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Full text of "Antioch News 03/07/1973"

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ANTIOCII TOWNSHIP UCR^EYC 



ANTIOCH TOWNSHIP LIBRARY 
™ 757 N.-MAIN ST. 
ANTlQCaiLL 60002 

-■■*.. .'.-■ij .^"'.. *- ' — " i:."~ "-■: ■ * in 



WEDNESDAY M 



7, 1973 



— uu4«ots-\fedcoa 



OiiB liner ^ 

When you a» Ahead - 
Don't look back. When 

you are Behind - Catch up. 




MEET YOUR 




VOL. LXXXVII NO. 36 15 CENTS PER COP 



£ 




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CANDIDATES 



see page 4 



*. \ 
% 





FINISH LINE 







-r 



The CurnetTTroperty Dev- 
elopment that has been labeled 
the Arbor Ltd. Development is 
nearmg the finish line in its race 
to secure Village approval. 

At the Village Board meeting 
on Monday, March 5th, the 
Board voted to accept the 
Zoning Board of Appeal's 
•recommendation to deny the 
R-S multiple zoning change and 
that the property in question. . 
remain as R-4 single-family 
zoning. The Board further 
agreed to accept the Zoning 
Board's recommendation to 
grant a R-4 Special Use permit 
rf .einbodying v ; agreements , \ and 
provisions as designated by 
both boards in an enforceable 
Ordinance. 

Some of the special agree- 
ments included such revisions 
in the Arbor. Ltd.. origlonal 
development plans as to the 
building of a larger retention 
pond, making Greenbriar Drive 
a thru dedicated street extend- 
ing from Anita Street to Gary's 
Drive and making the proposed 



payment of $120 per unit to be' 
paid upon issuance * of oc- 
cupancy permit to the schools, 
looping the property's- main 
street to provide for adequate 
fire and safety protection and to 
increase the number of ' pro- 
posed culdcsacs: 

The Board has now author- 
ized Attorney Ken Clark to draw 
up an Ordinance, which will 
provide for the R-4 special use 
permit zoning and also, in- 
corporate in it the special, 
agreements recommended by 
both the Village Board and the 
Zoning Board of Appeals. 
. This ..ordinance will be 
presented to the Boa rd a t the 
next regular meeting for their 
consideration. . 

Board member Robert Wilton 
was opposed -to the issuance of 
such an ordinance and cast the 
only negative vote of the night. 

Wilton wishing to clarify his 
negative vote said, "I still feel 
that we should wait the 
remaining two weeks until the 
PUD ordinance is ready for the 
Board:" 



■■*->, > I * 



Mr. George Good receives the Senior Citizen Fan award from Coach 
Andrews on Friday night, March 3, as Jody Patrovsky received the 
Miss Basketball Fan award. More information inside paper, (staff 

photo) 



PEGGY'S WINNING 
RECEIPE 



see page 6 



\ 



DETTER COMMUNICATIONS AT HAND 



Communications between 
different groups are often 
difficult and may breed many,, 
many problems. Communi- 
cations gaps have been com-, 
monly sited between countrys, 
races, workers, friends, parents 
and the children and naturally 
between students and admin- 
istrators. 

Antioch High School has been 
working to mend any such gaps 
and has begun to hold com - 



hmsictftlons with executive 
members of all of the classes, . 
The purpose of these sessions 
which are designed to be on an 
informal nature is to allow the 
students to make any problems 
known to the administrators,, 
and to ask for any clarification 
on issues that seem a bit cloudy. 
On Thursday, March- 1, from 
2:00 to 3:00 Superintendent 
Warren Polley, Mr. Blecke, who - 
is in charge of student activities 



and Mr. Kurek, who is in charge 
of counseling and scheduling 
met with members from the 
Sophomore class in the Board 
Room. 

At first the students seemed a 
bit hesitant and uncertain and a 
big tray of cookies sat 
untouched in the middle of the 
Board table for about 20 
minutes. As the students 
became more relaxed . the 
cookies made their rounds and 



many subjects were touched 
upon. 

The sophomores main con- 
cern seemed to be centered 
around the -high school's 
financial standing and ' many 
questions were asked about the 
school debt and the effect that 
the referendum had on it. The 
courses and activities that will 
be reinstated were discussed 
and questions, were asked about 
a girl's athletic program. 



Self-imposed scheduling was 
also on the list of topics 
discussed. ■ . '? 

After the hour was over Mr. 
Blecke asked the students if 
they felt that the session was 
worthwhile and the students . 
seemed to unanimously agree 
that it had been. These type of 
•sessions will' hopefully be held 
• on a monthly basis, or whenever 
the students voice a need for 
one; * 



. _ ■ .^,i 



Welcome to The Antioch News - Rev. Eugene Rental - see "Hindsight's Better Than Foresight" page 15 



ITT 



LET US SEND YOU TO LAS 







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Page 2. THE ANTIO€IT""NEWS u WEDNESDAY— MARCH-— 7? — 1OT3 




- /, 



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 . . \,V 

Regional Basketball tourney - 7:30 pm ■. Antioch vs Grant < 
.Newcomers meeting - 9 pm at State Bank 
Lakeside ^Rebecca Lodge^. American Legion. Hall t - 8 pm 
• WSCS meeting v -""^ntioclT&elhodist"'Church*." * - 

< ai ■ 

THURSDAY. MARCH ■ 8, 1973 
' Rotary meeting - Brave Bull -noon ,' s 

i Lake County Ostomy,. Assoc. - Victory Memorial »Hosp 



■> \ 



In 

I,! 1 



i ! - ■ s 






$'■ 1 



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=*• 



FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 1973 

Regional Basketball Tourney -7:30 pm - Championship game 

\ 
Saturday, March 10. 1973 

High School Solo Ensemble Contest 

t '- 
t 

.SUNDAY, MARCH U, 1973 t 

■ PM&L General meeting with entertainment - 8 pm 

MONDAY, MARCH 12, 1973 

Sequoit VFW Auxiliary meeting . 

Order of Rainbow for tiirls - 7 pm - Masonic Temple 

*• • 

* "■■■*- -■ - - - ■ i 

TUESDAY, MARCH 13. 1973 >. 

A.A.R.P. meeting 12:30 at Methodist Church - Free Box lunch 

Grade School Board meeting - 7:30 pm _ v _L_ .._ 

St. Peter Altar & Rosary - 8:00 pm 
Sequoit Post 4551 - 8 pm 



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14. 1973 

St. Ignatius Women's Auxiliary 
LaLeche League Meet - 1037 Victoria 



8 pm 



26 STUDENTS MAKE STRAIGHT 



"AV FIRST SEMESTER 



FIRST SEMESTER 

1972-73 

' To make the High Honor Roll, 
a student must have 18 grade 
points and no grade lower than 
a "B'\ An asterisk will identify 
those students/ who earned a 
straight "A".^ 

' SENIORS 
-fcGlen Amundsen, Toni Been- 
tol, Joan Boreen, Steve Carlson, 
James Ch ristensen, -Jf-Diane 
Dusek, Taffy~EnglefiaTdt7Pat~ 
ricia Geiger .<Jf Cynthia Hay den, 
JfJames Heidner, Michael 
Hubbell, Glenda Hurt, "JfrLinda 
Lagerstrom, Robin Lindblad, 
George Marotta, Tim Mieure, 
Kirk Moran, David Parker, 
Nora Pleviak, Thomas Ruhl, 
Pat Runyard, ' Kimberly 
Shkapich, Susan Stanley, 
Wendy Stout, Rpm Tumminello. 
Greg' Tossey, -fcJohn Thain, 
Dean Vendl, flCarol Wells, 
Dawji Woods, Cathy Wysoglad. 



James 



JUNIORS 

-Andersonr 



Bradley 



Banwart, #Bill Beese, Mary 
Blue, -^ Pam Burdick; Collette 
Carroll, -^Frances Colette, 
Mark Denman, Barbara Dodd, 
Marcia Doolittle, Christy 
Frankh'auser, Stephen ' Fet- 
tinger, #Lois Geist, Neil Good, 

'•JfrKevin LaChance, Nancy 
LaChance, Doris Meuter, John 
Glen Meyer, Kathleen Morenz, 
Barbara Olson," Debra Payne, 
Gary Reckers, John Ronan, 
John Rooker, #Wayne Rudis, 

' Nancy Schaeffer, ^fKa^n 
Schuln\eister t James Scribner , 
Mary Steffenburg, ' Stephen 
Steidl, Lynne Sterb'enz,, Kathy 
Toft, Donna Yucus. 



SOPHOMORES 

Kim Barlow, Jams Bittner, 
^Wendell Burr is, Kathleen 
Cerk, David Edwards, ^fJanet 
Gallimore, Ronald Gramer, 
Kim Hardy, Linda Kasik, 
Wendy Lloyd, Janet Lubkeman, ■ 



■fcMary Mayer; Tanya Millsop; 
;#BUl Mtchell, Bill Molinarolo, 
George Pierce, Irene Plouviez, 
Teresa Schleusener, #David 
Severson, Wanda Springer. 
Debra Squires, ^Cheryl Sur- 
rock, Carl Teichman, ^Dennis 
Thain, Stephen Whitmore, C. 
Weiczorek, CarofZe^man. 

FRESHMEN 

Dawn Chinn, Terry Corey, 
-Pamela— Donovan, ^Robert 
Dubek, if Bart Erickson, John 
Geiger, -Jfr Nancy Halverson, 
if Debra Hartokolis, Jefrey 
Jones, Gail Jordan!, Julie 
Kie'mle, Sharon Kurzin, John 
Long, James^ McLellah, Pat- 
ricia Mizar, Gregory Nord- 
strom, Deborah Pederson, Amy 
Ploss, Debbie VanPatten, 
Michael Vaughn, Judith Vendl, 
Robert Walsh, Christine Wiec- 
zorek, ffDavid Wurster, Mel- 
onie Smiths . . 



"To make the Honor $olI, a 
student must have 16 points and . 
no grade tower than a "C"." 
SENIORS 
Joan Bjork, Karen Bodin, Bill 
Burdelik, Debbie Burke, Alice 
Burnette, Barbara „' Bzdawka, 
Kathy Carrubba, Dawn Champ- 
ley, Ralph Coari, Ralph Dowell, 
Robin Ellis, James Fischer, 
Karen Frad, William Gerhardt, 
Sharon Gibbs, Diane Gramer, 
Joseph Green, Cathy Grune-. 
wald, Greg Grunow,. *Rita 
Haley, Missey Hallett, Jane 
Hinz, Tracey Hudson, Richard 
Klean, Marcia Kroeplin, Kathy 
Laursen," Diane Lubkeman, 
Mark Maras, Yvonne Mirocko, 
Edwina Nauer, Heidi Petty, 
Tom Pfaehler,_ Fred -Popp, 
Pamela Rausch, Sandy Rug- 
gles, Leon a Schlaiss, Kerry 
Shute, Cynthia Skrzynecki, 
Jerry Smouse, Sandi Stewart, 
Tracey Teltz, Everett Tonyan, 
Jeff Whitmore, Connie Wtec- 
zorek, C - . Wfurster. 





THE ANTIOCH NEWS has 
compiled a list of questions they 
feel are pertinent to a 
prosperous future id Antioch. 
These questions , were then 
submitted to all three of the 
mayoral candidates. Out of the 
three candidates only Mayor 
Toft ' chose to submit bis 
answers to us. We will continue 
to publish Mayor Toft's answers 



JUNIORS 

- Laura Allan, Mark Andrews, 
Mary Barr, Catherine Chase, 
Chris Chiappetti, Mary Cock- 



Ian, Anita Cooper, Mark 
Crawford, David Ducommun , . 
Margaret Griffin, Laura Kes- 
sler, Janet Kroeplin, Ellen 
McGeeney, Mark Mohar, Kim 
Netrefa, Mary Palaske, Vicki 
Plotz, Andrew Puein, Richelle 
Radke, Sue Rigby, Thomas E. 
Robinson, Bob Siperko, Mich- 
elle Stephenson, Mary Sullivan, 
Janet Whitlock, Susan Wit- 
t neb el, Jane Zeman. ^ 

SOPHOMORES 

Robert Bach, Raymond Bac- 
zynski, Sandra Bartlett, Cyn- 
thia Battle, Glen Bednar, Carol. 
Beller, Robert Blecke, Laura 
Christensen, Robert Dodd, Dale 
Eastman, Julie Ellis, Kim 
Eyanson, * Kathy Flanagan, 
Denise Golonka, Geraldine 
Hannum, Julie Harris, Fran- 
cine Henry, Sandra Herbert, 
Daniel Heuer, Rimantas Jas- 
tnevicius, Pamela Jepson, 
Gregory Kennedy, Laurence 
Kitterman, James Kuenhold, 
Deborah Lech, Barbara Leider, 
Lawrence Lloyd, Art Meyer, 
timothy Nolan, David Ny- 
strom, Colleen Payne, Carl 
Reichenbach, Diana Rentner, 
Cynthia Schreiber, Charles 
Smith, Gail Stephenson, Fred 
Teltz,- Kim Vasek, Carolyn 
Vestal, Julie We^er, Glen 
Weinberger, Debbie Willett, 
Scott Williams. 



FRESHMEN' ■ ~ 

Jacquelyn Armstrong, David 
Behrens, Debra Blanchette, 
Elin Bolt,' James Carroll, 
Kenneth Cash, John Christ- 
iansen, Paul Carmer, Carey. 
Deubel, Kathie Dobson, Julie 
Dye, Laurence Ellis, Kimberlee 
Fischer,; Rebecca Garrison, 
* Adele Girten, Clinton Glover, 
. Jim . Grippando, Kathryn 
Haase, Michael Harmon, Rock- 
ney Hudson, David Jordan, 
•Terrence Tempher, David 
Lagerstrom , Bonny Lloyd, Greg 
Mieure, Kathleen Paschke, Jim 
Pierce, Sue Proctor, Ester 
Schrieber, Beth Tanner; Philip ' 
Toal, Rhonda Ward, Michael . 
Ware, Guy Weinberger, Peter^ 
Weyrapch, Christine Zabielski, 
Sandra Stadick. vii - 



to the questions we submitted 

The Staff of THE ANTI 
NEWS purposely selected- the 

questions on subjects that are of 
vital -importance to- our fine 
community of Aniiocji. 

QUESTION: In the area of total 
city' planning' do you feel that 
Antioch is moving in the right 
direction and do you feel that 
the planning is moving at a fast 
enough pace? 



ANSWER: Antioch has had ( a 
comprehensive village plan 
since 1961. Over a year ago, I 
made additional, appointments 
to the Plan Commission and 
asked that this commission take . 
a hard look: at the overall plan 
and see in what areas it was 
followed," where natural growth 
deviated from the plan, and 
actually up-date it to provide 
information for present 1 and 
future' village needs; The 
Village Board followed the Plan 
Commission's recommendation 
to enter into a contract with the 
Lake Conty Plan Commission 
for their, assistance. Just 
recently we were informed that, 
due to unforeseen work pres- 
sures within their own County , 
Commission, alt three phases of 
their contract with the village 
would have to be delayed. 
Perhaps the time has come to 
become less dependent on 
receivinginformation from the 
county and hire outside profes- 
sional services for statistical 
data and expect a COMPRE- 
HENSIVE PLAN from the 
people who should know best 
where they want their village to 
grow, THE RESIDENTS WHO 
LIVE HERE!!!!! 



QUESTION: How do you think 
e county wide sewer system 
will affect Antloc* 






ANSWER:* Everyone is aware 
dfthe factthat a county wide 
sewer system is inevitable In 
order to clean up our' 
environment and. make our 
Chains-Lakes the recreational 
facility to meet the needs of 
area residents. BUT, my first 
duty is to the residents of our 
village who have paid for water 
and sewer facilities' and with 
economical . administration .'of . 
these facilities have maintained 
a low water and sewer rate. 
This I believe gives them the 
right to know the consequences 
of joining a county wide sewer 
system. As yet no figures have 
been given to me as to what will - 
happen to the water and sewer 
rates in our village when this 
inevitibility comes to pass. 

QUESTION: Do you feel that 
the village government should 
take an active part In fostering 
further industrial develop- 
' ments? 

ANSWER: Yes. area growth is 
closely linked to industrial 

, development as it has an impact 
on the number of jobs available, 
Which can ultimately affect the 
pattern of: both residential and 
commercial development as 
well as the local tax base. There 
is much discussion as to what 

, comes first industrial develop- 
ment or the availability of a 
•labor force, rather like the old 
fable, the chicken or the egg, 

• but which ever one it may be, it 
is my hope to stimulate a 
steady, .controlled growth pat- 

; tern. . . '. -^- - -.. ,■':'■ 



/'• 




-i 

— ^* — « 



cologne specials 

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SENDGARDSBY 




---* *■ ■-■-—- 



ANTIOCH; NEWS.WEONEfsbAY I^ARfek ^ n 1973Pa 



K*; 



THE I NDEP ENDENT PAPER DEDICATED TO THE THOUGHTS AND 
FEELINGS OF THE PEOPLE OF ANTIOCH. 



»■ C«!>. 







Published since If 14 



PUBLISHER, EDITOR 



RUSH 
RUSH BUSINESS MANAGER 

Publish*! wteWy on Wednesdays. Annual Subscription tl.OO.. 
Slngtt Copy IS Cents, Entered as Second Cless matter at Antioch, 
Illinois post office, fn case of cttange of address or non delivered 
copies notify the Publisher, 141 Chert Lena, Antloch, Illinois. 4000.2. 
Phone 3t23fS-55M. ? 




- Stall 
Lee Collins -Ad Sales 

Kathy Kauss - 'Stall. Reporter 

Gerri Amundsen -^Receptionist 

, Mrs. Del Jehneke, 

Beach Grove Representative If M14S 

' Mrs. Louise Gutowskl 

Channel Lake Representative 3f 4-1317 
* v - ■>° ■--->-"■■. 

MEMBER. OF ILLINOIS PRESS ASSOCIATION AND NATIONAL 

NEWSPAPER ASSOCIATION 



GIRL SCOUT WEEK 

Girl Scouting today is far more than cookie sales 
and handicrafts. As the nation commemorates Girl 
Scout Week - March 11-17 - millions of Girl Scouts 
wilt be working in community service programs 
such as tutoring of younger disadvantaged children, 
constructing "miniparks" on vacant city lots, drug 
abuse prevention and ecology, to name just a few. 

GSA is the world's largest voluntary organization 
for girls, with a membership of nearly 4 million 
girls and 670,000 adult leaders. Since its inception in 
1912, Girl Scouts of America has instilled in its 
members the highest ideals of character, service 
and patriotism so that the girls may become the 
wise - mothers and leaders America needs to grow 
and prosper. .^ 

As one organization pamphlet explains, the many 
worthwhile activities of GSA reflect "...the promise 
of continuous growth and unending service to. the 
nation and the world by young people who have 
transmitted their imagination, energies; and 
commitment through the broad scope of Girl 
Scouting." If any organization deserves special 
recognition for a job well done,, it is the -Girl Scouts 
of America! — — — ^~ 




LeUersjlo^the Editor on any 
currenT issues are Welcome?. 
Only letters with names can be 
considered for , this column. 
Signatures will be withheld on 
request. Letters -cannot -be 
returned >hnd are subject to 
minor editlmJT~~ - 



lunch there, 
— guests**-—-- Id 



with no Insect 



Ret Mosquito 
gram. 



abatement pro- 



CHAIN OF PROGRESS 



Today many question the advisability of pushing 
ahead with technical achievements such as nuclear 
power. Along with such concern, there should also 
be some serious questioning of the advisability of 
breaking the chain of scientific and technical 
progress that has always managed to create new 
jobs and new opportunities in new industries just in 
time to absorb the new hands that must be kept 
busy. , '/r. 

Nuclear power, for instance, may open horizons 
far broader than can be envisioned now -in addition 
to producing needed energy. Stories are spreading 
of how one "waste" product of nuclear power 
generation - warm water - is proving unexpectedly 
beneficial in a number of ways. We read of a rebirth 
of the oyster industry on the East Coast - thanks to 
a type of aquaculture in which warm water 
discharged from, nuclear plants has speeded the 
propagation of oysters. On the West Coast, 
experiments are advancing in. warm water use to 
stimulate the growth- of crops. Subsoil heating (with 
warm water) greatly enhances some crops' growing 
season and yields. For example, with soil heating 
applied to plant roots, cantaloupes were raised nine 
weeks ahead of schedule. The eventual effect of 
subso il heating may a llow farmers to fill the gap in 
■ growing. - seasons with a premium "^product at 
premium price. 
^_- Who knows what new opportunities the by-product 
of nuclear power g^itexa 

answer that question for sure,. but it can be said 
with, certainty - wholly aside from the energy 
question -: that a growing population can ill afford 
any shackling of the evolutionary process of 
creating" opportunities for the minds and hands of 
man. 



VILLAGE OF FOX LAKE 
QUALIFIES FOR NATIONAL 
FLOOD INSURANCE 
. Congressman Robert Mc- 
Clory announced" today from 
Washington that the Village of 
Fox Lake has qualified for 
subsidized flood ~ insurance. 
Beginning on March 9, 1973, all 
structures used for residential, 
business, religious, or agricul- 
tural purposes, structures oc- 
cupied by nonprofit organ- 
izations, and structures owned 
by State or local governments 
or agencies thereof are eligible 
for flood insurance coverage. 

