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Full text of "Antioch News 03/16/1961"

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TOMRSD>!^MARCH ^16, 1 961, A^IQCH, jILLINOtg; 



Flrit Jlh R#*ulU to A<fv«rtl««rr 



VOL. LXXV. NUMBER 37 








Ties 







MDICATION of the new tlllnefa 6*11 
Tetejrltone headquarter* of 331 Lake St. 
ImI week brought AnftMh a step «loMff 
to dM service. Tha modem, one-story 
and basement structure wlll.fiirnWi dial 
s atvl c g here when installation end test- 
fctf equfemsnt are co rn pis tod fates this 
yea*,' Illinois B«fl officials estimate auto- 
raaf re service will be In operation by Aug. 
1. Shown at cornerstone sealing cere- 
monies Merch 7 oio (loft to right) Roy 
Toft, president, ftro department; Idgar 
SJmanten, tiro cfclafj Clarence Shuttle, 
vhYega cfeifc; lm)o Sjrdow, wlro chief; 

i 

Honey Rekhardr, cfiiof operator; Horry 
Gffooofoo, intrallotion foreman; Id Jacobs 
jwMdlRf trowel), village ottomoy; Don 
L. Hood, Illinois loll Manager; and Ma- 
bel- Dow, service manager. Others not 
shown woro Iverett Of t e d ehl, . Rescue 
Sawed captain; Howard Shopord, busl- 
•toss manager, Antfoch News; and Jack 
fWo), Uom Oub president. 



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At loft, wlro chief 

In spa 

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woo soalod In 

it 

■PWnf*.VWff PWnWnVI Hlnl l*f plH" 

towtty wot a tapo r eco rding of eech 
toast's volet, a lotto* front Mayor Om- 
an tno omI system, company 
photographs and o currant tele- 
phone directory. 




Open Easter Seal Drive Here 



Here Mar. 20 

Ninety-so von athletes of Antioch 
Township High School will be guests 
of honor at the 21st annual banquet 
7 p.m. Monday at the high school. 

This traditional affair, sponsor- 
ed by the Ant loch Lions Club, is a 
measure of recognition to ATHS 
team members for their contribu- 
tions to conference and student af- 
fairs. 

Headlining the event will be 
Chuck Mather, backfield coach of 
the Chicago Bears Professional 
Football Team, who is expected, to 
enliven proceedings with anecdotes 
concerning Papa Halas' team. 

During and following the six- 
course roast beef dinner, the pro- 
gram will move along under Ber- 
nard N. Osmond, program chair- 
man, and Clarence Olson, toast- 
master. 

Guests will be welcomed by John 
Fields, Lions Club president, and 
response will be made by Leslie 
Herbst, president of the "A" club. 

Sharing the platform with Chuck 
Mather will be Albert Dittman, high 
school principal. 

Also on the program will be pre- 
sentation of high school athletes by 
Ward Lear, athletic director, and 
coaches Robert Walther, Roger An- 
drews, Roy Nelson, Douglas Rls- 
berg, William Seemann, Lawrence 
Leon, Emery Chandler, Allen Knurr 
and Stuart • Good. Presentation of 
the outstanding athlete trophy will 
be made by Fields. 

Also on. the program will be 
Joseph flu*h and bis pep band; Al- 
len Knurr* Pep Club sponsor; Nary 
Donovan and Gladys Brooks, advi- 
sors, and their cheerleaders. 

Special guests will include: town- 
ship supervisors L. E. Murrle, An- 
tioch, Edward Tlede, Lake Villa, and 
David Van Patten, Newport; W. C. 
Petty, county superintendent of 
schools; school board members Rob- 
ert Denman, Ruth Seyfarth, William 
Brook, Roger Prosise, Milburn Cain, 
Lester Osmond, Richard A. Ripley, 
and school treasurer Helen Nelson. 

Murrill Cunningham and Ervin 
Barnstable, presidents of Antioch 
and Lake Villa, complete the guest 
list. 





Antioch area residents can brace 
themselves for that bad news a bit 
earlier this year— Lake 'County's 
tax bills are expected to be in the 
mails about 45 days earlier than they 
were last year. 

Supervisor Emmett Moron ey, who 
is chairman of the Lake County 
Board of Review, said the board will 
complete its work by March 31, 
which is lifc months earlier than last 
year. 

The review board, which hears all 
tax assessment complaints, has lis- 
tened to a total of 2,144 gripes this 
year — 1,940 on real estate tax as-j 
sessments and the remainder on per> 
sonal property tax assessments. -^ 

Moroney takes a rosy view of tax- 
payer acceptance of the personal 
property tax. 

"Some- day it will be popular to 
pay the personal property tax," he 
predicts. "We have gone, through a 
period of trial and error, under- 
standing and misunderstanding on 
assessment rolls . . . and now there 
is a -feeling of understanding." 



Group of 29 



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Easter Seal Parade Day has been 
officially proclaimed in Antioch 
Township for Sunday, March 19, by 
Supervisor Lloyd E. Murrle. 

In Issuing the proclamation Sup- 
ervisor Murrie said, 'The Lake 
County Easter Seal Society provides 
many vital services for the people 
of Lake County, not the least of 
which Is the support and operation 
of the Lake County Center For Re- 
habilitation Center, 709 North Ave., 
Waukegan." 

Supervisor Murrie officially open- 
ed the Easter Seal campaign for An- 
tioch Township earlier this week 
when he purchased his Easter Seals 
from two-year-old Karl Shook, a 
tow-headed smiling patient at the 
Rehabilitation Center. 

After hearing of the tremendous 
progress little Karl has made under 
tile physical therapy treatment at 
the Rehabilitation Center Supervi- 
sor Murrie said, "If Karl were the 
only youngster in Lake County 
helped by the Lake County Easter 
Seal Society it would be worthy of 
our support, but there are scores of 
Karl Shooks and disabled adults an 
well who ai$. being helped to live a 
full life by the Society's Center for 
Rehabilitation." 

A battalion of 45 paraders under 
chairmanship of Mrs. Lorraine Huml, 
Bluff Dr., Antioch, will launch a 
two-hour door-to-door drive at 2 
p.m. Sunday. They are: Msdmes. 
William Aim. John Angcloff, Henry 
Apostal, Frank Benes, Jr., John 
Blctsch, Fred Bloom, Marie Bush- 
ing, Elmer Christophersen, Walter 
Delany, Gordon Donovan, John 
Fries, Janis Hagstrom, Robert Hart, 
Norman Heimbrodt, Harold Heinz, 
Edward Hevrdjas, Norman Jedele, 
Helen Kopriva, Henry Kubicki, 
CharteTTarson. 

Also Mesdmes. Robert Lasco, C. 
R. Laursen, James Leksicb, Maurice 
Lovens, John Magnuson, Charles 
Maplethorpe, Peter Matteoni, Jr., 
Harry Miller, Walter Mozal, Charles 
Ness, Glenn Nettles, Roy Nelson, 
Dave Nissen, Clarence Olson, Ru- 
dolph Palenik, Clarence Pyles, Fred 
Rausch, Jerry Rockow, Elmer Ru- 
dolph, Ed Strang, E. J. Thiele. Wil- 
liam Yucas and Patricia Mallory. 



Watercolor by Local 
Arfit I Wins Ribbon 

Artist Ellen McDowell's water 
coolr copped a blue ribbon at the 
Town & County Art Show last 
Thursday in Grayslake. 

The local artist's entry was of a 
Grass Lake cottage, painted in deli- 
cate and misty technique, and rated 
one of the 20 blue ribbons granted 
in the high school and adult classi- 
fications. 

Judging of the 245 paintings and 
21 craft pieces was done by Ted 
Edri, art lecturer at the University 
of Illinois, who presented a critique 
during the showing. 

Mrs. McDowell is a member of 
the Antioch Art Guild. 



Science Open Hoist 
Features 160 Exhibits 

LAKE VILLA — More than ISO 
exhibits will be on display at the 
second annual Science Open House 
at the Lake Villa Community Con- 
solidated School, 7-8:30 p.m. Sat- 
urday. 

Projects assembled by students of 
the seventh and eighth grades, will 
include studies in fields of astron- 
omy, electronics, chemistry, geology 

and physics. 

Entertainment will be by mem- 
bers of the 7th and 8th grade band 
under direction of Thala Rush. Re- 
freshments will be served. * 



Top echelon Republican leaden ' 
on the local level have formed ' a 
first-line organization of committee- 
men who will guide GOP efforts in 
future political campaigns. : 

The new organization, compris- 
ing the area of Judicial District I, 
is composed of 29 committeemen of 
the townships of Antioch, Lake Villa, 
Grant and Avon, and Is organized 
to guide party efforts on the coun- 
ty, state and national level. 

Chastened by state and national 
election results last November, these 
GOP leaders have organized to push 
efforts to keep Lake County in the' 
Republican column and ' to throw 
their weight behind state and na- 
tional candidates. 

First act of the new organization 
was a public caucus last month in 
Lake Villa, from which decision was 
made to back John "Bud" -Stanton, 
Grant Township, for justice of ,the 
peace, and Carl Schmidt, Avon 
Township, for constable Selection* 
of these two ' candidates was done 
through poll of those attending the 
caucus. 

Heading up the new oiganization 
is Warren Bushnell, Lake Villa 
Township, chairman; Helen s Burke, 
Antioch Township, Secretary; and 
Charles Larson, Antioch township, 



After this session, there will be a 
class for those age 19 and up, mole 
and female, to act as instructors in 
Lake County to fill a .need for life 
saving teachers during the summer 
season in the lake region. 



High School Cards Concert 
By DePauw University Band 



CAGE TOURNEY 

The world's series of Illinois 
basketball - the state high school 
championships — will be carried 
on Channel 7 (WBKB) this Sat- 
urday. 

Sponsored by Illinois Bell -Tele- 
phone Co. for the 10th consecutive 
year, the semi-finals will begin 
at 1 p.m. and the third place and 
championship games begin at 
7:30 p.m. 

Sportscasters for the tourna- 
ment will be Jack Drees, who has 
called all previous tournament 
telecasts; Tom Kelly, Peoria 
sportscasi er; and Chick Hearn, 
NBC announcer in Hollywood. 

The games will be televised live 
from Huff Gymnasium in Cham- 
pa ign-Urbana. 

The screaming crowd provides 
almost as much interest as the 
players as they cheer the teams to 
victory. 



Red Cross First Aid 
Class Starts Monday 

A six-week Red Cross first aid 

class is scheduled to begin at 8 p.m. 

Monday at Waukegan East Campus 

High School with Mrs. Roy Berry 

of Winthrop Harbor as instructor. 
Minimum age is 16 years for both I sergeant-at-arms. 

male and female. | other GOP committeemen mem- 

bers of the organization, listed by 
precincts and townships, are: 

Antioch - Russell Holtz (1), Fran- 
cir £ GHffftira), Henry Pape (5>, 
Fred Zeason (6); Lake Villa - Art- 
hur Bennett (1), John Killar (3, 
Elmer Wolff (4), Lewis Schwicht 
(5); Grant - Ed Koziara (J), Thomas 
Cusker (2), Leonard Hink <3), John 
Stanton (4), Leo Steffen (5), Peter 
Afeld (8), Adam Skrzenta (7), Ray 
Dreyer (8); Avon - Leo DeMeyer 
(1), John Murphy <2), William 
Wood (3) Hans Hanson (4) Carl 
Schmidt (5/, George Secor (6), 
George Jaques (7), Genevieve Haln 
(8> t Charles Billings (0). Kenneth 
Herring (10). 

The organization has scheduled a 
GOP dance to be held at 8 p.m. 
Saturday, March 25, at Lakewood 
Park in Round Lake. Arrangements 
are being handled by Billings, Han- 
son, Afeld, Wolff and Burke. 



Legion, Aaiiliary 
to Mark Anniversary 

. Members of Antioch American 
Legion Post 748 and the Legion 
Auxiliary will celebrate the 42nd 
birthday of the Legion with a birth- 
day party at 8 p.m. today in the 
Legion Hall. 

Post Commander David Kuiken, 
Lake Villa, and Mrs. William F. 
Chase, Auxiliary president, urged 
all Legionnaires and members of 
the ladies' unit to attend. The Post 
has a membership of 135 and the 
Auxiliary 111. 



The DePauw University concert 
band will present an evening of fine 
band music March 27 at 8:15 p.m. 
at the Antioch High School Audi- 
torium. 

The DePauw University Concert 
Bond, under the direction of Dan 
Hanna, associate professor of music 
education, will be making its first 
tour into northern Illinois. The Uni- 
versity band is planning to provide 
a well rounded* program of good 
band music. 

The university students will spend 
the night in Antioch, staying with 
the parents of the high school band 
and choir. 

Before the concert the Antioch 
High School Music Association, 
along with the parents who are put- 
ting the University students up for 
the night, w.Ul serve a carry-in sup- 
per to the students. 

The Antioch High School Music 
Association is sponsoring the De- 
Pauw Band to raise money for the 
high school band and choir summer 
music camp, planned for Aug. 13 
through 18. 

Tickets are available from all high 
school band and choir students. 
They will also be available at the 
door. 




A Pioneering Educational Effort 

What Are We Doing for 
Our Exceptional Youth? 

BY HARVEY L. PATTON 
(Third of o Series) 

Lost week, The Antioch News introduced its readers to 
the hard-of -hearing program of the Speciol Education District 
of Lake County, a pioneering public education project aimed 
at assisting exceptional children to in port overcome their 
handicaps and join the full world of their friends. 

Where but a few years ago these hondicapped children 
would hove been literally cast aside to exist in an aimless 
world of their own, programs such as the one established here 
today are reclaiming many of these unfortunate youngsters and 
bringing them along the paths of useful citizenship. 

In this article, The News takes its readers backstage into 

the lives of the Trainable Mentally Handicapped, 
dayu before Christ they 



THIS BRASS SOLO group will be featured when the DoPouw University bond 
presents a aprlng concert March 27 ot AnHoch Mifh School auditorium. Seated 
is Janet Staventon; standing left to right ere Thome* Taylor, William Austin and 
Bob McCleattor. 



In the dayu before 
were put to death 

With the spread of Christianity, 
their treatment was more harsh. 
They were locked up and forgotten 
except at feeding time. 

In these civilized times they arc 
committed to institutions, or allowed 
to remain at home, never existing 
in a normal sense and never advan- 
cing beyond the gray world of the 
mentally retarded. 

However, special education' pro- 
grams such as that organized within 
the Special Education District of 
Lake County are reclaiming certain 
of these mentally retarded young- 
sters and advancing them to a stage 
where they may someday become 
almost self-sufficient. 

The time and effort spent on 
their training is great, but the re- 
clamation of one youngster Into an 
individual who is able to learn self- 
carc, follow directions, master basic 
academic training, and In some 
cases contribute in some degree to 
a livelihood In later-years, is a full 
measure of return to the dedicated 
instructors who are part of this 



special educational program. 

In its simplest terms it's weighing 
the practice of allowing a mentally 
retarded youngster to continue his 
existence in limbo, often unable to 
attend his own personal needs, 
against a trained individual who has 
mastered the rudiments of safety, 
can move from one place to another 
and. in some cases, can accomplish 
such basic tasks (under supervision) 
as gardening and cleaning. 

Classified as Trainable Mentally 
Retarded, these youngsters can nev- 
er advance beyond basic self care, 
acquire a degree of socialization, 
master the ability to follow direct- 
ions, practice health habits and gain 
a very basic academic training with 
the following top expectations: read- 
ing for protection, during which 
students acquire a 5 to 20-word 
reading vocabulary consisting of 
such words as "fire", "danger", etc., 
and learning numbering concepts 
ranging up to 5 or 10, depending 
upon ability. 

These are the youngsters who will 
advance physically, somewhat be- 
(contbiued on page B) 



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THE ANTIOCH NEWS. ANTIOCH, ILLINOIS 




News Editorials 






K*y to QoH Schools 

"Education . . -the most important isubject ^which we as a 
people can be engaged in" . ^;s6 Mid 'Lincoln in 1832. 

Hji statement#^p€Cia1ly^m«(iy as the dates for spring school 
iboardielectibnsidrawinear. 

Our scr^odls will be as good as -the people want them' to be. 
Members of the school boards are the representatives of the people. 
Thus the Quality of our schools depends on the quality of the school 

board. '^-^' ' %w.-5 : . - ■■M-!;'.::.- ' W'- -.■'>: 

Voters can maintain the high level of quality which has char-1 
acterized bur. schools by seeking good candidates for school board 
membership, encouraging school election Voting -and demonstrating 
o continuing Interest in school affairs. • 

Specifically, voters can select board members of integrity and 
sincerity; persons 'whbjhave public confidence, are successful in 
♦heir work, have demonstrated judgment ond are objective, are gen- 
uinely interested in representing the whole community, exhibit faith 
In education and keep informed on educational matters, are open- 
minded, work well with others and are sufficiently courageous to 
resist outside pressures, ' _"•'■ 

Come to think of it, that might not be a.bad yardstick for can- 
didates to all off ices.' 




