a dedicated and depend- 
able guy." 

Scott is the narrator in "The Lit- 
tle Prince." He was General Snip- 
pet in 'Mouse' and Sheridan 
Whiteside ' In "The . Man Who 
Came to Dinner." * 

"Kyle is doing a marvelous 
job," Shehorn said. "He's.got a large 
amount of line responsibility, and 
he's just doing a tremendous job." 

Mortenson is the prince. She 
played the Secretary of State in 
'Mouse' and maid Sarah in 'Man." 
She was Alice in 'Alice." 

Vita Gold is the prince's narrator. 
She has appeared as a secretary in 
"The Man Who Came to Dinner," a 
diplomat in "The Mouse that 
Roared," and a narrator in"Alice In 
Wonderland." 

Jennie Groth is the queen in 
"The Little Prince." 

"She does a lovely job as the 
queen," said Shehorn. She too has 
appeared in alt three previous pro- 
ductions. 

Other seniors in "The Little 
Prince" will be Ted Welker and Erin 
Brodey. 

"these six have been stalwarts for 
us," Shehorn said. "But, we have 
some excellent freshmen coming up." 




38730 Deep Lake Rd. 

Lake Villa 

356-3701 



Johnsburg's 'ShootmgXor 
the Stars Gala and Auction' 



The Johnsburg Educational Part- 
nership Foundation (JEPF) will be 
holding its sixth annual "Shooting for 
the Stars Gala and Auction" on Satur- 
day, March 6, at the McHenry Coun- 
try Club. 

Besides an elegant dinner, the 
Gala features both silent and live 
auctions. This year there are over 100 
exciting items offered such as a "Par- 
ty with the Puppies" for 24 people at 
Dairyland Greyhound Park with din- 
ner included, weekend stays in Door 
County and Galena, American girl 
items, as well as many sports tickets 
and a spa package, just to name a 



few. 

The Black Tie Optional event will I 
start at 6 p.m. with an hors d'oeuvres 
reception and silent auction, out- 
standing cuisine follows at 7 p.m. 
and the live auction to start at 8 p.m. 
The evening will conclude with 
dancing by Stax O* Wax. 

If you or your company can offer 
a donation or would like to attend the 
event, you can contact a Committee 
Chairperson at 344-1970 "or Kathy 
Grons at the Johnsburg School (815) 
385-6916 from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. dai- 
ly. There is limited seating available. 
Tickets $65 per person. 




Come Worship With Us 

A Directory Of Antioch Area Churches 



Gf nceland Baptist Church. 2SS Ida St., Antioch, II 
Sunday School Ham., Morning Worship nam., 
Sunday Evening 7pm, Robert Wiiiiams._Past.or. 




STAR 

CRUISES 

Lindcnhurst 

www.northstartravel.com 

(847) 356-2000 



First Church of Christ, Scientist & Reading Rm. Rta 173 and 
Harden. Antioch, Phone (B47) 395-1196. Sunday School. 
Sunday Church Service 10:30am. Wednesday, 7:30pm, 

Besutilul Savior Evangelical Lutheran Church. 554 Partway, 
Antioch. Phone (847) 265-2450 Sunday Worship at 9am. Sunday 
School. High School & Adult Bible Classes 10:30am. 

St Ignatius Episcopal. 977 Main Sl Phone (947) 395-0662. Low 
Mass 730am, Hgh Mass 930am Sunday Sehcd & Nursery 930am, 

Antioch Evangelical Free Church. 750 Hghview Dr. Phone 
(847) 396-4117. Saturday Evening Service 630 p.m. Sunday 
School 9:45am, Sunday Worship 830, 11:00, Children's Church 
1 1 am. Nursery both services Awana Club. Senior Pastor David M. 
Grofeau. 

SL Stephen Lutheran Church. 1155 Hillside Ave. Phone (647) 
395-3359. Sunday Worship, 6, 9:15 & 1030. Church School 
9.15am., Sunday. Rev. Robert Trendel. Interim Pastor. 

Christian Ula Fellowship Assemblies of God Church. 41625 
Deep Lake Rd, Aniicch. Phone (647) 395-6572. Sunday School 
(all ages) 6am., Sunday Morning Worship i0am., Children's 
Church 10am,, Sunday Evening Worship 8:30pm„ Wednesday 
Worship & Children's Program 7am,, Tues. Women's Fellowship 
& Bible Study 9-1 130am. Jeff Brussary, Pastor. 



Faith Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main Si., Phone 
(847) 395-1600. Sunday Worship 6 & 1030am., Sunday 
School 9:25am., Sal. 7pm. , Rev. Gregory Hormanson, 
Pastor. Christian Day School (847) 395-1664. 

Mlllbum Congrtgallonol United Church ol Christ Grass 

Lake Rd. at Rle. 45, Phone (847) 356-5237. Sunday Service 

10am. Children's Program 10am. Rev. Paul R. Meluer, 

Paslor. 

United Methodist Church of Antioch. 846 Main St. Phone 

(847) 395-1259, Worship 630 & 10am., Fellowship Time 

630am; Sunday School 10am. Rev. Kurt A. Gamlin, Pastor. 

St. Peter's Church. SS7 W. Lake St., Anlioch. Phone (647) 
395-0274. Masses weekdays, 7:30am; Sunday 630, 8, 
9:30, 1130am & Saturday 530pm. Rev. Father Ronald H. 
Angtim, Paslor. 

Chain ol Lakes Community Bible Church. 23201 W, Grass 
Lake Rd, Antioch, Phone (647) 638-0103. Sunday Worship 8:15 
and 10:45. Sunday School 9:45. Children's Church 10.45. Youth, 
Women's, Awana & Small Group ministries. Pastor, Paul 
McMinimy. 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod). 
25100 W. Grand Ave. (Rle. 59 & 132), Lake Villa. (847) 
356-5158. Sunday Worship 6:15 & 10:45em; Sunday 
School (3 and up) and Bible Study 9:30am. Christian 
Preschool, Rev. John Zellmer, Paslor. 



Dan Dugenske, Director 
This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 



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February 19, 1999 



POLICE & FIRE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ ' A5 



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POLICE BEAT 



Persons charged with a crime are innocent until proven guilty In a court of law. 



UNDENHURST; 



March 3 In Grayslake. 



Resisting 

Undenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Charles N. Hilliard, 80, on 
Friday, Feb. 12, at 8:28 p.m. in the 
1800 block of East Grand Avenue. 
He was charged with disorderly 
conduct and resisting arrest. He 
was released on bond pending a 
Wednesday, March 3 court date at 9 
a.m. in Grayslake. Hilliard was tak- 
en to St. Therese Medical Center. 

Alcohol, drugs 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped MichaelM. Mehnert, 24, of 
Antioch, on Monday,' Feb. 15 at 
Grass Lake Road near Wittenburg 
Road in a 1991 Red Pontiac. He was 
charged with disobeying a stop sign, 
transportation of open alcohol, and 
possession of drug paraphernalia. . 
Adam J. Darling, 19, of Trevor, a pas- 
senger in the vehicle, was charged 
with consumption of alcohol by a 
minor. Both were released on bond 
pending a court date of Wednesday, 



Cited for Dili 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Charles LWatley, 57, of 
Zion, on Thursday, Feb. 11, at 
8:30 p.m. at Route 45 south of 
Country Place in a blue Pontiac. 
He was charged with failure to 
yield to an emergency vehicle, 
improper lane use, DUI- alcohol, 
and DUI over 0.08. He took a 
breathalyzer test (0.15). He was 
released on bond pending a court 
date of Tuesday, March 9 at 9 a.m. 
in Waukegan. 

LAKE VILLA 

Two injured in accident 

. Two people were injured in a 
rear-end collision at the intersection 
of Deep Lake and Grass Lake Roads. 
On Feb. 12 at 11:25 a.m., Cheryl 
D. Carter, 41, of Antioch, was driving 
southbound on Deep Lake Road ap- 
proaching the 4-way stop at Grass 
Lake Road. When she attempted to 



Waterway Agency 
to hold public hearing 
for noise ordinance 



By SPENCER SCHEIN 
Staff Reporter 



The Fox Waterway Agency is 
looking to hear some "noise" on a . 
proposed noise ordinance it hopes to 
start enforcing this year. 

The hearing will be held at the 
agency's next' meeting, Thursday, 
Feb. 25,'at 8 p.m., at McHehry Village 

Hall. 

The idea of the ordinance is to 
impose Incremental fines to boaters 
who roar their boat engines in narrow 
rivers adjacent to residences. 

Reports of rattled windows and 
startled boaters are routinely received 
by the McHenry County Sheriffs Of- 
fice, which Is behind the recom- 
mended proposal. 

A state law based on decibel lev- 



els is unenforceable, authorities said, 
as there is not enough room on the 
Fox River from Pistakee Lake down to 
Algonquin to get an accurate reading 
In a range of 25-miles. 

The agency board of directors Is 
likely to approve the ordinance at its 
meeting following the public hearing. 

If approved, a system of penalties 
will be installedi'startlng with a $35 
fine for the first offense, a $200 fine for 
the second offense, and a $500 fine for 
the third offense, along with a manda- 
tory court appearance and loss of 
boating privileges for the remainder 
of the season, said William Dam, 
chairman'of the agency*s board of di- 
rectors. 

Dam said the agency's attorney is 
now looking at an ordinance to regu- 
late loud music produced offof boats. 



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stop, the car went into a skid at 
about 30 mph. 

According to reports, she realized 
she was unable to stop and attempt- 
ed to swerve right to avoid collision, 
but the vehicle went into a sldeway 
sldd on the slippery pavement, strik- 
ing the rear of the car ahead of her 
with the leftside of her car. 

The driver of the other car, Gus 
J. Russo, 32, of Round Lake Beach 
. and a passenger in his car, Kathy 
Deangelo, 52, of Round Lake, both 
complained of back and neck pain. 
They were both transported by Lake 
Villa Rescue to Condell Medical 
Center, where they were treated for 
injuries. 

Carter was not injured. 

Carter was ticketed for failure to 
reduce speed to avoid an accident. 

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Steven Walter Verenski, 17, of 
North Chicago, was arrested by Lake 
Villa Police Feb. 12 on charges of 
improper lighting (one head light), 
no rear registration plate, posses- 
sion of drug paraphernalia and pos- 



session of tobacco products. 

At 6:17 p.m. Feb. 12, a patrol of- 
ficer noticed a white Taurus with 
only one headlight working heading 
westbound on Grand Avenue at 
Deep Lake Road. The car then 
turned onto Woodhead Drive and 
the officer initiated a traffic stop. 

The officer talked to the driver, 
Verenski, and asked if he could 
search the car. After a search, He 
found Redman and Skoal chewing 
tobacco and a package of Newport 
cigarettes. He also found a cannabis 
bong behind the seat with cannabis 
resin in it " 

Verenski was taken to Lake Villa 
Police station where he was issued 
the two traffic citations. He was re- 
leased pending a March 10 court 
date to appear on the charges of . 
possession of tobacco products and 
possession of drug paraphernalia. 

Illegal transportation of 
alcohol 

Lake Villa Police stopped a 
Chevy van Feb. 12 that was travel- 
. ing eastbbund on Grand Avenue 
from Route 83 with a canoe sticking 



out of the back of the van. 

A patrol officer Initiated a traffic 
stop on the vehicle at 5:23 p.m. on 
Grand Avenue east of Deep Lake 
Road. As he walked up to the vehi- 
cle, he noticed an open 1 2-pack of 
beer Inside the van with some emp- 
ty cans of Busch beer. 

The officer asked the driver, 
Gregory Thomas Andrews, 49, 
37083 N. Lawrence Drive, of Lake 
Villa, about the beer. Andrews said 
he had had two beers while fishing. 
The officer could not observe any 
visible signs that Andrews had been 
drinking or could he smell alcohol 
on his breath. 

Trie officer then ran a check on 
the passenger in the van, James ' 
Scott Kuebler, 44, of 36972 N. Carol ; 
Lane, Lake Villa. Kuebler was want- 
ed on a warrant by Lake County for' 
failure to appear in court on traffic 
charges. 

Andrews was issued two cita- 
tions for driving with a projected 
load and illegal transportation of al- 
cohol. 

Kuebler was taken into custody 
and was unable to post bond so he 
was taken to the Lake County Jail. 




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A6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 19, 1999 



FROM PAGE Al 



QUALITY: ACHS project 
shows skill of local craftsman 

RIcchio said that the excavation done as was demolition work by 
work by DK Contractors was well Pickus Construction— "They did 



exactly what they said they would 
do." 

Payne & Dolan did the reconfig- 
uration of Route 83 in front of the 
building. "They did it in a few days. 
It was amazing." 

Ricchio had praise for virtually 
all of the subcontractors: Circle 
Contract, International Decorators, 
LibertyvilleTile and Carpeting, 







m. i: mi 



for my family. 



When it comes to medical care, I want the best! 

\n western Lake County that means 

The Victory Surgery and Treatment Center. 

When I'm choosing a healthcare facility, I'm fussy. I look for what's 
important to me and my family. I won't settle for less. 

Things like: 

• Experienced, "quality physicians 

• Friendly, caring staff 

• Great customer service 

• Convenient location 

Whether someone in my family needs an outpatient surgical procedure, 
a blood test, physical therapy, X rays or some other service, I feel 
confident that the Victory Surgery and Treatment Center will be the 
place to go. 

For information about outpatient surgery, diagnostic and treatment 
services, call 847-356-4700, 





Victory Surgery 

and Treatment Center 

' * ; — . 

1050 Red Oak Lane 

(Located on the Victory Lakes Campus) 

Lindenhurst, Illinois - 

A Not For Profit Organization 



Committed to your standards of excellence. 



Meridian Acoustics, New Wall Doc- 
tor, Metalmaster/Roofmaster, Lake 
City Glass, and Nelson Fire Protec- 
tion. 

Colette & Ano, of Antioch, are 
providing some of the plumbing 
services. "(Reed Ano) Is very atten- 
tive, very cooperative," Ricchio said. 
Colette & Ano did not originally 
submit a bid to work on the high 
school because the firm, at that 
time, had been awarded bids on 
other large projects and did not 
think they could undertake the 
work. 

"(Ano) was responsible, He did- 
n't bid die job," Ricchio said. "That 
is very admirable." 

Ricchio appreciates Uiat type of 
■ consideration because he wants 
contractors who bid on the work to 
assign the correct manpower levels 
in order to meet project deadlines. 
Now that Colette & Ano is working 
on die project, he has high praise 
for their commitment and their 
work. Colette & Ano submitted a 
bid for work that started later in the 
schedule. 

Carey Electric also receives high 
praise. "He's always had enough 
people on this job," Ricchio said of 
Tom Carey. "I can't say enough 
good about him." 

ACHS Business Manager BUI 
Ahlers said that the quality of the 
work extends beyond the people 
who are building it. He said that 
people who are supplying materials 
for construction are providing high 
quality materials, on time. 

There are five general reasons 
offered for this confluence of quali- 
ty contracting and public construc- 
tion. They include the school's ad- 
ministrators and school board 
members, responsible bidding by 
confident contractors, Antioch area 
residents who serve as foreman or 
workers on the project, team meet- 
ings, and the opportunity to start 
with a good plan for the building. 

Ricchio attributes starting with 
a good plan to District Superinten- 
dent Dennis Hockney, Ahlers, and 
the school board itself. He said that 
they wanted a master plan of what 
needed to be done, so that they 
could anticipate where future addi- 
tions would go if more state educa- 
tion funds became available for 
construction. Ricchio said the 
school board and administrators 
took the time at the beginning to 
get the design correct. 

Ricchio offers a second reason 
for what has happened. He attribut- 
es some of the quality teamwork at- 
titude to the character and values of 
both Hockney and Ahlers. 

"I'm very Impressed.with how 
they work together. They make a 
very good team," Ricchio said. 

"(Bill Ahler's) business ethics 
are so good," he said. It gives con- 
tractors confidence that they will be 
treated fairly. They expect that 
Hockney and Ahlers will treat them 
fairly if there are unforeseen condi- 
tions. 

"(Ahlers is) known as a good, 
honest person. He's known to pay 



on time." 

"If you're known to pay your 
bills, people are clamoring to work 
for you, supply you." 

The school board itself Is part of 
this. Ahlers said, "We have seven 
board members and they all con- 
tribute In their own unique ways." 
The board reviewed plans and 
specifications and provided feed- 
back. 

Both Ricchio and Ahlers cited 
contributions by board member 
Larry Peterson..Peterson is an elec- 
trical engineer who Works in con- 
struction and real estate for Hewitt 
Associates. 

Ahlers said, "Larry has the abili- 
ty to look at a drawing and come up 
with ideas. They're always very cre- 
ative." 

"We met with Larry a number 
of times," Ricchio said; Peterson 
would provide ideas for the design 
team to think about. "He's very tal- 
ented that way. His vision was very . 
clear." 

Peterson was able to review the 
plans and specifications with other 
school board members and provide 
ideas and alternative solutions. The 
outcome was a building with im- 
proved design features that makes a 
unified visual statement. 

Ricchio said that a third factor Is 
that the quality of the people in- 
volved probably attracted good bids 
from high quality companies who 
might not normally have bid for this 
type of a project. He was referring 
to the reputation of the school. 

Ahlers said the same thing, ex- 
cept he cited the reputation of 
Seater Construction as a factor. 
"They're the ones who are setting 
the tone for what goes on." 

"All the subs knew who they 
were going to work for," Ahlers said. 
As a result, they prepared realistic 
bids that were competitive with the 
expectation that they would be 
treated fairly. 

Both Ricchio and Ahlers said 
that a fourth quality factor is the 
people who do the work. "There are* 
a lot of Antioch residents as fore- 
men on this job," said Ricchio, - 

People working oh the building 
take pride in working on a local pro- 
ject, 

Ricchio said that a key factor, 
fifth, was the management team for 
the project. The team is able to take 
care of problems,- and people work- 
ing on the project accept the decl : 
sions. 

Ahlers, Ricchio, and RickStuck- 
ey, the Project Manager from trie ar- 
chitect, O'Donnell, Wicklund, 
Pigozzi, and Peterson , are a three 
person team with power to solve 
problems that have came up during 
construction of the high school. . 

"The problems are there, but the 
team has been cooperative," Ricchio 
said. "There's been no finger-point- 
ing, only problem solving." 

The major tone of the project 
has been a focus on good relation- 
ships, doing quality work, and tak- 
ing a positive, problem-solving ap- 
proach to keep the project moving. 



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--.-• 



February 19,1999 



NEIGHBORS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A7 

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ORS 




' 'Name: Jack MdKeever 

" i ! . J , i ! ; 

Home: Llndehhui'st. 

Occupation: ' Chief of Police, Undenhurst Police Depart- 
ment ■ . ■> 

Community involvement: Hospice volunteer working 
with terminal patients. 

I'm originally from: The south side of Chicago. 

I graduated from: Webster University and the Univer- 
sity of St. Mary of the Lake, in Mundelein, 111. 

My family consists of : Wife Mary, the center of my life for the past 
quarter century, and Sara, my wonderful eighth grade daughter. 

My pets are: Pepper and Lucy, a pair of slightly used cats which I in- 
herited froma'co-worker. 

.■ 

What I like best about my Job: The constant and significant hu- 
man interaction, the occasional emergency action. 

The secret to my success is: Accepting the frailty of human na- 
ture and trying to be simply fair to people. 

I relax by: Reading non-fiction, especially history; monitoring interna- 
tional short-wave broadcasts; travel reading. 

My perfect day would be: Museum of Science and Industry; Chica- 
go Symphony Orchestra concert. 

Last book I read: A history of the World War II liberation ^of the 
Dachau Concentration Camp. 

Favorite TV show is: Andy Griffith Show— the principles endure, 
plus it's a good show to remind cops not to take themselves too seri- 
ously. 




Favorite movie is: "Casablanca," "schmaltz" and all. 

Favorite music: Classical music, especially Mozart and 
Vivaldi. 

Favorite restaurant: Nite 'n' Gale in Highwood or 
Karl Ratzche's in Milwaukee. 

Favorite band or musician: The Chicago Symphony 
Orchestra. 

My life's motto is: Peace. 

If I could be anyone in history, I would bo: Me. 

If I won the lottery, I would: Continue working as long as it Is still fun. 

My greatest accomplishments are: The current operation of the 
Lindenhurst Police Department. 

I want to be remembered as: A peace- maker. 

People who knew me in high school would say: He's too shy; 
then, I became president of my senior class in college. 

My pet peeve is: Intellectual dishonesty and essential hypocrisy. 

Most interesting person I ever met was: My wife, Mary. 

My dream job would be: Exactly what I am doing right now; I love 
. going to work. 

If I had a plane ticket to anywhere, I would go to: Having 
been to Europe 10 times, I would still go back for more of every country, 
and I'd add the Mid-East. 




• ■•■■■ . ... * 
- 

If you have a "Neighbor" that you would like to see profiled in 
this column, call Rhonda Hetrkk Burke at 223-8161.; 



Deep Lake derby canceled 



The Deep Lake Improvement As- 
sociation's 8th' Annual Ground Hog 
Fishing Derby set for Sunday, Feb. 21 
has been canceled due to poor Ice 
conditions., , , 

This is the second year we have 
had to cancel the derby due to poor ice 
conditions," said Mary Anderson. 

• The derby raffles for cash will still 
be held at 3 p.m. at Jack and Lidia's 
Resort, 38610 N. Edgewood, Lake Vil- 
la. 

, The cash raffle has a $500 first 
prize and a $250 second prize. The 
third prize is $100. Winners four and 
five each receive $50, and winners six 
and seven receive $25. 

"The winner need not be present. 



We'll just call them," Anderson said; 

Money raised by the fishing derby 
raffles is used by die association for 
lake improvement activities. 

, H^of^ernoneyisusjedfprafish 
stb i cl^gprbgram;1rheouSVrh < aU"isYor 
lake management activities. She said 
that the.association is cleaning a creek 
where the watershed drains into the 
lake. They have a engineering study 
that was prepared to guide some of 
their proposed improvements. 

The derby has drawn as many as 
280 participants in past years. 



FNBEO plans annual 

OTJ 





First National Bank-Employ- ... , 
ee Owned (FNBEO) In Antiocti; 
and Gurnee will be holding their 
annual Open House on Wednes- 
dayVMarch 17 and 5 to 7 p.m. 

The Open House will have 
a St. Patrick's Day theme and 
be held at FNBEO's Antioch fa- 
cility which is located at 485 Lake 
Street 



j FNBEO vyelcomes all cus-- 
tbmcrs,' and TettoW commuriUy 
members" to join them for an 
evening of, celebration that will 
include rhus/c, refreshments and 
hot hors d'oeuvres. The Open 
House is held, as a way of thank- 
ing customers and community 
members for over 70 years, of ser- 
vice. 



Alzheimer's Specialists 




For all 
the 

important 
things in 
your life 





Your family, children and their 
college education, home, business, 
valuables, car, retirement, and your 
heallh-.these are all important to 
you. No matter what life brings 
your way...your professional Pekin 
Insurance Agent can help you put 
together an insurance plan with the 
right coverages at a good price. 

Depend on your 

hometown professionals 

for auto, home, life, 

and health insurance. 

Osmond Insurance 
Service Ltd 

976 Hillside 
Antioch, Illinois 60002 

395-2500 




"Dad 



began his fishing 
business in 1939 with a rowboat 
he rented for 25-cents a week. 
It was a family business that grew 
and supported our family. 



. Today, my Dad has Alzheimer's 
and our family relies on another kind of 
support— from Encore Senior Villa. 

We're very pleased with the services and 
caring staff at Encore Senior Villa. No one 
takes care of all of his health needs— physical 
as well as mental— like they do. Dad lived at 
five other facilities and now we know he'll 
never have to move again. 

Naturally, the ideal situation would be 
for Dad to live at home. But as Alzheimer's 
advanced that no longer remained an option. 
Fortunately, Encore provides a positive 
solution for our family." 

Encore provides a loving home for residents 
with Alzheimer's. Please call for more 
information on how you can obtain support. 



Encore Senior Villa 

7135 Green Bay Road 
Kenosha, WI 53144 , 
(414) 942-0985 



For other Encore locations in Wisconsin, call toll-free (800) 341-1944 



Encore Senior Villa 

4600 52nd Avenue 
Kenosha, WI 53144 
(414)654-5183 





ENCO 

He « ;' a r L iv i n i\ 




Friday, Feb. 19 

9:30-11:30 a.m., The Lakeland 
Newcomers Club holds a daytime 
social In St. Mark's Lutheran 
; Church Fellowship Hall in Unden- 
hurst, call 855-7434 

7:30 p.m., Winter Play The Little 
Prince," at ACHS Auditorium, $2 
or $3 tickets, Sat. night also 

8 p.m., PM&L Theatre presents 
"Sleuth" at 877 Main Street in 
Antioch,, $10/adUlts,$8/students 
and seniors, info, and tickets at 
395-3055, Sat night also at 8 p.m. 

Saturday, Feb. 20 

8:30 a.m.-l p.m., Community Blood 
Drive held at First National Bank- 
Employee Owned, 485 Lake St 

9:00 a.m., Aglow International 
Antioch Chapter meeting at Hunter 
Country Club, 1 block east of Rte. 
. 12 on Rte. 173 in Richmond, 
R.S.V.P. by Feb. 17 at (815) 648- 
2166 or (815) 648-2744 

■ ...•'■tiM.riKM. ..mo.,!!,..!.. .l.ntrir<M 

7-9 p.m., Daddy-Daughter Dance 
at AUGS Gymnasium, sponsored 
by Antioch Parks and Rec. Dept. 

8 p.m., Masquerade Dance hosted 
by the German American Club of 

v Antioch at the VFW Hall, tickets at 
395-5008 or 356-7322 

Sunday, Feb. 21 

9 a,m.-4 p.m. Sportscard, Game, 
Comic and Beanie Babie show at 
the Best Western Executive Inn 
Hotel, 1-94 and Hwy50jn 
Kenosha, 50 cents adm,. for info., 
call Bill White at (414) 843-4147 

.2:30 p.m., PM&L Theatre presents 
"Sleuth" at 877 Main Street in 
Antioch, $10/adults, $8/students 
and seniors.tickets at 395-3055 

2:30 p.m.yVflnief Play -TrVoHittie 
. Prince," at ACHS Auditorium, $2 
or S3 tickets 

Monday, Feb. 22 

Antioch Lions Club meeting 

7 p.m. Bingo at Antioch Moose 
Lodge, Rte. 173 west of Antioch 

7:30 p.m. Antioch Jaycees meet 
at Regency Inn, call 395-8035 

Tuesday, Feb. 23 

9:15 a.m., Program Auditions for 
General Federation of Women's 
Clubs, Illinois 10th Dist, Terrace 
Restaurant, Wilmette Golf Club 

11 a.m. Antioch AARP Chapter 
387 (for adults 55 arid older) 
meets at Antioch Senior Center, 
817 Holbeck Dr., call 395-5068 

7 p.m. Antioch Public Library 
District Board meets 

7 p.m. Fourth of July meeting In 
the Maplethorpe Room of Commu- 
nity Bldg., 884 Main Street 

Wednesday, Feb. 24 

4-6 p.m., immunization Clinic for 
children at the Heart Center of 
Lake County, 2645 Washington 
St. In Waukegan, call 360-3114 



6:30 p.m. Antioch Rescue Squad 
offers CPR classes, call 395-5511 

Thursday, Feb. 25 

7:30 p.m. Lakes Region Historical 
Society meets at the museum, 
817 Main St., Antioch for Info., 
call 395-0899 or 395-1453 

7:30 p.m. Irish American Club 

meets at State Bank of the Lakes 

In Antioch, call 395-3942 

,,, ,,,,,,.„,...,,. i 

GOT SOMETHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14-day notice Is needed 
for all calendar requests. 
Ask for CristinaFeindt 
223-8161, ext. 141. 



■■ 







"^*"*.- ...._ 




*'_! - 



A8/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 




February 19, 1999 



A fair day 

Andrew Westberg, 2, of Antloch waits with his father Scott to play a game during the Fun Fair at 
Antioch Grade School Saturday. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 



FUND RAISING GUIDE 



Feb. 23 to April 30, Hastings 
Lake YMCA- Kids Need Heroes 
Campaign, annual giving campaign, 
Information: 356-4006 

March 6, Third Annual Comedy 
Night and Silent Auction, Antioch 
Junior Woman's Club, at Father 
Hanley Hall, $15 tickets at First 
National Bank- Employee Owned, 
club members. 

April 11, Raffle to buy Cairns 
IRIS Thermal Imaging Camera, only 
200 tickets at $150 apiece, $10,000 
given away, Antioch Firefighters 
Association, tickets at State Bank of 
The Lakes, First National Bank- 



Employee Owned, First National 
Bank of Chicago. 

June 16, District 34 Education 
Foundation, Golf Outing, Spring 
Valley Golf Course. 

July 10, $10 Raffle tickets for 
new 1998 Blazer donated by 
Raymond Chevrolet and 
Oidsmobile, for St. Peter's School, 
Tickets at State Bank of The Lakes, 
First National Bank- Employee 
Owned, First National Bank of 
Chicago. 

July 14, Sequoit Pride Golf 
Outing, 

Until July 24, CAN Raffle, 



Antioch Chamber of Commerce 
and Industry. Tickets: Pat 395-2233. 

Oct 30, Masquerade Ball by 
Antioch Woman's Club at 
Maravelas Banquet Facility. 

On-going, William E. Brook 
Memorial Fund, various-sized per- 
sonalized bricks and plaques, $50, 
$175, and $500. Order-form from 
Vickie Axton at 395- 1309. 

On-going, Raffle for 1999 
Chevrolet, for Lake Villa Township 
Baseball League, $10 tickets from 
Marty Geweke, Raymond Chevrolet 
and Oidsmobile, 120 West Route 
173, Antioch. 



Antioch News 
seeks 'hundred best 



i * m » » -*■ A * *..* v-* r » 



things' about Antioch 



The Antioch News will publish a 
story on March 26 about the one 
hundred best things in the Village of 
Antioch. 

Maybe. 

Area residents are encouraged 
to send in their ideas. 

The article will include ideas 
from the public and other sources 
that cover every facet of village life. 

"The range of 'best things' may 
include people, places, or activi- 
ties," said staff reporter Kenneth 
Patchen who will write the story. 
"I'm interested In knowing about all 
the specific ways that people are 
positively affected by Antioch." 

If there are not enough "best 
things" submitted, then Patchen 
may just write a story with what he 
has at deadline time. 

"I have previously written about 
how gorgeous downtown Antioch 
looks at 2 a.m. a few days before 
Christmas with snow falling. The 
view is especially nice if a person is 
looking north on Main Street at the 
star hung by the congregation on 
the side of the bell tower at the 
United Methodist Church of 
Antioch," he said. 

Area residents are encouraged 
to send in their ideas, in writing, as 
well as a statement about why that is 
a "best thing" about Antioch for 
them. 

People can send in a list with 
several items that they wish to nom- 
inate. It is not necessary that entries 
contain 100 best things. List what is 
truly considered to be wonderful 



and nice abouti.beirig In Antioch, 
about the community, or about 
events that makeJt nice tq,be here. 

The deadline for contributions 
is Friday, March 12. 

"This will give me, a chance to 
read them andj put the story togeth- 
er," Patchen said. "More important- 
ly, if no one sends in any Ideas, it 
gives me a chance to go through my. 
own list and pad the story with my 
own personal favorites," , 

Patchen maintains n '^i of "best 
things about Antioch" on his hard- 
drive on his computer at work. 

"Oh, I've got several listed,!' he 
said. "I like the view of Antioch 
Lake from the Burger. King parking 
lot. The marsh also looks nice from 
the Antioch Bowling Lanes parking 
lot." 

"There are others.. There is a 
banker who has done a. couple of 
things that I think are wonderful, 
but I can't tell anyone. I think some 
of the service clubs and volunteer 
groups are an outstanding resource 
for the community." 

Other items on his list include 
the absence of parking meters in 
downtown Antioch, a story Vern 
Thelen once told him long ago, the 
Independence Day. quilt, Luigi's 
Eggplant Parmegian, Main Street 
itself, and Route 173. 

Send the cards and letters to 
Rhonda Burke, Managing Editor, 
Antioch News, 30 South Whitney 
Street, Grayslake, Illinois 60030. t 
People may Fax nominations to 
223-8810. 







ilia Town: 



FOOTBALL and 




Lakk VII.I.A 

Township 

AGE LEVELS FOR 
FOOTBALL & CHEERLEADING 

7-8 yr. old - Bantam 

9-10 yr. old - Pee Wee 

11-12 yr. old - Featherweight 

12-13 yr. old - Li^tweight 

13-14 yr. old - Varsity 




March Registration 

at State Bank of the Lakes, Lindenhurst 

Wednesday, March 17th 6-8 p.m. 
Saturday, March 20 9 -Noon 








■ 



Wednesday/ April 21st 6-8 p.m. 
Saturday, April 24th 9 -Noon 

"$tve put ckU 4ft exfiwiwte o>t a ti$ettme" 



Lakeland 



• r'Cf i ■ jrtff .W»rV'H)»Xuiil."i - ' * -if *-^~' jityVWAv 



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Proudly SupBoifet^hj&j^^ 



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THE 
CUPBOARD 

BrendonO'Neil 



It's tourney 
time for area 




sters 



T 



he high school basketball 
sectionals are heating up, 
and one thing that usually 
happens during this time of 
year is happening again— like clock- 
work. 

Some varsity girls basketball 
teams are getting blown out by 
ridiculous margins. It happens 
every year in the early rounds of the 
state playoffs, and it happens in 
every state. The gap between the 
very good girls basketball programs 
and the not so good programs \_ 
seems to get wider and wider until 
some match-ups make people 
wonder if the two teams are playing 
the same sport. 

Sure, this happens in boys bas- 
ketball, too. But not nearly as often, 
and not hi the same way. 

One example of this, and this 
maybe the ultimate example of all 
time, occurred a few weeks ago in 
Texas. 

A girls basketball team from 
Duncanville (just outside Dallas), 
lost in the ultimate lopsided 
game — a shutout. Duncanville did 
not score a point, while the oppos- 
ing team tallied triple-digits, win- 
ning by more than 100 points. 

Locally, Grant ran into area 
juggemaught Lake Zurich in the 
first round of the Grayslake Section- 
al , and score was not pre try — 93 - 19 . 
"Grant has struggled all year to 
put points on the board, and Lake, 
Zurich is a high-powered, ftiel-In-'- 
jected squad which routinely scores 
oyer 60 points per game and is 
ranked in the top five in the state. 

Why does this happen more in 
girls basketball than in boys basket- 
ball? It may be attributed to the 
quality and availability of feeder 
programs and youth leagues, and 
the participation of girls at younger 
ages in these programs. 

Often in the past girls were not 
as involved in sports in the growing 
numbers that we find today. And 
these days, youth feeder programs 
for girls basketball are more preva- 
lent—yielding better and better 
players. But some areas are still 
light in those programs, which can 
contribute to these lopsided scores. 



T, 



his Friday night, after the Lib- 
ertyville boys varsity basketball 
team hosts Antioch, legendary Lib- 
ertyville High School basketball 
coach Max Sanders will be honored 
in a retirement gathering at In Laws 
Restaurant Banquet Room at 720 
Milwaukee Ave. in Gumee. 

Please call Libertyville Athletic 
Director Tim Albers at 367-3111 if 
you plan to attend or for more in- 
formation. 



jt\nc 



id another Icon of the local 
sports scene,, our very own sports 
reporter Lee Filas, will be leaving 
the Lakeland family after the Feb. 
26 issue. 

Lee accepted a position with 
the Daily Herald; and will be cover- 
ing police news for.the Vernon Hills 
location of the third-largest daily in 
Illinois. Although we hate to see 
him leave, we here at Lakeland wish 
Lee luck in his new job opportunity, 
arid we will think of him fondly 
each time we "scoop" him in our 
coverage of local news. 

Brendan O'Neill can be reachedat 
(847) 223-8161, ext, 132; fax (847) 
223-8810; or e-mail at 
edit@lnd.c6m. 




February 19, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers! AQ 



Sequoits gear up for 




ByLEEFILAS 
Staff Reporter 



Antioch boys basketball coach 
Jeff Dresser has been pointing to one 
reason all year why Antioch has been 
up and down in the standings 
throughout the season. 

"The name of the game is taking 
care of the ball/.' Dresser said. "The 
better we take care of the ball, the 
more games we win." 

Case In point for Dresser is the 
way Antioch turned the ball over 
during the Sequoits loss on Friday 
night to Lake Forest by a score of 52- 
46. 

"We just have to handle the ball 
better," Dresser explained. "They 
played good defense against us and 
were very patient on offense, but 
they had a lot of free throws in the 
fourth that put us away." 

With Antioch trailing at the end 
of the third by one point, the Scouts 
made only two baskets down the 
stretch, but converted 13 of 17 free 
throws to take the game going away. 
"They only had four points on 
two baskets in the fourth," Dresser 
said. "But, because of fouls and 
turnovers, they had more chances at 
the line and buried us with free 
throws." 

Sophomore Eric White and ju- 
nior Don Lackey scored 12 each in 
the game to lead the Sequoits, but it 
wasn't enough to take the NSC con- 
,. ference game. 

The following night, Antioch 
learned from their mistakes and tookX 
apart Waucbhda'b'y a'final score of 
52-42. 

"Wauconda has a good outside 
shooting team so we worked oh 
shutting it down," Dresser said. "And 
Lackey had a good game under- 
neath." 

Lackey hauled in 10 rebounds to 
go with his 22 points and four assists 
on the afternoon. 

"Lackey was dominating inside 
and the kids did a good job in finding 
him the ball," Dresser said. "That's 
the way it should be played. We took 
care of the ball much better." 

Though, Wauconda did have 
two kids hit double figures on the af- 
ternoon, as forward Chris Paddock 
and center Bill Yundt scored 16 a 
piece to lead Wauconda. 




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Antioch's Pat Straub looks for an opening in the defense as Brett McColIum sets a pick against 
Lake Forest last week.— Photo by Steve Young 



From here, Antioch will move on 
to face Libertyville in Libertyville be- 
fore ending the season against 
Mundelein at home.Then, on March 
1, Antioch will face Lake Forest again 



in the first round of the IHSA region- 
al tournament. 

"The kids are starting to get up 
for it," Dresser said. "We'll see how 
they are after the Mundelein game, 



but it looks like they're looking for- 
ward to it" 

Antioch is the 8th seed in the re- 
gional tournament while Lake Forest 
is the 9th seed. 




Lady Sequoits ousted 
from Sectionals 65-54 



ByLEEFILAS 
Staff Reporter 



Antioch's Erica Brown grabs a rebound In a recent game against 
Warren.— Photo by Steve Young 



ATHLETES OF THE WEEK 



Nome: Ryan HIniak 
School: Antioch 
Sport: Wrestling 
Yean Senior 
Last week's stats: Won 
individual regional title 
at 135 pounds at 
Grayslake regional last 
week. 




Wessel 



Name: Jenny Wessel 
School: Grayslake 
Sport: Basketball 
-Yean Junior 
Last week's stats: 
Scored 25 points and 
grabbed-16 rebounds in 
Graysalke's 48-45 win 
oyer. Lake Forest in See-, 
tionals. 



Though the Antioch girls basket- 
ball team made an early exit from the 
IHSA regional tournament this week 
with a 63-34 loss against Waukegan, 
the accolades for a job well done are 
still looming for the 8-19 Sequoits. 

"With what these girls have had 
to go through to get here throughout 
the year, I'm extremely proud of 
them," said Dave Woods, Antioch 
girls basketball coach. "Every girl on 
this team showed intestinal fortitude 
for the way they played and the ad- 
versary they faced. I give them a lot 
of credit" 

. Even if the game was scary 
enough to make humans wince. 

It was over from the opening 
quarter, as Waukegan raced out to a 
22-3 lead in the first with the Se- 
quoits hitting only one shot in the 
opening period. 

In the second, Waukegan 
poured in 12 more points while An- ; 
tioch struggled to find their shot. 
Waukegan rolled to a 34-8 half time 



lead as Antioch shot 3 of 18 from the 
field in the first half. 

"We did not shoot the ball real 
well," Woods added. "We got posi- 
tioned for the shots we wanted, we 
just couldn't make them." 

In the second Half, Antioch start- 
ed to get their groove back, outscor- 
ing Waukegan 15-11 in the third to 
mount a small comeback, but the 
hole they were trying to climb out of 
was too deep and Antioch fell in the 
end. 

"Playing catch-up against a team 

like Waukegan is tough for any 

team," Woods' said. "We just got 

down to far in the first half and 

, couldn't get back into it." 

, However, what started out a sea- 
son that lost two players due to in- 
juries, ended with a team that has 
grown closer to one another. 

"There were a lot of emotional 
issues we had to fight through," 
Woods said. "It made for a difficult 
year. There was a lot for us to over- 
come. I'm extremely proud of the 
way the girls handled themselves 
arid stuck with It all year." 



A1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



T > * *• 



SPORTS 



February'19, 1999 




Grapplers qualify fo 
state wrestling mee 




By LEE FILAS 
Staff Reporter 



Antioch's Nate Carden wrestles against Glenbard North High School Saturday at the IHSA Section- 
al Wrestling Tournament at Conant High School in Hoffman Estates.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 

NAYB to hold spring youth tournament 



North American Youth Basket- 
ball announced that they still have 
openings in their annual spring 
youth basketball tournament for 
teams in the Northwest Suburbs and 
surrounding area April 16 to 18 at 
Wauconda High School and other 
area sites. 

This tournament will feature 10 



different brackets. They include 5th 
and 6th grade boys; 5th and 6th 
grade girls; 7th grade boys; 7th grade 
girls; 8th grade boys; 8th grade girls; 
9th to 10th grade girls; 1 1th and 12th 
grade boys; 11th and 12th grade girls. 
All grades are based on the grade in 
which a student is currently enrolled. 
The entry fee for the tourna- 



ment is $95 and guarantees each 

team a minimum of two games. 

There will be awards presented in 

each bracket. 

The entry deadline is March 26, 
For additional information or an 

entry form, call Anita Lives ay at the 

toll-free NAYB spring tournament 

hotline at 1(888)629-2275. 



At least 17 area wrestlers will be 
heading to Champaign this weekend 
after placing in the top three at the 
Conant wrestling sectionals held at 
Conant High School on Friday and 
Saturday, Feb. 12 and 13. 

Grant High School leads the 
pack with six wrestlers heading 
down state, while Libertyville is 
sending five and Grayslake will be 
sending three. 

Grant will also be sending their 
entire team to sectionals onTuesday, 
Feb. 23, at Barrington High School. 
They will be wrestling against Maine 
West High School in Deerfield. Grant 
won the Grayslake regional over 
Grayslake while Maine West won the 
Arlington Heights regional last week. 

"Our kids wrestled real well," 
said Dave Kapraun, Grant wrestling 
coach." All in all, it was a good week- 
end for the kids." 

. Grant was also the big winner at 
regionals, sending 10 kids to individ- 
ual sectionals. 

For Grant, Charlie Jasinski, 
Robert Reyes and Eric Wulf all won 
their sectional divisions, while Ed 
Michneiwicz and Anthony Johnson 
took seconds and foe Michneiwicz 
took third. 

"Eric (Wulf) almost lost to a kid 
from Hersey in the opening round, 
which I think scared him a little," 
Kapraun said. "But it shows what 
kind of a kid Eric is. He was down by 
a point with less than 10 seconds to 
go when Eric got a takedown to win. 
It shows that when the match is on 
the line, Eric finds a way to come 
through." 



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Wulf is the only undefeated 
wrestler in the area going to state. 
Prior to the tournament, Grayslake's 
Wes Anderson and Grant Joe Mich- 
neiwicz were also undefeated, but 
lost during sectionals. 

Michneiwicz was beat early on In 
the competition but wrestled back to 
gain a third place victory. However, 
Anderson was penalized for four 
points during his match to give Jim 
Kassner from Conant a 5-4 win, 

According to Grayslake coach 
Steve Wood, Anderson had the 
match clearly won and the referee's 
decided to use judgment against An- 
derson. 

"He was called for two penalties 
during the match that were just ter- 
rible calls," Wood- said. "He was 
called for an illegal draping scissors 
in the third period, but the draping 
scissors is a legal move. They were all 
terrible calls. 

"Then, with four second left, Wes 
was called for stalling, which Is a 
judgment call," Wood said. "It was 
the third stage of penalty points 
which gave Kassner the win. 

"The referee didn't even know It 
was the third stage and he raised 
Wes' hand in victory," Wood said. 
"Then, Conant coach said that it was 
the third stage and two points should 
have been awarded to Kassner. So, 
Wes got the loss. 

"Wes dominated that match, 
and it was four bad calls by the of- 
ficials that changed the result," 
Wood said. "Wes wanted to end his 
season undefeated because it looks 
better for college recruiting, but 
now he can't because of the bad 
call. We're taking the tape of the 
match down state to show the offi- 
cials. It may not reverse any deci-, 
sions,.. but .they should still know 
what's Happening." 

Also from Grayslake, Eric Peter- 
son, who placed second at 119 
•pounds, and Andy Hamelet who 
took third, will make the trip down 
state. 

Antioch will also be sending 
wrestlers down to the big dance. 
Ryan HIiniak won at 135 pounds at 
the sectional, while Nate Carden 
took third place at Conant. 

For Libertyville, Arnold Thorstad 
and Chad Blomgren won their indi- 
vidual sectional weights, at 130 and 
189 respectively, whUe Aaron Cohen 
took second at 152 pounds and Eric 
Farr, at i40 pounds, and Cody Ram- 
sey, at heavyweight, took third. 

Wauconda's EricAhlberg, at 215 
pounds, took third place in the 
DeKalb sectional assignment over 
the weekend and will also be head- 
ing to Champaign for the state finals. 

The state final matches will be- 
gin on Friday morning, at 9 a.m., at 
the University of Illinois. 



Top asthma 
athletes compete 
for scholarships 

Schering/KEY to honor 10 High 
School Seniors in 1999 

The 15th annual Asthma Athlete 
Scholarship Program for high school 
scholar-athletes with asthma is un- 
derway. 

Sponsored bySchering/KEY, the 
"Will: to Win^program will grant 
$35,000 in scholarships to 10 high 
school seniors who have achieved 
athletic success in spite of the chal- 
lenge with asthma. The winner will 
receive a $10,000 Gold Award with 
four $5,000 Silver Awards and five 
$1,000 Bronze Awards also being 
awarded. 

Applications and posters for the 
Asthma Athlete Scholarship Program 
may be obtained by calling the "Will 
to Win" hotline at 1 (800) 558-7305. 
The deadline for entries is April 15, ' 



= 




February 19, 1999 



SPORTS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A1 1 



e. 
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tin ■ 






Cry foul! 

Erica Brown and Justine Sinkus react after Brown was fouled by a Mundelein defender in a recent 
NSC matchup. Antioch was eliminated from the Grayslake Sectional this week.— Photo by Steve 
Young 

Registration dates set for Golden Gloves 



from jaws 



ByLEEFlLAS 
Staff Reporter 

After giving up 24 turnovers in 
the second and third quarter, the 
Grayslake girls basketball team 
erased a 14 point deficit to pull the 
game out in the fourth quarter by a 
final score of 40-45. 

"They definitely gave us a run for 
our money," said Grayslake coach 
Mike Muldrow aboutthe win. "They 
trapped us all night and they frus- 
trated us. you have to give Lake For- 
est credit." 

Jenny Wessel was the high scor- 
er in the game, scoring 25 points with 
16 rebounds and 5 blocked shots on 
the night, while Amy Francis. had 
nine points, including a three point- 
er from the corner tying the game at 
43 with 45 seconds left to play. 

The game started out in 
Grayslake's favor, as Wessel scored 
10 of her points in the first quarter, 
helping the Rams run out to a 16-10 
lead, but Lake Forest buckled down 
in the middle during the second and 
third quarter, double and triple 
teaming Wessel underneath while 
Ram outside shots wasn't falling. 

The Rams only scored four 



points in the second quarter, while 
Lake Forest scored 10 to tie the game 
at the half. Then the Scouts, playing 
aggressive defense, didn't allow a 
basket and only three free throws at 
the halfway mark, running out to a 
14 point lead with three minutes left 
In the quarter. 

However, like night and day, the 
Rams came back at the end of the 
third to pull the game to within nine 
points, losing 39-30. 

With the Scouts leading 41-33 
with 5 minutes left in the game, The 
Rams stormed back again, catching' 
Lake Forest with one minute left on 
the Francis three pointer, before 
Wessel had a put back at 15 seconds 
to take the lead. 

In the final quarter, Grayslake 
didn't allow a single Lake Forest bas- 
ket, and Lake Forest went 5 of 11 
from the free throw line to give the 
game away: 

The game ended when Wessel 
blocked a Lake. Forest three footer 
under the basket to seal the win. 

"We were frustrated, down by 10 
points in the third and we had to get 
our heads back into it," Muldrow 
said. "The way we handled ourselves 
tonight to climb back in was great" 



Registration dates have been set 
for amateur boxers planning to com- 
pete in the 72nd annual Chicagoland 
Golden Gloves Tournament, pre- 
sented by Maywood Park Race 
Track. Boxers can register at the 
Clarendon Park Fieldhouse at 4501 
N. Clarendon Rd. in Chicago on ei- 
ther Sunday, March 7, from 10 a.m. 
to 2 psri. or Monday, March 8, from 
5 to 9 p.m. 

Boxers must bring their USA 
Boxing Passbook in order to register 
for the competition, or they may 
purchase a USA Boxing Passbook 
on-site f6f$25l There is no charge to 
register for the Golden Gloves Tour- 
nament. 

Over 200 amateur boxers are ex- 
pected to compete in the 72nd an- 



nual Chicagoland Golden Gloves 
Tournament with preliminary bouts 
set for March 15 to 17 and March 22, 
while semi-final matches will be held 
on March 23 and 24. The final round 
competitions will take place April 12 
and 13. All matches will be at St An- 
drew's Gym at 1658 W. Addison (Ad- 
dison and Paulina Streets). 

For more information on the 
1999 Chicagoland Golden- Gloves 
Tournament, call (773) 921-4000 or 
visitwww.chlcagogoldengloves.com. 

Chicagoland Golden Gloves' 
charities is a non-profit organization 
which supports the preservation of 
amateur boxing in the community. 
Through event proceeds and other 
fundraisers, the organization backs 
local boxers' participation in nation- 



al Golden Gloves competitions, do- 
nates athletic equipment to various 
charitable groups that feature boxing 
programs, and offers scholarships to 
local school-age boxers. - 

The 72nd annual Chicagoland 
Golden Gloves Tournament is pre- 
sented by Maywood Park Race Track * 
and supported by Corona Beer, 
Briskman and Briskman, the Chica- 
go Sun-Times, WSCR Radio, LaRaza 
Newspaper, International Boxing Di- 
gest and the Chicago Park District. 



1BK 



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A12 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 19, 1999 






I 



A.S.R. competes in Paul Hosier Memorial Tourney 



During the weekend of Jan. 23 
and '24, Antioch Shotokan Karate 
(ASK) participated in the Paul Hosier 
Memorial Tournament to help raise 
funds for the Children's Memorial 
Hospital Pediatric Brain Tumor Re- 
search Fund. 

Paul Hosier, an 8-year-old Cary 
boy and student in karate, died of 
brain cancer on Nov. 23. His parents, 
Christine and Mark Hosier and his 
karate Instructor, Jim O'Hara at FO- 
CUS Martial Arts, didn't want any- 
one to forget who he was. 

Paul Hosier was diagnosed with 
pontine brain stem glioma a year ago 
and went through radiation and 
chemotherapy at Children's Memo- 
rial Hospital in Chicago. A few 
months'later, Paul's condition wors- 
ened and he had to give up karate 
and all other strenuous physical ac- 
tivities so he could save his energy. 
On Nov. 23,10 months after he was 
diagnosed, Paul Hosier became one ■ 
of 200 children in the United States 
per y ear who die from brain stem 
glioma. 

This prompted his mother, 
Christine Hosier, to raise donations 
for the research fund. "Hopefully 
with research we can help find a 
cure," she said. 

Over 130 martial arts competi- 
tors train at FOCUS Martial Arts as 
well as 12 from Antioch Shotokan 
Karate came together to help out 
with the funds. There was also a raf- 
fle and donation container for those 
who wanted to make additional con- 
tributions. 

Eight participants, chosen ran- ' 
domly from Paul's sister, Sara, were 
given the Paul Hosier Memorial 
Tournament Participation Award 
just for being there. ASK brought 
home many medals, but that wasn't 
the important part of the competi- 
tion. Everyone from ASK was excited 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ANTIOCH COMMUNITY 
HIGH SCHOOL 
DISTRICT 117 
The District 117 Board of Educa- 
tion will hold a public hearing on March 
4, 1999 at 6:30 p.m. at Antioch Com- 
munity High School, 1 133 Main Street, 
Antioch. Illinois. The purpose of the 
hearing will be to receive comments on 
an Application for Waiver or Modifica- 
tion of State Board Rules and/or 
School Code Mandates, specifically, to 
modify 105 ILCS 5/27-23 of the School 
Code to allow the District to charge a 
fee of up to $300.00 for driver educa- 
tion. 

ys/DH 

' Dennis Hockney 

Superintendent 

February 11, 1999 

0299C-2442-AN/LV/LN 

February 19, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Digital Memo- 
ries 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 24830 W. 
Lakevlew Dr., Lake Villa, IL 60046. 
(847) 265-6535. (street) P.O. Box 
1320. Lake Villa, IL 60046, (847} 265- 
6535. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Shawn Mclnllre, P.O. Box 1320, Lake 
Villa. IL 60046. (647) 265-6535. Lisa 
Mclntlre. P.O. Box 1320, Lake Villa, IL 
60046. (847) 265-6535. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
.business from the locations) Indicated 
and that the true or real full name(s) of 
the porson(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business Is/are correct 
as shown. 

/s/Usa A. Mclntlre. February 6, 1999 
/s/Shawn Mclntlre, February 6. 1999 

The foregoing Instrument was ac- 
knowledged before me by the per- 
son^) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 6th day of February, 1999, 



-i 



/s/Deldre Palmer 

Notary Public 

Received: February, 1 1 , 1 999 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0299C-2444-LV 

February 19, 1999 

'February 26, 1999 

March 5. 1999 



with the fact that they could help 
contribute to the research fund by 
being a part of the tournament. This 
helped to remind everybody exactly 
how special each and every individ- 
ual is every day. 

AAU tourney results 

Antioch Shotokan Karate was 
part of an AAU Registration Tourna- 
ment last month, They had a new 
group of students participate and do 
extremely well. It was held at Lake 
Zurich High School and ran all day. 

Those who' took the honor of 
placing were as follows: 

KATA: Graham Conners, 4th; 
Robin Jaranson, gold; Jon Mrozinski, 
gold; Mike Mrozinski, gold; Robbie 
Saltz, 4th; Scott Curtis, silver; Ryan 
Curtis, gold; Derrick Hill, bronze; 
Daniel Panico, bronze; Ian Calvert, 
4th; Jacob Wilson, 4th; Corey Gib- 
bons, silver, Krystal Mason, bronze; 
Tai Jaranson, gold and JackReardon, 
gold. 

KUMITE: Graham Con- 
ners, gold; Robin Jaranson, silver; Jon 
Mrozinski, gold; Mike Mrozinski, 
gold; Robbie Saltz, silver; Scott Cur- 
tis.gold; Ryan Curtis, gold; Derrick 
Hill, silver; Daniel Panico, gold; 
Corey Gibbons, 4th. 

KOBUDO: Robbie Saltz, gold. 

Sensei Anna was very pleased to 
see a new group do so well. "This is a 
very focused group of students — 
they are all hard workers in class and 

public Notice 
assumed business 
name application 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Little Bistro Po- 
ems 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1203 Tyler 
Court, Lake Villa, IL 60046. (847) 265- 

7580. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS; 
Melvin Oscar Pflug, 1203 Tyler Court, 
Lake Villa. IL 60046. (847) 265-75B0. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) Indicated 
and that the true or real full name(s) of 
the person(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business Is/are correct 
as shown. 
/s/Melvln O. Pflug, February 3, 1999 

The foregoing Instrument was ac- 
knowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 3rd day of February, 1999. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

7s/Barbara J. Erskln 

Notary Public 

Received: February 3, 1999 

Willard R. Helander 

■ Lake County Clerk 

0199B-2421-LV 

February 12, 1999 

February 19, 1999 

February 26, 1999 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Concrete Re- 
moval Specialist 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 2310 Hon- 
eysuckle Ct„ Llndenhurst, IL 60046. ' 
(847) 356-9075. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT-* 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Mike Welnand, 2310 Honeysuckle Ct„ 
Undenhurst, IL 60046. (847) 356-9075. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 
' This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named ' 
business from the location (s) indicated , 
and lhat the true or real full name(s) of 
the person(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business Is/are correct 
as shown. - ', ; 

/s/MIke Welnand, January 22, 1999. 

The foregoing instrument was ac- 
knowledged before, me by the per- 
sons) Intending to conduct the busl- 
. ness this 22nd day of January, 1999. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Barbara J. Erskln 

Notary Public 

Received: January 22, 1999 

.. Willard R. Helander ■ 

Lake County Clerk 

0199A-2419-LV/LN 

Februarys, 1999 

February 12, 1999 

February 19, 1999 



it shows," she stated. 

If you would like more informa- 
tion on Antioch Shotokan Karate, 
call 395-KICK or 395-2160. 

Shotokan Seniors 

Senior Citizens from the Anti- 
och Senior Center were proud to say 
that they had passed their karate 
exam. 

Antioch Shotokan Karate offers 
a senior citizen class for free on Mon- 
days at 3:30 p.m. Currently there are 
about six to eight students who at- 
tend weekly and work hard at learn- 
ing the basics of karate. And yes, they 
do take belt exams. "They recently all 
passed to Full Yellow. They had to 
learn all the basics kata, and spar- 
ring," stated Sensei Anna Conners. 
. "They keep each other on their toes. 
I was very happy for each and every 
one on them— they did so well." 

The senior citizens class If just 
one of many classes offered at the 
Antioch Shotokan Karate which is 
held downstairs of the Antioch Se- 
nior Center. In addition to the se- 
niors' class, there Is also a Li'l Drag- 
ons (3 to 5 year olds), Li'l Tigers (6 to 
8 year olds), Intermediate One and 
Two, Ladies Class, Adult Class and 
Kobudo Class. And, of course, their 
new class— CARDIO- 

KARATE/KICKBOXJNG, which is 
. sweeping the nation. ' 

Give them a call at 395-K3CK or 
call 395-2160. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: American Deck 

Tech 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 231 Hon-^ 
eysuckle Ct„ Undenhurst, IL 60046. 

(B47) 356-0075. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 

residence;address(es)ofthe , 

PERSON(S) OWNING; CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Mike Welnand, 2310 Honeysuckle Ct.-j 
Undenhurst, IL 60046. (847) 356-9075. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) Indicated 
and that the true or real full name(s) of 
the person(s) owning, conducling or 
transacting the business is/are correct 
as shown. 
/s/Mike Welnand, January 22, 1999. 

The foregoing instalment was ac- 
knowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 22nd day of January, 1999. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Barbara J, Erskln 

. Notary Public 

Received: January 22, 1999 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0199A-2418-LV/LN 

Februan/5, 1999 

February 12, 1999 

February 19, 1999 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Crescendo 

Handling 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 21456 
Nlelson Dr., Lake Villa, IL 60046. (647) 
356-9457 " 

NAME(S)' AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Timothy T. Jensen, 21456 Nlelson Dr., 
Lake Villa, IL 60046. (647) 356-9457. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locatlon(s) Indicated 
and that the true or real full name(s) of 
the person(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business Is/are correct 
as shown. 

/s/Tlmolhy T. Jensen, February 10, 
1999. 

The foregoing Instrument was ac- ■ 
knowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 1 0th day of February, 1 999 . 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Karen A. Kerfey 

Notary Public 

Received: February 10 1999 

. Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0299C-2443-LV 

February 19, 1999 

February 26, 1999 

March 5, 1999 







Antioch Shotokan Karate— from left, top row: Graham Conners, 
Robin Jaranson, Jon Mrozinski, Mike Mrozinski, Sensei Anna Con- 
ners; middle row: Robbie Saltz, Scott Curtis, Ryan Curtis, Derrick 
Hill, Daniel Panico; bottom row: Ian Calvert, Jacob Wilson, Corey 
Gibbons, Krystal Mason and Tal Jaranson.— Submitted photo 




Antioch Shotokan Karate Seniors— from left, top row: Norman 
Jance, Loretta Yugens, Dorothy McAray, Sensei Anna Conners, 
Orln Hansen, Clara Fox; bottow row: Doris Bergstedt and Mike 
Tabers.— Submitted photo 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
STATE OF ILLINOIS ) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH 
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION ) 

OF Blake Andrew Toney ) 

ForCHANGE OF NAME ) 

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION . 
Public notice Is hereby given lhat on April 2.-1999, being one of the return days tn 
mo Circuit Court of the County of Lake, I will file my Petition In said Court praying for 
the change of name from Blake Andrew Toney to that of Blake Andrew Pecha, pur- 
suant to Ihe Statute In such case made and Provided. 

' Dated at Antioch, Illinois, February 10, 1999. 

/s/ Shena Pecha 

0299C-2445-AN 

February 19, 1999 

February 26, 1999 " 

March 5, 1999 

™_£_„»._ - ; 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 

LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 

NOTICE BY PUBLICATION 

Board of Education of Antioch Community High School District No. 117, 

Plaintiff . v. 
Heritage Standard Bank and Trust Company, et at., Defendants 
Cose No.: 98 ED 21 
The requisite affidavit for publication having been filed, NOTICE IS HEREBY G! V- ' 
EN YOU, FRANK JOHN GAVIN, Defendant In the above-capUoned suit, that a Com- 
plaint to Condemn Property was filed on September 3, 1998, In the Circuit Court for 
the Nineteenth Judicial Circuit, Lake County, Illinois, by the above-named Plaintiff 
against you, praying the Court for the condemnation of the following properties: . 
PARCEL 1: 

THE NORTH 29 ACRES OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTH WEST QUAR- 
TER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 46 NORTH. RANGE 10, EAST OF THE 
THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, (EXCEPT THAT PART THEREOF DESCRIBED 
AS FOLLOWS, TO-WIT: COMMENCING AT A POINT ON THE WEST UNE OF 
SAID HALF QUARTER SECTION 298.75 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTH WEST 
CORNER THEREOF; THENCE EAST PARALLEL WITH THE NORTH UNE OF 
SAID NORTH WEST QUARTER, 253.25 FEET; THENCE SOUTH PARALLEL 
WITH THE WEST LINE OF SAID HALF QUARTER SECTION, 320 FEET, MORE 
OR LESS, TO A POINT 75 FEET EAST OF THE SOUTH EAST CORNER OF 
PREMISES CONVEYED TO TRUSTEE OF GRAVE YARD BY DEED RECORD- 
ED JANUARY 19, 1861 , IN BOOK 32 OF DEEDS, PAGE 283 AND 284; THENCE 
WESTERLY TO THE SOUTH WEST CORNER OF SAID PREMISES CON- 
VEYED BY SAID DEED AND THENCE NORTH ALONG THE WEST LINE OF 
SAID HALF QUARTER SECTION TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING AND EX- 
CEPT THAT PART THEREOF, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, TO-WIT: BEGIN- 
NING AT A POINT IN THE WEST UNE OF SAtD NORTH WEST QUARTER 644 
FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTH WEST CORNER, THENCE EAST 109.4 FEET; 
THENCE SOUTH 267 FEET, THENCE WEST 109.3 FEETTO THE WEST LINE 
OF THE NORTH WEST QUARTER; THENCE NORTH 283 FEET TO THE 
. PLACE OF BEGINNING AND EXCEPT THAT PART THEREOF FALLING IN 
STATE AID ROUTE NO. 18) IN LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 
EaBCEL3i 

THAT PART OF THE SOUTH WEST QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 
AND RANGE AFORESAID, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS. TO-WIT: COMMENC- 
ING ATTHE SOUTH WEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 22; THENCE NORTH 
66 RODS; THENCE EAST 80 RODS; THENCE SOUTH 66 RODS ANDTHENCE 
WET 80 RODS TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING, IN LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 
PA RC EL 3! 