Fox Lake Village became 
qualified . under this program' 
when it agreed to adopt land use 
and control measures that will, 
minimize flood damage to 
future construction. 

The 'Congressman explained 
that he has been cooperating 
with Mayor Joseph Armondo to 
meet the urgent needs of the 
community as a result of the 
flooding conditions which have. 
been so prevalent, and' in 
providing an improved water 
.and sewer facility. . 

Further information may be 
obtained from Mayor Armondo. 
Local insurance agents may 
obtain forms of policies and 
other ' information from the 
National Flood Insurers Assoc- 
iation serving office, located in 
the State Fire & Casualty 
Company, Illinois Regional 
Office,. 2309 East Oakland Ave, 
Bloomington, III 61701. - 

* 

Mr. McClory stated: ■■ 

"Eligibility for. this subsi- 
dized insurance will, provide a 
tremendous boost • to the 
residents of the area, and to 
Mayor Armondo, and the City 
^Administration, in meeting the 
critical problems which have 
arisen as a result of flooding 
conditions in the Fox Lake area. 
I am immensely pleased that 
Fox. Lake has. been found 
qualified under this program, 
and Mayor Armondo and I shall 
continue to work toward an 
early solution to other problems 
pertaining to the community's 
water and sewer needs." . ** 



May 1 urge you and your 
.committee to give ■■ serious 
consideration to the .purple, 
martin mosquito abatement 
program introduced by the 
Jaycees first in Griggsville',' 
Illinois some years ago and 
since in many towns and cities . 
'across the" 17. S. (With Jaycee 
and other sponsorship). Al- 
though I wrote Mrs. Nelson a 
note about this a couple of years 
ago* I did not follow up witH a 
formal recommendation.) 
* v The purple martin as you may 
know is a unique bird which 
feasts on mosquitoes - up to2,0QQ 
a day, as well as flies and othe 
harmful insects. They winter 
" in Brazil; fly northward up the 
Mississippi , River Valley, and 
. reach Antloch usually in early 
April. Man has destroyed most 
of their preferred natural 
habitat, but they fortunately 
like the. replacement houses 
man has invented ■ to attract 
them. 

The advantage of. using 
martins for mosquito control 
.are; several: (I) the initial 
Investment is modest; (2) the 
maintenance, can probably be 
arranged . with . enthusiastic- 
volunteers who .will benefit 
*ffom having a martin house - 
near. their property; (3) it is an 
, effective, tested, natural con- 
trol (4) the birds are fascinating 
to watch and have a. beautiful- 
serenade! 

My interest in seeing Antloch 
adopt this program Is due to my 
being one of those people who is 
irresi stable to mosquitoes and 
also has a serious reaction, to 
bites. Except for the years when 
we have had martins in our 
yard, I cannot step outside 
without using quantities of OFF 
several times each day. With 
martins in the yard, I can work 
or sit in the yard all day- have 




-Unfortunately we did not get 
relief from the three sprayings 
last summer. The* mosqultos 
were fewer in number for a half— 
day each time, but the^/fies-'were— r 
untouched,, and , soon the 
mosquitoes were-as-thlck^as — l_ 
before; In addition, we appar- 
ently lost our beautiful pair of 
..cardinals.-whO had been visiting 
our feedet many times daily for , 
three years, during the firstly 
spraying. One of the difficulties 
of a spraying program is that 
insects develop immunity and 
we then must use increasingly 
stronger and more destructive 
chemicals. ■,. 
if the town would put up a few 
'houses in carefully selected 
strategic locations this year, 
and encourage individuals to 
put up additional ones, Antioch' 
may soon join okher municipali- 
ties which ;haVe" solved their 
mosquito problem in this 
satisfying and low-cost J way. 
The earlier the^ houses go up, the 
more likely we are. to get 
tenants (although sometimes , 
*u« Unttoaa nrp not occupied the . 
first year). .For more informa- 
tion: 

l. (A film: 13 minute, 16 mm 
sound and color, motion picture. 
Handling and cleaning .charge 
$3, plus return postage. Griggs-, 
vllle Wild Bird Society, Griggs- 
villei Zll. 62340 

. .2. A monthly paper: The 
Purple Martin Capital News; 
$3.00 per year.- Same' source as 
the film. Send for free sample 
• issue. * ? 

. .3. A book: The Purple Martin, * 
America's Most Wanted Bird, 
by J'.L. Wade. Any book store, 
. $2.95 in paperback. 

. . Because of my great need for 
effective control, I shall be glad 
— to order and pay for one copy of 
the film for showing to Antioch 
. groups who can provide a 
projector. And 1 hereby offer a 
copy of the book b) )J'.L. Wade to 
the first 'ten Antioch residents 
who erect one or more purple r> 
martin houses of either the ~" 
aluminum or -plastic multiple "- 
dwelling variety (wooden 
houses attract, sparrows and 
discourage martins). 

Mrs. Weld (Jessie) Carter 
Antioch, Illinois 




T 



FORGET 



Don't forget about Las Vegas 

For years you havewanted to 
take that special trip to Las 
Vegas - right? Well, don't muff 
a once in a lifetime opportunity. 
Start- today^to-collect new 
subscriptions to CThe Antioch 
News! Ten new subscriptions is 
allthat is necessary to give you 
a change for a weekend ticket to 
. Las Vegas. Hand them in one at 
a time or all at once. We will 
keep track for you! 
• Time is running out SO get 
busy today. (For complete 
details-see page 7) , ">. 



Dear Editor:" 

We are a group of housewives 
who are anxious to have a loud 
majority join us in our 
determination to preserve our 
American way of life. We feel 
strongly that women should be 
shown the respect of equality. 
However, the Equal Rights 
Amendment does not offer 
equality . and sameness. This , 
amendment, if ratified, would 
obliterate any distinction be-. 
tween'the sexes. . 

We now have laws which 
make discrimination against, 
women illegal. Our legislators 
would better serve ■.. us by 
insisting upon the iiriplementa- ' 
tion of these laws, rather than 
by working to amend our' 
constitution with a bill which 
bespeaks the cause of the 
Women's .Liberation move- 
ment. These women are 
ambitious for a unisex existence 
in this country. We must -not 
allow them to speak for us. 
Because they have their 
abberrations is no reason they 
should be allowed to inflict them 
upon us. Because 'they have 
been louder than we have been, 
many of our legislators nave 
found it politically expedient to 
carry .their banner. We must be 
heard. We must speak .out 
strongly against this legislation 
which allows for the drafting of 
our eighteen year old girls to 



serve in the armed forces in 
exactly the same, capacities as 
do the men;* which negates the 
responsibility of a husband to 
support his family; which sets 
aside statutory rape laws; and 
further demeans family life. 
Ask , those legislators who 
endorse the ERA if they will 
publically offer to resign from . 
office on the day that any of the ■ 
above mentioned threats to our 
freedom should occur as. a 
result of the ratification of the 
E.R.A. . ^ 

The total membership .of 
many " organizations which 
claim to endorse the ERA are 
actually split in the views of this 
amendment. ThGTiappiness of 
Womanh< od, Inc., the League of 
Housewives, The Right To Be A 
Woman, . The Woman's Anti 
Liberation League and The Du 
Page Italian-American Civic 
Comm. are among the organi- 
zations which strongly oppose 
the ERA. .. ' .. v . /. 

, Write, wire or call your state 
representative now to protest 
the possibility of the ratification 
"of the Equal Rights Amend- 
ment . You alone can express 
your thoughts. It is your 
privilege to be heard, and your 
duty to. speak. 

Beverly King, Chicago 
(formerly of Antioch) 



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Page 4. THE _ANTIOCH NEWS WEDNESDAY MARCH 7, 1973 






■ 



TOWNSHIP INTRODUCTIONS 



MEET YOUR 




April 3, 1973 is the date that 
has been set for Township 
Elections. Since that date is less 
than a month away the Antioch 
News has decided that this is an 
appropriate time to help you - 
our readers - get acquainted 
with the candidates. There are 




six seats that are open for;.re- 
etection including. Township 
Clerk, Township Assessor, and 
four auditor positions. ' ■ 

Only one of these, seats is 
uncontested as incumbent 
Township Clerk Llewellyn Van 
Patten, runs for his 7th term. 
However, there are many new 
faces in the race this year and 
the following is a short profile of 
each candidate as presented to 



us. 



s. 



LLEWELLYN VAN PATTEN 

Citizen's Party Candidate 
for Town Clerk 

■ This is not a new event for 
incumbent candidate for Town 
Clerk. Mr: Van Patten' has held. 
■ ■ the post for the last 24 years and 
once again heads the Cicizen's 
Party list. 

Van , Patten was born and 
raised in Antioch and resides at 
1036 Bishop Street.- He is a 
member of the Masonic Lodge 
and has served with the Fire 
Department for 25 years. 
. Mr. Van Patten is un- 
contested in his race for 
reflection. 





V 



HAROLD WILSON 

Citizen's Party Candidate 
for Auditor 




IRVING CAREY 

Citizen's Party Candidate 

for Auditor «t 

Irving W. Carey is a 
candidate for re-election, to 
Township Auditor. He has been 
a resident of Antioch since 1935 
and is President of the I. W. 
Carey Electric and Plumbing 
Company. He is the past 
President of the Antioch Lions 
Club and is -a Director of the 
State Bank of Antioch as well as 
a former member of the St. 
Peter's School Board. 



~For the past 23 years Harold- — , 
W. Wilson has owned and 
operated the Wilson Upholster- 
ing : business on Rte 173 in 
Antioch. He has been in the 
manufacturing of furniture and 
upholstering business for the 
past 44 years. . 

Wilson is active in Antioch 
and has .served as a board 
member of the Antioch igh 
School, and the Antioch Town- 
ship. He has. been a justice of 
the peace in Antioch and served 
as honorary member of the 
Lake county 'Safety Committee 
and served ten years as a board . 
member. 

In the past Wilson has been a 
member of the Western Lake 
county Public Works Com- 
mittee and served as Master of 
the.Sequoit Lodge 827 where he 
has been a 25 member. 

Wilson has twice been a past 
patron of the Antoch Chapter * 
Order of the Eastern Star 428 
and worked 5 years in the 
United States Naval Ordinance 
plant on torpedoes in Forest 
Park, 111. 
A property owner in' Fetters ] 
. Subdivision, Wilson has been 
married to his wife Barbara for 
the past 40 years. They have one 
son Harold P. Wilson, who 
presides with his wife and three 
children in Antioch. 



CLARENCE B. OLSON 

Citizen's Party Candidate 

for Township Assessor 

Clarence B, Olson, who 
aspires to be assessor of 
Antioch Township, says he has 
much going for him in the way 
of qualifications, which he feels 
are his best recommendations 
for the office. - 

First off, Clarence and his 
wife Gerri nave lived in the 
township for some 34 years, all 
of which time he was in business 
for himself, first as a wholesale 
food distributor, and later 
employment in the field of 
realestate. 

Clarence has served * the 
community long and well, as 
institutional representative for 



RUDY ECKERT 

Citizen's Party Candidate 
for Auditor 

Rudy Eckert is running an the 
Citizen's Party Ticket for 
auditor. He has been in business * 
for the last 49 years in Antioch. 
He is the owner of Gambles 
hardware on Main Street, which 
he founded in March of 19,34. 
• He married Florence Dane . 
of Milwaukee 38 years ago. 
They have two sons, Paul and 

Ralph." 

He is a member of St. Peter's 
Church and a member of the 
Lions Club, he also served as a 
police magistrate in Antioch 
from 1961-1964, and was chosen * 
as St. Peter's VlP last year. 
39 years 



the Boy Scout Troop 92, and as a 



A member of St. Peter's Holy 
Name , Society, the National 
Electrical- Contractors Assoc- 
iation - the Lake County 
Division, and of the Notre Dame 
Club of Lake county. | 



HOMER LAPLANT 

The Antioch _news_was^not 
able to contact Mr. LaPlant at 
this time, but a' profile will be 
presented at a later date. 
LaPlant is a new face on the 
'Citizen's Party ticket along with 
Rudy Eckert. 



member of Emmons School 
Board for six years/ He. is a 
member of the Antioch Lions 
Club and the Northern Illinois 
Conservation Club. , 

•The Olsons have ' been active 
members of the Antioch United 
Methodist Church for the last 23 
years. 

Clarence and Gerri have two 
children, Diana and Donald, 
who were born and raised in 
Antioch, and are . now in . 
professions on their own . 

Clarence graduated from Carl 
Schurz High School and finished 
his formal education at North- 
western Univ. the hard way - in 
the evening school. 
. Because of his experience in 
real estate values, as a school 
board member, and his work in 
the realty field, as well as his 
many years as a businessman,; 
the Citizen's Party chose 
Clarence to be their candidate 
for the office of assessor. It was 
felt he has all the necessary 
.qualifications to conduct the, 
assessors office in an honest 
and equable manner. 

If elected, Clarence plans to 
keep up to date on all phases 
and types of. construction, and 
to attend all meetings and 
seminars pertaining to the 
science of assessing real estate 
so that his knowledge and . 
judgement in all matters 
concerning the office will be 
current at all times. 




[B- J STUDIOS 
phone 395-5554 
141 Chert Lane ANTIOCH 



PETER J. CLE VEN 

•Independent Candidate for 
Township Auditor 

Pete is a recent addition to 
Antioch Township having 
moved here in 1968 when he 1 was 
employed by Household Fin- 
ance Corp. as Manager of the 
Antioch office. 

■Pete's background includes 8 
years of service in the U. S. Air 
force which were all spent in the - 
administrative field. 

Among his present activities 
are membership in the Antioch 
Chamber of Commerce and the 
Antioch Lions Club. He is also 
on the Antoch Zoning Board of 
Appeals and serves on the 
council of Saint Stephens 
Lutheran Church. 

Presently employed as As- 
sistant Vice-president at the 
—First National Bank- of Antioch , 
he and his wife, Rene a 
registered Nurse employed by 
Doctor's Abderholden, Lorang 
and Barnes, have two children, 
, Lisa a fifth grade student and 
Peter, a fourth grade student at 



Antioch Grade School live at 558 
Poplar -Ave, Antioch. 

Although he has not, pre- 
viously been "a cahdidajte for 
political office he feels the local 
government elections - are of 
prime importance this year and 
has. decided to make himself,, 
available' for the. Township' 
Auditor office. *His ■ main 
concern is to make all residents 
aware that there is a 
governmental unit, at the local, 
level, that is there to serve the 
Township. 




CH AR L 

REALTORS 

26 YRS SERVICE 

389 LAKE STREET 

ANTIOCH, ILL. 

395-3535 

'Complete License 
Plate Service 



ES 




i FRANK J. BENES 

Independent Candidate 
For Auditor ■ 

Frank J. Benes, whotoas lived 
in Antioch for the past N^years 
is employed as a general 
contractor and is the owner of 
the Benes Construction Co. He 
is a member of the Antioch 
Township Republican Club and 
previously ran for Township 
Auditor in 1968, but was 
defeated. He is a member .of St. 
Peter's Church. 
. Benes was elected to the first 
7 man board at the Grass Lake 
School and served two different 
: three year terms. He was past 
president, trustee, and is the 
present president of the Chain 
O'Lakes Park Association. He is 
presently serving' as Repub- 
lican Precinct Committeeman 
of Precinct 4 and has been doing 
so since 1969. 

A war veteran, Benes served 
in the Marine Corp during the 
Korean Conflict. He is a holder 
of a National Defense Medal, 
Korea, a Service Medal and a 
United at ions service medal. * . 

Frank lives on Lake Blvd. . 
with his wife, Jean and their 
three children, Frank Jr. 18, 
who .is a graduate of Antioch 
High School Elizabeth 13, and 
Daniel 10, who are enrolled at 
the Grass Lake School. . . 

Mr. Benes said, "I am very 
interested in' Township prob- 
lems, progress, development, 
and the planning of the Antioch 
Township area." 

* HERBERT W.HORTON 

Independent candidate " 
for Auditor 

Herbert W. Horton, Sr, came 

- to Antioch. in 1946 after serving 

in the United States Marine 

Corp., Pacific Theatre. He has 



Continued next page 



CER M AK 



•*- 



GEE. THE COUNTRY IS GREAT! 

You can say this too, with your 
own home in Antioch Township, 2 " 
bedrooms, private beach, enormous 
|/ .family room, living room, corner lot, , 
one car garage. $17,500.00 



r .v..: ■ . v i V. ,„ r -. y&t •*.,,- ..*,*. - v -^-at425,OOO.oo 



•BUDGET MINDED? 

* . i i 

■ * . * 

Here is size and location, for a 
great price. Bedrooms 12 x 10, 12 x 
15,12 x 15. Dining room 13 x 11" with' 
cheerful galley kitchen, heated 
garage 24 x 2a; All neatly placed on 
80 x k75 corner lot onlyl block from 
Chain\p* Lakes. Priced to sell 



•o-IN A CLASS BY ITSELF 

3 bedrooms, l Vfe baths, large 
carpeted dining room t living room 
and hallway, full basement, large 
1M» car garage, % year old 
landscaping. Like new plastered, 
walls, schools yery close. $31,500.00 



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MEET YOUR CANDIDATES CONTINUED 



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owned and operated his own 
dairy in the Antioch area and is 
presently a milk distributor for 
Meadow Gold Dairy, Wauk- 
egan, Illinois. 

Horton has served as Antioch . 
township Constable for 8 years, . 
as Lake county Special Deputy 
Sheriff for 12 years and as ake 
County Deputy Coroner for 3 
years. He is the past chairman 
of the Lake County Safety 
Commission and is presently a 
safety commission member. 

Past president and founder of 
the Antioch Township Repub- 
lican Club, Horton served as 
President for 9 consecutive 
years. 

Horton resides at 138 Bluff 
Drive with his wife Suzanne and 
family. 




¥?&*$& . 

;f,--':^" :' : '.!V : ,' 

GEORGE OLISAR 

Independent Candidate 
For Auditor 

' George- Olisar, has been a 
resident of the area for 20 years. 
He was a teacher at the Antioch 
Grade School. He directed the 
; grade school band thru 19 years 
of successful competitions, 
tours, concerts and parades. 
Mr. Olisar is now the Band 
director at the Carl Sandburg 
Jr. High in Muhdelein. He 
attended DePaul University irf 
Chicago where he received his 
Bachelor's Degree in Music 
Education and Northwestern 
University where he re ceive d 
his Master's Degree in Music 
-Education, he played- Solo 
Trumpet with the U.S.M.A. 
Band at West Point. He 
conducted the well-known John- " 
son Wax Band of Racine, Wis, 
for 7 years. He has played with 
the Chicago Symphony, the 
Lyric Opera of Chicago, and 
was staff trumpeter on W.G.N. 
""Radio and TV with the Bob 
Trendler Orchestra. 

He has played in shows with 
such stars as Lucille Ball & Desi 
Arnez, Yul Brynner, Mike 
Douglas, and, recently with 
Virginia Mayo and Dennis Day 
in "No, No, Nanette at the 
Schubert Theatre in Chicago. He 
is one of the founders of 
Antioch's PM&L Theatre. 

He is. also a member of the 
Antioch Township Republican 
Club, Millburn Church, Illinois 
Grade School Band Association, 
.Illinois Educators Association, 
Waukegan and Chicago Fed- 
erations of Musicians. 

Mr. Olisar resides with his 
wife, Jacquelyn and family on 
Winsor-Drive in Antioch. 




"There isn't 'much to be 
seen in a little town, but 
what you hear makes up 
for it."(Kin Hubbard) 





R.G."BUI)j f ;HOLTZ 

Independent, candidate for 
Tax Assessor 

-•;Mr.- Holtz was born in 

AVinneconne, Wis. on St. 
Patrick's pay, 1910. He was 
educated in the Public Schools 
of the area and was trained by 

, Wisconsin Bell Telephone - 
specializing in "' Electronics, . 
Transmission - and High Lines, 
he then served Wisconsin Bell in 
a Supervisory capacity as a 
specialist in the Transmission 
Department. 
Bud,, as he is known to his, 

, many friends of the Antioch 
area, moved to Antioch in 1933 
and opened Bud's Tavern, on 
Main Street, he has been in 
business in Antioch township 
^continuously over this span for 
40 years, at Bud's Place, and 
since 1960 at famous Blarney 
Island. He retired from business 
in 1972. 

Mr. Holtz made his home for 
the past 40 years in North 
Antioch except : for. a period 
"from 1941 to 1945 when he 
served his country overseas, 
after Volunteering for service in 
1941. Bud went into service as a 
Private in the Signal Corps and 
rose through the ranks to a First 
Lieutenant, and became Com- 

. mander of a Prisoner of War 
Camp in Hawaii. He later saw 



Service oh Okinawa, and Jhen 
with Special Forces for eleven 
months in Korea. He received 
his Honorable Discharge and 
returned to his home and 
business. 