A Significant Dale Approaches 

Although April J 5 is an important date in the lives of every 
wage earner, it has significance to those interested in beautif (ca- 
tion as well. 

For April 15 is generally considered the deadline for effective- 
ly spraying etm trees against Dutch elm disease. Experts advise 
spraying the trees in fall and winter, whenever the temperature is 
above 40 degrees, but not during the warm seasons. 

Many county parks completed their spraying. lost fall and win- 
ter, when temperatures were ideal, and thus have but few trees to 
service this season. However, park officials point out that by far 
the larger percentage of diseased elms in cities are usually located 
on privately-owned property, and thus do not come under the tree- 
spraying program. 

Elm trees can L><? saved from Dutch elm disease, but the treat- 
ment must be timely and thorough. Two main courses of action are 
to >Cut and burn all weak and dead elm wood, and then spray all 
/healthy elm trees. 
f Recommended spray is a DDT emulsion, which leaves a resi- 

due on the trees for a long enough period to protect them from the 
bork beetle which carries the disease. Spraying elms - at least the 
larger ones, should be done by a custom sprayer. Most satisfactory 
is the mist blower which gives good coverage, but is limited to where 
equipment can be driven. Hydraulic sprayers with long hoses may be 
used to spray trees back from the street. 

Regardless of reports to the contrary, the only way to protect 
o healthy elm is by use of spray. Although scientists predict a 
systemic insecticide will be available within several years, present 
so-called "cures" have proved ineffective. 



My State Senator Robert M«€lory 
Republican — Lake Bluff 

Members of the Illinois General 
Assembly are Justifiably concerned, 
about the growth and prevalence of 
crime In bur state. Most attention is 
being given to the shocking condi- 
tions in Chicago.T3Howevcr, other 
areas of the state where criminal 
elements hold sway will also re-" 
ccive the serious attention of our 
Springfield solons. * 

A major legislative task Is to cor- 
rect the organizational structure 
which permitted abuses and laxity 
in the Chicago Police Department 
culminating in the disclosure last 
year of scandalous combination of 
various police officers and thieves/ 

At the 1960 Special Session, this' 
member of the Senate advised Police 
Supt, Orlando W. Wilson that then 
was the time to enact police reform 
measures. It was as apparent then, 
as now, that Chicago Civil Service 
controls served to hamstring effec- 
tive management of the police de- 
partment. But, Supt. Wilson, admit- 
ting that he was without experience 
in securing the enactment of legis- 
lation, elected to wait. 

While he might have dictated the 
terms of police reform bills last year 
when the police scandals were fresh 
in the public mind, the chances of 
complete reform are now jeopard- 
ized by a powerful police lobby. 

As a co-sponsor of the legislative 
bills requested by Supt. Wilson for 
a Board of Rights and other needed 
reforms, this Senator will not com- 
promise with the leaders of the po- 
lice opposition which behaved in 
gang style to eject an assistant cor- 
poration counsel from their recent 
packed protest meeting. 

Another legislative measure de- 
signed to meet the increase in crime 
is the bill to study the need for a 
Department of Corrections in Cook 
County. The recent newspaper dis- 
closures of deplorable conditions at 
Chicago's Bridewell (House of Cor- 
rection) have led to this proposal. 
The new department would be or- 
ganized to give special attention to 
such groups as the juvenile offend- 
ers, first offenders and narcotics' 
cases. Another objective is the uni- 
fication and coordination of correct- 
ional and rehabilitation functions in 
an attempt to reduce the number of 



■THURSDAY^ MARCH Id, 1**1 



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from 





9y R*p. PAUL SIMON 



Zbc iHntiocb IRews 

Established In 1886 

M«rfor«t I. Gorton Howard SMpard 
Publlihir Buttons Manofor 

Representatives: 
CHANNEL LAKE LAKE VILLA 



Published Every Thurs- 
day at Antloch , Illinois 

Entered at Second Clan 
Matter or the Pottofflce 
at Antloch, Illinois, un- 
der Act of Mar. 3, 1879 



*S 



KIJiiTi 




Mrs. Pearl Kapell 
Antloch 1837 

MILLBURN 

Mm. Frank Edwards 
ELiot 6-3323 

TREVOR 

Mrs. Grace Miller 
UNderhill 2-3059 



Mrs. Fred Bartlett 
ELiot 6-5372 

SALEM 

Mrs. Byron Patrick 
Vlnewood 3-4683 



\i,'\-jDjm 



w.innmnw 



Subscription!: 

13 Per Tear In Advance In Lake, Cook, 

McHcnry and Ke&oaha Counties. 
M p«r Year. Elsewhere 

WILMOT 

Mrs. Herman Frank 
UNderhill 2-2752 



chronic criminals and to prevent 
first offenders and juveniles from 
mingling with hardened criminals, j 

The problem *>f 1ncreoea\vcrime la 
not unique to the City of Chicago; 
Other areas are affected, also. In- 
deed, it la suggested, that many 
hoodlums have found -that their op 
erations have become unprofitable 
in Chicago, and consequently, they 
have moved to the suburbs and other 
parts of the state, The recent grand 
jury Investigations' In Peoria Coun- 
ty, culminating in the indictment of 
that county's state's attorney, show 
that corruption is not limited to the 
City of Chicago. 

A measure sponsored by your 
Senator would establish a State 
Legislative Crime " Investigation 
Commission, to be composed of five 
members of the House «and five 
members of the Senate to investi- 
gate criminal activities in our state, 
including syndicate crime opera- 
tions and their effect on politics, 
business and labor. A Peoria resi- 
dent, indicating enthusiasm for this 
legislation, remarked that such a 
commission could spend the next 
two years in Peoria. 

The measure follow a legislative 
council study and report which 
shows the beneficial results of simi- 
lar State Crime Commissions in five 
other states. 

The federal legislative crime In- 
vestigations conducted in Chicago in 
recent years by Senator Kefauver 
and Senator McClellan showed dra- 
matically and tragically the preva- 
lence of syndicate crime In our state. 
The Illinois Legislature is not with- 
out the power to conduct its own in- 
vestigations and achieve its own re- 
sults. Passage of the bill before the 
State Senate would establish a bi- 
partisan commission which could be 
employed for a much needed, non- 
political public service. 

The success or failure of the legis- 
lative proposals to deal with the 
spread of criminal activities in Illi- 
nois depends in large measure on 
the concern of the public and of the 
public press. An aroused public will 
help drive dishonest policemen from 
our police ranks and help rid our 
communities of the crime and cor- 
ruption which could destroy our free 
institutions and our individual free- 
doms, as well. 



_, r - 

Potpourri 



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St. Peter of Antioch 

Knights of Columbus 

Council 3800 



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The drive is now on for 
new members to join the 
Knights of Columbus Coun- 
cil of Antioch. The class to 
be initiated in the sppring will be in 
honor of Father David J. Lynch, 
pastor of the parish of Prince of 
Peace, Lake Villa. The 1960 class 
was in honor of Father Alfred J. 
Henderson. Antioch pastor. 

Grand Knight James Leksich and 
Mrs. Leksich arc touring the south 

for their annual vacation. 

• • • 

Six members of the local council 
were among the 000 class recently 
initiated into the fourth degree at 
the Conrad Hilton Hotel, Chicago. 

On March 21, the basketball teams, 
cheerleaders and coaches from both 
parishes, Lake Villa and Antioch, 
will be given a party at the Antioch 
Legion Home. The party is an an- 
nual affair with trophies, pictures, 
refreshments and entertainment on 
the evening's program. 

• # • 

The selling campaign by mem- 
bers of the council will soon take 
place as, soon as CYO books are 
available. This is an annual affair 
of charity to finance the needs of 
the Catholic Youth's Organization in 
the Chicago Area, which includes 
Antioch as part of the Catholic arch- 
diocese. 



4-H Project Leaders 
School Opens Mar. 20 

4-H Leaders of Food Projects wMl 
attend a Training School from 10 
a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday at the Fair- 
grounds Auditorium, on Rt. 45. east 
of Grayslake. 

Mrs. Arthur Erichsen and Mrs. 
Edward Gordley will present the 
lesson which will be a laboratory 
lesson with all leaders participating 
in the preparation, judging and 
evaluation of the foods prepared. 
They will later be served for lun- 
cheon. Good nutrition in planning 
meals and preparation of foods will 
be stressed. 

At the afternoon program, all 4-H 
leaders in the county are invited to 
see the Electrical Activity Program 
on "Lighting for the Home". This 
will be presented, at 2 p.m. Harlan 
Baker, Public Service Co., will show 
slides of home lighting. 

Fifty 4-H Home Economics clubs 
have already organized for 1961. 
Others interested are invited to con- 
tact the County Home Adviser at 
P. O. Box 356, Grayslake. Enroll- 
ments will be taken until June 1. 



The businessmen paired off against the high school faculty in the 
basketball game of the decade March 4. and in so doing, raised more than 
$400 towards purchase of a whirlpool therapy device for the high school's 

banged and bruised athletes. Offi- 
cials lost no time in purchasing the 
device and it now stands in all its 
stainless splendor in the dressing 
rooms off the gym. Chief obstacle 
now, observers claim, is keeping 
Coach Leon out of therapy. It is said 
that he reclines in the new pool 
most every night, and fellow staff 
members fear he plans to bring the 
remainder of the family over to en- 
joy its soothing effects. 

We've noticed an arthritic twinge 
in the shoulder lately. How about It, 
coach? Line forms to the right. 




the 



The home nursing program of the 
Lake County chapter has been re- 
cently expanded. In the past year, 
ISO expectant mothers were trained 
in baby care by registered nurses 
who are Red Cross trained volun- 
teer instructors. Plans are underway 
to begin mother and baby care 
classes in communities all over the 
county. 



County Firemen's 
Convention May 27 

Fire companies throughout 
county will join in the annual con- 
vention of the Lake County Fire 
Association May 27 in Lake Villa. 

Planning for the event are fire 
chiefs of Round Lake, Fox Lake and 
Lake Villa, with William Harrison, 
St., Earl Dalziel and Erwin Barn- 
stable in charge of the arrangements. 

Future planning of the Associa- 
tion calls for formation of a special 
training school. 



To Mace an ad.... 
Phone 43 or 44 



Think you have it tough? 

Consider this young lady ... a demure 21 years old, in college and 
breathlessly awaiting her wedding date. Her only trouble . . . groom-to-be 
works for his parents, who are hog experts. Seems he wants the honey- 
moon to coincide with swing through the hinterlands on a hog-buying 
expedition. What's more, he plans on taking the parents along so he can 
profit from their advice on hoes. The bride asks, "What shall I do?" 

Honey, unless you're Moonbeam McSwine a la Al Capp, get that bum 
off his hog kick early or you'll always be playing second fiddle to a bunch 
of porkers. 



The above is typical fare in a metropolitan newspaper if you look 
beyond the headlines. We manage to keep a finger on the pulse of things 
by scanning the "advice to the lovelorn" columns. It is here that you dis- 
cover much in the way of smoothing the paths of matrimony. Such things 
as "don't eat crackers in bed", "please refrain from giving your helpmate 
the back of your hand", and other such can assist one over the rough spots 
. . . and they are many. 



Much excitement is being generated over formation of President Ken- 
nedy's Peace Corps, to be headed by brother-in-law R. S. Shriver. The 
idea is new, it has impact, and can do a lot to allay much of the ill-will that 
bumbling tourists, "fat cat" diplomats and a well-meaning but ill-advised 
public relations policy have created. May we suggest just two things in 
selection of young men and women for this Peace Corps. 

{ 1 ) All will have to read, at least four times, "The Ugly American" 
by William J. Lederer and Eugene Burdick. This is a devastating satire 
of our past actions in southeast Asia. It may not tell what should be done. 
But it certainly is a blueprint of what should not be done. 

(2) No males with button-down colors and button down brains. Just 
average Joe's who may not wear cordovans, but who have traversed a 
barnyard on occasion. The young ladies must be forbidden to wear black 
leotards, black sweaters and gray skirts. They must not wear their hair 
in a pony tail, and most certainly should wear a touch of lipstick — not 
white or orange . . . just red. Ballet slippers are out. 

They must have their eyes on the ball, not the stars. 



Word has it that lovely Nancy Kwan, star of the Hollywood produc- 
tion "The World of Suzie Wong, recently answered an ad in a London 
paper for a Chinese girl to teach the language to 100 recruits of the King's 
Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, slated to go to Malaya later this year. 
This lovely Oriental dish was turned down as "too beautiful — too dis- 
tracting." Seems but a few short years ago that our own "Wild Blue 
Yonder" boys were taught navigation on a life-size blow-up of Betty 
Grable, with certain key points serving as check points. If we remember 
correctly, the U. S. Army Air Force turned out to be well nigh unbeat- 
able. 

Maybe the King's Own is passing up a real deal. 



Those two internationally known lightweights, Jack and Ed, couldn't 
have drummed up more publicity if they had knocked off Adlai in the dim 
recesses of the UN Building. What with the world spinning madly and 
hanging on the brink, these two and their powder puff tiff must conjure 
up a moral somewhere. But darned if we can phrase it at the moment . . . 
at least In language fit to print. 



Let's call him Tom Jones. .-' > 

He's 92 years .old, has a wife and 
three teen-age children . and until a 
few weeks ago was working on the 
highways for the State of Illinois. 

Now he's unemployed, his wife is 
In the hospital and he cannot even 
qualify for unemployment compen- 
sation, since he worked for .the State.; 
And a man 52 has an extremely dif- 
ficult time getting a Job 

He was fired because he was a 
Republican. Everyone admitted he 
was doing a good Job! 

Thousands of people in Illinois 
are going through this these days. 
If there were a Republican adminis- 
tration coming in and the Democrats 
going out, the same thing would be 
happening In reverse. 

Both parties in Illinois accept the 
spoils system. * 

Didn't Tom Jones know he would 
lose his- job when the Democrats 
came in? Wasn't that taken for 
granted? 

* Yes, he knew it. But I don't be- 
lieve there Is a Democrat or a Re- 
publican in this state so heartless 
he Can rejoice to see this man out of 
work and his family suffering. 

Illinois has approximately 15,000 
patronage Jobs out of a total of 60,- 
000 state employees. 

We are one of the worst (or best, 
depending on your viewpoint) of the 
states in the nation In this respect. 
By comparison, for example, the 
Governor of Iowa has power over 
35 jobs, in Wisconsin 20 jobs, Cali- 
fornia 00, and so you could go on. In 
Colorado.. the Governor does not 
even have the opportunity to appoint 
his own cabinet — which I frankly 
think is going too far. 

Almost everyone agrees that pol- 
icy-making positions should change 
with an, administration. 

But when there are the wholesale 
changes like Illinois experiences, 
this is not healthy, for several rea- 
sons: 

1 — It saddles the Governor with 
burdens he should not have to bear. 
Governor Otto Kerner — as any 
governor — is overloaded with 
work and should not have to worry 
about patronage too. 

2 — It gets people interested in 
politics for the wrong, reasons. Poli- 
tics in Illinois tends to be job-orient- 
ed, rather than issue-oriented, and 
this is responsible for some of our 
deficiencies as a state. 

, 3 — It is costly. I happen to be in 
business, and if every few years 
there were a turnover in employees 
far above the ordinary turnover 
there always is, it would be expen- 
sive. It is also expensive for the 
state. 

4 — It results in people working 
for the state, not because they can 
do a Job well, but because they can 
produce a certain number of votes. 
Obviously, thij results in inefficien- 
cies. 

There are some hopeful signs. 

More and more, there is a trend 
toward civil service employment — 
weak as I agree that system is In 
Illinois. 

The climate has also changed, so 
that when Governor Kerner named 
two Republicans to top positions in 
the state, there was no huge outcry. 
He named Miss Maude Myers as 
personnel director and Ralph R. Bar- 



telsmeycr as the chief highway en- 
gineer. Both are eminently qualified 
and highly irespected. 

Another hopeful sign is to hear 
political leaders say privately: 
"Every political Job means there to 
one ingrate and ten enemies." By 
that he means that the person get- 
ting the Job usually feels it is owtd 
to him, and the ten people who 
don't get. the job are most unHappy. 

In the meantime, the system con- 
tinues. Among other places, It is re- 
flected in your pocketbook, a Utile 
emptier than ft should be. 




