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Full text of "Antioch News 02/26/1999"

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Antiach 1L 60002-1398 





.JftUBLIC LIBRARY DISTRICT _ _ _ _ 

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1999,37 NORTH-MAIN.- A lakeland Newspaper /75 cents 

"A"OTfOCH;it-60002 --— - — ---- 



Registration, resolutions highlight 

Antioch Elementary District 

referendum drive; voters decide 

April 13 on building proposal 



By KENNETH PATCHEN . 
Staff Reporter 

With one exception, the 
effort to educate voters 
about the school bond 
referendum appears to 
be working well. 

Citizen's Referendum Commit- 
tee members are 
reaching out to 
.all parts of the 
district to 
•inform voters 
.about the April 
v 13 .school bond j 
referendum. 
A dozen 
members have 
been trained to 



Feedback suggests local 
taxpayers do not under- 
stand the State of Illinois 
will give the school district 
.$7.1 million to help improve 

the schools if local voters 

pass Hie referendum to raise 

$11.8 million. 



that local taxpayers do not under- 
stand that the State of Illinois will 
give the school district $7.1 million 
to help improve the schools if local 
voters pass the referendum to raise 
$11.8 million. 

'In other words, the district can 
obtain an expanded, improved 
school system; with a new primary 
school, with a 37 




Rich Kufalk, Kathy Wilson (center) and Sue Stevens are serving 
as referendum co-chairs for the Antioch Elementary School DIst. 
34 April 13 building referendum. Initial feedback indicates, many, 
voters are not aware that the district will receive an additional 
$7.1 million from the state for the project if voters approve the 
$11.8 million referendum question. .The one-time state building 
aid was approved as part of the State School Reform Act Not 
pictured is Vickie Axton, committee treasurer.— Staff photo 



..register voters- , - ,-.. f ,-,- 

* for the election? tit local ^chools and ■ 
events. 

Members are making presenta- 
tions to community groups and 
organizations. Brochures are avail- 
able for distribution. 

Endorsements of the proposed 
referendum by village and high 
school district officials have been 
received. ^l 

Feedback sugjrests, however, 



percent 

discount provid- 
ed by a state 
grant 

It suggests 
there is still a 
- lot of commu- 
nicating with 
voters to be 
done, arid the 
^CidzenX Refer- 
endum CommltteeliSifitaken on 
that task. The Committee is also 
focused on voter registration 
during the next 17 days. - 

The deadline to register to vote : 
is March 15. 

"They can register at all tbe_ 
public libraries, at all our schooIiT 
village Hall," said Kathy Wilson. 
"They can also look for (registrars) 



at 



■at school events." 

.Wilson Is one of three co-chairs 
of the steering committee, The 
others are Rich Kufalk and Sue 
Stevens. VldcieAxton serves as 
treasurer of Uie committee. 

"It takes a "matter of three 
minutes to register (to vote)," 
Wilson said. "It's simple." 

"They.only need two forms of \ 
fdentmcafjon." 

" A driver's license, a social 
security card, a utility bill are _. 
examples of possible identification 
that can help become a registered 
voter. 

Wilson said that many people 
are reluctant to register to vote 
because they do not want to be 
selected for jury duty. That is not 



UHAUA 




how jurors are chosen. "Jury duty is 
selected by driver's licenser Wilson 
said. . 

In addition to registering voters, 
members are trying to inform the 
public about the need and the 
financing for the referendum. 
- On Thursday, Feb. 18, District 
34 Superintendent Dr. Daniel Burke 
. met with the Antioch Community 
^Mfgh ScftoptfcSinl.of EaucatJoa HSE 
told them that when he cam 
Antioch In 1990, there were 1,750 
students In his four school build- 
ings^ The district now has 2,100 
students. 

. "We still have four schools," he ' 
said. "Over the past nine years, a 

Please see VOTERS /A3 



More than half the people who 
returned survey forms distributed by 
United Homeowners Associations of 
Unincorporated Antioch favor 
construction of sewers. , 

Results of the survey will be 
reported to elected officials along 
with a request for help to upgrade 
and protect lake areas. 

Results of the survey were 
released at a meeting hosted by 
UHAUA on Tuesday, Feb. 16. 
Members present discussed the • 
results of the survey. 

The return rate for survey forms 
that were mailed out was 54%, 
according to Chris Peters, secretary 
of UHAUA. Of me forms returned, 55 
percent favored sewers and- 45 
percent were against 

People opposed to sewer exten- 
sion died cost as a major reason for 
their opposition. 

According to Peters, mis is . a 
concern that everyone has. 

The results of the survey will be 
presented to elected officials, 
according to Peferk^fBcfals w01.be - 
asked- for he/p i to ^upgrade -and - 
protect the quality of life and the 
environment of the Chain of Lakes 
area 

The next meeting hosted by 
UHAUA will be at St Stephen 
Lutheran Church, 1155 Hillside 
Avenue, on Tuesday, March 16.— By 
Kenneth Patchen 




Laughter rules 

Junior Woman's Club presents third 
annual comedy night, March 6 



CIRCLEJOILUFE 

How to achieve peace 
i through spirituality 

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By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Antioch Junior 

Woman's Club offers its 
third annual comedy 
night to' help . lead 
Antioch residents from 
winter to spring with 
smiles on their faces. 

There are . two 
comedians this year who 
will provide the • 
comedy— Fred Klett 
and Patti Vasquez. Both 
are comedy club and 
television veterans. 

Doors open at -7 
p.m. oh Saturday, March 
6 at St Peter Church's 
Father Hartley Hall. 
Tickets are available at 
First National Bank- 
Employee ; Ownedjv^BS 
Lake Street, although 
most of the audience 
? buys their $15 tickets, at 
the door. Club members 
tickets. 




Vasquez: A 
Second City grad 




Klett: Material 
focuses on family 

also hava 



The evening is more 
than family-style comedy. 
It is a visual feast of 
creative and festive . 
decorations. It is an 
opportunity to have a 
table arid bring friends 
together for a mutual 
good time. The evening 
Includes a 50/50 raffle, 
silent' auction, and, both 
hot and cold hors d'oeu- 
vres. Adult beverages' are 
available at the cash bar, 

"It's an all race-car 
theme," said, member 
Margie Walsh-Griffin. The 
evening is "racing to the 
millennium." 

Wabh-Griffin and Jodi 
Eckert are co-chairs of the 
decoration committee. 

; "Everything will be 
bright except for the black 
and white table cloths." 
Each table will have an 




Please see LAUGHTER I A3 



Stuff the bus 

Eddie Bedard and Wes Kumpler, third graders at Oakland School 
In Antioch, "stuff the bus" with food to be donated to the Antioch 
Food Pantry. The school, along with students from Antioch Upper 
Grade School, collected 957 pounds of food in one week. - 
by Sandy Bressner 




For home delivery, call (847) 740-4035: For ads, call (847) 223-8161 



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A2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



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February 26, 1999 




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February 26, 1999 



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FROM PAGE At 



VOTERS: Decide fate of 
Dist. 34 building project 



number of new students have 
come." 

Burke has said that the district 
expects the student population to 
increase about 50 percent in the 
next five years,, 

Burke showed the presentation 
about the referendum to the ACHS 
Board of Education. The program 
states, "This plan is our only chance 
to get a $7.1 million state grant If 
we don't pass this referendum, this 
April, we will lose this money." 

Burke said that there is no sec- 
ond chance to pass it next October. 

"We'd have to go to the end of 
the line and re-apply," he said. 

ACHS school board members 
asked questions about the likeli- 
hood that State officials actually will 
provide the money if the referen- 
dum passes. 

"This (grant) program is a very 
popular program In Springfield," 
Burke said. 

"You're entitled to the money if 
your taxpayers pass the feferen- 
, dum," Burke has been told by state 
officials. 

The ACHS Board of Education 
unanimously passed a resolution of 
support for the referendum initia- 
tive. 

It states/in part, that the ACHS 
Board of Education "supports the 

* need for adequate school facilities 

• in Antioch Community Consolidat- 
ed School District 34 in order to 
meet the needs of a growing student 
population, and wishes Antioch- 
Community Consolidated School 
District 34 successjn its efforts to 
secure the necessary funding 
through the upcoming referen- 
dum." ... . 

The Citizen's He'fer'endum 
Committee presents the same pro- 
gram to groups of voters to describe 
the problems of increasing student 
enrollment. The strategy to meet 
the educational needs of so many 



children is described. The program 
explains how it can be funded with 
a blend of local money and a state 
grant. 

Referendum committee mem- 
bers and school officials have made 
the presentation to more than a 
dozen groups already, and there are 
15 more already signed up. The dis- 
trict is meeting with any group that 
invites them. The most recent 
schedule reveals that on some 
evenings there are a couple of pre- 
sentations. 

Groups include: homeowner's 
associations, civic groups and ser- 
vice clubs, athletic associations, 
government bodies, and church 
groups, People who wish to sched- 
ule a presentation can make 
arrangements at 838-8400. 

In the meantime, local voters 
can drop in on some of the public 
meetings to see what the district 
proposes to do. 

Referendum Committee mem- 
bers will make a presentation to the 
Lindenhurst Park District on Tues- 
day, March 2 at 7:30 p.m. at the 
; Community Center on Grass Lake 
Road. 

There will be a presentation to 
the Lake Villa District Library Board 
at 7 p.m. on March 8 in the new li- 
brary building at Deep take Road 
and Grand Avenue. 

The Antioch Township Board 
will host a presentation at their of- 
fices-, 99 West Route 173/ at 7:30 
p.m. on Thursday; March 11. 

In between those events, the 
' Citizen's Referendum Committee is 
" meeting with the Cub Scouts, Par- 
en t Teacher Organizations, ACHS 
Band Rarehts. TheJAhtioch Junior 
■ Woman's Club/the Antfoch Rotary 
Club, Antioch Youth Baseball, The 
Antioch Woman's Club and Lake 
Villa Township Lions Club. 

They really are meeting with 
everyone who asks. 



LAUGHTER: Women's Club 
prepares for evening of fun 



imaginative centerpiece. 

There will be red-yellow- green bal- 
loons at the ceiling. Race car tires, 
cleaned-up, will be helping create 
some atmosphere. People will enter 
through tlie starting gate. 

People turn out for a good time 
and good laughs, and this year's co- 
medians have strong reputations for 
providing laughs. 

Comedian Fred Klett does fami- 
ly-oriented material about marriage 
that Bill Cosby so successfully em- 
ploys. Klett rants. He does calm ob- 
servations of existence. He com- 
ments about living with children. 

He and wife Nancy have three 
sons. 

It is home-grown humor profes- 
sionally presented. 

Klett has performed with Jerry 
Seinfeld, Jay Leno, and Richard 
Lewis. He has appeared on Comedy 
Central, HBO, and Showtime and, re- 
cently, made his network television 



debut on NBC's "Friday Night 
Videos." 

The comedy club atmosphere of 
the transformed Father Hahley Hall 
should be comfortable for Fred Klett 
He has been in many of them all over ' 
the country, including Zanies in Mt. 
•Prospect. 

Opening for Klett is Patti 
Vasquez. She too has been at Zanies 
where she has opened for comedians 
like BUI Maher, Tom Rhodes, Richard 
Lewis, John Pinnette, John Caponera, 
and Will Durst. 

Vasquez has appeared on NBC's 
"Friday Night" program. Perhaps one 
of her more widely repeated televi- 
sion appearances has been a Bud- 
weiser commercial. She learned her 
performance skills at two Illinois 
Universities but picked up' her cre- 
dentials with graduation from the 
flayers Workshop of Second City in 
Chicago. 

There is other entertainment. 



Antioch News 

Vol 1 14 No. 9 A Lakeland Newspaper Founded 1886 



Mtmbw ol lUinoit Pim* Amoc. 

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Lakeland Newspapers/ A3 




Daddy-daughter memories 

Allan Gordon and his daughter Samantha, 8 of Antioch, dance at the Daddy/Daughter dance held 
at the Antioch Upper Grade School Saturday night. —Photo by Lynn Gunnarson Dahlstrom 



Grass Lake School plans construction 



By KENNETH PATCHEN . 
Staff Reporter 

The Grass Lake School Board of 
Education has moved forward with 
plans to construct a cafeteria and 
other improvements. 

The board approved a concept 
plan at their Wednesday, Feb. 17 

t meeting. 

"The board's very excited about 
it," said Jim Beveridge. "This is the 
first construction that Grass Lake has 
done since the mid-to-iate 1970s." 

Beveridge is the Superintendent 
of Grass Lake School. 

"I want to get the cafeteria going 
as soon as we can," he said. "I'm talk- 
ing to bankers to see what we can af- 
ford." : 



By building the cafeteria im- 
provement, Beveridge will be able to 
move children off the school's stage in ■ 
the gymnasium. This wul permit the' 
school to use the gymnasium for ed- 
ucational purposes for the 90 minutes 
now used to feed school children. 

Beveridge expects to have some- 
thing undenyay this spring. 

VbYers~Qpproved a tax' base ex- 
tension proposoTfn 1998 which per- 

mits Grass Lake School officials to 
raise funds through school bonds. 
The school can raise $95,000 every 
year. 

The school has a strategic plan- 
ning committee which will review 
the concept plans in early March. 
The committee includes members of 
the community, the parent teacher 



organization, teachers, and parents. 
Beveridge said that the school 
olso'.will apply to the Illinois Capital 
Development Board for state fund : . 
: ing. Such funding may eventually be-" 
come available to the district at 
which tirhethe district will conduct 
a school bonid referendum. 

. Immediate concerns are to Im- 
prove the cafeteria situation, ir 
- prove a court yard area, obtain rw 

new classrooms, and create storage 
space. 

A second phase at some future, 
time will make changes to student; 
and transportation circulation pat- 
terns. School buses will deposit chil- 
dren at a new entrance and circula- 
tion of students through the school 
will be improved. 




ACHS promotes wellness at fair 



The Antioch Community 
High School Wellness Fair 
isThursday, March 4 from 
8 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the 
school's south gymnasium. 

"This is going to be our best 
one," said Steve Wapon, one of the 
people who has organized this third 
annual event. "Everybody's invit- 
ed." 

"We're having five areas it will fo- 
cus on: safety, nutrition, fitness, body 
fat and cholesterol," he said. This is 
an opportunity for people in the 
community and for students to learn 
something more about rjealth. " 

"It supplements what we do in 
the classroom," Wapon said. 

There will be booths from local 
agencies.the railroad, and others, 
such as LaCasa, providing informa- 
tion. There Will be an organ donor 
present to talk about the need for do- 
nations. 

There is an eyeglass collection 
box at the prescription counter of the 
Osco Drag Store inside the Jewel 
Food Store at Route 173 and Lake 

■ Street. The Antioch Lions Club has 
placed it there for. people who wish 
to donate old eyeglasses. It is a fast 
way to make a donation while shop- 
ping. There are. probably others 
around town also, Do not throw old 

, glasses away. Someone eise can use 
them. 

Coming up on Friday and Satur- 
day, March 12 and 13,' is the Antioch 



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OUR 
TOWN 

KenPatchen 



Community High School production 
of Swing Street Cafe 99. 

The A.LL Parent Network 
Beanie Baby raffle continues to at- 
tract interested participants and 
funds for the Antioch Community 
High School Post-Prom event. 

"It's doing well," said Barbara 
Porch. She is sponsoring the raffle 
of 14 Beanie Baby toys at her 
Choosey Child Store, 891. Main 
Street. 

"We'll do the drawing in mid- 
March," she said. Right now she is 
collecting the raffle tickets in a4-inch 
by 4-inch box that she expects will 
not become full by the time a winner 
is selected. 

Two raffle tickets are $5, four for 
$10, and eight for $20. Single tickets 
'are $3 and winners will be notified by 
telephone, t 

The"collection of 14 to be won 
by one person includes four new 
Beanie Baby collectibles and five 
that have been retired by Ty Cor- 
poration. 

Township Supervisor Tim Os- 
mond is warning Senior Citizens to 



be careful about buying goods or ser- 
vices from door-to-door sales peo- 
ple. "Recently, a senior citizen 
brought a receipt into show me and 
to ask if she had paid too much for a 
new driveway," said Osmond. 

The receipt had no business 
name, address, or telephone num- 
ber. There was ho information about 
them from the Better Business Bu- 
reau. 

"Before buying from door-to- 
door salespeople, get references and 
check them out/' said Osmond. "If it 
seems too good to be true, it proba- 
bly is." 

We-Read-The-"Illinois Agri- 
News"-So-That-You-Do-Not-Have- 
To Dept.: The soybean and corn pro- 
duction numbers are in for 102 Illi- 
nois Counties. Lake County farm- 
ers produced 1,872;000 bushels of 
corn on 15,600 acres with an average 
yield of 120 bushels per acre. They 
also, produced .727,650 bushels .of 
soybeans oh 18,900 acres with a an 
average yield of 38.5 bushels per 
acre. It sounds like a Jot of produe- 
' tion, but Iroquois County! produced 
51,511,000 bushels of corn and 
McLean . County produced 
15,777,600 bushels of soybeans last 
. year. 



If you have interesting infor- 
mation or anecdotes to submit for ' 
"Our Town" call staff reporter Ken , 
Patcheriat223-81 61, ext.131 or 
e-mail, edit @lnd,com." 






A4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 26, 1999 




Happy to pitch in 

Teri Chipman of Genoa City, Wis. donates blood Saturday to Life- 
source during a blood drive held by the First National Bank-Em- 
ployee Owned in Antioch. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 



Addpt-A-Highway locations available 



Three county roads are available 
for adoption by Antioch area organi- 
zations that want to help keep the 
roadside clean. 

Applications are due immediate- 
ly at the Lake County Division of 
Transportation for the program 
which starts ApriH. 

"It's a beautiful program and 
gets both children and adults In- 
volved In beautifying our communi- 
ty," said Judy Martini (R-DIst. 1). 

Lake County Board Representa- 
tive Martini seeks support for the 
county's . Adopt-A-Highway Pro- 
gram. In the past, she has been able 
to obtain 100 percent coverage for 
county roads in her district. At the 
present time, there are three county 
roads which need a volunteer spon- 
sor. The roads are Lake Avenue in 
Channel Lake, the western portion of 



Grass Lake Road, and Deep Lake 
Road south of Route 173. 

' The Lake County Division of 
Transportation now is acceptingap- 
plications for the Spring Clean-up 
session which starts April 1 and ex- 
tends through 2001. 

County Transportation Director 
Martin Buehler has told county offi- 
cials that the program is designed for 
civic groups, not-for-profit organiza- 
tions, commercial, and private enter- 
prises. Participants adopt a stretch of 
highway and pick-up litter on both 
sides of the road. This Js done twice a 
year for a two-year period. 

"We provide high-visibility vests, 
trash bags, and safety information 
and put a highway sign recognizing 
the particular group's name for their 
clean-up efforts," Buehler said. , 

The filled bags of trash left along 



the cleaned-up road are removed by 
the transportation division. 

Participants must be at least 10 
years old, and those under 18 years 
of age must have adequate adult su : 
pervision. 

Volunteers, clean about 125 
miles of county roads every year, 

"I wish to thank all the groups 
and businesses who volunteered to 
participate in the past," Martini said. 
"We are forming a true partnership 
between the Division of Transporta-^ 
tion and the volunteers in my dis- 
trict." 

Application forms for the Adopt- 
A-Highway Program are available 
from and accepted at the Lake Coun- 
ty Division of Transportation; 600 
West Winchester Road, Libertyvllle. 
Additional information is available 
from the division'at 362-3950. 



FWA candidate may be off ballot 



By SPENCER SCHEIN 
Staff Reporter 



The race for Fox Waterway 
Agency election may get a little 
smaller. 

One of the candidates running 
on the Lake County side has had his 
petitions brought into question, and 
a hearing by the State Board of Elec- 
tions on Thursday, Feb. 25, may kick 
him off the ballot. 

Richard Russell of Linden- 
hurst is the candidate in ques- 
tion. He filed to run against Roy 
V. Gundelach of Ingleslde and 
Michael N. Mueller of Antioch. 

Peggy A. Seymour of Antioch 
objected to Russell's petitions, 



stating only 178 of the 206 signa- 
tures he submitted were valid. 

"The objection is the petition 
does not have the number of re- 
quired signatures," said Daniel 
White, assistant executive direc- 
tor for the Chicago Office of the 
Illinois State Board of Elections. 

A hearing was held Feb. 16 at 
the Chicago office, with neither 
Russell or Seymour attending. 

"There was no action at that 
time," White said. 

The election board staff re- 
quested further time to research 
the objection and the petitions, 
and continued the hearing to Feb. 
25 at 10 a;m. 

Petitions to run for the Fox 



Waterway Agency required 200 
signatures of registered ;voters 
who live within the agency's ju- 
risdictions, either in Lake or 
McHenry counties, White said. 

Neither Russell or Seymour 
could be reached for comment. 

Objectors had until Feb. 8 to 
file objections. 

Russell, Gundelach and 
Mueller are running for one open 
four-year term in Lake County. £ ■ 

On the McHenry County side 
of the election, incumbent Direc- 
tors Marshall E. Lowe,' Jr., and 
Stan J. Mill, along with challenger 
Pamela J. Althoff, clerk of the city 
of McHenry, are running for two" 
four-year seats. 




Countryside Bakery 

2042 Grand Avenue • Lindenhurst, IL 60046 

847-356-2929 

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Lindenhurst, IL 60046 

847-356-1 424 








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February 26, 1999 



POLICE BEAT 



POLICE & FIRE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ AS 



Persons charged With a crime are innocent until proven guilty In a court of taw. 



ANTIOCH 



Warrant arrests 

Antioch Police Officers have 
stopped two individuals with out- 
standing warrants, 

Officers stopped Judith E. 
Gluck, 64, of Antioch, on Friday, 
Feb. 19 at 9:14 a.m. traveling at 
Routes 173 and 83 in a blue 1992 
Plymouth Van. She was wanted on 
an outstanding warrant issued by 
the Lake County Sheriff's Office. 
Glu'cfc posted bond pending a court 
date of Friday, March 5 at 9 a.m. in 
Waukegan. 

Officers also stopped Eric Cook, 
■ 27, of Round Lake, on Sunday, Feb. 
21 at 11:24* a.m. at Routes 173 and 
83 in a blue 1985 Toyota station 
wagon. He was wanted on an out- 
standing warrant issued by the 
Round Lake Beach Police Depart- 
ment and one issued by the Lake 
County Sheriffs Office. 
_ Round Lake Beach Police Offi- 
cers picked him up from the Anti- 
och Police Department at 1:35 p.m. 
that afternoon. 

LINDENHURST 



Warrant 



• Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Denis J. Hannigan, 45, of 
Lindenhurst, on Tuesday, Feb. 16 at 
5:25 a.m. at the intersection of Deep 
Lake Road and Grand Avenue in a 
1984 Red Honda vehicle. He was 
wanted on an outstanding warrant 
issued by the McHenry County 
Sheriffs Office. Hannigan posted 
bond pending a McHenry County 
court date. . . 



DUI 



During the past week, Linden- 



hurst Police Officers have stopped 
six people for alcohol-related of- 
fenses. 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Bonnie Jean Wallraf, 37, of 
Lindenhurst, on Tuesday, Feb. 16 at 
9:40 p.m. traveling on Hawthorne 
Drive just north of Grand Avenue in 
a blue Jeep. She was charged with 
an improper turn and DUI- alcohol. 
Wallraf was released on bond pend- 
ing a court date on Tuesday, March 
9 at 9 a.m. in Waukegan. 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Thomas Gene Klrkham, 54, 
of Lindenhurst, on Friday, Feb. 19 
at 10:41 a.m. In the 2500 block of 
Grand Avenue in a white Chrysler 
New Yorker. He was charged with a 
handicapped violation, DUI- alco- 
hol, and DUI. He accepted the offer 
to take a Breathalyzer test (0.20).He 
was released on bond pending a - 
court date on Tuesday, March 16 In 
Waukegan. 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Peter M. Kukla, 22, of 
Gages Lake, on Friday, Feb. 19 at 
10:45 p.m. at Beck and Grass Lake 
roads in a white Buick. He was 
charged with making an improper 
turn, improper lane usage, illegal 
transportation of alcohol, no insur- 
ance, DUI, and DUI over 0.08. He 
accepted the offer to take a Breatha- 
lyzer test (0.13). He was released on 
bond pending a Tuesday, March 9 
court date. 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Scott M. Landgren, 20, of 
Trevor, a passenger in the vehicle, 
on Tuesday, March 23 at 6:24 a.m. 
He was charged with being a minor 
■■ consuming alcohol. He was re- 
'' leased on bond pending a court 
date of Wednesday, April 7 at 9 a.m. 
in Grayslake. 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Raynard S. Turnipseed, 37, 



of Lake Villa, on Saturday, Feb. 20 at 
3:06 a.m. traveling east bound on 
Route 132 just west of Crabtree 
Court in a black 1994 Jeep. He was 
charged with speeding, improper 
lane use, no insurance, and DUI- 
alcohol. He declined the opportuni- 
ty to take a Breathalyzer or blood 
test. Turnipseed was released on 
bond pending a court date of Tues- 
day, March 9 at 9 a.m. in Waukegan. 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Glder Giderof, 56, of 
Gurnee, ori Friday, Feb.,19 at 11:53 
p.m. traveling on Grass Lake Road 
at Waterford Drive. Giderof was 
charged with improper lane usage, ' 
and DUI. Giderof declined the op- 
portunity to take a Breathalyzer 
test Giderof was released on bond 
pending a Waukegan court date. 

Warrant arrest 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Christine Moore-Oliver, 
52, of Lake Villa, on Sunday, Feb. 
21 at 2:52 a.m. traveling west 
bound on Grand Avenue at Grana- 
da in a brown Honda. She was 
wanted on an outstanding warrant 
issued by the McHenry County 
Sheriffs Office. Moore-Oliver was 
released on bond pending a court 
date In McHenry on Thursday, 
March 11. 

Registration problems 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Marguerite B, Tyler, 26, of 
Antioch, on Monday, Feb. 22 at 
12:40 a.m. traveling at Millburn 
and Crawford roads in a blue 1985 
Volvo. She was charged with im- 
proper use of registration, failure 
to transfer title, unlawful display 
of registration sticker, no insur- 
ance, and failure to notify the Sec-. 
retary of State. She was released 
on bond pending a court date 6f-'t 
Wednesday, April 7 at 1:30 p.'mi, in 
Grayslake. 




'Old- 
solves burg 




By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

^ntioch Police Officers have 
solved a series of burglaries from au^ 
tomobiles in area parking lots. A ju- 
venile, 15, of Antioch, has been 
charged with lOcountsof burglary to 
a motor vehicle. 

Since the beginning of the year, 
there have been burglaries in public 
parking lots of Antioch. These in- 
cluded Antioch Bowling Lanes', Anti- 
och Upper Grade School, St. Peter's 
School, and in the Industrial parks 
near Depot and Anita streets. 

Lt Ron Roth said that Detectives 
Craig Somerviile and Ron Nauman 
were assigned to solve the case. 

"They conducted the follow-up 
investigation," Roth said. "On Feb. 



ce work' 
from autos 



10 they were able to take one juvenile 
into custody just after he committed 
a car burglary." 

"This boiled down to good, old- 
fashioned police work," said Roth. 

"Through follow-up Investiga- 
tion, they were, able to recover a 
small amount of the property that 
was taken," Roth said. 

"The juvenile is being referred to 
juvenile court for 10 counts of bur- 
glary to a motor vehicle," said Roth. 
"Possibly, there may be additional 
charges," 

Burglaries were committed on 
vehicles that were locked. It was nec- 
essary to smash side windows with a 
small tool in order to gain entry. The 
apparent objective was money con- 
tained In purses located in the auto- 
• mobiles. 



Village reaches PSB 
construction agreement 



Village officials have retained 
Clark-Dietz Inc., to manage con- 
struction of the Antioch Public Safe- 
ty Building. 

Village consulting engineer 
John Boldt will manage the work of 
subcontractors for the village. Con- 
tractors will work for the village to 
build the police station. 

Boldt said that this arrangement 
may help the village to avoid ap- 



Jr 



High Savings Rate 




- ' ~ ■ . * 



• •• 




NOT AT 

FEDERAL savings 



2.52 



2,500.00 



% 




20.000.00 



A.P.Y.* 




19,999.99 




49.999.99 



OR WITHDRA W 




AMOUNT AT ANY 





proximately $80,000 to $90,000, of 
project costs. Savings are achieved 
by the elimination of duplicated 
services that would have been pro- 
vided had a general contractor been 
hired to construct the building. 

Final construction plans will be 
completed by mid-March. Boldt 
said that he expected the project 
would be set for bid by the end of 
March. 



Youth 

We" Want to report on your local teams 
Please call Brendan O'Neill at 223-8161 







### 



7^ . 




VISIT US TODAY 

— — - 12 & GRAND 
AKE, IL 




-Annual porcontago yields are accurate and effective as of 2/12/99. No Interest earned under S2500.00.The rales may change arte? the account is opened. Minimum to open account Is $250.00, 

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A6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 26, 1999 




Dancing German-style 

Volkhard Becker and Hannelori Becker of Spring Grove, Anna Marie Pokorny of Lake Villa, Rosina 
Hellstern and Joe Hellstern of Antioch and Ruth Gsell of Antioch form a dance line at the Ger- 
man/American Club of Antioch's Masquerade Party at the Antioch VFW. — Photo by Lynn Gunnar- 
son Dahfstrom. 



March is... 



Victory Health Services offers a variety of on~going programs, health screenings, 
seminars and workshops to help you get as much out of life as possible. 



♦ Diabetic Eye Screening 

Wednesday, March 10 • 9 a.m.-Noon 
at Victory Memorial Hospital, Waukegan 
Wednesday, March 10 • 2-5 p.m. 

at Victory Health Care Center, Grayslake 
At this free screening, those diagnosed with diabetes 
will be checked for related eye diseases. Call 
1-800-THE-CHOICE (1-800-843-2464) to register. 



^r* 



i 



♦ Diabetes Glucose Risk Screening 

March 22-26 • 8 a.m.-4 p.m. 

at Victory Memorial Hospital, Waukegan 

Tuesday, March 23 • 8 a.m.-Noon 

at Victory Health Care Center, Grayslake , 

Wednesday, March 24 • 8 a.m.-Noon 

at Victory Lakes Continuing Care Center, Lindenhurst 

At this free screening, participants will complete a questionnaire 

to determine risk potential for diabetes. Based on the results of the questionnaire, 

a blood test may follow. Call 1-800-THE-CHOICE (1-800-843-2464) to register. 

♦ Diabetic Healthy Meal Planning 

Tuesday, March 9 • 2-3 p.m. • Topic: Diabetic diet principle, simplified meal 

planning, sick day management, low blood sugar reaction 

Tuesday, March 23 • 2-3 p.m. • Topic: Label reading and diabetic cooking and baking 

These free classes are held at Victory Memorial Hospital, Waukegan 

Call 360-4095 for more information. 

♦ Living with Diabetes 

Thursday, March 11 • 6:30-8 p.m. • Topics: Shop smart 

Thursday, March 25 • 6:30-8 p.m. • Topics: The ins and outs of exercise 

These free classes are held at Victory Memorial Hospital, Waukegan 

Living with Diabetes classes present practical aspects of self care and information 

relating to the physical, emotional and dietary needs of people with diabetes. . 

For more information or a complete schedule, call 360-4148. 

♦ Diabetes Support Group 

Thursdays-March 18, April 15 and May 13 • 7-8:30 p.m. 

at Victory Memorial Hospital, Waukegan 

This free support group provides a non-judgmental environment in which 

to discuss issues of living with diabetes. Call 360-4148 for more information. 



Call 1-800-THE-CHOICE lor a complete listing of programs. 



liiose physically challenged and/or in need of an ASL interpreter may. contact us 
up to one week before a community program to determine how Victory can facili- 
tate their attendance, Tenemos disponibles los servicios de traduccidn al Espariot, 



Victory 

Health 

Services 



LOCAL DIGEST 



Village recycling 

Antioch residents continue to re- 
cycle their waste materials at a high 
rate. 

Statistical results from Waste 
Management North's curbside recy- 
cling program were reported to vil- 
lage trustees on Monday, Feb. 15 by 
Mayor Marilyn Shineflug. 

"Folks are recycling," she said. 

In July, 1998, Antioch residents 
placed an average of 61 pounds of re- 
cyclable material at the curb, a total 
of 4 1.4 tons. In August, an average of 
68 pounds per home was set out for 
a total of 48.3 tons. In September, the 
last month for which data is avail- 
able, residents set out an average of 
73 pounds per home for a total of 
39.4 tons. 

The percent of homes that par- 
ticipate-in the recycling program is 
68 percent for July, 71.1 percent for 
August, and 53.9 percent for Sep- 
tember. 

FEMA snow funds 

Antioch may receive help with its 
bill for snow removal at the start of 
this year. 

Village officials have applied for 
reimbursement of costs to remove 
snow on Saturday and Sunday, Jan. 2 
and 3. Village Manager Tim Wells 
said that the village would request 
$36,126 for documented costs to re- 
move snow on those days. 

"That's a good news item," he 
said. "Better, if we get it." , 

"We're not asking for a whole lot." 




BARK N' TOWN 
KENNELS 



<* 



• Boarding 

• Grooming •-Pet Supplies 

Toys & Bones for Your "Best Friends'' 

27607 W. Brandenburg Rd **« ** w F 
Ingloslde 

(815)385-0632 



B n m- 6 p m. 
T-TKSM. 

9am.. Noon 

(otUxbmes 

by upponttnonQ 



The emergency snow funds 
are available through the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency. 
Funding will cover all over-time 
costs, material such.as-sajt, the 
hourly rate for four trucks'; snow 
removal contractor payments, and 
fringe benefits. 

Wells reported on the applica- 
tion at the Monday, Feb. 15 village 
board meeting. 

A.LL. Parent 
Network donation 

Village officials have. donated 
$1,000 to the Antioch Community 
High School A.L.L. Parent Net- 
work. 

The funds wi|l help pay the costs 
to rent the Odyssey for a post^prom 
cruise on Lake Michigan by students. 
AX.L Parent Network helps to sub-. . 
sidize the cost of cruise tickets to 
make it affordable for students to at- 
tend. 

"It has been received very well 
over the past severafyears," said Vil- 
lage Trustee Wayne Foresta. 

Additional contributions from 
supporting community residents 
may be sent to the A.LL Parent Net- 
work directly at Post Office Box 713, 
Antioch, 60002. 

Church and state 

Antioch will receive use of 
church parking spaces in exchange 
for use of a road based on agree- 
ments between village officials and 
the United Methodist Church of An- 
tioch. 

Church and village officials will 
exchange documents giving one an- 
other the opportunity to use one an- 
other's property. The church will al- 
low the village to park cars oh land 
that it owns. The Village will permit 
the church to use a road in the same 
area. 

The agreements Improve park- 
ing at the Public Safety Building 
property. 

"They've been very accommo- 
dating," said J/illage ManagejrJTim w 
Wells. He reported on uWagreeme'ri I ■ 
at the village board meeting on Mon- 
day, Feb. 15. He said that it was a 
good agreement for both the church 
and die village. 





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Financing Available 



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February 26, 1999 



NEIGHBORS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A7 



rrrr. 



NEIGHBORS 



Name; Kenneth Karasek- 

Home: Antioch. 

Occupation: Network Design Engineer. 

Community involvement: Member of the Antioch 
Redevelopment Commission and the Independence Day 
Celebration. I also attend village board meetings. 

I'm originally from: Bolingbrook, Illinois. 

I graduated from: Proviso West High School and Joliet 
Junior College. 

My family consists of: My wife of 10 years; my 9 year-old-son, 
and 6-year -old daughter. 

What 1 like best about Antioch: Small town atmosphere 
,. where people help each other and become active in the community. 

What I like best about my job: The people I work with and the 
daily challenges. 

The secret to my success is: Never give up, there is always a 
way. 

I relax by: Working on and riding my motorcycle. 

Last book I read: "Unlimited Access: An FBI Agent Inside the 
Clinton White House," by Gary Aldrich. 

Favorite TV show is: "ER." 




Favorite movie Is: "Easy Rider." 

Favorite music: I listen to most all except rap. 

Favorite restaurant: Maggiano's. 

Favorite band or musician: Van Halen with Sammy 
Hagar. 

My life's motto is: Never Say Never. 

If I could be anyone in history, I would be: John 
Glenn. 

If I won the lottery, I would: Leave my job, buy a house on a 
lake, and spend more time with my family. 

My greatest accomplishments are: On the horizon. 

I want to be remembered as: Someone always willing to give a 
lending hand. 

My pet peeve is: People who give up without trying. 

* 

My dream job would be: Provide Island sailing tours on my 
own catamaran in the Virgin Islands. 

If I had a plane ticket to anywhere, I would go to: New 

Zealand. 



: ^ 



Ifyouhavea "Neighbor" that you would like to see profiled in thiscoU 
umn, call Rhonda Hetrick Burke at 223-8161. 



ROTARY BRIEFS 



Memorial donation 

Antioch Rotary Club has donat- 
ed the first third of Its $20,000 dona- 
tion to the Village of Antioch to build 
a walkway from Main Street to the 
William E. Brook Wetland Sanctuary 
and Entertainment Center. 

President Kevin Lyons and Past 
President Linda Pedersen presented 
a check for $6,666.66 to Mayor Mari- 



lyn Shinefiug and Community De- 
velopment Director Claude LeMere 
at the noon Rotary meeting at Hoffs 
Columbia Bay Restaurant on Thurs- 
day, Feb. 18. 

"We will put it to good use," said ' 
Shinefiug. She said that the Brook 
Memorial area would never have 
happened without the support of so 
many clubs such as Rotary. 

LeMere provided an update on 
project progress. "We are probably 
half-way through it," he said. "We 
hope to open it up in the year 2000." 



"We are approaching the finan- 
cial goal," LeMere said. The project 
has received commitments for 
$80,000 of in-kind contributions, 
$140,000 of financial donations, and 
$200,000 hi grants", ... 

. Rotarians are helping the village 

construct a handicapped accessible 

walkway between Choosey, Child 

: and Carey - G el den Electric in the 800 

block of Main Street 

Leadership Awards 

Three Antioch Community High 



School Students will attend a week- 
end leadership retreat sponsored by 
Rotary International 

Lawrence Addison, Kristen 
Jensen, and Lauren Reynolds will be 
at Camp Edwards in East Troy, Wis., 
from Thursday, March 25 through 
Sunday, March 28. 

"The focus of this annual Rotary 
event is to develop and enhance lead- 
ership skills In our community's 
youth," Rotarian Stan livermore said. 
"We are pleased to be able to offer our 
students this opportunity," he said. > 



Utli-l IM!J! 



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Someone You Can Count On 



ANTIOCH 

420 LAKE ST. 

(847) 395-6230 



Mchenry 

5102 w. ELM 
(815) 385-8630 



ROUND LAKE 
629 W. ROLLINS RD. 

(847) 546-4862 



FOX LAKE 

2 W. GRAND AVE. 

(SUITE 106) 

(847) 587-9333 



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474-B W. LIBERTY 

(847) 526-8877 



HOURS: MbnrThurs.9am-8;pm;'Fri.&Sat..9am-5pm;SundaysbyAppt. 






WB HE 



OPTIMA 



Calendar 



Friday, Feb. 26 

9:30 a.m;, Rules of the Road 
Review Course at Antioch Two. 
offices, Info, at 395-3378 

Saturday, Feb. 27 

10 a.m.-Noon, Page-A-Day 
Writer's Group meets at Salem 
Comm. Library, (414) 843-3517 

4 p.m., Presentation on School . 
Bond Referendum by Antioch 
Comm, School Disk #34 at the 
VFW Hall on North Avenue 

* ••*•; '■••■* ........ 

4:30:7:30 p.m., Free Spaghetti 
Dinner for SenlorCitlzens at St. 
Peter's Church, new elevator 
access, reservations at 395-2194 

Sunday, Feb. 28 

7:00 p.m., PM&L Readers' Theater 
presents "Kennedy's Children,! at 
the Theater, Orchard & Main St 

Monday, March 1 

Caslmlr Pulaski Day, no school at 
ACHS, Antioch School Dist #34 

12:45 p.m. Bingo at Antioch 
Senior Center, info, at 395-7120 

7 p.m. Northwest Educational 
Group meets at Lake Villa Adminis- 
trative complex 

7 p.m., Antioch Garden Club 
meets in theMaplethorpe Room at 
the Antioch Comm. Center, visitors 
welcome, call 395-3803 

7 p.m. Bingo at Antioch Moose 
Lodge, Rte. 173 west of Antioch 

7 p.m. Network of Friends, Multi- 
ple Sclerosis, support group meets 
at Antioch Moose Lodge 

7:30 p.m. Lakes Area Community 
Band at Antioch Community High 
School, information at 395-5566 

: 7:30 p.m., Wlage of Antioch 
Council meeting at Village Hall 

Tuesday, March 2 

6:45 p.m. Antioch VFW Bingo, 
refreshments available. Doors 
open at 4:30 p.m., 395-5393 

7 p.m., The Antioch Music and 
Performance Sponsors meet in the 
ACHS band room 

7:30 p.m. St. Peter Council of 
Catholic Women meet at parish 
hall, call 395-0274 

7:00-8:00 p.m. Weigh to Win 
program held at Calvary Christian . 
Center, Monaville Rd., west of Rte. 
83 in Lake villa, call 356-6181 

Wednesday, March 3 

7:30 p.m., Sequoit Pride meeting 
at Antioch Comm. High School 

6:30 p.m., TOPS Weight Loss . 
wefgh-ln, 7 p.m. meeting at Anti- 
och Senior Center, 395-6437 

.7-9 p.m., Northern Lake County 
Quitter's Guild meets, State Bank of. 
the Lakes, Undenhurst, 838-2126 ' 

Thursday, March 4 

12:15 p.m., Antioch Rotary Club ; 
meeting at Hoffs Columbia Bay 
Restaurant, 38744. North Hwy 59 

;««* ■••■•« .,|. ...... ...... 

7 p.m., "Variety Show" sponsored 
by Junior Class at ACHS 

6:30 p.m., ACHS School Board 
meeting In school library 

7 p.m. American Sewing'Guiid 
group "Running fri Stitches meets j 
at State Bank of the Lakes, ; Un- 
denhurst, 265-7932 or.548-8223: 

GOT SOMETHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14-day notice is needed 
for all calendar requests. 
Ask for Cristina Feindt 
223-8161, ext. 141. 









-4.V, 






....... *..;.t. ...... 1— ~-«—i«— ■ — — — 

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A8/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 26, 1999 




Almost 100 students pose with teachers after successful food drive for Antioch 
Food Pantry. Teachers Barbara Bose, Deanna Olenlck, Nicole Welsenbach, Kim 



Phillips, and Marilyn Bowen (not pictured) organized the event to teach the con- 
cept of one hundred.— Photo provided. 



Children celebrate centennial day of school with can 




By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Grass Lake School children cele- 
brated the 100th day of classes with 
a food drive in early February. 

The food collection was one of 
many activities teachers organized 



to firmly plant the concept in their 
student's minds. 

"All the children in grades K 
through three were involved in col- 
lecting canned and boxed goods, 
non-perishable, for the food pantry in 
Antioch," said teacher Barbara Bose. 
"We had over 100 (items). Well over." 



"We counted hundreds of 
things," she said. 

Pop tops, but not Pop Tarts. . 

"We counted snacks." 

There were hundreds of hats. 

"They're seeing what 100 looks 
like," Bose said. The 100th day is a 
good tike to do that. She said that it 



helps with counting skills and learn- 
ing about odds and evens. 

"This was a celebration. We are 
more than half way through (the 
school year)." 

The children, were involved in 
many counting activities, but the 
big event was the food drive. "It was 



good food; all kinds of different 
things," she said. 

"We've celebrated hundredth 
days many times before," said Bose. 
This was the first time they attached 
a food drive to it. 

"(School Superintendent) Jim 
Beveridge took the food over." 




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„."„L r ' l B ^uTArroN oL. all r,, w„h ^ H -„^^! r nr. '.' H.Wi-.N ..„. o»s ,»„ .L,o»m- „■■„■» ™o*°- -«... c«sh »no ~ . 






February 26, 1999 



LEGAL 







Lakeland Newspapers/ AQ 



1 



i 



FILE NUMBER: 
PETITIONER: 

OWNER: 



PROPERTY^ 



PUBUC NOTICE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS ) 

COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

IN THE CIRCUrr COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH 
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, UKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION- ) 

OF Blake Andrew Toney ) 

For v 

CHANGE OF NAME ) 

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION 
Public notice Is hereby given that on April 2, 1999. being one of the relum days In the 
Circuit Court of Ihe County of Lake, I will file my Petition In said Court praying for Ihe 
change of name from Blako Andrew Toney to thai of Blake Andrew Pecha, pursuant to 
the Statute In such case made and Provided. 

' DatodatAntloch, Illinois, February 10, 1099. 

1st Shena Pecha 

' 0299C-2445-AN 

February 19, 1999 

February 28, 1999 

March 5, 1999 

PUBUC NOTICE • 
NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 
.BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH 
PZB9B-07R; REQUESTED ANNEXATION & P.U.D. 
. M.W. Doran, Inc., an Illinois Corporation d/b/a Landmark Homes, 
Inc.; 4474 Cornell Ave., Gumee, IL 60031; phone: (847) 263-0990 
Luisa V; Andrae, Kurt E. Andrae and William M. Andrao as 
Tenants In Common; c/o Luisa V. Andrea; 2160 Fairtiavon Blvd.; 
Elm Grove, Wl 53122 

Property consists of approximately 26 acres; is situated South and 
East of the Falcon Hills Subdivision and along the westerly shores 
of Lake Antioch ; is identified on the Lake County Tax Maps as the 
following Permanent Index Numbers, (PIN): 02-16-200-019; 02-18- 
200-01 7; 02-18-400-004; 02-1 8-200-026; 02-18-200-027; 02-17- 
1 01 -027; and 02-1 7-301 -060; and Es legally described as fol lows: 
Parcel 1: That part of Lot "B* In Antioch Hills Subdivision, together with parts of the 
Northeast Quarter and of the Southeast Quarter of Section 18, Township 46 North, Range 
10, East of the third Principal Meridian, bounded and described as follows: Beginning at 
the Northwest comer of Lot *B" In Antfoch Hills; being a subdivision In Ihe Northwest Quar- 
ter and the Southwest Quarter of Section 17, Township 46 North, Range 10, East of the 
Third Principal Meridian, according to the plat thereof recorded October 2, 1924 as Doc- 
ument 246684, In Book 'M' of Plats, page 94; Running thence due South (being an as- 
sumed bearing for the benefit of this legal description) along the west line of said Antioch 
Hitls 662.84 feet, deed, 661 .18 feet, measured, to an Intersection with the North line of the 
East 8 acres of the South Half of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Sec- 
tion 18, aforesaid; also being the Southeast comer of Falcon Hills Estates recorded as 
Document 28351 92; Thence south 88 Degrees 40 Minutes 22 Seconds West, along said 
North line of the East 8 acres 526.5 feet, deed, (526.71 fee, measured) also being the 
South line of said Falcon Hills Estates to the West line of said East 8 acres; Thence South 
00 Degrees 06 Minutes 01 Seconds West, along said West line of the East B acres, 599.53 
feet to an Intersection with a point being 4 rods North and parallel with the South line of 
the Northeast Quarter of Section 18, aforesaid; Thence South 88 Degrees 33 Minutes 50 
Seconds West, along said parallel line, 769.20 feet to an intersection with the centeriine 
of Highway known as State Route NO. 59; Thence Southerly, being a curved line, con- 
vexed to the West, having a radius of 2868.93 feet, an arc. length of 67.08 feet (the chord 
of said arc bears South 8 Degrees 51 Minutes 34 Seconds West, 67.06 feet) to an Inter- 
section with the South line of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 18 aforesaid; Thence 
North 88 Degrees 33 Minutes 50 Seconds East along said South line of the Northeast 
.'.Corner. 779.42 feet to an Intersection with the Northerly extension of the East line ot Deer 
Ridge; being a subdivision of part ot the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter ot . 
Section 18, Township 46 North, Range 10, East of the Third Principal Meridian, accord- 
ing to the plat thereof recorded September. 19, 1978 as Document 1947538; Thence South 
00 Degrees 09 Minutes 46 Seconds East, along said East line of Deer Ridge Subdivision 
and the Northerly extension thereof, 395.22 feet to an intersection with the North line of 
Sabrina Manor; being a subdivision of part of the Southeast Quarter of Section 18, and of 
• the Southwest Quarter of Section 17, In Township and Range aforesaid; Thence North 
89 Degrees 1 3 M in utes 06 Seconds East, along said North line of Sabrina Manor, 757.06 : 
feet to an Intersection wit h'tho waters edge of Lake Antioch (as located on December 1 2, 
1986); Thence North 05 Degrees 00 Minutes 21 Seconds East, along said waters edge 
44.64 feet; Thence North 18 Degrees-54 Minutes 33 Seconds West, along said waters 
edge 73.01 feet; Thence North 43 Degrees 30 Minutes 24 Seconds West, along said wa- 
ters edge 60.24 feet; Thence North 43 Degrees 01 Minutes 44 Seconds West, along said 
waters edge 77.98 feet; Thence North 35 Degrees 56 Minutes 13 Seconds West, along 
said waters.edge 96.00 feet; Thence North 16 Degrees 33 Minutes 08 Seconds West, 
along said waters edge 130.48 feet; Thence North 14 Degrees 10 minutes 43 Seconds 
West, along said waters edge 107.19 feet; Thence North 31 Degrees 40 Minutes 31 Sec- 
onds West, along said waters edge 149.83 feet; Thence North 38 Degrees 42 Minutes 07 
Seconds West, along said waters edge 51 .1 7 feet; Thence North 70 Degrees 49 Minutes 
25 Seconds East, along said waters edge 31 .93 feet; Thence North 80 Degrees 53 min- 
utes 40 Seconds East, along said waters edge 85.1 9 feet; Thence North 80 Degrees 17 - 
- Minutes 58 Seconds East, along said waters edge 98.1 6 feet; Thence North 64 Degrees 
46 Minutes 03 Seconds East, along said waters edge 100.70 feet; Thence North 46 De- 
grees 57 minutes 26 Seconds East, along said waters edge 66.16 feet; Thence North 37 
Degrees 42 Minutes 23 Seconds East, along said waters edge 1 16.47 feet; Thence North 
25 Degrees 35 Minutes 37 Seconds East, along said waters edge 128.17 feet; Thence 
North 37 Degrees 24 Minutes 38 Seconds East, along said water edge 170.45 feet; 
Thence North 27 Degrees 41 Minutes 52 Seconds East, along said waters edge 83.71 
feet; Thence North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 14 Seconds West, along said waters edge 
50,38 feet: Thence North 27 Degrees 18 Minutes 40 Seconds West, along said waters 
edge 83.22 feet; Thence North 31 Degrees 21 Minutes 27 Seconds West along said wa- 
ters edge 1 1 1 .77 feet; Thence north 1 7 Degrees 06 Minutes 55 Secor&s West, along said 
waters edge 90,09 feet; Thence North 34 Degrees 46 Minutes 39 Seconds West, along 
said waters edge, 56.48 feet; Thence North 09 Degrees 19 Minutes 58 Seconds West, 
along said waters edge 86.24 feet; Thence North 09 Degrees 23 Minutes 16 Seconds 
West, along said waters edge 42.93 feet, to an intersection with the North line of Lot "B" 
.in said Antioch Hills, being also the North line ot the South half of the Northwest Quarter 
of Section 17, aforesaid, Thence South 89 Degrees 22 Minutes 00 Seconds West, along 
said North line 342.91 feel to the point of beginning, in Lake County, Illinois. 

Parcel 2: Lot "B" (except that part thereof falling in the following: First Addition to AriU- 
och Hills recorded as Document 644562, 2nd Addition to Antioch Hills recorded as Doc- 
ument 654479; Sunset Ridge recorded as Document 973402) and (except that part of 
said Lot "B* that lies between Lot 44 in Sunset Ridge, recorded as Document 973402 and 
low water mark of Lake Antioch and between the Westerly line extended Northerly and 
Southeasterly line extended Northeasterly of said Lot 44} In Antioch Hills, as subdivision 
In the Northwest Quarter and the Southwest Quarter of Section 17, Township 46 North, 
Range 10, East of the third Principal Meridian, according to the plat thereof recorded Oc- 
tober 2, 1 924 as Document 246684, In book "M' of Plats, page 94, and except any part of 
Lot "B* aforesaid falling within Parcel 1 herein, In Lake County, Illinois. 

, Parcel 3: The South 426 feet of the South Half of the Southeast Quarter of the North- 
east Quarter of Section 18, Township 46 North, Range 10, East of the Third Principal 
Meridian, which lies Easterly of the centeriine of Illinois Route #59, and West of the West 
line of the East 8.0 acres of the said Half of said Southeast Quarter ot the Northeast Quar- 
ter of said Section 1 8, except the East 425 feet of the North 360 feet, and except the North 
33 feet and the South 66 feet thereof, In Lake County, Illinois. 
REQUEST: Petitioner requests that the premises be annexed to the Village of 
Antioch, and classified in the R-1 Zoning District as a Planned Unit 
. Development. 
PROPOSAL: An annexation agreement shall be based upon the development 
proposal tor a specific P.U.D. plan as last heard by the Planning 
and Zoning Board on February 11,1 999. The proposed plan 
depicts 31 single-family residential lots. The drawings submitted 
Include; Preliminary (entitlement) Plat and related engineering, (3 
• sheets), revised dated 1 -8-99, prepared by Charles W^ Greengard 
Associates, Inc., Lincolnshire; Illinois; and Landscape Plans, (3 
sheets), date-stamped received on January 11, 1999, prepared by 
Scheel & Associates, Woodstock, Illinois. Copies of the proposal 
may be viewed at the Office of Village Clerk, 874 Main Street, 
Department of Planning, Zoning & Building, 885 Toft Avenue, and 
the Ready Reference Section of the Antioch Public Library, 757 
'Main Street. 
DATE: Monday, March 1 5, 1999 
TIME: 7:00 P.M. 
PLACE; Board Room. Village Hall 

874 Main Street, Antioch, IL 60002 
All persons desiring to appear and be heard thereon for or against said petition may 
appear at said hearing and be heard. 
Marilyn J. Shlneflug, Mayor 
Village Board of Trustees 

a 0299D-2453-AN 

February 26, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 
IN THE CIRCUrr COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 
LAKE COUNTY, ILUNOIS 
NOTICE BY PUBUCAT10N 
Board of Education of Antioch Community High School District No. 117, Plaintiff v. 
Heritage Standard Bank and Trust Company, ot a)., Defendants 
Case No.: 98 ED 21 
The requisite affidavit for publication having been filed, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
YOU, FRANK JOHN GAVIN, Defendant In the abovo-capiloned suit, that a Complaint to 
Condemn Property was filed on September 3, 1 998, In the Circuit Court for the Nineteenth 
Judicial Circuit, Lake County, Illinois, by the obove- named Plaintiff against you, praying 
the Court for the condemnation of the following properties: 
PARCEL 1: 

THE NORTH 29 ACRES OFTHE WEST HALF OFTHE NORTH WEST QUAR- 
TER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 48 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE 
THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, (EXCEPT THAT PART THEREOF DESCRIBED 
AS FOLLOWS, TO-WTT; COMMENCING AT A POINT ON THE WEST UNE OF 

• SAID HALF QUARTER SECTION 298.75 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTH 
WEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE EAST PARALLEL WITH THE NORTH 
UNE OF SAID NORTH WEST QUARTER, 253.25 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 
PARALLEL WITH THE WEST UNE OF SAID HALF QUARTER SECTION, 320 

> FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT 75 FEET EAST OF THE SOUTH EAST 
CORNER OF PREMISES CONVEYED TO TRUSTEE OF GRAVE YARD BY 

.DEED RECORDED JANUARY 19, 1861, IN BOOK 32 OF DEEDS, PAGE 283 
AND 284; THENCE WESTERLY TO THE SOUTH WEST CORNER OF SAID 
PREMISES CONVEYED BY SAID DEED AND THENCE NORTH ALONG THE 
WEST LINE OF SAID HALF QUARTER SECTION TO THE PLACE OF BE- 
GINNING AND EXCEPT THAT PART THEREOF, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, 
TO-WIT: BEGINNING AT A POINT IN THE WEST UNE OF SAID NORTH 
WEST QUARTER 644 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTH WESTCORNER, .' 
THENCE EAST 109.4 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 287 FEET, THENCE WEST 
1093 FEETTO THE WEST UNE OF THE NORTH WEST QUARTER; THENCE 
NORTH 283 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING AND EXCEPT THAT PART 
THEREOF FALLING IN STATE AID ROUTE NO. 18) IN LAKE COUNTY, ILU- 
NOIS. 
PARCEL 2: 

THAT PARTOFTHESOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 
AND RANGE AFORESAID, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, TO-WTT:. COM- 
MENCING ATTHE SOUTH WEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 22; THENCE 
NORTH 66 RODS; THENCE EAST 80 RODS; THENCE SOUTH 66 RODS AND 
THENCE WET 80 RODS TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING, IN LAKE COUNTY, 
ILUNOIS. 
EfiBCELa; 

THAT PART OFTHE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 
AND RANGE AFORESAID, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS. TO-WIT: ■COM-' 
MENCING AT THE SOUTH WEST CORNER OR THE EAST HALF OF THE * 
SOUTH WEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 22; THENCE NORTH 28 RODS; 
THENCE EAST 40 RODS; THENCE SOUTH 28 RODS; THENCE WEST 40. 
RODS TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING, IN LAKE COUNTY ILUNOIS. 
PARCEL 4: 
THAT PART OF THE NORTH WEST QUARTER OF SECTION 27.TOWNSHIP 

'46 NORTH, RANGETO, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN. DE- . 
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT IN THE WEST UNE OF 
SAID NORTH WESTQUARTER OF SAID SECTION 27, 644 FEET.SOUTH OF 
THE NORTH WEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTH 87 DEGREES 45 ■: 
MINUTES EAST 109.4 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 287 FEET; THENCE WEST . 

• 109.3 FEET TO THE WEST UNE OF SAID NORTH WEST QUARTER; 
THENCE NORTH ALONG SAID WEST UNE 283 FEETTO THE PLACE OF BE- 
GINNING (EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE WEST 33 FEET), IN LAKE COUN- 

. TY.TUJNOIS. 

Unless you, FRANK JOHN GAVIN, file your answer or otherwise make your appear- 
ance In this suit In the office of the Clerk of the Court of the Nineteenth Judicial Circuit, 
Lake County, Illinois, on or before March 12, 1999, a trial may be held and judgment may 
be entered against you for the relief prayed In the Complaint.' 

(SEAL) /a/ Sally D. Coffelt • 

0199B-2423-AN 

February 12, 1999 

February 19, 1999 

February 26, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE' 
ANTIOCH SELF STORAGE WILL 
DISPOSE OF GOODS FOR NON 
PAYMENT FROM: 

Unit No. 56 belonging to Jeffrey Pe- 
terson, Antioch, IL 60002. 

Unit No. 106 belonging to Cori Sfma, 
Gumee, IL 60031, consisting of house- 
hold & misc. Items. 

Unit No. 115 belonging to Andrea 
Nawrocki, Antioch, IL 60002, consisting 
of household & misc. Kerns. 

Unit No. 157 belonging to Shawn 
Needham, Trevor, Wl 53179, consisting 
of household & misc. Hems. 

Unit No. 1 82 belonging to Rebecca 
McRee, Antioch. IL 60002, consisting of , 
household & misc. Hems. 

Unit No. 224 belonging to Ray 
Hamilton, Antioch, IL 60002, consisting 
of household & misc. Kerns, 

! Unit No, 128 belonging to Frances 
O'Neill. Antioch, IL 60002, consisting of 
household & misc. items. 

Unit No. 97 belonging to Deana Ce- 
chlni, Northlake, IL 60164, consisting of 
household & misc. Kerns, 

. Unit No. 63 belonging to Autumn 
Garcia, Antioch, IL 60002, consisting of 
household & misc. Hems. 

. Unit No, 1 A belonging to Youth Ice- 
less Hockey, Antioch, IL 60002, consist- 
ing' of household & misc. Kerns. 

Unit No. 15 belonging to Julia John- 
son, Trevor, Wl 53179, consisting of 
household & misc. Kerns. 

Unit No. Outside belonging to 
Mosayov Avi Melr, Lake Geneva, Wl 
-53147, consisting of household & misc. 
Kerns. 

Unit No. 14 belonging to Truman 
Garrett, Trevor, Wl 53179, consisting of 
household & misc. Kerns. 

Unit No, 134 belonging to Ted Bur- 
bridge, Antioch, IL 60002, consisting of 
household & misc. Kerns. 

Unit No. 108 belonging to Peter 
O'Neill, Salem, Wl 53168, consisting of 
household & misc. Kerns. 

Unit No. 193 belonging to Benjamin 
Watkins, Gumee, IL 60031 , consisting of 
* household & misc. Kerns. - 

All of the Kerns stored in above units 
will be sold to highest bidder for cash. 
ANTIOCH SELF STORAGE reserves 
the right to withdraw any or all of Ihe 
Kerns stored In the above mentioned 
units prior to sale. 
Uen sale will be held; 
Date: February 27, 1999 
Time: 10:00 a.m. 
Location: ANTIOCH SELF STORAGE 
284 Main St, Antioch, IL 60002 
(647) 395-4980 
I si EtaJne Wertz 
President 

0299D-2452 : AN 
February 26, 1999" 




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A10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 26, J 999 



Brain studies reveal patterns 
of student learning success 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Student learning success is 
based on more than just school time 
and is helped by early experiences 
that stimulate brain development. 

Knowledge of how brains devel- 
op and effect learning only recently 
has become available and the impli- 
cations are Important for how chil- 
dren are taught. 

These are some of the initial 
ideas developed by Tim Mahaffy in a 
presentation to the Antioch Rotary 
Club on Thursday, Feb. 11 at their 
regular noon meeting at HofTs Co- 
lumbia Bay Restaurant 

Mahaffy is principal at W. C. Pet- 
ty Elementary School and a member 
of the Rotary Club. He is studying for 



a doctorate in school administration . 
His presentation is titled "It Takes a 
Village to Raise a Child.': 

"Schools are only part of It," Ma- 
haffy said. What happens to a young 
child from a variety of sources as he 
or she develops Is important for lat- 
er learning success. 

Knowledge about brain devel- 
opment, enrichment, and the 
learning process Is becoming 
available because of new technol- 
ogy that permits study of, brains. 
"We can now see the brain work- 
ing while the person is still alive," 
he said. 

Magnetic Resonance Imaging 
(MRI) and Positron Emission To- 
mography (PET) provide previously 
unavailable opportunities to exam- 
ine how brains develop and learn. 



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"Educators really need to under- 
stand the hew implications," he sold. 
New stimuli help the brain to im- 
prove itself, especially at the begin- 
ning of life. 

Mahaffy Identified some of the 
implications for schools: He said that 
the enriched environment is crucial. 
"Heredity makes up about 30 to 60 
percent of the brains wiring," he said. 
The other estimated 40 percent is 
due to an enriched environment that 
includes nutrition, exercise, genes, 
challenges and the arts, love, and 
feedback. These are the elements 
now thought to be critical for enrich- 
ment 

As an example, he discussed the 
role of music. It provides arousal and 
It can serve as a carrier for informa- 
tion. Also, "It primes the brain's 
neural pathways." 

The activities it takes for a 
person to listen to music are the 
activities it takes to learn. Music 
can help build the brain. If a per- 
son listens to music before a test, 
it helps the student respond to the 
test. However, music during a test 
can be a distraction and can hurt 
learning performance. 

"New learning needs to be fol- 
lowed by personal processing time," 
Mahaffy said. This includes such ac- 
tivities as reviewing materia], jour- 
naling, and even taking a nap. 

He noted that complex learning 
is enhanced by challenge and inhib- 
ited by threats. 

He also said that the window of 
opportunity for improving and en- 
hancing brain learning capability is 
the first decade of life. 



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SCHOOL DIGEST 



New telephone system 

Antioch Community high School 
will obtain a new telephone system 
before the year 2000. 

Lucent Technologies, Inc. has 
Informed the school that the present 
telephone system Is not year-2000 
compatible. The system should be 
replaced before the end of 1999. 

Business Manager Bill Ahlers 
recommended to the school board 
that the system be replaced at this 
time since the equipment needed is 
presently on sale. 

"It would be prudent to buy it 
now," he said to the board at their 
Thursday, Feb. 18 meeting at Grass 
Lake School. 

The Lucent Technologies system 
is sold for $20,000 but is now dis- 
counted to $12,000. 

Ahlers said that it would have 
been necessary to replace the system 
soon because of capacity issues. 

School Calendar 

. The Antioch Community High 
School Board of Education conduct- 
ed a public hearing on Thursday, 
Feb. 18 at Grass Lake School to re- 
ceive public comment about waiver 
of five mandated school holidays. 

The waiver will be requested 
from the Illinois State Board of Edu- 
cation. If approved, it would give lo- 
cal school officials the option to can- 
cel five holidays next year if the 
opening of school is delayed because 
of school construction activities. 

The days for which a waiver has 
been sought are included in the 
adopted school calendar. If it is nec- 
essary to cancel the days off, the 
school board will amend the calen- 
dar at that time. 

The five days for which a waiver 
will be requested Include: Monday, 
Jan. 17, Martin Luther King's Birth- 




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day; Feb. 12, Lincoln's Birthday; 
Monday, March 6, Casimir Pulaski 
Day; Monday, Oct. 11, Columbus 
Day; and, Nov. 1 1, Veteran's Day. 

There were no public comments 
at the hearing. The motion to request 
the waivers was unanimously passed 
by the school board. 

Graduation date set 

The Antioch Community High 
School' Board of Education .voted 
Thursday, Feb. 18 to hold graduation: 
exercises on Wednesday, June 2, 
1999. The motion passed unani- 
mously. 

1999-2000 ACHS 

holidays set 

The Antioch Community High 
School Board oiF Education adopted 
a schedule of holidays for the 1999- 
2000 school year. 

School will open for teachers on 
Aug. 23, and on Aug. 24 for students'. 

School will be closed on Sept. 6, 
Labor Day. 

There are three Institute Days for 
teachers. Students do not attend, 
school on Institute Day, The days are 
Sept. 15, Jan. 14, and Feb. 21. 

School will be closed for Colum- 
bus Day, Oct. 11. 

School will be closed for Veter- 
ans Day, Nov. 11. 

Thanksgiving Recess is from 
Nov. 25 to Nov. 26. Winter Recess is 
from Dec. 20 to Dec. 31. 

School will be closed on Martin 
Luther King's birthday, Jan. 17. 

School will be closed on Casjmir ■ 
Pulaski Day, March 6, 

Spring recess is scheduled for 
March 27 to March 31. 

School will be closed on April 21, 
as a non-attendance day. School of- 
ficials expect a potential for low at-", 
tendance because of Good Friday 
observances. . , ... . 

School will be closed for Memo- 
rial Day, May 29. 

The last day of school for teach- 
ers and students is scheduled to be 
June 8. This assumes that there are 
five snow days used during the, 
school year. 



Collections'sought 
for Antioch Library 

The Antioch Library still has 
openings for its adult display case for 
1999. This is a great way for commu- 
nity organizations to raise awareness 
of their activities or for collectors to 
display their collections. 

People may find out available 
months by ealling395-0874. 



Are You looking 
For Something To Do? 

See Lakelife In Section B 
Every Week 




Tiie Dude's Got A 
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"A Blast From The Past" 




Incense & Burners * Lava Lamps 
ftock'n Roll & Tie Dye T-Shirts 
Black Lights 

Posters • Women's Clothing 
Jewelry • Candles & More 




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THE 
CUPBOARD 



- LeeFilas 



Hasta la vista, 





sports fans 



Usually, a sentence falls at 
the bottom of this col- 
umn that says "Lee Fllas 
can be reached at ...," 
with a phone number following. 

This is no longer the case. Lee 
Filas, like Steve Peterson before 
him, is history. 

However, in my short stint as a 
Lakeland's sports reporter, I have 
learned numerous things on the job 
that I need to pass off to the person 
taking my place. These items will 
not only help you determine what is 
"right and wrong" but also major 
"do's and do not's".that every 
sports reporter in Lake County 
needs to know. 

First, never. call the Chicago 
White Sox "Satan's team" like I did... 
Not only does it create season ticket 
problems, but setting up locker 
room interviews, which have to be 
arranged through the front office, 
are a thing of the past 

Also, never challenge area bas- 
ketball teams to a game of horse. 
Back spasm's and muscle strains 
are for kids, not for 30-year-old- ' 
basketball-star- wannabe's like us. 
If for some unknown reason, 
you do get conned into a game of 
horse with an area basketball team, 
DO' NOT make a big deal out of it. If 
you do and you're losing, you'll see 
the other teams, coaches, athletic 
directors, principals; students, su- 
perintendents and lunch room 
ladies peek their head into the gym 
long enough tolaughat you. 

For the love of God, never get 
into a cardboard boat with anyone 
you work with. When It sinks, ex- 
pect the close comrades you have 
befriended at work to turn on you 
in a moments notice and blame you, 
for everything that is wrong with , 
the world today. 

Never-ever befriend anyone 
who has been tied to a pole in the 
dead of winter Tor being a Green 
Bay Packers Fan. Don't ask why, 
just know this to be true. 

Also, while we're at it, never 
befriend the guy who tied the Pack- 
er Fan to the pole. Again, don't ask 
why. 

Never announce to the world 
that you want to be Rick Reilly from 
the Sports Illustrated. You'll never 
live it down. 

Never get into a softball game 
against any of the teachers from 
Grant High School. I still don't un- 
derstand it, We had a great team ■ 
and the Bulldogs faculty just killed 
us. 1 still say they cheated. 

Always stand on the sidelines 
during football games (people will 
think you're important), behind the 
scorers table at basketball games 
(so you can sneak a peek in case 
you missed a stat) and never be in . 
the pool during swimming or diving 
meets (people will just think you're . 
weird). '-,'■-, 

Here's a big one - no matter 
what sports editor Brendan O'Neill 
says, never go "off the record." 
Some of the best stuff in the world 
was told to me off the record, where 
it still remains. 

And, above all elsej have fun. I 
' spent my last three months having 
fun with this job, and because of it, 
this job is something that I will nev- 
er forget. 

My thanks to everyone who 
made my sports writing career at 
Lakeland something special, and 
remember, keep an eye on Sports 
Illustrated. You never know when 
the day will come that columnist • 
Rick Reilly is replaced by columnist 
Lee Fllas. 

Now, play ball; ( 



:■ I 




■February 26, 1999 



' 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A1 1 






Antioch's Don Lackey is 
not a one dimensional athlete 



By LEE FILAS 
Staff Reporter 

Every kid dreams of being the 
star quarterback of the football team 
or the star forward of the basketball 
team. 

But, not every kid dreams of get- 
ting a high score on the ACT college 
test. 

"I want to get a higher score On 
my ACT's," said Don Lackey, star 
quarterback and forward of the And- . 
och Sequoits. "I mean, I want to be 
all conference and all county In the 
sports, and average 17-18 points on' 
the floor, but the grades are just as 
important." . 

Lackey, who averaged 180 yards 
passing In the fall for the Sequoits 
and averages 14 points per game on 
the court, is most proud of the grades 
he's been pulling down in his third 
year of high school. 

"You need good grades to play 
sports and good grades help you get 
Into college," Lackey explained. "You 
need good grades to go anywhere, so 
grades are the most important thing 
right now." 
- On the court, Lackey is a giant 
Standing 6-5 and 190 pounds, He 
takes command of the boards and 
forces people to play his game. 

"That's because of my Dad," 
Lackey explained. "My Dad pushes 
me hard to do things. He never let's 
me get to full of myself. I mean, I'm 
cocky, but you have to be. to play 
sports. My Dad doesn't let me ever 
think I'm great." 

However, in his third year on the 



field and on die court, Lackey Is turn- 
ing 'into the consummate profes- 
sional that is needed to lead the Se- 
quoits. He has poise in the pocket on 
the football field, knows his limita- 
tions on the basketball court, and re- 
alizes that learning is an important 
part of the game. 

"My Dad helps a lot," Lackey con- 
tinued. "He gets on me sometimes, but 
it helps. Every time I think I'm great, 
my Dad steps in and brings me back 
down. I think I'm good at a lot of 
things, but I know I can be a lot better." 

And the first improvement for 
Lackey Will be on the ACT scores; 

"I've been contacted by SMU, 
Whitewater, and a few other col- 
leges," Lackey said. "I want to major 
in criminal-justice and law. I don't - 
want to be stuck behind a desk for 
my whole life. I want to be out in the 
field somewhere." 

"And on order to do that, I need 
to retake my ACT scores and bring 
them up a little." 

And; with Don Lackey Sr. stand- 
ing over him, Don Lackey Jr. should 
do all right. 

."My Dad always pushes me to do 

more and more," Lackey said. "Ex- 

' cept, he doesn't push me in a bad 

way, but he pushes me in a good way. 

He helps me to see rriy potential." 

So, next September, when scouts 
are filling the stands to watch Lackey 
pass for 300 yards or score 20 points 
a game, don't be surprised when 
Lackey's head is buried in a book, 
studying for the ACT's, while his fa- 
ther stands over his shoulder, 
quizzing him. 



Lady Sequoits look to 
build toward future 



By LEE FILAS 
Staff Reporter 



After a season in which the 
Antioch Sequoits girls basketball 
team suffered on the court and off, 
coach Dave Woods is optimistic 
about turning'things around for 
next year. 

"We're quite optimistic about 
next year," Woods said. "We're defi- 
nitely looking.to be a junior domi- 
nated team next year. But the juniors 
that are going to be here have shown 
they can play." 

Sophomore Justine Sinkus has 
proven herself to be one of the area's 
premiere deep threats while sopho- 
more Bethany Shore has been tough 
off the bench for the Sequoits all 
year. 

"Also, the sophomores we have 
coming in had a real good year, and 
so did the freshman, so there may be 



help from below," Woods said. 
"Freshman Erica Brown has been on 
the team all year, and has performed 
well. If she can keep it up, she should 
.be strong next year," .. 

The toughest loss for the Se- 
quoits will be losing Amie Carlberg 
arid Katie Gofron in June to gradua- 
tion. 

However, with their loss comes 
the gain of Katieanne Pechauer, 
fresh off an ACL injury that sidelined 
her for a year. 

"Katieanne can do so much for 
us and create so much for us," 
Woods said. Getting her back will be 
a big boost for us." 

"This is the first year we won 
under 13 games, and we have a 
chance to break that. The North 
Suburban is always tough but if 
everyone works out, we'll definite- 
ly be a better team at both ends of 
the court next year." 



ATHLETES OF THE WEEK 



Name: Ryan Hlniak 
School: Antioch 
Sport: Wrestling . 
Yean Senior 
Last week's stats: 
Reached State Wrestling 
Meet at 135 pounds. . 




Name: Nate Garden 
School: Antioch 
Sport: Wrestling . 
Year: Senior 
Last week's stats: 
.Reached State Wrestling 
Meet at 215 pounds. 




Don Lackey, shown here in an early-season basketball game 
against Auburbn, has-been one of the most valuable players for 
the basketball and the football teams over the last two years, and 
the junior has one year remaining to lift the Sequoits to athletic 
success. — Photo by Steve Young 



For Rams, Wes is more 



By LEE FILAS 
Staff Reporter 



After two 'days of grueling 
wrestling matches, Grayslake "s Wes 
Anderson deserved to be heralded as 
the best wrestler in the state. 

However, Brian Corcoran of 
Sandburg High School had other 
things to say about that beating An- 
derson in overtime to claim the 215 
pound state wrestling championship 
in Champaign this past weekend. 

"Wes had a great tournament and 
wrestled some ■ 



*Weshas done things this 
year that no one else has 
done in Grayslake. He want- 
ed the state championship, 
and he went for it' 

Steve Wood 
Rams wrestling coach 



Garden 



great matches," 
said Steve 
Wood, 
Gray slake 
wrestling 
coach. "All 
year, * Wes 
would always 
push the enve- 
lope and wres- 
tle- the way he 
wanted to. He 
would go out and wrestle no matter 
who the other guy is." 

Anderson started the tournament 
with a first round 'win over Rich 
Behnke from Willowbrook High 
School by a score of 7-0, before mov- 
ing on to pin Joe Martinez of St. 
Lawrence High School in 50 seconds ; 
in the second round of the tourney. 

"Wes has done things this year 
that no one else has done in 
Grayslake," Wood said. "He wanted 
the state championship, and he went 
for it" 

From there, Anderson rolled into 
the final round by beating Mike 
Pasternak of Marist High School by a 
score of 4-2 arid Justin Sornsin of 
Rockford East 6-1. 

In the final match, Corcoran and 
Anderson battled to a 3-3 tie, before 
the referee awarded both wrestlers a 
penalty point with time running out 
to set up the overtime. Then in GT, 
Anderson went for a risky move and 
was outsmarted, resulting in a over-, 
time two point loss. 

"Ten to 15 seconds in overtime, 
Wes went for a big throw, which he's 
been doing all year," said Woods. "Cor- 
coran just flipped out of it. It was a 
tough move and the guy countered it" 

"Wes is disappointed he didn't 



win because he wanted the state 
championship badly," Wood said; 
"But he knows that he is just as good 
as the state champion, so that eases 
his pain a little. It's not like he got bea t 
10-0,'buthe wanted the state cham- 
pionship." 

Also appearing in the tourna- 
ment for Grayslake was 152 pounder 
Andy Hamelet, who wrestled his way 
to sixth place in the state tournament, 
and Eric Peterson at 119 pounds. 

Hamelet, who won sectionals 
and was placed in the first round of 

the tourna- 
ment, was 
pinned ' by 
Jerrel Johns of 
Thornwood 
in the quar- 
terfinals ' of 
the consoli- 
dation brack- 
et and lost to 
Aaron Armet- 
ta for fifth 
place by a 
score of 3-0. 

"I told Andy before the tourna- 
ment that if Andy wrestles his match, 
then he'll do real well put there," 
Wood said. "Andy did that and start- 
ed beating kids he wasn't supposed to 
beat" 

Peterson lost to Jason Jones of 
Glenbard North 3-0 in the opening 
round and Joe Rujawitz from 
Belleville West by a score of 7-4 to get 
knocked from contention. 

Two wrestlers from Antioch also 
found their way to Champaign over 
. the weekend, though* neither made it 
to the medal rounds. 

At 135 pounds, Ryan Hliniak lost 
a close contest against Nick Ctrrin- 
cione of Glenbard North in the first 
round. With the loss, Cirrincione did 
not advance far enough in the tour- 
nament to give Hliniak a chance to 
come back in wrestle-backs. 

-Natq Garden did slightly better. 
Carden beat Michael Bias of Chicago 
Vocational before losing to Justin 
Somsin of Rockford East pushing in 
the consolidation brackets. 

In the wrestle-backs, Carden 

pinned Kyle Rainey before being 

pinned by Joe. Martinez from St. 

■ Lawrence to be driven from the 

tourney. 



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4 , A12 / Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



February 26, 1999 




Sequoits boys hoopsters 
struggle without 




By LEE FILAS 
Staff Reporter 



Antioch sophomore guard Adam Durham goes up high for a layup against Libertyville last week. The 
Sequoits lost 49-45 and face Lake Forest In the first round of the Prospect Sectional.— Photo by 
Steve Young 



American Youth Basketball looking for teams 



The American Youth Basketball 
tour is accepting boy's and girl's 
teams interested in competing 
against good competition at various 
sights this spring and summer. As a 
team, you wiilbe playing in three dif- 
ferent District tournaments and one 
National tournament. The District 
tournaments are six games mini- 
mum, and the National tournament 
(at Indiana University or Northern 
Iowa University) will be a minimum 
of eight games. 

"This is a great alternative to 
team camps because it encompass- 
es three weekends and a four day 



tournament at the Nationals. You're 
not done playing as a team after only 
one week like at most of the team 
camps you see. Different teams are 
joining "The Tour" and seeing 
some very good results and great 
improvements in their play," 
states Tour Director Brian Evans. 
"It's also a fantastic developmen- 
tal organization for younger mid- 
dle school and junior high school 
kids. The kids are guaranteed 26 
games no matter how many they 
win or lose. Unlike many tourna- 
ments, you do not need to keep 
winning in order to keep play- 



ing, " said Evans. 

The breakdown of the grade 
brackets this year are 4/5, 6 6/7, 8, 
8/9 and 10/11. The grades represent 
the grades the players are in this 
school year. If you would like more 
information about the Tour, you can 
either send a self addressed stamped 
envelope to: 

The Tour, 2003 Hardwood Path, 
Lake Villa, IL 60046; or Call 223, 8031 
and leave a message, and your call 
will be returned. The deadline for en- 
tering a team is April 1, so don't hes- 
itate any longer if interested in par- 
ticipating. 



With a 49-45 loss in Liber- 
tyville on Friday, Antioch has 
stepped up and proven to be the 
most mysterious team in the 
North Suburban Conference. 

After beating fifth ranked 
Stevenson twice this year, 
as well as tenth ranked 
Grant and a one point loss 
to third ranked 
Mundeleln, a loss to 13th 
ranked Libertyville on Fri- 
day and 15th ranked North 
Chicago last week could spell 
trouble for Antioch. 

"I think we play as well as our . 
competition," said junior forward 
Don Lackey about the teams in- 
consistent play. "We play better 
against the better teams, but play 
worse against the lower teams." 

Lackey, who spent Friday 
night on the bench riding out an 
ankle injury, watched as his team 
got off to a slow first quarter start 
and never dug themselves out of 
the hole they created. 

Libertyville piled on 16 first 
quarter points and limited Anti- 
och to eight points over the same 
stretch to control the game from 
the tip. . 

In the second, both teams 
traded buckets, giving Libertyville 
a 29-20 half time lead. 

With Lackey riding the bench, 
senior forward Brett McCullom 
stepped up for the Sequoits, scor- 
ing 12 points in the game. How- 
ever, he was the only Sequoit to 
hit in double figures. » 

In the third, the teams traded 
baskets until Antioch came a live 




in the fourth, limiting the Tigers 
to just six points n the quarter 
while punching out 13 points 
down the stretch. However, with 
the game on the line late in the 
fourth, Libertyville rode their free 
throws to the victory, outscorlng 
Antioch In the final two minute 

stretch to seal the win. 

With the loss, Antioch 
dropped to 12-13 on the 
year, with a 4-9 record in 
the NSC. 
Also, for Libertyville, it 
was the final' hpme game 
win for longtime Libertyville 
basketball Max Sanders, retiring 
after 20 years as coach of Liber- 
tyville. 

The Sequoits will have to turn 
more consistent with the IHSA re- 
gional playoffs coming up In the 
next week. Antioch's first oppo- 
nent In the regionals will be- 
against ninth seeded Lake Forest 
at home. 

The big question for Antioch 
will be the health of Lackey. Lack- 
ey sprained his ankle in the home 
loss to North Chicago last week, 
and has been off the ankle for a 
week in an attempt to strengthen 
it. 

If Lackey's healthy, if sopho- 
mores Eric White and Adam 
Durham turn in decent efforts, 
and if seniors McCullom and 
Matt Koss play to their strengths, 
Antioch should advance to the 
second round. However, as has 
been shown recently, they have a 
tendency to play down to their 
competition. If the Sequoits stay' 
up for the game, then a regional 
finals birth could be on the hori- 
zon. 



wi^>-^ , ^>»<:v^-;^-x-^\^" ; «- r ti*-^v'"'V.< 



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*■ 



.-i-.-'Vr^ 







FOOTBALL and CHEER LEADING 

Registration 




Lakkvii.i.A 
TownshiF 

AGE LEVELS FOR 
FOOTBALL a CHEERLEADING 

7-8 yr.old - Bantam 
9-10 yr.old - Pee Wee 
11-12 yr.old - Featherweight 
12-13 yr.old - Lightweight 
13-14 yr.old - Varsity 

Members of the Junior Football League 
of Northern Illinois 







mate competitive teaque" RICK JOHNSEN, President LVTYF 

March Registration 

at State Bank of the Lakes, Linden hurst 

Wednesday, March 17th 6-8 p.m. 
Saturday, March 20th 9 -Noon 

April Registration 

Wednesday, April 21st 6-8 p.m. 
Saturday, April 24th 9-Nbon 

"fymcfam eiiid mexftmiettce a( a icfetcme 




?S5SSw5iB»s5 S i S iS< v> %Bji 



I tit I l At 






February 26, 1999 



SPORTS 



i 






i 









\ 






■ 



Jr. Corsairs 7th 
graders go 3-1 

The seventh grade Junior Cor- 
sairs just completed a very success- 
ful week of basketball. After losing to 
Warren (35-43) at home, the Corsairs 
then proceeded to go on the road 
and win three straight games. They, 
won at Barrington by the score of 44- 
38, beat Highland Park (40-26) and 
then beat Mundclein on a last sec- 
ond shot by Tony Balbin. As of Feb. 
21, the Junior Corsairs record stands 
at 7-7. The Corsairs season continues 
through March 21. 

Members of the seventh grade 
Junior Corsairs are: Matt Arcaro (St. 
Joseph, Libertyville),TonyBalgin (St. 
Mary, Buffalo Grove), Sean Dolan 
(Santa Maria, Mundelein), Michael 
Doyle (Transfiguration, Wauconda), 
Peter Hiss (St Mary, Buffalo Grove) 
Tom Kloss (St. Joseph, Libertyville) 
Luke Krombach ' (St. Gilbert, 
Grayslake) Jason Kwasigroch CTrans- 
figuration, Wauconda). 

Scott Lechowicz (St, Gilbert, 
Grayslake) Chris Londono (Our Lady 
of Humility, Zion) Kevin Morkin 
(Highland, Libertyville) DanPomier- 
ski (St. Joseph, Libertyville) Nathan 
Rittenberry (St. Patrick, Wadsworth), 
Chad Shoman. (St. Gilbert, 
Grayslake) and Grant Uhler (St.. 
Joseph, Libertyville) 
. All Junior Corsair home games 
are placed at Carmel High School. 
The Corsairs have five remaining 
conference games remaining. 

NAYB holds spring 
youth tournament 

North American Youth Basket- 
ball announced that they will once 
again host their annual spring youth 
basketball tournament for teams in 
the Aurora and surrounding area' 
JVlay 14 to 16 at East Aurora High 
School and other area sites. 

This tournament will feature 10 
different brackets. They include fifth- 
sixth grade boys; fifth-sixth grade 
girls; seventh grade boys; seventh 
grade girls; eighth grade boys; eighth 
grade girls; ninth-tenth grade boys; 
ninth-tenth grade girls; llth-12th 
grade boys; llth-12th grade girls. 

The entry deadline is April 23. 

For additional information or an 
entry form, call Anita Livesay at 1 
(888) 629-2275 or Tournament Di- 
rector Rocky May at (630) 897-7312. 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A"\ 3 



YOUTH ICELESS HOCKEY ASSN. LEAGUE STANDINGS 



W 

Grades 1-2 
Western Conference 

Central Division 

2 Maplclcafs 

3 p lies 
1 Wnckhiiwks 

4 Redwings 

8 Wolves 
4 Moose 
7 Hurricanes 
6 Vipers 
Pacific Division 

12 Sharks 
lSAvnlanchc 

13 Ducks 

9 Flames 

14 Oilers 

10 Canucks 

15 Coyotes 
Eastern Conference 
Atlantic Division 

21 Islanders 4 

22 Lightning 4 

18 Rangers 4 
21 Grizzlies 4 

23 Admirals 3 
17 Flyers , -2 

19 Capitals " 2 

20 Panthers 
NortliEast Division 
25 Can ad lens 5 

27 Bruins 5 

28 Predators 5 



6 
4 
4 
3 
3 
2 
1 


5 
4 
3 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 




2 
2 
3 
3 
4 
4 
6 



2 
3 
3 
3 
5 
5 



1 

1 
2 
2 
3 
4 
4 
6 

1 
1 
1 









o. 




1 

2 
1 


1 
1 






Pt 



12 



8 

6 

6 

4, 

4 



11 

10 

7 

6 

5 

5 

2 

2 









10 
10 
10 




For all 
the 
important 
things in 
your life 




\PEKIN/ 



Your family, children and their 
college education, home, business, : 
valuables, car, retirement, and your . 
health...these are all important to 
you. No matter what life brings 
your way...your professional Pekin 
Insurance Agent can help you put 
together an insurance plan with the 
right coverages at a good price. 

Depend on your 

hometown professionals 

for auto, home, life, 

and health insurance. 

Osmond Insurance 
Service Ltd 

976 Hillside 
Antioch, Illinois 60002 

395-2500 



More Choices In 
Cruising Hawaii 

by JIM WARNKEN, ** 

President, North Star Travel, Inc. 

You may recall an earlier story I wrote in which I explained lhat due to an outdated maritime law dating 
back to the IJiOU's, your choice of cruise lines sailing among the Hawaiian Islands is limited to American 
Hawaiian Cruise Lines. 

Uriefly, this restricts ships sailing From one U.S. port to anolherHJ.S. port, to American Flag-carrying 
vessels. One of the requirements lobe an American Flag-carrying vessel is that it must have been built in the 
U.S. Since there are no shipyards in the U.S. manufacturing passenger-carrying ocean liners, and the only two 
still in service are owned by American Hawaiian Cruises, they pretty much have a lock on the Hawaiian 
market. 

However, a foreign flag vessel can leave from a foreign port '(i.e. Canada or Mexico) and visit the 
Hawaiian Islands. 

That's exactly what many cruise lines do twice a year when they reposition their ships to and from 
summers sailing in Alaska, to (he Caribbean for the winter. 

For example, oh April IS, Carnival Cruise Lines' SupcrLincr, The Jubilee, will depart Enscnada, Mexico 
for Honolulu, 

After a four-day ocean crossing, the Jubilee will spend a day calling on the port of Kona on the west 
coast of the "Big Island" of Hawaii, dock for a couple of days in Maui, visit the port of Nawiliwili on the island 
of Kauai (my favorite), spend the day at Hilo on the other easi side of the Dig Island, and finally debark in 
Honolulu. 

You can also cruise to the mainland from the islands. The Jubilee sets sail from Honolulu on April 30, 
again calling on Maui, Kauai and the Dig Island of Hawaii before arriving at Vancouver, Canada, where she 
will spend the summer sailing to and from Alaska. • 

Princess Cruises,^ Royal Caribbean, Holland America and NCL all olTer similar repositioning cruises. 
However, don't just go for the best price. This may sound a little self-serving, but it's really important to find a 
good travel agent who not only knows their ships, but will get to know you and your interests. Believe me, not 
every ship is right for every person. 

Since Ihe cruise lines have to gel their ships to Alaska for the summer anyhow, they're all offering the 
same great deals on these sailings. 



