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Full text of "Antioch News 03/07/1997"

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ANIIOCH NEWS-REPORTER 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 

©1997-A Schroeder Publication 



VOL 112 NO. 1 



In The News: 




Bravisshno! 

CLC unveils the new 
performing arts center with a 
spring schedule of 
entertainment and 
enlightenment during the 
opening festival. 
Performances range from 
drama to dance with a variety 
of musical styles thrown in 
for good measure. 
— For more, see Page Bl 

Challenge 
dawned 

AttprneyJ2qneral.'s office 
dismisses 1 acomplaim that 
voters in the Lake County Soil 
and Water Conservation 
District election were non- 
eligible. \ 
— For more, see Page CI 

Forgiving 

U.S. Cable offers amnesty 
program to viewers who have 
been able to master the 
system to enjoy service 
without payment. After the 
deadline, unauthorized 
access may draw legal 
consequences. 
— For more, see Page C6 



INDEX 



BusiNEss C6 

ClAssifiEd ......CI } 

County News.. ....... ....CI 

Crossworo" .....'; BIO 

EdiTORiAl/OpiNiON ..C4 

HEAhkwATcli.... B14 

Horoscope BIO 

Hot Spare B8 

LMV Home/CarcIen,... Section D 

UkdifE Bl 

LEC,AlNoTicEs...A14 &C1 1 

LipsERvice.. B12 

MoviEs B6 

ObiTUARJES. CIO 



WIiereToCaLL 

Lakeland Newspapers 

For Circulation, Delivery 

or Subscriptions m .±. -•■'■ 

(847)740-4035 

FAX (847) 740 r 4086 
e-mail: edit@lnd.corii 



L 




ANTIOCH MARCH 7, 1 997 

School 

solution 

narrowe 

New high school woulc 
be part of Lake Villa Dist. 
41 unit or combined 
high school district 

ALEC fUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

Northwest Educational Planning Group 
has scrapped five possible school solutions 
and is down to two new possibilities 
suggested at the last meeting. 

The group is now pondering a K-12 unit 
district formed within the existing Lake Villa 
Elementary District or combining Grayslake 
and Antioch high school districts. The group 
consists of Antioch Community High School 
Board, Antioch, Lake Villa and Lindenhurst 
village board, chamber officials and all the 
elementary districts which feed into Antioch 
Community High School. 

"We have been talking about this since 
1986," said Ray Novak, Grayslake Community 
High School superintendent regarding either 
combining high schools or sharing the costs 
and operation of a new high school. 

Novak explained from an economic point of 
view, creating one high school instead of two 
new high schools may be the best solution. 

"We have to build a new school because 
See OPTIONS page A10 



FOUR SECTIONS-76 PAGES 



50 CENTS 




Maestro 

;The : C6Hege of. Lake-County is* celebrating its -new Performing i Arts .building at a 
ceremony, 1. p.m., March 8. With a series of events entitled Bravissimo, the 
opening event was the Chicago Symphonic Pops. Conductor Frank Winkler of the 
Chicago Symphonic Pops takes a bow during the performance. Steve Winkler, 
Andrew Snow and Anthony Porter await their cue. — Photo by Linda Chapman 









Antioch Jr. Woman's Club celebrates 10th anniversary 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 



Regional Editor 

Ten years ago, the Antioch 
Junior Woman's Club began with 
10 women meeting in one of 
their homes with the hopes of 
establishing a social outlet for 
women eager to contribute to the 
community and to charitable 
causes. 

Ten years later, the Antioch 
Junior Woman's Club boasts 
between 50 and 55 members who 
have become a reliable source of 
volunteers for many village 
events and causes. 

Additionally, the club's 
charitable arm now reaches 



beyond the confines of Antioch 
and includes regional and 
countywide organizations such 
as LaCasa, Safe Place, and ALL 
Parents Network. Of course, the 
club's heart and soul reaches out 
to local organizations the most. 
Some of them include the 
Antioch Rescue Squad, the 
Antioch Fire Department, PADS, 
and the Antioch Community 
Food Pantry. 

Actually, the Antioch Junior 
Woman's Club may be 
considered an offshoot from the 
Antioch Woman's Club. The 
main difference between the two 
clubs is that the junior club 




meets at night and the Antioch 
Woman's Club meets in the 
afternoon. Many women are 
members of both clubs. 

"With more and more women 
working, there was no other 
organization or club that gave an 
opportunity for women to get 
together socially or participate in 
community projects," recalled 
Linda Peterson, one of the 
founding members of the 
Antioch Junior Woman's Club. 

Now, each year the club 
grows in the number of members 
and in the number of projects 
the Antioch Junior Woman's 
Club embraces. 

"As we have grown as a club, 
we've been able to take on more 
projects," noted Carol Jester, 
who has watched the club grow 
since being elected the first 
president of the Antioch Junior 



Woman's Club in 1987. 

For the most part, the club 
began by establishing a 
scholarship fund and helping out 
during the Lions Club and 
Antioch Rescue Squad annual 
auction and chicken dinner. 

Since then, you can bet 
Antioch Junior Woman's Club 
members are lending helping 
hands in just about every event 
or cause in town from the 
building of the Centennial Park 
Playground to flipping flapjacks 
during the firemen's Pancake 
Breakfast. 

"It amazes me what a small 
club of 45 to 50 women can do," 
Peterson said. 

Club leaders emphasize 
involvement. Jester pointed out 
that each member has to be on a 
committee and assist with at 
See ANNIVERSARY page A10 



Club offers evening of laughs 



Dr. Joan Johnson and Amy Winters, president of the Antioch Jr. 
Woman's Club, present a check to Tim Osmond for the Antioch 
Rescue Squad, last fall. The club donates to numerous charitable 
organizations and members volunteer at community events. 



The Antioch Junior Woman's 
Club will be celebrating its 10th 
anniversary with a comedy night 
to be held at St. Peter's Social 
Center on Saturday, March 8, at 7 
p.m. 

Comedians Ed Fiala and 
Sonya White will provide the 
laughter. 

The Antioch Junior Woman's 
Club welcomes the public to the 
evening of laughter. Tickets are 
SI 5 and are available through 



club members or at First 
National Bank, Antioch Parks 
and Recreation and at the door. 

Founded in 1986, the Antioch 
Junior Woman's Club is a social 
outlet for women that provides 
service to the community. 
Meetings are held the second 
Tuesday of the month 
(September through May) at the 
Community Room. For more 
information, call Club President 
Amy Winters at 395-3434. 



!W COMMUNITY lAkdANd Newspapers Manch 7, 1997 




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MarcIi 7, 1997- UkelANcI Newspapers 



Village to swap land 
for more parking 



ALECjUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

Antioch trustees are working 
to provide more parking down- 
town and are proposing a land 
swap to make it happen. 

The board is beginning the 
process to acquire a portion of 
the southeast corner of Orchard 
and Main Street. Don Pittman car 
dealership occupies a portion of 
this property and would remain 
until the lease is expired. The 
board would then trade the Brans 
Nut building and $67,000 for the 
site, according to Kenneth Clark, 
village attorney. 

"This is a prime parking 
location," said Claude LeMere, 
community development direc- 
tor. 

He explained it would replace 
parking lost when Orchard Street 
was expanded and create addi- 
tional parking for downtown 
shoppers and visitors to the pro- 
posed wetlands recreation area 
on Skidmore Drive behind Main 
Street. 

The move would assist busi- 



nesses on the north end of Main 
Street such as JJ Blinkers and the 
Choosey Child while making it 
more attractive for additional 
retailers. 

The village would wait until 
the existing lease is expired. The 
lot would just take a portion of 
the Pittman property. This prop- 
erty is about 1 12 acre. 

Now, the Brans Nut building 
must be put up for public sale. 
The deal would be with developer 
John Terresi. Terresl will honor 
the village's lease with Brans Nut. 

"The village is not interested 
in staying in the rental business," 
LeMere said. 

The village will have 30 days to 
determine If they would want to 
sell the Brans Nut company to 
anyone else. 

If the deal is finalized, the vil- 
lage will have acquired the prop- 
erty without having to enter into 
condemnation proceedings. 

The village will also pocket the 
rental Pittman is paying to Terresi 
while Terresi would collect the 
Brans Nut rent. 



Library may add computer games 



ALECjUNGE 



Staff Reporter 

Antioch Public Library will 
likely soon be a source to try out 
computer games. 

The library board is beginning 
the process to allow games to be 
checked out by patrons. Before 
t'l.that happens, a policy was 
"lipproved and a system must be 
created to protect the games so 
they will last, according to [Cathy 
LaBuda, library director. 

The policy will require a late 
charge of SI per day if the games 
aren't returned, according to 
LaBuda. 

The check out time would be 
limited to one week. 

People checking them out will 



see information warning them 
not to put the games on their 
hard drives. 

LaBuda said one of the main 
concerns is working with the 
manufacturers on the use of the 
games. 

She added the board can't 
afford to pay a user fee if the man- 
ufacturers charge one. 

LaBuda added staff and the 
board is working to provide 
games for check out by May. She 
said they are initially looking at 30 
games to start with. 

The games also must be spe- 
cially packaged to ensure the 
games last for a longer period of 
time than just keeping them in 
game boxes. 



BrIeFs 

Auxiliary holds buffet fundraiser 

The Ladies Auxiliary of the Antioch VFW will hold a pasta 
buffet dinner March 9, 1-4 p.m.. There will be music as well. 
Cost is $10 for adults, $6 for children aged G-12 and children 
under 5 are free. 

Craft show coming 

Antioch VFW Post 4551 is sponsoring a "Swing Into Spring" 
craft show March 22 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sunday, March 23 
from 1 1 a.m.-4 p.m. Great gifts for Easter, spring and Mother's 
Day. For more information call Dorothee at 395-6934. 



Antioch News-Reporter 



Founded 1886 

Ollico ol Publication: 30 South Whltnoy St.. Groyslake. IL 60030. Phono (847)223-BI6t. 

Published wookly, periodical mall postago paid at Graystako, IL 60030. 

Mall Subsaiplion Rotes: S24.50 Par Year by Mail paid In advonco In Lake. Cook, Kenosha and 

McHonry Countlos; olsowhoro $35.00 Per Year by Moil paid In advance 

Postmaster: Send address changes to Antioch Nows-Roportor, 30 South Whitney Strool. P.O. Box 268, 

Graystako, Illinois 60030. 



SODNCXSPntSS 



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Lakeland 

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Antioch News-Reporter 
Lake Zurich Enterprise 
Lake Villa Record 
Mundelein News 
Grayslake Times 
Fox. Lake Press 



M.R. SCHROEDER 

Foundor-1 904-1 9B6 

WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

Publisher/President 

WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

General Manager 

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(USPS 
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Gumee Press 
Round Lake News 
WaucorxJa Leader 
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Vernon Hills News 
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Safety must come first 

Christina Clavey, 6, Antioch, gets a hug from her bus driver, Dawn Jones, after a class explain- 
ing the importance of bus safety. Using their new demo school bus, Dawn Jones and Kristen 
McCurry, teach kindergarteners and first-graders at Oakland School the correct behavior get- 
ting on and off a bus. — Photo by Linda Chapman 



Two vie for township assessor 



ALEC JUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

Antioch Township assessor 
candidates presented their vision 
of how they think the office 
should be run. 

Newcomers Heather Kufalk- 
Marotta and Michael Mueller are 
vying for the post. Both were on 
hand at a Candidate Forum spon- 
sored by the Antioch Chamber of 
Commerce & Industry Feb. 27. 
Both have extensive experience 



with assessing property. 

Kufalk-Marotta has been the 
deputy assessor for 11 years. She 
is a certified Illinois assessing offi- 
cial. Mueller has been the deputy 
assessor at Newport Township 
since 1991. He also is a certified 
Illinois assessing official. 

"I will be a full-time assessor 
with expanded office hours," 
Kufalk-Marotta promised. 

"We need to handle things at 
the local level," Mueller said. 



"People shouldn't have to go 
through the expense of hiring an 
attorney." 

Mueller was referring to what 
he felt was some unfair assess- 
ments by assessors' office. He 
said there have been people who 
have to fight the office almost on 
a yearly basts. 

"I enjoy working with the pub- 
lic and want to assure good com- 
munication and be available to 
the public," Kufalk-Marotta said. 



Township trustee hopefuls tell views 



ALECJUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

Antioch Township trustee 
candidates explained why they 
should get residents' vote in the 
April 1 election. 

Seeking election are incum- 
bent Trustees Judith Davis and 
Claudctte Skvarce and newcom- 
ers Ardeen Harris, Roy 
Sackschewsky, Wanda Schaefer 
and Steve Smouse. Davis was 
the only candidate not attend- 
ing a candidate forum spon- 
sored by the Antioch Chamber 
of Commerce & Industry. 

Each candidate was given 
time to introduce themselves to 
the estimated 75 people attend- 
ing the forum. Sackschewsky 
was critical about how the 
township board seemed to be 
handling public concerns. 

"The township board seems 
to think the township money is 
their money. It is not theirs; it is 
ours," Sackschewsky said. 



He suggested copies of the 
bills be shown to the public 
instead of residents having to 
fill out Freedom of Information 
Act requests. 

He questioned why the 
township board didn't act on 
petitions made by the public on 
several issues, including the for- 
mation of a Township Plan 
Commission. 

Sackschewsky is a 16-year 
resident. His volunteer activi- 
ties include being Chairman of 
Against Riverboat Casinos and 
Alliance for Better Government. 

"I always worked hard and will 
do my best to represent the resi- 
dents' best interests," Harris said. 

Schaefer felt her best quali- 
ties were ability to adapt and 
provide leadership. 

"The real strength is doing 
day-to-day tasks and to work 
together with adaptability and 
leadership," Schaefer. 

Schaefer has filled many 



posts with the Girl Scouts and 
St. Peter School, including 
school board member. 

Skvarce talked about efforts 
in developing a salary survey for 
township officials and having 
trustees paid per meeting and 
not paying them if they miss 
more than two meetings a year. 

"The salary was frozen at 
$175 per meeting. You have to 
be at the meetings," she said. 

Smouse stressed two issues, 
sewers and what the township 
board can do. 

"If the sewers come, the 
growth will follow. We can only 
do what the township board is 
allowed to do," Smouse said. 

Smouse was on the Antioch 
Plan Commission for 12 years. 
He stressed it is important to 
know what is being approved 
before the vote is taken. 

Davis was not at the event 
and her comments will be 
included at a later date. 



New fire maintenance facility in the works 



ALEC 1UNGE 



Staff Reporter 

The Antioch Fire 

Department will soon have a 
new maintenance and storage 
facility. 

The village board is expect- 
ed to finalize a rezoning of 806 
Holbeck Drive from 

Residential-2 zoning to R2 
with a special use permit. The 
property will be a combination 
fire maintenance, storage and 
public works offices. 



"We needed a building with 
a taller roof," said Mayor 
Marilyn Shineflug. 

She explained the existing 
fire station's roof is too low for 
maintenance of fire trucks. 

The residence is across the 
street from the fire depart- 
ment building. The home will 
be used for public works 
offices. 

Another structure will be 
constructed for the mainte- 
nance facility. 



The village has already bid 
the project and has a tentative 
estimate of $146,000. 

Older fire equipment and 
trucks will also be stored at the 
building, according to Tim 
Wells, village administrator. 

The final plans are being 
worked out. The board is hop- 
ing to begin the project in late 
spring. 

The board is expected to 
approve the rezoning at the 
next board meeting. 










UkEkd Newspapers MarcIi 7, 1997 




Antioch High School poms and cheerleaders are headed for state competition. Front row: from left, Liz 
Moyano, Melissa Hague, Kristy Miedema, Stephanie Haenchen, Audra Miles, Kacy Koperski, Laura 
Deutsch and Heather Burress. Second row: Katie Dalton, Stacy Astar, Shannah Jaburck, Krista Hintz, 
Nicole Ginascol, Alexis Dayhuff, Shannon Pcdersen, Holly McNamara, Christine Goblirsch, Shannon 
Bonner, Cathy Sperling, Alissa Grinde. Back row: Molly Meyer, Korbyn May, Samantha Griffin, Sarah 
Pendley, Kelly Haley, Channelle Bernt, Sarah Trovillion, jenny Gusserson, Teri Mozal, Sherry Friedle, Lisa 
Marshall, and Betsy Sperling. 




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School News 








Dynasty rolls on at ACHS 



It is difficult for pom pons 
and cheerleaders to be one of the 
best in the state as it is for any 
other athletic team. It is remark- 
able for poms and cheers from 
one school to be outstanding at 
one time. 

Antioch Community High 
School is the exception. The pom 
pon varsity squad took first place 
at the Stevenson High School 
Regional competition. The cheer- 
leaders also won the Stevenson 
Regional for cheerleaders. 

In the past several years, both 
squads have been recognized in 
the state as teams to beat, as they 
rack up numerous competition 
trophies. After any competition 
entered into by poms or cheers, 
ACHS is usually right on or near 
the top. Trophies have been won 
at Regional, Super Sectional, 
State, and national competitions, 
with poms taking second at state 
last year. 

Continued excellence and 
determination would indicate 
that it's only a matter of time 
before a state trophy resides in 
the ACHS trophy case. Both 
coaches, Joy Edge for pom pons 
and Bill Goctzelman for cheer- 
leading, agree that it's like being 
on a roll. 

Once you start winning you 
fall into a pattern that builds 



momentum from year to year. 
Once you set up a winning tradi- 
tion it just keeps rolling along. 
Lack of facilities and lack of 
recognition have heightened the 
desire to achieve. Much credit 
can also be given to the individu- 
als on the squads who practice 
with intensity and dedication 
equal to or above other sports 
programs at the school. 

The immediate goal of both 
squads is to bring home a state 
trophy, and the time seems ripe, 
meaning it could happen this 
year. 

Cheerleaders include 

Shannon Bonner, Heather 
Burress, Laura Deutsch, Sherry 
Friedle, Christine Goblirsch, 
Allisa Grinde, Jenny Gusserson, 
Candice Kasprzak, Kacy 
Koperski, Lisa Marshall, Holly 
McNamara, Teri Mozal, Betsy 
Sperling and Cathy Sperling, 

Pom pons include Melissa 
Hague, Stephanie Haenchen, 
Kristy Miedema, Audra Miles, Liz 
Moyano, Alexis Dayhuff, Sarah 
Trovillion, Megan Tripp, 
Shannon Pedersen, Shannah 
Jnburik, Sarah Pendley, Chnnelle 
Bernt, Samantha Griffin, Nicole 
Ginascol, Stacy Astar, Stacey 
Larcom, Korbyn May, Krisia 
Hintz, Kelly Haley, Katie Dalton 
and Molly Meyer. 



BrjeFs 



Kindergarten screening 

Kindergarten screening/ signup will be held at Grass 
Lake School Monday, March 17 from 9 a.m. -2 p.m..Cnlljhe_ Jt) 
school 395- 1 550 to set up an appointment for a screening. 
To be eligible to attend kindergarten during the 1997-98 
school year, a child must be 5 years of age on or before Sept. 
1, 1997. A birth certificate and proof of residency must be 
presented at this date. Forms will be issued to each parent 
for the child's physical examination and immunization 
record which must be completed before a child may enter 
school in the fall. 

Remember Spring Break 

Spring Break for District 34 Schools is from March 24-30. 



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MARCk 7, 1997 UkElANd NEWSpApERS 





e Beat 



Persons charged with a crime are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. 



Crime Stoppers seeks clues 
on Antioch burglaries 



ANTIOCH 

Arrested for driving offenses 

David Mataja, 40, 39535 Dilleys Road, 
Wadsworth, on March 2, was arrested for driving 
with a suspended license and speeding- He was 
stopped for driving 53 mph in a 25 mph zone. 
He was found to have a suspended license. 

NatKanieJ Kalmer, 20, 421 Johelo, Antioch, on 
Marcri'l, was^arrested for driving with a sus- 
pended drivers license; He was stopped for a 
loud exhaust and was found to have a suspend- 
ed license. 

Scott Moore, 25, 205 Washington Blvd., 
Mundelein, on Feb. 27, was arrested for driving 
with a suspended license. He was found to have 
a suspended license during an accident investi- 
gation. 

LAKE VILLA 

Arrested for possession 

Patrick Shannon, 20, 37369 Loretto, Lake 



Taxi driver steers 
into nightmare 

A language barrier com- 
bined with too much alcohol 
resulted in a harrowing experi- 
ence for both the passengers 
and driver of a cab from Metro 
taxi March 4. 

When two Libertyville men 
were too intoxicated to drive 
home from Sandy & Gwen's on 
Diamond Lake Road in 
Mundelein, the bartender 
called a taxi. The driver, a 
recent immigrant from the 
Ukraine, hod a limited com- 
mand of English. His passen- 
gers were both Hispanic and 
likewise were not proficient in '] 
English. 

Humberto Barrera, 32, of 
617 W. Park, and Santiago | 
Cruz, 36, of 611 W. Park, 
demanded to be taken to an 
address in Waukegan. The taxi 
traveled up Route 45 to 
Winchester, then turned east. 
The passengers became ner- 
vous, and suspicious of the dri- 
ver. Barrera, in the back seat, 
commanded him to stop, then 
grabbed him by the neck when 
he didn't. Cruz, in the front, 
later said he believed all cab 
drivers were armed with knives 
and held the driver's arms to 
prevent an attack. In an ensu- 
ing scuffle, Barrera bit part of 
the driver's nose off and all 
three got out of the car. Cruz 
took an empty beer bottle from 
his pocket and shattered it 
over the head of the driver 
before they both took off run- 
ning. 

Police responded to the 
report of an incessant horn 
and loud yelling in the 900 
block of W. Winchester 
around 2-a.m.. Meanwhile, a 
replacement taxi driver who 
came to pick up the victim's 
cab while the rescue squad 
took him to Condell Medical 
Center came across the sus- 
pects running along 
Winchester. She offered them 
a ride, drove to the service 
station at Butterfield and 
Route 45, and called police. 

Barrera and Cruz were both 
charged with battery; they 
each posted $100 and were 
released to appear in court in 
Waukegan March 24. The dri- 
ver, 33, was treated and 
released from Condell. 



Villa , on Feb. 24, was arrested for possession of 
marijuana. Police became suspicious when they 
saw Shannon and five companions at a Shell sta- 
tion acting strangely and appearing to be trying 
to hide something. The officer came to the car 
and smelled an odor believed to be marijuana. 
The officer asked Shannon if he had any and 
Shannon pulled a smallamount out of his pants 
pocket. 

LINDENHURST 

Arrested for VLV tampering 

David Steading, 41, of Des Plaines, on 
Feb. 26, was arrested for removing a vehicle 
identification number. He was stopped for 
having an expired plate. The last known reg- 
istration was 1993. Steading claimed he 
bought the vehicle from his friend; 
However, couldn't come up with a phone 
number for that person. The officer found 
where the VIN-number was tampered with 
an arrested him. 



Crime of the week 

Crime Stoppers and the 
Lake County Sheriffs Police 
Dept. are seeking information 
regarding several burglaries. 

Since October 1996 to the 
present date, unknown offend- 
er(s) have forcibly entered the 
following taverns all located 
along Route 173 in Antioch 
Township: Cheers, Toppers, We 
Willeys and the Antioch Moose 
Lodge. 

Taken was United States 
Currency and several coin 



operated amusement machines 
were broken into. 

If you have any informa- 
tion about this crime or any 
felony crime or felony fugitive 
contact Crime Stoppers at 662- 
2222. 

If your information leads to 
an arrest you could be eligible 
for a cash reward of up to 
$1,000. Remember all calls are 
confidential and Caller ID is not 
used. 

Crime Stoppers wants your 
information — not your name. 



Check the Classified Section Each 
Week when Looking for a New Job 



FAST? 



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Individuals who qualify can receive up to 25% 

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You write us a personal check and we will hold 

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Please call 

847-587-7700 

or come and see us at 

13 East Grand Avenue 

Fox Lake 

(across the street from the Fox Lake currency exchange) 




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LaI<eIancI Newspapers Marc^ 7, 1997 










In Focus 



The grand tour 

Antioch Cub Scouts from Den 3, Pack 191, arc given a first-hand tour of the Anlioch police sta- 
tion by Sergeant Ronald Roth. Front row, from left, Andy Mitchell and Eric Voight. Back row, 
Sgt. Roth, Ryan Knupp, Cody Groth, Zach Tognarelli and Ryan Smith. 



1 040A to Z. 






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the professionals at H&R Block. 

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ANTIOCH 
420 LAKE ST. 

(847) 395-6230 

FOX LAKE 
2 W. GRAND AVE. 

(SUITE 106) 

(847) 587-9333 



Mchenry 

5102 W. ELM 

(815)385-8630 

ROUND LAKE 
629 W. ROLLINS RD. 

(847) 546-4862 



WAUCONDA 
474-B. W. LIBERTY 

(847) 526-8877 



HE 



HOURS: Mon. thru 

Thurs. 9am - 8pm 

Fri. & Sat. 9am - 5pm 

Sundays by Appt. 



A perk for expectant moms] 




Wc arc all well aware that the 
first 23 parking spaces in any 
parking lot bear that little wheel- 
chaired character establishing 
them as "Handicapped parking 
spaces." Wc have come to accept 
this. And, in some parts of the 
United States you can even find a 
smattering of parking lots that 
have designated areas for senior 
citizens. But, folks, low and 
behold this designated parking 
plan has gotten a bit out of hand. 
At a shopping establishment 
in a neighboring town they now 
have parking spaces bearing a fly- 
ing stork carrying a cute little 
bundle in its beak— "Expectant 
mother" parking spaces. Docs 
this not border a little on the 
bizarre side of the road. Now as 
compassionate citizens we don't 
begrudge for 
one minute 
those Handicap 
Spaces. 

What, if any, 
advantages there 
arc to senior citi- 
zen designated 
parking spaces is 
hard to say but, 
there's definitely problems with 
the Pregnant Women parking 
spots. These women need the exer- 
cise. They should be parking in the 
remote sections of the lot and 
walking the extra mile or two up to 
the front doors of the store. These 
women are in for nothing but a 
rude awakening come baby 
birthin* time and they are no 
longer privy to those plush parking 
spots. 

The day will come, when 
they have to haul a baby, the car 
carrier, the diaper bag and them- 
selves into a store from a regular 
parking space and boy are they 
going to wish they had built up 
those inner thigh muscles and 
hoofed into the store all the way 
from parking lot "Z" during the 
pregnancy days. This is a concept 
that could really infuriate a small 
portion of the population. 
Some people just plain choose 
not to have children and others 
are finished with that baby busi- 
ness part of their lives, so they 
would never be entitled to those 
up front parking spots. Why not 
pull out all the stakes and create 
parking spots that encompass all 
aspects of life. Where are the spe- 
cial parking spots for moms with 
over two children. Or what about 



JINGLE FROM PRINGLE 



LYNN 
PRINGLE 



595 6J64 



creating spots for the " I just gotta I 
run in for a gallon of milk" crowd. 
How about the few incompetent 
slugs who feel its better to leave 
their unattended children in the 
car while they do their shopping? 
This is nothing against preg- 
nant women, being pregnant def. 
initely has its perks in life, but 
posh parking spaces should not 
be one of them. And, how exactly 
does an officer of the law enforce 
the parking rule. .Granted, some 
women blossohv burly in their 
pregnancy and there would be no 
denying what state they are in, 
but others don't have the plea- 
sure of wriggling into one of those 
wonderfully designed maternity 
frocks until they are well into 
their seventh or eighth month. 
With all this new Invitro and fer- 
tility stuff going 
on women know 
the exact minute 
of their concep- 
tion, so will this 
require women 
who are perhaps 
only six days 
pregnant to carry 
an ultrasound 
picture of her growing womb? 
And, tell me what police officer is 
trained to interpret whether or 
not the picture this women is 
holding is a picture of a fetus or 
someone's inflamed appendixes, 
So, although the whole concept 
behind "Expectant Mother" park- 
ing spaces may be a good-heart- 
ed idea, it just one more of those 
really fun experiences during 
pregnancy that "Expectant Dads" 
might feel left out of. And, we all 
know how men love those "front 
row" parking spots. 
VFWNews 

Mark your calendars becaw 
once agajn the ladies ol u'.e 
Antioch VFW Ladies Auxiliary arc 
gearing up for one of their 
fundraisers. They will be hosting 
a Pasta Buffet Dinner on Sunday, 
March 9 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the, 
WW Mall on North Ave. There 
will be music for your dining 
entertainment and, as always, the 
public is more than welcomed to 
attend. A fun-filled afternoon, 
with good food and music is all 
yours for a mere $10 donation per 
adult, children 6 to 1 2 years is $6, 
with children under 5 being free. 
And so goes another "Jingle 
from Pringle"— don't forget to 
call 395-6364. 




GREAT LAKES 

FOOT & ANKLE CENTER 

'Discover Our Gentle Touch For Tender Feet'' 



Initial Consultation* 

(Upon Request) 



*Does Not Include X-Ray Or Treatment 

•Bunions • Hammertoes 

• Heel Pain • Ingrown Toe Nails 

• Ankle Sprains • Warts 
•Fractures -Corns /Calluses 

• llriPii ? RAUL T. BASILE, DPM 

wp JOHN L BOSTANCHE, DPM 



SURGERY 



life 
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Fellow Amcr. College of Foot & An Idc Surgery 

Board certified 

Affiliated w/Condcll hosp. 



2 East Rollins Rd. • Suite 2 • Round Lake Beach 

(Behind Condell Acute Care Center) 

S46-3069 



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MarcIi 7, 1997 UkelANcI Newspapers 




-ParI< HAppEiNiNqs— — 

Join the Eggcellent Easter Adventure 



Eggcellent Easter 

Adventure 

The Antioch Park presents 
the 6th annual Eggcellent Easter 
Adventure. The Eggcellent 
Easter Adventure will take place 
on Saturday, March 15. The 
parade will kick off the event at 
10:30 a.m. down Main Street. 
The Egg Hunt will begin imme- 
diately following the parade at 
Williams Park, Little League 
Field. Registration is being held 
from now until March 14 at the 
Parks and Recreation Office at 
874 Main St. The fee is $2 per 
child ages 1 to 10. The children 
will receive 10 eggs each. Don't 
forget to bring a basket to hold 
the eggs. The hunt will be held 

Former dentist 
takes up 
clock repair 

ALEC JUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

For most retirees a watch is 
a gift. For Bill Revenaugh, 
keeping clocks going keeps 
him going. 

Revenaugh, an Antioch 
Rotarian, is a resident of Old 
Mill Creek. He picked up clock 
repair as something to do after 
retiring from his dental prac- 
Jjce in Lake Forest. 

"1 am fascinated by the 
mechanics of it," Revenaugh 
said. "I like things that are 
mechanical." 

Revenaugh mentioned he 
had slowly been getting into 
the business for five years. He 
admits his first repairs may not 
have been a shining example of 
worksmanship, but it helped 
him learn the craft. 

He added he has attended 
classes in Lake Forest and 
courses by the National Society 
of Clock Machinists. 

"It's nice to be in a business 
with no complaints and no bit- 
ing," Revenaugh joked. 

Being a dentist for 35 years 
helped prepare him for his new 
work. 

"I am used to working with 
small tools," he said. 

Revenaugh can repair a 
clock a day. Most of his work 
revolves around fixing broken 
grandfather clocks. 

He said many of them need 
new movements after only 7-10 
years because the brass parts 
are made from thin material. 

One of his more interesting 
projects is a clock which dates 
back to the 1750s. 

To build something like this 
in the 1600s and 1700s is mind 
boggling," Revenaugh said. 

Revenaugh's community 
service also includes being on 
the plan commission for Old 
Mill Creek and serving as the 
village treasurer. 



rain or shine. 

Kids can also visit the 
Easter Bunny at Brans Nut Co. 
at 935 Main St., beginning 
March 7 to 23. The bunny will be 
available for visits on Fridays 
from 3 to 7 p.m. and on 
Saturdays and Sundays from 11 
a.m. to 4 p.m. The Easter Bunny 
is sponsored by the Antioch 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Park Recreation spring 
break camp 

Looking for something fun 
for children to do during spring 
break? The Park is offering a 
Multi-Sport Camp. The camp is 
run by Sport Camps of America. 
The basic skills and rules will be 



taught to everyone, and games 
will be played in each of the dif- 
ferent sports. Sports covered 
include: soccer, basketball, T- 
ball/baseball and floor hockey. 
On the fifth day, the children 
will be able to pick which sport 
they would like to play. The 
class will be held at Antioch 
Upper Grade gym and will run 
Monday to Friday, March 24 to 
28. Ages 4 to 5 years from 9 to 11 
a.m. and ages 6 to 10 years from 
11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Each child will 
receive a Sport Camp of 
America T-Shirt and other sur- 
prises. Call 395-2160 for more 
information or stop by the Parks 
and Recreation office to register 
at 874 Main St. 



L 



LAkElANd 

CLxssifiEds 

Get the Job DoneI 

CaU (847) 225-8161 




Speed racers 

Jeffrey Heischberg, 10 and Andy Dawson, 8, both from 
Antioch, cheer on their cars during the Pinewoocl Derby 
Races held at Grass Lake School.— Pholo by Linda 
Chapman 



, 




h 



PRIVATE KINDERGARTEN 

• Certified Teachers, 10-1 rali» • Individual centers 

• Computers, educational games, art, physical development 

• Whole language and 'math their way' approach 

• Nutritional' lunches and snacks included 

• Includes Total Coverage 6:30 a.m. to f> p.m. 

• Before and after school care included 

SUMMER DA¥ CAMP 

• 5-8 year olds • Coverage 6:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. 

• 10-1 Student/Teacher ratio 

• Swimming Lessons • Karate lessons 

• Weekly field trips and Guest speakers 
■ Weekly themes and topics 

• Hot lunches and snacks • Crafts & Creative play time 



CoiNMUNiTy CaLencIar 

March 1997 Lakeland 



_..__... — < . 

IDCFS Ucerwod 309 Granada Btvd. G^^Z 6^228$% 



NcwBpopera 



FRIDAY, MARCH 7 

1 p.m. World Day of Prayer, St. Mark Lutheran Church, 1822 
Grand Ave. Lindenhurst, program written by women of S. 
Korea, prayers for peace and reuniting people of Korea, call 
church for information 



SATURDAY, MARCH 8 

Junior Women's Club Comedy Night at St. Peter 



SUNDAY, MARCH 9 

8 a.m.-Noon Pancake Breakfast Student Assistance Program at 
Antioch Community High School, cost $4 for adults, $3 for 
senior citizens, and $2.50 for children 4-12 

1 -4 p.m. Pasta buffet dinner at Antioch VFW post $1 for 
adults, $6 for children 6-12 

7-9 p.m. Open Gym Antioch Community High School 



MONDAY, MARCH 10 

7-10 p.m. Men's Basketball at Antioch Evangelical Free Church, 
call 395-4117 

7:30 p.m. Antioch Jaycees meet at the Regency Inn in Antioch, 
Rte. 173 Call 395-8035 



TUESDAY, MARCH 11 

9:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Antioch United Methodist Church holds 
Parents Day Out for infants to 5 year olds, call 395-1259 

1 1 a.m. AARP (for adults 55 and older) meets at Antioch Senior 
Center, 817 Holbeck Dr., for more info call Cecilia Jordan at 
395-7030 

6-8 p.m. Reception for Heather Kufalk-Marolta, candidate tor 
Antioch Township Assessor at Best Western Regency Inn, 350 
Hvvy. 1 73, Antioch. Free Hors d'oeuvres, cash bar 

6:30-8:30 p.m. High School Basketball, a full court, at Antioch 
Evangelical Free Church 

6:45 p.m. Antioch VFW Bingo, refreshments available. Doors 
open at 4:30 p.m. Call John Kernick, 395-5393 



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12 

A Safe Place/Lake County Crisis Center, free support group for 
women victims of abuse meets in Round Lake, call 249-4450 

6:30 p.m. CPR classes sponsored by the Antioch Rescue 
Squad, call 395-0302 for reservations 

6:30-8:15 p.m. AWANAS Club for children 3 years to 6th grade 
meets at Evangelical Free Church, call 395-41 1 7 

7 p.m. TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) meets at Holy Family 
Church, Lake Villa, call 587-1422 or 587-5994 

7 p.m. Antioch Township Board meets 



THURSDAY, MARCH 13 

9-1 1 a.m. MOPS (Mothers of Pre-Schoolers) meets at Antioch 
Evangelical Free Church. S5 covers craft and child care (meets 
September through May only) Call Dawn Brandcs (414) 877- 
2725 or 395-41 17 

9:30-1 1 :30 a.m. Prairie Patch Quilling Guild meets at Shepherd 
of the Lakes Church, Grayslake, call 223-1204 

6 p.m. TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) meets at Antioch 
Manor Apartments, call 395-8143 

7:30 p.m. ACHS AMPS meets in band room, call 395-7826 



GOT SOMETHING GOING ON? CALLUS! 

A 1 4 day notice is needed for all calendar requests. 

Ask for Priscilla Marotto 223-8161, ext. 142 



■ 



UkekNci Newspaper- MarcIi 7, 1997 






j 



i 



IVlARRJAqE LJCEINSES 



Jan. 14 - Feb 13 

Clifford Frank Moreci of Antioch 
and Susan McAIoon of Lindenhurst. 

Jeffrey John Rundle of Gumee 
and Victoria Alice Sherrod of Antiocli. 

Daniel Joseph Fiocchi and Jil) 
Madden of Antioch. 

Jason Aaron Goodman and Kelly 
Marie Pramshafer of Antioch. 

Anthony Frank Panico III and 



Christine Linda Harrison of Antioch. 

Gregorio Vazquez Catache and 
Noemi Hernandez Flores of Antioch. 

Wilson Orlando Ramirez of 
Waukegan and Constance Rhea Louis 
of Antioch. 

Steven Gregory DeRcu and 
Michelle Dschida of Antioch. 

Shawn David Ellis and Nadine 
Bowen of Antioch. 



Share Food offers Easter dinner 



The Antioch Share Food pro- 
gram had such a great success with 
the special Thanksgiving and 
Christmas packages that they have 
decided to have a special Easter 
package in addition to the regular 
share order. 

ForS14 plusS2.25 transporta- 
tion, participants will receive a 
special Easter dinner. The 
regular share program is also avail- 
able for the month of March at a 
cost of $15.25. Participants will 
receive a variety of meats, fresh 
fruits and vegetables and a few 
extra surprises. If interested in 
these share food programs, order 



by March 6 at the following sites: 

First National Bank of 
Antioch, State Bank of the Lakes 
(Antioch) and the Lake Villa 
Township office. Delivery will be 
March 22 between 9:30 and 10:30 
a.m. at the Antioch VFW Hall on 
North Ave. in Antioch. 

The Share program is a way of 
getting involved with the commu- 
nity. Volunteer two hours of time a 
month and pay SI 5.25 and receive 
S35 to $40 worth of groceries a 
month. 

Any questions, contact 
Ardeen Harris, the Antioch Share 
Food coordinator at 395-2761. 



pENqAqEMENT 



Diamantopoulos-Burgis 

Mr. and Mrs. Gus IDiamantopoulos of 
Antioch, announce the engagement of their 
daughter, Tina Diamantopoulos of Chicago, 
to Jeffrey Burgis of Chicago, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. William Burgis of Park Ridge. 

The ceremony will be at the 
Annunciation Cathedral in Chicago on May 

3. 

The bride-to-be is a 1908 graduate of 
Antioch Community High School and a 
1991 graduate of Marquette Univ. earning a 
bachelor of arts degree (cum laude) and a 
J.D. from Northwestern Univ. School of Law 
En political science. She is employed as an 
attorney for U.S. Securities and Exchange 
Commission Midwest Regional Office in 
Chicago. 

The groom-to-be is a 1988 graduate of 
Maine South High School and a 1992 gradu- 
ate of the Univ. of Notre Dame earning a 
bachelor of arts degree in economics and 
CPA. He is an associate for A.T. Kearney, 
Inc. in Chicago. 



L 




COMING TO A 
STATION NEAR YOU, 

TWO NEW TRAINS ON 
METRA'S NORTH CENTRAL SERVICE. 

• Later morning and evening rush-hour service to and from Chicago. 

• Adds Western Ave. stop for a.m. bus connections to North Michigan Ave. 

• Expands service to O'Hare Airport during peak travel times. 

• Downtown travel available from all stations during "non-train"' times via Pace 
bus service to Metro's UP/NW and Milwaukee train lines. 

• Daily and long-term parking at all North Central Service stations. 

Request your co/y ofMetra's "North Central Service Rider's Guide," 
Call l-80041-METRA (416-3872). 



STATION 


AN - 


riOCH TO CHICAGO 


ANTIOCH 


5:27o.m. 


6:02a.m. 


6:35g m. 


7:03a.m. 


3:29p.m. 


LAKEVRLA 


5:33 


6:08 


6:41 


7:09 


3:35 


ROUND IAKE BEACH 


5:37 


6:12 


6:45 


7:13 


3:39 


PRAIRIE CROSSING/ 












UBERTYVILLE 


5:43 


6:18 


6:51 


7:19 


3:45 


MUNDEUEIN 


5:49 


6:24 


6:57 


7:25 


3:51 


VERNON HIUS 


5:55 


6:30 


7:03 


7:31 


3:57 


PRAIRIE VIEW 


5:58 


6:33 


7:06 


7:34 


4:00 


BUFFALO GROVE 


6:02 


6:37 


7:10 


7:3B 


4:04 


WHEELING 


6:07 


6:42 


7:15 


7:43 


4:09 


PROSPECT HEIGHTS 


6:11 


6:46 


7:19 


7:47 


4:13 


O'HARE TRANSFER 


6:22 


6:57 


7:30 


7:58 


4:24 


•RIVER GROVE 


6:31 


7:06 


7:39 


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; UkelANd Newspapers M/vRCri 7, 1997 









Options — 

From page 1 

of the growth in the area," 

Novak said. 

Grayslake High School 
board expects to be out of room 
in about three years based on 
enrollment projections provid- 
ed by an independent demog- 
rapher. Novak said his board 
must make a decision as early 

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as this July to plan for the 
growth. 

ACHS board has committed 
to two high schools. They are 
keeping the existing campus 
and are looking to build anoth- 
er campus as enrollment swells 
down the road. 

"We will need to discuss this 
with our board to see how they 



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feel," said Dr. Dennis Hockney, 
ACHS superintendent of the 
latest two options. 

The other possibility is cre- 
ating a unit district within exist- 
ing boundaries of District 41. 
This option is different from the 
proposed unit district defeated 
by voters in 1994 because it 
doesn't include Millburn or 
Antioch elementary students or 
division of property. 

Novak said his board is will- 
ing to look at the new unit plan, 
however, he is concerned with 
the distribution of assets. 

If a district is created from a 

portion of an existing district, it 
gets a portion of the former dis- 
trict's assets based on student 
population. 

"We can't afford to pay $2 
million," Novak stressed. 

The entities have been 
meeting for a year trying to 



come up with a solution which 
is favorable to all the districts, 
which could be supported by 
the communities involved. 

However, each option con- 
sidered, such as a super unit 
district combining all elemen- 
tary districts into one high 
school district, creating two 
unit districts, creating a unit 
district without Millburn and 
doing nothing different were all 
rejected by the group. 

Lindenhurst is a prime 
example of why the group was 
formed. Lindenhurst children 
attend five school districts. 

Mayor Paul Baumunk didn't 
wish to comment on the 
process at this time but was 
upset with what happened at 
the Feb. 25 meeting. 

The next meeting is tentatively 
planned for March 31, 7 p.m. at the 
District 41 administrative complex. 




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Anniversary- 

From page 1" 

least one "ways and means" pro- 
ject. 

In addition to helping out in 
the Antioch community, the 
Antioch Junior Woman's Club 
keeps in contact with other clubs 
In Lake County as well as the 
General Federation of Women's 
Clubs of Illinois. 

"You learn so much from the 
other clubs," said Pat .Clark of the 
Antioch Junior Woman's Club. 
"You share ideas and bring them 
back to your own clubs." 

The Antioch Junior Woman's 
Club also caters to the individual 
needs and concerns of women by 
providing social camaraderie. 

"I can call any member in this 
club and ask for help for any- 
thing," said Amy Winters, current 
club president. 

During meetings, the club 
tries to provide informative pro- 
grams and speakers on various 
topics ranging from women's fit- 
ness to identifying the signs of 
chiid abuse. 

They also use the meetings to 
try to identify needs in the com- 
munity and devise ways to meet 
those needs. 

Last year, the club filled back- 
packs with personal items and 
donated them to PADS. The latest 
endeavor, for example, was the 
creation of a four-week baby-sit- 
ting clinic offered to young peo- 
ple. The baby-sitting clinic pro- 
vided information on a variety of 
topics for prospective baby-sit- 
ters. 

Antioch Junior Woman's Club 
members are not only excited 
about what they have accom- 
plished over the last 10 years, but 
they are equally excited about 
what the future holds. 

"We have many new young 
members," Winters said. "It's a 
real win-win situation when you 
have the experience of the older 
members and newer ideas of the 
newer members." 

That first group of women 
and those sure to come arc a liv- 
ing testimony of the Junior 
Woman's Club pledge which 
states in part: Live each day by 
trying to accomplish something, 
not merely to exist. 




Q race land Baptist Church. 258 Ida St, Antioch, IL 
Sunday School 11 am., morning Worship 11 am., 
Sunday Evening 7 p.m. Robert Williams, Pastor 

Flnrt Church of Christ, Scientist & Raiding Rm. Rta 
173 and Harden, Antioch. Phono (847) 395-1196, Sunday 
School, Sunday Church Service 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, 
8 p.m. 
Beautiful Savior Evangelical Lutheran Church. 

554 Partway, AnlSoch. Phono (947) 265-2450 
Sunday Worship at 9 a.m. Sunday School, High 
School & Adull Bible Classes 10:30 a.m. 

St Ignatius Episcopal. 977 Main st. Phuio (B47) 
395-0652. Low Mass 7:30 a.m., High Mass 8:30 
am. Sunday School 4 Nursury 9:30 a.m. 

Antioch Evangelical Free Church. 42429 N. Tiffany Rd. 
Phono (647) 385-4117. Sunday School 9;45 a.m., 
Sunday Worship 8:30, 11:00, 6:00, Children's Church 11 
a.m. Nursery both services. Awana Club. 

SL Stephen Lutheran Church. Hillside & Rta. 59, 
phono (847) 395-3359. Sunday Worship, 8, 9:1 5 & 
10:30. Church School 9 am. , Sunday. The Rev. Charles 
E. Miller, Pastor. 

Christian Life Fellowship Assemblies of Ood Church. 
41625 Deep Lake Rd., Antioch. Phone (847) 395-8572. 
Sunday School ( all agos) 9 am., Sunday morning 
Worship 10 a.m., Children's Church 10 a.m., Sunday 
EvonJng Worship 8:30 p.m., Wednesday Worship & 
Children's Program 7 am., Tues. Women's Fellowship & 
Blbio Study 9*11:30 am. Jeff Brussaty, Pastor. 



Come Woreliip Witli Uis^p^ 

A. Directory Of Antioch Area. Churches \f YVfi 



Faith Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main St. Phono 
(708) 395-1600. Sunday Worship 8 & 10:30 am., 
Sunday School 9:25 am., Sat 7 p.m., Rev. Gregory 
Hormanson, Pastor . Christian Day School (708) 395-1664. 



Millburn Congregations! United Church of Christ. 
Grass Lake Rd. at Rta. 45 Phone (847) 356-5237. 
Sunday service 10 a.m. Children's program ID am. Rev. 
Paul R, Moltzer, Pastor. 



United Methodist Church of Antioch. 848 Main SL 
Phone (847) 395-1259. Worship 8:30 & 10 a.m.; 
Fellowship Time 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School 10 am. The 
Rev. Kurt A. Qamlin, Pastor. 

8L Peter 1 ! Church. 557 W. Lake SL, Antioch. Phono 
(847) 395-0274. Masses weekdays, 7:15 & 8 a.m., 
Sunday 6:30, 8, 9:30, 11 am. & 12:15 p.m. Saturday 
5:30 p.m. Pastor Rev. Father Lawrence Hartley. 

Chain of Lakes Community Bible Church. 23201 W. 
Grass Lako Rd., Antioch, Phone (847) 638-0103 Sunday 
Worship 8:15 and 10:45. Sunday School 9:45, Children's 
Church 10:45. Youth, Women's, Awana & Small Group 
ministries. Senior Pastor, Rev. Don S woo tog. 



Good Shepherd Luthsm Church (Missouri Synod), 
25100 W. Grand Ave. (Rtw. 59 & 132), Lake Villa 
(047) 356-5158. Sunday Worship 8:15 & 10:45 a.m.; 
Sunday School (3 and up) and Bible Study 9:30 am. 
Rev. John Zalfrrwr, Pastor, Christian Pro school. 



Dan Dugenake, Director 
This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Heme of Antioch 



Jf~\ 



".: ■'■:■:■- 



bpORTS 



Boys BAskETbAll 
Area Stance Nqs 

North Suburban 



[School 



Conf.O'AU 



[Warren 12-2 

[Lake Forest 11-3 

[Libertyville 11-3 

Stevenson 7-7 

Zion-Benton 6-8 

Antioch 6-8 

North Chicago 2-12 

Mundelein 1-13 

Jtii 



Northwest suburban" 



Grant 


13-2 


18-8 


Marian Central 


10-5 


18-8 


Grayslake 


8-7 


12-12 


Johnsburg 


6-9 


10-14 


Round Lake 


6-9 


12-15 


VVauconda 


2-13 


7-17 




Big Northern White 
Final Standings 

Winnebago 13-2 22-4 
Stillman Valley 10-5 13-11 
Richmnd-Burtn 6-9 10-14 
Hampshire 5-10 7-17 
Genoa-Kingstn 3-12 7-22 
Huntley 2-13 8-10 

GIrIs BAskErbAll 
Area STANdiNqs 

North Suburban 



School 



W-L 



Libertyville 
1-ake Forest 
Warren 
Stevenson 
Antioch 
Zion-Benton 
Mundelein 
North Chicago 



13-1 

12-2 

11-3 

7-7 

5-9 

4-10 

3-11 

1-13 



Northwest Subu rban 

Wauconda 



Grant 
Johnsburg 
Grayslake 
Marian Central 
Round Lake 



TTT 

10-5 

10-5 

7-8 

3-12 

1-14 



Eighth grade 
Sequoits .500 

The Antioch Junior 
Sequoits eighth grade boys 
basketball team gained two 
wins and reached the .500 
mark in games last week. 

The Junior Sequoits 
downed Grayslake 54-40. 
Brandon White scored 15 
points, Eric White had 12, 
Bob Huebner 6 and Bryant 
Popp 5. Mike Perrone, Eric 
Langer and Rob Lodesky led 
the rebounding effort 
Justen Kent, Ari Brown and 
Zach Pratt were leaders on 
defense. 

Antioch beat Stevenson 
59-51. Eric White had 19 
points, Kent 9, Brown 6 and 
Perrone 6. Perrone and Scott 
Hodina pulled down the 
most rebounds. Lodesky and 
Popp led the defense. 

The seventh grade team 
won three of four games for 
an 1 1-5 record, They beat 
Stevenson 59-42; beat 
Highland Park 50-41 and 
downed Grayslake 61-45. 
The loss came to Deerfield, 
54-39. 

JoeFinkelberghad 11 
points against Stevenson 
and Chris Kocinski had 9, 
Andrew Kinney and Jeff 
Huebner 0. 

Kocinski pumped in 22 
points against Highland Park 
while Brian Walsh had 6. 



March 7, 1997 UkElANd Newspapers 



Prince of Peace tops 

Prince of Peace School in Lake Villa took first, 
place in an Antioch High invitational volleyball 
tournament. 

Eight area grade schools participated in the 
two-day event. 

The final match for the championship was a 
"best of three" competition between Antioch St. 
Peter and Prince of Peace. St. Peter won the first 
game 15-1. 

But Price of Peace came back strong to win the 
next two games, 15-10 and 15-12. The team is 
coached by Lorraine Gopp. 

Team members are from left: Jason Adams, Joe 
Wilson, Kyle Richards, Matt Green, Jack Lorang, 
Kevin Barclay, Andy Gundrum, Erik Hudson, Brian 
Radke. Not pictured: Chris Bernhardt , Matt Boiler, 
Scott Greenhill and Steve Goldblas. 



i 



SPORTS 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Bulldogs leave Sequoits singing the blues 



STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Reporter 

As anyone who hears the 
National Anthem at Grant High 
can verify, Chuck Bosworth has a 
future in singing. 

His plans include a music 
scholarship to attend Miilikin 
University. Thanks to a 22-point 
effort and some intense play from 
teammates as well, the senior has 
a present in basketball as well. 

Grant proved to all doubters 
that it had earned a first-round 
home game with a 62-56 win over 
Antioch in the first round of the 
Waukegan sectional. 

"I'm absolutely thrilled," 
Bosworth said about having a 
chance to play Deerfield in the 
regional final away on March 7. 
Deerfield comes in as the top 
seeded team and has Lake 
County's all-time leading scorer 
in Ryan Hogan, but Tuesday it 
was the Bulldogs time to shine. 

They gained revenge for a 
non-conference loss to Antioch 
just before the seeding meeting 
as they held Chris Groth to near 
his average of 24 points and only 
seven in the final period. 

"We wanted him to shoot 
twos, not threes," Bosworth said. 
"Dave Guisinger did a great job 
on him," Bosworth said. 

Guisinger did not play in the 
first meeting and neither did 
Chris Gallimore for Grant. 

Some other heroes for the 
Northwest Suburban Conference 
champs, now 18-8: 

Kirk Johnson and his first-half 
rebounds. 

Dave Fries with 8 rebounds as 



a 6-foot forward. 

A 24-6 advantage in made free 
throws for Grant. 

"Groth got his points - he earned 
every one of them. We changed up 
on him so he did not end up getting 
20. Everybody else did their job. We 
had pretty good interior and exterior 
defense. We are happy with our de- 
fensive game," Grant coach Tom 
Maple said. 

Grant made 18-of-23 free 
throws in the final quarter. "That 
is enough to win most games," 
Maple said. "We also shot the ball 
better from the field." 

Bosworth's 22 points came 
the hard way - on penetrating 
moves on clear out plays to the 
basket. His three-point shots 
were minimal but he scored 10 
points better than his average. 

Grant held a 23-18 lead at 
halftime as they led by as many as 
seven in the second quarter. 

Bosworth had four points at 
the close of the third period for a 
7-point lead, 37-30. the lead 
opened to 11 points in the first 
three minutes of the fourth pe- 
riod on two Jeff Ramlow free 
throws, 

A three-pointer by Mike 
Nielsen keyed a seven point run 
for the 11-14 Sequoits, but Grant 
made 5-of-6 free throws to stay 
ahead. 

Freshman Don Lackey gave 
ACHS two double digit scorers 
with 10 points, the final hoop 
coming on a tip-in for a six-point 
deficit. 

As the euphoria of the 18th 
win dies down, the reality set in 
about Hogan and Deerfield. 




Grant's Chuck Bosworth takes off with the ball in a 62-56 win , 
against Antioch. Bosworth scored 22 points in the game.— Photo 
by Steve Young 





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LaI<eUncI Newspapers MaiicIi 7, 1997 



; 



Lindenhurst Police Basketball League 

1996-1997 Championship Tournament 

Results from Feb. 28 Playoff games 

Game 1: Jacobsen Excavating 62; MGN Lock & Key, 49 
Game 2: Lindenhurst Travel, 48; North Star Travel, 31 
Game 3: Lake Villa Twp. Lions, 38; McDonald's, 42 
Game 4: Linden Barber Shop, 48; Kiwanis, 41 

High Scorers 

Jacobsen Excavating, Joe Miller, 18 

MGN Lock & Key, Tony Hunsberger, 17 

Lindenhurst Travel, George Fuchs, 14 

North Star Travel, Andy Green, 23 

Lake Villa Twp. Lions, Matt Heitman, 14; Eric Green, 14 

McDonald's, Charles Millovich, 14 

Lindenhurst Barber Shop, Steve Hovey, 12; Dan Elfring, 12 

Kiwanis, Joe Winner, 14 

March 7 Playoff gomes 

Game 7: 6:30 p.m. Jacobsen Excavating , (Winner Game 3) vs. 
Lindenhurst Travel (Winner Game 4) 
Game 8: 7:30 p.m. McDonald's (Winner Game 5) vs. 
Linden Barber Shop (Winner Game 6) 

March 14 Playoff games 

Third place game 

Game 9: 6:30 p.m. — Loser of Game 7 vs. Loser of Game 8 

Championship Game 

Game 10: 7:30 p.m. — Winner Game 7 vs. Winner Game 8 

Awards banquet to follow championship game 

March 14 at Lhideuhurst Men's Club 

March 21 All-Stars vs. Coaches, 7 p.m. at 

BJ Hooper School, Lindenhurst 

The Lindenhurst Police Basketball League All-Star Team: 

Mike Love, Jacobsen Excavating 

Frank Kersey, McDonald's 

Joe Winner, Kiwanis 

Tony Fuchs, Lindenhurst Travel 

Matt Hanson, North Star Travel 

Dan Elfring, Linden Barber Shop 

David Corey, Anderson Tile 

Eric Green, Lake Villa Twp. Lions Club 

Eric Bubash, Eagle Foods 

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Going for two 

Liam Moran, playing for MGN Lock & Key, flies high to make two 
points in Lindenhurst Police Basketball League championship play- 
off game. MGN lost the game to Jacobsen Excavating with a score 
of 62-49.— Photo by Roselle Love 



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Kerns gains Ail- 
American status 

Joe Kerns of Grayslake became 
the first College of Lake County 
wrestler to gain All-American status 
for the second straight year as he 
earned a sixth place at the national 
junior college wrestling meet. 

Kerns improved his place by 
one from a year earlier by winning 
three matches on Friday in 
Bismark, North Dakota.- 

"Joe had his focus' for the first 
day like 1 have never seen him 
before. He wanted to do well in that 
level of competition," CLC coach 
Stan Pasiewicz said. 

In the first round, Kerns de- 
feated a Rochester, Minn, wrestler 
10-2. In the quarterfinals he 
downed a Highline, Wash, wrestler 
5-3 on a last-second takedown. 

In the semis, he lost to the even- 
tual national champ at 142 pounds, 
from Clackamas, Ore. in a fall. He 
lost to rival James Wright of Lincoln 
and gained sixth place. 

"He was wrestling some solid 
kids with good records. He frus- 
trated them in that he did not allow 
many points. Saturday, his 
momentum was not there as he 
knew he had placed," Pasiewicz 
said. 

Kerns completed the season 12- 
6. 

Previous ail-Americans were 
Casey Welter from Grant; Wilbur 
Borero of Waukegan; Joe Belcher of 
Round Lake; Curt Onstad of 
Grayslake; Vernoe Pope of 
Waukegan. CLC has had 24 na- 
tional qualifiers since 1969 and 
three national champs. Fourteen of 
the national qualifers were coached 
by Pasiewicz. 

Tony Carlsen of Libertyville at 
126 had qualified for nationals as 
well as Shane Cook of Waukegan at 
150 pounds but did not compete. 

CLC placed fourth in the sec- 
tional meet, 20th out of 35 teams at 
national. 

Other squad members were: 
Ken Gersch of McHenry, Oscar 
Rivera of Waukegan and Steve 
Brzykcy, a Warren High grad. 

As for the future, CLC plans an 
organizational meeting March 10 to 
discuss application process, cost 
comparisons, practice and season 
schedules and academic and 
wrestling expectations. 

For more information, call 
Pasiewicz at 223-3600 days or 587- 
7281 evenings. 

"I met a lot of kids at sectional 
and regional - I feel comfortable 
about the future, " Pasiewicz said. 

ACHS trio shows 
perimeter shot talent 

Antioch High may have been 
bumped from the first round of the 
Waukegan sectional by Grant, but 
three Sequoits will continue on in 
the three-point shooting competi- 
tion March 7 at Decrfield. 

Senior reserve Paul Spronk and 
Mike Nielsen made 10-of-15 shots. 
Kevin Chutld, a senior guard, made 
8 to qualify. 

The battle at Grant featured a 
battle of the Bosworths. After tying 
in regulation with 6, there was a 
shoot-off from the baselines. Both 
made four, then frosh Wayne beat 
his older brother Chuck with a 4-3 
tally in the next round. 

"If 'there was another tic, I would 
have told him, 'you take it'," Chuck 
Bosworlh joked. 

Chuck Itasworth scored 22 
points In Grant's 62-56 win. 

Grant (18-8) is at top-seeded 
Deerfield March 7 with a spot in the 
sectional semifinals in Waukegan 
March 1 1 at slake. 




MarcIi 7, 1997 UkElAivd Newspapers 



St. Peter's 7th grade team 

St. Peter's 7th grade team finished 4th place in the East Division Conference. Team members 
are: Jeff Huebner, John Jansta, Kevin Mathewson, Kevin Olszewski, Ben Renschen, Jonathon 
Winkler, Mike Addison, Pat McConnell, Travis Mumm. Coaches were: Bob Huebner, Mike 
Renschen. 




Mumm and Asst. Bill Dzike 



Carmel looks for offense 
as ESCC season closes 



Offense was the priority for 
Carmel as the Corsairs prepared 
for the post-season tourney with 
hopes of knocking off one of the 
top seeds. 

Carmel clashed with Warren 
High, the second seed of the 
Waukegan sectional in the first 
round on Wednesday. The Corsairs 
had the tempo they liked but not 
the result in a 42-39 loss at Notre 
Dame on Friday in a East Suburban 
Catholic Conference game. 

"Both teams slowed the game 
down and were patient," Carmel 
coach Ben Berg said. 

Carmel was down 35-32 in the 
fourth quarter only to see Notre 
Dame extend the lead to five, with a 
key put back of a missed shot. 
Carmel trimmed die lead on Brian 
Stone free throws with 11 seconds 
left for a three-point deficit. But 
Notre Dame shut down the CHS 
offense in the waning seconds. 

"Lately we have been doing a 
better job on rebounds. It was a 
22-22 stalemate, but they had 13 
on the offensive glass. We have to 
hold Warren to eight or 10 of- 



fensive rebounds," Berg said be- 
fore the tourney. 

Notre Dame switched to a tri- 
angle and two defense, putting the 
man-to-man pressure on guards 
John Koch and soph Nick Leider. 
"They had less opportunities to get 
the ball," Berg said. 

Schmidt led the CHS offense 
with 12 points. "We would like to 
have him get the ball more because 
he shoots 61 percent from the 
field," Berg said. 

The two teams were dead- 
locked at 16-16 at halftime. The 
Corsairs finished 4-9 in the ESCC 
and were 6-19 before the clash at 
WTHS. 

A young and changing roster 
has meant several players have had 
a chance to contribute. Leider and 
Greg Teipel are two of those who 
are returning. 

"We have a lot of young guys 
who are coming back. Because of 
where we are developmentalJy and 
our tough schedule, we have not 
had a lot of blowout games. We play 
two or three juniors and a sopho- 
more," Berg said. 



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LAkelANcI Newspapers MAiich 7, 1997 



Antioch Township subdivision still on hold 



ALEC JUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

Lake Villa trustees and the devel- 
oper ofaproposed subdivision, most- 
ly in Antioch Township, still haven't 
come to an annexation agreement 

The developer, Rich Ender, 
doesn't want to pay a water recap- 
ture agreement with the village. If he 
is unwilling to pay the fee, the board 



will not amend the annexation 
agreement. The board approved an 
agreement, all that is required is the 
develope 's signature. 

"If you have capacity, you 
should hive to pay your fair share," 
Loffredo said. 

The board has consistently 
required all developers to either con- 
struct a w ell or pay for their share into 



Tonl Laurfch, 1713 E. Grand, 



name(s) of the person(s) owning, 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Legal Support Services. 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS IS TO BE CONDUCJTED OR TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 1713 E. Grand Ave., Llndenhurst, IL 60046. 847-265-8660. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR RESIDENCE ADDHES$(ES) OF THE PERSON(S) OWN- 
ING, CONDUCTING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Undenhurst, IL 60046. 356-4479, 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify (hat the undersigned Intend(s) to conduct the above named business 
from the locatlon(s) Indicated and that the true or real full 
conducting or transacting the business Is/are correct as shown, 
Tonl Laurich 
February 24, 1997 

The foregoing Instrument was acknowledged before rlne by the person{s) Intending to 
conduct the business this 24lh day of February, 1997. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Mellnda M. Perry 

Notary Public 

Received: Feb. 24, 1997 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0297D-654-LV/LN 

February 28, 1997 

March 7, 1997 

March 14, 1997 



creating more capacity to the system. 

"It would go toward the devel- 
opment of another well site as it is 
needed," Loftredo explained. 

The proposed development is a 
60-acre tract on the north side of 
Grass Lake Road just west of Oakland 
School. The subdivision is planned 
to have 120 single-family homes. 

Approximately 40 acres of the 
land is in Antioch Township. If 
agreement is reached, this will be the 
first subdivision from the Village of 
Lake Villa in Antioch Township. 



CoMMUNity 

Calvary Christian 
sets open house 

Calvary Christian School will 
Also involved is a possible sewer host an Open House for any parents 



For that to happen, the village 
and developer must work out the 
recapture issue, 



hookup to Oakland School. The 
developer has agreed to provide a 
sewer hookup to the school if the 
agreement is approved. 

Two months ago the issue 
was whether the village was 
responsible for snow plowing 
Lee Street. A month ago the 
concern was in the language of 
the agreement. • 



interested in enrolling their children 
for the 1997-98 school year on Friday, 
March 7 at 9 a.m. Parents will have the 
opportunity to meet with Calvary's 
Principal Lynn Gomoli, tour the facil- 
ity, visit the classrooms, and receive 
information about the school. 

Calvary is located at 134 Monaville 
Road in Lake Villa For further infor- 
mation, call 356-6181. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
CENTRAL BAPTIST CHILDREN'S HOME 
The Bright Beginnings Children's Center announces the sponsorship of the Child and Adult Care Food Program, This program is designed 
primarily to provide nulrillous meals to children In child care centers, outside school hour programs, and family day care homes. Meals are 
available at no separate charge. In the operation of the Child and Adult Care Food Program, no child will be discriminated against because of 
race, color, national origin, sex, age, or handicap. Any person who believes that he or she has been discriminated against in any USDA-retat- 
ed activity, should write Immediately to the Secretary of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. 20250. 

U.S.D.A. INCOME ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR FREE AND REDUCED PRICE MEALS 
The amount of reimbursement received by this center Is based on the number of enrolled children whose family household Income is at or 

Household Size Lovel for Free Meals Level for Reducod.Prlce Meals 







Year 


Month 


Week 


1 




$1 0,062 


S839 


S194 


2 — 




13,468 


1,123 


259 


3 




16,874 


1,407 


325 


4 




20,280 


1,690 


390 


5 




23,686 


1,974 


456 


6 




27,092 


2,258 


521 


7 




30,498 


2,542 


587 


e 




33,904 


2,826 


652 


Each Additional 








Family 


Member Add 


+3.406 


+ 2B4 


+66 




Marian Central Catholic High School 

Rt. 120 (fl/ioih mile E of RL 47) ■ Woodstock 
Sat. APRIL 12, 1997 7:30pm til 7 Doors Open 4pm 

•TWO COMPLETE SESSIONS 

•GUARANTEE OF 54,000." 

•SPECIAL GAMES 

•MINIMAL CHARGE S30." FOR 

ENTIRE EVENING 
(15 CARDS EACH SESSION) 

TO RESERVE SEATS 

•$10 DEPOSIT REQUIRED FOR 

EACH 30 C AR0SET 




Smoking — • 
Room 4 
Available "S 



tostfX 



Year 


Month 


Wook 


$14,139 


$1,194 


$276 


19,166 


1,598 


369 


24,013 


2,002 


462 


28,660 


2,405 


555 


33,707 


2.809 


649 


38,554 


3,213 


742 


43,401 


3,617 


835 


48,248 


4,021 


928 


+4,467 


+404 


+94 
0397A-667-LV 
March 7, 1997 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



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S1O.O0 deposit required' 
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PUBLIC NOTICE 

NOTICE OF FILING 

NORTHERN ILLINOIS GAS COMPANY hereby gives notice to the 
public that it has filed with the Illinois Commerce Commission on 
February 28, 1997, testimony and exhibits for Docket No. 97-0022, set- 
ting forth a reconciliation of the Company's Gas Supply Cost revenues 
with actual gas costs for 1 996, 

Further information with respect thereto may be obtained either 
directly from this Company or by addressing the Chief Clerk of the 
Illinois Commerce Commission at Springfield, Illinois 62794. 

A copy of this filing may be Inspected by an interested party at any 
business office of this Company. 

NORTHERN ILLINOIS GAS COMPANY 

-K.L. Halloran, Vice President 

0397A-665-LV 

March 7, 1997 

March 14, 1997 



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[ 



Arbor Day Foundation 

Sets Goal to Plant 10 Million 
Trees During 125th Anniversary 



We Need 

More Trees 

Where We live 

■ We Need 
More Trees 
for Wildlife 





Trees help make nature a pan of our daily lives. Trees provide nesting sites 
tor songbirds, and food and cover (or a woe variety ol wildlife. 



We Need 
More Trees 
to Conserve 
Energy 




Cities without trees are 'heal islands'; 100 million additional mature trees in 
U.S. cities would save S 2 billion per year in energy costs. The objective ol 
the Arbor Day Foundation's Tree City USA program is more trees throughout 
Americas towns and cities. 



■ We Need 
More Trees 
to Increase 
Property Values 

'M*5 ^Piv- ttjjffHt fame ca*\ imttease Us va&sup fo ih% ca inote. 
7& if. • Mtti A&r&ttCDt fatton -tfocuh. ftoAve Cflffin an/ 

^ SH.j.-Hidia fom. IktiphoinJt mi m o^ffi benetfk. 



MEL 



the?; 




Minim 

ami Am* fa* 



iQlttJZttl U-J& *> 
ce*Ktety anfftt'f art 



Scut« «-u, 0a t r <xra+cr UW*Ftrt«i*i«» H*mi\)**i*<dt&'W)tvr** UT * lr 1 CMV 



The flowers of the White Flowering Dogwood (Comus tlorida) are large and showy in the spring, Dogwoods' green leaves turn 
purple in Ihe fall. Their glossy red fruits provide food for songbirds during the lall and winter. 

► Ten Free 

Flowering Trees 



Ten free flowering trees will be given 
to each person who joins The National 
Arbor Day Foundation. 

The ten trees are two While Flowering 
Dogwoods, two Flowering Crobapples, two 
Golden Raintrecs, two Washington Haw- 
thorns, and two American Rcdbuds. 

"This year is the 125th Anniversary of 
Arbor Day, and the free (lowering trees are 
part of The National Arbor Day Foundation's 
Trees for America campaign to plant 10 
million trees in 1997," John Rosenow, the 
Foundation's president, said. 

These compact trees were selected for 
planting in large or small spaces," Rosenow 
said. "They will give your home the beauty of 
lovely pink, white, and yellow flowers — nnd 
also provide winter berries and nesting sites 
for songbirds." 

The trees will be shipped postpaid al the 
right time for planting in your area, February 
through May in the spring, or October 
through mid-December in the fall, along with 
enclosed planting instructions. The six to 
twelve inch trees are guaranteed to grow or 
they will be replaced free of charge. 

Members also receive a subscription to the 
Foundation's bimonthly publication, Arbor 
Day, and The Tree Book with information 
about tree planting and care. 

"Planting trees is something that each of 
us can do to leave our mark on the earth," 
Rosenow said. "Tree planting is a positive net 



that will improve our neighborhoods and 
communities, and make life better for future 
generations." 

America Needs More Trees 

The United Slates has lost a third of its forest 
cover during the last 200 years. 

Our towns and cities should have twice as 
many street trees as we have today. 

We need more trees around our homes and 
throughout our communities. We need more 
trees to protect our farm fields and our rivers 
and streams. To provide wood for our homes 
and the thousands of products we use every day. 

Trees Help Conserve Energy 

Trees cool our homes and entire cities in the 
summer, and slow cold winter winds. Shade 
trees and windbreaks can cut home utility bills 
15-35Cf. 

Trees clean the air we breathe. They provide 
life-giving oxygen while they remove particulates 
from the air and reduce atmospheric carbon 
dioxide. 

Trees fight erosion, and they provide food, 
shelter, and nesting sites for songbirds. 

You can help make the future better and more 
secure by planting trees. Join today, and plant 
yourTVees for America! 





The National 

Arbor Day Foundation " 

vyww.a rtx>rday.org 




The National Arbor Day Foundation 
mail to: I MMrbor Avenue. Ncbrxska (JtvAEWMO^ ^ _ 



Trees Make a World of Difference. 

Trees can truly transform the environment and quality of life in both rural and urban areas. 



World Without Trees 




IIIonlilK I'npmutlwl Sllty. Flood- Sun-IUkcd Rapid Gtitllcd 

Soil Farmstead.* Prone Rivers CJlles Kunolf Farmland 



Protected Sheltered Natural 

Field.* Farmstead* .Stream* 



Shaded Homes Forested Productive 
and Street* Slopes Farmland 



fifl co 



COMMUNITY UkElANd Newspapers MAnch 7, 1997 





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MarcN 7, 19,97 UkeUwd Newspapers LAKE LIFE 



Dudley. Moore performs with 
Lake Forest Symphony at CLC 

PAGE B4 




7 ^SS^S^^^~ r _ r _~: ■'. 