Mr. Holtz was a Charter 
Member of the Antioch Chapter 
of the Loyal Order of •• Moose, 
am| a Cnarter Member of the ; 
Antioch Lions Club, he is also a 
member of the VFW, the 
Antioch American Legion Post 
and the Antioch Rotary Club. 
. During his long service in the 
Antioch community, Bud has 
been known -for his active 
cooperation with all Community 
Activities', including the .Rescue 
Squad, the Fire Department,, 
the Churches, and the youth of 
I our community. At one time, he 
Was the manager and coach of 
the Antioch lions Club basket- 
ball team, made up of former 
high school players, which . 
established an enviable record 
in the area. - 

. Bud is j still in excellent 
physical shape at his young age 
of 62, and says that he feels he 
owuld like to use his knowledge., 
of the community and of the 
people to some good advantage, 
and hence his reason for 
offering to serve them in the 
difficult task of Tax Assessor. 
He feels that they should have 
someone' that they know will 
have concern 'for , their prob- 
lems' and someone they will 
. feel free to f isit with and confide 
• in. :, ; '' 

. Bud is the proud grandfather 
of three grandchildren, and 
resides with his wife, Stephanie, 
at 396 Winsor Drive in Antioch. 



These bar cookies feature fresh apples and an oatmeal crumb 
topping. 

4 cups (4 med) peeled, thinly sliced apples . 

2/3 cup sugar . *,. • 

1 Tablespoon flour {. 

1 teaspoon cinnamon „ ' .,., r 

8-ounce can Pillsbury Refrigerated Quick Crescent Dinner Rolls 

1 Tablespoon butter or margarine 
TOPPING :?• ■ \ 

1 cup firmly packed brown sugar 
•% cup rolled oats . 

.1/3 cup flour \- 
% M cup butter or margarine,, softened r. 

2 teaspoons vanilla 



\-* 



preheat oven to 375 degrees. In large bowl, combine first four (4) 
ingredients. Separate crescent dough into 2 large rectangles. Place 
rectangles in ungreased 15 x 10 - inch jelly roll pan. Gently press 
dough. to cover bottom of pan; seal perforations. Spoon apple 
mixture over dough. Dot with butter. In medium bowl, combine 
Topping ingredients until crumbly; sprinkle over apple mixture. 
Bake at 375 degrees for 25 to 30 minutes until golden brown and 
apples are tender. Cool; cut into bars. Makes 2 to 3 dozen. 
HIGH ALTITUDE: No change. 






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Hastings YMC A Camp, Lake 
Villa, Illinois offers Interna- 
tional camping trip to Den- 
mark. Ten boys and girls, 
interested in gy mhastics, age 14 
through 17 and a group leader 
will represent C amp Hastings in 
a five week trip to Denmark 



from July 11th to August 15th. 
They will stay at the interna- 
tionally famous Hellebjerg 
YMCA Gymnastics Sctiool anc 
tour other sites of interest. 

Reservations for this specia 
will be limited, so please do no 
delay to call for information 
Call 356-7567. '".••: 




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ANTIOCH, ILLINOIS 









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F«ge..^ZtHB^rANTIOCH^NEWS._WEDNEgDAy'..:'MARCH' 



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70 YEAKS AGO MARCH 5, 1903 

The new State Bank of Antioch was opened for business the last v 
week in February. This institution was organized in October, with 
E. B. Williams, George D. Paddock, W. S. Westlake, R. L. Strang, 
and Joseph Turner as directors. 

The many friends of Miss Effie Harden will be glad to hear that 
she is now located at the Metropolitan business college at Chicago. 
30 YEARS AGO MARCH 8, iM^f^ — 

There will be an auction sale on the Lpl LaPlant farm, located on 
South Main St. Antioch, on Wednesday, March 14.. Nine Head, of 
cattle will be sold. Sale will start at 1 o'clock, and W. J. Chinri will 
be the auctioneer. 

Otto K lass's vacation must be 'about, over. His trunks arrived 
about 2 weeks ago, but no Otto. We don't know whether he was lost 
en route or decided to walk back from Texas! 



20 YEARS AGO MARCH 5, 1953 

Antioch High's fighting Sequoits finished the Conference without 
a single loss in conference competition by walloping Grant 70-45, 
The Sophomore team coached by Warren Polley also had a near 
perfect record of wins. 

Antioch 1953 Red Cross Drive appointed Chairman is Mrs. Henry 
J. Buggies. The Red Cross Drive will continue throughout the 
month of March. 

10 YEARS AGO MARCH 7, 1963 _ 

George Boyd announced his candidacy for the office as County, 
Supervisor. 

Antioch businessmen take to the hard court against the high 
school faculty in their Annual Benefit basketball game. Some of the 
participating businessmen notables will be B? Lubkeman who with 
the aid of a step ladder, will demonstrate his famous "dunk shot." 
-The faculty's defensive unit under the direction ofRog Andrews 
will have high scoring Bernie Fosmark and : rebounding Ace 
-Warren Polley. 




ANTIOCH 




WINNERS 

Three! of Antioch's High 
School teachers, three parents, 
and three • students joined 
together to compete on (he 
Olympic Game Quiz show on 
WSNS (Channel 44) sponsored 
by the Olympic Savings and 
Loan Association, 'Berwyn. . 

The. team's efforts were 
rewarded this . # week with a 
. $600.00 award, which will be 
used to purchase SRA materials 
for' the school. The competing 
teachers were: David Mqnke, 
Diane Busch and Jim Corrigan. 
Competing parents were: 
Arthur. Blecks, Thomas 
Pocrnich and Lucien. McLean, 
Students competing were Wen: 
dell Burris, Cynthia Hayden 
and John Thain. 

The Olympic Game is 
scheduled to be reshown on 
March 14th at 5 p.m. oh channel . 
44.' v / 



PARENTS TO 
"WELCOME 



"Welcome Spring" is the title 
for the Emmons Parents Club 



ANTIOCH HIGH SCHOOL RECEIVES OLYMPIC GAME AWARD 

■'*•"-,',■ ■ — -^ 

Cindy Hayden and Wendell Burris, students at Antioch High 
School, with teacher David Monke (right) receive award from 

OlympicSavingsandUanAssociation Berwyn for participaUon in J^ SlSto'd^ to £ 
association^ new^JV Quiz show called Uie OlympcGameson h eldat7:30p.m., March 22nd at 
WSNS (channel 44) Saturdays at 5 pm. Presenting the award is 
Wesley E. Sedlacek, vice, president of Olympic. John Thain not 
pictured was the third student participating 




Lorenz's Smart Country House . 
in Antioch. * " ^ 

Korf s of Sixth. Avenue from 
Kenosha, Wisconsin will pre- 
sent the latest in spring fashions 
for your enjoyment. 

Prizes galore! For tickets call 
either 395-0749 or 395-2692. 



^hip^hore: 

Springy Knit... 
The Cotton that 
Can't be Beat 
$6 



REMEMBER WHEN 

REMEMBER WHEN? We don't, but we know that all It takes 
_-._"■. - : sometimes is. a little reminder, to jerk a memory and bring back 
recollections of those days gone by. Each week we print an old 
photo submitted by an Antioch resident. Some we will be able to 
identify, for others, we leave it to you to search your own mental 
3 scrapbook. Call us if you can identify a photo. Better yet, if you . _ 
have a memorable photo to share, bring It in to the office. 

100% GUARANTEED if not satisfied, you don't havo to pay 

3 BRUSHES .works on top and on doth sides 



LADIES' PAY SPECIAL 



i. * 



i 
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i 
i 

J EVERY MON. * THURS: CAR WASH Qlily $ 1700 

s ;'l*-;. .- ' • m ■••- reg. i'l.sd ■-■. . 

j GRAND OPENING! "SAT. MARCH 1 17 "FREE GIFTS" 
i GREGG & DUNCAN'S HEW AHTI0GH CAR WASH INC. 

' | ^TBXPBRT 

' ' 'Sir, . -.TlJf • __ i _ ■ __^^_ _^i 

■"^ B '^ r *^*^^-^^^^^S^'i ' ";'. : ■;■'■■-■;■;.,•.! "V>; ; J ■■iT-i\tia-~Mfr'if»SUtnntNatil'it 

v, ■ •' • . . ■ '■."■.'. •' : i-. .:.'. . . ■ 

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of Rt. 173 & 

8a.in.--8 p.m. 7 days a week 











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THE ANTIOCH NEWS. WEDNESDAY MARCH 7 f lW3 Page 7 

10 NEW SUBSCRIPTIOMS You Sell Your Nome Will 



mnmBMagi 




Be Placed In The Box Fpr Drawing At T^e End Of The Contest; 
(If You Sell 20 New Subscriptions You Have Two trances 

In The Drawing.) 



ARRANGEMENTS AND 

■* . ■ * - -* 

will be made for ypii by 

CORRIN TRAVEL AGENCY 
927 MAIN STREET ANTIOCH 




iC" 



•* 



■TT^I^ 




? - tO YOUy the ANTIOCH NEWS subscribers ONLY, because of your loyal readership 
over the years, We are going to give you a chance to win a HEAVENLY HOLIDAY in ,73 at OUrtEXPENSE 
ALL YOU DO .S HAVE THE FUN I CORTESTtO RUN FEBRUARY Id t. APRIL 2 

Winner To Be Announced In The April 1 lth Issue. 



HERE IS WHAT CAN BE YOURS- 



A Completely paid fun filled trjp for two to that 
Fun Capital of the world - LAS VEGAS - 
The whiner will receive - 

* -Air fare round trip Chicago to Las Vegas for 

two. . : 

* -3 Fun-filled days and 2 unforgettable nights at 

the Stardust Hotel and Casino located right on 
the Strip. - 

* -Free use of the Stardust olympic-size pools and 

-tennis courts; 

* -A FREE show at the Lido de Paris, world's 

greatest floor show - PLUS two of your favorite 
cocktails. ■ - 

* "A Starlight Lounge show . - The best on the Strip. 

* 2 Breakfasts in the lovely Palm Room AND a de- 

Ilicious dinner at the Platter Restaurant! 
* -An Exotic Gold Cup Cocktail in the romantic 
AKU AKU Polynesian Bar. 
* -PL US a surprise opportunity to win $2 5,000. 



SWINGIN* IN VEGAS IN 'T3 




RULES FOR ELIGIBILITY: 



1. Must be a current - paid-up subscriber . to the 
ANTIOCH NEWS. 

2. Must sell 10 or more N E W subscriptions to the 
ANTIOCH NEWS. (1 chance for each 10 
subscriptions sold.) Use forms below. 

i. Subscriptions may be ONLY to persons living in 
Lake County, III. or Kenosha County, Wise. 

4. Renewal subscriptions will NOT be counted. 

5. ALL entries must be mailed in on or before April 
" 2, 1?73. (subscriptions must be paid in full at time 

of entry)*. , ' . 



* You may mail in any or all subscriptions anytime 
between Feb. 19 and April 2. New subscribers will 
begin receiving their ANTIOCH NEWS within 3 
weeks after subscriptions are turned in. 
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Pagii '8. THE 'ANTlbeii ^^NEWSiWEDNESDAY : MARCH 7, .1973 








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11,/- 







Along the 
Way with 



The Antioch Firemen had 
their Annual Ladies night out on 
February 24. It was held at the 
Moose Lodge and hear ,a 
DELICIOUS family style dinner 
of beef and chicken was served 
by the women i of the Moose. 
Special guests attending were 
the village officers' and Fire 
District representatives. Two 
special guests of Antioch were 
made honorary members of the 
Antioch Fire Department: Bill 
It rook was made , an honorary, 
member for his generous gift of 
a boat for the' underwater 
recovery team and his help 
when needed throughout the 
year. Police Chief Jack Wells 
received a fire helmet with the 
title "Chjef j>f the West 
Division" (only thing is - it says 
it on BOTH front and back. How 
will he know which way to go?) 

Several awards were given to 
the firemen themselves. Among 
them were "Boner of the year" 
went to Tod Maplethorpe who 
was caught going to a fire the' 
wrong way. and Bernie Gut- 
owski received on of the 
trophies the firemen won at a 
water fight. Bernie is retiring 
from the water team and the 
men didn't want him to forget 
them . Following the program 
was dancing. 

.' Don't forget some events 
coming up - This Evening 
(Wed) and Friday night are the 
regional basketball games at 
ACHS. Come and cheer our boys 
on to the next step.- 

March 17 is the Lions Ladies 

Night. It will be held at the 

Abbey in Fontana and should 

prove to be a lovely evening for 

"all. 

Then. March 31 is St. Peter's 
VIP Dinner-dance which is 
always a fun ,_ affair. Ticket 
deadline is March 17 so get 
them now!!! 

Hear* the underwater re- 
covery ; team made a call 
already this year. Seems a man 

^ walked out on Petite Lake and 
the ice gave out on him on the 
way in. Some kind soul pushed a 
boat out to him but he hung 
suspended with his arms out on 
the ice until the men could get to 
him. Several "compationate" 

i ice fishermen just sat and 
watched the whole thing and 
ajVln't offer help to him. 
hummmmm 



. . Understand Bill Carney is 
limping a little. I knew this 
spring-like weather would get to 
a few. Now, Bill, take it easy 
and break in slowly when 
playing basketball with the* 
boys.. 

. Guess our prayers were 
answered - Dr. Ed. Abderholden 
came thru surgery beautifully 
and should be home soon . The 
\yhole town was pushing for you 
Dr. 

We have a request - Charles 
Mazzio - please send us "the 
receipe 'for your "Sour Cream 
. Cake". It was so enjoyed by all 
.that the ladies of Oakwood 
Knolls wonder if you might 
share the receipe with them. 
Send it and we will publish it, 
Charles -PLEASE!!! 



Birthday wishes this week go 
to Sandy Herbert and Roxane 
Stowell. To Dorothy Barnstable 
on the 7th and Florence Thomas 
on the 9th. Then two celebrating 
on the 10th are Collette Quinn 
and Barb Mitchell; Gail Fields' 
celebrates on 'March 13. 

Congratulations to the young 
iind old. Jody Patrovsky and 
Mr. George Good where 
honored at the Annual Parents 
night Friday for the Antioch- - 
Lake Zurich game. They are 
really 'enthusiastic, loyal fans. 
Lets not forget the Team and 
Coach Andrews who gave us. 
something to cheer about' this 
"winter. 

' Sunny & Harry Arndt cele- 
brate their anniversary on; 
March 12. Congrats..;.. 

Well, looks like, "Spring has 
sprung". Put away the sno- 
mobiles, skis and skates. Out 
with the tennis rackets., and 
bikes. 

Annie Mae • . 



■ r Our sincere condolences to 
the Don Amundsen family on 
■•■ I he death of Gerri's mother. 





MID WINTER BAND CONCERT 



& 



ART SHOW 



On April 4, the Antioch PTA 
will 'sponsor the 3rd Annual 
High School Art Show. It will be 
in the high school Commons at 
7:00 p.m. and is open to ihe 
public. . 

^_The two previous art shows 

^were well .received by the 

public, and showed jnuch 

potential artistic talent in the 

high school. 

The show is open to all ACHS 
students. The art will be judged 
in eight categories; Sculpture, 
oils,' water colours, sketching, 
ceramics, photography,' mac-, 
rame, and miscellaneous. 
There will also be displays by 
the woods, metals, electronics, 
.and drafting classes. 



SACRED LILY 
OF INDIA 

' "Mrs. Rhymer of Rte 2, Antoch 
has a very unusual plant. It is 
called a "Sacred Lily of India", 

• and it goes through various 
stages of growth. During the 
summer months it takes the 
form of a large umbrella shaped 
plant with a beautiful flower. 
During that period of time the 
plant requires much care and 
water. .At the end of the 
summer, 'Mrs. Rhymer digs up 
the bulb, washes it and puts it in 
her basement. Then after 
absolutely no care or dirt at all, 
the bulb begins to grow for one 
month averaging 3" of growth 
per day. Right now the stalk is. 
5'6". The stalk will soon die and 
when the spring arrives, Mrs. 
Rhymer will once again return 
the unusual bulb to her garden 
where it will once again grow 
into the umbrella shape. Mrs. 
Rhymer lives on route 83 South 
of Antioch. (staff photo) 



Saturday, March 17, will be 
the date for the Mid Winter" 
Band Concert, presentedby the 
Fine Arts Department of 
'Antioch Community High 
School. The program will be 
held in the Auditorium at 8:00 
p.m. , 

The program will feature the 
Wind Ensemble and the Concert 
Band, both under the direction 
of Ralph G. Brooke. An evening 
of great music from the pens of- 



MOOSE NEWS 



A class of 15 new members 
were enrolled Sundayr March 
4th at 12:00 Moose Time. The 
hew members and- •. their * 
sponsors are as follows; Walter 
Steffen sponsored by Ernie- 
Cook; Janes L. Andre spon- 
sored by Wayne Jensik; 
Kenneth Caryl sponsored by 
Edward Marsh; Eugene Welter 
sponsored by Les Sperling; 
Gene Hovland sponsored by 
Arthur Held; Robert Gavin 
sponsored by Earl Lowe; Paul 
C. Halper, Jn Robert P. Lovell, 
and Steven E. Galster spon- 
sored by Karl Lovell; Larry 
Williams and Ray Anderson 
sponsored by Robert McNally; 
Edward Lewandowski spon- 
sored by Ed Dan Ike; David R. 
, Higginson and Johnny KIchosky , 



great composers will be 
presented.. Some of the com- 
posers, and their "works are : 
George Gershwin's "American 
In Paris? ; Gloacchino Rossini's 
"William ; Tell Overture' 1 ; 
Johann Strauss' "Overture to 
DieFledermaus M ; arid Norman 
Dello Jois's Scenes from '"The 

Louvre". " 

Tickets will be on sale at the 
door, and may be obtained from 
members of the baftk. y\ »/ 



sponsored by Robert McNally; 
and Thomas McGuire . spon- 
sored by Terry Boston. Con- 
gratulations to all the new . 
members and welcome to 
Antioch 525. 

Hungry! March 11th is the 
monthly breakfast cooked by v 
Les Palmer and his crew. — 
Breakfast is served from 8 a.m. 
- 11 a.m. and is open, to '; all 
members and guests. So stop by , j 
for breakfast ■' ,. 

X 

St. Pat's Dinner and Dance 
will be held on March 17th. 
Dinner will be served from 6 to 9 
pm and dancing will begin at 9 
pm to the music of the Frank 
Cuden Trio. The donation 
tickets are $2.50 per person. All 
members and guests are s 
welcome. The tickets are now ■■ 
on sale at the Moose Club or ' 
from any L.O.O.M. Officer. , - 
wmmmmmmammmmmm " 



MR. ARNOLD'S 
COIFFURES 

Spedalomg in Hair Offing 
Styling Color 

WKJ3 Hie Stylish- Capfess Wigs 

1L ih— HAIR -STYLES -1 » "*■ •". 

By Apponrtnent 

tues. - Wed 9 m- 4 pum. 
Thin. - Fri. 8 aJiC- 7 run. 
SaL 8 ajn. -3 pm 

Gosed Monday 
IN THE SAWS AND WAN PIAZA ml m { n 




STAFF 
MR. ARNOLD 

BONNIE & LINDA 



I 








■qiUB* *.-+*.- Mt*i|***t^ 



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PROVIDE GOOD RECORDS 
SERVICE CHARGE 




With Minimum Balance Of $150.00 

■....' Member .' ''•• 



SERVICE 

.BANK 



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National 

Bank 




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Page VJ $- TriE ANTIOCH ')$ NEWSWEDNESDAY MARCH %\ i??' 



4973, 



PAY-LESS 



U.S.D. A .CHOICE 



CENTER GUT PORK CHOPS 

$1,09 lb.. 

U.S.D.A. CHOICE 

lescfi 2nd Mealy Boneless 

ROAST 





SUPER 
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401 lake St. *•# 



CLEAN-FRIENDLY STORES 

1 1. Itatl Oeeetitta. Mi S* 
Fncft rfllettfw Hw Soeety. 



&• Wffcf Te U»Jt O^HWti. No Silt U OooJtn. 
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U.S.D.A.CHOICE 

TORK L«H RIMST 3-4 Ik. average 

89' lb. 

U;S,DA CHOICE 

Beef Boneless ■££ .^,™ 
Chuck Steak $1=29 lb. 





US .DA. CHOICE 




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Boneless 
POT ROAST 
$1.19 lb. 



ft 



LIL LEPRECHAUN 
BRAND" 



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\ House Hold Del ight 25 ft. 

^ALUMINUM FOIL 
19 e 



BRISKET 

89' lb. 






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WEINERS$1. 




FROM THE DELI, A SLICED TO ORDER 
OSCAR MAYER BOLOGNA 50* »/ 2 ||| a 

OUR OWN HOME MADE 
; KIDNEY BEAN SALAD Reg. 59* 

49 c lb. 



Lg. stalk crisp 






INE RIPE 

TOMATOES 



celery 29 c ea. 



mm 







29' lb. 



GARDEN FRESH GREEN 



1 lb. cello bag 

CARROTS 

2/29 c 



OR. PEPPER 

16 oz. 8 pak or diet 

plus tax deposit 

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SwirtningSlb. 

SHORTENING 





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JONATHAN 3 lb. bag 

APPLES 59° 



10 lb. Russet eel© bag 

POTATOES 69° 




A COFFEE 



non-dairy coffee 
• creamer 16 oz . 

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MAXWELL HOUSE 
INSTANT 

Coupon 40° OFF 



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PAYLESS* 



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4ft oz. 