<*AV££ 



NORTH 




STAR 



CfiUISES 



Lindenhurst 

www.northstartravQl.com i 

(847) 356-21 



1 


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4 









30 Whalers 4 
29 Sabres 2 . 

31 Dragons 2 
32Thifflder 1 
26 Penguins 
Grades 3-4 
Western Conference 
Central Division - 
7 Hurricanes 
fl Wolves 

5 Redwings 

1 Bockhowlcs 

3 Bucs 

4 Moose 

6 Vpcrs 

2 Maplclcafs 

9 JeW 

Pacific Division 

15 Oilers 

18 Stars 

12 Kln B s 

10 Flames 

1 1 Canucks 

13 Sharks 

14 Ducks 

16 Coyotes 

17 Avalanche 
Eastern Conference 
Atlantic Division 
21 Capitols 7 

19 Flyers 5 

26 Grizzlies 5 

23 Islanders 4 

24 Lightning 3 

25 Admirals . 3 

27 Cyclones 2 



6 
5 
4 
4 
3 
3 
2 
2 




4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
1 
2 




2 
4 
4 
5 

6 




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1 
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5 
7 


3 
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1 
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•0 


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1 




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11 

10 

B 

7 

6 

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4 

o 

11 

a 
a 
a 
a 

7 
7 
6 



14 

10 

10 

9 

8 

7 

4 



20 Rangers 16 2 

22 Panthers 7 

North East Division 



31 Predators 
34 Dragons 
2GCanudlens 
29 Penguins 
33 Whalers 
33 Thunder 
36 Senators 
20 Bruins 

32 Sabres 
Grades 5-6 
Western Conference 
Central Division 

3 Moose 

4 Redwings, 
1 a pic leafs 
lackhnwks 
/olvcs 

5 Vipers 

6 Hurricanes 
Pacific Division 

11 Sharks 
10 Kings 

13 Coyotes 

12 Ducks 

8 Flames 

9 Canucks 

14 Avalanche 
Eastern Conference 

Atlantic Division 

15 Flyers 7 
20 Admirals 6 
19 Lightning 4 
IS Is Landers 3 



16 Rangers 

17 Panthers 
21 Grizzlies 



2 

2 

2 



?fli 

7 Wc 



5 
4 
4 
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2 
2 


6 
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1 


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a 


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a 


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6 


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4 


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2 



NortliEast Division 

27Whafirr» 5 

24 Bruins 4 

22 Canadians 4 

23 Penguins 3 
26 Sabres 3 

25 Predators 
28 Thunder 
Grades 7-B 
Western Conference 
Western Division 



2 
1 
3 
4 
3 
4 
7 

1 
3 
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5 





3 

3 




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15 
13 
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7 



iins 



5 
5 
5 
4 
3 
3 
2 
1 
1 




2 Pengut: 

7 Ducks 

8 Maplclcafs 

I Blackhawlcs 
10 Grizzlies 

3 Vipers 
6 Sharks 

9 Redwings 

4 Wolves 

Eastern Conference 
Eastern Division 

18 Thunder 5 

I I Rangers 4 

13 Coyotes 4 

19 Panthers 4 
15 Bruins 3 
17 Predators 3 

14 F yen 3 
12 Lightning 1 
16MOOSC 1 

20 Cyclones 



5 
5 
5 

1 
1 
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2 
3 
2 
6 



1 

1 
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6 



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Account Executive, 14 Years of Experience 

Serving Antioch, Lake Villa, Lindenhurst 
& Wisconsin 

PHONE (847) 223-8161, ext. 105 
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COMMUNITY 



February 26, 1999 



Line Dancing for the yunguns' 



Ever since Miss Liz (i.e the 
infamous Old Retired 
Lizard) was bitten by the 
Line Dance Bug, she has 
been trying to incorporate a few 
line dance steps into the curriculum 
at Camp Crayon. So far Miss Deb- 
bie, the Camp director, has been 
able to hold her off, but lo and be- 
hold, if there's a will there's a way 
and Miss Liz has come up with a 
fantastic new plan. 

She has decided to take all her 
Line Dance knowledge and wisdom 
and share it with all the little people 
of Antioch and the surrounding 
communities. 

So starting this summer she will 
be teaching Line Dance Lessons for 
Young People ages 8 to 13 years. 
Both boys and girls are invited to 




1 JINGLE 
m FROM 
PRINGLE 

: ,''_v •' Lynn Pringle 

come out on Wednesday mornings 
from 9:30 until 1 1:30 a.m. The 
lessons, which are sponsored by the 
Antioch Parks and Recreation De- 
portment, will be held at Grass Lake 
School which is located 1 1/2 miles 
west of Route 59 on Grass Lake 
Road. They will begin June 16 and 
run for six weeks. Advanced registra- 
tion is required and may be done at 
the Parks Department at 874 Main 
St. in beautiful downtown Antioch. 



For more Information, you may 
contact cither Liz Schmehl, the line 
Dance Queen, oh, I mean Instruc- 
tor, at 395-5380 or Laurie Stahl, the 
Park Director, at 365-2160. 

The minimum class size will be 
20, the maximum class size will be 
40. Line dancing is fun and easy to 
learn not to mention a great way to 
make new friends and wonderful 
exercise for the younguns'. So have 
the kids turn off the TVs and VCRs, 
put away their Nintendos and 
s Game Boys, and come but for a 
summer of yee-hoh. 

And so goes another "Jingle 
from Pringle." 

Readers with information for 
"Jingle from Pringle" should call 
Lynn Pringle at 395-6364. 



Township tot program sign-up underway 



Registration for fall, 1999 senior 
and junior age children's programs 
at the Lake Villa Township building 
is now underway. 

Children must be three years 



old by Wednesday, Sept. 1 to join 
the junior tot program, or 4 years 
old to join the senior tot program. 
AH programs meet in the town- 
ship's community room. 




Free Adoption Seminar 

Anyone contemplating adoption should 
attend this informational seminar 

Wednesday, March 3, 1999, 7:00 P.M. 

Family Counseling Clinic 
19300 West Highway 120 • Grayslake, Illinois 60030 

Infants and toddlers available from: 

"^•' ! I China, Poland, Vietnam, Bulgaria, Russia, India and Guatemala 



Space is limited, please call 847-223-8107 to register 
or for more information ask for Ginny Mann. 



The junior tot program meets 
on Mondays and Wednesdays for 
two hours each day. 

The senior tot program has 
both a two day and three day pro- 
gram available. Senior tots meet for 
two hours on Tuesday and Thurs- 
day. The three day program also 
meets for two hours on Friday. 

Lake Villa Area Tot Program, 
Inc. is an Illinois not-for-profit cor- 
poration sponsored, in part, by the 
Lake Villa Township Board of 
Trustees. 

Additional information is avail- 
able by telephone, 356-2284. Peo- 
ple may also stop by and visit. 

The township offices are locat- 
ed at Fairfield Road and Grand Av- 
• enue near the large, red Soo Line 
train caboose in the Park. 



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'Best of Antioch' 
nominations due 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



During the past two years, more 
than three dozen Antioch residents 
have answered the question "What I 
like best about Antioch? • The ques- 
tion is part of the "Neighbors" fea- 
ture published each week in the An- 
tioch News. 

During the past two years, the 
predominant answer given is that 
residents like Antioch because peo- 
ple are friendly. Almost half the 
neighbors interviewed say "friendly 
people" as the reason they like Anti- 
och. Not far behind is the fact that 
Antioch has a' small town atmos- 
phere. Other major reasons given are 
recreation opportunities and the fact 
that everybody knows everybody. 

Antioch residents also mention 
growth, the family atmosphere, 
meeting people they know, the ac- 
tive community life and volunteer 
ethic, the strong sense of communi- 
ty, and specific services such as the 
police, schools, firefighters, and res- 
cue squad. 

For many people in Antioch, the 
best part of being here is the positive 
emotional feeling created by the size 
of Antioch and the people who live 
here. 

The next question could be: 
what are the very specific aspects of 
Antioch that are behind those feel- 
ings? Are there specific people who 
live in Antioch that set the tone for 
friendliness? Are there restaurants, 
theaters, or events, such as Indepen- 
dence Day, that make a resident of 
Antioch glad they live here? 

The Antioch News will publish a 
story on March 26 about the one' 
hundred best things in the Village of 
Antioch. 

Residents are encouraged to 
nominate their ideas. 

The article will include ideas 
from the public, and other sources, 
that cover every facet of village life. 

Antioch area residents are en- 
couraged to send nominations in 
writing as well as a statement about 
why that is a "best thing" about An- 
tioch for them. 



People can send a list with sever- 
al items, It Is not necessary that en- 
tries contain 100 nominations. They 
can list what is truly considered to be 
wonderful and nice about being in 
Antioch, about the community, or 
about events that make it nice to be 
here. 

The deadline for contributions is 

Friday, March 12. 

Send the cards and letters to 
Rhonda Hetrick Burke, Managing 
Editor, Antioch News, 30 South 
Whitney Street, Grayslake, Illinois 
60030. People also may send nomi- 
nations by fax to 223-8810. 

A review of some of .the com- 
. ments over the past two years reveals 
the emotional tie that people have to 
their town. 

Mayor Marilyn Shineflug said 

that she liked "the quaintness of our 

' downtown and the strong sense "of 

community provided by the people 

who live here." 

"I love Antioch," said Carole Di- 
eriethal. "I like the people. I like the 
atmosphere. It has very good, posi-. 
tive energy." She is a downtown . 
merchant 

■ "I enjoy going down the street 
and knowing people Imeetalongthe 
way," said Bob Lindblad. He is pres- 
ident of the Lakes Region Historical 
Society. 

Betsy Wells said the same thing. 
"It's small and that's why you can 
know everybody and walk down the 
street and know everybody." 

Al Himber is a long-time resident 
and active in the Veterans of Foreign^ 
Wars Post. His wife, Dorothee, Is also^' 
active In the Ladles Auxiliary of die- 
post He was quite specific in his pos- 
itive feelings.' ■-■■ ; r : ! -'• '■ '- 

"I like die people. The people are 
great," Himber said. "The people are 
always with a smile. I love our police ( 
department, rescue squad, and the!' 
* fire, department, I know them; and 
they are wonderful people." 

There are many people, placesV 
events, organizations, services, or 
features of Antioch that can be nom- 
inated for the proposed story. People 
may send in as many as they wish 
and they should be quite specific. ' 



FUND-RAISING 



Feb. 26 to April 30, Hastings Lake 
YMCA- Kids Need Heroes Campaign, 
annual giving campaign, Informa- 
tion: 356-4006 

March 6, Third Annual Come- 
dy Night and Silent Auction, Anti- 
och Junior Woman's Club, at Fa- 
ther Hanley Hall, $15 tickets at 
First National Bank- Employee 



Owned, club members. 

April 11, Raffle to buy Cairns 
IRIS Thermal. Imaging Camera, 
only 200 tickets at $150 apiece, 
$10,000 given away, Antioch Fire- 
fighters Association, tickets at State 
Bank of The Lakes, First National. 
Bank- Employee Owned, First Na- 
tional Bank of Chicago. 

June 16, District 34 Education 
Foundation, Golf Outing, Spring Val- 
ley Golf Course. 



_ 



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February 26, 1999 



COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers / A1 5 



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COMMUNITY 



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LIFE'S A BEAR 

Stay clear of 
condiments?/ B2 

ANTIOCII PUBLIC LIBRARY DISTRICT 

757 mglU MAIN 
Ami<m\ % il 60002 



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We loved Lucy?' / B12 



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Lakeland 
Newspapers 

FcfaruMyzO, 




'They will be more at peace with themselves, because they will see how others live 7 




- ., •> i-. «jfttl<1r^ i 



•ii'.-V ... „ 




Native American teaches how to find peace through spirituality 



By SPENCER SCHE1N 
Staff Reporter 



In a simpler time in our nation, 
Native American's live in har- 
mony with the land and their 
beliefs. 

Some believe the answer to 
finding stress relief in today's busy 
America can be found in the teach- 
ing of Native Americans. 

Sam Musqua, is a native of 
Saskatchewan, Canada, where he is 
spiritual leader of the Keeseekoose 
(pronounced key-see-koo-see) and 
Ojlbway Tribal chairman. Today, he 
is traveling throughout Canada and 
the United States to teach the ways 
of his people. 

Musqua relocated to Janesvilie, 
Wis., in June, where he and 75 other 
people are trying to create a chil; 
dren's center. Musqua has spoken 
to people all over Canada and the 
United States, and prisoners in both 
countries, teaching them the heal- 
ing ways of his tribe. 

Now 43 years old, Musqua is 
settling down in Janesvilie, but is 
continuing his "fund-raising" efforts 




Grand Chief Sam Musqua from 
Children of the Land in Janes- 
vilie 

to benefit the center. 

Musqua's "barnstorming" has 
brought him ito lake County for the 
first time. He is offering a "Walk In 
Balance" program which started 
Saturday, Feb. 21, at the Grant 
Township Building in Ingleside, and 
continues on March 14, April 18, 
and May 18.- 

"It is open to anybody, because 
these things are for everybody," 
Musqua said. 



The topics Musqua intends to 
cover include an introduction to Na- 
tive American Spirituality, and many 
things that fall within the culture. 

The cultural topics include Clan 
Systems, Eagle Feather, Sacred Pipe, 
Sweat Lodge, Ojibway Prophesies, 
drumming and singing, and the Cir- 
cle of Life. 

By learning about the ways of 
the Ojibway, Musqua said partici- 
pants will become better people. 

"They will be more at peace with 
themselves, because they will see 
how others live," Musqua said, "and 
not just read it in textbooks." ; 

The ways of the Ojibway can ap- 
ply to everyday life. 

For Instance, the Sweat Lodge 
symbolizes the womb of mother 
earth; and all her children, which 
can go in four directions/ Musqua 
said. The four directions include the 
four races— the Yellow Man to the 
west, the Black Man to the south, 
the Red Man to the east, and the 
White Man to the north, he said. 

"So, all four have to live in the 

Please see CIRCLE IB6 



At top of page, carefully holding an eagle feather, Christine Andy 
of Janesvilie, Wisconsin shares in a Talking Circle at a Native 
American Teaching presentation held at the Grant Township Build- 
ing in Ingleside oh Sunday/Above, Carol Kiraly, of Fox Lake, holds 
onto an Eagle feather in a Talking Circle at a Native American 
Teaching presentation. — Photos by Lynn GunnarsoriDahlstrom. 



B2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



February 26, 1999 



Steer clear of politics, religiQH,aDd,condiments 



When I was young, my 
parents gave me a 
warning: never discuss 
politics or religion 
with my friends. Which was sort of 
confusing, now that I think about it 
If I couldn't discuss those things 
with friends, just who was I sup- 
posed to discuss them with — ene- 
mies? 

I suppose I could have struck 
up conversations with strangers, 
but they weren't as easy to locate 
back then. We didn't have Internet 
chat rooms, or phone numbers to 
call like 1-900-Talk-Politics-To-Me- 
Baby. 




LIFE'S 
A BEAR 

Donna Abear- 



Of course, that warning didn't 
matter much in my youth. Children 
tend to gravitate toward peers with 
similar interests. Ifweargued.it was 
rarely over anything more signifi- 
cant than which Beatle was cuter 
John Lennon or Paul McCartney. 
And when my friends picked Paul 



and I picked John, there was no ani- 
mosity. In fact, it was a good thing. 
I figured since most of the girls were 
"ga ga M over Paul, I was going to 
snatch up John without a whole lot 
of competition. (Dam thatYoko!) 

But adulthood has a way of 
changing things. Our circle of 
friends and acquaintances tends to 
broaden (along with our waist- 
bands), and our views on politics 
and religion evolve, grow stronger 
and far less flexible. By the time we 
hit 40, we can be downright belliger- 
ent when it comes to our opinions 
on these subjects. 

Still, it took the House and Sen- 



ate attempteitQj^mpearii tfifc PresB Vi A Apparently Ralph did not know 




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dent to really make my parents' 
warning become a reality. Sudden- 
ly, the stakes were so high that peo- 
ple were no longer able to politely 
abstain from discussion. The mere 
mention of this issue had the power 
to turn a quiet dinner with friends 
into an angry disagreement 

M Liar, liar, pants on fire, got 'em 
caught on a Linda Tripp wire..." 

. "Oh, yeah? Well, pat a back, pat 
a back, politics man, dig up a scan- 
dal however you can..." 

In fact, I cannot remember an 
issue that divided friends as much 
as this one, except perhaps the 
"mustard vs. ketchup" issue of 1987. 
This was a localized event, so you 
may not have heard of it. 

As I remember it, my husband 
and I were not yet married, and we 
were eating an impromptu. meal at 
the house of our friends, Lorrie 
and Ralph, Although they were ex- 
cellent cooks, it just so happened 
that at this meal, they were serving 
hot dogs. I looked at the condi- 
ments they had placed on the 
table — mustard, relish, onions, 
etc.— and realized somethfng was 
missing. 

"Hey, Ralph! Where's the 
ketchup?" I asked, innocently. 

Ralph stopped in his tracks, 
turned, arched one eyebrow threat- 
eningly, and said, "Ketchup? WHY 
do you need ketchup?" 





L 



To Subscribe To Your 
Hometown News 
Call 740-4055 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 



me as well as I thought. I mean, I 
was not just your average ketchup 
(or, as some prefer, catsup) con- 
sumer here. He was talking to a . 
woman who was practically a 
ketchup connoisseur. Why, as a 
child I thought that ketchup was the 
fifth food group. 

So I just laughed at Ralph's 
question. 

"WHY? Why do you think? I al- 
ways eat ketchup on my hot dog, sil- 
ly!" 

I had never seen Ralph look 
so...scary. "KETCHUP on a hot dog? 
Are you CRAZYI? You never, EVER, 
put ketchup on a hot dog. Only 
mustard." 

I tried to diffuse the situation. 

"Why? What will happen? Are 
the hot dog police going to arrest 
me?" 

"Don't joke about itl YOU WILL 
NEVER EAT KETCHUP ON A HOT 
DOG IN MY HOUSE!" he declared, 
veins bulging in his neck. 

I looked over at Lorrie, who just 
shrugged and gave me that "What 
can I say? It's Ralph" look, so I de- 
cided to humor him. It was not 
worth losing a friendship over 
ketchup. 

These days, Lorrie and I can 
laugh about that incident. Of 
course/maybe that's because she's 
no longer married to Ralph. 

Still, I learned my lesson. I have 
now added "condiments" to the list 
of things I try not to discuss with 
close friends. 

You never know who will rum 
out to be a mustard maniac. 



Questions or comments for hu- 
morist Donna Abear can be sent to 
P.O. Box 391, Antioch, IL 60002. 



NEWS 1 220 




THE TALK OF LAKE COUNTY 

V Sat. February 27th 

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Game Time: 7:30p 

V Tues. March 2nd 

Libertyville at Grayslake 

(boys regionals) 

Game Time: 7:30p 



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V Wed. March 3rd 

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(boys regionals) 

Game Time. 7:30p 



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For the Best Value... Shop the 

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Wizard Computers-Round Lake 

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I 








February 26, 1999 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 




Lakeland Newspapers I ; B 3 




With Its 1937 premiere, Walt Disney's "Snow White and the 
Seven Dwarfs" made history as the first full-length animated 
motion picture. This hand-inked, hand-painted eel Is available 
in a limited edition of 275. To see it, visit the Stay Tooned 
Gallery featuring animation art. from Disney Art. Editions 
through April 15. 

Disney's "Treasures From 



the Attic" 



Stay Tooned Gallery has 
announced the dates for the 
8th Annual Vintage Disney 
Animation Exhibit. Every 
February, Stay Tooned Gallery 
unveils over 100 never before 
seen pieces of one-of-a-kind 
artworks for Its 
Annual Cabin Fever 
Extravaganza. This 
year Stay Tooned 
Is celebrating 10 
years of operating 
in downtown 
Barrington, and will 
premier this year's 
exhibit Treasures 
From "The Attic...75 
years of Disney" on Friday, 
February 26, from 6 to 9 p.m. 
Admission to the premier is 
free, but reservations are rec- 
ommended and can be made 
by calling Jim or Tracy Lentz at 
382-2357. 

Stay Tooned Gallery is locat- 
ed at the Ice House Mall in 
downtown Barrington at 200 
Applebee Street. The Disney 
exhibit will run through April 15, 
1999. 

Stay Tooned began in 1989 
in downtown Barrington and 



opening 




has grown to become the 
largest framed animation 
gallery In the world. This once a 
year exhibit will include original 
studio animation drawings and 
hand painted eels from Snow 
White and the Seven Dwarfs as 
well as original art- 

n~"N works from virtual- 
ly eveiy Disney 
feature film right 
through to Mulan. 
Co-owners 
^ Jim and Tracy 
* Lentz take over • ■ 

J one year to curate 

s this timeless 

exhibit. "Once the 
exhibit is done, we immediately 
go to work on the following 
years' Cabin Fever Show." This 
year's show. Treasures From 
The Attic," Includes original art- 
works from Bambi, Pinocchto, 
Cinderella, Pete r Pan, Lady and 
the Tramp, as well as, Beauty 
and The Beast, The Little 
Mermaid and even Winnie The 
Pooh. 

Information on the Cabin 
Fever Exhibit 'Treasures From 
The Attic," can be obtained by 
calling 382-2357. 



"Cabin Fever Jazz" Concerts at Gorton 



The Marshall Vente Quartet 
with Vocalist Colleen Timler will 
perform on February 28 from 4-6 
p.m. at part of the "Cabin Fever 
Jazz" concerts at Gorton 
Community. Center, 400 East 
Illinois Rd. in Lake Forest. Tickets 
are $15 each. 

Marshall Vente has a long- 
standing love of jazz music, and 
hosts a show on public radio sta- 
tion WDCB called "Jazz 
Tropicale." Howard Reich, critic 
with the Chicago Tribune; 
describes him as an "irrepressible 
pianist, bandleader, composer, 
and emergent impresario." 
Marshall and WDCB produced 
•his fourth annual jazz festival, a 



SINGLES 



Dance set for Friday 

. -The Solo Singles Club meets every 
Friday at 8 p.m. at the Gale Street Inn, 
906 Diamond Lake Road In Mundcleln. 
The age range is 40 plus and admission 
is free. For more information call 746- 
6818. 

KID STUFF 



Cartooning classes 

The Anderson Arts Center of 
Kenosha will present a special scries of 
cartooning classes beginning Saturday, 
Feb. 20, at 1 p.m. The weekly, 90- 
minute classes, entitled "Toons," are 
designed for children 8 to 14 years of 
age and will be taught by artist Mario 
Gonzales. 

Classes will be held at the Anderson 
Arts Center's Kid's Space, which is 
located directly across the street from 
the Arts Center at 124 66th Street. 

Classes will run from 1 p.m. to 2:30 
p.m. Cost is 512 per class. For more 
Information, coll 4 14 -657.6005. 



DANCE 



Square Dancing 

The Whippy Winds Dance will be 
hosted by the Buoys and Belles Square 
Dance Club. Guest caller will be Lin 
Jarvis. The dance will be held on Friday, 
March 5, also a workshop; 8-8:30 p.m., 
main stream; 0:30-10:30 p.m. , plus tip 



at 10*30 p.m. Cost Is $3.50 per person. 
The dance will be at the First United 
Methodist Church, 128 N.Utica St., 
Waukcgan. Use west parking lot rear 
doorr downstairs to Fellowship Mall, All 
modern western square dancers In the 
area are Invited. Light refreshments will 
be served. Call 362*0130 or 566-0196 for 
more Information. 

Dancing Under 
the Stars 

Amateur and professional dancers 
are invited to swing, boogie and twist 
the night away to the sounds of top 
Chicago orchestras in the Crystal 
Gardens at Navy Pier. 

Admission is free. Dancing will be 
held every Wednesday through March 
10. Free dance lessons are offered 
between 6 and 7 p.m. and dancing will 
be held from 7-10 p.m. 



in the permanent collection of The Art 
Institute of Chicago. Tills program is in 
honor of Black History Month. 

Artstreet Art Fair 

A variety of fine art exhibits and 
crafts forall interests will be available 
for viewing and purchase on Saturday 
and Sunday, Feb. 27 and 26 In Festival 
Hall B at Navy Pier. Please call (608) 
831-0707 for more information. 






MUSIC 



ART 



An Uncommon Journey 

"A Look at African American Art: An 
Uncommon Journey" program to be 
held. 

Join other art lovers at the Waukcgan 
Public Library for a unique look at 
African American Art as presented by 
art historian, Jeff Mlshur, Saturday, Feb. 
27 at 130 p.m. 

Learn how various African American 
artists have chronicled their journey 
and the Journeys of their people 
through art. This Interactive slide lec- 
ture will introduce its audience to major 
African American artists of this century 
and will examine several works that are 



Live music at 
Duke O'Brien's 

Duke O'Brien's hosts live music 
throughout the month of February. The 
Fabulous Janes will be playing on 
Friday, Feb. 26 and the Cathy 
Richardson Trio appears on Saturday, 
Feb. 27. 

Duke O'Brien's Is located at 1 10 N. 
Main St. In Crystal Lake. For more infor- 
mation on any of these events, please 
coll 815-356-9980. 

Waukegan Symphony 
Orchestra 

The Waukcgan Symphony Orchestra 
will perform works of Schubert, Stamitz 
and Arnell guest directed by Richard 
Wilson on Sunday, Feb. 28 at 4 p.m. The 
concert will be in the Orlln D Trapp 
Auditorium in the Waukegan High 
School. Tickets are S12 for adults and 
$10 for students, seniors and military. 
Children under the age of 12 are free 






Please turn to next page 




three-day event at Joe Segal's Jazz 
Showcase, which consistently 
receives rave reviews. The 
Quartet plays a wide range of 
music, including standards, jazz 
classics, originals, Latin, Brazilian, 
and novelty tunes. Joining 
Marshall are vocalist Colleen 
Timler, whom Howard Reich calls 
"a persuasive., .and unpreten- 
tious... interpreter," Jim Batson 
on bass, Glenn Reitsma playing 
guitar, and Isidro Perez on 
drums. 

For information, or to receive a 
program brochure, contact the 
Gorton office at 234-6060 between 
9:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. on week- 
days. 






olleee? i 




give you 4,000! 



m 



■ 



Golf Volunteers Needed! 

Enthusiastic and energetic volunteers sought for Starter 
and Player Assistant positions for all Lake County Forest 
Preserve Golf Courses: Brae Loch, Groysloke; Countryside 
East & West, Munde/e/n; Fort Sheridan. Highland Park-, and 
ThunderHawk Golf Club. Beach Park. Must be able to vol- 
unteer a minimum of two. six-hour shifts:each week dur- 
ing the golfing season. 

Come join us promote the game of golf, meet new people, 
and enjoy a special golf benefits package. Call (847) 367- 
6640 for more information. 



■ 






The cost of a college degree is often a stu-. 
denfs main hesitation before enrolling in 
classes. We can help. 

The UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-PARKSIDE, 

set on a beautiful 700-acre campus near 
Kenosha just minutes from the Illinois border, 
is offering a $4,000 tuition break for up : to 
100 qualifying Illinois students who enroll 
full-time for fall 1999. 

With a perfect blend of small size,' personal 
attention and quality teaching, UW-Parkside. 
is the ideal place to;go to college. 

Choose from 26 majors {including our 
newest in criminal justice), or our nationally 
accredited business program. Live in our 
new state-of-the-art residence hall with cable 
TV, Internet access and a fitness room. ,< 

We'll cut 45 percent off the tuition bill. ,, 

If s that simple. Call toll-free, 

(877) NEED-UWP (633-3897), to learn more! 



♦ 



LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES 




*dT University of Wisconsin-Parkside 

900 Wood Road, PO Box 2000 • Kenosha, Wisconsin 53141-2000 





B4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



February 26, 1999 



with a paying adult For information or 
for tickets, call 360-4742. 

Women Composers of 
the Romantic Period 

Enjoy the very romantic and expres- 
sive music of two women composers 
who are finally being recognized by 
music audiences. Clara Schumann, who 
is remembered mainly as a concert 
pianist and the wife of Robert 
Schumann, will be discussed as a com- 
poser In her own right. 

Music appreciation instructor Jim 
Kendros weaves Insightful personal sto- 
ries about the composers and amazing 
historic fact to really give you a sense of 
what the times were about. Selections of 
the composers work will also be played 
and analyzed to give the audience a bet- 
ter understanding of some of the deci- 
sions they had to make, and why. 

At the Adler Ballroom, Friday, Feb. 
26, 1999, 7:30 p.m. Tickets are S9 and S7 
for DACC members. 



EDUCATION 



Divorce survival 

The Family Service Community 
Education Program is offering an edu- 
cational course called Divorce Survival. 
This Is a four week course which focuses 
on the personal, financial, and legal 
concerns of divorcing partners. 

This program will help you through 
the maze of divorce. Financial and legal 
experts will share knowledge and 
insights to help you make good deci- 



sions before you sign those papers. 

It will be held every Thursday at 7 - 
9 p.m. through Mar. 18. The cost Is $40. 

For more information call Kris 
Andersen at 662-4464. 

Stop and Prune 
the Roses 

The Gardeners of Central Lake 
County offer a program on "Pruning 
Roses and A Year in the Cook Park Rose 
Garden" on Monday, March 8. 

Don Ball in. former president of the 
American Rose Society and consulting 
rosarinn, will Instruct how and when to 
prune roses for healthier growth and 
better flower production. Mr. Balllrt has 
slides to help clarify his cxplanantions 
and he will take questions. 

Andy Plasz, also a consulting rosari- 
an, will then give a short slide presenta- 
tion on working In the Cook Park Rose 
Garden. 

Business meeting begins at 7:30 
p.m. and includes a member's discus- 
sion of gardening Information. So bring 
your problems and pointers to the 
forum at 7:30 and then enjoy the pro- 
grams which begin at 8 p.m. at the 
United Methodist Church, 429 Bralnerd 
Ave. in Libcrtyvillc. The public Is wel- 
come at no cost. For more information, 
call Susan at 816-8007. 

SPECIAL EVENTS" 

Lenten event 

The Council of Catholic Nurses of 
Lake County sponsors an annual Lenten | 



event on Saturday! Feb. 27. There will 
be a light breakfast, mass and a lun- 
cheon. Cost Is $25 for members, $30 for 
guests. The event will be held at 
Marytown, 1600 W. Park Avenue in 
Llbertyvllle. Reservations arc required, ' 
call 362-9586 or 623-9280. 

Purim Carnival 

Three suburban synagogues for the 
first time In many years will hold a joint 
Purim Carnival from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
on Sunday, Feb. 28, at Congregation Am 
Echod, 1500 Sunset Ave., Waukcgan. 

Participating with Am Echod arc Beth 
Hlllcl, Kenosha, and Beth Israel Sinnl, 
Racine. The entire community is invit- 
ed to celebrate the holiday of Purim. 

This joyous holiday recalls when 
Queen Esther of Persia, In about 500 
B.C.E., convinced her husband, King 
Ahasucrus, to save the Jewish people 
from a massacre being planned by 
Prime Minister Haman to kill them. 

The carnival. will feature games for 
children complete with prizes, singing, 
Jewish crafts, face painting and other 
activities. Food to be served will Include 
hamantaschen, hot dogs, cotton candy, 
chips and beverages. Hamantaschen is 
a Yiddish language word for a three cor- 
nered pastry filled with fruit. The shape 
originates from cither the hat Haman 
wore or the shape of his ears. 

Children arc urged to wear costumes 
to the carnival. Many of the children 
will dress as characters in the Esther 
story and a prize will be offered for the 
best costume. 

Noisemokers colled graggers will be 



RiVer&arging 

America^ Great Waterwaye! 



Travel the Cumberland River 

Tour Clarksville 

Visit An Antebellum home 

Explore Nashville 

■ America's Country Music Capital 




All Meals 

All shore excursions 
£j Fully escorted 



Departs July 5 

7 Full Days 

Free Pickup From Your Home\ 

$ 1 j 5 80 per Person Dbl 

For More Information Contact: 

North §tar Travel 

(347) 356-2000 Ext 200 



FOX LAKE THEATRE 




115 Lakeland Plaza 
Fox L3ke • 847/973-2800 




13 IE IE ID II <cir 

iriniE 



YOU COULD WIN A. 



the 

Contest is co-sponsored by 



Clip the ballot In this ad. 
For each category, check 
the box corresponding to 
the nominee you think will 
win. Deposit your entry In 
the box In the lobby of the 
Fox Lake Theatre, I IS 
Lakeland Plaza, Fox Lake. 

No purchases necessary. 
You must be 16 years or 
older. If your answers 
match the actual Academy 
Award winners, you will be 
entered In our drawing. 
Only one entry per per- 
son. per day, please. Up to 
ten winners, per theatre 
will receive a One Year 
Pass good at all Classic 
v Cinemas.;Winners will be 
notified by mall. Entry 
deadline Is March 20, 1 999. 



BEST PICTURE 

□ Elizabeth 

D Life Is Beautiful 

□ Saving Private Ryan 
Q Shakespeare In Love 
O The Thin Red Une 

BEST ACTOR 

□ Roberto Benlgnl, Ufe Is Beautiful 
Q Tom Hanks, Saving Private Ryan 

□ lan McKellen, Gods and Monsters 
D Nick tio\te t Affliction 

□ Edward Norton, American History X 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR 

□ James Coburn, Affliction 

□ Robert Duvall, A CM! Action 

□ Ed Harris, The Truman Show 

□ Geoffrey Rush, Shakespeare In Love 

□ Billy Bob Thornton, A Simp Jo Plan 

Name: ■ • 



BEST DIRECTOR 

□ Roberto Benlgnl, Life Is Beautiful 

□ Steven Spielberg, Saving Private Ryan 
Q John Madden, Shakespeare In Love 

□ Terrence Mallck, The Thin Red Line 

□ Peter Weir, The Truman Show 

BEST ACTRESS 

Q Gate Blanchett, Elizabeth 

□ Fernanda Montenegro, Centra/ Station 

□ Gwyneth Paltrow, Shakespeare In Love 
Q Meryl Streep, One True Thing 

□ Emily Watson, Hilary and Jackie 

BEST SUDDCRTINC ACTRESS 

□ Kathy Bates, Primary Colors 

□ Brenda Blethyn, Little Voice 

□ Judl Dench, Shakespeare In Love 

□ Rachel Griffiths, Hillary and Jackie 
Q Lynn Redgrave, Gods and Monsters 



Address: 
City: 1 



State: 



Zip: 



given to the children to be rung when- 
ever Hnman's name Is mentioned as a 
symbolic method or erasing Hnmon's 

name. 

Cost o'r the Purim Carnival Is $5 with 
no charge for children under the age of 
10 months. For more information call 
Am Echod at 847-336-9 1 10 or the local 
synagogues In Wisconsin. 

North Shore Home 
& Garden Show 

The 1999 North Shore Home & 
Garden Show will take place on 
Snturday & Sunday, Feb. 27 and 28. 



The 11th annunl home Improvement 
show features exhibits of products 
and services dealing with remodeling, 
decorating, landscaping and more. 

The show takes place at Deer Path 
School, 155 W. Decrpath Rd. In Lake 
Forest (1 /2 mile cast of Edens 
Hwy/41). Admission Is free to the 
public and a free shuttle and parking . 
arc available at Lake Forest's train 
station at historic Market Square. The 
show Is sponsored by Griffith, Grant 
& Lacktc Realtors and Better Homes 
and Gardens. For further information, 
call 234-0485 or 604-1718. 



Bowen Park Theatre Company 
performs "The Meeting" 



The Bowen Park Theatre 
Company will perform Jeff 
Stetson's play, The Meeting, 
directed by Debrah K. Neal at the 
Community Recreation Center, 
724 Genesee St. in Waukcgan on 
February 27 at 5pm. Admission 
is free and open to the public. 
This performance is supported 
byWaukegan Park District's 
Partners in Parks program and 
the Division of Cultural Arts. 

The play revolves around a fic- 
tional meeting between two of 
our most dynamic African- 
American leaders, Malcom X 
and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 
This meeting takes place in a 
hotel room in Harlem one week 
before the assassination of 
Malcolm X. The dialogue con- 



tained in this beautifully written 
piece depicts two men traveling 
on different roads, yet pursuing 
the same destination. This play 
will educate some and reiterate 
for others the significance of 
both views and its effects on the 
civil and equal rights move- 
ments. It is a poignant drama 
airing feelings on the past, pre- 
sent, as well as future struggles 
of African-American people in 
regard to their piece of the 
American pie. 

Bowen Park Theatre will pre- 
sent this exceptional play at the, . 
Community Recreation Center at 
724 Genesee St. in Waukegan on 
Sat., February 27 at 5pm. 
■ Admission is free; For more 
information, call 360-4740. 



WHERE MOVIE GOING IS FUN AND AFFORDABLE/ 



SPECIAL EVENTS 

CLC course covers financial 
strategies for retirement 

.Strategies for managing money and protecting assets, to provide 
a sound retirement will be covered in a four-week course offered 
by the College of Lake County. "Financial Strategies for Successful 
Retirement" (GSP 050-001, computer ID 1 130) will be held from 7- 
9:00 p.m. on Tuesdays, March 2 through 23 at the Technology 
Campus, 19525 Washington St. in Grayslake. 

The program is designed for retired individuals and couples, as 
well as those planning to retire in the next five to ten years. 
Subjects covered include how to generate a steady income, mini- 
mize taxes and make the best use of employee retirement plans. 
Students will learn about municipal bonds, tax-deferred annuities 
and mutual funds. Participants will prepare a personal financial 
plan in the class. No products or services will be promoted or 
offered at the seminar. 

The cost is $39, plus a $25 materials fee payable to the instruc- 
tor on the first night of class. For information, call 543-2022. To 
register by phone, dial 223-1 Ml. 

Become Part of "Living 

History" at the Bristol 

Renaissance Faire 

Travel back in time as a member of the Bristol Renaissance 
Faire community and relive the age of the English Renaissance 
when Queen Elizabeth Tudor reigned from 1558 to 1603. The 
Bristol Faire has performing and re-enactment opportunities for 
stage and street performers and in our Historical Guildes. 

Auditions are being held in Chicago on February 27 and March 
1 at The Theater Building. 

All performers auditioning for stage and street performer posi- ; 
tions must provide a current resume and photograph and must 
schedule an audition. Positions are available for both professional 
and apprentice performers. No walk-ins please. Primary casting 
areas include actors, dancers, jugglers, magicians and other variety 
artists. 

The Bristol Guildes are a hybrid of community theater and his- 
torical re-enactment groups and offer volunteer (unpaid) posi- 
tions. Guilde members have the opportunity to learn in depth 
about all aspects of Elizabethan England and how to bring that era 
to life at the Faire. Call to register, but, walk-ins will be accepted. 
Bring a current picture, no resume required. No monologue 
required unless you are auditioning for a specific historical charac- 
ter of the Elizabethan age. Wear comfortable clothing for improvi- 
sation and movement exercises. If you have specific interests such 
as costuming, music, needlework, dancing, scene playing, histori- 
cal interest, etc, bring samples to show if possible. Auditions will 
begin promptly and will last the entire allotted time period. 

Rehearsals and classes for all participants are held on week- 
ends beginning mid-May. The Bristol Renaissance Faire is open 
weekends from June 26 through August 22. 

Call Shawn Johnson at the Bristol Renaissance Faire at 385- 
7773, extension 221 for more information and to set up an audi- 
tion time. 










I 

■ 



February 26, 1999 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers / B5 







Exclusive, private schools are 
generally available to the 
wealthy and elite of the up- 
per class. But once in a 
while, a special student may distin- 
guish himself enough to receive a 
scholarship to enter such an es- 
teemed learning institution. This is - 
the case at the heart of "Rushmore,' 1 
the new off-beat comedy starring 
Bill Murray. 

"Rushmore" is a movie unlike 
any other I've seen in some time. 
Just when you think it Is a high- 
brow, "thinking man's" comedy, it 
introduces slapstick. Just when you 
think It's a slapstick film, you see : 
some bizarre subtle humor which 
again, catches you off guard. . 

Max Fischer (Jason Schwartz- 
man) Is a 15-year-old student at 
Rushmore, an exclusive private prep 
school, who is one of the school's 
worst students. 

Fischer Is ultra-active in extra- 
curricular activities. In fact, he is 
president and/or founder of nearly 
every club and group associated 
with the school, including chess 
team, German Club, French Club, 
Fencing team and the astrology so- 
ciety. Fischer's extra-curricular in- 
volvement has his academics in a 
rut, and the president of the school 
has put him on sudden-death acad- 
emic probation. 

Murray's character Herman 
Blume is a wealthy alumnus of 
Rushmore who built his fortune 



movie review 




Brendan O'Neill 



RUSHMORE 

Rated R 

Director 

Wes Anderson 

Starring 

Bill Murray 

Jason Schwartzman 

Olivia Williams 




himself, not through inheritance. Af- 
ter Blume gives an interesting 
speech to the students and faculty of 
Rushmore, Fischer seeks him out 
and befriends the'wealthy business- 
man. 

Blume seems amused by Fis- 



"Show. Boat" to open at the Fireside 



The Fireside, Inc., Wisconsin's 
premier dining and theatre experi- 
ence in Fort Atkinson, is proud to 
present the granddaddy of all Amer- 
ican Musicals • the musical classic 
by Jerome Kem and Oscar Ham- 
j mersteln II, Show [Boat. 

Set agdnst the granileiir of the 
South at the turn of the century, 
Show Boat takes you for a ride on 
the River Boat Cotton Blossom to 
follow Miss Magnolia Hawks from 
the Mississippi to Chicago and New 
York where she becomes a musical- 
comedy star. 

The production is Directed by Ed 
Flesch with Musical Direction by 
Paul Hamilton and Choreography 
by Paula Lynn. Starring as Magnolia 
Hawks and Gaylord Ravenal will be 
Kim Carkhuff and Christopher 
Lynn. Other featured roles include 
JeffWolf as Cap'n Andy, Kara Pow- 
ers as Parthy, Dan Nickerson as 
Frank, Rachel Smargiossi as Ellie, 
Mary Grace Gordon as Julie, Earl 



HazelJ, Jr. as Joe and Crystal Sims as 
Quecnie. 

The Fireside will-present nine 
shows weekly Wednesday, through 
Sunday, March 4 - March 16, with 
dinner served prior to each perfor- 
mance. The Fireside complex in- 
ciucles servera! gift shoppes with an 
extensive selection of unique mer- 
chandise including many popular 
collectible lines and is located on 
Business Hwy 26 on the south side 
of Fort Atkinson. 

For tickets or additional Infor- 
mation, call 1-800-477-9505, or 
write to The Fireside at P.O. Box 7, 
Fort Atkinson, WI 5353B, or check 
out their website at 
www.firesidetheatre.com 



|.^«lf »iB 



! CLA88ICli)CINEMA&8 



FOX LAKE M <S $ 3 

847-973-2800 Rcg . adult $c 
115 Lakeland Plaza after 5 pm «2 

Jvrulion fll Rte. 132 & Rollins Rd. Fox Lake 
nrn»n,.rt»t D ] | n aii auditoriums * DIGITAL 



ShowPlace8 

VERNON HILLS 

Milwaukee Ave-2nd Light S of <EB> 
$ 847/247-8958 ^& 



ALL SEATS s 2?° FRI & Sat 

s 1. 50 Sun thru Thurs 



Showtime* For fri. t 2/26 Thru Thun., 3/4 

*Sat.-Sun. Matinees in | Brackets | 
STAR TREK (PG) 

/[*l;50 *4:20]6:50 9: 1 5 DIGITAL 

PLEASANT VILLE (PG-I3) 
.[►I: IP *4:00] 7:00 9:50 DIGITAL 

IN DREAMS (R) 
[*l:40 *4;30] 7:40 1 0: 1 5 DIGITAL 

AT FIRST SIGHT (PG-I3) 

[» 1 :00 *3:50] 7:20 1 0:00 DIGITAL 

RUGRATS (G) 

[*l:45 *4:IS] 6:45 9:00 DIGITAL 

MIGHTY JOE YOUNG (PG) 

[*I:I5 +3:45] 7: 10 9:30 DIGITAL 

ENEMY OE THE STATE (R) 

r*l:3'p.*4:l0].7:30 I0:I0 DIGITAL 

WATFRBOY (PG-I3) 
[*l:20 *3:40] 7: 1 5 9:45 DIGITAL 

| vlilt our watrt* it www.tonnotwxom 



Free Holill on Popcorn fi Soil Dnntu,' 
l§*t*l DIGITAL SOUND f" 



SHOW/TIMES— FRIDAY, FEB. 26 
THRU THURSDAY, MAR. 4 

MY FAVORITE MARTIAN L p C] 

DIGITAL Fri 5:30 8:00 10:15 

.Sat 1 2:25 3:05 5:30 8:00 1 0: 1 5 

Sun/Mon/Wed 12:25 3:05 5:30 8:00 

Tue/Thur 5:30 8:00 

OCTOBER SKY* [PC] 

DIGITAL Fri 5:20 7:50 10:10 

Sat 12:20 2:50 5:20 7:50 10; 10 

Sun/Mon/Wcd 12:20 2:50 5:20 7:50 

I Tue/Thur 5:20 7:50 

MESSAGE IN A BOTTLE [Pa..,] 

Frl 5:05 7:40 10:10 

Sat 1 2:00 2:30 5:05 7:40 1 0: 1 

Sun/M on/Wed 12:00 2:30 5:05 7:40 

TueTThur 5:05 7:40 

BLAST FROM THE PAST trcm 

Frl 5:15 7:45 10:05 

Sat 12:10 2:40 5:15 7:45 10:05 

Sun/M on/Wed 12:10 2:40 5:15 7:45 

• Tue/Thur 5:15 7:45 

PAYBACK m 

Frl 5:30 7:55 10:15 

Sat 12:15 3:00 5:30 7:55 10:15 

Sun/Mon/Wed 12:15 3:00 5:30 7:55 

Tue/Thur 5:30 7:55 

■ No puMi or coupon* ' 

FREE REFILLS 

POPCORN & SOFT DRINKSI 

u* rhUiwi und* I admitted lo (Uottd movies ofta 6 PMJ 



WHERE M0UIE CQINC IS FUN AND' AFFORDABLE 



chcr's odd idiosyncrasies and takes 
him under his wing, even acting as . 
financial backer to Fischer's project 
to put an aquarium on the school's 
baseball field. 

The relationship between the 
two becomes strained as both fall in 
love with the first grade teacher, 
Miss Cross. The younger Fischer 
and the older Blume are vying for 
Cross' affections, and the struggle 
comes to a head when the two suit- 
ors go to great lengths to hurt the 
other, 

Fischer eventually'gets expelled 
because of the unauthorized aquar- 
ium, and Blume's life goes down hill 
as his wife sues him for divorce. 

The acting in "Rushmore" is 
very good all around, with Murray 
receiving the bulk of trie notoriety. 
But don't overlook Schwartzman's 
performance as Fisher. He could 
have easily been nominated for an 
academy award in this strange, 
brooding, bumbling role. 

The script is well written, and 
the plotllne is not the dull, ordinary, 
predictable dribble which has pop- 
ulated the theaters in recent 
months, but offers something dif- 
ferent and original for an audience 
searching for more than your aver- 
age comedy. 

Based the wide range of humor 
and very strong acting, I give "Rush- 
more" 31/2 out of five popcorn box- 
es. 



Arte 



id on a more somber note, 
movie critics everywhere, and 
movie goers everywhere, are 
mourning the death of Gene Siskel, 
the Chicago Tribune's expert movie 
critic, and co-star of the popular 
television show "Siskel & Ebert" 

Siskel was an outspoken, opin- 
ionated critic who was quick to 
point out when a film was terrible, 
as well as glad to extol the virtues of 
films which deserved his plaudits. 

We here at Lakeland will miss 
Siskel and his accurate, knowledge- 
able film analysis. 



£>\ General Cinema 

$) LAKEHURST 



[ROUTE 43 near ROUTE 120 

(8471 444-FILM »7 



■AftOAM MAT1HOS IVMY DAT 
All SHOWS MMM6PM 



SHOWTIMES FOR 2/26 THRU 3/4 



I BARGAIN MATINEES ALL SHOWS BEFORE 6PM 
INDICATES VIP TICKET RESTRICTIONS APPLY 



BLAST FROM THE PAST f^i3» 

Fa 430, W A 9:30 SaU Sun MO, 430, 7:00, 930 



MESSAGE W A BOTTLE PQ-13J 

Frl 420, 7:00. 9:45 Sat 1 Sua 1:45, 450, 7:00, 9:45 
Moa-Tta 4:20. 7:00 



MY FAVORITE MARTIAN (pcj 
Fri 530, 7:45, IfcOOSaUSw. 1:00, 3:15, 530, ' 
7:45, IfcOQ Mon-Thr. 530, 7:45 



A SIMPLE PLAN m 

Fri. 430, 7:10, 9:45 Sat & Sua 200, 430, 7:10, 9:45 
MotvThur. 430,7:10 • 



SHE'S ALL THAT tPO-«j 

Fri. 520, 730, 9:40 Sal. 4 Sun. 1:00, 3:10, 520, 730, 
9:40 MofL-Tlw. 520. 7:30_ . 



PRINCE OF EGYPT PC) 

Fri, Mon.-Thuf. 4:30 Sat &Sui 215, 4:30 



VARSITY BLUES m 

iFri-Sun. 430,930 Mai-M 430 , 



PATCH ADAMS (Po-t at 

Fri., Moa-Thut 7 JO SaL & Sun. 2^)0. 7.U0 



SAVING PRIVATE RYAN mi 

Fri. 430, fl.-00Sat-Sun.1fl0, 4:30,630 
Mofi-Thjr, 6:15 



PAYBACKS 

FA 530,6:45, 7:45, 9m H 

Mtt5346S.7; 




OFFICE SPACE w 

Fri 520, 730, 9:40, 11:40 Sat 150, 3:10, 520, 730, 
9.40, 11:40 Sui. 1:00.3:10, 520,739,9.40 
Moa.Hu520.739 



8MM (H) 

FA 430, 7;15. 1WQ Sat & Skn. 1:45, 439, 7:15, 1030 
MoivTiu 430, 7:15 : ■ . 



FACULTY (R) 

Fa 530,7:45, IMQSaL JSuiW 115, 530, 7:45, IDtOO 
Uoa-Thi. 530, 7:45 _ 



I ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW w Sat 11:30 



anjBai 




From left, Bill Murray as Her- 
man Blume and Jason 
Schwartzman as Max Fischer 
both give outstanding perfor- 
mances In "Rushmore." 



EGAL 



* mwj.h>t Mi 



TWO DAY 
ADVANCED 
' TICKETS 




HO CMtDKN HUM t KM HAW) MOVU 
WOWWUO AVMAMI « • - 



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BARGAIN MATINEES ALL SHOWS STARTING BEFORE 6PU 

CHARGE TICKETS BY PHONE (877) 66-HEGAL 



GURNEE 



1-04 1 Grand A«r. vv-n 
S47B5S-°940 




*8MM(R) (1:454:30)725 IftlSDwl 

JAWBREAKER (Ft) (12:45 300 5.15)7:35 10 05 Dtal 
THE FACULTY (R) ." (12:55 355)7:45 1&CK)l»o| 
OCTOBER SKY (PG) . (1 20 4:20) 7:10 10:05 Dial 
* OFFICE SPACE (P.) (t:00 3:15 5:20) 7:30 9:40 dwI 
MESSAGE IN A BOTTLE {PG-13) (1:15 4:10) 7:10950 DwI 
BLAST FROM THE PAST<Pfi-13) (1250 4:00} 73)9:40dmI 
MY FAVORfTE MARTUN (PG) (12J0 110 525) Z45 9iS DioJ 
SHAKESPEARE IN LOVE (R) (1:10 4.05) 6:55 9:45 owl 
THE THIN RED LINE (R) 6,00 920 owl 

PAYBACK^} (1:10 1:35 4:10 4:35) 7.05 750 935 10:15 DM J 
SHE'S ALLTHAT(PG-13) {(2:40 3:105:30) 750 10:10 D»l 
SAVING PRIVATE RYAN (R) ' (1:00 4:30) 8:00 Dtal 
VARSITY BLUES (R) (4:00) 9:15 Dial 

Stepmom (PG-13) ■'' (1:304:45) 7:40 1020oia| 
THE PRINCE OF EGYPT (PG) (12:40 3:05) Diol 

A BUG'S LIFE (G) ' (12:452:55 5:05) 7:20 9:30 djq| 
A aWL ACTION (PG-13) (125) 6:50 DM I 

THE RUGRATS MOVIE(G) |l:053:05 5:10) 7:15 10:10 Dio| 



♦No Passes * Ni 
DIG = WGllAl SOUHD STH = SIJRtO OOl = OOlflY SIIRIO 
Times Valid For Friday, February 26. Only O 1999 



SHO WT1MI5 FOB FtL 2/26 THRU THURS. 3/4 
■•'AVAttAlU*- 



"TEunaormG 

IMM(R)^ 
THEOTHaS1STBt(PG13) 

200 aRAMTTU (B) • 

oma spAcitR) • 

JAWHEAKH «)• 
0CfOU»SrCf(fG1 
'"5SASIMAlOTnEtK13) .' 

f f AVOtnt MAKIAN [K] 
|UAnnOWTWPUTtK13) 
iRUSHMOttlR) ' 

Patucxid^ 

ISHiS All THAT (PGI3) 

Isxi/WG ntmui jtan m 

ISNAKESMAMmOVH*) 

yuairr nuts m '■ 
tHf fAcutrr fi) 

iTOimCOTMATUPG) FRSSU 



140.420,700,940 
115.400,615.930 
105.315,520,745.1006 
105.305,505.725,925 
105.310.515.735,1000 
145.440.730.350 
135,410.645.920 
110.310,510.7.0,9.0 
• 110.320.533.740,960 
125. 325, 525,725, 925 
. 110,320,530.740,955 
105, 315, 525, 74ft SS5 
. 120.450,545 
100.3+0,710,950 
103,315.530,745 
1000 
TH 70S, 930 SAT 930 



«INaOFtGTPT(PG) Fn-SA4TU.TH155,43S 

ANAUrZfTHJSItj ; ADVANCED SHOWINQ SAT 70S 

OHM CAttJON rUSNTADON JVM : 37J 
PRINCE Of KYFT (PC) SU-MO 155.435 



GURNEE CINEMA ART 



GODS AND MONSTOS(NI) 

UttUIEAUTirUl|PGI3) 

AfROON(l) 



145.435,705,925 
130.400.653.915 

125,350,640.900 



KATHERINE HEPBURN FILM FEST 



SEEAaTHRFlFlA6VmHThtFESTTiaOITPORJUSTS10 
PHRADEtPHW STORY (FR & SA) 100, 400, 700. 930 
ADAM'S RIB ■ (SU& MO) 100.400,700.900 

FAT AND MIXt fTTJ ■ TTj 100, JQ0, 700, 930 



MOVIES AND TIMES START FEBRUARY 26, 1999 



• LAKE ZURICH (847) 550-0000 

755 S. Rond Rd, 6 



$«m seniors (ovEn en & ckudren 
A, W (t 1 ft UNO£KJ ADtfUS V JO AFTEII 6PM 

T «wmcoffWttg.t«jDP*aTicfwTH>tMJaq 



ANTIOCH (847)395-0216 
378 Lake St. Antioch 



i $ 



8MM: EIGHT MIUJMEfER m 

03*^1:05,3:45,6:25,9:05 

200 CiGARETTES m 

Daily 12:15, 2:35, 4:55, 7:15, 9:35 ' 

ANALYZE THIS m 

Sat 7:00 

0FHCE SPACE m 

Daily 12:20, 2:30, 4:40, 6:50, 9: 

OCTOBER SKY («) 

Daly 11:55, 2:15, 435, 655, 9:15 , 

THE OTHER SISTER <»-") 
Dafly12^a30,&20,9c10 

MESSAGE IN A BOTTLE («■«) 
PrL SurL-Trxis. rlsOO, 3545, 630; 
9:15 Sat 1>0p, 3*5, 9t15 \ 

RUSHMORE «, 

Dally 12:40, 2:45, 4:50, 6:55, 
9^0 

BUST FROM THE PAST (w 

Daily 11:50, 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:- 

MY FAVORITE MARTIAN (K) 

Daily 12:00, 2:10, 4:20, 6:30, 6:40 

PAYBACK (H) 

Daly 12:10, 230, 450, 7:10, 930 

SHAKESPEARE IN LOVE ffl) 

Daily 1:00, 3:35, 6:15, 8:50 

SHE'S ALL THAT ffwa) 

Daly 625, 830 

PRINCE OF EGYPT CO 
Dally 11:50, 2:00, 4:10 



/ &IHPEH1 



SO00 S9U0RS I0VEH BOJ. CHELOfieJ 
* J#WW « lun EH11)iALLSflOW3B£FORE6Py 

■ADUIJS AFTER 6PH 



MY FAVORfTE MARTIAN (PC) 

Fri. 6:45, 8:45; Sat 2:15, 4:30, 

6:45, 8:45; Sun. 2:15, 4:30, 7:00; 

Mon. - Thurs. 7:00 



LIBERTY (847)362-3011 
708 N. Milwaukee Ave.. Liberlyville 



20Q SetWRSIOVERaaiCHURBi 
(UHDEH 11) I ALL SKW3 BEFORE VM 
kW ADULTS AFTEH 6PM 

YOU'VE GOT MAIL (PG) 

Fri. 6:30, 9:00; Sat 6:30, 9:00; 
Sun. 7:15; Mon. - Thurs. 7:15 

A BUG'S LIFE (G) 

Sat & Sun. 2:00, 4:15 

PATCH ADAMS (PC-13) 

Fri. 6:15, 8:45; Sat 1:45, 4:00, 

6:15, 8:45 Sun. 1:45, 4:00, 7:00 

' Mon. - Thurs. 7:00 



rfi 9 Mchenry 1 & 2 (815) 385-0144 

1204 N. Green St. 



SEM0AS kWEB erj» A CHUWEM 

(II lUNOEHJADUlTSSMO AFTER 6PM 



»J90 

PRINCE OF EGYPT (N) 

Sat & Sun. 2:15, 4:30 

A SIMPLE PLAN w 

Fri. 6:30, 9:00; Sat 6:30, 9:00; 
Sun, 7:00; Mon. - Thurs. 7:00 

MIGHTY JOE YOUNG in) 

Sat & Sun. 1:45, 4:00 

A CIVIL ACTION (n-ii) 

Fri. 6:15, 8:45 

Sat. 6:15, 6:45; Sun. 7:1 S; 

Mon. - Thura. 7:15 









HI«MMIIIMMM(M«l(UlttMUt«t)«HMtltMI(MIIII 




■ * ^.--^..■n^*»*-*">t*<*J^f ■■ » *»'^fc ■-. -'.~_Tt 






. 



B6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



'Perfect Wedding' a blissful comedy 



DruryLane 

ion runs 




through March 7 



First of all, best-laid plans 
notwithstanding, there's no such 
thing as a "perfect wedding." 

But Robin Hawdon's "Perfect 
Wedding," as presented at Drury 
Lane Theatre in Evergreen Park, is a . 
nearly perfect British Farce. It has 
all the right elements, from multiple 
doors to allow for quick entries and 
exits and daffy characters with a 
penchant for digging themselves 
deeper and deeper into the quag- 
mire of a plot founded on improba- 
ble tall tales. 

The action takes place in a con- 
ventional setting for this kind of dra- 
ma: the honeymoon suite of a small 
hotel. It's the day of the wedding, and 
the would-be groom, still groggy from 
a late-night bachelor party, awakes to 



find himself in bed in the honeymoon 
suite-with a strange women. The best 
man arrives to inform him that die 
bride-to-be Is en route. 

Things become complicated as 
identities are quickly switched to 
avert a scandal. The mystery 
women (in reality, a friend of the 
best man) must assume the identity 
of the chamber maid while the real 
maid is passed off as the best man's 
new girl friend. 

And that's just for starters. 

Under the direction of David 
Mink, Chris Petschler and Dan nod- 
den get high marks for their zany, 
laugh-a-minute performances and 
perfect timing. So do Julie Gancy, 
Charma Bonanno and lindley 
Traynor. Veteran actress Paula 
Scrofano fares well in a minor role 
as mother of the bride. 

"Perfect Wedding" is funny stuff 
indeed. Information on dinner 
show reservations is available at 
708/422-0404. Performances are 
through March 7 By Tom Whom 



Those at odds with each other in Robin Hawdon's comedy Per- 
fect Wedding, directed by David Mink. From left to right Paula 
Scrofano, Julie Ganey, Undley Curry Traynor, Daniel Allar and 
Dan Rodden. 



?^m&«s3mr=E22==z2> 



Saturday & Sunday March 

10 am until 4 pm 

gg^g^HoIiday Inn in Mundelei 
■*i*Jb (Routes S3 and 




t anu^casing great ideas in: 

• home repair and remodeling * landscaping • decks and room additions 



atingana -air conditioning • decorating • pools and spas • kitchen cabinets 



_ ww . ,„~~ --,--. and floor covering 
r y .»*• helpful seminars-Sunday only 




Phone 680-07 SO for more details 



Sponsored by: 




Newspapers 




.NEWS 1220 

WKRS 

Tl,c;-«; commVrclif?r"cc^uX. I \ THE TALK OF LAKE COUNTY 



„. hoi! i 

m *tjMawaysl 
_ fait tie 
foster Bum 




February 26, 1999 




Everything's 
coming up 



roses 




Classes on how to grow roses 
will be sponsored by the Gardeners 
of Central Lake County in March. 
The instructors are area rose gar- 
deners who are consulting rosarians 
and experienced horticulturists with 
teaching experience. The classes in- 
clude preparation of beds, planting, 
winter protection, fertilization, dis- 
eases, classification and how to buy 
roses with an optional class on ex- 
hibiting roses. Informational hand- 
outs will be provided. 

Classes will be on the following 
Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m.: March 3, 
March 10, and March 17. One mon- 
day class will be held on Monday, 
March 8 at 8 p.m. Each class will last . 
one hour with plenty of time for 
questions afterwards. All sessions 
will be held at the United Methodist 
Church, 429 Brainerd Ave., Liber- 
tyville. 

Field lessons in Cook Park In 
Libertyville will be held on the first 
two Saturday mornings in April and 
on selected Wednesday evenings 
throughout the summer. 

The fee is $30 per person for the,,, 
scries and is fully refundable with 
the completion of 5 guided field 
lessons in Cook Parte Registration is 
limited to the first twenty people. 
For more information or to register 
for classes, call Gee Gunawardana at 
918-8671 or Jerry Cleland at 566- 
6409. 



FROM PAGE Bl 
CIRCLE: 

Native Americans 
celebrate culture 



Circle of Life, so they have to learn 
to live together and get along," 
Musqua said. 

The Circle of Life revolves 
around the basic teachings of love, 
respect, understanding and sharing 
between others and amongst one- 
self. 

"It teaches us peace, respect, 
understanding and knowledge," he 
said. "These are teachings the chil- . 
dren give to us." 

The person responsible for 
bringing Musqua to Lake County is 
Carol Kiraly of Pistakee Highlands, a 
yoga instructor, a certified alcohol 
and drug counselor, a national certi- 
fied massage therapist and a pas- 
toral and individual counselor. 

"I work with the concept of the 
medicine wheel, addressing the 
heart, mind, body and soul," Kiraly 
said. 

Of Musqua, Kiraly said, "He is a 
friend of mine and also one of my 
teachers." 

Musqua is the second NaUve 
American elder Kiraly has invited to 
speak with others. Last year, Black- 
wolf of the Lac Courte Oreilles 
Reservation in Wisconsin gave two 
one-day presentations. 

Kiraly was excited to have 
Musqua bring his teachings to this 
area. "He is the spiritual advisor to 
the chiefs," she said, "He is a very 
dedicated human being,* commit- 
ting his life to helping people. 

"He Is very knowledgeable in 
culture, tradition, language, songs, 
ceremony and healing," she said. 

Based on the response of 
Musqua's programs, future ones 
maybe held. "If we have an interest, 
he is willing to continue offering 
workshops in this area," she said. 
Pre-registration is required to 
attend the "Walk In Balance" pro- 
grams, at a cost of $40 persession. 
For information and registration, 
call Carol Kiraly at 497-4704. 



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U. M 



B7 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



February 26, 1999 



Growing plants with great scents 



Fragrance has a way of lifting 
our spirits and evoking 
pleasant memories. Every- 
time spring comes and the 
lilacs are blooming, they remind me 
of my childhood, and picking lilacs 
from grandma's lilac tree. They also 
remind me of when my oldest was a 
young boy and would surprise me 
by bringing me a bunch of lilacs 
home for a special bouquet. Those 
were the days. 

We tend to think of flowers, 
when we think of scent, yet many 
garden plants have great smelling 
leaves. Many herbs such as lemon 
verbena rival the scent of a lovely 
flower. Oftentimes though, leaf fra- 
grance must be discovered, by rub- 
bing or crushing the leaves to re- 
lease the scent, as with mint or 
rosemary, herbs that will lend 
scent to the garden are chamomile, 
lavender, mints scented gerani- 
ums, rosemary and thyme. 

In a single gardening season 
you can work aroma into your gar- 
dening scheme by planting fast- - 
growing annuals and perennials. 
Here are some great smelling flow- 
ers to grow. Chocolate cosmos, a 
perennial with brownish-red flow- 
ers. Some people say that it smells 
like chocolate and others vanill a. 





GARDEN 
JOURNAL 

LydiaHuff 



Pinks (Dlanthus) There are sev- 
eral varieties of pinks, they all are 
very fragrant, including cheddor 
pink, cottage pink, maiden pink, 
and tiny rubies. 

Carnations (Dlanthus 
caryophyllus) Perennial, usually 
grown as an annual. Chose bushy 
border types, rather than the florist 
variety. Fragrance in shades of 
crimson, rose, pink and white is a 
good choice. 

Sweet Peas (Lathyrus odoratus) 
The old-fashioned varieties are the 
most fragrant by far. Look for Old 
Spice and Painted Lady, another 
truly fragrant one is Mammoth Mix. 

Stock (Mathiola Incana) Spice 
sweet flowers cluster along erect 
stems, which are from one to three 
feet tail, depending on variety. They 
come in shades of pink, rose purple, 
yellow, and white and are great for 
cutting. 



Sweet Violet (Viola odorata) A 
perennial, long cherished for its 
sweet oils, which were extracted for 
perfumes. It has dark green, heart 
shaped leaves and depending on 
the varietry grows from two to 12 
inches. The flowers come in shades 
of deep violet, bluish pink, and 
white. 

Other flowers that are usually 
planted for scent yet are delightfully 
fragrant are the peony Myrtle 
Gentry with a tea rose scent. 
Daylillies which are highly 
scented are the lemon daylily, 
Fragrant Light, Hyperion, Ida 
Jane and Cltrina. Many early 
tulips are fragrant such as Bel- 
lona a butter-yellow. variety and 
General DeWet, a golden orange 
type. The multi-flowered Tullpa 
sylvestris has a pleasant, sweet 
fragrance; with yellow blossoms 
with a hint of green on the outer 
petals. 

I hope these ideas will add 
some fragrance to your life, enjoy. 

Until next time, peace. 

Garden questions may be sent to 
Garden Journal, do Lakeland 
Newspapers, 30 S.Whitney St, 
Grayslake.lL 60030. 




' ' * j ■ ...*.'-.'■>* 



i<-''i 



The Jazmer Ensemble will 
perform a wide-ranging program 
of Jewish, Klezmer, and Israeli 
vocal and instrumental music 
Saturday evening at the David 
Adler Cultural Center in Llber- 
tyvllle. Four members of the 
group, Shirlee Todd on vocals, 
Donald Jacobs on clarinet and . 
saxophone, Ruby Harrison violin 
and mandolin, and Sasha 
Brusin, guitarist, will play tradi- 
tional Yiddish folk music from 
Europe. 

Old instrumental dance 
pieces first performed by 
Klezmer master larinetist Naftlle 
Brand wine will also be played, as 
well as songs of Molly Picon, 
songs In Ladino, holiday songs 
of Purim and Passover, songs of 
hope written after the Holo- 
caust, and a Yiddish song that 
will warm the hearts of baseball 
fans everywhere. 

The Jazmer Ensemble was 
founded in 1995 by Shirlee Todd 
and Donald Jacobs, who had 
previously performed Jewish 
music together for many years. 
Shirlee has a large vocal reper- 



semble 
Feb. 27 



tolre of Yiddish, Hebrew and • 
Ladino songs. Don plays Balkan 
and jazz in addition to his 
Klezmer music. Violinist/man- 
dollnist Ruby Harris is a well- 
known performer in Blues and 
Jewish music in Chicago/New 
York and Israel. Guitarist Sasha 
Brusin has played with jazmer 
for two and a half years. He is 
known for his jazz and contem- 
porary performances, and Is also 
a devoted guitar teacher. 

Jazmer will provide historic 
backgrounds and persjpectives 
on the songs. This very special 
music will be performed on 
acoustic instruments without 
amplifiers. The intimate ball- 
room of the David Adler Cultural 
Center is a room made to listen 
to live music In. ..' 

The David Adler Cultural 
Center is located at 1700 N. Mil- 
waukee Ave. in Libertyville. Tick- 
ets are $10, $8 for seniors, 1/2 
price for children, and may be 
purchased in advance or at the 
door. Seating Is limited. 

For more information, please 
call Brett Neiman at 367-0707. 




MART 






*4 PAYMENT 
JBT INTEREST 



FURNITURE - APPLIANCE - BEDDING * Till MAY * S 



OPEN 7 DAYS 

MON 10AM-8PM 
* TUE 10AM-8PM 
WED 10AM-8PM 
THUR 10AM-8PM 
FRI 10AM-8PM 
10AM-5PM 
SUN 11AM-4PM 




LAKE VILLA 265-0655 










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FREEZERS FREEZERS DISHWASHERS 



IFIUGIDA1RE 



5 CUBIC *199" 

7 cubic 5 249 





IFRIGIDAIREL 







SLEEP BETTER TONIGHT 




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GREAT*.. 
RECLINER 

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B8 I Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 



February 26, 1999 



February 26, 199$ 



HOT SPOTS 



■■ihihi 




Lakeland Newspapers/ B9 



,■ . V 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Holiday Inn Mundelein 




Location: 

Peppercorns Grille and Maxwell's Club in 

Holiday Inn Mundelein at Routes 60 and 45. 







New restaurant and lounge at new Holiday Inn 




Hours: 

Peppercorns Grille-daily from 6:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. 
Maxwell's Club Sunday through Friday until 
midnight, and Saturdays from 4 p.m. until 1 a.m. 



.O. 



To go along with the bright and beautiful new look of Buffet, both buffets are $8.95. Fridays is Lake Perch, Fish Fry 

the Holiday Inn Mundelein, its new Business Center, and its Buffet, a value of $7.95. Make your reservations early for both 

new professional and experienced ownership/management the scrumptious Easter and Mother's Day Brunch Buffet 
team, are the hotel's new restaurant and lounge, The new Peppercorn's Grille Restaurant regularly offers a 

Peppercorn's Grille and Maxwell's Lounge. long cuisine list, a grilled to order breakfast, ana a variety of 



hors d'oeuvres and drink specials. Watch all your favorite 
sporting events on their large screen TV and surrounding TVs. 
Maxwell's is open from 4 p.m. to midnight daily and from 4 
p.m. to 1a.m. on Saturdays. 

The 180-room hotel, with its $4.5 million renovation, 



Menu: 

Fine casual dinmg-a wide cuisine variety 

featuring Prime Rib Buffet. 






In a dramatic change from the restaurant, formerly located . daily lunch and dinner specials. Its location, just off the hotel's inside and out, now featuring 2,000 square feet conference 



in the Holiday Inn Mundelein at Routes 60 and 45, the full main lobby, is designed for the convenience of Holiday Inn 

service Peppercorn's Grille welcomes guests to experience guests as well as those living in the surrounding area, 
fine,' yet casual dining, in lush Victorian ambiance. The new Peppercorn's Grille Restaurant is open daily, ■ 

The Holiday Inn's award-winning new chef has designed serving breakfast from 6:30 to 1 1 a.m.; lunch from 1 1 :30 a.m. 

a Peppercorn's menu that is filled with gourmet delights. Look to 2 p.m., and dinner from 5:30 to 1 p.m. 
for Peppercorn's AIl-You-Can-Eat-Rib-Buffet on Mondays and The new Maxwell's Club, serving cocktails and a light 

Fridays, and on Tuesdays and Thursdays, Chicken and Pasta menu, is adjacent to the restaurant. It features complimentary 



center with its own separate entrance, total banquet space 
of 1 3,000 square feet, has become the area's largest func- 
tion and catering facility for both business and social 
events. The hotel also features three Jacuzzi Suites and 10 
Business Class rooms. For reservations and more information, 
call (B47) 949-5100 or fax (847) 949-01 1 7. 



JOIN US! 



List your favorite HOT SPOTS restaurant for our 
(monthly drawing to win a $ 25 gift certificate. 





Mail to: Lakeland Newspapers 
. Box 268 •Grayslake, IL 60030 







MONDAY 

$1.00 Domestic Beers 

TUESDAY 

\ Taco Ntght • $3.00 All-U-Can-Eat 

THURSDAY 

50C Drafts 



BAR& 
GRILL 



Open Moti-Thurs. Mom-Midnight; 
Fri, & Sot. I lam-hm; Sunday 8amMdnighl 



LENT FRIDAY 

ALL-U-CAN -EAT SPECIALS 

Fish Fry $5.95 

Crab Legs SI 6.95 

PINNER SPECIALS 

Cod $8.95 

Shrimp Scampi $9.95 





I 



£"reshest of ingredients 
just for you when ordered ^ 

Sit aridrelax in our din^ areia^Enjoy a^cxickMiJ^^^b^k^t^ 
< chips a^salsa^hp^Su waittforms to biSou yojtu^eaj,^ 



Food & Drink 



KITCHEN OPEN fl». & SAT. TIL MIDNIGHT 
18490 W. Old Gages Lake Rd, Cages Lake 

(847) 223-2575 



JOIN US FRIDAY 

Walleye Fish Fry » $ 8 % 
All-U-Can-Eat Cod • $6.93 

JOIN US SATURDAY 

Prime Rib 

A la Carte 10 oz.: $9.95 Enbee 10 oz.: $11.97 
A la Carte 14 oz.: $11.97 Entree 14 oz.: $13.94 

OPEN FOR BREAKFAST 
9 am Saturday & Sunday 



ALL 




s 




t 



Chirruchanga, Enchiladas, Bijita Platter & Taco Platter. 
All dinners include lettuc e, tom atoes, rice, beans, guacamole, , 
sour cream plus a COMFLTMENTAKY MARGARTTA 

Please mention this coupon when ordering. Expires 3-1-99, 

-^i Linden Plaza i. 



Free Chips & Salsa 
&22*&andAve. 'SEl l with every o rder 

PK&265-1411 






SATURDAY 

AH- U -Can-Eat 
Prime Rtb $12.95 



26375 W. Rt 173, Antioch, IL 

847-395-1707 

2 1/2 Miles West of Rt. 59 Soup s. appetites Ewy .jvjgtu 



SUNDAY 

847-395 - 1707 Breakfast Buffet a $3.99 




Dining on the Lake 



GALE STREET INN 

On Diamond Lake 

A Reputallon for Fine Kood, Spirits and llispllutlty on Beuuliful 

DIAMOND LAKE, MUNDELEIN 

A Casual, Country Atmosphere Specializing in 



since 1963 

A GALE STREET TRADITION 

LUNCH AND DINNER 

PARTY AND BANQUET FACILITIES (30 - 160) 

Show Lounge Dancing Featuring 

PETER GUERIN 

Elvis Impersonator 
Friday and Saturday 



906 Diamond Lake Rd., Mundelein 566-1090 



m 



ij.5226 





iIl»i!U«UKTOe^K!S^IieWU»eHa^iKc5iiaSiIl 



All-U-Can-Eat Sp& 



•'- ^iiCiflia 



Wednesidays^t3O?9:30| 
Creates i\?brav<>wft 



31 



&rFZTWlrtJ 






r w 



Fridays 4 :30-< 

FishFky 

Cod-Catfish-Lake P^rch? 






Full line Of Beer 'Wines •Cocktails •Liqueurs •Cordials 

Closed Tuesdays, New Sunday Kitchen Hours: 2pm - 6pm 
899 Main St • Antioch • 847-395-3373 

Additional parking in rear 



;»ui 



in^i 



Vllltf, 




Chinese Restaurant 



The Best Chinese Food 

In The Area... 

And Our Customers 

Are The Critics 



FREE Delivery 
Call for details 



Plenty of Free Parking 



• Dine In • Cany Out • Cocktails 

The Chinese Restaurant That Everybody's Talking About 

Conveniently Located Across -From Fairgrounds 
111 S. Hwy. 45 Grayslake 

(847) 548-8882 Fax: (847) 548-2822 





NACO 



Fine Foods - Cocktails 

2816 Rt. 120 • McHenrV, II 60050 

(815) 385-5278 




» »»»n« » «t » » i «m««« » «m««» » tM » »t«i»»««tm«« » «»t» i»m»n »n 




Saturday Night 

16 oz. Steak Dinner S 11 9S 



Home of McHenry's 



. 



Dinner Special every Sunday night 
accompanied with music by 

Jim 



; .-. . 






10:30am - 2:00pm 

Carving Station with Pee! and Eat Shrimp 



Also including,... Sausage Links and 

Carved Breast of Turkey Hickory Smoked Bacon 

Lox Platter with Eggs Benedict 

Cream Cheese Cheese'Blintzes with 

Cheese and Bagels Assorted Fruit Toppings 
Eggs Cooked to Order 



'eppezcopts 
title 



S14J9 for Adults • SI t M Senior Citizens Over 55 ' 

for Children. 12 years oj age and uruler 

for'Chi\dren Under 5 Years of Age 
'Of Eqilal or Lesser Value 

M uj I present coupon 




Chicken Selection 

Pasta of the Day „_« .. ;'..;'.■/. .. 
Fish of the Day ™ ™ *WWf °™*r 
Extra Thick French Toast tlftiM* M IttZBf 

Pancakes ^rfirtftttl^l^ 

DELE 



Belgian Waffles 



NEED A CHANGE OF FACE? 

Give Our Mexican Cuisine A Taste 



MAIN STREET STATION 

nGantina y Restaurante 

Located In the Old cecriw Train Depot 
4005 W. Main Street ■• McHenry, IL 

585-41 10 

•.Delicious Appetizers 

• DrinK Specials All Week 

• t Lunch & Dinner Specials Mon.-Fri. 




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FREE M AEG ARM J 

w/purchase of adult entree 
THURSDAY NIGHTS 

(limit 2 mxrgaritns per table) 

Expires 2/28/99 







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B8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 



February 26, 1999 



February 26, 1999 



HOT SPOTS 




Lakeland Newspapers/ B9 



ADVERTISEMENT 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Location: 

Peppercorns Grille and Maxwell's Club in 

Holiday Inn Mundelein at Routes 60 and 45. 

Telephone: 
{847)949-5100 

Hours: 

Peppercorns Grille-daily from 6:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. 
Maxwell's Club Sunday through Friday until 
midnight, and Saturdays from 4 p.m. until 1 a.m. 

Menu: 

Fine casual dining-a wide cuisine variety 

featuring Prime Rib Buffet. 



Holiday Inn Mundelein 

i i* 






restaurant and lounge at new Holiday Inn 



y 



To go along with the bright and beautiful new look of Buffet, both buffets are $8.95. Fridays is Lake Perch, Fish Fry hors d'oeuvres and drink specials. Watch all your favorite 
the Holiday Inn Mundelein, its new Business Center, and its Buffet, a value of $7.95. Make your reservations early for both sporting events on their large screen TV and surrounding TVs. 
new professional and experienced ownership/management the scrumptious Easter and Mother's Day Brunch Buffet. Maxwell's is open from 4 p.m. to midnight daily and from 4 

team, are the hotel's new restaurant and lounge, The new Peppercorn's Grille Restaurant regularly offers a p.m. to 1 a.m. on Saturdays. 

.1, 



Peppercorn's Grille and Maxwell's Lounge. 



long cuisine list, a grilled to order breakfast, and a variety of 



The 1 80-room hotel, with its $4.5 million renovation, 



In a dramatic change from the restaurant, formerly located daily lunch and dinner specials. Its location, just off the hotel's', inside and out, now featuring 2,000 square feet conference 
In the Holiday Inn Mundelein at Routes 60 and 45, the full main lobby, is designed for the convenience of Holiday Inn - center with its own separate entrance, total banquet space 



service Peppercorn's Grille welcomes guests to experience guests as well as those living in (he surrounding area. 



of 1 3,000 square feet, has become trie area's largest funo 



fine,' yet casual dining, In lush Victorian ambiance. The new Peppercorn's Grille Restaurant is open daily, ' . tion and catering facility for both business and social 

The Holiday Inn's award-winning new. chef has designed serving breakfast from 6:30 to 1 1 a.m.; lunch from 1 1:30 a.m. events. The hotel also features three Jacuzzi Suites and 10.,, 

a Peppercorn's menu that is filled with gourmet delights. Look to 2 p.m., and dinner from 5:30 to 1 p.m, Business Class rooms. For reservations and more information, 

for Peppercorn's Al I-You-Ca n - Ea t-Rib-B uffet on Mondays and The new Maxwell's Club, serving cocktails and a light call (847) 949-51 00 or fax (847) 949-01 1 7. 

Fridays, and on Tuesdays and Thursdays, Chicken and Pasta menu, is adjacent to the restaurant. It features complimentary 



— — 



,■ 



SList your favorite HOT SPOTS restaurant for our 



m-r. . 

monthly drawing to win a $ 25 gift certificate. 







Mail [to: Lakeland Newspapers 
RO. Box 268 • Gray slake, IL 60030 





JUSTUKEHOMEipEa 

Preparw^ily%wn^cralch 
- -Freshest of ingredients 

t •Made just for you when ordered 

Sit aricVielax in our dining are^njoy a cbdrtailSwthSf baskeror 
/chips and'salsa^hMypu waitforais to brihgwou your meaJL^ 

Tall dinners just s 6 95 < 




JOIN U/f 



JOIN US FRIDAY 





Food & Drink 



i game room open Walleye Fish Fry • $ 8 96 
NDZI0LKA I AU-U-Can-Eat Cod • (6.93 

JOIN US SATURDAY 

Prime Rib 

A la Carte lOoz.: $9.95 Entree 10 oz.: $11.97 
A la Carte 14 oz.: $11.97 Entree 14 oz.: $13.94 

OPEN FOR BREAKFAST 
9 am Saturday & Sunday 



life':''''-- 

fggp:, KIWHEH OPEN ffl/. & SAL 771 MIDNIGHT 



18490 W. Old Cages Lake Rd, Gages Lake 

(847) 223-2575 



Chimichanga, Enchiladas, ffijita Platter & Taco Platter. 

All dinners include lettuc e, lonj atoes, rice, beans, guacamole, 

sour cream pliis a COMFCIMENTAKY MARGARITA 



Please mention this coupon when ordering. Expires 3-1-99. ■ >, 

J$Sb j m ^ >s- Free Chips & Salsa \w 



flGinden Plaza' "Jjjjj tr %^ hi P 
^izferandAve. gE\ with every order 



Wri: 



rs: y 






utm 




MONDAY 

$1.00 Domestic Beers 

TUESDAY 

Taco Night • $3.00 All-U-Can-Eat 

THURSDAY 

50c Drafts 



LENT FRIDAY 

ALL-U-CAN-EAT SPECIALS 

Fish Fry $5.95 

Crab Legs $16.95 

DINNER SPECIALS 

Cod $8.95 

Shrimp Scampi $9.95 



Open Mor\.-Thutz Uom-Midnight; 
Fri.&Sat llam-3om; Sunday 8amMidnigt\l 



SATURDAY 

All-U-Can-Eat 
Prime Rib $12.95 



I 



26375 W. Rt. 173, Antioch, IL 

847-395-1707 

21/2 Miles West of Rt. 59 Soup. <C OppeiVzeiu. £wty. MgM 



SUNDAY 

847-395"1707 Breakfast Bufre°$3.99 




Dining on the Lake 



GALE STREET INN 

On Diamond Lake 

A Repulallon for Fine Food, Sptrils and Hospitality on Beautiful 
DIAMOND LAKE, MUNDELEIN 

A Casual, Country Atmosphen; Specialising In 



since 1963 

A GALE STREET TRADITION 

LUNCH AND DINNER 

PARTY AND BANQUET FACILITIES (30 - 160) 

Show Lounge Dancing Featuring 

PETER GUERIN 

Elvis Impersonator 
Friday and Saturday 



906 Diamond Lake Rd., Mundelein 566-1090 



stiriderihufst 
,. Ph$265~1411 ' -;>., SurUThu%10:30-8r30$ 
*^rT^2^gw5226. ^ M&&, SaKUO:30-10:00?i, 




^j^!ijaiai^«5«^ttsaiwiBU&^^ 





AU-U-Can-Eat ' 

Wednesdays^SO^ 

Create Ttoi^Oroi* 

■ m^mmm 

"Frida^4:30-?:3p : 
Cod-Catfish-Eike Perci 






1 

Full Line Of Beer 'Wines •Cocktails •Liqueurs 'Cordials • 

Closed Tuesdays, New Sunday Kitchen Hours: 2pm - 6pm I 

899 Main St • Antioch • 847-395-3373 

Additional parking in rear 



.■i'"i 



mm 



ii»n*i 




Chinese Restaurant 



The Best Chinese Food 

In The Area... 

And Our Customers 

Are The Critics 



FREE Delivery 

Call for details 



Plenty of Free Parking 



• Dine In • • Cany Out • Cocktails 
The Chinese Restaurant That Everybody's Talking About 

Conveniently Located Across-Front Fairgrounds 
111 S. Hwy. 45 Grayslake 

(847) 548-8882 Fax: (847) 548-2822 



MONACO' 

Fine Foods - Cocktails 
2816 Rt 120 • McHenry, II 60050 ; 

(815) 385-5278 





Saturday Night 

16 oz. Steak Dinner s 1 1 9S 



Home of McHenry -s 



Dinner Special every Sunday night 
accompanied with music by 






^timcA 




10:30am - 2:00pm 

Carving Station with Peel and Eat Shrimp 



Also including.,, Sausage Linb and 

Carved Breast of Turkey Hickot y $mM Bacon 

Lox Platter with Bggs Benedict 

Cream Cheese CheeseBHntzeswith 

Cheese and Bagels Assorted Fruit Toppings 
Eggs Cooked to Order 



$14£5 for Adults • $11 M Senior Citizens Over 55' 
for Children .12 years of age and, under 
for' Children Under 5 Yean of Age 

•Of Equal or Lesser Value 

Must present coupon • 



'efrpezcopw 



Chicken Selection 

Pasta of the Day ^ .. •-* immtk 
Fish of the Day ™* !■" ^fW ™^ 
Extra Thick French Toast MptiktM tk dtUBB§ 

Pancakes |^tf MitWlSj 

&MsMmWm MUNDELE 



Belgian Waffles 



NEED A CHANGE OF PACE? 

Give Our Mexican Cuisine A Taste 



MAIN STREET STATION 

r\ Gantina y Restaurants 

Located In the Old C6CIHW Train Depot 
4005.W. Main Street • • McHenry, IL 

383-41 10 ^Ifffik. 
. Delicious Appetizers TaBOr 

• Drink Specials All Week ."P^ 

• •Lunch &t Dinner Specials Mon.-Fri. 




CM^ 






^S* c js! 






\\ 




with your favorite friends and your fomifte 
mourh^e^ 



C^^-^^ri^ira^/li; \ ^510 E; Routers^;* Reservations r&commehded (847) 949^5100^ 



FREE MARGARITA 

w/purchase of adult entree 
THURSDAY NIGHTS 

(limit Zmargaritas per table) 

Expires 2/28/99 







-*-*>.■—+-*■ .^+ -■ - f |- j } 




<t * 



^.f,-.,, 



B 1 /Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 



February 26, 1999 



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1 



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3 

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Last Forever And 







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The Same Time! 



THE WILLIAM E. BROOK 
WINTER RECREATION PROJECT 

A PART OF THE 

William E. Brook Memorial 

Wetland Sanctuary and Entertainment Center 




In April of 1996 the Village of 
Antioch announced plans for a special 
project located east of Skidmore Drive. 
The purpose of the project is to 
enhance 3.25 acres of wetland on a 
6-acre site along Sequoit Creek to pro- 
mote increased wildlife habitat and 
provide educational benefits for the 
residents, tourists and students. This 
project includes the creation of two 
ponds, planting of wetland vegetation, 
creation of a commemorative brick 
path entrance including berms, plant- 
ing trees and wild flowers, construc- 
tion of walking paths and board walks 
through the wetlands, educational stan- 
dards, nesting areas for water fowl and 
a building to be used as an educational 
and entertainment center. 



This special project has since grown 
into the William E. Brook Memorial 
Wetland Sanctuary and Entertainment 
Center. The purpose of the memorial 
is to honor the life and the legacy of 
our remarkable citizen, William E. 
Brook. His love of, and respect for 
nature continue to inspire us. 

The goal is to accomplish this entire 
project through private donations, 
in-kind donations, volunteer help and 
grants. The sale of commemorative 
bricks for the entrance will help raise 
money for the overall project. Your 
brick(s) can become a permanent part 
of this spectacular project. 



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Your fully tax deductible purchase can start as low as $ 50 00 per 
4" x 8" engraved brick. For full information call (847) 395- 1309 



8 

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LAKE FOREST 
HOSPITAL 



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Coping With Parenthood 

New parents and their babies are 
invited to this fonim for coping 
strategies and sharing. Program is ' 
facilitated by a couple who recently 
delivered at LFH. Topics include 
adjustments in your personal rela- 
tionship, balancing time with baby 
and each other, Intimacy after baby 
and the realities of parenting. No 
fee. To register, call 847-234-6182. 

Newborn Hotline 

Help is only a phone call 
away. Call 847-234-6161, 24 
hours a day, 7 days a week and 
you will be able to talk to an RN 
with any questions and concerns 
about your baby (up to six weeks 
of age). 

Wellness Festival Lecture 
Series 

As a follow-up to the Wellness 
Festival, health practitioners ex- 
plain and demonstrate comple- 
mentary approaches to health and 
wellness. Lectures held In the 
Health Education Center. Space is 
limited. For speaker schedule and 
registration, call Community Edu- 
cation, 847-234-6112. March 2, 3, 4, 
9, 10 and 11. 

PROVENA SAINT 
THERESE MEDICAL 

Natural Birth After 
Cesarean (VBAC) 

For the expectant mom who 
has had a previous C-sectlon and is 
planning to have a natural birth. 
Cost is $10. Offered upon request. 
For information and registration, 
call Lenora Bonn, RN, certified 
childbirth and lactation educator, at 
(847) 360-2281. 