Dear Sir: 

On behalf of the Antioch High 
School Lettermen's Club, I would 
Iflce to thank' you, the teachers, and 
other businessmen who participated 
in the recent benefit basketball gape 
and style show. 

Because of the help and co-opera- 
tion we received from everyone, we 
were able to pay more than half the 
price of a new whirlpool. The whirl- 
pool, which has already been deliv- 
ered to the school, cost $631. We took 
in $450 at the game. The remaining 
amount will be paid by the club next 
year. 

The athletic department has want- 
ed to purchase a whirlpool for quite 
some time. The "A" Club Is very 
grateful that it was able to donate 
one to the school. 
Sincerely yours, 
Les Herbst 
"A" Club President 



Boating Activity 
Sets New Record 

Boating is edging up as a favorite 
recreation and sport; according to 
reports of the National Association 
of Engine and Boat Manufacturers. 
The Association reports that boat 
shipments during the fall of 1940 
were the highest in the history of 
the industry. 

Orders on hand for the fall months 
exceeded orders for the correspond- 
ing period of 1059 by 31 percent. 



..al n '. a.m | fit.' a 

, <ssr . 


1 


^d^~ *^j 


:J u.s, 

l* SAVINGS 
/ 


mmm^s * m^m \*m 


m*W ^SMaLL^AAS'-^BBB* 



+ BLACK DIRT 
* GRAVEL 
♦ SAND 
* FILL 

M. CUNNINGHAM 
CARTAGE 

PROMPT'SIRVICI Mm 41t 
L Ncrtfi Ave, Anttacfi, HL 



You are invited to visit our 

Garden and Farm Store 

PUNT FOODS- 

F$ Special — Ammonium Nitrate — Oraanlct 
Potash, Phosphates, 16-8-8, 10-10-10, 7-28-14 



Rye Grosses — Blue Grosses — Red Top — 
Fescues — Bent. 



Bulbs — Bulk Seeds 

ALL NATURAL PRODUCTS FOR ORGANIC 
GARDENING 

Hybrotite, Rock Phosphate, Gypsum, etc. 



Now is the time to: 

Fertilize your lawn; apply 

Vauahan's Pre-Kill Crabgrass 

Dormant spray on fruit trees 

and shrubs; Plant peat pots. 




- 



4 



Seed Potatoes - (Order Now) 

Softener Salt - Dog Food - Baby Chicks 

Ducks - Horse and Stable Supplies 

Specialists In seeds and plant foods tor 32 years 
— WE DELIVER — 

LAKE-COOK FARM SUPPLY COMPANY 

391 C«nttt StrMt QvaytlaiM 

lAldwf* 3-2441 



K 



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i 






THURSDAY/ AMRCH 1 6 f 1961 




s^P^.';:;.v;; :-;, 



THE ANTIOCH iNEWfr ANTIOCH, ILLINOIS 



Francis Barnstable Heads Auxiliary; 

le Downey Activities 





Mn. Fred Bartfett . : . 

a LAKE VILLA — The Veterans 
Tcjhib dance will be held Saturday 
starting at 9 p.m. at the VFW hall 
JttJ-Lake Villa. Muilc wm'be by 
Bill Fringle orchestra. 
^"The i VFW Auxiliary held their 
regular meeting at the VFW hall on 
Monday night. Elected for the en- 
suing year werer Francis Barnstable, 
president; Florence Peterson, senior 
vice president; Ann Rezmer, junior 
vice president Helen Page, treasur- 
er; Eva Gay lord, chaplain; Joyce' 
McCIoed, secretary; Minnie Hart, 
guard; Dorothy Barnstable, con-; 
ductresa; Mario McLleland, 3-year 
trustee; Evelyn Whitmore, patriotic 
instructor; Anneleise Nader, flag 
bearer; Rossella McCarthy, banner] 
bearer. (Color guards -are Doris 
Bhimenschein, Arlyn Fopp, Lillian 
Gray, and Helen Keisler; historian 
is Arlene Blazes. . ■ 

Joint Installation of the Lake Vil- 
li! VFW Post and Auxiliary will be 
held April 22 at the Lake Villa VFW 
hall on Soo Line road and. Grand 
Ave. starting at 8 p.m. 

At the VFW Auxiliary meeting 
Monday night, Department hospital 
chairman Kay Kasting presented 
Helen Keisler with a 500-hour pin 
for work at Downey. Cecile Blumen- 
schein was awarded a 80-hour pin 
for similar work. President Marie 
Me Lleland of the VFW Auxiliary 
and Edna Botts, oracle of the Royal 
Neighbors of Lake Villa, thanked 
all members who worked at the 
Tummake and bake sale Friday and 
Saturday at the Lake Villa grade 
school. 

Members of the Women's Society 
for Christian Service of the Lake 
Villa Methodist Church were en- 
tertained by Mrs. Roger Froslse at 
their March 7 meeting*. 

Mrs. Frosted presented a portrayal 
of family reading with selections 
from books to appeal to the varied 
interests and ages of the average 
family. 

Hostesses fpr the day were Mrs. 
Vera Blust and Mrs. Ruth Erics- 
son, with devotional period by Mrs. 
John Miller. 

Martha Circle of the Women's 
Society for Christian Service of the 
Lake Villa Methodist Church met 
Wednesday at 12 noon for a desert 
luncheon followed by the regular 
business meeting. Hostesses will be 
Mrs. John Magnuson and Miss Mar- 
garet Kirk. Devotions will be given 
by Mrs. Arthur Evans. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Fish are re- 
ceiving congratulations on the ar- 
rival of a grandson born to Mr. and 
Mrs. James Fish of Waukegan, born 
Sunday at the Victory Memorial hos- 
pital. 

Frank Cremln entertained at a 
party Saturday evening. Present 
from Antioch were Edna Gable, 
Ralph Fields and Sheridan Burnette; 
from Lake Villa, Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Fish, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence 
Blumenschein, and Mr. and*, Mrs. 
Jacob Fish; from Twin Lakes, Wis., 
Mr. an d M rs. Herman Keisler. 

The VFW Auxiliary is sponsoring 
a dance at Downey tonight. 

Members will leave the VFW hall 
at 8:20 p.m. Sandwiches and coffee 
will be served. Any one wishing to 
donate sandwiches can leave them 
at the home of Mrs. Gordon Blumen- 
schein before 6:20 p.m. today. 

Mrs. Marie Mc Lleland has been 
named cancer drive chairman for 
this area. All desiring to help can 
contact her at El. 8-5348. 
' Mrs. Fred Bartlett, Sr. has been 
named Doughnut Day chairman 
again this year for the Salvation 
. Army. Tag day wlll.be held June 9. 
Anyone wishing to assist for 2 hours 
on that day can get in touch with 
Mrs. Bartlett, call El. 6-5372. Mrs. 
Jacob Fish will be co-chairman. 

Jo-Ann Wilson returned home 
from the St. Therese hospital Satur- 
day after being a patient there for a 

Mrs. Philip Wagner, Sr., is apat- 
ient at Condell Hospital in Liberty- 
vJlle. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Botts and son, 
Danny, visited relatives at Stream- 
wood, 111,, Sunday . 




•APTtST 

COMHUHITY BAPTIST CBUBCH 

-Jf.t 

Bar" - 




Junior 

Aw»rtB iVotrth— Monday, •56' pm, 
Communion Btrv1c«rnrst Sunday. 



LABKLAND BAPTIST CHtJBCH 
Great AVB. (B*. US) A 



sails* wort of 



Bav. Bcfctrt B. Prinaiaf, 
Hist Tj&l 



Sunday 
all age*. 



Mom Kl)J«t . 
SUNDAY 
School— O:40 a.ra. 



C lams lor 



Worship. Service— 11 mm. 

_ 30 p.ffl 
Nursery facilities for both a.m. service*. 



■P. I 



Youtti Fellowship— fl:» p.m. 



for Informati on pUm as c hona Ant ITS. 
IALIM HBTHODIST cnM%cn 

B«v.*fBMB ^feH%an4 

Sunday School-Oisgr A. M. - " 
Worship Sarvlce—arao and 11 A.J If. ^ 
Woman's Soctsty of Christian Sorvica 
second and fo urth Thursday s. 

MSTBOOIST CHtJCB 

SUV. lUMsl^AmLa*. VI MM1 

Sunday «choot-fl;» AM. 

Church Service— 0:00 A ,M. 

Women's Twilight Guild. Third Wednes- 
day, 8 P. M. ■'-:../ 

W^.CB, Third Tuesday, 1PM. 




ODIST CHUBCH 
Grove, Illinois 

11 Gardmer, Sunt 

4 Holliday 
11 A.vlt. 



WEDNESDAY 
Prayer Meeting and Bible Study— 7 p Jn. 
Junior Choir Rehearsal — 7 p.m. 
Adult Choir Rehearsal — 8 p-ro. 
THIRD MONDAY of each month — 
Woman's Missionary Society meeting, 7:30 

BAPTIST BIBLE CHUBCH 
Cedar Lake Bd. sad Highland Terrace 

Rev. Jamea A. Watt, Pastor 
1318 W. Rollins Rd.. Round Lake, OL 

Phone Kimball f-3«3 
9:30 A Jt\— Sunday School. 
11:00 AJf^-Momlng Worship. 
0:00 P. M— Young People 
7:Q0 P. M. — Evening Worship 
Women's Missionary Society, 1st 
3rd Friday Evenings, IP. E 

FOX LAKE BAPTIST CHUBCH 

U W. Grand Ave, Justice 7-SS3S 
Rev. Baser Bersesen, Pastor 
avBttce f>8013 
0:48 A. M. Sunday School 

11:00 A-M—Morning Worship. 
6:30 PJf^-YouuTrellowshlp. 
7:30 P.M. — Evening Gospel Service. 
7:30 P.M.— Wed, Ths Hour of Power. 
Women's Missionary Society, and Thurs. 
Girls* Missionary Guild, every- other 
Tuesday. 



Morning 



COMMUNITY MRTBODIST CHURCH 
Lake Villa, ffimeis 
^Bav. Gerald Bobbuon, Paster ^r 

Sunday— 8:88 « 11 Service of Worship 

9:80 Church School. 

Womena Society Meeting— 1st Tuesday 
at 13 Noon; Martha Circle— 3rd Wednes- 
day at 18:30 p.m.; Naomi Circle— 3nd 
Monday at 8 p.m ;, Rebecca Circle— 1st 
Monday at 8 p.m. 

Methodist Men — Jnd Tuesday at 7 pjn. 

Intermediate Fellowship — Friday, 7 pnt. 

Senior Fellowship—Sunday at 7 pjn. - 

Choirs: 'Adult Thursday at 7:30 pm; 
High School, Wednesday at 7 pjn.; Junior 
Choir, Friday at 3; 19 p.m.; Cherub ^ Choir, 
Saturday at 10 A. VL . 

Pastor's Confirmation Class, Saturday 
at 10 am. 



MORMON .-A 

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST, L. 0. S. 

Chain O' Lakes Branch 

MesUnia in LikartyvlUe Temple 

Dr. Calvin P. Mldaley, Preaidiof Rider 

"The Glory of Cod la Intelligence" 
PrtesUtood-Meeting— 9 A. M. ^ 

Sunday School— iff A. M, 

Sacrament Service— 8 :30 P,M, ; " i 

PRISIYTIR(AN i 

CALVARY PRBSBYTRRIAN CHURCH 
Cedar Lake Road, Round Lake, m tools 
Rev, C. Wayne King Klmkall f-lftil 

9:30 A. M.— Sunday School . 
11:00 A. M^- Worshlp Serv ice 

OTHIRS ~~ '^\ ^ 

CONGREGATION AM RCHOO 

330 N. Sheridan Road, Waufecfaa, Hliaels 

Majestic J-37M 

Services: 
Friday Evening— 8:30 
., Saturday Morning— OHM 
.Sunday Morning— 0:00 
Weekday Mornings— 7H0, " 




ANTIOCH RV. FRRB CHURCH 

Meeting in Emmons School Rte. 89 

Beach Grove Rd., Herbert CottrelL Pastor 

For Information, Antioch 1007. - ■ ■ ; 

Sunday 'School for all ages -0:40 a.m. 

Sunday Morning— SI am, 

Sunday Evening — 7:00. 

Mid-week Prayer Meeting Wednesday, 
7:30 p.i.i,, at the home of the pastor, 
410 Harden Street 



HICKORY SCHOOL 
Denominationally unaffiliated 
Rte, 48, K mile north of ■ Rte. 171 
Rev. Gilbert l, Howe 
Sunday School — 0:30 A.M. . 
Worship Servli* — 10:30 AJ1. 
Young People— 0:30 P. M. 
MldtWeek Prayer Meeting— Wed. 7:30. 



Office Supplies, Printing tt Postage 

Electricity 

Social Security Expense 

'Total Cash Disbursements — To Page 1 



1M.05 

jai>,t 

23,49(5.40 



- - 



■■- ;:':>'; : 



■ - f~j% 



mm 


Mm 

j as 


>V'jU.,^ SJft'^ 


yi ,i ' : 


'; .' as 



Schedule $ 
— Poor *MtW 
5TATIMCNTOP CASH RICllPTS mnd DISiUASf MINTS 






Gtrla* Missionary Guild, every .ther 
CROSS LAKE COMMUNITY BAPTIST 
CHURCH 
(Former^ Oakwoods KaoDa Offke) 
On Cress Lake, AnUoeh, HL 
On Cross Lake, AnUoeh, Tttnaertaas Br. 
Bible School— 9:48 ant. 
Morning Worship-— 11 ajn. 
Independent — Fundamental, Welcome 
to a Bible-believing church. 

CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH 

One block west of Rt 81 m 83 on 

North Avenue 

Rav. Lebum Orear, Pastor 

Sunday School— 9:45 A.M. 
Worship Service — 11 A.M. 
Training Union — 8:30 P.M. 
Evening Worship — 7:30. 
Bible Study Session Wednesday — 7:30 
P.M. 



Legal Notice 



18 



CATHOLIC 

ST. PETER'S CATHOLIC CHUBCH 

Anttoch. HI. — Telephone 270 

Rev. Alfred Henderson, Pastor 

Fr. Francis Johnson, A«t. Faster 

Sunday Masses — 0, 7:30, 0, 10, 11 St 

Weekday Masses — 8 a.m. 

Catechism Class for Children— Saturday 

Morning at 10 o'clock. 

Inquiry Class— Tucb,, & Thurs. pjn. 

Confessions — 'Saturday afternoons and 

evenings from 4 until 8:48, and from 7:30 

until 9 o'clock 



ST. FRANCIS XAV1ER CHURCH 

Brighton. Wis, 
Rav. 3. V. Bier, Pastor 

School Year Masses: Sundays— and 10; 
daily— fl. 

Summer Mass Schedule — Sundays, 7, 
and 10:30 a.m.; dally, 7:30; holy days 8 
a.m. and p.m. 

First Friday Mass — 8 p.m. 

Confessions — Saturday, 9 and 7:30; also 
Thursday before first Friday 

PRINCE OF PEACE CHURCH 
S. E. Corner of Grand Ave. St Rte. 21 
Lake Villa, ID. . 
Rev. David J. Lynch, Pastor 
Phone Elliot ff-7913 
Sunday Masses at 7, S, 9, 10, and 11:18. 
Confessions — Saturday, 4-8; 7-8 pin 
Masses Dally — 7 a.m. 

ST. SCHOLASTICA'S CATHOLIC 

CHURCH 

Lake Shangri-La, Benet Lake 

Father Eugene Bwldorn, Pastor 

Sunday Masses — 8 and 10 a.m. 

Confessions before Masses. 



Antioch Township 

REPORT OF EXAMINATION 

Year Ended January 31, 1961 

NORMAN S. JEDELE 

K Certified Public Accountant 

February 23, 1981 
Mr. I* E. Murrle, Supervisor, 
Antioch Township, 
Antioch, Illinois 

The following statements pertain to cash receipts and disbursements 
for the year of February I, 1960 to January 31, 1961 for the various funds 
handled by your office. x ^ 

The statements, and the"examinations preparatory thereto, have been 
made in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards and in- 
eluded such teats as we considered necessary in the circumstances. 

All cash receipts were traced to the various depositories; all disburse- 
ments were accordingly tested as to propriety and correctness. The various 
funds were reconciled to, and verified by, the various banks. 
Statements included are: 

Schedule 1 — Summary of Funds 
Schedule 2 — General Town Fund 
Schedule 3 — Poor Fund 
Schedule 4 — Road & Bridge Fund 
Schedule 5 — Black Top Bead Improvement Fund 
Schedule 6 — Special Funds 
No special mention has been noted as to the various unpaid accounts 
as of January 31, 1961, inasmuch as they serve no purpose to you for they 
are only the same type which recur from month to month. In addition, 
the statements presented to you have always been prepared on a cash 
basis, which do not reflect accrued items. However, it should be noted that 
the Road & Bridge Fund has $14,000.00 in tax anticipation warrants out- 
standing. 

