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Full text of "Antioch News 03/05/1999"

757NQ^ Tr 




AM0757 12/27/99 wCOOl 

ftKTinCH TQMHSHIP LIPRARY 

757 11AIH STREET 

Antioch IL 60002-1398 




Four Sections — 56 F^ges FRIDAY, MARCH 5, 1999 



A Lakeland Newspaper /75 cents 




The Chamber will be sponsoring a $1,000 grand raffle prize in 
. Chamber gift certificates at the end' 

Merchants button-up downtown 

Create shopper 

incentive program 

to highlight new 

parking 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



D 



owntown merchants will 
welcome shoppers with 
incentives, 



convenient 
parking behind their 
stores, new back-of- 
the-store entrances, 
and a $1,000 grand 
raffle prize at the end of 
sidewalk construction. 

' Downtown 
sidewalks may be under 
construction for several 
weeks, but merchants 
remain undaunted. 
They plan to reward 
shoppers who use rear 
parking lots and contin- 
ue to shop with them. 

. The parking lots are 
on Toft Avenue and . 
Skidmore Drive. 

"It's your button to 
success," said Larry 
Hanson, downtown 
merchant and member 
of the Antioch 
Chamber of 
Commerce and Indus- 
try. He is one of a few 
dozen merchants who 
decided on the 
program at a morning chamber 




Nolan: Owner of 

Impressions 

Count, 907 Main 

Street 




Johnston: 

Manager of Brans 

Nut Co., 935 Main 

Street 



meeting Thursday, Feb. 11. 

"I think it's a great idea," said 
President Barbara Porch. She 
presented the button proposal to 
members so it could be in place 
when construction starts in early 
March. 

Downtown Antioch merchants 
will distribute 10,000 buttons 
throughout the Antioch area The 
two-color button with a picture of a 
yellow construction hard-hat will 
have a pin on the back. Shoppers 
will be encouraged to wear the 

button during the March 
through May downtown 
sidewalk renovation 
period. 

Shoppers who wear 
the button, or have a 
shopper card, will receive 
an incentive gift from 
merchants when making 
a purchase. Each partici- 
pating business will have 
a different gift. 

Incentive gifts maybe 
a piece of candy, a 
coupon for a discount on 
a future purchase, an 
immediate discount, or 
some other item. 
Customers can also show 
their button or shopper ■ 
cord to enter a raffle 
drawing in each business. 
Merchants may have 
weekly raffle drawings for 
their customers. Partici- 
pating stores will have 
different raffle prizes. 
At the end of the 
sidewalk construction 
period, all shopper raffle 
entrants of all stores will be eligible 
for a grand prize. 

"The Chamber will be sponsor- 




Parking along Main Street in downtown Antioch will be put on hold 
through May while the village renovates sidewalks used by local 
shoppers. —Photo by Sandy Bressner 



ing a $1,000 grand raffle prize In • 
Chamber gift certificates at the 
end," said Porch. "We will do the 
, drawing Saturday night at the Taste 
of Antioch." 

Taste of Antioch/ Maxwell Street 
Days will be Thursday to Sunday, 
July 22 through 25.. 

Merchants also will distribute 
maps to identify locations of new 
parking lots behind downtown 
stores as well as how to reach them. 

At the February meeting, 
Antioch Community Development 
Director Claude LeMere described 
the upcoming sidewalk improve- 
ment program to merchants. 



"We'll selecta (construcUon) 
company on the 25th," LeMere said. 
The contractor will start construe- ' 
tiori during the first few weekifof — - 
March. 

The village will set-up big signs 
with flashing lights to direct people - 
to parking lots. ,< •' 

LeMere promised merchants 
that he will be out on. the project 
every day.ta move it along. "I'm 
sure after one week with me it will 
move along faster." 

There will be no parking permit- 



Please see DOWNTOWN /A3 



approved 

495 homes slated 
forRteA73, 
Savage Road 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Village of Antioch trustees 
approved a preliminary develop- 
ment plan for the Deercrest Planned 
Unit Development, PUD, at their 
Monday, March 1 village board 
meeting. 

Approval for the PUD was based 
on agreements between the village 
and the developer that emerged 
from staff meetings and public 
hearings by the Combined Plan and 
Zoning Commission that began 
Thursday, Jan. B, 1998 and ended 
Thursday, Oct. 8, 1998. 

Agreement between the village 
and the developer regarding the 
issue of fences between Deercrest 
and adjacent property was not 
resolved and will be discussed 
further. The developer agreed to 
abide by future village decisions. 

The Deercrest PUD, in general, 
contains more open space and is less 
dense than required or permitted by 
village ordinances. 
- - -The.Combiried Plan and Zoning 
Commission . - had . i*ecommerided 
denial of the Deercrest PUD request 
on Oct 8. A subsequent workshop 
between the developer and village 
trustees with plan and zoning 
commissioners was conducted 
Tuesday, Jan. 12, 1999 to evaluate 11 
reasons for the commission's vote to 
deny. 

The Deercrest development is 
on 232 acres of land owned by Otto 

Please see HOMES I A3 




Cashier Ray cashes-in on $100,000 instant cache 



PATCHED TOGETHER 

i -Quilt shows and raffles'-ald.y 
like County organizations ; 



Sti 



m 



-PLEASE SEE PACE Bl 

YEAR 2000 

ibon't worry, but be 
safe instead of sorry 

-PLEASE SEE PACE C2 

WHAT A CONCEPT 

Design business 
grows rapidly 

— PLEASE SEE PAGE C5 

INDEX 



LV-SflcD.'' Horace* ,„.. 88 
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By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter • 

Fortune smiled on Antioch 
Armanetti Wine and Liquors' 
Cashier Kay Druse at 10 a.m. Friday, 
Feb. 26 when she received $100,000. 

Someone had to tell her how 
much she won because she kept 
miscounting the zeros. 

She's already left town. 

Druse will be back. 

"I was trying to save money," 
Druse said. In the moments before 
she scratched an Illinois State Lottery 
scratch-and-win ticket, she was 
trying to figure a way to save a few 
more dollars for her 10-day vacation 
trip to Florida with her sisters and 
Aunt. 

"Every couple of years we go," 
she said. Sisters Lynn, Joy, Val, and 
Aunt Helen were scheduled to leave 
on vacation this week. A few more 
dollars in her pocket would help her 
enhance the experience. 

"1 was standing here working," 
she said. "When 1 work, 1 play a 
couple of scratch-offs. To no avail." 

Friday would be different, but it 
had not felt different before the big 
win. . 

"I took a chance." 



"It spit out a winner." 

The $5 ticket revealed itself in 
stages, according to Druse. "I didn't 
believe my eyes." 

At first she thought it was $100, 
but then it looked more like a $1,000. 

?I just couldn't count 'cm." 

That is $5 for five zeros, after a 
non-descript number one. 

She will continue to work, "It's 
not a million," she said. 

True, but it is enough to spread it 
around, and she intends to help out 
some family members with two 
purchases. Indeed, if she buys the 
cars at Antioch dealerships, her sales 
taxes will in turn help out every 
Antioch resident 

"I'm going to buy both my 
daughters (Karen and Dawn) a car. I 
need a new kitchen floor and 
countertop. And, 1 would love to go 
to Alaska," she said. "Everyone says it 
is beautiful. Now I can afford to go." 

"The rest we're going to save," 
she, said. "We need a nest egg," 

Druse and husband Delbert take 
fall vacations. They like to head west. 
She said that she only plays local 
lottery games, but on their trips west 
through Davenport, she admits she 

Pleasesee MONEY I A3 




Kay Druse, a cashier at Antioch Armanetti Wine and Liquors, 
celebrates with roses given to her by her husband after winning 
$100,000 on a scratch-off lottery ticket at the store.— Photo by 
Sandy Bressner 



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A2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



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March 5, 1999 



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March 5, 1999 



COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A3 



1 



FROM PAGE Al 



HOMES: Development gains 
nod of Village Board 



^ 



Sprenger on the north side of Route 
173 at the north end of Savage Road. 
There will be a total of 495 dwelling 
units in the Deercrest PUD. 

The approved PUD is 20 
dwelling units less than the 515 units 
originally proposed by Deercrest de- 
velopers. Also, existing zoning con- 
ditions on the property would allow 
672 dwelling units. 

Deercrest developers agreed to 
create a conservation easement for 
designated portions of the property 
that will be managed by a group ac- 
ceptable to the village. 

The developer will pay the vil- 
lage $40 per dwelling unit to be 
placed in a fund to help pay for a 
traffic signal, at some future unspec- 
ified and unknown time, at Route 
173 and Savage Road. 

The developer will pay school 
impact fees and library impact fees 
as agreed upon with officials of each 
district. 

The developer will transfer park 
property to the Village of Antioch 
Parks and Recreation Department as 
well as $883,000 of park improve- 
ments secured by a bond of 1 15 per- 
cent. 

The 495 dwelling units will con- 
sist of 1 16 town homes, 1 1 1 clustered 
homes, and 268 single family homes. 
Townhouse units will not be placed 
on top of one another. 

The village will provide sewer 
and water to the development from 



Its own lines yet to be constructed. 
Repayment of village bonds for the 
sewer and water improvements con- 
structed by the village will be guar- 
anteed by an unconditional letter of 
credit in place prior to final plan ap- 
proval. 

Final plans for Deercrest must 
be submitted within five years or the 
village will have the right to hold 
public hearings and considering 
canceling the approved Deercrest 
PUD. 

In addition, two other changes 
have been made ;by the Deercrest 
developer in the preliminary plan 
and approved by the Village board. 

A secondary road was added to 
permit a future connection with any 
land development to the west of the. 
property. At the present time, no de- 
velopment is planned for that area. 

A 10-foot wide easement was 
created between some lots that gives 
residents In the northwestern por- 
tion of the property access to Mary's 
Park. 

The developer will work with Vil- 
lage of Antioch officials to petition 
the Illinois Department of Trans- 
portation to obtain a traffic signal at 
Savage Road and Route 173. Deer- 
crest plans include proper right-of- 
way widths and areas for decelera- 
tion lanes. 

Townhouse buildings will not 
have more than four dwelling units 
per building. 



DOWNTOWN: Merchants ^ 
button-up to create parking awareness 



ted downtown during construction. 
There will be only one'lane of traffic 
through downtown, and the side- 
walks will be replaced on one side of 
the street at a time. 

LeMere gave a strong endorse- 
ment to the merchant button and 
shopper card program. "This button 
program that Barbara (Porch) is go- 
ing to introduce is wonderful." 

• Buttons will be distributed in a 
variety of ways. Some merchants 
suggested passing them out at the 
Piggly-Wiggiy grocery store and the 
True Value/lust Ask Rental Store, 
both on Orchard Street. Merchants 
will have buttons in their stores to 
give-away, 

"We can hand out buttons at the 



Expo at the end of March," said 
Porch. 

The Chamber will sponsor its 
third annual Antioch Business 
Expo/Trade Show at Antioch Com- 
munity High School on Saturday 
and Sunday, March 27 and 28. 

"I like the button idea because 
of the visual impact," said Wendy 
Maston, of Quilter's Dream Inc., 902 
Main Street. 

Randy Nolan, of Impressions 
Count, 907 Main Street, urged that 
the program start as soon as possi- 
ble so customers will have their but- 
tons and cards in hand as construc- 
tion starts. 

"This is a positive program," 
LeMere told merchants. 



MONEY: Cashier wins 



has walked onto a Riyerboat Casino. 

"I play, a quick-pick when the 
numbers are big," she said. Other- 
wise, her risk-taking is limited to 
scratch-offs, 

Druse has been in the area all her 
life. "1 grew up in Lake Villa and lived 
here my adult life, over 30 years," she 
said. She has worked for eleven years 
at Antioch Armanetti Wine and 
Liquors, 1180 Main Street, at Routes 
173 and 83. 

All of her regular customers are 



excited for her. "They all want to 
come in and rub me for luck," she 
said. 

The store put up a large sign an- 
nouncing that she is a winner. 

For her, the scratch-off games 
are the ones to play. She said that 
she knows if she has won or lost im- 
mediately. "It's fun." According to 
her, you never know what you're 
getting. 

"It's a shocker. I still can't sleep," 
she said of her winnings. 



Antioch News 

Vol. 114 No. 10 A Lakeland Newspaper Founded 1886 



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Table hopping 

Danielle Abbate, 14, of Antioch served as a waitress Saturday during a spaghetti dinner given by 
the eighth grade confirmation class at St. Peter's Church in Antioch. —Photo by Sandy Bressner 



Comedy night benefits community 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



The Antioch Junior Wom- 
an's Club's Comedy Night presents 
its third annual comedy night, to- 
morrow, Saturday, March 6 at Father 
Hanley Hall at St. Peter's School 
starting at 7 p.m.. 

Two comedians are the featured 
performers of the evening, but the 
real community-building action is 
the raffle and silent auctions. For ap- 
petites, there are appetizers and 
desserts. 

To add dignity to the evening, 
The Antioch Woman's Club has 
added President Ted Axton, of the 
First National Bank- Employee 
Owned, and Antioch Community 
High School District 1 17 Superinten- 
dent Dr. Dennis Hockney to the mix 
as masters of ceremony. 

"We're getting a lot of good feed- 
back," said club President Cathi 
Hackelor. "It's March. We're all look- 
ing forward to a night out that is 
close-by." 

She urges everyone to come and 
enjoy the comedy and have a great 
time. It is a full evening of food, en- 
tertainment, and humor. "Every- 
body's been very supportive of what 
we're trying to do," Hackelor said. 

Professional comedians Fred 



Klett and PattI Vasquez will each cre- 
ate a special evening. They are the 
featured attraction for 90 minutes of 
family humor during the evening. 

Comedian Fred Klett does a style 
of family-oriented material about 
marriage that Bill Cosby so success- 
fully employs. He does calm obser- 
vations of existence. He comments 
about living with children. 

Klett has performed with Jerry 
Seinfeld, lay Leno, and Richard 
Lewis. He has appeared on Comedy 
Central, HBO, and Showtime and, 
recently, made his network televi- 
sion debut on NBC's "Friday Night 
Videos." 

Opening for Klett ,1s Patti 
Vasquez. She has been at Zanies In 
Mt Prospect where she has opened 
for comedians like Bill Maher, Tom 
Rhodes, Richard Lewis, John Pin- 
nette, John Caponera, and Will 
Durst. . 

Vasquez has appeared on NBC's 
" Friday Night" program. She learned 
her performance skills at the Players 
Workshop of Second City in Chicago. 

Comedy Night provides most of 
the funds the woman's club uses . 
during die year to benefit communi- 
ty groups. The money helps local or- 
ganizations such as the Antioch Res- 
cue Squad, Guiding Eyes for the . 
Blind, Save-a-Life Foundation, as 



well as area school programs such as 
Snowflake, the Tom-Tom newspa- 
per, Finesse Magazine, and the choir. 

"Last year we gave to die bum 
camp," member Vickie Axton said. A 
$1,300 donation covers the costfor 
two children for a one week stay, 

"We gave, last year, to the Guid- 
ing Eyes for the Blind." 

Local automobile dealerships, 
restaurants, and downtown busi- 
nesses have contributed merchan- 
dise, gift certificates, and iservtccs. 
"Usually there's something.: for 
everybody," said member Karen Ku- 
bin. 

"We do have a hand-painted 
print of a light-house. Jack Miller 
painted it," said Vickie Axton. 

Laurie StahJ has donated cre- 
ation of a special cake. J.Cs Pizzeria ' 
has donated a pizza-a-month for one 
year. There are season tickets for 
PM&LTheateras well as for Six Flags 
Great America. 

Baskets have been donated with 
special collections. They include: 
a Christmas basket, chocolate 
basket, Italian wine and pasta 
basket, bird basket, birthday bas- 
ket, garden basket, and a desper- 
ation dinner basket. 

"There will be clothing from Se- 
quoit Pride," said Vickie Axton. 

Tickets at the door are $15. 



Artist to demonstrate in pottery shop 



I 111 Tortorella will host Anne- 
Bridget Gary at the Antioch 
Pottery Works on Thursday, 
March 1 1 starting at 10 a.m. 
/ will discuss her experiences as 
a potter-ceramist in China, Korea, 
Japan, and the United States. 

Gary is professor of ceramics 
at the University of Wisconsin at 
Stevens Point. 

She will have slides and 
demonstration pieces. Gary "will 
demonstrate her unique style of 
wheel throwing that includes 
carving, both porcelain and 
stoneware, and 'stuffing' forms for 
sculpture." Tortorella said that 
people should be a lunch and 
drink. 

Antioch Pottery works is locat- 
ed at 25942 Heart O'Lakes Boule- 
vard (west on Grass Lake Road, 
west of 59, right on Bluff lake Road 
to Heart O'Lakes, left to theAntl- 
och Pottery Works. 

The Antioch Junior Woman's 
Club is building its membership. 
They have added about 15 new 
members this year, according to 
President Cathl Hackelor, That - 




OUR 
TOWN 

KenPatchen 



gives them about 60 members total. 

A major up-coming event is 
their Walk-a-Thon on May 15 at 9 
a.m. in Van Paten Woods. 

It will cost $12 to enter. "It's- 
our twelfth year," she said. People 
can donate more if they like. 

Member Jodl Eckert is orga- 
nizing the walk. 

The club will meet in a few days, 
Tuesday, March 9, at the 
Maplethorpe Room of the Commu- 
nity Building at 7 p.m. Pickard Chi- 
na will make a presentation as well 
as Antioch Community School Dis- 
trict 34. The district will present in- 
formation about the Tuesday, April 
13 school bond referendum. 

Antioch Community Chorus 
will present "Trie Crucifixion" in 
the sanctuary of the Benedictine 
Abbey on Palm Sunday, March 28 



at 7:30 p.m. Ralph Brooke, of 

Antioch, will conduct. Featured 
local soloists are Wanda 
Sobczak, Ken Smouse, and 
John Desblens. Nicholas 
Solomon, of Deer Held, and Nor- 
man Miranda, of Kenosha, will 
also sing. 

Antioch resident Judith 
Bronder will be on the Illinois 
Lottery's television game show 
"Illinois' Luckiest" on Saturday, 
March 6. She will appear on 
Chicago's WGN-TV, Channel 9 at 
6:30 p.m. She will compete with 17 
other contestants from across the 
state for prizes of up to $100,000 
or more. She qualified to appear 
when she found three television 
sets on her "Illinois' Luckiest" in- 
stant ticket. She filled out the back 
of the ticket and sent it to Spring- 
field. MinimUm prize for contes- 
tants is $500. 

If you have interesting infor- 
mation or anecdotes to submit for 
"Our Town" call staff reporter Ken 
Patchen at 223-8161, ext, 131 ore- 
mail, edlt.@lnd.com, " . 



-■■''■'- 



A4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



March 5, 1999 



Swing Street Cafe '99 
offers musical evening 

o 

yKENNEl 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Swing Street Cafe *99 rolls out 
some new sounds and dance move- 
ments this year in the completely re- 
decorated south gymnasium of Anti- 
och Community High School. 

This annual showcase of musical 
talent and evening of fun and danc- 
ing will be Friday and Saturday, 
March 12 and 13. The doors open at 
7 p.m. 

"The show starts at 7:30 p.m. 
and it ends around 10," said Sheri 
Fries. 

Fries and Lynne Keller have 
brought this annual event together 
with the members of ACHS Music 
and Performance Sponsors, AMPS. 

Swing Street Cafe" presents the 
musical talent gathered in the jazz 
ensembles, concert and symphonic 
bands, soloists, the Show Choir, the 
Fortunate Eight choir, and theater 



members. 

"On the menu will be nachos, 
pizza, potatoes, desserts, and bever- 
ages," said Fries. "We have a lot of 
parent help making the desserts." 

Larry Mondie's Baskin and Rob- 
bins Antioch franchise has made a 
donation for the evening's food. 
Domlnos is helping to provide the 
pizzas. 

"We will also have a variety of 
raffle prizes drawn each night that 
were donated by area businesses." 

The raffles this year are for mer- 
chandise. There is no 50/50 raffle this 
year, according to Fries. 

Tickets are at the door at are $6 
for adults, $3 for students, and chil- 
dren under five may attend without 
cost. 

"The money generated by this 
fund raiser will go towards the in- 
strumental music program at Anti- 
och Community High School," Fries 
said. 



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Antioch School District 34 board member Steve Turner hands out pamphlets Saturday concerning 
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Women to pray with Venezuela service at St. Peter 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



A Women's Ecumenical World 
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written by women in Venezuela will 



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be hosted in Antioch by women at St. 
Peter Church. The service also will 
be held in churches around the 
world. 

"St. Peter's Women invite 
women of all faiths to join us on Fri- 
day, March 5," said lean Zak, a 
member of the organizing commit- 
tee. 

The service includes a pot luck 
luncheon and then the special 
prayer service at 1 p.m. 

"A pot luck will be served at 1 1:30 
p.m. in the lower level of the 



Church," she said. "A new elevator 
has been installed for your conve- 
nience." 

"The entrance is off the side 
door." 

She asks that participants bring 
a dish to pass. 

"Every year women. from a dif- 
ferent country will write the pro- 
gram," Zak said. "This year it is writ- 
ten by the women of Venezuela." 

Twelve women from different 
churches in the Antioch area will put 
on the prayer service. 





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March 5, 1999 



POLICE & FIRE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ AS 












Veterans donate radar display unit to police 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



. Members of the Antioch Veter- 
ans of Foreign Wars Sequoit Post 
4551 and Ladies Auxiliary have do- 
nated a radar speed display unit to 
the Antioch Police Department. 

The donation is one of a series of 
actions the post has taken to support 
Antioch and Improve community 
service, 

VFW Members also have made 
contributions to the DARE Program 
and have recently purchased addi- 
tional land for more parking for peo- 
ple who use their hall for communi- 
ty events, 

The radar display unit shows dri- 
vers the speed of automobiles as they 
pass through the radar. 

"They had seen the unit," said Lt 
Ron Roth, of the Antioch Police De- 
partment. "They thought it was a 
great tool for the police department 
to promote safe driving." 

.- "This piece of equipment Is state 
of the art," said Roth. It is made by a 
manufacturer well known for quali- 
ty law enforcement radar systems. 

The veterans' membership vot- 
ed to make the donation in January, 
according to Post Commander Bill 
Oerly The Ladies Auxiliary of Anti- 
och Veterans of Foreign Wars Se- 
quoit Post 4551 contributed $500, 
and the Sequoit Post veterans con- 
tributed $1,000. The Village of Anti- 
och matched the grants to purchase 
the equipment. 

Roth said, "This is part of a com- 
munity policing effort. It lets drivers 
know what their speed is." 

Post member Al Himber said, 
"It's not to intimidate the motorist but 
to keep them aware of speeds to help 
protect children in the community." 

"What we're doing, number one 
priority, is putting this in school zone 
areas during school hours," said 
RotH. The unit also will be used in 
high volume traffic areas and places 
that have a high rate of accidents. 
. The unit will be placed in areas 



where police receive a high level of 
citizen complaints about speeding. 

"It's helped somer Roth said. 
People do slow down when they are 
reminded of their speed. "We've had 
a lot of positive feedback on this.'' 

"Most people realize we're trying 
to make drivers aware of the speed 
limits without issuing a traffic cita- 
tion." 

Roth offered a helpful hint for 
Antioch drivers who pass the unit on 
top of a police squad car. Roth said 
that after setting-up the radar display, 
unit in an area for a day or two, dri- 
vers may later see a squad car in the 
area actually running radar and writ- . 
ing tickets. 

"WhichI think is more than fair," 
he said. 

Oerly said that Sequoit Post was 
able to raise money for the donation 
through its bingo program and Pull- 
tab receipts. In the past, the post has 
donated in-vehicle computers to the 
police department. They also have 
donated to the Antioch Fire Depart- 
ment First Fire Protection District 
and the Antioch Rescue Squad. 

The veterans' support for the 
DARE Program has been given over 
a few years. "We've made a donation 
last year and this year too," Oerly, 
said. The money helps the depart- 
ment purchase T-shirts and program 
literature. 

"We donated to help them buy 
what they needed," Oerly said. "I 
think it's a good program." 

The donations by the veterans 
for.community projects is financed 
through their weekly bingo games 
and Pull- tabs. i 

To assure themselves that they 
have sufficient parking for the hall, 
the veterans have purchased proper- 
ty east of their building. 

"We purchased it for a parking 
lot," Oerly said. "Right now we're 
parking up to 50 to 60 cars on a good 
night." 

The purchase was approved by 
the membership at a special meet- 
ing. 




Members of the Antioch Veterans of Foreign Wars Sequoit Post 4551 and the Ladies Auxiliary of 
the post helped purchase a radar display unit for the Antioch Police department. It will tell motorists 
their speed on village roads. With the donated unit are, from the left, Ron Harmon, John Kurinec, 
Al Himber, Gloria Karrick, Dorothee Himber, Wally Hartge, Nell Kangeter, Joan Jendras, and Post 
Commander Bill Oerly.— Photo by Kenneth Patchen 




POLICE BEAT 



Persons charged with a crime are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. 



ANTIOCH 



Possession of 
alcohol, cannabis 

Antioch Police Officers stopped 
Michael M. Mehnert, 24, of Antioch, 
on Thursday, Feb. 25 at 2:10 a.m. 
traveling south bound in the 800 
block of Anita Street in a red 1991 
Grand Am Pontiac. He was charged 
with improper lighting, illegal trans- 
portation of alcohol, and unlawful 
possession of cannabis. 



Disobeying 
a railroad signal 

Antioch Police Officers stopped 
David P. Korus, 22, of Trevor, Wis., 
on Monday, March 1 at 6:02 am. at 
Route 83 and the Wisconsin Central 
Railroad tracks in a blue 1994 Jeep 
Carryall. He.was charged with not 
having a valid drivers license, dis- 
obeying a railroad signal, and oper- 
ating an uninsured vehicle. 

Korus was released on bond 
pending a court date on Wednesday, 
March 24 at 10:30 am in Grayslake. 



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A6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



March 5, 1999 



Antioch historians learn of barns' beauty, fate 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter , 



Members of the Lakes Region 
Historical Society met Thursday, 
Feb. 25 to stop, look, and listen to the 
history and future fate of Lake Coun- 
ty bams. 

Nancy Burgess, of Long Grove- 
based Save -a-Bam Foundation, pre- 
sented a selection of slides to docu- 
ment county barns of all shapes, 
sizes, and styles. More than 100 
bams will eventually appear In a 
book about Lake County barns that 
she has completed. She is trying to 
raise money to help her publish the 



four-color, hard cover book. 

"I got started doing this because 
last year we had bams on the Long 
Grove Village calendar," Burgess 
said. She spoke to a packed meeting 
room at the society's museum at De- 
pot and Main streets. 

"Ikindoffellinlove." 

Burgess said that the bams she 
has found and photographed each 
have the essence of the people who 
built them, the farmers who used 
them, and the people who own them 
now. 

"I will show you 33 barns I've 
documented." 

"These bams were built from our 



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very early forests," she said. "It was 
one of the most Important structures 
on the farm." 

At the time that the county's old- 
est bams were built, they were con- 
structed to last forever. 

Early pioneers had never seen 
land before that looked like the 
county landscape. "They set their 
bams in die best places overlooking 
the lands closer to the fields." It was 
a break with European traditions of 
bam placement. 

Burgess took the society's mem- 
.bers on a century-long tour of Lake 
County bam history. Her earliest 
photograph shows one said to have 
been built in 1834 In the Barrlngton 
area by Native Americans. Other 
bams In her collection reflected Ger- 
man traditions of construction. 

Some bams were simply con- 
structed of hand-hewn beams. The 
wood had been prepared for use by 
a water-soaking and then two years 
of vertical drying. "It was designed to 
last 100 years," she said of one 1847 
structure, now 152 years old. 

Burgess shared stones about the 
construction methods, materials, 
and the families that built the bams 
or owned them. She described de- 
sign changes through the decades. 
She explained the social and cultur- 
al history of bams. 

For example, there was a period 
of time when bams were built by 
wealthy gentleman farmers who 
hired architects to design them. 
Bams could have hot and cold run- 
ning water, cork floors to better pro- 
tect hoofs, and special woods, Some 
bams were expanded as the family 
grew. 

Bams revealed much about the 
family. "If you had a large beautiful 
bam, you definitely had your priori- 
ties in order." 



"The silo was really a revolution- 
ary addition," Burgess said. It al- 
lowed farmers to offer animals a bet- 
ter feed ration through the winter 
and early spring. It improved silage 
storage. Other bams added a new 
invention, ridge poles. 

Some bams had stars carved 
Into their walls to permit light to en? 
ter to illuminate the interior. The 
star also would serve for the farmer 
as a reminder of who was really in 
charge of his farm. Some barns had 
windows near the peak with panes of 
glass that had been carefully carried 
from the east coast. 

The best time for dairy bams in 
Lake County was around the 1880s. 
"It was becoming a very strong busi- 
ness," she said. By the 1890s, the size 
of bams had increased dramatically, 
In part because of a new roof line de- 
sign. "It allowed for more storage in 
the hay lofts," she said. 

The history of barns in Lake 
County is a rich tour of the agricul- 



tural roots of the county and the tra- 
ditions of the life that was lived on its 
farms. 

Burgess makes her presentations 
to educate and interest people about 
county bam history. She seeks fi- 
nancial support for the Save-a-Bam 
Foundation, sells deep green T- 
shirts, post cards, and posters, 

The foundation was created to 
save Lake County bams. She said 
that If people do not help save them, 
they will be destroyed. 

"Many of the bams In the coun- 
ty have already been bought by de- 
velopers," she said. Opportunities to 
save them, maintain them, or re-use 
them have become ever more pre- 
cious. She showed examples of bams 
re-used as homes, churches, and 
community centers. 

The Save-A-Bam hotline is 847- 
913-9464. There is also a web site 
(www.nsn.org/eakhome/savebam), 

"Each one has Its own story," she 
said. 



Historians to host open house 



The Lakes Region Historical So- 
ciety will host an open house Sun- 
day, May 2. 

Members will meet Thursday, 
March 25 to plan for the event. 

The open house will feature new 
exhibits built by member Earl Beese 
in the lower level display area during 
the past several months. 

"We're going to need a little bit of 
help," said President Bob Lindblad. 



He encouraged the membership to 
turn out for the March 25 meeting. 

"I will ask for people to sign up to 
serve on open house committees," 
he said. Committees to be formed In- 
clude refreshments, invitations, and 
publicity. 

The society will invite local con- 
tractors involved in helping the so- 
ciety as well as local political lead- 
ers. 



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March 5, 1999 



NEIGHBORS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A7 



i 



Neighbors 



Name: Cindy Mroczek 

Home: Lindcnhurst. 

Occupation: Senior Records Cleric, Undenhurst Po- 
lice Department 

I'm originally from: Downers Grove. 

I graduated from: Downers Grove North High 
School. 

My family consists of: My husband John, my son 
John, 19, and my daughter Michelle, 14. 

My pets are: A cat named Missy, 

What I Hke best about my town: The friendly people and rural 
atmosphere. 

What I like best about my Job: Lending assistance in an ever- 
changing environment with the help and joining together of the de- 
partment. 

The secret to my success Is: Receiving support from family 
and friends. * 

I relax by: Reading. 

My perfect day in Undenhurst would be: Spending fun time 
with my family and friends or taking walks through my neighborhood 
or through McDonald Woods. 

Last book I read: "Men Are from Mars; Women Are from Venus" 
by John Gray. 

Favorite TV show is: "Dateline/* "20-20," "48 Hours." 

Favorite movie is: "The King and I." 

Favorite music: Classic Rock. 




Favorite restaurant: Country Squire. 

Favorite band or musician: Rolling Stones and 
Aerosmlth. 

My life's motto Is: Do unto others as you would have 
them do unto you. 

If I won the lottery, I would: Wisely put it to good use. 

My greatest accomplishment Is: Being named 
"Officer of the Year." 

I want to be remembered as: An individual who is 
caring and helpful. 

My pet peeve Is: Inconsiderate people. 

Most interesting person I ever met was: People in general 
have interesting stories in their lives to share, whether it be resource- 
ful or personal. 

My dream job would be: It's what I am doing now that I enjoy. 

If I had a plane ticket to anywhere, I would go to: Actual- 
ly, I'd like to go to Florida to take a cruise with my family. 

If you have a "Neighbor" that you would like to see profited in 
this column, call Rhonda Hetrick Burke at 223-8161. 



Rotary seeks homes 
for exchange students 



Have Lake (BmiM 






local news 
to your home! 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
„Staff. Reporter.^. . 






r4-r *= : ./ : W-.-..'.-.: 



- Antioch Rotary Club members 
arc searching for host families for 
their 1999 Exchange Student from 
Denmark. Rotarians hope to secure 
three families that will offer him a 
place to stay. 

Magnus Boesen, 16, will arrive 
from Klampenborg, a suburb of 
Copenhagen, in August. He speaks 
both German and English well. 

The principal for his school de- 
scribed him as a skilled student who 
is serious about his studies. Boesen 
was described as a good ambassador 
for Denmark. 

Exchange students are not 
tourists who must be entertained, 
according to Stan Livermore, Rotary 
member. "They're coming to learn 
about life in the United States and to 
be an ambassador for their home 
country," he said. "They're not here 
to be on vacation." 

Members of the Antioch Rotary 
Club are looking for area families 
that would welcome Boesen into 
their homes for a few months so that 
he can learn what life in the United 
States is like. 

"What we would like to do is find 
three families that will each host him 
for three-and-a-half months. 

All school expenses of the ex- 
change student are paid by Rotary. 
Boesen also receives a financial al- 
lowance from Rotary. 

"The host family receives $100 a 
month to offset room and board," 
Livermore said. 

Boesen does not need his own 
room. He is allowed to share a room. 

Boesen comes from a family of 
two doctors and has a sister, 13, by 
the name of Eva. His father is a spe- 
cialist in ear, nose, and throat medi- 
cine. His mother is a family doctor. 
They each have their own clinic. 

Boesen said that he Is looking 
forward to the opportunity to make 
new friends, experience another 
school system, learn about anoth- 
er culture, and live with another 
family. He expects to improve his 
ability to write and speak English 
through the exchange student ex-. 
perience. 



Boesen said that he would like to 
seek additional education after high 
school. He is thinking of becoming a 
pilot, a biologist, or a zoologist. 

His hobbies are active ones,- ten- 
nis and soccer. He plays tennis well 
and recently won a championship of 
a club of which he is a member. He 
also teaches tennis to 12 children 
who are about 7 or 8 years old. 

Boesen is already well-traveled. 
The family has been to California 
twice and to Florida twice. In addi- 
tion, they have been to Mexico, 
Holland, and Greece, Boesen has 
spent quite a bit of time in France, 
Italy, Germany, Sweden, and Nor- 
way. 

Antioch area residents who 
would like to host the Rotary ex- 
change student can contact Liver- 
more at 395-4200. 



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Calendar 

Friday, March 5 

11:30 a.m. Low Impact, Low 
stress aerobic program for seniors 
age 55 and over al the 
Undenhurst Park Dist. Community 
Center, 220 E. Grass Lake Rd., 
fee $1 for details call 356-7676 

Saturday, March 6 

8 p.m. The Solo Singles Club is 
having a Special Super Dance at 
Bellini's, Rte.21&Rte; 137 in 
Ubertyville, Admission Is $7, call 
746-6818 for details. 

Sunday, March 7 

9:30 a.m. The Better Fellowship," 
a Christian Alcohol & Drug Support 
Group at Calvary Christian Center, 
134 Monaville Rd. LV, open mtg., 
child care provided, 356-6181 

7-9 p.m. Open Gym at Antioch 
Community High School, cost $2, 
adults only 

Monday, March 8 

12:45 p.m. Bingo at Antioch 
Senior Center, Info, at 395-7120 

6:30 p.m., Bereavement support 
group for children or parents at St. 
Paul The Apostle Church, 6401 
Gages Lake Rd. in Gumee, reg. 
nee., call 940-0779 for details 

7 p.m. Bingo at Antioch Moose 
Lodge, Rte. 173 west of Antioch 

7:30 p.m. Lakes Area Community 
Band at ACHS, Info, at 395-5566 

Tuesday, March 9 

9-11 a.m. Ladles Bible Study at 
Antioch Evangelical Free Church, 
child care provided, call 395-4117 

9 a.m. - Noon Antioch United 
Methodist Church holds Parents 
-.Day-Out for-infants to 5 yearolds,. 
call 395-1362 

11 a.m. AARP (for adults 55 and 
older) meets at Antioch Senior 
Center, 817 Holbeck Dr., for more 
info call 395-5068 

6:30-8:30 p.m. High School Boys 
Basketball, a full court, at Antioch 
Evangelical Free Church 

6:45 p.m. Antioch VFW Bingo, 
refreshments available. Doors 
open at 4:30 p.m. Call John 
Kemick, 395-5393 

Wednesday, March 10 

A Safe Place/Lake County Crisis 
Center, free support group for 
women victims of abuse meets in 
Round Lake, call 249-4450 

9 a.m. - Noon Antioch United 

Methodist Church holds Parents 

Day Out for Infants to 5 year olds, 

call 395-1362 

....,, , ,, i 

1:00 p.m., Antioch Woman's Club 
regualr meeting at United 
Methodist Church of Antioch, info, 
at 395-4210 

6:30 p.m. CPR classes sponsored 
by the Antioch Rescue Squad, ath 
the Rescue Squad Bldg., 835 
Holbek Dr., $5, call 395-5511 for 
information 

Thursday, March 11 

8:45-11 a.m. MOPS (Mothers of 
Pre-Schoolers) meets at Antioch 
Evangelical Free Church. $5 
covers craft and child care, call 
395-4117 for Info. 

7:30 p.m. ACHS AMPS meets In 
band room, call 395-7826 



GOT SOMETHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14-day notice is needed 
for all calendar requests. 
Ask for Cristina Feindt 
223-8161, ext. 141. 



i 



A8/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



March 5, 1999 



Police WcLTIl Seniors I Visitor nominates nine of Antioch's features 

of driveway fraud 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Antioch Police Officers have 
received complaints about two men 
in a pick-up truck who offer to seal- 
coat driveways for senior citizens. 

The men offer to cover a drive- 
way for $300 for homeowners. 

One homeowner noticed that 
the men were doing a poor job on 
her driveway. She requested a 
receipt with their name and busi- 
ness address which they could not 
provide her. 



"She said she was calling the 
police, and they left/' said Lt. Ron 
Roth of the Antioch Police 
Department. 

Roth said that people should be 
aware that driveways are not seal- 
coated in February in this area. The 
$300 cost is excessive. 

People who become suspicious 
of this service being performed for 
them, or arc concerned that it may 
not be legitimate, should call the 
police department. 

"People should be aware that 
this could happen," he said. 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Youth Sports 

We Want to report on your local teams 
Please call Brendan O'Neill at 223-8161 




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It would be nice to report that 
the search for the 100 Best things 
about Antioch is flushed with suc- 
cess. 

Instead, maybe it is time to send 
it down the tubes. 

After a few weeks of seeking sug- 
gestions and participation, only two 
people have taken the time to write 
and fax what they consider to be the 
best attributes of their home town. 

One e-mail list has shown up 
from San Francisco, however, and it 
offers a ranking of the top nine 
attractive features, The list offers a 
visitor's perspective of what is great 
about Antioch. 

The Antioch News may publish 
a story on March 26 about the one 
hundred best things in the Village of 
Antioch. 

Residents are encouraged to 
nominate their ideas. 

The article will include ideas 
from the public, and other 
sources, that cover every facet of 
village life. 

Antioch area residents should 
send nominations in writing as 
well as a statement about why 
that is a "best thing" about 
Antioch for them. 

People can send a list with sev- 
eral items, it is not necessary there 
be 100 nominations. They can list 
what is truly considered to be won- 
derful and nice about being in 
Antioch, about the community, or 
about people or events that make it 
nice to be here. 

The deadline for contributions 
is Friday, March 12. 

Send the cards and letters to 
Rhonda Hetrick Burke, Managing 
Editor, Antioch News, 30 South 
Whitney Street, Grayslake, Illinois 
60030. 



People also may send nomina- 
tions by fax to 223-8810. 

Checking in from San Francisco 
is occasional visitor. Terry Scdik. He 
Is the Community Development 
Director of Daly City, California. His 
father, Emil Sedik, lives in Highland 
Park. Sedik frequently visits his 
father and other friends, including 
one.in the Antioch area." 

"Can I offer you my list of things 
to put on the 100 best things list?" he 
said. 

Number nine on his list was the 
ease of parking downtown. He 
thinks he is influenced in that 
choice because he lives in San 
Francisco where there is no parking, 
more or less. 

He listed the wine selection at 
Antioch Armanetti Wine and 
Liquors, 1180 Main Street. It is a 
good collection, and Dean Weiner is 
a very knowledgeable person on the 
staff there who can help people with 
selections. 

Number seven, on his list is the 
Halloween festivities in downtown 
Antioch. "Totally neat," he said. 

He put Buttdck Sawmill Park on 
the list as number six. 

Five is DiMarco's Restaurant, 
883 Main Street. From the terra 
cotta planters in front, the beautiful 
exterior, the atmosphere setting 
music of Frank Sinatra, to the menu 
and daily specials, this is a beautiful 
place with great food. 

He nominated the Lakes Region 
Historical Society as number four. 
True, he's never been there, but he 
likes to read the stories about their 
activities on the NetDirect web site 
which displays stories from 
Lakeland Newspapers (www. 
Ipnews.com). It is good to know that 
the excitement of local people shar- 
ing discoveries and knowledge 
about village elders comes across in 
the stories. The meetings are fun. 



824 changes to the tax code. That root canal 
is looking pretty good about now. 



| , i 



Why suffer trying to figure out the tax code changes? Leave it to the professionals. 



At H&R Block, its our job to stay up-to-date on the latest changes. In fact, no one else has 



more experience preparing taxes. That's how we help get you everything you have coming. 



This is a strong nomination. 

His second place choice was the 
Chamber of Commerce and Industry 
web page • (www.Iake- 

online.com/antioch/index.htm). "In 
bloom 365 days a year," he said. The 
page is maintained for the chamber 
by Judith Krdlos at istudio, 391 Lake 
Street. Kallos does outstanding work 
maintaining the page, although the 
wiggling peek-a-boo eyeball on the 
chamber's Halloween page in 1997 
was perhaps their outstanding 
achievement 

For Terry Sedik, village tourist 
from San Francisco, the number 
one best thing about Antioch is 
"Something Sweet," 879 Main 
Street. The homemade fudge that 
Sandy Leibolt and Michele Michel 
make and sell Is very good. They 
donate some of their product to 
community groups to help with 
silent auctions or raffles. They are 
surely some of the friendliest people 
around. They contribute the door- 
prize to PM&L Theater productions. 

Even from the left side of the 
continent, the best things of Antioch 
. are evident. 

Right now, the last issue before 
the deadline, however, it would 
seem that the best aspect of Antioch 
may be its modesty and unwilling- 
ness to draw attention to its best 
features. 

Perhaps such modesty should 
be respected. 



Crafters needed 
for annual 
spring show 

The 1999 Spring Croft Show at 
the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post has 
openings for additional crafters. 

The show will be Saturday, 
March 13 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 
on Sunday, March 14 from 1 1 a.m. to 
4 p.m. 

"I'm still looking for crafters," 
Dorothee Himber said. She is the • 
organizer for the craft show for the 
Ladies Auxiliary of the Antioch 
Veterans of Foreign Wars Sequoit 
Post 4551. 

People who would like to partici- 
pate may call Himber at 395-6934. 

Crafters will offer gift items suit- 
able for upcoming holiday events 
such as Easter and Mother's Day, 
according to Himber. 

"This is the 19lh one," she said. 
"We will have pretty close to 1,000 
people who attend." 

Last year there were 70 crafters 
offering a rich variety of merchandise. 
Himber said there will be clocks, 
planters, ceramic gift items, afghans, 
outdoor wood signs, T-shirts, sweat 
shirts, Doormats made from recycled 
tires, candy, and pottery. 

"The fudge store is going to. be 
here," she said. —Kenneth Patchen 






.■ 



H&R BLOCK 

Someone You Can Count On 



H&R BLOCK 



We know. Do you?. 









ANTIOCH 
420 LAKE ST. 

(847) 395-6230 



McHENRY 

5102 W. ELM 

(815) 385-8630 



ROUND LAKE 
629 W. ROLLINS RD. 

(847) 546-4862 



FOX LAKE 

2 W. GRAND AVE. 

(SUITE 106) 

(847) 587-9333 



WAUCONDA 
474-B W. LIBERTY 

(847) 526-8877 



.- r "? , ' ! 



HOURS: Mon.-Thurs. 9 am - 8 pm; Fri, &Sat. 9 am - 5 pm; Sundays by Appt. 



OPTIMA 




Saturday, March 6th 

K A RAOKE 

by Starfire 



Tuesday, March 9 th 

MGD BASKETBALL 
HOOPS CONTEST 

8 pm - 10 pm 



WIN BULLS 
TICKETS 
& OTHER 
PRIZES 




Boat 

Casino Trip ; 
March 20^ 



• 



-..,. 



Stop In lor (total [3 



38730 Deep Lake Rd. 
Lake Villa 
356-3701 



■ 







THE 
CUPBOARD 



John Phelps 




Sports fans, start 
your engines 

■ 

f e have already been 
and arc going through 
the rigorous christen- 
ing regarding the 
"new-look" Bulls. Who are these 
guys anyway? Will the real Bulls 
please step forward! 

Anyway, enough on that, I 
promise not to subject you to any 
further agony. However, closer to 
home here at Iceland Newspa- 
pers, we are also experiencing 
somewhat of a 'christening' and I'm 
pleased that I can be a part of it In 
my case, we refer to the sports de- 
partment. 

Though not as earth-shattering 
in magnitude as the Bulls, 1 can as- 
sure you of more promising results. 
Allow me to introduce myself. 
I'm John Phelps, currently residing 
in Chicago. Thanks to Executive Ed- 
itor Neal Tucker and Managing Edi- 
tor Rhonda Burke, along with sports 
editorBrendan O'Neill and the rest 
of the staff, I thank you for taking 
me in. 

I have been saddled with the 
enviable task of picking up and car- 
rying on (and then some) the legacy 
left behind of the departed Lee Filas. 

Tall order, but I think we'll 
manage. I do have an advantage in 
my arsenal-prior knowledge 
of Lake County and some of the out- 
standing athletes It has and contin- , 
ues to produce year in and year out* 

To some of you, I may be a fa- 
miliar name, especially in the mid- 
late 1980s. To others, this will be a 
new experience that we can work 
„on,BettinitLhrough together. 

,'In short, I 've spent niariy years ' 
in this neck of the woods. A 1985 
graduate of Warren High, I jour- 
neyed over to The College of Lake 
County for two years. 

That's where 1 discovered that 
journalism, specifically in 
the print arena, was the direction I 
wanted to go. With the aid of then 
interim athletic director and pre- 
sent guidance counselor Larry 
Whittier, I became the school's first 
Sports Information Director for the 
two ensuing years. 

After two great years at CLC, 
I've spent the next, or last 12, de- 
pending on how you view it, dab- 
bling around in the world of print - 
journalism-most notably as a free- 
lance sports writer for the News-Sun 
for six years and then at the Chicago 
Tribune, where I worked freelance 
for four years and was inside for 
four, all focusing on the prep level. 
Somewhere in the middle of all 
of the chaos I managed to squeeze in 
a B A in Communications from little 
Eureka College in central Illinois. 

Anyway, that's the portfolio in 
a nutshell. I'm very happy to be 
back in the smaller, weekly atmos- 
phere for a variety of reasons. 
Right off the bat Lakeland 
Newspapers is a great company al- 
ways playing a part in our continu- 
ously growing culture. Further- 
more, I hope to assist in the pro- 
duction of in-depth sports coverage 
to our readers, and Lakeland is the 
right place for me to do that. 

Finally, it's nice to return to the 
small town atmosphere and get 
away from the hustle-and-bustSe 
big city life tends to lend itself to. 
Not that there's anything wrong 
with that-call it a matter of prefer- 
ence. My folks, Al and Sunsannah 
DeCarlo, presently make Grayslake 
their home. It's nice to be some- 
what closer to the family— return- 
ing to one's roots, if you will. 

Anyway, sit back and enjoy the 
ride-1 know I will. 

John Phelps can be reached at 
(647)223-8161, ext. 130; fax (847) 
223-8810; or e-mail at 
edit@lnd.com. 



SPORTS 



March 5, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A9 



Lady Rams 'Dream Season' not over yet 



By JOHN PHELPS 
Staff Reporter 



Repetition might be the buzz 
word here. 

Head coach Mike Muldrow 
couldn't have asked for anything 
more in his inaugural season as the 
Grayslake girl's varsity basketball 
coach. 

The truth of the matter is that his 
Lady. Rams recently concluded 
somewhat of a dream season, finish- 
ing with the best record in the 
school's history at 21-8, including 13 
consecutive victories to open the 
season. Grayslake, the sixth-seed In 
the regionals two weeks ago, beat 
Lake Forest in the first round before 
being eliminated by eliminated by 
Libertyville In the semifinals. 

But watt— it gets better. 
Muldrow might not be asking for it 
but the chances are that he'll get It- 
an encore dream season if not better 
heading into next year. 

"We did great", he said. "The 
biggest positive though is that we 
lose only two seniors and have eight 
juniors returning." 

The Lady Rams should be the 
early odds-on favorites to win the 
Fox Valley going into next season, 
with Alicia Ratay departed from Lake 
Zurich, which has wreaked havoc in 
the FVC for many years. 

Changing of the guard? "Lake 
Zurich will still be very strong, but 
with the likes of (Alicia) Ratay gone, 
they should be a. little more beat- 
able," Muldrow said. 

Grayslake, which finished sec 
ondthls^ar tT^'T)ehIha \vriS-e " 
Lake Zurich, will suffer from the loss- 
es of 5-6 guard Alison Losik and 6-0 
center Kendra Gallaugher. 

"Alison did a tot of great things at 
the guard position and Kendra, with 
her size advantage, was a good post 
player and grabbed a lotof rebounds 
for us " said Muldrow. 

"We have a couple of holes to Fill 
but we started juniors and sopho- 
mores most of the season, so their 
experience will definitely be an ad- 
vantage for 
us next year." 

Of those juniors returning for 
their senior campaign includes 6-4 
center jenny Wessel, one of the 
area's leading scorers this season 
with a 16.5 clip. Wessel, who shot 60 
percent from the field and 70 percent 
from the foul line, and had over 100 
blocks on the year, was an All -Tour- 
nament selection at the Elk Grove 
Thanksgiving and Wheaton North 








Close call 

Antioch's Don Lackey puts up a shot against Lake Forest In the Sequolts 49-51 overtime win over 
the Scouts in the first round of the Waukegan Sectional.— Photo by Steve Young 



Christmas Tournaments . 

For her efforts, Wessel was 
named to the Daily Herald All-Area 
and FVC All-Conference teams. 

Carie Pasenelli, 5-7 point-guard, 
was also a FVC all- co nference choice 
and will 

be looked upon to run the Rams of- 
fense next year. 

"They're, both very dedicated 
players and Wessel is a great defen- 
sive specialist inside," said Muldrow. 

Also returning next year will be 
5-9 guard /forward Amy Francis, who 
was all-tournament at Elk Grove and 
all-conference as a sophomore, and 
5-8 guard Carrie Hovik, who will 
probably start along with Pasenelli In 
what will be a solid backcourt for 
Grayslake. 

Melissa Sanders (5-8) will be a 
junior and solidify the guard position 
for the Rams. 

"She's a great athlete that started 
a lot of games for us towards the end 
of the season," said Muldrow. • 

It looks to be a very promising 
outlook for Grayslake as they look 
ahead towards next year-some of the 
proof is already there. 




Rati, Rah! 

The Antioch Community High School cheerleaders show their sup- 
port for the boys basketball team at the Waukegan Sectional this 
week. — Photo by Steve Young 



Lady Sequoits to build off season of struggles 



By JOHN PHELPS 
Staff Reporter 



Character is probably the best 
word to describe this years Antioch 
girl's basketball team. The Sequoits 
struggled to an 8-18 record, but head 
coach Dave Woods Isn't about to 
sweat it. 

"I very proud how they hung in 
there," 'he said. "They could have 
folded the tent very easily but the 
character and willingness to hang In 



there and play hard despite being 
out-manned a lot of times- that real- 
ly impressed me. They sure didn't 
play like an 8- 18 team." 

Antioch loses three seniors in 
Amy Carlberg (9 ppg), Katie Gofron, 
and Erin Riepe. But juniors waiting 
to step in include 5-9 forward Jour- 
dan Phillips and 5-10 forward Mar- 
garet Fischer, both of whom saw sub- 
stantial time coming off the bench as 
juniors. Woods will look to them to be 
major contributors next year. 



ATHLETES OF THE WEEK 



Nome: Jourdain Milot. 
School: Warren 
Sport: Basketball ' 
Year; Junior 

Lost week's stats: Scored 
16 points in Warren's 72-35 
win over Wauconda in the 
first round of die 
Waukegan Sectional. 




Milot 



Name: Liam McCluskey 
School: Grayslake 
Sport: Basketball 
Yean Junior 
Last week's stats: 
Scored 15 points to lead 
the Rams over Libertyville 
72-52 in the first round of 
the Waukegan Sectional. 



In addition, and perhaps most 
encouraging to Woods is that he will 
get his playmaker/point-guard back 
in 5-7 junior Katianne Pechauer, 
who went down with a torn ACL and 
missed most of this past season. 

"We're really excited about her 
returning," said Woods. "She's got 
all-conference written all over her. 
Unfortunately, when she went down 
this year, we had to play some peo- 
ple out of position, so that kind of 
hurt us to lose her! She'll definitely be 
looked upon to run the offense next 
year." 

The rest of the junior contingent 
coming in next year saw plenty of 
varsity time this season, so Woods is- 
n't worried about inexperience. 

In addition, he'll have 5-5 guard 
Bethany Shore, one of the perennial 
three-point threats in the area, along 
with Justine Sinkus, a 5-9 forward 
who led the team as a sophomore 
with six rebounds per game. Erica 
Brown, only a freshman this year, 
will complement Sinkus In the post., 



as will Shelley Wolfgram, a 6-1 junior 
center, and 5-5 guard Sasha Mika, a 
three-point threat. 

Brown was Antioch's leading 
scorer In about six games this past 
season and as she continues to ma- 
ture, will be outstanding. 

"We have a great group of out- 
side shooters and the inside game to 
go along with it in Erica, Shelley, and 
Margaret. Whatever tandem we have 
in there between those players will 
tough to handle inside. Overall, 
things are looking pretty good." 

"As long as they make the com- 
mitment to playing hard and staying 
in shape over the summer, next year 
looks promising. How hard they 
work over the summer will dictate 
pretty much what happens next 
year. . 

This was somewhat of a frustrat- 
ing year for the Lady Sequoits and 
Woods is eager to put it behind. 

"We so we just want to put it be- 
hind us and try to take It to the next 
level." 









-: 



3= 



<l.;<i i 



A10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



March 5, 1999 




Longtime Sequoit honored 

Steve Young, who graduated from Antioch Community High 
School in 1950, shows off the plaque given to him from Sequoit 
Pride for the 50 years he has spent photographing the school's 
sporting events. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 



YOUTH ICELESS HOCKEY ASSOCIATION 



Grades 1-2 

Western Conference 
Central Division 

2 Maplelcafs 6 I 

3 Blues 5 2 

I Blackhawks 5 2 

8 Wolves 3 4 
7 Hurricanes 3 4 

4 Moose 3 4 

5 Redwings 3 4 

6 Vipers 7 
Pacific Division 

II Kings 

12 Sharks 

16 Avalanche 

13 Ducks 

9 Flames 

14 Oilers 

15 Coyotes 

10 Canucks 

Eastern Conference 
Atlantic Division 

21 Islanders 

22 Lightning 

24 Grizzlies 

18 Rangers 

23 Admirals 

19 Capitals 

17 Flyers 

20 Panthers 
North East Division 

25 Canadians 6 1 

28 Predators 6 I 
27 Bruins 5 2 

30 Whalers 5 2 

29 Sabres 2 5 

31 Dragons 2 5 

26 Penguins 1 6 

32 Thunder 1 6 
Grades 3-4 

Western Conference 
Central Division 

7 Hurricanes 7 

5 Redwings 5 1 

8 Wolves 5 2 
1 Blackhawks , 5 3 

6 Vipers 3 4 
3 Blues 3 4 

























12 

10 

10 

6 

6 

6 

6 





6 





1 


13 


5 





2 


12 


4 


2 


1 


9 


3 


4 





6 


2 


4 


1 


5 


2 


4 


1 


5 


2 


5 





4 


1 


6 





2 


5 


1 


1 


11 


5 


1 


1 


11 


5 


2 





10 


4 


3 





8 


3 


4 





6 


3 


4 





6 


2 


5 





4 





7 









12 

12 

10 

10 

4 

4 

2 

2 



1 15 

2 12 
1 11 

10 

1 7 
1* 7 



4 Moose 3 

2 Maplelcafs 2 

9 Jets 
Pacific Division 

15 Oilers 5 

1 1 Canucks 4 
14 Ducks 2 

18 Stars 4 

12 Kings 4 

10 Flames 3 

13 Sharks 3 

16 Coyotes 2 

17 Avalanche 1 
Eastern Confernce 
Atlantic Division 

21 Capitals 7 

26 Grizzlies 6 

19 Flyers 6 

23 Islanders 5 

24 Lightning 4 

25 Admirals 3 

27 Cyclones 2 

20 Rangers 1 

22 Panthers 
North East Division 

31 Predators 

34 Dragons 

29 Penguins 

28 Canadiens 
33 Whalers 

35 Thunder 

36 Senators 

30 Bruins 

32 Sabres 
Grades 5-6 
Western Conference 
Central Division 

3 Moose 6 

4 Redwings 4 
2 Mapleleafs 5 
1 Blackhawks 3 
7 Wolves 2 

. 5 Vipers 2 

6 Hurricanes 

Pacific Division 

11 Sharks 6 

12 Ducks. 4 
10 Kings 3 



1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
4 
6 
7 




2 
1 
3 
4 
4 
4 
8 



2 

1 






10 

7 

4 

2 





5 6 13 Coyotes 

6 4 14 Avalanche 
8 8 Flames 

9 Canucks 
"3 13 

2 10 Eastern Conference 
5 9 ' Atlantic Division 
8. 20 Admirals 

8 15 Flyers 
2 8 10 Islanders 

1 7 ' 19 Lightning 

2 6 21 Grizzlies 
13 16 Rangers 

17 Panthers 

North East Division 
14 24 Bruins 
12 27 Whalers 

12 22 Canadiens 

1 11 23 Penguins 
26 Sabres 
25 Predators 
28 Thunder 

Grades 7-8 
Western Conference 
Western Division 

2 Penguins 

5 Kings 

7 Ducks 

8 Maplelcafs 
10 Grizzlies 
1 Blackhawks 

•3 Vipers • 

9 Redwings 

6 Sharks 
4 Wolves 
Eastern Conference 

12 Eastern Division 

3 11 11 Rangers 
10 18 Thunder 
17 19 Panthers 

2 6 13 Coyotes 
2 6 14 Flyers 
15 Bruins 

17 Predators 

2 12 12 Lightning 
4 8 16 Moose 

3 2 8 20 Cyclones 



7 





1 


15 


5 


2 


1 


11 


5 


3 





10 


4 


4 





8 


4 


4 





8 


4 


4 





8 


3 


5 





6 


2 


6 





4 


1 


7 





2 



3 3 2 8 

3 5 6 

2 4 2 6 

2 6 4 



7 
7 
4 
4 
2 
2 
2 

5 
5 
5 
4 
4 
1 




6 
5 
5 
5 
4 
3 
3 
2 
1 




5 
5 
5 
4 
4 
3 
3 
2 
2 




1 
1 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
5 
5 
7 



1 
1 
1 

1 
1 


2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
4 









1 

1 








1 





1 
1 








15 

15 

9 

8 

5 

5 

4 

12 

11 

11 

10 

9 

6 





12 

10 

10 

10 

9 

7 

6 

4 

2 





1 U 



11 

10 

8 

8 

7 

7 

4 

4 





/Mfc-. 



Z? 



NAYB still has 
tourney openings 

North American Youth Basket- 
ball announced that they still have 
openings in their annual spring 
youth basketball tournament for 
teams in the Elgin and surrounding 
area April 30 to May 2 at Dundee 
Crown High School and other area 
sites. 

This tournament will feature 10 
different brackets. They include fifth 
to sixth grade boys; fifth to sixth grade 
girls; seventh grade boys; seventh 
grade girls; eighth grade boys; eighth 
grade girls; ninth to 10th grade boys; 
ninth to 10th grade girls; 1 1th to 12th 
grade boys; 11th to 12th grade girls. 
All grades are based on the grade in 
which a student is currently enrolled. 

The entry deadline is April 9. 

For additional information or an 
entry form, call Anita Livesay at the 
toll-free NAYB spring tournament 
hotline at 1 (88B) 629-2275, or tour- 
nament director Mark Garrigan at 1 
(800) 787-3265. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

The following parcels of property, acquired through the Tax Sale Certificate Pro- 
gram, are being offered for sale by the County of Lake. 

Written bids should be submitted to the County of Lake, Tax Extension Dept, Boom 
101. 16 N. County St., Waukegan, IL 60005. 

Glds received will be retained for 30 days after the initial bid. After completion of the 
30-day period, the County has the right to accept the highest bid or to reject it it the 
amount Is Insufficient or if the sale would not be in the best Interest of Lake County 
Taxpayers. 








Wlllard Rooks Helander 




Lake County Clerk 


UNINCORPORATED ANTIOCH 


i 60002 ,. 


26625 W.Cedar St. 


OM1-302-014 


26591 W. Cedar St. 


01-11-302-017 


42444 N. Willow St. 


01-11-305-003 


42436 N. Willow St. 


01-11-305-004 


25390 W. Hilidalo Av. 


01-25-214-014 


27137W. FalrviewAv. 


01-34-203-011 


27127 W. FairviewAv. 


01-34-203-014 


27140 W. Park Av. 


01-34-203-025 


271 36 W. Park Av. 


01-34-203-026 


271 32 W. Park Av. 


01-34-203-027 


27128 W. Park Av. 


01*34-203-028 


40287 N. Fox Run Ln. 


02-20-300-027 


22086 W. Sarana Dr. 


02-21-405-023 


22080 W. Sarana Dr. 


02-21-405-024 


22072 W. Sarana Dr. 


02-21-405-025 


22066 W. Sarana Dr. 


02-21-405-026 


22058 W. Sarana Dr. 


02-21-405-027 


22046 W. Sarana Dr. 


02-21-405-028 


22032 W. Sarana Dr. 


02-21-405-029 


22135 W. Well Dr. 


02-21-408-007 


22257 W. Loon Dr. 


02-21-409-017 


22276 W. Lee Dr. 


02-21-409-031 


INCORPORATED OLD MILL CREEK 


60083 


39143 N. Mill Creek Rd. 


03-28-400003 




0399A-2479-AN 


. 


March 5, 1999 




Come Worship With Us 5 

A Directory Of Antioch Area Churches 



Grassland Baptist Church. 258 Ida St., Anlioch, IL 
Sunday School 11am., Morning Worship nam., 
Sunday Evening 7pm, Robert Williams, Pastor. 

First Church ot Christ, Scientist & Reading Rm. Rta 173 and 
Harden, Antioch. Phone (847) 395-1 196. Sunday School, 
Sunday Church Service 1030am, Wednesday, 7;30pm. 

Beautiful Savior Evangelical Lutheran Church. 554 Parkway, 
Anlioch. Phone (847) 26S-24S0 Sunday Worship at 9am, Sunday 
School, High School & Adult B»bla Classes i0;30am. 

St Ignatius Episcopal. 977 Main St Phone (847) 3964662. Low 
Mass 7:30am., Hgh Mass 930am Sunday School & Nursery 930am. 

Anlioch Evangelical Free Church. 750 Highviow Dr. Phone 
(847) 395-4117. Saturday Evening Service 530 p.m. Sunday 
School 9:45am, Sunday Worship 830, 11:00, Children's Church 
1 1am. Nursery both services Awana Club. Senior Pastor David M. 
Groleau. 

St, Stephen Lutheran Church. 1155 Hillside Ave. Phone (847) 
395-3359. Sunday Worship, 8, 9:15 & 10.30. Church School 
9:1 5am., Sunday. Rev. Robert Trendel, Interim Pastor. 

Christian Lite Fellowship Assemblies ot God Church. 41625 
Deep Lake Rd., Antioch. Phono (847) 395-8572. Sunday School 
(all ages) 9am., Sunday Morning Worship 10am., Children's 
Church 10am., Sunday Evening Worship 6:30pm., Wednesday 
Worship & Children's Program 7am., Tues. Women's Fellowship 
& Bible Study 9- 11 30am. Jeff Brussaly, Pastor, 



Faith Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main St., Phone 
(847) 395-1600. Sunday Worship 8 & 10:30am., Sunday 
School 9:25am., Sal. 7pm„ Rev. Gregory Hermanson, 
Pastor, Christian Day School (847) 395-1664. 

Mlllbum Congregational United Church ot Christ. Grass 

Lake Rd. at Rta, 45. Phone (847) 356-5237. Sunday Service 

10am. Children's Program 10am. Rev. Paul R. Meltzor, 

Pastor. 

United Methodist Church at Antioch. B48 Main St. Phone 

(847) 395-1259. Worship 8.30 & 10am„ Fellowship Time 

9:30am; Sunday School 10am. Rev. Kurt A. Gamlin, Pastor. 

St. Peter's Church. 557 W. Lake St., Anlioch. Phone (847) 
395-0274. Masses weekdays, 730am; Sunday 6:30, 8, 
9:30, 11:30am & Saturday 5:30pm. Rev. Father Ronald H. 
Anglim, Pastor. 

Chain of Lakes Community Bible Church, 23201 W. Grass 
Lake Rd, Antioch. Phone (847) 838-0103. Sunday Worship 0:15 
and 10:45, Sunday School 9:45. Children's Church 10:45. Youth, 
Women's, Awana & Small Group ministries. Pastor, Paul 

McMinlmy. 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod). 
25100 W. Grand Ave. (Rle. 59 & 132), Lake Villa. (847) 
356-5158. Sunday Worship 8:15 & 10:45am; Sunday 
School (3 and up) and Bible Study 9:30am. Christian 
Preschool. Rev. John Zellmer, Pastor. 



Dan Dugenske, Director 
This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
STATE OF ILLINOIS ) 

) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH 
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION ) 

OF Biake Andrew Toney ) 

For ) 

CHANGE OF NAME ) 

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION 

Public notice is hereby given that on April 2, 1 999, being one of the return days En 
the Circuit Court otiho County of Lake, I will tllo my Petition In said Court praying for 
the change of name from Stake Andrew Toney to that of Blake Andrew Pecha, pur- 
suant to the Statute In such case made and Provided. 

Dated at Antioch, Illinois, February 10, 1999. 

/s/ Shena Pecha 

0299C-2445-AN 

February 19, 1999 

February 26, 1999 



) 



March 5, 1999 



f 
. / 



i FREE 
LIMITED 
EYE EXAM 



3-5 YR. OLDS 



2r *.**<»• 



/a 



nv* 



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Sat., March 13, iqqq 
<?:ooam - 3:00pm 

Balloons & Prizes 
Please Call For An Appointment 



h 



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5'iLM 



win 



W*S5M 



" 



'XKZXZ 



♦ VISION CARE ASSOCIATES 

vT. Dr. Charlotte Nielsen, Dr. Elliott Friedman 
♦£, #* Optometrists - 

•*£ >Z » 2403-Grand Ave., Waukegan 

* ' 847-662-3800 






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CORNER OF ROUTE 12 & GRAND AVE 



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EQUAL HOUSING 

LENDER 



(847) 587-6311 







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is 5.15%. Minimum to open and earn A.RY. is $2,500 
There is a penalty for early withdrawal. There is a 7-day grace 



Ahnualiercentage yield is effective as of 3/5/99. ^he|g^ maturity date, Limited time offer 



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1-" : '':~:^Z202M^^^ 








*-JC 






A12 /Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



March 5, 1999 




i 
I 

i 



£ BEDDING 

EN6IANBER & SERTA 

'98 DISCONTINUED MODELS 



UP TO 





;'\ 



'-- 




Table & Chairs Formica Top Table with 
4 Swivel/Tilt Chairs, Large Selection 



Starting at $ 688 and up.5pcs. 



tWtm.rt.. • f^-r^m^ -■■■■■ 



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BENCHCRAFT SECTIONAL 

Double Recliner 
With Sleeper And Wedge 

STARTING AT $1488 & up 



No Payment Until March 2000 

WE'RE # 1 IN 






:s 



COMPLETE ROOMS TOGO! 

Sofa, Loveseat, Cocktail Table, 2 End Tables And 

2 Lamps All At One Low Price. Starting at s 44.00/mo. 



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1. Free Financing 

2. No Down Payment 

3. Free Delivery 



4. Free Set-up 

5. Open 7 days 

6. Complete Service 




■%■* £■ •*+ '■* 



*« ,2ra?02 



Serta 



Name Brands At I scount Prices : > groyhiii . -BenchCraft 

• Chromcraft •Pulaski 

• Don't let the low, low price fool you! ; o«^iii»hni«>. n «, . cr,„i-»r.H r 

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Friday 9am-9pm; Saturday 9am-5:30pm 

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757 NORTH MAIN 




D1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



www.webautomarket.com 



Marcn5,1999 



The Volvo C70 Convertible: 
Subtracting a roof adds a 



new 




The new Volvo C70 convertible 
may be a luxurious, sporting 
open four-place tourer provid- 
ing driving enjoyment, but first 
— and foremost — it is a Volvo, which 
means a car designed to safely and se- 
curely transport its driver and passen- 
gers. 

The driving enjoyment in part is pro- 
vided by a 190- horsepower, aluminum 
engine powering the front wheels 
through a four-speed automatic trans- 
mission; electronic climate-control sys- 
tem; power windows/ mirrors/locks (with 
remote); eight-way power'seats with 
memory; leather upholstery; in-dash sin- 
gle-CD/AM/FM/cassette with 240-Watt 
10-speaker audio system; cruise control 
and remote lock/ unlock with security 
system. 

The lined, automatic, one-button 
convertilbe top, which goes up or down 
In approximately 30 seconds, features a 
glass rear window with electric defroster. 
Glass provides superior vision properties 
over the plastic rear window found in 
many soft-top cars due to its better resis- 
tance to scratching, ease of cleaning, less 
visual distortion and the ability to have' 
an integral defroster element. 

.Tho.qzo.corxvertible's sofety^sys^jjjtns, 

and features combine those found in al) 
Volve models plus some designed to meet 
the unique needs of the "roof-less" C70. 
Active safety features include the su- 
perior traction offeredjby front-wheel dri- 
ve, which can be supplemented by an op- 
tional Stability and Traction Control sys- 
tem; front-independent, rear Delta-link 
suspension for sure handling and the 
stopping power from four-wheel disc 
brakes with anti-lock system. 

For passive-safety, the Swedish firm's 



•. ■' 



Rearview mirror has automatic, 
electro-chromatic filter for auto- 
matic dimming 

Side marker lamps at the front 
and rear bumpers 
Integrated child booster cushion 
Child safety locks on rear doors 
enhances the level of child safety 
Approach light to enable the car 
owner to approach the car safely 
and securely In the dark 




engineers began by providing a strong 
platform designed to absorb and transmit 
impact energy around a rigid passenger 
"safety-cage." Collision forces from front, 
side or rear are channeled to reinforced 




Please see C70 / D4 1999 VOLVO C70 CONVERTIBLE 




; Chevrolet 



MARCH Brings Luck for 





#5917 — .... 