New era in diagnostic 
technology dawns at MRI 

PAGE B14 




<■. 



g 



.-.-- 




Lakeland 

Newpapers 





i.^JJ'^F 




CLC ce 
with 




Hhough temporary signs directed students 
amid the hum of power tools, classes began 
back in January in the new Instructional . 
Performing Arts Building at the College of 
Lake County. . ' 

The public is invited to join in official 
grand opening festivities that begin this weekend. 
"Bravissimo!" will feature a dedication ceremony begin- 
ning at 1 p.m., March 8, in the lobby, followed by a sam- 
pling of dance, music and theater performances. Special 
events throughout the next two weeks will give students 
and the public a sparkling introduction to the potential of 
the new center. 

"This facility is better than many I have seen at four- 

SUZIE REED 

Staff Reporter 



lebrates the arts in high style 
new Performing Arts building 



year colleges," said Gwethalyn Bronner, a fine arts gradu- 
ate of Northwestern University and director of the center. 
"It is state-of-the-art and it is new." 

Bronner plans to match that high quality with perfor- 
mances of the same caliber while providing the best pos- 
sible training in the arts. 

"One of my goals is to present the best entertainment 
that we can," she promised. "We will be presenting a vari- 
ety of artistic disciplines; it has to be high quality." 

Performances began last month with a concert by the 
Symphonic Pops Orchestra of Chicago. Workers.struggled 
to complete the 600-seat Mainstage theatre which 
includes a motorized orchestra pit and seats that can be 
removed for wheelchair access. 




BC&£aJM*t< i 



The College of Lake County will dedicate the new 
Instructional Performing Arts Building, March 8 at 
1 p.m. 



"There are no bad seats in this house," said Bronner, 
and technical theater instructor Tom Mitchell described 
equipment for the hearing impaired that will take the 
sound signals to special headsets. "We had an auditorium 
that was a glorified lecture hall t " he recalled. "Acoustically 
it was a very bad space." 

The official opening of the 
new building features a variety 
of special events and perfor- 
mances. 

The Studio Theatre was 
christened with a production 
of "The Glass Menagerie" that 
began Feb. 28 and runs 
through March 8. Students will 
greet spring with a production 
of "She Loves Me" in April. 

The 250-seat theater 
includes a center space that is 
completely flexible and a "trap 
room," explained technical 
theater instructor Tom 
Mitchell. "We're delighted with 
the intimacy of this space," he 
added. 

A poetry reading is sched- 
uled there for 7 p.m., March 20. 
Debra Bruce will read from her 
new collection entitled "What 
Wind Will Do." 




two weeks as all areas of the building come to life. 

The CLC Jazz Ensembles will warm up the audience for 
a special treat on March 12. At 7:30 p.m., jazz pianist 
Ramsey Lewis will deliver an unforgettable program and 
performance in the Mainstage Theatre. Although admis- 
sion is free, space is limited and tickets are required. 

CLC music instructor Bruce* 
Mack directs more than 100 instru- 
mental students. 

"We have a wind ensemble, 
and we hope to form a concert 
band," he said. "It will give more 
"people an opportunity to play." 

The instrumental music room 
is down a hallway lined with instruc- 
tional and rehearsal rooms to the 
right of the glass rotunda entrance. 
"They're close to the perform- 
ing area," explained Bronner. 
"(Students) just have to go right 
down the hall to the 600-seat theater 
where we will be doing most of our 
performing." 

The Mainstage Theatre will echo 
with the stirring sounds of the Illinois 
Brass Band on March 14. Tickets for 
their 8 p.m. performance are $10. A 
different beat is scheduled there for 
March 13. when Dudley Moore is to 



Lynelle Kirkwood from Clenview tunes her 

harp before performing with Chicago perform with the Lake Forest 

The opening celebration will Symphonic Pops at CLC's new Fine Art Symphony beginning at 8 p.m 

continue for the better part of Center. See BRAVISSIMO page Bl 1 




Valerie Pedonc of Gurnee stretches with her dance Performing Arts Building at College of Lake County, 
class before rehearsal in the new Instructional —Photo by Sandy Bressner 




LAKELIFE LaI<e1ancI Newspapers MarcU 7, 1997 



-Kid's Fare — — — — — — — 

Children's Theatre presents Velveteen Rabbit March 8 



; 0- 




%Mi 






1 ^« 


ij. <i 






1 *3 


3tji 


:■'■■'-. 






Ff5 






ivif V'A ■' ■■'■■ 


Saris. * I 





Velveteen Rabbit 



The classic children's story 
"The Velveteen Rabbit" will be 
brought to life in a theatre produc- 
tion at the College of Lake County 
on March B.The show, presented 
by Theatre Works/USA, will be 
performed at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. in 
the CLC auditorium at the . 
Grayslake Campus. Tickets are $3, 
all seats. Advance ticket purchase 
is recommended. Call 223-6601, 
ext. 2300 for reservations. 

Tea time 

Addy Walker, the popular fic- 
tional "American Girl," will talk 
about life during the Civil War at 
the American Girl Quilt and Tea, 
on Saturday, March 8, from 1 to 4 "" 




i 




ELEBRATE 

I Your Birthday 
On Skates! 

ALL PARTIES WELCOME 



p.m., at the Lake County Forest 
Preserves' Lake County Museum. 

Hear the tale of Addy's life as an 
African American girl growing up 
during the GivU War at this special 
living history performance. Then, 
grab a quilt square and learn basic 
guilting stitches. The program will 
be followed by an old fashioned 
tea party, complete with fresh tea 
and cookies. Addy will be on hand 
throughout the program to answer 
questions from children. 
- Come early and visit the muse- 
um's galleries before the program. 
American Girl Quilt and Tea is 
open to families with children ages 
12 and under. The cost of the pro- 
gram is $8 ($10 for non- Lake 
County residents). Reservations 
and pre-payment are required. 
Materials will be provided for the 
quilt project. 

The Lake County Museum is 
located in Lakewood Forest 
Preserve on Rte. 175, just west of 
Fairfield Road near Wauconda. For 
more information or to make a 



reservation, call the museum at 
526-7878^ 

t 

Sap is running 

The sugar maples have already 
been tapped at Ryerson Woods 
near Deerfield, and reservations 
are now being accepted for the 
annual "Maple Syruping" pro- 
grams. These popular family and 
school group programs begin 
every 30 minutes from 1 to 3 p.m. 
on Saturdays and Sundays in 
March. 

School groups from throughout 
Lake County have already made , 
reservations. Call ahead to Ryerson 
Woods to find out when a school 
group from your area is scheduled 
to attend a Maple Syruping pro- 
gram. On the one-hour walk, par- 
ticipants will learn how trees work 
by discovering how sap is gathered 
and turned into syrup. Everyone 
gets a taste of Ryerson Woods' 
pure maple syrup. For.further 
information, call Lynn Hepler at 
948-7753, ext 217. 



The Clean, Safe and Friendly Place For Fun. 




=\ 



TIM AILE 



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STARTS FRIDAY * FOX LAKE THEATRE 



Charlie Brown 

"You're A Good Man Charlie 
Brown" returns to Marriott's 
Lincolnshire iTheiitre for Young 
Audiences. Performances run now 
through May 17 Wednesdays 
through Fridays at 10 a.m. and 
Saturdays at 1 1 a.m. 

A question and answer session 
with the cast follows each perfor- 
mance. 

Ticket prices are $6 for individ- 
uals, groups of 15 or more are $5 
and available by calling 634-5909. 
Birthday party celebration pack- 
ages are also available with groups 
of 15 or more, the birthday boy or 
girl receives an autographed pic- 
ture of the cast and a complimen- 
tary ticket. 

Vacation days 

The'Northwest Suburban 
Jewish Community Center for 
Early Childhood Dept., 1250 
RadclilTe Rd., Buffalo Grove, offers 
Spring Vacation Day programs for 
3- to 5-year-olds, 10:30 a.m. to 
12:30 p.m., March 24 to 28 
Programs feature age-appropriate 
activities and entertainment, 
including a puppet show, Junior. . 
Olympics, kaleidoscope making 
and fun Willi bubbles. 

The price is $12 for JCC mem- 
bers and $16 non-members. 
Participants should bring a dairy 
lunch; JCC provides beverage and 
dessert. 

Register before March 17. Call 
Lois Agran at 392-74 1 1 for further 
information.— by ROSELUB LOVE 




JUST FOR KIDS'! 

FuKrACTORy 






-^CTEf" 





Insect find 



PERHAPS HISTORY'S MOST TAL- 
ENTED ATHLETE, BABE ZAH ARIAS 
EXCELLED IN A NUMBER OF 
SPORTS, INCLUDING PROFES- 
SIONAL GOLF. SHE WON OLYMPIC 
" GOLD MEDALS FOR JAVELIN 
... THROWING AND HURDLING. 



HOW THEY 
SAY IT IN*. 



There are 14 insects hidden throughout the scrambled puzzle below. 
See how many you can find and circle. The words go horizontally and 

vertically, backwards and forwards. 

ant grasshopper moth 

cricket beetle . . housefly 

cockroach • . locust glowworm 

cicada DragonflY flea 

butterfly wasp 




ENGLISH* UQH 

SPANISHt LE6N 

ITALIAN: LEONE 

FRENCH: LION 

GERMAN: LOWE 

LATIN: LEO 



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•ALEXANDER GRA- 
HAM BELL PIO- 
NEERED THE ELEC- 
TRIC TELEPHONE. 

•THE FIRST ORGA- 
NIZED CANADIAN 
ICE HOCKEY 
MATCH WAS 
PLAYED. 

•THE KENTUCKY 
DERBY HAD ITS 
FIRST RUNNING. 

•A MACHINE WAS 
INVENTED TO 
STRIP THE KER- 
NELS FROM CORN 
COBS, LEADING TO 
CANNED CORN. 







F.Y.I. 







MarcU 7, 1997 UvkElANd Newspapers LAKELIFE If 



LU 

fed 

I 



Little Mermaid' 

Papai Players presents "The 
Little Mermaid," at Cutting 
Hal], 150 E Wood St, Palatine. 
Join in the musical adventure 
under the sea with a fun filled, 
one hdur.perforrriance with 
Aria the mermaid and her sea 
friends. Scheduled perfor- 
mances are March 8 and 14 at 
10 a.m.; March 25, 26, 27 and 
28 at 10:30 am; April 3, 9, 1 1 , 
19, 23 and 24 at 10 a.m. Ticket price is 
S5 prepaid, SG cash at the door. 
Advanced group purchases of 20 or 
more are S4 each. Call 359-9556 for 
ticket reservations. 



Tickets are $7 for the general public 
and $5 for CLC students, staff and 
alumni. For tickets, call 223-6601, ext. 
2300. 




"The Little Mermaid/' Karen Ratio 
of Mundelein and Kevin Peterson 
of Arlington Heights as Crab 
Louie. 

'Plaza Suite' 

The Cultural Arts Connection of the 
Ela Area presents Neil Simon's "Plaza 
Suite" on Fridays and Saturdays', JVlnrch 
7, 8, 14 and 15 at 7:30 p'.m. and 
Sundays, March 9 and 16 at 2 p.m. at 
the Lake Zurich High School. 

Tickets are S8 for adults, S6 for 
senior citizens and students and S5 for 
Cultural Arts Connection members. 
ContH.ct.Kothy at 550-6007 for ticket 
Inrormatibn. 

'Under Milk Wood 1 

The student production of "Under 
Milk Wood/' a play by Dylan Thomas, 
will lie performed at the Univ. of 
Wisconsin-Parkside. The final perfor- 
mances will be held March 6 through 
8. The performance Is part of the 1996- 
97 Plays at Parkside Series. The play 
will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Studio U, 
located In the Communication Arts 
Theatre. Matinee performances will be 
held March G and 7 at 10 a.m. 
Admission is S8, S6 for senior citizens. 
For rese. valions, call (414)595-2564. 

'The Glass Menagerie' 

"The Glass Menagerie," the College 
or Lake County's theatre production, 
continues March 6 and 7 at 8 p.m. at 
Studio Theatre in the new Performing 
Arts Building at the Grayslnke campus. 




Jason Edwards stars in ''The Will 
Rogers Follies" at Marriott's 
Lincolnshire Theatre. 

Will Rogers Follies' 

"The WiU Rogers Follies," winner of 
six Tony Awards, Including Best 
Musical is now being presented at' 
Marriott's Lincolnshire Theatre. The 
show runs through March 30. 

The show stars Jason Edwards as 
the charismatic Will Rogers and 
Catherine Lord, Ronald Keaton, Angela 
Berra, Shane Partlow as the Roper, and 
Brackncy's Madcap Mutts (recreating 
their original Broadway scene-stealing 
antics). Performance schedule is 
Wednesdays at 2 and 8 p.m.; Thursdays 
at 8 p.m.; Fridays at p.m.; Saturdays at 
5 and 830 p.m.; and Sundays at 2:30 
and 7 p.m. Tickets to all performances 
are $33. Senior citizens and students 
receive $10 off on Wednesday 2 and 8 
p.m. performances and Sunday at 2:30 
p.m. performances. For further ticket 
information, call 634-0200. \ 

'Oklahoma' 

Saint Joseph High School's, in 
Kenosha, Wis., production or 
"Oklahoma" is underway. 

Performances are set for Friday and 
Saturday, March 14, 15,21 and 22 at 
7:30 p.m. with a 2 p.m. matinee perfor- 
mance on Sunday, March 16. Reserved 
scats are $8 and can be obtained at the 
school office located at 2401 69ih St. in 
Kenosha. For more information, call 
Scott Seidl at (414)654-8651. 

'The Heidi Chronicles 7 

The Highland Park Players presents 
its spring production, "The Heidi 
Chronicles," written by Wendy 
Wasscrslein. Performances will take 
place on Fridays and Saturdays, March 
14, 15, 21', 22 at 8 p.m. and Sundays, 
March 16 and 23 at 2 p.m. All perfor- 
mances will be at the Highland Park 
Community House, 1991 Sheridan Rd., 
Highland Park. Tickets are $8 in 
advance and $9 at Ute door and may be 
purchased at Kargcr and West Ridge 
Centers in Highland Park or call 945- 
4617. 






TOTAL CONPIOENCE! 





"Achieve your goalaf Our Trie 
Program is an opportunity 
gain confidence and tell- 3 

. defense abilities. Adult classes ' 
are forming ridwT 

Hrtt10ciflerirec«tv»< 



Train with Illinois' highest ranked Mi Yama Ryu Jli Jutsu black Belt. Retired Police 
Officer, Author "Necessary & Reasonable Force." Available as your Personal Trainer, 
Group rates also available. _ 

Edward F. Sullivan 

Chief Instructor 

1 1 7 S. H wy. 45, Graystako, IL 60030 
CALL todayl 847-548-9245 
In (he historic Schoolhousc plaza. 




Auditions 

Bo wen Park Theatre Company, a 
professional theatre company located 
at the Jack Benny Center for the ARts In 
Waukegan, is announcing audi dons far 
Goldonl's "The Fan." This play will be 
done comedian style. Artistic Director 
Maura Elizabeth Manning Is looking 
for actors who are familiar with impro- 
visational theatre. Aud i lions are by 
appointment Saturday, March 8 form 1 
to 5 p.m., and Sunday, March 9 from 1 
to 5 p.m. Walk-Ins will be seen as time 
allows. Actors must prepare two con- 
trasdng monologues no more than two 
minutes apiece. There will also be read-, 
ings from the script. All positions are 
paid. For further information, call 360- 
4741. 

Premiere Festival 

The Stage Two Theatre Company Is 
presenting three premiere producdons 
in a single night! "Contact," a science- 
fiction drama by Doug Grissom, 
"Mystery at Midnight," a radio drama 
parody by Randal] Rehbert, and 
"Woofer the psychic Dog," a zany com- 
edy by Bryan Willis, Frank Pugliese and , 
Ken Lonergan on from March 13 
through April 12. 

Performances are set for Thursdays 
through Sundays; 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, 
8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and 3 
p.m. Sundays. Tickets are $ 15, S12 for 
students and senior citizens, S10 for 
groups of eight or more. 

Stage Two Theatre is located at 4 10 
Sheridan Rd., Highwood. Call 432-7469 
for further Information. 

Musicians needed 

The Big Band Sound of 
Dcerfield needs a few musi- * 
clans for the 1997 concert sea- 
son. Needed are players of 
piano and keyboard, acoustic 
or electric bass guitar and 
trombone. For an audidon call 
Bill CotUe at 446-9496. 

Cabin Fever Jazz 

Ron Surace will perform on 
March 9 from 4 to 6 p.m. at Gorton 
Community Center, 400 E. Illinois Rd., 
Lake Forest. Surace earned a master's 
degree In piano" performance from 
Northwestern Univ., and his doctorate 
from the Univ. of Cincinnati College 
Conservatory of Music. Joining Surace 
are bassist Marlene Rosenberg drum- 
mer Rusty Jones, and bass trumpeter 
Ryan Schultz. Tickets are $20 at the 
door. 

The Salty Dogs are the featured per- 
formers on March 16. The 4 to 6 p.m. 
performance is sold out, and a second 
show has been added from 7 to 9 p.m. 
Celebrating its 50th anniversary tiiis 
year, die Dogs play all types of jazz • 





OPEN HOUSE 

at 

COUNTRY 
MEADOWS 
MONTESSORI SCHOOL 

6151 Washington St, 

Gurnee 
(Washington and Cemetery Rd.) 

Saturday, March 15th 
1-3 PM 

Register Now for 
Summer and Fall 1997 

Country Meadows Montessori 

School cordially invites you 

to visit our school, view the 

classrooms, and discuss the 

Montessori program with 

our Directresses. 

Preschool & Kindergarten 

(ages 3-6) 

Elementary Program 

(ages 6-13+) 

Before & After School Care 

7:00 AM - 6:00 PM 

Available for all enrolled students 

Summer Camp All Programs 

2 - Four Week Sessions 

Call 244-9352 

for details. 

Conic Kor Coffee. 
<SLoy tor Ten Yeans 



from New Orleans to West Coast style,, 
and have recorded 13 albums. Tickets 
are $ 1 2 if purchased by March 7 or $20 
at the door. For further Information, on 
both" shows, call 234-6060. 

Auditions 

The Village School of Music, 645 
Osterman, Dcerfield, is holding audi* 
tions for teachers of piano, clarinet, 
saxophone, violin, and folk instru- 
ments. For audidon appointment call 
LanaRac at 945-5321. 

Illinois Brass Band 

The Illinois Brass Band, winner of 
the 1996 North American Brass Band 
Championship, will be performing at 
the First Presbyterian Church, W. 
Maple and Douglas Ave., LIbertyville 
on Sunday, March 9 at 3 p.m. Aspecial 
performance of the intemaUonally 
renowned English Comet Soloist Roger 
Webster will be performing. For ticket 
information call 395-6729. 

Werner at Barat . 

Guitarist and vocalist Susan Werner 
will present a concert of contemporary 
folk music at 8 p.m., Friday, March 14, 
in the Hilton Theater at Barat College. 
The concert, sponsored by the 
College's Committee on Cultural 
Events, is open to the public free of 
charge. For further informadon. call 
234-3000. 

Mini-folk fest 

A March Madness Mini-Folkfest 
with Trish Alexander, Mark Dvorak, 
Eric Lugasch, Molly and The Tinker, 
Larry Penn, Dan Zahn, Joe Kerpe, 
Marcia Krieger, Jim Gary, Acoustic 
Prism (VVhyte Knuckles, Rick Neeley, 
Chuck VanderVcnnetJ, The Chicago 
Songwriters' Collective, Separated At • 



Birth, Kim Hughes and many others 
will be performing Sunday, March 9 
from 3 to 10 p.m. atTavem On Lake 
Street, Rte.83 and Lake Street In 
Grayslake. Admission is $10. For further 
information, call 949-5355. 




Antioch Community High School 
band members rehearse for annu- 
al production of Swing Street 
Cafe. 

Swing Street 

The music department of Antioch 
Community High School invites all to a 
night of popular music under the stars 
as the gym is magically transformed 
into an outdoor cafe-like setting for the 
annual production of Swing Street 
Cafe. The evening features the school's 
jazz bands, as well as wind ensemble, 
concert and symphonic bands, select- 
ed vocai performances and a dance set. 
A variety of refreshments will be avail- 
able to make the evening complete. 
Doors open at 7 p.m. both Friday, 
March 7 and Saturday, March 8. 
Tickets arc S6 for adults and S4 for stu- 
dents and children. 
See FYI page B4 



GRAYSLAKE 



& 

liGiQtLE C TAJSLE S 

SUNDAY 

MARCH 9th, 8:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M. 

Lake County Fairgrounds 

Grayslake, It; "->■- 

1L 120 &US45 

ADMISSION $a.OO 

Lake County Pro rnoti oris 

P.O. Box 461 

Grayslake, It- 60030 
847/223-1 433 or :847/356-7499 

Call Tuesday,"! -4 pirn. 



Las Vegas At Sea 

by JIM WARNKEN, PRESIDENT 
NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

She's always dreamed of cruising the sunny Caribbean. He just can't wait to 
hit the tables in Vegas. (Or is it the other way around?). 

Neither of you can get away for more than 3 or 4 days, and the budget's a 
little tight this year, so it looks like a cheapy three day Vegas package is the only 
choice. 

Not so. 

Only a few years ago a three day cruise meant sailing on a small converted 
trans-atlantic passenger ship offering little more than a couple of slot machines 
and very amateurish shows. 

Times have changed. Most of today's ships are as big as many of the largest 
resorts in Las Vegas and now offer full casinos'. 

For example, Carnival Cruise Lines ship, The Fantasy, which does three and 
four day sailings, has no less than 2 15 slots arid 27 gaming tables including 
Blackjack, Craps, Red Dog, Roulette and Stud Poker. Lotteries, Bingo and many 
other games of chance arc offered during the cruise. 

Two professional full production Las Vegas Style Shows arc offered nightly. 
Unlike Las Vegas, though, these shows arc free. 

The food may be cheap in Vegas, but on a cruise ship you can have eight 
meals a day, a midnight buffet and 24 hour room service, including breakfast in 
bed-all for free. 

Casino hopping your thing? No problem since most 3 day cruises dock at 
Nassau, the home of the two largest casinos in the Caribbean. You can gel to 
either by cab. but for some fun ask your travel agent how to gel to the Crystal 
Palace on the Green Bus for a SI or Paradise Island Casino via "Bum Boat" again 
for a buck. 

So, how do we stay within a Vegas budget and still take a cruise? Actually, a 
three day cruise costs only about $30 a day more than the average three day Las 
Vegas package and your meals, entertainment and lots more are included free. 

<StAV££ 



NORTH 




STAR 



CRUISES 

Lindenhurst 
(Next to McDonalds) 

(847) 356-3010 



■ 



(847) 356-301 



. „' . J- ...rf ,»-.»*l."*>™*» 



3E555? 



' \ - • • 



LAKEL1FE UIceIancI Newspapers MarcIi 7, 1997 



737 



From page B3 ' 

Children's Choir 

Santa Maria del Popolo in 
Mundelein will be hosting the 10th 
Annual Lake County Children's Choir 
Festival on Sunday, March 9. Seven 
Catholic Children's Choirs from the 
area will be performing individual 
selections including five children's 
handbell choirs. The choirs will com- 
bine forces to sing three pieces that will 
be conducted by Kent Parry, choral 
director from Carmel High School, The 
concert will begin at 4:30 p.m. in the 
church located at 1 16 N. Lake St., (Rte. 
45} in Mundelein. Admission is free 
and refreshments will be served. For 
further information, call 949-8300" or 
Debra Titus at 566-0959. 

Say it with music 

Say It With Music XI "Best or 
Second City," the Second City National 
Touring Company will appear In a ben- 
efit performance for the Waukegan 
Symphony Orchestra and Concert 
Chorus on Saturday, Mnxh 8 at 7 p.m. 
in the Orlan Trapp Audita : ' n, 
Waukegan High School, I ^5 
Brookside, Waukegan. Tickets are $20. 
For reservations, call 360-4742, 

Grafters needed 

The Grayslake Community 
High School Band Boosters, 
need crafters for die Spring 
Craft Festival set for April 19 
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. to be 
held at the school, 400 N. Lake 
St., Grayslake. For information, 
call Peggy at 540-6515. 

Poetry contest 

The American Poetry Assn. 
announces its National Open Poetry 
Contest. Casli prizes, Including $500 
grand prize, and publication in deluxe 
anthology. All submissions should be 
original. Limit entry to one poem, of 
any style, not exceeding 25 lines. Send 
poems, widi name and address, to 
American Poetry Assn., P.O. Box 1216, 
Highland Park. IL 60035. Contest dead- 
line is April 30. 




Craft bazaar 

Beach Park Schools Spring Craft 
Bazaar will be held at Kenneth Murphy 
Junior High School, 1 1315 W. 
Wadsworth Rd., Beach Park (East of 
Lewis Avenue), March B and 9 from 10 
a.m. to 4 p.m. A bake sale and lun- 
cheon will also be available. For infor- 
mation, call 623-7035. 

Artists Forum 

The March garnering of the Artists 
Forum will take place at 7 p.m. March 
10 at die BAAC Gallery, 207 Park Ave., 
Banington. Ralph Arnold, senior pro- 
fessor of art at Loyola Univ. will critique 
"Urban Edges," die gallery show that 
will be on exhibit during the month of 
March. For more information, call 3B2- 
5626. 

Barn dance 

The Adler Center's monthly 
square dance Is moving from 
Saturday to Friday night. It will 
be regularly held at die Adler 
House ballroom on the first 
Friday of die mondi in con- 

Q junction widi Open Stage 
music jam. The dance will be 
held March 7 at 7:30 p.m. A 
slow fiddle turn jam session for 
beginning fiddlers, banjoists 
and odiers will start at 7:30 
p.m. The tempo will gradually pick up 
until die dancers are ready to go at 8:30 
p.m. Musicians and callers are encour- 
aged to come join in this "open mic" 
dance. 

. The event will be hosted by Dot 
Kent and Paul Tyler, and will feature a 
lead musician each mondi including 
Adler instructors Chirps Smitii, Liz 
Amos and Katiiy Casper. For furdicr 
information, call 367-0707. 

•'Lord of the Dance 

The Chicago-area premiere of 
Michael Fladcy's "Lord of die Dance" 
has been re-scheduled for April 3 
dirough 6 at die Rosemont Theatre. 
"Lord of the Dance is die newest Irish 
dance spectacular created by and star- 
ring Michael Flallcy, the Chicago-bom 
dancer-choreographer whose rapid-fire 




step- dancing launched die 
"Riverdance" phenomenon. Tickets are, 
on sale at the Rosemont Theatre box ' 
office, 5400 N. River Rd., across from 
the Rosemont Convention Center , and 
at all Tickemastcr locations. 

lions and Lambs 

Buoys and Belles Square Dance 
Club is holding a Lions and Lambs 
dance with caller Jody Serllck and 
Elissa Pischke cueing rounds. The 
dance will be held Friday, March 7 at 
First United Methodist Church, 120 N. 
Udca St., Waukegan. Plus workshop 
will be held fro m to 0:30 p.m., main 
stream and round dancing from 8:30 to 
10:30 p.m. with plus tip at 10:30 p.m. 
Cost is $3.50 per person. For further 
information, call 662-6546. 

Colossal Cuties 

Chicago's Colossal Cuties presents ' 
a dance for plus size and tiicir admirers 
on March 15 at die Holiday Inn 
Express, 933 S. Rte. 83, Etmhurst. The 
dance will be held from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. 
Cost is $15 at die door. For more infor- 
mation, call (312)458-9144. " 

Joel Hall Dancers 

The famed Joel Hall Dancers of 
Chicago will present two performances 
at die College of Lake County on March 
19 as part of die college's festival of 
events marking die opening of its new 
Performing Arts Building. 

The performances, slated for 2 and 
7:30 p.m. in the new Mainstagc 
Theatre, will feature "The Crossing," a 
celebration of the musical contribu- 
tions of African-Americans for die last 
200 years. From slave field songs to 
funky blues to jazz, the program cap- 
tures die spirit of a people expressed 
dirough the songs they sing. 

Tickets for the 2 p.m. performance 
are $8 for the general public and $6 for 
CLC students, staff and alumni. 

Tickets for the 7:30 p.m. perfor- 
mance is $12 for general admission and 
$8 for CLC students, staff and alumni. 
Advance reservations are recommend- 
ed. " . 

For reservations, call 543-2300. 



Oo' 



© 



m J£ 



We're Searching 
Far And Wide... 

Please help us find our 

long lost classmates 

from Antioch 

; Community 

High School 

Class of 1 987! 



& 



Chris Adrainsen 
Rodney Almodovar 
Joel Arucuk 
Joel Bachochln 
Anna Bates 
Gary Baker 
Gary Bleganowsft 
Irene Bochnak 
Elisc Bond 

Michelle (Boerman) O'Connor 
. Chris Borys 
Jon Brocckcr 
Debbie Bynum 
Rich Caldwell 
Jessica Callos 
Sue Cardiff 
Jodi Cardiff 
Jane Carson 
Rob Chrisiman 
Dan Chudnow 
Jennifer Clmagllo 
Bill Cmiel 
Leah Cowle 
Brian Cramer 
Gary Davis 
Cindy Delano 
Lorl Drewnlak 
Lorial Drury 
Kim Duwaldt 



Ginger Ferguson 

Micky Fox 

Jill Frenzel 

Sue Giles 

Jennifer Griffin 

Debrina Hamlin 

Colteen Heaton 

Monica Henning 

Jim Hernandei 

John Hlgglns 

Peter Horvaih 

Nick Huculak 

Donna Jackson 

Jason Janis 

Richard jeans 

Laura Jones 

Tom Jones 
Shawna Kness 
Deanna Knudsen 
Bcrnadctte Koiio! 
Tammy Krause 
April Krucger 
Glen Kruger 
Jerry Kursiewskl 
Kristlne Laursen 
Mlchelc Lent 
Steve Uctlc 
Amy Malone 
Christine Marshall 
Craig Mertes 
Bernard Metzet 



Evette Miranda 
Heidi Monhardt 
Sue Montrimas 
Robin Monroe 
Kristlne Nelson 
Lisa Novak 
Kathy Nyden 
Lisa O'Brien 
joe O'Connel 
Cindy Olsen 
Amy Olson 
Melltsa Ortiz 
Allan Outinen 
Kim Paul/ 
John Payne 
Bill Pearsc 
Connie Perry 

Carol Peterson 

Duane Petterec 

Mike Pezall 

Jerry Pfelfer 

John Phillips 

Lisa Pickle 

Kelly Piskorowskl 

Carotee (Pollak) Wiedeman 

Brian Pomrening 

Barb Pratt 

Erica Queen 

Delaine Remter 

Jake Rletschel 

Nick Rlzzo 



Nina Rosqulst 

Rob Roszkowski 

Laura Ruane 

Christine Ruhl 

Lisa Saunders 

Tony Shank 

Scott Schmidt 

Steve Searle 

Laurie Shlfrin 

Sherie Shlfrin 

Angela Simons 

Bill Skupien 

Holly Smith 

Nande Stephens 

Val Stroscheln 
Duane Thiele 
Brian Trusky 
Candl Turner 
Dawn Unrein 
Sherry Waldroup 
Michelle Walk 
Sherrl Walsh 
Brian Webster 
DaveWestergaard" 
JoeWestergaard 
Michelle White 
Mark Whitehead 
Larry Williams 
Darren Wolf 
Pam Zydek 



Dudley Moore 
Lake Forest 



;( 



Jon Emmerich 
Janet Eng 

If you have a mailing address and/or phone number for any of the above listed 
people, please contact Sue Nauman at (847) 395-8760. The Class of '87 Reunion 
Committee would like to send Information about our August reunion activities to 
all of our fellow classmates so that everyone has the opportunity to attend. 

Thank You! 






nyatCLC 



Actor/musician Dudley Moore will join the Lake Forest 
Symphony in a benefit concert at the College of Lake County 
on March 15. Sponsored by the CLC Foundation, the concert 
will begin at 8 p.m. in the Mainsfage Theatre in tlie.Performing 
Arts Building at CLC's Grayslake Campus. Tickets are $100 for 
concert only and $200 for the concert and a post-show dessert 
reception. Proceeds will benefit the Foundation's capital cam- 
paign in support of the hew 
Performing Arts Building. 

During Moore's more than 3P- 
year entertainment career, the 
British-born performer has estab- 
lished himself as a stage actor, 
comedian, movie star, composer, 
pop musician and a jazz pianist. 
He became a popular celebrity in 
the United States with his leading 
roles in the comedy movie hits 
"10" and "Arthur,'' a role which 




Dudley Moore 




won him a Golden Globe and an Academy Award 
nomination for best actor. He continued to 
demonstrate his unique comedic flair in 
numerous other popular feature films, 
including "Romantic Comedy," 
"Mickey and Maude" and "Like 
Father, Like Son." 

Long before he became a 
successful actor, Moore was a 
musical prodigy who started out as 
a jazz musician and became a 
respected classical pianist. He begin 

playing piano at age 6,'studied violin at 12 and was a church 
organist at 14. His musical talent earned him a scholarship to 
attend Oxford University where he received a bachelor's 
degree in music and composition. 

After a brief career on Broadway in "Beyond the Fringe," a 
satirical revue, Moore returned to music by traveling world- 
wide performing with the Dudley Moore Trio. Later he began 
performing as a guest artist with famous musicians and 
orchestras. Some of this memorable performances include an 
appearance with the Los Angeles Philharmonic for a Gershwin 
tribute, a concert at the New York's Metropolitan Museum of 
Art with violinist Robert Mann, a solo performance at Carnegie 
Hall and a performance at the Hollywood Bowl. 

Moore scored his biggest musical triumph in 1991 when he 
joined forces with Conductor Sir Gcorg Solti for a 10-part 
music series that aired on the Showtime cable network. He 
completed a successful concert tour in England with the BBC 
Concert Orchestra, playing at the Royal Albert Hall in London 
as well as cities in Birmingham and Brighton. 

Moore has recently been traveling internationally, perform- 
ing classical pieces on the piano with prestigious orchestras 
and symphonies. For ticket information and reservations, call 
the CLC Foundation office at 223-6601, ext. 2488. 




I thought I was a social drinker... 

A few beers, maybe a nightcap or two. I thought I could 

handle it. But when my job performance went down, my 

relationships were affected and I couldn't stop, 

I had to admit I needed help.. 

Just hoping the problem will go away isn't enough. 

Take the first step toward recovery, call us today for a 
confidential assessment at 

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24 hours a day 



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A Not For Profit Organization 

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MabcIi 7,-1997 UkslANd Newspapers LAKELIFE 




Coming soon— Stepford family values 



When !■ picked up my Sunday 
paper two weeks ago, the strange 
headline immediately jumped 
out at me— "First Mammal is 
Cloned."- 

As you can imagine, I was 
shocked. I thought, ''Excuse me, 
but where has respect for moth- 
erhood in this country gone? Is 
nothing sacred? Since 
when do we refer to 
Hillary Clinton as the 
"First Mammal'?!?" 

Fortunately, there 
was a picture inside with 
the rest of the article and 
as soon as I saw the curly 
white hair, I knew they 
weren't talking about 
Hillary. Barbara Bush, maybe, 
but not Hillary. 

I knew this because, on closer 
inspection, one thing became 
obvious — I need an eye exam. 
Because it turns out that it was- 
n't Hillary or Barbara in the pic- 
ture. It was a ewe; 

And I'm not talking about a 
you. 1 mean "ewe" — as in 
"sheep." And here's the amazing 
part — this one ewe has now 
become two ewes, without any 
contributions whatsoever from a 
sheep of the male persuasion. 

This is not to be confused 
with what we humans call a 
"deadbeat" Dad — there was no 
male sheep involved in the cre- 
ation, admitted or otherwise. 
Instead, researchers in Scotland 
were able to successfully clone a 
lamb from a single cell of an 
adult ewe; 

It does seem rather fitting 
that Scotland was the location 
for this achievement. I mean, 
heck, those guys have been 

Luck-O-Irish 
shenanigans 

Adults 50 and over are invited 
to the Beach Park Village Hall on 
Wednesday, March 12 for the 
Luck-O-lrish party. The fun takes 
place from 1 to 3 p.m. with an Irish 
luncheon and bingo. Songs and* 
music provided by banjo player 
Larry Jellinek. 

Added to the shenanigans is a 
chance to become the first Senior 
Mr. and Mrs. Beach Park, 
Participants must live in Beach 
Park and be willing to participate 
in some of the village's events dur- 
ing the year. 

A free raffle for a chance to win 
an overnight trip for two to the 
Lake of the Torches Casino will be 
offered. 

There is no fee to attend the 
party, but registration is necessary 
and can be made by calling the 
Beach Park Village Hall, 746-1770. 

For further information, call 
Trustee Barbara Briam at 872- 
6931. 

Everything must go 

The Friends of the Waukegan 
Public Library are moving out of 
the basement (temporarily) so 
construction may begin on the 
new children's wing of the library. 
A Spring Book Sale will lake place 
on Thursday, March 6 from 7 to 9 
p.m. (preview from Friends only) 
and on Saturday, March 8 from 9 
a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sunday, 1 to 4 . 
p.m. 

Books and records only 10 
cents, free magazines. On Sunday 
only bring a bag to fill up for only 
25 cents! 

The library is located in down- 
town Waukegan, next the the 
■ County Courthouse, 120 N. County 
St. For further information, call 
623-2041. 



wearing plaid skirts for cen- 
turies — there's obviously some 
major "mother envy" going on 
over there. So now they've come 
up with the perfect solution: if 
you can't give birth to 'em, clone 
'em. 

All of which makes me, as a 
member of the original birth-giv- 




ing genderra little nervous. If 
there is one thing that separates 
the women from- the men, it is 
that, along with our ability to ask 
directions when we're lost, we 
are the only ones capable of 
growing a new life within our 
bodies. 

As far as I know, the only life 
that men are capable of growing 
inside their bodies is a tape- 
Worm. Even my dog can do that. 
(OK, I admit there are some men 
capable of growing beer bellies 
that look remarkably pregnant- 
like; however, I haVe yet to see 
one give birth to a 12-pack). 

But now, with the first suc- 
cessful cloning of an adult sheep, 
the idea of cloning humans has 
moved from the pages of science 
fiction to a frightening possibili- 
ty. And, having overheard the 
first male reactions to this event, 
we ladies are going to have to 
stay on our toes. 

Shortly after the news broke, 
two of my male co-workers ' 



began discussing what they per- 
ceived as the benefits of cloning. 

'Think of it" said the first 
guy. "Wo more of that 'honey do 
this, honey, do that 1 stuff, because 
we would only clone women who 
believe the man should be king of 
his castle." 

'You got that right, "said the 
other. "And they'd all 
look like Christie 
Brinkley, too." 

It figures, I 
thought. Give men a 
chance to, create life, 
and next thing you 
know, we're the 
Stepford Wives. I had 
to set them straight. 
"Oh, yeah?" And who says 
only men will be making the 
cloning decisions? For instance, 
if I had a choice between cloning 
Tom Cruise or one of you two 
'kings,', the odds that I would 
clone you would be more like 
Mission Impossible." 

"Oh, yeah? Well maybe we . 
wouldn't clone any women at all. 
Maybe we'd just clone ourselves. " 

Hmmm. I had to think abut 
that for a moment. But then I 
smiled. 

"Really?" I said. 
"Really." 

"All right, then — which one of 
you guys is going to breastfeed 
the baby?" 
Silence. 

Relax, ladies— make that two 
things that separate the women 
from the men. 

Editor's note: Donna Abear 
can also be heard as a guest 
humorist on WXLC 102.3 FM's 
morning show at 7:10 a.m. on 
alternate Mondays. 




PSYCHIC FAIRS 

March 8, 9 - DAYS INN 

Rt. 25, just N. of 1-90, Elgin - 
Sat. 9-7; Sun. 10-6 ' 



• 15 Of America's Best Psychics • Aura Photography 
| Lectures • MMENA'S PSYCHIC GEMS * CRYSTALS 



rf, March 11, TUES, 5-10 PM - GARIBALDI'S EATERY 
$r Gofl Rd PB|, just E. d Mnglon Hts Rd, Mnglon Hts. - * J 4 M All Stan 
March 22, 23 - DAYS INN, Hwy. 50 4 1-94 • Kenosha 

March 25. TUES. 6-10PM - THE DONKEY INN, Plum Grove Rd., 
/i* t <r? i n j just N. of E«*d, Palatine-* JAM All-Stars 

/JU * t f!£j%5 'of? ApH19,20 .CRYSTALLAKEHOUDAYINN, RL 31 ^ 

America's Best Psychics ^ Qpp iJoMUJUtiW Wjth2hJ8Ar^.8M.in7_ _ 



f 



"Dr. Mom" Marianne Neif ert 

leads parenting conference 

Parenting in the 90s 

7 a.m. March 1a 

10 a.m. March 15 
College of Lake County Auditorium 
19351 w. Washington St., crayslake 

Dr. Neifert brings her professional, personal 
experiences as a board-certified pediatrician 
and a mother of five children to offer common 
sense advice for a host of contemporary family 
and social issues impacting today's generation 
of children and the parents who must prepare 

them. 

Tickets: $8 general public, 
$6 CLC students/staff/alumni 

The program is co-sponsored by the 

Wildwood Presbyterian Church. 

Free Child care provided 

Advance registration is required. 

Call 223-6601, ext 2300 



s 



^ 



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USIC 

Rbselle LoVe 




• 




continues 



Jam Jubilee, the ^attJe of thebaiitis, continues;on Saturday, 
March 8 at Kristof s Enteitamment Center, 421 W. RoLJins Rd, 
Round LakeJBeach. Battling bands include: Corpuscle, 
Diplomats, Open Ground and Red Eye Express. 

The Jam Jubilee will move on to the Village Spirit Rub, March 
15, 1123 N. Cedar Lake Rd v Round Lake BeacKArea bands will be 
battling for cash prizes with the top band to play March 22 at 
iFrigatesi 25250 W. Lake Shore in Ingleside. Coyer. charge to each 
..'event is $2 or free with Jam Jubliee flyer; aviailable.atOrlando's on 
Rollins Road in Round Lake or Rosario's Pizzeria, 1116 N. Cedar 
Lake Rd., Round Lake Beach. To enteraband into the contest, call 
Mystical Music at 546-721 L - 

Magic of entertainment at it's best 

The music of Dave Major is made up of four unique musi- 
cians, who blend their individual talents to bring an exciting variety 
of sounds arid styles to their audiences; Each of diiefoitr performs as 
lead vocalist, and among them, they utilize 22 instruments, to pro- •'■ 
duce a show that is sure to have something for everyone. 

Dave Major, plays 15 instruments arid arranges the group. He is 
joined by Joy Sornmer, a female vocalist, who also accompanies the 
band with guitar and bass. Dave Majoris now appearing at Dover 
. Straits, Mundelein. Call the Dave Major hotline at (708)502-0442 for 
other appearances. 

Friday and Saturday, March 7 and 8 

Black Alley Blues will be performing at Donnelli's located 
across from Rockland Road House on Rte. 176, Lake Bluff. 

' Stone Diam (Rock) will be at Durty Nellies, 55 N. Bothwell, 
Palatine for a 9 p.m. show. Cover is $3.Call 358-9150. On Saturday, 
March 8, Fabulous Janes with Brother Jed (Rock) will perform 
at Durty Nellies. ;■ 

Maurice John Vaughn Blues Band play at Chicago Blue 
Note, 1550 N. Rand Rd., Palatine. Byther Smith and The 
Mghtriders take the stage Saturday., Friday and Saturday hours 
are 8 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. Call 776-9850. 

Call223-8161, ext. 136 to get your band listing into Music Notes! 



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■ 





3J LAKELIFE La!<cIancj Newspapers MarcIi 7, 1997 



■ 

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SATURCJAy 



AAXIW presents Portrait of CLC' 

The Waukegan Area Brailch of the American j\ssn. of University 
'■Women (AAUW) will meet oh Saturday, March 8 at 10 a.m. in con- 
' ferencerbpmCOOa at the College of Lake County, 19351; 
Washington St., Grayslake, College President Gretchen Naff will 
present an oral "Portrait of CLQ" Call 244-6858 forinformatidh: " 

- — — ^ — TuEsdAy — - "\ . ' . '• — 



Retired Teachers of Lake County to meet 

A presentation on health for the elderly by Michael Peddle of . ■ ■ 
the Steele Home Health Center and a presentation by Henry Brown 
of Wauconda, who recently won the 100-meter run in the 65to 69 
age group at the U.S. National Senior Sports Classic in San Antonio, 
Texas will be at the Retired Teacher's Assn. of Lake County meeting 
Tuesday; March 11 at noon. The meeting.will be held at the 
Meadows 21 restaurant, 1760 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyvilie. A pre- 
luncheon social will be held at 1 1:30 a.m. Reservations are not 
required. For further information, call 662-5314. 

AARP plans meeting 

The American Assn. of Retired Persons, Chapter 387 of Antioch, 
invite all to attend their meetings held on the second and fourth 
Tuesday of each month, September through June. The meetings are 
held at the Antioch Senior Center, 817 Hdlbeck Dr. Open social 
time is held from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Contact Cecilia Jordan, presi- 
dent for additional information, caU 395-7030. 

CoivuNq Soon 



Variety show set at German-American club 

German-American Club of Antioch presents "German Variety 
Show and Dance" direct from Germany, Reiner Nordmann, Die 
Weibergs, and Enji Enzmanri. The show will take place Saturday, 
March 15 at the Antioch Golf Club, Rte. 59 and Grass Lake Road, 
Antioch. Doors open at 6 p.m. with the show starting at 7 p.m. 
Admission is S14. For reservations, call 356-5484. 



Jgurnee CINEMA^ 

GURNEE MILLS SHOPPING MALL • | 
847-855-9940 



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BARGAIN MATINEES • ADULTS $4 JO BEFORE 530 

CHUMN UHOtR 1 WOT ABUTTED TO fT MTTD FEATURE! 

V Ho (mh or Uo*i» Fat TlcUtt Aectptod 

FEATURES ANO SHOWTIMES FOR FRIDAY, 

MARCH 7 THRU THURSO AY, MARCH 13 



PRIVATE PARTS+ R 

1 225, 1 :*0, 2:45, 4:00, 5:05, 6:40, 7:30, W0, MS 



JUNGLE 2 JUNGLE po 

12;15, StOO, 4;45, 7:10, 9:25 




DONNIE BRASCO+ R 

FRI-SUN 11:15, 1:40, 4:05, 8:50, 050 
MON-THURS 1:40, 4:05, 0:50, Q-2Q 



EMPIRE STRIKES BACK PQ 

1230, yjX, 3.05, 425, 6:00, 7:00. B35 

FRI-SUN ALSO SHOWING AT 11:15 AM 



ABSOLUTE POWER R 

1:30, 4:15, 7:00. 9:35 



STAR WARS PQ 

FRI-SUN 11:30, £06, 4:40, 7:15, 9:50 
MON-THURS 1:45, 4:40. 7:15. 0:50 



FOOLS RUSH IN PG-13 

12:10, 2:30, 4:55, 7:20, 9:40 



VEGAS VACATION pg 

1:10,3:15,520,7:45,9:45 



MARVIN'S ROOM PG-13 

1K)5, 3:10, 5:15, 725, 925 



BOOTY CALL R 

12:00. 2:00, 4:00, 6:00, 6:00, 10*0 



DANTE'S PEAK PG-13 

1220. 2:40, 5:10, 7:35. 10:00 



THAT DARN CAT pg 

12:00. 2:00 



JERRY MAGUIRE R 

4:15, 7:00, 9:45 



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8:30 



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$howPlace8 



VERNON HILLS, 

Milwaukee Ave-2nd Light S of (ED 
847/2474958 



50 All Seats. 
All Times. 



PREACHER'S WIFE (PG) 

Dally 4:00. 6;4S. 9:40 
. Sat/Sun Matinee 1:00 

EMMA (PG) in Ddby sa 
Dally 5:00,7:45. 10:15 
Sa JSun Matinee 2:00 

GHOSTS OF MISSISSIPPI (ft) hDo^sa 

Daily 4: 1 5. 7: 1 5. 10:00 
Sat/Sun Matinee 1:00 

MY FELLOW AMERICANS (PG-13) him Dpi 

Dallv 4:30. 7:00. 9:30 
Sat/Sun Matinee 1:45 

RANSOM (R) In Dolby Di r ul 
Daily 4:30. 7:30. 10:10 
Sat/Sun Matinee 1:30 

I ONE FINE DAY (PG) inDTSDi s i B i 

Dally 4:45, 7: IS, 9:50 
I Sat/Sun Matinee 2:15 

MARS ATTACKS (PG-l3)inDTSDii«j 

Daily 4:00. 6:30, 9: 1 5 
SaJSun Matinee 12:45 

SPACE JAM (PG) InDTSDfciu! 
Dally 5:30. 7:45, 9:45 
SarJSun Matinees 12:30,2:45 



Free Refill on Popcorn & Soil Drinks) 
[™""1 ALL rrjTj 

l«t»l DIGITAL SOUND f 



MoviE Pick 
Nicholson, Caine make 'Wine' 




Jack Nicholson 

Jack Nicholson and Michael 
Caine have been around the 
film world for a long, long time, 
becoming two of the best actors 
ever to grace the big screen. It is 
their acting prowess that lifts 
"Blood and Wine" out of the 
mediocre mire its confusing 



script would have it sink into. 

"Wine" has Nicholson, a 
businessman in big money 
trouble, getting mixed up in a 
gem heist in order to relieve 
that financial stress. 

Caine plays a dying thief 
helping Nicholson in the theft 
of a diamond necklacet. 

A major portion of this 
movie spends time on the rela- 
tionship between Nicholson 
and his stepson, expertly played 
by Stephen Dorff. Father and 
stepson are involved with the 
same girl, Nicholson's Cuban 
mistress played by Jennifer 
Lopez. 

As the confusing plot- 
evolves, filled with one too 
many twists, Dorff also gets 
involved in the robbery. 

Judy Davis, again wastes her 
talents in mediocrity as she did 
in "Absolute Power," by playing 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 
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223-8161 



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Theatres 662-741 

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Ample Parking 



B $2.00 all seats all shows 

E Michael Jordan & Bugs Bunny In 
S SPACE JAM (PG-13) 

JJ Frl & Mon-Thurs 5:30. 7:30, 9:40 

1J Sat & Sun 1:15, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:40 

-n Queen Ulifah 

K SET IT OFF (R) 

Z\ Ffl & Mon-Thurs 4:45, 7:05, 9:30 
■J Sat & Sun 1:55, 4:45, 7:05, 9:30 



fj 
IfJ 
fj 
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Whoopl Goldberg *™Hie rarmnfl □[ 

GHOSTS OF MISSISSIPPI (PG-13)S 

Daily 9:25 'LI 

John loguizamo [^ 

THE PEST (PG-13) - 8 

Frl & Mon-Thurs 5:30, 7:30 . . LI 

Sal & Sun 1:30, 3:30. 550, 7:30 d 

Whrtnoy Houston & Donzot Washington jA 

THE PREACHER'S WIFE (PG) 3 

Fri & Mon-Thurs 4:45, 7:05, 9:30 L| 

Sat & Sun 1 :55, 4:45. 7:05, 9:30 fj 



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PLAYING MAR. 7-MAR. 13 



PRIVATE PARTS* (R) 

FRI 5:10,755, 10:15 SAT 12:10, 2:45, 5:10, 755, 10:15 
SUNMEDJilO, 2:45, 5:10, 755 MOHmJE/THUR 5:10, 755 



DANTE'S PEAK (PG-13) 

FRI&15 i aO5,1fe20 SAT 12:15, 250,5:15, KB, 1020 
SUN/WED 12:15, 250, 5:15, 8S5 MOHmJE/THUR 5:15, MS 



ABSOLUTE POWER (R) 

FRI 7:45, 10:15 SAT 1£05, 2:40, 7:45, 10:15 
SUN/WED 1205, 2:40, 7:45 MOH/rUE/THUH 7:45 



JUNGLE 2 JUNGLE* (PG) 

FRI 520, &0S, 1020 SAT 1220. 255, 520, &05, 1020 
SUN/WED 1220, 255, 520, a&MOfVTUEMJR 520, ttOS 

„ IN . 1 — ^ 

LTJfW**«ra 



EMPIRE STRIKES BACK (PG) 

FRI &06, 735, 10:10 SAT 1201, 225, fctfi, 755, 10:10 
SUN/ffE0 1200,435, 5*5, 755 HOHmJEmiUR &05, 755 



THAT DARN CAT (PG) 

DAILY 545 



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PREDICT THE OSCARS & WIN A ONE YEAR MOVIE PASS • BALLOTS AT THEATRE 



MOVIES & TIMES START FRIDAY 3-7-97 



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$6.50 Adults After 3 P.M. 
LOO Children Under 11 



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Q0 Daily Afternoon Shows 
; UNTIL 5 PM 



PRIVATE PARTS (R) 

Da*/ 1:00, l:«, 3:45, 4:30, 630, 650.B--Q0. 930 



JLNGIE 2 JUNGLE (PC) Daiy 12:45. 330, 6:10,0:45 



THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK (PG) 

• Daily 1:15,4:00, 6:45, 930 



DONNIE BRASCO(R) Daly 12:10. 250.5:45. 825 



ADULTS £4.00 SENIORS & CHILDREN $2.00 

$2.00 SAT & SUN BARGAIN MATINEE Tia 5 P.M. 



JUNGLE 2 JUNGLE (PG) 

FRI„ MON.-THURS. 6:45, 9.00 
SAT.-SUN. 2:15, 430, 6:45, 9.00 



LIBERTY (847) .362-3011 
708 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyvilie 



ADULTS WjOO SEHtORS aCHILDREN 11 A UNMBUOO 

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Ttte Empire Strikes Back (PG) (DTS Digital) 

Fri., Mon.-Thu. 7:00, 9:45; Sal-Sun. (1:00, 3:45) 7:00, 9:45 



Star Wars (PC) (Dolby stmo) 

Fri., Mon.-Thu. 7;15, 1O.O0; Sat-Sun. (1:20, 4:10) 7:15, 1O.00 



Dannie BraSCO (It) (Dolby Stereo)* 
Fri, Mon.-Thu. 7:15, 930; Sat.-Su n. (1*30, 430), 7:15, 9:50 



STAR WARS (PG) Daly 1230, 3:15, 603, 8:45 



VEGAS VACATION (PG) Daily 1:00,3: 153:40,735, 935 



■ ABSOLUTE POWER (R) Daiy 130, 420, 7.00. 935 



- MARVIN'S ROOM (PG-13) Daly 130, 4;00, 650,635 



I THAT DABN CAT (PG) 



Daiy 1220 



DANTE'S PEAK (PG-13) Daiy 3^:45.8:15 
+ no pussoM or coupon* 



THAT DARN GAT (PG) 

Sal.-Sun. 2:15, 4:15 
EVITA (PG) Daily 6:15, 8:45 



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SJ OO.ADULtS ■ 12 CO SENIORS & KtQSH I & UWEB) • 



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Frl, Uji-TIui. 600, 9 00 Sal-Sin 1 £00, 300, 600, 900 



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S1.50 Bargain Mpiinoo Unlil 5 pm 
101 DALMATIANS (G) 

Snl-Sun. 2:00. 4:15 



Marvin's Room (pg-ijj (Dolby stmo) 

Fri., Mon.-Thu. 730, 935; Sat.-Sun. (1:15,3:20,5:25)730,9:55 



JUtlglC 2 Jungle (PG) (Dolby Stmo)* 
Fri., Mon.-Thu. 6:45, 930; Sflt.-Sun. (130, 4.00) 6:45, 930 



Foots Rush In (PG-W (Dolby Stereo) 
Fri.. Mon.-Thu. 7:40. 955 ; Sat.-Sun, (2:15, 4:45) 7:40, 955 



EVITA (PG) 

Ffl.-Sun. 6:30. 9:00 Mon-Thurs. 7:15 



MOTHER (PG-13) 

fri, 645.8 45 Sal.-Sm M£ 430, 6 4S. 1 4S Mon -Tim 730 



Howard Stem's Private Parts (it) (Dolby stereo)' 

Fri., Mon.-Thu, 7:00, 9:40; Sal.-Surt, (1:00, 4:00) 7:00, 9:40 



Slittg Blade (ID (Dolby Stereo) 
Fri., Mon.-Thu. 6;45, 9:45; Sal.-Sun. (12:45, 3:45) 6:45, 9:45 



HAWTHORN CENTER 



Absolute Power (R) (Dolby Stereo) 
Fri, Mon.- Tim. 7;10, 9:40; Sal -Sun. (1:45, 4:15) 7:10, 9:40 



Dante's Peak (PG-J3) 

Fri., Mon.-Tliu. 7:15, 9:45; S.H.- Sun. (2:15, 4:45) 7:15, 9:45 






Booty Call (It) (Dolby Stereo)* 
Fri, Mon.-Thu. 8:00, 10:00; Sal,- Sun. (2:00, 4:(XI) 6;00, 8:00, IO.00 



'No 1'jw*s 



Jerry Magttire (it) 
Fri., Mon-lliu. 6:45, 9:30; Sat. - Sun.{l2:45, 3:40) 6:45, 930 



Nicholson's alcoholic wife, a 
creature of little importance in 
this particular criminal scheme 
• of things. ;; vl-'iiuyoa ■ 

All these dark happenings 
take place in Florida's blazing 
sunlight. Nicholson, a wine- 
maker by trade, chooses to steal 
the necklace from one of his 
wealthy customers, who is also 
Lopez's boss. 

Caine's safecracking exper- 
tise is the backbone of this plan. 

Caine is responsible for a 
long line of film villains. This 
may be his best. 

Meanwhile Nicholson . 
retains control of'the picture 
with the menacing intensity we 
have all grown to love. . 

Too bad this flick is not up 
to the talents of its cast. 

We give "Blood and Wine," 
rated "R", 2.5 out of five stars.— 
by GLORIA DAVIS 

IKC accepting 
entries for dog 
judging contest 

Entries are now being accepted 
for the Junior Dog Judging Contest, 
an exclusive feature of the 
International Kennel Club of 
Chicago's 57th Annual Spring Dog 
Show on Sunday, March 30 at 
McCormick Place north Annex, 
23rd and Martin Luther King 
Drive, Chicago. The contest is 
open to boys and girls between the 
ages of 9 and 19. Entrants will be 
asked to place three to five breeds 

based upon how they conform lo 

the breed standards recognizee by~ 
the American Kennel Club. 

The C. Groverman Ellis Sterling 
Silver Championship Trophy will 
be engraved with the name of the 
highest ranking individual in judg- 
ing all classes. Silver-plated tro- 
phies will be presented to first 
through 10th place finishers. 

For further details, call 
{773)237-5100. 



General Cinema 

LAKEHURST 



IROUTE 43 near ROUTE 120 
473-4200 



BAtOAIN MATINUi IVIRT DAT 
All tHOWl IITOff I 6_Wj 



BOOTY CALL (R) 

Fri-Sul 1 00.20), 300, 4:00, 503. BOO, 7£0, BOO, 900. lOOO 
Mon-Tlxirs 4.00, 5:00. 6:00, 7:00, 8.00, 9:00. 10:00 
11:00 Friday »nd Saturday only 



EMPIRE STRIKES BACK (PG) 

Frl-Sun 1:30, 4:15.7X10.9:45 
Mon-Thurs 4:15, 7:00, 9:45 



JUNGLE 2 JUNGLE (PG) 

Frf-Sun 1230, 2:50, 5:10. 730, 950 

Mon-Thurs 5:10. 730. 9:50 

1 2:15 Friday and Saturday only 



PRIVATE PARTS (R) 

Frl-Son 1230, 230. 5:10, 730, 9.50 
Mon-Thurs 5:10. 7:30, 9:50 
12:15 Friday and Saturday only 



VEGAS VACATION (PG) 



Frl-Sun 125, 3:25, 7:45 
Mon-Thurs 7:45 



DANTE'S PEAK (PG-13) 



Daily 525, 10:00, 



MARVIN'S ROOM (PG-13) 

Frl-Sun 1:00, 3:05. 6:10. 7:15, 9:20 
Mon-Thurs 5:10, 7:15. 920 



STAR WARS (PG) 

Frl-Sun 1:15.4:00. 6:45.9:20 
Mon-Thurt 4:00, 6:45, 920 



ABSOLUTE POWER (R) 

Fri-Sun 2:00, 4:30, 7:05. 9:40 • 
Mon-Thurs 430. 7:05, 9:40 



DONNY BRASCO (R) 

Frl-Sun 130, 4:15, 7:00, 9:45 
Mon-Thurs 4:15, 7:00, 9:45 



FOOLS RUSH IN (PG-13) 

Fri-Sun 2:15, 4:45, 720, 9:60 
Mon-Thurs 4:45. 7:20, 0:50 



ROSEWOOD (R) 

Fri-Sun 2:15. 5:15, 6:15 
Mon-Thurs 5:15. D:15 



GIFT CERTIFICATES ON SALE 






■ 



^xlS^Sffffigffi ,v. ; 



•k'-U,«><,l 



.-..v. ic* wcKSSK5»aa»tes: 



-rr 












Marc(i7, 1997 UkEUd Newspapers LAKELIFE 



Dr. Singer offers help for child with a common fear 




Dr. Singer, 

My son Is having a prob- 
lem that I figure many kids 
probably have at one time or 
another so I decided to write 
this in to your column. He Is 
12 and in seventh grade. He 
is being required to do a 
speech In a speech class lie 
has and is so terrified of It lie 
is considering not going to 
school that day. Actually, I 
think he Is also contemplat- 
ing leaving the country! 
Since obviously, neither of 
these options are OK with 
myself and his dad, I was . 
wondering if you have any 
words of wisdom on helping 
him to get over this fear? 
Thanks. M.G. 

DearM.G. 

I saw a study one time that 
showed that people would prefer 
death and root canal to speaking 
in public! I was amazed by that 
study but also know what that 
feeling is. It might surprise you 
to know that a doctor, especially, 
one that regularly speaks to 
groups, can understand that 
feeling, but it is the absolute 
truth* I can completely under- 
stand your child's fear and trepi- 
dation over doing this and can 
remember those wonderful 
speech classes vividly. You prob- 
ably can too. In fact, if you want 
to give your son something to 
not only laugh about, but be 
amazed about, tell him about 
how, for my sophomore year 
"How To" speech, I showed my 
entire English class how to disco 



dance!! I kid you not! And there 
were some really tough kids in 
that class. If I could do that, 
your son can do anything! 

In answer to your question, 
there are ways to help someone 
to get a grip on this, however, it ■ 
is difficult. I'll try my best here: 

1.) Make sure you know first, 
that the good old, "try and see 
the audience in their under- 
wear," doesn't usually work as 
well as we have been told. 

Sometimes; there are some 
people there you really wouldn't 
want to see in their underwear 
and other times, it can make you 
feel downright embarrassed. 
What can work better is to help 
build up your son's confidence 
in himself. Make sure he knows 
that everyone else in the class is 
equally scared to do this. 

Try and tell him stories ( 
good ones) about when you and 
his dad did this. 

2.) Try and make sure your 
son has a topic that interests 
him. If he is interested in the 
topic, chances are, there will be 
a natural flow to his talk and he 
will feel far-better and more con- 
fident about it before, during 
and after. 

If the child doesn't have the 
ability to pick the topic, you 
might want to have a private talk 
with his teacher to see if there is 
a way to allow that to happen so 
he doesn't panic. After 

all, school is preparatory for later 
life and most of the time as 
adults, when we speak to a 
group, we at least remotely enjoy 
the topic or are familiar with it 



through work. Why shouldn't he 
have the same advantage now? 

3.) Try and help him organize 
his core outline so it's interest- 
ing. Help him to understand the 
importance of opening with 



4.) Give him me old... "So 
what if you don't do great." Try 
and take the pressure off. He's 
worried about his grade, his rep- 
utation with kids and his future 
with these kids. People really 



PARENT'S 

Place 

t t ■ . 



Sherri Singer, Psy.D. 

Licensed Clinical Psychologist 



humor (appropriate humor that 
is-no "Beavis and Butthead.") 
The importance of engaging the 
audience... of not reading from 
note-cards. 

NOTE: Tell him that when I 
go in and talk now, even to 
groUps of 100 and more, I don't 
bring detailed note cards. I bring 
a list of important sketchy notes 
and then wing it, because I am 
able to be far more natural and 
fun that way. 

Again, I. enjoy the topic so 
that can happen! The same 
thing can happen for him if he 
enjoys the topic too! If he has 
fun with the talk, it will show 
through and the kids will really 
enjoy the talk. My disco dance 
was the scariest thing I ever took 
on at school, but boy did kids 
have fun with it and respect me 
afterwards! He might be sur- 
prised. 



forget things fast. Even in Jr. 
High School. His mistakes are 
probably going to be more 
noticeable to him than anyone 
else in the room. 

5.) Go out and get some 
books about stage fright or fear 
of public speaking. I know of a 
.great one that is more geared 
toward adults, but there are defi- 
nitely things in there that can 
apply to any age. 

This book is called, "I Can 
See You Naked. A Fearless Guide 
to Making Great Presentations." 
It's by Ron Hoff. This is not a 
book that you would hand to 
him to read. This is more likely a 
book for you to read and pick 
out important parts that might 
help him. 

The reason I say this is 
because the last thing your Jr. 
High Kid will want to do before a 
talk is more work! . 



6.) Last but definitely not 
least, make sure your son is 
aware of the fact that everyone is 
afraid of speaking publicly. 
Some of us have mastered that 
fear better than others have, but 
it never goes away completely. 
He should know that this is a 
part of being human and that it's 
nothing to be ashamed of. He 
should also know that more of 
the kids that I knew at that age 
felt more compassion for the 
person talking than you would 
have thought, because it was 
their turn soon! 

He's got to do this one for a 
grade, but if he doesn't like it to 
the level of intensity, he just 
won't choose to be a public ora- 
tor in his future! Hope this is 
helpful! Tell your son-good luck 
from me! 

. Editor's note: Meet Dr. Singer 
at the Lakeland Newspapers ■ 
health fair On Wednesday, 
March 26 at The Country Squire 
restaurant in Grayslake. 

Dr. Sherri Singer is a Licensed 
■ Clinical Psychologist, Childhood 
Behavior Specialist and author of 
the book, "Why Time Out Doesn't 
Work." Copyright J 99S, 1996. 
Send letters or questions to Dr. 
Sherri Singer, Psy.D., 4256 N. 
Arlington Hts. Rd. t No. 240 
Arlington Hts., 1L 60004. 

For questions and comments 
' leave a message in the general 
voicemail mailbox at (630) 415- 
0974 (do not press an ext. num- 
ber.). 

To set up a personal appoint- 
ment with Dr. Singer call (708) 
962-2549 or (847) 577-8832. 



UJ ; ; rii/,. .. ■■ • . .. . . 



i Receive Any 1 

! BOX OF CANDY OF YOUR CHOICE ! 



,.., 



■ 



■-_< 



*■ • 

r 



■ 



Lakeland Newspapers/RMC Theaters 



_ — __ — . RMC COUPON 





Entries must be postmarked no later than 

Friday March 21, 1997 

Winners announced in your March 28th Issue of the Lakeland Newspapers 

E*0 W Movie Tickets From 
MrttJEiML RMC Theaters 



I 

I 



I 



Antioch Theatre 

Libertyville Theatre 

McHenry Theatre 

Show Place Theatre, Crystal Lake 

Grayslake Outdoor Theatre 

McHenry Outdoor Theatre 

Dunes Theatre, Zion 

Lake Zurich Theatre 




14 Winners I* 

1st Prize- 12 Admissions 3rd Prize-6 Admissions 

2nd Prize-8 Admissions 4th Prize-4 Admissions 

10 Runners Up-2 Admissions Each 

NO LIMIT! 

Enter as many limes as you want. 
•Note: In case of lie, earliest postmark will determine winner. 



I 



FREE 

with purchase of 

1 Large Popcorn and 

1 Large Drink 



Valid at RMC Theatres below: i 

Antioch Theatre Grayslake Outdoor Theatre ' 

Libertyville Theatre McHenry Outdoor Theatre | 

McHenry Theatre Dunes Theatre, Zion 

Show Place Theatre, *" Lake Zurich Theatre 

Crystal Lake ! 

Coupon expires April 30, 1997. ■ 



I 1. BEST PICTURE I 2. BEST ACTOR 



_"The English Patient" 
_"Fargo" 

"Jerry Maguire" 

_"Secrets & Lies" 
"Shine" 



__Tom Cruise, "Jerry Maguire" 
_Ralph Fiennes, "The English Patient" 
_Woody Harrelson, 'The People vsLanyFlyiU" 
_Geofrrey Rush, "Shine" 
Billy Bob Thornton, "Sling Blade" 



| 3. BEST ACTRESS | 

= _Brenda Blethyn, "Secrets & Lies" 
_Diane Keaton, "Marvin's Room" 
.Frances McDormand, "Fargo" 
_Kristin Scott Thomas, The English Patient* V 
_Ernily Watson, "Breaking the Waves" | 



1 4. SUPPORTING ACTOR 1 5. SUPPORTING ACTRESS | 6. BEST DIRECTOR | 



_Cuba Gooding Jr., "Jerry Maguire" 
__WiUiam H. Macy, "Fargo" 
_Armin Mueller-Stahl, "Shine" 

Edward Norton, "Primal Fear" 

James Woods, "Ghosts of Mississippi" 



|_Joan Allen, "The Crucible" 

J Lauren Bacall, "The Mirror Has Two Faces" 

|_Juliette Binoche, "The English Patient 
|_Barbara Hershey, The Portrait of a Lady 
i Marianne Jean-Baptiste, "Secrets & Lies 



" V- 



n JJ 



Anthony Minghella, The English Patient" 

_Joel Coen, "Fargo" 

Milos Forman, The People vs Larry Flynt* 

Mike Leigh,- "Secrets & Lies" 

„Scott Hicks, "Shine" 



7. ORIGINAL DRAfMTIC SCORE 

_"The English Patient", Gabriel Yared 
_ "Hamlet", Patrick Doyle 
„ "Michael Collins", Elliot Goldcnthal 
_ "Shine", David Hirschfelder 
_ "Sleepers", John Williams 



5 Mail Your Ballot To: 
1 Name: 



Lakeland Newspapers Academy Awards Contest 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030 



3 Address: 
I Phone: „ 



■-■ " f ;-» 7-t* " " r 'l ^w 










HOT SPOTS, UkdAwd Newspapers Maiu* 7, .1.9.97 



MahcK'7, 1997 '-UkElANd Newspapers. HOT $POTS:|[ 





'■JiinniunrriBii imiimnitniiiiiiiii nmiiiiii imniiiiiiiiiiiHiiiit. 



Eating and meeting in the Lakeland area 



The Chinese 

^ Restaurant 

That Everybody's 

Talking About In 

Grayslake, 

Chinese Restaurant ** 

• Dine In • Carry Out • Delivery ■' Cocktails 
We have vegetarian dishes for the Easter holidays! 
Conveniently Located Across From Fairgrounds 

111 S. Hwy. 45 Grayslake 
(847) 548-8882 Fax: (847) 548-2822 




niiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiniitiiiiiiiiii iimi in niiiiiiiiniiiniiiirnniiiir. 




BAKERY 



SOMETHINGS BREWING, 36 S. Whiihey Street, Downtown Grayslake, 
,548-4600. Fresh baked pastries, all 'occasion decorated cakes, hand- 
made chocolates, espresso/coffee bnr, bulk beans, gourmet sand- 
wiches, homemade salads, soups, hand sliced deii meat and 
cheeses. Gift baskets, gift certificates. 1 6 flavors of premium hand- 
dipped ice cream. Outdoor cafe. Somethings Brewing is open 
Sunday through Thursday from 5:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday and 
Saturday until 10 p.m. $ Gl ' 



3®| JUo/tco's 




Grv.at Italian (jiishw 



ST. JOSEPH'S DAY 

Complimentary Sweet Table on 
Sat., March 22nd in honor of St. Joseph 



FRIDAYS: SATURDAYS: 

Crab Legs 1 Lobster Tail 

AH You can Eat By Itself: s 10 95 

S 11 8-95 Complete Dinner: s 16 95 



Rated **+t/2 



883 Main St., Antioch 



(847) 395-8883 



llllllll 



AifcYOU 



• Roasted Chicken 

• Hoi & Sour PickJes 

• Egg Rolls 

• Fresh Fruit 



Soups: 

• Hot and Sour Soup 

• Egg Drop Soup 



WEHKBM 

Appetizers: 

• Cold Beef 

• Pork w/ Garlic Sauce 

• Potato Salad 

• Crab Rangoon 

Entrees: 

• Combination Fried Rice 
- • Combination Lo Mein 

• Twice Cooked Duck 

• Chicken Chop Suey 

• Shrimp & Vegetables 

• Garlic Chicken 

Lunch Specials Start at $3.75 

4 EAST PHILUP RD. ( VERNON HILLS 

G8Q-1760 (On Rto. 60 - 3/4 Mi. W. of Milwaukee) Ave.) 

Reservations Recommended • Open 7 Days 



Raf 

(ITALIA^ 






LIVE ENTERTAINMENT^ 
EVERY WEEKEND 



V 



4 POOLTABLES • DARTS • GAMES • PIZZA 
FEATURING: 
Friday, March 7 ? 9:00 pm - 2:00 am 
"DAKOTA ROSE" 

Saturday, March B • 9:00 pm - 2:00 am 

"STARFIRE" 

Sunday, March 9 • 11:00 am- Midnight 

• GOOBER CISSELL BENEFIT * 
. Lets All Help! 4 Bands, Food, Raffles 

225 Route 1 34, Round Lake Park Hours: Tu *.-Th. 3 pm-? 

740-4625 Fri.-SaL 3 pm-3 am; Sun. 11 am-? 



"74a( <?n&Lt PfattJ 




Featuring Traditional Italian Food with a Northern Accent 
And Fireside Dining with Old World Charm 

COME CELEBRATE SPRING! 
2 Far 1 Dinners! 