In August, 1960, the Poor Fund invested $25,000.00 in a Certificate of 
Deposit at the State Bank of Antioch. This certificate matured February 
5, 1961 and bears interest at the rate of 3%. 

In our opinion, the accompanying statements present fairly the finan- 
cial position of ANTIOCH TOWNSHIP at January 31, 1961, and the results 
of its operations for the fiscal year then ended, in conformity with gen- 
erally accepted accounting principles on a cash basis consistent with that 
of the preceding year. 

Yours very truly, 

NORMAN S. JEDELE 
Certified Public Accountant 
Antioch Township 
SUMMARY OF FUNDS 

February 1, 1960 ta January 31, 1961 

Fiscal Year Ended 
Balances 
2-1-60 

23,674.73 
29,627.57 



Antioch 



February 1, 1960 ta January 31. 1961 

Cash <m Depoeit — February 1, I960 2M27.67 

Cash Receipts 

Towriship Taxation 15>675;0O 

Recoveries by Poor Master 0,990.34 

JP Total Receipts " , 23.625.S4 

Total Cash Available During 1946/41 
Cash Disbursements 
• Food' 
Fuel ^ 
Ambulance Service 
' Lake County Hospital > 
Lake County Home ;, - a^ r 
Clothing 
Transportation 
Foster Homes 
" Rents paid 

Investments — -Certificate of Deposit 

Total Disbursements 

Cash on Deposit — January 31, 1961 
Cash Invested (Certificate of Deposit) 

Fund Balance — January 31, 1961 

CERTIFICATE 

I, Lloyd E. Murrle, Supervisor of the Township of Antioch, County 
of Lake; State of Illinois, do hereby solemnly swear that the above report 
contains a full and true statement of all money belonging to the Township 
Poor Fund received by me. and -of all disbursements made on account 
thereof, during the period February 1, 1960 to January 31, 1961 Inclusive, 
to the best of my knowledge and belief. 

L. E. MURRIE 
Supervisor 
Subscribed and sworn to before me 
this 24th d ay of February,! 961 

EARL STRINGER 1 

Notary Public * 

Schedule 4 1 

Page 1 .1 

Antioch Township — Road and Bridge Fund 
STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS and DISBURSEMENTS 
February 1, 1960 to January 31, 1961 
Cash on Deposit — February 1, 1960 2,269.29 

Cash Receipts 

Township Taxation 26,953.92 

Sale of Materials 53.44 

Insurance Refund 2.20 

Tax Warrants Sold r 33,000.00 



Total Cash Receipts 
Total Caah Available During 1966/61 
Cash Dtebursementa 
Per detail — Page 2 

Cash on Deposit — January 31, 1961 



60,000.56 

62,298.85 

60,383.42 
1,935.43 



DEATH NOTICES 



EARL L. CRAWFORD 

Funeral services were held at 2 
p.m. Tuesday in Antioch for Earl L. 
Crawford, 74, life- long resident of 
Newport and Antioch townships, 
who died Saturday morning in Vic- 
tory Memorial Hospital. 

The deceased was born Dec. 2, 
1686, on a farm near Highway 173 
in Newport Township. At the age 
of 3 he moved with his parents to a 
nearby farm on Crawford road, 
where he resided until four years 
ago when he moved to 509 Lake St., 
Antioch. 

Survivors include a niece, Mrs. 
Lucille Pott of Zlon. He was pre- 
ceded in death by his parents, John 
T. and Mary Lewin Crawford, pio- 
neer Lake County residents; a sis- 
ter, Bertha, Dec. 25, 1941, and a 
brother, Clarence C, April 8, 1955. 

Strang's handled funeral arrange- 
ments with the Rev. L. H. Messer- 
smith, MjQfburn Congregational 
Church, officiating. Interment was 
in Millbum cemetery. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 

FIRST CBUBCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 

ANTIOCH 

S5S Victoria Street, Antioch, BL 

Sunday School — 0:30 A.M. 

Sunday Morning Service — 11 A.M. 

Wednesday Evening Service — 8:00 

A reading room la maintained at the 
above address and Is open Wednesday 
from a to 4 and 7 to 8: on Saturday. 3 to 4. 

Junior High Youth Meeting, «;» 

CONGREGATIONAL 

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

MlUburn, Illlnolf 
Bev. L. B. Metsersmlth, Pastor 
Sunday School — 10 AM. 
Preaching Service — 10 AM. 
Pilgrim Fellowship — 7 PJf. 

EPISCOPAL 

THE CBUBCH OF ST. IGNATIUS 
OF ANTIOCH 

The Bev. Edmend B. Bood, Sector 
Richard B. Landau. lay Ltadtr 
Telephone 153 
SUNDAYS: 
8:00 A. Mv— Holy Eucharist 
9:30 A. M. — Church School 
11:00 A. M— Holy Eucharist, First 
Third} Morning Prayer, Second 

Fourth. 

WEEKDAYS: 
Wednesdays— 7 A. M.— Holy Eucharist 
Fridays— 0:00 A. M— Holy Eucharist. 

LUTHERAN ^ 

FAITH EV. LUTHERAN CBUBCH 

AnUoeh. Illinois 
M. E. Otterttatter, Pastor 
Phone UNderhUl 2-3103 
Worship and Sunday School are con- 
ducted at S. Main Street, AnUoeh: 
Sunday Worship— 8 and 10:30 AM. 
Sunday School-— 0:15 A.M. 
Visitors Always^ Wei co me. 



Sched- 
ule Name of Fund 

2 General Town Fund 

3 Poor Fund 

3 Poor Fund - Investments 

4 Road & Bridge Fund 

5 Black Top - Road 
Improvement Fund 

6 Special Funds: 

Heart-O-Lakes 
Lagoona Beach 

Beginning Cash 
Balance 
+ 
Receipts 

Disbursements 

Ending Cash Balance 



January 31, 1961 Balances 
Receipts DIsburse'ts 1-31-61 

23,335.76 22,496.40 24,514.09 
37,152.23 



2,289.29 



22,625.34 
25,000.00 
60,009.56 



60,363.42 



15,100.68 
25,000.00 
1,935.43 



210.69 29,194.22 17,893.32 11,511.59 



20.85 
2,926.14 



58,749.27 



20.85 
2,926.14 



+ 160.164..88 



- 137,905.37 



= 81,008.78 



ANTIOCH CHAPTER, O. E. B. 
Antioch .Chapter No. 43s, Order of the 

■astern Biar— meetings at Masonic Tern 
|p s e cond and fourth Ttw 

ith. 



Thursdays of each 



GRACE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN 
CHUBCH (U. L, C. A.> 

Richmond, BUnols 
Harold L, Carlson, Pastor 

Invites you to worship next Sunday 
Church School— 0:48 A. M. 
Worship Service— 11:00 A. M. 



Funds, listed above, audited and certified to be correct, as per ac- 
countant's opinion attached. 

NORMAN S. JEDELE 

Certified Public Accountant 
Schedule 2 
Page 1 

Antioch Township — General Town Fund - ' 

STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS and DISBURSEMENTS 
February 1, 1960 to January 31, 1961 
Cash on Deposit — February 1, 1960 23,674.73 

Caah Receipts: 

Township Taxation 22,885.84 

Village of Antioch — Sale of Law Books , 40.00 

Antioch Township Library — 

Reimbursed Social Security 344.72 

Error Correction — Prior Years 85.20 



CERTIFICATE 

I, Lloyd E. Murrie, Supervisor and Ex-Officio Treasurer of the Road 
& Bridge Fund and the Road Improvement Fund, of the Town of Antioch* 
County of Lake, State of Illinois, do hereby solemnly swear that the above 
report contains a full and true statement of all money belonging to the 
funds stated received by me, and of all disbursements made on account 
thereof, during the period from February 1, 1960 to January 31, 1961 in- 
clusive, to the best of my knowledge and belief. . 

L. E. MURRIE 
Ex-Officio Treasurer 
Subscribed and sworn to before me 
this 24th day of February ,1961 
EARL STRINGER 
Notary Public 
Schedule 4 
Page 2 
Caah Disbursements 

Tax warrants paid * 19,000.00 

Interest on tax warrants 766.92 

Labor 8,901.56 

Gas, oil, grease 1,132.48 

Repairs and maintenance 1,886.59 

Parts and supplies 1,105.32 

Materials 1,268.70 

Insurance • 261.34 

Electricity 32.36 

Telephone 113.85 

Printting 9.00 

Licenses and safety tests 13.50 

Radio Service 145.00 

Uniform Service 107.25 

Trucking 108,50 

Tree cutting 66.00 

Treasurer's commission 388.85 

Social security taxes . 308.90 

Capital Expenditures: 

Road Grader 24,142.74 

Road Grader blades 540.90 

Tires 63.66 



Total Disbursements — To Page 1 



24,747.30 

60,363.42 



Total Receipts 

Total Cash Available During 1960/61 
Cash Disbursements 
Per detail — Page 2 

Caah on Deposit — January 31, 1961 



23,335.76 



TRINITY 



Alfred 

Sunday 
Mom in, 



RV. LUTHERAN 
OP LONG LAKE 



Lang ho a ih, Pastor 
School— f 



9:18 and 11 



CHURCH 

BX a. ism 

A. U. 



i Worship— 0:10 and 11. 
uther League, Sunday Evenings 
Junior Luther League — 8 pjn. 1st and 
3rd Tuesday. 
Senior Choir Rehearsal — Wed. S p-ro. 



PEACE EV. LUTHERAN CBUBCH 
WUxnot, Wlaeoostn 
B. P. Otto, Pastor 

0:30 A. BL— Sunday School 
10:00 A. M— Worship Service 
We preach the CrucWed and 
Christ. 



ST. PAUL LUTHERAN CBUBCH 

Renehan Bead, Round Lake, 
(Missouri Synod) 
Herman C. Noll, Pastor 
"We Preach Christ Ci 



METHODIST 

TBE MRTBODIST CBUBCH 
OP ANTIOCH 

EeV.WeUs** 
First Worship I 
Church School— 9M A. _ 
Second Worship Service— 11 A, BL 
A nursery is provided for the 11 o'clock. 



•enrlosw 

Resnuur 
shlpSor 4 
are a* a 



scttvttMM of 



dlfierent age and to 1 



47,010.49 
22,498.40 
24,514.09 

CERTIFICATE 

I, Lloyd E. Murrie, Supervisor of the Township of Antioch, County 
of Lake, State of Illinois, do hereby solemnly swear that the above report 
contains a full and true statement of all money belonging to the General 
Town Fund received by me, and of all disbursements made on account 
thereof, during the period February 1, 1960 to January 31, 1061 inclusive, 
to the best of my knowledge and belief. 

L. E. MURRIE 
Supervisor 
Subscribed and sworn to before me 
fthis 24th day of February,196l 
EARL STRINGER 
Notary Public 
Schedule 2 
Page 2 
Cash Disbursements 

Supervisor (Poormaster) 
Supervisor — Expenses 
Highway Commissioner 
Assessors Office: 

Salary 3,500.00 

Expenses 451.00 

Deputy Assessors 3,630.88 

Office Expenses: 

Rent 240.00 

Supplies, Postage, etc. 197.85 

Telephone 86.17 



Schedule 5 

Antioch Township — Black Top Rood Improvement Fund 
STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS and DISBURSEMENTS 
February 1, I960 to January 31, 1961 
Cash on Deposit — February 1, I960 

Cash Receipts * 

Township Taxation 



210.80 



3,492.00* 

400.00 

6,760.00 





29,404.91 


12,675.57 

874.14 

4,532.71 


■ 
1 


189.10 


17,893.31 y 




t* 


11,511.59 



29,194.22 

Total Cash Available During 1960/61 
Cash Disbursements 

Materials 
Gas & Oil 
Labor 
Less — Payroll Taxes Withheld, paid from 
Road & Bridge Fund 

Total Disbursements 

Cash on Deposit — January 31, 1961 

CERTIFICATE 

1, Lloyd E. Murrie, Supervisor and Ex-Officio Treasurer of the Road 
& Bridge Fund and the Road Improvement Fund of the Town of Antioch, 
County of Lake, State of Illinois, do hereby solemnly swear that the above 
report contains a full and true statement of all money belonging to the 
fund stated received by me, and of all disbursements made on account 
thereof, during the period from February 1, I960 to January 31, 1961 in- 
clusive, to the best of my knowledge and belief. 

L. E. MURRIE 
Ex-OMieio Treasurer 
Subscribed and sworn to before me 
this 24th day of February, 1961 
EARL STRINGER 
Notary Public 
Schedule 6 ' ' . 

Antioch Township — Special Funds 
STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS and DISBURSEMENTS 
February 1, 1960 to January 31, 1961 

Heart -O- 
fS. Lakes 

Cash on Deposit — February 1, 1960 20.85 

Cash Receipts — 



Lagoona 

Subdivision 

2,926.14 



Total Caah Available During 1960/61 
Cash Disbursements 

Cash on Deposit — January 31, 1961 



20.85 



2,926.14 



20.85 



8,114.90 



Board of Auditors 
Clerk's Office: 

Salary 

Office Rent 

Supplies 

Lege! 
Accounting 

Thistle Commissioner 
Dues & Memberships 
Officials Bonds 



sss 


858.50 
937.05 




180.00 

340.00 
100.00 
40.00 
160.00 
1W.13 



2,926.14 

CERTIFICATE 

I, Lloyd E. Murrie, Supervisor and Ex-Officio Treasurer of the Road 
& Bridge Fund and the Road Improvement Fund, the Secondary 6c Feeder 
Road Fund, the Road & Bridge Special Fund of the Town of Antioch, 
County of Lake, State of Illinois, do hereby solemnly swear that the above 
report contains a full and true statement of all money belonging to the 
funds stated received by me, and of oil dk&ursecnents made on account 
thereof, during the period from February 1, i960 to January 31. 1881 in- 
clusive, to thebest oFmy knowledge and belief. * °V «" «n- 

^ L. C. MURRIE 

„ 1- -_«. ^ _» A *_ m Hx-OJliclo Treasurer 

Subscribed and sworn to before me 

this 24th day of rebruary.lSfl 

KARLffnilNOER 

Notary PisbUo * 



StMii 





52,202.01 .-.'-.; ■;/■ 




•.' '; iia«7.7d " * 




32.10 


:' 


10.00 • .:" • -■-!,• 




7,390,89 
- ■ 2,578.02- ■',,-■■ •'.- --- 




■ 44,63 - 


■ ' ■ 


75.00 ' 




324.10 


1 


160.00 




25,000.00 




37,152.23 v 




' 15,100.68 




25,000.00 




40,100,60 



m 



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MGEiFOUIt 



THE AjgtiXHJjEWS, ANTIOCH, ItUNOtS 



16. 1941 




ijn Fund Drive 
Easter Benefit 

Four ; Antioch %womeri , will be 
among models ?in *he;^Unitcd.jCere- 

^bral^Palsy sponsored paster Fashion 
Parade event Monday In WatikeganJ 
- s The ^models ; — Mrs, 'Robert JCI 
Lubkemon, Rt. 4, Mrs, T\a vid Buck, j 
Mrs. Leonard Roblin, David St., and 
Mrs. W. H. Seemann, 1009 "Victoria 

'■if— ■ will present ^hair styles^and^'ori- 
Igirials'^eslgned specif ically for the, 

event. ' = , ^ J ' 

■''-; Mrs. Lubkemqn, itV vaddttlonV.ito'! 

modeling chores, Is co-chajrman ofj 

the event, and vMrsJ'Seemann, for-^ 

Tmerly with Marshall Field Sc Co,, is 

fashion coordinator. -.;.-' 

: ~ 'Others appearing on the program' 

include special guest John :Doremus, 

radio personality, and the Rev. Wi!-: 

liam- Green of. Wauconda. ' ; 

- The event 'As' sponsored by the 

Lake County" Council of United 

Cerebral Palsy and all proceeds will 

.be used to send cerebral palsied 

children to the Lake County day 

camp. 

Luncheon will be served at Ma- 
tron's, Clayton St., at 12:30, im- 
mediately preceding the showing. 
Reservations must be in by Satur- 
day, March 18* 



^m^^ri 






m 




i 



an 




ii m 






3 



OES CLUB TO MEET 

The Past .Matron's Club of An- 
tioch Chapter No. 428, Order of the 
Eastern Star, will meet Wednesday 
evening at the home of Mrs. Hazel 
Parfitt, Channel Lakes Shores. 