1999 Chevy Tracker Co 



Pei Nti, 
3fi Ma 



1999 Chevy Camaro^ 

U<:U&; &<tC^rV P« ! »'1w/j Lfja&e £>0 /■ U *™ Mo - Ufcise £'0^ Q* Phi Mo. : Lease £>*}*\C\ PeiMiV 

fwOnty - llylJ SM* ■ for Only v ^4ffrfl tttty, , ! Fty.Qn.ty v ^ |Q 3&W& j ' Fur.-Qn.iy, ^^£y $sCm 
'$2251 due al inception^ plus tax. I '$230/ duo al iiia'plion. plus lax, *$2279 due nt incnfilimt, plic tn. '$2290 dim at hceptnn, \im tu 

.LMA*drim&a*w&MH*&nt&3a±-!4 v*w-/ ,-*j| \*^~'MT--Tzj.*s^j&i+m-wmB*f*a&s«c$aai*mKimnKmBa* Pi«rn i n pin nhn ji n nam in hi ihi wwui I Hi LHwlPll I p ' W i m'j JifUTl i i n n iii n I !■■> i ■ n in i m i 

Used Core o\ f?pyrnond Chevy/Olds in Antioch Used Cars at Ray Chevrolet in Fox Lake 



1998 Chevy Tracker LSI $14,995 

1985 Ford High Cub© $7,495 



1997 Ford Blaier 4X4 4-Dr. $17,995 

1997 Saturn SLi $11,995 

1996 Ford Ranger XLT J$7.995 



1991 Chevy Corsica $5,495 

1992 Fontlac Bonneville $9,995 

1994 Cutlass Supreme SL $6,995 

1994 Olds Cutlass 4-DR $5,995 

1995 Dodge Neon . $5,995 

1994 Ford Taurus LX $8,995 

1994 Corvette Coupe $22,995 

1997 Chevy K1500 X Cab 4X4_$20,995 

1997 Chevy Astro Von— $10,995 

J99B Pontlac Transport $19,995 

1989 Celebrity Wagon___ $2,495 

1993 Jeep Wrangler 4X4 .$9,995 

1994 P-150 XLT Bxt.Cab 4X4__$14.495 

1995 Olds Aurora $17,995 

1993 Ford Escort Wagon $5,995 

1997 Dodge Ram, Ext $22,995 



1997 Tohoe 4WD 4-Dr _$27,995 

1995 Sulck Lesobre Limited. $1 5,995 

1988 Ford Bronco 4X4 _$5.495 

1992 Mitsubishi Eclipse $2,595 

1992 Chevy C1500 X Cab P/U_$9.995 

1993 Toyota 4-Runner 6R5 V6_$14,995 
1993 Chevy Conv Van $9,995 

1993 CMC Jimmy SLT 4X4 $10,995 

1994 Chevy S-10 Blazer 4X4_$7.995 
1988 Ford Bronco $5,995 



1998 Olds Intrigue. 



-$16,995 

1997 Chrysler Sebrlng LXI $16,995 

1998 Tracker LSI 4-Dr 4X4 $14,495 

1993 Bronco 4X4 E/B_ .$12,495 

1994 Dodge Caravan $7,995 



1994 GMC Jimmy 4-Dr 4X4_$13,995 

(993 Chevy 4X4 W/T $9,995 

J995 Dakota Ext V-8 W/ CapJ$13,995 

1991 MoidaRX7 : $6,995 

1997 Chevy 0500 fixt $21,995 

1994 Chevy Astro Conv Van_$12,995 
1994 Chevy Blazer LT 4X4_$14.995 
1994 Mercury Cougar XR7 $7.995 

1992 Olds Delta 88 Royal $9,995 

1989 Dodge Grand Caravan J$3, 995 
1991 Ford Crown Vlctorlo LX_$5.995 
1991 Cadillac Eldorado Barrltz_$9.995 

1993 Ford F-150 $8,995 

1990 Chevy Astro CL $4,995 

1994 Ford Tempo GL $5,995 



I Outh Stores Feature HID's 

rfiSlIfl Of Drastically Reduced 

'mi j i/ Pre-Otiveits. Mos! Are 

H JH Cold Check Certified. 

^LLL_IU.LI We Also Carry GM 

mLLlLUll) Cettificd Used Vehicles! 



■ 



Certified 

USED VEHICLES 



_$5.995 

.$12,995 

.$11,995 



1992 Chevy Blazer 4X4. 

1993 Dodge Dakota 

1993 Chevy Suburban- 

1993 Ford explorer $12,995 

1994 Dodge Conv Van__ $9,995 

1995 Chevy S-10 4X4j_ $14,995 



1995 Chevy Tahoe LT 4-Dr_ $19,995 
1995 Chevy KI500 Ext Conv_$21,995 
1995 Chevy C1500 Sllverado_$1 6,495 

1995 Tahoe K1500 2-Dr _$19,995 

1997 Chevy Tahoe LT_J $27,995 



1996 Monte Carlo 2/34. 

1998 Astro Cargo 

1996 Chevy Blazer 

1998 Chevy Venture. 



.$14,995 
-$18,995 
-$18,995 
:$23.995 



1995 Chevy Astro Converslon_$15,995 

1994 Subaru Legacy $8,995 

-$13,995 
-$11,995 
.$18,995 
.$15,995 



1998 Dodge Neon Sport. 

1996 Chevy S-10 Ext 

1996 Chevy Blazer LT 

- 1996 Chevy Blazer LT 




D2 / Lbkelane Newspapers 



i -n 1(1 Y AUTO MARKETPLACE 



March 5, 1999 




s 98 Park Avenue Ultra 



fmBmmm 

'99 Neon Sedan 



Stock #5859. 
MSRP $38,180.00. 




njnQind^Mtti 




Enauz Demo Discount -$4,903 
Consumer Rebate -$3,000 



KI\1AUZ DEMO SALE PRICE 

$30,277 



Includes: 
Leather Seati 



Astroroof, 
Power Seats, 
AM/FM CD & 
Cassette 




KIMAUZ 
LEASE PRICE 

VC 1 4 MONTH 



3G months 



Stock #96219, 



.for 

GLORIA 



Loaded with 
Sunroof, Tilt, 
Cruise, Auto, Air 
& Keyless Entry. 

36 month lease totals $7,764,00; 
Residual value $6,653,00. All rebates 
applied, must take delivery by 3/1/99. .-.-, 
Must quality for recent college gradu- 
ate and aulo show bonus programs. 



Disclaimer: TAXES ARE EXCLUDED. All rebates applied. Term restrictions may apply. Credit approval required • see dealer for details. 



AFFORDABLE LUXURY CARS - ASK FOR MARIO 



'94 LEXUS GS300 STK# P5101 G, GOLD, LOADED, MUST SEE, 84,000 MILES, ONLY $17,995 

'95 OLDSMOBILE AURORA STK# P5098, BLACK, PRICED TO SELL AT ONLY $13,995 

'95 CADILLAC DEVILLE SEDAN STK# 5836A, BLACK W/LEATHER AND ALL THE TOYS, 60,000 MILES AND PRICED AT ONLY $15,995 

'95 CADILLAC DEVILLE SEDAN WHITE W/50,000 MILES AND ALLTHE TOYS, VALUE PRICED AT ONLY $16,895 

'95 CHRYSLER NEW YORKER STK# 86517A, TEAL GREEN WITH LESS THAN 46,000 MILES, SALE PRICED AT ONLY $11,495 

•96 INFINITY 620 STK# 95028. ONLY 47.000 MILES, $14/195 

•96 LINCOLN TOWN CAR STK# 6460RA, WHITE W/GRAY INTERIOR, LOW MILES AND PRICED AT ONLY $17,995 

'98 NISSAN MAXIMA STK# P5141, ONLY 19.000 MILES, PRICED AT ONLY $20,695 



SUBURBAN DRIVEN FAMILY CARS -ASK FOR HOWARD 



'93 FORD CROWN VICTORIA STK# P5072, BLUE READY FOR A NEW HOME AT ONLY $7,295 

'94 BUICK LESABRE STK# 5832A, DARK BLUE W/LEATHER SEATING, 97,000 MILES AND RUNS GREAT PRICED ACCORDINGLY AT $6,495 

'94 CHEVROLET CORSICA STK#P5068. TEAL, 63p00 MILES, ONIY $5,995 . ....... 

'94 NISSAN ALT1MA STK# P5107G, WHITE, GREAT EVERYDAY CAR AT ONLY$7,995T, 

•95 NISSAN MAXIMA STK# P5087. DARK GREEN, LOADED, DRIVE IT HOME TODAY AT ONLY $11,995 

'95 CHRYSLER CONCORDE STK# 96O90A. BLUE W/LESS THAN 50.000 MILES, SALE PRICED AT $10,595 

•95 EAGLE VISION STK# P5092. BLACK. CLEARANCED PRICED AT ONLY $8/495 

•96 BUICK LESABRE SEDAN STK# 95003A. BLUE W/TAUPE INTERIOR, 53.000 MILES, A BEST BUY AT $11,995 

'96 PLYMOUTH BREEZE, STK# P5031, GREEN W/LESS THAN 33,000 MILES, PERFECT FAMILY CAR AT A PRICE YOU CAN AFFORD $7,995 

'98 CHEVROLET MAUBU STK# P5122, 35,000 MILES, ONLY $11,595 



MINI-VANS AND SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES -ASK FOR GLORIA 



«93 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4 STK& P5095, DUAL TOPS. RED, ONLY 66,000 MILES AT $7,995 

'94 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY STK# 96228A, ALL WHEEL DRIVE, READY FOR THE SNOW AND PRICED RIGHT AT ONLY $11/195 

•94 CHEVROLET BLAZER SPORT STK# P5079, BLACK. 85,000 MILES, PRICED TO SELL AT $13/195 . 

'94 ISUZU TROOPER 4X4 STK# P5083, 88,000 MILES AND RUNS GREAT, ONLY $9495 

'95 CHEVROLET 1500 4X4 CLUB CAB Z7T SILVERADO EDITION STK# P5090, ONLY $18,995 

•96 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER STK# P5078, DARK IRIS. 81,000 MILES, ONLY $11995 

'97 CHEVROLET ASTRO CONVERSION VAN STKfl P5082, 14,000 MILES, ONLY $15,995 

'97 CHEVROLET VENTURE LS WAGON STK# P5102G, WHITE, 29,000 MILES, ONLY $15,995 

«97 FORD WINDSTAR STK# P5132, 60.000 MILES, ONLY $12,995 

•98 CHEVROLETTAHOE 4X4 STK# P5076. MUST SEE TO BELIEVE. 28.000 MILES, ONLY $23,995 

•98 SUZUKI SIDEKICK 4X4 STKtt P508B, GREEN, 26.000 MILES. $15,195 



SPORTS CARS, COUPES & CONVERTIBLES - ASK FOR MARIO 



'93 HONDA PRELUDE STKSP5067. 81.000 MILES, $8,995 

•93 OLDS CUTLASS CONVERTIBLE STKSP5099, 72,000 MILES. $8/495 

'94 CHEVROLET CAMARO CONVERTIBLE V-8 STK#P5081, PURPLE PYTHON PAINT AND MORE, ONLY $14,995 

.'95 PONT1AC GRAND AMSTK8 P5070, RED, MUST DRIVE TO BELIEVE, ONLY $6,995 • 

■96 CHEVROLET CAVALIER Z24 COUPE STK#P5106G, WHITE, MUST SEE, ONLY $8,995 

'96 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVERTIBLE STK*/86631A, GREEN W/SADDLE TOR LESS THAN 37,000 MILES, WINTER SALE PRICE OF $17/495 

'97 r CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVERTIBLE STK#P5085. SPRING tS ALMOST HERE, ONLY$15,795 • 

•97 CHEVROLET CAVALIER COUPE STKtf P5071. RED. 29.000 MILES. ONLY $9,595 




SEE GEORGE FOR PRICING ON OVER 50 BANK REPOSSESSED 
VEHICLES - BELOW IS A SAMPLING OF THESE VEHICLES AT 
TREMENDOUS SAVINGS! 



'95 NISSAN MAXIMA 

'97 CHEVROLET ASTRO VAN 

•95 EAGLE VISION ESI 
SEDAN 

'96 SATURN SL2 



•95 CHEVROLET 1500 CLUB 

CAB4X4Z-71 

'96 CHEVROLET CAVALIER 
'97 CHEVROLET CAVALIER 
'97 CHEVROLET CAVALIER 



•94 MAZDA B2300 PICK-UP '97 CHEVROLET VENTURE 

LS WAGON 
'91 P0NT1AC FIREBIRD 

'91 FORD MUSTANG COUPE 

•90 HONDA ACCORD 

•92 HONDA ACCORD 

*93 HONDA PRELUDE 

•93 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4 
«94 LEXUS 6S30Q SEDAN 
'98 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE 
'95 NISSAN MAXIMA 
"95 OLDS AURORA 
'95 PONTIAC GRAND AM 



'98 CHEVROLET BLAZER 
TAH0E 

' '98'SUZUKl SIDEKICK 
SPORT 

'94 IZUZU TROOPER 

•95 FORD ESCORT LX 

•97 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 

'94 FORD PROBE GT 

'94 FORD MUSTANG GT 

'94 CHEVROLET CORSICA 

•93 CROWN VICTORIA 
SEDAN 

'95 P0NTIAC GRAND AM 

■92 FORD ESCORT LX 

'95 FORD ESCORT WAGON 

'97 CHRYSLER SEBRING 
CONVERTIBLE 

•94 CHEVROLET BLAZER 

'94 CHEVROLET CAMARO 




3 Deerpath Rd. 

CD 



THE ANSWER IS: THEY'RE ALL GREAT DEALS. CALL KNAUZ BEFORE YOURS IS GONE. 






of Lake Forest 



k 



1044 N. Western Avenue • 847-234-2800 • www.knauz.com 






RfliP.1 .?. thmU 
March 5, 1999 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



, ».*» *^ 



Lakeland Newspapers'/ D3j 




_' ^^ 



CHKYSI.I-K 
Vlymoutfj 

Dodge 

Dodge Trucks 



LAKE COUNTY'S LARGEST VOLUME 

CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH-DODGE-DODGE TRUCK DEALER 



mcK 



SANDY McKBE & STAFF THANKS YOU (OUR CUSTOMERS]) 
FOR RATING US #1 DEALER FOR SATISFACTION, SALES, 
SERVICE AND CUSTOMER REFERRALS IN LAKE COUNTY. 





&» ON ALL 
NEW 



»»o$ reD 



Ve&m 





SIOO - S2800 

BELOW INVOICE + 



•Excludes 300M & LHS. \ All incentlvei included on $2800 Below Invoice. 



MO GAMES, NO GIMMICKS, NO HASSLE 

YOU DON'T HAVE TO BE A SUPER STORE FOR SUPER SAVINGS 

All Prices Clearly Marked On Every Used Car, Every Day Of The Week 

"BUYING A CAR IS NEVER GONNA FEEL THE SAME" 



USED CAR WARRANTY GUIDE 

BAL = Balance of Factory 6/6 = 6 Monrh/6,000 Mile 3/3 = 3 Month/3,000 Mile 




= As Is No Warranty 



CLEARANCE 

CARS 
CARS 

CARS 



'92 NISSAN 5ENTRA CPE. 

5*. lH-6792.ts.i*ivJ$rd,A/C 
•AVI $49495 

WARRANTY! 6/6 I 



'97PONTIAC5UNrlRECPE, 

, SA 18-6624. Auto, A/C, Con , Low Mm 

" v «nO,995 

• 'WARRANTY! BAL 



'98 DODGE STRATUS . 

SA*8'6612. Auto. A/C. Con 

i*av.s| i 995 

WARRANTYiBAL 



'98 CHRYSLER SEBRJNGCQNV, 

SA »l 1-6770. rW,R,H,Ovii#.OoodWlo. 

|gAV, *l 7,514 

WARRANTYiBAL 



'96 DODGE GRAND CARAVANS 

SA i I0-6689T. ImU MIn fcgfci 

" W * 13,995 " 

'WARRANTY! 6/6 



'98 510 EXTENDED CAB IS 3-DR. 

SA Rl 06754T. IfflxU. IW, R. I* Cm*, VI 

* AV, *14,560 

WARRANTYi BAL 



'97 S10 BLAZE 2-DR. 

54. f I O 6734T. TH, \ ft, &*. Yd Q> fbj» 

•*"*! 6,552 , 

WARRANTYl 6/6 



'97 CHEVY SILVERADO 4X4 

Sid. 13-65991. loaiKJaoJHk. 

sAv. $ir 995 

'WARRANTY! BAL 



'94 DODGE SHADOW CPE. 

SA 09-664 1 Auto, A/C. low Min 

tAVi Si 



WARRANTY! 6/6 



'96 CHEVY CORSICA , 

SA 18-6568. Coed Mdn, Auto, A/C 
SAV>$£995 

WARRANTYl 6/6 



'95 CHEVY CAVALIER CPE. 

SA 196667, Auto, A/C, Com 

uvi $7995 

_ warranty 6/6 



'95 CHEVY CAVALIER SON. 

SA.R10-66PO.Al A/C, lo-Hkt 

** v ' *8 1 1 9 

WARRANTY! 6/6 



'98 DODGE NEON CPE. 

SA 18 661 1. SAVE, SAVE, SAVE 

»avi S9793 

WARRANTY! BAL 



'970LDSACHIEVASDN. 

SA 16-6574. V4, FW, Ft. Ti, Croiw 
SAVI $| 

T "WARRANTY! BJ 



CLEARANCE 

TRUCKS, c A R s 
VANS, 4X4s ! 



CARS 



* '88 OLDS DELTA 88 

SlV. • 1-6942. fW.N. I*. &.*0m 

5avi $3294 

WARRANTY! A) 



'91 MERCURY SABLE LS WAGON 

SA. f 2-4937.AbvAiUr Undid, Oat. 

sav.$ 4 293 



WARRANTY! Al 



'92 GRAND PRIX 5E SDN. 

.. SA 11 2-6871. taU.W- 

**v.$ 4511 

WARRANTYl At 



'93 CHEVY CORSICA 

SA It2-6BS6.SAVE. SAVE. SAVt 

5AV, *4630 

• WARRANTY! 3/3 



'95 DODGE NEON SDN. 

SA. 12-6912^ Auto, A/C, Warair/. 
ISAVI $ 



WARRANTYl 6/6 



'95 DODGE STRATUS 

SA f 1 2-6869. SAVE, SAVE, SAVE. 

I«* v, »7i73 

WARRANTYl 6/6 



'90 DODGE CARAVAN 

SA * II 68061 Bow Trammitwn 

■*« * 1 595 



WARRANTY! t 



'95 CHEVY LUMINALS 

SA. * 11 -6798. PW, FV Ti*. Ovi», Cou. 

I " V,5 7717 

WARRANTY! 6/6 



'94 FORD RANGER SUPER CAB 

S A §9-66361. &** Wort twk. Cap 

***■ $8469 

WARRANTY! 6/6 



'95 JEEP WRANGLER 

SA. «10 6746T. Auto, fco Wrveb. Niwfcp 

*av* $9995 

WARRANTY! A/6 



'96 DAKOTA CLUB CAB SIX 

SA 19-65091. tw, lo« MJm, Cop 

'wAR»ANTYiA/6 



'85 CROWN VICTORIA 

SA.f 2-6940. boMOoiCk 

savi $995 

• WARRANTYl Al 



'90 DODGE SHADOW 

SA 12-6934. A*. h«W» 

SAV, *1548 

WARRANTY! Al 



'89 OLDS CUTLASS 

SA»2-6926.3tt,r* T *»* 

" V1 M786 

WARRANTY! Al 



'96 DODGE NEON SDN. 

SA. f 1 2-6874. Auto, A/C, Good Mm 

** VI $7848 

WARRANTYl 6/6 



'93 MERCURY COUGAR XR7 

SA 12-69 1 0, AbtcAitoly NVa. 

WARRANTY! 6/6 



'96SATURNSU ■» 

SA. 12-6941 . Pmw Roof, Auto, A/C 

»*vi $9995 

WARRANTY! 6/6 I 



'94 CHRYSLER CONCORDE 

SA f 1 1 -6796. PW, PL lA, OwH/Cau.. 
*AV1 59995 

WARRANTYl 6/6 



'97 PLYMOUTH BREEZE 

SA. 12-6936. AT, A/C, Ti, Cvx. I7K WSal | 

9MnS 11,475 

'WARRANTY! BAL 



'96 CHRYSLER CIRRUS 

SA. (1 1 -6803. PW, H. Ti, Ouw, Uo*w. 

■**■ * 1 2,365 

WARRANTY! 6/6 



'96 DODGE INTREPID 

SA « 12-6862. PW. PL, T*. CiwHt. 

"" * 1 2,387 . 

\tfARRANTYl6/6 



'96 DODGE INTREPID 

SA » 12-68 14. ImdvL umMW 

SAV,$ 12,392 



WARRANTYl 6/6 



'98 DODGE STRATUS 

SA * 1 2-6840. PW, PL Ti. Cub* 

"« *'l 2,575 



'Warranty! 6/6 



'98 DODGE STRATUS 

SA » 1 2-6839. PW, PI, Ti, Ovi* 

""* 12,575 

VmRRANTYi BAL 



CARS 

TRUCKS 
VANS 

4X4s 



'90 DODGE CARAVAN 

SA R2-6920T. Bmic Tram. • 

" v "*2543 

WARRANTYl Al 



"93 CHEVY GM CONVERSION VAN 

SA 1I2-6827T. U»Air.TV,VO , ,lW, PLTA 

1^*8557 

WARRANTYl 6/6 



'93 CHEVY GIO CONVERSION VAN 

SA #2-69 1 9T. VS. fW. PL ». IV S* 

I s*vi $3995 

WARRANTYl 6/6 



'96 FORD F150 RIG. CAB 

SA. 12-6923T. Auto, Air, SAVE. 

l*"-»10,325 

WARRANTY! 6/6 



SA 

SAVI 



'91 FORD EXPLORER 4X4 

12-6939T. Auto, PW, PL, T», C 



Oviie.' 



WARRANTYl Al 



'94GEOTRACHR4X4 -.< 

SA R2-6925T. Auto, Hard-Top, Soh-fop 
SAVI $ 



WARRANTY! 6/6 



'91 FORD EXPLORER 4X4 XLT4-DR. 

SA 12-69 I7T, PW.PLtt. 

ttV,s 6595 

WARRANTYl 6/6 



'93 CHRYSLER CONCORDE, 

SA. 12-6818. PW. PL Ti, Own, low WU» 

savi $3995 

WARRANTYl 6/6 



'95 DODGE AVENGER ES , 

SA f 12-6861. V6, IxxxU, Sunroof. 

" VI *1 2,711 



Warranty! fl/i" 



J 98 CHRYSLER SEBSUNG JX C0NV. 

SA. 1 1 1 -6770. IW, PL ri. Cnim lw MJn. 

" v, *l 7,714 

WARRANTYiBAL 



•94 DODGE RAM 1500 

SA 12-6927T. SAVE, SAVE, SAVE 



WARRANTYl 6/6 



'94 DODGE CARAVAN SPORT 

SA * 1 2-684 1 T. 1*0 Cleon. Euro dm 

savi $7532 

WARRANTYl 6/6 



'95 RAM 1500 SIT ■ ' 

SA f I -6892T. FjoJU 1 * fctk. 

**«* 12,556 

V/ARRANTTl 6/6 



'97 IZUZU RODEO 

SA. f 1 -68941. WoyUwMlti 

"«* 12,992 

WARRANTYiBAL 



'96 PLYMOUTH GRAND VOYAGER 

SA. * 1 2-6824T. IsaM Dtm I Hon* 

««*13,81«S 

WARRANTY! 6/6 



'94 FORD F-150 SUPER CAB 4X4 

SA 12-69221. 5-SpJ, Ej*o Own. 52K. 

»"* 13,995 

VaRRANTY! 6/6 



'96 PLYMOUTH GRAND VOYAGER 5E 

SA » I -6886T. to A* 4 rta*, PW, ft. Ti 

ww * 13,995 ■ 

WARRANTY! 6/6 



'96 FORD F150 SUPER CAB XLT 

. SA H-68391. FW. a LniiEKksW 

ttW, . $ 15,960 

>MRRANTY: 6/6 



'94 CHEVY EXTENDED CAB 4X4 

SA. 11-68877, SWsoxlaAdXKMa 

"«» 15,993 



WARRANTY: 6/6 



'96 DODGE RAM 1500 CLUB 4X4 

SA. 11 2-68S9T. rW. B. T*. Owt Coa 

« AV, *1 #5,920 - 

WARRANTYl 6/6 



'96 DODGE RAM CLUB CAB SLT 

SA 1I2-6870T. 4C*r«AH0wCa«»« 

lAV ' s 16,987 

WARRANTYl 6/6 



'96 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY 

SA 112-6860T. fcgV4.uc4v.LsU 

** v,$ 16,996 

WARRANTYl 6/6 



6 DODGE RAM 15004X4 

i. »I2-6857T. rW,ILft,Cw«.C«. 

SAV "*17,132 

WARRANTYl 6/6 



'9B DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE 

SA. * 1 2-68341 to Ai, MAI* (ml 

iAV,s 18,575 



WARRANTY! BAL 



'98 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE 

. SA. H2-6833T. FWATaCwk 

5AV,$ 18,575 

WARRANTY! BAL 



'97 DODGE DAKOTA SLT 

SA 112-68291. Gw.fl.rW.ILU.Owtujlr.hi 

«v.$i3 995 

'WARRANTYl BAL 



'97 RAM 2500 SLT VIO CLUB CAB 

. SA.ll-6898T.MtaU. 

SAVr *20,938 - 

WARRANTY! 6/6 




D,4- / Lakeland Newspapers, 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



March 5, 199B 



FROM PAGE Dl 



■ 



C7 : Roof adds new dimension 



— _ 

structural members, not the passenger 
compartment. 

A car's roof generally provides a major 
degree of torsional rigidity. The C70, de- 
signed to be a convertible, compensates 
for the missing sheet metal with heavily 
reinforced lower side rails; reinforced B- 
pillars; two-pair of struts reinforcing the 
front subframes; a horseshoe-shaped 
steel member in the rear passenger com- 



strength-steel tube sandwiched between 
reinforcements of Boron steel. This rein- 
forced structure combined with Volvo's 
Roll-Over-Protection System (ROPS) 
helps to provide passenger protection 
during certain types of accidents. 

The Volvo Side Impact Protection Sys- 
tem (SIPS) incorporates door anti-intru- 
sion members made of Boron steel, 
Boron, a type of steel, is superior to other 
partment area, and a steel wall behind the hardening steels in terms of toughness 
rear seats. The A-pillars and windshield . relative to hardness and has high fatigue 
surround are reinforced by a high- strength and wear resistance. There are 

some 10 critical compo- 
nents made of or rein- 
forced with Boron steel in 
the C70 convertible. 

SIPS also incorporates 
dual side impact airbags 
(part of the Supplemental 
Restraint System or SRS) 
mounted in the side bol- 
ster's of the C70 convert- 
ible's front seats. 

Dual front airbags, with 
knee bolsters, comprise the 
remainder of the convert- 
ible's SRS, which comple- 
ment the three-point seat 
belts with pyrotechnic ten- 
sioners found at all four . 
passenger spots in the con- 
vertible. 

Seat-belt pre-tensioners 
increase effectiveness of 
the three-point harness by 
removing belt slack in the 
event of an accident, help- 
ing to keep passengers 
more firmly - and safely - 
in their seats during certain 
types of accidents. 




Many of the driver's controls have been gathered to- 
gether on the center console - easy to reach and 
with large simple-to-operate buttons. This makes for 
relaxed and safe driving. 



Please seeC7Q /D6 




ILLINOIS SALES TAX INCLUDED! 

REGISTRATION/PLATES..INCLUDED! 

ACQUISITION FEE INCLUDED! 

SECURITY DEPOSIT.. ..NONE! 
MONEY DOWN NONE! 









"'"V»-*K 




GH3ES1 



/jH+fxflB^WwSS.U'r lj«**»— . 



i tB$&& 



NEW 1999 SAAB 9 s SE 



•AUTOMATIC 'LEATHER 'SUNROOF -HEATED SEATS 'CD & CASS. 'POWER MEMORY SEATS 




With approved credit. Chicago residents add 6% use tax. 

FIRST COME.. FIRST SERVED! 




THE^EXCHANGE 

2300 SSBftSa" "' «*n 432-9300 

yvww.saabexchange.com 

A Dlv. Of Semersky Enterprises, Inc. 



Auto Marketplace 



Can for Sale 



CORVETTE 1992 CON- 

VERTIBLE while with white 
lop, garage kept, 55,000 
miles. Excellent condition. 
,815)365-8468, 



AUDI 1995 A6, 
(847) 432-5020. 



$17,990. 



AUDI 1996 A4, 
(847) 432-5020. 



$19,990. 



BONNEVILLE SSE 1994. 
Don't miss out-Savo. Below 
payoff and below dealer pric- 
es. We have 2, musl sell 1, 
we're buying homo. Black with 
gold trim, loaded up with leath- 
er, 65K miles plus large 3yr, 
35 K mile warranty, $11,800. 
(815) 675-2788 overlings and 
weekends after 6pm. 

CADILLAC 1995 CON-. 
COURS, Sf2,997. (847) 587- 
3400. 

CARS $100, $500 & up. Po- 
lice Impounds. 1980's-1997's 
Hondas, Chevys, Jeeps and 
Sport Ulitity. Must sell. 800- 
772-7470 exl. 7040. (SCA Net- 
work). 

CARS FROM $500 

Police Impounds 
AndTax Repo's. 
For listings call 
1-B00-31 9-3323 
exl. 2292. 

CHEVY 1990 LUMINA, 
$3,998. (847) 336-3510. 

CHEVY 1991 CORSICA, 
$5,495. (847) 395-3600. 

CHEVY 1995 LUMINA, 
$8,995. (847) 587-6473. 

CHEVY 1996 MONTE CAR- 
LO, $10,994. (847) 356-2530. 

CHEVY, FORD PICK-UP 
Bodies, Factory-new guar- 
anteed from $1300.00. Doors 
from $69.00 Fenders from 
$50.00 Beds from $800. oo. 
Bedllners $169.00. Bumpers, 
Grills Repari Panels, Paints, 
Abrasives, windshields, radia- 
tors, Delivery, Marx (217) 624- 
6184. 



CHRYSLER, .1993.. NEW 
YORKER "FIFTH AVENUE, 
all power, 73K, excel lent me- 
chanical condition, $6,700. 

(847)491-0256. - 

CONTINENTAL 19B7 EX- 
CELLENT condition, fully 
loaded, owned by mechanic,' 
recent tune-up, tires, brakes 
and more. $2,B0O/best. (847) 
973-1557. 

DODGE 1994 INTREPID, 
$8,394. (847) 356-2530. 

DODGE 1995 NEON SON, 
S5.995. (847) 587-6473. 



DODGE 1995 NEON 
SPORT, red, 4-door, automat- 
ic, A/C, arri/fm cassotle, 1- 
owner, 36,300/bost. (847) 
645-7904. 

EXPRESS AUTO 
EXCHANGE 
USED CARS 

We lake consignment cars. 

No charge 

Too busy to sell your car? 

Let us do it for you. 

(847)740-1400 

1 18 W. Rollins Rd. 

Round Lake Beach. 

(Across from Burger King). 

Ask for Chris. 

FORD 1991 TEMPO SE- 
DAN, $2,995. (847) 587-6473. 

FORD' 1992 TEMPO, 
$3.494. (847) 356-2530. 

FORD 1992 TEMPO, 
S4.68B. (847) 587-3400. 

FORD 1993 ESCORT 
WAGON, $4,995. (847) 360- 
5000. 

FORD 1994 PROBE, 

$6,988, (847) 587-3400. 

FORD 1994 PROBE, 
$8,294. (847) 356-2530. 

FORD 1994 TAURUS LX, 

$8.995. (847) 395-3600. 

FORD 1998 CONTOUR, 
$9,988. (B47) 587-3400. 

GEO 1993 PRIZM, 5- 
speed, air, am/fm, 64,000 
miles, excellent condition, 
$5,000/best. (847) 872-7954. 

GEO" STORM 1995, 

$3,988. (847) 587-3400. 

GOLF VW 1992, 50,400 

. acutal miles, woman driver, 

woman owner. Very sharp, 

runs excellent, manual, A/C. 

. $5,650. (847) 543-1965. 



HONDA" PRELUDE 1997, 
$19,000, 5-spood, moonroof, 
14K miles, perfect condition, 
(847) 473-6095. 

HYUNDAI 1993 ELAN- 
TRA, $3.995. (847) 249-1300. 

HYUNDAI 1995 SCOUPE, 
$5,995. (B47) 249-1300. 

INFINITI G20 1993, 

$9,995. (847) 362-9200. 

INFINITI J30 1995, 

$16,995, (847) 362-9200. 



INFINITI Q45, 
(847) 362-9200. 



$15,995. 



.MAZDA 1995 MILLENIA, 
$12.995. (847)362-9200. 

MAZDA 626 1996, $10,998. 
(847) 336-3510. ■ 

MERCURY 1993 COUGAR 

XR7, $7,995. (847) 587-6473. 

MERCURY 1993 TRACER 
WAGON, $4,888. (847) 587- 
3400. „ 

MITSUBISHI 1993 
ECLIPSE COUPE, $7,595. 
(847) 234-2800. 

NISSAN 1994 ALTIMA, 
$7,995. (847) 234-2800. 

OLDS 1986 CUSTOM 
CRUISER WAGON, (Tower 
windows/locks, good condi- 
tion, runs great, (847) 
487-5913. 

OLDS 1989 CALAIS, 
$1.595. (847) 5876473. 

OLDS 93 REGENCY, 1991, 
$3,595. (847) 360-5000. 

OLDSMOBILE 1986 CUT- 
LASS SUPREME. 76.000 
miles, many new parts, 
$1,700/best. (047) 546-1025. 

OLDSMOBILE 1994 
ACHIEVA, $4,998. (847) 338- 
3510. 

OLDSMOBILE 1995 AU- 
RORA, $13,995. (847) 234- 

2800. 

PLYMOUTH 1994 SUN- 
DANCE, $5,494. (847) 356- 
2530. 

PLYMOUTH 1996 

BREEZE, $7,995. (847) 234- 
, 2800... .. ., r 

PLYMOUTH 1997 NEON, 
$9,995. (847) 249-1300. 



To 

advertise 

in this 

section, 

call (847) 

223-8161 



PONTIAC 1995 GRAND 
AM, $6.995. (847) 234-2800. 

PONTIAC 1996 GRAND 
AM, 510.995. (847) 395-3700. 

PONTIAC 1996 SUNFIRE 
CONVERTIBLE, 511,988. 
(847) 587-3400. _^ 

PONTIAC 1997 GRAND 
AM SE, $12,995. (847) 587- 
6473. 

PORSCHE 1991 911 
COUPE, $27,990. (847) 432- 
5020. _^ 

PORSCHE 1994 988 CA- 
BRIOLET, $25,990. (847) 432- 
5020. _^ 

SAAB 1997 900 SE, 

$21,950. (847)432-9300. 

SAAB 1995 9QQS- CON- 
VERTIBLE, $17,950, (847) 
432-9300. , 

SAAB 1996 900SE, 

518,950. (847) .432-9300. 

SAAB 1997 9000 CSE, 
$25,950. (847) 432-9300. 

SAAB 9000 1996, $20,995. 
(847) 362-9200. 

SATURN 1995 SC2, 46K 

miles, excellent condition, 
$10,000/best. ' (847) 

918-1476 leave message. 

SATURN 1995 SL, $5,995, 
(847) 360-5000. 

SATURN 1997 SL2 SE- 
DAN, $10,495. (847) 234- 

2800. 



SUBARU 1992 LOYALE, 
$3 ,498. (847) 3363510. 

SUZUKI ESTEEM 1998,' 

$9,995. (847) 249-1300. 

TOYOTA 1993 COROLLA 

LE, $6,995. (847) 362-9200. 

VOLVO 1994 850 SEDAN. 
$18,995. (847) 362-9200. 

VOLVO 1998 855 GLT 
WAGON, $22,295, (847) 382- 
9200. 

VOLVO 740 1992, $9,998. 
(047) 336-3510. 

VOLVO SELECT S70 1998, 
$24,595.(847)382-9200. 

VW JETTA GL 1995, $8,995. 
f847) 249-1300. 



Vans 



DODGE 1992 CARAVAN, 

cargo style, 4-cyllnder, air, 
power brakes/steering, cas- 
sette, newer tires, brakes 'and 
tune-up. Excetlent condition, 
$4,000.(847)587-7868. ' 

CHRYSLER 1994 TOWN 
6V COUNTRY, $10,595. (B47) 
234-2800. • 

CHRYSLER 'lS9S TOWN & 
COUNTRY", $13,294. (847) 
356-2530. - 

DODGE 1994 CARAVAN 
SPORT, $7,532. (847) 587- 
6473. 

FORD 1991 CARGO VAN, 
$5,995. (847) 395-3600. 

FORD 1992 AEROSTAR 

'EXTENDED MINI VAN, 

97,000 miles, $4,900/besl. 

(847) 550-0883. 

FORD 1993 AEROSTAR 
XL, $6,995. (847) 587-3400. 

PLYMOUTH 1992 VOYAG- 
ER, $3.995. (847) 395-3600. 

VW EUROVAN 1993, 
$8,995. (647) 249-1300. 



Four Wheel Drive 
Jeeps . 



CHEVY 1992 BLAZER 4X4, 
$5,995. (847)587-3300. 

CHEVY 1003 .SUBURBAN, — 

$11,995.(647)587-3300. 

CHEVY .. 1993 Z71 OF- 
FROAD, mint condition, low 
miles. (847) 746-7004. 

CHEVY 1994 BLAZER 
512.494. (847) 356-2530. 

CHEVY 1994 S-10 BLAZER 
4x4, 4-door, loaded, must soil, 
$10,000/bost. (847) 
546-8525. 

CHEVY 1995 S-10 BUZ- 
ER, $15.900. (847) 395-3700. 

FORD 1993 EXPLORER, 

$12,995. (847) 587-3300. 

FORD 1994 BRONCO 4x4, 
$5,995. (B47) 395-3700. . 

GEO TRACKER CON- 
VERTIBLE 1992, $3,895. 
(847) 360-5000. 

GMC 1994 JIMMY 4X4, 
$13,995. (847) 587-3300. • 

ISUZI 1994 TROOPER 
4X4. $9,495. (847) 234-2800. 

ISUZU 1994 RODEO 4x4, 
$10,998. (847)336-3510. . 

"ISUZU 1997 RODEO, 
$12,992. (847) 587-6473. 

ISUZU RODEO LS 1995 
4WD, loaded. 2-tone, 52.000 
miles, 5-spoed, V8. Asking 
S13,800/best. (414) 

635-9772, . 

JEEP 1993 WRANGLER 
4x4, $7,995. (6.47) 234-2800. 

JEEP CHEROKEE 1992, 
$7,694, (847) 356-2530. 

JEEP CHEROKEE SPORT 
1992, $9,988. (847) 587-3400. 

JEEP COMANCHE 1989 
2x4, 140K miles, 5-speed, 
bedliner, snap -on bed cover, 
. now tires, excellent condition 
and runner, $3,300. (414) 
534-6548. 

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 
1994, $10,994. (847) 356- 
2530. • 

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 
LTD., 1996, $21,995. (847) 
362-9200. 



For More 
Classifieds, 
See Page 5 



i 






March 5, 1999 



AUTO MARKETPLACE Lakeland Newspapers /P5 

Auto Marketplace Classifieds 



JEEP WRANGLER 1995, 
S9.B95, (847) 587-6473. . 

JEEP WRANGLER 1995, 
$9,494, (847) 356-2530. 

SUZUKI 1998 SIDEKICK 
4x4, $15,195. (847) 234-2800. 



STARCRAFT TRUCK 

CAMPER 1987, 9.5', excel- 
lent condition. Refrigerator, 
water heator, bathroom, air, 
$4,000. (414) 878-9747* 



Snowmoblks/ATV's 



Trucks/Trailers 



Boal/Motors/Etc 



DODGE 1993 DAKOTA 
EXTENDED CAS MARK 
111, loaded, V8, 81.000 
mllos. S8,800/bost. (414) 
6S3-B840. 

DODGE 1993 DAKOTA, 
$5,995. (847) 395-3700, 

FORD 1989 F-250 4X4, 
$1.995.(847)587-6473. 

FORD 1994 F-150, $9,995. 
(847) 587-3400. 

FORD 1994 RANGER 
XLT, 5-spoed, AM/FM cas- 
sette, bedllnor, excellent con- 
dition, 66.000 miles, $8,800. 
(847)816-7846. 

FORD 1998 RANGER, 5- 
speed, atr, CD, roar slider bed- 
llnor, custom paint. Must sell. 
$li,900/besl. (815) 

759-9187, (847) 774-9240. 



1984 RENKEN WITH cuddy 
cabin excellent condition, just 
lunod up for summer boating. 
Bolgo with blue stripe, clean, 
S3,400/b03t. (047) 360-9665. 

1995 LUND 16ft. do op V fish- 
ing boat, 40hp Tlllor Mercury 
electric start trolling motor, 
roller trailer, $6,250/best. 
(847) 356-9242. 

BOAT FOR SALE 198921ft. 
Sea Sprite, Big. vo, open bow, 
sun deck, great condition, 
scats 9, 1 -owner, white & blue. 
Price with trailer $10,000. Ask 
for Jerry (847) 587-9378. 



SNOWMOBILE 1993 

WILDCAT 700, studs, ski 
skins, mirrors, cover, hydrau- 
lic disk, extremely fast, $2,850. 
(847)587-6151. 



SNOWMOBILE 1999 PO- 
LARIS XCR440 SP EDGE, 
t of 500 made, 500 milos, 
must sell, $8,200. (414) 
877-2968." 



SNOWMOBILES . (2) 1988 
Yamaha SRVs, great shape, 
$1.100/ea. (847) 419-1252. 

SNOWMOBILES (2) YA- 
MAHA'S, 1994 600 & 1995 
800, accessories, trailer. (414) 
877-4309. 




Motorcycles' 



HARLEY DAVIDSON 
1998. 883 HUGGER, black 
with spokod wheels, mint con- 
dition, $8,000. (847) 
872-4062. " 

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1999 
1200 CUSTOM SPORT, 
$10.500.(414)652-4810. 

SUZUKI GS XR1100 1997, 
4 In 1, 3,000 mites, 
$8,5O0/best. (414) 598-0644 
after 4pm. 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



1997 SPORTSMAN 27FT. 
TRAVEL TRAILER, fiberglass 
body, fully equipped, fully 
scroenod-in porch, A/C, 
$13.000/b05t. (815) 385-4670 

GEORGIE BOY 1985 MO- 
TORHOME 24ft., $9,900. 
(815)648-2316. 



® M&Mm&I&S&mfflM&M&mM&M&mffl&mmM&M 



I 
1 

1 

i 
I 




Lakeland's Auto 
Marketplace help you! 

Call 
(847) 223-8161 

'_ for more 
information! 



raiBIBraiBIBIBlBlBIBlBlBIBIBIBIBlBIBIBIBIBIMBIBIBlBIEl 



m 
I 

! 

1 

1 

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i 



~ ■■ ■ ■» 



^l^j ~A 1~* 



Advice for Weary 
Wet Weather Drivers 

When it comes to driving, 
few things can be more stressful 
than setting out on a long trip in 
a driving rainstorm. In fact, ac- 
cording to recent statistics from 
the National Highway Traffic 
and Safety Administration 
(NHTSA), nearly one million 
motor vehicle accidents occur 
each year during wet weather 
conditions. No doubt a number 
of these accidents could have 
been avoided if drivers had 
made a few adjustments to their 
normal driving routine. Follow- 
ing are a few basic suggestions 
to help you improve your dri- 
ving when the roads get soggy: 

^S^ffi^^i S Slass treatment formula from STP®, Vision- 
better grip on the road, enabling Blade® causes water to bead, enhancing a dn- 
the tread grooves to channel wa- ve r' s ability to see oncoming traffic, road hazards 
ter more effectively. Slowing and pedestrians in the rain. 
down also will help reduce the 




risk of hydroplaning — a condi- 
tion in which the tires ride on. water 
rather than the road's surface. If you feel a 
sudden loss of control, ease up on the ac- 
celerators-avoid using the brakes. 

•Maintain a safe distance. It's impor- 
tant to remember that you need more 
stopping distance on wet pavement. Fo-. 
cus on the road ahead and allow yourself 
enough room to react to emergency situa- 
tions. This margin of safety could protect 
your life. 

• Consider using a glass treatment. 
Wipers do a competent job, but recent ad- 
vances in technology have created glass 
treatments designed to improve visibility 
when it rains. VisionBlade®, a glass treat- 
ment formula from STP, adheres to the 
surface of windshield glass, to enhance 
the ability to see oncoming traffic, road 
hazards and pedestrians in the rain. 

VisionBlade® causes water to bead, 



forcing it to roll off the windshield more 
quickly than on untreated glass. The effect 
of this beading action is most dramatic at 
night, when the product effectively helps 
to reduce glare from approaching head- 
lights and streetlights. 
According to STP marketing manager 
Dave Berlin, "When it comes to driving in 
the rain, it's essential to adjust your dri- 
ving style to suit the wet road conditions. 
Additionally, using a glass treatment like 
VisionBlade® allows you to see more of 
the window — resulting in an improved 
view of the road ahead." 

Unlike other glass treatments on the 
market, VisionBlade® lasts for up to six 
months. The unique, easy-to-use applica- 
tor provides effective coverage, across the 
windshield and exterior glass of one car, 
or can be used to treat the windshields of 
two cars in about 10 minutes. 



Pauly Acura 

Routes 41 & 22, Highland Park 

433-8200 

Ulft.it' 

Audi 

The Audi Exchange 
-5050 First St., Highland Park 
432-5020 



@ 



Karl knauz Motors 

407 Skokii Volley Hwy., Lak« Bluff 

604-5000 




• Anthony Pontiac/ • 
GMCTruck/Buick 

2727 Bervidtre Rd. (Rle. 120}. Woukegan 
244-1010 

• Knauz of Lake Forest 

1044 N. Western Ave., Lake Forest 
234-2800 

• Liberty Auto City 

1000 E. Park Ave., Libertyville 
362-2683 

• Mitchell Buick-Oldsrpobile & 
GMC Truck 

903 N. Front Street, McHenry 
(815) 385-7200 

• Country Buick/Pontiac 
845 Main St., Antioch 
395-4400 




• Weil Oldsmobile Cadillac Inc. 
1 050 S. Mirwa ukee Ave., libertyville 
362-4100 

* Gary Lang Pontiac- 
Cadilloc Subaru 

1107 S. Route 31, McHenry 
(815) 385-6000 



CHEVROLET 

• Bernard Chevrolet/lsuzu 

"1001 3; Milwaukee Ave.7Ut)«nyvme 
362-1400 

• Boehmer Chevrolet 

416 W. Liberty (Rte. 176) Waucondo 
526-2424 

• Classic Chevrolet Inc. 

" 425 N. Green Say Rd. r Waukegan 
3364300 

• Gary Long Chevrolet 
1107 S. Route 31, McHenry 
(815)385-2100 

• Ray Chevrolet Inc. 

' 39 N. Route 12, Fox Loke 
587-3300 

• Raymond Chevrolet/ 
Oldsmobile Inc. 

120 W. Loke St. (Rte. 173), Antioch 
395-3600 

• Rockenbach Chevrolet 
1000 E. Bolvidere Rd., Groyslake 
223-8651 

• Shepard Chevrolet 
930 Carriage Ln, Lake Bluff 
234-7900 



cimtsun 



• Knauz of Lake Forest . 

1044 N. Western Ave., Lake Forest 
234-2800 

• Lake Villa Chrysler-Plymouth 
Jeep/ Eagle 

130 Cedar Ave., Lake Villa 
356-2530 

• Sondy McKie & Sons 
Chrysler-Plymouth Dodge Truck 
91 S, Route 12, Fox Lake 
587-6471 

• Sunnyside Dodge-Chrysler- 
Plymouth . . 
4810 W. Elm St., McHenry 
(815)385-7220 - 




• Antioch Dodge 
105 Rte. 83, Antioch 
3950200 

• Fohrman Auto Mart 
2725 Belvidere Rd., Waukegan 
336-3510 

• Miller-Krueger Dodge 

119 N. Milwaukee Ave,, Libertyville 
362-3800 

• Sandy McKie & Sons 
Chrysler-Plymouth Dodge Truck 
91 S, Route 12, Fox Lake 
587-6471 

■ Sunnyside Dodge-Chrysler- 
Plymouth 

4810 W. Elm St., McHenry 
(815)3B5-7220 



• Buss Ford 

3925 W, Route 120, McHenry 
(815) 3B5-2000 

• Fox Lake Ford-Mercury Inc. 
90 5. Route 12, Fox Lake 
587-3400 

• Lyons-Ryan Ford 

104 W. Routa 173, Antioch 
395-3900 

• Celozzi Ford 

3100 Grand Ave. (Rte. 132}. Waukegan 
336-2340 

• Sessler Ford Inc. 

- 1010 S, Milwaukee Ave, Uberlyvilte 
3624550 

• Victor Ford 

Route 12 (N. of Rte. 176), Waucondo 
526-5541 



• Knauz Continental Motors 
407 Skokie Hwy,, Lake Bluff 
234-1700 



• Anthony Pontiac/GMC/Buick 
2727 Bolvidere Rd., Waukegan 
244-1010 

• Mitchell Bukk-Oldsmobile & 
GMC Truck . 

903 N. Front Street, McHenry 
(815)385-7200 

• Patrick Pontiac-GMC Truck Inc 
1120 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
680-5000 

• Pedersen GMC Truck 
Corners of Rtes. 45 & 173, Antioch 
395-3700 




• Pauly Honda 

1111S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
362-4300 

• Rosen Honda 

Rte. 132 (Grand Ave.), Gumee 
623-7673 




• Liberty Auto City 

1000 E. Park Ave. (176). Libertyville 
360-2683 

• Gurnee Hyundai VW-Olds 

Rte. 41 & Washington St, Guro*«A Vou ^*9 an 
249-1300 

I N f I N I T I . 

• Fields Inftniti 

1121 S. Mihwulf • Ave, libertrvitlt 

362-9200 



ISUZU 



Bernard Chevrolet/lsuzu 
1001 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
362-1400 



•Jeep. 



• Country Jeep-Eagle 
3017 W. Route 120. McHenry 
(815) 363-9999 

• Delf'sJeep 

1521 Bervidere Rd., Waukegan 
623-1492 

• loke Villa Chrysler-Plymouth Jeep Eagle 
130 Cedar Ave., Loke Villa 
356-2530 

• Liberty Jeep Eogle 

1000 E. Park Ave., Libertyville 
362-2683 . 



LAND 
-ROVER 



• Land Rover of Lake Bluff 
375 N, Skokie Hwy, Loke Bluff 
604-8100 




• Fox Lake Ford/Mercury 
90 S. Route 12, Fax Lake 
587-3400 

• Libertyville Lincoln/Mercury Inc. 
941 5. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
367-1700 

• Lyons-Ryan Ford-Lincoln-Mercury Inc. 
104 W. Route 173, Antioch 
395-3900 

• Don McCue Lincoln-Mercury Inc 
660 W. NW Hwy., Borrington 
382-5600 

• Rosen Lincoln-Mercury 

100 N. Green Bay Rd., Waukegon 
623-7673 



- K4 ■ -*z 



Libertyville Auto' City 

1000 E. Park Ave., Libertyville 

362-2683 

Rosen Mazda 

100 N, Green Bay Rd., Waukegan 

662-2400 



Mm 



Libertyville Mitsubishi 

1119 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 

8156660 



tmm 

• Liberty Nissan Kia Volkswagen 
921 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
680-8000 

• Union Nissan 

3315 Grand Ave. (Rte. 13IJ. Waukegan 
244-8000 

<25 Oldsmobile 

• Gurnee Olds VW/Hyundai 

Rte. 4) & Washington St, Gumtt/Wbultaon 
249-1300 

• Raymond Chevrolet/ 
Oldsmobile Inc. 

120 W. Route 173, Antioch 
395-3600 

• Weil Oldsmobile/Cadillac Inc 
1050 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
362-4100 



YE 



PONTIAC. 



• Anthony Pantioc/GMCTruck/fluick 
' 2727 Be Were Rd. (Rle. 120). Waukegan 

244-1010 

• Gory Lang Pontiac Cadillac 
& Subaru 

1107 5. Route 31, McHenry 
(815) 385-6000 

• Patrick Pontiac GMC Truck Inc 
1120 S. Milwaukee Ave, Libertyville 
680-5000 

• Country Pontiac/Buick 
S45 Main Street, Antioch 
3954400 



JTha Porsche Exchange 
2050 First St. 
Highland Pork 
432-5020 






The Saab exchange 
2300 Skokie Valley Rd. (Rte. 41) 
Highland Park 
432-9300 

SATU1N. 

Saturn of Libertyville 

1160 S. Milwoukee Ave., Libertyville 

362-6600 

Saturn of Waukegan 

500 S. Green Bay Rd., Waukegon 

360-5000 




Gary Long Pontiac Cadillac Subaru 
1111 S. Route 31, McHenry 
(B15) 3B5-6000 

Liberty Subaru 

1000 E. Pork Ave., Libertyville 

362-26B3 



# SUZUKI 

.Wi j i iv i xv MtmiMiu tint." 

•.Liberty Auto City 
1000 L Park Ave., (176) Libertyville 
362-2683 

® TOYOTA 

• Classic Toyota 

425 S. Green Bay Rd., Waukegan 
3354300 - - 

• Pauly Toyota 

5417 NW Hwy, Crystal Lake 
(815) 459-7100 




• Liberty Nissan Votkswagen/Kio 
921 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville' 
680-8000 

• Gurnee VW Olds Hyundai 
Rte 41 & Washington St, GuniH/WauLegan 
249-1300 

VOjLVO 

• Fields Volvo 

1121 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
362-9200 





«**eMOTORS 

jpy ^ Oldsmobile *• Hyundai • Volkswagen 
; 'park City's' Used Car L «*i"M»*-^ 



PARK CITY'S USED CAR 
HEADQUARTERS ANNOUNCES 



D6 / Lakeland Newspapers AUTO MARKETPLACE March 5, 1999 

FR0MMGED4 





MOTORTHON 

IT'S A USED CAR SELL-OFF 
LIKE NO OTHER 



THREE DAYS ONLY! 

Thursday, March 4 • Friday, March 5 
Saturday, March 6 



, : 




ose d vehicles, 



97^W Je?tta QI? 

AC, 25,000 Miles 



$ 

. ' . ; . . . 



1 2,995 




In addition to the tensioners, the bot- 
tom of the front seat belts and thus assure 
the best possible positioning of the lap- 
belt portion of the three-point harness. 

The front shoulder belt no longer 
needs height adjustment in the C70 Con- 
vertible since the top fastening point is 
much further back than in a sedan. Given 
this geometry, movement up or down has 
little or no affect on actual seat-belt posi- 
tion on the shoulder. 

The rear-seat harnesses are mounted 
in the center of heavily- reinforced ledge 
and lock on the outboard side of the rear 
seats. There are equipped with child-re- 
straint-locking lap belts. 

The airbag sensor serves double duty 
in the C70 convertible, providing trigger- 
ing signals for both the airbags and the 
spring-loaded roll-over bars of the 
Rollever Protection System (ROPS). 

The two steel roll over bars, that are 
hidden behind the rear seats, pop up 
within two tenths of a second after the 
sensor detects a 40-degree side-to-side or 
72-degree front-to-rear roll. Another sen- 
sor detects if the car is in a "free-flight" 
roll and triggers the bars under such cir- 
cumstances. 

Driver (and passenger) safety means 
more than protection from or in the event 
of a collision. It also means securing the 
vehicle from intrusion and ease of 
ingress /egress. 

The C70 comes standard with a secu- 
rity system integrated with the convert- 
ible's central locking system. Activation is 
with either the door keys or the keyless re- 
mote control pad. A "mass movement" 
sensor and inclination senor are optional- 
ly available to supplement the security 
system's effectiveness. The mass : movc- 
ment sensor guards the interior of the 
convertible much like a home-security 
system's motion detector. The inclination 
sensor determines if one end of the car is 
being lifted to help ward off car thieves 
bent on taking the entire vehicle. 

The keyless romote has buttons to 



A Minimum 6 Month/6,000 Mile 



■ ■ i 



- 
1 



Warranty Available on all Used Cars* 



....... ...y„ 



ir-'^vrnii^mm 



90 Hyundai Excel 

fi/T, 25.0W Miles 

93 Hyundai Elantra 
95 Hyundai Scoupe 
93 Hyundai Eiantra 

50,000 Miles 

98 Hyundai Accent 
95 Hyundai Sonata 
98 Hyundai Elantra 
95 VW Jetta GL 
93 VW Eurovan 
92 Cadillac Seville 



Motors Used Car Headquarters 



*3,595 
*3,995 
*5,995 
*6,995 
*7,995 
*7.995 
'8,995 
'8,995 
*8,995 
'9,995 



".:...'.' . .:. v^ .,■.'■■": 



97 Plymouth Neon 

98 Suzuki Esteem 

96 VW Jetta GL 

NX 

97 VW Jetta GL 

96 VW Jetta GLS 

97 VW Jetta GT 

98 VW Jetta GLS 

97 VW Cabrio 
96 VW Jetta GLX 

98 VW Beetle 

A/T, Silver 



'9,995 
'9,995 
'12,995 
'12,995 
'1 3,995 
'13,995 
.'1 5,995 
'15,995 
'17,995 
'19,995 



S»rf l?9^UN(t»'l) 



UXA/££ 



MOTORS 



Sales Hours: 

Monday Friday Bam ■ 9pm 
Saturday 9am 6pm 

100 Old Skokie Road 

Park City, IL 

"On Route 41 at the 
Washington Street East exit" 



S* habla ««pifiol 

"6.5% sales tax' 
for Lake County 

customers! , 



Service Hours 

Mon Fn 7:30am - 530pni 
Sat Sam 12pm 






€ 



Wuhnqton Slum I 1 



(847)249-1 300 



•All ore-driven cars with less than 150,000 miles have available 6 month/6,000 miles (whichever comes 

first) dnvetrain warranty. All above prices plus lax. title, license and doc tee. 

When you lind us standing behind our used cars, please don t back up. Thanks. For qualilied buyers. 



open the trunk (which takes two depres- 
sions within three seconds for release to 
reduce the risk of accidentally opening . 
the trunk), lock/unlock the doors (as well 
as arm/disarm the security system) and a 
panic button to trigger the alarm. 

The C70 Convertible shares safety fea- 
tures from it's hard top cousin. They are: 
Two level trigger system for front air bags 
deployment, automatic door unlocking 
feature with frontal air bag deployment, 
antllock brakes with Electronic Brake Dis- 
tribution to maximize brake performance 
under all conditions and all loads, seat 
belt pretensloners in all four seating posi- 
tions, the steering column is equipped 
with three split points and, as a result, 
collapses further away from the driver in 
the event of certain types of collisions, 
Eye-level Light Emitting Diode (LED) 
brake light on the rear window which 
lights faster than the typict halogen bult 
units, designed to reduce driver's reaction 
time, four air bags (two front and two 
side) to help protect front-seat occupants 
during both front and side impact, three 
point scat belts In all four seating posi- 
tions, head restraints at all four seating 
positions. 



TEST DRIVE THE 

VOI71TO 

C70 Convertible at: 

Fields Volvo 

1121 S. Milwaukee Ave. 
Libertyville 

362-9200 




USED CAR SALES 
EXTRAVAGANZA! 



Just $99 gets you into any used car on the lot! 1 




$0$i^sgm^i^[ 



nest selection in the area! 



89 Ford Escort Wagon 

A/T, AC, Economical, stk«6277A 
68 Chevy S-10 Blazer 4x4 
A/T, AC, Red, slk»Kl88A 
93 Ford Escort Wagon 

A/T. AC. Economical, slk«600BA 

90 Dodge Caravan Van 

Family will love It, stk*5661A 

96 Geo Metro Hatchback 

Economical, Wmty 

93 Plymouth Voyager Van 

A/T.AC, 7 Pass., stk«5765A, 

95 Saturn SL1 

Best Buy of Week. 8lk#6268A 

93 Saturn SL1 Sedan 

Saturn Quality. slkfl'5217A 

93 Ford Mustang LX Convertible 

A/T, AC. Think Spring, stktf 2725P 

95 Saturn Wagon 

A/T.AC, Convenient, slk# 621 6A 

96 Chevrolet Corsica Sedan 
One Owner, Wrnly 



«<s one 97 Ford Escort GL sedan s q cqc 

*0,OyD A/T.AC, Full Power, Wmty, slk«6261A *5J,0570 

en At\c 95 Jee P Cherokee 4 Dr 4x4 sQ qqc 

*O,1%70 A/T,AC,stk«61O0A *3j330 

«<!» nnc 95 Ford Wlndstar Mini van S Q QQC 

*0,yyt) A/T, AC, Extras. Wmty. SlkB27B0P *57,5J5JO 

$ 4,395 Full Factory. Wrnly. slk»0164A *1 0,900 

S 4,995 - Only 13.000 Miles. Wrnly, stk«6251 A *1 0,900 

sC CQC 97 Jeep Wrangler SE 4x4^ . $1«>AQC 

*0,DyO Convertible. Wmty, slkrt629GA * I £,15JO 

$ 5,995 Only 3,000 Miles, Full Wmty, 6tk»2730P *1 2,595 

. c cne 96 Honda Accord LX <^ *\ aqp 

*0,t>yS) Loaded. Only 17.000 Miles, stk»2705P I £,5J%70 

tc 7nc - 95 Pontlac Bonneville SSE S1Q QQC 

*D,fyO Learner, Moonrool, Wrnly. sik«2704P * I 0,59570 

*f ,995 Only 600 Miles. 5 yr. Wmty, slk#6045A 5 1 3,995 

to nne 95 Dodge Dakota SLT 4x4 X-Cab s -« * CQC 

*0,yyO A/T.AC, Wmty. stk*522GC "11,051%) 



Saturn of 



A DIVISION OF THE BOB ROHRMAN GROUP 



(847)360 



HOURS r 5C 

Mon. - Fri., 8am - 9pm v,- 

Sat., Sam - 6pm 9 



n'aV ^° ad 
--seRffi-- Green v™ 



'with approved credit 



March 5, 1999 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



Lakeland Newspapers I D7 




NEW 1999 FORD 

ESCORT LX 4-DR 





t 



MSRP ..,......, WTO 

FOX LAKE DISCOUNT -$677 

REBATE. ............. .^$2,000 

COLLEGE GRAD DISCOUNT .-$400 





tt 



NEW 1 999 FORD 

RANGER 








t 




MSRP. hiiiiiii iifltiBJ 

FACTORY DISCOUNT ..,.,#00 

FOX LAKE DISCOUNT #00 

REBATE.......... 41)500 

COLLEGE GRAD DISCOUNT. .4400 




NEW 1999 FORD 

TAURUS 



MSRP II 1 1 M I M 1 1 Ml M >f |7|99S 

FOX UKE DISCOUNT ... #,225 
REBATE..,...,. ....,.,#,000 
COLLEGE CHAD DISCOUNTS 











'97 MAZDA PROTEGE 

LX model, 4 cyl, auto, p/s, p/b, p/l, pto, 



9.988 



MMinsmcii g 'HFOiDfisi warn 



I..-1 . 



4x4, XLT model, 6 cyl, 
a/c, p/w, till/cruise 



XLT model. 

4x4 



19.995 



H BttftiM WCI 



VTBUS^VttW'WfeJ'WS 



MM 



mimmmiimmmmi ^mm™ I SSEKB 



uto.4cyl t p/s,p/b,a/c. 
AM/FM tea! green 



A/c, pAv, p/l, 
tilt/cruise 



Buy now & Save! 
24K miles 



3 To Choose -Your choice! 
Loaded! 



V8, auto, a/c, p/vv, till/cruise, 
cap, 14K miles 



'91 FORD ESCORT VP 

'4 cyl, p/s, 



i 

i 
t 



u:m § w.m I w.988 i %m 






HMWM'IM '95 GEO STORM f '92 JEEP CHEROKEE SPORT I SnfH«OI I '33 Mil JBM 



4 dr,4 cyL, auto, p/s, p/b, p/dl, p/w, 
tllt/crulse, a/c, tan, Sharp Car! , 




V8, XLT model, 
auto, a/c 



4 cyl, auto, p/s, a/c, 
cass., gold 



M 



- 



'92 FORD TEMPO 

V6,Aulo,p/s, 



Cassette, ;: 4x4,6cyi,auip,p/s,p/o, u ,v ; 'r" ciss oold 7 ph-dc 

a/c purple M tilt/cruise, a/c, cass. ■'• au,0 J^ fe| i£2«-» / «*«■ » w*«* 

9.9*» I '9.988 I IfcMf f '«.988 f 'H.688 



W/WfiS^^SS^ 



I 

I 



95 CADILLAC CONCOURS 



I 



Lthr,V-8, 

Loaded! 



'3. 



'97 FORD ESCORT 

LX model, 4cyl, 4dr t aulo, p/s, p/b. a/c, 
cass., balance factory warranty 






12.9971 '9.988 



' t r ' ■ ' " 



'93FORDAEROSTARXLI '92 FORD TEMPO 



tndudes XL Plus package 
2TO CHOOSE FROM1 



'95F0RDTHUNDERBIRD 

V8. aulo, p/s, p/b. p/dl, p/w, a/c 
llll/crulsc, cass., blue custom Interior ■ 

y 9 f 98* 



'92 FORD TEMPO /! '97 ftfflD f flUNDERBIRD 

store* a/c. Iw miles, hluo d „_ l^wmmrty 



'95 FORD ESCORT 

LX model. 4dr, aulo, p/s, p/b. o/c, c 



'94 BUICK CENTURY 



5 Star Rated Vehicle. 
Crash lest! 



5.988 i '5.998 I '7.995 









„_ | sjjggg § 'B.988 



f'98 FORD MUSTANG COUPE 

/:/ V-6, Loaded, 

Bright Red 

! '10.998 



ff '88 CHEVY CAVALIER 

Blue, auto, air 



995 



'96 HONDA ACCORD 



M blVcnise. cass,' air tag, Black Beau , 

13.998 



■ je ' '■ -V 






JggggjBSSgfrJ 



^^^a-'; 1 ^!. 



f'97F0RDTHUNDERBIRD 

VS,c/d.pM.prb.pfl Aulo, pM.pfl, Very Clranl 



Aulo, air, p/b, p/s 



Auto, air, p/b. p/s 



Loaded. Must See! 



B.995 1 'ZO^ '6.988 '8.995 'M.895 '8.988 

"ROUTE. 12 hPmud.SnonsoroLl 




A Proud Sponsor of... | 

Save-A-Pet 



. ■ 






HOIKS: 

UUKs.'nM°l , M IKl.OVVlSrM sUOVMot'M 





jj license, and first month security deposit. All rebates applied wWWioxlakeford.COlIl I 



■**■* 



minim u m i 



D8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



March 5, 1999 



-*> 



**??, 



-y. 



Impala 




at every turn 



"Some measure value in terms of quality, ex- 
tensive safety features, roominess, convenience 
and a long list of innovative features," said Im- 
pala Brand Manager Don Parkinson, "impala 
offers a thoughtful blend of all these character- 
istics." 

Impala's solid structure is a primary enabler 
of excellent quality. Structural highlights in- 
clude: 

■A one-piece door ring and rear quarter 
stamping that provides greater dimensional ac- 
curacy for excellent door fits. It's also more rigid 
than a comparable welded unit, which lends 
additional strength and solidity to the overall 
body. 

•Thicker-gauge steel where it makes sense, 
such as the rear-end panel and the beltiine of 
the B-pillar 

•Product simplification is another of Im- 
pala's quality cnablers. Comparted to the high- 
quality Lumina, Impala features a reduced 
number of build combinations, even though a 
greater number of features are available to Im- 
pala customers. 

Impala requires 15 percent fewer parts, on 
average, than comparable Lumina models, and 
benefits From a dramatically simplified electri- 
cal system. 

"Impala uses fewer electrical connections 
than Lumina," said Impala Electronics Engi- 
neer Judy Kines. "And the remaining wiring 
hardware is packaged to be more efficient and 
more reliable. We've achieved an 8 percent re- 
duction in total wiring mass and a 31 percent 
reduction in wiring gauge size." 

A quiet and serene vehicle interior is anoth- 
er primary measure of quality. To this end, Im- 
pala's engineers scrutinized every area of the . 
vehicle to help identify and reduce potential 
sources of road noise, wind noise or bother- . 
some vibration. 

Specific noise reduction measures include 
the following: 

•An extensive network of noise-absorbing 
patches, decouplers and foam insulation. 

•Window seals have been improved/rela- 
tive to previous designs, for enhanced isolation 
of wind noise 



•Multec II fuel injectors operate more qui- 
etly than previous designs 

•Impala's HVAC system also utilizes a new, 
shrouded cooling fan, which achieves a 10 per- 
cent noise reduction, relative to previous de- 
signs. 
Using technology to redefine value 

By integrating sophisticated technologies, 
Impala will offer customers high levels of ftmc- 
tionality, dependability, security and conve- 
nience. 

For example, approximately every two sec- 
onds, Impala's Class II electrical system exe- 
cutes a comprehensive diagnostic survey of all 
the vehicle systems to ensure that they are op- 
crating properly. 

"Should the system detect anything but of 
the ordinary," explained Kines, "The data is ei- 
ther stored for later retrieval by a technician or 
displayed on the instrument panel." 

Located within Impala's instrument panel 
is a reconfigurable telltale display. This is a 
small liquid crystal display that provides the 
driver with a continuous flow of information 
relative to Impala's operating condition, this 
feature communicates 17 different mes- 
sages, many of which can help the driver 
take action to enhance the long-term dura- 
bility of the powertrain and other critical ve- 
hicles systems. 

Impala's audio systems also feature added 
functionality. . 

Impala features RDS-capable audio sys- 
tems. RDS stands for Radio Data Systems, a 
new technology for transmitting digital signals 
encoded with multiple levels of information 
such as a radio station's format, signal strength, 
text messages, current time and traffic or 
weather bulletins. 

Impala's audio system allows the customer 
to interface with the vehicle to tailor various 
functions that contribute to the vehicle's overall 
environment For example, the driver may pro- 
gram die horn chirp that accompanies the re- 
mote power lock/unlock function, the length of 
time the dome lamps remains illuminated 
(from to 60 seconds), and the volume of Im- 
pala's many warning chimes. 



THE 



Audi 



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2050 First St.* Highland Park 

Please contact CarlRitz: Phone: (847)432-5020 ■ 
Website: www.audiexchange.com • www.porschexchange.com 




2000 Chevrolet Impala LS 

Impala's remote keyless entry option with 
vehicle locator also comes with an innovative 
twist; the system comes with two key fobs. Each 
key fob will recall the audio system and vehicle 
environment settings (chime volume and inte- 
rior lighting) programmed by the respective 
drivers. 
A Very Smart Car 

The following is a partial summary of the 
smart features that add up to enhanced conve- 
nience and peace of mind for the Impala cus- 
tomer: 

•Battery Rundown Protection automatical- 
ly shuts off courtesy tights to help protect the 
customer from inadvertently draining Impala's 
battery 

•Content Theft-Deterrent System will acti- 
vate the lights and horn if the doors are opened 
without authorized use 

• Coolant Loss Protection will help Impala 
reach service (within up to 50 miles, depending 
on conditions) in the event of a loss of engine 
coolant 

•Electrical Load Management. If the elec- 
trical system detects that the battery is not be- 
ing properly charged, it automatically begins a 
process of selectively disabling low priority 
electrical components (such as air conditioning 



and the audio system) to ensure that the igni- 
tion system continues to operate as long as 
possible 

•Lock-out Protection will now allow the 
power door locks to lock the driver's door if the 
keys are left in the ignition 

•OnStar®. Available as a dealer-installed 
option, OnStar combines cellular phone and ■■■ 
Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite tech- 
nology and a 24-hour OnStar Center to provide 
Impala customers with added convenience 
and security 

•Starter Interrupt will prevent the starter 
from engaging if the engine is already running, 
thereby preventing potential damage to the 
component. 
Impala brings it all together 

As Chevrolet's first car of the new millenni- 
um, the 2000 Impala is a flagship four-door 
sedan that Americans will be proud to own and 
will love to drive. As Parkinson explained, the 
new Impala represents the ultimate evolution 
of the Chevrolet formula. "Today's sedan buy- 
ers expect just one thing - everything. And they 
want it at a fair price. That's what Chevrolet Im- 
pala is all about. It's the car that sedan buyers 
want. It's the car they need. It's the car they de- 
serve." 



hmk taw 



Lakeland 

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March 5, 1999 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



Lakeland Newspapers / D9 



Protect Your Car's Engine 
Using the Proper Fluids 




■ Checking, filling or changing your vehicle's 
fluids regularly is critical to its longevity and 
performance. It also is important to choose the 
right product, especially in choosing the right 
grade of automatic transmission fluid CATF) or 
motor oil. 

"You can't just go to the local parts store or 
discount store and pick any quart off the shelf . 
and expect it to work," warns Gabe Giordano, 
technical representative at Kendall Motor Oil. 
"Even for consumers who rely on 'do-it-for-me' 
outlets for service — whether It's a quick lube, 
tire store or car dealership — it's a good idea to 
review what fluid is being used to make sure it's 
what the owner's manual specifies." 

Differentiation Among Some Cars' 
ATF Requirements 

. People who own a Ford or General Motors 
car can use a more versatile automatic trans- 
mission fluid product like Kendall Multi-Pur- 
pose ATF, which is approved for both GM 
Dexron® III Fluid and Ford Mercon® ATF 
specifications. 

"Once you go beyond a GM or Ford vehicle, 
though, you should look at a different type of 
ATF, because each car manufacturer has a dif- 
ferent design for its automatic transmissions," 
says Giordano. 

More specifically, the clutch materials —com- 
ponents used to engage and disengage gears as 
. the car shifts— vary from one automobile mak- ■ 
er to another. This, in tunvaffects and causes 
some variation in what Giordano refers to as the - 
required "frictional characteristics" of the auto- 
matic transmission fluid. It is important to use ; 
what the owner's manual recommends. . 

Avoiding the "Oil Is OH" Mind-set 

Even if a car gets an oil change every 3,000 
miles, the owner needs to keep an eye on what 
type of motor oil is poured into the engine. In 
certain climates and in certain kinds of en- 
gines, an SAE grade 10W-30 product may be 
too high in viscosity (too thick). 

Cars with multi-valve engines, for example, 
have overhead camshafts (above the valves as 




Subaru announces 
February sales figures 

■ - 

Best February Total Sales Month Since 1989 



Changing your vehicle's fluids regular- 
ly is critical to its longevity and perfor- 
mance. Oil changes with a quality oil 
like KendaU Superb® 100 SAE 5W-30, 
are Inexpensive insurance'for longer 
engine life. 

opposed to a camshaft built right into the en- 
gine block). This means that oU has farther to 
travel, and it has to be thin enough to move 
quickly and lubricate all parts of the engines to 
prevent it from "starving." Otherwise, start-up ■• 
problems or accelerated engine wear can re- 
sult. If your car has a multi-valve engine, Gior- 
dano recommends a lighter motor oil product, 
like Kendall Superb® 100 SAE 5W-30. 