Cesarean Birth Preparation 

For the expectant mom who 
will have a C-section. Surgery, anes- 
thesia and comfort measures are 
discussed. Cost is $10. Offered upon 
request. For information and regis- 
tration, call Lenora Bonn, RN, certi- 
fied childbirth and lactation educa- 
tor, at (847) 360-2281. 

CONDELL HOSPITAL 

Widowed Outreach Network 

Sunday, Feb. 28 Widowed Out- 
reach Network meeting for the indi- 
vidual coping with the loss of a 
spouse will be held at 2 p.m. in the 
Allen Conference Center at Conclell 
Medical Center, 700 Garfield Ave., 
Libertyville. The Mundeliners, a, 
line dancing group, will be the fea- 
tured entertainment. The public is 
invited. Call 362-2905, ext. 5275. 

VICTORY MEMORIAL 
HOSPITAL 

Blood Pressure Screenings 
and Recordings ' 

From 8 a.m. to noon on March 
1, free "Blood Pressure Screenings 
and Recordings" will be given at 
Victory Lakes Continuing Care Cen- 
ter, 1055 East Grand Ave., Linden- 
hurst. No registration is necessary. 
Call (847) 356-5900 for more infor- 
mation. 

Dual Disorders Anonymous 

At 7 p.m. on March 1, "Dual . 
Disorders Anonymous" will meet at 
Victory memorial Hospital, 1324 
North Sheridan Road, Waukegan. 
This free support group offers help 
to those diagnosed with both men- 
tal health and chemical dependen- 
cy problems. Call (847) 360-4073 for 
more information, 

Managing Your Congestive 
Heart Failure 

At 10 a.m., March 8, "Managing 
Your Congestive Heart Failure" will 
be held at Victory Memorial Hospi- 
tal, 1324 North Sheridan Road, 
Waukegan., This free class is de- 
signed to help tliose diagnosed with 
Congestive Heart Failure to learn to 
manage.the disease on a daily basis. 
For more information, call (847) 
360-4031. 




B1 1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



-~£,sr-/T - 






February 26, 1999 



Save your vision week good time for eye exam 




March 7-13 is national 'Save 
Your Vision Week' and a perfect 
time to schedule overdue eye and 
vision examinations, says the Amer- 
ican Optomehic Association. "So 
many people suffer needlessly from 
untreated vision conditions and eye 
diseases," says Dr. Charlotte 
Nielsen, a member of the American 
Optometric Association and the Illi- 
nois Optometric Association. "Save 
Your Vision Week is a national re- 
minder to make eye examinations a 



priority for everyone in the family." 

In honor of 'Save Your Vision 
Week', Dr. Charlotte Nielsen and 
Dr. 'Elliott Friedman of Vision Care 
Associates will be offering free limit- 
ed exams for 3 to 5 year olds on Sat., 
March 13th from 9 am to 3 p.m. 
Balloons and prizes will be given 
away. Call 847-662-3800 for details 
or an appointment. 

The American Optometric As- 
sociation recommends the follow- 
ing eye examination schedule; how- 



ever, Dr. Nielsen and Dr. Friedman 
note that some people may need 
more frequent exams if they have or 
are at risk of developing certain eye 
health or vision conditions. Infants, 
By six months of age; preschoolers, 
at age three; school children, before 
kindergarten and every year in 
school; adults 19-40, every two 
years if not wearing contact lenses, 
every year if wearing contact lenses; 
adults over 41, every.year. 
'Save Your Vision Week' was 



started by doctors of optometry in 
1927 and is proclaimed nationally 
by the President of the United 
States. The celebration emphasizes 
the importance of professional eye 
examinations and the scope of ser- 
vices available from doctors of op- 
tometry including diagnosis and 
treatment of eye diseases and vision 
conditions, prescription of medica-* 
tion to treat eye disease, and provir 
sion of vision therapy and low vi- 
sion services. 




in repetitive stress injuries 
explosive growth in personal computers 




The burgeoning use of personal 
computers -- both on the job and in 
the home -- shows no signs of slow- 
ing. During the last 15 years, desk- 
top computers have evolved from a 
novelty to a normality, with an esti- 
mated 73 million Americans own- 
ing a home computer and 50 mil- 
lion having one on their desk at 
work. 

But health- related issues have 
shadowed the phenomenal growth 
of desktop computing. Specifically, 
there has been a significant in- 
crease in job-related Repetitive 
Stress Injuries (RSIs). In fact, the 
number of repeated trauma cases 
reported to the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics (BLS) has skyrocketed 
from 23,800 in 1972 to 332,000 in 
1994 -a fourteen-fold increase. 

Work : relate'd musculoskeletal ' 
disorders are now the nation's 
largest workplace health problem, 
with work-related overexertion and 
repetitive stress injuries, such as 
carpal tunnel syndrome, account- 
ing for more than 60 percent of all 
occupational illnesses. Resulting 
worker's compensation costs have 
reached $20 billion annually. 



(Carpal tunnel syndrome is a 
painful hand and wrist condition 
often associated with extensive 
computer use and other tasks that 
require repetitive hand and wrist 
motions. Its symptoms include 
numbness, tingling, swelling, weak- 
ness and a burning pain.) 

In some states, concern over this 
"occupational hazard of the ^Os" 
has prompted preventive action. 
California recently instituted a reg- 
ulation that requires corporations 
to begin an ergonomic training pro- 
gram if two employees who per- 
form identical work activities sus- 
tain similar repetitive stress i n - 
juries. Legislation may not be far 
behind. 

^Luckily, both companies and in- 
dividuals can take a very active role 
in prevention of RSIs," states fitness 
expert Judi Sheppard Missett, 
founder of Jazzercise. "Things as 
simple as creating an ergonomic 
work station and taking regular 
stretch and relaxation breaks can 
have a significant impact." Missett's 
company has introduced a new 
computer screen saver to help em- 
ployees achieve both ends. "Cyber- 




Tooth Talk 

Abby Licke, 6, listens as Dr. Sonia Gutierrez descripes the prop- 
er way to care for teeth during a visit with her class from BJ. 
Hooper School In Undenhurst at the Kids' Dentist in Grayslake 
Feb. 19.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



Health Dept. offers free breast 
and cervical cancer screening 



Free breast and cervical cancer 
screening are offered to eligible 
Lake County women through the 
Illinois Breast and Cervical Can- 
cer Project, women can receive, 
at no cost to them, a complete 
medical examination, a clinical 
breast exam and a pap test, as 
well as referral for a free mam- 
mogram at a local hospital. On- 
going yearly exams and medical ' 
follow-up are provided. 



Women 40 years of age or 
older, who are underinsured or 
uninsured, and whose family in- 
come does not exceed 200 percent 
of federal poverty guidelines are eli- 
gible, for this free program. Exami- 
nations are done at the clinics of the 
Lake County Health Department and 
Community Health Center and are 
by appointment. To find out if you 
are eligible, please call the Heal Oh De- 
partment at (847) 360-2917. 




A new computer screen saver "cyberstrech" provides computer 
users with tips and exercises to avoid repetitive stress injuries 
commonly associated with computer usage.— Photo courtesy of 
ARA. 



Stretch is a safety program for com- 
puter users and a cost reduction 
program for business owners," Mis- 
sett explains. 

The software application offers 
26 body-specific, timed stretches 
with full color illustrations and 26 
action tips (vision and relaxation 
breaks, posture checks and fitness 
tips) developed and approved by an 
exercise physiologist. 

" [These] exercise techniques are 
the most innovative, practical, ef- 
fective and preventative applica- 
tions that have come along thus far 



in the field of ergonomics," states 
Sandy Allen, safety director and er- 
gonomic specialist at SouthCoast 
Newspapers, Inc. "Specialists have 
devised the right method and prod- 
uct." 

CyberStretch runs on Windows 
3.1, 3.11, 95 and NT, and Macintosh 
7.5 and 8. 

Visit the home pages of Cyber- 
Stretch and Jazzercise at www.cy- 
berstretch.com and www.jazzer- 
cise.com. 

For additional information call 1- 
888-79-STRETCH.— ARA 



Deborah Martinkus, R.N., 
appointed to Victory surgery 
and treatment center staff 



Grayslake resident Deborah 
Martinkus, R.M., BSN, CNOR, 
RNFA, has been named manager of 
the Surgery Department at the Vic- 
tory Surgery and Treatment Center 
(Undenhurst), which is ciirrentiy 
under construction. 

"In this new position," says Mar- 
tinkus, "my goal is to provide high 
quality surgical care for area resi- 
dents and to make northwestern 
Lake County's first outpatient 
surgery center a comfortable, effi- 
cient facility both for our patients 
and the physicians who treat mem . 
here." 

Initially, Markinkus is involved 
in preparing for the center's open- 
ing this spring. Her current respon- 
sibilities include obtaining state li- 
censure and accreditation for the 
center. 



Prior to 




joining the 


a&£* 


staff of the 


m y /■ . y« 


Victory 




Surgery and 


m ft 


Treatment 




Center, Mar- 


m^L^^' 


tinkus was 




O.R. coordi- 




nator at the 


Ek. ^J 


Center ofRe- 




constructive 


Martinkus 


Surgery, Oak 




Lawn. 


., 



The Victory Surgery and Treat- 
ment Center will provide outpatient 
surgical services, laboratory and di- 
agnosis tests to people In north- 
western Lake County. The center 
is located on 1050 Red Oak Lane 
(on the Victory Lakes' campus), off 
Grand Avenue, Undenhurst. 



. 



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HEALTHWATCH 



February 26, 1999 



What happened to the days when ' We Loved Lucy?' 



Hi Dr. Singer, 

I'm concerned about what 
my kids watch on TV. My con- 
cern goes further than what 
they choose to watch, though. 
1 am concerned about what I 
believe Is a lack of choice. I 
grew up on shows like "Nick at 
Night" shows. "Brady Bunch," 
"Taxi," "Happy Days," etc 
Those shows seemed to be so 
much better than what Is on 
today. I Just wonder what your 
view Is on this. RS 

DearR.S., 

I have to say that for the most 
part, I agree with you. I also grew 
up on the shows you mentioned 




PARENT'S 
PLACE 

Sherri Singer, 
Psy.a 



and feel something kind of special 
when I watch "Nick" and see those 
shows. I am so thankful for that 
network. 

The way 1 see it is this: It 
seems that most every show today, 
be it sitcom or night time drama, 
has to focus on realism. Every- 
thing revolves around the real is- 



sues of the day and what actually 
occurs in our lives. "No holds 
barred," so to speak. No protec- 
tion from the cruelty of many life 
issues. Some would call this being 
informed. 

The older shows, by contrast, 
seemed to focus on idealism or es- 
capism. They had nothing to do 
with real life. There was a level of 
protectionism built in. Everything 
was happy, friendly, fun and gen- 
uine entertainment. 

The violence, outrage, hatred 
and gore were saved for the news. 
That was the reality. Even the 
news, at that time, as I remember, 
wasn't that bad. The question 1 al- 
ways ask is: "Why do we want to 









V: 












J 



( 



Put your Pain in the 
hands of a specialist! 



DR. SCOTT REISER 
ROUND LAKE BEACH CHIROPRACTIC 

If any of these symptoms sound familiar, let us help you: 

* Headaches * Lower Back Pain * Sport Injuries 

* Neck Pain or Stiffness or Pain * Whiplash 

* Mid-Back Pain 




or Stiffness or Pain 
* Numbness or Pain 
in Arms or Legs 



* Auto or Work Related 
Injuries 




Dr. Scott Reiser 



(847) 740-2800 

314 W. Rollins Rd., Round Lake Beach, IL 
(Next to Eagle Foods & Dollar Video) 

Auto and Work Related Injuries Excluded, But Covered 100%. 






tJmttBmNT 

X-RAY & EXAM 






Round Lake Beach Chiropractic 



Expires 2/28^95 




Life Skills Series 



Sponsored by the behavioral medicine 
department at Provena Saint Therese Medical 
Center. Free! To register, call 847-360-2280. 



Parenting and Child Development 

A Parent's Guide to ADHD 

March 10 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Provena Saint Therese. 
Presented by Michael Greenbaum, M.D. 

Parenting 101: The High School Years 

An overview of healthy discipline and limit-setting. March 22 
from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Round Lake Park District 814 Hart 
Road, Round Lake, 111. Presented by The Skills Program staff. 

Issues of Daily Living for Adults 

Don't Give in to Depression 

An overview of effective treatments available. March 3 from 7 
to 8:30 p.m. at Provena Area Treatment Satellite, 37809 N. Route 
59, Lake Villa, 111. Presented by John Jochem, Psy.D. 

Managing Pain: A Psychological Approach 

March 24 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Provena Saint Therese. 
Presented by William Lee, Ed.D. 

Conflict Resolution 

Making Peace 

Learn to resolve conflicts with others by using the rules for 
fighting fair. March 17 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. 



yrf Provena 



Saint Therese Medical Center 

What every hospital should be? 

2615 Washington Street 
Waukegan, IL 60085 
847-249-3900 
www.sainttherese.org 



watch the pain of real life in our 
entertainment?" I sure don't/It's 
not everyone's real life either, 

The Bradys were always col- 
orful and close. They did reflect an 
Issue at the time. Namely blended 
families, however, they could re- 
solve any family problem within 
30 minutes. 

Lucy wore pearls to vacuum 
her rug. The Happy Days kids did 
things for each other, etc. Maybe it 
wasn't real life and maybe every- 
one didn't live in that situation, 
probably no one did, but I see 
nothing wrong In our entertain- 
ment being happy, uplifting and 
teaching good things versus what 
we see today: shootings, mega 
amounts of cop shows, drug busts, 
violence, gang affiliation, underly- 
ing political messages, etc. 

I think we really need to clear- 
ly define entertainment when 
looking at this issue. Entertain- 
ment is not a support group. It Is- 
n't and shouldn't be designed 
around how many people are go- 
ing through the same level of de- 
spair. The soap operas used to be 
the outlet for that. 

Also, let me point out that I 
have heard that, "G" rated movies 
have been proven time and time 
again to do better at the box office 
than either, "P 

G" or "R" rated movies. To me, it is 
a reflection of what is inside of the 
film makers, producers, etc. that is 
being shown. Not a reflection of 
. the people watching it. 

Now, I will not condemn a 
whole industry in one fell swoop. 
There are definitely good pro- 
grams left. "Home Improvement" 
is one example of a very warm 
family show. 1 don't watch much 
more than that and Nick, so I can't 
really recommend others person- 
ally. 

I have given other programs a 



try, but I find many of them focus- 
ing on and exploiting the reality of 
our lives versus the more old fash- 
ioned family situations, I can say, 
that if you are worried about it, 
keep it tuned to "nick" or "The 
Family Channel" and talk about 
the shows with your kids. Some 
would say that by doing that you 
are sheltering your kids from real 
life. 

I remember in the old days 
when people would get angry at 
"The Brady Bunch" because "they, 
just weren't real life." Well, I've 
got a news flash for those peo- 
ple. They weren't real life, never 
were, never will be, however, 
they were entertainment and 
they touched and touch some- 
thing very warm, family oriented 
and comforting for many people. 
To me that is the essence of en- 
tertainment. 

And to the people who would 
tell you that sheltering your kids 
from real life is bad, I would reply: 
sheltering your kids from what 
Hollywood Producers and Direc- 
tors today portray as real life is one 
of a parent's most important jobs. 

Real life can be wonderful and 
helpful and warm and comfort- 
able. It can also be scary and vio- 
lent and out of control. It depends 
on what you want to focus on.' ' ' 

We don't want to let the 90s 
Hollywood version of real life — be- 
come real life. - • 

\ This column is for entertain- 
ment purposes only. Information 
in this column cannot and should 
not replace proper Psychological 
treatment Dr. Sherri Singer is a Li' 
censed Clinical Psychologist, child- 
hood behavior specialist and au- 
thor of the book. "Dr. Singer's Se- 
crets for Lightening Quick Behavior 
Change." For an appointment;call 
1708)962-2549.' 



Lakeland SCRIBE 740-4035 

Newspapers TODAY! / ^ U ^t^OO 



lEr^S* 



Foot Care 
Specialist 



BOARD CERTIFIED' 



FOOT FACTS 

From The Foot Doctor 
DR. GRIFF J. WINTERS & ASSOC. 

Specializing in Reconstnjctive Foot & Ankle Surgery 



LASER SURGERY FOR WARTS is the most advanced and successful form of treat- 
ment tor removal ol resistant plantar warts. Laser Surgery Is done in the office and allows normal 
shoe wear and no time off from work. 

If you have the above s ymptoms or any other foot discomfort, you may contact Or. Winters for a NO 
COST CONSULTATION to see if there may be an answer to your foot pain. 

*By the American Board of Pediatric Surgery 



770 Barron Blvd. 
(Rte. 83) 



223-4000 



Grayslake 



A WORD ABOUT 

SEALANTS 



You may lunv heard sonu: of your 
friends talking about a product tluit 
prevents cavities on children's teelk 
Tltey aw tailed sealants. 

WHATISASEALANT? 
A sealant is a protective plastic coat- 
ing tfiat covers the biting surfaces of 
the permanent back molars, Tltey 
Iwlp 'seal out" the food and plaque 
that cause cavities. 

H0WD01KN0WIFMYCH1LD 

NEEDS SEALANTS? 

Some factors to consider in deciding 

whether a child needs sealants are, 
heredity, anatomy of the tooth, 
brushing habits and diet We strong- 
ly recommend sealants as a preven- 
tive measure for ALLchildtcn with 
permanent molars. 

HOW ARE SEALANTS APPUEDT 
Sealants are quick and painless to 
apply. Tlieycan usualtybedonein 

one or two visits. Your Pediatric 



Dentist orllygienist will condition 
the tooth, apply the sealant and 
then allow it to harden. 

IF MYC1ULDGETS SEALANTS 
DOES THAT GUARANTEE TI I EY 
WILLNEVERGETACAVrrYT 
Sealants are very effective when 
placed on permanent molars to pre- 
ivntcavities. Tltey are N(fl,however, 
a 100% guarantee that your chilil 
will never get a cavity 
Wliile sealants work on the biting 
surfaces of the back teeth, they do 
not workon lite front teeth, or the 
spaces between wltereflossingand 
fluoride work to prevent cavities. 

WiaiNSURANCE COVER 

SEALANTS? 

Same insumnce companies ewer. 

sealants at 100%, but in order to be 

sure, call your insumnce company 

and ask if tltey cover Occlusal 

Sealants (ADA code 01351) 




Wk \mnin (fitliiua 




DENTISTIIIIIIII 



br.l<illi\llitMlIlUm 

Sonia Gutierrez 
& Associates 

/.) Coiiiiitmi' Ik 

Sititrllb 
Cmydakv, IL WQ30 

847-223-1400 

wtvw.KulsdtLuvm 

i:\lail: 
KtdsDLrS@bul.coni 












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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT PREPARED BY LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 

YOUNG AT HEART 



February 26, 1999 




Lakeland Newspapers/ 





Lunch with friends 

AARP member Rosemary Coluclo of Lake Villa scoops up food at a Valentine potluck lunch at the 
community room of the Lake Villa Township offices. — Photo by Lynn Gunnarson. 



AARP 




find budget 



'intriguing' 

Statement by AARP Executive Director Horace Deets in 
response to President Clinton's FY 2000 budget 

The President's budget contains 
several intriguing proposals to ad- 
dress the future reUrement security 
needs of the boomers. Chief among 
them is applying 62 percent of the 
projected unified budget surplus to 
the Social Security Trust Funds. 
AARP looks forward to seeing and ex- 
ploring the all-important details of 
this proposal, especially its effect on 
reducing the public debt. 

AARP also believes it is impor- 
tant to continue to explore addition- 
al ways to strengthen Social Security 
to ensure its financial stability for the 
full 75-year period. Any investment 
of the Social Security Trust Funds 
must be fully insulated from political 
influence. 

AARP is pleased that the Presi- 
dent's FY 2000 budget acknowledges 
the need for a systematic and ratio- 
nal approach to the new era of bud- 
get surpluses. The challenge to the 
Administration and the Congress is 
to invest in the future without aban- 
doning the bipartisanship and fiscal 



discipline that got us to this moment 

The long-term care initiative to 
provide tax credits for family care- 
givers is an important recognition of 
what families are already doing to 
provide high quality care to a family 
member. This initiative will give 
some help to persons with serious 
disabilities. While it will not address 
our nation's full long-term care need, 
it is one of a number of steps that we' 
need to take toward solving the na- 
tion's long-term care problems. 

In proposing. mat a portion of 
the surplus be used to extend 
Medicare solvency, the President is 
indicating that in order to address 
Medicares financial challenges and 
continue to provide dependable 
health care coverage, it will be ulti- 
mately necessary to consider addi- 
tional financing sources. 

The President has also proposed 
to reduce Medicare payments to 
hospitals. 

These reductions should be 
scrutinized to ensure that they will 
not jeopardize beneficiaries. 



In addition to ensuring 
Medicare's and Social Security's long- 
term solvency, AARP has long sup- 
ported the concept of improving re- 
tirement savings. The President's 
proposed USA accounts via a tax 
credit offers a creative approach to 
that goal that merits further discus- 
sion, and may lay the groundwork 
for a bipartisan approach to this is- 
sue and die broader question of tax 
relief. 

The President also proposes to 
increase spending on a number of 
domestic programs and for defense. 
It is critical that these proposals be 
accompanied by corresponding ad- 
justments in current budget caps so 
that they will not cause dislocations 
in other parts of the budget. 

AARP looks forward to working 
with the President and the Congress 
on these important issues. Our con- 
cern is to strengthen the prospects 
for the retirement security of the 
boomer generation while protecting 
those already retired. 



SENIOR SOCIAL SERVICES 



Education 

Exercise 

Recreation 

Travel 

Full-Course Meals 
Meals On Wheels 



Investigation of 
Elder Abuse/Neglect 

Employment Training 
& Placement" 

Information & 
Assistance 



Outreach 
Assessment 
Case Management 
Emergency Support 
Shared Housing 

Choices For Care 
Nursing Home Prescreening 



■catholic 

Charities 

or THK AMCHOIOOK or chicaoo 

WASMON IN ACTION UNCI 1MT 



TOLL FREE NUMBER: 
1-800-942-3930 

Catholic amities does not discriminate on the basis of religion, sex, nee, national 
origin, sexual preference, or economic status In I is employees, volunteers, or d lento. 



Volunteers Always Needed And Welcome 




Illinois 
flGINCj 




UnieatfWty 




nts to discuss 
of Social 




As the debate over Social Security 
Intensifies in Congress, Congressman 
John Porter (R-lOth) is inviting 10th 
District residents to join him at a spe- 
cial event for a review of the current 
Social Security system and to discuss 
how it should function in the next 
century. Rep. Porter will chair "The 
Citizen Forum on Social Security" to- 
gether with William .Kbzel, Acting 
State Coordinator of the AARR The fo- 
rum, sponsored by the Public Forum 
Institute, the Concord Coalition, and 
other local organizations! will be held 
on Saturday, Feb. 27 from 9 a.m. to 
130 p.m. at the Sheraton North Shore 
inNorthbrook. 
• "Social Security has emerged as a 
critical concern to Americans from all 
walks of life," Porter said. "While the 
Congress is considering various pro- 
posals to ensure the continuing 
strength of. Social Security, I am 
pleased to chair this forum. It pro- 
vides an opportunity fo r I o cal c i tizens 
to participate In the national dialogue 




on Social Security and for me to hear 
the views of the people of our area on 
this vital policy issue" 

Following an overview, partici- 
pants will use electronic polling tech- 
nology to record their opinions and 
compare them with those of others 
across America. They will engage Rep. 
Porter and one another in discussing 
the values that should guide Social Se- 
curity's future and the options for re- 
form now under consideration. 

The forum Is free {an optional 
lunch is available for $15), but space 
is limited. Interested persons should 
register by contacting the Public Fo- 
rum Institute via fax (registration 
forms are available from Congress- 
man Porter's Deerfield office 940- 
0202), a toll-free phone number (1 
(888) 560-CFSS) or e-mail 
(Rachel@PubltcForumInstitute.com). 
More information on the forum is 
also available on the internet at 
www.PublicForumInstirute.com/ssev 
ents. 



National fitness speaker 
to lead 'time for a change' 
senior fitness series 



Nationally recognized fitness mo-. 
tiva to r Craig Dean, M D. , will be one of 
the featured speakers at the free Se- 
nior Breakfast Club series "Time for 
a Change" at Good Shepherd Hos- 
pital. This three-part series, spon- 
sored by Good Shepherd, the Bar- 
rington Area Council on Aging and 
the Barrington Park District, will 
give seniors tips on how to improve 
health and slow the aging process 
through fitness. 

The series begins Thursday, 
March 5 from 8:30-10:30 a.m. with 
"Fitness Basics." The speaker is Tracy 
Rhodes, MS, coordinator of commu- 
nity events at Good Shepherd Hospi- 
tal and American College of sports 
Medicine certified fitness specialist, 
who will talk to seniors, ages 55 and 
older, on the basic information o n 
what makes a person fit and how they 
can stay that way. 

Part 2 of the series will be Thurs- 
day, March 12 from 8:30-10:30 a.m. 
when Dr. Dean will present "Motiva- 
tion." Dean is physician director of the 
Cardiac Rehab program and Emer- 



<> 



gency Department at Condell Med- 
ical Center, Libertyville, and a mem- 
ber of the Board of Directors of the 
Running & Fitness Association. He is 
a frequent writer for Running Times 
magazine. 

The final class will be Friday, 
March 20 from 9-10:30 a.m. when the 
topic is "Time to commit and To Get 
Fit," and will include a presentation 
"on personal training by Nell 
Wywialowski, certified personal train- 
er at Forest Grove Athletic Club in 
Palatine and representatives from var- 
ious fitness clubs and programs avail- 
able in the area. 

Registration for the free program 
may be made by calling HealthAdvi- 
sor at 1-800-323-8622 as space is lim- 
ited. 

Good Shepherd Hospital, located 
on Highway 22, two miles north of 
Barrington, provides a full reach of 
community outreach and health ed- 
ucation services. The hospital is part 
of Advocate Health Care, one of the 
Chicago areas largest health care or- 
ganizations. 



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of a/ valid/ uuM packa/j^/ 

inciudlnq/ a/ lutin^tAriU/. 

Randy P. Evangelides 

Attorney at Law 

847-543-1745 

Grayslake, IL 



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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT PREPARED BY LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 

HOME & GARDEN 



February 26, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers / B 1,4 



Landscaping can save money on 




Saving energy isn't always as simple as 
turning off a light or making certain 
that a faucet doesn't drip. The land- 
scaping that you have around the out- 
side of your home can prove to be a valuable 
energy saver, Inside. Properly placed wind- 
breaks, snow fences and shade trees can be 
very beneficial when it comes to saving mon- 
ey in the heating and cooling of yourhome. 

The provision of shade and cooling in the 
summer and protection from the cold winter 
winds can lead to a reduction in heating and 
air conditioning bills for the homeowner by 
as much as 30 percent 

Windbreaks and living snow fences pro- 
vide a source of shade and wind protection 
for livestock both in the summer and winter. 
Animals are kept healthy by shading and 
cooling them in the summer and protecting 
them from wind-chill and snow in the winter. 
Finally, property values are increased with 
improved privacy, beauty and noise reduc- 
tion. One of the most affordable windbreak 
and shade trees available to the consumer is 
the Austree Hybrid. 

"Adaptability, versatility and durability are 
the main selling points of the Austree," said 
company president Dennis Warnecke. "The 
Austree Hybrid is a tree that will grow in virtu- 
ally any soil condition and is greatly needed 
in the U.S. . . . especially with all of the new 
development that is taking place across the 
country. People-want a fast growing tree at a 
reasonable price to protect homes, agricul- 
ture and animals." 

When Bill Lieb planted 1,000 2' to 3' Aus- 

trees at Rocky Mountain Rosters in Colorado, 

he hoped that the trees would grow as fast as 

the catalog promised. 

■ "1 didn't believe the trees could grow 8' to 



15' a year," said Lleb. "If I hadn't been able to 
look at my window and see the results myself, 
I still wouldn't believe it. They are a super 
windbreak for this country where there aren't 
any trees. Just take care of them and watch 
them go!" 

When planting a windbreak or a snow 
fence, you should consider fast growing de- 
ciduous trees and augment the windbreak 
with slower growing evergreen trees. 

The deciduous trees will offer a great deal 
of shade and wind protection in the summer 
and fall, and even though they lose their 
leaves in the winter, they wUl provide effective 
wind protection in the winter, too. The ever- 
greens will take 20 or more years to provide 
much protection, but will be a viable solid 
wind barrier year round after maturity. 

Rocky Mountain Roosters planted the fast 
growing Austree in various sites on their 5000 
acre ranch. Their plain was primarily de- 
signed for windbreak protection, wildlife 
habitat and to create instant shade trees for 
the newly developed land. "We have been 
able to develop great bird habitats and living 
snow fences with the Austree Hybrids. We 
have planted the slower growing pines and 
other conifer trees as well," Lieb said. 

Getting the trees to perform as advertised 
may require a bit of management, particular- 
ly in their first year or so. "If you do what we 
tell you, and we outline it in great detail in our 
planting instructions, chances are you'll get 
great results," Brett Axton, CEO of Austree ad- 
vises. "People expect a miracle; it's still only a 
tree. But it certainly does everything we say it 
will do and more, in a short period of time." 
Spring time is the ideal time to start planning 
your windbreaks and sites for specific shade 
trees. 








IT 

TWO SPEEDS, BUT 

YOUR GAS BILLS 

WILL STAY ON 'LO.' 



u 



u 




Most gas furnaces have one speed. High. Trane's XV 80, on 
the other hand, has a two-stage gas valve and a variable speed 
blower. Under most conditions it runs at low speed, maintaining 
a delightfully even level of warmth in your home. At either speed 

it's remarkably quiet. And, with ^^^^ 

over 80% efficiency, extremely E^^l: TRfiQMT 

economical. Now how can you ^p- : jy 

turn down a furnace like that? It's Hard To St an A Prune." 



H 






MILLER'S AREA HEATING, INC. 

^ „« 112 CENTER STREET • GRAYSLAKE, IL 60030 SHP&Ofo 

! L& 223-021 1 *>s 



Kilt 



24 HOUR SERVICE • SAME LOCATION 1948-1999 

Only at participating dealers. Homeowner must complete H.E.L.P. contract. 




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nfttttflurde A&orictlioi 



Only 14-months old, this Austree windbreak dwarfs a man standing 6 feet, 3 inch- 
es tall. 



Individuals should contact the Lake 
County extension office at 223-8627, for a list 
of evergreen trees and other deciduous trees 
that would be suitable for your area. 

Proper ground preparation and watering 
of all new plants will increase the success of 
your living energy saving investment. The 
Austree is a male sterile 
hybrid tree of the Salix family." The tree is a re- 
sult of over 30 years of selective breeding by 



the Department of Science and Industrial Re- 
search of New Zealand. The trees are ideal for 
uses as windbreaks, hedges, privacy screens, i 
erosion control, shade trees, noise and dust 
barriers. 

For more information, or to receive a 
free 12 page color brochure, call 800-760 
TREE, or write to: Rocky Mountain Aus- 
tree Inc., P.O. Box 9307, Colorado Springs, 
CO 80932. 




Registration for Fall 1999 

OLD SCHOOL 



* 




A Traditional Montessori School 

OPEN HOUSE - Saturday, March 6 
10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 

• We Are Now In Our New Facility 

• Primary Classrooms - Ages 3 thru 6 (Full and Half Day Programs) 

• Elementary Classrooms - Ages 6 thru 13 (1st thru 8th grade) 

• Program Plus Available Before and After School, 7 am to 6 pm 

• Summer Programs 

• Full and Extensive Curriculum: Includes Montessori Curriculum 
as Well as Traditional School Curriculum Presented Within . 
Framework of the Montessori Philosophy 

• Registered with State of Illinois Board of Education '- 
Kindergarten thru 8th 

*• Member American Montessori Society 



INTENT FOR THE CHILD 

• Exploration 

• Independence 

• Responsibility 



LOCATED IN GRAYSLAKE 

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LAKELIFE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ ' B1 5 



land Publishers, Inc. & College of Lake County 

99 Health and 



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ATTRACTIONS 



Face Painting •Blood Pressure 

Stress Relaxation Tapes 

Home Health Care Items 

Body Fat Testing • First Aid Kits 

Complimentary Guest Classes on Fitness 

Chair Massages •Posture Exams 

Arthritis Screenings • Diabetes Screenings 

Toothbrushes • And Much More! 



DON'T MISS THIS ONE!!! 

Saturday, March 27, 1 999 

10:00 am to 3:00 pm 
College of Lake County 

Physical Education Center-Gymnasium 

935 I Washington, Grayslake 






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Alex Rothacker from 

TOPS dog training kennels 

and Olive Oyl, a Russian 

Wolfhound who is in the 

Guinness Book of World 

Records -Two Times!! 

Come meet them 

and see their show! 



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DONATE BLOOD 

At Lakeland Publishers' and College of 

Lake County's Blood Drive 

in conjunction with 

LIFESOURCE Blood Services 

When you give blood you give another birthday, 

another anniversary, another day at the beach, 

another night under the stars, another talk with 

a friend, another laugh, another hug, another 

chance. GIVE BLOOD • GIVE UFEl 



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| Exhibitors •Demonstrations 

• Audience Participation 

• Giveaways 

• Door Prizes 



Sponsored by: 
Lakeland Publishers and College of Lake County 






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B16 / Lakeland Newspapers '"' 



LAKELIFE 





February 2&, 1999 



Get It Done Rightl 



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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3rd AT 8:00 P.M. 

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315 West Rollins Road (1 Block West of Cedar Lake Rd.)> Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 

STORE HOURS: Mon.-Thurs. 9-8; Fri. & Sat. 10-5:30; Closed Sunday 



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Lakeland 
Newspapers 

At*uary26, 
1999 



Section 




at seams as mall 




By SPENCER SCHEIN 
Staff Reporter 



Hawthorn Woods Village Hall has 
a large board meeting room, but not 
large enough for the biggest Issue to 



Chief Gary Kupsak, who deals with 
Hawthorn Mall on a dally, basis. 

If time permitted, property taxes 
were also up for discussion, Kalmar 
said. 

Taubman submitted documents 



hit the community since It Incorpo- stating property taxes would remain 

rate i , stable, and possibly increase, if the 

Crowds of 300 to 400 attended mail is. built : The report looked at 

the first two of a series of five public home values from 1993 and 1995 In 

meetings with the Taubman Group areas where large malls are located, 



and ^a joint 
Hawthorn Woods 
Village Board/Plan 
Commission. 

Meetings have 
-been, held In the 
gymnalsum of St 
Matthews Luther- 
- an School, Gld 
McHenryRoad,'tq 
accomodate the- 
Interested" resi- 

„ . / °* runmeniai is- 
Hawthorn Woods', North Barrington, sues. A meeting is also scheduled for 
and other nearby communities that 8:30 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 27. No agen- 
would feel impacts from a regional da has been set for that meeting, ex- 
shopping mall, cept to hear testimony from anit-mall 
"The hearing process has gone a experts and conulstants, Kalmarsaid. 
little slower than we anticipated," Talks on Feb. 20 and 22 centered 
said John M. Kalmar, village admlnis- on the proposed building and traffic 



Taubman consultants 
have said the mall would 

add20,000carsaday 

to the road on weekdays, 

and 23,000 a day on 

weekends, nearly 

tripling the current 

traffic patterns 



such as North- 
brook Court, 
Gurnee Mills in 
Gurhee, Rand- 
hurst Mall in Mt 
Prospect 

The meeting 
on Friday, Feb. 
26, at 7:30 p.m., 
is scheduled to 
be about storm 
-water and envi- 
ronmental is- 



trator. 

The public meetings may hold 
over into next week, he said. 

The discussion scheduled the 
evening of Feb. 24 was to feature a 
discussion about crime, law enforce- 
ment and police protection. 

Hawthorn Woods Police Chief 
William H. Urry was scheduled to 
speak, as was Vernon Hills Police 



THIS 
WEEK 




plans 

Taubman Co., of Michigan, owns 

, 110 acres at Rand and Old McHenry 

roads; where the, up*scalc,' two-story 

"mall Is proposed. The plan has been 

scaled back, somewhat:with a.Taub-- 

.: mair representauVe. : stating.the;l.l- 

. miUion-square-foot mall would be a 

Please see MALL / C2 



$56 M set 




county 





BUSINESS TIP 

, Customers are good 
for business 

PLEASE SEE PAGE C7 



By JOHN R0SZK0WSK1 

City Editor 



PLAN NOW 

Maximize your pension 
at retirement 

PLEASE SEE PAGE C7 



REAL ESTATE BUYS 

What did the house down 
the street sell for?' 

PLEASE SEE PAGE C8 



A $4.4 million project to widen 
Hunt Club Road between Route 120 
and Washington Street is one of the 
road improvement projects sched- 
uled to be done this year. 

The Lake County Division, of 
Transportation recently unveiled its 
1999 construction program, which 
provides for a total of $36 million in 
spending on county roads. 

One of the largest project son the 
list of improvements Is the Hunt Club 
Road expansion, slated to start this 

spring. 

Martin Buehler, director of trans- 
portation/county engineer for Lake 
County, said plans are for widening 
Hunt Club Road between Route 120 
to Washington Street from two to five 
lanes (including center turn lanes), 

Traffic control devices will also be 
installed at the intersection of Hunt 
Club Road and Gages Lake Road to 
alleviate traffic congestion at that in- 
tersection. Currently, there is a four- 
way stop at the intersection. 

"Right now, there's a huge backup 



Please see$36M/C2 



ANTIOCH PUBLIC LIBRARY DISTRICT 
757 NORTH MAIN 
ANTW^!^ 





X*M# 



Bra- 



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Lake County Board Chairman Jim LaBelle catches some fresh air on the shores of Lake Michigan in 
Wlnthrop Harbor, where he is employed at Skipper Bud's Marina. LaBelle has experienced a politi- 
cal resurgence after surviving a deadly form of cancer diagnosed 11 years ago — P/joto by Sandy 
tfressner 

A second chance 



Victorious over a deadly f orfa of cancer Jim 

W^jWfamttf 



is now making the most out o 




ByJOHNROSZKQWSKI 
City Editor 



Many people hope for a . 
second chance at life. 
Jim LaBelle got one. 
LaBelle knows he's 
been fortunate. Fortunate to have 
survived the terrible illness that 
sapped him of all his strength and 
nearly took his life. Fortunate to 
have the opportunity to serve a sec- 
ond time as chairman of the Lake 
County Board. But most of all, for- 
tunate to be able to - 
continue to spend time 
with the family he dear- 
ly loyes. 

"Having come 
through it and survived 
it, I have a feeling it has , 
made me a better per- 
son. 1 hope it has any- 
way," LaBelle says reflectively. 

Clearly, Jim LaBelle is a different 
person than the first time he ran for 
the County Board back in 1980. He 
is no longer the politically ambi- 
tious young man he was back then. 
Now at 47 he is "older, and hopeful- 
ly, wiser" but "not sadder." 

LaBelle was first elected to the 
Lake County Board when he was 
only 29 and, at the time, he was the 
junior member of the board. Due 
to his youth, he appeared young 
and unexperienced to some of his 
fellow board members. 

But, within four short years, in 
1984, LaBelle was elected chairman 
of the County Board by his peers. 
Just three years later, in 1987, he 
was appointed to Governor Jim ; 
Thompson's staff for local govern- 
ment, economic development arid 
transportation. His political future 
looked bright. 

"The first time I was chairman I 
don't think I had a sense things were 
going to slow down," LaBelle said. "I 
think I had this idea that my politi- 



cal career would just kind of keep 
going up, and the chairmanship 
was part of that . , .And when I took 
the position with the governors of-", 
flee I kind of felt that, it was just an- 
other step in a long-term political, 
governmental service career." 

In March 1988, however, illness 
brought LaBelle down to earth/ He 
was diagnosed with lymphoma, a 
deadly form of cancer that eats 
away at bone marrow. It made him 
reevaluate what he had been doing 
and what his priorities were. 



'I think clearly as soonl was diagnosed 
I realized that the most important thing 
to me is my family and the life we have 1 

Jim LaBelle 
Lake County Board Chairman 



"I think clearly as soon I was di- 
agnosed I realized that the most im- 
portant thing to me is my family 
and the life we have," he said. "It 
kind of changed the priorities that I 
had. I think before that I was giving 
more priority to my own career and 
political life. I suspect that if I had 
not been diagnosed It could have 
led to difficulties in our family. I 
might have just kept on going in my 
own direction and not paid enough 
attention to Jan and the kids and in 
the long run that would have been a 
mistake. The diagnosis kind of", 
forced me to rethink all of that" 

Even so, there were times when 
LaBelle wondered he if he would 
survive the illness. He recalls times 
when the nurses In the hospital 
couldn't even find the veins In his 
hands because of the effects of the 
lymphoma. His white blood cell ■ 
count at times was literally down to 
almost zero, 

LaBelle knows he could not 
have made it through the ordeal 
without the support of his family. In 



1990, he received a bone marrow 
transplant from his sister and start- 
ed on the long, ancl sometimes ■ 
painful, road to recovery. 

"I've likened going through that 
process, the bone marrow trans- 
-plant, as getting as close to death as 
you can, klnclofleaning over the 
edge, and justgradually getting 
pulled back into life. That's literally 
, how you are," he said. 

: However, the struggle contin- 
ued even years after the marrow 
transplant In 1991, he said he was 
in an out of the hospital 
on eight different occa- 
sions with infections and 
other problems; Well 
into 1992; he was having 
trouble walking and 
thought he might be go- 
ingblind. 

"I started won- 
dering if it was worth it to have gone 
through it 1 spent a few months try- 
ing to decide whether it was worih 
it or no t I probably was feeling 
some depression." 

But things finally did change for 
the better. Despite his illness, La- 
Belle continued serving on the 
County Board as well as working for 
eight years as the manager of North 
Point Marina in Wlnthrop Harbor 
between spring 1989 and spring 
1997. 

LaBelle became involved in the 
marina business after he was diag- ' 
nosed with lymphoma. He realized 
he could not continue his demand- 
ing work sched ul e on the governor's 
staff and wanted to be closer to 
home. North Point Marina, which 
opened in 1989, was only eight min- 
utes from his home in Zion. 

"I was away from home a lot 
(while working on the governor's 
staff) arid Iknewlcouldntkeep 
doing that so it was a good time to 

Please see CHANCE IC2 



$200 GRAND IS STILL NOT ENOUGH / C5 



02/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



February 26, 1999 



FROM PAGE CI 



CHANCE: Cancer survivor 



make that change. And I really did 
enjoy running the marina. I enjoy 
the marina business/' said LaBelie. 
Since the spring of 1997, he has 
worked for Skipper Marine in 
Winthrop Harbor. 

As LaBelie regained his health, 
he again became more Involved 
with county government issues. 
And, when the County Board reor- 
ganized In December, he was cho- 
sen to lead the board's new majori- 
ty. 

LaBelie said he was honored to 
be chosen for the position, but did 
not actively campaign for it as he 
had done the first time he was elect- 
ed chairman in 1984. 

"I approach it differently this 
time than I did in 1984," said La- 
Belle. "I wasn't really actively seek- 
ing the position this time, but I 
thought the needs of the board 
might lead to this event. I feel it's a 
responsibility for me to fulfill. 

"Since my illness, I've just 
looked at my county service and re- ■ 
ally just about everything I've done 
as another opportunity to do some 
good," said LaBelie, who also served 
a brief stint as forest preserve presi- 
dent. " It's an opportunity I wasn't 
sure I would have when I was diag- 
nosed." 

Besides having a new perspec- 
tive, LaBelie sees different chal- 
lenges facing the county. In the mid' 
1980s, the No. 1 issue facing the . 
county was jobs and the need for 
economic development. 

Since that time, LaBelie said the 
county has made significant strides 
in terms of economic development 
Now, he said, "we're dealing more 



with the impacts of growth, how to 
deal with them, than in the early 
1980s." 

"The congestion in certain parts 
of the county is a pretty serious. . 
problem," UBeU/saia. 1 cUi * "A 

LaBelie said some of the thomes . 
of the new County Board are rn^ . 
"preservation of our open land's, 
preservation of our communities 
and catching up with the growth 
that's occurring." 

LaBelie believes the county 
must act to protect its open space 
and manage growth in a responsible 
fashion. Passage of the upcoming 
forest preserve referendum is one 
way to ensure open space is protect- 
ed, he said. The new board has also 
pushed for a new Unified Develop- 
ment Ordinance to provide for con- 
trolled growth and development. 

LaBelie said reinvestment in 
communities is another major issue 
the county must address. While 
many communities are growing, 
some communities such as Zion, 
Waukegan, North Chicago and 
some of the Round Lake communi- 
ties have not shared the economic 
benefits. 

. "I think one of my personal mis- 
sions is to try pay more attention to 
those communities that need the in- • 
vestment," he said, 

Having grown up in Zion and 
graduated from Benton-Zion High 
School, LaBelie believes the sense of 
community is what makes Lake 
County a special place to live. 

"We have, so far, an atmosphere 
of small town living," he said. "I 
think a lot of people that are attract- 
ed to Lake County have seen it as a 



CROSSWORD 



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ACROSS 

1 . Mechanical devices 
4. Powder 
8, Foot part 

10. Happen 

11. Thousand cubic feet, abbr. 

12. Mohammedan warrior 

13. Cavities 



ANSWERS 



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14. Giants 

15. Johnny , comedian 

18. Commoners 

20. Judge's seat 

22. Russian sourgrass soup 

23. More acrimonious 

24. Posts 

25. Be successful 

DOWN 

1 . The "Rolls Royce 
of country singers" 

2. Approval 

3. Pas de Calais 

5. .Gum from. Persian tree 

6. Restaurants 

7. Adjusts grades 
9. Wipe out 

1 6. . Bantu 

17. From Dallas 

19. Brazilian seaport 

21 . Gelatinous seaweed 



place where you have communities 
that are at a scale you can deal with, 
that you can participate in your 
hometown." 

LaBelie has little choice but to 
take active interest in his hometown 
of Zion. His wife, Jan, has be'en in- 
volved in community activities for 
years, formerly serving as executive 
director of the Zion Chamber of 
Commerce. She also ran for the 
mayor of Zion. 
5F J f \ .Sb; when there's Jalkjarpund the 
/> dinner.table at the I^Belle's, it's \ /j 
' more likely to'b'e'about local com- 
- muni ty issues in Zion than county 
board politics. 

"We end up talking about J ocal Is- 



sues a lot. I think we talk more about 
local community things and the 
schools, of course, with the kids than 
we do about the things I'm doing (on 
the County Board). At home, our fo- 
cus is on our own community." 

Much of LaBelle's passion for 
public service stemmed from the 
fact that he grew up in a family that 
was active in its community. His 
passion for public service is some- 
thing illness has not taken away. 

It's hard to tell what the future 
will hold for Jim LaBelie. He has not" 
ruled out the possibility that some- 
day he may run for higher office, 
perhaps even a statewide post. For 
now, however, LaBelie is content 



serving as chairman of the Lake 
County Board — and spending time 
with his family. 

"I haven't discounted the idea 
that I will do more politically in my 
life than I am now, but in the short 
term, the priority is my family and 
taking care of business at home. I've 
come to think that if I'm going to do 
more politically than I am right now, 
I'll just have to live long enough and . 
do that later on in my life, whereas 
20 years ago, I probably felt like' I 
needed to do it right away. I don't 
now. It's a matter of what your pri- 
orities are, and I really don't want 
my political life to get in the way of 
my family that much." 



MALL: Discussions linger 



fashion center with four department* 
stores. 

No outlot buildings would be 
constructed, and the site would be 
surrounded by 2,000 trees to act as a 
shield for surrounding neighbor- 
hoods. 

Preliminary plans show the 



mall having four roadway access 
points: Rand Road opposite Timer- 
lake Drive; Rand Road about 1,200 
feet south of Timberlake; Old 
McHenry Road, halfway between 
Fox Hunt Trail and Bixtone Path; 
and Old McHenry Road opposite 
Equestrian Way. 



Taubman cousultants have 
said the mall would add 20,000 
cars a day to the road on weekdays, 
and 23,000 a day on, weekends, 
nearly tripling the current traffic 
■patterns. 

However, traffic consultants 
hired by ACRE (Area Residents for 
Responsible Expansion) said the 
traffic counts would be 27,000 vehi- 
cles on weekdays and 34,000 vehi- 
cles on weekends if the mall is built. 



$36 M: Road improvements planned 



at Gages Lake Road and it will be 
eliminated," he said. 

The only other road widening 
projects planned are a $7.6 million 
road expansion of Butteriield Road 
from Orleans Drive to North Hunt- 
ington Drive in Vernon Hills and a 
$2.2 million widening project on 
King Drive in North Chicago. 

Other projects scheduled to start 
this year are: 

• A $1.5 million project to rebuild 
Hawley Street from Chevy Chase 
Road to Gilmer Road and bring it up 
to county safety standards. 

• A $2.7 million project for a ma- 
jor reconstruction of Big Hollow Road 
from U.S. Route 12 to the McHenry 
County line. 



• A $1.9 million project to elimi- 
nate a sharp turn on Gilmer Road at 
the intersection of Fish Lake 
Road/Callahan Road in rural Wau- 
conda. 

• A $2.2 million resurfacing pro- 
ject of Quentin Road from Route 22 to 
Route 12 through Lake Zurich. 

County officials say the road im- 
provements, while important, do not 
address all of the traffic congestion 
problems Lake County is facing. 

"We are still falling behind," said 
Buehler. "There's three miles per 
year being added to the congestion 
backlog, and we're only able to ad- 
dress two miles per year." 

County Board officials said al- 



though $36 million has been bud- 
geted for road improvements this 
year, the county does not receive its 
fair, share of state and federal road 
dollars. 

"Road improvements needed 
to increase the capacity for growth 
in traffic have not kept pace with 
development," said Public Works 
and Transportation Chairman 
Committee Bonnie Thomson 
Carter. "While we pursue addition- 
al transportation funding to ad- 
dress that backlog, Lake County 
will have a visible presence but on 
the roads again this season, with 
projects taking place throughout 

the entire county." 



HOROSCOPE 



Aries- March 21/Aprll 20 
A lot of people are depending on 
you when it comes to a business 
decision this week, Aries, Don't just 
think about yourself. You need to 
consider what is best for everyone 
involved — even if that means mak- 
ing some compromises when it 
comes to what you want. Gemini 
plays an Important role. 
Taurus - April 21 /May 21 
You have a lot on your mind, Tau- 
rus. Don't get stressed out about 
everything. Stay calm, and try to or- 
ganize your schedule. You have a 
lot to do, but you can get it all done 
if you prioritize things. If you're still 
nervous, talk to a trusted loved one. 
He or she Is sure to calm you down. 
Gemini - May 22/June 21 
Try to take it easy this week, Geml-" 
nl. You've been busy for quite a 
while. Now that you have a break, 
enjoy yourself, spend some time 
with friends, and Just relax. You de- 
serve it. A close friend needs your 
help with a personal problem. Be 
supportive, and do whatever you 
can for him or her. 
Cancer - June 22/July 22 
Don't get down on yourself for aml- 
nor mistake at work. It could have 
happened to anyone, and no serious 
consequences came from It. Just re- 
lax, and move on. That special 
someone has a surprise for you. 
Don't accept It if you're having sec- 
ond thoughts about the relationship. 
Think about what you really want. 
Leo - July 23/August 23 
You get caught In the middle of a 
disagreement between business 
associates early in the week, Leo. 
While you don't want to get in-, 
volved, you have no choice. Help 
these co-workers to see both sides 
of the situation and work toward a 
compromise. It's not going to be 
easy, but you can dolt. Capricorn 
plays an Important role. 
Virgo -Aug 24/Sept 22 
While you want to be alone this 
week, Vou're not going to get your 
wish. During the day, several co- 
workers need your help with a pro- 



ject, and a loved one monopolizes 
your time during the evening. Be 
there for all of them; it's all you can 
do. However, don't get frustrated; 
they'll leave you alone by the end of 
the week. 

Ubra-Sept23/Oct23 
While you like to be in charge, 
that's not how things work early in 
the week. Let the more qualified 
person take control when it comes 
to a business problem. Pay atten- 
tion to his or her actions, and learn 
from the situation. 
Scorpio - Oct 24/Nov 22 
Don't be possessive when it comes 
to that special someone. He or she 
truly cares for you, but he or she 
also needs some time alone. While 
you're nervous, time apart actually 
will strengthen your relationship. A 
close friend asks you for financial 
advice. This is important, so be 
honest. 

Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 
When it comes to a heart-to-heart 
talk with a loved one, be blunt. 
That's really the only way you can 
get your point across. While your 
words will sting, he or she needs to 



hear them. That special someone 
has an Important question for you. 
Be truthful with him or her. 
Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 
While you need to show your au- 
thority at work, don't be harsh. Take 
the lead, but show your co-workers 
some compassion. They will re- 
spect you tor it. A friend asks a fa- 
vor of you. While you want to help, 
say no. Getting involved will cause 
you a lot of problems. 
Aquarius - Jan 21 /Feb 18 
Don't try to force" your personal 
views onto others, Aquarius. They 
' are entitled to their own opinions — 
even if they are radically different 
from yours. A family friend drops by 
unexpectedly. Don t rush him or her 
out the door; he or she Is there for a 
good reason. Cancer plays an Im- 
portant role late In the week. 
Pisces - Feb 1 9/March 20 
Dont take a loved one's harsh words 
to heart. He or she is going through a 
rough time and just needs to vent a ' 
little. Listen to him or her, and try to 
help ease the situation. A close 
friend has good news and wants to 
celebrate with you. Enjoyl 



Brush two times every day 
using a fluoride toothpaste. 

This tooth tip provided by your local 
Pediatric Dentist at Kids Dentist 



15 Commerce Dr. 
Grayslake 

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February 26, 1999 



COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers /C3 



AT A GLANCE 



A DIGEST OF STORIES MAKING HEADLINES THROUGHOUT OUR REGION 



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Trustee resigns from library board 

Uhertyville— Cook Memorial Library Trustee Linda 
Lucke resigned Monday, but will continue to serve the library 
district. ' 

Lucke, who was appointed to the board late last year, had 
filed for re-election, but was kicked off the April election ballot 
when her filing petition was ruled invalid because the pages 
were not numbered as is required by law. 

In her resignation letter Lucke said, "As you know, I had 
hoped to be able to continue as a member of the board. Since 
this Is not now possible for the near future, I have given some 
thought to alternate methods by which I might continue to 
work for the benefit of Cook Library." 

Lucke will now serve as general chair of the Citizens for 
Cook Library District. 

"Serving In this role will give me the opportunity to do 
everything I can to make certain the referendum I helped 
place on the ballot Is passed," she said in the letter. 

Girl pleads guilty to battery 

Wadsworth— A 16-year-old girl pleaded guilty Monday 
to her Involvement in the attack of her father, a 45-year-old 
Wadsworth man. 

The girl entered a negotiated guilty plea to aggravated bat- 
tery before the Lake County Circuit Court. 

Charges of home invasion, conspiracy to commit home 
invasion, residential burglary and attempted murder were 
dropped as part of the deal. 

The charges were the result of an August 199B incident in 
which the girl and three of her friends entered her father's 
Wadsworth home in an attempted robbery; 

It resulted in the two men beating her father severely. 

The other three participants, a Shannon COlleran, 17, 
Francisco Sosa, 18, and Arthur Fletcher, 18, have all plead 
guilty. 

The juvenile gfrl'\viU face up to 10 years in prison when 
she is sentenced on March 30. 

Authors cater to children 

Wlldwood— Two local authors have sparked the interest 
of children with newly published books. 

Kathleen Lohg-Bostrdm, of WUdwood, is the author of 4 
books: "Who Is Jesus," "What is God Like?," "The World That 
God Made," and her latest book "The Value-Able Chad" 

All four books can be ordered at local bookstores or by 
contacting Good Year/Book Person Learning at 1-800-358- 
4566! 

Priscilln Mitchell,' also of Wildwbbd/published the book 
"Seeds God's Awesome Computers" which can be found at lo- 
cal bookstores or ordered by logging on to Amazon.com on 
the Internet. 

Music for the mind 

Round Lake — One local mother has taken an innova- 
tive approach by teaching music to children ages 18-months 

to4-years. 

Wendolyn Davis, of Round Lake, is director of "Kinder- 
musik." The half-hour classes are structured to allow the child 
to explore his or her creativity trough sound, touch, rhythm, 
and listening. 

Studies continue to suggest that music aids the brain 
during the developmental process. As a result programs like 
"Kindermusik" continue to blossom. 

Davis has noticed the benefits of music with her own 
child, and invites parents and children to try the first class for 

free. , - 

For more information regarding the "Kindermusik pro- 

gram contact Davis at 546-2093, 

Annual comedy night at AJWC 

Antloch— Ahtibch Junior Woman's Club offers its third 
annual comedy night to help lead Antioch residents from win- 
ter to spring with smiles on their faces. 

There are two comedians this year who will provide the 
cornedy-r- Fred Klett arid Patti Vasquez. Both are comedy club 
and television veterans. 

Doors open at 7 p.m. on Saturday, March 6 at St. Peter 
Church's Father Hanley Hall. Tickets are available at First Na- 
tional Bank- Employee Owned, 485 Lake Street, although 




Big Bad Wolf Trial 

Lake County Courts Judge Ray MeKoski makes notes 
during a trial of the "Big, Bad Wolf,"- held by Tamara 
Graham's third grade class Monday at Woodland Ele- 
mentary School In Gurnee. —Photo by Sandy Bre$s- 



ner 



most of the audience buys their $15 tickets at the door. Club 
members also have tickets. 

The evening is more than family-style comedy. It is a visual 
feast of creative and festive decorations. It is an opportunity to 
rent a table and bring friends together for a mutual good time. 
The evening includes a 50/50 raffle, silent auction, and both , 
hot and cold hors d'oeuvres. Adult beverages are available at 
the cash bar. 

Poet to read, teach workshop 

Lake Villa— Lake Villa District Library hosts author Paul B. 
Janeczko on March 2 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. He will read his 
poetry and conduct a writing workshop. 

Janeczko is the author of books for children and adults, is a 
poet,"and Is a former English" teacher who lectures throughout 
the United States. He has prepared many award-winning an- 
, thologies, some of which have been named best book of the 
year by the American Library Association. 

"He's going to give a reading of his poems," said PauJ.Kar - 
plan, a member of the library staff. "He's going to do a poetry 
workshop forages 9 to 90." 

This is truly a family program, according to Kaplan. 

The workshop offers an opportunity for parents and teach- 
ers to help children learn how to write. 

St. Patrick's parade March 13 

Lake Villa— Lake Villa's seventh annual St. Patrick's Day 
Parade will be Saturday, March 13 starting at noon. 

Groups that wish to participate in the parade should con- 
. tact Lake Villa Village Hall at 356-6100. 

The parade will assemble at the Lake County Health De- 
partment parking lot on Grand Avenue. The parade will end at 
Lehmann Park on Cedar Avenue. ' 

After the parade, there will be live entertainment and 
corned beef and cabbage at Lake Villa Veterans of Foreign Wars 
Post 4308. The meal is $5 for adults and $3 for children. 

The parade is sponsored by the Village of Lake Villa, VFW 
Post/1308, and the St. Patrick's Limerick Club. The Grand Mar? 
shall is Maurice Hartnett. 

Woodland referendum passes 

Gurnee— Woodland School District experienced a victory 
Tuesday when the education fund referendum passed with 56 
percent of the votes. There were 2,375 "yes" votes and 1,897. 
"no" votes. . ■ 

' "I think this is a big win for the students of the distnet, said 
Dr. Dennis Conti, superintendent. 

The referendum will result in a 40-cent property tax increase 



. for residents within the district. Board member Marty Pryzgo 
da said the reason the district needs the referendum is be- 
cause of growth. 

Currently, the student enrollment In the district is 5,800. 
That number is expected to grow by approximately 6.6 per- 
cent each year. The education fund pays for teacher salaries. 
The district's teacher base has increased by 52 percent in th 
■past two years. 

Man charged for leaving child alone 

Miindeleln— A Libertyville man has been charged with 
child endangerment after leaving his 8-month-oId child alone 
in a vehicle while shopping, at a store in Mundelein. 

Police responded to a'call at 4:45 p.m. on Feb. 16 regarding 
'. an unattended child left in a vehicle in the parking lot of 
Menards, 120 Oak Creek Plaza. Police found a child in a 1994 
Mazda pick-up truck. 

The owner of the vehicle, identified as Song H. Lor, 35, of 
423 Windsor Terrace, was located at 7:20 p.m. Lor said he 
wanted to shop in the store and opted to leave the child in the 
vehicle, said Sergeant Paul Werfelmann of the Mundelein Po- - 
lice Department. 

Lor was charged with child endangerment and was re- 
leased on a $100 cash bond. Lor is scheduled to appear in 
court on March 8 in Waukegan. The incident was reported to 
the Illinois Department of Child and Family Services. 

County euthanizes killer dogs 

Wauconda— The two purebred huskydogs that killed 
Fritz, a little Yorkshire terrier, are gone. Keystone and Frosted 
were euthanized sometime before noon Feb. 24, said Chief 
Leri Hackl of the Lake County Animal Control Office. 

The dogs had been kept at the Lake County Animal Shel- 
ter in Mundelein from Feb. 10, the day they killed Fritz in the ' 
front yard of his owners Wauconda home, until they were put 
to death by injection. "It is painless and it Is quick," said 
Hackl. 

The owner called Hackl on Feb. 22 by phone from Califor- 
nia, stating he did not want the dogs back. Hackl received a 
signed authorization form on Feb. 24. It had been faxed late 
in the day Feb. 23, the next morning, 

"He said he does not want the dogs back," Hackl said. 
Fritz was killed at around 11:30 a.m. Feb. 10, when the two 
huskydogs entered the yard of his owners home and started a 
fight 





lage s regional 
sewage treatment pTantruns but of capacity. 

. A report conducted two years ago said the plant had until 
2007 before It reached 80 percent of its 9 million gallons per 
day capacity. A study conducted by a new engineering firm 
said the plant is nearing 7.2 million gallons per day capacity 
now, putting it at 80 percent. 

■ I The plant takes in sewage from seven municipalities and 
unincorporated areas, and from the Lakes Regional Sanitary 
Sewer District. ; 

. If the plant needs to. expand beyond 1 2 million capacity, 
to possibly.18 million, the costs will be high, officials said, and 
Mayor Jim Pappas does not want Fox Lake residents paying 
the costs for other communities expansion. 

Open space referendum fails 

Libertyville— Voters denied the Libertyville Township 
open space referendum Tuesday night by a vote of 3,300 to 
2,804, which translates into 54.06 percent to;45.94.percent. 

The referendum asked voters "to issue bonds for open 
space purposes in an amount not exceeding five percent of 
the valuation of all taxable property in the Township." 

Five percent would mean $76 million although the 
Township placed a resolution to cap the bond issue at 
$37 million. 

Libertyville Township Supervisor F.T. "Mike Grar \ 
ham said he felt the requirement by law to word the ref- 
erendum as "five percent" hurt the chances for ap- 
proval. 

Pat Connors, who opposed the referendum, said he , 
was pleased with voters who voted not to have the extra 

tax * 

"Taxes are what sunk this referendum, he said. 



I 









Pick up any of Lakeland Newspapers 1 1 editions in coming weeks for: 



:■• : ■ ■'■ 



QUILTERS 'R US 

Everything at this expo is 
sold for charity, 
— Lakolife 





AFFORDABLE HOUSING 

Lake County's quest to answer the call 
— County 




* m * 



HOME SHOWCASE 

Look for the special section 
previewing the LMV Chamber 
of Commerce Home. 
Improvement Show 



C 4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OPINIONS 



February 26, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers 

William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 



Neal Tucker 

Executive Editor/Composition Mgr. 



Rhonda Hetrick Burke 

Managing Editor 



30 South Whitney St., Grayslake, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (847) 223-0161. E-mail: edlt@lnd.com 



EDITORIALS 

Double standard 
blots public life 

Boll the whole sordid impeachment mess down to this basic 
truth: President Clinton's squalid behavior would not be tol- 
erated — not for a minute — by standards for public officials 
in our community. 

A libertyville teacher plants an indiscreet kiss on a student and 
becomes history in a matter of months. A Wauconda police chief Is 
involved in a liquor incident and is fired. A Gurnee scout leader re- 
lates improperly to boys in his troop and is banished. The local scene 
is replete with many examples of the public's revulsion at improper 
behavior on the part of public servants followed by swift reprisal. 

Have the majority of Americans established a double standard 
that keeps President Clinton in office? That question begs another 
question: How much misbehavior would our community condone in 
our superintendent of schools, our police chief, members of the cler- 
gy? 

A strange ambivalence has overcome the land if we are to believe 
the pronouncements of pundits and pollsters that most Americans 
consider the Presidential behavior essentially private and not sub- 
stantial, even in face of evidence that the rule of law was compro- 
mised and the Constitution violated. 

Massive cultural changes are being hastened by the non-involve- 
ment, non-judgmental attitude that pervades modem society. Amer- 
icans are quick to lash out and sue when their own toes are stepped 
on, but if they're feeling good, they don't want to get involved any- 
more. 

Ryan's 'fits all' budget 
tests Lake's lawmakers 

ake County legislators will be combing Gov. George Ryan's 
$40.6 billion state budget with a "what's in it for us" outlook for 
many weeks to come. As a political document, the governor's 
I message was long on promises. But as an operating docu- 
ment, the budget outlined last week was short on specifics. 

Electors here and throughout Illinois can heave a sigh of relief that 
the governor did not call for a general tax increase. That, in itself, is 
good news. 

As he did during the campaign, Governor Ryan emphasized top 
priority status for education and transportation in his combined state 
of the state and budget address. Nowhere else In Illinois does atten- 
tion to transportation needs carry a more critical label than Lake 
County. If they are doing their job, our local lawmakers should exert 
great effort to direct a significant portion of the governor's $1.59 bil- 
lion road improvement program to Lake County. Need for upgrading 
east-west arterials is so urgent as to beg criticism of belaboring the ob- 
vious. 

.Even while possessing some of Illinois' wealthiest school districts, 
Lake County looks to benefit from Governor Ryan's proposal to spend 
58 percent of new general revenues on public schools. Adults will ben- 
efit from job training initiatives. Chronically underfunded school dis- 
tricts like Round Lake, Woodland, Waukegan and Fox Lake can look to 
new help from Springfield. Prospects are bright for a state income tax 
credit for families with school age children. 

We live in flush economic times, but there is no paucity of prob- 
lems nor challenges. Rather than criticize the new governor for 
promising the moon, he deserves praise for ambition. 

Green up for spring 

The Lake County Soil and Water Conservation District is plan- 
ning its 17th annual tree sale. 
The annual sale offers a large variety of native trees, shrubs, 
wildflowers and grasses that thrive in northern Illinois while 
adding beauty and integrity to the county. 

By participating in the annual sale, homeowners help the district 
manage and protect natural resources in Lake County. 

Pressure from lobbying groups has made advertising of the sale to 
the public nearly taboo, because of fear of competition. Developers 
and local nursery growers don't always see the work of the soil and 
water district as positive. 

When selecting species for sale, the district puts great emphasis 
on adaptability to environmental conditions in Lake County, wildlife 
benefit and windbreak quality. 

The conservation district can aid Lake County residents in select- 
ing appropriate material to enhance conservation on their property. 

Orders are accepted through March 22. Contact the office in 
Grayslake for more information. 



T 



q&^ 

„{*&*&& 




VIEWPOINT 




By Georg 
sports revealed 



Our elation over the in- 
duction of long-time 
family friend George 
Benson into the Wild- 
cats' Hall of Fame afforded a 
convenient opportunity to com- 
pare athletes of old with today's 
pampered, self-indulgent, over 
paid jocks. 

Benson, whose Lake County 
ties go back to his days at 
Northwestern more than a half 
century ago, was among four . 
inductees at a recent ceremony 
at Welsh-Ryan Arena. 

George, a summer-time 
Long Lake resident for many 
years, was always good for de- 
lightful sports conversation that 
guys indulge in at picnics and 
beer parties. I knew him for 
more than 20 years before it 
came out that he had been a 
scholarship athlete at NU. "I 
was just a big kid from Gary, 
Ind., who liked sports," he men- 
tioned. 

Upon pressing, George al- 
lowed that he played "some 
■football and baseball" at North- 
western— "a long time ago." 
That was that, as talk turned to 
NU sports notables during his 
playing days and acquaintances 
in professional ranks. 

Some kid, some playing 
time, all right. At the Wildcat ' 
ceremony honoring Northwest- 
ern sports greats, it turned out 
that the George Benson I 
thought I know was a remark- 
ably versatile athlete in three 
sports, football, basketball and 
baseball from 1939-42. He won 
nine letters and is well deserv- 
ing of NU's greatest sports ac- 
claim. 

Not bad for a big kid from 
Gary, And how different from 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



so many publicity seeking, 
money-hungry, status con- 
scious athletes today. 

George always had a special 
fondness for his hometown, 
even though his sports exploits 
opened doors in business in 
Chicago and Florida. He and 
his wife, Betty, named their son, 
Gary, who is a successful Chica- 
go builder and developer. One 
of his projects is Heron Bay in 
Antioch. 

1/2 right, 1/2 wrong 

This column had the right 
office but the wrong state com- 
menting six months ago on the 
First Lady's lust for future politi- 
cal office. Hilliary Clinton's in- 
terest in running for the U.S. 
Senate went unnoticed by the 
elite media last summer, but it 
made an interesting Viewpoint 
tidbit. 

Mrs. Clinton dropped the 
Senate bid hint at a Maine East 
High alumni gathering in Park 
Ridge that representing her 
home state in the U.S. Senate 
has appeal. We speculated that 
the first opening would be 2002 
when U.S. Sen. Dick Durbih's 






first term is up. Durbin would 
step aside by taking a judicial 
appointment or an ambassado- 
rial post. Seemed like a conve- 
nient fit. Only it looks like 
Hilliary didn't want to wait that 
long. OK, New, York. You got 
HlllTary. J We're not shedding 
any tears. 

Word from Coach 

A group of World War II era 
alums of Libertyville High - 
School was thrilled to learn that 
Coach Art Bergstrom has en- 
dorsed plans for memorializing 
war veterans of the community. 
Coach Bergstrom, a spry 92 and 
residing in San Diego, sent a 
touching note reflecting on his 
football and basketball players 
being snapped up in their teens 
to fight in World War II. Some 
of them never came home, not- 
ed Coach. He and his wife, Eva, 
enclosed a check. We'll be 
watching the memorial project. 
Promise. 

Boating delight 

Lake County boating enthu- 
siasts won't be far from the na- 
tion's biggest antique wood boat 
show of the year scheduled for 
Saturday, Sept. 25, at the Abbey 
Resort, Fontana, Wis. The 
show, being staged in conjunc- 
tion with the Corinne Kreissl 
Memorial Classic Car Rally to 
benefit cancer research, will 
eclipse antique craft displayed 
annually at Lake Tahoe, Calif., 
and Clayton, N.Y, on the St. 
Lawrence River. Addition of the 
"woodies" will give a true land, 
v sea and air flavor to the rally, - 
which already feature's one of 
the biggest displays of antique 
cars in the midwest. 



Guest 
commentaries welcome 

Lakeland Newspapers welcomes guest columns by our readers on topics of general interest. 
Anyone Interested In writing a column can contact Publisher W.H. Schroeder at (847) 223-8161, 
Submissions may be mailed c/o Lakeland Newspapers, P.O. Box 268, Grayslake IL., 60030 or 
fax to (847) 223-881 0. Deadline is Friday at noon; 



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February 26, 1999 



OPINIONS 



Lakeland Newspapers / C5 



PARTY LINES 

PARTY LINES, THE LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS' COLUMN OF POLITICAL OPINION 

IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS. 



Begorra-Po 
St. 





oliticians and St. Patrick's 
1 Day go together like corned 
beef and cabbage. 
Only in office two v 
months, State Rep. Urn Osmond 
(R-Antioch) is stepping out with a 
fundraising event Sunday, March 14, 
with a St. Patrick's theme at the Dou- 
ble Eagle Sports Club, 955 Route 59, 
Antioch. Wouldn't you know that a 
lass by the name of Colleen will be 
in charge of ticket reservations at 
395-2500. 

Wauconda Republicans will be 
carrying on a tradition of many 
years standing when they stage their 
annual corned beef and cabbage 
feast Friday, March 19, at the Wau- 
conda American Legion Post begin- 
ning with cocktails at 6 p.m. 

Congressman Phil O'Crane 
and State Rep. Mark CBeaubten 
are among the notables expected to 
attend. Chairperson Venlta Mc- 
Connell said you don't' have to be 
of Irish heritage to attend. The only 
requirement is a ticket for $13.50. 

Ain't over yet 

Attorney Dan Pierce, a likable 
and durable Democratic politician 
must be listening to Yogi Berra, 
who once opined, "It ain't over until 
it's over." So Pierce is running hard 
"for mayor of Highland park, an of- 
fice he's previously held.-Pierce 
knows the territory. He previously 
served 'two terms as mayor arid was 
an Illinois' legislator 30 years ago 
representing a big piece of Lake 
County. Pierce is challenging first 
term incumbent Mayor Roy 
Geraci. 

Role playing 

Congressman John Porter (R- 

10th) planned to give citizens a 
chance to see how it feels to be a leg- 
islator with a'role playing exercise at 
a forum Saturday, Feb. 27, running 
from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Sher- 
aton North Shore in Northbrook. 

Politicians and St. Patrick's Day 
go together like, well, corned beef 
and cabbage. Only in office two 




Porter: In town 
to talk about 
Social Security 




Graham: 

He'll be back 



months, State Rep. Tim Osmond. 

Analyzing results 

- Libertyville Township Su- 
pervisor RT^'Mike" Graham 

says awkward wording was the 
reason voters rejected his pro- 
posal to extend open space 
bonds in Tuesday's election. 

Graham says required 
wording by the attorneys made 
it appear as through the town- 
ship was asking for more mon- 
ey than it was. The proposal 



was defeated by 55 percent of 
the vote. 

No word yet on how Gra- 
ham intends to acquire more 
land for his open space district, 
but it is sure to come. 

Link optimistic 

State Senator Terry Link (D- 

Vernon Hills) says he is optimistic 
about the proposals Gov. George 
Ryan presented on the issues of ed- 
ucation and transportation in his 
budget . 

Link applauded Ryan's mention 
of the need for compromise and the 
public being tired of partisan bick- 
ering. 

: "Gov. Ryan has laid out the 
framework for some significant leg- 
islation," Link said. 

Wife's bid fails 

County Board Chairman Jim 
LaBelleto wife, Jan LaBelle, lost 
her bid Tuesday to be Mayor of the 
City of Zion, in a three-person pri- 
mary race. 

Ian LaBelle has always been 
supportive of her husband's politi- 
cal career and has been active as a 
city commissioner and on the local 
elementary school board. 

Look for Ian (and Jim) to both 
continue to be voices for the people' 
of their hometown. 

Freshman sponsors bill 

Lake County's freshman State 
Rep. Tim Osmond (Dist 62- Anti- 
och) wants to ensure children have 
access to computers at the turn of 
the century. Osmond has spon- 
sored a bill called the "C Drives for 
kid's Program' which is designed to 
put more computers in classrooms 
and after school programs. 

Under the bill, businesses will 
be able to donate their older com- 
puters to the state. The State Board 
of Education will then contract with 
prisons and community colleges to 
refurbish and upgrade the donated 
computers for use by schools, park 
districts and community centers. 





Ogrin's 'office' 



Folks who follow the Profes- 
sional Golfers Association 
(PGA) tour may have no- 
ticed that Waukegan's David 
Ogrin has been conspicuous by his 
absence. 

Because he didn't finish the 1998 
tour among the top 125 money win- 
ners/Ogrin wasn't invited to six of 
this year's first seven tournaments, 
events in California, Hawaii and Ari- 
zona. However, he Is scheduled to 
be playing this weekend in Tucson, 
Ariz. 

Ogrin won $219,000 competing 
with the world's best golfers last 
year, a tldysum butonly good for 
130th on the money list. Only the 
top 125 players become regulars for 
the following year (it's called exempt 
status), so Ogrin must wait until at 
least five regulars take a week off be- 
fore he Is called to fill in. 

When I saw he wasn't playing, I 
phoned his home in Texas to get the 
straight scoop. David happened to 
be at the "office'' (a nearby golf 
course) so I chatted with his wife 
Sharon. 

"He will be getting into more 
tournaments from now on," she 
said. "All of last year's top 125, after 
having December off, are eager to 
get started in the January and Febru- 
ary events," . 

David did get to play earlier this 
month in the Pebble Beach, Calif., . 
National Pro-Am, but didn't score 
well. However, he and his amateur 
partner, baseball pitcher Orel Her- 
shiser, did very well as a team. ' 

VOrel was great," Sharon said. 
"He played spectacularly. David did-- 
n't putt well, he left a lotof putts 
about a foot short" 

A longtime pal, Paul Azinger, 
whose victories include the 1993 ' 
PGA Championship and a battle 
with lymphoma In tils right shoul- 
der, immediately passed along a 
putting tip, an interesting new tech- 
nique which David is working on. 




■M 



THE 

PFARR 

CORNER 

i JerryPfarr 



The tour is overflowing with tal- 
ent now, and so lucrative that 26 
players earned more than $1 million 
last year. 

, After falling just short of the top 
125, Ogrin once again could have 
sought exempt status at the tour's 
qualifying school, a six-day grind in 
which hundreds of hopefuls vie for 
40 spots. But he needed arthroscop- 
ic surgery to repair wear and tear on 
his left knee. 

A phenpm as a teenager in 
Waukegan, and then a college star at 
Texas A&M, David Is 41 now. He has 
been on the tour, his dream come 
true, for 16 years. The PGApress 
book says, "Ogrin exemplifies the 
determination necessary to make it 
in the 'show.' After 14 years on the 
tour, and 405 tournaments, he 
scored his first victory in the 1996 
Texas Open, fighting off charges by 
Jay Haas and Tiger Woods." 

The victory was worth $216,000 
and, for that year, Ogrin earned 
$573,000. 

David and Sharon, a Texas lass, 
live in a San Antonio suburb with 
their four children: Amy 10; Jessica, 
9; Dana, 6; arid Clark Addison; 5. 

The PGA. press book says David's 

special interests ara Christianity, hi* 

children and the Chicago Cubs. . 4 ; 
C (Clark Addison is named for the 
streets bordering Wrigley Held) • . 

Cub fans have higher hop es : 
than usual this yean and David '?. 
Ogrin hopes to keep earning hefty 
paychecks on the nation's great golf 
courses. It's a tough job but some- 
body has to doit 



tetters welcome 

Letters to the editor are welcome. 

They should be on topics of general Interest, 

approximately 250 words or less. All letters must be signed, 

and contain a home address and telephone number. 

The editor reserves the right to condense all letters. 





Let's not 



ecently the Lake County 
Board elected a new chair- 
man.The chairman of the 
board is chosen by a vote of 
the members of the board. This is 
how most organizations pick their 
leaders. Each of the representatives 
on the board are elected by the vot- 
ers in their districts: 

. It seems reasonable to assume 
that if we elect these people to office 
.we would thlrlk them capable of 
picking their own leader. 

But recently State Senator Terry 
Link has come up with the idea that 
the chairman should be elected by 
popular vote and wants to pass leg- 
islation in Springfield to force Lake 
County to do it this way. That is the 
way that it is done in some other 
places Including Cook County. 

To me, It seems that this would 
givea great advantage to whoever 
has the most money, or in the case 
of Cook County, it is whoever the 
Mayor of Chicago wants. Either 
way it seems like a bad idea. I'm 
sure we coUld go to a referendum 
if we wished, at least it would be 




LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



hip of Lake 




our choice. 

Maybe Senator Link wishes to 
be like Mayor Daley in Chicago. It 
that case, I'm sure there is room for 
two there. You would think there are 
more important matters in Spring- 
field besides forcing Lake County 
into being like Cook County. 

Senator Link, let us, the people 

of Lake County make these calls. We 

do not want to sell this position to 

the highestbidder. It Is a far better 

Idea to let our elected officials on the 

board decide who should be their 

leaders. 

Bob Powers 

Round Lake Beach 

Hawthorn Woods 
disappoints 

We are deeply disappointed in 
you and other members of the Vil- 
lage of Hawthorn Woods board of 
trustees in howyoii have handled 
the situation involving the annexa- 
tion and development of a super re- 
gional-mega mall in Hawthorn 
Woods by theTaubman Company. 
' Furthermore, we are disappoint- 



ed in how you handled Saturday's 
public hearing at St. Matthew's 
Church in Hawthorn Woods. As you 
know, the venue was not large 
enough to accommodate the many 
hundreds of citizens' who wanted to 
attend including many ,of my neigh- 
bors. That was totally unacceptable. 

For the record, we strongly op- 
pose the proposed mall project. 

We look forward to participating 
in this week's public hearings and 
vigorously opposing the mall. In ad- 
dition, we are anxious to exercise 
our voting rights on April 13 not only 
to reject the mall but also to elect 
board of trustees who share our 
same position, morals and values. 
Kevin JR., Susan P., Madeline C, 
and Tristan R. Petschow 
Hawthorn Woods 

Is Mall good for all 

We attended the Feb. 20 Public 
Hearing on the Dimucci annexation 
and zoning matter and frankly were 
appalled by the rude and crude con- 
duct of a large portion of the audi- 
ence. 



In our opinion, their obvious 
disregard for proper decorum not 
only served no useful purpose, but 
in fact prevented and/or delayed a 
civil discussion of the issues. 

Having said that, we would ac- 
knowledge that both sides of the 
question apparently have merit, i.e. 
the trustees arguably should pro- 
ceed with the annexation, but reject 
the requested zoning alternative (if 
certain per-annexation agreements 
are not in place.) 

From what we have read in the 
local news media, and heard dis- 
cussed at the Hearing, you are ap- 
parently bent on enabling the devel- 
' opment of a Mall on the Dimucci 
property. While it would appear that 
a substantial portion of the Village 
residents oppose such an action; ev- 
idently the allure of tax dollars has 
you somewhat mesmerized. 

As it Is obvious that reasonable 
vehicular access from the west will 
be impossible to achieve, the Mall " 
will be, in effect, only serviced from 
three sides; north, south and east As 
anybody presently utilizing these ' 



Board 



feeder arterials, i.e. Route 12 and Old 
McHenry Road will attest, the pre- 
sent configuration of these facilities . 
will in no way accommodate the 
traffic volumes anticipated to be 
generous by Mall visitors. 

An even more significant ques- 
tion that needs to be addressed is 
the apparently rosy real estate tax 
revenue picture that the developer 
has, and will continue to paint. (We 
believe this words were "potential 
benefits"). 

In closing, let us implore you 
to resist being hoodwinked by the 
presentations_of the developers 
hired gun consultants. While they 
may well offer convincing argu- 
ments, keep in mind that they 
were retained to present a pro-de- 
velopment position and, should 
the Village so choose, we are confi- 
dent that other equally qualified 
consultants could present an 
equally compelling argument 
against the project. 

John and Jennifer Rader 

Hawthorn Woods 



C6 / Lakeland Newspapers 




February 26, 1999 



Get it off your chest (847) 223-8073 
Fax (847) 223-8810 e-mail: lipservice@lpnews.com 

Upservice Is a phone-in column presented as a feature of Lakeland newspapers. Lake- 
land newspapers makes no claim to the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland news- 
papers does not claim the content or the subject matter as fact, but as the personal 
opinion of the caller. Lakeland newspapers reserves the tight to edit copy or to refrain 
from printing a message. Call in at 223-8073, fax In at 223-8810, or e-mail at llpser- 
vlce@lpnBws.com and leave your message 24-hours a day. Callers must leave their 
name, phone number and village name, names and phone numbers will not be printed; 
however, callers maybe called for verification. 

No 'clowns' 



In response to "newsworthy" If the 
person would have done some re- 
search, as to the Zoning and Building 
Board (ZBA) he would have found out 
that Planning and Zoning Board mem- 
bers do not vote. Then he had no rea- 
son to call anyone a "clown" Igno- 
rance Is bliss anyway. 

Fox Lake 

Keep up good work 

This is for people that are complaining 
that the newspaper does not cover 
enough sports so their children can be 
the "pick of the litter" arid get their 
faces in the paper. Why would you 
subscribe to a paper that doesn't cover 
the sports to begin with if you are un- 
happy about the coverage? I personal- 
ly, am not a big sports fan, like to keep 
informed of what's going in the world 
so as to keep my children informed of 
the kind of a world they will be raised 
in. I personally enjoy reading the Fox 
Lake Press. I personally like the format 
of the Fox Lake Press and the coverage 
is very good. So, 1 say to you, stop com- 
plaining about simple little matters 
and start your own paper, iflt's that 
much of a bother to you. Fox Lake 
Press-Great job. Keep doing what 
you're doing. 

Ingleside 

Long live Mrs. Heaney 

I'd like to say something to Mr. Lesch- 
er. He says he hasn't heard from Mrs. 
Heaney in a long time. I think he 
should have a better memory recall. 
We Grant High School students have 
been working with Mrs. Heaney a long 
time. She contacts the papers and con- 
tacts the art museums. Mr. Leschcr's 
name is included on the wall of names 
of people who have donated money to 
the art works of children's museum. 
Mrs. Heaney is doing good things for 
Fox lake kids. Grant High School looks 
for our art work to be e-mailed to the 
art museum. 

Lake Villa 

No 'giveaway ads' 

Please stop littering. Give-away pet ads 
arc magic words for those to continue 
medical research or local cult activi- 
ties. I commend Lakeland Newspapers 
for not publishing "giveaway ads." For 
all those who are too busy, too lazy or 
not well informed, please consider al- 
tering your companion or pet. The 
shelters are full and there aren't 
enough good homes to go around. If 
you can't keep your pet, at least ask a 
fee. Don't let pups or kittens younger 
than eight weeks, be adopted. Or, at 
least put it up for adoption. It's not 
only the law but they will not develop 
correctly and will have health prob- 
lems later on. There is a friend wailing 
for you at (he pound or at die shelter. 
He or she is already housebroken and 
needs someone to love. 

Round Lake Beach 

'Cannot tell a lie' 

I feel very bad for what the 45 Democ- 
rats did to this country. It's an embar- 
rassment to let the president off scot- 
free for committing perjurous acts of 
ethics. What does this tell the kids 
now? You can commit a crime now, 
that's perjurous, you can lie to a court? 
We have to set standards in this coun- 
try, that lying or perjury Is not accept- 
able. How can those senators live with 
themselves by doing this? When Clin- 
ton meets his "Maker," I wonder what 
the answer will be. 

Lake Villa Township 

Please do something 

For the mayor of Antioch. Have you 
been reading Lipservice? I am wonder- 
ing what you are going to do about all 
your "snobby" people in Antioch? An- 
tioch used to be a wonderful town 



back In the 70s and 60s. Now it has be- 
come a bunch of "stuck up snobs" that 
won't even talk to yon: People that 
have been longtime residents arc very 
disgusted. Not with you, but all these 
snobs. Is there anything you can do, 
Mayor? ! know that you are a very busy 
person, but this Is growing more and 
more of a concern for me and my fam- 
ily. I have noticed a lot of complaints. 

Antioch 

'Who's judging whom?' 

In response to '^tarr wrong". I saw a 
show the other night. I believe it was 
20-20 about Mr. Starr's past. He had 
offended GMAC because he reported 
Uiat GMAC in the 80s, built a car that, . 
if you hit the bumper slightly, it would 
cause the car to explode the gas tank, 
causing people to be burned alive. 1 
watched it on TV. I really think Uiat 
this senate problem should be dis- 
missed. The president did do wrong, 
but Monica also did wrong. So did Ken 
Starr. So who's judging who here? 

Antioch 

'Wrong example' 

I just watched President Clinton get 
acquitted on impeachment charges 
and 1 am absolutely furious. If any av- 
erage citizen committed perjury or an 
obstruction of justice as die president 
did, they would Find themselves in a 
jail cell right now. Furthermore, I 
watched die majority of die trial, 
which most Americans didn't even 
bother, but Uiey have the nerve to for- 
mulate an opinion as serious as this. It 
makes me sick. I'd also like to add dial, 
what people don't realize Is, there are 
people defending the president when 
he committed sexual harassment and 
settled in the Paula Jones harassment 
case. If he wasn't guilty of that and he 
has a past of sexual harassment of 
women, Uien he wouldn't have paid 
her settlement money. I don't want 
someone like this setting an example 
. for my children who has a past of sexu- 
ally harassing women, lying under 
oath, amongst other things. It's the 
wrong example, and I am furious. 

Round Lake Beach 

Need garbage pickup 

In regards to the article of Round Lake 
in the clean up service. I am a senior. 1 
can usually get someone to take some 
garbage to the street, but I can't get 
someone to haul it away. We used to 
have Uiis service. I don't when or why 
they stopped. It is really needed. 
Thank you 

Round Lake Heights 

What 'slut' town? 

Response to "Who is she" Feb. 12 
Lipservicc. Someone said that Monica 
Lcwinski should be fined, thrown in 
jail, or thrown into some 'slut' town. 
How about sending her to Round Lake 
Beach, Uiat would be a fate worse than 
any of your suggestions. 

Grayslake 

Where's the vendors? 

This paper sponsored the Computer 
Show in Lake County in January. You 
advertised 80 vendors and people of 
different businesses would be there. 
Where were Uiey? My wife and I went 
to see the January show. It stunk. Your 
excuse was, they didn't have time for 
the show to get the vendors lined up. 
Bull, you had plenty of time. 

Lindenhurst 

Impeachment done 

Now that this Impeachment Is finally 
finished, I'd like to give my opinion of 
this verdict. I think it is very wrong 
what happened today. How are you 
going to explain this to little kids or In 
the future, people that ore doing time 
in jail for doing tiie same thing that. 
President Clinton did? The only differ- 
ence is, President Clinton got away 



LAST WEEK'S QUESTION WAS: 

Does- the Clinton presidency mean anything now? 

THIS WEEK'S QUESTION IS: 

Will you retaliate against the Republicans In the next election? 



with it and these other people didn't. If 
1 was them, I would be contacting my 
lawyer right now to try to get out of Jal! 
as quick as I can and say "well, If Presi- 
dent Clinton can get away with It, why 
can't I?" I Uilnk Clinton should have 
been convicted of these crimes. It's 
pretty bad when politicians are more ' 
concerned about the future of their 
own offices Uian Uiey are about the 
law. One thing l am very happy about, 
is at 39 years, 1 have never voted for a 
politician a day in my life and I never 
will, thanks to die vote of today, 

Lake Villa 

So funny 

Was Uiat Llpservlce caller trying to be 
funny, by wanting to name the local 
garbage dump "Mount Carey" for 
Grayslake's Mayor Pat Carey? We are 
getting a lot of benefit from living with 
this small mountain. Let's relegate mis 
whole bad dream, to a place, even our 
brain doesn't know, so we don't have 
to think about it. We could do Uiis, I 
think, if only this smell would go away. 