Miss Bonnie Lee Walker and Mr. 
James W. Murrie were united in 
marriage by the Rev. L.jH.4Messer-; 
smith, in a double ring ceremony 
Feb. 18 at the Millburn Congrega- 
tional Church. 

Miss Walker is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Walker of Lake 
Villa; Mr. and Mrs. George Murrie; 
are the parents of the groom. ;| 

The bride's gown was fashioned 
with an alencon lace bodice, with 
long sleeves, and scalloped neckline 
over embroidered '■■ taffeta, "with a 
full taffeta floor length skirt. Her 
fingertip veil was caught to a crown 
of pearls and she carried a colonial 
bouquet of carnations, with a pink 
rose in the center. 

Miss Karen Lonson ."" maid of 
honor, wore a floor length gown of 
ice blue satin and chiffon, and her 
colonial bouquet was of pink and 








blue carnations. 

Miss Lynnette Murrie, sister of, 
the groom, zserved las bridesmaid.! 
She wore a pastel pink floor length 
gown of satin and chiffon and also 
carried a colonial bouquet of qink 
and 'blue. 

Serving as best man to the groom: 
was Mr. Halden Myers. : Marvip 
Walker, ^brother of; the bride, was! 
the usher. ;■' ■ '<? ■/-'' 

v Candle lighters for the ceremony 
were Allen. Murrie and, Bobby De- 
Young. '■ 

: Frank De Young, soloist, sang "I 
Love* You Truly" and "The Lord's 
Prayer." 

, A reception for 150 guests was 
held in Millburn Masonic Hall with 
the MttH>uxii Ladie g^Aid serving as 
hostesses, assisted by Sandy and 
Mary Bartlett and Hazel Brlttam- 

The couple's new address is Rt. 
2, Box 633, Lake Villa. 



The history, of lighting through 
the centuries will be traced in a 
highly-Illustrated talk before mem- 
bers of the Antioch Woman's Club 
Monday, March 20 at 1:30 p.m. 

Guest speaker will be Mrs Fran- 
ces Rittenhouse of Hinsdale, 111, who 
Will illustrate her discussion of light- 
ing with an open lamp dating from 
1200 B.C., found in Palestine; a 
Roman lamp used fin the time of 
Christ; a '"Paul Clever"; lantern; 
brass, bronze and iron lighting de 
vices used In the 16th and 17th cen- 
turies, and other rare antique-lamps, 

Mrs. Rittenhouse will be attired 
in a reproduction of an elaborate 
costume of 1881 to lend atmosphere 
to her discussion, "One If iBy Land". 

The speaker is a graduate of the 
University of Illinois, and studied 
antiques and interior decorating at 
the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts 
and the Art Institute. 

Hostess committee for the day will 
consist of Mesdames S. W. Bailey, 
Charles Solar, Walker Lyons, Lester 
Osmond, Arthur Laursen, C, Gib- 
bons, A. H. Kaufmann, Roy Turo- 



Mrs. Frances Rittenhouse ^ 

vaara, Richard Whitaker and O. L. 
Raether. : : \:.\ 



!««••• 



FROM TROPICAL SHORES 

Mrs. David Strattan of Naber 
•Ave. and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Tay- 
lor, Chicago, returned this week 
from Nassau, the Bahamas, and Flor- 
ida, where they had been vacation- 
ing for the past three weeks. 



To Place an ad 

Phone Antioch 43 



The Antioch Homemakes Club 
elected officers for the coming year 
at their dessert luncheon meeting 
Feb: 22, at the (homo of Mrs. Henrr 

Schmidt - ^ ^ 

All former officer* -were .re-elect- 
ed to their resi»ecilve Ipejljlj^^ 
follows: Mrs. Ida Wlls, pres dent; 
Mrs. ?Harry Weiss, vice president: 
Mrs, Robert Hew, secfctery ijtil^ 
Mrs. Louise Llche, llnandal *~* 

>tarv. 

Assisting MrsiiScto^ 
hostesses * were ^Mrs.' James vWdHh 
vrtek and ^Mrs. William "f*ey^it*>. 
stituting for Mrs. Harry DotmB, 
who could not be present 

The next meeting is scheduled f*r 
March 22, at the home of Mrs. Albert 
Slma, Lake Avenue, Channel Lake. 

HOSPITAL PATIENT 

•Mrs. Charlotte Wagner of Lake 
Villa was a hospital patient at Con- 
dell Memorial Hospital last week. 

ENROLLS AT LAKE FOREST 

Jerome Edmond Qullty, »7» Spei- 
ford St., is. among 740 students 
have enrolled for the second 
ter at Lake Forest College, 






Engagement Announced 




Joan Scharrer 

Mr. John Scharre rof Lake Villa 
has announced the engagement of 
his daughter, Joan, to Verden White 
of Antioch. 

Mr. White is stationed with the 
United States Air Force in Alaska. 
The couple plan a June wedding 
here after which they will honey- 
moon in Alaska. 







Mr. and Mrs. James W. Murrie 



Faye Mann and Donald Englishman 
Wed in Late-Afternoon Ceremony 



Engagement Told 




The Antioch Methodist Church 
was the setting for the late after- 
noon wedding on March 4 of Miss 
Faye Mann and Mr. Donald English- 
man, with the Rev. Wallace Ander- 
son performing the single ring cere- 
mony. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mann, High- 
way 173, are parents of the bride; 
the groom's parents are Mr. and 
Mrs. Ellsworth Englishman of Lex- 
ington Drive, Hazelcrest. 

The bride, who was given in mar- 
riage by her father, chose for her 
wedding a gown of floor length silk 
organza, fashioned with a pearl 
trimmed bodiae, a scoop neckline, 
long sleeves and full skirt, ending in 
a chapel train. She carried white 
carnations with white rosebuds. 

Serving as maid of honor, was 
Miss Barbara Yates, who was cos- 
tumed in a deep violet, silk organza, 
ballerina length gown, with match- 



ing crown and veil. She carried 
white carnations with center rose- 
buds tinted to match her attire. 

Kenneth Hallberg was the groom'* 
best man, and ushers were Forrest 
Stahmer and Robert Lindholm. 

A reception was held in Wesley 
Hall of the church after the cere- 
mony. Mrs. Robert Wilton and Mrs. 
W. C. Petty poured and Mrs. Charles 
Watson cut the cake. 

The couple toured the southern 
states on their honeymoon trip, and 
are now at home at 13046 S. Wabash, 
Riverdale. 

The bride is a graduate of Antioch 
High School and completed one and 
a half years at Illinois Wesleyan 
University. 

The groom is a graduate of Blue 
Island High School and Thornton 
Junior College, and attended the 
University of Illinois. 



■ » • 




Double Play 

is a captivating idea — 
disciplines your tummy 
so delightfully J 

The partite with criss-cross bands m* 
to put the hex on tummy bulge! 

Look as captivating as you'll feel! The magic is in the tummy- 
flattening front hands. Try the incredibly light, incredibly strong 
'Double Play'™ pantie, here, today! Blossom-trimmed for beauty. 

219 waistline pantie: Power net, satin elastic (rayon* 
nylonruhhercotton). W/ifre, Black, Beige, Sky Blue. 
Fresh Peach or Turquoise. S t M, L~$7M. * 

the loveliest things about you ^^ \\ 7 • 

take shape at Warner S* 



TflcvU rfwtet 




Antioch, Illinois 



faw«MtH<»>MIHWMlrtWMIIIIIIIIIIWIMMMIWMtWIIIIIIMIIMI<M,|WI«iHW«»>M«MMMWII«IMIIIllMMl»IIIIIMWI,l>4IIM»MIMI«IIIMIMM.IU,IHIIIMMIIIilMIIIII»MMU W MHW HM WH tl H I MUM MUHWmtMM 

: 

FOR UNIQUE AND GRACIOUS DINING 

The One and Only 



*&oneHf<i 



•.->' 



t 



Sheryl Joy Mohr 

Mr. and Mrs. Chris Mohr of East 
Loon Lake announce the engage- 
ment of their daughter, Sheryl Joy, 
to Mr. Richard Wolters of Chicago 

Sheryl is a senior at Holy Child 
High School Th Waukegan. Mr. Wol- 
ters. previously of East Loon Lake, 
served as a Corporal in the Marines 
in Cherry Point, North Carolina. 
He is the son of Mr. Richard Wol- 
ters of Downers Grove and Mrs. 
Joseph Stocci of Chicago. 



DEATH NOTICES 

IRA W BOYLAN 

Funeral services were held in Chi- 
cago Saturday for Ira W. Boylan, 82, 
who passed away there March 8. 
Burial was r.t Union Hickory Ceme- 
tery, Antioch. 

Mr. Boylan was born in Antioch 
on July 1 1, 1878, and lived here as a 
young man. 

He is survived by his widow, Mar- 
ion; one son, Donald and grandchil- 
dren Diane. Kevin and David, of 
Homewood, and a niece, Ardis 
Grimm Anzinger of Antioch. 




Smart Country House 

Located an Highway 173-14 mile west of Rte. 59 

Special Luncheons Served Daily — $1.00 & up 

Full Course Dinner — $2.50 up 
Fish Plate Friday - $1.25 

Prime Rib — Steaks — Lobster 






SMORGASBORD $2.25 

EVERY WEDNESDAY 5 to 9 



^VWWWMWW^^W^^^WWW^^^^^<^^*^*^^^^^^V^^^^^ ^ ^^^^^ ^ ^^^^^^ ^ ^^^ ^ W <^ ^^^^W^^MWWWWW M W W 



Mr. and Mrs. Donald Englishman 



A 



Banquets — Wedding Parties 

Babe Wagner at the organ 

Phone Antioch 602 

«MMWIIMMMHMMIHIIHIllMIIIIIHWiHMtMt|ilMIUIMtlllHUIHIWIMUIMIill4IIIIUUIUII|IIMH|llll, InillMIMIIMIIMMMIMMMIMlMMMIH 



fytil ' 



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• ■ - . * ' 



'7 



' 






THE ANTIOCH NEWS, ANTtOCH, IIXlNOtS 







^|*c;^ap^iii» 



PAGCFIVf 




THIS! AM TH1 TBAINABU MINTALIY hendkeeoKl - cfclMnn, wlw prior fe formerfcm o* teedel cfewet iwch «t 
**>•«« conducted 5i«o#r the Spec fol Idwcetfon Dttf kt of Lofce County, would hove received no formal education, destined ol- 
woyt to i remain In the «r«y world off tfw monNlly retarded. Here, hewtver, under guidance off special Instructor Dik Hacfc- 
iMn In a special classroom off Adler Park School, UbertyvJftc, these youngsters ere brought alone, to their optimum potential. 
Many contlnuo on to became self-tuff kicnt artel ocqiifro • measure off roi eontiblHty, 






■ 



■ 



/■ 



Our Exceptional Children 



(continued from page 1) 
hind their normal friends, but who 
will never progress mentally beyond 
lower elementary grades, This group 
includes among others, those which 
the layman knows as "Mongoloids". 

Task with these youngsters is to 
develop their optimum potential. 

Let's look in on the TMH Room 
at Adler Park School, In Liber ty- 
ville. 

Four girls and six boys, ranging 
in age from 6 to 10 years, are cur- 
rently enrolled in the TMH class. 
Ten children is the maximum num- 
ber of students for this type in one 
class under state ruling, and there 
can be no more than a four-year 
age span. 

The 10 youngsters in Adler Park 
come from eight different school 
districts Within the Special Educa- 
tion District of Lake County. Liber- 
tyville, with the host school, has one 
child, in the class. 

Parents bring their children so 
that they arrive by 0:30 a.m., and 
the day begins with roll call and 
such simple greetings "Today is 
Tuesday", etc. 

i Remember, these children have 

I pre-school mentalities and are Hard- 
pressed to dress themselves. 

At 9:45 a.m., children have a free- 
play period during which they are 

: given various things to do . . . play- 
ing with blocks and toys. A self-care 
period follows at 10:30, during which 
students go to the wash room and 
prepare to go outside. Taking care 

. of themselves and dressing to go 
outside actually takes 'more time 
than is spent out of doors. But it is 
considered an important period of 
the day because it allows the chil- 
dren to learn self care. 

At 11 o'clock comes speech in- 
struction. A major portion of the 
child's training consists of speak- 
ing, as many can do well to make 
themselves understood during init- 



ial stages of instruction. 

At 11:45 a.m^the children prepare 
for lunch, and this is one of the 
most enjoyable and responsive per- 
iods of their instruction. 

Under an instructor, the children 
prepare for lunch by washing, set- 
ting the table, and, where possible, 
assembling the food for cooking. 
Preparation of lunch in the class- 
room is an important part of their 
instruction and carries .a number of 
important teaching features includ- 
ing: 

1 - Health - personal care, clean- 
liness — 

2 - Care of dishes and cooking 
utensils — 

3 - Setting table - organization, 
number concept — 

4 - Following directions — 

5 - How to use eating utensils — - 
- How to clean up, washing dish- 
es, and similar chores. 

A number of children enter the 
program with eating problems. 

Some want to eat by themselves, 
doubtless because of habits acquired 
at home where perhaps they have 
I not eaten with their families. Others 
have been fed by their parents be- 
cause- it was- simpler to- feed the 
child as one would a baby than to 
patiently stand by and guide the 
child. Some have developed definite 
I eating habits because some foods 
struck their fancy or were easier to 
, handle than others. 

One youngster would eat but one 
or two foods when he first joined 
the others in the important hot lunch 
program. 

But discipline, of necessity is firm. 
The instructor says, "This is what 
we are having . . . eat it or don't." 

After several days of watching 
his chowhound peers stoke up this 
youngster came around, and now, 
as the saying goes, "Will eat any- 
thing that doesn"t cat him first." 

After lunch, it's the washroom 




SPECIAL EDUCATION inttructor Oik Heckman discuses o simple problem in 
numbers with three exceptional children. Under the program conducted by the 
Special Education District of Lake County, physically and mentally handicapped 
youngsters such as these are being prepared to lead useful lives. Average cost per 
pupil per year under this special program ranges about $50 more than for average 
students. 



again, and at 12:45 the youngsters 
work on number concepts. From 1 
to 1:30 they work in the all-purpose 
room for a bit of sports both un- 
der direction and free activity. Here 
they bounce and catch, play basket- 
ball and otherwise attempt to play 
athletic games. 

At 1:30 it's back outside after 
training in dressing themselves. 
They look' at nature, discuss the 
weather, are guided in street cross- 
ing procedures, cautioned i not to 
pull leaves off trees, and similar 
activity. If a pond or stream is near- 
by they are taken there to learn 
about possible dangers. 

Music appreciation comes at 2 p. 
m. where the youngsters become 
acquainted with music through rec- 
ords and song. 

At 2:15 they visit the washroom 
and prepare for the end of the school 
day by being booted, zippered, etc., 
so they are ready when their 
mothers come at 2:30, the end of 
their school day. 

The children, as far as possible 
prepare themselves for going home. 
Guiding the youngsters at Adler 
Park School is Dik Heckman, a 
World War II veteran who also saw 
duty in the post-war period. In his 
mid-30's, Dik holds a master's de- 
gree and has studied at the Univer- 
sity of Toledo, the University . of 
Denver and Illinois State Normal 
University. 

On completion of college, he, 
served as a high school teacher in 
English. While an instructor in Eng- 
lish in Waukegan, Dik became in- 
terested in retarded children through 
the efforts of the guidance director 
of Waukegan high school who was 
then director for the Lake County 
Society for the Mentally Retarded. 
His interest reached the point where 
he decided to make his career in the 
field of instructing retarded chil- 
dren. 

He resigned his position as a 
teacher and reentered Illinois Nor- 
mal U. to study the area of the re- 
tarded to meet state approval in this 
special field of the trainable men- 
tally retarded. 

On completion of his special 
training at INU, Dik taught for the 
Lake County Society for two years. 
On organization of the Special Edu- 
cation District of Lake County, he 
took over the training of the men- 
tally retarded, thus relieving the 
Society of this responsibility. 

A trim six footer, Dik knows his 
children and he knows their poten- 
tial and limitations. Training for his 
charges must be gentle, yet firm. 
The children have short memories. 
They may,as would a baby, reach 
out and touch something and be 
burned. Several minutes later, they 
may reach out again to the same ob- 
ject, to be burned again. 