THAT PART OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 
AND RANGE AFORESAID, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, TO-WIT: COMMENC- 
ING AT THE SOUTH WEST CORNER OF THE EAST HALF OF THE SOUTH 
WEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 22; THENCE NORTH 28 RODS; THENCE 
EAST 40 RODS; THENCE SOUTH 28 RODS; THENCE WEST 40 RODS TO 
THE PLACE OF BEGINNING, IN LAKE COUNTY ILLINOIS. 
PARCEL 4; 

THAT PART OF THE NORTH WEST QUARTER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 
46 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, DE- 
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT IN THE WEST LINE OF 
SAID NORTH WEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 27, 644 FEET SOUTH OF 
THE NORTH WEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTH 87 DEGREES 45 i 
MINUTES EAST 109.4 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 287 FEET; THENCE WEST 
109.3 FEET TO THE WEST UNE OF SAID NORTH WEST QUARTER; THENCE 
NORTH ALONG SAID WEST UNE 263 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING 
(EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE WEST 33 FEET), IN LAKE COUNTY, ILLI- 
NOIS. 

Unless you, FRANK JOHN GAVIN, file your answer or otherwise make your ap- 
pearance In this suit In the office of the Clerk of the Court of the Nineteenth Judicial 
Circuit, Lake County, Illinois, on or before March 12, 1999, a trial may be held and Judg- 
ment may be entered against you for the relief prayed in the Complaint, 

. (SEAL) 
/s/ Sally D. Cotfelt ' 

0199B-2423-AN 
February 12, 1999 
February 19, 1999 
February 26, 1999 






i . , , . 



February 19, 1999 



? JJ 









YOUTH ICELESS HOCKEY ASSN. 



sports 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A1 3 



Grades 1-2 
Western Conference 
Central Division 

2Mnpleleafs 

3Blucs 

lBlackhawks 

4 Moose 

SRedwings 

7Hurrlcancs 

OWolves 

GVIpcrs 

Pacific Division 

HKlngs 

12 Sharks 

16 Avalanche 

9 Flames 

13 Ducks 

14 Oilers 

10 Canucks 

15 Coyotes 

Eastern Conference 
Atlantic Division 

21 Islanders 
24 Grizzlies 

22 Lightning 
18 Rangers 

23 Admirals 

17 Flyers 
l9Capitals 
20 Panthers- : 
NorthEast Division 
25Canadiens 

27 Bruins 

28 Predators 

30 Whalers - : 

31 Dragons . 

29 Sabres 

32 Thunder 
26 Penguins 
Grades 3-4 
Western Conference 
Central Division: 
■7Hurricanes - 
8W6Ives 

I Blackh'awks 
SRedwings 
4Moose 
6Vlpers 
2MaplcIenfs 
3Blues 
9jets0 

Pacific Division 

15 Oilers 
10 Flames 

II Canucks 
13 Sharks 

18 Stars 

16 Coyotes 



W L T Pts 



5 
4 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 


5 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 



"4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
1 
1 


4 
4 
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4 
2 
1 
1 








1 

2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
5 













10 

8 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 





10 
1 9 

2 1 

3 







3 
3 
4 
4 



1 




1 1 

2 



2 

4 
4 
5 

1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
4 
4 
5 



4 1 1 

4 2 

3 1 

3 3 

2 3 

2 4 

1 4 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 



2 
2 
3 
2 



5 
4 
4 
4 
2 
2 




















6 



9 

8. 

7 

6 

6 

2 

2 



8 
8 
B 
8 
4 
2 
2 




5 1 11 



9 
8 
8 
6 
5 
4 
3 



3 9 

1 2 8 
1 7 

1 7 
6 

2 6 



14 Ducks 
12 Kings 
17 Avalanche 
Eastern Conference 
Atlantic Division 

21 Capitals 

19 Flyers 

26 Grizzlies 

23 Islanders 

24 Lightning 

25 Admirals 

27 Cyclones 

20 Rangers 

22 Panthers 
NorthEast Division 

31 Predators 

34 Dragons 

28 Canadians 

29 Penguins / 
36 Senators 
33 Whalers 

35 Thunder 

30 Bruins 

32 Sabres 
Grades 5-6 
Western Conference 
Central Division 
3Moose ' 
2Mapleleafs 
4Redwings, 
lDlackhawks 
SVipers 

7Wolves 
6Hurricancs 
Pacific Division 

11 Sharks 

13 Coyotes 

12 Ducks 
8 Flames 
10 Kings 
9Canuclcs 

14 Avalanche 
Eastern Conference 
Atlantic Division 

15 Flyers 

20 Admirals. 
19 Lightning 
18 Islanders 

21 Grizzlies 
17 Panthers 

16 Rangers 
NorthEast Division 

27 Whalers' ' 

24 Bruins 

22 Canadians 

23 Penguins 
26 Sabres 

25 Predators 

28 Thunder 



114 6 
2 4 4 
5 11 



6 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
2 
1 


5 
5 
4 
3 
3 




2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 



4 

4 
3 
3 
2 
2 


5 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 



6 
5 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 

5 

4 

4! 

3 

2 







12 

8 

8 

1 7 



I 






.0 1 
2 



3 

3 

2 4 

2 4 

15 

1 5 








2 

3 
1 
4 
3 
3 
6 

1 

3» 

3 

4 

3 

4 

5 





3 
2 
3 
4 
5 

1 

2 
2 
3 
2 
5 




1 

2 



7 
6 
4 
2 







1 11 
11 



8 
6 
6 
4 
4 
2 
2 



8 

8 

2 8 

6 

1 5 
1 5 




1 
1 

1 





2 
1 
1 

3 




10 
7 
6 
6 



1 5 
4 
4 



13 
11 
6 

5 
4 
4 
4 

10 
10 
9 

7 
4 
3 




STEVENSON VALENTINE TOURNAMENT RESULTS 



Grade 8 Tournament 

Stevenson 23 vs. '"■irnee 51; 
Wilmette 17 vs. Stevenson 48; 
Gurnee 46 vs. Glenview 38; Antioch, 
27 vs. Wilmette 40; Antioch 28 vs. 
Stevenson 43; Glenview 48 vs, WII-,, 
mette 29; Gurnee 45 vs. Antioch 18; 
Glenview38 vs. Antioch 22; Wilmette 
34 vs. Gurnee 60; Stevenson 18 vs. 
Glenview 47. 

First place-Gurnee; Second 
place-GIenview; Third place-Steven ■ 



son; Fourth place-WUmette; Fifth 
place-Antioch. 

Grade 7 Tournament 

Libertyville/Vernon Hills 24 vs. 
Storm 28; Storm 53 vs. Fremd White 
12; Stevenson 24 vs. Lake Forest 25; 
Libertyville/Vernon Hills 34 vs. 
Fremd White 7; Lake Forest 11 vs. 
Fremd Green 40; Lake Bluff 8 vs. 
Storm 50; Sacred Heart 13 vs. Steven- 
son 37; Fremd 42 vs. Sacred' Heart 13; 



Libertyville/Vernon Hills 35 vs. Lake 
Bluff 15; Lake Forest 19 vs. Sacred 
Heart 10; Stevenson 17 vs. Fremd 
Green 28; Fremd White 22 vs. Lake . 
Bluff 26. 

First place-Storm; . Second 
place-Fremd Green; Third place-Lib- 
ertyville-Vemon Hills; Fourth place- 
Lake Forest; Fifth place-Stevenson; 
Sixth place-Lake Bluff; Seventh 
place-Fremd White; Eight place-Sa- 
cred Fleart 




Chili Open 
Golf Tournament 



Saturday, February 27, 1999 
Brae Loch Golf Course, Grayslake 

•Challenge Old Man Winter To Nine Holes 
•Enjoy An All-You-Can-Eat Chili Lunch 
•Take Home Door Prizes & Awards 

Only $25 per person. 
Pre-paid registration required. 

Call (847) 223-5i 
to reserve your foursome. 

Special Prizes for Best Dressed Dapper & Daffy Duffers 



LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES 



Preservation, Restoration, Education and Recreation 




••• ] 



20,000.00 



■ . .- . - « i 



2,500.00 



19.999.99 



49,999.99 




DEPOSIT OR WITHDRAW A 




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VISIT US TODAY 
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A1 4 /Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 19, 1999 







• / 





shattered dream 



Barbara Porch of Antloch and Claude LeMere of Antloch discuss the Roaring *20s-theme Love Fest 
held at the Antioch VFW. — Photos by Lynn Gunnarson Dahlstrom 




Above, Fiddler Don Jones of Waukegan entertains the crowd along 
with fellow band members of The Bangers who entertained at the 
Roaring 20's-theme Love Fest held at the Antioch VFW. Right, 
Mary Jadrich of Ingleslde burns up the dace floor with her flapper 
routine at the Roaring '20s-theme Love Fest held at the Antioch 
VFW. — Photos by Lynn Gunnarson Dahlstrom 




The head of the household 
is still in mourning. The 
homestead remains 
draped In black bunting. ' 
The occupants of the home still 
speak in hushed tones and walk 
with light footsteps. 

Although the football season 
has been over now for sometime 
now this man can't shake his disap- 
pointment. His hopes were soaring 
so high that St. Peter himself, 
guarding the pearly white gates 
above, even joined in on the antici- 
pated reverie. The man is not ranti- 
ng and raving as some would im- 
age, but remains quiet in his grief. 
The mood is somewhat somber, . 
gloomy. Friends call, but the 
wound is still too fresh, he is not up 
to chatting about his devastating 
loss, his emptiness, his astonish- 
ment at the ugly twist of fate. 

He was oh, so ready, he was oh, 
so sure, he was oh, so mentally pre- 
pared that this was the year his life- 
long dream was going to come to- 
gether under the hot Miami sun. 
Never had there been a team so well 
tuned, so well oiled, so well starved 
for the game of all games. And with 
one wayward kick, his hopes and 
dreams were sent down the sewer- 
like last weeks melting snows. 

His enthusiasm was shattered 
like a plate glass window. The wind 
was let out of his sails, the air 
knocked out of his gut. The TV sits 
silent but still, surprisingly, intact. It 
was spared destruction, why, one 
can only wonder. Six weeks worth 
of daily papers sit piled up on the 
counter, still in their blue wrapping, 
the sports section left unread. The 




JINGLE 

FROM 

PRINGL 

Lynn Pringle 



six year old asks why daddy isn't 
talking to the TV anymore, and 
mommy trie&to explain withdrawal 
symptoms. 

As a feeble attempt to cheer up 
her grieving man, the wife in- 
formed him of the unavailability of 
airline seats from this region to 
Florida the last week in January. "I 
would have driven," came his 
stone cold reply. 

How is it a human being can 
become so passionate in his quest 
to follow a group of grown men 
running around a field, wearing 
padded pants, and throwing a 
leather ball to each other. A man so 
obsessed in his mission he is willing 
to drive 3,000 miles, spend three 
days on the road and dole out $300 
for a game ticket. 

Although we know in time the 
pain will subside, the grief will 
lessen, the anguish will diminish, 
the fact still remains that the Min- 
nesota Vikings once again were 
playing golf instead of strutting 
their talents on the field at Super 
Bowl XXXIII in Miami. 

And so goes another, "Jingle 
from Pringle." 

Readers with information for "Jin- 
gle from Pringle" should call Lynn 
Pringle at 395-6364. 





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February 19, 1999 



COMMUNITY 




Lakeland Newspapers/ A1 5 , _ f 




By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Beaucoups Beanie Baby Bears 
are once again raising money at 
Choosey Child for Antioch Com- 
munity High School students. 

When a single raffle winner of 
the 14 Beanie Baby Bears is select- 
ed this spring, A.LL, Parent Net- 
work and Antldch Community 
High School students also will be 
big winners . 

A 14 Beanie Baby Bear raffle 
now underway at Choosey Child, 
891 Main Street, in downtown An- 
tioch, will enrich one person with 
14 new, current, and retired bears. 

"If you odd all those up on the 
secondary market, they total as 
much as $1,000," said store owner 
Barbara Porch. "People are getting 
value for their donation." 

Porch is sponsoring the raffle 
to raise funds for the high school 
parent volunteer group A.LL Par- 
ent Network. The network Is rais- 
ing funds to defray the costs for the 
Saturday, May 9 high school post 
prom event which they sponsor. 

Lindenhurst, Antioch, and 
Lake Villa high school students are 
able to purchase discounted post 



prom event tickets to spend a 
chaperoned, early morning oh the 
Odyssey Cruise Ship on Lake 
Michigan in Chicago. 

People may purchase two 
Beanie Baby Baffle tickets for $5, 
four for.$10, ahd eight tickets for 
$20. Single tickets are $3. The win- 
ner will be notified by telephone. 

There are four new Beanie 
Baby bears sold by Ty Corporation 
in this raffle collection. They are 
Millennium Bear, '99 Signature 
Bear, Valentina, and Kicks- Soccer 
Bear. 

Also included are Halo- Angel 
Bear, Peace- Tye Dye Bear, 
Princess Bear, Erin- St. Patrick's 
Bear, and Fortune- Panda Bear. 

There are five retired bears In 
the collection. They are: '98 Teddy, 
'97 Teddy, Glory, Valentino, and 
Curly; 

This is the third raffle spon- 
sored by Porch for the A.LL Parent 
Network. Two previous raffles 
have raised more than $2,000 for 
the parent group. 

Choosey Child is open Tuesday 
to Friday from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., 
Thursday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., 
Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 




One person will win all 14. Beanie Baby Bears raffled at Choosey Child, 891 Main Street, in down- 
town Antioch early this spring. The raffle will benefit the Antioch Community High School parent vol- 
unteer group A.LL Parent Network; Funds raised will help defray the costs of student tickets to 
participate in the post prom cruise ship event In Chicago In early May. — Photo by Karen Powell 



Library Friends seek donations 



Antioch Library Friends need 
book donations 

The Antioch Library Friends 
are looking for book donations 
starting April 1. 

During the month of April, 
they will accept every- kind of 
bqols— fiction, non-fiction, hard 
and soft covers. Bring your books 



to the library. No magazines or 
Reader's Digest Condensed. 

The Antioch Library is locat- 
ed at 757 Main St. (Route 83) in 
Antioch. Mark your calendar now 
for the Spring Used Book Sale on 
Saturday, May 1, from 9 a.m. to 5 
p.m. Call Nancy Brown at 838- 
2332 for further Information. 



Laic eland Newspapers is 

.Interested to hear news of 

local Events,Clubs, and 

Organizations. 

Please send news Items to: 

Rhonda Hctrick Burke, 
30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, 60030 

Tel. 223^8161 
Fax 333-8810 

Photos ore also welcome. 

: rrr =-: — ^—. — r 




aving is 




Our reputation 
isn't the only thing 

extending 

beyond 

the 

STATE 
LINE. 



Our pediatric specialists arc, too. For the past year, we've been serving the families 
of northern Illinois at. our Children's Hospital Clinics in Gurnec; Our clinic is easy 
to reach, whether you're from Crystal Lake, Decrficld, Evanston, Winnctka or any- 
where else in suburban Chicago. 

Parents in northern Illinois have been bringing their children to Children's Hospital 
of Wisconsin for years. Now, we're coming to you. 

Ask your pediatrician about Children's Hospital Clinics, or call (847) 662-4380 for 
more information. * 

Asthma/Allergy •Cardiology • Dermatology • 

Hematology ■• Neurology • Nephrology • Neurosurgery • 

Pulmonary Medicine • Rheumatology 

Children's Hospital Clinics 
310 S. Grcenleaf Ave., Suite 201 MM Children's 

Gurnee, 111., 60031 ■ 
(847)662-4380 




Let E.Z. 

:> \ Show Vbu How! 

Eggbert Z.f agle (EZ) has arrived at First National 

Bank-Employee Owned and he's showing kids 

how to save money the (un way - by joining 

FNBEO's Kids' Klub savings account program! 

When kids open a savings account at First 

National Bank-Employee Owned, they will receive 

■ Kids' Klub Folder with Savings Account Record and Official Kids' Klub I.D. Card 

■ Kids' Klub Quarter Savers Card with Starter Quarter 

• Coupon Redeemable for a Special Birthday Surprise! 

Save Money The Fun Way Today 
And Join E.Z. Eagle 





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(847)662-BANK 



Access £.Z/s Kids' Klub on the Internet/ 
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v ^ A1 6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 19, 1999 



* 



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Schimke student of month 



The Grant Community High 
School February Student of the 

Month is Jill 
Schimke, 
daughter of 
Jack and 
Elyane 
O'Neill of 
Round Lake 
Beach. 




■*it 



Schimke's 
academic 
ach ie ve- 
ments in- 
clude Na- 
tional Honor Society, three years 
and has been on the Honor Roll 
every semester. She is currently 



Schimke: NHS 

member, involved 
in flag corps. 



ranked eighth in the senior class with 
a cumulative grade average of 4.056. 

Her extracurricular activities in- 
clude participation in the Spring 
Musical, three years; Fall Play, three 
years; winter flag corps, two years; 
tennis team, four years; Academic 
team, three years; and TEAM mem- 
ber, two years. 

Schimke's special interest in- 
clude reading, babysitting, and 
serving as a leader for her church's 
youth group. She also works parK 
time at the K-Mart in Round Lake 
Beach. 

After graduation, she plans on 
attending Carthage College in 
Kenosha, Wis. or the College of Lake 
County. 



Columbia College plans registration 



The next session at Columbia 
College of Missouri's Lake County 
Branch begins March 22 with regis- 
tration beginning March 8. Colum- 
bia College offers programs leading 
to the following degrees: Associate 
in Arts; Bachelor of Arts in Business 
Administration; Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Business Administration; 
Bachelor of Arts in Psychology; 
Bachelor of Science in Computer 
Information Systems; and Bachelor 



of Arts in Individual studies with 
concentrations in Criminal Justice, 
English, History and Political Sci- 
ence/Government. 

The Lake County Branch of Co- 
lumbia College is located at 220 Old 
Skokie Road in Park City (formerly 
located above Welton's Pick and 
Save on Grand Avenue In Gumee). 
Call the college at336-6333 for more 
information or to schedule an ap- 
pointment with an advisor. 



i-W/f 




"Lucky Load" 

Dry Dock Laundromat 
Now In Progress 






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Wash 12 loads and get your 
"Lucky Load" FREE! 

What a fantastic way to wash and save! Bring in your 
laundry today, and we'll give you a card that will be 
stamped for you by our attendant — each time you 
do a load of wash. After you've washed 12 loads, 
turn in your card, and you'll get the 13th 
— your "Lucky Load" — free! 



We feature 4 different 
size washing machines. 
Computerized dryers. 
Drop-off Laundry and 
Dry Cleaning Service. 



We Are 
A Smoke- 
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Facility, 



Dry Dock Coin-Op 
Laundromat 

509 Washington St., Ingleside, IL 60041 

(Next to Dog & Suds) 

587-5445 

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 




Grant High launches web site! 



http://www.grant. 
lake.kl2.ilus 



Last week the world wide web 
saw the debut of the Grant Commu- 
nity High School Web Site, 

The site was created by the 
school's web- master, Christopher 
Buti and a senior student, Gabe Kan- 
gas. The web committee that helped 
develop the outline for the site was 
made up of Christopher Buti, Eric 
Taubery, Dev Kennedy, and Sue 
Wings. They worked over the sum- 
mer on this project. Further assis- 
tance during the school year comes 
from Rose Lipinski, Rose Loffredo, 
and Jeanne Wallin. 

Buti claims that the purpose of 
the site is "to help inform the staff, 
student, parents, and community 
about Grant High School." As the 
site continues to expand, plans are 
being made to include the results of 
athletic events, scholarship infor- 
mation, honor rolls, class projects, a 
guest book, reunion information, 
and much more. Any questions can 
be directed to the webmaster 
through email at 

cbuti@kiwi.dep.anl.gov or by phone 
at 587-2561 ext. 233. 

Below Is an alphabetical listing 
of all of the separate pages that 
can currently be found at our site. 
All pages link back to the home 
page. 

Acceptable Use Policy 

Art 

Athletics 

Awards and Honors 

Board of Education 

Band Notes 

Bowling 




Grant Community High School 
District #124 



285 E*s GnadAvwvt* 
Fox Lake, 11 60020 
Ptam. 847-597-2561 
F«- 647-587-2991 



Mission Statement 



With ap&fkh* tmiro»m*Mofmeoumsimt»tanSmtKualruptaa 
tmodoKil and socki pw\h, Grant Commmky High Sehootfttdpi 

pmjirmfwhkhwtBpnpanllmmfortlmSiitctnniiy, 



The Grant High School website offers a variety of information 
about the school and its programs. It can be found at 
www.grant.lake.kl2.II.us. 



Boys Basketball 

Bulldog Pride Awards 

Business 

Calendar 

Choir Notes 

Community Links 

Curriculum 

Departments 

Directory 

Educational Links 

English 

Fall Play 

Family 

Foreign Languages 

Grant Arts Society 

Girls Basketball ' 

Guidance 

Student Handbook 

GCHS Index= home page 

Industrial Arts 

Library 

Mathematics 

Marching Band Personnel 

Music 

Music Computer Lab 



Music Officers 

National Honors Society 

Performing Arts Society 

PAS Alumni 

PAS Links 

PAS Schedule 

Physical Education 

School Songs 

Science 

Social Science 

Student of the Month 

Sustained Reading 

Staff Listing 

State Goals 

Student-Parent Newsletter 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January 

February 

Trinity Concert Program 

Water Colors 

Winter Flag Corps 

Wrestling 



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FRIENDLY RATES -FRIENDLY SERVICE 







February 19, 1999 



COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A1 7 



■ 



Riverboa 




By SPENCER SCHEIN 
Staff Reporter 



Is a gambling riverboat in Fox 
Lake's future? The answer depends 
on who you talk to, and on what side 
of the fence you are on. 

As far as Lake County Board 
Member Judy Martini (RiAntioch) is 
concerned, the boat can dock else- 
where, as It is not wanted. 

"I have personally received many 
calls of Fox Lake area people 
adamantly opposed to any casino in 
Fox Lake," Martini said. 

That is the talk fellow board 
member Bonnie Thomson Carter (R- 
Ingleside) said she heard three years 
ago, when she said the silent majori- 
ty said no to riverboais. 

"I do not support the riverboat 
for this area," Carter said. 

Talk of bringing a riverboat casi- 
no to Fox Lake comes up everyone 
once in a while, especially when new 
legislators are seated in Springfield. 

"We are waiting for the legislator 
to take some action," said Glenn Sei- 
denfeld, Jr., chairman of the Lake 
County Riverboat Limited Partner- 
ship. "We have asked the legislator to 
reconsider as we have for the last four 
years." 

State legislators have yet to act on 
any of the eight bills floating around 
the state capitoi, much to Seiden- 
feid's dismay. 

"Nothing has changed," He said. 
"There is no news." 

If anything is to happen, it would 
probably not be due to the "big 



shoulders" of Fox Lake. 

"Chicago Is the main reason for ; 
something to happen," Seidenfeld 
said.' The Second City is losing $ 1 bil- 
lion a year to Indiana's riverboat casi- 
no's just across the state-line, he said, 

There are 10 boats in Illinois, but 
none In Lake County. 

"The debate is If Lake County is 
going to get what the other counties 
already have," Seidenfeld said. 

Should the state grant a riverboat 
license to the partnership, the boat 
would be anchored in Pistakee Lake, 
An agreement between the partner- 
ship and the Fox Waterway Agency 
will give the agency a percentage of • 
Fox Lake's revenues, up to $850,000 a 
year. 

That kind of money will allow the 
agency to do more than twice as 
many dredging projects each year, 
said William Dam, chairman of the 
agency's board of directors. 

Fox Lake would retain 25 percent 
of revenues from the local wagering 
tax to be imposed should the river- 
boat materialize. The village would 
have to donate as much as S3 million 
each year to McHeniy County, and 
up to $4 million a year to Lake Coun- 
ty. 

Should Fox Lake geta boat,' Mar- 
tini is not so sure the revenues will 
follow, as there are four places for 
gambling within a one hour drive 
from Fox Lake.. 

"It does have a negative impact 
on the police department, and the 
public works department for clean- 
• ing up trash," Martini said. 



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The spirit of February 

Residents at Oakridge Village Apartments take a breather after decorating an evergreen tree with 
Valentine-theme ornaments In their apartment lobby. Those involved with the decorating Include: 
Blanche Yasz, Christine Fernandez and Sunny ArndtjEleanor Roman, Kathleen Stofflett, who along 
with her husband Bob (not pictured) are Oakridge Village Apartments Resident Managers, and Mar- 
ilyn Warden. — Photo by Lynn Gunnarson Dahlstrom 



CAR ACCIDENT RECENTLY? 



Free Report reveals what the insurance companies don't want 
you to know. 

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A18 I Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 19, 1999 



vr- 



St. Peter Board of 
Education seeks to 
fill two vacancies 



On April 30, two members of 
the St. Peter School Board will 
have completed their terms. 

Dr. Dan Boarini, will not seek 
re-election. Pat O'Connell will 
have completed an assigned 
term. He is eligible for another 
&l term and is seeking re-election. 
St. Peter Parish consequently will 
vote to fill these two positions. 
Terms are for a period of three 
years. Members may serve a max- 
imum of six consecutive years. 

Prospective members must 
qualify according to the school 
board requirements; reside in the 
community for at least six 
months; be a parish member or 
parent of a St. Peter school child; 
and be at least 18 years of age. 
Employees of St. Peter 
School/Parish and their immedi- 
ate family's members shall not be 
eligible for election to the board. 

Candidates for board mem- 
bership must submit their appli- 
cation/petition signed by at least 
10 parishioners or parents of St, 
Peter School children, to the prin- 
cipal, no later than 3 p.m.' on 
^i Tuesday, March 9. Applica- 
tions/petitions are available at 
the school office during school 



hours. Names will appear on the 
ballot in the order petitions are 
filed. 

Announcement of qualifying 
candidates will be made at the 
regular school board meeting of 
March 11. 

The election will be held on 
April 24 and .25, after all Masses. 
All adult parishioners or parents 
of St. Peter School children are el- 
igible to vote. Parish rolls will be 
used to determine voter eligibili- 
ty. In the event of a tie, a runoff 
election will be held on the fol- 
lowing Sunday. 

Ballots will be made available 
in Fr. Frawley Hall after each 
Mass. Absentee ballots will be 
available in the school office. 

Currently on the St. Peter 
School Board is Julinnne Thain- 
president; Dan Boarini-vice pres- 
ident; Joanne Adams-secretary; 
Laura Conley, Pat O'Connell, Jim 
Murray and Don Oelerich. 

The St. Peter, School Board 
serves the parish, die school and the 
administration strictly as an advisory 
group. It Is the function of the board 
to provide advice, encouragement, 
support and cooperation in all areas 
of school life. 



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Playing it safe 

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on the melting Ice on Channel Lake, during the Northern Illinois Conservation Club's annual fishing 
tournament. Pawlikowski fell through the ice during last year's tournament. — Photo by Sandy Bress- 
ner 

Grass Lake names honor students 



These students of Grass Lake 
Junior High School are named to 
the honor roll for the second quar- 
ter. 

Grades 
High honors 

Kellfe Davis, Lauren Foerster, 
Ryan Thamerus, Kara Vojak. 
Regular honors 

Kclsey Dent, Amy Knutson, Wal- 
ter Malccki, Thomas Marquart, Angel 
Simoninl, Billy Thurlwell. 



Grade 7 
High honors 

Melissa Shields, Lauren Thuri- 
.well 
Regular honors 

Katie Clarke, Britany Colson, Hei- 
di Gwlnn, Christine Karlovitz, Korin 
Knutson, Ryan McHale, Chris Pantic, 
William Rutter 

Grade 8-1 
High honors 



Dlna Izcnstark 
Regular honors 

Ann Abel, Christian Hudson, 
Kurt is Karczcwski, Katio Macon, Cur- 
tis Thcel. 

Grade 8-II 

High honors 

Krista Chlnn, Missy Schramm 
Regular honors 

Chris Barred, April Coiciough, 
Chris Marquart, Kristina Mosier, Tom 
Olandcse, Chad Thurston. 



Abby Girod wins 
Arbor Day Poster contest 



Abby Girod, fifth grader at W.C. 
Petty School, In Mrs. Elaine Hof- 
man's class has won the first round 
of the 1000 Arbor Day National 
Poster Contest. Her poster was se- 
lected to represent W.C. Petty School 
at the state level. 

The theme of the poster contest 
is "Trees are terrific— for shelter and 
shade. The poster depicts a child read- 
ing under die shade of a tree with ani- 
mals shown living in the tree. Girod 



said, "I wanted to explain a lot of ideas ' 
about how trees can be shelter and 
shade to a lot of living creatures." 

The Arbor Day National Poster 
Contest is sponsored by The Nation- 
al Arbor Day Foundation and State 
Coordinator Cathy Ware. The Na- 
tional Arbor Day Foundation is a non 
profit membership organization 
dedicated to tree planting, environ- 
mental stewardship, and the cele- 
bration of Arbor Day. 



German-American 
Club of Antioch 
dance, Saturday 

The German American Club of 
Antioch presents .its. annual 
"Faschings Dance" (Masquerade 
Dance) on Saturday, Feb. 20 at 8 p.m. 
at the VFW Hall, North Ave. 1 14 mile 
east of Highway 83 in Antioch. The 
more guests in costume the better, 
but it is not required. 

For ticket information, call Su- 
san 395-5008 or call Dolores 356- 
7322. 



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PHONE (847) 223-8161, ext. 105 
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COMMUNITY 



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LIFE'S A BEAR 

'Tinky-Winky 1 — 

What's the big stink? / B2 



GARDEN CORNER 

Getting a start 
on i spring 7 B2 



MOVIE REVIEW 

Lakeland's Oscar picks: 
See big names win big / B5 



Lakeliujd 
Newspapers 

February 19, 

1999 



Section 





i 



train'ed artist 



Artist David Becker finds long train commute a worthwhile experience 




or many people in Lake County, 
commuting back and forth to work 
on the train everyday is a tedious 
experience. 



They wake up early to catch the 
Metra and then they have a long 
train ride to their jobs in downtown 
Chicago. And, then, after putting in 
a long day at the office, they get on 
the train again for another hour or 
two before finally getting home at 
night. 

Some people may get frustrated 
by the long com- 
mute, but not 



David Becker. In- 
stead of com- 
plaining, like 

others sometimes do, Becker has 
decided to put the time to good use. 
He draws illustrations that he 
sometimes uses in his job as an il- 
lustrator for an advertising agency, 
and paints to further his career as a 
fineartist. 

"It's amazing how much I can 
get done on the train," said Becker. 
"People say, 'oh man, you're on the 
train an hour and a half,' but I just, 
get so much done." 

Becker lives in Long Lake and 
every morning he takes the Metra 



By JOHN ROSZKOWSIU 



train to work. He hops on the train 
at 7:05 a.m. and arrives in down- 
town Chicago around 8:45 am, 
where he works as an illustrator for 
Foote, Cone and Belding Advertis- 
ing. At night, he leaves the office 
about 5:20 p.m. and arrives back 
home at about 6:45 p.m. 

Becker often draws sketches of 
ideas that are t 
used in the 



company's ad- 
vertising cam- , 
palgns— and 
some of the'illustratlons he has 
done on the train have been very 
successful. 

For example, he created and il- 
lustrated the 1998-1999 holiday 
"Snowman Snowboarder" for7UP's 
holiday campaign. Many of his Ini- 
tial sketches were done while he 
was on the train. The company 
loved it and the Snowman Snow- 
boarder character was used on 
store shelves to promote 7UP prod- 
ucts. 

"They wanted a character for 




Top of page, artist David Becker draws free-lance art work during 
his train commute from Fox Lake to Chicago. Above, Becker works 
on a painting during a class he teaches at St. Bedes. Right, Beck- 
er boards the train ready to commute and paint.— Photos pro- 
vided, by LeeFllas 



their promotion," he said. "I came 
up with the Snowboarder because 
at that time the Olympic thing was 
really in^-and that's the one they 
choose." 

Becker also created an illustra- 
tion for Wendy's Hamburgers called 
the Four Nuggeters that will appear 
on kid's meals boxes later this year 



and has done storybook frames for 
TV commercials — all while com- 
muting back and forth from work. 

A watercqlor artist, Becker also 
devotes much of his time on the 
train to his painting. 

It Is just my job to be an illus- 
trator, but my love is fine art," said 
Becker, who hopes someday to 







t\ 






I 



open up his own art studio and be 
able to give lectures on the art * 
workshop circuit He currently " : 
teaches a class on watercolor paint- 
ing on Wednesday nights at the 

Please see ARTIST / B2 



B2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



February 19, 1999 



Stretching the 



g season 




In our midwestern climate that 
is most unpredictable, we do 
not have to be stuck with a 
short growing season. We can 
manipulate the climate and'utilize 
some strategies to get moregarden; 
ing time in, We can be creative and 
get a jump on spring. By squeezing /•, J 
in a few weeks of plant growth earli- 
er and later in the year, we can enjoy 
a bit of a longer season similar to 
one or two zones milder. 

Do start plants indoors. Cool* 
season plants such as cabbage and 
broccoli, lettuce can stand some 
light frosts. Start them indoors, 
timed so they will be ready for trans- 
planting about three to four weeks 
before the average last frost date 
(around late April). 

Tender crops such as peppers, 
eggplants, squash and tomatoes can 
be started early and put under pro- 
tective cover about two weeks be- 
fore the average frost date. 

Making use of a cold frame real- 
ly extends your season. A cold frame 
speeds seed germination and shel- 
ters plants from frost. The frame is a 
bottomless box, usually constructed 
from wood. It has a slanting, tight- 
fitting top made of old windows or 
other transparent or translucent 
materials such as plastic or fiber- 
glass, A typical frame is approxi- 
mately 3 feet wide and 6 feet long 
with an 18 inch high back sloping 
down to 12 inches high In the front. 

Place the frame outdoors, over a 
garden bed or against the south wall 
of your home. Orient it so it slopes to 
the south. The sun warms the air and 
soil inside, creating a cozy environ- 
. ment for plants. Sow seeds for trans- 
plants directly in the cold frame. Or 
grow crops such as radishes, spinach, 
beets, and lettuce to maturity in the 
frame. When I was a young girl, my 
neighbor always used a cold frame, 
and he always boasted of the first ripe 
tomato on the block. 

You can prop the top open dur- 
ing the day for ventilation and lower 
it at night to conserve the heat. If 
you like the idea of a cold frame but 
want even more temperature con- 
trol, consider a hot bed. It's basically 
a cold frame with a heat source 
• (commonly electric heating cable) 




GARDEN 
JOURNAL 



LydiaHuff 



to warmiKe fcdif.'Tfie cable usually 
includes a built-in soil thermostat 
and is preset for about 75 degrees, 
ideal for germination of most seeds. 

When tender plants are ready to 
be transplanted into their perma- - 
nent garden spot, you will need to 
protect them from frost. Otherwise 
all your hard work will be for 
naught. I have used hot caps recy- 
cled from gallon milk jugs. Anchor it 
in the ground with a stake and leave 
the cap off so your plant does not 
bake inside. Of course, you need to 
cut the bottom out. 

There is also a product called 
Wall 0*Waters A ring of connected, 
water-filled plastic tubes forms a 
teepee, which is used to enclose an 
individual plant During the day, the 
water in the tubes absorbs solar heat. 
As the water cools down at night, it 
releases heat slowly, protecting the 
plant inside from temperatures 
down to 16 degrees. Use them to pro- 
tect seedlings from late frosts. 

The use of row covers is also a 
great, economical idea. Drape light- 
weight synthetic fabrics, called float- 
ing row covers, over the plants. They 
let light and water pass through 
while protecting the plants from 
temperatures as low as 24 degrees, 
depending on the fabric used. 

Invariably every spring an unex- 
pected frost throws you off guard. 
You can be creative and use things 
that are around the house for cover. 
To save plants, use cardboard boxes, 
old sheets, empty buckets, or even 
newspaper spread over the plants 
lends a few degrees of protection. 
Just remember to remove the stuff 
the following day so as not to bake 
the plants. 

Until next time, peace 

Garden questions may be sent to 
Garden Journal, do Lakeland News- 
papers, 30S.Wliitney St, Grayslake, 
1L 60030. ' 



What's the big stinky 
about 'Tinky-Winky?' 



I always enjoyed TV sportscaster 
Tim Weigel's funny sports-clip 
segments "Weigel's Wieners.'' 
At the end of the dips, he would 
choose a particular pratfall or dumb 
quote from an athlete or coach to re- 
ceive his "Wiener" award. 

In fact, I like the idea so much, I 
decided recently that maybe I should 
begin giving out my own "Wieners." 
But then I realized that wouldn't 
work, because my name does not be- 
gin with the letter "W." "Abear's 
Wieners" just doesn't cut the mus- 
tard, if you know what I mean. 

So, I did a little brainstorming. 
First I thought about wieners. Mys- 
tery meat, of course. And then I 
asked myself; what else is made of 
mystery meat? That was easy- 
bologna. So, what does "Abear" 
start with? Well, if you take off the 
letter "A," it starts with a "B." (I 
thought you would enjoy having a 
little insight into how the creative 
process works. Mind-boggling, isn't 
it?) 

. And that is how I came up with 
my idea for "Bear's Bologna 
Bunch." I will announce new mem- 
bers of this "honorary group" here 
in this space, whenever the mood 
or a stray hormone strikes me. Each 
winner will have his name men- 
tioned, and I will write a special 
paragraph in his or her honor, one 
that can be sung to the tune of a 
former Oscar Mayer commercial 
jingle that begins like this: "My 
bologna has a first name— it's O-S- 
C-A-R." 

So, without further ado, I am 
happy to announce the newest 
(and, so far, only) member of 
"Bear's Bologna Bunch:" Reverend 
Jerry Falwell. 

Congratulations, Jerry. 

Mr. Falwell has a first name 

It'sJ-e-r-r-y 

And he thinks our children 
shouldn't watch 

that TinkyWinky guy 

With his purple fur and bright 
red purse, 

our kids might learn bad taste 
(and worse). 

I think what Jerry's got to say 




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nci .»' 



LIFE'S 
ABEAR 

Donna Abear 



is b*o-l-o-g-n-a. 

For those of you who don't have 
children or just pretend you don't, 
let me explain what the fuss is all 
about Apparently, Reverend Jerry 
Falwell's paper, the National Liberty 
Journal, issued a parent alert about. 

Tinky WInky, a character on a 
current popular show for small chil- 
dren, "TeleTtubbies." His paper 
pointed out that one of the tele-tub- 
bies, named TinkyWinky, is purple 
("the gay pride color"), carries a 
purse, and the antenna growing out 
of his head is shaped like a triangle 
(The gay pride symbol"). In light of 
these "clues," he suspects that Tinky 
Wmky is gay, and represents a nega- 
tive role model for our children. 

Which is why I chose him to join 
the "Bear's Bologna Bunch." Because 
personally, this stinky Mr. Falwell is 
making about Tinky Winky makes 
me thinky that some folks' brains are 
really dinky. Just because adults are 
kinky does not mean that those who 
are young enough to still suck on a 
binky could possible have a clue 
about Tinky Winky's preferences re- 
garding "winky winky." Those kind of 
rinky- dinky ideas make me want to 
throw up in the sinky. 

By the way, while you adult 
readers may have found the previ- 



ous paragraph to be Irritating and 
childlike, children under the age of 4 
would consider me to be a shoo-In 
for a Pulitzer Prize. 

Which illustrates the problem 
with Mr. Falwell's theory— children 
do not see things the way adult see 
things. As a mother, I can honestly 
say that never once did any of my 
toddler-age children watch Sesame 
Street, for example, and then dis- 
cuss whether or not Bert and Emle 
were more than just "friends." 

' Kids take things at face value. To 
them, a green haired grouch who 
lives in a garbage can is a green- 
haired grouch who lives in a garbage 
can. They do not see a representa- 
tive of the homeless. To them, a red- 
haired muppet named Elmo who 
begins all his sentences with "Me" 
such as "Me Elmo. Me like that," Is 
just a red-haired muppet named 
Elmo. They do not see some stereo- 
typical representation of a "red- 
skin," as in "Me Big Chief Slam- 
Dances with Wolves.", * 

So to say that our children will 
grow up to be gay just because Tin- 
ky Winky on "Tele-rubbles" Is pur- 
ple and carries a purse is pure 
bologna. It's as dumb as saying that 
the reason so many members of my 
generation experimented with drugs 
is because as children, we watched 
Popeye inhaling some strange green 
stufffromacan. 

HEY— wait a minute. Do you 
think—? 



Questions or comments for hu- 
morist Donna Abear can be sent to 
P.O. Box 391, Antioch, 1L 60002. 



FROM PAGE Bl 



ARTIST: Artist makes 
communting a work of art 



Palate and Chisel Academy in 
downtown Chicago. He also 
teaches a watercolor class on Sun- 
days at St. Bedes school in Ingle- 
side. 

Whenever he gets inspired 
during his train ride, Becker just 
opens up his watercolor set and 
starts to paint. "Everybody's got 
laptops now. This is by 'laptop", I 
just open it up and start painting," 
he said. 

Becker recently wrote and il- 
lustrated his own how to watercol- 
or book entitled "Watercolor 
Composition Made Easy," while 
he was on the train. The book, '■. 
which is being published by 
North Light Books, will hit store 
shelves later this year. 

"I wouldn't have had anytime 
to write that book if it wasn't for 
the train," said Becker. "I wrote 
the whole darn book on the train 
because there's no other time I 
could actually do it with three kids 
at home." 

Sometimes, other commuters 
will watch Becker while he does 
his artwork. Occasionally, he'll 
even sell one of his small watercol- 
. or paintings, which he usually ■ 
does on 5 by 7 inch cards. 

"I sell them the card for $20 
and I'll make my train ticket and 
fare," he said. 

Becker said painting on the 
train is also a great way of getting . 
noticed as an artist. 

"1 do paintings on there to get 
recognition. I mean, where else 
can you get such nice publicity? 
You sit down on the train and start 
painting and people will come up 
to you and stop and look at your 
work. It's a great way to get pub- 



licity, I think. You're sitting on the 
train. It doesn't cost you any- 
thing." 

Becker was born in downtown 
Chicago near Wrigley Field and 
moved to the Fox Lake area when 
he was in the third grade* where 
he has spent most of his life, He 
currently lives in Long Lake with 
his wife, Sharon, and three chil- 
dren, Tara, 7, Devon, 5, and Den- 
nis, 3. 

He became seriously interest- 
ed in fine art while attending 
Grant High School in the late 
1970s. One of his high school 
teachers took him on a trip to the 
American Academy of Arts In 
downtown Chicago. He knew right 
then he had found his niche. "I 
loved it. I said that's for me." 

Ultimately, if he gets enough 
recognition he would like to make 
fine art a full-time career and be. 
able to open his own art studio. 

"I do like painting Chicago 
scenes. I'm trying to get a show to- 
gether at the cultural center this 
year. I hope to be known as a 
Chicago artist who does Chicago 
scenes," Becker said. 

"I love water, too, and that's 
why I live up here. I love the won- 
derful boats and stuff. I get the 
best of both worlds. I go in during 
the day and see the city and then I 
come home and go fishing with 
the kids. It's the best of both 
worlds," he said. 

And, for now at least, the long 
train commute doesn't seem to 
bother him. 

"People ask me, 'don't you get 
sick of it sometimes.' Sometimes I 
do, but most of the times, I get a 
lot done." 



I 



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I ' 



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February 19, 1999 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers / B3 



i • 






I 




BHIy Siegenfeld, artistic director of the Jump Rhythm Jazz 
Project wilt host a Swing Jazz Master Class March 7 at the 
Dancenter North In Ubertyville. 

Billy Siegenfeld introduces 
swing jazz to local dancers 



On March 7, Dancenter 
North, of Ubertyville, will host 
a Wing Jazz Master Class with 
Billy Siegenfeld, artistic direc- 
tor of the r Jump Rhythm Jazz : 
Project. 

Siegenfeld, a member of 
the dance facul- 
ty at 

Northwestern 
University In 
Evan st on, Is a 
highly skilled 
teacher whose''. 
lively style is 
based on tech- 
nique, muslcali- 
"tyrondortlstlc 
expression.. His 
outstanding choreography has 
been recognized by the Ruth 
Page Foundation of Chicago, 
Jazz Dance World Congress, 
and his most recent recogni- 
tion appeared In the August 
issue of Dance' Magazine. 
Billy Slegenfeid's Swing 
Jazz Master Class is based on 
classic jazz dance to the ■ 




rhythms of blues, Latin Jazz, 
and swinging jazz, not to be 
confused with East Coast 
Swing. ' 

Intermediate and Advanced 
dancers, ages 13 to adult, are 
Invited to participate in 

Slegenfeid's 
Swing Jazz 
Master Class on 
March. 7, -from 1- 
3 p.m. Class 
price is $22 for 
dancers and $8 
for, observers. 

•A photo 
opportunity will 
?belavallable ,' 
March 7 at 1-3 
p.m. Contact NtkW White for 
more information at 367-7970. 
Dancenter North Is located 
in downtown Ubertyville' at 
540 North Milwaukee Avenue. 
For reservations or more Infor- 
mation 'on* Billy Slegenfeid's 
Swing Jazz Master Class, 
please call Dancenter North at 
367-7970. 



Neil Simon's Odd Couple set for March 

jnv/ >;:/•■ -y.'-i.. * ■ . . 



•The International Center on 
Deafness and the Arts (ICODA) 
will-present Neil Simon's The Odd 
Couple, March 5-28, at Center 
Light Sign and Voice Theatre, 
3444 Dundee Rd.» Northbrook. 
Show times are Friday 8 p.m., 
Saturday 3 p.m.- and 8 p.m. and 
Sunday 3 p.m. Advance tickets 
are $8 for children 14 and under 



and $13 for adults. Tickets at the 
door are $10 for chhildren and 
$15 for adults. 

Proceeds from The Odd Couple 
benefit ICODA and their continuing 
effort to educate deaf and hearing- 
Impaired children on the pleasures 
and benefits of the arts. For reser- 
vations call 559-0110, ext 237 or 
559-9493 try. 



SINGLES 



Dream Date Auction set 

The Midwest Chapter of the 
Starlight Children's Foundation will 
present its Oth annual Dream Date 
Auction on Friday, Feb. 19, at 6 p.m., 
at the Park West, 322 W. Armitage In 
Chicago, 

The event will feature the auction 
of 26 bachelor and bachelorette date 
packages, food from over 30 of 
Chicago's favorite restaurants and a 
raffle and auction offering internation- 
al, deluxe trip packages. Cost Is $30 In 
advance, $35 at the door To order 
tickets or for more information, call 
(312) 251-7827. 

Dance set for Friday 

The Solo Singles Club meets 
every Friday at 8 p.m. at the Gale ' 
Street Inn, 906 Diamond Lake Road', 
in Mundeletn. The age range Is 40. • 
plus and admission is free. For 
•more Information call 746-6818. 



KID STUFF 



Cartooning classes 

The Anderson Arts Center of 
Kenosha will present a special series 
of cartooning classes beginning "'■ 
Saturday, Feb. 20,' at 1 p.m. The', 
weekly, 90-minute classes, entitled 
"Toons," are designed for children 8 
to 14 years of age and will be taught 
by artist Mario Gonzales. 

Classes will be held at the 
Anderson Arts Center's Kid's Space, . 
which is located directly across the 
street from the Arts Center at 124- 
66th Street. 

Classes Will run fro;m 1 p.m. to 
2:30 p.m. Cost is S 12 per calss. For. 
more information call 414-657-6005. 



DANGE 



Dancing Under 
the Stars'" r 

Amateur and professional 
dancers are invited to swing, boogie 
and twist the night away to the . 
sounds of top Chicago orchestras in 
the Crystal Gardens at Navy Pier. 

' Admission Is free. Dancing will ' 
be held every Wednesday through 
March 10. Free dance lessons are 
offered between 6 and 7 p.m. and 
dancing will be held from 7 -JO p.m. • 



ART 



Art Members Exhibition 

The College of Lake County will 
be hosting the Community Gallery 
of Art Members Exhibition. This 
group show features Lake County 
artists who have joined the "Friends 
of the Gallery." Works on display . 
include a wide variety of styles and 
media. 

The exhibition will take place 
Jan. 15 through Feb. 21, 1999. 

This is free and open to the pub- 
lic. , . 

For more information or to 



become a "Friend of the Gallery" call 
543-2405! 

Artstreet Art Fair 

A variety of fine art exhibits and 
crafts for all interests will be avail- 
able for viewing and purchase on 
Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 27 and 28 
In Festival Hall B at Navy Pier. Please 
call (608) 831-0707 for more informa- 
tion. ' 



MUSIC 



live music at 
Duke O'Brien's 

Duke O'Brien's hosts live music 
throughout the month of February. 
On Friday, Feb. 19 The Big Babies 
will be playing rock music foryour 
enjoyment A band known as Not the 
Beatles will perform on Feb. 20, The 
Fabulous Janes will be live on Friday, 
Feb. 26 and the Cathy Richardson 
Trio appears on Saturday, Feb. 27... 

•Duke O'Brien's Is'lo'cated at 110 N. 
Main St. In Crystal Lak&For more 
Information on any of these events, 
please call 815-356-9980. 

Chicago Sinfonietta 
solo debut 

Acclaimed violinist Rachel 
Barton, and Lyric Opera percussion- 
ist Ed Harrison will make their 
Chicago Sinfonietta solo debuts in 
March, as part of the Chicago 
Sinforiletta's fifth concert of their 
12th season. 

Music Director Paul Freeman will 
conduct Two performances only: 
Sunday, March 7, 230 p.m. at 
Dominican University, 7900 W. 
Division St. in- River Forest and 
Monday, March 15, 7:30 p.m. In 

. Orchestra Hall at Symphony Center, . 

• 220 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago. 

Tickets are now available by call- 
ing the Chicago Sinfonietta box office 
at (312)'857-1062. Ticket prices are 

:. Sl7-$28 [at Dominican University arid 
4 $22-$35 at Symphony Center, , 



Symphony presents 
Cabaret Pops 

Saturday, Feb. 20, the Lake Forest 
Symphony will present its annual 
Cabaret Pops dinner evening featuring 
the symphony's own maestro David 
Itkln with vocalists Krlsd Tingle and 

•' Steve Hufflnes. This evening of dining 
and entertainment will be held at the 
Deer Path Inn, 255 E. Illinois Road In 
Lake Forest Tickets are $55 per persoru, 

I Call 295-2135 for further Information 

Leon Redbone in 
concert 

Leon Redbone will present two 
conce'rts at the Woodstock Opera House 
on Friday, March 26 and Saturday, 
March 27. Each show will begin at 8 
p.m. 

Tickets for the Redbone concerts 
are available at the Woodstock Opera 
House box office. Please call 815-338- 
5300. 

Women Composers of 
the Romantic Period 

Enjoy the very romantic and 
expressive music of two women 
composers who are,finally being rec- 
ognized by music audiences. Clara ' 
Schumann, who Is remembered 

. mainly as a concert pianist and the 
wife of Robert Schumann, will be dis- 
cussed as a composer In her own 
right, who has written works of great 
romantic character. 

• Music appreciation instructor Jim 
Kendros weaves insightful personal 
stories about the composers and 

- amazing historic fact to really give 
you a sense of what in the times was 
about Selections of the composers 
work will also be played and ana- 
lyzed to give the audience a better 

-, understanding of some of the deci- 
sions they had to make, and why 
they made them. 

At the Alder Ballroom, Friday, 
Feb. 26, I999y7:30 p.m. Tickets are 
$9 and $7 Tor DACC members. 

Please turn to nest page 



g£3sm 



Presents 

Sleuth 

By Anthony Shaffer ' 

Directed by Donna Badtke 

February 19, 20 at 8:00 pm 

February 21 at 2:30 pm 

Fri. & Sat. 8 p.m.; Sunday Matinee 2:30 p.m. 
. Adults $10; Students & Seniors $8 

Call for Reservations 

(847)3954055 

Box office opened January 25. 
PM&L Theatre,: P.O. Box 23, 877 Main St., Antioch 

3E3 



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B4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



. February 19, 1999 



BLOODDRIW 

Give blood at CLC 

The College of Lake County health 
center, In cooperation with the 
American Red Cross, will conduct a 
blood drive from noon to 7 p.m. on Feb. 
23 in the Brandcl Court at the Grayslakc 
Campus. 

Donors must be 17 or older, 
weigh at least 110 pounds, be in 
good health and not have donated 
blood within 5G days. Donors will 
receive a mini-physical that includes 
- a blood pressure check and iron 
level count. 

The blood drive will be conducted 
on a walk-i n basis; priority appoint- 
ments may be scheduled by calling 
the CLC health center at 543-2064. 



EDUCATION 






Divorce survival 

the Family Service Community 
Education Program Is offering an 
educational course called Divorce 
Survival. This is a four week course 
which focuses on the personal, finan- 
cial, and legal concerns of divorcing 
partners. 

This program will help you 
through the maze of divorce, 
Financial and legal experts will share 
knowledge and insights to help you 
make good decision before you sign 
those papers. 

It will be held every Thursday at 
7 -9 p.m. Feb. 25 through Mar. 18. 
The cost Is $40. ■ 

For more information call Kris 
Andersen at 662-4464. 



'Keeping your keepsakes' at guild 



"Keeping Your Keepsakes," 
will be the focus of the Tuesday, 
March 2 meeting of the North 
Suburban Embroiderer's Guild. 

Teacher/lecturer, Peg Morris 
has an extensive background in tex- 
tile conservation and needlework 
and has taught for national needle 
arts seminars, stitchery shops, and , 
guilds across the country. 

Her slide/lecture will cover 
aspects of cleaning, storing and fin- 



ishing heirloom quilts, wedding 
dresses, and vintage textiles and 
needleworks. She will also be offer- 
ing a workshop on Wednesday and 
Thursday entitled "Casting 
Shadows" demonstrating highly 
textured stitches using hand 
embroidery as well as other tech- 
niques resulting in very dimension- 
al effects. 

For more information call 
Debbie Brice 255-6793. 



THEATRE REVIEW 



'Goody Two Shoes/ black patent 




is 



By GLORIA DAVIS 

Correspondent 



T 




'Tom Sawyer' to be presented at CLC 



The adventures of Mark 
Twain's classic character ' Tom 
Sawyer' will be recreated in a 
musical production at the 
College of Lake County on Feb. 
27. 

Performances will be held at 



10 a.m., noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. 
in the auditorium, Room COOS, 
on the Grayslake Campus. 

Tickets are $3 for CLC stu?" 
dents, alumni and children 
under 12 and $4 for the general 
public.CaU.543-2300 for tickets. 



he cast and crew 

of Marriott 

Lincolnshire's 

new musical, 
again pose the '50s vin- 
tage question; "Do Black 
Patent Leather Shoes 
Really Reflect Up?" 

Maybe this post-war 
Catholic nostalgia is 
slightly time-worn and 
not quite as fresh in the 
1990s as it was in the 
1980s, the last time John 
Powers' Catholic school 
tuneful odyssey was on 
Marriott's boards, or 
maybe the slickness and j^ e cas t f "Do Black 
musicalsuperiority of the : Rea „ y Reflect Up/ . 
recent "Grease revival ?•> 

dims "Shoes" in compari- 
son. 

For many, the naivete* of this 
story of two Catholic school sweet- 
hearts and their friends, who face 
the rigors of romancing during an 
era when they were taught that an 
innocent kiss goodnight could send 
them into Hell's darkest regions, is 
somewhat refreshing in light of 
today's headlines. 

Though not a smasherino, this 
latest production of "Shoes" retains 
much of the charm and innocence 
of the original, drawing lots of 
smiles, chuckles and appropriate 
applause for what is still a good 
family show. 

If you've never experienced the 
dance of the giant saddle shoes, or 
watched the cleverness of school 
desks that act as tricycles, or identi- 
fied with the teenage mistration 
arid the tyranny of the good priests 



Patent Leather Shoes 



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\(; Fri, February 19th 

Mundelein at Zion 

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Game Time 730p 



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The BEST in High School 
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Teams to be announced 
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and nuns whose job it was to save 
their charges from the perils of sex, 
you will enjoy "Shoes." 

Your reviewer actually lived the 
story and more so, having had a 
biology teacher who had visions 
now and then between showing us 
how to dissect a frog or identify a 
poison ivy leaf. 

This sainted sister would stop, 
put her hand to her forehead, close 
her eyes, and quote the show's title, 
adding "Never wear pearls, they ■ 
reflect down," or "Don't jump over 
puddles," and (in the days before 
pantyhose) "Don't sit on a boy's lap 
without the thickness of a phone 
book between you because the feel 
of your garters will get him all hot , 
and bothered." 

Then there was the piece de 
resistance, "Don't go to restaurants 
with white tablecloths,' they will 
remind the boys of bed sheets." 
True story!! 

Aaron Thielen, a familiar 
Marriott face, is a capable Eddie, . 



while the arresting Kelli 
Cramer, as usual, owns 
the stage when she's" on 
it in the role of his love, 
Becky. 

Ann Whitney reminds 
us of our crotchety third- 
grade teacher, and Mary 
Ernster's Sister Helen Is 
well done, a pleasing 
mixture of two or three 
nuns we have known 
and loved. 

While Don Forston 
does his expected 
engaging portrayal of 
Father O'Reilly, it's 
Robert Alan Mason's 
sparkling version of- 
Louis Schlang, espe- 
cially whenhe and the 
company rock the 
stage with "Doo Waa- 
Doo Wee," and Angela 
Berra's funny, Mary Kenny, that 
are standouts. 

Ann Jacob/s Nancy Ralansky is 
also right up there on our good 
performance check list. 

The priestly and "nunlsh".dis- 
clplinc, such has the Three 
Stoogish head hitting, etc., gets to 
be a bit much, irritating is the 
word. 

Though the music of James 
Quinn and Alaric Jans serves more 
as a backdrop than a catalyst, we 
did enjoy such rollicking numbers 
as "Mad Bombers," and "Its the 
Nuns." 

"Shoes" is good, not great, 
but it's sweet and clean, scarce 
commodities by today's stan- 
dards, and a pleasant way for the 
entire family to go back, back to 
the days of yesteryear when kids 
were, actually afraid of their 

teachers, respected. their parents, 
boys got pimp]oB-from.th*»J«»«»i* *»£j 
sex, and love and relationships 
were the most mysterious things 
of all. 



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1 » \ \ \ 1 \ \ \ 



SPECIAL EVENTS 

Bulldog band annual 

spaghetti dinner 

set for Friday 

The Waukegan High School's Bulldog Band will host their ' 
annual spaghetti dinner. Dinner will be on Friday, Feb. 19 at 
5:30 to 8 p.m. The meal features Louie's Restaurant at the 
Waukegan High School cafeteria (entrance off Monroe Street). 
Entertainment will be provided by the band students. 

Tickets are $7 for adults; $4 for students with ID; $4 for 
senior citizens; free for kids under age 5. 

To purchase tickets.'call 360-5651. Tickets may also be pur- 
chased at the door. 



Innovative child care 
program to be held at Gorton 

"Child Care at Home," an innovative program for anyone 
considering home day care, will be held at Gorton Community 
Center, 400 EasUlljnois Road, Lake Forest. 

The program will be led by Julie Kalin,' a Lake Bluff resident, 
early childhood educator, owner of Stay, Play & Learn; and will 
take place oh Tuesday, Feb. 23 from 7-9 p.m. or Saturday, Feb. 
27 from 9-11 a.m. The fee Is $40. 

Interested participants should register and pay in advance. 
For further information, or to receive a program brochure/ con- 
tact or stop by the Gorton office at 847-234-6060 between 9 a.m 
and 4:30 p.m, weekdays. 

Grafters wanted 
for spring festival 

Crafters needed for the Spring Craft Festival, March 13, at 10 
a.m. — 4 p.m. at Grayslake High School, 400 N. Lake Street, 
: Grayslake." This event is sponsored by the Grayslake High School 
Band Boosters. 

For more information please call Carol 548-1139. 



1. 1 






• 



w 



















February 19, 1999 












FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers I 



Lakeland's Oscar picks see big names win big 



movie review 

IIUIIIUll 




John Kmitta & 
Brendan O'Neill 



Best Picture 

"Elizabeth" 
"LifeisBeautifiil" 
"Saving Private Ryan" 
"Shakespeare in Love" 
"The Tfiin Red Line" 

lakeland's pick: 
"Saving Private Ryan" 
Comment: "Shakespeare in Love" 
may be a close second, but it can't 
match the grand scale of topic and 
filmwork of Spielbergs latest mas- 
terpiece. 

Best Director 

Roberto Benigni - 
"Life is Beautiful" 
John Madden - 
"Shakespeare in Love" 
Terrence Malick; - 
TtieTliin Red Line" 
Steven Spielberg - . 
"Saving Private Ryan" 
Peter Weir - 
"Hie Truman Show" i 

Lakeland's pick Steven Spielberg ' 
Comment: See the comment for 
best picture and you will see why. 
He is the master artisan of modern 
film. But, John Madden; not the 
football announcer, could make a 
strong run at the king — especially 
with the late push'of "Shakespeare 
inLove," 

Best Actor 

Roberto Benigni - 
"LifeisBeautifiil" 
Tom Hanks - 
"Saving Private Ryan" 
IanMcKellan- 
"Gods and Monsters" 
NickNolte- 
"Affliction" 
Edward Norton - 
"American History X" 

Lakeland's Pick Tom Hanks 
Comment: This one is hotly con- 
tested and it could be anyone's Os- 
; car to take home, but we will stick 
with Hanks since he was our Best 




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Actor pick for our year in review. 
Look for some solid, growing sup- 
port for Edward Norton, whose 
portrayal of a nazi skinhead has 
stirred a groundswell of support, as 
well as critical acclaim. 

Best Actress 

Cate Blanchctt - 
"Elizabeth" 

Fernanda Montenegro - 
"Central Station" 
GwynethPaltrow- 
"Shakespearein Love" 
. Meryl Streep - 
"One True Tiling' 
Emily Watson - 
"Hilary and Jackie" 

Lakeland's pick GwynethPaltrow 
Comment: Pal trow shines in her 
cross-dressing role, stealing the 
show from the title character* Cate . 
Blanche tt's portrayal of Queen Eliz- 
abeth should be Paltrow'sstiffest 
competition in the battle of 'the pe- 
riod pieces. 