2nd Entree 

Of Equal Or Lesser Value 



With This Coupon Thru March 29, 1997 

Not Valid an St. Patrick's Day 

Dine-In Only * Limit 2 Coupons per Table 

Not valid with any other offers 



• 5a u teed String Deans 

• Beef w/ Broccoli 

• Fried Zucchini 

• Sweet & Sour Chicken 

• Hunan Fish 






Elegant banquet facilities accommodate 

up to 250. 

Weddings are our specialty. 



Lunch Buffet - 
$5.95 

Mondoythrough Friday. 



Lunch • Brunch • Dinner 



^ Lunch • bruncn • uinner 

W 1765 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 

(847)367-8088 



mm 






7 f 








884-3900 

1149 Coif Rd., West, Hoffman Estates 






949-1550 

890 East Route 45 
Mundelefn, IL 60060 

WHERE FRESHNESS IS A SPECIALTY 

S2 llnique 

'Experience in 

Seafood 'Dining 

^Iso an excellent selection 

of fine meat entrees 

Featuring: 

Live Entertainment - Tues. thru Sat 
Music by Dave Major 

Dally Specials 

Private Party Facilities 

Ample Parking 

Early Bird Menu 
Sunday thru Friday 

Gift Certificates Available 

Open Dally: 

Monday thru Friday, 11 am 

Saturday, 4 pm 

Sunday, 2 pm 

All major credit cards-accepted 



ADVERTISEMENT 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Main Street Inn 



Location: 

225 Rte. 134 in 
Round Lake frrk 

Telephone: 

(847) 740-4625 

Hours: 

From 3- p.m. to closing 
Tues., Wed., and Thurs. 
and from 3 p.m. to '3 
a.m. on Fri. and Sat. 
From 1 1 a:m. to 
closing on Sunday 

Menu: 

Four open pool tables, 
video games, shuffle- 
board and darts. Live 
country music on Fri. 
and live pop music on 
Sat. for listening and 
dancing. Snacks, hot 
popcorn and pizza, 
with two fully stocked 
bars available 




Something for 
everyone at Main St. 

When it comes to good clean entertainment, 
in a comfortable and cozy atmosphere, at very 
affordable prices, Main St. is the place to go. ' 

Main St., a newly remodeled night-club, locat- 
ed at 225 Rte. 134 in Round Lake Park, has some- 
thing for everyone in search of fun and amuse- 
ment. 

The friendly'and courteous staff at Main St. 
welcomes old and new customers, from the 
ages of 21 To 100 years young, to three attrac- 
tive rooms where they can have a drink, meet 
the challenges of playing games, or enjoy a 
variety of live music and dancing. Making your 



visit memorable so that you return soon is their - 
main goal. 

The first room has four open pool tables, and 
offers a variety of video games. It's the place 
where a game of shuffleboard or darts is usually in 
progress. Then there's the main barroom filled 
with flowers and soft greenery, where one can lay 
back and enjoy good friends in a feel-good atmos- 
phere. 

An extremely large stage and dance floor is the 
place where its happening every Friday and 
Saturday evening. On Friday some the most poplar 
local country bands play their music and line 
dancers, as well as two-step fanciers, crowd the 
roomy dance floor. 

On Saturday, the joint is rockin' with slow and 
fast live music from the '50s to some of today's 
favorite songs. The music and dancing can be 
seen and heard throughout the club. 

Delicious snacks, pizza and hot popcorn from 
the popcorn machine will add to the enjoyment. A 
variety of hot appetizers will be available in the! 
near future. Look for more theme parties and spe- 
cial events, including the opening of our open air 
beer garden in June. 

Main St. is closed on Mondays; open Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday from 3 p.m. to closing 
and from 3 p.m. to 3 a.m. every Friday and 
Saturday. Sunday hours are from 1 1 a.m. to clos- 
ing. Free pool tables are offered on Sunday. For 
more information, call (847)740-4625. 




ilP^ 




Why mess wit! 
when you can get the best 

CHARCOAL GRILLED 

•Steaks 
•Fresh Fish 
•Lobster 
•BBQue Ribs 
•Kabobs 



^-**?IP 




Award Winning Steaks 
Three Yean funning! 

Children's Menu 
Home-Made Desser 



The Backyard Steak Pit 

1818 N. Grandwood Dr., Gurnee 

(I mile west of Gurnee Mills on Rt. 132) 

(847) 356-5200 



MorL-Thun. 4:00-10:00 

•Tit & Sat. 4:00-11*00 

Sun. 4(00-9:00 



ti* 



*74&*#h& 



for Traditional Polish-American Dining ^K> 

S^&fCr Mon.-Fri. Mon.-Sun. 

OS LUNCH BUFFET DINNER 

** $E95 BUFFET 

*£ WEEKEND BRUNCH 



kxrssxWg Vviv* 




POLISH-AMERICAN BUFFET 
217 North Front St., McHenry • (815) 344-0330 

1 Mile South of Rte. 120 on Rte. 31 










HOT SPOTS, UkdANd Newspapers MarcIi 7, 1997 



.. .... l^.-^-j 



•Vw*->— — — ~-— ~-— *-"-' - *- *- 



MarcIi 7, 1997: ; ^UkslANd. Newspapers. HdTTSPOTS; 





Eating and meeting in the Lakeland area 



UimiiiiiiMiiBtitiiimiMMiimt miiiiniiiHiiiHMHMtiHiiiniHiiHiiiiiiiiiiiniiii. 



The Chinese 

Restaurant 

That Everybody's 

Talking About In 

Grauslake. 

Chinese Restaurant ** 

•Dine In • Garry Out 'Delivery 'Cocktails 
We have vegetarian dishes for the Easter holidays! 
Conveniently Located Across From Fairgrounds 

111 S. Hwy. 45 Grayslake 

(847) 548-8882 Fax: (847) 548-2822 




.-m 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 1 1 n i 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 n i 1 1 imiiiiiiiiimiiiiir. 



BAKERY 



SOMETHINGS BREWING, 36 S. Whitney Street, Downtown Grayslake, 
.548-4600. Fresh baked pastries, aH'occasion decorated cakes, hand- 
made chocolates, espresso/coffee bar, bulk beans, gourmet sand- 
wiches, homemade salads, soups, hnnd sliced deii meat and 
cheeses. Gift baskets, gift certificates. 16 flavors of premium hand- 
dipped ice cream. Outdoor cafe. Somethings Brewing is open 
Sunday through Thursday from 5:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday and 
Saturday until 10 p.m. $ OJ 





Sffli JUa/tco's 




Grvat Italian Luismu 



ST. JOSEPH'S DAY 

Complimentary Sweet Table on 
Sat., March 22nd in honor of St. Joseph 



Rated **+t/2 



FRIDAYS: 

Crab Legs 



All You Can Eat Byltselft S 10 



$18.95 



SATURDAYS: 

1 Lobster Tail 



Complete Dinner s 16 



883 Main- St., Antioch 



(847) 395-8883 



Ik 74eSM "Mcutdmm 3$ 



TMNCttWlEEBE 



Mtmmms&r 






• iJH -i.-i^il. i*i-i w-viiyv*^; ri-iiV.J's&v v.V*kx 




Raf 



(ITALIAN 






V"76*t $itat PUet 



KL 



225 Route 134, Round Lake Park 
740-4625 



LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 
EVERY WEEKEND 

A POOLTABLES • DARTS • GAMES • PIZZA 

FEATURING: ' 

Friday, March 7 • 9:00 pm - 2:00 am 

"DAKOTA ROSE" 

Saturday. March 8 • 9:00 pm - 2:00 am 

"STARFIRE" 

Sunday, March 9 • 1 1:00 am - Midnight 

* GOOBER CISSELL BENEFIT *' 

Let's All Help! 4 Bands, Food. Raffles 




Hours: Tucs,-Th. 3 pm-? 

Fri.-S.it 3 pm-3 am; Sun. 11 am 




• Roasted Chicken 

• Hoi & Sour Pickles 

• Egg Rolls 

• Fresh Fruit 



Soups: 

• Hot and Sour Soup 

• Egg Drop Soup 



Appetizers: 

• Cold Beef 

• Pork w/Garlic Sauce 

• Potato Salad 

• Crab Rangoon 

Entrees: 

• Combination Fried Rice 
- • Combination Lo Mein 

• Twice Cooked Duck 

• Chicken Chop Suey 

• Shrimp & Vegetables 

• Garlic Chicken 

Lunch Specials Start at $3.75 

4 EAST PHILLIP RD.. VERNON HILLS 

GflO-1760 (On Rto. GO - 3/4 Mi. W. of Milwaukee Ave.) 

Reservations Recommended • Open 7 Days 



• Sauleed String Beans 

• Beef w/Broccoli 

• Fried Zucchini 

• Sweet & Sour Chicken 

• Hunan Fish 



I 

I 

I 

I 

1 

I 

I 

I 

I 



Featuring Traditional Italian Food with a Northern Accent 
And Fireside Dining with Old World Charm 

COME CELEBRATE SPRING! 
- - -2 Far 1 Dinners! 

2nd Entree 

Of Equal Or Lesser Value 

Vp To 
$ 12.00 



With This Coupon Thru March 29, 1997 

Not Valid on St. Patrick's Day 

Dine-In Only * Limit 2 Coupons per Table 

Not valid with any other offers 



i March 17th i 

St. Patrick's Day 

Corned Beef & 




Elegant banquet facilities accommodate 

up to 250. 

.Weddings are our specialty. 



. Lunch Buffet - 
$5.95 

Monday through Friday. 



Lunch • Brunch • Dinner 



^^ Lunch • Brunch • Dinner 

j9H9 1765 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyv'ille 

(847)367-8088 



*J 



mm- 






Am 



£.GE 12 



EAT F^;EE irs THE RfllNFOREST! 

In celebration of our one year anniversary 
in Chicagoland, kids age 12 and under enjoy 

1 FREE RAINFOREST 
RASCALS KID'S MEAL 

with the purchase of an adult entree Monday-Friday. Just bring In this adl 
Plus, kids receive a FREE collectable Rainforest Cafe cup! 

(beverage not included) 



■•t/- 






C A P E 

A WILD PLACE TO SHOP AND EAT 3 



WAITING IN LINE IS FOR THE BIRDS ... 

CALL NOW FOR RESERVATIONS! 



• COMING SOON TO DOWNTOWN CHICAGO! 

Woodfield Mall 847\619*1900 Gurnee Mills Mall 847«B55*7800 

OFFER GOOD AT ANY CHICACGOLAND LOCATION fflOHDAV- FRIDAY ONLY. VALIDTHRU MARCH 21. 1997. ■ 
CHILDREN MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY AH ADULT, ONE COUPON PER ADULT IN PARTY. TAX AND GRATUITY NOT INCLUDED (LN)) 







1 • 




i^wll 




E^V 



ws 



chef kanVs 

edeLtueiss inn 

411 Li. l'ark (On 1 70, Jusi Eiisi of 2 1 ) 

Libcriyvitlc • (847) 367-9(il)(i 

LUNCH: Tues.- Fri. 1 1:302:30; DINNER: Tues.- SauS-lY 

CLOSED SUNDAY AND MONDAY . 

We Do Catering and Special Affairs up to 1,000 

Chef Karl's New Friday Night 
All-You-Can-Eat Fish Fry Buffet 

Chef's Fish Fry and Cole Slaw, Kidney Bean Salad, 

French Fries.Tartar Sauce, 

Home Baked Bread and Butter 

$.6.95 Children $3.95 

Every Night: Free Appetizer - 

Oysters Rockefeller or Marinated Herring Salad 
and Chefs Spring Salad Plate 
with all dinners ;^ c 

Every Night Special: 

9 oz. New York Strip Steak with Peppercorn Sauce, , 
Garnished or Sauteed Wiener Schnitzel 

$9.95 




884-3900 

1149 ColF Rd., West, Hoffman Estates 




949-1550 

890 East Route 45 
Mundelefn, IL 60060 

WHERE FRESHNESS IS A SPECIALTY 

PL llnique 

'Experience in 

Seafood ^Dining 

^Iso an excellent selection 

of fine meat entrees 

Featuring: 

Live Entertainment - Tues. thru Sat! 
Music by Dave Major 

Daily Specials 

Private Party Facilities 

Ample Parking 

Early Bird Menu 
Sunday thru Friday 

Gift Certificates Available 

Open Dally: 

Monday thru Friday, 11 am 

Saturday, 4pm 

Sunday, 2 pm 

All major credit cards-accepted 



ADVERTISEMENT 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Main Street Inn 



Location: 

225 Rte. 134 in 
Round Lake Park 

Telephone: 

(847) 740-4625 

Hours: 

From 3 p.m. to closing 
Tues., Wed., and Thurs. 
and from 3 p.m. to 3 
a.m. on Fri. and Sat. 
From 1 1 aim. to 
closing on Sunday 

Menu: 

Four open pool tables, 
video games, shuffle- 
board and darts. Live 
country music on Fri. 
and live pop music on 
Sat. for listening and 
dancing. Snacks, hot 
popcorn and pizza, 
with two fully stocked 
bars available 




Something for 
everyone at Main St. 

When it comes to good clean entertainment, 
in a comfortable and cozy atmosphere, at very 
affordable prices, Main St. is the place to go. 

Main St., a newly remodeled night-club, locat- 
ed at 225 Rte. 134 in Round Lake Park, has some- 
thing for everyone in search of fun and amuse- 
ment. 

The friendlyand courteous staff at Main St. 
welcomes old and new customers, from the 
ages of 21 to 100 years young, to three attrac- 
tive rooms where they can have a drink, meet 
the challenges of playing games, or enjoy a 
variety of live music and dancing. Making your 



visit memorable so that you return soon is their - 
main goal. 

. The first room has four open pool tables, and 
offers a variety of video games. It's the place 
where a game of shuffieboard or darts is usually in 
progress. Then there's the main barroom filled 
with flowers and soft greenery, ^where one can lay 
back and enjoy good friends in a feel-good atmos- 
phere. 

An extremely large stage and dance floor is the 
place "where its happening every Friday and 
Saturday evening. On Friday some the most poplar 
local country bands play their music and line 
dancers, as well as two-step fanciers, crowd the 
roomy dance floor. 

On Saturday, the joint is rockin' with slow and 
fast live music from the '50s to some of today's 
favorite songs. The music and dancing can be 
seen and heard throughout the club. 

Delicious snacks, pizza and hot popcorn from 
the popcorn machine will add to the enjoyment. A 
variety of hot appetizers will be available in the; 
near future. Look for more theme parties and spe- 
cial events, including the opening of our open air 
beer garden in June. 

Main St. is closed on Mondays; open Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday from 3 p.m. to closing 
and from 3 p.m. to 3 a.m. every Friday and 
Saturday. Sunday hours are from 1 1 a.m. to clos- 
ing. Free pool tables are offered on Sunday. For 
more information, call (847)740-4625. 









Why mess with the rest, 
when you can gel the best 

CHARCOAL GRILLED 

•Steaks 
•Fresh Fisht 
•Lobster 
-BBQue Ribs 

•Kabobs 






usn 

for Traditional Polish-American Dining 



Award Winning Steaks 
Three Years Running! 

Children's Menu 
Home-Made Desserts- 



The Backyard Steak Pit 

1810 N. Grandwood Dr., Gurnee 

(I mile west of Gurnee Mills on lit. 132) 

(847) 356-5200 



Maru-Thun. 4;00-J0:00 
-rrl.&Sat.4:00-ll;00 

Sun. 4:00-9:00 - i 



*£« 



iff 






\T3\C LUNCH BUFFET 

^* $C95 



Mon.-Fri. Mon.-Sun. 



DINNER 



WEEKEND BRUNCH 




QxrsssWg Hwvy 



& 




POLISH-AMERICAN BUFFET 

217 North Front St., McHenry • (815) 344-0330 
1 Mile South of Rte. 120 on Rte. 31 




■ ' ■ ' < - • 



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■a HOT SPOTS UkF.lA,Nd Newspapers MarcIi 7, 1997 



i ■ ' 



rCROSSWORd 




Clues ACROSS 

1. Country-western group 
5. Blemished 

7. Assisted, in a way 

8. Female name, 
lene 

10. Partner • 

11. Celebration 

13. Vile 

14. Summary 
17. Expanded 
19. Bring in 

21. Central Dravidian 

22. Shoreline 

23. Metal 

24. Makes unhappy 



Clues DOWN 

2. One who assists 

3. Growth hormone 

4. Confused and vague 

5. Confessed 

6. Desert in southern Israel 

7. Entrance fee 
9. Authorization 

1 2. Great fun 

15. Visualize 

16, Ends 

18. Embellishment 

20. Used to have (Scottish) 



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SNOiimos 




Aries- March 21/AprII 20 
Don't get frustrated if you hit 
some unexpected bumps at 
work. Think creatively, and 
you'll discover that there's 
more than one way to skin a 
cat Has your ear been ringing 
lately? Looks like you're the 
topic of discussion at work this 
week. Play your cards right, 
and a promotion could be near. 

Taurus - April 21/May 21 
A serious discussion with a 
loved one will make you real- 
ize something good about 
yourself. You'll discover that 
sometimes you have to take a 
step back' in order to forge 
ahead. Single? Good newsl A 
new romance may be on the 
way. Be sure to look your best 
this coming weekend. 

Gemini - May 22/June 21 
Be true to yourself — and oth- 
ers- — this week. Don't make 
promises you can't keep. . In 
fact, try not to say anything 
you're not absolutely certain of, 
or you could get yourself into 
trouble. A friend's good news 
will be the cause for celebration 
this weekend. Watch your 
spending this weekend, too. 

Cancer - June 22/July 22 
Caught In a rut? Pull yourself 
out by doing something you've 
always wanted to try. Don't be 
afraid to make a change. 
Overcome frustrations with a 
loved one by expressing your 
feelings. Be honest about your 
feelings, and try to be kind in 
your approach. A Libra Is 
involved. 

Leo - July 23/August 23 
A heated argument could lead 



you to say something you'll 
regret. Hurtful words could 
leave long-lasting scars. Tasks 
left until the last minute may be 
laced with mistakes. An orga- 
nized approach is what you 
need. At work, be sure to give 
credit where credit is due. A 
major change Is looming. 

Virgo - Aug 24/Sopt 22 

Don't be generous with other 
people's money. 

Presumptuous actions cause 
hard feelings. A promotion at 
work is likely. An asso- 
ciate's blunder will 
end up benefiting 
you. On Friday, 
you'll find yourself 
in the right place 
at the right time. 
Be strong when 
it comes to love. 

Libra -Sept 23/ 
Oct 23 

A loved one's harsh words 
should be taken with a grain of 
salt. Don't let words said In 
anger get you down. Instead, 
take a look at the big picture. A 
break In routine will be a 
refreshing change. New faces 
and new places will stimulate 
your creativity. If you work 
under deadline pressure, this 
could be a week to implement 
a more organized approach. 

Scorpio - Oct 24/Nov 22 
Take the first step in accom- 

f)lishing a long-term goal. You'll 
ind that taking action gives you 
a sense of control. You'll be 
happy with what you initiated. 
Strapped for cash? A careful 
evaluation of cash flow is prob- 
ably necessary. Be realistic 
when it comes to budgeting. 




Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 
Take care of routine matters 
before moving on to more 
ambitious projects at work. An 
organized schedule will be 
necessary to get everything 
accomplished, A younger fam- 
ily member will call on you for 
advice. Be sure to give an 
unbiased opinion. New love 
could be on the way. 

Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 ' 
Don't let a period of doubt and 
uncertainty damage a good 
relationship. A heart-to-heart 
conversation will proba- 
bly help clear things 
up. Your social life 
may be on the 
rise, but don't get 
carried away. Too 
many late nights 
could affect your 
health. Be sure to 
get plenty of rest 

Aquarius - Jan 21/Fob 1 8 
This week, you may find your- 
self reflecting on the past. A 
mistake you made some time 
ago will serve as a guideline 
for today. A period of confu- 
sion could hurt a love relation- 
ship. Take some time to figure 
out what you really want. A 
social event turns out to be 
more fun than anticipated. 

Pisces - Feb 19/March 20 
Everything seems to fall Into 
place. You'll feel as if luck has 
finally found you. This is an 
ideal time to Implement 
change. You'll feel confident to 
reach for what you want. Do 
you deserve a promotion? 
Well, don't be afraid to go in 
and ask for one. Reach for the 
stars this weekl 




Eating 

and 

meeting 

in the 

Lakeland 

area 




i 



Check This Section 


Every Week 


For Dining Out 


Specials 


And Information! 

1 ' •- ' ■ ■ 



Celebrating 50 Years At This Location 



Lei The 
Laughs Begin 

And Frigate Lounge 

Saturday, March 15th: 

Comedy Show, Dinner, And Open Bar Package 

Your Package Includes: 

• Comedy Show - Three Great Comedians 
•Three Hours Open Bar (Unlimited Cocktails) 

8 pm -11 pm (Includes Premium Brands) 

• Dinner 

Your Choice N.Y. Strip, Prime Rib or 

Chicken Breast Marsala. All Dinners Served With' 

Caesar Salad, Potato, And Homemade Bread 




ABOUT THE COMEDIANS... 

Our opener this evening is AMY CROSSFIELD. She hoi performed at top comedy 

dubs across the country such as Funny Bone and Zanies. The feature comedian, 

PATRIK KEATING, has opened far Dennis Miller and has played clubs throughout the 

midwest When it became clear to TOM NAUGKTON that his landlord and 

collection agencies had to get paid he earnestly developed his comedy act. Since 

then, ho has appeared on WGN and has performed his observational style comedy in 

clubs across North America, 
SHOW STARTS AT 9:00 PkVJ. 



DJ & DANCING AFTER THE SHOW 






(847) 587-3211 - ROLLINS RD. - INGLESIDE 

Between Wilson and Fairfield On Long take . 
B Miles West of Gurriee Mills on Rollins Road 
Between Fox Lake & Round Lake 



» 



YOU SHOULD Bl 

Grilled or Fried 
Haddock 

$Q95 Includes 

3C****r 



u 



8 ! 



Chowder, Potatoes 
and Cole Slaw 
4PM - 9PM • Reservations Requested 






A 



3035 Belvtdere Street Waukegan • 847/336-0222 
' Now Open Sundays, 1:00 - 8:00 




worn? cmcz 

KE7TAUIZANT t TILLING 7TATI0N 




SERVIM CLASSIC AMERICAN FARE 

Sandwiches • Hamburgers • Ribs • Steak • Seafood 
HAWTH0RI1 SHOPPinG CEnTER 

(next to Marshall Field's) 

(847) 367-4704 
Fax: (847) 367-4743 

Servicing the Area for Over is years! 






TRY OUR A WARD- Winn inG SALAD BAR 







MARck 7, .1 997 UkElANd Newspapers HOT SPOTS 



. 



'■"Ti. 



Roses bring beauty to the garden Bravissimo 



I have always loved roses. 
My grandmother tended them, 
my mother and sister grow them. 
My uncle used to propagate 
them through the method of 
grafting. 1 still have a 
'Tropicana^jbitt, he started 30 . 
years ago. 

Would you like to 
have a rose garden? There 
are many varieties of roses. 
The hybrid teas produce 
large flowers usually one 
on a long stem. 
Grandfloras produce the . 
same large flowers, but in • 
clusters. Rugosa shrub 
roses are valued for their 
hardiness, healthiness and 
ability to thrive in adverse 
conditions. Floribundas 
are noted for their perma- 
nence, continuity of bloom and 
ease of culture. 

No shrub can match. them 
for floral display both in amount 
of bloom, and for their lengthy 
blooming period. The miniature 
fairy rose is vigorous, disease 
resistible, has dark green foliage 
and production of numerous 
flowers and a long blooming sea 
son. The old shrub roses, the 
favorites of Victorian gardens, 
are unmatched for their fra- 
grance, romantic colors and free 
dom of bloom. 

Roses need at least five 



hours of sun each day, and 
should be protected from wind 
and planted away from other 
plants with vigorous root sys- 
tems. They do take work, but 
the results are worth it. Roses 
need rich, loamy soil full of 
humus and need tolje fed reg- 



Cjardener '& 
journal 

r 

hyT.yiia HufrT 



■ ularly. Start feeding plants in 
April. One award winning rose 
gardener feeds his roses the 
following formula: 1/2 cup 
slow release nitrogen, 1 tea- 
spoon urea, 1 teaspoon chelat- 
ed iron and 1/2 cup Epsom 
salts for the initial feeding. 
Then as the season progresses 
apply urea, chelated iron and 
Epsom salts every three weeks 
until August when feeding 
stops. In June or July he rec- 
ommends using a fish emul- 
sion fertilizer in between gran- 
ular feedings. 




Whether you buy bare root 
roses or container roses you 
should dig a hole at least 18 
inches deep and 2 feet wide. Be 
careful not to damage the roots 
at planting. If you purchase 
bare root stock from a garden- 
ing center, soak the roses in 
"Water to "which you 
have added a bit of 
bleach (to kill any bac- 
teria) overnite. At 
planting time add plen- 
ty of organic material 
to the hole and fertiliz- 
er and water well. * 

Roses need to be 
pruned every spring 
early April is a good time 
for this task. Invest in a 
good, sharp pruning tool 
as you definitely will 
need one. Make your cuts at a 45 
degree angle about 1/4 inch 
above a swelling bud eye, facing 
outward from the center of the 
bush. Pruning is essential for 
healthy plants. 

Choosing to care for roses 
can be most rewarding and wilt 
bring you pleasure for years to 
come, you can order the 
"Handbook for Selecting Roses," 
published by the American Rose 
Society by sending $5 and a self- 
addressed stamped envelope to 
American Rose Society, Box 
3000, Shreveport, LA 71130-0030 



From page Bl 
Tickets for the concert are $100; 
$200 includes admission to a 
reception following the perfor- 
mance. 

The wind ensemble will be back 
onstage at 7 p.m., March 16, for a 
free performance of classical and 
popular pieces. 

Footwork fans will enjoy the 
Joel Hall Dancers for two perfor- 
mances in the Mainstage Theatre, 
March 19. "The Crossing" cele- 
brates the musical heritage of the 
African-American community. 
Tickets for the public are $6 for the 
2 p.m. performance and $12 for 
the evening show that begins at 
7:30 p.m. 

Leslie Hopkins, founder of 
"Prairie Spirit Dance Theatre" at 
CLC, recalled having to move 
chairs and dance on carpet before 
a genuine studio provided a hard- 
wood floor, mirrors and curtains. 
Her students, she said, range in . 
age from 8 to 50-something and 
share enthusiasm along with a love 
of dance. 

Facilities superintendent Mike 
Anthony pointed out the energy- 
saving features of the room. 

"We've installed occupancy 
sensors to control light and tem- 
perature; it adds up to a lot," he 
said. "We've improved the func- 
tionality and we'Ve done it very 
efficiently." ' 

Prairie Spirits students are 




Fox Lake Volunteer Fire 
Dept, & Rescue Squads 

Present.... 

11th Annual St. Pat's Dance 

& Las Vegas Night 

March 15th & 



The \ 




Donation s 1 .00 



Music By The Washington St. Station at the park 
"Rockefellers" Tickets Available At The Door 

6:00 p.m. til 1:00 a.m. 



$3.00 Admission per person - $5.00 per couple 

CG286 



1*^ "A 



-t 



SUNDAY 

CHAMPAGNE 
BRUNCH 

Ovn 25 Dtficinl 

Entreat To 

Chooa* From 

'8.95 Mrt> 

'4.95 OMrm Utter 10 
*1 .95 (■ HlflU Chair 



Special Prices For Children 

715 W. RT. 173 
ANTIOCH 



eriaflo „ 

Banquet & Buffet ■ ^*-< 

WEDNESDAY 

ttibMBfltM 

•7.95 

THURSDAY 

Internittontl Bnftrt 
•7.95 

FRIDAY 

Seafood Bufftt 
•7.95 

SATURDAY 

Prima Rib Buffat 

•12.95 

847-395-2212 

Call For Rtstrvathns 




*yr*yy(iY mm *~vyr~ m * — yypnr m Tr~ yf ~ l 



CoUtW 



TRIPLE J 



fPk 



e $e. 



STEAK HOUSE 






AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



"&**& 



eef* 



Located On Rt. 83 1/2 Mile North Of Antioch 

414-862-9886 

Winter Hours; Wed. & Thurs. 4-9:30 pm; Fri, i Sal. 4-10 pm; Sun. 1-6:30 pm 
Book Your Private Parties Or Business Lunch Up To 100 Now! 

SUNDAY, MARCH 1 6th 

life: St. Patrick's Day ^ 

"The Best" 
Corned Beef & Cabbage 

-$8.25- 

Includes soup or salad, baby red potatoes, carrots & celery. 

Other Excellent Entrees: 

• BBQ Baby -Back Ribs 

• Certified Angus Prime Rib' - (Sat. Only) 

• Friday Fish Fry (Friday Only) 

• Seafood - Salmon, Scallops, Shrimp, 

Australian Cold Water Lobster, 

Alaskan King Crab, 

and Much More 




r;4+-^jnrt.; 



L>f 





(ITALIAIN T p CAFE ) 



'Easter Sunday 
<Buffet 



Serving from 10:00 am until 5:00 pm 



Breakfast Selection 

Omelettes made to order 

Scrambled Eggs 

Bacon • Sausage 

Ham * Pancakes 

Belgian Waffles 

Potato Pancakes 

Strawberry Blintzes 

Seafood Selection 

Smoked Trout 

Peel and Eat Shrimp 

Baked Cod 

Lox & Bagels 

and much 





Hot Entrees 

Carved Steamship Round of Beef 

Italian Sausage 

Polish Sausage 

Chicken Marsala 

Pasta • Vegetables • Potatoes 

Lamb • Pork • Chicken 

Turkey & Stuffing 

Bar-B-Que Ribs 

Dessert Selection 

Cmn Youx 0\w la Cham Sundai 8m 

Cheesecoke • Rum Cakes 

Jello * Pudding 

Fresh Fruit • Juice 

much more 



$13.95 Adults • $6.95 Children (under 10) 



1765 N. Milwaukee Ave. 
Libertyville, IL 60048 

(847) 367-8088 

corner of Rte. 137 & Milwaukee Ave. 
Make Your Reservations Now! 




already preparing for "Behold!" in 
May, said Hopkins. "It's dedicated 
to different aspects of the Lake 
County community," she 
explained. 

An experimental "black box" 
theater features-flexible seating for 
up to 120 people, and a simple 
lighting and sound system stu- 
dents can work without a great 
deal of experience, said Bronner. 

"Hopefully down the line we 
will have student-produced 
shows," said theater coordinator 
Bibhlin Glennon. "It's a wonderful 
. space for working." 

A scene shop also serves as a 
classroom for stage craft, and 
room for costume storage and 
design provides not only laundry 
facilities and sewing machines but 
new potential for instruction. 
Instead of contracting with an 
outside source for the design and 
construction of costumes, the 
department can provide their own 
labor and resources. "It's some- 
thing theater people need to 
learn," said Bronner. 

A make-up room is bordered 
by a counter with 20 stations. It is 
separate from the dressing area 
and can be used by large compa- 
nies that come to perform at CLC. 

""It's designed as a classroom 
concept," said theater instructor 
Bob CoscarellL "It's more closely 
related to academic theater where 
students learn about various 
aspects of make-up." 

The dressing rooms (one male, 
one female) are equipped with 
make-up areas as well, along with 
complete toilet and shower facili- 
ties and lockers. 

"This has everything we are 
going to need for musicals and 
road shows," said Bronner. "There 
is such a potential for students 
and for the public." 

Hosts sought for 
'Up With People' 
staff, performers 

Local families and individuals 
are sought to host young men and 
women from the internationally 
acclaimed group "Up With 
People" in March and April. "Up 
With People" will perform two 
shows at Stevenson High School 
on Saturday, April 19. 

Four "Up With People" staff 
members will arrive in the area 
March 19 to help promote the 
concerts and coordinate group 
activities, and will depart April 20. 

The team comprises three 
women and one man whose ages 
range from 2 1 to 26. All four speak 
English. Host families are expected 
tu provide separate rooms if they 
wish to host more than one 
advance team member. In addi- 
tion, hosts should provide break- 
fast and dinner. The advance team 
will provide its own transportation. 

If interested in hosting, call Jim 
Conrey at 634-4000, ext 276. 

To order tickets for one of April 
19 performances, call 634-4000, 
exL 300. - 

Attend sports 
cards, comics, 
and game show 

Attend the Sports Card, 
Comic and Game Show event on 
Sunday, March 9 at the Racine 
Knights of Columbus Hall, locat- 
ed at 1-94 and Hwy. 20. Hours of 
the show are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Admission is free. 

On Sunday, March 16 the 
show moves on to the the Brat 
Stop located west of 1-94 on Hwy. 
50. Show are are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
with admission of 50 cents. 



LL_^. 



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-c'-i -it- r- 




LIPSERVICE UkelANd Newspapers Maim* 7, 1997 



: 



LI 



It's tIhe TAlk of tIhe town 

Get It off youR chEST (847) 225-8075 




Lipservice is a phone-in column presented as a feature of 
Lakeland Newspapers. Lakeland Newspapers makes no claim to 
the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland Newspapers does not 
claim the content or the subject matter as fact, but as the personal 
opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to 
edit copy or to refrain from printing a message. Call in at 223-8073 
and leave your message 24-hours a day. Although the call is 
anonymous, please leave your village name, 

and friends. We wonder, what 



Report it 

Response to Neighbor in 
Antioch, who has drug dealing 
information. If you have such 
information, you should of 
called the cops by now. They 
are drug dealing, they are near 
* a school. You don't need to 
wait a week. Report. 

Sleepy town, Mayberry 

Lake Villa wants to build a 
McDonalds on Rte.83 and 
Grand, they are already consid- 
ering a hospital on this same 
intersection within the year. Its' 
already too congested. Police 
already have to assist traffic 
from the industrial park. Village 
boards want to see a grocery 
store there. After it's totally 
jammed up then the state can 
justify a 4- or 6-lane expansion. . .. 

Does Lake Villa need this? Tell We won't go for liars ■ 
your leaders, I urge you, or we Voters won '* S° for liars * You ' !l 
won't have a sleepy little town see in lhe A P ril 1st election. As 
anymore. Stop the McDonald's the sa Y in B B oes ' lf vou can't 
they want to build, it'll be too take the heal ' sta Y oul of lhe 
much. kitchen. 



else are you doing? 

Gambling vote 

Publish the Partners of the 
Gambling vote. Who are the 
corporations, directors, who are 
' behind this big push for the 
gambling vote. We need to 
know both sides of who these 
people are who are moving into 
our community. 

Use the lumberyard 

To Grant Township and offi- 
cials of Fox Lake: Why don't 
you buy the old lumberyard in 
center of the town and put the 
township office there with the ■ 
other little offices so they would 
be convenient to all. Maybe the 
post office too. 



Reassurance 

I wanted to let Mayor Davis 
know not to worry about voters, 
because this voter is "voting for 
Schrimpf. The water bills 
weren't this high when he was' 
in office. What's going on 
around here? 

How could you? 

How can you let Lipservice 
continue to make claims 
against their neighbors, when 
there is no proof. I can't sit and 
watch this any longer. All 
anonymously. Lipservice isn't 
news, its garbage, not journat- 

» ism. It's irresponsible gossip 
and rumors that's at the root of 
all problems that are in our 
society today. — John Smith, 

♦ . Smith Engineering, McHenry 

f How much? 

To the anti-hunter in Antioch, 
how much money do you give 
to the animal conservationists 
to support the animals? 

Stop crying. 

Local Mundeleln restaurant: 
take down your signs asking for 
a liquor license. We do need a 
quality restaurant. Focus on 
quality and a good pricing and 
you won'tneed the license. I'm 
' ■* not a Mayor Sindles fan, but she 
was right on the mark on this 
one. 

, Shame on you 

Shame on Island Lake -mayor 



Minuteman 

At the Lincoln Day Celebration 
the mayor gave you a new 
name. Congratulations to 
Minuteman! Nice to see you're 
so close friends with mayor. II 
could come in handy. Good 
Luck. 

To citizen with guts 

To the neighbor in Antioch. 
Others are also aware of the 
drug dealing. We hope to see 
an article from you in 
Lipservice that you are OK 
since you fear your life and 
safety as we do, afraid if we put 
our names on the report. 

History lesson 

I think many of the people in 
this country need a history les- 
son. First the Indians were here, 
and then the Spanish came up 
through Mexico, settled 
California, Florida, and much 
of the mid-west, Colorado, etc. 
Not the Hispanic that settled 
these areas, but Spanish. 
•Though there were some from 
Mexico, but a great number of 
.them were from Spain. 

Tripping 

Wouldn't it be wonderful if all 
the "Mr. Russels" in the nation 
would devote more of their 
lime to police and fire depart- 
ments as well as school and 
library districts? In their quest 
for media attention in upcom- 
ing elections, they seem to trip 



over their own feet. 

Congrats Grayslake 

I'd like to congratulate the 
Grayslake Park District in the 
baseball movement, on the fine 
job they've done on screwing 
up Avon's baseball program. 
Grayslake had no intention on 
looking out for the kids of the 
area, their sole hidden agenda. 
After try outs, the truth is finally 
out! Avon Baseball will wel- 
come those kids who are not 
accepted in Grayslake program, 
and will be stronger, and grow 
from this action. 

Thank you all! 

We are the parents of the young 
man who had the snowmobile 
accident in Fox Lake. We will 
try to answer much of the cards 
and letters to those- who 
showed their concern and sup- 
port. We want to especially 
thank the kids from school and 
his friends. We hope he will be 
able to thank you himself soon. 
We want you to know how 
much it helped turn a corner for 
us to those of you in the com- 
munity. We will write to each 
of you personally but it may 
take some time." 

Speed limits 

At a village board meeting I 
attended on Feb. 10, ( asked a 
question of why the speed limit 
in Fox Lake was reduced to 
35mph from '40mph. No one 
came forward. It was the 
Rainier Woods subdivision, not 
the park to be, by State Bank of 
the Lakes. Isn't it- the real rea- 
son Mr. Pappas is running in 
the election? 

Support our kids 

Whether you're pro-choice or 
anti-abortion, support family 
planning. There's millions of 
children sleeping on streets in 
the world who deserve a life 
too. Call your senators, sup- 
port family planning. Care 
about the children, that are 
already here. 

Seven in charge 

We live in a delightful area that 
used to be an RV Park, but it 
now has permanant residents. 
We enjoy the beauty of bur liny 
Lake Sullivan, where the rules 
and regulations date back to its 
start. We have a board of seven, 
who have jockeyed themselves 
into position to spend and not 
ask the general population of 
the park on spending. They 
make decisions that are not 
practical. Can these seven be 
the only intelligent people to 
decide for us? 

Disabled are able 

I resent the commercials for the 



disabled. There are many suc- 
cessful disabled people in this 
world. Attorneys, wake up. This 
is wrong. 

Summer help 

l run a summer business. Thank 
you for organizing the project 
for the summer youth job expo. 
Lakelands' "At a glance" col- 
umn reported the information. 
It ran at Be.ach Park village 
hall. I was able to hire a dozen 
teens. Barbara Braim organized 
this and was instrumental. Very 
well done. You all deserve a lot 
of credit. 

Another subject 

This is in regard to the mention 
on Feb. 28 of the debate 
between Mayor Lumber and 
Patrick Smylhe in Round Lake. 
How about adding the topic of 
Arrow Lake subdivision? I think 
it's lime we get a new voice in 
Round Lake! 

Earth to Myers 

Who does this guy think he is? 
In his first public appearance* 
he goes on public record lying. 
Then he tells everyone to look 
at his yuppie home page. Admit 
it, Dirk, you're a Schrimpf lack- 
.ey who's trying to steal votes 
from Davis. Get real! 

Plan, plan 

Looking at the mayor's race in 
Mundelein, I hope the voters 
can see the difference between 
someone with "envisionment" 
and someone with a vision and. 
plan for the future. The current 
administration seems to be 
planning for the future. The 
challengers say they couldn't 
. be involved with Mundelein 
because ihey didn't have the 
time and didn't know who to 
call. Great excuses. If they win, 
will they use these excuses 
again? No one plans to fail, but 
many fail because they simply 
didn't plan. 

Overreacted 

Is it possible that our Fox Lake 
fire department has overreacted 
just slightly with the acid spill 
on Route 1 2 and Grand? Do we 
call for mutual aid from other 
departments every time there's 
a car accident and the battery 
case is ruptured, leaking acid 
on the ground? Who is respon- 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



T V>j' 



sible for that fiasco? 
ant 

Help each other 

l was one of/.the representatives 
and volunteers that worked 
with LifeSource to give blood 
during the recent project, I wish 
the community could have 
shown this project more sup- 
port. This was for three kids 
from this area. Let's help out 
eadh other. 

Be concerned 

What we should really be con- 
cerned about is what the Pledge 
of Allegiance says, "And justice 
for all.". What it really should 
say is, "And innocence for 
those who can buy it," i.e. O.j. 
Simpson, Woody Allen and 
Michael Jackson. That we 
should really be concerned 
about. 

Concentrate on us 

About the proposed Antioch 
waterfront hotel, Antioch village 
officials would do well to con- 
centrate on the well-being of the 
residents in the town and town- 
ship without bringing more 
problems and weekenders to 
our already overcrowded town 
and waterway. It would be 
adverse to the existing motels 
and other rental properties. 
Boats and trailers would be filled 
and refilled with gas* at stations 
on- the road instead of marinas. 
The hotel off-season business 
would not be enough to justify 
building it in the first place. Boat 
slips and ramp fees would also 
suffer during the short summer 
season. 

Keep format 

I'm calling about cable TV, 
specifically US Cable. I just 
finished reading the Sunday 
Sun-Times of Feb. 16 and it 
mentions surveys. I can't 
remember the last time US 
Cable had a survey, so I'm 
giving you my opinion. 
Generally we like the current 
lineup and the channels you 
have now.- I've seen some of 
lhe new channels and feel 
they're not necessary, just a 
're-hash of what's already on. 
We like the Comedy Channel, 
Nickelodeon, and AMC. 
Don't change a thing; we like 
what you've gol now and the 
format is pretty good.. 



WSeMCashFqh 

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HiqhlANcI PaiiI< 
Hospiml 



Fibromyalgia support 

A support group for 
fibromyalgia sufferers is 
offered at Highland Park 
Hospital. Fibromyalgia Is a 
chronic disorder that causes 
pain and stiffness through- 
out the tissues that support 
and move the bones and 
joints. Sometimes called 
fibrositis, Is afflicts three-to- 
six million people in the 
United States. 

This free support group 
meets on the second 
Wednesday of each month, 
with the next meeting 
scheduled for March 12, 
from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the 
Education Center. Interested 
individuals can call 
Raymona Herbrick at 432- 
8000, ext. 5027. 

ALS support 

Highland Park Hospital, 
and the Les Turner ALS 
Foundation offer two free 
monthly amyotrophic lateral 
sclerosis (ALS) support 
groups. One group is 
designed for people suffer- 
ing from ALS and the other 
is for ALS patients' family 
members and caregivers. 
Both groups will meet on 
Wednesday, March 19 from 
6:45 to 8:15 p.m. at Highland 
Park Hospital, .71 8 Glenview 
Ave., Highland Park. For fur- 
ther information, call 432 : 
8000. 



ConoeII MecKcaI 
Center 



Weight management 

Free Weight 
Management Orientation 
program will be held 
Thursday, March 6 at 7 p.m. 
at Centre Club, 200 W. Golf 
Rd., Libertyville. 
Information about the vari- 
ous weight management 
programs offered at 
Condeil's Medical Center 
Health Institute. 

NutriQuest, a program 
for individuals who are 20 
percent or more over their 
ideal body weight, offers a 
comprehensive approach to 
weight loss, emphasizing 
long-term weight manage- 
ment. 

Lean for Life is a 12 
week diet and exercise pro- 
gram with a thorough focus 
on nutrition, exercise and 
behavior issues related to 
weight management, and 
use of Centre Club facilities. 
Biometrics is a customized, 
one-on-one weight loss pro- 
gram which actively inte- 
grates exercise with a bal- 
anced healthy eating plan. 

The Weight Management 
by Prescription Program uti- 
lizes new weight loss med- 
ications to help an Individ- : 
ual achieve their long-term 
weight goals. Registration iiJ 
required. Call 362-2905, ext. 
5770. -• 

Arthritis council 

Sunday, March 9 the 
Arthritis Action Council, a 
support group for people 
coping with arthritis, will 
meet at 2 p.m. in the Allen 
Conference Center, Condell , 
Medical Center, 801 S. 
Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville. 



Managed care plans can't afford to skimp on quality 



SHERMAN M. WOLFF 

Although managed care health plans have 
been around for decades, there is currently more 
discussion about them than ever before. Much 
of the public discourse is focused on the quality 
of the health care delivered through these plans 
versus controlling the cost of health care. Critics 
assume that managed care health plans can't 
achieve one without sacrificing the other. 

At a recent seminar sponsored by Blue Cross, 
nationally respected health care policy expert 
Professor Alain Enthoven, noted that quality is 
quickly becoming a key factor in employers' 
health care purchasing decisions. In just the last 
couple of years, large employers have joined 
together to study the quality of the health plans 
serving their employees. In industries that com- 
pete for talented employees, the quality of a 
company's health care plan is extremely impor- 
tant. 

Individual consumers are also becoming 
more informed about health plans. They are now 



better able to access the information they need 
to make health plan purchasing or enrollment 
decisions. Independent agencies, like the 
National Committee for Quality Assurance, are 
using standardized criteria to measure the qual- 
ity of health plans and they are reporting their 
results through a variety of media including the 
Internet. 

From a purely business perspective, it makes 
sense for a health plan to constantly strive to 
improve the quality of the health care delivered. 
That's why the better managed care plans spend 
a great deal of time, effort and money in selecting 
the best physicians, hospitals and other 
providers for their managed care networks. 
That's why managed care providers are moni- 
tored for the quality of their patient care. 

That's why the member of managed care 
plans are frequently surveyed for.their opinions 
on the quality of the care they are receiving. And 
that's why managed care plans place an empha- 
sis on preventive care to keep people well. 



Most well-run managed care plans are gen- 
uinely concerned with providing quality health 
care because it's the right tiling to do. But it's 
important to note that there are also sound bot- 
tom-line business reasons for managed care 
plans to continually improve quality. Even the 
most cynical person can see t that actions that 
would reduce quality in a health 7 plan would be 
extremely shortsighted. 

And in health care; as in other fields, short- 
sighted actions usually result in short-lived com- 
panies. 

Increased competition means that high- 
quality health care is essential to the long-term 
success of a managed care health plan. And tak- 
ing the long view is the hallmark of major health 
insurers like Blue Cross and, Blue Shield of 
Illinois. It's not accident that we've been around 
for more than 60 years. 

Editor's note: Sherman M. Woljfis senior vice 
president and chief financial officer of Blue Cross 
and Blue Shield of Illinois. 



H EA LTH WATCH 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



New era in diagnostic technology dawns at MRI 



Since opening its doors in 1992, 
the Magnetic Resonance Institute 
of Lake County has been commit- 
ted to meeting the diagnositc needs 
of area physicians and their 
patients. 

With the new installation of the 
General Electric Signa Horizon LX 
MRI system, which is one of only 
two such units in the nation, con- 
tinues that commitment. It pro- 
vides area physicians with an 
expanded list of diagnostic proce- 
dures due to its increased imaging 
capabilities. 

. "With this technology," says 
Robert Breit, MD., institute medical 
director, "we can provide diagnos- 
tic options to area physicians which 
were not available in the past. Plus, 
the resolution and clarity of the 
images achieved are better than 
those provided by other MRI tech- 
nologies." 

MRI's are used to provide "pic- 
tures" of the body to assist physi- 
cians in diagnosing disease. They 
can be used for a broad range of 
imaging, including viewing head, 
neck, heart, lung, jaw, back, 
abdomen, arteries, all joints, etc. 

Patient comfort is a primary 
concern of the institute's staff, 
according to Joe Coil, executive 
director. "This new magnet is 
designed to help patients be more 
relaxed during the procedure," says 
Coil. 

The magnet includes a larger 
opening than incorporated in earli- 
er designs. And, the built-in inter- 
com system allows for easy voice 
contact with the technologist dur- 
ing the procedure. There is also a 
music system which allows patients 
to listen to their favorite CD's and 
tapes. In addition, the institute 
offers a conscious I.V, sedation 
treatment to medically calm 
patients if required. 




Dwarfed by a powerful new magnet, technicians install the new technology at the Magnetic 
Resonance Institute of Lake County in Gurnee. The new magnet provides a variety of new diagnos- 
tic opportunities for area physicians. 



"For the convenience or 
patients who may require addition- 
al diagnostic testing, we have 
added a full-range of diagnostic 
services at our convenient loca- 
tion," says Coil. 

In addition to MRI's, patients 
can also be scheduled for general x- 
rays, screening and diagnostic 
mammograms, and medical labo- 
ratory tests at the institute. 

"These new services allow our 
patients to complete many proce- 
dures while here, saving them 
time," says Coil. 

The Magnetic Resonance 
Institute of Lake County is staffed 
by board certified radiologists who 
specialize in Mill technology and 
ARRT registered technologists, cer- 
tified in MRI, mammography and 
general x-ray. 

The institute is located at 60 S. 
Grccnlcaf St., Gurnee. Convenient 



appointments for MRI procedures 
are available between 6:30 a.m. and 
10:30 p.m., Monday through 
Friday, and between 7 a.m. and 5:30 
p.m. on Saturdays. Other services 
are available between 9 a.m. and 
5:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. 



The Magnetic Resonance 
Institute of Lake County is a not for 
profit corporation and is a joint 
venture between Victory Memorial 
Hospital and the Saint Thercse 
Medical Center. For more informa- 
tion, call Joe Coil at 360-1674. 



Victory Memorial receives award 



Victory Memorial Hospital and 
three members of its staff have 
been recognized by the board of 
directors' of the Lake County 
Children's Advocacy Center, 
Waukegan. 

Tim Harrington, Victory 
Memorial Hospital president, was 
presented with the center's 
Community Support Award, in 
recognition of the hospital's sup- 
port of the Lake County Children's 
Advocacy Center and the hospital's 
"outstanding initiative to protect all 
children." 

Individual awards for outstand- 



ing service to the children of Lake 
County were presented to Victory 
staff members: Pat Behling, RN; 
Linda Hale, RN and Kathy Saesan, 
RN. 

The awards were presented in 
recognition of the establishment of 
MECCA, Victory Hospital's Medical 
Examination Clinic for Child 
Advocacy. The clinic provides a 
safe, child-friendly environment in 
which children who may be victims 
of sexual or physical abuse receive 
medical care by specially trained 
doctors and nurses. MECCA is the 
first such clinic in Lake County. 



Lake County Health Dept. 
offers Mobile Health Services 

The Lake County Health Dept. Mobile Health Service, support- 
ed by the participating townships, will be at the following locations: 

• Grant Twp. Hall, 411 Washington, Inglcside on March 13, 20 . . 
and 27 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Call 587-2233. 

• Warren Twp. Citizens Building, 17801 W. Washington, Gurnee 
on March 7, 14 and 21 from 5 to 7 p.m. Call 244-1101. ■ •"■"' 

• St Mary's Parish Center, (sponsored by Shields Twp.), 201 E; 
Illinois Rd., Lake Forest on March 11 and 25 from 9 to 1 1:30 a.m. 
Call 234-0802. 

• Harry Knigge Civic Center, (sponsored by Ela Twp,), 95 E. 
Main St., Lake Zurich an March 12 and 24 from 9 to 1 1:30 a.m. Call 
438-7823. there is no charge to senior citizens that are residents fn 
Ela Twp. 

• Vernon Twp. Administrative Offices, 3050 N. Main St., Prairie 
View, March 19 from 9 to 1 1:30 a.m. Call 634-4600. 

• Deerspring Park Multi-Purpose Room, (sponsored by West 
Deerfield Twp.), 200 Deerfield Rd., Deerfield (Deerspring 

• Pool/Lions Drive), March 18 from 9 to 1 1:30 aim. Call 945-761 0. 

Available services consist of a physician, for diagnosis and treat- 
ment of medical problems and school and sports physical examina- 
tions. Blood pressure testing and health counseling by a registered 
nurse are also available. Township residents unable to pay for those 
services requiring a fee should contact dieir township supervisor at 
the number listed above. 

Tlie Mobile Health Service provides primary medical care to 
township residents at various sites throughout Lake County and 
refers individuals to private physicians for medical conditions 
requiring further treatment. For more infonnation, call 872-4780 or 
the appropriate township office. 



pKv HEAITHWATCH UkeUnd Newspapers MaucU 7, 1997 




News with Nancy 




. Nancy Weil, executive^irector of Source for Sehiars/WUl 
discuss current events at Hawthorn Lakes Retirement 
Community; 10 E/Hawthorn Pkwy., Vernon Hills oh Saturday, 
March 8;atll;'30 a.m. Also, Easter decorations, "afghans; cro- 
cheted arid tatted items, and plastic canvas and other home- 
made crafts will be on sale at Hawthorn Lakes Retirement 
Community's annual Spring Boutique Tuesday, March 11 from 
9 a.m. to noon. For more information, call Kathy Morris at 367- 
2561. 

Deaf, hard of hearing plan social 

Lake County Center for Independent Living, 706 E, Hawley.. 
St., Mundelein is holding a ; social for the deaf and hard of hear- 
ing on Tuesday, March 18 from 4 to 7 p.m. Bingo, games and 
workshop .will be offered. Admission is free and refreshments 
are prdvided.'Participarits are asked to bring prie snack or 
dessert to share. No children, please. A sigh language inter- 
preter will be provided. For further information, call 949-4440; 

Self-esteem workshop set 

. Build your confidence, learn to' have your needs met, 
increase your feeling of self- worth by attending Victory's free 
self-esteem workshop, Thursday, March 13 from 7 to 9 p.m. at 
Victory Memorial Hospital, 1324 N. Sheridan Rd., Waukegan. 
Call 1(800)THECHOICE to register. 

Families Anonymous meet weekly 

Families Anonymous-has changed its weekly meeting to 2 
p.m. on Sundays at the Gateway Youth Center, off Rte. 59 and 

Bering Lane, Lake Villa. For information,, call 838-1903. 

■ ■ 

Discussion on arthritis slated 

Dr. Charles E. Frank, an orthopedic surgeon, will discuss 
"Sleep and Pain:' Help for Your Arthritis" at 2 p.m. on. Sunday, 
March 9 at Condell Medical Center, Conference Center, 
Libertyville, A question period will follow. For information call 
Martha at 362-0089. This event is sponsored by the Arthritis 
Foundation's "Arthritis Coping and Education", program. 



Immunization clinics held for children 



The Lake County Health 
Dept., in conjunction with the 
Lake County Community Health 
Partnership, offers immunization 
clinics for Lake County children. 

Childhood immunization 
clinics will be held at the follow- 
ing locations and times. A parent 
or guardian' must accompany all 
children: 

• Lake County Health Dept., 
Belviclere Medical Building, 2400 
Belvidere Rd., Waukegan every 
Monday and Thursday, 1 to 3 
p.m. 

• Condell Medical Center, 
Allen Conference Center, 700 
Garfield Ave., Libertyville on 



March 1 1 from 5 to 7 p.m. Call 
. 362-2900, ext. 5120. 

• American Legion Hall, 1 1 1 E. 
Main (Rte. 134), Round Lake 
Park, March 12 from 9 to 11 a.m. 
Call 360-3114. 

• Midwestern Regional 
Medical Center, 2501 Emmaus 
Ave., Zion, March 8 from 9 to 1 1 
a.m. Call 872-6062. 

• • Victory Memorial Hospital, 
1324 N; Sheridan Rd„ Waukegan, 
March 18 from 9 to 11 a.m. Call 
360-4127. 

For more information, call the 
Lake County Health Dept. 
Communicable Disease Program, 
360-6761. 




by Charlotte F. Nielsen O.D. 



Astigmatism Is most often caused by distortion or an irregularity of the 
cornea, the front surface of the eye. With normal, undistorted vision, the 
cornea Is .smooth and equally curved In all directions. When astigmatism Is 
present, the cornea is "warped" and It curves more in one direction than In 
the other. In othef words, the cornea Is shaped more like a football than a 
basketball, 

The effect of astigmatism Is to change vision like that seen when looking 
In a mirror with a wavy surface.. .similar to the funhouse mirrors that make 
you look too tall, too wide or too thin. Astigmatism is usually Inherited, may 
be present at birth, and frequently remains unchanged during a lifetime. 
Small amounts of astigmatism are very common and do not always require 
correction. 

Periodic eye examinations ore the best way to preserve comfortable, 
good vision. Call us for an appointment. 



LCi <-' 



,SJs 




VISION CARE ASSOCIATES 



Or. C.F. Nielsen, Dr. W.B. Lyons, Dr. E.L. Friedman 
2403 Grand Ave., Waukegan 

847-662-3800 



Lake Forest Hospital Foundation announces 
new members to board of directors 



Lake Forest Hospital (LFH) 
Foundation, elected Eve new mem- 
bers to its board of directors. As the 
new medical staff president, Leslie 
J. Block, MD, joins the board for 
one year. Additional board mem- 
bers Leonard L. Beck, MD; Thomas 
B. Hunter III; Mark G. Miller and 
Thomas Swarthout will serve on the . 
board until the year 2000. t 

Leonard L Beck, MD is an anes- 
thesiologist on staff at Lake Forest 
Hospital and former president of 
the Lake Forest Hospital medical 
staff. 

Leslie J. Block, MD is an oto- 
laryngologist (ear, nose and throat 
specialist) on staff at Lake Forest 
Hospital and president of the med- 
ical staff. Block maintains offices in 
both Lake Forest and Gumee. 

Thomas B. Hunter III is an 
active member of the Lake Forest 
community and a long-time con- 



' tributor and supporter of Lake. 
Forest Hospital. 

Mark G. Miller is president and 
CEO of Stericycle, Inc., Deerfield. 
Stericycle is a multi-regional inte- 
grated company that provides envi- 
ronmentally-responsible manage- 
ment of regulated medial waste for 
the health care industry. Prior to his 
career with Stericycle, Miller served 
as a vice president for the 
International Division of Abbott 
Laboratories. 

Thomas Swarthout is president 
of The Highview Group, a local 
building and development compa- 
ny. A native of Lake Forest, 
Swarthout also serves as chairman 
of the parks and recreation com- 
mittee for the community.- 

Officers of the board include 
Ashley M. Maentz, chairman; 
Harold S. Jensen, chairman-elect; 
William G. Ries, president and CEO; 



GSH Senior transportation 
services hours extended 



The popular Good Shepherd 
Hospital Senior Transportation 
Services now have new extended ' 
hours for the convenience of area 
seniors (ages 55 and older). The ser- 
vice will now be available Monday 
through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 
p.m. 

Offered by the hospital's Older 
Adult Services, the bus transporta- 
tion provides door-to-door trans- 
portation to Good Shepherd 
Hospital for the convenience of 
seniors who need to use the hospi- 
tal facilities for cardiac rehabilita- 
tion, outpatient testing, day 
surgery, oncology treatment, psy- 
chiatric day programs, physical 
therapy, physician appointments, 
to visit a patient or the attend a 
Good Shepherd community educa- 
tion prograrh. The bus route also 
includes the Good Shepherd 



Hospital campus, Doctor's Office 
Building, Smith Professional 
Building, Good Shepherd Manor 
and the Barrington Park District. 

The following towns are 
included in the transportation ser- 
vice: Algonquin, Barrington, 
Barrington Hills, Lake Barrington, 
South Barrington, North 
Barrington, Cary, Crystal Lake, Fox 
River Grove, Hawthorn Woods, 
Inverness, Island Lake, Lake in the 
Hills, Lake Zurich, Long Grove, 
Mundelein, McHenry, Palatine and 
Wauconda, 

The bus service is $4 per ride, 
each way from an individual's 
home to the Good Shepherd 
Hospital campus. The service is 
wheelchair accessible. Ai least 24 
hours notice is required for pick- 
up. To make a reservation for the 
bus, call 1 (800) 995-4267. 



James J.Glasser, secretary/treasur- 
er; and Paul T. Schuster, assistant 
secretary. Directors continuing 
their. term include: James G. 
Aridress, Arthur M. Baker Jr.; Joan S. 
Blair, J. Melfort Campbell, Paul N. 
Clark, Joseph -F. Damico, John H. 
Dick, Peter F. Drake, Christian S. 
Fisher, John N. Fox, Jr.; Kathryn H. 
Lansing, Sherwood A. Libit, MD; 
Mrs. Gerald E. Mahler, Karl F. 
Nagel, Sidney H. Paige, Donald M. 
Peterson, Maurice B. Pickard, MD; 
Robert J. Simmons and Donald E. 
Surber. 

Retiring board members 
include Tyler R. Cain, Peter B. 
Cherry, John A. Hilton Jr.; Mrs. 
James P. Langdon and Osmar P. 
Steinwald, Jr., MD. 

The Lake Forest Hospital 
Foundation board of directors 
oversees the business functions of 
Lake Forest Hospital, Deerhaven 
Child Care Center, Deerpath 
Services, Inc., Lake Forest Health 
and Fitness Institute, Lake Forest 
Physician Services,. Inc., 
Westmoreland Nursing Center, 
and the Women's Auxiliary of Lake 
Forest Hospital. 



Quit Smoking 
In 60 Minutes 

Only *89 00 

No Weight Gainl 



By Individual 

Appointment 

One Year 

Guarantee 



Call for 
Information 

356-2675 




James R Baker 

Certified 
Hypnotherapist 



A Nutrition Research Study at 

Cancer Treatment Centers of America 

at Midwestern Regional Medical Center 



Diet Modification and Breast Cancer: 

The Women's Intervention Nutrition Study 

(WINS) is recruiting 2,500 women to participate. 



You may be eligible if you: 

• Are age 48 to 78 

• Had surgery for localized invasive breast cancer in the past year 

• Take Tamoxifen (Nolvadex) or treated with chemotherapy or both 

The National Cancer Institute and the American Health Foundation are 
sponsors of the WINS study at cancer centers nationwide. This study 
will investigate whether or not changing what you eat plays a role in 
breast cancer recurrence. 

It's free to join. 

All women who qualify to participate will have their current diet analyzed 
by a nutritionist and will be randomly assigned to one of two diet groups. 
If you would like to find out whether or not you qualify for the study, 
please speak to your doctor or call Cancer Treatment Centers of America 
at Midwestern Regional Medical Center at 1-800-268-0786. 



Midwestern m ^> 

■ i c i n i 4 i >hk>i mill 



CWCER iTREA" 




CENTERS 



O I iMlltC* 



2501 Emmaus Avenue Zion, Illinois 60099 
The cancer program at Midwestern is managed by Cancer Treatment Centers of America. 



:'i 



&&W 




BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE UkElANd Newspapers MarcIi 7, 1997 



HicjIhIancJ ParI< 
HospiiAl 



Fibromyalgia support 

Asupport group for 
-fibromyalgia sufferers is 
offered at Highland Park 
' Hospital. Fibromyalgia is a 
chronic disorder that causes 
pain and stiffness through- 
out the tissues that "support 
and move the bones and 
.joints. Sometimes called 
fibrositis, is afflicts three-to- 
six million people in the 
United States/ 

This free support group 
meets oh the second 
Wednesday of each month, 
with the next meeting 
scheduled for March 12, 
from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the 
Education Center. Interested 
individuals can call 
Raymona Herbrick at 432- 
8000, ext. 5027. 

ALS support 

Highland Park Hospital, 
and the Les Turner ALS 
Foundation offer two free 
monthly amyotrophic lateral 
sclerosis (ALS) support 
groups. One group is 
designed for people suffer- 
ing from ALS and the other " 
is for ALS patients' family 
members and caregivers. • . 
Both groups willmeet on 
Wednesday, March 19 from 
6:45 to 8:15 p.m; at Highland 
Park Hospital, 718 Glenview 
Ave., Highland Park. For fur- 
ther information, call 432- 
8000. 



ConcieII Meo'icaI 
Center 



Weight management 

Free Weight 
Management Orientation 
program will be held 
Thursday, March 6 at 7 p.m. 
at Centre Club, 200 W. Golf 
Rd., Libertyville. 
Information about the vari- 
ous weight management 
programs offered at 
Condell's Medical Center 
Health Institute. 

NulriQuest, a program 
for individuals who are 20 
percent or more over their 
ideal body weight, offers a 
comprehensive approach to 
weight loss, emphasizing 
long-term weight manage- 
ment. 

Lean for Life is a 12 
week diet and exercise pro- 
gram with a thorough focus 
on nutrition, exercise and 
behavior issues related to 
weight management, and 
use of Centre Club facilities. 
Biometrics is a customized, 
one-on-one weight loss pro- 
gram which actively inte- 
grates exercise with a bal- 
anced healthy eating plan. 

The Weight Management 
by Prescription Program uti- 
Iizes.new weight loss med- 
ications to help an individ- : 
ual achieve their long-term 
weight goals. Registration isJ ■ 
required. CaH'362-2905/ ext.' 
. 5770. ■ 

Arthritis council 

Sunday, March 9 the 
Arthritis Action Council, a 
support group, for people . 
coping with arthritis, will 
meet at 2 p.m. in the Allen 
Conference Center, Condell ; 
Medical Center, 801 S. 
Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville. 



Managed care plans can't afford to skimp on qu 




SHERMAN M. WOLFF 

Although managed care health plans have 
been around for decades, there is currently more 
discussion about them than ever before. Much 
of the public discourse is focused on the quality 
of. the health care delivered through these plans 
versus controlling the cost of health care. Critics 
assume that managed care health plans can't 
achieve one without sacrificing the other. 

At a recent seminar sponsored by Blue Cross, 
nationally respected health care policy expert 
Professor Alain Enthoven, noted that quality is 
quickly becoming a key factor in employers' 
health care purchasing decisions. In just the last 
couple of years, large employers have joined 
together to study the quality of tlie health plans 
serving their employees. In industries that com- 
pete for talented employees, tlie quality of a 
company's health care plan is extremely impor- 
tant. 

Individual consumers are also becoming 
more informed about health plans. They are now 



better able to access the information they need 
to make health plan purchasing or enrollment 
decisions. Independent agencies, like the 
National Committee for Quality Assurance, are 
using standardized criteria to measure tlie qual- 
ity of health plans and they are reporting their 
results through a variety of media including the 
Internet. 

From a purely business perspective, it makes 
sense for a health plan to constantly strive to 
improve tlie quality of the health care delivered. 
That's why the better managed care plans spend 
a great deal of time, effort and money in selecting 
the best physicians, hospitals and other 
providers for their managed care networks. 
That's why managed care providers are moni- 
tored for tlie quality of their patient care. 

That's why the member of managed care 
plans are frequently surveyed for.their opinions 
on the quality of the care they are receiving. And 
that's why managed care plans place an empha- 
sis on preventive care to keep people well. 



Most well-run managed care plans are gen- 
uinely concerned with providing quality health 
care because it's the right thing to do. But it's 
important to note that there are also sound bot- 
tom-line business reasons for managed care 
plans to continually improve quality. Even the 
most cynical person can see that actions that 
would reduce quality in a health 'plan would be 
extremely shortsighted. 

And in health care, as in other fields, short- 
sighted actions usually result in short-lived com- 
panies. 

■ Increased competition means that high- 
quality health care is essential to the long-term 
success of a managed care health plan. And tak- 
ing tlie long view is the hallmark of major health 
' insurers like Blue Cross and . Blue Shield of 
Illinois. It's not accident that we've been around 
for more than 60 years. 

Editor's note: Sherman M. Wolff is senior vice 
president and chief financial officer of Blue Cross 
and Blue Shield of Illinois. 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



New era in diagnostic technology dawns at MRI 



Since opening its doors in 1992, ' 
the Magnetic Resonance Institute 
of Lake County has been commit- 
ted to meeting the diagnositc needs 
of area physicians and their 
patients. 

With the new installation of the 
"General Electric Signa Horizon LX 
MRI system, which is one of only 
two such units in tlie nation, con- 
tinues that commitment. It pro- 
vides area physicians with an 
expanded list of diagnostic proce- 
dures due to its increased imaging 
capabilities. 

"With this technology," says 
Robert Breit, MD„ institute medical 
director, "we can provide diagnos- 
tic options to area physicians which 
were not available in the past. Plus, 
the resolution and clarity of the 
images achieved are better than 
those provided by other MRI tech- 
nologies." 

MRl's are used to provide "pic- 
tures" of the body to assist physi- 
cians in diagnosing disease. They " 
can be used for a broad range of 
imaging, including viewing head, 
neck, heart, lung, jaw, back, 
abdomen, arteries, all joints, etc. 

Patient comfort is a primary 
concern of the institute's staff, 
according to Joe Coil, executive 
director. "This new magnet is 
designed to help patients be more 
relaxed during the procedure," says 
Coil. 

The magnet includes a larger 
opening than incorporated in earli- 
er designs. And, the built-in inter- 
com system allows for easy voice 
contact with the technologist dur- 
ing die procedure. There is also a 
music system which allows patients 
to listen to their favorite CD's and 
tapes. In addition, the institute 
offers a conscious I.V. sedation 
treatment to medically calm 
patients if required. 




Dwarfed by a powerful new magnet, technicians install the new technology at the Magnetic 
Resonance Institute of Lake County in Gurnce. The new magnet provides a variety of new diagnos- 
tic opportunities for area physicians. 



"For the convenience of 
patients who may require addition- 
al diagnostic testing, we have 
added a full-range of diagnostic 
services at our convenient loca- 
tion," says Coil. 

In addition to MRl's, patients 
can also be scheduled for general x- 
rays, screening and diagnostic 
mammograms, and medical labo- 
ratory tests at the institute. 

"These new services allow our 
patients to complete rnany proce- 
dures while here, saving them 
time," says Coil. 

The Magnetic Resonance 
Institute of Lake County is staffed 
by board certified radiologists who 
specialize in MRI technology and 
ARRT registered technologists, cer- 
tified in MRI, mammography and 
general x-ray. 

The institute is located at 60 S. 
Greenleaf St., Gumee. Convenient 



appointments for MRI procedures 
are available between 6:30 a.m. and 
10:30 p.m., Monday through 
Friday, and between 7 a.m. and 5:30 
p.m. on Saturdays. Other services 
are available between 9 a.m. and 
5:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. 



The Magnetic Resonance 
Institute of Lake County is a not for 
profit corporation and is a joint 
venture between Victory Memorial 
Hospital and the Saint Therese 
Medical Center. For more informa- 
tion, call Joe Coil at 360-1674. 



Victory Memorial receives award 



Victory Memorial Hospital and 
three members of its staff have 
been recognized by the board of 
directors of the Lake County 
Children's Advocacy Center, 
Waukegan. 

Tim Harrington, Victory 
Memorial Hospital president, was 
presented with the center's 
Community Support Award, in 
recognition of the hospital's sup- 
port of tlie Lake County Children's 
Advocacy Center and the hospital's 
"outstanding initiative to protect all 
children." 

Individual awards for outstand- 



ing service to the children of Lake 
County were presented to Victory 
staff members: Pat Behling, RN; 
Linda Hale, RN and Kathy Saesan, 
RN. 

The awards were presented in 
recognition of the establishment of 
MECCA, Victory Hospital's Medical 
Examination Clinic for Child 
Advocacy. The clinic provides a 
safe, child-friendly environment in 
which children who maybe victims 
of sexual or physical abuse receive 
medical care by specially trained 
doctors and nurses. MECCA is the 
first such clinic in Lake County. 



Lake County Health Dept. 
offers Mobile Health Services 

Tlie Lake County Health DcpL Mobile Health Service, support- 
ed by die participating townships, will be at tlie following locations: 

• Grant Twp. Hall, 411 Washington, Ingleside on Marchl3, 20'.' f. 
and 27 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Call 587-2233, 

• Warren Twp. Citizen's Building, 17801 W. Washington, Gurnee 
on March 7, 14 and 21 from 5 to 7 p.m. Call 244-1101. 

• St Mary's Parish Center, (sponsored by Shields Twp.), 201 E. 
Illinois Rd., Lake Forest on March 1 1 and 25 from 9 to 1 1:30 a.m. 
Call 234-0802. 

• Harry Knigge Civic Center, (sponsored by Ela Twp.), 95 Ev 
Main St., Lake Zurich on March 12 and 24 from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Call 
438-7823. There is no charge to senior citizens that are residents in 
Ela Twp. 

• Vernon Twp. Administrative Offices, 3050 N. Main St., Prairie 
View, March 19 from 9 to 1 1:30 a.m. Call 634-4600. ' . 

• Deerspring Park Multi-Purpose Room, (sponsored by West 
DeerfieldTwp;), 200Deerfield Rd.', Deerfield (Deerspring 
Pool/Lions Drive), March 18 from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Call 945-7610, 

Available services consist of a physician, for diagnosis and treat- 
ment of medical problems and school and sports physical examina- 
. tions. Blood pressure testing and health counseling by a registered 
nurse are also available. Township residents unable to pay for those 
services requiring a fee should contact dieir township supervisor at 
tlie number listed above. 

The Mobile Health Service provides primary medical care to 
township residents at various sites throughout Lake County and 
refers individuals to private physicians for medical conditions 
requiring further treatment. For more infonnation, call 872-4780 or 
the appropriate township office. 