Following a Maintenance Schedule 

In making sure that all fluids for the car are 
at the proper levels, Kendall strongly encour- 
ages consumers to refer again to the owner's 
manual, which should contain a maintenance 
schedule for your car. Where you live and how 
many miles you drive per year are important 
considerations, too. The Kendall experts rec- 
ommend having your mechanic check the fol- 
lowing key fluids regularly: 
•Antifreeze 

* Power-steering fluid 

• Automatic transmission fluid 
•Motor oil 

•Brake fluid 



Subaru of America,, Inc. (SOA) today an- 
nounced its February sales figures. Subaru 
recorded a sates total of 11,095 units for the 
month, up 12 percent over the same period last 
year. Year-to-date totals of 20,926 units are up 
11 percent over 1998 year-to-date totals, Feb- 
ruary 1999 marks the best February total sales 
month since 1989. 

The Legacy model tine led sales with 6,567 
units posted. Outback sales were up over 15 
percent (4,282 units) versus 1998 February 
Outback sales (3,716 units). Forester post- 



ed 3,373 units, an increase of-53 percent 
over the same month last year 

Subaru of America, Inc. is a wholly owned 
subsidiary of Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd. of. 
Japan. Headquartered near Philadelphia, the 
company markets and distributes Subaru ve- 
' hides, parts and accessories through a network 
of nearly 600 franchised dealers across the Unit- 
ed States. All Legacy models sold in the U.S., in- 
cluding the Outback and Sport Utility the com- 
pany's American manufacturing plant, Subaru- 
Isuzu Automotive, Inc., hear Lafayette, Ind. 



Weight Loss and Inflation are 

in 






Have you taken a look at your tires lately? 
Since they're the only thing between you and 
the pavement, maybe it's time for a close in- 
spection. This means getting the car off the 
ground and onto a lift. 

Tires are designed to last many thousands of 
miles through. just about every conceivable 
road condition, says Car Care Council. It's not 
the road that is responsible for premature tire- 
wear, it's neglect. Following are three chief 
causes of early tire wear or failure. 

1. INCORRECT INFLATION. Under-inflated 
tires tend to wear along the sides while over in- 
flation wears a strip down the middle of the 
tread. ..■'.' 

Radial tires always tend to look a little soft 



but do not be fooled and assume inflation is 
correct. If you don't already own one, buy a tire 
gauge and use it monthly. 

2. INCORRECT ALIGNMENT. Periodic ad- 
justments to steering and suspension compo- 
nents generally will correct this misalignment. 
You'll also enjoy improved steering and han- 
dling after having this important service done, 
and your tires will last longer, as well. 

3. WHEELS OUT OF BALANCE. Tires that 
wear unevenly often are victirris.of this condi- 
tion. The loss of just one balancing weight from 
the wheel rim, due to impact with a pot hole or 
curb, can be enough to throw,a wheel out of 
balance. 



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DIP /Lakeland Newspapers AUTO MARKETPLACE 

Illinois dealers sue to preserve 
GM advertising program 



. More than 60 General Motors dealers in 
Illinois Hied suit last week to challenge Gener- 
al Motors Corporation's intention to seize the 
1 percent dealer marketing initiative and 
eliminate its nearly 1 ,000 advertising line 
groups nationwide. 

The class action challenges the legality of 
GM's recently announced Field Marketing 
Strategy Program. The program, scheduled to 
take effect April 1, involves unilateral changes 
to the way GM advertises on local and nation- 
al levels. 

Samuel Skinner, the onetime U.S. Trans- 
portation Secretary hired to represent the 
dealers, said he would use the teeth of the Illi- 
nois Motor Vehicle Franchise Dealer Act to 
thwart the desires of the world's largest au- . 
tomaker. The act prevents automobile manu- 
facturers from requiring dealers to fund man- 
ufacturers' advertising campaigns at their 
own expense. 

"TheGM dealers are very disappointed 
that General Motors has taken action on the 
issue without prior discussion or input from 
its largest customer, the 9,000 dealers it relies 
on to sell Us products every day,** Skinner said. 
"This money Is the dealers' money, not Gen- 



eral Motors'. There was an understanding as 
to who would control these funds, and now 
GM Is going back on its word. 

"We want to resolve this matter quickly, 
and let the dealers get back to their business 
of addressing the needs of the consumer." 

Under the present system, the 1 percent 
marketing initiative collected from vehicle 
sales funds the advertising of local dealer 
marketing groups. Under the proposed pro- 
gram, GM would control the money. 

Skinner said that if GM gains control of 
the marketing Incentive, which could 
amount to $600 million a year, the corpora- 
tion could spend it however it wishes, in- 
cluding putting it against the bottom line. 
Even if the proceeds were to be spent on ad- 
vertising. Skinner said there is no assurance 
that all the money raised in the Chicago 
market would be spent there. 

. The GM nameplate represents 29 percent 
of vehicje sales nationwide, but GM com- 
mands 38 percent of the sales in Chicagoland. 

"The reason that Chicago has been such a 
bastion for GM dealers," said Lexus dealer 
Mike McGrath, "is because of their ad associa- 
tions. That's why they're successful." 



Two trailering tips from Car Care council 



Trailer towing, whether boats, campers or 
cargo trailers, are a way of American life. So is 
the penalty for neglecting-the tow vehicle 
and / or the one behind it. 

Car Care Council says millions of dollars 
are spent each year repairing transmissions 
that were not prepared for towing. Simple 
preventive maintenance, which includes 
changing transmission fluid and filter, often 
is all that's necessary. For heavier loads, pre- 
ventive maintenance may include the addi- 



tion of an auxiliary cooler, necessary be- 
cause of the heat build-up inside the trans- 
mission when pulling a heavy load up a long 
grade. 

The other tip deals with trailer tires and 
wheel bearings.. Because the driver usually 
cannot feel or hear the warning signs of possi- 
ble failure until it's too late, the Council rec- 
ommends close inspection of trailer tires and 
wheel bearings, especially before towing pn.a 
long trip. : 



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Lakeland Newspapers/ D 1 1 



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A rocky road 

Report says Lake County drivers are in for gridlock 
even if current improvement plans are completed 



ByJOHNROSZKOWSKI 
City Editor 



Congested roads are becoming 
an Increasing aggravation for Lake 
County residents — and If you think 
the problem is bad now, just wait an- 
other 20 years. 

"It's not going to get any better 
unless something Is done," said 
David Lutyens, project director of the 
Lake County Transportation Im- 
provement Project. 

The project is a joint venture be- 
tween the Illinois Department of 
Transportation and Illinois State Toll 
Highway Authority which is studying 
the existing road and mass transit 
system in the county and attempting 
to identify solutions to transportation 
problems. 

The project's Transportation Sys- 
tem Performance Report, which was 
released in January, surveyed Lake 
County residents about the road sys- 
tem. Most people agreed traffic con- 
gestion is a serious problem. During the 
afternoon "rush," which extends two 
hours, approximately one third of the 
roadways are considered congested. 

Lutyens said by the year 2020 
two-thirds of the roads will be con- 
gested, even If all the road construc- 
tion projects currently planned are 
completed. 

"Everybody's complaining now. 
Just think what it's going to be like in 
2020," he said. 

The report identifies 30 miles of 
road widening improvement projects 
that are scheduled to be completed 



over the next 20 years. The report also 
Identifies an additional 44 miles that 
"aren't yet funded but could be 
planned," according to Lutyens. 

"We're looking at major problem 
areas," said Pete Harmet, deputy pro- 
ject manager. 'Are we going to solve 
them all? No." 

Transportation officials are at- 
tempting to deal with transportation 
problems caused by the dramatic 
population growth of Lake County. 
Between 1970 and 1990, Lake Coun- 
ty's population grew 35 percent from 
382,638 people to 516,418. 

"We see that trend continuing," 
said Lutyens, a transportation con- 
sultant who previously worked for 
IDOT for 35 years. "We see another 
250,000 people (moving) up here by 
the year 2020." 

The report examines all major as- 
pects of the county's transportation 
system, not just roads. It also studies 
mass transit services such as the Me- 
tro train and Pace bus services. 

But the greatest need the survey 
identified was improving the road sys- 
tem. According to the survey, 88 per- 
cent of work trips by Lake County resi- 
dents are made by automobile, while 
rail accounts for 3.7 percent and bus .5 
percent The remaining trips are by 
motorcycle, walking orbicycling. 

"Three-fourths of the people we 
polled thought the No. 1 priority was 
doing something about the roads," 
said Harmet. 

Currently there are 1.73 million 
daily vehicle trips in Lake County, ac- 
cording to the report. While not dis- 



counting the need for improvements 
to east-west roads, Harmet said the 
predominant flow of traffic seems to 
be north and south. That's because 
many people are commuting back 
and forth to their jobs in downtown 
Chicago or northward up to Milwau- 
kee, he said. 

One of the more controversial 
north-south projects identified in the 
report is the proposed expansion of 
Route 53. Lutyens said Route 53 is just 
one of the issues still under study. 

"This is a ground up approach 
putting this thing together," said Lu- 
tyens. "Again, Route 53 Is on the table. 
It never went away." 

But he emphasized: "This study 
isn't just about Route 53. It's about 
looking at major improvement pro- 
jects in Lake County. It may or may 
not include Route 53." 

The project team, which consists 
of Lutyens, Harmet and deputy pro- 
ject manager Chris Snyder, has been 
speaking to meetings of community 
and business groups and local trans- 
portation officials to outline the find- 
ings of the recent report 

The report is part of a two-year 
process to evaluate potential alterna- 
tive transportation improvements in 
the project study area. The findings of 
the.report. will .bemused to develop 
long-term transportation 'plans and 
solutions. 

The Lake CountyTransportation 
Improvement Project is still seeking 
public input It has established an of- 
fice in Mundelein and can be reached 
by telephone at 438-3442. 




Lake County Forest Preserve President Carol Calabresa takes a 
walk through Rollins Savannah, located on Rollins Road, west of 
Route 45. Calabresa is preparing a campaign for the upcoming 
forest preserve referendum on the April 13 ballot. — Photo by 
Sandy Bressner 



THIS 
WEEK 



YEAR 2000 

Don't worry, but be safe 
Instead of sorry 

PLEASE SEE PAGE C2 

REAL ESTATE BUYS 

What did the house down 
the street sell for? 

PLEASE SEE PAGE C6 




Hastings Lake YMCA 
seeks funds from 'heroes' 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



WHAT A CONCEPT 

Design business 
grows rapidly 

PLEASE SEE PAGE C5 



Hastings Lake YMCA offers 
county residents a chance to become 
heroes for children. 

Metro-Chicago YMCA officials, 
friends, parents, and Hastings Lake 
Board members kicked off their "Kids 
Need Heroes" fund-raising cam- 
paign Tuesday, Feb. 23. The evening 
dinner included testimonials from 
adults who knew from personal ex- 
perience the impact that YMCA 
camp experiences have on the life of 
a child. 

County area residents will be en- 
couraged to contribute money to al- 
low children to attend summer 
camp. The money will go to help chil- 
dren who can not otherwise afford 
the experience of Hastings Lake 
YMCA camps. 

"We are looking to raise $88,000 
this year," said Mary Ann Schiltz, who 
introduced the campaign fund effort. 
She encouraged board members to 
tell people the story of the Hastings 
Lake YMCA experience and how it 
can affect the lives of children who 
otherwise may have no chance to at- 
tend camp. . 

Molly Donahue is a member of 
the Parent Advisory Committee. She 
spoke to dinner attendees of her per- 
sonal experiences with Hastings Lake 
YMCA camp staff. Her children have 



been able to attend the camp for 
many years. 

"For the past number of years 
I've been coming here, it has had a 
profound impact on my children," 
she said. "Over the years, there is a 
stronger and stronger bond between 
them and here." 

Donohue said that her children 
have made friendships at camp that 
have carried them through the next 
year. They have learned about a 
world they otherwise would never 
have seen. Summer camp filled her 
children's minds with happy memo- 
ries of positive experiences. 

"You've all made it possible for 
my kids to come here, and I thank 
you," she told fund raisers. 

Hastings Lake YMCA Senior Ex- 
ecutive Director Jim Scherer de- 
scribed the type of campaign they 
will conduct. "This campaign, first 
and foremost, is a neighbor to neigh- 
bor campaign, a member to member 
campaign, a friend to friend cam- 
paign." 

Scherer said that last year's cam- 
paign gave 500 families the chance to 
be at Hastings Lakei "It changed 
those lives," he said. 

"Camping is really unique," Gor- 
don Kaplan said. He is the Executive 
Director of the American Camping 
Association, Illinois Section, He pre- 

Please w HEROES' IC6 




a balance 

Referendum supporters say forest 
preserves are a balance to growth 



ByJOHNROSZKOWSKI 
City Editor • 



Balance is a word that Lake 
County Forest Preserve President 
Carol Calabresa uses a lot when she 
talks about the upcoming forest pre- 
serve referendum on the 
April 13 ballot. 

"1 think the residents of 
Lake County have always 
appreciated the special re- 
sources we have in Lake 
County. With all the growth 
we've seen, we need a bal- 
ance to that growth. We're 
looking to the future to 
make sure there . are 
enough' public access 
lands available for future 
generations," Calabresa 
said. 

Supporters of the forest preserve 
referendum are gearing up for the 



chosen at that time and early sup- 
porters will be recognized. 

The "Friends of the Forest Pre- 
serve" will help raise funds to pro- 
mote the referendum and coordinate 
the activities of campaign volunteers. 
Linda Kellough, a Highland Park res- 
ident, will be the cam- 
paign manager for the ref- 
erendum. 

Calabresa said the mes- 
sage of the campaign is a 
simple, but important 
one. 

"We're just trying to bal- 
ance the growth. We want 
to protect the land while 
it's still available and in- 
terest rates are low. We've 
got to preserve land while 
it's still available, particu- 
larly environmentally sensitive land," 
he said. 

The referendum would provide a 




upcoming referendum, which asks . total of $35 million for the purchase 



Lake County. voters if they will sup- 
port a $55 million bond issue to help 
improve and expand the forest pre- 
serve system. 

The "Friends of the Forest Pre- 
serve" will officially kickoff the refer- 
endum campaign with the opening 
of its referendum office. A office 
warming and campaign kickoff will 
be held from 10 a.m. to noon Satur- 
day, March 6 at the campaign head- 
quarters at 411 S. Milwaukee, liber- 
tyville. A campaign theme will be 



of new forest preserve land. With 
that additional money, Calabresa 
said the forest preserve district would 
be able to acquire 5,000 new acres, 
thereby increasing the total acreage 
of forest preserve land from 21,000 to . 
26,000 acres. 

About $20 million would be used 
for habitat restoration and other im- 
provements to the existing forest pre- 
serve system. Kellough said she 

Please see BALANCE / C6 



THE ULTIMATE GEEZER ROLE MODEL / C3 



■-': 

I 






■ 






02/ Lakelimt^^a^rf A ^?S 



OPINIONS 



March 5, 1999 



i^nnvw^^ 



Lakeland Newspapers 

William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 
Neal Tucker Rhonda Hetrick Burke 

Executive Editor/Composition Mgr. Managing Editor 



30 South Whitney St., Grays! ake, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (847) 223-8161. E-mail: cdlt@Ind.com 



EDITORIALS 

Forest Preserve 

referendum will 

help balance growth 



Whether you have lived in Lake County a month, a year or 
a lifetime, you have undoubtedly noticed that open 
space seems to disappear daily in this county. 
The Lake County Forest Preserve is seeking a $55 mil- 
lion referendum on the April 13 ballot to preserve additional land be- 
fore it is lost to development. The Forest Preserve has proven time 
and again that it can preserve land at a reasonable cost. 

Proponents of the plan say a balance must be struck between 
growth and land preservation. Preserving the county's environmen- 
tally sensitive land makes sense. Educating county residents that their 
home is also the habitat of more endangered species than any other 
county in Illinois underscores the importance of land preservation. 

The message of the Forest Preserve campaign is simple but effec- 
tive — preserve the land while it's available and interest rates are low. 

Plans call for $35 million to be spent on acquiring 5,000 acres or 
more Increasing the Forest Preserve land holdings to 26,000 acres. 

An additional $20 million will be used for habitat restoration and 
other improvements to the existing Forest Preserves. t 

Opponents of the referendum say for each acre of land that is pre- 
served, the existing land becomes even more expensive for developers 
to buy, thus feeding the economic circle which dictates that new 
homes will cost even more in the future. 

The argument might make sense to business leaders, but won't 
land prices continue to rise with or without additional preservation of 
open space? 

Given the alternative, wouldn't we all rather have more balance? 

After all, developers sell Lake County on their brochures by pitch- 
ing its Forest Preserves and programs, given that shouldn't they also 
support the continuation of these programs to ensure their buyers are 
well-served in Lake County. 

Development will continue to come to Lake County and along 
with it will come more jobs and more opportunities for residents. 

Lake Countians enjoy a robust economy with a rosy job outlook. 
Shouldn't they also balance that good fortunate with the beauty of 
open space and the ability to preserve for the next generation the fad- 
ing natural beauty of Lake County which has attracted so many of us 
to settle here. 

We heartily support the ballot question. 



Study results in: 
Road work needed now 



T'here is something we just can't understand and it has to do 
with roads. 
According to David Lutyens, project director for the Lake 
County Transportation Improvement Project, drivers in Lake 
County are headed for more gridlock. Worse, even if every road im- 
provement project planned to date is completed by the year 2020, we 
will still have massive traffic problems based on projected population 
growth. 

Then, the simple solution is, put all the planned projects into road 
gear and start dreaming up new solutions right now to help us with 
the future. Right? 

Wrong. 

Even though current road projects are on the drawing board, Lu- 
tyens is quick to point out even those plans are not chiseled in stone, 
meaning there is no guarantee that some of the areas in the county 
will see any kind of traffic relief through road improvements in the 
next two decades. Thirty miles of roads are already slated for work but 
another 44 miles "aren't yet funded but could be planned." 

We know the wheels of government sometimes grind slowly when 
all the various agencies, both funding and environmental, as well as 
public input, lock horns on any issue. There must be studies, then 
more studies, then even more, but let's put this in perspective. There 
are some roads in the state that have been the subject of studies since 
the 1950s and have still not realized any improvements. If any of 
these officials were standing on railroad tracks and saw a train coming 
head on, would they implement a study first to decide what should be 
done or would they drop everything they are doing and make a deci- 
sion? We know it can be done because we've had an effective interstate 
highway system in place for more than 30 years. 

Lake County drivers, you're about to be hit head on and those who 
have the ability to prevent it are still mired in red tape. It's time for 
them to get off the tracks and back onto the road. 



VIEWPOINT 



Reality of Y2R no 
small wonder 



As a kid, I was a worry wort. 
Only I didn't know I was 
worrying. I thought I was 
just wondering about 
stuff. 

Wondering why I had to wear 
knickers when other boys wore long 
pants? Or why piano practice was 
one hour instead of half that long? 
Or why my brother was better look- 
ing and more popular? 

Why did I have to be home be- 
fore dark when the other kids could 
ride their bikes around the neigh- 
borhood until 9 o'clock? How come 
I had to eat oatmeal for breakfast ' 
when other kids ate Wheaties — 
with the picture on the box? 

About age 8 or 9 1 got to wonder- 
ing one day whether I'd live long 
enough to see the year 2000. That 
seemed like a long time away be- 
sides being an interesting goal to 
achieve. Mom alla^d longevity 
fears in a hurry, offering homespun 
advice for a sure path to that far 
away event like always eating my 
vegetables; bundling up warm and 
wearing a cap in winter. Get plenty 
of sleep. Apply lots ofVicks when a 
case of the sniffles develops. Never 
eat green apples or too much ice 
cream. Keep eating that wonderful 
oatmeal. 

Those suggestions must have 
worked (or at least they didn't hurt) 
because here we are, only 10 months 
away from 2000 and the magic mil- 
lenium. Now the small boy who 
worried about living long enough to 
see 2000 has turned to wondering 
about how to manage predicted Y2K 
stumbling blocks. 

Let's leave the technical aspects 
of coping with potential Y2K pitfalls 
to the computer techies and new 
age know-it-alls. My plans for fend- 
ing offY2K glitches don't involve 
much more than stocking up on 
canned goods, avoiding New Years 
Eve travel and putting away a few 
greenbacks just in case the banks 
run into some problems. I don't 
subscribe to theories that airplanes 
will fall from the sky the moment 
the clock strikes 12 midnight on 
Dec. 31 . But why tempt fate? 

I'm following the lead of my 
golfing partner, Sam, who already 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



has decided to turn in early Friday 
night, the 3 1st, so he'll be ready to 
start the new day, the new year and 
the new millenium next morning. 
No junketing to an exotic place New 
Years weekend to celebrate. I figure 
Sam is on to something. He's a pret- 
ty sharp guy, a school teacher and 
an assistant principal to boot 

Sorry if you think you got tricked 
Into another Y2K column. I'm not 
worrying or even wondering any- 
more. Unless Jan. 1 , 2000 is a 
cloudy day, the sun will shine. 
What's the big deal? 

Remembering Joan 

A nearly three-mile-long funeral 
procession bespoke of the love and 
admiration countless persons from 
all walks of life held for loan Marsh 
Legat, 62, who carved a remarkable 
record of community service while 
battling bouts of cancer for 20 years. 

TheWaukegan resident was put 
to rest last Saturday at Ascension 
Cemetery, Libertyville. Even while 
fighting off recurring cancers, she 
intensified her daily pace following 
civic and charitable pursuits, follow- 
ing a schedule that would have ex- 
hausted two persons. 

loan achieved well deserved 
recognition for her support and 
leadership of the College of Lake 
County Foundation. But for those 
who could read beyond the head- 
lines, she was known for myriad acts 
of kindness and help for people and 
causes that were known only to Joan 
and the recipient. That's the kind of 
person she was. Condolences to 
her husband, Joe, a prominent ar- 



chitect, and her daughter, an airline 
pilot, and her son, a teacher. . 

Denny deciding 

Congressman John Porter (R- 
Winnetka) has the job of twisting the 
arm of House Speaker Dennis 
Hastert to agree to addressing the 
annual Lake County Republican 
Federation Spring Dinner Friday, 
April 30. 

Hastert never has made an offi- 
cial visit to Lake County. Gov. 
George W. Bush promised fellow 
Texans that he would be home 
bound until June so dinner planners 
scratched him from their speaker 
list. 

Protest slaughter 

Horse lovers are planning to 
pack a meeting of the McHenry 
County Board at 7 p.m. Tuesday, 
March 16, for a public hearing on a 
permit application to operate a facil- 
ity for slaughtering horses for hu- 
man consumption. More than 200 
persons protested at a Feb. 9 meet- 
ing. A packing company aims to 
ship horsemeat to Europe for 
gourmet meals. The McHenry • 
County is regarded as ideal by the 
packers because it has the largest - 
horse population in Illinois. Mem- 
bers or the Barrington Hills Riding 
Club are among the vocal oppo-* - 
nents. . / 

Crane upbeat 

Congressman Phil Crane (R-Ill;)^ 
addressing a hometown audience 
last weekend, left no doubt about 
his disdain for weak-kneed Republi 
cans in the vote to impeach Presi- 
dent Clinton. Crane called them . 
"Finger Lick'en" senators. Crane 
never referred to Clinton by name. 
"The American people deserve what 
they went through with this person," 
Crane spat out. 

Looking to the future, Crane told 
GOP partisans that the 2000 election 
presents a "unique opportunity" to 
add seats in both the House and 
Senate and capture the White 
House. "I'm not negative or pes- 
simistic about 2000," Crane de- 
clared. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



SMC protects natural resources 



Stormwater Management 
Commission (SMC) is 
strengthening its Watershed 
Development Ordinance to 
better protect natural resources 
needed to control flooding. With the 
new County Board endorsing smart 
growth, SMC has the opportunity to 
update regulations and their en- 
forcement. Homebuilders have had 
their day, and we are paying for it. 

Revision is critical to better im- 
plement flood control regulations 
incorporating new knowledge and 
what we have learned from past 
mistakes. Development affected the 
watersheds, causing problems for 
property owners. These revisions 
are, in part, a reaction to escalating 
flooding in Lake County. It would be 
foolish to not use common sense 
and expert knowledge to help pro- 
tect residents from the ravages of 
development. 

If you have experienced flood- 
ing, now of watershed problems or 
had no recourse to enforce viola- 



tions affecting your property, send 
your public comment to SMC, 333- 
B Peterson Rd., Libertyville, 1L 
60048 to arrive by March 8. This is 
your opportunity to help make Lake 
County a finer and safer place to 
live. 

Cheryl Doros 
Grayslake 

Malls don't belong in 
residential settings 

My family has a number of con- 
cerns about having the mall at the 
comer of Route 12 and Old McHen- 
ry Road. 

With no major east-west high- 
way, the likelihood of such a shop- 
ping center succeeding is question- 
able. If it is horrifying to live next tp 
a lively, busy, noisy mall it is TERRI- 
FYING to live next to a dead one. 
"Dead" shopping centers are well- 
known as crime-magnets and eye- 
sores. 

Malls do not belong in the mid- 
dle of a pastoral residential area. We 



don't even have a gas station or a 
convenience store in this area. If 
Hawthorn Woods as a Village op- 
poses the extension of Route 53, 
how can we be in favor of this? 

The residents of both North 
Barrington and Hawthorn Woods 
have repeatedly voiced their oppo- 
sition to this project. The Lake 
County Board concurs. 

We urge you and the • 
planning/zoning commission to 
discourage this project. 

Linda Drakeall 
Hawthorn Woods 

Public deserves 
government it gets 

First order of business is to 
thank everyone who spent time and 
money in our effort to promote the 
tax saving Open Space program. 
Secondly, our sincere thanks to the 
2,804 people who shared our con- 
cerns and took the time to vote. To 

Please see LETTERS / C3 



I 



I I 




March 5, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers 1 07 



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DEATH NOTICES 



MOE 

James Duanc Moe, age 74 of Beach Park 
Arc Congdori Funeral Home, Zion 

RALMES 

Raymond W. Balmes, age 85 of Beach 

Bark 

Arc Bradley Funeral Home, Chicago 

GDRARDI 

Albert Glrardl, age 74 ofWadsworth 
;Arc Marsh Funeral Home of Gumee 

ST0U2 

Stanley L Stoltz, age 78 of Lake Villa 
Arc Ponga Funeral Home, Lake Villa 

KLOCZKOWSKJ 

Virginia M. Kryczka Kloczkowski, age 68 

of Gumee 

Arc Marsh Funeral Home of Gumee 



KAZIMOUM 

(Catherine Kozlmour, age 61 ofWauconda 
Arc Kisselburg-Wauconda Funeral 
Home.Wauconda 

SMITH 

Leslie 'Smllty* Smith, age 72 of 

Wadsworth 

Arc Congdon Funeral Home, Zion 

GOTTSCIIAJLK 

Elmer L Gottschalk, age 88 of Mundeleln 
Arc Windridge Funeral Home, Cary 

KOVICII 

Robert R Kovich, age 63 ofWauconda 
Arc Kisselburg-Wauconda Funeral 

Home.Wauconda 

BLUDER 

Harold Louis Bludcr, age 83 of Round 
Lake Park 

Arc Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake 






Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Funeral Directory 



JUSTEN'S ROUND LAKE FUNERAL HOME 

222 N. Rosedale Court (Rosedale at Cedar Lake Road) 

(847) 546-3300 

Nancy Justen & Mark Justen, Directors 

Additional Locations in McHenry and Wonder Lake 

K.K. HAMSHER FUNERAL HOME, LTD. 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Rd\, Fox Lake, IL 

(847)587-2100 

Kenneth K. Hamsher, Debra Hamsher Glen, Directors 

RINGA FUNERAL HOME 

; ; 122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 
(847)356-2146 
Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

Dan Dugenske, Director 

(847) 395-4000 

SPRING GROVE FUNERAL CHAPEL 

8103 Wilmot Rd. ( P.O. Box 65, Spring Grove, IL 60081 

Kurk P. Paleka, Director 

(815) 675-0550 or Toll Free (888) 394-8744 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL AND CREMATORIUM, LTD. 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake, IL 

(847) 223-8122 

David G. Strang and Richard A Gaddis, Director 



Kenneth Earl Collis 

Age 73, passed aWay on Feb. 21, 1999 at the Provcna St. 
Thcrcse Medical Center, Waukegan. Mr, Collis was born on 
Oct. 18, 1925 and has resided In Lake County for the past 31 
years formerly of Chicago. He was a veteran of the United 
States Navy serving his country during WWII, and a former 
20 year employee with Culligan, Inc. of Northbrook. 

He is survived by his son, James Collis (Cheryl Davis) of 
Arlington Heights. Kenneth Is preceded In death by.hls wife, 
Eleanor C Collis (nee Johnson) who passed away on Oct. 13, 
1993. 

Funeral Services were held at the Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake with the Rev. Richard 
Rubletta of the United Protestant Church, Grayslake, officiat- 
ing. . 

Interment followed at Warren Cemetery, Gurnee. 

In lieu of flowers, donations may be given to your 
favorite charity in his memory. 

Patricia Darlene Villa (nee Sorce) 

Age 60, of Round Lake Beach passed away Tuesday, Feb. 
23, 1999 at her residence. She was born Jan. 12, 1939 In 
, Milwaukee and had made her home In Round Lake Beach for - 
• over 30 years. She worked at the Round Lake Magee Middle 
School as custodian for many years. 

_ She leaves her husband, Benny Villa whom she married 
on May 16, 19B7 In Round Lake; her children, Kathy (Robert) 
Soto of Round Lake and Kevin (Heather) Funk of Round Lake 
Beach; grandchildren, Jeffrey Funk and Teresa Hammond; 
sisters, Sandy (Ronald) .Schmidt of Milwaukee, Wise, 
Rosemary (David) Fewkes of Oakbrook, and Joanne Conley 
of Milwaukee, Wis., several nieces and nephews. She is pre- 
ceded In death by her parents, Jerome (June) Sorce and 
brother, Leslie Hcnsmann in 1986, and her former husband, 
Kenneth Funk In 1983. 

Funeral Services were held at the Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake with the Rev. Lisle J. 
Kauffman of the Calvary Presbyterian Church of Round Lake, 
officiating. 

Interment was privately held at Highland Memorial Park 
Cemetery In UbcrtyvUle. . 

Memorials m ay be give n to ihc family In memory of Mrs. 
VlUa. 

Ilelene J. Stenek (nee Vesety) 

Age 84 of South Carolina passed away Feb. 19, 1999 In 
Rock Hill, SC She was born April 28, 1914 in Chicago and had 
been a former resident of Grayslake and Gages Lake. Former 
owner of the "Old Hickory Inn" in Antioch and member of 
the Women of the Moose Chapter 735 Antioch. Friendship 
Club of Gages Lake and the Grayslake Seniors. 

She leaves her son, Joseph W. (Connie) Zdenek; daugh- 
ter-in-law, Marlene Zdenek; sister-in-law, Adeline Valenta; 
nephews, Edward and Richard Hubacek and John Valenta; 
nieces, Laura Dominas and Patricia Maxian; seven grand- 
children and 11 great grandchildren. She is preceded in 
death by her husband, Joseph B. Zdenek and son, Donald 
Zdenek ah d sister, Marie Hubacek 

Memorials Services were held at the Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium, Ltd, Grayslake with the Rev. Lisle 
J. Kauffman of the Calvary Presbyterian Church of Round 
Lake, officiating. 

Interment was privately held at Woodlawn Cemetery in 
Forest Park. 

Memorials may be given to the American Cancer Society 
or to the Hospice of choice in memory of Mrs. Stenek. 

Evelyn R. McCrary 

Age 56 of Round Lake, died Tuesday, Feb. 23, 1999 at her 
residence in Round Lake. She was born on Sept. 19, 1942 in 
Asheville, NC, the daughter of Charles Duncan and Jackie 
Ray (nee Aiken) Weatherford. She was formerly a resident of 
Asheville, NC where she worked as a nurse at St. Joseph's 
Hospital. She lived In the Round Lake area for the past 25 
years. She enjoyed doing crafts and spending time with her 
family. 

She is survived by her husband, Bobby McCrary of 
Round Lake; two daughters, Diana (Todd) Hangos of Round 
Lake, Tammy Washa of Kenosha, Wis.; two sons, Charles 
"Butch" Wilson of Asheville, NC, Robert Wilson of Round 
Lake; three grandsons, Sister-in-law, Janet (Harold) Hart of 
Paddock Lake, Wis., two brother-in-laws, Ralph (Pearle) 
McCrary of Bonners Lake, Wis. and Byron (Carol) McCrary of 
Milwaukee, Wis. She Is preceded in death by her parents; her 
daughter, Janice Farmer on June 5, 1996. 

A Memorial Service was held at the Justen's Round Lake 
Funeral Home, with (he Rev. Raymond Skriba of St. Joseph 
Church, officiating. 

Interment was private. 

In lieu of flowers, memorials to the family would be 
appreciated. 

Ms. Florence I. Johnson (nee ToaJe) 

Age 98, a resident of'Hillcrcst Retirement Center In 
Round Lake for the past few years, formerly of Fox Lake and 
lngleslde, and formerly of Chicago, died Sunday, Feb. 21, 
1999 at the North Shore Terrace Nursing Home in Waukegan. 
She was bornon Sept. 1, 1900. Mrs. Johnson had worked as a 
secretary for the Jelinek Law Office, the Soffletti Law office, 
and the Major Hill insurance Agency In Fox Lake before her 
retirement. She had been a member of St. Bede Catholic 
Church, the Fox Lake Garden Club, and the Fox Lake 
Grandmother's Club. 

Survivors include, her grandchildren, David Keating of 
California, Lawrence Keating of lngleslde and Kathy (James) 
LIndqutst of Mesa, Ariz,; six great grandchildren, Nicole, 
Adam, Amy, Jamie, Sean and Julie and her sister, Jule; and her 
former son-in-law, Earl J. Keating of lngleslde. she Is preced- 
ed in death by her late husband, Richard O. Johnson In 1975, 
and by her daughter, Dorothy Owen, and by her two sisters. 

Private interment was arranged by the K. K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home, Fox Lake (The Chapel on the Lake) 



Miriam J. Bettasso 

Age 67 of Antioch, passed aw^y Monday, March 1, 1999 
at Victory Memorial Hospital, Waukegan. She was bom Jan. 
26, 1932 in Lakeland, Fla. and had lived in Schiller Park 
before moving to Antioch in 1978. Before her retirement, she 
worked as a receptionist. for Catholic Charities in Round 
Lakc.On April 12, 1952 she married John Bettasso in Atlanta, 
Ga. and he preceded her In death on Nov. 20, 1993. 

Survivors Include one son, John Jr. (Barb) Bettasso of 
Antioch; her mother, Bernlce McCabe of Zion; and three 
grandchildren, John, Amy and Sarah. In addition to her hus- 
band, she is preceded in death by.onc brother, John McCabe. 

Funeral Services and Interment were private. 

Arrangements were handled by Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch. 

Those desiring, may make donations to the Antioch 
Rescue Squad In her memory. 

Marie E. Nielsen 

Age 82 of Fox Lake, and formerly of Long Lake, passed . 
away at Victory Lakes Continuing Care Center In 
Undenhurst on Saturday, Feb. 27, 1999. She was born In 
Chicago on Jan. 21, 1917, the daughter of the late George and 
Frieda Relnhart. Mrs. Nielsen was very active in education 
and was the past president of the Gavin Elementary School 
PTA and the Grant High School PTA. For many years, she 
wrote a neighborhood column for the Lakeland Press'. Fox 
Lake News, An avid traveler, she especially enjoyed visiting 
the mountainous regions of the Western United States. 

She is survived by her children, Donna (Richard) Pfell of 
Granger, Ind., Wayne (Cindy) of Moab, Utah, and Denise 
(Marc) Nielsen-Hall of Lake Villa, and her grandchildren, 
Holly (Shane) Johnson of Orlando, Fla. and Eric Llndberg of 
Dallas, Tex. She Is preceded In death by her husband, 
Norman and her brother, Donald Relnhart. 

Memorial Services will be at 11 a.m. on Saturday, March 
6, 1999 at Rlnga Funeral Home, 122 S. Route 83, Lake Villa, 
. with the Rev. Paul Weeg, officiating. 

Private interment will be at Acacia Park Cemetery, 
Chicago. 

Visitation will be on Saturday morning from 10 a.m. 
until the time of service. 

tn lieu. of flowers. 'memorial*" \n Vict memory «> 
Lighthouse tor the BYmd -or the American Dlabete* 
Foundation appreciated; 

.Ringa Funeral Home, Lake Villa handled the arrange- 
ments. 

Bernice Rose Moran Campagna 

Age 86 of Bristol, Wis., passed away Sunday, Feb, 28, 1999 
at her home. She was born Aug. 27, 1912 In Brighton, Wis., 
the daughter of the late Lawrence and Elizabeth (Fonk) 
Molitor. She had lived In Antioch, since 1954, moving to 
Bristol, Wis, in May of 1997. She was a member of St. Peter 
. Church, the Antioch Senior Center, and the Women of the 
Moose 735 of Antioch. She had worked as a cook for Lorcnz' 
Country House In AnUoch before her retirement. 

Survivors include her son Richard (Carol) Moran of Fox 
Lake; three^ daughters, Kathleen (Howard) England of 
Kenosha, Wis., Marilyn VynaJek of Bristol, Wis. and Patricia 
(Robert 'Bud') Anderson of Bristol, Wis.; one brother, 
Lawrence (Elsie) Molitor Jr. of Burlington, Wis. She was the 
grandmother of 15, great grandmother of 22. She is preceded 
in death by her first husband, Leo E. Moran, her second hus-,~" 
band, Joseph Campagna and her son Wayne E. Moran. 

Funeral Services with Mass of Christian Burial was held 
at St. Peter Church, Antioch. 

Interment was at Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. 
Friends called at the Strang Funeral Home of Antioch. 
In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to 
Covenant Hospice, 4000 Spring St., Racine, Wis. 53404, St. 
Peter Church or St. Benedict Abbey In her memory. 

Grace M. Rombaut 

Age 79, passed away on March 1, 1999 at Winchester 
House Nursing Home in IJbertyviUe. Mrs. Rombaut was bom 
on July 2, 1919 in Chicago and resided in Grayslake. She was 
a member of the Skokle Valley VFW Post 3854 Women's 
Auxiliary. 

Please see page C8 



Strang Funeral Chapel 
8l Crematorium, Ltd 




FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED 
ESTABLISHED 1898 

410 East Belvidere Road 
Grayslake, IL 60030 ~l 

(847) 223-8122 

David G. Strang • Richard A. Gaddis 
Directors 



1 



V 

1 



C8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



OBITUARIES/COUNTY 



March 5, 1999 



(Continued from page C7 

She Is survived by her husband of 53 
years Peter Rombaut; her daughter, 
Pamela (Joseph) DIJohn or Lake 
Barrington; her son Paul (Maureen) of 
Wheeling; and her two grandchildren, 
Julie and Suzanne Dijoiin. 

Mass of Christian Burial will be held 
at 10 a.m. on Friday, March 5 at St. Mary 
Church, Fremont Center. 

Friends of the family may visit at 
Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd., 410 E. Belvidere Rd„ 
Grayslake on Thursday, March 4 from 5 
to 9 p.m. 

Interment will be at St. Mary 
Cemetery, Fremont Center. 

In lieu of flowers donations may be 
given to the American Diabetes 
Foundation. 

Wilbur R. Kuhrt 

Age 79 of Antioch, passed away, 
Monday, March 1, 1999 at Northern 
Illinois Medical Center, McHcnry. He was 



bom Aug. 22, 1919 in Chicago, the son of 
the late Herman and Martha (Katzcl) 
Kuhrt. He moved to Antioch after his 
retirement In 1984 from Stanley Spring 
Company In Chicago, where he worked as 
a hand coil winder. On Oct. 28, 1944, he 
married Lorraine Jcndral In Chicago. 

Survivors Include his wife, Lorraine; 
three sons, James (Nancy) of Dale City, 
Va., Jerry (Carol) of Romulus, Mich, and 
Ricky (Sue) of Hemet, Calif.; nine grand- 
children, one great grandchild and many 
nieces and nephews. He Is preceded in 
death by 11 brothers and sisters. 

Funeral Services will be held at 1 
p.m., Friday, March 5, at the Strang 
Funeral Home of Antioch, 1055 Main St., 
(Route 83) Antioch. 

Interment will be In Willow Lawn 
Memorial Park, Vernon Hills. 

Friends may call at the Funeral 
Home from 4 until 8 p.m., Thursday, 
March 4. 

Those desiring, may make contribu- 
tlons to the Antioch Rescue Squad in his 
memory. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

. NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: K-G Machine 

Repair 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 35757 N. 
Helondalo Rd„ Ingleside, 1L 60041. 
(847)973-1563. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Gary Sorertson, 35757 Helendale Rd„ 
Ingleside. IL 60041, (847) 973-1563. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
tntend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locatlon(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) ol the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Gary Sorenson, February 10, 1999 
The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 10th day of February, 1999. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Vernadall M. Sorrentino 

Notary Public 

Received: February 10. 1999 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0299C-2440-FL 

February 19, 1999 

February 26, 1 999 

. March 5, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice Is hereby given that on 
March 26, 1999 at 10:00 a.m. a sale 
will be held at 133 Sayton, Fox Lake, 
IL 60020 to sell the following articles 
to enforce a Hen existing under the 
laws of the State of Illinois against 
such articles for labor, service, skill or 
material extended upon a storage fur- 
nished for such articles at the request 
of the following designated persons. 
unless such articles are redeemed 
within thirty days of the publication of 
this notice. 

Ronald & Katharine Sal yards, VEH: 
1983 Honda. 

VIM: 1HFSC0227DA322901 
Amt. Owed $1907,77 
Russell Rediske, VEH: 1980 Pontiac 
VIN# : 2W87WAL104814 
Amt. Owed SI 932.77 
Dorthy Smith, VEH: 1985 Chevrolet 
VINrT : 1GIFP87S3FN1 73141 
Amt. Owed $1907.77 
Larry Weatherbee, VEH: 1984 
Chevrolet 

VIN» : 1G1APB710EL239B66 
Amt. Owed $1932.77 
Judith Bowsher, VEH: 1988 Chrysler 
VIN# : 1C3CJ41E4JG361580 
Amt. Owed $1932.77 
Neil Monson, VEH: 19B4 Ponllac 
VIN# : 1G2A5B710EL234693 
Amt. Owed $1932.77 
Laura Schoeder, VEH: 19B6 Ford 
VINA : 1FMCU14T5GUC80864 
Amt. Owed $1932.77 
Custom Timber Works. VEH: 1987 
Lincoln 

VlNS : 1LNBM93M7HY644295 
Amt. Owed $1932.77 

0299D-2463-FL 

February 26, 1999 

March 5, 1999 

March 12, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS 

Public notice is hereby given pursuant to a Preliminary Sila Plan on file in the 

Village Clerk's office of the Village of Fox Lake, thai a public hearing will be held on 

March 25, 1999 at 7:30 p.m. In Ihe Village Hall, Fox Lake, Illinois, to hear the Petition 

of Steven Pacquet & Russell Freeman, and Mark N. Scarpelli, General Partners, 

owner of the following described real estate lo-wit: 

E X HIBI T 'A " 
Parcel 1: Lots 4,5 and 6 and that part of Lot 18 described as follows: Beginning at 
the North West corner of said Lot 18; thence South on the West line of said Lot 18 
(which Is also the East line of Ihe alley), a distance of 100 feet; thence Easterly on a 
line making an angle of 90 degrees minute with Ihe said West line ol Lot 18 to the 
Easterly line of said Lot 18 (which is also the right of way line of the Chicago, 
Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad); thence Northerly on the Easterly line of 
said Lot 18 to a point 5.1 feet East of Ihe point of beginning; Ihence Westerly to the 
point ol beginning, all In Louis Olson's Subdivision, being a subdivision of Block 6 
(except the North 360 feet thereof and also except that part now included in the right 
of way of the public highway known as U.S. Route 12), in Marvin's Subdivision In the 
North East 1/4 of Section 9, Township 45 North, Range 9. East ol the Third Principal 
Meridian, according lo the plat thereof recorded September 13, 1946 as document 
600217, In Book 776 ol Records, page 61 1, in Lake County. Illinois. 

Parcel 2: that part of the alley lying East of Lois 4 and 5 and North of the South 
- line of Lot 5 extended East in Louis Oisen's Subdivision, aforesaid. In Lake County, 
Illinois. 

Location of property is: On the East side of Route 12 immediately South of the cur- 
rent Ray Chevrolet & Geo location. 

The common address is: 35 N. Route 12 
Petitioner Is requesting the following: Special Use for Auto Sales 
Said Preliminary site plan is available for examination In the Village Clerk's office 
at the Village Hall In Fox Lake, Illinois 

All interested persons are invited lo attend said hearing and be heard. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ron Stochl, Chairman 

Fox Lake Zoning Board of Appeals 

Dated at Fox Lake, Illinois 

This 24lh day of February, 1999 

0399A-2467-FL 

March 5, 1999 



THE DEADLINE FOR 

LEGAL NOTICES 

IS TUESDAY 

AT 10 A.M. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Afford a Wo Sell Storage will dis- 
pose of goods for non payment from: 

Unit No, 2 belonging to Michael 
James consisting of shop equipment 
and tools. 

Unit No. 3B belonging to Julie 
Bergmann consisting of miscella- 
neous boxes. 

Unit No, 139 belonging lo 
Maureon McDade consisting of mis- 
cellaneous household goods. 

Disposal of the Items will take 
place at Affordable Self Storage, 133 
S, Route 12, Fox Lake, IL on March 
13, 1999 at 10:00 am. 

0299D-2459-FL 

February 26, 1999 

March 5, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
Fox Lake Grade School District 
1 14 Is seeking bids for the transporta- 
tion of our special education studenls 
for Ihe 1999-2000 school year. 
Qualified parlies must submit a bid by 
3:00 P.M. on Monday, March 15th, 
1999. For Information and to 
receive a specifications packet 
please contact Dr. Stephen A. 
Shuda at the District Administrative 
Office, 17 N. Forest Avenue, Fox 
Lake. Phone B47-587-B275. The 
Board of Education Reserves the right 
to reject any and all bids. 

0399A-2468-GEN 
March 5, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

REQUEST FOR BIDS 

VILLAGE OF FOX LAKE 

301 S. RT. 59 

FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS 60020 

Sealed bids will be received In the 

oliice of the Village Clerk, 30! S. Rt. 

59, Fox Lake, Illinois 60020 until 10:00 

am on March 29, 1999, for Alley 

behind Post Office Sanitary Sower 

Improvements. 

Specifications may be picked up at 
the Village of Fox Lake, 301 S. Rl. 59, 
Fox Lake, Illinois 60020. 

Mark sealed envelope "Sanitary 
Sewer behind Post Office" 

Bids will be open on March 29, 
1999, at 10:15 am In the Council 
Chambers ol the Village of Fox Lake. 
301 S. Route 59, Fox Lake, Illinois 
60020. 

The right Is reserved by the Village 

of Fox Lake to re/eel any or all bids. 

0399A-2487-GEN 

March 5, 1999 

March 12, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
REQUEST FOR BIDS 
VILLAGE OF FOX LAKE 
301 S. RT, 59 
FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS 60020 
Sealed bids will be received In the 
olfice of the Village Clerk, 301 S. Rt. 
59, Fox Lake. Illinois 60020 until 10:00 
am on March 29, 1999, for Spring 
Road Sanitary Sewer 

Improvements. 

Specifications may be picked up at 
the Village of Fox Lake, 301 S. Rt. 59, 
Fox Lake, Illinois 60020. 

Mark sealed envelope "Spring 
Road Sanitary Sewer 

Improvements." 

Bids will bo open on March 29, 
1999, at 10:00 am in the Council 
Chambers of the Village of Fox Lake, 
301 S. Route 59, Fox Lake, Illinois 
60020. 

The right Is reserved by the Village 

of Fox Lake to reject any or all bids. 

0399A-2488-GEN 

March 5. 1999 

March 12, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Engineered 

Comfort Systems 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 13 S. 
Maple, Fox Lake, IL 60020. (847) 973- 
2477. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Joe Damore, 13 S. Maple, Fox Lake, 
IL 60020. (847) 973-2477. Gail 
Damore, 13 S. Maple, Fox Lake, IL 
60020. (847) 973-2477. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from Ihe location(s) indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person (s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/ , December 

31,1999 

/s/ Gail Damore, December 31, 1999 
The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 30th day of January, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Cynthla Ducak 
Notary Public 
Received: February 17, 1999 
Willard R v Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0299D-2462-FL 
February 26, 1999 
March 5, 1999 
■ March 12, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
Fox Lake Grade School District 
1 14 Is seeking bids on iho fabrication 
and Installation of an outdoor. teller 
board stylo school sign. For sign spec- 
ifications, please contact Dr. Stephen 
A. Shuda, at 17 North Forest Avenuo, 
Fox Lako, Phono: 847-587-8275. All 
bids are due In Ihe Administrative 
Olfico by 3:00 PM, March 15th. Board 
of Education reserves the right to 
reject any or all bids. 

0399A-2469-GEN 
March 5, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

REQUEST FOR BID 

Antioch Community High School 
(A.C.H.S.) is. prosontly soliciting bids 
for a root replacement. The deadline 
for submission of bids Is April 1, 1999 
at 2:00 p.m. Bid specifications will be 
distributed at a mandatory pre-bld 
mooting on March 23, 1999 at 9:30 
a.m. In Iho high school cafeteria. 
Contact Mr. Joe Ring, 847/758-8400. 
0399A-2471-GEN 
March 5, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

The Round Lake Area Park District Is requesting statements of qualifications and 
Interest for site master planning and architectural services for Iho proposed North 
Shore Park and Community Center site. The park site Is 40+ acros and will lncludo 
outdoor recroatlon components as well as a community center facility. Statements will 
be received at the District Office located at 814 Hart Road, Round Lake, Illinois until 
5:00 pm„ (Chicago Time), on Friday, March 19, 1999. 

Qualifications and Selection Process: Preference will be given to Ihose planners 
demonstrating capability and experience In park and recreation planning, environ- 
mental analysis and related Issues. Proposals will bo screened and finalists will be 
Invited to an Interview. Selection of the consultant will bo followod by contract negoti- 
ation and Is subject to approval by the Board of Commissioners. In general, state- 
ments should reflect the quality of work which can be expected by the planner, Includ- 
ing the media and communication principles used. 

Organization of Statements: Statement shall Include; 

• Brief history of the firm, 

• A list of personnel and their qualifications. 

• A list of at least three former clients for whom the. planner has performed slmijar 
services. 

• Samples of previous reports on park and recreation projects should bo inc'uded. 
The Round Lake Area Park Dislrict reserves the right to defer acceptance of any 

proposal for a period not to oxceed (30) thirty calendar days after the date proposals 
are to bo received, to reject any or all proposals, and to waive technicalities. Only pro- 
posal for a period not to exceed (30) thirty calendar days after the date proposals are 
to be received, to reject any or all proposals, and to waive technicalities. Only pro- 
posals In compliance with the provisions of this Advertisement will be considered. 

Jamos D. Rock, Executive Director 

Round Lake Area Park District 

814 Hart Road 

Round Lake, Illinois 60073 

0399A-2470-GEN 

March 5, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
NOTICE TO BIDDERS 
Route: Various Streets 

Road District/Township: Warren Township Hwy. Oept. 
County: Lake 

TIME AND PLACE OF OPENING BIDS 
Return with Bid 

Sealed proposals for the improvement described below will be received at the 
office of Warren Township Highway Commissioner, 17801 W. Washington Street, 
Gurnee, Illinois until 10:00 o'clock A.M. March 18, 1999. Proposals will be opened and 
read publicly at 10:00 A.M. March 18, 1999 at the office ol Warren Township Highway 
Commissioner, 17801 W.Washington Street, Gurnee, Illinois 60031. 
Description of Work 
Name: Hunt Club Farms. Unit 2 
Location: Pi. Of the S.E. 1/4 Section 6.T4SN Rl 1E 
- Proposed Improvement: bituminous surface removal, bituminous patching, leveling 
binder, bituminous concrete surface course, refieclivo crack control, aggregate shoul- 
' ders and other necessary and related work. 
BIDDERS INSTRUCTIONS 

1 . Plans and proposed forms will bo available in the office of Warren Township 
Highway Commissioners. 17801 W.Washington Street, Gurnee, Illinois 60031. 

2. All proposals must be accompanied by a proposal guaranty as provided in 
article 102.09 of the "Standard Specifications lor Road and Bridge 
Construction," prepared by tho Department of Transportation, 

3. Tho awarding authority reserves Ihe right to waive technicalities and to re|ect 
any or all proposals as provided In article 102.08 of the "Standard 
Specifications for Road and Bridgo Construction," prepared by the Department 
of Transportation. 

4. Bidders need not return the entire proposal when bids are submitted. Portions 

of the proposal that must be returned Include (he following: 

a. BLR 5701 ■ Contract Cover 

b. BLR 5704 • Notice to Bidders 

c. BLR 5705 ■ Contract Proposal 

d. BLR 5706 - Contract Schedule of Prices (if needed) 

e. BLR 5707 • Contract Schedule of Prices and Signatures 

f. BLR 5708 • Proposal Bid Bond (if required) 

g. All proposal documents, Including Proposal Guaranty Checks or Proposal 
Bid Bonds, should be stapled logether to prevent loss when bids are 
processed. 

By Order Of: 
Warren Township 
Highway Commissioner 
GERALD E. RUDD 
Highway Commissioner 

0399A-2490-GEN 
March 5, 1999. 

PUBUC NOTICE 
NOTICE TO BIDDERS 
Route: Various Streets 

Road District/Township: Warren Township Hwy. Dept. 
County: Lake 

TIME AND PUCE OF OPENING OF BIDS 
Return with Bid 

Sealed proposals for the Improvement described below will be received at the 
oflice of Warren Township Highway Commissioner, 17801 W. Washington Street, 
Gurnee, Illinois unlil 10:1 5 o'clock A.M. March 18, 1999. Proposals will be opened and 
read publicly at 10: 15 A.M. at 10:15 March 18, 1999 at the office of Warren Township 
Highway Commissioner, 17801 W, Washington Street, Gurnee, Illinois 60031. 

Description of Work 

Name: Brookside Subdivision, various streets 

Location; PI. Of the S.E. 1/4 Soction 8.T45N R11E 

Proposed Improvement: bilumlnous surface removal, bituminous patching, leveling 
binder, bilumlnous concrete surface course, C & G removal and replacement and 
other necessary and related work. 

BIDDERS INSTRUCTIONS 

1 . Plans and proposed forms will be available in Ihe office of Warren Township 
Highway Commissioners, 17801 W.Washington Street, Gurnee, Illinois 60031. 

2. All proposals must be accompanied by a proposal guaranty as provided In 
article 102.09 or the "Standard Specifications for Road and Bridge 
Construction," prepared by the Department of Transportation. 

3. The awarding authority reserves the right to waive technicalities and to reject 
any or all proposals as provided in article 102.03 of the "Standard 
Specifications for Road and Bridge Construction," prepared by the Department 
of Transportation. 

4. Bidders need not return the entire proposal when bids are submitted. Portions 
of the proposal that must be returned Include the following: 

a. BLR 5701 • Contract Cover 

b. BLR 5704 - Notice to Bidders 

c. BLR 5705 • Contract Proposal 

d. BLR 5706 • Contract Schedule of Prices (if needed) 

e. BLR 5707 - Contract Schedule of Prices and Signatures 

f. BLR 5708 - Proposal Bid Bond (if required) 

g. All proposal documents; Including Proposal Guaranty Checks or Proposal 
Bid Bonds, should be stapled logether to prevent loss when bids are 
processed,. 

By Order Of: 
Warren Township 
Highway Commissioner 
GERALD E. RUDD 
Highway Commissioner 

• 0399A-2489-GEN 

March 5, 1999 



<" J - - " !.**!.. ■ I * 



' 






March 5, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



220 



Kelp Wanted 
Foil-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



I 



Lakeland Newspapers I C1 3 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanied 
Full-time 



220 



CAD Operator 



Fortune 500 company located In northern Illinois has 
an Immediate opening for a CAD Operator. Primary 
responsibilities will Include development of detailed 
parts drawings using ProEnglneer software, convert 
drawings and sketches designed by engineering to 
formal drawings, develops mechanical layouts of 
average complexity and prepares the related engineer- 
ing drawings. 

Qualified applicants must possess: 

- Solid background and working knowledge In. 
ProEnglneer CAD software 

- Ability to read and Interpret electrical schematics 
and mechanical drawings. 

• 2 year associate's degree In CAD program or 
equivalent experience 

- 1-3 years experience as CAD operator using 
ProEnglneer software 

The selected candidate will enjoy an excellent wage 
and benefit package that Includes medical, dental, 
vision, 401k, 

Qualified candidates may fax/send resume with salary 
requirements to: • 

Danaher Controls 

1675 Delany Road 

Curnee, IL 60031 

FAX: 847-662-6633 






! 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



WMWMWnW 



W& DEVELOPER 

Chicagoland's premier 

Internet Service. 

Provider is in search of a Web 



i 



| Developer due to rapid growth. This ! 
{individual will work with customers ! 



and develop sites. Knowledge in 

HTML and JAVA Script required. If 

you are interested in creating a 

future with a rapidly growing 

organization, fax resume to skw. 

(847) 223-8810 or 

L e-mail: skw@us-netdirect.com 



I 



] 



3 Permanent Job Positions Locally 

Due to company promotions 3 openings exist 

now for young minded persons In Ihe local £ 

branch of a large International company. 

If selected you will be given 3 weeks minimum 

expense paid classroom training and additional 

on-ttie-Job training. We provide complete . 

company benefits, major medical, dental and 

optional pension plan second to none. 

Your starting salary Income will be 520,000 - $30,000 1st 

year depending on ability and qualifications. All 

promotions are based on merit, nor seniority. To 

be accepted, you need a pleasant personality to 

be ambitious, eager to get ahead, have a 12th 

grade education or better, be bondable and free 

to start work Immediately. We are particularly 

Interested In those with leadership ability who 

are looking for a genuine career opportunity. 

To schedule an Interview, Call Wed-Frl 

Between 10 AM and 6 PM at 815-334-9600 

and ask for Mark Bartiett 



LANDSCAPING^ 
lit b«*tnpVi) <* toft* frWwb* »tWi U* 

t«.t» t COfOTUCnwrCKlUAM. 
CtMtoctm rip. uUtofahrd ^aiami 

S UrUVOOi 1*1 4 yn. Mi up, vm/orgm 
lUb ptlfidd* oppttstori tarw, r* IwlW 
™d bmUp be WftWtU pociojri 
raft Lnhaning be *7M Ma (W U, 

[ on7 Cm,llttM 
OAOmWUHW JnWWtUt 



LOAN ASSOCIATE 

LAKELAND 
COMMUNITY BANK 

Tiiii fall lime potltlan offer* a 
wldt variety of duties In Hit 
lean department of a locally 
owned and managed community 
bank. Loan documentation, iy»- 
tem Input and word preweailng 
experience required. 

We offer a complete benefits 
package Including medical, 
dental, life ' disability insurance, 
along with a company match 
retirement plan and more 

Apply In person or call Lynn 
it (S47) 740-2365 

LAKELAND COMMUNITY BANK 

«5 W.ROLLINS ROAD 
RaLSDLAKE.IL 60073 




DICAL OPPO 



To place your medic 
opportunity here, 
call Paula or Ross 
at 847-223-8161 



DIRECT 

CARE 



Direct Care 

Workers for 
MR/DD women In 
residential setting. : 
All shifts available. 1 I 

Full Time or 

Part Time. 
We are committed ; ; 

to quality 
residential care. 

Contact 
Gall Becker 
Mount Saint 

Joseph 

Lake Zurich 

847-438-5050 



IP 



Immediate full time 

position available In 

our Lake Zurich 

Intermediate Care 

Facltlty. Will be 

responsible for 

planning, developing, 

and supervising 

case management 

activities for 

MR/DD women. 

Bachelor's Degree 

and one year. 

experience with 

MR/DD population 

required. 

Contact Gail Becker 

Mount Saint Joseph. 

Lake Zurich 

(847)438-5050 



^ 




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847-223-8161 





■ 



1 PRN position for home J 
Scare visits primarily in the! 
a Lake County area. Illinois y 
ft RN license, valid driver's « 

license. Insurance 
J required. Wisconsin RN 

. license, previous home J 
■ care experience preferred, y 
H Flexible scheduling. Apply | 
A at VNA of Lake County, I 

I 
ft 
ft 
ft 
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372 North Avenue, 

Antloch IL : 

between noon and 4p y 

or FAX resume to | 

(847) 838-5278. 

J Equal Opportunity Employer ■ 



NURSING 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Drerpalh Medical Attociitn, a 
tatte phytic i.im' Rrmip located 
In the Northern Suburb*, it cur- 
rently looklnc for RN'i. Duties 
Include aniitine phytlcian with 
procedure*, phlebotomy, EKG't, 
and education of patient*. The 
chosen candidates will be 
customer service drUen and 
detailed oriented and posiess an 
IL License. For confidential con- 
sideration send/fai resumes lo; 

Decrpalri Medical Assoc. 

71 WauLegan Hd 

tale Bluff, IL 60044 

fa*: (647)293-1547 S 

or for more information call 

(847) 533-8080. EOE 



t^Vew Beginnings are Happening 

at Aurora Medical Center in Kenosha 



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Our innovative approach to patient care allows employees to grow in a 
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3rd shift Medical Technologist 
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1st & 3rd shifts Registered Nurses 

ER/ICU (1st & 3rd shifts) 
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2nd & 3rd shifts Respiratory Therapist 

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LPN, Medical Assistants, 
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Sign-on bonuses arc offered for a variety of positions. Wc offer a competitive salary and benefit package and 

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Aurora Medical Center 

3$ AuroraHealthCare* 

http://www.aurorahcaltlicare.ore • Equal Opportunity Employer • M/F/D/V 
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RECYCLE 
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aiior 
$15-$35 PER HOUR 

Easy medical billing. 

Full training. 

Computer required. 

1-800-259-6661 

exL222 



RECEPTIONIST 

Dermatology office 
In Highland Park. 
Typing required. 
• Includes eve'ry 
other Saturday a.m. 

Call Elsie 
(847)432-4650. 



CNA's 
WOW! 

Don't miss out! Limited 

openings available. Our 

new starling salary of 

9.75/hr plus benefils, 

shows our dedication to 

employee appreciation. 

Only team oriented 

CNA's need apply. 

Apply in person at: 

Care Centre of 

Wauconda 

176 Thomas Court 

Wauconda, IL 

847/526-5551 

. . - .' 



PART-TIME RN 

Dermatology office 

in Highland Park. 

Approximately 

20-30 hours a 

week. Includes 

some Saturday's. 

Office experience 

preferred. 

Call Elsie 
(847)432-4650. 



C.N.A.'s 

NEW HIGHER RATES OF PAYII! 

While hall North . a beautiful, 
private, SNF is seeking caring 
and reliable CNA's to care tor 
our rosidenls. We oiler: 

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• Outstanding benefits!! 

Low resident to C.N.A. ratios 

• Day and pm shift available 
We offer training to become a 
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For consideration, please call 
or apply in person at: 

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Deerfleld, IL600I5 

(847) 945-4600 



NURSES and CNAs 

Earn extraordinary wages! 

Set your own work schedule. 

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ALL STAFF 

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MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST 

Immediate opening lor IT medical receptionist; Must 
possess e.\cl. lei. skills with good working knowledge 
of man. care protocol. Snme comput. exp. Successful 
candidate will be organized and possess a friendly, 
sympathetic and professional personality with a team 
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X-RAY 

Immediate opening in our 5 man Orthopaedic prac- 
tice lor 1 FF.& "1 l*i Radiographer. We seek enthusi- 
astic, hard working learn players lo join our busy • 
staff. Kesp. incl. integration of. both radiologic and 
clinical duties. ■ Candidate will be well organized, 
energetic and possess a friendlv, professional 
demeanor. ARRT cert, and IDi^S lie. req, Exp! in 
Qriho setting a plus. Some comp. exp. helpful. Days, 
no call. Competitive salary and benefits. Send ■ 
Resume with educ. bkgr. and desc, of respon. Incl. 
salary hist, and req. to: 

Box I It II I 

c/o Lakeland Publications 

P.O. Box 268 

Grayslake, I L 61)030 

' 'EOE 



JOB FAIR JOB FAIR 



Medical Opr> Miiuiii k t 

NURSES AIDES 

• • JOIl FAIR •• 

WEI)., .V10 

9nrr|'llnm . 

OnThrSpcttlnltrrltHi 

Ilomt Support- 

lllRMand Park Hospital 

1M Wilmot RJ., DrtrfitM 

We Have It All! 

Htgliluikl PmUlotpul'* 

llmir Suprnifi Scnkxt 

lot cu r) tiling ) in) wan* 

In a career'. 

YOU'LL ENJOY: 

FVc^iMc «clinlut**-cl»»>«« 

' ..ptUMtHy rmfrrmi. 

• Shint »Uli* or 8 fct 1 Z hr. 
yliiln available 

• Sliilr JillVrrnibli 
1 In-hiNttc or Ipwriiial ><nin| 

> WiJc rjiifrnt tjvri 
Oif nution A: nuniiny 
MircnitliNl tor all vacs 
Uve-incawnjukxi. 
| Selected caixliJaW mutl luve 
inn trjnirkiruihin, 
Ce nifk ji i»ii it hiflily unir- 
uhlc. OppimuniiH:!> currently 
exit! Ill pf cu itic rxrMin,il care 
fur a variety of ctx* fmm . 
ncuraimt iii (lie eklcrly. 
wiping »iih ADL& lif lit 
l»iu»e let ping. 
1 If vtHi're unaMe in ntcvt «ilh 
I ui, plcav ci intact: Liu 
I Lrtthrn, Home Support of 
llilhland Park Hospital, 
106 Ullmol Hd„ Drer firlil. 
ILtOOI5.niONE:(W7l 
| 4SO-374f . FAX: (847) 44J. 

.«;o (e« nvr/ii/t » 

IIICIILANDi'ARK 

, - IIUSPIT.M. » 

A Member of 

NorlhHalrm MraJthclrt 

lleallhnreAIA lll(htrUi(l! I 



JOB FAIR JOB FAIR 



Nursing 

We're setting new 
standards. Again. 

Healthcare is changing and 
so are we. At Condell 
Medical Center, we've been 
a healthcare leader in Lake 
County lor decades. We've 
recently received high marks 
from JCAHO proving that 
our commitment is stronger 
than ever. So if you're ready 
to set new standards, we're 
ready lo invest in you. 

Right now we have tremen- 
dous opportunities for IL . 
licensed, -experienced RNs. 

•Home Health. FT/PT Days 
•Home Health Psych. 

PT Days 

Contact: Drexa Unverzagt, 

ext.5031. 
•Behavioral Health, FT/PT 

rotating, CADC 

■ER. PT Days/PMs/Nlghts 

Med-Surg, PT Nights 
•OB, FT/PT PMs. Nights 
•Orthopedics, PT Days 

Recovery, PT PMs 
•Surgical Services, FT Days 

CNA/Unit Secretary/ Monitor 
Techs/O R Techs positions 
also available. 

To find out more about our 
facility, attractive salary and 
outstanding benefits, please 
contact: Gwen Shafer, Nurse 
Recruiter, Human Resources, 
303 Cleveland Ave., 
Liber tyville, I L 60048. 
Phone: 847/362-2905 
x5236. FAX: 847/918-8309. 
Job Hotline: 847/573-4305, 
www.condell.org EOE 

CONDELL MEDICAL 
CENTER 






■IfMWffi 



C 1 4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



March 5, 1999 



220 



1 kip Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



HclpWiUitctl 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanlcd 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



iiimiiiiiimnmiiimiiiHuiiiin 

Insulation 

Installers 

Needed 

experience 

preferred, but will 

train if needed. 

Southern Wl & 

Northern 1L area 

Builders 

Insulation 

815-675-0085 

:HitlllifcliriltlIlltMII1l» iiiimu 



Hiipwamsd 

Software Support 
Specialist. Full knowl- 
edge of Windows 95 
a must. Knowledge of 
NT helpful. Full bene- 
fits. Fast growing con- 
cern. Put your knowl- 
edge to work. 

Apply in person: 

Iniccmp Computer Systems 
820 LakHldt Drive. Suit* 
Qurnee, IL 60031 



ADMINISTRATIVE 

ASSISTANT 

TEMP TO PERM 
$14.00 PER HOUR 

Our client (fortune 200- 
Vernon Hills) is seeking .in 
Atlm. Assistant (or 2-3 
months. Op|wttunity for full 
time employment. Must 
know Windows 'J5, MS 
Word (Excel .md ftowerPuinl 
added plus). 

Gill H47/7^0-fl3t.7 to set 
up interview or Fax resume 
H.J7/740-H't05. 



FULLTIME 

RECEPTIONIST 

Work In a fast paced 
environment. 

Days, some early evenings, 
alternating Saturdays. 
Computer experience 

required. 

Apply In person or send 

resume to: 

Mtimlclcitt Animal Hospital 

1133 W. Maple Ave. 

Mimdtlein, IL 

,^Fax:S47-S66-SH77 

K*BKr "" / J '""" •'""■' 
A>/'nj5 plen\t. 



\ 



ENGINEERING 

Fasr growing Roof Truss 

' Mfg Co, w/plants in 

Florida b Georgia socks 

Truss Designers 6 

Estimators. Must have 

exp In designing truss 

layouts or engineering. 

Prof using Mitek 2000. 

Salary up to S50K. 

Exc bnO pkg. 

Fax resume 

561-840-1748; 

Call 361-840-2075 

for Interview. " 



HelpWMed 
Full-Time 

INSURANCE 

ALL POSITIONS REQUIRE 
INSURANCE EX'PERCiriCE 

• COMM'LCSR to J35K 

• GROUP ADMIN to *50K 

• PERSONAL LINES CSR taS«K 

• COMM'LTECHASST toJJZK 

HALLMARK 

(847) 298-1900 
Pax (847) 298-1906 

email: hpl2200aol.com 






; ^smp^i\.Vj^ i l> bill 



'jz — i: 



iczs: 



c: z 




M 



' HAIRDRESSER / BARBERS WANTED ' 
Part time & Full time work 
Established northshore salon. 

'Full Time benefits 
'Excellent work environment 
'Upscale salon 

Apply In person 

Mon-Frl 6a-8p / Sat. 8a - 5p 

Send or Fax resume to: 847-336-2033 

Attn: Rae Taylor 

Gold Coast Salon ft Day Spa 

422 N. Green Bay Rd. 

Waukegan, IL 60085 

Phone (847) 336-2012 



O 



yiiiiiiinimuiiimiiiiintinnitiinraiiiiiiiitnimnsnQi 
PERSONALITY PLUS? I 

Customer Support - 

7 new positions now 

available $8-l0/hr 

plus incentives 

Superior Personnel 

244-0016 

Gurnec 

or 549-0016 

Venion Hills 



1 



© 



upcrior 

Personnel 



SnnitiniHiiiniiiimiiitminiiiiiitiinraiirarnraDiiD? 



BOOKKEEPER/ 
RECEPTIONIST 

Full Time, 

experience 

preferred for small 

auto dealership; 

ADP experience 

a plus. 

Contact Paul Bach 

for Interview 
647/356-2530 

EOE 



FULLTIME 

VETERINARIAN 
TECHNICIAN 

Want to work In a fast 

paced environment? 

Experience Is required. 

Phase apply In person 

or fax resume to: 

Mundcleln Animal Hospital 

1133 W. Maple Ave. 

Mundettin, II. 
Fax: 847-566-5877 



Ho phont rails 
please. 










OFFICE 
MANAGER 

Auto dealership; 

experience 

preferred; 

ADP and Ins. 

Contact 

Paul Bach 

for interview 

847/356-2530 

EOE 



%~ 



□EQB3BUQDQBUQSHBBBQBQQBBCUOEaSUBQUBaHBBQQO 

Get an "A" for Success!! 

TAKE THIS QUIZ! 



imiiiiiimiiiimi 



', ' - 



■ 



s=3UB 



LET'S TALK 



Do you like to earn money, but 

not work long hours? Do you 

enjoy talking on the phone? 

Then give me a call. Excellent 

sales opportunities are available 

in Lakeland's Classified Sales 

Dept. Telemarketing 

experience preferred 

but not required. 

Send resume or request 
for application to: 

Attn: M. Combs 
Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 60030 



Yes 


No 


L 


1 1 




_ 








Do you like to earn money? 

Do you like people? 

Do you have a pleasant phone voice? I 

Do you want part-time work in a 
friendly environment? 

If you answered yes to any or all or the 
above, you can start earning dollars plus 
[ commission in LAKELAND'S Client 
Services Department 

Please send letter of interest to: 

Attn: Maureen Combs 

c/o Lakeland Publishers 

P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 

or fax to 

(847) 223-2691 

)BBHBBD5BBBCEBaBaOBHaoan-aBBBaBOHCSBB3aaOBfl 



PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS 



Triad Circuits. Inc. 

is now hiring for: 

• Plating Supervisor 
(5 yr. BRgrna. in printed 
circuit board plating) 

• Photo Technician 

• CNC Operators 

(Drilling/Routing) 

Minimum 1 year experience in the 

manufacturing ol printed circuit 

boards required. Benefits include 

paid vacation, holidays and 

personal days. Health, Dental & 

Life Insurance. Please apply in 

person at: 

703 N. Sunset, 

Round Lake, IL 

Call: (847)546-7722 

NO ASSEMBLY!! 



i'^x.z::vs*jx.zzttr;:^-. 



Equal Opportunity Employer 




ADMINISTRATIVE EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT & GENERAL MANAGER 

Wauconda based business has a unique administrative position available for a very motivated self-starter 
with supervisory skills. This unique position combines a variety of administrative duties and supervision* 

The successful candidate must possess the ability to handle a wide range of responsibilities, be self- 
directed, have strong organizational skills and working knowledge of Office 97. The candidate must be 
able to effectively interact with department supervisors while taking the initiative to handle a number of 
other duties under minimal supervision. You can expect competitive compensation and benefits. 