Best Supporting Actor 

James Cobum- 
"Affliction" 
Robert Duvall- 
"A Civil Action" 
Ed Harris - 
"The Truman Show" 
Geoffrey Rush - 
"Sliakespeare in Love" 
Billy Bob Thornton - 
"ASimptePlan" 

Lakeland's pick 
Billy Bob Thornton 
Comment: Thornton should take 
home the statue for giving his char- 
acter more depth than all the other 
actors combined, Harris and Rush 
made minimal contributions to 
their respective films, and Thorn- 
tonlsjquicf^y'b&Mmj^gafdnJa-.'\ 
vorite. 

Best Supporting Actress 

Kathy Bates - 
"Primary Colors" 
BrendaBlethyn- 
"Uttle Voice" 
judi Dench -' 
"Shakespeare in Love" 
Rachel Griffiths - 
"Hilary and Jackie" 
Lynn Redgrave - 
"Gods and Monsters" 

Lakeland's pick Abstain 
Comment: We didn't see enough of* 




Gwyneth 
Pallrow 



Shakespeare 
in Love 



these movies to make a solid vote, 
but Cathy Bates wasstrongand 
convincing in "Primary Colors" 
while Judi Dench barely appeared 
in "Shakespeare in Love." 

Best Screenplay 

(written directly for the screen) 
Warren Beatty and 
Jeremy Pikser - "Bulworth" 
Vincenzo Cerami and 
Roberto Benigni - 
• "LifeisBeautifiil" 
Robert Rodat- 
"Sqvirig Private Ryan" 
Marc Norman and 
Tom Stoppard - 
"Shakespeare in Love" 
Andrew Nicol - 
'The Truman Show" 

Lakeland's pick 

Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard - 
"Shakespeare in Love" 
Comment: They should be recog- 
nized for the interesting insightful 



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MOVIES AND TIMES START FEBRUARY 19, 1999 



LAKE ZURICH (847) 550-0000 
755 S. Rand Rd. 



i -nn SENIORS (OVEH 60) & CHILDREN 
>AyV ft 1 A UNDER) ADUtTS 57.50 AFTER GPM 

^ icwsnjopfffwcs-nro;gmmio(WHWPq 



OFFICE SPACE <■> 

Daily 12:20, 2:30, 4:40, 6:50, 9:00{ 

JAWBREAKER (R) 

DaBy 1230, 235, 4:40, 6:45, 850 

OCTOBER SKY m 

Dairy 1155, 2:15,435, 655, 9:15 

THE OTHER SISTER <«-»» 

Sat7:00 

MESSAGE IN A BOTTLE («•«> 
DaBy 12:15. 1:15, 255, 355, 535, 
635,8:15,9:15 

RUSHM0RE (R) 

Fri., Sun.-Thur. 12:40, 2:45, 

4:50,6:55,9:00; 

831.12:40,2:45,4:50,9:40 

BLAST FROM THE PAST <«-«) 
Daily 11:50, 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30 

MY FAVORITE MARTIAN <«) 

Daily 12:00, 2:10, 4:20, 6:30, 8:40 

PAYBACK (R) 

Daily 12:10, 230, 450, 7:10, 930 

SHAKESPEARE IN LOVE w 

Daily 1:00, 3:35, 6:15, 8:50 

SHE'S ALL THAT <«-«) 
DaBy 12KJ5, 2^0, 435, 650, 9i)5 

PRINCE OF EGYPT (K» 

DailyTl:50, 2:00, 4:10 

A CIVIL ACTION <«-«)'. 
Fri; 6:35, 9:00 



ANTIOCH (847) 395-0216 • 
378 Lake St. Antioch 



CAflQ SENIORS [OVH 601 CKIIDHEN ' 
g / UU WNDEH 11) 4 AU SHOWS BEFORE 6PM 
™ KM ADULTS AFTER 6PM 

PAYBACK (R) 

Fri. 6:45, 9:00; Sat. 2:15, 4:30, 

6:45, 9:00; Sun. 2:15, 4:30, 7:00; 

Mon. - Thurs. 7:00 



LIBERTY (847)362-3011 

708 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyvllle 



SENIORS [OVER 601 CHILDREN 

(UNDER 11)* AIL SHOWS BEfW.EWM 
W.OO 



sooo 

* ktD ADULTS AFTEH6PM 

SHE'S ALL TKA1T (P6-13) 

Fri. 6:45, 9:00; Sat 6:45, 9:00; 
Sun. 7:15; Mon. - Thurs. 7:15 

A BUG'S LIFE (G) 

Sat & Sun. 2:00, 4:15 

CALL THEATER FOR 
SHOW & TIMES 



McHENRY 1 & 2 (815) 385-0144 
1204 N. Green St. 



44KII SENIORS (OVERW) A CHILDREN 
'l 3 " (11 4UN0&) ADULTS $100 AFTER 6PM 

RUGRATS(Q) 

Sat & Sun. 2:15, 4:15 

VARSITY BLUES <r> 

Fri. 6:30, 8:45; Sat. 6:30, 8:45; 
Sun. 7:15; Mon. - Thura. 7:15 

A BUG'S LIFE (G) 

- Sat. & Sun. 2:30, 4:30 

SIMPLY IRRESISTIBLE (ran) 

Fri. 6:45, 9:00 

Sat. 6:45, 9:00; Sun. 7:00; 

Mon. -Thurs. 7:00 




Saving 
Private Ryan 



Tom Hanks 



look at the Bard that while partly 
fictional, still entertains immense- " 
ly. 

Best Adapted 
Screenplay 

(based on previously published or 

produced material) 

Bill Condon - 

< "Gods and Monsters" 

Scott Frank - 

"OutofSight" 

Elaine May - 

"Primary Colors" . 

Scott B. Smith- ■ 

"ASimplePlan" 

Terrence Malick - 

'The Thin Red Line" 

Lakeland's pick 

Scott Frank- "OutofSight" 
Comment: Frank took Elmore 
Leonard's novel and created one of 
the most entertaining and under- 
rated films of the year. 



i f r-- 1 iwfTIEJl :;..-• 



ROUND LAKE BEACH 18 

All.nf ;i«i fli...„ [ji il-i i (-- .- . J — i __ ■!., n .i r- mm . ,, - - 



lftGAi\ MATlf.EES ALL SHOWS ST ARTi\G BEFORE 6PM 
CHARGE TICKETS BY PHONE <B77i 6&OEC.AL 



OCTOIU »KY [fH] "- (1:30 4.20) 7:10 1&05 Old | 

* OFF1C1 §Ma (*) (1.-00 3:15 5:20) 7:30 9:40 DM 
MULSAGI IMA IOTTU (r&13) (1:15 4:10) 7:10 9:50 DIG | 

| MAST HIOM THE PAST [ PG-1 J) 

(12:50 1 JO 4:00 4:45) 7:00 7:40 9:40 10:10 DIG I 

I •MYMVO«nittlTON(K)(12iO 110 5:25) 7:45 9J5OI0 
f HAMUPUU IN LOVI (») (1:10 4:05] 6:55 9:45 DIG 
THE TWIN MD UNE (>) (5 JO) 9:20 DIG 

■FAY1ACK (I) (1:10 US 4:10 4J5) 7:15 15Q MS. 10:15010 [ 

■iHE'l Alt THAT (PC-13) (12:40 1:10 SJ0| 7:50 10:10 DIG I 

* tAVINQ PtIVATI RYAN (A) (1:00 4 JO) 8:00 DIG f 
VAJIirTY ILUU (I) (1:45 4:45) 7:2 10:15 DIG 

l'MTCH ADAMS (PO-D) (12:55 3:55) 7:45 10:20 Did 
STUMOM (M-13) i 7;30 10:05 DIG 

MIGHTY JOE YOUNG («J) (12:40 3r0SJ DIG 

.•THIMIKCf OFECYFT(PG) (12:45 3:00 5:15) DIG 
|- A lUG'S U» (G) (12:45 2:55 5:05) 7:20 9J0 DIG 

AOVILACnON(K-ll) (1:25 4:00} 6:50 9:15 DIG 
THEKUGUTSMOVU(e) (1.05 3:05 5:10) 7:15 la.OODIG 



♦ No Passes * No Passes of Super Saves 

DIG a WGltAt SOUND SI» ; iIiB(D QOl = DOLBY SIEftf O 
Times Valid For Friday. January 20. Only iO 1939 






•••••••••••••••••••••••••••< 



)■••••*••••••••••••• •.•••••••• 



!0!» 



CLASSIC if) CINEMA 




FOX LAKE n 4£r 

847-973.2800 ::;::;:;., 

115 Lakeland 



ijl.^T.Tf i ir,1 | 



in all auditoriums * DIGITAL 



SHOVAHIMES '-; PRIDAY. FEB. 19 
THRU THURSDAY, FEB: 2S 

MY FAVORITE MAHT1AH* m 

DIGITAL hi. 5:30 8:00 10:15 

5at. 12:25 3:05 5:30 8:00 -10:15 

5un./Wed. 12:25 3:05 5:30 8:00 

MonyruesyTTiurs. 5:30.8:00 

OCTOBER SKY* m 

O/G/Mi f=ri, 5:20 7:50 iO:10 

5aL 12:20 2:50 5:20 7:50 10:10 

SunJWed. 12:20 2:50 5:20 7:50 

Honyruesyihurs. 5:20 7:50 

MESSAGE IN A BOTTLE* (pq- i5) 

Fri. 5:05 7:40 10:10 

5aL 12:00 2:30 5:05 7:40 10:10 

SunTWed. 12:00 2:30 5;05 7:40 

Moriyruesyrriura. 5:05 7:40 

BLAST FROM THE PAST* ( pq -u, 

Fri. 5:15 7:45 10:05 

SaL 12:10 2:40 5:15 7:45 10:05 

SunTWed. 12:10 2:40 5:15 7:45 

Mon/rue5yTrujr5. 5:15 7:45 

PAYBACK ( R ) 

Fri. 5:30 7:55 10:15 

Sat 12:15 3:00 5:30 7:55 10:15 

Sun^A/ed. 12:15 3:00 5:30 7:55 

MonyruesyThurs. 5:30 7:55 

m tto pa «s« or coupons 

FREE REFILLS 

POPCORN & SOFT DRIMK5 

No childrtn wider I idnitttd to R-rated iwriti tflir i N 



Nl, : t«WiW.ll MH.Iia i lfl.T:1i/>V.l>TlM 



ShowPlaceS 



VERNON 

Milwaukee Ave-2nd Light 8 of <SD 
?f 847/247-8958 6. 



ALL SEATS s 2. ou FBI & SAT 

s 1. 50 Sun thru Thurs 



Sfiovytimej For Fri., 2/I9 Thru Thura., 2/25 
*Sat.-Sun. Matinees in (Brackets] 

AT FIRST SIGHT (PG-I3) 

[*IKK) *4:00] 7:20 10:00 DIGITAL 

RUGRATS(G) 

[*l:45 *4:I5] 6:45 9;00, DIGnAL 

MIGHTY JOE YOUNG (PG) 

t*l:IO *3:50] 7:10 9:30 DIGITAL 

ENEMY Of THE STATE (R) 

[*I145 *330] 660 9:40 

ph20 *4:I0] 7:30 10:10 DIGITAL 

WATERBOY (PGI3) 

;;pfl;15 *3^0] 7:15 9:45' 
[*100 *4:20] 8;00 10:15 DIGITAL 

JACK FROST (PG) 

[♦1:30 *4:30] 7:00 9:15 DIGITAL 



| vtohourwbittiit wmrw.torMotM.com | 



Free Rcdll on Popcorn (i Soil Dnn^s' 



!.«■!» I DIGITAL SOUfJO 



General Cinema 

LAKEHURST 



ROUTE 43 near ROUTE 1 20 
(847) 444-FIIM »to 



BAtOAIH MATINfU IVUY DAY 
AU SHOWS tlTOtl * FM 



SHOVVTIMES POR 2/19 THRU 2/25 



I BARGAIN MATINEES AU SHOWS BEFORE 6PM 
•INDICATES VIP TICKET RESTPJCTTONS APPLY 



BLAST FROM THE PAST km* 

fii 430, 7:00.930 Sal.4 Sen. 2:00. 4:30, 7:00, m 
\\kxi-Thx.&JM 



MESSAGE M A BOTTLE ikm* 

l Moa^hLi.«0,71X) 

ISTEPMOM 5HH31 

I a-Sur^7^\Qffl>Hoft>Thi.7aO » ^ 

MY FAVORITE MARTIAN CO) 

fri 530, 7:45, 1WW SaL *Sm ^,1*15,530, 
7:«J0^Mon>TfU 530. 7;45 

A SIMPLE PLAN m 

fii 430, 7:10. 9:45 Sat 4Sua2fl), 430. 7:10. 9:45 
Moa-flix 433, 7:10 



SHE'S ALL THAT (Pfl 13) 

Ri 520, 730, m SaL & Sua 1.-00. 3:10, 530, 730, 
lft40Moa-Thuf.530,730 



PRINCE OF EGYPT (PC) 

Fa 530 SaL & Sun. 130, II 0, 520 Mon-ltur. 530 



VARSITY BLUES ra 

fii 43ft 7ffl. StXSaL 4 Sji 230,430, ZfflJ, 933 



PATCH ADAMS po-iaj 

Fri. 4:45, 720, 9.45 SaL 4 Sin 2:15, 4:45, 720, 9:45 
Moa-Tbn 4:45, 720 



SAVING PRIVATE RYAN W 

Fri.430,830SaL-Sui.1«),430,aD0 
Moa-Thur.6:15 



PAYBACK^ 

Fii 433, 530, 650,7^5, 9D0, 1031 11:15 
SaL133,2l5, 115. 431530. 6ffl7:45,9fl0a 1003, 11:15 
Sun. 1^215. 115.4^ Saw 7:45,901 IQtOO 



OFFICE SPACE m 

Fri. 521 73& 94A 11:40 Si 101 3:10, 520, 730, 
44411:40 SuiMfttHS2H 730,140 
Moa-Tlu520,730 



I ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW PI 

SaL 1150 



GIFT CERTIFICATES ON SALE 



• ••••••••••••••.•*** 



PR » L 





EBPD. no mt% 5 

VIDEO TAKE TWO 

~lJL.tt ~( 847 )2 2 3" 827 3 
3 1 South Seymour 
Grayslakc.il. 60030 




*••****••*•••*•*••* 







\ 




B6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 



February 19, 1999 



February 19, 1999 



HOT SPOTS 




bnman .-, 



Lakeland Newspapers J B7 




ADVERTISEMENT 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Location: 

Just off the 1-94, at 5572 Grand Ave., in 

Curnee 

Telephone: 

(847) 662-2929 

Hours: 

Call as soon as possible to assure get- 
ting an open date. 

Menu: 

The finest American cujsine served ■ 
family style, buffet style, a seven 
course dinner, a luncheon. We will 
tailor your party to your specifications. 



Grand Palace 



O'TJ'WT*'* 



^1?ij^?^vrv^ 







List your favorite HOT SPOTS restaurant for our 
monthly drawing to win a $ 25 gift certificate. 




Palace offers 'A Wedding to Remember 7 



You've found that special someone and now It's time the Grand Place's professional and experienced banquet 
ail' 



to start planning a wedding you will remember for the 
rest of your lives. 

The Grand Ralace Banauet Center, located in the heart 
of Lake County's commercial and entertainment mecca, 
"adjacent to Mings of China, at 5572 Grand Ave., Gumee, 
takes greatpride in creatine "A Wedding to Remember." 

me Grand Palace oners elegant banquet facilities 
enhanced by crystal chandeliers and soft tapestry walls, 
perfect for trie intimate party of 50, or a grand celebra- 
tion for 250." 

To capture that wedding dream and make it come true, 



For reservations and more information, call Toni at 662- 
coordinator will work with the bride and eroom every step of 2929 as soon as possible. There are still openings for spring 
the way, establishing a relationship that will help you realize and summer receptions. ' 
the perfect wedding fantasy. 



The Grand Falace is also the perfect place to celebrate, 
Among the many package choices are an American t , birthdays, graduations, anniversaries, hold, business dinners, 
cuisine dinnerserved family style with main entrees, like '. for every important occasion. There is special pricing for par- 
roast chicken, sirloin of beef and mostaccioli, plus refills', ;ties held on weekdays, Friday or Sunday., 
up to steak and lobster; a sevencourse dinner, a grand-- C . rorout-of:town guests, the Grand Palace is located near 
buffet; or a luncheon. 1-94, close to Great America,, and Gumee Mills, with the 

Our wedding packages can Include four hours of pre- convenience of a hotel nearby, 
mium bar, a wine or champagne toast, a lovely wedding 
cake and more. A private bridal room is also available. 




•.-- 




4 




ne: 



%^ " " 



Favorite Restaurant: 



Mail to: Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 • Grayslake, IL 60030 



>: i 




Dining on the Lake 



GALE STREET INN 

On Diamond Lake 

A Reputation Tor Fine Food, Spirits and Hospitality on Ueuullful 
DIAMOND LAKE, MUNDELEIN 

A Casual. Country Atmosphere SpcciallzJnfi In 



since l%3 

A GALE STREET TRADITION 
LUNCH AND DINNER 

PARTY AND BANQUET FACILITIES (30 - 160) 

Show l.outi£(i Dancing Featuring 

PETER GUERIN 

Elvis Impersonator 
Friday and Saturday 



906 Diamond Lako Rcl., Mundeleln 566-1090 




, Soon 1 
Mpantied 

Menu^. v 

JUST LIKE HOMEMADE. ..ONlff BETTER 

^^^-•Prepai^d^fty ttwii scratch 
.•Freshest of ingredients 
i •Made just for you when ordered 

Sit and relax in our dk^^^y^'ciy^^^ 
^fcwps ar&salsarwhjle^u i wait fonjus. to bring|ou.yo^rn^]L, 



0+ 



■a basket of 



ALL DINNERS 




SC95 



6 



Chimichanga, Enchiladasl ^i^atter &Taco Platter. 

All dinners include lettuc^.i^atoes/nce; beans, guacarnole, 

sour cream plus a COMPllMENTARY MARGAROA 

Please mention this coupon when ordering. Expires 3-1-99. 



i Linden Plaza 



3 , 



■■# 



■ --:.'*j:.^ 



Free Chips, & Salsa 
with every order 



\L ! inaenptst : ,. ^ \ 
x Pl$265,~1411 i 

^ EaX"26§;-5226 f Fri; ~& Sa^0:30-ld:00^ 



a 



Hours: • i&a 
^10:30-8-3 





c4 

yUe^U^m to* 
SZ<Dememo< 




rand 
'dace 



IUS1AURANTI BANQUIIS 



featuring American cuisine ^— •— ^— — ^ 

Seven-Course Dinners "Luncheons 

Four Hours of Unlimited Premium Bar 

Witie or Champagne Toast for All Your Guests 

Wedding Cake 

Your Own Private Bridal Dressing Room 

Seating from 50 to 250 people 

Also Available for Rehearsal Dinners, Anniversaries, 

Reunions and Birthdays 

5572 W. Grand Ave. -Gumee • (847) 662-2929 



MONACO 

Fine Foods - Cocktails 
2816 Rt. 120.* McHenry, II 60050 

(815) 385-5278 





Saturday Night 

16 oz. Steak Dinner $ 1 1 9S 



Home of McHenry's 



Dinner Special every Sunday night 
accompanied with music by 












ADVERTISE YOUR RESTAURANT 

HERE 




8^7-223-8161 



- - . . 

- * ■ vt 

yWHWpHHWw 




' 




NEED A CHANGE OF FACE? 

Give Our Mexican Cuisine A Taste 



MAIN STREET STATION 

Cantina y Restaurante 

Located In.the Old C&MW Train Depot 
4005 W. T*iatn Street -McHenry, IL 

385^110 

• Delicious Appetizers 

• Drink' Specials AH Week 
t.i Lunch et Dinner Specials Mon.-Fri. 





caf^ 



v\&* 



JOIN UT! 




Jesse ^faks 

■M|mJM|H||M| 

Food & Drink 



KITCHEN OPEN FBI. &SAL W MIDNIGHT 

18^490 W. Old Gages Lake Rd., Gages Lake 

(847) 223-2575 



JOIN US FRIDAY 

Walleye Fish Fry * $ 8 96 
AU-U-Can-Eat God • $6.93 

JOIN US SATURDAY 

Prime Rib 

A la Carte 10 oz.: $9,95 Entree 10 oz.: $11.97 
A la Carte 14 oz!: $11.97 EntreeWoz.: $13.94 

OPEN FOR BREAKFAST 
9 am Saturday & Sunday 




MONDAY 

$1.00 Domestic Beers 

TUESDAY 

-, Toco Nfght • $3.00 All-U-Ccm-Eat 

WEDNESDAY 

Mint Burgers 
$1.25 oa. or 6 pack for $5.95 



THURSDAY 

50c Drafts 



GFVLL~ 

FRIDAY 

AII-U-CarvEat 
Fish Fry $5.95 • Crab Legs $16.95 



Open Moti'lhurs. UamMidnight; 
Fri&SaL I/om-Jor^ Sunday DamMidnight 



SATURDAY 

AH-U-Can-Eat 
Prime Rib $12.95 



26375 W. Rt 173, Aniioch, IL 

847-395-1707 

2 1/2 Miles West Of Rt. 59 Soup. <£ OppeOze** &my rfJgfo 



SUNDAY 
847-395-1707 Breakfast BSffet°$3.99 




The Best Chinese Food 

In The Area... 

And Our Customers 

Are The Critics 



FREE Delivery 
Call for details 



Chinese Restaurant 



Plenty of Free Parking 

• Dine In • Carry Out • Cocktails 

The Chinese Restaurant That Everybody's Talking About 

Conveniently Located Across From Fairgrounds 

111 S. Hwy. 45 Grayslake 

(847)548-8882^ Fax: (847)m r 2S21 



FREE MARGARITA 

w/purchase of adult entree 
THURSDAY NIGHTS 

(limit 2 margaritas per table) 

Expires 2/28/99 




NEW EXPANDED MENU 



FASTER SERVICE 



FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE 




■-..-■ ... ■ .. 

!91I€lG|rmN 










■'-■■ 



356-2300 




- 



-. : 






'. 



' 







B6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 



February 19, 1999 



February 19* 1999 



HOT SPOTS 




Lakeland Newspapers I B.7 




ADVERTISEMENT 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Location: 

Just off Ihc 1-94, at 5572 Grand Ave., in 
Curnee 

Telephone: 

(847) 662-2929 

Hours: 

Call as soon as possible to assure get- 
ting an open date. 

Menu: 

The finest American cuisine served • 
family style, buffet style, a seven 
course dinner, a luncheon. We will 
tailor your party to your specifications. 



Grand Palace 





You've found that special someone and now it's time 
to start planning a wedding you will remember for the 
rest of your lives. 

The Grand Ralace Banouet Center, located in the heart 
of Lake County's commercial and entertainment mecca, 
"adjacent to Mings of China/at 5572 Grand Ave., Gumee, 
takes greatpride in creatine "A Wedding to Remember." 

me Grand Palace offers elegant banquet facilities 
enhanced by crystal chandeliers and soft tapestry walls, 
perfect for trie intimate party of 50, or a grand celebra- 
tion for 250. 

To capture that wedding dream and make it come true, 



rs 'A Wedding to Remember 1 



For reservations and more information, call Ton! at 662- 



groom every step of 2929 as soon as possible. There are still openings for spring 
vfll help you realize and summer receptions. 

The Grand ralace is also the perfect place to celebrate; 



the Grand Palace's professional and experienced banquet 
coordinator will work with the bride and , 
the way, establishing a relationship that wil 
the perfect wedding fantasy. 

birthdays, graduations, anniversaries, hola business dinners, 
"~", occasion. There is special pricing for par- 
lays, Friday or Sunday. 

up to steak and lobster; a seven course dinner,' a grand - -■ . For out-of-town guests, the Grand ralace is located near 

buffet, or a luncheon. 1*94, close to Great America, and Gumee Mills, with the 

Our wedding packages can include four hours of pre- convenience of a hotel nearby, 
mium bar, a wine or champagne toast, a lovely wedding 
cake and more. A private bridal room is also available. 




:?^^?£^»'Vril^^"V^^ "-; V: '. 









^ 








List your favorite HOT SPOTS restaurant for our 
monthly drawing to win a s 25 gift certificate. 

Name: __ 







: '■■ 



■ ' 




-V ' 



,. 




ip: 



i Phone: 



Favorite Restaurant: 



■_■-£ ' 



Mail to: Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 • Grayslake, IL 60030 




Dining on the Lake 



GALE STREET INN 

On Diamond Lake 

A Reputation for Pine food, Spirits and Hospitality on IScautiful 

DIAMOND LAKE, MUNDELEIN 

A Casual, Country Atmosphere Specializing in 




stare l9f>3 
A GALE STREET TRADITION 

LUNCH AND DINNER 

PARTY AND BANQUET FACILITIES (30 - 160) 

Show lounge Dancing Featuring 

PETER GUERIN 

Elvis Impersonator 
Friday and Saturday 



906 Diamond Lake RcK, Mundcloin 566-1090 




Dinetn 
Garm 



i 



>f: 



from scratch 
•Freshest of ingredients 
Made just for you when ordered 



: 



&4F?*: 



'■^ 

,-//:', 



•M 



Sit art ftfelax in/our ^i^a^S^^jaids^^^ba^^!L 
etups anfi'salsffwhjle^u walt/drijis. to bringf ou.yoti; meg]^_ 



v. 




■ If Pi 

r#ri|fiwiilB 



JOIN Uf! 




Jesse W® 

Food & Drink 



KITCHEN OPEN FBI. & SAT. TIL MIDNIGHT 

Gfl®KL°fftaOa 

18490 W. Old Cages Lake Rd., Cages Lake 

(847) 223-2575 



JOIN US FRIDAY 

WaUeye Fish Fry ' $ 8 % 
AU-U-Can-Eat Cod • $6.93 

JOIN US SATURDAY 

Prime Rib 

A la Carte 10 oz,: $9.95 Entree 10 oz.: $11.97 
A la Carte 14 oz:: $11.97 Entree 14 oz.: $13.94 

OPEN FOR BREAKFAST 
9 am Saturday & Sunday 



ft 



>*; ' / 



sr 



as* 



ALL DINNERS 




$£95 



6 



Chimichangq, Enchiladas^pi^alter&^acp Platter. 

All dinners include lettuc^amatoes/nce; beans, guacamole, 

sour cream plus a COMPUMENTARY MARGARITA 

Please mention this coupon when ordering. Expires 3-1-99. 



\w 



\\ 



"W 



•vT.:<*jfrS 



> : Linden Plaza 
iliCGrand Ave. 'mc^x 



Free Chips. & Salsa 
with every order 



^fciiMenlrarst - ^ W3?iV ■ Htips: / 
vEax-265h5226. / Frir & Sa®gt0:30-10:00 :"■. 




L>iii£||iS^£L2 



(/weddwia to* 
emwmwp 



mnd 
wace 

RtSTMJRANI I banquus, 



featuring American cuisine 

Seven-Course Dinners • Luncheons 

Four Hours of Unlimited Premium Bar 

Wine or Champagne Toast for All Your Guests 

Wedding Cake 

Your Own Private Bridal Dressing Room 

Seating from 50 to 250 people 

Also Available for Rehearsal Dinners, Anniversaries, 

Reunions and Birthdays 

5572 W. Grand Ave. • Gurnee • (847) 662-2929 



MONACO 

Fine Foods - Cocktails 
2816 Rt. 120« McHenry, II 60050 

(815) 385-5278 





. Saturday Night 

16 oz. Steak Dinner s 1 1 9S 



Home of McHenry's 




MONDAY 

$1.00 Domestic Beers 

TUESDAY 

Toco NIflht • $3.00 AtUJ-Can-Eat 

WEDNESDAY 

Mini Burgers 
$1.25 ao. or 6 pack for $5.95 



THURSDAY 

50c Drafts 



Open Mon.-Thurs. Van+Midnigbt;' 
Fri & Sat llom-3om; Sunday Bom-Midnight 



FRIDAY 

AIMJ-Can-Eat 
Fish Fry $5.95 • Crab Legs $16.95 

SATURDAY 

All-U-Can-Eat 
Prime Rib $12.95 



26375 W.Rt.-173,Antioch,IL 

847-395-1707 

2 1/2 Miles West Of Rt. 59 Soup. <£ appetite* Etw/, Might 



SUNDAY 

AIJ-U-Can-Eat 
Breakfast Buffet $3.99 




The Best Chinese Food 

In The Area... 

And Our Customers 

Are The Critics 



FREE Delivery 
Call for details 



Chinese Restaurant 



Plenty of Free Parking 

• Dine In • Garry Out • Cocktails 

The Chinese Restaurant That Everybody's Talking About 

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February 19, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers I B8 



it* 



THIS WAY TO WEALTH 

Turbo-charged 
retirement planning 



By ALAN FRIEDLANDER 
& PAUL GARRETT 



Anyone interested in saving and 
investing on a tax-advantaged basis 
should consider a Private Pension 
Plan. You may invest in this plan 
even if you already have an IRA or 
are involved in an employer spon- 
sored retirement plan. 

IRS rules limit the amount of 
money many people can invest in 
qualified plans. The Private Pension 
Plan contribution, however, is not 
limited. Qualified plans have a tax 
penalty for early withdrawals. With- 
drawals from the Private Pension 
Plans can be made at any time with- 
out IRS penalties. 

The Private Pension Plan en- 
joys many of the benefits of the 
Roth IRA. Interest is earned tax- 
free if your earnings are reinvest- 
ed in the same vehicle. The plan 
can be set up to receive income 
on a tax-free basis. Receiving in- 
come tax-free may prevent you 
from being bumped into a higher 
tax bracket. Money invested in 
the private pension plan does not 
have to be withdrawn at age 70 
1/ 2 like It does in a traditional 
IRA. 



Varied products 

The return on your Private Pen- 
sion Plan will vary with the type of 
product selected. Because returns 
are market driven, investment re- 
sults are not always guaranteed, but 
this plan can be invested In prod- 
ucts with guaranteed returns. Fund- 
ing is done with life insurance and 
is therefore self-completing upon 
death or disability. 

Life insurance used in the plan 
maximizes tax advantages that are 
not available in other Investment 
vehicles. The most effective advan- 
tage is tax-deferred earnings, while 
the policy is in force. 

Business owners have many ad- 
vantages to using the private pen- 
sion plan. Approximately sixty five 
percent of all publicly traded com- 
panies use a form of the plan, called 
a "Non-Qualified Retirement Plan' . 
or "Split-Dollar Retirement Fund- 
ing". Business may select and limit 
participants. 

No IRS approval 

Private Pension Plans do not 
require IRS approval. Because no 
IRS approval is needed, this plan 
eliminates costly qualified plan 
administration and documenta- 



tion. The company may fund the 
plan, the employee may fund the 
plan, or both can fund it. If the 
company funds the plan, corpo- 
rate contributions can be recov- 
ered when the employee dies or 
leaves the company. 

Whether sponsored by your 
employer or sponsored individually, 
the Private Pension Plan offers the 
opportunity to accumulate capital ■ 
for long-term needs like college 
funding or for retirement Accumu- 
lation is on a tax-deferred basis, 
without the penalties and restric- 
tions imposed on similar tax-advan- 
tage Investment programs. At the 
same time, the plan offers addition- 
al protection to your family on pre- 
retirement years. 

Alan Friedlander is a Registered 
Representative with Oak Brook Secu- 
rities and a member in good standing 
of the Progressive Alliance of Retire- 
ment Planners. Paul Garret is an Ex- , 
ecutive Vice President with Oak 
Brook Securities. Friedlander and 
Garrett have primary expertise in re- 
tirement planning, with an emphasis 
in qualified and non-qualified plan 
consulting. 



Should you pile into an index fund? 



Stock picking used to be an Indi- 
vidual affair. Investors picked their 
stocks one at a time and monitored 
the progress of each. Then came 
stock mutual funds, and investors 
were able to rely on the pros to 
choose a group of stocks and stand 
watch over their performance. 

Most recendy, millions of Ameri- 
cans have invested in stock index 
mutual funds. These "index funds" 
hold shares in all of the companies 
that make up a popular stock mar- 
ket index, for example, the Standard 
&'Poor's 500 index. The fund's per- 
formance is tied to how the index 



performs. 

Index funds are known as "pas- 
sively managed" funds because they 
simply track the daily price move- 
ments of the index stocks and ad- 
just holdings accordingly. They are 
the autopilot brethren of "actively 
managed" funds (also known as 
"managed funds"), which employ 
top-flight managers to analyze mar- 
ket outlooks and industry trends; 
then trade accordingly. 

Individual investors have plowed 
millions of dollars into S&P 500 in- 
dex funds oyer the past few years, 
mostly through their 401 (k) pro- 



grams. What's the attraction? It's 
the results: The S&P 500 index beat 
most actively managed mutual 
funds over the past 10 years. 

Some of the success of index 
funds can be attributed to ex- 
penses - or lack thereof. Man- 
aged funds have higher costs be- 
cause fund managers actively buy 
and sell stocks, and are compen- 
sated for their decision making. 
These annual expenses are fig- 
ured into results. Index funds, on 
the other hand, spend less. Lower 
expenses mean more money for 
the shareholders. 



v. 



New Community Bank Investment 
Opportunity In Grayslake, Illinois 

Announcing an offering of Common Stock at a price 
of $10.00 per share. Minimum Purchase of 500 Shares. 

Proceeds of the offering will be used to capitalize Northway State 

Bank, a new independent bank in organization to be located at 

180 West Center Street, Grayslake, Illinois, 

These shares are being, offered and sold directly by the Bank 
Opening is scheduled for May 1999 

Organizers and Directors 

-• Anthony M. Augelli • Frederic J. Holtgrcn • John W. Lynn 

• David A. Novak • David L. Waldron • Peter J. Rath • Joseph F. Tomascllo 



««► 



Northway 
State Bank 

(In organization) 

P.O. Dox 00 

Gruvsloke. Hi G0O30-O0G0- 

■ 



To receive an offering circular or to arrange for 
a personal appointment contact: 

Mr. Peter J. Rath or Mr. Joseph F. Tomascllo 
(847) 543-7900 <847) 543-8100 (Fax) 

IM'O0.» NORTHWAY STATU I1AJVK.COM 



; This announcement )i In no way Id bo coimIiiumI n* an offer 1u ttell or sollclintlon of on offer lo Iniy miy of lliese situi lili?s, 
lite offprint; ! s rnaile only by the offering cfrcu|or which may l>o obtained by contact hie; either of the nhove-noincd Individuals.' 
An Intertilled InvcKtor'ilinuItl read the complete offering circular before iuvestine;. . 




retiree 




eorge Bums, the cigar- 
smoking comedian who 
entertained audiences 
well into his 90s, had a lot 
to say about retirement. He once 
deadpanned, "Retirement at 65 is 
ridiculous. When I was 65, 1 still had 
pimples." 

Whatever age you decide to re- 
tire, you can make sure it's an event 
to look forward to by making sure 
you are "retirement ready." 
Unfortunately, large numbers of 
Americans are not sufficiently sav- 
ing for their retirement, and they 
fear the repercussions. A poll by 
Sun America/a financial-services 
company specializing in retirement 
savings, found that 40 percent of the 
women surveyed worry they will be 
living in poverty when they retire. 
About half of people polled believe 
they might not be able to retire at 
all. Close to 80 percent of those sur- 
veyed between age 25 and 55 are 
concerned that they won't have 
enough to live on when they retire. 

Today's workers realize the 
shortcomings associated with Social 
Security. They know Social Security 
alone won't provide a comfortable 
retirement - it pays only about 27 
percent of an individual's retire- 
ment needs. It's clear we cannot de- 
pend upon the government to take 
care of us in our old age. 

Instead, we must rely on the 
qualities Americans have historical- 
ly shown, the traits that have made 
the United States the wealthiest na- 
tion in the world: self-reliance and 
en trepren eurship. And we must ap- 
ply those qualities to saving for our 
own futures, 

There are numerous ways to 
accumulate retirement wealth. 
Some strategies have immediate 



tax benefits; some have future tax 
benefits. The traditional IRA is 
alive and well. The new Roth IRA 
provides another way to build a re- 
tirement fund. In addition, thou- 
sands of workers contribute regu- 
larly to a 401 (k) plan. 

Other Investing choices, such as 
individual stocks or mutual funds, 
lack the tax benefits of the IRA and ' 
401 (k), but the amount you may in- 
vest is unlimited. Many investors' 
start by making modest investment 
purchases regularly, and then in- 
crease those amounts through the 
years. Most money managers sug- 
gest that you put aside 5 percent to 
10 percent of your monthly income 
for long-term goals. 

The investment vehicles you 
choose should depend upon your 
age and your goals. How many 
years do you have to save? The ' 
younger you are, the more aggres- 
sively you can invest. What kind of 
lifestyle do you want to maintain 
during retirement, and how long 
will you be retired? The amount 
you put away should be based on 
what you anticipate your expenses 
will be throughout those golden 
years. .„ 

Theiacts show that long-term 
savers/ investors will have the mon- 
ey to enjoy a secure retirement. 
Some may be able to retire early, 
but most willleave the daily work 
world in their 60s and sail off into a 
comfortable retirement, thanks to 
smart investing started early. 

Or, you may decide to work un- 
til you're 100 years old, like George 
Bums. If you've saved and invested 
wisely over the years, your choice 
will be just that- a choice, not a ne- 
cessity. And that's what retirement 
freedom is all about. 



Selecting solid stocks 



In the 1960s, a Brooklyn couple, 
Donald and Mildred Othmer, in- 
vested $50,000 in the stock market 
on the advice of a trusted friend. 
When the Othmers died during the 
1990s, they left an estate worth 
$800 million, thanks to the advice 
of their friend, Warren Buffett. 

Of course, not alt of us are fortu- 
nate enough to have a Wall Street 
legend such as Buffett within our 
circle of friends and acquain- 
tances. Most investors, however, 
do have the same opportunity to 
choose good stocks in a market, 
that has historically rewarded in- 
vestors with excellent returns. 
Buffett's approach is available to 
you: Buy value at reasonable 
prices, then wait for it to mature. 

But how do you select top stocks? 
Here are seyeral suggestions. 

First, look for successful compa- 
nies that are long-standing indus- 
try leaders.' These businesses typi- 
cally have thrived during many 
market cycles and have proven to 
be pre-eminent performers. 

Second, check the consistency of 
the company's present and past 
earnings. A 10-year history of ris- 
ing earnings is usually a good indi- 
cation of stability. 

Third, buy only, those companies 
with wise management capable of 



industry leadership. Strong man- 
agement is the basis of corporate . 
success. Read annual reports from 
several years. Look for evidence of 
solid business planning. Were 
goals met from year to year? How 
successful is the company in de- 
veloping and introducing new 
products and sustaining old ones? 

Fourth, a company must be finan- 
cially sound. Once again, review the 
annual report. Check for a strong 
balance sheet and reasonable long- 
term debt. If you are unsure of what 
to look for, an investment profes- 
sional can help you apply several 
simple tests to determine a compa- 
ny's financial stability. 

Finally, choose companies, from 
diverse industries to minimize the 
impact of a downturn in any single 
sector. This is most easily 
achieved by investing in a broad- 
based mutual fund with a history 
of excellent management and 
growth; Does all of this research 
require some work? You bet. But 
it's well worth the investment in 
time. 

You don't need to hope for your 
own personal Warren Buffett. All 
that's required is a little initiative 
and some professional advice to 

help you achieve your financial 
goals. 



J Y /.CO J 



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VICTORY MEMORIAL 
HOSPITAL 

Blood Pressure Screenings 
and Recordings 

From 8 a.m to noon on Mon- 
day., Feb. 22, free "Blood Pres- 
sure Screenings andRecordlngs" 
willbe given at Victory lakes 
Continuing Care Center, 1055 
East Grand Avenue, Linden- 
hurst. No registration Is neces- 
sary. Call (847) 356-5900 for 
more information, 

Dual Disorders 
Anonymous 

At 7 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 
22, "Dual Disorders Anony- 
mous" will meet at Victory 
Memorial Hospital, 1324 North 
Sheridan Rd.j Waukegan. This 
free support group offers help to- 
those diagnosed with both men-" 
tal health and chemical depen- 
dency problems. Call (847) 360- 
4073 for more information. 

Medications and the Elderly 

At 7 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 22, 
"Medications and the Elderly: 
Avoiding Dangerous Interactions" 
will be presented at Christ Episco- 
pal Church, 410 Grand Ave., 
Waukegan. Sponsored by Victory 
Community ElderCARE, this pro- 
gram is designed for adult children 
who are providing care for frail, el- 
derly parents and other loved ones 
at home, Registration is required. 
Call (847) 360-4004 for more infor- 
[marion and to register for this free 
[community seminar. 

[Diabetic Healthy 
leal Planning 

At 2 p.m. on Feb; 2$ "Diabetic 
[ealthyjvleal Planning" will be pre- 
)nted at Victory Memorial Hospital, 
[324 North Sheridan Rd„ Waukegan; 
Pthls free seminar will include prod- 
uct label reading and diabetic cook- 
ing and baking. The program is de- 
sign ed for people diagnosed with di- 
abetes and their families. For more 
Information, call (847) 360-4095."" 

Living with Loss 

At 7 p.m., Feb. 23, "living with 
Loss" will, be held at Victory Memori- 
al Hospital, 1324 North'Sheridan 
Rd., Waukegari; This free support 
group is designed for those.who. 
have experienced a loss in their life. 
Call (847) 360:4014 for more infor- , 
mation. 

CONDELL MEDICAL 
CENTER . 

Dance Medicine Program 

CohdeU'Me'dicai Center's 
enw Dance Medicine Program 
will KostitstFlrst-Annual Dance 
Medicine Seminar from 9'aVm. to 
3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 20, in the 
Allen Conference Center, 700 
Garfield Ave.,;Libertyville. 
DaiicerSjjnstructors/andpar- 
ents are invited to learn the lat- 
est tr.ends in health and wellness 
pertainingto dance. Alice G.; 
Brahdfdribrener, MD, assistant 
professor of Medicine at North- 
western University medical 
School,^ the featured speaker. 
She has been Involved in the 
medical care of performing 
artists since the .early 1970s, and 
hasbeen director.of medical 
care at Iriterlbchen's National 
Music Camp in Michigan, and 
founded the Medical Program 
for Performing Artists at the Re- 
habilitation Institute of Chicago. 
Other featured speakers are ;-' 
Teresa Beckman, PT, a Condell ' 
clinical skills coordinator; Liz 
Mattox,,RD, health educator and 
a licensed and registered dietitian 
at Centre Club; Katie Metcalf, MS, 
ATC/L, Dance Medicine specialist ' 
with the Dance Medicine Program, i 
and Larry Scire, MS, ATC/L, Condell 
Sports Medicine director. Registra- 
tion fees are $20 for dancers; $25 for 
instructo're.a nd $30 for dancer with 
parent. Fees' include seminar lec- 
tures, lunch; and dance-related ed- 
ucationclas'ses. Call Kathie Metcalf, 
MS, ATC/L, seminar coordinator; at 
362-2905, ext. 5780 for a registration 
brochure. . 




B9 - 1 Lakeland Newspapers 



February 10, 1999 



. 



Ll.o. r 




ceis 




First-class stamp recognizes quality 
end-oflife choice, contributions of 
Hospice professionals, volunteers 



The United States Postal Service 
(USPS) today issued its newest 
commemorative first-class 33 cents; 
stamp, in celebration of 25 years of 
hospice care In the United States. 
Today, there are 3,000 hospices in 
the United States, served by 25,000 
professionals and more than 
100,000 volunteers. 

The "Hospice Care" stamp de- 
sign is a butterfly over a home, sym- 
bolizirig life's journey to its final 
stage. More than 100 million of " 
these stamps will be issued, and are 
available, starting today, at every 
post office in the country. 

"This stamp presents an oppor- 
tunity both nationally arid locally to 
share the message that dying well, 
surrounded by friends and loved 



ones, is an option available k> all 
Americans," notes National Hos- 
pice Organization president Karen 
Ai'Davie. 

1 "We could not be more grateful 
to the United States Post Office for 
their generosity in dedicating talent 
and resources to salute all those as- 
sociated with the hospice move- 
merit," said Arihe B^ Miller/RN, 
Provena Hospice patient care coor- 
dinator; "The end of human life re- 
mains one of the hiost sensitive 
subjects for discussion, but in- 
creased public education on hos- 
pice is a healthy and constructive 
way to let people know they do 
have options that give them more 
control over their final days." 

As more Americans live longer, 



managing the end of life has in- 
creasingly become an important is- 
sue for families to plan together. In 
fact, a nationwide Gallup poll con- 
ducted in 1996 for the National 
Hospice Organization showed that 
when asked to name their greatest 
fear associated with death, respon- 
dents most often cited "being a bur- 
den to family and fiends," ranking 
this above "fear of pain." 

While hospices originally treat- 
ed primarily cancer patients (and 
still care for about half of all cancer 
deaths of America), those with heart 
and kidney disease, AIDS and 
Alzheimer's disease comprise a sig- 
nificant portion of hospice users. 

"Hospice professionals and vol- 
unteers accept death as a natural 
part of life, seeking neither to has- 
ten nor prolong the dying process," 
said Miller/" In short, to help termi- 
nally ill patients live out their final 
days in dignity, and without the' fear 
of dying in pain and alone." 

Hospices not only manage 
medical care and answer to emo • 



e stamp 



tional and spiritual needs, but also 
provide support services such as 
bereavement programs, memorial 
services and counseling. It is not 
unusual for a hospice to provide 
continuing contact and support for 
family and friends for a least a year 
following the death of a loved one. 
Last September, Provena Saint 
Therese Medical Center and Prove- 
na Home Care/Hospice earned ac- 
creditation with commendation " 
from the Joint Commission on Ac- 
creditation of Healthcare Organiza- 
tions (JCAHO), the highest level of 
accreditation awarded by JCAHO. 

Provena Saint Tfierese Medical Cen- 
ter is part of Provena Health, an in- 
tegrated health care delivery net-, 
work formed by the merger of Fran - 
ciscan Sisters Health Care Corpora- 
tion, ServantCor and Mercy Center 
for Health Care Services.' Provena ' 
Health includes seven hospitals, 13 
long-term/residential facilities, and 
more than 40 clinics in Illinois and 
Indiana. 



Program for people newly diagnosed with MS now on Internet 



; People recently diagnosed 
■with multiple sclerosis (MS) can 
log onto the Internet for five in- . 
teractlve programs about the dis- 
ease of the central nervous sys- 
tem. A free series will take place. . 
at 3 p.m. (CT) on successive Sat- 
urdays beginning Feb. 20. Experts 
on topics ranging from MS re- 
search to keeping a job willpre- 
senr. the live, one-hour Internet 
"broadcasts'; sponsored by the . 
National Multiple Sclerosis Soci- 
ety. There is no registration re- 
quired. 

Topics are: Feb. 20— What 
You Need to Know About Multi- 
• pie Sclerosis and Symptom 



Mangement, by Loren Rolak, MD, 
Director, Marshfield (Wl) MS 
Center. 

Feb. 27— Coping With Multi- 
ple Sclerosis, by Peggy. Crawford, 
Ph. D.y psychologist, The Mellon 
Center, Cleveland,' Ohio. • 

.March Milking With 
"F^enB's'and^arrfiryAb outTMu 1 1 i - 
pie Sclerosis, by Rosalind Kaib, 
Ph. D., a psychologist with the '. 
MS Center at S. Agnes Hospital 
(New York); with private practice 
in Connecticut, and a National 
MS Society consultant. 

March 13— Managing the Im- 
pact of Multiple Sclerosis on Em- 
ployment, by Phillip Rumrill, Ph. 




insurance 




is 




Employers can now help their : 
employees get reimbursement for 
dependent children's portion of 
their premium even if the doctor 
and hospital services are already 
covered by health insurance. The 
reimbursement is part of a new 
State of Illinois KidCare program. . 

Analysts project 1999 will see 
an average of 8 percent in corporate 
health insurance premiums. Pre- 
mium'increases are usually passed 
on to'employees. 

VVhether the premium is paid 
by the corporate pocket book or in- 
dividual pocket books, many Illi- 
. nois residents with kids now have 
' an option to lower or eliminate 
their children's health insurance 
premium. 

This new program is one every 
human resource director and small 
business manager should look. into. • 
It's a win-win situation for employ- 
ers and lower income employees. 

The KidCare rebate plan is to . 
those who may riot be able to other- 
wise afford private health insur- 
ance. The child must be an Illinois 
resident who- Is a U.S. citizen or le- 
gal immigrant and have a need 
based on income! A KidCare rebate 
income eligibility is based on the 
■following formula: 
1. Take the family's total monthly 
earnings and other income. 
2," Subtract daycare expenses (up ,. 
to $200 per child under 2 and $175 
per child age 2 to 18), .. 

3. Subtract monthly child support 
received (up to $50). 

4. Subtract monthly child support 
paid. 

" $ Subtract $90 for every adult with 
income from a job. 



. . A monthly KidCare income be- 
tween $893 arid $2,968 may qualify ' 
if your families between one and 
five people including adults. 

The KidCare rebate plan is only 
one of several options available un- 
der the KidCare program. If a child.. , 
does not have existing coverage, a 
plan may be available depending 
on income and family size. 

The KidCare assist plan will pay 
for your child's health; care with no 
co-pays or premium- The KidCare 
share and premium plans both 
have low co-payments each time 
your child receives health care ser- 
vices. The KidCare premium plan U 
has low monthly premium to help 
offset the costs. KidCare plans are 
all based on income eligibility. 

KidCare also has a plan for eligi- 
ble expectant moms. If the mom 
qualifies, KidCare moms and babies 
plan will help throughput pregnan- 
cy and the first year of the baby's 
life. This planincludes prenatal vis- 
its, delivery services, well-baby care ' 
and immunizations with no co- 
pays or premiums. 

Many people with medical con- 
cerns have trouble getting health 
insurance under traditional plans, 
but, KidCare plans do not have ex- 
clusions for preexisting conditions. 

Alan Friedlarider is a registered 
financial representative. His prac- 
. tice specializes in helping individu- 
als and businesses make financial 
and insurance decisions, To help 
your company see if employees are 
eligible for KidCare relmburse- 
. ments and to learn more about Kid- 
Care options, have, your human re-, 
•sources manager call Friedlander at 
847/823-8095, extension 107. 



D. ( rehabilitation psychologist, 
Kent State University, Ohio. 

March 20r-:The National Mul- 
tiple Sclerosis Society: Programs 
and Research Directions, by Nan- 
cy Law, LSW, Vice President, 
Client Programs Department, 
and Janie Brunette, RN, MSN, 
chair of the Society's National. 
Programs Advisory Council, who 
has beenllving with MS for more 
than 19 years; and Patricia 
O'Looney, Ph. D., Director, Bio- 
Medical Research, for the Nation- 
al MS Society. 

Each Saturday sessions will 
start with a an half hour live au-/ 
-dio presentaiton, foliowed.by a 
half an hour question and answer 
segment when people can e-mail 
questions to their presenter. Free 
audio software, RealPlayer, can 



easily be downloaded from . 
www.realplayer.com. 

The Society suggests down- 
loading at least a day before the 
first program. All programs will 
'be archived on the NMSS web- 
site, www.nmss.org. following 
each live broadcast.These, pro- 
grams are made possible by un- 
restricted grants from Berlex Lab- 
oratories, Teva Marion Partners, 
and Biogen, Inc. 

For more informationabout 
the Internet programs, call'1-800- 
FIGHT-MS, or use the NMSS 
website, www.nmss.org. Infor- 
mation about programs provided 
by the Chicago-Greater Illinois - 
Chapter, NMSS, to its service area . 
of 73 central and northern Illinois 
counties, is available by calling 
'312/922-8000 orl-800-922-0484. 




^,' 



Valentines for Veterans 

Cliff Peterson, Zion, creates Valentine's Day cards for veterans 
while Karen Majkrzak, manager, Victory Community ElderCARE, 
watches.The clients at Victory Adult Day Center, Waukegan, send 
these cards to the director of the VA Hospital for distribution. Oc- 
casionally, the veterans respond back. 



.■".■ 



B10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HEALTHWATCH 



February J9, 1999 



H 




's pain at losing a 




Dear Sr. Singer. 

Our 8 year old daughter's 
dog just passed away, The dog 
was around before she was and 
she was so attached to this dog 
that she Is heartbroken about 
the loss. She cries all the time. 
She Is so sad and we want to 
help her. We thought that we 
would like to get her a new pup- 
py now but weren't sure If she 
might think we were trying to 
replace her dog. Would it be 
better to wait for awhile or get 
one now. What do you think 
£3> about this? 

C.F. 

DearCF. 

This Is one of the most heart- 
breaking things to go through 
whether you are a child or an adult 
We also have animals and adore 
them. We also know the pain of los- 
ing one of pur animals. It is searing 
pain, especially if the bond between 
you is very long term. 

I'm going to give you two ways 
to look at this and then you need to 
choose which one feels right for 
your family. . 

The first way to look at it is this: 
Getting a new puppy would not re- 




PARENT'S 
PLACE 

SherriSinger, 
Psy.D, 



ally be replacing the old one, just 
having a new friend to spend time 
with. It may sound nuts, but I be- 
lieve that these sweet, innocent lit- 
tle souls are true angels, and souls 
that good don't just dissipate. They 
get recycled. There is so much love 
given to and received by a new 
plippy, that It might be just the tick- 
et to help your daughter to smile 
again and to feel that bond and love 
all over again. 

The second way to look at it is 
that time to grieve is needed prior 
to getting a new puppy. I personally 
agree more with the first philoso- 
phy that I wrote about Yes, grieving 
is important, but I feel that getting a 
new puppy isn't going to erase the 
feelings or thoughts for the other 
dog. 

Your daughter had a very spe- 
cial relationship with this dog and 
obviously has a lot of love to give. 



Giving that love to another puppy 
might be great therapy for her with 
regards to her grieving. Many times, 
when we lose a pet, we feel that 
there was something more we 
should have done to make it better. 
We end up feeling like we were 
completely helpless to do anything 
to stop it. That may be the reality of 
the situation, but I see no purpose 
in sitting around thinking and ob- 
sessing over feeling terrible and 
helpless. Re-running the situation 
over and over again in your mind. 

I don't view this as grieving time 
or time to get healthy. I believe it is 
time to feel worse and reinforce the 
feelings of helplessness and terror. 

I know of what I speak here. I . 
hope this will tell you why I believe 
that these souls do get sent back 
here in different forms. When 
we lost one of our cats, after a long 
battle with an illness, I was beyond . 
devastation. This was a cat that held 
my hand every night as I went to 
sleep. You can imagine that when 
the time came to do what was right 
for her. It was some of the worst 
pain 1 had ever experienced. 

The day we had to put her 
down, my husband I were com- 
pletely grief stricken. While driving 



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ROUND LAKE BEACH CHIROPRACTIC 

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back from the vets office after it was 
over, we were both in tears so badly, 
we couldn't drive. We pulled into a 
gas station to calm down a bit and 
at the same time looked at each 
other and asked each other if we 
thought getting another cat would 
be a bad thing to do right now. 

We decided that we would try 
and look and that if our search was 
unproductive, it was meant that we 
shouldn't do this now. We checked 
several places and the only place we 
could find a kitten was a local pet 
store. ' 

We went there and found this 
kitten to be the spitting image of the 
cat we had just Ialdlo rest. When I 
say spitting image, 1 mean every- 
thing. The coloring, look, personali- 
ty, etc. We both knew instantly that 
this was a sign. We adopted this 
adorable little tike and (here's the 
strange part) on the way home, he 
was doing a double meow (two at 
once-rl've never heard this before 
and believe me we have expert- 
ences with cats.) 

His habits were the exact same 
habits as the other cat. Some of 
these habits were very strange and 
not common to all cats. We knew 
that our beloved first cat was with . 
us in the form of the second kitten. 
We never felt like we replaced her or 
that we disrespected her memory 
through adopting a second kitten.: 
We opened our home and our lives 







Condell 

Acute Care 

Centers 

Affiliated with Condell Medical Center 



to another wonderful little soul who 
helped us to heal and has charmed 
us ever since. Guess what? He holds 
my hand all night long,' just like the 
first cat did. 

I think that getting your daugh- 
ter a new puppy would be a won- 
derful thing for her and the puppy. ] 
You just cannot help but smile and 
feel good when'you look at these 
cuti.es. Maybe the best answer is to 
ask your daughter how she feels. If 
she is OK with it, she will tell you, 
and if she needs more time, she will 
tell you that, too/You might talk to 
her a little bit and make sure that 
she know that you are not suggest- 
ing replacing the other dog, be- 
cause you m- f»r can do that Each 
one of them is special in their own 
way. If your daughter's grief doesn't 
get better in a reasonable amount 
of time or with the adoption of a 
new puppy, I would suggest you get 
some short term counseling for her.' 
Tell your daughter that I|m so sorry 
for her loss and your loss too. 

Tftis column is for entertain- 
ment purposes only, Information in 
this column cannot and should not 
replaceproper Psychological treat- '. 
menu Dr. Sherri Singer.is a Licensed 
Clinical Psychologist, childhood be- 
havior specidlistand author oj 'the 
book, "Dr. Singer's Secrets for Ligh t- 
ening Quick Behavior Change. " For 
an appointment, call (708) 962- 
2549. 



American Family announces 
new long term care insurance 

it easier for people to purchase this r ,j 
type of coverage. 

Bob Powers, health operations; 
^director, soys American Family K 
LTC product stress flexibility. If a 
policyholder does not use all avail- 
able benefits within a specific time 
period - two.years, for'example - 3 
those benefits can be saved for ma- 
ture needs. 

This varies from many other o 
policies that pay actual expenses 
only and do not allow policyholders 
to save unused benefits. 

"Many people mistakenly be- '. 
Heve long term care costs are cov- 
ered under Medicare, Medicare sup- 
plements or private health insur- 
ance, "says Powers. 

American Family Insurance pro- 
vides auto, home, business, health :: 
and life insurance protection, as well 
as consumer loans. It markets its 
products in 14 states, and has 6.8 
million policies in force. Submitted i ' 
by Roger Lutz - AMIA-Grayslake 



American Family Insurance is 
offering Qualified LongTerm Care 
9LTC) insurance to eligible individit- 
ralsVages v 45t6 84. *- {*?} rir- > 

The new product will privde : 
coverage for long-term care in nurs- 
ing homes and assisted living facili- 
ties, as well as home and communi- 
ty-based services. Some of those ser- 
vices include home health and adult 
day care services, respite care, care- 
giving training and therapeutic 
equpiment. 

"People want to keep their inde-- 
pendence for as long as possible, 
and long term care insurance can do 
that," says JoeTisserand, life compa- 
ny vice president. "It provides peace 
of mind arid, in a sense, gives folks 
more control over their lives," he 
adds. . 

The new product is termed 
"Qualifed" because it allows policy- 
holders certain tax advantages. By * 
offering tax benefits, the federal and 
many state governments have made 




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• ' i i i I i i i i i i 

• i i I l I i i I r i < i I i . • , 




February 19,1999 



HEALTHWATCH 



Lakeland Newspapers/Bi 1 




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LAKELIFE 



February 19, 1999 



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Section 



ANTIOCH,iL <UKfe,i», 

1999 




Proposal to elect C i 



iy iji 

Geo-Karis, Peterson sign on as co-sponsors to the legislation 



. , 



! 





an gains steam 




ByJOHNROSZKOWSKI 
City Editor . 



Legislation that would provide 
for the Lake County Board chairman 
to be elected at large appears to gain- 
ing bi-partisan support in the Gener- 
al Assembly. 

State Senator Terry Llnk\D-Ver- 
non HiUs) said Senate Bill 9, which he 
introduced, is scheduled to come up 
before the Senate's Local Govern- 
ment Committee next week. 

Link said he believes the bill will 
have bi-partisan support in the Sen- 
ate. He said State Sen. Adeline Geo- 
Karis (R-Zion) and Sen. William Pe- 
terson (R-Prairle View) have signed 
on as co -sponsors to the bill. 

"I think we should have no prob- 
lem passing it in the Senate," said 
Link, who was reached at his office in 
Springfield on Tuesday. "I can't speak 
for the House." 

Link's proposal provides that all 



counties with populations over 
500,000 would have 'at large' elections 
for County Board chairman. Lake 
. County is the only countyinllllnolsof 
that size that doesn't elect its board 
chairman at large. 

An at-large election means the 
voters would directly elect the 
board chairman. Currently, in Lake 
County, a majority of the County 
Board's 23 members select the 
board chairman. 

"The voters get to do the picking 
of the County Board chairmen in- 
stead of 12 people on the County 
Board," Link said regarding the pro- 
posal. 

Geo-Karis, who was. reached in' 
her Springfield office on Wednesday, 
said she supports the legislation be- 
cause other countywide officehold- 
ers, such as the county clerk and trea- 
surer, are already elected at large. 

"It's just being consistent," said 
Geo-Karis, adding"! think it will elim- 



inate a lot of politics," 

Geo-Karis said the legislation has 
support of both Democrats and Re- 
publican. 

"It's a bi-partisan effort, as you 
notice. Link Is a Democrat and (Bill) 
Peterson and I are Republicans," she 
said. 

At least one potential candidate 
has already expressed an interest in 
running for County Board chairman 
if it were elected atlarge. 

When Link first proposed the 
idea, former U.S. Attorney Fred Fore- 
man, a Republican, indicated he 
would consider running for the post 
if it were elected at large. 

Some current County Board 
members have expressed skepticism 
about the bill. They claim running a 
countywide campaign for chairman 
would be costly, and therefore would 
. make it even more difficult for people 
of moderate 'incomes to become 
board chairman. 




Link Geo-Karis Peterson 

All three politicians support bipartisan bill 



Others have expressed con- 
cern that electing the board chair- 
man at large could change the 
whole structure of government, 
thereby making Lake County a 
home rule unit. 

But Link said electing the board 
chairman at large would not change 
the form of government Lake County 
currently has. 

"It would not change the form of 
government whatsoever. It would 



only change how (the County Board 
chairman) Is elected," he said. 

Link said there may be some 
changes in the bill before a final vote 
Is taken. The bill was originally pro- 
posed to become effective in the year 
2000, but due to reapportionment, 
Link feels it would be better for it to 
take effect In 2002. 

"We'll be adding some amend- 
ments to the bill. We're working on 
those right how," he said. 



County seeks volunteers 
for Adopt-a-Highway 



Business, civic and not-for-profit 
organizations looking for a good way 
to help their community are encour- 
aged to volunteer for Lake County's. 
Adopt-a-Hiahway.pragranu:. . 

County Board merribers'heard a' 

presentation last week about thepro- 
gram,-by Lake County Division of 
Transportation Director Marty 
Buehler, who indicated that partici- 
pation appears to be waning slightly 
in the six-year-old program. 