Grayslake 

Which town? 

In response to "Who is she" Feb. 12 
Lipservice. Just wondering what "slut 
town" you would want Monica Lcwin- 
ski to go to? Perhaps Round Lake - 
Beach or maybe Antioch? Since every- 
one seems to enjoy "slamming" them 
lately. 

Wldivood 




In response to "Ilfchildren" Feb. 12 
Lipservice. Quit whining about your 
loss of money. Haven't you ever heard 
of saving for a rainy day? Out of curios- 
ity, 1 wonder how many people did 
your kids, you or your husband infect 
with pink eye or strep Uiroat, before 
you realized everyone had It? Don't 
you know that both of these diseases 
or viruses arc contagious before it is 
obvious that it's Uiere? Take care of 
yourself and stop whining. Save some 
of your money for Uie next time you 
are sick. Then you are taken care of, 
arcn'tyou?As for the question of the 
week on the Senate Impeachment 
Vote. 1 think the people should leave it 
alone, get away from it and start a new 
life. It's really getting boring. 

Round Lake Beach 

Poor service 

About a restaurant in Gumec. After be- 
ing seated and waiting for a long time, 
my wife and I waited for about eight 
minutes for the attendant. In a busi- 
ness like manner, 1 got up and asked 
the young matrc d' if we could be wait- 
ed on. She replied, sure, probably in a 
minute. We waited five more minutes 
before we packed up and left. I con- 
fronted bath matre d's, a young Greek 
couple, and asked if Uiis is how Uiey 
did business? They had no response. I 
asked if they take their customers for 
granted and Uiey responded "some- 
times." It was unbelievable. I told 
them I would make others aware of 
their abuse to their customers. Next 
step for me Is the village. It's unbeliev- 
able treatment of customers in this 
day and age. 

Gumce 

Buy scanners 

All Antioch residents. I want you all to 
go out to buy scanners to listen to the 
rescue squad and fire department and 
check how long It takes them to re- 
spond to a call. You will notice that 
certain full arrests, fire calls or any oth- 
er major emergencies, takes a mini- 
mum of 10 minutes for these people to 
get mere. I am on a local fire depart- 
ment and I want you all to be aware 
that you need to get better service and 
better care Uian what is provided for 
you. 

Round Lake Beach 

Help educators educate 

I believe Uiat education could be die 
first big benefit in our lives. So why are 
parents making excuses for their chil- 
dren who are just too tired (lazy) or 
overworked? Work should be sec- 



ondary to a student who cannot keep 
his/her grades up. Get Uicm up, make 
them go to school and help Uie educa- 
tors educate. They will probably . 
thank you someday for it. Maybe If 
some of our parents kept on us no 
matter how much we complained, we , 
wouldn't all be out working so hard to 
make such a good life for them. We 
could be home more often helping 
them. 
Fox Lake 



Tough love 



Did you know that there arc a lot of * 
students who fall into Uie category of 
just not wanting to be at school? Some 
students will actually make themselves 
sick just thinking (his way. This Is not 
really a reason to excuse Uicm from 
school. How many times did you want 
to leave work but did not, knowing 
that me consequences could be se- 
vere? We are getting too lenient on our 
students. Those who are sick have to 
be questioned, because the quantity of 
sick students is rising. Sick students 
should be sent home. Students wiUi 
school phobia should be sent to their 
counselors to get to the base of die 
problem. The more you give in to it, 
the more destructive it could be for 
their future. We all want the best'for 
our children, don't we? So, think twice 
about it. Tough love for our children is 
the hardest diing but sometimes the 
best diing. 

Fox Lake 

Trial over 

The impeachment trial Is over and 
President Clinton was not convicted or 
removed from office. News reports 
show Uiat Clinton is experiencing an , 
all time high popularity rating. Some 
say he is a hero by escaping un- 
scathed. What am I missing here? The 
fact that Clinton had an affair with an 
intern depicts his true colors about 
cUiics and morality' although it is not a 
reason for impeachment. Lying under 
oath and misleading the grand jury is. 
What sort of signal are we sending to 
the young people of tills country? Bill 
Clinton's conduct is reprehensible and 
unacceptable. We know Uiat he is an 
expert liar and actor. He abuses power 
to satisfy himself and routinely makes 
other people pay a high price for his 
actions. If he had any backbone at all, 
he would have resigned from office. It 
is unfortunate Uiat politics once again 
played a large roll in Uiis trial. If both 
Republicans and Democrats could 
have looked at the evidence objective- 
ly widiout regard to party loyalties, we 
might have seen a different conclusion 
to this trial. In die end, President Clin- 
ton will meet his Maker and that will 
be die final judgment day. 

Libertyvllle 



Agitt 



Tins is regarding the comments about 
"Home of Mrs, Illinois International" 
signs in WadsworUi. It Is a shame a 
Lipservice contributor, who must live 
in Wadsworlh didn't bother to check 
out the truths before reporting erro- 
neous facts. Wadsworlh has a proud 
husband who paid for his wife's 
"Mrs. Illinois International" sign rid- 
ers and also took care of installing 
them as a gift to her. Again, if this 
person had attended last November's 
village meetings they would have 
known this. 

Watlsworth 

Irreverence to officials 

This is in response to "Thump on 
head." I feel this remark shows a great 
irreverence to a group of officials who 
sacrifice time and effort to make 
Wadsworlh a better place to live. By 
allowinglhese signs to be posted, 
they have shown their willingness to 
support Wadsworlh residents and 
iheir accomplishments; Let's get the 
important issue out of the way first. 
The village did not pay for these 
signs. Also, Mrs. Illinois International 
is not a beauty contest. However, the 
Mrs. International system chooses to 
recognize married women for their 
accomplishments, commitment to 
marriage, and community steward- 



ship. (If there are any ladles who feel 
they qualify, this year's pageant will be 
held June 6th at Mldlanc Country 
Club.) 

Wadstvorth 

Lost a conference 

Congratulations, Rick Johnson for be- 
ing elected President of the Lake Villa 
Timbcrwolves. It's too bad you had to 
call for a special election because you 
lost the first time. Now, our kids won't 
have an opportunity to get into confer- 
ence where they will be able to com- 
pete in it and learn the fundamentals 
of the game. 

Antioch 

Remember to vote 

Do you realize Uiat an election like the 
one on April 13 is the only chance you 
have to change the faces on the 
Grayslake Village board? Let's vote 
in some new bright minds that we 
can trust and feci good about. Peo- 
ple that are friendly, instead of 
"soursnubbers." Do something for 
your town. Vote in some new peo- 
ple April 13. 

Grayslake 

No smoking 

I work for a gas station in Gumec. Wc 
have "no smoking" signs posted on 
our doors. I am tired of customers who 
ignore these "no smoking" signs. You 
have a legal right to smoke, but I also 
have a legal right to work in a smoke 
Tree environment. That is why we have 
"no smoking" signs on our doors. It is 
not my fault that I am allergic to ciga- 
rette smoke. So when I politely ask you 
to stop and put-your cigarette out, 
please do It. Don't letl me that 1 
shouldn't work in a gas station or wilh 
the public, and don't blow your ciga- 
rette smoke In my face. I treat all my . 
customers with respect. Please do the 
same for me. 

Gurttee 

An American 

I am a mother and an American by 
birth 1 believe that President Clinton 
should have resigned for what he did. 
As a president of this country, he Is set- 
ting an example for our men and 
women in the armed forces, and our 
children. How much did he pay these 
people to say he was not guilty? 

WtUlwood 

Point system 

Calling about the "letter to the editor" 
that Larry Lutz had written. Maybe not 
within the last several years, but possi- 
bly within the last five, I ihink he may 
have had his eyes closed. As far as the 
points at registration, when one reg- 
isters their child, where is the point 
book? Why Is he saying more points 
for more work, are you trying to say 
that the board members get the most 
points because they do the most 
work? When you do a volunteer job, 
that's exactly what it is, you shouldn't 
try to look for rewards. I'd like to 
know, how many tickets are these 
board members buying for (he 
fundraisers? Mr. Lutz, how many kids 
do you have playing? 

Fox Lake 

Ex-meat wrapper 

Concerning the article about ground 
meat. 1 had worked as a "meat wrap- 
per" for approximately 10 years in the 
larger super markets in the area. The 
color of the ground beef is brown, not 
purple and it's all the same meat. It 
just bleeds out, from sitting all day. 
Note Uie blood on die bottom of your 
package, What most people don't un- 
derstand, is that the fresh ground beef 
, can be up to four days old. Meat 
wrapped with fresh trimmings, keeps 
that fresh look going on outside. Tiie 
results of this Is Uie brown beef inside. 
I could go Into other, not so fresh sides 
of the business, but won't, I have only 
one bit of advice to those who want 
what they pay for — buy it from your 
small specialty stores In the area. It 
may cost more, but believe me, It will 
bcworihit. 

Lake Villa 



\ 



i 




I 







MINDING 
YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 

Don Taylor 



Dance with 
who brought 
you to the party 

Le'n Baker is one of America's 
top business speakers. He's 
easy to listen to and gives 
you news you can use. 

A few months ago, I heard Bak- 
er speak about the importance of . 
customer service. With tongue in 
cheek he slipped in this line, "Re- 
member, customers are good for 
business." It's a great line and a sol- 
id reminder. 

Occasionally, we all need to re- 
member that customers are good 
for business. They are the only rea- 
son our businesses exist, and they 
provide the means for our long- 
term success. To succeed! we must 
satisfy our customers. 

If operating a business was like 
throwing a dance party, it's the cus- 
tomer who pays the band, provides 
the refreshments and purchases the 
dancehall building. It is our job to 
see that the customer enjoys the . 
party. 

Growing customer 
loyalty 

• Cultivate your most diffi- 
cult customers. Tough cus- 
tomers keep you on your toes. They 
sharpen your service skills and 
make you stretch to new limits. Dif- 
ficult customers force improvement 
and push you to new'standards of 
excellence. 

• Take care of your current 
customers. One of my business - 
clients described how her bank had 
attracted new customers with offers 
of free services and special incen- 
tives. When she asked for the same 
treatment, a bank employee quickly 
explained that these special deals 
applied only to "new" customers. 
My client became a new cus- 
tomer...at another bank. 

• Cultivate your most im- 
portant customers. Several years 
ago I wrote that 20 percent of your 
customers could produce as much . 
as 80 percent of your revenues. A 
reader from Missouri wrote to tell 
me he had doubted my statement 
until he studied his records. He 
found that the top 20 percent of his 
customers generated 83 percent of 
his sales and nearly 60 percent of 
his net income. He promised to fo- 
cus extra effort on his most impor- 
tant revenue generators. 

• All business Is personal. 
You build solid relationships one 
customer at a time. Focus on the 
personal issues. Learn your cus- 
tomer's names, needs and nu- 
ances. The mass marketer tries to 
sell something to everybody. You 
build your niche - your positioning 
strength - by providing the best 
value for each customer personal-. 

iy. 

• Look for customers out- 
side your box. Several months 

ago I visited with a client who is 
building quality products. Most of 
his sales were from one market seg- 
ment. The economy intnis seg- 
ment was soft and offered an uncer- 
tain future potential. 1 encouraged 
this client to look outside the estab- 
lished market - outside the box. Re- 
cently, thedtent's spouse reported 
that they.had shown the product at . 
- a trade show in a completely unre- 
lated industry. The response was 
very strong, and the future looks . 
brighter. Don't let artificial walls 
separate you from potential cus- 
tomers. 

• Beef up your "after-the- 
saie" service. The opera may be 

Please see TAYLOR / C8 




February 26, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers C.7 




Labor markets forecasted to remain tight 



show strong gains 



• The gross domestic product 
(GDP) is expected to rise by 2.6 per- 
cent in the first quarter, with contin- 
ued gains throughout the year, said 
Diane C. Swonk, deputy chief econ- 
omist for First Chicago. 

In her , monthly One View 
newsletter, Swonk said the positive 
outlook, for 1999 stems from the 
economy's exceptional fourth quar- 
ter growth of 5,6 percent. 

"Lastyear's performance ended at 
such a high level that the economy 
does not need to grow much to secure 



almost 2 percent average gains in 
1999," Swonk said. "These trends will 
allow us to hold steady on growth, 
even if we are unable to attain the 
highs of the fourth quarter." 

She said that the fundamentals for 
solid economic gains remain intact: 

• Labormarkets continue to be tight; 

• Real wage gains are expected to re- 
main relatively robust; and 

• Attitudes concerning peoples' cur- 
rent economic conditions, which are" 
a better indicator of spending than 
the overall index of consumer confi- . 



dence, will reach new highs. 

Swonk also said that the mo- 
mentum created by recent housing 
market gains' will make it difficult for 
the economy to soften during the 
first half of the year. However, she 
added, the case for better than 3 per- 
cent growth rests in the hands of the 
U.S. consumer, 

"The bet is that the factors dri- 
ving real wage gains in late 1998 will 
persist, and household spending will 
continue to surprise many analyst on 
the upside of 1999," Swonk said.' 

For the first time in almost three 
decades, the amount of money in 
consumers' pockets is growing. This 



is the result of real wages accelerating 
due to the tightening labor market. 

"The single most important de- 
terminant of consumer spending is 
rising rapidly," Swonk said. "And the 
two-thirds of the U.S. consumer is up 
and running." 

Inflation is a risk, but is ex- 
pected to remain benign in the 
near-term. 

Swonk also noted that the Fed 
eased in the face of ah accelerating 
economy in the fourth quarter. 
Some of that liquidity is likely to don- 
tribute to equity market gains in the 
months ahead if the Fed funds rate 
remains unchanged. 




ens 



Schwab 
Office in 
Libertyville 

Charles Schwab & Co., Inc., one 
of the nation's largest financial service 
firms, has announced the opening of 
it's first office in Libertyville. The new 
office is part of a branch expansion 
program that will add many more of- 
fices nationwide. Schwab's growth of 
investor accounts and assets has in- 
creased the demand for more local of- 
fices. Libertyville joins the North- 
brook and Woodfield offices in Illi- 
nois. The Libertyville office provides 
appointment only service for person- 
al investment consultations. 

James Pontious and Robert 
Kuthrell and are the Senior Invest- 
ment Specialists for the Libertyville 
office located 700 Florsheim Drive, 
Suite 10 in the Florsheini Profession- 
al Centre. The telephone number to 
set an appointment is 847-680-6758. 
Mr. Pontious and Mr. Kuthrell have a 
combined 11 years experience in 
working in various Illinois Schwab of- 
fices. 

Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. serves 
over 5.4 million active investor ac- 
counts with $390 billion in client as- 
sets, through a multii-channel offer- 
ingof the Internet, 288 branch offices, 
automated speech recognition and 
touch-tone telephone brokerage ser- 
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night, 7 days a week. Schwab is a pio- 
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and investment solutions for a grow- 
ing number of online investors. Mem- 
ber S1PC/NYSE (1/99). 




Always learning 

Phyllis Harrington of Gurnee works on a computer as Warren Township High School senior Marci 
Herber looks on and consults on how to efficiently use computers during a session hosted by the 
schooPs'Future Business Leaders of America club.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



THIS WAY TO WEALTH 



Maximize your pension benefits when you are young 



Did you know that, at retire- 
ment, you may have to make a diffi- 
cult decision that could severly im- 
pact your future financial security 
and that of your spouse? At. retire- 
ment, you will have to decide how 
your pension benefit will be paid out 
for the rest of your life. 

You can elect to. receive the max- 
imum retirement check each month 
for as long as you live, with the con- 
dition that upon your death, your 
spouse gets nothing: or, you can 
elect to receive a reduced retirement 
check each month, with the.condi- 
tion that your death, your spouse will 
continue to receive an Income. 

The decision you make will de- 
termine the amount of pension in- 
come you receive for the rest of your 
life." This decision is generally irre- 
versible. In making this decision, 
most people unknowingly purchase 
the largest death benefit they will 
' ever; buy and one over which they 



have no control. . 

Let's look at the results of two 
common pension payout options, 
using a hypothetical example. 

Option 1: "Life Income Option" 
means the employee will receive the 
maximum lifetime pension and the 
surviving spouse receives nothing af- 
ter the death of the employee. In this 
example the employees receives 
$4,000 monthly while the surviving 
spouse receives $0. 

Option 2: "joint and Equal Sur- 
vivor Option; means the retiring em- 
ployee will receive 75 percent of the 
"Life Income Option" while the sur- 
viving spouse continues to receive 
that same amount after the employ- 
ee's death. In this example the em- 
ployee receives $3,000 monthly and 
the surviving spouse also receives 
$3,000 monthly. 

At first glance, Option 2 looks like 
the best solution because in Option 
1, if the employee dies, before, the 



spouse, the spouse is left with noth- 
ing. There is, however, an alternative 
to sacrificing 25 percent of your pen- 
sion benefit in order to provide your 
spouse with a survivor henefit. 

If you are married, federal law re- 
quires that, in order to protect your 
spouse, you must elect a form of 
"joint and survivor" (option two) for 
your pension benefits. This guaran- 
tees that your surviving spouse will 
continue to receive at least one-half 
of your pension income. 

This concept is sound, except 
that you have to pay for a joint and 
survivor payout option because the 
pension benefit is reduced for as 
long as you live. If your spouse dies 
before you, your benefit cannot be 
restored to its unreduced amount. 
All pension payments cease when 
both you and your spouse die. 

The federal law allows a pension 
plan participant to waive the "joint 
and survivor" annually payout re- 



quirement, with the written consent 
of his or her spouse. This means that, 
with your spouse's consent, you can 
elect to receive the maximum life in- 
come option at your retirement 
(Ooptionl). 

Guarantee your spouse will have 
adequate income if you die first. Pur- 
chase life insurance today, before re- 
tirement, while you are younger and 
insurable. Have a qualified profes- 
sional calculate the amount of life in- 
surance needed to continue the de- 
sired income to your surviving 
spouse. 

Your retirement income must be 
sufficient to ensure that the life in- 
surance policy premiums can be 
paid and coverage stay in force for 
•your lifetime.. The spread between 
Option 1 and Option 2 in our exam- 
ple is $1,000 (Option 1 benefit is 
$4,000. Option 2 benefit is $3,000). 

Please see PENSION /C8 



■f- 



C8/ Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



February 26, 1999 



FROM PAGE C7 



TAYLOR: Customer service is 
the key to success 



over when the fat lady sings, but in 
business your "loyalty opportunity" 
begins after the sole is made. Keith 
Deitz, a Canyon, TX contractor, in- 
stalled a new heating and air condi- 
tioning system for us two years ago. 
We've called on him twice since to 
solve problems that were unrelated 
to the system he installed. He re- 
sponded quickly, fixed the prob- 
lems and refused payment both 
times. "You're good customers and 
I appreciate your business," he said 
on the lost call. Are we pleased? 
You bet. Are we loyal? Absolutely. 
Would we recommend his services 



to others? Without reservation. 

• Tune In on what your cus- 
tomers ore saying. Be a good lis- 
tener and you'll be popular with all 
your customers. In addition, you'll 
[earn something. There is no better 
way to build your business than by 
listening to what your customers 
tell you of their needs, wants and 
passions. 

Don Taylor is the co-author of 
Up Against the Wat-Marts. You can 
reach him at Minding Your Own 
Business, PO Box 67, Amarillo, TX 
79105. 



PENSION :Maximize benefits 
while you're young 



You can invest some or all of that 
spread Into the life insurance policy 
and still be ahead of Option 2 with a 
lot more ability to control your own 
finances. 

if you use the pension maximiza- 
tion funded with the life insurance 
option, you and your spouse enjoy 
your full pension benefit (minus the 
cost for the life insurance protection). 
If you die first, your spouse can use 
the income tax-free death benefit to 
provide a lifetime income. 

If your spouse dies first, you con- 
tinue to receive your full pension and 
can continue the life insurance policy 
or use it's cash value to provide addi- 
tional retirement income. If you have 
a financial emergency, you can bor- 
row or withdraw any cash value from 



the life insurance policy. 

Additionally, your children or oth- 
er heirs can be named beneficiaries of 
die life insurance policy if your spouse 
dies first. Under the "joint and sur- 
vivor" option, your children or other 
heirs receive nothing from your pen- 
sion when you and your spouse die. 

Alan Friedlaner is the invest- 
ment specialist with VistaNational 
Insurance Group, Inc. Friedlander 
has primary expertise in investment 
planning, with an emphasis in qual- 
ified and non-qualified employee 
benefit consulting. For questions or 
your free consultation you are invit- 
ed to write This WayTo Walth, 2203B 
Lakeside Drive, Bannockburn, IL 
60015. You may call Friedlander di- 
rect at 847/823-8095. 



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REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Below are real estate transactions for villages in and around the Lakeland 
Newspapers circulation area. Listed are the property address, property buyer, 
and purchase price. 



Allti PcU 



42211 6 th St, Dianne F Pezzati & 

John Duckworth, $125,000 

508 First St, William & Irus Hutch- 

ings, $175,000 

39961 Hidden Bunker Crt, Roland 

& Stella Walenter, $101,759 

704 Main St, Todd & Erin Van- 

heirseele, $125,500 

744 Tiffany Ct, David J Hallwas, 

$124,500 

City 

street . Street Name, Buyer/first 
Buyer/last & Buyer.2/first Buy- 
ers/last, $ 

Fox Lake 

62-5 Aspen Colony, Charles Rojex, 

$40,000 

7424 Clarendon Ct, LilHasTlerney, 

$49,000 

68 Lake Ln, Joel Saxe, $140,000 

26 Lilac Ave, Richter Clavey, 

$87,400 

503 Lincoln, Scott Rees & Denice 

Ross, $125,500 

7233 Oxford, June Duenri, 

$120,000 

Grayslake __ 

560 Chard Ct, Eugenia M 
Grabowski, $91,500 
440 Cross Arm, Charles & Debra 
Jeffrey, $305,000 
848 Grassland Dr, Erma Weibel, 
$215,000 

802 Deep Woods Ct, Robert & Car- 
olyn Strahs, $241,000 
835 Easton Ct, Paul & Julie Reed, 
$144,000 

874 Essex Cir, Amy Bassing, 
$122,000 

1469 Fairport, Troy & Kimberly 
Wood, $168,000 

231 Galway St, Thomas & Mary B 
Wilkin, $231,000 
260 Heather, Alisa Yingling, 
$101,000 

991 Highgate Ln, Sandeep R & 
ManishaS Patel, $215,339 
996 Highgate Ln, Ronald A & 
Sharon L Damitz, $214,264 
634 Indian Path Rd, Joseph J & 
CydneyMuti, $308,669 
77 Jamestown Ct, Gerald Jenrich, 
$375,000 

436 Lexington Ln, Gregory N & 
Marnie R Pedersen, $170,000 
1387 London Ct, Peter D Petracik, 
$180,000 

18171 Meander Dr, Robert W & 
Carey D Fox, $267,000 
1082 Potomac Ct, John E Walters, 
$292,500 

1346 Prairie Trail, Thomas W & 
Patty Bennett, $409,192 
24087 W Rt 60, Patricia A Bruno, 
$310,000 

18319 WSpringwood Dr, Bradley 
C Feldman, $230,440 
18283 WSpringwood Ln, Gregory 
& Lisa A Hunt, $244,500 
17711 W Stone Manor Dr,Berle& 
Patricia Ann Hopkins, $409,409 
668 Waterford Dr, Gregory O 
Leary, $224,000 
350 Woodland Dr, Craig A Katzen- 



maier & Melissa A Costello, 
$154,000 

Gurnec 

901 Abingdon, Jon T Davis, 
$67,000 

669 Beth Ct, Thomas P Burke, 
$97,500 

883 Blackburn St, Glen & Catina 
Roeck, $135,000 

990 Blackburn St, Craig Sprovach 
& Denise Spovach, $209,000 
7428 Bradfird Crt, Kevin P Mc- 
gowan & Insun Ho, $314,005 
7401 Brentwood Ln, William G & 
Wanda MNlles, $348,270 
7640 Cascade Way, Steven B & 
Kristin J Trapp, $256,411 
7686 Cascade Way, Todd M & Lisa 
M Wolf, $337,639 
7702 Cascade Way, Garett R & 
Debby L Garofolo, $323,599 
690 Chandler #410, Veronica Mary 
Olson, $87,000 

945 Clark Dr, Michael W Myers, 
$96,000 

17695 Dawn Ct, Joy & Stephen 
Wilkins, $202,000 
6286 Eagle Ridge Dr, John Napi- 
orkowski, $170,000 
4465 Eastwood, Laura ETrujillo, 
$225,000 

36551 Edgewood Dr, Tim Hernan- 
der, $131,500 

900 Fuller, Donald & Karen D Ster- 
ly, $183,900 

298 Greenleaf, Walter Kzos, 
$168,750 

338 Hawthorne, Yolanda & Peter 
Dickson, $153,000 
505 Hickory Haven Dr, Michael J & 
NadineCVito, $210,000 
36561 N Douglas Terrace, William 
D&Dixel Ray, $112,000 
33973 N Hunt Club Rd, Francine & 
Barry Kamensky, $175,000 
36554 N Old Wood Tr, Nathan & 
Sandra Hyde, $368,750 
34040 N White Oak Ln, Susan Cog- 
ley, $108,000 

34498 Old Walnut Cir, David P 
Hogan, $204,160 
6732 Roanoake Ct, Chang & Mi 
HeeYoo, $127,500 
4432 Robin Ct, Rudolph & Theresa 
Zeithammel, $130,314 
682 Rolling Green, Susan J Church 
Singer, $170,000 

36865 Rosedale, Octavio Cavazos, 
$159,900 

7017 S Stratton #02d, Jonathan J 
Carreira, $115,900 
6271 Sleepy Hollow Ln, Winston E 
& Mary C West, $195,000 
920 Vose Dr #501, Louis R & Louise 
Bruno, $119,000 
17682 W Dawn Ct, Richard A & 
Janet D Turner, $207,000 
34 105 Whiteoak Ln, Kay F Kle- 
mens, $121,000 

607 Whitney, William Belmont, 
$95,500 

607 Whitney Ct, William Ty Bel- 
mont, $95,500 

4290 Woodlawn, Jonathan Rund, 
$173,500 



jHimrthnrae Woods 



145 Glen Rd, Eric C & Deborah A 

Hotmblad, $295,000 

55 Parkview, Timothy Oleary, 

$490,000 

Ingleslde 

25053 Brodie Dr, Bryan & Elaine 
Renkal, $115,500 
707 Crestview Dr, Shari Alaniz, 
$128,500 

26646 Elmwood, Donald Bergllnd, 
$107,500 

35703 Helendale, James & Diane 
Faller, $120,000 

34690 N Lakeside Dr, Emella M 
Koencmann, $144,460 
36797 Ridge Rd, Donald Thrun, 
$81,400 

26200 W Vista Crt, Michael R & 
Nicole M Carstens, $210,430 
26192 W Vista Ct, Brenda L Kay, 
$183,998 . 

26196 W Vista Ct, Scott L Novak & 
Mary KNorrls, $175,483 
26252 W Vista Ct, Joseph F & Patri- 
cia M Vavrina, $158,239 
26359 W Vista Ct, Patrick & Penny 
Cummings, $229,987 . 
36920 Waterside, Johnny & Shelly 
Jensen, $129,000 

Luke Villa ' 

889 Breeze Dr, Aloysius Lai, 

$243,840 

35298 DruryLn, Cambridge 

Homes, $239,200 

22035 Engle Dr, Kathleen Edl- 

mann, $75,000 

899 Harvard Ct, Adam & Emily 

Rudman, $482,500 

150 Oakwood Ave, Donald & 

Pamela Peleska, $105,500 

2 1445 Sarah Dr, The Secretary Of 

Hud, $77,643 

24037 Saxony, James Hinnman, 

$235,000 

1213 Sun Lake Ct,IgbalH& 

Sharon A Khan, $169,394 

Lake Zurich 

753 N Old Rand Rd, Sharon I Ayl- 
ward, $195,000 

Ltbertyvllle A 

291 Crescent Knoll, James Do- 
minik, $202,500 

1322 Downs Pky, Steven J Bohne, 
$175,000 

1213 Flamingo Pky, Susan C Van 
Den Hall, $140,000 
29805 Forest Lake Ln, Jeffrey M 
Winton, $493,241 
765 Garfield, Jane Ellen Vickerilla, 
$.155,000 

1827 N Countryside, James J & 
Deanna R Willemsen, $255,000 
- 1601 Nathan Ln, Rapheal E & 
Raquel A Martinez, $389,391 . 
1016 Tall Tree Ter, James & Cindy 
Lenart, $217,000 
28601 Tanglewood Crt, Avrom & 
Kathleen M Roberts, $460,000 
1609 Virgina Ave, John J & Mary 
Ellen Boyne, $323,500 
17169 W Cunningham Ct, The Na- 
tional Bank Trust Company, 
$165,641 

17177 W Cunningham Ct, Roxanne 
E Miller, $182,890 
17185 W Cunningham Ct, Andrea 
L&Ara Pedian, $171,450 
122 W Golf Rd #3-1, Krey Peterson, 



Please see REAL ESTATE/ C9 



I 



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I 



C9/ Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



February 26,1999 



FROM PAGE C8 



i 



REAL ESTATE:Whose 



buying homes in neig 



$134,000 

126 W Lincoln, Kenneth & Susan 

Welter, $238,000 

Undenhurst 

2305 Glendale Ct, David Padilla & 
Angela Kramer, $122,000 :• 
112 Hickory Dr, Tracy Bomkamp, 
$129,900 

274 Jamine Cir, Brian O & Jennifer 
L Fuller, $161,560 " 
278 Jasmine Cir, Ebrahim K & 
■ Shabham Jahroml, $1691680 
25 10 Timber Ln, Thomas & Susan 
Derrick, $117,761 . 
539 WaterfordDr, Phillip B 
Thomason & Karen LChisholm, 
$124,900 

Miindcleln 

821 Ambria, Todd & Kelly Bow- . 
land, $275,000 

1233-b Ballantrae, Christine Price 
& Paul Stephan, $90,000 
1657 Blackbum Dr, Marci Moss, 
$217,000 

1112 Crystal, Jeffery & Bobbi J : 
Rudolph, $192,000 
737 E Mckinley Ave, Tad A & 
Colleen T Dennis, $121,000 
825 E Orchard Rd, T Dale Johnson, 
$68,000' 

1212 Huntington S, David N & Su- 
san B Kretchman, $125,000 
174 N Sylvan, Jerry A Kroll & Judith 
Snyders, $200,000 
1407 Orleans Dr, Walter R BIase\ 
$117,900 

925 Raleigh Rd, Chad S & Karen S 
Pompilio, $159,000 
1205 Regent Dr, David M & Brenda 
J Henreckson, $140,000 
301 S Lake St, Terry Belter & 
Meaghan Maccallum, $1 18,000 ! 
205 S Lincoln AVe, Erie Lundquist 
& Kimberly Engman, $162,500 




140 S Linden, Debra Lynn, 
$135,000 

31 S Windsor PI, Todd R Breitne- - 
field & Karen A Breitenfield, 
$167,750 

19458 W Harvard, Leovardo & .' 
Federico Hernandez, $137,000 
20220 W Indian Creek Rd, Paul 
Davis, $460,000 

574 Woodcrest#574, Gwendolyn - 
Wllke, $1,14,000 
Round Lake 

603 Linden Dr, Philip V Poprawski, 
$79,000 

401 N Barnwood Ct, VInce & Enza 
Baratta, $168,681 
Round Lake Beach 
108 Beachview, Ramon Gonzalez, 
$122,900 

1531 Cherokee, Juan Dominguez 
& Juan Haro, $109,000 
276 Claredon, Roberto Gil, 
$114,000 

354 E Stanton Ct, Melka C & Todd 
A Claerhout, $149,721 
386 E Stanton Ct, Curtis J & 
Thomas J Leach, $148,335 > 
525 Heather Ter, The Secretary Of 
Hud, $111,906 

1604 Juneway Terr, Charles N & 
Janet M Roeske, $92,750 , 
2226 N Canterbury Ln, Christo- 
pher N & Krista A M Jackson, 
$175,625 

2300 N Canterbury Ln, Steven M 
Upinski & Catherine L Ferguson, 
$200,110 

1520 N Channel, Leyda Hernandez 
& Jeffery Golemo, $87,000 

2301 N Silver Oaks Dr, AureHo& 
Cecelia Villa, $168,419 

2253 N StonehedgeCt, Timothy C 
& Andreal Shales, $151,739 
1429 North Ave, The Secretary Of 



Hud, $123,091 

2377 Sunrise Dr, Jeffrey 8i Laura L 

Rorhig, $158,000 

1208 Woodrldge, Jorge L& Fabian 

Guzman, $117,500 

Round Lake Heights " 

824 Rollins Rd, Victor lil Nix, 

$165,000 

Round Lake Park 

427 Greenwood, Frederick A Mon- 

temarano &t Kevin C Mihalko, 

$96,000 

213 Kenwood, Samuel & Susan 

Meroni,$ 

Wadsworth 

4221 Gent Dr, Robert L& Kimberly. 
Fisher, $228,000 

2773 N Augusta Dr, Michael J Lam- 
bert & Wendy J Hurt, $117, 100 
36780 Thoroughbred Dr, James E : 
& Mary Pat Nickell, $465,000 
14610 Wadsworth, Robert R &\ 
Theresa Bbersma, $210,000 

Wauconda •: 

1000 Brown St, Dennis Malinoski & 
Charles Schott, $1 12,000 
309 Brown St, Ronald O & Rose- 
mary Gutman, $140,000 
231 C Brett Circle, Diane Hanson, 
$89,000 . 

512 Greenview, Jerrold Clemens, ' 
$240,000 

388 Hollow Hill Dr, David R & An- 
gela E Hammer!, $310,000 
112 Hubbard Ct, Elizabeth G 
Lisafeld & John R Gross, $1 10,500 
1002 Monroe St, Kathy K Olson, 
$135,000 

26730 South Main St, Jerry 
Delawrentis &' Maria Till, $225,000 

Wlldwood 

33157-Us Hwy 45, Warren Ed- 
wards Builders! $235,000 



Information provided by Record Information Ser- 
vices, Inc. in St. Charles. Tliecompanyprovides 
public record data for Lake, DuPage, Cook. Kane, 
McHenry t Kendalland Will counties including ~ 
new incorporations, business licenses, bankrupt- 
cies, foreclosures, judgments, mecliank liens, state 
and federal tax liens, residential and commercial 
real estate transfers, building permits, DUI arrests, 
divorce reports, sheriff saleforeclosures, (630)365- 
6490, pubtk-record.com. 




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associ 
Grand in Ing 
for 1998 



Four associates at RE/MAX 
Grand, 727 Grand Ave., Ingleside, 
have been honored by RE/MAX 
of Northern Illinois for their out- 
standing-sales achievements- in 
1998. This places them In a se- 
lect group ^among more than 
2,500 sales' associates in 119 
RE/.MAX offices across northern 
Illinois; 

RE/MAX associates can 
achieve membership in one of the 
four honorary clubs based upon 
the commissions they earned over 
the course of 1998. the most ex- 
ceptional sales performance ' Is 
honored; by membership in the 
Platinum Club. Other top achiev- 
ers can earn a spot in the 100 per- 
cent Club, Executive Club or Pres- 
ident's Club. 
100 percent Club 

Annual sales of the 100 percent 
club members range from S3. 5 
million to $8. million. Carolyn 
Theesfield earned 100 percent 
Club membership for her 1998 
sales achievements. 




Executive Club 

Members of the Executive club 
typically have annual sales of $2 
million to $3.5 million/ Sharon 
Kennedy was named to Executive 
Club membership for 1998 for her 
achievements. 
President's Club 

Annual sales In the $1 million 
to $2 million range earn member- 
ship in the President's Club. Hon- 
ored for reaching this sales mile- 
stone were Susan Gust and Linda 
Mortehsen. 

The RE/MAX of Northern Illi- 
nois network has led the Chicago 
metropolitan residential real es- 
tate market each year since 1989 
in closed volume. In 1998, its 
closed sales volume exceeded 
$9.2 billion. Since 1995, one out 
of four homes sold In 
Chicagoland was listed, by 
RE/MAX International network, 
with 53,000 members operating 
from 3,200 independently owned 
and operated full-service real es- 
tate offices in 28 nations. 



Bersani, Stark pass $1 million mark 
at Century 21 Kreuser and Seiler 



Brenda Bersani arid Judy Stark 
passed the SI million mark in 1999 
sales production during the month 
of January, reported M.J , Seiler, 
Co-owner of the Libertyville based 
firm of Century 21 Kreuser arid 
Seiler. 

Bersani is a longtime Lake 
County resident and is an active 
member* of St; Gilbert's Catholic 
Church where she serves as a Eu- 



charistic Minister and on the 
Helping Hand committee, she and 
■ her husband, Joe, and family live 
inG-rayslake. 

Stark is a member of the Liber- 
tyville Parent CATS organization 
and serves as the Finance chair- 
man for St. Maty o£- Vernon. 
Catholic Church. She and her hus- 
band, Dick; and family live in the 
Deerpath area of Vernon Hills. 



LVi'' 



Pam Hideriotis takes 
listing honor at Century 21 

Antioch resident Pam Hideriotis 
("Pam Hi") took top honors at the Lib- 
ertyville office of Century 21 Kreuser 
and Seiler In listings taken.with 4.5 
million In the month of January, re- 
ported Tom Kreuser, Co-owner. 
Hideriotis finished up calendar year 
1998 with production exceeding $6.7 
million. 

An award winning agent since en- 
tering the business in 1984, Hideriotis 
has earned the Century 21 Master 
Club and Centurion designations. 
Pam is an active member of the 



Audubon 
Society and 
Ducks Un- 
limited orga- 
nizations. A 
Lake County 

•resident for 
over 25 

. years, Pam 
and her hus- 
band, Jim, 






\ @ 



M. 



Hideriotis: Top 

In January listings 

live in unincorporated Antioch. 

Other Listings in January includ- 
ed Gina Collins and Brenda Bersani. 






B*G CYCLERY 

(847)740-0007 

131 E. Rollins • Round Lake Beach 

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33860 N. Hwy. 45 

Gages Lake, IL 60030 

Fax (847) 223-4887 

Business (847) 223-4800 




MOVE-IN CONDITION TRI-LEVEL 
.On quiet street in Wildwood, .lovely wooded 
property with sun porch and walk-out 
basement,' Newer roof cV carpeting, ceramic 
bath, new kitchen floor. $122,900 



BRAND NEW 2-STORY 
Be lit to own . this J BR, 2 BTH 
contemporary. Volume ceilings, liv/din 
combo, 1st floor master suite, oak cabinets, 
deck, generous closet space & 2 car. garage. 
RoundLakc Beach $129,900 



TRANSFERRED OWNER SAYS SELLI 

Come view this pondfront 4 BR, 2 1/2 DTI 1 
2-siory and make in offer! Many cstras already in- 
closet organizers, window treatments, ciir a cabi- 
nets in kitchen & garage, ceiling fans, water filter 
& more. Round Lake Beach SU3,90D 






C10 /Lakeland Newspapers 



February 26, 1993 



A Funeral Home Serving 
All Your Needs 

Over 50 Years Of Caring, Dignified Service 




**-.iXVTVA>Wr.i: 



Family Owned & Staffed 



♦> 



Traditional Services 



♦ 



♦ Pre-Planning ♦> Cremation Services 

♦ Serving McHenry & Lake Counties 
Out Of State Arrangements ♦ All Faiths 

♦ Available 24-Hours A Day 

K.K. HAMSHER 

Funeral Home Ltd. 



847-587-2100 
815-385-1001 



12 N. IMSTAKEE LAKE RD • FOX LAKE 
1 BLOCK WEST OF BT. 12 - 1/2 BLOCK NORTH OF GRAN 



DEATH NOTICES 



NOVAK 

Andrew B. Novak, age 51 of Wadsworth 
Am Marsh Funeral Home of Gurnce 

WEBB 

Jack Webb, age 42 of Mundelein 

An: Kristan Funeral Home, PC, Mundelein 

BLOUCII 

Donald E. Blouch, age 73 of Mundelein 



Am Kristan Funeral Home, Mundelein 

DVORCHAK 

Anna M. Dvorchak, age 80 of Lake Zurich 
Am Ahlgrim and Sons Funeral Home, Lake 
Zurich 

REIUO 

Virginia L Relllo, age 77 of Gurnce ' 
Am Marsh Funeral Home ofWaukegan 



The Deadline for Obituaries & 
Death Notices is 10 a.m. on Tuesdays. 



1 - .1 V *' 



i ■**<*"- *- . 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Funeral Directory 



JUSTEN'S ROUND LAKE FUNERAL HOME 

222 N. Rosedale Court (Rosedale at Cedar Lake Road) 
■ (847) 546-3300 
Nancy Justen & Mark Justen, Directors 
Additional Locations in McHenry and Wonder Lake 

K.K. HAMSHER FUNERAL HOME, LTD. 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Rd., Fox Lake, IL 
" (847)587-2100 
Kenneth K, Hamsher, Debra Hamsher Glen, Directors 

RINGA FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2146 

Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

Dan Dugenske, Director 

(847)395-4000 

SPRING GROVE FUNERAL CHAPEL 

8103 Wilmot Rd., P.O. Box.65, Spring Grove, IL 60081 

Kurk P. Paleka, Director 

(815) 675-0550 orToll Free (888) 394-8744 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL AND CREMATORIUM, LTD. 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake, IL 

(847)223-8122 

David G. Strang and Richard A Gaddis, Director 



Virginia F. Johnson (nee Carlson) 

Age 82 of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. passed away Feb. 14, 1999 
tn Dcltona, Fla. she was bom Dec. 29, 1916 in Chicago and 
had made her home in Round Lake Heights for over 40 years 
retiring to Ft. Lauderdale in 1 9B8, Mrs. Johnson was employed 
with the First State Bank of Round Lake as the head book* 
keeper, retiring in 1902. 

She leaves her children, Diane Qulglcy of Fairfax, Va., 
Leonard (Sandra) of Inglcsidc, Roy (Barbara) of Dcltona, Fla. 
and Robert (Karen) Johnson of Salem, SQ nine grandchildren 
and 10 great 'grandchildren. Also surviving are her sisters, 
Dorothy (Carl) Hummel of Crystal Lake and Norma 
_ Daniel son of Watertown, Wis.; several nieces and nephews. 
She is preceded in death by her husband, Albert in 1964 and 
sister, Margaret Awvc In 1997. 

Funeral Services were held at Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake with the Pastor Robert 
Melselwjtz of the St. Pauls Lutheran Church of Round Lake, 
officiating. 

Interment followed at Rldgcwood Cemetery in Des 
Plalncs. 

Memorials maybe given to the American Cancer Society 
In her memory. 

Louise J, Hamer 

Age 95 ofWUdwood, passed away Friday, Feb. 12, 1999 at 
Condeil Medical Center in Libcrtyville. Bom Jan. 23, 1904 in 
Mobile, Ala. She had made her home in Libertyville for more 
than 40 years and retired to Wildwood 10 years ago. She was a 
member of Calvary Presbyterian Church; 

Louise leaves her children, Dorothy (Orric) Friedberg of 
Chicago, Charles II Hamer ofWiJd wood and George E Hamer 
of North Chicago; 13 grandchildren; 21 great grandchildren 
and three great, great grandchildren. She Is preceded in death 
by her husband, Charles Hamer II. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake 

Graveside Rites were held at Wood National Cemetery, 
Wood, Wis. with Rev. Lisle J. Kauffman of Calvary Presbyterian 
Church, officiating. 

John D. Flister 

Age 46 of Antioch, passed away Thursday, Feb. 18, 1999 at 
his home. He was bom May 1, 1952 in Janesvilie, Wis., the son 
of Odell B. and Helen (Rogers) Fllster. He moved to Antioch tn 
.1975 and was a member of Faith Evangelical Lutheran 
Church. John was a graduate of Carthage College in Kenosha, 
Wis. and worked as a consultant with Whittman-Hart, Inc. of 
Milwaukee, Wis., since August of 1988. Previously lie was 
employed as an accountant with Mazer Chemicals and PPG 
of Gumee and was a former consultant with KPMG Peat 
Marwick In Chicago. On Oct. 19, 1974, he married Gall 
Mephom In Ft. Atkinson, Wis. 

Survivors Include his wife, Gall and children, Abigail, 
Michael, Annabel and Matthew, his parents, Odell and Helen 
Fb'sterof Janesvilie, Wis.; his brothers; James (Joni) Fllster and 
Odell (Julie) Fllster Jr. arid his sister, Constance (Delmar) Cox 
all of Janesvilie Wis. He is preceded In death by his sister, 
Susan Kay Fllster. 

Funeral Services were held at Faith Evangelical Lutheran 
Church, Antioch with Pastor Gregory Hermanson, officiating. 

Interment was private In Evergreen Cemetery, Ft. 
Atkinson, Wis. 

Friends and family visited at the Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch. 

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Faith 
Evangelical Lutheran Church, in his memory. 

r 

Jack Robert Harrington 

Age 73 of Cumming, Ga., who passed awayTuesday, Feb. 
17, 1999. 

Surviving family members include; his wife, Ruth K. 
Harrington of Cumming, Ga.; daughter, Shelley Anne 
Johnson of Cumming, Ga., Lorl K. (Joseph) Brubec of 
McHenry; sons, Jack E (Mariene) Harrington of Woodstock; 
Ga., Daniel G. (Julie) Harrington of Buffalo Grove, Clifford H. 
Harrington of Gainesville, Ga., James R. (Vicky) Harrington of 
Algonquin; sister, Shirley (Ray) LeDuc of Ann Arbor, Mich; 
five grand daughters; five grandsons and one great grand 
daughter, several nieces and nephews. 

Funeral Services were held at Deer Creek Shores 
Presbyterian Church with Rev. Scudder Edwards and Rev. 
James Kelso, officiating. 

Services were held at McDonald and Son Funeral Home 
of Cumming Ga. 

Memorial gifts should be made to the Deer Creek Shores 
Presbyterian Church Building Fund. 

Anita J. McBrearty (nee Talk) 

Age 75 , passed away Sa'turday, Feb. 13, 1999. Bom In 
Galesburg, a member of St. Gilbert's Church. 

She Is survived by her husband of 57 years, Jack L 
McBrearty; daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs.Thomas H. 
Eddy of Grayslake; daughter-in-law, -Mrs. Michael J. 
McBrearty of Apple Spring, Tex.; eight grandchildren arid four 
great-grandchildren. She is preceded In death by her son, 
Michael J. Brearty. 

A Funeral Mass was held at St. Gilbert's Catholic Church 
in Grayslake with Father Beaven, officiating. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake. 

Interment was at Curlew Hills Memory Gardens In 
Florida. 

Norbert 1. Raymer 

Age 76 of Round Lake, passed away Feb. 17, 1999, He was 
born in Chicago on Sept. 22, 1922. 

He is survived by four daughters, Janice (Richard) Fietze 
of Waukegan,' Janet (Peter) Lishamer of Ingleslde, Jackie" 
(fiance, Bill Catrette) of Spring Grove, JUJ (Richard) Speidell of 
Bakcrsfield, Calif; two sons, Jeffery Raymer of Round Lake, Jim 
(Lien) Raymer of Reno, Nev.; grandchildren, Ronald and 
Felicia Fietze, Jenifer (Carl) Williams, Jeff- Fietze (fiancee, 
Erlka) Peter Lishamer Jr., David Raymer, Nicole Dox, Gunnar 
Conglusti, Heather Speidell, Brittany Congiustl; great grand' 
children, Carl Joseph Williams and Craig Williams. He is pre- 
ceded in death by his wife, Marion, his brother, Ralph and 



mother and father. 

Arrangements were entrusted to Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake. 

Wallace Joseph Weirich 

A resident ofFbx Lake, and a seasonal resident of Sunday 
Lake, Minocqua, Wis., died Tuesday, Feb.' 16, 1999 in 
. Llndenhurst. He was a former resident of Barringto ri. He was 
born in Chicago on Dec, 16, 1912 to a longline of Chlcagoans, 
dating back to the Chicago Fire. Mr. Weirich attended the 
University of Illinois In Champaign, graduating In 1935 with a 
degree In mechanical engineering. During WWII, he was 
employed as a general foreman with AC Spark Plug In Flint, 
Mich., that manufactured Air Craft Bearings for all the war 
time aircraft, and was a pioneer engineer In the plastics 
Industry. In 1976, he retired from Loren Tool Manufacturing 
Co. In Franklin Park as co-founder and president of the com- 
pany. He was a member of St. Peter's Catholic Church In 
Spring Grove and was an avid wood carver, golfer and gar- 
dener. 

Survivors Include; his wife, Helen (nee Gutcnkauf) 
Weirich of Leisure Village, Fox Lake; one son, Roger (Donna) 
Weirich of Palatine; two daughters, Kathleen VanElla of Lake 
Forest, Marianne (Charles) Kueckcr of Gary; grandchildren, 
Alcen (fiance, John Malloy) Van Ella, Erica (Mark) 
Krzyszkowski, Christopher, Kathryn and Cynthia Kueckcr; 
two brothers, Arthur (Lorayne) Weirich and the late Fred 
Weirich. 

Family and friends visited at the K. K, Hamsher Funeral 
Home, Fox Lake (The Chapel on the Lake). 

A Catholic Funeral Mass was held at St Peter's Church, 
Spring Grove. 

Interment was held at Wlndridge Cemetery, Guy 

Arthur G. Schobcr 

Age 96 of Round Lake, passed away Tuesday, Feb. 16, 
1 9 99 a t Vic t o ry Lakes Continuing Care Center in Iindenh u rs t. 
He was bom Oct. 19, 1902 in Chicago and had lived there for 
many years before moving to Round Lake In 1967. He was a 
member of the Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church in 
Ingleslde, the Rising Sun Masonic Lodge 1 15 In Grayslake. He 
was a very active board member with the Long Lake 
Improvement Association Operation Clear Water In Long 
Lake and was past president and board member, of the. 
Pleasant Hill Improvement Association. Mr. Schobcr worked 
as a sheet metal worker and was also a member of the 
International Association of Sheet Metal Workers Union Local 
73. In 1948, he married his wife, Helen in Chicago. 

Survivors include his wife, Helen, and two nephews, Alan 
Schobcr and Lee Standers, He Is also survived by dearest 
friends, Jim Boness, Betty Raymer and Leslie White. 

. Funeral Services were held at the Ringa Funeral Home, 
Lake Villa with the Rev. W. Paul Wceg of Trinity Evangelical 
Lutheran Church, officiating. 

Interment was at Avon Centra Cemetery, Grayslake 

Joseph F. look 

Age. BO of Llndenhurst, passed away Monday, Feb. 15, 
1999 at his home. He was born March 14, 1918 in Chicago, the , 
son of the late Joseph and Elizabeth (Mlchalczek) Look. He 
had lived in Moslnee, Wis., Hamlet, Ind. and Blackearth, Wis., 
before moving to Llndenhurst in 1989. He was a member of 
Prince of Peace Church in Lake Villa. Mr. Look was a retired 
maintenance worker retiring In 1976 after many years at 
Corlet Turner Corp. in Franklin Park and also Zenith Corp. In 
Chicago. On Sept. 2, 1940 he married Marie Hell in Marathon, 
Wis. ■ 

Survivors include his wife, Marie; seven children, Patricia 
(Robert) Erskine of Ocean Springs, Miss., Mary Ellen Burke of 
Schaumburg, Betty (Jerry) Merkes of Cross Plalnes, Wis., 
Joseph (Cynthia) of Solvang, Calif., Kathy Look and her hus- 
band, Steven Howard, Rozanne Lookof Silver Spring, Md. and 
Ron (Pamela) of Schaumburg; two sisters, Sr. Betty Look of 
Dubuque, Iowa, and Clare Delaney of Lake Geneva, Wis. He 
was the grandfather of 14 and great grandfather of two; He Is 
preceded In death by two brothers, Philip and James; two sis- 
ters, Harriet Mlchallk and Anna Metz and a son-in-law, James 
Burke. 

Funeral Services with Mass of Christian Burial was held 
at Prince of Peace Church in Lake Villa. . 

Friends and family visited at the Ringa Funeral Home, 
LakeVUla. 

Interment was at Maryhlll Cemetery, Niles 
, In lieu of flowers, those desiring, may make contribu- 
tions to Mercy Home, 1140 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, IL 
60607 In his memory. 

John J. McDonald 

Age 67 of Antioch, passed away Monday, Feb. 15, 1999 at 
the Northern Illinois Medical Center, McHenry, after a brief 
Illness. He was bom Sept. 1, 1931 In Springfield, the son of the 
late, John J. and Mary E (Marks) McDonald. After, living In 
Springfield for 33 years, he moved to Buffalo Grove , where he 
lived for 33 years, moving to.Antloch on March 31, 1998. Mr. 
McDonald was a painter and decorator and had worked for 
the Beatty Decorating Co. of LakeFbrest, for 26 years, retiring 
In 1995. He was a member "of the Painters and Allied Trades 
Council, Local 863 of Libertyville. On Feb. 17, 1951, he mar- 
ried Lavena Smith In Springfield. 

Survivors include his wife; three sons, John (Terrie) of 
Antioch, Tom (Tricla) of Gurnce and David (Jennet) of 
Pcotone; two daughters, Mary Beth (Robert) VanOmum and 
Kathleen (John) Serkowski, both of Buffalo Grove and 11 
grandchildren. 

Funeral Services with Mass of Christian Burial was held 
at St. Peter Church, Antioch. 

Friends and family visited at the Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch. ' 

Interment was at Liberty Cemetery, Salem, Wis. 

Those. desiring may make contributions to the Antioch 
Rescue Squad in his memory. I 

Patricia Ann Parks 

Age 56 of Antioch, passed away Wednesday, Feb! 17, 1999 
at her home. She was born July 1, 1942 In Chicago, the.daugh- 

• Please see page CI 1 






• 



February 26, 1999 



OBITUARIES/LEGAL NOTICES 



Lakeland Newspapers / C 1 1 






(Continued from page CIO 

ter of the late Bernard and Ruby 
{Jackson) One, moving to Antloch per- 
manently In 1965. Mrs. Parks was a 
homcmaker. 

Survivors Include two sons, William 
J. "Buzz" Penger of Spring Grove and 
Steven E. (Angle) Fenger with the VJS. 
Navy In Italy; her grandson, Nicholas 
Fenger; /her sfstcr, Marian, (David) 
Schneider of Crystal Lake; her nieces, 
Kathryn (Curt) Donald, Carolyn (Henry) 
Franklin and Karen Marie Dancy; her 
grand nephews, Justin and Brandon 
Franklin and her grand niece, Danielle 
Franklin and her dear friend, Louise 
(Henry) Kauke. In addition to her par- 
ents, she is preceded in death by her first 
husband, William August Fenger and her 
second husband, Donald Parks. 

Funeral Serviceswere held at Strang 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
NOTICE OF MEETING 

Notice Is hereby- given that the 
Board of Fire arid Police 
Commissioners of the Village of 
Round Lake Park will hold a special 
business meeting, for (he purpose of 
reviewing changes to the rules and 
regulations, at the hour of 7:00 p.m. at 
the Village Police Department, on 2 
March 1999. 

BOARD OF FIRE AND POLICE 
COMMISSIONERS OFTHE VILLAGE 
OF ROUND LAKE PARK, ILLINOIS 
BY: Is/ Gary Brown 



Chairman 
0299D-2481-RL 
February 26, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 
. ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Engineered 
Comfort Systems 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS-. 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 13 S. 
Maple, Fox Lake, IL 60020. (847) 973- 
2477. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING.' CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Joe.Damore. 13 S. Maple, Fox Lake, 
IL 60020. (847) . 973-2477. Gall 
Damoro, 13 S. Maple, Fox Lake, IL 
60020,(847)973-2477. ■ 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location (s) indicat- 
ed and that (ho tmo or. real full 
name(s) of the pereon(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
7s/ , December 31 ,1 998 

Is/ Gall Damore, December 31, 1998 
The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
» sonfs) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 30th day of January, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Cynlhla Ducak 
Notary Public 
Received: February 17, 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0299D-2462-FL 
February 26, 1999 
March 5, 1999 
March 12, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
■ NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: The Comedy 
House 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 2611 
Grand Ave., Waukegan, IL 60085. 
(847) 609-1725. ■ 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Anna Estrada. 314 Windrldge Dr., 
Round Lake Park, IL 60073. . (847) 
740-0616. 

Sonya Scales, 314 Windrldge Dr., 
Round Lake,. IL 60073. (847) 740- 
0616. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
* This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locatlon(s) Indicat- 
ed, and that the true or real lull 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Sonya Scales, February 12, 1999 
/a/ Anna Estrada, February 12, 1999 
The . foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busl- 
ness this 12th day of February, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/PatrlclaAVukovich 
Notary Public 
Received: February 12, 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0299C-2447-RL 
February 19, 1999 
February 26, 1999 
March 5, 1999 



Funeral Home of Antloch. 

Interment was at Salem Mound 
Cemetery, Salem, Wis. 

Memorials may be made to the fam- 
ily. 

Clara M. S trickier 

Age 84, a resident of Lake Villa and a 
former resident of Ingleside, died 
Thursday, Feb. 18, 1999 at St. Therese 
Hospital In Waukegan. She was bom irr 
Chicago, on Sept. 22, 1914 to Tilden and 
Clara (nee BaiWe) Stricklcr. ' She was 
employed with BVI ManufacturIng*Co. In 
Grayslake for 16 years and in her earlier 
years had enjoyed knitting and biking. 
She had spent a good part of her life car- 
ing fop her family. 

Survivors include: her niece, June 
(Alfred) Jilly of Lake Villa with whom she 
made her home; her nephew, William 
Strlckler of Washington, DC; great 
nephew, Tom (Julie) Jilly. of Hilton Head, 



SC; great nieces, Laurie Hammock of 
Ingleside and Lisa (Michael) 
Sparrowgrove of Lake Villa; eight great 
nieces and nephews. She Is preceded in 
death by her parents; one brother/Arthur 
Strlckler and by oncslster, Bessie Llnkand 
by her nephew, Donald Strlckler. 

Arrangements for private services 
and Intermentwere arranged for by the K. 
K. Hamsher Funeral Home, Fox Lake (The 
Chapel on the Lake), 

Marie Estelle McGovera 

Age 88'of Round Lake Beach passed 
away Saturday, Feb. 20, 1999 at 
Winchester House In Ubertyville. She was 
born Aug. 9, 1910 In Chicago and had 
made her home in Round Lake Beach for 
the past 15 years. 

She leaves her daughter, Kathy (Dill) 
Smock of Round Lake Beach; son, Tom 
McGovem of Brooksville, Fla.; grandchil- 
dren, Victoria (Mark) Wcgge of Grayslake, 



Lori Smock of Round Lake Beach, Susie 
Smock of Fox Lake and Steve Smock of 
Round Lake Beach; two great grandchil- 
dren, Sean and Dana Wcgge. Also surviv- 
ing are her sister, Ann (Bob) Young of 
Chicago and brother, George (Rita) Brink 
of Arlington Heights and sistcr-In -law, 
Eleanor Brink of Chicago. She Is preceded 
In death by her husband, Thomas on Feb. 
14, 1974 and five brothers. 

Funeral Services were held at Irving 
Park Cemetery Chapel. 

Arrangements were entrusted to 
Strang Funeral Chapel and Crematorium, 
Ltd., Grayslake. 

John S. Secor 

Age 91 of Round. Lake Beach, died 
Friday, Feb, 19, 1999 at Winchester House 
In Ubertyville. He was bom on April 24, 
1907 in Chicago to Charles and Catherine 
(Kaufmann) Secor. He was formerly a res- 
ident of Chicago and moved to the Round 



Lake area In 1940. He owned and operat- 
ed Secor Service Station on the comer of 
Cedar Lake Road and Hawthorne in 
Round Lake Beach for 50 years. Mr. Secor 
repaired cars, delivered fuel , oil and 
pumped gas serving many residents of 
Round Lake Beach as his station was one 
of the first In the area. 

He is survived by a brother, Lewis 
Secor of Chicago; many nieces, nephews, 
and great nieces and nephews. He Is pre- 
ceded In death by his parents; his wife, 
InezA. Secor on June4,1994; five brothers 
George 'Dan', Charles,' EU Is, Arthur and' 
Ward; and a sister, Mary Kohler. 

A private Funeral Service was held at 
the Justen's Round Lake Funeral Home, 
222 N. Rdsedale Court (Rosedale Court at 
Cedar Lake Road) Round Lake, with Rev. 
Lisle Kauflman of Calvary Presbyterian 
Church, officiating. 

Interment was at Avon. Centre 
Cemetery, Grayslake. 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Gratters* 

Gallery • 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 384 Lake 
Street, Antloch, IL 60002.(847) 395- 
5550. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
• RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Dale Perryman, 25416 W. Rockford, 
Ingleside, IL 60041. (847) 548-6399. 
Judith C. Perryman. 25418 W 
Rockford, Ingleside, IL 60041. (847) 
546-6399. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
iniend(s) to conduct the above named . 
business from the locatlonfs) indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(8) ownIng, : con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Judith C. Perryman, February 4, 
1999 

/s/.Dale Perryman, February 4, 1999. 
The foregoing ■ Instrument . was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 5th day of February, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Kenncth M. Clark 
Notary Public 
Received: February 9, 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
. Lake County Clerk 
0299C-2449-MN 
February 19, 1999 
February 26, 1999 
March 5, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF. BUSINESS: Wauconda 
Self-Service Storage 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONOUCTED OR TRANS- " 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 500 S. 
Rand Road, Wauconda, IL600B4. 
(847) 526-5055. (street) P,0. Box 505. 
Wauconda, IL 60084.. • 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
George Gallagher, 1020 S. Fleming 
Rd„ Woodstock, IL 60098. (815) 338- 
6763. Doris Davis Gallagher, 1020 S. 
Fleming Rd., Woodstock, IL 60098. 
(815) 338-6763. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Iniend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person (s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/George Gallagher, February 2,1999 
The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 2nd day of February, 1999. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Phyllls Kelnz 
Notary Public 
Received: February 2, 1999 
Willard R. Helander . 
-Lake County Clerk 
0199B-2427-WL 
February 12, 1999 
February 19. 1999 
February 26, 1999 



STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 



PUBUC NOTICE 

J 

)SS - - 

) 



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE 19TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 
LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
IN THAT MATTER OFTHE PETITION OF ) 
TONYA JEAN EGELSTON, ) 

for ) 

CHANGE OF NAME ) 

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION 
PUBUC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on April 9, 1999, being one of the 
return days In the Circuit Court of the Country of Lake, I will file my Petition In said 
Court praying for the change of my name from Tonya Jean Egelslon to that of Tonya 
Jean Sund, pursuant to the statute in such case made and provided. 

Dated at Round Lake Park, Illinois, February 2, 1999 

/s/ Tonya J. Egelston 

0199B-2436-RL 

February 12, 1999 

February 19, 1999 

February 26, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 
LAKE COUNTY ZONING NOTICE #3059 
The Lake County Zoning Board of Appeals has scheduled a public hearing on 
March 11, 1999 at 1:30 p.m. in the Grant Township Hall, 411 Washington Street, 
Ingleside, Illinois on the application of Ellzabelh Franke, record owner, which requests 
a reduction from 30 feet to 15 feet of the required front yard setback abutting Bergen 
Street In order to construction a detached 2 car garage. The sub]ect property Is locat- 
ed at 25397 W. Muskego Avenue, Ingleside and is legally described as follows: . 
Lot 53 In Long Lake subdivision, being a subdivision of the northeast quar- 
ter of section 24 township 45, Range 9, east of the third principal meridian 
according to'the plat therefor recorded August 29, 1924 as document 
245040 In book "N* of plats, page 35, In Lake County. Illinois. 
This application Is available for public examlnallon at the office of the Lake County 
Zoning Board of Appeals, 18 N. County Street, Room 600, Waukegan, II. (phone 

647/360-6465). 

Clayton L Christensen 

Chairman 

0299D-2458-FL 

February 26, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE. 

BID REQUEST 

FOX LAKE FIRE DEPARTMENT 

301 S. RT 69 

FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS 60020 

The Village ol Fox Lake Fire Department will be accepting bids for a 3/4 Ton 

Passenger Van. 

■ Sealed bids will be received In the office of the Village Clerk, 301 S. Rt. 59, Fox 
Lake, Illinois 60020 until 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, March 02, 1999. 

Specifications may be picked up at the Village of. Fox Lake maintenance Garage, 
216 Washington, Ingleside, Illinois 60041. 
Marked Sealed Envelope "Bld« for 3/4 Ton Pimnoer Van". 
Bids will be open on Tuesday, March 02, 1999 at 10:00 a.m. In the Council 
Chambers of the Fox Lake Village Hall. 
The Right Is reserved by the Village of Fox Lake to reject any or all bids. 

; 0299D-2455-FL 
February 26, 1999 



STATE OF ILUNOIS ) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 



PUBUC NOTICE 



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH 
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILUNOIS 

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION } 

OF Qunfeng Lu Schulze ) 

For CHANGE OF NAME } 

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION 
Public notice is hereby given that on March 30, 1999, being one of the relurn days 
In the Circuit Court of the County of Lake, I will Tie my Petition in said Court praying 
for the change of name from Qunfeng Lu Schulze to that of Jolle-Qunfeng Lu Schulze, 
pursuant to the Statute in such case made and Provided. 

Dated at Fox Lake, Illinois, February 2, 1999. 
Is/ Qunfeng Lu Schulze 
" 0299B-2434-FL 
February 12, 1899 
February 19, 1999 
February 26, 1999 



.PUBUC NOTICE 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH 
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILUNOIS 
IN THE MATTER OFTHE PETITiON ) 

OF Ciprlna Jean Pratt ) 

FOR ) 

CHANGE OF NAME ) 

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION 
Public notice Is hereby given that on March 19, 1999 being "one of the return days 
In the Circuit Court bt the County of Lake, I will file my Petition in said Court praying , 
for the change of my name from Clprina Jean Pratt to that ol Ciprina Jean Sptrzirrl. 
pursuant to the Statute in such case made and Provided. 

Dated at Grayslake, Illinois, February 4, 1999. 

• '/a/Clprina Pratt 

0t9QB-2424-GL 

- . , - ._. , , .. .... „-. ,,. -„ ^UF*b«*»ryaa/*oo»!a- 

February 19. 1999 
February 26, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE' 
TAKE NOTICE 
CERTIFICATE NO. 05-28-301-016 
TO: 

ELGIN FED FINANCIAL CENTER 
MATHEW RODKEY 
KRIUCH COMPANY 
AUSTIN BANK TR 6243 
PORTS OF LAKE SULLIVAN 
LAKE COUNTY CLERK 

Persons in occupancy or actual possession of said property; Unknown owners or par- 
lies in interest In said land or lots. 

A Petition for a Tax Deed on the premise described below has been filed in the Circuit 
Clerk's Office of LAKE County. Illinois as Case No. 96 TX1 99TD7. 

The Property is located at: 64 SINKER BAY, LAKEMOOR. IL 

Permanent Index Number; 05-28-301 -016. 

Said Property was sold on 12/09/96 for Delinquent Real Estate Taxes and/or Special 
Assessments for the year 1995. 

The period of redemption will expire on 07/01/99. 

On 07/22/99 at 1:30 PM the Petitioner will make application to such Court In said 

County for an Order for Issuance of a Tax Deed. 

JohnZajicek 

Petitioner 
TAKE NOTICE 
CERTIFICATE NO. 05-28-304-033 

TO; 

THE PORTS OF SULLIVAN LAKE 

PORTS OF SULLIVAN LAKE 

AUSTIN BANK TR 6243 

KRIUCH COMPANY 

LAKE COUNTY CLERK 

Persons in occupancy or actual possession of said property; Unknown owners or par- 
ties In Interest In said land or lots. 

A Petiiion for a Tax Deed on the premise described below has been filed In the Circuit 
Clerk's Office of LAKE County, Illinois as Case No. 96TX1 99TD6. 
The Property is located at: 135 STOWAWAY BAY, LAKEMOOR. IL 
Permanent Index Number: 05-28-304-033. 

Said Property was sold on 12/09/96 for Delinquent Real Estate Taxes and/or Special. 
Assessments for the year 1995. 

The period of redemption will expire on 07/01/99. 

On 07/22/99 at 1:30 PM the Petitioner will make application to such Court In said 
County for an Order for Issuance of a Tax Deed. 

JohnZajicek 
Petitioner 
TAKE NOTICE 
CERTIFICATE NO. 05-28-301-015 
TO: 

ELGIN FED FINANCIAL CENTER 
MATHEW RODKEY 
KRIUCH COMPANY 
PORTS OF SULLIVAN LAKE 
AUSTIN BANK TR 6243 
LAKE COUNTY CLERK 

Persons In occupancy or actual possession of said property; Unknown owners or par- 
ties In Interest in said land or lots. 

A Petition for a Tax Deed on the premise described below has been filed in the Circuit 
Clerk's Office In LAKE County. Illinois as Case N0.96TX1 99TD8. 
The Property Is located at: 64 SINKER BAY, LAKEMOOR. IL 
Permanent Index Number: 05-28-301 -01 5. 

Said Property was sold on 12/09/96 for Delinquent Real Estate Taxes and/or Special 
Assessments for the year 1995, 

The period of redemption will expire on 07/01/99. 

On 07/22/99 at 1:30 PM the Petitioner will make application to such Court In said 
County for an Order for Issuance of a Tax Deed. 

JohnZajicek 

Petitioner 

0299D-2454-FL 

-February 26, 1999 

March 5, 1999 

March 12, 1999 



'. 



■ * I « , 

012/ Lakeland Newspapers 



LEGAL NOTICES 



February 26, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
REQUEST FOR BID 

Antloch Community High School 
(A.C.H.S.) Is presently soliciting bids 
for Insulation services. Tho deadline 
for submission of bids Is March 23, 
1 999 at 2:30 p.m. A mandatory pro-bid 
meeting Is scheduled for March B at 
9:30 a.m. Contact W.C. Ahlers at 
847/395-1421 , oxt. 220, for bid specifi- 
cations. 

0299D-2466-GEN 
February 26, 1999 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: R&S 
Associates 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 821 Brian 
Ct., Gurnae, IL 80031. (847) 880- 
7603. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Sandra E. Doran, 821 Brian Ct., 
Gurnee, IL 60031. (847) 680-7603. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend (s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locatlon(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the .true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Sandra E. Doran, January 26, 1999. 
The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son (s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 26th day of January, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Denlse L Balmes 
- Notary Public 
Received: January 28, 1999 
Wlllard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0109B-2429-GP 
February 12, 1999 
February 19, 1999 
February 26, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Cutting Edge 

D.J.'s 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 4327 
Centennial Ct. #8, Gurnee, IL 60031, 
(847) 625-0985. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Sean Gillette, 4327 Centennial Ct. #8. 
Gurnee, IL 60031. (647) 625-0985. 
Jennifer Gillette, 4327 Centennial Ct. 
#8, Gurnee, IL 60031. (847) 625- 
0965. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locatlon(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
namo(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
• ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ S. Gillette, February 5, 1999 
Is! Jennifer Gillette, February 5, 1999 
The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 5th day of February, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Patrlcla A. Vukovlch 
Notary Public 
Received; February 5, 1999 
Wlllard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199B-2437-GP 
February 12, 1999 
February 19, 1999 
February 26, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
Notice Is hereby given that on 
March 26, 1999 at 10:00 a.m. a sale 
will be held at 133 Sayton, Fox Lake, 
IL 60020 to sell the following articles 
to enforce a lien existing under the 
laws of the State of Illinois against 
such articles for labor, service, skill or 
material extended upon a storage fur- 
nished for such articles at the request 
of the following designated persons, 
unless such articles are redeemed 
within thirty days of the publication of 
this notice. 

Ronald & Katharine Salyards, VEH: 
1983 Honda, . 
VINIf: 1HFSC0227DA322901 
Amt. Owed $1907.77 
Russell Redlske, VEH: 1980 Pontlac 
VIN#:2WB7WAL104814 
Amt. Owed $1932.77 
Dorthy Smith, VEH: 1985 Chevrolet 
VINO : 1GIFP87S3FN1 73141 
Amt. Owed $1907.77 
Larry Weatherbee, VEH: 1984 
Chevrolet 

VIN# : 1GIAP8710EL239866 
Amt. Owed $1932.77 
Judith Bowsher, VEH: 1968 Chrysler - 
VIN# : 1C3CJ41E4JG361580 
Amt: Owed $1932.77 
Nell Monson, VEH; 1984 Pontlac 
VIM : 1G2A58710EL234693 
Amt; Owed $1932.77 
Laura Schoeder, VEH; 1986 Ford c 
VlNtt : 1FMCU14T5GUC80864 
Amt. Owed $1932.77 
Custom Timber Works, VEH: 1987 
Lincoln 

Vim : 1LNBM93M7HY644295 
Amt. Owed $1932.77. 

6299D-2463-FL. 
February 26, .1999 
March 5, '1999 
March 12, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 
The Department of Children and 
Family Services has received a 
request to change the conditions of 
the license held by Alternative 
Behavior Treatment Centers, a child 
care Institution, located at 27255 
North Fairfield Road, Mundeleln, 
Illinois 60060. 

Change the ago or type of children 
served from: 15 to 17 years of age to 
14 to 18 years of age. 

Comments about this change may 
be sent to the facility director. 

0299C-2448-MN 

February 19, 1999 

February 28, 1999 

March 5, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE. 
Affordable Self Storage will dis- 
pose of goods for non payment from: 
Unit No. 2 belonging to Michael 
James consisting of shop equipment 
and tools. 

Unit No. 38 belonging to Julie 
Bergmann consisting of miscella- 
neous boxes. 

Unit No. 139 belonging to 
Maureen McDade consisting of mis- 
cellaneous household goods. 

Disposal of the Items will take 
place at Affordable Self Storage, 133 
S. Route 12, Fox Lake, IL on March 
13, 1999 at 10:00 am. 

0299D-2459-FL 

February 26, 1999 

March 5, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: K-G Machine 

Repair 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 35757 N. 
Helendale Rd., Ingleside, IL 60041. 
(847) 973-1563. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Gary Sorenson, 35757 Helendale Rd., 
Ingteslde. IL 60041. (847) 973-1563. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locatlon(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Gary Sorenson, February 10, 1999 
The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 1 0th day of February, 1 999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Vernadall M. Sorrentino 
Notary Public 
Received: February 10, 1999 
Wlllard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0299C-2440-FL 
February 19, 1999 
February 28, 1999 
March 5, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS; The Symmetry 

Group < 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 507 Lake 
Court, Wauconda, IL 60084. (847) 
526-2251. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Michael P. McGralh, 507 Lake Court, 
Wauconda, IL 60084. (847) 526-2251. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intendfs) to conduct the above named 
business from the location's) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
namefs) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are conect as shown. 
/s/Mlchael P. McGralh 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness (his 12th day of February, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Barbara J. Erskln 
Notary Public 
Received: February 12, 1999 
Wlllard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0299C-2446-WL 
February 19, 1B99 
« February 26, 1999 
March 5, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Stonebrook 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 6695 
Grand Ave. #B, Gurnee, IL 60031. 
(847) 856-1630. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Mlllalne Edmons, 22257 Honey Ridge 
Ct., Klldeer, IL 60047. (647) 438-0882. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
' This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locations) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/sVMIHalno Edmons. February 5, 1999. 
The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 5th day of February, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Barbara J, Erskln 
Notary Public 
Received: February 05, 1699 
Wlllard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199B-2435-GP 
February 12, 1999 
February 19, 1999 
February 26, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ZAMPARO and GOLDSTEIN, P.C. 

Attorneys for Plaintiff 

899 Skokle Boulevard, Suite 300 

Northbrook, Illinois 60062 

(847) 564-3100 

STATE OF ILUNOIS, COUNTY OF LAKE, SS. -IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 

NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILUNOIS. LaSALLE NATIONAL 

BANK, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT 

DATED OCTOBER 1, 1997. SERIES 1997-2, PLA1NTIFFV. JEFFREY I. GLASSMAN, 

ELLEN M. GLASSMAN. BRIARCREST HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, 

UNKNOWN TENANTS, UNKNOWN OWNERS and NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, 

DEFENDANTS, NO. 9B CH 238. . 

Public notice Is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment made and entered In 
said Court In the above-entitled cause, the Sheriff of Lake County, Illinois will, on 
Monday, March 15, 1999, at the hour of 9:00 a.m. at 25 South Uiica, Waukegan, 
Illinois, sell at public auction the following In Lake County, Illinois, or so much thereof 
as shall be sufficient to satisfy the Judgment, to-wit: 

PARCEL 1; LOT #3 IN BRIARCREST SUBDIVISION, BEING A SUBDI-' 
VISION IN THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 19 AND THE 
SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 43 NORTH, 
RANGE 11, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORD- 
ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED SEPTEMBER 1, 1988 AS 
DOCUMENT NUMBER 2716884, AND CORRECTED BY CERTIFI- 
CATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED DECEMBER 29, 19BB AS DOC- 
UMENT NUMBER 2752829, IN LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 
PARCEL 2: EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS FOR THE , 
BENEFIT OF PARCEL 1 OVER THE PRIVATE ROADWAYS AS LOCAT- 
ED AND DEPICTED ON THE PLAT OF BRIARCREST SUBDIVISION 
RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NUMBER 2716884, IN LAKE COUNTY, 
ILLINOIS. 

PARCEL 3; EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS FORTHE BEN- 
EFIT OF PARCEL 1 AS GRANTED BY INSTRUMENT RECORDED AS 
DOCUMENT NUMBER 2716883, WHICH EASEMENT IS LOCATED 
AND DEPICTED ON EXHIBIT "C" ATTACHED THEREOF, IN LAKE 
COUNTY, ILLINOIS, 

PARCEL 4: EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS FORTHE BEN- 
EFIT OF PARCEL 1 AS GRANTED BY INSTRUMENT RECORDED AS 
DOCUMENT NUMBER 2716881, WHICH EASEMENT IS LOCATED 
AND EVICTED ON EXHIBIT "C" ATTACHED THERETO, IN LAKE 
COUNTY, ILUNOIS, 
P.I.N. 15-19-404-002-0000 
commonly known as; 5213 Hilltop Road, Long Grove, Illinois 60047. Improved with 
a single family residence. 

Sale shall be under the following terms: 10% down, balance within 24 hours. 
Premises will not be open for Inspection, 

For Information contact: laurence J. Goldstein, ZAMPARO and GOLDSTEIN, P.C, 
Plaintiff's Attorney, 899 Skokle Boulevard, Suite 300, Northbrook, Illinois 60062, 
.Telephone: (647) 564-3100. 
Dated: February 2, 1999. 

0199B-2422-LB 
February 12, 1999 
February 19, 1999 
February 26, 1699 



PUBUC NOTICE 

WARREN TOWN SHIP HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Nollce Is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the office of Town Clerk 

at 17801 Wost Washington Street, Gurnee, Illinois 60031 until 9:00 odock AM^, 

Wednesday March 10, 1999, for furnishing the following equipment: 1999 Case 90XT 

Skid Steer Loader or equlvalont. •' ;•; *,,-'■ _ , , 

Proposals shall bo made of forms furnished by tho Township Highway Commissioner, 

and Shall be addressed In a sealed envelope to Warren Township Highway Department. 

C/O Margaret Koenan-Dennlston, Town Clerk and shall be markod -Equipment Proposal 

Letting of Wednesday March 10, 1999, Wanen Township". 

Further Information regarding the tolling may be obtained by contacting Ihe.Hlghway 

Commissioner at (647) 244-1101. -- ■ , 

The Township In accordance with the laws of tho State of Illinois hereby notifies all bid- 
ders that It will affirmatively Insur? that the contract entered Into pursuant to this adver- 
tisement will be awarded to the lowest responsible bidder without discrimination on Iho 
grounds of race, color, or national origin, 'j ••'.:'! 

By order of, /s/Gerald E. Rudd, Warren Township Highway Commissioner 

0299D-2465-GEN 
February 26, 1999 

""pUBUCNoiicE 
DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES 
OFFICE OF RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 
NOTICE OF SEALED BID PROPOSALS FOR FARM LEASING 

Sealed bid proposals for farm leasing will be accepted by the Department of Natural 
Resources, State of Illinois on one lease, on approximately 33 acres. This acreage Is 
' located on the Redwing Slough/Deer Creek Natural Area. Bid proposal forma and relat- 
ed Information will be presented and discussed at a meeting to be conducted by the Farm 
Lease Manager, Sieve Frank, from the Department of Natural Resources at the Site 
Headquarters located Chain O'Lakes S.R, 8916 Wltmot Road, Spring Grove, Illinois at 
1 1 :00 a.m., Thursday, March 1 1 , 1999. 

Invitation for Lease Bid Packets will be available to pick up at (he pro-bid meeting on 
March 1 1 , 1 999 at the Site Headquarters. 

Bidders must have their bid forms completed and delivered to the Department of 
Natural Resources, In care of Ed Rodlek, 8916 Wllmot Road, Spring Grove, IL 60081 by 
11:00 a.m., Thursday, March 18, 1999. The bids will be awarded to the highest qualified 
bidders. For further Information phone: 647-587-5512. 

The Slate of Illinois, Department of Natural Resources, shall not unlawfully discrimi- 
nate on the basis of race, color, sex, national origin, age or handicap In admission to, or 
treatment or employment In, programs or activities. 

The Department of Natural Resources reserves the right to reject any or all proposals 
and to waive technicalities. 

BY ORDER OFTHE DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES 
Brent Manning, Director 

0299D-2451-GEN 
. February 28, 1999 

PUBUC NOTICE 

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR A 

GUARANTEED SAVINGS PROGRAMTECHNOLOGY UPGRADE 

Notice Is hereby given that Woodland Community Consolidated School District SO 
(•District") requests Sealed Proposals for the Implementation of energy saving sand tech- 
nology initiatives that will finance equipment and repair, modernization, and maintenance 
services in the District's buildings on a performance contracting basis. The District's 
objectives In Issuing this Request for Proposals (RFP) are to provide a competitive means 
In which to select a single qualified provider of a Guaranteed Energy Savings Contract 
and Technology Upgrade. The contract shall follow the requirements of the Illinois 
Performance Contracting Legislation (Public Act 87-1106). 

Sealed Proposals will be received until 2:00 P.M. on Friday, March 12, 1999 at the 
Office of the Director of Operations and will be opened immediately thereafter. Proposals 
will be in accordance with Illinois Public Act 87-1 106 and the Request For Proposal (RFP) 
guidelines. For more information, contact Don Bradley, Director of Operations, (847) 856- 
3590 or Woody Williams, Director of Buildings and Grounds, (847) 856-3575, Woodland 
Community Consolidated School District 50, 17370 W. Gages Lake Rd., Gages Lake, IL 
60030. 

The District will base its qualified provider selection on the following criteria: 

1 . Experience and Qualifications 

2. Technical Approach 

3. Financial Approach and Guarantee 

4. Service Capabilities 

5. Project Management 

6. Overall Quality of the Proposal 

Upon review of Proposals received in response to this RFP, the District may enter Into 
a contract with the provider that provides the best overall value to the District, , 

The District reserves the right to reject any and all proposals and to be the sole Judge 
of the value and merit of the proposals offered. •>•- '•!'• 

0299D-2464-GEN 
February 26, 1999 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
STATE OF ILUNOIS ) SS 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 
LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
JOHN CHARLES BEESON and MARY E. 
HARMAN, as Successor Truatoos under ) 

the CHARLES E. BEESON Trust dated 
September 24, 1992 as Assignee of ) 

CHARLES BEESON and MAY BEESON 
Plaintiff, 

THOMAS E.' BEESON. DONNA L. BEESON, 
HARRIS BANK PALATINE, TMK 
DEVELOPMENT, LTD., MIDWEST ) 

TRADING HORTICULTURAL SUPPLIES, 
INC., WITTEMAN & CO. B.V., OXFORD 
CAPITAL FUND, LTD., DUNLAP ENTERPRISES, 
LTD., UNKNOWN OWNERS and NONRECORD 
CLAIMANTS, 

Defendants. 



No. 97 CH 554 









) 



THOMAS E\ BEESON" 



Counter-Plaintiff, 



vs. 



JOHN CHARLES BEESON and MARY E. HARMAN, 
as Successor Trustees under the CHARLES E. 
BEESON Trust dated September 24, 1992, JOHN 
CHARLES BEESON, MARY E. HARMAN, 
Individually, and the CHARLES E, BEESON) 
Trust, 

Counter-Defendants. ) 

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE 

MORTGAGE FO RECLOSURE 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment heretofore entered by the 
said Court In the above-enlitled cause on December t, 1998, Sheriff of Lake County, 
Illinois, will on Monday, March 15, 1999 at the hour of 9:00 AM at the Robert H. Babcox 
Justice Center, 25 S. Utlca Street, Conference Room, First Floor, Waukegan, Illinois 
60085, sell at public auction to the highest bidder and best bidder for cash, all and sin- 
gular, the following described premises and real estate In the said Judgment menlioned, 
situation In the County of Lake, State of Illinois, or so much thereto as shall bo sufficient - 
to satisfy said Judgment. 

The South 646.36 feet as measured along the east line of the Northwest Quarter of 
them Southwest Quarter of that part of the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter 
of Section 17, Township 43 North, Range 12, East of the third Principal Meridian, lying 
East of the Easterly right of way line of Illinois Route 43 and North of the Northerly right 
of way line of Illinois Route 22 In Lake County, Illinois 

Said property is commonly known as 1 1760 W. Route 22, Deerileld, Illinois 60015, •«- 

P.I.N. 16-17-300-032-011 and 16-1 7-300-032-0010 

The person to contact for Information regarding this property Is: 

MarkT. Hamilton at Churchill, Baumgarlner & Qulnn, 2 S. Vvhitney Street, Grayslake, 
IL 60030, (847)223-1500. 

The terms of sale are: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certi- 
fied funds. No refunds. 

The property Is approximately a five acre parcel of land Improved by a concrete block 
building, a one story concrete block garden store, and a glass greenhouse and frame 
building with a house attached, including a three car garage, three to four bedrooms and 
one and one half baths. 

The Judgment amount was $1,895,164.93.- . , 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection! 

Together with all buildings and Improvements thereon, and the tenements, heredita- 
ments and appurtenances thereunto belonging. 
MARKT. HAMILTON 
JOHNW.QUINN 

CHURCHILL, BAUMGARTNER &QUINN, LTD. 
Attorneys for Plaintiff s 
P.O. Box 284 
Grayslake, IL 60030 
(847) 223-1500 
Attorney.No. 011 11000 

' 0199B-2425-LB 
February 12, 1999 
February 19, 1999 
February 26, 1999 



if 



February 26, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers / C13 





• EinIhance 

• ALIevjate 

• PViysicAl ANd MentaI ReliEf 




ITIONS 





Member: 
American Massage 
Therapy Association 



II (847) 639-2923 




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February 26, 1999' 




Business With An 



• Your 4' x 8' sign will be 
located along the outfield 
walls* of the playing 
diamonds at the Lake Villa 
"State of the Art" Baseball 
Complex. 

*Requests for sign location (field number & location) 
will be determined on a first come first serve basis. 



i Your sponsorship/sign will 
include recognition on 
the letterhead & LVTBL 
plaque. 



Over 300 games will be played. 
And your sign will be seen 
approximately 80 r 000 to 
100 F 000 viewers. 



*Ot.V^XS«t 



J**y*i*i'k-i .'wSJivvS*.^ 









CONCESSION 
BUILDING 





LVTBL Baseball Complex -'West Of The Corner Of Grass Lake & Deep Lake Rds. 




For Further Information Please Calk 

Rich Coles John Tierney Marty Geweke 

847-356-0834 847-395-8224 847-395- 




• I 



February 26, 1999 



COUNTY 



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CI 6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



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February 26, 1999 



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world of 



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Lakeland Newspapers 

^ ynamite 
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iscounts 

CS*7) 74kCMt035 




► Good for "4 USES" at Each of 9 Locations = 36 OFFERS^ 



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Pay for your 

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for 1 or 2 years and receive the 

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Q Gurnee Press 
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Round Lake News 
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Exp. Date. 



Amount 



Signature. 



February 26, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers I C17 




la%iified 




Uiae 




Personals . .■ , J25 

Auctions . . v , I30 

Business Personals 135 

Financial |40 



Juitli'j?;/ltVjI 



Help Wanted Pan-Time ; 2I9, 

Help AViiiitcd Full-Time 220 

Employment Agencies ,221 

Business Opportunities ... . ,225 

Situations Wanted 228 

Cliild Care ; 240 

School/Instruction .250 

atkei C*fuific ' 



mOiAiia^iL. 



,K'.V4-~*,i* . 



. V. i .l fa 




Antiques . .301 

Appliances .'.... .304 

Burter/Tnidc . ■; ; .308 

Bazaars/Crafis ........... 310 

Building Materials . . : (| 314 

Business/Office Equipment X . . .318 

Electronics/Computers ,320 

Farm Guide . .324 

Firewood 328 

Garage/Rummage Sales .330 

Good Tilings To But 334 

Horses «stTack" 338 

Household Goods/ Furniture , , .340 

Jewelry , .344 

Lawii/Gardeu .348 

Clothing . . 349 

"Miscellaneous 350 

Medical Equip/Supplies ................. .354 

Musical instruments . ,35B 

Pets & Supplies 300 

Restaurant Equipment 364 

Toots & Machinery , 368 

Wanted To Buy .370 

Homes For Sale ■. . .500 

Homes For Rent ,504 

Homes Wanted 508 

Homes Builders 510 

Condo/Tawn Homes ■. .514 

Mobile Homes 518 

Apartments For Rent .520 

Apartments Wanted .524 

Api/HoniesTo.Share . , 528 

Rooms For Rent .... 530 

Buildings .533 

Business Properly For Sale ..534 

Business Property For' Rent .-. .538 

Investment Propcrtyi :r . /■» v .540 

Mortgage Services ■', ■"! ,\\'. '■.' ;". '. , . .544 

Farms ...,.,',.,.. .' 548. 

Vacant Lots/Acreage .560 

Resorts/Vacation, Rentals .564 

Out Of Area Property 568 

Cemetery Lots ; ' .570 

Real Estate Wanted 574 

Real Estate Misc. . . . . . . .5 78 





Recreational Vehicles .704 

Snowmobiles/ATVs 70S 

Bouls/Molors/Ete ! 710 

Camping - .714 

Travel/Vacation '. . ■ ... . -718 

Sports Equipment ...... 720 

Airplanes . .^ 724 

■ ■ , . 