Thus, it is repetition and habit 
that mold them. And there can be 
no leeway. Directions are given, and 
once understood, must be obeyed. 
Dik has a small paddle handy to I 
whap small behinds when his charg- : 
es indulge in too much horseplay 
when a bit of learning is demanded. 
And like other youngsters, these 
children have their tears and their 
ups and downs. But by and large j 
they are a happy bunch. Age doesn't ! 
mean much to these youngsters. The 
10-year-old is as happy in her way, ) 
discovering the thrill of zipping her 
own boots, as your youngster is in 
doing her first multiplication. And 
though she'll never be able to do 
the things your youngster can do, 
with good fortune and much pa- 
tience, she'll end up a partially-suf- 
ficient and willing member of so- 
ciety. 

* * * 

Follow the story, what your Spec- 
ial Education District of Lake Coun- 
ty is doing for the handicapped 
youngster, a pioneering educational 
effort which is salvaging these ex- 
ceptional children and molding 
them into useful citizens. Follow us 
next week as we make the rounds 
with the district's social worker. 




■>.-• -: 






WH 



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FREE 

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OFFER 

100 



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ion you redeem the coupon beloW 

on purchase of ALUMINUM Gookv/are; 



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EXTRA THICK • MIRROR FINISH • SEAMLESS 







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tith this coupon and purchase of 3 pkgs. new ■ 

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Redeemable only at Piggly Wiggly. Umlt one 
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THE AflTiOci-i NEWS? AW<XH|; ILJNdlS 



tfvr;: 



Thursday. March i^ iftft 



.. t 



Expected Arrival 
Arrives Early p|#| 

LAKE VILLA — The stork 
brought an abrupt end to Sunday 
School at the Community Metho- 
dist Church 'here for Mrs; /Robert 
Smith. 

Although the claw wasrtft yet 
over, Mrs. Smith told her husband 
Sunday -^"It»s time to go." 

Less than 20 minutes later iter 
•^liiiby/a boy, was born in their auto 
on Washington St. near St; Therese 
Hospital. Hospital personnel helped 
Smith geflhia wife and baby info 
the hospital, where both were re- 
ported doing fine. 

The Smiths have two "other chil- 
dren, ^s" 



During March, whirls tradition- 
ally Red Cross month, . each Lake 
Count! an that contributes $1 or 

.. more to the Red Cross -fund cam- 
paign becomes a member with vot- 

\ ing privileges in the affairs of the 
local chapter. Each year the chap- 
iter's volunteer board of directors 
determines the amount of money 
needed to carry on Red Cross- pro- 
grams in Lake County. Annual elec- 
tions are held for board members 
and chapter officials. 




tmm 




Mi-31 

ANTISEPTIC 

MOUTH WASH 

Used as a gargle, it kills 
contacted germs. 

SIT 89* 2« 94* 



AT OUR (ME DRUG STORE 




UVENOEII 

SHAVE 
CREAMS 

Regular or Mentholated. 

Extra rich. 

10-sz.JUmiqI - « am 

■.« 98* 2 "■ 1.03 



AT OUR (I^ffj DRUG STORE 




AEROSOL 
TOOTH 
PASTE 

Mere fer yeur 
money, eat let to 
«t«. lefraahlng 
mint (lover. 
I«f. 9S« ea«h 



Uljli rffgffi 'OKUC S'TURE 




DOLLAR DOUBLE 
I buys 2 



■*&*£*** 



BUFFERED 
ASPIRIN 



fatter nlfaf from 
pel*. Won't vpttt 
yewrtlemeck. 

lOO'ittf.vK 



G59 



KING'S 

DRUG STORE 

plume tt 




One of the responsibilities given 
to the American Red Cross by Con* 
great lit 1905 U (that of the home 
service program. This program is 
the official connecting link between 
Lake County famiiles and their ser- 



vicemen stationed anywhere) In the 
worM^Ahbther horne service rune* 
tion is to provide assistance to vet- 
erans and their families During the 
past year the Lake County chapter 
assisted 1,483 fsmiliee of servicemen 
at a cost oMlaVlMill 



jjjjjiiiu i i i 'iii i J i iii'i i ' ii V i V iii MM iii ' i pimV i i. iwiiwiii l liwiwwiwi HMW tw .M i M i M i hi w K iiiiiM ( M i n iiiiiiiiiiii m iiiiim 




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Shop for your Easter 
outfit at the store of class. 

The Klass Men's Store 



ANTIOCH ;>21^ 

B«t«l««MI I III M «HII H II H IHIHH H IIMWI M HWHHWfHIWM 



'1 , 



|H«tWWWWIIIIIM«W J IIIIM H M HMI HI I MI H I MMH HH«tWi 



NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY members of Anttoch Township High School pete for pfiete following receef e l ec t la w af 
21 new members to Hie group. In front row (left to fight) ore Jo mas Colo, finite Rekheosoch, Sharon Lanabefn, Joseph Itte*, 
Connie Von Noy, Joeeph fnlt, Jean Van Heeche, Margo Oft, David tanner. Middle row - Petti ■foot*, JiH Awee n ow, Pemele 
Or uckor, Diane Jaret, Deo StMton, Karen Ughteey, Jan Doha, Gail Tirtaln, Carole Gonoelach, Albert DMtmon. Lost row - 
Daryt Danman, grlan Elliott, Stephen Chandler, William tanner, Leslie Horfctf, Laoco KoWer r Daniel Conrad, tar na rd Ait- 
aamit. Jamas ProiJto, Edward Martin. 



^ y»W»»WWWWIWWW W ^*WWW^ 



News of Wilmot 



By Mrs. Herman Frank 
WILMOT, Wis. — Mr. and Mrs. 
Clyde Cates, Ray, Duane, June were 
Tuesday supper guests at the James 
Cates home to celebrate the first 
birthday of Johnny Cates. His birth- 
day was Feb. 29. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Smith and Eva 
and Mr. and Mrs. Herman Frank 
celebrated Mrs. Richard Frank's 
birthday Thursday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Schaal, 
Bruce and Douglas, Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Zarnstorff Jr., Marjorie and 
Dennis, Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Zarn- 
storff, Kenneth, Jack, Jeffrey, Kath- 
leen, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Zarnstorff 
Sr., spent Thursday evening with 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Getting in hon- 
or of Mrs. Oetting's birthday. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Harms, Mr, 
and Mrs. Earl Harms and Harold, 
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Frank, Mrs. 
Flavia Ehlert, Mr. Herman Ehlert, 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Wienke, Lon, 
Brian, Lane, celebrated . Rodelle 
Harms birthday, Saturday evening, 
Mrs. Frank Zarnstorff Sr. enter- 
tained her 500 club Tuesday. Awards 
went to Mrs. Barbara FassI, Mrs. 
Frank Zarnstorff" Sr. Mrs. Rose Dan- 
iels. Traveling prize went to Mrs. 
Flavia Ehlert. 

Lottie Schmalfeldt, - Kansasville, 
spent Saturday with Mrs. Paul 
Ganzlin, 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman Frank, and 
Mrs. Paul Ganzlin called on Mir. 
Harold Bouiden, Burlington, Mon- 
day. 

Mrs. George Bovee, Mrs. Ervin 
Rasch Memler and Mrs. Harvey 
Brown attended a luncheon for the 
W. S. C. S. at the Paris Church, 
Thursday evening. 

Patty and Danny Brown, McHen- 
ry, spirit the weekend with their 
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey 
Brown, Their folks, Mr. and Mrs. 
Stanley Brown, were Sunday din- 
ner guests. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Kufalk, An- 
tioch, Mr. and Mrs. Donald Wienke 
and sons and Mr. and Mrs. Herman 
| Frank spent Sunday with Mrs. Ber- 
tha Harms. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Rasch, Mr. 
and Mrs. James Cates and Johnny 
celebrated the 28th wedding anni- 
versary, Saturday evening of Mr. 
and Mrs. Clyde Cates. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Cates and 
David, Mr. Ervin Cates and Mrs, 
Rose Daniels spent Sunday with 
Mr. and Mrs. Bob Lois, Shorewood 
Terrace. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Frank spent 
Sunday evening with Mr. and Mrs. 
Clyde Gates. 

Fred Rieman returned home Wed- 
nesday from Burlington Memorial 
Hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Zarnstorff Sr. 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Mecklenburg. 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Hirsch- 
miller, ^dy and George returned 
home Friday after a three-week va- 
cation at Lake Wales, Fla. They also 
spent a couple of days with-Mr. and 
Mrs. Vern Grover, Lakeland, Fla. 

Mr. und Mrs. Floyd Gyger Sr. and 
Sandra St. John spent Saturday 
afternoon with Mr. and Mrs. Gary 
Kirchke, Antioch. 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Hirsch- 
millcr, Judy and George spent Sat- 
urday morning with Mr. and Mrs. 
Floyd Gyger Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Hyde, Mr: and 
Mrs. Louis Anderson were recent 
visitors of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Kruckman. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cyril Pacey spent 
Thursday evening with Mr. and Mrs. 
Floyd Pacey, Kenosha. 
. Mr. and Mrs. Ervin Rasch spent 
Saturday evening with Mr. and Mrs. 
Freddie Mauser. 

Gerald Tindall and John Feder- 

meyer were Sunday visitors of Mr. 

and Mrs. Frank Federmeyer, Port 

Washington, 

Mrs. R. C. Shotliff spent a few 



Fashion Show on Grass 
Lake PTA Schedule 

The regular meeting of the Grass 
Lake PTA will be held at 8 p.m. in 
the school building Monday, March 
20. Mrs. Betty Ferrler, president, 
will preside. 

^Evcnt of the «veaiag-Will be a. 
fashion show, with PTA members 
modeling latest spring styles. 

Refreshments will be served by 
mothers of third grade students, 
with Mrs. Pat Bye as chairman. 





'awiian Crw&# 



ftfev a Weoferhl, Ketone Oeeeo 

(Jeer teens Wo r/em Ae Wert 
Ceerf fe H«w«lt. U**e M«v 17. 
Refer* Jtee lt+. 



598* 




H*tet 



d 






,*uyJ 

TtAVal SamVICf 
17ff MAMt AVt, MA Mf? 



-* 



days with Mrs. Stanford Heide, Ken- 
osha. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Federmeyer, 
Decatur, 111. spent Sunday at the 
Tindall-Federmeyer home. 

Mr. \ Harley Shotliff, Dearborn, 
Mich., was a Monday overnight 
guest of Mrs. R. C. Shotliff. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Tindall spent 
Sunday evening at the Wm. Wayda 
home, Bristol. 

Beverly Rasch, Kenosha, spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Norman 
Rasch. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gust Neuman and 
Fred Rieman were Sunday guests of 
Adolph and Hannah Neuman, Ra- 
cine. 






COMMERCIAL 
PRINTING 



FOR EVERY 

BUSINESS NEED! 
We assure you of 
Quality Work and 
Materials Always 

• LETTERHEADS 

• ENVELOPES 

• BUSINESS FORMS 

• RULED FORMS 

• BUSINESS CARDS 

• POSTERS 

• ADVERTISING PIECES 

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• ORDER & SALES BOOKS 

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• BOOKLETS 

• CIRCULARS 

• CATALOGS 

• ART WORK 

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• WEDDING INVITATIONS 

• ANNOUNCEMENTS 

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GASTON 
PRINTING CO. 

Publishers of 

The Antioch News 

Kttabllshod 1884 

PHONES 

ANTIOCH 43 ft 44 

928 MAIN ST. 

ANTIOCH ILLINOIS 




Read the 

CLASSIFIED ADS 
Every Week 



WHEN YOU COME IN FOR A 

FREE CHECKUP 

OF YOUR TV 

RECEIVING TUBES 



FOR THE BATHROOM, BIDROOM, < 
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a will last over 5 years 
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a no swith to turn on . . . plug In 
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on Route 173, 1 mile West off Route 59 



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IPH0N6 ANTIOCH 43 or 44 '"SBJiSSKi^S 



Card of Thanks 

We wlah to thank our friends and 
neighbors for their many acta of 
kindnesa and sympathy, at the death 
of our father. 

,;v The^drew|DeBoer family 

Card of ;ThanjMM : ,1 
I wish to thank the many friends 
who sent cards, gifts and flowers to 
me, while 1 was in the hospital, and 
when I returned home. 

Mrs. Arthur Lauraen 






MEMORIUM TO OUR MOTHER 

Mia. Anna Fink , 
who passed away March 24, 1986. 
Memories^ arc treasures no one. can 

steal; 
'•:."•? Death la a heart-ache nothing 

can heal. 

Some may forget her, now that she 

has gone, 

But we shall remember, no 

matter how long! 

Loving Son, Andrew and 

Daughter-in-Law, Josephine Fink 



FOR SALE 



Real Estate 



LOG SIDING CABtH — 5Wx20\ 
knotty cedar lined and insulated. 
Ideal |or summer cottage. Can be 
moved easily on flat-bed truck. 
Phone Waukegan, MAjestic 3-3239. 



COLOR is our business! We make 
2900 colors automatically Jin any 
finish. ^.h-'-v/--:^^;.^;^^-.-.; ■ /.;] 

VART , S : PAINT STORE 
404-406 Lake St. 

'Twin doorways to color" . 



ANTIOCH MONUMENT SALES 
Samples may be seen oh premises. 
Steve's Garden ^Center i ' 
1041 S. Main St. Aritloch, 111. 

■■:•-' -r^H .'(36-37) 



"Every blootntn' thing In wallpaper" 

1 ■ at ■■*■■. • 
ART'S PAINT STORE 
404-406 Lake St. 
"Twin doorways to color" 



BE DIFFERENT — .'■-" 

Buy your Easter hat where there is 

only one of a kind. 

$1,09-. $2.99 - $3.99 and up 

Hundreds to choose from 

Dresses in sizes 9 to 92 

WEBSTER'S WEARING APPAREL 

(Formerly Silver's) 

1217 - 63rd St. Kenosha, Wis. 

Phone OLymplc 2-2774 



ROCK LAKE, Trevor, Wis. — 1 
block from beach, 2 miles from An- 
tioch - Corner Park Lane - Rock 
Lake Road - 2-bedroom home on 
2 lots. Large living room, tile cabi- 
net kitchen, built-in-refrigerator; oil 
furnace heat; concrete foundation; 
garage. Phone ' UNderhill 2-4214 
(Trevor, Wis.) 



WANTED 

LAKE PROPERTIES 

Lake Front and Channel Front list- 
Sags. We have cash buyers, 
— Financing Available — 

• • • 

WANTED 
FARM PROPERTIES 

5 Acres to 900 Acres 
Our farm investors corner want im- 
proved farms. Plenty of financing 
for- those who want U* buy. 



WANTED 



Female Help 



Sb 



WINTHRGP HARBOR — Single 
steeping room for gent; $7, Hot 
water, parking area! Phone TRinity 
2-3281. v ; ,^ (37-8-9) 



•www 



^WMW¥MWWW¥W«wilWWlW¥»iWW^W^ ^ » 



PIANO — ORGAN ■•■r-^IMNT a 
new Wurlitser piano or organ — 
ONLY $8.00 per month, plus small 
cartage. First time in Antioch area. 
For details, call ONtario 2-4040 col- 
lect.' .;;' * ■ • t ■■: 

JOHN -CHARLES MUSIC XXX 
228 N. Genesee, Waukegan 



INDUSTRIAL BUILDING — in 
Waukegan - 1,000 or- 2,000 sq. it. 
Good for any purpose. Call Delta 
8-9383 or MAjestic 3-9490. (37-8) 



SERVICES 



WAITRESS WANTED — either 
days or nights until 12:30. Village 
Pizzeria, Lake Villa. Apply in per- 
son or phone ELJlott 6-7458. 



EXPERIENCED Waitress wanted. 
Apply in person at Nielsen's Restau- 
rant, Route 99 and Grass Lake Rd. 



E. ELMER BROOK 
918 Main St. 



Antloch 460 



40 ACRES OF LAND with 700 
feet of frontage, on a beautiful, cry- 
stal clear, fast flowing trout stream. 
Price $2,280; $190 Down, $25 a 
month. Art Schmidt, Broker, Park 
Falls, Wis. 



Widower wants you to live in his 
lovely home with his 11 year old son 
and 9 year old daughter, .If you are 
qualified to be a housekeeper. If 
you love children, are cheery, re- 
sponsible, neat and tidy, in good 
health,- and would like to be a part 
of our family — Write to S. R. Rod- 
gers, 253 Oak Knoll Terrace, High- 
land Park, 111. Give qualifications, 
age, experience, snapshot if avail- 
able and wages desired. 



FOR GOOD 

„FIRE INSURANCE 

CONSULT 

J. P. MILLER 

Rt 69, Post Office Boa 143 

Phone Antioch 1231 - Antloch, 111 

HOME 
INSULATION 
Saves you up to 40% in fuel, youi 
home Is much cooler in summer, re- 
duces floor drafts and makes cold 
rooms warmer. Makes more 
room temperature. 