THIS 
WEEK 




THROUGH THE 
LOOKING GLASS 

CLC hidden cameras 
a concern 

PLEASE SEE PAGE C5 



CAMBRIDGE 
HOMES 

'Builder of the Decade' 
PLEASE SEE PAGE C7 



GET IT OFF 

YOURCHEST 

Lipservlce offers you 
an oratory forum 

PLEASE SEE PAGE C9 



"It's not a drastic dropoff," 
Buehler said. "It's a little downward 
trend and we don't want that to'con- 
tlnue. We are trying toget the word 
out for new groups that inlght be in- 
terested;" 

Volunteers yearly:dean up about 
125 miles of roads and have picked up 
all sorts of garbage during the past six 
years in the Adopt-a-Highway program. 
Buehler said that the program is 
designed for civic groups, not-for- 
profit organizations, commercial or 
private enterprises, whose partici- 
pants adopt a stretch of highway and 
pick up litter on both sides at least 
two times a year for at least two years. 
Buehler said the program has 
been successful in cleaning up many 
highways. "It does good things to our 
highway system," he said. "It makes it 
cleaner. We want this to be a popular 
program." 

The program was started in 1993 
and the first year 37 groups partici- 
pated. That number had grown 
steadily to 145 groups in 1998. So far 
this year, only 125 groups have signed 
up so the deadline has been extended 
to Feb. 24. Applications for the Adopt- 
a-Highway program are being ac- 
cepted though that date at the Divi- 
sion of Transportation offices, 600 W. 
Winchester Road, Libertyville. 

"We provide high-visibility vests, 
trash bags and safety information and 
put up a highway sign to recognize 
the particular group's cleanup ef- 
forts," Buehler explained. Lake Coun- 
ty's Division ofTransportation also re- 
moves the filled bags from the road- 
sides. 

Board member Bonnie Thomson 
Carter, who chairs the Public Works 
and Transportation Committee, said 
each County Board member received 
a printout of roads available for adop- 
tion in his or her area, and she en- 
couraged board members to find pro- 
gram participants. 

Participants must be at least 10- 
years old. Participants younger than 
18 years must have adequateadult 
supervision. 

For more information or, to re- 
ceive an application, call your Coun- 
ty Board member, or the Lake Coun- 
ty Division ofTransportation at 362- 
3950, 




In their memory 

Grayslake Mayor Pat Carey reads a plaque, which will hang in Village Hall, memorializing four vil- 
lage employees who were killed In a sewer accident 25 years ago Mayor Carey presented the 
plaque with Sandra Dungan, Rose Pech, Tom Pech and Lesley Pech, whose relatives were in the 
accident.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



United Way of Lake County raises $8.85 M 



United Way of Lake County an- 
nounced a record total of contribu- 
tions to their annual community 
wide campaign, raising $8.85 million 
in just over three months, 

The total also surpasses last 
year's amount of $8.2 million by 
more than. 7.5 percent, one of the 
largest year-to-year increases in the 
organization's 74 year history. 

General Campaign Chair 
Thomas Freyman, vice president and 
treasurer at Abbott Laboratories, told 
a crowd of 120 at the Holiday Inn in 
Gurhee, "The support from the com- 
munity for this campaign has been 
tremendous. Everyone I have talked 
to expressed a desire to give back In 
a way that truly makes the lives of 
those who live here better." 

The campaign began Aug. 31 
with a community improvement 



project at Lake County Family YMCA 
in Waukegan. The project featured a , 
restoration of a playground and the 
creation of a cross-generational sit- 
ting park and gardening area. 

Fundralsing activities began 
shortly thereafter and were conduct- 
ed by over 3,000 volunteers in work- 
places throughout Lake County. 
United Way of Lake County was 
loaned 14 executives by local com- 
panies who worked with campaign 
coordinators in more than 300 busi- 
nesses in the county to run work- 
place campaigns. 

Resources generated from this 
year's campaign will help support the 
94 programs that are funded in part 
through United Way of Lake County's 
community Fund, collaborations 
and initiatives with which United 
Way has a partnership, as well as 



hundreds of other nonprofit organi- 
zations chosen by the donors. 

The campaign was highlighted 
by the addition of seven new mem- 
bers to the Alexis deTocqueville so- 
ciety, which is made up of individual 
donors who contributed $10,000 or 
more. The society currenUy has 22 
members. 

Company workplace campaigns 
of all sizes contributed heavily to the 
overall success. Pledges from the. 
largest employers in Lake County 
grew from $5,674 million last year to 
a projected total of $6,364 million 
this year, while contributions from 
. smaU to mid-size business cam- 
paigns jumped an impressive 10 per- 
cent to $821,000. 

Douglas Weber, presidenrand • 

/' 
Please see UNITED WAY / C2 



PRISON GROWTH EDGAR'S LEGACY / C4 



--t— — , — t — *" 



■ " ; r " 




C2/ Lakeland New mm ^ nu Q| jflOT l\OQlTSJ> 



COUNTY 



February 19, 1999 



CLC DIGEST woo* j* .looiTWA 



Want to start 
a business? 

Individuals about to start a busi- 
ness con team the skills necessary to 
moke more than 40 business start-up 
decisions by attending "The Road to 
Business Success," an entrepreneur- 
ial training program offered .by the 
College of Lake County's Small Busi- 
ness Development Center. 

The program includes several 
workshops covering a step-by-step 
business planning process. A free 
bonus session providing tips on co- 
ordinating and using the plan is also 
included. The sessions will be offered 
from 6:30 to 10 p.m. in Room C003 at 
the Grayslake Campus as follows: 

Gettingstarted:Areyoureadyfor 
entrepreneurs]-) ip? March 4 and 11. 
Cost $60. 

Business planning: Your 



roadmap to success: March 18 and 
25. Cost $60. 

Steps to small business start-up. 
April 1. Cost $30. 

Market planning and Implemen- 
tation. April 8, 15, 22 and 29. Cost: 
$120. 

Basic record-keeping and ac- 
counting for small business: May 6 
and 13. Cost: $60. 

Bonus session: Putting it all to- 
gether. May 20. 

Students may enroll in individual 
sessions or attend all 12 sessions for 
$280 or 10 sessions for $255. The 
training program is offered in coop- 
eration with the United States Small 
Business Administration and the Illi- 
nois Department of Commerce and 
Community Affairs. To register, call 
543-2033d or fax to 223-9371. Mas- 
terCard, Visa, Discover and American 
Express are accepted. 



FROM PAGE CI 



UNITED WAY: Raises $8.8 mil in campai 




chief executive officer of United Way 
of Lake County, told the gathering, "It 
is just remarkable to me to know that 
everyday I have the opportunity to 
work with people like yourselves who 
feel as strongly as I do about this or- 
ganization and the work that we do in 
improving Lake County.. Every year, 
the volunteer leadership in Lake 
County brings their talents and skills 
and tireless efforts to our campaign to 
make sure we have the resources 
needed to make our community to a 
better place to live," 

Carl Johann, vice president for 
resource development and the 
campaign's manager, had praise 
for Freyman and the campaign 



HOROSCOPE 



Aries - March 21/Aprt! 20 
You have a good head on your shoul- 
ders, Aries. Use it) Don't let an ac- 
quaintance try to pull the wool over 
your eyes early In the week. Pay at- 
tention to what's going on, and stand 
up for yourself. A friend introduces 
you to tils or her business associate. 
Be prepared, because Cupid's arrow 
is going to strike! 

Taurus - April 21/May 21 
Keep your negative thoughts to your- 
self when it comes to a business 
problem. Speaking your mind only will 
make things worse. Just work with 
those involved to remedy the situa- 
tion. A close friend needs a shoulder 
to cry on. Be there for him or her. Leo 
plays a key role on Tuesday. 

Gemini -May 22/June 21 
Don't sulk over a minor disagreement 
with a friend. You two are allowed to 
have different opinions. No damage 
has been done to your relationship. 
Things will be back to normal very 
soon. That special someone forgets 
an important date. Don't get angry. He 
or she has a good reason for getting 
sidetracked. 

Cancer - June 22/July 22 
Don't make an important financial 
decision without looking at all of the 
facts. There's too much at stake to 
follow a whim. Listen to a loved 
one's advice; he or she has your 
best interest at heart. A business • 
associate asks for your opinion 
about a personal matter. Be honest 



with him or her. 

Leo - July 23/August 23 

Don't hold a grudge against a loved 
one this week. He or she really didn't 
mean to upset you. On the contrary, 
he or she had the very best of Inten- 
tions. Try to understand that. An old 
flame comes back Into your life. Get 
reacquainted with him or her. It will be 
worth the effort. 

Virgo- Aug 24/Sopt 22 
You are about to take a very impor- 
tant step In your personal life this 
week, Virgo. Don't be nervous. You 
know what you're doing. Don't let 
others try to dissuade you from this. 
A loved one needs your help with a 
family problem. Say no, because 
his or her solution only will make 
matters worse. Scorpio plays a key 
role. 

Libra - Sapl 23/Oct 23 
' .Don't let a tenso situation at work get 
you nervoUs. Stay optimistic. No one 
really knows what's going on, so don't 
listen to rumors. Try to find out the 
facts, Instead of just getting upset. 
The person whom you've been seeing 
wants to'get serious. Say yes. 

Scorpio - Oct 24/Nov 22 
Don't keep your emotions bottled up 
when It comes to a discussion with a 
close friend this week. Let him or her 
know how you truly feel. It will make 
your relationship much stronger. A co- 
worker wants to get to know you bet- 
ter. Don't get Involved with hfm or her; 



It only will lead to problems. 

Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 
Don't be scared when it comes to a 
confrontation with a friend of a friend 
early In the week, Sagittarius. You 
have honor on your side, and a lot of 
people are supporting you. Be brave. 
That special someone finally agrees 
to go out with you. Just be yourself, 
and you're sure to win his or her 
heart. Pisces plays a key role on 
Tuesday. 

Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 
You have a busy week ahead of you, . 
Capricorn. Don't get stressed out. 
Just organize your time, and you are 
sure to get everything done. If you 
need a little help, don't be afraid to 
ask for it. A loved one gets into trou- 
ble late in the week. Be there for him 
or her. He or she is counting on you. 

Aquarius - Jan 21 /Fob 1 

Don't overanalyze a friend's actions , ,. 
early in the week. He or she onty 
wants to help you with a personal 
problem. There are no bad intentions 
at all. The person whom you've been 
seeing stops calling. While your ego is 
bruised, you know that this really is for 
the best. 

Pisces - Feb 1 9/March 20 
No matter what happens this week, 
Pisces, keep your sense of humor. 
People are going to demand a lot 
from you. Don't take it too seriously, 
or you'll get frustrated and anxious. 
Virgo plays a key role. 





a Dentist 

F&R your child 




Smiles 



by Soma Gutierrez, D.D.S., M.S. and Associates . 
Pediatric Dentistry Grayslake 



Remember when children 
kicked and screamed their 
way to the dentist? Not any- 
more. 77m? trip is judged a 
treat by children who visit an 
office designed specifically for litem from the color 
schemes to the toothbrushes. Pediatric dental 
offices have more in common with a modern play 
land than an old-fashioned doctor's office. 

Tiie pediatricians of dentistry, pediatric den- 
tists are specially trained for children's unique 
dental health needs. Tiieir professional education 
includes two to three years of specialized study 
after becoming a dentist, emphasizing child psy- 
chology, growth and develop- 
ment. Pediatric dentists 
take a large number qf 
continuing education 
courses each year to pro- 
vide the latest and 
most effective oral- 
care treatment for 
your child. Infancy 
through the ado- 
lescent years', each 
child needs differ- 
ent approaches in 
dealing with behavior, 
guiding dental growth 
and development, and 
aiding to avoid future 
dental problems. WMi a 
team approach encom- 
passing the pediatric 
dentist, pediatricians 
and other denial special- 



ists, all children — 
whether healthy, ctironi- 
colly ill, disabled or men- 
'tally impaired— arc best 
served. 

Tiiere are several ques- 
tions you might want to ask 
when choosing a dentist for 
your child. 





BEFORE THE VISIT: 

• Does Ihe dejiUst hare special training or interest in treating children?. 
*Is the dentist a member of the American Dental Association and the 

• American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry? 
1 Is the dental office designed for children? 
•How does the dentist deal with emergencies?- 

• Is the 'office conveniently located? 

• Does the practice accept jtiiir dentil insurance? 

AFTER THE VISIT: 

•ftere you asked foracompicte medical and dental history for joui child? 
.'• Wis (he dentist'genUe but thorough when examining your cliild?. 
(• Did the dentist or staff talk lojwciukl, encouraging her 

involvement In dental health? 
;'Mrepiiiformed about yourchild's tooth development, the causes- 

and premtion of dental disease and appropriate dental care at home? 
•Were j"our queitions treated UilH concern and : 

• Wks the \isit positive for ' 



cabinet's role in the campaign's 
success. 

"Tom and the cabinet have spent 
many long days and long evenings 
talking about the community fund 
and how vitally important it is that we 
do everything we can to make it as 
strong as possible. They fervently be- 
lieve that it is our responsibility to 
spread that message, and their dedi- 
cation and true desire to work in 
every facet of the campaign this year 
have been nothing short of remark- 
able." 

"To me, this campaign is about 
taking the opportunity to help people 
who really need it," Freyman said. 
"And it's about reminding people just 
how much power they have to make 
a difference for them." 

The community fund, which is 
made up of 94 local programs man- 
aged by 41 Lake County agencies, is 
the heart of the United Way concept 
developed nearly 75 years ago. In- 
stead of giving to one or two charities, 
an individual or corporation could 
use The community fund to spread 
their contributions around to a num- 
ber of groups all working to impact 
specified human service goals. Deci- 
sions on which programs receive 
funding and how much is decided by 
groups of local volunteers who review 
human service needs and program 
information. 

Freyman and his campaign team 
of local volunteers set out to reinforce 
the importance of The Community 



Fund to business leaders. He used 
one key statistic to support his mes- 
sage. 

"Last year, local health and hu- 
man service agencies requested near- 
ly $2 million more than what the 
Community Fund had available for 
distribution. We need the communi- 
ty to stand up and say providing 
funding to these programs is impor- 
tant." 

Operating cost at United Way of 
Lake County are 13.5 percent, which 
means more than .86$ of every cam- 
paign dollar raised goes to support 
health and human services in Lake 
County. That amount is well above 
the acceptable standard set by the 
National Charities Information Bu- 
reau's "Standard in Philanthropy" of 
60C of every dollar. 

United Way of Lake County Is a 
local, nonprofit organization that 
has been supporting health and hu- 
man service programs in Lake 
County since 1924. This support is 
provided with funds raised through 
an annual community wide 
fundraising campaign that re-, 
sponds to year-round assessment 
of problems, issues and service 
needs in Lake County. United Way 
of Lake County is governed by a 35 
member volunteer board of direc- 
tors, and there are over 100 com- 
munity volunteers who serve in a 
variety of programs and activities. 
The volunteers are supported by a 
staff of 22. 



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■■-'.■-•. , 



February 19, 1999 




COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers /C3 



AT A GLANCE 



A DIGEST OF STORIES MAKING HEADLINES THROUGHOUT OUR REGION ' 




' I 



Library trustee kicked off ballot 

Ubertyville— For one Cook Memorial Library Board In- ' 
ciimbent, a run for re-election was over before It really got 
started. . 

Trustee Linda Lucke was kicked off the April election bal- 
lot last week wrien her filing petition was ruled invalid. 

! Libraryboard president Joe Bean said the matter was 
brought before the electoral board because Jack Martin filed a 
fl challenge to Lucke's petition because the pages were not - 
numbered as Is required by law. 

, The electoral board was comprised of Circuit Clerk Sally 
Coffelt, County Clerk WUlardHelander, and Assistant State's 
Attorney Mitchell Hoffman. 

, Bean said the members of the electoral board stated they 
were "reluctantly" voting to remove Lucke from the ballot, but 
because it Is the law to have the pages numbered they voted 
in fayor of removing her. . 

Lucke,was appointed.to the board late last year. 

Man dies from house fire 

, Wadsworth— A house fire ignited by smoking material 
caused the death of a Wadsworth man on Feb.,14.. 

Andrew Novak, 51 , of 38661 Pine Girove, died at Provena 
St. Therese in Waukegan after being rescued from the blaze in 
critical condition. 

Another occupant of the house had gone to a neighbors to 
place the call for help at 6:06 a.m. - - 

The area does not have municipal water supply and there- 
fore no fire hydrants. It took approximately 50 gallons of water 
to control the fire. 

The fire apparently started in the living room couch due to 
smoking materials, he said. There were two smoke detectors 
• in the home, but neither Had batteries. 

Novak was not in the living room during the fire. The 
cause of his death is pending a review by the coroner. 

Open space referendum debated 

IibertyvWe— The Ubertyville Township request for 
open space bond referendum is going on the Feb. 23 primary 
ballot. It is not going quietly, 

At the Township board's Feb." 11 regular meeting, its last . 
prior to the vote, both those in favor of the referendum and 
those against It made their arguments heard. 

The Feb. 23 referendum question will ask voters for open 
space bonds not to exceed five percent of the valuation of all 
taxable property in the township. 

The township board has passe^.a resolution which will 
put a cap on the bond issue so as not to exceed $37 million. 

Pat Connors and Jack Martin of the Assodationof Liber- 
tyirtUe Township Property ^Oymershaveldppoisedthereferen- - 
dum saying the bond issue cap could be changed by this or 
any subsequent board at any time and. the full five percent, or 
$76 millioh.could be issued. 

Duffy said legislation can countermand this act, but this 
board has done what they can to commit itself to the $37 mil- • 
lion. 

Woman's Club improving community 

Anttoch— The Aritioch Woman's Club has undertaken a 
major community Improvement project at the William E. 
Brook Wetland Sanctuary and Entertainment Center. 

The Winter Recreation Project will improve cold-weather 
recreation resources for community parents and children. 

.The club has scheduled major fund raising activities and 
events during the year to obtain support for the project, ac- 
cording to club member Sue Allen. 

The Winter Recreation Project will require construction of 
a sledding hill with lighting, padded poles, and protective ' 
fencing. There will be a warming shed for skaters and children 
using sleds; 

Use of the Brook memorial area by children during winter 
when plants are dormant is not expected to harm the sanctu- 
ary values of the ponds and wetlands. 

Two arrested for felony theft 

Mundelein— A night manager of a Mundelein gas station 
and her boyfriend were arrested last weekfor felony theft in 
relation to a staged armed robbery. 

Lisa Dubick, 32, of 120 Southport in Mundelein, went to 
FirstarBank at 2000 S. Lake St., at 7:45 a.m. on Feb. 11 to de- 




Men at work 

McHenry Construction Company employees work in 
the tunnel of a new roller coaster, The Raging Bull, at 
Six Rag's Great America Wednesday.— Photo by 
Sandy Bressner 

posit money in the night depository. While Dubick was at the 
depository, a man approached her from behind and took a 
bank bag which contained $5,000 lncunrehcy, said Sergeant 
: Paul Werfelmann. She then returned to the Clark station to in- 
form her manager. «* . 

After viewing the surveillance tape, police.noticedinconsisj 
tendes between.Dublck's statements and the'video. Dubick 
later confessed that the robbery was staged and that her 
. boyfriend, Jody Johnson, 34, of Elk Grove, was the offender. Po- 
lice recovered most of the money. Both Dubick and Johnson 
were charged with felony theft. Dubick was also charged with 
disorderly conduct. 

Hawthorn Woods to discuss plan 

Hawthorn Woods— The Village Board of Hawthorn 
Woods will meet in a joint session with the village's plan com- 
mission, Saturday, Feb: 20, at 6:30 a.m. at St. Matthews Luther- 
an Church gym, Fairfield and Old McHenry Roads, 

The topic of discussion will be the proposed Taubman 

Mall.onRte.12. . 

The village may take an annexation vote at the meeting. 
Public input will be taken on the site plan and other details of 
the project. 

Odor along roadway identified 

Fox Lake— Officials have identified the cause of a noxious 
odor along Rollins Road near the village's Waste Water Treat- . 
ment.Plant , 

Odor control devices installed in 1993 may take care of any 
sewage odor, but not high levels of hydrogen sulfide, which 
when combined with water form sulfuric acid, Jack Bajor Jr., of 
Morris Engineering, Inc., of Lisle, the village's engineers. 

The village has already experienced crumbling sewer main 
crowns due to hydrogen sulfide, which in some cases has been 
measured at 200 parts per million, compared with the one- 
tenth parts per million needed to detect jtat all, Bajor said. Of- 
ficials will discuss how to remove the problem at a meeting 
March 1. 



Power company told to leave 

Island Lake— Trustees voted against asking a power 
company to build a facility in town. Ah informal poll taken at 
the board's Feb. 11 meeting showed unanimous board oppo- 
sition to KN Energy, of Lakewodd, Col. 

. The company proposed purchasing 141 acres north of 
Dowell Road and west of Darrell Road, to build the plant. 

In order to supply electricity to customers and supply 
power for its operations, the company said it needed to draw 
3.5 million gallons of water each day from the ground aquifer. 
This did not sit well with residents orofTicIals, who in past 
summers have suffered through sprinkling bans due to water 
shortages. 

Two dogs attack, kill third dog 

Wauconda— Lake County Animal Control is holding two 
husky dogs that killed a little Yorkshire terrier last week as his 
owners watched in horror. Fritz, weighing 9 to 10 pounds, 
was brutally attacked by two 90 to 100 pound male huskies - 
that wandered into the front yard where he was on a leash, 
the late morning of Feb. 10. 

The dogs were captured by Wauconda police, and turned 
over to the Lake County Animal Control Office In Mundelein. 
The dogs were scheduled to be put to sleep on Satdrday, Feb. 
20, unless their owner wants them back. 

In that case, the owner would have to appear in court and 
face four counts of animals running at large, as two of his oth- 
er dogs were also found running about, said Len Hackl, chief 
of trie Lake County Animal Control Office. 

Program helps children read 

Round Lake— Signs, job application, menus, and books 
are all part of our literary everyday life; but when you can't 
read they simply become abstract pictures in an everyday 
world. 

Fifty-six-students at Magee Middle school are participat- 
Ingln the new "Developmental Reading Program" which is 
designed to help at risk students with reading skills. 

Unlike a grant which expires in two to three years. The 
program will continue to run on revenue generated by local 
agencies. 

Dan Christiansen principal for Magee Middle school said 
It has always been a goal to try an reach the children in one 
way or another.' 

Police chase spans several towns 

'^'Ubiertyirflle^-Sevcrala^ 

, .thepursuitof astolen 1995 Nissan Quest the morning of Feb. 

viil. : 

The driver of the stolen vehicle, Kevin M. Rix, 22, of480 
WUdspringlri Round Lake was arrested arid-charged with ag- 
gravated offenses relating to trafficviolatlons and Class 1 
felony possession of a stolen motor vehicle. 

The vehicle was stolen from Round Lake. Police pursued 
the vehicle soutH through Mundelein to Ubertyville where 
the chase concluded on eastbound Winchester Road just west 
of Route 21. 

Rix had attempted to drive the vehicle over a burm, but in 
doing so flattened to two front tires. 

Ironically, the car came to a stop just short of the Lake 
County Sheriffs office parking lot. 

Rix was transported to Lake County Jail on a $50,000 re - 
mandbond. 

YMGA to open in Gray slake 

Grayslake— A 10,500 square-foot YMCA Is scheduled to 
open up by early spring in the Country Faire Plaza on Route 
45 and 120. 

. The YMCA who, first planted their roots in England, 
1851, has now become a household name in many towns ah 
has continues to grow. Nordic Properties, Grayslake will lease ; 
the property to the YMCA. " 

The facility will include; state of the art treadmills, life 
cycle machines, aerobics, weight lifting, and child care. 

The Grayslake YMCA will serve as a satellite facility for 
Hasting Lake YMCA in Lake Villa. 

It will be the first satellite YMCA in the Lake County area. 
Although the satellite concept isfairlynewatthistimethe 
Chicago Metropolitan YMCA is not looking to expand the 
Grayslake YMCA into a lull size facility. 



i 



. . . 



m 







Pick up any of Lakeland Newspapers 1 1 editions in coming 



.■ 



QUILTERS'RUS 

Everything at this expo Is 
sold for charity. • 
— Lakelife 








Lakeland profiles 10 of the most. , 
interesting people in Lake County in this 
annual special issue . 




HOME SHOWCASE 



->,;■ 



Look for the special section 
previewing the UVW Chamber 
of Commerce Home 
Improvement Show ■ 



. 




| 



■-■ 



C4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OPINIONS 



February 19, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers 



William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 



William M. Schroeder 

Presldent/C.E.O. 



Neal Tucker 

Executive Editor/Composition Mgr. 



Rhonda Heirick Burke 

Managing Editor 

30 South Whitney St., Grayslakc, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (847) 223-8161. E-mail: edlt@lnd.com 



EDITORIALS 



End autocratic 

rule with tone 

of harmony 

Members of the Lake County Board came away . 
from a precedent setting two-day goal-setting 
workshop energized, in a collaborative mood 
and anxious to begin work on an ambitious 38 
point policy agenda. 

County Board Chairman Jim LaBelle was pleased with the 
results of the meeting at Illinois Beach State Park earlier this 
month. And well he should. Such a meeting never would 
have taken place under the two previous county chairmen. 
If the 23 representatives hew to their agenda and work in 
harmony, the era of autocratic rule will be effectively part of 
county history.. 

The agenda includes adoption of the Unified Develop- 
ment Ordinance as the roadmap for development of unin- 
corporated areas, correcting school impact fee deficiencies, 
work on establishing a university center, implementing a 
. county- wide gasoline tax to improve highways, dredging ** 
Waukegan Harbor, formulation of a brownfields strategy to 
rebuild former factory areas and establishing a policy for af- 
fordable housing. 

Talk at the workshop touched forcibly on the need for a 
"new beginning." Without question, a new era of openness 
and cooperation in county government will be well received. 
The conservation-minded majority has an exceptional op- 
portunity to lead effectively. The new majority must not 
squander this leadership opportunity by turning off elected 
officials in Lake County's cities and villages. They must be 
considered and included. Then, indeed, a new era will have, 
been launched. 




politics demeans 
state office 

The concern of a majority of Illinois newspaper edito- 
rialists with vehicle license plates borders on near 
obsession. Secretary of State Jesse White won fawn- 
ing praise and broad editorial support for election 
last fall when he boldly and courageously came out with a 
pledge to issue new license plates. Say what? - 

Now, Secretary White has raised more than a few eye- 
brows among the pundit set by drawing a pedestrian plan for 
funding the production of new plates that includes a raid on 
the road fund and punishing tardy plate purchasers with a 
fine. It should come as no surprisethat some voters are 
wondering why they voted for Jesse last Nov. 3. As for the in- 
habitants of journalistic ivory towers, pondering plate policy 
offers an easily comprehended subject that affects just about 
everyone in Illinois. Amateur pontificating. 

Playing license plate politics, though, demeans the office, 
detracting from a surprisingly broad list of responsibilities 
vested with the Secretary of State. Applauding the Secretary 
of State for issuing license plates is like praising the governor 
for applying salt to icy winter highways or hailing our fire chief 
for having a well stocked supply of hose, 

. That's part of the job description, isn't it? We apologize for 
venting our nausea. 



VIEWPOINT 




of Edgar legacy 



Lost or at least glossed over in 
the assessment of the two 
terms served by Gov. Jim 
Edgar was the virtual over- 
haul of the Illinois prison system. 

Mild mannered and soft spoken; 
Edgar's retirement recalled his 
achievements in advancing educa- 
tion and his leadership in stabilizing 
shaky state finances early in his first 
term following a recession that cost 
President Bush re-election. 

As a shrewd politician, though, 
Edgar corcectly read public de- 
mands for tougher law enforcement 
and hard time in Illinois prisons that 
would send a message to cri minals 
who literally were running the state's 
overcrowded and antiquated prison 
system in the early 1990s. . - 

Upon taking office, Edgar was . 
faced with a prison population of 
27,794 inmates housed in space de- 
, signed for 19,000. The times called 
for new prisons and a crackdown in 
administration. Edgar set about 
cracking down and prison building 
with an uncharacteristic fervor. 

Inmate population would swell 
to more than 43,000 during Gov. 
Edgar's eight years in office. During 
that, time he built or initiated con- 
struction of eight newconection fa- 
cilities, including the 500-bed 
Tamms "super max," designed for 
gang leaders and violent prisoners, 
where isolation in 80 square foot 
cells 23 hours a day was instituted — 
-home for the "baddesl of the bad." 

Edgar's prison building binge 
turned corrections facility operation 
into a major industry in job-starved 
southern Illinois. When Democratic 
lawmakers shrugged off Edgar's 
funding proposals, the governor de- 
vised a "build now, pay later" plan 
with contractors in the private sec- 
tor. 

Besides upgrading facilities for 
hardened criminals, the Edgar ad- 
ministration established a 100-bed 
juvenile boot camp at Murphysboro 
and expanded Dwight Conectional 
Center, the main facility for female 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



inmates. A 600-bed minimum se- 
curity prison for drug treatment, the 
nation's second largest, was built in 
a former Catholic high school near 
East St. Louis'. 

In his last year in office, Gov. 
Edgar announced a 1,000-bed maxi- 
mum security prison to be built at 
the former Savanna Army Depot in 
western Illinois and broke ground 
for a new medium security prison 
near Red Hills State Park in 
Lawrence County, bringing the Illi- 
nois prison system to more than two 
dozen sites. 

Jim Edgar never presented him- 
self as a tough guy, but he was tough 
enough when it came to meeting 
demands for bigger and better pris- 
ons in Illinois. 

Price of growth 

Residents of Vblo, Lake County's 
youngest municipality, will be asked 
to Increase their village tax rate from 
25 cents to 43.75 cents at the April 13 
election. Mayor Burnell Russell, 
who has been pushing a growth 
strategy, says the 25 cent rate and 
sales tax income aren't keeping up 
with operating expenses. A familiar , 
refrain. Vblo officials are looking 
forward to the arrival of a big box 
discounter to swell sales tax. ■■ 

Lake over-matched 

Lake County, in the end, never, 
had a chance landing the new head- 



quarters home for Rockwell Interna- 
tional Corp., which Is relocating its 
base in Costa Mesa, Calif. Wiscon- 
sin and Milwaukee had too much' ' 
fire power. Chairman and CEO Don 
H. Davis was drawn to Milwaukee 
where he started and spent most of 
his career at Allen-Bradley Co., now 
a key Rockwell component. What 
tipped the scale was a pledge from 
Gov. Tommy Thompson to eliminate 
out-of-state sales in the calculation 
of me state 7.9 percent corporate in- 
come tax. That savings will be huge. 

Ripe for office 

. Under the Clinton-style present 
standards of political morality, Roy 
Gundelach ought to be a shoo-in for 
election April 13 running for a direc- 
torship of the Fox Water Agency. - v He 
was fired as dredging coordinator by 
the agency for personal use of state 
equipment, involved in a alcohol in- 
cident while employed by the 
agency, accused by his son of em- 
bezzlement in connection with a 
family business and charged wim 
misappropriation of jointly held real • 
estate by his ex-wife. Of minor con- 
sequence, is an accusation that he.y 
illegally filled a wetland. Gundelach 
claims the misfortunes are a misun- 
derstanding. That, and involvement 
in what he called a family feud. 

She's a trooper 

Still hobbled by a leg cast result- . 
ing from a holiday auto crash, Ltj-f , ' 
Gov.Corinne Wood quickly 
demonstrated at the.Grant Town- 
ship Republican Lincoln Day din- 
ner why she's piling up points as a 
heavy hitter in Illinois politics. 
The "Light Guv" touched on her 
Lake County roots (Barringtbn, 
' Wauconda and Lake Forest), paid 
homage to the Great Emancipator 
and, as a good soldier, expressed 
fealty to her boss, Gov. George 
Ryan. As Wood put it, "Abe Lincoln 
and George Ryan share good old 
fashion midwest values." Spoken 
like a trooper! 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Vote 'yes' on open space plan 



Libertyville Township citizens 
should vote "YES" for the open 
space proposal.. 

I have attended most Town- 
ship Board meetings and have 
heard what I believe to be unrea- 
sonable criticism of the Open 
Space Plan by a very few people 
who seem to have.a personal 
vendetta against Mike Graham.. 

They demanded and are getting 
a vote on the bond issue to finance 
this plan. Now they are suggesting 
that the Township might borcow $76 
million; however, the Board Is com- 
mitted to borrowing only $37 mil- 
lion. No increase in the current tax 
rate (19 cents per $100) should be 
necessary. * 

The Township Attorney and 
the Independent Bond Counsel 
have explained that Illinois law re- 
quires that the referendum must 
say, —issue bonds— riot exceeding 
5 percent of the valuation of all tax- 
able properties — Bond Counsel said 
that the official bond documents 
will state that theTownship Is com- 
mitted to borrowing only $37 mil- 
- Hon. He said more than $37 million 
would require another vote on a re- 
vised plan. The few objectors, I be- 



lieve, continue to try to mislead me 
public. 

TheTownship has presented an 
open space plan, as required by law, 
identifying the properties they hope 
to acquire. When funds are avail- 
able, tfiey will negotiate with the 
property owners (no condemna- 
tion). The Township is planning to 
acquire land for recreational pur- 
poses, trails, and open space. This 
will be our last chance to acquire 
land in Libertyville Township, since 
the remaining parcels are rapidly 
being purchased for residential and 
commercial development. 

Those who wish to minimize 
additional traffic, minimize school 
bond referenda, provide recreation- 
al land, and continue to see some 
open space as they travel around 
me Township, should vote "YES" on 
Tuesday, Feb. 23, 

JackTindall 
Trustee, Village o/Mettawa 
Director, Citizens Against Subur- 
ban Sprawl (CASS) 

Leader should resign 

Hawthorn Woods' village presi- 
dent, John Clery, has failed to suc- 
cessfully negotiate an agreement 



with North Banington in regards to 
how 120 acres of vacant land be- 
tween the two communities will be 
developed. As a result, he says, 
Hawthorn Woods has been forced 
to woo super regional mega mall 
developer Taubman Corporation. 
Additionally, he has decided to rush 
acceptance of this development, 
even though hundreds of taxpaying 
residents petitioned for a referen- 
dum question on this subject. He 
has repeatedly stated that he is not 
Interested in a referendum. 

I don't believe mat we must be 
forced into a knee jerk situation, 
where we approve of a mall because 
a village president falls to success- 
fully negotiate. Instead, I propose 
that we follow me Chicago Bears' 
lead, and switch leaders In an effort 
to do what the taxpaying residents' " 
of our communities wish. 

I propose that John Clery resign 
as Hawthorn Woods village presi- 
dent, since he too has failed to ne- 
gotiate fundamentals, and since he 
is threatening to devastate our com- 
munity with mall traffic in excess of 
20,000 cars per day, as a result. 

DaveClasen 
Hawthorn Woods 




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February 19, 1999 



OPINIONS 



Lakeland Newspapers / C5 




PARTY LINES 




PARTY LINES, THE LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS* COLUMN OF POLITICAL OPINION, 

IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS. 






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Foreman: Hfcnteto 
/efld county board? 



link: Surprises with 
bill proposal > 



Garrett: Democrat's 
'big winner 



Foreman foray alarms 
County Board 




Majority members of the 
Lake County Board are 
taking seriously Fred 
Foreman's sudden in- 
terest in county government and 
prospects that the post of county 
, chairman could become elective as 
early as the 2000 election. 

Environmental and "smart 
growth" Republicans on the board 
see the Senate bill to enable an at- 
large election Introduced by State 
Sen. Terry link (D-Vernon Hills) 
as either an unfriendly act or a po- 
litical blunder— or both. 

Privately, some County Board 
members think Link might have 
been hoodwinked by Foreman, for- 
mer U.S. District Attorney and an 
ex- Lake County Stat e's Attorney 

who hasn't disguised his desire to 
get back into elective politics. 

Associated with a high pow- 
ered Chicago law firm, Foreman 
basically has been involved as a 
lobbyist in Springfield for riverboat 
gambling interests. 

With help from Democratic 
strategists and high powered Re- 
publican campaign contributors, 
some Lake County Board members 
have expressed the fear that Fore- 
man, a native of Warren Township, 
could turn an election for county 
chairman into a chip-shot event. 

With Foreman at the helm of 
Lake County government, majority 
members view the future as a re- 



turn to arm-twisting, deal-making, 
pro-growth politics that character- 
ized Bob Depke's tenure as chair- 
man. Coincidentally, Depke and 
Foreman used to be neighbors. 

More work 

Waukegan businessman Pete 
Couvall, Lake County Democratic 
vice chair, has taken over party ad- 
ministrative duties with the bless- 
ing of State Senator Terry link (D- 
Vernon Hills), county Democratic 
chairman. Democratic insiders are 
looking at Couvall to assume the 
county leadership if and when Sen- 
ator Link is ready to shed die title. 
Couvall operates a restaurant on 
Belvidere Road. : 

Sherman replaced' 

Pete Co avail's assumption of 
additional party responsibility is 
tied to the falling out last fall be- 
tween Link and Craig Sherman, 
full-time manager of affairs at Lake 
County Democratic headquarters 
in Waukegan. Despite some Demo 
gains, notably the election of State 
Rep. Susan Garrett (D-Lake For- 
est), Link wasn't happy with Sher- 
man's organizational abilities. 

Talk first, eat later 

Grant Township Republicans 
think they might have hit upon a 
new script for success for apolitical 
dinner— plan the speechmaking 



first and eat later. Because of a 
tight schedule, Lt. Gov. Corinne 
Wood gave the Lincoln Day dinner 
address before the rock cornish 
hen was served. Vern Men- 
nemeyer, president of the Grant 
GOP club, said many of the 270 
diners expressed approval of the 
reordering of events. "We might do 
it again," remarked Mennemeyer. 
The Lincoln Day celebration has 
been a top county Republican 
event for years. 

Just a little lie 

At a recent meeting of the Liber- 
tyvilleTownship Board of TVustees, : 
Township Supervisor KT^Mike" 
Graham was questioned abo ut - 
' more than $2 ,000 worth of compen- 
sation to'an 'employee hired by the 
Town board. ■ 

Graham had presented the hir- 
ing to the board based on the stipu- 
lation that the employee would not 
receive insurance benefits. 

The compensation was to make 
up for the amount the employee 
lost in benefits. 

When political strategist Jack 
Martin questioned Graham on the 
issue, Graham said he felt it was the 
right thing to do. 

"So in other words you lied to 
the board," Martin said. 

Graham held his thumb and 
forefinger a couple of inches apart 
and said, "well, it was just a little lie." 



Talking heads 



looking bookish 



Have you noticed how tele- 
vision reporters, com- 
mentators and news ana- 
lysts often do their talk- 
ing-head thing with shelves full of 
books in the background? 

Those pompous props no doubt 
are designed to help them appear 
scholarly and super-informed to 
speak to us with authority. 

But they can't fool me. The 
books are much too neatly stacked 
and obviously unbothered, while the 
desks they speak from are too order- 
ly, devoid of a newsmaris hectic 
work in progress. 

These "experts" apparently don't 
have enough to do, or maybe it's be- 
cause this isn't their actual work set- 
ting— it's just aTV studio with a 
view of the Capitol from a.window . 
in the background, or maybe a big 
cardboard photo of the Capitol 
building. 

An exception is Andy Rooney, 
the Sunday evening "60 Minutes" 
humorist who is seated behind the 
appropriately cluttered desk of a real 
newsman, In front of a bookcase 
that looks like ifs being used, and at 
his elbow a 1950s manual type- 
writer. 

At your local library, on the cov- 
ers of his several books, you will find 
Andy always pictured at the messy 
desk in front of his bookshelves. 

I think the next time I am invit- 
ed to talk on television, I will ask that 
the camera be brought to my home 
where I can pose in front of our 
, bookshelves. Or, 1 could have my 
: picture taken in my home office and 
_ send It out to friends at Christmas! . 

'■ TheywouldhesolmpressedlWe 
have accumulated a couple hundred 
books over the years and I actually 
have read a few of them. 

My main claim to literacy is that 
'I have read Shakespeare's play, 
"Hamlet," and have seen four movie 
versions: Laurence Olivier's, Richard 
Burton's, Mel Gibson's and Kenneth . 




THE 




CORNEI 

JerryPfa 



Branagh's. (The incomparable Olivi- 
er did it best) 

But I digress. For my Christmas 
picture (or next TV appearance) I • 
will make sure the books directly be- 
hind me will include "The Complete 
Works of Shakespeare," "War and 
Peace" (as if I ever got past the first 
50 pages), "The Great Gatsby," "The 
Glass Menagerie," some National 
Geographic magazines and a set of 
encyclopedia (the volumes my wife 
bought back in 1964. I'll blow off the 
dust). - . 

We can tell a lot about a person 
by what he or she is reading. I have 
been trying to make out the titles 
behind the talking heads but the 
television cameras seem to lack 
depth of field, so the titles are fuzzy. 
Mrybe they don't want us to know 
what they are reading. 

What kind of literature do you 
suppose President Clinton reads? 
Not that big, thick Bible he totes to 
and from church on Sundays? 

I once received a Christmas card 
from Gov. Jim Edgar in which he, his 
wife Brenda, son Brad, daughter 
Elizabeth and the family poodle 
were gathered in front of a book- 
case. Vollal A few of the titles wen 
focus: 

"ED.fL" 

"Reagan." 

"Africa." 

"An Indian Dynasty," the story of 
the Nehru-Gandhi family. 

"A Time to Heal," the autobiog- 
raphy of Gerald R. Ford. 

And a set of encyclopedia, law 
books and other reference works! 

Impressive. 




. 



Guest commentaries 

Lakeland Newspapers welcomes guest columns by our readers on top- 
ics of general Interest. Anyone Interested In writing a column can contact 
Publisher W.H. Schroeder at (847) 223-8161. Submissions maybe mailed 
c/o Lakeland Newspapers, P.O. Box 268, Grayslake ll_, 60030 or fax to 
(847) 223-881 0. Deadline Is Friday at noon. 



Smile CLC: You're on 'Candid Camera' 



fj 



I was interested in reading re- 
cently that the Candid Camera 
TV show was in Lake County to 
film a segment of its show at a 
movie theater in Lake Zurich. The 
skit will show a few theater-goer" 
victims" who have to move from 
seat-to-seat when "plants" sit in 
front of them to block their view, sit 
next to them munching hard on 
popcorn, and other inconveniences 
are staged. 

The Candid Camera program, 
initially created by Allen Funt, and 
now re-created by his son, has 
brought laughs to us for many years. 
The segment filmed in Lake County 
will be aired in a month* or two, and 
I'm sure that it will be funny. 

We were recently exposed to an- 
other "candid camera program" in 
Lake County that wasn't so funny. 
Maintenance workers at the College 
of Lake County discovered two hid- 
den tiny cameras at the school, one 
at the faculty lounge and another in 
a computer laboratory. 

CLC officials have "candidly" ad- 
mitted that they have used hidden 
surveillance cameras for security 
purposes since 1992. In the recent 
expose, they said that the cameras 



were there to "catch" a thief who was 
stealing food from a refrigerator and 
to "catch" someone who was down- 
loading pornographic matter on 
computers. 

Needless to say, some of die fac- 
ulty and students were upset over 
what they called an invasion of their 
privacy. CLC President Gretchen 
Neff said that she was not aware of 
the use of hidden cameras and she 
ordered an investigation of the 
scope of the use of the hidden 
videos. She banned such cameras 
until some policy was defined. 

In my mind, the students and 
faculty should be more than upset 
over what happened; they should be 
outraged. We keep hearing that peo- 
ple are beginning to lose their rights, 
and one that I feel that is precious 
and we must fight to protect it, is the 
right to privacy. 

Not that it is the case here, it is a 
fact that in institutions of learning 
there have been cases where admin- 
istrators have spied on faculty who 
have not "hewed to the company 
line." Faculty and students should 
be comfortable in the feeling that no 
one is "looking over their shoulders" 
when they work and learn in the 




SEEING 

IT 

THROUGH 

JohnS.Matijevich 



university setting. 

I cannot believe that, if there 
were a matter of necessary security, 
an open camera in plain view, 
wouldn't be just as effective in deter- 
ring any criminal activity. Placing 
hidden cameras in a public college 
is a lot different from using cameras 
to catch bank robbers, or the like. 

Shortly after reading about the 
CLC incident, I read about a matter 
in Waukesha, Wis. where a sales- 
woman was dismissed from her job 
at aTV appliance store because she 
refused to secretly videotape her 
sales conversations with customers. 
She had worked for the store over a 
year and all was okay until she was 
asked to be involved in the store's 
policy to secretly record customer 
transactions! 

The saleslady said that she just 



couldn't get herself to tape cus- 
tomers without their consent. This 
wasn't a matter of using hidden 
cameras to catch retail criminals; 
this was a matter of using hidden 
cameras to promote retail sales. 
Rather than being dismissed, the 
woman deserves a medal for stand- 
ing up against a company policy 
which invades the privacy of cus- 
tomers. When we walk into a store, 
not as criminals but as customers, 
do we give to corporate authorities 
the right to videotape our face-to- 
face transactions with salespersons? . 
Isn't it possible that customers could 
be innocent victims if a videotape of 
them falls Into wrongful hands? 

The above incident may, be un- 
related to what has happened at 
CLC, but it does bring out the dan- 
gers to our liberties that come in to- 
day's technological society. It is easy 
for anyone to disregard it as just an- 
other thing that we must accept in 
today's world. But, I hold strongly to 
the concept that if you allow a chip- 
ping away of our rights and free- 
doms, you are giving up the most 
important protections that separate 
us from other societies. 

When CLC President Gretchen 



Naff said that they will ban the use 
of hidden cameras until a policy is 
determined, I have a suggestion to 
the college officialdom. Ban hidden 
cameras — period. 

To the faculty and students at 
CLC, I have a suggestion, too. Don't 
treat this matter as nothing, don't 
dismiss it as "if you have nothing to 
hide, why worry if someone is tap- 
ing you?" After all, this is America 
and you are in a public college and 
what you say or do should not be se- 
cretly videotaped or audio-recorded. 

Some will dismiss the incident 
because "their motives were good; 
they just wanted to catch a thief." 
First, there are many ways to catch a 
thief wi tii out infringing on the rights 
of others. Secondly, If you relinquish 
to today's good motives, you are sur- 
rendering your privacy rights to what 
may be tomorrow's bad motives. 

So, CLC, leave future "Candid 
Camera" programs up to Allen Funt 
for entertainment purposes. Adopt a 
strong policy position that hidden 
video and audio tapings will not be 
used to infringe on the privacy of 
faculty and students at G^*VYou in- 
stitution will be free. secure,%nd 
better, for it. , 



„*. Ik.- — . 



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iw^Wi,^;; '*~-~~*r-^>^^ J 



C6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



February 19, 19J99 



iv ( 



L 

1 ■ 



K«. 



t 



BUSINESS REVIEW 

COUNTY NEWS 

is safely responsible for sales, contents and collection of the Review Section 



GAPITOL INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 



GODUCO FAMILY DENISTRY 

PHILIP V. GODUCO DDS 



Even otic smiles in the same laitgu ago. 
The onlce of PHILIP V. GODUCO 
DDS, located nl 281 Evergreen Drive, 
in Vernon Hills, phone 816-0465 cnii 
help you keep si hoallhv smile' Willi 
quality dentistry at reasonable rates. 
Denial health has improved enor- 
mously aiming Americans in the last 
50 years thanks to heller oral hy me ne. 
the use of fluoride and adv ances in pro- 
fessional denial care, the services ai 
the office of DR. PHILIP V. 
GODUCO DDS include: alt preven- 
live care ami counseling, drill ess 



denhtry. children 's and general den- 
tistry, cosmetic dentistry, bad breath 
detection and treatment, and etner' 
gency treatment. 

If the agreement is made that you or 
your child require hniecs. ihc doelor 
will counsel you on the different types 
available and the advantages ofcach. 
At the office or PHILIP V. GODUCO 
DDS. they honor most dental insurance 
plans ami will discuss vtuir require- 
ments and their costs before treatment 
is started. They lake pride in offering 
quality care, convenience mid 



alVordahillty. Preventing dental dis- 
ease, improv iug ihe appearance ufv our 
teeth and keeping > our smile hrighl- 
these are the priorities uf the caiing 
stall' of professionals at the office of 
PHILIP V. GODUCO DDS. 
We. Ihc Editors' of this 1999 Busi- 
ness Review & Reference Guide, arc 
proud to recommend this fine prac- 
tice to all or our readers. Mention 
this Ad and receive complimentary 
exnm & four X-rays { n $89.00 value) 
for new pnlicnts only. 



FAIR HAVEN PHARMACY 



FAIR HAVEN PHARMACY, loeutcd 
in Mundelein at 608 Ess! Ilawley 
Strecl, phone (847) 566-5800, is the 
area's full-service pharmacy. Ronald 
Farland. the licensed pharmacist, is a 
member of the faculty of (he Uuher- 
sily of Illinois College of Pharmacy und 
is available to answcrquesiions on pre- 
scriptions or other products (hey offer. 
Since service is the most important lac- 
tor in the success ot'a local pharmacy, 
the professionals al FAIR HAVEN 
PHARMACY always put service first. 
They participate in most major pre- 
scription programs, offer senior ciii/cus 
discounts, and keep accurate cumput- 



Ronald J. Farland, RPh 

eri/ed patient drug profiles and lax 
records on file for your safely and con- 
venience. Prompt preseriptimrscrvice. 
over-the-counter medications, diabetic 
und ostomy supplies, vitamins, natu- 
ral herbal and homeopathic remedies, 
and the durable hospital equipment 
Ihev oner are sure to satisfv anv 
cus'tomer's needs. FAIR HAVEN 
PHARMACY keeps in stock a com- 
plete line of hospital beds, canes, walk- 
ers, crutches, bedside commodes, 
w heel chairs and miscellaneous equip- 
ment. They carry mastectomy products, 
and fit mastectomy forms and carry 
therapeutic magnets to help with pain- 



ful conditions. Tlicy also have free 
' delivery and direel billing lor Medi- 
care and lor private insurance. Add this 
to their last and friendly prescription 
service, and you come tip with a tup 
quality pharmacy. 

If you're new in the area, visit FAIR 
HAVEN PHARMACY and discover 
why ilicy are the area's number one 
choice. - 

The Writers or (his 1999 Business 
Review St Reference Guide 
unhesitatingly recommend this fine 
pharmacy lo nil of our readers. 



ANTHONY PONTIAC/GMC/BUICK 

Awarded #1 In Customer Satisfaction By Pontiac 



Gurnce, IL - ANTHONY 
PONTIAC^GMC/BUICK has just 
received, for the second year in a row. 
Pontiac's CSI Award for being "1 in 
total customer satisfaction. 
"We are extremely honored lo receive 
this award for the second year in a 
row", states Tony Augclli. ['resident 
and owner of ANTHONY. 
"It takes a total team effort and every - 
one from the porters lo the salespeople 
have worked very hard to maintain ihc 
high standard of service that our cus- 
tomers have come to expect from us. 
And. with the addition of their new 



Vice Presidenl/Cencrai Manager. Trent 
Tohias. our customers can expect that 
standard to he raised even higher." 
ANTHONY'S new state of the art fa- 
cility, currently under construction in 
Gurnce, will open in the summer or 
1999. "Our customers can expect the 
same high standards in the future at 
our new store." continues Augclli. 
ANTHONY has received other awards 
from General Molors including GM's 
prestigious "Leaders of Distinction" 
award given- to only 5*!« of ihc 3600 
i'onliac/GMC dealers nationwide, as 
well as being nominated for the " 1 999 



lime Magazine Quality Dealer Award 
", one of the highest awards a dealer- 
ship can receive. 

Tony stales "Receiving all or these 
aw ards is very rewarding (o us here at 
ANTHONY," but if it wasn't for Ihe 
trust and friendship of our customers 
and our community, we would have 
nolhing. und we want them lo know. 
Foil have a friend at ANTHONY. " 
ANTHONY PONTIAC/GMC/ 
BUICK Is currently located at 2727 
Uclvidcre Road In Waukcgan. Their 
phone number Is (847) 244-1010. 



RED WING SHOE STORE «??: 



Since 1905. RED WIND SHOE 
STORE has provided quality footwear. 
They specialize in all types of work 
boots, spurts boots and causal shoes. 
If you're in the construction field or 
required to wear work boots on your 
job. you know how hard it can be to 
find a store lo meet vour special needs. 
RED WING SHOE STORE, located 
in Carpcntcrsville al 184 South West- 
ern Avenue, {Route 31), phone 551- 
1333 has the answer to your footwear 
requirements. They sell all of the fa- 
mous Rett Wing shoes and boots and 
arc also makers of the "top quality" 
Irish Setter sporting boot. They can fit 



anv size Tool from size 6 10 size 1 6 with 
widths from AA to EEEE. You willfind 
work boots and sporting boats of ev- 
ery imaginable style. Including steel 
toe, soft leather, low top, high top or 
athletic work shoes. They arc also fa- 
mous for their excellent selection or 
casual footw ear. and the service is the 
best anywhere. The knowledgeable 
staff can offer suggestions on style and 
qualitv. and will make sure you have 
the perfect fit. RED WING shoes are 
famous for quality and dependability, 
and have been trusted for generations. 
Outdoorsmcn will find their Irish Set- 
ter sporting boots one or their best val- 



yilNG 

^SHOES' 

;i-- T twi»iijjL 



ucs. 

So. if shopping for ihc right boots or 
shoes is gelling you down, visit the 
RED WING SHOE STORE. Their 
reputation is backed by satisfied cus- 
'turners, service and quality footwear 
made in the USA. 

As the Editors or the 1999 Business 
Review & Reference Guide, wc are 
pleased to recommend RED WING 
SHOE STORE to all of our readers, 
and remember, RED WING SHOES 
arc the best friends your feet will 
ever have! 



HILLERY'S BBQ 



Who makes the most mouthwatering, 
finger lickin* barbecue around'.' Who 
has thai famous smoked flavor that 
everyone yearns for? The answer is 
simple, but their secret recipe is not. 
HILLERY'S BBQ is located in 
Waukegan at 2021 North Lewis Av- 
enue, phone 336-0033, und in North 
Chicago at 1617 14* Street, phone 
473-1722. 

Their tasie-lcmpling mealy ribs are 
smoked- hard wood grilled to sizzling 
perfection. Only fresh meal and poul- 
try are used in their secret recipe. 



You'll find chicken along with beef, 
pork, fish and shrimp, or course, lots 
or side dishes, such as beans and cole 
slaw are featured. 

When you come in to HILLERY'S 
BBQ, bring your appetite along. 
They're not only famous for their out- 
standing food, but also Tor large help- 
ings, ir you're planning a family out- 
ing, business meeting or church rune- 
lion, let HILLERY'S BBQ handle 
your catering needs. 
You know ihe food is scrumptious, their 
service is friendly, and their prices sim- 



ply can't be beat. No gathering is loo 
large or loo small. Their hours or op- 
eration are Sunday and Monday from 
1 lam to 8pm. Tuesday through Thurs- 
day from 1 0am to 1 0pm. and Friday 
and Saturday from I (Jam to IO:30pm. 
We, the Writers or this 1999 Busi- 
ness Review & Reference Guide 
know that when It comes to barbe- 
cue, you shouldn't settle for second 
best. For the most mealy, juicy and 
finger lickin' food around, stop in at 
HILLERY'S BBQ today! 



MIDWEST AGGREGATE 



When you need sand and gravel to com- 
plete u construction project, you need 
ilrighlnow! At MIDWEST AGGRE- 
GATE in Antioch, Illinois at 28435 
West Route 173. phone (847) 395- 
2595, you'll never have problems with 
your order not being filled promptly 
and delivered on schedule! These 
qualified professionals of (he sand und 
gravel business can offcrjuu. the cus- 



tomer, more in terms of quality prod- 
ucts and the very fastest service! They 
can supply any amount of graded and 
'sized gravel, crushed rock, fill materi- 
als, lopsuil. concrete, road base, ap- 
proved filter sand, washed sand, gar- 
den sand, or other related products. 
MIDWEST AGGREGATE also has 
a comprehensive listing of specially 
contractors, who will do <i particular 



job for you. if you desire. For small 
loads, ihey offer money-saving pit scr- 
' vice on sand und gravel lor 
homeowners. See litis full service or- 
ganization lor ALL of your sand and 
gravel needs. 

The Writers of this 1999 Business 
Review & Reference Guide recom- 
mend them to nil of our readers. 



VERNON HILLS GOLF COURSE 

Ron O'Brien, PGA Professional 



More and more people of all ages are 
taking up the challenging sport ol'golf.. 
Unlike most sports, golf can he played 
at your own pace and is one of the best 
daily exercises you can enjoy. 
VERNON HILLS GOLF COURSE, 
located in Vernon Hills at 291 Ever- 
green Drive, phone (847) 680-9310.' 
is a challenging and beautiful course 
to play. ThjCi&hulc championship 
course is c<C > vy*y seasoned golfers 
and has bca'.jMfa-d us one of the lop 
9-holc golf courses in the Chicago land 



area by The Chicago Tribune. For 



your equipment needs, they feature a 
pro shop with a Jine selection of clubs, 
bags, apparel and golf accessories. 
(iolf carts'and clubs can be rented and 
balls, lees and other items are on hand 
should you need them. 
Golf instruction for beginners, as well 
us advanced players, is available. 
You'll find ihe green fees ul VERNON 
HILLS GOLF COURSE to be (he 
most reasonable around with discounts 
available for juniors and seniors dur- 
ing the weekdays. 
For your eating and drinking enjoy- 



ment, there is a most pleasant bar and 
grill uvailuble. A banquet facility will) 
sealing for up to HO people is also avail- 
able for parties and gulf outings. Gel 
a group or friends together and play 
VERNON HILLS GOLF COURSE. 
This is one of the finest courses in Ihe 
urea und the public is always welcome, 
'fee limes may he scheduled up to one 
week in advance. 

We, Ihe Editors of this 1999 Busi- 
ness Review and Reference Guide 
recommend this outstanding golf 
course to all golf enthusiasts! 



In Business For Over 1 1 Years 



lias your automobile insurance been 
canceled'.' 1 hive you been refused cov- 
erage, or tire you paying too much for 
loo little? Whatever your need. Hie 
auto insurance specialists who can 
seive villi best tire at CAPITOL IN- 
SURANCE AGENCY, INC. Their 
offices tire located in Mundelein ul J64 
Town Line Road, phone 970-9040: in 
Wheeling at JO West Dundee Road, 
phone 520-9440; and in Round Lake 
Bench al 1228 North Cedar Lake 
Rniul. plume 5-INSURE. 
Ilicy specialize in insuring high-risk 
drivers and high performance eai . No 



insurable ear or driver is refused. Can- 
celed policies cm he replaced and driv- 
ers with accidents or violations on 
record-are ncceplcd. The aim ol' this 
company is to insure any and all risks, 
and. of course, sale drivers receive n 
special discount. Ihe advantages ol' 
turning to CAPITOL INSURANCE 
AGENCY, INC', for your automobile 
insurance needs include immediate 
ciwcnigcimd NR-22 filings, low down 
payments montlil> pauncnl plans, and 
short or long Icrm policies Ihev in- 
sure cares, trucks, vims mid motor- 
evcles. and can provide nil Ivpcs of 



coverage for any vehicle. Their per- 
sonalized yet fast and efficient service 
is the finest available. You'll be 
pleased with how you are treated and 
die coverage and terms you receive! 
That when the Editors oT this 1999 
Business Review and Reference 
Guide suggest that you want lo deal 
with experts in automobile Insur- 
ance contact CAPITOL INSUR- 
ANCE AGENCY, INC. Call today 
far a free quote.. .and get back on the 
road again. For your convenience, 
VISA and Master Card are ac- 
cepted. 



DECK THE WALLS 

Bob Marcus, Owner 



Whether you are u serious collector or 
just brow sing, you're sure in find some- 
thing of interest nt DECK THE 
WALLS, located in Vernon Hills ul 
704 Hawthorn Shopping Center, on 
the upper level, near Marshall 
Fields, phone 5494070. Ihc collec- 
tion or fine traditional and contempo- 
rary art featured here includes ihe work 
ol'popnlar local artists, as well as those 
ol' national and international renown, 
and are arranged in a truly complemen- 
tary fashion. 

A friendly and knowledgeable stall' w ill 
show you canvas url work, watcrcolors. 
limited and open edition prints, featur- 



ing works of renowned artists such as 
Peterson, liycrlcy. Barnes. Benson, 
Wysocki, Romero Rrtllo. l'a//ino nnd 
others. 

Discover Ihc diversity of artwork at 
DECK THE WALLS. In their In- 
formal atmosphere, the collector and 
the art appreclator wilt enjoy the ex- 
tensive selection an. display that In- 
cludes sports art, Photomosalcs, 
lighted pictures and animated cartoon 
art. From old masters to contempo- 
rary art, you wilt be more than 
pleased with their collection of over 
2.000 prints and Limited Edition art 
in stock, and quick access to over 



80,000 In catalogs With their own 
frame shop on the premises, 'DECK 
THE WALLS expert siaffof fntmcrs 
deliver quick turn-around of quality 
products, including a lifetime guaran- 
tee!. 

The Editors of the 1999 Business 
Review & Reference Guide recom- 
mend DECK THE WALLS as, the 
gallery you won't want to miss, 
whether you are just beginning your 
collection or are seeking to enrich 
one. Service, reliability and Integ- 
' rity are a tradition at this well-re- 
spected gallery. 



COSPER & COSPER TOURS 



Bill & Gayle Cospcr, Owners 



COSPER & COSPER TOURS is 

your complete iravel headquarters far 
nil phases of business or leisure travel. 
They cater lo individual business 
people and to corporate groups of all 
sizes. These travel experts are located 
in Wheeling al 33 Huntington Lane, 
nnd invite you to call (847) 541-3000 
when you or your company needs lo 
make Iravel plans. 

COSPER & COSPER TOURS is 
fully computerized and can make ev- 
ery ami ngemenl necessary foryourtrip 



including hotel, car and transportation 
reservations as well as provide cruise 
and lour bookings. They are experi- 
enced in planning all accommodations 
for business meetings and large con- 
ventions as well as Iravel incentives for 
your company. COSPER & COSPER 
TOURS keeps a computer profile Tor 
each or their clients, which includes 
their personal travel policies to moni- 
tor iravel expenses. Contact ihcm for 
an appoinlmcnt lo discuss your firm's 
travel needs. 



For individual or business travel for 
yourscir or a group, COSPER St 
COSPER TOURS is ihc agency to 
contact You will find their professional 
service and personalized attention to 
be among the best available. Let them 
be your travel connection. 
The Writers or this 1999 Business 
Review St Reference Guide suggest 
you call COSPER St COSPER 
TOURS, they can make your vaca- 
tion as enjoyable and relaxing as you 
want it to be. 



Gleason 



Climate- Solutions for 
Today's Lifestyles 




Mechanical Service* 



Ifering 



Who is the full -service air condition- 1 
rfing'and healing speciulist'in the area? 
Who can you rely on for competent ser- 
vice and installation? GLEASON & 
ELFERING'", serving ihc area since 
1951, phone (847) 566-6009, is the 
company many people recommend. 
For major and minor repair problems, 
annual servicing, duct cleaning and for 
complete heating and air systems. 
GLEASON & ELFERING^ has the 
training and experience lo do Ihc job 
Right The First Time! They serve 
both residential and commercial needs. 



and repair and service all makes and 
models. They arc a licensed contrac- 
tor, and offer emergency services 24 
hours a day. Above alt, they are com- 
petent and prompt in handling your 
problem. 