15° OFF 

With Coupon 



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FOLGERS'S COFFEE 

2 lb. 
Coupon 20° OFF 

PAYLESS 



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Page 10 THE ANTIOCH NEWS.^EPNESDAY MARCH 7, 1973 




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teOJJ-TY 



n; pi. TIES. (L. tocletas fr. 
socio* a companion; cf. F. 
SOCIETE. S«e SOCIAL) the 

relationship of man associated 
in any. way to one another; 
companionship; fellowship; 
connection; participation. 



i 




Paulsen-Gorsi 




m 



THE MOOSE 

Antioch was hostess to 177 
co-workers on Chapter Rally 
Day, Feb. 25. Junior Graduate 
Regent Judy Page gave the 
address of welcome and the 
responSe was by Marie Dahl of 
Waukegan. Chapters participat- 
ing in the Ritual Ceremony 
were: Opening-Highland Park, 
Balloting-Zion -Benton, Enrol- 
lment-Waukegan, Endowment • 
Fund-Antioch and Closing-Fox 
Lake, _ ; 'i t : : . 

There were 27 Collegians, 11 . 
Star Recorders and 34 Academy 
of Friendship members in 
attendance. 

The chapters presented 
checks in amount of $804.00 to 
be sent to Mooseheart ' toward 
the expense of the new Health 
Center being constructed there. 1 
All chapters of the. Women of 
the Moose throughout the 
United States and Canada have 
undertaken to raise funds for 
the erection and equipping of. 
this center at the Child City of 
_ Mooseheart7~The -name— and- 
number .of each chapter Ujat 
contributes a total amount of 
$2.00 per member during the 
chapter years 1972-74 will be 
listed in raised letters on a' 
bronze plaque, which will be 
permanently displayed in the 
center. This center will be built 
at a cost of approximately half a 



BURT ANDERSONS 
CELEBRATE 
SO YEARS 

+ ■ 4 

An Open House will be held on 
Sunday March nth' from 2pm to 
6 pm at the Tarfu Club, Loon 
Lake in honor of the Golden 
Anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. 
Burt Anderson of Antioch. They 
were married on March 12, 1923 
in Princeton, Illinois and moved 
to Antioch in 1925. Before his 
retirement, Mr. Anderson 
owned and operated Anderson's ; 
Radio and TV Service. 
' They have six children, all of 
whom live in this - area; 
twenty-three grandchildren; 
and 2 great-grandsons. Their 
children are Charles ; and 
Andrew of Antioch; Pat 
Polsgroye (gtrsT Wayne) of 
Lake Villa; Roberta Armstrong 
(Mrs Jack) of Antioch; Kay 
Bawden (Mrs Edward) of 
Spring Grove, and Penny 
Kovalenko (Mrs Dan) of Zion« 

The Andersons look forward 
to visiting with many, old and 
dear friends. on Sunday. 



March 3rd was the wedding day of Mabel Ann Paulsen of Antioch 
and Edward J. Corsi of Daytona Beach, Florida. 

The wedding ceremony took place at St. Mark's Luthern Church 
with pastor Harold Nelson officiating. 

The bride wore a pink floor length gown and orchids were her 
wedding flowers. Garoline Corduan, who wore an .orange .floor 
length gown was the matron of honor and Wilbur Mattila was the 
best man. 

A reception for a few friends was held at the Colony House, 
Trevor Wis. following the wedding and a honeymoon trip is plan 
ned for Lisbon -Portugal. 

The couple will return home. to Antioch on June 1. (g-J Rush 
photo) k •_:•-. 



million dollars through the 
combined efforts of all co : . 
workers and their fund-raising 
projects. 

New candidates enrolled for 
Antioch were: June " Bowie- 
sponsor, June Ballenger, Arlehe 
Peters-sponsor, Judy Cook and 
Roseann Mazzio and Virginia 
Rutko, both sponsored by Ann 
Barone. 

The chapter would like to 
extend their sincere apprecia- 
tion to Brother Dick Stroner and 
Loyal Order members who 
prepared and served a delicious 
beef dinner to all co-workers 
after the 'meeting. 
♦ At the Chapter Night Pro-_^ 
gram, March 7, Mpbsehaven 
chairman Sarah Brahn intro- 
duced Grover C. Colip, Mem- 
bership Director from Janes- 
ville, Wis., who played a taped 
interview he conducted with 
children living at Mooseheart. 
It was heart-warming to hear 
the happiness and contentness 
in the voices of these children. 1 
: Candidates enrolled were- 
Maria Stanley-sponsor, Karen 
Bartuska, Helen Seboen- 
sponsor, Marjorie Hartman and 
Evelyn Niemietz-sponsor, 

— Qeraldine Schumann. 





SONIYA ELICHEK MARRIED 



ROXANE 

MARINO 
ENGAGED 

Mr. and Mrs. William 
Bowman of Antioch are pleased 
to announce the engagement of 
her daughter, Roxane Marino to 
N. Michael Conforti, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Chester N. Conforti of 
Kenosha Wisconsin. 

Roxane is a 1972 graduate of 
Antioch community high school. 

An April 28 wedding date has 
been set. )B-J Rush photo) 



Antioch methodist Church, 
Antioch, Illinois, with the Rev. 
William Jannusch of Bristol, 
Wisconsin was the scene for the 
February 24 wedding of Miss 
Soniya M. Elichek to Mr, 
Donald A. Davis of Liber ty ville, 
Illinois. 

The bride was given away by 
her brother, Dan Elichek. She 
wore her mother's wedding 
gown of white slipper satin with 
a 7 yard train. Her heart 

shaped headpiece was id- 
entical to the. one her mother 
wore-and designed 32 years ago. 
She also wore a heart-shaped 



locket of her mother's. 

Mrs. Ruth Johnston served as 
Miss Elichek 's matron of honor, 
while Mr. Gene Lombardb 
served as best man. The matron 
of honor wore a tangerine 
orange gown of silk organza 
carrying a bouquet of yellow 
carnations// » 

The wedding couple were 
honored at a reception at 
Lorenzs' Smart Country House. 

After a honeymoon trip to 
Starved Rock Lodge, Ottawa, 
Illinois Mr. and Mrs. Don Davis 
will make their home at 207 
Brookhill Rd., Ubertyvilie, 
Illinois. (B-J Rush photo) 



■v. .i> ■ 



ADVANCE DATES: March ll' 
- . River , Grove Green Cap 
Program, * 2:00 pm Jr Grad. 
Regent Judy Page to be guest 
pianist. L March 15- . Chapter 
■ business meeting, 8:00 pm 
: March 19 - Fox Lake Green Cap 
Program, 8:00 pm Judy Page to 
be guest Senior Regent. 




ENGAGEMENT TOLD 

jMt. and Mrs. August Reuter 
of 950 Van Street/ Elgin, 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Jean Mdrie, to 
Frank David Roblin of 293 
JoAnna Court, Antioch, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Roblin of 
139 Tahiti circle, Naples, Fla. 
August 11 is set for the wedding. 



lto» - Bo^B-flHto F«t% Sfyfe 13.25 
W - Ffck F*, - PatoPawite ^95 

HIGHWAY 178, WE8T OF 59 
ANTIOCH 896.4211 

CLOSED TUESDAY 

Mtmtorof Dinm Club and American 

■ \ • 4 . 



—rr. 



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rijMjiMMg— Mt 



THE ANTIOCH NEWS. WEDNESDAY MARCH %' 1973 n *m H 







OpH_\t dari ■ itek lf H jmA\ jw 



- ■ . 



Skiing Eteryday, Dancing Til. . & SaL Kites 

International Smorgasbord every Sat. Kite 

Different Hationafify each week 

/phone -for information 

.HOLIDAY HOUSE, 
W- 134. % HI- DOT Of W 12 
. PO BOX 156 

pdone 3I2-54M2H 






Dortmunder Inn 



— LUNCHES & DIHHERS FROM 11 AM- 

"ROM A SAJtDWKH TO A SIEAKT 

FISH FRY EVERY FRIDAY NUE 

ASSORTED SEA FOOD PUllER- PERCH, WAUEYE PIKE, SHRIMP, SCAUOPS RC 

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Closed Thurs. 




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FRIDAY & SATURDAY 

-.RCl- NITE FISH FRY 2.25 
SAT- NITE PRIME RIB DINNER 5.50 

SERVING LUNCHEON DAILY 
FROM. 11 :00 AM- (Closed AAon.) 



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Old Hickory Inn 








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OJTD fWCKORlJ Wft 

Enjoy Outdoor Atnosphere inside 

Complete Sandwich Menu - Homemade Potato Pancakes Daily 
ALWAYS 2RVWG (MM W THE BASKET ft TOMBSTONE PIZZA 

Inch from" 11:30 am. daffy 
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5 - 10 jun. hi. ft Sat 

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Our Speciality GREAT. PIZZA Made To Your Order 

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THURS- ConpllBiwtari flwirf CHAHPA6HE 
TUB- Spagheffi^and Heat Saace TO THE 1ADIES 
WB), Fried Chicken fftl Ocean Perch 

Specials Includes Relish Trai ens Breed & Butter 






. OUR EH0RH0US MUM SATtffY > 

Rt. 83 S OF Rt. 173 Antfocfi opeh m pjLto j 
CARRY OUTS 395-2606 aosaniOMDAY 




MICHELLE' ROTH 

QUALIFIES IN MISS 

TEENAGER PAGEANT 




Chicago on July 6 and 7.-The 
State 4 Bank of Antioch is 
sponsoring Michelle'. 

Michelle* is a freshman at 
Antioch High School. She is 
active in choir, gymnastic, and 
GAA. Also is secretary of the 
Freshman Class. Michelle* is a 
volunteer worker for St. Peter f s 
Blood Bank. She also helps the 
Knights of Columbus on their 
Tootsie Roll Drive for " the 
Mentally Retarded and vol- 
unteers with the Knights of 
columbus to wheel disabled 
-Veterans to Mass at Downey 



I * " -O 4^^^ 




"Inflation is that period 
when a man can lose his 
shirt not only in the stock 
'market' - but also - -in- the 
supermarket." (Changing 
Times) 



A.U.G.S. STUDENT- 
-FACULTY GAAAE 



*• . 



- Michelle* L'Vette* Roth fas 
qualified as a contestant in the 
National 1 Teen Ager_ Pageant. 
The finals will be held in; 



Hospital. 

Michelle* hopes to' be^ a 
Stewardess of a model. . 

Daughter of Mr. and, Mrs. 
Alfred C. Roth, Rte 1, Box 862, 
Antioch, Michelle's hobbies are 
sewing, swimming, water 
skiing and boating.. 



MEETS 

• the La Leche League of Lake 
VIUa-Ahtioch will meet at 8:00 
pm Wednesday, March 14 at 
1037 Victoria Street, Antioch, 
Illinois. V 

To pic for discussion will be 



Hear ye! Hear ye! This is an 
absolute must for all you 
basketball fans. Come to the 
student-faculty basketball 

game and see the famous 
A.U.G.S. faculty "Drop-outs** 
play the 8th grade basketball 
team at Antioch Upper Grade 
School, March 10, 7 :C0 p.m. 
. Before you see this wonderful 
game, you will surely want to 
watch the "Drop-outs' " female 
counterpart play the 8th grade 



girls' volleyball team. 
. All of this will cost .you $1.00 
for adults and $.75 for grade, 
school students, if you pay at 
the door. Now if you are 
economically inclined, you can 
by advance tickets from the 
teachers through any student at 
A.U.G.S. for $.25 less. 

The proceeds will go to the 
sports program at the school. If 
you come, the A.U.G.S. students 
will be eternally grateful for 
this support. 



"Advantages of Breast Feeding 
to Mother and Babies'*. 

Babies are always welcome 
as well as any other women 
interested in learning more 
about the art of breast feeding. 
For more information call 
3*56-8381, 395-6081 or 223-5861. 




..,> ■ 



Tony & LiPs 


• ■ • 
* 

„ - * ' 

Marino's 


MARINO'S 

OPEN DAILY 10 a.m. to 1-ul 

RESTAURANT - LOUNGE 


- 


FRI. «SAT. NITE 
"MUSIC FOR All OCCASIONS' "VELVET0NES" 

JBf SUNKEWKZ MEN EWCK50N JOE DtHARCO 
C0RD0V0X TRUMPET 1EADER-DRUHS 

9 p.m.to /I a.ra. 




1 . - 


• 


RTE. S3 & GRASS LAKE ROAD 

JUST SOUTH OF ANTIOCH 

PHONE 395-9880 PACKAGE LIQUOR STORE 


i 



t .- 



V 



■i'^nninwi*^"" 



T — ™ 









V|<X * »l|-».-l^, , 



Page 12 THE ANTIOCII NEWS WEDNESDAY MARCH 7, 

L ■ 




Deductions 



%jt^d' 



Ms. Robert Gedville, route 4, 

Box 328, Antioch, Illinois is 

pictured. during their current 

~vacatiflii~at-Del~webb's~wat^ 

ionally famous resort-retire- 
ment, community, Sun City,. 
Arizona. 



1— »#—##—# — ##—— »—» — a 

Uinhy and Wally Henningoif 
Rte 173, Antioch are the proud 
parents .of a baby boy, Jeffrey 
Tremayne .He tipped the scales 

~ m at 7 lbs and 9 oz. and was born. 
on February 28th, 1973. 
, Ginny's father, Chief Jack 
Wells, is now a ' happy 
grandfather for the first time 
and has already passed out as _ 
many as 50 J cigars, .Paternal 
grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter Henning, 963 Victoria 

f and w of course, "grandma" 
Wells can't be: forgotten. 

SCOn ALBRIGHT 
PLEDGED TO 
FRATERNITY 

- " * 

Scott Albright, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Kenneth Albright, 
Antioch, Illinois has been 
-pledged to the Theta Alpha Psi - 
fraternity. Scott is a freshman 
at Midland College, Fremont, 
Nebraska. 




Mrs. Cramer's third graders proudly display their shoe box housed deserts In the hall of. the Antioch 
Grade School. The class constructed the desert scenes as part of their lesson oh desert invlronments. 
(staff photo) . 



,• <> 



STUDENTS THINK DRY THOUGHTS 



For the last month Mrs. 
Cramer's* third grade class at 
the Antioch Grade School has 
been learning about the desert 
environment. They have writ- 
ten reports on the desert animal . 
or plant of their choice. 

This type of written report is 
not an easy task for a third 
grader. Therefore an English 
lesson has been coupled with the 



science program. The students" 
learned how to make a report, 
how to search for information, 
where to find it and what to do 
with it when found. The students 
then learned how to re-write the 
material and it was presented to 
the other third grade classes 
last Friday. 

The students also constructed 
desert scenes in shoe boxes 




NEWCOMERS CARD AND 
GAMES PARTY PLANNED 



The Antioch Welcome Wagon 
Newcomers' Club will hold it's 
monthly meeting Wednesday, 
March 7th at 8:00 pm at the 
Antioch State Bank. Our 
program for the meeting will be 
a reading by Don Beveroth of 
the PM&L Players. 

On Tuesday, March 13th", Mr. 
Nicholas of Home Extension 
will give a class in gardening - 
lawn and landscaping care. 
This promises to be very 
informative. The class will 
meet at the Public Library in 
Antioch and will be a two hour 
session from 7 to 9 pm. __ 

The Newcomers will hold it's 



first card and games party, 
Wednesday March 14th, at the 
American Legion Post on Ida 
Street in Antioch at 8 : 00 pm . We ' 
are looking forward to a large 
crowd. Prizes and raffles plus 
refreshments is on the agenda/ 
so bring along your friends and 
neighbors for. a fun gekto- 
gether evening. The donation is 
$1.50. If you have any prizes of 
gifts for the card party, kindly, 
bring them along to the meeting 
on the 7th, For more inform- 
ation call Rose Gardula -' 
395-6292 or Dorothy Quirk at 
414-857-2032. 



including in the scene both 
animal and desert plants. 

Moving on from the desert the 
students will be able to choose 
for themselves their next area 
of study. They may explore 
either a marine or a pond 
environment and they „ may 
work individually or in small 
groups. 

Mrs. Cramer has been 
teaching in Antioch since 1953 
and is still very actively' 
engaged' with her students. 



-DAUGHTER 
MOTHER- 
BANQUET 



• .• 



Members of the Evangelical 
Free. Church are busy in 
preparation, for the coming 
Mother-Daughter banquet on 
April 13, at 6:30 p.m. Much 
planning has ^ gone into the 
program which will make it an 
enjoyable evening to both the 
older, set and the youngsters. 

Watch for more details later. 




FasHions 
for men 



THURS.-FRI.-SoT. 

DON'T MISS OUT ! ! f 



TRAUX AND COTTER 



Miss Donna T ruax of Millburn 
was married to Robert R. 
Cotter in the Millburn United 
Church of Christ on February 
10th at 12 noon ceremony by 
the Reverend Lauren* H. 
Messersmith. Music was pro- 
vided at the organ by Mrs. 
Kenneth Young and Mr. & Mrs. 
Harold Myers, vocalists, all' of 
Lake Villa. 

Miss Truax is the daughter of 
Mr. & Mrs. Donald Truax of 
Millburn and Co tier is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger Cotter of 
Waldo, Wis. Both met while 
students at . University of . 
Wis. -Stout. Cotter graduated in 
May 1972 with a degree in 
industrial arts . education and 
the new Mrs. Cotter "was 
December graduate' with a 
degree in home economics 
education. She is affiliated with 
Gamma Sigma Sigma, national 
service sorority '. ■ 

Cousin of the , bride, Miss 



Barbara Clark of Waukegan,, 
was maid of honor, and there 
were three bri desmaids . in the 
wedomgMiss K athy Zarnstorff , 
of Genoa" City, Wis., college 
roommate of the bride, Mrs. 
Charles Flunker of. Waldo, Wis. 
sister of the g room; and Miss 
Doreen Hauser of Kenosha, 

wis. • ; » • 

College friend o f the couple, Jeff 
Reames of Menonionie, Wis, 
was chosen as best man. 
Groomsmen • were Thomas 
Prescott, Cambridge, Vfis., a 
college friend, (Charles Flunker 
of Waldo, Wis., brother-in-law 
of the groom and John DeHaan- 
of Waukegan ., the bride's 

—cousin.— — •— — ili — \^1 



49 SPORT COATS 

values to 70.00 

28.88 



■ 



187 SHIRTS 

values to 12410 



PANTS 

values to 22.50 

.;- 7.! 



- or • 
2 for $7.00 



3.88 



18 JEANS 

reg. 12.00 to 15.00 

3.88 



63 SWEATERS 6.88 

values to 20.00 



14 CAPS 1.88 

values to 11.50 " ww 



The Cotters a re now at home 
at 450 Plum St, Apt. 1, East 
Dubuque, 111. after a short 
honeymoon. Co tter is employed 
with the Mi nne sota Mining and 
Manufacturirig . Company of 
Dubuque and Mrs. Cotter will 
be teaching. 



and other 

miscellaneous 

items 



"The Friendly Ones" 

BJ'S FASHIONS 

93 f Main Street 
495-6212 . " 




-±~ + 



;asHions 
Gormen 



% 



g^TJ-. . -.. 



-- * * '•'■ ' 



...,..:. 1: 



£|g^g||^ 



1 







ANTIOCH 

. 7! 

* 

. ANT 



TOWNSHIP LIBRARY 

TN. MAIN ST. 
CH, ILL 60002 




THE ANTIOCH NEWS. WEDNESDAY MARCH .7, 1973 Page 13 



{ American Legion Auxiliary 




FRAMING PICTURES FOR 
ART SHOWS, ..^ataiijg j^ 
picture serves, several pur- 
poses. It protec ts the edge of the 
picture from damage, it holds* 
the glass in place, it gives the 
needed .support for the wires 
used in hanging , and lastly and 
yet so important, it isolates the 
picture from the surrounding 
background. Improperly, 

framed picture s are a nusiance 
for those on a hanging 
committee at a n art show. They 
should not have to take valuable 
time to redo the framing errors 
of the amateur.. So avoid these 
common errors in framing 
when you plan to exhibit. 

All watercolors, pastels, 
prints and drawings should be . 
framed under glass, as these 
need that protection from dirt 
and fingermarks in handling. In 
some^exhibits, though,_rules_ 
will state that no glass be, 
allowed because of possible 
breakage so in that case, you 
will have to protect your work 
with some type of clear plasstic, 
which : is best tightly fastened 
under the mat o pening. You will 
also have to provide hangers on 
the back if the matted pictures 
areunframed. T hese could be of 
the type with gu mmed surfaces, 
and if you use two of them with 
a picture wire between them, it 
will be easier to hang the 
picture level. 

Oil paintings , acrylics, .col- 
lage and any other" pictures 
which are protected with 
varnished, lacquered or other 
cleanable surfaces need to be 
put into, frames in a secure 
manner, for there is far more 
handling of pictures at art 
shows and exhibits than in a 
private show, so be certain your 
framing is strong and secure. 
Be sure that the fasteners or 
small nails are well tapped in 
and. not apt to come loose in 
handling. Never use any kind of 

I cord or string in place of picture 
wire, as knots. Jiaye a way .of 
becoming undone in the 
handling. Twist the picture' wire 



securely and test it to make 
sure it will not slip loose. Never, 
use nails to hold the picture wire 
to. the frame as these -wiggle 
loose easily but instead rely 
only on screw eyes. These 
should be placed one third of the 
way from the top of the frame, 
in order to tilt the picture at the 
proper angle. 