Fax resume to: 847-526-3377 or mail to:. 

Protective Products International, Inc. 

Unit 116, 1205 Karl Court, Wauconda, IL 60084 



mmi-i--' 



K1RKWOOD INDUSTRIES, INC. 



K & B - MUNDELEIN SUBSIDIARY 



Due to the expansion ol our business, a world-leading manufacturer ol' components Tor 
the automotive, power tool, and home appliance industries has the following 
opportunities available on our second shin (3:30 p.m. to 1 1:45 p.m.) in our Mundclein. 
IL division: 

Electrician 

Will be responsible Tor phiuniiif> tlic Hiring and installation of equipment and fixtures, 
| ensure v»irinj» and fixtures conform lo company specifications and local electrical codes, 
interpret specifications, blueprints and vtork orders, repair and maintain machines and 
equipment, repair electronics down to the board level, anil repair power supplies. PLC 
experience it plus. 

Machine Set-Up Operator 

Starting Rate SI 1.20/tir. Must be mechanically Inclined, able to work independently, 

assure all parts are of acceptable quality, complete tool chnngeovcrs, be concerned with 

I safely, maintain a constant flow of production and properly record production charts. 

We hire only highly motivated individuals who enjoy working in u team environ* 
mem. Wc offer a challenging environment, competitive salary, and extensive 
benefits. Please apply in person or send your resume lo; 

KIRKWOOD INDUSTRIES, INC. 

675 Tower Rd. 

Mundclein, IL 60060 

Fax: (847) 949-8521 

ISO 9001 Certified 

Visit our website at: www.kirkwood-ind.com 



to 




M(B 




Do you enjoy variety? 
Do you enjoy a challenge? 
Oo you thrive in a fast- 
paced, dynamic environ- 
ment? If so, you could be 
the person we're looking for! 
Lakeland Newspapers is 
looking for someone to join 
our exciting sales depart- 
ment. You will be a success 
if you possess. organization- 
al and communication skills 
and are • self-motivated. If 
you are interested in this 
exciting opportunity, please 
send your resume to: 



Lakeland 



Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268, 
Grayslake, IL 60030 
\^Attn: Maureen Combs 



220 



Help Warned 

Full-Time 



line Cooks 
Saute, Broiler. 

AM & PM wait staff, 

bus persons 

FUN, GREAT PAY, 

FLEXIBLE HOURS, 

IMMEDIATE 

OPENINGS 

high energy pub 

& grill 

Duke's 

(847) 526-0002 
Wauconda 



* 
* 

8 

ft 
* 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 



SALES CONSULTANT 



Immediate opening 

for an oulgoing and" 

detail minded 

Individual for our 

lighting showroom. 

WARREN 
ELECTRIC, INC. 

33261 N.Hwy.45 

Wildwood, IL 

(847) 223-8691 

or fax resume to: 

(847) 223-8693 






abased, 'business . 
has a full time 

SSSSeHquse 

jst b'e able to * 
heavy-items: '• 

' DJUS ; ' 

ts 

Call- 



Sit 




847-223-8161 



SALES 



GET 

THE GREEN 
ADVANTAGE 



$24-$26K . 
BASE SALARY 

PLUS 
COMMISSIONS! 

We Offer; 

Reliable Leads 

Fully Paid Training 

Great Sales Support 

Unlimited 
Earnings 

Opportunities 

Salary + 

Commission 

+ Benefits 

If you're hardworking, 

ambitious and ready for a 

challenge, find out about 

career opportunities with 

TruCretn+ChemUwn, 

{division of the fortune 500 

i ServiceMaster Company, 

;J and the nation's largest & 

j fastest growing Lawn Care 

Company! 

CALL 

800-934-8055 
for an appointment! 



..'' 



TwKhfTH'fmyirviir 



(E.O.K.) 



I 



., 



March 5, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers I C9 




la%iified Cmfuidi 






tttautitetneitlt 

- 

Notices ', . . . .1 id 

Lost & Found 115 

Free 120 

I'crsuimls .125 

Auctions 130 

Business I'crsoiwls ' • 135 

Fiiiiiticltil 140 



-• - : 



Hitjifoyittetit 






Help Wunlud Part-Time 219 

Help Wanted Fiill-Time .\.220 

Employment Agencies 221 

Uuisliicss Opportunities 225 

Sllusilioits Wanted 228 

Child Cure 240 

ScluKil/liistriiction .Z50 



- -! 

Anikpics 




.301 



Appliances 304 

Uahur/rnidc 3tlK 

Uuziiars/Crdfis 310 

lluiltliuj: Maierials 314 

Business/Office Equipment 318 

Hlec Ironies/Computers .320 

Farm Guide I 324 

Firewood 328 

Garutic/Kiimuiaue Sales .330 

C'mxhI Tilings To Fat 334 

Horses & Tack . . . . : 338 

Household (lOtids/Fumllurc . . . ! 340 

Jewelry • • ■ .344 

|jiwn/(!arden 348 

Clotlilnn 340 

Miscellaneous . , 350 

Medical Equip/Supplies .354 

Musical Insirtiniciiis 358 

Pets ■& Supplies 3<i0 

ItestaiirJitl Equipment'. 364 

Tools i*i Machinery 368 

Waukd To Buy . . . . 370 

Af«l Ctilfl/c 

Homes For Sale : V. . ....'. ... .500 

Homes For Rent 504 

Homes Wanted 508 

Hiintcs Huildcis 510 

('ontlo/t'owii Hniues 514 

Mobile Homes ' 518 

Apartments For Kent 520 

Apartments Wanted .524 

Api/HomesTo Share " 528 

Rooms lw Kent 530 

Buildings 533 

^Business Property For Sale . . .- 534 

llusiness Property For Kent 538 

Investment Propeily 540 

Mortgage Services ■, .544 

Farm-. ■ ■ ■ - S4K 

Viilmmi lluiii/Aereajje 3f»0 

K"e*oi|s/VuV;nl<m ftuiiiiiri 564 

(Jul ar'Areii Property 568 

Cemetery Lots -V9 

. Kcul Hsiate Warned • "4 

Kcul Ksiiiiv MiM- v.^.l .-tAj; -■-;: ,7H 

Kecrusiltnitul Vehicles 7IM 

.Sni»viiiol>ilesVA'IVs 708 

Hoals/Motors/lile • 710 

Camping .'.714 

Travel/Vacation 718 

Sports Equipment .720 

Airplanes 724 






0*m " 

L~*t<t!llftOft<ttiOtt 



Cars Kir Sale 804 

Keiiuil/I.cascs 808 

Classic/Aiiliipie C'ur> • 810 

Services & Parts 814 

Car Loans/insurance .818 

Vans 824 

Four Wheel Drive/Jeeps 828 

Trueks/Traileis 834 

I Icavy lupiipincul S3S 

Mtiloicyeles ,-.'. 844 

Wanted To Uuy -. 84S 



*<&>< 



Appliances Kepair S03 

lilacktop S0o 

Unilders S(W 

Carpentry . '. S 12 

Curpei Cleaning ■' SI5 

Ctmcreie/CVmctil SI8 

l>ry Wall t S2I 

Fducalioii/Iiislrucliou S24 

Electrical ,..". -S27 

p'iiewtKiil -. .S30 

Handyman .. S33 

Heatine/Air Condiiioiiiiiji S3f> 

House keepi iig - • ■ • • .S3') 



Land 



scaping 



.S42 



Liundry'Clcaning S45 

lA'gal Services ■ .• S48 

Medical Sen ices . . S5I 

Moving/Storage S54 

Fainting Decorating • • • S57 

l^iralegal/Typiiig Services S6U 

Plumbing S63 

Finds : < • .Sftfi 

Pressure Washing Sfi'J 

Professional Sen ices S72 

Kudio/TV Kepair S75 

Remodeling X? x 

Resumes ....SKI 

KnoliiigASidii>e S84 

S87 

.S'JO 

S')3 

SW> 

. , , : s'j'j 



Slonigi 



Trees/l'laiH.s . 
Wedding ... 
Miscellaneous 



& 



iitribution 



Kenosha 
County 



Kenosha 




Johruburg 



McHenry 



CryitaT 
Lake 

McHcnry 
County 



— .Round LJ_k« •/ "Ortyilaku 

sin v^ 



Zlon 
£J adiworth 

Gurnoc 

Waukogmj 
P*rk 
City 




fiUnd Uko 




Mundeleln 



North 
n Chicago 

0»k»" 



Wauconda 



•North 
Barrlngton LakoZurlch 

Klldeer 



© 



V«mon ubirtyvllle 



Mill* 



.*--.. 



Lake Forest \ 



Barrlngton 



Long 
Qrovo 



Highland Park , 



Deerfleld 



Palatine 
Cook County 



Buffalo Grove 



North brook 



Lakeland Newspapers' Classifieds Appear In 11 Newspapers! 

Antlocli News • Round Lake News • Lake Villa Record 

Mtindeleln News • Wndsworth News • Grayslake Times 

Fox Lake Press • Gurnec Press • Liiuleiihursi News 

Wmiconda Leader • LiberLy\'llle News 



HOW TO PLACE A 
CLASSIFIED AD 



BY CALL 

PHONE (847)223-81 61 

gy Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 
MAlL Grayslake, IL 60030 



IN 30 S. Whitney St. 

PERSON Grayslake 

BY 

FAX (847)223-2691 






DEADLINES 

Direct Line Tues. 5pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party...Wed. I Oam 
HOURS 

8am-8pm Mon.-Thurs 

8am-5pm Friday 




- „ _ * Lakeland 

I CH % ifiCCl Newspapers 




125 



Penonals 



125 



ERRORS: 

We strive to eliminate 

errors, but if one should 

occur, please report it 

immediately as we can be 

responsible lor the first two 

(2) weeks only. 

NO ADJUSTMENTS CAN 

BE MADE UNLESSTHEY 

AFFECT THE MATERIAL 

VALUE OF AN AD 

HYPNOSIS 

WHY DO THOUSANDS 

OF PEOPLE SAY 

TRY HYPNOSIS FIRST 

NOT LAST? 

(1) BECAUSE IT WORKS. 

(2) IT WILL SAVE YOU A 

LOT OF MONEY 

BECAUSE YOU WILL GO 

INTO THE RIGHT 

DIRECTION RIGHT 

AWAY. 

(3) IT SAVES YOU TIME- 
NO NEED TO KEEP 

COMING BACK. 

WHAT IS HYPNOSIS? 

DURING HYPNOSIS '■ 

YOU'RE RELAXED AND 

GIVEN POSITIVE 

SUGGESTIONS. ITS 

THAT SIMPLE IN THE 

HANDS OF A TRAINED 

HYPNOTIST. THERE IS 

NOTHING MYSTERIOUS 

ABOUT IT. ANYONE WITH 

NORMAL INTELLIGENCE 

CAN BE HYPNOTIZED. 

YOU ARE ALWAYS IN 

CONTROL. 

THE CENTER FOR 

HABIT CONTROL 

128 NEWBERRY 

AVE., 
LIBERTYVILLE, 

ILL. 60048. 

(847)816-4951. 

DAVID E. WOLD 

CHT. 



MISSING MALE CAT 
tO/months old. tiger typo with 
copper eyes, last seen on 
Sunday 2/21/99 at 9pm, lives 
In Plstakee Highlands, on 
Meadow Hill Ct. Could be any- 
where, pleasa call It you have 
or have seen him. IB47) 
497-4109. REWARDII 



120 



■Free 



1 



IIEALTIIY WOMJ2N 

BIIBIEIOiBffi) 

$.15110.00 Cumpi'iutulifin 

llouhliy women, i^c 20-33. 

nccilttl ti» ietvc ;is :iiii)ii)'iiuiu% 

tryy diHiiirv Uuiiiirs will be 

rviiiiiruil Ki lake (iwdieulliiii. 

blood simnitiie ami iimiKtuo 

miiior surgical priKudua*. Wo 

are iulcrcitoil in nil oihiiic 

hntiiirotiinK, Multiple liK'UlilUIS 

iiviiilablo- If iiucioieil c:ill 

AKI1773..127.73I5 

Serious litiiiitrnw Only 



115 


Lost & Found 



DID YOU FIND Somooncs 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dept., and gel your 
results, FOUND ads are 
RUN FHEE of Charge. Call 
{847)223-81 61. 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 
FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 

UMN, For more Information, 
ploase contact the Humans 

Society. . ' 

DON'T THROW AWAY 
YOUR OLD COMPUTER 
EQUIPMENT, Nintendo, 
Sega, Play Station or Atari 
Video Equipment or Games. I 
will come and pick It up for 
FREE. Call (847) 566-2819 
alter 5:30pm. 

FREE 1990 MOORE DE- 
COLLATORS WEB. Excel- 
lent condition. Very light 
usage. Separates multipart 
forms and cuts off perfora- 
tions at the tractor feed -sot up 
now to handle up to 4 part 
forms. Can be shortened lo 2 
part. Must provide own trans- 
portation. Some disassembly 
required. (847) 634-4250 oxi. 
268, 



FREE LUXURY BUS RIDE 
TOPOTAWATOMI 
BINGO. 
BRAND NEW 1999 BUSI 
Monday-Tuesday- 
Thursday. 
Pick-up 4:15pm at 
Hampton Inn, Gurnee. 
Rldo 10 times and get a 
f reo package of specials. 
Every Tuesday In March 
Is Spin (he Wheel with 
single, double, triple 
payout. 
Hollywood Casino 
March 11th & 22nd, 4pm, 
Pay $15 rocoivod SI 5 
back, 2-sosslons 

Call for Information 

(847) 831-1094, 
(847) 473-1263. 



FREE LAMINATOR AND 2- 
PIANOS. You must pick up. 
(B47) 623-7773. 

ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad In the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are run at NO 
CHARGE! (We discourage 
any pet ads). Deadlines: 10am 
Wednesdays. (847) 

223-8161.exl.1 40. 



A BABY ADORED 
ADOPTION 

We're eager to give your 

baby 
the best life has to offer, 
our complete love, support, 
devotion, college education, 
at-home mom, comfortable 
home Tilled with laughter and 
• muaic.-our iTvwa mciuuw tovmvj 
families, travel end a genilo 
' ' dog'. Lef a help each otrtor. 
Cindy & David 
1-800-249-O319. 



A BABY- ADORED We're 
Lynne & Scott, a young (31 & 
36), happily married couple 
who want to provide all you Ve 
been dreaming for your baby: 
a . stay-at-home mom, suc- 
cessful dad with flexible work 
hours, playful dog and safe, 
secure, bright future. LYNNE 
& SCOTT 1-877-209-BB20 
TOLL FREE. 

A LOVING CHOICE Dear 
birth mom, we're Ken and 
Jean, a happily married cou- 
ple with a 5yr. old adopted son 
who can provide a warm, lov- 
ing home for your child. We'd 
be happy to keep In touch 
through pictures and tetters. 
Please call our attorney Sara 
(773) 509-0099 or (toil free) 
(877) 509-0099. 



ARE YOU PREGNANT? 

Considering Adoption? Many 
couples anxious to adopt. Call 
our adoption consultants 
24hrs./day for more Informa- 
tion and answers to your ques- 
tions. Help with allowable ex- 
penses. 1-800-676-3407. 

AROMA THIN tm 

WEIGHT LOSS PENS 

ARE THE LINK BETWEEN 

AROMATHERAPY 

AND WEIGHT LOSS. 

NO SHAKES OR PILLS. 

TRUE WEIGHT CONTROL 

IS RIGHT UNDER YOUR 

NOSE. JUST SNIFF AND 

LOSE. FOR MORE 

INFORMATION AND A 

FREE VIDEO CALL 

(647) 731-7429. 

BEAUTIFUL FOREVER! 

PERMANENT COSMETIC 

MAKE-UP. 

•Eyebrows 

•Eyelino 

•Also 

•Electrolysis 

•(Permanent Hair Removal). 

Sherry (847) 249-7446. 

ITS TIME TO LOSE 

WEIGHT AND FEEL 

RIGHT 

With Herba Life. 

Guaranteed results. 

Dr. Approved. 

Independent Distributor. 

"(847) 587-1708. 




140 



tmuitciitl 



.LOOK AND FEEL 
YEARS YOUNGER 

In 180 days or your money 
backl Exciting nutritional 
supplement. Listen to our 
4 minute message 
1 -800-721-6986 
and call me al 
(847) B38-5437 

LOOK GREAT! 
LOSE WEIGHTI 
MAKE MONEYI 
(847) 840-9669. 

MAGNIFICENT WOMAN 

Plus Size Lingerie. 

Call for FREE catalog. 

(847) 634-1307. 

METABOUFE356in 
Natural diet supplement 
As advertised on local 

TV and radio- 
Independent distributor 

- (847)263-3876. 

HHMOUtW. 

PRAIRIE HOUSE 

New & Slightly Used 

Plus Size. 

Hours: M-W-F 

12pm-3pm 

Or by appointment 

(847) 634-4852 

Fax: (847) 634-0561. 

Clothes Bought for Cash. 



ssssssssssssssss 



s 
s 

s 

s 
s 

s 



INSTANT 
CASH 



I We hold the title 

.s^^Jovouccarj 
* Toil ReepTiie 

(Jet skis, 

motorcycles & 

snowmobiles tool!) 



5 

5 

S 
S 
$ 

S i 
$ 

s, 

S 

5 



No Credit Check 
15 Min Approval 



s 

s 

s 

s 

s 

$ 

s 

s 

s 

$ 
$ 
s 

s 

5 
S 

s 
$ 



$ (847) 249-5500 f 

ssssssssssssssss 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



GREAT $$'s 

Flexible Hours 

Setting Appointments. 

Call for information 

(647) 940-9689. 



140 


Financial 



SSSOVERDUE BILLS!! 
CREDIT PROBLEMS? Con- 
solidate debts. Same day ap- 
proval. Cut monthly payments 
up to 50%!!! Become debt 
(reo. NO APPLICATION FEES! 
1-800-863-9006 Ext. 900. 
www.help-pay-bills.com (SCA 
Network). 

BANKRUPTCY $78+. 
STOPS garnishments. Guar- 
anteed valid since 1991. Di- 
vorce $99+ Low caost Debt 
Reduction and Foreclosure. 
Avoidance services available 
without bankruptcy. Fresh- 
Start 888-395-8030 

MAXED OUT? 

Buried In Debt? 

Behind on your payments? 

LMng paycheck to paycheck? 

You're not alone, 

But the good news Is, 

we have a REAL solution 

Debt Crisis Solutions. 

Confidential. 

Call Today (847) 740-9178. 

Ext. #3. 

VISA, MASTERCARD 
$2,500, No ono refused. No 
credit check. For application 
call 1-315-768-7181, 24hrs. 
(SCA Network). 

VISA/MASTERCARD-UP 
TO $6000. No deposit. No 
credit/bad credit OK. Call 
today lor guaranteed fast ap- 
proval or information. Call 1- 
800-247-7012 (SCA Network). 



Pampered Chef 

needs more consultants 

to demonstrate quality 

kitchen tools at home 

kitchen shows. 

Average S15/S20 

hour commission. 

No experience necessary. 

Call Linda 

(847)249-1015 



PART TIME 
CLEANER 



LOCAL BUILDER 

SEEKS PTCLEANliR 

FOR MODELS/OrilCL- 

. 2-1 MRS/WEEK 

S8.00/IIOUR. 

CALL ERIN 
543-1134 



1% 

• 

• 
V 
V 
N 

.» 
■ 
■ 

• 
V 
I 



•n. 



OFFICE HELP 



IMMEDIATE OPENING 

FOR AN OUTGOING. 

DETAIL MINDED 

INDIVIDUAL 

W/COMPUTER SKILLS. 

PART TIME IN THE 

BEGINNING. LEADING TO 

FULL TIME W/BENEflTS, - 

CALLKARINAT- 
847-356-2070 

OFFICE LOCATED 
IN LAKE VILLA 



C10 I Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



March 5, 1999 



219 



l\ti\\) Wanted 
Part-Time 



We arc looking for \ 

personable, highly < 

energetic individuals whd 

can work independently' 

handing out newspapers' 

at Lake County store < 

locations, Wc will train. \ \ 

Hourly rale plus 

commissions. 

Thursdays 4-8 pm and 

Saturdays 9 am-2 pm 

Call Kevin for 

an interview. 

(847) 740-4035 



Permanent 
Part - Time 

Work from heme. 

Ftoxibto schedule. 

Weekly paychecks. 

Setting appointments to 

collect local donations of 

household Hems for 

nationally recognized 

charitable organization. 

Please call 

(630) 515-5766 



*»««>»♦«»♦♦♦♦♦»+♦«♦♦♦»»+ » 



KELLY'S 
DAY CAMP 

Now Hiring! " 

SUMMER BUS 

DRIVERS 

June 21 -August 13 

Vernon Hills location, 

accommodating hours. 

jk competitive salary. 

For information 

& interview. 

Call 
(847) 634-9393 1 



RETIREES!!! 

Are you willing to help 
high school students 
learn a trade or vocation 
tn your spare time? The 

Technology Campus In • 
Graystehe Is looking for 
substitute teachers to 
work in hands-on learning 
environments, flexible 
hours, 575,00 per day, 
S80.00 after 10 days. 
Must have Bachelors 
degree. Regular teaching 
certificate not required. 

For more Info. 

Call Jeff Brlerton 

{817)221-6681x7201 



EMPLOYMENT 




DON'T MISS 

OUT!!! 
IT'S COMING! 

EVERY YEAR 

LAKELAND 

NEWSPAPERS 

OFFERS 

EMPLOYMENT 

OUTLOOK 

TO ITS 

READERS 

FEATURING THE 

HOTTEST 

JOBS IN TOWN! 

DON'T MISS 

THIS SPECIAL 

SECTION! 



219 



lldpWiuited 
Part-Time 




ISO. 



tn search of that 
perfect employee? 



Rosa or Paula canhoIpV 

you find tho i perfect 

porsonlCall today to got 

-^ your help wanted, 

spaaonal.bppohtihKy, : > 

modlcat opportunity V 

|ob fair od tn tho next 

Lakeland paper. 



TEI.EPHONEWORK 
FROM HOME. 
NEED MONEY? 

No selling involved. 

Home makers and 

retirees encouraged 

to apply. 

Dependability 

required. 

Call 

815-344-8037 




Locations .ill over Lake Counly 

Please call 

(847) 548-0771 



Part Time p.m. positions 

Available Monday-Friday, 

Excellent salary 

Supervise school-age 

children in: 

•Outside Play 

•Indoor Activities 

•Arts & Crafts 

•Cooperative Games 



AssrmMy Workers Needed! 

We .we looking for dependable ami cncrgclic individuals lo work In a 

fasl paced friendly environment preparing and labeling 

newspapers. Cray-slake/ Round Like area. Thursday 5:00a.m. Io3.00fi.ni. 

Physical position, some lifting required. 

OH Diane for Inlervletvll (M7) 740-403S 

Needed to deliver newspapers to Lake Counly businesses. Thursday 

and Friday routes available. Great opportunity to be your own boss and 

earn some extra cash (or only a few hours of work a week! 

Tapers available by 7.00 a.m., routes take approximately 4-6 hours. 

Call Kevin (or more Information. 

(tW7) 740-4035 

Drivers Wanted!! 

Drivers needed to deliver newspapers to Lake Counly businesses. 

Thursday and Friday routes available, Creat opportunity to cam some 

extra cash (or only a few hours of work a week! 

Call Kevin (or more information. 

(UJ7) 740-1035 



Part-Time 



1 



AUDITORS NEEDED 



• EARLY AM HOURS 

• CAR NECE5SARY 

• $8.00 TO START 



Call Between 10 & 2pm Mon-Fri 
For An Interview 



847-662 9277 



INVENTORY 

SPECIALISTS 



An Equal Opportunity Employer 



DELIVERY 



Want to earn up to $200 per 
week and be your own boss? 

The Daily Herald is looking for 

adult, independent personnel for 

newspaper delivery in the Lake 

County area. 2-3 hour routes 

available between the hours of 

2am & 6am, Monday thru 

Friday; 2am-7am, Saturdays, 

Sundays and Holidays. 

For more information call... 

(847) 427-4333 



Telemarketing/Part-Time 

r *■ * r «_ 



pniypur v 



Now's your chance to 
cash in on your free time. 

Lakeland Newspapers is now accepting 

applications for purl lime telephone sales. 

& work from our Grayslake office. 

No experience necessary (hut a plus). 

RETIREES 

COLLEGE STUDENTS 

HOUSEWIVES 

Must enjoy talking lo people. 

Hourly wages plus Imnus. 

Average $ 1 0«S 1 5 per hour or more. 

HOURS: 

Mon.-Tlmrs. 5:00 p.m .- 8:.T0 p.m. 
f Day Hours Sat. '*()() a.m. • 2:00 p.m. 

^ For Inteiview Call Dick 
V (after Noon) 

£* Lakeland Newspapers 
> (847) 740-4035 

1/VVWWS 



i 




AVON PRODUCTS- 

START a homebasod busi- 
ness. Work flexible hours. 
Enjoy unlimited earnings. Call 
Toll Froa (868)561 -AVON, 

DRIVER ■ COMPANY DRIV- 
ERS Top pay and great bene- 
fits. Owner operators - 75$ per 
loaded mile with great leaso 
options. Trainoes - company 
paid training. CalArk BB8 -4CA- 
LARK (BBB-422-5275). 

DRIVER BUD MEYER 
Truck Unas Refrigerated Haul- 
ing '$1,000 sign-on bonus for 
experienced company drivers 
'Solo drivers start up to 33c 
solos drivers and contractors 
CALL TOLL FREE B77-283- 
6393 GRADUATE STUDENTS 
1-800-236-642B, 

HELP WANTED SEMI 
DUMP DRIVER, 5yrs. experi- 
ence. (847} 587-4251. 



DRIVER: UP TO S700/weok 
orientation pay. Up to 35c/mllo 
to start. Great homotime. As- 
signed, all conventional Heel, 
Lease Purchase Options. 
BOYD BROS. 800-543-8923 
EOE. 

DRIVERS - ATTN: Profes- 
sional Owner Operators. No 
Canada, NYC & NE, Mln. 23yr. 
with lyr. OTR CDL with Haz- 
mat . Paschall Truck Lines 600- 
648-0405. 



SCHUSTER - DRIVERS: 
OVER THE ROAD. Reefers 
and dry van. Wo offer now pay 
package: Odometer miles or 
computer milos 'Great home 
time 'Lumpers 'Groat health 
Insurance *401K plan *1995- 
99 all conv. fleet 'Direct depos- 
it your bank 'Quarterly safely 
bonus 'Rider policy. You 
need: Class A CDL with Haz- 
Mat & 2yrs. OTR exp. Call Gor- 
don 800-831-4832. 



AIM HIGH FIND your future , 
with the Air Forcel Training, 
travel, educational assistance 
and financial security. Plus en- 
listment bonuses up to 
$9,000 to those who qualify, 
Age requirement 17-27. For a 
free information packet, call 1- 
800-423-USAF or visit 
www.alrforco.com 

ANYONE CAN DO THISI 

Earn $800-S5,000 per month 

Taking Customer Service 

Calls at home. 

Full or Parl-Tlmo. 

Call 1-886-395-0743. 

ASSEMBLE ARTS, 

CRAFTS, Toys In your spara 
time. Earn CASHI Phono work, 
typing, sewing, electronics, 
more. Great Pay. CALL 24 
hour Information. 1-800-795- 
0380 Ext. 21. (SCA Network) 

INSURANCE 4 DAY work 
week. Leads, advances, 
$1,000/week, statewldo op- 
portunity, 5 pooplo minimum. 
Call ASAP 1-800-252-2581. 

THE CRST ADVANTAGE: 
INEXPERIENCED DRIVERS - 
•Company sponsored training 
•Up to $31,000 first year. EX- 
PERIENCED DRIVERS - 'Solo 
and team *Up to $2,000 sign- 
on 'Immediate Insurance 
•Lease/purchase. RECENT 
SCHOOL GRADUATE - Tui- 
tion reimbursement '$500 
sign-on. Call Karen 1-800-504- 
2778 - CRST International, 

TRUCK DRIVERS • Variety 
of hauls. Flats? Reefer? Van? 
Etc.You choose. Benefits, no 
Jump seals. Call Gary now at 
600-220-4140, 

DRIVERS WE DON'T 
JUST recruit you, we watch 
over you. No experience • No 
problem. No Cost CDL Train- 
ing If qualified $30,000 a year 
& benefits, 1-800-553-1044. 



BENCH TECHNICIAN 

Small manufacturing 
company socks bench 
technician for service and 
production deparlments. 
Candidate will have solid 
knowledge of electronic 
circuitry as well as good 
mechanical skills. Ability lol 
use basic electronic lesl 
equipment is necessary. 

Electronics Degree, 

trouble-shooting skills 

and good communication 

skills are helpful. 

Send resume to: 

HUMAN RESOURCES 

DcpL "L" 

27B40 Concrete Drive 

Ingleside, IL 60041 



SECRETARY 



An exciting place 

to work! Major 

Highland Park Kenl 

Estate firm is seeking 

;i detail -oriented. 

energetic individual 

Willi strong compulcr 

skills to support our 

busy sales slaff. 

Please call 

Erin or Joanne at: 

847-433-7220. 




jWECA 8T0RE 



COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST 

Experience preferred, but will train. 
Responsibilities will include: 

• Customer relations 

• Tracking/recording data 

• Scheduling appointments 

. • Explaining sales/promotions 
Call Steve at: 847-223-8651, ext 3013 



ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 

Growing lake County Manufacturing Co. 

has immediate openings for full and/or part lime 

administrative assistants. Duties include customer 

telephone contact, sales/order entry, truck shipment 

scheduling, light duly: filing, word processing, 

telephone operator/ receptionist. Excellent starting 

wages and benefits available for candidates with 

required job skills and steady work record. 

Apply in person or send resume to: 

Air-Drive, Inc. 

4070 Ryan Road 

Gurnee, IL 60031 



WAREHOUSE 

Waukegnn liistrihuliun center seeks cncrgclic, self-motivated 

warehouse personnel.- Qualifications required: 2-3 years 

warehouse/distribution experience, reliability, team player, 

computer skills, organization skills, anil good work History. 

High school diploma required. Excellent benefits, team 

atmosphere and room to grow. I lours; Tuesday-Friday 

10:30 a.m. - 7 p.m., plus Salurday 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Salary com parahlp lo experience. 

Send resume with 3 work references to: - 

ULINE.INC. 
22110 Lakeside Drive 
Waukcgan, IL b00U5 
Attention: Recruiter 

fax; III1I1-H47-0354 
Ciiual Opportunity Emuluyur 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



DRIVERS -BE HOME AND 
MAKE THE MONEY YOU 
WANT. Home weekly. Re- 
gional runs. Experienced driv- 
ers and owner operators 
needed. Burlington Motor Car- 
riors S00-564-6262. 

DRIVERS AND TEAMS: 
Starling pay up to 37c/mllo, As- 
signed Frelghtllner conven- 
tional, Improved speed 
stance, excellent miles, lime 
homo overyJMQ days In most 
areas and more. Experienced 
drivers call Heartland Express 
toll-free 1-87-PRO-DRIVE. 
Owner Operators ask about 
BBC/mile. Call 1-8-PROFIT- 
PRO. E.O.E. 

DRIVERS MIDWEST 
BASED terminal hiring com- 
pany drivers. Full benefits, 
comp pay and mites. Flexible 
home lime. We have openings 
for driving school graduates. 
800-B43-9817. 

EASY WORK! 

NO EXPERIENCE 

$500-St,000 part-time at 

home stuffing envelopes. 

For free Information send 

self-addressed, 

stamped envelope: 

R&J Enterprises 

Mailing Services, Inc. 

P.O. Box 402 
Ingleside. III. 6004 1. 

DRIVERS/OWNER OP- 
ERATORS: PULL our trail- 
ers or yours. Excellent com- 
pensation, milos and home 
time. Class A CDL, one year 
OTR. Call Dave at PTI 800- 
447-4822. 

EARN EXTRA MONEY 
Work one weekend a month 
and two weeks a year and re- 
ceive 100% college tuition, the 
Montgomery G.I. Bill and an 
excellent paycheck. You may 
also qualify for a cash enlist- 
ment bonus. Call your local 
National Guard representative 
today at l-BOO-OK-GUARD. 



WILDLIFE JOBS 

to$21.60/HR 

Inc. Benefits. Game 

wardens, security, 

maintenance, park 

rangers. No exp needed. 

For app, and exam info 

call 1-800-813-3585, 

ext 2407. 8am-9pm, 

7 days, fds inc 



Credil/CollecllQiis 

At Quill, we're one ol tlie nation's 
leading direct marketers of busi- 
ness products. This kind ol success 
doesn't happen without Incredible 
attention to our customers' needs. 
Thai's why we're looking for peo- 
ple like you People wllh talent. 
ambition and the desire lo be the 
best. 

We are now seeking: 

Credit Analyst • You will analyze 
our customers' credit stolus and 
perform related documentation. 
1+ years of credit experience, 
demonstrating excellent analytical 
and decision making skills and 
effective communication skills 
essential. . 

Crcdi [/Collection Analyst 
You will thoroughly review all cus- 
tomer antecedents and determine 
whether lo hold or release orders. 
You will communicate via tele- 
phone with customers lo obtain 
solutions to delinquent accounts 
and handle any concerns regard- 
ing account status. Candidates 
must have strong decision making 
skills, effective oral/wrltlen/onoryt- 
teal skills and I + years ol credit 
experience. 

Collection Representatives 
You will contact our business cus- 
tomers via telephone to negotiate 
and resoKv; account delinquencies, 
determine current credit stains, 
find decide action lo lake on pcml- 
ing orders. This fast paced posi- 
tion icqulres excellent communica- 
tion skills and the ability lo llilnk 
on your feet, 1+ years experience 
In a general office selling is 
required and cclk-clion experience 
Is preferred. 

We offer a competitive salary, 
excellent benefits packayc. which 
Includes tuition reimbursement, 
profit and gain sharing and com- 
plete training lo help you achieve 
your career goals. Please forward 
all inquiries with salary 
requirements lo:' 

Quilt Corporation 

100 Schelter Drive 

Dept. KL/COL 

Lincolnshire. IL 60069 

FAX 847-G34-58Z0 

Equal Oppoituniiy Employer 

tn/f/d/v 

(SQUILL* 

vvrw poionnul n*wi» opponuiuiy 



220 



Help Wonted 
Full-Tiiitc 



LEGAL 
SECRETARY 



Waukegan 

Corel WordPerfect 7.0 

experience required. 

Minimum 3 years 

legal experience. 

Fax resume to: 

(847) 249-8457 



POSTAL JOBS 
to$18.35/HR 

INC. BENEFITS 
NO EXPERIENCE 

FOR APP. AND 

EXAM INFO. CALL 

1-800-813-3585 

EXT 2406 

BAM-9PM 

7 DAYS fds, inc 



Immediate 

opening for a 

Legal Secretary 

for FOX LAKE 

LAW Office; 

competitive 

benefits 

contact Mary @ 

847-587-2551 



I 



MAINTENANCE 
TECHNICIAN 

k" Growing cnmpiny Kii position 
^ open to costi our northern and 
w north central Illinois tWUur.inU, 
^ Ideal c,indid.n« should fuve J 
^ yrs r < i wi icnt c with I IVACR, he 
I f PA certified and Me lo obtain 
! Oat* C dirvet s license. Previous 
I wpcfif nee in ien.Hir.mi equ!|)- 
I mt'iit irp.iir .1 plus. 

I Competitive cnmpeinaliun 
1 bated on experience and 

excellent benefits. Including 
I vacation and holidays, nicil- 
I lc.il insurance, profit sharing 

] ,mi I slock pun li.nc plan. Situ) 
I resume Irir 

STEAK N SHAKE 

1704 VV Washington 

Bluomington, IL 61701 

r.n: 3OT.827.OMZ 

ror 



* ARROW <" 

MARINE 
TRANSPORT 

o local I rucking/ 
transportation company, Is 
currently seeking qualified, 
team-minded professionals 
to fill the following positions: 

Diesel Mechanic's; 



qualified diesel mechanics 
and apprentices encour- 
aged lo apply. 
Truck Drivers: 



must possess valid class-A 
CDL flatbed/dump/ 
tank/van experience a plus 
Prlmaiity local wortc Paid 
benefits. Possible ttalnlng 
available wilh good MVR. 
Q wn Br.Oparotors: 



weekly selllemenls and cash 

advances. Flatbed/dump/ 

tank/van wot k. 

• 'Excellent opportunities. 

please coll our Recruiting 

Deportment at 

(847) 587-0022' 



ENGINEER 

AWE ARE o leading nunuLxluier 
Jol s|>ok« components In need of 
jjdn experienced MANUFACTUR- 
|ING ENGINEER. To join our learn 
A you musi ! i !iit . 

!■ 
ii 

ft 

!■ 

II 

ft 



:» YEARS EXPERIENCE 
AS A MFG. ENGINEER 
WORKED W/MANAGEMENT 
ON MACHINERY & 
PROCESS IMPROVEMENTS 
KNOWLEDGE OF 
PNEUMATICS &. 
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION 
FAMILIARITY W/ 
IMPLEMENTATION OF 
CELLULAR CONCEPTS 
STRONG DOCUMENTATION 
SKILLS FOR ISO 
COMPLIANCE 

ft WE OFFER a coinpetlilve benefits 
!pkg& a salary commensurate - 

| w/ex|ie»lewe & education, 
ft II YOU need these requirement!, 
Jsend/ldx (84 7-395- B8G2I resume 
Jjw/vJ.iiy history In confidence lo: 

NuWay Speaker 
Products, Inc. 

<M)5 Anita Are. 
Anhoch,IL6G002 



ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 



■IfuWay 






» 



March 5, J 999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C1 1 






220 



Help Wanted 
Full-time 



* U:):Uf -Hj i ii JIJuN II Ul» 

jiiiiiirB niiKiiiiiftrii j» 

J Applicant must hovo a * 
J thorough understanding of J 



220 







Help Wanted 
FiilUTIme 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



small englnos & related 

power equipment. Position 

requires organizational. 

computer & people skills, 

Bilingual applicants 

welcome, 

Can for appolnlmonr. 

Grayslako Food Sales 

Outdoor Power Equipment • 

(847)223-6333 



DIANNA'SHAIR 

AND TAN SALON 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 

NEEDS STYLISTS 

CALLDIANNAAT 

516-2081 

SIGN-ON BONUS 

FULL OR PT 

GUARANTEE - 

FLEXIBLE 

SCHEDULE 



! DELIVERY 



BRANCH ASSISTANTS 



Immediate openings for individuals to assist 

with day-to-day operations in branch 

locations. Responsibilities will include setting 

up papers for delivery as well as for 

occasional absence of distributor. 

Current openings in the following locations: 

•Libertyviile 
•Mundelein 
•Vernon Hills 

Work 3-4 hours a day with flexibility in 

starting and ending times. 
Starting pay is $9162/hr. plus benefits. 

For more information call: 
(847) 427-4333 

tfe(HMMtM<»O4HMO4l0O4NMMHMHMMMIOO4KMMK>4HM>O4MMH>Oa4MMMMMM 



Printing 
Supervisor 

Immecl Opening- 

Bnkcrsficld, CA. Leader in 

Ihcmfg of packaging 

products for the quick 

service restaurant industry 

seeks Printing Supervisor 

, for our growing 

Bakersflcld, CA plant 

w/ 170 employees. 

Responsible for Ihc 

overall printing operations 

on a rotating shift. Seek 

5+ yrs supervisory cxp in 

a printing environment, 

as well as in-line 
cutting cxp. Knowledge 

of Rotogravure & 

r-lcxographic printing a 

plus. Exc compensation/ 

bnft pkg including 401 K 

& profit share plan. 

Rcto a»t avail. . 

Resume w/sal rcqs: 

Dopaco, Inc. 

Attn: HR 

5801 District Blvd. 

Bakcrsficld, CA 93313 

Fax: 805-827-1780. 

EOE/AA . 



Driven/School But 




No 

Experience... 

Wo Offer A Paid 
Training Program 



• $5000 Fi 
• M«dkal & 



No 

Transportation... 

Employee 
Shuttle Service 




No 
Baby - sit J or. 

Child Rido Along 

(bring your kid* fo work) 



lance Bonuses 
• Credit Union 
Morel 



Call A Location Near You: 



NORTHERNLAK&OUrfrY (UKS FOREST): 

847-680-9305 

PARK CITY 
847-244-5690 



Applkonii mull b» 21 year* or eloW 

with cUan driving record. 
Drug KtfrHiJnfl r»qulr»d. EOC M/T7D/V 



T: Ry der- 

^^^■^ Stud*m Trcnspo 



Tranftporrattoti 



Sales (pt& ft) 



5,000 customers per month average 



No price haggling 



No pressure solos todies 



Cosual dross evory day 



Open & friendly work environment 



Part-rime Sotos Consultants earn 
$12 -$25 per hour in commissions 



Full-time Solos Consultants earn 
$2-$3K per month in commissions 

Full-time Senior Sales Consultants oarn 
53.5-S75K por month in commissions 



CAnmax 



Quality • Integrity • Uw Prk« 

Relax. It's CarMax. 



220 



Help Warned 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



$220 TO $650 WEEKLY!)! 

Assemble Products or Milling 

Brochures From Home. Any 

Hours! No Experience 

Call First American Publishing 
1-800-818- W9 
Ext.37 24hrt 



AUTO MECHANIC 

Busy N. Suburban 
torvlce shop needs 

2 mechanics. 

Must have own toots. 

Call Karen or AvI 

647-933-9300 



• ROUTE 

DISPATCH 

COORDINATOR 

Salaried Position 
W/BENEFITS! 
Bilingual 
English/Spanish Req. 
PARK CiTY: Customer Service/ 
Safety oriented individual needed 
for dispatch position available 
with lending transponoilon set- ' 
vice. You will be responsible (or 
all aspect* of dispatching dally 
routes for student transportation 
In Wauhcgan & North Chicago 
area. Knowledge ol North 
Chicago/vVaukegan area with . 
prior despatch routing expert' - 
encc required. Good organlia- ■ 
Uonal & communication req. 10 
handle 150 bus location. 
Computer skills a plus, with 
ability lo obtain s GDI/school 
bus permit desired. 
Send/Fax (847-244-5705) 
resume to: Dan Marchese, 
3625 W. Washington St., 
Park Oty.IL 60085, 
(e.o.e. m/f/d/v) Drug test req. 



r&Qt nVI^SUHBH fcrtecp^ 






I Clerical 

Float Pool 

•Clerical 

• Receptionist/ 

• Switchboard 

• General Office 

Yaskawa Electric America. Inc. 
has great opportunities lor 
talented Individuals who would 
enjoy using their olflce talents, 
uiihout commit ling lo a full 
lime Job. 

I You will work In our new 
I ttate-ol-lhe art corporate 
j headquarters, located Just a 
j lew minutes south of Great 
j America. These positions are 
I on on "as needed* basis, 
I offering some flexibility of 
I schedule. 

Submit your resume or letter 
of Interest to: 

| Yukawa Electric America. Inc. 

Depl. JS/fteat 

2121 Norman Drive South 

Waukegan.IL 60085 

Fax:847-887-7020. 
JilljUex 9yaskawa.com 

eoc m/f/d/v 






***fl Career in Photography*** 
Wal-Mart Portrait Studio Manager 

You enjoy people, relate well with children and know how 

to make them smile. Turn your skill Into a career. 

Outstanding management opportunity for Wal-Mart portrait 

photography studio managers and assistant managers. 

PCA operates more than 1700 portrait studios In the U.S. 

and has earned a reputation tor superior customer service 

and technical leadership. Choosing to become a member 

of the PCA Team offers you a partnership with an 

innovative dynamic company, eager to help you develop 

and expand your skills. Paid training program, first year 

earnings to $20,000+, weekly bonus opportunity with paid 

vacation, sick days, medical, denial and life Insurance, 
j salary continuation, long term disability & 401K profit . 
sharing program. Rotating A~d»y and 5-d ay work 

schedule* with •vary other Sunday oltr - Trsas 
■ 
Opportunity for advancement with our rapidly growing 

organization. PCA rewards employee dedication, consistent 

achievement and leadership through a compensation 

package and opportunity for personal career advancement 

wlthtn the organization. 100% of our Regional and District ' 

Managers were promoted from within the Company. 38% - 

of PCA District Managers were promoted within 2 years 

of Joining the company. 

If you are outgoing, enjoy satisfying customers and selling 

In a pleasant and .clean retail studio, take pride in 

presenting a professional business image, are proud of 

your strong work ethic and self-dlsclpllno, like a fast paced 

working environment and the challenge of achieving 

performance goals this could be the career for you. 

No prior photography experience required. 

Call for a personal Interview. 

Call Anytime 24 his. Every Day. 
Toll Free (877) 777-4443 

EOEMttV/H 

*>ooo<>ooooo 



Looking to 

reverse your 

commute to work? 

The new CarMax AuloMoll in Kenosho has 
opportunities for Solos Consutlonls. Hang on for ihe 
ride of your life! CarMax is revolutionizing the way 
people buy cars by listening to whol the customer 
wants. We have 27 stores across the counlry, and have 
rapid expansion plans for the years lo come. What 
makes this tremendous growih possible? Our 
commitment lo providing customer- friendly service, a 
huge selection of vehicles at tow, no-haggle prices, 
and guaranteed quality) If you want to be part of a new, 
revolutionary company that's taking ihe country by 
storm and changing the way Amoricans buy cars, 
please call usl Our Job Line is open Sun, 1 -5pm, or 
Mort-Fri, 9:30am-6pm, El c^^: ====r j -j===== =. ft 

Earning rongoj based on avefogo* 

of auodatei who hova 

boon employed ot least one year. A 

voflddrW* Scon* i» required i»5 \*\ 




220 




Help Warned 
Full-Timc 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



DRIVER 



Full or part-time, cxp. 
preferred but will train. 

Good driving record. 

Works well with people, 

beneftti. 

The Be it Driving School, Inc. 

Graysiakc 

847-223-7338 



LANDSCAPERH 

FULL OR PART TIME 
POSITIONS, 

EXPERIENCE HELPFUL 
BUT NOT NECESSARY. 

LAKE COUNTY AREA. 

CALL TODD 
(047) 740-1492 

1 n*r* 




Banking 
SSIGN-ON BONUS$ 

Pick the right job while working close to home! 

• Proof Operator; Libertyviile: 
Operate NCR-Proof Machine 

« Bookkeeper : Libertyviile 

• Loan Operations/Administrative Assistant: 



Deerfield: Full-time: Work with lenders to prepare 
loan presentations and documents, Microsoft 
Word and familiarity with LazerPro helpful. 

• Loan Opener Lincolnshire: Full-Lime: 
Verify customer loan information and assemble 
loan files. 

Top-notch salaries and generous benefits offered 
while working in a friendly environment. 
Interested candidates may mail or fax resumes to: 

FAX: (847)279-9373 

MAIL: Human Resources Dept. 

1020 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

Deerfield, IL 60015 

EOE M/F/ V/D Smoke-Free Work Environment 



SUBSTITUTE 
DIRECTORY 

The following schools need 

substitutes on a continuing basis, please contact the 

names listed below for farther information. 



JUllol ft. StQV«neon High School District W VL"i 

TV/o Stevenson Drive, Lincolnshire, IL 60069 

Contact: Personnel x-320 (847) 634-4000, 

Aptaitfeic -Tripp School District #102 
1231 Welland Road, Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 ' 

Contact: Laurel Karolczaic (847) 634-5338 

Big Hollow School District #38 
34699 N. Hwy 12, Inglesfde, IL 6oo4l 

Contact: Ms. Buchner (847) 587-6800 

Day School / Nortlibrook 

3210 Dundee Road, Northbrook IL 60062 

Contact: Ede Snyder. (847) 205-0274 

Deerfield School District #109 
517 Deerfield Road, Deerfield, IL 60015 

Contact: Phyllis x-222 (847) 945-1844 

Grass Lake School District #36 
26177 W. Grass Lake Road, Aniioeh, IL 60002 

Contact: Pat Rische or Sue ■. ... i ... (847) 395-1550 

Grayslake School District #46 
450 N. Barron Blvd., Grayslake, IL 60030 

Con/act: Jan Fabry x-1 100 (847) 223-3650 

Hawthorn School District #73 

201 Hawthorn Parkway, Vernon Hills, IL6OO6I 

Contact: Shari Keena (847) 367-3279 

Lake Forest Elementary Schools 

95 W. Deerpath, Lake Forest, IL 60045 

Contact: Karen Allie .............. (847) 604-7423 

Lake Forest High School District #115 
1285"North McKinley Road, Lake Forest, IL 60045 

Contact: Wendy Antrim x-118 (847) 234-3600 

Lake Villa School District #41 
131 McKinley, Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Contact: Kathy (847) 356-2385 

North Chicago Community Unit School Dlst, #187 
2000 Lewis Ave., North Chicago, IL 60064 

Contact: Mona Armstrong. (847) 689-8150 

Northern Suburban Special Education District 
760 Red Oak Lane, Highland Park, IL 60035 

Contact: Bill Charts . . . . (847) 831-5100 

Waukegan Public Schools District #60 
1201 N. Sheridan Road, Waukegan, IL 60085 

Contact: Personnel (847) 360-5404 

Woodland School District #50 

17370 Gages Lake Road, Gages Lake, IL 60030 

Cow/art-Mlchelle (847) 856-3605 

Young at Heart Center 

610 Pelcrson Road, Libertyviile, IL60048 

Contacts or Leslie (847) 367-61 10 






—~ 



I 






I* 






t 
1 

I 



Q 



C12 I Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



March 5, 1999 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanlcd 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Best Inns 
of America 

is looking to fill the 
following positions: 

• Front Desk 
•Night Audit 

llpm-7am Fri & Sat. 

Apply In person or call 

Best Inns 

1809 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

Ubcrtyville 

(847) 816-8006 



WMMWWWMMWM^WWW M WI W WWWWWrtWW 



DO YOU 
LOVE 

ANIMALS? 

Do you hav* 2 hour* par 

WMk to sparo? Aaslal 

Animal Foundation, on* 

of iho area's no-klll 

shatter Is staking 

volunteers for work that 

Is highly rewarding and 

funl Wa need men and 

women who: 

Can work with cats and 

dogs, do light repair 

work, and answer 

phonos and other office 

dullas. 

We are located In 

Crystal Lake. 

For more Information 
call 

(815)459-0990 



Luciano 

Refrigerated 

Transport 

Offers: 

♦ Home Often 

♦ 3 Of per mile to 
company drlvcrs/tcims 
start at 34* 

♦ '97 Volvo Conventional 
with Big Block Engines 

GET MILES... 

BUT GET HOME, TOO! 
We're big enough to pay 

well, but small enough to 

ore about people) 

Call Jim in Chicago 

at 800-637-5154 

or 

Call M.J. In Recruiting 

at 800-753-8165 



PURCHASING CLERK 



CROWING MEDICAL PKC 

CO SEEKING TO FILL A 

FULLTIME POSITION FOR 

A PURCHASING CLERK. 

WEOFFERACOMPETmVE 

SALARY PLUS BONUS, 

FULL MEDICAL BENEFITS 

AND -101 (K). CLEAN, 

NON-SMOKING 

ENVIRONMENT. FOR 

CONSIDERATION PLEASE 

FAX RESUME TO GREG AT 

847/537-8703, 

OR MAIL TO. 

MEDIKMARK,INC 

900 ASBURY DRIVE 

BUFFALO GROVE, 1L 60089 

PLEASE INCLUDE 
SALARY REQUIREMENTS. 

eeaaeeeeeetaeeeee 



v MOTHERS & OTHERS 
Work (rom Homo or Office 
Maikot Pononal Caro 
Products 

Part iimo $500-$ 1500/mo. 
Full-lime t2000-$6000/mo. 
CALL 
fi M7-604-4971 



<»t ■ •»■» ■■• •■'■""•■■' mn *■*» ««»•*• 



! 



! 



r*fNVENTORY" 
J CONTROL 

jjWc iire one oftlie Midwest's 
Noisiest growing importer/ 
{distributors a f office lurnjiuiv 
j Wc have :i position lo tniimigo 
Hour inventory control. In this 
•.newly trcik-il position. \ou 
Swill join our small, fast-pacou" 
JJenvirontncm. 
|We lire looking for a minimum § 

• 2-3 yrs importing experience. ¥ 
JCollege decree preferred. 

* Knowledge or Chinese a plus. J 

|Miim be able to woik wiili nil y 

tlcvcUvln jtkjMUtnwni. arid .-T S - """ 
"liitvc c*et:l\ciu cimumiiiic-.uttiH 1 



« 

V 

V 

V 

» 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 



S300 Million In Assets ! 220 Employees ! 

V$,Q0Q Members ! 

Great Lakes Credit Union Is Mrlnal 

We are currently accepling applications for a variety ol 
positions such as: 

• Tellers 

• Financial Service Representatives 

• ATM Representatives 

• Visa Representatives 

• Collectors 

• RTC Represenlalives 

• Call Center Representatives 
* * Accountants 

In Return We Offer: 



' 40 IK with matching 

■ Paid Vacations 

' Casual Dross 

' Monthly Incentives 

• Credit Union Membership 



Training 

Paid Holiday Timo 

Medea I/Dental/Vis ion Coverage 

Tuition Reimbursement 

Recognition/Awards 



To apply mail/fax/e-mail resume indicating position ol interest to: 

Attention Stalling 
Great Lakes Credit Union 
2525 Green Bay Road 
Norlh Chicago, IL 60064 
Fax: 847-887-8798 
E-mail: j enc@olcu.orQ 

For more information call our Job Hotline at 847-578-89091 

EOE 



"*■■; 

it. { 



Engineering 

FblirH Inrhnlrta, the trilling nunufic 
lurrr of it crtillnnit rttiklrt, h trHing 
to fit) mrnl try mftinre rinfl potiliortt. 

Strilor Ciil doipwr-Crrjtn tomptilf t 
modth oljitifnfdwiltrcnri cornpo- 
nrnK Prrpjrn dalprt, Umut, itw 
drjHWgt >< cording to rnywiin* t|*< 
inuDom.Two.ffjr ilftrt* h mttnint- 
nt drifting. froTitictil in Pro-E, phn 5-7 
yrin prnrtow riptrimct. 

Ootkipmcnl tnglnm-rnpomSile for 
dnrtoping ind specifying (Ml pnxe- 
dum and equipment la conduct tunc. 
lion ind duribdilr Inti on prrvaul 
walrrcrcfr. IS In mtctunlcil roginftT- 
bg, ind 5-7 ytin nccrVncc. 
[kclrktl project craineti-drilpi, 
updilf, ind IrouMewwol it) vnlmrafl 
mtlnrnk tyttfim. tleclrkit engineer- 
ing degree plot J-S jwrt npedrncr. 
Inlrmled ind qualified cindidiltt 
thoutdiend nwnt Ice 

Olftd Doud 

foljril Intkntlitt 

I900llwr7l 

Spirit Ulf , Iowa SOW tot. 

t,*m***ma ******* »«»■«»»*■ *+**ton**t*m w»* W n 



Social Service 
Full Time 

Coordinator needed for leen 
Court Program. RcfrcMsihllitie* 
include: 

• Case m.in.igcmonl fur 
, .idolesccnt program 

participants 

• Work wllh law' enforce- 
ment agencies throughout 
I he county 

• Facilitate educational 

(Us*!* 
Keijtiirements: 

• 1-2 years working 
willi adolescenl5 

• Some Saturdays and 
evening hours 
necessary 

• UxiH'riencc in adolescent 
substance abuse or social 
work preferred. 

• Bilingual | Spanish) a plus 
Stibmil resumes to: 

NICASAc/oJ.rawt 

31979 N. Fish Lake Road 

Round Lake, IL 60073 EOE 



j .skills. 

H Wc offer a coiJipelliive salary, 
He\eellenr heuefii pkg inelud- 
Jiiig medical, 401 K. tuition 



rciini'munYeuttim ¥; 

¥ 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 



mail 



presume wiili .salary reipiia'- 
llineiits lo: 

2 Comfortago Industries ¥ 
880 Lakeside Dr. 

Suite 3 
Gurnce.IL 60031 
Attn: Mary J;uie or ¥ 

5 fa\ to: K47-S55-0877 



Automolive 

BEGIN AN EXCITING 

CAREER IN THE 

FASTEST GROWING 

FIELD OF THE 

AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY! 

We will train you to earn 

52,000.00 to (S3.O0O.OO plus 

PER MONTH 

and 

PAY YOU.. 

While You Learn to become a 

complete and competent 
AUTOMOTIVETECHNICIANI 

SUPERIOR SOUND, INC., 

IS THE MIDWEST'S LARGEST 

AUTOMOTIVE AFTERMARKET 

ACCESSORIES DISTRIBUTOR, 

AND WE'RE STILL 

GROWING. 

Wa aie currently seeking sell- 
motivated individuals who want 
to become pari ol one ol the 
lastesl growing fields In the 
automolive Industry. LEARN 
MOBILE VIDEO. REMOTE 
START SYSTEMS, AUTOMO- 
TIVE SECURITY, AND MUCH 
MUCH MOREI 

We NOW have openings at our 
Schaumburg, Norlhbrook, 
Mundelein, Crystal Lake, and 
Elmhurst locations. 

Must have reliable transporta- 
tion and a valid driver's license. 
We offer excellent earnings, a 
comprehensive insurance pack' 
age, profit sharing, 40 IK, paid 
vacation and free uniforms. 

Take advantage ol those poten- 
tial career yielding opportuni- 
ties by calling: 1-B8B-777-0371. 

SUPERIOR SOUND, INC. 
630-279-1600 
Fax: 708-633-0037 
• EOE 




-V^ v >V%V'\i^ 



OPEN HOUSE 



Coma for on-the-spot Interviews, Don't miss this opportunity to walk 
away with a new position at Quill. 

DATE: Tuesday March 9th & 
Wednesday March 10th 

TIME: 9am - 7pm (walk In until 7pm) 

PLACE: Quill Corporation 

1 00 Schelter Rd„ Lincolnshire, IL 60069 

(2 blocks west from corner of RIs 22 & 21) 

SEEKING: Customer Service Reps 
Data Entry Reps & 
Inside Sales/Development 

Come to our Open House and get ready for an eye-opening 
experience. Here's just a peek at what we begin lo offer 

• Competitive salary, commission structure (sales only) 

• Employee stock purchase plan & 401 K 

• Paid training 

• 2 week vacatlonryear 

• Advancement opportunities 

• Insurance benefits (medical/dental/life) 

If unable to attend, fax resumes to: 
(847) 634-5820 attn: KB/0PHSE. 
We are an EOE m/l/d/v. 




® 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



DRIVERA VANJ-LOCAL 

We transport 

train-crews safely. 

Minimum age 23 yrs. 

$7.00/start 
Call 1-800-597-1678 



Medical Receptionist 
Full Time and Part Time 
Opportunities 
' Dccrpalh Medical Associates, a 
I mulli-specJally physicians 
I Group, Is now hiring part lime 
i and full lime Medical 
| Receptionists. The chosen can- 
, dldates Mill be responsible for 
answering phones, registering 
pallenls, scheduling appolnt- 
1 ments, anJ upkeep of records. 
■ Our Ideal candidate wll have 
1 exceptional communication, 
I customer service, and detailed 
i oriented skills and have previ- 
ous medical office experience. 
i Your dedication and hard work 
I will be rewarded with competi- 
tive compensation. For confi- 
dential consideration send/fax 
resume lo 71 Waukegan Rd. Ste. 
900, Lake Bluff, IL 60044/ 
faw«J47) 295-1 S17. EOE. 



Plumbers 
Licensed 

Montana/lmmcd 

openings. Needed (or large 

residential & commercial 

plumbing contractor 

located In 
"Big Sky Country" 
Bozomon, MT. 
A community of 30,000 
offers: great quality of life, 
exc school systems, 
affordable housing, low 
crime, tremendous hunt- 
ing, fishing, & outdoor 
activities. Must possess 
ability to bo a leader & 
willing to work throughout 

MT.Top wages, profit 

sharing, 401k, Insurance, 

5 day wrk wk. 

Contact 

Williams Plbg. & Htg 

Box 10 

Bozcman, MT 59771 

or call Kurt Smith 

406-5B7-0969. 
Fox 406-585-9458 



FULLTIME 
TEACHER 



Wainift ti© wsurfe 



Join our caring 

team at a private 

preschool/day care 

In LIbertyvllle. 

Call for 

qualifications. 

Will train. 

(847)367-6110 



Drivers 

Company Drivers 

wanted. Immed 

openings. 300 mile 

radius, home 

on wknds & 

during the wk. 

Flatbed exp helpful, 

but will train the 

right people. 

Class CDL a must. 

800-611-3763 



y~ ... 



Start a Home-Based Business. 

Work Flexible Hours. 

Enjoy Unlimited Earnings. 

AVON 

Call Toll Free (800) 735-8867 



CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE 

Arc you looking for a rewarding and 
satisfying career in customer service? Uline 
Shipping Supplies is a fast growing business to 
business mail order company. 
We are seeking team players who can type 35 
wpm, have great communication skills, and love 
helping customers over the phone. 

We offer a starting wage of $13 per hour, 
competitive benefits and exceptional bonus 
opportunities. Full-time Hours: Monday - Friday, 

TO a.m. - G: 30 p.m. 

Please send your resume lo: 

Uline, Inc. 

Attn: Recruiter 

2200 S. Lakeside Drive 

Waukegan, IL 60085 

k Fax:888-847.0354 



1 



If 



POLICE OFFICER 

The Fire and Police-Commission of the Village of Lindenhurst 

announces an examination for the position of Patrol Officer. 

Saturday, April 10th, 1999 10:00am 

Applicants must be a high school graduate or equivalent 

and will be required to pass physical agility, 

swimming, written, oral, psychological, background, 

medical and drug test. 

Salary range as of May 1998 $32,200 - $43,600 (merit based) 

Registration forms may be picked up and returned to the 

Police Station no later than Thursday, April 1st, 1999 - 10pm 

Lindenhurst Police Department 

Attn.: Commander Miller 

2301 E. Sand Lake Rd. 

Lindenhurst, IL 60046 

PH: 847-356-5488 

EOE/ADA Employer 



ACCOUNTING 
MANAGER 

Lakeland Newspapers has an opening for an Accounting 
Manager, Responsibilities include all phases of accounts 
payable, accounts receivable, payroll and taxes. You would 
reconcile all bank statements and prepare monthly P&L 
statements. The accounting department has 5 members, so 
leadership skills are important. Excellent benefit package, 
salary based on experience. Send resume and cover letter 
with salary history to Bill Schroeder at: 

P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

No faxes or phone calls please 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 



March 5,1999 



OPINIONS 



Lakeland Newspapers I C3 



PARTY LINES 



PARTY LINES, THE LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS' COLUMN OF POLITICAL OPINION 

IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS. 



Grand Marshal 

g new 





■ j 




for us geezers 




Venita McConnel, grand 
dame of west Lake County 
politics, went out in style 
as president of the 8th 
Congressional Dist Republican 
Club, winning a standing ovation 
from members and a new title, Field 
Marshal. 

McConnel, 70, former village 
clerk ofWauconda who once cam- 
paigned for Lake County clerk, 
turned over her gavel to Bob Neal 
of Wadsworth at a dinner at Con- 
corde Banquets, Kildeer, before the 
biggest turnout in the club's history. 

The no-holds-barred Republican 
partisan with a ready wit Is moving to 
Mt Carroll in northwestern Illinois 
where her husband John will be able 
to fish and farm, and she can pursue 
her love of politics in a new arena, 
Venita said one of her goals will be re- 
tiring liberal Democrat Congressman 
Lane Evans. If you knowVenita, you 
know she's not kidding. 

The Field Marshal title was be- 
stowed by County Clerk WUlard 
Helander who presented Mc- 
Connel with a four star military hel- 
met and a Patton-style riding crop 
before reading "Ode to the Mc- 
Connel Brigade." Helander attrib- 
utes her hard-fought victory over 
Linda Hess last November to the 
campaign strategy orchestrated by 
McConnel. 

Venita stationed herself at the 
exit door to shake hands with each' ' 
of the 190 guests. GOP activists were 
l happy and sad at the same time, 
happy for Venita's new chapter and 
sad to see a powerhouse personality 
bow out of Lake County politics. 

Mueller favored 

. Mike Mueller of Antioch, can- 
didate in the April 13 election for a , 
• Lake County seat on the Fox Water- 
way Agency board of directors, has a 
Who's Who of county politics en- 




Dam: Backs Mueller 
for waterway board 




Neal: Leading the 8th 
Dist. Republican Club 






■ -' * 

' - it" 

. • - - 8 . 



h f 



Bean: h las good vibes 
over referendum 



dorsinghim. His backers include 
Dr. William C. Dam of Fox Lake, 
the agency chairman, who Is serving 
as Mueller's campaign chairman. 
Mueller is rated a strong favorite 
over Roy Gundelach of Ingieside. 
There are three candidates running 
for the two McHenry County seats 
up for election. 

New chief 

Jim Thacker has taken over as 
chief of staff for Congressman Phil 
Crane (R-8th), replacing Kurt John- 
son, who left politics for the private 
sector. Thacker is rated an astute po- 
litical tactitf on. He guided AlSalvi to 
an upset victory in the Republican 
nomination for U.S. Senate in 1996. 
Thacker previously served as chief of 
staff for Congressman Don Manznl- 
lo, a Republican representing a 
northern tie of Illinois counties along 
the Wisconsin stateline. 

Less anger 

Joe Bean, president of the em- 
battled Cook Memorial Library Dis- 
trict, says he has good vibes over the 
Impending referendum on rebuild- 
ing in downtown Libertyville. "A lot 
of the anger and emotion involved 
in our previous referendum is gone. 
People like the plan to maintain the 
main library In Libertyville" Voters 
slapped down a previous proposi- 
tion to build a larger library In the 

Speed trap 

i Fox Lake TYustee Alan R. 
Prouty is making hews this week 
but not for being the youngest 
trustees on a village board. 

Prouty, 18, was arrested on 
charges of speeding, disobeying a 
stop sign and disobeying a Lake 
Villa police officer after police 
stopped his car on Monaviile Road 
Feb. 24. 



I wasn't looking for a role model, 
Andy Rooney just popped up 
on the tube saying things that 
fit the way I feel. 

In our younger days my four 
brothers and I had to look no further 
than our father. As brother Earl says, 
"He was a great man. He never 
swore, he never complained. Til 
never be as good a man as he was." 

Earl came close enough; he also 
became a fine father to five boys, 
passing along the values be- 
queathed by our dad. 

• Young people need role models 
but grown-ups don't, do they? If so, 
that person certainly should be an el- 
der, so I could choose Paul Newman 
— except we look too much alike. 
People would think we were twins. 

No, the guy I want to be like 
when I grow up some more is Andy 
Rooney, the "60 Minutes" television 
humorist I always enjoy his Sunday 
evening commentaries but what 
sold me was his recent interview on 
"Larry King Live." 

Rooney, who Is 80, still writes 
two newspaper columns a week In 
addition to his amusingTVskiL 

When Larry King asked his age, 
Rooney griped: "I'm 80 years old and 
I just hate it I think of it nine times 
an hour. 

"I am loving my life so much 
and I am approaching the end of it 
This is a constant negative thought 
in my mind." 

Larry*. "Ill bet 20 years ago if 
someone said you'd make it to 80, 
you'd have said, 'I'll take it!' " 

Andy. "I used to think about 83, 

^ tt L^ t W^nVw^rtol5 J ^^ 

Andy: "I absolutely do not want 
to go. Something has to be done 
about that, Lany." \ 

These were some of Andy's other 
remarks in the interview: 

"President Clinton says his rela- 
tionship with Monica Lewinsky is a 
private matter between him, his 
family and their God. But I doubt if 
God wants any part of that mess." 

"Clinton is like Mike Tyson. He's 
good at what he does but terrible at 




THE 

PFARR 

CORNER 

Jerry Pfarr 



what he is." 

"Hillary Clinton won't run for 
the Senate from New York. Too many 
things would come ouLThe White- 
water problems would emerge, and 
there's the carpetbagger thing (a 
nonresident or new resident who 
meddles in politics). She won't run. I 
don't know why they're going 
through this charade." 

Andy says he took the "60 Min- 
utes" gig because he felt he could- 
write about anything; but he said 
ideas don't come like in cartoons, 
with a light bulb appearing over 
someone's head. "You sit down at a 
typewriter and decide to damn well 
have an idea." 

King called him an American 
treasure and a world-class curmud- 
geon. Rooney agreed with the latter 
label. In fact, a reference book, "The 
Portable Curmudgeon" by Jon 
WInokur, includes him along with 
such cranky old cusses as Robert 
Benchley, William Buckley, W.C. 
Fields, Groucho Marx, Mike Royko 
andMarkTwain. ARooney-ism 
from the book: "The average dog is a 
nicer person than the average per- 
son." 

. "Will you someday retire?" Lany 

writers retire." 

Larry: "Yeah, right Retire to 
what?" 



Letters welcome 

Letters to the editor are welcome. They 

should be on topics of general Interest, 

approximately 250 words or less. All 

letters must be signed, and contain a 

home address and telephone number. 

The editor reserves the right to 

condense all letters. 



Voters have a voice on development projects 



It has been almost a year ago 
.when I wrote here that the "re- 
making of Gumee" should be 
troubling concern for commu- 
nities throughout Lake County. I 
quoted Mayor Richard Welton, who 
at the time said that residential de- 
velopment was at a "critical mass" 
because there wasn't much more 
room for it, but there was "much 
more to look forward on commer- 
cial development." 

That column was written at the 
behest of an Antioch woman who 



has fears that her beloved commu- 
nity would become, in her words, 
"another Gumee." This time I am 
writing at the request of a long-time 
Gumee couple who said, "What you 
wrote bears some repeating because 
they're still at iL" 

From all that I am hearing, 
many citizens of Gumee aren't look- 
ing forward to Mayor Welton's nev- 
er-ending development crusade. 
The CURV group (Citizens United 
for a Residential Village) have filed 
• for an advisory vote in the April 13 




SEEING 

IT 

THROUGH 

JohnS.Matijevich 



LETTERS 



the 3,300 people who voted no, we 
apologize for failing to get the "true" 
message across to you. 

To the winner, Jack Martin and 
Pat Connors, for you and a very few 
people who benefit by over-devel- 
opment, you were willing to spend 
the money, and, I suspect, a great 
deal of money, to make those 5,400 
telephone calls over the weekend, 
and deserve some grudging credit. 

To Libertyville Township, the 
Open Space team offers our apol- 
ogy for allowing Jack Martin and 
Pat Connors to win the day on an 
issue no one should have op- 
posed, if the public were really 



given the true facts. 

However, we must all keep in 
mind "Good or bad, the public al- 
ways deserves the government it 
gets," by who they vote for or 
against. The real sad part of this sto- 
ry, only 23 percent of the public 
bothered to vote on this issue that 
can spell the death knell for all the 
remaining Open Space in Liber- 
tyville township. Nearly all com- 
plain about what's wrong, but only 
one in four botherto vote. What's 
wrong with this picture? 

F.T. 'Mike' Graham 
•Libertyville 



election on the $400 million Six 
Flags Entertainment Village. That's 
not the kind of "village" the citizens 
want in their community. 

Comments from Welton seem to 
indicate that "his side" will stick with 
their approval of the major project, 
no matter what the April vote. Some 
residents have told me, though, that 
they see a change in the mayor's 
usual "coolness" at public hearings 
and board meetings, so that it may 
be that "people pressure" is getting 

to htm. 

Gumee citizens aren't the only 
county people standing up to be 
heard against what they call "over- 
development" in their communities. 
Citizens in both Hawthorn Woods 
and North Barrington have filed for 
referendums to withhold their vil- 
lages from approving a massive 
shopping mall until the voters are 
heard from. 

Until recently, most of the "heat" 
against "over-development" and "ur- 
ban sprawl" has been directed at the 



county board. But, now the citizens 
are waking up to the fact that it is 
happening right in their "own back 
yards" in Incorporated areas or on 
neighboring sites where developers 
are looking to annex to their villages. 

Whenever large-scale develop- 
ers throw their pitch to invade your 
community, they throw loosely 
words like "progress" and "enhanc- 
ing property values," and "bringing ' 
extra taxes" which somehow, but 
never happens, reduces yours. Sure, 
all of the sales taxes that a mega- 
project brings in may reduce your 
village or municipality tax, but when 
you look at your tax bill, that's not 
the taxing body digging into your 
"deep pockets." 

Although Mayor Welton maybe 
at the "top of the list" when it comes 
to being "hell-bent for develop- 
ment" now that "Bull-dozer Bob" 
Depke has escaped the political 
landscape, it is almost an occupa- 
tional hazard for mayors and mu- 
nicipal policy-makers to heed the 
wishes of the large-scale developers. 
That leaning can shift when more 
citizens take the "bull by the horns" 
and insist that they have a greater 
"say-so" on what goes on in their 
communities.. 

Since the developers like to 
throw words around to promote 
their mega-projects, I don't believe 
that citizens can come up with any- 



thing better than their own interpre- 
tation of "quality of life." After all, 
that is why families choose to live in 
certain communities. They don't 
want congestion and they don't ] 
want our precious open spaces cov- 
ered with concrete and asphalt 

I have said for some time that 
this mad rush for every community 
to compete to see which can out- 
build the other will stop only when 
politicians will decide that "it's good 
politics" to bring some balance to 
the building frenzy. What do you 
know? They are "getting the mes- 
sage." In the state legislature, there is 
aTask Force on Urban Sprawl. 
Across the country, lawmakers are 
hearing from their constituents to 
do something about "runaway 
growth." 