Novv's the time to have GLEASON & 
ELFERING'" service your air condi- 
tioning or heating system. This should 
be done yearly to achieve the most ef- 
ficient operation of your system. If you 
don't have central heating and air. let 
GLEASON St ELFERINC™ quote 
you a price on installing a new system 



which can pay for itself over the years. 
'Give them a call today and start living 
in comfort all year long. GLEASON 
& ELFERINC™ — Where Compe- 
tence Comes At No Extra Charge, 
Call for special pricing of their out- 
standing furnace or air conditioner 
units. 

The Editors or this 1999 Business 
Review & Reference Guide ire 
proud to recommend GLEASON St 
ELFERINC 1 " to all or our many 
readers and suggest you give them a 
call today. 



RADISSON HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER 



Linda Kushnir ~ Catering Director 



Are you in charge of the arrangements 
for your company's annual holiday 
party, your daughter's wedding recep- 
tion, your high-school class reunion or 
your firm's annual dinner dance? Is 
it up to you lo arrange your professional 
organf/alioii's seminar'* For these pur- 
poses and more, you can confidently 
rely on the facilities and stalT of the 
RADISSON HOTEL & CONFER- 
ENCE CENTER, located in 
Northbrook at 2875 North Milwau- 
kee Avenue, phone (847) 298-2525. 
This establishment offers complete 
banquet facilities and expert catering, 
and will handle nil details according 
to your specific needs. They will gladly 
offer you helpful advice based on their 



experience and expertise in catering. 
When your next affair is held at the 
RADISSON HOTEL & CONFER- 
ENCE CENTER, you can expect to 
receive accolades from your pampered 
and impressed guests. RADISSON 
HOTEL k CONFERENCE CENTER 
has IS meeting rooms with a total of 
1 7,0(10 sq.ft. of meeting space, 3 Ball- 
rooms and M0 guest rooms far over 
night guests, 

Linda Kushnir has been the catering 
director al ihe RADISSON HOTEL 
St CONFERENCE CENTER for 
over 2 years. Known for coordinating 
nil details into a flawless occasion and 
providing the very' best menu, she gives 
personalized intention to each of her 



clients, regardless of the size of ihe 
event. Whether it's a Prom, Christ- 
mas party. Bar/Bat Mitzvah, Bowling 
banquet. Wedding reception, Anniver- 
sary celebration or any other special 
occasion, moke your affair a memo- 
rable one. For reservations and guar- 
anteed satisfaction, call the banquet 
specialists at the RADISSON HO- 
TEL St CONFERENCE CENTER. 
The Editors of this 1999 Business 
Review and Reference Guide suggest 
you call RADISSON HOTEL & 
CONFERENCE CENTER at (847) 
298-2525 to find out what makes ca- 
tering different - satisfaction guar- 
anteed! 



GEM EXTERIORS INC. 



GEM EXTERIORS INC., located in 
Mundelein at 21797 Highway 176, 
phone 837-9955, lealures slale-ol-llio- 
nrt seamless guller machines which 
produce ihe finest quality seamless 
gutters of tiny si/.e necessary for resi- 
dential and commercial application. 
T he ad vantages of seamless gutters are 
that they never leak and are always 
lubricated on locution. These innova- 
tive machines can roll out a gutter of 
unlimited length. They use only Ihe 



Quality Work Since 1976 

most durable aluminum, slocked in a 
variety of colors lo coordinate with your 
home or business exterior. They also 
supply all your fascia, soffit and down 
spoul needs with a lifetime warranty, 
They also offer rooting, windows and 
siding. 

This firm employs people who. under- 
stand their business and who are care- 
fill lo sec that their products are accu- 
rately installed. They're licensed. 
bonded and insured for your proteciion, 



ond can be relied upon for accurate cost 
estimates. Call GEM EXTERIORS 
INC. at 837-9955 for an estimate. 
Their reputation is your guarantee of a 
job well done. 

The Writers of this 1999 Business 
Review and Reference Guide suggest 
you contact GEM EXTERIORS 
INC, for all of your gutters and down 
spouts needs! 



ANIMAL CARE & MEDICAL CENTER 



Area residents are fortunate to have 
ANIMAL CARE & MEDICAL 
CENTER available in provide quality 
veterinary cure, litis state-of-the-art 
hospital is folly equipped to provide 
quality cure for small animals, birds 
and exotics. 

Dr. Timothy Harris, ihe veterinarian 
on staff, has been fully trained in vet- 
erinary care, lie provides diagnostic 
services as well us counseling on nu- 
trition and other veterinary related 
problems. They oiler emergency treat- 
ment, and keep accurate health records 
for cacti or their patients. They also 
offer flea dipping, grooming and board- 



Timothy J. Harris, DVM 

iug and a complete line of health care 
products. Quality mobile pet care is 
also available by appointment which 
enables you in huvc ihe convenience 
of having Ihe veterinarian come to you, 
The mobile unit is fully equipped with' 
(lie necessary supplies and equipment 
lo provide professional medical and 
surgical care lor your pel. 
Dr. Harris und his sialf would like lo 
stress ihnt all animals need annual ex- 
aminations for curly detection and the 
besl possible treatment of health prob- 
lems. Now is ihe llnii for yo-r pet's 
heartworm examination anu the lime 
to start Program' at Advantage as part 



of your pet's flea prevention program. 
Program is an oral medication and 
Frontline is a topical medication, and 
either is left up to the owner's prefer- 
ence. ANIMAL CARE St MEDI- 
CAL CENTER is located in 
Libertyville nt 438 Peterson Road, 
phone (847) 362-5954, for an appoint- 
ment or for more information. 
The Editors or this 1999 Business 
Review St Reference Guide recom- 
mend' ANIMAL CARE & MEDI- 
CAL CENTER to all of our many 
riders who want the very best care 
for their pet. 





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MINDING 
YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 

Don Taylor, 



Six Shortcuts 
to 




up 









BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



February 19, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers/ 1 



- 

Cambridge Homes 'Builder of the Decad 




| he American dream to be 
your own boss is alive and 

| well as we head toward a 

L new millennium. Millions 
of Americans are itching to paint 
their names over the door of a 
small business they can call their 
own. 

„, Every week in our office .we 
meet with men and women who 
want to turn their dream into real- 
ity. All too often the conversation 
starts like this, "Well, I want to 
start my own business because 
I've been out of work for four 
months and can't And a job. Since 
I'm about out of savings, I need 
some Income quick. What kind of 
business should I start?" 

While we do not wish to squelch 
anyone's dreams, we often have to 
bring a dose of reality to these meet- 
ings. Starting a business isn't easy 
under the best circumstances. Start- 
ing out with little or no money in- 
creases the difficulty. Not knowing 
what type of business to start makes 
It almost impossible to achieve start- 
up success. 

The good news is there are steps 
you can take that will help you elim- 
inate mistakes and reduce your start- 
up risks. Here are six to get you off to 
a running start 

Start-up Steps 

•Ask yourself why. The first 

step toward success is to carefully 
consideryourmoUvation for starting 
your own business. Not having a job, 
disliking your boss or wanting to 
ease your workload are not good rea- 
sons. 

You will work harder in your own 
business than you've ever worked 
before. You will not generate quick 
income, and you may find that many 
of your new bosses - sometimes re- 
ferred to as customers - are difficult 
to work for, too. 

• Pick a business to start The 
next step is to select a type of busi- 
ness to start. Most experts agree that 
it helps if you know something about 
the business you want to operate. It 
should be something that utilizes 
your skills and abilities and some- 
thing you enjoy. It must also include 
products or services that potential 
customers need. 

• Put together a plan. A busi- 
ness plan doesn't guarantee your suc- 
cess; but it will improve your chances. 
It will show potential lenders that 
you've done your homework and will 
help you focus on success. 

A good plan should address sev- 
eral start-up areas. It should Include 
market research, market potential, 
management issues, marketing 
strategies, capital needs and finan- 
cial projections. 

• Cover the legal bases. You 
should select a legal structure, 
check zoning requirements and se- 
cure, the proper licenses and per- 
mits. You'll need to check with 
your local tax authorities for infor- 
mation on sales taxes, employee 
taxes and income taxes. After 
you've selected a name for your 
business, register it with the proper 
authorities. 

•Take charge of financial Is- 
sues. The first step I'd recommend 
in. this area Is to open a separate 
business checking account. Select a 
bank that can help with your future 
credit needs. 

Create your own budget and 
record keeping system before you 
open the business. Accounting 
firms, 

Please see TAYLOR IC8 



By L£SUE PIOTROWSKJ 
Staff Reporter 

New home buyers in Lake Coun- 
ty are familiar with the name Cam- 
bridge Homes. The Ubertyville-based 
builder has completed 12,000 new 
houses In the County since 1967. 

Cambridge Homes was just hon- 
ored as Builder of th e Decade by Mid-, 
west Homebuilder Magazine. It was 
chosen from more than 100 of the top 
home builders in Illinois, Indiana, 
Wisconsin and Michigan. • 

"This award Is a great honor be- 
cause it recognizes the long and im- 
pressive history of Cambridge homes, 
and our contributions to the housing 
industry as the developer of out- 
standing communities," said Richard 



J. Brown, the company's chairman 
and chief executive officer. 

Brown has long maintained that 
home building is more than building 
quality homes: It is also the creation 
of entire communities that provide 
the best possible quality of living and 
investment for home buyers. 

The first Cambridge community, 
built in Buffalo Grove in the mid- 
1960s, reflects this philosophy. It was 
the only subdivision to offera wide va- 
riety of home styles and exterior de- 
signs within the same community, but 
It was built before monotony codes 
prevented builders from constructing 
similar homes next to each other. 

To enhance the overall living en- 
vironment within communities, 
Brown pioneered the concept of pro- 



viding complete landscaped parks, 
recreational amenities, and parkway 
trees before villages required them. 
He has also placed emphasis on pre- 
serving the natural beauty Inherited 
with each property such as nature ar- 
eas and mature trees. 

Under Brown's direction, Cam- 
bridge Homes experienced steady 
growth in sales and revenue through - 
out the past three decades and was 
' . consistently one of the top five home- 
builders in Illinois from the late 1980s 
to the mid-1990s. Midwest Home- 
builder Magazine has awarded Cam- 
bridge with annual Builder of the Year 
awards five times. . 

This is the first time the publica- 
tion has honored a developer with a 
Builder of the Decade award. One of 



the reasons Cambridge Homes was 
selected was for offeringhome buyers 
a wide variety of advantages. 

"Not only are Cambridge Home 
designs exciting, functional and built 
with quality craftsmanship and mate- 
rials, but Cambridge neighborhoods 
also offer an outstanding environ- 
ment, with a number of enhance- 
ments that add up to an excellent 
quality of life," said the magazine's 
publisher Thomas Chaffee. 

Cambridge Homes' Lake County 
communities include Leisure Village, . 
an active adult community in Fox 
Lake and the Links of English Mead- 
ows in Grayslake. It is currently devel- 
oping Carillon North, an active adult 
lifestyle community in Grayslake and 
the Woodlands in Mundelein. 




program 
luncheon 



Anyone for winter sailing? The 
Waukegan Downtown Association 
(WDA) will host its monthly program 
luncheon on Feb. 19 at the Madison 
Avenue Restaurant. (Madison Av- 
enue & Sheridan Rd.) in Waukegan. 
The luncheon will begin at 11:30a.m. 
and cost $5 per person. The program 
follows at 12:15 p.m., and is open to 
the general public. 

Dr. Edward Leslie will fill you in 
of what's happening at the lakefront 
in the winter. Sailing is just one of 
many activities planned that will be 
described in greater detail. So, join 
us for this informative meeting, and 
learn more about how to get in- 
volved in the activities at the harbor. 

For more information, drop by 
the WDA/ Waukegan Sunrise Center, 
205 N. Genesee SL or call 623-6650 



Rinella 

reelected 

president 

Mike Rinella, Vice President of 
Marketing & Sales for Rinella Bever- 
age Co. in Mundelein, was reelected 
of the associated Beer Distributors of 
Illinois (A.B.D.I.). 

Rinella has as president of 
A.B.D.I. since June 1997, He previ- 
ously chaired the A.B.D.I,/Political 
Action Committee, served on the 
Board of Directors, served as Treasur- 
er, chaired the Finance Committee 
and the Health, Accident and Life In- 
surance Committee, and co-chaired 
the Cook Street Properties Subcom- 

jjs mittee. Rinella has worked in the beer 
industry since 1978. Rinella Beverage 
Company distributesAnheuser-Bush, 
Becks and Kirin products. They also 
distribute Mickey Finn's Wheat Ale. 
AB.D.I. Is a business trade associ- 
ation, headquartered in Springfield, 
representing 95 beer wholesalers lo- 
, cated throughout Illinois. Established 
in 1938, A.B.D.I. provides Informa- 

* tional, government relations and ed- 
ucational services to its members. 




From left: Peggy Kayser, EVP; Terri Sponburgh, Vice President; Marge Harris, President; Mike Meline, 
Immediate Past President; Nancy Barker, Treasurer; and Steve Lawrence, Secretary 

Realtors install 1999 officers 



Installed as 1999 President 
was Marge Harris, of RE/MAX 
Center, Grayslake; as 1999 Vice 
President Terri Sponburgh, of 
RE/MAX Suburban in Libertyville; 
as 1999 Treasurer Nancy Barker 
of Century 21 Gwaltney in Gages 
Lake; as 1999 Secretary Steven 
Lawrence of Baird & Warner, Lib- 
ertyville; as Immediate Past Pres- 
ident Mike Meline of RE/MAX 
Showcase in Long Grove. 



Also installed as 1999 Director 
Were Brenda Bersani of Century 
21 Kreuser & Seiler, Libertyville; 
Richard Capoccioni of RE/MAX 
Center In Grayslake; Deborah 
Cassidy of RE/MAX Showcase in 
Long Grove; Linda Dlabay of cen- 
tury 21 Kreuser and Seiler, Liber- 
tyville; Darryl Hayes of Century 
21 Kreuser & Seiler, Libertyville; 
Michael Lescher of RE/ MAX Ad- 
vantage in Antioch; Gloria Miller- 



Kimmell of RE/MAX Showcase, 
Gurnee; Robert Ott of Ott and 
Company, Mundelein; and Patri- 
cia Palzet-Taylor of ERA Connec- 
tion Real Estate in Wauconda. 

Continuing on in her 10th 
year as Executive Vice President 
is Peggy Kayser. 

The Lake County association of 
REALTORS is a not for profit trade 
association serving the 53 commu- 
nities in the Lake County Area. 



Winthrop Harbor Hotel receives rating upgrade 



Winthrop Harbor's largest ho- 
tel, the Sandpiper Inn, has exceed- . 
ed the American Automobile Asso-- 
ciation's (AAA) requirements for an 
overall quality rating of two dia- 
monds. Already the only AAA-'ap- 
proved lodging facility in Winthrop 
Harbor, the addition of the extra di- 
amond widens the quality and ser- 
vice gulf between the Sandpiper 
and its competitors. 

"We're extremely proud of this 
achievement," said Steve Gasser, 
Vice President and General Manag- 
er of the Industry Group Limited, 
which purchased the 28-room 



property in 1997. "We've made sig- 
nificant progress in upgrading the 
facility and have alleviated many 
maintenance obstacles which were 
preventing the hotel from reaching 
its potential. The extra diamond is 
our pat on the back and more than 
ever makes us the hotel of choice 
on Sheridan Road, from' the state 
line down to Waukegan." 

Pride of ownership and com- 
mitment to capital reinvestment 
are primary reasons leading to the 
revised rating. Company president 
Jack Schall has coordinated the ren- 
ovation efforts and has done much 



of the work himself. "It's more like 
a hobby than work," he grins. "It's . 
great to see it pay off this way." 

According to *" the 1998 AAA 
Tourbook a designation of two di- 
amonds reflects significant en- 
hancements to room decor and 
■ furnishings while still targeting 
; the budget-oriented traveler. One 
third of properties in operation do 
not even merit a one diamond rat- 
ing. Although AAA's evaluation 
did not coincide with their publi- 
cation for the 1999 Tourbook, the 
new rating will appear'in the year 
2000 edition. 



*1»-r : i i * m^ m m^ m 



„ , »*.^-*., .-^^ 



■ *•*••—+- 



C8 /Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE 



Februrary 19, 1999 



it 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Be/ow are reaZ estate transactions for villages in and around the Lakeland 
' Newspapers circulation area. Listed are the property address, property buyer, 
and purchase price, 



Anttoch 

bb4 Harvest Dr, John C Maibaucr, 

$153,900 

340 Joren Trail, Eric Russell, 

$119,000 

434 Joren Trail, Rachel K & Judith 

E Donahue, $114,000 

609 Lake St, Walter Delaney Jr, 

$60,000 

39965 N Hidden Bunker Ct, Lynn 

Morgan Demien, $117,775 

39817 N Long Dr, Wendy E Sied- 

schlag, $151,213 

39821 N Long Dr, Mark W Cooper, 

$146,213 

42377 N Woods Dr, Wayne & 

Louise Kowalski, $78,000 

345 Oakwood Dr, Paul & Deborah 

Fowler, $129,000 

801 Rinear Rd, Richard F Meltzer 

& Marianne E Schaudt, $1 18,000 

728 Summerlyn Dr, Christopher & 

Mirtha Schroeder, $176,177 

24177 W Beach Grove Rd, Sharon 

A & Timothy C Hill, $185,000 

25093 W North Ave, John & Janet 

Wilkinson, $199,000 

Cltv 

street . Street Name, Buyer/first 
Buyer/last & Buyer.2/first Buy- 
ers/last, $ 

Pox liike ' 

7412 Crest Hill Ct, Thomas G & Ar- 



lihe S Carlson, $130,000 
91 Hilldale, Larry & Marcta Ben- 
ncke, $64,500 

415 Kings Rd, Daniel Heitchmidt, 
$78,500 

26 N York, Steven M & Lori A Jay- 
nan, $335,000 

8 S Lake Ave, Anthony G & Karen 
Milner, $200,000 
29 W Arlington, Karen A Gora, . 
$120,000 

67 Woodhills Bay Rd, Dixon Whit- 
son, $75,100 

Graysloke 

900 Cambridge Dr, Michael 
Rawald, $154,500 
161 Cecelia, Craig M Tisdale, 
$112,000 

1 Coral Reef Ct, Annette Deloren- 
zo, $173,000 

839 Easton Ct, George D Zelenba- 
ba, $142,000 

886 Essex Cir, David Cox, $125,000 
763 Fieldale Ln, Nicholas & Kris- 
tine M Verdea, $273,000 
31010 Fish Lake Rd, Todd Steffen- 
hagen, $109,000 
341 Gate wood Ln, Michael J & 
Dena A Lawrence, $200,000 
381 Getchell, Judith E Bourdon & 
John A Schmit, $104,500 
1004 Highgate Ln, Raymond C & 
Sarah I Yan, $222,095 



35 Jamestown, Steve Davis, 

$285,000 

987 Mckay Cir, Leroy & Judy Miht- 

gan, $176,464 

32768 N Stone Manor, Barbara & 

Dennis Rucker, $273,500 

261 Penny Ln, Larry & Josephine 

Herzog, $177,000 

332 Quist Ct, William & Julie L 

Welsshiemer, $148,000 

309 Woodland Dr, Kenneth E 

Johnson, $140,000 ■ 

Green Onka ■ 

1734 Glenmore Rd, Jennifer & 
Richard Snorf, $406,000 
31119 N Prairie Ridge Rd, James S 
Parker, $410,000 

Giirnee 

1455 Almaden Ln, Kenneth & Ash- 
ley Ganzer, $250,000 
5180 Beechwood, Slobodan Milic, 
$143,500 

1712 Belle Plaine, Jerry Griffin, 
$190,000 

974 Blackburn, William J Hemrich, 
$164,900 

5122 Carol Lane, Bryan L Kraemer, 
$84,000 

5598 Chapel Hill, Linda I Flores, 
$304,000 

5629 Chapel Hill, Lois A Cantrell, 
$330,390 

4227 Cobblestone Ct, Christopher 
J Rode & Jorry L Heinrich, 
$228,000 

227 Concord Square, Michael & 
Colleen Aleksic, $178,900 
3583 Crescent Ave, Philip B & 
Deborah L Jensen, $155,000 
779 Darnell Ln, Anton Tichy, 
$190,000 



3844 Dorchester, Michael D & 
Amy M Bakakos, $149,500 
613 Dunham, Margaret Kehoe, 
$94,000 

931 Emerald Ave, Village Of 
Gurnee, $116,000 
7002 Hamilton Dr, Michele Wagn- 
er, $157,500 

18572 Judy Dr, Edgar & Edith 
Lomell, $117,000 
33849 N Summerfield Dr, Cory & 
RandlSBinsteck, $288,185 
6723 Nantucket, Tammy Ng, 
$112,500 

350 Pine Grove, William & Eliza- 
beth Mac Lagan, $155,000 
1105 Portsmouth Cir, Brian & Di- 
ana Gilliam, $393,000 
6785 Roanoake, Joseph Piotter, 
$120,500 

1111 Suffolk, Chan Koo & Ok Cho, 
$220,500 

910 Tralee Ct, Kimberly M Ivory, 
$130,000 

912 Tralee Ct, Ruth J & Ebbert L 
Ridley, $130,000 
17788 W Braewick Rd, Todd J 
Dunda, $122,500 
17796 W Salisbury Dr, Joseph D 
Kole, $114,300 
651 White Crt, Timothy M 
Goguen, $164,500 
643 White Ct, David Plunkett, 
$136,000 

Halnesvtlle 

105 E Aspen Cir, Department Of 

Veteran Affairs, $131,368 

63 E Heritage Trail, Michael J & 

Cathy L Neuman, $195,643 

337 Fawn, Roberto & Lisa Olan, 

$161,000 




REftflK* 



Center 

Each Office Independently 
Owned and Operated 



onoriiPiMto 




LINDA SPARKS 

Multi-Million Dollar 

Producer 

847-223-7878 

100 Atkinson Road 
Grayslake, Illinois 60030 

(847) 223-6131 



A 












YOUR HOME COULD BE ADVERTISED HERE!!! 

TODAY'S REAL ESTATE MARKET IS A LOT MORE DEMANDING... 

WHICH MEANS YOU SHOULD BE TOO!! 

S-0-O...IF YOU'RE INTERVIEWING REALTORS, YOU CAN'T AFFORD NOT TO INTERVIEW MEW 

LINDA SPARKS . (Direct) 847-223-6131 




WHY RENT??? 



$79,900 



Great two-bedroom tonnhome in durable subdivision, large htng room w/panked eel- 
ir.g t. r*w carpebng. Great wv krtche n *,lots ol canine ts, new ckshwasher, ealing area 
in) skdert lo deck. Two good site bedroom and LI baths. Altered garage. Uw 
a ssessment for wel-maintained area. Owl wart. these don't come along often!l 

Linda Sparks (Direct) (847) 223-6131 








TOWNHOUSE IN THE TREES!! $138,500 

WonderM, bright & airy end tint In wooded, private location! Hewer development dose 
to train and shoppy Three bedrooms, t»g kitchen wtols of oak cabinet* and Hde< to 
patio, lit door laundry, largo mailer bedroom w.Vtung room and private master bath 
wrVhirlpoof and teat garage. Call now. This location cant be beat!!! 

Linda Sparks (Direct) (847) 223-6131 



ALL THIS COULD BE YOURS!! $114,900 

Wonderful, weTmantalned raised ranch on beautifully landscaped fenced comer toL 
large country kitchen wA)ts ol cabinets, pantry, new Door and plenty of room for i table. 
Good-sued rooms, central air. Ml finished basement with cory famiy room, harJ-baU) and 
large private bedroom. Must see to appreciate! Garage! 

Linda Sparks..... (Direct) (847) 223-6131 





.«vK4]5, 



STARTING OUT? SLOWING DOWN? $86,900 

Great two bedroom ranch on fantastic do u Me lot conveniently located dose to shopping 
and trairvWrvi-jy. This charming home has a spacious feet! Vaulted celing, new ca.-^t- 
Ing, fresh patt, two-bered deck and beautiful yard make this property one you wont want 
lo niuW Cal now, this to cheaper than renting!! Noihing to do™ Justrocwonlnll 

Linda Sparks .(Direct) (847) 223-6131 



HOT BUY!!! $124,900 

Wcnderful GrajiJak* ranch mrUi treat woier >1ew!l Plus, fenced yurd. rvewef 2<ai £ar3|-. 
deck & iking. HardMod Doors, large twig room, three bedrooms, and eat-in kitchen 
whkti Indudes an appliances!! Great neighborhood. Call now ■ litis one wont last kxg-i 
Must m to appreciate afl ihii home h» to oftetltl 

Linda Sparks (Direct) (847) 223-6131 




LOCATION!!! LOCATION!!! $ 14*£3? 

tar des erve lo come home lo this desirabe NE W townhome community close lo the ioD- 
way. lowly, premium kxaUw. vWurne ceiings, neutral decor, bay wWow, attached twe- 
car garage, finished (arrdy room. Great contemporary Wchen WHg islanclbreaWasl bar, 
pantry, sMen to deck and large eating area. Too much to list low assessment Gumee 

Linda Sparks (Direct) (847) 223-6131 




AFFORDABLE LUXURY!!! $172,900 

1393 contemporary 2-story has it al!!l Premium pond location backing lo open preserve. 
Cedar fenced yard & 2t>er deck. Four bedrooms, 2.1 baths, hardwood floors, new car- 
peting. 1st floor famfy room w,Wck fireplace overlooking preserve. Great view from 
almost any room. M finished basement just coffldeled!! lake Villa schools. What mora 
do you waniJ? Must see. Call now, 

Linda Sparks ...(Direct) (847) 223-6131 



SPRAWLING RANCH $149,900 

Wxtierfi updated ranch with water right* lo loch tomond. New furnace, air conctliort- 
Ing and hot water healer. Updated oak kitchen features tots of cabinets, pantry, eating 
aid lainliy areas, fluge tMr^ rjning& family roctns f^ 
son room adds lo your enjoyment, rreshfy painted, large yard t garage. Hurry!! 

Unda Sparks (Direct) (847) 223-6131 




SO BIG...S0 BEAUTIFUL $309,900 

Gorgeous contemporary 2-story on premium lot TEH rooms featuring vaUted ceilings, 
hardwood noon, IracUess carpeting and neutral decorating. 1st floor den, a kitchen any 
cook would lose with tons ol oak cabinets, bull in desk, walk-In pantry plus bland 
wAreakfasl bad Ful basement Newer suodMskw, convenient location!! Cal for 
brochure! 

Unda Sparks.. ....... .(Direct) (847) 223-6131 



368 Katherine, Raymond F 

Pouiiot, $176,900 

Intdeslde . 

27682 Glenayre St, Robert D & 

Elaine SCayet, $108,000 

25415 Madison, John C Polte, ■ 

$106,900 

25636 W Oakland Dr, George J 

Muffick, $80,000 

Lake Villa 

37072 Avon Dr, Jeffrey W Lenz, 
$119,000 

1320 Baxter Ln, John S & April D 
Kasprzak, $105,939 
580 Cedar Lake Rd, School Dis- 
trict 41, $220,000 
38957 Cedar Valley Dr, Cliff & 
Theresa Sanderson, $203,000 
2020 Hardwood Path, Daniel & 
Elizabeth A Capron, $191,900 
32 Monaville Rd, Calvary Christ- 
ian Center, $130,000 
39181 N Deep Lake Rd, Frank A 
Cunningham, $114,900 
36973 N Deer Trail Dr, Diana Sar- 
ma&PsbDr, $244,519 
1221 Sun Lake Ct, John J & Carol 
Pontikes, $179,321 
21913 W Engle Dr, James M & 
Wendy J Lanahan, $108,000 
644 Winchester Ln, Karen & Carl E 
Knutson, $139,513 
96 Winddance Dr, John W & Bren- 
daF Young, $205,000 

Ubertwtfle 

1001 Ashley Ln, Randall F & Clau- 
dia Castelluzzo, $595,000 
422 Buckingham Place, Scott 
Rlchter, $207,000 
1725 Cedar Glen Dr, KunjinSht & 
Xucjian Guo, $252,000 
1124 Dawes, Michael Wolfe, 
$191,000 

731 E Glendale Rd, Erik J Karlson, 
$140,750 

1015 Garfield Ave, Tony J & Susan 
MKIimczak, $197,000 
703 Kenwood Ave, Eric & Kathleen 
Booker, $204,500 
406 Meadow Ln, Mary King, 
$211,000 

128 N Fourth St, Lorene Schramm, 
$155,000 

625 Nordict Ct, Andrew Cowdery, 
$222,000 

1245 Oak Trail Dr, William Wright, 
$230,185 
18520 Old Peterson Rd, Michael W 

Nobbe, $289,800 

1318 St William Dr, Scott & Andrea 
O Brien, $359,000 

Iindenhurst 

2012 E Fairfield, Michael N Dydo, 

$159,900 

2807 Falling Waters Dr, Gustav 

Van Dacosta & Relvas Cristine S, 

$135,980 

2809 Falling Waters Dr, Lynnae M 

Holmes, $161,482 

2813 Falling Waters Dr, Lori A 

Sadler, $159,299 

2817 Falling Waters Dr, Laura 

ColHnsr$147,528 

2806 Falling Waters Ln, Ceslo & 

Leila Relvas, $134,350 

3154 Falling Waters Ln, Michael J 

& Shari A Pullen, $119,455 



FROM PAGE C7 

TVttfLOR: 

Shortcuts to 
success 



business. Accounting firms, busi- 
ness consultants and small busi- 
ness development centers can help 
in this area. Don't ignore your . 
records. You'll need timely man- 
agement information, and this can 
help you save on taxes later on. 

• Pull the trigger. The final 
step is to put your plan in motion. 
Kick off your marketing plan and 
start learning customer's names. Go 
all out to make your service memo- 
rable. Every business is built one 
customer contact at a time. Get in- 
volved in your community, network 
with others and ask for business. 

For a free copy of our complete 
business plan outline, send a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope to: 
Business Plan, c/o Don Taylor, PO 
Boxe^Amarillo.TX 79105.' 

Don Taylor is the co-author of 
Up Against the WaUMarts. You can 
reach him at Minding Your Own 
Business, PO Box 67, Amarillo, IX 
79105. 







> ■ 



i! 



■ •**»■*-'«*#»»• 



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/ Lakeland Newspapers 



February 19, 1999 



Get it off your chest (847)223-8073 

e-mail: lipservice@lpnews.com 




Upservice Is a phone-In column presented as a feature of Lakeland newspapers. Lake- 
land newspapers makes no claimio the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland news- 
papers does not claim the content or the subject matter as fact, but as the personal 
opinion of the caller, lakeland newspapers reserves the right to edit copy or to retrain 
from printing a message. Call In at 223-8073, fax In at 223-8310, or. e-mail at llpser- 
vlce@tpnews.com and leave your message 24-houri a day. Callers must leave their 
name, phone number and village name, names and phone numbers will not be printed; 
however, callers may be called for verification. 



• 



People He; Everybody lies. You want 
your kids not. to lie? It's impossible. 
Are all your tax deductions, legitl- 
mate? Know anyone who turned back 
the odometer on their car? How 
about speeding and say "You didn't 
know" Do you perpetuate the "Santa 
"tie to your kids? A lie is a lie; Is a lie, 
Whether its under oath or whether its 
not. So let's "get real" and "get over 
it." There are no saints and for 
darned sure our president is not a 
saint. He's a liar just like everybody 
else,. 

Island Lake 

2 cents worth 

Calling about the article oh "hospital 
abuse." I would like to put in my 2C I 
have my mother In a nursing home in 
Round Lake Beach. I want her to , 
have the best treatment she could 
have but, she is not. The people there 
are rude and only care about them- 
' selves. It's really upsetting me that 
my mother Is In the nursing home, 
and she fs not getting treated fairly. 

Round Lake Beach 

Money, help needed 

Response to fundraiscr'd out, You're 
not very welUnformed.on.what hap- 
pens here. We have one fundraiser a 
, year, We are still the cheapest 
" riro'urid.'Go to Lake Villa. and pay 
5175 there. We have a zero balance of 
the end of each year; This money Is 
desperately needed. Hot dogs are SI , 
not S3. I've attended approx. 15 
board meetings a year, and about 4 
or 5 hours on a Sunday night, which 1 
really don't have time. But I care 
about my child, and other kids in our 
community. Everybody who Is in- 
volved, gets points taken off and 
money deducted from their registra- 
tion fees. The people that are com- 
plaining are usually the people that 
aren't helping. Instead of spending 
time, writing letters (9 complain, 
pitch In a little bit of your time and , 
help us clean up the field. Come out 
and help us sell some hot dogs. Come 
out and help us coach the children. 
Where are you spending your time? 
Complaining, not helping. 

Fox Lake 

Get involved 

Response to Grant Township Athletic 
Association. The reason I got in- 
volved is because I didn't like how 
things were being done and I am 
learning a little bit about why it is the 
way it is, Those who don't like the 
way It's run. We have three positions 
available on the board. Feb, 7 and 21; 
Mar. 7 and 21; April 1 1 and 25; May 9 
and 23; June 13 and 27; July 1 1 and 25 j 
and Aug. 29. are the scheduled board 
meetings. They usually run from 
about 7 p.m. until about 1 1 p.m. in " 
' the evening. There is also a million 
other things that need to be done. If 
we get enough people to help, we 
; could probably drop registration fees. 
I would like to sec that happen and I 
would like to see kids play for about 
S40. Until we get more cooperation, * 
we can't do that. So "the more the 
merrier." Pitch In and help. 

Fox Lake 

Deserve better 

? To all Antioch residents and people 
that areicovered by the Antioch Fire 
Dept. and Rescue Squad, 1 am en- 
couraging all of you to go out and buy. 
police and fire scanners and listen tori 
the Fire Dept. and Rescue Squad re- 
sponse time.; I've been listening to 
this for a long time. Many times the • 
rescue squad has taken 10 to 15 min- 
utes to get to a house that a person is 
having a full cardiac arrest.- You peo- 
ple deserve much better than you are 
getting. I suggest that you rally to- 



gether and go to a village hall meet- 
ing, so that your town can get a bet- 
ter fire department and rescue squad 
service. 

Round Lake Beach 



I would like to congratulate Tom 
Maple on the 350th coaching victory 
against the Round Lake Panthers. 
That's Grant spirit! 
Let's go Bull Dogs 

Fox Lake 

Appreciate thanks 

Tills is the guy who bought the Fox 
Lake paper at the Clark station. You 
are very welcome. I appreciate the 
thank you. 

. Fox Lake 
• ■ 



man 

Why are people so concerned about 
embarrassing the president? Could 
we possibly embarrass him more 
than he already has embarrassed 
himself? Or us? He lied under oath 
more than once. If you or I had, we 
wouldn't be embarrassed, we would 
' be In prison. What he and his wife do 
In their own home, Is their business. 
What about his conduct In the oval .' 
/office? Why ore people making all 
these excuses for him and his behav- 
ior? He Is nn unprincipled man. Mis 
' conduct Is'a disgrace;- unc6n : : 
sclonablc and unacceptable 

Round Lake 

Y2K on cars? 

Answer this question. On the com- 
puters In our cars, what will happen 
with the Y2K glitch when it does hit 
Jan. 1st in the year 2000? Do the cars 
start? Do beepers work? This Is some- 
* thing that was not covered on the 
special on TV just last night. These 
two very important questions need to 
be answered 

Gurnee 

Similar experience 

•; Calling about the "quality meat" 
question about ground meat. 1 had a 
similar experience In Grayslake, that 
red meat Is wrapped around old ; 
meat. A couple of articles I read that 
it is not illegal for stores to do this as 
long as the meat that they are wrap- 
ping up was not more than 3 days 
old. It Is legal, from what 1 read. 1 
could be wrong but I returned my 
meat to the store and got a full re- 
fund. 

Grayslake 

Not worth watching 

Our favorite super bowl commercials 
are the ones we did pot watch. Most 
of them are not worth watching and 
are a waste of time 

. Zion 



LAST WEEK'S QUESTION WAS: 

How do you feel about the Senate's impeachment vote? 

THIS WEEK'S QUESTION IS; 

Does the Clinton presidency mean anything now? 



Not on my lawn 

This Is not for the responsible dog 
owners. I am talking about the irre- 
sponsible ones, that feel that your 
• lawn is forthelr dog waste. They 
trample all over your lawn picking up 
the dog waste, but sometimes they 
leave it there. I don't want you on my 
lawn. I don't want your dog oh my 
lawn. Go on your own lawn. Your dog 
Is your responsibility. 

Grayslake 

Save my life 

Why must you drive on my bumper 
when I am doing the speed limit or 
over. It won't make me go faster. 
Have your heard of turning signals?' 
They are located on your steering col- 
umn. They are not decorations. If It is 
raining or foggy, lights are to be used . 
so other drivers can see you, not just 
for you to see in the dark. The life you 
save m ny be mine. Obviously, the 
way you drive you could care less 
about saving yours. 

Libertyvllle 

Loose dog 

« About the Akita or Malamute dog 
that's been wandering around the 
neighborhood since around Christ- : 
mas time. It's a very friendly, very 
nice dog but It is leaving Its Waste all • 
over the place and jumping all over 
little children. The person that owns 
■ this dog, must know this dog is run- 
ning all over the.place. If they don't' 
come to get their dog die next time 
their dog Is loose, I'm going to claim . 
it as my own and take it to the dog 
pound. 

- Fox Lake 

'A good thing' 

I read the article that Jim Walton isn't 
running for trustee on the village 

, board. I think that's the best thing he 
has done for this village. I want to 
thank the Fox Lake Press for giving 
me something GOOD to read this 

: morning. 

Fox Lake 

Proud member 

I should be ashamed? You don't want 
to pay? You don't want to help raise 
funds? You don't want to volunteer? 
Then we're the ones with the prob- 
i lem? Proud to.be a member 

Fox Lake 

Same price service 

I recently got a small Social Security 
raise but a large raise on my garbage 
pick-up. I called my garbage pick-up 
service, they said we could negotiate 
the cost. This means that they charge 
whatever they can get. You may be 
paying more or less than your neigh- 
bor. 1 have asked around and this is 
true. We don't pay the same for the 
same service. Isn't there something: 
that can be done about this? I would 
like to hear from people that feel that 
they are being overcharged. 

Antioch 



Name 

Name calling admittedly Is not very 
nice but so far it Is not illegal, nor 
should It be? Because "A" has devel- 
oped a sensitivity. "B's" free speech is 
not to be Infringed and penalized. 
Whatever happened to "Sticks and 
stones may break my bones, but 
names will never hurt me?" If some- 
thing that Is said is not true or even if 
it is, It's only power to hurt you Is 
only the power you give It. I heard re- 
cently that some words ore to be 
eliminated from the dictionary. That 
the proposal and certain sexual refer- 
ences arc to be eliminated. Just ex- 
actly who makes these decisions and 
how far does this childish nonsense 
go? I think everybody should grow 
up. 

Round Lake 

Glad its back 

Hey Lfpservicc, I think you are doing 
an outstanding job. I'm glad you're 
back and I'm glad you are a full page 
now. I wish more people would call, 
so we could even be two pages. 

Gurnee 

Help Fox Lake plaza 

Just a question for Fox Lake. If the 
Round Lake government and the 
board of trustees can give financial 
help to their Plaza to put in a Cub 
foods, why can't Fox Lake's govern- 
ment help In our Plaza to put In a 
food store here; /What Is the problem , i 
'''with paiVdng? Give me a break. There 

has been enough parking there since 

1961. Who's kidding who? 

Fox Lake 



trouble or the drinking drivers leave 
this place and possibly h urts some- 
one else, better watch where they are 
going. Don't say "My kids wouldn't 
do that." They are doing that Why 
hot check on them? Watch where 
they are going, when they go out on 
the weekend? 

Wilmot 

Two opinions 

I have three opinions for the price of 
one. First, I'd like to say that Presi- 
dent Clinton should be impeached. I 
think that everyone forgets how he 
waved his finger at us, telling us he 
did not have sexual relations with . 
that woman, when In fact he did. 
Monica was telling the truth and 
Clinton wasn't. Mr. Clinton should 
not be held above the law. He should 
be impeached. Opinion two. To all 
you cry babies, that live In Grayslake. 
You have to learn to deal with the 
dump. As far as I know, that dump 
was there long before most of those 
subdivisions were. If you don't like 
the smell, you shouldn't have moved 
there. You shouldn't have moved by a 
garbage dump if you are going to 
complain about the smell. We do live 
in America, you do have a "freedom 
of choice". If you choose to live by a 
dump, you better learn to deal with 
the consequences. 

FoxLake 

Let's be friends 

, We too have Just moved to'Ahtloch ' 
from Wisconsin. Most of our neigh- - 

- bors also live In the Emmons Schoot 
District, except for a few select 
homes. Our boys go off to a few of the 

- neighbor's houses, only to be reject- 
ed. My sons are clean, fun and great 
kids who even do well In school. But 
in the eight or nine months we have 
lived here, they still have no friends : 
among this eagle's neighborhood. My 
husband has been wanting to move 
in the past six months. Are there any 
kids who enjoy meeting new people 
and playing outside and having a 
good time? If so, wehave'yet to meet 
them. 

Antioch 



Out of control 

Some Wisconsin Teen, most of thehi 
four or five years under the drinking 
age. They have found neW and luxuri- 
ous places for their drinking parties. 
Now They don't have to wait until 
their parents are out of town. They 
have found a way to get the adults to 
get them rooms at a popular county 
motel; supply. them with booze ,and 
maybe other uncontrolled sub-, 
stances. Before one of them gets in 

¥ " ""• ' "". - 1 

ROBERT P. WILL, JR. : 

_ RALPH A. STRATHMANR 

* 

\ ewe / wate f/ /& aw/M/wce /Acw ateecea/ehfi** 



* 

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A . 

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Seven South County Street 
Waukegan, Illinois 60085 

(847)336-4440 



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10:30am -2:O0ptn 

Carving Station with Peel and Eat Shrimp 



Also' including.. . 

Carved Breast ofTUrkey 

Lox Platter with 

Cream Cheese 

Cheese and Bagels 

Eggs Cooked to Order 



Sausage Links and 
Hickory Smoked Bacon 

Eggs Benedict 

Cheese Blintzes with 

Assorted Fruit Topping 



Chicken Selection 

Pasta of the Day 

Fish of the Day 

Extra Thick French Toast 

Pancakes 

Belgian Waffles 



$1 AM for Ailutts*, SI XM Senior Cittern Overf55\ 

' tMS/or Clutdnm 1Z )?ars ofage and tinder; 

for Cliildrth Under :5 Yean of Age 
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C10 / Lakeland Newspapers 




February 19, 199.9 



i) 






A Funeral Home Serving 
All Your Needs 

Over 50 Years Of Caring, Dignified Service 



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1 BLOCK WEST OF RT. 12 - 1/2 BLOCK NORTH OF GRAND AVE. 



DEATH NOTICES 



CASE 

Vcrva R. Case, age 91 of Llbertyville 

Arr. Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, 

Llbertyville 

FIFIELD 

Ruth M. Fifield, age 79 of Wauconda 

Arn Klssclburg- Wauconda Funeral Home, 

Wauconda 

CZECH 

Stanley A. Czech, age 77 ofGrayslakc 
Arr: Kristan Funeral Home PC, 
Mundclcin 



HACKING 

James R. Glacking, age 70, of Llbertyville 
Arr: Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, 
Llbertyville 

KOFIER 

Brother Augustine Kofler, SFO, age 00 of 

Llbertyville 

Am Bumctt-Dane Funeral Home, Libenyvillc 

PANTHER 

Timothy James Panther, age 23, of 

Llbertyville 

Am McMunpugh Chapel, Ubcrtyville 



n : 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 







eral Directory 



fUSTEN'S ROUND LAKE FUNERAL HOME 

222 N. Rosedale Court (Rosedale at Cedar Lake Road) 

(847) 546-3300 

Nancy Justen & Mark Justen, Directors 

Additional Locations in McHenry and Wonder Lake 

K.K. HAMSHER FUNERAL HOME, LTD. 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Rd., Fox Lake, IL 

(847)587-2100 

Kenneth K. Hamsher, Debra Hamsher Glen, Directors 

RINGA FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2146 

Robert J. Ringa,. Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL . , 

Dan Dugenske, Director 
(847)395-4000 

SPRING GROVE FUNERAL CHAPEL 

8103 Wilmot Rd., P.O. Box 65, Spring Grove, IL 60081 

Kurk P. Paleka, Director 

(815) 675:0550 or Toll Free (888) 394-8744 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL AND CREMATORIUM, LTD. 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake,' IL 
(847) 223-8122 ' 
David'G. Strang and Richard A Gaddis, Director . 

i' :■»! - ****** ■ ■•,"-.■■? 



Timothy Walter Cozzi Jr. 

Age3 months, of Round Lake Beach, passed through the 
gates of heaven on Feb. 7, 1999. He was bom Nov. 14, 1990 In 
Llbertyville. 

'For whatever life holds for you and your family in the 
coming days, weave the unfailing fabric of God's Word 
through your heart and mind. It will hold strong, even if the 
rest of life unravels" 

Glgl Graham Tchlvtdjlan 

He Is survived and greatly loved by his parents, Crystal 
and Timothy Cozzi and loving sister MaryAnne. He will be 
greatly missed by his many relatives and friends, maternal 
grandparents Cyndl Preckl, Robert Sanders,- Ernest Haynes; 
fraternal grandparents, Chuck and Debbie Cozzi;, great 
grandparents, Eva and George Pavlls, Brcnda and J.D. 
Sanders, Dorothy and Walter Wilson; Aunt Tamaia Sanders, 
Aunt Jacl and Aunt Erica Haynes; Uncle Joey Preckl, Uncle 
Dennis (Christine) Cozzi, Aunt Diane Cozzi, Aunt Debra 
Cozzi; cousins, Damlan, Benjamin, Sadie, Jessie; his godfa- 
ther, Raymond Gredecki; special friends, Patrick White, 
Dcrcck Skogsbcrg, Jason Carson, Diane VanTrceck, Pete 
Strom and Dave Moynlhan. He Is preceded In death by his 
great grandparents, Ruby and Larry Doylcn; cousin, 
Stephanie Basharh, step -grandfather, Pete Preckl and great, 
great, grandmother, Lorcn Smith. 

Funeral Services were held at Kristan Funeral Home PC, 
Mundelein with Rev. Lylc Kauffman, officiating. 

Interment followed at the Ivanhoe Cemetery 

In lieu of (lowers, memorials to Timothy's family would 
be appreciated, 

Mark Anthony Barranco 

Age 18 of Silver Lake, Wis. passed away suddenly, 
Tuesday, Feb. 9, 1999 at Memorial Hospital, Burlington, Wis. 
He was born, Sept. 14, 1980 in Waukegan, the son of Sam and 
Nancy (Bartlctt) Barranco. Mark lived In Salem, Wis. until 
moving to Silver Lake in 1986, where he attended Rivcrvicw 
Grade School, He was active in the Lakeland Little League, 
the Genoa City American Legion . Baseball Team and the 
Salem Pioneers 4-H Club. He was a senior at Wilmot High 
School and was on the varsity basketball, baseball and foot- 
ball teams and was a member of the Lctterman Club. During 
the past two summers he worked at the Wilmot High School, 
Mark was also a member of the Mlllbum Congregational 
Church in Millburn. ■ 

Survivors include his parents, Sam and Nancy Barranco; 
his sister, Dawn Marie at home; his aunts and uncles, Sandy 
and George Hoist, Barb and Dave Foley, Rose Marie and Ken 
Carlson and Mary Cudahy, his godparents,' Sue and Mike 
Undholm; several cousins and many, many friends and 
schoolmates. He is preceded in death by his maternal grand- 
parents, Edmund and Vera Bartlett and his paternnl grand- 
parents, Sam and Myrtle Barranco. 

Funeral Services were held at the Strang Funeral Home 
of Antioch, Antioch,, with the Rev. Paul Meltzer of the 
Mlllbum Congregational Church, officiating. 

Interment was at Wilmot Cemetery, Wilmot, Wis. 

Those desiring, may make contributions to the Wilmot 
High School Athletic Booster Club, in his memory. 

Joseph A. Pundzus 

Age 83, passed away Sunday, Feb. 14, 1999 In Scottsdale, ' 
Ariz. He was bom in southern Illinois and was a resident of 
Grayslake for over 40 years. Joseph served his country in the 
Army during WWII and was a long lime member of St. 
Gilberts Church in Grayslake. 

He is survived by his son, Jim (Gabricla) Pundzus of Lake 
Villa, and his daughter, Janice (Greg) Grimm of Scottsdale, 
Ariz.; and five grandchildren. He is preceded In death by his 
wife, Mary who passed away in 1990. 

Friends and family visited at the Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium , Ltd, Grayslake. 

Funeral Mass of Christian Burial was held at St. Gilberts 
Chapel, Grayslake. 

Interment was at Ascension Cemetery In Llbertyville. 

Memorial donations may' be made to the American 
Cancer Society. 

EUi H. Amann 

Age 74, passed away on Saturday, Feb. 13, 1S99 at the 
Lake Forest Hospital, Lake Forest. Mrs. Amann was born on 
, July 16, 1924 and made her home in Round Lake for over 37 
years. 

She leaves her husband, Frank 'Bud' Amann; children,. 
Edel (Rick) Bailey of Crystal Lake, Helmut (Andrea) Honnlgof 
Round Lake; sister, Ida Hoffmann; brother, Bruno Heln, both 
of Germany; four grandchildren, Christopher Bryan Bailey, 
Andrew Waldemar Hennig, Erick Robert Hennlg and 
Amanda Andrea Hennig. She is preceded in death by her first 
husband, Waldemar Hennig on April 26, 1972; grand daugh- 
ter, Robin Lynn Bailey on June 9, 1989. 

Funeral services were held at the Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake, with the Rev. John Holm 
and Rev. Paul Galchutt of the Shepherd of the Lake Lutheran 
Church, Grayslake, officiating. 

Interment followed at Avon Centre Cemetery, Grayslake. 



1 



Interment was at Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. 
Those desiring, may make contributions td the Antioch 
Rescue Squad In hfs memory. 

Lilah Mae Sarmont \f -' 

Age 83 of Antioch, passed nway Friday, Feb. 12, 1999 at 
Rolling Hills Manor, Zlon. She was born' Nov. 13, 1915 in 
Winthrop Harbor, the daughter of the late Elmer and 
Wllhemlna (Graves) Sarmont. She moved to Channel Lake In 
1967 and then to Florida before returning to Antioch in 1987. 

Survivors Include her son, Richard Sarmont of AhtI6ch;u 
and one grandson, Lcland Sarmont. She 1" preceded in death* ' 
by her husband, Richard L Sarmont on Aoril 1 1, 1993 and 
one grandson, Kurkwood. 

No services were planned. 

Interment was private. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Home of. 
Antioch. 

In lieu of flowers, those desiring may make contribu- 
tions for the Antioch Rescue Squad or the Antioch Lions Club 
In her memory. 

J. Leonard Armstrong 

Age 85 of Lake Villa, passed away Saturday, Feb. 13, 1999 
at Provena St. Thercse Medical Center, Waukegan, after a 
brief illness. He was bom April 28, 1913 In Antioch, the son of ■ 
the late Samuel Jeremiah and Minnie (Zumbaiigh) - 
Armstrong and has been a lifelong resident of the area. For 
many years he had spent thr <vmter months in Hot Springs, 
. Ark. He graduated from An!i>fii High School, served In the 
U.S. Marine Corps during WWII and was a life memberof the 
VFW Post 4308 of Lake Villa and a Tormer member of the Fox 
Lake American Legion Post. His activities included service In ' 
the Lake Villa Volunteer Fire Department, golfing and horse- 
shoe pitching. His work included 22 years as foreman of the 
picking house for the former Weber Duck Farm in Lake Villa 
and later worked at the Lake Villa Post Office for 20 years 
, retiring In 1974. On May 23, 1933, he married Bcrnlce Nader. 
In Crown Point, Ind. 

Survivors include, his wife, Bernlcc; three sons, C; Jack. 
Armstrong of Lake Villa, Joel Dennis (Kathleen) Armstrong of 
Troy, Ohio and Phillip Dale (Leila) Armstrong of Mlnot, ND; 
one sister Bessie Lovina (Ralph) Livingston of Waukegan. He 
was the grandfather of eight and great grandfather of six. In 
addition to hfs parents he is preceded In death by two sons, 
infant James Jr. and Darrcll Wayne and one brother, Arney. . 
. VFW Services and final services were held at the Strang 
Funeral Home of Antioch. 

Interment was private. 

Those so desiring, may make contributions to the Lake 
Villa Fire Dcpt. or the Lake Villa Rescue Squad In his memo- 
ry. 

John II. Ilaltermann ' "~ :| 

Age 68 of Mundelein, passed away Thursday, Feb. 11, 
1999 at the Rosewood Nursing Home In Northbrook. He was 
born,' Aug. 13, 1930 In Highland Park and had made his home 
in Mundelein, since 1996, formerly of Wheeling. A veteran of 
the U.S. Marines, serving during the. Korean Conflict. Mr. 
Haltermann retired in 1996 from National Canine Co. in 
Northbrook. A memberof the American Legion Post 1247of " 
Vernon Township. 

He leaves his children, Pattl Roberts of Northbrook. 
Dawn Bell of Kenosha, Wis., Diane tJeff) Pennington of 
Gumee, Leslie (Dimitrios) Kostakis of Holiday, Fla.and 
Michael (Tami) Haltermann of Deerficld; 13 grandchildren 
and one great grandchild. Also surviving are his sisters, Ann 
(George) Soefkcr and Shirley Evcrs all of Mission, Tex., and 
several nieces and nephews. He is preceded In death by hfs 
parents, Henry (Anne) Haltermann and his brother. 

Friends and family visited at the Strang Funeral Chapel ' 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake 

Services and interment were private. 

Memorials may be given to the American Lung Assoc, 
1440 W.Washington Blvd., Chicago, IL 60607. 

Ron Charles Casey 

Age 61, a longtime resident of Fox Lake, died Friday, Feb. 
12, 1999 in Wheeling. He was born In Gillespie on June 13, 
1937. Wliile he attended college, he played football and later 
played with a semi-professional football team. He served In 

Please see page CI I 



Matthew J. Nolan 

Age 77 of Antioch, passed away Saturday, Feb. 13, 1999 at , 
Provena St.Therese Medical Center, Waukegan. He was bom, 
Jan. 28, 1922 in Chicago, the son of the late Matthew P. and 
Frances (Clark) Nolan. He served in the Sea Bees with the 
U.S. Navy during WWII. On Oct. 16, 1948, he married Helen 
P. Bozec In LaGrangc, moving to Antioch In 1949 where they 
operated the Nolan Resort on Petite Lake for many years. He 
was a member, of St. Peter Church In Antioch. He later ' 
worked for the Goodyear Rubber Co! In North Chicago, until 
his retirement. 

Survivors Include his wife, Helen; two sons, Matthew J. 
'(Sandra) Nolan Jr. of Paddock Lake, Wis, and Tim (Marcla) 
Nolan of Bristol, Wis!; his sister, Madelyn Olson Of Hudson, 
Fla. and four grandchildren. 

Funeral Services with Mass of Christian Burial was Held 
at St. Peter Church, Antioch. 

Family and friends visited at the Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch. 



Strang Funeral Chapel 
&. Crematorium, Ltd 






-;\J± 



./"v^ 



vj-V* 




FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED 
ESTABLISHED 1898 

410 East Belvidere Road 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

(847) 223-8122 

David G. Strang • Richard A. Gaddis 
Directors 



■»» — ~~ r&E&Zftdi/ijpi 



■»«-« • tt^'-J * p.' 



February 19, 1999 



OBITUARIES/LEGAL NOTICES 



Lakeland Newspapers /C1 '' 



(Continued from page CIO 

the U.S. Air Force and had been a long- 
time employee with Strange Engineering 
Co, In Evanston, Mr. Casey coached pee- 
wee. football, as welf as .Lakeland 
Cardinal football for many years, and 
proudly wore two Cardinal 
Championship rings. He had also 
coached the former Lake County semi- 
pro football Viking team. He was a for- 
mer member of the Fox Lake Lions Club, 

Survivors include, two daughters, 
Denise (William) Anderson of Wheaton, 
Barbara (Timothy) Bcal of McHcnry; six 
grandchildren; one brother, Steven 
Casey of Forest Park. He Is preceded in 
death by his parents, Charles end 
Marcella (nee Rhoads) Casey. 

, Funeral Services were held at the K. 
K. Hamsher Funeral Home, Fax Lake 
(The Chapel on the Lake) 

Interment was private. 

JohnBelec 

Age 85, passed away Feb. 9, 1999 at 
Provcna , St. Therese Hospital In 
Waukegan. He was bom on Dec. 9, 1913 
in Slovenia and was a resident of 
Wlldwood.' John was retired after 28 
years from Johnson Motors. He was a 
devoted member of St. Gilberts Church 
in Grayslakc and formerly a 43 year 
member of Mother of God Church. in 
Waukegan. He was a member of St. 
Mary's KSKJ 

He Is survived by his wire, Mary of 54 
years; his daughter, Mary (Tom) Nelson 
of Wlldwood; his grandsons, Tom and 
Tim Nelson of Wlldwood; his brother, 
Paul Bclec, In Argentina; and many 
nieces and nephews In Slovenia and 
Argentina. He is preceded In death by his 
six brothers. 

Friends and family visited at St. 
Gilbert's Chapel in Grayslakc until time 
of the Funeral Mass. 

Interment was at Ascension 
Cemetery In Ubertyville. 

Arrangements were made by Strang 
Funeral Chapel and Crematorium, Ltd., 
Graysloke. 

In lieu of flowers, donations to St 
Gilberts Church, Graysloke will be appre- 
ciated. 

OlgaKuleff 

- Age 91 of Round Lake, passed away 
Fob. 10, 1999 at the Winchester House In 
Libertyville. She was bom March 20, 
1907 in Newfoiden, Mn. and had made; 
her home In Round Lake since 1947, for- 
. merly of Chicago. A past member of the 
Waukegan Moose Lodge and past owner 
and operator of Steve's Men and Boys 
Wear in Round Lake. 

She leaves her daughter, Dartene 
(Thomas) DeRyke of Sliver Lake, Wis.; 
grand daughter, Anna-Lisa (David) 
Foster; grandson, Stephen DeRyke all of 
Chicago; her sisters, Olive Peccl of 
Chicago and Evelyn Joppru of Deep 
River Fails, Mn. and sister-in-law, 
Thelma Dahl, also of Deep River Falls, 
Mn. She is preceded in death by her hus- 
band, Steve in 1966 and several brothers 
and sisters. 

Funeral Services were held at the 
Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslakc 

Interment followed at the North 
Shore Garden of Memories In North 
Chicago. 

Memorials may be given to the 
Winchester House, 1125 N. Milwaukee 
Ave., Libertyville, IL 60648, in memory of 
Mrs. Kuleff. 

Thomas L. McSorley 

Age 68, passed away on Monday, 
Feb, 8, 1999 at Condell Medical Center, 
Libertyville. He was bom on Aug. 13, 
■' 1930 in Victor, Mo. and has been a resi- 
dent of Grayslakc the past seven years, 
formerly of Wlldwood for over 27 years. 
Mr. McSorley retired in 1979 from U.S. 
Steel In Waukegan where he was 
employed- in Quality Control. After 
retirement- he was employed at Freund 
International Co. in Libertyville and 
Decorcl Co. In Mundeleln. He was a 
member of the Calvary Christian Center 
In Lake Villa and also of the Steel Workers 
Retiree Club. 

He Is survived by his loving wife, 
Jean to whom he wed on Dec. 9, 1950 in 
Cicero; also his daughters, Cynthia lind 
of Antloch, Patricia (Tim) Grubbs of 
Pickerington, Ohio; his son, Thomas L 
(Rita) McSorley Jr. of Manassas, Va.j a sis- 
ter, Carol (Jim) Cooper of Nashville, NC; 
a brother, Virgil McSorley of Portage, 
Ind.; sevcraLrileces and nephews; eight 
grandchildren and one great grandchild. 
He Is preceded In death by his parents, 
Virgil and Stella McSorley; and his three 
sisters, Betty Sknggs, Evelyn Long, and 
Dolores Tubbs. 

Funeral Services were field at Strang 
Funeral Chapel and Crematorium, Ltd., 
Grayslake with the Pastor William 
Kruger, officiating. 

Interment was at Highland 



Memorial Park Cemetery. 

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be 
given to the Calvary Christian Center, 134 
Monaville Rd., Lake Villa, IL 60046. 

Edward 'Fast Eddy' Sheppartf 

Age 82 of Antloch, passed away 
Wednesday, Feb. 10, 1999 at home. He 
was bom July 24, 1916 In Chicago, mov- 
ing to Llndcnhurst In 1956 and then to 
Antloch In 1991. He attended St. Peter 
Church in Antioch. Mr. Shcppard retired 
from International Harvester In 
Libertyville where he was a machine 
operator and union steward for local 
1643 of the UAW in Ubertyville. On May 
29, 1943, he married Hazel Barry In 
Chicago, and she preceded him In death 
in March of 1988. 

Survivors include three sons, 
Raymond of Chicago, John (Donna) of 
Antioch and James (Penny) of 
Mundeleln; one daughter, Phyllis 
(Walter) Langer of Lake Villa. He was the 
grandfather of 10 and the great grandfa- 
ther of 11. In addition to his wife, he is 
preceded In. death by one sister, Dolly 
Kaplan. 

Funeral Services with Christian 
Burial was held at St. Peter Church, 
Antioch. 

. Friends and family visited at the 
Strang Funeral Home of Antloch. 

Interment was at Highland 
Memorial Park, Ubertyville. 

Margaret B. Schnur 

Age 91 of Wlldwood passed, away 
Wednesday, Feb. 10, 1999 at Provena St. 
Therese Medical Center In Waukegan.' 
She was bom Aug. 27, 1907 In Chicago 
and had been a resident ofWUdwood the 
past 23 years, formerly of Waukegan. Mrs. 
Schnur retired In "1973 from Abbott 
Laboratories, North Chicago. She was a 
member of the Shepherd of the Lakes 
Lutheran Church of Grayslake and a 
member of the American Legion 
Auxiliary, of Chicago, 

She leaves her loving son, Sanders 
(Dorothy) Schnur of Wlldwood; grand 
daughter, Kathleen (Joe) Priola of Gages 
Lake and her great grandchildren, Jason 
(Chrissy) Gibbs of Lake Villa, Willie Glbbs 
ofWaukcgan; great, great grand daughter, 
Ashlee Glbbs of Lake Villa. She Is preced- 
ed In death by her parents, Emmanuel 
(Karl) Benson; brothers, Edward and 



John Benson; grand daughter, Karen 
Glbbs on Sept. 19, 1998 and her grand- 
son, Tbm Schnur In 1978. 

Funeral Services were held at Ringa 
Funeral Home of Lake Villa with Pastor 
Bruce Cole, officiating. 