1 
1 




HEALTHWATCH UkElArvd NewspApERS March 7, 1997 




News with Nancy 



. NanfyWeil, executive director of Source for Seniors; will 
discuss current events at Hawthorn Lakes Retirement 
Community, 10 E. Hawthorn Pkwy., Vernon Hills oh Saturday, 
March 8 ,at 11 :30 am. Also,. Easter decorations, afghansj cro- 
cheted and tatted items, and plastic canvas and other home- 
made crafts'will be on saleat Hawthorn Lakes Retirement' 
Community's annual Spring Boutique Tuesday, March 11 from 
9 a.m. to noon. For more information,, callKathy Morris at 367- 
2561. ' 

Deaf, hard of hearing plan social 

. Lake County Center for IndeperidentUving, 706 E. Hawley.. 
St., Mundelein is holding a socialfoir the deaf and hard of hear- 
ing on.Tuesday, March 18from 4 to 7 p.m. Bingo, games and 
workshop will be offered, Admission is free and refreshments 
are provided. Participants are asked to bring one snack or 
dessert to share. No children, please. A sign language inter- 
preter will be provided. For further information, call 949-4440; 

Self-esteem workshop set 

Build your confidence, learn to have your heeds met, 
increase your feeling of self-worth by attending Victory's free . 
self-esteem workshop, Thursday, March 13 from 7 to 9 p.m. at 
Victory Memorial Hospital, 1324 N. Sheridan Rd., Waukegan. 
Call l(80b)THECHOICE to register. 

Families Anonymous meet weekly 

i Families Anonymous -has changed its weekly meeting to 2- 
p.m. onSundays at the Gateway Youth Center, off Rte. 59and 
Dering Lane, Lake Villa. For information,. call 838-1903. 

Discussion on arthritis slated 

Dr. Charles E. Frank, an orthopedic surgeon, willdiscuss 
"Sleep and Pain: Help for Your Arthritis" at 2 p.m. on Sunday, 
March. 9 at CondeH Medical Center, Conference Center, 
Libertyville, A question period will follow. For information call 
Martha at 362-0889. This event is sponsored by the Arthritis 
Foundation's "Arthritis Coping and Education" .program. 



Immunization clinics held for children 



The Lake County Health 
Dept., in conjunction with the 
Lake County Community Health 
Partnership, offers immunization 
clinics for Lake County children. 

Childhood immunization 
clinics will be held at the follow- 
ing locations and times. A parent 
or guardian" must accompany all 
children: 

• Lake County Health Dept., 
Belvidere Medical Building, 2400 
Belvidere Rd., Waukegan every 
Monday and Thursday, 1 to 3 
p.m. 

• Condell Medical Center, 
Allen Conference Center, 700 
Garfield Ave., Libertyville on 



March 11 from 5 to 7 p.m. Call 
362-2900, ext. 5120. 

• American Legion Hall, 1 1 1 E. 
Main (Rte. 134), Round Lake 
Park, March 12 from 9 to 11 a.m. 
Call 360-3114. 

• Midwestern Regional 
Medical Center, 2501 Emmaus 
Ave., Zion, March 8 from 9 to 11 
a.m. Call 872-6062. 

- • Victory Memorial Hospital, 
1324 N; Sheridan Rd., Waukegan, 
March 18 from 9 to 11 a.m. Call 
360-4127. 

For more information, call the 
Lake County Health Dept. 
Communicable Disease Program, 
360-6761. 




Eyes°^ 

by Charlotte F. Nielsen O.D. 

Astigmatism Is most often caused by distortion or an Irregularity of the 
cornea, the front surface of the eye. With norma!, undistorted vision, the 
cornea issmoolh and equally curved In all directions. When astigmatism is 
present, the cornea is "warped" and it curves more In one airectlon than In 
the other. In other words', Ihe cornea Is shaped more like a football than a 
basketball. 

The effect of astigmatism Is to change vision like that seen when looking 
In a mirror with a "wavy surface.-slmllar to the funhouse mirrors that make 
you look too tall, too wide or too thin. Astigmatism is usually inherited, may 
be present at birth, and frequently remains unchangea during a lifetime. 
Small amounls of astigmatism are very common and do not always require 
correction. 

Periodic eye examinations are Ihe best way to preserve comfortable, 
good vision. Coll us for an appointment. 



u \-r. 



Wi. 




Dr. C.F. 



VISION CARE ASSOCIATES 

sen, Dr. W.B. Lyons,. Dr. E.L. Friedman 
2403 Grand Ave., Waukegan 

847-662-3800 



■ 

Lake Forest Hospital Foundation announces 
new members to board of directors 




Lake Forest Hospital (LFH) 
Foundation, elected five new mem- 
bers to its board of directors. As the 
new medical staff president, Leslie 
I. Block, MD, joins the board for 
one year. Additional board mem- 
bers Leonard L Beck, MD; Thomas 
B. Hunter III; Mark-G. Miller and 
Thomas Swarthout will serve on the . 
board Until the year 2000. \ 

Leonard L Beck, MD is an anes- 
thesiologist on staff at Lake Forest 
Hospital and former president of 
the Lake Forest Hospital medical 
staff. 

Leslie J. Block, MD is an oto- 
laryngologist (ear, nose and throat 
specialist) on staff at Lake Forest 
Hospital and president of the med- 
ical staff. Block maintains offices in 
both Lake Forest and Gumee. 

Thomas B. Hunter III is an 
active member of the Lake Forest 
community and a long-time con- 



tributor and supporter of Lake, 
Forest Hospital. 

Mark G. Miller is president and 
. CEO of Stericycle, Inc., Deerfield. 
Stericycle is a multi-regional inte- 
grated company that provides envi- 
ronmentally-responsible manage- 
ment of regulated medial waste for 
the health care industry. Prior to his 
career with Stericycle, Miller served 
as a vice president for the 
International Division of Abbott 
Laboratories. 

Thomas Swarthout is president 
of The Highview Group, a local 
building and development compa- 
ny. A native of -Lake Forest, 
Swarthout also serves as chairman 
of the parks and recreation com- 
mittee for the community. 

Officers of the board include 

Ashley M. Maentz, chairman; 

Harold S. Jensen, chairman-elect; 

■ William G.Ries, president and CEO; 



GSH Senior transportation 
services hours extended 



The popular Good Shepherd 
Hospital Senior Transportation 
Services now have new extended ' 
hours for the convenience of area 
seniors (ages 55 and older). The ser- 
vice will now be available Monday 
through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 
p.m. 

Offered by the hospital's Older 
Adult Services, the bus transporta- 
tion provides door-to-door trans- 
portation to Good Shepherd 
Hospital for the convenience of 
seniors who need to use the hospi- 
tal facilities for cardiac rehabilita- 
tion, outpatient testing, day 
surgery, oncology treatment, psy- 
chiatric day programs, physical 
therapy, physician appointments, 
to visit a patient or the attend a 
Good Shepherd community educa- 
tion program. The bus route also 
includes the Good Shepherd 



Hospital campus, Doctor's Office 
Building, Smith Professional 
Building, Good Shepherd Manor 
and the Barrington Park District. 

The following towns are 
included in the transportation ser- 
vice: Algonquin, Barrington, 
Barrington Hills, Lake Barrington, 
South Barrington, North 
Barrington, Cary, Crystal Lake, Fox 
River Grove, Hawthorn Woods, 
Inverness, Island Lake, Lake in the 
Hills, Lake Zurich, Long Grove, 
Mundelein, McHenry, Palatine and 
Wauconda 

The bus service is $4 per ride, 
each way from an individual's 
home to the Good Shephejd 
Hospital campus. The service is 
wheelchair accessible. At least 24 
hours notice is required for pick- 
up. To make a reservation for the 
bus, call 1 (800) 995-4267. 



James J.. Glasser, secretary/treasur- 
er; and Paul T. Schuster, assistant 
secretary. Directors continuing 
their . term include: James G. 
Address, Arthur M. Baker Jr.; Joan S. 
Blair, J. Melfort Campbell, Paul N. 
Clark, Joseph F. Damico, John H. 
Dick, Peter F. Drake, Christian S. 
Fisher, John N. Fox, Jr.; Kathryn H. 
Lansing, Sherwood A- Libit, MD; 
Mrs. Gerald E. Mahler, Karl F. 
Nagel, Sidney H. Paige, Donald M. 
Peterson, Maurice B. Pickard, MD; 
Robert J. Simmons and Donald E. 
Surber. 

Retiring board members 
include Tyler R. Cain, Peter B. 
Cherry, John A. Hilton Jr.; Mrs. 
James P. Langdon and Osmar P. 
Steinwald, Jr., MD. 

The Lake Forest Hospital 
Foundation board of directors 
oversees the business functions of 
Lake Forest Hospital, Deerhaven 
Child Care Center, Deerpath 
Services, Inc., Lake Forest Health 
and Fitness Institute, Lake Forest 
Physician Services,. Inc., 
Westmoreland Nursing Center, 
and the Women's Auxiliary of Lake 
Forest Hospital. 



Quit Smoking 
In 60 Minutes 

Only $ 89°° 

No Weight Gainl 



By Individual 

Appointment 

One Year 

Guarantee 



Calltor 
Information" 

356-2675 




James R. Baker 

Certified 
Hypnotherapist 



A Nutrition Research Study at 

Cancer Treatment Centers of America 

at Midwestern Regional Medical Center 



Diet Modification and Breast Cancer: 

The Women's Intervention Nutrition Study 

(WINS) is recruiting 2,500 women to participate. 



You may be eligible if you: 

• Are age 48 to 78 

• Had surgery for localized invasive breast cancer in the past year 

• Take Tamoxifen (Nolvadex) or treated with chemotherapy or both 

The National Cancer Institute and the American Health Foundation are 
sponsors of the WINS study at cancer centers nationwide. This study 
will investigate whether or not changing what you eat plays a role in 
breast cancer recurrence. 

It's free to join. 

All women who qualify to participate will have their current diet analyzed 
by a nutritionist and will be randomly assigned to one of two diet groups. 
If you would like to find out whether or not you qualify for the study, 
please speak to your doctor or call Cancer Treatment Centers of America 
at Midwestern Regional Medical Center at 1-800-268-0786. 



Midwestern m^l 



CANCER tTREA: 




CENTERS 



of imiic t 



2501 Emmaus Avenue Zion, Illinois 60099 
The cancer program at Midwestern is managed by Cancer Treatment Centers of America. 




LAKELIFE LaIceIancJ Newspapers MarcN 7, 1997 



For 39 Years, We've Brought You Home 



And Ndw, to Celebrate pw Anniversary, We' 







tHomeferles 



Come In and See Why Arden's Furniture has been serving Lake County Longer 
than ANY Other Fine Furniture Retailer.,. You'll be Glad You Did! 




This Limited Time Offer applies to all sofas, chairs, bedroom suites, dining room suites, 
and office furniture. Let our Professional Decorators work with you to create the home 
you've always dreamed of, with thousands of fabrics, styles, and colors to choose from. 
Visit our newly decorated showroom and see just a few samples of the finest furniture 
available, from Living Rooms to Dining Rooms, Family Rooms, Bedrooms, and Libraries. 
Join thousands of satisfied Arden's Furniture Customers who know that we are the 
leader for price, quality, service, and value! 



416 M. Mitumuhee 
ft&vdyjvMe 
\ (847) 367 1122 

MotuLuj., 5fuw&xlay, 6L 3hddoy 10-8 
Sue&doy. S. Wjulncd-dcuj. 1.0-6 
SxUwutay 10-5; Sunday. 12-5 








■ 
■ 



§ 

-4 



NEWS 1 220 

2 i£ t& y.%&j r 






THE TALK OF LAKE COUNTY 

Updates at www.wkrs.com 



See It First* .Before You Buy! 

One Full Day of Bargains! 
A Super Money Saving Event!! 




Sale Begins Saturday, March 22nd at 9am on NEWS I220-WKRSII 

Bid on the Following Items... 



• Carpet Cleaning 

American Carpet Service-Waukegan 

• Complete Brake Jobs & Oil Changes 
Jerry's Aulomotfve-Waukegan 

• Adult or Family Memeberships 
Lake County YMCA-Waukegan 

• Corian Deluxe Cutting Boards 
Counlerfitters-Grayslake . 

• Complete Transmission Repair 
Karry Brothers Transmissions-Waukegan 

• Mountain Bike 
Waukegan Schwinn-Waukegan 

• Pentium Computer Including 16 Megs, 
CO Rom, Sound & Video Card, 

14" Monitor, Keyboard and Mouse 
Wizard Computers-Round Lake Beach 

• G.E. Profile 25 Cubic Inch Refrigerator 
Lucy's Appliances-Zion 

• Muffler/Exhaust Systems & Shocks/Struts 
Merlins Muffler & Brake-Waukegan 

• Rust Proofing for Car/Truck/Van 
Car Smart-Waukegan 



• Golf Foursome Packages 
Orchard Hill Country Club-Waukegan 

• 60 Sq. Yards of Carpet w/lnstallation 
Coloramic Tile and Carpet-Waukegan 

• Complete Deluxe Trailer Hitch 
Master Hitch-Waukegan 

• Leider's Garden Greenery Certificate 
Lake Villa 

• Jelly Belly Factory Store Certificate 
North Chicago 

• 20 Foot Flag Pole with Installation 
Kosco Flags-Waukegan 

• Arien's Lawn Mower Model 91 1044 
The Shop-Waukegan 

• Cole Sewell Storm Doors Models 
#2500 and #1530 

Doors Plus-Waukegan 

• Lowery Holiday Organ Model #350 
Conn Music Center-Mundelein 

• Three Months of Internet Access 
l-Connection-Waukegan 



• New 1995 Suzuki K a tana 600 Motorcycle 
1996 Yamaha YZ-250 Motorcross Bike 
Ace Honda-Kenosha 

• 1996 Cub Cadet Series 2000 Lawn Tractor' 
D.S.P. Service Dynamies-Libertyville '». 

• Monthly Floral Arrangements for One Year 
Floral Acres- Antjoch 

• Set of Golf Clubs (Woods & Irons) 
The Clubhouse-Gurnee 



y 



• Salt Water Aquarium Set-Up and 
Merchandise Certificates 
Happyland Pet Center-Beach Park 

• Interior/Exterior Work on Car/Truck 
Auto-Marine Interiors-Lake Bluff 

• Raliegh Bikes Models R-40 and C-40, 
20" DXR 6-Speed BMX Juvenile Bike 

B & G Cyclery-Round Lake Beach 



Dining Certifcates From: 



• Struggles Restaurant 
Antioch 

• Randell's Restaurant 
Grayslake 

• Di Marco's Restaurant 
Antioch 

• Choo Choo's Restaurant & Club Car 
Fox Lake 

• Hillery's Ribs & BBQ 
North Chicago 



• Gale Street Inn 
Mundelein 

• Richard's Sports Bar & Eatery 
Round Lake Heights 

• Gilardi's 
Vernon Hills 

• Saluto's 
Gurnee 

• Jenson House 
Antioch 



§ 




f 



'."fli's" > . J A :' V" "''*!- 



«>. rtiViJ^!*;-. 






l. 



Fabric Softener 

3201. $959 

Reg. 4.95 ^J 
Liquid Laundry Soap 



32 oz. 
Reg. 5.79 

Dishwashing 
Liquid 

Lemon/Aloe 

$-|99 



16 oz. 
Reg. 2.95 







■:. 



£ 



a n 



■i 



I h 



-fuchs. 



V,i^ 




Toothbrushes 

Soft or medium bristles 



Herbal Toothpaste 

The Original Ayurvedic 
Toothpaste 




3oz. 
Reg. 2.95 



Reg. 1 .79 ea. 



$129 







Peroxide 
Scrub t a~ 

t: 

Skin gets 



PHROXJCtfj 




i^iiiiCi^ii^SiiS"!; 



■'J ^^■' >'-w 







Green Tea 

Several 
Energizing 
Varieties! 



NATURAL COSMETICS 

Stick Deodorant 

Ho Aluminum Chlortiydrate 

AW, Apricol+E, Herb, Wild Yam 



2.5 oz. $949 

Reg. 4.49-5.99 llj 




tOaxmMtf 



PUR ELL ^^-^—-^-vi 

Hand Sanitizer L°g L 6.39 P 



2oz. 
Reg. 2.65 



W%&$W &'^ - ! pSSii^gife"j?" " " ■ - ! 'J4 J : , ' . ' V Bj J 





J^ Rescue 
flC/? Remedy 



ANCIENT 

iirAUwrnauiu 



o 

Green Tea 
.KdrhbuchaH 

and Chinese; Herbs 









ALL ONE* f^^ 

Multi Mix 

'ith or without Rice Bast 



ALL-ONE 



m 



5.3 oz. 
Reg. $11.95 

t:'-j l^V^Jl a'l+fff^*^ wygj- 
vjii&nTs.«!SuiSt3K!.ii-ri^';.":p.' ; .r 




MRVAHk 
Body Wash 

Assorted Varieties 
8 02. 

Reg.6.95 



Helps create 

a sense of 

well-being! 






10 mt 
i Reg.9.95 



§120 ml 
1 Reg.14.I 







' ■ -- : ■■' 




Herbal Mouth & 
Gum Therapy 




Cherry, Cinnamon, or Mint 
The solution for serious oral care! 



8oz. 
Reg. 9.99 





Organic Whole Leaf 
Aloe Vera Gel 



32 Qt ' 



6allM 
Reg. 23.99 




Organic 
Aloe Vera Gel 




16 oz, 
Reg. 3.99 



l§KsSAW:J4*liV 



GaJlaa 
Ref. 21.99 



Afctyre's Pitas* 

The Energy Supplements* | 

Nutritional support for 

hair and nails. 

Ultra Nails 

60 Tabs •Reg. $11 .35 



Other natural Foods 




Ultra Hair 

*11 



60 Tabs 
Reg. $14.50 





^sgSJSte. 





Royal Jelly 

500 mg Softgels 



30 Gels 
Ref. $11.48 



1W& 

SchifF 

Single Day 

Timed-Release 

A3 49 



60 Tabs 
Reg. $17.99 




As Sprint; Approaches, remember to Keep Mother ^ff oo ^ 

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle - Use nTtural household cleaners - Use natural pesncdes - Buy organ, foods -Use paper g 

Remember, every day is Earth nay! 
Mark your calendars for the Chicago celebration - April 2^. 

Call your local natural Way Store for details 

l^feK'lSl O Th' 5 sale flyer is printed on recycled paper. 



material 



cause YOU arc natural 



fflm. 



960 MAIN STREET, Antioch 

Phone: 847-395-0461; 847-395-0469 

Open Mon thru Thurs. 9 to 6; Fri 9 to 8; 

Saturday 9 to 5; Closed Sunday 



Charge it 



NATURAL FOODS 



Natural Foods and Vitamins are our only Business'. 



F^T— 




■fijc. 




J/A/ S / O /N A 

ATURAL COSMETICS 

Stick Deodorant 

No Aluminum Chlorhytfrate 

Aloe, Apricat+E, Herb, Wild Yam 

2,5 oz. $^149 

Reg. 4.49- 5.99 W 



TZM^mm^mmmmmmz- 



ffe: 

WlIU 

r DtttwtWl-, 



PISRELL 
Hand Samtizer Reg. 6.39 






2 01. 
Reg. 2.65 



rfl 



$4 



$-|99 g 




F 



^ 



J? Rescue 
2£^ Remedy 



■ **«| 



Multi Mix 

tVith or without Rice Base 



1 NIRlflNk ^ 

Body Wash 

Assorted Varieties 



$ 8 



1 5.3 oz. 
Reg. $11.95 

■ ■■ ■' - ■ ■ 



--■-^^SSS^^^^F^TT.- - -■■■ ": ■•••"* 

Herbal Mouth & 
Gum Therapy 

Cherry, Cinnamon, or Mint 
The solution for serious oral care! 

8 oz $"J99 

Reg. 9.99 g 








Helps create 

a sense of 

well-being! 



10 ml 
Reg.9.95 



Organic 
Aloe Vera Gel 



18 or. 
Reg. 3.99 



32 bz. 
Reg. 8.95 



Gallon 
Reg. 21 .99 



$2« 
$499 

$ 16 99 



n 

m 



■ - 



Nature's Plu$„ 

[ The Energy Supplements®^ 

Nutritional support for 

hair and nails. 

Ultra Nails 

60 Tabs* Reg. $11.35 



Ultra Hair 



Other 



^^jgRQV^ 



Royal Jelly 

500 mg Softgets 



1 60 Tabs 
Reg. $14.50 



$ 11 




As Spring Approaches, remember to \eep Mother Nature healthy. 

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle — Use natural household cleaners — Use natural pesticides — Buy organic foods — Use paper goods made from recycled material 

Remember, every day is Earth Bay! 
Mar\ your calendars for tfrte €Jhica%o celebration - April 2S! 

Call your local natural Way Store for details 




•3 This sale flyer is printed on recycled paper. 



cause ^®U are natural.". 






960 MAIN STREET, Antioch 

Phone: 847-395-0461; 847-395-0469 

Open Mon thru Thurs. 9 to 6; Fri 9 to 8; 

Saturday 9 to 5; Closed Sunday 



w . NATURAL FOODS 

OB 

[cfi j9j 

l ^^ Natural Foods and Vitamins are our only Business! 




\ 



\ 



t^fpTin^ 




SALE PRICES IN EFFECT THROUGH APRIL 6, 1997 

Spring Snacks 



Prices may vary per store. All items may not be available at all stores. 
Not responsible for printing errors. 



. "= * i»»; ">/ r ->- ■"■ ■--*'-". 



:'.,;.::: 



SB jkdtGbcar 




SNACKS 
Triple Mix 



4.5 oz. 
Reg $2.19 



$149 





Organic tftxxls,- 

Tortilla Chips 

With or Without Salt 



16 oz. 
Reg. $2.99 



,$199 




Breakfast 



STEM OF TME MONTH 







Westbrae Natural' 

Organic 
Potato Ghips 

Regular, No Salt, Ripple 



5oz. 

Reg. $2.40-2.55 



$■(79 





Graham Crackers 

Oat Bran or Amaranth 



7oz. 
Reg $2.29 



-€-4lC£s^n*A 



$169 



*ffi!!l!W> 



' 



Coffee Substitute 

Almond/Amaretto, Chocolate 
Mint, Original or Vanilla Nut 




Fig Bars 



4P» Fat-Free Bars ^ 

J Peach Apricot, Wildbcrry pg- « 29 

rW. 1? _«■„ ..$999 $949 

$129 



8.5 oz. 
Reg $6.85 



ifciffc 



Reg. $3.89 



Fat-Free Saltine Crackers 

Regular or Pepper • Reg.51.79 

Organic Peanut Butter ^^ - 

Crunchy or Creamy 16 oz, *£*** $ a |sa MUy RlCS 

Premium Salsa 




Granola 

Cholesterol Free, Sodium Free, Wheat Free, All 
Hatural Fruit Juice and Honey Sweetened Cereal 

Many Delicious Varieties 



Granola 



13 oz. Boxes 
or 1 lb. Bags 
Reg. $2.95-3.49 




(Erewhon) 



with or without salt Rb 9* **' 49 




Wholewheat i 0oz . 

Tortillas Reg $1.09 



79* 



15 oz, 
Reg $5.09 



$349 



';■■ . .- 




j Organic, - 
Raisin Bran 



15 oz. 
Reg. 3.95 



frJ 



1 iie OaftASK K> «>* J «fn 



DairylSoy 



Liunch & Dinner Foods 




Fat-Free Soups 

Assorted Varieties 



15 oz. 
Reg $1.99 



$j49 




NATURALS^ 



Fish Sticks 
or Fish Fillets 

Organic, Whole Wheat 





m 



Mates 
MORi-MU Pudding and Pie Filling 

1 Chocolate, Cappuccino 

or Lemon 




J^nCd 



*-»*? 






)\ 



Li 



\-*iS 



8oz. 
Reg. 5.29 






Veggie Pockets 

Assorted Varieties 



5oz. 
Reg. $1.85 



$1 



39 




Organic Pasta Sauce 

Assorted Varieties 



26 oz 
Reg. 



< 39 *2 79 







Bella Pasta 

Rotelli, Zita, Elbows' 
I 10 oz. $439 

Salad Dressings 

Blue Cheese, Honey French, 
Oriental Ginger, Italian Garlic 



SHARE 

RETRIED BEANS 

ORGANIC FAT FREE 

Organic Fat 
Free Beans 

Assorted 
Varieties 



15 oz. 
Reg. $1.95 



Chicken Franks 
or Turkey Franks 

Cooked, Un cured 



12 oz. 

Reg. $3.09-3.19 



ftp' 

m/ Pot Pies 

Assorted Varieties 



«- $929 

i Reg. $2.99 fa wHfflmmmumm 




3.75 oz. 
Reg. $2.35 

i Tofu 10 Qlt 

Xtra-Firm Lite Reg. $1.59 




Nonfat Soy Drink 

Plain or Vanilla 

$149 






32 oz. 
Reg. 2.55 






8 0Z. 

Reg. $4.09-4.39 



Tofu Bella 
Cheese Alternative 

Assorted 
ies 



■ 



I 



m 

m 



Organic Cheese 

Assorted Varieties 

O w:in?iiFHLW4an bfjQ 8oz $9 

mi Rdla Reg.3.69^£ 

Beverages t§ 

Spritzers 

Assorted Varieties 

\m 




Nutritious Juices 

Natural Juice with 
Nutritional Support 



NtrnunwS 



32 fl. oz. 

Reg. 3.09-3.45 ea. 



$199 



6-12 oz. Cans 
Reg. 1.09 ea. 

$g49/6pk. 




Juice Quarts 

Cranberry-Mango, Cranberry 
Strawberry or Cranberry-Kiwi 



32 oz. 
Reg. 3.45 



i? SV&\FtOElfiML 



pfefii^ 



j^m^f, j u j ce 

Apple Strawberry or * "I I 
Black Cherry 



Oat Milk 



32 oz. 
Reg. $2.99 



$229 



1L 

Reg. 2.69 ea 



$199 

i. 1 



m*~ in ■ — ■ . p . 1 'L i [ -if 



. » / ' -.1:1^, 




I ,r * t 





Total Cleanse 



Ginger Wonder Syrup 

Combines the health benefits and great taste of 
Ginger and Honey to provide help with all kinds 

of indigestion. 

W This Statement has nut been evaluated by the FDA. Tin's product is not 
intended tu diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. 



% 



4 oz. • Reg. 7.95 



-J 




Ultimate Cleansing and 

Purification of intestines, 

liver, blood, kidneys, skin 

and lymph. 



120 Caps 

Reg. $19.98 



$14 



a 



$ 5 



99 



8 oz. • Reg. 14.95 

99 



iTwzyz 



"■•! ■' ■ ■ '.v ' ..." ■ ,, , T AjA * '^" 1 . :- ! * '■> " 1,*^ — v<vj ^-' ;, ■ • -(:• 




gXAll'ltl -'S-jiH itl.Q 



Ultimate Fiber 

Offers a Mend of whole 

psyllium husks, slippery 

elm bark and acidophilus 

$13" 



8.801. 
Reg. $16.95 



a^g^^ Provides the perfect blend 
of essential fatty acids! 

90So1tgels '" U T# ' ■ 
Reg. $16.50 









Ultimate Oil 



TIME 

B-50 Gaps 

The B-Complcx Vitamins are vital to the health of the 
nervous system. Stress may increase the body's need 




for B-complex Vitamins. 



$E99 



60 Caps V"^*''' 120 Caps 
Reg. $7.25 V Reg. $12.99 



*9 



99 



B-50 

Capsules 
B-Comolex formula 



L^ZZ^ ^ff &&m^ 




AMERICAN © HEALTH 



Royal Brittany 
Evening Primrose Oil 

Bonus Pack - High in GLA! 

2/50Sottgels 2/100 Softgels 2/200 Softgels 

Reg. 13.59 Reg. 20.89 Reg. 37.75 

$10" $15" $29" 



/ ~~7 1 



Evening 

Primrose 

500 mg 

SOSoftgtfa^ 

AMBOGWHOTH 






• ■ " 'T* " ' "^ 1 - T 'V.i-'JV. ' v^f,':,; \i-- '^.■'3%,i'--"l ' -f.- r, 'i>-lii:W- T r >Z7r 










4«; ?iJ 



sienna 




• i~3 or 




© 



Ocuguard Plus 



Ocuguard 
Caps 

Advanced vitamin and antioxidant 

nutritional supplement specifically 

formulated for the eyes* 




With Lutein 



60 Caps* Reg. $22.50 



$17 



99 



120 Caps* Reg. $42.99 




60 Caps* Reg. $15.49 



120 Caps* Reg. $28.95 





Ocuguard and Ocuguard Tins are advanced vitamin and antioxidant supplements formu- 
lated for the eyes. Each capsule supplies a combination of micrnnutricnts, including beta- 
carotene, Vitamin E, Vitamin C, zinc picolinate, selenium, and many more nutrients 
which studies surest. contribute to proper ocular nutrition. An exciting new nutrient 
called lutein has been added to Ocuguard Plus. Lutein is the most abundant carotenoid 
found in fruits ck vegetables as well as a potent antioxidant. - Twintab 

This Statement has nut been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or 
prevent any disease. 



■; ■'._. ,-■■ 




. ' 





ACES 

Provides a four point attack 
to "mop-up" free radicals. 



50 Sottgels 
Reg. $11 .90 



90 Sottgels 
Reg. $19.90 





Rssyal Jelly 

Royal Jelly is a substance produced by 
worker honey bees and is a storehouse of 
nutrients. It's the world's richest natural 
source of pantothenic acid, Vitamin B-5. 
Royal Jelly is also rich in other B vita- 
mins, amino acids,' and many important 
minerals. It's no surprise that royal jelly's, 
popularity as an energy supplement has 
reached epic proportions. 

—Premier One 



Selenium 






SELENIUM 

200 F/ICG 
CO CAPSULES 



KYOLIC 



Garlic with 
Lecithin 



200 meg 

A vital antioxidant that helps protect the 
system by preventing the formation of free 



60 Caps 
Reg. $7.90 



immune 
radicals. 




~T 



KYOUC 

mm iBS"~ 



200 Caps 
Reg. $19.95 



» KYOUC 

1 ""SIM -" 



$1499/ e3 

I ^^B 1 *-^i nun.. 11 



Garlic with 
Brewer's Yeast 



200 Tabs 
Res. $17.95 



$12" 



Herbal Mouth & Gum tterapy 

The Natural Dentist Herbal Mouth & Gum 
Therapy was formulated to be more than just 
a breath freshener. It contains several well- 
known herbal ingredients including 
echinacea, goldenseal and calendula, and has 
been clinically shown to be effective in fight- 
inn plaque and relieving swollen, irritated 
or bleeding gums. Use it as part of a com- 
plete oral hygiene program to help prevent 
gum problems, tooth decay, and minor 
mouth irritations. - Natural Dentist 

This Statement has nut been evaluated by the FDA. 
This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure 
ur prevent any disease. 



BRAND >USA 



I 



Boswellin Tablets 

Helps ease 
arthritis pain! 



Boswellin Cream 




BOSWELLIN 

FROM isni\ — 




30 Tabs 
Reg. $11.99 



99 



Warm 

penetrating 

action! 

4 02. 
Reg. 9.79 



$g 

$ 13" $ 7" 



50 Tabs 
Reg. $17.49 

~~T" " ■'.?iB3SBS^l':^;.- 1 - ~ "~ ------ 







e&bs 



^? ,J. — 1 P 7 " * ' L « 1 - '^ M ." ^ * * 



7*7 



~M 




Bio-Active 
C Ascorbates 

1000 mg 



A combination of polyphenols and bioflavonoids 
that work synergistically with vitamin C! 



60 Tabs* Reg. $12.95 



I 
I 





90 Tabs* Reg. $17.50 



i 




BIO-ACTIVE 



c 



ASCORBATES 

1000 rag 




I 



Rescue Remedy 

We all experience stress, unfortunately for 
many of us it is experienced on a daily basis. 
Rescue Remedy provides a gentle and effec- 
tive approach to dealing with stress. Com- 
posed of five of the Bach Essences, it can be . 
taken any time you fee! stressed or anxious. 
Try Rescue Remedy to restore your system's 
emotional balance. 

-Bach 
This Statement has not been evaluated by the FDA. 
This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure 
or prevent any disease. 




L-Carnitine »^|f M $8 

500 mg <t*e9«i 

1/2 OFF! 23**1 O** 

Chromium Picolinate 

200 meg 
1/2 OFF! 

$399 

$749 

sran 



HiES'i P 



100 Caps 
Reg. $7.99 

200 Caps 
Reg. $14.99 



frr /.? ~ - — — ■—. ~ 





Gtricmanminm. 

Maintaining hcaUhy joints is an important consider- 
ation to anyone suffering from arthritis. Glucosamine, 
an amino sugar derived from the shellsof crustaceans, 
has been shown to be beneficial to the maintenance 
of these joint structures. Research conducted in Mil;m, 
Italy concluded that patients suffering from sever 
osteoarthrosis experienced significantly less pain when 
treated with glucosamine and thar it actually helped 
to rebuild damaged carrilage. In his recently heralded 
book, "The Arthritis Cure", Dr. Jason Thcodosakis 
recommends using Glucosamine with Chondroitin 
sulfate, as a Nutritional Support for the 35 million 
Americins who suffer from this degenerative disease. 

Dovanti, A., et al. "Therapeutic Activity of Oral Glu- 
cosamine Sulfate in ( hteaarthTosii: A Placehn-C^ontTolUd 
DouhU'lilind Investiflfltron." Clinical Therapeutic* 
3(4):266-272. 198Q. 

Thb Statement h» not been evaluated by the FDA. Thi* product 
is nut Intended to dij£tHHC, treat, enrr or prevent any Jnra*c. 



- SOLGAR 



600 mg Vitamin C with Rose Hips, Citrus 
Bioflavonoids, Rutin and Hcsperidin. 

250 Tabs 
Reg. $20.50 




100 Tabs 
Reg. $9.40 




$13 



99 



VTTAUM C, BUflAVCMOIOS, 

miTM AMD HtlPtXXXH 
FHOU NATURAL SOURCES 



SUITABLE FO« VEOETHHIANS 
SUCU, IMT WO ITAKH fflQ 




SOU1AR 
Stbrrum 

GINSENG 

(ELEUTHEHOCOCCUS SENTCOSUSI 
BOng 



Siberian Ginseng 

520 mg 

100% Active Ingredient! 

100 Caps • Reg. $10.80 





V7'- ' >|t* I .M.W" r£ ? .-y ? —. \ -^J}--','*:" -V J ' - t- ' ^* 



irAI&afxJtjKtfitAk-lU * },--^, -.-•_ • :..;*■ 7~ 



JL-- .__•_! „;■_- *.!■_:■- 



r •v.—**?*' • 



MarcIi 7, 1997 UkElANd Newspapers COUNTY 



County food drive to fill pantry shelves 



The Lake County Food Resource Council and volun 
teers across Lake County are busy making last minute 
preparations for the 10th Annual Lake County Food Drive, 
scheduled for March 8 through 15. the Food Resource 
Council is a nonprofit group of volunteers from county 
soup kitchens, food pantries and citizens at large. This 
food drive is unique in that all food collected will remain 
in Lake County. All food is distributed immediately after 
the drive to qualified soup kitchens and food pantries. 

The Northeast Council, Boy Scouts of America, is 
again co-sponsoring the drive with the Lake County Food 
Resource council, as they have for the past eight years. 
Additional co-sponsors are Browning Ferris (BFI) 
Industries and the Lake County Life Underwriters 
Association. 

Each year, county churches, synagogues and civic 
groups collect food donations to fill county food pantry 
and soup kitchen shelves. Currently, shelves in many food 



pantries have been all but emptied due to increased 
demand for food because of the harsh winter. Lake 
County citizens are asked to open their hearts and cup- 
boards, and share their excess with those less fortunate. 
The 1996 drive netted 75,000 pounds (35 tons) of food 
from community schools and groups. Corporate food 
drive collections will continue to be in the Fall. 

Lake County Superintendent of Schools, Ed Gonwa, has 
encouraged county schools to participate in the food drive. 
Each year there is intense competition between schools to 
collect the most food. First place in 1996 went to Half Day 
School, which collected 3,400 pounds. In second place was 
Round Lake Village School with 2,400 pounds, followed by 
Avon School in Round Lake with 1,750 pounds of food. 

To encourage participation in the drive, Boy Scouts 
will hang 110,000 plastic food drive bags on doors 
throughout the county. They will hang the bags, donated 
by BFI, between Saturday, March 8 and Thursday, March 



13. Saturday, March 15, the Boy Scouts will collect the 
bags and deliver them to the sorting site. 

The Lake County Farm Bureau is typical of many 
groups that support the food drive. This year, each child 
attending the Ag Expo, scheduled for March 19 to 21 at the 
Lake County Fair Grounds, is asked to bring a food item to 
donate to the drive. The "Prime Timers," a group of active 
seniors, also plan to donate food to the drive at their 
March 13 meeting. In addition, the Farm Bureau Women's 
Committee is providing a drop-off box at the Farm Bureau 
for food donations. 

This year, the food drive committee is asking that 
groups and individuals not contacted by the Scouts, but 
wishing to support the drive, drop off the food at the sort- 
ing site. Food will be sorted again this year in the former 
Builder's Square building in Waukegan. The location is 
three blocks east of Green Bay Road on Belvidere Road 
See FOOD DRIVE page C2 



COUNTY 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



THIS WEEK 

Laying 
groundwork 

County Forum helps 
families cope with 
violent society 
PACE C4 

Viewpoint 

Gash targets tpliway 
for sweeping reform 

PAGE C4 




Lucky gems 

'An Affair of the Heart' 
gala raises 
$100,000 
PAGE C6 



Cable pirates 
beware 

US Cable and local 
authorities launch 
Amnesty Campaign 
PAGE C6 



Financial 
Focus 

Tax-free investments 
can be good 
way to achieve 
higher returns 
PAGE C8 



Soil,Water election challenge downed 



Non-eligible voters, district boundaries under scrutiny 



RHONDA HETR1CK BURKE 

Editor in Chief 

A challenge to the election at 
the Lake County Soil and Water 
Conservation District appears to 
have been shot down by the 
Attorney General's Office in 
Springfield. 

Local activist Kim Eudy, of 
Ingle-side, filed a letter of chal- 
lenge to the Lake County Soil and 
Water Conservation District elec- 
tion held Feb. 11, on the grounds 
that non-eligible voters were 
allowed to cast ballots. 

The informal opinion was 
issued by Michael T. Luke of the 
Attorney General's office, March 
5. The Attorney General's office 
is representing the Lake County 



Soil and Water District on the 
matter. 

Eudy challenged the election 
based on the fact the soil and 
water conservation district 
boundaries are difficult to under- 
stand and that voters are allowed 
to present themselves on the 
"honor system" without verifica- 
tion of addresses. 

According to a spokesperson 
From the Attorney General's 
office, the statutory requirements 
in the matter indicate that a letter 
of complaint doesn't necessitate 
a challenge to the election 
results. 

The Attorney General's office 
spokesperson declined to be 
quoted in the matter, saying as 



the attorney representing the 
Lake County Soil and Water 
Conservation District it would be 
inappropriate for him to be quot- 
ed. Director of the Soil and Water 
Conservation District Sharon 
Buckeridge, however, was 
unavailable to comment on the 
issue. 

The issuance of the opinion 
means, however, that Dave 
Richards and Otto Sprenger, who 
were elected Feb. 1 1, will now be 
seated as directors on the five- 
member board. 

The issue of clearly under- 
standing the district's boundaries 
has long been debated by the dis- 
trict , according to former direc- 
tor Sandy Cole of Grayslakc. Cole 



served from 1994-1996 and 
resigned along with Al 
Westerman, when both were 
elected to the Lake County Board. 

"During the two years I was 
on the board, we asked an attor- 
ney to look at whether or not the 
district could change its bound- 
aries to include all of Lake 
County," Cole said. "We received 
differing opinions on the matter." 

According to the Illinois 
Department of Agriculture, the 
issue of altering the boundaries 
would hove to be taken to the 
state legislature. 

"The boundaries were estab- 
lished by law," said Patrick 
Hogan, spokesman for the 
Department of Agriculture. "In 
some districts around the state, 
See CHALLENGE page C2 



Education is key to preventing gangs 



RHONDA HETR1CK BURKE 

Editor in Chief 

Gang activity may have risen 
in Lake County in the last five 
years, but, according to two 
experts, the rise in activity does- 
n't present a real-threat to Lake 
County businesses and citizens. 

Dei. Carlos Fere?, and Det. 
Larnell Farmer of the Waukegan 
Police Department Gang 
Suppression Unit spoke to Lake 
County business leaders on the 
subject of street gangs at the 
monthly power breakfast, March 
5. 

"There are currently about 50 
gangs operating in Uikc County," 
Farmer said. 'These gangs have 
grown from those in Chicago, but 
do not operate at the level of 
intensity that they do in the city." 
The detectives told business 
leaders gang members rarely 
bring their affiliation with them 
to the work place, but ihrough 
education of gang symbols and 
colors, employers can take steps 
to prevent gang activity from 
occurring on their premises. 

"Employers can do what 
schools have done very success- 
fully by enacting dress codes," 
said Fere/., who added that strict 
dress codes in area high schools 
such as Waukegan have limited 
gang activity from occurring 



within the school. 

"They have very good security 
at Waukegan High and a strict 
policy of no-tolerance for gang 
activity that is workimg very 



well," Perez said. 

Both Farmer and Perez agreed 
that media images, particularly in 
the movies, attract teens to gang 
activities. 



"In the movies and the media, 
gang activity gets a lot of atten- 
tion and praise," Perez said. "No 
one ever dies because of their 
See GANGS page C2 




Hal Coxon facilitates the Lake County Power Breakfast forum with Waukegan Police Dept. Gang 
Task Forces members Det. Carols Perez and Det. Larnell Farmer. The officers addressed business 
leaders about street gang operations in Lake County.— Photo by Linda Chapman 




COUNTY UldANd Newspapers MarcIi 7, 1 997 




Knights honor auxiliary bishop 

Numerous clergy from Lake County Roman Catholic parish- 
es attended a dinner held in honor of Gerald Kicanas, auxil- 
iary bishop of Lake County, Chicago Archdiocese. More than 
1 00 guests were also present at the dinner which was held at 
the Olde Stratford Inn in Grayslake. The dinner was spon- 
sored by the Knights of Columbus Fourth Degree of Bishop 
Quarter Assembly Lake County. Sir Knight William Cook and 
Faithful Navigator Bishop Quarter Assembly Michael Murar 
present Kicanas with a plaque. 



WeIcome 
WAqoN 

Has useful gifts and helpful 
information for you... 

ALL FREE! 

Just Engaged? New Parent? Moved? 

Antioch 

Linda 

838-0151 



Fox Lake/lngleside/ 
Spring Grove 

Kathy 
740-3662 



Grayslake 
Witdwood 

Kim Linda 

566-9536 223-1607 



Gurnee 

Gabriella & Michael 

548-8740 

lori 

548-8740 



DIVORCES 



Lake Villa 

Lindenhurst 

Eileen Rosemarie 

740-3770 725-2375 



Lake Zurich 

Anne 
540-5790 



Libertyville 

Jessae 

586-7213 



Long Grove - Kildeer 
Hawthorn Woods 

Mary 
438-0287 



Mundelein 

Faith 
872-1672 



Round Lake 

Diana Trad 

546-1076 546-3588 



Vernon Hills 

Doris 
680-7276 



Forum to help adolescents, 
parents cope with violent society 



You are entitled to a compli- 
mentary subscription from 
your hometown newspaper. 
To receive your paper, con- 
tact your Welcome Wagon 
representative or call 
Lakeland Newspapers at 
(847)223-8161, 



Feb. 20 - Feb. 26 

Debra and Robert Justus; 
Maloy I,, and Mark R. Hyatt; Grctci 
and Uric Davenport; Elaine G. 
Gern-Ratncr and John Charles 
Perkins Hatncr; Barbara and 
Ronald Jensen; Jody and James W. 
Meyer; Leah S. and LeVancc Andre 
Huley, Sr.; Susan M. and David G. 
Pribyl; Deborah A, and Steven R. 
Sutton; Michelle Marie Rante 
Burnstein and Ricky Scott 
Burnstcin; Joyce F. and Robert E 
Jagert; Angelique Jeanelte and Joh 
n Kenneth Stair; MaryAnn and 
Edward M. Olson; Meghan E. and 
Peter R. Samulevich; Linda and 
David R. Hugg; Jennifer Lynn and 
David Michael Nash. 

Sasha and Damon Trotter; 
Rosa Elena Alonso and Jose 
Antonio Almazo; Cynthia and 
Martin Cassidy; Karen Sue and 

Michael J, Hooz; Parit and Gregory 

Morse; Lucy A. and John T. Klein; 
Tina and Juan Carlos Espinoza; 

Tara and Charles Grammer Jr.; 

Audrey L. and Wayne Murphy; 

Joyce Diann and John P. Campbell; 

Janet A. Edward William Olson; 

Kathleen M. and Erwin W. While; 

Scott A. and Jody S. Murphy; 

Valarie J, and Mark D. Dunkel; 

Nancy Fick and Philip Finck; Gary J. 

and Laura Ingles; Darlenc M. and 

Dale C. Johnson; Danisc D. 

Valentinc-Lindscy and Troy 

Atchinson Lindsey; Heather R. and 

Glendon L. Chesser; Monica R. 

Farah and Bruce R. Szclag; Dcon 

Lopez and Arika St. Lot; 

Guiliermina P. and Jaime C. 

Moreno; Beth M. and Steven E. 

Dubow. 

Food drive - 

From page CI 

(Route 120) in Waukegan. The 
building is located behind Long 
John Silver's restaurant, at the 
east end of the Venture Shopping 
Center. Food can be dropped off 
at the sorting Facility Friday, 
March 14 and Saturday, March 
15. Those who deliver their dona- 
tions will be amazed as they 
watch the, organized precision 
that takes place during the food 
sorting activity. 

Those wishing to help sort 



A community forum, entitled 
"How Adolescents Are Affected 
by A Violent Society," is sched- 
uled for Saturday, March 9 from 
10 a.m. to noon at the Round 
Lake public Library auditorium. 

One in a series of public 
forums co-sponsored by LaCASA, 
the Lake County Council Against 
Sexual Assault (a non-profit orga- 
nization which helps sexual 
assault survivors) and A SAFE 
PLACE (Lake County's only 
domestic physical violence shel- 
ter). This event is open to all Lake 
County residents and expected to 
draw participants from all over 
the region. 

According to LaCASA 

Challenge— 

From page CI 

because of the growth since the 
late 1950s, the district bound- 
aries have become vague. But it 
is a matter of law." 

The Soil and Water 
Conservation Districts through- 
out the state were established 
in 1957. At that time, existing 
municipalities and platted sub- 
divisions in Lake County made 
a choice whether or not to be a 
part of the district. 

Those long-ago decisions 
affect today's Lake County 
homeowners who find it diffi- 
cult to understand why or why 
not they are within the district's 
boundaries. The determination 
to vote in the election is based 
on soil and water conservation 
district employees checking an 
individual's address against a 
land-use map from the late 
1950s. 

The mission of the soil and 
water district is to preserve the 
natural resources and protect 
soil and water conservation. 

Anytime there is a proposed 
land use change, whether it is 
an individual home owner or a 
developer, a natural resources 
information report for the 
property is required before the 
plat approval process is com- 
pleted. This informational 
report is prepared by the coun- 
ty soil and water conservation 
district. 

The reports point out sites 



spokesperson, Jane Hunter, this 
community forum is aimed at 
promoting understanding of how 
adolescent children arc impacted 
by a violent society and abuse. 
"Awareness and communication, 
both at the interpersonal and 
community levels, are the keys to 
combating sexual violence and 
abuse," said Hunter, Coordinator 
of Community Education for 
LaCASA. 

The forum will begin with a 
panel discussion featuring: 

• Hameedah Carr, Child 
Services Counselor for LaCASA. 

• Esther Barmak, Children's 
Counselor for A Safe Place. 

• Dr. Donald Sherwood, a 



private therapist 

• other community leaders 
and advocates 

Following the panel discus- 
sion, attendees are encouraged to 
voice their observations and 
opinions, or raise questions on 
child safety, advocacy, and per- 
sonal rights. "Our focus with this 
forum is to help adults communi- 
cate with children and under- 
stand the impact of what they 
way and do," said Esther Bramak 
of A Safe Place. "This forum will 
help lay the groundwork for 
ongoing discussions to help ado- 
lescents develop healthy relation- 
ships with their family, neigh- 
bors, and peers." 



on the property which are sen- 
sitive such as the location of 
existing wells, field tiles and 
natural resources such as trees, 
wetlands and other items. 

"It is an advisory report that 
makes recommendations such 
as "this property should have 
limitations for the number of 
basements'," said Cole. "The 
majority of people who use the 
soil and water district to obtain 
these reports arc consultants 
for developers." The district 
also provides aerial pho- 
tographs from the early 1900s 
and other information neces- 
sary for the plat approval 
process. 

"Last year usage numbers 
indicated that npproximniuly 
two-thirds of the individuals 
using the services of the district 
were developers," Cole said. 

New role 

One of the issues driving the 
recent board of directors elec- 
tion was the signing of a new 
contract by the soil and water 
conservation district with the 
Army Corps of Engineers to 
issue 404 permits and do fol- 
low-up visits on such permits. 

"What this involves is hav- 
ing a local agency check back 
sites for erosion control meth- 
ods," said Cole. The 404 permit 
involves the mitigation of wet- 
lands on 1-acre or less sites 
with the need for soil erosion 



and sediment control. This 
involves a land owner meeting 
with a soil and water district 
resources conservationist for a 
site review so that the develop- 
er knows what is expect ed of 
them. 

"The types of recommenda- 
tions made by the resource 
conservationist involve the 
placement of silt fences, straw 
bales and erosion control blan- 
kets, which are very simple 
measures," Cole said. "These 
are measures that benefit the 
developer and the nearby land 
owner." 

The Army Corps of 
Engineers has made a similar 

contract with McHenry County 
Soil unci Wulur Conservation 
District Tor such services and is 
negotiating with other collar 
counties as well. 

According to Cole, the con- 
tract with the Army Corps 
became a driving issue 
because the permit follow-ups 
have previously been handled 
by the Lake County 
Department of Planning, 
Building and Zoning. 

"The Army Corps felt that 
there was not enough follow-up 
for permit violations in these 
matters and sought an outside 
agency to accomplish this. 
That is how they came to talk to 
the soil and water conservation 
district about being involved in 
the permit process," Cole said. 



Gangs 

From page CI 



involvement in a street gang in 
the movies." 

"For some, the gang serves 
as an extended family," Farmer 
said. "But, gang members 
come from all backgrounds. 
For some kids it's the thrill or 



food may call Mrs. Hclti at 662- 
3408 after 6 p.m., or Mrs. 
Hammer 948-0747 evenings or 
leave a message at 441-2930. 
Those wishing to donate funds 
to the drive instead of food 
may send their donation to: 
Lake County Food Resource 
Council, PO Box 685, 
Grayslake. All donations are 
tax-deductible. 

For more information, con- 
tact Ann Conroy, Food Drive 
chairperson at 360-6818. 



glory of being involved in gangs 
that attracts them. For others 
they arc lacking something at 
home." 

The detectives recommend 
that families also need to be 
more aware of their children's 
activities so that they can pre- 
vent gang problems at home. 

"Parents need to know who 
their children's friends are and 
what types of activities they are 
involved in," said Farmer. 
"Many families don't recognize 
gang symbols and colors so 
they don't recognize that their 
kids are involved in such activi- 
ty." 

Perez says another problem 
In dealing with families and 
gangs is that In some families' 
gang involvement has been a 
part of their life for generations. 

"Some parents don't take 
issue with the child's involve- 
ment because they were 



■>*? 



involved as youngsters, too," 
said Perez. 

The officers stressed that 
the more information they 
receive on potential gang mem- 
bers, the better job that can do 
on preventing gang problems. 

"If anyone suspects or 
knows an individual is a gang 
member they should provide 
that information to the local 
police department so that per- 
son can be registered as a 
known gang member," Farmer 
said. "The state also keeps a list 
of such people, and attempts to 
track them as they move from 
place to place." 

The detectives said there are 
three rules to gang prevention: 
Read it, report it, remove it. 

"When business people or 
residences sec gang graffiti they 
should read it and report it to 
the police department, then 
remove it from the building." 



i 









MARch 7, 1997 UkElANd Newspapers COUNTY 






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At A GIance— 

Peterson sponsors busing bill 

GRAYSLAKE— Proposed legislation from state 
Senator Bill Peterson (R-Long Grove) would give par- 

ents leverage in their attempts 
to get busing for their 
- S ■ children if it is 
passed. 

Peterson is spon- 
soring Illinois State 
Senate Bill 558. If 
passed it would 
require school dis- 
tricts to conduct a 
safety study of 
school walk routes 
at the request or peti- 
tion of a parent/guardian to a 
school board. The study would 
then be reviewed by the state 
department of transportation to 
ensure accuracy. 

Peterson said he considered the legislation when 
several Grayslake parents called him during a contro- 
versy over busing students from the Manor subdivision 
to school. Last fall the parents of these children lobbied 
the District 46 Board of Education tirelessly to get bus- , 
ing for their children who lived within a mile and a half 
of Woodview School. The parents believe the walk 
route poses several safety threats to the children 
including an isolated walk path, lack of sidewalks in 
the subdivision and what they believe to be a haz- 
ardous train crossing. 

Since the last safety survey done by District 46, 
trains have been added to the Wisconsin Central Metra 
commuter line and Peterson said this has contributed 
to an increase in freight train traffic as well. 

Parents believe this bill, if passed would eliminate a 
lengthy debate with the school board to have a new 
safety study conducted.— by ELIZABETH EAKEN 

Lake Villa may get own district 

ANTIOCH— After nearly a year of discussions, The 
Northwest Educational Planning Group has agreed to 
discuss the possibility of Lake Villa Elementary District 
becoming a K-12 district or Grayslake and Antioch high 
schools sharing a Klgh school or combining Into a large 
district. 

Included in these discussions have been village 
board representatives and chamber officials from 
Antioch, Lake Villa and Lindenhurst. 

The unified Lake Villa Elementary District would be 
similar to the Lake Villa Unit District plan rejected by 
voters two years ago. However, this plan would leave 
Millburn out the picture and not part of the new unit 
district. 

The combined high school would allow one new 
high school to be built and save both high school dis- 
tricts from each having to construct a school to accom- 
modate growth, according to Ray Novak, Grayslake 
High School superintendent. 

The next meeting will be March 31,7 p.m. at the 
Lake Villa administrative complex. Grayslake High 
School officials have been invited to the group for the 
first time to offer their thoughts, —by ALEC JUNGE 

Partnership wins grant 

LIBERTYVILLE— The Upper Des Plaincs 
Partnership has been awarded a $95,000 conservation 
2000 grant from the State of Illinois. 

The funds will be used to develop a management 
plan for the organization, which includes representa- 
tives from the Liberty Prairie Foundation, the Liberty 
Prairie Conservancy, the Army Corps of Engineers, the 
Lake Cotlnty Stormwater Management Commission 
and the Lake County Forest Preserve District as well as 
a number of individuals representing agricultural, 
development and sports interests. 

"the goal of the partnership is to look at the Des 
Plaines Watershed," said Michael Sands, executive 
director of the Prairie Foundation. "We'll work with 
these interests to develop a more broad, wide-ranging 
management plan."— by SUZIE REED 

Millburn museum gets website 

OLD MILL CREEK— Millburn Is giving the world 
the opportunity to know what the residents of the tiny 
hamlet already know, it's a special place with an inter- 
esting story to tell. The Martin's Gen'L Store Museum, 
now has its own site on the World Wide Web. 

The site is located on NorthStarNet and can be 
accessed from the Warrcn-Nbwport Library- Arts, 
Culture and Entertainment page. The address is 
http://www.nsn. org/ wrkhomc/hmca. 

"This web site allows us to be open 24 hours a day, 
seven days a week, something we cannot do in real 
life," according to Dorothy Fettinger, chairman of the 



Historic Millburn Community Association, Inc. 

The site tells browsers almost everything a first 
time visitor to the museum would be interested in 
knowing. 

The community association has operated the gen- 
eral store museum in Millburn since 1985. It is located 
at the intersection of Highway 45 and Grass Lake Road. 

At onetime it was the bustling community center 
of the area. It boasted three stores, three doctors, two 
undertakers, the first church and Masonic Lodge in the 
area, the first consolidated school district in the state 
and was home to the oldest mutual insurance compa- 
ny in the state, according to the association.— by ELIZ- 
ABETH EAKEN 

Schools target ice safety 

MUNDELEIN— The winter's freeze-thaw cycle 
has made area lakes even more dangerous. One 
fatality and a close call brought the need for educa- 
tion to the forefront. 

County Board Representative Diana O'Kelly of 
Mundelein is among the most ardent supporters of a 
safety program offered by the Lake County Forest 
Preserve. A video features children who demonstrate 
precautions as well as the proper response in an 
emergency. 

"We teach them to treat ice as you would water," 
said Roy lohnson, superintendent of rangers for the 
Forest Preserve. 

"If it were my children I'd want to make sure 
they were given an opportunity to learn this," said 
O'Kelly, who encouraged area schools and youth 
groups to take advantage of the presentation. — by 
SUZIE REED 



-Quote of tUe weeIc 



Tm not in favor of home rule. I 

don't think elected officials need 

that kind of power. 1 

Senior Libertyville Trustee Duane Laska, 
unopposed candidate for mayor 

Theatre stages 'Plaza Suite' 

LAKE ZURICH— Neil Simon's "Plaza Suite" will be 
presented the next two weekends by the Alpine 
Community Theatre of Lake Zurich. 

The three-act play will take place in the auditorium 
of Lake Zurich High School the evenings of March 7, 8, 
14 and 15, and the afternoons of March 9 and 16. 

Ten-minute intermissions will be held between the 
acts. Tickets for the play are S8 for adults, S6 for senior 
citizens and students, and 55 for Cultural Arts 
Connection members, and will be sold advance or at 
the door. 

Evening performances will start at 7:30 p.m., and 
matinee performances will begin at 2 p.m. 

Profits from the show will go back into the funds of 
the Cultural Arts Connection. 

Lake Zurich High School is located at 300 Church 
St. (Midlothian Road), one-quarter mile north of Route 
22.— by SPENCER SCHEIN 

Gurnee group favors fee cuts 

GURNEE— Members of the Gurnee Tax Rebate 
Committee would rather see village officials walk to- 
ward a proposed rebate than run. 

The committee recommended to the village board 
a reduction in service fees, such as water and garbage. 
If approved, it would be instituted under a grant pro- 
gram. 

"The committee recommended that if there is a 
surplus of funds, that the board should consider a 
reduction in user fee or service charges," Gurnee 
Administrator James Hayner said. 

Hayner said just which services would be reduced 
in cost has yet to be determined. The amount of sur- 
plus expected at the end of the fiscal year should be 
known later this month, he said. 

Committee member Tom Chamberlain urged the 
board to consider increasing the amusement tax at Six 
Flags Great America. The village has received 40 cents 
per guest for more than a decade. 

"inhere are three million visitors, at $20 average 
ticket price, the village could receive S3 million, which 
is three times what we arc getting now," Chamberlain 
said. 

He does not agree with Mayor Richard Wclton that 



such a tax would be too complicated. 

When the village board begins its budget hearings 
on April 5, the tax rebate will be known as a grant pro- 
gram, to offset legal viewpoints, — by STEVE PETER- 
SON 

Village pushes for fair share 

LAKE VILLA — An annexation agreement is not 
being signed by a developer because he feels the village 
should pay for the cost of water hookups to the pro- 
posed development. 

Rich Ender is proposing to construct a 120-unit 
subdivision on a 60-acre tract on the north side of 
Grass Lake Road and west of Deep Lake Road. A major- 
ity of the subdivision is in Antioch Township. Ender 
said he believed based on previous discussions with 
the village that Lake % Villa would be providing the ser- 
vice. 

Mayor Frank Loffredo explained all developers are 
required to pay their fair share for their portion of 
water improvements. 

Until the developer signs the agreement, there is no 
annexation agreement. — by ALEC JUNGE 

Funding plan questioned 

WAUCONDA— A consortium of education associa- 
tions are trying to get Illinois legislators to approve a 
new plan for getting more state aid to school districts. 

The plan is entitled "Fair School Funding: A 
Proposal from the Education Community." Wauconda 
Unit District 118 officials took a look at the plan, and 
think it needs some work before it will go forward. 

What the alliance is proposing is to increase the 
state income tax from 3 percent to 4 percent in order to 
provide more funding for education, and is supposed 
to allow for some reduction in property taxes, said 
William Harkin, director of financial and operational 
services. 

"Part of that is going to be put back in education," 
Harkin said. 

As board President Gary Thompson sees it, there is 
a critical problem with the plan. 

"We are taking away property tax, and that is a way 
of selling it," he said. But not all of the increases in 
income tax will go back into education, he said. — by 
SPENCER SCHEIN 

Davis back on ballot 

ROUND LAKE BEACH — Citing problems posed 
by contradictory testimony and a lack of unbiased wit- 
nesses, a new electoral board for Round Lake Beach 
has ruled 2-1 to put Round Lake Beach Mayor Ralph 
Davis* Beach 2000 slate back on the April 1 ballot. 

The new hearing took place at the County Building 
in Waukegan on the afternoon of Feb. 27 before a 
board composed of three attorneys: Robin Detnars 
Goodstein of Lake Bluff, Matthew Chancey of 
Waukegan and Board Chairman Peter Friedman of 
Chicago. 

Board member Goodstein disagreed with Friedman 
and Chancey, saying that "the candidates do not 
belong on the ballot due to their non-compliance" and 
recommending that they "pursue aavriie-in cam- 
paign." 

"It's just been a speed bump in the campaign," said 
Davis of the petition challenge to his slate following the 
ruling. "We're looking forward to setting our sights on 
the real issues."— by JEFF PATERSON 

Board eyes sewer extension 

FOX LAKE — The village board is considering the 
issue of extending sewer service to more than 800 
homes irj subdivisions south and west beyond the vil- 
lage limits. The issue has been brought forward 
by a Lake County proposal to remedy the chronic sep- 
tic system problems of subdivision residents. 

Residents of the southwestern subdivisions were at 
the meeting to lend their support for the county pro- 
posal. 

"I would ask the board to really put serious consid- 
eration into this project," said Bill Brumbach of 
Bayview Terrace. "We all know, once the water goes 
into the septic, it goes out somewhere, and if you study 
it at any length, it's going into the lake." The plan 
could be financially lucrative for the village. 
Calculations indicate 979 connectable lots of the sys- 
tem could generate $979,000 in regional connection 
fees for the plant and $293,700 in local connection fees. 
Monthly user fees generated annually would be 
$196,779 in regional fees and $46,992 in local fees. 

The issue has been referred back to the Sewer and 
Water Committee for more research and to try to 
determine the total financial impact upon the village if 
the proposal is adopted, —by JEFF PATERSON 



EDITORIAL UkelANd Newspapers MarcIi7, 1997 




increases lower 

When it combs to township government these days, electors 
: generally, are expecting more and paying less. Or at least pay- 
ing smaller salary increases to elected officials than they did 
formerly. 

In a random survey, Lakeland Newspapers found that the typ- 
ical township official taking office after election day April 1 will 
be receiving the smallest pay increase in years. Historically, 
township salaries dwarf those of the other level of grassroots 
government, the municipalities. 

In Warren Township, outgoing officials took a "hack and 
slash" attitude in setting new salary rates. Statutes prohibit sit- 
ting township officials from setting their own pay. In what was 
seen widely as a political reprisal, the Warren supervisor's 
salary was cut from $57,240 to $30,000. Pay for the assessor 
and township clerk also was cut drastically. 

An tioch Township downgraded the supervisor's salary from 
$5 1 ,688 to $44,000. Grant Township enacted a pay freeze on 
all elected officials. Pay of the Libertyville Township supervi- 
sor was kept at $51,000 per year. Slight pay increases for the 
elected were voted in Lake Villa, Wauconda, Ela and Avon 
. townships. Fremont Township (rural Mundelein) voted a pay 
hike and adopted three percent annual cost of living increases. 
At Vernon Township, the wealthiest township in Lake County, 
all officers except the highway commission, were voted incre- 
mental increases with annual COLA adjustments for the length 
of their terms. 

While elected township officials took a more circumspect atti- 
tude toward pay, electors stepped up demands for service and 
leadership, particularly in west Lake County where the flames 
of growth and development are engulfing formerly placid unin- 
corporated areas. 

A whole new set of demands have been placed on township 
government to go witii the time-honored roles of providing 
general assistance to the needy, road maintenance and sup- 
porting the framework for assessing real property. Now citi- 
zens are heaping on the townships demands for land use plan- 
ning, recreational facilities, preservation of open space, 
garbage removal and recycling, senior citizens services and 
protection of the environment. 

What citizens are saying to township officials, in effect, is that 
"we're paying you well. Now do something for us." It didn't 
used to be that way. 

Petition strategy 
tests Corps might 

Opponents of the wealthy Prilzker family's vast home build- 
ing project in west Lake County, largest ever in the area, are 
turning to a time-honored strategy to slow down the develop- 
ment express — petitioning. 

With hopes of obtaining hundreds of signatures, their aim is 
to leverage a no-more nation-wide permit position of the U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers as pertaining to Arrow Lake. The 
development calls for 1,828 homes clustered around a vast wet- 
lands, once considered for acquisition by Illinois Dept. of 
Conservation because of its pristine qualities. 

Pritzker foes seek support for the Army Corps position as it 
relates to the meandering Squaw Creek watershed study being 
undertaken by the Lake County Stormwater Management 
Agency, The study, planned to be completed by 1999, will 
include a careful analysis of downstream impact of Arrow Lake 
building. The 24,000 acre watershed reaching as far as 
Wauconda and Ivanhoe empties into flood-prone Long Lake 
and is connected to the Chain 'O Lakes at Fox Lake. 

Downstream residents are frustrated that officials of the 
Village of Round Lake, which provided corporate approval for 
the controversial high density home project, have ignored their 
pleas for consideration. Homeowners say Arrow Lake building 
will only intensify flooding dangers in addition to damaging 
flora and fauna distinctive to the area known locally as Mud 
Lake. 

The significance of the petition effort is that the prestige of 
the Army Corps to control flooding and protect the environ- 
ment is being put squarely on the line. If one of the richest 
families in America with the help of their minions in a small 
town "on the make" for growth can thumb their nose at the 
Army Corps, then there isn't much else that can be done to 
curb unfettered development. 



Guest commentates weIcome 

Lakeland Newspapers welcomes guest columns 
by our readers on topics of general Interest, 
Anyone Interested in writing a column can con- 
tact Publisher W.H. Schroeder at (847) 223-8161. 
Submissions .may be mailed c/o Lakeland 
Newspapers, RO. Box 268, Grayslake IL 60030 or 
fax to (847) 223-8810. Deadline is Friday at noon. 



EDITORIAL 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



NRRWWREE 
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TUtSlsmgCAPTAIN. 
OUR FLYING TIME 
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57 MINUTES. 





- Vi Ew/poi nt — — 

Gash targets tollway 
for sweeping reform 



BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 

Unless you're a die-hard fan of 
the Illinois Toll Highway 
Authority, there's a lot to like 
about the changes State Rep. 
Lauren Beth Gash (D-Highland 
Park) aims to bring about in the 
way the oft maligned agency 
operates. 

The feisty Lake County legislator 
wants to bring about sweeping 
tollway operational changes and 
insure adoption of the bipartisan 
supported "Tollpayers Bill of 
Rights," which among other 
things, requires appointment of a 
badly need inspector general. 

Gash is giving Republican lead- 
ers(and a few Democrats, too) fits 
in her legislative proposals to reign 
in the abuse and mismanagement 
of the Toll Highway Authority. 
She is an appropriate heir to the 
long-standing work conducted 
during his days in the General 
Assembly by former State Rep. 
John Malijevich (D-Waukegan) to 
designate tollways freeways after 
bonds have been retired and pro- 
vide for greater accountibility of 
tollway commissioners. 
Gash has a lengthy list of tollway 
reform initiatives. They include 
matching tolls paid with location 
of repair work {ending the so- 
called "system" approach), limit- 
ing the cozy relationship between 
the tollway and Illinois Dept. of 
Transportation (IDOT), eliminat- 
ing 15 lollbooths, curbing politi- 
cal contributions from compa- 
nies doing business with the toll- 
way and stiffening environmental 
impact statements for proposed 
construction. 

The tollway authority plans to 
spend nearly $700 million for the 
proposed 1-355 extension in Will 
County and close to $1 billion for 
the proposed Rte. 53 cxtention in 
Like County. As it stands now, 
elected representatives have no 
say so in how tollway commission- 



ers and their employees conduct 
business. This doesn't seem right. 
••••••• 
FLOATING ON AIR— Subscriber 
Doug Ploss wondered whether air 
bags wouldn't make snowmobiles 
safer considering that a large num- 
ber of snowmobile fatalities occur 
when machines break through 
thin ice. 

This column is happy to report 
that Ploss was supplied with infor- 
mation, which he happily sent 
along to Lakeland Newspaper 
readers, that two Canadian engi- 
neering students have developed a 
snowmobile flotation system that 
deploys when machines break 
through ice. 

Three bags — one under the 
nose and one under each running 
board, inflate with carbondioxide 
about two seconds after water 
rises past n designated level. The 
flotation devices arc going to 
become optional equipment. 
••*••*• 
LIFETIME JOB— The way it 
worked out, getting elected 
senior class president 50 years 
ago turned out to be a lifetime job 
for Bob Krumrey of Libertyville. 
Just as he has done during inter- 
vals over the years and again for 
the golden anniversary, Krumrey 
now is heading up arrangements 
for a reunion of the Class of 1947 
of Libertyville High School. The 




class has reserved Brae Loch Golf 
Club for a dinner Oct. 24. But 
there will be plenty of work to do 
before. 

•••*•*• 
ACHIEVER— Nancy Weliver 
Dague should be a lock for a 
Alpha Gamma Delta sorority 
achievement award. She's the 
Long Lake mom who delivered 
quadruplets at Lutheran General 
Hospital. Nancy is an alumna of 
the University of Illinois Chapter. 
The Dague quads are destined to 
become Lake County celebrities 
if not nationally known, at least 
with their mom's sorority. 
••*•*•• 

'NEW TOWN'— A Schaumburg- 
based developer has captured the 
interest of officials of the Village of 
Round Lake with a design for a 
relocated commercial center to 
the intersection of Rte. 134 and 
Fairfield Rd. A key part of the pro- 
ject is relocation of a Metra station 
and construction of an apartment 
complex of nearly 600 units. 
Mayor Jim Lumber views the pro- 
ject as a "good fit" since it would 
be adjacent to the Pritzker Arrow 
Lake development of more than 

1.B00 homes. Together, the two 
projects would dwarf the existing 
village in size and population. 
*•**•*• 



-Letters to TriE EdiTOR 



How to invite learning 

Editor: 

I confess a lack of sophistica- 
tion when it comes to evaluating 
the many variables surrounding 
Gurnce's upcoming referendum 
on school improvements. 1 am 
attuned, however, to the level of 
commitment — the value— I place 
on my daughters' educational 1 
environments. 



I like walking into O'Plaine 
School and have wondered why. I 
think it's because the physical 
space invites learning. It's that 
simple. And this observation 
gives me helpful information as I 
look at the existing learning envi- 
ronments at Spaulding . and 
Viking Schools. Because I think 
faculty and staff do a remarkable 
See LETTERS page C5 






MARch 7, 19»7 UkeUNd NE\wp»pEK COUNTY 



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Fundraiser brings out who's who in GOP circles 



Party Lines, the Lakeland Newspapers 
column of political opinion, is prepared 
from staff reports. 

More than 230 people attended a fund- 
raiser for the Wauconda Tag Team, hosted 
by former Wauconda Mayor Ken McGlU 
and long-time village clerk Venlta 
McConnel. 

Among the well-known past and pre- 
sent Lake County Republican politicians 
in attendance were: Sheriff Gary Del Re, 
Coroner Barbara Richardson, Judge 
John Goshgarlan, Circuit Court Clerk 
Sally Coffelt, Lake County Clerk 
WHIard Helander, State Rep. Mark 
Beaublen (R-52nd), County Board 
Members Bob Neal (Wadsworth) and 
Bonnie Thomson Carter (Ingleside), 
Mayor Charles Amrlch of Island Lake 
and former Sheriff Clint Giinnell. 
♦ ♦♦ 

Raising funds- Last week party lines 
mentioned a murder mystery fund raiser 
sponsored by State Majority Leader 
Robert Churchill at the home of Antioch 
businessman Randy MUes. 

Churchill was the highest bidder in the 
Antioch Rotary Club auction for the mur- 
der mystery event which Miles, a Rotary 
member, was gracious enough to offer to 
host at his home. Miles did so in hopes of 
garnering a higher bid for the murder 
mystery. 

Churchill bid $3,000. It was Churchill's 
choice to have a fund raiser. 

Neither Rotary Club members nor 
Miles had entertained thoughts the win- 



Letters 



From pago C4 

job under present conditions, it's easy to 
dream about what might be possible if the 
physical properties met the standard of 
O'Plaine School. I hope maintaining the 
momentum of educational excellence in 
Gurnce continues to win the support of 
the community— surely, we'd all be better 
for it. 

Noel Calhoun III 
Gurnee 

'Selling' guns to youth 

Editor: 

What a joke. An organization in 
Antioch calling itself the Northern Illinois 
Conservation Club will open its facilities in 
March for the teaching of "hunter safety — 
to adults and children" by the Illinois 
Dept. of Natural Resources. 

What has conservation to do with 
hunting? What does the word "conserva- 
tion" in its title imply — killings to be con- 
served as trophies. 