BURLINGTON ROOFING 
HEATING 
880 Geneva Street 
Burlington, Wisconsin 
Phone Rockwell 8-6191 



Male Help 



5a" 



5-ROOM, all-year-round home: 
Ideal for couple. Large bedroom 
with picture window; all-tile bath- 
room and kitchen; 1% car garage. 
Beach and boating privileges. $2,000 
DOWN. Financing can be arranged. 
North Shore Loon Lake. Call An- 
tloch 1904, all day Sunday; after 6 
p.m. weekdays. 



WINTHOP HARBOR — 6 Room 
house; 3 bedrooms, bath, newly dec- 
orated. Phone evenings, Kenosha, 
Wis. — OLympic 2-2928 (37-8) 



OWN YOUR OWN BUSINESS 
Get paid weekly; healthful work. 
Liberal terms to right man in choice 
territory as sales representative for 
Wisconsin's Greatest Nursery, es- 
tablished over 55 years. No deliv- 
ering or collecting. Liberal guar- 
antee. Nurseries of over 650 acres 
at Waterloo, Wisconsin. Write 
McKay NURSERY COMPANY 
Madison, Wisconsin 

(36-7-8) 



FOR GOOD 
LIFE INSURANCE 

CONSULT 
- J. P. MILLER 
Rt 59, Post Office Box 143 
Phone Antloch 1282 - Antioch, HI 



Mariners and would-be ma- 
riners will get a hearty wel- 
come to the Chicago National 
Boat Show, March 24 through 
April 2, from pert, 18-year-old 
Helen Anderson. Shell reign 
over the huge boating exposi- 
tion in Chicago's new McCor- 
mick Place as Miss Dream- 
boat. Helen won the title along 
with that of Miss Photoflash 
in a contest sponsored by the 
Chicago Press Photographers 
Association. 



Teach and eat! There's double fun in making apple plea 
o I0e« Mother's with one recipe shared between two little fuf 
cookat Mother's easy recipe is divided in half to make one 5-1 
pie and two 3-inch pie*, just daughter's size. Simplified crust ti 
pastry mis; the appropriate apple variety for flavor-retention is the 
tart and tansy Washington Winesap. JTust as Mother doea, little 
girls sprinkle Winesap apples with coconut, grated orange and 
lemon rind for tropical touch to pje. 

Wlnetap Apple Pie '' 
2 sticks prepared pastry . Grated rind and Juice 



'■•■ ""'.. >H; 



mla 

6 medium Washington 
Wi nesap apples . 
% civ brown sugar V 
l A cup white sugar 
1% tsp. nutmeg 



of: 1 orange 
Grated rind and Juice 
' . of 1 lemon' 
3 tbsps. flne-grated 

coconut 
3 tbsps. butter 



Prepare pastry according to directions oh the package. Line 9- ' 
inch pie pan. Wash, peel, core and thinly slice apples. Toss apple 
slices with the sugars, nutmeg and juices of lemon and orange. 
Turn into lined pie pan. Sprinkle with orange and lemon rind, 
coconut, dot with butter. Top with paatry. Bake in 400° F. oven 15 
minutes. Lower heat to 360*F„ bake an additional 30 minutes. 
Will make one 9-inch pie OR one 6-inch pie and two 3-inch pies. 



ATTENTION FARMERS! 

For prompt removal of all dead 
animals, call collect: 
THE GLOBE RENDERING CO. 

Phone Burlington- ROckwell 3-8400 

— or Kenosha _- . .OLympIc^U 11 



Miscellaneous 



WANTED — SLEEPING ROOMS 
for men. Phone Antioch 264. (37-8-9) 



FOR RENT 



< » »»WWW ¥ » W <WWM«W» » OHM»W^W^W*^ 



6-room home; basement, furnace. 

$5,300 cash. 

* * * 

Home Sites and Highway Acreage 

NELSON'S 

Real Estate and 

Fire Insurance 

881 Main St Phone 23 

Antloch, Illinois - 



Automotive 



3c 



NEED A USED CART 
See Dan, your Ford Man, today! 
Get the very best deal on an A-l 
Used Car. 100 models from which 
to choose. Call or stop by and ask 
for 

DAN LIGHTSEY 
at Rced-Randle Ford, Waukegan 
0-2340 Antloch 928 



Houses 



4a 



BY OWNER — Machinery - Nor- 
ton clyindrical grinder. Also other 
machinery. Call DElta 0-9363 or 
MAjestic 3-9450 (Waukegan). 

(37-8) 

Miscellaneous * 



Lasy days ahead! Paint early with 
paint from Art's, boat paint, house 
paint, floor paint — just to mention 
a few. 

Anything you need in paint from — 

ARTS PAINT STORE 

404-400 Lake St. 

"Twin doorways to color" 



FOR RENT- 
IN ANTIOCH — Modern 3-room 
apartment; heat, water, refrigera- 
tor and range furnished. Laundry 

privileges. $80.00 per month. 

• * * 

4-room dwelling; basement, oil 

heat. In Antioch — $80 per month. 

• * * 

6-room house with bath. $100 per 
month. 

NELSON'S 

Real Estate and 

Fire Insurance 

881 Main St. Phone 23 

Antioch, Illinois 



WE APPLY 

SIDING: 

Aluminum 
Insulated 
Asbestos 

ALUMINUM: 

Doors * Windows 
Jalousie Porch 

Roll and Permanent Awnings 

ALL TYPES OF ROOFING - INSULATING 

BURLINGTON ROOFING 

& HEATING CO. 

680 Geneva Street 

BURLINGTON, WISCONSIN 



Apartments 



4b 



CONCRETE AND LIGHTWEIGHT 

BUKSCS - PATIO BLOCKS 

CRAB ORCHARD. LANNON AND 

FRENCH LICK STONE 

Complete Line of All 

F ACE B RICK - ALUMINUM AND 

STEEL WINDOWS AND DRAIN 

TILE 
FOX LAKE CONCRETE PRO- 
DUCTS &¥LdG. MATERIAL CO 
Rt W * RR Depot, Fox Lake, HI 
Ph. Justice 7-1441 U»( ) 



LEGAL NOTICE OF ELECTION 

FOR SCHOOL DIRECTOR OF 

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 33, IN 
LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS . 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
that on Saturday, the 8th day of 
April, 1981, an election will be held 
at Emmons School in School District 
No. 33 of the County of Lake and 
the State of Illinois, for the purpose 
of electing a school director of said 
school district for the full term. 

For the purpose of this, election 
the school district shall constitute 
one precinct and the polling place 
therein shall be at Emmons School, 
Route 59 and Beach Grove Road, 
Antioch, Illinois. 

The polls shall be opened at 12 
o'clock Noon and closed at 5 o'clock 
P. M. the. same day. 

(A caucus will be held at the poll- 
ing_p]ace_ immediately before the 
opening of the polfiTfor the purpose 
of nominating a candidate for school 
director.) 

By order of the School Board of 
said District. 

Dated this 8th day of March, 1981. 
LOUTS TANNER 
, President 
Ruby Aim 

Clerk 

(March 18, 1961) 




FOR 

ST. PATRICK'S 



Shamrocks 

and 

Green Carnations 




• SPECIAL • 
FRI.-SAT.-SUN. 

2V4" PLANTER PLANTS 
4 for $1.00 



COMPLETE 
FLORAL SERVICE 

Weddings 
• Corsage* 
• Funerals 

• Centerpieces 



FLORAL ACRES 

Phon« Antloch 1399 Bob Wlllratt 1 mile S. on Rtet. 83 A 21 
ANTIOCH'S NEWEST * LARGEST FLORIST ft GARDEN HDQTS. 





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PARTY 



THE FUN 



FURNACES CLEANED 

AND REPAIRED 

Oil Burner Service. A J. EGGERT, 
Camp Lake, Wis. Tel. Silver Like, 

TUcker 8-M91. <Mtf) 



SMALL KITCHENETTE APART- 
MENT — Refrigerator furnished; 
gas heated; one-car garage. First 
floor, front. 487 Lake St., Antioch. 
Phone Antioch 2389-M. 



SOU GOOD 
BILE INSURANCE 
CONSULT 
J. P. MILLER 
Rt 89, Feet Office Box 141 
Phone Antiosh 1332 - Antioch, Dl 

Legal Notices » 



4-Room apartment; private en- 
trance, private bath with shower. 
All utilities included. Located at 
Petite Lake. Phone Antioch 2880. 



Having sold my home, I am going 
out of business. Come this week for 
a very low closing-out price on 
what I have yet to sell. Suggest your 
own price if you like. COME NOW 
AND SEE— COME NOW AND 
SAVE! Ella G. Jensen, 324 Park 
Ave. Turn East at Murrie'a Station, 
4th house right side of street. Phone 



FOR RENT 

3 bedrooms, 2 baths, living room, 
kitchen, pvt. basement, near schools 
and shopping., playground, and 
children welcome. 

KIRCHMEIER APTS. 

office: 312 Depot St., Antioch, 111. 

Phone Antioch 791 



NOT RESPONSIBLE for debts 
other than my own on and after 
March 8, 1961. 

(Mrs. Carl) Marie Burgdorf 
(March 9, 16 & 23, 1961) 



KITCHENETTE APARTMENT— 
heated; gas range, refrigerator; can 
be furnished or unfurnished. 1 car 



garage. First floor, front. Phone An- 
Antioch W$& Everyone welcome. I tloch 2369-M. 



Adjudication and Claim Day Notice 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to 
all persons that the first Monday 
of May, 1961, is the claim date in 
the estate of William Pratt, Decea- 
sed pending in the Probate Court of 
Lake County, Illinois, and that 
claims may be filed against the said 
estate on or before said date without 
issuance of summons. All claims 
filed against said estate on or before 
said date and not contested, will be 
adjudicated on the first Tuesday 
after the first Monday of the next 
succeeding month at 9 a.m. 

William Pratt, Jr., 
Executor 
Edward C. Jacobs, Attorney 
950 Main Street 
Antloch, Illinois 

(March 9, 16, 8c 23, 1961) 



COUNTY ZONING NOTICE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 

' ss 
COUNTY OF LAKE 
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given 
to all persons in the Town of An- 
tioch, Lake County, Illinois, that a 
public hearing will be held on April 
6, 1961, at 1:30 p.m., in the Village 
Hall, Antioch, Illinois, relative to a 
proposal to vary the terms of the 
Lake County Zoning Ordinance, or 
to reclassify by amendment thereto, 
from the R-4 Residential District, to 
the B-l Business District, the fol- 
lowing described real estate, to-wit: 
That part of the Southeast quar- 
ter of Sec. 13, Twp. 46 N., R 9, 
East of the 3rd P.M., described as 
follows: 

Commencing on the East bank of 
Lake Marie, 28.03 chains North 
of the South line of said Sec. 13; 
thence North 81- Vi degrees East 
9 chains to the Westerly bank of 
said Lake Marie; thence Northerly 
along the shore line of said lake; 
236 feet; thence Westerly in a di- 
rect line to a point 236 feet North 
of the place of beginning, and 
thence Southerly along the shore 
line of said lake to the place of 
beginning, (except the Northerly 
50 feet measured at right angles 
to the Northerly line thereof of 
that part of said premises which 
lies East of the Easterly shore of 
Lake Marie and West of the West- 
erly line of West Lake Avenue, 
and also except that part that lies 
Easterly of a straight line drawn 
from the Southwest corner of Lot 
18 in George H. Acker man's Sub- 
division in said Sec. 13, to the 
Northwest corner of Lot 11 of the 
subdivision of Block 7 in Merry- 
wood Point Subdivision in said 
Sec. 13), in Lake County, Illinois. 
As a result of the petition of 
JOSEPH KLOPP & EMMA KLOPP, 
which petition is on file and avail- 
able for examination in the office 
of the below named Board, 316 
Washington Street, Waukegan, Illi- 
nois. 

All persons interested are invited 
to attend and be heard. 

LAKE COUNTY ZONING 
.. BOARD OF APPEALS 
Max Pilz 
, Chairman Pro Tern. 

Dated at Waukegan, Illinois, this 
16th day of March, 1961. 




PLACE: 

Ar Your 

Moose Home 

DATE: 
March 18th 

TIME: 

8 p.m, - f 




Do your House Cleaning 

with a 



WANT AD 




Clean House on Unwanted Heme for 
Quick Cash — or Trade Them for 
What You Need! 

If you're foil cleaning and discover 
furniture, small appliances, toys or cloth- 
ing you no longer need, let a low-cost want 
ad sell or trade them for you. You'll be 
pleasantly surprised at how many folks are 
seeking those very Items. But, you've got 
to tell them in order to 
sell them! Use the 
WANT ADS for eco- 
"nomicat, and really- 
fast results! 



THE ANTIOCH NEWS 
Phone Antioch 43 




->~* 




-\i 



-.7?*.-. »;- 



A total of 62 aspirants answered 
Coach Larry Leon's call for baseball 
last Frldajf at the high school, giv- 
ing local fins of "America's leading 
sport" anftptimistic outlook on Se- 
quoit diarsforid hopes this spring. 

With ttik/aea son's opener against 
Lake Forest less than a month away, 
Coach Leon has his work cut out 
for him. But there's optimism dur- 
ing early evening workouts which 
officially got. underway yesterday.: 

With only four letter men return- 
ing, Coach Leon's first task will be 
to shake . loose a starting line-up. 
Arid although it's too early to pre- 
dict starters at this time, it's pos- 
sible that several sophomores may 
be pulled up to varsity level if need- 
ed to bolster strengthen a starting 
line-up. ■, " : 

Four lettermen, including two 
regulars, answered the call last Ffi- 
.day. George Hogan, pitcher and 
third basemen, and Joe Fleviak, in- 
fielder, both juniors, were regulars 
last year and are expected to serve 
as a nucleus "for the 1961' squad. 
Dudley Sheehan, catcher. and third 
base, and Jack Thompson, catcher, 
lettered last year, and will be shoot- 
ing for first string this season. 

Here arc the candidates for the 
1961 varsity baseball .squad: 

Seniors 

Chuck Maxwell, outfield; Terry 
Blank, catcher; Don Horscti, out- 
field; Dudley Sheehan, catcher, 3d; 
John Hedburg, ' pitcher, IF; Gayle 
Augsburger, outfield; Jim Sanhatn- 
el, outfield; Mike Grealis, outfield; 
Richard Porter, pitcher, OF; John 
Loeper, third; Jack Thompson, 
catcher. 

Juniors) 

George Hogan, pitcher. 3rd; Joe 
Pleviak, infield; Ron Gable, out- 
field; Joe Wolf, pitcher, OF; Mike 
Horn, outfield; Phil Fabry, outfield; 
Joe Enis, infield; Toby Henry, out- 
field; Bill Ozga, pitcher, IF; Deryl 
Denman, pitcher, OF. 

Varsity managers — Bill Bonner, 
assisted by Bruce Wollpert. 

Candidates for Coach Bill See- 
mann's firosh-soph squad are: 
Sophomores 

Don Blackman, ss & 2d; Doug 
Lang, lb; Denny Apostolou, pitcher, 
OF; Bob Grant, If; Mike Roepenack, 
2b & ss; Dean Horton, infield; Les 
Geist, outfield; Jim Brownlee, cat- 
cher, IF; Dave Cardiff, 3b & ss; Ken 
Shew an, outfield; Roger Dewar, 3b; 
Jim Wetterberg, outfield; George 
Wilson, oitcher, OF; Rick Prosise, 
outfield; Mike Solar, outfield; Geo. 
Hanson, pitcher; Paul Erickson, pit- 
cher; Jim Valek, outfield; Rich 
Good, pitcher.< 

Freshmen 

Bradley Brenna, ss, 2b & OF; 
Richard Miller, If; Glenn Young, 2b 
& 3b; Jerry Kaminski, cf; Dave 
Schweigert, outfield; Jim Lindley, 
If; Joe Anzinger, pitcher; Jim Woj- 
cynskl, If; Patric Beatie, 3b; Dan 
Hamelberg, outfield; Ed Matejka, 
lb; Roger Eberman, lef; Bob Oil- 
schlager, pitcher; Ernest Westlund, 
lb; Doug Feller, ss & OF;; Jerry 
Berke, catcher & 3b; Jim Barnsta- 
ble* catcher, outf.; Dean Denman, 
catcher; John Horton, OF & IF; Ken 
Larson, 2b; Ken Stankus, If; Noel 
Birr, outfield. , 

Managers — John Bonner and 
Wayne Ream. 