Curs For Sale ;..'., Vv ! . . . .804 

RentaULcascs 808 

Classic/ Antique Cars - . .810 

Services & Parts ,..,......., .814 

Car'Loans/tnsurancc 818 

Vans . . . . . . .< .824 

Four Wheel Drive/Jeeps 828 

Trucks/Trailers 834 

Heavy Equipment 838 

Motorcycles 844 

Warned To B«£ . . •••••■•• • • •■ 848 



Appliances Repair . . . -S03 

Blacktop '. S06 

Builders' . • - S09 

Carpentry . . .S12 

Carpet Cleaning ! . S15 

Concrete/Cement SI8 

Dry Wall S2I 

Educalion/lnstruelion , . . : S24 

Electrical 



S27 

Firewood .."... S30 

Handyman .S33 

Heating/Air Conditioning . . S36 

., S39 

.....' .- S42 



Housekeeping 
Landscaping 



Laundry/Cleaning.. . .'.. » S45 



•1 
Legitl Services ... . 

Medical Services . . . TT . . 

Moving/Storage . 

Painting Deeoraliug . . . - 

l\ira]ega I/Typing Services 

Plumhing .... .■'• ...... 

Pools 

Pressure Washing 

Professional Services , . . 

Radtu/TV Repair . . 

Remodeling 

Resumes ..,■., 

Rooting/Siding ........ 

Storage 

Tax Service 

Trees/Plants 

Wedding 

Miscellaneous 




Kenosha 
County 




Spring* 
Grow 



Johnsburg 



MeHsnry 



Crystsl 

UVe 

Mcllcnry 
County 




. , Jetmd l^jy,. Qhry*Wc« 



Waucorida 



(itindUk* 

North 
Bsrrington u^ Zurich 

<"• knde* 




Zlon 
£) Widsworih 

Gume* 

Wiukeosni 
Park 

Cfty 'North 
ei n Chl«oo : . 



Mundeltki 



Ooks 



® Vernon LttwriyvUlo :■-.... 1 
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Long 

Grove 



-. Highland Pirk 
DeerifSeld 



Cook County 



Buffalo Grove 



Northbfook 



Lakeland Newspapers' Class iilcds Appear in 11 Newspapers! 

Antiocli News • Round Lake News • Lake Villa Record 

Mundelciir News • Wadswortli News • Grayslake Times 

Fox Lake Press • Gurnce Press • Lindenhiirst News 

Wanconda Leader • Libertyville News 



HOW TO PLACE A 
CLASSIFIED AD 



BY CALL 

PHONE (847)223-8161 

py Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 
MAIL Grayslake, IL 60030 






IN 



30 S.Whitney St. 




PERSON Grayslake 

BY 
FAX (847)223-2691 



Direct Line .Tues. 5pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party...Wed. 10am 



8am-8prp Mon.-Thurs. 

8am-5pm... Friday 




«i*ii 





Newspapers 



no 



Notices 



110 



Notices 



120 


['tec 



125 


Personals 



ERRORS: 

We' strive to eliminate 

errors, but if one should 

• occur, please report it 

; immediately as we can be 

responsible for the first two 

(2) weeks ority. 

NO A^DJUSTMENTS'CAN 
BE MADE UNLESS THEY 
AFFECT THE MATERIAL 
VALUE OF AMAD'; 



WANTEDII! 

Nwd ptople who an strkro* 

about bwlnj w< SghL 

Programs under $100, 

Nitural, Dr. Recotwaeadtd. 

CALL: 

847/482-1796 



ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 

FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad In the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are run at NO 
CHARGEI (We discourage 
any pet ads). Deadlines: 10am 
Wednesdays. (847) 

223-6161, exL1 40. 



CUSTOM WINDOW 
TREATMENTS 

Without the high prices. 
You buy the material, 

We make It. 

Use our designers. 

Call now (847) 973-2681 or 

Fax (647) 973-2684. 

HYPNOSIS 

WHY DO THOUSANDS 
OF PEOPLE SAY 
* TRY HYPNOSIS FIRST 
NOT LAST? 

(1) BECAUSE n" WORKS. 

(2) rr WILL SAVE YOUJV 
, LOT OF MONEY* 

BECAUSE YOU WILL GO 
^INTO THE RIGHT 
DIRECTION RIGHT 
AWAY. 

(3) IT SAVES YOU TIME- 
NO NEED TO KEEP 

COMING BACK. 

WHAT IS HYPNOSIS? 

DURING HYPNOSIS • 

YOU'RE RELAXED AND 

GIVEN POSITIVE 

.SUGGESTIONS. ITS 

THAT SIMPLE IN THE 

HANDS OF A TRAINED 

HYPNOTIST. THERE IS 

NOTHING MYSTERIOUS 

ABOUT IT. ANYONE WITH 

NORMAL INTELLIGENCE 

CAN BE HYPNOTIZED. 

YOU ARE ALWAYS IN 

CONTROL 

THE CENTER FOR 
HABIT CONTROL 
128 NEWBERRY 

AVE. 
LIBERTYVILLE, 

ILL. 60048. 

(847) 816-4951. 

DAVID E. WOLD 

CHT. 



1R1E.CVC4.E 
iRECVOLE 



SPRING FRY SPECIAL • 

$29.95. Cornish Rocks, Pul- 
lets, Turkeys, Ducklings, Gos- 
lings, Rare and exotic. breeds. 
Discount prices. FREE CATA- 
LOG. SUN-RAY CHICKS 
HATCHERY, Box 300, Hazel- 
ton, IA. 50641, Poultry Hotline: 
1-800-872-0481. 



HEAL THY W OMEN 

NffiEEMEIID 

$3500.00 Compensation 

Healthy women, age 20-33. 

needed to serve as anonymous 

epg donors. Donors will be 

required to lake medical ion, 

blood screening and undergo 

minor surgical procedure. We 

are interested in all ethnic 

backgrounds. Multiple locations 

available. If interested call 

ARR 773-327-7315 

Serious Inquiries Only 



125 


Personals 



115 



Lost & Found 



LOST DOG 2YR. old female 
.Blue Heeler, resembles 'fox. 
Rear limp. Vicinity North Ave. 
between Swift & 53. Reward. 
(630)266-0717. 

LOST SHEPHERD BLACK 

with brown and white, named 
Jerry, Spring Grove area. 
(815) 675-2494. 

DID YOU FIND Someone* 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dept.. and get your 
results, FOUND ads are 
RUN FREE of Charge! Catl 
(847)223-8161. 



120 



Free 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 
FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 
UMN. For more Information, 
please contact the Humane 
Society. 

DON'T THROW AWAY 
YOUR" OLD COMPUTER 
EQUIPMENT. I will come and 
pick It up for FREE. Call (647) 
566-2819 after 5:30pm. . 



FREE LUXURY BUS RIDE 

TO POTAWATOMl 

BINGO. 

BRAND NEW 1999 BUSl 

Monday-Tuesday- 

Thursday. , •; 

Pick-up 4:1 5pm at 

Hampton Inn, Gurnoe. 

Ride 10 times and get a 

free package of specials. 

Hollywood Casino, 

Valentines Day 

8am. Pay $15 get free 

brunch and $8 back. 

Call for Information \ 
(647) 831-1094. 
(647) 473-1263. 



A LOVING CHOICE Dear 
birth mom, we're Ken and 
Jean, a happily married cou- 
ple with a 5yr. old adopted son 
who can provide a warm, lov- 
ing home for your child. We'd 
be happy to keep in touch 
through pictures and letters. 
Please call our attorney Sara 
(773) 509-0099 or (toll free) 
(877) 509:0099. 

ADOPTION WE'RE SUE 
. and Fred, celebrating happy 
years of marriage, and still 
best friends. We will raise your 
child In a loving and stable en- 
vironment with plenty of sup- 
port and. understanding. We'll 
gladly help you through this 
difficult time. SUE & FRED 688- 
764-5820. 

ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE 

FOR ACHES AND PAINS. 

Therapeutic massage for 

Infants and children. 

FREE MASSAGE 

TEACHING 

To motherslll 

(847) 623^1523. 



ARE YOU PREGNANT? 
Considering Adoption? Many 
couples anxious to adopt Call 
our adoption consultants 
24hrs./day for more Informa- 
tion and answers to your ques- 
tions. Help with allowable ex- 
pensas. 1-800-676-3407. 

BEAUTIFUL FOREVER! 

PERMANENT COSMETIC 

MAKE-UP. 

'Eyebrows 

•Eyellne 

•Also 

♦Electrolysis 

•{Permanent Hair Removal). 

Sherry (847) 249-7448. 



WE'RE A HAPPILY MAR- 
RIED, secure, loving couple 
unable to have children. Our 
greatest dream Is to share our 
lives with a child, and we 
would embrace the opportuni- 
ty to adopt the baby that you 
"may not be ready for. The 
dreams you have for your 
baby can come I rue. If you are 
considering an adoption plan 
as an alternative in your preg- 
nancy, please call us. Paul 
and Denise 1-888-697.5777 
We can help each other. ? 



HOLY SPIRIT YOU who 
made me see everything, and 
showed me the way to reach 
my ideal, You who gave me ' 
the Divine gift to forgive and 
forget the wrong that Is done 
to me, and You who In all In- 
stances of my life are with me, 
I In a short dialogue want to 
thank you for everything and 
confirm once more that I never 
want to be separated from 
You no matter how great. the 
material desire may be. I want 
to be with You and my loved 
ones In your perpetual glory. 
Amen. Thank You for your 
love toward me and my loved 
ones. Persons must pray this 
prayer 3 consecutive days 
without asking your wish, after 
the third day your wish will be 
granted no matter how difficult 
It may be. Then promise to 
publish this dialogue as soon 
as the favor Is granted. Thank 
You Holy Spirit Thank You St 
Jude. LJ. 



LOOK AND FEEL 

YEARS YOUNGER 

In 160 days or your money 

back) Exciting nutritional 

supplement. Listen to our 

4 minute message 

1-600-721-6988 

and call me at 

(847) 838-5437 

to get started. 



LOOK GREAT1 
LOSE WEIGHT] 
MAKE MONEYI 
(847)940-9689. 

METABOLIFE 356» 

All natural dietary supplement 

that helps raise your 

metabolism, burn fat, and 

control your appelitel 

For lowest prices call 

ENERGY BURST. 

(847)543-8403 

|nd«pend*nt OcDrfcutor, 



METAB0LIFE356™ 
Natural diet supplement. 
As advertised on local ~ 

TV and radio,,. 

Independent distributor 

(847) 263-3878. 

MVpOUTM. 

PLEASE HELP. US 

ADOPTI Musical' mom,' athle- 
tic dad, married 12 years, hop- 
ing: to adopt, your' precious*, 
baby. We. live In an activity: 
filled comfortable home, with 2 • 
' lovable , mutts In a close-knit 
neighborhood full of children 
(many. adopted). Medical, le- 
gal, counseling and court ap- 
proved living expenses paid. 
Confidential.- Please call our 
attorney at (708) 957-6833. 



140 


Financial 



FINANCIAL RELIEF FOR 
THE TERMINALLY ILL If 
you're living with a terminal Ill- 
ness and have a life Insurance 
policy, we can give you cash 
for your policy's face value. 
For free Info kit call Enhance 
Ufe Benefits 1-800-325-8120. 

MAXEO.ourr?. 

Buriod'ln Debt? - 
Behind on your payments? 
Living paycheck to paycheck? 
You're not alone. 
But the good news Is, 
we have a REAL solution 
Debt Crisis Solutions. 
Confidential. ' 
Call Today (647) 740-9178. 
Ext #3. 

MONEY PROBLEMS? WE 
can help. Loans available 
$3,000 and up. Good or bad 
credit Call now 1-800-822- 
3985 ext 206. (SCA Network). 

MONEY PROBLEMS7 WE 

can help. Loans available 
$3,000 and up. Good or bad 
credit. Call now 1-800-822- 
3985 ext 206. (SCA Network). 



VISA/MASTERCARD-UP 
TO $6000. No deposit. No 
credit/bad credit OK Call 
today for guaranteed fast ap- 
proval or information. Call 1- 
800-247-7012 (SCA Network). 

SSSSSSSSSSS5SSSS 



INSTANT 
CASH 

We hold the title 

to your car- 
You keep the car. 

(Jet skis, 

motorcycles & 

snowmobiles tool!) 

• No Credit Check 

• IS Mm Approval 



| (847) 249-5500 1 

$$$s$$s$ $$$$$$$$ 



ATTENTION 
CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

IT you have placed classified 
advertising with the Uike 
land; Newspapers you may re 
celve a misleading statement 
from ; another firm request- 
ing payment for. this adverUs> 
ing. To receive proper cred- 
it to your account, all pay. 
mentt for your, Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

munt.be made as Invoiced 
and directed to; 
.' Lakeland Newspapers 
PO Box 208 
30 S. Whitney 8t. 
OrmysUke, 1L 00030-0268 



p iiw uMw w^ w r ■« •*n~>*% ^f.^r^'-rr^ w~vLi^^^^ ' ^ ^' ^^^^i. ' J<v . ^9 *3Bsasiair^t mT<i!h^_tn ' * ' ■ - •* < tor i * i . Mwn < ttf vf awttM B gCSita aa fta gi; 



C18 /Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 26, 1999 



219 



Help Wiiwcil 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Warned 
Part-Time 



GREAT $$'s 

Flexible Hours 

Sotting Appointments. 

Call for Information 

(047) 940-9689. 



Pampered Chef 

needs more consultants 

to demonstrate quality 

kitchen tools at home 

kitchen shows. 

Average $15/$20 

hour commission. 

No experience necessary. 

Call Linda 

(847)249-1015 



r 



1 



Calling anyone who 

needs extra money!!! 

We are tooling for highly 

energetic tndtvtdiuls to work In a 

fast paced friendly environmenl 

preparing newspapet* for delivery. 

TNnda y from 130 im.lo7i.rn. 

Crayiuke/Round Ukearti. 

This Job wl II give you plenty of lime I 

lo get la a full tbnc Job, home before ' 

the Lid* get o fl to khoat, or have 

the rest of the day toyounelfl No 

ipecii I ikllb needed, iludenli and 

retirees are welcome! Applicant 

must be physically able to lift 

small bundles of p per. 

Call Diane for Interview II 
(M7)74tM0J5 



'< 



«f 




gss^Lookkg for a 
*^ flexible working 
schedule? Work from 

home scheduling 

appointment* of small 

household goods for a 

well-known charitable 

organizatioa Minimum 

4-6 hrsv/weck Must be 

reliable. For details 

please call 

\(630) 515-5766^ 



CAMPUS 
SECURITY 

3 Part-time campus 
safety positions 

ore currently available 
at the Lake County High 
School's Technology 
Campus In Grayslake. 
510.00-512.00 per hour. 

These positions arc for 
school year only. FOR 
MORE INFORMATION 
PLEASE CALL JEFF 
DRIF.RTON 223-6681, 
x7201 



YWCA ACTIVITIES DIRECTOR 

DEVELOP YWCA EVENTS. RESPONSIBLE 

FOR AGENCY NEWSLETTER & PRESS 

RELEASES. BACKGROUND IN MARKETING, 

PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT, FUND RAISING & 

BUDGETS. PART-TIME FLEXIBLE 

SCHEDULE TO INCLUDE SOME WEEKENDS 

& EVENINGS. PLEASE SEND RESUME TO: 

YWCA 

• 2133 BELVIDERE RD. 

WAUKEGAN, IL 60085 

847-662-4247. EOE 



DELIVERY 



Want to earn up to $200 per 
week and be your own boss? 

The Daily Herald is looking for 

adult, independent personnel for 

newspaper delivery in the Lake 

County area. 2-3 hour routes 

available between the hours of 

2am & 6am, Monday thru 

Friday; 2am-7am, Saturdays, 

Sundays and Holidays. 

For more information call... 

(847) 427-4333 



LET'S TALK 



Do you like to earn money, but 

not work long hours? Do you 

enjoy talking on the phone? 

Then give me a call. Excellent 

sales opportunities are available 

in Lakeland's Classified Sales 

Dept. Telemarketing 

experience preferred 

but not required. 

Send resume or request 
for application to: 

Attn: M. Combs 
Lakeland Newspapers 

EO. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

or Fax 



(847) 223-8810 ' 



219 



Help Warned 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



We arc looking for \ 

. personable, highly < 

energetic individuals who] 

can work independently < 

handing out newspapers] 

at Lake County store > 

locations. We will train. \ 

Hourly rale plus • 

commissions. \ 

Thursday 4-8 pm and < 

Salurdays 9 am-2 pm \ 

Call Kevin for 
an Interview. ! 

(847) 740-4035 ] 



Social Services 
NIGHT MONITOR 

Interventions, ihitk'.iicd 
lo helping tenuis girls 
overcome drug ndiilction; 
seeks person lo provide 
overnight adult supervi- 
sion. Wo offer mcdk'.il/ 
dental/life insurance and 
paid lime off. 

Call or send resume to: 
Interventions/Contact 

PO Hox 341 

'Waucond.1, 1160084- 

Ph: W7.526W04. coe 



RECEPTIONIST 

for busy, upscale 

cotometry practice 

Must be able to work 

everings and Saturdays. 

Mature, stylish and 

dependable - norvsmck- 

er only! Approximately 

30 hours per week. 

Grayslake Family 
EyeCare 

101 Center 

Grayslake 

No phone calls 

fax resume to: 

847-518-2916 



Gise Manager, 

14 hours/week. Utilize ynilr \ 

social service skills in case 

management of l he elderly. 

Assess for program 

eligibility, develop care plan 

& manage case load with • 

varied level of complexity. 

SAVES required. Car necessary. 

Stvd nvumt lo: 

CatKolic Charities 

116 N.Lincoln Ave. 

Round Lake, IL 60073 

or fax (847) 516-7114 

Attn: Jackie Grcndal 

E.O.E. 

Smoke- Free Environment 



t-Time 



AUDITORS NEEDED 



• EARLY AM HOURS 

• CAR NECESSARY 
•$8.00 TO START 



Call For An Interview 



847-662-9277 



[INVENTORY 
^SPECIALISTS 



An Equal Opportunity Employer 



raphic 
fesigner 

We're looking for d 

"graphic designer" fo join our learn. 

Do you have experience wilh * 

computers and graphic design 

programs? If you do, 

(hen we can leach you the 

rest in this cnlry level position. 

1, Send your resume to NEAL TUCKER at: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 
Grayslake, IL 60030 
^\or fax to 223-8810JJBT 



[mi 



1 




Telemarketing/Part-Time 



i^r**^^J^^j, 



ESSr. 




\ 



Now's your chance to 
cash in on your free time. 

Like kind Newspapers is now accepting 

implications for part lime telephone sides. 

& work from our Grayslake office. 

No experience necessary (but a plus). 

RETIREES 

COLLEGE STUDENTS 

HOUSEWIVES 

Must enjoy talking lo people. - 
Hourly wages plus bonus. 
Average SI 0-5 1 5 per hour or more. 

HOURS: 



Mon.-Thurs, 5:90 p.m .-8:30 p.m. 
Day Hours Sal. 9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m 

For Interview Call Dick 

(after Noon) 

Lakeland Newspapers 

(847) 740-4035 





220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



$1000 BONUS ■ Run solo 
regional. Get homo woekond3. 
00% No Touch Freight. Full 
benefits package. Call Dob 
Scholl @ 1-800-553-2778 Ext. 
2742 -_i__ 

AIM HIGH FIND your future 
with the Air Force! Training, 
travel, educational assistance 
and financial security, Plus en- 
listment bonuses up to 
$9,000 to those who qualify. 
Age requirement 17-27. For a 
free Information packet, call 1* 
800-423-USAF or visit 
www.alrforce.com 

ANYONE CAN DO THIS! 

Earn $B0O-$5,000 per month 

Taking Customer Service 

Calls at home. 

Full or Part-Time. 

Cell 1-888-395 0743. ' 

ASSEMBLE ARTS, 

CRAFTS, Toys In your spare 
time. Earn CASHI Phone work, 
. typing, sewing, electronics, 
more. Great Pay, CALL 24 
hour Information. 1-800-795- 
0380 Ext. 21, (SCA Network) 



I 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you have placed class tried 
advertising with the Lake- 
land Newspaper! you may 
receive a misleading state- 
ment from another firm re- 
questing payment for this 
advertising. To receive prop- 
er credit to your account, 
nil payments for your Lake- 
land Newspaper* advertising 
must i be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: . 
. Lckehutd Newspapers 
PO Box 368 
30 8. Whitney St. 
Oraysudte, IL 60030-0266 



ATTENTION EXPERI- 

ENCED OTR DRIVERS and 
owner operators. Hiring a limit- 
ed number of positions. Lucia- 
no otters *Top pay *New as- 
signed 425hp. condos 'Fre- 
quent home time 'Benefit 
package. Call MJ at 800-753- 
6165, Wayne at 800-727- 
5768. 

AVON PRODUCTS- 

START a homebased busi- 
ness. Work flexible hours. 
Enjoy unlimited earnings. Call 
Toll Free (888) 561-AVON. 

SALES CAREER REAL op- 
portunity to earn high Income. 
Proven product, complete 
training and our rural market- 
ing system has created great 
success since 1977. Monthly 
qualified draw of $2000-54000 
for first three months. Travel In 
state overnight. No relocation 
necessary. For more Informa- 
tion call 1-800-575-1643. 



PHOTOGRAPHY 
ENTRY LEVEL 

No ejop, reqU we wil train & 

pfovide equip. +camefa+. 
benefits. Wbfk local. Cor feq'd. 

708-338-0713 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-nine 



DRIVER • CHOOSE YOUR 
FLEETIt 'Regional fleet, 
home weekends, 'National 
F loot, out 7 days, home 2, Out 
10. home 3. *Solo or team. 
*Co. Drivers start with- a 27- 
34e/ml base. 28-39$ ml. wilh 
bonuses. 'Owner operators 
81-820 all miles. Excollont In- 
surance, toll, fuel, tractor pur- 
chase programs. 48753' van 
or flatbed. 95% no touch. On- 
the-job training for recent 
school graduates. Talk to our 
drivers. 1-800-467-6345, 
www.foohl.net '. 

DRIVER BUD MEYER 
Truck Unas Refrigerated Haul- ■ 
Ing '$1,000 sign-on bonus for 
experienced company drivers 
'Solo drivers start up to 33* 
solos drivers and contractors 
CALL TOLL FREE 877-283- 
6393 GRADUATE STUDENTS 
1-800-338-6428. 

DRIVERS - ATTN: Profes- 
sional Owner Operators. No 
Canada, NYC & NE, Mln. 23yr. 
wilh lyr. OTR CDL with Haz- 
mat. Paschall Truck Unas 800- 
8480405. ' 

DRIVERS - BE HOME AND 
MAKE THE MONEY YOU 
WANT. Home weekly. Re- 
gional runs. Experienced driv- 
ers and owner operators 
needed. Burlington Motor Car- 
Here 800-564-6262. 

DRIVERS - OWNER Opera- 
tors: LOOKING FOR high pay- 
ing freight, home weekends, 
no forcod dispatch, company 
trailers, discounts on fuel and 
equipment? Call LANDSTAR 
RANGER 1-800-844-6644. 

DRIVERS AND TEAMS: 
Starting pay up to 37c/mile. As- 
signed Frelghtllner conven- 
tional, Improved ' speed 
stance, excellent miles, time 
home every 7-10 days In most 
areas and more. Experienced 
drivers call Heartland Express 
toll-free 1-87-PRO-DRIVE. 
Owner Operators ask about 
B8tf/mlle. Call 1-8-PROFIT- 
FRO. E.O.E. 

EARN EXTRA MONEY 

Work one weekend a month 
and two weeks a year and re- 
ceive 100% college tuition, the . 
Montgomery G.I. BUI and an 
excellent paycheck. You may 
also qualify for "a cash enlist- 
ment bonus. Call your local 
National Guard representative 
today at 1-800-OK-GUARD. 

DRIVERS WE DONT 
JUST recruit you, we watch 
over you. No experience - No 
problem. No Cost CDL Train- 
ing if qualified $30,000 a year 
& benefits, "1 -800-553-1 044. 

Infant Teacher g 
VA Child 
J Care Center 1 

ft 8:30 a.m.-5:U0 p.m. M-F J 
A Must have 2 years | 
J college, 6 lire ECE 

| Call Mrs. Ackerman y ■ 

I (847) 578-3896 

J E.O.E, M/F/D/V V 



220 



Help Wanted- 
Fiill-Tlmc 



EASY WORK! 

NO EXPERIENCE 

$500-$1 ,000 part-time at 

homo stuffing onvelopos, 

For free Information send 

self-addressed, 

stamped .envelope: 

R&J Enterprises 

Mailing Services, Inc, 

P.O. Box 402 
Ingleslde, III. 60041- 

GRAPHIC DESIGNER 

We're looking for a 

•graphic designer* to |oln our 

team. Do you have experience 

with computers end graphic 

design programs? If you do, 

then we can teach you the 

rest 

In this entry level position. 

Send your resume to: 

Neat Tucker, 

Lakeland Newspapers, 

30 S. Whitney St., 

Grayslake, III. 60030. 

Or fax to: (847) 223-8810. 

HELP . WANTED SEMI 

DUMP DRIVER, 5yra. experi- 
ence. (847) 587-4251. 



OTR DRIVERS • Your fu- 
ture has arrlvod. Late models, 
groat miles. Top of the line, 
condos. Mln, lyr. exp. CALL 
Butler Transport 600-KC- 
TRUCK. 



PUT YOUR COMPUTER 
TO WORK! $499 P/T-S8499 
F/T. For free Information log 
onto www.hbn.com Use ac- 
cess code 5682 or phono toll 
free 1-888 -78- GOALS. (SCA 
Network). 

REPORTER Lakeland News- 
papers has an opening for an 
entry level reporter on its ex- 
panding editorial staff. Experi- 
ence In writing and some pho- 
tography is helpful. Will handle 
a variety of writing assign- 
ments and work on a varied, 
flexible schedule. You must be 
able to work under deadline 
situations. II you have the 
basic skills we need, this may 
be your chance for a career 
start. Come on board with us 
and we'll teach you the rest. 
Please fax resumes to: Neal 
Tucker, Executive Editor, 
(647) 223-8810 or mall to: 30 
S. Whitney St., Grayslake, III. 
60030. 



WEIGHT LOSS! 

We'll pay you to 

Lose up to 

30lbs. in 30 days. 

Call 1-800-600-0343 

exl. 2465. 



RECEPTIONIST 

Dermatology office 
In Highland Park. 

Typing required. 

Includes every 
other Saturday a.m. 

Call Elsie 
(847) 432-4650. 



I 



ACCOUNTING 




Lakeland Newspapers has an opening for an Accounting 
Manager. Responsibilities include all phases of accounts 
payable, accounts receivable, payroll and taxes. You would 
reconcile all bank statements and prepare monthly P&L 
statements. The accounting department has 5 members, so 
leadership skills are important. Excellent benefit package, 
salary based on experience. Send resume and cover letter 
with salary history to Bill Schroeder at: 

P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

No faxes or phone calls please 




Newspapers 



• 



February 26, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers I C1 9. 



I 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



. I 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



TITLE SEARCHERS 

Experienced, Flexible Hours 

For Winnebago, McHenry. 

Cook. Lake and 

Wisconsin Counties. 

Ginocchlo Enterprises Inc. 
(312)587^279 



TRAYI'XACiKXT 

lull or I'uil 'I line 



r 



Plumbers * 
Licensed 

Montana/lmmed jl: 

openings. Needed for largo! 

roildontlal & commercial ' 

plumbing contractor 

located In 

"Big 9ky Country'*; 

B oio man, MT. 

A community of 30,000 



otfera: great quality of life, y 

ex'c school ayatemi, y 

affordable housing, low y 

crime, tremendous hunt- | 

Ing, fishing, & outdoor y 

activities. Must possess § 

ability to be a leader & § 

willing to work throughout y 

MT.TopwBgos, profit | 

sharing, 40tk, insurance, I 



5 day wrk wk. 
- Contact 
Williams Plbg. tVHIg. 

Box 10 

Boieman,MT 59771. 

•' or call Kurt Smith -. 

406-587.0969. 

Fax 406-585-9458 



Driven/School But 



If 
V 
V 
I 
sj 



Ililmuu.it ii |iliis. 
< 'nil Kim in* Muriie 

HlT-fKHJ-KJId 






$220 TO S650 WEEKLYIll 

Asirmbtc Products or Mailing 

Drodiurci From Home. Any 

Hours! ti>j Experience 

Necc>Mr>IFT/PT. 

Call Pint Amerian Publishing 

1-BO0-818-9979 

Exl.37 24 hn 



JiitiiininiiiiiiiililiniiimiiiiiiiiiiiTTC 



HVAC WHOLESALE CO, 

HAS IMMEDIATE 
OPENING FOR AN OFT1CE 

POSmON. WE ARE 

LOOKING FOR A PERSON 

WHO WANTS A LONG 

TEWvlPOSmONWrTH 

A FAST GROWING 
COMPANY. DLITIES MAY 

INCLUDE HUNG, 
COMPUTER DATA ENTRY, 

ASSIST CUSTOMERS 

OVERTHE PHONE, ETC. 

WE CAN OFFER A v > 

COMPETITIVE WAGE, 

PROFTT SHARING 

PROGRAM &. AN 

EXCELLENT INSURANCE 

PACKAGE. IF YOU WANT 

-TO BE PART OF A TEAM 

PLEASE APPLY© 

CONTKOLD ENGiNEfJUNG 

SlflTLYNOtTH 

23915 N. HtJUCY DR 

sunt 105 

LAKE 1U1TF, tt 60044 

■ NO PHONE CALLS 

niASf;' 






Great Pay and 
Terrific Benefits! 

The VilUge et Victory Lakes 
rvsi an exciting opportunity for 
dependable Individuals lo Kryc 
chit senior clientele in our 
tipjcolc, private rcstaurflnl. 

FT & PT.PREP ASST 

At lead 1 yr prep cap needed 
for day & early evening shilis. 
Responsible for preparing dairy 
menu St maintaining a sanitary 
department. ' 

EwnlrK^weekcnd/holktay pre- 
mium*. Full ben* fill package 
available It you work at least 40 
hrs. In a rwo-uwck period - 
Paid vacalkms and ttobdayi. 
medical and denial plans, dis- 
counts on Wtoty. Memorial 
Hospital services, company- 
sponsored pension plan, lax- 
shebered Annuities, and MUCH 
MORE. • 

Please apply in person between 

7:30amr7:00pm Mon-Sun at 

,' the Continuing Core Center, 

1055 Grand Avenue 

Oust east of Deep Lake Road]. 

Llndenhursl, IL 

(847) 356-4551. 

EOE 



CMC Programmers/ 
Operators 

Iron wood, Nf I 
(Upper Peninsula). 
Immcd Openings. 
Dynamic, clean & modern 
fast-paced mold shop in 
the heart of Sportsman's 
'Paradise in Mi's U.P. 
.(Iron wood: safe, family 
friendly small communi- 
ty), seeks skilled 
Employees to allow us lo , 

continue to grow & 
expand, Comp wages ae 
bnfls offered in addition 
. to a very pleasant team 

environment. 
Fax resume 906-932-8111. 
Review of company: 
www.exlremelool.com : 



.iiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiininiii 1 1 7 




DRIVERS 

SEVERAL POSmONS 
AT 2 LOCATIONS 
(WAUKECAN& ELKCROVE) 
CpLA&BW/HAZMAT4T 
AIRBRAKES 

VEHICLE INSPECTOR 

FULLTIME POSITION. 
DEPENDABLE 

APPLY IN PERSON 

KfcR 
TRANSPORTATION 

3059 W.WASHINGTON 
WAUKEGAN 




w 




Manufacturing " 

* MECHANICS: Troubleshooting St.repairof 
electric motors, gearboxes,. pumps, etc. Position' 
req. meeh. aptitude St. basic tools; with electrical,, 
) machining, or welding knowledge a plus. 

ELECTRONIC MOTOR REWINDER: 

' Electric motor winder/trainee lo learn hand 
winding skills for repair of large electric motors 
& related equip. Req. good hand/eye coord. & 

; quality-oriented. Exp. in any phase of AC/DC 
repair a plus. 

Competitive compensation St benefits Incl. 401(k), 
profit sharing, health/dental Insurance, paid vaca- 
|* lion & holiday, plus more! 

McHENRY ELECTRIC 
& SUPPLY CO. INC 

4012 W. Main Street, McHenry, Illinois 
Ph: 815-385-5530 Fax: 815-385-61 1 2 

eoe m/f/d/u 



J 



No 
Experience... 

Wo Offer A Paid 
Training Program 



*$5000Fri 

• Medical & 

• St 



No 
Transportation... 

Employee 
Shuttle Service 



No 
Baby-sitter. 

Child Ride Along 
{bring your kidj ro work) 



Bonuses 
• Credit Union 
fMorel 



Call A Location Near You: 



NORTHERrTuKWHJ STY OAKi 
847-680-9305 

PARK CITY 
847-244-5690 



Applicant! mil b* 21 yton or oUt 

wilk d«an aVMna record. 
Drvg Kmntng r*qvlr*£ tOE M/rVD/V 




TT^iSSSSSSW 3IMSIII TrMMStMlaliMI 



Banking 
$SIGN-ON BONUS$ 

Pick the right job while. working close to home! 

• Proof Operator; Libgrtvville: 
Operate NCR-Proof Machine. 

• Book Keeper : Libertyville: 

Loan Operations/Administrative Assistant: 



Deerfield: Full-time: Work with lenders to prepare 
loan presentations and documents. Microsoft 
Word and familiarity with LazerPro helpful. 

* Loan Opener: Lincolnshire: Full-time: 
Verify customer loan information and assemble 
loan files. 

Top-notch salaries and generous benefits offered 
while working in a friendly environment. 
Interested candidates may mail or fax resumes lo: 

FAX: \ (847)215-0580 

MAIL:- Human Resources Dept. 

1020 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

Deerfield, IL 6001 5 

EOE M/F/V/D Smoke-Free Work Environment 



Sales 



(PT & FT) 



5,000 customers per month overage 



No price haggling 



No pressure sates foclics 



Casual dress every day 



Open & friendly work environment 



Port -time Sales Consultants earn 
S 12-S25 per hour in commissions 



Full -lime Sotes Comultants ooin 
52 - S3K per month in commissions 



Full-time Senior Soles Consullarvlv oorn 
S3 5-575K per month m commissioni 



Looking to 

reverse your 

commute to work? 

" The new CarMax AutoMall in Kenosha has 
opportunities for Sales Consultants. Hang on for the 
ride of your life! CarMax is revolutionizing ihe way 
people buy cars, by listening to what the. customer 
wants. We have 27 stores across tho country, and hove 
rapid expansion plans for lha years lo come. What 
makes this tremendous growth possible? Our 
commitment to providing customer -friendly, service, a 
huge selection of vehicles al low, no-haggle prices, 
and guaranteed quality I If you want lo bo part of a new, ' 
revolutionary company that's .taking the country by, 
storm and changing Ihe way Americans buy cars, " 
please call usl Our Job Line is open Sun, 1 -5pm, or 

. Mon - Fri, 9;30am- 6pm, FT. ,— ^gj===^^p======. * 

taming ranges bosod on ovorogos 
- of auodotai who hovfl 
been employed ot toast one year. A 

valid driver's fcense i i requii od. 




CARmax 



. Quality • Integrity • Law Prfc* 

Rtrhsx. It'* CarMsuc. 





■.Only $ urwbi* to coll. | 
^Vjsi'wrwthOe'cji 
WW promo*i a oVoo^rrw worlqjioxs. EO£, , . 

SSBBBBBBBBBBBBBBi 



220 



Help Wanted 
Futl-Tlmc 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Tinie 



POSTAL JOBS 
to$18.35/HR 

INC. BENEFITS 

NO EXPERIENCE 

. FOR APR AND 

• EXAM INFO, CALL 

T-800-813-35B5 

EXT 2406 

i 8AM-9PM 

7DAYSfds,'inc 



Ll_ 



EDUCATION 
INSTRUCTOR 

- Fullorpart-fJmclcxp. 

preferred but wilt train. 

Good driving record, 

Works well wfth people, 

berteflu. 

The Best Driving School, Inc. 

GraysUke 

847-223-7338 



Start a Home-Based Business. 

Work Flexible Hours. 

Enjoy Unlimited Earnings. 

AVO N 

Call Toll Free (800) 735-8867 



PARTS ASSISTANT 



Heavy" equipment repair-facility, seeks individual wilh 
good organizational skills to assist in Parts 'Department. 
Dul.ics will include ordering parts, scheduling.equtp- 
mcni, customer. contact ami helping lo maintain parts 
inventory. Previous experience helpful but will train 
right individual, We offer a competitive salary and 
complete benefits package. 

Please complete application form at: 

28572 N. Bradley Road 
Libertyville, IL 60048 

between Ihe hours of 7:00 a.m.' and 7:00 p.m. seven 
days per week or- telephone (847) 247-5215 and leave 
I your name and number. 




. ■ ■ 





The following schools need 
substitutes on a continuing basis, please contact the 
: names listed below for further information.' . 

Adl'ai E. Stevenson High School District #125 
Two Stevenson Drive, Uncolnsliirc, IL6OO69 

Contact: Personnel x-320 (847) 634-4000 

Aptakisic - Tripp School District #102 
123 1 Welland Road, Buffalo Grore, IL 60089 

Contact: Laurel Karolczak .... (847) 634-5338 

Big Hollow School District #38 
34699 N. Hwy 12, fngleslde, IL 60041 

Contact: Ms! Buclmer (847) 587-6800 

Day School / Norlhbrook 

3210 Dundee Road, Northbrook IL6OQ62 

Contact: EdeSn>der. ..:..!........ . , (847) 205^0274 

Deerfield School District #109 
517 Deerfield Road, Deerfield [■ IL 60015 • 

Contact: Phyllis x-222 (847) 945-1844 

Grass Lake School District #36 

26177 W. Grass Lake Road, AnUoch, IL 60002 • 

Contact: Pat Rlsche or Sue. (847) 395-1550 

Grayslake School District #46 
450 N. Banon Blvd., Gra)?lake, IL 6O03O 

Contact: Jan Fabry x-1 100. (847) 223-3650 

Hawthorn School District #73 

201 Hawthorn Parkway, Vemon Hills, IL6006I 

Conlad:Shm Keena (847) 367-3279 

Lake Forest Elementary Schools 
95 W. Deerpalh, Lake Forest, IL 60045 

Contact: Karen Allie (847) 

Lake Forest High School District #115 
1285 North McKinley Road, Lake Forcst^IL 60045 

Contact: Wendy Antrim x-1 18 (847) 234-3600 

Lake Villa School District #41 
131 McKinley, Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Contact: Kathy, (847) 356-2385 

North Chicago Community Unit School Dist. #187 
2000 Lewis Aw., North Chicago, IL 60664 

Contact: Mona Armstrong. .-..;., (847) 689-8150 

Northern Suburban Special Education District 
760 Red Oak Lane,' Highland Park, IL 60035 

Contact: Bill i .Charts ■■ (847) 831-5100 

Waukegan Public Schools District #60 
1201 N. Sheridan Road., Waukegan, IL 60085 

Contact: Personnel. . (847) 360-5 404 

Woodland School District #50 

17370 GageslLake Road, Gages Lake, IL 60030 

CoHtoc/.MIchelle v, (847) 856-3605 

Young at Heart Center 

610 Peterson Road, Libertyville, IL 60048 

Cbw/rtd.Llsa or Leslie ; ; (847) 367-6110 



rt 1 



-4J 



C20 (Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



UelpWanici! 
Kiill-Timc 



220 



Help Warned 
Fiill-Thne 



220 



Help Wanted' 
Fnll-Tlmc. 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 






Mulll-Spcctaliy Physicians office located in the northern suburbs 

Is presently seeking an Administrative Assistant. Candidate must 

be proficient with Microsoft Office and Dictaphone, as well as 

possess past Administrative Assistant experience. Your efforts 

will be rewarded with competitive compensation. For 
confidential consideration, please send/fax your resumes to: 

Decrpath Medical Assoc. 

Human Resources 

71 Waukogan Rd., Sle. 900 

Lake Bluff, IL 60044 
fax: (847) 295-1547. EOE 



YWCA HAS IMMEDIATE OPENING FOIt A 

RECEPTIONIST, BILINGUAL PREFERRED 

FULLTIME W/ BENEFITS, MUST HAVE 

DATA ENTRY COMPUTER SKILLS & 

CUSTOMER SERVICE EXPERIENCE. 

PLEASE SEND RESUME TO: 

YWCA 2133 BELVIDERE RD. 

WAUKEGAN,IL 60085 

OR CALL SUZANNE 847-662-4247 



DELIVERY 



BRANCH ASSISTANTS 



Immediate openings for individuals to assist 

with day-to-day operations in branch 

locations. Responsibilities will include setting 

up papers for delivery as well as for 

occasional absence of distributor. 

Current openings in the following locations: 

• Libertyville 
•Mundeleln 
•Vernon Hills 

Work 3-4 hours a day with flexibility in 

starting and ending times. 
Starting pay is S9.62/hr. plus benefits. 

For more information call: 
(847) 427-4333 

«4HHMHMMKM>04MHHHHHHMMM>04MHKHMHMMNHMKHHHHMHKHVMHHMM 



Great Lakes Credit Union is Hiring! 
Come Join Our Team! 

We are currently accepting applications for the 
following positions: 

• Call Center Reps 

• Tellers 

• Financial Service Reps 

• Collectors 

• Accountants 

If you have excellent customer service experience, 
great Interpersonal skills, computer experience, and 
outstanding communication skills then apply todayl 

In return we offer medical/dental/vislon, 401 K, tuition, 
paid vacations/holidays/personal time, training, and 
monthly Incentives! 

To apply mail/fax/e-mail to: Attn: Staffing, GLCU, 
2525 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064.. 
Fax: 847-887*8798. E-mail: lenc@glcu.org 

Call our Job Hotline for more info at 847-576-8909! 

EOE 



Immediate 

opening for a 

Legal Secretary 

for FOX LAKE 

LAW Office; 

competitive 

benefits 

contact Mary @ 

847-587-2551 



< TSIOMI li 
SKllYIU'. 



Growing Medical Pkg 
Co. seeking to fill a full 
time position for a 
customer service repre- 
sentative. We offer a 
competitive salary plus 
bonus, full medical 
benefits and 401 (k). 
Clean, non-smoking 
environment. 

For.consideralion please 
fax resume to Fran at: 
847/537-8703, or mail 
to: 

MEDIKMARK, INC. 
900 Asbury Drive' 

Buffalo Grove, IL 60089. 

.' Please Include salary 
requirements. 



JB Banking 

jj EXCELLENT, 

D OPPORTUNITIES 

^ Grand Premier Operating 
w Systems. Inc.. located In 
Ik Vernon Mills, is the opcra- 
V lions division for Grand 

i National Banks. 
k We currently haw avail- 
B[ab!e the (ollwmg FT& 
^PT positions: 

• Transactions Services 
Proof 
Statements 

1 Readcr/Sorler Operator 
' Mall Clerk (PT) 
III you are interested in a 
I challenging job. casual work 
1 environment, excellent ben- 
I elils and competitive pay. 
[apply In person at; ' 

588 Lakeview Parkway 
{Off Executive Driver, 
near Ric 60 & Rte 21) 

Vernon Hills 

Or mail/lax resume lo: 

847-526-3750 

Grand Premier 

Financial, Inc. , 

Attn: HR 

486 W. liberty 

Wauconda. IL 60084 

For a listing ol additional 

I Job opportunities, call our 

JOB HOTLINE at: 

1-800-927-2191 

Visit our website at: 
ivww.grandprcmicr.com 

GPOS Is a Drug-free 
Environment. EOE/AA 







I 



*> 



Reliable Leads 

Fully Paid Training 

Great Sales Support 

Unlimited 

Earnings 

Opportunities 

Salary* 

Commission 

+ Benefits 

If you're hardworking, 
ambitious and ready for a 
challenge, find out about 
I career opportunities with 
I TruCrecn+Chcmlawn, 
; division of the Fortune 500 
.! ServiceMaster Company, 
'< and the nation') largest & 
' fastest growing Lawn Care 
Company! 

CALL 

800-934-8088 
for an appointment! 

TtauQKEN*GcMLiMr 



(E.O.E.) 



WEBDEVELOPER 

Chicagoland's premier 

Internet Service. 

Provider is in search of a Web 

Developer due to rapid growth. This 

individual will work with customers 

and develop sites. Knowledge in 

HTML and JAVA Script required. If 

you are interested in creating a 

future with a rapidly growing 

organization, fax resume to skw. 

(847) 223-8810 or 
e-mail: skw@us-netdirect.com 



i 






REPORTER 



I Lakeland Newspapers has an opening for aril 
entry level reporter on its expanding editorial! 
staff. Experience in writing and some photog- 
raphy is helpful. Will handle a variety of writing I 
assignments and work on a varied, flexible] 
schedule. You must be abie to work under) 
deadline situations. If you have the basic skills! 
we need, this may be your chance for a career! 
start. Come on board with us and we'll teach! 
you the rest. 

| Please fax resumes to: 
Neal Tucker 
Executive Editor 
(847)223-8810 
or mall to: 30 S. Whitney St. 
IGrayslake, IL 60030 



ADMINISTRATIVE EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT & GENERAL MANAGER 

Wauconda based business has a unique administrative position available for a very motivated self-slarter 
with, supervisory skills. This unique position combines a variety of administrative duties and supervision. 

The successful candidate must possess the ability to handle a wide range of responsibilities, be self- 
directed, have strong organizational skills and working knowledge of Office 97. The candidate must be 
able to effectively interact with department supervisors while taking the initiative to handle a number of 
. other duties under minimal supervision. You can expect competitive compensation and benefits. 

Fax resume to: 847-526-3377 or mail to: 

Protective Products International, Inc. 

Unit 1 1 6, 1 205 Karl Court, Wauconda, IL 60084 



LOCAL ORIGINATION 
ACCESS COORDINATOR 

TCI or Northeast Illinois 
has an Immediate opening 
in our Local Origination 
Department. Enjoy being 
part or a Tun, fast paced, 
and dynamic industry! 
I'lds Is a full lime position. 
We ofTer a complete bene- 
fit package including med- 
ical, dcnlnl, vision, Julk, 
paid holidays, vacations 
and many others. 

We require: 

•Good natural people 
-Excellent communication 

skills 
•High School diploma or 

GEO 
•Pre-employment drug 

screen and physical 
-Communications degree 

or .1 years experience in 

related field. 

Please submit 
applications lo: 

Attn: Snndv Martin • 

3237 Sheridan Road 

Zton,lL' 60099 

Tax (8-17) 7-M-36U' 

Only qualified applicants 
uill he contacted Tor 

an Interview. 

Please no phone calls. 

. TCI Is nn Equal 

Opportunity Emplovcr 

M/F/D/V 



i'IIW - r^Vl >• 



This is your 

week 




On Tuesday March 9th & Wednesday 
March 10th, Quill Corporation will be 
holding, at it's Lincolnshire Headquarters, an 



OPEN HOUSE 



from 9am -7pm 



We'll be hiring on the spot for 

• Customer Service Reps 

• Data Entry Reps 

• Inside Sales /Development 

We're going to change the way you think about 
customer service & sates. More pay. More 
benefits. More of everything. Watch next week's 
classified section for mare details. If unable to 
attend, please fax resume to: (847) 634-5820. 
Quill Corporation, 100 Scholter Rd., 
Lincolnshire IL 60069. 




'0' ,y n 1 ' i ■•vr<V'' t 
February 26, 1999 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fuli-Timc 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fuli-Tlmc 



Production Jobs 

Available In 
SOUTH CAROLINA! 

Irrimed Openings. • 
isola USA hiis.immcd 
entry level positions in 
our Ridgeway, SC mfg 
plant, training provided, 
rloexp nee. 
Come grow with us! 
Wc offer exc start wages 
& bnfts in an area 
where the housing 
costs arc reasonable. 
Resume/send for application: 
isola USA 
Attn: HR 
lOOTillcsscn Blvd 
Ridgeway, SC 29130 
Fax 803-337-8254 
E-nuil iljuiJcnJjlc»i5ob-u».com 

isola USA is an EEO 
employer, drug free work place ' 



ItJt^k^h.Jk^k^kJk 



I Retail 

i INSIDE SALES 
^ (Full-Time) 

A Some previous lumber 
and bultding materials 
""f background preferred, 
^ but willing to train Hie 
4 right candidate. Flexible 
■^ schedule! Mundeleln 
^ location. Hourly rale, 
A + commissions. 
]J Call our Corporate Office £ 



r 

r 
k- 
r 
k 
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> 

k 
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k. 



2 



at 847-742-2000 or 
apply In person lo: 

SEIGLE'S 

The Professional's 

Choice 

1440TownllncRd. 

(Rte 60) 
Mundeleln 

Equal Opportunity 
Employer 



Sf 



\ 



Maintenance Technicians 

Nichols Aluminum Lincolnshire, an ISO 9002 

certified leader in the processing of cold rolled 

aiumirfum sheet, is seeking qualified maintenance 

technicians. 

The qualifications include knowledge and proficiency 

in welding/gas cutting, hydraulics, pipe fitting, pumps, 

power transmission, lubrication, rigging, shop 

machines - toots and equipment, basic electrical 

and pneumatic. 

Starting wage will be $ 1 8.28 for individuals 
successfully passing the maintenance qualification test. 
Additional wages include a production bonus shared 
by all shop employees, quarterly safety bonus,. 
' yearly attendance bonus and 3-2-2 premium. 

An excellent benefit package including: Group, Health, 
Dental and Life, a 401-K plan which includes a 
6.5% contribution by the Company after one year 
- and a stock purchase plan. 

Please contact Stan or Julie at: 

Nichols Aluminum 

200 Schelter Road 

Lincolnshire, IL 60069 

800-442-0707 

EOE/M/F/H/V 



K 




How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

Bv Naiicv Sakol 



Dear Search, 



• 



I was offered a Job with a fine company. I told the employer 
that I would have to give my present employer a 2-weck notice 
upon accepting the new position. The new employer told me 
that their needs were immediate and although they would 
appreciate me glvlng'only a l-week notice to my present 
employer, they agreed to a 2-weck starting date. During the 
weekend before I was lo start my new Job after having already 
left my farmer employer, I contracted what I thought was a 
virus that kept me from starting my job on the first day. When 
I called my new employer to tell them they seemed to under- 
stand. I called on the second day and told them I was still 
under the weather and they seemed to reluctantly understand. 
They asked me If 1 had seen a physician and I told them that I 
would try to go that day. On Thursday I called the company 
and said that I could start the fob the following Monday. The 
company was upset with this and said that the work toad was 
piling up, that they had released the other employee who had 
been on the fob previously, brought in a temp and that it was 
Imperative that I show up to work on Monday with a doctor's 
excuse. Come Monday, I realized that I had no note to give the 
employer, mainly because I didn't feel I needed to visit the 
doctor. But 1 took my chances and showed up for work any- 
way. When I was greeted by the Personnel Manager, she 
Immediately asked for my doctor's note for which I told her 1 
icvcr went to the doctor. She told me that they held the post- 
Ion an additional week that had been agreed upon, and she 
had lo hire a temp lo come in and help out the days that 1 was 
not there. They think thatln lieu of this, they may call the temp 
back in, or continue looking for someone to fill this position. 
They already hired me. How can they do that? 
E.M. - Fox Lake 

Dear EM., 

Technically, although you were hired, you never actually con- 
summated your employment. People do get sick. I have yet to 
come across a sickness dial was timely. I understand your 
predicament, however, I also understand theirs. If you told 
them you were to see a doctor, you should have followed 
through or told them you didn't feel you needed one. One draw 
buck to this untimely Illness is that they had a perfect opportu- 
nity to bring In that temporary who then showed them what 
he/she could do. Pick yourselfup and don't dwell on this. 
Who knows, perhaps your former employer would welcome 
you buck. NOTE: Temporary assignments can lead to full time 
permanent Job placements. It allows for the perfect opportu- 
nity lo "show them what you can do". 

teller* enn In- bi-ni tu Nti'ncy Snkul 

C'/ti Ulkrlnnil Ni!Wi|ia|ii'rs. 
CO. Mux 2CH, Crnyslnfcc. II. C0030 



February 26, 1999 



220 



Help Waiud 
Full -Time 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers I C21 



220 



Help Wanted 
.'; Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time- 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help VKuited 
FitllrTime 



Tired of Earning 

$2000 to $3000 a month when 
your lifestyle demand* more? 
I need 10 key people. High 5 W 
for those able to tain and 
motivate others. 
CALL: 847/604-4971 



.1 & KTIUJCK 
TRAINING 

Get training at ' 

THE OLDEST & THE BEST 

truck (raining school In Illinois- 

YQRKVILLEAREA 

030-553-iMHH) 

M»MHI « «MMMMM 



'■':-" 



ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 

:Gro vying Lake County Manufacturing Co. 
.has immediate openings for full and/or part time 
"administrative assistants. Duties include customed/ 
telephone contact, sales/order entry, truck shipment 
.'.scheduling, light duty: filing, word processing, 
' telephone operator/ receptionist Excellent starting: 
wages and benefits available for candidates with ; 
required job skills and steady work record. 

Apply iri person or send resume to: , 

Air-Drive, -Inc. 
4070 Ryan Road 
Gumee, IL 60031 




ONCE IN A CAREFR OPPORTUNITY! 



Recently consolidated HQ has just moved to the 

NORTHERN SLBURBS. vYs're.starting fresh & reinventing 

our Corporate Processes, Relationships, Culture. 

ACCOUNTING CLERK 

Responsible for reconej&rig bank accts [;& various GL. 
iaccts; preparrigi daiy cash "reports &> other (financial 
^reports, sales/use tax returns; processing monthly journal' 
entries & intercompany transadiohs. Requires 2-3 .yrs; 
; acctg exp & yvorldng knowledge of Lotus or Excel " 

A/RREP 

Work, with customers to research, ;&. troubleshoot^ 
problems. Also handle Cash AppL& direct baling. 
Requires 02 yrs exp Ge'djt/CoUection in manirfacturihg : 
or distribution environrrient. 



IF YOU'RE tired of the cliques & 
politics & want to get In on the 

ground floor, Mail/Fax 
(847)573-3834 resume to: HR, 

XERTIFIED POWER, 970 /QenMWlWlrc 
Campus Dr., Mundeleln, IL c 
60060 (e.o.elm/0 




■ I* "MMtl 






CAD Operator 



Fortune 500 company located In northern Illinois has. 
an Immediate opening for a CAD Operator. Primary' 
responsibilities will Include development of detailed 
parts drawings using ProEnglneer software, convert 
drawings and sketches designed by engineering to 
formal drawings, develops mechanical layouts of 
average complexity and prepares the related engineer- 
ing drawings. 
Qualified applicants must possess: 

- Solid background and working knowledge In 
ProEnglneer CAD software 

-Ability to read and Interpret electrical schematics 
and mechanical drawings. 

- 2 year associate's degree In CAD program or 
equivalent experience 

- 1-3 years experience as CAD operator using 

ProEnglneer software 
The selected candidate will enjoy an excellent wage 
and benefit package that Includes medical, dental, ' 
vision, 401k. 

Qualified candidates may fax/send resume with salary 
requirements to: 

Danaher Controls 

1675 Delany Road 

Gumee, IL 60031 
.FAX: 847-662-6633 



IlIliliElIlllBlllllill 



;i^fi?ik#.'r* 



►RINTED GiRGUlT BOARDS 



Triad Circuits. Inc. 

is now hiring for: 

!• Plating Supervisor 
(5 yr. BRgrnrJ. in printed 
.circuit board plating) 

• Photo technician 

• CNC Operators 

(Drilling/Routing) 

Minimum 1 year experience in the 

manufacturing of printed circuit 

boards required. Benefits include 

paid vacation, holidaysand 

personal days. Health, Dental & 

Life Insurance. Please apply in 

person at: 

703 N. Sunset, 

Round Lake, IL 

Call: (847)546-7722 

, Equal. Opportunity Employer 



ASSEMBLER 

Assembler wwled for light 

mechanical assembly & related 

duties, Apply In person at: 

ILLINOIS 
INSTRUMENTS, INC. 

27840 Concrete Drive - 
Ingleslde, IL6G041 



Banking 

•Promote Yourself* 

LP's. Closers, CSR's, 

Senior Clerical Support, 

Mortgage &. Credit 

Lending, Long Term, 

Temp/Perm 

SRS CROUP 
888-829-1 160 X79 



WILDLIFE JOBS 

to $21 .60/HR 

Inc. Benefits, Game 
' wardens, security, 
maintenance, park 
rangers. No exp needed. 
For app. and exam info 
; call 1-800-813-35B5, 
. ext 2407. 8am*9pm, 
7 days, fds Inc 



Flooring Opportunities 

Carpet - Resilient • Ceramic. 

Looking for dependable 

helpers, trainees & 

warehouse person. 

' Apply in person. 
LibertyvllleTile & Carpet 
550 W. Peterson 

Libertyville 
(847)362-8500 



Professional 

Sates Positions! 

Our organization has a 

direct sales route open 

now! Services/sales 

experience helpful, but 

not necessary. 

Pull benefits 

Including medical, 

dental, 401K, and • 

ESOP. Above 

average earnings 25K 

to 40K. For 

consideration fax 

resume to 

847-205-1835 

,ttn: District Manager 



•MACHINIST 

- Growing manufacturer 

In Lake Bluff looking 

for 5 years minimum 

experience In lathe, 

NG programmer/ 

operator, 4 Axis & 

mill turn centers. 

Hands-on. Excellent 

benefits, friendly work 

environment. 



: 



PHOTOGRAPHY/ 



Mfl^fltfRaiM 



No exp, req'd we wil Wn & 
provide cm opply. for growth. 

Work local assJgnmls.. 
'Car req'd $600 to $900 wit 

708-338-0744 



m Please send resume to: 8 

35 Baker Road 

• Lake Bluff, IL 60044 f 

X or fax 847-549-9714 I 

m • 

■»•■••••••••■•••••••••• 



R 



raphic 
/esigner 



m 



•■••••••••••••••••••< 



We're looking for a 

"graphic designer" to join our team. 

Do you have experience with 

computers and graphic design 

programs? If you do, 

then we can teach you the 

rest in this entry level position. 

| Send your resume to NEAL TUCKER at: 
•••••••••«•••••■■•••••••••••••••" 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

i| or fax to 223-8810^ 



EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 

Right hand to Executive Director of 

77 year old Lake County women's 

organization. Strong computer 

& organizational skills required, 

with proficiency in Microsoft. 

(Office '97, Word, Access, Excel). 

Must be flexible and dedicated to 

furthering women's empowerment. 

Full time, exempt, with benefits. 

Please send resume or call Suzanne 

YWCA 2133 Belvidere 

Waukegan, IL 600S5 

(847) 662-4247 

EOE 



. 



►SALES CONSULTANT 

Immediate opening 

' for an outgoing and 

detail minded 

Individual for our 

lighting showroom. 

Apply In person at: 

WARREN ELECTRIC, INC. 

33261 N.Hwy. 45 

W«dwood,.IL 

or fax resumes to: 

(847) 223-8693 



f^ENQNEERING" 
I Immcd Openings. Polaris 8 
•.Industries, the leading mfrg 
I of recreational vehicles I 
seeks to fill several key 

Engineering pos. 

SR. CAD DESIGNER 

-creates computer 

j models of assigned water 

craft components, 



I prepares designs/ layout 



DIRECTOR WOMEN'S HEALTH 



PROFESSIONAL WITH BACKGROUND IN 

COMMUNITY HEALTH, SOCIAL WORK & 

COUNSELING. ABLE TO ADDRESS THE HEALTH 

NEEDS OF WOMEN & GIRLS OF LOW INCOME. 

DEVELOPS WORKING RELATIONSHIP WITH 

COMMUNITY, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICE 

PROVIDERS. WRITING EXPERIENCE FOR 

PROPOSALS, GRANTS AND REPORTS TO FUNDERS. 

FULL TIME WITH BENEFITS. . 

SEND RESUME TO: 






YWCA OF LAKE COUNTY 

. 2133 BELVIDERE RD. 
''WAUKEGAN, IL 60085 . 
OR CALL SUZANNE 847-6624247 



I /drawings according to 
N engr'g specs. 2yr deg. in 
| mech drafting- ProfTin 
I Pro-E & 5-7yrs pre v. exp. 
• DEVELOPMENT ENG'R- 
8 resp, for developing & 
H specifying lest procedures J 
A& cqpmt to conduct func- 5 
J tion & durability tests on J 
I personal watercraft. BS in g 
I mech cng & 5-7yrs exp. V 
! ELECTRICAL 8 



PROJECT ENGINEER 



-design, update & 
I troublesnoot all water 






£ craft electronic systems, 8 
ftElec.'Eng deg 3-Syrs exp. % 
g Resume: David poud, i 
5 Polaris industries I 
I '" !900Hwy71 % 

Spirit Lake, IA 51360 




Bitter ; .;. 

$15-$35 PER HOUR 

Easy medical billing. 

Full training. 

- Computer required. 

1-800-259-6661 

ext 222 



NURSING 
ASSISTANTS 

WE'VE GOT CLASS 

HILLCREST^URSING 

CENTER IS NOW 
OFFERING IN-HOUSE 

CNA TRAINING 
"EARN WHILE YOU LEARN" 

CUSSES START MID-MARCH 
10 PER CLASS, APPLY EARLY 

APPLY IN PERSON 

1740 NORTH 

CIRCUIT DRIVE 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 

(847) 546-5300 



PRP 

Immediate full time posi- 
tion available in our 

Lake Zurich Intermediate 
Care FacitityAVill be 

responsible for plann ing, 

developing t and supervis- 
ing case management 
activities for MR/DD 

' women. Bachelor's 
Degree and one year 

experience with MR/DD 
population required. • 

Ccntact Coll Becker 
Mtounl Saint tj«$cph. 
Lake Zurich • 
(£47) 43S-3C3C - 



DIRECT 1 
CARE 

Direct Care Workers 

for MR/DD women 

in residential setting. 

All shifts available. 

Full Time or 
Part Time. We are 

* 

committed to quality 
residential care. 

Contact 

Gail Becker 

Mount Saint Joseph 

Lake Zurich 

847-438-5050 



I 



Healthcare 

CNAs 

Make a Difference 
in our Residents' Lives 

Full-lime und part-time 
opportunities available for 
caring and compassionate 
people to work in our skilled 
nursing, medicare and 
alzhcimcr units. Must he 
cenified in Illinois or close 
to completion. Competitive 
pay und complete benefits 
package available for full 
AND part lime with med- 
icul/denta) benefits starting 
almost immediately. 
Please apply in person at; 

Victory Lakes 

Continuing Cure Center 

1055 East Grand Avenue 

Undcnl>ursl.lL60046 

Hi: 847-356-4551 

eoe m/f/d/v 



Dermatology office 

in Highland Park. 

Approximately 

20-30 hours a 

week. Includes 

some Saturday's. 

Office experience 

preferred. 

.Call Elsie ' ' 
(847} 432-4650. 



RN'S/LPN'S 



THUEDOF 
SKILLED CARE 

NOW IS YOUR CHANCE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

HILLCREST NURSING 
CENTER 

INTERMEDIATE 
CARE NURSING 

CALL TODAY . 

SALLY LEMAR 

.(847)546-5300. 

1740 N CIRCUIT DRIVE 
ROUND LAKE BEACH, IL 



MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST 

Immediate opening for IT medical receptionist. Must 
possess excl. lei. skills Willi good working knowledge 
of man. care protocol. Some compnt. exp. Successful 
candidate will be organized and possess a friendly, 
sympathetic and professional personality with a team 
oriented work ethic. Bilingual a plus. We offer a solid 
ben. pkg. and competitive salary, 

X-RAY 

Immediate opening in our 5 man Orthopaedic prac- . 
tice for "TIT it 1 l r l' Radiographer,- We seek enlhusi- 
nsticjiard'working team players to join our busy 
staff. Resp. incl. integration of both radiologic and 
clinical duties. Candidate will be well organized, 
energetic and possess a friendly, professional' 
demeanor. ARRT cert, and I DNS lie. req. Exp. in 
Ortho setting a plus. Some comp. exp. hclpluL Days, 
no call. Competitive salary and benefits. Send 
Resume with educ. bkgr. and desc. of respon. incl. 
salary hist, and req. to: 

Box HI 111 
c/o Lakeland Publications 
P.O. Box 268. . 
Grayslake, IL 60030 
;: EOE 



Social Services 

CAREERS THAT COME 

WITH AN INSTANT BONUS • 

A SMILE 

CLENK1RX IS HIRING) 
HIRING BONUS $125 
Call for detail* 
Whether Ift the wnile on the face 
of the people we tense or the sat- 
isfaction a GLEN KIRK professional 
holds Inside, opportunities hece 
prove to be invaluable. As a 
leader in community-based ser- 
vices that assists those with devel- 
opmental disabilities. GLENKIRK 
is always looking for professionals 
looking to make a true difference 
daily. We are willing to train for 
the following opportunities: 
PERSONAL HABIIITATION 

INSTRUCTOR 
DEVELOPMENTAL TRAINERS 
With above average salaries; ■ 
excellent benefits and the satisfac- 
tion of helping others succeed, 
there's never been, a better time to 
consider a career with Glcnkirk, 
ADDITIONAL HIRING BONUS 
(for our Mundeleln facilities) ol S225 
(Call us for further Information). 
Call today at (847) 272-5111 
exl, 130 or FAX your resume to: 
(847)272-7350; 
- Attn: Helen Maltison. 
^ EOE. M/rVD/V. 



CNAs 
WOW! 

Don't miss out! Limited 

openings available. Our 

new starting salary of 

9.75/hr plus benefits. 

shows our dedication to 

employee appreciation, 

Only team oriented 

CNA's need apply. 

Apply in person at: 

Care Centre of 

Wauconda 

176 Thomas Court 

Wauconda, IL 

847/526-5551 



p 


847-223-8161^1 

1 ffl;x'-'t^%.r^TWffl;!twiTB, , iy' 



C22 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 26, 1999 



220 



Help W;uud 
Full-Time 



220 



Help \V;ii lid 
Full-Time 



MEDICAL 
RECEPTIONIST 



Responsibilities include, 

scheduling appointments. 

registering patients, cashiering, 

answering phones, and updating 

patient Information, Seeking 

candidates with past health care 

or customer service exp. 

Send/fax resumes to: 

Dccrpath Medical Assoc., 

7tWaukeganRd. 

Ste.900 

Uke Bluff. IL 60044 

fax: (847) 295-1547 or call 

(847) 535-8080. EOE 



SALES 

INSIDE SALES/DISPATCH 
Vulcan Materials Co , rha 
nation's leading aggregats 
producer, scoka an Irsido 
Sates/Dtopaleh poreon. Lake 
Ca area Dutea Indixto 
dtopatehing trucks, price quotes, 
tiling. Must bo highly 
motivated, nbto to wotK 
Independent Knowtodga of 
construction industry a plus. 

Ful time position has oxcefiom 
benefits & growth potential. 

For ooreidefabon, send resumo 
w/salary history. 
Vulcan Materials Co. 
747 E. 22nd #200 

Leotard, IL 00140 

Ann: Liito Ca Dispatch Oppty. 

(EOE) 



• *•* Attention * • * • 
: EARN $400 Kit WEM : 

* PER COMPANY PROGRAM • 



*» 



■*, 



\ 18 men A wom»n needed J, 
Immediately to sUrt 

work for local 

distributor of Irs* 

Manufacturing Co. 

Must be neat fai 

« appearance, ambitious ft » 

have own vehicle. ' 
* Management trainee * 
; positions open. ; 

for Interview Call Now * 
(847) 740-0410 




MIDWEST 

KENWORTH, INC 

MECHANICS 



Immed Openings. 

Midwest Kenworlh, Ihc 

area's largest (ruck 

dealership is on the 

move in 1999, Come join 

our loam of Service Prosl 

We provide family 

hllh/dcnl insurance al 

minimal employee cost. 

We also provide: 

•Profit share & savings plan 

• fti id Sick Leave 

•Flex work schedule 

•Up to 3 wks paid vacation 

•100% paid uniforms 

•10 paid holidays/year 

•Training & 

advancement oppty s. 

We arc now hiring (or 

•Exp'd Truck Techs 

•Exp'd Refrigeration Techs. 



V«. 



Call between 
8a-5p, M-F. 

816-483-7035 
or toll free 

800-766-7035 



DRIVERS 



Local trucking co. seeks 

F/T Tractor Trailer Drivers. 

0-600 mile runs & OTR. 

Must have 3 yrs verif. 

T/T cxp & be able to pass 

DOT & postal quals. If 

you're interested in a 

good-paying F/T driving 

position, exc start wages, 

hlth/dcnt/life/disabilily, 

'101 K, pension plan, pd 

vacations, 2 personal 

days, 7 holidays & 3 

incentive days per year. 

For more info 
414-544-6010 



* 
« 

* 



BENCH TECHNICIAN 

Small manufacturing 

company seeks bench. 

technician for service and 

production departments. 

Candidate will have solid 

knowledge of electronic 

circuitry as welt as good 

mechanical skills. Ability to 

use basic electronic lest 

equipment is necessary. 

Electronics Degree, 

trouble-shooting skills 

and good communication 

skills are helpful. 

Send resume to: 

HUMAN RESOURCES 
DepL "L" 

27840 Concrete Drive 

Ingle side, I L 60041 



-r t 



-*- V 



' HAIRDRESSER / BARBERS WANTED * 
Part time & Full time work 
Established northshore salon. 

'Fuli Time benefits 
'Excellent wotk environment 
'Upscale salon 

Apply In person 

Mon-Ftl Ba-8p / Sat. 8a - 5p 

Send or Fax resume to: 847-336-2033 

Attn: Rae Taylor 

Gold Coast Salon fit Day Spa 

422 N. Green Bay Rd. 

Waukegan, 1L 60085 

Phone (847) 336-2012 




' 



r 



HAWTHORN LAKES 

RETIREMENT COMMUNITY 

Needs You... 

RECEPTIONIST 



F/T Receptionist for 4:30pm- 1:00am shift to 
answer phones, greet residents & visitors, etc. 
No exp, nee. Must enjoy working with seniors 
58/hr + benefits & exc. work environment. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE 



F/T (Mon-Fri) Building Maintenance person. Resp 
inc bqt set ups, trash removal, carpet shampooing, 
int/ext main!, light bldg repairs. 

Excellent pay & work environment. 
Call Rosa 847/367-2516 or apply in person 
10 E. Hawthorn Fkwy, Vernon Hills, IL 60061 



f 



RECEPTIONIST 

Are you a person who likes lo work independently, yc( be busy, 

with challenging work? Perhaps we have a job for you. We sell 

slccl doors and frames along with hardware anil other building 

products to the construction industry in the Chicago area. We have 

"been in business for over 40 years and recently moved 

into new quarters at the Corporate Woods Business 

Park in Vernon Hills. Good lyping/kcyboarding, phone ability, 

and other office skills arc important qualities. . 

Work with a great group of people in a bright and pleasant 

work environment. Good pay and benefits. 

Please slop in, or send resume to: 

LA FORCE, INC. 

280 Corporate Woods Pkwy 
Vernon Hills, IL 60061 . 

I-8O0-236-S85S 

Patrick Costello 
wwwLAF0RCEINC.com 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



I 



"Warehouse 

s 



Person" 

Salary + benefits 
based on experience. 

Must have valid IL 
Driver's Lie. & Forklifl 
experience. Must be 

able lo lift 50 lbs. 

Apply in person 

315 W. Rollins Rd. 

Round Lake Beach 

Between hours of 

jj_ 10:00 AM and 5:00 PM 






WAUCONDA 

based business 

'has. a full time 

WAREHOUSE 

POSITION. 

Must be able to 

lift heavy items. 

Salary plus 

benefits.. 

Call 
, 847-526-1380 f 



ENGINEERING 
Fast growing roof truss 

mfg co. w/plante In 
Florida 6 Georgia seeks 

Truss Designers 6 

Estimators. Must have 

exp In designing truss 

layouts or engineering. 

Pref using Mltek 2000. 

Salary up to SSOK. 

Exc bnft pkg. 

Fax resume 

561-840-1748; 

Call 561-840-2075 

for Interview. 



I FULLTIME 

RECEPTIONIST 

Work in a fast paced 
environment 

Days, some early evenings, 
alternating Saturdays. 

Computer experience 

required. 

Apply in person or send 

resume to: 

Mil ml vie in Animal Hospital 

1133 W. Muple Ave. 

Mtiudclciit, IL 

,.h'ax:H47-S66-5H77 







No plume inlh 



INDUSTRIAL 

Immed Opening. 

Exp'd personnel 

req'd for portable 

machining, stud 

tensioning & torqulng, 

Comp renumerah'on 

Bbntfs. 

Resume w/rets: 

Catalyst Services 

PO Box 86 

New Albany, IN 47151 



220 



Help" Wanted'** 
Full-Time 



llimMMf imillMlMfllMMMIMIMIHfllll 

Office PosjtIon 

Am you ntlUblc, 
tnrnqiilc an<I fun id wank vriili? 
II you Iwvr bulc coMpuitr* ddllt, 

mkIIcaI or* duvul oilier upmliNct 

vnl r,wxl AHCniion to limit, our 

buty owl WMitrry of Met »wy bi 

ilit pUci loit yoot 1 lilt (bom aifici 

po-lilioN tuoutnti Ml-litlC 1 1 OHM 

(mo wukcmch) «td mIaiw h bud 
upon upirtlincr. 

an, 
(847) 625-591 ? 

io find our mom. . 

illilimilii iiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiii 



Lake Villa School 
District #41 

seeks CONRTTER 

T£CWaWNEmORK 

ADtVlNSTRATOR 

for 4 bUldngs. 

30K + benefits + 

continuing education 

Call or Apply: 

Lake villa School 

District 141 

131 McKJntey 

Lake Villa, L 60046 

(8471 356-2385 
Fax - (847) 356-2670 



INSURANCE 

ALL POSITIONS REQUIRE 
INSURANCE EXPEREINCE 

•COMM'LCSR to S35K 

•GROUP ADMIN JotSOK 

• PERSONAL UNE5 CSR lo J32K 

•COMMLTECHASST toS32K 

HALLMARK 

(847) 298-1900 
Fax (847) 298-1906 

email: hpl220Oaol.com 



II 



SALES 
SUPERVISOR 

Furrcrn USA. mfg. ol 

Tic Toe & Roc her 

chocolates seeks FT 

Individual lo supervise PT 

sales team in Ihc 

N, Cliicago/Mihvauhce area. 

Residence In Cook. Lake or 

Kenosha County preferred. 

■ 30K + bonus 

• Company Vehicle/Benefits 

• Valid Driver's License 

• Confectionery/Food 
industry k'nowl. a plus 

Possible ovci night travel rcttulred. 

Fax resume w/salary history to: 

S47-4S7-1S89 

by Sal. Feb. 27lh. EOE 



§" 



:ii:iiiiirjiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiitiimmiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiuii 
PERSONALITY PLUS? ! 

Customer Support- j 
7 new positions now i 
available S8- 1 0/lir 
plus incentives 
Superior Personnel I 
244-0016 
Gurnee 
or 549-0016 
Vernon Hills 



Superior 

Personnel 



rniiDiiiiiiiiiiiii;iiiii.iiii]]iiniiiii]i:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiif? 



DENTAL OFFICE 

OUR LAKE FOREST DENTAL PRACTICE 

HAS IAAMEDIATE OPENING FOR A 

HYGIENE COORDINATOR. IF YOU ARE 

SEEKING A CHALLENGING AND FUN 

EXPERIENCE AND YOU HAVE A GREAT 

PERSONALITY AND ATTITUDE, WE WOULD 

LIKE TO MEET YOU. 

PREVIOUS DENTAL ASSISTING EXPERIENCE 
WOULD BE HELPFUL, BUT NOT NECESSARY. 
WEOFFERa3^APETTr^VE SALARY AND BENEFrTS. 

PLEASE CALL (847) 234-8608 



ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE 

Due lo continued growth, private company Is seeking responsible , 
representative to develop telephone rapport and assist Individuals! 
in processing Medicaid applications. Must have ability lo learn 1 
complex technical information to communicate effectively wilhj 
various individuals and government employees, maintain records!! 
process work under lime constraint, and work, with computer to' 
process and document activity. We oiler a competitive salary and J 
excellent benelits lo the selected Individual that shows a strong] 
work elhle and positive outlook. 

Send resume wilh cover tetter to: 
860 NorthpoInt Blvd 
Waukegan, IL 60085 
alin:' Kim Chapman 



220 



Help Warned 
Full-Time 



—*- 



Mechanic 

Radiator Repair Tech. 

Immed openings, 

Sarasota Florida 

Busy shop in FL, 

cxp in recoring ■ 

& indusl'l rebuilding. 
Top pay, bnfts. 

941-366-4003 



■■■li.HJ..^— **— 



za' 



LEGAL SECRETARY/ 
PARALEGAL 

Law firm seeks Individual 
with good typing and 
organizational skills to 

perform paralegal duties In 

Litigation Department 

Knowledge of Microsoft 

Office a plus. 

Send resume to: 

B60 Morthpolnt Blvd. 

Waukegan, IL 60085 

Attn: Deborah flgueroa 



« MMMMMMMM > MM 



CDL DRIVERS 

limned Openings. 
5500 Sign-On, 
S1000 Referral, 
ftiy pkg for exp'd, 
29c-33e for al! 
dispatched miles 
(paid practical miles not shortest) 
At slop pay + per- 
formance & safety bonus. 
, Home most wknds, 
late model eqpmt. 
Med & pension, sign-on 
referral bonuses avail. 
800-435-9631 
< I MI I MM»WMI»»M 



FULLTIME 

VETERINARIAN 
TECHNICIAN 

Want to work In a fast 

paced environment? 

Experience is required. 

Please apply In person 

urfax resume to: 

Mundeltin Animal Hospital 

1133 IK Staple Ave. 

. Mundeltin, IL 

Ftuc: 847-566-5877 



No phone tails 
please. 




Telemarketing 

PHONES 
AVAILABLE 

start today 

pay tomorrow 

no experience 

necessary, 

will train, 

flexible hours 

(847) 336-1613 





Business 
Opportunities 



$20,000 

IN FOUR MONTHS 

No selling. 

Will Train. 

800-995-0796 

oxt. 1255 

24hrs, 

1 TRILLION DOLLAR IN- 
DUSTRY. Online Casino Soft- 
ware Rights. Huge Royalties. 
Licensed. Limited Partner- 
ships 1 k-5k. See our website: 
http://www,sgaaltd.com or call 
1. 888-689-0450 , (SCA Net- 
work^ 

AREA PEPSI 
ROUTE 

Fifteen Prime Locations Loft! 

Can Earn $750/week. 

1-800-819-6228. 

FREE GRANT MONEY! To 
start or expand your business, 
purchase equipment, pay 
salaries, rent, overhead, medi- 
cal bills, tuition, debts. NEVER 
REPAY. Free Information 1- 
B16-379-3362. (SCA Network), 

MOLLY MAID HOME serv- 
ice Is 'big business. Join ex- 
panding leading residential 
cleaning franchise. Train- 
ing/technology. Minimum in- 
vestment $12-5 15K, financing 
available, protected territories. 
800-665-5962. www.molly- 
mald.com ■ 

NO BABYSrTTER 

NEEDEDII 

Become a Homemaker's Idea 

Company Consultant. 

Work 1-2 nights per week, 

while dad stays home 

with the kids. 

•Unlimited Income* 

•Bonuses* 

•Flexible Hours* 

*Be Your Own Boss* • 

Perfect for stay at home 

moms ' 

Call Todayll 

1-800-639-4516. 

OWN YOUR OWN APPAR- 
EL, shoe, weslemwear, linger- 
ie, bridal, gift or $1 .00 store. In- 
cludes Inventory, fixtures, buy- 
ing trip, training. Minimum In- 
vestment $18,900. Call Paul at 
Liberty. 1-501-327-8031. 

TARGET 13 MILLION 
HOMES WITH YOUR AD 
Advertise your product or serv- 
ice to 13 million households In 
North America's best suburbs 
by placing your classified ad In 
800 suburban newspapers 
just tike this one. $895 for a 25 
word ad. One phone call, one 
Invoice, one payment. Call the 
Suburban Classified Advertis- 
ing Network fax on demand 
service at 800-356-2061 or 
312-644-6610 X4731 to speak 
with a sales coordinator. 

WANTED1 

STAY AT HOME 

MOMS OR DADS! 

If you're currently at home, 

or you'd like to be, we have 

the opportunity for you. 

Work PT/FT around your 

schedule and enjoy unlimited 

income potential. Be part of 

the nutrition revolution as an 

Independent Reliv Distributor. 

Call tor more Information. 

Scolt Pomerance 

Independent Reliv Distributor 

(847) 945-2481 

MONEY BACK 

GUARANTEE 



gH 



Business 
Opportunltcs 



**************** 

: EMBROIDERY J 

* BUSINESS * 

* Computer generated * 

* growing business, lots * 
J of room for growlh, J 
a Everything you need * 

* to be successful. * 
^ * 

£ Great home-based * 

A builnossf * 

* $35,000 * 

* (847)548-5511 * 

**************** 



228 


Situations Wanted 



HOME CARE ASSIS- 
TANCE A special lady need- 
ing assistance with bathing, 
grooming and cooking. Re- . 
quires transportation to ap- 
pointments, shopping and 
movies. tpm-7pm, Monday- 
Friday, 9am-12pm Saturdays. 
(847) 223-5436 afternoons 
for appointments. 

LIVE-IN HOUSEKEEPER 
NEEDED 5-6 days, good sal- 
ary, own room, nice family, 
must have experience and ref- 
erences. (847) 913-8862. 



250 


School/instruction 



GET YOUR R.E. LICENSE 

•Job Placement Available 

•Earn Extra Income 

•Many Locations Available 

•Traditional Classes 

Starling Soon. 

For more Information call: 

Century 21 

Real Estate Academy 

(847)296-0410. 

PIANO LESSONS 

IN MY LAKE VILLA HOME 

OPENINGS 

Now for students 

6yrs. to adult. 

Over 25y rs. experience. 

REASONABLE RATES. 

(847)356-2760. 



304 



Appliances 



RAINBOW VACUUM, ALL 
attachments + shampooer 
and stair brush, excellent con- 
dition, 5500/bsat.. (815) 
356-7028. 

TEN 30LB. SPEED Queen 
Dryers, stainless, from taun- 
drymat. (847) 869-7444. 



310 



Bazaars/Crafts 



BEANIE BABY SALE 

BUY/TRADE 

Holiday Inn Gurnee, 

6161 Grand Ave. 

Friday, 10am-10pm. 

Saturday, 10am-7pm, 

Sunday, 9am-7pm. 

Free Admission. 



314 



Building Materials 



STEEL BUILDINGS SALE: 
40x60x14, 59,094. 50x75x14, 
$12,275. 50x100x16, 

$16,879. 60x100x16, $18,261. 
Mini-storage buildings. 

40x160, 32 units, $16,914. 
Free brochures, www.sentlnel- 
bulldlngs.com, Sentinel Build- 
ings, 800-327-0790. Exten- 
sion 79. 



■ ' : ' ' ... ■-' """ ; ■ . 



CKiilctCare 

c ° o ° 




MOTHER OF 2 offering ba- 
bysitting at reasonable rates 
In her Antloch home. (847) 

83S-297B. 

NEED A SITTER? Mother of 
4 looking to babysit in my 
Round Lake home. (847) 
546-2884. 



PRE-SCHOOL MOM HAS 

openings In Fox Lake home 
daycare. (847) 587-229JU 



STATE LICENSED DAY- 
CARE In my Antloch home. 
Grass Lake School District. 
Current openings for children 
2+, full/part-time, Monday-Fri- 
day. (847) 395-5574, 



STAY AT HOME MOTHER 
OF 2 will care for your children 
In my Round Lake Beach 
home. Very reasonable rates. 
Meals and snacks included. 
Toy room, fenced-in back 
yard. Lots of TLC, Call Jen 
(847) 740-7026. 



CHILD CARE CERTIFIED, 
references, 1st and 2nd shift, 
Full or part-time, snacks pro- 
vided, 2019 45th St. (414) 

656-1486. 

CHILD CARE 

GROUP SIZE 

LIMITED TO 3 

Mother of 1 In Grayslake 

(close to Rt. 83), has an 

opening full-time or part-time, 

for a child ages 1-3. Our days 

will be structured with fun, 

educational activities. 

Please call Lisa 

(847) 223-9314. 



CHILD CARE IN a loving 
and educational home day 
care. Call Rebecca (847) 
546-4330. ■ 



FUN LOVING ANTIOCH 
MOTHER has full and part- 
time openings. Meals, snacks 
and lots of TLC. (847) 
836^3930. 



IN HOME DAY CARE IN IS- 
LAND LAKE has full and part- 
time openings, meals and 
snacks Included, lots of TLC 
and fun. (847)516-9606. 

LOVING, RESPONSIBLE 
NANNY NEEDED to care 
for our 2-chlldren. 3yrs., 
20/months, in our Grayslake 
home, 30hrs,/week, English 
speaking, non-smoking, excel- 
lent references. Call Snarl 
(847) 546-5430. 

MCHENRY/JOHNSBURO 
MOM FT/PT opening, rea- 
sonable rates. (815) 
363-6001, 

MOM WITH DAY CARE 
TEACHING EXPERIENCE 

has openings In her Wlldwood 
home. Part/Full-time, Monday- 
Friday, 6am-6pm. Meals and 
snacks Included. Lots of TLC 
and Fun. (847) 54B-0B90, 



MOTHER OF' 1 looking to 
care for your children In my 
Round Lake Beach home, 
FT/PT. Call Trade (847) 
356-2322. t 






February 26, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 




Lakeland Newspapers I C23 



320 



Electronics 
Computers 



340 



llousdioltl 
(IckhIs/ Fiirnlltirc 




500 



llomcj Fur Silk* 



500 



Homes For S;ilc 



500 



Homes For Sale 



514 



Condo/fown 
Homes 



C3MHZ PENTIUM 16MB, 
SCSI,' 1.6GB, 400MB HD, CD, 
sound, speakers, keyboard, 
mouse, 14.4 fax/modem, 16ln. 
monitor. $300, (847) 
356-8162, 

TV 50IN. BIG SCREEN PRO- 
SCAN, 4yr. warranty, 1yr. old, 
$1 .700/best. (847) 395-8971. 



330 



Garage 
Rummage SaJe 



AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIQ SALE, and there 

Is still things that just did not 
go,... Call us at LAKELAND 
Newspapers and run it 
under the "FREE or Givea- 
ways" classified column. FREE 
ADS are NO CHARQEI 
(8471 223-8181. ext. 140. 



334 



Good Things To Eat 



HOME GROWN BEEF. Cus- 
tom cut, freezer' ready. (815) 
648-2316. 




HAY FOR SALE. Horses 
love round hales too. All stored 
Inside. On the spot delivery. 
Over 20,000 served. (815) 
568-7128. •__ 

ROUND PENS, 5 footer, 6ft. 
high, 4 or 5 rails, 50ft. or 60ft. 
Made out of pipe, not tubing. 
(414) 594-2278. ; 

SADDLE SHOP HORSE 
trailers, Western/English, 
new/used. Buy, sell, trade. The 
Corral, Sullivan, Wisconsin. 
(414) 593-8048. 

WALKING HORSES. FOR a 
smooth ride for an older- per- 
son or bad backs. . Quarter 
horse for fun, ponies for every- 
one. Horse drawn surrey and 
drivjng ponies. Exp. gated rid- 
ing mule. Also hay for sale, 
S375 delivered. (630) 
443-8880. • 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



'BABY STUFF" ALL excel- 
lent condition. Bassett Crib, 
brown. Electric baby monitors- 
Realistic. Kolcraft car seat. 2- 
chltd safety gates. Girls Infant 
(0-6 months) clothes. Mobile, 
with matching bumper pads 
and wall hangings. Baby bot- 
tles. Mini-Mouse toy chest. 
Pink/white table and chairs. 
Graco stroller. Toys. Lullaby 
light show. Call (847) 973- 
2610, 

BATHROOM VANITY 
BASE 60ln. with oak finish, 3- 
door, 3 -drawer, white cultured 
marble top, single faucet, 
S200/best. 24IN. BATH- 
ROOM VANITY BASE with 
natural oak finish, 1-door, 2- 
drawer, white cultured marble 
top, single faucet, $1 so/best. 
TOILET, 12ln. offset, com- 
plete with seat, $25/best. 
(847) 395-8312 evenings 
after 5pm. 

BED QUEEN ORTHOPE- 
DIC mattress set Including 
brass headboard and frame. 
Never used, still In plastic. Sac- 
rifice $300. (414)453-0072, 

BRASS BED QUEEN with 
new deluxe never used mat- 
tress set, $245. Black iron ca- 
nopy bed queen, complete, 
$375. Delivery available. (847) 
236-0032, 



DESIGNER MODEL 

HOMES FURNITURE 

CLEARANCEI 

Sofa/loveseat set, 

hunter green, $495. 

Sofa, white, $350. 

Sofa/loveseat, . 

earth tones, $595. 

Also: Plaids, Florals, 

Leathers and More. 

Dlnlngroom sets, 10-plece: 

Cherry, $1,395, 

Mahogany, $2,395, ' 

Oak $1,695. 

Other sets available. 

Also: Bedroom Sets, 

from $995. 

(847)329-4119. 

www.modelhomefumlture.com 

SWEET DREAMSI 
WOULD love to keep this 
headboard, frame and foot- 
board (of solid maple) but this 
family treasure must be sold. 
Asking $125/besl. Call (847) 
548-2660 after 6pm. 

TWO MAHOGANY CHIP- 
PENDALE UPHOLSTERED 
OVAL BACK SIDE CHAIRS, 
$200/ea. Mahogany marble 
top foyer tabled with matching 
mirror, $950. 2-colonlal cherry 
stained pine currios with 
poured glass,- ball feet, 
$950/ea. (815) 344-1675. 



DININGROOM SET, LIKE 
new, walnut, with hutch, 
$1,200. Call weekdays after 
5pm and weekends 9am-5pm. 
(847) 872-1 9SB. 

FORMAL DININGROOM 
TABLE, 6 navy blue uphol- 
stered chairs, 1ln. thick bev- 
eled glass top with dark hard- 
wood base. Best Olfer. Excel- 
lent condition. Must see to ep- 
preclato, (847) 9730460, 

FURNACE 80,000 BTU, 
5yra. old,* runs great, 
$250/flrrn, (847)244-2353. 

KING SIZE WATERBED, 
with accessories, $175. 79 Ya- 
maha Enlicor, $750. Whirlpool 
refrigerator, almond, $200. 
(847) 497-4162 after 6pm, 

ROWE 8-PIECE CONTEM- 
PORARY llvlngroom set, 
$400. Lee Reynolds wall hang- 
ing, $200/ea. King waterbed, 
good condition, $500. (815) 
337-8806. 

SATELLITE 3YSTEMS. 

18IN. DirecTV Dishes Basic 
Unit $99.00. Dual Box Systems 
Only $1 99.00, $200 worth of 
free programming. Mention ad 
receive free Install kit ($60.00 
value) 1-800-325-7838 

00111. (SCA Network). 