So, citizens In communities like 
Gumee must take the lead, so that 
their leaders can follow them. I dont 
know how the citizens will vote in 
the April election, but I do know that 
it is difficult for elected policy-mak- 
ers to enact that which is contrary to 
the will of the people. 

They always say that nothing is 
as strong as an idea whose time has 
come. I believe that citizens all over 
Lake County are gaining strength in 
the idea that curbing over-develop- 
ment is an "idea whose time has 
come." Catch up to that idea, politi- 
cians, or "your time will come." 



/ Lakeland Newspapers 



AT A GLANCE 



. .March 5, 1999 



AT A GLANCE 



< \ i 



A DIGEST OF STORIES MAKING HEADLINES THROUGHOUT OUR REGION 



.;. 



Co-founder of Lambs Farm dies 

UbertyviLle— Bob Terese, co-founder of Lambs Farm, 
died Feb. 21 at the age of 74 . 

Terese suffered from various ailments including heart 
problems and diabetes, until he asked to be taken off of life 
support. 

A memorial service will be held March 5 at 1 1 a.m. at Llb- 
ertyville Covenant Church. Following the service will be an 
open house at the Lambs Farm restaurant from 12 to 3 p.m. . 

Terese, an Elgin resident, was semi-retired, but stayed ac- 
tive with Lambs Farm until a week prior to his death, Flood 
said. 

He is survived by his wife Mary Ruth, son Michael, daugh- 
ter Carol Korytko and five grandchildren. 

Memorials maybe sent to the Lambs Farm Founders 
Fund, P.O. Box 520, Libertyville, IL 60048. 

Police involved in lengthy standoff 

Vernon Hills— A man was arrested following a lengthy 
standoff with police. 

James S. Mc Namee, 46, of the 600 block of Westmoreland, 
was arrested and charged with unlawful use of a weapon and 
aggravated assault for the March 1 through 2 incident. 

At approximately 4:23 p.m. on March 1 Vernon Hills Po- 
lice responded to the call after Mc Namee had pointed a gun 
at his neighbors. 

As police arrived Mc Namee retreated, alone, into his resi- 
dence. 

The standoff until police used an approximately 3 a.m. on 
March 2, after negotiations had failed, police threw a canister 
of OC, an inflammatory agent, through an exterior window of 
Mc Namee's residence prompting him to surrender. 

Nobody was hurt in the incident. 

Historians learn of barns' beauty 

Antloch— Members of the Lakes Region Historical Soci- 
ety met Thursday, Feb. 25 to stop, look, and listen to the histo- 
ry and future fate of Lake County barns. 

Nancy Burgess, of theSave-a-Barn Foundation, presented 
a selection of slides to document county barns of all shapes, 
sizes, and styles. More than 100 barns will eventually appear 
in a book about Lake County bams that she has completed. 
She is trying to raise money to help her publish the four-color, 
hard cover book. 

Burgess makes her presentations to educate and interest 
people about county barn history. She seeks financial sup- 

^sfiIrts?pb u sTca?^ 



The foundation was created to save Lake County barns. 
She said that if people do not help save them, they will be de- 
stroyed. 

The Save-A-Barn hotline is 847-913-9464. There is also a 
web site (www.nsn.org/eakhome/savebarn). 

Debevic retirement gathers friends 

Lake Villa— Village residents, friends, colleagues, and 
police officers gathered at the Lake Villa Veterans of Foreign 
Wars Post on Thursday evening, Feb. 25 to honor retiring 
Chief of Police John Debevic. 

Village officials presented Debevic with a gold retirement 
badge in recognition of his years of service at the village board 
meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 24. At the Thursday retire- 
ment party, people spoke briefly of their association with De- 
bevic and gave him additional gifts, some of which were per- 
sonal. He was given police memorabilia, a photograph of de- 
partment officers, numerous boxes of cigars, several gift cer- 
tificates, clothing items, and equipment to help him catch 
fish. 

Debevic spoke briefly. "All 1 can say is 'thanks everybody. 
"It's been a pleasure working here." 

Housing development proposed 

Mundeletn— The Mundelein Village Board voted Monday 
night to draft an ordinance in regards to a proposed senior 
citizen housing development. 

Ashbrook Senior Housing Community, being proposed by 
Peter Feurich of 2000 Millennium Corporation, would be lo- 
cated on Midlothian Road near Cambridge Country Homes. 
The housing community would consist of 60 condominium 
units and 90 assisted-living units. According to current plans, 
there will be 20 units per acre, within the five three-story 




Able-Minded 

12-year-old Veronica Mosansky of Fox Lake attempts 
to paint a picture without using her hands by using 
her mouth to hold the paintbrush, during a disability 
challenge at St. Bede's Church in Ingleside Satur- 
day. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 



buildings. 

Many residents attended the Mondav nichLmeetintUn ex^„, 
nmrettscq traffic and noise from the devel- 



opment. The village board said it will work on addressing those 
concerns. 

Board supports state funding plan 

Gurnee— At Woodland School District's Feb. 25 board 
meeting, board members expressed their support for house 
bills 559 and 230, which would help relieve the district of any fi- 
nancial burden from the Prairie Crossing Charter School. 

Despite the school board's denial of the charter school, it 
was approved in December by the Illinois State Board of Edu- 
cation. As a result, Woodland district will have to pay the per 
capita amount for each student, which is currently $5,300, to 
the charter school. The charter school is hoping for a minimum 
of 190 students from Woodland School District to attend the 
school, which would result in the district paying approximately 
SI million for students who would not attend Woodland 
schools. 

House bill 559 would relieve public schools of the financial 
burden of charter schools. Whoever granted the charter, in this 
case the Illinois State Board of Education, would be responsible 
for financing the charter school. 

Island Lake man faces jail 

Wauconda— Damian K. Jackson of Island Lake plead 
guilty last week to the charge of aggravated driving under the 
influence, in an accident which severely injured his friend. 

Jackson, 23, agreed to the plea on Feb. 23 before Lake 
County Circuit Judge Raymond McKoski, in exchange for a sen- 
tence not likely to include a prison term. Jackson will be sen- 
tenced on March 31. 

Jackson was the driver of a 1997 Chevy Z28, owned by his 
friend, Joshua D. Niggemarin, 22, which crashed into the back 
end of a semi-trailer truck, at 11:30 p.m. Sept. 30, on north- 
bound Route 1 2, just north of Cook Street. Niggemann suffered 
major head, chest and leg injuries, and remains unable to walk. 



World Day of Prayer 

Ingleside— A group of women from churches in Ingle- 
side and Round Like are gathering Friday for a benefit to help 
less fortunate women in Venezuela. Friday, March 5, is World 
Day of Prayer, a celebration started In 1887 by Presbyterian 
laywoman Mary Ellen James, and sponsored by the United 
States by Church Women United since 1941. 

World Day of Prayer brings together women of various 
races, cultures and Christian traditions In Informed prayer 
and prayerful action. This year's service, "Gods Tender 
Touch," is a play, written by Christian women of Venezuela, 
and celebrates the gift of God's love. 

St. Bede Women's Club is sponsoring this year's service, 
at St. Bede Catholic Church, at the comers of Wilson Road 
and Route 59, beginning at 1 p.m. March 5. There is no ad- 
mission, however a collection plate will be passed. • 

Village approves water tower 

Fox Lake— Officials approved a bid to build an 130-foot 
elevated water storage tank on Ernest Avenue, at The Art- 
Works building, 23 South Street, at a cost of $688,100. 

The bid was approved at the board's March 1 meeting. A 
contract with CB&I Constructors Inc., of Chicago is expected 
to be approved at the board's March 8 meeting. 

The new tank will hold 250,000 gallons of water, quadru- 
pling the old 120-foot, 60,000 tank in the same location. That 

• tank will be taken down after the new tank Is completed in 
late October. Fox Lake has a 150-foot, 500,000 gallon tank be- 
hind its village hall. 

Townhome project approved 

Wauconda— Village trustees approved rezonirigand pre- 
liminary plat ordinances for Sunset Ridge Townhomes by a 4- 
l vote, at the March 2 board meeting. 

The project will involve the construction of 90 townhome 
units in 15 buildings on two adjacent parcels, totaling 11.61 
acres, at the northwest corner of Route 176 and Hill St. The 
land was rezoned from R-3, single family to a maximum of 
duplex, to R-5, multi-family. 

Sunset Ridge will be developed by C & H Development 
Company, of Arlington Heights, which intends to break 
ground in June, and complete the project in 25 months. 

Girl attacked by dog 

Round Lake Beach— A 5-year old Round Lake Beach 

girl was attacked by a stray dog on March 1. 

She was transported to Condell Medical Center and 
treated for bites to her head and face. The girl was later re- 
leased. 

• Round Lake Beach police officers had separated the stray 
from another dog earlier in the day, but were unable to ap- 
prehend it. 

The stray returned to the area at approximately 1 p.m. 
and attacked the girl when she attempted to pet it, 

Lake County Chief Animal Warden Len Hackl said the 
dog is a male lab and shepherd mix with a red collar , but no • 

• tags. 

At this point -animal control as well community service 
officers are going door to door in hopes of locating the owner 
of the dog, said Hackl. 

Building inspector change proposed 

Wadsworth— The Wadsworth Village Board of Trustees 
Tuesday night tabled two proposed ordinances which would 
change the building inspector services and raise building per- 
mit fees. 

The proposal would change the building inspection ser- 
vices from "in-house" Wadsworth based inspectors to that of 
Independent Inspections Ltd., a Wisconsin-based inspection 
firm. 

The village hall was crowded with residents who voiced 
opposition to the plan and concerns about the response time 
and fees of the new firm. 

Trustee Evelyn Hoselton said local builders will lose a per- 
sonal touch they receive in dealing with the Wadsworth- 
based inspectors. 

Trustee RonTrahan said he would like to table the motion 
until an inspector from Independent Inspections Ltd. is avail- 
able to answer any questions the board or the public may 
have. 



STAY TUNED 

Pick up any of Lakeland Newspapers 1 1 editions in coming weeks for: 



FOUR LEAF 
CLOVER 

A look at St. Patrick's Day . 

and the local celebrations In 

store 

— Lakelife 





AFFORDABLE HOUSING 

Lake' County's quest to answer the call 
— County 




HOME SHOWCASE 

Look for the.speclal section 

previewing the LMV Chamber 

. of Commerce' Home. 

Improvement Show 




MINDING 
YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 

Don Taylor 



Five Elements 
ofH.A.P.P.Y. 
Customer Service 

Service Is a critical clement of 
success in a service economy. 
For all businesses, of all sizes 
quality service Is a must. 
However, today's customer Is 
a tough and unforgiving judge. The 
customer demands better care and 
we must deliver better service to 
survive. Here are some thoughts to 
guide you on your quality Improve- 
ment journey* 

HJLP.P.Y.Care 

•Hassle free. I define hassle- 
free service as "quick, convenient 
and complete." 

Several weeks ago I rented a 
car from a local company. As I ap- 
proached the desk, three young 
men were in sight. (Two on the 
phone and one behind a cubicle 
wall apparently doing paper work.) 

After a brief wait, one of the 
men on the phone cupped his 
hand over the receiver and shouted 
across the room to tell the one hot 
on the phone to "get the guy at the 
counter." A few seconds later I was 
"got" 

They had rented all of the car 
model I'd reserved, so I accepted 
the minivan offered at the same 
price. Then the real wait began. I 
had to wait several minutes while 
the backseats were replaced. Then 
I waited 10 more minutes while 
they added gas to the tank. When I 
checked the gauge there was a ' 
quarter tank of gas. I commented , 
on this and the rental clerk replied, 
"No problem, just bring it back 
with the same amount." Quality 
service Is simple: Have the car re- 
served, eliminate the wait and fill 
the tank so the renter doesn't have 
to add gas twice. 

My rental car experience was 
neither quick, convenient nor com- 
plete. My advice for the company 
who picks you up: Try harder. 

• Always Improving, One 
thing I've noticed about companies 
who give great service is that they " 
never give it a rest. Today's great 
service is never good enough. 
Their long-term goal is perfection. 
Their short-term goal is excellence. 

To improve your service you 
must measure how you're doing. 
Then you must find ways to please 
the customer even more. Look 
outside your own company for im- 
provement ideas. Adapt good con- 
cepts and raise the standard. 

• People centered. The key 
to great service is great people. 
Quality service can only come from 
people who are trained carefully 
and love to serve. 

My advice is to hire C.U.T.E 
people. The "C" stands for caring 
and friendly, the "U" for untiring, 
the "T" for truthful and the "E" for 
enthusiastic. 

• Promise keepers. Keeping 
your promises is not the ultimate 
goal of a company focused on im- 
proving its' customer service. Be- 
ing a promise keeper is the founda- 
tion of great customer service. It is 
a minimum base to build on. 

For example, if you repair au- 
tomobiles and promise to have a 
customer's car ready by 5 p.m., you 
haven't given you great service if 
you finish the car at 5 p.m. Build 
on that foundation by vacuuming 
the carpets, cleaning the windows, 
or picking the customer up at work, 
etc. 

•Yearly assessment Great 
service companies give themselves 
regular checkups. They ask tough 
questions. I've included a few 

- PleaseTMLOR/CG 




March 5, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers C5 



Grayslake interior designer loves her job 



By LESLIE P10TR0WSKI 
Staff Reporter 



It takes a sharp eye to know just 
what a room needs to come to life. 
Barbara Bertler, owner of Window & 
Wall Concepts in Grayslake, has that 
skill and many others. 

After earning a degree In design 
from the University of Wisconsin in 
1982, she worked for a drapery and 
blind manufacturer in California, 
then moved back to her home town, 
Chicago, to become a designer for 
Bloomingdale's. 

But working for someone else 
was not her calling. In 1989, Bertler 
opened Window & Wall Concepts on 
Route 83 in Grayslake. 

"I basically felt I had the know 
how and confidence to start my own 
business," she said. 

At the time, her store was only 
500 square feet and she worked 
alone. Today the business, that has 
moved to 827 E. Center Street, is 
2,000-square-feet and has grown to 
maintain one part-time and two full- 
time employees. 

Enter Bertler's showroom and 
you feel right at home. On display are 
the latest styles in custom draperies, 
top treatments, blinds, wall coverings 
and coordinating room accessories. 

"We do all kinds of custom drap- 
ery, pillows, reupholstery, slip cov- 
ers, and blinds," said Bertler. 

Proper window treatments coor- 
dinated with wall coverings can be- 
come the most effective elements in 
, a room's decor, said Bertler. She reg- 
ularly- works with customorc who 

want to give a new look to an existing 
room as well as with new homeown- 
ers who are starling from scratch. 

Bertler is proud that many of her 
customers return for more business 
and refer her to other clients. 

"We have a loyal clientele in part 
due to our service," said Bertler. "In- 
stead of just selling a product, we treat 
people as family." 

She has worked with clients as far 
north as the Wisconsin border and as 
far south as Homewood. Many 




Designer Traecy Thomas, right, and Barbara Bertler, designer/owner of Window & Wall Concepts in 
Grayslake, look at the latest fabric collections from Waverley wallcoverings. Bertler is celebrating 
her 10th year In business as an interior designer in Grayslake. — Photo by Lynn Gunnarson 
Dahlstrom 



homes in Grayslake's new subdivi- 
sions reflect her decorating skills. 

Bertler has also designed the in- 
teriors of a variety of local business- 

-oo r in«UuUn & r.ilardi!s Restaurant in i 
Half Day, the Grayslake Chamber or-pj 

Commerce, the Northside Commu- 
nity Bank in Gurnee, and several 
Burger Kings in Lake County. 

In February, the store celebrated 
its 10th anniversary. Now Bertler is 
making plans for the next decade. 
She is looking into the possibility of 
manufacturing draperies to offer 
c>. .jmers « quicker turn-around 
and is considering moving her busi- 
ness into a house to showcase her 
products in a comfortable home en- 



vironment. 

She loves her job. 

"I enjoy meetingnew people and 



being able to create a warm cus- 
tomized environment for them to 
Uve-in," Bertler said. 



CLC Foundation Board 
Member Legat mourned 



"She was a person who made 
things happen," said Dr. Gretchen 
Naff, president of the College of Lake 
County. 

Naff was among many hundreds 
of Lake County residents who at- 
tended funeral services for Joan Ar- 
lene Legat, 62, of Waukegan, Feb. 27. 

Legat had served as a board 
member of the College of Lake 
County Foundation since 1988. 

"loan was an extraordinary per- 
son who gave a lot of herself to make 
a better world for others,' Naff said. 
"She was a woman of character who 
served as a role model for all of us." 

Legat passed away Monday, Feb. 
22 at St. Mary's Hospital in 
Rochester, MN. She was bom Dec. 7, 
1936 in Elgin, III. and resided in 
Waukegan most of her life. 

She was the executive secretary 
at Legat Architects, owned by her 
husband, Joe Legat. 

In addition to serving on the Col- 
lege of Lake County Foundation 
Board, Joan was an active member of 
the First United Methodist Churcji of 
Waukegan, President of Senior Ser- 
vices Waukegan Emblem Club, 
member of the Women's Golf Asso- 
ciation of Glen Flora Country Club, 
Foundation Board Member of 
SEDOL, member of the Friends of 
Victory Board and a member of the 



Little Fort Chapter of the DAR. 

Bill Devore, executive director of 
the CLC Foundation, served with 
Joan on the Foundation Board and 
first met her in 1963. 

"My father was the pastor at the 
church where she and her husband 
attended," Devore recalled. Devore 
was asked by Joe Legat to give re-, 
marks about his wife at Saturday's 
funeral. 

"1 think she was one who burned 
a path for others^to follow," Devore 
said. "She didn't take no very often." 

Devore worked closely with loan 
when he was special events coordi- 
nator for the Victory Hospital Foun- 
dation; 

"She was a woman whose ener- 
gy and enthusiasm were conta- 
gious," he said. "She had such love 
for people she had never met. She 
impacted the lives of many students 
through her fundraising for scholar- 
ships." 

Joan was chairman of the annu- 
al CLC Foundation Golf Outing as 
well as many other special events. 

She had battled cancer off and 
on for 20 years. 

In addition to her husband she is 
survived by a son, Joseph M. Legat of 
Pahrump, NV and a daughter,, Lori 
Cline of Greensboro, NC and her 
mother, Marian Marsh Hudson. 



qflister Incorporated supports La 
Leche League international building fund 



^^■■MfCW* 



The final installment of a 
$100,000 contribution was present- 
ed to La Leche League International 
(LLLI) to support the organization's 
efforts to purchase a new worldwide 
headquarters building. 

The $20,000 check, presented by 
Al Herbert, President and Chief Op- 
erating Officer (COO) of Hollister In- 
corporated, honored a five-year 
commitment to LLLI originally 
made by Ameda AG, a Swiss manu- 
facturer of breastfeeding products. 
Ameda AG is now a wholly owned 
subsidiary of Hollister Incorporated. 

For more than 75 years, Hollister 
has provided hospitals with obstet- 
ric products including birth certifi- 



cates, cord clamps, amniotic mem- 
brane perforators, footprinters, and 
rhore. With the acquisition of Ame- 
da AG, a firm that pioneered the de- 
velopment of breast pumps more 
than 50 years ago, Hollister broadens 
its product line to include a variety of 
breastfeeding pumps, kits, and ac- 
cessories. 

LLLI was established in 1958 to 
provide personal encouragement, 
assistance, and educational materi- 
als to mothers who breastfeed their 
babies. Today LLLI has 30,000 mem- 
bers and 8,000 leaders globally who 
provide support to lactating mothers 
in 66 counties. To reach LLLI, call 1- 
800-LaLeche. 



Rascoe to lead Congregation Am Ecod 



Congregation Am Echod, 
Waukegan and Lindenhurst, has 
engaged Michael L. Rascoe as its 
new rabbi succeeding Rabbi 
William Fertig who has emeritus 
status with the 103:year old Lake 
County synagogue.^ 

Rabbi Rascoe has spent most 
of his career in Grand Rapids and 
more recently in the New York 
and Philadelphia areas. He said 
returning to the Midwest was one . 
of his many goals in moving to Am 
Echod. 

Announcement of the ap- 
pointment was made by Jerry 
Reizner, temple president, who 
also is a Lindenhurst resident. 

Rabbi Rascoe said "My goal as 
rabbi is to make Judaism a more 
vibrant part of everybody's life. I 
like making a many thousand year 
old religion relevant and to take 
the academics into real life situa- 
tions." 

He said that Judaism has been 
around a lot longer than our-pre- 
sent culture and has a lot to con- 
tribute to make the world a better 




place, the rabbi said he has many 
ideas about how to define and ex- 
plain Judaism and translate it to 
real life situations. 

Reizner 
said the 
Rabbi 
Search 
Committee 
was im- 
pressed * by 
Rabbi Ras- 
coe's back- 
ground. 

SKii Lu Hook: looks 

work with petition.' 

congrega- ^ 

tions in teaching and in develop- 
ing programs within his congrega- 
tions such as innovative ones in 
support groups. He also has ex- 
tensive experience in working 
with the community at large 
where he has organized multi reli- 
gion events. 

His education includes study 
at Columbia University and the 
Jewish Theological Seminary. 



. ( --l-. 



..♦,.■»„.-. 



C6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



March 5, 1999 



■ 

I 



L ' 



l 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Below are real estate transactions for villages in and around the Lakeland 
Newspapers circulation area. Listed are the property address, property buyer, 
and purchase price. 



A nUoch 



507 Garys Dr, Al Little, $142,500 
921 Tiffany Rd, Kyle Christensen, 
$120,000 
City 

street . Street Name, Buyer/first Buy- 
er/last & Buyer.2/first Buyer,2/last, $ 

FQ Xlqke 

130-a Cora Ave, Bankers Trust Com- 
pany Of Ca, $40,800 
56HighviewAve, Hud, $126,822 



Cravslnke 



243 Alleghany, Robert Jagla & Carol 
Shasta!, 5135,900 . 
33036 N Stone Manor Dr, Ronald & 
Irene Jursa, $254,000 

Green Oaks 

2259 Heathercliff Dr,- Jaroslava 
Downing, $203,000 

Guni££ 

5714 Delaware, Jason L Mcrell, 
$115,000 

2160 Maplewood Dr, Eric W & Mary 
S Marsh, $223,000 

7576 Melon Ct, Mid America Feder- 
al Savings Bank, $245,000 
3440 N Old Walnut Cir, Craig & 
Melissa Frier, $195,000 
920 Vose #307, William & Elizabeth 
Potochnik, $84,500 
4277 Waterford Way, Robert E 
Schrark, $265,920 
HalnesvUle 



Mae Pawlowske, $175,774 

41 N Brittany Ln, Richard P & Lisa A 

Kempf, $191,552 

Hawthorn Woods 

55 Gentry, Joseph A & Tina M Rago, 
$397,500 

lngle?ld,e 

26181 W Lakeview, Aames Capital 
Corporation, $72,767 

late Vil l a 

1322 Baxter Ln, Kenneth W & Jen- 
nifer L Hassett, $1 19,580 
606 Carlyle Ct, Michael G & Jennifer 
A Larriuz, $216,709 
506 Mckenzie Ct, Robert & Susan 
Vettese, $225,155 . 
617 N Lakewood Ave, David M & 
Karen E Barnes, $155,000 
25506 W Chesney Dr, Heather A 
Skidds & Steven V Ray, $107,900 

Uhertwliie 

239 Kenloch Ave, Patrick L & Mary M 

Corkins, $159,000 

841 Liberty Bell Ln, Robert & Kristen 

Wochinski, $215,000 

1612 Virginia Ave, Daniel Lewis, 

$320,000 

402 W Lincoln, Waly & Rosemary 

Lowry, $141,900 

Undenhurst 

2803 Falling Waters Dr, George 
" Zorich, $181,566 
Mundeleln 



$146,000 

281 Fairview, Vickie S James, 

$120,000 

51 S Archer, Douglas P Larsen, 

$131,500 

1320 S Huntington Dr, Sharen Pi- 

varunas, $129,000 

1357 Spalding, Lynn A Gibson, 

$138,000 

314 Stonebridge Way, Walter R & 

Marie F Trendota, $278,500 

Round Lake \ 

507 N Hainesville Rd, Jack A & Mar- 
garet M Buttacavoli, $110,500 
Round Lake Beach 
209 Clifton Dr, The Secretary Of Vet- 
eran Affairs, $70,545 
1610 Kildeer, Saul Ambriz, $89,000 
1503 Kildeer Dr, Florence Mcatee, 
$104,500 

1626 Melrose, Sandra Burnett, 
$81,300 

Round Lake Heights 

625 Warrior, Wayne Peters, $1 15,000 

Wauconda , 

215 Delia, Andrea M Berry, $147,000 

648 Marine Rd, Shane Christensen, 

$125,250 

26554 N Pond Shore Dr, Bank Of 

New York, $348,770 



Lake County Food Drive 
helps fill pantry shelves 



146 E Heritage Trail, James A & Ella 1841 Barnhill Dr, Justin Convey, 



Information provided by Record Informa- 
tion Services, Inc. in St. Charles. The com- 
pany provides public record data for Lake, 
DuPage, Cook, Kane, McHenry, Kendall 
and Will counties including new incorpo- 
rations, business licenses, bankruptcies, 
foreclosures, judgments, mechanic liens, 
state and federal tax liens, residential and 
commercial real estate transfers, building 
permits, DVJ arrests, divorce reports, 
sheriff sate foreclosures, (630) 365-6490, 
public-record, com. 



FROM PAGE CI 



'HEROES':YMCA looks for funding help 



sented a program of his slides that il- 
lustrated how YMCA employees 



■trciTOOlO tlVIU\nJ lu« *«*s. ^.AA. 



ues for the people involved. 

The magic of the camp experi- 



..H«Wt C»- -It'll. 



care for and instruct in summer pro- 
grams. 

Kaplan attributes the magic of 
the camping experience to five char- 
acteristics. The first is that it involves " 
total involvement. People are away 
from the stress of the everyday world 
and its responsibilities. 

Timeliness is a second factor. 
"We don't have to be governed by 
the clock," he said. Learning takes 
place at its own pace when it can 
have the best impact. 

"Camp is a temporary commu- 
nity," Kaplan said. "You can really fo- 
cus your attention on meeting the 
needs of the campers." 

Fourth, Kaplan said that camp 
has a restorative quality. It is an out* 
door activity. "It provides a clean 
slate." 

And last, camp is a community 
controlled by campers. He said that 
when campers are involved with 
running the camp, it generates val- 



dren who come from distressed en- 
vironments. 

"A camper who comes from that 
type of situation builds self-esteem 
and self-confidence," Kaplan said. 
"They develop social skills. They 
leam to share, to cooperate." 

"For many children, it is their 
first independent living situation." It 
is the first time they have three meals 
a day. For others, it is the first time 
they have had their own bed. It is 
also the first time they have a chance 
to be with children who are different 
from themselves. 

For many children, camp is their 
first chance to have meaningful 
choices. 

Kaplan said that, for him, the he- 
roes are the staff members of the 
YMCA camps. "That is what does 
make a difference for children," he 
said. 

Financial contributions given 
to fund raisers in the "Kids Need 



Heroes" campaign can have very 
specific impacts for parents with 
-«iiiiuiciirror example, a week of 

before and after school care for a 
student is possible for $80. A child 
can be taught to swim and be com- 
fortable in water for $100. A child 
can enjoy two weeks of summer 
day camp for $265. Those who pro- 
vide a $588 contribution, make it 
possible for an entire family to have 
a one-year YMCA membership. A 
family of four can experience camp 
together if someone makes a $250 
contribution. 

Hastings Lake YMCA is a single 
camp. However, it is sometimes eas- 
ier to see it as three different camp 
areas surrounding a beautiful lake. 

Funds will be collected from 
now to Tuesday, April 6. Volunteers 
will be calling on people to discuss 
the Hastings Lake YMCA and asking 
for community support. 

"I hope you're real successful," 
Kaplan told the kick-off dinner par- 
ticipants. "What you're doing Is very, 
very important." 



BALANCE: Forest preserve looks for $55 M 



got involved in the referendum cam- 
paign because she frequently takes 
her children to Ryerson Woods For- 
est Preserve in Deerfield and visits 
many of other forest preserves in 
Lake County. She said she has found 
the quality of the forest preserves 
and the programs they offer to be ex- 
cellent — and recent surveys indi- 
cate that the public shares those 
views. , . 



The forest preserves also provide 
one of the last refuges for endan- 
gered species in Lake County, ac- 
cording to Calabresa. 

"Lake County has more endan- 
gered species than any county in the 
state so if we're not protecting them, 
it affects the whole state. It's that cru- 
cial," she said. 

Although $55 million may 
sound like a lot of money, the net 



effect on the average property own- 
er in Lake County would be mini- 
mal, according to Calabresa. The 
estimated tax increase for the own- 
er of a $200,000 home would be less 
than $20 a year if the referendum 
passes, she said. 

"We've learned over the last 40 
years the price of land is only in- 
creasing so we need to buy land at a 
reasonable cost," she said. 



FROM PAGE C5 



TAYLOR: Good service makes the difference 



thought starters, but you can prob- 
ably add many to these. 

Assessment questions: In 
what areas can we document 
that our service improved? What 
skills did we acquire this year In 
our company that allowed us to 
- serve our customers more effec- 
tively? Who has responsibility 



for improving service this year? 
Does our use of technology sup- 
port improved customer service. 
Do our service policies provide 
genuine value to our customers? 
Are we out serving our competi- 
tors? 

You can improve your service 
quality. Try the H AP.P.Y. system. 



It may Just make a few customers 
smile. 

(Suggested Tag Line) 
Don Taylor is the co-author of Up 
Against the Wal-Marts. You may 
write to 

him in care of Minding Your Own 
Business, PO Box 67, Amarillo, TX 
79105. 



The Lake County food Re- 
source Council and many volun- 
teers throughout Lake County are 
busy with the last minute prepara- 
tions for the 12th annual Lake 
County Food Drive. The drive is 
scheduled for March 6 to 13. The 
Council is a not-for-profit group 
established to assist food pantries 
and soup kitchens in the county by 
helping provide food, expertise 
and networking among the volun- 
teers and staff of the county's 
agencies helping the hungry. All 
food collected during Food Drive 
will be distributed in Lake County. 

Co-sponsors for the Food Drive 
include the Northeast Council Boy 
Scouts of America and the Lake 
County Life Underwriters. Boy Scout 
troop members will distribute plastic 
bags to the households of the coun- 
ty, asking residents to fill the bags 
with NON-PERISHABLE food items 
and leave them at their doors for 
pickup by the Scouts on Saturday 
morning, March 13. The members of 



Lake County Life Underwriters will 
collect from the schools and church- 
es foodstuffs contributed there. Ed- 
ward Gonwa, Regional Superinten- 
dent of Schools, has encouraged all 
schools in the county to participate 
in the Food Drive. Members of the 
Board of the Food'Resource Council 
have contacted churches throughout 
the county. 

Volunteers will sort the collected 
foods on Saturday, March 13, at 
■ Northpointe Achievement Center In 
Zlon (donated for this occasion.) 
Food will then be distributed to qual- 
ifying pantries and soup kitchens Im- 
mediately. Any persons wishing. to 
assist in the Drive are encouraged to 
call Margaret Bragado at 623-7885, 
Vickl Hammer at 948-8747, or Ann 
Conroy at 360-68 18 for further infor- 
mation. 

All monetary donations should 
be made payable to Lake County 
Food Resource Council and mailed 
to Post Office Box 685, Grayslake, IL 
60030. 



In-person absentee voting 
begins at County Clerk's office 



"In-person absentee voting for 
the Consolidated Election to be held 
April 13, begins Thursday, March 4, 
in the County Clerk's office, Room 
101, 18 N. County St., Waukegan," 
announced Lake County Clerk 
Willard Helander. Voting will be of- 
fered during regular office hours of 
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through 
Thursday, and 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. 
on Friday.In-person absentee voting 
Will also be offered on Saturday, April 
10, from 9 a.m. to noon. The last day 
to vote in-person absentee is Mon- 
day, April 12. 

In Illinois, absentee voting is re- 
stricted to the following: absent from 
Lake County on election day, physi- 
cally incapacitated; student tem- 
porarily residing outside Lake Coun- 
ty; observance of a religious holiday; 
incarceration pending trial date; 
serving jury duty; employed in the 
Office of the Lake County 



Clerk/State's Attorney/or serving as 
an election judge and election day 
duties will prevent being present at 
the polling place. 

A registered voter may also vote 
an absentee ballot by mail beginning 
March 4. The voter should request an 
Application for Absentee Ballot by 
calling the Lake County Clerk's office 
at 360-5912. Once the signed appli- 
cation is returned, our office will mail 
the voter their ballot within 48 hours. 

"Our office also offers a number 
of absentee programs which accom- 
modate voters who are temporarily 
or permanently unable to be at the 
polls on election day. These include 
the Disabled Voter Program, the 
Temporarily Absent Student Pro- 
gram and the Snowbird Program. We 
encourage voters who wish to learn 
more about these programs to con- 
tact our Absentee Voting Depart- 
ment at 360-5912," Helander said. 



U.S. Census Bureau to hire 
block canvassers in Illinois 



The race to the next decenni- 
al census is on, and the Census 
Bureau is combing the state in 
hopes of recruiting thousands of 
workers called "Block Can- 
vassers" to help check address 
lists for Census 2000. The list will 
be used later when Census Ques- 
tionnaires are delivers to every- 
one in the nation. 

At first glance, Block Can- 
vassers are temporary workers, 
who travel each block in their 
community to verify and update 
the Census Bureau's list of ad- 
dresses in city style areas— But 
Block Canvassers are really much 
more than that. 

Block Canvassers are local peo- 
ple who help make the community a 
better place to live— just by verifying 
addresses. They touch the lives of 
people who have children in head- 
start or daycare. They help make it 
possible for friends and. family to 
have access to the healthcare bene- 
fits they need. They help the elderly 
to benefit from programs they so 
richly deserve. 

How? Block Canvassers help lay 
the groundwork to make an accurate 
census possible. In turn, the census 
population count is used to deter- 
mine how much money communi- 
ties will get for services like child as- 
sistance, education, roads, housing 
healthcare, and elderly care. The cen- 



sus is also the basis for apportioning 
seats in the U.S. House of Represen- 
tatives. By working in the census, 
Block Canvassers help their neigh- 
bors to have a voice in our nation's 
government. 

The Census Bureau needs to re- 
cruit thousands of people in Illinois 
within the next several weeks— a 
massive undertaking. Retirees, par- 
ticipants in government programs, 
those looking for temporary jobs, 
and everyone who is interested in the 
well-being of their community are 
encouraged to apply. 

Full and part-time jobs are 
available with flexible days and 
weekend hours. Work may start as ■ 
soon as late February, and will last 
up to eight weeks. Local people 
will be hired to work within their, 
own neighborhoods because they 
are most familiar with the resi- 1 
dents in their community. Work- 
ers will be paid weekly at a com- 
petitive wage, including mileage 
reimbursement. Training is pro- 
vided, and job applicants must 
take a basic written test which Is 
being offered at various sites 
throughout the state. 

, For more information about be- 
coming a census worker, and to be 
scheduled for the next testing session 
in your area, contact the Census Bu- 
reau office toll free at 1.(888) 325- 
7733. 









March 5, 1999 



►SIFIED 



CLASSIFIE 



Lakeland Newspapers / C15 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Ftill-Tinic 




How To 
Survive 
The Job 



By Nancy Sakol 

In a recent survey and through many letters I've received 
regarding gift giving by. employers and employees, I have 
heard all sides.. .those who were quite pleased with the gen- 
erosity of their employer and those labeling them Scrooge. On 
the other side of the coin were the letters and calls received 
from employers who were quite taken by the generosity of 
their employees. One letter came in from a gentleman we will 
call George, an employee of a large corporation of over 1500 
employees that has employed him for 14 years. He was dis- 
gruntled over the fact that., "after 14 years of service, my 
Christmas bonus amounted to a $25,00 gift certificate to a 
national retailer." George. .there are 1500 plus employees In 
the corporal Ion. ..now taking Into account i 500 employees and 
let us hypothctlcally say everyone of those employees received 
the some gift certificate, .Your employer has then given out 
$37,300. 00.. ."stop complaining", I told him, as I began to tell 
him the story of the employer who had a tough year, compel' 
I rig with the bigger competition. He had a staff of 25 full timers 
and 3 part timers who tie swore were the "cream of the crop". 
They had been promised pay Increases starting after the first 
of the year. Their loyalty and caring for the company went to 
an extreme when the employer gave each employee a gener- 
ous Christmas bonus, and they In turn reciprocated by hand- 
ing him a gift and Inside was a letter signed by all the employ- 
ees, offering to stay at their same wages until business picked 
up In the spring. Loss for words, huh? 
My alt time favorite Is the employer who threw a Christmas 
dinner celebration for the staff who were escorted to a posh 
Chicago restaurant by a stocked limousine, use of the limou- 
sines after dinner to do as they pleased before being returned 
to their original starting point A former employee and spouse 
who had left the company 2 months prior were asked to Join 
the staff for the ho) Iday celebration and were escorted by lim- 
ousine as well. Dinner was superb, the company delightful and 
then It was time for the employer's yearly speech which ended 
with an envelope to each employee, and a basket of delicacies 
for the former employee. The former employee, on the return 
trip voiced her opinions of ho w she cannot believe she did not 
get a Christmas bonus, while the others sat In amazement and 
amusement, while she continued to embarrass herself The 
employer caught wind of what went on and could not believe 
that his generous offer to invite a former employee would 
result In this employee believing that actually warranted a 
Christmas bonus..Wasn't the evening and gift enough? You 
don't work there anymore! You should be thankful they Invit- 
ed you at all! To you I say, GROW UP! 
Come on. ..the holidays are a time for caring and sharing. 
There arc some who unfortunately forget the true meaning- 
those who have come to expect gifts, who are bitter over some- 
thing given to them, that they feel they should have more. 
Why...? Then I say^to.the man withjhe staff who gave some- 
thing back to him In a Christmas car J., you are blessed. 1 ' 

Note: Nancy Sakol Is a licensed personnel professional 

and President of Superior Personnel In Gumee. 

' Letters can be sent to Nancy Sakol 

c/o Lakeland Newspaper*. 

P.O. Box 268, Crayslakc.lL G0030 



225 



Business 
Opportunities 



225 



Business 
Opportunites 



$20,000 

IN FOUR MONTHS 

No selling. 

Will Train. 

800-995-0796 

ext. 1255 

24hre. 

AREA PEPSI 

ROUTE 

Prima Locations (Local). 

Route Earns 1O0K Yearly, 

1-600-440-2371. 

BUSINESS OWNERS. IN- 
CREASE SALES by accept- 
ing Visa, Mastercard, Discov- 
er, Amox. NO upfront charges 
or fees. Approval regardless 
of type,- size, age and credit. 
NO documentation required. 1- 
600-908-0011 24hrs. 715. 
(SCA Network). •' 

EARN $17,680 MONTHLY 
FROM HOMEI if you're Inter- 
ested In computers we'll 
finance your own computer 
and business guaranteed. No 
experience's, free training. 
Call now (800) 747-0946. 
(SCA Network). . 

NO BABYSITTER 

NEED ED! I 

Become a Homemaker's Idea 

Company Consultant. 

Work 1-2 nights per week, 

while dad stays home 

with the kids. 

•Unlimited Income* 

'Bonuses* 

•Flexible Hours* 

•Be Your Own Boss* 

Perfect lor stay at home 

,i moms 

CallTodayll 

(414)862-9391. 

TARGET 13 MILLION 
HOMES WITH YOUR AD 
Advertise your product or serv- 
ice to 13 million households In 
. North America's best suburbs 
by placing your classified ad In 
800 suburban newspapers 
just like this one, $895 for a 25 
word ad. One phone call, one 
Invoice, one payment. Call the 
Suburban Classified Advertis- 
ing Network fax on demand 
service at 800-356-2061 or 
312t644-661,0 x4?31 '.to. speak 
with a sales coordinator.' ■ 



THE 'HOT SHOT CHAL- 
LENGE". A slot type vend- 
ing/game machine for kids 6- 
16. Player wins everyllme. 
Turn-key operation exception- 
al profits mln. Inv. $10,000. 
Call 1-888-203-1252. (SCA 
Network). 



250 



School/Instruction 



GET YOUR R.E. LICENSE 

•Job Placement Available 

•Earn Extra Income 

•Many Locations Available 

Traditional Classes 

Starting Soon. 

For more Information call: 

Century 21 

Real Estate Academy 

(847) 296-0410. 

LEARN SPANISH IN MEXI- 
CO httPi//www.elouobln.com- 
Enjoy belter jobs, exciting trav- 
el, business opportunities and 
a new language. Complete Im- 
mersion 4-week programs. 
Within the U.S. Call 1-800-596- 
3240 for brochure. Outside of 
U.S. e-mail: InfoOslnue- 
bJfLfiflipJSCA Network). 

PIANO LESSONS 

IN MY LAKE VILLA HOME 

OPENINGS 

Now for students 

6yrs. to adult. 

Over 25yrs. experience. 

REASONABLE RATES, 

(647) 356-2760. 



304 



Appliances 



TEN 30LB. SPEED Queen 
Dryers/ stainless, from laun- 
drymat. (847) 869-7444. 



WANTED. 
STAY AT HOME 
MOMS OR DADS! 

If you're currently at home, 

or you'd tike to be, we have 

the opportunity for you. 

Work PT/FT around your 

schedule and enjoy unlimited 

Income potential. Be part of 

the nutrition revolution as an 

Independent Reliv Distributor. 

Call for more Information. 

Scott Pomerance 

Independent Reliv Distributor 

(847) 945-2481 

MONEY BACK 

GUARANTEE 

http://ww.retiv.com 



******** * **** *** 

: EMBROIDERY J 

* BUSINESS * 

* Computer generated * 

* growing business, lots * 
J of room for growth. J 

* Everything you need * 

* to be successful. * 

* Great home-based * 

* buslnessl * 

* $35,000 * 
X (847)548-5511 * 
**************** 



228 


Situations Wanted 



HOME CARE ASSIS- 
TANCE A special lady needs 
assistance with bathing, 
grooming and cooking. Re- 
quires transportation to ap- 
pointments, shopping and 
movies. Flexible, afternoon 
hours and Sturday mornings. 
(847) 223-5436 for appoint- 
ments. 



310 



BaaarVCrafls 



BEANIE BABY SALE 

BUY/SELL/TRADE 

Comfort Inn 

6080 Gumee Mills Blvd. 

Gumee. 

Wednesday 3/10, ■ 

11 am -6pm. 

We will be buying old Beanies 

for cash. 

Frea Admission. 



BEANIE BABY SALE 
BUY/SELL/TRADE 

Bast Inn 

1609 N. Milwaukee 

Ubertyyille. 

Thursday 3/11, 

11am-6pm. 
Free Admission. 



BEANIE BABY SALE 

BUY/TRADE - 

Holiday Inn Gumee, 

6161 Grand Ave. 

Friday, I0am-10pm. 

U Saturday, 1 Qam-7pm, 

Free Admission. 



BEANIE BABY SALE 

Buy/Sol I/Trade 

Blue Lagoon 

1707 7th St. 

Winthrop Harbor. 

Thursday 3/4/99, 

I2pm-7pm. 

BEANIE BABY SALE 

Days Inn 

Interstate 94 & Highway 50, - 

Kenosha. 

Friday March 5, 

10am-5pm. 

CERAMIC KILN (3 Ring 
Knight) with fixtures, 60 
molds, 92 piece green ware, 
708 piece bisque. $5,000 val- 
ue, asking 52,100/best. (647) 
244-6065. 

SHARJOY'S PROMOTION 

PRESENTS 

A Full Boonlo Babies 

Show 

New Beanies, New Furbles 

Beanie Buddies. 

Cases and Tag Protectorsr 

Sunday, March 7, 1999. 

Gumee Holiday Inn 

6161 Grand Ave., 

Gumee. 

10am-3pm. 

Hourly door prizes: 

The new 1999 Bears. 

Grand Prize: The New Fuzz 

Bear. Supersite will be buying 

at the show. 

Admission: $2.00 Adults 

$1.00 Children. 

2 & under Free. 




318 



Business 
Office Equipment 



FREE- 1990 MOORE DE- 
COLLATORS WEB. Excel- 
lent condition. Very light 
usage, Separates multi-part 
forms and cuts off perfora- 
tions at the tractor feed-set up 
now to handle up to 4 part 
forms. Can be shortened to 2 
part. Must provide own trans- 
portation. Some disassembly 
required. (847) 634-4250 ext 
288. 



320 


Electronics 
Computers 


MS OFFICE "97 WORD, Ex- 
cel, Power Pi, Access Out- 
look, sealed, $800. (800) 
.801-6345. 


330 


Garage 

Hum mage Sale 



REPOSSESSED THREE 

QUO N SET steel arch build- 
ings. One Is 30'x40\ one is 
40'x60\ and one Is 50*1 00\ 
WILL SELL FOR BALANCE 
DUE. 1-B00-453-9025. 

STEEL BUILDINGS SALE: 
40x60x14, $9,094. 50x75x14, 
$12,275. 50x100x16, 

$16,879. 60X100X16, $18,261. 
Mini-storage buildings. 

40x160, 32 units, $16,914. 
Free brochures, www. so mine I- 
bulldings.com, Sentinel Build- 
ings, 800-327-0790. Exten- 
sion 79. 



|R£,CVC4.£ 
iRiE,CSYCl.£ 



AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIG SALE, and there 
Is still things that Just did not 
go.... Call us at LAKELAND 
Newspapers and run It 
under the 'FREE or Givea- 
ways" classified column. FREE 
ADS are NO CHARGEI 
(847) 223-6161, ext 140. 



334 



Good Things To Eat 



HOME GROWN BEEF. Cus- 
tom cut, freezer ready. (815) 
648-2316. 



338 


Horses & Tacks 



"AQHA BROODMARE' 
15.1. CH., Leo/Klng/Jag, 
$1,000 or trade. (847) 
931-5313. 

ROUND PENS, 6 footer, 6ft. 
high, 4 or.5 rails, 50ft. or 60ft. 
Made out of pipe, not tubing. 
(414) 594-2276. 

SADDLE SHOP HORSE 
trailers, Western/English, 
new/used. Buy, sell, trade. The 
Corral, Sullivan, Wisconsin. 
(414)593-8048. 

WALKING HORSES FOR a 
smooth ride for an older per- 
son or bad backs. Quarter 
horse for fun, ponies for every- 
one. Horse drawn surrey and 
driving ponies. Exp. gated rid- 
ing mule. Also hay for sale, 
$375 delivered. (630) 
443-6880..-^r : **•""■ -*-■--- 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



'BABY STUFF" ALL excel- 
lent condition. Bassett Crib, 
brown. Electric baby monitors- 
Realistic, Kolcraft car seat. 2- 
chlld safety gates. Girts Infant 
(0-6 months) clothes. Mobile, 
with matching bumper pads 
and wall hangings. Baby bot- 
tles. Mini-Mouse toy chest. 
Pink/white table and chairs. 
Graco stroller. Toys. Lullaby 
light show. Call (847) 973- 
2610. " 

NEW FURNITURE 

SALE 

FANTASTIC 

PRICES 

•3pc. IMngroom set, $200. 

*5pc. butcher block 

dlnnetteset,$100. 

•Futon, black lacquer 

with mattress, $100. 

*5pc. black lacquer 

bedroom set. $350, 

■ ape. 100% Italian 

Leather sofa, loveseat 

and chair. 

Complete set, $1,200. 

'Italian Leather 

Sectional, $1,295. 

*7pc. Cherry dlnlngroom set, 

$475. 

* Four drawer chest, $39.95. 

"Halogen lamp, $12.95. 

* 5pc. glass dining set, $100. 

"Cherry cocktail and 
2 end tables, $79.95. 

* Queen deluxe mattress set, 

■ $100. 
Call days (773)' 973-7070. 



SOFA, DREXEL HERIT- 
AGE, custom made, cream, 
excellent condition, $600/best. 
(B47) 296-61 16. i- 



SWEET DREAMSI 

WOULD love to keep this 
headboard, frame and foot- 
board (of solid maple) but this 
family treasure must be sold. 
Asking $125/best, Call (847) 
548-2680 after 6pm. 



TWO MAHOGANY CHIP- 
PENDALE UPHOLSTERED 
OVAL BACK SIDE CHAIRS, 
$200/ea. Mahogany marble 
top foyer tabled with matching 
mirror, $950. 2-colonlal cherry 
stained pine currlos with 
poured Qlass, • ball feet, 
$950/ea. (815) 344-1675. 



340 



■Household 
Goods/ Furniture 



BATHROOM VANITY 
BASE GOin. with oak finish, 3- 
door, 3-drawor, white cultured 
marble top, single faucet, 
$200/best. 24IN. BATH* 
ROOM VANITY BASE With 
natural oak finish, 1-door, 2- 
drawor, white cultured marble 
top, single faucet, $150/best. 
TOILET, 12ln. offset, com- 
plete -with seat, $25/best. 
(847) 395-8312 evenings 
after 5pm. ' 

BED QUEEN ORTHOPE- 
DIC mattress set Including 
brass headboard and frame. 
Never used, still In plastic. Sac- 

riflco $250. (414) 453-0072. 

BED, BLACK IRON canopy, 
with queen sot and frame, 
new In plastic. Cost $1,100, 
sell for $350. (630) 258-0587. 

BED, KING SIZE, extra thick 
pillow top with split box set and 
frame, new In plastic. Cost 
$1,200, sell for $450. (630) 
258-0587. 

DESIGNER MODEL 
HOMES FURNITURE 

CLEARANCE! 

Sofa/loveseal set, 
hunter.green, $495. 
Sofa, white, $350. 

Sofa/loveseal, 

earth tones, $595. 

Also: Plaids, Florals, 

Leathers and More. 

Dlnlngroom sets, 10- piece: 

Cherry. $1 ,395, 

Mahogany, $2,395, 

Oak $1,695, 

Other sets available. 

Also: Bedroom Sets, 

from $995. 

(647)329-4118. 

www.modelhomefumilure.com 

DININGROOM SET, 
CHERRY, 72in. oval table, 6 
Queen Ann chairs, lighted buf- 
fet and hutch, new In box. Cost 
$4,700, sell for $1,800. (630) 
256-0587. >V_ 

DININGROOM SET, LIKE 
new, walnut,, with hutch, 
$1,200. Call weekdays after 
5pm and weekends 9am-5pm. 
(847) 872-1958. 

FORMAL DININGROOM 
TABLE, 6 navy blue uphol- 
stered chairs, 1ln. thick bev- 
eled glass top with dark hard- 
wood base. Best Otter. Excel- 
• lent condition; Must sea to ap- 
preciate. (847) 973-0460. 

FURNACE 80,000 BTU, 
Syrs. old, runs great, 
$2507flrm. (847) 244-2353. 

IMPORTED ITALIAN MAR- 
BLE dining table with leather 
chairs plus server. Top quality 
Italian leather sofa, loveseat,' 
and chair. Matching marble 
coffee table and end tables. 
Will separate. Paid $13,000, 
sacrifice all for $5,000/best. 
(847) 549-9394. 

MOVING SALE NEW couch 
and loveseat, coffee and end 
tables, toddler car seat, and 
many more. Must sell. (647) 
247-1049. ■___ 

MOVING SALE SOLID oak 
roll top computer desk, $400. 
Baby jogger stroller, original, 
red, $80. Little Tykes outdoor 
play set, large, $75. Packard 
Bell Multi-Media computer, 
$100. Fisher Price chllds bike 
seat, $20. (847) 548-4752. 



340 



Household 

Goods/ Furniture 



MOVING SALE: HOUSE- 
HOLD goods, furniture, cloth- 
ing, exercise equipment, 
much more. Everything must 
go. Saturday 3/6 & 3/13, 
10am-3pm, and also on Sun- 
day 3/7 & 3/14, 1pm -4 pm. 
2219 N. Jackson Si, Wauko- 
gan (Northside), 



349 


Clothing 


FOR SALE BEAUTIFUL 
RACOON SHORT JACK- 
ET. Excellent condition. (847) 
356-1148. 


LADIES RED LEATHER 

COAT, 3/4 length, size 3X, 
$200. E, Bauer goretex down 
coat, XL $50. (847) 816-1241. 


350 


Miscellaneous 



18' SATELLITE FREE Pro- 
gramming available. $99-bas- 
Ics. $199-Two box systems. 1- 
800-325-7836 00111. (SCA 
Network), 

BASEBALL/FOOTBALL 
CARDS PREMIUM/ROOK- 
IES/AUTO'S. (815) 
363-6343, 

BOYS TODDLER 
CLOTHES, Precious Mo-, 
merits, 35mm camera. (847) 
356-3089 after 6pm. 

COMPLETE AUTO- 
GRAPHED JOE Montana fig- 
urines and plates by Gartland 
& Savino. Best offer. Will sepa- 
rate. (847) 683-4309, . 

GAS PUMPS FROM 66 Sta- 
tions, 4-pleces, good condi- 
tion, $200/ea. Call John (847) 
223-3459. 

RETIRED AND SUSPEND- 
ED PRECIOUS MOMENTS 
FIGURINES. Over 170 differ- 
ent Items. At far below as- 
sessed value. (414) 
537-2662. •__ 

UPRIGHT PIANO WITH 
bench, $200. Kitchen table, 
new 60x36, butcher block 
style, $100. Dresser, 5-draw- 
ers, light finish, $30. Girls bike, 

18ln..$15.(847)543-139B. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS. 
TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT 
and SAVEI Commercial/home 
'units from $199. Low monthly 
payments. FREE color cata- 
log. Call today 1-600-842- 
1310. 



360 


Pets & Supplies 



AMERICAN PIT BULL 
PUPS, ADBA registered, bom 
1/2/99, parents on premises. 
Sire: Old fam. red nose. Dam: 
Midnight Cowboy/Cracker 
Jack line. Wonder Lake (815) 
728-0016. 

BICHON MALE WANTED 
to breed with female Bichon. 
Must be AKC registered, (647) 
244-0260 leave message. 

DOG SITTING 

IN MY HOME. 

State licensed. 

Reasonable Rates. 

Call Florence (847) 966-6319. 

GOLDEN RETRIEVER 
AKC PUPS, shots, wormed, 
males $200, females. $450. 
(920) 825-7487. 

GREAT DANE PUPPIES 
AKC REGISTERED. Call Tere- 
sa (647) 543-9153. 



360 



Pets & Supplies 



KITTENS IN NEED OF 
GOOD HOME. Serious pet 
lovers only. (647) 731-0141. 

NEEDS NEW HOME ASAP 
BUDDY owner developed seri- 
ous allergies, 6yr, old neu- 
tered malo cat, Indoor/out- 
door, very loving, clean and' 
good natured. (647) 
587-7477 before 7pm. 

NEOPOLfTAN MASTIFF 
PUPS, shota, wormed, $400- 
$800. (615) 569-2907. 

PET GROOMING 

10 years experience. 

Dog and cat grooming. 

Cockers $23-25 to start. 

Miniature Schnauzera 

$19-21 to start. 

Lhasa's $20-$23 to start. 

Labs $19-521 to start. 

Nail trimming, amai!-$4.00, 

medIum/targe-$5.00. 
Open Monday - Saturday. 
' New clients welcome. 
3400 Kehm Blvd., 

Park City, IL 
(B47) 249-3755. 

PUPPIES FOR SALE 

Springer Spaniel/Lab mix, 1st 
shots, wormed, $75/ea. For 
more Information please call 
(414)876-1812. 

PURPLE MARTIN BIRD 
HOUSES. 12-FAMILY: $29.95 
& S/H. TELESCOPIC 
POLES/ACCESSORIES 
AVAILABLE. MARTINS EAT 
2000 FLYING INSECTS PER 
DAY. FREE CATALOG. 
ORDER TODAY. CALL 1-600- 
764-8688. www.purplomar- 
tin.net 

SCHNAUZERS/MINIA- 
TURE PUPS, 9/WEEKS, 
ears/tall/shots done. $350- 
$400,(815)726-0424. 

SHEPHERD/COLLIE MIX 
PUPPIES, trl-color, $100/ea. 
(414) 551-9606. 

STANDARD POODLE 

PUIPS, black/cream, shots, 
health guaranteed, $200- 
$350. (815) 5 88-0594. 

YELLOW LAB, 1YR. old 
male, great with kids, crate in- 
cluded, $250/best. (815) 
385-6368. 



370 



Wanted To Buy' 



BUYING BEANIE BABIES 
Top $Cash$ Paid. Taglsss or 
with tags. (847) 395-6744. 

BUYING OLD POST-. 
CARDS, foreign coins and sil- 
ver coins before 1964. Paying 
cash. (815) 338-6399 after 
6pm. 

BUYING RETIRED BEAN- 
IE BABIES. Please call Mike 
after 7pm weekdays or all day 
weekends 1-888-291-4932, 
pin #6104, Ubertyville area. 

Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
Parts. Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coke Machines. 
Paying CASHI Call 
(630)965-2742. 

WANTED ANTIQUES, 

DESPERATELY . needed. 
Old furniture, marble top ta- 
bles, dressers, dlnlngroom 
and livlngroom sets, sofas, 
stain glass lamps, rugs, oil 
paintings, clocks and anything 
Interesting. Please call (847) 
587-5848. 




BABYSITTING NEWBORN 
TO 4. Will provide care In my 
home, full and part-time. If In- 
terested please call (414) 
653-1402. 

CHILD CARE IN a loving 
and educational home day 
care. Call Rebecca (847) 
546-4330. ■ 

FUN LOVING ANTtOCH 
MOTHER has full and part- 
time openings. Meals, snacks 
and lots of TLC, (847) 
j 636-3930. 

HAPPY MEDIUM - Licensed 
home day care has 3 full lime 
openings for children ages 2 
months to 5 years Ten years 
experience. Two teachers to 
care for your children at all 
times. (647)587-4410 

HOME DAYCARE LI- 
CENSED fenced yard, meals 
Included, ages 1yr.-6yrs. Vicin- 
ity Rt. 63 & Monavllle. (847) 
356-4231. 



LOOKING-FOR SITTER In 
my Round Lake Park home, 
Monday-Friday, 8am-6pm. 
References required. (847) 
546-5404. 



PRE-SCHOOL MOM HAS 
openings In Fox Lake home 
daycare. (647) 587-2291. 



MOM WITH DAY CARE 
TEACHING EXPERIENCE 

has openings In her Wildwood 
home. Part/Full-time, Monday- 
Friday, 6am-6pm, Meals and 
snacks Included. Lots of TLC 
and Fun. (647) 548-0890. 



MOTHER OF 1 . looking to 
care for your children In my 
Round Lake Beach home. 
FT/PT. Call Tiacle (847) 
356-2322. 



NEED A SITTER? Mother of 
4 looking to babysit In my 
Round Lako home. (647) 
546-2884. 



M 



RELIABLE CHILDCARE, 
14YRS. experience In my 
.Vaukegan home. Fenced 
backyard, at " home at- 
mosphere, lunch and snacks. 
(847) 249-0567. 



STATE LICENSED DAY- 
CARE In my Antioch home. 
Grass Lake School District. 
Current openings for children 
2+, full/part-time, Monday-Frl- 

day. (647) 395-5574. 

STAY AT HOME MOTHER 
OF 2 will care for your children 
In my Round Lake Beach 
home. Very reasonable rates,- 
Meals and snacks Included, 
Toy room, fenced-in back 
yard. Lots of TLC. Call Jen 
(847) 740-7026. 






JL 



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C 1 6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For Sale 



$119,000 3-BEDROOM, 2- 
BATH, lull basement, ranch, 
picket fence backyard, lot 
122'x125'. Open Houso 
3/8/99, 1pm-4pm. (414) 
862-9733. 

BY OWNER 

CHAIN OLAKES 

A-FRAME 

• 2-bedrooms, 2-baths, 

2-flreplaces, Jacuzzi, 

3-car garage. 1/2 wooded 

acre on water. $167,900, 

(847) 838-1200. 

BY OWNER IN unincorporat- 
ed area of Fox Lake. 3-bed- 
room home with appliances, 
full basement, C/A, hilltop view 
with large new deck, 
$119,000. Shown by appoint- 
ment (647) 587-5507. 

CHAIN O'LAKES RIGHTS 
and views, 4-bedrooms, 2- 
baths, 3-car garage, triple 
wooded lot, lower than mar- 
ket, financing available. 28584 
Valley, Ingleslde, III. $152,000 
Reduced. (847) 587-4B14. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER 
Beautiful 3-bedroom, 2-car ga- 
rage, professionally mani- 
cured lawn, Beach Park 
Schools, $152,000. (847) 
872-0646. 

FOX LAKE BY OWNER Im- 
maculate lyr, old, 3-bedroom, 
1-balh, 2-car garage, base- 
ment, landscaped, and new 
appliances stay. $125,000. 
Sellers relocating. Call (847) 
587-0335. 

GRAYS LAKE 
CHESAPEAKE FARMS. 

CLOSE IN EITHER 

MARCH OR APRIL FOR 

LESS THAN $1,000 

INCLUDING DOWN 

PAYMENT. 

4-bedrooms, 2-1/2 baths, 

2-car garage, neutral decor, 

master bedroom with volume 

ceiling, mature trees and lots 

more. $184,900, 

(847) 548-7718. 

JUST STARTING OUT? 2- 

bedroom ranch In Trevor, Wl. 
Maintenance tree exterior, 
C/A, extra heated 2-1/2 car 
garage, alt on 2 lots, alt ap- 
pliances Included, $124,000. 
Call (414) 862-9718 for ap- 
p olntmenl. No realtors please. 

LAKE BEAVER DAM, WIS. 
115ft. of beautiful lakefront, 3* 
bedroom, 2-balh, C/A, 1/2 
acre lot, 2-1/2 car, 40 miles 
N.W. of Milwaukee. Great fish- 
ing and boating. $69,900. 
(847)265-9411. 

LAKEFRONT PROPERTY 
NEW CONSTRUCTION, 4- 
bedrooms, cathedral ceilings 
with 4-skyllghts throughout 
2nd floor, 3-car garage. (847) 
587-6703. 

LIMITED TIME OFFER 
Southwest Wisconsin 3-bed- 
room year round rustic retreat. 
16+ divldable acres. $150,000 
Invested. Licensed appraisal 
$105,000. 3-1/2hrs. from Chi- 
cago suburbs. 395,000/lirm. 
(847) 836-7886. 

MUNDELEIN 3-BED- 
ROOM, 1-BATH, living- 
room, dlnlngroom, family- 
room, new paint and carpel, 
neutral colors, all appliances 
stay, fenced-in back yard with 
deck. $130,000. (647) 
599-1721. 

NEW HOME ON LAKE AN- 
TIOCH BY OWNER 4+ bed- 
rooms, finished walk-out base- 
ment, $330,000. (630) 
894-2634. 

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 
March 7th,' 1pm-5pm. 19th 
Ave. -7705 Kenosha. 2- bed- 
room, 1-balh, recroom, 1.- bed- 
room and 1-bath In basement. 
Well kept yard. Immediate oc- 
cupancy. $92,900. (414) 
' 653-0197. 



ROUND LAKE BEACH 3- 
BEDROOM TOWNHOUSE 
very clean, all appliances, 
deck, fenced yard, on cul-de- 
sac. $85,000. (847) 740-4783. 



ROUND LAKE BEACH 5 
bedroom 1 1/2 bath ranch with 
screened In porch, gym set, 
satellite dish, large shed, 1/2 
block to beach. Quiet neigh- 
borhood $110,000. (847) 
740-9985 



ROUND LAKE TOWN- 
HOUSE 2-BEDROOM 2- 
BATH RECENT CONSTRUC- 
TION, $114,500. Buy, why 
rent? C21 (773) 508-2121. 



COUNTRY SCHOOL 

HOUSE 120YR. old brick 
uniquely remodeled duplex, 
1.8 acre mini farm. Upper 
2,016sq.ft,, 3-bodrooms, 1-1/2 
baths, fireplaces, spiral stair- 
case, attached deck with out- 
side hot tub. Lower 1, 240sq.lt., 
2-bedroom, 1-bath, fireplace, 
1,240sq.ft., 1-car brick ga- 
rage, 30x30 2-stall horse bam. 
Racine County. By owner. 
$235.000. (414) 835-2349. 

THIS (S ITI Round Lake 
Nice 3+bodroom tri-level, 2- 
full baths, A/C, 2+car garage, 
$112.900. (647) 740-2654, 

TWIN LAKES BY OWNER 

Well maintained 3-bedroom, 2- 
bath, full basement, main floor 
laundry, all appliances Includ- 
ed, 1-1/2 car garage, corner 
lot, $112,000. (414) 
877-^164, 

VA/HUD REPOSI 

New lists weekly. 

Call Ryan & Co., Realtors 

"Your Repo Specialists." 

(847) 526-0300. 

VERNON HILLS FOR 
SALE-SI 94,000, RENT- 
SI ,750. 4-BEDROOM, 2- 
1/2 bath, 2-car garage, remo- 
deled, close to 
schools/pool/parks, must see. 
(847) 367-6109. 

WAUKEGAN (NORTH- 

SIDE) BY OWNER: 2219 
Jackson St. 3-bedroom, 1- 
bath brick ranch. Full finished 
basement, new roof, central 
A/C, furnace. Walking dis- 
tance to schools, parks, forest 
preserve, North Shore bike 
path. Close to Amstutz and 
shopping, Must be pre-ap- 
proved. Serious buyers only. 
Shown by appointment only. 
Call for description of features. 
$124,900. (647) 623-3199. 

WINTHROP HARBOR 2- 
BEDROOM home, newly 
fenced big yard, garage, new 
shed, many updates, $88,000. 
(847) 872-9388. 

I Gov't Foreclosures 
Round Lake 
$54,7SO& $97,200 

Waukegan 

$67,750 ft $81,000 

Low Down/Make Offer! 

Western Really 

630-495-6100 847-778-2962 



All-Subs 

REPOS 

Low down! 

-CALL- 

A company you can trust 

•MEMBER BETTER BUSINESS* 

Liberty Re. Inc. 

630-539-6200 



504 



Homes For Rent 



504 



Homes For Rent 



WADSWORTH 7-ROOM, 
3-BEDROOM, 2-balh, 2-car 
garage. Barn for rent, land for 
rent. (773) 825-3732 oven- 
ings after 6pm. ~ 

ZtON 1-BEOROOM, AP- 
PLIANCES, $450/monlh plus 
deooslt. (847) 682-8669. 

GURNEE S90O/MONTH, 2- 
bedroom, 1-bath, garage, 
basement, C/A/H, washer/dry- 
er hook-up, available 4/1. No 
subsidies/pets. (847) 782- 
9606, (647) 623-7519. 

MUNDELEIN 3-BED- 

ROOM HOME, remodeled 
kitchen and bath, large living- 
room, finished basement, ga- 
rage, no pels, credit check, 
$1,050/month. (847) 

362-0640. 



ROUND LAKE 

Walk to the train! 

1 BR Duplex - 

2nd Floor. 

No garage. 

Long Term Lease. 

$475/mo + 

utilities & 

sec dep. 

Land Management 
815-678-4334 







If you have an item you 

want to sell for $75.00 or 

less you can place an ad 

for only $3,001 Call: Lisa at 

(847) 223-8161 ext. 140 

j for more Information. 



508 


Homes Wanted 



WANTED 3-4 BEDROOM 
house, with 2-1/2 baths, fire- 
place, basement. In Grays- 
lake/Gurnee area on a 
lease/purchase option basis. 
Call Cindy (847) 543-1741. 



514 



Condo/Town Homes 



CLEAN 3-BEDROOM 
WITH garage, A/C, North 
Waukegan, $900/month. 
(847)623-4071, 

BEACH PARK 2-BED- 
ROOM, full basement, 1-car 
garage, stove, refrigerator, 
dishwasher, A/C, washer/dry- 
er hook-up, fenced backyard, 
private patio, like new building. 
$830/month plus security de- 
posit. No pets. (847) 
746-2615. 

BURLING TON, WISCON- 
SIN LAKEFRONT house, 3- 
bedrooms, 1-1/2 baths, 

$950/monih, 1st & last plus 
security deposit. Available 
March 1st. (414) 537-2361. 

CLEAN 2-BEDROOm 
HOME In Round Lake Beach, 
Ready to move In. 
$675/month plus utilities. Call 
between 6pm & 9pm. (847) 
546-20 00. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH UP- 
DATE 3-bedroom 1 bath 
ranch on double lot. Eat-In 
kitchen. New appliances and 
carpeting. Freshly painted. 
Full basement. Available 
March 1st. $995/month, (847) 
945-5217. 

ROUND LAKE SMALL 1- 
bedroom house for rent, avail- 
able Immediately, $550/month 
plus $550 security, 6/monlh or 
lyr. lease. (708) 344-3158 
after 6pm ask for Keith. 

VERY NICE 2-STORY 
home In Old Mill Creek, 4-bed- 
rooms, 2.5 baths, 
51,300/monUi plus deposit. 
Call Cathy, Monday-Friday, 
8am-5pm, (847) 244-5330. 



GURNEE TOWHNHOUSE 
1-BEDROOM, 1.5 baths, liv- 
Ingroom, kitchen, patio, 1-car 
garage, large loft, fireplace, 
storage space, tile floors, pets 
considered, $l,Q50/monlh 
plus security and utilities. 
Available 4/1. (847) 623-8799. 

LIBERTYVILLE 2-BED- 
ROOM, ' 2-BATH condo, 
many extras, excellent loca- 
tion, (847) 362-0938, i 

LIBERTYVILLE FOR SALE 
BY OWNER 3-bedroom. 2- 
1/2 bath. 2-1/2 car garage, 
2400sq.ft. ot elegance. Must 
see. Private, green, woods. 
$325,000. (847) 918-0643, 

PARK PLACE CONDO 
LOWER 3208 Wood Rd. #7. 2- 
bedrooms, 2-baths, all ap- 
pliances, attached garage, 
wooded view. $87,000. (414) 
554-4876. 



MONEY 
MONEY 
MONEY 
MONEY 

MONEY 

MO.?4EY 

If yoL'r' reading 

this you know 

classified ads work. 

Place yours today. 

Call Lisa 

847.223.8161 



518 


Mobile Homes 



518 



Mobile Homes 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



WAUCONDA IN TOWN : 
WALK TO EVERYTHING 
OVER 65 COMMUNITY. 
Now 1997 
Manufactured home 
1 -bedroom, 1-bath 
with garage and recroom. 
Includes: washer/dryer, 
stove/refrigerator, 
oft street parking. 
$54,900. 
1988 2-bedroom, 2-bath, 
carport, shed and deck, 

$39,900. 
1995 2-bedroom, 2-bath, 
with garage and carport, 

$56,900. 

1990 1 -bedroom, 1-bath, 

carport and shed, 

newly remodeled. 

$28,900. 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message. 



MOBILE HOME. NICE 
comer lot, Rainbow Park, Brls- . 
toi, 1973 Dlckman, 2 bed- 
room, 1 bath, large kitchen 
and living room, new carpet In 
kitchen, living and hall. Cen- 
tral air. New furnace 5 years 
ago. New siding and awnings, 
1 year ago. Washer, dryer, 
stove and refrigerator stay. 
Asking $38,800. Very good 
condition. Call Patti to see. 
(847)395-1143 

MODULARS • DOU- 
BLEWIDES - SINGLEWIDES 
- ILLINOIS LARGEST DIS- 
PLAY OF MODEL HOMES. 
FOUNDATIONS. BASE- 

MENTS, GARAGES, SEPT- 
ICS • WE DO IT ALLII FREE 
STATEWIDE DELIVERY/IN- 
STALLATION. RILEY MANU- 
FACTURED HOMES 1-800- 
798-1541. 



GURNEE/WAUKEGAN 
NORTH SHORE 
APARTMENTS 

At Affordable Prices. , 

Spacious. 

Luxury Living, 

Elevators. 

On Site Staff. 

Good Location, 

Easy to Toll Roads. 

IMPERIAL TOWER/MANOR. 

(847) 244-9222. 

LAKEVIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA, Large 1 & 2 bedrooms, 
$6io-$745/month. Heat, wa- 
ter, air included. (847) 
356-5474. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
WALK TO EVERYTHING 

Large new 2-bedroom, 

2-balh, 1-car heated garage, 

$895/month plus security. 

Available March 1st. 

No pets, 

(847) 526-8000 

leave message. 

WAUKEGAN 3-BEDROOM 
UNFURNISHED apartment, 
tenant pays electric and gas, 
parking In back. 961 N. Lewis. 
(847)623-8078. 

ZION 2-BEDROOM COM- 
PLETELY remodeled, excel- 
lent location, $625/month plus 
deposit. No pets. (847) 
782-1807. 




ANT10CH 1-BEDROOM 

APARTMENT, lakefront, fur- 
nished, A/C, utilities Included, 
washer/dryer, private area, 
near train, no pets, 
$575/month. (847) 395-6395. 



ANTIOCH LAKEFRONT. 

Newly remodeled 1 -bedroom, 
$600/month a utilities included. 
Boat slip available. No pets. 
(847) 526-0598. 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

ir you have placed classified 
advertising with the Lake- 
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advertising. To receive prop- 
er credit to your account, 
all payments for your Lake- 
land Newspapers advertising 
must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

LftkeUnd Newspaper* 

PO Box 208 

30 8. Whitney St. 

Qrsystake, If, 60030-0368 



ANTIOCH WATERFRONT 
1-BEDROOM apartment, for 
1-person. Furnished $595, un- 
furnished $495, 1 -month se- 
curity. (847)838-1228. 



FOX LAKE AREA off 134, 2- 
bedroom apartment. No pets. 
$695/month. (847) 297-5018. 



VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave., Zion 
1,2 & 3 BEDROOMS 

FREE HEAT 

Appliances • On Site 

Manager • No Pets 

Starting from 

$495/mo. 