And the intent of the Illinois Dept. of 
Natural Resources in conducting these 
classes? Obviously, to stimulate interest 
in hunting at the earliest possible ages, 
capitalizing on the fascination guns hold 
for most youngsters; also to help coun- 
terturn the decline of interest and par- 
ticipation in hunting by young people. 
Increases in hunter population mean 
increases in licensing and associated 
sources of considerable revenue for the 
Department. In short, money is the pri- 
mary motivation, not regard for the safe- 
ty of hunters. 

If the Illinois Dept. of Natural 
Resources were truly concerned about 
safety, it would never recommend placing 
guns in the hands of children. 

Helen Strzalk 
Antioch 

Listen to all sides 

Editor: 

Arc Lake Zurich's taxpayers tired of 
politics as usual? Are the taxpayers tired of 
our tax dollars being wasted such as the 
village did during a two year period of try- 
ing to force an unnecessary, expensive 




ner may turn the club's fund-raising event 
into a fund-raiser of their own. 

Chalk that up for the lessons learned 
column. 

♦ ♦♦ 
Communication key— The Time 
Team in Grant Twp. is calling communica- 
tion the key to a 
successful future 
for the township. 
Supervisor candi- 
date Mike Francis 
is calling for an 
enhanced working 
relationship with 
surrounding vil- 
lages, schools, 
townships and with 
county leaders on 
joint public pro- 
jects. 
Francis says he is prepared to seek, 
one-on-one, monthly meetings with local 
mayors and township supervisors to better 
understand each other's concerns if elect- 
ed April 1. 

♦ ♦♦ 
Grever, Neal on national steering 
committee— Lake County Board 
Chairman Robert L. Grever of Kildeer is 
once again following in the footsteps of his 
predecessor Bob Depke in his appoint- 
ment to the National Association of 
Counties (NACo) Transportation and 
Telecommunications Steering 

Committee. 

'I am excited to work on this effort and 
am very pleased that Lake County's repre- 



Francis 



boardwalk/promenade on us, in which, 
even the Governor turned down a request 
for a federal grant? Are the taxpayers tired 
of all the secret meetings, unfortunate 
investigations and expensive litigations? 
You bet we are. 

Are the taxpayers, particularly those 
who didn't vote for Mayor Vasels, tired of 
being ignored by her not meeting with us 
or answering our letters and phone calls to 
discuss issues that reflect directly on our 
health, safety and welfare? Are the taxpay- 
ers tired of being told our 140 Freedom of 
Information Act request cannot be 
acknowledged because there is no file? 
Are the taxpayers tired of not being 
informed that large, heavy trucks and 
equipment, along with flood lights, would 
be operating and keeping the residents up 
all night from 9 p.m. until 5:30 a.m. the 
next morning? You bet we are. 

Therefore, based on the above and 
other concerns of ours for the village, our 
choice for the April 1 election is Village 
First consisting of Krischke for mayor, 
Hutton, McAvoy and Talbett for trustees 
and Steffens for clerk. Their platform is 
simple: open government, control growth 
(no new annexations for housing develop- 
ments), listen to and represent "all" the 
residents of Lake Zurich among other 
great ideas to enhance the quality of lives, 
while controlling taxes. 

Claudette Dyback 
Lake Zurich 

Candidates 'eliminated' 

Editor: 

New resident Allen Stubitsch and his 
three cohorts vying to become mayor and 
village trustees in Mundelein are not being 
truthful in their campaign to win the 
upcoming Mundelein election. 

Fact: The Village of Mundelein, 
through the efforts of elected village offi- 
cials, village staff the business develop- 
ment commission and in conjunction with 
the owners of vacant business sites within 
the Village of Mundelein have contacted 
nearly 1,000 entities since 1995 in efforts to 
attract and retain more nonresidential tax 
generating businesses into our corporate 



sentation on this important committee is 
continuing," Grever said. 

The committee is comprised of 
approximately 50-60 county officials who 
meet several times during the year to 
examine issues critical of local govern- 
ment. 

Additionally, County Board Member 
Bob Neal of Wadsworth was reappointed 
to serve on the intergovernmental rela- 
tions steering committee of NACo. 

"I enjoy working on this committee 
because it's important that the different 
county departments work together to pro- 
vide the necessary services to citizens at 
the least possible cost," Neal said. 
♦ ♦♦ 
Campaign comedy— The Dedicated 
to Mundelein literature handed out at a 
recent gathering included glowing reports 
of each candidate's qualifications. The 
slate includes incumbent Mayor Marilyn 

Slndles, Trustees 
Bruce Campbell 
and Jim 

Nutschnlg, and 
newcomer Steve 
Powell. A notation 
instructed the 
reader to "see other 
side" for the oppo- 
nents' qualifica- 
tions. The back of 
the page was blank. 

Welton w - ■ 

In the spot- 
light- One of the hottest issues in Gurnee 
last year made the "onion" list of Chicago 




Magazine's February edition. Gurnee 
Mayor Richard Welton and the trustees' 
decision to give back Six Flags Great 
America tickets destined for public offi- 
cials was mentioned. The long-standing 
policy was right up there with other subur- 
ban and city public official blunders, 
according to the magazine. 

♦ ♦♦ 

Seeing double — There might be 
some confusion at the Lake Zurich polls 
April 1, with two trustee candidates who 
have the same name. 

A slight spelling derivation may provide 
voters with the only clue when choosing 
three candidates for trustee, including 
David L Talbott and Michael S. Talbett. 
Both are running on competing slates. 

♦ ♦♦ 

Making waves — The political rumor 
mill has it that Newport Township 
Supervisor candidate Thomas Pawlak is 
an ally of County Board Member Bob 
Neal and that he got involved in the town- 
ship election to avenge incumbent 
Supervisor Mildred Corde^s support of 
Neal's opponent in his bid for Lake County 
Recorder of Deeds in November. Any 
truth to this one? 

♦ ♦♦ 

Porter forum — Congressman John 
Porter (R-lOth) will hold the second in his 
1997 series of public forums March 8, 
from 10 a.m. to noon, at the Waukegan 
Public Library, 128 North County Street in 
Waukegan. For more information contact 
Congressman Porter's office in Deerfield, 
940-0202 or Waukegan, 662-0101. 



boundaries. These efforts have included, 
but are not limited to: Bass Pro Shops; 
Cabellas; Gander Mountain; CDW, Zany 
Brainy; Out Back Steak House; bakeries, 
various Cinema complexes; grocery 
stores; car, boat and motorcycle dealers; 
an ice rink and the YMCA, 

Many simply do not respond to our 
efforts; some say we do not have any sites 
that are accommodating; many want to 
locate near an existing shopping mall; 
some want the village taxpayers to donate 
land or be "business partners" in their 
efforts; some wish to retain their sales 
property tax and others choose to hold off 
until Route 53 comes to fruition. The vil- 
lage has also been instructed by various 
owners of vacant property to stay out of 
their marketing campaigns as they 
attempt to fill their own vacancies via the 
free market place. 

We, as taxpayers and elected officials 
realize that we have a fiduciary responsi- 
bility to our citizenry to attract nonresi- 
dential tax generating growth to the 
Village of Mundelein; we are projecting 
sales tax revenues to increase nearly 10 
percent over the past two years; hopefully, 
the residents of Mundelein will become 
aware of this and our other positive 
accomplishments and vote for the most 
qualified candidates to be mayor and vil- 
lage trustees— which definitely eliminates 
Alan Stubitch and his three trustees candi- 
dates. 

Raymond T. Semple 
Mundelein Village Trustee 



Show of courage 

Editor: 

Congratulations to North Barrington. 
They have shown uncommon courage 
and class in turning down that mega-mall. 
They were not hypnotized into believing 
that the income was the beginning and 
the end. 

The arrogance of those out-of-town- 
ers descending on a community and 
telling its citizens what they must have, is 
unbelievable. As if they know what they're 
talking about, beyond making big bucks 



for themselves and their investors. As if 
they care, beyond" making big bucks for 
themselves and their investors. And the 
small merchant has no choice but to pay 
their high rentals or go out of business, 
when they come to town. 

There are enough malls a 30-minute 
drive from here. Let those sacrificial citi- 
zens bear the consequences. If Abe 
Lincoln could walk miles and miles and 
miles to borrow books to lift himself out of 
ignorance, surely us modern day people 
can drive our comfortable cars 10 miles 
over well marked and safe roads to one of 
these malls, for fun and diversion and 
glitz. 

And you had better watch Mr. 
Eschenbauch. He has already laid a 
framework for a local mall. 

Phyllis Nicolopoulos 
Wauconda 

Time for a choice 

Editor: 

The upcoming April 1 election for 
Libertyville township Assessor gives resi- 
dents of the district a choice of two dis- 
tinctly different candidates. 

There is, of course, the incumbent 
assessor, Dennis Jagla. Four years ago, 
local political activist Jack Martin, spent 
over $20,000 of his own money to run one 
of the great misinformation campaigns to 
get Jagla elected. Jagla was to be the tax- 
payers savior — he has been far from that. 
From being very unavailable, to being very 
rude to the inquiring taxpayer we have not 
received what Martin advertised. 

This April we have a chance to elect a 
very committed, well meaning assessor in 
Peggy Boyes Freese. Freese is community 
involved, taxpayer oriented and anxious 
to serve the residents of Libertyville 
Township. Her roots are in the township 
and she cares about the effectiveness and 
equity in the tax process. 

I urge you to vote for Peggy Boyes 
Freese this April 1. Don't let the 
Jagla/Martin team try to fool us for four 
more years. 

Mary E. Fairbairn 
Libertyville 



I "bOSI NESS/REAL ESTATE UkslANd Newspapers MarcIi 7, 1997 _^ ■ = — 

Investigate closely get rich quick schemes 



There are two ways to getting 
on in this world: by ones own 
industry, or by the weakness of 
others. — Jean de La Bruy^re 

Nearly every week for the last few 
weeks, my mailbox has contained infor- 
mation on some new business venture 
someone believes I should be involved in. 
They all have one theme in common: for 
little money, with no selling and almost no 
effort you can make some major bucks. 

The headlines arc exciting. Phrases 
such as "Earn $3 to 5,000 per month part- 
time!" "Would you like a big raise? (usually 
followed by a long list of folks earning 
thousands every month)" and "I make 
$1,000 per day," are typical. 

I'm certain I'll get more mail after writ- 
ing this column. Folks who believe in 



multi-level marketing businesses (and require more money than others and all 
there are thousands of them out there) are have some element of risk. 



going to flood my 
mailbox. 

■ So for the 
record, let me 
stress that this is 
not an and multi- 
level marketing 
piece. I will try to 
cover the subject 
in a neutral man- 
ner. Some are bound to perceive it in a 
negative way simply because I don't hap- 
pen to share their enthusiasm. 

In reality, multi-level marketing offers 
comparable opportunities to franchises 
and other types of businesses. Some con- 
cepts are better than others, some ideas 




Not every 

multi-level mar- 
keting business is 
a good one. In 
addition, no busi- 
ness will make 

you rich (legally) 

without some 
investment and a 
good deal of effort 
on your part. 

Separating the wheat from the chaff 
So how can you spot a good multi-level 
marketing opportunity? How do you know 
when to jump in with both feet? Let me 
share a few thoughts on what to look for. 
• First, look closely at the opportunity. 



MiNdiNq Your 
Own Business 

Don TavIor 



Are the products or service the company 
provides really needed or wanted by a 
wide range of people? What makes this 
company's offerings truly unique and 
marketable? Can your potential customers 
purchase similar products through con- 
ventional retail channels? Why are this 
company's products and services better or 
more attractive to consumers? 

• Second, determine if the products or 
service offer good value: Remember, that 
value is a comparison of price versus qual- 
ity and quantity. Compare products with 
other brands and companies. Try the 
products before you sign on. Can you real- 
ly save money? Does this product or ser- 
vice save time or enhance your life? If you 
become a believer, it's easier to convince 
See SCHEMES page C8 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE Ks£" d 



BNG celebrates 
fifth anniversary 

The Business Networking 
Group (BNG), a networking 
group for local business peo- 
ple that serves south Lake and 
north Cook Counties, is host- 
ing a breakfast open house to 
celebrate its fifth anniversary. 
The buffet breakfast will be 
held on Friday, March 14, 
from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at the 
Centre Lights Cafe, located in 
the Centre Club of Condell 
Medical Center, 200 Golf Rd., 
Libertyville. This event will be 
open to all interested people; 
there is no charge for any 
guest, however reservations 
are requested. 

Started in 1992 by a group 
of six entrepreneurs, die BNG 
now has a membership of 
approximately 30 members. 

The purpose of this group 
is to provide an opportunity 
for those in noncompetitive 
businesses to network and 
expand their business con- 
tacts. It is also a forum for 
business to business informa- 
tion assistance, where the 
membership's business 
expertise is accessible by all 
for mutual information and 
benefit. 

For reservations, call 
Holly Monger at 362-0335. 



STOCK WATCH 



US Cable and local authorities launch Amnesty Campaign 



Company 


Price 


Change 


Abbott 


55 7/8 


-2 3/8 


Allstate 


63 3/8 


-3 3/4 


Ameritech 


62 1/4 


-1 1/2 


AT&T 


36 


-5 1/8 


Baxter 


46 3/4 


-2 


Brunswick 


29 


+1/8 


Unicom 


221/8 


-1/2 


D. Witter 


39 


-2 1/8 


McDonalds 


44 1/8 


-3 1/4 


Motorola 


57 3/8 





Peoples En. 34 3/8 +1/8 

Qkr.Oats 36 

Sara Lee 38 3/4 -1 
Scars 54 3/8 -1/2 

UAL 63 7/8 +3 3/8 

Walgreens 42 1/2 -3/4 
WMXTech. 32 . -1 3/8 
Cherry Elec 13 1/4 +1/4 
Brvvn. Ferris 31 1/8 -5/8 

AT&T lost over 12 percent of 
their value after annoucnlng 
that first quarter earnings would 
be lower than expected. 

Stock Watch provided by 
Noah Seidenberg of Edward D. 
Jones & Co., Grayslake. 



US Cable of Lake County has 
announced its participation with 
local authorities in an amnesty 
campaign to educate and inform 
consumers about cable theft. US 
Cable estimates that theft of 
cable service costs the system 
more than $3,901,791, and 
$195,090 in lost franchise fees for 
the community. 

Amnesty will be granted to all 
consumers who are illegally 
receiving cable services without 
payment. This includes all illegal 
connections to the system, the 
use of unauthorized descramling 
equipment or receipt of other 
services which are not being paid 
for. 



Amnesty will be granted until 
March 31. After that date, US 
Cable will begin an audit of the 
entire cable system to secure all 
services. At that time, any unau- 
thorized services that are discov- 
ered will be turned over to the 
local police department and the 
Lake County States Attorney's 
office for prosecution to the 
fullest extent of the law. 

Theft of cable service is a vio- 
lation oflllinois law, punishable 
by up to six months in jai! and 
fines of $1,000. In addition, US 
Cable reserves the right to file 
civil charges against any illegal 
users of its service for back pay- 
ment of services received for 



IRS trained volunteers 
offer free tax help 



Free tax help is now available 
from IRS trained volunteers at sev- 
eral locations throughout Lake 
County. 

Tax assistance has been spon- 
sored through the IRS Volunteer 
Income Tax Assistance (VITA) and 
Tax Counseling for the Elderly 
(TCE) programs for over 25 years. 
Last year, almost 147,000 Illinois 
taxpayers were assisted through 
VITA and TCE. These programs 
assist lower and middle income, 
handicapped, non-English speak- 
ing and elderly taxpayers at loca- 
tions in their own community. 

Each year IRS tax specialists 
conduct training classes for hun- 
dreds of volunteers who then pre- 
pare individual tax returns free of 
charge for Illinois residents. Some 
volunteer sites also offer free elec- 
tronic filing. 

The volunteer sites are conve- 
niently located in churches, com- 
munity centers, libraries and 
seniors centers. 

Bring your tax package, Forms 
W-2 and 1099, and any other tax 
records when visiting a VITA /TCE 
site. Some sites may require an 
appointment, so it's best to phone 
first. 

Following is a list of sites in the 
Lake County area. Those sites offer- 
ing free electronic filing are indicat- 
ed with "ELF." 

• Barrington library (TCE), 505 
Northwest Hwy., Wednesday from 
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Call 381-5030. 

• Fox Lake Library (TCE), 255 E. 



consumers who do not take 
advantage of amnesty. 

In making the announce- 
ment, US Cable General 
Manager Paul Ashley said "Cable 
theft is a serious crime that influ- 
ences all aspects of our business. 
The revenues lost to cable theft 
can impact the quality of ser- 
vices consumers receive as well 
as our ability to offer new ser- 
vices in the future. We feel a 
tremendous commitment to 



Grand Ave., Tuesdays from 1 to 4 
p.m., walk-in. 

• Warren Newport Library, 225 
O'PIaine Rd. (TCE/ELF), Mondays 
and Fridays, Call 244-5150. 

• Highland Park Senior Center, 
VITA, 54 Laurel Ave., Mondays 
through Fridays from 9 a.m. to 5 
p.m. Call 432-4110. 

• Gorton Senior Center (TCE), 
400 E. Illinois, Lake Forest, 
Mondays, Thursdays, Fridays. Call 
234-2209. 

• Ela Library and Harry K. Civic 
Center, TCE, 135 S. Buesching Rd., 
Lake Zurich, Wednesdays, noon to 
4 p.m. Call 526-2631. 

• Community Senior Center, 
135 W. Church, Libertyville, 
Mondays and Tuesdays from 9 a.m. 
to noon. 

• Mundelein Senior Center, 200 
W. Maple, Mundelein, Tuesdays 
from 9 a.m. to noon, walk-in. 

• Fremont Library, 40 N. Lake 
St., Mundelein, Tuesdays, noon to 
3:30 p.m. Call 208-6673. 

• North Chicago Community 
Center, Argonne Drive and Lewis 
Ave., North Chicago, Mondays 
from 1 to 4 p.m. Call 288-21 17. 

• Round Lake Senior Center, 
814 Hart Rd., Round Lake, Fridays 
from 9 a.m. to noon. Call 516-0056. 

• Lake Villa Dist. Library, 1001 E. 
Grand Ave., Mondays from 1 to 4 
p.m., walk-in. 

• Wauconda Library, 00 1 N. 
Main St., Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 
noon, and Tuesdays from noon to 3 
p.m.. Call 438-0303. 



securing our system and to our 
paying customers." 

"Our business is to bring 
entertainment and information 
to our paying customers, but 
when that objective is at risk, we 
must take these aggressive steps 
to protect our product. I know 
that the cooperative effort with 
the local authorities will enhance 
our efforts greatly and I thank 
them for their commitment," 
Ashley added. 




Sen. Adeline Geo-Karis and guest search for the winning 
ruby during 'An Affair of the Heart' gala. 

'An Affair of the Heart' 
gala raises $100,000 

Saint Therese Medical Center Foundation held their 13th 
annual Affair of the Heart at the Marriott Lincolnshire Resort. 
The benefit gala raised $100,000 for Saint Therese Medical 
Center. Those funds will be used for various projects within the 
medical center. 

The evening saw the first Champagne Surprise contest. "The 
champagne glasses were filled with gems worth $40 to $300. 

Each numbered glass was bought for $30 and in one of the 
glasses was the contest winner, a $2,200 ruby. Dr. Rodney 
I laenschen of the Northern Illinois Emergency Physicians was 
the big winner," said Tim Selz-, Saint Therese Medical Center 
president. 

The silent auction was a success as well. "We had everything 
from golf clubs to a diamond slide to framed baseball cards. 
Everything went," said Marguerite Turpel, Saint Therese 
Medical Center Foundation board member. 

The guests included Illinois Senator Adeline Geo-Karis, 
Waukegan Mayor Bill Durkin, former Lake County Board 
Chairman Robert Dcpkc and State Representative Terry Link, as 
well as doctors, employees, and business people from all over 
Lake County. 

The $100,000 raised will be used by the hospital to purchase 
high-tech equipment or support the expansion of the hospital 
or its programs. 

For more information or to become a member of the Saint 
Therese Medical Center Foundation, call 360-2183. 





MARch7, 1997 UkcUNd Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 1^ 



Legal check-up can prevent problems down the road 



Most people have a family 
doctor— a general practitioner 
they can call on for many of their 
health needs. But, fewer people 
have their own attorney to handle 
general legal matters, even 
though their legal well-being may 
suffer as a result, according to 
Ralph Gabric, president of the 
34,000 member Illinois State Bar 
Association and a partner in the 
Wheaton law firm of Gabric, 
Millon and Ory. 

"Many people decide to seek 
help from an attorney only after a 
legal problem occurs," says 
Gabric. "By this time, an easy 
solution to the problem may not 
be possible. In law, as in medi- 
cine, an ounce of prevention is 
worth a pound of cure." • 

Most people do not have fre- 
quent need for legal services, but 
there are certain events in every- 
one's life when legal advice is 
indispensable, Gabric continues. 
The most common legal services 
are for buying or selling a home, 
making an estate plan, starting a 
business, or dealing with that 
dreaded traffic ticket, he says. 

"When the need to have a 
legal advocate arises suddenly, it 
is far better to have a trusted 
advisor than having to turn to a 
complete stranger," he contin- 
ues. 

Gabric says that most gener- 
al practitioners will provide an 
initial consultation with a 
prospective client for either a 
nominal fee or no fee. This is an 
opportunity to review the legal 
status and to begin a professional 



relationship that can save time, 
money and unnecessary hard- 
ships in the future. 

"Surveys indicate that many 
people are hesitant to see a 
lawyer, even when they know 
they have a legal problem," he 
says. "Perhaps they are unfamil- 
iar with the services provided by 
lawyers or are fearful of the cost. 
In many cases, delay may mean 
the problem will be more expen- 
sive to resolve or can no longer be 
resolved." 

An extreme example of this is 
in estate planning. Statistics 
reveal that three out of four peo- 
ple die without leaving a will or 
other instructions for distributing 
their property and possessions, 
according to Gabric. In the 
absence of a properly executed 
will, an estate is distributed 
according to formula contained 
in state law that may or may not 
be appropriate for the surviving 
family. 

There are other legal reme- 
dies that are subject to statutes of 
limitations. Failure to take action 
within a specified time can result 
in a loss of the right to the reme- 
dy, he says. 

During an initial consulta- 
tion with a lawyer, Gabric advises 
discussing fees. "For most ser- 
vices, a lawyer should be able to 
tell what the cost will be or pro- 
vide an estimate," he says. 

"Having a lawyer means hav- 
ing someone to represent one's 
best interests when the need aris- 
es. A lawyer offers his or her time, 
expertise, and loyalty. A lawyer 



must abide by the Rules of concludes. "The General Practitioner" and 

Professional Conduct which The Illinois State Bar "Know Your Lawyer," write the 

require, among other things, that Association has free brochures ISBA Public Affairs Dept., 

a lawyer must have no conflicting that explain how to find and work Illinois Bar Center, Springfield, 

loyalties to other persons," he with a lawyer. To obtain copies of IL 62701. 




'Capone and Caviar' fundraiser set March 15 

The Holy Family Women's Board will host their "Capone and Caviar" Gala fund-raiser March 
15 at the Rosemont Convention Center. The event is orchestrated by Holy Family's Women's 
Board and is the Medical Center's largest t'undraising activity each year drawing crowds of" 300- 
500 from surrounding communities. Last year, funds raised by the Women's Board from the gala 
totaled more than $80,000. Members of the board include: Debbie Mattan of Libertyviile, pres- 
ident and co-chair of the gala; Barbara Raff of Long Grove, immediate past president & gala 
reservations chair; Mary Jobski of Mt. Prospect, gala chair: and Cathie Lauth of Riverwoocls, sec- 
retary and invitations chair. For more information on the gala call, 847) 297-1 BOO. ext. 1118. 




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BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE UkEUwd Newspapers MarcIi 7, 1997 



CLC board approves contract to look to 21st century needs 



The College of Lake County 
Board of Trustees authorized the 
college administration to hire a 
facilitator to conduct a process 
called "Future Search" that will 
help the college plan to meet the 
needs of the next century, 

The board approved a contract 
for $25,000 with The Nova Group, a 
consulting company in St. Paul, 
Minn., and its executive director 
Monica Manning, to design and 
facilitate the process, which will 
involve college staff, students and 
Lake County community members 
in a "Future Search Conference" 
that will be held by the end of 1997. 
Participants in the conference will 
review the college's past, explore 
present concerns and assess future 
needs and issues. Based on this 
analysis, they will identify a "pre- 
ferred future" for the college and 
then recommend action plans. 
These plans will be incorporated 
into the college's existing planning 



process as it formulates future goals 
and objectives. The "Future 
Search" process has been success- 
fully implemented by several com- 
munity colleges and four-year uni- 
versities. 

In other action, the board 
adopted a proposal establishing 
tuition and fees for fiscal years 

1998, 1999 and 2000. Under the 
new proposal, die in-district tuition 
per credit hour will remain at the 
present rate of $47 for fiscal years 
1998 and 1999. 

Tuition will be increased to $48 
in fiscal year 2000. The board also 
approved a technology fee of $1 per 
credit hour beginning in fiscal year 

1999. Additionally, the board 
increased the student senate's 
share of the $4 comprehensive fee 
from the current $1.25 to $1.30 per 
credit hour, effective in fiscal year 
1998, to support student clubs and 
expand student activities and ser- 
vices. 



In other business, the board 
accepted a $3,000 grant from the 
Illinois Campus Compact for 
Community Service (ICCCS) and a 
$1,000 grant from the Illinois Dept. 
of Transportation (IDOT). The 
ICCCS grant will provide stipends 
for two faculty members and two 
students to develop projects that 
will be integrated into computer 
science and horticulture course 
curricula for middle schools. Upon 
completion, the project will be pilot 
tested by 30 CLC students at 
Stanton Middle School in Fox Lake. 
The IDOT grant will be used to 
bring a Dodge Neon car, equipped 
with a drunk driving simulator, to 
the college on April 15 to promote 
prevention of drunk driving. 

In other action, the board 
adopted a new policy titled 
Responsible Use of Information 
Technology that establishes guide- 
lines for appropriate use of the col- 
lege's communications equipment, 



CaIencJar of Events 



History of the '99s 

On March 13 Mary Foley and 
Virginia Rabung, members of the 
Aux Plaines Chapter of "The '99s," 
which is one of the 20 chapters in 
the Midwest, will be the guest 
speakers at the monthly meeting of 
the American Assn. of University 
Women. The meeting will be at 7:30 
p.m. at the l.ibertyville Twp. hall, 
359 Merrill Crl., Libertyville. 
"History of the '99s" is a look at the 
history of women in aviation. The 



ladies will share first hand flight 
experience. 

For further information, call 
Marilyn Schaefer at 367-6505. 

Waters of Lake County 

"The Water of Lake County" is a 
one-day workshop for educators 
and group leaders interested in 
aquatic management. The work- 
shop will be held on Friday, March 
14 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Univ. 
of Illinois Cooperative Extension 



Services office, 100 S. Hwy. 45, 
Grayslake. 

Attendees will learn to identify 
the types of aquatic systems found 
in Lake County and develop skills 
necessary to implement aquatic 
based educational programs. A 
sample curriculum, 

Fee for attending is $5, which 
includes lunch and educational 
materials. 

For reservations, call Ingrid 
West at 360-6747. 



software and networks, including 
telephones, computers, fax 
machines, Internet and electronic 
mail systems, video conferencing 
and satellite transmission systems. 

Prior to the meeting, the board 
held a hearing on the college's pro- 
posal to issue limited tax bonds in 
die amount of $7 million to cover 
the cost of early retirement incen- 
tives and technology acquisition. 
The board adopted a resolution of 
intent to issue bonds at its January 
meeting and is expected to approve 
the First bond sale at the March 
board meeting. 

In purchasing, the board 
approved the purchase of a com- 

Schemes— 

From C6 
someone else. 

• The next step is to evaluate 
whether the company is more 
focused on tangibles (products 
and/or services) or intangibles 
(building mass by creating huge 
down lines). Long-term success 
will depend on tangibles. No one 
builds real wealth unless some- 
one in the down line is selling 
product. You can only maintain 
sales year after year with quality 
and value. 

• Finally, take a good look at 
the company. Is the firm one with 
a proven track record? Has is sur- 
vived the test of time? There is a 
downside here. Recent research 
shows that those folks who 



puterized mail management sys- 
tem from Neopost of Rolling 
Meadows for $24,414.55. 

. The board also approved the 
purchase of disk storage hardware 
from EMC2 of Park Ridge for 
$358,750; heating, ventilation and 
air conditioning equipment from 
York International Corp. of 
Wheeling for $119,000; and an 
annual lease of IBM software from 
IBM Corp. of Chicago for $59,000. 

Finally, the board approved a 
proposal to keep the college open 
five days a week this summer while 
allowing employees a four-day flex- 
ible work week beginning June 9 
and ending Aug. 1 



become pint of a multi-level mar- 
keting program early on have bet- 
ter than average odds of achiev- 
ing real wealth from the venture. 
There are analysts who believe 
you've waited too long, if you 
wait to see a firm develop a 
proven record. 

I wish you well with your 
efforts. If you decide to jump in, 
please don't try to sign me up. 
I've already got all the opportuni- 
ties I can manage. I would, how- 
ever, enjoy hearing about your 
success. 

Editor's note: Don Taylor is the 
co-author of "Up Against the Wal- 
Marts." Write to him in care of 
"Minding Your Own Business," 
P.O. Box 67, Amarillo, TX 79105. 



Bank & Finance 




Lakeland 



Newspapers 



Tax-free investments can be good 
way to achieve higher returns 



Would you believe that you can make* 
exceptional profits on paper, yet gradually 
be losing wealth? 

Hven though your investments may 
appear to be providing competitive rates 
or return, their "real returns" may be 
much less. Real return is what your 
investment provides after you consider 
inflation and taxes. 

H. Garrett 
Thornburgjr., an 
investment adviser 
managing more than 
$5 billion in assets, 

illustrates real return with a hypothetical 
dollar invested in the Standard & Poor's 
(S&P) Index of 500 stocks in 1925. 
Seventy years later, that dollar would have 
grown to about $1,114. Take out infla- 
tion, taxes and expenses, however, and 
that dollar would now be worth about 
$27. 

Here's another way to illustrate real 
return; From 1966 through 1995, after 
deducting taxes, inflation and expenses, 
the S&P 500 provided an average annual 
return of about 2 percent. 

Part of the reason for this is taxes. 
When investing in stocks and mutual 
funds, you pay taxes on your dividends. 
Your tax rate (along with the inflation rate 
and any investment expenses) must be 
factored into the dividend yield to obtain 
your real return each year. 

You also owe taxes if you realize a gain 
when you sell the investment. If your 
investment's value has appreciated, you 
will lose up to 28 percent of that increase 
to capital gains taxes. 

Commissions and annual expenses 
also reduce your real return, and inflation 
takes a bite, too. Over the past decade, 



FilNAINCiAl Focus 



inflation has averaged 3.47 percent, which 
is low by historical standards, but it still 
has a major impact on your investment 
returns. 

What's an investor to do? You can't do 
much about inflation (that's the Federal 
Reserve's job), but you may be able to 
minimize taxes. 

Ifyou'reinthe28 
percent lax bracket or 
higher, you should 
consider the advan- 
tages of tax-exempt 
investments, such as 
tax-free bonds, mutual funds and unit 
investment trusts. 

For example, you can find intermedi- 
alc-tcrm tax-free bonds paying about 5.1 
percent. With inflation at about 3 percent 
today, your real return (before expenses) 
is about 2.1 percent — by historical stan- 
dards, an attractive real return Tor a con- 
servative investment. 

Tax-deferred vehicles are another way 
to reduce current taxes and improve real 
returns. 

With pension and profit-sharing plans, 
401 (k)s and IRAs, you can invest in high- 
er-paying taxable investments while shel- 
tering them from current taxes. 

As baby boomers age, increases in 
Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security 
seem imminent — and those increases 
will likely be paid for with higher taxes. 
For this reason, it will become even more 
important for investors to focus on real 
returns. Tax-free Investments can be a 
good way to achieve higher real returns. 
Editor's note: Editorial submitted by 
Noah Seidenberg, investment representa- 
tive for Edward Jones in Grayslake. For 
questions call Jones at, 223-1908, 




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MarcN 7, 1997 UkdANd Newspapers BANK & FINANCE 




Bank & Hnance 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Take advantage of several 
tax-savings opportunities 



Whether you're working for a company, 
running your own business, or even looking 
for a job, you can improve your bottom line 
by taking advantage of some tax-savings 
opportunities. To get started, the Illinois CPA 
Society provides answers to some of the com- 
mon questions that small business owners 
and employees are likely to have about busi- 
ness-related tax issues. 

Q.As a self-employed consultant, can 
I deduct the cost of meals I eat alone 
wlille traveling away from home or only 
those eaten with business associates? 

A. If the primary purpose of your trip is 
business, meal expenses are deductible 
whether you eat alone or with business asso- 
ciates. 

However, as with all business meals, you 
may only deduct 50 percent of the cost. 

Q. Since I'm always bringing work 
home from the office, I bought a home 
computer. As an employee, can I deduct 
the cost of my computer? 

A. You may be eligible to claim a first-year 
expensing deduction for your computer if 
you meet certain requirements. 

According to tax law, you must use the 
computer over 50 percent nf the time for 
business, and it must be placed in your home 
for the convenience of your employer. It also 
must be required as a condition of your 
employment so you can properly perform 
your duties as an employee. If you meet these 
requirements, you may expense the cost of 
the business portion of the property. 

. Q. Is It true that I no longer need 
receipts to document travel and enter- 
tainment expenses under $75. 

A. That's right. The IRS no longer requires 



you to keep receipts for business-related trav 
el and entertainment expenses under $75. 
But in the event of an audit, you still will need 
to substantiate your expenses. So, be sure 
your records reflect the date, location, and 
amount, as well as the name of the person 
entertained and the business purpose of the 
entertainment. 

Q. I've heard 1 may be able to save 
taxes by structuring my new business as 
a Limited Liability Partnership (LLP). 
What Is an LLP and how can It help me? 

A. An LLP is a form of legal entity that 
combines the liability protection of a corpo- 
ration with the tax advantages of a partner- 
ship. Like a corporation, an LLP protects its 
owners from personal liability for the compa- 
ny's debts. But, an LLP is taxes like a partner- 
ship, which means that LLP owners report 
income on their personal returns and pay tax 
at their own individual rates. 

Q. I Incurred substantial job hunting 
expenses last year when I decided to 
switch careers. Arc these tax deductible? 

A. No. In order to deduct costs associated 
with job hunting, you must have been seek- 
ing a position in your current line of work. 

Q. For the past 10 years, I have 
deducted expenses related to my home 
office. I'm planning to sell my house 
later this year and roll over the gain 
into a new home. Will my home office 
affect the tax treatment of my sale? 

A. Yes. The area in your home that you 
used as an office is considered business, not 
residential property. That means the part of 
your gain that is allocable to your home office 
does not qualify for the tax-deferred rollover 
and is taxable. 



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1 CLASSIFIED UldANd Newspapers MarcN 7, 1997 



OBITUARIES 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



T 




Newspapers 




MARSH FUNERAL HOME OF LINDENHURST 

1840 E. Grand Ave., Lindenhurst, IL 

(847)265-6611 

Terry H. Marsh, President 

RING A FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 

(847)356-2146 

Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL, I1D. 
AND CREMATORIUM 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake, IL 

(847) 223-8122 

David G. Strang and 

Richard A Gaddis, Director 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

Dan Dugenske, Director 

(847) 395-4000 

K.K. HAMSHER FUNERAL HOME, LTD. 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Rd., Fox Lake, IL 

(847)587-2100 

Kenneth K. Hamsher, Debra Hamsher Glen, 

Directors 



TrIE DEAdlilNE foR ObiTUARlES 
& DEATrl NOTJCES is 

10 a.m. on TuEsdAys. 



Grief mrtes\ 

How can I prevent 
di£Eiculties £rom grieS? 

Many who confront grief for the first time are surprised atl 
Ithe intensity of their feelings. Grief is most often associated! 
with the death of a loved one but is can also result from! 
divorce, loss of bodily function, moving or from child grow-l 
ing up and leaving home. Because grief is poorly understood, 
those who have not experienced it personally can be poor] 
helpers. By learning about grief ahead of time we can more] 
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families. Take time to read and inquire about grief and learn| 
|ways to assist those in need of support. 

%%. Hamsher 

funeral Home Ltd. 



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12 N. Pistakee Lake Road, Fox Lake, Illinois 

-The CfiapeCon tfie Lafig" 

Serving- *ybu sn.Ttytime. . . - fLrtyzofLera 

Phone: (847) 587-2100 • (815) 385-1001 



DEATH Notjces 



rirY 

Christina M. Guy (nee Wayncn), age 40, of Fox Lake 
Ait: K. K. Hamsher Funeral Home, Fox Lake 

GAUIIN 

Matthew Joseph Gaulin, age 4 months, or 
Liberryville .' iM ; 

Arr: Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, Libcrtyville 

TURNBUU : -,•• 

David A. Tumbull, age 5G, of Mundclein 
Arr: Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, Ubertyville 

CUNNINGHAM 

Donald D. Cummingham, age 71, of Antioch 
Arr: Strang Funeral Home ofAntioch 

WESLING 

Bernicc Flo Wcsling, age 96, of Libcrtyville 
Arr: Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, Libcrtyville 

CIUTZ 

Lylc B. Critz, age 30, of Round Lake 

Arr: Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, Libcrtyville 

MC ADAMS 

Bcrnadcttc 'Bernic' McAdams, age 52, of 

Wadsworth 

Arr: Congdon Funeral Home, Zion 

KICK 

Anna Kick, age 93, ofLibertyvillc 

Arr: Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, Libcrtyville 

STROHM 

Irene E. Strohm, age 80, ofGurnee 
Arr: Marsh FunerafHome of Gurnce 



John and Ida (nee Guentert) Bolchert. She came to the 
United States In 1921 through the Port of New York. She 
moved to Chicago In. 1921 and lived In Chicago until 
1939, when Emifie and her husband In 1939 settled in 
Volo. They were the owners of the Fish Lake Beach 
Camping Resort. She was affiliated with the Zion 
Lutheran Church in McHenry. 

She is survived by her daughter, Yvonne (Delmar) 
Maasscl of Volo; grandmother of Yvonne (Randy) Crow 
and Deslrcc Maasscl, both of Volo; great grandmother of 
Christiana and Joshua. She Is preceded in death by her 
husband, Alfred, Nov. 14, 1968; her brother, John 
Bolchert and her sister Yvonne Bolchert. 
• Funeral service was held at Zion Lutheran Church, 
McHenry, with Rev. Thomas Acton officiating. 

Arrangements were made by George R. Justcn and 
Son Funeral Home, McHenry. 

Memorials greatly appreciated to the Zion Lutheran 
Organ Fund. 



Carol Lynn Anderson 

Age 56, of Antioch and Delavan Lake, Wise, died 
Wednesday, Feb. 26, 1997, at Condell Medical Center, 
Libcrtyville. Carol was born Dec. 27, 1940 In Chicago, the 
daughter of Lawrence and Evelyn Anderson. She mar- 
ried Donald Anderson, June 25, 1960 in Chicago. Carol 
was the owner of H and R Block of Round Lake. She was 
a member of Sugar Creek Lutheran Church. in rural 
Delavan, Wise. She enjoyed camping, boating, traveling 
and crossword puzzles. 

She is survived by her husband, Donald; one daugh- 
ter, Sue Anderson of Chicago; one son, Michael (Mary) 
Anderson of Round Lake; her mother, Evelyn Anderson 
of Chicago; one grandson, James; a sister, Laurel 
Anderson of Chicago. 

Funeral services were held at Sugar Creek Lutheran 
Church. 

Arrangement were made by Betzer Funeral Home, 
Delavan, Wise, 

Memorials to the church are welcomed. 

Welton A. Stewart 

Age 79, of McHenry, passed away Wednesday, Feb. 
26, 1997, at the Northern Illinois Medical Center in 
McHenry. He was born in Eden, Ala., on March 25, 1918, 
and had made his home in Birmingham, Ala., retiring to 
McHenry the past three years. Mr. Stewart worked for 
the Birmingham, Ala. zoo as a maintenance engineer for 
over 20 years. 

He leaves his son: James (Mary) Stewart of Round 
Lake Beach; six grandchildren and 12 great grandchil- 
dren. Also surviving is his brother: George (Hazel) 
Stewart and two sisters: Mildred (LJ.) Layton and Helen 
(Itaymon) Smith all of Pell City, Ala. He is preceded In 
death by his wife: Marie in 1990 and a grand daughter 
JoAnnain 1905. 

Funeral services were held in Adamsvllle, Ala. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake. 

Emilie C. Kcil 

Age 93, of Volo, died Wednesday, Feb. 26, 1997, n her 
residence. Emilie was horn in Germany, July 10, 1903, to 



Strang JuneraC ChapeC, Ltd. 
& Crematorium >titab(uht.d mn 



William E. Wilcox 

Age 08, of Dixon, formerly of Spring Grove, died 
Friday, Feb. 20, 1997, at Kathcrlne Shaw Bethea Hospital. 
He was employed by Illinois Bell Telephone for 52 years 
prior to his retirement in 1973. He was born July 14, 1908 
in Athens Ohio, the son of William C. and Laura Dell 
(Hatfield) Wilcox. He married Ruth Agnes KJellen, Sept. 
24, 1932 in Porter County, Ind., she preceded him in 
death on Aug. 26, 1960. William was a member of the 
Spring Grove American Legion and VFW. 

Survivors include a son, Robert N. Wilcox of Spring 
Grove; sister, Ruth (Richard) Jacoby of Marietta, Ohio; 
sister-in-law, Virginia Murray of Sycamore; five grand- 
children and seven great grandchildren. He Is also pre- 
ceded in death by a brother. 

Private funeral services were held at the Preston- 
Schilling Funeral Home, Dixon. 

Arrangements were made by Preston-Schilling 
Funeral Home, Ltd., Dixon. 

Cremation rites will be accorded. There was no visi- 
tation. 



Palmer Claren Hagen 

Age 82, of Round Lake, passed away Friday, Feb. 28, 
1997, at theSi.Thcrese Medical Center in Waukegan. He 
was born Jan. 12, 1915, in Albert Lea, Minn., making his 
home in Round Lake since 1944, formerly of Mt. Carmcl. 
He was a member of the Waukegan Musicians Union for 
over 20 years and a former band member of the "Golden 
Tones," which played throughout the Chicagoland area. 
Palmer, retired In 1978 from the Frank G. Hough Co., in 
Libcrtyville. 

He leaves his wife: Pauline A. (nee NorrJck) whomlie'!, 
mnrrled on May 27, 1937, In Mt. Gunnel; two daughters: 
Dixie Lcc Pawlowskl of Undcnhurst and Bonnie (Peter) 
Pedersen of Lake Villa; a son: Lee (Carolyn) Hagen of 
Coppclt, Tex., and seven grandchildren. He Is preceded 
in death by his parents and two brothers. 

Funeral services were held at the Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake, with the Rev. 
Lisle J. Kauffman of the Calvary P/esbyterian Church of 
Round Lake officiating. *** 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake 

Interment was at the Fort Hill Cemetery in Round 

Lake. 

Memorials may be given to the church in his mem- 




"WE CARE" 

410%. (BeCvidere %gad 
Qrayslafg, IL 60030 

847-223-8122 

David G. Strang-Richard A. Gaddis 

'DIRECTORS 



ory. 



Ilwood 'Woody' Miller 

Age SB, of Antioch, passed away Friday, Feb. 2B, 
1997, on arrival at Victory Memorial Hospital, 
Waukegan. He was born Sept. 26, 1930, in Chicago, mov- 
ing to Antioch in 1983. Woody served in the U.S. Marine 
Corp. from 1956 until 1959. He was a Union Flat Worker 
Mason and a member of the Lake Co. Cement Masons 
Union 3C2. On April 15, 1966, he married Betty Waldorf 
in Grayslake. , ,_. . 

Survivors include his wife Betty, a son. )oe (Ginny) 
Miller ofAntioch; three daughters, Terry (Bart) Beck of 
Highland, Tex., Dawn (Kenny) Davis of Beach Park; and 
Denisc (Steven) McCollum of Lake Villa; five grandchil- 
dren, Stacy, Samantha, Tommy, Jacob and Katie and one 
brother, Ken (Ann) Miller of Kenosha, Wise. 

Funeral services were held at Strang Funeral Home 
of Antioch with the Rev. David Groleau of Antioch 
Evangelical Free Church officiating. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Home, 

Inc., Antioch 

Interment was at Millburn Cemetery, Millburn. 

William J. Butcnschoen 

Age 79, of Waukegan, passed away Sunday, March 2, 
1997, at Victory Memorial Hospital, Waukegan, following 
a brief illness, lie was born in Des Plaines, July 13, 1917 
and had resided in Lake County for the past 47 years. On 
June 2, 1956, he was united in marriage to Dolores M. 
Stang In Waukegan. He retired from Abbott Laboratories, 
Waukegan, after <10 years of service in July 1982. He was 
a member of First Presbyterian Church, Waukegan. He 
was an avid bowler participating in many competitions. 

He leaves his wife Dolores "Dee" of Waukegan; a 
daughter, Ardis Ash, Hoffman Estates; and a son William 
(Joan) ihitcnschocn, Woodstock; several in-laws, nieces 
and nephews. He is preceded in death by his parents and 
a son, Jack. 

Funeral services were offered at Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium, Grayslake, with Rev. David 
Eikenhcrry, Pastor First Presbyterian Church, Waukegan 
officiating. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake Interment was 
at Lakeside Cemetery, Libcrtyville. 

In lieu of (lowers, donations may be made to First 
Presbyterian Church, Waukegan or to Waukegan Rescue 
Squad or to Grayslake Rescue Squad in his memory. 
See OBITUARIES page CI 1 



Marc* 7, 1997 UkElANd Newspapers CLASSIFIED 




LEGAL NOTICES 



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Newspapers 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

WARREN TOWNSHIP 

Notice Is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at 

Ihe office of Town Clerk at 17801 West Washington Street, 

Gurnse, Illinois 60O31 until 8:00 o'clock A.M., on March 18, 1997 

for furnishing of the following equipment: 

One (1) New 1997 Conventional Truck Cab & Chassls- 
GMC Model C7H042 or approved equal - no trade. 
One (1) New 1997 Conventional Truck Cab & Chassis- 
GMC Model C7H042 or approved equal • with trade. 
Proposals shall be made on forms furnished by the Township 
Highway Commissioner, and shall be addressed In a seated enve- 
lope to Warren Township Highway Department, c/o James 
Sammon, Town Clerk and shall be marked "Equipment Proposal - 
Letting of March 18, 1997 (8:00 a.m.) Warren Township". Further 
information regarding the letting may be obtained by contacting 
the Highway Commissioner at (847) 244-1101. 

The Township In accordance with the laws of the State of Illinois 
hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively Insure that the 
contract entered Into pursuant to this advertisement will be award- 
ed to the lowest responsible bidder without discrimination on the 
ground of race, color or national origin. 

By order of /a /Gerald E. Rudd 

Warren Township Highway Commissioner 

0397A-669-GEN 

March 7, 1997 



PUBUC NOTICE 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE 19TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 
LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
HOUSEHOLD BANK, FSB 

Plaintiff, 
v. 

CARY I- CYBUL AND KATHLEEN A. CYBUL, HARDWOOD 
UNLIMITED, INC., WEST END HEATING AND AIR CONDITION- 
ING, INC., WINDY CITY INSULATION, INC., STATE OF ILLINOIS. 
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND 
NONRECORD CLAIMANTS, 
Defendants. 

No. 95 CH 644 
AFFIDAVIT FOR PUBLICATION 
Timothy E. Wellandt, being first duly sworn on oath, deposes 
and says that he Is one of the attorneys for Plaintiff In the above- 
entitled action and Plaintiff's agent in this behalf and Is duly autho- 
rized to make this Affidavit. 

Deponent further says that he has made due and diligent 
Inquiry to find the following defendants to this action, and to ascer- 
tain their respective places of residence, to wit: UNKNOWN OWN- 
ERS AND NONRECORD OWNERS; that upon due inquiry such 
defendants cannot be found nor can any of them, so that process 
cannot be served upon any of them, nor on diligent Inquiry can the 
place of residence of any of them be ascertained, nor can the 
pioco, whoro any of, thorn has porotofora rosldod be ascertained. 
AND DEPONENT FURTHER SAYETH NOT. 

/s/ Timothy E.Woilandt 

Timothy E. Weilandt 

McCarthy, Duffy. Neldhart, Snakard 

Firm No. 90533 

180 North LaSallo Street 

Suite 1400 



PUBUC NOTICE 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 
IN THE CIRCUS COURT FOR THE 19TH JUDICIAL DISTHICT 

LAKE COUNTY - WAUKEGAN, ILLINOIS 
BANK OF AMERICA, F. S.B., PLAINTIFF, 
VS. 

WOLFGANG H. RIEDL; THERESA A RIEDL; CHICAGO TITLE 
AND TRUST COMPANY; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON- 
RECORD CLAIMANTS; DEFENDANTS. 

NO. 96 CH 1059 
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION 

NOTICE IS GIVEN YOU, THERESA A RIEDL; UNKNOWN 
OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS: defendants, that 
this case has been commenced In this Court against you and 
olher defendanls, asking for the foreclosure of a certain Mortgage 
conveying the premises described as follows, to-wit: 

Lot 636 In College Trail Unit 4 being a subdivision of part of 
the west Half of the Northwest Quarter of Section 25 and of the 
Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 24, both 
In Township 45 North, Range 10 East of the Third Principal. 
Meridian, according to the plat thereof recorded January 16, 
1992, as Document 3105350 in Lake County, Illinois. 

COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1193 BLACKBURN DRIVE, 
GRAYSLAKE, IL 60030 and which said Mortgage was made by, 
WOLFGANG H. RIEDL; THERESA A RIEDL; Mortgagor(s), to, 
MARGARETTEN & COMPANY, INC., Mortgagee, and recorded 
in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of LAKE County, Illinois, as 
Document No. 3246447; and for other relief, 

UNLESS YOU file your answer or otherwise file your appear- 
ance in this case in the Office of the Clerk of this Court, Ms. Sally 
CotfBll, CLERK OF THE COURT, 18 North County Street, 
Waukegan, Illinois 60085, on or before March 31, 1997, A JUDG- 
MENT OR DECREE BY DEFAULT MAY BE TAKEN AGAINST 
YOU FOR THE RELIEF ASKED IN THE COMPLAINT. 

WITNESS. February 20, 1997 

/s/Sally 0. Coffelt 

(Clerk of the Circuit Court) 



0297D-653-GL 

February 2B, 1997 

March 7, 1997 

March 14, 1997 



SUBSCRIBED AND SWORN TO 
before mo this 31 day of August, 1995. 
/s/Donna Birmingham 
Notary Public 
"OFFICIAL SEAL' 



Chicago, IL 60601 
(312) 726-0355 



0397A-668-GEN 

March 7. 1997 

March 14, 1997 

March 21, 1997 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Midwest Engineering Consultants. 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR 
TRANS-ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 21234 W. Commercial Dr., 
Mundelein. IL (847) 918-9886. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR RESIDENCE ADDRESS- (ES) 
OF THE PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCTING OR TRANSACT- 
ING BUSINESS: George Bowman, 203 Arcadia Dr.. Vernon Hills, 
IL 847-362-9034. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify lhat the undersigned Intendfs) to conduct ihe 
above named business from the location(s) indicated and that the 
true or real full name(s) of the person(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business is/are correct as shown. 
George Bowman 
February 11, 1997 

The foregoing instrument was acknowledged before me by the 
person(s) intending to conduct the business this 1 1th day of 
February, 1997. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Richard M. Bilof, Ph, D. 

Notary Public 

Received: Feb. 17, 1997 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0297D-648-VH 

February 28, 1997 

March 7, 1997 

March 14, 1997 



-ObiTUARJES 



From page CIO 

Glen L. Bachan 

Age 40 years, of Antioch, passed away Saturday, 
March 1, 1997, at Victory Memorial Hospital, Waukegan, 
after an extended illness. He was born April 23, 1956 in 
Chicago, the son of Jerry and Lillian (Chamcrlik) 
Bachan, moving to Antioch in 1978. Before his illness, 
Glenn worked as a installer of office furniture. 

Survivors include his parents: Jerry and Lillian 
Bachan of Antioch; a sister, Deborah Ralson of Des 
Plaines; an aunt, Bessie Bachan and three uncles, 
William, Hillard and Ronald Chamerlik and several 
nieces and nephews. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Home, 
Inc. of Antioch. 

Interment was private. 

Donations will be appreciated to the Leukemia 
Research Foundations, 4761 W. Touhy Ave., Suite 211, 
Lincolnwood, IL 60646-9802, in his memory. 

Frankl. Pohnan 

Age 81, of Gurnee, passed away on Tuesday, March 
4, 1997, at Victory Memorial Hospital in Waukegan. 
Frank was born and raised in Chicago and has been a 
resident of Gurnee for the past 19 years, formerly of 
Round Lake Park. He retired in 1900 from the Goodyear 
Tire Co. of North Chicago, after several years of service. 

He leaves his daughter, Francine Reed of Waukegan 
and son, Patrick Pohnnn of Gurnee; two grandchildren, 
Elizabeth and Charlotte and one great grand daughter, 
Ceslie. He is preceded In death by his wife, Josephine In 
1959; parents and three brothers. 

Funeral blessing was offered at the Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium, Ltd, Graysiake, with the Rev. 
Robert Beavcn of St. Gilbert Catholic Church, Graysiake 
officiating. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Graysiake 

Interment was at St. Joseph Cemetery, Round Lake. 

Memorials may be given to the family in his memory. 



Ernest M. Vera 

Age 45, of Graysiake, passed away on Monday, 
March 3, 1997. He has been a resident of Graysiake for 
the past 19 years, formerly of Chicago. Ernest was 
employed with the Conserv FS Co. of Wauconda. 

He leaves his wife, Mary and a son, Michael Vera, 
both of Graysiake. He is preceded In death by his parents 
and son Tony E. Vera, May 22, 1995. 

Funeral services were held at Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Graysiake with the Rev. Lisle J. 
Kauffman of Calvary Presbyterian Church, Round Lake 
officiating. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Graysiake 

Interment was at Avon Centre Cemetery, Graysiake. 

Memorials may be given to the Kidney Foundation 
in his memory. 

Geraldine A. Wittmer 

Age 71, of Bristol, Wise, passed away on Feb. 28, 
1997, at her residence, after a long illness. She was bom 
July 26, 1925 in Chicago, to John A. and Gertrude M. 
(Palmer) Carlson. She moved to Kenosha, Wise, after liv- 
ing in the Chicago suburbs for 42 years. She was 
employed as an auditor at Charmglow, and also at 
Lottery and Foods Unlimited, before retiring in 1996. 

She Is survived by her second husband Charles 
Wittmer, whom she married, August 1978; two daugh- 
ters, April Ismael of Kenosha and Spring Graves of 
Spring Grove; one brother, Eldon A. Carlson, four grand- 
children, one great grandchild. She is preceded in death 
by her parents, her first husband, Arthur E. Robarge; two 
sisters, Elinor Lomax and Nany Carlson. 

Memorial services were held at Good Shepherd 
Lutheran Church, Kenosha, Wise. 

Arrangements were made by Bruch Funeral Home, 
Kenosha, Wise. 

Interment was at All Saints Mausoleum. 

In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate 
memorials be made to Hospice in her memory. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: 

Midwest Precision Repair 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSI- 
NESS IS TO BE CONDUCTED 
OR TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY:7607 Mendocino 
Dr., Gurnee, IL 60031. 548- 
8287. 

NAME{S) AND POST OFFICE 
OR RESIDENCE 

ADDRESSES) OF THE PER- 
SON^) OWNING, CON- 
DUCTING OR TRANSACTING 
BUSINESS: Pena, Randy S., 
7607 Mendocino Dr., Gurnee, 
IL 60031. 548-8287. Celano, 
Gerald B., 662 Independence 
Dr., Palatine, IL 60074. 847- 
776-1931. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This is to certify that the 
undersigned intend(s) to con- 
duct the above named busi- 
ness from the locations) indi- 
cated and that the true or real 
full name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or trans- 
acting the business is/are cor- 
rect as shown. 
Randy J, Pena; 2/8/97 
Gerald B. Celano; 2/8/97 

The foregoing instrument 
was acknowledged before me 
by the person(s) Intending to 
conduct the business this 8th 
day of February, 1997. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Claudia M. Wesson 

Notary Public 

Received: Feb. 10, 1997 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0297C-632-GP 

February 21, 1997 

February 28, 1997 

March 7, 1997 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Mid- 
America Properties. 
AODRESS(ES) WHERE BUSI- 
NESS IS TO BE CONDUCTED 
OR TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 1 134 Hummingbird 
Lane. Graysiake. IL 60030. 
B47-548-1053. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE 
OR RESIDENCE 

ADDRESS(ES) OF THE PER- 
SONS) OWNING, CON- 
DUCTING OR TRANSACTING 
BUSINESS: Consueio Salazar, 
P.O. Box 126, Graysiake, IL 
60030. 847-548-1053. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify that the 
undersigned intend{s) to con- 
duct the above named busi- 
ness from the location (s) indi- 
cated and thai the true or real 
full name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or trans- 
acting the business is/are cor- 
rect as shown. 
Consueio Salazar 
2/10/97 

The foregoing instrument 

was acknowledged before me 

by the person(s) intending to 

conduct Ihe business this 

10th day of February, 1997. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Linda M. Wright 

Notary Public 

Received: Feb. 10, 1997 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0297C-635-GL 

February 21, 1997 

February 28, 1997 

March 7. 1997 



-tr 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
REQUEST FOR BIDS 

FOX LAKE 
FIRE DEPARTMENT 
301 S. RT. 59 
FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS 60020 
The Fox Lake Fire Depart- 
ment will be accepting bids for 
a re chassis of ambulance 
2243. 

Sealed bids will be received 
in the olfice of the Village 
Clerk, 301 S. Routo 59, Fox 
Lake. Illinois 60020 until 10:00 
a.m. on Wednesday, March 
26. 1997. 

Specifications may be picked 
up at Ihe Village Maintenance 
Garage, 216 Washington, 
Ingleside, Illinois 60041. 
Mark the sealed envelope 
'Re chassis (or 2243'. 

Bids will be opened on 
Wednesday, March 26. 1997 
at 10:00 am, In the Council 
Chambers of the Village of Fox 
Lake, 301 S. Rt. 59, Fox Lake, 
Illinois, 60020. 

The right is reserved by the 
Village of Fox Lake to reject 
any or all bids. 

0397A-671-GEN 
March 7, 1997 



PUBUC NOTICE 
Grant Community High 
School District 124 is accept- 
ing bid3 for group major med- 
ical and dental insurance 
effective 9/1/97. Bid specifica- 
tions may be obtained at Grant 
Community High School, 285 
E. Grand Ave., Fox Lake, IL 
60020 in the office of the AssL 
Supt. for Business & 
Operations. Bids are due at 
10:00 a.m. on Friday, April 4, 
1997. 

0397A-662-GEN 
March 7, 1997 



PUBUC NOTICE 
Notice is hereby given that 
the President and Board of 
Trustees of the Village of Long 
Grove shall hold a public hear- 
ing on April 8, 1997 at 8 p.m. 
in the Long Grove Village Hall, 
3110 RFD, Old McHenry 
Road. Long Grove, IL 60047 
for the purpose of presenting 
the 1 997-98 Budget 
Ordinance. 

A draft copy of the 1 997-98 
Budget Ordinance Is on file at 
the Village Offices for review 
by Ihe public during regular 
business hours Monday 
through Friday. 9 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. until the hearing date. 

Any and all persons wish- 
ing to present testimony on 
the 1997-98 Budget 
Ordinance shall be present to 
do so at the hearing. The 
President and Board of 
Trustees of Long Grove 
reserve the right to continue 
the Budget hearing to a lime 
and date certain should that 
become necessary. 
Lenore J. Simmons, President 
Village ol Long Grove 
D.M.'Cal" Doughty, 
Village Manager 
Published: March 7. 1997 
Vernon Hills News 
0397A-670-VH 
March 7. 1997 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Silk-N- 

Haz 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSI- 
NESS IS TO BE CONDUCTED 
OR TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 16 W. Belvidere 
Rd., Hainesville, IL 60030. 
847-223-3166. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE 
W.OR RESIDENCE 

ADDRESS(ES) OF THE PER- 
SON^) OWNING, CON- 
DUCTING OR TRANSACTING 
BUSINESS: Hazel D. Doyle. 
20 Webb St., Graysiake. IL 
60030.847-223-1344. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This is to certify that the 
undersigned intend(s) to con- 
duct the above named busi- 
ness from the locatlon(s) indi- 
cated and that Ihe true or real 
full name{s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or trans- 
acting the business is/are cor- 
rect as shown. 
Hazel D. Doyle 
February 10, 1997 

The foregoing Instrument 

was acknowledged before me 

by the person(s) intending to 

conduct the business this 

10th day ol February. 1997. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Patricia Kassner 

Notary Public 

Received: Feb. 11. 1997 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0297C-636-GL 

February 21. 1997 

February 28. 1997 

March 7. 1997 




PUBUC NOTICE 
Grant Community High . 
School District 124 is accept- 
ing bids for auditing services 
for year ending 6/30/97. Bid 
specifications may be ob- 
tained at Grant Community 
High School, 285 E. Grand 
Ave., Fox Lake, IL 60020 In 
the office of the Asst. Supt. for 
Business & Operations. Bids 
are due at 2:00 p.m. on Friday, 
April 4, 1997. 

0397A-661-GEN 
March 7, 1997 

PUBUC NOTICE 

Notice is hereby given that 
the EXTRA CLOSET, 849 
Anita Street, Antioch, IL 
60002, will sell the personal 
goods from the fallowing units 
lo satisfy the lien of the 
EXTRA CLOSET (Seller) tor 
rental and other charges due. 

Unit-#2195X10. Occupant- 
Myrtle McDuff. Contents- 
Clothes and Lots of Boxes. 

Unit #2421010. Occupant- 
Gina Burns. Contents- Desk, 
Cooler. Suitcase, Wicker 
Baskets. Table. Chairs and 
Boxes. 

Unit #4035x05. Occupant- 
Eugene Krzyzanowski. 
Contents-Picture and Frames, 
Two Tool Boxes, Belt Sander, 
Car Seat and Many Boxes. 

These items and all items 
stored in the above units will 
be sold to the highest bidder 
for cash. Removal of all items 
Irom the premises must be 
within three days from the 
date of sale and a security 
bond posted to cover same. 

Sale will be held on March 
15, 1997. on the premises ol 
The EXTRA CLOSET, 849 
Anita Street. Antioch, IL, 
(Depot & Anita Sts.) at approx- 
imately 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. 
The EXTRA CLOSET 
reserves the right to withdraw 
any or all of the above men- 
tioned items prior to sale. 

NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR 
ACCIDENTS. 

0297D-65S-AR 

February 28, 1997 

March 7, 1997 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Hairs* 
The Look. 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSI- 
NESS IS TO BE CONDUCTED 
OR TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 634 N. Barron 
Blvd., Graysiake, IL 60030. 
847-223-0776. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE 
OR RESIDENCE 

ADDRESS(ES) OF THE PER- 
SON(S) OWNING, CON- 
DUCTING OR TRANSACTING 
BUSINESS: Mary P. Vera, 634 
N. Barron Blvd., Graysiake, IL 
60030. 847-223-0724. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This is to certify lhat the 
undersigned intend(s) to con- 
duct tho above named busi- 
ness from the location(s) indi- 
cated and that the true or real 
full name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or trans- 
acting the business is/are cor- 
rect as shown. 
Mary P. Vera 
February 14, 1997 

The foregoing Instrument 

was acknowledged beloro me 

by the person(s) intending to 

conduct the business this 

14th day of February, 1997. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Linda Wegge Slipke 

Notary Public 

Received: Feb. 21. 1997 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0297D-657-GL 

February 28, 1997 

March 7, 1997 



mm GENERAL LEGAL iMmd Newspapers March 7, 1997 




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ANNOUNCEMENTS 



■■\-\-.'-^.\-yy-vA<y//AV/-j 



Notices „„ „ ........ no 

Lo5l abound 115 

Free 120 

Personals........ ,„,.,...,„.........,....„.,.... .,...12$ 

Auctions .. 130 

Business Personals „ 135 

Financial .. „ „ .... 140 



||pl6yiyte|| 



Hdp Wanted Part-Time 219 

Help Wanted Pull-Ttme r ....220 

Employment Agendo « 221 

Business Opportunities. ».. .....225 

Situations Wanted 228 

Child Care v » 240 

School/Instruction - — 250 






(Vi/\Rkar GuicIe 



Antiques m - 301 

Appliances.., „ ~ ~ 304 

Barter/Trade 308 

Bazaars/Crafts ~ 310 

Building Materials «... ...314 

Business/Office Equipment 318 

ElcdJoolcsyCocnputcrs .....320 

Farm Guide...., 324 

Firewood ....................... ~ „ 328 

Garwe/Ruovnige Sales „.,„..._ ........330 

GoodTntags to EiL — ,„ 334 

Horses ft Tack. 338 

Household Coods/Furrtture. .'.340 

Jewelry .......„, — -,..344 

Lawn/Garden , ; 348 

Miscellaneous » 350 

Medical Equip/Supplies 354 

Musical Instruments 358 

Pets ft Supplies 360 

Restaurant Equipment • 364 

Tools ft Machinery. ...... 368 

Wanted To Buy. — -370 

ReaI Estate 

Homes For Sole.............. ~ -500 

Homes For Rent 504 

Homes Wanted - 508 

Homes Builders 510 

Condo/Toffn Homes «5l4 

Mobile Homes 518 

Apartments For Rent 520 

Apartments Wanted... „. ; .„ - - 524 

Apl/Homes To Share ,'. » .«.- 528 

Rooms For Rent „ 530 

Buildings . 533 

I Business Property For Sale -.-534 

• Business Property For Rent, ,-. 538 

laws imcxii Property 540 

Mortgage Services 544 

Farms „„ 548 

Vacant Lots/Acreage 56*0 

Resorts/Vacation Rentals .,.„ 564 

Out of Area Property „ 568 

Cemetery Lots „ .570 

Real Estate Wanted 574 

Real Estates Mlsc „ 578 



REdREATidNAl 



Recreational Vehldcs 704 

Snowmohiic/ATVj „ „ 708 

Boals/Motors/Elc 710 

Camping ..........714 

Travel/Vacation 718 

Sports Equipment 720 

Airplanes 724 

Transportation 

Can For Sale. 804 

Rental/Leases „ „ 808 

Classic/Antique Cars 810 

Service ft Parts - 814 

Car Loans/Insurance .... - ...818 

Vans.... 824 

Four Wheel Drtvojoeps ..828 

Trucks/Trailers 834 

Heavy Equipment 838 

Motorcycles... , 844 

WantedToBuy. 848 

Service piRECTORy 

Appliances Repair - S03 

Blacktop S06 

Builders S09 

Carpentry S12 

Carpet CI caning S15 

Concrete/Cement S18 

Dry Wall , SZl 

EducaUon/InslrucUoQ S24 

Electrical S27 

Firewood S30 

Handyman S3 J 

Heating/Air Conditioning S36 

Housekeeping S39 

Landscaping S42 

Laundry/deanlng S45 

Legal Services „ S48 

Medical Services S5 1 

Moving/Storage.,,., - S54 

Painting/Decorating SS7 

ParaLegal/TypIng Services S6o 

Plumbing S63 

Poofs „ S66 

Pressure Washing S6°- 

Profcsslonal Services S72 

Itadio/rv Repair. S75 

Remodeling. S78 

Resumes • SB' 

Rooflng/Sldlng S84 

Storage S87 

Tax Service S90 

Trecs/Flanls - S93 

Wedding. i „ , S* 

Miscellaneous Sendees -$99 



disTRiburioN 



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County 

•Bristol 



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•Palatine 




HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD 



X2JI PHONE 




BY 
MAIL 

IN 



| Call (847) 223-8161 

Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 
"' Grayslake, IL 60030 



Buffalo Grove 



Metra 
-^Milwaukee 
RR 



■Hotihbrook 



Cunk County 



Lakeland Newspapers Classifieds Appear in 13 Newspapers! 

Antioch News-Reporter • Round lake News • Lake Zurich Enterprise 

• Lake Villa Record • Mundelem Nero • Wadsworth News • 

Grayslake Times • Fox lake Press • Gurnee Press • Ilndenhurst 

News • Vernon Flills News • Wauconda leader • Iibertyvule News 



PERSON... 30 S.Whitney St. 

Grayslake 

Q| BY FAX ... (847)223-8810 

DEADLINES 

Direct Line ......Tues. 5 pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party ..Wed. 10 am 

HOURS 

8 am - 8 pm Mon.-Thurs 

am - 6 pm Friday 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



110 



Notices 



120 



ftec 



120 



Free 



BECOME A HOST FAMILY 

SCANDINAVIAN. EURO- 
PEAN, SOUTH AMERICAN, 
ASIAN, RUSSIAN HIGH 
SCHOOL EXCHANGE STUD- 
ENTS ARRIVING AUGUST. 
AMERICAN INTERCULTUR- 
AL STUDENT EXCHANGE. 
CALL 1-800-SIBLING. 

DIET MAGIC 
Lose up to 30lbs. 
30 day programs. 

Start at $30. 
(8T5) 675-9237 
teavo mossago. 



•Healthy Women 

Needed 

•Excellent 

Compensation 

Hoalthy woman 35 and under 
and with a history of previous 
pregnancy needod to serve 
as anonymous ogg donors. 
Donors will be required to 
take medication, btood 
screening and undergo minor 
surgical procedure. 

Substantial compensation 
will be given. K Interested 
call ARR, 312-327-7315. 
Serious Inquiries only. 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 
FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 
UMN. For more Information, 
please contact the Humane 
Society. __ 

KOMBUCHA MUSHROOM 
BABY. (847)623-1 295. 

KOMBUCHI MUSH- 
ROOMS. HEALING, 
CLEANSING, DETOXIFYING, 
AIDS IN WEIGHT LOSS. 
FREE. JUST CALL (847) 
•263-3030. 

ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING77 GET HID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad In the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are run at NO 
CHARGE! (We discourage 
any pet ads). Deadlines: 10am 
Wednesdays. (847) 

223-8161.exl.140. 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



125 


i Personals 



ft************ *****•••** 

YOU! 



CAN BE 

"MRS. ILLINOIS 

AMERICA" 

1997 

WIN: A Trip 
To Nationals 

Magnificent 
Wardrobe! 
Fabulous Prizes! \ 

* 
* 

* 

* 
* 

* 

* 




Paige Moseley 

"Mrs. Illinois" 1997 

Official Preliminary 
to 'Mrs. America 



* 
• 

• 
* 
* 
• 
* 
* 
• 



ENTER NOW! 

For your Entry Form Call 
Classic Pageants, Inc. • 
2615 W. 35th Street * 
Oak Brook, II 60521 
(630) 325-5509 



* 
a********************** 



115 



Lost & Pound 



A BABY IS LOVE 

ADOPTION. 

Loving mom, dad and 1yr. old 

sister wilh lots ol love seek 

to share secure homo, 

family and happiness. 

Call collect anytime. 

Jim & Lynn 

(630) 654-2444. 

ADOPT: AN ABUNDANCE 
o! love awaits your baby. Fi- 
nancially secure coupie yoam 
to become a mom & dad. Ex- 
penses paid. Angela & Andy 1 - 
800-631-2644. 

ADOPTION 
SOMETHING WE HAVE 

IN COMMON 

My lather was adopted by a 

loving couple, who provided a 

home lull of love and 

happiness. We will do the 

samo for your child. We have 

not even met you, yet we 

have 

the most Important thing In the 

world In common with 

you...The tove for your child. 

Medical, legal, counseling, 

and court approved living 

expenses paid, confidential. 

Call our Attorney at 

(708) 957-6838. 

HERE'S THE SOLUTION 

TO YOUR NEW YEAR'S 

RESOLUTION!! 

We pay YOU to lose 

weighlll 

30 day $$$-back guarantee. 

100% Natural. 

Dr. Rocommended. 

FREE SAMPLES. 

Call Melody (847) 548-4191. 



MAY THE SACRED Heart ol 
Jesus be adored, glorified, 
loved and preserved through- 
out the world now and forever 
amen. Sacred Heart ot Jesus 
pray tor us. St. Judo Worker of 
Miracles pray tor us. St. Jude 
Helper ot the hopeless pray 
for us. Say this prayer 9 times 
a day for 9 days. On the 8th 
day It will be answered. Thank 
You St. Jude lor prayers an- 
swored. K.H.F. 

MISSING!! 

TINY FAMILY MEMBER. 

You are looking to give your 

baby an opportunity with love, 

wo are looking for an 

opportunity to love a baby. 

Young couple anxious to 

share sun & ski vacations, 

quiet nights In front ot the 

fireplace, puppy romps on 

3 acre yard, large extended 

family, and lots ot LOVE) 

Medical, legal, counseling, 

court approved living 

expenses paid. Confidential. 

Please call our attorney at 

(708) 957-6822. 

PLEASE HELP US 
BECOME A FAMILY. 

Choosing adoption takes a lot 

ol love and courage. Let's 

help 

each other. We are a childless 

couple In our eariy 30's. We 

will provide your baby with 

endless love, security and 

devotion. Allowable expenses 

paid. Help make our 

dream come true. 

PImm cell Julie and Jeff 

at 

1-80CM84-16S9, 

code 1659. 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



LEASING AGENT 

Smiling, Friendly and Reliable 

person needed to assist with running all 
aspects of a luxury apartment community. 
There is room to grow and we will train the 
right individual. 



Call Gina at 



»/eee'. 