Interment followed at Highland 
Memorial Park Cemetery, Ubertyville. 

Memorials may be given to the 
Shepherd of the Lakes Lutheran Church, 
285 E. Washington St., Grayslake, IL 
60030. 

Arrangements were entrusted to 
Strang Funeral Chapel and Crematorium 
Ltd., Grayslake. 

Anna Hiera (nee Bostrom) 

Age 80, a longtime resident of 
Leisure Village, Fox Lake, died Monday, 
Feb. 8, 1999 at the Glenbrook Hospital. 
She was bom In Chicago on July 6, 1918 
and had attended the Art Institute In 
Chicago. She was recognized as a fine arts 
pointer and sculptress and had raised 
countless funds for various churches, 
charities and scouting organization 
throughout the years. Most recently she 
had been the art instructor at Leisure 
Village, Fox Lake. She has been a long- 
time, active member of the Swedish Artist 
4 Club of Chicago and was a member of St. 
Bede Catholic Church in Ingleslde. 

Survivors include; her husband . 
Chester Hiera of Fox Lake with whom she 
had been united In marriage In February 
1943. The couple had recently celebrated 
their 56th wedding anniversary. Also sur- 
viving are two sons, Roy (SmUJka) 'Cica' 
Hiera of Chicago, James ({Catherine) 
Hiera of Tulsa, Okla.; Nancy Hera of 
Grayslake; a brother, Elmer (Emily) 
Bostrom of Palos Hills; two sisters, 
Gertrude Roppoto of Fox Lake . and 
Josephine Zukowski of Chicago; six 
grandchildren and five great grandchil- 
dren.. She Is preceded In death by her 
brother, Bernard Bostrom and one sister 
Myrtle Nelson. 

Family and friends visited at the K. K. 
Hamsher Funeral Home, Fox Lake (The 
Chapel on the Lake) 

A Catholic Funeral Mass was cele- 
brated at St. Bede Church In Ingleslde. 

Interment followed at St. Adalbert's 
Catholic Cemetery In Niles 

Violet A. Sluka (nee Janes) 

Age 7B, a resident of Fox Lake for 



over 18 years, formerly of Riverside, died 
on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 1999 at Good 
Shepherd Hospital In Banington. Mrs. 
Sluka was bom on Sept, 29, 1920 In 
Chicago, the daughter of Frank and 
Barbara Janes (nee Gonzurck). She was a 
former employee of Bork Travel and 
Western Electric. She was a member of St. 
Bede Catholic Church In Ingleslde. 

She Is survived by her husband, 
Edward G. Sluka with whom she was 
united to in marriage on Aug. 13, 1942 at 
St. Odilo Catholic Church in Berwyn; her 
children, Peter (Mary) Sluka of Aurora, 
Janice Lewsader of Westmont, Michael 
(Jan) Sluka of Wllmctte and Sharon 
(Kevin) Hulgens of Berwyn; her sisters, 
Doris Kotek of Lamont and Gcraldlne 
Janes of Oak Park; nine grandchildren 
and one great grandchild. She Is preced- 
ed In death by one brother, Frank Janes; 
one sister, Marie Pouzar and three grand- 
children. ' 

Funeral Mass and visitation was held 
at St Bede Catholic Church, Ingleslde. 

Interment followed at Queen of 
Heaven Cemetery In H Ulstde. 

Arrangements were made by K. K. 
Hamsher Funeral Home, Ltd., Fox Lake 
(The Chapel on the Lake) 

in lieu of flowers, memorials to 
Catholic Charities of Lake County, 1 N. 
Genesee St., Waukegan. 

Robert G. Lasco 

Age 54 of Kenosha, Wis., died 
Sunday, Feb. 7, 1999 at St Luke's Hospital, 
Milwaukee, Wis. Bom on Sept 5, 1944 in 
Waukegan, he was the son of Becbe G. 
and Alice W. (Pohlman) Lasco, He attend- 
ed schools In Antioch and was a graduate 
of Antloch Community^ High School in 
1962. In 1964 he graduated from Gateway 
Technical College with an associate 
degree In data processing, he then 
received his B A degree In business In 
196B from the U.W. Parkslde. As a 
Specialist 5th Class he served in the U.S. 
Army, entering on Aug. 18, 1965 and was 
discharged on Aug. 17, 1967 from Ft. 
Sheridan. He received the National 
Defense Service Medal, the Good 
Conduct, and the Sharpshooter Badge. 
On Nov. 26, 1966 in Antioch, he married 
Karen L Seaberg. Following his gradua- 
. Uon at Gateway Technical College the 
school employcdhlm as a computer pro- 
grammer until 1977. He was then 



employed at Jockey International and 
American Hospital In Illinois and In 1981, 
began working at Kenosha Unified 
School District as a Data Base Supervisor 
where he worked until the time of his 
death. An active member of the Kenosha 
School Administrators Association, he 
served as a board member. 

Survivors Include his wife, Karen L 
of Kenosha, Wis.; a son, Ronald G. of 
Kenosha, Wis.; two daughters, Lisa C 
Lasco of Kenosha, Wis. and Kristlne L 
Hammond of Farmington, Mn., a broth- 
er, Danny R. of Trevor, Wis. and one 
grand daughter, Meghan Hammond. 
Also surviving are a son-in-law, Steve 
Hammond. 

Funeral Services were held at 
Plasccki-Althaus-Thulfn Funeral Home, 
Kenosha, Wis. 

Interment followed in Sunset Ridge 
Memorial Park, Kenosha, Wis. 

Rfarjorie Lorraine Malcolm 

Age 70 of Gurriee, died Feb. 14, 
1999 at Victory Memorial Hospital, 
Waukegan. She was born Feb. 22, 1928 
In Crosby, Minn. She was a member of 
St. Mark Lutheran Church, 
Llndcnhurst and worked at the 
College of Lake County, Grayslake as 
executive secretary to the vice presi- 
dent from July 1972 through October 
1994. She was secretary to the coordi- 
nator at Valparaiso University. She was 
a beloved wife, mother, grandmother 
and friend, Den Mother of Pack 74, 
Scout Troop 74, Little League Baseball 
at Grandwood Park, Teen Club 
Grandwood Park and Community 
Players Stage Shows In Green Bay, Wis. 

Survivors Include; her husband, 
Gene J. Malcolm; sons, Thomas A. 
Malcolm and Scott E. Malcolm; mother- 
in-law, Josephine T. Malcolm; daughters- 
in-law, Rose M. Malcolm and Renatc I. 
Malcolm; grandchildren, Garrett 
Malcolm, Courtney Malcolm, Kerl 
Malcolm, Rachel Malcolm, Katie 
Malcolm. She is preceded in death by her 
parents, Eincr and Mandi Hautala; and 
father-in-law, Anthony Malcolm. 

Funeral Services were held at St. 
Mark Lutheran Church, Undenhurst. 

Arrangements were made by Marsh 
Funeral Home, Ltd., Undenhurst 

Interment was held at Highland 
Memorial Park, UbertyvUle. 









PUBLIC NOTICE 
Roberts Road Mini Storage 
P.O. Box 300-4015 Roberts Road 
Island Lake, IL 60042 
847-487-8673 • 
Notice Is hereby given that on 
2/25/99 at 9:30am, a sale will be held 
at 4015 Roberts Road, Island Lake, 
office location Is 400 1 Roberts Road, 
to sell the following to enforce a lien 
existing under the laws of the State of 
Illinois against such articles for labor, 
service, skill or material extended 
upon a storage furnished for such arti- 
cles at the request of the following: 

Unit No 606 belonging to Patricia 
Dahlqulst consisting of miscellaneous 
Items. 

0199B-2438-WL 
February 12, 1999 
February 19, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Emboss 

Designs 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1741 
Devonshire Ct., Lake Forest, IL 
60045. (847) 283-0941. (Street) P.O. 
Box 44, Doerfleld, IL 60015. (847) 
283-0941. (mailing) 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Theresa Zuska, 1741 Devonshire Ct„ 
Lake Forest, IL 60045. (647) 234- 
2816. Susan Z. Johnson, 1100 Ridge 
Rd., Wilmette, IL 60091. (847) 256- 
4651. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the tocatlon(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real -full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Theresa Zuska, January 19,1999 
/s/Susan Z. Johnson, January 19, 
1999 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 19th day of January, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/a/Barbara J. Erskln 
Notary Public 
Received: January 19, 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199D-2385-GL 
January 29, 1999 
Februarys, 1999 
February 12, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Stonebrook 

Cleaners 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 6695 
Grand Ave. 08, Gurnee, I L 60031. 
(847) 856-1630. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Millalno Edmons, 22257 Honey Ridge 
Ct, Kildeer, IL 60047. (847) 438-0882. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend (s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person (s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Mlllalne Edmons, February 5, 1999. 
The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 5th day of February, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Barbara J. Erskln 
Notary Public 
Received: February 05, 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199B-2435-GP 
February 12, 1999 
February 19, 1999 
February 26, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Quality Deck 

Treatment 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 203 
Newberry Ave., Ubertyville, IL 60046. 
(847) 309-1270, (847) 247-0772. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Les G. Clay pool, 203 Newberry Ave., 
Ubertyville, IL 60048. (847) 247-0772. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locatlon(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Les G. CI ay pool, January 25, 1999. 
' The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 



son (s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 25th day of January, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Karen A Kerfey 
Notary Public 
Received: January 25, 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199A-2408-LB 
Februarys, 1999 
February 12, 1999 
February 19, 1999 

PUBUC NOTICE • 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPUCATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Crafters' Gallery 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS IS 
TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANSACT- 
ED INTHIS COUNTY: 384 Lake Street, 
Antioch, IL 60002. (847) 395-5550. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCTING 
OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: Dale 
Ferryman, 25416 W. Rockford, 
Ingleslde, IL 60041. (847) 546-6399. 
Judith C, Perryman, 25416 W. Rockford, 
Ingleslde, IL 60041. (847) 546-6399. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend (s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locations) indicated 
and that the true or real full name(s) of 
the person's) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business is/are correct 
as shown. 

/a/Judith C. Perryman, February 4, 1 999 
/a/ Dale Perryman, February 4, 1999. 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son's) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 5th day of February, 1 999. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Kenneth M. Clark 

Notary Public 

Received: February 9, 1999 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0299C-2449-MN 

February 19, 1999 

February 26, 1999 

March 5, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: ' R&S 

Assoc lot os 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 821 Brian 
Ct., Gurnee, IL 60031. (847) 680- 
7603. 

NAME(S) AND POST . OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 



ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Sandra E. Doran, 821 - Brian Ct., 
Gurnee, IL 60031. (847) 680-7603. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location's) 
Indicated and that the true or real full 
riamefs) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Sandra E. Doran, January 26, 
1999. 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sonfs) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 26th day of January, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Denise L Balmes 
Notary Public 
Received: January 28, 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199B-2429-GP 
February 12, 1999 
February 19, 1999 
February 26, 1999 

PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Cutting Edge 

D.J.S 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS IS 
TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANSACT- 
ED INTHIS COUNTY: 4327 Centennial 
Ct #8, Gurnee, IL 60031. (847) 625- 
0985. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE ' 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCTING 
OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: Sean 
Gillette, 4327 Centennial Ct. KB, 
Gurnee, IL 60031, (847) 625-0985. 
Jennifer Gillette. 4327 Centennial Ct 
#8, Gurnee, IL 60031. (847) 625-0985. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intendfs) to conduct the above named 
business from the iocatlon(s) Indicated 
and that the true or real full namefs) of 
the person(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business Is/are, correct 
as shown. 

/s/ S. Gillette, February 5, 1999 
/s/ Jennifer Gillette, February 5, 1999 

The foregoing Instalment was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sonfs) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 5th day of February, 1999. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Patricla A Vu kovich 

Notary Public 

Received: February 5, 1999 

. Willard a Helander 

.Lake County Clerk 

0199B-2437-GP 

February 12, 1999 

February '19, 1999 

February 26, 1999 



<"> J 4 



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C12 I Lakeland Newspapers 



LEGAL NOTICES 



February 19, 1999 



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PUBUC NOTICE 
FORT HAINESVILLE STORAGE 

The contents of storage oulaido 

renled by Howard Ortiz will be sold on 

February 28, 1999 for delinquent rent. 

The contents are a '94 G.T, Mustang. 

Trie contents of storage outside 

rented by Jeff Noat will be sold on 

February 26. 1899 for delinquent rent. 

The contents are '81 Camaro. ° 

0199B-2431-GL 

February 12, 1999 

February 19, 1999 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

BIB REQUEST 

Village of Fox Lake 

301 S. Rt. 59 

Fox Lake, Illinois 60020 

Sealed bids will be received In the 

office of the Village Clerk, 301 S. Rt. 

59, Fox Lake, Illinois 60020 until 4:00 

p.m. on Thursday, February 25, 1999. 

For the Waltonlan Sewer Lining. 

Specifications may be picked up at 
the Village of Fox Lake, 301 S. Rt. 59, 
Fox Lake, Illinois 60020. 

Mark Sealed Envelope " Bids for 
Waltonlan Sewer Lining" 

Bids will be open on Thursday, 
February 25, 1999 at 4:00 p.m. in the 
Council Chambers of the Fox Lake 
Village Hall. 

The Right is reserved by the Village 
of Fox Lake to reject any or all bids. 

0299C-2439-GEN 
February 19, 1999 

"PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: K-G Machine 
Repair 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 35757 N. 
Helendale Rd., Ingleslde, IL 60041. 
(847)973-1563. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Gary Sorenson. 35757 Helendale Rd., 
Ingleslde, IL 60041. (847) 973-1563. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct (he above named 
business from the locatlon(s) indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name's) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Gary Sorenson, February 10, 1999 
The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
*son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 1 oih day ot February, 1 999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Vornadail M. Sorrentlno 
Notary Public 
Received: February 10, 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0299C-2440-FL 
February 19, 1999 
February 26, 1999 
March 5, 1 999 



PUBUC NOTICE 
The Department of Children end 
Family Services has received a 
request to change the conditions of 
the license held by Alternative 
Behavior Treatment Centers, a child 
care Institution, located at 27255 
North Fairfield Road, Mundeleln, 
Illinois 60060. 

Change the age or type of children 
served from: 15 to 17 years ot age to 
14lo 18 years of age. 

Comments about this change may 
be sent to the facility director. 

0299C-2448-MN 

February 19, 1999 

February 26, 1999 

March 5, 1999 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
PRIVATE FOUNDATION 
ANNUAL RETURN 
Pursuant to Section 6104(d) of the 
Internal Revenue Code, notice is here- 
by given that the annual return for the 
fiscal year ended September 30, 
1998, of the Wagner Family 
Foundation, a private foundation, is 
available at the foundation's principal 
office for Inspection during regular 
business hours by any citizen who 
requests It within 180 days after the 
date of this publication. 

The foundation's principal office is 
located at 600 Central Avenue, Suile 
365, Highland Park, IL 60035. The 
principal manager of the foundation is 
Susan Wagner at (847) 432-3666. 

0299C-2441-GEN 
February 19, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: The Symmetry 

Group 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 507 Lake 
Courl, Wauconda, IL 60084. (847) 
526-2251. 

NAME(S) AND POST. OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, .CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Michael P. McGrath, 507 Lake Courl, 
Wauconda, IL 60084. (847) 526-2251. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location^) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Michael P. McGrath 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 12th day of February, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Barbara J, Erskln, Notary Public 
Received: February 12. 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0299C-2446-WL 
February 19, 1999 
February 26, 1999 
March 5, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
STATE OF ILLINOIS ) SS 

COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE 19TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 
LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
IN THAT MATTER OFTHE PETITION OF ) 
TONYA JEAN EGELSTON, ) 

for CHANGE OF NAME. ) 

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION 
PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on April 9, 1999, being one of the 
return days in Ihe Circuit Court of the Country of Lake, I will file my Petition In said 
Court praying for the change of my name from Tonya Jean Egelston to that of Tonya 
Jean Surd, pursuant to the statute in such case made and provided. 

Dated at Round Lake Park, Illinois, February 2, 1999 

/s/ Tonya J. Egelston 

0199B-2436-RL 

February 12, 1999 

February 19, 1999 

February 26, 1999 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
STATE OF ILLINOIS ) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FORTHE NINETEENTH 
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION ) 

OF Ounfeng Lu Schulze ) 

For CHANGE OF NAME ) 

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION 
Public notice Is hereby given that on March 30, 1999, being one of the relurn days 
In the Circuit Court of the County of Lake, I will file my Petition In said Court praying 
lor the change of name from Qunfeng Lu Schulze to that of Jollie-Qunleng Lu 
Schulze, pursuant to the Statute In such case made and Provided. 

Dated at Fox Lake, Illinois, February 2, 1999, 

1st Qunfeng Lu Schulze 

0199B-2434-FL 

February 12, 1999 

February 19, 1999 

PUBUC NOTICE 

NOTICETO BIDDERS 

LINCOLNSHIRE-PRAIRIE VIEW SCHOOL DISTRICT #103 

The Board of Education of the Lincolnshire-Prairie View School District #103, Lake 

County, Lincolnshire, Illinois, will receive sealed bids until 1:30 P.M. local time, March 3, 

1999, In the Business Office, 1370 Riverwoods Road, Lake Forest, Illinois for Lawn and 

Grounds Maintenance. 

At 1:30 P.M., all bids that are received will be publicly opened and read aloud in the 
Business Office. 

In general, the project consists of, providing lawn mowing, trimming and edglng,.plant 
material pruning, weeding and related improvements as directed by ihe district for the 
1999 season. 

* All prospective bidders are required to review said specifications and requirements 
prior to submitting their bid. Bid specifications may be obtained through the Business 
Office, 1370 Riverwoods Road, Lake Forest, Illinois 60045. 
Bids must be submitted on the forms provided by (he district. 
All bids must be accompanied by Certificates of Insurance and such other documents 
as required In the specifications. 

Where applicable and appropriate, the general prevailing rate of wages In Lake 
County, Illinois shall be paid for the each craft or type of workman or mechanic needed 
to execute the contract of perform such work. 

Sealed bids shall be addressed' to Uncholnshlre-Prairie View School District #103, 
Business Office, 1370 Riverwoods Road, Lake Forest, Illinois 60045. 

The Board of Education reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids and to 
waive any Informalities In bidding. 
■Mary Croswhlle, Secretary Dated this sixteenth day 

-, Board of Education of February, 1999 

. • 0299C-2450-GEN 
February 19. 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: The Comedy 
House 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 2811 
Grand Ave., Waukegan, IL 600B5: 
(847) 609-1725. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Anna Estrada, 314 Windridge Dr., 
Round Lake Park, IL 60073. (847) 
740-0616. 

Sonya Scales, 314 Windridge Dr., 
Round Lake. IL 60073, (847) 740- 
0616. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undersigned 
Inlend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locailon(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown.. 
/s/Sonya Scales, February 12, 1999 
/s) Anna Estrada, February 12, 1999 
The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me '.by the per- 
son's) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 12th day of February, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/PatridaA.Vukov1ch 
Notary Public 
Received: February 12, 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0299C-2447-RL 
February 19, 1999 
February 26, 1999 
March 5, 1999 

PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Wauconda 
Self-Service Storage 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 500 S. 
Rand Road, Wauconda, IL 60064. 
(847) 526-5055. (street) P.O. Box 505, 
Wauconda, IL 60084. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
George Gallagher, 1020 S. Fleming 
Rd., Woodstock, IL 60098. (615) 338- 
6763. Doris Oavis Gallagher, 1020 S. 
Fleming Rd„ Woodstock, IL 60098. 
{815)338-6763. ' 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that Ihe undersigned 
intend (s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location (s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
/s/George Gallagher, February 2,1999 
The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 2nd day of February, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Phyltis Kelnz 
Notary Public 
Received: February 2, 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199B-2427-WL 
February 12, 1999 
February 19, 1999 
February 26, 1999 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Executive 

Suites of Gurnee 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 5465 W. 
Grand Ave., Suite 100, Gurnee, IL 
60031.(847)855-4500. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Robin Jazwlak, 34063 White Oak La, ' 
Gurnee, IL 60031. (847) 855-8426. 
Jay Jazwiak, 34063 White Oak Ln„ 
Gurnee, IL 60031. (847) 655-8426. 
Marleno Scott, 14286 W. Oak Knoll, 
Wadsworth, IL 60083. (847) 244- 
7822. 

Al Scott, 14286 W. Oak Knoll, 
Wadsworth, IL 60083. (847) 244- 
7822. 

Brian Scott, 7680 Grand Ave., 
Gurnee, IL 60031. (847) 922-1087. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locatlon(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Brian Scott, January 15,1999 
/s/Robln Jazwlak, January 14,1999 
/s/Jay Jazwlak, January 14,1999 
/s/Marlone Scott, January 14,1999 
/s/Albert Scott, January 14,1999 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this t8lh day of January, 1999. 
/s/Jeffery A. Sannes 
Notary Public 
Received: January 20, 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199A-2407-GP 
Februarys, 1999 
February 12, 1999 
February 19, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 

COUNTY OF LAKE) 

IN THE CIRCUn* COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH 

JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 

IN THE MATTER OFTHE PETITION ) 

OF Clprlna Joan Pratt ) 

FOR ) 

CHANGE OF NAME ) 

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION 
Public notice is hereby given that on March 19, 1999 being one of the return days 
In the Circuit Court of Ihe County of Lake, I will file my Petition in sold Court praying 
for the change ol my namo from Clprlna Jean Pratt to lhat of Clprlna Joan Splzzlrrl, 
pursuant to Ihe Statute In such case made and Provided. 

Dated at Grayslake, Illinois, February 4, 1 999. 

/s/Ciprlna Pratt 

0199B-2424-GL- 

February 12, 1999 

February 19, 1999 

February 26, 1999 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
ZAMPARO and GOLDSTEIN, P.C. 
Attorneys for Plaintiff 
899 Skoklo Boulevard, Suite 300, Northbrook, Illinois 60062 
(847)564-3100 
STATE OF ILLINOIS, COUNTY OF LAKE, SS. -IN THE CIRCUIT COUjTT OF THE 
NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. LaSALLE NATIONAL I 
BANK. AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT 
DATED OCTOBER 1. 1997, SERIES 1997-2. PLAINTIFF V.JEFFREY I. GASMAN* 
ELLEN M. GLASSMAN, BRIARCREST HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION,. 
UNKNOWN TENANTS, UNKNOWN OWNERS and NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS. 
DEFENDANTS. NO. 98 CH 238. 

Public notice Is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment made and entered In 
said Court in the above-entitled cause, the Sherllf of Lake County. Illinois will, on 
Monday, March 15, 1999, at the hour of 9:00 a.m. at 25 South Utlca, Waukegan, 
Illinois, sell at public auction the following In Lake County, Illinois, or so much thereof 
as shall be sufficient to satisfy the Judgment, to-wlt: 

PARCEL 1: LOT #3 IN BRIARCREST SUBDIVISION, BEING A SUBD1- 
VISION IN THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 19 AND THE 
SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 43 NORTH, 
RANGE 11. EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORD-' 
ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED SEPTEMBER 1, 1988 AS 
DOCUMENT NUMBER 2716884, AND CORRECTED BY CERTIFI- 
CATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED DECEMBER 29, 1988 AS DOC- 
UMENT NUMBER 2752829. IN LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 
- PARCEL 2: EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS FOR THE 
BENEFIT OF PARCEL 1 OVER THE PRIVATE ROADWAYS AS LOCAT- 
ED AND DEPICTED ON THE PLAT OF BRIARCREST SUBDIVISION 
RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NUMBER 2716884, IN LAKE COUNTY, 
ILLINOIS. 

PARCEL 3: EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS FORTHE BEN- 
EFIT OF PARCEL 1 AS GRANTED BY INSTRUMENT RECORDED AS 
DOCUMENT NUMBER 2716883, WHICH EASEMENT IS LOCATED 
AND DEPICTED ON EXHIBIT "0* ATTACHED THEREOF, IN LAKE 
COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 

PARCEL 4: EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS FOR THE BEN- 
EFIT OF PARCEL 1 AS GRANTED BY INSTRUMENT RECORDED AS 
DOCUMENT NUMBER 2716881. WHICH EASEMENT IS LOCATED 
AND EVICTED ON EXHIBIT *C" ATTACHED THERETO. IN LAKE ' 
COUNTY. ILUNOIS, 
P.I.N. 15-19-404-002-0000 
commonly known as: 5213 Hilltop Road, Long Grove, Illinois 60047. Improved with 
a s I ngle fam I ly reside nee. 

Sale shall be under the following terms: 10% down, balance within 24 hours. 
Premises will not be open for Inspection. 

For information contact: laurence J. Goldstein, ZAMPARO and GOLDSTEIN. PC. 
Plaintiff's Attorney, 899 Skokie Boulevard, Suite 300. Northbrook, Illinois 60062. 
Telephone: (847) 564-3100. 
Dated: February 2. 1999. 

0199B-2422-LB 
February 12, ,1999 
February 19, 1999 
February 26, 1999 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
STATE OF ILUNOIS ) 

) SS 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 
LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
JOHN CHARLES BEESON and MARY E. 
HARMAN, as Successor Trustees undor 
Ihe CHARLES E. BEESON Trust dated 
September 24, 1992 as Asslgnoe of 
CHARLES BEESON and MAY BEESON 
Plaintiff, 
vs. 
THOMAS E. BEESON, DONNA L BEESON, 
HARRIS BANK PALATINE.TMK 
DEVELOPMENT, LTD., MIDWEST ) 

TRADING HORTICULTURAL SUPPLIES. 
INC., WITTEMAN & CO. B.V., OXFORD 
CAPITAL FUND, LTD., DUNLAP ENTERPRISES, * 
LTD., UNKNOWN OWNERS and NONRECORD 
CLAIMANTS, 

Defendants. 



) 

) 

) 

) 

) 
)No.97CH554 

) 
) 

) 
) 
) 

) 



) 



THOMAS E. BEESON 



vs. 



Counter-Plaintiff, 



JOHN CHARLES BEESON and MARY E. HARMAN, ) 

as Successor Trustees under tho CHARLES E. ) 

BEESON Trust dated September 24, 1992, JOHN ) 

CHARLES BEESON, MARY E, HARMAN, ) 
Individually, and the CHARLES E. BEESON) 
Trust, 

Counter-Defendants. ) 

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE 

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment heretofore entered by 
the said Court In the above-entitled cause on December 1, 1998, Sheriff of Lake 
County, Illinois, will on Monday, March 15, 1999 at the hour of 9:00 AM al the Robert 
H. Babcox Justice Center, 25 S. Ulica Street, Conference Room, First Floor, 
Waukegan, Illinois 60065, sell at public auction to the highest bidder and best bidder 
for cash, all and singular, the following described premises and real estate in the said 
Judgment mentioned, situation In the County of Lake, State of Illinois, or so much 
thereto as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment. 

The South 646.36 feet as measured along the east line of the Northwest Quarter 
of them Southwest Quarter of that part of the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest 
Quarter of Section 17, Township 43 North, Range 12, East of the third Principal 
Meridian, lying East of the Easterly right of way tine of Illinois Route 43 and North of 
the Northerly right of way line of Illinois Route 22 In Lake County, Illinois 

Said property Is commonly known as 11760 W, Route 22, Deerfield, Illinois 60015. 
' P.I.N. 16-17-300-032-011 and 16-17-300-032-0010 

The person to contact for Information regarding this properly Is: 

Mark T. Hamilton at Churchill, Baumgartner & Qulnn, 2 S. Whitney Street, 
Grayslake, IL 60030, (847) 223-1500. 

The terms of sale are: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by 
certified funds. No refunds. 

* The property is approximately a five acre parcel of land Improved by a concrete 
block building, a one story concrete block garden store, and a glass greenhouse and 
frame building with a house attached, Including a three car garage, three to four bed- 
rooms and one and one half baths. 

The Judgment amount was $1,895,164.93. 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 

Together with all buildings and Improvements thereon, and the tenements, hered- 
itaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging. 
MARK T.HAMILTON 
JOHN W. QUINN 

CHURCHILL, BAUMGARTNER & QUINN, LTD. 
Attorneys for Plaintiffs 
RO, Box 284 
Grayslake, IL 60030 
(847)223-1500 
Attorney No, 01 11 1000 

0199B-2425LB 
February 12, 1999 
February 19, 1999 
February 26, 1999 



. 



^&JfMKn i 




February 19, 1999 



■ 




CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C 1 3 








otlccs v. no 

Lost & Foiind ^: 1 15 

F«e .-. no 

Personals , . / ,....,......,,.,., 125 

Auctions 130 

Business Personals ', ;135 

Flnunctul 140 

Giminployiitmt 

Help Wuntcd Pjrt-Tlme 219 

Help Wanted Full-Time . .220 

Employment Agencies ',-. ,221 

. Business Opportunities ,225 

.Situations Wuntcd 228 

Child Care .'. .240 

School/Instruction .250 




Antiques 301 

Appliances .304 

Durtcr/Trude 308 

Bazaars/Crafts .310 

Building Materials 314 

Uusincss/Officc Equipment .318 

Electronics/Computers 320 

Farm Guide ............. .324 

Firewood ' .328 

Gunipe/Rnmiiugc Sales 330 

Good Tilings To Eat L'." 334 

Horses & Tack 338 

Household Goods/Furniture .340 

Jewelry 344 

Lawn/Garden . . . . 348 

Clothing ; . . .340 

Miscellaneous .350 

Medical Equip/Supplies 3S4 

Musical Instrument:. .358 

Pels Sc Supplies 300 

Restaurant Equipment ,364 

Tools & Machinery 368 

Wanted To Buy . . . ; 370 




uloir 

Homes For Sale v 500 

Homes. For Kent .' 504 

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Coiido/Towu Homes 514 

Mobile Homes .5 1 S 

Apartments For Rent . .' 520 

Apartments Wanted 524 

Apt/Homes To Share . . . '. '. 528 

Rooms For Rent '. 530 

Buildings 533 

Business Property For Sale 534 

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Investment Property . . .~ .540 

'Mortgage Services 544 

Farms 548 

Vacant Lots/Acreage 560 

Resorts/Vacation Rentals 564 

Out Of Area Properly 568 

Cemetery Luis 570 

Real Estate Wanted -574 

Real Estate Misc. .'. v . . . '. /._.. .:■.•_„.. ..£78 

^Recreational'-'- 






■ 



Recreational Vehicles. . .. 704 

Snowmobiles/ATVs .708 

Boats/Motors/Etc 710 

Camping : . : 714 

Travel/Vacation ... 718 

Sports Equipment ,,.,... . .720 

Ail planes ' • - -724 

tranipprtatlun 

Cars For Sale : ;>,:.. v.." . .804 

Rental/Leases .'. .... .808 

Classic/ Antique Cars .810 

Services & Parts V 814 

Cur Loans/insurance . . ,818 

Vans.. 824 

Four Wheel Drive/Jeeps' '. .828 

Trucks/Trailers 834 

Heavy Equipment • • ■ -838 

Motorcycles 844 

Wante d 1o Buy ^.. ..848 

Appliances Repair . , . S03 

Blacktop S06 

Builders '. S09 

Carpentry S i 2 

Carpel Cleaning SI5 

Concrete/Cement S 18 

Dry Wall" I ■ ■ «2I 

Education/Instruction • • • • >S24 

Electrical -S27 

Firewood • -S30 

Handy man . . . , '.,,... S33 

Healing/Air Conditioning S36 

Housekeeping . ^39 

landscaping t . • • >S42 

Lautidry/Clcaniug S45 

Legal Services .S48 

Medical Services . .S51 

Moving/Storage ' S54 

Painting Dcconitlug S57 

Puralegul/IViilng Services SoO 

Plumbing £03 

., S66 

V ; ;..... ..S69 

...;.,. .S72 

',..'.,,'. ..['.. '., ...S75 

....S78 

. ...... SSI 

,.S84 

■ ;. . ... .S87 

S<J0 



Pools 

Pressure Washing . . 
Professional Services 
Radio/TV Repair 
Remodeling . . .... 

Resumes ■ 



RiHiriiq?/Sldiiig' 

Storage 

Tux Service . . . 



Trees/Plants . 

Wedding 

Miscellaneous 



•S93 
.S9G 
,S9'J 



£) 



istri button 



Kenosha 
County 



Twin Lake* Silver Uk» 



Brtitol 




John* burg 



McHonry 



CrytttI 

Lake 

Mcllcnxy 



County 



Kenosha 



Dofl 
EJ Wadavrorth 

GurnM 
'>=— -Round UMe: Orayalatal Waukegar 

m .^*-s^ As Nor , h 



laland Lake 




Mundelaln 



Oaks 



.North Wauconda; 
BanlflBtori LakaZurlch 

Klldeer 



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Cook County 



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Pick-up 4:15pm at 
Hampton Inn, Gumee. 
Ride 10 times and get a 
free package of specials. 
Hollywood Casino, 
Valentines Day 
Bam. Pay $15 get free 
brunch and $8 back. 
Call for Information 

(847) 831-1094. 
(847) 473-1263. 



ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad In the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are run at NO 
CHARGE1 (We discourage 
any pet ads), Deadlines: 10am 
Wednesdays. (847) 

223-8161, ext.140. 



HEA1IHY WOMEN 

$3500.00 Compensation 

lleuhliy women, age 20-33, 

needed io serve as anonymous 

egg donors. Donors will bo 

required to Kike, medication, 

blood screening and undergo 

minor surgical procedure. We 

are interested in nil elliuic 

backgrounds. Multiple locations 

available. If interested call 

ARR77.V327-7315 

Serious ditjitirlex Only ' 



ONLY 




If you have an Item 
you want to sell for 

$75.00 or. less you 
can place an ad for 
only $3,001 Call; Lisa 

at (847) 223-8161 

ext.140 

for more Information. 



A LOVING CHOICE Dear 
birth mom, we're Ken and 
Jean, a happily married cou- 
ple with a 5yr. old adopted son 
who can provide a warm, lov- 
ing home for your child. We'd 
be happy to keep In touch 
through . pictures and letters. 
Please call our attorney Sara 
(773) 503-0099 or (toll free) 
(877) 509-0099. 

ADOPTION 

We're Mary and Mark, 

partners In marriage and the 

best of friends. Having a child 

will fulfill our greatest dream. 

We value education, 

have supportive families, 

financial security and 

lots of energy and love. 

We'll gladly help you, tool ' 

CALL MARY AND MARK 

888-295-1313. 

ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE 

FOR ACHES AND PAINS. 

Therapeutic massage for 

infants and children. 

FREE MASSAGE 

TEACHING 

To molherslll 

(847) 623-4523. 

BEAUTIFUL FOREVER! 

PERMANENT COSMETIC 

MAKE-UP. 

•Eyebrows 

*Eyeline 

*Also 

•Electrolysis 

•(Permanent Hair Removal). 

Sherry (847) 249-7446. 

ITS TIME TO LOSE 

WEIGHT AND FEEL 

RIGHT 

With Herba Ufa. 

Guaranteed results. 

Dr. Approved. 

Independent Distributor. 

(847) 587-1708. 



LOOK GREAT! 
LOSE WEIGHT) 
MAKE MONEY! 
(847) 940-9689. 

LOSE WEIGHT NOWI 

We'll pay you to lose up to 

30ibs. In the next 30 daysll 

All Natural. 

100% guaranteed. 

Call 1-877-81 6-8028. . 

METABOLIFE 356m 

All natural dietary supplement 

that helps raise your 

metabolism, bum fat, and 

control your appetite! 

For lowest prices call . 

ENERGY BURST 

(847)543-8403 

Indepond*ii Diilnbutw. 

METABOLIFE356W ■ 
Natural diet supplement. 
As advertised on local 

TV and radio,.. 

Independent distributor 

(847) 263-3876. 



PLEASE HELP US 

ADOPT! Musical mom, athle- 
tic dad, married 12 years, hop-. 
Ing to adopt your precious 
baby. We live in an. activity - 
filled comfortable home with 2 
lovable mutts In a close-knit 
neighborhood lull of children 
(many adopted). Medical, le- 
gal, counseling and' court ap- 
proved living expenses paid. 
Confidential. Please call our 
attorney at (70S) 957-6833. 

WE'RE A HAPPILY MAR- 
RIED, secure, loving couple 
unable to have children. Our 
greatest dream Is to share our 
lives with a child, and we 
would embrace the opportuni- 
ty to adopt the baby that you 
may not be ready for. The 
dreams you have for your 
baby can come true. If you are 
considering an adoption plan 
as an alternative In your preg- 
nancy, please call us. Paul 
and Denlsa 1-888-697-5777 
We can help each other. 



ssssssssssssssss 



$ 
$ 

s 

$ 
s 
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s 
-8 
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$ 
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$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 



INSTANT 
CASH 

We bold the title 

toyourcar- 

You keep the car. 

(Jet skis, 

motorcycles & 
snowmobiles tool!) 

* No Credit Check 
' IS Mm Approval 



I (847) 249-5500 



219 



HdpWsntcd 
Part-Time 



140 


Financial 



ALL CASHl RECEIVING 
payments on a mortgage? 
Why wait? Best prices paid na- 
tionwide, plus we pay transfer 
costs. Sell all/part. Purchase 
Equity Investors 1-800-999- 
9892. 

BANKRUPTCY S78+. 
STOPS garnishments. Guar- 
anteed valid since 1991. Di- 
vorce $99+ Low caost Debt 
Reduction and Foreclosure. 
Avoidance services available 
without bankruptcy. Fresh- 
Start 888-395-6030 

FINANCIAL RELIEF FOR 
THE TERMINALLY ILL If 
you're living with a terminal ill- 
ness and have a life Insurance 
policy, we can give you cash 
for your policy's face value. 
For free Info kit call Enhance 
UfeBenelils 1-800-325-8120. 

MAXEDOUT? 

Burled In Debt7 

Behind on your payments? 

Uvlng paycheck to paycheck? 

You're not alone. 

But the good news Is, 

. we have a REAL solution 

Debt Crisis Solutions. 

Confidential. 

» Call Today (847) 740-9178. 

. Ext. #3. ■ 

REGARDLESS OF CRED- 
IT Loans, debt consolidation, 
credit cards. For all your finan- 
cial: needs call 1-888-898- 
7476 (SCA Network). 

V1SA/MASTERCARD-UP 
TO $6000. No deposit. No 
credit/bad credit OK. Call 
today for guaranteed fast ap- 
proval or Information. Call 1- 
800-247-7012 (SCA Network). 



GREAT $$'s 

Flexible Hours 

Setting Appointments. 

Call for Information 

(847) 940-9689. 

LOOKING FOR 

DEPENDABLE 

AUTO MECHANIC 

WITH TOWING & 
! FLATBED EXPERIENCE 

j CALL WARD 

847-295-5878 



1 



SECRETARY/ 
RECEPTIONIST 



Allendale Association, a 

multi-service treatment 

center, is seeking a part 

time Secretary/Receptionist 

for our Bradley Counseling 

Center. Preferred candidate 

will have high school 

diploma, one year solid 

office experience, MS 

Office and data entry 

proficiency, and type 50 

wpm. Responsibilities 

include; switchboard, 

visitor/client processing, 

clerical support, data entry 

and statistical reports. 

3 days per wcck/4 hrs. per 

day (PM only). 

Fax or send resume to: 

Allendale Association 

Human Resources Dept. 
P.O. Box 1088 
Lake Villa, IL 60046 
Fax: 847-356-0290 . 




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C14 / Lakeland Newspapers 



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CLASSIFIED 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Pan-Time 



9SSS83SSSSSSSSSS 

J Earn Extra income | 

8 Weekly paychecks s 
| working from home. 

Your choice of s 

9 evenings and/or S 
| weekends. Scheduling | 
| appointments to pickup s 
S discarded household 8 
| items for well known j 
| charitable organization. s 
8 Minimum 4-6 hours a 8 
J week. Please call § 

(630)515-5752 J 
8S3S83SS8SS8888S 




Don't Miss Outi 
It's Comingl 

Every year 

IjikclanJ Newspapers offers 

Employment Outlook lo its 

renders Fcaluring ihc 

(Hottest jobs in lawn! 
Don't miss tills special scclionl 



.& 



800 



SODEXHO MARRIOTT 

Food Service 

Part Time Help 

Range of hours: 9:00am to 2:30pm 

Apply in person at 
Round Lake High School 
North High School Rd., Round Lake, IL 
047-546-7430 

EOE 



Reception!*! 

Full-Time Benefits 
I'.rl-Time Hour*: 12:00 PM -5:00 PM 
NCH NuWorld Marking Umlled Is the leading worldwide nurVellng services 
provider of coupon redemption & promotioiul Infnrmalkxi. Our clients Include 
leading consumer packaged goods manufacturers, mass mercrundbera and 
grocery retailers. We are growing domestically and Internationally In our core 
Business,!! well as new ventures. We are looking for a tram pla)cr with a 
positive altitude to add to our sUff. 

You will be responsible for operating our6-llneswlkhboanJ. Receiving it for- 
warding alls/messages. Creel and direct visitors. General a itmlnlstrative/ 
clerical projects as needed. 

Qualified candldales will haveal least ! yr. experience. Typing sklllsa must 
Knowledge of Word, Excel and PowerPoint desired. Excellent telephone skills 
w/lhc ability to handle high volume phone oils. 

We offer a challenging and reward Ing environment, as well as a very compclillve 
compensation anil benefit* package. Please forward resume Including salary 
reculremenlslo NCM NuWorld NLuketuie. Limited, 75 Tri-Stale Inlemallonal, 

I Lincolnshire, IL 60069, Attn: MR, or fax to W7-31 7-5575. 
EOE/M/F/D/v 



« 



AUDITORS NEEDED 



• EARLY AM HOURS 

• CAR NECESSARY 
•$8.00 TO START 



Call For An Interview 



847- 662-927 7 

nm& SPECIALISTS 
An Equal Opportunity Employer 



YWCA ACTIVITIES DIRECTOR 

DEVELOP YWCA EVENTS. RESPONSIBLE 

FOR AGENCY NEWSLETTER & PRESS 

RELEASES. BACKGROUND IN MARKETING, 

PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT, FUND RAISING & 

BUDGETS. PART-TIME FLEXIBLE 

SCHEDULE TO INCLUDE SOME WEEKENDS 

& EVENINGS. PLEASE SEND RESUME TO: 

YWCA 

2133 BELVIDERE RD. 

WAUKEGAN, IL 60085 

847-662-4247. EOE 



LET'S TALK 



■ 



Do you like to earn money, but 

not work long hours? Do you 

enjoy talking on the phone? 

Then give me a call. Excellent 

sales opportunities are available 

jn Lakeland's Classified Sales 

Dept. Telemarketing 

experience preferred -a< 

but not required. 

Send resume or request 
for application to: 

Attn: M. Combs 
Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, JX 60030 

or Fax 



(847) 223-8810' 



219 



Help Warned 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Warned 
Part-Time 






t- 



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ft] 



GIFT SHOP 

mature person 
for 3 yveekdays. 

Must work 

independently. 

The Tulip Patch 

390 Like St., Antioch 
847-395-7331 



Calling anyone who 
needs extra money!!! 

We are looking for highly 

energetic Individuals lo work In a 

fait paced friendly environment 

preparing newspapers tot delivery. 

Thursday from 130 mil to 7 a jtl 

Ctayslake/Round Lake area. 

This job will give you plenty of lime I 

lo gel lo a full lime job, home before J 

the kids get off lo school, or have 

the rest of the dav lo yourself! No 

ipccbl skills needed, students and 

retirees are welcome! Applicant 

must be physically able lo lift 

small bundles of piper. 

Call DLinc for Interview'.! 
($47) 7404035 



PART-TIME 
I FLEXIBLE DAY HOURS ; 

Groat phono skills, 
filing, light typing, errands 

& olher mbc. duties 

for fast paced 

Downtown Ubertyville 

office dealing with health 

Information. 
(Perfect for moms or students) 

847-680-1333 



Part time 
evening hours for busy 

CHIROPRACTIC 
OFFICE 

,1s looking Tor a motivated 

self starter, high energy, 

enthusiastic Individual lo 

do office work, light 

filing, phones, etc 

Must have computer 

experience and great 

people skills. Professional 

atmosphere. $7/hr. 

Please call Dr. Bouma 

(847) 543-1055 



1tJ 



raphic 
'esigner 



We're looking for a 

"graphic designer" lo join our (cam. 

Do you have experience with 

computers and graphic design 

programs? If you do, 

Ihcn wc can leach you Ihc 

rest in this cnlry level position. 

Wend your resume to NEAL TUCKER at: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 
Grayslake, IL 60030 
or fax to 223-8810 



DELIVERY 



Want to earn up to $200 per 
week and be your own boss? 

The Daily Herald is looking for 

adult, independent personnel for 

newspaper delivery in the Lake 

County area. 2-3 hour routes 

available between the hours of 

2am & 6am, Monday thru 

Friday; 2am-7am, Saturdays, 

Sundays and Holidays. 

For more information call... 

(847) 427-4333 



ielomarkeling/Part-Time 




<, 



Now's your chance to 
cfisk in on your free time. * 

Ltkeland Newspapers is now accepting application i for \* 

purl time tikp'ione sales, 4 wurkfmm our Ctayshke office. J 

No experience necessary \ka a plus). ^l 

RETIREES / 

COLLEGE STUDENTS S 
HOUSEWIVES ^ 

k Must enjoy talking to people. Hourly wage plus bomix\^ 



Average $IQ-$I5 per hour or more 

HOURS: 

Mon.-Tlturs. 5:00pm. - 8:30p.m. 
Day Hours Sat. 9:00am-2:00pm 



<£ For Interview Call 
f Dick (after Noon) 
^ Lakeland Newspapers 
> (847) 740-4035 

Taaaaaaa 




219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



NICASA 

lias a parr time position 

(20 hours per week) for a 

qualifier! data entry clerk 

who Is derail minded, a 

self-starter and Ims the 

ability to communicate and 

work well with others. 

Requirements: Excellent 

kcybojrding skills, and 

10 key pad experience. 

Send or fax resume to: 

NICASA 

. c/o Janc^Sage 
31979 N. Fish Lake Road 
. Round Lake, ILC0073 
FX: 847-516-6760 
EOE 



NICASA 

PART-TIME 

ACCOUNTING 

SELF-STARTER 
EXPERIENCED IN 

ACCOUNT 

RECONCILIATION 
BUDGET PREPARATION 

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS 

HOURS FLEXIBLE 

15-20 PER WEEK 

SEND RESUME TO: 

LINDA SNELTEN 

C/O NICASA 

319797 N. FISH LAKE RD 

ROUND LAKE, IL 60073 




220 



Help Wanted 
Pull-Time 



$1000 BONUS - Run solo 
regional. Got home weekends, 
90% No Touch Freight. Full 
benefits package. Call Deb 
Scholt @ 1-800-553-2778 Ext. 
2742 

1000 ENVELOPES=$4000 
AT HOMEI Receive S4 for 
every envelope you stuff with 
our sales materials. Gur- 
anteed. Free Info, 24hr. 
recording. (310) 851-2152. 
(SCA Network). ■ 

AG POSITIONS: AGRON- 
OMY $55K; Plant Manager 
$50K; Sales S38K; Applicator 
S40K; Seed Sales S45K; G.P.S. 
Precision Manager $45K. Bill 
Meyer, Agra Placements Ltd., 
Lincoln. II. 217-735-4373. 

AIM HIGH FIND your future 
with the Air Forcel Training, 
travel, educational assistance 
and financial security. Plus en- 
listment bonuses up lo 
$9,000 to those who qualify. 
Age requirement 17-27. For a 
free Information packet, call 1- 
800-423-USAF or visit 
www.Blrforce.com 

ANYONE CAN DO THIS1 

Earn $800-$5,000 per month 
Taking Customer Service 
i Calls at home. 
^ Full or Part-Time. 
Call 1-888-395-0743. 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you have placed classified 
advertising with the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may 
receive n misleading state- 
ment from another firm re- 
questing payment for this 
advertising. To receive prop- 
er credit to your account, 
oil payments ror your Lake- 
land Newspapers advertising 
must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

PO Box 208 

SO B. Whitney St. 

Orsyslftkc, IL 60030-0268 



AVON PRODUCTS- 
START a homobasod busi- 
ness. Work flexlblo hours. 
Enjoy unlimited earnings. Call 
Toll Free (888) 561 -AVON. 

DRIVE TO OWN: LIVE 
YOUR DREAM. Class A COL & 
2yrs. experience required. No 
$ down/No credit chock. Com- 
pany drivers • up to 35e/mile + 
bonus. Owner ops needed. 
Call now. 800-843-3364 or 
800-843-8308. 



DRIVER - ATTENTION: 
STAY CLOSE TO HOME AND 
GET THE MILES YOU NEED. 
Regional runs, home weekly. 
Experienced drivers and 
owner operators needed. Bur- 
lington Motor Carriers 800- 
564-6262. 



220 



Help Wanted 
Ftill-Tlinc 



DRIVER DON'T JUST 

move over, move up, Con- 
Way Truckload Services Is 
more than fust a Trucking 
Company." CWT Drivers re : 
colve paid health Insurance 
for thom9olvos and their faml- 
ty...Pald holidays and vaca- 
tions. Company "paid llfo In ; 
suranco and 401 K. Family 
rider program, assigned new 
and into model conventional. 
Frequent home time, direct 
deposit, competitive pay, 
CWT drivers avorage 
$42,158.25 per year. Let us 
toil you more about CWT and 
how you 'can be more than 
just a driver. Call 000-555- 
CWTS cwt.job@con-way.com 
Con-Way Truckload Services 
CWT In an EOE. 

DRIVER: UP TO S700/week 
orientation pay. Up to 35c/mile 
to start. Great hometlme. As- 
signed, all conventional fleet. 
Lease Purchase Options. 
BOYD BROS. 800-543-8923 
EOE. 

DRIVERS - NO exp/No prob- 
lem. No cost CDL training If 
qualified. $30,000 a year + 
benefits. BOO-553-1044. 

DRIVERS • OWNER Ops 
Feel Like your In Neutral? No 
Canada, NYC or NE, Mln. ■ 
23yr. wllh 1yr. OTR CDL with 
Hazmat. Paschall Truck Lines 
80O-B4B-0405. 

DRIVERS AND TEAMS: 

Starting pay up to 37c/mlle. As- 
signed Frelghillnor conven- 
tionale, Improved speed 
stance, excellent miles, lime 
home every 7-10 days In most 
areas and moro. Experienced 
drivers call Heartland Express 
toll-free 1-87-PRO-ORIVE. 
Owner Operators ask about 
88C/mlle. Call 1-8-PROFIT- 
PRO. E.O.E. 

DRIVERS ARE YOU looking 
lo make a change? Look no 
further. G.F. Lacaeyse Trans- 
port has the miles, the equip- 
ment and the experience to 
make you successful. Call 800- 
645-3748. 

DRIVERS: OWNER OP- 
ERATORS and temporary 
company drivers for hauling 
manufactured products. New 
compensation package. 3+ 
months experience. North 
American Van Unes 800-348- 
2147. Dept. ILS. 

EARN EXTRA MONEY 
Work one weekend a month 
and two weeks a year and re- 
ceive 100% college tuition, the 
Montgomery G.I. Bill and an 
excellent paycheck. You may 
also qualify for a cash enlist- 
ment bonus. Call your local 
National Guard representative 
today al 1-800-OK-GUARD. 

EASY WORKI 

NO EXPERIENCE 

$500-$ 1 ,000 part-time at 

home stuffing envelopes. 

For free Information send 

self-addressed, 

stamped envelope: 

R&J Enterprises 

Mailing Services, Inc. 

P.O. Box 402 ' 
Ingleslde, 111.60041. 

DRIVER BUD MEYER 
Truck Unes Refrigerated Haul- 
ing "$1,000 sign-on bonus for 
experienced company drivers 
"Solo drivers start up to 33c 
solos drivers and contractors 
CALL TOLL FREE 877-283- 
6393 GRADUATE STUDENTS 
1-800-338-6428. 

DRIVER INEXPERI- 

ENCED? Ask about our com- 
pany sponsored training. We 
have raised pay for ALL our 
drivers, and we offer top con- 
ventional equipment. U.S. Ex- 
press 888-936-3338. 



UllllllllllllllllillillllllNlllllimilllllllllllimiNIUIilllli 

ESCAPE THE 

SNOW & COLD 

Irnmed Openings- 
Atlanta, GA. 
The S.E.'s Largest 
Volvo & GMC Dealer 
seeks qualified individuals I 
to keep up with our 
growth. 

MECHANICS 
' 3yrs dlesel cxp 

* Volvo St GMC 
background a plus 

* Pay based on 
performance 

' Exc bnfts 
* Training provided, 

Resume; 
Volvo & GMC Trucks, 

Atlanta 

Altn: P. Knight, HR 

. 700 Ruskln Dr, . 

Forest Park, GA 30297 

Fax 404-362-3755 

lltllJIllltllllllUUIIIIIltllilUIIMIIIIIIUMIIIimilllillJ 



. 



February 19, 1999 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



REPORTER Lakeland News- 
papers has an opening for an 
entry level reporter on Its ex- 
panding editorial staff. Experi- 
ence in writing and some pho- 
tography Is helpful, Will handle 
a variety of writing assign- 
ments end work on a varied, 
flexlblo schedule. You must be 
able to work under deadline 
situations. If you havo the 
basic skills wo need, this may 
be your chance for a career 
start. Come on board with us 
and we'll teach you the rest. 
Please fax resumes to: Nea) 
Tucker, Executive Editor, 
(847) 223-8810 or mall to: 30 
S. Whitney St., Grayslake, III. 
60030. ____ 

SCHUSTER - DRIVERS! 
OVER THE ROAD. Reefers 
and dry van. We offer new pay 
package: Odometer miles or 
computer miles 'Great home 
time *Lumpers *Great health 
Insurance *401K plan *1995- 
99 all conv. fleet 'Direct depos- 
it your bank 'Quarterly safety 
bonus 'Rider policy. You 
need: Class A CDL with Haz- 
Mat & 2yrs. OTR exp. Call Gor- 
don 800-831-4832. 

THE CRST ADVANTAGE: 

INEXPERIENCED DRIVERS • 
"Company sponsored training 
*Up to $31,000 first year. EX- 
PERIENCED DRIVERS - *Solo 
and team *Up to $2,000 sign- 
on "Immediate Insurance 
•Lease/purchase. RECENT 
SCHOOL GRADUATE - Tui- 
tion reimbursement *$500 
sign-on. Call Karen 1-80O-5O4- 
2778 • CRST International. 

WEIGHT LOSSI 

We'll pay you to 

Lose up to 

30! bs. In 30 days. 

Call 1-800-600-0343 

oxt. 2465. 



GET PAID S15-S30 per 
hour processing Insurance 
claims for local doctors office. 
Complete Iralnlng provided. 
Computer and modem re- 
quired. Call 600/942-8141 
EXT. 82. * 



GRAPHIC DESIGNER 

We're looking for a 

■graphic designer* to join our 

learn. Do you have experience 

with computers and graphic . 

design programs? If you do, 

then we can teach you the 

rest 

In this entry level position. 

Send your resume lo: 

Neal Tucker , 

Lakeland Newspapers, 

30 S. Whitney St, 

Grayslake, III. 60030. 

Or fax to: (847) 223-8810. 



HELP WANTED SEMI 

DUMP DRIVER, 5yrs. expert- 
ence. (647)587-4251. 

INSURANCE 4 DAY work 
week. Leads, advances, 
$1,000/week, statewide op- 
portunity, 5 people minimum. 
Call ASAP 1-800-252-2581. 

MEDICAL BILLING NA- 
TIONWIDE Company seek- 
ing billers. PC reaqulred, no 
experience necessary. Poten- 
tial earnings of $31,500-1- in- 
vestment required, Call 800- 
524-1478. ' 

QUALITY DRIVE-AWAY 
NEEDS DRIVERS TO DELIV- 
ER RV'S: Owner operators 
with pickup trucks; Driver to 
deliver Drive-Away units. Also, 
tractors to pull company or op- 
erator's trailers. Call Larry 
(800) 695-9743. • 



Medical 

RECEPTIONIST 

Your communication skills 
arc essential to our busy 
Gurnee, Ear, Nose and 
Throat practice. This Full 
Time Day position would be 
ideal for someone with . 
reception experience In a 
medical practice, but we are 
willing to train an effective 
communicator. Bilingual 
ability In English/Spanish 
would be a plus. 
We provide an excellent 
salary and bene Ills package. 
Please apply In person or 
send/fax resume to: 

VICTORY 
MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

1324 N. Sheridan Rd. 

Waukegan, IL 60085 

Fax; 847-360-4230 

Equal Opportunity Employer M/F 






M 






■V.'.? 1 <*.\ jntoiftdsft 



February 19, 1999 



a=»* 



^J» 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C 1 5 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time- 



220 



Help Warned 
Full-Time " 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fulf-Tinic 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



IKi 



TOOLING TECHNICIAN/MACHINIST 



ChlcaQO Cuflory, one of the world's loading manufac- 
turers of qualify knives b currents seeking a highly mali- 
valed and experienced Tooling Technician. This job 
Inckjdes responsibility for maintaining all tooling In 
excellent repair for use In production: replacing punch- 
es, bushings and other die parti* working from blue- 
prints to buDd fixtures; and helping In press change 
overs. 

The Ideal candidate wDi have a minimum of Iwo years 
experience maintaining progressive i lamping toots plus 
special course work In machine tool Tech. or appren- 
tice program (AA/AS degree In Machine Tool 
Technology preferred). 

This full time position on the day shift otters competitive 
salary, bonus ca pabffity and comprehensive benefit 
pockage Including medical denial Ife Insurance, 401 00, 
pension, pd vacollon & hoBdays.To appfy, please send 
or fax your resume Including SQlorv history to: 

Chicago Cutlery, Inc. 

441 Bonner RdV 

WducondalL 60084 

Attn: HR Mgr/LN 

Fax: '847-526-2154 

Apply In person frorri 8 am - 4 pav No phono cato please 
Final candidate rtiflt pan drug town. EO£ 



k 




■ 



■a 



Start a Home-Based Business. 

Work Flexible Hours. 

■ 

Enjoy Unlimited Earnings. 

AVON 

Call Toll Free (800) 735-8867 



off 



f- *> *X#<^I^H0HtBMI 



Banking 




There's Only One Environment 
That's Best for Your Lifestyle! 




Harris Bank Client Contact Center, located In 
Buffalo Grove, is seeking the following Individuals to 
'join its team: 

TELEPHONE BANKING 
REPRESENTATIVES 

You must possess a professional demeanor and out- . 
standing customer service/sales skills, as Well as enjoy 

f>roblem solving and a fast paced environment. The abil- 
ty to handle a high volume of calls from our Retail Bank 
customers and excellent communication and organiza- 
tional skills also required. IRA experience, keyboardlng 
skills, and bilingual a plus. 

After successful compfetfon of 90 days 
of employment, you will receive a 
$500 SIGN-ON BONUS! " 
' *•'"■ ■ - ■ - •■■■ ...... ..... , — 

We otter an excellent salary and compensation pack- 
age, Including state-of-the-art technology, tuition reim- 
bursement for full-time positions, and ample opportuni- 
ty for advancement. For consideration, forward 
resume, including salary history, to: Human . 
Resources, BGR733, Harris Bank Card Center, 
700 E. Lake Cook Rd., Buffalo Grove, IL 60089. 
Fax: (847)520-649 i.EOE. 



S~J= HARRIS 
jy| BANK. 



HELPING YOU MAKE BCTTTK CHOICES. 



DIRECTOR WOMEN'S HEALTH 



PROFESSIONAL WITH BACKGROUND IN 
COMMUNITY HEALTH, SOCIAL WORK & ' 
COUNSELING. ABLE TO ADDRESS THE HEALTH 
NEEDS OF WOMEN & GIRLS OF LOWINCOME. 

DEVELOPS WORKING RELATIONSHIP WITH 

COMMUNITY, HEALTHAND HUMAN SERVICE 

PROVIDERS. WRITING EXPERIENCE FOR- 

PROPOSALS, GRANTS AND REPORTS TO MINDERS. 

mLLTINffi WITH BENEFITS. - ' 

SEND RESUME TO; 

YWCA OF LAKE COUNTY 

2133 BELV1DERE RD. 

WAUKEGAN.IL 60085 

OR CALL SUZANNE 847-662-4247 



Restaurant-hourly positions now available 



SERVERS, COOKS 
BARTENDERS , j 

And All Other, fk An fflflfi 

and Business 15 -«* 



Earn Top$$$ & Great Benefits.. 

Tuition; assistance program, health club 
membership, car buying assistance, free 
employee meals, paid vacations, Insurance, 
day rare discbunt and more all in a fun and 
very festive working atmosphere! 

So stop by today & fill out an application at: 
677 Lake Cook Road In. Deerfleld 

next to the Deerfield Metra Station! 



ROMANO'S 




GRILL 

.WJUJOJilMTEm 



Sales 



Positions! 



CarMax* The Auto Superstore, pioneered the no haggling, no negotiating used-car 
superstore format that ho* ravotiiHonixod th* way America buys con. We are currently - 
Molting full and port-ttmo Solo* Consultant* at our now Kenoiha Auto Mall. Locatod 
on W4 and Highway 50, we sell both new and used tars. ■ 

CarMax off erst 

• Great earning potential- Senior Sale) Consultant typically earn an average 
-,ot $3.5-$7.5K per monlh in commission. (Commiwion-bateci earnings of 

fulMimo top-perfonrton with ai leoil one year of conh'nuoui service,) Regular 
rulkimo Sales Consultants who have been employed at least one year typically 
earn between S2-$3K per monlh in commissions. . 

• Excellent retail hours • Wo oro closed on Sundays. 

• Excellent benefits including employee discounts, slock purchase plan, and tuition ... 
reimbursement. Fulltime associates receive health care, dental, life and paid 
vacation. 

• Extensive training program. Previous automotive experience not necessary. 

" CarMax is leekingi 

• Sales professionals wilh high energy, excellent communication skills, who 
are team' players. (Full & part-time positions available) 

• Proviom retail sales experience a plus-. 

We also have opening* for the following position*! - 
Bui ines s Office Administrators 
Customer Assistance Representatives 
Auto Technicians 
Auto Porters 









: ■-:":; '-o\ 






Quality ■ Integrity - L 

Relax. It's CarMax. 



m 



»3i<- v > 



220 



Help Wanted 
• Full-Time 



, _ 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



YWCA HAS IMMEDIATE OPENING FOR A 

RECEPTIONIST, BILINGUAL PREFERRED 

FULL TIME W/BENEFITS. MUST HAVE 

DATA ENTRY COMPUTER SKILLS & 

CUSTOMER SERVICE EXPERIENCE. 

PLEASE SEND RESUME TOr 

YWCA 2133 BELVIDERE RD. 

WAUKEGAN.IL 60085 

OR CALL SUZANNE 847-662-4247 






V 



Maintenance Technicians 

Nichols Aluminum Lincolnshire, an ISO 9002 

certified leader in the processing of cold rolled 

aluminum sheet, is seeking qualified maintenance 

technicians, 

The qualifications include knowledge and proficiency 

in welding/gas cutting, hydraulics, pipe fitting, pumps, 

power transmission, lubrication, rigging, shop 

machines - tools and equipment, basic electrical 

and pneumatic. 