The kind of frame you select 
.becomes very important in 
* competitions, for certain fram- 
ing practices have been known 
* to 'fturn off" the judges that 
includes too glossy, too ornate, 
and too colorful frames which 
detract fom the picture. If you 
use unfinished frames, do not 
give them coats, of glossy 
varnishes, but instead paint 
them with flat paint of neutral 
colors which compliment the 
painting, and ru b into the frame 
some darker tone to give a 
^-distressed or antiqued look-In- 
important competitive shows, 
. you are safer using professional 
type frames. Take the picture 
with you, to the frame shop 
. where you can t ry out corners of 
; the mouldings. If you sell your 
work, always figure in the cost 
of the framing as . part, of the 
. price of the pic ture. 

In order to keep the cost of 
framing at a mi nimum, and still 
have your pictu res presentable, 
I recommend' using lattice 
strips obtainable at any lumber 
supply. These strips are nailed 
directly onto the strecher frame 
of the picture w ith small nails or 
brads. They are first painted or 
sprayed to suit the picture, and 
will protect and isolate the 
picture, sufficiently. When you 
sell the painting , the price does 
not include this frame as it is 
nominal and you can suggest to 
the buyer that he can choose a 
suitable frame to his own tastes. 
' These simple la ttice frames are 
acceptable in all judged shows 
and are gaining popularity as 
they fir into m oderri settings 
'better than the old ornate 
frames as were considered 
''finds 1 ' from someone's attic. 
■ •"- Happy framing. 



"Service Begins on Home 
Base" and "Operation Contact" 
j. the two most widely known 
slogans in the American Legion 
riliarys' Community Service 
Program, according to Mrs. 
Thomas Rizzo of Lake Zurich, 
district community service 
chairman- of the 10th District 
Auxiliary. At semi-annual re- 
port time, Mrs. Rizzo learned 
how much just the 22 Units in 
Lake County have been doing 
for their communities and the 
, people who need a f 'friendly, 
helping hand": Numerous hours ' 
have been devoted to church . 
work, especially with children ; 
hours .. have, been spent in 
cub-scouting, brownies,, girl 
scouting and other youth 
activities. Countless time and , 
efforts have been donated by 
members working in the March 
of Dimes, the Multiple Sen- 
lerosis Drive, the Heart Fund," 




the Red Cross and the Cancer 
Fund drives, not counting the 
money contributed. by the Units 
and members for these worth- 
while causes. - 

Many members have helped 
in the , nation's ecology's 
program in the saving and 
recycling of cans and glass 
containers. Thanksgiving and 
Christmas baskets of food went 
to many indigent families. More 
members are active workers in 
the schools and with the school 
organizations, school referen- 
dum s ( elections, etc. A number 
of the wom^n work with the 
retarded children at Klingsberg 
School. 

"Operation Contact" is a 
typically fine and • simple 
project in which an entire Unit 
participates" states Mrs.. Rizzo. 
"It's sponsors find an elderly 
person ' or couple for each 
member, to virtually adopt. 
They visit them, telephone them, 
take them Christmas gifts and 
birthday gifts. They are simply 
befriending lonely people who 
have no one to remember them. 
Larger Units with more 
members can do more along 



KATHLEEN 
MALLORY 
ENGAGED 

• Mr. and Mrs. Pat Masters, 
former residents of Antioch, 
how residing in San Diego, 
California, have announced the 
engagement of her: daughter, 
Kathleen Mallory to Mr. Don 
Jones, son of Mr. and Mrs. V. E . 
Jones of Rancho La Costa, ,' 
California. 

The bride-elect is a 1970* 
graduate of ACHS and attended 
San Diego Mesa College. The 
groom-elect- graduated from 
Highline H. S. and attended the 
University of Washington in 
Seattle. 

, A March 31st wedding is 
planned.—-- - 



* Miss Karen Schleusener,i015 
Victoria, . Antioch, * is on the 
beginning gym team for Illinois 
State University. . She is the 
daughter • of Mr. and Mrs. 
Roland Schleusener. 

Illinois t Stat<* University 
hosted the sixth annual Intercol- 
legiate, State Gymnastic Meet 
on March 2-3 in McCormick 
Gym.. 

Sixteen Illinois colleges and 
universities had teams compet- 
ing at all three levels of 
competition - beginning, inter- 
metiate and advanced. 

Qualifying teams from any of 
the three levels of competition 
in the ISU meet will enter the 
Regional . Tournament this 
weekend, March 9 & 10 at 
Southern Illinois University. 



these lines - some of them are 

. "adopting small nursing homes 
"•visiting the patients, running 
errands, shopping for them, and 
writing letters for those no 
longer able to write." t ' 

An entirely new phase of ' 
community service is now being 
put into practice, that of the 
restoration of historical land- 
marks, or the preservation of 
already existing landmarks. 
This is not a simple matter as 
■there- are selfish . business 
interests who are not interested 
in the historic past, and wish to 
tear down "old buildings, etc"' 
for monetary purposes of their 
own. Mrs. Rizzo asks that all 
American Legion Auxiliary 
members encourage public 
interest in preserving districts, 
sites, • buildings, and objects 

. important in America's history 
and culture. 

There Will be a 10th District 
American- -Legion and the ; 
Auxiliary' children and youth 
meeting on Sunday, March 18th,— 
at 1:30 pm, at the Homer 
Dahringer American Legion 
Home in Waukegan. Robert 
Maxwell, Mundelein, Chairman 
and co-chairmen, John Jones, 
North Chicago, and Mrs: Louis 
Thompson, Waukegan ; request. 

-that all post commanders, unit 
presidents and their respective 
children and youth chairmen be \ 
at this session. On the agenda 
for discussion, will be the 
annual picnic for some 150 
children from the Lake County 
Children's Homes, which will 
beheld at the Lake Regions' 
American Legion Home in Fox 
Lake in May. 1 On June 3rd, the 

'-'Trip to Normal" will take, 
place at the Illinois Sailors and 
Soldiers' Childrens' School, 
where thousands of legionnaires 
and Auxiliary members con- 
verge on the school. They bring 
a large picnic . lunch for the 
children and themselves, as 
well as gifts for the children and 
cottages they sponsor. It is a 
day that * is always eagerly 
awaited by the ISSCS children 
and all the- organization 

. members. 

Slated for discussion also will 
be decision of what large gift for 
Harbord Cottage or smaller 
gifts for the- boys will .be 
purchased. Planning to part- 
icipate in this meeting will be 
Mrs. John L. Hor an, Antioch 
Unit - President; and . Mrs. 
William Dowden, children and 
youth chairman. 



REPUBLICAN 
WOMEN TO AID 



SPECIAL 



/ 



SCHOOL 



JCw*e 



m 



At their \ February 21st 
meeting, the Women's Aux- 
iliary of the Antioch Township 
Republican Club voted to 
donate certain proceeds from 
, their annual Sp ring Luncheon to 
'the Dobe Farm Special Educ- 
. ation School, located on t Route 
45 in Gray slake. 

They also discussed running 
an Easter Party for these 
children, and this was referred 
' to a special committee headed 
by Mrs. El Roy (Thelma) 
Anderson. 

The Women's Spring Lunch- 
reo^wiU - be _ held~Wednesday-" 
April 4th at Rustic Manor in 
Gumee. Tickets may be 
obtained from club secretary 
Hilda Stern at 395-2713. 

Mrs, Stern read a letter of 
thanks, irom President Nixon 
• ; for their efforts oifbehalf of his • 



#####*** 



S&. 



B 



CAPTURE THAT ONCE IN A LIFETIME 
RADIANCE OF YOUR WEDDING DAY 

AND LET IT LIVE ON FOREVER- • IN 

■• A " 

BEAUTIFULLY SET, 
LIVING COLOR PORTRAIT 



ap 






Phone 312-395-5554 



Call Now For That Appointment. 

B— J RUSH PHOTO STUDIO 



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Page 14 THE .ANTIOCH NEWS WEDNESDAY MARCH 7, 1M3 

' r ' * it 

announce? Let's give them a 
little thanks too, for bur games 
would be chaos without them. 
The Senior -executive board 
met with Mr. Policy , Mr. Blecke 
and Mr. Kurek for a meeting, 
and cookies and milk! We 
discussed what the seniors 
woul&give as a gift upon their 
leaving. We considered the 
multiplex and curtains for the 
auditorium. A few other things . 
were mentioned but * were 
extremely . expensive.-' Mr. . 
Smouse showed up to plead his 
cause! We also discussed the 
possibility that students would? T 
give morning announcements 
through Miss Pickett's Advan- 
ced Speech Class, Mr. Kurek'. 
talked to us, or vice versa, £ 
about some present problems 
jwith. college. Some of us were 




SEQUOIT HAPPENINGS 



BITS AND PIECES 

.By: Taffy Engelhard! 

■ ■ .: t 

Friday night was the last 
game in the conference for the 
Sequoi tsr~ It - wasyan-exciting 
season and it's sad to see it 
closing. Our game^against Lake 
Zurich was' especially impor- 



probably a bit too bitter toward 
him about things he can't help 
or that we had caused 
ourselves. 
The agenda for the Student 



tant, sinceit was Parent's Nigh|_ CouncU Meeti was: Infor 
for the Varsity squad and 
cheerleaders. They were all 



.>* 



introduced and recognized 
individually. The parents were 
easy to spot since the mother's 
had corsages and the fathers 
had boutineer's.: The cheer- 
leaders were" 'surprized to 
receive flowers also from the 
varsity' team. A special thanks 
to them. Speaking of surprises - 
they too were quite shocked to 
walk into a normally bare 
'locker room to find it decorated 
with posters,, crepe paper, 
paint, etc. The cheerleaders had 
"to. work hard and fast after 
school to get it all finished but it 
served well as a morale booster 
and a special Good Luck to our 
team. Congratulations to Jody 
Patrovsky, who received the 
Miss Basketball fan award. 
Since the winner is usually a 
senior, and Jody is only a 
sophomore, she was quite 
surprised. She was chosen by 
the varsity coach, team and 
cheerleaders. This year, for the ' 
first time, another spectator 
award was given to the. Senior 
Citizen Basketball Fan of the 
Year. 81-year old, enthusiastic 
Mr. George Good received it 
and was also given credit for his 
spirit at all of the other sports 
events he* attends. .Congrat- 
ulations to Mr. Good. Oh, and by 
the way, I forgot to mention the 
important part ...we won the 
game! . Our first game at 
Regionals, here at ACHS, is on, 
Thursday, March 9, against 
Grant. We need lotsa fans! 

A reminder to all seniors who 
forgot to order their Graduation , 
announcements. They can still 
be ordered through A & B 
Printing Company on Victoria" 
Street. After Friday, March 9, 
they will pot be available. Also,' 
don't forget to order your Senior 
Memory Rook through B- J Rush 
Studio, the cost is $4.00 

Swing Choir, Girl's En- 

; semble. Boys Ensemble and 

several solo's will go to contest, 

Saturday the 10th at Round 

Lake. Good Luck to them. 

Every year credit is given to 
. outstanding spectators at sports 
events, such as those people I 
mentioned earlier. But there 
are also a few people who never 
receive any recognition for 
4heir efforts. David Young, a 
senior is one of them. He has 
done a good job all year at the 
home basketball games. 
Through the entire game, he 
keeps our courts free front 
confusion by keeping everyone 
outside the doors while the 
game is in session. I'm sure he 
doesn't gain any friends in the 
process! And, what about the 
boys who hold the ropes, and 
those who keep score and 



matio for class meetings, 
Report from Banquet, Student 
council Week, and Spring Dance 
Committees, Bill Beese, re- 
ported on Student Respon- 
sibility, popcorn for Friday, and 
popcorn and gins for the 
Regional Tournaments. 




Sophomore class members met this week with the high school administrators, Supt. Warren Policy and 
Mr. Art Blecke to air any problems and to clarify any questions they had about the workings of the 
school, (staff photo) '■'■■• 



cynthia hayden v. 
Merit scholarship finalist 



Cynthia Hay den, a senior at 
Antioch high school has been 
chosen as a. finalist in the 
National Merit Scholarship 
program. This is an honor that 
is shared by less than one-half 
of. one percent of the nation's 
.graduating secondary school 



INTERMIN REPORTS 



Wednesday, February 21, 
marked the midpoint of the 
third nine weeks. At this time 
interim reports were given to 
students who have a D in any of 
their. courses; This is < not the 
fetter grade- that they will 
receive for the nine weeks it is a 
warning to tell a student if 
he-she is in danger .' Parents are 
to sign the reports and students 
are to return them to their 
teachers. 

These reports are given out 
really to help the students. If 
theyare in danger, they have 
four weeks^to improve their 
grades. 

If a student receives an F or 
two D's He is put in a special 
supervised study until he-she 
improves his grade. - - ■ 

Diann Butterfield 



'seniors. 3,000 Merit Scholars 
will be chosen in 1973 and the 
lucky finalists will be notified 
between mid-March and mid- 
May; . '.; . * 

Cynthia has already, been 
named an Illinois State Scholar- 
ship Winner and 1 has been 
accepted-: , . to Wesleyan 
University in Middletown, 
Conn:, where she will major in 
Chemistry. 

The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
William Hayden, Cynthia is a 
graduate of Newport grade 
school, (staff . photo) 





Cynthia Hayden receives her merit scholarship certificate from 
mr. Kurek. (staff photo). 



On Friday; March 16, at 7:30, 
the Antioch Interact Club will 
hold a fund raising dance at the 
Antioch Community High 
School Cafeteria. 

Tickets will be $1.00 for 
singles, and $1,50 for couples. 

WEAR GREEN!!! 







Kentucky 

Fried 

Chicken 

IS ALWAYS 
CRISPY 

Ktnt^ky fried tfkkfcm. 

OF ANTIOCH INC. 

RfS. 59 ft 173 

Antioch. Illinois 600O2. 







*m 



GEORGIA'S BEAUTY SHOP 

fEATUIWG. 

SANDY, JUNE. AND MARY 




Tues. thru Sat. 9 a.m. 
Closed Sun. and Mon. 
For Prompt Service, Phone First 

395-1198 



[Needed One -Opera tor 
faperiented Beauty 



mm mmm 

LOTS OF BUSra 
IDEM WORKING COHDITKM 



RT 173 Vt BL WEST of RT 69 

PARKING 







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MR. VIRGIL C. BURNETTE - 
: SOyears old 6f-308-Park-A venuer 
Antioch, III passed away on 
Saturday March 3rd at the , 
Veterans Administration Hosp- 
ital in Wood, Wis., 'He was born 
August 8, 1922 in Ant loch and 
had lived here all of hfo lift, He 
holds membership in the 
Antioch Post 4551 of theV.F. W. 
and' is on .the/' inactive 
membership of /the, Antioch 
Volunteer Fire Department he 
had -served in the U.S. Army 
during W.y{2. He worked for 15 
years for /Ace Hardware in 
, Antioch and the last 5, years as. 
manager of the Burlington Ace 
Ha rdwa re jStore^ He^jmarried^ 
~ elen M. Schrbede'ronApril'IS,' 
'im atlake Villa, til. 

He is survived by his wife 
Helen - 1 sister . Mrs. Helen 
(Jake) Fish (Lake Villa) - 2 
brothers Raymond Burnette of 
Antioch & Richard O, Burnette' 
(Antioch). He was proceeded in 
death by his parents Sheridan 
and Bertha Burnette. 

Funeral services were held on 
Tuesday at the Strang Funeral 
Home In Antiochwlth Rev. L..H. 
Messersmith officiating. Inter- . 
ment was in Oakwood Rest 
Cemetery at Oak Creek, Wis. 




See YOUR PHARMACIST 




...FOR THE FINEST IN 
HEALTH PRODUCTS! 

We carry only the 
best in health needs 
.for everyone in the 
family from baby to 
Grandpa! Your well- 
being is our concern 
at alt times! 



' prompt, expert 
PRESCRIPTION 
SERVICE 

Reeves 
Drugs 

Phone 395 3606 
1901 Main Antioch 



EDWARD OTTO MASCHEK 

o£s 60 suffered a heart attack on 
a fishing trip and4ied March 5, 
1973 in Meihorlal Hospital 
Lanchester /Wisconsin. 
rMrr— Maschek— was—bornrin- 



/ 




Chicago on March II, 1912 and 
moved to Lake Villa area with 
his wife ' Eleanor -(nee 
Gorozyca). He Is also survived 
by three sons, Kenneth; Russell 
and Randall, all living in 
Highland Park and Park Ridga, 
III. Grandchildren of Mr. 
Maschek are Melissa Anne, 
Joanne Ann, and Shannor Roe. 
Two brother's Arthur of Chicago, 
Theodore of Brookft&ld, III and 
one sister Mrs. Florence Dook 
of California. 

Mr. Maschek was employed 
by Johnson Motors 0>M.C, 
JJuMityJOpntrpl^par tme nt for 
years. He was a member of 
Lawndale Masonic ihdge 995 
A.F. & A.M. of Riverside, III; 
Ancient Acceptance . Scqtlsh 
Right; Present board of 
directors member of Lake Villa 
Lions Club. — 

Visitation will be on Wednes- 
day,, March 7, 1973 from 2 to 10 
p.m. at the. Bar r Funeral Home, 
Colonial Chapel, 532 Lake Street 
Antioch, lit. The Lawndale 
Masonic Lodge' 'will have 
services on Wednesday night. 
~Internment will be Thursday 
in Bohemian-national Cemetery' 
Chicago, Illinois in a family-lot 
at the convenience of the 
Maschek family. 

the family has asked that 
friends may donate In remem- 
be ranee of Edward Maschek to 
the Lake Villa Lions Club. - 



MR. JOHN' T. HORSCH- 60' 
years old of ChannelLafee near 
Antioch, III. passed away on 
Friday March 2nd at .Victory 
Memorial Hospital. He wasvborn 
Feb. 4, 1913 in Chicago, III. and 
moved to Antioch in 1949 but 
had spent his summers here for_ 
.- years previously. He is a 
member of St. Peter's Catholic 
Church in Antioch. He and his 
wife were^the-^owners and 
operators of "Sunny Banks 
Resprt" at Channel Lake, since 
—1952. -He married Genevieye_ 
Gilboe on Oct. , 1, 1938' In 
Chicago.- 

He Is survived by his wife 
Genevieve - 1 son Philip Horsch 
(Antioch)> - 1 daughter Miss 
Patricia Horsch (Ant) - his 
father John L. Horsch (Sey- 
mour, Ind) -2 grandchildren. Ho 
was preceeded in death by his 
mother Frances Horsch on Jan., 
27, 1968, and by i brother 
Francis Horsch on August 28, 
1968. 

Funeral mass was held at. 
11:00 a.m. on Monday at St. 
Peter Church in Antioch with 
interment at Hillside Cemetery. 
Friends desiring may make 
contributions to the Antioch 
Rescue Squad. 



[MRS. VERA C. BROWN - 72 

"years aid of Wllmot, Wis. 

passed away Wed. February 28 

in Kenosha Memorial Hospital 7 

after along illness. She was 

—born~Marchr^~l Tr^l 900-^in- 
Fairchild, Wis. -the daughter of 

• the late George & Mary. 
:Llvermore.— She married. 
Harvey Brown orx~ August 13, 
1918 In Falrchitd and lived there 
until moving to a farm at East 
Troy, Wis. in 1926. They moved : 
to McHe/try III. in 1936 and 
farmed there until moving 'to 
Wilmot in 1946 where they 
farmed until retiring, in 1962 
when they moved to Silver 
Lake. . She was a member'of 
the United Methodist Church of 
Wilmot and Past officer ana\ 
member of the Women's United 

.^jChrlst ian S ervice, 'America n 
legion; Auxiliary "Post- 381 ~6f z 
Wilmot and the Kenosha Co... 
' Homemakers. She was 'prece- 
ded in death by ' 1 daughter' 
Norma asp child. - _ 
' SurvlvorsPdre her husbamT 

— Harvey; 4 sons -Stanley (Mc- 
Henty) Ralph (Bristol) Donald 
(Wilmot) and Philip (Capron, 
'ill) 2 daughters Mrs. Floyd 
(Mavis) Gyger (Trevor) and 
Mrs. Ralph (Barbara) Orr 
(West Hollywood Fla) 2 sisters 
Mrs,. Beryl Ayers and Mrs. 
—Vloldlves both of Oseo, JlVls.-l- 
brother Philip Livermore (Mer- 
jMlWis)jl_grandchildren and 3 
„ great grandchildren, also sur- 
vive. . 

Funeral services were held on 
Saturday at the United Meth- 
odist Church of Wilmot with 
Rev. Richard O'Neil officiating 
and Interment in Evergreen 
Cemetery at Troy Center, Wis. 




NEWS.WEDNESDAY MARCH 7, _1073 Page 15 




ftftf& Funeral Home 

.COLONIAL CHAPEL 

532 LAKE STREET ANTIOCH, ILL. 60002 

312-395,2303 




xsxattttc 





JOHN (JACK) STRATTON J>4, 
of Lily Pond Drive, South 
Yarmouth, Mass, a former 
-Leicester resident and U. , S. 
Marine Corps Recruiter for 

—WorcesterGounty-dled-Frlday,— 
February 16 in the . New 
England Medical, Center, 
Boston,. Ma'ss f __ - •'; '.. 

Master Gunnery Sergeant 
John Stratton wast a 30 year 
Marine Corp veteran and had 
served in World, War II and the 
Korean War, retired in 1970^ he, , 
had served in Japan, Korea and 
the Mediteranean area before 
taking the. recruiters' post in 
April of '64. 