S-V <8*7) 356-5007 *&*£ 



DENTAL 
RECEPTIONIST 

Monday, Tuesday & 

Thursday 1-6pm, 

Experienced or will train. 

(«47) 438-8231 
Ask for Robin 



DENTAL OFFICE I 
RECEPTIONIST 

Experienced 

preferred, but will 

lra«n the right person! 

Please phone 
(847)395-2017 




Help Wanted: Seasonal/Part-Time 
SUMMER. LIFEGUARDS WANTED: 

Must be Ellis & Assoc. Licensed, flexible and willing to 
work a variety of hours. Will assist in lifeguard training. 
For Details contact Mike Kading, Gurnee Park District 
599-3755 prior to March 18, 1997 



135 



Business Personals 



BE YOUR OWN BOSS. 
Work trom homo. Need help 
Immediately, SSOO+woek part- 
lime. For a free booklet send a 
SASE Legal size to: MMF En- 
terprises, 912 E. Rollins Rd., 
Suite 136. Round Lake Beach, 
III. 60073. 



140 



financial 



DID YOU FIND Somoones 
PET or Spoclal Lost Arlldo? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classiliods Dept., and got your 
results, FOUND ads are 
RUN FREE of Chargs. Call 
(847)223-8161. 



WE PAY YOU 

TO LOSE WEIGHTI 

SO YOU CAN KEEP IT 

OFF GUARANTEEII 
IF YOU'RE SERIOUS A 

DETERMINED 
CALL 630-690-7222. 



5SCASH$$ IMMEDIATE 

$$ lor structured sottlo merits 
delorred insurance claims. 1- 
800-386-3582 J.G. Went* 
worth. 

SCASH NOWS FOR YOUR 
FUTURE LOTTERY INSTALL- 
MENTS. STRUCTURED SET- 
TLEMENTS. ANNUITIES 
CLASS ACTION AWARDS 
AND INHERITANCES. 1-800- 
457-9922. BACH INVEST- 
MENTS. INC. 

LUMP SUM CASH NOWII 
Wo buy your INSURANCE 
SETTLEMENT. ANNUITY OR 
LOTTERY WINNINGS. Pay- 
ments lor CASHl Quick clos- 
ings. 1-800-338-5815 Ext. 100. 



TALK IS NOT CHEAP AT 
LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS! 

3iou&z Mtum, Wanted 

Do you need some extra cash 

and a few hours on your own? For an 

opportunity to earn generous hourly 

wage and commission with flexible 

hours, contact Lakeland Newspapers. 

We have several positions available in 

our telemarketing department. 

CoBMowieenot 

(M7) 223-®t 

Ux &et up, on ititewueiu- 



ADVERTISEVG 
SAIvES ASSISTANT ! 

Part-time person needed to support Display 

Advertising Dept. Manager Sc staff. Proof reading, ! 

client contact, and miscellaneous other duties. ] 

Contact: Esther Hebbard 
at Lakeland Newspapers 

(847) £23-8161 

or fax resume to 

(847) 333-8810. 



— .* . 



f?*M$ 



KWi-A *?J\ n 



XW* S tl 



. 



I 



1 

: 




CLASSIFIED UkEUwd Newspapers MarcI* 7, 1 997 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



QMMOTIB DDfiHT 

Experience Required 

Parl-Time Aftornoons 

Monday • Thur • Friday 

1:30pm-6:30pm 

Contact: Cathie 

(847) 5C0-I9GO 



220 



I [dp Wanted 
FuU-Ttme 



220 



l 



•AVON', NO DOOR-TO- 
DOOR REQUIRED. No Mlnlr 
mum Orders or Inventory. 
IND/SALES/REP, 800-236- 
0041. 

CDL TRUCK DRIVER 
TRAINING Job available upon 
graduation. Sign on bonus. 
Groat home lime. Lodging and 
financing available. ROEHL 
600-626-1218. 

DBJY£B OWNER/OPERA- 
TORS FLEET OPERATORS 
REGIONAL SHORTHAUL 
CARRIER NEEDS 12 MORE 
TRUCKS TO HANDLE LOTS 
OF 'NO TOUCH' FREIGHT. 
WE OFFER: *ALL MILES PAID 
•ALL PERMITS PAID !NQ 
COMPANY TRUCKS 'MILE- 
AGE GUARANTEES INQ 
HOLDBACK OR ESCROW 
•HOME WEEKENDS GUAR- 
ANTEED CALL LARRY 
TODAY AT 800-200-CUBE 
MON-FRI, 8AM-5PM. GET 
THE DETAILSIII HI-CUBE EX- 
PRESS, INC. 

DRIVER-ATS WANTS 
YOU! Al ConvomlonaJ fleet, 
no slipsoailng, lull benollta 
package. We pay for experi- 
ence. Tractor purchase pro- 
gram available. Cat ATS 1- 
B00-241-8787. 

DRIVERS - OTR Advanced 
Distribution System $1,000 
sign-on bonus limited open- 
ings for flatbed drivers. Phone 
apps approved fn 2 hours! 
800-646-3438, Ext. 1005 
Owner Operators Welcome. 

DRIVERS COVENANT 

TRAINERS earn over 
$70,000. Covenant loams 
earn over $1 00,000 and run 
225,000 mites a year. Make 
money and go\ the most mltea. 
Call today. Experienced driv- 
ers and ownor/oporator loams 
1 -800-441-4394. Graduate 
Students 1-800-338-0428. 

DRIVERS EXP. OtO, recent 
school grads. Builders Trans- 
port Is now hiring In your area 
tor our van, flatbed & dedicat- 
ed fleets. Call today: B00-762- 
1819. 

DRIVERS OTR - One year + 
experience, up to 30e per 
mite, weekly pay, Insurance 
tumlshed, 401 K. Assigned 
tractors, CDL "A" with HAZ- 
MAT required. Call Landair 
Transport, Inc. BOO-788-7357. 

DRIVERS-CalArk INTER- 
NATIONAL OFFERS 
GREAT PAY, BENEFfTS and 
the chance to GET HOME 
MORE OFTEN! Must bo 22 
with CDL and HazMat en- 
dorsemont. 888-422-5275. 

DRIVERS-REGIONAL 
RUNS FROM your area. 
Class A CDL/1 year OTR ex- 
perience required. Mln. 23 yrs. 
No exp? Free training avall- 
able. 1-800-527-9568. EOE. 

DRIVERS...TRAINING 
AVAILABLE! SWIFT Trans- 
portation. Great Pay & Full 

Benefits. Job stability, consist- 
ent miles, assigned equip- 
ment. Hiring: Experienced, tn- 
exportenced Drivers, Teams, 
and owner-operators!: 1-800- 
284-8785 (eoe-m/f). 

DRIVERS/OTR - CRST ott- 
ers tuition-free training & a 
guaranteed |ob. Earn up to 
$30,000 first year. Mln. age 
21, no felonies. CALL CRST: 1- 
800-504-2778. 

FLEET OWNER NEEDS 
DRIVERS with 1 YR. OTR 
flatbed experience. Class A 
CDL Excellent Equipment in- 
surance. Call Terry at 800- 
851-2646. 

GET A GOOD JOB in elec- 
tronics, computers, machine 
repair. HS grads under 34, wilt- 
ing to re locale. Paid training 
with full benefits and all reloca- 
tion expenses. Call 1-800-469- 
6289, 



RECYCLE 



WORK AT HOME! Over 

1,000 jobs available For de- 
la'i3 send SASE: Roxann La- 
zero, 2324-C California Ave., 
Groat Lakes, III. 60088. 



ildp Wanted 
Full-Time 

WESTWAY EXPRESS, 

INC. NOW HIRING EXPERI- 
ENCED OTR DRIVERS UP 
TO .30 CPM STARTING BASE 
PAY D.O.E. PLUS UP TO .08 
CPM BONUSES TOP PAY, 
BENEFfTS. AND EQUIPMENT 
NOW LEASING OWNER/OP- 
ERATORS PERCENT- 
AGE/MILEAGE CONTRACT 
ZERO 5$ DOWN TRUCK 
LEASES AVAILABLE. CALL 
Lee BarMey 800-99-DRIVE. 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuU-Time 



NOW HIRING! 

•PTWAITSTAFF 

Starts $4.55/hr + tips 

• FT KITCHEN 

STAFF 

$6.00/hr 

at Bobby's Barrel Inn 

Contact Pete or Loretta \ 

at 815-385-8811 

< CHRISTIAN BERNARD JEWELERS* 

^is looking for jewelry & retail professionals. We have a* 
afew select positions al our exciting outlet store location* 
j'm Gurnee Mills. * 

j We hire candidates with retail experience, positive &k 
^upbeat outlooks. We love selling quality jewelry at a£ 
}great price. Full & Part Time positions are available. We£ 
goffer competitive salaries, commission, benefits & 401 K.£ 
5 Call Joe at 630-202-1488 

4 Fax Resume to 847-855-1 172 



jimiM .II»w.5lnli»illlw«nil»nniro»M>""" ""' mm.iimm.m inm. 



NU.Hfm.r.|IH.,l[|i.m^ 

i 



OFFICE SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST 

Hours 9am-2pm * Monday - Friday 

Salary Negotiable, Required are excellent phone skills, 
excellent organizational skills, &. good typing skills. Medical 

office experience & computer skills a piusl 
Send resume to: Colettl Sports Medicine Physical Therapy 
543 Orchard, Antloch, IL 60002 



Senior Citizens, 

IWelanmeJ 

Do you have a sales background? 
Do you like talking on the phone? 

This is an opportunity to continue 

using your skills. No physical work. 

We offer flexible hours, generous 

hourly wage & commission at 

Lakeland Newspapers. 

Call Maureen at 
(847) 223-8161 ext. 109. 




How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 



Dear Search, 

I am writing In regard lo a conversation ! was Involved in 
a few weeks hack. An acquaintance was describing an inci- 
dent that had caught her as she put it, "off guard." She had 
applied for a position as a genera! office clerk. Her qualifi- 
cations were as she put ft, "up to par." While she was cur- 
rently employed with another company in the same Indus- 
try, the Idea of taking a job closer to home appealed to her 
and made her want the job all the more. During her first 
interview the company was impressed with her ability to 
deal with difficult people, and al the end of the two hour 
Interview, the potential employer asked if she had anything 
else to add other than what appeared on her resume and 
application. She said that she would appreciate it if they 
would not contact her current employer as she did not want 
to let on that she was looking for a new job. At that point the 
company stated that they would be checking references. It 
came to be known within the first 15 minutes of reference 
checking that this person did not graduate from the High 
School for which she staled. In fact, it was found that there 
was no High School diploma from any school nor was there 
an equivalency test. The company was let down by the 
thought of thinking they had found the right person, only to 
have found h-r honesty to be questionable. In questioning 
the references they were given by this person, it was found 
that although she stated that she was currently employed 
with a specific employer, a reference staled that she had not 
been employed there for a very long time. The employer 
called her on these discrepancies In her Information for 
which the person became irate, by using four letter words 
followed by three letter words and resembling nothing short 
of a Jckyll fir Hyde routine. "How dare they check my current 
employer," she was overheard to say. I chuckled at the 
thought of how she reacted to something that she herself 
caused. It wasn't until she started to rant and rave about 
how she was going to call the Better Business Bureau an the 
company and tell all her friends not to work for that compa- 
ny, that 1 finally stuck my piece of mind in on the deal. What 
Is wrong with this picture? Every application I have filled out 
in my time asks for a signature which slates something 
tlkc.to the best of my knowledge, alt the information Is true 
and correct. She said she signed it and I asked her what did 
you think that was for ...your autograph?!?!? It is a docu- 
ment. ..binding.. .and legal. People check references. Those 
who don't, open themselves up for trouble right from the 
start. Do you agree? Thanks for listening. 
F.R.-Gurncc 

DearF.IL, 

Bight you are! Had the person been honest in the begin- 
ning, they would have stood a much better chance of land- 
ing the job than for the company to have found it out In the 
long run and destroyed her credibility. She seems to have 
done that all on her own. Thanks for writing! 

Note: Nancy Sakol Is a licensed personnel professional and 
President of Superior Personnel in Gurnee. 

Letters can be sent to Nancy Sakol c/o Lakeland 
Newspapers, P.O. Box 260, Grayslake, I L (50030 



220 



Help Wanlcd 
Full-Time 



220 



IWpWmied 
Full-Time 



'"'" ■ I 



MAINTENANCE 

Wanted for Full Time 

| • Benefits available 
i ■ Must have some 
' ' knowledge of plumbing, 
electrical & carpentry 
• Must be able to work 



weekends 

Apply In person: 

Maintenance Garago 

Hastings Lake YMCA 

21 1 55 W. Golden Rd. 

Lake Villa, IL 

or Call Al at 

356-4027 



> — *--_. r i 



■ 
■ 

i 

i 
i 

i 
i 

ii 
ii 

ii 

i 
i 

ii 
■ 

ii 

ii 

i 



WAREHOUSE/DELIVERY 
Full Time 

Growing parts and equip- 
ment wholesale company 
needs energetic person for 
stocking and deliveries. 

• El eel lent driving record required. 

• CDOmnust 

• Good ftaftlng pay and benefits 

• Great advancement potential 

8am to 3pm starting 
Mon. March 10th 
Apply in person 

ILLCO 

1004 NorthpoInt Blvd. 
Waukegan, IL 60085 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Hdp Wanted 
FuJLTimc 



INTERNET 
OPPORTUNITIES 

Lakeland netDIRECT, Lake County's pre- 
mier Internet access provider, has ground 
floor opportunities for people interested In 
the Internet. We are looking for sales peo- 
ple with the ability to introduce and present 
the Internet to businesses, organizations, 
and individuals. You need surfing experi- 
ence with the Internet, not a technical back- 
ground. If you are interested In creating the 
future, fax resume to Bill Schroeder, 

(847) 223-8810 

or e-mail: bill@lnd.com 



1 0O r ¥QU KHBW M ACS? ; 

tA grojyinrQCTtolzfcakcrfiOWfy company* 
Jwith 13 years in the Mac industry} is poking* 
*for Mat support technicians. Applicants must* 
Jknow lilacf system software, be familiar with! 

* different network setups and hardware fconfig-* 
Jurations arid have own reliable transportation. I 

* If you knowyour-Macintosh,-thisis an excel-* 
*lent opportunity for a.responsiblc^inojviduaL *, 

* IBM support knowledgeris'also'arptus! 



* Send resumes to: 



M^Oppprtnnfiy 




P.Q.iB6x455 



I L^Gm yslaKe71E:60030 




-&IMHKCAT ^ 



S* 



011TCERS/«M»ERAT«IKS 

Needed for snowplowing. 

Northshore area. 

Top Pay! Work today-pay tomorrow. 

Lots of hours. 

(847) 272-1747 






y r 



Superior Opportunities 

Administrative Assistant $26K 

Corporate Collections $20K 

Receiving Clerk , $8.50/hr 

Customer Service $22K 

Teller Supervisor. $25K 

H.R. Recruiter. $20K 

Data Entry. $8.50/hr 

549-OOI6 244-0016 

Vernon Hills Gurnee 



^ 



iy 



perior Xcrsonne 



iiu 



BauBCBUHUBQaHaaauHaaasaQyHBByQQQaytayuBaBn 

&**£%> CERTIFIED MNORITy I 
sfo TEACHERS WAiVTEDE 

,L The Kenosha Unified School b 
ri District No. 1 wishes to employ an£ 
i^h ^C»J^ < increased number of minority g 
[j ^0/ nlettff' teachers tn accordance withjj 
employment goals as staled in the" 




***************************************** 



MAINTENANCE 
TECHNICIAN 

NORTHWEST SUBURBAN MANUFACTURER OF 

VALVES AND PIPE FITTINGS IS SEEKING AN 

INDIVIDUAL WITH A COMPLETE ELECTRICAL 

BACKGROUND AND SKILLS IN: 

• CNC MACHINE TOOL CONTROL ELECTRONICS 

• HYDRAULICS AND PNEUMATICS 

• SERVICE AND FACILITY WIRING 

• MAINTENANCE OF MECHANICAL SYSTEMS 

COMPETITIVE WAGES AND 
EXCELLENT BENEFfTS 

SEND RESUME OR APPLY IN PERSON 

KEMPER VALVE & FITTINGS 
CORPORATION 

3001 DARRELL ROAD 
ISLAND LAKE, IL 60042 



1 SYSreMS PROFESSIONALS | 

Join Us Where "Family Values' 

1 Is A Way Of Life MOT Just A Slogan j 

§ UNR ROHN, a rapidly expanding company with I 
| ZERO turnover seeks the following professionals. | 

1AM ADIWftSTRATOR 

sIBM and AIX required with Systems View a plus. 

1 UrOX ADMUNISTRAXOR 

i Must have UNIX SYSTEM Administration experi-| 
Hence in the Civil/Structural Engineering field. Musl| 
=have working knowledge of HP-UX and TCP/IP net-= 
§work protocol including security. Ability to write shell! 
| scripts for operation of the system and maintain print- 1 
gers, plotters and HP work stations. Maintenance ofg 
gclear documentation of both hardware and software! 
Irequired. Knowledge of ANVIL 5000, OMNIBACK.I 
| WINDOWS NT would be a definite plus. 
I UNR ROHN offers a very competitive salary andi 
Ibenefit package with relocation assistance available to== 
| Peoria, IL, conveniently located between Chicago, St,l 
| Louis and Moline. Peoria offers excellent schools, iow§ 
gcrime, affordable living and the sporting and social! 
lamenities of "Big City" living without the hassle. Yous 
| owe it to yourself and your family to investigate these | 
| unique opportunities. Please send resume with salary 1 
phistory to H.R. Director, | 

| UNR ROHN | 

P.O. Box 2000, Peoria, IL 61656 | 

EOE M/F/DA/ ■ FAX (309) 697-5612 1 

inillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll«IIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHHIIHIIII«l«lllHllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllF. 



ci District's Affirmative Action Plan. 
a Employment opportunities for 1997-98 may be avail- E 
{{able in a number of subject areas including, but not limit- J] 
[Jed to, elementary, special education, math, science, busi-{j 
□mess/marketing, bilingual, vocational-technical education, g 
a foreign language, nursery/pre-kindergarten, and homen 
3 economics. o 

3 Candidates desiring lo explore the possibility of relo- Jj 
"eating to a proactive community seeking to attract minor- g 
gity teachers area encouraged to meet with Kenosha « 
ti Unified employment representatives at the Ramada Inn.n 
u200 No. Green Bay Road, Waukegan, IL on Thurs.,n 
"March 13, 1997. Interviews will be conducted In Room" 
g1771rom5to8 p.m. 
u Evidence of certification and teaching references are[j 

S required prior to finalizing any offer of employment, jj 
Competitive salaries and benefits aro In olfoct. ~-'"<i ." » ii 
Candidates unable to attend may submit letters ofH 
{J interest, transcripts, and credentials to the Division off] 
"Human Resources, Educational Support Center, 3600-fj 
«52nd St., Kenosha, Wl 53144. g 

An equal opportunity educator/employer 

■'jaauaaaaaaaauaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaauaaaaiaaaaaB 

POLICE OFFICER 

"The Fire and Police Commission of the Village ofra 
jjLindenhurst announces an examination for the position of 3 
| Patrol Officer. 3 



g Applicants must be a high school graduate or equivalent | 
a and will be required to pass physical agility, swimming, | 
u written, oral, psychological, background, medical and drug a 



"tests 



Salary Range as of May 1996: $30,400-$41 ,200. 



u Registration forms may be picked up and returned lo the a 
3 police station no later than 3:00 p.m., March 26, 1997 at: u 

a Lindeiihurst Police Department 

a 2301 E. Sand Lake Road, Lindenhunt, IL 60046 u 

a Phone: (847) 356-5488 • EEO/AJDA Employer a 

■aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa« 



Chicago Cutlery, Inc. 

is currently seeking qualified Individuals to 
work at our Wauconda location. 

CNC MACHINE OPEltATOKS 

Responsibilities Include performing hands-on operation, basic 
adjustments of programs (programming experience not 
required, but preferred), load and unload parts, set up machin- 
ery, perform tool change-overs, and lift up to 40 lbs., while 
achieving efficiency and safety standards. Minimum two years 
CNC experience required (preforably with Allen-Bradley con- 
trols). Previous wood working knoVrlodge desirable. Must 
havo manual dexterity, good hand-eye coordination, pay atten- 
tion to detail and the ability to understand and speak English. 

MACHINE OPERATORS 

Responsibilities aro to perform a variety of manufacturing 
operations on a rotating basis including riveting, backing, 
sanding, branding, waxing, butloring, and butting, and lifting up 
to 40 lbs., while achieving efficiency and safety standards, and 
meeting attendance requirements. Previous machine operator 
experience would bo a plus, although training is available. 
Must have manual dexterity, good hand-eye coordination, and 
tho ability lo understand and speak English. 

.IA1VITOU/II01JSEKEEPEU 

Responsibilities for Ihis position vary in order to mainlaln plant 
area, office area, rest rooms and lunchroom in a sanitary, 
dean and orderly condition - swooping, mopping, dusting, dis- 
posing sawdust properly, and general cleaning. 
Responsibilities may also Include minor errands (driving local- 
ry), preparing lunchos for meetings, and holiday decorating, 
Ideal candidate wuid have minimum one year experience in 
tanitoriat/hausekocplng, good attention to detail, excellent fol- 
low Ihrough skills, and the ability to understand and spoak 
English. 

These full limo posilions offer incontives and benelils including 
medical, dental and lilo insuranco, 401 (k) savings plan, pon- 
skm plan, paid vacation and holidays. To apply, pfoaso fax 
your resume to 847-526-2154 or apply in person at: Chicago 
Cutlery, Inc.. 441 Bonner Road, Wauconda, IL 60084. ATTN: 
HR/LN. No phono calls please. Final candidates must pass 
drug and alcohol screen. EOE. 



MarcIi 7, 1997 UkclANd Newspapers CLASSIFIED 



> [sn 



J20 



HdpWtokd 
Fufl-Tlmc 




|f Help Warned 



ftill-Tfane 







Telemarketing 
earn up to $500 

I Extra Cash In 
Your Pocket!! 

[Dally Pay, no experience 

[necessary. Start today, 

Fuller Part Time. 

Mundelein 

[(847) 049-9240 



- 



• 



jacri-aauuuuuBBHBOQUOaowaat 

mundelein: Illinois 

We are seeking 

| individuals for the j 

■following positions: J 

• Maintenance Worker \ 

• Banquet Supervisor j 

• Housekeeping 
Supervisor 

• Housekeeping 
Attendants 

• Front Desk Clerk 

• Restaurant 
Waitress/Walter 
We offer excellent] 

benefits, which j] 

Include: 

Health insurance, 

vacation pay, and 

employee meals. 

Please apply In 

person at: 

Holiday Inn 
j Mundelein jj 

| 510 East Route 83 | 
! Mundelein, IL 60060 

! (847) 949-5100 

EOE 



WANTED: 

Call 526-8273 



DISPLAY 

ADUERTiSING 

AUTOMOTIVE 

SPECIALIST 

Lakeland Newspapers has 
an Immediate opening for 
an Automotive Display 
Advertising Account 

Executive. We publish 13 
community weekly news- 
papers In Lake County 
serving over 54,000 
households. 

The ideal candidate must 
possess excellent commu- 
nication , customer service 
& organizational skills. A 
self-starter who Is ener- 
getic & results oriented will 
be assured success in this 
fast-paced environment. 
Compensation based on 
experience (Base + 
Commission). Previous 
Automotive Advertising 
Sales experience pre- 
ferred. 

tf you are seeking a full- 
time position offering ben- 
efits and rewards, please j 
fax resume to 

847-223-8810 

or contact 

Esther Decker 

Hebbard, 

DispUy AdviRTisiNq 

MANAqCR 

30 S. Whitney, 
Grayslake, IL 






847-223-8161 

ext US 



-•- 




iBOOBBOOaOOOOOOOBOBBHOaO 

B B B BB bOBOaaaBBBBBBaOByBBQBBBPOB B BB Q OB O B B O BOQO yBgBOn 

I ■* # 

I MtrsinFi fin. Illinois WEr/UlU 

We are seeking Individuals to Join our 
I Management team. 

a* Sales Manag er -a self motivated, energetic individual tog 

3 contact corporate businesses for their guests' hotel accom-g 

ti modation and maintaining current corporate accounts. 

« Banquet Supervis or - responsible for overall organize- g 

Ition and appearance of every event and scheduling of the 8 

• set up and wait staff. 

j* Housekeeping Supervisor - responsible for overseeing jj 
■ the housekeeping attendants performance and cleaning Si 
Jguest rooms. 

We are also seeking candidates for 
the following positions: 

i» front Desk Clerks - 7 a.m. - 3 p.m. or 3 p.m. to 1 1 p.m 
-'ier- 12:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. 
tendants - days 
j • Restaurant Walt Staff - days & evenings 
j* Night Auditor - Fri. & Sat. (1 1 p.m. to 7 a.m.) 
J We offer excellent benefits, which include health insurance, [ 
vacation pay, employee meals and discount on hotel stays. 

Send your resume or call: 

Holiday Inn Mundelein 

510 East Route 83, Mundelein, IL 60060 

(847) 949-5100 

E/O/E 



c 

c 
■ 

-I 

t 

I 



ig. 

n- 

ix: 

3°S 
ss; 



lEARN MONEY I 
I AND GET IN I 
SHAPE!! 1 

|Our delivery service is expanding!! We^ 
are looking for energetic adults over | 
18 to deliver papers on Mondays and ^ 

Thursdays to downtown areas around \ 

Lake County, if you like the outdoors | 

and want to make money too, this is | 

the perfect job for you!! ^ 

Call Alternate f 
Delivery Express 
today!! 

Ask for Sue or Dennis 

(847) 740-4035 1 




220 



Help Wanted 
Pull-Time 



Maintenance 

■ GENERAL 
MAINTENANCE 

NORTHSIDE manufacturer 
of speaker components has 
an opening for experienced 
maintenance person. 
YOU WILL repair and main- 
tain electrical, mechanical & 
hydraulic equipment. 
GOOD benefits, with salary 
based on experience. 

Mall/Fax (847-3954862) 

resume attn: Jack Slogol, 

Nu-Way Speaker 

Products, Iiic 

905 Anita Ave., 

Antloch, IL 60002. 

Apply In person 

or call 

847-395-5141 

(e.o.e.) 



'drivers' 




WANTED 

JSEarn that Extra Cashtt 
Residential delivery. 

Small car and 
Insurance necessary. 

Mundelein 
(847) 949-9240 




CUSTOMER 

SERVICE 
REPRESENTATIVE 

(Cashier) 

FULLTIME ALL SHIFTS 

FULLTIME BENEFITS 
INCLUDED 

• Medical & Life Insurance 

• Educational Assistance 
Program 

• Paid Vacation & Holidays 

• 60 Day Review 

AMOCO FOOD 
SHOPS 

noVhirTng" 
under new 
management! 

Please apply in person at: 
Buffalo Gmve-540 MeHenry Rd, 

Carpentersvllle- 
695 Barring Ion Rd. j 



I! 



DISPUY 

ADVERTISING 

SALES 

Do you like 
meeting new 

people? 
Do you like 

solving 

problems? 

Do you give 

good customer 

service? 

If this is you, we 

would like to hear 

from you. 

Unleash your 

earning potential 

with this growth 

driven publisher. 

Call 

847-223-8161 
ext. 113 

or fax your resume to 

Esther Hebbard 

at 

847-223-8810 

today! 

Group Health Benefits, 

401K&more! 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuMlnic 



Lakeland Newspapers 
is seeking correspon- 
dents to cover village 
government and school 
board meetings 
throughout Lake 
County. 

Fax resumes and 

writing samples to 

Rhonda Burke 

(847) 223-8810 



Quality Assurance 

• QA TECHNICIAN 

WE NEED A CREATIVE, 
responsible, dependable 
person to support our Q. A. 
Department. 

YOU MUST HAVE a mini- 
mum one year Q.A./Q.C. 
experience in manufactur- 
ing, basic knowledge of 
SPC and ability to use var- 
ious measuring instru- 
ments. 

WE OFFER GROWTH 
potential PLUS benefits. 
Mail/Fax (847-395-8862) 
resume attn: Human 
Resources, Nu-Way 

Speaker Products, Inc., 
905 Anita Ave, Antioch, IL 
60002, Apply in Person, or 
call 847-395-5141 (e.o.e.) 



WWlA^uV^^AV^i^ 



•■•••••••••••••a*** 

jC@©Ks 

J Full Time X 

Z- intermediate care ' * 
Z facility has an * 
Z immediate opening Z 
I for a cook. Must be Z 
Z available to work Z 
5 7am to 3:30pm & Z 
X every other weekend. Z 
Z Health Care Z 
Z experience preferred. Z 
X If interested, contact: £ 

• Lunne Valenzano ; 

• Mff. St. Joseph ; 

Lake Zurich 

• (847) 438-5050 j 

• • 

••••••••••••••••••• 



•PRODUCTION 
SUPERVISOR 

HANDS ON SUPER-! 
VISE 5 to 8 employees 
w/expanding North Lake 
Suburban company 
REQUIRES 1-2 years 
supervisory experi- 
ence/bilingual in English 
& Spanish 

WE OFFER GROWTH 
| potential PLUS benefits. 

| Mall/fax (847-395-8862) 

resume attn: 
; Human Resources, 
; Nu-Way Speaker 
i Products, Inc., 
905 Anita Ave., 
Antloch, IL 60002, 
Apply In person or call 
847-395-5141 (e.o.e.) 




Retail 

Find €i job 
you'll love... 

...at PetCare Superstore, lite 
Midwest's largest chain ol compa- 
ny owned pet bod and supply 
stores. We have exciting and 
rewarding opportunities that are 
available at our Round Lake Beach 
and Crystal Lake locations lor: 

MANAGERS 
ASST. MANAGERS 

Requires 2-3 years retail 
speciality mgmt. exper. 

SALES ASSOCIATES 

as "Pel Pals** Full & Part 71 me 

Sales or customer scrv. 

exper. needed. 

PelCare otters good benefits & 
salary commensurate w/exper. 
For MGMT. positions, please 
apply In person at PelCare 
Superstore, 230 S. Virginia St., 
Crystal Lake; or lax/send resume 
to Dept. JB, PelCare. 700 N. 
Commerce Dr., Aurora, IL 
60504-8174; Fax 630-585-1402. 

Pet Pals, please apply in person 
at the PotCare Superstore near- 
est you; 230 S. Virginia SI., 
Crystal Lake (ph: 815-356-7337) 
or 436 E. Rollins Rd., Round 
Lako Beach (ph: B47-740-1290) 

PETCARE SUPERSTORE 

Equal Opportunity Employer 




f| Help Wanted 
U Fun-Time 



EETfl" 



Help Wanted 
Full-Tlme 



CIIAUFFEUR 

Full/Part Time. Willi 
train. Must be 25 years 
old and have a good| 
driving record. 

Call (847) 549-00201 



$ SINGERS/SONG > 

*; WRITERS :> 

3 Cut something worth ^ 
•J hearing. $ 

^ Jimmy Harris* Music ^ 
j£ 615-340-0045 ^ 
*»,»,<».*.^ •»*»*» •*«*** w»^«» * 



CUSTOMER 
SERVICE 

OUR FORTUNE 500 Clients 
need your customer service 
accounting & administrative, 
general office, data entry 
skills for long term and 
lemp-to-perm assignments. 
We offer competitive salary. 
Please call Nanci at: 

Express Personnel 

Services 

(847) 816-8422 
or Fax (847)816-0888 

WE OFFER THE LEADING HEALTH 
CAM PACKAGING M THE PER- 
SONNEL SEHtrtCES KDUSTHY1 



> 




!@3IEIEn 



- IT* 

IcOMPAWrt* 

SALESPERSON ! 
WANTED 

i For lawn equipment, commer- J 
■ rial grounds care equipment,* 
J and skid loaders. Must have! 
I mechanical aptitude and a gen- « 
J crai knowledge of power equip- J 
I mem. Will be required to call J 

• on and demonstrate product to v 
' customers. 

i We sell very high quality John g 
J Deere, Gehl and other equip- X 
J merit. We are a well estab-J 
a lished dealer ottering a stable. « 
J full time position with good ben- • 

• efrts and compensation, .' 
I Send resume by March 17 to a 
{Schmidt Implement Co. inc.* 
I P.O. Box 10, Salem, Wl 53168 , 

• Attn: Bob. « 



EDITOR 

Lakeland Newspapers is 
seeking a creative, hard 
: working sports writer to fill 
the position ot sports edi- 
tor. The position requires 
flexible hours, a thorough 
: knowledge of high school 
: sports and creative ideas 
:to make our sports section 
Ihe best in the county. 
Page layout and good edit- 
ing skills are necessary. 
Experience in sports pho- 
tography preferred. 
Fax resumes and 
writing samples to 
Rhonda Burke, 

(847)223-8810 ; 



z 



CHILD CARE AND 
LEARNNG CENTER 

in Mundclcfn 

has an opening tor an earty child- 
hood teacher tor our three and tour 
year old classroom. Qualifications 
include; 60 credit hours including 6 in 
early childhood education, or 30 
credit hours including 6 in earty child- 
hood education and 1 year of experi- 
ence in a child care cerrier or CDA. 

Benefits include: 
Paid sick, vacation, and personal 
days, full medical S dental insur- 
ance, retirement program, YMCA 
membership. 

Salary commensurate with 

experience and education. 

Apply In person: 

706 E. Hawley St. 

Mundelein, IL 60060 

847-949-0060 

Cyntnij Sfteppartf, Child Cant Dlr, 



CABLE TV 
PROFESSIONALS 

Immed Openings. Prince 
Cable is hiring highly qual'd 
Cable TV Prol'ls to fill positions 
in Greater Mlwkee area. 
Installation Depl hiring FT 
Trainer, Asst Mgr, Field Sprvsrs 
& Quality Control Personnel. 
Req exp in cable TV, wireless or 
other telecommunications sves. 
Computer skills a plus. Olfer 
comp pay/401 K. Send/fax 
resume incl sal reqs: Prince 
Cable of Wise, 5055 N. Lydetl 
Ave, Glendale, Wl 53217; Fax 
414-967-9375. EOE. 



ELECTRICAL 
ASSEMBLER 

Hook-up test & trouble shoot 
motors, compressors, etc., 
using wiring diagrams & 
schematics. Day shift. Lake 
Zurich area. $12flir. 
^CCEVT * (84 7) 126*367 



RETAIL 

Guitar Center, the nation's 
number one musical Instrument 
retailer now has immed Sales 
Openings, Expansion also has 
us needing Mgrs. Bnfts/profit 
share/career opptys. If you are 
interested in a fast paced, excit- 
ing career In the music industry 
& would like to help keep Guitar 
Center H\ in cost, sve, apply at 
2375 S. Arlington Heights Rd. 



&■ 



Computer 
TecIinicaI 

Services Rep 

Growing publisher in 
Libertyville is seeking 
technical support for - 
customer & internal. To 
apply call: 
(800) 764-8462 
Anytime. 



RECEPTION/CLERICAL 

Good typist with pleasant & 
professional phone skills need- 
ed tor busy sales office located 
in Elk Grove. Responsibilities 
include billing, shipping, switch- 
board, and office support. 
Ccnlatlt Laurie H4?-3fft-500S 



(847) 548-9374 

EOE 



i 
I 

1 1 in ii z rn ri in i ii rixii 



)< fbntastie Sams { 

FULL TIME OR 
PART TIME 

• Guaranteed Salary) 

• Paid Holidays! 

• Paid Vacation il 
"New Grayslake location 

opening in March" 
i Also hiring for Lake Zurich i 

location. 
Contact Wendy or Jenny at ' 
540-0511 



PARKING LOT 
MARKING 

Established pavement 

marking company is 

seeking experienced help. 

• Crew Foreman 
• Helpers 

Clean driving record 
required. Mundelein. 

Call: 
On Line Services 
(847) 566-4995 



COLLECTORS 

Join our team of professionals 
as an Account Representative. 
Applicants should have six 
months of consumer loan expe- 
rience. Preference will be 
given to those with auto loan 
collection experience and 
some college education. This 
motivated individual must be 
able to work in an aggressive 
environment and spend Ihe 
majority of tho day on the tele 
phone. Gurnee based Eagle 
Finance offers a competitive 
salary plus bonus incentives 
and a full benefits package with 
a 40 IK plan. 

Call anylimo to completo an 
automated telephone applica- 
tion: 1 (BOO) 549-0341 Ext 537 







UND BOAT DETA1HR. 5 

N References required. ^ 
{ Self-starter, 

We also need a crew. 
S Call to set up interview, ? 

587-9243 
> POWER WASH PLUS, INC S 

xxzzxzxxxzxzzzzzzxzxzxxz 

I Education f 

MAKE A i 
1 DIFFERENCE... | 

I ...as a Lead Teacher (6 hrs.| 
|ECE req.) at our brand new* 
x center in Grayslake. Both FT x 
i and FT positions available, x 
x Excellent benefits including af 
x generous child care discount, f 
Call Kathy at 



I 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time . 



ADVERTISING/SALES 

Caring, appreciative office. 

Salary, commission, 

excellent benefits. 

McHenryStar 

815-385-2231 

Fax 815-385-2237 



COMPUTER 

Need computer whiz to imple- 
ment or design program to bring 
our office up to tho Ws. Currently 
running afl paperwork manually, 
and would like to switch to effi- 
cient computer system for every- 
thing from Afl, NP, to Inventory, 
order entry, shipping, monthly 
statements, and eventually the 
quoting system. Hardware knowl- 
edge as well as software or pro- 
gramming presidency necessary. 
Contocf: Lavri* S47-S64-S005 



LICENSED 

PLUMBER 

WANTED 

Must have own 

transportation and tools. 

Good pay) 

Please call 

847-970-0004 

& leave message. 

OMMMB 



U iui~. ' ^iLi-Mz:x z 



..■>■■.•!■ 



VETERANS! 

: Part-time jobs available on one 
iweetend per month. Pay by grade 
:(i.e.£5*S176.44, E4=$149.C0). You 
twill enter at your last grada hdd 
j (active, guard, reserve). $200,000 
ttrlo insurance, PX and commissary 
•priviledges available. 50% tuition 
i reimbursemert. student loan repay- 
: ment and entstment bonus available 
jit you qualify Basic training not 
j required. AIT not required rl MOSQ. 
jvVe have marry posrbons avaiaWe. 
■ Wisconsin Army National Guard. 
i Call today: Bill Sallibury 
414-656-6496 



DATA ENTRY 

No phone work. Key names & 
addresses, part numbers & 
quantities. Sort 4 file paper 
work. Long lerm assignment 

ACCENT 

(847) 726-8367 



■BBBBBOimW 



MOLDMAKER 

DENVER, COLORADO 

Progressive mold shop looking for 
exp'd 30 programmers (MASTER - 
CAM & CAMAX). mold designers, 
mold makers, apprentices, CMC mill 
operators A CNC EDM operators 
Etc. pay & benefits. Call 303-373- 
9838; r ax Resume 303-375-9252. 



AUTO TECHNICIANS 

Immed Opening- Florida. Are 
you tired of Ihe wind & the 
cold & the snow? Want to live 
& work in sunny FL? Lg Ford 
Dealer in Ft. Myers just 
moved into brand new facili- 
ties w/60K sf sve space. 
Need qual'd Techs in all 
areas. ASE cert nee. Ford 
exp helpful. John Flaherty 
941-939-5000; Fax resume: 
941-274-2406. EOEDFW 







1 



j JOBS! JOBS! j 
|jOBS!JOBS!| 



! 



Western Staff Services | 
has immediate long- 
term openings tor 
f packaging positions in 
Lake Villa. 



We will be taking 
! applications at the Best 
[ Western in Antioch near 
Rt. 83 and Rt. 173 from j 
Noon to 5pm on March j 
12th! Be sure to bring j 

2 forms of I.D. with you. \ 

I 

We offer competitive 
I wages, weekly checks, 
I health insurance, child 
| care reimbursements 
I and much more! Apply 
today and work 
tomorrow! 

Western 

STAFF SERVICES 



| 3812 Roosevelt Rd. 
| Kenosha, Wl 53142 

1 414-697-1188 



EOE M/F/H/V 



&^ 



i ^,^ J » c ,^> W i »?*—? ■ -_ *-■ - ? r» ™ ^. * » - f* & 




CLASSIFIED UkElANd Newspapers" MakcU 7; 1 997 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



225 



Business 
Opportunilies 



225 



Business 
Opiiorlunltfcs 



DRIVERS 

Immed Openings. CDL-A 
w/HazMat. OTR Co. Drivers & 
Independents. Regional posi- 
tions avl for Co, Drivers living 
In Ohio. Full bnfts/convention- 
als. Dave 800-777-0585 




ELECTRONIC MEDICAL 
CLAIMS PROCESSING- 
PT/FT $50,000 potential. 
Leam from tho experts. Train- 
ing, software, support. Pro- 
grams from $4,975. FREE DE- 
TAILS. Call •314-447-3185, 
press option 1. 



HOTTEST BIZ IN USA. CD 
Rom software manufacturer 
seeks distributor! Family, 
children's, educational, and 
business lines. S100K poten- 
tial. No selllngl Terrific fun- 
draiser! Investment required! 
1-600-201-5889. 



MEDICAL 

St 




OPPORTUNITIES 



OOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOCOO 

§ EDUCATION § 

g Montessori Teachers: g 

g Toddler/Primary/Elementary, g 

g Accepting apps. Growing % 

2 school. Must be Monlessori | 

cert'd, exp pref. 113 8 

" students. Academy of the 8 

o 
o 

o t>. (-ragier ur, w. caim o 

o B.--<jch,FL 33041; 561 -832- 8 

o 8815; Fax 561-832-3343 g 

ooooooooooooooocoooooooo 



Palm Beaches, 1901 
S. Ragier Dr, W. Palm 



| Place your 
g medical S 
1 opportunities 8 
ad here 

Call | 

or Dave « 






REHAB AIDES 

&CNAs 

Long term care facility. Full 
time/Part time & weekends 
available. All shifts, must 
be certified or enrolled In a 
certification class. 
Call, fax or apply: 

Lexington Health Care 

Center of Lake Zurich 

900 S. Rand Rd. 

Lake Zurich, IL 60047 
Phone: {847} 726-1200 

Fax: (847) 726-1265 




Medical 

PHYSICAL THERAPIST 

Physical Therapist wanted for 
practice in Morgantown, W.V. 
Must have current WV license. 
Full or part-time position avail- 
able. Low stress, pleasant 
working conditions. No 
evening or weekend work. 
Send resume lo; Physical 
Therapist, P.O. Box 4544, 
Morgantown, WV 26505 or fax 
10 304-599-1952. E.O.E. 

•OBe a strrxmri 



^ffffT H Tffffffff 



Medical 

MEDICAL DOCTOR 

Wanted tor Multi-discipline Practice in 
West Virginia. Family Practice 
General Medicine w other specialty 
will bo considered. FuH or Part-time 
position avail. Exc benefits. No 
evenings or wltends. No on call. Musi 
have current WV lie. Please send cur 
riculum vitaa to Medical Doctor, PO 
Box 4544, Morgantown, WV 26505 or 
fax lo 304-599-1952. Mju may also 
call 304-596-2632 to speak w/the 
clinic director or general mgr. 



PHYSICIAN 

Immed Opening. Medical 
Physician wanted for group prac- 
tice. Mild climate. Sal range: 575K- 
$150Kryw/bnfts. Noon-call. 
Dr. Ted 800-443-2378; 
Fax resume 501-631-9820 



HABITATION 
AIDE/ 

Francos House, Inc., an 
agency serving the needs ol 
devcJoprnonfally disabled 
adults is seeking qualified 
individuals lo staff our new 
group home on tho north 
sldeofWaukegan. Excellent 
starting salary, free meals, 
insurance available. All 
shifts are available. $0.55 
per hour. Must have GED or 
diploma. Drivers possess 
ability to work hard and gel 
along with others 

Please apply at 

IB60 South Lowis Avo.,Wkgn, 
(047)244-2312. EOE 



I 



Health Care 

CNA's 

Long term care facility, 
lull/part lime, weekends 
available. All shifts-must be 
certified or enrolled in a cer- 
tification class. Call/lax or 
apply at: 

Lexington Health 

Care Center 

900 S. Rand Rd. 

Lake Zurich, IL 60047 

Phone (847) 726-1200 

Fax (847) 726-1265 
tmmmmmmmmmmmmmmBmm 



1 



DEVELOPMENTAL 
TRAINERS 

Immediate openings, 
Monday-Friday, day 
hours, entry level, will 
train. You train 
MR/DD Adults in per- 
sonal care prework, 
communication & 
domestic skills. 

Contact 

Gail Becker 

Mt. St. Joseph 

Lake Zurich 

(847)438-5050 



WAUKEGAN AREA 

MENTAL HEALTH 

COUNSELOR 

BA/BSyBSW in Psych. 
related field. Seeking 
Mental Health Counselor 
to work in partial hospital 
program with the mentally 
ill. Experience a plus. 

Send or fax your 
resume to: 

PO Box 3854 

Oak Park, IL 60303 

(708) 386-0376 



REGISTERED 
NURSES 

Immed Openings-Nursing 
Opptys. East Texas Medical 
Center, loe'd in the scenic Piney 
Woods of Tyler, TX w/beaut 
lakes & quality fam living, is only 
a short dist. to Dallas. Currently 
have positions avl lor exp'd RNs 
interested in the following: 
•Critical Care fTrauma/Neuro) 
*Med-Surg 'Oncology 'Rehab 
'Orthopedics. Exc sal/bnlts/ 
moving allowances avl. Don't 
miss this oppty. Contact: HR, 
East Texas Medical Center, 
1000 S. Beckham, Tyler, TX 
75701; 800-543-7786; Fax 903- 
597-4918. EOEM/F/D/V. East 
Texas Medical Center, Regional 
Healthcare System. 



1 LPN's/PRIMARY CARE 5 

x 
x 

X 
X 

Illinois J 



(PART TIME/FLEX) 

I We arc now accepting applications for our sub-acutc/skilled I 
Interested parties must have a current 



DIRECT 
CARE 

Direct Care 

Workers for 

MR/DD women in 

residential setting. 

All shifts. 

We are committed 

to quality 

residential care. 

If Interested please ', 
call Gall Becker. 

(847) 438-5050 

Mt. St. Joseph 

Lake Zurich 



I care unit 



i license. If you arc an up-beat, compassionate, energetic care! 
x giver, then welcome to our team of exceptional health carcx 



| providers. Wc offer a competitive salary & benefits package, 
x Contact: 



x 

X 

x 
x 
x 
x 

X 
X 



Libertyville Manor 

610 Peterson Rd. (Hwy. 137) 

Libertyville, IL 60048 

(847)367-6100 



xxxxixixxxxx xixxxxxxirrxxxxxiixxxixiiixxrxxixirixix 



V 

¥ 
V 




• $7.00/Hr. to Start 

• Great Benefits 

• Excellent Working Conditions 

• Fantastic Opportunity 

^^^\ Apply to Person: 

fnt ■ I WO H. Circuit Or. 

V l rtlLLCREST Round Lake Beach. IL 
^^ - hu^c-- meb i ndBarger Ktagoa 

^^ Rotllas Rd.) 



¥ 
¥ 



¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 



Medical 

NEON ATAL NUKSE 
PRACTITIONERS 

Legacy Emanuel Children's Hospital 
& Health Center, loe'd in tho beauti- 
ful paiwamic Northwest, is one ol 
tho mosl comprehensive pediatric 
tertiary care facilities In the state of 
Oregon. Legacy Health System 
tanked one ot the ten best employ- 
ers in Oregon lor (he second year 
running. Fult-timo, Provide clinical 
mgm't o( infants in a 45- bed Level III 
NICU. Beqmls include current ON 
license. BSN/MSN, completion ol 
unrvefslty-ainiialcd Neonatal Nurse 
Practitioner Program & two years 
NICU nursing exp. Portland, Oregon 
offers urban amenities In an attrac- 
tive & attordaWo living environment 
within 90 mlnulos drive ol the 
Cascade Mtns & Pacific Coast. We 
offer a competitive salary range from 
$44,400-$66,600; excellent, flexible 
benefits program; a goal sharo pro- 
gram & on-site filness & chjkJcare 
centers. Please send/tax your 
resume to: 

Barbara Becker 

LEGACY EMANUEL HOSPflM. 

2601 N.Gonlonbeln 

Portland, OR S7227 

Fox: (503) 41 M774 

Phone:(503)413-4911 

EOE/AA 



225 



Business 
Opportunltes 



$50 IN PRODUCTS FREE. 
Call and ask me how to ro- 
cetvo yours. Elegant candles, 
candle holders and accesso- 
ries (or mqre than 23yrs. Ask 
(or my (roe 36 page full color 
catalog. First tlmo customers 
receive 1 dozen votivos (roe. 
Aro you looking to supplement 
your lncome7 You may wish to 
consider our available oppor- 
tunities. Call Holly (847) 740- 
1690. '_ 

INCOME OPPORTUNITY. 
WE MAKE S2200-57700 
WEEKLY WITH NO COMPETI- 
TION. CALL NOW 1-800-095- 
0796 X8448 FOR FREE 2 
MINUTE OVERVIEW. 

STATE DIRECTOR/RE- 

GIONAL MANAGER Linen 
party plan, new lo area, 20 
years experience, seeking ex- 
perienced loader. Advertls- 
Ing/car allowances. 50 shows 
earns 51 ,500/monlh. 1-800- 
536-2457. 



PERSON WANTED 

to own and operate' retail 
candy shop In Grayslake 
area. Low investment. For 
information call Mrs. Burden's 
Gourmet Candy Company, 
Dallas, TX (972) 991-S239 



PERSON WANTED 

Mo own and operate retailj 
Icandy shop in Wauconda| 
'area. Low investment. Fori 
I information call Mrs. Burden's) 
[Gourmet Candy Company, j 
Dallas, TX (972) 991-8239 



228 


Stuaiions Wanted 



LAID OFF PAINTER 
NEEDS WORK, Wauconda 
area, I2yrs. experience. Paint- 
ing, drywall, taping, light car- 
pentry. Call Tyler (847) 
487-5809. 



240 


OiildCarc 



240 



Child Care 



MOTHER OF 2 has 1 full- 
tlmo opening to give your child 
lots of TLC, ages lyr. & up. 
Lots ol activities, fonced-ln 
yard, meals and snacks In- 
cluded. References available. 
Round Lake Beach. (847) 
740-3417. 

f jmri mrr nrmrn iiihiiiiiiiiijl 



us 



liAU PAIR USA j 

Live-in childcare. 

Quality, screened 

European. Legal. 

English speaking. 

Under $200 p/w. 
j Amy Krilzman 

847-821-8524 
j Emily Matz 

847-251-1643 



; w wr fl j i a m w * ¥ T g g*^* 



304 



Appliances 



BROWN GAS STOVE AND 
G.E. REFRIGERATOR, 
ALSO EGG SHELL RE- 
FRIGERATOR, ALL 
WORK FANTASTIC. CALL 
FOR MORE INFORMA- 
TION. KENWOOD ANTI- 
THEFT AM/FM CAS- 
SETTE STEHEO. $250/bost. 
(847) 203-5509. 

MICROWAVE KENMORE, 
CLEAN, quiet, - big, 

$150*est, Nintendo Game 
Mortal Combat Ultimate, $30. 
(414) 605-9980. 



310 


Bazaars/Crafts 



COVERED BRIDGE 

QUILT GUILD SHOW Sat- 
urday & Sunday, March 15 
and 16. 1997. Bureau County 
Fairgrounds, Princeton, Illinois 
SASE: Wanda Stenzol, 910 
Bruce Lane, Princeton, IL 
61356: 815/879-3861. 



314 


Ridding Materials 



^ u fc 



CHILD CARE AVAILABLE 

In Island Lake home. Lots ol 
TLC, learning activities, 2 full- 
time openings. ages 
IB/months & up. References. 
(B47) 487-0077. 

DAY CARE CONCERNED? 
KEEPING thorn safe Is a full 
time (ob...lot me do this job so 
you can do yours. Part/full 
lime. The Links of English 
Meadows. Call Laurie (847) 
548-4796. 

EVERY CHILD DESERVES 
a healthy, happy, nurturing en- 
vironment in which lo grow. 
Mooseheart, a private home 
and school tor children located 
40 miles west ol Chicago has 
tho following FT opportunities 
available: RESIDENTIAL 
CHILD CARE STAFF: soaking 
caring, energetic, patient Indi- 
viduals or couples to live in our 
campus homes to nurture and 
provide guidance to our child- 
ren newborn through high 
school age. Applicants must 
be over 21 , experienced wont- 
ing wilh youth. College degree 
preferred. Salary - $1,250.00 
per month with benefits lo In- 
clude tree room and board (a 
value ol over 59,000), free 
major medical Insurance, pen- 
sion plan, and 4038. For addi- 
tional Information, please con- 
tact Campus Personnel 
630/859-2000 ext. 328. Back- 
ground checks will be conduct- 
ed. 

HEY MOMI I can can watch 
Bamoy on a Big Screenl 
TheyVe got a big yard, huge 
playroom, and oodles of toys. 
Meals and snacks included. 
And my sister can come too. 
Call now for Immediate open- 
ing. Reasonable rates. (847) 
740-0306. 

LICENSED DAY CARE 
HOME In Grayslake has full- 
time openings for children 
6/wks-6yrs„ Monday-Friday,, 
6am-6pm. Professional quality 
child care, In a clean, loving, 
smoke tree home environ- 
ment full of fun things to do. 
CPR & First Aid Certified. Nutri- 
tious meals and snacks. Excel- 
lent roloroncos. For appoint- 
ment call (847) 548-4)455, 

LINDENHURST MOM 

WILL provide quality child- 
care In my homo, lult/part- 

llme. (847) 356-4469, 

MOTHER .OF 2 (4yrs. & 
18mos.) will care for your child 
In clean, smoke-free Underv 
hursl home. (047) 356-2036. 

NANNY NEEDED MUNDE- 
. LIEN AREA, Monday-Fri- 
day, 7om-6pm, live-oul/ln. 
Non-smoker. References re- 
quired. (847)566-^7711. ' • 



FACTORY CLOSEOUTS 

Pre spring blast! Up to 50% 
savings! 2-25x28; 3-32x40; 4- 
35x48; 2-41x54; 4-47x80; 2- 
50x98; 1-55x170. While Invon- 
lory lasts. 1-800-211-9593. 

STEEL BUILDINGS SALE: 
30X40X10. $4,644. 40x60x14, 
$8,324. 50x75x14, $11,316. 
50x100x16, $15,027. 

60x100x16. $17,115. Mini- 
storage buildings. 30x100, 20 
units, $9,692. Free brochures. 
Sentinel Buildings, 800-327- 
0790. Extension 79, 




I Business 
•J Office Equipment 



ELECTRONIC 15 DE- 
PARTMENT cash registers 
and miscellaneous apparel 
racking. (847) 546-4551 
10am- 6pm. 

FULL SYSTEM COPY MA- 
CHINE. Excellent quality. ADS, 
zoom, hi- speed, color. Cost 
$7,900, soil $1,550. (630) 
415-3016. 



320 



Bcctronia 
Computers 



COMPUTERS FOR SALE. 
IBM ThInkpad, 486 SX33, 
color laptop with expanded 
RAM, 28.8 modem, Ethernet 
card and carrying case. Excel- 
lent condition. $950/best. 
Epson FX1030 Dot Matrix 
Printer, $50. Call Ralph at (847 
546-5809 evonlngs after 7pm 



328 



firewood 



MIXED FIREWOOD CUT 
and cured, $30 a pick-up, you 
load or $40 I load. (847) 
244-7764. 



330 



Garage 
Rummage Sale 



UMW RUMMAGE SALE 

GARY UNITED 

METHODIST CHURCH. 

500 First St., Can/. 

Thursday March 6lh, 

7pm-9pm. 

Friday March 71h, 

9am-2pm. 

$1 bag available noon on 

Friday. Housohold Items, 

clothing, small appliances, 

much much more. 

AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIG SALE, and thore 
is still things that |ust did not 
go.... Call us at LAKELAND 
Newspapers and run it 
under the TREE or Givea- 
ways* dasslllod column. FREE 
ADS are NO CHARQEI 
(847)223-8161.0x1.140. 




Horees& Tacks 



SHAVINGS 

Hay, straw, food. 

WE DELIVERI 

(414) 857-2525. 

M-F8-5 

Sal. 8-3. 



Household Goods 
Fumilurc 

EASY CHAIR, SOFA and 
Lovoseal, Blue, Mauve, 
Croam, $575. LEATHER 
sofa and lovoseal, $950. Ex- 
cellent condition, MUST SELLI 
(847)546-1046. 

QUEEN ANNE STYLE bed- 
room, complete $1,100. Din- 
ing room set, $1,700. OAK 
bodroom set $1,200, Oak 
dlnlngroom sot $1,980. 
ALSO Sleigh bedroom sot, 
$1,745. All In PERFECT con- 
dlllon. MUST SELL! 
(847)548-1045. 

BED QUEEN ORTHO MAT- 
TRESS SET, brass head- 
board/frame. Never used. New 
$800, sell $300. (414) 
427-B5B3. 

DESIGNER MODEL 
HOME CONTENTS 
Sofa/lovesoat set, hunter 
green and cranberry, $595. 
Sola/lovesoat set, earth tones, 
$695. Other sets, plaids, 
stripes, florals, leathers, etc. 
Dlnlngroom set, 10-pioce, 
$1,595. Bedroom sot, 6- 
pleco, $995, etc. (847) 329- 
4119. 

FOR SALE 25" COLOR 
CONSOLE TV, $125. (70S) 
710-3995. 

GLASS TOP DINETTE 
SET with 4-chalrs, $40. Light- 
ed entertainment center, 
whlto and brass, 7rt.x7ft., 
S200. (847) 548-1508. 

MOVING SALE, SUNDAY, 
9am-6pm, 39911 Crab Applo 
Dr., Antloch. Rt. 59 Anttoch 
Golf Courso. Everything 50% 
off except fumlluro. furniture 
25% off. Whlto (ull-longth mink 
tor salo. $1,850Aest (847) 
395-0514, (847) 674-B160. 

REMODELING...MUST 
SELLII UPRIGHT FREEZ- 
ER, MICROWAVE, 
DRESSERS, DESKS, 
BOOK CASE, CHINA CAB- 
INET, BRAND NEW 
RANGE HOOD, BEDS, 
KITCHEN BOOTH AND 
TABLE, LOVESEAT AND 
CHAIR, FILE CABINETS, 
ANTIQUE GLASSWARE, 
MISCELLANEOUS KNICK- 
KNACKS AND MORE. 
PRICED TO GOII CALL 
(847) 3S6-6BS6. ' 

VERSATILE THREE 
PIECE SCANDINAVIAN 
TEAK HUTCH. Has many 
uses: Excellent condition. Ask- 
ing $450. (847) 838-0544 
after 3:30pm. 

WEDDING DRESS, SIZE 
16-18, perfect condition, $250. 
Dlnlngroom set, glass lop, 4- 
chairs, $200. TV and stereo 
cabinet, glass door, $70. Uv- 
Ingroom sot, 5-ploce couch 
and 13 pillows, $500. Much 
moroll (847) 546-7903. 



348 


LawnAardcn 



GARDEN TILLERS TROY- 
BILT Rear-Tine Tillers at low, 
direct from factory prices. For 
FREE catalog with prices, spe- 
cial SAVINGS NOW IN EF- 
FECT, and Model Guide, call 
TOLL FREE 1-6OO-520-0400. 
Dept. 11. 



ESP 



Clothes 



WEDDING DRESS DIA- 
MOND COLLECTION, bri- 
dal dross, size 16. While, 
cathedral longlh train, off the 
shoulder dress. Long sleeves, 
beautiful with sequins and 
poaris. Brand new headpiece 
and veil. Paid $2,000,- first 
$500 takes all. Call Melodl 
(414) 889-8414. 

FOR SALE RUSSIAN Blue 
Fox Jacket, size medium, origi- 
nally $899, Will sell $250. (847) 
B3B-3302. 

FULL LENGTH BEAVER 
.COAT, Fox trim. Color Ebony. 
Size extra large. Paid $4,000, 
sell $1,000. (B47) 746-2245 



350 



Miscellaneous 



21 '6" LONG ARCHED 
STEEL BRIDGE, 4'6' wide. 
Heavy duty and nice railings 
attached on both sides. $900. 
(414)857-3211. 

LIFESTYLER EXERCISE 
BIKE, digital timer, $150. 
(414) 857-7918 leavo mes- 
sage. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS. 
TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT 
and SAVEI Commercial/home 
units from $199. Low monthly 
payments. FREE color cata- 
log. Call today 1-800-842- 
1310. 



354 



Medical Equip 
Supplies 



DO YOU HAVE DIA- 
BETES? Receive your glu- 
cose monitor & supplies at no 
cost to youl Call Rainbow 
Foundation toll free 24 hours 
1-888-429-1025. 



358 



Musical Instruments 



ANTIQUE 1925 ESTES 
CHURCH ORGAN, excollent 
condition, solid oak. Call lor 
appointment (847) 587-2100 
ask for Ken. 



360 



Pels & Supplies 




DOG BOARDING 

Vacation In your 

schedule? 

I can watch your dog/pup in 

my homo..,,, , : 

Lots of alledlon (or your ,', . 

"Companion". 

Convenient Irom Rl,41/Edort3 

or yourO'Haro flight schedule 

More comfortable than a 

kennel. Reasonable. 

Call Florence or leave 

message with dales nooded. 

(847)066-6319. 

AQUARIUM NEW 
TANK/HOOD COMBOS: 
20's $42; 30's $69; 55's $89; 
75*s $142; 125's $269! Equip- 
ment sate! Aquatic World 
(414) 567-7339. 

BIRDSl BREEDER MOV- 
ING selling alt birds. Cocka- 
tiels, Love Birds, Parakeets, 
Bourko Parakeets, Indian 
Ring Neck Parakeet, female. 
Senegal Parrot, mato. Quaker 
Parakeets. Sun Conuro, male. 
Tlmneh African Grey, male. 
Amazons Orange Wing, male. 
Blue front, tomato. 5806 6th 
Ave., Downtown Kenosha. 
Birds can bo seen between 
10am & 4pm. daily. 

BRITTANY AKC QUALITY 
pups, great hunters, $350. 
(414) 781-1974. 



PUG AKC, 6/WEEKS, all 
black male, $400. (B47) 
746-7345. 



ipiigGlassifi^d Ads 



I- 




THOUSANDS 

f^^oplewith 

^INTERNET. 



Oei your ^^ment 

. ; ii,oe^aiJvertise^ahsth6 : 
inte&flfet along wim\yqur 

newspaper adJ 




for the future'with 
d and advertise on 
(wtjitfemei. 



Call 
Greg or Dave 
847-223-8161 



'■: ■ - . - ■ . 



MarcIi 7, 1997 UkelANd Newspapers CLASSIFIED 




360 



Pees & Supplies 



COCKER SPANIELS AKC, 
O/wooks Old. (047) 249-4215 
allor 6pm, or page 074-0133. 
Tho sire b a Peril Cocker. 
Dame la red. Both on promis- 
es^ 

COLLIE PUPPIES, SABLE 
and wtilto, health guaranteed, 
vol chocked, eyes certlllod, 
$350.(414)639-0195. 

DO YOU ENJOY working 
with animals? Do you have 2 
hours per week to spare? Assi- 
st Animal Foundation, one of 
tho area's no- kill shelters Is 
seeking volunteers (or work 
that Is highly rewarding and 
lunl We need men and 
women who: can work with 
cats and dogs, do light repair 
work and can arawor phones 
and olhor oHIce duties. We are 
locatod In Crystal Lake. For 
more Information please call 
(815)459-0990. 

TO GOOD HOME 2- 
DOGS, MALE Gorman 
Shepherd, medium mix black 
& tan. (B 15) 344-7957. 

GERMAN SHEPHERD 
PUPS, AKC with papers, 
white, black & Ian, $300. (815) 
943-5715. 

HAPPY JACK MANGE 
MEDICINE: promotes heal- 
ing & hair growth to severe 
skin diseases on dogs & 
horses without steroids. Con- 
tains NO bonzyl-bonzoaio. At 
farm, feed, hardware stores, 

SHIH-TZU PUPS, 

MALE/FEMALE, $350-$375. 
Call Maria (847) 803-5684 
ovenlngs, (773) 509-3298 
days. 

TWO YEAR OLD forret with 
large roll away cage, 
SJOOTbosl. (847) 263-7713. 



370 



Wanted To Buy 



JUST THE FAXit Doos your 
FAX machine not work any 
mom? I |ust need a machine 
that SENDS faxes. I donl care 
If li receives thorn. If you havo 
ono. donl throw it away. IB 
give you a couple bucks tor It. 
Call Davo at (847) 625-2559. 

Slot Machine* WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
Parts. Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nlckato- 

doon and Coko Machines. 
Paying CASH! Call 
(630)985-2742. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



BY OWNER 2-STORY with 
5211. ol covered efront porch, 
5-6 bedrooms. 3-1/2 baths, 
first Hoar oil. ceilings, and 
hardwood, 6-panel doors, tin* 
(shod basoment, 3-car ga- 
rage, on over 3/4 aero, emer- 
ald Estates Subdivision, Ingle- 
sklo. S254.0O0. Exceptional 
quality. Must see. (847) 
587-5411. 

CAN'T AFFORD THE 
HOME YOU NEED? Get 
MORE home for your money 
with minimal do wnpay merit . 
Complete financing H quali- 
lled. DeGeorgo Homo Al- 
llanco, 1-800-343-2884. 

COUNTRYSIDE LAKE 

OPEN House March 9th, 1pm- 
4pm, 20395 Wlndllower CI., 
Mundolein. 4-bedrooms, 2-1/2 
baths, 1 acre, private lakor- 
kjhls, South of 60, Midlothian 
to Countryside Lako Drive to 
Buckthorn, right on Longmea- 
dow, left to Wlndllower, 
$369,900. (847) 566-3726. 

DO YOU WORK? 
Then why donl you own 

a homo??? 

Many hard working people 

think I hey cant buy a home 

because of the type of work 

they do, or because of credit 

or savings issues. Today's 

buyers have options) 

(Mortgages as low as 2% 

down!!) JUST ASKUlm 

Schakt 

your source of Real Estate. 

RE/MAX Plaza 

(815) 363-2454. 

SPRING GROVE, 3-8ED- 
ROOM, 2-balh raised ranch 
on largo wooded lot, 2-1/2 car 
garago, with homo warranty. 
$144,000.(815)675-2381. 

TAX BREAK RENTING 
doesnl do it so why not get out 
of an apartment Into your own 
homo? You may qualify for as 
litllo as 3% down. Servicing II. 
& Wl. Jim Davis (800) 747- 
5547. __ 

TIRED OF RENTING7 A 
homo b In your roach with as 
little as 3% down for qualified 
buyers. Servicing II. & Wl. Jim 
Davis (BOO) 747-5547. 



500 



Homes I'ur S:tk' 



GRAYSLAKE HERITAGE 
AREA BY OWNER, 2-bed- 
room, 1-bath ranch, many up- 
grades, huge lot, hot tub nego- 
tiable, not Included, must sell. 
Bargain at $127,000. Bring all 
offers. No agents. (847) 
223-4229. ' 

INGLESIDE 26117 W. In- 

gleslde Ave. Cute, super 
clean 2-bedroom, 1-bath 
ranch, located In nice neigh- 
borhood on wide lot. Has ce- 
ramic Hie In kitchen, bath, uttll- 
ryroom and entry. Oversized 
groat room with fireplace next 
to large dlntngroom. Freshly 
painted and recently land- 
scaped, includes all applianc- 
es, with new A/C, new water 
soflner. Must see, shows like a 
modell $99,900. Cat! (847) 
587-4119 for more Info. No 
agents please. 

INTEREST BREAK HOME 
owners use equity to pay off 
high Interest obligations. Bet- 
ter than paying high rales on 
credit cards or other bins and 
get the tax benefit. Jim Davis 
(800) 747-5547 Servicing II. & 
m 

ISLAND LAKE 3YRS. NEW 
3-bodrooms, 1-1/2 baths, 
basement, large lot, backs to 
conservation, cul-de-sac, river 
Viow, deck. $155,000. (847) 
487-5323. 

L1NDENHURST 
LEASE/PURCHASE. 
$2,000 down & 

51,400/month buys 4 -bod- 
room, 2-1/2 bath, Uvingroom, 
tamityroom with woodbumlng 
llreplaco. kitchen, dinotto. full 
basement and 2-car garage. 
$183.000. (847) 336-8583. 

LOOKING FOR A TAX DE- 
DUCTION IN 1996? The 
best one may be your own 
home. Wo service II. & Wt. You 
may quality for as tllllo as 3% 
down. Jim Davis (800) 747- 
5547. 



500 


Homes For Sate 



mm 



Homes For Rent 



NEW CONSTRUCTION 
ROUND LAKE BEACH 3- 
BEDROOM, 2-balh ranch, 
with attached 2-car garage, 
vaulted ceilings, skylights, ce- 
ramic tile, much more. Call 
today $119,900. (847) 263- 
3589. 

RENT TO OWN ROUND 
LAKE spacious 3-bedroom, 
2-balh, has an upgrades in- 
cluding huge kitchen, with cus- 
tom cabinets, sunroom, fin- 
ished walk-out basement with 
ofllce, 2-car, fenced yard, 
great neighborhood, 

$995/monlh, (847) 438-1012. 

RENT WITH OPTION 4- 
bedroom, 1-bath In Round 
Lake Beach, newly remo- 
deled. $87,000 owner flnanc- 
Ing available. (847) 223-8081. 

SELL A HOME/BUY A 
HOME. It selling, we have a 
number of interested buyers, tf 
interested in purchasing you 
may quality lor as little as 3% 
down. Servicing II. & Wl. Jim 
Davis. (800) 747-5547. 

WE BUY HOUSES. Any 
size, any condition. Fast close. 

(847)438-0901. 

WOODSTOCK (5) ACRE 

Farmetto. 3-bodrooms, 2- 
baths, 2- large metal clad 
buildings, zoned A-2, 
5240,000. (847) 540-9946. 



504 



Homo For Rent 



ANTIOCH HOME 2-BED- 
ROOMS, 2-1/2 car garage, 
cute and cloan. $875/monlh. 
(847) 265-2650. 



Fax Us 
Your Ad 

223-881 



DO YOU WORK? 
Then why donl you own 

a home??? 

Many hard working people 

think they canl buy a home 

because of the type of work 

they do, or because of credit 

or savings Issues. Today's 

buyers havo options! 

(Mortgages as low as 2% 

downll) JUST ASKUlm 

Schald 

your source of Real Estate. 

RE/MAX Plaza 

(815)363-2454. 

LINDENHURST 3-BED- 

ROOM, 2-BATH, fenced 
yard, excellent condition, short 
or long term. $1,300/month. 

(216) 974-7625. 

NORTH CHICAGO 4-BED- 
ROOM, 2-car garage, 
$680/monlh plus lease and 
deposit. Patel (647) 

776-1024 leave message. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 

clean and cozy 3-bodoom 
ranch, on quiet street near 
take. Available April 1st. Pels 
OK. $849/monlh plus $1,000 
security. (847) 945-5217. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH styl- 
ish 2-1- bedrooms. 2-balh 
home with wood floors, vault- 
ed ceilings, while kitchen, 
washer & dryer. $795/monlh. 
(847) 680-4940. 

TWIN LAKES NEW 3-bed- 
room home, 2-full oaths, futf 
basement, 2-car garage, C/A, 
5-appllances, no pels. 
$975/monih plus utilities and 
security. (414) 279-5930. 

WAUCOHDA 4-BED- 

ROOM, 1-1/2 balh, sunken 
Uvingroom, 2-car garage, pri- 
vate beach, $1,100/monlh. 
(630) 529-2465. 



508 



Homes Wrnled 



Ml 



3 Bedrooms, boat slip, 2 yrs. old m 

Sound interesting? This 8 room 2.5 bath 
home is a few doors from the sub-division 
dock on Pistakee Lake. Master suite features 
sun room, Jacuzzi & walk-in closet. Eat-in 
kitchen, formal dining room, extra large win- 
dows & a garage. $124,900 

Michael Lescher 

RE/MAX Advantage 
(847) 395-3000 

"Your link to the chain" 



ATTENTION REALTORS: 
JOURNEYMAN Electrician, 
20 years exporlenco willing to 
exchange contract electrical 
work on your buildings lor suit- 
able housing. Below union 
contract prices, savo big $S. 
Expert In renovations and 
electrical code violations. Will- 
ing to barter contract vs. rent. 
Call BIO. Lot's talk! (414) 654-, 
2104 room 318, leave mes- 
sapo. 

I NEED To Buy A 

HOUSE 
ANY CONDITION. 
MUST BE 
REASONABLE. 
(B47) 587-43SS. 

R.N. WITH ONE child sooks 
2+ bedroom house. Nice aroa, 
good schools in North Lake 
County/South Kenosha Coun- 
ty area. $600-S725/month. 
Must allow dogs and be avail- 
able by 3/15-4/1. Prof er largo 
fenced yard. Ploaso call Kelly 
after 6pm (630) 369-6802. 




DRIFTWOOD 



pmrnvoooitmii 



•| -■'i-t-iL'' oT«n' 



GUJGC 

.'■■■•'J 



nronrmx 



MASTtttSUlE • 




HCI 

100 * sfl 



DRIFTWOOD 

In today's economy, when eve*y cent counts, a young family shopping for their first home would 
like to make an economical purchase that presents the most for each building dollar. It you nappen 
to fit that profile, you need look no further than the 1033 square foot Driftwood. This three bedroom, 
two balh home wastes none of the allotted space. Retired couples wishing to downsize, should also 
consider the Driftwood. 