Starting wage will be $18.28 for individuals 

successfully passing the maintenance qualification test. 

Additional wages include a production bonus shared. 

by all shop employees, quarterly safety bonus, 

yearly attendance bonus and 3-2-2 premium. 

An excellent benefit package including: Group, Health, 

Denial and Life, a 401-K plan which includes a 

6.5% contribution by the Company after one year 

and a stock purchase plan. 

Please contact Stan or Julie at: 

Nichols Aluminum 

200 Schelter Road 

Lincolnshire, IL 60069 

800-442-0707 

EOE/M/F/H/V 



A 




LjL 



1L1J 




K 



The following schools need 

substitutes on a continuing basis, please contact the 

names listed below for further information. 

Adlal E. Stevenson High School District #125 
Two Stevenson Drive, Lincolnshire, IL 60069 . 

Contact; Personnel. .. (847)634-4000 

Aptakislc - Tripp School District #102 
1231 Weiland Rd, Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 

Contact: Laurel Karolczak (847) 634-5338 

Big Hollow School District #38 
34699 N.Hwy 12, Ingleside, IL 60041 

Contact: Ms, Buchner (847) 587-6800 

Day School / Northbrook 

32 10 Dundee Road, Northbrook . IL 60062 

Contact: Ede Snyder. .............. . . (847) 205-0274 

Deerfleld School District #109 
517 Deerfleld Rd. Deerfleld, IL 60015 

Contact: Phyllis x-222. ........." (847) 945-1S44 

Grass Lake School District #36 

26177 WJJrass Lake Road, Antioch, IL'66002 

Contact: Pal Reed or Sue.'. ....,*;... : . (847) 395-1550 

Grayslakc School District #46 

450 N. Barron Blvd., Grayslake, IL 60030 

Contact:}^ Fabry x-1 100, (847) 223-3650 

Hawthorn School District #73 

201 Hawitiom Parkway, Vernon Hills, IL6OO61 

Contact: Shari Kecna (847) 367-3279 

Lake Forest Elementary Schools 
95 W. Deerpatli, Lake Forest, IL 60045 

Q»MA»c/:'Ka'ren Allie ; (847) 604-7423 

Lake Forest High School District #115 
1285 North McKinley Road, Lake Forest, IL 60045 

Contact: Wendy Antrim x-1 18 -. . . (847) 234-3600 

Lake Villa School District #41 
131 McKiiiley, Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Contact: Kathy :'...'.... . . (847) 356-2385 

North' Chicago Community Unit School Dist. #187 
2000 Lewis Ave., North Chicago, IL 60064 

Contact: Mona Armstrong. . .' . . (847) 689-8150 

Northern Suburban Special Education District 
760 Red Oak Lane, Highland Park, IL 60035 

Contact: Bill'Charis :) (847) 831-5I0C 

Old School Mon'tcssori 

144 Commerce Drive, Grayslake, IL 60030 , 

Contact: Marilyn (847) 223-9606 

Waukegan Public Schools District #60 
1201 N.* Sheridan Rd; Waukegan, IL 60085 

Contact: Personnel 

Woodland School District #50 

17370 Gages Lake Road, Gages Lake, IL60030 . 

CoM^-Mlchelle .-. L: (847) 856-3605 

Young at Heart Center 

610 Peterson Road, Libertyville, IL 60048 

Coritact:Usi or Leslie ....... i (847) 367.-6110 



(847)360*5404 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



r T- "shTppNc ~ T " i 



SHIPPING 

1 INTRODUCTORY LEVEL 
I POSITION -SMALL - 
I COMPANY, COME CROW 
I WITH US! MUST BEADLE 
! TO USE UPS SHIPPING 
I PROGRAM, WE ARE LOOK- 1 
I INC FOR A RELIABLE 
! INDIVIDUAL WtTH GOOD , 
I WORK HISTORY. WE OFFER I 
1 GOOD SALARY PLUS FULLY* 
J PAID HEALTH INSURANCE . 
I AFTER 90 DAYS. APPLICANT! 



[I 

I 

I 

L 



MUST HAVE VALID 
DRIVERS LICENSE & 
PASS DRUG SCREEN.' I 

PLEASE CALL JANICE I 
815-759-9000 i 



•MACHINIST 



Growing manufacturer 

. In Lake Bluff looking 

for 5 years minimum 

experience in lelthe, 

' NC programmer/ 

operator, 4-Axls & 

mill turn centers. 

Hands-on. Excellent 

benefits, friendly work 

environment. 

Please send resume to: 

35 Baker Road 
Lake Bluff, IL 60044 
or fax 847-549-971 4 



Production 

PACKAGING 
SUPERVISORS 

2nd & 3rd Shift 

Deluxe Video Services, ihe 
worlds leading supplier of video H 
duplication, packaging Si distrib- 
ution services to the Hollywood 
Studios, has opportunities avail- 
able (or Packaging Supervisors 
In our PLEASANT PRAIRIE, 
Wl facility. This position Is 
responsible for dally production 
operations lo ensure thai cus- 
tomer specifications and ship- 
ping dates are met. Duties also', 
Include hiring, training, and . 
administration ot performanc* 
lieviews for 15*70 employees. 

| The qualified candidates must .. 
possess a BA In Buslrwss/ 
Production Operations or a 
2 -year degree wilh equivalent 
work experience. Requires 3-5 
years supervisory experience, 
3-5 years in a high-uolumc 
rjroduction environment, and - 
1-2 yean leadership experience. 

These arc regular; full- time post- 
llons at Deluxe with competitive 
compensation and excellent - 
benefits Including 401K and 
tuition reimbursement. Please 
forward resume to: 

DELUXE VIDEO SERVICES, 
INC, Attn: Human Resources, 

11500 80th Avenue, Pleasant 

Pr»!r*. W15315S-0328. 

Fair 414-947-71 ia 

An Equal Opportunity Empbyer 
M/F/D/V 









(Data Entry 

Join A- 

WINNING 

Team! 

Uniforms Unlimited, 

Inc. is a leader in the ■: 

catalog distribution 

Industry and .YOU can 

share In our success... 

We offer profit sharing, 

major medical, paid 
benefit time and a pro- 
fessional environment, 
Applications are being p 
accepted for the follow- 
ing team members: 

Data Entry 
Operators 

($10.00 Per Hour) 

Entry Level 

Utilize your excellent 

Data Entry skills in 

our fast-paced, 

pleasant environment. 

■ Position requires good * 

communication, 

organizational and \ 

Interpersonal abilities. 

Hours are flexible 

between days and 

evenings. 

Please respond to 

Ruth Erbach, 

847-821-7755, 

Uniforms 

Unlimited, Inc., 

700 Corporate 

Wood* Parkway, " 

Vernon Hills. IL 60061, 

or fox to 

847-821-8885. EOE 



i '• 






m • n »..— 






/ 



C1 6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 19, 1999 



*i 



$ 



'■ 



■■') 










220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



HVAC WHOLESALE CO. 

HAS IMMEDIATE 
OPENING FOR AN OFFICE 

POSITION. WE ARE 

LOOKING FORATERSON 

WHO WANTS A LONG 

TERM POSmON WTTH 

A FAST GROWING 
COMPANY. DUTIES MAY 

INCLUDE FILING, 
COMPUTER DATA ENTRY, 

ASSIST CUSTOMERS 

OVER THE PHONE, ETC. 

WE CAN OFFER A 

COMPETITIVE WAGE, 

PROFIT SHARING 

PROGRAM ft. AN 

EXCELLENT INSURANCE 

PACKAGE, IF YOU WANT 

TO BE PART OF A TEAM 

■ PLEASE APPLY © 

CONIIOL'D ENGINEERING 

SUPPLY NORTH 

289 1 5 N. HERKY DR 

SUITE I OS 

LAKE BLUFF, IL 60044 

' NO PHONE CALLS 

PLEASE* 



J TCI of Northeast Illinois Lis 
| nn immediate opening in our 



fl position, Mon-Frl., with a 
! rotaltoruil Sat. An excellent 



mmm»»m»»mmm»»mm 
H WAREHOUSEPERSON • 

* 

I 

2 Warehouse. This is a full-time ■ 

I 
V 

H 
H benefit package Includes med- 1 

Jlcal/denlal, vacation, holidays* 

¥ 
V 
I 
I 
H 
« 
« 



Rand some unique extras. 

ft 

I We require: 

I -Good nalured people 
J -115. diploma or G ED 

•a 

* 
ft 
ft 
ft 

ft 
ft 



Post US. education preferred Ijl 



Minimum 2 years previous 
experience within a 
computerized environment 
PC Skills desirable 



J -Pre-employment drug screen 
ft and physical 

ft Please submit applications to: 
1 1 3233 W.Grand Ave. 
WaukoganJL 60085 
i Alln: Steve Wldmer 

ft Equal Opportunity Employer I 



WANTED - Looking for Waitresses/Dancers 

• Can you do Ihe twist? • Do you know all the twist songs? 

• Can you do a routine to twist music? 

If. you answered yes - we want you. 

Interviews will begin on 2/15/99 for a starting date of 4/14/99. 

. We need 12 dancers, Wed. ihru Sun. Good salary for the 

"right staff. The uniform Is a bikini, so no visible tattoos. 

To apply, cati (847) 587-8088 

TWISTING AT JUKEBOX 

37318 Stanlon Point Rd., Ingtestde, IL .60041 

, Females encouraged to apply 



C- 



E=3I 



HAIRDRESSER / BARBERS WANTED ' 
Part time & Full time work 
Established northshore salon. 



■O 





'Full Time benefits 
'Excellent work environment 
'Upscale salon 

Apply In person 

Mon-Frl 8a-8p / Sat. 8a - 5p 

Send or Fax resume to: 847-336-2033 

Attn: Rao Taylor 

Gold Coail Salon & Day Spa 

422 N. Green Bay Rd, 

Waukeaan, IL 60085 

Phone (647) 336-2012 



^ 




How To 
Survive 

The Job 
Search 

By Nancy Sakol 



Dear Search, 

I am writing because I am sick of working crummy Jobs. 1 was 
employed with a great company Tor over 4 years and burned 
my bridges with them when I left lost April to follow a girl- 
friend who was moving out of state for employment. Needless 
to say. .. that was sho rt-1 ived and I returned to find that [ was no 
longer welcome in my former position, or company for that 
matter. Since that time 1 have gone through 3 jobs and I'm sick 
of III When I go for an Interview, the first thing that seems to be 
asked of me is why I have been job hopping, I am not being 
hired for many good jobs, so 1 am forced to take anything to 
survive. What do you suggest for someone In this rutT 
M.M.-Zlon 

DearM.M., 

Leaving your job of 4 years plus on the "If-come'*, Is now water 
under the bridge and basically you can't get that back, so move 
onl You say that your lost 3 jobs were all crummy, however 
your biggest problem right now Is overcoming the job happing 
question during an interview. Find yourself something that 
you can tolerate for at least a year, hopefully longer. Get some 
sense of stability In your work history again, and perhaps the 
question or your job hopping will not be brought up to you, 
therefore making It possible for you to not have to make excus- 
es. Good Luck! 

Dear Search, 

As on owner of a new start-up business, 1 am In need of going 
on to a computerized system Instead of working everything 
manually. My problem Is, that I need to find a way to train my 
employees and myself without the major expense of time off. 
How do you suggest going about this, and Is there such a thing 
as an economical way to do so? Thanks! 
LG.- Lake Bluff 

DearLG., ... 

The type or equipment and software you hove purchased will 
dictate to you the expense Involved In training. The good news 
Is there are plenty of computer consultants who will come on- 
site to youp location for group or one-on-one training. Prices 
vary tremendously, so beware. Also, the other alternative Is to 
contact your local college for a list of computer classes. 
Sometimes these classes may be spread over several weeks 
which may or may not be suitable for you to teach the staff. But 
there are those we have found that ore mini-courses over a 
weekend or over a few evenings, Feel free to contact me and I'll 

be happy to provide you with further Info, 

i* - - . 

Letteri can bo lent to Nancy Sakol 

c/o Lakeland Newipsperii 

P.O. Box 268, Cray i lake, IL C0C3 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wauled 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fnll-Tlmc 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



'INSURANCE""! 
INSPECTOR 

If you travel In 

Lake County 

In your Job, 

handle our 

Inspections also. 

312-559-9100 






Computer/Into Systems 

SENIOR PROGRAMMER/ 
ANALYST 

We are seeking an individual 
with a degree In CS or 
Rainess and 7-10 yean 
experience in programming 
and systems analysis and 
design In a healthcare setting. 
Demonstrated competence In 
Visual Basic or C++ program- 
ming language* and knowledge 
of UNIX operating systems U 
essential. Experience with 
Orack database, SQL or 
Crystal Report writing would . 
be helpful. Dulles Involve 
planning, programming; 
implementation and support 
of all hospital financial, clinical 
and decision support systems. 
Strong verbal and written 
communication skills are 
needed for project manage- 
ment and interfacing with 
management and systems 
users. 

Excellent salary and benefits. 

Please send resume In 

confidence to: 

Human Resources 
847-360-4170 

VICTORY 
MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

1324 N. Sheridan Rd. 

Wo u keg an, I L 60085 

FAX: 847-360-4230 

Equal opportunity employer m/T 



CAMPUS 
SECURITY 

3 Part-time campus 
safety positions 
arc currently available 
at the Lake County High 
School's Technology 
Campus In Crayslalc. 
S10.00-S12.00 per hour, 

-These positions arc for 
school year only. FOR 
MORE INFORMATION 
PLEASE CALL JEFF 
BRIERTON 223-6681, 
x7201 IllffWfcff 



DRIVER 

EDUCATION 

INSTRUCTOR 

Full or part-time, cxp. 
preferred but will train. 

Good driving record. 

Works well with people, 

benefits. 

The Beit Driving School, Inc. 

GrayiUkc 

847.223-7338 



Administrative 
This Valentine's Day... 

FALL IN LOVE 

WITH YOUR JOB1 

»• ADMINISTRATIVE «* 
SPECIALIST 

Are you an excellent communica- 
tor with a desire to help people 
and solve problems? 11 so, consid- 
er Joining our busy HR depart- 
ment! You will respond to many 
phone calls and questions so you 
must hove the ability to manage 
multiple priorities. We'll help you 
learn the HR world, as long as you 
contribute your solid Windows 
computer skills, a High School 
Diploma and a minimum of 2 
years olflce ' experience. 

Please e-mail, send or fax resume 
to: Jane Rojos, Human Resources, 
CODE: LK218AS, HIGHLAND 
PARK HOSPTTAL, 718 Glenvkrw 
Aw.; Highland Park, IL 60035. 
Fax:847-480-3833. 

E-mail: JroJasOh phosp.org 

HIGHLAND PARK 

HOSPITAL 

Nortl^eTntaLre 

(coc rrv'f/d/vt 



Restaurant 

RED LOBSTER 

All rbiilions Available 

Servers earn up lo $500 wecklyl 

(Tip out not required) 

Benefits from Day One Include: 

• Medical/Dental/ 
Prescription Insurance 

• 401k profit sharing 

• Eye care plan 

• 50% discount on meals . 
during shifts. 

• 25% discount on meals 
at any Red Lobster or 
Olive Garden for family 
and friends 

Other benefits Include: 

15% discount on stock 

purchase 

Paid vacations 

You must be 18 years or 
older/ friendly, outgoing, 
and willing lo work week- 
ends. Apply anytime 
between 1 lam-7 pm at: 







-A- 

v. 



lobstec 



445 East Townllno Road 
Vernon Hills 



KIRKWOOD INDUSTRIES. INC. 

K & B - MUNDELEIN SUBSIDIARY 



Due to the expansion of our business, a world-leading manufacturer of components for the 
automotive, power tool, and home appliance industries has the following opportunity avail- 
able in our Mundeletn, IL division: 

I Machine Set-Up Operator ; .? .' t 

Second Shift (3:30 p.m. to 11:45 p.m.) | 

Must be mechanically Inclined, able to work independently, assure all parts are of f 
acceptable quality, complete tool changeovers, be concerned with safely, maintain a 
constant flow of production and properly record production charts. 

We hire only highly motivated individuals who enjoy working in a team environment. We 
offer a challenging environment, competitive salary, and extensive benefits. Please apply 
I in person or send your resume to: 

Kirkwood Industries, Inc. 

675 Tower Rd. 

i Mundelein, IL 60060 
Fax: (847) 949-8521 

ISO 9001 Certified 



Visit our website at: www.kirkwood-ind.com 



'SiSSiiim «•- 



Drivers/School Bus 




No 
Experience... 

We Offer A Paid 
Training Program 



« $5000 Fr 
• Medical & 
• $ 



No 
Transportation... 

Employee 
Shuttle Service 




No 
Baby-sitter. 

Child Ride Along 

{bring your kids lo work) 



ante Bonuses 
d • Credit Union 

Morel 



Call A Location Near You: 



NORTHERNLAK&OUNTY (LAKE FOREST) 
847-680-9305 

PARK CITY 
847-244-5690 



Applicant! mull b« 21 yt on or oldw 

with titan driving recent, 
Drvfl icretntng requlrnJ, EOC M/F/D/V 




Customer Service 

Very busy Internal medicine 
practice hai Immediate 
opportunity for: 

CUSTOMER 

SERVICE/ 

FRONT DESK 

REPRESENTATIVES 

Reiponiibiliilra Indude idwrfulinf 
ippolm menu, coflecdnf co-piyi, 
new pit! em din collection ind 
he ivy phone contact Prior medial 
oflce experience, excellent cut;, 
comer icrvke and phone ttdtli, plui 
ability to work In i fan-paced envi- 
ronment art required. CNA or MA 
expcrlence/certlll cation would be 
considered a plus. 
For conilderatlon,fax reiuma with 
iiUry requirement! to: ' 
(847) 933-6082 or e-mail to: 
hrdept@nh.net RUSH NORTH 
SHORE MEDICAL CENTER, 
9600 Groti POtnc Road 
Skokie.IL60076.EOE 



I ADMlNISTHATIVn - 
i SECRETARY 

| Student Services 

. J RESPONSIBLE FOR providing 
5 lecretarlol end administrative 
1 iiippart, exercising dlicreiion 



T 

•.» 
U 
V 
V 

Siuppart, exercising ancreiion 5. 
jrmd Independent Judgement In u 
5 disseminating sensitive matorl- | 
gal and Information based on an y 
|ln-depth knowledge orcollege y 
ft policies and procedures, as well j 
jjai anticipates and Initiates § 
A salon regarding administrative | 
ft details. A I IICH SCHOOL dlplo- jj 
. Hm«orGED,5Swpm,4yearsof t 
J experience, computer literacy I 
J (Windows 95) and excellent 
{communication skills are ' 

5 tequlred. SUIIMIT A COM- 
PLETED application, letter of 5 
2 interest, resume and keyboard ' ! 
2 lest to Human Resources by 
B March 16, 1999. Please contact g 
I Human Resources. (B47)5«- kj 
^2065 and (847) 22356] 5, Tor kj 
■ more Information. 
| COLLEGE OF LAKE COUNTY V 
ft 19351 W. Washington Si.; V 

aGrayslake,IL6O03O-119S V 

ftEOE//Wm/f/diV. 



Great Jobs 

Come In All 

Sizes 

At Great Lakes Credit Union! 



* 

ft 
* 

n 

* 
J 

n Are you tired of retail? Would you like to make at least 

ft 58.50/hr? Are you looking for better hours? Better benefits? Just 

ft an all around Belter place lo work? If so then look no further!! 

ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 



We ore looking for quality people with: 

• Excellent Communication Skills 

• Computer Experience 

• Outstanding Customer Service Ability 

• Team Players 

• Remarkable Interpersonal Skills 

• Cnsft Handling Experience 

gin return wc offer mcdic.il/dtntal/vision, 401K with matching, 
5 paid vacations/Holidays, tuition reimbursement on-site train- 
*. ing, credit union membership, Casual environment, and month 
g ly Incentives! To apply mail/fax resume to Attn Staffing, GLCU, 
5 2525 Green Day Road, North Chicago, IL 60064. 
g Fax 847-867-8798 E-mail: lencflglcu.prg, 

ft Oil GLCU's JOB HOTLINE for More Information 

ft 847-578-8909! 

ft EOE 



! 

r 

I 

if 



i''-' 






raphic 
designer 



We're looking for a 

"graphic designer" to join our team. 

Do you have experience with 

computers and graphic design ' 

programs? If you do, 

Ihcn wc can teach you the 

rest in this entry level position. 

[Send your resume to NEAl TUCKER at: 

Lakeland Newspapers 
30 S. Whitney St. 
* Grayslake,IL 60030 
^orfaxto223-iS810 



»'•- 



■•-'■■X--- 3 '-''" ---■'■ '• 



BOARDS 






TrWfMCtsnoci 



: 



'riad Circuits, Inc. 

, is now hiring for: 

• Plating Supervisor 

(5 yr. Bkgrnd. in printed 
circuit board plating) 

• Photo Technician 

Minimum 1 year experience In the 

manufacturing of printed circuit 

boards required. Benefits Include 

paid vacation, holidays and 

personal days. Health, Dental & 

Life Insurance. Please apply In 

, person at: 

703 N. Sunset, 

Round Lake, IL 

Call: (847)546-7722 

NO ASSEMBLY!! 

Equal Opportunity Employer; 






. 















February 19, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers I 




220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Warded 
Full-Time 



220 



■Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuU-TIme 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



IMIII I MIH »M M> 



| EXPERIENCED 
PLUMBER 

Call Monday through 

Friday between 

8 am and 3 pm 

(847) 265-1626 



I M I MM I II I Mt i mtMMM I M I 



Tired of Earning 

$2000 to $3000 a fnanUi when 
your lifestyle demands more? 
I need 10 key people, High fit 
for those able to train and 
motivate othcrl. 

CALL: 847/604-4971 



POSTAL JOBS In *18.35ffir 

WILDHFE JODS to 

|21,60flir_ 

Inc.Bfu, No Exp, nee. for 

App ft exam Info, 

Toll Freo 

1477-293.1179x116 

M-S I0«m.0 ( >m EST - CCFS 




DRIVERS 

SEVERAL POSmONS 
AT 2 LOCATIONS 
(WAUKEGAN & ELK GROVE) 
CDLA&BW/I1AZMAT& 
AIRBRAKES 

VEHICLE INSPECTOR 

FULLTIME POSITION 
DEPENDABLE 

APPLY IN PERSON 

KfcR 

TRANSPORTATION 

3059 W.WASHINGTON 
WAUKEGAN 





Luciano 

Refrigerated 

Transport 

Offers:' 

♦ Home Often 

♦ 3 Of, per mile to 
company drivers/teams 
start at j4< 

♦ '97 Volvo Conventional* 
with Big Block Engines 

GET MILES.... 

BUT GET HOME, TOOI 

We're big enough to pay 

well, but small enough to 

care about people I 

Call Jim in Chicago 

at 800.-637-5154 

or 

Call M.J. In Recruiting 

at 800-753-8165 



Driver 

TRUCK DRIVER 
Full Time 



! „ 

^ Local Driver needed to 
-^ haul care throughout the 
North and Northwest 
suburban areas ot 
Chicago. Requires a 
clean MVR, CDL, and 
knowledge of the area. 
Excellent pay and 
benefits with uniforms 
provided. Call between 
the hours of 9am-ipm to 
schedule an. Immediate 
Interview, ask (or Ann. 

| S&S Automotive, Inc. 

Mundeteln, IL 

(630) 617-3832 

EOE 



RECONCILIATION SPECIALIST 

Great Lakes Credit Union, located near 

j Waukegan, IL, has an excellent opportunity In our! 

Accounting Dept,. for a Reconciliation Specialist \ 

This person will reconcile mortgage G/L's, 

corporate checks, and other G/L's as assigned. 

This person must have at least 2 years basic 

accounting experience, excel knowledge, and 

good communication skills. To apply, fax resume 

to 847-887-8798 or e-mail jenc@glcu.org. 

Call our JOB HOTLINE at 847-578-8909 to find 

out morel 

EOE 



MEGaItore 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE CLERK - Full-Time, 
8-5, auto dealer exp. pref, ADP Exp, helpful, 

fax resume to 847-223-5985 

MAINTENANCE - seeking experienced person 
for maintenance dept Full-time or part-time 
available. Great position for retiree. 
Call 847-223-8651, exb 3132. 



HAIRSTYLIST 

Chair rental available, 

new upscale salon. 

CallClnrry 

(847)833-2200 



TcJecornrnunleallom 

NORTEL 

Victory Memorial Hospital 
has a full time opening for a 
Nortel Certified Communication 
| Technician. 2 years - 
experience required. 
Responsibilities Include 
| maintaining PBX firmware, 
facility infrastructure and 
ancillary equipment. Please 
i apply In person or send 
your resume to: 

Human Resources 

VICTORY 

I MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

1324 N. Sheridan Rd. 

Waukegan, IL 60085 . 

Ph: 847-3604170 

FAX: 847-360-4230 

Equal opportunity employer tn/I 



$220 TO 5650 WEIKLYIH 

Assemble Products or Mailing 

Brochures From Home. Arry 

Hours! No Experience 

NecessAiyl FT/Pf. 

Cad first American Publishing 

1-800-8 18-9979 

Ext. 37 24hrs 






Factory 
GENERAL FACTORY 

Applications are now being 
accepted at our dean and 
modern manufacturing 
facility in Libertyvllle for 
regular employment 
opportunities. 
Details include: 

• Machine Operators 
•Packers 

•Hours; 11:00pm to 7;00em 
•$9,08/Hr to Start 

• Overtime Required 
« Excellent Benefits 

• Shift Premium 

• Scheduled Step Pay increases 

Apply in person from 
9am to 3pm at the 
Employment Office. 

TEMPO. STEEL CO. 

2200 Tempel Drive 
' LlbertyviHe, fL 60048 
EOE M/F/D/V: 



'■";■'''■;- - ;■ ' 



REPORTER 



I Lakeland Newspapers has an opening tori 

an entry level reporter on its expanding 

editorial staff. Experience in writing and 
[some photography is helpful. Will handle a 
Ivariety of writing assignments and work onl 
la varied, flexible schedule. You must be able 

to work under deadline situations. If you 
(have the basic skills we need, this may be 
(your chance for a career start. Come on| 
I board with us and we'll teach you the rest. 

Please fax resumes to: 

Neal Tucker 

Executive Editor 

(847)223-8810 

lor mall to: 30 S. Whitney St. 
lGrayslake, IL 60030 



HAWTHORN LAKES 

RETIREMENT COMMUNITY 

Needs You... 

RECEPTIONIST 

P/T Receptionist for 4:30pm-l:00am shift to 

answer phones, greet residents & visitors, etc 

No exp, nee. Must enjoy working with seniors. 

$67hr+ benefits & exc. work 

environment. 

P1SH WA SHER 

F/T & P/T Dishwashers. AM, PM & wknd shifts 

avail. 56/hr + benefits. 

P/T Server for AM shifts Mon-Fri. Up to $5.75/hr. 

BUSSER 

P/T Busser for AM shifts Mon-Fri. Up to $5.50/hr. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE 

F/T (Mon-Fri) Building Maintenance person. Resp 

inc bqt set ups, trash removal, carpet shampooing, 

in t/ext ma in t, light bldg repairs. 

Excellent pay & work environment 
Call Rosa 847/367-2516 or apply in person 
10 E. Hawthorn Pkwy, Vernon Tiills, IL 60061 



MMSMIM. 






~-*5 



WEBDEVELOPER \ 



Chicagoland's premier 

Internet Service. 

Provider is in search of a Web 



i 



{Developer due to rapid growth. This k 
,! individual will work with customers j 



I 



individual will work with customers 

and develop sites. Knowledge in 

HTML and JAVA Script required. If 

you are interested in creating a 

future with a rapidly growing 

5 organization, fax resume to skw. 

(847) 223-881 or 



5 



e-mail: skw@us-netdirect.com 






ENGINEERING 
TECHNICIAN III/TV 
The City of Kenosha, WI. 

(population 87,314) Is seeking 

qualified applicants for 

technical and professional 

engineering and planning 

work including surveying, 

plotting, drafting. Inspection 

and Investigation of 

construction defects. 

Requires 6 yrs. experience, 

Associate degree 

in Qvil Engineering Tech. 

or related and 

2 ymCAD experience. 

Salary 
$28,932- $37,500 DOQ. 

CalN14-653-4130 

to apply. 

City Applications will 

be accepted until 

February 26, 1999. 

Affirmative Action Employer 
M/F/D 




g3Sfcv3 




QMRP 

Immediate full time posi- 
tion available in our 

Lake Zurich Intermediate 
Care Facility. Will be 

responsible for planning, 

developing, and supervis- 

ing case management 

activities for MR/DD 

women. Bachelor's 

Degree and one year 

experience with MR/DD 
population required. ■ 

Contact Call Becker 

Mount Saint eJcseph. 

■ Lake Zurich 

(847) 43S-SC3G 




fl* 



DENTAL POSITIONS a! 
NAVAL DENTAL CENTER- 
GREAT LAKES, IL Navy soaks 
six General Dentists and six 
Dental Hygtanlita to work as 
contractors: Individuals only. 

Applicants with minimum 

requirements will be evaluated 

based on overall qualifications 

& price. Bone'iis Include 26 

toial days per year annual & 

sick leave, 10 paid holidays, 

malpractice insurance covered 

Proot ol minimum requirements 

required with completed 

Requirements Package (RP). 

CoiL'FAX Susan Walien with 

requests for HP (Indicate 

position ol interest) to 

301-619-3022 (ph) 

301-6T9-2925<fax).EOE. 



&iler 

$ 15-$35 PER HOUR 

Easy medical billing. 

Full training. 

Computer required, 

1-000-259-6661 

exL222 



<£ 



Health Care 
MDS/CARE PLAN 
COORDINATOR 

Part Time, No Weekends 
Victory Lakes, a beautiful and 
modem 120- bod continuing 
care center, has created a new 
day shift position In lis Nursing 
Administration Department. 
Qualified applicants will be 
RNs licensed to practice In 
Illinois with a rru'n. ol 2 years 
experience In long-term care 
nursing. Prior MDS and PPS 
experience a plus. You will be 
responsible lor coordinating the 
resident assessment process 
to ensure accurate and timely 
completion ol the MDS and 
coordinate the development of. 
the resident care plan. 
Competitive pay and complete 
benefits. Please lax resume lo 
947-356-4599, mail resume or 
apply In person: Victory Lakes 
Continuing Care Center, 1055 
Grand Avenue (just east ol 
Deep Lake Road), Undenhursl, 
ILEOE. 



Medical 
Assistant 

Spectrum Healthcare 
Resources has ON-CALL 

! opportunities available for 
Certified Medical 
Assistants in the Northern 
suburbs of Chicago. 
Requires current CPR and 
MA ccnif., with min, 1 yr. 
prior exp. preferred. For 

I consideration, please FAX 
resume to: 

Julie Nelson 

FAX (800) 774-9083. 
EOE/AA 



RN'S/LPN'S 



TIRED OF 
SKILLED CARE 

NOW IS YOUR CHANCE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

HILLCREST NURSING 
CENTER 

INTERMEDIATE 

CARE NURSING 

CALL TODAY 

SALLY LEMAR 

(847) 546-5300 

1740 N CIRCUIT DRIVE 
ROUND LAKE BEACH, IL 



DIRECT 
CARE 

Direct Care Workers 

for MR/DD women 

in residential setting. 

All shifts available. 

Full Time or. 

Part Time. We are 

committed to quality 

residential care. 

Contact 

Gail Becker 

Mount Saint Joseph 

Lake Zurich 

847-438-5050 



RN/LPN 



. 113 bed skilled 

nursing facility needs 

PT/FT nurse for days 

or PM's. Previous - 

LTC exp. helpful. 

Must be' team player 

and be detail oriented. 

Comprehensive benefits 

+ training package. 

Apply in person or 
fax resume to: * 
Care Centre of 

Wauconda 

1 76 Thomas Ct. 

Wauconda, IL 

847-526-5551 

Fax 847-526-0807 



NURSING 
ASSISTANTS 

WE'VE GOT CLASS 

HILLCRESTNURSING 

CENTER IS NOW 
OFFERING IN-HOUSE 

CNA TRAINING 
"EARN WHILE YOU LEARN" 

CLASSES START MID-MARCH 
10 PER CLASS, APPLY EARLY 

APPLY IN PERSON 

1740 NORTH 

CIRCUIT DRIVE 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 

(847) 546-5300 




NIGHT 
AIDE 



Immediate 
Part Time 
positions 

available in our 

Lake Zurich 

facility. 

For D/D Women. 

Experience not 
required. 

Willing to train. 

9 p.m. - 6 a.m. 



Contact Gall Becker 

Mount Saint Joseph 

Lake Zurich 

V 847-438-5050 -A? 



Health Care 

RNs 
•Up to $21 an hour! 

LPNs 
•Up to $17 an hourl 

CNAs 
•Up to $10 an hourl 

If you're ready to bring your 

friendly and compassionate 

attitude to a company 

dedicated to excellence, 
we want to talk to youl 

ManorCare, the premier 

provider of skilled nursing 
care in the nation, Is seeking 
several nursing professionals 

at ManorCare-Libet tyvilie. 

In addition to competitive 

wages, we offer an excellent 

benefits package and a ! 

supportive nursing team. 

Please send your resume or 

apply In person: 

ManorCare-Llbertyvllle 

1500S. Milwaukee Ave. 

LlbertyviHe, IL 60043 

Phone:847-819-3200 

Fax: 847-816-8981. EOE 

rc 

MonorGure 

HullhSmka 



Nursing Home 
Administrator 

Positions aval In Detroit & 

N. Michigan. Immed 

Openings. We seek an 

outstanding Individual to 

lead our team at ■ 

Tendercare facility toe'd 

in the metro Detroit area, 

Tendercare (Ml) inc. b the 

largest long-term care 

provider In Ml w/35 Iocs & 

over 3400 employees. 

Must possess: current 

nursing home 
administration lie,. 2yrs 
exp, positive attitude, 
strong communication & 
leadership skills as an 
NHA. We offer: comp 
wages, exc bnfts, 401 K 
plan, career opptys. a 
positive atmosphere 
w/outstandlng team 
support, If you are 
Interested In a team- 
oriented company where 
caring b the key 
submit your resume: 

HR Recruiter. 

Tendercare (Ml) Inc. 

209 E. Portage Ave, 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ml 49783; 

Fax 906-635-6008. EOE 



REGISTERED 
NURSE 



The Allendale Association, 
a mu I ti -service child 
welfare agency (located 
10 mi. west oi Gumec 
Mills), seeks a full-time 
(2nd Shift, 3:00 p.m.- 
11:00 p.m.) RN willing to 
work flexible hours to 
administer basic health 
care to emotionally 
disturbed/ behavior 
disordered children, . 
ages 8-18. Instructor's 
Certification in CPR and 
First Aid preferred, but 
not required. 
Competitive salary/ 
benefits and generous 
education assistance. 
Submit resume to: 

ALLENDALE 

ASSOCIATION 

Attn; Human Resources Dept 

P.O. Box 1083 

Like Villa, IL 60046 

FAX; (847) 356-0290 

AA/EEO 



HEALTH CAUL 
COMMERCIAL 

INSURANCE. HILLEK 



I Growing company is adding 

■ iic w department and ■ 

■ looking for experienced ■ 
B candidate lo grow with the g 
m business. Selected Individual 

must have knowledge ol 

UB92 fields and billing 

requirements for various 

commercial insurance j 

H carriers. Responsibilities will B 

■ Include submit ting claims ' 

■ and following up for ■ 

■ payment. Will have ■ 
demonstrated ability to ■ 
work volume caseload ■ 

■ within computer queue to ■ 
I ' process claims in limited ■ 

time frames. Accuracy lo a 
_ detail, good phone skills and B 
-positive customer service ( 
approach a must. For 
' immediate consideration fax 
" resume to: l 

■ 847-8B7-8501 

■ aitn:D.Dennhaxdt .■ 

■ or mail to ■ 

■ 860 Northpoint Blvd. ■ 

■ Waukegan, IL 60085 ■ 





Me.illli Chi- 



:l 



;•* ' 




To place your medical;, 
opportunity here, call Paula 

' A « Daoo at fl47.9')t.CHft ( 



.'- •'-.' 



or Ross at 847-223-8161 



CNA, LPN (x RN 
OPEN HOUSE 

Sat., Feb. 20th 
lpm - 4pm 



» 



, 



4 ! 



\jlt 



Victory 
Lakes 



Continuing Cast Center 



lift 



Invites you to take a look at us 
(Be Prepared To Be Impressed!) 

- Penonal Toun ol our Clean, Modem and Beautiful Facility. 

• On the spot interviews. 

• Refreshments will be served. 

- Learn about job opportunities In our long-term 
care, Medicare fit Alzheimer's units. 

- Competitive pay and complete benefits package 
for full and. part time. ' 

1055 Grand Ave, • Llndenhurst, IL 60046 

(Between Routes B3 k 45, just east of Deep Lake Road) 

For Directions or more Information, call: 

847-356-4551 



1 



***T a 



C 1 8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 19, 1999 



i 









/j 



• 






. 



1 1 ■ 



■ 



i 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



POSTAL JOBS 
to$18.35/HR 

INC. BENEFITS 
NO EXPERIENCE. 

FOR APP. 

AND EXAM INFO, 

CALL 1-800-813-3585 

EXT 2408 

8AM-9PM 

7 DAYS fds, (nc 



Telemarketing 

PHONES 
AVAILABLE 

start today 
pay tomorrow 
no experience 
necessary, 
will train, 
flexible hours 
(847) 336-1613 



SALES-IN HOM 

INVISIBLE FENCE 
PET CONTAINMENT 



fee 



^i 



Do you low 

dop-, enjoy being 

outside & huvc grt-.it 

sales skills? 

Enthusiastic 

nppllciints wanted 

for growing company. 

Commission 

& benefits. 

Cull 

800-909-HIRE 



Mechanic- 
Radiator Repair 
Tech 

I mmed Opening 

Sarasota, FL. 

For busy shop in 

FL, exp in recoring 

& indust'l 

rebuilding. 

Top pay/bnfts. 

941-366-4003 



CUSTOMER SERVICE/ 
OFFICE COORDINATOR 

Growing manufacturing 

co. is looking for a 

motivated individual that 

is customer driven! 

Must have some 

computer skills & the 

desire to learn. Very 

competitive wages, 

great benefits & pleasant 

work environment. 

Send resume to: 

Meyer Machine 

& Equipment 

351 Main St, 

Antloch, IL 60002 

(847)395-2970 
Fax (847)395-2972 



220 



Help Warned 
Full-Time 



WILDLIFE JOBS 

to$21.60/HR 

Inc. Benefits. Game 

wardens, security, 

maintenance, park 

rangers. No exp needed. 

For app. and exam info 

call 1-800-813-3585, 

ex! 2407. 8am-9pm, 

7 days, fds inc 



RECEPTIONIST/ 
DESIGN ASST. 

High quality home furnishings 

, company li seeking a friendly, 

outgoing Indiv, lo greet clientele. 

Duties incl. answering phone, 

'updating dialogs/ fabrics, and 

assisting our Interior design 

slalf. Exceptional 

environment and slalf. 

Please call Lynn Blmbsch at: 

fW 7-4 78- 1 TOO 

or forward resume lo: 

TOMS-PRICE 

400 Jamestown Ln. 

Lincolnshire, IL 60069 

Fax: 847-478-1955 



fm.Jl.Jm.Jw>Am.AAJm.AJ».Jm. t 



I 



Security 



Full/Part-time 
positions available 

In Halnesvllle. 
S7.00/hr starting pay. 
All applicants must 
apply In person Mon 
thru Thursday 
10:00am-2:00pm. 
4 ASI Security Inc. 
i 1001 E.Chicago Ave. 
4 Napervllle, IL 60540 
4 630-416-4600 ext. 245 



Automotive 

PORTERS 
We Are Seeking 
Reliable Porters For 
Our NW Suburban 
Dealership. Must have 
Valid Driver's License. 
Call Cory Smith at 
(847) 356-2530. 

LAKE VILLA 

•CHRYSLER 

•PLYMOUTH 

•JEEP 



Maintenance 

Mechanic 
AAanufacturlng 

1st shift position available 

For a self-motivated 

individual with experience 

weldng and performing 

general and preventative 

maintenance on 

eqiipment similar to 

furnaces, presses 

and grinders 

Apply In person or 

send resume to 

DarteBe Andrews at: 

TSC - Ferrtte International 

39105 M Magnetics Blvd. 

WadswortK IL 60083 



j Business/Operations Manager 

I Directs finance office in areas of financial 
management, reporting and Internal control systems. 
Manages annual budgeting process, monitors revenue/ 
expenditures, forecasts for all agency activities, pro- 
m grams, contracts and grants. Prepares financial reports, 

I fiscal/contract liaison to government contract officials 
and maintenance of facility. 3-5 years experience, . 
I accounting degree preferred. Full time with benefits. 
Please send resume to: YWCA 2133 Belvldere Rd. 
Waukegan.IL 60085 847-662-4247 E.O.E. 



3 






:.: 



i 

a 



i 
i 



COLLECTORS! 

Great Lakes Credit Union has career 

opportunities available for successful Collectors 

in our Gurnee location. This person will be 

collecting on past due accounts, such as 

Visa's, auto loans and mortgage loans. Ideal 

candidate will have 1 year collection exp. In a 

financial Institution, familiar with collection 

policy and procedures, and knowledge of laws 

concerning repossessions. To apply, fax resume 

to 847-887-8798 or e-mail Jenc@glcu.org, Call 

our JOB HOTLINE at 847-578-8909 

to find out morel EOE 

i mzz22 'mssri ■am mmi mmt e 



■ 

» 

2' 

1 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



ASSEMBLER 

Aisemblcr wanted for light 

mechanical assembly & related 

duties, Apply In person at: 

ILLINOIS 
INSTRUMENTS, INC. 

278-iO Concrete Drive 

Inptfjlile, IL 60011 



WAUCONDA 

based business 
has a fulltime^ 
WAREHOUSE 
POSITION. 

Must be; able to 

;lift;heavy items, _ 

Salaryplus 

benefits.. 

Call 
847^526-1380^ 



<!•■ Illlllll 1, ,11,1,1 >■> 

OfficE PosMon 

Arc you RilUblc 
rii Rf,uic vtd fur, 10 woik wiili? 
If you Iwvr basic compunn skills, 

MtdicAl or dinui office npcitltftci 

Ami r,ood awmIo* to dt!*il, our 

busy orwl WRr,cRy ollicc *uy be 

ilic jiU.ce Ion youl Hit* Iromi ollicc 
posiiloN RiotiiRU full'ilMi lioum 

(mo at tit vJs) **rJ uLuy h Iwud 
upoM Lxpcrticnci. 

all 
(847)625-591? 

10 find our MOM. 

IIIIMI IIIIIIIIII.HIKMIKIIIMII4IIHI 



LEGAL SECRETARY/ 
PARALEGAL 

Law firm seeks Individual 
with good typing and 
organizational skills to 

perform paralegal duties In 

Litigation Department 

Knowledge of Microsoft 

Office a plus. 

Send resume to: 
860 tlorthpoint Blvd, 
Waukegan, IL 60085 

Attn: Deborah Plgueroa 

wm ip — — — gm 



GENERAL 

FACTORY 



3rd Shift 

10:30 PM -7:00 AM 

Start Rate $7.72/hr 

Plus Shift Bonus 

Leading local area sheet 

metal fabricator currently 

has several entry level 

openings. To qualify you 

should possess basic level 

English and main skills. 

Applications available 

between a:0OAM & 3:00PM 

Morton Mfg. Co. 

5th & Church Sis. 

Libertyville, IL 



220 



Help Warned 
Full-Time 



CARPENTER 



Busy remodeling company 

is seeking an individual 
to sub carpentry & remod- 
eling projects loo. Must be 
able to work both indepen- 
dently & wllh our team. 
Basements, bathrooms, 
siding, windows & more. • 

Call Mark at 
(rH7) 740-3200 



Ei 



FULLTIME 

RECEPTIONIST 

Work In a fast paced 
environment. 

Days, some early evenings, 
alternating Saturdays. 

Computer experience 
required, 

Apply In person or send 
resume to: 

Mundtleln Animal Hospital 

1133 W. Maple Ave. 

Mundtleln, IL 

No phone calls 
phase. 




INSURANCE 

ALL POSITIONS REQUIRE 
INSURANCE EXPEREINCE 

•COMM'ICSR lo»5K 

•GROUP ADMIN .toJSOK 

• rtRSONAL LINES CSR to$32K 

•COMMlTECHASST.....1o$32K 

HALLMARK 

(847) 298-1900 
Fax (847) 298-1906 

email: hpl220Gaol.com 



ENGINEERING 
Fast growing roof truss 

mfg co. w/plants In 

Florida 6 Georgia seeks 

Truss Designers 6 

Estimators. Must have 

exp In designing truss 

layouts or engineering. 

Pref using Mltek 2000. 

Salary up to S50K. 

Exc bnfr pkg. 

Fax resume 

561-840-1748; 

Call 561-840-2075 

for Interview. 



=; 



BENCH TECHNICIAN 

Small manufacturing 

company seeks bench 

technician for service and 

production departments. 

Candidate will have solid 

knowledge of clccironic 

circuitry as well as good 

mechanical skills. Ability to 

use basic electronic test 

equipment is necessary. 

Electronics Degree, 

trouble- 5 hooting skills 

and good communication 

skills arc helpful. 

Send resume to: 

HUMAN RESOURCES 

Dept.-L" 

27840 Concrete Drive 

jngleside, IL 600-11 



K? DENTAL OFFICE 

€C OUR LAKE FOREST DENTAL PRACTICE 

HAS IMMEDIATE OPENING FOR A 

HYGIENE COORDINATOR. IF YOU ARE 

SEEKING A CHALLENGING AND FUN 

EXPERIENCE AND YOU HAVE A GREAT 

PERSONALITY AND ATTITUDE, WE WOULD 

LIKE TO MEET YOU. 

PREVIOUS DENTAL ASSISTING EXPERIENCE 

WOULD BE HELPFUL, BUT NOT NECESSARY. 

WEOFFERGOMPETmVE SAIARYAND BENEFITS. 

PLEASE CALL (847)234-8608 



i ,iS 



ACCOUNTANT 

Great Lakes Credit Union, located near 
Waukegan, IL, has an excellent career opportunity 
for an Accountant This person will remit funds for 
sold loans, balance loan sales G/L's, and assist with 
related department projects. Qualified individuals 

will have excellent excel experience, good 

communication skills and analytical skills, Degree 

not required but preferred. To apply fax resume to 

817-887-8798 or e-mail jenc@glcu.org. Call our 

JOB.HOTLINE at 847-578-8909 to find out more! 

EOE 



220 



Help Wanlcd 
Full-Time 



Immediate 

opening for a 

Legal Secretary 

for FOX LAKE 

LAW Office; 

competitive 

benefits 

contact Mary @ 

847-587-2551 



EXPERIENCED F/T 
PAINTERS NEEDED 

for 
Altmann Drywall 

& Painting 

Located In Wauconda 

Must have resume & 

references. 401 K avail. 

Cafl 
(847) 526-8273 



PERSONALITY PLUS? 

Customer Support - 

7 new positions now 

available $8-10/hr 

plus incentives 

Superior Personnel 

244-0016. 

Gurnee 

or 549-0016 

Vernon Hills 




ID! DEL? 



J C Penney ^ 
optical 

has Immediate opening 

Some experience 

helpful but will train. 

30 to ho hrs. 

available. 

Benefits, commission 

and associate discount 

Hawthorn Center 

Vernon Hills 

L 367-0420 



m 



Efcsffi* 




fieri • 



Dont Miss Out! 
It's Coming! 

Every year 
Lakeland Newspapers offers 
Employment Outlook to ils 
renders featuring llic ■ 

jH.O tt est jobs in town! 
Don't miss tliis special section! 



• TOOL & DIE 
MAKER 

for 1st & 2nd Shift 

Growing manufacturing co. 

of speaker components 

needs a tool & die maker. 

The candidate must have 

3 or more years of 

experience with C NC. 

We otter full benefits and a 

salary commensurate 

with experience. 

Qualified applicants 

may send/fax 

(847-395-8862) resume or 

apply In person at: 

NuWay Speaker 

Products, Inc. 

905 Anita Ave., 

Antloch, IL 60002 

■gifltfay 



s 



j i iw y i 



=— =*[ 



MAINTENANCE 
MECHANIC 

Manufacturer of high quality steel 
laminations has an opening for a ' 
Maintenance Mechanic. The 
person we seek must possess own 
tools, work a 2nd or 3rd shift, 
woik scheduled overtime, and 
woik under minimal supervision. 

The successful candidate must 
hive 7>10 yrs related e»petlence 
and be capable of troubleshoot- 
ing, overhauling and repairing a 
wide range ol machinery ana 
production equipment. Ability to 
work from blueprints and compe- 
tently operate shop machlncs'also 
required. Knowledge of welding 
and electrlcjVelecuonlcs » must 

I We offer excellent wages and * 
benefits Including medical, 
dent j I, 40 1 (k) and pension plan. 
Apply in person Monday through 

J Friday, 9AM lo 4PM at: 

I TEMPEl STEEL COMPANY 

tjnptoymcnl Office 

2200 Tempel Drive 

Libertyville, IL 60048 

coenVf/d/v 



225 



flusincss 
Opportunities 



250 



SchooHnstrucllon 



$20,000 
IN FOUR MONTHS 

No selling. 
' Will Train, 
800-0950796 
oxt, 1255 
24hrs, 

"EXCELLENT PROFITS- 
LOG HOME WHOLESAL- 
ERS** Join proven I8yr. Log 
Manufacturer 16 kiln-dried log 
stylos, starting 59,800. Exclu- 
sive territory. Mr. Buck 1-800- 
321-5647, Old Timer Log 
Homes. 

ADVERTISE NATIONALLY 

• Inexpensively You can mar- 
ket your product to 13 million 
households throughout North 
America by placing your classi- 
fied ad In more than 800 sub- 
urban newspapers like this 
one for only $895. One phone 
call, one Invoice, one low pay- 
ment Is ail It takes. Call the 
Suburban Classified Advertis- 
ing Network fax on demand 
service at 800-356-2061 or 
312-644-6610 X4731 to speak 
with a sales coordinator. (SCA 
Network). 

BUSINESS OWNERS. IN- 
CREASE SALES by accept- 
ing Visa, Mastercard, Discov- 
er, Amex. NO upfront charges 
or fees. Approval regardless 
of type, size, age and credit. 
NO documentation required. 1- 
800-908-0011 24hrs. 715, 
(SCA Network). ■ 

CARDLINK INTERNA- 

TIONAL NO longer the best 
kept secret. Thousands are 
making tens of thousands. No 
selling, no recruiting. Call now 
and change your life. 1-888- 
489-9433. (SCA Network). 



NEED EXTRA INCOME?? 

Start off the New Year. 

Become a Home maker's Idea 

Company Consultant. 

'Unlimited Income* 

•Bonuses* 

•Flexible Hours* 

*Be Your Own Boss* 

Perfect for stay at home 

moms 

Call Todayll 

1-800-639-4516. 



QET YOUR R.E. LICENSE 
Mob Placement Available 

•Earn Extra Income 

'Many Locations Available ' 

•Traditional Classes 

Starling Soon. 

For more information call; 

Century 21 

Real Estate Academy 

(847)296-0410. 

PIANO LESSONS 

IN MY LAKE VILLA HOME 

OPENINGS 

Now for students 

Gyre, to adult. 
Over 25yra. experience. 
REASONABLE RATES. ■ - 
(847)356-2780. «t-.-~ 

TUTORING-QURNEE 

Teacher with Master degree 

providing quality, private 

tutoring for K-fl student*. 

Committed, respectful and 

motivating. 
Klmberty (847) 54B-7057. 



304 


Appliances, 



RAINBOW VACUUM, ALL 

attachments + shampooer 
and stair brush, excellent con-. 

dilion, $500/best. (815) 
356-7028. 



310 


Bazaastrafts 



228 


Situations Wanted 



HOUSE CLEANING. 18 
years experience. Bonded, In- 
sured, reference available. 
(847) 836-4537. 



BEANIE BABY AND 
SPORTSCARDS SALE 

Register to win Erin Beanie 
Buddy. Millenium, $40. ValontJ- 
na, $40, Signature, $40. All 
three for $100 with this ad 
(white supplies last). Prime- 
time' Sportscards, 3398 Sheri- 
dan Rd., Zlon (next to Dunes 
Theater). Open 7/days a 
week. (647) 746-2273. 

BEANIE BABY SALE 

BUY/TRADE 

Best Inn 

1809 "N. Milwaukee 

Ubertyville. 

Sunday 2/14, 

10am-3pm. 

Thursday 2/16. 

11am-7pm, 
Free Admission. 



BEANIE BABY SALE 

BUY/TRADE . ( 

Holiday Inn Gurnee,.: 

6161 Grand Ave. 

Friday, 10am-10pm. 

Saturday, 10am-7pm, 

Sunday, 9am-7pm. 

Free Admission. 




CHILD CARE CERTIFIED, 
references, 1st and 2nd shift. 
Full or part-lime, snacks pro- 
vided, 2019 45th St. (414) 
656-1486. . ■ . 

LOVING, RESPONSIBLE 
NANNY NEEDED to care 
for our 2-chltdren, 3yrs„ 
20/months, in our Grayslake 
home, '30hrs./week. English 
speaking, non-smoking, excel- 
lent references. Call Shari 
(847) 546-5430. ■ 

MCHENRY/JOHNSBURG 
MOM FT/PT opening, rea- 
sonable rates. (815) 
363-6801. , 

MOTHER OF 1 looking to 
care for your children in my 
Round Lake Beach home, 
FT/PT. Call Tracie (847) 
356-2322. 

MOTHER OF 1 wilt care for 
your child In her Antloch 
home. Clean, fun, non-smok- 
ing environment. Call Sue 
(847) 838-4864. 

MOTHER OF 2 offering ba- 
bysitting at reasonable rates 
in her Antloch home. (847) 
838-2978. 

NEED A SITTER? Mother of 
4 looking to babysit In my 
Round Lake home. (847) 
546-2884. 

NEED DAYCARE 

FOR A CHILD WITH 

SPECIAL NEEDS? 

Call Easter Seals at 

(847) 949-0060 

for Information. 

RESPONSIBLE, LOVING 
CHILD CARE PROVIDER 
NEEDED In Llndenhurst 
home. Salary/hours negoti- 
able. References required. 
(847) 356-5160, (847) 265- 
9355. 



A LOVING MOTHER OF 2 
will care for your child In her 
Round Lake home. Reason- 
able rates. Flexible hours. 

(847) 546-3930. 

CHILD CARE 

GROUP SIZE 

LIMITED TO 3 

Mother of 1 1n Grayslake 

(close to Rt. 83), has an 

opening full-time or part-time, 

for a child ages i -3. Our days 

will be structured with fun, 

educational activities. 

Please call Lisa 

(847) 223-9314, 

CHILD CARE IN a loving 
and educational home day 
care. Call Rebecca (847) 
546-4330. 

CKILDCARE NEEDED 

FOR 2 children, 2-afte moons 
a week In my Libertyville 
home, your child welcome, 
must have own transportation, 
$8/hr. (847)549-9126. 

EXPERIENCED NANNY 
10YRS. American trained, 
seeks part-time or. full-time, 
live out position with apprecia- 
tive family. References avail- 
able, Respond; P.O. Box 445, 
405 Orchard, Antloch, III. 
60002. 

IN HOME DAY CARE IN IS- 
LAND LAKE has full and part- 
time openings, meals and 
snacks included, lots of TLC 
and fun, (847)516-9806. 

LICENSED DAY CARE IN 
MY HAINESVILLE HOME. 
Reasonable rates, lunches 
and snacks Included. Imme- 
diate openings. Call for more 
Info. (647) 223-7254. 

UNDENHURST MOM 

NEEDS caring person to care 
for. her children In our home, 
days. References required. 
(847) 265-6604. 







. • 



I* 

t- 
d 
C 

N 
E. 

>3 
9- 

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e, 

d. 




February 19, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers I. C19 



314 


Building MalertaU 



340 



Household 
GoouV Furniture 



8TEEL BUILDINGS SALE: 

40x60x14, $9,094. 50x75x14, 
$12,275. 50*100*16, 

$16,079. 60x100x16. $18,281. 

Mlnl-storogo buildings. 
40x160, 32 units, $16,914. 
Free brochures, www.sentlnel- 
bulldlnss.com, Sontlnol Build- 
ings, 800-327-0790. Exton- 
nlon 79, ' 

STEEL I-BEAMS 

20FT.X1BFT. Many to 
choose from. <815) 344-1160. 



320 



Electronic* 
Computers 



STOP LOOKING FOR used 
computers. Own a brand new 

system at a wholesale price. 
Complete systems from 
OOOMhz starting at $669 to 
450 Mhz starting at $1399; Up 
to 70% off of retail on software 
from over 150 manufacturers 
Including Microsoft. Visit us at 
VWVW.WHOLESELL.COM and 
start saving money today I 

TV 50IN. BIQ SCREEN PRO- 
SCAN, 4yr; warranty, 1yr. old, 
$1.700/best. (647) 395-6971 



ROYAL' pbULTON "OLD 

Country Roses* dinnerware, 
eight piece set plus, $400/firm. 
(647)872-6614. 

SATELLITE SYSTEMS. 

181N. DirecTV Dishes Basic 
Unit $99.00. Dual Box Systems 
Only $199.00. $200 worth of 
free programming. Mention ad 
receive free Install kit ($60.00 
value) 1.000-325-7636 

00111. (SCA Network). 

TWO MAHOGANY CHIP- 
PENDALE UPHOLSTERED 
OVAL BACK SIDE CHAIRS, 
$100/ea. Mahogany marble 
top foyer tabled with matching 
mirror, $950. 2-colonial cherry 
stained pine currios with 
poured glass, ball feet, 
$950/ea. (815)344-1675. 



344 


jewelry 



MARQUIS ENGAGEMENT 
RING and wedding band with 
3 Marquis diamonds, let. total 
wt. Paid $2,400. Must sell, best 
Offer, (647) 357-1043. 




AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIG SALE, and there 
is still things that Just did not 
go.... Call U3 at LAKELAND 
Newspapers and run It 
under the 'FREE or Givea- 
ways' classified column. FREE 
ADS are NO CHARGE! 
(547) 223-6161.BX1. 140. 



338 


Horses & Tacks 



GOOD QUALITY SQUARE 
AND ROUND BALES OF 
HAY AND STRAW FOR 
SALE. Can deliver. .(414) 
248-1331. _____ 

HAY FOR SALE. Horses 
love round bales too. All stored 
inside. On the spot delivery. 
Over 20,000 served. (815) 
565-7128. 

RELIABLE HORSESHOER 
(815) 385-2647. 

WALKING HORSES FOR a 
smooth ride for an older per- 
son or bad backs. Quarter 
horse for fun, ponies for every- 
one. Horse 'drawn surrey and 
driving ponies. Exp. gated rid- 
ing mule. Also hay for sale, 
$375 delivered. (630) 
443-8880. 



BEAUTIFUL A-LINE SIZE 
10 WEDDING GOWN In Ivory, 
very regal with short sleeves, 
$750/best. (847) 838-4509. 

FOR SALE BEAUTIFUL 
RACOON SHORT JACK- 
ET. Excellent condition. (847) 
356-1148. 

FUR COATS MINK and 
leather, 3/4 length, $500/ea. 
Red Fox, 3/4 length, $500. 
(630)289-4211. 



350 


Miscellaneous 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



BATHROOM VANITY 

BASE 60in. with oak finish, 3- 
door, 3-drawer, white cultured 
marble top, single faucet, 
$200/best. 24IN. BATH- 
ROOM VANITY BASE with 
natural oak finish, 1-door, 2- 
drawer, white cultured marble 
top, single faucet, $150/best. 
TOILET, 12In, offset, com- 
plete -with seat, $25/best. 
(847) 395-8312 evenings 
after 5pm. ■ •■ 

BED QUEEN ORTHOPE- 
DIC mattress set Including 
brass headboard and frame. 
Never used, still In plastic. Sac- 
rlflce $300. (414) 453-O072. . 

BRASS BED QUEEN With 
new deluxe never used mat- 
tress set, $245. Black iron ca- 
nopy bed queen, complete, 
$375. Delivery available. (847) 
236-0032, 



DESIGNER MODEL 

HOMES FURNfTURE 

CLEARANCEI 

Sofa/loves oat set, 
hunter green, $495, 
Sofa, white, $350. 

Sofa/loveseat, 

earth tones, $595. 

Also: Plaids, Florals, 

Leathers and More. 

Dinlngroom sets, 10-plece: 

Cherry, $1 ,395, 

Mahogany, $2,395, 

Oak $1,695. 

Other sets available. 

Also: Bedroom Sets, 

from $995. 

(847)329-4119. 

www.modelhomefumiture.com 

FORMAL DININGROOM 
TABLE, 6 navy blue uphol- 
stered chairs, 1ln. thick bev- 
eled glass top with dark hard- 
wood base. $2,400 new, ask- 
ing $700. Excellent condition. 
Must see to appreciate. (847) 
973-0460. 

FURNACE . 80,000 BTU, 
Syrs. .old, runs great, 
$250/flrm. (847) 244-2353. 

KING SIZE WATERBED, 

with accessories, $175. 79 Ya- 
maha Enllcer, $750. Whirlpool 
refrigerator, almond, $200. 
(847) 497-4182 after 6pm. 



360 



Pets & Supplies 



BEANIE BABIES 129 for 
sate CHEAP. Most newly re- 
tired. Some bears. Mint condi- 
tion with tags. Desperate to 
get rid of. Would prefer to sell ' 
entire set together. (847) 
362-6197. ' 

BUDWEISER SIGNS 
6'10'XI'a", lighted, In bub- 
bles, B horses, large wagon, 2 
men and dog. $1,200. Lighted 
revolving 8 horses, wagon. 2 
men, and 6 dogs, $600. (414) 
654-7355. '"■* 

LOWHEY ORGAN, GENIE 
68, $lO0/best. Soloftex with at- 
tachments, like new, $1,200 
new, will part for 5450/best. 
(847)740-0568. 

MICHAEL JORDAN 
"SPACE Jam' cookie Jar, In 
box, mint, $125, will ship. 
(615)686-7063. 

MIRRORS (3) S'XeY 
$225/ea, or $600 for all three. 
(847)223-1247. 

MUST SELL ENESCO 
Cherished Teddies Collection, 
many retired and suspended. 
Mint condition, boxes for all. 
(847) 487-6202, 

ROCKWELL DELTA BAND 
SAW with stand, $100. Rock- 
well Delta drill press with 
stand, $100. Powarmatlc belt 
sander, Gin. with 9in. disc, with 
extra belts, $125. Sears Roe- 
buck Jigsaw, $10. 1986 Bulck 
Century Wagon, 2.8 V6, good 
work vehicle, dependable, 
asking $500ibest. Small Cher- 
ry filing cabinet, fair condition, 
$25, (847) 546-0616. 

STATIONARY BIKE, 
TREADMILL, rowing ma- 
chine. Also organ. Call for de- 
talls. (414)537-2203. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS. 
TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT 
and SAVEI Commercial/home 
units from $199. Low monthly 
payments. FREE color cata- 
log. Call today 1-800-842- 
1310. 