SOFA, DREXEL HERIT- 
AGE, custom made, cream, 
excellent condition, $650/best. 
(847)296-0116. - 

SUNROOM/LIVINGROOM 
FURNITURE, green floral 6- 
piece set, excellent condition, 

$975.(847)549-7910. 




BEAUTIFUL A-LINE SIZE 
10 WEDDING GOWN In Ivory, 
very regal with short sleeves, 
$750/best. (847) 838-4509. 

FOR SALE BEAUTIFUL 
RACOON SHORT JACK- 
ET. Excellent condition. (847) 
356-1148. 



350 



Miscellaneous 



BASEBALL/FOOTBALL 
CARDS PREMIUM/ROOK- 
IES/AUTO'S. (815) 
363-0343, 

BEANIE BABIES' 129 for 
sale CHEAP. Most newly re- 
tired. Some bears. Mint condi- 
tion with tags. Desperate to 
get rid of. Would prefer to sell 
entire set together. (847) 
362-6197. _^_ 

CELL PHONE PRIMECO, 
Includes all accessories, $100. 
Microwave, Goldstar with 
turntable, $75. (414) 
859-0531. ■■ 

COMPLETE AUTO- 
GRAPHED JOE Montana fig- 
urines and plates by Gartland 
& Savtno. Best offer. Will sepa- 
rate. (847) 683-^309. 

LAST CHANCE TO BUY 15 
tavern neon's, miscellaneous 
mirrors, shot glass liquor cool- 
er. (414) 632-6979. 

LOWREY ORGAN, GENIE 
88, S100/best. Soloflex with at- 
tachments, like new, .$1,200 
new, will part for $450/besl. 
(847) 740-0568. , 

MUST SELL ENESCO 

Cherished Teddies Collection, 
many retired and suspended. 
Mint condition, boxes for all. 
(847) 487-6202. 

STEREO/RADIO CON- 

SOLE, PHILCO, large. Ma- 
hogany long cocktail table, 2- 
octagon matching tables. 
$300/all. (847) 497-9007, 

TELESCOPE MEAD 

MODEL 230, $150/best. 
(847)872-1176. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS. 
TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT 
and SAVEI Commercial/home 
units from $199. Low monthly 
payments. FREE j color cata- 
log. Call today 1-800-842- 
1310. 



358 



Musical Instruments 



BRAND NEW BASS AMP 
combo, Ampeg, $600/best. 
(815)653-3131. 



ONLY 




If you have an Item you 

want to sell for $75,00 or' 

less you can place an ad 

for only $3,00! Call: Lisa al 

(847)223-8161 ext. 140 

for more information. 



AKITA PUPS AKC, cham- 
pion bloodlines, .big, Call, for 
Info., $400/bost. (815) 
629-2608. . 

BOXER PUPS AKC; 
7/weeka old, fawn, 4*males, 1- 
femalo, lalls/dewclaws done, 
$350.(815)496-9127. 

COLLIE PUPS SHORTER 
coated, elegant, shots, 
wormed. $50 without, $200 
With AKC, (847) 742-7060. 

DOG SITTING 

IN MY HOME. 

State licensed. 

Reasonable Rates. 

Call Florence (847) 966-8319. 

GOLDEN RETRIEVER 

AKC PUPS, shots, wormed, 
males $200, females, $450. 
(920) 825-7487. 

GOLDEN ' RETRIEVER 
PUPS AKC, gentle, health 
and hips guaranteed, $450, 
(847)516-1575. 

LABRADOR POINTER 
MIX, 9/month female, black, 
great temperament, spayed, 
shots, fenced yard please, 
$75 donation. (847) 
. 431-9734.. 

NEEDS GOOD HOME 6yr. 
old neutered male cat, BUD- 
DY, has claws, very loving and 
good natured. Call (847) 
5B7-7477 before 7pm. 

NEOPOLITAN MASTIFF 
PUPS, shots, wormed, $800- 
$1500.(815)569-2907. 

PET GROOMING, 10 years 
experience. Dog and cat 
grooming. Nail trimming,' small- 
$4.00, medlum/large-$5.00. 
Open Monday • Saturday. 
New clients welcome. 3400 
Kehm Blvd., Park City, IL 
(847) 249-3755 

REPTILE AND SMALL ani- 
mal custom made aquarium, 
glass/wood, heat lamp, strip 
light, 25 , Hx63'Lx20 , D. (847) 
639-1505. 

SCHNAUZERS/MINIA- 
TURE PUPS, 9/WEEKS, 

ears/tall/shots done. $350- 
$400. (B1 5) 726-0424. 

THE SCOOP 
COMPANY 

v Pet Cloon-Up Service - 
Affordable Rates. 
. Weekly service. 
(847) 548-4633. 



370 



Wanted To Buy 



BUYING OLD POST- 
CARDS, foreign coins and sil- 
ver coins before 1964. Paying 
cash. (815) 338-8399 after 
6pm. . . 

BUYING RETIRED BEAN- 
IE BABIES. Please call Mike 
after 7pm weekdays or all day 
weekends 1-868-291-4932, 
pin #6104, Ubertyville area. 

Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
Parts. Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coke Machines. 
Paying CASH) Call 
(630)985-2742. 

WANTED ANTIQUES, 
DESPERATELY needed. 
Old furniture, marble top ta- 
bles, dressers, dlnlngroom 
and llvlngroom sets, sofas, 
stain glass lamps, rugs, oil 
paintings, clocks and anything 
Interesting. Please call (847) 
587-5B48. 

WANTED TO BUY OR SELL 
retired Beanie Babies. Paying 
cash. (847) 395-6744. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



ANTIOCH GREAT LOCA- 
TION near town. Beautiful 
view, 2-large bedrooms, possi- 
ble 3rd In full finished base- 
ment, 2-car garage, A/C. Ask- 
ing S1 26.900. (847) 
' 395-7238. . 

BY OWNER 

CHAIN O'LAKES 

A-FRAME 

2-bedrooms, 2-baths, 

2-fireplaces, Jacuzzi, 

3-car garage. 1/2 wooded 

acre on water. $1 67,900. 

(847) 838-1200. 

CHAIN O'LAKES RIGHTS 
and views, 4-bedrooms, 2- 
balhs, 3-car garage, triple 
wooded lot, tower than mar- 
ket, financing available, 28584 
Valley, Ingleslde, 111. $152,000 
Reduced. (847) 587-4814. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER 
Beautiful 3-bedroom, 2-car ga- 
rage, professionally mani- 
cured tawn, Beach Park 
Schools, $152,000. (847) 
872-0646. 



FOX LAKE BY OWNER Im- 
maculate lyr. old, 3-bedroom, 
1-bath, 2-car garage, base- 
ment, landscaped, and new 
appliances stay. $125,000. 
Sellers relocating. Call (847) 
587-0335. __ 

GRAYSLAKE 
CHESAPEAKE FARMS. 

CLOSE IN EITHER 

MARCH OR APRIL FOR 

LESS THAN $1,000 

INCLUDING DOWN 

PAYMENT. 

4-bedrooms, 2-1/2 baths, 

2-car garage, neutral decor, 

master bedroom with volume 

celling, mature trees and lots 

more. $184,900. 

(847) 548-7718, 

HOUSE FOR SALE 2-bed- 
room, 1-bath, C/A, 2-car ga- 
rage, $89,900. (414) 
843-4509, (414) 843-3637. 

JUST STARTING OUT? 2- 
bedroom ranch In Trevor, Wl. 
Maintenance free exterior, 
C/A, extra heated 2-1/2 car 
garage, all on 2 lots, all ap- 
pliances Included, $124,000. 
Call (414) 862-9718 for ap- 
polntment. No realtors please. 

LAKE BEAVER DAM, WIS. 
1 15ft. of beautiful lakefront, 3- 
bedroom, 2-balh, C/A, 1/2 
acre lot, 2-1/2 car, 40 miles 
N.W. of Milwaukee. Great fish- 
ing and boating, ' $89,900. 
(847) 265-9411. ,__^ 

LAKEFRONT PROPERTY 
NEW CONSTRUCTION, 4- 
bedrooms, cathedral ceilings 
with 4-skyllghls throughout 
2nd floor, 3-car garage. (847) 
587-6703. 

LIMITED TIME OFFER 
Southwest Wisconsin 3-bed- 
room year round rustic retreat. 
16+ dividable acres, $150,000 
Invested. Licensed appraisal 
$105,000. 3-1/2hrs. from Chi- 
cago suburbs. $95,000/tirm. 
(847) 636-7886. 

OPEN HOUSE 

Saturday & Sunday, 

12pm-2pm, 
81 16 203rd. Ave., 

Bristol, Wise. 

Pristine 3-bedroom, 

1-1/2 bath, famllyroom, 

brick fireplace, 1/2 acre lot, 

2-blocks tram Bristol Grade 

School. Well maintained. • 

""$155,000. 

(414) 857-6652. 



VERNON HILLS 4-BED- 
ROOM, 2-1/2 bath, 2-car ga- 
rage, remodeled, close to 
schools/pool/parks, must see. 
(847)367-6109. 



WINTHROP HARBOR 2- 
BEDROOM home, newly 
fenced big yard, garage, new 
shed, many updates, $88,000. 
(847) 872-938R. 



WOODED 2-BEDROOM 

POSSIBLE 3 handyman spe- 
cial Ahtioch home. Lake rights. 
$89,500 price negotiable. 
(847)838-4741. 



OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 
2/28/99, 12pm*4pm, 51 Marin- 
er, Fox Lake (Wood hills Bay). 
Help I We've been transferred I 
Beautiful end unit townhouse, 
Chain O'Lakes Mlneola area. 
2-bedrooms 1-1/2 baths, pa- 
tio, full basement, all applianc- 
es stay, enjoy lakeside club 
house, pool, tennis courts, 
boat launch and storage. 
$99,500. Call for private show- 
ing. (847) 973-1821, (414) 
827-5086. 

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 
February 28th, 2pm-4pm. 
19th Ave.-7705 Kenosha. 2- 
bedroom, 1-bath, recroom, 1- 
bedroom and 1 bath In base- 
ment. Well kept yard. Imme- 
diate occupancy. $92,900. 
(414) 653-0197. 

REDUCED FOR QUICK 
SALE 3-bedroom Lake Villa 
ranch, finished basement, 
small fenced in yard with heat- 
ed pool and large deck, lake 
rights to Stanton Bay, 
$125,000/firm. Rt. 59 at Mona- 
villa Rd. (847) 587-9539. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 5 
bedroom 1 1/2 bath ranch with 
screened in porch, gym set, 
satellite dish, large shed, 1/2 
block to beach. Quiet neigh- 
borhood $110,000. (847) 
740-9985 

ROUND LAKE BY OWNER 
Remodeled 1 -bedroom, 
breakfast bar, washer/dryer 
hook-up, walk-up attic, large 
shed. Reduced $62,000. (815) 
385-2697. 

ROUND LAKE TOWN- 
HOUSE 2-BEDROOM 2- 
BATH RECENT CONSTRUC- 
TION, $114,500. Buy. why 
rent? C21 (773)506-2121. 

SCHOOL HOUSE 120YR. 

old brick uniquely remodeled 
duplex, 1.8 acre mini farm. 3- 
bedrooms, 1-1/2 baths UP- 
PER, fireplaces, spiral stair- 
case, attached deck with out- 
side hot tub. 2,01 6sq.ft., 2- 
bedroom, 1-bath LOWER, fire- 
place, i,240sq.ft., 1-car brick 
garage, 30x30 2-stall horse 
bam. In North Cape. By owner. 
$235.000. (414) 835-2349. 

THIS IS IT) - Round . Lake 
Nice 3+bedroom tri-1eve1,"2-' 
.full baths, A/C, 2+ car garage, 
$112,900.(847)740-2654. 

THREE BEDROOM 

RANCH, hardwood floor In llv- 
lngroom and - bedroom, 
fenced-in yard, on a quiet 
street In Round Lake Park, 
$85,900. (847) 497-3559. - 



TWIN LAKES BY OWNER 
Well maintained 3-bedroom, 2- 
bath, full basement, main floor 
laundry, all appliances includ- 
ed, 1-1/2 car garage, comer 
lot,' $112,000. (414) 
877-4164. 



V A/HUD REPOSI 

New lists weekly, 

Call Ryan & Co., Realtors 

"Your Rapo Specialists." 

(847) 526-0300. 



STATE OF ILLINOIS ) SS No. 97 CH 554 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUI T 
LAKE COUNTS, ILLINOIS 
JOHN CHARLES BEESON and MARY E. HARMAN, as Successor 
Trustees under iho CHARLES E. BEESON Trust dated September 
24. 1992 is Asslgnes of CHARLES BEESON and MAY BEESON, 
Plalntlir. 
Vi. 

THOMAS E. BEESON, DONNA L BEESON, HARRIS BANK PALA- 
TINE, TMK DEVELOPMENT, LTD,. MIDWEST TRADING HORT1CUL- ' 
t URAL SUPPLIES, INC, WITTEMAN & CO. B.V., OXFORD CAPITAL 
FUND, LTD., OUNLAP ENTERPRISES.LTD., UNKNOWN OWNERS 
and NONRECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendants. 
THOMAS E. BEESON . Counter-Plalntltt, 
vs. 

JOHN CHARLES BEESON and MARY E. HARMAN, as Successor 
Trustees under the CHARLES E, BEESON Trust dated September 
24. 1992, JOHN CHARLES BEESON, MARY E. HARMAN, Individual- 
ly, and the CHARLES E. BEESON, Trust, Counter-Defendants. 
NOTtCE OF SHERIFFS SALE OF REAL ESTATE 
MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment heretofore 
eniered by the said Court in the above-emitted cause on December 1, 
1998, Sherill ol Lake County, Illinois, will on Monday, March IS, 1999 at 
the hour ol 9:00 AM at the Robert K. Babcox Justice Center, 25 S. Utiea 
Street, Conference Room, First Floor, Woukegan. Illinois 60085, sell at 
public auction lo the highest bidder and best bidder for cash, all and sin- 
gular, the following described promises and real estate in the said 
Judgment mentioned, situation in the County ol Lake. State of Illinois, or 
so much thereto as shall be sulliclenl to satisfy said Judgment. 

Said propony Is commonly known aa 11760 W. Route 22, Deerlield, 
Illinois 60015; 

P.I.N. 16-17-300-032-011 and 16-17-30O-032-0O10 

The person to contact for information regarding this property Is: 

Mark T. Hamilton at Churchill, Baumgartner & Qui™, 2 S. Whitney 
Street, Grayslake, IL 60030, (B47) 223-1500. 

The terms ol sole are: 10% down by cenilied funds, balance within 24 
hours, by certified funds. No refunds. 

The property Is approximately a live acre parcel ol land improved by a 
concrete block building, a one story concrete block garden store, and a 
glass greenhouse and frame building with a house attached, including a 
three car garage, three lo four bedrooms and one and one half baths. 

The Judgment amount was $1,895,164.93. 

The properly will NOT be open lor Inspection, 

Together with all buildings and Improvements thereon, and the teno- 
ments. hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging. 



Ail-Subs 

REPO'S 

Low down! 

••CALL- 

A company you can trust 

•MEMBER BETTER BUSINESS* 

liberty Re. Inc. 

630*539-6200 



Gov t Foreclosures 

Bcich iWfc 30ft 

$114,000 

Round Uke2/3flR 

SJ6,$00 A S74JBS 

F6kUke3flR 

$6-),300 . 

WMltrunJBR 

$5B,426 & $117,000 

ZJmOOR 

$57,000 & $105,300 

Low Dm*n/MJl* Offer 

WESTERN REALTY 

\t3<M9W10O 

847.776^2963 




BURLINGTON, WISCON- 
SIN LAKEFRONT house, 3- 
bedrooms, 1-1/2 baths, 
$950/month, 1st & last plus 
security deposit. Available 
March 1st, (414) 537-2361. 

GURNEE S900/MONTH, 2- 
bedroom, 1-bath, garage, 
basement, C/A/H, washer/dry- 
er hook-up, available 4/1. No 
subsidies/pels. (847) 762- 
9608.. 

LAKEFRONT HOME 4- 
BEDROOMS, available 3/15. 
(847) 395^1173, (847) 395- 
1428. 

MUNDELEIN 3-BED- 

ROOM HOME, remodeled 
kitchen and bath, large living- 
room, finished basement, ga- 
rage, no pets, credit check, 
S1,050/monlh. (847) 

362-0640. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH UP- 
DATE 3-bedroom 1 bath 
ranch on double lot. Eat-In 
kitchen. New appliances and 
carpeting. Freshly painted. 
Full basement. Available 
; March let. $993/month. (647) 
^ 945-5217. •_ 

VERY NICE 2-STORY 
home In Old Mill Creek, 4-bed- 
rooms, 2.5 baths, 
$1.300/month plus deposit. 
Call Cathy, Monday-Friday, 
8am-5pm, (647) 244-5330. 

WATERFRONT 2-3 BED- 
ROOM, 2-balh, newly remo- 
deled home on Center Lake, 
Salem, Wisconsin, 10 minutes 
North of Antloch, III. Fur- 
nished/unfurnished, alumi- 
num rowboat Included. No 
pets. Prefer non-smoklng. 
$875/month plus utilities and 
security deposit; (847) 
438-3653 evenings. 

WATERFRONT FOX LAKE 
1 -bedroom, single family 
house, available immediately, 
5450/month plus security, In- 
cludes heat and parking. Call 
Greg (847) 835-0709. 




1 BR Duplex:- 2mi 
Floor. 

No garage. 
Long Term Lease. ! 

$475/mo + 
utilities & sec depS 

■ Land Managements 

«ti5*78;«3p 




WANTED 3-4 BEDROOM 
house, with 2-1/2 baths, fire- 
place, basement. In Grays- 
take/Gurnee area on a 
lease/purchase option basis. 
Call Cindy (847) 543-1741. 



514 



Condo/Towi Homes 



GRAYSLAKE TOWN- 

HOME 2-BEDROOMS, plus 
loft, plus office/den, 1.5 baths, 
llvlngroom, dlnlngroom, A/C, 
washer/dryer, cathedral ceil- 
ings, skylights, large balcony, 
eat-in kitchen, all appliances, 
gas, 2-car garage, 
51,100/month plus deposit. 
Available 3/1. Month-to- month 
lease. (847) 548-7973. 



GURNEE TOWHNHOUSE 
1-BEDROOM, 1.5 baths, liv- 
Ingroom, kitchen, patio, 1-car 
garage, large loft, fireplace, 
storage space, tile floors, pets 
considered, . $1,050/month 
plus security and utilities, 
Available 4/1. (847) 623-3799. 

UBERTYVILLE FOR SALE 
BY OWNER 3-bedroom, 2- 
1/2 bath, 2-1/2 car garage, 
2400sq.lt. of elegance. Must 
see. Private, green, woods. 
$325,000. (847) 918-0643. 

READY FOR SUMMER 
Move-In condition, 1 -bedroom 
condo on Lake Do la van, Wl. 
Furnished, sleeps 6, Includes 
garage, fireplace, C/A, stove, 
refrigerator, microwave, dish- 
washer, clubhouse wlih pool, 
sauna, steam, exercise and 
game room, $106,000. (647) 
398-2132. 

UNION GROVE, WISCON- 
SIN Deluxe 3-bedroom. town- 
house, 2-full baths, cathedral 
ceilings, celling fans, patio, full 
basement, C/A 2-1/2 car ga- 
rage. $B75/month plus securi- 
ty. (414)642-9423. 

VACATION HOME BY 
OWNER Chain O'Lakes 
Townhouse, 2-bedroom, brick 
fireplace,- kitchen, IMngroom, 
dlnlngroom, ceramic baths, 
large patio, views of Fox Lake. 
Boat launch and storage, 
swimming pool, club house 
and tennis courts, 1-car ga- 
rage. $109,900. . (847) 
705-7800. 

WAUKEGAN TOWN- 

HOUSE FOR RENT, 3-bed- 
rooms, 2-baths, Irvhgroom, dl- 
nlngroom, eat-in kitchen, faml- 
lyroom, 1-car garage, all ap- 
pliances. C/A, great northwest 
location. Gurnee District 56 & 
121 Schools. S1,075/month. 
(847) 247-9323. 



518 


Mobile Homes 



1996 28X60 SCHULT MO- 
BILE HOME In Timber Ridge 
Park (Pleasant Prairie. Wise). 
3-bedrooms, 2-baths, formal 
dlnlngroom, sunroom, 

IGSOsq.fL, 10x24 deck, 12x16 
bam style shed. Excellent con- 
dition. All appliances except 
.'. washer/dryer Included. 

S67,500/beSt; (414) 

697-0286. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

OVER 55 COMMUNITY. 

New 1997 

Manufactured home 

1 -bedroom, 1-bath 

with garage and recroom. 

Includes: washer/dryer, 

stove/refrigerator, 

off street parking. 

$54,900. 

1938 2-bedroom, 2- bath, 

carport, shed arid deck, 

$39,900. 
1995 2-bedroom, 2-bath, 
with garage and carport, 

$58,900. 

1990 1 -bedroom, 1-bath, 

carport and shed, 

newly remodeled. 

$28,900. 
(847) 526-5000 
leave message. 

MOBILE HOME. NICE 
corner lot, Rainbow Park, Bris- 
tol, 1973 Dickman, 2 bed- 
room, 1 bath, large kitchen 
and living room, new carpet In 
kitchen, living and hall. Cen- 
tral air. New furnace 5 years 
ago. New siding and awnings, 
1 year ago. Washer, dryer, 
stove and refrigerator stay. 
Asking $38,800. Very good 
condition. Call Patti to see, 
(847)395-1143 

MODULARS - DOU- 
BLEWIDES - SINGLEWIDES 
• ILLINOIS LARGEST DIS- 
PLAY OF MODEL HOMES. 
FOUNDATIONS, BASE- 
MENTS, GARAGES, SEPT- 
ICS - WE DO IT ALUI FREE 
STATEWIDE DELIVERY/IN- 
STALLATION. "RILEY MANU- 
FACTURED HOMES 1-800- 
798-1541. 

RURAL GRAYSLAKE 

New & Used 

Homes For Sate 

Chain O'Lakes Mobile Homes 

Rt. 120 Si Fairfield Rd. 

For appointment 

(847) 546-2316 

leave message on machine. 



KECVOLE 

ihjcvcue 

RfiCVCLf. 



C24 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 26, 1999 



W 



c* 






520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



ANTIOCH 1.BEDR00M 

APARTMENT, takefront, fur- 
nlshed, A/C, utilities Included, 
washer/dryer, private area, 
near train, no pets, 
$57S/month. (847) 395-8395. 

ANTIOCH LAKEFRONT. 
Newly remodeled 1 -bedroom, 
$600/ffionih utilities Included. 
Boat slip available. No pets. 
(647) 526-0598. 

ANTIOCH WATERFRONT 
1-BEDROOM apartment, fur- 
nished $595, unfurnished 
$495, 1 -month security. (847) 
638-1228. 

QRAYSLAKE APART- 
MENT LARGE 1 -bedroom, 
In good neighborhood. Utility 
room and on sits manager. 
K , t 1yr. lease plus security depos- 
it and references. $800/month. 
(847) 223-0022, (847) 356- 
6309. 

GURNEE/WAUKEGAN 
NORTH SHORE 
APARTMENTS 

At Affordable Prices. 

Spacious. 

Luxury Living. 

Elevators. 

On Site Staff. 

Good Location. 

Easy to Toll Roads, 

IMPERIAL TOWER/MANOR. 

(847) 244-9222. 

LAKEVIEW TERRACE 
APAHTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA, Large 1 & 2 bedrooms, 
$610-$745/month. Heat, wa- 
ter, air Included. (847) 
356-5474. 

LINCOLNSHIRE LARGE 2- 
BEDROOM apartment, pri- 
vate drive, washer/dryer, no 
pels, $eOG/month. (708) 562- 
4843. 

VACATION VILLAGE 

LARGE studio apartment, 
2nd floor, laundry facilities, se- 
cured entrance, access to 
Chain 0' Lakes. (847) 
335-4733. 



,WADSWORTH SPACIOUS, 
newly remodeled, 1 -bedroom, 
In private home, $650/month 
Including utilities, quiet tenant 
with good references only. 
(847)746-0425. 

WAUCONDA 2-BED- 

ROOM, CONVENIENT to 
stores, 2nd floor, stove/refrig- 
erator $625/monlh. Available 
Immediately. (847) 381-3846. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN ' 
WALK TO EVERYTHING 

Large new 2-bedroom, 

2-bath, 1-car heated garage, 

$895/monlh plus security. 

Available March 1st. 

No pets. 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message. 

ZION LARGE 1 bedroom, 
2nd floor. Furnishing and 
laundry facilities available. 
241 2 Elm $525 /month. (847) 
872-2436 



WESTWIHD 
VILLAGE 

APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave., Zton 
1,2 &3 BEDROOMS 

FREE HEAT 

Appliances • On Site 

Manager • No Pets 

Starting from 

$495/mo. : 

Call Martha & Issac 

(847) 746-1420 

or BEAR PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

(414)697-9616 



RECYCLE 
RECYCLE 
RECYCLE 



bvkEwood VilUqE Apartments 

In UlANd Uke m6 GraysIake 

OKewnc, aHowJaMe housiNc, fori ouAlifkd ApplicANts. 
Now AccEpiiisq ApplicAiloNs ion our: 

• ],2 md J bEdnooM apartments 

PlEASE CaII f0R MORE JfvfoTOAliOM OR AppOINtMENT AT: 

(847)22?*6644 TDD# (800)526,0644 

LAkEWOod VilUqE Aparimeni is pnofEssioNAlly fd*f 



MANAqtd by MEnitliAN Group, Inc. 






OAKRIDGE VIULAGE 
APARTMENTS 



Offering Affordable Housing for 
Qualified Applicants. 

Currently Accepting Applications on our 

1 fit 2 Bedroom Apartments 

Stop in at: 

299 Oakridge Court in Antioch 

Or call; 

847-395-4840 
f=J 1-800-526-0844 TDD 

Managed by Meridian Group, Inc. 



*•*■*■!,*. II 



■'< 



-s& 



The Search Is Over... 



Twoofjthe finest apartment 
cbmmtmitiesintyfr 

haveit^iaiyou'reloohiiigfbr.' 



All of our apartments have: 

• 1 & 2 bdrm spacious floor plans 

• On-site -24-hour emergency maint. 

• Laundry facilities 

• Convenient to Metra 

• Beautifully manicured grounds 

• Flexibly leasing 



ANTIOCH 
MANOR 




ATAMMIN1S 



445 Donin Dr. 

Antioch, IL 

(847) 395-0949 



Deep Lake Hermitage 

149 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2002 



A Place To Cm Home 



G.P. Management, Inc. ^ 



fU 



528 



Api^lomes 
. To Share 



538 



Business Property 
For Rem 



560 



Vacant Lot/Acreage 



ROOMMATE WANTED 
Non-smoking tomato to sharo 
brand new' 2-bedroom, 2-bath 
townhouso In Llndenhurst, 
$525/month plus 1/2 utilities. 
Pool, exorcise room, and ten- 
nis courts on site. Gall Chris* 
tine (B47) 356^5765. 

VERNON HILLS CONDO by 
lake, to share with profession- 
al female, non-smoker/drink- 
er, no deposit, $425/month, In- 
cludes all utilities: except 
phone. (B47) 549-1773. 

WOMAN NON-SMOKER, 
non-drinker to share private 
home with same, private 
room, ranch style brick home, 
$450/month Including utilities. 
(847) 965-6980. 



WAUCONDA AREA IN- 
DUSTRIAL AND SHOP 
SPACE FOR RENT 
1 .OSOsq.ft . unit, $695 plus se- 
curity. Available Immediately, 
24003q.Jt. POLE BARN 
with concrete floor. Heat, elec- 
tric, outside storage can be' 
added. Office trailer available. 
$495 as Is. Available Imme- 
diately. ISLAND LAKE IN- 
DUSTRIAL 3,000sq.ft. shop, 
with loading dock and office, 
(1) 10ft.x10ft., (1) 10ft.x11ft. 
overhead door. Available April 
1st. $1,18u/month plus securi- 
ty. (847) 526-5000, leavo 
message, 



85TH ST., 1601 VACANT 
LOT, 40x85. (414) 652-8391. 



BARGAIN 




530 


Rooms For Rent 



ROOM FOR RENT with full 
house privileges in Vernon 
Hills. Male/female, age 25+. 
S500/month, $250 deposit, In- 
cludes all utilities except 
phone. (847) 367-5898 leave 
message. 

SEMI-FURNISHED 
QUIET, clean, convenient. 
$200 to move in, $70/wk. 
(847)360-8568. 



Richmond Car 

Lot orYour 

Business Use 

Brick Bldg. on Re 1 2, 

Shop with overhead 

door, office, additional 

storage garage 

& sales lot. 

Excellent visibility. 

$795/mo 

Land Mgmt. 
815/678-4334 



COASTER TYPE BIKE fat 
wheels, like new, $75. (847) 
S46-3156. 

DO YOU HAVE 

SOMETHING TO SELL 

FOR $75 OR LESS? 

Place your ad in this section 

for only $3,00 for 10 words or 

lass. Must be prepaid. 

Call Lisa (847) 223-8161 

ext. 140 or send the ad with 

with your payment to: 

Lakeland Publishers, 

P. 0. Box 268, 

30 S. Whitney SL, 

GraysIake III. 60030. 

Atten: Lisa. 



568 



Out Of Area Proper!) 




Business Property 
For Sale 



GAS STATION. PRIME 
LOCATION. Major oil compa- 
ny sits on 1/2 acre+ lot; great 
Income. Potential for mini 
mart/car wash. Land and busi- 
ness. Priced to sell. Ponlarelll 
(773) 631-6121 ext. 104- 
Frank, 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



FOX LAKE NEW lake view 
offices on Grand Avenue. 
Starting at $275/month. (847) 
587-1615. - 

HAINESVILLE OFFICE 

SPACE 6G0sq.ft„ excellent 
condition, great signage on Rt, 
120. 3700/month. Ubertyville 
5000sq.lt.. with outside stor- 
age, Rt. 137, zoned highway 
commercial. Tri-County R.E. 
(847)615-1200. 

SMALL MODERN OFFIC- 
ES FOR RENT IN BUR- 
LINGTON, 258 S. Pino, 
450sq.ft. Excellent location 
on main thoroughfare. All utili- 
ties and snow removal includ- 
ed. Immediate occupancy. 
Call Rick at (414) 763-7686 
days, (414) 534-5258 even- 
ings. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
700sq.ft. Industrial space with 
regular overhead door, pay 
own utilities, $395/monlh, plus 
security. (847) 526-5000 
leave message. 



raCHMOND 

. Fountain Head 

Corporate Center, 

RL 12. 

New Superior 

2750 to 7630 s.f. 

units, for 

|ll\DLSTRy/BUSINKS,| 

a/c ofc, Common 

or Private Dock 

2750 sf. $995 

Land MgnL 
815/678-4771 




NO DOWN PAYMENT? 

PROBLEM CREDIT? Own 
the home you need now, with- 
out a big downpayment. Com- 
plete financing If qualified. De- 
George Home Alliance 1-800- 
343-2884. 




If you have an Item you 

want to sell for $75.00 or 

less you can place on ad 

for only $3,001 Colt: Lisa at 

(847) 223-8161 ext. 140 

for more Information. 



KENTUCKY LAKEFRONT 
15 acres - $39,900. Lake 
property on beautiful undis- 
covered lake. Small town, 
country living. Meadows, 
woods, views and sunset. 4 
seasons, year round boating 
and fishing 800-816-5253. 

LAKEFRONT PROPERTY 
1-ACRE, perc tested, sand 
beach, large oak trees, Lily 
Lake, Wisconsin, $85,000. 
(414) 857-6652. ' 

SO, COLORADO RANCH. 
54 acres - $34,900. Bring your 
horses and ride out to one of 
the last great ranches In CO. 
Nice fields with outstanding 
Rocky Mtn views. Yr. round ac- 
cess, tel/olec. Excellent financ- 
ing. Call now 719-676-6367 
Hatchet Ranch. 

SOUTHERN COLORADO 
RANCH SALE. 92 acres - 
$59,900. Borders 8LM.. Enjoy 
panoramic view and sensa- 
tional sunsets over the Rock- 
ies from this gently rolling 
acreage. Ideal for horses. Ex- 
cellent financing. Call now 719- 
676-6367. 

TN LAKE BARGAIN • 
$17,900. $1,800 down. Boat 
dock. Beautifully wooded lot at 
spectacular 30,000 acre lake. 
Paved road, utilities, sur- 
veyed, soils tested. Local bank 
has appraised - will finance 
7.25% fixed, 15 years. Only 
$147/monlh. Priced to sell Im- 
mediately. Offered first come, 
first served. Call now 800-861- 
5253, ext. 2301. 

TiBM—MiiiiifliHfifinrmg 
MISSOURI 
ATTENTION HUNTERS! 

Great RtfitM Piopcitie*- 

Hardwoods, Remote. 

OHciing a wide variety of hunting & | 

rrerc aiionjl ground for sale. Tracts 

of 60, 127 & 280 acre* In Southeast | 

& South Central Missouri, 

Call 573.547-7622 far details. 






H^f 



!fr 



Dfc-£ 



DOROTHEA: 

(337-020) 

A wraparound Iront porch, wilh waist-high railirig^ahdTafiice strip enhance the country 
atmosphere of the Dorothea (337-020). This exquisitely designed home oilers 2,339 square 
feet of finished living space on two levels The brilliance ol the floor plan is matched by the 
beauty of Ihe exterior design. A blend ol wood, brick and glass work together to create an 
attractive environment. 

, To the left of the vaulted entry, the main floor boasts a front-lacing living room with vaulled 
ceiling and windows galore. This room, perfect for after dinner entertaining, has a private 
entrance from the porch. 

Directly behind the living room sits the master suite. Isolated for privacy, Ihe master suite 
features a bathroom with tub, shower and twin basins, a huge walk-in closet and a private deck 
lhat will allow you to enjoy Ihe summer sun while relaxing or liring up the barbecue. 

The vaulted country kitchen is sure to please. Here you have a garden window, plenty of 
open counter, a walk-in pantry and a roomy breakfast nook. A few steps away, for easy serv- 
ing, there Is a vaulted dining room that will make any meal a pleasure. 

Completing the main level are a nice-sized home office, with built-in desk and a large ulil- 
ity room lhat includes an ironing board, sink and space for a Ireezer. These two rooms are sep- 
arated by a half-bath. The utility room conveniently opens Into the two-car garage complete 
wilh a storage cabinet and a built-in workbench. 

The basement level houses the secondary sleeping areas and can be a good fit lor a fam- 
ily wilh older children living at home. Located here are two good-sized bedrooms, each with 
ample closet space for a dresser 
next to the entry. They both have 
private access to the back patio 
and share a central bathroom. 

The lower level also has a 
small storage room, linen closet 
and an optional bonus room that 
could be set up wilh a large screen 
TV, couch, or Ping Pong table: 

For a study kit of the 
DOROTHEA (337-020LP60) send 
S14.95, to Landmark Designs, J 
33127 Saginaw Rd. E., Cottage^' 
Grove, OR 97424 (Specify plan '■ 
name & number for kit). For a 
collection of pian; books, sand 
520.00, or save by ordering the 
kit and collection together for 
S29.95, or call 1-800-562-1151. 



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574 



Real Estate Wanted 



t BUY PROPERTIES. Will 
pay fair price with small down. 
Quick closings. (847) 
265-5987. 

INVESTOR SEEKS REAL 
ESTATE AGENT specializ- 
ing In handyman houses. 
Looking for all cash deals and 
quick closings. (847) 
265-5987. 



704 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



1997 SPORTSMAN 27FT. 
TRAVEL TRAILER, fiberglass 
body, fully equipped, fully 
screened-ln porch, A/C, 
$13,000/best. (815) 385-4670 

GEORGIE BOY 1985 MO- 
TORHOME 24ft., $9,900. 
(815)648-2316. _^ 

STARCRAFT TRUCK 

CAMPER -1987, 9.5', excel- 
lent condition. Refrigerator, 
water heater! bathroom, air, 
S4.000. (414) 878-9747. 




SNOWMOBILE 1993 
WILDCAT 700, studs, ski 
skins, mirrors, cover, hydrau- 
lic disk, extremely fast, $2,850. 
(847)587-6151. 

SNOWMOBILE 1999 PO- 
LARIS XCR440 SP EDGE, 
1 of 500 made, 500 miles, 
must sell, $6,200. (414) 
877-2968. 

SNOWMOBILES (2) 1986 
Yamaha SRVs. great shape, 
S1,100/ea. (847) 419-1252. 

SNOWMOBILES (2) YA- 
MAHA'S, 1994 600 & 1995 
BOO, accessories, trailer. (414) 
877-4309. 




1984 RENKEN WITH cuddy 
cabin excellent condition, Just 
tuned up for summer boating. 
Beige with blue stripe, clean, 
S3.400/best. (847) 360-9665. 

1995 LUND 16ft. deep V fish- 
ing boat, 40hp Tiller Mercury 
electric start trolling motor, 
roller trailer, $6,250/best. 
(847)356-9242. 

BOAT FOR SALE 1989 21ft. 
Sea Sprite, Big VS. open bow, 
sun deck, great condition, 
seats 9, 1 -owner, white & blue. 
Price with trailer $10,000. Ask 
for Jerry (847) 587-9378. 



720 


Sports Equipment 



EXERCISE EQUIPMENT 
HEALTH Rider with video, 
$200. Body Stridor Body By 
Jake with video, $150. Rockit 
Solarflex with video, $400. All 
In excellent condition. (414) 
697-9534. 



804 



Cars for Sale 



CORVETTE 1992 CON- 
VERTIBLE white with white 
top, garage kept, 55,000 
miles. Excellent condition. 
(815) 385-8468. ■■ 

AUDI 1995 A6, $17,990. 
(847) 432-5020. 

AUDI 1996 A4, $19,990. 
(847) 432-5020. 

BONNEVILLE SSE 1994. 
Don't miss out-Save. Below 
payoff and below dealer pric- 
es. We have 2, must sell 1, 
we're buying home. Black with 
gold trim, loaded up with leath- 
er, 65K miles plus large 3yr. 
35K mile warranty, $11,800. 
(815) 675-2788 evenings and 
weekends after 6pm. 



804 



Ctrs For Sale 



CADILLAC 1095 CON- 
COURS, $12,997. (847) 587- 
3400. ____ 

CARS $100, $500 & up. Po- 
lice Impounds. 1980's-1 897*8 
Hondas, Chevys, Jeeps and 
Sport Utility. Must sell. 800- 
772-7470 ext. 7040. (SCA Not- • 
work). • 

CARS FROM $500 
Police Impounds 
AndTax Repo'a. 
For listings call 

1-800-319-3323 
ext. 2292. 

CHEVY 1990 LUMINA, 
$3,998. (847) 336-3510. 

CHEVY 1891 CORSICA, 
$5,495. (847) 395-3600. . 

CHEVY 1995 LUMINA, 
$8,995. (847) 587-6473. ■ 

CHEVY 1998 MONTE CAR- 
LP, $10,994. (847) 356-2530. 

CHEVY, FORD PICK-UP 
Bodies, Factory-new guar- 
anteed from $1300.00. Doors 
from $89.00 Fenders from 
$50.00 Beds from $800.00, 
Bedilners $169.00. Bumpers, 
Grills Reparl Panels, Paints, 
Abrasives, windshields, radia- 
tors, Delivery, Marx (217) 624- 
6184. 

CHRYSLER 1993 . NEW 
YORKER FIFTH AVENUE, 
all power, 73K, . excellent me- 
chanical condition, $6,700. 
(847) 491-0256. 

CONTINENTAL 1987 EX- 
CELLENT condition, fully 
loaded, owned by mechanic, 
recent tune-up, tires, brakes 
and more. $2,800/bost. (847) 
973-1557. 

DODGE 1994 INTREPID, 
$8,394, (847) 356-2530. 

DODGE 1995 NEON SON, 
S5.995. (647) 587-6473. 

DODGE 1995 NEON 
SPORT, red, 4-door, automat- 
ic, A/C, am/fm cassette, ,1-. 
owner, $6,300/best. (847) 
845-7904. • 

EXPRESS AUTO 

EXCHANGE 

USED CARS 

•We take consignment cars. 

iNo.charge;, GAA-i 
Too busy to sell your car? 
Let us do it for you. 

(847)740-1400 

119 W. Rollins Rd. 

Round Lake Beach. 

(Across from Burger King). 

Ask for Chris. 

FORD 1991 TEMPO SE- 
DAN. $2,995. (847) 587-6473. 

FORD ,_ 1992 TEMPO, 
53,494. (847) 356-2530. 

FORD 1992 TEMPO, 
$4,688. (847) 587-3400. 

FORD 1993 ESCORT 

WAGON, $4,995. (847) 360- 
5000. ^^_ 

FORD 1994 PROBE, 
$6,988. (847) 587-3400. 

FORD 1994 PROBE, 
$8,294. (847) 358-2530. 

FORD 1994 TAURUS LX, 
$8,995. (847) 395-3600. , ; 



FORD 1996 CONTOUR, 
$9,988. (847) 587-3400, 

GEO 1993 PRIZM, 5- 
speed, air, am/fm, 64,000 
miles, excellent condition, 
$5,000/best. (847) 872-7954. 

GEO STORM 1995, 
$3,988. (847) 587-3400. 

GOLF VW 1992, 50,400 
acuta! miles, woman driver, 
woman owner. Very sharp, 
runs excellent, manual, A/C. 
$5,650. (847) 543-1965. 



HONDA PRELUDE '1997, 
$19,000, 5-speed, moonroof, 
14K miles, perfect condition, 
(847) 473-6095. 

HYUNDAI 1993 ELAN- 
TRA, $3,995, (647) 249-1300. 

HYUNDAI 1995 SCOUPE, 
$5,995.(847)249-1300, 

INFINITI G20 1993, 

$9,995. (847) 362-9200. 

INFINITI J30 1995, 

$16,995. (847) 382-9200. 



INFINITI ' Q45, 
(847)362-9200. 



$15,995. 



MAZDA 1995 MILLENIA, 
$12,995. (847) 362-9200. 

MAZDA 626 1996, $10,998. 
(847)336-3510, 

MERCURY 1993 COUGAR 
XR7, $7,995. (847) 587-6473. 



rrr.T xc 



•» •.' * 



February 26, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C2J 



804 



Cars For Sale 



824 



Vans 



MERCURY 1983 TRACER ; 

WAGON, $4,988. (847) 587- 
3400.. , '. 

MITSUBISHI 1693 
ECLIPSE COUPE, $7,695. 
(847) 234-2800. 

NISSAN 1994 ALTIMA, 
$7.995. (847) 234-2800, 

OLDS 1988 CUSTOM 
CRUISER WAGON, power 
windows/iocka, good - condi- 
tion, runs great, (847) 
487-5913. 

OLDS 1989 CALAIS, 
$1,595, (847) 587-0473. 

OLDS GO REGENCY, 1991. 
$3,595. (847) 380-5000. 

OLDSMOBILE 1888 CUT' 
LASS SUPREME, 76,000 
miles, many new parts, 
$1,700/best, (847) 548-1025. 

OLDSMOBILE 1994 

ACHIEVA, $4,998. (847) 338- 

3510. 

OLDSMOBILE 1995 AU- 
RORA, $13,995. (847) 234- 
2800. 

PLYMOUTH 1994 SUN- 
DANCE, $5,494. (847) 358- 
2530. 

PLYMOUTH 1896 

BREEZE, $7,995. (847) 234- 
2800. _^^^^^ 

PLYMOUTH 1897 NEON, 
$9,995. (647) 249-1300. 

PONTIAC 1995 GRAND 
AM, $8,995, (847) 234-2800. 

PONTIAC 1996 GRAND. 
AM, $10,995. (847) 395-3700. 

PONTIAC 1996 SUNFIRE 
CONVERTIBLE. $11,988. 
(847) 587-3400. 

PONTIAC 1987 GRAND 
AM SE, $12,995. (647) 587- 
6473. ' ' 

PORSCHE 1991 811 
COUPE. $27,990. (847) 432- 

5020. t 

PORSCHE 1894 968 CA- 
BRIOLET. $25,990. (847) 432- 

5020, , . -■■ 

SAAB 1997 900 SE, 

$21,950. (847) 432-9300. 

SAAB ' 1995 9005 CON- 
VERTIBLE, $17,950;' (847) 
432-9300. ' 

SAAB - 1996 900SE, 

$18,950.(847)432-9300. 

SAAB 1997 9000 CSE, 
$25,950. (847) 432-9300. 

SAAB 9000 -1896, $20,995. 
(647) 362-9200. 

SATURN 1993 SC2, 46K 

miles, excellent condition, 
$10.000/best. .(847) 

918-1476 leave massage. 

SATURN 1895 SL, $5,995. 
(847) 360-5000. 

SATURN 1997 SL2 SE- 
DAN, $10,495. (847) 234- 
2800. ■ 

SUBARU 1992 LOYALE, 

$3,498. (647)336-3510. 

SUZUKI , ESTEEM 1898, 
$9,995.(847)249-1300. 

TOYOTA 1993 COROLLA 
LE, $6,995. (847) 362-9200. ; 

VOLVO 1894 650 -SEDAN, 
$16,995. (847) 362-9200; 

VOLVO 1996 855 GLT 
WAGON, $22,295. (847) 362- 
9200. . . 

VOLVO 740 1992, $9,998. 
(847)336-3510, 

VOLVO SELECT S70 1998, 
$24,595. (847) 362-9200. 

VW JETTA GL 1995. $8,995. 
(847) 248-1300. 



FORD 1881 CARGO VAN, 
$5,985,' (847) 395-3600. 

FORD 1892 AEROSTAR 
EXTENDED MINI VAN, - 
97,000 miles, $4,900/beat, 
(847)550-0883. 

FORD 1893 AEROSTAR 
XL, $6,995. (847) 587-3400. 

PLYMOUTH 1992 VOYAG- 
ER, $3,995, (847) 395-3600. . 

VW EUROVAN 1883, 
$8,995.(847)248-1300. 




Four Wheel Drive 
Jeeps 



CHEVY 1882 BLAZER 4X4, 
$5,995. (847)687-3300.' 

CHEVY 1883 SUBURBAN, 
$11,995. (847) 597-3300. 

CHEVY : 1883 271 OF- 
FROAD, mint condition, low 
miles. (647) 746-7004. 

CHEVY' 1894 BLAZER 
$12,494. (847) 356-2530. , 

CHEVY 1884 8-10 BLAZER 
4x4, 4-door, loaded, must sell, 
$10,000/beet. (847) 
546-8525, : : 

CHEVY, 1995 S-10 BLAZ- 
ER, $15,900. (847)395-3700. 

FORD 1993 EXPLORER, 
$12,995. (647) 587-3300. 

FORD 1984 BRONCO 4x4, 
$5,995. (847) 395-3700. 

GEO TRACKER CON- 
VERTIBLE 1992, $3,695. 
(847) 360-5000. 

GMC 1894 JIMMY 4X4. 

$13,995. (847)587-3300. 

ISUZI 1894 TROOPER 

4X4. $9,495. (847) 234-2800. 

ISUZU 1994 RODEO 4x4.' 
$10,998.(847)336-3510. 

ISUZU 1987 RODEO, 
$12.992.(647)587-6473.- 

ISUZU RODEO LS 1995 
4WD, loaded, 2-tone, 52,000 
miles, 5-speed, V8. Asking 
$13,800/best. •; (414) 

635-8772. 

JEEP 1993 WRANGLER 
4X4. $7,995. (847) 234-2800. 

JEEP CHEROKEE 1992, 
$7,694. (847) 356-2530, 

JEEP CHEROKEE SPORT 
. 1992. $9,988. (847) 587-3400. 

JEEP ' COMANCHE 1889 

2x4, 140K miles,- 5-speed, 
bedliner, snap-on bed cover, 
new tires, excellent condition 
and runner, $3,300. (414) 
534-6548. 

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 
1994, $10,894. (847) 356- 
2530, 

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 
LTD., 1996, $21,995. (847) 
362-9200. ' 

JEEP WRANGLER 1995, 

$9,995. (847) 587-6473. 

JEEP WRANGLER . 1995, 
$9.494. (B47) 356-2530. 

SUZUKI 199B SIDEKICK 
4X4. $15,195. (847) 234-2800. 



810 



Cksic/AntiqueCan 



LINCOLN 1966 4-DOOR 
convertible (suicide doors), re- 
tractable top, needs restora- 
tion, $2,500/best. Or will part 
out. (847) 587-7444. 



824 



Vans 



834 



Trucks/Trailers* 



DODGE 1993 DAKOTA 
EXTENDED CAB MARK 
111, loaded, V8, . 81,000 
miles. $8,eoo/best. (414) 

653-6840. ' 

DODGE 1993 DAKOTA, 
$5,995. (847) 395-3700. 

FORD 1989 F-250 4X4, 
$1,995.(847)587-6473. 

FORD 1994 F-1S0, $9,985. 
(647) 587-3400. • 

FORD 1984 RANGER 
XLT, 5-speed, AM/FM cas- 
sette, bedliner, excellent con- 
dition, 66,000 miles, $8,800. 
(947) 816-7846; 

FORD 1998 RANGER, .5- 
speed, air, CD, rear slider bed- 
I linor, custom paint. Must sell, 
511,900/best, (815) 

759-9187. (847) 774-9240. 



844 


Motorcycles 


S39 


Housekeeping 



HARLEY DAVIDSON 

1996, 883 HUGGER, black 
with spoked wheels, mint con- 
dition, $8,000. (847) 
872-4062. 

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1999 
1200 CUSTOM SPORT, 
$10,500. (414) 652-4810. 

SUZUKI GS XR1100 1897, 
4 In 1, 3,000 miles, 
$8,500/beat. (414) 598-0644 
alter 4pm. 



S33 



Handyman 



AHE . YOU TIRE OF 
CLEANING OR JUST 
DONT HAVE THE TIME? 
Give mo a call. Have referenc- 
es and Insurance. Weekly/bi- 
weekly. Kalhy (847) 
395-1150. ■ 

MORAVIA 

CLEANING SERVICE. 

House cleaning 

Window cleaning. , 

References available. - 

Quality work at low cost. 

(847) 623-4943. 



THE HANDYMAN -NO Job 
too small. Painting, carpentry 
and repair work. Reasonable 
rates and Mreo estimates, 
(647) 223-7724. 



DODGE 1982 CARAVAN, 
cargo style, 4-cyllnder, air, 
power brakes/steering,, cas- 
sette, newer tires, brakes and 
tune-up. Excellent condition, 
$4.000.(647)587-7668. 

CHRYSLER 1894 TOWN 
& COUNTRY,, $10,595. (847) 

234-2800. 

CHRYSLEH 1995 TOWN & 
COUNTRY, $13,294. • (847) 
358-2530. , 

DODGE 1 984 CARAVAN 

SPORT, $7,532. (847) 587- 
6473. 



838 



Meaty Equipment 



IRRIGATION PUMP & MO- 
TOR, model 6203A, 40hp, 
phase 3. Peerless pump, 4In. 
Ductal falanged, 20hp. motor. 
$650. (847) 740-7380 attar 

5DITI. 




S78 


. Remodeling' 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you hnve placed classified 
advertising with the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may re- 
ceive a misleading statement 
from another : firm request- 
ing payment for this advertls* 
Ing, To receive proper cred 
It to your account, all pay 
ments Tor your • Lakeland 
Newspapers [advertising 
must be. made a*' Invoiced 
and directed to: ; '' 

Lakeland Newspapers 
PO Box 208 
30 B. Whitney Bt. . 
OraysUke.JL 60030-0366 | 



DC TILE WE Install floor and 
walL tiles of all kinds. Remodel 
all bathrooms and kitchens. 
Free estimates. (847) 395; 
0777. 



JACK'S 

REMODELING 

*Basement Finishing 

•Famllyrooms & Offlcerooms 

'Electrical & Plumbing 

•Kitchens & Baths ■ 

•Vinyl Replacement Windows 

•Soffit Fascia. - 

FREE ESTIMATES" 

(847) 546-3758. 




Lakeland Newspapers Is pleased to present our 1999 



Ldke 



County 





Lakeland Newspapers will be publishing a 
Special Employment Guide on Friday 
March 19, 1999. You won't want 
to miss out on this special pullout 
section. It will be inserted In all 
1 1 Lakeland Newspapers, 
covering 90% of Lake County. 



This is the perfect 
opportunity to recruit from 
Lake County's finest job applicants! Or 
let people know about your resume 
service! This informative section will 
feature articles and information 
on the employment situation here in 

Lake County. 




Call your Classified Advertising Account Executive today at 

(847)223-8161 

Deadline for ad space is Friday March 12 at 5 p.m. 



P.O. Box 268 • 30 South Whitney 

Grayslake, Illinois 60030 

(847) 223-8161 



i?i 



Cf 



C', 



C26 /Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 26, 1999 



A 



TAX DIRECTORY 



Bs. 



ATCWEGGE,LTD. 

Enrolled Agents • CPA 

IRS Representation 

Established Since 1960 

265 Center St • Grayslake 

(847) 223-0777 

CARL SAND 
ACCOUNTING & INCOME TAX 

E- FILE available 

404 Lake St • Antioch 

(847) 395-7444 

COMPREHENSIVE 
ACCOUNTING SERVICE 

Free Electronic Filing wl pd. return 

564 N. Route 83 • Grayslake 

Daniel E. Coulon, EA 

(847) 223-4040 

COTE & WRIGHT 

Servicing Lake County for over 30 years 

1304 Washington St. • Waukegan 
(847) 662-6019 • fax (847) 662-6053 

DAM, SNELL & TAVEIRNE, LTD. 

Certified Public Accountants - 

21 Rollins Rd. • Fox Lake 

• (847) 587-3022 

1512 Artaius Parkway • Libertyville 

(847) 367-4448 

2022 S. Route 31 • McHenry 

(815)363-1801 
Internet Address: dstcpa.com 

THOMAS L. KRON, CPA 

Individual & Business Taxes 

Appointments available at 

your convenience 

1724 E. Grand Ave. • Lindenhurst 

(847) 265-0866 



V 



H&R BLOCK 



474B W. Liberty • Wauconda 

(847)526-8877 

2 W. Grand • Fox Lake 

(847)587-9333 

426 Lake • Antioch 

(847)395-6230 

629 W. Rollins • Round Lake 

(847)546-4862 

23 South Route 12 • Fox Lake 
(847)973-1099 
226 N. Barron Blvd. • Grayslake . 

(847)548-6060 

46 West Main St. • Lake Zurich 

(847)726-1099 

622 E. Hawley • Mundelein 

(847)949-8433 

2435 Green Bay Road • North Chicago 

(847)689-1099 
23 West Rollins Road • Round Lake Beach 

(847)740-1099 

336 S. Green Bay Road* Waukegan 

(847)360-1099 

2250 Sheridan Road • Zion 

(847)746-1099 

CALL 1-800-234-1040 

FOR OTHER LOCATIONS. 

JERROLD I. WEINSTEIN, LTD. 

Income Tax Preparation 
(Electronic Filing Available) 
Small Business Accounting 

Payroll Service • 
4949 Grand Ave. • Gurnee 
(847) 662-3420 






If you would like your company to be 
added to Lakeland 's Tax Directory, j } ■ 
jplease cailPaulaf or Ross at a47-223-8l6li 



■ 






£&£?vC°0°R°N°E°R 




Child Care 



CHILD CARE in my home. 
Excellent references. 6:30am 
lo 6:30pm.- 847-555-0000 




LOVING CHILD 
CARE IN 'MY 
GRAYSLAKE 

HOME. Hot lunch, 
nutritious snacks, educational 
loys and lots of TLC, 34 years 
experience. Will take 6mo to 
6yrs. Please call for many ref- 
erences or to visit and 
observe. 

847-555-0000 




M c H o n r y / 

Johnsburg mom 
of 2 will watch your 
child In my home. 
Big, fenced backyard, large 
playroom, no pets, non smok- 
ing, and plenty of love. 
Available Monday- Friday 6am 
lo 6pm. Breakfast, lunch and 
snacks will be provided. 
Please call Sue 
847-S55-O00O 



CHILD'CARE in your home, or 
mine. References available. 
847-555-0000 



Word Rate Ads 

15 words $9,75 

150 for each 

additional word 

(pre-paid) 

Ad with border 
and logo 

15 words $14.75 

150 for each 

additional word 

(pre-paid) 

PRIVATE PARTY 
ONLY 



Classified Order Blank ; 

Use the handy coupon below. Count words. 
Phone numbers and hyphenated words count as one word. Write copy below. 



■ ,T 



l 

l 
l 
l 
l 
l 



l,a 



Enclose check & mail to: Lakeland Publishers, 30 S. Whitney P.O. Box 268, 

Grayslake, 1L 60030 or fax (847) 223-2691. To place an order by j>hone call 

Lisa at (847) 223-8161 ext. 140. We also accept Visa & MasterCard. 



\*\ 









; 



{ ■ 



Lakeland Newspapers is your 




C*/ 



fA 



\>i 



To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



To Place 
Your Ad Here 

Call 

847-223-8161 





Room '''Additions*-' •Bathrooms " • Siding . 
Basements •Dormers •Roofing 

Kitchens: •Windows •Decks 

j^rAii ytforkGiiaranteed 
illy (Licensed, Bonded 





HHHHMHHHHHMHHHHHHMMMHHHHHMHHHMHMKMHHMHHHHHMMHNKHHHHHHHMH 
H Al I JY AA HiT JV *l ^^« • • r 

h 

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it 

H 



ALL AMERICAN CONST. 

Kitchen-Bath Basement 
Painting/Custom Remodeling ^ 





Quality work at affordable prices 

SPECIAL ON BASEMENTS NOW 

WITHIN 24 HR. HANDYAAAN SERVICE 
Free Estimates 



Y 
Y 

\ 
Y 

m Lie. Bonded 

a *_* 847-548-5110 

HHMHHHMMMMHHHHHMHMHMHHMHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHMMHHHHHHHM> 



AECUSTEWD w 

withtic O 

BETTER TTRTl 

eusmusauncAU 



General Servicing 

& fTI Residential a 
LzJ Commercial 

Interior • Exterior 

' Painting * Drywalt Repair 

' General Repairs ' Power Washing 

■ * Deck Staining & Sealing 

'Gutter Clean-Out 

' Apartment & House Maintenance 

' rv A Phone Jack Installation 

(B47) 973-9466 

Insured 




Landmark 



An Illinois Mortgage Banker 

• Refinancing • Debt Consolidation 

• Home Improvement • FHA Loans 

• Purchase • Equity Credit Line 

CALL your local rep 
MIKE WINGO Today 

(630) 424-9512 fg> 

Landmark Financial Is an Illinois Residential Licensee mm t 



' ■■ ■ ■ ■ I I ■ ■ 1 1 1 i| 'u i ii4„t 




.«h someth^fl 7 

#\esuretocUe^« 
?^'» Direct Unes i 



February 26, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers I C27 




iND Newspapers is your 




se Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



To Place 
Your Ad Here 

Call 
847-223-8161 



.■■•■-.-■•- 
"affordable 

HOME REPAIRS 



HANDYMAN SERVICE 



Save money by using America's 

largest handyman service. 
Insured; bonded, guaranteed. 

(847) 726-1061 



mw 




OFFICES IN 30 STATES 



T. LAZZARETTO 

CON STRU CTION 

OFFERS: 

• General Contracting 

• Interior Trim ,• Remodeling 

♦ Siding* Soffit, Fascia • Addition* 

•Basement Finishing r .'■ 

-'• Decks/Screen Porches ; 

•Window Replacement 

• DrjrwaTl & Painting^ 

QuALirr Wokic 

GUARAHTEEd!!! 
Call CS473 •37'OlT? 
Ask' for .Tony 
. ■ ' Folly Insured 





* Painting 



Extiertlnstattation 
ye^^ahli^Vinyl 




* 



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MARTY'S 

LANDSCAPE MAINT 
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Coqnnw md Indlvkttui U> ind Accotm(k>f 

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(847) 223-8691 





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Saturday 9am -;3pm 
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"Call Us For Fast Courteous Service" 

33265 N. Ftt»; 45 

Wlldwood, IL 60030 

(847)223-4682 

RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL 





*; 



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C28 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



February 26, 1999 



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65% 0// ' 

.Selected Hunter Douglas? 

products. Excludes Silhouette? t 

Vigmtlf, & Lnmihcuft 






-'-+,. 






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',-■ •>■;•■.,■. 






70% Of) 

Applause™ 

.Honeycomb 

Shades 



INCLUDING: 

• Custom Draperies 

• Top Treatments 

• Sivags/Jabois 

• Balloon/Roman Shades 

• Reupholsteiy y f Slipcovers 

• Wallcoverings 

• Fabrics 

FEATURING: 

•Mini Blinds •Vertical Blinds 

• Country Woods™ Wood Blinds 

• Duetid® Honeycomb Shades 

• Applause® Honeycomb Shades 

• Silhouetted Window Shadings 

• Vignetted Window Shadings 

• Pleated Shades 

• Window Shades 



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decorating consultation and free price estimates 

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On Custom Blind orders of $999 or greater 



82 7<E. Center St 



Hours 
Mon.10-5 *%%f 106 

mi07*SaLjQ$ 
Closed Sun.OrByAppt 




Libertyvtile (847) 680-8267 




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• - .—.:■■.; ..., 

www.webautomarket.com 



February 26, 1999 



1999 Chrysler 




embodies elegant 




With its stunning looks, interi- 
or comfort, driving agility 
and overall efficiency, the 
Chrysler Concorde has be- 
come an instant hit in its first model year 
on the market, winning widespread criti- 
cal acclaim. 

"Few cars have such a striking presence 
on the road, and few, if any^ cars in Con- 
corde's price class can match its overall- 
driving experience," said Martin R. Levine, 
General Manager - 

Chrysler/ Plymouth/Jeep® Division. "We 
knew that Concorde would break strongly 
into the market, and we are seeing a sig- 
nificant increase in sales and share in this 
important market segment." 

Completely redesigned for 1998, the 
Chrysler Concorde LX and LXi set the new 
standard among premium sedans for 1999 
and beyond while complementing the ' 
wide array of other vehicles in the Chrysler 
brand portfolio. Concorde has already 
been awarded 'Automobile' magazine's 
Design of the Year Award for 1998. 

Several enhancements^ offered for 
1999 to keep the Chrysler Concorde's mo-. 
men turn going. Changes for 1999 include 
premium carpeting, a new headliner iahd^ 

niw frtP T in T fahrlM jnriypthpra; Arnvjse 
leather seating surface will be standard on 
the LXi, while a new fabric will be offered 
later in the model year on the LXVA new 
stitched boot design for the shift lever 
(late availability) also provides a richer 
look to the overall interior. 

Functionally, the recently redesigned 
Concorde continues to offer a high blend 
of quiet, refined and powerful perfor- 
mance. New, more robust sway bar links 
will be phased into production mid-model 
year, as will 'tubular rear trailing arms. 
Both will provide an added measure Of. 








■ 
: 




DIMENSIONS: Length: 209.1 
in.; Width: 74.5 in.; Wheelbase, 
in.: 113 in. 

BRAKES: Vented diskv^nge 
piston caTtpers 

MSUP BASE PBSCE: 

1999 FEATURE 
HIGHLIGHTS 

» Luxury-Timed Suspension 

► Sentry Key'" Theft-Deterrent Sys^;. 

,tem Added To Vehicle Theft Secu- 
rity Alarm.' 

» New Optional Leather Seat Mate- 
rial 

• Improved-Appearance Floor Car- 
pet 

• Trunk Cargo Net 

• New Exterior Color: Light Cypress 
Green ~ 






road isolation without affecting driving 
performance. On the exterior, 16- inch 
Medallion alloy wheels are added as stan- . 
dafd equipment on the Concorde LXi. For 
enhanced security, Chrysler's exclusive 



_ PtaeseeC0NC0RDE/D6 1999 CHRYSLER CONCORDE 





Onlt^. 



15,895 



- 



Only.-. 



$ 9495 



T/^ •« Or%„ , 



Only 



$ 19295 




1999 
Chevy 
Blazer LS 



1999 

Chevy 

MaUbu 



ffMM*K-$900A 




Only... 



23995 «*$14.395' 



1999 
Chevy 
Cavalier 
Cpe. | 

Only... 



New 1999 

Olds 

Aurora 



$9,195 <«u_ $ 29.495 



faUNDREDSlORHARlA^^ 



Used Cars at Raymond Chevy/oids in Anfioch 



Used Cars ai Ray Chevrolet in Fox Lake 



1992 Plymouth Voyager. 

1965 Ford High Cube 

1987 8-10 Blazer 

1997 Saturn 8L1. 

1991 ford Cargo Van 

1991 Chevy Corsica 



1992 Pontlac Bonnev!Ue_ 
199* Cutlass Supreme 81 
199* Olds Cutlass *-DR_ 

1995 Dodge Neon 

199* Ford Taurus LX 



-$3,995 
-$7,495 
-$2,495 
.$11,995 
_$5.995 
_$5.495 
-$9,995 
-$6,995 
J$5.995 
-$5,995 
-$8,995 



199* Corvette Coupe. $22 . 995 

1997 Chevy K1500 X Cab *X*-$20,995 

1997 Chevy Astro Van $10,995 

1998 Ponttoc Transport $19,995 

1987 Chevy Suburban *XV-_$5995 

1993 Jeep Wrangler *X* $9,995 

199* P-150 XLT Ext Cab *X*_ $14,495 

1995 Olds Aurora _$17.995 

199* OHC jimmy *X* SUE $11,995 

1997 Dodge Ram Ext. -$22,995 



1997 Tahoe *WD *Dr-l $27,995 

' 1995 Bulck Lesdbre LlmiledJ$15,995 

1988 Ford Bronco *X* $5,495 

1988 Chevy C1500 PAJ $3,495 

1992 Chevy C1500 X Cab PAL- $9,995 

1993 Toyota *-Runner 9R5 V6-$14.995 

1993 Chevy Conv Van_ _$9,995 

1993 OHC Jimmy SLT *X* $10,995 

199* Chevy 8-10 Blazer *X*_$7,995 

1988 Ford Bronco $5,995 

.1998 Olds Intrigue $16,995 

199* Nissan Sentra lr $6,995 



1998 Tracker LSI *Dr *X*_$14.495 
1993 Bronco *X*E/B $12.495 



199* Dodge Caravan 



-$7,995 



199* OHC Jimmy VDr *X* $13,995 

1993 Ford T-BIrd ; '. $7,995 

199* Chevy K250O Ext *X*—$17.995 

1991 Mazda RX7 $6,995 

1997 Chevy C1500 Ext .$21,995 

199* Chevy Astro Conv Van_$12,995 
199* Chevy Blazer LT *X*__ $14,995 
.199* Hercury Cougar XR7 $7,995 

1992 Olds Delta 88 Royal $9,995 

1989 Dodge Grand Caravan_$3,995 
1988 Chevy 6-10 PflJ $2,995 

1991 Cadillac Eldorado Barrrtz_$9.995 

1993 Ford F-150- ! $8,995 

1990 Chevy Astro CL :_$4.995 

1992 Ford Bronco: : $9,995 



— \ Uulh Slurus feature Hill's 

/ fifil B 0f Drastically Rutlum! 

WULU Pre-Diivcns. Most Ate 

JJ r {y ; GdIU Check Certitied. 

lll ?,-. u ' We Also Carry GM 

. Certified Used Vehicles! 



inni 

Certified 



USED VEHICLES 



_$5.995 
.$12,995 
-$11,995 
.$12,995 
.$9,995 



1992 Chevy Blazer *X*_ 

1993 Dodge Dakota 

1993 Chevy euburban. 

1993 Ford Explorer - 

199* Dodge ConvVon- 

1995 Cnevy 8-10 *X* $14,995 

1995 Chevy Tahoe LT *Dr_$l9,995 
1995 Chevy K1500 Exl Conv__$21,995 
1995 Chevy a500 6ltverado-$16.495 

1995 Tahoe K1500 2-Dr $19,995 

1997 Chevy Tahoe LT — ; $27,995 

1996 Monte Carta z/3* $14,995 

1998 Astro Cargo $18,995 

1996 Chevy Blazer- 
1998 Chevy Venture. 



.$18,995 
.$23 * 



1995 Chevy Astro Conv»r»ion.$1 5 , 99! 

199* 8uboru Legocy $8.995 

1998 Dodge Neon Sport. $13,995 

1996 Chevy 8-10 Ext $U,995 
1996 Chevy Blazer LT 



1996 Chevy Blazer LT; 



:$18.995 
.$15,995 







D2 / Lbkelane Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



February 26, 1999 



FIND THE G 



JANSWERAT 



I 



I 



I 



..'_.. ;_ni.' c ".'.i*.." ^.,„^isa 



i-'r^xlti.. 




f TOM OF THE 



'98 Park Avenue Ultra 



c 99 Neon 



LA 





Stock H5B59. 
MSRP $38,160.00. 



.yft 



"??rs>v. 



ASK 



■•■■■ ■■*»!■ X'#j/ 



■ 



«>•«:•- 



Knauz Demo Discount -$4,903 
Consumer Rebate -$3,000 



KNAUZ DEMO SALE PRICE 

$30,277 



HOWARD 

■■■■,:■ :,.■■.■■'».:■-■■' 



Includes: 
Leather Seating, 
Astroroof, 
Power Seats, 
AM/FM CD & 
Cassette 




: Stock #96219i':: 



4VSKI 



M 



V.'JJ 1 ''** 



KNAUZ 
LEASE PRICE 

$ SJ# MONTH 



36 months 



?GLdRI 



ItfLAJKIM 



Loaded with 
Sunroof, Tilt, 
Cruise, Auto, Air 
& Keyless Entry. 

36 month lease totals $7,092.00. 
Restdiral value $6,653.00. All rebates 
applied, must take delivery by 3/1799- 
Must qualify for recent college gradu- 
ate and auto show bonus programs. 



Disclaimer: TAXES ARE EXCLUDED. All rebates applied. Term restrictions may apply. Credit approval required - see dealer for details. 



AFFORDABLE LUXURY CARS - ASK FOR MARIO 



'94 LEXUS .GS300 STK# PS101 G, GOLD, LOADED, MUST SEE, 84,000 MILES, ONLY $17,995 

'95 OLDSMOBILE AURORA STK# P5098, BLACK, PRICED TO SELL AT ONLY $13,995 

«95 OLDSMOBILE DELTA 88 LSS STK# P5111G, GREEN W/CAMEL LEATHER, ONLY 27,000 MILES 

'95 CADILLAC DEVILLE SEDAN STK# 5836A, BLACK W/LEATHER AND ALL THE TOYS. 60,000 MILES AND PRICED AT ONLY $15,995 

'95 CADILLAC DEVILLE SEDAN WHITE W/50,000 MILES AND ALL THE TOYS, VALUE PRICED AT ONLY $16,895 

•95 CHRYSLER NEW YORKER STK# 86517A.TEAL GREEN WITH LESS THAN 46,000 MILES, SALE PRICED AT ONLY $11495 

•96 LINCOLN TOWN CAR STK# 6460RA, WHITE W/GRAY INTERIOR, LOW MILES AND PRICED AT ONLY $17,995 



SUBURBAN DRIVEN FAMILY CARS -ASK FOR HOWARD 



GEORGE'SlBlWKlREpOSSESSEDM 
CORNER :i -ASK FOfJ GEOfidg® 



SEE GEORGE FOR PRICING ON OVER 50 BANK REPOSSESSED 
VEHICLES - BELOW IS A SAMPLING OF THESE VEHICLES AT 
TREMENDOUS SAVINGS! 



'95 NISSAN MAXIMA 

'97 CHEVROLET ASTRO VA 

'95 EAGLE VISION ESI 
SEDAN 

'96 SATURN SL2 



'95 CHEVROLET 1500 CLUB 
CAB4X4Z-71 

'96 CHEVROLET CAVALIER 

*97 CHEVROLET CAVALIER 

«97 CHEVROLET CAVALIER 



'93 BUICK PARK AVENUE SEDAN STK# 96104A, LESS THAN 50,000 MILES, BABY BLUE W/CLOTH SEATS, CLEARANCE PRICED AT ONLY $9,995 

'93 FORD CROWN VICTORIA STK# P5072, BLUE READY FOR A NEW HOME AT ONLY $7,295 

'94 BUICK LESABRE STK# 5832A, DARK BLUE W/LEATHER SEATING, 97,000 MILES AND RUNS GREAT, PRICED ACCORDINGLY AT $6,495 

:«94 CHEVROLET CORSICA STK#-P5068;^rEAL^ 63,000 Ml^ i--- ..~_-~~w — — - : _*;- - -..••■■ 

•94 NISSAN ALTIMA STK# P5107G, WHITE, GREAT EVERYDAY CAR AT ONLY $7,995 . : 

'95 NISSAN MAXIMA STK# P5087, DARK GREEN, LOADED, DRIVE IT HOME TODAY AT ONLY $11,995 

'95 CHRYSLER CONCORDE STK# 96090A, BLUE W/LESS THAN-50,000 MILES, SALE PRICED AT $10,595 

•95 EAGLE VISION STK# P5092, BLACK, CLEARANCED PRICED AT ONLY'$8495 - 

'96 BUICK LESABRE SEDAN STK# 95003A, BLUE W/TAUPE INTERIOR, 53,000 MILES, A BEST BUY AT $11,995 

( 96 PLYMOUTH BREEZE, STK# P5031, GREEN W/LESS THAN 33,000 MILES, PERFECT FAMILY CAR AT A PRICE YOU CAN AFFORD $7,995 

'97 SATURN SL2 SEDAN, STK# 95037A, LOADED W/SUNROOF AND MORE, SALE PRICED AT ONLY $10/195 



MINI-VANS AND SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES - ASK FOR GLORIA 



'93 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4 STK# P5095, DUAL TOPS, RED, ONLY 66,000 MILES AT $7,995 

'94 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY STK# 96152A, BLUE W/WOOD TRIM, LESS THAN 50,000 MILES, RECENTTRADE-IN AND PRICED AT $10,595 
'94 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY STKf* 96228A, ALL WHEEL DRIVE, READY FOR THE SNOW AND PRICED RIGHT AT ONLY $11/495 
'94 CHEVROLET BLAZER SPORT STK# P5079, BLACK, 85,000 MILES, PRICED TO SELL AT $13495 
•94 ISUZU TROOPER 4X4 STK# P50B3, 88,000 MILES AND RUNS GREAT ONLY $9495 
•95 CHEVROLET 1500 4X4 CLUB CAB Z71 SILVERADO EDITION STKtt P5090, ONLY $18,995 
'96 P1YMOUTH VOYAGER STK# P5078, DARK IRIS, 81,000 MILES, ONLY $11995 
. '97 CHEVROLET ASTRO CONVERSION VAN STKtf P5082, 14,000 MILES, ONLY $15,995 
'97 CHEVROLET VENTURE LS WAGON STK# P5102G, WHITE, 29,000 MILES, ONLY $15,995 
. '98 CHEVROLETTAHOE 4X4 STK# P5076, MUST SEE TO BEUEVE, 28,000 MILES, ONLY $23995 
'98 SUZUKI SIDEKICK 4X4 STK# P5088, GREEN, 26,000 MILES, $15,195 



SPORTS CARS, COUPES £ CONVERTIBLES - ASK FOR MARIO 



•93 MITSUBISHI ECUPSE COUPE STK# 6491 B, WHITE W/67,000 MILES, VALUE PRICED AT ONLY $7,595 - ■ 

•94 CHEVROLET CAMARO CONVERTIBLE V-8 STK#P5081, PURPLE PYTHON PAINT AND MORE, ONLY $14,995 

•95 CHRYSLER LEBARON CONVERTIBLE STK# P5065, DRIFTWOOD W/TAN INTERIOR, ONLY 26,000 MILES, WINTER TIME PRICED AT $8,995 

'95 PONTTAC GRAND AM STK# P5070, RED, MUST DRIVE TO BEUEVE, ONLY $6,995 

•96 CHEVROLET CAVAUER Z24 COUPE STK«P5106G, WHITE, MUST SEE, ONLY $8,995 

•96 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVERTIBLE STK# 86631 A, GREEN W/SADDLE TOR LESS THAN 37,000 MILES, WINTER SALE PRICE OF $17495 

•97 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVERTIBLE STK#P5085, SPRING IS ALMOST HERE, ONLY$15,795 

'97 CHEVROLET CAVAUER COUPE STKtt P5071, RED, 29,000 MILES, ONLY $9,595 



'94 MAZDA B2300 PICK-UP '97 CHEVROLET VENTURE 

LS WAGON 
'91 P0NTIAC FIREBIRD 

'91 FORD MUSTANG COUPE 
'98 CHEVROLET BLAZER 
5i. TAHOE L ^r^ ^j- '98F0RD W1NDSTAR. 

'98 SUZUKI SIDEKICK 



SPORT 
'94 IZUZU TROOPER 
'95 FORD ESCORT LX 
'97 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 
'94 FORD PROBE GT 
'94 FORD MUSTANG GT 



'90 HONDA ACCORD 
■92 HONDA ACCORD 
'93 HONDA PRELUDE 
'93 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4 
•94 LEXUS GS300 SEDAN 
'98 MITSUBISHI ECUPSE 



'94 CHEVROLET CORSICA '95 NISSAN MAXIMA 

'93 OLDS AURORA 



«93 CROWN VICTORIA 
SEDAN 

'95P0NTIACGRANDAM 

'92 FORD ESCORT LX 

'95 FORD ESCORT WAGON 

'97 CHRYSLER SEBRING 
CONVERTIBLE 

'94 CHEVROLET BLAZER 

'94 CHEVROLET CAMARO 



'95 OLDS AURORA 

'95 PONTIAC GRAND AM 

'95 SUZUKI SIDEKICK 




5 Deerpath Rd. 



THE ANSWER IS: THEY'RE ALL GREAT DEALS. CALL KNAUZ BEFORE YOURS IS GONE. 








f, 



1044 N. Western Avenue • 847-234-2800 • www.knauz.com 






, 



February 26, 1999 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 




Lakeland Newspapers /. D3 



. -it-VU .._-•.. || 



CHRYSLER 
Vlymoutfi 

Dodge 

Dodge Trucks 




LAKE COUNTY'S LARGEST VOLUME 

CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH-DODGE-DODGE TRUCK DEALER 



SANDY McKIE & ST1&EFEF THANKS Y©Q9 COUR CUSTOMERS) 
FOR RATING US #1 DEALER FOR SATISFACTION, SALES, 
SERVICE AND CUSTOMER REFERRALS IN LAKE COUNTY. 




NOW, AN ADDITIONAL $500 FROM CHRYSLER (« n seie«t vehicles) 

THIS WEEK ONLY!!* 

You can save like this: 



. 



ALL 1999 MINIVANS, 







PLYMOUTH, AND DODGE 




LWB t SW, LXI f LX, SE, LE 
ALL MINIVANS IN STOCK 




NEW CHRYSLER SEBRING JX CONVERTIBLE 




MSJLP. $24,041*1 

SANDY DISCOUNT $3100" 
CHRYSLER REBATE $1,000" 
AUTO SHOW REBATE S500» 
COLLEGE GRAD. $400** 




Slock 1 1 SI 6-8 



Power Windows, Power Locks, Tilt, Cruise Control, 
V6, AM/FM Cassette, CD Player, Infinity System. 
Anti-Lock Brake System Tracking Control, 16" 
Aluminum Wheels, Candy Apple Red. . 



— - 11 

LAST ONE 
IN STOCK_ 



•Agio Show Rtbott 'Thii Wtik Only* Ends March', t On Select Motfili. "'Includes All Incinlivet. tt Add Tax, Licinti, Tide, Doc f ««. "* Aulo thow Rebale Appliei Only lo Thit Converlible In Slock. 



m 



NO GAMES, NO GIMI^QDCOSS. DOO HA 






VOU DON'T HAVE TO BE A SUPER STORE FOR SUPER SAVINGS 

All Prices Clearly Marked On Every Used Car, Every Day Of The Week 

"BOWING A CAR IS NEVER GONNA FEEL THE S 



USED CAR WARRANTY GUIDE 

BAL = Balance of Factory 6/6 = 6 Month/6,000 Mile 3/3 = 3 Month/3,000 Mile 



CLEARANCE 

CARS 

_ ^ [R. s 

CARS 




'98 DODGE NEON CPE, 

Si. tB-661 1.5AVE, SWE, SAVt 

WARRANTO RAL 



'96 CHRYSLER CIRRUS ' 

Si. #9-6474. PW, Pi 14, Gum, Loaded 
I SAVI S 



WARRANTO 6/4 



'97MNTLACS1MIRKPE, 

SA. »B-6«4. A.*, A/C Con., lo- Mln 

|,AV, MO,995 

WARRANTO RAl 



'92 FORD ESCORT SDN. 

5A. « 1 06699. rw, R. T*. A/C, Cn«. Ccu. 

s * v,5 2808 

WARRANTYl Al 



'91 FORD TEMPO SDN. 

SA. *I0 44V?. IWARA/COvktoHht 
1AVC $ 



WARRANTO Al 



'98 DODGE STRATUS ' 

Silt. >fl-641Z Auto, A/C, Cau. 

SAVIS 1 1,995 

WARRANTO RAL 



'97 CHRYSLER LHS. 

SA. «8-6i76. 0»>iWi Bel UaW. 

* V1$ 16,795' 



WARIAMTYl IA1 



'94 NISSAN PATHFINDER 4-DR. I 

A.»6-M7ll.PW,n,rACi««,Vd,lood«d. 



= As Is No Warranty 



5*. 

SAVR 



* 13,543 

-.'.'- WARRANTO ft/4 



'9S GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 

SA.»10-673ZT.toiW,V4,lo»Mki 

SAV,S 1-4,995 

WARRANTO 6/6 



'94 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER 

SA. #?■ 6640T. to* foam , Good Mln. 

" v, *10,995, 

~ WARRANTY: 6/6 



' '?6 DAKOTA CLUB CAB SLT 

Si, t9 -6S09T. Uw. lo- Hb, Cop 

" v «* 12,262 

WAfiltANTO 6/6 



'96 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE 

Sit. tlO-MSCT.imUMfatVt 

* 13,995 

WARRANT*, 6/6 



SAVI 



'95 FORD ESCORT SDN/ 

SA. «7-65U. MAUCwuttoM 

**" *5770 

WARRANTY: 6/6 



'94 DODGE SHADOW CPE. 

SA. »?■ 664 1 Auio, A/C lowMibi. 

savk $5995 

. WARRANTYl 6/6 



'96 CHEVY CORSICA , 

SA. f 8-6MS. Good Milu, Auto, A/C 

«v« $6995 

WARRANTO 6/6 



'95 CHEVY CAVALIER CPE. £ 

Sit »9-6647. Aulo. A/C, Coit 

WV,$ 7995'- 

■' "-V< WARRANTY 6/6 



'95 CHEVY CAVAUER SDN. 

. SA. » 10-6490. Al Aft, b. Ml* 
»AV,S 81 | 9 

WARRANTY! 6/6 



'970LDSACHIEVASDN. 

Si. 13 6374. V6, PW, ft, Til. Cnii* . 

savr $9995 

■ WARRANTO RAL 



CLEARANCE 
TRUCKS, 

VANS, 4X4$ 



'91 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN LE 

SA. * 1 064531. A3 Wfc«4 Dmt, loafed 

,AV '*6811 

WARRANTYl ft/6 



'98 S10 EXTENDED CAB IS 3-DR. 

1 Si, 1 10-6754T. fcoU rw, n. fi, Ow* Vi 

|» AV, M4,560 

WARRANTO RAL 



'97 S10 BLAZER 2-DR. 

sa. » 1 0^734 r. r#,ruA0«*Yt am,* 

•* V, M 6,552 

WARRANTO 6/6 



'93 GMC SAFARI VAN 

SA.*8 6M8T.rW,n.t*»A<Y«,rwa 

I**"* ■.•5,995 

1 - WARRANTO RAL 



'97 CHEVY SILVERADO 4X4 

. 5A.fB-6469r.LoM Cool W» 

MV '* 17,995 



WARRANTO RAL 



CARS 



'89 OLDS CALAIS 

SA.»2-69I3.A*.A/C 

ttV, *1595 

WARRANTO Al 



■ '96 DODGE NEON SDN. . 

Si. II 2-6874. Auto. A?C Good (WW 

I **« $7848 

WARRANTYl 6/6 



'89 DODGE SHADOW ES 2-DR. 

SA.fl 1-6777. A*, A/C 
SAVI $ 



WARRANTY! Al 



'91 CHEVY CORSICA U 

S*. • I -6879, rw n. 0. Cnm. 

•*y5*2976 

WARRANTYl Al 



'92 GRAND PRIX SE SDN. 

-SA. 112-6871. loii Vt 
WARRANTY; Al 



.'93 CHEVY CORSICA 

SA, f 1 2-6BS4.5AVE, SAVt, SAVE 

**X"*4630 

WARRANTY) 3/3 



'92 NISSAN 5ENTRA CPE. 

Si. # 1 1 -6792, 5 STO, A/C lw MWt 

""■ *5338 

WARRANTY) 6/6 



*95 DODGE NEON SDN, 

.S*. f2 r 69 1 2. AAo. A/C VWnronV- 



SAVR 



WARRANTYl ft/ft 



'95 DODGE STRATUS 

SA. #12-6869. SAVE, SAVE. SAVE. 
WARRANTYl ft/6 



'94 FORD RANGER SUPER CAB 

SA. •9-6634I. CVk* WoA Irvek. Cqp. 

^■ k *8469 

WARRANTO 6/6 



CA 



'95 CHEVY LUMINALS 

SA, *t 1-6796. fW. ft, T,k,Cnjit.,&M. 
| SAVR $73^1 7 r 

WARRANTY! ft/6 



'95 JEEP WRANGLER 

SA. • 10-67461. A*, t« Who*. Nl*V 

«avi $9995 

WARRANTO 6/6 



'93 MERCURY COUGAR XR7 

' SA.»2-69!0,Al»oUVNk. 

I savi *y995 ' 

WARRANTYl ft/6 



'93 CHRYSLER CONCORDE 

SA. *2-6S 1 6. PW, ft. I-; Cniit, Im MWt. 
SAVR $ 



WARRANTY: 6/6 



*95 CHEVY LUMINA 

SA. R2-49 1 6. PW, Pi, W, Cmiut, Cm 
savi $g005 

' WARRANTYl 6/6 



'97 P0NT1AC GRAND AM SE 2-DR, 

SA. * 1-6904. taxied. CcUfto, 

«v-* 12 995 

WARKANTYttAL 



'98 CHRYSLER CIRRUS LXI 

&lLtl-6833.ljo«*f.fodDr/WbiTOi^. 

""♦I Ail 72 

UUtRANTORAL 



r -w] 



'98 CHRYSLER SEBRING JXCONV. 

SA. ( II -6770. PW, iCSl Q**,\om Mo. 

MV, *17J14 

WARRANTYl SAL 



'93 CHEVY G20 C0NVHSI0W VAN 

SA. n-69 191 VI, rw. ft, IK TV s* 

SAVR, 4 j 



WARRANTYl 6/6 



'94 JEEP CHEROKEE SPORT ' 

SA. 12-69151 W.looAtLlMMJo. 

SAV "*12,270 

"VMHRANTY16/6 



'95 RAM 1500 SLT " 

SA. f I -6892T bote I ■ tuck 

"^l 2,556 

WARRANTY) 



6/ft 



v '95 OLDS CUTLASS SUPREME: 

Sik. 12-69 1 4, iW, ft. TJt. Ov j» 
SAVR $ 



WARRANTYl 6/6 



'94 CHRYSUR CONCORDE 

SA. til -6796. PW, ft. M, Gww, Cou. 
SAVR $1 



WARRANTYl 6/6 



'96 CHRYSLER GURUS 

SA. • 11 -6B03. PW, ft. n, Gww. laotlw. 

■*"* 12,365 

WARRANTYi 6/6 



'96 DODGE INTREPID 

SA. f 12-6862. PW,n.T^CiuM. 

* AV "*12;387 

VMfWiTTi v/ft 



'96 DODGE INTREPID, 

SA. 112-6814. Irooed. low Mln. 

** v,$ 12,392 

'■ WARRANTY) 6/6 



'98 DODGE STRATUS 

Si. tl 2-6840. PW. ft. (',*, Ovi* 

" v, *12 r 575 



"'VuXRANTO 6/6 



'98 DODGE STRATUS 

SA. RI2-6839. PW. R.Ti, Gui* 

**«*! 2,575 



'^VARRANTYl RAL 



J 95 DODGE AVENGER ES , 

SA. * 12-4861, Vi.tcadad.SuwDoi 

""-',12,71 1 

V/ARRANTYl 6/6 



CARS 

TRUCK 

4X4- 



'89 FORD F2504X4 SUPER CAB 

SA. R2-6906I oWaio' SpmoL 

* AV, *1995 

WARRANTO Al 



797 IZU7.U RODEO* 

SA.I I -489411 W^ L»Mki 

'""* 12,992 

WURAMTYI BAL 



1 '96 PLYMOUTH GRAND VOYAGER 

. SA. • l2-6824t LniUL Dm I Km. 

I** 1 "* 13,81 6 



WARRANTYl 6/6 



'96 PLYMOUTH GRAND VOWGERSE 

SA. > I -6B86T. b« Ak & Ha, fW, ft. Tk 

I "^^ 13,995 

WARRANTYl 6/6 



'91 FORD EXPLORER 4X4 XII MR. 

SA.i2-69l7r.PW,ft,rfc 

SAVR 



WARRANTYl ft/6 



'94 DODGE CARAVAN SPORT 

Si. II 2-684IT. fen Out, bts 0«iv 

" V1$ 7532 

■' WAtRANTYt 6/6 



'M CHEVY G20 CONVERSION VAN 
at » 1 2-6B27T. «■¥ Aif, iv, va, PW. ft, rt 

" v,$ 8557 

- WARRANTYl ft/6 



'97 DODGE DAKOTA SLT 

w,s 13,995 

WARRANTYi_RAL 



'96 TOYOTA TACOMA CLUB 4X4 

- S*.#l-6Sa5T.W.b..fc>.Wii 

**"* 14,995 

WARRANTY* 6/6 



'95 JEff(JRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 

SA.#|.6S96T. 4.4. larid, IwUJo, 

" VM$ 15,549 

WARRANTY) 6/6 



94 CHEVY EXTENDED CAB 4X4 

SA. # I -6887T. Siwdv toW Xt W» 

"^^ 15,993 

. WARRANTY! 6/6 



'96 DODGE RAM 1500 aUB4X4| 

: S^«12-6U9T.fWR,n,CM*Cot. 