In addition to the attractive wood oxterior, this Innovative floor design offers more than many \,\& t -\s 
boasting a lot moro square footage and a higher price tag, A classic covered porch takes you 
through the entry and into the spacious family room. A vaulted celling accents the feeling of open- 
ness that marks Jho Driftwood, There Is plenty of room here lor a full complement of furniture. An 
optional entertainment center will add to your enjoyment of this main family gathering spot. 

The two secondary bedrooms are nico-sizod, and each has a generous closet end a view win- 
dow facing front. They share a lull bathroom located In the connecting hallway, which also features 
built-in sholvos and convenient guest closet. 

Tho master sulto is quite a surprise (or a home this size. A big sleeping aroa. hugo walK-ln clos- 
et and private bathroom grace tho main bedroom. Linen storage and a small utility closet aro near- 
by. 

The garago, stylishly attached to the side ol the house, olfers you the safety and bonoiit ol being 
able to unload groceries directly Irom your car into the kitchen. No need to worry about tho weather 
while performing this chore. 

Tho functional kitchen, complete with all the built-in appliances, lets you prepare meals with a 
minimum of bother. Tho vaulted dining room provides a pleasant atmosphere to break bread and 
discuss Ihe events of the day. Sliding glass doors open to the back patio, admitting a cool breeze 
and offering a spot for occasional outdoor dining or working on your tan when the sun Is shining. 

For a study kit ol the DRIFTWOOD (404-41). send $10.00, to Landmark Designs, P.O. Box 2307- 
LP60, Eugene, OR 97402 (Bo sure to specify plan name & number). For a collection ot plan books 
loaturlng our most popular homo plans, send $20 to Landmark. 



514 



GDndaTwui Homes 



FOR RENT AVAILABLE 
IMMEDIATELY, in Anlloch 
spacious 2-bedroom town- 
house with large closets, 1-1/2 
balhs, appliances, C/A, laun- 
dry room In basement with 
washer and gas dryer hook- 
up, plus 2-car garage wrih 
opener. Close to schools and 
shopping. $925/month, (list 
and last months rent plus se- 
curity deposit. No pets. Refer- 
ences needed. (647) 356- 
2417 leave message. 

GURNEE CONDO EXTRA 
clean 2-bedroom, fireplace, 
A/C, washer/dryer, garage, 
pool, 4-6 month lease, Imme- 
diate. 5950/monlh. (847) 
336-2719. 

ISLAND LAKE NEWER 3- 
bedroom, 1-1/2 bath town- 
home, 2-car garage, fireplace, 
new palk). Perfect first home. 
Only $113,000. (647) 
467-6102. 

TOWNHOUSE-WAUKE- 
GAN, 3-BEDROOM, 2-1/2 
BATHS AND MUCH 
MORE. GURNEE 
SCHOOLS. $98,000. (047) 
249-5442. 

VACATION VILLAGE 
BEAUTIFUL 2-bedroom, all 
on one level, ground door, 
near walk-way. Mostly fur- 
nished. $64,900. (647) 
309-6900. 

OPEN HOUSE, SUNDAY 
3/9, 1PM-5PM, S45 MARI- 
NA ST., WAUCONDA 
LAKEFRONT CONDO IN 
LAKEPOINTE SUBDIVI- 
SION, gorgeous 2-bedroom, 
2-balh, den, fireplace, A/C. 
vaulted celling, large deck 
overlooking Bang3 Lake, asso- 
ciation, pool, beach, marina. 
For sale by owner, $189,900. 
(647) 487-7576. 



518 


Motxlc Homes 



1994 DOUBLE WIDE, 3- 
bedrooms, 2-balhs, C/A, Uv- 
ingroom, famllyroom, dining- 
room, large kitchen, $54,000. 
(414) 942-4126, pager 800- 
590-0S57. 

MOBILE HOME 2-BED- 
ROOM, high callings, ceiling 
fans, 2-sheds for storage, 
swimming pool and park 
across street. Appliances up- 
dated InsJdo and out. Growing 
family needs more room. 
S16,500/bost. (847) 
740-4418. 

MODULARS 'DOU- 
BLEWIDES -SIN- 
GLEWIDES TWO STORY 
MODULAR ON DISPLAY! 
FOUNDATIONS 'BASE- 
MENTS 'GARAGES *WELLS 
•SEPTIC. WE DO IT ALLI 
FREE STATEWIDE DELIV- 
ERY/SET. RILEY MANUFAC- 
TURED HOMES 1-800-790- 
1541. 

TODAY'S MANUFAC- 
TURED HOMES ARE MORE 
HOME THAN YOU IMAG- 
INED. MANUFACTURED 
HOMES ARE WELL CON- 
STRUCTED. BEAUTIFULLY 
DESIGNED TO MEET YOUR 
HOUSING NEEDS. FOR 
MORE INFORMATION CAUL 
ILLINOIS MANUFACTURED 
HOUSING ASSOCIATION I- 
600-252-0495. 

WOODLAND SCHOOL 

DISTRICT) Wo II maintained 
3-bedroom rnobilo homo, al 
appliances and window treat- 
ments, C/A, storage shed, 
largo dock. $15,500. (847) 
360-9200 ask for Dave. 



520 



Apartments Per Rent 



FOR RENT 1-BEDROOM 
In Round Lake Beach. Rent 
Irom $495/monih lor first 

6/morths. (647) 623-8869, or 
page (647) 210-9508. 

FOX LAKE 1-BEDROOM, 
private patio, new carpet, re- 
modeled. Free heat, water, 
gas, parking, coin laundry. 
(B47) 567-6360. 

FOX LAKE/LEISURE VIL- 
LAGE, secure senior living, 2- 
bodroom3, 1-bath, A/C, wash- 
er/dryer, golf, pool, bus serv- 
ice, community center. 
5725/monlh plus electric. 
(647)381-1591. 

GRAYSLAKE 1-BED- 

ROOM, POOL, garago. utlll- 
llos, no pots. $650/monlh plus 
security. (847) 540-7353. 

GURNEE LUXURY 2-BED- 
ROOM, 2-balh, 5-6 month 
lease with extension available. 
Balcony, washer/dryer, pool, 
clubhouse, gas/AC, flexible 
move-In dale, $905/monlh 
plus security. Pels OK. (847) 
336-2719. 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



GURNEE NEWER 2-BED- 
ROOM, great location. C/A, 
W/D hook-up, no pets. Applca- 
lion and security required, 
$650/monlh (847) 244-«199 
weekdays. 

IMPERIAL TOWER & 
IMPERIAL MANOR 

QUIET BUILDINGS 
LARGE SPACIOUS 

APARTMENTS 

AIR CONDITIONING 

PRIVATE BALCONIES 

LARGE CLOSETS 

PRIVACY WALLS 

CONVENIENT LAUNDRY 

FACILITIES. 

CALL (647) 244-9222. 

ORCHARD APARTMENTS 
3-1/2 mles West ol CLC on 
Washington St. Large 2-bed- 
room, carpeted, balcony, laun- 
dry facilities. Heat, cooking 
gas, water Included. NO 

PFTS NO WATERBEDS. 
$590/month. Lease. (847) 
328-€674. 



CENTER 
STREET 

APARTMENTS 

Studio 

Apartment 

now available! 

Utilities 
included! 

CALL TODAY! 

395-0949 



Calling 

All 

Military 

Personnel 

You are 

to report 

immediately to 

Waterford Place 

for a great deal 

on 1 bedroom 

apartments! '. 

Call today! 
(847)746-2211 



STWINIT 

VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave, Zlon 

1 & 2 BEDROOMS 

FREE HEAT 

[Appliances • Custom Blinds] 

On-site Manager • No Pets 

Starting from $495/mo. 

Call Martha & Isaac 

(847) 746-1420 

or Bear Property 
Management 

f.414) 697-961&I 
1E> 



One 'Mantfi, TFre& 

Stop, Look, and Live Here' 



Apartments Feature 
•Full)- equipped 
kitchen with dish- 
washer and disposal 
• 1,1-1/2 or 2 baths 
•Wall (o wall 

carpeting 
•window Blinds 
•Individually 

controlled heating 

and A/C 



Townbomes feature 
•2levd&3-bd 
^ Doorplms 

i_ Village gj .pnio or balconies 



Luxury Rental •Attached garages 
Townhomes •Private strect-lcvd 

and entrances 

Apartments .Wisher&drjw 
Minutes from lake hookups 
Michigan and tbc .Rrepbcesinsome 
units 



•Laundry bcilite tU Marim 

5215 lllh Ave. 
IBtirwmApts fen^M 2Bdm. 

frm$490 (414)656-1010 Tomtoms $64} 

OFFER EXPIRES 2/28/97 



Water's Edge 

WISHES YOU A 

HAPPY EASTER! 

•Oi'. Hcai, cooking and water included 
•On site maintenance 
•Comfortably designed apunmcnis 

WATER'S EDGE APARTMENTS 

250 S. Route 59, Ingleside/Fox Lake 

847-587-6888 tg| 




OAKREDGE VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 



Offering Affordable Housing for 

Qualified Applicants* 

Currently Accepting Applications on 

our 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments 

Stop in at: 

299 Oakridge Court in Antioch 

Or Call: 

847-395-4840 

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY 
Managed by Meridian Group. Inc. 




Swing By 
and See! 




ANTIOCH 
MANOR 



ATAHTMENTS 



Limited Number 
Available 

CALL NOW! 

• Convenient to Metra 
• No Maintenance Worries 

Be One of the Lucky Ones! 

847-395-0949 

HWY. 83 & North Ave. 



EUS3 



¥ * *•* * * •- r • • 



■ * U** **- 




CLASSIFIED UkdANc! Newspapers MarcIi'7, 1997 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



528 



Apt/Homes 
To Share 



530 


Rooms For Rent 



534 



Business Property 
For Sale 



luiintiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiuiiiuiiiiiuiiiniiiiiiiiiiiii 

ENGIEWOOD, FL 

(SW) - Pizzeria For Sate by 
Owner. Easy operation, 
turn-key business. $55K 
firm, cash offers accepted. 

941-474-5050 

tnmiiiiiitiuiruiMUUllllllilllHUUUIIllllllllllllllI 



MyRTLE BEACH, SC 

Outstanding Business 
Opptys. S50K-S3M price 
range! "Restaurant (fine 
dining) 'Convenient stores 
•Liquor stores 'Hardware 
store/rental business/truck 
rental 'Major casino (video 
poker). Other comm'l opp- 
tys & R/E for dvfpmt. 
Marshall G. Bryant (Pres), 
Sunbelt Business Brokers 
in Myrtle Beach tor more 
confidential info. 
003-1 4 8-1 293/5 520; 
Rix 803-826-874 1 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



OFFICE/STORE FOR 

RENT, 330sq.tt., Round Lake. 
(888) 354-1029. 



a STORES I 
| FOR RENT jj 



STORES 
FOR RENT 

SJTwo adjacent stores each|* 
S 1200 square feet. Busy JJ 
j strip center, good park- Si 
g ing. Be next to Papa 3 
JJ Johns Pizza, Subway H 
u Sandwiches, Jewel/Osco, " 
u Blockbuster & Dairy u 
j* Queen on 21st Street jj 
[J (Rt. 173) Just west of Jj 



Sheridan Rd. 



3 (847)680-7700 3 




540 



Investment Propery 



568 



OiUOfAreiPropertj 



WAUCONDA, IN TOWN 
ADULT COMMUNITY, 1- 

room studio, $49S/month, In- 
cludes all utilities and cable 
TV. (847) 526-5000. 

WAUKEGAN AVAILABLE 
SOON, remodeled 2-bod- 
room. Free heat, water, gaa, 
parking, coin laundry. From 
$595/month. (847) 587-6360. 

ZION 1 & 2 bedroom apart- 
ments. Free heat, water, gas, 
parking, coin laundry. From 
$450/monlh. (647) 587-8360. 



CANADA 

Ontario - Growing restau- 
rant chain (British Style 

Pubs) looking for Investors. 
Call 905-765-6595 

Email: stgeorge@netcom.ca 



560 



Vacant Lot/Acreage 



ROOMMATE WANTED to 
share 2-bedroom house In 
Lake Villa, $250/month and 
1/2 Utilities. (647) 265-6738 
evenings, (647) 918-2210 
ext.236 days. 



LOOKING FOR A LOT? 1 

acre lot, Spring Grove, 32,000 
down, no Intoresl or payments 
for 18 months or will discount 
lor cash. Can owner. (815) 
678-4228. 



ILLINOIS 

Tho unsurpassed elegance ot this 
nearly new 6000 sf. home w/every 
conceivable extra on 118 secluded 
ac of hills, ponds & trees offers you 
the utmost In gracious living 2-1/2 
hrs. Chicago, S795K. Also; Maint 
free ranch w/your own pvl dock & 
high & dry Mississippi River loca- 
tion make this the perfect roliremenl 
or vac home. Only $98,500. Call 
Buck or Sue 815-273-3461 Old 
Northwest Land Co., Inc. for details. 



568 



Out Of Area Property 



FURNISHED SLEEPING 
ROOMS. Mundeleln area. 
Male/female. No pets. 
S90/per week. References. 
(647) 566-2B85. 

ROOM %TH HOUSE- 
HOLD PRIVILEGES, pleas- 
ant surroundings, $3T5/month 
utilities inlcuded. Ask for Rose 
(647) 740-0813. 



1.62 ACRE LOT on private 
Island with lake. Near Hilton 
Head, S.C. Community dock & 
boat launch Into IntracoaslaJ 
waterway., $35,000. Call f. 

600-417-6770 

MONTANA AWESOME 

LAKE VIEWS. Level building 
sito w/!ols of ponderosa pines 
A spectacular mln vlows. 
Power & phone nearby. 20 
acres - $49,900. Financing. 
Call now 406-227-5901. 

SOUTHERN COLORADO. 
RIDE off Into the sunset! 47 
acros-$29,900. Rolling fields A 
woods w/beautlful mtn vlows & 
abundant wildlife. Close to 
lakes A National Forest. Year 
round access, electric, tele- 
phone. Easy financing. Call 
now 719-564-6367 Red Crook 
at Hatchet. 



XXXII1IIXXIUIUIIIXXXIXXXXX1X 

ARIZONA 

SCOTTSDALE GOLF 
PROPS 

Desert Mln TefravHa, Boulders, Troon 
A others. Sales & seasonal rentals. 
Buyer/tenant rep. Links International 
Got! Properties. Richard J. Roland, 
Bkr, G02-595-O77O 

iimiiimiiiiumiiinmir 



■ ■r..m.im..m.im ntiri 



S. WISCONSIN 

For Sale by Owner. 26ac 

farmette, 4BR, wlk-ln attic, 

fin bsmt, spring w/poten- 

tial for pond. S250K. 

941-574-6269 



miniiinii i ii i iiiniiiniiii 



INVESTMENT 
OPPORTUNE 

Osceoia County, Florida. Near 
Olsney World and beaches, 
17.5 acres (mol) lakefront, 
$265,000. Also same area, 
88.59 acres, cleared, elevated 
land, $7,600.00 acre. Both 
properties abut paved road and 
have development potential. 
■107-937-2323, Les Murdock 
ERA Friendship Really Inc. 



INDIANA BUSINESS 
PROPERTY 

in northern LaPorte cty nr 1-94 & 
Hwy 20. Property ind'ds 1-42'xB2' 
& 1 •36'x60' bldg on 5.83 acs. Many 
potential opptys. S160K. Also; 72 * 
acs nr LaPorte & not fa/ from 1-94 & 

90. Small creek, a wetland & 
rolling hills make this property ideal 
lor development or for 2 or 3 home 
sites. Real estate broker is an 
owner, S435K. Call Bob at; 

BOKTIBEMJY. 1-BOO-75S-70S8. 



[MISSOURI 1 

< 560 acres. Cattle ranch, > 
* exc, house, bldgs, fence, ? 
\ Sedalia, MO. $775,000 for \ 

4 all. Owner finance. > 

5 Business Properties Ltd. J 

4 8l&-52S~5042 > 



j CASWELL BEACH, NC[ 

i For Sale by Owner. Beaut. 
S Island bch hse, 1 blk to 
; ocean on 7th fairway of Oak _ 
■Island CC. 4BR/3BA, LR, Ig; 
■FR, DR, 2c-gar, Ig scrndE 
■ porch opens to golf crse.B 

Spvtbch. S225KorB/0. No- 

I 



MISSOURI 

16 mi. E. of Lake ol Ihe Ozarks. 
260 ac. hunting & cattle ranch 
w/2 homes, spring fed lake 
(would make great retirement, 
corporate or individual retreat). 
Blacktop road frontage, 
S26O.0O0. By Owner. 
Call 573-635-4661 for details. 



Sbkrs. 



Ask for 



DickS 



I Richardson 600-872-411 8; | 
Seves 800-548-4996 S 

■ ■ 

■■■■■■■■■■■— nimiimiif in m—v 

; COLORADO j 

1 Near Durango. Relocate to a« 
{ Growth Market In a low crime 5 
•area, 3br, 3-l/2blh ranch, 110} 
1 irrig acs, horse & cattle prop., « 
16000 sf barn, huge silo, J 
{ lenced vu. S520K. By Owner. « 
1 Call 909-699-9733 for details. « 
W..«— »— « — ««J( 



"branson; mo" 

Area-On Table Rock Lake. 
Newsubdiv., 101 lots, lake 
front & lake vw, will build to 
suit, log homes & A frames 
our specialty. Finc'g avl. 
Dale 80O-66O-4720 

k -■ --< 



WISCONSIN 

iFor Sale by Owner, Sand 
I beach. Build able lot + Brm 
I hse. All Ig rms, dbi ft pi, Ig oak 
trees. 25mi N. of IL. 17mi S. 
I of Mlwkee. $169,800. 
414-895-6133 



■aaaaaaaaoaaaaaaaauuuaa ■ 



NORTH MICHIGAN 

HARBOR BEACH on Lake Huron 
Iprime development property 
|(resid'l/comm'l), 41 acs adjoining 
indus.park. 1300 tt. on good road, 
can be subdivided. Exc. invest 
ment opportunity. @ $1 1,000 per 
acre. Must sell quickly. By Owner. 
Call 517-479-6167 (or into/details 



MISSOURI 

460 acre farm. 35 mi. N. ol 
Arkansas. 40 ac. alfalfa, 3/4 bot- 
tomland, 60x60' hay barn, other oul- 
btdgs. 3BR remodeled (arm homo 
(2100t 50, 62 mi. E ol Branson, 
Mo. J550K. Owner finance. Call 
117-256-5346 lor details. 



J 



TAX 



568 



Out of Area 
Property 



W. MICHIGAN 

Dairy Farm, 600+ac. 

Silver Lake Hardware 

Store. Century-21, 

Sandy/Date 
800-968-5510 



Ml - UNION 

(N. ol Elkhart, Indiana). Gel 
Away From It All. 120 ac 
Income & recreational prop- 
erty, Marketable timber. 4 mi. 
No. of 80/90 tollroad - Elkhart 
exit. S365K/OBO. By Owner. 
Call 334-215-0704 tor details. 



MISSOURI 

286 acs hill farm, 160 acs till- 
able. 1 mile of Castor River 
access. Nice for game hunting, 
45 mlns. S.W. of Cape 
Girardeau, Also: 720 acs grad- 
ed farmland adjoins $2.5 Million 
total. 573-438-2427 for details 



CENT. WISC. 

(Clark City) 

For Sale By Owner. 60 ac 

mostly wooded. Small 

creek & spring, SOOK cash 

offers accepted. 

715-267-3282 



MISSOURI 

Got Away From The Problems 
Ol The City, Spac. 2 yr old 5br 
house on 60 rolling acs, park 
like setting, 4 ponds, Ig dock, 
barn, other oulbldgs, nr main 
hwy, $265K. By Owner. 
Call 816-438-2562 far detaiU. 



ARIZONA 

MOBILE HOME PARK 
100% Occupied. With a com- 
mercial building, 26 spaces, 5 
mobile homes Included. Well 
established, laundry, dose to 
Colorado River & casinos, 
$325,000. 520-669-4558 
n:n=iiniiTiT HnTiTTTs 



TUSCANY. ITALY 

1600s Villa for Lease by 

Owner. Newly renov, fab 

vws. 1/2hr to Florence 

on famous 800ac 

wine/olive oil estate. 

Sips 2-16. Wkly/long- 

term. Poof, cent. ht. 

English caretaker. 

800-450-1555. 



[ MICHIGAN j 

SCassopolis - For Sale By: 
; Owner - Lovely yr rnd 2 M: 
■home on beaut Diamond; 

• Ikfrnt. Boathouse, sprklr sys,; 

• 2-c att gar, nice neighbor- ■ 
Shood, S485K 616-445-3370 : 



COLORADO, DURANGO 

Get away from tho Problems of 
the Big City. 80 ac, dream ranch, 
ponderosa pines, exlnt hunting, 
building sites, beautiful views, yr 
'round access, 14x80 mobil, free 
natural gas, £275,000. By Owner. 
Call 970-365-7S37 



SUBSCRIBI 



223-8161 



DIMECTORlf 




INCOME TAXES 
& ACCOUNTING 

Personal - Business 

g dUe qqej.Tn 

Enrolled Agents & CPA 

Established I960 

847-223-0777 

Hrs: 8:30am - 7pm (open all year) 

265 Center St. 

Grayslakc, II 60030 




10 W. Phillip Rd.; Suite 101 

Vernon Hills, IL 60061 

847-549-7007 Phone 

847-549-7014 Fax 

Weekend & Evening Hours 
Accounting and Tax Services 
Individuals & Small Businesses 
Reasonable Rates 
Visa & Mastercard accepted 



I 



I 



S 



I 



r A • visa & rviasiercara accepted « 



ft 



B tiaEMBflaaBiaaaaflfl^ 



KELLY A. GOUDREAU, EA 
KELCO ACCOUNTING 



ENROLLED TO PRACTICE 

BEFORE THE 

INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE 



37135 N. CREMONA AVENUE TEL: (B47i 356-5770 
LAKE VILLA, ILLINOIS 60046 FAX: (8471 356-9540 



Comprehensive 9 Accounting Services 
GET YOUR TAXES DONE IN A 

SNAP! 

Federal & State Taxes 
Personal Business 



564 N. Route 83 
Grayslake, IL 60030 
Phone (847) 223-4040 



B 



ELECTRONIC 
TAX FILING 



Daniel E. Coulon, EA 
Enrolled to practice beforo tho I.R.S 



570 



Cemetery LoU 



CRYPT BURIAL PLOTS (2) 
In Momory Gardens, Arling- 
ton Heights. Call (815) 
675-1402 5pm-7pm K no an- 
swer. leave message 



704 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



1078 DODGE TRANS- 
VAN 360 V8 rebuilt transmis- 
sion, automatic, tow mileage, 
complete brake Job, 
$2,000/best. (647) 356-324B. 



708 



SnowmDbiles/ATVs 



1994 YAMAHA V-MAX 600, 
644 original miles, garage 
kept, electric start and hand- 
warmers, reverse and cover, 
$4,600/t>est. (647)587-1051. 

CASE UNI-LOADER 

SNOW BUCKET, like new, 
$700 or trade. 500 gallon fuel 
lank & sland, $100. Profes- 
sional weight bench & weights, 
bosl otfor. (847) 751-9529. 

SNOWMOBILES & ACCES- 
SORIES (2) 1991 Yamaha. 
(1) Vonture 2up Reverse 
460CC. (1) Exciter II 570cc Liq- 
uid approximately 1000 miles 
both. $2.450/oa. (2) 1993 Po- 
laris 500 E.F.I. 450 miles, stud 
track, carbides, $3,500/ea. 
Also covers (or at) (4). (1) 1992 
Featherllte aluminum en- 
closed Sno-Traller drive In & 
drive out, $5,750. (1) Cat Cut- 
ter (2 child size) windshield, 
padded seat, $595. Purchase 
entire package tor $14,995. 
(815) 356-7912. 

SNOWMOBILES ft BOAT 
1991 Wildcat 700, very good 
condition, $2,200. 1979 Arctic 
Cat Jag, completely rebuilt, 
$500. New 2-placo enclosed 
trailer, $1,100. 1979 23ft. 
Cabin Cruiser boat, $4,500. 
(647) 872-3029. 

SNOWMOBILES MUST 

SELL! I 1997 MXZ670, mint, 
with belly pan protector, low 
mllos, $5,700. 1996 Formula 
III, with picks, Texan, car- 
bides, extra carbides, $4,500. 
Call Ray (547) 623-7847. 




1SFT. FIBERGLASS 
BOAT, 55hp Johnson, runs 
groat, excellent ski boat. Com- 
plete. Asking $1,500. (414) 
653-6378. 

17-1/2 FT. LARSON. 
New seals. 
Fiberglass. 

V-a 1BBhp. 
Includes trailer. 

$2,900. 
(847)395-6449. 

BASS BOAT RANGER 
AZTEC 176, 2 livo wells, (1) 
115hp Johnson outboard, 17lt. 
long. Call after 6pm, 
$6,000/best. Must soe. (815) 
385-2335. 



SIMPLY GORGEOUS- 
BETTER TIIAN MEWI! 

Ora year oW Ranch ONLY $ 1 26,900 
- Wesl Son (Just East ol Lewis) 
PROMISING PLEASERlt 

Spacious 1 yr. now Ranch 
w/noutial carpel, hugo country 
Kitchen, 3 bdrms, 2 full baths. 
2-1/2 car attachod garage. Full 
Bsmt for U 2 finish. Whlto 
glove clean. 

CORNERSTONE REALTY 
Ask for fln.ni/rt 872/1515/8998 



JUST LISTED 

Wlnthrop Harbor 4 bod 
room CUSTOM BUILT 
HOME-ONLY $219,50011) 
Tho builder built (his home for 
himself & spared nothing!! 
Hardwood entry, oak cablnots 
& doors, 1st lloor laundry, 4 
bedrooms plus hugo loll area 
for a den. Family room w/firo- 
placc-3 car garage-oxten- 
slve dock & gazebo, 
Basement. Super Impressive 
area of new homes. 

CORNERSTONE REALTY/Call 
Brenda 872-1 51 5/872-699B 



BEACH PARK 

NEW CONSTRUCTION 

AMAZINGLY ONLY $113,90O!IJ 
Spacious 3 bedfoom-2 bath 
Ranch w/oak cablnots-slidor 
to a dock. Full basemoni 
ready to finish. Deep lot-room 
4 a garage. Still time lo 
choose colors. 

Call Brtmta today 

CORNERSTONE REALTY 

872-1315/87^8998 



710 



Boats, Motors, 
Inc. 



SEA-DOO "XP". Usod 
8/l!mes (less-than 20hrs.). 
Mint condition. Sold new 
$7,200. Must sell $3,750. 
(647)396-5481. 

SLIPS AVAILALE ON FOX 
LAKE, with 4-way Ilea, and 
safety springs. Call (647) 
356-2747. 

SUMMER FUNI SUPER 

1094 Bass Tracker Party Hut, 
wllh covers, screens, galley, 
head, Mercury Marine out- 
board, 90hp, under SOhra., 
1995 trailer. All mint. $22,500. 
(647) 934-6196, (647) 991- 
2246. 

5 SYLVAN 

! PONTOON BOATS 

30 New In Stock 
Indoor Showroom 

HUSTLER SPORT 

CENTER, INC 

(815) 385-4848 



720 



Sporb Equipment 



AB ROLLER PLUS TRAIN- 
ER, (as soon on TV), with 
vldoo and exorcise pad. Brand 
now $135. Sell (or $75/best. 
(647) 973-0342. 



804 


Can for Stic 




1970 OLDS CUTLASS 
CONVERTIBLE. Value 
$6,000. Will go $5,000*ost. 
(647) 467-7743. 

1974 FORD RANCHERO, 
76,000 original miles, 351C, 
runs excellent, body in very 
good condition, no rust, good 
tiros, $1,000 cash. Ask for 
John (414) 843-^4632. 

1961 AMC SPIRIT, good 
runner, many new parts, no 
rust, $1,000/best. (647) 
546-3205, pagor (647) 339- 
7937. 

1981 AUDI 5000. MUST 
SELL. MANY NEW PARTS. 
NEW TIRES, POWER 
SUNROOF AND WIND- 
OWS. BEST OFFER. (647) 
223-8161 EXT. 156. 

1982 TOYOTA CELICA 
FAST BACK, 4-cyllnder. 5- 
spood, onry 64,000 miles, runs 
good, needs minor repairs, 
(exhaust) otherwise moch- 
porfocl. Sell $650 or fast cash 
otfor. Call Bill (414^ 654-2104 
room 316, leave message 

1984 LINCOLN TOWN 
CAR, 92,000 miles, black, ox- 
collont condition, $2,450. 
(706)399-0251. 

1965 DODGE TURBO 
LANCER ES, $600*ost. 
Needs work. Call Slu (647) 
396-3334. 

1986 PLYMOUTH VOYAG- 
ER SE, now transmission, al- 
ternator, 1-owner, good condl- 
tlon, $2,699. (647) 295-5B9B. 

1987 PLYMOUTH SUN- 
DANCE TURBO, 2-door, 5- 
spood, am/lm cassollo, A/C, 
rear dolog, $1,900. (647) 
356-6941. 

1988 HONDA PRELUDE 
SI, A/C, crulso, automatic, 
loadod, CD tapo, sunroof, low 
mllos. no nisi, $6,000. (847) 
872-34B8. 

1968 MERCEDES 190E, 
rod, sunrool, mint condition, 
$9,500/bosl. (414) 697-9G07 
evonlngs, (647) 473-9125 
days. 

1989 COUGAR, GREY, 2- 
door, power window/locks, 
sloroo, groat appoaranco, 
runs great, $3,600*ost. (706) 
558-2563. 

1989 MERCURY SABLE 
GS, PDL, AM/FM casello ra- 
dlo, S2.900. (847) 249-6B68. 

1990 CHEVY CAVALIER, 
automatic, air, oxcollonl condi- 
lion, $3,395, (847) 587-7476. 

1990 SUZUKI SWIFT, 48K 
mllos, manual, sunroof, good 
condition, $2,500. (647) 
265-6414. 

1991 CHEVY LUMINA, 4- 
door, black, power wind- 
ows/locks, A/C, CD player, 
$3,000ta)sl, (647) 746-6219. 

1991 CAMARO, $500 and 
lako over payments. 1964 
Camry, $1,300/bost. (647) 
662-6109. 

1991 HONDA CIVIC 

HATCHBACK, A/C, sunroof, 
AM/FM cosselto, now tiros, 
low mlloago, original owner, 
$6,250. Anlloch. (847) 872- 
8394 days, (647) 838-0838 
evenings. 



804 


Cars For Sale 



1991 HONDA. CIVIC, 2- 
door hatchback . 4-speed, new 
tiros, no rust, excellent run- 
ning condition. Located in Ml- 
nols. $2,800. (414) 694-4625. 

1992 EXCEL 20SX, 20!L, 
open bow, V6 Volvo-Perrta 
I/O, $11,000. 1967 4-place 
caravan snowmobllo trailer, 
$1,000. 1987 Indy400 Polaris, 
$1,500. 1965 SW-Doo Formu- 
la Plus, $1,000. 1983 Yamaha 
Phazer, $800, plus spare 
parts. (815) 676-4902 alter 
5pm. 

1992 TOYOTA CELICA, 

excellent condition, brand now 
sport tiros, brand new brakes. 
$11,500. (647) 625-2925. 

1993 FORD TAURUS, 37K 
miles, P/W, A/C, excellent con- 
dition. Ford 660 extended war- 
ranty. $8,500. (647) 
672-2813. 

1993 TAURUS GL WAGON, 
excellent condition, high 
miles, $7,000. (414) 
763-9016. 

1994 325I CONVERTIBLE. 
LOADED, Mtd. Blue-grey 
leather Interior. CD changer, 
ail power, all options Inc. rollo- 
ver protection. Excellent condi- 
tion, garage kepi, like now. 
Serious Inquiries only. 
$32,900. (847) 587-4119 
leave message. 

1994 FORD CROWN VIC- 
TORIA, excellent condition, 
high miles, $8,250. (414) 

763-9016. 

199E DODGE STRATUS, 

medium green with 
grey/groen Interior, 23K, viper 
alarm, AM/FM cassette, 
crulso, excellent condition. 
(847) 265-1360 anytime. 

AUDI 1986 5000, 4-door, 
turbo. with sunroof, 
$4.300A)OSt. (414) 657-9363. 

FORD 1994 ESCORT LX 
WAGON, automatic, Ike new, 
21,000 miles, $8,300. (414) 
942-0166. 

HONDA 1987 CRX, runs ex- 
cellent, brand new tiros, many 
extras, $3,100. (414) 

652-5038 evenings. 

OLDS 1984 CUTLASS 
CRUISER WAQON.,^aood 

condition, full power, now 3.0L 
V6, $2,900. (647) 205-5656 
leave mossage. 



810 



Oassic/Anu'que Can 



1972 F-100 PICKUP 351 
Cleveland engine. Automatic, 
western truck. Many extra's. 
$1,700. (414) 767-9795. 



814 



.Service & Parts 



1987 CHEVY 4X4 350 turbo 
trans and transfer case, 
$400A)OSI. (647) 746-3667. 

BUICK 1979 REGAL, G-cy- 
llnder turbo, 60,000 original 
mllos, onglno and most of 
body In oxcollonl condition, 
$800, (414) 654-3644. 

CHEVY, FORD PICK-UP 
bodies. Factory new, guar- 
anteed Irom $1,300. Doors 
from 389.00, tondero from 
$50.00, bods from $600, bed- 
llnors $169.00. BUMPERS, 
GRILLS, REPAIR PANELS, 
PAINTS, ABRASIVES, WIND- 
SHIELDS, RADIATORS. Dellv- 
ery. Mark's 217-624-6184. 

TIRESI 

CHEAP CHEAP CHEAPI! 

Now or used. 

Carry out or Installed, 

CRAZY RON'S 

WAUKEGAN. 

(647) 244-2584. 





T* make life 

a little easier 

place yttir 

ad III 

Lakeland 

tfewapapera 

Call 

6rcg t Save 

at 
147-223-IIEI 

raoAv 





I I .1 J i >. 



MarcI* 7, 1997 UketANd Newspapers CLASSIFIED 




824 



Vans 



{1987 FOHD VAN E-150 
300, 6-cyllndor, automatic, 
new tires, now brakes, Icebox, 
cabinets, (old down bed, 

j S3.0O0/best. (647) 356-324B, 

1990 PLYMOUTH VOYAG- 
ER SE, V6, 65,000 mllea, 
blue, no rust, new Iront tires, 
$8,000 or lake over payments, 
(847) 487-2032, (847) 610- 
5760. 

1994 CHEVY ASTRO VAN, 
conversion package, loaded, 
low miles, $16,300. (414) 
862-7111. 

CHEVY 1990 WHITE VAN. 
S7,000/best. New 

llres/brakos. runs great, 
66,000. (815) 344-6362. 



828 



1985 JEEP GRAND WA- 
GONEER 4x4, 4-door, au- 
tomatic, lull power, leather, 
sunroof, new tires, 90,000 
mllos, some rust, 51.900 too si. 
(847) 395-9958 after 6:30pm 
or weekends. 

1985 TOYOTA 4X4, 
115,000 miles, excellent con- 
dition. Asking 53,000/besl. 
Many extras. Call Randy alter 
4pm, Monday-Friday and any- 
time on weekends. (414) 
694-9771. 

1987 JEEP CHEROKEE 4- 
wheel drive, V6, 4.0 liter en- 
gine, charcoal grey, 110,000 
miles, runs and looks good. 
Asking $3,900A>est. Call Joe 
or Frank (847) 740-4222. 

1993 JEEP GRAND CHER- 
OKEE LAREDO, 4.0L. au- 
tomatic, excellent, 64K miles, 
$15,000/best. (414) 
884-8530. 

1993 SUBURBAN 4X4 
2,500 high miles, 

515,900/best. Partial trades 
considered. (815) 344-3763, 

1996 FORD EXPLORER 
4x4 SPORT, loaded, great in- 
terior, 1,200 miles. 523.900. 
(847) 263-6798. 

CHEVY 1992 BLAZER S- 
10, rod, loaded, alarm, hitch, 
excellent condition, $10,000. 
(847) 265-6473. 



334 



TruckyTnblr.n 



1984 CHEVY PU 3/4 ton, 3- 
spood, new clutch, brakes, al- 
ternator, starter. Low mllos. 
53.500. (847) 623-2017. 

1991 FORD F-150 SUPER 
CAB 4x4, fully loaded, 
$12,S00/bost. (414) 
643-3653. 

1991 FORD F-250 heavy 
duty, well maintained, 67,000 
mllos, with cap, hitch and 
snow tires on rims, $7,500. 

(615) 678^658. 

1993 S-10 PICKUP, black 
bed covor, fiber glass cap ma- 
roon. (847) 356-1148 anytime. 

1996 CHEVY S-10 PU 4x4. 
automatic, 6-cytinder, black, 
otf-rd/LS package, bodllnor, 
lint windows and hitch. 
$15,900. (847) 244-9644 
Mike. 





TRAILER 4*X8' HEAVY 
duty with sides, 5400/best. 
Ford engine 351 motor, 
$299/bost. (847) 587-547B. 


844 


Motorcycles 


1984 CUSTOM HARLEY 
DAVIDSON SPORTSTER, 
lots of chrome, 6' oxtonded 
forks, S & S carburator. Must 
seo. $6,500. (847) 740-7380 
ask lor Kim. 




S30 


Firewood 


p J 


FIREWOOD 
UNLIMITED 

Season - 2 years 

Ft**, Fast D*Uv*ry 

Prompt Courteous Service', 

Credit Cards Accepted 

Mixed Hardwoods $69 

F.C. Oak $78 

Cherry Birch Hickory Mix $84 

Discount on 2 or more. 

I -630-87 tMUXl 



•FIREWOOD FOR SUE 
(Delivered) 

•TREE SERVICE 

Ciitl Robert Klatt 
(847) 587-0586 



S30| 


Firewood 




FANTASTIC 
FIREWOOD 

2 yr. old seasoned hardwood 

oak, ash, maple, cherry. $64.00 

per face cord mixed. $74.00 

per face cord 100% oak. 

Free stacking and delivery. 

Buf Iho wood that's 

guaranteed to burn. 

(847) 546-3613 * (81$) 3-14-9522 
1-800430^262 


S39 


Housekeeping 



MEAN MAIDSI 

WE HATE AND 

TERMINATE DIRT. 

WE WILL CLEAN YOUR 

HOME WEEKLY, 

BI-WEEKLY OR 

ONE TIME ONLY. 

ONE CLEANER. 

NO WORRY. 
(847) 746-2245. 



S57 



Wntir^DcconUing 



S93 



Tree/Plants 



TREE & STUMP :; 
REMOVAL 

Land Gearing 

\ Wholesale Seasoned j j 

Hardwood 

Nordstrom Tree 
Experts Co. 

(Fully Insured) 

847-526-0858 




5 r*nniri3«ni3m J 

| EARTH | 
f DAV If I 
I APRI1 n m I 



* < tPtcasodo'Uottv % 

a pm(/ta'[itesaiuc> g 

p ouv land fov yoiiv 5 

cfiitdxavatul>lfieLv o 



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MH 



xav and 



I'tftCVfr j 



5 cfiitdxM'atuIrtfieit/ u 



PAINTING. Professionally 
done. ..Interior/exterior. Free 
estimates, Insured, reason- 
able rates and references. 
Also help with fix-it projects 
your homo may require. 
Please call DK'a Painting 
(647) 223-3006. 

PRECISE PAINTING 

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR. 

•New construction or we 

can make It look Ilk* new! 

♦Expert Wallpaper 

Removal 

'Wall Rapair. 

♦Ready to be painted 

or papered. 

Call ua about 

Reasonable Rates. 

Refundable $25 estimate 

charge deducted from 

coat of Job contract. 

(S47) 395-0490. 



s 



cfiild 



lav., 



% 



taaaa Q 



[ABBREVIATIONS 

Air conditioning - AC 
or 

Air. 
Anli-lock Brakes - 
ABS 

Automatic - 
Transmission - 

Auto or AT 
Average - Avg. 

B 
Battery - Batt. 
Between - Btwn. 
Black - Bik. 
Brakes - Brks. 
Brown - Brwn. 

C 
Carburetor - Carb. 
Cassette - Cass. 
Certified mites - Cert. 

mi. 

Condition - Cond. 
Convertible - ConvL 
Cruise Control - 
Cruise 
Cylinder - Cyl. 

D 

I Dealer- Dlr. 
|Door(s) - DR 

E 
Engine - Eng. 

Equ i pment/Equipped 

equip. 

Excellent - Exc. 

F . 

Financing - Fin. 

Four Wheel Drive - 

4WD 

G 

Garage - Gar. 

Hatchback - Htchbk. 
or 

HB 

Horsepower - HP 
Hard(op - Hrdtp. 

Immaculate - Immac. 
Interior - Int. 

K 
Thousand • K 

L 
Leather - Lthr. 

M 

Mites - Ml 
Moonroof - Mnri. 
Maintenance - Maint. 
Manufacturer - Mir. or 

Mfg. 
Miles per gallon • 
MPG 

O 
Or best otter - OBO 
Offer - Ofr. 
Option(s) - Opt(s). 

Power Brakes - PB 
Power Doors - PD 
Power Locks - PL 
Power Steering - PS 
Power Windows - PW 

R 
Radials - Rad. 
Records - Rec. 
Rear Window Defog - 
RWD 

S 
Sacrifice - Sac. 
Speed - Spd. 
Sunroof - Snrf. 

T 
Tires - Trs. 
Trailer Hitch - Trl. 
Htch. 
Transmission - Trans. 

V 
Very good condition - 
VGC 
W 
Warranty - Wan*. 
Wheel(s) - Whl(s). 
White - Wht. 
Whltewalls - W/W 
with - W/ 

jMFG'S BRANDS 

General Motors 

Cadillac - CAD 
Chevrolet - CHEVY 
Pontiac'- PONT 
jOldsmobile - OLDS 

Ford Motors 

Lincoln - LINC 
Mercury - MERC 

Chrysler Corp. 

Plymouth - PLYM 
Chrysler - CHRYS 
[Dodge - DOD 

Other 

Volkswagon - VW 
Mitsubishi - MITSU 
Honda - HON 
Toyota - TOY 




For Fast service/ 

Fax your classified ad. 



If you can't afford to be tied 
up on the phone, save time. 
Use the Lakeland 
Newspapers' fax line. 

Fax your ad to us in care of 
"Classified". Indicate ad clas- 
sification and the weeks you 
would like it to run. We'll take 
it from there! 

If you have any other ques- 
tions about faxing your ad, 
call us at (M7)* 223-8161, 




Fax: 
(847) 223*8810 

Word Rate Ads: 

15 words $6.75, 

1 5 cents for each 

additional word (pre-paid) 

15 words $7.75, 

1 5 cents for each 

additional word (to be billed) 

(Private Party Only) 



Classified Order Blank 

Use the handy coupon below. 
Count words. Phone numbers and hyphenated words count as one word. Write copy below. 




with this coupon 



Coupon must accompany ad 
Expires April 30, Wi 



Enclose check & mail to: 

Lakeland Publishers 

30 S, Whitney P.O. Box 268 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

or FAX (847) 223-8810 

We also accept Visa & Master Card 

For more information, call 

(847)223-8161 



■^M^&i 



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Mi 



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.^^ 



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%?«; 



SSS; 









Easter 



MflH 

m 



5ira^ 



March 



coming 
30th 



"SsSBiy 



'Brunches* 

*Egg Hunts' 

'Meeting the Easter Bunny* 

Place all of your ads in 

Lakeland Classifieds. 

It's Easy just call 

847-223-8161 

and ask for Greg or Dave 



vtm&r 




CLASSIFIED bvkcUNd Newspapers Marc* 7, 1997 









••, 



w 



I 






. ' ■ * 




Antique Furniture Mart 

Largest Showroom in Midwest 
Adjacent to the well-established 



OK ELK GROVE 



I'llW.Hl 

WANTED 

Furniture Dealers 

1 1 66-1 1 70 W. Devon Ave. 

Open 7 days a week • Mon-Fri 1 1-7 * Sat & Sun 10-5 

(847} 895-8900 



REMEMBER US ? 




SB 



We are located li 

WILLIAMS BROS. 



EMPORIUM 

lOA7\ AQft 07R7 910 MAIN ST " (RTE ' 83) 

(847) B38-2767 ANTIOC H. IL. 6 QO02 

DINING ROOM SET SALE 

THROUGHOUT THE MONTH OF MARCH, ALL OUR 

DINING ROOM SETTS ARE ON SALE. WE HAVE 7 SETS 

IN STOCK AND MORE COMING. BIG SAVINGS WHILE 

THEY LAST. 

OPEWTPAYS 



GALLERY 

Bunnies, Baskets, Easter Shirts & More 
Now open 7 days a week! 

M-F 10-6 
Sat 9-5 • Son 11-4 

Limited Space Available for Crofters 
384 Lake St., Antioch 

T8471 395-5550 



Grayslake 

c^NTIQUES 

COLLECTABLES 

Lake County Fairgrounds 

Grayslake, Illinois 
IL 120 & U.S. 45 

ADMISSION $3.00 

8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 
March 9th, 1997 

Lake County Promotions, Inc. 
P.O. Box 461 , Grayslake, IL 60030 
(847) 223-1433 or (847) 356-7499 



Grafter's Gallery 








Lois Estes, 


WW a WW "i\Ai 


Owner of 


jly^n^ 


Grafter's 




Gallery 
384 Lake St 


VJH 


Antioch, IL 


.^V'^iH/.^^'i'' 



(cm&tFTF siecidw 

presented by: 

POST 911 

SiS S. Main St • Wauconda, IL 

(847) 526-9718 

Sat. March 8th - 9 'til 4 

Sun. March 9th - 10 til 3 

Great Food • Raffles • FREE Admission 







t 



PET OF THE 

WEEK 

Biscuit 

"BISCUIT" Is a one year 
old, female labrador mix, 
A puppy at heart, this 
attractive girl has a soft 
fawn colored coat with 

cream highlights, a gentle face and a sweet docile per- 
sonality. A smaller mid-size dog, Biscuit combines the 
delightful playfulness of a puppy with the affectionate tail 
wagging love that labs are known for. Young and very 
trainable, Biscuit wants to please and will quickly learn 
whatever she Is taught. Biscuit loves attention and she is 
very responsive. This is a dog that loves life and people, 
wants to love someone special and to be loved. If you 
are looking for a great dog for your family, come and see 
Biscuit in Cage 77. She has been waiting since June 
1995 for a family to call her very own. 

ALL DOGS BENEFIT FROM BASIC HOUSEBREAK- 
ING & OBEDIENCE TRAINING WHICH HELPS BOND 
DOG TO OWNER. CRATING IS RECOMMENDED 
WHEN THE OWNER IS AWAY FOR THE FIRST YEAR 
IF NEEDED. 

Cash $55 donation includes free spay/neuter, collar, 
tag, leash, first shots, follow up care and more. 

Orphans of the Storm is located at 2200 Riverwoods 
Rd., Deerfield. Hours are 11am-5pm, seven days a 
week. Call (847) 945-0235 for further Information, 



PET OF THE WEEK 
SPONSORED BY: 

Dr. M.H. Dahler 
Beach Park Animal Hospital 
27063 N. Sheridan Rd., Beach Park.IL 
(847)244-1230 . 

* • Dr. Dave Trask 
2595 E. Grand Ave.. LindonhurstJL 
(847)356-1516 

, Wal-Mart Pet Dept. 
772 E. Rollins Rd., Round Lake Beach, IL 
(847 ) 546- 0043 . 

Drs. Craig & Simms 
Ani'mas Veterinary Clinic 
320 E. Neville Dr., Grayslake; IL V 

(847)223-5593 '"-r 
Pel Food Outlet Purrfect Pet Care 

1476Townline Rd. - Antioch, IL 

Mundelein_ u (847 j 83B-LOVE 



&** v w p* - 



Dr. Trask 



Ask The Vet 

Ask The Vet-Dr. David Trask is 
part of a group of northern Lake 
County veterinarians who pooled 
their money and expertise to start 
All Creatures Emergency Hospital 
in Grayslake providing emer- 
gency care to pets nights, week- 
ends and holidays. During the 
day he can be reached at 
Lindenhurst Animal Hospital. 



Question: 

How do pets get fleas? What 
is the best way to get rid of 
them? 
Answer: 

The fleas live In the carpet, or 
the park or yard grass, or on an 
infested animal. Most of the 
time your pet passes through 
or near an area where fleas 
have not had a blood meal for a 
while and they are very hungry. 
The fleas sense your pet's 
movement, body heat, and car- 
bon dioxide and hop on to eat. 
PREVENTING fleas is the best 
and most cost effective treat- 
ment. There are several excel- 
lent Ilea preventatives available 
through your veterinarian. 
These new products are safe 
and easy to use. Depending 
on the product your veterinari- 
an feels best for your specific 
pet and environment, they may 
only have to be applied to your 
pet every 2-4 weeks, your 
house every 4-6 months, and 
the outdoor area treated every 
4-8 weeks, We like to start flea 
preventative in April or May 
when the weather breaks and 
warms to 65-70 degree tem- 
peratures which encourage 
their life cycle. We continue 



preventatives until it Is frozen 
outdoors, usually occurlng 
around-Thanksgiving. 
Question: 

My dog barks when the door- 
bell rings. How do I get him to 
stop? 
Answer: 

Barking when an unusual 
sound Is heard is a natural 
Instinct for your pet. We feel 
this is something that most pet 
owners would NOT want to 
stop since this makes 
strangers aware that there is a 
pet guarding the home. If this 
Is something that is very both- 
ersome to you, then this natur- 
al response can be conditioned 
to be stopped, but It will be very 
time consuming because you 
are trying to break your pet of 
something that occurs natural- 
ly. Professional trainers can be 
very helpful In this situation. 
Desensitizing your pet to those 
sounds with prescription mood 
elevator medication may also 
be helpful. 
Question: 

I have a pet frog. How do I 
care for him and what is the 
average life expectancy for 
frogs? 



Answer: 

There are several different 
species of frogs available, 
varying In size, life expectancy, 
and environment. For this rea- 
son we cannot properly answer 
the above question for your 
specific frog, but we can refer 
you to your local library where 
you will find a large selection of 
books on the husbandry, care, 
and characteristics of all the 
various species of frogs. 
Question: 

Why does by dog bite me when 
I run? 
Answer: 

Dogs get very excited when 
playing/running/jumping 
because these behaviors are 
part of their natural play habits. 
If you have ever watched pup- 
pies or dogs together in their 
environment when they play, 
then you know jumping and bit- 
ing Is a normal response. You 
need to work with your pet to 



let it know that you are its mas- 
ter, not a sibling, and that 
although playing Is okay and 
expected, biting is not an 
acceptable behavior for its 
master. 
Question: 

How do you keep dogs from 
jumping on people? 
Answer: 

This habit cam be broken by 
bringing you knee to the dog's 
chest when the dog jumps, 
then saying "NOf and remov- 
ing the dog from your environ- 
ment and giving them NO 
ATTENTION for 30-60 minutes. 
We recommend that you have 
a professional trainer or your 
veterinarian demonstrate the 
proper way to do this so injury 
to your pet does not occur. 
Remember that your pet can 
not distinguish when jumping Is 
acceptable and when it is not, 
so breaking this habit means 
NEVER allowing the jumping 
without punishment. 



* 

* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



ANIMAS 

VETERINARy 

CUINIC 

Providing optimum veterinary 
medicine and surgery along with 

complimentary options for 
companion animal health care. 




I'amcla Ann Craig, D.V.M. 

mi 

Via IK Simms, li.VM. 

DOGS/CATS/BIRDS/EXOTICS 

VACCINATIONS 
NUTRITION 
GERIATRIC 
BEHAVIOR 






120 



• DENTISTRY 

• SURGICAL 

• RADIOLOGY 

• PHARMACY 

«r-* AMJMA . S . MorvFrU«n-6 P m 

f (847) 223-5593 s.i.s^inoon 

I 320 E. Neville Dr. Ift«w»«« 

Qraytlak., IL 60030 ■">«*"• »i— •«!""« 

WMHillWWI'if-aCRIIWII'Jiltltffl 



LCive a complimentary nail clipping for your peti 



. 



Wfct 



V £?£>M .-.■■• 



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cn^rfrVJJjgEJ 



March 7, 1997 UkelANd Newspapers CLASSIFIED 




•RESIDENTIAL 

•COMMERCIAL* 






Paints^ 



! SPECIALTY COATINGS "A NEW LOOK FOR OLD FINISHES" \ 
CUSTOM INTERIORS EXTERIOR EXPERTS 



Metal/Wood Cabinets 
1 Woodwork/Panelling 
; Faux Finishes/Textures 
1 Basement/Garage Interiors 



Aluminum/Cedar Siding 
Rustoleurn/Metal Coatings 
Decks/Fences/Shutters 

Brick/Masonry/Gutters 



FAMILY OPERATED 
SINCE 1974 



©4)^~(§§4-§4}®® 



FREE CLASSIFIED AWS! 

NQ FEE TO SEARCH! 

LOW FEE TO SELL! 

NO SIZE OR ITEM LIMITS! 

NO DEADLINES! 

CHANGE OR CANCEL ANYTIME! 

SAVE TIME AND MONEY BY 

LISTING WITH US! 

CALL ONE OF OUR OPERATORS 

TODAY FOR DETAILS! 

COMPU-AD 
847-587-0411 



CREATIVE EXTERIOR CONCEPTS, INC. 



Save 10% Up to $500 ESQ 

Siding b/V * Roofin 9 

Vinyl Windows V tfcv • Soffit & Fascia 

Bays & Bows f^E -Gutters 

Patio Doors Lj li I ' Doors 

Licensed, Insured and Bonded 



(847) 726-1060 




I 



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WOOD 

Mixed Seasoned 

Hardwood. 

$65 a face cord 

delivered and 

stacked. 

Call 
(847) 566-9372 



i 



S 



RESIDENTIAL 
ROOFING 

CONTRACTOR 

COMPLETE ROOFING SERVICE 

SVARAS ROOFING 

Island Lake, IL 

(847) 526-2304 

'take advantage ol our reduced 

winter pricing, same 

warranty, same quality 







****************** 

J Painting, Wallpapering 
£ Expert Installation 

J Pa^ej*l|abric»Vlhyl 

* 




UOtoest 



Weddings 
• Proms 
Special Occasions 
• Airport 




DAY # 773-604-4751 
raff?* m ro^n- y EVENING # 847-487-0456 ■ 
L 2i^U 'm *■***'' PAGER # 312-824-0620 



20% OFF ALL INTERIOR 
_ PAINTING 4 DECORATING i 

5 ■ Quality Work • Neatly Done \ 

i 847-838-1713 estimates^ 



! Michael's I 

] Custom > 
I Builders I 

2 General Contractor > 

• Custom Homes 

• Additions 

• Design Services 

• Decks 

• Basements 



(847) 680-2902 



ATM 
...complete... 

PAINTING & 
DECORATING 

COMMERCIAL-RESIDENTIAL-INOUSTRtAL 
40 YEARS OF SATISFIED 
CUSTOMERS/ PROMPT AFFORD- 
ABLE PROFESSIONALISM 
FULLY INSURED...FREE ESTIMATES 

(847) 546-7926 



CatCigrapfiy 

6 if S\nna. 

•Wedding Invitations 

•Graduation Announcements 

•Marriage Licenses 

•letterhead 

•All Special Needs 

Beautiful Work to Suit You! 

(847) 223-1730 



ik«C*\ 




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I 



■*rirwrwrwwirir-*rv*r<*r*r 




Frozen Beverage Machine Rental 
S47-339-9&22 

Great for: 
*BridiI/Biby Shown *Bufiniii Evtnti *Holldayi 
*Bir!hdiyi *Theme Partial *Kidi Pirliai 

•Anytime 

Can ba lartftd with or without alcohol 



. 



I 



INFINITE INTERNET SOLUTIONS 

Your Competition is on the Internet-are YOU? 

• Internet marketing for small to midsized businesses. 

• Business & personal Internet research 

• Internet training & support 

Contact IIS to find out how you & your business can benefit from 

today's most powerful tool for business & personal advancement. 

(847) 546-6204 

jy.emba@iwc.net 



Countryside 

Heating & Cooling Inc. 

|$100 OFFlw* OFfT!10» OfVJ 

Z . i . ., . i Serveo Ca» Or 

[Nw Furnace Wi Apiitairo 

Humidifier 



| Air Conditioner 
l J. 



i 
i 



Furnaco | 
Ooaning I 



Jf 



265-0016 

Park Place Business Center 
4B5 Park Ave. Unit 5 Lako Villa 

Coupon Musi Bo Presoniod At Time Ot 
Purchase. Umit 1 Coupon Per Customer 

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<9r<David 



(847) 





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Clip 

this ad 

for S2S 

OFF 



DUCT CLEANING 

• Residential • Commercial • Industrial 

Major Reasons to dean Your Air Ducts with our Power Vacuum System: 

■RnluasCwumlrijriMMtldrw, Dus(. Ilicinu, Utof Mjio) .JtfducoOilon »B«rtU Sfckncto 
•ProWU fjm% llcallh •RcJoCBAnoiBfS)in(itomi 

AU Work Guaranteed & Free Estimates 

(847) 740-4571 



I 



m 



No Payment For One Year* 




PRE-/EA/ON 
AIR CONDITIONER /ALE 

2 Ton A c r OU7 A Q $1bT*^ COO 



< 



,0ACB2, AS LOW AS 

Prices includo-Condense Unit, A-Coil, 
Concrete Pad.T-Stat, Line Set, Electric, Drain, Labor Extra. 

Brp. Dale 3-22-97 

LENNOX' ° N * liii IMINt I O W O • ■ V ABOUT. 

All Tsup heating 

PALATINE • 358-7100 

*To Ounlifxtd BuyvtB 





WAUCONDA • 526-9082 




Welcome Home. 






50% OFF 

in upgrade 
savings on 
your new 

Wausau 

Home!* 

'Swings depend upon option* chosen. 

You must order ) our net home beftern 

Dec. 2, 1996 and Mirch 14, 1997 for ddittry 

bem-cm .Hirth 3 and May 23. 1997. 
See jour Wausau builder for specific details. 

County line Builders 

General Contractors 

437 S. Main St. 

Wauconda, IL 60084 

(847) 526-4663 

Mike or Scott 

Your Local, Independent Builder 
of Wausau Homes 



LAKE ONLINE 
& Internet Studio 

391 Lake Street 
Antioch, IL USA 



. THumumts Htitno mr..,. 

WHf NOT fINV W WHAT IT tS Alt ABOUT 
AMlfiJOYWEfllW 



5 Yean Online Experience 
1 5 Vean Marketing Expertise 

No Techno-babblef 

Web Page Deiijn & Sertfen 

Internet Training & Marketing 

Lake Online Gives Vou "The Ede/f 

FREE 'LIVE* Online Intro to the "Net 

No Computer? Use Oirrsf 



WARHIKO: While ihs Internet may be 
entertaining, ilia side ollects may causa 
mental growth. Increased knowledge and 
expanded awareness. : • ) <UBG> 



847-395-9115 

email: lstudto@f,ikc-onUne.com 

htlp:flWWW. Inko-onlmo.eom 

Lake County, IL's Mot Spot on the WWW! 

40.000* Hits Per Monlhl 



AAAJkWUULJWkiLAiLAiiAAA 



Seal Coating 
Fall Discount 15% off 
Insured Free Estimates 

•Quality Scalmastcr* Products 
•SciluMiiri); By Hand 
•Prevents Oxidation 
•Resists Gas & Oils 
•Weatherproof* 
•Ocautifics Pavements 
•Low Maintenance/Economical 
Locally Owned & Operated 

PAYLESS PAVING 
847-360-8013 




•Concrete Repair 

'Floor Cracks Repaired 

•Basement Walls 



^OLDFASmoHiD SRKVICEi "1 
| OL D FASHIONED QUALIT Y." | 

I 

I 
I 
I 



all Temp 



HEATING • AIR CONDITIONING • HUMIDIFVCATrON 



. Exterior steps & Hallways Repaired J 
Z & Resurfaced to Look New Again! [ 



FREE ESTIMATES 
CALL 847:210- 



SERVICE CALL 

$25.00 SAVINGS 

PARTS S LABOR 

NOTINCL 



APRIL AIR 
HUMIDIFIER 

SALE 
AS LOW AS 

*239°° 

INSTALLED 



S26-9082 



vrwrrirwrww 



!88&k 4 ■=■■> WS^«1sl1^. J I 




CLASSIFIED Ukclwid Newspapers MarcIi 7, 1997 



To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



WE PAY YOU 

to LOSE 
WEIGHT 
NOW!! 

GUARANTEE 
847-918-87761 



Tctllwlnds 




iei skatb 



£ji Jg W^ Sell (Bauer & Don Jicksan) 
^ ffipf S We Rent ($8/day ■ $3/2 hrs.) 
y^^ s! We Sharpen ($5 ■ Usually 

while you wait) 

1816 Belvidere RiL 

CORNER OF RT. 120 & 45 

223-1798 



Duderstadt 
Designs 

Mailing c§* framing 

• Select Mats & Frames 
From Your Home 

• Decorating Assistance 
Available 

(847) 265-6033 



■wssre 



DnaapDDDnDDDaDnnnDnaDaaDDnn 

§ SECRETARIAL 
§ SERVICE 

d Word Processing, Document 

o Preparation, Transcription, 

d Data Entry, Proof Reading, 

g Invoicing, Form Design 

a Need an extra set of hands 
n for your business? 

§ Call for more information: 

o Sunrise Secretarial 
847/949-9954 

DDDaDDnDnnnDaDDDDOnDDDDDODa 



□ 

D 

D 

a 
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riFANmsfici 

FIREWOOD 

2 yr. old seasoned hard- 
wood oak, ash, maple, 
cherry $64.00 per face 
cord mixed $74.00 per 
face cord 100% oak 
Free stacking & delivery 
Buy the wood that's 
guaranteed to burn 
(847) 546-3613 
(815) 344-9522 
1-800-430-6262 



«■ 



ROOF 
REPAIR 

1/2 Down, Balance when Leaks stop. 

Rcroofing-Tearoffs-Flals 

♦Will meet any comparable price* 

♦TUCK POINTING* 

Gutter cleaning, siding repair 

and gutter repair. 

ALL TYPES OF HOME 

IMPROVEMENT 
ALL TYPES OF ROOFING 
State licensed, Liability workmen's comp. 

(847)838-0353 
| NO JOB TOO SMALL 



ACE COMPUTER SERVICES 

We teach you the Internet. 

1 on 1 training 

Your place or ours. Can teach 

you on our computers. 

Appointments available now. 

We do upgrades and servicing. 

We can backup your data. 

Reasonable rates, call now!! 

Spring Grove, 1L 

847-973-2037 



Over 40 years of 
uaIItvj>crsonal service 




JJdock 

iiikconstructipn inc. 

• custom homes • basements 

• design services • decks 

• additions 

* 10% Winter Discount on Remodeling Work 

Willi This Ad (Exp. 3/1/97) 

Fully Insured (847)526-1500 
FREE Estimates Wauconda 
General Contractors 



B M^mM^MSM^&SM^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^M 



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B 






WILLS^A^o 

ROM &2Q w *t\ 



Xf** FROM $29 ^'Ov 

tvo fiTTomys, w&r, s/mpu, m wmmg 

BUSINESS PLANS - RESUMES AND MORE 
CALL FOR ADDITIONAL SERVICES OFFERED 

WE THE PEOPLE BUSINESS CENTER 

(847) 548-1300 



3 



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1 

§ 

1 

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7 *s-" 



Home Owners 

$ave 

$50,000 
to 

T*Ci^ii^ir**" rr $100,000 

ON YOUR EXISTING HOME LOAN 

WttPoiAt REFINANCING 

FREE INFORMATION AND A FREE 

COMPUTER MORTGAGE ANALYSIS 

CALL: 

(847) 619-1807 



in 



TOP PRICE 
PAID 

We pay more for old or 
scrap gold. No amount 
too small or too large! 

(847) 
438-0125 







the cleaners inc. 



CwwwiCmwgS-vif 



Specializing in: 

Commercial Cleaning 
Complete Office & 
Apt. Complex Cleaning 
Model Home Cleaning 

847-244-2520 




I CONTRACTORS ELECTRIC SERVICE^ 
/ ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 
/ "Call Us For Fast Courteous Service" 
33265 N. Rte. 43 
Wlldwood, IL 60030 

(847) 223-4682 
RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL 

m 



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JACK'S 
REMODELING 

BASEMENTS 

• Siding • Soffit -Windows 

• Kitchen • Decks 

• Bathrooms 

FREE ESTIMATES 

plus references 

CALL JACK AT 



iiiiii t-i 



(847) 546-3759 



1 in mi iiimn miinimiiiimnminm4iii 



' II 

IIIHIHIIlllrJ 



Am POLLUTION SOLUTION 

Using Breakthrough Technology 

with an 

AIR PURIFIER 

Thin is not a filter! Get the Facts!! 
Get what Works!! 

Cleanses the air of gases, fumes, odors, 
allergens, construction pollutants, viral & 

bacterial contaminants, and more!! 

ONE SMALL UNIT FRESHENS THE 

AIR UP TO 2,500 SQUARE FEET. 

(Smaller or larger units available.) 
Affordable. Only pennies a day to run. 

For a Free Tria 1 , cal I 
■-• Kevin Purccll (847)5264)572- 



-AUTO LOANS- 

As low As $99 down 

Auto dealer will arrange 

financing even if you have 

been turned down before. 

Loans available for no credit, 

bad credit and bankruptcy 

buyers. No cosigners needed. 

Call Becky 

847-587-2055 



a 



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CARPENTER & i 
I CABINET MAKER | 




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B 
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With U0 years 
experience will do: 

' Kitchens 

• Bathrooms 

• Windows *Doors 

• Decks -Etc.. 
Complete Job! 



| (847) 438-6302 



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ssm ibsep mm w> 

QODSB \5^Ha©HRT 

Need 96 people serious 
about losing weight. Dr. rec- 
ommended program. Limited 

time only, help needed 

M 

Toll Free 
(888) 840-1212 



RECYCLE! 



Cash For 

• Aluminum Cans 

• All Other Scrap Metals 

Industrial Accounts Welcome 

Chicago Surplus 

11304 260th Avenue 
Trevor, Wl 



Price Subject To Chang* 

LOCATION: Trevor. Wl |S mmures 
North of Anlioclu Take Hwy C one 
mile west of Route 63 Turn North on 
259th SI . Veer to left lor 2 blocks (nenl 
to Foxy's Tavern) 

Mon. • Fri. 8:30 am - 5 pm 
Saturday 8:30 am - 3:30 pm 
(414) 862-2517 




SHOP 

WAREHOUSE 

STORAGE 



• #1 location In Lake County 

• 20* x 50* Bays 

• Large 12* x 14* Doors 

Call AL ait 

223-1919 

35! 10 ROUTE 83 • GRAYSIAKE, OilNOS 60030 



giiiiiiiiiiiiiu.iiiiiitimiiiiiii]iiiiiiimitiiiiiimiiiiiiulh' 

George's 1 
Decorating | 

Paint & Wallpaper I 
Interior & Exterior | 
General Repairs | 
Quality Work 
Free Estimates 
Written Guarantee 
(847)548-5110 

■ni;iiiuiinjiiimiuiiiiinniiiiiiiin!inirtiiiimiiiijniiT?. 




CONSTRUCTION * GENERAL CARPENTRY 

•Custom Decks 

•Porches 'Room Additions •Basement Remodeling 
•Bathrooms - Kitchens *C ustom Carpentry 'Improvement s & Repairs! 

INSURED & BONDED 
FREE ESTIMATES 

(414) 889-8442 

Please Call Gary Kolkau 








••* low rates *** 

heanets INSIDE 
ItV STORAGE 

Any Size BoalTraile-r or 2 Snows On Trailer 

$25.00 per month 

Car-Pop Up • $35.00 per monlh 

Boats, Trailers, Motor Homes 

Insido Storage for Anything on Wheels 

<847) 587-9100 



FURNITURE COVERS 
PLASTIC & SLIPCOVERS 

25-50% OFF on all brands 
Special Prices On Custom 

Plastic Covers 

THIS WEEK ONLY! 

Call Dominick's 

(847) 336-8344 

For The Lowest Price Ever 

Free Estimates - Call For 

. Appointment - Sc Habla Espanol. 




AURSEN & 
LACKMAN<h. 

Window & Door Replacement 

Service You Can Trust 
Free Estimates 

(847)838-5300 



Licensed 

Insured 

FREE 

Estimates 



ROOFING 

SIDING & TRIM 

SEAMLESS GUTTERS 

WINDOWS •DOORS 

DECKS • AWNINGS 

Repair & Insurance Work 

(847) 438-6634 



Quality 

Craftsmanship 

Guaranteed 



DONT THROW AWAY 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR 
LAMP DOCTORS, 
FOR REPAIRS. 

WARREN ELECTRIC INC. 
33261 N. Highway 45 
Wlldwood, IL 60030 
■ >. (847 1223-8691. & 




MahcIi 7, 1997 UkflANd Newspapers CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 



■u- 




-To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



TO PLACE 

YOUR AD HERE 

CALL 

847-223-8161 





Lighting 
the Way 




CELEBRATE MARCH! 

WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH 

Join members of 

THE LAKE COUNTY WOMEN'S 

COALITION: 

Attrusa International of Lake County 

American Association of University Women, Mid-Lake County Branch 

American Association of University Women, Waukegan Area Branch 

American Business Women's Association 

Aux Plaines Chapter 99s 

Association of Women Attorneys of Lake County 

Beta Sigma Phi • ERA-lliinois 

Lake County Association for Home & Community Education 

Lake County Business & Professional Women 

GFWC, 10th District • North Shore Chapter of Links, Inc. 

WINGS • XYZingers 

YWCA of Northeastern Illinois 

CELEBRATING THE ACHIEVEMENTS OF WOMEN, 

Past, Present 
and Future 




1 
i 



S'OE Dave 1847) 223-8161 



1 

I 
1 

1 

1 

1 
i 

i 



PLACE 
YOUR 

AD 
HERE 

Call Greg or Dave at 

8161 




Blfgj^jgjgjtgiigMMigi^iaigi^ 







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EKS FREE 



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for your DIRECT LINE AD 




Gall Greg or Dave at 847-223-8161 



1997 LAKE COUNTS 

BOWLING ASSOCIATION 

TOURNAMENT SCORES 






• 
• 
• 





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i Fair Haven Lanes / Sunset Lanes 



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(847) 566-41 10 / (847) 336-8001 

GOO0UJC»WW«* KS! [ 




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6@@D LUCK B@WLERS!» 

From 

Bertrand Bowling Lanes, Inc. 

3616 Washington, Waukegan, IL 
(847) 244-1300 





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LAKES 
BCWL 

Round Lake, IL 
(847) 546-2776 



^^^^^^^^^W!^»T^vv 



\^^ 






First weekend of the doubles and singles event in the 

LCDA Tournament at Rynish Center came off with 

some high scoring, unofficial leaders in each event. 

DOUBLES HOOP EVENT 

1. Robert Bullitt - Jacob Wallace 1420 

2. Mike Vela - Jim Johnson 1381 

3. Leon Lee - Wesley Green 1359 

4. Eric Rose - Jeff Rose 1347 

5. Joe Piagentlnl - Keith Garrett 1345 

DOUBLES SCRATCH 

Joe Piagentlnl - Keith Garrett 1315 
Low Score Still In Money 1272 

SINGLES HOOP EUENT 

1. George Shop, a 138 average bowler this season 
shot a whopping 621 actual series with a 192 Hdcp 
gave him the lead with a score of 613. 

2. Bill Wing 764 

3. Tom DIMItroff 760 

4. Lewis Hill 750 

5. Mike Waggoner 720 

SINGLES SCRATCH 

Tom DIMItroff . 664 

Low Score Still In Money 647 

ALL EUENT HOOP 

1 . Tom DIMItroff with team score of 608 - Doubles 
61 1 and Singles Event score of 664, totaling 1883 
with Hdcp of 2171 

2. Robbie Citron 2062 

3. Ralph Randolph 2060 

4. Lewis Hill 2059 

5. Dave Gutantes 2050 

ALL EUENT SCRATCH 

Joe Piagentlnl: Team Event 672, Doubles Event 
658, Singles Event 620. Total = 1950 

The final weekend, March 8th and 9th. will 
conculde the 1 997 LCBA Annual Tournament. 



* * ■* ■ » < • • * ■* ■ • - * •■ m m *# * # ** 'm » • m f • ■ 



GOOD LUCK BOWLERS! 

£itidett SicvtBm SJbof, 

(847) 356-0679 




1 GOOD LUCK LAKE COUNTY BOWLERS!% 
From Brunswick 
Lakehurst Bowl 
_ 847-473-2600 






Lakeland would like to wish 

Newspapers all bowlers 

GOOD LUCK! 




« i».j# 4***194*4., 



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• 



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■•-"Trr - -" 



— p. » .*.**-,-* i 




COUNTY LAkElwd Newspapers MabcIi 7, 1997 






: 



Your thoughts could be worth $500! 



Please participate in our reader survey 



1 . Which newspapers do you read? $ 
What do you read newspapers for? £ 

(J 
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□ Chicago Tribune 


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Q News-Sun 




















□ Lakeland Newspapers* 




















□ Pioneer Press 




















Q Daily Herald 




















□ Chicago Sun-Times 





















2, How would you describe your newspaper readership habits? 