Call Martha & Isaac 

(847) 746-1420 

or BEAR PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

(414)697-9616 



OAKRIDGE VILLAGE: 
APARTMENTS 



Offering Affordable Housing for 
Qualified Applicants, 

Currently Accepting Applications on our 

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments 

Stop in at: 

299 Oakridge Court in Antioch 

Or call: 

847-395-4840 
f=Y 1-800-526-0844 TDD 

Managed by Meridian Group, Inc. 



i*»i* ■-•.!* 



1993 16X80 MOBILE 
HOME, 3 : bedrooms, 2-full 
baths, laundryroom, C/A, dish- 
washer, refrigerator, stove, 
water softener, 12x16 deck, 
fenced pool, kennel, storage 
shed with electric. Located in 
Carefree Estates, $45,000, 
(414) 862-9832. 

1996 28X60 8CHULT MO- 
BILE HOME In Timber Ridge 
Park (Pleasant Prairie, Wise). 
3-bedrooms, 2-baths, formal 
diningroom, sunroom, 

1650sq.ft., 10x24 deck, 12x16 
barn style shed. Excellent con- 
dition. All appliances except 
washer/dryer Included. 

$67,500/beBt. (414) 

697-0288. 



A Place To 



Home 




• 1 & 2 hdkm spacious floor plans 

• On-site 24-hour emergency maint. 

• Laundry rACiLrriES 

• convenienrto metra 

• Beautifully manicured grounds 

• Flexible leasing .—^~~ 



ANTIOCH 

ImanoiiI 




445 Donin Or. 

Antioch, IL 

(847) 395-0949 



Deep Liikc llcrmiiiiee 
149 N. Milwaukee Ave, 

Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2002 



UltEwood ViLUqE Apartments 

In IsUncI Lake ano* GraysIake 

OffeniiNq AffoncJAbk Itousiisq fort ourtlilid ApplfcAiyis. 
Now AccEpiirsq AppllcATioNS fort our: 

• 1,2 ancI J bedRooM apartments 

PIeASE CAll fort MORE i.NfoflMAliON. Ofl AppOINTMENI AT: 

(847)225.6644 TDD# (800)526-0844 

Ukewood YilUqE ApARtMENf is prtoltssioNAlly -*£»* 
MAMACiEd by MerMan Gnoup, Inc. Is- « 



528 



Aptylloma 
To Share 



LAKE BLUFF Female will 
share large home with same, 
$416 Includes utilities. No 
drugs/smoMng/pets. (B47) 
234-1093. 

VERNON HILLS CONDO by 
lake, to share with profession- 
al female, non-smoker/drink- 
er, no deposit, $425/monlh, In- 
cludes all utilities except 
phono. (847) 549-1773. 




ROOM FOR RENT With full 
house privileges In Vernon 
Hills. Male/female, age 25+. 
$500/month, $250 deposit, in- 
cludes all utilities except 
phone, (847) 387-5B98 leave 
message. 



533 


Buildings 



FIVE UNIT APARTMENT 
BUILDING, Income of 
S34,200/year. Excellent Ingle- 
side location. $269,000. (847) 
680-4540. 



534 



Business Property 
For Sale 



GAS STATION. PRIME 
LOCATION. Major oil compa- 
ny sits an 1/2 acro+ lot; great 
Income. Potential for mini 
mart/car wash. Land and busi- 
ness. Priced to sell. Pontarelli 
(773) 631-8121 ext. 104- 
Frank.- 

KENOSHA WORKSHOPS, 
DOCKS, OFFICES, 

9000sq.ft. $25,000 annual 
profit. $179,000. (414) 
835-1216. 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



KENOSHA 29TH AVE., 
6813, 540sq.fL, offices or ? 
1st. floor, $360. (414) 
835-1216. 

FOX LAKE NEW lake view 
offices on Grand Avenue. 
(847)587-1615. 

HAINESVILLE OFFICE 
SPACE 600sq.ft, , excellent 
condition, great signage on Rt. 
120. $700/month. Ubertyville 
SOOOsq.ft., with outside stor- 
age, Rt. 137, zoned highway 
commercial. Trl-County R.E. 
(847) 615-1200. 

UBERTYVILLE-WAQEN- 
ER CORPORATE' CEN- 
TRE, 1265, 1600 & 5735sq.ft 
Industrial units available, 
Grade level and truck level 
loading. 15% A/C offices. US 
Mall and courier boxes on 
property. WEI (847) 
816-2621. 

ROUND LAKE LIQHT In- 
dustrial, 1900-6300sq.lt.. Rt. 
134 Frontage, drive-In door. 
O'Leary Realty (847) 
718-1745. 

SMALL MODERN OFFIC- 
ES FOR RENT IN BUR- 
LINGTON, 258 S. Pine, 
450s q.tt. Excellent location 
on main thoroughfare. All utili- 
ties and snow removal includ- 
ed. Immediate occupancy. 
Call Rick at (414) 763-7686 
days, (414) 534-5258 even- 
ings, 

WAUCONDA IN - TOWN 

700sq.lt , Industrial space with 
regular overhead door, pay 
own utilities, $395/month, plus 
security. (847) 526-5000 
leave message. 

WAUCONDA AREA IN- 
DUSTRIAL AND SHOP 
SPACE FOR RENT 

1, 080sq.lt. unit, $695 plus se- 
curity. Available immediately. 
2400aq.ft. POLE BARN 
with concrete floor. Heat, elec- 
tric, outside storage can be 
added. Office trailer available. 
$495 as Is. Available imme- 
diately. ISLAND LAKE IN- 
DUSTRIAL 3,000sq.fl, shop, 
with loading dock and office, 
(1) 10ft,x10ft., (1) 10ft.x11ft. 
overhead door. Available April 
1st. $1,160/month plus securi- 
ty. (B47) 526-5000, leave 
message. 



Richmond Car 

Lot or Your 

Business Use 

Brick Bldg. on Rt. 12, 

Shop with overhead 

door, office, additional 

storage garage 

& sales lot 

Excellent visibility. 

$795/mo 

Land Mgmt. 
815/678-4334 

MMM4M 



March 5, 1999 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



OFFICES 

FOR LEASE. 

1560 SQUARE 

FEET IN A 

SHOPPING STRIP. 

MIDLOTHIAN 
ROAD &RT. 176. 

FOR MORE 
INFORMATION 

CALL 
312-474-0036 



RICHMOND 

Fountain Head 

Corporate Center. 

RL 12, •; 

New Superior 

2750 to 7630 s.f. 

units, for 

INDUSTRy/BUSINESS,| 

a/c ofc, Common 

or Private Dock. 

.-2750 sf. $995 

Land MgnrL 
815/678-4771 



544 


Mortgage Senices 



NO DOWNPAYMENT? 

PROBLEM CREDIT? Own 

the home you need now, with- 
out e big down payment. Com- 
plete financing If qualified. De- 
George Home Alliance 1-800- 
343-2884. 

BARGAIN 
[ SHOPPE R^ 

DO YOU HAVE 

SOMETHING TO SELL 

FOR $75 OR LESS? 

Place your ad in this section 

for only $3.00 for 1 words or 

less. Must be prepaid. 

Call Usa (847) 223-8181 

ext. 140 or send the ad with 

with your payment to: 

Lakeland Publishers, 

P. O. Box 26a, 
30 S. Whitney St., 
Grayslake III. 60030. 
Attorn Lisa- 

SNOWBLOWER AND 

LAWNMOWER $75/ea. 

(847) 546M309. 



564 



RcsonWncalion 
Rentals 



GALENA AREA-SENIOR 
CITIZEN SPECIAL 3 nights 
lodging, two $50 casino fun 
books, great golf course, 
chance to win cash, only 
S99/porson (double occupan- 
cy req.). Timmerman'3 Hotel. 
Free Information 800-336* 
3181, www.tlmmermans.com 



568 



OutOfAreaPropert) 



KENTUCKY LAKEFRONT 
15 acres - $39,900. Lake 
property on beautiful undis- 
covered lake. Small town, 
country living. Meadows, 
woods, views and sunset. 4 
seasons, year round boating 
and fishing 800816-5253. 



SO. COLORADO RANCH. 

80 acres • $49,900. Bring your 
horses and ride out to one of 
the last great ranches in CO. 
Nice jfields with outstanding 
Rocky! Mln views. Yr. round ac- 
cess, lel/elec. Excellent financ- 
ing. Call now 719-676-6367 
Hatchet Ranch. 



TN LAKE BAHGAIN - 
$17,900. $1,800 down. Boat 
dock. Beautifully wooded lot at 
spectacular 30,000 acre lake, 
Paved road, utilities, sur- 
veyed, soils tested. Local bank 
has appraised • will finance 
7.25% fixed, 15 yeara. Only 
$147ymonth. Priced to sell Im- 
mediately. Offered first come, 
first served. Call now 800-861- 
5253,6X1.2301. 



ARKANSAS 

Get away horn the city. Great 

retirement property. Beautiful 160 

acie farm. Owtk Mms. Aikansaj. 

1800 it home. 2 lis DR. Z car 

garage, Irg Wlchen. FT. hdwd 

noon. Otchaid. bams, pond, 

itream, excel/hunting. 1195,000. 

Dy owner. Call 

8I2-36Z-6035 for detail*. 



B 



a 



* 









; 









• 




March 5, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers I CI 7 



574 



RefliEftite Wanted 



710 


Boal/Moton/Etc 



804 



Cirs For Sale 



I BUY HOUSES 
Call Mike (847) 362-0589, 

I BUY PROPERTIES. Will 
pay fair price with small down. 
Quick closings. (847) 
265-5987, ' 

INVESTOR SEEKS REAL 
ESTATE AGENT specializ- 
ing In handyman houses. 
Looking for all cash deals and 
quick closings. (847) 
265-5987, 



704 



Recreational 
Vehicles ' 



1997 SPORTSMAN 27FT. 
TRAVEL TRAILER, fiberglass 
body, fully equipped, fully 
screened-ln porch, Central 
Air, $12,000/best. (815) 
385-4670 ■ 

QEOROIE BOY 19B5 MO- 
TORHOME 24ft., $9,900. 
{015) 64B-2316. 

STARCRAFT TRUCK 

CAMPER 1987, 9.5', excel- 
lent condition. Refrigerator, 
water heater, bathroom, air, 
$4,000. (414) 878-9747. 

TRAVEL TRAILER 1992 
Dutchman, fully loaded, 26ft., 
excellent condition, 

$6.900/besl. (847) 669-3119 
after 5pm. 



1965 . STEURY 16FT. FI- 
BERGLASS SPEEDBOAT, 
boat, motor, trailer all In excel- 
lent shape. 90hp Johnson, 
new interior, $i,200/best. 
(414) 862-6911 MIcK. 

1995 LUND 16ft. deep V fish- 
ing boat, 40hp Tiller Mercury 
electric start trolling motor, 
roller, trailer, $6,250/bost, 
(847) 356-9242. ■ 

BOAT FOR SALE 1989.21ft. 
Sea Sprite, Big V8. open bow, 
aun deck, great condition, 
seats 9, 1 -owner, white & blue. 
Price with trailer $10,000. Ask 
for Jerry (847) 587-9378. 



720 



Sporu Equipment 



AWESOME MUSKIE 

LURE. Ruby the Black Suck- 
er. Call order (847) 740-6961. 

HANDGUNS NEW GUNS at 
discount prices. All models 
. available. Call for needs. Also, 
I buy used guns, must have 
F.O.I.D. (847) 949-8762 M. 
Sonka after 2pm. 

NORDIC TRACK PRO with 
owners guide and video, 
$400/best. (847) 549-8317, 
(847) 660-4292 after 5pm. 



804 



Can for Sale 



708 



Snowmobilei/ATVs 



1994 YAMAHA TIMBER- 
WOLF 2WD. 250cc, rarely 
used, never abused. Very low 
hours. Previously owned by 
Scottio Pippen ol the Chicago 
Bulls, S2,600/best. (414) 
862-6911 Mick. » 

SCOTTIE PIPPENS PRE- 
VIOUSLY OWNED 4 
WHEELERS 1994 Yamaha 
Kodlac Bear 400cc, 4WD. 
Rarely used, never abused, 
very low hours. Previously 
owned by Scottie Pippen of. 
the Chicago Bulls. 
$3,600/best. (414) 682-6911 
Mick. 

SNOWMOBILE 1995 ARC- 
TIC Cat Puma Deluxe, elec- 
tric start, hand-warmers, low 
mileage, ... mint . condition, 
$1,600/best. (815) 675-6126. 

SNOWMOBILE .1096 SKI 
DOO GRAND TOURING, 2 
up seating, SBOcc's, excellent 
condition, adult driven, loin, 
suspension, 2,050 miles, 
$3,990. (414) 279-3853 after 
5pm. ■ ■ 

SNOWMOBILES (2) 1986 
Yamaha SRVs, great shape, 
$1,100/ea, (847) 419-1252. 

YAMAHA 1982 44 OSS, ex- 
cellent condition, $1,050. 
1980 Yamaha XLV, excellent 
condition, $950. (815) 
648-4022. 



CHEVY 1987 EL CAMINO 
P/U, low miles, no rust, A/T. 
PS, PB, am/fm cassette, bed- 
liner, $4,500. (B47) 395-3932 
after 5pm. .! 

CORVETTE 1992 CON- 
VERTIBLE while with white 
top, garage kept, 55,000 
miles. Excellent condition. 
(815)365-6468. 

AUDI 1995 A6, $17,990. 
(847) 432-5020. 

AUDI 1996 A4, $19,990. 
(847) 432-5020. 

BUICK 1994 CENTURY, 

$5,998. (647) 587-3400. 

CADILLAC 1992 SEVILLE, 
$9.995. (647) 249-1300. 

CADILLAC 1995 CON- 
COURS, $12,997. (847) 5B7- 
3400. 

CADILLAC 1995 DEVILLE 
SEDAN, $15,995. (847) 234- 
2BD0. 

CARS FROM $500 

Pollco Impounds 

■ AndTax Repo's. 

For listings call 

1-800-319-3323 
exl. 2292. 

CHEVROLET 1996 COR- 
SICA SEDAN, $8,995. (847) 
360-5000. • • 

CHEVROLET 1996 

MONTE CARLO, excellent 
condition, low miles, loaded, 
$13,500/bost. (847) 

395-7303. . 



CHEVROLET 1998 . MALI- 
BU, $1 1,595. (847) 234-2800, 

CHEVY 1996 CAVALIER 
Z24, 60,000 miles, power 
steorlng/brakes, 5-speed, CD, 
A/C, excellent condition, 
$10,299/best. Must sell. (647) 
247-1048. 

CHEVY 1996 CAVALIER, 
$6,988. (847) 587-3400. 

CONTINENTAL 19B7 EX- 
CELLENT condition, fully 
loaded, owned by mechanic, 
recent tune-up, tires, brakes 
and more. $2,800/best. (847) 
973-1557. 

CORVETTES 1953-1996 
OVER 1501 One location. 
Free catalog. Toll free: 888- 
592-5086 Fax: 419-592-4242 
Website: www.proteamcor- 
vette.com ProTeam, Box 608, 
Napoleon, Ohio 43545. Cor- 
vettes Wanted. 

DODGE 1990 SHADOW, 
$1,548. (647) 587-6473. 

DODGE 1992 COLT 
HATCHBACK, $1,500/best. 
(847) 680-5110. 

DODGE 1995 NEON, 
$5,995.(847)623-1492. 

ENCORE 1995, 5-SPEED, 
1 .7, sliver with mags and rac- 
ing' stripes, clean, well main- 
tained, moving, nice runner, 
(414) 697-4123. 

EXPRESS AUTO 
EXCHANGE 
USED CARS 

We take consignment cars. 

No charge. 

Too busy to sell your car? 

Let us do it tor you. 

(647)740-1400 

1 19 W. Rollins Rd. 

Round Lake Beach. 

(Across from Burger King). 

Ask for Chris. 

FORD 1987 ESCORT 
WAGON $500/best. FORD 
1981 ECONOLINE, 

$1,250/best. Black, reese trail- 
er hitch. (414) 652-7647. 

FORD 1989 ESCORT 
WAGON, $3,395. (847) 360* 
5000. 

FORD -, ,Wlfl92... „> TEMPO, 
$4,668. (647) 587-3400. 

FORD 1993 PROBE GT, 
red, ' runs great, loaded, 
$7.000/best. (414) 862-2999. 

FORD 1994 TEMPO GL, 
$5,995. (847) 5B7-3300. 

FORD 1995 ' ESCORT 
WAGON, like - new, garage 
kept, 5-speed, low miles, 
$5,200. (647) 836-5722 even- 
ings, (847) 872-4470 ext.325, 
days. _> ' 

GEO STORM 1995, 

$3,988. (847) 567-3400. 



-V", 



jA 



fi^arfl^ 



mm 



3' 



AfJ 



CLETUS 

(338-012) 

The Clelus (338*012) presents the image of southern colonial with its columns and arched 
entry, along with Ihe country style shown oil by the wraparound porch. Brick with wood accents 
emphasizes the looks ol this home. Numerous windows around the home allow sunlight and 
excellent views. The dormers provide light and a great contemporary look. 

The Clelus has 2,415 square leet, wilh the living area on one end and the bedrooms on 
Ihe other. The kitchen, nook, and formal dining take up one end ot the home wilh skylights over 
the cooking area, and over the family room. The highlight 61 the kitchen is the elongated pantry 
wilh an appliance center, along with double'ovens and an eating bar. 

The nook accesses the covered porch through French doors. Through a pocket door off Ihe 
nook is the utility room with a full balh, direct access to the breezeway and garage. 

The family room, office, and the formal dining room are all vaulted. Archways to the oflice 
and formal dining room are oft Ihe vaulted entry. The family room has a lireplace in the corner 
and a built-in entertainment cenler, wiring access located in the oflice area. A basement Is an 
option and the stairs are located adjacent to the family room. French doors also open on to the 
covered breezeway, along with an open deck. 

The three bedrooms run along the front of Ihe home on ihe lell end. A full bathroom is locat- 
ed at the end of the hall. Across the hall, the master bedroom runs hall the rear length ol the 
home. It has all the comforts, Irom built-in shelves, linen closets, two large walk-In closets, an 
oval enlarged tub, twin sinks, two toilets, a vanity, and a shower. 

To top the home olf is the detached qaraae located behind the home. It has an area Ideal 
for a shopwllh a rear exit of 



ont-ili oa'KiiQNt: if I » r 
Lnma.'iain-M>>h-t 



ALutdrnaric 



k Designs 



double doors for easy access. cuiam.™ 

_, * , . or i. •mm-'! --tr- 

Ove rail, the Clelus is a dream 

home. of the highest quality. It 
would fulfill the family's needs for 
space and comfort. 

For a study kit of the CLE- 
TUS (33B-012LP60) send $14.95, 
to Landmark Designs, 33127 
■Saginaw Rd. E.,- Cottage Grove, 
OR 97424 (Specify plan name & 
number for kit). For a collection 
of plan books, send 520.00, or 
savo by ordering the kit and col- 
lodion together for S29.95, or 
call 1-800-562-1151. 



-=l>. , 



-'l 






/: -4 •- v 



U" d 

d'U P. iff tmm 



804 



Cars For Sale 



GOLF VW 1992, 50,400 
acutat 'miles, woman driver, 
woman owner, Very sharp, 
runs excellent, manual, A/C. 
$5,650.(647)543-1965. 

HONDA 1987 ACCORD 
LXI SEDAN, sunroof, fully 
loaded, $4,300. (847) 
973-9166. >. . 

HONDA 1991 ACCORD 
LX, 4-door, 5-speed, excellent 
condition, 30MPG, low mile- 
age, 1 -owner, loaded, $5,425. 
(414)882-9263. 

HONDA 1993 ACCORD 
SE, $9,900. (847) 623-1492. 

HONDA 1993 DEL SOL 
CONVERTIBLE, asking 

$4,999, (847) 918-1943. 

HONDA 1993 PRELUDE, 
$8,995.(647)234-2800. 

HONDA PRELUDE 1997, 
$19,000, 5-speed, rnoonroof, 
14K miles, perfect condition, 
(647) 473-6095. 

HYUNDAI 1993 ELAN- 
TRA, $3,995. (647) 249-1300. 

INFINITI 1993 G20, 

$9,595. (847) 362-9200. 

INFINITI 1995 J30, 

$16,995, (B47) 362-9200. 

INFINITI 045'S, $15,995. 

(847) 362-9200. 

LEXUS 1994 GS300, 
$17,995, (847) 234-2800. 

MAZDA 1989 MX8 GT TUR- 
BO, sunroof, all power, red, 5- 
speed. Fast car. Low miles, 
one owner, $4,850. (847) 
516-2364. 

MAZDA 1695 MtLLENIA, 
$12,995.(847)362-9200. 

MERCURY 1993 TRACER 
WAGON, $4,968. (847) 587- 
3400. 

MERCURY 1994 TOPAZ, 
$2,900, (647) 623-1492. 

MITSUBISHI 1992 

ECUPSE, $2,595. (847) 395- 
3600. - 

NATIONAL USED BUS 
SALE March 16-20. Motor- 
homes, campers, sealed 
coaches and more. All priced 
to. sell In 3 days. Register Jo^ 
win a free car. ABC Bus"Com-" 
pantes, Chicago. 877-222- 
2S78. . 

OLDS 1969 CUTLASS, 
$1,786. (647) 587-6473. 

OLDSMOBILE 1995 AU- 
RORA, $13,995. (847) 234- 
2800. 

PLYMOUTH 1997 
BREEZE, $11,475. (847) 
587-6473. '■ 

PLYMOUTH 1997 NEON, 
$9,995. (647) 249-1300. 

PONTIAC 1991 FIREBIRD 
PRO-AM, $8,988. (647) 587- 
3400. 

PONTIAC 1991 GRAND 
AM, 2-door, excellent condi- 
tion, body clean In and out, au- 
tomatic engine 2.5, garage 
kept. ' $5,000/besl. (847) 
731-2950. 

PONTIAC 1995 GRAND 
AM, $6,995. (847) 234-2800. 

PORSCHE 1983 911 CAB., 
$22,990. (847)432-5020. 

PORSCHE 1991 911 CHE., 
$27,990. (847) 432-5020. 

SAAB 1995 900S CVT„ 
$17,950. (647) 432-9300. 

SAAB 1996 9000, $20,995. 
(847) 362-9200. 

SAAB 1996 900SE, 5- 
DOOR, $18,950. (647) 432- 
9300. 

SAAB 1997 9000CSE, 
$24,950. (847) 432-930O. 

SAAB 1999 9.3SE 5-DOOR. 
526.950. (847) 432-9300. 

SATURN 1993 4-DOOR, 
country driven, well cared for. 
Asking $5,500. (847) 
356-3023. 

SATURN 1995 SC2, 

POWER LOCKS/WIND- 

OWS/SUNROOF, ABS, 5- 
SPEED, BLACK GOLD, 

excellent condition, 
$10,000/best. (847) 
916-1476. 

SATURN 1996 SL1, 
$9.995. (847) 587-6473. 

SATURN SL1 1995, 

$5,995. (847) 360-5000. 

SUBARU 1994 LEGACY, 

58,995, (847) 587-3300. 

SUZUKI 1998 ESTEEM, 
$9,995. (847) 249-1300. • 



804 


Cars For SaJc 



TOYOTA 1S93 COROLLA 
LE, $6,995. (647) 362-9200. ' 

TRACER 1989, GOOD 

body, needs mechanical work. 
(815) 646-4957. 

VOLVO 1994 850 SEDAN, 
$18,995.(647)362-9200. 

VOLVO 1996 655 GLT 
WAGON, $22,295. (847) 362- 
9200. __ 

VOLVO 1998 SELECT 

S70'S, $24,595. (847) 352- 
9200. , 

VW 1995 JETTA GL, 
$6,995. (647) 249-1300. 



810 



Classic/Antique Can 



CHEVY 1967 IMPALA 
Chevy Vet Fest winner, 
$11,000. 1947 Chevy project, 
$1,800.(647)546-8425. 



814 


, Service SPartj 



CLASSIC QUARTER 

PANEL SALE, Mustang, Cam- 
aro, Nova, Chevelle, Cutlass, 
Mopars, Pontlac, Chevrolet, 
moret TRUCK PANS, FLOOR 
PANS. DOORS, FENDERS, 
BUMPERS. New and Califor- 
nia. Rust free. MARK'S PLAT- 
ING & SUPPLY 217-824-61 84. 



824 


Vans 



828 



Four Wheel Drive 
Jeep* 



CHEVROLET 1994 BLAZ- 
ER SPORT, $13,495. (847) 

234-2800. 

CHEVY 1994 S-10 BLAZER 
4X4, $7,995. (847) 395-3600. 



828 



Four Weds 
Dttrefleeps 



DODGE 1992 CARAVAN, 

cargo style, 4-cyllnder, air, 
power brakes/steering, cas- 
sette, newer tires, brakes and 
tune-up. Excellent condition, 
$4,000. (847) 587-7868. 

CHEVROLET 1892 CON- 
VERSION, new 
tlres/b rakes/exhaust, 75,000 
miles, loaded. Nice. Must see. 
$7,500, (414) 552-7640. 

CHEVY 1993 G20 CON- 
VERSION VAN, $9,320. (847) 
587-6473. 

DODGE 1990 CARAVAN, 
$2,543. (847) 587-6473. 

DODGE 1993 CARAVAN, 

$4,500. (647) 623-1492. 

FORD 1993 AEROSTAR 
XL, $8.995. tB47),SB7;a400..,, 

FORD 1995 E-150 CON- 
VERSION . VAN, loaded, 
leather tntertor, running 
boards, tow package, only 
36,000 mites, asking $16,900. 
(847) 526-5957. 

FORD 1997 AEROSTAR' 
XLT, low mileage, 6-cylInder, 
tan/tan Interior, am/fm cas- 
sette, rear defrost/wiper, lug- 
gage rack, tilt and cruise, 
power windows and locks, 
(647) 497-4302. . 

FORD 1997 WINDSTAR, 
$12,995, (647) 234-2600. 

PLYMOUTH 1993 VOYAG- 
ER, $4,000/best. (414) 
279-6370 after 5pm. 



PLYMOUTH 1993 VOYAG- 
ER VAN, $5,595. (847) 360- 
5000. 

VW EUROVAN 1993, 
$8,995. (847) 249-1300. 



CHEVY 1995 CK1500 
TAHOE 2-door, 4WD, loaded, 
excellent condition, 
$16,500/best. (847) 
550-9034, t 

CHEVY 1995 TAHOE, 

4WD, 4-door, power every- 
thing, $18.500/best Call Ace 
Wortd Wide (630) 543-5510. 

F-250 XLT 1993, extended 
cab, 4x4 7.3 Diesel, automatic, 
Florida truck, 130K mites, lyr. 
old Meyers plow, 
$14,Q00/best. (414) 
876-3477. 

FORD 1986 BRONCO, 
$5,995. (847) 395-3600. 

FORD 1991 EXPLORER 
4X4, $4,995. (847) 587-6473. 

FORD 1997 EXPLORER 
XLT, $20,788. (647) 587-3400, 

GEO 1694 TRACKER 4X4, 
$6,596. (647) 587-6473. 

GMC 1987 JIMMY S-15, 
4WD, V6, 5-speed, custom 
paint, dependable and very 
clean, loaded. (414) 
694-1251. 

GMC 1994 SUBURBAN 
SLE, 4WD, 78K miles, good 
condition, tow package, 
$21,000.(815)338-6087. ' 

GMC 1995 JIMMY, 58K 
miles, V6, 4x4, black, loaded. 
Custom Craft Conversion, ex- 
tended warranty, $16,500. 

(414) 876-9329. 

GMC JIMMY SLT 4X4 1993, 
$10,995. (847) 395-3600. 



GRAND CHEROKEE 
1995, $15,900. (647) 623- 
1492. 

ISUZU 1994 TROOPER 

4X4, S9.495, (647) 234-2600. 

JEEP 1991 CHEROKEE 
LIMITED, 4WD, 4.0L, 6-cylIn- 
der, automatic, A/C, power 
windows/locks, white with tan 
leather, $5,495. (647) 
573-0206. 

JEEP 1993 WRANGLER 
4X4, $7.995. (847) 234-2800. 

JEEP 1994 GRAND CHER- 
OKEE LIMITED, 53K, good 
shape. (847) 672-8752. 

JEEP 1994 GRAND CHER- 
OKEE LAREDO, "S1 2,995. 
(847) 362-9200. 

JEEP 1994 WRANGLER, 
$9,900. (647) 623-1492. 

JEEP COMANCHE 1989 
2x4, 140K. miles, 5-speed, 
bedliner, snap-on bed cover, 
new tires, excellent condition 
and runner, $3,300. (414) 
534-6548. - 

NISSAN PATHFINDER 

16S7, excellent condition, 
$3,750/besL (847) 395-6014. 



834 


Trucks/Trailers 



DODGE 1993 DAKOTA 
EXTENDED CAB MARK 
111, loaded, VS, 81,000 
miles. $8,800/best. (414) 
653-6840. 

DODGE 1993 DAKOTA, 
$12.995. (647) 587-3300. 

DODGE 1994 RAM 1500, 
$7.237. (647) 587-6473. 

DODGE 1996 DAKOTA 
SLT CLUB CAB, 4x4 V8, fully 
loaded, $15,700. (414) 
S59-9344. 

ENCLOSED TRAILER 

FOR JUNIOR DRAGSTER, 
16ft., $1,200/best. ' (414) 
279-6370 after 5pm. 



834 


Tmcks/Trailers 



FORD 1980 F-250 SNOW- 
PLOW, runs good, plows 
good, body rough, 
$1,0O0/beSt (647) 672-2866 
after 5pm. 

FORD 1969 TRUCK F250 
4X4, 5-speed, manual trans., 
comm. top and steel rack, 
$2,850. (847) 587-7897 after 
6pm. .__^^^^ 

FORD 1993 F-150, $8,995. 
(847) 587-3300, 

FORD 1994 F-150 SUPER 
CAB 4X4, $13,995. (647) 587- 
6473. 

FORD 1994 RANGER 
XLT, 5-speed, AM/FM cas- 
•sette, bedliner, excellent con- 
dition, 66,000 miles, 
$8,500/best. (847) 816-7646. 

FORD 1995 RANGER 
SUPER CAB, $9,966. (847) 

587-3400. ' 

FORD F-150 XLT red, ex- 
tended cab short box, match- 
ing fiberglass cap, 4x4 West- 
ern Proplow, $12,000/best. 
(847) 662-6669. 



838 


Heavy Equipment 



CRANE ELECTRIC 220 
volt, 3-phase, $300. (414) 
669-8513. 



844 



Motorcycles 



HARLEY DAVIDSON 1999 
1200. CUSTOM SPORT, 
$10,500.(414)652-4810. 



S18 



Concrete/ 
Cement 



HAULING OF ALL TYPES 
and demolition, driveways, 
foundations, all cement work. 
Backhoe and dump truck serv- 
ices. No one beats our prices. 
Villa Concrete Company also 
will barter for services for 
RVs, automobiles, furniture, 
etc. (847) 526-8871. 



S33 


Handyman 



THE HANDYMAN NO Job 

too small. Painting, carpentry 
and repair work. Reasonable 
rates and free estimates. 
(647)223-7724. 



S39 



Housekeeping 



ARE YOU TIRE OF 
CLEANING OR JUST 
DONT HAVE THE TIME? 

Give me a call. Have referenc- 
es and insurance. Weekly/bi- 
weekly. Kathy (847) 
395-1150. 

HOUSEKEEPING CAN 

GIVE references. (414) 

653-9456. ■ 

MORAVIA 

. CLEANING SERVICE. 

House cleaning 

Window cleaning. 

References available. 

Quality work at low cosL 

(847) 623-4943. 



S78 


Remodeling 



DC TILE WE Install floor and 
wall tiles of all kinds, Remodel 
all bathrooms and kitchens. 
Free estimates. (647) 395- 
0777. 

JACK'S 

REMODELING 

•Basement Finishing 

*Famllyrooms & Officerooms 

•Electrical & Plumbing 

■Kitchens & Baths 

•Vinyl Replacement Windows 

'Soffit Fascia. 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(647) 546-3759. 



Lakeland's 





A Word 
•Rate 




1) Ad in Lakeland's 11 papers 

2) Ad in Great Lakes Bulletin 

3) Ad in Market Journal Wst- 

4) Plus ad placement on the Internet 

Price based on 15 words or fewer 
Ve<ucu«c4 - Tuesday @ 5:00 pm 
6*U4U* © (847) 223-8161 ext 140 
fat Sjiecitl IRttfe 





C18 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



March 5, 1999 



TAX DIRECTOR 



&* 



ATCWEGGE,LTD. 

Enrolled Agents • CPA 

IRS Representation 

Established Since 1960 

265 Center St • Grayslake 

(847) 223-0777 

CARL SAND 
ACCOUNTING & INCOME TAX 

E-FILE available 

404 Lake St • Antioch 

(847) 395-7444 

COMPREHENSIVE 
ACCOUNTING SERVICE 

Free Electronic Filing vol pd. return 

564 N. Route 83 • Grayslake 

Daniel E. Coulon, EA 

(847) 223-4040 

COTE & WRIGHT 

Servicing Lake County for over 30 years 

1304 Washington St. • Waukegan 
(847) 662-6019 • fax (847) 662-6053 

DAM, SNELL & TAVEIRNE, LTD. 

Certified Public Accountants 

21 Rollins Rd. • Fox Lake 

(847) 587-3022 

1512Artaius Parkway • Libertyville 

(847) 367-4448 

2022 S. Route 31 • McHenry 

(815) 363-1801 
Internet Address: dstcpa.com 

THOMAS L. KRON, CPA 

Individual & Business Taxes 

Appointments available at 

your convenience 

1 724 E. Grand Ave. • Lindenhurst 

(847) 265-0866 




H&R BLOCK 

474B W.Liberty • Wauconda 

(847)526-8877 

2 W. Grand • Fox Lake 

(847)587-9333 

426 Lake • Antioch 

(847)395-6230 

629 W. Rollins • Round Lake 

(847)546-4862 

23 South Route 12 • Fox Lake 

(847)973-1099 

226 N. Barron Blvd. • Grayslake 

(847)548-6060 

46 West Main St. • Lake Zurich 

(847)726-1099 

622 E. Hawley • Mundelein 

(847)949-8433 

2435 Green Bay Road • North Chicago 

(847)689-1099 
23 West Rollins Road • Round Lake Beach 

(847)740-1099 

336 S. Green Bay Road* Waukegan 

(847)360-1099 

2250 Sheridan Road • Zion 

(847)746-1099 

CALL 1-800-234-1040 

FOR OTHER LOCATIONS. 

JERROLD J. WEINSTEIN, LTD. 

Income Tax Preparation 
(Electronic Filing Available) 
Small Business Accounting 

Payroll Service 

4949 Grand Ave. • Gurnee 

(847) 662-3420 






.■;,-..- 



u would like your/company to be 



added to Lakeland's Tax Directory, 
please call Paula or Ross at 847-223-8161 j 









cm 

OR N E-R 



ffv. 




Child Care 



CHILD CARE in my home, 

Excellent references, 6:30am 
to 6:30pm. 847.555-0000 




LOVING CHILD 
CARE IN MY 
GRAYSLAKE 
HOME. Hot lunch, 
nutritious snacks, educational 
toys and lots of TLC. 34 years 
experience. Will take 6mo to 
6yrs. Please call tor many ref- 
erences or to visit and 
observe. 

847-555-0000 




McHonry/ 
Johnaburg mom 
of 2 will watch your 
child In my home. 
Big, fenced backyard, large 
playroom, no pets, non smok- 
ing, and plenty of love. 
Available Monday- Friday 6am 
to 6pm. Breakfast, lunch and 
snacks will be provided. 
Please call Sue 
"847-555-0000 



CHILD CARE in your home, or 
mine. References available. 
847-555-0000 



Word Rate Ads 

1 5 words $9.75 

150 for each 

additional word 

(pre-paid) 

Ad with border 
and logo 

•15 words $14.75 

150 for each 

additional word 

(pre-paid) 

PRIVATE PARTY 
ONLY 



Classified Order Blank 



1 Use the handy coupon below. Count words. 

j Phone numbers and hyphenated words count as one word. Write copy below. 



Enclose check & mail to: Lakeland Publishers, 30 S. Whitney P.O. Box 268, 

Grayslake, IL 60030 or fax (847) 223-2691. To place an order by phone call 

Lisa at (847) 223-8161 ext. 140. We also accept Visa & MasterCard. 



Lakeland Newspapers is your 




To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



To Place 
Your Ad Here 

Call 

847-223-8161 




jgjjg 



] 


1. 

1 


1 


1 


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^RbbmAdditions.. • •Bathrooms •Siding; 

• Basements ««DorMehBS •Roofing 

../...■ 



w^^M^omsrln'J 







HHHHKHHKHKHHHHHHHHHHMHKHHHHHMHKHHHKHMHMHHHHHHHMHHHHKHHHH 

M ALL AMERICAN CONST, 3 




Lie. Bonded 
& Insured 



Kitchen-Bath-Basement 

Painting/Custom Remodeling 

Quality work at affordable prices 

SPECIAL ON BASEMENTS NOW 

WITHIN 24 HR. HANDYAAAN SERVICE 
Free Estimates 

847-548-5110 



H 




REOISTEKD 

WITH TIC 

better TTRTT 

BUWNOS Buncw — ■ — 



a 



HMMMMKMHHHMHMKMHMMMHMMHHHMHHHHHHMHHMHHHHHMMMHKHHHMHMHHMM 



♦♦♦>»»« QMM I»»« Q «< I >H MH I Mimi l l l l l l »t»«t» MHMWtW 



LandTiark Financial, Inc. 

An Illinois Mortgage Banker 

• Refinancing • Debt Consolidation 

• Home Improvement • FHA Loans 

• Purchase • Equity Credit Line 

CALL your local rep 
MIKE WINGO Today 

(630)424-9512 fgj 

Landmark Financial Is id Illinois Residential Licensee tUtWi 




* * " Mt l ll l llllHtlllll l »B »OM »»I H I « I Mm, 



|A| General Servicing 

& ffl Residential & 
LL Commercial 
Interior • Exterior 

' Painting * Drywalt Repair 

' General Repairs ' Power Washing 

' * Deck Staining & Sealing 

'Gutter Clean-Out 

* Apartment A House Maintenance 

' TV & Phone Jack Installation 

(847) 973-9466 

Insured 








I 



March 5, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers 



/C19 



Lakeland Mewspapers is your 



Place 



,«~j 



Here 



-}*? 



m\ 






\jm\ g gggggABEABU SWESS & SERVICES 



M ! 




T. UkZZARETTO 

CONSTRUCTION 

OFFERS: 

• General Contracting 
•Interior Trim •R«n^ e J**« . 

•Sldlnff, SoKlt, Fewta .Addition* 

• Basement Finishing 

• Decks/Screen Porches 
•Window Replacement 

• Drywnll & Painting 
quality Work 

fTT CUARANTEEDlJ! 

M Call CB47) S37-0677 

Wl ; Aek. Sor Tony 

| t/|/ Fullvlniured 





AFFORDABLE 
HOME REPAIRS 



HANDYMAN SERVICE 



Save money by using Americas 

largest handyman service. 

Insured; bonded, guaranteed. 

(847) 726-1061 




INSTALLATIONS! INC. 

• Custom Remodeling 

• Basements • Kitchens 

• Balhs • Stairs 

• Railings- Decks 

• Aluminum Vinyl . 
& Wood Siding 

No Job Too Big or Small 

Free Estimates 

847-356-1602 



J Painting •^lfeapering t 
: Expirtinstailation 
| Paper -FaBric vVinxl 



OFFICES IN 30 STATES 



Call Paula or 

^ssT^dayTo 

Gst Your Service 

Placed H 




Sj,s INTRODUCE: 

YOUtt BUSINESS 

10 111 U MOULD! 

We offer complete Web Site 

design and hosting packages 

for any size site. 

netDIREGF- 

(«47) 223-8109 

\ Since 199S SleveWadhwaRefrrtnctt 
' m»M »r* 




THE SCOOP COMPANY 
Pet Clean-Up Service 

Weekly Service • Affordable Rates 

847/548-4633 



; 



! (84^395-8428 

DONT THHOUMWAY' 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR 
LAMP DOCTORS 
FOR REPAIRS. 

WARREN ELECTRIC INC. 

33261 N. HIGHWAY 45 

W1LDW00D, IL 60030 

08*7)223-8691 





nnh nrah W. Anzelc, CPA 

— — ~ a^77»nTii3Si3uIiu7«rfA««ioiin( 

Ttl (M7) 36 WMl 1 B7t South (hprcT Une 

f«<847)361-MM . lifcrtfnto, ilftuM MM" 

A IocaI Ciniillwl Public AccouniIw RnM *onhIw, 

ciiS« JSSoXd URYiciV ftl COMpOhWE Mill 

Our uraic" IncIwU: 
.OookWcipiM-, ANd ««o«.«ilw, 

• I'Aynotl ttmki* 

■ HUNCUI tl»IU«INl pMp»«AlIw 

• Niw Uftloft* *tmii-up »«K»NCf 
•INtipAUlion ol blrtlMM i« »tltwrt 

• PRip*i"l!o« <•« pmw* 1 •" ■""• M 
•AtCOUNllMt «Jiw*Bt \\HH\ 

• CwWll«liOM - 




New Ideas Daily. 

Ad Campaigns, Logo Design, 

Identity Pieces for Communicating 

in the New Millennium. 

whinger's 

Graphic Art & Design 

(847) 265-0986 




MARTY'S 
LANDSCAPE MAINT 
^GUTTER & TREE SERVICE 

Spring & Fall Clean-up 

Lawn Care 

Annual 4 Step 

Fertilizing Program 

Senior Discounts 

Licensed & Insured 

FREE ESTIMATES 

Call Marty 
(815)759-1503 



£&ke Online! 

■Lake County's Hot Spot on the WWWf 

wwrW.lake-oniine.com 



PxoJuccJ 6 i the $&*W Winning 



litudio 




Complete small Engine 
Repair Service 

e TUne-Ups • Repair 
• Overhaul 

Otietim prompt, amneuus service vn 

your 2-cyctt or4-rycle «*''"<• 

Wilding also available 

S.LNI.C.O. 

WIS N OAA«..R« , u™ JLol,;De ? ,:IUL 

R47-740-3729 



Get Your 
Service 



l, hit l >>r 

. Aluminum Cms 

. All Oik* Siu|> MW-»I> 
/nifuMrwMii'iHMi^tVi'fiiiim; 

CHICAGO SURPLUS 

11304 260th Avenue 

Trevor, Wl 

Loco'hon: Trevor. Wl 1 rrnle west ol 83 & C. Turn 
North on 259* St veer to loll 2 Hocks 

Mon. - Fit 9am - 5pm 

Saturday 9am - 3pm 

Closed 12 - I for lunch 

(414)862-2517 





DECKS PLUS 

• CONSTRUCTION 
GENERAL CARPENTRY 
• Custom Decks 

•Porches 'Room Additions 
' •Basement Remodeling 
•Bathrooms r Kitchens 
•Custom Carpentry 
'Improvements & Repaiis! 
INSURED & BONDED 
FHEE ESTIMATES 

(414) 889*44* 

PlMse Call Gary Kolkau 



Businesses 
tntemeU 

From S«w« Wsb SK*w to Pro^tou. W«to 
StU W. Empower £>a with the Information 
Crucial to Your Sucee** . . - 

■^1.1^ with f»-Y «" Wr» Produce: 

- Inlemet Marketing Somrwr- 

- MonthV WWW Marketing Newsletter - 

Free Link In Lake Onllne's Market 

Place with 12,000 visitors Per Montnl 



Choose Your Online Partners Wisely. 
www.lheistudio.com/criteria.hlm 



847-395-9115 

391 Lake Street Downtown Antloch 



m 



FAHTAST1C FIREWOOD 

k ASH, MAPLE, CHERRY $<£ ' 

100% OAK $75 (F.C) 

m&fr 1841)546-3613 

(8IS) 344-9522 

1-800-430-6262 ( 



m 



2?S,V> 



JE3 




HEATWAVE x ^SB^j 

Heating m Air Conditioning mmm 



PRE-SEASON SPECIAL 

I PRECISION FURNACE 
TUNE-UP 

WITH THIS COUPON 



(847) 740-4127 

Fax (847) 546-0855 
We Service All Makes & Models 
Fuify Licensed & Insured 
All Work Guaranteed 
Wo accept All Ma|or 
Credit Cards 



SKILLED CARPENTERS!! 

Deal with the people 

who do the work. 

SAVE MONEY on 

• Room Additions 

• Second Story Additions 

• Homes 

Over 30 years experience 

Call Rod Johnson 

(847) 543-8972 



I Aardvark Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning 

: Providing friendly, professional service to Lake Co. 
I 2 roomsAiall steam cleaning: $45 

I 3 roomsAiall steam cleaning: $65 

'• L-shaped & extra large rooms count as two. 

I No hidden charges, fully licensed & insured. 



■ f 



847-855-9187 



■ ■ ■ ■ 



■ ■ ■■ ■ 



■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 




Licensed 

Insured 

FREE 

Estimates 



rooming;* 

- SIDING &:f RIM "■■..'. 

SEAMLESS-jGUTTERS;;; 

WINDOWS: DOORS 

;DEGKS- AWNINGS^ 

Repair ^insurance Work 

(847) 438-6634 or 

(847)550-9536 



nnn 



EXTERIORS 



rum 



- Quality 
Craftsmanship 
Guaranteed 



FORTRESS -HfiLL 

Siding 
VINYL - ALUMINUM 

Dealer Rep 

TRAC0 1M SUN ROOMS 

ALLSIDE ,M VINYL WINDOWS 

Inglcside, IL 

(847) 587-1777 



"Call Us For Fast Courteous Service 

33265 N. Rte. 45 

WUdwood.IL 60030 

(847) 223-4682 

RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL 





C20 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



March 5, 1999 







FREE ADM I//ION 



3nd Afltmi 

9e&tival 

Saturday, March I 
1 0:00am -4:00pm 

Grayslake Community : 
High School ? 

400 N.Lake St. ^ 
Grayslake, Illinois 
Over 75 Grafters 
Sponsored by Band Boosters 

BAKE /ALE 





WANTED TO BUV 

ALL antiques ,md old furniture, old clocks, 

crocks, toys, old lamps, glassware, art glass 

rugs, advertising Items 6* military Items. 

Buy one piece, or entire estatel 

Call Joe 
I -414-877-2432 

or 
1-800-628-9255 



-<n%TE- 




na/nosa 



r ues 



WE BUY & SELL 



•Furniture -Clocks -Toys -Rugs 

•Jewelry -Glassware -Stiver -Lamps 
-Paintings -Porcelain -Dolls 



SERVICES INCLUDE 



Estate Settlement 
Auction Service 



test® 





mg 



Rentals 



Xiberlyville fyntylll 

185 Peterson Rcl. • Llhcrtyvillc 

Everything for a party... 
except guests! 

847/362-7610 



Invitations 



Personal Care 



<£)iei &Z 

Naturally & Nutritiously 
jjose Weight Fast!! 

847/244-2606 

("U)ok"& "Feel" the best you can on 
this all important dav of your life! ) 

m — «~~„ ; — ... 



Limousine Service 



Chicago 



filler. $ress 
9G6 victoria St. • Aiitioch | Xundiisine Service, Inc. 

1 10% OFF your wedding invitation 
order with this ad 



847/395-1203 



•Glean-out Service 
-Appraisals 



Ziaw <Antiqu& "Mall 

"Beautiful Bits of Yesterday" 

2754 Sheridan Rd. t Zion 

(847)731-2060 

Tues.-Sat. 9:30-5:00 

Sun. 1-5 V Closed Mon. 

Visit our website: www.zionantlquemall.com 



(847) 356-0832 



Open 1)aift/ 10- J • (Jfosecf 9IConcfays 

JSH336 Hi). £?r*etri<fC%u<;. 

£tus/ Wes/ offJ?/ 43 on !7?/ JD2 

3 y/f/'/i. T(L>ejs/ of 




m»<*tWP*WW*W»**WW*» *mtW+**rt*miiMt9mM**m 



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_ — ... . ■• . • , r n tx # ijj f jf r t xwiiliM:±**iK 



Travel Agent 



jforlh Star 'Travel 

Lliulculuirst 

Sandals Specialist 

847/356-2000 ext 100 



Luxurious, 



8-passenger limousines 



847/913-9600 



Florists 



<P.S. Mowers % Walloons] 

135 E. Liberty • Wnucoiuln 

Specializing in custom weddings 
10% OFF any gift item taptnt 3.3hx» 

847/526-5300 



ijV ua :■'-■ : 






v. .'I 



BBPB— ■ 



. g*M|| 



Valentine 




INNERS! 




fill winners will receive 
complimentary movie tickets to 

Regal Cinemas (Round Lake) 



•> ■ 






Ages 4-6 

Kaylee Jo Sid dens 

Lake Villa 



Ages 7-8 

Katarina Musser 

Wauconda 



Ages 9- 10 

Joflnna Nannini 

Gurnee 



Thank you to all our contestants. It was a very hard decision for our judges.^ 



■■"V./.ij* 



c*T. 



: •■ 







INMtJtafe « SMEIF fMMRJMBfe 



**»: 



■ 




***: 



THE SCOOP COMPANY 
Pet Clcan-Up Service 

Weekly Service 
Affordable Rates 

847/548-4633 



-ST 






■ . 



■ i 



■ 







IN DOG TRAINING CORP. 



t 



10 



% OFF ANY 
SERVICE 



I 

1 
I 



V, 



j 1 460 E. Belvidere Rd., Grayslake, l L | 



I 






(847) 223-2822 



I 



;.l| oxpires 4/30/99 One coupon per customer per visit | 





Teddy is this week's "PET OF THE WEEK". As a recent 
addition to the house, Teddy loves all adults, kids and cats 

alike. He also put a spark back into his 12-year-old 
Labrador housemate who was mourning the toss of her ^T 
. lifelong buddy.Here he Is shown with' neighbor, Tyler. ■ 
Submitted by: Mary H., Volo 

March, 1999 . 









?■->■:&?.! 



'. 



Assisi Animal Foundation-Pet of the Month 



BEAR is one of the most 
handsome fellows we've run 
across. He's a pure white 
Shepherd with a won- 
derful loving 
and gentle 
disposition. 
Bear is only 
16 months old, 
and therefore 
bounding with 
energy! He's very 
bright, but wi 
need and deserves 
training, whic 

because of his high 
intelligence shou 
produce fine results 




The ASSISI ANIMAL 
FOUNDATI ON, 
McHenry County's first 
no-kill shelter has fine, 
loving pets for perma- 
nent, loving homes. 
We urgently mmd 
volunteers and wel- 
come your help 
working with the 
animals or offer- 
ing a skill to 
help in a new 
building for 
the animals. If you 
love animals and can give 
them just two hours any morning 
on a weekly basis, we'll welcome 



He is very social, and accepts you'to our work for the animals, 

other dogs and youngsters Please call (815)455-9411 for| 

well. He'll be a definite plus information on adoption, vol- 

to some lucky family. - untccring or our programs. 



;.'js^ttf 'ircrHi tv «»i..i .■ . (■■■<. .a. .'—.-.n. ... r ..u«j'^i^_.^ 



GARDEN JOURNAL LIFE'S A BEAR 

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Promising you a rose garden/ B8 ANTIOCII P JBf ifif^&rp the wtnter blues ' B2 

7fcNORTIfMAW DISTR|CT 
ANTIOCII, IL 60002 



MOVIE REVIEW 

'8MM' falls a few 
millimeters short/ B5 




Lakeland 
Newspapers 

"Hi ..I, e 

morcno, 
1999 



Section 



i w , -. , ..—> » ■ t**. 




Karen Powell, a member of the Northern Lake County Quilters Guild, points out some of the miniature quilts she had on loan from all over'the world in January. 
Photo by Sandy Bressner '.':- 





Quilt passions: shows and raffles aid Lake County organizations 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Handmade quilts continue 
to capture the imagina- 
tion, fill the heart, and 
bring warmth wherever 
they are placed. 

For people who love them and 
the artistic expression they capture, 
the next few months will present 
opportunities to admire and ac- 
quire a family treasure. 

County residents who admire 
quilts will find everything they want 
at the "Lake County Impressions V" 
Quilt Show sponsored by the North- 
em Lake County Quilters Guild on 
Sunday, May 2 from 10 a.m. to 4 
p.m. In the College of Lake County 
Physical Education Center. 

County residents who want to 
acquire a quilt made in Lake Coun- 
ty, will have four opportunities to 
win a hand-crafted quilt in raffles 
that also will raise money for county 
organizations. 

The Northern Lake County 
Quilters Guild is sponsoring a quilt 
raffle In association with their Col- 
lege of Lake County show. 

Customers and artisans at Quit- 
ter's Dream Inc., 902 Main Street, in 
downtown Antioch are creating an 
Independence Sampler Quilt that 
will be raffled at Williams Park in 
Antioch on July 3, 

People who attend summer 
events at the Central Baptist Chil- 



dren's Home in Lake Villa will have, 
once again, an opportunity to pur- ; 
chase raffle tickets for a quilt made 
and donated by all the employees at 
State Bank of The Lakes. 

The Antioch Woman's Club Is 
making a quilt that will be raffled at 
their Saturday, Oct 30 Masquerade 
Ball at Maravela's in Fox Lake. 

The Northern Lake County 
Quilter's Guild has. their quilt closest 
to completion. "We're just now fin- 
ishing it up," said Karen Powell of 
the guild. "The center of it is called 
Medallion. The outer edge is sam- 
pler blocks," 

It is a combination of two tradi- 
tional quilt-top patterns. 

Raffle tickets for this quilt are . 
sold at Quilter's Dream in down- 
town Antioch. Members of the guild 
also have tickets. Tickets will be on 
sale at the May 2 show. 

"This is our Fifth show since our 
club's Inception," said Powell. The 
show is an opportunity for the pub- 
lic to view traditional and contem- 
porary quilts. There also will be 
many other activities associated 
with the show. 

There is a silent auction, wall 
hangings are displayed, door prizes 
-will be given, Make it- Take it ses- 
sions are available for instruction, 
and there is a merchants mall for 
vendors. People can make contacts 
with vendors from throughout the 
bi-state, multi-county region at this 
one show. 




Robin Kessell, co-owner of the Quilter's Dream, works on the An- 
tioch Woman's Club quilt which will be raffled in October to raise 
money to build sledding hills and an Ice skating rink at Antioch 's 
William E. Brook Wetland Sanctuary and Entertainment Center.- 
Photos by Sandy Bressner 



One exhibition that will not be 
on display at this year's show Is a 
stunning collection of miniature , 
quilts. "Miniature Quilt Magazine 
holds a yearly contest. They call it 
'Miniatures from the Heart,"' Powell 
said. The top three quilts from sev- 
eral categories are sent on national 
tour. The guild was able to see the 
show at their own meeting in early 



January. 

Miniature quilts display sewing 
skills that maybe missed on a larger 
canvas. The intricate sewing can 
provoke a sense of disbelief among 
those who closely inspect the quilts. 

The College of Lake County 
show offers the public an opportu- 
nity to view very special quilts sewn 
by people in Lake County. Admis- 




The Northern Lake County Quil- 
ters Guild will raffle this Medal- 
lion Quilt during their fifth annu- 
al quilt show, May 2 at the Col- 
lege of Lake County. , 



sion is $3 and children under 12 
may enter free of cost 

A portion of the proceeds from 
the May 2 show will be donated by 
the guild to the Central Baptist Chil- 
dren's Home. 

The Antioch Independence Day 
quilt will be raffled on Saturday, July 
3 during afternoon festivities at 
Williams Park, east of the public li- 
brary. Wendy Maston, co-owner of 
Quilter's Dream, is working with a 
group of customers and volunteers 

Please see QUILTS IB12 







B2 /Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



March 5, 1999 




The co-chalrs who planned the Mardi Gras Ball were Karen Van- 
derBeke , Sharon Hawkins of Lincolnshire, Sandi Heckman, Mary 
Connelley of Lake Forest. and Donna Hauser of Barrington. 

Auxiliary raised $75,000 
at Mardi Gras Ball 



New Orleans visited Lin- 
colnshire on the night of Feb. 5, 
when the Riverside Foundation 
Auxiliary hosted its Mardi Gras Ball 
at the Marriott Lincolnshire Resort. 
Glamour, glitz, masks and magic all 
found their way into this black-tie 
event. Everyone enjoyed a sumptu- 
ous dinner, exciting silent and live 



auctions, as well as dancing to the 
tunes of the Bradley Young Orches- 
tra. This year's special auction prize, 
a six-week old male, yellow 
Labrador puppy donated by Can- 
dlewood Kennel, went for $2,000. 
Preliminary figures show that ap- 
proximately $75,000 was raised by 
the event. 



WMlMg to inhale: 
A look at cabin fever 



March is, at least as far as 
I'm concerned, "Cabin 
Fever Month." But 
don't look that up on 
your calendar yet because Hallmark 
has somehow managed to overlook 
this whole phenomena. They have 
not yet realized that this is a perfect 
opportunity to sell more greeting 
cards, because at any given mo- 
ment in the month of March, mil- 
lions of people stricken with cabin 
fever would be thrilled to receive a 
card. 

Actually, they'd be just as 
thrilled to receive a Tupperware 
party invitation, if only for the 
chance to win an exciting prize, 
such as a designer-colored spatula. 
That is the nature of cabin fever, ' 
Even modem science knows 
more than Hallmark. In their con- 
tinuing quest for truth and an ex- 
cuse for ridiculous funding from the 
government, research scientists 
have attempted to turn cabin fever 




reason 



We'll give you 4,000! 



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classes. We can help. 

The UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-PARKSIDE, 

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100 qualifying Illinois students who enroll 
full-time for fall 1999. 

With a perfect blend of small size, personal 
attention and quality teaching, UW-Parkside 
is the ideal place to go to college. 

Choose from 26 majors (including our 
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We'll cut 45 percent off the tuition bill. 

It's that simple. Call toll-free, 

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LIFE'S 
A BEAR 

Donna Abear 



into a "disease," just as they've done 
with other problems like overeating 
and the unhealthy desire to have 
real butter on your toast. They pre- 
fer to call it "sunlight-deprivation," a 
depression brought on by insuffi- 
cient sunlight. 

I don't think that this is going to 
become an accepted diagnosis, 
however. It just doesn't seem possi- 
ble that insurance companies will 
start covering trips to the Bahamas 
every winter in order to cure this 
"disease." Trust me - I've already 
called them. 

Hollywood has also had its fasci- 
nation with the cabin fever phe- 
nomena, though they took it to the 
extreme, as they usually do. I'm 
sure many of you saw the movie, 
"The Shining," several years ago, die 
one where Jack Nicholson runs 
around breaking down doors with 
an ax, announcing "He-e-e-e-ere's 
Johnny!" Apparently the makers of 
this film wanted us to swallow the 
story mat Jack, supposedly insane 
from cabin fever (not to mention 
having a really bad hair day), actual- 
ly wants to kill his entire family after 
being stuck in an empty hotel with 
them for several months! Can you 
Imagine that? 

Come to think of it, I can. I hate 
to admit this, but by mid-March, 
I've been known to begin uttering 
threats to my own children, such as 
"If you don't stop whining, I am go- 
ing to kill Barney. Yes, I know he's a 



magic dinosaur, but I'm a mother 
and I have powers of my own. It's 
up to you - whining or Barney. You 
choose." Believe me, as I stand 
there with the remote control In my 
hand, they know I'm not kidding. 

I even begin to have strange fan- 
tasies, where I see myself on a de- 
serted island in the Caribbean, lay- 
ing in the sun while talking on my 
cellular phone to the kids: "No, 
honey, Mommy didn't run away. I'll 
be back as soon as it's spring. I 
promise. Gotta go now, sweetie - 
Raul the cabana boy is here with my 
drink.". 

.1 assume that this cabin fever 
thing is limited to those of us who 
have an intimate relationship with 
snow each winter. Although, when 
you think about it, it's not actually 
the snow that causes these feelings 
of boredom, frustration, andshort- 
temperedness. It is the fact that 
every time you turn your head, a 
child is standing there, pouting and 
uttering those immortal words "I 
don't have nothin' to do." Which is 
not only irritating, it is grammatical- 
ly incorrect! 

I, however, clever person that I 
am (oris that "desperate"?), have 
managed to find a way to temporari- 
ly relieve my cabin fever symptoms 
by simulating a trip to a sunny cli- 
mate. I place my outdoor lounge 
chair directly under the skylight in 
the ceiling of my bedroom. Dressed 
in my bathing suit and sunglasses, I 
lay there and imagine myself on a 

beach somewhere. 

There's only one drawback - my 

husband does not appreciate being 
called "Raul." 



Questions or comments for hu- 
morist Donna Abear can be sent to 
P.O. Box 391, Antioch, IL 60002. 



Rent at Marcus Center March 9-14 



Casting is being announced for 
the Milwaukee premiere of the mu- 
sical phenomenon Rent in Uihlein 
Hall of the Marcus Center for the 
Performing Arts March 9-14. 

The cast includes Pierre Angelo 
Bayuga as transvestite Angel Schu- 
nard; Dwayne Clark as cumputer- 
age philosopher Tom Collins; Crista 
Fadale as performance artist Mau- 
reen Johnson; Danielle Greaves as 
Public interest lawyer Joanne Jeffer- 
son; Scott Hunt as filmmaker Mark 
Cohen; Christina Mena as a song- 
writer Roger Davis; Julia Santana as 
exotic dancer Mimi Marquez; and 
Carl Thorton as landlord Benjamin 
Coffin III. Rounding out the Rent 
cast are Thorn Allison, Christine 
Bandelow, Yasmin Ennis, Robert 
Glean, Owen Johnson II, Anika Lar- 
son, Kristin McDonald, Ron 
Christopher Patric, Wichasta Reese, 
Horace V. Rogers, Peter Matthew 
Smith, Brent Davin Vance, and Tri- 
cia Young in the ensemble. 

Pierre Angelo Bayuga (Angel) . 
performed in Miss Saigon in Ger- 
many and his homeland of Canada. 
Dwayne Clark (Collins) Joins the 
Rent company directly from 
Smokey Joe's Care on Broadway, 
Australia, and the national tour. . 
Cristina Fadale (Maureen) joins 
Rent from the European tour of 
Fame where she played Serena. 
Danielle Greaves' (Joanne) Broad- 
way credits include Show Boat and 
Sunset Boulevard. Scott Hunt 
(Mark) peformed in Rent on Broad- 
way and In the 10th anniversary 
production of Les Miserables. Born 
in Chile and rasied in Canada, 
Christian Mena (Roger) Is a' 
singer/songwriter who fronts the 



Latin pop band Maraciijah! Julia 
Santana (Mimi) is an actress/singer 
who has healiner such major clubs 
as The Palladium and Roseland. She 
is working on new music with her 
band The Cribb. Carl Thorton (Ben- 
ny) was recetnly on tour singing' 
backup vocals for Atlantic Records 
recording artist Robin S. 

This company represents the 
second national tour of Rent. It be- 
gan performances in July of in La 
Jolla, California before moving to 
Los Angeles for an 18- week run and 
continuing on across the country. 
Rent has five other productions 
worldwide including the first na- 
tional tour and the Broadway, Lon- 
don, Japanese, and Australian com- 
panies. 

Rent is the third installment in 
the 1998-1999 MasterCard Broad- 
way Series presented by the Marcus 
Center and PACE Theatrical Group, 
Inc., one of the nation's largest pre-, 
senters of Broadway touring shows, 
according to Marcus Center Manag- 
ing Director Paul F. Mathews. 

Single tickets, $21.50-$56.50, 
can be purchased at the Marcus 
Center Box'Office, 929 North Water 
Street, and all Ticketmaster loca- 
tions. To charge tickets by tele- 
phone, call Ticketmaster at (4 14) 
276-4545; Marcus Center Box Office 
at (414) 273-7206, or toll-free atl- 
888-612-3500; TDD (414) 273-3080 . 
for the hearing impaired/For group 
sales, call (414) 273-7121, extension 
210, or toll-free at 1-88B-367-8101. 

Rent at the Marcus Center for 
the Performing Arts is sponsored by 
Lucent Technologies, Midwest Ex- 
press Airlines, the Milwaukee Jour- . 
nal Sentinel, and Today's TMJ4. 



i 



* i* 






March 5, 1999 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers I B3, 



'I 



i 



SINGLES 



Dance set for Friday 

The Solo Singles Club meets every 
Friday at p.m. at the Gale Street Inn, 
906 Diamond Lake Road in Mundclcln. 
The age range is 40 plus and admission 
is free. For more information call 746- 
6618. 



DANCE 



Solo Singles super 
dance 

Solor Single super dance will be 
held March 6, 8 p.m. at Bellini's Italian 
Restaurant, Route 137 & 21 In 
Libertyvillc. The cost Is $7 at the door. 
Dress up attire Is required. Please call 
the hotline for more Information at 746* 
6818. 

The Friday night dances arc also 
continued. 

Solo Singles group 40-plus meets 
every Friday evening at 8 p.m. at the 
Gale Street Inn on Diamond Lake Road 
in Mundelcin for dancing and socializ- 
ing. 

Please call the hotline for more 
Information 746-6818. 

Square Dancing 

The Whippy Winds Dance will be 
hosted by the Buoys and Belles 
Square Dance Club. Guest caller will 
be Lin Jnrvis. The dance will be held 
on Friday, March 5, also a workshop; 
8-8:30 p.m., main stream; 8:30-10:30 
p.m. , plus tip at 10:30 p.m. Cost Is 
S3.50 per person, 

The dance will be at the First 
United Methodist Church, 128 N. 
Utica St., Waukegan. Use west park- 
ing lot rear door, downstairs to 
Fellowship Hall: All modern western 
square dancers in the area arc invit- 
ed. Light refreshments will be 
served. Call 362-0130 or 566-0196 for 
more Information. 



'Cabin Fever 
Jazz' Continues 
At Gorton 



Limited tickets are available 
for "Cabin Fever Jazz" concerts, 
Sundays, at Gorton Community 
Center, 400 East Illinois Road, 
Lake Forest. 

"Cabin Fever Jazz" features 
some of the finest bands and 
vocalists in the area, with jazz for 
all musical palettes— everything 
from traditional and ragtime to 
be-bop and modern jazz. The 
concerts are presented from 4-6 
p.m. with a beer, wine, and soft 
drink cash bar. Tickets are $15 
each. 

On March 7, Suenos is the fea- 
tured band, with leader Steven 
Hashimoto on bass, Joe 
Sonnefeldt playing steel 
drums/percussion, Michael Lebin 
on saxophone, Bob Long on key- 
boards, and drummer Health 
Chappell.the quintet plays 
Brazilian blends of standard jazz 
tunes and ballads, plus original 
music. 

Pianist/composer Marcin 
Januskiewicz returns to Gorton on 
March 14 with his Chicago 
Coalition Jazz Septet. Jerry 
DiMuzio plays tenor and soprano 
saxophone, with Charles 
Braugham on drums', Nick 
Tountas on bass, Ryan Shultz 
playing bass trumpet, Jim Cooper 
on vibraphone, and percussionist 
AlejoPoveda. 

Blue Skies, a dynamic, four- 
part harmony vocal group, will 
close the series on March 21. Patti 
Lupo, Susan Prlschmann, Paul 
Zimmerman and Greg Jasperse 
combine their vocal talents with 
the adept musicianship of jazz 
pianist Jeremy Kahn, bassist Larry 
Kohut, and jim Hines on drums 
and percussion. 

For further information, or to 
receive a program brochure, con- 
tact or stop by the Qortori office 
at 234-6060.between 9 a.m. and 
4:30 p.m., weekdays. 



Dancing Under 
the Stars 

Amateur andprofesslqnal dancers 
arc invited to swing, boogie and twist, 
the night away to the sounds of lop 
Chicago orchestras in the Crystal 
Gardens at Navy Pier. 

Admission Is free. Dancing will be 
held every Wednesday through March 
10. Free dance lessons are offered 
between 6 and 7 p.m. and dancing will 
be held from 7- 10 p.m. 



MUSIC 



Durty Nellie's hosts 
evening of Irish music 
and food 

Pro-St. Pat's Day Charity Benefit will 
be held at Durty Nellie'sMarch 10, 5:15 
p.m. to 1230 a.m. S10 minimum dona- 
tion; 55 after 9 p.m. Irish food & music, 
raffle, prizes and fun! Proceeds go to 
this NW suburban shelter for women & 
children. Entertainment includes; 
WhlteyO'Day5:15-6:15p.m., Chicago 
Rovers 7:30-830 p.m. and Pat McCurdy 
9 p.m.- 1230 a.m. 



EDUCATION 



Child Care at Home 

"Child Care at Home," an infor- 
mative program for anyone consider- 
ing home day care, will be presented 
at Gorton Coomunlty Center, 400 Eat 
Illinois Road, Lake Forest. The pro- 
gram will be ted by Julia Kalln, a Lake 
Bluff resident, early childhood educa- 
tor and owner of "Stay,- Play & Learn," 
and will take place on Tuesday, March 

Please turn to next page 



Highland Park players to present 
'Five Women Wearing the Same Dress' 



The Highland Park 
Players proudly presents its 
spring production, "Five 
Women Wearing the Same 
Dress." Performances will 
take place on Fridays and - 



Saturday, March 12,13,19, 
20 at 8 p.m. and Sundays, 
March 14 & 21 at 2 p.m. All 
performances will be at the 
Attic Playhouse, 
410 Sheridan 




The cast from Highland Park Players upcoming production, 
Five Women Wearing the Same Dress, are Laura Larson, 
Rachel Mermel, Patricia True, Danny Burke, Kristie Stovall 
and Alexis Klosner. 



Road, Hfghwood. 

"Five Women Wearing the 
Same Dress" Is a slfce-oMife 
comedy about five bridesmaids 
who have barricad- 

^ ed themselves in 

a bedroom. during 
the wedding 
reception. They 
gripe about the 
bride and eventu- 
ally help each 
other cope, with 
the memories that 
— weddings arid 

family gatherings 
dredge up. Directed by Donna 
Lubow and produced by Nancy 
Streifler, cast members 
include: Danny Burke, Alexis 
Klossner, Laura Larson, Rachel 
Mermel, Kristie Stovall and ' 
Patricia True. 

Tickets are $10 in 
advance: $12 at the door, $9 
for groups of 10 or more. 
Tickets may be purchased by 
sending a self-addressed 
stamped envelope with order . 
(please specify dates) and a 
check payable to Highland Park 
Players to 160 Sequoia 
Avenue, Deerfield 60015; 

For additional ticket infor- 
mation, call 604-HPP1 (4771). 
Dinner packages available with 
"Two Guys from Italy 
Restaurant" located in the 
same building. 



FOX LAKE THEATRE 





115 Lakeland Plaza 
M Fox Lake • 817/973 2800 



PREDICT THE OSCARS 



You Could V/in A 



£> ABBESS* 5 * 



Clip the ballot In 
this ad. For each cat- 
egory, check the box 
corresponding to the 
nominee you think 
will win. You may mail 
your entry or deposit 
it in the box in the 
lobby of the Fox 
Lake Theatre, 1 15 
Lakeland Plaza, Fox 
Lake, IL 60020. 

No purchase 
necessary. You must 
be 1 6 years or older. 
If your answers match 
the actual Academy 
Award winners, you 
will be entered in our 
drawing. Only one 
entry per person per 
day, please. Up to ten 
winners per theatre 
will receive a One- 
Year Pass good at all 
Classic Cinemas. 
Winners will be 
notified by mall. 
Entry deadline Is 
March 20, 1999. 



to the MOVIES! 

. Contest is co-sponsored by 




BEST PICTURE 

a Elizabeth 

Q Life Is Beautiful 

Q Saving Private Ryan 

□ Shakespeare In Love 

Q The Thin Red Line 

| BESTACTCP 

□ Roberto Benign!, Life ts Beautiful 

□ Tom Hanks, Saving Private Ryan 
Q Ian McKelleni Gods and Monsters 

□ Nick Nolte, Affliction 

□ Edward Norton, American History X 



I 
I 
I 



BEST DIRECTOR 

□ Roberto Benign!, Life Is Beautiful 

Q Steven Spielberg, Saving Private Ryan 
Q John Madden, Shakespeare In Love 

□ Terrence Mallck, The Thin Red Line 

□ Peter Weir, The Truman Show 

B EST ACTRESS 

□ Gate Blanchett, Elizabeth 

Q Fernanda Montenegro, Central Station 

□ Gwyneth Pal trow, Shakespeare In Love 
Q Meryl Streep, One True Thing 

Q Emily Watson, Hilary and Jackie 



BEST SUPPORTING ACTCR BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS 



□ James Coburn, Affliction 

□ Robert Duval I, A Civil Action 

□ Ed Harris, The Truman Show 

Q Geoffrey Rush, Shakespeare In Love 
Q Billy Bob Thornton, A Simple Plan 



□ Kathy Bates, Primary Colors 

□ Branda Blethyn, Utile Yoke 

□ Judl Dench, Shakespeare in Love 

□ Rachel Griffiths, Hillary and Jackie 

□ Lynn Redgrave, Gods and Monsters 



Name: 



( Address: ; 

| City: 

| Clip & Mail Ballot To Fox Lake Theatre, 1.15 Lakeland Plaza, Fox Lake, I L 60020 



State: 



Zip: 



I 
I 

I 

I 
I 



WHERE MOVIE GOING IS FUN AND AFFORDABLE/ 



—g—w— 



i w i illinium kt m*m 



i l B H ii "ii i ni i Vnn 



B4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



March 5, 1999 



9 from 7-9 p.m. or Saturday, March 13, 
from 9-1 1 a.m. The Tee Is $40. 