1AV,,i 16,920 

WARRANTY) 6/6 



'96 DODGE RAM CLUB CAB SIT 

SA. * 1 2-6870X VI (* IX *, HC« (■ KRt 

**"*! 6,987 

WARRANTYl 6/6 



96 CHRYSLER TOWN A COUI 

SA.»l2-6860t«9V4,l«*»,ta 

■ AV,$ 16,996 

WARRANTO ft/6 



'96 DODGE RAM 1500 4X4 

5i.4ll2-68S7I,ntn.RCnkr 

■*?■*.* 17, 132 

YVAJR^Nrr 7 6/6 



'97 DODGE RAM 4X4 

SA. f t-69011 run. tiOu^Cw 

uv, *17.983 

WARRANTY! 6/6 



'93 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE 

5A.*12-6834T,UjrAitr*tfS.tt,0wt 

■** v, *18;575 

WARRANTYl RAL 



'98 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE 

Si.f)2-6833f.rXR.tHGwt 

^*1 8,575 

WARRANTYl RAt 



'95FORDF15Q4X4 

SA.l2-4908T.S4«&i,A/Ci*t- 

""♦15,916 

WARRANTO 6/6 



'96 FORD F150 SUPER CAB XLT 

SA, #1-69891. M.n.toHVtvi». . 

1AV< $ 15,960 

^AtRANTYlA/6 



•97 RAM 2500 5LTV10 CLUB CAB 

' SA. « 1-68981 4M,laddl , 

sAv. $20,938 

WARRANTYl 6/ft 



MANY MORE 
TO CHOOSE 

OVER 150 
USED VEHICLES 




OOR WEB 



WWW.SAN DYMCKB 



Call Today and Drive Awayt .-" . 
(800) 501-0702 

Automated Credit Approval Hotlino 

No Hassles • No Paperwork 

• No Embarrassment - 

24 Hours A Day 7 Days A Week 



ad Credit • No Credit • Repossession 
:•,; Judgements • 1 st time Buyer 

, Or, for a personal Extension 2 at 

Interview, call (847) 587-6473 




''All rebates applied plus tax, 
lie, title, $46 doc. fee 
APR In lieu of rebate. 



For applicable used cars 

substitute 3/3 powertran 

warranty for 6/6 added care 

on all advertised prices. 





(847) 



(UKVMIK 
Vlynroulfi 

Badge 



91 S. Route 12 In Fox 



ro 

SANDY 



h ' * m m * 



"Setjabla Espanol* 



only limits 

FROM CURNZC MILLS 



KCHOSHA 




KAWUOAH 



IUWCH-' LUWKTYVaiil 
HUNORU9N< 
WFWLOMOVt 

rtumm 





P4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



February 26, 1999 



Auto Marketplace Classifieds 



Can for Sale 



TOYOTA MR2 1906, black, 
4-cyllrtdor, 5-apoed, power 
sloorlng, brakes, windows, 
locks, A/C, sunroof, in good 
shapo, runs excellent, 
51,350/best. Call Judy or 
Chuck (847) SB7-1759. 

CORVETTE 1992 CON- 
VERTIBLE white' Wltf- while, 
top, garage kept, 55,000 
miles. Excellent condition. 
(B15) 385-8468. __ 

HONDA 1992 CIVIC LX 4- 
door, automatic transmission, 
A/C, all power except locks, 
cruise control, AM/FM cas-, 
selte, excellent * condition, 
70K, 56,000/best. (847) 
543-9558. 

MUSTANG 1998 LOADED 

with all the extras, 5,000 miles, 
brand new condition. Must 
sell. (847) 662-3909. 

AUDI A4 1996, $19,990. 
(BAT) 432-5020. - 

AUDI A6 1995, $17,990. 
(847) 432-5020. 

BMW 1989 750IL, S7.195, 
(B47) 234-2800. ___. 

BONNEVILLE SSE 1994. 
Don't miss out-Save. Below 
payoff and below deator pric- 
es. We have 2, must sell 1, 
we're buying home. Black with 
gold trim, loaded up with leath- 
er, 65K miles plus targe Syr. 
35K mile warranty, $11,800. 
(815) 675-2788 evenings and 
weekends after 6pm. 

BUICK 1993 CENTURY 
WAGON, $7,495. (847) 234- 
2800. 

BUICK 1994 CENTURY, 

$5,998. (847) 587-3400. 

CADILLAC 1995 CON- 
COURS, $12,997. (847) 587- 
3400. - 

CAMRY XLE 1993, V8, 

ABS, highway miles, automat- 
ic everything, leather Interior, 
gold, $8.500/besl. (414) 
857-3439. 

CHEVROLET 1995 GM 
SONOMA. 59,000 miles, 

-♦5,006. (414) 032-6430.7*-—*- 



CHEVY 1988 CAVALIER, 

$995. (847) 587-3400, 

CHEVY 1994 CORSICA, 
$7,995. (847) 587-3300. 

CHEVY IMPALA SS 1995, 

black, fully loadod, excellent 
condition, must sell. (414) 
694-9449. 

CHRYSLER 1995 LEBAR- 
ON CONVERTIBLE, $8,995. 
(847) 234-2800. 

i 
DODGE 1989 SHADOW 
ES, $2,655. (B47) 587-6473. 

DODGE 1995 NEON 
SPORT, red, 4-door, automat- 
ic, A/C, am/fm cassette, 1- 
owner, $6,300/bosl. (847) 
845-7904. 

DODGE 1995 NEON, 
$5.995. (847) 395-3600. 

DODGE 1995 NEON* 

$5,995. (847) 623-1492. 

EXPRESS AUTO 

EXCHANGE 

USED CARS 

We take consignment cars. 

No charge. 

Too busy to sell your car? 

Let us do It for you. 

(847) 740-1400 

1 19 W. Rollins Rd. 

Round Lake Beach, 

(Across from Burger King). 

Ask for Chris. 

FORD 1990 TAURUS, 
$3.778. (847) 587-6473. 

FORD 1991 TEMPO 4- 
door, full power, $2,250/best. 
FORD 1986 F-250 Super Cab 
Pickup 4x4, manual transmis- 
sion, full power, cap, 454 en- ■ 
gine, $4,850. (815) 344-1675. 

FORD 1992 TEMPO, 
$4,988. (847) 587-3400. 



GEO 1995 STORM, 

$3,988. (847) 587-3400. 

'HONDA 1987 ACCORD 
LXI, dependable, economical, 
automatic transmission, 

power steering, power brakes, 
power door locks, power wind- 
ows, A/C, cruise,' power sun- 
roof, am/fm cassotto, now 
tires, 17K, original owner. 
Runs great. $2,500. (847) 
265-1635. 

HONDA 1996 ACCORD, 
$13,99B. (847) 587-3400. 

HYUNDAI 1993 ELAN- 

TRA, $3,995. (847) 249-1300. 

HYUNDAI 1998 ACCENT, 
$7,995. (847) 249-1300. 

INFINITI 1895 J30'S 
$16,995. (847) 382-9200. 

INFINITI G20 1993, 

$9,995. (847) 362-9200. 

LEXUS 1990 LS400 SE- 
DAN, $7,995. (847) 234-2800. 



FORD 

WAGON, 

5000. • 



1993 

$4,995. 



ESCORT 
(847) 360- 



FORD 1995 MUSTANG 
COUPE, loaded. 18.600 miles, 
$11,500. (414) 605-9942. 

FORD 1996 CONTOUR; 
$9,988. (847) 587-3400. 

FORD 1997 ESCORT, 
- tQ.Oaa. (847)^8 7^3400^1.^4,^ - 



HI M&M&M&MM 


| Selling | 
i Your i 
1 Car? 1 

1 W g 
I Lakeland's 1 


i Auto 1 

i Marketplace g 

\ help you! |j 

& Call - b 


| (847) 223-8161 | 


ij for more & 
1 information! I 


si irsraraiaiafrsrarai go 




ILLINOIS SALES TAX INCLUDED! 

REGISTRATION/PLATES..INCLUDED! 

ACQUISITION FEE. ...INCLUDED! 

SECURITY DEPOSIT.. ..NONE! 
M ON E Y DOW N ............ N O N E ! 





".:"■.* f J : .-: 1"' 

■ 




% Bill *=sa l-ux— ^- m 

NEW 1999 SAAB 9 s SE 



•AUTOMATIC 'LEATHER -SUNROOF -HEATED SEATS -CD & CASS, -POWER MEMORY SEATS 




With approved credit. Chicago residents add 6% use tax. 

FIRST COME... FIRST SERVED! 




2300 SSBMSa," "' (847) 432-9300 

www.saabexchange.com 

A Dlv. Of Semersky Enterprises, Inc. 



MAZDA 1996 626 LX, 
$11,995; (847) 362-9200. 

MAZDA 1997 PROTEGE, 
$9,908, (847) 587-3400, 

MERCURY TOPAZ 1994, 
$2,900.(847)623-1492. 

MITSUBISHI 1992 MI- 
RAGE, $3,798. (847) 336- 
3510. 

NISSAN 1990 SENTRA, 
A/C, excellent condition; origi- 
nal owner, highway miles, 
$1,600. - Days (847) 
913-8880, (847) 680-4773, 

NISSAN 1992 MAXIMA, 

$6,498,(847)336-3510, 

NISSAN 1992 SENTRA, 
$2,998,(847)336-3510, 

NISSAN 1992 SENTRA, 
$4,995, (847) 587-6473. • 

NISSAN 1994 SENTRA LE, 
$6,995. (847) 395-3600. 

OLDS 1968 CUSTOM 
CRUISER WAGON,, power 
windows/locks, good condi- 
tion, runs great, (847) 
487-5913. 

OLDS 1988 98 REGENCY, 
all options, high miles, good 
dependable transportation, 
must sell $2.450/besl. (847) 
724-3313, 



OLDS 1991 CUTLASS 
CRUISER WAGON, $5,998. 
(847)336-3510. 

OLDS 1992 DELTA 88 
ROYAL, $9,995. (847) 587- 

3300. 

OLDSMOBILE 1986 CUT- 
LASS SUPREME, 76,000 
miles, many new parts, 
$1,700/bast. (847) 546-1025. 

PLYMOUTH 1996 
BREEZE, $7,995. (847) 234- 
2600. 

PLYMOUTH 1997 NEON, 

$9,995, (847) 249-1300, 

PONTtAC 1992 GRAND 
PRIX LE, $4,998. (847) 336- 
3510. 

PORSCHE 911 CABRIO- 
LET 1983, $22,990. (847) 



PORSCHE 968 CABRIO- 
LET 1994, $25,990. (847) 
432-5020. 

SAAB 9000 1998, $20,995. 
(847) 362-9200. ■ 

SAAB 1990 TURBO CON- 
VERTIBLE, $8,495. (847) 234- 
2800. 



SAAB 900 SE 1996, 5-door, 
$18,950. (647) 432-9300. 

SAAB 9000 CSE 1997, 
$25,950. (647) 432-9300. 

SAAB 900S CONVERT- 
IBLE, 1995, $17,950. (847) 
432-9300. 



SAAB 900SE 1997, 
$21,950.(847)432-9300. 

SATURN. 1995 SL, $5,995. 
(847) 360-5000. . 

SATURN 1997 SL2 SE- 

OAN, $8,995. (847) 234-2800. 

SATURN SC2 1993, 
$6,998. (847) 336-3510. 

SUZUKI ESTEEM 1996, 
$9,995. (847) 249-1300. 

TAKE, OVER PAYMENTS 

1997, Monte Carlo LS, show- 
room condition, lealher^ power 
windows/locks, CD, sunroof,. 
20,400 miles, $345/mo. (815) 
477-3419 6pm- 10pm. 

TOYOTA 1995 CAMRY 
LE, $10,598. (847) 336-3510. 

VOLVO 1998 850 GLT SE- 
DAN, $20,895. (847) 362- 
9200. 

VOLVO 1996 855 GLT 
WAGON, $22,295. (847) 362- 
9200. 



VOLVO 1998 SELECT 
S70's. $24,595. (847) 362- 

9200. 

VOLVO 1998 V70 R AWD 
WAGON, $31,995. (847) 362- 
9200. 

VW. BEETLE 1998, -red, 5- 
spoed, loaded, best offer. 
(815)338-7294.- ,■ >* . 

VW ,JETTA GL 1997. 
•$12,995. (847)'249^ 300.' rr^" 



Cla5$!c/AntlqueCarf 



LINCOLN 1968 4-DOOR 
convertible (suicide doors), re- 
tractable top, needs restora- 
tion, 52,500/bosl. Or will part 
out. (847) 587-7444. 



Service & Pari* 



ADRIAN CONTRACTORS 
BINS, heavy duty stool for full 
size van, brand now, 
$1,000/besl. (414) 877-3843 
aHorSpm. 

CLASSIC QUARTER 

PANEL SALE. Mustang, Cam- 
aro, Nova, Chevelle, Cutlass, 
Mopars, Pontlac, Chevrolet, 
morel' TRUCK PANS, FLOOR 
PANS. DOORS, FENDERS. 
BUMPERS. New and Califor- 
nia. Rust free, MARKs PLAT- 
ING & SUPPLY 217-824-8184. 



Vans 



CHEVROLET 1989 HIGH 
TOP CONVERSION VAN, 
TV & VCR Included, excellent 
cond!llon,$3,800/best. TOYO- 
TA 1986-4-RUNNER, Flori- 
da Truck, good condition, 89K, 
automatic, A/C, $3,500/best. 
(847)740-7841. 

CHEVY 1993 G/20 CON- 
VERSION VAN. $6,995. (847) 
587-3300, . .. 

DODGE 1988 CARAVAN, 
good condition, $1,500. (414) 

551-9892. 

DODGE 1990 CARAVAN, 
$2,595. (847) 587-6473. 

FORD 1995 WINDSTAR, 
$7.995. (847) 587-3400. 

GRAND CARAVAN 1994, 
excellent condition, fully load- 
ed, $B,500/best. , (847) 
356-5082. 



For More 
Classifieds, 
See Page 8 



JUL. 



i ■ i -iiiii 



THE 



Audi 

F=>CDI=*SCIHI 



EXCHANGE 



#1 Audi/Porsche Dealer in 

the Midwest and the 4th 

Largest Audi/Porsche 

Dealership in the Country. 

Chicagoland's Premier Audi/Porsche Dealer 
Supporting Chicagoland Communities 



New '99 
Audi A6 



r 




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Choose from over 200 New Si Used Audis and Porsches. 




2050 First Sf Highland Park 

Please contact Carl Kite; Phone: (847) 432 5020 
Website; www.audiexchange.com • iwunw.porschexchanfife.com 



.,>•■ 




February 26, 1999 



i 

I 
i 
i 
* 






^ 



Lakeland Newspapers I D5 




NEW 1999 FORD 

EXPLORER 

'M,699 



'JUSTADOWX, 
TlTl£SUCaS£ 



MSRP .$20,590 

FOX LAKE DISCOUNT .... ... .-S1 >9t 

COLLEGE GRAD DISCOUNT . ...-S400 



*9.99S 



26.595 

MSRP .$29,995 

FOX LAKE DISCOUNT ....... .-$3,000 

COLLEGE GRAD DISCOUNT . . . .-$400 



JUSTADOTAX, . 
TmfiUCENSC.. 



'mSS 

M 




'98 FORD ESCORT ZX2 

Auto, 4cyl, p/s. p/b. a/c. cass. 
denim blue, factory warranty 

1 £.nOifif 




'94 FORD M 50 I '97 CHEVROLET CAVALIER 



'97 FORD F150 SUPER CAB 



6 cyl. auto, stereo 
Fiberglass top 



4x4. XLT model. 5 cyl. 
a/c. pAv. tilt/cruise 



XLT model. 
4x4 



9.995 I '9.995 1 *|7 MS 




'98 FORD TAURUS I'liFMFHSNCJIt I '9( FORD ESCORT WGN 



3 To Choose -Your choice' 
Loaded' 



V8. 3uto. at. p/w. tilt'cruise. 
cap. 14.K miles 



4 cyl. p/s. 
p/b. white 



-• , 



■ 



*96 FORD CONTOUR 

4 dr. 4 cyl, auto. p/s. p/b. p/dl. p/w, 
tilt/cruise, a/c, tan, Sharp Car! 



Cassette, 
a/c. purple 



'95 CADILLAC CONCOURS 

Uhr.V-8. Loaded! 



'95 GEO STORM f '92 JEEP CHEROKEE SPORT I '35 FORD FISO SUPER CAS 

4x4. 6 cyl. auto, p/s. p/b. B VS. XLT model, 

till'cruise. a/c. cass. J auto, a/c 

13. 9 ft- 



94 FORD PROBE 

5 cyl auto. ps pbpd'.pw tilicfu.se 
ac cass. biacii grey learner 



4 cyl. auto. p/s. a/c. 
cass.. gold 



'92 FORD TEMPO 

V6. Auto, p/s, 
p/b, a/c 



'96 PONTIAC GRAND AM 

V-6. Good Looking. Loaded! 




'95 FORD THUNDERBIRD 

V8, auto. p/s. p'b, p/dl, p/w a'c. 
till'cruise. cass.. blue custom interior 



'94 BUICK CENTURY 

6 cyl. auto. p/s. p/b. p/dl. p/w. 
tilt/cruise, a/c. cass. 



'95 FORD WINDSTAR 

5 Star Rated Vehicle. 
Crash test! 



'93 FORD AEROSTAR XL I '92 FORD TEMPO 



Includes XL Plus package 
2T0 CHOOSE FROM! 



4dr. 4 cyl, auto, p/s, p/b. tilt/cruise, 
stereo, a/c, low miles, blue 



'97 FORD THUNDERBIRD I '98 FORD MUSTANG COUPE 

19K miles, loaded, balanced it V-6 Loaded 

factory warranty j] Bright Red' 

m,m\w,m 







ROUTE. 12 

FOX LAKE 

847-587-3400 



HOURS: 

MON-TUl KS. 9AM-9PM ~ FRI. 9AM-8PM ~ SAT. 9AM-()PM 



♦Available to qualified buyers on select models with approved credit through Ford Motor Co. In lieu of cash incentives. 0.9% up to 48 mos. and 
,5.9%. t660 mos oh used Ford &' Mercury '97-;98 sport utility Vehicles. Some customers' may not qualify, t Plus tax, tllte, license & $46 doc:' fee, 
order yours today. All factory Incentives subject to change without notice. Vehicle ***Not available with any other offer or new vehicles. 




WWW. 



D6 /Lakeland Newspapers AUTO MARKETPLACE February 26, 1999 

FROM''JJGE'Dr ' ' " ■ " : "~ : 

CONCORDE: Elegant design, 
spaciousness and agility 



Sentra Key™ system is offered. Light Cy- 
press Green is added to the color palette 
for 1999. 

Beneath the 1999 Concorde's sleek ex- 
terior is a choice of two aluminum engines 
that are up to 25 percent more powerful 
and 10 percent more fuel efficient than the 
previous generation engine used through 
1997. Both engines feature direct coil-on- 
plug ignition systems and platinum-tipped 
sparkplugs to provide 100,000 : mile inter- 
vals between tune-ups. \ 

The Concorde LX is powered by an all- 
new, all-aluminum 2.7-iiter, 24-valve V-6 
engine rated at 200 horsepower, which has 
the best horsepower-per-ltter rating in its 
class. The Concorde LXi is powered by an 
all-aluminum 3.2-liter, 24-valve V-6 that 
generates 225 horsepower and is more 
powerful, lighter and fuel efficient than the 
larger, previous generation 3.5 iter V-6 en- 
gine. 

Style is a high priority for buyers in the 
premium end of the car market, and that's 
where the 1999 Chrysler Concorde excels. 
Its distinctive appearance in a landscape 
of look-alike sedansborrbws from both the 
great classic automotive designs of the 
past and the most contemporary trends. 

"A major goal in designing the Chrysler 
Concorde was to gives a coefficient of drag 
(CD) of only .288, rivaling some of the best , 
sports cars in the world,. Concorde also 
wears the unmistakable look of a Chrysler .. 
with the winged Chrysler brand medallion, 
which appeared in a similar form on.Wal- . . 
ter.P. Chrysler's very first car in 1924. 

. Inside,. the.Chrysler Concorde has v 
more interior and trunk room than jhost * 
competing sedans and continues to be. of? 
fered I with a 50 : 50,front seat for those, who v 
require a car that Can seat six aduIts^omV 
fortably. Features include a "Pass-through" 



between the rear seat and trunk that may 
be sued for access or carrying long objects, 
such as skis. Larger storage bins, including 
a wide center compartment in the 50-50 
front seat with cassette and CD storage 
slots, coin holder and fold out cup holders 
also are included. Hear storage and cup 
holders are included in the rear center 
armrest. 



Sign & Drive 



USED CAR SALES 
EXTRAVAGANZA! 




Just $99 gets you into any used car on the lot!* 



.■ isjt #3 m i&R*y.* •. 



Premium. Cenificd Used Ciirs--iiie finest selection in the area! 



TEST DRIVE THE 




^ CHRYSLER 



Concorde at: 

Knauz Chrysler/Plymouth 

1044 N. Western Ave., Lake Forest 

234-2800 

Lake Villa Chrysler/ 
Plymouth/Jeep 

1 30 Cedar Ave., Lake Villa 

356-2530 



usv'M 



■»*.V 




McKie&Sons 

91 S. Route 1 2, Fox Lake 

,387-6471 



''vis* 



87 Chevy Nova Sedan 
Memories are mado of these , " 

91 Olds '9B Regency 

Old Time Class 

92 Geo Tracker Convertible 

Special Paint, Sharp 

93 Ford Escort Wagon 

AT, Whlla 

93 Plymouth Voyager SE 

Beautiful, Loaded 

95 Saturn SL 4 dr 

5Spd, A/C. Wmty ■ 



*995 
*3,595 
'3,895 
'4,995 
s 5,99 



' ■=-■ $ 5, . 

94 Chevy Cavalier Sport Coupe,- r\nr- 
AT. A/C,- Clean ^3,990 

94 Dodge Duster Sport C6upe t£ * Mf\ic 
AT, Burgandy- *D,4yt). 

'6i99t 
«8,99i 



94MazdaMX3 

Very Cloari 

95 Ford Mustang ' 
V6, Low Miles, Clean' 



95 Jeep Cherokee Sport 4 Dt j - nnr* 
AT4X4 »1 0,995 

*1 0,995 
'12,900 
'12,995 
'12,995 
'13,995 
'14,495 
'14,995 
s 24,995 
'27,995 



96 Toyota Corolla 

Sharp, Only 25,000 Milosl 

98 Ford Ranger XLT pickup 
Only 12,000 Miles, Wmty 

97 Jeep Wrangler 4x4 SE 

Soft Top 

:Vvj 96 .Honda Accord 

- 5Spd, '17,000 Miles . 

98 Chevy Cavalier 224 
AT, Sunroof, 9,000 Miles, Red 

97 Dodge Work Van 

26,000 Miles, Great Buy . . 

95 Poritlac Bonneville SSE 
Leather, Stinroofl . * - '• 



96 Cadillac Seville SLS 
Uge.O^iM^Bs^Extra-plo'ari .* 

98 Ford ExpedlHon XLT 

Leather, Roar A/C & Heat 



^Saturn of i 

\_Waukegan I 



A DIVISION OI : THE UOI5 ROIIKMAN GKOUP 



(847)360-5000 \ 

„ aV Road 



ia ^$®h 



Sat., 8am - 6pm 




'with approved credit 




■ - ■■ ■ •_-_■__ 

This vVtekAt 



£.c- 





Experience Our 






ONSTRUCTION 



Our construction crcsvs are making it possible for us to become Gurnee Dodge inlune. A^'reauy need to 
sett oitriiew Dodges for tots less n^ 

1.9% -5.9% Financing • Rebates From $400 -*3SOO 



NEW 1999W. 



*3o^p<^ ^^zSm 



! CJIRAVAN 



*DOi!CI6VSMPICnJne *, 20 Ga&on Fuel Tank 
*Auiomauc . * Courtesy Lamps 

•rur Conditioning * iTorwKear P< 

• fort 5catCanp Net •TimnlClra 

• (Mtnal UxfckUe Drawer 

• 7 Pamcnpr Scaling 

• Rear Floor Stknorr 
•DuilAirBjf-, 

RttMENTSOFONIK 



•Rear^aidowWper 
MiwwKear Puwer Oialm • RearWtrMknv Defroster 



• Lflcrmaicnl WimWikil Wipers 

• RearWr* 
•RearVSV 

• Inbound 



$214 



.50 



i+*+- j rimm*&i**t9.*i9m*+* 





1500 



•^t^pll«tl3,911lCT•600AMP^^aiIltminoc•26G»^]n^udTlIuV • Power Stming 

SMFIEntfnc Free Barmy • FuIlSbe Sparc Tut • StalnleA S«d ExSwutsl 

•Auumadc 'it Box • bttnntucni Wiper* • Slock 007362 

• Dcfcuu? Clxh ■ Rrar Ami Uxic IVaIu* 
Bend) Seal Aal rdaaafe. *aaaa m v -v 

• AkCcrekknng 

• Rear Bumper ■ 

RWMENTSOFONIX 



tk Brake* 

$236 



.48 




FOHRNAN SELECT PRE DRIVEN VEHICLES 



DOMESTIC 



"96 Ford Escort LXW^gon 

Black. Auto, Air, Sharp- 



97 Saturn SL2 

Green AjjS, 21,001 rite, Loaded. 



96 Chevy Bercua 

Pujfe 3IKMteAutftAir,Shafp_ 



94 Dodge Caravan LE 

Green, fop 01 m Line. Loaded. 



940UsTnobikAdhieva 

Whne, Loaded. 0ean_ 



91 LXxlgc Sludow Gxivcrubk 

nTAe,Wti!f%AIPoKr,Oean 

90 Chevy Lumina 

Gray, Sedan, Aukx Air : 



$11,998 
_S7,998 
-S5998 

$4,498 
$3,998 



IMPORTS 



98 Honda Accord 

Star, Auto, 10,099 rttes, Lke New_ 

96 Mazda 626 

W«e.Auifl,fulPowf 



94 Isuzu Rodeo 4x4 

GiEcaAiit%LoarJed,Clean 



92\falvo740 

Gnsn, Auto, LearJwf, Loaded- 



92 Subaru Loyak 

:Wt*e.4WD. Loaded 



.516,498 
.$10,998 
.$10,998 

59,998 

-$3,498 



'Plus tax, license & doc fee. 72 mas at 125% APR to qualified buyers with $2,000 down. Must qualify for all rebates. Payments good thru March 1, 1999 



YOttHE 
A SHORT 




NEW 1999M 



• 32LV8En^ne • RearVfefaorWrxr 
•Automatic • L lii i MfliaNSIpert 
•AbrCondioanlD^ ■ OniAi-nap 
•TflbCrubc •SurBcmiiCla» 

• FtmcrWIrKlows • Rear Antfcdk Brakes 
■nrntrlixki • HocrMati 
•PantrMJrron • Trcw*/Vat Power OaJca 
•AMjTMCaMeae * Courtoy Ufa. Group 
•RcarWndowDdL • Inbound 



98 Jocp Grand Chcrohfi^imiled 

Plamm. Loaded, LwdedL Loadctf SAVE 

98 Dodge Dakota 
BkjeSpon 7.000 fate, AutxAir.Cap. 
93 Dodge 1500 Pick-Up 
WteSUfecfc«e.V8,AiJKxAir. 
93 Chevy S-10 Blazer 
TeaLM Loaded. Sharp_ 



94 Chevy G20 Conv. \an 

Sr*r, 61,185 mes. Loaded. 



W Ford F-150Oub Cab 

Gr3]r,Cap.Air I 0u%TlL ; 




AGfazAT 



A A 



\Ve*ic Vtoikiliji lo CiiuikV In June i9*Hl lx*comini;tuinuv Dtnl^i'! I or AC ().MI > I III" tilting lHWu ln\«.iuoi\. \\i"\c \Uv;ul\ NUncil lo wMM.^inuviliHly.i-oin 



Check 

Us Out 

On The 

Internet! 



Microsoft* ^ 

C^arMht; 

www auport.com I 

Certified Dealer— l 



2725 Behidere Rd CRt 120) Vvkukgan 

-3510 





ILL A f^ CHRYSLER- PLYMOUTH 



c- . : ; -.■!' .-.: 


'■ ■ 1 


IT H •JEEP 


' 




BELOW FACTORY INVOICE 
ON ALL MINIVANSi 



NEW 1999 PLYMOUTH 



Front Vyheel Drive; High-Back Seats, Auto., Rear Window 
Defroster, Family Value ^Package. Stfc#?23030 a 




*$3299.71 Dye At Sig ning=$2393.22. Down , $400 Sec. Dep., 1st Pymt Lease w/approved credit. Add fa* title, lie, & $46.05 Doc-Fee. 12,000 Free Miles Per Year. Lessee Responsible for Maintenance, Repair, and Liability in the Event of Early Lease Termination; 



UBURBAN-DRIVEN U 




D CARS 



'97 DODGE INTREPID 

#483. 

.'96 CHEVY MONTE CARLO 

#798151. 34K, Black. 

'98 DODGE STRATUS 

#998192. 

'92 FORD TEMPO 

Red. #1098206. 

'94 FORD PROBE 

#1098211. 4j3K Mi. Must See! 

'94 DODGE INTREPID 

#1198223. 



$ 14,294 

* 10,994 

$ 12,994 

$ 3494 



'93 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 

#1198235. 

'94 PLYMOUTH SUNDANCE 

#1198239/ . 

'92 JEEP CHEROKEE 

#1298245 

'94 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 

#1298247 

'96 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 

#1298251 



*10,094 



*7694 



*10,994 
t 16 v 894 



'95 DODGE STRATUS ES 

#1298254 

'97 FORD MUSTANG 

#199007 

'94 CHEVY BLAZER v 
#199002 Monroe Pkge. 



$ 7694 



1 



*9494 



'95 JEEP WRANGLER 

#199016 

'95 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY 
#199017 * 13,294 

'96 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 

v-8, #199010 * 16,994 



7 



-' 



D8 /Lakeland Newspapers AUTO MARKETPLACE February 26, 1999 

Auto Marketplace Classifieds 



NISSAN 198S QUEST MINI 
VAN, $14,995. (047) 234- 
260O. 

PLYMOUTH 1889 VOYAG- 
ER, $1,595, (847)587-6473, 

PLYMOUTH 1992 GRAND 
VOYAGER IE, $5,995. (847) 
234-2800. • . . ', 

PLYMOUTH 1992 VOYAG- 
ER, $3.995. (B47) 395-3600. 

PLYMOUTH 1993 VOYAG- 
ER SE, $5,995. (847) 360- 
5000. 

VW 1993 EUROVAN, 
$8,995. (847) 249-1300. 



Four Wheel Drive 
i t"it Jeeps 



CHEVY 1987 S-10 BLAZ- 
ER, $2.498. (847) 335-351 Q. 

CHEVY 1989 BLAZER 4x4, 
$4.000.(847)623-1492. 

CHEVY 1993 271 OF- 
FROAD, mint condition, low 
miles. (847) 746-7004. 

CHEVY 1995 S-10 BLAZ- 
ER, $12,998. (847) 336051 0. 

DODGE 1985 RAM 

CHARGER 4x4, runs well, 
many new parts, $1 ,900. (815) 
675-6032. 

FORD 198S BRONCO, 
$5,995. (847) 395-3600. 

FORD 1991 EXPLORER, 
S5.795. (847) 587-6473. 

GEO TRACKER 1992 CON- 
VERTIBLE, $3,895. (847) 360- 
5000. . ' 

GMC 1994 JIMMY SUV, 
$8,995. (847) 234-2800. 

GMC 1994 JIMMY, 

$13,995. (647) 587-3300. 

GRAND CHEROKEE 
1993, $10,900. (847) 623- 
1492. 

GRAND CHEROKEE 
1997, $20,900. (847) 623- 
1492. 

ISUZU RODEO LS 1995 
4WD, loaded, 2-tone, 52,000 
miles, 5-speed, V8. Asking 
$13,800/best. (414) 

635-9772. 



JEEP '93 GRAND Chero- 
kee, 4 x 4 cd, 78k, mini, 6 cy- 
linder. $10,900/obO. (773) 
7B2-0757 

JEEP COMANCHE 1989 
2x4, 140K miles, 5-speed, 
bedllner, snap-on bed cover, 
new tires, excellent condition 
and runner, $3,300. (414) 
534-6548. ' 

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 
LTD., 1998. $22,595. (847) 
362-9200. _^ 

JEEP WRANGLER 1994, 

$9,900. (647) 623-1492. 

NISSAN 1994 PATH- 
FINDER SE, $12,995. (847) 
587-6473. ■ 

TOYOTA 1991 4-RUNNER 
SR5, V6, gold, great condition, 
1-owner, automatic, air, 
$8,750. (414) 275-5819, 



HARLEY DAVIDSON 

1998, 683 HUGGER, black 
with spoked wheels, mint con- 
dition, $8,000. (847) 
072-4062. ' 

HONDA 750 NIGHTHAWK 
1995, black, like new condi- 
tion, garage kept, ridden only 
2 seasons, 4,000 miles, 
$5,800 new, selling $3,600.. 
(847) 548-0409. 

SUZUKI GS XR1100 1997, 
4 In 1, 3.000 miles, 
$8,500/best. (414) 598-0644 
alter 4pm. 



Snowmoblles/ATVs 



Trucks/Trailers 



CHEVY 19B0 C-30 UTILITY 
TRUCK, built-in propane gen- 
erator. 6-cylInder. 
$2.000/besL (847) 356-2903. 

CHEVY 1993 Z71, pickup, 
loaded, perfect condition, low 
miles, (647) 746-9004. 

DODGE 1994 DAKOTA 
CLUB PICK-UP, $9,998. (847) 
336-3510. 



DODGE 1996 DAKOTA 
SLT, $1 1,995. (847) 587-6473. 

FORD 1994 RANGER 
SUPER CAB, $7,995. (847) 
587-6473. 

FORD 1998 RANGER, 5- 

speed, air, CD, rear slider bed- 
liner, custom palnL Must sell. 
$H.900/best. (815) 

759-9187. (847) 774-9240. 

MITSUBISHI 1890 

MIGHTY MAX, $2,875. (847) 
587-6473. 



Motorcycles 



1997 SUZUKI 1400 IN- 
TRUDER, with cover, helmets 
and shield, 480 miles, 
$6,500/Iirm. (847) 785-8843. 



1990 WELLS CARGO en- 
Closed, drive on/o If, 12ft., 2-3 
place, electric brakes, excel- 
lent condition, $2,000/besl. 
(815)356-1794. 

KITTY CAT SNOWMO- 

BILE, good condition; runs 
groat, $550. (815) 356-9690. 

MAMA HATES THE COLD 
1998 Skl-Doo Grand Touring 
700 Triple, 2-sealer, 150 
miles, studded track, Bin. car- 
bides, electric start, reverse, 
every possible option. ; Used 
onco. Perfect condition. 
$6,500/best. (847) 726-7998. 

SKI-DO O BLIZZARD 

7500, 1979, RV chassis, very 
good condition, $575/besi. 
(414) 877-2940 after 8pm, 

SNOWMOBILE 1993 

WILDCAT 700, studs, ski 
skins, mirrors, cover, hydrau- 
lic disk, extremely fast, $2,850. 
(847)587r6151. 



SNOWMOBILE 1999 PO- 
LARIS XCR440 SP EDGE, 
1 of 500 made, 500 miles, 
must sell, $6,200. (414) 
877-2968. • 

SNOWMOBILES (2) YA- 
MAHA'S, 1994 600 & 1995 
600, accessories, trailer. (414) 
877-4309. 

YAMAHA & L ELAND 1992 
Exciter, 2,300 miles, picked 
clutch kit, pipe, looks and runs 
great, 2-ptaco . steel trailer, 
$2,400 for everything. (847) 

872-6779.. - .-- 



Positive buying conditions suggest 
strong sales as new car year begins 



Buying conditions for light vehicles have 
improved substantially in recent months, with 
continued growth anticipated as the new mod- 
el year begins, said Diane C. Swonk, Deputy 
chief economist at Bank One. 

She cited several positive industry trends, 
including the rebound in vehicle buying atti- 
tudes since the General Motors strike ended, 
robust gains in real wages, and declining inter- 
est rates and prices. Swonk issued those com- 
ments in her monthly One View newsletter, 
previously titled First Forecasts. 

"Light vehicle production alone is sched- 
uled to rise at a double-digit rate during' the 
quarter," Swonk said. "Vehicle incentives are 
expected to return, which should provide a 
boost for light vehicle sales." 

According to Swonk, household spending 
is expected to continue increasing with the re- 
cent housing market gains. Spending on equip- 
ment is also projected to rise during the start of 
the new year. 

As a result, the Great Lakes Index (GL1) is 

I'.-d ;•■<■:■ ■■ 



expected to surge 4.2 percent during the fourth 
quarter of 1998. In comparison, the national 
Gross Domestic Product is projected to rise 2.6 
percent and 3.9 percent in the third and fourth 
quarters, respectively. 

The Great Lakes Index, created by First 
Chicago, measures the total output of goods 
and services within the five-state region of Illi- 
nois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin. 

"The only real negative is trade, which is ex- 
pected to deteriorate further," said Swonk. 
"Weak growth in asia, coupled with some 
spread of financial contagion to Latin America, 
suggests that exports will remain weak in the 
near- term." 

However, increased exports to Canada and 
Europe should help stabilize trade in 1999. 

First Chicago is a subsidiary of BANK ONE 
CORPORATION, the Midwests' largest bank 
holding company with assets of over $240 bil- 
lion. It's the leading retail bank in eight states, 
including Illinois, and a premier national 
provider of financial services. 



Minivan a postage stamp 




The U.S. Postal Service has offered up an 
image of mlnivans for voters to choose to rep- 
resent the 1980s as part of Celebrate the Cen- 
tury™,-'the official 20th century commemora- 
tive stamp series. 

Votingomong 30 images from the '80s will 
be conducted at local post offices during Feb- 
ruary. Also this month, the top vote getters from 
194'Osjcons will be released to philatelists. Vot- 
ers will" consider images from the century's fi- 
nal decade in May, ■ 
- The post office placed the minivan on bal- 



lots to represent the decade when the minivan 
"claimed an integral place in America's auto- 
motive landscape." Other vehicles immortal- 
ized on Celebrate the Century™ stamps in- 
clude the 1900s ModelT, cars from the '50s with 
tail fins and chrome, and the 1964 Mustang. 

Images competing with the minivan under 
the 1980s "Lifestyles" category include video 
games, aerobics, mountain bikes," Cabbage 
Patch Kids, camcorders and talk shows. Other 
categories: People & Events, Arts & Entertain- 
ment, Sports, and Science fit Technology. 




WdNIOTORS 

VV ^ Oldsmohile • Hyundai • Volkswagen 

" _ _, •■„ . _ :«a. tifc fl'B ^ A Wis* 

Park City's Used Car, 





••• 




It's a premium used Jetta 
celebration like no other! 



■ i 



■> i " 



THREE DAYS ONLY! 

^Hursday^ : f^ua^^!^^\ds^ February 26 
Saturday, February 27 





Je«as and a** 
used vehicles 

S pecialpr> ce °i 



^aWMqjU 






97 VW Jefta Gil ■*--. 

AC, 25,000 Miles 

1 2,995 



.. .,.,.:.■ 




A Minimum 6 Month/6,000 Mile 
Warranty Available on all Used Cars* 




90 Hyundai Excel 

A/T, 25,000 Miles 

93 Hyundai Elantra 
95 Hyundai Scoupe 
93 Hyundai Elantra 

50,000 Miles 

98 Hyundai Accent 
95 Hyundai Sonata 
98 Hyundai Elantra 
95 VW Jetta GL 
93 VW Eurovan 
92 Cadillac Seville 



*3,595 
'3,995 
*5,995 
'6,995 
'7.995 
'7,995 
'8,995 
'8,995 
*8,995 
'9,995 



97 Plymouth Neon 

98 Suzuki Esteem 

96 VW Jetta GL 

97 VW Jetta GL 

96 VW Jetta GLS 

97 VW Jetta GT 

98 VW Jetta GLS 

97 VW Cabrio 
96 VW Jetta GLX 

98 VW Beetle 

A/T, Silver 



uarters 

njjwii i "ii " .' 'J, i 
'9.995 

*9,995 
•1 2,995 
•1 2,995 
•1 3,995 
'13,995 
'1 5,995 
'15,995 
* 17,995 
'19,995 



ttȣ 2?:l/it. 



UXA/££ 

MOTORS 



Sales Hours: 

Monday Friday Barn 9pm 
Saturday 9am 6pm 

100 Old Slcokie Road 

Park City, IL 

"On Route 41 nt the 
Washington Street East exit" 



6.5% sales tax ' 

for Lake County! 

cuatomaral 



lf ^'«.> 



■594 Sj 




€ 



Wl>Kiry]tonSll— tl 



Service Hours 

Iiiii I ii 7 M.ii'i •} 3(}|>f' 
S.il rt.n'i '.'ih'i 



(847)249-130(0) 



"All pre-dnven cars with less than ISO 000 'intes have available >i month'b.000 milus (whichever comes 

lust) dnvelrain warranty All abovu Mf.n iks plus tax title license and doc fee 

When you Itnd us standing behind tmr uski cars please don I back up thanks "Fur qualified buyers 







February 26, 1999 AUTO MARKETPLACE Lakeland Newspapers /D9 

Chevrolet earns perfect six with 
U.S. Figure Skating Association 



Chevrolet Motor Division shifts into high 
gear Feb. 6-14 as a sponsor of the 1999 State 
Farm U.S. Figure Skating Championships in 
Salt Lake City, Utah. Chevrolet serves as title 
sponsor to host the exhibition of Champions 
at the Chevrolet Skating spectacular in Sun- ' 
day, Feb. 14. 

Far the past three years, Chevrolet has 
teamed with the United States Figure Skating 
Association (USFSA) to sponsor Innovation 
new programs that provide training, incen- 
tives and college scholarships to skaters at all 
levels - from grassroots to novice to elite. 

Teaming with toe United] States Figure 
Skating Association provides Chevy with a 
wonderful chance to show our consumers 
what Genuine Chevrolet means," said Sherrie 
Weltzman, manager for passenger car adver- ' 
Using at Chevrolet "We're happy our name is 
associated with programs that are sincere In 
their encouragement of both academic and 
athletic excellence. We also believe that peo- 
ple enjoy learning how the hard work of to- 
day's figure skating champions helps propel 
them to the top. This is what Genuine 
Chevrolet is all about"- ! 

"We are excited that Chevrolet is continu- 
ing its involvement with the United States 
Figure Skating Association by providing the 
support necessary to continue quality skating 
programs at all levels," said Ji mmy Disbrow, 
USFSA president. 

During theState Farm U.S. Figure Skating 
Championships in Salt Lake City, Chevrolet 
will announce the 1999 awards and scholar- 
ships for Its specific brand programs. They 
include: 

•Chevy MallbuTeam 2002-Chevy hopes 
to help potential Olympians achieve the 
American dream by cultivating American ex- 
cellence by providing special team training to 
top novice skaters who have been identified 
by USFSA. Chevrolet will help train these ath- 
letes through intensive workshops that in- 
clude guest speaker seminars, health educa- 
tion activities and the chance to meet with' 
judges and other skating officials. 
; »ChtvyCava fef F erte c t S l ffl w anl-'The 
more you score, the more you can help"- 
Chevy will donate money to the USFSA 
Memorial Fund as skaters are awarded per- 
fect six's for their routines, throughout the 





competition. 



competition. Cavalier will donate $1,000 to 
the USFSA Memorial Fund each time a skater 
is awarded a perfect six for his/her routine 
during the short program. The Fund, found- 
ed In memory of the 1981 U.S. World Figure 
Skating Team that perished in a plane crash 
en route to the World Championships, pro- 

j vides assistance to athletes as they strive to- 
ward their goals in figure skating. In the event 
that no skater earns a perfect six in the short 
program, Chevrolet will then donate $2,000 
per perfect six in the long program. In the 
event that no skater earns a perfect six in ei- 
ther program, Chevrolet will donate a "perfect 
$6,000" to the fund. 

•Chevy Lumina Scholastic Honors Team-. 
Chevy will make paying for college a little less 
• stressful for up to 12 high school students 
who will be selected for recognition on both 
academic accomplishments and athletic 
achievements during an annual ceremony at 
"Nationals," and provides each student with a 
$1,000 scholarship stipend from the USFSA ' 
and Chevrolet To be eligible, students must 
submit an essay, have at least a 3.2 grade 
point average and must be full-time high 

* school juniors or seniors who have competed 
at either the junior or championship levels at 
USFSA events. 

"These honors and awards demonstrate 
Chevy's commitment to figure skating," said 
■Weltzman. "Providing Incentives, training and 
college scholarships help young skaters learn, 
helps foster the talent of skating^ future stars 

*■ f and helps menTfeaclfmelr dream&This pro- 
gram coincides with the core philosophy of 
Chevrolet-T- to build performance, style and 
quality and to be a car company that our cus- 
tomers can trust" 




Motoring For 




It's new car buying season for many 
consumers across the United States, with 
new 1999 models in dealer showrooms. 
The time just might be right to buy that 
new vehicle you've had your eye on. 
Let's move through the process quickly. 
You make your choice, arrange financing, 
your insurance is in place, you clean out 
a spot in the garage and take delivery of 
your new prized possession. Life Is good. 

With years of motoring under your belt, 
and the knowledge of how to keep and 
maintain a new vehicle, you're ready to 
hit the road. Or are you? 

One critical area of car care that is fre- 
quently misunderstood involves collision 
repair. Where do you turn for Information 
on the subject? The dealer who sold you 
your vehicle may be, the best place to 
start. Ford, General Motors and Chrysler 
Corporation customer service divisions 
all agree the consumer needs to make In- 
telligent, informed decisions when it 
comes to collision repair. 
Here's a brief review.ofyhe important 
steps of collision repair if you are one of 
the 36 million people who will be in- 
volved in a vehicle accident this year. 

If you are involved in an accident, let's 
assume you can drive your vehicle home. 
Now you're faced with the unfamiliar task 
of using that insurance policy that you 
filed away somewhere months ago/and 
the even more unfamiliar task of securing 
collision repair. The path you choose dur- 
ing the repair process Is critical because a 
proper repair will help protect your vehi- 
cle investment; Here are a few basic tips; 

The Insurance Company-One call to 
your insurance agent will help you under- 
stand the terms; conditions and limita- 



tions of your coverage. Many policies re- 
quire that your vehicle be returned to 
"pre-accident condition." Talk to your in- 
surance agent and be sure you under- 
stand exactly what the insurance com par 
ny must do to keep you a happy cus- 
tomer. 

The Body Shop-Your insurance compa- 
ny may recommend a collision repair 
shop, but you have the right to make the 
final choice. Your dealership may be a 
starting point of reference. Choose wisely. 
Ask around and select the shop with the 
best references. 

The Estimate-Read the collision repair . 
estimate carefully. Collision repair esti- 
mates can be confusing, so ask for expla- 
nations of all abbreviations, acronyms or 
terms which yoiimay not fullyunder- 
' stand. If you are offered a repair payment 
check immediately at a drive-in claim 
center, don't cash it until you review the 
estimate with the collision repairer to be 
sure the check covers all repairs. . 

The PartSrCrash parts come from. three 
categories! Original Equipment Manufac- 
turer (OEM) or genuine parts; new after- 
market or "imitation" parts; and salvaged 
parts. The type of crash parts to be used 
on your vehicle should be clearly listed 
on your estimate. If you prefer certain ■ 
types of parts be used, alert your collision 
repair professional or insurance repre- 
sentative immediately. 
■; It's important to be happy with the final 
repairs. Inspect them carefully and be 
sure everything. was done right before you 
.sign-off on the job. 

Remembering these few collision re- 
pair tips can help ensure that your vehi- 
cle experience Is positive. 



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1997 GMC S JIMMY SLE 4X4 

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1996 GMC 1/2 TON SUBURBAN 

AClcafed jftVC 



1995 CHEVY S-10 BLAZER 

«UDacr.l*K $1RQAA 

toaTttLcs& IviTUU 



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1995 CHEVY 

SP0RTS1DE 




1994 CHEVROLET 1/2 TON EXTBIDa) CAB 4X4 

WOssCap gjWfc 



1994 FORD BRONCO 4X4 
%Ma,ma $| 



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1993 DODGE DAKOTA 

2x4,V5, $ 

5 speed, air..... 



1989 CHEVY 3/4 TON 4X4 

VMA,niPPiw....$CQQC 



1988 GMC 1/2 TON 4X4 

v^mrw. $AQQ5 



1996 PONfTIAC GRAND AM 

4 Door, Wife SlfJOQR 



V8, Auto, fiJC, leaded, VWGenerva Pko, 
RediReady SAVE 



1993 BUICK REGAL 

low Ms, Clean. v4«7J 



1992 LINCOLN T0WNCAR 

V8LA*xA^l£ate:Ctean $OQQR 
totetLUfelSffl WW 



1992 CHEVY LUMINA APV 

V6,Autaratic,Air, ..■ 




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2|PEDERSEN GMC TRUCK 







Since 1936 



, IL • 847 

Corner* of JK, 451173 





• •.„... M« ■! ■ ■■« 



* r r a i^mIi^'TT" 



■**■*■ 



t\ "FimurniBwiimii 







^.7 



,*— *»o 



GMCTruck/Buickf 
2727 Behridere Rd. [Rte. 120), Woukegon 
244-1010 

Knouz of Lake Forest 
1044 N, Western Ave., Lake Forest 
234-2800 
Liberty Auto City 
1000 E. Pork Ave., Libertyville 
362-2663 

Mitchell Buick-Oldsmobile & 
GMC Truck 

903 N. Front Street, McHenry 
(815) 385-7200 
1 Country Buick/Pontiae 
845 Main St., Antioch 
395-4400 




Weil Oldsmobile Cadillac Inc. 

1050 S. Milwoukee Ave., Libertyville 

362-4100 

Gary Long Pontiac- 

Cadillac Subaru 

1107 S. Route 31, McHenry 

(815) 385-6000 



CHEVROLET 

• Bernard Chevrolet/lsuzu 

1001 S. Milwaukee Ave,, Libertyville 
362-1400 

• Boehmer Chevrolet 

416 W. Uberty (Rte. 176) Wouconda 
526-2424 - 

• Classic Chevrolet Inc. 

425 N. Green Boy Rd., Waukegon 
3364300 

• Gary Lang Chevrolet 
1107 S. Route 31, McHenry 
(815) 385-2100 

• Roy Chevrolet Inc. 
39 N. Route 12, Fox Lake 
587-3300 

• Raymond Chevrolet/ 
Oldsmobile Inc. 

120 W. Lake St. (Rte. 173), Antioch 
395- 3600 

• Rockenbach Chevrolet 
1000 E. Bclvidero Rd„ Groysloke 
223-8651 

• Shepard Chevrolet 
930 Cordage Ln., Lake Bluff 
234-7900 

ciitmifH 

: ' 3 

• Knauz of Lake Forest 

1044 N. Western Ave., Lake Forest 
234-2800 

• Lake Villa Chrysler-Plymouth 
Jeep/Eagle 

130 Cedar Ave., Lake Villa 
356-2530 

• Sandy McKie & Sons 

, Chrysler-Plymouth Dodge Truck 
91 5. Route 12, Fox Lake 
587-6471 

• Sunnyside Dodge-Chrysler- ' 
Plymouth 

4810 W.- Elm St., McHenry 
(815) 385-7220 




• Antioch Dodge 
105 Rte. 83, Antioch 
395.0200 

• Fohrman Auto Mart 
2725 Delvidere Rd., Woukegon . 
336-3510 

• Mtllor-Krueger Dodge 

119 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
362-3800 

• 'Sandy- McKie & Sons 
Chrysler-Plymouth Dodge Truck 
91 S. Route 12, Fox Lake 
587-6471 ■ 

• Sunnyside DodgeChrysler- 
Plymouth 

4810 W. Elm St.", McHenry 
(815)385-7220 



Anthony Pontiac/GMC/Buick 
2727 Bclvidero Rd., Waukjigan 
244-1010 

Mitchell Buick-Oldsmobile & 

GMC Truck 

903 N. Front Street, McHenry 

(615)385-7200 

Patrick Pontiac-QMC Truck Inc. 
1120 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
680-5000 

Pedersen GMC Truck 
Corners of Rtes 45 & 173, Antioch 
395-3700 



D 



Pouly Hondo 

1111 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 

3624300 

Rosen Honda 

Rte. 132 (Grand Ave.), Gum go 

623-7673 




• Liberty Auto City 

1000 E. Park Ave. (176), libertyville 
360-2683 

• Gurnee Hyundai VW-Olds 

Rte. 41 & Washington St, GurnetAYoukegan 
249-1300 

INFINITI. 

• Fields Infiniti 

1121 S. Milwoukee Ave., Libertyville 
362-9200 



ISUZU 



* Bernard Chevrolet/lsuzu 
1001 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
362-1400 




Country Jeep-Eagle ■ 
3017 W. Route 120, McHenry 
(815) 363-9999 

Delf's Jeep 

1521 Behvidere Rd., Woukegon 

623-1492 

Lake Villa Chrysler-Plymouth Jeep Eagle 
130 Cedar Ave., Lake Villa 
356-2530 
1 Liberty Jeep Eagle 
1000 E. Pork Ave., Libertyville 
362-2683 




• Land Rover of Lake Bluff 
375 N. Skokie Hwy, Lake Bluff 
604-8100 



Fox Lake Ford/Mercury 
90 S. Route 12, Fox Lake 
587-3400 

Libertyville Lin coin/ Mercury Inc. 
941 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
367-1700 

Lyons-Ryan Ford-Lincoln-Mercury Inc. 
104 W. Route 173, Antioch 
395-3900 

Don McCue Lincoln-Mercury Inc. 
660 W. NW Hwy, Borrington 
382-5600 

Rosen Lincoln-Mercury 

100 N. Green Bay Rd., Woukegon 

623-7673 



Libertyville Auto City 
1000 E. Pork Ave., Libertyville 
362-2663 

Rosen Mazda 

■100 N. Green Bay Rd., Woukegon 

662-2400 



Raymond Chevrolet/ 

Oldsmobile Inc. 

120 W. Route 173, Antioch 

395-3600 

Weil Oldsmobile/Cadillac Inc. 

1050 S. Milwoukee Ave., Libertyville 

362-4100 ' 

PONTIAC 



YSE 



• Anthony Pontiac/GMCTruck/Buick 
2727 Belvidere Rd. (Rte. 120), Woukegon 
244-1010 

• Gary Lang Pontiac Cadillac 
& Subaru 

1107 S. Route 31, McHenry 
(615) 385-6000 

• Patrick Pontiac GMC Truck Inc. 

1120 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
680-5000 

• Country Pontioc/Bulck 
845 Main Street, Antioch 
3954400 



• Trie Porsche Exchange 

2050 First Si 

Highland Park 
, 432-5020 






The Saab Exchange 
2300 Skokie Valley Rd. (Rte. 41) 
Highland Park 
432-9300 

SATUIN. 

Saturn of Libertyville 

1160 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 

362-6600 

Saturn ofWaukegan 

500 S. Green flay Rd., Woukegon 

360-5000 




. DIP /Lakeland Newspapers AUTO MARKETPLACE February 26, 1999 

Infiniti celebrates outstanding 
reputation for award-winning 
customer satisfaction and 



Gary Lang Pontioc Cadillac Subaru 
1111S. Route 31, McHenry 
(815)385-6000 

Liberty Subaru 

1000 E. Park Ave., Libertyville 

362-2683 



$ SUZUKI 

A«k unwti' uhn iiwi|<t tuk>* 

Liberty Auto City 

1000 E. Pork Ave., (176) Libertyville 

362-2683 

® TOYOTA 

Classic Toyota 

425 S. Green Bay Rd., Waukegon 

336-4300 

Pouly Toyota 

5417 NW Hwy., Crystal Lake 

(815)459-7100 




Liberty Nissan Volkswagen/Kio 

921 5. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 

680-8000 

Gurnee VW Olds Hyundai 

Rl».41 & Washington St, Gurnet/Weukegon 

249-1300 

VO jjUVO 

Fields Volvo 

1121 5. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 

362-9200 



. In 1909, Infiniti set out to create a new stan- 
dard of excellence in customer care and vehi- 
cle quality by offering superior products and a 
pressure-free, client-focused retail environ- 
ment. Nearly ten years later, Infiniti continues 
to honor Its customers with one -of the most 
highly regarded ownership experiences in the , 
automotive industry. 

The independently-funded J.D, Power and 
Associates product quality and dealer service 
studies provide some of the best evidence af- 
file Division's suc- 
cess. In fact, over .^- ->^ 

the past ten years £ VV ^ 
Infiniti and its ^^ ^f j |\| 

collection of luxu- 
ry vehicles have 

received more than 15 awards from the Cali- 
fornia-based research firm. 

Exacting Quality 

One of the most recent awards came in 
spring 1998, as the Infiniti QX4 was ranked 
for the second consecutive year as the "Best 
Luxury Sport Utility Vehicle (in a tie)" in the 
J.D. Power and Associates Initial Quality 
Study (IQS). The prestigious IQS study, 
which was refined in 1998 to more accu- 
rately reflect consumer concerns, tracks 
consumer-reported vehicle problems dur- 
ing eh critical first 90 days of ownership. 

Infiniti and its luxury vehicles have con- 
sistently achieved top IQS honors over the 
years. In 1997 the 130 luxury sedan was 
ranked "Best Entry Luxury Car" and Infini- 
ti's flagship Q45 luxury performance sedan 
ranked among the top ten models in IQS for 
three straight years between 1991 and 1993. 
Infiniti Division was also ranked "Best Over- 
all Carline in Initial Quality" in 1992 and 
1995. 




F IN I T I 



Customer Satisfaction 

In addition to Infinitt's IQS honors, the: 
luxury marque has consistently topped J.D. 
Power and Associates' customer satisfaction 
(CSI) and sales satisfaction (SSI) reports. In- 
finiti was ranked "itl Carline in Customer 
Satisfaction" in both the 1991 and 1996 CSI. 
studies; The high-rpfile CSI report Is based 
on owner satisfaction with their vehicle and 
dealer service after one year of ownership. 
Infiniti 's unique pressure- free sales 

process is also re- 
garded by its cus- 
tomers and indus- 
try observers as a 
model retail expe- 
rience. The luxury 
division has consistently ranked among the. 
top riamcplates in the J.D. Povyer and Asso- 
ciates SSI study and was named "Best Over- 
all Carline" in 1993. 
The Total Ownership Experience® 

Since the Division's inception, Infiniti 
has striven to make every customer contact 
completely satisfying through The Infiniti 
Total Ownership Experience (TOE), a phi- 
losophy that has created a unique alliance 
between retailers and buyers of both new 
and pre-owned Infiniti vehicles. 

TOE includes numerous tangible fea- 
tures, such as comprehensive roadside as- 
sistance and service loan, car support for 
both new and previously owned Infiniti- 
models. But the experience goes much far- 
ther/wlth such intangibles as an unmatched ^ 
level of customer service - beginning with 
theVelaxed, pressure-free atmosphere of the 
dealerships and supported through an en- 
hanced level of comprehensive training for 
all Infiniti retail personnel 




mmmmmmmmxmm 




i 




Visit us on flie Internet at 
us-netdirect.com 



nelDirect 



1 -877-netDIRECT 



a toll-free call 

Mention CODE 5763C when calling 

http://www.us-netdirect.com 



p*2j [o^j 



February 26, 1999 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ D 1-1 



FIELDS MATTERS ... 



. <r tof..r-.-r.-. .-J'A 

1P1 

m 




MSRP: 

$ 26,995 

Complete wf Leather, PwrSmtroofA- 
Convenience rdtjn • 3.0L 190 HP.VS • ABS • 

15" Aluminum Alloy Wheth • Air Bap • Pm > 
Drivtr & Pauenger SeaUf WnSovnJloda • ' -. 
KifauE^tS*a^SyiUm»CSGfrt*AfC c 
• Well-Integrated Instrument JPtowf • 200- 
WatU 6-Speaker Bote audio CD & Ostium • \ 
Side Window Defoggtn 



33495. 
$399 



pei Ma 
39Ma 

$1,324 due at inception, including 
$399 first months payment; a $400 
refundable security deposit; and 
$525 acquisition fee/ plus ta* title 
& Gcense> 



- New 1999 Infiniti Q45 New 1999 Infiniti G20 - automatic 



MSRP: 549,115 

SQifxAavee 



J(east*\' 



'41.995 
*599 



■S?i * . ■ •-- 



»M I 



MSRP: *22;320 



Tt - „m 




$ 20495 



$ 




■ 



w PER MO. 

" 39wa 



$2,724 due at Inception, Indud- 
ing $599 first months payment a 
$600 refundable security deposit 
and $525 acquisition fee, plus 
tax, title & license* 






FJNANCINC FOR UP TO 24 MONTHS + 



ilii|*1 



$1,524 due at inception, inducfing a 

$500 CAP cost reduction, $249 first 
months payment, a $250 refundable 
security deposit and $525 acquisition 
fee, plus tax, title & kense. 



Over 40 QX4s in stock & ready for deliver 



1121 S. Milwaukee Ave. Libertyville • 847.362.9200 
Visit Us on the Web: www.fieidsauto.com 




INFINITI 



® 



U'rtur^rfiKflr^^ 




*439 



PER MO. 
48 MO. 



$2,339 due at inception, including $439 first months payment, a $450 refundable security 
deposit, and $450 acquisition fee, plus tax, title & license. 



19 9 8 
SELL-OFF 



1998 S70A 

Leather. Ir.irs, 
Slk .-9K.H) -demo, 
Hluc-f.rcrn/lvnry 
MSRI': W^M% 

selling price. . $26,555* 
199S S70 GLT 

Leather, Grand Touring 
r.itkijiv. Cold/Irmv 1 to Okhjsc 
SikrJTW-tkiiuj-AVhite/luiry 
Slk-^J/'XJ-dLiiKt - Nav\ Win.'/ 
'l.uipi- 

Msur mwpi 

.selling price. . $29,035* 

1998 S70T5A 



Volvo S80 2.9 Luxury Rotates Include: Front and side air bags, side air curtain protection system, leather, 
sunroof, keyless entry, AM/FM cassette, CD, cold weather, stability & tracs control and much much more! 

O ff er s E x p i r e F e bru a r y 2 8 



10 C70 Convertibles in Stock & Ready for Immediate Delivery! 



Slk. = 'l Till ikltm - 
f'.rvin \\<-n 
MMII' vi7 'i in 

selling price>2 l >,2'K)< 



9 9 9 



1998 S70 GLT-Ncw 

Whitc/lvtm 

selling price.. $30,980* 
1998 S70 T5A-N«v 

6 to Choose 
Red 

selling price. .532,960' 

1998 V70 AWD 
Cross Country 

Fully butted 
Slk =')'ni deim>. 
Hod.CiapliiU' 
MSHP: il.S.f.Mi 

selling price. . §J2$$f# 

Demonstrators 
available for 
immediate 
delivery 




Fields 



F .a. ■ m. m 




1121 S. Milwaukee Ave. • Libertyville • 847.362.9200 
Visit Us on the Web: www.fieldsauto.com 




tPtustax, title Stlicense. 



,i' 



ECAUSE YOU 



ATTER 



i-cri. 



D 1 2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



February 26, 1999 





AttfZ&Utz/ ST A 



BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT 

GARY LANG CHEVROLET 

WILL TAKE DELIVERY OF A 

SPECIAL ALLOCATION OF 

100 CONVERSION VANS AT 

PRICES NEVER BEFORE 

OFFERED! 



Gulf Stream 

anufactures'Representatives Will Be On Site With Incentives! 



t999 Purchase/] 



■ 



m 



VftlPi 



m 



;PWT0» 

ORDEROL 



fcafeS 



m 



m 



mi 



IlM 



fOntnl.WSl' 



m 

Dollars Cash, Back 
NON-NEGOTIABU 



AUTO SHOW REBATE 
+ $500 Gary Lang 
Discount to Match! 



eb. 26 th , 27 th & March 1 * ONLY! 



flew 99 Chevy full-iize Conversion lew99 Chevy 



Conversion Mew 99 Chevy full-§ize Conversion 




illustration 
approximate 



Gulf Stream 

Automatic; Air Conditioning, AM/FM Cassette? 

Power Windows & Locks, 4 Captain Chairs, 

Bi-fo d Sofa, Running Boards,™ & Cruise, 



ID/Cassette 



Automatic, V-8, Air Conditioning, 

He, Power Windows & Locks, Keyless Entrfr 

4-Captain Chairs, Rear Heat & Air, Vista Bay Windows, 

Power Antenna, Bi-fbld Sofa, Tinted Glass, 

Fiberglass Running Boards 



Entry; 



Automatic, V-8, Air Conditioning, 

uD/Cassette. Power Windows & Locks, Keyless . 

4-Captain Chairs. Rear Stereo, Rear Heat & Air. Night 

Shades, Power Antenna, Bi-fold Sofa. Tinted Glass 

Oak Trim, Running Boards 








Stk. #C9QM4 ^~"~~ — — 

hMa«MtebShowepniaiiSaoo&rt>«gDlKaH jrtjdwHMCcliyOnrtftMi 







ttkteen/MS^MCOwan&ISDOG^rlJriganwl MiiNt«»Oi*QiGmlM>* 




tndUtalTOUgStaNCUpntSSUteyLfvtfcnft MudNtttOMhgiGndMrii 



V,* 



lS TOW\' 



k c»s*2: 



<*&&&* CUSTOM 1 - . ¥ ^VQW» 

.11 Trucks by oS BLAZER 4x4 3' SUBURBAN/TAHOE °SKT TRUCK 
Gary Lang CONVERSIONS CONVERSIONS CONVERSIONS 



BaC*«f JhftM&fcri* VIsiTTHEGMV WNG 



Microsoft. 



MMmmmmi • ' fSSSSSSSSSSSSS^ 





Carffcnt 

WWW.CMP0INT.COM 

On Route 31 Between 
Crystal Lake & McHenry 



TOLL JFiBEIEI! (G/AILIL TOIDAYI! 




-385-LANG 




*(** All sales add tax, title, license ,$46. doc fee. ALL available 
rebates applied. Rebates and financing on approved credit are 
not combfnable. - -- ■-- '■-■ - 




• ■f.Jt-.*) •►«.# ' 



».— H i* f ' ■i*' "^ 1 ' 





siAwm m AGAINST MS 

BUttDING FOB THE fUW 



♦«»**•■■•»*** 



Page 17 



Page 31 




I 



ijimmttli** *^* 




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,.?#*■■■> V- 












EotefrKtnts 



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u*a 







FUNERAL CHAPEL & CREMATORIUM 

Since I898^Sv -eii'lSS^ 



3* 







v**-. ■■■ 



^Jv^**35 



A Commemorative display, three generations 

of ownership. 
From horse-drawn carriages to motorized hearses, 




viF'^F M*t H^W 



/lfcouc: First Motorized Hearse 

At Right: 
Horse-Drawn Carriage 



"We Care 



W 




■■ 1-- 




George Strang 



\jk- ■**&&& 



*L 




m^'; 




■-,,■ 
U -.. . ! - 



Pa 




Harold J. Strang 



m 



kwKEa 



Datnrf G. Strang 

RANG FUNERAL CHAPEL & CREMATORIUM, LT 
410 E. Belvidere Rd., Grayslake, Illinois 60030 

(847) 223-8122 

DAVID G. STRANG & RICHARD A. GADDIS, DIRECTORS 






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TEST 




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Forefronts 



Profile 



B 



The stor 






oard President Joe Bean 
shares his love of words 



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Joe Bean looks at the portrait of the 
man he calls his mentor. The pic- 
ture depicts a distinguished looking 
man smoking a cigar and. reading a 
newspaper. 
It is a picture of Robert E. Yorke. A 

man who had so much influence on Bean 

- • ■ -* 

that he named his son after the man. 

But the picture could very well be of 
Bean. Calm, contemplative, focused. 



John Kmitta 




Yorke was a street reporter in hisjate.'60s when Bean 
was just getting his start as a 15-year-bld reporter for the 
"Daily Sikeston Standard" in the small Missouri.town to 

. which it owed its name. 

Because the newspaper could no longer afford to pay 
Bean for every freelance photo he took as a 14-year-old, 
iUiithey hired him as a reporter for $1 an hour. „.,. 

ft IS n n Bean Jooks at theportrait.and reflects onthe small 



newsroom where the two of them spent a good portion of 
their time during the early 1960s. 

He tells the story of a man who would always hang up 
the phone without saying good-bye, but he also tells the 
" story 'of a man who,' despite a large age difference/was his 
friend. 

"Yorke would say, 'Write it as long as you have to and 
as short as you can."' 

Bean said Yorke would never give him a compliment, 
but when it was time for him to go away to college, Yorke 
said to him, "You're going to be a reporter? I think you will 
be a good one." 

•In doing so, he not only recounts the story of a man 
who shared his passion for words, but also reveals a little 
bit about himself. 
. Bean said he has been told he is a storyteller. 

That love of stories has translated into a love of books 
, and a love of communication. 

Joe Bean is the president of the Cook Memorial Library 
Board m libertyville. 

Prior to ttiat, he had served as a trustee. He has held the 
position of boardpresident since 1997. 

The position has brought with it some major decisions 
and major discussion. Over the past two years, the library . 
board has searched for a new library site to solve over- 
crowding and provide a library system to service residents 
of Libertyville,. Vernon Hills and Green Oaks. 

Bean said he jran for the position because of a love of ^ ^ 
, ^reading and aloye of writing. „ .. i ■■ 



"Reading is the cornerstone of everything that we "do as 
human beings," he said. ,. ; 

"If you can't read.you can't grow. You can'tlearn." 

Once again, he reflects back to the influence of grooving 
up in Sikeston;.frequenting the small local library. - : 

^Wh'en I was a kid I read every biography on the shelf," 
he said. 

He said he would argue with the librarian over which 
books he was old enough to read. 

"I was an avid reader, I would go 'to the library and get 
books and keep them and pay the fines," he said. 

"It was a little bitty library in Sikeston and it was a won- 
derful place to go. I read any book I could get my hands 
on. It was a way of expanding my universe a littlebiti" 

Now," as library board president, he is striving to give 
area children the opportunity to share his passion and ex- 
pand their univeTrse through reading. 

"There are thousands of kids in Vernon Hills who'doh't 
have access td a library," Bean said. "If there is something 
we can do as a board to fix that, it is incumbent upon us to 
do that." 

That passion forbooks and newspapers and all other 
forms of communication led not only to a position as li- 
brary board president for Joe Bean, but also to a life-long 
career. 

Bean is a corporate communications consultant,' 
but it all began at that small newspaper in the small 



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Profile 



Forefronts 



FROM PAGE E3 



Bean 



town of Sikeston. 

"On the editorial side at one time , I was sports re- 
porter, street reporter, sports editor, city editor, I did 
everything but the society page." 

What began-with humble beginnings has blossomed 
into a fine-tuned career. 

Following graduation from Northwestern with a degree 
in journalism, Dean went to work for the chamber of com- 
merce in Chicago handling public relations. 

"I really wanted to write," he said. "I wasn't doing a lot 
of writing. I was doing a lot of media contact." 

He had been writing slide presentations for the cham- , 
ber luncheons to encourage new membership when he got 
a phone call. 

The man on the other end of the line told Bean that his 
client was interested in having him write a slide presenta- 
tion for her. 

Bean's bosses told him he could do it as long as it did- . 
n't infringe on his normal work hours at the chamber. 

"The guy said, 'Do you think you can do it for $2,000?' I 
was making $7,200 a year at the time." 

After splitting the earnings with the photographer, 
Bean said he made the decision to become a freelance 
writer. 

"1 said my gosh, if I can make S 1,000 in six weeks doing 
this part time, think of how much I could make doing it full 
time." 

"So, I became a freelance writer in December of '69. 1 
realized quickly the math didn't work out that way, but 
I've been doing it ever since." . 

"I tell people that I've been writing professionally for 39 
years," Bean said. They, usually look at him puzzled, "but 
I've been getting paid to write since I was 15-and-a-half." 

"I've always done something that had to do with writ- 
ing. 

Bean said he tells prospective clients, "My job is to help 
you figure out what you want to say, to whom you want to 
say it, and what you want them to do after you've said it." 

"And then I'll figure out what is the best way to say it." 

His work has included writing speeches, strategic plan- 
ning, financial presentations, annual reports and video- 
tape production. 

"My approach to what I do is research it carefully, exe- 



cute it, then evaluate the feedback so that you can then go 
back and modify it to make it work," Bean said. 

' "In my business I think good communications are 
when we know what's expected after the exchange has tak- 
en place. And there has got to be an exchange," Bean said. 

"There is no one-way communication. I think that's an 
oxymoron, one-way communication; implicit in that is a 
two-way exchange. The message has been articulated and 
received then acknowledged. It is based on what I want to 
happen." 

Bean said it is amazing the amount of prospective 
clients who think the only way the intended receiver can 
get the message is through a long, involved presentation. 

"The most effective communication device we have in 
this country is the stop sign," Bean said. 

"Everybody understands it. It's one word. It's a symbol. 
You don't even have to read It. You just look at it and you 
know what to do and it doesn't take that long." 

Bean said that all the technology we have today; the 
faxes, e-mail, pagers and cellular phones all make commu- 
nication far superior to what it was in the past. Do we 
communicate any better? 

"I think probably not," he said. "I think on a sociologi- 
cal/psychological level, we're probably more isolated than 
ever." 

On a daily basis, Bean works to make communication a 
little bit better, a little smoother. In doing so, he travels of- 
ten. 

Patience; Bean said, is the most important thing he has 
learned from his years traveling. 

"Make realistic plans. Think through to the end what 
you're going to be doing." 

"One of the fun things about travel is to leam things 
about the places you go." 

He tells the story of this past Christmas Eve, spent in 
Italy with his wife, Joan Link, and his.sons Jonathon and 
Josh. (Jonathon's middle name,, by the way, is Yorke). ' 

The four were invited to a bell ringing on Christmas 
Eve. 

"We thought we were going to be standing out in the 
piazza, so we dressed warmly." 

Instead, they were led by their Italian friend down an 
alley and through a side door Into a room with a ladder. . 

Six floors up they climbed and there, at midnight, 
Christmas morning, the bell ringers began. \ 

It took two, men to ring the large bell, and another man 



to work the two$malIer bells. 

"The tower was shaking, I will never forget it. That was 
a real experience." 

The key to learning when you travel is find out where 
the locals go and what they eat, Bean said. 

"Just get out and start walking. That's how you learn a 
town, you walk it. If you get lost, you get lost." 

Bean said he has always'ehjoyed learning. 

"I am just as interested in reading a book of philosophy 
as I am reading a newspaper as I am reading a recipe.and I 
love to cook." 

How does he balance being freelance writer, president 
of the library board, husband and father and still find time 
to cook? 

"I don't balance'it," he said. "Family gets third some- 
times. I wanted to run for the library board and I am will-, 
ing to make those choices." 

Bean said part of his influence comes from his parents. 

"One of the reasons I am a freelancer is they told me to 
do what I want to do. They never had a leash on me," he 
said. . 

"They taught me a respect for honest, hard work." 

Bean said his parents also taught him a respect for peo- 
ple. 

That respect was tested very early in Bean's career as; 
he recalls his youth spent working at "The Daily Sikeston 
Standard" In the early 1960s. 

On his breaks he would head to a local coffee shop by 
taking a short-cut. The route led him past a lunchcounter 
for colored people only. 

"There was a white school system and a black school 
system," Bean said. 

"I remember being confused by the inequality I saw 
and the way it was rationalized." , 

He said the values and respect his parents instilled in 
him allowed him to see past that inequality. It is a respect 
for people which has helped Joe Bean to find a way to 
communicate with people of all ages and races. 

Joe Bean has many-more stories to tell. Stories about 
working in a small newsroom in a town which is still sur- 
rounded by cornfields but no longer has the newspaper by 
the name of the "Daily Sikeston Standard," Stories about 
giving back to the community what you take out of it. Sto- 
ries about his family, his travels and his work. Stories 
about life. . . i 

After all, he is a storyteller. 



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Forefronts 



Profile 



ES 





Inspired by helping children, Cindy Irwin builds -a 
legacy as Fox Lake's most active volunteer 






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! 



t all started with softball uniforms," 
Cindy Irwin said as she poured sugar 
into her coffee at the Whistle Stop Cafe, 
a restaurant located in the small heart z 
of Fox Lake. "The girls were wearing 

uniforms that the boys basketball team 

wore in the '50s." 




ByLeeFilas 

. "Theyneeded uniforms and I decided to help raise mon- 
ey for them." 

Now, a quarterpf a century later, what started out as a 
helping hand turned into an obsession. That obsession is 
what pushed Irwin into the hearts of Fox Lake residents 
everywhere. 

"I enjoy It/* Irwin said, sipping her coffee and warming 
up after plodding through the streets on a cold January 



morning. "I don't know/it has always given me a feeling of 
accomplishment. But it's more than that." 




Irwin was born in a farm house in rural Greenville, Illi- 
nois. - - - 

"Not on your life are you going to get me to answer that," 
Irwin said about the year she was born. "What do you think, 
I'm stupid? Answering something like that. C'mon." 

Her family left Greenville shortly after Irwin's birth and 
moved to Chicago. 

Then, in 1952, Irwin and her family found their way to 
Round Lake Beach. 

"My brother was a hoodlum," Irwin said. "A judge told 
my. father that it would be best if we left Chicago for the 
country." 

However, Irwin said, the country atmosphere did noth- 
ing to discourage the, wild. youthfulness of her brother. 

"My brother decided to steal the Grayslake High School 
principal's car," Irwin said^Hesaid he felt like taking It for 
a Joy rlde.'H© was a wild Wd-" 

Her first marriage carrie two mbmVi3-ber©r«.-Vior^2Yci' 

birthday, with her first child coming shortly after. 

Then, Irwin, her former husband and their child traveled 
. everywhere. 

"We were in Detroit, Pennsylvania, New York," Irwi 
plained in short answers to rush through thetopfc. 
we split up and I came horned ^ 

Home to Fox Lake. 





" Irwin has downed her third cup of Java at. the Whistle 
.Stop and is slowly working on her fourth. . 

,-The restaurant, which was packed full of Sunday morn- 
ing eaters,' is starting to slowdown. Waitresses and busboys 
don't zip by as fast anymore and people are starting to pay 
their, checks "and work their way to the door. But no one 
•leaves Withoutstoppmg.at the table to say good-bye to Ir- 
win. •-■ 

After each one leaves through the brightly colored door 
at the Whistle Stop, Irwin points to the people leaving and.', 
announces "They're great people." 

And, the people leaving are saying the same thing about 
Irwin. Everyone knows who she is. Not just in name; bur in ~ 
spirit as well. 

"Well, I've been here for 27 years and had seven kids, all 

Please see IRWIN IE6 







»f— 



Profile 



-Forefronts 



FROM PAGE E5 



Irwin 



raised in Fox Lake," Irwin said. "I should hope they know 
me." 

After returning home to Round Lake Beach, she met Bob 
Irwin, the man she is married to today. 

"I would have married Elvis, but he wasn't available," Ir-, 
win said jokingly. "But, Bob is great. We make quite a cou- 
ple." 

And, with seven kids running around the house, three of 
her own arid four from Bob, Irwin found herself with plen- 
ty of opportunities to become inspirational. 

"It all started because of my kids," Irwin said. "I still do 
everything for my kids. They live in Fox Lake and I want to 
make it a great place to live for everyone." 

She shrugs in response to the thought that she has be- 
come an inspirational leader in Fox Lake. 

"I only do the things that I feel need to be done," Irwin 
said, slowly stirring the sugar in the bottom of the cup. 
"Somebody needs to do it, so why not me?" 

What started out as a fund-raiser for softball uniforms 
has turned into a full-time job. 

•it's not a job though because I love to do it so much," 
Irwin said. "Sure, sometimes it's hectic, but it pays off in the 
end when people come to a function and have a great time." 
i In 1998 alone, Irwin has helped organize at least 10 com- 
munity events for either the village of Fox Lake or charities 
that operate within the village. And, her business, Balloons- 
To-You, has donated time and balloons to at least 15 other 
charitable events. 

"1 have no idea how much I've donated over the 
years," Irwin said, smiling as she looks back on it. "I have 
no clue, but it's around 15 or so functions a year for the 
last 25 years. 

In 1998, Balloons-To-You donated decorations to the 
Grant High School Gala, the Mineola Fireworks Super-Raf- 
fle, the Grant Township Republicans Club Lincoln Day Din- 
ner, the Stanton School graduation and graduation dance 
and the Grant High School prom, and at least three differ- 
ent golf outings, just to name a few. 

"You know, V probably do donate too much," Irwin 
said. "But, I just can't say no. 1 don't feel right charging 
people fur these things. It's one of the least things I could 
do." 




In addition to the 
numerous donations, Ir- 
win, again in 1998, was 
the fund-raising leader 
for "The Haye a Heart 
Auction," the Village of 
Fox Lake Easter Egg 
Hunt, The Fox Lake 
Chamber of Commerce 
Cardboard Boat Regatta, 
the Village of Fox Lake 
Gazebo Grand Opening, 
the Village of Fox Lake 
Fun Run Car Show the 
Fox Lake Chamber 
Fourth, of July Parade 
and numerous blood 
drives in the area. 

"It needs to be done," 
she said again, smiling at the thought of her accomplish- 
ments. "I want to see the people of Fox Lake have a good 
time. I want to be a part of it so I do what I can to make it 
happen." 

A far cry from the softball uniforms for middle school 
girls attending Shady Lane School - now Stanton Middle 
School - in 1972. 

"I had three daughters on the team and I couldn't 
stand the thought of them playing softball in those bas- 
ketball uniforms," Irwin reiterated. "They needed new 
uniforms, so I went from door-to-door to raise the mon- 
ey for it. By the time I was done, they had new uniforms." 

Another person stops by the table to wish Cindy well, 
and Cindy greets him with open arms, as she has for her 
entire life. 

"The people in this town are great," Irwin said. "That's 
why I've done the things I've done— for the people," 

Which is why, in 1972, Irwin— for the people — led the 
"one-and-only" protest in the Village of Fox Lake. 



When an explosion went off at 1 1:55 p.m. on March 16, 
1977 in downtown Fox Lake, Irwin was seen in her paja- 
mas, dancing, while the police picked up the rubble and 
sorted out the details. ; 

"No, I didn't blowup the theater," Irwin said, smiling 



at the question she Is 
asked constantly. "I had 
nothing to do with it. I 
was questioned, but It 
wasn't me." 

Irwin was suspected 
in the explosion of the 
Towne Theater In 1977 
because she was the 
leader of a group of Fox 
Lake mothers protest- 
ing the theater showing 
pornography. 
"They took the theater 
away from our kids to 
show smut to everyone," 
Irwin said. "My daughter 
came to me and asked if 
I could do anything 
about this. So, every night, we picketed the Fox Lake The- 
ater for a month until, one night, boom, the place blew up." 
It was later determined that Irwin had nothing to do 
with the explosion and police assume, to this day, that the 
explosion was caused by a member of the projectionist 
union upset with the theater not using union workers. 
However, no one has ever been charged for the crime. 

Irwin, however, remembers the effort by the parents to 
make things copacetic in Fox Lake, as well as her midnight 
dance amongst the rubble. 

"I'm glad no one got hurt and nothing else was dam- 
aged from the explosion," Irwin said, still smiling. "But in 
the end, we won. I danced because I felt like we won a ma- 
jor victory that night." 

And, today, Irwin dances every time she wins. 
"I believe in this town, and I believe in the people in it,". 
Irwin stated, looking into her empty cup of coffee. "I do 
what I do to make the town better for the people who live 
here. This is a great place to live." 

As another pair of well-wishers passes by, Irwin smiles 
and gets to her feet. She greets the man and woman, smil- 
ing with genuine affection for the couple. After a minute, 
Irwin sits back down in her seat, pointing at the couple 
just leaving. 

"They're great people," Irwin says, copying the state- 
ment for the 50th time that morning. "They all are.". , 
It takes one to know one. 



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E7 



i 



Gordon 





Elected as township clerk at the age of 23, 

Grant Township Supervisor Gordon Kiesgen 

has made public service his hallmark 






i 




rant Township Supervisor Gordon 
Kiesgen once considered becom- 
ing a priest, but ended up in poli- 
tics. Anyone who knows him, 
however, knows his interest in 
ministering is still close to his heart. His life- 
long devotion to his community is evident 
in just about everything he does. 

By Leslie Piotrowski 

L 
He was born in Fox Lake and has lived there all his life. 

His parents moved there from Chicago where his father 
ran a used car lot on Western Avenue. Both parents were 
active in the community. His mother was president of the 
Fox Lake PTA, while his father was' involved In jocal poli- 



tics. 



tit 



^TheYi^dorh mii In ity frivol verriehVr^^H'd'offon^th'elrson'. 
In 1961, when Kiesgen was 23, he was elected as Grant 
Township Clerk. He remained in that position for 31 years 
until he was elected Supervisor in 1992. 

Over many years of living and working in Fox Lake, 
Kiesgen has seen the area go through a transition. 

"Fox Lake has changed drastically," he said. "I'm al- 
most shell-shocked. • 

, ~ "We used to have such stores as Pilgrim's, a candy 
store with a soda fountain on' Forest and Grand," he fondly 
recalled. "Everyone from school snuck over there. We had 
clothing stores, a shoe store, a gift shop. You could buy 
anything, and you never had to travel away from your 
community." 

Today, Fox Lake's downtown center features a few 
shops, but is also burdened by a number of vacant store- 
fronts. Many residents shop elsewhere. 

"We hope that within the near future, we can bring our 
community back to life," Kiesgen said. "We have the big 
attraction of the Chain O' Lakes, and we're right in the 
growing belt." 

If anyone has the connections to help make things 
happen in Fox Lake; Kiesgen has them. He has been in- 
volved in just about every community organization, from 
the Chamber of Commerce to the Rotary Club. 

He joined the Fox Lake Volunteer Fire Department 
when he.was 21 where he served as a lieutenant for 14 
years. He was an assistant scout-master for troop 81, and 
served as a.chairman of Ducks Unlimited, a conservation 
group, for 11 years, For more than 20 years, he has been 
active as a Republican precinct committeeman. 





"If there's an organization in town, I've been a mem- 
ber," he said. 

His major political focus now is on, "helping the area 
, develop^to where It should be." 

He is particularly proud of the development taking , 
■ place at Molidor Road, east of Route 12. The previous ad- 
ministration had purchased 40 acres there forthe devel- 
opment of a park and recreation area. 

When Kiesgen wmejnto office^e^appUe^dlojan^^e^^ 
""ceived a $200^000 matching grant from the state. He is cur- 
rently working with his board of directors as well as Grant 



Township schools, businesses and the community to raise 
the necessary matching funds by the end of 1999. 

The park will feature something for everyone; soccer, 
football and baseball fields', tot lots, walking trails' and a y 
picnic shelter.The Fox Lake Fire Department District arid 
Highway Department already exist on the site. 

Kiesgen's other major goal is to build a new town hall. 
It would be built at the site of the present building on 
Wa§h ingt on Street i n higi^ide. ^ ^isss^sxaasks ansa} 



Pleasesee KIESGEN / E8 



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Profile 



Forefronts 



FROM PAGE E7 



"A great way to celebrate the new millennium ts to 
have a new park area and a new building," he said. 

Putting politics aside, there are other things that make 
Kiesgen's eyes light up. One of those things is children. 

"I love children," he said. "I figure children are our fu- 
ture. If we ignore them, we ignore our future." 

His interest in kids led him to portray Santa Claus, a 
role he has played with love and humility for more than 40 
years. He started out playing Santa at the Fox Lake Com- 
munity Church, then at the Fire Department, the Fox Lake 
Chamber of Commerce, Korpan's Yacht Club Parade, Big 
Hollow School and many other organizations. 

Children have come to look at him as the 'real Santa.' 
In fact, more than 700 children have told him year after 
year what they most want for Christmas, and he says their 
wishes tell one a great deal. 

"Out of their mouths come many truths," said Kiesgen. 
"One little boy said, 'All I want is for my mom and dad to 
be together.' Another said, 'My daddy has left and I want 
to buy my mamma a diamond ring.'" 

Kiesgen's eight-year-old granddaughter, Kalie, can tell 
who is dressed up in the beard and red suit, but she thinks 



fr "*'^'2 'Z ZIT her grandfather is a hotline to the real Santa Claus. 
IVlCSJiCll "She is a true believer," Kiesgen said. 

2 i n addition to Kalie, Kiesgen has a grandson, Danny. 

His children Debbie, Gordy and Brian all graduated from 
Grant Community High School, as Kiesgen did. 

"I have an understanding family," said Kiesgen. "My 
wife (Diane) puts up with me a lot." 

What his family endures is that Kiesgen is constantly 
out and about talking, listening and helping people. 



ship, his eyes shine with pride. 

"I don't think there is a better community to live in 
than this because people come together when the chips 
are down," he said. 






I don't think there is 
a better community to 

live in than this because 
people come together 

when the chips are down 

GORDY KIESGEN 



"I try to be a part of everything I can," he admits. "You 
have an obligation to your town." 

Kiesgen recently received the American Hometown 
Leadership Award of outstanding leadership of communi- 
ties with populations of 25,000 or less. Wal-Mart, which 
co-sponsored the award, presented a grant of $1,000 to 
Grant Township in Kiesgen's honor. 

He has been involved in the Township's year-round 
food pantry for 38 years. The pantry is the product of a 
food drive started.by a now defunct tavern more than 50 
years ago. It is most busy during the December holiday, 
season when volunteers prepare 250 food baskets for the 
needy. 

Local organizations help out with donations each year. 
For instance, the Stanton Point Improvement Association 
recently donated 1,300 pounds of potatoes and 1,300 
pounds of onions. 

The food pantry is a true example of teamwork. In the 
spring, the Fox Lake Post Office sends out notices asking 
people to leave extra food by post office boxes. In the fall, the 
Ingleside Post Office does the same. As a result, food is avail- 
able throughout the year and 24 hours throughout' the day. 

As Kiesgen discusses the community spirit of his town- 













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Forefronts 



Profile 



E9 



Michael 



Music man 




e 



Fox Lake Realtor, school board 
member, economic development leader writes 
his own love songs for community he cherishes 




hen. Michael Lescher was a 
young boy, his family would 
\f spend summers on the Fox Riv- 
er, at his grandfather's cottage 
away from their home in 
Elmhurst. , 

"We spent most of our time on the river 
and Pistakee Lake/' he said. 

By Spencer Schein 

Those summertime visits during the '50s and '60s left an 
impression on Lescher, who) with his wife, Maxime, decided to 
raise their family in the area. . 

"When we had children, we kind of thought this would be a 
great place to grow up," he said. 

That was 13 years ago, and they still live on Pistakee Lake 
with their-son.Xander, 15, and daughter) Geneva, LI; 

Lesclierls grandfather Had a wooden speedboat they used 
to take out on the lake and river. That boat is long gorie. but 
Lescher kept the memory, and last year purchased ai 21-foot 
wooden speedboat of his own, christened Maxime I. 