He was born in Lake Villa, son 
of Harry and Arlyn (Herem) 

-.Stratton. .He was, a graduate of 
• Grant High School and had 
attended Wheaton College 

~befdi~e^foirilng~—the~U~Sr: 
marines. He was scoutmaster of 
Leicester Boy. Scout Troop 124 . 
and Manager of the Lelscester 

: Grange Utile League team. 
He leaves his widow, Marg- 
uerite (Georgen) Stratton, four 
daughters, Mrs. Arlyn Noonon 
of Webster, Catherine (Arthur) 
Johnson,' Patricia (Steven) 
Perry, both of Worcester *and 
Miss Carol Marie of South 
Yarmouth and a brother,' Dick 
Stratton, of Independence, 

:t Missouri and elg^';,]grand_^ 

children; also several relatives 
from this ared. He was 
preceded in death by a son, 
John Robert in Feb. 71. 
. The' funeral was held Tuesday 
'Februar'y~20~ftbm the HalXet 
Funeral Home 1 283 Station Ave, 
South YarmoutHi Mass. with a 
Mass at 10 a.m. in St. Plus X 
Church. Burial in Worcester 
County "Memorial Farfe- in 
Paxton, Mass. 




"HINDSIGHT'S 
BETTER ™" 




" ST. STEPHEN LUTHERAN 
CHURCH 

R«v. Phillip O. Laurln, Pastor 
Hillside ami Rte S? 

395-3359 

Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. 
Sunday School 10:45 a.m. 

ST, IGNATIUS EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH 

Rev. T.A. Bessette, Rector 

983 Main Street 

TO4452 • . " — . ■■ . 

Sunday a.m., 9:30 a.m. - 

' ANTIOCH EVANGELICAL 
- FREE CHURCH 

Bernard C. FosmarK, Pastor 
Tiffany Road and Highway Dr. 

395-4117 

Sunday School 9^5 a.m. 

Sunday Services 11 a.m., 7 p.m. . v 

Thurs. Eve. 7:30 p.m. , 

MILLBURN CONGREGATIONAL 
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST 

Rev. Lauren Messersmith ' 

350-5237 

Sunday Service 10 a.m. 

FAITH EVANGELICAL 

LUTHERAN CHURCH . . 
Rev. Kent Schroeder, Pastor 
1275 S. Main St. 
- 395-1840 
'Sunday Service «/ 10:30 a.m. 
Sunday School 9:15 a.m. 

. ST. PETER'S ROMAN CATH. . 
CHURCH 
Rev. Francis L. Johnson 
557 Lake St. 
395-0274 

Masses: Sat. 5:30 p.m. 
Sun. 4:30,8,9:30,10:45,12. 

ANTIOCH UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. Donald Cobb, Minister 

848 Main St. 

395-1259 

Worship Service 9:30 a.m. 

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, 

-SCIENTIST ■. ,..^r 

Rte. 173 and Harden ~ ~7 

395-1194 

Sunday 11 a.m. 

Sunday School 11 a.m. 

Wed. Eve. 8 p.m. 
. . v Reading Room Wed. 2-4 p.m. ! 

Sat. 2-4 p.m. , £'-*'•;; 

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Christian Science 
Churches 



Release Prior to March 11 

WE read in Genesis 1 that 
"God created. man in his own 
image, in the image of God 
created— he— him ;— male^and- 
female created he them". 
* In the lesson-sermon "Man" 
this Sunday at the First Church 
of Christ, Scientist, this com- 
mentary from Science and 
Health with Key to the 
Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy 
will be read:; "Man, made in 
God's likeness, possesses and 
reflects God's dominion over all 
the earth. Man and woman as 
coexistent and eternal with God 
forever reflect, in glorified 
quality, the infinite Father- 
Mother God." 

Services begin at 11 a.m. at 
First Church of Christ, Scien- 
tist, Rte 173 and Harden, 
Antioch, Illinois and the public 
is always welcome. 



FORESIGHT" 

by 
Rev. Eugene Keusaf 

In a world of scientific facts 
the certainty of God should not 
weaken but intensify. The 
Einsteinian Revolution of Re- 
lativity demands an absolute, 
one absolute and that absolute 
is God, otherwise any relative is 
relative to nothing. 

But being human and being 
able to share ourselves through - 

' our senses, hearing, seeing • 
feeling, tasting and smelling,; 

This is the only wa y that God can 
share Himself with us. So the 
meeting point of the human and 
the devine must be a "sign" 
that can effect the senses— 
- This is why God took on a 

, human nature, this is why Jesus 
came to be. God wanted us to 
have more than an. abstract 
idea of who and what 1 He. is. 
Jesus was the sign that could be 
perceived by the senses. The 
people who lived at the same 
time as Jesus could experience, 
if they believed, our . invisible 
God through a visible person. 

• ' Jesus went back to our Father 
but He left the "sign" of 
Himself, in this world so that we 
and those who do not yet believe 
could also experience the 
invisible God in a visible 
person. Where is that sign? 

-What is that sign?- u Peoplewiih 
know you are my disciples by 
the love you, have, for one 
another." * . .. -. / 

You who believe and ,are 
baptized are. that sign. You are 
that sign to each other and to 
those who do not yet believe. 
God must think an awful lot of 
us and have a great deal of faith 
in us to put such great 
responsibility on our shoulders. . 



• "PUT DOWN CRITICISM/* 

Listen this Sunday to the 
Christian Science Radio 
Series for some interesting 
insights on this question. 

5:00a.m.-WLS 

6:45a.m..WEMP-Wis. 

7:00 a.m. -WJJD- AM 

<Feb. thru Nov.)f 

9:30 a.m. -WAIT 

-7:00'a.m. - WJJD-FM _ 

THE ™ : 




THAT HEALS 



DAY OF RENEWAL 



A Day of Renewal for the 
prayer groups of' Northern 
Illinois and Southern Wisconsin 
is planned for the First Sunday 
of Lent, March 11th, at St. 
Benedict's Abbey north of 
Antioch. Schedule for the day: 

10:30 am Mass - Monastery 
Church. 

• 11 : 30-1 : 00 Registration 
) 12 noon Pot Luck Dinner 

1 p.m.' Singing and sharing 

l p.m. Instruction period for 
newcomers 

, 1:45 p.m. Speaker: Father 
Van Biga.-O.F.M* 
* -2:45 p.m. Break . ■* coffee, 
fellowship and visit the Book- 
store 

. 3 p.m. Vespers 
. 3:30 p.m. Prayer meeting. 
— All Christians are welcome 
and are free to come and go at 
their convenience. 







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Page 16 THE ANTIOCHt NEWS WEDNESDAY MARCH 7, 1973 



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HOMETOWN NEWS 

BARBARA AMD JANET POLSGROVI 
I ILLINOIS WESLEYAN DEAN'S LIST 



■■■ ■ ■: * : 



The Dean's List for the first 
semester of the 1972-73 school 
year at Illinois Wesleyan 
University* includes 708 stu- 
dents, DrrJohn L. Oark, dean- 
of the university, announced 
today. 

Students on the Dean's List . 



earned a grade-point average of 
at least 3.250, based on 4.0 for all 
A's during the first semester. 
Barbara is a freshman this 
year and Janet is a Junior. They^- 
are the daughters of Mr. and 
Mrs Wayne Polsgrove of Lake ' 
Villa (formerly Antioch). 




ANTIOCH ADVENTURES 
4-H ACTIVITIE! 



...■■• ■ r- -- 

by Laura Dubek 
-The Antioch Adventures met 
at 6:00 at the Methodist Church 
Sunday, February 25 after 
bowling at the Antioch JBowl. All 
members were present (13). 

The 4-Her's have been giving 
talks and demonstrations. This 
week, Laura Dube'k gave a talk 
on how to make fruit salad.Karen 
Kirsche gave a talk en how to . 
identify rocks, Silvia Mueter ' 
also gave a talk on how to give a 
correct cooking demonstration. 
They were all very good. 

Shirty. Wertke showed the 
4-Hers some slides from a tour 



Shirly and lier band went on. 
They went to Europe and 
Russia. 

The 'Antioch Adventures have . 
decided to compete in Share- 
The-Fun. 

In June or August the 4-Hers 

are going camping to Kettle 

-Moraine. _ _■ _ 

Since the 4-Hers are going 
bowling every month, to end the 
meeting we had a bowling quiz. 

In the King & Queen contest 

Linda Lagers trdm won the 

Queen. Linda is a member of 

__the_ Antioch Adventures_ 4-H 

Club. 



cV 



JAMES KNIRSCH RECEIVES 



Mr. James Knirsch, son of 
Mr. and Mrs Mel Knirsch, 
Route 1, Antioch received his 
Masters of Business Administ- 
ration with a major in 
management from Wayne State 
University on December 19, 
1972. 

James was a 1965 graduate of 
Antioch High School, and 

. — ^—:- / 



received a B. S. degree in 
engineering and a second 
bachelor's degree in psychology 
from the University of Illinois in 
1970. 

He and his wife, Susan, live in 
Warren, Michigan where he is 
employed , by Chrysler Corp- 
oration. 



HOME EXTENSION SERVICE 
OFFERS ADULT EDUCATION 



Lake County Homemakers 

-Extension Service offers an 
Adult Educational Program to 
all people. It makes new 

.knowledge based on research 
available through its educ- 
ational programs to help solve 
Home and Family and Com- 
munity problems. 

How can the public avail 
themselves of this service? One 
way. is through Extension 
ftomemaker Units, . organized 
by interested homemakers that 

"^ like to keep up. A lesson 

(demonstration or talk) is given 

at each monthly meeting by 

-Extension Advisers or Vol- 

'" unteer leaders. These leaders 
are unit members trained by 
specialist from the University 
of Illinois. 

i. Lessons for 'the coming year 
will include: Consumer In- 
formation, Professional Sewing 
Tips, Metric System, Recipes 
for Elegant Entertaining, Low 
Cost Decorating, The Correct 
Fit in. Patterns and Ready To 
Wear, New Ways With Less 
Tender Cuts of Meat,' Auto- 



motive Care, How To Grow and 
Use Spices and Herbs, Interior 
Decorating Classes and Land- 
scaping Classes, Needlepoint, 
Quilting and Crocheting, House- 
plants and Terrariums. 
' Communities or neighbor-, 
hoods interested in starting a 
Homemaker Unit should call 
the Extension Office - 223-4844. 
In Lake County, the Extension 
program is directed by Irene M. 
Green, Extension Adviser and 
Sharon R. Coffman, Assistant, 
working with specialists from 
the University of Illinois. A 
. Council of members selected 
fromtheNinits help with admin- 
istration ) and committee 
planning/ . ■ '', 

Open "meetings and classes 
are available to . the general 
public at various times during 
the year.. Such programs at 
Table Settings . for Home, and 
Show, Sewing With Knits, 
Safety Driving, and Refinishing 
Furniture. The Extension 
Service also has a pamphlet 
service available on request. 







Even .faster than Mark Spitz, the otter ia the champ 
swimmer and diver among land mammals. 



RECEIVES LETTER 
IH VOLLEYBALL 



Wendy P. Jen sen, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Jensen, 
477 First Street, Antioch, 
received her second letter for 
participation in women's inter- 
collegiate Volleyball at North 
Central College in Naperville 
during fall .term. Miss Jensen 
-was also selected by the team as- 
"Most Valuable Player," 

A 1970 graduate of Antioch 
Community high school, Miss 
Jensen is a junior majoring in 
physical educa t ion. 

North Central is a private, 
coeducational, liberal arts 
college. 



LAKE COUNTY 
SALON 191 

ILLINOIS EIGHT 
AND FORTY 

° The Lake County Salon 191 of 
the Illinois Eight and Forty, 
honor subsidiary of the Amer- 
ican Legion Auxiliary, will have 

"their meeting on Wednesday,' 
March 7th, at 8:00 p.m. at the 
Zion-Benton American Legion 
Home, on Lewis Avenue' near 
Wadsworth Road. Mrs. Ray 
Suzzi, Highwood, Le Chapeau, 
will be the presiding officer. 

A silent auction will be held, 
so members are reminded to 
bring items with them. 

The state spring pouvior will 
be held IVLarch 31st and April* 
1st, at the Sheraton Inn at 
Spingfield. ; There J will be^ 

1 election of delegates and 
alternates for the pouvior. 

Hostesses will be Mrs. Robert 
Broege, Deerfield; Mrs. Elbert 
Wayne, Winthrop Harbor; Mrs. 
William Solberg, Mrs. James 

' Burgess and Mrs. Gilbert 
Ri enter, all of Zion-Benton. 



TELL OUR PROSPECT ABOUT 
ODD-FELLOWSHIP 



LARRY F.HOWEN 

Airman Larry F. Howeh, son 
of Mr. & Mrs. Edwin F. Howeri 
Jr. of Trevor, Wis.,, has been 
assigned to Sheppard AFB, 
Tex., after completing Air 
Force basic training. 

During his six weeks at the 
Air Training Command's Lack- 
land AFB, Texas, he studied the 
Air Force mission, organization 
and I customs and received 
special instruction in human 
relations. 

The airman has been as- 
signed to the Technical Train- . 
ing Center at' Sheppard, for 
specialized training as ,a 
medical services specialist. 

Airman Howen is a 1970 
graduate of Salem Central High 
School, Paddock Lake, Wis. 



The Odd-Fellows were among 
the first organizations to reunite 
the North and South after the 
Civil War. In Sept 1805 an 
invitation was extended to the 
Southern Representatives to 
attend the annual session of the; 
Grand Lodge ot the United , 
States,, (now the Soveriegn 
Grand Lodge) and the ded- 
ications of ' the monument 
erected to the memory of 
Thomas Wildey, Founder of the 
Order on the North American 
continent in the city of 
Baltimore, Maryland: Pres- 
ident Andrew Jackson compli- 
mented the Odd-Fellows in their 
effort to reunite the north and 
the south on this eventful 
occasion. ' 

This Order has been pri- 
vileged to partifipate in 
functions of national and 
international interest, a few of 
which are listed: Our Sovereign 
Grand Master, the international 
head upon invitation, attended 
the Coronation of Her Majesty 
the Queen Elizabeth. 

It was the f irs* Fraternal 
Organization to recognize aux- 
iliaries permitting ladies to 
participate in Xhe affairs of the 
Order. 

The Order is privileged to 
conduct a Pilgrimage each year ■ 
to the Tombs of the Unknown 
Soldier. Also permission was 
granted by the Department of 
the Army for conferral of the 
Grand Decoration of Chivalry a 
Military honor upon the. 
Unknown of World War I & II 
and the Korean War. 

The Patriarchs Militant 
branch of our Order has been 
granted the privilege of having 
a reserve, or regular officer of 
the Armed Forces of the United 
States as military advisor on 



the General Commanding arid 
Department staffs. 

The Order is also privileged to 
have a float each year in the 
Rose parade on New' Year's 
Day in Pasedena, Calif. 

Every year over 700 boys and 
girls from our High Schools all 
over the United States 'and 
Canada are sent to the United 
Nations on an educational tour, 
one full week of which is spent 
at the United Nations Head- 
quarters in New York. They sit 
in meetings, have conferences 
with representatives of foreign 
countries ask questions 7 and 
learn what the United Nations is 
and what it is doing, and its 
objectives. Odd Fellows and 
Rebekahs pay the expenses of 
these tours. 

Our Order has an Educational 
Foundation Fund. from which 
we loan money to students to go 
to college. This is not confined 
to sons and daughters, of 
Odd-Fellows or -Rebekahs, but 
open to anyone who can qualify. . 
We have two homes that our 
Order provides for the Old 
Folks Hojme at Mat toon and the 
Childrens Home at Lincoln, 111. 

Our Fraternity has con- 
tributed large sums of money 
after various disasters, such as 
hurricanes, floods, fires, wars, 
etc. on the North American 
continent and throughout 'the 
world. 

Also our Order has an Eye 
Bank interest. . 
* In becoming a member our 
our Order we guarantee, that 
there- is nothing that will 
conflict with the individual's 
duty to his God, his Country, his 
family, or himself. The Noble 
Grand of Lakeside Rebekah 
Lodge 82. ';'. r 



ORGAN RECITAL 



An organ recital entitled 
"Four Pro^an^^pjs^jwULbe^ 
presented on Sunday, March 25, 
1973, 4:00 p.m. at Grace 
Episcopal Church, 924 Lake. 
Street, Oak Park. The perform- 
ing artists are' Judith Truitt, 
Organist of Church of the 
Transfiguration, Palos Park; 
William Murray, Church of the' 
Mediator, Chicago; Dr. Robert 
Lodine, St. Chrysostom's, Chi- 
cago; B. Lynn Hebert, Cath- 
edral Church of St. James. 

The recital, sponsored by the 
Bishop's Advisory Commission 
on Church Music,. Episcopal 
Diocese of Chicago, will. feature 
works of Bach, Langlais, 



Vierne, Franck, Litaize, 'and 

Messiaen. Tickets may___bje_ 

obtained at the door or at any 
Episcopal Church. Donation 
$2.00 



RAINBOW NEWS 

The Rainbow girls of Antioch 
Assembly 23 held their meeting 
on Monday, February 26. We 
initiated'Cindy Bowling into our 
assembly. After the meeting we 
had refreshments. 

The Rainbow girls are selling 
candy. Have you. bought your 
box of candy yet? 



I ANTIOCH 1 HR. DRY CLEANERS f 
1 LAUNDEREnE OFFERS CONVENIENCE t 



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THE BEnER YOU LOOK- 
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38 WASHERS and 21 DRYERS 
ANTIOCH 1 HR. DRY CLEANERS 

IU* 173 183 

395-0891 






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THE ANTOCHi^NEiWS /WEDNESDAY^ MARCH 7. 1973 Page «.. 





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24 hour 
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Y 395-0102 

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Service & 
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PHONE 012) 3954445 




Free Estimates 







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NELSON'S 

REAL ESTATE 

INSURANCE 

Homeowners & Auto 
881 Main Street, Antioch 



395-4420 



HOWARD 
GASTON 

481 Orchard St 
39 6-1203 

Quality 
fo Printing £» 




SEOSSS3D 



\NTJ0UI\SIIKKT 
MO AIa INC. 

HEATING & 
AIR CONDITIONING 

SALES & SERVICE 









SHAKER 
DECORATING 

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR 

OF ALL KINDS 

FREE ESTIMATES - INSURED 

QUALITY WORKMANSHIP 
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL 
£4 CALL 

M312) 395-0606 
or call 395-3356 



i 



HERB'S USED AUTO PARTS 

Rte 83 -Lake Villa, III. 60046 
-i— -• 395:5300 



We Buy Junk Cars 








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Complete Menu * 

Phis Great 
PIZZA AND MUN DISHES 

Weasel's 

■ . V 

Tues-Sat-5-12 

Sandav-5-t t 
dosed Hoodar 

395-6466 

Vk Miles West of Antioch 
»L, (h ft IB * 

THANK-Y0U 

Our grateful tnanfcs to the 
many thoughtful friends and 
neighbors for the kindness 
shown us Curing our recent 
bereavement. A special thanks 
to Father Johnson, Father 
Keusal, Lillian Olson, Thelma 
Anderson, Gloria Carrick, The 
Altar & Rosary Society, The 
Antioch Women's Republican 
Club, The Antioch Police 
Department and Dan Dugenski 
and Ed Strang. 

Vincent Hawks, 
pennis Hawks and family 
4 ' 36-c 

THANK YOU \ 

I would like to thank ail the 
friends and neighbors who were 
so thoughtful with cards. • and 
calls of concern for my wife; 
Edith,' and for their support 
following her death. 

Sincerely 

George Good and'family 

>-:" . '.::■■ : : .--, : : - ,.,. ' l„ ' . 36-c 



Classifieds 



RATLS: First 15 words $1.60 - Additional words $.08 each. Ad 
deadline: Monday afternoon. 141 Cheri Lane, Antioch, 
Illinois 60002. 395-5554. 



HELP WANTED 



\ 



Tool & Die makers,, exper- 
ience preferred but not neces- 
sary. Top wages, overtime, paid 
insurance - Call collect 
414-694-0778 and ask for Ron. • 
l . 36-c 



For Sale 



MUSICAL 
Tenor Sax for sale - $250.00. 

Phone 356-2282 or KI6-9393. 

' - 36,37-c 



SERVICES 



-SEMI DRIVERS 
, NEEDED 

Common carriers now offering 
training thru their facilities. 
Local and over-the-Road. Aver- 
age industry paychecks ■ are 
exceedingly high. For immedi- 
ate application and further, info 
call Area Code 319-326-0202 or 
write to Semi Division; 612 Kail 
Bidg.; Davenport, Iowa 52801 . 

35-36-C 



WANTED 

REAL ESTATE 

REAL ESTATE WANTED 
Private party wants to buy lake 
cottage. Write P.O. Box 22, 
•Westchester Illinois 60153. 

Ud,«S't,Ot),tSv*C ' 



BABYSITTING 

* 
WilT do babysitting in my 
home part or^full time. No age 
limit. Phone 395-3933. 

36,37,38-c 

"NEVER used anything tike ft/' say ' 
users of Blue Lustre carpet cleaner. 
Rent electric shampooer. SI. 
Antioch .V. 8. S Hardware, 910 Main 
Street, ; Antloch, III. ■ 
, ' "• 36-C 




m 



rhmt ^^ 

ATM 312 -~» 

0509 



£. 




The CmpleJi Service for your time. 
Tor Business and Industry. 