Both care givers and parent will 
benefit from a range of valuable infor- 
mation, Including starting your own 
home day care business, safety Issues, 
child care resources, and tools for 
improving and maintaining a positive , 
relationship between client and care 
giver. The fee includes a handbook. 
Additional forms will be available for 
purchase. 

Interested participants should 
register and pay in advance. For fur- 
ther information, or to receive a pro- 
gram brochure, contact or slop by the 
Gorton office at 234-6060 between 9 
a.m. and 4:30 p.m. weekdays. 

Divorce survival 

The Family Service Community 
Education Program is offering an educa- 
tional course called Divorce Survival. 
This is a four week course which focuses 
on the personal, financial, and legal con- 
cerns of divorcing partners. 

This program will help you through 
the maze of divorce. Financial and legal 
experts will share knowledge and 
insights to help you make good deci- 
sions before you sign those papers. 

It will be held every Thursday at 7 -9 
p.m. through March 18. The cost Is S40. 

For more Information call Kris 
Andersen at 662-4464. 

Stop and Prune 
the Roses 

The Gardeners of Central Lake 
County offer a program on "Pruning 
Roses and A Year In the Cook Park Rose 
Garden" on Monday, March 6. 

Don Dallin, former president of the 
American Rose Society and consulting 
rosarian, will instruct how and when to 
prune roses for healthier growth and 
better flower production. Mr. Ballin has 
slides to help clarify his cxplanantlons 
and he will take questions. 

Andy Plasz, also a consulting rosari- 
an, will then give a short slide presenta- 
tion on working in the Cook Park Rose 
Garden. 

Business meeting begins at 7:30 
p.m. and includes a member's discus- 
sion of gardening information. So bring 
your problems and pointers to the 
fonim at 7:30 and then enjoy live pro- 
grams which begin at 8 p.m. at the 
United Methodist Church. 429 Braincrd 
Ave. in Libertyville. The public is wel- 
come at no cost. For more information, 
callSusanatB16-B007. 



COMEDY 



Zanies March line-up 

Zanies comedy nile club of Vernon 
Hills, 230 Hawthorn Village Commons, 
March talent and dates arc as follows: 
March 3,4 — Dobie Maxwell, Todd 
Pcssik, Jim Ruel, Mike Hoffman. March 
5,6— John Pinctte March 10-13 — 
Jackson Perdue, Monica Carter, Emily 
Grove March 14— Walt Will ey 
March 17-20— Tim Single, Dwaync 
Kennedy, Marty Stein 
March 24-26— Larry Recb, Tim Clue, 
Mike Mcrryficld March 27— Richard 
Lewis, The " Wreck In Progress" tour 

For more information please call 
549-6030. 

Novelist to present 
workshop and 
reading at CLC 

Novelist Rosellen Brown will pre- 
sent a fiction-writing workshop and 
a reading on March 1 1 at the College 
of Lake County. The workshop J3265 
and the reading will begin at 7 p.m. 
in C002. Doth programs are free and 
open to the public. 

A creative writing teacher in the 
graduate program at the School of 
the Art Institute of Chicago, Brown 
is the author of four novels, "Before 
and After," "Civil Wars," "Tender 
Mercies" and "The Autobiography 
of My Mother." She also has written 
three collections of poetry, "Some 
Deaths in the Delta," "Cory Fry" and 
"Cora Fry's Pillow Book." She has 
published a collection of stories, 
"Street Games," and her. stories have 
appeared frequently in Best 
American Short Stories and O. 
Henry Prize Stories. 

For information, call 543-2040. 



ART 



Postcard exhibition 

Postcard art competition/Exhibition 
at the Lake County Museum, Lakewood 
Forest Preserve in Wauconda. A recep- 
tion and award ceremony will be held 
Friday, March 5, at 5-7 p.m. Music and 
refreshment will be served. This exhibit 
will run through May 31. 

The Museum Is located on Route 
176 and Fairfield Road, Wauconda. 

For more Information call 526-GG38. 

NW Art museum 
hosts exhibit 

The National Vietnam Veterans Art 
Museum will be holding a opening 
reception for Richard Olsen. The 
exhibit "Ole's Wall: Richard Olson, 
Selected Paintings /Wall Scries" Is a 
scries of abstractions created out of 
metaphoric impressions from the walls 
of Olscn's studio. The reception will be 
held on Friday, March 12 from 5 p.m. 
to 9 p.m. 

The National Vietnam Veterans Art 
Museum is located at 180) S. Indiana 
Avenue in Chicago. 

RSVP to Kay Tibbs at 312-326- 
0270. 




SPECIAL EVENTS 

A bit of Ireland comes 
to Long Grove 



Visitors to Long Grove 
can celebrate and find all 
things Irish for St. Patrick's 
Day at many of the nearly 
100 specialty shops and 
restaurants in the historic 
village. 

Leading the celebra- 
tion will be Paddy's on the 
Square (634-0339) and the 
Irish Boutique (634-3540). The Irish Boutique, 
located by the covered bridge, carries Irish 
Dresden, Belleek China, Waterford Crystal, 
Claddagh rings in gold and silver, handmade 
linens, handmade Nicholas Mosse pottery, and tra- 
ditional Irish foods. At Paddy's In Apple Haus 
Square, visitors will find handknit sweaters, . 
woolens, capes, novelty clothing and accessories, 
and family tracing computer programs. The shop 
boasts the largest collection of traditional and pop- 
ular Irish music in the Midwest. To get into the 



spirit of St. Patrick's Day, Paddy's will host two 
weekends of entertainment. The schedule is as fol- 
lows: The music of Donnybrook on March 6, Jeff 
Ward, guitarist on March 7, Kevin Henry plays the 
Uilleann pipe and tin whistle on March 13, and the 
McNulty Irish Step Dancers perform on March 14. 
All performances take place from 1-3 p.m. 

The Pine Cone Christmas Shop (634-0090) will 
feature the Top O' the Momin' Possible Dreams 
Santa sporting a green morning coat with a gold 
shamrock on the lapel. The Celtic Sounds Musical 
Santa, holding a shillelagh, wears a green vest and 
plays, "When Irish Eyes are Smiling." 

The Village Tavern (634-31 17) will be wearin' 
the green from 1 1:30 a.m. to midnight on March 17, 
serving corned beef and cabbage, green beer, and 
St. Patrick's Day Sundaes. Evening entertainment 
features pianist Roger Pauley from 6-10 p.m. 

For further information on Long Grove shops 
and special events, phone the Merchants 
Association at 634-0888. 






LMV CliamTb^^of Commerce 




i 



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10am until 4 pm 

Holiday Inn in Mundelein 
(Routes 83 and 45) 



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March 5, 1999 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers / B5 



'8MM' falls a few millimeters short 



Let me start by saying that 
eight millimeter should be 
abbreviated B mm. The 
brains behind the film 
"flMATmust have felt capital "M's" 
sandwiched against the number 
looked better on a movie poster. 

Grammar note aside, the con- 
cept behind "flMM"is intriguing. A . 
detective trying to solve a murder 
with the only evidence being a 
short 8 mm film. 

It is a concept which opens the 
door for many different scenarios, 
because there could be numerous 
plot-lines behind the mysterious 
film. 

The scenario "8MM" chooses to i 
follow is sleazy, dark, twisted and 
gruesome. 

Tom Welles (Nicolas Cage) Is a 
private detective who is known for 
his surveillance skills, his knack for 
working alone, and his ability to 
keep a secret 

He is hired by the widow of a 
wealthy man. In the deceased 
man's safe was an 8 mm film which 
depicts the brutal death of a young 
woman. 

The widow wants Welles to 
find out if the film is real, and if so, 
who the girl was and why the film 
was in her husband's safe. 

Welles' investigation leads him 
to the dark underworld of black- 
market pornography. 

The more he digs, the more dirt 
surrounds him, until he becomes 
enveloped in the grime which he is 
trying to shed some light upon. 

'WM/'like the small film 
Welles investigates pulls the viewer 
into that same dark hole. 

You want to keep digging and 
find an answer, but in the end you 
just want to wash off the filth. 

Written by Andrew Kevin .**■* — L 
Walker, the same mind that creat- 
ed "Seven," another darkly en- 
grossing film, "8MM" pulls the 
viewer in with the same kind of ■ 
intensity, but not the same kind 
of intelligence. 



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movie review 




JohnKmitta 



8 MM 

Rated R 
extreme violence 

Director 

Joel Schumacher 

Starring 

Nicolas Cage 

Joaquin Phoenix 

James Gandalflni 

Peter Storm are 

Anthony Heald 

Chris Bauer 
Catherine Keener 




The portions of "flMATwhere 
Welles is beginning to dig into the 
investigation are intriguing be- 
cause there are so many un- 
knowns. It is fun to watch how he 
makes the plot become known. 

But for all the elements which 
make Welles look like super-sleuth, 
there are elements of the investiga- 
tion which make you want to 
scream at him for not checking. 



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Rather than go over every frame 
of the 8 mm film with a fine-toothed 
comb prior to beginning his foot- 
work, Welles picks up on small clues 
when he watches the film at later 
stages of the investigation. 

Cage's portrayal of Welles is 
done well enough that you can see 
his transition from the calm, cool 
detective to a man who is con- 
sumed by this 8 mm film. Still, he 
has a tendency to over-act which 
make the character a little less 
credible. 

Joaquin Phoenix also does well 
as Max, Welles' guide through the 
porn underground. 

But it is there in the sick, twist- 
ed bowels of the city that the film 
begins to lose the viewer and slip 
into formulaic psycho slasher film 
mode. 

It is also the point that begs you 
to ask yourself if you really want to 
follow in Welles' footsteps and see a 
resolve to this gruesome film. 

For not taking advantage of the 
endless Hitchcock-style plot points 
this film could have used, I give 
"8MM" two-and-a-half out of five 
popcorn buckets. • 





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Tom Welles (Nicolas Cage) discovers a world beyond his worst 
nightmares when he investigates the contents of a small reel of 
eight millimeter film. 



Your News is Our News! 

Call us mtii your story ideas at 

(847) 223-8161or fax us a<847) 223-8810 




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115 Lakeland Plaza alter 5 P m 
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SHOWT1HES— FRIDAY. MAR. S J 
THRO THURSDAY, MAR. 11 

CRUEL INTENTIONS* m 

DIGITAL: Fri 5:15 7:35 9:50 

Sat 12:30 2:45 S:IS 7:35 9:50 

' Sun/Wed 12:30 2:45 5:15 7:35 

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ANALYZE THIS* [R] 

DIGITAL Fri 6:45 9:10 

Sat 1:20 3:40 6:45 9:10 
Sun/Wed 1:20 3:40 6:00 8:20 
Mon/Tuc/Thur 6:00 8:20 

MY FAVORITE MARTIAN ™ 

Daily 5:10 
Sat/Sun/Wed 12:35 2:50 5:10 

MESSAGE IN A BOTTLE ( Pc )3] 

Frl/Sat 7:15 10:00 
Sun-Thur 7:15 

OCTOBER SKY [P G] 

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Mon/Tue/Thur 5:55 8:15 

PAYBACK [R] Fri 6:50 9:15 

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ANALYZE THIS (R) 

8MM(R) 
JAWBREAKER (R) 
THE FACULTY (R) 
OCTOBER SKY (PG) 
OFFICE SPACE (R) 



THE OTHER SiSTER(PG-13) (1:30 4:45) 7:25 10:05 DW 
* CRUEL INTENTIONS(H) (1:30 1.503:404:00) 6:10 

7:00 &15 93010:20010 
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MY FAVORITE MARTIAN (PG)(12^0 3:10 525) 745 9:55 DIO 
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THE THIN RED UNE(R) 6:009:20010 

PAYBACK (R) (1:10 4:10) 7:05 7:50 9:35 10:15oio 
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THE PRINCE OF EGYPT (PG) (12:40 3:05 5:20) Dia 
A BUG'S LIFE (G) (12:45 2:55 5:05) 7:20 9.30 dig 
THE RUGRATS MOVIE (G) (1:05 3:05) oio 



♦ No Passes * No Passes or Super Savers 

DtG = CMGIlAi. SOUND StRiSttHO [XX > OOIAY SJEttO 
Times Valid For Friday. March 5, Only © 1999 



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MY fAVORITl MARTIAN (PG) 


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SHAKESPEAiri IN LOVE (R) 


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105,310.1000 


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MOVIES AND TIMES START MARCH 5, 1999 



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TEL.fc (847)223-8273 



3 1 South Seymour 
"Grayslake.il. 60030 





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^T. g*^ AI«TWH (847) 395^0216 j 

378 Lake St. Antioch 



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> A UU (i i & UNDER) ADULTS 57.50 AFTER CPM 

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9:15 

8MM: EIGHT MILLIMETER («> 
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Daily 1155, 2:15, 455, 655, 9:15 

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Daily 12>W, 330, 620, 9:10 

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Daily 1^0, 3?45, 650, 9:15 

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Daily 6:30, 8:35 

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031^11:50,2:15,4:40 

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JDaily 12:00, 2:10, 4:20, 6:30, 8:40 

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Daily 11:50, 2:00, 4:10 



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Sun. 7:00; Mon. - Thurs. 7:00 

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Fri. 6:45, 8:45 
Sat. 6:45, 8:45; Sun. 7:15; 
• Mon. -Thurs, 7:15 



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1 * 1 1 * 



•**-.»■< '-*.-*,.>*>•< 




B6 f Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 



March 5, 1999 



March 5, 1999 



HOT SPOTS 



Lakeland Newspapers 1 1 








ADVF.KTISrMENT 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Location: 

305 S. Rte. 83 in Gcnyslake 

Telephone: 
(847) 223-9400 

Hours: 

Open from 1 1 a.m. to 1 1 p.m. 

The bar is open until 1 a.m. daily. 

Menu: 

Fine casual dining-a wide cuisine variety 

featuring lunch Buffet. 



Olivers Grill & Bar 




Celebrate the luck o' the Irish at Olivers 



Whether it's lunch, dinner or you're just looking for a place to 
unwind, Oliver's in Crayslakc offers an up-beat, casual atmos- 
phere for your dining pleasure. 

Located at 305 S. Rte. 83 in Crayslake, Oliver's has been 
serving up outstanding food at reasonable prices for the past 
eight years. 

Open seven days a week, ihe friendly and professional staff 
invile diners to experience food service, which truly separates 
Oliver's from the ordinary. Whether it's a night out for the whole 
family or an intimate dinner for two, Oliver's is the perfect choice. 

Oliver's is the place to be to celebrale the luck o' ihe Irish on 
St. Baddy's day when the cook will feature a Com Beef and cab- 
bage buffet sure to put you in favor with the leprechauns. 

Plan now to celebrate Easter Sunday at Oliver's special 
Sunday buffet. Reservations are now being accepted for April 4. 



Oliver's makes every Sunday special with the wide variety of 
breakfast delights fealured on the breakfast buffet including juice, 
coffee or other beverages. It is served from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 
is truly a treat for the whole family. 

Oliver's is not just for special occasions, however, Oliver's 
luncbeon buffet is a terrific option for the hearty or light appetite. 
The buffet serves up such hot entrees as meat loaf, BBQ ribs, 
fresh fish, potatoes and vegetables. The full-service salad bar is 
complete with all your favorite cold-salads such as pasta', potato, 
coleslaw and many others. The lunch buffet is served Monday 
through Friday from 1 1 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

The buffet is not your only lunch choice, Oliver's offers a full/' 
menu of selections ranging from sandwiches to full dinners. 

Looking for a place to unwind after work or meet friends? 
Oliver's lounge offers a full-bar, including micro-brews on 



tap, and a large selection of appetizers. Play darts, watch the 
big game or just unwind in the comfortable bar accented 
with natural lighting. 

Wednesday and Friday, visit Oliver's for the all you can 
eat fish fry, a great dinner option for the family. 

If seafood is your favorite, than the Alaskan Snow Crab 
Legs are a don't miss menu feature Saturday evening along 
with prime rib, both queen and king cuts, which are a real 
crowd-pleaser. 

, Oliver's also has a meeting room for your special gath- 
ering. Plan your next office get-together or club meeting here. 

Oliver's is a full-service restaurant and lounge, open 
from 1 1 a.m. to 1 1 p.m. ; The bar is open until 1 a.m. daily. 
For more information call 223-9400. 




;■■:■ -.•■.■;;■.;,>':. ■!■■.' 



, .'.; 








Gift Certificate 



List your favorite HOT SPOTS restaurant for our 
monthly drawing to win a s 25 gift certificate. 

Name: _^ 

Address: 



■ ;■ 



> ■ - . 



ip 



Kv\ 



Favorite Restaurant: 



Mail to: Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 . • Gray slake, IL 60030 





1 

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il 



LIKE HOMEMADE,, 

Prepared daily from scratch 
^•Freshest of ingredients 
•Made just for you when ordered 



Sit and relax in'our 



areajEhjrSy a cxxkraH with/a basket?b£ : 

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ps andsalsa^whilejyou wait tortus to bnngvyou your meaJc^j 

(ALL DINNERS i JUST W\ 

^Chimichanga, Enchtladai'Fajita Plattcfr&Taco Platter. . ■ j 
All dinners include lettuce, tomatoes, rice, beans, guacamole, 



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sour cream plus a COMPUMENTARY MARGARITA 



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Phase mention this coupon when ordering. Expires 3-1-99. 

^Binden Plaza .' BBQ, 
^rand Ave. mcs' 



Free Chips & Salsa 
with every order 

, Ph*265-1411 SuS.nXK^10:30:8:l, 

^ ^a?c 265 r 5226 .,?'•■ ^Frg-fe Sa^L0:30-10-0()4 





The Best Chinese Food 

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Chinese Restaurant _, 

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Conveniently Located Across From Fairgrounds 
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THURSDAY 

50c Drafts 



BARS. 
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Open Mon.-Thuts. tlom-Midnigbt; . 
Fri. & Sal I \am-3om; Sunday Sam-Midnight 



LENT FRIDAY 

ALL-U-CAN -EAT SPECIALS 

Fish Fry $5.95 

Crab Logs $16.95 

DINNER SPECIALS 

Cod $8.95 

Shrimp Scampi $9.95 



SATURDAY 

All-U-Can-Eat 
Prime Rib $12.95 



26375 W. Rt. 173, Antioch, IL SUNDAY 

847-395-1 7 07 Breakfast Buffet 1 $3.99 

21/2 Miles West of Rt. 59 Soup. <£ appdiw* tomj. Atyfa. 




JOIM US! 



GAME ROOM OPEN 



e.i v ■;■ _ ■:■- ' ■ 



much mumu registration stmts • smmc mi ■ cookoiits & mms o/v swdms 



irii'fr , ~ A '^ I ^-'"^^- t *'** v -" f '**^* ,MJ# -*'" u *" v '*^ >, "-* t -* 



Jesse 



$aks 



Food'A 




mam ohm fri. & sat. til midnight 

18490 W. Old Gages Lake Rd., Cages Lake 

(847) 223-2575 



JOIN US FRIDAY 

Walleye Fish Fry •*»* 
All-U-Can-Eat Cod • $6.93 

JOIN US SATURDAY 

Prime Rib 

A la Carte 10 oz.: $9.95 Enhee 10 oz.: $11.97 
A la Carte 14 oz.: $11.97 Entree 14 oz.: $13.94 

OPEN FOR BREAKFAST 
9 am Saturday & Sunday 



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'rearns^eome.Truel 

Th&;DiSl<;>lurgens 

Bi^BqncJ 'Weekend 
'Under Ih^iDireqtfon 
of Don Ring % ! 
-March 19-21v : T999 




$396.00:;; 

per couple 
double occ upancy 



.-. i 



TtyolNight Package}Iricludes: 

i • Deluxe Accommodations foVvTWo, Nights ,'.,] 



■ ■ 



Friday' Night Neptune Seafood; Buffet ■-.. ■ 

*3f 




•Saturday Night Banquet f D |nnci\ ijl :Qr&na y!-t 
. „„ ■ Ballroom with One Hour. Open Barfe- - 



.00.00 

:•■■■-•. '. 

rptrepn, r 
single occupancy 



' - 



: 



• Sunday. .Champagne Brunch in the 
Monaco Dining Room 

•Ballroom Dancing Friday and Saturday \ 
Evenings, 8:00 pm to Midnight- 

• All Taxes and Gratuities 

■:';••.■•*';•. • i 



; iFriday^orSatiirtiay ; 
Night Dancing 

, , j;$24.00,pcr couple 




Saturday Night ; 
One flour OpenlBao 

■ - - ■ . . ■ ■ - 

Dinner and Dancing 
$86.00 percoiipie'rlv*^ 



: ;.'. 



For. Reservatioi 
ormt 

■m 






-.''*; 




\tflK*iS^'(lW ! HiwWC>5i£ii 





TO ADVERTISE 
YOUR BUSINESS 







CALL 
847.223.8161 





" ij '"' r 



Dining on the Lake 



*'j. 



A Reputation for Fine Food, Splrils and Hospitality on Beaullful' r 
DIAMOND LAKE, MUNDELEIN 

A Casual, CounUy AlmosphereSpcdalbtlrig in 



since 1963 
A OALE STREET TRADITION ? 

LUNCH AND DINNER 

PARTY AND BANQUET FACILITIES (30 - 160) 

Show Lounge Dancing Featuring 

The Compliments 

Friday arid Saturday .. 



906 Diamond Lake Rd., Mundelein 566-1090 



NEED A CHANGE OF FACE? 

Give Our Mexican Cuisine A Taste 



MAIN STREET STATION 

Can Una y Restaurante 

Located in the Old C&MW Train Depot 
!_:--■.■ 4.005..W. Main Street • Mctlenry, IL 
- : --•-"-•- 385-4-1 lO " 

• Delicious Appetizers 

• Drink Specials All Week 

• Lunch 6V Dinner Specials Mon.-Frl. 




i-OUW 




^ rr V^e 



FREE MARGARITA 

w/purchase of adult entree 
THURSDAY NIGHTS 

(limit 2 margaritas per table) 

Expires 2/28/99 




ONACO' 

Fine Foods - Cocktails 
2816 Rt 120 • McHenry, II 60050 

(815) 385-5278 





Saturday Night 

16 oz. Steak Dinner $ 1 1 9S 



Home of McHenry's 



Dinner 'Special -every Sunday night 
accompanied with music by 

Jim Sieg 



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Fanmiy piriihg At Its 







l-YburGarK^t North Atlantic Ctid 



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TRY THESE 
GREAT SPECIALTIES 

RIBS ' -1/2 LB. BURGERS, 

STEAKS • BR0ASTED CHICKEN 
ITALIAN • LARGE SALAD BAR 
MEXICAN •FRIDAY RSH FRY 
PIZZA - THINAHICK/DOUBLE DECKER 

FULL SERVICE 
MENU 




B6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 



March 5, 1999 



March. 5, 1999 



HOT SPOTS 



Lakeland Newspapers f B7 




ADVEKTISCMHNT 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Location: 

305 S. Rte. 83 in Grayslake 

Telephone: 
(847) 223-9400 

Hours: 

Open from 1 1 a.m. to 1 1 p.m. 

The bar is open until 1 a.m. daily. 

Menu: 

Fine casual dining-a wide cuisine variety 

featuring lunch Buffet. 



Olivers Grill & Bar 




Celebrate the luck o' the Irish at Olivers 



Whether it's lunch, dinner or you're just looking for a place to 
unwind, Oliver's in Crayslake offers an up-beat, casual atmos- 
phere for your dining pleasure. 

Located at 305 S. Rte. 83 in Crayslake, Oliver's h3s been 
serving up outstanding food at reasonable prices for the past 
eight years. 

Open seven days a week, the friendly and professional staff 
invite diners to experience food service, which truly separates 
Oliver's from the ordinary. Whether it's a night out for the whole 
family or an intimate dinner for two, Oliver's is the perfect choice. 

Oliver's is the place to be to celebrate the luck o' the Irish on 
St. Biddy's day when the cook will feature a Com Beef and cab- . 
bage buffet sure to put you in favor with the leprechauns. 

Plan now to celebrate Easter Sunday at Oliver's special 
Sunday buffet. Reservations are now being accepted for April 4. 



Oliver's makes every Sunday special with the wide variety of 
breakfast delights featured on the breakfast buffet including juice, 
coffee or other beverages. It is served from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 
is truly a treat for the whole family. 

Oliver's is not just for special occasions, however, Oliver's 
luncheon buffet is a terrific option for the hearty or light appetite. 
The buffet serves up such hot entrees as meat loaf, 8BQ ribs, 
fresh fish, potatoes and vegetables. The full-service salad bar i$ 
complete with all your favorite cold-salads such as pasta', potato, 
coleslaw and many olhers. The lunch buffet is served Monday • 
through Friday from 1 1 a.m. to 2 p.m. '■'.'' 

The buffet is not your only lunch choice, Oliver's offers a full '■' 
menu of selections ranging from sandwiches to full dinners. 

Looking for a place to unwind after work or meet friends? 
Oliver's lounge offers a full-bar, including micro-brews on 



tap, and a large selection of appetizers. Play darts, watch the 
big game or just unwind in the comfortable bar accented 
with natural lighting. 

Wednesday and Friday, visit Oliver's for the all you can 
eat fish fry, a great dinner option for thefamily. 

If seafood is your favorite, than the Alaskan Snow Crab 
Legs are a don't miss menu feature Saturday evening along 
with prime rib, both queen and king cuts, which are a real 
crowd-pleaser. 

Oliver's also has a meeting room for your special gath- 
ering. Plan your next office get-together or club meeting here. 

Oliver's is a full-service restaurant and lounge, open 
from 1 1 a.m. to 1 1 p.m.. The bar is open until 1 a.m. daily. 
For more information call 223-9400. 




A ^40 




Gift Certificate 

List your favorite HOT SPOTS restaurant for our 
monthly drawing to win a $ 25 gift certificate. 



-i 



A»l* 



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• | 







ir 



Favorite Restaurant: 



Mail to: Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 • Grayslake; IL 60030 



~*w- ■ -. * 




5miri% Soon 

o 

Expanded 

JUST LIKE HOMEMADE^qMlf^ETTER 

•Freshest of ingredients 
i *Made just for you when ordered 



/xnips ana sai5a;wniigwou wait iur-ub io onngwuu yuur me«u._ 

i ALL DINNERS JUST 6^ 

Chimichangn, EnchilodniilFajita Platter. &Taco Platter.- , ; j, 
All dinners include lettuce, tomatoes, rice, beans, guacamole, 
sour cream plus a COMP1IMENTARY MARGARITA 

I Please mention this coupon when ordering. Expires 3-1-99. 

iknden Plaza / 'pS? 
2122 v GrandAve. "aoV 

PH£265-141i :>.' 



3 



Free Chips & Salsa 
with every order 



'Jrsin 



cjgjg^265>£226 



Siin,rJ^SflO:30-8;:5( 
Fr£& Sa^t0:30-10:00^ 





The Best Chinese Food 

In Tite Area... 

And Our Customers 

Are The Critics 



FREE Delivery 
Call for details 




Plenty of Free Parking 

• Dine In • Carry Out • Cocktails 
The Chinese Restaurant That Everybody's Talking About 

Conveniently Located Across From Fairgrounds 

111 S. Hwy. 45 Grayslake 

(847)548-8882 . Fax: (847)548-2822 



MONDAY 

$1.00 Domestic Beers 

TUESDAY 
Toco Night • $3.00 All-U-Can-Eat 

THURSDAY 

50C Drafts 



BARS. 
GRILL 



Open Mon.-lhurs. Uam-Midn'tgbt; . 
Fti&Sat. f torn- Jam; Sunday Sam-Midnight 



LENT FRIDAY 

ALL-U.CAN.EAT SRECIA LS 

Fish Fry $5.95 

Crab Logs $16.95 

DIMMER SPECIALS 

Cod $8.95 

Shrimp Scampi $9.95 



SATURDAY 

Atl-U-Can-Eat 
Prime Rib $12.95 



26375 W. Rt. 173, Antioch, IL 

847-395-1707 

21/2 Miles West of Rt 59 Soup. <£ appetizer Even/ JVig&t 



SUNDAY 

All-U-Can-Eat 
Breakfast Buffet $3.99 



JOIH US! 




Jesse 



W? I ' - KrWHEN OPEN FBI, & SAT. TIL MIDNIGHT 



Food'ft 




18490 W. Old Gages Lake Rd„ Cages Lake 

(847) 223-2575 



JOIN US FRIDAY 

Walleye Fish Fry ,$ 8 
All-U-Can-Eat Cod • $6.93 

JOIN US SATURDAY 

Prime Rib 

A la Carte 10 oz.: $9.95 Entree 10 oz.: $11.97 
A la Carie 14 oz.: $11.97 Entree 14 oz.: $13.94 

OPEN FOR BREAKFAST 
9 am Saturday & Sunday 



96 



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Under.l|Tet;DlrpGti6n 
■:-;bf Don Ring I 

Wwft 19-2 fvt 999 




$396.00 .::; 

; " '^-r ; ":,.- J per coup Ji: ' ' ' ;^ 
:'j '• double occupancy 

$3ooido 

per person 
slngk;tKcupNi)cy; 



Two Night Package Includes: 

• Deluxe Accommodations for Two rf ig 

• Friday Night Neptune Seafood Buffet- y 
■ * Saturday Night Banquet Dinhcr.in Grand 

Ballroom with One. Hour. Open Bar 

• Sunday Champagne Brunch in the 
' Monaco Dining Room . 

••Ballroom Dancing Friday arVd ; Saturday ; 
; Evenings, 8:00 pm to Midnight 

• All Taxes and Gratuities . 



^gji Friday or Saturday 

: : ;:;;;vNight:Dariei ng :; 

; $24.00, per couple 




Saturday Night 
One Hour Open Bar 
Dinner and Dancing 
$86.00 perJcoupjei" 




i '■!,■' 




lOrt'Sf;."::. 
ilMHi 



:'g0® •■•■ '■■"'•■ •■ ■ 
llfll^^ 



^.l :'■ ;':" 







TO ADVERTISE 
YOWffi BUSINESS 



I 



GALL 
847.223.8161 





iy,*W->W«Jt«!»i>n 






#>MMKa^a^iiiiaaaMgMMM^MBBBBBMt^i j ft ^ * ^* 



Dining on the Lake 









vt* I 



iamond Lake 

A Reputation Tor Fine Food,' Spirits' and Hospitality on Beautiful 

Dl AMO ND LAKE, MUNDELEI N 

A Casual, Countiy Atmosphere Sncciallring (n 



tl nee 1963 : 

A GALE STREET TRADITION f- 

LUNCH AND DINNER 
PARTY AND BANQUET FACILITIES (30 - 160) 

Show Lounge Dancing Featuring 

The Compliments 

Mr* Ken 

Friday arid Saturday 



906 Diamond Lake Rd„ Mundeloin 566-1090 



NEED A CHANGE OF FACE? 

Give Our Mexican Cuisine A Taste 



MAIN STREET STATION 

Cantina y Restaurante 

Located In the Old C&MW Train Depot 
~, 4005 W. Maln^Street • Mctlenry, tL 
£,-«: -j: -^ .:, 335-4-1 io * ~^iffifc 

• Delicious Appetizers 

• Drink Specials AH Week 

• Lunch & Dinner Specials Mori.-Frl. 







FREE MARGARITA 

w/purchase of adult entree 
THURSDAY NIGHTS 

(limit 2 margaritas per table) 
Expires 2/28/99 



MONACO 

Fine Foods - Cocktails 

2816 Rt. 120 • Mc Henry, II 60050 

(815) 385-5278 





Saturday Night 

16 oz. Steak Dinner s 11 95 



Home of McHenry's 



Dinner .Special every Sunday night 
accompanied with music by 

Jim Sieg 






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FISH FRY 





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NorthAtl 







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OUR ENTIRE 

MENU AVAILABLE 

FOR CARRYOUT 

OR DELIVERY 

FAX US YOUR ORDER 

356-3927 ^ 



WATCH ALL YOUR FAVORITE 
SPORTS IN OUR LOUNGE. 

NEWDAYT0NA 500 VIDEO GAME 




TRY THESE 
GREAT SPECIALTIES 

• RIBS • 1/2 LB. BURGERS. 

■STEAKS • BR0ASTED CHICKEN 

• ITALIAN • LARGE SALAD BAR 

-•Mexican • Friday Fish FRY ■ 

• PIZZA - THINAHICK/OOUBLE decker 

FULL SERVICE 
MENU 



j.^i H ! »iii i i ii' — wnwn i nii 



356-2300 



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■** 



B 8/ Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



March 5, 1999 






CROSSWORD 



P: 

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ACROSS 

1. NYC cultural venue 

8. South American country, var. 

9. Art, U.S. jazz pianist 
10. Arab king 



ANSWERS 


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11. Reference mark 
14. Youngster 
16. Singing voices 
18. Flying mammals 

22. Military adornment 

23. Type of eclipse 

24. Wallis Simpson's husband 



DOWN 

1 . Endures 

2. Bolder 

3. Pig sound 

4. Khoikhoin peoples 

5. Beautiful, var 

6. Vietnamese New Year 

7. Small dish 

12. Form 

13. Engraving 

14. Halt 

15. Native American language 
17. Policy 

19. Guthrie and others 

20. More dried-up 

21 . Part of Hindu calendar 



HOROSCOPE 



Aries- March 21/Aprll 20 
You have to control your temper when It 
comes to a difference of opinion with a 
co-worker earty In the week, Aries. Just 
because he or she disagrees with you 
does not mean that your ideas don't mat- 
ter. Explain your position, and others will 
support you. A close friend needs some 
financial assistance. Do what you can. 

Taurus - April 2 1 /May 21 
Don't keep your feelings bottled up, Tau- 
rus. If something Is bothering you, let 
people know about it. They will respect 
your opinion, and you will start to feel a lot 
better. A loved one turns to you In a time 
of need. Even though you may not want 
to get involved, be there for him or her. 

Gemini - May 22/June 21 
Things are looking up this week, Gemini. 
You make great progress professionally, 
and your personal life takes a turn for 
the better. You meet an Interesting per- 
son late In the week. Don't be shy — he 
or she Is attracted to you too. Sagittarius 
plays an Important role on Thursday. ' 

Cancer- June 22/July 22 
Stay focused this week. You have a lot 
to do, but those around you want to in- 
volve you In thefr problems. Don't let 
them. Some important people are count- 
ing on you to work diligently. The person 
whom you've been seeing wants to 
spend more time with you. Think about 
what you really want before saying yes. 

Leo - July 23/August 23 
Don't stay angry at a close friend who 
gets you Into trouble this week, Leo. 
This person doesn't mean any harm; he 
or she just wants to help you. A loved 
one asks for your advice about a per- 
sonal problem. Be honest with him or- 
her — even if what you say won't be ap- 
preciated. 

Virgo- Aug 24/Sept 22 
Don't be too upset with yourself when 
you make a mistake early in the week. 
Your actions don't create any major 
problems, and things are back to normal 
within a matter of hours. Others under- 
stand the situation; you should too. You 
run into an old friend on Thursday. 



> 



i ■ 



• 







Registration for Fall 1999 

OLD SCHOOL 
MONTESSORI 



A Traditional Montessori School 

OPEN HOUSE - Saturday, March 6 
10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. 

• We Are Now In Our New Facility 

• Primary Classrooms - Ages 3 thru 6 (Fulh and Half Day Programs) 

• Elementary Classrooms - Ages 6 thru 13 (1st thru 8th grade) 

• Program Plus Available Before and After School; 7 am to 6 pm 

• Summer Programs 

• Full and Extensive Curriculum: Includes Montessori Curriculum 
as Well as Traditional School Curriculum Presented Within 
Framework of the Montessori Philosophy 

•.Registered with State of Illinois Board of Education - 
Kindergarten thru 8th 

• Member American Montessori Society 



w 



INTENT FOR THE CHILD 

• Exploration 

• Independence 

• Responsibility 



LOCATED IN GRAYSLAKE 

144 Commerce Drive (847) 223-9606 



N 

CENTin IT. 





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Spend some time with him or her. 

Libra- Sept 23/0ct 23 
Your positive attitude saves the day late 
In the week, Libra, when friends get Into 
a disagreement. You help them to see 
each other's point of view and keep 
everyone talking. You should be proud 
of yourself. Another Libra plays a key 
role on Wednesday. 

Scorpio - Oct 24/Nov 22 
You are on top of the world when you 
receive an unexpected windfall this 
week. Enjoy yourself —you deserve it. 
However, save something for the future. 
You're going to need It down the road. A 
close friend reveals his or her true feel- 
ings for you. Don't let this damage your 
relationship. 

Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 
Your courage sets you apart from the 
rest early in the week, Sagittarius. You 
stand up to a difficult acquaintance and 
make life a little easier for several peo- 



ple, including yourself. Your efforts defi- 
nitely will be appreciated. A friend offers 
you some romantic advice. Usten to 
what he or she Is saying. 

Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 
Don't be stubborn when it comes to a fi- 
nancial situation. What you want Isn't al- 
ways easy to get. Look at all of your op- 
tions, and make a realistic choice. Turn 
to loved ones for advice if you need ft. - 
They will look out for your best Interest. 
Capricorn plays an Important role. • 

Aquarius - Jan 21/Feb 1B 
Don't be too critical of an acquaintance 
who offers you assistance. He or she l3 
just trying to be helpful — there are no 
ulterior motives. A loved one introduces 
you to an interesting person. It will be 
worth the effort to get to know him or 
her better. Cancer plays a key role. 

Pisces - Feb 19/March 20 
Try to keep your sense of humor about 
you this week, Pisces. If you don't, 
you're going to have a difficult time. 
Don't take things to heart. Just work to 
resolve problems, and keep smiling. A 
loved one turns to you for comfort. Be 
there for him or her. 



Planning a rose garden 

GARDEN 

JOURNAL 



I have always loved the rose, . 
nothing else has such an intoxi- 
cating fragrance as this lovely 
flower. Roses have long been 
one of tlie most adored flowers 
since they have discovered. Many 
people though have been afraid to 
grow them, because they have heard 
they take a lot of time and trouble to 
grow well. 

You do not have to follow 100 
rules to grow a great looking and 
smelling rose. You can have nice, 
gorgeous flowers for a little effort. 
Rose gardening is not difficult, but 
you need to become familiar with 
the many types of roses available to- 
day. Over centuries, species have 
been selected, crossed, and re- 
crossed to form numerous classes or 
types of roses. Following I'll give you 
a rundown on the various roses 
available. 

David Austin roses are a mix of 
the blossom shapes and scents of 
old roses with the disease resistance 
and everblooming qualities of new- 
er strains and they are a wonderful 
new rose. 

Gertrude Jekyll is a strongly fra- 
grant shell pink blossom on a plant 
that can be pruned into a bush or 
trained as a climber. 

Graham Thomas is a romantic, 
apricot-pink rose with a hardy tea 
fragrance, while mature blooms are 
a striking, glistening yellow. Plants 
become quite bushy and grow from 
four to eight feet tall. 

The Prince has flowers of a rich 
crimson, maturing to an equally rich 
purple. No rose of this particular 
coloring has been producing in the 
last 150 years. They have an intoxi- 
cating old-rose fragrance. Compact, 
three to four foot by two to three 
foot shrubs. 

Noted for their performance, 
continuity of bloom and ease of cul- 
ture, Floribundas or Cluster roses, . 
are especially well adapted to mass 
plantings. No shrub can match 
them for floral display, both in 
amount of bloom at a given time, 
and for their lengthy blooming peri- 
od. 

Sturdy and bushy in growth 
habit, they flower continuously in 
opulent clusters, growing four to five 
feet high. 

White Queen Elizabeth is a fiori- 




LydiaHuff 



bunda with white sometimes 
flushed with pink, four inch flowers 
on strong, vigorous upright plants 
that can reach eight feet tall. Flowers 
are pleasingly fragrant. 

Armada is an outstanding rose. 
It blooms profusely all summer, 
producing large clusters of rich rose 
pink, semi-double flowers that hold 
their color well in hot, humid condi- 
tions. The bush is upright and stur- 
dy six feet high by four feet wide. 

Hybrid Teas are the flowers 
most of us think of when the rose Is 
mentioned. Hybrid Teas produce 
large flowers, usually one on a long 
stem. Grandifloras produce the 
same large flowers, but often in clus- 
ters. In truth, both groups are inter- 
changeable, and both are ideal for 
cutting. 

The McCartney Rose is possi- 
bly the most fragrant Hybrid Tea 
in existence. It has passion pink 
buds that are double and perfectly 
formed. Mr. Lincoln is considered 
the best red rose ever. Rich ma- 
roon buds open their velvet petals 
to form perfect, high-centered ful- 
ly double flowers of lively red that 
will not fade. Wonderfully fra- 
grant. Dessert Peace is a version of 
the long t ime'favorite Hybrid Tea 
Peace. It has many blooms that 
open to a peachy cream color and 
have vibrant shades of yellow and 
orange. It's spicy fragrance can't 
be matched. 

There are shrub roses or land- 
scape roses which are a rose that 
doesn't fit precisely in one of the 
preceding classes. These roses are 
some of the most carefree and pro- 
fusely blooming of all roses. They 
are extremely disease resistant and 
flower throughout the season. 

Until next time, peace. 



Garden questions may be sent to 
Garden Journal, c/o Lakeland news- 
papers, 30 S. WliitneySt., Grayslake, 
11 60030 



i '. 




t^TURF & TREE M.D^ 

The Dr. Specializes In: 

• Lawn Fertilization 

• Weed & Crabgrass Control 

• Core Aeration 

• Grub Control 

• Tree Fertilization 
■ insect Spraying 

• Disease Control 

• Consultation & Analysis 

Free Estimates - your satisfaction is guaranteed. 
State of IL Licensed -Cert.. Arborist 

847-838-0469 

$ 10 off your first appl. when you mention this ad! 



i 



-.KV'..--. 



VICTORY MEMORIAL 
HOSPITAL 






Managing Your Congestive 
Heart Failure 

At 10 a.m., March 8, "Managing 
Your Congestive Heart Failure" will 
be held at Victory Memorial Hospi- 
tal^ Sheridan Rd„ Waukegan. This 
free class is designed to help those 
diagnosed with Congestive Heart 
Failure to learn to manage the dis- 
ease on a dally basis. For more in- 
formation, call (847) 360-4031. 

Diabetic Healthy 
Meal Planning 

At 2 p.m. on March 9, "Diabetic 
Healthy Meal Planning" will be held 
at Victory Memorial Hospital, 1324 
North Sheridan Rd., Waukegan. The 
diabetic diet principle, simplified 
meal planning, sick day manage- 
ment and low blood sugar reaction 
. treatment will be discussed. Call 
(847) 360*4095 for more informa- 
tion. 

Early Pregnancy Class 

From 6:30-8:30 p.m. on March 9, 
"Early Pregnancy Class" will be held 
at Victory Memorial Hospital, 1324 
North Sheridan, Waukegan. This . 
class is intended for expectant par- 
ents during the first months of 
pregnancy. Discussion includes nu- 
trition, physicial changes and dis- 
comforts of pregnancy, prenatal 
care, emotional responses, fetal de- 
velopment and warning signs to 
speak with your doctor about. 
There is a $10 class fee. To register, 
call (847) 360-4297 extension 5218. 



PROVENA SAINT 
THERESE MEDICAL 

Tax help for seniors 

Senior Spirit has joined forces 
with the American Association of 
Retired Persons (AARP) to offer Tax- 
Aide, a free tax preparation service 
for seniors. Volunteers are available 
to assist you in filing forms 1040, 
1040Aand 1040E2L For a location 
near you, call Roman Miller at (847) 
662-0071. Waukegan residents may 
call Bernie Ruzga, (847) 662-8814 to 
make an appointment. 

SHIP counselors available 

Senior.HeaHh Insurance Pro- 
gram (SHIP) counselors are avail- 
able at Provena Saint Therese Med- 
ical Center to help seniors with 
questions and concerns about their 
medical bills. Counselors are avail- 
able Monday, Wednesday and Fri- 
day from 1 1 a.m. to 2 p.m. There is 
no charge for this service. Appoint- 
ment are required; call (847) 360- 
2172. For assistance in Spanish, call 
(847) 360-2249. 

Eat with a Dietitian 

March 16. Ntritional information 
will be given by a registered dietit- 
ian from noon to 1 p.m. in the cafe- 
teria. Cost is 99$ for Senior Spirit 
members and $2.50 for non-mem- 
bers (includes lunch). Seating is 
limited. To register, call (847) 360- 
2172. -, 

CONDELL MEDICAL 
CENTER ; 

Home Health 
Care Services 

Accredited Home Health 
Care Services are available 
through Condell Medical Cen- 
ter, 801 S. Milwaukee Ave. at 
Condell Drive, Libertyville. 
Skilled nursing care, physical, 
speech and occupational thera- 
pies, and home health aide ser- 
vices are provided through the 
Home Health Care Depart- 
ment. Personal plans are. pro- 
vided each patient and may be 
enhanced by many of the out- 
reach services from Condell 
.Medical Center including res- 
piratory aids and medical 
equipment to rent or purchase 
for the home. The information, 
call Condell Medical Center at 
816-7717. 




B9 / Lakeland Newspapers 



- ^ I . ^^ .4 . - » i. . ■ 



March 5, 1999 



Dentist makes kids eager to brush their teeth 



By, LESLIE P10TR0WSKI 
Staff Reporter 



A teddy bear with huge teeth 
plays an important role at Kids 
Dentist In Grayslake. Several 
times a week, groups of 15 to 25 
children watch a dentist or hy- 
glenist brush the cuddly bear's 
teeth as part of a presentation . 
on dental care, prevention and 
nutrition. 

"We teach children in a non- 
threatening way about nutrition 
and what's good and bad for 
their teeth," said Stacey Polinski 
of Kids Dentist. "They learn 
what a trip to the dentist is like." 

Each year, Kids Dentist In- 
vites pre-school, kindergarten 
and first grade students from lo- 
cal schools to participate in free 
half-hour presentations. The 
sessions begin in February, 
which is National Children's 
Dental Health Month, and con- 
tinue through April. This year, 
more than 2,500 children are ex- 
pected to visit. 

In addition to the demon- 
stration with the bear, the chil- 
dren are shown instruments that 
a dentist uses for cleaning and 
shining teeth. At the end of the 
session, they are given tooth- 
brushes' and plaque-disclosing 
tablets to take home. The tablets 
help them locate areas in their 
mouths that need better brush- 
ing. 

Sonia Gutierrez, D.D.S., 
.M.S., came up with the idea to..., 
invite children to her office and 
educate them about their dental 
health four years ago. She main- 
tains that building a good atti- 
tude in young people makes for 
healthier, happier adults. 

"There is no reason to have 
bad teeth anymore," she said. 
"There are many ways to pre- 
vent cavities. Proper brushing, 
sealants and good dietary habits 
can prevent future problems." 
Polinski said the response 
has been quite positive. 

"We've received many letters 
from parents," she said. "One 
parent wrote, 'My son actually 
wants to brush his teeth now.'" 
Recently children from B.J. 
Hooper School in Lindenhurst 
and 4-Kids in Grayslake visited 
the office. 

"The kids are thrilled when 
they're here," Polinski said. 




Dr. Sonia Gutierrez of theKids* Dentist in Grayslake-shows students from B.J. Hooper School in Lin- 
denhurst what one of her tools used to clean teeth feels like during a visit to the office Feb. 19. — 
Photo by Sandy Bressner 



Fox Lake American Legion raising 
funds to aid children with cancer 



Fox Lake American Legion 
Post 703 will sponsor a fundrais- 
ing pancake breakfast to assist 
area children suffering from 
Neuroblastoma, a rare and ter- 
minal form of cancer. 

The breakfast will be held 
March 27 from 8 to 11 a.m. at the 
American Legion Post 703, Rte. 
12, Fox Lake. 



The cost of the breakfast is 
$4.50 for adults and $3 for chil- 
dren 6-12 years of age. Children 
under 6 are free. 

All proceeds will be divided 
between the families of Cody 
Sturges and Nicole Wallace. Both 
children are suffering from neu- 
roblastoma. 

Individuals wishing to make 



a contribution to the fund can 
mail donations to: 

Nicole Wallace Fund, c/o 
Second Federal Savings and 
Loan, 2 E. Grand Ave, Fox Lake, 
111. 60020. 

Cody Sturges Fund, c/o Al- 
gonquin State Bank, 2400 Hunt- 
ington Drive, Algonquin, 111. 
60102. 



Medical school offers 
free seminars 



In an effort to promote com- 
munity wellness to the residents 
of Lake County, the Robert R. 
McCormick University Clinics, 
located on the campus of Finch 
University of Health 
Sciences/The Chicago Medical 
School, will begin offering a se- 
ries of free educational seminars 
this spring. The seminars will in- 
clude the latest information on 
medical and health related is- 
sues. Kicking off the series on 
March 28, from 1-3 p.m. will be a 
presentation on High Blood • 
Pressure, by Dr. David Rudy, 
chairman of the department of 
family medicine, followed by a 
free blood pressure screening. 

Serving Lake County since 
1982, The Robert R. McCormick 
University Clinics offer primary 



patient care, a comprehensive 
women's health center, and a 
full range of specialty services. 
The Clinics are staffed by a team, 
of expert physicians and health- 
care professionals dedicated to 
providing affordable, high quali- 
ty care. 

Finch University of Health 
Sciences/The Chicago Medical 
School has maintained a posi- 
tion of excellence as a national 
and community resource for 
over half a century and wel- 
comes the opportunity to con- 
tinue serving the Lake County 
community. The Clinics are lo- 
cated on the University's cam- 
'.pus at 3333 Green Bay Rd„ North 
Chicago. For further seminar or 
clinic information, call (847) 
473-4357. 



Teddy Bear Clinic eases 
anxiety for children's 
doctor visits 



On Sat., March 6, from 1 to 4 
p.m. in Lake Forest Hospital's Pa- 
tient Services and Health Education 
Center, children are invited to bring 
in their favorite teddy bear or doll for 
a thorough "check-up." Lake Forest 
Hospital staff explain what to expect 
during a physical exam while chil- 
dren, see, feel and use some com- 
mon exam room equipment or take 
an imaginary stroll through the op- 
erating room. 

"Thisis a wonderful opportunity 
for children to become familiar and 
comfortable in a medical setting and 
to understand the roles of clini- 
cians," said Sharon Hopkins, RN, 
Lake Forest Hospital Emergency 
Medical Services 9EMS) /Trauma 
Coordinator. "Lake Forest Hospital is 
working closely with the community 
to incorporate other child safety is- 



sues into the Teddy Bear Clinic." 

Teachers from Dearhaven Child 
Care and Learning Center will dress 
up as clinicians and role play with 
children to explain the procedure 
when a child visits a doctor. 

Representatives from the Lake 
Forest Police Department and the 
Lake Forest Fire Department talk 
about other child safety and fire safe- 
ty issues, and teach children how 
and when to dial 911. In addition, a 
pediatric dentist will be on hand to 
interact withthe kids. 

Other discussion topics include 
nutritional snacks arid kitchen safety. 

Lake Forest Hospital's Teddy 
Bear Clinic is open to the public and 
free of charge. For additional infor- 
mation, contact Lake Forest Hospital 
Community Education at (847) 234- 
6112. • 



B10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HEALTHWATCH 



March 5, 1999 



- 



r 



This mom has a problem with no bull! 



c- 



Hi Dr. Singer, 

My son and my husband 
used to be very big into watch- 
ing the Bulls play. In the past 
when the Bulls were having 
great seasons, the two of them 
were Inseparable and always 
right next to each other on that 
couch. Now that the Bulls arc 
not having as good a season, 
my son and husband seem to 
be drifting apart and don't 
seem to have much more in 
common. Is there anything I 
can suggest to them so that 
maybe they can have some- 
thing else this special? H.H. 

DearH.H., 

There is something I can 
suggest to you for this and that 
would be that the two of them 
should do just about anything 
together! If they had that type 
of relationship around the Bulls 
than they can really have that 
kind of relationship around any 
other type of sport or hobby. 
You didn't mention anything 
about any "bad blood" between 
them, so I am going to speak to 




PARENT'S 
PLACE 

Sherri Singer, 
Psy.D. 



this as though they are just a lit- 
tle bit out of touch with each 
other. 

They obviously love sports, 
so, even better than sitting in 
front of the T.V., why not have 
them get out to the local YMCA 
or other facility that has sports 
related activities and play to- 
gether. 

If they love to watch basket- 
ball, playing it together might 
be even better. There are also 
other sports that can be just as 
interesting. A lot of the kids I'm 
meeting these days have been 
getting into golf. It's a great 
conversation sport, too. Time to 
walk and talk or just dive balls 
and talk! 

Other things that can be 
done are more hobby related. 
Some dads and sons love to fish 
together or hike together. This 









■ , 

V 

i 


■: i, 


i 




You are invited to attend. . . 

Keeping 
tbe Beat \< 
with Arthriti 

presented by Joon Woo Kim, M.D., Ph.D. 



Wednesday, March 10 

6:30-8 p.m. 

Salutos Italian restaurant 
7680 Grand Ave,, Gurnee 



Dr. Kim, board-certified rheumatobgist, will discuss 
pain management strategies for arthritis. 

Cost: $1 (includes buffet dinner, drink & dessert) 

For reservations, call 360-2181. 

MiPROVENA 

Saint Thcrese Medical Center 

What every hospital should be. * 
2615 Washington Street 
WaukcganJL 60085 
www.saimtherese.org 




is also great talk time. The op- 
tions are almost limitless. 

If your son and husband 
have difficulty talking without a 
topic or activity between them, 
you might want to research why 
that is happening. If you don't 
want to be the one facilitating 
the discussion, you might talk to 
your husband and suggest that 
he do some thinking about 
maybe how to change it. 

The easiest way to do this is 
just to talk about it and find out. 
If It turns out to be something 
serious, get therapy for it. If it 
turns out to be awkwardness, 
(as many fathers and sons as 
well as mothers and daughters 
can feel) the best single way to 
get over that is to be together 
and get to know each other, just 
like friends would do. 

If all else fails and they are 
unwilling to give up their "T.V. 
head" status, you might get ca- 
ble or a dish and make sure you 
have ESPN so they can find oth- 
er teams to watch. I personally 
hope that they get out and do 
more together rather than 
watch more together. 

This column is for entertain- 
ment purposes only. Infor- 
mation in this column can- 
not and should not replace 
proper Psychological treat- 
ment. Dr. Sherri Singer is a 
Licensed Clinical Psycholo- 
gist, childhood behavior spe- 
cialist and author of the 
book, "Dr. Singer's Secrets for 
Lightening Quick Behavior 
Change in Kids!" For an ap- 
pointment, please call (708) 
962- 2549. 



Free osteoporosis screenings 
and lecture at CLC March 10 



A free lecture on osteoporosis, 
and screenings to measure the risk of 
developing the disease, will be pre- 
sented on Mar. 10 at the College of 
Lake County's Graysiake Campus. 

Anne Beeson, a registered nurse 
and nurse coordinator at Highland 
Park Hospital, will conduct the 
screenings from 6 to 8 p.m. in 
Room C003. The lecture titled "The 
Revolution in Osteoporosis" will be 
presented by Michael DiMuzio, 
Ph.D., director of the osteoporosis 
prevention and research center at 
Highland Park Hospital and a clini- 
cal assistant professor in the de r 
partment of oral biology at North- 
western University. 

Osteoporosis screening is rec- 
ommended especially for women 
over age 50 or women going through 



memopause. Individuals with family 
history of osteoporosis or bone prob- 
lems are at highest risk, noted Anne 
Devney, directory of health services 
at CLC. She also added that anyone, 
regardless of age, who may be at risk 
should be screened. Test results will 
be available immediately after the 
screening. 

Speaker DiMuzio will present 
the latest data on three new treat- 
ment alternatives and the recently 
FDA-approved medication, ralox- 
ifene. He also will explain the ad- 
vances In diagnostics and preven- 
tion measure. 

Screenings will be done on a 
walk-in basis; appointments are 
not needed. For information, call 
the CLC health center at 847-543- 
2064. 



Support group for young 
widows/widowers 



A six-week support group is be- 
ing offered by Hospice of North- 
eastern Illinois (HNI) in the Bar- 
rington area beginning March 2nd. 
The Young Widow/Widowers 
Group is designed to meet the 
unique needs of those who must 
face loss at this stage of their life cy- 
cle. This group will be held on con- 
secutive Tuesday evenings from 
7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. beginning on 
March 2nd and ending April 6th. 
Babysitting will be provided for • 
those attending the group. 

The HNI is a not-for-profit, 
community-based organization ac- 
credited by the joint Commission 



on Accreditation of Healthcare Or- 
ganizations 0CAHO). HNl's pur- 
pose is to support terminally ill 
patients and their families in all 
of Boone, DuPage, Kane and 
McHenry counties as well as in 
western Lake and Cook Counties. 
Hospice is dedicated to easing the 
emotional, physical and spiritual 
pain that often accompanies ter- 
minal illness, ensuring a higher 
quality of life for both patients 
and their families. 

For additional information or to 
register, please call Terry Ras- 
mussen or Chris Mezydlo at (847) 
381-5599. 



Yury M. Shklyar, M.D. 

FAMILY PRACTICE • BOARD CERTIFIED 

(847)548-5063 

X-Ray and Laboratory on Site 



NOW TREATING ACUTE/CHRONIC PAIN WITH MATRIX • NON-INVASIVE TREATMENT 




Specialty Includes Treatment Of: 

Adult & Pediatric Diseases Joints Disease 

Headaches Peripheral Vascular Problems 

Back Problems Obesity 

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Varicose & Spider Veins 

Diabetic Neuropathy Various Skin Lesions Removal 



PHYSICAL 
THERAPY 



Call for 

Appointment 

Evening & Saturday 

Appointments are 

Available 



School Physicals & Vaccinations 

Affiliated with Condell Hospital 

Conveniently Located at j n case 0/ 

The New Condell Medical Building Emergency - 
1 1 70 East Belvldere Rd. , Suite 202 24 Hour 

Graysiake, Illinois 60030 Availability 



Put your Pain in the 
hands of a specialist! 



DR. SCOTT REISER 
ROUND LAKE BEACH CHIROPRACTIC 

If any of these symptoms sound familiar, let us help you: 

* Headaches * Lower Back Pain * Sport Injuries 

* Neck Pain or Stiffness or Pain * Whiplash , 
* Numbness or Pain * Auto or Work Related 

in Arms or Legs Injuries 



Mid-Back Pain 




' iy I 



(847) 740-2800 

314 W. Rollins Rd., Round Lake Beach, IL 

(Next to Eagle Foods & Dollar Video) 

Auto and Work Related Injuries Excluded, But Covered 100%. 



Dr. Scott Reiser 



NEW PATIENT SP 






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.■*■:-■■ i 




^RoondL^Bee^diiropittctki 



& EXAM 

Exphtt3/31/99 : : ; : 



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mrmnn&>^^ 



LAST YEAR LSOO PARENTS CALLED 

THE YWCA FOR CHILD CARE! 

WERE YOU LISTED ON THE YWCA 

DATA BASE FOR REFERRALS? 

IF YOU ARE CURRENTLY A CHILD CARE PROVIDER 

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO BECOME A CHILD CARE PROVIDER 

CALL THE YWCA FOR INFORMATION ON: 

LISTING ON THE FREE DATA BASE FOR PARENT REFERRALS 

SPRING TRAINING CLASS SCHEDULES 

HOW TO START A CHILD CARE BUSINESS CLASS 

ACCESS TO TOY AND EQUIPMENT LENDING LIBRARY 

ACCESS TO VIDEO AND RESOURCE LIBRARY 

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE - PHONE AND ON-SITE 

ANNUAL YWCA EARLY CHILDHOOD CONFERENCE, APRIL 10, 1999 

NETWORKING WiTH OTHER CHILD CARE SPECIALISTS 

WE ARE THE SOURCE FOR YOUR CHILD CARE NEEDS! 

YWCA OF LAKE COUNTY 
CHILD CARE RESOURCE & REFERRAL PROGRAM 
... 2133 BELVIDERE ROAD, WAUKECAN, ILLINOIS 60085 
(847) 662-4247 Fax: (847) 662^4752 




fflS' 








LIPSERVICE 



B1 1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



March 5, 1999 



Get it off your chest (847) 223-8073 

Fax (847) 223-8810 e-mail: lipservice@lpnews.com 

Upservlce Is a phone-in column presented as a feature of Lakeland newspapers. Lake- 
land newspapers makes no claim to the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland news- 
papers does not claim the content or the subject matter as fact, but as. the personal 
opinion of the caller. Lakeland newspapers reserves the right to edit copy or to retrain 
from printing a message. Call In at 223-8073, fax In at 223-8810, or e-mail at llpser- 
vlce@lpnews.com and leave your message 24-hours a day. Callers must leave their 
name, phone number and village name, names and phone numbers will not be printed; 
however, callers maybe called for verification. 



Don't return Huskies 

About the Huskies that ate the poor tittle 
Yorkshire Terrier In Wauconda— be- 
lieve me the Huskies don't deserve 
to be alive, let alone given back to 
the owners. They will be running free 
again and next time possibly hurting 
a child. Destroy those dogs, do not 
give them back. Make the owner buy 
a Yorkie for the family that tost one. 

Round Lake Park 



Pick Lakehurst 



The powers-to-be are trying to decide 
on the best of three locations for the 
new Lake County College. The only 
logical decision Is to locate the new 
college by purchasing the falling 
Lakehurst shopping center. Much of 
the building that now exists can easi- 
ly be transformed Into a marvelous 
college setting with plenty of land 
and parking space available. The 
most attractive element of this loca- 
tion Is that the roadwork is already 
in place. 

Antioch 



'Tinky Winky' 

In regards to all the f 



i regards to all tfie fuss about "Tinky 
Wlnky," I have two young children that 
love Tel- tubbies. I don't see anything 
wrong with "Tinky Wlnky." I don't con- 



sider htm gay. If that's the case, is it gay 
that my two kids come to give me a big 
hug when they see all these tele- tubbies 
hug each other? I think it's absolutely 
ridiculous that people would even think 
about that I'd like to hear other people's 
comments about this. 

Antioch 

Kudos Grant Twp. 

My children are Involved In all Grant 
Township's athletic activities and we 
have the best coaches. The kids have the 
best time and the parents are (he best. 
For those that complain to say Its too ex- 
pensive—it's not I say kudos to Grant 
Township. 

LaksVlUa 

Condolences 

To the family whose dog, Fritz, was torn 
apart by the Huskies. My condolences. 

Wauconjta 

A little weak 

As far as the impeachment is concerned, 
I hope the senate works just as hard on 
solving the problems of social security 
as it did in making Lewlnskl innocent. It 
was just a little too weak. 

Fox Lake 

Not voting 

I don't know how some of the politi- 



cians got Into office. Clinton Is over, 
done. The politicians should get back to 
work. 

Antioch 

Handy grocery store 

Why don't we have a grocery store in • 
town? It would be so handy. 

Fox Lake 

Welcome volunteers 

Regarding Antioch Rescue Squad re- 
sponse time- Such a shame, you don't 
have any knowledge of the Antioch Res- 
cue Squad. Members of the rescue 
squad are volunteers, They give of their 
own time to their community, both day 
and night. Their families and friends tol- 
erate their schedules, and absences, so , 
that they could provide a service to their 
community. They go out in all types of 
weather and at all hours of the night. If 
the need Is there, they are too. Perhaps 
you didn't know that other rigs were out 
when that supposed call you heard, . 
. came In. Perhaps you should move to 
Antioch and bless us with your volun- 
teerism. A great volunteer Is always wel- 



come. 



Antioch 



Thanks, truck-driver 

I want to thank the wonderful truck dri- 
ver that was on Route 173 on Feb. 19 
and saw our Bulldog running across the 
street. The dog somehow got loose from 
his chain and was running around out- 
side and almost got killed. The man took 
the time to slow his truck down, 
grabbed the dog and brought It to our 
house. God bless you. 

Antioch 

Organ donation 

Comment about the Walter Payton story 
featuring the effort on his part to obtain 
a liver drgan. Regardless of what the 
people from the organ donation society 
say, the rich and famous are always go- 
ing to get in line first 1 hope that Payton 






Lakeland Publishers, Inc. & College of Lake County 

«99 Health and (II 

Fair 

K A a 



FREE ATTRACTIONS 



Face Fainting • Blood Pressure 

Stress Relaxation Tapes 

Home Health Care Items 

Body Fat Testing • Fine Aid Kits 

Complimentary Guest Classes on Fitness 

Chair Massages • Posture Exams 

Arthritis Screenings • Diabetes Screenings ' 

Toothbrushes • And Much More! 



DON'T MISSTHIS ONE!!! 

Saturday, March 27, 1999 

10:00 am to 3:00 pm 
College of Lake County 

Physical Education Center^Gymnasium 
I 935 I Washington, Grayslake 



COME SEE!! 



Alex Rothaeker from 

TOPS dog training kennels 

and Olive OyU Russian i 

Wolihound who Ij In the 

Guinness Book of World 

Records -Two Timet!! 

Come meet them 

and see their show! 





DONATE BLOOD 

At Lakeland Publisher*' and College of 

Lake Councy'i Blood Drive 

In conjunction with 

LIFESOURCE Blood Services 

When you girt Wood you five another birthday, 

another annhreriory. another day at the frcoch, 

another n'f ht under the Kort, another talk with 

a ftitnd, another lauth, another hug. another 

trwnce. GIVE WOOD • OVEUFEi 



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gets one, but t also hope that everyone 
else that's waiting In line will get one 
too, 

- Mundeletn 

Tell the truth 

Comment about the president's Im- 
peachment. AH the articles that are out 
that arc telling us how we should tell our 
children about the president lying. I. 
think we need to tell our kids the truth, 
that no one Is perfect and that people 
will do things they shouldn't do, 
whether It be lying, killing or whatever. 
Kids should be told the truth. 

Mundeletn 

Good economy 

In response to the question "Does the 
Clinton presidency mean anything 
now?" It absolutely does, it means that 
the for the next two years our economy 
Is going to be very good. God forbid, if 
the people make a mistake and don't 
elect Al Gore as president in the year 
2000. He will keep the economy going. - 

Mundeletn 

Good stores 

I am very glad that Fox Lake is getting 
some nice new stores on Grand Avenue. 

FoxLake 

Stop negativity 

I have moved to Antioch and my daugh- 
ter attends Emmons School. She plays 
with children at their houses In the area 
and their kids come here. There are peo- 
ple that live in many different economic 
levels and I feel they get along very well. 
I love living in this community. There 
are the lakes, the porks, eta It's time to 
stop the negativity. 

Antioch 



Vote April 

I absolutely do 



1 



ly do not want my taxes si- 
phoned off the park district because 
they can't live within their means. 
Where Is this new Gray slake founda- 
tion when you need them? Aren't they 
supposed to be seeking donations for 
this? 

Grayslake 




first 



To the Northern Illinois Conservation 
Club and to other organizers of Ice fish- 
ing tournaments. Why do you continue 
to put adults and children at risk by 
holding your Ice fishing derbys in Febru- 
ary, when over the post two years, there 
has been a trend of milder winters? I am 
a fellow fisherman also and I choose not 
to ice fish in this year's derby, because a, 
friend of mine fell through the Ice last 
year at a sanctioned event. Why not 
consider scheduling these ice events In 
January, when the ice has been thicker 
and much safer. These arc supposed to 
' be family events and you should have 
safety first and foremost on your mind. 
It's nice to Ice fish when there arc sunny 
skies and gentle breezes, but a drowning 
Isn't worth it. Next year, guys, let's think 
about safety first and consider schedul- 
ing in January. 

Antioch 

Need new voices 

Can't we get a few new trustees on the 
Grayslake village board In the April 13 
election? We need trustees for educators 
or those who work with people and have 
a better perspective on making deci- 
sions based on getting along with peo- 
ple and not focusing on how every ac- 
tion must somehow be tied to money. 
When 1 hear some trustees speak, 1 
am amazed by the shallowness of 
their reasoning. Where arc these 
people from? Where do these people 
go to school? What books do they 
read? Don't they even have a basic 
understanding on government's role 
in society? We need some new voices 
on the village board. 

Grayslake 

Vote 2001 

As a contractor in Round Lake Beach, I 
detest the fact that the mayor is solicit- 
ing funds for candidates of trustees. I 
have no desire to fund the mayor's party 
for any election. The only party that I 
wish to support Is someone that would 
go against him In the year 2001. Do your 
job, do It right. 

Round Lake Beach 

What about sewers? 

Whatever happened to the push for 
sewers? It seems like they have been 



counting questionnaires for two 
months. As I understand It, there were 
about 5,000 questionnaires sent to the 
people of Antioch Township. They got 
back about 50 percent A little over half 
of those were FOR sewers. That leaves a 
large percentage of the people that 
won't buy Into the outrageous cost of 
sewers. About two years ago, it was stat- 
ed that the majority didn't want sewers. 
It's time to drop It. 

Antioch 



No loose cats 



■ Please keep your cats In your house or 
put a collar on them. We are going to 
start trapping any un- collared cats. If 
you arc going to let your cats' out of the 
house, please put a collar on them. 

Round Lake Beach 

Poor business 

Stanton School Board Is under the Im- 
pression that the S12 million referen- 
dum is a shoe In at the next election. At a 
village board meeting, It was stated that 
the "drawing Is not going to be changed 
and that's that." They had better get 
back to the drawing board if they want 
that passed. The bus situation is one of 
the stumbling blocks and the property 
north of Shady Lane Is another issue 
that they do not want to discuss. I'm 
against selling the other school build* 
ings until after all this is done. To 
spend $12 million dollars to save 
$60,000 a year Is poor business as far as 
I'm concerned. 

FoxLake 



Collared cat 



-** 



I have called the Animal control Dept. 
and was told that if a cat does not have a 
collar on, we can trap It and bring it into 
the animal control office. Round Lake 
Beach police department has stated that 
the homeowners can trap wild cats 
without collars on them and bring them. 
Into animal control. So, this spring, any- 
one who has a cat that Is loose outdoors 
and doesn't have collars on, they will be 
taken to Animal Control. I'm tired of 
them hanging around In my yard, poop- 
ing all over, getting into my vegetable 
garden and flower beds. Keep your cat 
indoors or make sure it has a collar and 



tag on. 



Round Lake Beach , 



Unite Round Lake 

My comment to the four Round Lake 
villages. I think it is quite obvious that 
this community would benefit greatly in 
becoming one united village. They 
would receive greater fire and police 
protection, higher federal and Illinois * 
tax compensation, a simpler and more 
efficient government The population of 
this town would not easily be Ignored by 
any Chicago area investors. 

Round Lake 

Get organized 

My comment is about the 
Daddy/daughter dance held at the 
Round Lake Park District. Previous 
dances were veiy enjoyable and well 
organized. Everyone had a great 
time. This last one, was very disap- M 
pointing. In the past there was an ex- 
tra charge for a photographer. I be- 
lieve most people ordered It, regard- 
less. It was a nice memento. Let's get 
back to the way it was last year, more ! 
focused on the children, more orga- ^ 
nized and more fun. If It Is needed to 
raise the prices, so be it. 

Rowui Lake Park ' 

Chamber charity 

Does the Grayslake Chamber commerce ': 
need charity? Do you know the village 
board decided to tax us $35,000 per year • 
for three years to expand the welcome 
program, maintain the business data 
base, expand the customer attraction ' . 
program and coordinate special events? 
What gives? Can't the chamber afford to 
bankroll its own profit making plans fn 
this upscale community of Grayslake? . 
They have the dough, but they would 
, rather use yours. Are you going to let 
them? They should build their own , 

building, not house the village hall. This i 
Is why we have to get some openly 
brazen businessmen off the board so * 
they won't be spending our taxes for 
their gains. Surely our founding fathers 
would not agree to tax the citizens for 
businesses. \ 

Grayslake 



• ■j 




u 






•v^ 



B 1 2/ Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



March 5,1999 



FROM PAGE Bl 



QUI LTS : Create warmth for area charities 



to create it. common fabric to make a star block 

"We're going to do a sampler of their choice. "There are lots of dif- 

quilt," she said. Customers will use a ferent star blocks." 



The final blocks then will be dis- 
played. "Customers will vote on 
their favorite top five." The top 15 



■Q 




'.."•■"" \. '-^- ■',-'--.;'-■■■ ,'-v ■•.-*-' -•• ■'-■',--''. -■■ .w '"■' ■ --' "J" -iV-V' 



irMO f edits m Mmmeme 

A\£z^*Z/^ : ^ V .":■■• ^-£^j&£&,'- ■■■■■■ 



GRAND OPENING SALE 

MARCH 6th - 14th 

IU-W-F 9-6 • Sat. 9-4 
T-Th 9-8 • Sun. 10-3 



i 
® 



■ 



■v 




squares will then be made Into a 
red, white, and blue quilt, of which 
the blue color will be dominant. 

"This will be the fifth (Indepen- 
dence Day) quilt," Maston said. 
"We'll have it in the shop for awhile 
and then we'll finish it up on July 3 
at the festivities." 

Raffle tickets are available at the 
store. One ticket is $ 1 and 6 are $5. 
"The bulk of the tickets are sold (In- 
dependence) day." 

"We divide the profits between 
the historical society and the Inde- 
pendence Day Committee," Maston 
said. 

The back of the quilt will have a 
label with the names of all the peo- 
ple who worked on it. Usually there 
are about IB to 20 people who will 
put stitches in it 

State Bank of The Lakes employ- 
ees create a quilt that is donated to 
the Central Baptist Children's Home 
in Lake Villa and which they raffle 
off. "We started last September," 
said Jan Wilke. She coordinates the 
all-bank effort to create the quilt. 

"We did our vote. We're doing a 
Christmas Quilt," she said. "It's go- 
ing to be an outstandingly good 
quilt this year." 