"Mine is a little bigger than grandpa's - was, and a little 
faster," he joked. 

Fox Lake is a town dear to Lescher's heart, one he wants to 
see flourish for future generations,. His drive has given him the 
chance to work with several diverse groups within the commu- 
nity, all with the common goal to better the community for 
everyone. 

I would see my role in the 
future as pitching in anywhere 
I thought I could help to ^ 
achieve that potential 





MICHAEL LESCHER 



Lescher, 47, is working on improving education as vice 
president of Fox Lake Elementary School District 1 14, and has 
been'on the board the past five years. 

"I felt it was a way I could help my children and benefit 
hundreds of other children at the same time," he said. 

Lescher is not confined behind the dais of a board room, 
and actually gets out in the classrooms every once in a while, 
most recently Ian. 6, speaking about the scientific side of mu- 
sic to students of Stanton School, the district's sixth through 
eighth grade center. 

He also wants to improve the business community 
through his role as president of the Fox Lake. Economic Devel- 
opment Corporation, a group founded in 1993. 

The corporation was formed as a way to offer low income 
loans for remodeling projects by the Fox Lake Economic Com- 
mission, founded in 1988 and disbanded in 1998. 

Yet, the.corporatioh, with businessmen and women as its 
directors, lives on. While the loan program is long dead, as are 
other suggestions offered years ago, the corporation has new 
members bringing new ideas to the table. 

Lescher has also been on the board of directors of the Lake 
County Association of Realtors.for five years, and has served as 
chairman of the fair housing committee the past three years. 

Please see LESCHER IE1Q 




!:.'.'■- g 



E10- 



Profile 



Forefronts 



FROM PAGE E9 



Lescher 



He has been involved with the real estate business since 
1975, when he started buying and selling properties, and has 
been a licensed real estate agent since 1988, working at the An- 
tioch Re/Max office, where for the past six years, he has been 
assistant office manager, 

"I started buying apartment buildings in Chicago on the 
north side and doing some rehabilitation projects over there," 
he said. In 1986, he and Maxime bought a resort with a little 
restaurant and tavern on Pistakee Lake, which they called The 
Settle Inn on Eagle Point. 

"Both my wife and I had backgrounds in the restaurant 
business/' he said. 

Working at a restaurant is how they met in the early 1970s . 
on the north side of Chicago. "My wife was a hostess and I got 
a job delivering pizzas at The Spot," he said. He eventually be- 
came manager of the restaurant, and Maxime became dining 
room manager. 

Lescher may have spent more time in clubs and restaurants 
than working in them, due to his other background as a musi- 
cian. 

"By the late '70s, I was on the road traveling with a rock 
band, and she would go along and work the lights," he said. 

He played piano in the band Four Play from 1976 to 1983. 
This was during the time when disco and punk music was the 
new rage, leaving Four Play's rock 'n roll repertoire on the out- 
side looking in. 



"We kept busy with club work," Lescher said. "We were 
probably a good band in the wrong era," he joked. 

"We probably played 50 weeks a year," he said, all through- 
out the Midwest, including the former Little Johns in McHenry 
and the Brat Stop In Kenosha. 

They played some original songs and copies for the clubs, 
and even put out a 45, but could not get a record contract. 
Lescher quit the band following the birth of his son, and went 
. the solo route, playing piano 35 to 40 weekends a year through - 
out Chicago. 

Lescher caught the "band bug" again In the early 
1990s, when he formed the Michael Lescher Band, a four- 
piece group that plays clubs around the Chicago area. 

The thrill of being in a rock band ended Lescher 's collegiate 
career short of a degree, after spending two years at Quincy 
College, and some time at Marquette University, where he was 
studying liberal arts. 

The Leschers demolished their resort in 1991 and built a 
home on the land. "We live two doors away from mat site," he 
said. 

Lescher has since bought and sold several other homes in 
the area, Including one to Peter Hoyt, drummer in the Michael 
Lescher Band and Four Play. 

"I sold him a house on Pistakee Lake," he said. "He got 
tired of driving up here from Glenview for gigs." 

Everything Lescher does takes up a lot of his time, yet he 
would not have it any other way. "I find it personally reward- 
ing," he said. "I find the relationships I establish with people 
very enjoyable. 

"I have always felt everybody ought to pitch in and help 




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their community," Lescher said. 

"I see Fox Lake as a village with loads of potential and I do 
not feel in the time I have been here it has achieved what it 
could be," he said. "I would see my role in the future as pitch- 
ing In anywhere I thought I could help to achieve that poten- 
tial." 




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Forefronts 



Profile 




-hi 





Rev. Brad Lutz ministers to those society would outcast 
including AIDS victims and homosexuals 



^ 
t'„ 



w 






o be patient toward all that is un- 
solved in your heart and to try to 
love the questions themselves like 
locked rooms and like books that are 
written in a very foreign tongue. Do not 
seek the answers, which cannot be given you 
because you would not be able to live them. 
And the point is to live everything. Live the 
questions now. 

Rainer Maria Rilke 

By Rhonda Hetrick Burke 

This Is the Reverend Brad Lutz's favorite quote. 

It defines this man who is priest, counselor and advo- 
cate. 

Lutz says his decision to be a pastor was decided when 
"he was still in the womb." 

"My sense of calling is so deep it precedes my aware- 
ness," Lutz said. 

Growing up in Tafnaqua County, Pennsylvania, Lutz 
and his family attended the United Church of Christ. He 
says it was. the social center of the small 10,000- member 
community. 

"My mother was the assistant organist and while she 
practiced I would crawl up into the pulpit and play minis- 



ter. It is all I ever wanted to do." 

„ From high school, Lutz went directly into the seminary 
for the church. 

He was confirmed as a pastor in 1974. During his min- 
istry with the UCC he has worked in pastoral care, min- 
istry.youth fellowship and teaching. 

In the late 1980s, Lutz became the resident manager of 
a home in Cincinnati for AIDS patients. He did so as the 
plight of those with AIDS was first being thrust into the 
national spotlight 

"I was their pastoral leader," Lutz said of the home's 
residents. 

. "It was one of the first AIDS residency homes outside 
; of a major metropolitan city," Lutz said. He received the 
Ohio Department of Health AIDS Award for his work in 
Cincinnati. The plaque hangs behind his desk at the First 
Congregational United Church of Christ in Waukegan, 
where he has been pastor since 1992. 

Lutz arrived in Waukegan in July of 1992 after being ac- 
ceptance as pastor of the church by its board. 

In December of 1992, he held the first candlelight vigil 
for AIDS awareness in Lake County. He was also the first 
to observe World AIDS Day. 

When Lutz came to Waukegan in 1992, he became in- 
volved in the Lake County HIV-AIDS Network. The Net- 
work includes members from the Lake County Health De- 
partment, Catholic. Charities and other social agencies. 
Out of the group grew the AIDS Two-Year Plan, a study 
which identified housing as the number one heed for peo- 
ple with HIV/AIDS; 

In response to the need for housing for these individu- . 
als, Alexian Brothers, a Catholic order dedicated to caring 




;./»•> 



A 



for the poor, outcast and 
dying, opened The Harbor 
in Waukegan as a home for 
AIDS victims. Lutz was 
hired by Alexian Brothers 
to locate a facility and set- 
up the program. 

The home opened in 
May of 1998. 

"We had a lot of opposi-' 
tion, initially, from the 
community," he said. "We. 
had to show them we are 
hot a-fly-by-night opera- 
tion. We are a good neigh- 
bor." 

The Harbor provides a 
supportive place to help 
lowrincome people suffer- 
ing from HIV/ AIDS and re- 
covering from substance 
abuse to become healthy so they can live independently. 

It's not uncommon for an HIV-positive person to have 
problems with substance or drug abuse, according to Lutz. 
These problems compound their financial instability and : : 
lack of support system. 

Now that the home is open and running, Lutz has 
handed-bff day to day operations to a full-time program - 
administrator. He remains on the board of directors and 
provides pastoral care for the eight residents in the pro- 

Please see LUTZ /El 2 




^llZ— 






Profile 



-Forefronts 



i 



■•■"" 



PAGE Ell 



Lutz 






til 




gram. 

His work to set up the facility will be recognized annur 
- ally following a vote of the Board of Directors to establish 
the Rev. Brad Lutz Community Service Award. It recog- 
nizes the work of an individual who becomes involved in 
. the community. 

"The first recipient this year was Coroner Barbara 
Richardson," Lutz said. 

Lutz's work with less fortunate people and AIDS vic- 
tims follows a long-established tradition of the UCC. 

"The United Church of Christ 
has always been a. very liberal 
main-line Protestant Church," Lutz 
said 

"The UCC has a long history of 
placing their authority in the local 
congregation. When our national 
church says something we can re- 
spectfully disagree," he said. "Lo- 
cal autonomy is very difficult for 
most congregations." 

In the midr 1800s it was the UCC 
to which most northern abolition- 
ists belonged. TheWaukegan 

Church split over the issue of slavery in the 1850s and be- 
came the present day First United Church of Christ. To- 
day, the church, which Lutz pastors is the oldest congre- 
gation in Waukegan. 

Lutz believes the UCC's open-minded philosophy car- 
ries with it a responsibility to "struggle with social issues." 

The church was very active during the Civil Rights 
movement in tiie 1960s. In the early 1970s, it became in- 
volved in the rights of gays. They were the first church to 
ordain an openly-gay man in 1973. 

"It was a natural evolution," Lutz said. 

Many UCC churches are open and affirming, meaning 
they accept openly gay members into their parishes and 
many will perform marriage ceremonies for gay members. 
- The First Congregational United Church of Christ in 
Waukegan made the decision to become accepting in Au- 
gust of 1995. It followed six intensive sessions that dis- 
cussed gay inclusion on a social and theological level. 

The vote by the church members was extremely tense 




for Lutz. He had not brought the discussion up for vote, 
but he had told church members that he himself was ho- 
mosexual. 

Lutz came to terms with his own sexuality later in his 
adult years. He believes "each individual's sexuality is a 
gift from God." 

Lutz says response to the church's decision has been 
very positive. 

"Gay people can't believe there is a place where they 
are welcome to worship God," he said. 

Diversity, however, is not the norm, in the 66-member 
parish. 

"We probably have just four church members who are 



God created people for 
relationships and to live in 
relationships. I don't think 
gender makes a difference 

REV; BRAD LUTZ 



gay." Lutz said. "There are several others who attend 
church on a regular basis." 

As part of the church's open and affirming viewpoint, 
Lutz performs marriage ceremonies for gay couples. 

"I approach it in the same manner as I do a heterosexu- 
al couple," Lutz said. "There is required pre-marriage 
counseling where we discuss the same issues as heterosex- 
ual couples." 

The ceremony provides the couples with no legal 
rights, but does give them an opportunity to declare their 
love and commitment before God and their families. 

"God created people for relationships and to live in re- 
. lationships," Lutz said. "I don't think gender makes a dif- 
ference." 

As for himself, Lutz is in a committed relationship, but 
has not participated in a marriage ceremony with his part- 
ner. 
, At his church he also does special pastoral care and re- 
treats for homosexuals. Where he finds most issues deal 




with family pressures and rejections* he also counsels ho- 
mosexual couples to get legal counseling on issues such as: 
powers of attorney and property. 

It is a subject with which Lutz can relate. 
"My family and I really don't discuss my sexuality," 
Lutz said. It is something of which they are aware. 

Lutz does not see a time in the near future when homo- 
sexual couples will be given full rights for property such as 
married heterosexual couples. 

"At this point it is still hard enough to get sexual orien- 
tation' in cludecl irrthe Hate Crimes Bill," Lutz said. "They 
don't want special rights, they just want the same rights." 
Lutz believes people do not make the choice to be gay. 
He feels all to often the Bible is used to con- 
demn people when that is not its intended 
use at all. 

"The question is how do you use the 
Bible in a positive way instead of to beat 
people over the head. I can come up with 
250 passages on how to treat people who 
are different and they begin to put things in 
a positive light," he said. 

For Lutz the Bible is "not authoritative 
but fundamental." "For me it is a place to 
start," Lutz said. He feels God speaks to 
people through the Bible but that we have a 
responsibility to interpret his messages for 
our times. 

"At the heart of the Biblical message is that God is 
deeply concerned for the 'defenseless,'" Lutz said. "When 
I read the stories of Jesus, he was aware of people on the 
fringe of acceptance by society. He taught us to show hos- 
pitality to them with ho questions asked." 

This central message of the Bible has become the mis- 
sion of Lutz's life. 

"You have to accept the call (of God.) It will lead you 
where you are to go." 

Lutz says it is because of his faith that he has come to 
work with AIDS patients, the homeless and habitat for hu- 
manity and other causes. 

He see his role as a church leader as a delicate one. 
"You have access to people's lives like few others do. You 
see people at their best and their worst, at celebrations and 
in times of tragedy," Lutz said. "I have been called to be 
faithful and called to.be a pastor and a teacher .of the, faith. I 
accomplish this not on my skillbutpn God's grace." 




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E29 




Magna Charter 

Looking at the charter school concept on a grand scale 







Residents of 



e Prairie Crossing subdivision in Grayslake are lookin 



>rward to their charter school, which will be in a restored school house, starting in the fall. 
They Include: Richard Kaplan, William Kaplan, 17 months, Ellen Wihick and her daughter Emma Mitchiner, 2, Forrest and Quentin Siegel, 3, Janet Seigel, Amy Frey, 
Jackson Frey, 2, Zachary Frey, 4, Tracy Goldberg, Max Goldberg, 2, Mike Wall and Ethan Wall, 10 rnonths.^/ioto by Sandy Bressner 



char-ter \ 'charlte(r)\ n 1: an official document granting 
rights or privileges (as to a colony, town, or college) from a. 
sovereign or a governing body 

2; a special privilege, immunity, or exemption that is pub- 
licly conceded or generally understood. 

G barter schools/Those two words, and 
the concepts accompanying them, 
can spur a conversation or debate. 
They are words and concepts 
which have become prevalent in the minds 
of many in Lake County recently, with the ap- 
proval of one charter school and, prior to 
that, the denial of another. 

Beyond those two facilities, and those in- 
dividual cases lie the concepts, questions 
and arguments which could make charter 
schools prevalent in the minds of everyone 
interested in the future of education. 

ByJohnKmitta 

Finding a definition for those two words would be the place 
■ tostart 

" The founders of Prairie Crossing ; Charter School (PCCS), the 



first charter school in Lake County granted a charter by the state, 
defines charter school as "a public school, authorized bylaw, . 
which is funded.by per capita funding that follows the students 
who attend. 

Iii Illinois, a charter school may not charge tuition and must 
be non-discriminatory. Charter schools in Illinois are free from 
many restrictions which govern the operations of other public 
schools, but have strict accountability to the chartering authori- 
ty. 

Miriam Frank, a member of the PCCS board of directors, said 
the freedom given to charter schools provides the opportunity 
for choice in education. 

"People are interested in having alternatives in public educa- 
tion," she said 

The alternatives in education at PCCS are centered around a 
environmentally based curriculum. PCCS is located in Grayslake 
in the Prairie Crossing subdivision. It borders on Woodland 
School District 50 and Fremont School District 79. 

The school, scheduled to open In August of 1999, will be 
housed in a renovated school house with a capacity of 80 stu- 
dents. 

Those students will be drawn from both the Woodland and 
Fremont school districts. 

Founders of the school have stated that the learning pro- 
gram, centered around environmental science and civic respon- 
sibility accompanied by the natural surroundings and agricultur- 
al campus and the small student population, will provide indi- 
vidualized learning for each student in an intimate, country- 
school atmosphere. 

Frank said she does not know if Prairie Crossing will open the. 
doors for more charter schools in Lake County. She said the ef- 



fect remains to be seen and it would depend on the type of pro- 
gram the proposed schools offer. 

Vicky Ranhey, vice-president, Prairie Holdings Corporation, 
said she doesn't think it is just the passing of Prairie Crossing 
which will influence the creation of more charter schools in Lake 
County, but rather it is a statewide and national movement to 
create more charter schools. 

She said there have been talks in the Illinois legislature of 
raising the cap of how many charter schools can be formed in 
the state. 

"Charter schools are an idea whose time has come," Ranney 
said. 

Finding a definition. 

It maybe an idea whose time has come, but has the idea of a 
charter school been clearly established? 

One website devoted to charter school laws and concepts de- 
fines charter schools as independent public schools! designed 
and operated by educators, parents, community leaders, educa- 
tional entrepreneurs and others. They are spbnsorect by desig- 
nated local or state educational organizations who monitor their 
quality and integrity, but also alio w them to operate freed from 
traditional bureaucracies. 

Does that definition establish a commonalty between PCCS , 
and other charter schools? 

Barbara Shafer, founder of Liberty Hail, a charter school pro- 
posed for Li be rtyvilie which has been denied by the state board 
of education, was to be based on phonic-based English and ad- 
vanced science and technology. 

. . Please see SCHOOL? E30 



I 

J-' 

- 






E30 



1 * * -»■».. . 






— Forefronts 



:'. \ 



m 









> ; - 



FROM PAGE E29 



School 



Shafer said the proposal is on hold until the state legislature 
settles on a specific charter school structure. 

She said her group is still interested in the ideas they have 
put forth, but it remains to be seen if they will pursue an appeal 
on the charter school or form a private school. 

liberty Hall would probably have been a vastly different 
school than the country-style, environmentally-based Prairie 
Crossing. Is there a defining common bond? 

If the common bond is the funding structure and freedom 
from bureaucracies, what will the future hold for established 
charter schools if the concept of choice becomes a popular one? 

Frank said if the demand for enrollment is greater than the 
capacity amount of students PCCS can accommodate, the 
school will select students by way of a lottery system. 

She said the founders of PCCS would not consider expanding 
( beyond the student body cap of 330 because it would be contra- 
dictory to the school's goal of remaining small. 

If interest is great enough in PCCS to push enrollment appli- 
cations to far beyond what PCCS could handle the result could 
be two possible scenarios, Frank said. 

The first possibility is that the desire for the PCCS form of 
curriculum would spawn similar charter school proposals, she 
said. The second possible result could be a need by the public 
school system to alter the curriculum to meet the needs of the 
students. 

One of proposals before the state is to allow the founders of a 
. charter school to have their children as automatically enrolled in 
the charter school, Shafer said. 

The rest of the student population would then be by lottery. 

Frank said there are many proposals before the Illinois legis- 
lature which could alter the charter school laws. One of the ma- 
jor issues is the funding. 

She said the support PCCS shows for any specific funding 
structure would depend on the specifics of the proposal. 

Whatever funding structure is ultimately settled upon for 
. charter schools, PCCS will maintain a level of support, Frank 
said. 

Funding, then is most likely the defining characteristic. 

*a Finding a definition. 

Some have defined charter schools as "private schools which 
are publicly funded." 

Ed Gonwa, Regional Superintendent of Schools, said the 





Lake County superintendents group Is behind the concept of 
charter schools but, "they have a very serious problem with the 
present funding structure.'' 

Gonwa said that the Lake County superintendents want to 
develop a state-wide task force to look at the funding. 

He said the present charter school law should be changed to 
have the funding come from the state level which would spread 
the burden. 

Shafer said the one decision which would have a huge im- 



I think it does (place pressure 

on public schools), and that's a 

good thing, for the school and 

for choices 



VICKY RANNEY 
Prairie Crossing Charter School 

pact on charter school proposals is the funding structure. 

She said if the state legislature elects to go with a state funded 
structure of charter schools which were approved by the state 
board of education then the local boards would not have much, 
if any, opposition. 

"If the state is funding it makes it easier to initiates," he said. 

Gonwa said that with the current funding structure, the state 
is putting specific burdens on public school districts which are 
already strapped for funding. 

With the money leaving the public school district to fund 



ch art er schools it Is leaving many taxpayers wondering how that 
money is being spent, he said. \ 

Gonwa said me charter schools are essentially privatizing i 

public funds. \ 

He said the current structure leaves taxpayers wondering 
why they have to fund schools which are not being held to the 
same standards as public schools. 

The public school districts are accountable for every dollar 
spent, Gonwa said. There are very high standards placed on the 
public schools both academically and economically, he said. 

"Those same standards should apply to charter schools," 
Gonwa said. 

Frank said Prairie Crossing will require the students to 
meet all state test requirements. She said she feels this is 
another reason why PCCS was approved by the state. 

"We have to make sure they (the students) are pre- 
pared to handle the high school curriculum," she said. 

Frank said the standards for educators at a charter 
school are looser than the standards for public schools. 
For example, the teachers can be certified or non-certi- 
flebVshe said. 

Gonwa said charter schools are a relaxation of regulations 
which put people who may or may not have the proper creden- 
tials into positions of educating the youth of the community. 

Yet, when it comes to the public school district the hiring 
standards and the requirements for being a teacher are held to 
the utmost of scrutiny. 

Gonwa said that he just wants the same standards to apply to 
charter schools as apply to public schools. 

Please see SCHOOL /E38 




-rey, 2, plays 
his mom Amy during a play 
group. 



Custom Framing (All Sizes & Shapes) 
Matting - Frames - Glass - Mirrors 

• Gift Items 
Needlework Stretching 

The Professional Framers 

MUNDELEIN FRAME HOUSE 

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■ •;.;,.,,; Mundeleln, IL 60060 
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MEMBER OF THE MUNDELEIN MAINSTREET 






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Victory Lakes. . . The Natural Choice 

Victory Lakes provides family-centered, quality long'term care In a natural home-like environment. 
We realize ili.ii when a loved one must separate from the Family, it can be a difficult experience for everyone 
involved. Al Victory Lakes, we try to make this transition a little easier by having open visiting hours and 
encouraging family and friends to stop by and join in our many resident activities and holiday gatherings. 

Victory Lakes offers comfort, convenience and concern. From the raised, outdoor flower beds for our 
wheelchair-bound gardeners to the cozy dining room to our inhotise beauty parlor and colorful aviary to the 
sparkling clean living areas, loving care is evident everywhere. 

Come visit any time. Meet our professional staff. Gel to know firsthand what you can expect from a 
quality nursing home environment. 




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4 Alzheimer's and Related Disorders Unit 

♦ Respite Care Program-utwrifefif ia 30 days 

♦ Assisted Living 



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1055' East Grand Avenue 
Victory Lakes Uiulcnhurst ■ Illinois 

Continuing Care Center 7 miles west of Rt. 234 

Affiliated Willi Victory Memorial Hospital 



WY ic 



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At the Gurnee Park District, we 
understand the importance of getting 
girls involved in a sports program. 
Studies show that giris who 
participate in sports: 

© have higher self-confidence 

oj gain improved academic achievement 

© have a positive feeling about body Image . 

& learn decision-making skills, discipline and team work 

© are 40% less likely to dropout of high school 

® are 35 % less likely to become a teen mom 

& are less likely to smoke cigarettes 

© learn to feel less vulnerable and more powerful 

© learn to be both cooperative and competitive 




Give her the chance 
to take risks and 
you've given her a 
lifetime of benefits. 



Registrations are now being taken. To obtain a list of programs 
and a registration form, pick up a brochure at the Gurnee Park 
District, Warren Newport Library, Village Hall, or visit us on the 
Web at www.gurtieeparkdlstrlct.com. 



Gurnee Park District -setting the foundation for future champions. 



GURNEE PARK DISTRICT 

"1 4374 Grand Avenue, Gurnee, IL 6003 UPhonc (847) 623-7788 





) 



J 

Forefronts 



-E31 




" 2\nQfki?.-i r jhriii'. 




■■■■ - * \ 

University Center will serve the 
needs of an underserved market 




*! 



In the movie "Field of Dreams", who 
can forget the memorable lines of 
Shoeless Joe Jackson, "If you build 
it, they will come." 

Ed Moore knows the students 
will come when a new University Center is 
built in Lake County. He recently visited a 
similar facility in Houston which just 
opened last January; it already has more 
than 3,000 students. 

By John Roszkowski 
& Spencer Schein 

"I've been to the one in Houston. I'd love to have it in 
Lake County," Moore said. "It's state-of-the-art arid it's very 
busy. It's kind of like in the movie 'Field of Dreams': If you 
build it, they will come." 

A Lake County resident, Moore serves on the Illinois 
Board of Higher Education which will have the final say on 
where the University Center is located. Moore and other 
state board officials believe students will certainly come 
when the University Center of Lake County is built. 

"We anticipate the University Center will tap a need 
that will grow the number of people enrolled to. between 
-3,000 and 5;0Q0," said Don Sevener, director of.communlca-^ 



tions for the State Board of Higher Education. 

The idea of a University Center is a relatively new con- 
cept. There are three currently operating in Texas (including 
the Houston facility), four in Michigan, one in Maryland, one 
in Virginia and one in Ohio. The University Center of Lake ' 
County would be the first of its kind in Illinois. 

The College of Lake County, Lakehurst Shopping Center 
and a downtown Mundelein site are being considered as 
sites for the University Center. The state board will make a 
decision in April. 

The University Center of Lake County would be unlike a 
traditional four-year college or university in that it would of- 
fer only junior and senior level classes and graduate level 
courses. There would also be no .dormitories so students that 
use the University Center would not live on campus. 

"We don't anticipate it will grow to the size of a residen- 
tial university because it won't have freshman and sopho- 
more classes/' Sevener said. 

Still, the University Center will serve an important need 
for many potential students who would otherwise not have - 
an opportunity for higher education. 

"We believe the University Center will provide an attrac- 
tive alternative for those students who have to commute long 
distances to earn a degree," said Gretchen Naff, president of 
the College of Lake County, and a member of the University 
Center Task Force. 

Those commutes have students of all.ages traveling to 
Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, Barat College, Lake 
Forest College, or even Loyola and DePaul universities in 
Chicago' to attend classes. 

'/. "It wiU open lip the possibility of earning a degree for 
students who find the long commute impractical due to long 



working hours," Naff said. 

Naff said the University Center will serve many of the 
same types of students who are already attending CLC. "The 
average age of our students is over 30 and 80 percent of our 
students attend part-time," she said. 
• Having a University Center in Lake County to compli- 
ment the first two years offered at the College of Lake County 
will offer students the chance to earn college degrees without 
leaving the county's borders. But will they come? 

"Students will attend both schools," said Naff. "Research .-> 
has found that most potential students for the University 
Center are 'place bound' or are working adults who 'want to 
attend classes within a hajf hour of where they live or work. 

"We believe that our graduates will constitute the major- 
ity of the University Center's students, ■" she said. "A CLC 
graduate survey conducted by the Illinois Board of Higher 
Education indicated that about two-thirds of the respon- 
dents plan to take a college-level course within the next three 
years, arid would be interested in enrolling at the University 
Center." 

Research conducted by the Illinois Board of Higher Edu- 
cation indicates Lake County residents are interested in the 
University Center to enhance specificskills for job advance- 
ment and to earn either a bachelor's or master's degree. 

"Those surveyed indicated most interest in such areas as 
computer science, business, teacher education; accounting, 
educational administration, health services or engineering," 
said Naff. "Convenience and affordability are also expec'ta- 
. tions voiced by residents," she added. 

The idea for a University Center of Lake County is not a , 

Please see UNIVERSITY IE32 



'■'■"■ :!: ' : '— -^ 



-'-•— '' r 



fl 



Forefronts 




FROM PAGE E31 



University 





There are some programs we 
aren't able to offer now because 

there's not enough space. This 

will allow us to offer additional 

programs we can't do now 

KATHY JOHNSON 

Coordinator of the 

multi-university program 



completely new one; in fact, the concept originated more 
than two years ago. In the fall of 1996, the University of Illi- 
nois, in conjunction with 1 1 universities and colleges 
throughout Illinois, were directed by the state to work to- 
gether to create "a Multi-University Center." 

Lake County's Multi- University Center currently offers 
upper division and graduate level classes to nearly 1,000 stu- 
dents in the county, according to Kalhy Johnson, coordinator 
of the program. Faculty from each of the 12 universities teach 
the courses which are offered at multiple sites throughout 



Lake County, including Grayslake, Gurnee, Waukegan and 
Vernon Hills. 

When the Multi- University Center was created, Johnson 
said, "We concluded we needed to build the University Center 
to expand programs." 

"I think the state has projected the facility will be able to 
serve about 5,000 students," she said. "There are some pro- . 
grams we aren't able to offer now because there's not enough 
space. This will allow us to offer additional programs we can't 
do now." 

Johnson said the University Center will primarily be used 
by students who can't leave the county to attend school be- * 
cause of job and family commitments. 

"Those will primarily be adults who are looking for 



evening classes," she said. "The goal is really to try to meet the 
needs of an underserved education market." 

Moore noted that many of the students simply can't af- 
ford the cost of going to school elsewhere. 

"This creates an opportunity for them to extend 
their education they wouldn't otherwise have," he 
said. 

In addition to serving on the State Board of Higher Edu- 
cation, Moore has a personal interest in seeing the University . 
Center be built in Lake County. He's lived here for the past 21 
years. 

"I'm very pleased to be playing a part in bringing educa- 
tional opportunities to a large number of people in Lake 
County," he said. 




WE'LL MIND YOUR BUSINESS 



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223-2929 



868 E. BeMdere (Rte. 120) 

Suite 114 
' Grayslake, 111:60030 
Fax (847) 223-3221 







Calvary Presbyterian Church 







The Rev. Lisle J. Kauffman 
Pastor 

Sunday 

9:30 • Innovative Worship 
11:00 - Traditional Worship 

9:30 -11:00 Sunday School 

Child Care Provided at Both Services 



546-4444 

Serving Our Lord Since 1952 
510 Cedar Lake Rd. Round Lake 



Plan on a 
wonderful way 

toJM Jpl 





GRAYSLAKE COMMUNITY PARK DISTRICT 

We have tons of fun In store for you this summorl Come check us out! 
•Adventure Day Camp - K through 6th Grade 
•Tiny Tots Camp - 3 & 4 yrs. 
•Totally Two Camp - 2 yrs. 
•Sports Camps - 4 - 12 yrs. 

•Specialized Camps Include: , , 

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PLUS MANY MORE PROGRAMS AND "3 " 

EVENTS FOR ALL AGE GROUPSI />, 

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All camp Information will be available In March. Complete summer brochure 

comes out In mld-Aprll. Stop by the Park District office at 151 Hawley St. to 

pick up your camp brochure. Call us at 223-7529 for more Information. 




Charlotte Zwisster and Betty Anderson are just gelling b know 
each other. Nothing like a continual bicycle trip to make a friend. 

Keep the part of your lifestyle you want to keep, 
add the extra time you've always wanted to have; 
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atVktory Lakes 
1075 Victory Drive Undcnhurst, Illinois 60046 



*■-■ 






D34- 



Forefronts 



. 



hURErROJNlS 1999 

X The premier progress edition 

for Lake County 

Forefronts, Lake County Progress 1999 takes a look at who is making a 
difference in Lake County and where the county is headed for the future. 

This special section begins with profiles of the 10 most interesting people 
in Lake County this year as chosen by the editorial staff. Lakeland Newspa- 
pers feels the selection represents a cross section of occupations and goals. 
Some of the personalities may be controversial, nevertheless, we feel these in- 
dividuals are influencing the direction of LakeCounty. 
We welcome your comments, call (847)223-8161. 

Founder: M.R. Schroeder (1904-1986) 

Publisher: William H. Schroeder 

Comptroller: Mimi Koob 

Executive Editor: Neal Tucker 

Managing Editor: Rhonda Hetrick Burke 

Display Advertising Manager: Bob Ulmer 

Classified Manager: Maureen Combs 

Circulation Manager: Karen O'Toole 



Staff Writers: Brendan O'Neill, John Roszkowski, 

Kenneth Patchen, Spencer Schein, 

Lee Filas, John Krnitta, Korrina Grom, 

Leslie Piotrowski, 

Adriana Mercado 

Photographer: Sandy Bressner 

Cover photos: Sandy Bressner, Lynn Gunnarson Dahlstrom 

Cover Design: Robert Wulff 




Thelen provides complete packages from 
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Libertyville/Mundelein/Vernon Hills Area 
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Lake County's Largest Association Of Local 

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Libertyville, Illinois 60048 




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Call Today for Membership Information 







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If you are looking for a Christ Centered-Bible. Based Church 

Come Crow With Us! 

(New worship facilities currently being built on Rt. 120 between Alleghany & Hainesville Rds.) 



'i 



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28955 W. Highway 173 

Antioch, IL 60002 

847-395-3313 

815-675-6613 



Wilmot Ready Mix 
29901 W. Highway C 

Wilmot, Wl 53192 
414-862-2324 
800-537-2324 



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847-662-0760 

ihmahi knouii tt< Uhlum!'* 

[uwouw Rutihi Mix Co. Iik.i 



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Sunday School and t 
Adult Bible Study 9:3 

Celebration Worship 10:30 

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VISIT US AT OUR WEBSITE: www.thelensg.com 



For more information 

Call (847) 548-LORD 

Office: 888 E. Belvidere Rd. • Suite #300 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

Pastor: Rev. Glenn S. Brauer 






Forefronts 



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Peppercorns Grille 

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Meeting Rooms 

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Extensive catering selection for every type event- 
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More and more, business decision-makers are realizing that the Internet is'a powerful tool for buying, selling, and information 

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^ 847-587-631 1 

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aukegaii Safe 
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Forefronts 



■E37 



\ 









■ 

8 

15 

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Forefronts 



| 






FROM PAGE E30 



School 



"I just want fairness," he said. 



Finding a definition. 

G6nwa's point of fairness brings us back to the second part 
of the definition of charter; a special privilege, immunity, or ex- 
emption that is publicly conceded or generally understood. 

Although not everyone may understand the concept of char- 
ter schools, Ranney said those special privileges, combined with 
the passing of Prairie Crossing and the growth of the charter 
school concept helps to put positive pressure on the public 
school districts to create more innovative programs and become 
more like charter schools as schools of choice. 

"I think it does (place pressure on public schools), and that's 
a good thing for the school and for choices," she said. 

Frank said some people may think the purpose of charter 
schools is to put pressure on the public schools to change the 
curriculum. She said that may be the intent of some people, but 
she sees charter schools as another option and people like to 
have the option to choose a charter school. 

The argument that charter schools put pressure on public 



schools Is an old argument, Gonwa said. 

The problem with that model is you have to do more with 
less," he said. 

Gonwa said the charter schools are taking funding away from 
the public school district which then prevents the public school 
from having the money to fund innovative programs. 

He said he likes the direction the Lake County school districts 
are going. 

"Our public schools are doing better and better," he said. The 
schools are improving in testing, planning and working with the 
state, he said. 

"How can you question a school district with an exemplary 
record," Gonwa said. 

Gonwa said it is going to be hard for charter schools to offer 
programs which are better than those offered by the public 
school district 

He said it is the inherent job of the boards of education for 
each district to look at the needs of the children in the communi- 
ty and offer the best possible programs. 

As in the case of the proposed libertyville charter school; 
Gonwa said it would be tough for a group to come into a district 
which has won state awards for innovative programs and say 
that you can do better with a charter school. 

Shafer, differed in opinion with Gonwa, but said that If the 



public schools do create more choices there would not be talk of 
charter schools. ' 

"Right now, there are no options in the public school sys- 
tem," Shafer said. "One size fits all does not fit alL" 

She said if the public school systems opened the door to a 
wider range of teaching options and gave the parents a choice of 
learning programs she would not be considering the formation 
of a charter school. 

Shafer said if there were a number of options available 
and the doors for communication between school and par- 
ent were wide open, the need for charter schools might be 
eliminated. , 

She said she feels charter schools are not the ultimate answer 
for education, but more a intermediary step to reaching the ulti- 
mate scenario. 

Charter schools may not be easily defined. Perhaps an at- 
tempt to define charter schools is in vain because each one is 
self-defining. They stand alone, freed from the structure which 
would define them. 

Perhaps the key to defining charter schools lies inherently in 
the state creating a more defined structure. 

In the end in may negate the need to search for a definition 
and instead open the door to something altogether new instead. 
As Barbara Shafer said, the next step in education. 




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LAKE VILLA 


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6:17 


6:49 


7:18 


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MUNDELE1N 


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7:24 


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VERNON HILLS 


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6:29 


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7:30 


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O'HARE TRANSFER TO ANTIOCH: WEEKDAY SCHEDULE 


STATION 


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4:59 


5:29 


6:15 


6:46 


PROSPECT HEIGHTS 


2:04 


5:09 


5:39 


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2:09 
2:14 


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5:48 


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6:35 


7:01 


7:05 


PRAIRIE VIEW 


2:18 


5:22 


5:52 


6:39 


7:09 


VERNON HILLS 


2:21 


5:25 


5:55 


6:42 


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2:27 


5:31 


6:01 


6:48 


7:18 


PRAIRIE CROSSING/ 












UBERTYVILLE 


2:33 


5:37 


6:07 


6:54 


7:24; 


ROUND LAKE BEACH 2:39 


5:43 


6:13 


7:00 


7:30 


LAKE VILLA 


2:43 


5:47 


6:17 


7:04 


7:34 


AR: ANTIOCH 


2:52 


5:55 


■ 6:25 


.7:12 


7:42 



p 



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Forefronts 



f 







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Forefronts 



Profile 



4DI 



Linda Nersen 








It began with school, then chairing the Antioch Centennial andpoMcalfundraising. 
Now, Antioch'sown Linda Pedersen is legislative aide to State Rep. Tim Osmond. 



The moment a person volunteers to 
do something is very simple. 
This is a story about the enrich- 
ment that occurs as a person helps 
build a community and a life as a volunteer. 

By Kenneth LR.Patchen 

4 

At the end of April, 1097 former presidents of the United 
States George Bush and Jimmy Carter, President BUI Clinton, 
and Gen. Colin L Powell gathered in Philadelphia. They were 
at the Presidents' Summit for America's Future for a three-day 
symposium to encourage a nationwide commitment to volun- 
teering. 

"I'm here because I want to redefine the meaning of citi- 
zenship In America," Clinton said. "I want the answer to be, 
'Well, to be a good citizen, you have to obey the taw, you've got 
to go to work or be in school, yoii've got to pay your taxes , 
and— oh, yes, you have to serve in your community to help 
make It a better place. 1 " 

,;ii -'Theintent.of^e symposium \vas to focus attention on the v 
need for and the accomplishments of volunteers in communi- , 
ty life: These past and present leaders of the country had come 
together to focus attention on the need to reclaim the troubled 
spirit of volunteerism In America. 

"It creates a great spirit," said Linda Pedersen, of Antioch. 
"You reap a lot of benefits from (volunteering)." 

For her, the spirit of volunteer activity is what makes Anti- 
och a special community. In addition, for her, it has been a 
• major part of her adult life in the community. Pedersen be- 
lt creates a great spirit. You 
reap a lot of benefits from 
(volunteering) 

LINDA PEDERSEN 

- - «-. 

Heves that she Is a better person for it. She believes that the vol- 
unteers she has worked with through the years have helped to 
build a wonderful community. 

Today, she serves as president of the Tenth District of the 
General Federation of Women's Clubs of Illinois.* She works as 
a legislative aide to State Representative Timothy H. Osmond , 
(R-DIst. 62). After decades of community volunteer work, she is 
now bringing those skills to a larger region of Lake County. 
i Pedersen also has a very rewarding personal life. She is 
married to Dean A. Pedersen , Sr. who is a partner in Pedersen 
i GMC Truck of Antioch. Their son Dean A. Pedersen Jr. works in 
an advertising agency in Chicago. Daughter Jeanhine L Peder- 
sen works as curator of collections at Catallna Island Museum 
in California. [ 

"What originally got me started is (that) I got involved at 
: school with the ldds," she said. "When my son was in second 
grade, I ran for school board." 

i The principal at the school had encouraged her to consider 
running for the school board, and Pedersen decided to accept 
the encouragement. 

"I give her a lot of credit," she said. "She saw something in 
me. 

."I really enjoyed working with people; It snowballed from 
there." 

Pedersen was elected to the St. Peter's School board in An- 
tioch where she served two three-year terms. Four of those 
years she served as president. 

It was during the years at St. Peter's School that she came 
' to know a small group of women who worked during the day 









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and who wanted to work together on community projects. 
They wanted to be part of a woman's club but could not meet 
during the day. 

Her mother-in-law, Florence Pedersen, was president of 
the Tenth District of the Illinois General Federation of Wom- 
an's Clubs. She helped the 10 women organize themselves into 
aclub. 

"We had the first three meetings in the basement of my 
house," Linda Pedersen said. They organized the club, wrote 
by-laws/scheduled a meeting room at the library, and went • 
looking for more members. 

Today, the members of the Antioch Junior Woman's Club 
meet in the Maplethorpe Room of the Community Building, j 
884 Main Street, downtown. 



"When I really started to get involved with the community, 
it was through the junior woman's club," Pedersen said. She i 
also remained involved with St, Peter Church. 

In 1982 she was asked to be on the St Peter's School Foot- 
lights Committee. FooUights is a community-wide social insti- 
tution of music, food, entertainment, and humor. Footlights 
was intended to help support St Peter's School financially. It 
continues to do that, and it helps to hold down the cost of tu- 
ition. 

In 1990, the Antioch Rescue Squad asked the junior wom- 
an's club to help it hold a 50th anniversary celebration. "I 



Please see PEDERSEN 7 £14 



Ell- 



Profile 



Forefronts 



> 



FROM PAGE E13 



Pedersen 



thought it was a wonderful idea," Pedersen said. 

The club took on the assignment and filled Maravela's Inc. 
banquet facility in Fox Lake with grateful people. 

"It was wonderful/' Pedersen said. "We made $13,000 for 
the squad." 

"I think from that is where things blossomed/' she said of 
her volunteer career. "The rescue squad dinner was what really 
got me out into the community part of it" 

Also in 1990, Mayor Robert C. Wilton asked William E. 
Brook, President of the State Bank of Antioch, and Linda Peder- . 
sen to co-chair the village's Centennial Committee. They each 
picked three people to serve on the committee. 

"It was time consuming, but we did some wonderful 
things." Indeed, two of the major centennial-inspired events 
continue in the community to this day. The first was the day- 
long Independence Day celebration itself and the other was 
construction of a large playground at Centennial Park. To this 
day, the Centennial Park playground remains a touchstone of 
the volunteer spirit in the heart of Antioch. 

"I think it was just really something that pulled this com- 
munity together," Pedersen said. 

It also pulled her into the fund-raising events of the com- 
munity. "There's a fund-raiser every month in this town," she 
said. 

As a result, community groups are wise to carefully sched- 
ule and consider their events. The challenge is to create fresh 
interest and excitement for people to attend an evenL 

That problem faced the Antioch Junior Woman's Club a few 
years ago as they considered their annual fund-raiser. Their ob- 
jective was to create something different that would appeal to a 
lot of people. They chose comedy. This year, this April, the club 
will host its third comedy night. 

"It has been very weU attended and we've raised some good 
money ... It all goes back into the community, and we have a 
good time." 

"You can have a good time doing all these things," Pedersen 
said. 

Actually, according to Pedersen, fun occurs both ways and 
volunteers are the ones who benefit. There is the fun that peo- 
ple have together as they plan, promote, and produce an event. 
Second, there is the fun people have who attend the event. 

Pedersen is deeply involved in only a few of the many 



events that occur in Antioch. 
The Antioch Junior Woman's 
Club, Antioch Rotary Club, 
and St Peter Church's Foot- 
lights are some of the most 
evident organizations with 
which she works. 

: "I really like the Rotary 
Club. I really enjoy it," said 
Pedersen. 

She served as president 
in 1997. Prior to that she was 
the Treasurer, Secretary, 
Presldent-Elect, and Pork- 
chop Auction Chairman. 

The Antioch Rotary Club 
has several female members. 
She was not the first. "The 
guys couldn't have been 
nicer," Pedersen said. "They 
have been wonderful from 
. the git-go." 

. In recent years, Pedersen 
has begun to add to her local 
volunteer action the greater responsibilities of regional volun- 
teer activity. Now she has moved more deeply into regional ac- 
tivities through Illinois state politics and the Illinois Federation 
of Women's Clubs. 

"The General Federation of Woman's Clubs is the largest 
volunteer organization In the world," Pedersen said. The junior 
woman's clubs are growing, and there is a program for even 
younger women. 

The tenth district has 27 woman's clubs and they are part of 
the state organization, which is part of the national federation. 
"It is a wonderful network," Pedersen said. 
Because.of the woman's club, and her work with the 
state federation, she has had the opportunity to travel ex- 
tensively. "I have hit 'almost' every town in the State of 
Illinois in the last seven or eight years," she said.."It's been 
very educational," 

She'shares ideas with other state leaders about what hap- 
pens in the tenth district She learns about what other commu- 
nities are doing. "You leam from other communities." 

In recent years, Pedersen has begun to work more exten- 
sively in politics. 

"I've been'involved in pbliticsmore in the background," 




she said. She had helped with fund-raisers for former State 
Representative Robert W, Churchill. A member of the Antioch 
Republican Club, she has served as a precinct committeeman. 

"This last year was the first time I took the plunge," Peder- 
sen said. "I enjoyed it" In 1998, she ran for Lake County office 
as a District 1 Representative but was not elected. 

Pedersen has served as an assistant legislative aide for 
Churchill and now works as a legislative aide for Osmond. 

Last year Pedersen was awarded a fellowship for the 1998 
Illinois Lincoln Excellence In Public Service. The fellowship 
program provided her with educational seminars and training 
to participate in politics. The program took her all over the state 
and to Washington, D.C. 

"It's a group of Republican women involved in the political 
process," she said. "It's a mentoring process." 

The intent of the program Is to bring women Into politics, 
"It was a well-rounded program," she said. 

Fellowship activities provided her With skills and training to 
manage larger events at a state level of political responsibility in 
addition to the local level. . 

Because of all of her own positive, diverse, local, and 
now regional, experiences as a volunteer, she has been very 
enthusiastic about the need for other people to become in- 
volved. 

"It's not one person who can take credit fordoing all these' 
things," she said. One person can get the ball rolling, according 
to Pedersen, but many others have to join in. 

She said that it is very strange to her, but people will not 
volunteer on their own initiative. People seem to want to be 
asked. "If we could get past that, we'd have a lot more people 
out there." 

She does not believe that volunteer effort Is an anachro- 
nism. It's health may be a concern among Presidents and Gen- 
erals at the national level/but at the local level of Antioch, she . 
can still recognize its strength. 

"Personally, in the last five years, (I think) volunteering is 
getting even stronger." 

"I really enjoy it," she said. "If people tried it a little more, 
they would see how much they get out of it It's been one of my 
passions." 

She has found many friends who enrich her life. She appre- 
ciates the wealth of information it has given to her, as well as 
the free education. She appreciates the opportunities it has cre- 
ated for her. She believes that volunteer work provides person- 
al rewards as well as group rewards. 

"You reap a lot of benefits from it," Pedersen si 



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Forefronts 



Profile 



415 



lack Martin 




Jack Martin, owner of the nation's premier equine retail business, 
creates a legacy by speaking out on the issues of taxation and 



Libertyville Saddle Shop, 
right 'candidates 






Jack Martin takes his business seri- 
ously - along with just about every- 
thing else he does. 
But then Martin, owner of the 
Libertyville Saddle Shop, is not your 
ordinary businessman. 

By John Roszkowski 

A lifelong resident of Libertyville, Martin has taken an 
active role in local business groups and community is- 
sues. He^has been past president of the Libertyville Ro- 
tary Club, serves on a local bank board and is vice-chair- 
man of the LMV Chamber of Commerce! 

He has also led a local crusade against escalating 
property taxes and has actively supported the political 
campaigns of many Republican; Party candidates. 

Martin is not one to shy away from delicate issues. 

"I try to express myself honestly. I'm known to be 
very string ^wUled/'.^aid thb.57^ 

''I'm'lrivdl'ved.'i'mTrivoived in'a lot ; of issues and it all 
comes back to a personal commitment I have." 

In addition to his business and community, involve-' 
ments, Martin is a man of many Interests; He is aworld 
traveler and is proud to be an amateur chef. He has even 
iprlnted his, own/ world famous" recipe for making risotto . 
with tomatoes and parmesan. 

"I'm happy to be an amateur chef. I usually cook on 
Fridays and Sundays. My mother's. French and she. was a 
tremendous cook," he said. 

One can get a flavor for who Jack Martin is by a quick 
glance around his office. Hanging on one wallis mock 
front page of Time Magazine produced by the company's 
design staff. It has a large portrait of Martin with him fea- 
tured as Time's "Man of the Year." 

His office is adorned with portraits of horses, reflect- " 
ing his love for the family business he's been involved in 
since the 1960s. 

. One wall is a picture that was taken of him riding 
back in 1948 when he was only eight or nine years old. AK 
though his business is for horse enthusiasts, that picture 
may have been one of trie last times he ever rode a horse. 

"I enjoy horses because I'm in the business, but I 
don't ride," Martin admits. 

Please see MARTIN /E16 





Eii- 



ProBle 



Forefronts 



FROM PAGE E13 



Pedersen 



> 



thought it was a wonderful Idea/' Pedersen said. 

The club took on the assignment and filled Maravela's Inc. 
banquet facility in Fox Lake with grateful people. 

"It was wonderful," Pedersen said. "We made $13,000 for 
the squad." 

"I think from that is where things blossomed," she said of 
her volunteer career. "The rescue squad dinner was what really 
got me out into the community part of it." 

Also in 1990, Mayor Robert C. Wilton asked William E. 
Brook, President of the State Bank of Antioch, and Linda Peder- . 
sen to co-chair the village's Centennial Committee. They each 
picked three people to serve on the committee. 

"It was time consuming, but we did some wonderful 
things." Indeed, two of the major centennial-inspired events 
continue in the community to this day. The first was the day- 
long Independence Day celebration itself and the other was 
construction of a large playground at Centennial Park. To this 
day, the Centennial Park playground remains a touchstone of 
the volunteer spirit in the heart of Antioch. 

"I think it was just really something that pulled this com- 
munity together," Pedersen said. 

It also pulled her into the fund-raising events of the com- 
munity. "There's a fund-raiser every month in this town," she 
said. 

As a result, community groups are wise to carefully sched- 
ule and consider their events. The challenge is to create fresh 
interest and excitement for people to attend an event 

That problem faced the Antioch Junior Woman's Club a few 
years ago as they considered their annual fund-raiser. Their ob- 
jective was to create something different that would appeal to a 
lot of people. They chose comedy. This year, this April, the club 
will host its third comedy night. 

"It has been very well attended and we've raised some good 
money ... It all goes back into the community, and we have a 
good time." 

"You can have a good time doing all these things," Pedersen 
said. 

Actually, according to Pedersen, fun occurs both ways and 
volunteers are the ones who benefit. There is the fun that peo- 
ple have together as they plan, promote, and produce an event. 
Second, there is the fun people have who attend the event. 

Pedersen is deeply involved in only a few of the many 



events that occur in Antioch. 
The Antioch Junior Woman's 
Club, Antioch Rotary Club, 
and St. Peter Church's Foot- 
lights axe some of the most 
evident organizations with 
which she works. 

"I really like the Rotary 
Club. I really enjoy It," said 
Pedersen. 

She served as president 
in 1997. Prior to that she was 
the Treasurer, Secretary, 
President-Elect, and Pork- 
chop Auction Chairman. 

The Antioch Rotary Club 
has several female members. 
She was not the first. "The 
guys couldn't have been 
nicer," Pedersen said. "They 
have been wonderful from 
the git-go." 

In recent years, Pedersen 
has begun to add to her local 
volunteer action the greater responsibilities of regional volun- 
teer activity. Now she has moved more deeply into regional ac- 
tivities through Illinois state politics and the Illinois Federation 
of Women's Clubs. 

"The General Federation of Woman's Clubs is the largest 
volunteer organization in the world," Pedersen said. The junior 
woman's clubs are growing, and there is a program for even 
younger women. 

The tenth district has 27 woman's clubs and they are part of 
the state organization, which is part of the national federation. 
"It Is a wonderful network," Pedersen said. 
Because of the woman's club, and her work with the 
state federation, she has had the opportunity to travel ex- 
tensively. "I have hit 'almost' every town in the State of 
Illinois in the last seven or eight years," she said.. "It's been 
very educational." 

She'shares ideas with other state leaders about what hap- 
pens in the tenth district. She learns about what other commu- 
nities are doing. "You learn from other communities." 

In recent years, Pedersen has begun to work more exten- 
sively in politics. 

"I've been involved in politics' more in the background," 




she said, She had helped with fund-raisers for former State 
Representative Robert W. Churchill. A member of the Antioch 
Republican Club, she has served as a precinct committeeman. 

"This last year was the first time 1 took the plunge," Peder- 
sen said. "I enjoyed It." In 1998, she ran for Lake County office 
as a District 1 Representative but was not elected. 

Pedersen has served as an assistant legislative aide for 
Churchill and now works as a legislative aide for Osmond. 

Last year Pedersen was awarded a fellowship for the 1998 
Illinois Lincoln Excellence in Public Service. The fellowship 
program provided her with educational seminars and training 
to participate in politics. The program took her all over the state 
and to Washington, D.C. 

"It's a group of Republican women involved in the political 
process," she said. "It's a mentoring process." 

The intent of the program is to bring women into politics. 
"It was a well-rounded program," she said. 

Fellowship activities provided her With skills and training to 
manage larger events at a state level of political responsibility in 
addition to the local level. 

Because of all of her own positive, diverse, local, and ■ 
now regional, experiences as a volunteer, she has been very 
enthusiastic about the need for other people to become in- 
volved. 

"It's not one person who can take credit for doing all these' 
things," she said. One person can get the ball rolling, according 
to Pedersen, but many others have to join In. 

She said that it is very strange to her, but people will not 
volunteer on their own initiative. People seem to want to be 
asked. "If we could get past that, we'd have a lot more people 
out there." 

* She does not believe that volunteer effort is an anachro- 
nism. It's health may be a concern among Presidents and Gen- 
erals at the national level, but at the local level of Antioch, she 
can still recognize its strength. 

"Personally, in the last five years, (I think) volunteering is 
getting even stronger." 

"I really enjoy it," she said. "If people tried it a little more, 
they would see how much they get out of it. It's been one of my- 
passions," 

. She has found many friends who enrich her life. She appre- 
ciates the wealth of information it has given to her, as well as 
the free education. She appreciates the opportunities it has cre- 
ated for her. She believes that volunteer work provides person- 
al rewards as well as group rewards. . > '■ \ , ■ , 

"You reap a lot of benefits from if," Pedereen'said. 



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Forefronts 



Profile 



-115 



Riding high 



lack Martin 




Jack Martin, owner of the nation's premier equine retail business, Libertyville Saddle Shop, 
creates a legacy by speaking out on the issues of taxation and the 'right candidates 



Jack Martin takes his business seri- 
ously - along with just about every- 
thing else he does. 
But then Martin, owner of the 
Libertyville Saddle Shop, is not your 
ordinary businessman. 

By John Roszkowski 

A lifelong resident of Libertyville, Martin has taken an 
active role in local business groups and community is- 
sues. Hehas been past president of the Libertyville Ro- 
tary Club, serves on a local bank board and is vice-chair- 
man of the LMV Chamber of Commerce. 

He has also led a local crusade against escalating 
property taxes and has actively supported the political 
campaigns of many Republican Party, candidates. 

Martin is not one to shy away from delicate issues. 

"1 try to express myself honestly. I'm known to be 
very strqng willed," said the 57-year-pld, Martin. 

TmMhvolved: I'm involved in a lot of issues and it all 
comes back to a personal commitment I.have." 

In addition to his business and community involve-' 
ments, Martin is a man of many interests. He is a world 
traveler and is proud to be an amateur chef. He has even 
'printed his own "world famous" recipe for making risotto . 
with tomatoes ajnd parmesan. 

"I'm happy to be an amateur chef. I usually cook on 
Fridays and Sundays. My mother's French and she was a 
tremendous cook," he said. 

One can get a flavor for who Jack Martin is by a quick 
glance around his office. Hanging on one wall is mock 
front page of Time Magazine produced by the company's 
design staff. It has a large portrait of Martin with him fea- 
tured as Time's "Man of the Year." 

His office is adorned with portraits of horses, reflect- * 
ing his love for the family business he's been involved in 
since the 1960s. 

. One wall is a picture that was taken of him riding 
back in 1948 when he was only eight or nine years old. Al- 
though his business is for horse enthusiasts, that picture 
may have been one of the last times he ever rode a horse. 

"I enjoy horses because I'm in the business, but I 
don't ride," Martin admits. 

Please see MARTIN / El 6 








E18- 



Profile 



Forefronts 



FROM PAGE E15 



Even so, Martin's business is considered one of the 
premier equine retail businesses in the United States, per- 
haps even the world. In fact, the Libertyville Saddle 
Shop's 40,000 square foot office building on Peterson 
Road is the largest full-service equine retail store in the 
United States. 

"Our business is really a sporting goods business for 
people who ride horses for recreational purposes," he 
said. 

Martin said the business serves two major markets. It 
has Western-style saddles and apparel for "the John 
Wayne cowboy types." It also sells items which appeal to 
the Eastern or English type of horse enthusiasts. Overall, 
the store has more than 4,000 saddles in stock and a vari- 
ety of other items for the equestrian lover. 

In addition to the main office, the Libertyville Saddle 
Shop's mail order business has grown dramatically. The 
company operates a 100,000 square-foot mail order distri- 
bution center on Temple Drive, which distributes prod- 
ucts to customers throughout the world. 

"Our business has grown, our mail order has grown;" 
said Martin. 

"We're very much involved in product development," 
he added. "We have over 100 trademarks." 

Despite the dramatic growth of the business, Martin is 
glad the business has maintained a family-owned quality. 
His wife, Beverly, and his three sons, Gregory, Brian and 
Steven, all work at the Libertyville Saddle Shop and help 
out with the business. 

"We are a family-owned business. We've been here 
since the 1960s. My father was involved in the business 
and (when he retired) I took over running it," he said. 

While Martin's business takes up a large amount of 
his time, so do his community involvements. 

In the late 1980s, for example, Martin helped form a 
group known as IRATE, a tax watch-dog group formed to 
fight escalating property taxes. He believes the group's ef- 
forts were instrumental in helping get statewide tax caps 
passed in Illinois. 

More recently, he led a successful effort last year that 
helped defeat a referendum for a new library facility in 
Libertyville. This year, he is waging a campaign against a 



proposed open space tax referendum proposed by Liber- 

l\/Io rtf-jri tyville Township Supervisor F.T. "Mike" Graham. 

1Y lCll till Because of those efforts, Martin has a reputation in 

some quarters as an anti-tax zealot. It's a reputation he 

feels is undeserved. 

"I'm not anti-tax. We need a police department, we 

need a fire department, we need good schools, we need 

sewers. If I were anti-tax, I'd be against all of these 

things," he said. 

As an example of the fact that he is not against all tax 

referendums, Martin said he's been "very much involved" 

with the Friends of the Forest Preserve in helping them 



We, as businessmen 

and women, have to take 

public issues away from 

politicians and provide 

leadership and a plan 

JACK MARTIN 



pass a tax referendum this spring. 

"I do think we need to spend money. We have a lot of 
crucial issues facing us in Lake County. We have a forest 
preserve referendum coming up. The forest preserve does 
a lot more for a lot less money than Mike Graham's open 
space referendum." 

The question that concerns Martin the most about 
property taxes is how much can the average property tax- 
payer afford, "how deep is that pocket?" 

With the dramatic growth in the county, Martin said 
taxpayers aren't going to be able to afford tax increases for 
every conceivable service. He said projections indicate the 
county's population, which is expected to reach about 
580,000 people by the year 2000, could increase to 830,000 
by the year 2020. 

With that kind of growth, Martin said he believes the 
county will need fiscally conservative leaders who will 
carefully watch how tax dollars are spent— and Martin has 
done his part in supporting those kind of candidates. He 
has had campaign fundraisers for candidates such as 



County Clerk Willard Helander, secretary of state candi- 
date At Salvi and Governor-elect George Ryan. At his of- 
fice, he also maintains a databank of registered voters in 
Lake County, which provides useful strategic information 
for candidates. 

"I've helped most with quality Republican candidates 
In their elections," he said. "I help people with strategy 
and I help people with resources because nobody's got 
enough money or enough time." 

Martin believes it's important for business leaders to 
take a leadership role in their communities. 

"We, as businessmen and women, have to take public 
issues away from politicians and provide leadership and a 
plan," he said. 

And Martin said he will continue to speak out on is- 
sues he thinks are important to the people of Lake County. 

"I've been a spokesman for a lot of things. I'm known 
to have a strong will and a backbone." 

It's doubtful anyone is questioning that. 







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Forefronts 



Profile 



-atj 



417 



2 1*1 



■, - ■ . 



Standing tall 

His nervous system slowly debilitated by MS, Bob Roth 
exemplifies what it really takes to be a good man, father 





Bob Roth is a lucky man. 
He has a great job, good neigh- 
bors, terrific coworkers and a won- 
derful, loving family. In fact, he 
says, between home, neighbors and 
work, he could not ask for a better situa- 
tion. 

Bob Roth also has multiple sclerosis. 

By Neal Tucker 

His life story* in short, is one of a privileged upbringing, . 
constant athleticism and most importantly of triumph over 
tragedy, 

i ;T He grew up in Kenilworth, a North Shore depository for 
wealthy suburbahites.ito a surgeon fatKerand'sufglcal'nurse.. 
mother. Roth was well provided for and did not know that 
anybody lived any differently. • 



"That was tough because when you get out on your own 
you realize not everybody lives that way. Because of that we 
also didn't realize what it took to be successful," Roth said. 

But success he had. 

He was a pitcher for New Trier High School in Winnetka. 
Good enough to make the baseball team at the University of 
Miami, a college baseball Mecca of monolithic proportion, 
unspoken rule— teams were expected to win. The Hurricanes 
did win, a lot. In the fantasy world of college baseball, he was 
a young kid affected by very little because good things just 
happened. 

Roth recounts an early 70s trip to Nicaragua to play 
baseball. This was a country that had rebuilt the athletic sta- 
diums before rebuilding housing after a devastating earth- 
quake. The team was escorted everywhere by armed guards. 
.Armed guards were even posted in the outfield during every 
contest. And the countrymen were living In abject poverty. 

TrAie.tp form, Roth was shocked by the living conditions, 
but could only think of one thing at the time, 

•"All ofus couldn't wait to get back to Miami," he said. 

The dream did not end with his college career. Originally 
enrolled in pre- med classes, he instead opted for minor 



league baseball. He played for the Texas and Seattle farm sys- 
tem before ending up in Grays Harbor, Wash, playing for the 
Loggers. 

"I was still living a fantasy life," Roth said. 

It was then a challenge presented itself in the form of a 
rotator cuff injury. To most 
pitchers, this particular infir- 
mity means game over. To 
Roth, it was the next step in 
his life of growing up. 

His contacts in the base- 
ball world led him to a job at 
Mississippi State University 
to coach baseball. He also 
finished the last year of his ' 
college degree there while 
his college sweetheart, Anne, 
worked at Harris Bank in 
Chicago. 

Please see ROTH IE18 




EI8- 



Proflle 



Forefronts 



FROM PAGE E17 



Roth 



In 1979, they married and later 
moved to Anne's home state of 
Pennsylvania where Roth coached 
college baseball for another two 
years. It was during this ilme that 
Roth began to evolve as a person, 
which ironically prepared him for 
unseen challenges that would later 
befall him. He credited marriage 
for his growth. 

"It was the reality of the fact 
that I was growing up and had to 
be responsible. Marriage is real life 
and provides stability," he said. 

After Pennsylvania, Roth land- 
ed a coaching job at the College of 
Lake County. By 1985, he had two 
children. Life was beginning to de- 
mand he become more responsi- 
ble. 

It was during that summer he 
was met with a second, far more 
difficult challenge than a torn rota- 
tor cuff. The way his life changed in 
a few short minutes could be no 
more climactic if it had been writ- 
ten into a movie script. . 

During a summer baseball 
camp, he was intending to show 
the young kids how to turn around 
first base. He started his mad dash 
from home plate and promptly fell 
flat on his face. The children were 
amused and Roth was terrified. His 
legs just couldn't catch up to his brain. 

"I tried it a second time and it just didn't work. I finally 
had one of the assistant coaches finish the drill," he said. 

When it came time for lunch, Roth remained on the field 
as the children and coaches filed inside. He could walk well, 
but when he tried to run in the outfield he simply could not 
do it. 




Roth worried very loudly in his mind. And it got worse. 

Along with coaching, Roth ran a residential cottage at 
Allendale In Lake Villa. Shortly after the Incident on the 

baseball diamond, several Allen- 
dale students asked him how he 
could do that weird thing with his 
eyes. 

"I didn't know what they were 
talking about. Apparently, when I 
looked to the side, only one eye . 
would move while the other 
looked straight ahead." 

He called his wife to drive him 
home, then scheduled a doctor's 
appointment. The worries In his 
mind became louder. "What if I 
have a brain tumor . . . How are my 
kids going to grow up without me . . 
. What will my wife do?" All he 
could think about was his family. 
After an MRI scan at the hospi- 
tal, the 'good news' came. He had 
multiple sclerosis, or MS, a pro- 
gressive disease that affects the 
central nervous system and is * 
most evident in a person's motor 
skills. More importantly to Roth, 
the disease does not affect a vic- 
tim's life span. 

"When I had the MRI and was 
so relieved the doctor looked at 
me like I was nuts. My first ques- 
tion was Ms this going to kill me?' 
He told me I had a lot of time left 
and that was important, not for 
me, but for my wife and kids," he 
said. 

Today, the 44-year-old resident of Gurnee is in his 
fourth year as special education coordinator for Grayslake 
Community High School, involved in meeting the needs 
of 200 students. He drives a Ford Explorer with special 
hand controls and cruises the school hallways on a scoot- 
er. Severe temperatures and humidity do hamper him and 
he has developed a slight shaking in his left hand. He also 
has a service dog, a husky named Lobo, who will eventu- 





In the quiet solitude of the basebali outfield that day, ally open and close doors, get the paper and call 911 from 



J think everybody, whether 

they have a malady or not; 

has down days. Mine might be 

a little more self indulgent, but to be 

honest, everybody has their 

own set of problems. 

Life certainly is what you make of it. 

BOB ROTH 

a special phone pad because Roth "has a tendency to . 
fall." 

For all intents and purposes, he functions quite normal- 
ly. But there are times when he is reminded he has MS, and 
those times once again center around his family, which now 
includes three children. 

"I went from pitching batting practice to' setting up bat- 
ting tees and doing short throws in the basement with my 
kids," he said, then turned more philosophical, "I think 
everybody, whether they have a malady or not, has down 
days. Mine might be a little more self indulgent, but to be 
honest, everybody has their own set of problems. Life cer- 
tainly is what you make of it." 

Truth be known, it appears Roth's concerns for his 
burden to the family are more of his own figment than a 
reality to his wife and kids. 

From a document hanging from both a wall at home 
and in his office, he shares a few paragraphs of prose, 
written by his eldest son, Rob, that touched him so deeply 
he could not finish it the first time, he read it. In fact, be- 
fore he attempted to read it a second time he had it lami- 
nated so the tears would not smear the type. 

The document, entitled "Father," is a first person 
plea from his son on how is dad should view his family. It 
includes the words: 

Never do anything and get hurt. I don't. 

Never be afraid to ask for help. I'm not, * . 

Always remember we are there for you. 

You are the best always, remember that. I will. 

Yes, indeed, Bob Roth is a very lucky man. 



- -*^ 




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Forefronts 




Forefronts 



Profile 



-as 




Gym rat 



Liberty ville's Max Sanders has spent nearly his entire life in a 
basketball gym, but there's more to this coach than Xs and Os 







A gym rat. Not the four-legged ro- 
dent, but a basketball junkie who 
spends all of his time practicing, 
perfecting and enjoying the game, 
Every team seems to have one or two. But 
not gvery team has Max Sanders. They 
could only hope for as much. 

By Brendan O'Neill 

Max Sanders is the son of a basketball coach, and grew up 
in Ubertyville Community High School's Brainerd gymnasi- 
um—dribbling, shooting, practicing moves. He was a gym rat 
whosepassion for the game was unparalleled. Now, nearly 50 
years later, he can still be found in Libertyville's gym, with bas- 
ketball bouncing, rims raiding and nets swishing. But now 
he's th'graach^n^t^^ 
But the competitive fires stilt burn. 



Sanders is the head coach of the boys varsity basketball 
team at Ubertyville High School, a position which he has held 
for 20 of his 34 years in coaching. This is his dream job, and he 
is still amazed at how his life has turned out. 

"Ever since I can remember 1 wanted to be a high school 
basketball coach," said Sanders. 



Ever since I can remember I 

wanted to be a high 

school basketball coach 





MAX SANDERS 

Sanders comes from solid midwestem stock. His grandfa- 
ther was a coal miner in southern Illinois, and his father, Har- 
vey, began coaching basketball in Marion, 111. before the family 
moved to Ubertyville in the early 1950s, the summer before 
Sanders enrolled in the fourth grade. Harvey coached the boys 
K.yacsity basketbalLteam but was alsaa social studies and.history. 
teacher, which had some influence on Max's career path. 



Once the Sanders' established a homefront in the boom- 
ing town of Ubertyville, with a then-population near 4,000, 
Harvey began scripting the Xs and Os for the Wildcats of LCHS. 

The move to a small-town environment such as Uber- 
tyville offered Max and the Sanders' family a great place to live 
and raise children. 

"You couldn't get into too much trouble because everyone 
knew your name," said Sanders. "It was a great environment to 
grow up in. You had the small town aspect of Ubertyville, with 
the big city of Chicago just a train-ride away." 

The only trouble Sanders got Into involved tagging along 
with his father to the high school basketball practices where the 
youngster Max was often Found playing with the 'big boys.' 

"(As a coach's son) I had the opportunity to play against 
the older kids (high school). They always say that the best way 
to get better is to challenge yourself." 

And when Max was home from school on winter break, 
this coach's son spent hours and hours alone in the gym. 

"It gave me a place to workout and that's where I learned 
to compete," said Sanders, fondly remembering his childhood. 

i 

Please see SANDERS IE24 



E24- 



Proffle 



Forefronts 



FROM PAGE E23 



Sanders 






"I wish I had a cent for every basket I shot at the old Bralnerd 
gym." 

That background gave Sanders the foundation on which to 
buiid a solid athletic and social life, but it was one which would 
not see the younger Sanders playing for his father. 

"When I came into the high school, he got out of coaching 
and concentrated on teaching." 

But being around the game for so long had made an in- 
delible mark on the sprouting young man. 

. "When you're a coach's son and you're always around 
sports, you develop a love for the game(s)." 

Sanders led the classic stereotyped life of the high school 
jock depicted in sugar-coated '50s television. He was the quar- ' 
terback of the football team and the star of the basketball team. 
And in "Leave-it-Beaver fashion, his girlfriend was a cheer- 
leader who was also the Homecoming Queen. 

But that wasn't enough for Sanders, who accepted an ath- 
letic scholarship to Bradley University, where he graduated 
with a degree in education and returned to his high school 
alma mater to hold the same position as his father-coach. 

"He used to tease me saying I could make more money do- 
ing something else," said Sanders, fondly recalling his father's 
barbs. "But he was very proud that 1 got into teaching and 
coaching." 

It is a situation which is common to many coach's sons. 
They have the desire to compete and an interest in sports, 
which leads them back to coaching. 

"It's a way to continue that competition. 1 was able to play 

football, basketball and base- 
ball in high school, and then I 
went to Bradley University on 
a basketball scholarship." 
"It gives me a way of 
staying young— young at 
heart. I still get up for games. 
Especially the big games. 1 
still get butterflies before the 
game starts." 

But those butterflies are 
fleeting fast , as Sanders is in 
- the stretch run of his 34th 
year as Llbertyvi lie's head 
coach — which will be his last. 






After compiling a record of over 300 wins and 200 losses, this 
legendary Wildcat will turn in his clipboard and whistle and 
pickup his golf clubs. 

"I really haven't had the opportunity to play as much as I 
would like," said Sanders of his experience on the links. "But 
maybe now I can get out there and play some more." 

Sanders and his wife Peggy, a lifetime Libertyville resident, 
will take some time to do some traveling, both to the east and 
west coasts and to warm places during the harsh Lake County 
winters, but make no mistake about it, they will remain in Lib- 
ertyville. 

J love Libertyville and Lake 

County. We'll never 

leave Libertyville 

MAX SANDERS 

"My life's been spent in Libertyville, but I still have some of 
that hillbilly blood in me. I don't like the cold winters," said 
Sanders. 

"I love Libertyville and Lake County. We'll never leave Lib- 
ertyville, but we may travel in the winter— get away from the 
cold." . 

But stepping off the basketball court for the last time will 
not be easy for Sanders. 

"I'm really going to miss seeing some of my former players 
sitting in the stands at a game and talking with them before and 
after the games," said Sanders, reflecting on his long, successful 
career. 

"That's the fun of coaching. Seeing second-generation 
players come through the system. That's what it's all about." 

Sure, Sanders' teams have made long playoff runs in the 
past, into the sweet 16 and the elite eight, but those are not the 
memories he holds most dear. 

"I really enjoy the interaction with young people and con- 
necting with the kids. Those things really outweigh any nega- 
tives." * - 

But Sanders does not devote his entire day to the hard- 
• wood; he also teaches driver's education at the high school. 

Earlier in his teaching career he taught subjects such as bi- 



ology and physical education, but settled on driver's education 
because of the time it allowed him to devote to coaching and to 
his family. 

And Sanders makes a connection between teaching dri- 
ver's ed. and coaching basketball. 

"In both cases, you're teaching physical skills," said 
Sanders. "There's the mental part of It, too. They share the 
same basic concepts (teaching and coaching). You have to ver- 
balize, and be aware that people react to suggestions different- 
ly." 

"So much of driving and basketball is physical, especially 
early on (in teaching and coaching), that they really are simi- 
lar." 

During his tenure at Libertyville High School, Sanders and 
his wife, Peggy, have seen their three children go through the 
high school and graduate. 

Max's oldest child, Shane, Is now 34 and lives in Lin- 
colnshire, while Brennan, 32, lives in Libertyville and Erin, 30, 
lives in WUlmington, N.C. and Is raising Max's first grandson. 

When asked if any of his children plan to follow in his foot- 
steps, teaching or coaching, Sanders laughs and acknowledges 
that none of his children have inherited the teaching "gene." 

Sanders' children did make their own marks in sports, 
however. Shane was a state champion gymnast, an&went on to 
become a Big Eight champ at the University of Iowa State! 
Brennan played basketball while a freshman at LCHS, but tore 
his patella tendon and turned to gymnastics like his older 
brother. Erin also played basketball her freshman year, and 
made the varsity squad before knee trouble sidelined her in her 
sophomore season, but she continued to run cross country for 
the Wildcats. 

With his children all grown up and having children of their 
own, and the bulk of his career sustained in fond memories and 
stories, Sanders will say good-bye to both teaching and coach- 
ing when the school year ends. Sanders' basketball retirement, 
party was held Feb. 19, and he will continue teaching until the ' 
end of the semester. 

"I'm not really a formal kind of guy. I didn't want a formal 
banquet {to retire from coaching). I just want to walk round 
and talk with the players and former players." 

That Inforrnalltyis just part of what has endeared him to^ 
his players. He is a player's coach. He is a student's teacher.He 
is a child's father, and he is a wife's husband. 



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Forefronts 



Profile 



-E2S ' 



Richard Welton 



; 

! 




Gurnee's Mayor Welton defines his hometown by building 
a future for residents to grow-up and stay 




Family. Tradition. Opportunity. 
Growth. 
These are four simple words 
which describe what Richard 
"Dick" Welton is all about. Each 
word carries its own significance in the life 
of Welton, who decided at a very young age 
that he needed to help Gurnee flourish. 

ByKorrinaGrom 

His grandparents were some of the first inhabitants of 
Gurnee, back when the village was merely a farming town. 
Gumee was what Welton referred to as a "hillbilly" town, with 
neighboring Waukegan a booming city. 



"There's a saying that Waukegan had driver's ed, and Gurnee 
had tractor's ed," Welton said, laughing. 

Welton's grandfather, R.B. Dickson, was very influential in 
helping the Village of Gumee get on its feet. In 1927, Dickson 
held a meeting in the living room of his home, bringing togeth- 
er people in the community who were concerned with the fu- 
ture of the village. Shortly thereafter, Gumee was incorporated 
in order to protect the village. 

During the Great Depression, Welton said, little activity oc- 
curred. In the 1960s, Cook County was beginning to boom with 
activity, and Gurnee began feeling the pressure to grow as well. 
. It was around this time that Welton graduated from high 
school. 

"I noticed that most students would leave the community 
because there were no opportunities in the area," Welton said. 
"It was probably the driving force for me wanting to become 
mayor. It was burned Into my mind that if we didn't have op- 
' portunities, (Gumee] would just dry up and go away." . 

Welton saw the opportunity to help Gurnee begin its trans- 
formation. During the 1960s, Welton attended board meetings 



and was eventually made a board member. It was not long after 
that when the village hired a village administrator, a profes- 
sional who would help Gumee realize its goals. 

, In 1973, Welton ran for mayor, winning the race. One of his 
first projects was to design a comprehensive plan that would 
map out the future of Gumee. Taxing bodies and average citi- 
zens attended meeting after meeting, deciding upon the direc- 
tion Gumee would take. 

"We created the comprehensive plan for becoming a bal- 
anced community," Welton said, "Not just an industrial com- 
munity, but also a residential community. We wanted to create 
opportunity for everyone." 

Plans were underway for a variety of housing options in 
Gumee, as well as light industry and shopping. Welton wanted 
to create a Gurnee which would allow a lot of people to hold 
jobs there. 

Subsequently, the plan was approved, and has been updated 



.._•!-- .1 



Please see WELTON/ E26 



\~ 



#28- 



Proffle 



Forefronts 



FROM PAGE E25 



Welton 



every five or six years. Welton said Gumee continues to make 
adjustments, but the basics of the plan remain essentially the 
same. 

During the course of his political career, Welton has met 
many interesting people, including Ronald Reagan prior to his 
presidency. Reagan's theory that the government belonged to 
the people was one which Welton has tried to pass on to 
Gurnee. It is yet another part of the inspiration to create oppor- 
tunity in the village. He stressed that those who are most active 
in the community are often the happiest. 

"Gurnee is a community of opportunity now. A lot of people 
stay here, live, work, and raise their families," Welton said. 

Welton's family has been a source of inspiration throughout 
his life. The Weltons operated a grocery store for 50 years in 
Gurnee, but was put out of business once larger, chain stores 
began moving in. 

"It was our family farm," Welton said. "We all worked on it. 
But I can't look back. I've got to look forward." 

Out of Welton's five children, four of them still live in 
Gurnee. This is a feat which has been achieved by making 
Gurnee a land of opportunity. 

However, with the growth of Gurnee came many critics, 
which Welton is well aware of. With the board's recent ap- 





proval of the Six Flags Entertainment Village, area citizens have 
taken a stand in opposition of the amount of growth in Gurnee. 

"I don't know when to stop," Welton said. "The community 
we layed out would be a community of 30,000 people, where 
people can have an identity and a high level of services. It's an 
ideal size community." 

Welton said Gumee is close to achieving that goal, with its 
current population of close to 26,500. What happens when the 
population reaches 30,000? 

"We'll be a mature community," Welton said. The communi- 
ty will be healthy, and will be allowed to prosper. 

In the future, Welton sees Gumee as a center of technology 
and trade, full of business activity and retail. He envisions 
Gurnee as being in the "middle of everywhere." 

The Six Flags Entertainment Village is seen, by Welton, as a 
benefit to Gurnee. With the hotel being built by Six Flags, the 
village will have the opportunity to attract Fortune 500 compa- 

(Gurnee) has given me 

purpose in my life. I've gotten 

back far more thanlcould've 

ever given 

RICHARD WELTON 

nies in order to help diversify Gurnee. Just as Six Flags Great 
America has been a benefit to the village, the new Entertain- 
ment Village will be crucial in helping Gumee continue to 
flourish. 

"(Gurneel has given me purpose in my life," Welton said. He 
has been able to raise his family in a safe and healthy atmos- 
phere, and has allowed others to.do the same. "I've gotten back 
far more than I couid've ever given." 

If Gurnee continues to be a village of opportunity, it is almost 
certain that more and more leaders will come from its many 
citizens. Lake County Coroner Barbara Richardson and fonner 
Lake County Treasurer Jack "Red" Anderson are but two of the 
many Lake County leaders who have spent their formative 
years in Gumee. But what makes Gumee such a leader-pro- ^ 
ducing village? 

"We all swam in the pit behind the high school. There are 
magical quotients of leadership in the water. It's what we call 
'spring-fed leadership,'" Welton said. "If you go out on a Satur- 
day night, you'll still see us all swimming there." 





Making life a little richer. 




They're tlie nuts and Dolts 
of our community. 



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Forefronts 



Profile 



-07 




'^■ : %:^r 





Water theme park has backing of community, leaders, hits snag with residents 




Artist concept of what the proposed Entertainment Village. would look like. The water park and entertainment complex has gained preliminary approval from the Vil- 
lage of Gurnee and is proposed to be adjacent to Great America.— Concept drawing provided by Prism Development 



Gurnee's Entertainment Village, a 
$400 million water park and com- 
mercial complex slated for 134 
acres across the Tollway from 
Great America, is said to offer a variety of 
benefits to Lake County residents and busi- 
nesses and yet, it remains controversial. 

By Leslie Piotrowskl & Korrina Gram 

One of the project's major attractions, a 21 -acre water 
park, is scheduled to open within the year 2000. The develop- 
ers, Six Flags Great America and Prism Development Compa- 
ny, anticipate that it will draw a substantial number of resi- 
dents from Lake County and beyond. 

Originally projected to attract 3,000 guests per day during 
the 100-day water park season, the park is expected to include 
a lazy river, water slides^ tube slides, wave pool and a chil- 



dren's area. Other than tollway frontage, it Will be located with- 
in the interior of the site. 

Water parks, which replicate a beach environment, have 
been in existence for about 10 years. In-door water parks have 
helped make the Wisconsin Dells a popular year-round tourist 
destination. 

"Six Flags' demographic studies concluded that 94 percent 
of Six Flags' recent visitors would likely use the water park," 
said Hal Coxon, a spokesperson for Prism Development. "Sev- 
enty-nine percent of the general population and 86 percent 
within a 50- mile radius said they would use it." 

Coxon said that only local people are expected to use the 
water park for just one day at a time. 

"One of the exciting things about the park is that it will ex- 
tend the stay of people coming here and produce a higher yield 
in the local market place," said Coxon. "By capturing visitors 
for two or three days, it won't exacerbate road problems." 

Another major aspect oDhe development is a destination 
hotel and conference center. The first-class facility will consist 
of 400 to 500 rooms and 130,000 square feet of conference 
space. Serving the needs of boUl business and tourist visitors, it 
also will most likely feature a gym, indoor and/or outdoor pool, 
.restaurants, day spa and other full-service hotel amenities. 



Coxon said that Lake County currently lacks this type of fa- 
cility. 

"Ttie Gurnee village board has a plan to attract more office 
parks and so they need supporting infrastructure," he said. 
"The destination hotel will help the trustees meet their goals 
and enhance the village's image." 

Housing facilities for Six Flags' seasonal employees are an- 
other feature of the development. Two three-story buildings 
will each contain 125 rooms to accommodate a total of 500 em- 
ployees; A third building will provide recreational opportuni- 
ties, such as video games and table tennis. 

In the past, Six Flags has rented college campus dorm 
rooms for its employees. But colleges have needed the dorm 
rooms back in August when the school season begins. 

To act as a buffer to properties situated to the west and 
south of the development, a 25-acre conservation area will be 
established. Pedestrian and bike paths, indigenous plant mate- 
rial, streams, ponds and nature conservancies will be com- 
bined together through a unified landscape design plan. 

The water park, hotel/conference center and the housing 
facilities have all been approved by Gurnee's plan commission 

Please sea ENTERTAINMENT IE28 



■ 



-«"■*•***-- 



E28- 



Forefronts 



from page E27 Entertainment 



and village board. 

Conceptual plans for a hotel and entertainment district, 
comprising approximately 23 acres, were also approved but re- 
quire more specific details before it can be built The plans 
originally called for multiple buildings, such, as hotels, restau- 
rants and entertainment facilities, in a landscaped, pedestrian- 
oriented commercial environment. Any further development 
will have to undergo a full review process by the plan commis- 
sion and village board. 

Over the past year, the development has garnered support 
from a broad cross section of business and community leaders 
such as Warren Township High School Board of Education, the ■ 
•Lake County Illinois Convention & Visitors Bureau, the Lake 
County Chamber of Commerce and the Illinois Department of 
Commerce and Community Affairs. 

Gumee residents are the main source of the criticism that 
has been voiced about the project. 

C.U.R.V. (Citizens United for a Residential Village of 
Gumee), which has been a constant source of opposition for 
the commercial growth in Gumee, including Entertainrnent 
Village, will have an advisory referendum concerning the devel- 
opment on the April 13 ballot. While the referendum is non- 
binding, the results will indicate how voters feel about the pro- 
ject. The group gathered a total of 1 ,827 signatures in order to 
get the advisory question on the ballot. 

"If residents support the referendum, it will be apparent 
that the Mayor doesn't represent the residents, but the busi- 
ness owners," said Silha. We have the number one tax base 
in all of Lake County and the Mayor has done a great job in 
that, but at some point one has to say, 'is this a commercial 
village or a residential village?' I think we've crossed the line 

Is this a commercial village or 

a residential village? I think 

we've crossed the line where 

the village has become 

too commercial 

GARY SHILHA 
Founder of CURV 





where the village had become too commercial." 

pDuring an 18-month review process, residents consistently 
expressed concerns about the traffic, noise and crime the project 
could potentially generate. They also were concerned that prop- 
erty values and the general quality of life in Gumee would de- 
cline. 

Six Flags and Prism Development reduced the scope of the 
development concept to address these concerns. A 12,000-seat 
events center was eliminated from the proposal. However, the. 
developers still have the ability to come back and request this 
use in the future. The developers also agreed to reduce the 
number of outlots planned for Washington Street from four to 
one. 

To address traffic concerns, the developers will complete 
approximately $7 million in roadway improvements to widen 
Washington Street and make intersection improvements to 
Washington at both Hunt Club Road and Route 21. If traffic 
problems continue at Hunt Club Road despite the improve- 
ments, they will pay for police to direct traffic. 

A misconception some residents have had was that the 
land Entertainment Village will occupy was planned for open 
space, 

"The 137-acre parcel was never zoned as 'open space,'" 
said Brad Burke, the village's public information officer and as- 
sistant to the village administrator. "Originally, back in the 
1970s, it was zoned as light Industrial or office." 

Gumee expects Entertainment Village to bring substantial 
revenue in the form of sales, amusement and hotel taxes as well 
as tax revenue to the schools, park and library districts without 
placing any additional burden on the governing bodies. 

Allen L Kracower & Associates, Inc., the village's urban 
planning and real estate consultant, researched the fiscal bene- 
fits to Gumee and presented the findings last October. Accord- 
ing to the firm's findings, the conference center alone will gen-* 
erate an estimated $155 per square foot in sales tax revenues 
per year. The planned conference center will consist of 130,000 
square feet, resulting in a total of more than S20 million in rev- 
enues. 

The government's cost in supporting Six Flags has hovered 
near $300,000 annually.'This, the firm said in a prepared infor- 
mational packet, is comparable to the projected governmental 
cost of the Entertainment Village. The new development will, 
cost the government approximately $317,000, with no addi- 
tional costs to Gurnee. 

"We have found no basis for increasing the estimated cost 
of services provided by the Village of Gumee," die firm said. 

Traditionally, the money has been used to pay for'one full- 





Six Flags is an important 

part of the community. 

We are trying to diversify and 

finish the comprehensive plan 

RICHARD WELTON 
Mayor of Gurnee 

time police officer for Great America. Six Flags has paid for any 
additional officers. Emergency and ambulance services are typ- 
ically paid for by the user. 

According to the firm, 14 local taxing jurisdictions will re- 
ceive real estate tax revenues from the Entertainment Village 
development Woodland School District 50, Gumee Elemen- 
tary District 56, and Warren Township High School District 121 
will receive a total of $6 million annually. 

Several other entities in the area will receive money, In- 
cluding the Lake County Forest Preserve, Warren Township, 
Gurnee Park District, Warren-Newport Public Library, and 
College of Lake County. The total amount to be received by 
all entities, including school districts, is approximately $8 
million. 

"Six Flags is an important part of the community," said 
Mayor Dick Welton. "We are trying to diversify and finish the 
comprehensive plan." 

• Welton said the hotel conference center will help to attract 
Fortune 500 companies which will provide many benefits to 
Gumee, including employment opportunities, which Welton 
said is important. 

There is no doubt that Six Flags Entertainment Village 
brings both benefits and controversy to the Village of Gumee. 
While many residents have concerns that traffic woes will be 
magnified, and that commercial growth is becoming too wide- 
spread, the development can also bring benefits to the village. 
The development will bring millions of dollars in real estate 
and sales tax revenues to schools and various other entities 
county-wide. In addition, to help combat potential traffic 
problems, Washington Street will be widened from two lanes to 
four lanes. ' 

Since 1976, Six Flags has made a substantial impact on 
Gumee and all of Lake County. The corporation will once again 
have the chance to prove whether or not it can be an asset to 
the community. 



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ZION PARK DISTRICT 

2400 Dowie Memorial Drive • Zion, Illinois 

■ (847) 746-5500 g^£ 

■since IW 




Paints 
Sundries 
Tools 
Hardware 
School Items 



• Cleaning Supplies 

• Lawn & Garden 

• Electrical Supplies 
•Joys/Hobbies 

• Window & Screen Repair 

ICE RENTAL PLACE 



Pet Supplies 
Sporting Goods 
Plumbing Supplies 
Automotive 



•Round Lake Home Center •Round Lake Beach •Gurnee 
The best place for quality Hardware and Rental Equipment 



Chainsaws .• Kerosene Heaters -Generators 

Carpet Shampooers • Sump Pumps » •Tile'Cutters 

Pipe Cutters ? Power Tools • Ladders 

■ Log Splitters • Air Tools • Leaf Blowers 

1 Sod Cutter • Lawn Tools • Mowers 

... ana much more for almost any job on your list 



Drain Augers 
Compressors 
Power Washers 
Roto Tillers 



SERVING THE AREA SINCE 1962 





Round Lake 

Rte 134 

West of Cedar Lake Rd. 

047-546-4660 


Llbertyvllle 

155 Peterson Rd., 

(Rte 137) 
647-362-3340 


Gurnee * 

Grand Ave. & Rte 21 
647-336-0101 


- Round Lake Beach 

Rte 63 & Rollins Rd 
674-223-0190 


Mundeleln 

609 E. Hawley Street 
• 647-566-1100 


WaLfceganUkehurst 

Convenience Center 

Rte 120 

d47-473-0320