. DOG SITTING 

IN MY HOME, 

State licensed. 

Reasonable Rates. 

Call Florence (647) 068-6310, 

GERMAN SHORTHAIR 

POINTER PUPPIES, pure 
bred, $75-$150, Call Rudy 
(847)634-2831. 

TO GOOD HOM GERMAN 
SHORTHAIR POINTER, 
AKC, male, up-to-date on all 
shots, 2yre. old, (847) 
526-1217. 

GOLDEN RETRIEVER 

AKC PUPS, shots, wormed! 
males $200, females, $450. 
(920) 825-7487. 

GOLDEN RETRIEVER 

PUPPIES, READY TO 

GO, AKC, 1st shots, 9/weeks 
old, $400. (847) 680-5809. 

GOLDEN RETRIEVER 
PUPS AKC, gentle, health 
and hips. guaranteed, $450. 
(847) 516-1575. • 

LABRADOR POINTER 
MIX, 9/month female, black, 
great temperament, spayed, 
shots,, fenced yard please, 
$75 donation! (847) 
431-9734. 

LABS AKC, SHOTS, OFA, 
yellow, dewclaws, ' family 
raised, written guarantee, 
mates $350, females, $400. 
(414)697-1021. * 

NEOPOLITAN MASTIFF 
PUPS, shots, wormed, $800- 
$1500.(815)569-2907. 

PET GROOMING, 10 years 
experience. Dog and cat 
grooming. Open Monday - 
Saturday, New clients wel- 
come. 3400 Kehm Blvd., Park 
City, IL (847) 249-3755 

PIT BULL PUPPIES, 
4/weeks, very Independent. 
(414) 653-9874. 

POMERANIAN- PUPS, 

$350, Includes 1st shots and 
AKC. (414) 654-7864. 

ROTTWEILER/LAB PUPS, 
S20/ea. (847)546-3951. 

ROTWE1LER PUPS AKC ; 
registered, dewclaws re- 
moved, talis clipped, first 
puppy shot3,' wormed. (414) 
657-1591." - • 

SCHNAUZERS/MINIA- 
TURE PUPS, '9/WEEKS, 

ears/tall/shots done, $350- 
$400. (815) 726-0424. 

SHELTIE PUPPIES AKC, 
sable, bom 1/31, will release 
3/28, 3- males, 1 -female, great 
family pet, parents on premis- 
es, a must see. $450 with pa- 
pers. (414) 605-0872. ' 

SHIHTZU PUPPIES AKC. 
PLEASE BE MY VALEN- 
TINE! Females and mates. 

(414) 633-1569. 

STUD SERVICE RED, min- 
iature Dachshund, AKC regls- 
tered. (414) 65S-1788. 

THE SCOOP 
COMPANY 

Pet Clean-Up Service 

Affordable Rates. 

Weekly service. 

(847) 548-4633. 



500 


Homes For Sale 



368 



Tools & 
Machinery 




AKC COCKER SPANIELS, 
black and chocolate, wormed 
and ready for your home. 

Dave/Kelly (41 4) 869-4423. , 

AKITA PUPS AKC, cham- 
pion bloodlines, big. Call for 
Info., $400/best. (815) 
629-2606. . 

BOXER PUPS AKC, 
7/weeks old, fawn, 4-males, 1- 
female, talls/dewclaws done, 
$350. (81 S) 496-9127. 

CAT ~ BEAUTIFUL 

ORANGE AND WHITE, -1yr. 
neutered male, all shots + 
toys, must give to good home. 
Bill (847) 263-9820. 

COLLIE PUPS SHORTER 

coated, . elegant, shots, 
wormed, $50 without, $200 
with AKC. (847) 742-7060. 



TWO 3 INCH trash pumps; V 
Hamelite • $550.00, 1 Teel - 
$350.00. One 2 inch trash 
pump, Teel - $260.00. Hoses 
also available - suction and 
discharge. (847)546-3153 



BUYING RETIRED BEAN- 
IE BABIES. Please call Mike 
after 7pm weekdays or all day 
weekends 1-888-291-4932, 
pin #8104, Libertyville area. 

Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
Parts. Alio JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coke Machines. 
Paying CASHI Call 
(630)985-2742. . . 

WANTED ANTIQUES, 

DESPERATELY needed. 
Old furniture, marble top ta- 
bles, dressers, dinlngroom 
and llvingroom sets, sofas, 
stain glass lamps, rugs, oil 
paintings, clocks and anything 
Interesting. Please call (847) 
587-5848. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For Sale 




ilC 



Homes For Sale 



ANTIOCH GREAT LOCA- 
TION near town. Beautiful 
view, 2-largo bedrooms, possi- 
ble 3rd In full finished base- 
ment, 2-cor garage, A/C. Ask- 
ing $128,900. (847) 
395-7238. 

BRISTOL SPECTACULAR 
VIEWS, 3yrs. old, 2 miles 
from I-94, 1-1/2 story with 
wrap around porch on 1 acre. 
3-bedrooms, 2-1/2 baths, toft, 
open staircase, field stone fire- 
place, vaulted ceilings, artisan 
well, attached 2-1/2 car ga- 
rage. Much morei $169,900. 
For appointment call (414) 
657-3013. 

CHAIN O'LAKES RIGHTS 

and views, 4 -bed rooms, 2- 
baths, 3-car garage, triple 
wooded lot, lower than mar- 
- ket, financing available. 28584 
Valley, Ingleslde, III. $152,000 
Reduced. (647) 587-4814. 

FOX LAKE REPO $95,000. 
4-bedroom house, low down, 
make offer. Four Seasons Re- 
airy (847) 934-9100. 

: FOX LAKE BY OWNER Im- 
maculate 1yr. old, 3 -bedroom, 
1-bath, 2-car garage, base- 
ment, landscaped, and new 
appliances stay, $125,000. 
Sellers relocating. Call (847) 
587-0335. 

IMMACULATE GRAYS- 

LAKE HOME with 2-story en- 
try, 4-bedroms, 2.5 baths, 
huge kitchen, with Island, mas- 
ter suite, first floor laundry, 
look-out basement, large land- 
scaped yard, 2,5 car garage, 
security system, 2-level deck ■ 
with lacuzzJ, $249,900. (847) 
548-6633. 

LAKEFRONT PROPERTY 
NEW CONSTRUCTION, 4- 
bedrooms, cathedral ceilings 
with 4-skyllghts throughout 
2nd floor, 3-car garage. (847) 
587-6703. 

LIMITED TIME OFFER 
Southwest Wisconsin 3-bed- 
room year round rustic retreat. . 
16+ dMdable acres. $150,000 
Invested. Licensed appraisal 
$105,000. 3-1/2hrs. from Chi- 
cago suburbs. S95,000/firm. 
(847) 636-7886. . 

MUNDELEIN REPO 
! $155,000. 2-story, - Cam- . 
bridge West. Make offer. Four ' 
Seasons' ' -Realty (847) 
934-9100. 

OPEN HOUSE 
Saturday & Sunday, * 

12pm-2pm, 
81 16 203rd. Ave., 

Bristol, Wise: 

Pristine 3-bedroom, 

1-1/2 bath, famllyroom, 

brick fireplace, 1/2 acre lot, 

. 2-blocks from Bristol. Grade 

School. Well maintained, 

$155,000. 

(414) 857-6652. 

OWNER FINANCING AN- 
TIOCH 4-bedroom home, 3- 
, 1/2 baths, deck off master 
bedroom, Inground swimming 
pool, hot tub, fireplace, 2-1/2 
car attached garage on 1 acre 
and lot on a dead-end street, 
$224,900 with reasonable 
downpayment. (847) 
838-0647. 

OWNER LEFT STATE 
Newer 3+bedroom home, 
vaulted ceilings, master suite 
with separate shower and 
whirlpool, English -basement, 
fireplace, $189,000. Chain 
O'Lakes Realty (647) 
587-8233. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 5 
bedroom 1 1/2 bath ranch with 
screened In porch, gym set, 
satellite dish, large shed, 1/2 
. block to beach. Quiet neigh- 
borhood $110,000. (847) 
740-9985 ' ' ' 

ROUND LAKE BY OWNER 
Remodeled 1 -bedroom, 

breaklast bar, washer/dryer 
hook-up, walk-up attic, large 
shed. Reduced $62,000. (815) 
3B5-2697. 

SCHOOL HOUSE 120YR. 

old brick uniquely remodeled 
duplex, 1 .8 acre mini farm. 3- 
bedrooms, 1-1/2 baths UP- 
PER, fireplaces, spiral stair- 
case, attached deck with out- 
side hot tub. 2,016so,.ft., 2- 
bedroom, 1-bath LOWER, fire-* 
place, 1,240sq.ft.. 1-car brick 
garage, 30x30 2-stall horse 
barn, In North Cape. By owner. 
$235,000. (414) 835-2349. 



THREE. BEDROOM 

RANCH, hardwood floor In llv- 
ingroom and bedroom, 
fenced-in yard, on a quiet 
street in Round Lake Park, 
$85,900. (847) 497-3559. 

TWIN LAKES, WISCON- 
SIN Cute 2-bedroom, 1-bath 
home, I200sq.it., basement, 
garage, C/A, 75x200 lot, com- 
pletely fenced, $79,900. Extra 
lot 50x200, $16,000. Broker 
owned. (414) 279-9888, 

* 

VA/HUD REPOSI 

New lists weekly. 

Call Ryan & Co., Realtors 

•Your Repo Specialists." 

(847) 526-0300. 



VERNON HILLS 4-BED- 
ROOM, 2-1/2 bath, 2-car ga- 
rage, remodeled, close. to' 
schools/pool/parks, must see. 
(947) 367-6109. 



WATERFRONTI 

DESPERATEI 

MUST SELL! 

Price reducod $15,000. 

Big, beautiful new home, 

3,470sq.ft..'Huge rooms and 

walk-out basement, over 1/2 

acre, 2-decks, all amenities. 

$235,900. 

(647) 587-1097. 



WAUKEGAN BRICK 2 unit, 
2-bedroom, up & 3-bedroom 
down, $119,500. (647) 361- 
6165, (847) 623-3826, 



WAUKEGAN NORTH SIDE 
2-bedroom, 1-1/2 car garage, 
good neighborhood, $68,000. 
(847) 662-2949. 



WINTHROP HARBOR 2- 
BEDROOM home, newly 
fenced 'big yard, garage, new 
shed, many updates, $88,000. 
(847) 872-9388. 



STATE OF ILUNOI3 . ) S3 No. 97 CH SS4 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 
LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
JOHN CHARLES DEESON and MARY E. HARM AN. at Succettor 
Tru ttcoi under the CHARLES E. BEESON Truit dated September 
34, 1992 at Altlgnee of. CHARLES BEESON and MAY BEESON, 
Plaintiff. 
Vt.', 

THOMAS E. BEESON, DONNA L BEESON, HARRIS BANK PALA- 
TINE, TMK DEVELOPMENT, LTD., MIDWEST TRADING HORTICUL- 
TURAL SUPPLIES, INC., WITTEMAN & CO. B.V., OXKJRO CAPITAL 
FUNO, LTD., DUNLAP ENTEHPRISES.LTD., UNKNOWN OWNERS 
•rtdNONRECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendenli. 
THOMAS E. BEESON , Counter-Plilntlff, 
vt. 

JOHN CHARLES BEESON and MARY E. HARMAN, at Succettor 
Trutteea under the CHARLES E. BEESON Truit dated September 
34, 1992, JOHN CHARLES BEESON, MARY E. HARMAN, Individual- . 
ly, and Hie CHARLES E. BEESON, Truit, Courtier- Defendants. 
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SftlE OF BPfll P3TATP 

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE 

NOTICE 19 HEREBY GIVEN (hot pursuant to a Judgment heretofore 
entered by the said Court In the above-entitled cause on December 1, 
1998, Sheriff cf Lake County, rtUnois, will on Monday, March 15, 1999 at 
the hour of 9:00 AM m the Robert H. Babcox Justice Center, 25 S. Utica 
Street, Conference Room, First Floor, Waukegan, Illinois 60085. ted at 
public auction to the highest bidder and best bidder lor cash, all and tin-. 
gular, the following described promises and real estate In the said 
Judgment mentioned, situation In the County of Lake, Stale of Illinois, or 
to much thereto as than be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment. 

Said property Is commonly known as 11760 W, Route 22, Oeerfield, 
Illinois 60015. 

P.I.N. 16-17-300-032-011 and 1S-1 7-300-032^)010 

The person to contact lor Information regarding this property Is: 

Mark T. Hamilton al Churchill, Baumgartner & Quinn, 2 S. Whitney 
Street. Qrayslake, IL 60030. (847) 223-1500. 

The terms ol sale are: 10% down by certified lunds, balance within 24 
hours, by certilied funds. No refunds. 

The property Is approximately a live acre parcel ol land Improved by a 
concrete block building, a one story concrete block garden store, and a 
glass greenhouse and frame building with a house attached, including a 
three car garage, three to lour bedrooms and one and one half baths. 

The Judgment amount was $1,695,164.93. 

The property will NOT be open tor Inspection, 

Together with all buildings end improvements thereon, and the tene- 
ments, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging. 




If you would like to advertise In this exciting 
section, please call your ad rep. 847223.8161 



All-Subs 

REPO'S 

Low down! 

••CALL- 

A company you can trust 

•MEMBER BETTER BUSINESS* 

Liberty Re. Inc. 

630-539-6200 



OPEN HOUSE I 

1 



Gov't Foreclosures 

Fox Lab 4 Br $95,000 

Mundelein 3 Br $155,000 
Woukegan 3 Br $53,000 
Waufcegon 6 Br $73,000 
WinthropHari»r3Br 

$89,000 
Son 4 Br. $90,000 

Vemon Hilli TH 2 Br $77,000 
Round Lake 3 Br $78,000 

LOW DOWN/MAKE OFFER! 

WESTERN REALTY 
630495-6100 
847-778-2962 




OPEN HOUSE Sun. 1-4 

GURNEE-PEMBROOK 
Beautifully Malnt'd 3 Bdrm, 
Loft, 2 Full Bth, Frml LvRmV 
DrtRm, FamRm w/FrpI, Fncd 
Yrd.AIIAppls.FSBO. 
Must Seel $169,900 
847-263-9690 





ONLH 



If you have an item 

you want to' sell for 

$75.00 or less you 

can place an ad for 

only $3.00! Call: Lisa 

al(847) 223-81 61. 

ext. 140 

for more information. 



*P--< 






*:-* 



%. j= =; t»--i*^— i^k*. £' 



ELIZABETH 

(337-030) 

The 2,706 square foot Elizabeth (337-030) is the ideal home for an expanding family. Not 
only does this tour bedroom plan offer plenty of space, it gives more for the building dollar. 
Constructed with a. handsome shake roof and lap siding, the curb appeal ot the Elizabeth is 
evident. A large columned front porch, trimmed in brick, adds to the overall beauty. 

The graceful formal entry has a tiled floor and vaulted ceiling. To the right, it leads into the 
living room and formal dining area, both with vaulted ceilings. The living room has a large bay 
window to provide an excellent view. A built-in hutch for your good china is in the dining room. 

To the left ol the entry Is the home office, almost a necessity these days, and the Isolated 
master suite. The master suite boasts a vaulted ceiling over the sleeping area, a huge walk-in 
closet, home security system to assure your safety, a long vanity and a private bathroom with 
shower, raised tub and twin basins. 

The family room Is quite large and is open to the kitchen. The family room has a vaulted 
celling, multiple skylights, a gas fireplace, plenty of windows and access to a large back deck. 

The walk-through kitchen has a large garden window to check out the summer fun on the 
deck, double ovens, walk-In pantry, island cooktop, eating bar and an octagonal breakfast nook 
that catches all the available sunlight For ease of clean up, a raised dishwasher has been pro- 
vided, making bending unnecessary. 

There are three secondary bedrooms. All three offer ample closet space and a view win- 
dow. Bedroom number two, nearest the bathroom, has a built-in desk and might be useful as 
guest accommodations, sewing room or music room, 

The Moor design of the Elizabeth offers a second level bonus roam with 810 square feet ot 
space. This unique area could be 
that private office or den where < 
escape from the family Is possible. 

The plan finishes with a full util- 
ity room conveniently located with 
an entrance to the three-car 
garage. The garage has a shop and 
storage area, accessible Indepen- 
dent of the garage area by a service 
door directly Into that area. 

For a study kit of the 
ELIZABETH (337-030LP60) sendee 
$14.95, to Landmark Design 
33127 Saginaw Rd. E., Cottage 
Grove, OR 97424 (Specify plan 
name & number for kit). For a col- 
lection of plan books, send 
$20.00, or save by ordering the 
kit and collection together for 
$29.95, or call 1 -800-562-1 1 51 . X ^^^ jjp 



ELIZABETH niNHO) 

WWENSIONS; sm" 
UVWQ: »T» tquve tart - 
OPT. BOWS ROC** 111 tquwi ket 
OARAGE: It 2 tquvt tort 



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C20 J Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 19, 1999 






■ 



/ ■ 
w 



504 


Homes For Rent 



BURLINGTON, WISCON- 
SIN LAKEFRONT house, 3- 
badrooms, 1*1/2 baths, 
S950/monlh, 1st & last plus 
security doposlt. Available 
March 1st. (414) 537-2361. 

QURNEE 3-BEDROOM, 1- 

BATH, washcr/dryor, base- 
ment, C/A, remodelod, lawn 
service Included, 
51,100/month plus security 
and utilities, Available 4/1. 
(847) 336-8730, 

INGLESIDE AREA 1-BED- 
ROOM house, 1-2 people, In- 
cludes washer/dryer, no pets, 
$625/monlh. (847) 587-7514. 

LAKEFRONT HOME 4- 
BEDROOMS, available 3/15. 
(847) 395-1173, (847) 395- 
1428, 

ROUND LAKE BEACH UP- 
DATE 3-bedroom 1 bath 
ranch on double lot. Eat-In 
kitchen. New appliances and 
carpeting. Freshly painted. 
Full basement. Available 
March 1st. $995/month. (847) 
945-5217. __ 

ROUND LAKE TOWN- 
HOUSE ON WOODED lot, 
3-bodrooms, 2-1/2 baths, pa- 
tio, 2-car garage, whirlpool 
tub, fireplace, S1.300/mon!h. 
(847) 497-9260. 

VERY NICE 2-STORY 
home In Old Mill Creek, 4-bed- 
rooms, 2.5 baths, . 

$1,300/month plus deposit. 
Call Cathy, Monday-Friday, 
8am-5pm, (847) 244-5330. 

WATERFRONT 2-3 BED- 
ROOM, 2-bath, newly remo- 
deled home on Center Lake, 
Salem, Wisconsin, 10 minutes 
North of Antloch, III. Fur- 
nished/unfurnished, alumi- 
num rowboat included. No 
pets. Prefer non-smoking. 
$875/month plus utilities and 
security deposit. (847) 
438-3653 evenings. 

WINTHROP HARBOR DU- 
PLEX quiet neighborhood, 2- 
bedroom, basement, garage, 
no pets. $690/month plus utili- 
ties and security deposit. 
(B47\ 223-626(1, 



\ 



WAUKEGAH COZY HOME 

2 BR. FULL BSMT. 

HARDWOOD FLOORS. ALUM. 

SIDtD. ntWER APPLIAnCES. 

FRESHLY DECORATED 

615 AVAILABLE now 

CARL 847-241-5800 




OUNDxnuK 

alk tothctraihl^ 
^BR Duplex -2iii^i 
Floor. ■:■-''■ 
No garage. 
Long Term Lease. 

$475/mo + 
utilities & sec dep. , 

Managi 




508 


Homes Wanted 



WANTED 3-4 BEDROOM 

house, with 2-1/2 baths, fire- 
place, basement. In Grays- 
lake/Gurnee area on a 3-5yr. 
contract for deed basis. Call 
Cindy (847) 543-1741. 




514 



Condo/Town 
Homes 



READY FOR SUMMER 

Move-In condition, 1 -bedroom 
condo on Lako Dolavon, Wl. 
Furnished, sloops 8, Includes 
garage, fireplace, C/A. stove, 
refrigerator, microwave, dish- 
washer, clubhouse with pool, 
sauna, steam, exercise and 
game room, $106,000. (847) 
396-2132. __^_ 

UNION GROVE, WISCON- 
SIN Deluxe 3-bodroom town- 
house, 2-full baths, cathedral 
ceilings, celling fans, patio, full 
basement, C/A, 2-1/2 car ga- 
rage. $875/month plus sccurl- 
ty. (414) 545-3503. 

VACATION HOME BY 
OWNER Chain Olakes 
Townhouse. 2-bedroom, brick 
fireplace, kitchen, llvlngroom, 
dlnlngroom, ceramic balhs, 
large patio, views of Fox Lake, 
Boat launch and storage, 
swimming pool, club house 
and tennis courts, 1-car ga- 
rage. 51 09,900. (847) 
705-7800. 




BEAUTIFUL 3-BED- 

ROOM, 1-1/2 bath town- 
home In Countryside Hills, In 
Round Lake Beach. Fireplace, 
deck, and fenced back yard, 
$89,900. (847) 546M850. 

GRAYSLAKE TOWN- 

HOME 2-BEDROOMS, plus 
loft, plus office/den, 1.5 balhs, 
llvlngroom, dlnlngroom, A/C, 
washer/dryer, cathedral ceil- 
ings, skylights, large balcony, 
eat-in kitchen, all appliances, 
gas, 2-car garage, 

51,100/month plus deposit. 
Available 3/1. Month-to-month 
lease. (847) 548-7973. 

LIBERTYVILLE FOR SALE 
BY OWNER 3-bedroom, 2- 
1/2 bath, 2-1/2 car garage, 
2400sq.lt. of elegance. Must 
see. Private, green, woods. 
$325,000. (847) 918-0643. 



VERNON HILLS MOTI- 
VATED. Georgetown Square. 
New 2-bedroom, 2-bath. ranch 
lownhouse. Many upgrades, 2- 
car garage, $197,900. (847) 
478-9738. 



16X80 1993 MARSH- 
FIELD MOBILE HOME, newly 
carpeted, pets, 3-bodroom, 
C/A, 35x100 back yard area, 
2-car driveway, deck, like 
brand new, price negotiable. 

(414)694-3714. 

1S93 MANUFACTURED 
HOME, Carefree Estates, 
Trevor, 1,680sq.ft., 3-bed- 
rooms, 2-1/2 baths, family- 
room with fireplace, living- 
room, dlnlngroom, C/A, In- 
cludes kitchen appliances, 
washer/dryor and lots of ex- 
tras. (414) 862-9729. 

1996 28X60 SCHULT MO- 
BILE HOME In Timber Ridge 
Park (Pleasant Prairie, Wise). 
3-bedrooms, 2-baths, formal 
dlnlngroom, sunroom, 
1650sq.fi., 10x24 deck, 12x16 
barn style shed. Excellent con- 
dition. All appliances except 
washer/dryer Included. 
$67,500/best. (414) 
697-0286. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
WALK TO EVERYTHING 
OVER 55 COMMUNITY. 
Now 1907 
Manufactured horn* 
1-bodroom. 1-baih 
with garage and recroom. 
Includes: washer/dryer, 
stove/refrigerator, 
off street parking. 
$54,900. 
19B8 2-bedroom, 2-bath, 
carport, shed and deck, 

$39,900. 

1995 2-bedroom, 2-bath, 
with garage and carport, ■ 

$64,900. 

1990 1 -bedroom, 1-balh, 

carport and shed, 

newly remodeled. 

$28,900. 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message. 

MOBILE HOME MARSH- 
FIELD 1972 14X70, 2-bed- 
room, newly remodeled, 
$9,900.(414)551-0102. 

MOBILE HOME. NICE 
comer lot, Rainbow Park, Bris- 
tol, 1973 Dlckman, 2 bed- 
room, 1 bath, large kitchen 
and living room, new carpet In 
kitchen, living and hall; Cen- 
tral air. New furnace 5 years 
ago. New siding and awnings, 
1 year ago. Washer, dryer, 
stove and refrigerator stay. 
Asking $38,800. Very good 
condition. Call Patii lo see. 
(847)395-1143 

MODULARS - DOU- 
BLEWIDES • SINGLEWIDES 
- ILLINOIS LARGEST DIS- 
PLAY OF MODEL HOMES. 
FOUNDATIONS, BASE- 
MENTS. GARAGES, SEPT- 
ICS - WE DO IT ALL!! FREE 
STATEWIDE DELIVERY/IN- 
STALLATION. RILEY MANU- 
FACTURED HOMES 1-800- 
798-1541. . 

RURAL GRAYSLAKE 

New & Used 

Homes For Sale 

Chain O'Lakes Mobile Homes 

Rt. 120 & Fairfield Rd. 

For appointment 

(847) 546-2316 

leave message on machine. 



520 



Apartments For Rent 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



ANTIOCH APARTMENT 
DOWNTOWN. Cloan 1 -bed- 
room, kitchen, llvlngroom, 
bath, rear parking. Tenant 
pays electric. 1yr. lease with 
security doposlt plus referenc- 
es. $425/monlh, (847) 356- 
6309 days, (847) 548-1360 
evenings. __ 

ANTIOCH LAKEFRONT. 
Newly remodeled 1 -bedroom, 
$600/month utilitlos Included. 
Boat slip available. No pets. 
(847) 526-0598. > 

ANTIOCH WATERFRONT 
1-BEDROOM apartment, fur- 
nished $595, unfurnishod 
$495, 1 -month security. (847) 
838-1228. 

GRAYSLAKE 2-BED- 

ROOM, ALL new, off street 
parking, laundry, $700/month 
plus utilities. No pets. (847) 
223-6633. 



ZION LARGE 1 bedroom, 
2nd floor. Furnishing and 
laundry facilities available. 
2412 Elm $525 /month. (647) 
872-2436 

ZION LARGE 1-BED- 
ROOM, carpeted, stove, re- 
frigerator and dishwasher. No 
subsidies or pets. $500/monlh 
Dlus securltv. (847) 872-8091. 



LAKEVIEW ' TERRACE 
APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA, Large 1 & 2 bedrooms, 
$610-$745/month. Hoat, wa- 
ter, air Included. (847] 
356-5474. 




LARGE STUDIO APART- 
MENT In beautiful Vacation 
Village, 24hr. security, 
$425/month plus 1-1/2 
months socurlty deposit. (847) 
S87-S675, 

VERNON HILLS 2-BED- 
ROOMS, A/C, carpet, dish- 
washer, 1st floor, no pets, nice 
neighborhood, $720/month 
plus doposlt. (847) 566-6883. 

WAUCONDA 2-BED- 

ROOM, CONVENIENT to 
stores, 2nd floor, stove/refrig- 
erator $625/month. Available 
Immediately. (847) 381-3848. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
WALK TO EVERYTHING 

Large new 2-bedroom, 

2-bath, 1-car heated garage, 

S895/monlh plus security. 

Available March 1st. 

No pets. 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message, 



GRAYSLAKE APART- 
MENT LARGE 1 -bedroom, 
in good neighborhood. Utility 
room and on site manager. 
1yr. lease plus security depos- 
it and references. $600/monlh. 
(847) 223-0022, (847) 356- 
6309. 

GURNEEAVAUKEGAN 

NORTH SHORE 

APARTMENTS 

At Affordable Prices. 

Spacious. 

Luxury Living. 

Elevators. 

On Site Staff. 

Good Location. 

Easy to Toll Roads. 

IMPERIAL TOWER/MANOR. 

(847) 244-9222. 



WESTWIND 

VILLAGE 

APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave., ZIon 
1,2 & 3 BEDROOMS 

FREE HEAT 

Appliances * On Site 

Manager • No Pets 

Starting from 

$495/mo. 

Call Martha & Issac 

(847) 746-1420 

or BEAR PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

(414)697-9616 






Ukewood YilUqE Apartments 

In IslANd Lake ancI GnAysUkE 

OlfEMNq ftliontUble liousiisq (on QUAlifitd AppticANis. 
Now ftCCEpiitsq AppllcAiioNS Ion our: . 

• 1,2 ancI J bednooM apartments . 

PlCME CAll Ion MORE infoRMAliON OR AppoiNfMEM AI: 

(847)225-6644 TDD# (800)526-0844 

bvkewood YilUqE ApAniMiNi is prtokssioisAJly >v 
MANAqEci by MinidiAN Gnoup, Inc. 8bSJ 



OAKRIDGE VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 



Offering Affordable Housing for 
Qualified Applicants, 

Currently Accepting Applications on our 

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments 

Stop in at: 

299 Oakridge Court in Antioch 

Or call: 

847-395-4840 
fat 1-800-526-0844 TDD 

sn.Tsn Managed by Meridian Group, Inc. 



',»■; >. 



J 



The Search Is Over... 



.Tivo of the finest apartment 
communities in the area are sure to 
.; have what ydtfre^lookitig for. 



All of our apartments have: 

• 1 & 2 bdrm spacious floor plans 

• on-srte 24-hour emergency maint. 

• Laundry facilities 

• Convenient to Metra 

• Beautifully manicured grounds 

• Flexibly leasing 



ANTIOCH 
MANOR 




Af AlTHiNtS 



445 Donin Dr. 

Antioch, IL 

(847) 395-0949 



Deep Luke llcrmiloge 

149 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2002 



A Place To Call Home 

G.P. Management, Inc. ^ 



528 



Apt/Homes 
To Share 



sa 



Business Property 
For Rent 




ROOMMATE WANTED 

Non-smoking female to share 
brand now 2-bedroom, 2-bath 
townhouGo In Llndonhurst, 
$525/month plus 1/2 utilities. 
Pool, exercise room, and ten- 
nis courts on slto. Call Chris- 
llne (847) 356-5765. 

WOMAN NON-SMOKER, 

non-drinker to share private, 
home with samo, private 
room, ranch style brick home, 

$450/month Including utilities. 
(B47) 965-6988. 



530 


Rooms For Rent 



ROOM FOR RENT with full 
house privileges In Vernon 
Hills. Male/female, age 25+. 
$500/month, $250 doposlt, In- 
cludes all utilities except 
.phone. (847) 367-5B93 leave 
message. 

SEMI-FURNISHED 
QUIET, clean, convenient. 
$200 to move In, $70/wk. 
(847) 360-9568. 



raCHMOND 

Fountain Head 

Corporate Center, 

Rt. 12, 

New Superior 

2?50 to 7630 s.f. 

units, for 

|lf\DUSTO/BUSINESS,| 

a/c ofc, Ccrnmon 

or Private Dock. 

2750 sf. $995 

Land Mcjnt 
815/678-4771 



544 



Mortgage Services 



534 



Business Property 
For Sale 



SMALL FULL-TIME NAIL 
BUSINESS. Take over very 
well established clientele. Seri- 
ous buyers only. (B47) 356- 
9025 leave message. 



FORD DEALERSHIP 
For Sale By Owner. 

Rare oppty. 

Turnkey operation. 

Includes property 

& inventory. 

$1.4 M. 
SE Georgia. 
904-419-3477 



, --.♦•*->■*. , ;=; .» 



ONLY 




If you have an Item you 

want to sell for S 75.00 or 

less you can place an ad 

for only $3,001 Call: Lisa af 

(847) 223-8161 oxt. 140 

. for more Informal ion. 



534 



Business Property 
For Sale 



BUILDING(S) FOR SALE OR LEASE 

Grayslake 

1750, 3500, 5250.SQ. FT. 



*l 

* 
* 
* 

* UNIT SIZE 
J 1750 Sq. Ft. 
J 1750Sq. Ft. 
£ 1750 Sq. Ft. 

* 

* Air conditioned offices arid warehouses 
{Please call Livorsl Marine - 847-548-5900 J 
************************** 



OFFICE 
275 Sq. Ft. 
SOOSq.R. 
275 Sq. Ft. 



LEASE PRICE 
$1200/permo. 
S1200/permo. 
$l250/permo. 



SALE PRICE 
$129,000 
5129,000 ' 
5136.000 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



Vai'-ifiKS 



FOX LAKE NEW lake view 
offices on Grand Avenue. 
Starting at $275/montrt. (847} 
587-1615. 

HAINESVILLE OFFICE 
SPACE 600sq.!t., excellent 
condition, great signage on RL 
120. $700/month. Tri-County 
R.E. (847) 615-1200. 

SMALL MODERN OFFIC- 
ES FOR RENT IN BUR- 
LINGTON, 258 S. Pine, 
450sq.ft. Excellent location 
on main thoroughfare. All utili- 
ties and snow removal Includ- 
ed. Immediate occupancy. 
Call Rick at (414) 763-7686 
days, (414) 534-5258 even- 
ings^ 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

700/800sq.ft. Industrial space 
with regular overhead door, 
pay own utilities, 5395/month 
each, plus security. (647) 
526-5000 leave message. 

WAUCONDA AREA IN- 
DUSTRIAL AND SHOP 
SPACE FOR RENT 

1,0 80 sq.ft. unit, 5695 plus se- 
curity. Available immediately. 
2400sq.fl. POLE BARN 
with concrete floor. Heal, elec- 
tric, outside storage can be 
added. Office trailer available, 
S495 as Is. Avallablo imme- 
diately. ISLAND LAKE IN- 
DUSTRIAL 3,000sq.ft. shop, 
with loading dock and office, 
(1) 10rU10ft., (1) 10ft.x11ft. 
overhead door. Available April 
1st. 51,180/monlh plus securi- 
ty. (847) 526-5000, - leave 
message. 




560 



Vacant Lot/Acreage 



568 



Out Of Area Property 




Richmond Car 
Lot or Your 
Business Use ■ 

Brick Bldg. on Rt. 12, 

Shop with overhead 

door, office, additional 

storage garage 

& sales lot 

Excellent visibility. 

$795/mo 

Land Mgmt. 
815/678-4334 



568 



Out of Area 
Property 



SOUTHERN COLORADO 
RANCH SALE. 92 acres - 
$59,900. Borders BLM, Enjoy 
panoramic view and sensa- 
tlonal sunsets over the Rock* 
log from this gently rolling 
acreage. Ideal for horses. Ex- 
cellent financing. Call now 71 9- 
678-6367, 

TN LAKE BARGAIN - 
$17,900. $1,800 down. Boat 
dock. Beautifully wooded lot at 
spectacular 30.000 acre lake. 
-Paved road, utilities, sur- 
veyed, soils tested. Local bank 
has appraised • will finance 
7.25% fixed, 15 years. Only 
$147/month. Priced to sell Im-^ 
mediately. Offered first come, 
first served. Call now 800-881- 
5253, ext. 2301. 



NO DOWNPAYMENT7 

PROBLEM CREDIT? Own 
the homo you need now, with- 
out a big downpaymont. Com- 
plete financing If qualified. De- 
George Homo Alliance 1-800- 
343-2884. 



IOWA - AG LAND REALTY 

344 oc Monona co near Onawj, 

all till, lew I, Hwy location, 2 

litigation tyslcmi, grain noragc, 

SI 750 per acre. 60 ac 2 miles W 

of Marnialllown on W«t Main St, 

nice likltf sik-v will divide. Call 

Henry |oe SanoVe, Broker 

Manhalllown 515-752-4505 

for dctaili 



.1 



GEORGIA 

For Sale by Owner. 

Golf, fteHng, swing, 

|2 story brick home, 

4500sf, toe'd on 

4.5 ac, 546ft 

on water. 

$865KV 

20ac pasture avalL 

912-273-6998 



704 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



1997 SPORTSMAN 27FT. 
TRAVEL TRAILER, fiberglass 
body, fully equipped, fully 
screened-ln porch, A/C, 
$13.000/best. (815) 385-4670 

STARCRAFT TRUCK 

CAMPER 1987, 9.5', excel- 
lent condition. Refrigerator, 
water healer, bathroom, air, 
$4,000. (414) 878-9747. 



* 
* 



708 



SnowmobUeVATVs 



tsHQPPER 

MARBLES, MICROME- 

TER, 8-TRACK TAPES, 
records, block and tackle. 
iB471 587-6956. 

DO YOU HAVE 

SOMETHING TO SELL 

FOR $75 OR LESS? 

Place your ad In this section 

for only $3.00 for 10 words or 

less. Must be prepaid. 

Call Usa (Ml) 223-8161 

ext. 1 40 or send the ad with 

with your payment to: 

Lakeland Publishers, 

P. O. Box 268, 

30 S. Whitney St., 

Grayslake III. 60030. 

Alton: Usa. 



65TH ST., 1501 VACANT 
LOT, 40x85. (414)652-6391. 

CRYSTAL LAKE 1 acre +, 
wooded, soil tested approved, 
with septic design, quiet cul- 
de-sac, $82,000. (815) 
479-9078. 



KENTUCKY LAKEFRONT 
15 acres - $39,900. Lake 
property on beautiful undis- 
covered lake. Small town, 
country living. ' Meadows, 
woods, views and sunset. 4 
seasons, year round boating 
and fishing 800-816-5253. 



LAKEFRONT PROPERTY 
1-ACRE, perc tested, sand 
beach, large oak trees, Uly 
Lake, Wisconsin, $85,000. 
(414) 857-6652. 



SO. COLORADO RANCH. 
54 acres - $34,900. Bring your 
horses and ride out to one of 
the last great ranches In CO. 
Nice fields with outstanding 
Rocky Mtn views. Yr, round ac- v 
cess, tel/elec, Excellent financ- 
ing. Call now 719-676-6367 
Hatchet Ranch. 



1990 WELLS CARGO en- 
closed, drive on/off, 12ft., 2,-3 ( 
- u i place, electric brakes, excel" "" 
lent condition, $2,000/best. 

(615)356-1794. 

KITTY CAT SNOWMO- 
BILE, good condition, runs 
great, $550. (815) 356-9690. 

MAMA HATES THE COLD " 
1998 Skl-Doo Grand Touring' 
700 Triple, 2-seater, 150 
miles, studded track, Bin. car- 
bides, electric start, reverse, 
every possible option. Used 
once. Perfect condition. 
S6,500/bost. (847) 726-7998. 



SKI-DOO BLIZZARD 

7500, 1979, RV chassis, very 
good condition, $575/best. 
(414) 877-2940 after 8pm. 

SNOWMOBILE 1993 

WILDCAT 700, studs, skt 
skins, mirrors, cover, hydrau- 
lic disk, extremely fast, $2,850. 
(847) 587-6151. 



SNOWMOBILE 1999 PO- 
LARIS XCR440 SP EDGE, 
1 of 500 "made, 500 miles, 
must sell, $6,200. (414) 
877-2968. - -■ 

SNOWMOBILES (2) YA- 
MAHA'S, 1994 600 & 1995 
800, accessories, trailer. (414) 
877-4309. 

YAMAHA & LELAND 1992 
Exciter, 2,300 miles, picked 
clutch kit, pipe, looks and runs 
great, 2-piace steel trailer, 
$2,400 for everything. (847) 
872-6779. 



710 


Boat/Motors/Eic 



"FfSHERMANS DREAM 
PACKAGE" 14ft. V-hull extra 
wide, I5hp OB with bonus 
301b. electric troll motor, depth 
finder, HD trailer, all accesso- 
ries Included, $2,100, (847) 
524-2723. 

1984 RENKEN WITH cuddy 
cabin excellent condition, just 
tuned up for summer boating. 
Beige with blue stripe, dean, 
$3,400/besl. (847) 360-9665. 

BOAT FOR SALE 16B9 21ft. 
Sea Sprite, Big V8, open bow, 
sun deck, great condition, 
seats 9, 1 -owner, white & blue. 
Price with trailer $10,000. Ask 
for Jerry (847) 587-9378. 



>S\ 



9 






. 



- 



1 

■ 



February 19, 1999, 



720 



Sporti Equipment 



804 



Cars For Sale 



804 



Cars For Sale 



810 




CLASSIFIED 



EXERCISE EQUIPMENT 
HEALTH Rider with vldoo, 
$200. Body Stridor Body By 
Jako with video, $150. RockH 
Solorflex with Video, $400. All 
In excellent condition. {414) 
897-0534.. 

NORDIC TRACK 'PRO, ex- 
cellent condition, $400/best. 
Mountain bike, outback, good 
condition, $100/beat. ; (847) 
304-0824. 

SCHWIN MOUNTAIN 

BIKE, won It at draw box, 
been sitting In garage since 
1995," first $150 takes home. 
(847) 223-1530. 

SCHWINN STATIONARY 
BIKE/COMPUTER.$200. 

Precor rowing .machine/com-, 
outer' $200.00. Pro- Fitness 
stepper $200.00. Precor 810 
rower-$1 50.00. (847) 

295-7353 



804 



Can for Sale. 



DODGE 1895 NEON, 
$5,995; (047) 623-1492. 

EXPRESS AUTO 
EXCHANGE 
USED CABS 

Wo take consignment cars. 

No charge. 

Too busy to aotl your car? 

Lot U9 do It for you. 

(847)740-1400 

1 19 W. Rollins Rd. 

Round Lake Beach, 

(Across from Burger King). 

Ask for Chris. 

FORD 1890 TAURUS, 
$3,778. (847) 587-6473. 

FORD 1991 TEMPO 4- 
door, full power, $2,250/best 
FORD 1988 F-250 Super Cab 
Pickup 4x4, manual transmis- 
sion, full power, cap, 454 en- 
glne, $4.850. (815) 344-1675. 

FORD 1992 TEMPO, 
$4,988/(847) 587-3400, 



OLDS 1986 CUSTOM 
CRUISER WAGON, power 
windows/locks, good condi- 
tion, runs great, . (847) 
487-5913. ' " " 

OLDS 1988. 98 REGENCY, 
all options, high miles, good 
dependable., transportation, 
must sell $2,450/be$t. (847) 
724-3313. 

OLDB 1991 CUTLASS 
CRUISER WAGON, $5,998. 
(847)338-3510. ' 

OLDS 1992 DELTA 86 
ROYAL, $9,995. (847) 587- 
3300. 

OLDSMOBILE 1986 CUT- 
■ LASS .SUPREME, 76,000 

miles, many now parts, 
i$1i700/best. (847) 546-1025. 



UNCOLN 1986 4-DOOR 
convertible (suicide doom), re- 
tractable top, needs restora- 
tion;- $2,5(XVbost. Or will part 
but. (6471 587-7444. 



814 



Service & Part* 



NISSAN 1994 PATH- 
FINDER SE, $12,995, (847) 
587-6473. ■ ■ 

TOYOTA 1991 4-RUNNER 
SR5, V6, gold, great condition, 

1-ownor, automatic, air, 
$8,750.(414)275-6819. 



ADRIAN CONTRACTORS 

BINS, heavy duty steel for full 
size van, brand new, 
$1,000/best, (414) 877-3843 
after 5pm. ' 

CLASSIC QUARTER 

PANEL SALE. Mustang, Cam- 
era, Nova, Chevelle, Cutlass, 
Mopars, Pontlac, Chevrolet, ' 
morel TRUCK PANS, FLOOR 
PANS. DOORS, FENDERS, : 
BUMPERS, New and Callfor- , 
rila.. Rust free. MARKs PLAT- 
ING & SUPPLY 217-824-6184. 



834 



Trucb/Trailcn 



PLYMOUTH 

BREEZE, $7,995. 
2800. 



1996 
(847) 234-, 



TOYOTA MR2 1986, black, 
4-cyllndar, S-speed, power 
steering, brakes, windows, 
locks, A/C, , sunroof, In good 
shape, ' runs ' excellent, 
Sl,350/bost, Call 'Judy or 
Chuck (847) 587-1759. 

CORVETTE 1992 CON- 
VERTIBLE white with white 
top, garage kept, 55,000 
miles. Excellent condition. 
(B1S) 385-8468. 

HONDA 1992 CIVIC LX 4- 
door. automatic transmission, 
A/C, all power except locks, 
cruise control, AM/FM" cas- 
sette, excellent condition, 
70K, $6,000/best. ' (847) 
543-9558. 

MUSTANG 1998 LOADED 

with all the extras, 5,000 miles, 
brand new condition. Must 
sell. (647) 662-3909. 



FORD '1993 
WAGON, $4,995, 
5000. 



ESCORT. 

(847) 360- 



AUDI A4 1998, 
(847)432-5020. 



$19,990. 



FORD 1995 MUSTANG 
COUPE, loaded, 18,600 miles, 
$11,500/(414)605-9942. 

FORD 1996 ' CONTOUR, 
$9.988. (847) 587-3400. 

FORD 1997 ESCORT, 
$9,988. (847) 587-3400. 

GEO 1999 STORM, 
■ $3,988. (847) 587^400. ' 

HONDA 1987 ACCORD 
LXi, dependable, economical, 
automatic transmission, 
power steering,! power brakes, 
power door locks, power wind- 
ows, A/C, cruise, power sun- 
roof, am/fm cassette, new 
tires, 17K, original; .owner. 
Runs great. $2,500. (847)' 
265-1635.. • 

HONDA 1998 ACCORD, 
$13,998.(847)587-3400. 



PLYMOUTH ...1997 : NEON, 
$9,995.(847)249-1300. 

PONTIAC 1992 GRAND 
PRIX LE, $4,998, (847) 336- 
3510. 



. 



824 



PORSCHE 
LET 1983, 
432-5020. 



911 CABRIO- 

$22,990. (847) 



PORSCHE 
LET 1994, 
432-5020; 



969 CABRIO- 
$25,990. . (847) 



AUDI A6 1995, 
(047) 432-5020. 



$17,990. 



HYUNDAI 
TRA, $3,995. 



1993 ELAN- 
(847) 249-1300. 



BMW 1989 750IL, $7,195. 
(847) 234-2800. 

BONNEVILLE SSE 1994. 
Don't . miss out-Save. Below 
. payoftlAj^'belcw'.dealerj priq- ,„_ 
es. We have 2rmust ; sell i, 
we're buying home. Black with, 
gold trim, loaded up with leath- 
er, 65K miles plus large 3yr. 
35K mile warranty, '$11,800. 
(815) 675-2788 evenings and 
weekends after 6 pm. • 

BUICK' 1993 CENTURY 

WAGON, $7,495. (847) 234- 
2800. 

BUICK 1994 CENTURY, 

$5,998. (847) 587-3400. - 

CADILLAC 1995 CON- 
COURS, $12,997. (847) 587- 
3400. . 

CAMRY XLE 1993, V6, 
ABS, highway miles, automat- 
ic everything, leather Interior, 
gold, $8,500/best. (414) 
857-3439. : 

CARS $100, $500 & up. Po- 
lice impounds. 1980's-1897's 
Hondas, Chevys, Jeeps and 
Sport Utility. Must sell. 800- 
772-7470 ext. .7040. (SCA Net- 
work). . ■ ■ 

CARS $200 & UP Police im- 
pounds. 1980's-1997's Hon- 
das,- Chevys, Jeeps & Sport 
Utility . Must . Sell. 800-772- 
7470 ext. 7040" (SCA Net- 
work). 

CARS FROM $500 
Police Impounds 
AndTax Reptfs. 
For listings call . 
1-800-319-3323 
ext. 2292. 

CHEVROLET 1995 GM 
SONOMA, 59,000 miles, 
$5,995. (414) 652-6430. 

CHEVY 1968 CAVALIER, 
$995. (847) 587-3400. • 

CHEVY 1994 CORSICA, 
$7.995. (847) 587-3300. 

CHEVY IMPALA SSM995, 
black, fully loaded, excellent 
condition, must sell.' (414). 
694-9449. 

CHRYSLER 1995 LEBAR- 
ON CONVERTIBLE,' $8,995. 
(847)' 234-2800. 



DODGE 1989 SHADOW 
ES. $2,655. (647) 587-6473. 

DODGE 1995 NEON. 
SPORT, red, 4-door, automat- 
ic, A/C, am/fm cassette,- 1- 
owner, $6,300/bost. (847)' 

845-7904. -. 

DODGE 1995 NEON, 
$5,995. (647) 395-3600. 



HYUNDAI -1998 ACCENT, 
$7,995. (847) 249-1300. 

INFINITI 1995 J30'S 

$16,995. (847) 362-9200. 

INFINITI daO,~ 1M3,. 

$9,995; (647)362-9200'. 

LEXUS 1090 LS400 SE- 
DAN. $7.095. (847) 234-2800. 

MAZDA 1998 626 LX. 
$11,995. (847)362-9200.. 

MAZDA 1997 PROTEGE, 

$9,988, (847) 587-3400. 



MERCURY TOPAZ 1994, 
$2,900. (847) 623-1492. 

MITSUBISHI 1992 MI- 
RAGE, $3,798. (847) 336- 
3510. ;'' . 

NISSAN -1990 SENTRA, 
A/C, excellent condition, orlgt- " 
nal owner,' highway, miles, 
$1,600. Days : -(647)' 

913-8680, (847) 680-4773. 

. 
NISSAN 1992 MAXIMA, 
$6.498.(847)336-3510. „ 

NISSAN "1992 SENTRA, 
$2,998. (847) 338-3510. 

NISSAN .1992 SENTRA, 
$4.995. (B47) 587-6473. 

NISSAN 1994 SENTRA LE, 

$6,995. (847) 395-3600. 



SAAB. 9000 4996, $20,995. 
(847) 362-9200: 

SAAB "1990 TURBO- CON- 
VERTIBLE, $8,495. (847) 234- 
2800. -•■■-.■■ 

.'SAAB 900 SE 1996, 5-door, 
$18,950.(847) 432-9300. 

SAAB 0000. CSE 1997, 
. $25.950. (847) 432-9300. 

SAAB 900S CONVERT- 
IBLE, 1995, $17,950. (647) 
432-9300. 

SAAB 900SE . 1997, 
$21,950.(847)432-9300. 

SATURN ' 1995 SL, $5,995. 

(847)360-5000. " ._ 

SATURN' 1997. SL2 ,"SE- 
DAN, $8,995. (847) 234-2800. 

SATURN SC2 1993, 

, $6.998? (847) 3364510. " 

SUZUKI ESTEEM 1996, 

. $9.995. (647) 249-1300. 

TAKE OVER PAYMENTS 
1997 Monte Carlo LS, show- 
room condition, leather, power 
windows/locks, CD, -sunroof,. 
20.400 miles, $345/mo. (815) 
477-3419 6pm-10prn. . 

TOYOTA 1995 CAMRY 
LE, $10.598. (847) 335-3510. 

VOLVO 1996 850 GLT SE- 
DAN. $20,995. (847) 362- 
9200. .. 

VOLVO 1996 855 GLT 

WAGON, $22,295. (847) 382- 
9200/ 



CHEVROLET 1989 HIGH 
TOP .CONVERSION VAN K 

TV & VCR included, excellent 
condllion,$3,B00/best. TOYO-. 
TA 1986 4-RUNNER, Flori- 
da Truck, good condition, 89K, 
automatic, A/C, $3,500/best/ 
(847)740-7841.. 

CHEVY 1093 G/20; CON- ' 
VERSION VAN, $6,995; (847) 
587-3300.- 

DODGE 1988 CARAVAN, 
good condition, $1,500,' (414) 
551-9892. .. 

DODGE 1990 CARAVAN, 
$2.595. (647) 587-6473. 

FORD 1995 WlNDSTAR, 
$7,995. (847) 587-3400. 

■ _^^^^^^^^^— ^^^» ■ 

GRAND CARAVAN 1994, 
excellent condition, fully load-, 
ed, $8,500/best. (847) 
356-5082. 



XHEVY 1080 C-30 UTILITY 
.TRUCK, built-in propane gen- 
orator, 8-cyllnder, 
$2,000/best, (847) 356-2903. 

CHEVY 1993 Z71, pickup, 
loaded, perfect condition, low 
miles. (847) 748-9004. 

DODGE 1994 -DAKOTA 
.'CLUB PICK-UP; $9,998. (847) . 
336-3510.- 

DODGE 1996 DAKOTA 
SLTj $11,995. (847) 587-6473. 

FORD- 1994 RANGER 

'SUPER CAB, $7,995. (847) 
587-6473. . 

FORD 1998 RANGER, 5- 
speed, air, CD, rear slider bed- 
liner, custom paint. Must sell. 
$11,B0O/best. (815) 

759-9187, (847) 774-9240. 



1997 SUZUKI 1400 IN- 
TRUDER, with covery helmets 
and shield, 480 mites, 
' $6,500/flrm. (847) 785-6843. 

HARLEY . DAVIDSON 

1998, 883 HUGGER, black 
wHh spoked wheels, mint con- 
dition, $6,000. (847) 
872-4062. 

HONDA 750* NIQHTHAWK 

1995, black, like new condi- 
tion, garage kept, ridden only 
2 seasons, 4,000 miles, 
$5,800 new, selling $3,600. 
(847)548-0409, 

SUZUKI GS XR*1 100 1997, 
4 In 1, 3.000 miles, 
$6,500/best. (414) 598-0644 
after 4pm. 



HOUSECLEANING SERV- 
ICES 5YRS. experlenco, dal- 
ly, weekly, bi-weekly. Refer- 
ences. Call for appointment, 
(414)889-6513. 

THE. HANDYMAN NO job 

too small. Painting, carpentry 
and repair work. Reasonable 
rates and free estimates. 
(847) 223-7724. 



S39 



Housekeeping 



S21 



Dry Wall 



PAINTING, DRYWALL 

AND OLD FASHION 
PLASTER REPAIR, 15yrs. 

experience, Insured, senior 
discount. (414) 652-3220. ■ 



LET US DO IT FOR YOU 

Dependable, reliable. Weekly, 
bj-wekly. Call Sue (847) 
587-6466. . 

MORAVIA 

CLEANING SERVICE. 

House cleaning 

Window cleaning. 

, References available. 

Quality work at low cost 

(847) 623--1943. 



S78 


Remodeling 



MITSUBISHI 1990 

MIGHTY 'MAX, $2,875. (847) 
587-6473. 



838 


Heavy Equipment 



IRRIGATION PUMP & MO- 
TOR, model 6203A, 40hp, 
phase 3. Peerless pump, 4in. 
Ductal falanged, 20hp. motor, 
$650. (647) : 740-7380 after 
5pm. • 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you have placed classified 
advertising wtth the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may re- 
ceive a misleading statement 
from another firm request; 
ing payment for this advertis- 
ing. To receive < proper cred- 
it to your account, all pay- 
ments., for your Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: '"• v . 

Lakeland Newspapers 

POBo*2G8 

30 8. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IL 60030-0308 



DC TILE WE Install floor and 
wall tiles of all kinds'. Remodel 
all bathrooms and kitchens. 
Free estimates. (847) 395- 
0777. ■ 

JACK'S 

REMQDEUNG 

*Baaemerrt Finishing 

•Famllyrooms & Officerooma 

•Electrical & Plumbing 

•Kitchens & Baths 

•Vinyl Replacement Windows 

•Soffit Fascia. . 

FREE ESTIMATES 

-(847)546-3759, 



NISSAN 1996 QUEST MINI 
VAN. $14,995. (847) '234- 

2800. y 

PLYMOUTH 1889 VOYAQ- 

ER,$1, 595. (847) 587-6473, 

PLYMOUTH 1992 -GRAND 
VOYAGER LE; $5.995.. (847) 
234-2800; ' 

PLYMOUTH 1992 VOYAG- 
ER, $3.995. (847) 395-3600.. , 

PLYMOUTH 1993 VOYAG-" 

ER SE, . $5,995. (847) 360- 
5000. ' ■ ■ ! 

VW - 1993 EUROVAN, 
$8,995. (847) 249-1300. 



Lakeland's 




75 




Four Vhed Drive 
Jeeps 



VOLVO 1998 
S70'S. $24,595, 

9200. * ' 



SELECT 
(847) 382- 



VOLVO 1998 V70 R AWD 
WAGON. $31,995. (847) 362- 
9200. 

VW BEETLE 1998, red, 5-. 
speed, loaded, best offer. 

^ (815)338-7294. 

VW JETTA GL 1997, 
$12,995.(847)249-1300. 




CHEVY 1987 S-10 BLA2- 
ER,,$2,496. (647) 336-3510. 

CHEVY 1989 BLAZER 4X4; 
$4.000. (647) 623-1492. 

CREVY 1993 Z71 OF- 
FROAD, mint condition, low 
miles. (847) 746-7004. 

CHEVY 1995 S-10 BLA2- 
ER, $12,998. (847) 336-3510. '" 

DODGE 1985 RAM 

CHARGER 4x4, runs well, 
many new parts, $1,900. (815) 
675-6032. ■ ■ . . 

FORD 1988 BRONCO, 

$5,995. (847) 395-3600. 

FORD 1991 EXPLORER, 

^ $5.795. (847) 587-6473. 

GEO TRACKER 1092 CON- 
VERTIBLE, $3,895; (847) 360- 

5000. ' - 

' GMC 1694 JIMMY SUV; = 
$8,995.(847)234-2800. . 

GMC 1094 . JIMMY, 

$13,995. (847) 587-3300. 




A Word] 
•Rate 



1) Ad in Lakeii 



. 



Il^papi^rs 



■sail 



2) Ad in Great Lakes Bulletin 

3) Ad in Market Journal 



- : : ...... 

4) Plus ad placement on the Internet 



e*UJlU* @ (8^223^8161 ext 140 







GRAND 

1993, $10,900. 

1492. 



CHEROKEE 
(847) 623 : : 



GRAND 

1997, $20,900. 

1492. 



CHEROKEE 
(B47). 623- 



. Keasha Louisa is Ihis week's *PET OF THE WEEK* 

This Siberian Husky'ooes to work eveiyday with her 

mom, Kimberty, and plays with the horses. Keasha 

has one blue eye and one brown eye and specializes 

• In saying TlJweYrju* in Husky Talk. She trres with " 

her sisler Sasha Marie and 3 cats. 

Submitted by: Holly T„ McHtnry . 

February, 1999 



ISUZU RODEO LS 1995 
4WD, loaded, 2-tone, 52,000 
mites, 5-speed, V8. Asking 
$13,800/best. (414) 
635-9772. 

JEEP '93 GRAND Chero- 
kee, 4 x 4 cd, 78k, mint, 6 cy-. 
Under. S10,900/obo. (773) 
782-0757 , 

JEEP COMANCHE ' .1989 

' 2x4, 140K miles, 5-speed, 
bedliner, snap-on bed cover, 
new tires, excellent condition 
and runner, $3,300. (414) 
534-6548. ■ , .■•'.;'-. 

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 
LTD., 1996. $22,595." (647) 
362-820Q. 

JEEP' WRANGLER 1994, 

' $9,900. (847) 623-1492. 



If you have an item to sell for $75.00 or less , you 

can place your dd in our Bargain Shopper 

Section for only $3.00! Take advantage of this 

• new section by filling .out the form (with 10 

words or less) and send your payment to: 

Attn: Lisa 

C/O Lakeland Publishers 

P.O. Box 360, Grayslake, IL 60030 

or call with a credit card (847) 223-8161 ext. 140 

Orders Must Be Prepaid 



(telephone number) 



Fill out this form to sell items 
$75.00 or less. 



u. 



■ 



■ 

if 






i. : > 



.ny I \ 



■ ( 






C22 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 19, 1999 



^ 



TAX DIRECTORY 



^. 






ATCWEGGE.LTD. 

Enrolled Agents • CPA 

/f?S Representation 

Established Since 1960 

265 Center St • Grayslake 

(847)223-0777 

* 

CARL SAND 
ACCOUNTING & INCOME TAX 

E-F1LE available 

404 Lake St • Antioch 

. (847) 395-7444 

COMPREHENSIVE 
ACCOUNTING SERVICE 

Free Electronic Filing wf pd. return 

564 N. Route'83 • Grayslake 

Daniel E. Coulon, EA 

(847) 223-4040 

COTE & WRIGHT 

Servicing Lake County for over 30 years 

1304 Washington St. • Waukegan 
(847) 662-6019 • fax (847) 662-6053 

DAM, SNELL & TAVEIRNE, LTD. 

Certified Public Accountants^ 

21 Rollins Rd. • Fox Lake 

(847) 587-3022 

1512 Artaius Parkway • Libertyville 

(847) 367-4448 

2022 S. Route 31 • McHenry 

(815) 363-1801 
Internet Address: dstcpa.com 



H&R BLOC 








THOMAS L. KRON, CPA 

Individual & Business Taxes 

Appointments available at 

your convenience 

1724 E. Grand Ave. • Lindenhurst 

(847) 265-0866 



474B W.Liberty • Wauconda 

(847)526-8877 . 

2 W. Grand •Fox Lake 

(847)587-9333 

426 Lake * Antioch 

(847)395-6230 

629 W. Rollins • Round Lake 

(847)546-4862 



JACKSONHEWM 



23 South Route 12* Fox Lake 

(847)973-1099 
226 N. Barron Blvd. • Grayslake 

(847)548-6060 

46 West Main St. • Lake Zurich 

(847)726-1099 

622 E. Hawley • Mundelein 

(847)949-8433 

2435 Green Bay Road • North Chicago 

(847)689-1099 
23 West Rollins Road • Round Lake Beach 

(847)740-1099 

336 5. Green Bay Road* Waukegan 

(847)360-1099 

2250 Sheridan Road • Zion 

(847)746-1099 

CALL 1-800-234-1040 

FOR OTHER LOCATIONS. 

IERROLD I. WEINSTEIN, LTD. 

Income Tax Preparation 
(Electronic giling Available) 
Small Business Accounting 

Payroll Service 

4949 Grand Ave, • Gurnee 

(847) 662-3420 



Lakeland Newspapers Is pleased to present our 1999 




I 



ayrr RyxT^ rTT^rrry^v* 



If you would like your company to be 
added to Lakeland's Tax Directory, 
I please call Paula or Ross at 847-223-8161 




Spring Edition 



Lakeland Newspapers 
will be publishing a 3 
Special Employment 
Guide on Friday 
March 19, 1999. You 
won't want to miss 
out on this special 
pullout section. It will 
be Inserted In all 1 1 Lakeland Newspapers, 
covering 90% of Lake County 



This is the perfect opportunity to 
recruit from Lake County's 
finest job applicants! Or let 

people know about your ^**- 
resume service! This ^ 
informative section will 

feature articles and informa- 
tion on the employment 
situation here in Lake County. 

Call your Classified Advertising 
Account Executive today at 







Deadline for ad space is Friday 
March 12 at 5 p.m. 



Lakeland Newspapers is your 




To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



To Place 
Your Adhere 

Call 

847-223-8161 







ItonllrMon 



' Remodeling &J 
Home Improvements 



■ ; .■ 



mi u m 




Room Additions '$?. Bathrooms 
^£as$ments ' ' -••Dormers;",:'; 







» W^5«MVf i' JJl^g^^W^ i Ut? r*»r)gytr < f.-*?tT- 



^fe^SisSiS^naw/aoyropm 



Easy Fi 



CON 




i 




HHMHHHHHMMHHHHHHHMHHHHHHHHHHHHMHMHHHHHHHMMHHHHHHMHHHHHHH 

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BCTTIH 
(UOItCU BUREAU 



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milll l lM I I IIIII IIMI I I I MMI I II IIM I HMI I MMM II Ml i m i lMMI 



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Insured 



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February 19, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 




Lakeland Newspapers I C23 



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RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL 








C24 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



February 19, 1999 



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Hours: 
Mom 10-5 *%W y FI0-6 

Th. 10-7 • to. iO-5 
Closed Sun. Or ByAppt. 

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Liberty ville (847) 680-8267 




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