"It's a very elegant looking 
quilt" 

"It will be blocks set in a lattice," 
she said. It is based on three blocks 
that are set in a random fashion. • 
They are red, green, and ivory. She 
said that the quilt will have a Victori- 
an feel to it. The quilt comes with 
adoption papers that explain its his- 
tory and how it was made. 

"It comes with credentials," she 
said. Helen Anderson sews a special 
cross-stitch label for it V 

"We sell the raffle tickets at each 
of our facilities." State Bank of The 
Lakes has offices located in 
Grayslake, Lindenhurst, and 
Gurnee. "We will have a new facility 
in Spring Grove (late this year)." 

Once the quilt is ready, it will be 
placed on display in each branch of 



the bank in order to encourage sale 
of tickets. 

The Antloch Woman's Club has 
started work on a quilt to raise mon- 
ey for a community Improvement 
project. The club is raising money to 
create a sledding hill and skating fa- 
cility for families and children at the 
William E. Brook Wetland Sanctuary 
and Entertainment Center in down- 
town Antioch. 

Working closely with the club on 
the design is Robin Kessell, co-own- 
er of Quilter's Dream. "It's still in ' 
pieces," she said. "I've been design- 
ing as I go along." 

The background of the quilt is 
green with some tan. "I'm trying to 
stay with country colors," Kessell 
said. Predominant colors include 
blue, green, white, and gray. She is 
using an applique* technique for the 
blocks of fabric, although other 
techniques are used. Blocks will be 
held together with a lattice of cloth. 

"The scenes are fairly realistic," 
woman's club member Sue Allen 
said. 

There is a scene of workmen, 
birds and animals, flowers, sledding, 
and some wetland scenes. They are 
meant to depict the features of the 
downtown wetland restoration area, 
according to Allen. 

The woman's club quilt will be 
on display throughout Antioch dur- 
ing the coming months, and people 
can buy tickets at locations that will 
be announced. The price of raffle 
tickets for this very special quilt have 
not yet been set 

Once the top sheet has been as- 
sembled, woman's club members 
will sew the top cover to the bottom 
sheet with padding between them. 

For people who love quilts and 
have wanted to own one, the oppor- 
tunities to see or own a handmade 
quilt will unfold during the next sev- 
eral months. The Sunday, May 2 
"Lake County Impressions V" Quilt 
Show will be the best place to start 
indulging a passion for quilting. 



ft 



Round Lake Area B.E.S.T. 

"Bringing Everyone's Strengths Together" 

is proud to present 

The Walker Bros. Circus 



Come join us for a good old-fashioned day at 
the circus, and best of all advance-purchased 
kids' tickets are free! 



When: 



Where: 



Cost: 



Two Great Shows! 
Saturday, March 6, 1999 
5:30pm AND 7:30pm 
Round Lake High School's New Gym 
1 Panther Blvd., Round Lake, Illinois 
Advance- 
Children 12 and under - free 
Ages 13 and up - $6.00 
Show Day- 
Children 12 and under - $5.00 
Ages 13 and up - $8.00 



Please note: 

This event is a fundraiser for Round Lake Area 
B.E.S.T. And, since the highest profit is made 
from advance ticket sales, it is essential that 
everyone buy their tickets EARLY. 

Call Kris Nobilio at (847) 587-2207 for 
further ticket information. 

We look forward to seeing you there! 







Four Sections — 56 Pages 



FRIDAY, MARCH 5, 1999 



A Lakeland Newspaper /75 cents 



■ 






'The Chamber will be sponsoring a $1,000 grand raffle prize in 

Chamber gift certificates at the end* 

Merchants button-up downtown 




Create shopper 

incentive program 

to highlight new 

parking 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



D 



owntown merchants will 
welcome shoppers with 
incentives, 



convenient 
parking behind their 
stores, new back-of- 
the-store entrances, 
and a $1,000 grand 
raffle prize at the end of 
sidewalk construction. 

Downtown 
sidewalks may be under 
construction for several 
weeks, but merchants 
remain undaunted. 
They plan to reward 
shoppers who use rear 
parking lots and contin- 
ue to shop with them. 

The parking lots are 
on Toft Avenue and 




Nolan: Owner of 

Impressions 

Count, 907 Main 

Street 



e Skidmore Drjye^. 



"It's your button to 



success," said Larry 
Hanson, downtown 
merchant and member 
oftheAntioch 
Chamber of 
Commerce and Indus- 
try. He is one of a few 
dozen merchants who 
decided on the 
program at a morning chamber 




Johnston: 

Manager of Brans 

Nut Co., 935 Main 

Street 



meeting Thursday, Feb. 11. 

"I think it's a great Idea," said 
President Barbara Porch. She 
presented the button proposal to 
members so it could be in place 
when construction Starts in early 
March. 

Downtown Antioch merchants 
will distribute 10,000 buttons 
throughout the Antioch area. The 
two-color button with a picture of a 
yellow construction hard-hat will 
have a pin on the back. Shoppers 
will be encouraged to wear the 

button during the March 
through May downtown 
sidewalk renovation 
period. 

Shoppers who wear 
the button, or have a 
shopper card, will receive 
an incentive gift from 
merchants when making 
a purchase. Each partici- 
pating business will have 
a different gift. 

Incentive gifts may be 
a piece of candy, a 
coupon for a discount on 
a future purchase, an 
immediate discount, or 
some other item. 
Customers can also show 
their button or shopper 
card toenter a raffle 
drawing in each business. 
Merchants may have 
weekly raffle drawings for 
their customer?. Partici- 
pating stores will have 
different raffle prizes. 
At the end of the 
sidewalk construction 
period, all shopper raffle 
entrants of all stores will be eligible 
for a grand prize. 

"the Chamber will be sponsor- 




Parking along Main Street in downtown Antioch will be put on hold 
through May while the village. renovates sidewalks used by local 
shoppers. —Photo by Sandy Bressner 



495 homes slated 
forRte.173, 
Savage Road 

By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



ing a $1,000 grand raffle prize in 
Chamber gift certificates at the 
end," said Porch. "We will do the 
drawing Saturday night at the Taste 
v bf Antioch." ._.-;. .. 

:, Taste of Antioch/ Maxwell Street 
Days will be Thursday to Sunday, 
July 22 through 25. 

Merchants also will distribute 
maps to identify locations of new "■ 
parking lots behind downtown ' 
stores as well as how to reach them. 

At die February meeting, 
Antioch Community Development . 
Director Claude LeMere described 
the upcoming sidewalk Improve- 
ment program to merchants. 



"We'll select a (construction) 
company on the 25th," LeMere said. 
The contractor will start construc- 
tion during the first few weeks of 

MarcruU^.^' * 



Thevillagewillset-upbig signs 
with flashing lights to direct people 
to parking lots. 

LeMere promised merchants . 
that he will be out on the project 
every day to move it along. Tm 
sure after one week with me it will 
move along faster." 

There will be no parking permit- 



Please see DOWNTOWN /A3 




Village of Antioch trustees 
approved a preliminary develop- 
ment plan for the Deercrest Planned 
Unit" Development, PUD, at their 
Monday, March 1 village board 
meeting. 

Approval for the PUD was based 
on agreements between the village 
and the developer that emerged 
from staff meetings and public 
hearings by the Combined Plan and 
Zoning Commission that began 
Thursday, Ian. 8, 1998 and ended 
Thursday, Oct 8, 1998. 

Agreement between the village 
and the developer regarding the 
issue of fences between Deercrest 
and adjacent property was not 
resolved and will be discussed 
further. The developer agreed to 
abide by future village decisions. 

The Deercrest PUD, in general, 
contains more open space and is less 
dense than required or permitted by 
village ordinances. 

The Combined Plan and Zoning 
^.Gommisslon'- had 'recommended 
denial of me Deercrest PUD request' 
on Oct 8. A subsequent workshop 
between the developer and village 
trustees with plan and zoning 
commissioners, was conducted 
Tuesday, Jan. 12, 1999 to evaluate 11 
reasons for the commission's vote to 
deny. 

The Deercrest development is 
on 232 acres of land owned by Otto 

Please see HOMES IA3 



Cashier Ray cashes-in on $100,000 instant cache 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



PATCHED TOGETHER 



: 






- Qui it shows arid raffles aid , 
Lake County organizations . ' 
— PLEASE SEE PAGE Bl 



YEAf 

i; Don't worry, 'i 



YEAR 2000 

but;be 
safe Instead of sorry 

~ PLEASE SEE PAGE C2 



WHAT A CONCEPT 

Design' business 
grows rapidly 
— PLEASE 



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Bmktm — C5 Hot Spots B6 

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Fortune smiled on Antioch 
Armanetti Wine and Liquors' 
Cashier Kay Druse at 10 a.m. Friday, 
Feb. 26 when she received $100,000. 

Someone had to tell her how 
much she won because she kept 
miscounting the zeros. 

She's already left town. 

Druse will be back. 

"1 was trying to save money," 
Druse said. In the moments before 
she scratched an Illinois State Lottery 
scratch-and-win ticket, she was 
trying to figure a way to save a few 
more dollars for her 10-day vacation 
trip to Florida with her sisters and . 
Aunt. 

"Every couple of years we go," 
she said. Sisters Lynn, joy, Val, and 
Aunt Helen were scheduled to leave 
on vacation this week. A few more 
dollars in her pocket would help her 
enhance the experience. 

"I was standing here working," 
she said. "When I work, I play a 
couple of scratch-offs. To no avail." 

Friday would be different, but it 
had not felt different before the big 
win. 

"I took a chance." 



"It spit out a winner." 

The $5 ticket revealed itself in 
stages, according to Druse. "I didn't 
believe my eyes." 

At first she thought it was $100, 
but then it looked more like a $1,000. 

"I just couldn't count 'em." 

That is $5 for five zeros, after a 
non*descript number one. 

She will continue to work. "It's 
not a million," she said. 

True, but it is enough to spread it 
around, and she intends to help out 
some family members with two 
purchases. Indeed, if she buys the 
cars at Antioch dealerships, her sales 
taxes will in turn help out every 
Antioch resident. 

"I'm going to buy bom my 
daughters (Karen and Dawn) a car. 1 
need a new kitchen floor and 
countertop. And, 1 would love to go 
to Alaska," she said. "Everyone says it 
is beautiful. Now I can afford to go." 

"The rest we're going to save," 
she said. "We need a nest egg." 

Druse and husband Delbert take 
fall vacations. They like to head west. 
She said that she only plays local 
lottery games, but on their trips west 
through Davenport, she admits she' 

Please see MONEY/ A3 




Kay Druse, a cashier at Antioch Armanetti Wine and Liquors, 
celebrates with roses given to her by her husband after winning 
$100,000 on a scratch-off lottery ticket at the store.— Photo by 
Sandy Bressner 



. 



GET CONNECTED ... ■ 
Look for us on the Internet at 



For home delivery, call (847) 740-4035; For ads, call (847) 223-8161 



A2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



March 5, 1999 








i 



Bob Ringa, Jr. - Funeral Director 

Funeral customs are slowly changing, and so, too, is the ownership of many family funeral 
homes and cemeteries. 

A recent trend has been for a few large domestic and foreign corporations to purchase family- 
run funeral homes. Unfortunately, they do not change the name on the sign, leaving one to 
assume the original family still owns the establishment. 

Our firm is still owned by the family that founded it over 103 years ago. And, because we are 
a family-owned and directed funeral home, we can still provide the thoughtful service that 
only a family can, at fair prices. 

Burial Services • Cremation Services 

Pre-Planning 

122 S. Route 83 
Lake Villa, Illinois 

(847) 356-2146 

The ONLY Family Owned & Operated Funeral Home 

Serving Lake Villa and 



*\ 






I March 5, 1999 



COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers! A3 



w 



■ 



FROM PAGE Al 



HOMES: 

nod of Village Board 




gams 



.. Sprenger on the north side of Route 
173 at the north end of Savage Road. 
There will be a total of 495 dwelling 
units in the Deercrest PUD.. 

The approved PUD Is 20 
dwelllngunits less than the515 units 
originally proposed by Deercrest de- 
velopers. Also, existing zoning con- 
ditions on the property would allow 
672 dwelling units. 

Deercrest developers agreed to 
create a conservation easement for 
designated portions of the property 
that will be managed by a group ac- 
ceptable to the village. 

The developer will pay the vil- 
lage $40 per dwelling unit to be 
r placed in a fund to help pay for a 
traffic signal, at some future unspec- 
ified and unknown time, at Route 
173 and Savage Road. 

The developer will pay school 
impact fees and library impact fees 
as agreed upon with officials of each 
district. 

The developer will transfer park 
property to the Village of Antioch 
Parks and Recreation Department as 
well as $883,000 of park improve- 
ments secured by a bond of 1 15 per- 
cent. 

The 495 dwelling unitswill con- 
sist of 1 16 town homes, 1 1 1 clustered 
homes, and 268 single family homes. 
i Townhouse units will not be placed 
on top of one another. 

The village will provide sewer 
: and water to the development from 



its own lines yet to be constructed 
Repayment of village bonds for the 
sewer and water improvements con 
structed by the village will be guar- 
anteed by an unconditional letter of 
credit in place prior to final plan ap- 
proval. 

Final plans for Deercrest must 
be submitted within Ave years or the 
village will have the right to hold 
public hearings and considering 
canceling the. approved Deercrest 
PUD. 

In addition, two other changes 
have been made by the Deercrest 
developer in the preliminary plan 
and approved by the Village board. 

A secondary road was added to 
permit a future connection with any 
land development to the west of the 
property. At the present time, no de- 
velopment is planned for that area. 

A 10-foot wide easement was 
created between some lots that gives 
residents in the northwestern por- 
tion of the property access to Mary's 
Park. 

The developer will work with Vil- 
lage of Antioch officials to petition 
the Illinois Department of Trans- 
portation to obtain a traffic signal at 
Savage Road and Route 173. Deer- 
crest plans include proper right-of- 
way widths and areas for decelera- 
tion lanes, 

Townhouse buildings will not 
have more than four dwelling units 
per building. 




DOWNTOWN: Merchants 
button-up to create parking awareness 



I ted downtown during construction. 
1 There will be only one lane of traffic' 
through downtown, and the side- 
walks will be replaced on one side of 
the street at a time. 

LeMere gave a strong endorse- 
ment to the merchant button and 
shopper card program. "This button 
program that Barbara (Porch) is go- 
ing to introduce is wonderful." 

Buttons will be distributed in a 
variety of ways. Some merchants 
. suggested passing them out at the 
Piggly-Wiggly grocery store and the 
True Value/Just Ask Rental Store, 
both on Orchard Street. Merchants 
will have buttons in their stores to 
give-away. 

"We can hand out buttons at the 



Expo at the end of March," said 
Porch. 

The Chamber will sponsor its 
third annual Antioch Business 
Expo/Trade Show at Antioch Com- 
munity High School on Saturday 
arid Sunday, March 27 and 28. 

"I like the button idea because 
of the visual impact," said Wendy 
' Maston, of Quilter's Dream Inc., 902 
Main Street . 

Randy Nolan, of Impressions 
Count, 907 Main Street, urged that 
the program start as soon as possi- 
ble so customers will have their but- 
tons and cards in hand as construc- 
tion starts. 

"This Is a positive program," 
LeMere told merchants. 



MONEY: Cashier wins 



has walked onto a Riverboat Casino. 

"I play a quick-pick when the 
numbers are big," she said. Other : 
wise, her risk-taking is limited to 
scratch-offs. 

Druse has been in the area all her 
life. "I grew up in Lake Villa and lived 
here my adult life, over 30 years," she 
said. She has worked for eleven years 
. at Antioch Armanetti Wine and 
Liquors, 1180 Main Street, at Routes 
173 and 83. 

All of her regular customers are 



excited for her. "They all want to 
come in and rub me for luck," she 
said; 

The store put up a large sign an- 
nouncing that she is a winner. 

For her, the scratch-off games 
are the ones to play. She said that 
she knows if she has won or lost im- 
mediately. "It's fun." According to 
her, you never know what you're 
getting. 

"It's a shocker. I still can't sleep," 
she said of her winnings, 



Antioch News 

Vol.114 No. 10 A Lakeland Newspaper Founded 1886 

(USPS 027-080} Editorial Office Morot>« ol Winoii Piou A»»t 

30 South Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030 * Look for us on tho Internet at 

(847) 223-8161 WWW.LPNEWS.COM 

. . Orl*» ol PuWicaliOn: 30 South Wtwey St. GiayiWie, IL 60030. Plw» (847)2!3-BI8t. 

Publiihod wooWy. periodical mat poitago paid al Grayslakt. IL 60030 

Henna Wivefy Ratal: SUM par year in Laks, Cook. KanoVia and McHonry Counliat; 

ouewtwe M0 00 par yea/ by mail pad in advance. 

Poitmailw : Send eddieti ehangei lo Anllocti Newi, 30 Soul* Wh4ney SlreeL P.O. Bo* 268, Qraytlake, lUmoii 60030. 



M.R. SCHR0EDER 

Founder- 1904-1 986 



WILLIAM H. SCHR0EDER 

Publisher 



KAREN O'TOOLE 

Circulation Mgr. 

B0BULMER 

Display Advertising Mgr, 

MAUREEN COMBS 

Classified Advertising Mgr. 



CORKEY GROSS 

Public Relations Manager 

NEAL TUCKER 

Composition MgrjExecutivo Editor 

lYrSSffillS RHONDA HEIRICK BURKE 

^VSSfcSS" Managing Ed,tot^ 



Table hopping 

Danielle Abbate, 14, of Anttoch served as a waitress Saturday during a spaghetti dinner given by 
the eighth grade confirmation class at St. Peter's Church In Antioch. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 



Comedy night benefits community 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



The Antioch Junior Wom- 
an's Club's Comedy Night presents 
its third annua] comedy night, to* 
morrow, Saturday, March 6 at Father 
Hanley Hall at St. Peter's School 
starting at 7 p.m.. 

Two comedians are the featured 
performers of the evening, but the 
real community-building action is 
the raffle and silent auctions. For ap- 
petites, there are appetizers and 
desserts. 

To add, dignity Jo .'the evening, ■ ' 
The Antioch Woman's Club has 
added President Ted-Axton, of the 
First National Bank- Employee 
Owned, and- Antioch Community 
High School District 1 17 Superinten- 
dent Dr. Dennis Hockney to the mix 
as masters of ceremony. 

"We're gettingalot of good feed- 
back," said club President Cathi 
Hackelor. "It's March. We're all look- 
ing forward to a night out that is 
close-by." 

She urges everyone to come and 
enjoy the comedy and have a great 
time. It is a full evening of food, en- 
tertainment, and humor. "Every-- 
body's been very supportive of what 
we're trying to do," Hackelor said. 

Professional comedians Fred 



Klett and Patti Vasquez will each ere*, 
ate a special evening. They are the 
featured attraction for 90 minutes of 
family humor during the evening. 

Comedian Fred Klett does a style 
of family-oriented material about 
marriage that Bill Cosby so success- 
fully employs. He does calm obser- 
vations of existence. He comments 
about living with children. 

Klett has performed With Jerry 
Seinfeld, Jay Leno, and Richard 
Lewis, He has appeared on Comedy 
Central, HBO, and Showtime' and, 
,' recently, made his network televi- 
sion debut on NBC's "Friday Night 
Videos." 

Opening for Klett is Patti 
Vasquez. She has been at Zanies In 
Mt. Prospect where she has opened 
for comedians like Bill Maher, Tom 
Rhodes, Richard Lewis, John Pin- 
nette, John Caponera, and Will 
Durst. 

Vasquez has appeared on NBC's 

"Friday Night" program. She learned 

. her performance skills at the Players 

Workshop of Second City in Chicago. 

Comedy Night provides most of 
the funds the woman's club uses 
during the year to benefit communi- 
ty groups. The money helps local or- 
ganizations such as the Antioch Res- 
cue Squad, Guiding Eyes for the 
Blind, Save-a-Life Foundation, as 



well as area school programs such as 
Snowfiake, the Tom-Tom newspa- 
per, Finesse Magazine, and the choir. 

"Last year we gave to the bum 
camp," member Vickie Axton said. A 
SI ,300 donation covers the cost for 
two children for a one week stay. 

"We gave, last year, to the Guid- 
ing Eyes for the Blind." 

Local automobile dealerships, 
restaurants, and downtown busi- 
nesses have contributed merchan- 
dise,' gift certificates, and services. 
"Usually there's something for 
everybody," said member Karen l^u- 
' .bin. 

"We do have a hand-painted 
print of a light-house. Jack Miller 
painted it," said Vickie Axton. 

Laurie Stahl has donated cre- 
ation of a special cake. J.C.'s Pizzeria 
has donated a pizza -a- month for one 
year. There are season tickets for 
PM&LTheater as well as for Six Flags 
Great America. 

■ Baskets have been donated with 
special collections. They include: 
a Christmas basket, chocolate 
basket, Italian wine and pasta 
basket, bird basket, birthday bas- 
ket, garden basket, and a desper- 
ation dinner basket. 

"There will be clothing from Se- 
quoit Pride," said Vickie Axton. 

Tickets at the door are $15. 



Artist to demonstrate in pottery shop 



Vi 



I 111 Tortorella will host Anne- 
Bridget Gary at the Antioch 
Pottery Works on Thursday, 
March 11 starting at 10 a.m. 
/ will discuss her experiences as 
a potter-ceramist in China, Korea, 
Japan, and the United States. 

Gary is professor of ceramics 
at the University of Wisconsin at 
Stevens Point. 

She will have slides and 
demonstration pieces. Gary "will 
demonstrate her unique style of 
wheel throwing that includes 
carving, both porcelain and 
stoneware, and 'stuffing' forms for 
sculpture." Tortorella said that 
people should be a lunch and , 
drink. 

Antioch Pottery works is locat- 
ed at 25942 Heart O'Lakes Boule- 
vard (west on Grass Lake Road, 
west of 59, right on Blufflake Road 
to Heart O'Lakes, left to the Anti- 
och Pottery Works. 

The Antioch Junior Woman's 
Club is building its membership. 
They have added about 15 new 
members this year, according to 
President Catlil Hackelor. That 




OUR 

TOWN 



^J* --A KenPqtchen 

gives them about 60 members total. 

A major up-coming event is 
their Walk-a-Thon on May 15 at 9 
a.m. in Van Paten Woods. 

It will cost $12 to enter. "It's 
our twelfth year," she said. People 
can donate more if they like. 

Member Jodl Eckert is orga- 
nizing the walk. 

The club will meet in a few days, 
Tuesday, March'9, at the 
Maplethorpe Room of the Commu- 
nity Building at 7 p.m. Pickard Chi- 
na will make a presentation as well - 
as Antioch Community School Dis- 
trict 34. The district will present in- 
formation about the Tuesday, April 
13 school bond referendum. 

Antioch Community Chorus 
will present "The Crucifixion" in 
the sanctuary of the Benedictine 
Abbey on Palm Sunday, March 28 



at 7:30 p.m. Ralph Brooke, of 
Antioch, will conduct. Featured 
local soloists are Wanda 
Sobczak, Ken Smouse, and 
John Desblens. Nicholas 
Solomon, of Deeriteld, and Nor- 
man Miranda, of Kenosha, will 
also sing. 

Antioch resident Judith 
Bronder will be on the Illinois 
Lottery's television game show 
"Illinois' Luckiest" on Saturday, 
March 6. She will appear on 
Chicago's WGN-TV, Channel 9 at 
6:30 p.m. She will compete with 17 
other contestants from across the 
state for prizes of up to $100,000 
or more. She qualified to appear 
when she found three television * 
sets on her "Illinois' Luckiest" in- 
stant ticket. She filled out the back 
of the ticket and sent it to Spring- 
field. Minimum prize for contes- 
tants is $500. 

If you have interesting infor- 
mation or anecdotes to submit for 
"Our Town" call staff reporter Ken 
Patchen at 223-8161, ext. 131 ore- 
. mail, edit @lnd.com," 



A4 /Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



March 5, 1999 



Swing Street CafS '99 
offers musical evening 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Swing Street Cafe* '99 rolls out 
some new sounds and dance move- 
ments this year i n the completely re- 
decorated south gymnasium of Anti- 
och Community High School. 

This annual showcase of musical 
talent and evening of fun and danc- 
ing will be Friday and Saturday, 
March 12 and 13. The doors open at 
7 p.m. 

"The show starts at 7:30 p.m. 
and it ends around 10/' said Sheri 
Fries. 

Fries and Lynne Keller have 
brought this annual event together 
with the members of ACHS Music 
and Performance Sponsors, AMPS. 

Swing Street Cafe" presents the 
musical talent gathered in the jazz 
ensembles, concert and symphonic 
bands, soloists, the Show Choir, the 
Fortunate Eight choir, and theater 



members. 

"On the menu will be nachos, 
pizza, potatoes, desserts, and bever- 
ages," said Fries. "We have a lot of 
parent help making the desserts." 

Larry Mondle's Baskin and Rob- 
bins Antioch franchise has made a 
donation for the evening's food. 
Dominos is helping to provide the 
pizzas. 

"We will also have a variety of 
raffle prizes drawn each night that 
were donated by area businesses." 

The raffles this year are for mer- 
chandise. There Is no 50/50 raffle this 
year, according to Fries. 

Tickets are at the door at are S6 
for adults, $3 for students, and chil- 
dren under five may attend without 
cost. 

"The money generated by this 
fund raiser will go towards the in- 
strumental music program at Anti- 
och Community High School," Fries 
said. 



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Preparing for the future 

Antioch School District 34 board member Steve Turner hands out pamphlets Saturday concerning 
a referendum for the April elections before a Cub Scout meeting at the Antioch VFW Hall. —Photo 
by Sandy Bressner 



Women to pray with Venezuela service at St. Peter 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



A Women's Ecumenical World 
Day of Prayer based on a service 
written by women in Venezuela will 




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be hosted in Antioch by women at St. 
Peter Church. The service also will 
be held in churches around the 
world. 

"St. Peter's Women invite 
women of all faiths to join us on Fri- 
day, March 5," said lean Zak, a 
member of the organizing commit:, 
tee. 

The service includes a pot luck 
luncheon and then the special 
prayer service at 1 p.m. 

"A pot luck will be served at 1 1 :30 
p.m. in the lower level of the 



Church," she said. "A new elevator 
has been installed for your conve- 
nience." 

"The entrance is off the side 
door." 

She asks that participants bring 
a dish to pass. 

"Every year women from a dif- , 
ferent country will write the pro- 
gram," Zak said. "This year it is writ- 
ten by the women of Venezuela." 

Twelve women from different 
churches in the Antioch area will put 
on the prayer service. 



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March 5, 1999 



POLICE & FIRE 






Lakeland Newspapers/ A3 



Veterans donate radar display unit to police 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Members of the Antioch Veter- 
ans of Foreign Wars Scquoit Post 
4551 and Ladies Auxiliary have do- 
nated a radar speed display unit to ' 
the Antioch Police Department. 

The donation is one of a series of . 
actions the post has taken to support 
Antioch and improve community 
service. 

VFW Members also have made 
contributions to the DARE Program 
and have recently purchased addi- 
tional land for more parking for peo- 
ple who use their hall for communi- 
ty events. 

The radar display unit shows dri- 
vers the speed of automobiles as they 
pass through the radar. 

"They had seen the unit," said LL : 
Ron Roth, of the Antioch Police De- 
partment. "They thought it was a 
great tool for the police department 
to promote safe driving." 

"This piece of equipment Is state 
of the art," said Roth. It is made by a 
manufacturer well known for quali- 
ty law enforcement radar systems. 

The veterans' membership vot- 
ed to make the donation In January, 
according to Post Commander Bill 
Oerly. The Ladies Auxiliary of Anti- 
och Veterans of Foreign Wars Se- 
quoit Post 4551 contributed $500, 
and the Scquoit Post veterans con- . 
tributed $1,000. The Village of Anti- 
och matched the grantsto purchase 
the equipment. 

Roth said, "This is part of a com- 
munity policing effort. It lets drivers 
know what their speed is." 

Post member Al Himber said, 
"It's not to intimidate the motorist but 
to keep them aware of speeds to help 
protect children in the community." 

"What we're doing, number one 
priority, is putting this in school zone 
areas during school hours," said 
Roth. The unit also will be used in 
high volume traffic areas and places 
that have a high rate of accidents. 

The unit will be placed in areas 



where police receive a high level of 
citizen complaints about speeding. 

"It's helped some," Roth said. 
People do slow down when they are 
reminded of their speed. "We've had 
a lot of positive feedback on this." 

"Most people realize we're trying 
to make drivers aware of the speed 
limits without issuing a traffic cita- 
tion." 

Roth offered a helpful hint for 
Antioch drivers who pass the unit on 
top of a police squad car. Roth said 
that after setting-up the radar display 
unit in an area for a day or two, .dri- 
vers may later see a squad car in the 
area actually running radar and writ- 
ing tickets. 

"Which I think is more than fair," 
he said. 

Oerly said that Sequoit Post was 
able to raise money for the donation 
through its bingo program and Pull- 
tab receipts. In the past, the post has 
donated in-vehlcle computers to the 
police department They also have 
donated to the Antioch Fire Depart- 
ment First Fire Protection District 
and the Antioch Rescue Squad. 

The veterans' support for the 
DARE Program has been given over 
a few years. "We've made a donation 
last year and this year too," Oerly 
said. The money helps the depart- 
ment purchase T-shirts and program 
literature. 

"We donated to help them buy 
what they needed," Oerly said. "I 
think it's a good program." 

The donations by the veterans 
, for community projects is financed 
through their weekly bingo games 
and Pull-tabs. 

"T To assure themselves that they 
have" sufficient parking for the hail, 
the veterans have purchased proper- 
ty east of their building. 

"We purchased it for a parking 
lot," Oerly said. "Right now we're 
parking up to 50 to 60 cars on a good. . 
night" 

The purchase was approved by 
the membership at a special meet- 
ing. 




Members of the Antioch Veterans of Foreign Wars Sequoit Post 4551 and the Ladies Auxiliary of 
the post helped purchase a radar display unit for the Antioch Police department. It will tell motorists 
their speed on village roads. With the donated unit are, from the left, Ron Harmon, John Kurinec, 
Al Himber, Gloria Karrick, Dorothee Himber, Wally Hartge, Nell Kangeter, Joan Jendras, and Post 
Commander Bill Oerly.— Photo by Kenneth Patchen 




POLICE BEAT 



Penotu charged with a crime are innocent until proven guilty In a court of law. 



ANTIOCH 



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Possession of 
alcohol, cannabis 

Antioch Police Officers stopped 
Michael M. Mehnert, 24, of Antioch, 
on Thursday, Feb. 25 at 2:10 a.m. 
traveling south bound in the 800 
block of Anita Street in a red 1991 
Grand Am Pontiac. He was charged 
with improper lighting, illegal trans- 
portation of alcohol, and unlawful 
possession of cannabis. 



a railroad signal 

Antioch Police Officers stopped 
David P. Korus, 22, of Trevor, Wis., 
on Monday, March 1 at 6:02 a.m. at 
Route 83 and the Wisconsin Central 
Railroad tracks in a blue 1994 Jeep 
Carryall. He was charged with not 
having a valid drivers license, dis- t 
obeying a railroad signal, and oper- 
ating an uninsured vehicle. 

Korus was released on bond 
pendinga court date on Wednesday, 
March 24 at 10:30 a.m. in Grayslake. 



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A6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



March 5, 1999 



Antioch historians learn of barns' beauty, fate 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Members of the Lakes Region 
Historical Society met Thursday, 
Feb. 25 to stop, look, and listen to the 
history and future fate of Lake Coun- 
ty bams. 

Nancy Burgess, of Long Grove- 
based Save-a-Barn Foundation, pre- 
sented a selection of slides to docu- 
ment county bams of all shapes, 
sizes, and styles. More than 100 
bams will eventually appear in a 
book about Lake County bams that 
she has completed. She is trying to 
raise money to help her publish the 



four-color, hard cover book. 

"I got started doing this because 
last year we had bams on the Long 
Grove Village calendar," Burgess 
said. She spoke to a packed meeting 
room at the society's museum at De- 
pot and Main streets. 

"I kind offell in love." 

Burgess said that the barns she 
has found and photographed each 
have the essence of the people who 
built them, the farmers who used 
them, and the people who own them 
now. 

"I will show you 33 bams I've 
documented." 

"These bams were built from our 



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very early forests," she said. "It was 
one of the most important structures 
on the farm." 

At the time that the county's old- 
est bams were built, they were con- 
structed to last forever. 

Early pioneers had never seen 
land before that looked like, the 
county landscape. "They set their 
bams in the best places overlooking 
the lands closer to the fields." It was 
a break with European traditions of 
bam placement, 

Burgess took the society's mem- 
bers on a century-long tour of Lake 
County barn history. Her earliest 
photograph shows one said to have 
been built in 1834 in the Barrington 
area by Native Americans. Other 
bams In her collection reflected Ger- 
man traditions of construction. 

Some bams were simply con- 
structed of hand-hewn beams. The 
wood had been prepared for use by 
a water-soaking and then two years 
of vertical drying. "It was designed to 
last 100 years," she said of one 1847 
structure, now 152 years old. 

Burgess shared stories about the 
construction methods, materials, 
and the families that built the bams 
or owned them. She described de- 
sign changes through the decades. 
She explained the social and cultur- 
al history of bams. 

For example, there was a period 
of time when bams were built by 
wealthy gentleman farmers who 
hired, architects to design them. 
Bams could have hot and cold run- 
ning water, cork floors to better pro- 
tect hoofs, and special woods. Some 
bams were expanded as the family 
grew. 

Barns revealed much about the 
family. "If you had a large beautiful 
bam, you definitely had your priori- 
ties in order." 



"The silo was really a revolution- 
ary addition," Burgess said. It al- 
lowed farmers to offer animals abet- 
ter feed ration through the winter 
and early spring. It improved silage 
storage. Other barns added a new 
invention, ridge poles. 

Some barns had stars carved 
into their walls to permit light to en- 
ter to illuminate the interior. The 
star also would serve for the farmer 
as a reminder of who was really In 
charge of his farm. Some bams had 
windows near the peak with panes of 
glass that had been carefully carried 
from the east coast. 

The best time for dairy bams in 
Lake County was around the 1880s. 
"It was becoming a very strong busi- 
ness," she said. By the 1890s, the size 
of barns had increased dramatically, 
in part because of a new roof line de- 
sign. "It allowed for more storage in 
the haylofts," she said. 

The history of bams in Lake 
County is a rich tour of the agricul- 



tural roots of the county and the tra- 
ditions of the life that was lived on its 
farms. 

Burgess makes her presentations 
to educate and interest people about 
county bam history. She seeks fi- 
nancial support for the Save-a-Barn 
Foundation, sells deep green T- 
shirts, post cards, and posters. 

The foundation was created to 
save Lake County bams. She said 
that if people do not help save them, 
they will be destroyed. ■ 

"Many of the bams in the coun- 
ty have already been bought by de- 
velopers," she said. Opportunities to 
save them, maintain them, or re-use 
them have become ever more pre- 
cious. She showed examples of bams 
re-used as homes, churches, and 
community centers. 

The Save-A-Barn hotline Is 847- 
913-9464. There is also a web site 
(www.nsn.org/eakhome/savebam). 

"Each one has its own story," she 
said. 



Historians to host open house 



The Lakes Region Historical So- 
ciety will host an open house Sun- 
day, May 2. 

Members will meet Thursday, 
March 25 to plan for the event. 

The open house will feature new 
exhibits built by member Earl Bcese 
in the lower level display area during 
the past several months. 

"We're going to need a little bit of 
help," said President Bob Lindblad. 



He encouraged the membership to 
turn out for the March 25 meeting. 

"I will ask for people to sign up to 
serve on open house committees," 
he said. Committees to be formed In- 
clude refreshments, invitations, and 
publicity. 

The society will invite local con- 
tractors involved in helping the so- 
ciety as well as local political lead- 
ers. 



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NEIGHBORS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A7 



Neighbors 



Name: Cindy Mroczck 

Home: Lindenhurst. 

Occupation: Senior Records Clerk, Lindenhurst Po- 
lice Department 

I'm originally from: Downers Grove. 

I graduated from: Downers Grove North High 
School, 

My family consists of: My husband John, my son 
John, 19, and my daughter Michelle, 14. 

My pets are: A cat named Missy. 

What I like best about my town: The friendly people and rural 
atmosphere, 

What I like best about my job: Lending assistance in an ever- 
changing environment with the help and joining together of the de- 
partment. 

The secret to my success is: Receiving support from family 
and friends. 

I relax by: Reading. 

My perfect day in Lindenhurst would be: spending fun time 
with my family and friends or taking walks through my neighborhood 
or through McDonald Woods. 

Last book I read: "Men Are from Mars; Women Are from Venus" 
by John Gray. 

Favorite TV show is: "Dateline," M 20-20, M "48 Hours." 

Favorite movie is: "The King and 1." 

Favorite music: Classic Rock. 




Favorite restaurant: Country Squire. 

Favorite band or musician: Rolling Stones and 

Acrosmith. 

My life's motto is: Do unto others as you would have 
them do unto you. 

If I won the lottery, I would: Wisely put it to good use. 

My greatest accomplishment is: Being named 
"OfficeroftheYear." 

I want to be remembered as: An individual who is 
caring and helpful. 

My pet peeve Is: Inconsiderate people. 

Most interesting person I ever met was: People in general 
have interesting stories In their lives to share, whether it be resource- 
ful or personal. 

My dream job would be: It's what I am doing now that I enjoy. 

If I had a plane ticket to anywhere, I would go to: Actual- 
ly, I'd like to go to Florida to take a cruise with my family. 

If you have a "Neighbor" that you would like to see profiled in 
this column, call Rhonda Hetrick Burke at 223-8161. 



Have Lake Compos 
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Rotary seeks homes 
for exchange students 



* 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter^- 




news 




to your home! 



Antioch Rotary Club members 
are searching for host families for 
their 1999 Exchange Student [com 
Denmark. Rotarians hope to secure 
three families that will offer him a 
place to stay. 

Magnus Boesen, 16, will arrive 
from Klampenborg, a suburb of 
Copenhagen, in August. He speaks 
both German and English well. 

The principal for his school de- 
scribed him as a skilled student who 
is serious about his studies. Boesen 
was described as a good ambassador 
for Denmark. 

Exchange students are not 
tourists who must be entertained, 
according to Stan Uvermore, Rotary 
member. "They're coming to learn 
about life in the United States and to 
be an ambassador for their home 
country," he said. "They're not here 
to be on vacation." 

Members of the Antioch Rotary 
Club are looking for area families 
that would welcome Boesen into 
their homes for a few months so that 
he can learn what life In the United 
States is like. 

"What we would like to do is find 
three families that will each host him 
for three-arid-a-half months. 

Ail school expenses of the ex- 
change student are paid by Rotary. 
Boesen also receives a financial al- 
lowance from Rotary. 

"The host family receives $100 a 
month to offset room and board," 
Uvermore safd. 

Boesen does not need his own 
room. He is allowed to share a room. 
Boesen comes from a family of 
two doctors and has a sister, 13, by 
the name of Eva. His father Is a spe- 
cialist In ear, nose, and throat medi- 
cine. His mother is a family doctor. 
They each have their own clinic. 

Boesen said that he is looking 
forward to the opportunity to make 
new friends, experience another 
school system, learn about anoth- 
er culture, and live with another 
family. He expects' to improve his 
ability to write and speak English 
through the exchange student ex- 
perience. 



Boesen said that he would like to 
! seek additional education after high 
school. He is thinking of becominga 
pilot, a biologist, or a zoologist! 

His hobbies are active ones, ten- 
nis and soccer. He plays tennis well 
and recently won a championship of 
a club of which he is a member. He 
also teaches tennis to 12 children 
who are about 7 or 8 years old. 

Boesen is already well-traveled. 
The family has been to California 
twice and to Florida twice. In addi- 
tion, they have been to Mexico, 
Holland, and Greece. Boesen has 
spent quite a bit of time in France, 
Italy, Germany, Sweden, and Nor- 
way. 

Antioch area .residents who 
would like to host the Rotary ex- 
change student can contact Liver- 
more at 395-4200. 




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Calendar 

Friday, March 5 

11:30 a.m. Low Impact, Low 
stress aerobic program for seniors 
age 55 and over at the 
Lindenhurst Park Dist. Community 
Center, 220 E. Grass Lake Rd., 
fee $1 for details call 356-7676 

Saturday, March 6 

8 p.m. The Solo Singles Club. is 
having a Special Super Dance at 
Bellini's, Rte. 21 & Rte. 137 in 
Libertyville. Admission is $7, call 
746-6818 for details. 

Sunday, March 7 

9:30 a.m. "The BetterFellowship," 
a Christian Alcohol & Drug Support 
Group at Calvary Christian Center, ' 
134 .Monavijle Rd. LV, open mtg., 
child care provided, 356-6181 , 

7-9 p.m. Open Gym at Antipch 
Community High School, cost $2, 
adults only 

Monday, March 8 

12:45 p.m. Bingo at Antioch 
Senior Center, info, at 395-7120 

6:30 p.m., Bereavement support 
group for children or parents at St. 
Paul The Apostle Church, 6401 
Gages Lake Rd. in Gumee, reg. 
nee, call 940-0779 for details * 

7 p.m. Bingo at Antioch Moose 
Lodge, Rte. 173 west of Antioch 

7:30 p.m. Lakes Area Community 
Band at ACHS, info, at 395-5566 

Tuesday, March 9 

9-11 a.m. Ladies Bible Study at 
Antioch Evangelical Free Church, 
child care provided, call 395-4117 

»**«.tt»l.*h««J ••• MIIMMtMlf Ifl«ll*»t 

9 a.m. - Noon Antioch United 
Methodist Church holds Parents 

. \ Day QuVfor-infarjjs.to 5 year olds, 
^call395-'1362'' £ 

11 a.m.' AARP (for adults 55 and 
older) meets at Antioch Senior 
Center, 817 Holbeck Dr., for more 
Info call 395-5068 

6:30-8:30 p.m. High School Boys 
Basketball, a full court, at Antioch 
Evangelical Free Church 

6:45 p.m. Antioch VFW Bingo, 
refreshments available. Doors 
open at 4:30 p.m. Call John 
Kemlck, 395-5393 

Wednesday, March 10 

A Safe Place/Lake County Crisis 
Center, free support group for 
women victims of abuse meets in 
Round Lake, call 24,9-4450 

9 a.m. - Noon Antioch United 
Methodist Church holds Parents 
Day Out for infants to 5 year olds, 
call 395-1362 

1:00 p.m., Antioch Woman's Club 
regualr meeting at United 
Methodist Church of Antioch, info, 
at 395-4210 



6:30 p.m. CPR classes sponsored 
by the Antioch Rescue Squad, ath 
the Rescue Squad Bldg., 835 
Holbek Dr., $5, call 395-5511 for 
Information 

Thursday, March 11 

8:45-11 a.m. MOPS (Mothers of 
Pre-Schoolers) meets at Antioch 
Evangelical Free Church. $5 
covers craft and child care, call 
395-4117 for info. 

7:30 p.m/ ACHS AMPS meets in 
band room, call 395-7826 



GOT SOMETHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14-day notice is needed 
for all calendar requests. 
AskforCristinaFeindi 
223-8161, exU 141. 



X 



■" . 



A8/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



March 5, 1999 



t-~ 



Police warn seniors 
of driveway fraud 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Antioch Police Officers have 
received complaints about two men 
in a pick-up truck who offer to seal- 
coat driveways for senior citizens. 

The men offer to cover a drive- 
way for S300 for homeowners. 

One homeowner noticed that 
the men were doing a poor job on 
her driveway. She requested a 
receipt with their name and busi- 
ness address which they could not 
provide her. 



"She said she was calling the 
police, and they left," said Lt. Ron 
Roth of the Antioch Police 
Department. 

Roth said that people should be 
aware that driveways are not seal- 
coated in February in this area. The 
$300 cost is excessive. 

People who become suspicious 
of this service being performed for 
them, or are concerned that it may 
not be legitimate, should call the 
police department. 

"People should be aware that 
this could happen," he said. 



Youth Sports 

We Want to report on your local teams 
Please call Brendan O'Neill at 223-8161 




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West on Orchard) 



Visitor nominates nine of Antioch's features 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



It would be nice to report that 
the search for the 100 Best things 
about Antioch is flushed with suc- 
cess. 

Instead, maybe it Is time to send ' 
it down the tubes. 

After a few weeks of seeking sug- 
gestions and participation, only two 
people have taken the time to write 
and fax what they consider to be the 
best attributes of their home town. 

One e-mail list has shown up 
from San Francisco, however, and it 
offers a ranking of the top nine 
attractive features. The list. offers a 
visitor's perspective of what is gTeat 
about Antioch. 

The Antioch News may publish 
a story on March .26 about the one 
hundred best things In the Village of 
Antioch. 

Residents are encouraged to 
nominate their ideas. 

The article will include Ideas 
from the public, and other 
sources, that cover every facet of 
village life. 

Antioch area residents should 
send nominations in writing as 
well as a statement about why 
that is a "best thing" about 
Antioch for them. 

People can send a list with sev- 
eral items. It is not necessary there 
be 100 nominations. They can list 
what is truly considered to be won- 
derful and nice about being in 
Antioch, about the community, or 
about people or events that make it 
nice to be here. ' 

The deadline for contributions 
is Friday, March 12. 

Send the cards and letters to 

Rhonda Heirick Burke, Managing 

Editor, Antioch News, 30 South 

■ Whitney Street, Grayslake, Illinois 

60030. 



People also may send nomina- 
tions by fax to 223-0810. 

Checking in from San Francisco 
is occasional visitor Terry Sedik. He 
is the Community Development 
Director of Daly City, California. His 
father, Emil Sedlk, lives in Highland 
Park. Sedik frequently visits his 
father and other friends, including 
one in the Antioch area. 

"Can I offer you my list of things 
to put on the 100 best tilings list?" he 
said. 

Number nine on his list was the 
case of parking downtown. He 
thinks he is influenced In that 
choice because he lives in San 
Francisco where there is no parking, 
more or less. 

He listed the wine selection at 
Antioch Armanetti Wine and 
Liquors, 1180 Main Street. It is a 
good collection, and Dean Weiner is 
a very knowledgeable person on the 
staff there who can help people with 
selections. 

Number seven, on his list Is the 
Halloween festivities in downtown 
Antioch. "Totally neat," he said. 

He put Buttrick Sawmill Park on 
the list as number six. 

Five is DiMarco's Restaurant, 
B83 Main Street. From the terra 
cotta planters in front, the beautiful 
exterior, the atmosphere setting 
music of Frank Sinatra, to the menu 
and daily specials, this is a beautiful 
place with great food. 

He nominated the Lakes Region 
Historical Society as number four. 
Tnie, he's never been there, but he 
likes to read the stories about their 
activities on the NetDirect web site 
which displays stories from 
Lakeland Newspapers (www. 
lpncws.com). It is good to know that 
the excitement of local people shar- 
ing discoveries and knowledge 
about village ciders comes across in 
the stories. The meetings are fun. 



824 changes to the tax code. That root canal 
is looking pretty good about now. 



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This is a strong nomination. 

His second place choice was the 
Chamberof Commerce and Industry 
web page (www.lake- 

onllne.com/antioch/inde3chtm). "In 
bloom 365 days a year," he said. The 
page is maintained for the chamber 
by Judith Kallos at istudio, 391 Lake 
Street. Kallos does outstanding work 
maintaining the page, although the 
wiggling peek-a-boo eyeball on the 
chamber's Halloween page in 1997 
was perhaps their outstanding 
achievement. 

For Terry Sedlk, village tourist 
from San Francisco, the number 
one best thing about Antioch is 
"Something Sweet," 879 Main 
Street. The homemade fudge that 
Sandy Leibolt and Michele Michel 
make and sell is very good. They 
donate some of their product to 
community groups to help with 
silent auctions or raffles. They are 
surely some of the friendliest people 
around. They contribute the door- 
prize to PM&L Theater productions. 

Even from the left side of the 
continent, the best things of Antioch 
are evident. 

Right now, the last issue before 
the deadline, however, it would 
seem that the best aspect of Antioch 
may be its modesty and unwilling- 
ness to draw attention to its best 
features. 

Perhaps such modesty should 
be respected. 

Crafters needed 
for annual 
spring show 

The 1999 Spring Craft Show at 
the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post has 
openings for additional crafters. 

The show will be Saturday, 
March 13 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 
on Sunday, March 14 from 11 a.m. to 
4 p.m. 

"I'm still looking for crafters," 
Dorothee Himber said. She is the 
organizer for the craft show for the 
Ladies Auxiliary of the Antioch 
Veterans of Foreign Wars Sequoit 
Post 4551. 

People who would like to partici- 
pate may call Himber at 395-6934. 

Crafters will offer gift items suit- 
able for upcoming holiday events 
such as Easter and Mother's Day, 
according to Himber. 

"This is the 19th one," she said. 
"We will have pretty close to 1,000 
people who attend." 

Last year there were 70 crafters 
offering a rich variety of merchandise. 
Himber said there will be clocks, 
planters, ceramic gift items, afghans, 
■ outdoor wood signs, T-shirts, sweat 
shirts, floormats made from recycled 
tires, candy, and pottery. 

"The fudge store Is. going to be 
here," she said. — Kenneth Patchen 






H&R BLOCK 



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420 LAKE ST. 

(847) 395-6230 



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(847) 546-4862 



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THE 
CUPBOARD 

John Phelps 



Sports fans, start 
your engines 

We have already been 
and are going through 
the rigorous christen- 
ing regarding the 
"new-look" Bulls, Who are these 
guys anyway? Will the real Bulls 
please step forward! 

Anyway, enough on that. I 
promise not to subject you to any 
further agony. However, closer to 
home here at Lakeland Newspa- 
pers, we are also experiencing 
somewhat of a 'christening' and I'm 
pleased that I can be a part of it. In 
my case, we refer to the sports de- 
partment 

Though not as earth-shattering 
in magnitude as the Bulls, I can as- ; 
sure you of more promising results. 

Allow me to introduce myself. 
I'm John Phelps, currently residing 
in Chicago. Thanks to Executive Ed- 
itor Neal Tucker and Managing Edi- 
tor Rhonda Burke, along with sports 
editor Brendan O'Neill and the rest 
of the staff, 1 thank you for taking 
me in. 

I have been saddled with the 
enviable task of picking up and car- 
rying on (and then some) the legacy 
left behind of the departed Lee Filas. 

Tall order, but I think we'll 
manage. I do have an advantage in 
my arsenal- prior knowledge 
of Lake County and some of the out- 
standing athletes it has and contin- 
ues to produce year in and year out. 

To some of you, I may be a fa- 
. miliar name, especially in the mid- 
late 1980s. To others, this will be a 
new experience that we can work 
_on Eettingihrough together. 

Inshort, I've spent many years 
in this neck of the woods. A 1985 
graduate of Warren High, I jour- 
neyed over to The College of Lake 
County for two years. 

That's where 1 discovered that 
journalism, specifically in 
the print arena, was the direction I 
wanted to go. With the aid of then 
interim athletic director and pre- 
sent guidance counselor Larry 
Whittier, I became the school's first 
Sports Information Director for the 
two ensuing years. 

After two great years at CLC, 
I've spent the next, or last 12, de- 
pending on how you view it, dab- 
bling around in the world of print 
journalism-most notably as a free- 
lance sports writer for the News-Sun 
for six years and then at the Chicago 
Tribune, where 1 worked freelance 
for four years and was inside for 
four, all focusing on the prep level. 

Somewhere in the middle of all 
of the chaos I managed to squeeze in 
a B A in Communications from little 
Eureka College in central Illinois. 

Anyway, that's the portfolio in 
a nutshell. I'm very happy to be 
back in the smaller, weekly atmos- 
phere for a variety of reasons. 

Right off the bat Lakeland 
Newspapers is a great company al- 
ways playing a part in our continu- 
ously growing culture. Further- 
more, I hope to assist in the pro- 
duction of in-depth sports coverage 
to our readers, and Lakeland is the, 
right place for me to do that. 

Finally, it's nice to return to the 
small town atmosphere and get 
away from the hustle-and-bustle 
big city life tends to lend itself to. 
Not that there's anything wrong 
with that-call it a matter of prefer- 
ence. My folks, Al and Sunsannah 
DeCarlo, presently make Grayslake 
their home. It's nice to be some- 
what closer to the family— return- 
ing to one's roots, if you will. 

Anyway, sit back and enjoy the 
ride-I know I will. 

John Phelps can be reached at 
(847) 223-8161, ext 130; fax (847) 
223-8810; or e-mail at 
edit@lnd,com. 




U\ 



March 5, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A9 



Lady Rams 'Dream Season' not over yet 



By JOHN PHELPS 
Staff Reporter 



Repetition might be the buzz 
word here. 

Head coach Mike Muldrow 
couldn't have asked for anything 
more In his inaugural season as the 
Grayslake girl's varsity basketball 
coach. 

The truth of the matter is that his 
Lady Rams recently concluded 
somewhat of a dream season, finish- 
ing with the best record in the 
school's history at'21-8, including 13 
consecutive victories to open, the 
season. Grayslake, the sixth-seed In 
the regionals two weeks ago, beat 
Lake Forest In the first round before 
being eliminated by eliminated by 
Libertyville in the semifinals. 

But wait— it gets better. 
Muldrow might not be asking for it 
but the chances are that he'll get it- 
an encore dream season if not better 
heading into next year. 

"We did great", he said. "The 
biggest positive though is that we 
lose only two seniors and have eight 
juniors returning." 

The Lady Rams should be the 
early odds-on favorites to win the 
Fox Valley going into next season, 
with Alicia Ratay departed- from Lake 
Zurich, which has wreaked havoc in 
the FVC for many years. 

Changing of the guard? "Lake 
Zurich will still be very strong, but 
with the likes of (Alicia) Ratay gone, 
they should be a little more beat- 
able," Muldrow said. 

Grayslake, which finished sec- 
ond this year (13-5) behind who else', 
Lake Zurich, will suffer from the loss- 
es of 5-6 guard Alison Losik and 6-0 
center Kendra Gallaugher. 

"Alison did a lot of great things at 
the guard position and Kendra, with 
her size advantage, was a good post 
player and grabbed a lot of rebounds 
for us " said Muldrow. 

"We have a couple of holes to fill 
but we started juniors and sopho- 
mores most of the season, so their 
experience will definitely be an ad- 
vantage for 
us next year." 

Of those juniors returning for 
their senior campaign includes 6-4 
center Jenny Wessel, one of the 
area's leading scorers this season 
with a 16.5 clip. Wessel, who shot 60 
percent from the field and 70 percent 
from the foul line, and had over 100 
blocks on the year, was an All-Tour- 
hament selection at the Elk Grove 
Thanksgiving and Wheaton North 




m 



Close call 



Antioch's Don Lackey puts up a shot against Lake Forest in the Sequoits 49-51 overtime win over 
the Scouts In the first round of the Waukegan Sectional. — Photo by Steve Young 



Christmas Tournaments . 

For her efforts, Wessel was 
named to the Daily Herald All-Area 
and FVC All-Conference teams. 

Carie Pasenelli, 5-7 point-guard, 
was also a FVC all-conference choice 
and will 

be looked upon to run the Rams of- 
fense next year. 

"They're both very dedicated 
players and Wessel is a great defen- 
sive specialist inside," said Muldrow. 

Also returning next year will be 
5-9 guard/fonvard Amy Francis, who' 
was all -tournament at Elk Grove and 
all-conference as a sophomore, and 
5-8 guard Carrie Hovik, who will 
probably start along with Pasenelli in 
what will be a solid backcourt for 
Grayslake. 

Melissa Sanders (5-8) will be a 
junior and solidify the guard position 
for the Rams. 

"She's a great athlete that started 
a lot of games for us towards the end 
of the season," said Muldrow. 

- It looks to be a very promising 
outlook for Grayslake as they look 
ahead towards next year-some of the 
proof is already there. 




The Antioch Community High School cheerleaders show their sup- 
port for the boys basketball team at the Waukegan Sectional this 
week.— Photo by Steve Young 



Lady Sequoits to build off season of struggles 



By JOHN PHELPS 
Staff Reporter 



Character is probably the best 
word to describe this years Antioch 
girl's basketball team. The Sequoits 
struggled to an 8-18 record, buthead 
coach Dave Woods Isn't about to 
sweat it. . 

"I very proud how they hung in 
there," he said. "They could have 
folded the tent very easily but the 
character and willingness to hang in 



there and play hard despite being 
out-manned a lot of times- that real- 
ly impressed me. They sure didn't 
play like an 8-18 team." 

Antioch loses three seniors In 
Amy Carlberg (9 ppg), Katie Gofron, 
and Erin Riepe. But juniors waiting 
to step in include 5-9 forward Jour- 
dan Phillips and 5-10 forward Mar- 
garet Fischer, both of whom sawsub- 
stantial time coming off the bench as 
juniors. Woods will look to them to be 
major contributors next year. 



ATHLETES OF THE WEEK 



Name: Jourdain Milot 
School: Warren 
Sport: Basketball 
Year: Junior 

Last week's stats: Scored 
16 points in Warren's 72-35 
win over Wauconda in the 
first round of the 
Waukegan Sectional. . 




Milot 



Name: Liam McCluskey 
School: Grayslake 
Sport: Basketball 
Yean Junior 
Last week's stats: 
Scored 15 points to lead 
the Rams over Libertyville 
72-52 in the first round of 
the Waukegan Sectional. 



In addition, and perhaps most 
encouraging to Woods is that he will 
get his playmaker/point-guard back 
in 5-7 junior Katianne Pechauer, 
who went down with a torn ACL and 
missed most of this past season. 

"We're really excited about her 
returning," said Woods, "She's got 
all-conference written all over her. 
Unfortunately, when she went down 
this year, we had to play some peo- 
ple out of position, so that kind of 
hurt us to lose her. She'll definitely be 
looked upon to run the offense next 
year." 

The rest of the junior contingent 
coming in next year saw plenty of 
varsity time this season, so Woods is- 
n't worried about inexperience. 

In addition, he'll have 5-5 guard 
Bethany Shore, one of the perennial 
three-point threats in the area, along 
with Justine Sihkus, a 5-9 forward 
who led the team as a sophomore 
with six rebounds per game. Erica 
Brown, only a freshman this year, 
will complement Sinkus In the post., 



as will Shelley Wol fgram, a 6- 1 junior 
center, and 5-5 guard Sasha Mika, a 
three-point threat. 

Brown was Antioch's leading 
scorer in about six games this past 
season and as she continues to ma- 
ture, will be outstanding. 

"We have a great group of out- 
side shooters and the inside game to 
go along with it in Erica, Shelley, and 
Margaret Whatever tandem we have 
in there between those players will 
tough to handle inside. Overall, 
things are looking pretty good." 

"As long as they make the com- 
mitment to playing hard and staying 
in shape over the summer, next year 
looks promising. How hard they 
work over the summer will dictate 
pretty much what happens next 
year, 

This was somewhat of a frustrat- 
ing year for the Lady Sequoits and 
Woods is eager to put it behind. 

"We so we just want to put it be- 
hind us and try to take it to the next 
level."" 



"U 






A10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



March 5, 1999 



- tew i 



i 






.-■■ 



i 

. 

1 4 







YOUTH ICELESS HOCKEY ASSOCIATION 



Grades 1-2 

Western Conference 
Central Division 



Mnpleleafs 

Blues 

Dlackhawks 



Longtime Sequoit honored 

Steve Young, who graduated from Antioch Community High 
School in 1950, shows off the plaque given to him from Sequoit 
Pride for the 50 years he has spent photographing the school's 
sporting events. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 



8 Wolves 

7 Hurricanes 

4 Moose 

5 Redwings 

6 Vipers 
Pacific Division 

11 Kings 

12 Sharks 

16 Avalanche 

13 Ducks 

9 Flames 

14 Oilers 

15 Coyotes 

10 Canucks 
Eastern Conference 
Atlantic Division 

21 Islanders 

22 Lightning 

24 Grizzlies 

18 Rangers 

23 Admirals 

19 Capitals 

17 Flyers 

20 Panthers 
NorthEast Division 

25 Canadlens 

28 Predators 
27 Bruins 

30 Whalers 

29 Sabres 

31 Dragons 

26 Penguins 

32 Thunder 
Grades 3-4 
Western Conference 
Central Division 

7 Hurricanes 

5 Redwings 

8 Wolves 

1 Blockhawks 

6 Vipers 
3 Blues 



6 

5 

5 

3 

3. 

3 

3 



6 
5 
4 
3 
2 
2 
2 
1 



4 Moose 
v2 Maplclcafs 
9 Jets 

1 o 12 Pacific Division 

2 10 15 Oilers 

2 10 11 Canucks - 
4 6 14 Ducks 
4 6 18 Stars. 
4 6 12 Kings 
4 6 10 Flames 
7 13 Sharks 

16 Coyotes 
1 13 17 Avalanche 

2 12 Eastern Confernce 
2 19 Atlantic Division 

4 6 21 Capitals 
4 l 5 26 Grizzlies 

4 1 5 19 Flyers 

5 4 23 Islanders 

6 2 24 Lightning 

25 Admirals 
27 Cyclones 

1 1 11. 20 Rangers 

1 1 11 22 Panthers 

2 10 NorthEast Division 

3 8 31 Predators 
6 34 Dragons 
6 29 Penguins 
4' 28 Canadlens 
' 33 Whalers 

35 Thunder 

12 36 Senators 

12 30 Bruins 

10 32 Sabres . 

io Grades 5-6 

4 Western Conference 

4 Central Division 

2 3 Moose 

2 4 Redwings 
2 Maplclcafs 
1 Blackhawks 



3 5 
2 6 
8 



4 
4 
5 

7 

1 

1 
2 
2 
5 
5 
G 
6 




1 
2 
3 
4 
4 



7 Wolves 

5 Vipers 

6 Hurricanes 
Pacific Division 
11 Sharks 

7 12 Ducks 
7 10 Kings 



1 15 

2 12 
1 11 

10 

1 
1 



5 
4 
2 
4 
4 
3 
3 
2 
1 



7 
6 
6 
5 
4 
3 
2 
1 


7 
5 

5 
4 
4 
4 
3 
2 
1 



6 
4 
5 
3 
2 
2 


6 

4 
3 




2 
1 
4 
4 
3 
4 
4 
6 



1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
4 
6 
7 




2 
3 
4 
4 
4 
5 
6 
7 



2 
1 
3 
4 
4 
4 
Q 

2 

4 
3 



6 

4 



3 13 

2 10 

5 9 

8 

8 
2 8 

1 7 

2 6 
1 3 



14 

12 

12 

1 11 



2 

r 
o 
o 
o 



10 

7 

4 

2 





1 


15 


1 


11 





10 





8 





8 





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14 Avalanche 

8 Flames 

9 Canucks 

Eastern Conference 
' Atlantic Division 

20 Admirals 

15 Flyers 

18 Islanders 

19 Lightning 

21 Grizzlies 

16 Rangers 

17 Panthers 
NorthEast Division 

24 Bruins 

27 Whalers 

22 Canadlens 

23 Penguins 
26 Sabres 

25 Predators 

28 Thunder 

Grades 7-8 
Western Conference 
Western Division 

2 Penguins 

5 Kings 

7 Ducks 

8 Maplclcafs 

10 Grizzlies 

1 Blackhawks 

3 Vipers 

9 Redwings 

6 Sharks 

4 Wolves 

Eastern Conference 
Eastern Division 

1 1 Rangers 

18 Thunder 

19 Panthers 

13 Coyotes 

14 Flyers 

15 Bruins 
17 Predators 

12 Lightning 

16 Moose 

20 Cyclones 



3 3 2 

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NAYB still has 
tourney openings 

North American Youth Basket- 
ball announced that they still have 
openings in their annual spring 
youth basketball tournament for 
teams In the Elgin and surrounding 
area April 30 to May 2 at Dundee 
Crown High School and other area 
sites. 

This tournament will feature 10 
different brackets. They include fifth 
to sixth grade boys; fiftluo sixth grade 
girls; seventh grade boys; seventh 
grade girls; eighth grade boys; eighth 
grade girls; ninth to 10th grade boys; 
ninth to 10th grade girls; 11th to 12th 
grade boys; 11th to 12th grade girls. 
All grades are based on the grade in 
which a student is currently enrolled. 

The entry deadline is April 9. 

For additional information or an 
entry form, call Anita Livesay at the 
toll-free NAYB spring tournament 
hotline at 1 (888) 629-2275, or tour- 
nament director Mark Garrigan at 1 
(800) 787-3265. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
The following parcels of property, acquired through the Tax Sale Certificate Pro- 
gram, are being offered for safe by the County of Lake. 

Written bids should be submitted to the County of Lake, Tax Extension Dopt., Room 
101, 18 N. County St., Waukegan, IL600B5. 

Bids received will be retained for 30 days after the Initial bid. After completion of the 
30-day period, the County has the right to accept the highest bid or to reject It If the 
amount is Insufficient or if the sale would not be In the best interest of Lake County 
Taxpayers. 

Willard Rooks Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
60002 

01-11-302-OU 
01-11-302-017 
01-11-305-003 
01-1 f -305-004 
01-25-214-014 
01-34-203-011 
01-34-203-014 
01-34-203-025 
01-34-203-026 
01-34-203-027 
01-34-203-028 
02-20-300-027 
02-21 -405-023 
02-21-405024 
02-21-405-025 
02-21-405-026 
02-21-405-027 
02-21-405-028 
02-21-405-029 
02-21-408-007 
02-21 -409-017 
02-21-409-031 
60083 
03-28-400-003 

0399A-2479-AN 
March 5, 1999 



UNINCORPORATED ANTIOCH 

26625 w. Cedar St. 

26591 W. Cedar St. 

42444 N. Willow St. 

42436 N. Willow St. 

25390 W.HilldaleAv. 

27137 W. Fairvlew Av. 

27127 W.FalrviewAv. 

271 40 W. Park Av. 

27136 W. Park Av. 

27132 W. Park Av. 

271 26 W. Park Av. 

40287 N. Fox Run Ln. 

22086 W. Sarana Dr. 

22080 W. Sarana Dr. 

22072 W. Sarana Dr. 

22066 W. Sarana Dr. 

22058 W. Sarana Dr. 

22046 W. Sarana Dr. 

22032 W. Sarana Dr. 

22135W.VIrellDr. 

22257 W. Loon Dr. 

22276 W. Lee Dr. 

INCORPORATED OLD MILL CREEK 

39143 N. Mill Creek Rd. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS ) 
) 

county of lake ) 

in the circuit court for the nineteenth 
judicial circuit, lake county, Illinois 
in the matter of the petition ) 

OF Blake Andrew Toney ) 

For ) 

CHANGE OF NAME ) 

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION 
Public notice is hereby given that on April 2, 1999, being one of the return days In 
the Circuit Court of the County of Lake, I will file my PotHlon In said Court praying for 
the change of name from Blake Andrew Toney to that ofBlake Andrew Pecha, pur- 
suant to the Statute In such case made and Provided. 

Dated at Antioch, Illinois, February 10, 1999. 

/s/ Shena Pecha 

0299C-2445-AN 

February 19, 1999 

February 26, 1999 

March 5, 1999 



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Come Worship With 

A Directory Of Antioch Area Churches 



A 



FREE 
LIMITED 
EVE EXAM 



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3-5 YR. OLDS 



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Graceland Baptist Church. 258 Ida St., Aniioch. I L 
Sunday School 1 1 am., Morning Worship t f am., 
Sunday Evening 7pm. Robert Williams, Pastor. 

First Church of Christ, Scientist & Reading Rm. Rte 173 and 

Harden, Antioch, Phone (847) 395-1196. Sunday School, 
Sunday Church Service 10.30am, Wednesday, 7:30pm. 

Beautiful Savior Evangelical Lulheran Church. 554 Parkway, 
Antioch. Phone (547) 265-2450 Sunday Worship at Sam, Sunday 
School, High School & Adult Bible Classes 103Qam. 

St Ignatius Episcopal. 977 Man St. Phone (847) 335-0652. Low 
Mass 730am., Hgh Mass 930am Sunday Sehcd & Nursery 930am. 

Antioch Evangelical Free Church. 750 Mighview Or. Phone 
(847) 395-4117. Saturday Evening Service 530 p.m. Sunday 
School 9:45am, Sunday Worship 830, 11:00, Children's Church 
1 1 am. Nursery both services Awana Club. Senior Pastor David M. 
Groleati, 

St. Stephen Lutheran Church. 1155 Hillside Ave. Phone (847) 
395-3359. Sunday Worship, 8, 9:15 & 1O.30. Church School 
9:15am., Sunday. Rev. Robert Trendel, Interim Pastor. 

Christian Uta Fellowship Assemblies ol God Church, 41625 
Deep Lake Rd„ Antioch. Phone (847) 395-8572. Sunday School 
(all ages) 9am., Sunday Morning Worship 10am., Children's 
Church 10am., Sunday Evening Worship G:30pm., Wednesday 
Worship & Children's Program 7am., Tues. Women's Fellowship 
& Bible Sludy 9-1 1 30am. JeK Brussary, Pastor, 



Faith Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main St., Phone 
(847) 395-1600. Sunday Worship 8 & I0:30am„ Sunday 
School 9:25am., Sal, 7pm., Rev. Gregory Hermansoo, 
Pastor. Christian Day School (847) 395-1664. 

Mlllbum Congregational United Church of Christ Grass 

Lake Rd. at Rte. 45. Phone (847) 356-5237. Sunday Service 

10am. Children's Program 10am. Rev. Paul R. Meluer, 

Pastor. 

United Methodist Church ol Antioch. 848 Main St. Phone 

(847) 395-1259. Worship 8:30 & 10am,, Fellowship Time 

930am; Sunday School 10am. Rev. Kurt A. Gamlin, Pastor. 

St. Peter's Church. 557 W. Lake St., Antioch. Phone (847) 
395-0274. Masses weekdays, 730am; Sunday 630, 6, 
930, 1 1 30am & Saturday 5:30pm. Rev. Father Ronald H. . 
Anglim, Pastor. 

Chain ol Lakes Community Bible Church. 23201 W. Grass 
Lake Rd, Antioch, Phone (847) 838-0103. Sunday Worship 8:15 
and 10:45. Sunday School 9:45. Children's Church 1045. Youth, 
Women's, Awana & Small Group ministries. Pastor, Paul 
McMinimy. 

Good Shepherd Lulheran Church (Missouri Synod). 
25100 W. Grand Ave. (Rio. 59 & 132), Lake Villa. (847) 
356-5158. Sunday Worship 8:15 & 10:45am; Sunday 
School (3 and up) and Bible Study 9:30am. Christian 
Preschool, Rev. John Zellmer, Pastor. 



K^. 



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Dan Dugenske, Director 

This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 



SkUSB 



EES«£ 



Sat., March 13, mw 
q:ooam - 3:00pm 

* Balloons & Prizes 

Please Call For An Appointment 

" — ^ VISION CARE ASSOCIATES 

Dr. Charlotte Nielsen, Dr. Elliott Friedman 
♦^ *•■ Optometrists 

,^aaa«"" ■•■**. «-* * 

-*£ u ■■ 2403-Grand Ave., Waukegan 

>' 847-662-3800 



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COND 




SAVINGS 





12 & 




EQUAL HOUSING 

LENDER 



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(847) 587-631 1 

/ ♦„«. v i»iri is effective as of 3/5/99. The rate is 5.15*. Minimum to open and earn A.P.Y. is $2,500. 



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A12 I Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



March 5, 1999 



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x BEDDIN 

ENGIANDER & SEETA 

'98 DISCONTINUED MODELS 
UP TO 



50% OFF 




Table & Chairs Formica Top Table with 

4 Swivel/Tilt Chairs, Large Selection 

Starting at $ 688 and up. 5pcs. 




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yV^Trwt '..■'-■- '. . "• \tfj£»Wi ■:■■■■: " .Mi>„'.-J'>V ■• 



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Double Recliner 

With Sleeper And Wedge 

STARTING AT $1488 & up 



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No Payment Unt// March 2000 





COMPLETE ROOMS TO GO! 

Sofa, Loveseat, Cocktail Table, 2 End Tables And 

2 Lamps All r At, One Low Price. Starting at *44.00/mo. 



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Home of N anon a^ly^ Advertised 
Name Brands At Discount Prices 

•Don't let the low, low pride fool you! 
> pur low overhead and KING SIZE buying 
; pbwer make all this posslbiell! 



4. Free Set-up 

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6. Complete Service 



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Chromcraft 
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Already 60% Off, Plus take an 

EXTRA 10 % Off 

Reg. $50-$800, sale $20-$32Q, 

less 10% FINAL PRICE $18-$2i 

Excludes other Super Guys and 
75% off discontinued items. 










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Kids' dress apparel. 
Reg; 12.99-49.99, 
sale 8.44-32.49 

35% off entire stock 
kids' outerwear. 
Reg. 14.99-42.99, 
sale 9.74-27.94 



7.99 

14k 18" herringbone 
necklace with FREE 
bracelet. Reg. $80, 
sale 19.99 



Saturday, IVIarch 6 

8am-6\Soon ONLY 

See lite hack cover for more great Early Bird values! 




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27" 

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Stonewash jeans. 

Reg. 39.99 

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tees. Reg. 18.00-44.9J 
sale 12.99-29.99 




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/Tact's wofe- life if® 

Prices good Saturday, March 6, 1999 only. 

Sale includes only those items designated as sale priced. Clearance 
merchandise is excluded from entire stock categories herein. Actual 
savings may exceed percent savings shown. KOHL'S® and Kohl's 
brand names are trademarks of Kohl's Illinois, Inc. 



Visit Our Newest Locations: 



Mill St'»el 


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For the Kohl's Store 

nearest you call 

1 -800-837-1500 or 

visit us on the web at 

www.kotils.com 



Botavla 

251 N. Randall Road 
Batavia.IL 60510 



Jotlet 

2510 Route 59 
Plainfteld, IL 60544 



03Q5-TC