-f«iu foutvrip- 



Mtollfor: . 24httmrq€nat Repair 
Mot mfing 
Shingles- sail type 
RollRoofirig 

Glazing, Siding, flutters 
Wind Damage Kepair 

fK0f / INSPECTION ^ ESTIMATES 

rm ( # frank Skrzgnecb' 

Bok 144 F „ ROOFER 

Awttoch, m 40002 312/39 S-OSQ9 




-turn r» «mx 



MICHAEL WARREN && 

Real Estate Sales and Investments 



3fr A spacious three bedroom, IVt bath, home on 
lovely corner lot. -Magnificent living room 
(17x17) overlooking Chain of Lakes Channel. 
New carpet in living room and den. Refrigerator 
find stove stay in this , bargain priced home. 
$21,500 



£ An executive special in one of Antioch's very 
nicest subdivisions. This tri-Ievel home has lots 
of deluxe features including rich carpeting, 
ceramic tile wainscot in kitchen, automatic 
humidifier, patio and swimming pooh 3 
. bedrooms with 1%' baths accompany all of these 
. fine features. .$45,000 

« 
jKf Lakeside Chalet! 3 beautiful bedrooms with the 
master bedroom overlooking Channel Lake in 
Antioch. This lovely home features den with 
brick fireplace, living room overlooking lake 
with sliding glass door to patio. Two car heated 
' garage.. $46,800 

Monday thru Friday ;l:wi to fi:0ii S 
Saturday 9:00 to 5:00 r- Sunday 1:00 toi 5:00. 



Member M. L. S. 
392 Lake Street, Antioch, 

Phone 312-395-5900 



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Page 18. THE ANTIOCH NEWSiWEDNESDAY MARCH 7, 1973 

" ■ < .. .'■.•''"' * .',."'.' '.,''..''. . .' ' . . « 

park - six feet of scruffy grass, 
a mesh fence and a sidewalk - 
running a couple of miles up 
Sheridan Road across from the * 
Railroad tracks.'* 
~"Don*t~forget the sign.. It- 
probably "says something like 
FORT SHERIDAN, Property of 
the -JJ.S. Government, NO 
TRESPASSING." 

"There might be enough room '...'. 
for a couple of benches and a 
trash can." , 

We -never, were able to 
I conclude just what the govern- . 
ment had m mind by offering to 
dispose of the rind of -Fori -~ 
Sheridan. Particularly that part 
which • 'underlies' • Sheridan 
Road. Of what possible use, 
-pray? — - 

It almost sounds like the 
subject of a nationwide contest . 
"Find a use for the High wood 
_ Husk! -Put-this prime- location -_-—■- 
land to work and win $500,000 or v 
a week in the Caribbean!" 

Mad Magazine, please copy... 





SCOTCH LADS OPEN AT THE ABBE 



rvini a 

Stern Eye 



"I'm not sure I understand 
what this is about," Fred said 
the other morning, laying a set. 
of papers before me. "It came 
in this morning's mail, from the 
General Services . Administ- 
ration, U. S. Government." ) 

I read quickly through the 
cover letter. "It seems to 
indicate that they are trying to 
dispose of Fort Sheridan. Can 
that be right?" 

. ]< i haven't read anything 
about it in the paper," said Fred 
dubiously. 

"He re, wait a mi nute." - that 
the above" property has.. been~ 
determined to be* surplus 
Government property - mumble 
-consists of concrete sidewalks, 
caution traffic signal, instal- 
latin identification entrance 
sign, shrubbery and grass along 
fence line, wire mesh fence and 
asphalt roaciways, It is located 
just outside reservation fence 
and underlies Sheridan Road, 
Route 42 - "" 

"That can't be right. Read 
that again." i- . 

"It \s located -- Yes, that's 
what it says. Wait here's a 
drawing on the last page. Look 
at that!" 

-There-was a long silence as 
We studied the plan. "Drawing 
Not to Scale" it said under- 
neath. "What do you suppose ~" 
1 began. 

"Might be a good place for 
building a condominium - close 



to the Fort there." A suggestion 
from Joan who was not looking 
at the drawing. 

"It would have to be about 
three feet wide" said Fred, 
running his finger around the 
red penciled peripheri of Fort- 
Sheridan as illustrated on the 
mimeographed sheet before 
him. "The government seems-to 
be disposing of a rim of land 
around the edge of the Fort 
property - the part outside the 
mesh fence -" ." 

"--but including the fence," I 
said, pointing out the list of that 
which was included. "If ^ we 
could persuade them that we 
were suitable owners - it would 
have to be a private enterprise 
of course- we could own a three 
foot lip all the way around the 
installation. And our very own 
traffic light. Wonderful!" 

"We'd own the gates too 
apparently," said Fred. * 

:• "If the Indians hear about this 
they may want to apply. They 
could effectively seal, off the 
Fort from, all aid. Food/ or 
cavalry." >■ _ 

"Could one erect a tool gate 
perhaps, at each of the 
entrances?" 

"It says something about 
easements, but I don't see any 
of them noted on the drawing." 
, .We paused again. Looked at 
the drawing.' Studied the 
description. Noted the terms of 
application. "We would have to 
disclose the contemplated use of 
the property, it says here. I 
don't think they'd let us use it to 
erect toll gates." 

"It wouldn't make much of a 



In loving memory of our 
dear son and brother, Ted 
DeBoer, who passed away' 
March 5, 1971: 

In pur thoughts we like to 
stray, 

~Along "the - 'road to 
yesterday. 

' To live again in memory, 
' The happy days that used 
to be. >-.'<";;-■ 

To hear you laugh, and see 
you smile, 

To talk to you a little 
while. 

We long to linger on the 
way, 

That leads us back* to 
yesterday. ' ; 

Sadly missed by: 
Mom, Dad, 
Dennis and David 



y 




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•AVON REPUBLICAN CLUB 
INSTALLATION DINNER DANCE 



The Avon Township Rep- 
ublican, Club is having an 
Installation ..Dinner Dance on 
Inarch .10, 1973 at the Renwood 
Country Club," Hainesville 
Road, Round Lake Beach, 111. A 
Prime Rib Dinner will be served 
at ^:30p.m/ Hors-d'oeuvre's 



and social hour at 6:30 p.m. The 
price for tickets is $12.50 each. 
This price includes opeh bar 
until 1 :00-a^m— Sheriff ^Clayey 
will be the speaker. Ed Roberts, 
T.V. personality will M.C. the 
/program. Please- contact 
546-1602 or 223-5455 for tickets. 








There's a better way out. 

The troublesome, costly-to-maintain wooden, door to your 
basement may leave something to be desired. It's probably 
a little awkward to operate, leaky, dangerous for the children 
to play on, and not much to look at.. 

Replacing it with a modern, all-steel Bilco Door gives you ' 
a better Way out. You'll like the Bilco Door's neat trim appear- 
ance, easy operation and weathertightness. And while you 
are enjoying its benefits, it is paying for itself by saving you 
repair and replacement costs. . ~ ., 



AMERICA'S FINEST 
BASEMENT DOOR 



Stop in and see our display. We'll give you free literature 
on how to do it On suggest a man to Install it for you. 





hen it comes to boat* 
inder 35 feet, we covei 
the waterfront. A low- 
cost STATE FARM 

B0AT0WNERS POLICY 
protects boat, motor 

and 

frailer on the water or 

on the road. Call me. 



i 




Antioch Lumber & Goal Co. 

EVERYTHINOTO BUILD ANYTHING 
Op«*«rT:IOtmto5:00|La. Ckm* W«L a W mo m * 8m. 



GE3> 



315 Mpot • Antioch # 3990015 




DICK WITT 

408 Lake Antioch 



STATE FARM 



mil r*iM 

INIU*AH|C^ 



STATE FARM 
MUTUAL AUTOMOBILE 
INSURANCE COMPANY 
Horn. Officer 
Bloomlngton. Illinois 




Sorixebdcly called it . the 
perfect marriage of the decade - 
our, area's Scotch Lads. Orch- 
estra and The Abbey 

Geneva-inJFQntana, Wisconsin, _j '_ 

and most seem to agree. 
■ The Abbey, .with its 92-acre 
resort complete with nearly 300. 
rooms, indoor pools and saunas, 
and triple-decker dining room is 
the perfect showcase for the 
talents of The Scotch Lads. 
Larry Leafblad, of Grayslake, 
leader of the band said, "It's 
perfect for lis, because we'll be . 
playing weekends thru May, 
then full-time the first* two. ..." 
weeks in June -and it's as close 
as we'll ever Want to get to • 
becoming full time enter- 
tainers." 

/There are only two dates this 
spring the band will hot be in the 
A toy^sj^wer Deck: Saturday, ' 
March 17 (at Lindenhurst' Civic 
Center) and Saturday; May 12 
(Antioch Mental Health Cotil- 
lion). 

The roots of the Scotch LadV • 
are deep in take County. They 
were born at Renwood Country 
Club in 1963 at a Christmas 
Party jam-session for Farkwaj* 
Foods of Grayslake. The^-_ 
original members were Dr. 
Gordon Falknor, Warrea , 
Brown, William Hall, _ and ; 
Leafblad - all of Grayslake. 
Falknor, Brown, and Hall are 
now 3 of the" four-man 
SCOTSMEN \Orchestra. The 
original : Scotch Lads began 
their professional career to- 
gether entertaining; at parties 
dances, and functions primarily 
in the Northwest Lake County 
Area. The blend of different 
ages and styles of music have 
molded the present Scotch Lads 
Orchestra into a unit with a 
blend of the past and today's 
contemporary music * in a 
delightful ^show-style?' Viloor 
show. .."■ '*)'■ 

Organist Barry. Schaefeir 
-from -Round Lake joined -the 
band when foot, doctoring got 
extra busy for Dr. Falknor. Ray 
Trusky of Waukegan is the 
drummer; Herb Eimerman of 
Waukegan is the bassman and 

Jmultynstrument_composerlof_ ,_ 

the group and Guitarist James 
Christmah of Zion filled the 
newly-created fifty man guitar 
position in January 1972. 

The popularity of The Scotch ' 
Lads is proven in the size of 
their active '^mailing list" with 
names in excess of 300 who 
attend their functions and 
appearances. 

"We love every bit of it," ., 
Leafblad said. "And that's our 
secret. Simple as that. We're a 
'people-band.' We carry on a 
love-affair with our audience. 
When they're in the mood; we're 
in the mood. When the audience 
is sad and moody, we're the 
same. We like to think of 
ourselves as crowd-engineers: 
one of the audience. Together - 
and, it works unbelievably well - 
most of the time." v 

Starting March 2nd, and 
running thru the middle of June. 
Then, back again in September, 
running right thru New Years 
Eve. The Scotch Lads are at the 
Abbey, and everyone is invited 

to spend a nite, a weekeridr-a— 

vacation sampling the love of 
music with, the five from bur 
area. It's gonna get you. ..-• ■ 







DEADLINE 

Monday 
Afternoon 



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WHtt 



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THE ANTIOCH NEWS WEDNESDAY MARCH 



CUB SCOUT PACK 80 HOLDS BLUE AND GOLD DINNER 



Cup Scout Pack 80 celebrated Mother from 

lattq^nnrilvaranrVAf fuviiitliif} rec_«ltlvu/AQ \\ 



Pack 99, who . Webelos. Bear badges plus one 
the 63r\jl anniversary of scouting recently was the recipient of the : gold and two silver arrows were 

SilveT^FawirAw^^uteWglTest-^ 



at^ejjMEiMuaTiBlu^ 
Dinner iTebrua ry 25th at Grass 
Lake School^. T wenty-eight Cub 
Scouts, - their families - and 
guests enjoyed ' a delicious pot 
luck dinner. . — 

Mr. Gary Vau ghn, Committee 
Chairman, served as master of 
ceremonies introducing Mr. and 
/Mrs. John Steitz, Jr., President 
of. Grass Lake School PTO; Mr. 
and Mrs. Bill Hart, Super: 
intendent of Gr ass Lake School ; 
and Mrs, La Ve me Martin, Den 



award given to women in 
scouting 7 . Mrs. Martin shared a 
few of her scoii ting experiences 
with the group 

The- Webelos opened the 
meeting .with the presentation 
of the colors. D en 3 presented a 
puppet show with puppets the 
boys had made. Frank Walsh, 
Jr., Cubmaster, welcomed 
Louis Tomasallo and Matthew 
Boarini into .the Pack as 
Bobcats. Daniel Boarini was 
advanced to the rank of 



'CHICAGO JUNIOR SCHOOL 
SEARCH FOR ALUMNI 



' . The Chicago Junior School, a 
sixty year old boarding school, , 
is building an effective* alumni 
. organization, that will be in the 
interests of both the school and 
its former students. As a non 

-profit elementary school, CJS 
provides a' warm, 



CLCTHEATRE 
WORKSHOP 



atmosphere for Children, 'ages - 
five to- fifteen. Records show 
that the following alumni, John 
M. Fleider, once lived in our 
community/Information on Mr. 
Fleider or other CJS alumni is. 
welcome .- addresses would be 
homelike . especially helpful. Write : Alum- 
ni Affairs, ■ Chicago -Junior 
School, 1600 Dundee Avenue, 
Elgin Illinois 60120. 



Kevin Hassett, Jim Domkovfcki 

and John Domkowski. Wolf 

badges plus one gold and one 

silver arrow were awarded to 

David Walsh and Robbie 

Mullens. Gold and silver arrows 

were awarded to Mike Gardino;. 

Steve Vaughn and John Lloyd. 

Tony Warneke received a 

denher award and a l year pin 

and the assista nt denner award 

was given to R icky Samson. 

jta the Webelos den Mike 

Mattson receiv ed outdoorsman t 

"craftsman;"'' 'scientiest and 

citizen , Scott E ichler was given 

scientist,' Scott Goari received 

. engineer and Glenn Samson 

earned showman. Den 1 closed 

the meeting with a cheer for the 

Pack. 

- The PiheWood- Derby race 
was held follow ing the meeting. 
Jason Whyte.w on the first place 
trophey , Steve Vaughn earned 
the second place trophey and 
third and fourth place plaques 
' went to Mike M attson and Mike 
Whitehead. V 

The March 20 th Pack meeting 
will feature an iceless hockey 
game for the boys of PackflOr 




ANOTHER TROUBLED SPOT regularly plagued by 'Spring, 
flooding is being studied by CITIZENS* ACTION PARTY. Michael 
J. Haley (left), Ronald J. .Cunningham, candidates for village 
trustees and Robert C. Wilton, village trustee and candidate for 
mayor, are shown studying area of North Ave. and. Oak wood Drive, 
which is of major concern to ca.p. The Citizens' Action Party, as 
part of their platform, will develop and implement ah overall storm 
..water plan that will elimin ate excessive floodin g in. many areas of 
the village' •' r '. 



■ Every Tuesday evening 
twenty-five thespiaris meet - at 
Antioch High School for- a 
theatre workshop offered as a 
continuing education sourse by , 
the College of lake County. 
According '■'■ to CLC drama 
instructor, Frank, Haroish, the 
workshop was developed- as the 
College's response to the 
request of local theatre groups. 
"Most of the people enrolled are 
also members of the theatre 
group! "Palatte, . Mask, and 
Lyre," he said. 

The course is designed to 
serve the interests of the 
participants. It is concentrated 
on such conventional areas of 
theatre production, as script 
analysis, characterization, 
blocking, and rnovenierit. • - ; 

Harold Morris, also a CLC 
theatre instructor, will attend 
one workshop session to answer 
questions related to technical 
theatre problems. In addition, 
Dr. Patricia Domingues, psy- 
chology instructor at the 
College, will devote one session 
to a discussion of interpersonal 
relations as an aspect of theatre 
management, group processes, 
and group problem solving. 

Workshop participants will 
visit CLC's main campus later 
this month (March) to use the 
closed circuit TV system. 



YOUR DOOR TO 
QUALITY 



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mUM YOU-MAY N©T KNOW ABOUT CONSERVING ELECTRICITY 



» 



Forgotten filters can cost you money. 



«-,.- 



. . KxtwirirR . 

OPEN DAILY 9-6 

CLOSED 

SUNDAYS & 

HOLIDAYS 

Heat Specialists 

For Over 48 yrs. 

Phone 395-3951 



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Since filters are usually out of 
sight, they're usually out of 
mind. That is, until you notice 
something wrong with your 
heating or air conditioning. - 
Then you may find a dirty filter 
behind it. 

Dust or lint on filters reduces 
your system's ability to move 
heated or cooled air. 

It's a good idea to check your 

filters every 30-60 days. To 



remind yourself, you may want 
to do it the same day you pay 
your fuel bill. If the filter is dirty, 
clean or replace it. Clean filters ' 
also help keep your home cleaner. 

This principle applies essentially 
to all heating fuels— electricity, 
gas or oil. 

Don't forget the filter on your - 
clothes dryer either. Clean it 
after every load to keep your 
dryer in top operating condition. 

Maintaining clean filters is only 
one area where we have . 



information that can help you 
conserve energy. If you would 
like our booklet "101 Ways to 
Conserve Electricity at Home," 
write Commonwealth Edison, 
Department AV, P.O. Box 767, 
Chicago, Illinois 60690. 
We'll send it to you free. 

Commonwealth Edison 

concern tor your total environment 




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Page 20. THE ATMTIOCH MEWS WEDNESDAY MARCH 7, 1973 



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TEN PIN TOP PLERS 

FEB.Z7, im 
High Team. Series; Anderson' 

Heating 841-787 -787-2415 
; -HIgh-Individu al Series ;-Barb_ 

Oilschlager 139 -165-222-526. 

Shure-Fire He atirig 2, Tarfu 

Club I ; Retail Clerks Union 2, 

Anderson Heating 1). Gibbs & 
- Jenssen Carousel 2, H. Gaston 

Printers 1»; A & B. Printing '2. 

Hartnell Chevy I; Young Image 

2, Quaker 1 ; Du gout Inn 3, Lake 

Villa Bank 0. 



PINSFOTTEKS 
FEB. 16, 1973 

High— Team—Series Wilton 
Electric 888;774*822-2484. 

Higji Individual Series; Dee 
Ellis 213,179,165-557. 
Wilton Electric 3, Mr. Wbnder- 
ful's ; Bohnen's 3, Village Inn 
0; Lakeside Resort 2, Herb's 
Used Auto Pts. 1; Wilfow Park 
2, Pire V l : A & J Bar 2, Lepsis 
Lodge 1 

Schneider Trucking 2, State 
Farm 1. 



Jo 



CASTAWAYS 

FEB. 27,1973 

High; Team Series; Brave 
Bull 832,894,761-2487. 

High Individual Series; 
Martin 188,159,:175-52. 
Brave. Bull 2. 885 Club 
1; ReCupido En t.3, Village Pub 
0; Legion Bar 3 , Tom's Arco 0; 
Orchard Plaza 2, Parker Inn 1. 





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141 Cher,i Lane - Antioch, 111 
.312- 3 9 S - 5 f $ 4 




< Week of March 9-15>;. 
ARIES (March 21 April 20): Friends from a distance can be helpful 
in achieving your goals. Heed, their counsel. Accident potential 
indicates strong heed for extra caution if traveling this weekend. 
Be sensitive to family problems this week. Best days.: Friday, 
Saturday. '-_ •> 

< ^ • * •• . • •"".•• 

TAURUS (April 21-May 20): Moon in your*sign makes Friday a 
good day to demonstrate. your ability. Diligence now can lead td 
increased recognition later. A good week for visiting with. relatives, 
enjoying leisure, time pursuits.. Best day: Thursday. 

GEMINI (May 21-Jne 2U; Your urge to break away from routine 
may be strong. But unfinished tasks at work or home demand your 
concentration. Someone in authority, could be influential in 
advancing your interests later In week. Best day: Tuesday. 

* ■ 

CANCER (June 22- July 21): Romance potential is on the rise! 
Accept social invitations. Someone you meet this week could be key 
to important changes in your life. An excelent time for shopping for 
a new outfit to -show off at social event.- Best days: Saturday, 
Monday. 



LEO (July 22-Aug. 22) : A favorable period for almost any Activity! 
Associates should 'prove cooperative and helpful. Parties and 
entertainment may spark your interest Wednesday, and Thursday. 
Luck and popularity dominate. your sign this week. Best days: 
Friday,' Saturday. . 

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept 22): Parents may be difficult and upset your 
plans this week. Tact and consideration can help avoid family 
tension. 'Romantic potential favorable..' Someone born under the 
sign of Cancer may be especially attractive at this time. Best days: 
Friday, Thursday. 

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Friendship dominates your sign during 
this period. Weekend is a good time to shop for gifts, clothing. 
Splurge a little. Financial Improvement possible during the week. 
Rest days: Tuesday, Thursday. 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 22): Move forward with confidence on 
projects under way to improve finances, community prestige. 
Social activities favored. Your, charm and wit will be appreciated, 
discretion is favored in romantic affairs. Best day: Thursday. 



SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21): Solar signs favorable for 

I creative work and for completing action on business Involving 

* property. Avoid emotional entanglements which interfere with 

your responsibilities. Your intuition is a winner on matters 

Involving sales, civic projects. Best day: Wednesday. 

I ., . . : l 

[CAPRICORN (Dec. 22- Jan 20): Problems with relatives or loved 
ones coutd be upsetting this weekend. A little time spent on home 
repairs, improvements can keep you busy and Improve family 
relations. Moderation indicated In financial matters. Best day: 
Saturday. .* _ ■ 



AQUARIUS (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) : Someone may confide in you and 
nek your counsel. Be encouraging and discreet. A purchase you 

jjmake on an impulse could turn out to be a bargain. Social activities 

.could be tiresome. Best day: Monday.' 

JPISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):' Curiosity and glamor highlight your 
sign this week. You could receive a welcome Invitation from 
someone who admires you. Trust your own judgment in all matters 
financial. Best days: Monday/Thursday. , - ■ 



v 



ANTIOCH LADIES CLASSIC 
FEB, 19,1973 

High Team Series; Country 
Company Insurance 620,679,714- 
2013. 

High Individual Series; June 
Troyer 159,174,225 558 , 

State Bank 2, Antioch sheet 
Metal 0; Country Co. Insurance 
3, First Nat'l Bank 0; Truman 
Gerretsen 2, Lorenzl; -Antioch . 
Lumber 3, Antioch Savings & 
Loan 0. ■ 

hi indi vidua 1 series; Jane 
Hartman 528; Mary Derer 527;, ; 
Bea Solatiay 526; Clare Harms 
521; Dee Ellis 520; Jane Brell 
509;Val Corbel 512; Fay Veltum 
502; Helen Barnes 1 501; June 

Hi mdivjdiia 1 game, June 
Troyer 225. 



THURSDAY BUSINESS MEN- 

March 1,197*3 

High team series, Kings- 
Drugs; 946-991-951 - 2888 

High individual series ; C. 
Moran, 269-247-229 - 745 

Kings Drugs 3, State Bank 0; 
Hicksgas 3, Town Tap & Grill 0; , 
Carey .Electric 2, Dicks Tree 
Service 1; 1st National Bank 2, . 
■Wilton electric 1; Advertiser 2, 
Ace Roofing 1; Teresi Chev & 
Olds 2, Millers Dog-N-Suds 1. 



ICE HOCKEY NEWS 

Camp Hastings' 4HOCKEY MOMS 7 would like to thank all the 
mothers who baked and helped sell all the wonderful bakery gobSds 
which made the "BaKejftleso successful. Special thanks to Gtenda 
Bogaerts, Doris Surrock, Joanne Carpenter rEleanorCollis, Mary 
Ann Skopek, Jane Lytikainen and Lois Bachochin who helped 
organize the sale. Also the four Hockey flayers in their smart 
hockey uniforms -who spent their time with the mothers, Bob 
Skopek, Bob Kelley, Tom Surrock, and Greg Carpenter. Thank you, 
too, State Bank : of Antioch and First National Blank of Antioch for 
your cooperation. 



Week of March 2nd ..... 
Team Won Lost 1 
Canadiens 6 .. 
Rangers 4 

Kings 3 

North5tars^-.3 =_i 

.Jets 1 

Flyers 1 ..' 

Bruins . 

Week of March 2nd - 



Tied 



2 

2 

3 

3 

3 

5.-' 



Pts 


0. 
1 



2 

1 



RedWings 5 

Cougars 5 

Maple Leafs; 3. 

Falcons 3 

Black Hawks 3 

Flames 1 

Vikings' 1 



1 

1 

3 

3* 

3 

5 

5 













Goals for 
12 
8 

'7. 
■V 6_ 

'4' . 
< 4 

1 



10 
10 

6 
6 
6 
2 
2 







Goals against 


35 


21 


30 


17 


48 


44 


27 


32 


- 37 


46 


34 


39 


18 


34 



Division -NHL 



61 
28 
47 
45 
36 
34 
17 



14 
23 
40 
42 
40 
61 
50 



J. E. BUNCHER JOINS ABBOTT LABS 



FRIDAY MEN'S 

March 2, 1973 

High team series, Fox River 
•Garden's - 878, 1082, 1077-3037* 

High individual series, Dennis 
Roth, 154, 200, 235 - 589. 
: i; Fox River Gardens 2, Michael 
Warren 1. ; Starr Enterprises 2, 
Paul's Paint 1; Lakeside Rest 2, 
Richards ? 1; Lil & Ed's 2, 
Hide-A-Way 1. 



James E. Buncher has joined 
Abbott Laboratories as control- 
ler, hospital products division. 
Buncher comes to Abbott 1 
Laboratories • following ten 
years in various accounting and 
financial positions at Glidden- 
Durkee Division of the SCM 
Corporation. His most recent 
position was controller, Durkee 
Consumer Foods. 

A graduate of the University 
of Illinois with a B.S. and a 
M. A.S., Buncher is a certified 



public accountant, and/ an 
active member of the National 
Association of Accountants. 
i Buncher, his wife Mary and 
son Douglas will relocate in the 
Lake County area. 




GLEN R. LARSON 



Glen R. Larson has been 
promoted to manager of 
international hospital products 
research and development at 
Abbott Laboratories. 

He joined Abbott in 1968 as a 
research pharmacist in the' 
hospital products division, and 
holds a B.S. degree in 
pharmacy from the University 
of Minnesota. 

Larson and his wife Marlene 
live at 2313 E. Beck Rd., 
Lindenhurst. • - * . 



6E0RGE A. BUELTMANN 

• i * 

PROMOTED 



George A. Bueltmann has 
been., promoted to systems 
manager, international ' and 
group operations, at Abbott 
Laboratories. 

He joined Abbott in 1968 as a 
systems analyst, and was 
promoted & senior systems 
analyst in 1972, Bueltmann, 34, 
holds a B.S. degree from, 
Southern Illinois University^and 
a ' M.S-.T. degree from " the 
•Illinois Institute of Technology. 

Bueltmann, his wife Mary 
Ellyn and their- four children 
live at 2241 Heathercliff Drive, 
Libertyvilie. ' 



4$ 




Siding 

AlumirtDm 
Steel - 
Vinyl. 
Shutters • 



Insured Free Estimates 






Roofing 

Awnings 

Doors & Windows 
Jalousie Porch 
Roll & Permanent 
• Awnings 

Residential and Commercial 

i phone 763-9630 

-Wair SCHILLER 

Roofing ft Insulating Go. 

188 Lewis . BurtingtontWto- WALTER J. SCHILLER-OWNER 



Ofcr 28 Yean Experience 



by: Tork Torkelson - 

■ • ■ I ; ; •:-'■ 

TRANSMISSIONS And 
REAR AXLES 

The subjects of transmis- 
sions and rear axles can 
become somewhat involved 
because they closely relate to. 
each other and to the engines. 

All Ford Motor Company 
manual-shift transmissions - 
the 3-, 4- and 5-shif t types - are 
fully synchronized for smooth, 
quiet upshifting and down- 
shifting, and to provide longer 
life. -i 

The Ford Division cars' 
automatic transmissions, 
SelectShift Cruise-O-Matic, 
and the Lincoln-Mercury 
Division cars' automatic 
transmissions, the SelectShift, 
are all 3-speed types. And 
most of them feature im- 
proved transmission cooling, 
too. .,* 




y. 



•' »■ « ■* j ■j-vi j .-, , » - -^»/ i r i /*r*^*»»'" - 



B 






LYONS-RYAN 
FORD MERCURY SALES 



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THE ANTIOCH ] NEWS. Page 21 . 
WEDNESDAY MARCH 7, 1973 

;■•-' 1 - ■ * 

SEQUOITS WIN 







NIG 




Friday night marked the end of the le^oit Basketball Season. Guards Coach Roger Andrews, and of course the Sequoits 
was including the cheerleaders, the faithful fans, the G.A. A. Color _„._-,_. 





' t ^ 



AGENCY 



INCLUSIVE FEATURES 



WfM 



'Wm 



WAIKIKI and choice of KAUAI or MAUI 

# Round trip jet via United Air Ones and connecting HAWAII ONE+ WEEK 
carrier from gateway city 

# Comphmentary meals and champagne aboard 

# Complimentary movie and stereo entertainment 
across the Pacific ~ - - ■ - 

£ Round trip jet air transportation to Kauai or Maui 
where applicable 

# Handling of 1 piece of baggage 

# A fragrant lei greeting on arrival n 
£ Round trip airport-hotel transfers vi 

# Get acquainted briefing 
<£ City and Punchbowl tour-736A Passengers only 

# Hotel accomodations as specified 
& Services of Trade Wind lours Native Hawaiian host Honolulu 

7 Nights - 8 Pays TOTAL COST $379.00 from "" 






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Complete choices 
of optional activitie 



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f ■ . . \ 



Parents Night 1973 was a huge 
success as the Sequoits rolled to 
a 75-49 victory over the Lake 
Zurich Bears last Friday 
evening. 

Leading the scoring attack 
was Antioch 's All-State candi- 
date Tim Mieure, with 25 points. 
Vic McGuire and Mike Gut- 
owski also scored jn the double 
figures with 12 points each. 

The Bears scored theiirst two 
points~of"the~game,-but -» the. 
Sequoits countered with 14 
straight points, with 4 points by 
Gutowski, Andrews, and 'Mc- 
Guire, with Mieure hitting a 
layup. From this poit on,_the _ 
Sequoits continued to increase 
their lead. 

In the third quarter, the 
Sequoits lead by Mieure's seven 
points opened up a 47 to 22 lead 
and at this point coach Andrews 
was substituting freely. In all, 
ten players scored for the 
Sequoits, as the team looked 
very sharp and really ready for 
the Tournament this week. 

For the second straight week, 
antioch ■ cagers he|d their, 
opponents to less than 50 points. 
The team, also has the _best ; !l 
defehsive"mark in the con- 
ference. Mark Andrews had the 
assignment of the top scorer for 
the other team and held him to 
less than his regular average. 
Jn the final review, the squad is 
-nn great shape for the 
tournament. The defense lead 
by . Andrews and Fred Popp' 
couldn't be ■ better, and the 
shooting is improving, with a 
few new plays added, to the . 
offense looking good adding . 
some life to the offense. 

Parents Night is an Antioch 

tradition, held annually to honor 

the parents of the players and 

cheerleaders. Along with • the 

. parents night honor, a "Miss 

Basketball Fan" is selected to 

honor the female student who 

best attends the games, cheers, 

and. is loyal to the, basketball 

-team during the year.* This 

years selection, an excellent - 
- selectionr— -is— - Miss -~. ~Jody_J 
! Patrovsky * ' Congratulations, ^ 

Jody. 

In honor of a senior citizen, 
. who has attended home bootball 
and basketball games for years, 
an award was presented to Mr. 
.; George Good, as "Senior Citizen * 
Fan" for the school year 
1972-73. You can see Mr. Good at 
the basketball games, sitting in 
the top row, in the middle of the 
gym. Best wishes to him and 
may we see him for many more 
years at the Sequoits athletic 

events. 

. ^.. „_..._ *■ ..; 

Antioch-Lake Zurich game 



Amundsen 


FG 


FT 


PF 


TP 


Mieure 


10 


5 


2 


25 


Andrews ..... 


4 





1 


8 


McGuire 


5 


2 


4 


12 


Gutowski ' 


6 





2 


12 


Popp 





2 • 


3 


2 


Chapman 





0. 





.0, 


Janosko" 


2 





1 


.-■4 


Maras \ 


1 


-0- 


1 , 


-2 


Schroeder : 


.1, 


2 


o >' 


t 4 


Amundsen 








l 





Bailey 


1 





a 


.. 2 


White > 


2 








'4 


.. . 


,32 


11 


15 


75 



Score by quarters 
Antiocli 2M4-15-26-75 
Lake Zurich 8-10-12-19- 49 

TopReboiinders: Vic McGuire 
10 and Mark Andrews -'. 7. 



" Vt ~ wP~"~ r - * ' 



V 



■■' '- ■ 




BEHIND THE SCENES 
OF THE STATE 
REGIONAL TOURNAMENT 



basketball team defeated Lake 
Zurich last Friday by a score of 
52 to 26, The win brought the 
Sophs record^to 21 wins and 3 



losses; — y$0 

The Sophs defeated i4- 
different teams-over the season 
and -they defeated every team 
they played at leasLonce.. The 
wins were over all of the teams 



;* ■ 



l' 



X 



i 



On March 6th, 7th, and 9th 
rAntioctrHigtr School will-play- 
host to the State Regional 
Tournament for the first time in 
20 years. < v . 

A lot of work, time and effort 
have gone into these three 
tournament- games.- -Antioch 
High School has been keeping 
the State of Illinois informed of 
their facility capabilities, their 
seating * capacities, dressing 
room facilities, etc., and of their 
interest in hosting a tourna- 
ment. 

-The state in return reviews 
the schols with adequate, 
facilities and who have shown 
an • interest in hosting a 
tournament. The state tries not 
to just pick the schools with the 
best facilities, but rather they 
try to pick the. schools ^mi a 
rotating basis. 



Antioch received a letter from 
the state sometime ago asking 
if they would accept the 
Tournament according to the., 
state arrangements; According 
to state arrangements the State 
gets 60 percent of the profit and 
the school receives 40 percent of 
the profit from which they must 
pay officials, pay. the visiting 
teams 40 cents* a mile of their 
trip to the tournament, etc. If 
the school does not feel that this 
type of an arrangement would 
afford them adequate profit, 
they may then turn their 
tournament budget into the.. 
State and the State will pay a 
reasonable budget. Antioch has 
accepted the 60-40 arrange-" 
menu 

* 

• . If is upto Antioch High School 
to provide all of the help, ticket 
sellers, the supervision,' pro- 
visions for concessions, a ■ 
•hospitality ^room ■ for visiting 
coaches and administrators, 
"etc. , ..---•- 

*■■ Four schools, including 
Antioch, Grant, McHenry, and 
Woodstock will be participating' 
in the Tournament. The schools 
were picked by the State on. a 
basis of enrollment and geo- 
graphy. Once Antioch had been 
selected 'as host' for . the 
tournament an organizational 



, 



meeting was held between the 
schools. Rules were established, 
and a list of 20 acceptable 



officials were drawn up. The 
schools then rated these 

"~off icials on *a~scale~of ~1^20-and 
the list was forwarded to the 
State. The State in turn selected 
two/officials, who will preside* 
over the three games. 
■ The first game will take place 
tonight between McHenry and- 
Woodstock at 7:30. The second 
game will be played Thursday 
night between Grant and 
Antioch. Winners of these two . 
games will compete on Friday, 

: march 9th for the Champion- 
ship. The winner of this 

"~tournament 7 wjircompete in the . 
Rockford Sectional the follow- 
ing week, which will take place 
on March 13, 14 and 16th. 
Winner of the Rockford Tourn- 
ament will then travel, to 
DeKalb for the Super-Sectional 
during the week of March 19th. 
From the Super-Sectional the ■ 
lucky team will head for the 
Champagne Finals. 

Antioch High School's gym 
capacity totals 2,800 seats and 
Round Lake-type crowds are 
expected to turn out for the 
games, ah estimated crowd of 
1,400 - 1,600 for each session. 
Tickets will be sold in advance 
at the school for $1.25 for adults 
and 75 cents for students. 
Tickets will also be available at 
v the door for $1.25 for everyone. 
The reason the same general 
admission will be. charged is .to . 
eliminate problems of student 
identification. Each school has 
been slotted 700 tickets for 
advanced sale. 

According to Mr. Ward Lear, 
everyone has been very., 
cooperative in helping to make' 
the tournament a success. Some 
of the sophomore boys have 
volunteered to hold the ropes 
between half-time, meeting the 
. officials,, directing them to the 
gym and even saving them a 
parking place. 

An extra burden will be 
placed on the custodial staff, 
but they have been more than 
cooperative and some of them 
will even "be helping in the 
parking lot. 

.The color guard will perform 
at the start of each game, but 
Mr. Lear voiced a regret that 
the high school is without a pep 
band and therefore without 
half-time music. 




of- the Northwest Suburban. 
Conference plus East Lyden, 
Barrington, Mundelein, Elgin 
Larkin, Kenosha Tramper, 
McHenfy; Waukegan, Wheeling 
and Zion-Benton. The three 
losses were to Lake Forest, 
.Warren and Zion-Benton. The 
team finished the season with a 
Conference. Record of 12 wins 
and 2 losses, good for second 
place in the conference. . 

The Soph team won the i 
Thanksgiving Tourney at Bar- 
rington arid they took second 
place In the ' Zion-Behtpii 
Tourney over Christmas yac- : 

ation— -. ^ ~— - 

• In the win over Lake Zurich 
Mike Perrone led, the scoring 
with 19 points. Russ Albano and 
Kevin Walpole each added 9 and 
Larry Smith contributed 8. 



Basketball maids, Cindy Meierdirk and Kathy Chase tally. the 
statistics during the last conference game of the season; (staff 
photo) / 




*' 



HOCKEY: A GROWING SPORT 



In the Antioch area alone, 
everywhere you look, there's a 
hockey team springing up. If 
they .don't have the ice on the 
lakes, they will travel 50 miles 
to Milwaukee to rent a hockey 
stadium for a few hours. Many 
of the teams are sponsored; by 
neighboring merchants. The 
State Bank, Walsh's and other 
sponsor teams to play the game 
of hockey. When you have 
uniforms you feel much more, 
like a. team and in many -cases 



INTRA-MURAL SPORTS 

To be in any type of sport at 
Antioch High, you definitely 
have to be experienced and 
co-ordinated. There is a small 
ratio between athletes and 
non-athletes. I'm sure there are , 
many students who would wish 
to be on a team and just have a 
good time. Whether it be > 
basketball or track, wrestling 
or football, kids have fun no 
' matter if they're on the varsity 
team, or the losing intramural 
team. It's much better to have 
this type of acttvitiy in sports ' 
than to deprive some lesser 
talented student of having 
something to strengthen him 
and build his confidence. 
There's nothing more. depres- 
sing than Having a coach tell 
^you that you're ^not good, 
enough. After you have tried . 



will perform better. 

The Sporting Goods busi- 
nessess are specializing greatly 
in hockey; All of a 'sudden the 
past two or' three years there 
has been a sudden rush towards 
the ice. Unfortunately the lakes 
have been bad for the novice, 
but fortunately there are 
always people to get kids 
interested 1 in playing the 
fantastic winter sport of 
hockey. 

. Ed Anderson 

your best you should get a 
consolation. 

If we had. something more 
than just our physical education 
at school, there would be much 
more drive and stamina to 
improve in everything they 
participate in. 

Ed Anderson 



by: Carol Dry gas 

SLEEPING RAGS ft 
SNOWMOBILE SUITS 

. These are hard -working 
item's! They are designed to 
Insulate you against the cold 
and comfort youagalnst the 
hard grounds Dirt and con* 

'. tlnual use pack them down and 
cut their efficiency: So a trip 
to the cleaner has the 
responsibility to deliver these 
items both clean and free of 
any chemical residue which 
could remain in the fill. This 

. solvent Is toxic. At its least It 
can cause nausea; and' at. its 
worse, it's deadly. At A & S we 
know how. to neutralize the 
chemical, aerate and fluff the 
fill & If you wish, water repel' 
.these items for added surface 
protection. As with most 
things, cleaning extends their 

• life/ so, enjoy the outdoors, but 

keep your "gear" In top shape. 

' > Carol 



Sit 

TAILORS 1 

395-2282 

W0 MAIN STREET 
ANTIOCH 



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tos 

Hi 

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J»i 1 ■+ h S + H 5 •♦ H • 11 +.-H S + H 31 1 S -t- H T 



t-«n 



'/■'If; 

III 



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CLAYTON SCHUMANN (Busier) 



-MANAGER 



SCHULTZ 



$10.00 in S 



Tune-ops 

Snowplowing J 
Minor Repairs . 
Air-Canditibning and Brakes ^ 

Service Catis 

Car Washing and Waxing 



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H Green Stamps for every {5.00 Purchase. 



Milk 95* gal. - 
2% ■; 89 1> gal. 
Rolls- 

Stereo Tapes 



ElMER PET! OWNER 




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SUN -1HURS 5 a.m.-IO.p.m. 



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.-.-"•• 



\r 



v.-- 



r 




THE ANTIOCH NEWS WEDNESDAY MARCH 7, MS-Yawpr 



A- 



* ■a.* 



LS 



The Sharp Shooting Sequoits 




.. o 




75 



LAKE ZURICH 



f 



48 
*ACH$ 





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\ Bulletin Boards Compliments of 
Antioch News. Save For Future 
Reference. 




COACH ANDREWS ^ ~ 

Nov. 22-25 Barrmgton Tourney 

Dec. 1 Warren*..... 6:45 

Dec. 2 Trempcr............ ;...,. 6: 15 

Dec* 8 Grant .....%. 6: 45 

Dec, 15 Lake Forest?.'..., .-. ....6 : 45 

Dec. 16 McHenrj%. .....6i45 

Dec. 22 Round Lake 6:45 

Dec. 27-28-29-30 Rockford Tour- 
nament 

Dec. 27-28-29 Soph, at Ziori 
Tournament 

Jan 5.<Jrayslake?fr. 6:45 

Jan. 6 Zion-Benton .....' 6:45 

Jan. 12WaucondaT. ......6:45 

Jan. 13 Lake Zurich 6:45 

Jan. 19 Warren...'.. 6:45 

Jan. 26 Grant*.................. 6:45 

Feb. 2 Lake Forest.........;... 6:45 

Feb. 9 Round Lake?. 6:45 

Feb. 16 Gray slake 6:45 

Feb. 23 Wauconda.. 6:45 

lilar. 2 Lake Zurich*. 6:45 

¥t Home Games 



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,, ».j*_ ^.IjiIi.i vvii.f ,'. t. . v