□ Regularly 
Q Daily 

Q Weekly 

□ Monthly 

□ Rarely 
Q Never 



3. Where do you reside? 
q Antioch 

□ Fox Lake 

□ Grays lake 

□ Gurnee 

□ Ingleside 

□ Lake Villa 

□ Lake Zurich 

□ Liberty vi lie 



q Lindenhurst 

q Mc Henry County 

□ Mundelein 

□ Round Lake 

□ Vernon Hills 
Q Wisconsin 
Q Wadsworth 

□ Wauconda 

Q Other 



4. How long have you resided there? 



6* Describe your shopper readership habits? 

Q Frequently 
Q Infrequently 



7. What is your gender? 

QMale 
Q Female 



9. What is your marital status? 

□Single 
QMarried 



12. Do you intend to purchase a home in 
Lake County within the next 12 months? 



15. What is your annual household income 
(optional)? 

q Under $25,000 
Q $25,000-54,999 
Q $55,000-74,999 
Q $75,000-94,999 
□ $95,000 plus 



18. Check what activities you are interested in? 

q golfing q water/snow skiing 

q bicycling Q running/jogging 

□ gardening pfishing/hunting 

□ camping □swimming 

□ cooking ^working out/aerobics 

□ hiking Qsports 

□ computers Qtravel 

□ home and decorating Qarts and entertainment 

□ reading □auto/home repair 

□ other ; 



10. How many adults (18+) reside in your 
household? 

q one 

Q tWO 

q three 

□ four 
a five 

13. What is your highest level of education? 

□ High School 

□ College 

□ Post-graduate 



1 6. How many people contribute to your 
annual household income? 



5. Which Lake County advertising shoppers 
do you read? 

Q The Market Journal 
Q The Advertiser 

□ The Bargaineer 

□ Kenosha Bulletin 



8. What is your age: 

□ 18-24 

□ 25-34 
Q 35-44 

□ 45-54 

□ 55-64 

□ 65 plus 

11. Do you own or rent your home? 

□ Own 

□ Rent 

14. How many children (and in what age groups) 
reside in your household? 

□ # age 0-2 

□ # age 3-5 

□ 8 age 6-1 

□ # age 11-13 



□ # age 14-17 



19. What improvements would you like to 
see in your Lakeland Newspaper? 



17. What is your occupation? 

□ Homemaker 
Farmer 

Executive/Administrative 
Military 

Professional/Technical 
Retired 
Clerical 
Student 
Trades 

Q Self-employed/Business owner 
a Sales 

□ Other 



a 
a 
a 
a 

a 
a 
□ 
□ 



20. What Lakeland Newspaper editions do 
you read? (Check all that apply) 

□Antioch News-Reporter QLindenhurst News 

□ Fox Lake Press QMundelein News 

□ Grayslake Times aRound Lake News 

□ Gurnee Press QVernon Hills News 

□ Lake Villa Record □ Wadsworth News 

□ Lake Zurich Enterprise □ Wauconda Leader 

□ Libertyville News 



Thank you for participating in our reader survey. 
Your input is critical to the improvement and 
further development of all of our newspapers. It 
is our intention to publish the best community 
newspapers/ featuring quality local news, enter- 
tainment and regional news. 



Note: Employees and family members of Lakeland Newspapers, The Market Journal, 
Lakeland nelDlrect and ADX are not eligible. No purchase necessary lo enter contest. 
Survey forms available at Lakeland Newspapers' main office, 30 S. Whitney Street, 
Grayslake, IL 60030. 

All surveys must be received by 5 p.m., March 14, 1997 to be eligible for the contest. 

Drawings for winners wilt be March 21, 1997. Winner's names will be published in the 
March 2Blh 1997 edition of Lakeland Newspapers. ... 



With the completionof this survey, you have an opportunity to win one of these prizes. 
To compete in a drawing for the following prizes, please provide your name, address and phone number. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 



PHONE 



GRAND PRIZE $500 

FIRST PRIZE $100 

SECOND PRIZE $50 

THIRD PRIZE One-month free subscription and set-up fee to Lakeland netDirect on-line services 

(value $34.95 each 2 prizes awarded) 
FOURTH PRIZE A free one-year subscription to any Lakeland Newspaper (10 prizes awarded- value $24.50 each) 
FIFTH PRIZE A free private party ad (20 words ) 

(10 prizes awarded- value $15.00 each) 

Please, limit one prize per household. Mail surveys to Reader Survey, 

P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 

or drop off at 30 S. Whitney Street, Grayslake 












1997 

Home 



Garden 









MARCH 15 & 16 
am until 4 pm 

Holiday Inn 

in Mundelein 
(Routes 83 and 45) 



Showcasing Great Ideas 

for Inside and Outside Your Home! 

• Home Repair and Remodeling 
Deck and Room Additions 
Heating and Air Conditioning 
Kitchen Cabinets 



© 



© 



• Financing 
e Paint and Wallpaper 

• Floor Coverings 

• Landscaping 



Ot)0O 




c 




" 




Prize ^ 
Giveaways 

• Food • 

Over 60 Booths 

\ $2.00 Admission 



\ 



■-. 



at the Door 



. 








/^X Til A *s*ZZ*"°m NEWS 1220 

Sponsored by: jfi3r£Sf^ MS ' 3 



WKRS 

THf TALK OF LAKl CQUKTT 



7; 1997 LMV HOME & GARDEN SHOW LfikdANct Newspapers MarcIi 7, 1997 




Windsor debuts all-new models at Fairway Greens 



Windsor Development Corporation 
recently hosted a model grand opening 
at Fairway Greens in Antioch. 

A new townhome community 
framed by the fairways and greens of the 
picturesque Antioch Golf Course, 
Fairway Greens is currently featuring 
three brand new floor plans designed 
expressly for the new 86-horne commu- 
nity. The three new models include: 
The Bayhill 

A 1,363 square foot two-story, the 
Bayhill features a spacious foyer, volume 
living room, adjoining volume dining 
room and a large eat-in kitchen on the 
first floor. On the second floor are a mas- 
ter bedroom with walk-in closet, full hall 
balh, sitting room/second bedroom and 
dramatic loft overlooking the dining 
room below. The Bayhill is base priced 
from $139,900 (all prices are subject to 
change without notice) including a full 
basement, an attached two-car garage, 
central air-conditioning, and a deck. 

The Cantigny 

Another two-story, the 1 ,520 square 
foot Cantigny opens to a large angled 
foyer. Other first-floor highlights include 
a two-story living room, open formal 
dining room and side-by-side 
kitchen/breakfast room. A spacious 
master suite with oversized private bath, 
a second luxury bath and an 1 1 1 /2-foot 
by 12-foot secondary bedroom are fea- 
tured upstairs. The Cantigny is base 
priced from $1 49,900 (three bedroom 
version available from $153,600) includ- 
ing a full basement, an attached two-car 
garage, central air-conditioning, and a 
deck. 



The Augusta 

The largest of the three plans, the 
Augusta offers 1,527 square feet of liv- 
ing space, A mirror image of the 
Bayhill on the first floor, the Augusta 
also comes complete with a large foyer, 
volume living room, formal (but not 
volume) dining room and a spacious 
eat- in kitchen. The second door, how- 
ever, has been expanded to include a 
larger master suite, larger secondary 
bedroom, larger loft and an additional 
full bath. The Augusta is based priced 



from $140,900 including a full base- 
ment, an attached two-car garage, 
central air-conditioning, and a deck. 

According to Sharon Glusica, sales 
manager at Fairway Greens, two of the 
three models— The Augusta and 
Cantigny— feature fully- furnished 
interiors designed by Bonni Morris of 
Chicago-based B. Morris interiors. 

"We left the Bayhill model unfur- 
nished so buyers could get an up- 
close-and-pcrsonal look at the quality 
construction built into all three 



plans," Glusica said. 

For more information, call 
(047)838-0595 or visit the on-site sales 
center and new models. To reach 
Fairway Greens, take Rte. 59 north to 
Harbor Ridge Drive (less than one- 
quarter mile south of Grass Lake 
Road) and turn left (west). Follow 
Harbor Ridge Drive through the 
Antioch Golf Club to the sales center 
and models located at 3975 N. Tee 
Side Crt. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
daily. 




The largest of the three plans, the Augusta offers 1,527 square feet of living space. The Augusta also comes complete with a 
large foyer, volume living room, formal dining room and a spacious eat-in kitchen. Available at Fairway Greens in Antioch. 







' 



I 



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vv-dW3M^iii .■vi-BTT'f -titui. :.-.' • . ■. . .'.'..-, V ' ' 






March 7, 1997 UktlANd Ndvspapers 1997 LMV HOME & GARDEN SHOWf } 



1997 LMV 

Home & GarcIen 

Show 

This special guide is 
brought to you by 
Lakeland Newspapers and 
is presented in conjunction 
with the 

1997 LMV Home and 
Garden Show. 

This guide represents 
many of the fine businesses 
participating in the show, 
as well as additional busi- 
nesses throughout the Lake County area. 

We are proud to bring you this guide and hope you will 
support these businesses and join us at the show. 

We would like to extend a special thank you to the 
Liber tyville, Mundelein, Vernon Hills Chamber of Commerce 
for all their efforts and coordination with Lakeland 
Newspapers to produce this Home and Garden Show Guide. 

We welcome your comments, (847)223-8161. 

Esther D. Hebbard — Display Advertising Manager 

Rhonda Hetrick Burke — Editor In Chief 

Gloria Davis — Contributing Reporter 

Roselte Love — Special Sections Editor 

Kim Stull — Events Coordinator 

Jennifer Banks — Cover design 




PRESEASON 

AIR CONDITIONING SALE 

COMPLETE AIR CONDITIONING PACKAGES FROM 




OVER-STOCKED WAREHOUSE SALE! 200 FURNACES 
AND AIR CONDITIONERS MUST GO! 



• ■■ 




SPRING 
SAVINGS! 

WHOIEIHOUSE HUMiomets 

The Best Cure For Dryness." 

MODEL 550 FROM *189 M INSTALLED 

MODEL 560 FROM *2QSP INSTALLED 

MODEL 760 FROM S 290 M INSTALLED 

90 DAIS SAME AS CASH TO QUALIFIED BUYERS 



~ SHOW SPECIAL!— 

- FREE 23 POINT 

AIR CONDITIONING TUNE UP! 

• . Bring this ad to Booth 39 at the Mundelein 
Holiday Inn on March 15th and 16th to qualify! 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Authorized Dealers For 





Carrier 



GOLD MEDAL WINNER IN SERVICE & CUSTOMER SATISFACTION 

DQQDE1B 

HEATING & COOLING, INC. 
CUSTOM SHEET METAL 
24 HOUR SERVICE INSTALLATION 

1576 Baskin Rd., Mundelein, IL 60060 • 362-0262 ' 



A Special Offer From 

THE DOOR STORE in honor of the 

LMV Chamber's Home & Garden Show 



-tAJ** 




TAKE 10% OFF ALL MATERIALS & LABOR! 

THAT'S 10% OFF OUR ALREADY LOW INSTALLED PRICES ON STORM 

DOORS, ENTRY DOORS, PATIO DOORS, WINDOWS, AND MORE!* 





COLE SEWELL 



jre© 



STORM DOORS 



THERMA TRU 
FIBER CLASSIC 
ENTRY DOORS 



1352 S. MILWAUKEE AVE. 
(Red Top Plaza) 
LIBERTYVILLE 

816-8866 





LARSON 



BASCO 

SHOWER 

DOORS 



ANDERSON & 
CARE FREE 

VINYL 
WINDOWS 




. 



DELIVERY 

Within a 15 
Mile Radius 



DOORS - A/VINDOWS 



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'Installed Products Only 




'Previous Sales inoligiUo. Can! be used 
In conjucten with any other saJo olios. 



KITCHENS 



• 



*This Special Offer is extended through 3/22 only. 
Must present this ad for discounts.* 



1827 WAUKEGAN RD. 

(Across from Burger King) 
GLENVIEW 

724-7300 

MON.-FRI. 10-6 
SAT. 10-4 

CLOSED SUNDAY 




W^M^M^M^mM^mw^M^M^^^: 




mencan 

omes 



A member of the Kennedy Group of Companies 



Limited Partnership 



The Best Kept Secret In Wauconda IS OUT! 



cc 



Brighton Place 



» 



13 Home Sites Total With Only 5 Remaining 




w 









The Fairmont, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, formal living 
and dining rooms, spacious family room adjacent to 
large eat in kitchen with island, large master bedroom 
with walk-in closet, .soaking tub and separate shower, 
2188 sq. ft., prices starting from $188,900. 




Cry**; ' !'>•*!*••.■ "*,' 



The Charleston, 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, living room 
has volume ceiling, separate dining room, spacious 
family room adjacent to large eat in kitchen with 
island, large master bedroom with walk-in closet, ■ 
soaking tub and separate shower, 2004 sq. ft., prices 
starting from $185,900. 



. ■ 



<—,•!( 't » 



We have six other home styles available with prices starting at $157,900. Our homes include many, quality ' 
features and our standards are what many other builders call "options." 

Hurry in - this could be your last opportunity to purchase a quality home in a beautiful "in town" Wauconda. 
location. Walk to schools, park, lake, library and Downtown shopping district. 

For information, call: (847) 487-8951. Office hours: Monday-Friday, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm„ Weekends, 11:00 am to 
4:00 pm or call to set up a before or after hours appointment. We would be happy to discuss making one of our: 
"houses" your "home." ' ■ ' ' ' ' : : 



NOftWBST MORTGAGE 



Gary Wendt - Sr. Mortgage Consultant 
VoicePager (847) 762-1235 

"Over 10 Years New Construction Lending Experience" 



40-J West Terra Cotta Ave. - Crystal Lake IL 60014- Toll Free (888) 463-1216 ext. 16 



Brighton Place is conveniently located in Wauconda. From Route 
176, turn North on Brown (1 block East of Route 12). Turn right on 
Minerva (3rd Stop Sign) to Daniel. Brighton Place is on your right. 




(847) 4 







1 







Minerva 




rn 


c 

CO 


Helena 


O 

I 

a 


«3 








Slocum 



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Rte. 176 /Liberty 



M*wh 7 r 1997 -UkElANd Newspapers. f X9.9 7 L WW HOME & CAR DEN SHOW 




h 



merican 





A member of the Kennedy Group of Companies 



Limited Partnership 



tif v 



w&wew 




Premiere Location - Unbelievable Value 

Wilmot Farms of Spring Grove 

Preconstruetion Pricing Available - Homes & Sites from the 190's 






BflEAKFAST 



□ 



UTIUTY KITCHEN 



ijsjn 



OARAGE 
195" kWO" 



FAMILY ROOM 
10*3* ilM" 







DiNINO ROOM 

inr» 11*11- 



LSV1HG ROOM 
t 12"3"*14"2" 



BEDROOM3 
11*11" x11'9" 




BEDROOM 4 
12'fl" x 11*11" 




i nw 



il 11 tq 



- IU 



1ST FLOOR 



BEDROOM 2 
11*11"! x 13*11- 



T^~~^l 1 



Dn 



MASTER BEDROOM 

is*2*'xai'ir 



REG ROOM 
19'5"k 12"2* 



Our newest home is a 3083 square foot two-story. This home 
includes a separate living room and dining room which open off of 
the center foyer. The back of the home features a "family living 
area" of kitchen, breakfast area and spacious family room. The 
second floor has a 19 x 21 master bedroom, along with three sec- 
ondary bedrooms in addition to a large rec room.. 

Wilmot Farms of Spring Grove is a country rural community of 
one and two story homes located across form the 6000 acre Chain 
of Lakes State Park. All homes are built on one acre plus sites 
and have beautiful open views. 

This peaceful area creates the setting for the perfect lifestyle - 
yet is convenient to recreational areas, shopping and transporta- 
tion and includes the extra benefit of being in a highly rated . 
school district. 



Standard features in these homes are: full basements, central air 
conditioning, oak railings and trim, oak kitchen cabinets, "super 
baths" in the master suites, ceramic or parquet foyers, a highly 
rated insulation package and distinctive exterior elevations. Eight 
new floor plans are being offered, and these quality homes can be 
customized to your individual needs. 

Three car garages are one of the options offered at Wilmot Farms. 
Other options are: whirlpool tubs, fireplaces - in either brick or 
marble-skylights, central vacuum systems and security systems. 

Our Sales Center is open Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and 
Friday from 9:00 am through 5:00 pm and Saturday and Sunday 
from 10:00 am through 5:00 pm or call to set up an appointment 
for a time that is convenient for you. (815) 675-3333. 



NORWEST MORTGAGE 



Gary Wendt - Sr. Mortgage Consultant 
VoicePager (847) 762-1235 

"Over 10 Years New Construction Lending Experience" 



LONG TERM 

NO EXTRA 

COST 

RATE 

PROTECTION 



40-J West Terra Cotta Ave. - Crystal Lake IL 60014 - Toll Free (888) 463-1216 ext. 16 



WILMOT FARMS 




(815) 6 










T9*7 Lt*V HOME & CARDS* SHOW {UHeM! Nfewspaipas Moti 7; 1*37 




FREMONT 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Join Us For 
National Library Week 
April 13th thru April 19th 



New Library Card Applications 

will be Eligible for drawing for 

Savings Bonds Courtesy of: 

First of American Bank of Munedlein 





MONT PUBLIC .LIBRARY 

is in the information business 

The Fremont Public 
Library, located at 470 N. 
Lake Su in Mundelein, is in 
the reading and information 
business, so to speak, offer- 
ing 67,253 unique items for 
this purpose, from books, to 
compact discs, video and 
audio cassettes, even start- 
ing on CD ROM programs, 
and much, much more. 

The library's director and 
head librarian is Kelly Krieg- 
Sigman. The Children's 
Library has three full time 
and three part time staff 
members to serve the first 
step customers from 22 
months to two years of age, through 
Jr. High School The summer reading 
programs are very popular. 
The library offers inter-library 

loans, 

having 

the ability 

to get 

material 

on a 

national 

basis. Six 

comput- 
ers with 

local net- 
works are 

available 

which 

allow the 

customer 

access to 

multiple 



CD ROM programs: the OPAC (On 
Line Public Access Catalogue) and 
info-Trac Magazine index. Inter Net 
access will; be available'by summer of 
1997. 

With the addition of expanded 
adult programs and the new 
Sunday Afternoon in the Library 
Concert Series, the library is now 
offering more and more activities 
for patrons of all ages and inter- 
ests. 

Remodeling was completed in 
August of 1996 with the addition of 
a new Circulation Desk and an 
Information and Reference Area. 

The library's hours are 9 a.m. to 
9 p.m., Monday through Thursday, 
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Saturday 
and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. (from 
October to May). For furth-v infor- 
mation, call (847)566-8702. 



LICENSED 
BONDED 
INSURED 




^jZ^Tl ( jz^merican 



All 

ROOFIN 

Gutters •He 




^sment • Windows 



'"$ WOOD SHAKES 




tops in industry 



JackTaitter, owner and operator of 
AH American Roofing, located at 550 
Telser Rd. in Lake Zurich, brings 22 
years of experience in the roofing and 
siding industries to customers. 

All American's well-trained staff is 
well-known for serving both residen- 
tial and commercial clients' needs 
quickly and professionally. They 
install all types of residential roof 
materials, including standard 3-tab 
shingles, laminated architectural 
shingles, cedar shakes, concrete tile 
and slate. 

Reynolds and Alcoa, two of the sid- 
ing industry's biggest names, are pop- 
ular with All American's customers 
for both aluminum and vinyl siding. 
Installing aluminum soffit and fascia 



eliminates the need of scraping and 
painting. 

All American's commercial roofing 
and sheet metal division offers all 
types of conventional built up roofing 
systems, as well as single ply EPDM 
Roof Systems. Firestone Roofing 
Systems has recently recognized All 
American's commitment to quality by 
presenting them with the President's 
Club Award. 

Repeat customers and positive rec- 
ommendations attest to the quality of 
All American's work. AH American's 
office hours are from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., 
Monday through Friday, and from 8 to 
1 1 a.m. on Saturday. All jobs are done 
by contract, call (847)438-4131 for a 
free estimate. 



ASPHALT SHIMS 



•VINYL •ALUMINUM SIDING 
SEAMLESS ALiilltlM GUTTERS 



,*. 



■ 



CUSTOM SHEir|M)|rAL& POPPER 
• FASCIA & SOFFIT SYSTEMS 
• BAY & BOW WINDOWS 
• PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATIONS 






hn moot 



FREE 



MAN (Wlr'MTO RIOTS 
(SUDARAINITil 



ESTIMATES 



438-4131 



HOOT 



ft.-'. 1 L »—■■ '• -M t 




MahcIi 7, 1997 UkclANd Newspapers 1997 LMV HOME & GARDEN SHOWl? 



Sue Hageman, Kyta Buchta and Kathy Wisdom will be happy to show customers 
the many beautiful lighting fixtures available at Warren Electric in Wildwood. 





ighting up customers' lives for 45 years 



When Warren W. Shadron opened 
Warren Electric, at 33261 N. Hwy. 45, in 
Wildwood, 45 years ago, he carried the 
latest in lighting fixtures and lamps. It 
was easy to choose then because their 
were only a few choices in home lighting 
fixtures. 

Today, Warren Electric, still in the 
same location, is a home lighting center 
and showroom carrying over 75 brands 
of lighting fixtures, giving customers 
hundreds of choices. 

Besides indoor home lighting, 
including outstanding ceiling and foyer 
pieces, chandeliers, and ceiling fans, 
Warren offers outdoor lanterns, land- 
scape lighting, as well as Broan inter- 
coms.and central vacuum systems. 

Warren's expert lighting staff will 
help you choose the perfect lighting to 

— -* ■"-■— ** JiA T* a |" l '~HWi ■ mi i if » 



enhance the beauty of your home from 
famous brands like Casablanca, Stiffel, 
Kichler, Framburg and Hinkley. . . 

Warren is your specialty lighting 
store, with installations available upon 
request. The lighting center also offers 
lamp and lighting repairs. 

Warren Electric is open Monday, 
Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday from 9 
t a.m. to 6 p.m. and on Thursday from 9 
' a.m. to 8 p.m., Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 
p.m. 

Warren invites you to stop in and 
visit so you can peruse the wide array of 
lighting fixtures, lamps, lighting sup- 
plies, as well as other cutting edge elec- 
trical devices that will make your life a . 
little bit brighter. 

Call (847)223-8691 for more infor- 
mation. 



1 




65% Off 

On selected products 

Excludes 
Sllhouotto, VignoHo 

'Feiturhg HunterDou glas 

W I ■ I 

• Mini Blinds 

• Vertical. Blinds 



!■>•« r * « « i o ■ i 



Applause® 

Honeycomb Shades 

Pleated Shades 



• Country Woods 

Wood Blindi 

• Duette® 

Honeycomb Shades 



Privacy Backing 
On Alt glflilfj Shmdma 



Daporallv* H»m« 
On Al l RolUr Sh«d.« 




• Window Shades 

• Silhouette® 

Window Shading* 

• Vignette® 

Window Shadings 



NEW Soft Suede i 
Mini Blinds 



NOW OPEN 
SUNDAYS 

11 A.M. -4 P.M 



FREE MEASURING & INSTALLATION 

On Custom Blind Orders $500 or more 



Vltlt our ihowroom or call for in In homo decorating eoniuflatloti and free 
price ettlmatei in (he convenience and environment of your own home. 



827 E. Center St. • Groyslake: 
(Piggty Wlggly Plaza at Center & Atkinson} 

•slake Showroom , CfV'tll La M ' 

(815) 459-4267 



IBS 

Houn: M. T, W, F iO-6 Th 1Q-8 S.I. IPS Sun. 11-4 Or By Appt 



WARREN ELECTRIC 



Showroom And Electrical Supplies 
Experienced & Friendly 

Let Us -SMISi 

Light Your 
Way! 

•Broan intercoms 
•Central Vacuum 

Systems 

•Lamp Repairs 

•Outdoor Lanterns 

• Landscape Lighting 





We Are your Specialty Store 

•Paddle Fans 

hiiihley ' F °y er Pieces 

lighting •Chandeliers 

•Bathroom Lighting 

(847) 223-8691 

33261 N. Hwy. 45 - Gray slake 
Installation Available 



VISA 




' ^SSM 



HOURS: 

M,T,W,F -9-6 

Thurs 9-8 

Sat. 8-2 



Making decorating choices 
enhanced by personal taste 



The design experts at Window and 
Wall Concepts will make you feel right at 
home in their home, the attractive 
showroom at 827 E. Center St. in 








^sm 




Grayslake, while they assist you making 
decorating decisions enhanced by your 
own personal taste. 

Making choices will be easier 
because you will^e surrounded by all 
the latest styles in custom draperies, top 
treatments, blinds, and wall coverings, 
plus a myriad of unique coordinating 
room accessories. 

The home fashion experts will help 
take the confusion out of choos- 
ing from the vast array of selec- 
tions available by assisting you in 
narrowing your choices down 
and arriving at the best decorat- 
ing solution for your home. 

The perfect window treat- 
ments, coordinated with the right 
wall coverings, can become the 
focal point in a room's decor. 

Window and Wall Concepts' 
staff enjoys creating a new look by 
working with existing room set- 
tings or starting from scratch for 



the new home owner. 

"We have an extremely sau'sfied 
clientele, which is evident by our high 
repeat and referral business," said 
owner Barbara Bertier, adding "We 
always go that extra mile to please 
our customers while guaranteeing to 
provide the most personalized ser- 
vice." 

Custom work can take any- 
where from two to four weeks 
depending on the availability of 
materials, whereas blinds and shades 
typically can be delivered and 
installed within a week. "This is a 
great benefit for new homeowners 
who have bare windows when they 
move in," said Bertier. 
Window & Wall Concepts' showroom 
is open Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday 
and Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; on 
Thursday until 8 p.m.; on Saturday until 
5 p.m. and on Sunday from 1 1 a.m. to 4 
p.m. 

Home consultation appointments 
for those who want to make their selec- 
tion in the comfort of their own home 
can be made by calling (847)223-3267. 











■ [ I 19.97 LMV HOME & GARDEN SHOW UkelANCJ Newspapers MarcIi 7,-1997 




ttft&i&fc*"™** 



CARPE 

C 











:tJ .if^i^'^it - 



For excellent carpet cleaning call Mike Davignon, Bonnie Perry, Lee Kraft, Chris 
Williams, David Creiger or Jim Fox at Dick's Carpet Service. 




arpet, upholstery 
cleaning at its best 



Remember when carpets and uphol- 
stery never looked quite the same after 
they were cleaned? Dick's Carpet 
Service, located at 39070 Green Bay Rd. 
in Beach Park, uses a revolutionary 
cleaning process that keeps those valu- 
able carpets and your favorite uphol- 
stery looking as good as new. 

According to Mike Davignon, who 
has 31 years of carpet cleaning knowl- 
edge to offer customers, the use of a van 
mounted cleaning system, the Bane- 
Clene Process, is the secret, one recom- 
mended by most carpet manufacturers. 
This is a warm water extraction pro- 
cess which uses over 99 percent water to 
clean your favorite carpet, leaving no 
residue to draw dirt. Extracting 95 per- 
cent of the cleaning solution from your 
carpet leaves it practically dry when the 

■ process is finished. The solution used is 
biodegradable and non-toxic, so it is . 

1 safe for children and pets. 



A speed drying system is implement- 
ed during humid weather and deodor- 
ization is done when necessary. A quali- 
ty control call will be made the day after 
the cleaning to insure excellent service. 

Oriental and area rugs will be picked 
up, cleaned at the plant and returned. 
Dick's also offers water damage restora- 
tion, as well as upholstery dry cleaning. 
Each customer receives free lifetime 
spot cleaner refills. 

Dick's Carpet Service offers three dis- 
tinct packages to fit most carpet-clean- 
ing needs: the Value Added Service Pkg., 
the Protector Guarantee Pkg. and the 
Always Clean Maintenance Service Pkg. 

Office hours are from 8 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m., Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 
1 p.m. on Saturday. Work hours are from 
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. with special evening 
hours available Monday through - 
Saturday if requested. Call (847)746- . 
3332 for more information. 



q © » © & o o o 




o © e o o o o 



I computers match job seekers with jobs 



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IDES, the Illinois Dept. of 
Employment Security, located at 221 N. 
Genesee St. in Waukegan, has brought 
job hunting and help wanted ads into 
the computer age with a cutting edge 
job service activity. 

This service, which is open both to 
those looking for a job, and businesses 
and industries that have jobs to offer, 
utilizes a computerized network that 
covers the entire state of Illinois, 
expanding employment possibilities far 
beyond previous capabilities . 

This job service activity also allows 
IDES to establish a constantly updated 
pool of qualified workers. Job searchers 
can go to the IDES office in Waukegan 
during office hours and use the com- 
puter keyboard themselves to find out 
what positions are currently available, 
or IDES' experienced staff can assist 
with accessing job information. 



IDES also participates in the 
nationwide .job bank that is available 
through the Internet. 

The job centers' computers also 
offer a file service that will match 
workers with job openings. The 
computer automatically follows-up 
by telephoning listed job seekers to 
inform them what available jobs 
they qualify for. 

This job service activity finds 
employment and employees in every 
field of endeavor, from blue collar 
workers to white collar jobs, for job 
seekers who have a degree, to job 
openings at the entry level. IDES 
matches jobs and qualifications. 

The IDES office is open from 8:30 
a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. 
Call (847)662-6913 or more informa- 
tion. IDES does not charge for this job 
service activity. 



dickV- 

Carpet Service 






■>; 




Carpet & Upholstery cleaning 
Trained Professionals 



Serving 

Lake County « 

for over 30 

years! 



r^SOFF! 

for new customers 
on their first carpet or 
upholstery cleaning. 
Offer exp. 4/30/97 J 



Ask about 

our 3 service 

> packages designed i 

to SAVE you time, 

loney , and extends^ 

the life of your 

carpet 



• CARPET • UPHOLSTERY • DRAPERIES 
• WATER DAMAGE RESTORATION • 

Residential & Commercial 
Serving Lake County Illinois Since 1966 



C21 



Call: 



918- 1222 



- Libertyville 




Resurfacing Of: 

• Porcelain & fiberglass 
bath tubs 

• Ceramic tile 

• Porcelain & cultured 
marble sinks 

• Counter & vanity tops 

• Appliances 



RuI^A-Diib-Diib 

Bath & Kitchen Resurfacing 

We Can Refinish & Repair 
• PORCELAIN • CERAMIC • FIBERGLASS 

rv 



Call Today! 
336-BATH 

(2284) 



1 1 



i 



With This Coupon 
Offer exp. 4/30/97 



t y Marc* 7, 1997 UkelANcI Newspapers 1997'LMV HOME & CARDEN'SHoWl! 










INVENTORY 
CLEARANCE 

ALL FIBERGLASS BOATS 
ALL EVINRUDE MOTORS 



BOATS: 

FREE Layaway 
FREE Storage 
FREE Cover 



EViriRUDE^ 

OUTBOABDSi 

FREE 

2nd Year Warranty 




RhtatfCiOCl marine, 1300 Towniihe Road (Rt. 60) Mundelein, IL 
a 847-949-8899 4 Miles West Of 1-94, 3 /. Mile East Of Rt. 83 

OPEN SAT. 8-5, SUN. 10-3, WED., FRI. 9:30-6; THURS. 9:30 - 8:00 
" ALL MODELS CURRENTLY IN AHLSTRAND^ INVENTORY. SALE ENDS 3-23 



For windows to look at, 
as well as through 



Alan Melnick and Greg Garofolo, 
owners of A Shade Above, located at 
631 N. Midlothian Rd. in Mundelein, 
offer their clients the latest in quality 
custom window treatments, draperies 
and valances, 
including cus 
torn vertical 
blinds they \MJG& 



1/ / 1 ■■ 



S te 



law 






£.<K ■ 






manufacture 
themselves. 

With 10 years of combined experi- 
ence in the window treatment indus- 
try, they and their knowledgeable staff 
offer personalized service to go along 
with blinds, draperies and valances 
from all the major manufacturers, 
including custom vertical blinds they 
themselves manufacture. 

After guiding customers in choos- 
ing the perfect window treatment to 
suit their own individual needs and 
tastes, the professionals at A Shade 



ii.,-~ „," 




— r ■ 



-:■■•■'•! 



Above will come to their home to 
carefully measure and then complete 
the installation. All products sold and 
installed by a Shade Above carry a 
lifetime warrantee as well as their 

guarantee 
of a perfect 
fit. 

Changing, 
or just . 

freshening the look of a home's decor 
can be completed as soon as three 
weeks from the time the measuring is 
done. Financing plans are available. 
Watch for the sale specials that 
change weekly. 

A Shade Above is open from 10 
a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Friday; from 10 
a.m. to 7 p.m. on Thursday, and 
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. 
Call (847)949-7422 for more infor- 
mation. 




Ahlstrand Marine carries 

enough 

boats to 

supply an 

Army! 



Ahlstrand Marine stocks 
enough canoes, boats and 
•paddle boats to supply a 
small army (Ahlstrand has 
already supplied the "Navy" 
at Great Lakes Naval Training 
Center). 

It all started back in 1974 
on Milwaukee Avenue in 
Wheeling. Specializing in 
custom fishing boats, 
Ahlstrand outgrew their 
Wheeling facility and moved 
to their present location in 
1984. At 1300 Town Line Rd., 
Mundelein, Ahlstrand con- 
tinued with fishing boats and 
added runabouts (fiberglass 
aluminum) as well as paddle 
boats, canoes and a greatly 
expanded display of boating 
accessories and supplies. To 
service what they sell, an 
eight bay service center was 
added shortly after the move 
to Mundelein. 

Stop by any day but 
Monday and see what 
Ahlstrand Marine has to 
offer, or call them at 
(847)949-8899 to get down 
loaded on their specials. 




A SHADE ABOVE 

Blind & Drapery Experts 



S 



Vertical Blinds, 

Draperies & Top 

Treatments 



58 



met?** 
i?,% off 



HunterDouglas 



IND0W r A J M I 

•Silhouette* 
•Duette* 
•Vignette*" 
•Roller Shades 
•Crystal Pleat 
•Mini Blinds 
•Wood Blinds 
•2" Vinyl Blinds 
•Custom Drapery 
•Custom Valances 



o n s 



NO MONEH DOWN 

1 yR. INTEREST FREE 

or 

NO PAYMENT *TIU JULbT 



GUARANTEED BEST SERVICE & PRICES 



FR££ 

Measure 



hit 



Rte. 176 + Midlothian 

847-949-7422 

Visit Our Showroom 

•With Approved Credit- "With Minimum Purchase. Excludes Specialties. See Store For Details. VISA-MASTER CHARGE-DISCCVER 



install** 



SALE 

tms 

3/31/97 






M 1997 LMV HOME & GARDEN SHOW LaIceIancJ Newspapers MarcIi 7, 1997 



*3 



1997 

Home 
Garden 





Showcasing Great Ideas for Inside and Outside Your Home! 







. 



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Free Food 
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8 



10 



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16 



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(Routes 83 and 45) 



Sponsored by: Q) S£8*4 <§§* WkPA 

\. ."' Pft*H»S»««" Hit TALK Of LAKE COOK 



-..,- 



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Hotel 
Desk 



MarcIi 7, 1 997 LAk E U N d Newspapers 1997 LMV HOME & GARDEN SHOW[ 






Booth 



Li § [] O (j I O 

Business 





I Century 21 • 

2 Lambs Farm 

3 Meyers Communications Group 

7 . . .McGuire Mortgage Company 

8 Nationwide Insurance 

9 ..,.,. Consumers Cooperative Credit Union 

10 ;..,...- Superior Exteriors 

||,I2 .'■. Oelerich Heating, Ventilating & Air 

13 First of America - Illinois 

14 . , Mega Home Improvement 

15 .Citibank, F.S.B. 

16 Sparkling Spring Water Co. 

17, 1 8 .... Ahlstrand Marine 

19 Surface Doctor 

20 Earthstone & Surface Expressions, Inc. 

21 Bosco Chiropractic Clinic 

22 InfoRamp Express 

23 Libertyville Bank, a branch of Richmond Bank 

24 . . North Shore Gas Co. 

25 Daily Herald 

26 > . Taylor Rental 

27 Dick's Carpet Service 

28 WKRS/WXLC Radio 

29 . . . , .Success National Bank 

30, 3 1 .M.G.N. Lock-Key & Safes, Inc. 

32 laursen & Blackman Company 

33 .Shur-Way Moving & Cartage Co. 

34 Swanson Diversified Industries, Inc. 

35 Northview Bank & Trust 

36 Majestic Mortgage Corp. 

37 Nutri-Lawn/Simply Green 

38 Re Nu Kitchen & Baths 

39 , Toptec Heating & Cooling 

41 Townline Appraisal & Home Inspection 

42, 43 Fremont Public Llibrary 

44 . Totalink Communications 

45 Harris Bank Libertyville 

46, 47 .Carpet Corner 

'48 .P & J Air Purification 

49 Castle Construction 

50 1 Commonwealth-United Mortgage 

52 All American Roofing 

53 D.S.R Service Dynamics 

54 , . . ". Best Landscape Management, Ltd. 

55 # ; .North Shore Limousine 

56 Grand National Bank 

57 Resort Travel Corp. 

58 [[,[[, .WLIP/WIIL Radio 

59 Lakeland Newspapers 

^O, 61 LMV Network Group 

' 62 ■ TPN/Primestar 

63 \ \\\ \ \\ . , .LaSalle Bank, FSB 

64 Longaberger Baskets 

65 The Advertiser 

66 Joseph M Art & Framing 



S22^^3S325£^.E5E22k- 



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jflM 1997LMV HOME & GARDEN SHOW UknUNcJ NcwspApcws MAiicfi 7, T997 



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Buildin 



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\ 
\ 



Risking It All 



If you think investing equals too much risk, perhaps 
you've never considered the risk of being too safe. If 
your returns aren't keeping up with inflation, you're 
actually risking the security of your financial future. 

So what should you do? Attend this free A.G. Edwards 
investment seminar! 

"Building Wealth Without Risking It All" 

Vernon Park District Mundclein Park District 

Thursday, March 20 Tuesday, March 25 

7 to 9 p.m. 7 to 9 p.m. 

Linden hurst Park District 

Wednesday, April 30 

7 to 9 p.m. 

Guest Speaker: AI Rodriguez 

You'll learn about: 

• Increasing your investment return potential 

• Minimizing risk through diversification 

• Setting realistic investment goals 

• Tax-advantaged investments and strategies 

Seating is limited, so make your reservations by calling 
A.G. Edwards today! 

jLGEdwards 

Al Rodriguez 
(312) 648-5314 



Member SI PC 




■ 



NORTH SHORE 

LIMOUSINE SERVICE, INC. 



Sedan 

Stretch 

Super Stretch 



(847) 816-7474 

CivcpjaHt • Weddings, 
• Q£iwttjvu>, • Sj)£cia£ Clccatietu, 

1352 Armour Blvd. • Mundelein, IL 60060 



■N&;-- 



■ 1 1 



ii 



pug Cool Thoughts for Summed fljjj 1 

CALL TODAY & SAVE $(00.00 
ON A NEW LENNOX- A/C SYSTEM 



Free 
Estimates 




OFFER EXPIRES 4-10.97 




KuRTHERH 6B3EC , B , SAUSEii OLSEH 

* HsYSTEUS " ' ' 683 E " Center St > HEATING & klfl COHDITIONINO = 

Grayslake, IL a Division of Norltwm Air Systems, Inc. 

223-8877 60030 949-51 1 1 



Rodriguez keeps juggling 
job, coaching, radio gig 



Alan Rodriguez, an investment bro- 
ker for A.G. Edwards and Son in Chicago 
helps kids make real money every year. 

Making it his business to teach busi- 
ness, he leads a course called applied 
economics at Addison Trail High School. 
The students issue share in a company, 
then engage in various business activi- 
ties to make the value grow. The stu- 
dents have a strong sense of ownership 
in their company, he said. 

At the end of the year, the company 
is dissolved and the money distributed. 
"Last year our class made about $35 a 
share," he added. 

Through a similar program called 
Project Business, Rodriguez works with 
eighth graders at Palisades Middle 
School in Burr Ridge. 

"We have an auction, selling ofT 
items tire kids like, to show them how to 
supply and demand work to escalate 
prices," he said. 

His educational efforts are not limit- 
ed to children since Rodriguez also 
teaches finance courses through Lyons 
Twp. Adult Education. 

At age 32, Alan T. Rodriguez is just 
warming up. 

An investment broker for two years 
at A.G. Edwards and Sons in Chicago, he 
was a broker for two years at Hamilton 
Investments. 

For seven years, he taught religion 
classes at St. Cletus Church in LaGrange 
and at St. Scholastica in Woodridge. 
However, just when he got smart, decid- 
ed to slow down and stop leaching die 
Sunday school, he got a strange feeling. 

"I felt like I wasn't doing enough for 
my community. I felt I had to give some- 
thing back, so 1 started coaching," 
Rodriguez said. 

Being head basketball coach as St. 



Cletus wasn't enough, he also had to 
take on the job of assistant coach of the 
school's football team. He is now an 
assistant coach for eighth grade and 
won the LTMS tournament. 

"With teaching Sunday school, I felt I 
taught the kids morals. It's a litUe differ- 
ent with sports. Teaching them to try to 
achieve and enjoy winning makes kids 
feel like they're doing something. It's 
very important." 

Rodriguez provides advice not just to 
his clients, but also to listeners of radio 
station WKRS, 1220-AM in Lake County. 
Rodriguez gives a live, two-minute stock 
market wrap-up and business report for 
the station twice a day, Monday through 
Friday, He also hosts a monthly 45- 
minute call-in show during which he 
answers investment questions. "I want 
to help people meet their financial 
goals," says Rodriguez. 

"There are so many choices out 
there," he observes, options ranging 
from stocks and bonds to mutual funds, 
municipal bonds and annuities, it can 
be tough to decide the best way to uti- 
lize your assets. By reviewing each indi- 
vidual's each individual's situation, we 
can customize an investment strategy 
that fits." 

For example, Rodriguez explains, 
"Investors looking for companies with 
high dividend payouts should look for 
companies that have raised their divi- 
dends continuously over the past five or 
10 years. 

Who knows what's next for "AI T" as 
he sometimes calls himself? 
Rodriguez even makes house calls! To 
arrange an appointment, call i (800)888- 
4299. 

Editor's note: Partial editorial submit- 
ted byjanyce Hamilton. 



SffBINfir INTO IT 




A&W mi R ,. lflA ain 39 S. ROUTE 12, FOX LAKE 
rffrJEk W0 NU-DIAMUND showroom on route 12, 

^-_p- -j- ....... * ACROSS FROM MCDONALD'S 

^^P*/ GLASS CO. (847)587-2226 

HAVE A SMASHING DAY 1 . TOLL FREE 1 -800-255-0340 



ft 

ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 

V 




Stop by our booth... 
March 15 & 16 

1997 LMV Home & Garden Show 

consumers 



member owned 



cooperative credit union 

2750 Washington St. • Waukegan, IL 60085 

1210 South Lake St. • Mundelein, IL 60060 

728 East Rollins Rd. • Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 

(847) 623-3636 











MabcIi 7, 19?7 UkEtANd Newspapers 1997 LMV HOME & GARDEN SHOWf 




■ 



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MGN Lock-Key & Safes, Inc. is a full-service 
lock and key shop with a large showroom devoted 
to safes, locks, and keys, as well as answers for all 
your security needs. 

Owner Carl Norlin, along with their team of 
four other employees, believe in giving a little 
extra by way of personal and friendly service. 

MGN has been providing professional and high 
tech knowledge and service in Lake and parts of 
Cook County for over 20 years. 

MGN operates three fully equipped mobile 
Lockshops with extensive inventory and equip- 
ment tooffer you on-site physical security ser- 
vice. 



Day and 
night service is 
provided by 
MGN, with 
their commit- 
ment to giving 
their cus- 
tomers 24- 
hour emer- 
gency service 
for unexpected 
lockouts and 
other after- 
hour service 
needs. You're 
always guaran- 
teed prompt attention and reliable service. 

MGN stocks foreign and domestic automotive, 
motorcycle, luggage, safe deposit box, mailbox 
and even those "old time" skeleton keys. Plus, if 
you need key chains, rings, or anything key relat- 
ed, MGN is the place to go. 

MGN offers The Schlage Primus High Security 
Cylinder System, the answer to your key control 
problems. With the patented protection Primus 
key, special keys are produced by the factory and 
issued only to authorized Primus Locksmiths. 
Keys and service are only available to the owner 
or manager upon presentation of the appropriate 
ID Card. These features successfully protect 




against the unauthorized duplica- 
tion of keys. Plus,' it's easy to 
incorporate them into an 
existing key system because 
Primus cylinders are 
compatible with most 
Schlage systems. 

MGN can solve 
your door prob- 
lems, too. Call 
them for professional- 
ly installed Roton 
Hinge systems or a 
Markar reinforcing pivot 
hinge. And if you need 
documents in your home or 
office protected from fire and 
burglary, MGN has more than 30 safes on display, 
with everything from cash boxes to record safes. 

For help in defining your security needs, call 
MGN Lock-Key & Safes, Inc. (847)949-0603, 513 
E. Hawley St. in Mundelein. 
Hours are Monday 
through Friday 
from 9 a.m. 
to 6 p.m. 
and 

Saturday 
from 9 a.m. to 
5 p.m. <AJ>>K?W 





J 

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$ 

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Hi 



MGN IS THE KEY TO SECURITY & SAFETY 

FOR ANY LIFE STYLE 

Say MGN "A safe place to go" and get a FREE Lock de-icer! 

•Large Assortment of Sales • Specialty Locks 

•Door Repair and Replacement -Foreign & Domestic Keys 

Family Owned and Operated For Over 23 Yrs. 

Come and See Our Showroom! 




**2l** 




513 S. Hawley St. 
Mundelein, 1L 60060 



24 HOUR 

EMERGENCY 

SERVICE 



(847) 949-0603 








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J 1997 LMV HOME & GARDEN SHOW UkelANd Newspapers Mam* 7, 1997 



Wild Bird Center 
offers community 
valuable resource 












t\ia>*SiiKa: 



1 



■ EUT^^ 



^J^TSJ 






fl&r-TSs-J 



A Wild Bird Center customer recently 
noticed a bird outside his window, but 
didn't know what it was. And there was 
another mystery, why did the bird ignore 
the seed mix he just bought? 
Somewhere across town a backyard 
enthusiast pondered her empty bird- 
h©.use, and wondered how she could 
attract a tenant this spring. 

Our customers belong to a growing 
number of Americans who enjoy back- 
yard birdwatching. In'fact, feeding and 
watching birds is the second most popu- 
lar hobby in the country. (Gardening is 
first). The reasons are obvious, birds are 
everywhere. Their songs and colors are 
among the simplest joys of nature. 
Getting to know the birds and their 
habits is relaxing and brings us closer to 
the natural world. Best of all, our back- 
yards are a great place to do it. 

The Wild Bird Center is the place to 
find answers to your bird questions, and 
much more. Walk into die store, and 
you'll be treated to a sample of what 
backyard birding offers you. Gently flow- 
ing water, the melodious sounds of 
birds, and the subtle smell of cedar and 
sunflower calm your senses. Then you 
begin to explore, and be sure to allow 
plenty of time. 

The Wild Bird Center offers the area's 
largest selection of feeders, seed, houses, 
baths, optics, and books for birdwatch- 
ing. More importantly, we have the 
knowledge to help you sort it all out. For 
example, offering niger seed to 



Goldfinches requires a special type of 
feeder with tiny openings. Goldfinches 
lose their bright yellow plumage in the 
winter, but they remain in many areas 
throughout the year, so don't take those 
niger feeders down. 

Some people are surprised to learn 
that a seed mix isn't always the best 
option to attract the birds you want in 
your yard. You often get better results 
with a certain type of seed offered where 
the birds who like it are most likely to 
feed. Millet, for example, is best offered 
on the ground where it is popular with 
ground feeders such as chipping or tree . 
sparrows, juncos, and doves. 

For a better view of the beautiful birds 
in the Lake County area, the Wild Bird 
Center offers a choice of the finest binoc- 
ulars and spotting scopes with the tech- 
nical expertise to help you find the best 
match. You'll also find an extensive selec- 
tion of field guides and books on favorite 
species such as hummingbirds or blue- 
birds. Audio tapes and CDs can help train 
your ears to recognize bird songs. 

The Wild Bird Center is more than a 
store. It is also a valuable community 
resource. The center features regularly 
scheduled free birdwalks, and offers spe- 
cial programs for kids, garden clubs, 
seniors and other organizations. The 
programs include topics like feeder 
placement, birdhouse building, and 
bird-friendly landscaping. For more 
information, call Wild Bird Center at 
[847) 549-9990. 



f 



■ 



Local 
Internet Access!! 



^ 



Mm JMP£ PRESS 



As far as you want to go. 






* Most complete net access available anywhere 

* Our modems are the fastest available 

* New accounts normally set-up the same day 

* Our low flat rate pricing can't be beat 

* Our tech support and customer service won't 
let you down 

for businesses, corporate clients, schools 

and power users, we otter the following 

advanced services: 

► Home Page publishing 
and design 

► Domain name registration 

► Dedicated lines up to full Tl 

► ISDN Connections 

for more information or to order today, please call, fax or E-Mail: 

Telephone: (847) 549-0192 fax: (847) 367-6666 

E-Mail: infoex@theramp.net Web Site: http://IheRamp.net 

^ S 





Part of a balanced breakfast 

Recommended by doctors as a way to reduce stress, 
watching birds at feeders will help you keep your life 
in balance. Take a break from the morning news, and 
enjoy the birds outside your home. For expert advice 
and superior products, visit the Wild Bird Center. 

Wild Bird Center 

For your enjoyment of backyard birds 

Red Top Plaza ^49~9990 Mon *" Wed * 10 * 6 
1322 S. Milwaukee Aver J * Thurs. 10-7 

Lflbertyville, Illinois 60048 Fri-SaL 10-5 

t (Behind Burger King) 

. — ' — ■ . 1 r — - — 

M 




Sun, 124 



WMM 




31b. L»«*s 

Dr. Geis Mix Bird Seed 

w/min. $5.00 

Purchase 






Any one item of 

your choice 
excluding optics 

(not -veil Id -w/otiier offers) 



I cxp. 4/30/97 C970202J [^P-J 1 '^/^ ___S1 7 °£° 3 J 



* ! i 



Providing quality Internet 
service at affordable prices 



Tired of dealing with national 
Internet service providers who 
promise more than they can deliv- 
er? Looking for a local provider who 
you can actually talk to on the tele- 
phone? Than how about unlimited 
monthly Internet Access from 
InfoRamp 
Express. Based 
in Vernon Hills, 
the InfoRamp 
Express has 
delivered on its 
promise to 
provide quality 
Internet service 
at an afford- 
able price. The 
Internet has 
become a part 
of almost every 
walk of life, 
and InfoRamp 
Express is 

widely recognized as Chicagoland's 
premiere provider. InfoRamp 
Express makes the Internet afford- 
able and easy to use. 

Enjoy using the JnfoRamp's 
unlimited e-mail service to stay in 
touch with friends and relatives. 
You may even meet exciting new 
acquaintances with InfoRamp chat 
lines. You can spend as much time 
as you like in these chat rooms, 
because every call to InfoRamp is a 




local call and the monthly fee is 
only $19.95. 

Browse the world wide web to 
shop, do homework, play games, 
manage your investments or just 
surf the web to some unknown 
adventure. InfoRamp understands 

that the 
Internet is not 
just technology, 
its people. -.- 
That's - why they 
offer local 
friendly cus- 
tomer service to 
make your 
Internet experi- 
ence a pleasant 
trip. 

For Lake 
and McHenry 
county busi- 
. ness's ■ 
InfoRamp 
Express, offers a wide range of 
connectivity solutions from flat 
rate dial-up accounts to high 
speed dedicated lines from 
56Kbps to full T-l. We also design 
and host web sites for companies 
of any size. So if you are looking 
for quality local access to the 
Internet that's guaranteed to 
please, call Steve Bienstock, at 
InfoRamp Express at (847)549- 
0192. 




S'-T-J: zi -=.tx .*- .j* 






MarcJi 7 f 1997 UkelANd Newspapers 1997 LMVHOME & GARDEN SHOWRBf^P 





implement; family 
wned and operated since 1923 



For oyer^O years, Schmidt 
iplement Company in Salem, Wis. 
is bejefij' providing quality, equip - 
ent ati'd'service tp-'people in 
Aitherji Wisconsin 1 and northern 
inoisFjohrrlSeere, known for its 






►ST** 







//« 



performance and quality; has 
always been the main brand sold at 
Schmidt's, in farm machinery, lawn 
and grounds care equipment for 
both the horrieowner andcommer- 
cial user, and'light industrial equip- 
ment. John Deere's line has tractors 
to fit allneeds from smalllawns to 
large estates to landscaping work 
and farming. Schmidt also carries 
John Deere and:Gehl skid loaders, 
Echo outdoor power equipment, 
Land Pride tractor attachments, 
used equipment, and other special- 
ized lines. i : 

In 1923, Frank Schmidt moved 
from a farm into Salem and bought 



a farm equipment business that 
operated in an old livery stable barn 
(horses were a common trade-in in 
those days). His son Al Schmidt 
took over the business in 1935 and 
led the company into years of 
growth and a new building in the 
1960's. By the time Al's son Bob 
replaced him in 1970, the company 
was changing with the community 
and was selling John Deere lawn 
and garden tractors. Currently Bob 
and his son Dave, the fourth gener- 
ation of the family in the business, 
serve a customer base that is half 
non-farm. Schmidt's has grown to 
be one of the largest John Deere 
lawn equipment dealers in the 
state. 

Schmidt Implement has always 
strived to provide the best cus- 
tomer service to all they do busi- 
ness with. Whether you need a new 
spark plug or to invest in large 
equipment, the friendly people at 
Schmidt Implement will take the 
time to make sure your needs are 
met. A large inventory is available 
for you to test drive something 
before you buy. Equipment is sold 
assembled and ready to use with 
delivery service available. 

Financing is available on site not 
only for new and used equipment 
but for parts and repair service as 
well. So for all your equipment 
needs, you can rely on Schmidt 
Implement, family owned and 
operated since 1923. 



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902-904 Main St. Antioch (847) 395-7979 

Bath and Kitchen Remodeling 
Custom Ceramic Tile Installations 

PLAN YOUR NEW BATHROOM 
WITH BERTCH CABINETS 

Planning a remodeling or 
building project for the 
bathroom? Then you'll want 
to visit the experts at 
The Bath Works and ask 
about the variety of quality 
bathroom cabinetry from 
Be'rtch Cabinet Manufacturing. 
Bertch cabinets come in styles 
and finishes that will suit your 
tastes whether traditional or 
contemporary. So whether 
you're just looking for ideas 
or have a specific need in 

mind, stop in at 

The Bath Works and see 

how quality cabinetry from 

Bertch can fit in. 















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Bertch Cabinet Mfg., Inc. 



JOHN DEERE 



- Lawn & Grounds Care 

QgjJ2H33 Equipment 

Save Time Sale 



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Buying a John Deere LX188 LAWN TRACTOR 

NOW will save you: 

with 17 HP, 48" mower and Hydrostatic drive, it is easy to 

drive and mows big lawns fast. 

Save money during our SAVE TIME SALE 

through March 29, 1997. 

DRIVE ONE AT SCHMIDT'S AND SEE THE DIFFERENCE! 

Helpful People • Quality Products 
Outstanding Service Since 1923 



IMPLEMENT fT^ 
COMPANY (l ^ 

HY. 83, 5 Ml. NORTH OF ANTIOCH 

SALEM, Wl • 414-843-2326 • HOURS 8- 5 MON. - SAT. 

♦Subject to credit approval-On selected models only-Finance charge is 19.8% for 

accounts not paid in 90 days. 10% down payment required 

See store for details 




lun& i® remodel tfi& most 
relaxing; room in tfi& fiou&e> 



If your bathroom is starting to show 
its age, be assured of one thing: It will 
look even older next year. But, take 
comfort in knowing that not every 
bathroom requires full-scale renova- 
tion. Simple ideas can spruce up a 
bathroom and give it a sophisticated 
new look. 

Let The Bath Works be your one-stop 
shop for all your bath remodeling 
needs. Visit the newly remodeled show 
room of The Bath Works, located at 902 
Main St. Antioch. The Bath Works is 
your source for total bathroom renova- 
tions and ceramic tile installations. 
In business since 1984 The Bath Works 
offers their clients quality products with 
professional installation. When taking 



on those long over due home projects, 
The Bath Works is there to answer do-it- 
yourself project questions by offering 
quality products and plenty of profes- 
sional installation advice. 

Best of all The Bath Works specializes 
in ceramic tiles to create custom coun- 
tertops, fireplaces, foyers, kitchen, and 
sun rooms. 

Pamper yourself in a newly renovat- 
ed bathroom and let The Bath Works 
help you design the most popular room 
in the house! 

Hours are Tuesday through Friday 
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday from 9 
a.m. to 3 p.m.; closed Sunday and 
Monday, but evening appointments are 
available. 



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[Q1997 LMV HOME & GARDEN SHOW UkElwd Newspapers MarcIi 7, 1997 



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OPENING 
APRIL 1st 

Visit our new 

3,000 square foot 

greenhouse with 

20,000+ perennials. 

Many new 

demonstration 

gardens on a 50 acre 

site where you can 

personally select 

your plant 

materials. 

All plant material 
of specimen quality. 

Professional 

Landscape Services 

since 1979. 






40960 Mill Creek Rd. Wadsworth 

(847) 838-0501 

Directions to Mill Creek Nursery; 41 North to Rte. 173 (Rosecrans) 
West to (1st Intersection) Mill Creek Rd., Left on gravel road 1/2 mile to Nursery Sign. 



Tool rules to keep in mind 
for spring fix-up jobs 




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Before the first robin returns, 
homeowners are thinking about the 
jobs that await them after a hard 
winter. Before starting your spring 

fix-up pro- 
jects, take 
time to 
make sure 
your tools 
are in top 
working 
order and 
are right for 
the job. 
Any 

tool, no matter how durable, can fail 
if it is misused, whether it's used for 
gutter and shingle repair, installa- 
tion of storm windows, or getting 
equipment ready for the lawn and 
garden. 

Metal-to-metal contact under 
pressure, combined with a striking 
or twisting motion, can result in 
broken metal fragments that can 
cause injury. In the interest of do-it- 
yourselfer safety, these general safe- 
ty rules should be studied before 
starting any spring projects: 

• Follow the manufacturer's 
instruction on the package. 

• Wear safety goggles when using 
hand tools. 

• Keep all tools clean, dry and in 
working order. 

• Use the tool only for the job it 
was meant to do. 

• Buy several versions or sizes of 
the same tool or ensure the right 



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tool for the job. 

• Throw away 
damaged for abused 
tools promptly. 

• Be sure tools and 
work are compatible. 

• Be sure handles are fixed firmly 
into a tool's working end. 

• Confine impact forces to strik- 
ing and struck tools. 

• Shut off current before using a 
tool near electricity. 

• Hold work in a clamp or vise, 
not in your hand. 

• Never use a vise or clamp for 
lifting, pulling or transporting. 

• Pull instead of push a wrench 
handle for safer leverage. 

• Keep jaw teeth, cutter and 
blades sharp for better results. 

• Use steady pressure on jaws 
and cutters; don't rock the tool. 
Keep a tool's moving parts properly 
cleaned and tightened. 

• A sharp cutting tool is less dan- 
gerous than a dull one. i 

• Use pads in the jaws to protect 
soft or crushable work. 

• Keep tools from excessive heat. 

• For continuous work, use com- 
fort grips or gloves. 



Greco Landscape offers over 
50-acres of trees to choose 



As one of the leading landscape con- 
tractors in northern Illinois, Mike Greco 
Landscape, Inc., located in Gumee and 
their Nursery/Garden Center, Mill Creek 
Nursery, Inc. in Wadsworth, encourage 
all to call or visit die nursery to discuss 
their landscaping needs. Specializing in 
residential design and implementation, 
Mike Greco Landscape started in busi- 
ness in 1977. Their nursery was started 
in 1990 and now has over 50-acres of 



shade trees, ornamentals, evergreens 
and perennials to choose from. 

Customers are able to view and per- 
sonally tour the nursery to select plants 
that have been designed on their prop- 
erties. It is time to start planning a land- 
scape that will beautify your home and 
property for all to enjoy for years. 

For further information, call the 
office at (847)855-0590 or the nursery at 
(847)838-0501. J 




WELL TRAINED REALTORS* GET RESULTS 




COMPUTER TRAINING CENTER 



CAHEER INSTITUTE 

Baird & Warner offers comprehensive professional and technology training 
programs ensuring its Sales Associates are the most knowledgeable In the Industry. 

(BaM&Wamer 1113 S. Milwaukee Ave. 

yJ^&VSXS"* Libertyville, IL 60048 



RENT WITH- CON F I' DEN CE 




Bobcat Loaders 
Trenchers 
Paint Sprayers 
Air Compressors 
Breaking Hammers 
Demolition Hammers 




WYLOR RENTAL 

We re more than Just products at work.® 

Cut-off & Concrete Saws Carpel Cleaners Canopy Tents 

Compactors Roof Sanders & Edgers Tables (ail sizes) 

Pressure Washers Snakes Skirting 

Chainsaws Pumps & Generators Unens • Many Colors 

Tiller & Mowers Tables & Chairs Chairs 

Thatchers Tents, Frame & Pole Chafing Dishes 

We sell used & new ei 



« 



Coffee Makers 

Candelabra 
Champagne Fountains 
Wedding Arches 
Place Settings 
Barbecue Grills 
Dance Floors 



We sell used & new equipment 

Serving contractors, do-it-yourselfers, caterers, meeting planners, 

weddings, and private parties in Lake County 

MUNDELEIN 946 South Lake St 949-0500 



Call for reservations, Open 7 days a week 



©Taylor Rental 






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Marc(i 7, 1997 UktlANd Neu-spa P ers 1997 LMV HOME & GARDEN SHOW ffifl * 



.- ! • - 



Lake County's Newest Lighting Showroom 

Our 3 locations have cleared out our warehouses and moved it 
to. our Gurnee location for the BIG event! 

HURRY IN! 
FINAL WEEK! 



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CONTRACTORS I ©FILING FAN | Mon . Sa | 10 . 5 

WELCOME |_ _ _ S^l | Thurs. % 7 pm 



3615 Grand Avenue • Gurnee 

(On Rte. 132, 2 blocks East of 41) 

1 (847)625-4286 z 



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The 

Light 










now specialize 

in. 
ceiling fans 




Ever since a great power said "Let 
there be light!" we have been drawn 
towards its brilliance and glitter. With 
the many beautiful lighting styles 
available on today's market, we are 
also drawn by the glamour of light. 

At the Light Brothers Lighting 
Showrooms, owned by the Vivirito 
family since 1907, every lighting line 
sold in the country is represented. 
They also carry complete lines of ceil- 
ing fans and art decor, such as Tiffany 
art glass. The Light Brothers special- 
ize in furnishing the complete light- 
ing for newly constructed homes, as 
'well as free lighting design and lay- 
outs for inside and outside, including 
landscape lighting. 

Emerson, Regency and Casablanca 
are just a few of the well-known 
brands found in their huge selection 
of ceiling fans, with and without 
lights. A myriad of attractive lamp 
shades in many sizes, shapes and col- 
ors can also be found at their show- 
rooms. The professional and friendly 




way their staff handles special orders 
and customized lighting, as well as 
custom installations and repairs, is 
another reason for the Light Brothers' 
success. 

The Light Brothers Showroom in 
Gurnee is located at 3615 Grand Ave., 
call (847)625-4286; in Lombard the 
showroom is at 340 W. Roosevelt Rd., 
call (708)953-0900; in Mt. Prospect, ,«* 
it's at 212 E. Rand Rd., call (847)394- 
2900; and their newest showroom is 
on Rte. 31, in Carpentersville, across 
from the Spring Hill Mall. Light 
Brothers Showrooms are open daily 
from 10 a;m. to 5 p.m. and on 
Thursday until 8 p.m. 




lit's not tti§ only pl&m 
fQi^U flndi extra money 




You're sitting on a lot of extra money and might not even know 
it This windfall can be found in a home equity loan or line of 
credit from LaSalfe. Besides low rates, we offer unbeatable 
advantages like no application fee, no points and no closing 
costs. Best of all, it's probably tax-deductible (ask your tax 
advisor). So hunt under the cushions if you 
need change. But for some real money, get a 
home equity loan from the bank that works. 



LaSalle 



ThkBankThxpWohkv 



xfcMHi no mm 



There are over 70 LaSalle Bank FSB 
locations to serve you. To apply or for 
more information, call 1-800-697-3300. 



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QIJ 1997 LMY HOME & GARDEN SHOW U^eIancj Newspapers MarcIi 7, 1997 



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Four single -f ai^^y homes are 
available for earlyMelivery at 
Painted Lakes, Sltedrnrnunity high- 
lighted by more^hfan 66-acres of 
wetlands presefv^and natural open 
space in Lake Villja': 

Bordered on one side by the Sun 
Lake Forest Preserve, Painted Lakes 
is a 165-acre community which will 
include 218 singfejfamily homes in 
^two series as well-as 134 townhomes 
when complete.jJJour professionally 
decorated singlejtfamily models are 
now open and tft&community is 
currently 20 percent sold. 

Buyers may choose from 10 home 
designs in two distinctive series, the 
Genesis Classic, 'base-priced from 
$149,990 to $187,990 and the 
Genesis Heritage, base-priced from 
$185,990 to $214,990. 

The two-story Essex in the 
Genesis Classic Series offer 1,930 
square feet of living space; four bed- 
rooms; 2 1/2 baths; formal living 
room and dining room; family room; 
eat-in kitchen; first-floor den; and 
attached two-car garage, priced 
from $175,990. The Essex may also 
r-^be expanded to 2,250 square feet. 
Homes are situated on large 
homesites, ranging in size from 
8,500 to 15,000 square feet. Due to 
the rolling nature of the land plan, 
the community is ideal for walk-out 



and English basements. 

Buyers may also view three- 
dimensional home designs with a new 
virtual reality computer program at 
The Townhomes of Painted Lakes. The 
Fern is a 1,334 square-foot home 
which features two bedrooms and a 
loft, 2 1/2 bath; expansive great room 
with fireplace; formal dining room 
with access to the patio; spacious 
kitchen; master bedroom suite with 
large walk-in closet and private access 
to a fulj bath; additional storage; and 
attached two-car garage, priced from 
$126,990. 

Upon entering the Fern, guests 
are welcomed by a two-story entry 
with dramatic views of the graceful 
staircase with decorative plant shelf. 
The expansive living room measures 
13 3/4 by 14 3/4 feet and features a 
cozy corner fireplace. Adjoining the 
living room is the formal dining 
room, which measures 9 3/4 by 12 
feet and offers access to the patio. 

Designed to accommodate walk- 
out and English basements, eight 
two-story plans are available to buy- 
ers. The townhomes are arranged 
with three lo five homes per build- 
ing. 

Residents can enjoy the benefits 
of living in a picturesque communi- 
ty and still have easy access to near- 
by shopping, restaurants and 



regional attractions including the 
Chain O'Lakes, Gurnee Mills Outlet 
Mall and Six Flags Great America. 

In addition, the highly rated 
Dist. 34 schools serve the residents 
of Painted Lakes. A new Metra sta- 
tion opened in Lake Villa in August, 
1996, offering access to O'Hare 
International Airport and down- 



town Chicago/' 

Painted Lakes is located on Deep 
Lake Road approximately one mile 
north on Grand Avenue (Rte. 132) in 
Lake Villa. Sales office hours are 
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily, except 
for Fridays when homes are from 
noon to 6 p.m. For more informa- 
tion, call (847)356-5420. 




The two-story Essex in the Genesis Classic Series offer 1,930 square feet of living 
space, bordered on one side by the Sun Lake Forest Preserve. Available at Painted 
Lakes in Lake Villa. 



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Quiet, private living available in 
townhome on Wooster £ake 



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The grand opening of five pro- 
fessionally decorated model 
homes is now being celebrated at 
Tanneron Bay, a townhome com- 
munity on the shores of Wooster 
Lake in Ingleside. 

Tanneron Bay will include 
86 townhomes on a scenic 26- 
acre lakefront parcel of land 
with views of the 100-acre 
lake. Prices range from 
$124,990 to $147,490, and 
walk-out basements are avail- 
able, ranging from $13,450 to 
$17,450. 

Being developed by Four 
Oaks Development Corp., 
Tanneron Bay features the 
same award-winning 
designs that sold out in just 
nine months at Library Hill 
in Wauconda. The same 
homes are also being offered 
at Rainier Woods in Fox 
Lake. 

According to Marcia 
Redlinger, sales and marketing 
manager, special incentives 
are being offered as part of the 
introduction of the new mod- 
els. 

"Visitors to Tanneron Bay 
during our grand opening 
phase can walk through five 
beautiful homes, and if they 
decide to buy, they can take 
advantage of affordable introduc- 
tory pricing and free central air 



conditioning," said Redlinger. "In 
addition, those buyers who have 
dreamed of living in lakefront 
homes can choose among select 
locations which overlook beauti- 
ful Wooster Lake. Lakefront sites 



Quiet, private Wooster Lake is 
used for sailing, fishing and- 
paddle boats so it offers a 
serene environment for the 
homes. A boat launch and a 
park with a walking path along 



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Five professionally decorated model Homes are now open for viewing at Tanneron 
Bay, a community of townhomes overlooking Wooster Lake Jn ingleside. The com- 
munity; is being developed by Four Oaks Development Corporation, 



are available in Phase I which is 
presently underway, and all lake- 
front sites come with walk-out 
basements." 



the lakeshore are planned for 

the future, and two ponds, 

aspens and oak forests as well as by appointment. Call (847)740-4700 

a maple grove give the commu- for more information. 



nity a setting of exceptional nat- 
ural beauty. 

The five model homes, with . 
interior design by the Concept 
Group of Northbrook, feature 
exciting, open architecture with 
vaulted ceilings, dramatic 
window expanses and 
convenient traffic pat- 
terns. Six floor plans are . 
offered, ranging from 
1,330 to 1,756 square feet 
with tow or three bed- 
rooms; 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 
baths; and attached one- 
or two-car attached 
garages. Exterior mainte- 
nance is handled by an 
association. 
"These homes are ideal 
for professional singles 
and couples, firsts-time 
home buyers and those 
whose children are 
grown," said Redlinger. 
"With walk-out base- 
ments, buyers can add 
approximately'600 feet of . 
living space, so the floor 
plans are very flexible." 
The sales center and new 
model homes at Tanneron 
: Bay are located on Rte. 
134, one mile east or Rte. 
12/59. Hours are from 10 a;m. to 5 
p.m. seven days a week and evenings 



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MARch 7, 1997 UkelANd Newspapers 1997 LMV HOME & GARDEN SHOW RE 



.i. 






I •■ i 



PAINTED LAKES IN LAKE VILLA 



It 



't get any better than this. 
Or this. Or this. Or this. 







Painted Lakes by Centex Homes. 

Only 4 Minutes To Lake Villa Metra Station And 13 Minutes To 1-94. 

The most incredibly beautiful community in the Lakes area where 90% of the homes back up to a nature 
area. Here, space is everything. If you wish to talk to your neighbor over the back fence you can, but 
you'll have to holler. Painted Lakes is a 165-acre planned community perfectly located. It's just minutes 
to Gurnee Mills, Great America, and more. It's Painted Lakes — a great place to live for you and your 
family. And it's only from Centex Homes. _ _, ^_ _ _ ^~ -- « aa g—n « 

CENTEX SINGLE FAMILY HOMES FROM $150,000 TO $209,000 AND TOWNHOMES FROM $122,000. 

Classic Homes Heritage Homes The Townhomes of Painted Lakes 

1,555 to 2,259 sq. ft. 2,203 to 2,740 sq. ft. 1,291 to 1,550 sq. ft. 




Painted Lakes in I^ake Villa 
Located off 132 west of 
Gurnee Mills. North on 
Deefi Lake. 



$149,990 -$179,990 
847/356-5420 



$185,990 -$208,990 
847/356-5420 



$121,990 -$134,990 
847/838-9063 



Sales Office Hours: Saturday - Thursday 10a.m. - 6p.m. and Friday Noon - 6p.m. 

Check neighborhood listings for square footage and prices. Centex Homes is a subsidiary of Centex Corporation, listed on the l^YSE. 




orromMTY 



HOME 
BUILDERS 

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Great Ideas 

for Inside and Outside 

Your Home! 



•Home Repair and Remodeling • Paint and Wallpaper 
• Deck and Room Additions • Kitchen Cabinets 
• Heating and Air Conditioning • Floor Coverings 
Landscaping • Financing ....and Much, Much More/ 




V 4h H 



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H, 

!• 



BRING IN THIS COUPON FOR 

FREE ADMISSION 

4 ($2.00 Value) 

y Complimentary Tickets Are Also Available 
\ At Participating Vendor Locations 

MARCH 15 & 16 



•<4 
i 



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1997 

Gr? 6 ^ 10 am until 4 pm 

Q 6 »*i/ Holiday Inn in Mundelein 

<1i* ^) ylXM^V (Routes 83 and 45) 






^J 



Sponsored by: 




Til A «*m"» NEWS 1 22 G 

Lake! and 102.3 yfr cur g| § 



Newspupers 



»» fc.>,-*^. 



r«e MtK of UKf cowrr 



MARCH 15 & 16 

1 am until 4 pm 

Holiday Inn 
in Mundelein 

(Routes 83 and 45) 

i 

Prize Giveaways 

Food 
Over 60 Booths 

Call (847) 680-0750 
for more information 



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