The Sequoits went through last 
season with a 6-8 won-lost record. 






r 




HOW ABOUT A DIP? Us Harbsr il«ft>, Coach Lofty Lm>* and Alhhrtlc Di- 
rector Ward Lear Inspect imw whirlpool therapy dovieo far the high sckoof. Pur- 
chase of tha whirlpool was financed in part by the benefit basketball some March 
4 pining businessmen again* fha high school faculty, a ttyfa show tha soma ava- 
iling, and other entertainment. 




HONOR! D by Scauoft cage mate* wara thasa four pfayart thaw* with Coach 
Lorry Loon (right). From loft to right ara Danny Pagoca and Bill Oiaa, voted tha 
mott Improved pfayart of tha taoson; Las Harbtt, most valuable, and voted ce- 
captoln along with Brian Ullott. 



# 



I'm proud 
to represent the 

WORLD'S 
LARGEST 

AUTOMOBILE 

INSURANCE 

COMPANY 




U of I Set to Host 
Fans at Basketball 
Tourney Mar. 18 

CHAMPAIGN — University of 
Illinois facilities will be taxed to the 
limit Friday and Saturday, March 
17-18, when the annual State High 
School Basketball Tournament is 
held in George Huff Gymnasium. 
Through years of experience in 
handling the throngs which des- 
cend upon the Twin Cities, Univer- 
sity personnel is well prepared for 
the on-slaught. 

Housing offices are ready to assist 
visitors. Temporary facilities are 
available to high school boys and 
girls, Accommodations for adults 
are available In private homes and 
arrangements can be made at the 
University Housing Office In Illlnl 
Hall. Advance reservations are not 
accepted. 

A complete schedule of events~haT 
been arranged to occupy the free 
time of teenagers when they are 
not attending tournament games. 
Center of activities is the Armory, 
just across the street from Huff 
Gym. Dances are scheduled in the 
Ulini Union Building. * 

The Illinois High School Associa- 
tion, which conducts the tourna- 
ment series, has urged students and 
fans not to come to Champaign-Ur- 
bana unless they have tickets for 
the tournament. There is no public 
sale of tickets. Each high school in 
the state has the privilege of buying 
four season books. Remaining dis- 
tribution is handled through the 
schools involved in each tourna- 
ment session. 

Those Tvho are not able to see the 
games in Champaign-Urbana may 
join a television audience of 2Vfe mil- 
lions in watching the semi-finals and 
finals on a 12-station television net- 
work. Also, Friday's games will be 
televised by WCIA, Champaign, and 
WMBD, Peoria 

Local arrangements for the tour- 
nament are handled by the Univer- 
sity Athletic Association, which co- 
operates with the I.H.S.A. in pro- 
viding this service to the citizens o" 
the state. 



Keno Softball 
League to Hold 
First Meeting 

The Lake Keno softbball league 
will prepare for the 1061 season with 
an organizational meeting of spon- 
sors, prospective sponsors and man- 
agers Sunday afternoon In Trevor. 

The meeting will get underway 
at 1 p.m. at the Golf View Motel, it 
was announced. 

The season wil lopen the second 
week in May, with games played on 
the motel baseball field In Trevor. 
Officiating will be William Grinnell, 
noted Fox Lake sportsman, who will 
be umpire-in-chief. 

Teams tentatively entering the 
Lake Keno league Include Joes Tap, 
Lake Villa; Pat's Lounge, Long 
Lake; Boosters, and Jim's Sinclair 
Service, Antioch; Stervenz Loon 
Lake Garage; Fox Lake Hills Sports- 
man's Club; and Golf View Motel. 

Managers or sponsors seeking to 
enter the league are urged to attend 
Sunday's meeting. Further informa- 
tion may be obtained by contacting 
the Golf View Motel, Trevor, Wis., 
or call Underbill 2-3651 (Felix). 



With snow still lit the air, can- 
didates for Antioch Township High 
School's varsity ^and fresh-soph 
basebairsquads are sharing time and 
space with Sequbtt trackmen In an 
effort to get in shape for the April 
7 opener against Lake Forest. 

Against a background of nets that 
make the gym look like something 
out of Tarzan, 62 diamond. aspirants 
are going through their paces night- 
ly, awaiting only the whim of the 
weatherman until they can adjourn 
outside and start throwing and slap- 
ping the ball around in earnest. 

The Sequoits play a 14-game 
schedule during the 1961 baseball 
season, extending April 7 through 
May 23. Here's the way it shapes up: 
Frl. f April 7 - Lake Forest (there) 
Tue, April 11 - Ela- Vernon (here) 
Fri„ April 14 - Wauconda (there) 
Tue., April 18 - Grant (here) 
Fri.» April 21 - R. Lake (there) 
Tue., April 25 - Warren (there) 
Fri., April 28 - Grayslake (here) 
Tue.* May 2 - L. Forest ((here) 
Fri., May 5 - Ela-Vernon (there* 
Tue., May 9 - Wauconda (here) 
Fri., May 12 - Grant (there) 
Tue., May 16 - R. Lake (here) 
Fri., May 19 - Warren (here) 
Tue., May 23 - Grayslake (there) 

Set Early Start 
On Town Center 
For Lindenhurst 

LINDENHUBST — Groundbreak- 
ing for the new Lindenhurst Com- 
munity Center on Old Elm Road ia 
tentatively scheduled for April 1. 

The Lindenhurst Men's Club re- 
ported that plans for the full-base- 
ment one-story structure are Hear- 
ing completion. Estimated cost of 
materials is $12,478. All labor will 
be voluntary except for plumbing, 
plastering and the heating plant, 
which is expected to cost about 
$3,700. 

The club announced that the build- 
ing fund account now contains 
$3,200, and that this amount is ex- 
pected to be increased to $6,000 soon 
through the additional sale of 
"bricks", a car-wash day, the re- 
cent doughnut sale, and a block par- 
ty and. dance at the Shopping Cen- 
ter, 

The 40 x 80 foot structure is to be 
erected on a 260 x 150 foot lot on an 
Old Elm Road site to be deeded by 
the First National Bank of Lake 
Forest. 

Volunteer labor from tradesmen 
and others is being sought. Volun- 
teers can register- with John Slove 
at the Slove Bakery. Those donat- 
ing skills wil be honored in a special 
display to be erected. 



The Antioch Scouts have closed, 
the book on a sparkling season in 
the Land O'Lakes semiipro league, 
which wound -iup^with the local 
squad in the second place notch, k 

The Scouts had a season record 
of 11 wins snd 4 losses, coming in 
behind Grayslake, which posted a 
13-2 record. 

The Scouts rolled up a total of 
1,230 points during the season, com- 
pared to their opponents* 1,087. In 
addition, the Scouts* scoring ace. Art 
Pregenzer, ranked fourth Jn indi- 
vidual scoring, sinking a total of 110 
buckets and 84 free throws for a 
total of 274 points. ^ 

Antioch smashed two records in 
the final game of the season. They 
broke the old league record of 106 
points with aJ 12-74 victory over 



Grant High School is finding it 
no easy task to replace. head basket- 
ball coach Ray Collier; who resigned 

late last month to devote full time 
to his duties as dean of 

According to Wade -Eberly, school 
principal, '^Anyone?!* eligible to -ap- 
ply for the post^ He reported that 
the school has received a number off 
applications including what he con- 
siders to be two or three "good ones." 
"Mr: Collier will be a hard man to 
replace, but 1 am hoping that we will 
be able to get someone with some 
kind of record'?, vhe added. Grant la 
accustomed to a good brand of bas- 
ketball and will use care in select- 
ing a successor, he pointed out. * 



Round Lake. By connecting with a 
total of 46 field goals, they also 
broke the old record of 44. 

Following second-place Antioch 
in the league standings were Wau- 
conda (9-6), Richmond (8-7), Round 
Lake (2-13) and Fox Lake (1-14). 



Opening Our New 
Anchor Dinning Room 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
Dors Beef and Cabbage 

Soil 

Route 59 and Grand Ave. 



All You Gas Eat 
$2.00 



I 



Fax Lake, Illinois 



M»M » MMMMMM«MMMM*M» « M* ♦«♦♦» » 




This Week's SPECIAL 



Cose of 12 - 32 ox. quart* 

SILVERBR00K 



:: 



$ 



1.59 c 



U. £L Choice Fresh Meats 

Wisconsin Lunch Meats and Cheeses 

Open 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 7 Days a Week 

We Give S&H Green Stamps 

Fresh Homemade Italian and Polish 

Sausage 

The House Of Quality 



Nielsen's Corner 



FOOD SHOP 



Antioch ISO 



GEORGE MAZZUCA 

Route 59 and Grau Lade Road 
PHONE ANTIOCH 1089 

STATE FARM 
MUTUAL 

MnoKNMU iRtvfANCt ceuHurr 

Maine Of *ic«; Bloomington, Illinois 

69—20 




Antioch residents were a gabby 
lot during "last week's winter storm. 
Illinois Bell Telephone operators 
handled a total of 24,252 calls March 
8, for an average of almost 8 calls 
per telephone. This compares with 
an average of between 14,000-15,000 
calls on a normal Wednesday. 



COMMUNITY DANCE 

The Channel Lake Community 
Club will .-.ponsor a public dance 
April 9 at the American Legion Hall, 
Ida St., An'ioch. Music will be by 
the Rhythm Kings. 



It's Third Time Around 
For These 2 Opponents 

LAKE VILLA — Incumbent vil- 
lage president Ervin Barnstable 
faces a familiar opponent on the bal- 
lot in the April election here. 

Running against him will be Wal- 
ter W. Schneider St., and it will 
mark the third time that the two 
have squared off in a contest for the 
village presidency. Both men have 
served two terms, and Barnstable 
has served the last two terms. 

The ballot took final shape with 
the passage of the deadline for with- 
drawal of candidates. 

Barnstable heads the Peoples tick- 
et, with running mates Russell Wil- 
son, Paul Williamson and Melvin 
Harms for trustees; Robert A Van- 
der Pyl for police magistrate and 
Neil Redel for clerk. 

Schneider is running alone on the 
Citizens Party ticket. 

Running as Independent Party 
candidates are Anthony Sciacero for 
president and Wallace Lutcrbach for 
police magistrate. • 



NEW ARRIVAL 

Mr. and Mrs. George Busscher, 
Antioch, are the parents of a girl 
born last wt-ek in Condell Memorial 
Hospital. 



61st ANNIVERSARY 

Mr. and M*-s. P. J. Kohl of Beach 
Grove Rd., south of Antioch, cele- 
brated their 01st wedding anniver- 
sary yesterday. 




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THURSDAY, MARCH 16, 196! 



m^mma/mm 



ME 



THE ANTtOCH NEWS, ANTIOCH, ILLINOIS 






PAGE 




twiMwwf>a*a « w»»MWrfw*> * a*aw<w»iWwMwwiiy 



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Lounge — 23S3. •''. i 

iCuriyWerte — MM ^ 

BarnaUbSe St Broftn Iwtt Antloch 
IOA J. 

Garwood Cletaen beat Qrue 
Lake .Lumber 3. M 

Bueeie't Lounge beat Haggle & 
Bofa Town Club 3. 

La lfeer Conttraction beat Hor- 
toa Feed 3. 

Antloch Sheet Metal beat Lao Fox 
Tracking 2. ..' 

Marty's Morgue beat Beeves 2. 



CMtev BaU GlrH — March 1 

LaPlant Masonry — 2102. i f 

FloYucus — 484. 

State Bank beat Sexauer 3. 

La Plant Masonry beat Tot Shop 3. 

Pedersen Bakery beat Cox Cor- 
ner 2. 

John's River Inn beat Meiners- 
man 2. 

Laursen & Blackmail beat An- 
tloch Automotive Supply 2. 

Watty's Channel Inn beat Bill's 
Service 2. 



Aatloeh Major — March It 

Miller's Insurance — 3030. 

George Smith — 692. 

John Gaa St Son beat Cermak B. 
E, 3. t 

Miller's Ins. beat Joe St Helens 3. 

Tolo Bait Shop beat Spring Val- 
ley C. C. 3. 

Garwood Interior beat Blumen- 
scheln Exc. 3. 
- Antloch Lumber beat Tiede Ins. 2. 

Ace Hardware beat Rollie U Jo's 
2. 



■■■...■ ■• 



At a tiieetl n g held recently In the! 
office MSN* 3C. Patty of Antloch, 
Lake County Superintendent of 
schools, Roger K. Johnson, Lake 
County Safety Cotomliilon educa- 
tion chairman, E, G. Landen, execu- 
tive director of the Safety Commis- 
sion, and Howard M. Leinbaugri, 
education coordinator for the Divi- 
of Traffic Safety, SUte of Illi- 
tha National School Safety 
Honor Boll sj presented by the Na- 
tional Safety Council was discus- 
sed end endorsed as an educational 
project for elementary and secon- 
dary schools in Lake County. 



The National School Safety Honor 
Roll Is the National Safety Coun- 
cil's way of recognizing schoolsTforl 
their achievement in safety activi- 
ties. Participation In this program] 
( 1 ■) offers an opportunity for 'school 
people to receive a crittcai evalua- 
tion on their present school safety 
program; (2) offers a method of in- 
creasing the effectiveness and extent 
of that program; (3) gives national 
recognition for a job well done. j 

'Although enrollment in the pro- 
gram Is endorsed by the Lake Coun- 
ty Superintendent of Schools, the 
Laka CoUhty Safety Commission and 
the niinoli Division of Traffic Safe- 
ty, it ft th« prerogative of the indi- 
vidual school to accept or reject such 
a program, according to E. G Lan- 
den, executive director of the Safety 
Commission. 



Schools throughout the county! 
are invited to request literature Ire-' 
gardlng this program from the Lake 
County Safety Commission, P. O. 
Box 405, Liberty vllle* 




Main Mum 29 

AatlachJIIIfiafa 



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ANTINNAS INSTALLED * RlFAfllD 



Radio • Sfarao # 
;~ Naw Talavlslow Sata from $1 If .tS 
RCA Whirlpool - Dryen - Wot Mrs 




SERVICE 0ALL3 MADE Ml 

S#oraHours — Mo*.thra$af.f ^,$WW,1-6 
Gwora at aa d 




TV* 




439tafca$eraa? 



Acroat From Tfca Jawal 



, # ; »•♦ • a » »♦♦»»♦♦♦»♦»#♦ ♦♦♦»♦»♦ ♦♦♦••♦»♦ + *♦•♦♦♦ s s • •»»»♦»♦• 



Moose Mixed — March 5 

Tanner Construction 2137. , 4 

Don Richards — 944. 

Irene Noble — 479. 

Tanner Construction beat Antioch 
Launderette 3. 

Kaye's Snack Bar beat Antioch 
Landscaping Ser. 2. 

Lake County Heating beat All 
American Life 2. 

Sail Inn beat Charcot House 2. 

G. Blumenscheln Sewer St Ex 
beat Antioch Auto Service 2. 

Gamble Stores beat Moose 925 2. 



Tfcarstiay Business Men — March • - 

King's Drug Store — 2731. 

M. Carney — 901. 

King's Drugs beat Dick's Tree 
Service 3. 

Vox Trucking beat Merry Go 
Round Bakery 2. 

- Erich's Auto Repair beat Carey 
Electric 2. 

Town for Men St Boys beat Mur- 
ine's Standard Service 2. 

Ray's Shell Station beat Wertz 
Well Drillers 2. 

Lake Villa Lumber beat Salem 
King Pins 2. 



Bl-State League — March t 

Mason Shoes — 2749. 

Ray Anderson — 001. 

Dalgaards IGA beat Rudolph 
Turkeys 2. 

Kirchmeyer Construction beat 
Roepenack 3. 

Dortmunder Inn beat Mason Shoes 
2. 

Lyons - Ryan beat Beauti-Vue 
Products 2. 

Vos Construction beat Bob's Mo- 
bil 2. 

Haydon Homes beat Adolph's 
Channel Inn 2. 



Pvt Off Qualifies 
Expert with Carbine 

Army Pvt. Ronald J. Off, son of 
Mrs. Dorothy E. Blasko, 108 Janet 
ct. t Antioch, recently achieved rec- 
ognition as a top Army marksman 
by qualifying for the expert marks- 
manship badge during range firing 
with the carbine at Fort Campbell, 
Ky. 

Pvt. Off is a telephone repair- 
man in Headquarters and Company 
A, Maintenance Battalion, 101st Air- 
borne Division. He entered the Army 
in January, i960, and completed 
basic training at Fort Leonard 
Wood, Mo. He attended Taft High 
School in Chicago. 



Antloch News classified ads bring 
results. 




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o 



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world's oldest and finest insurance companies. 



HERE'S ALL YOU PAY 

for example, o doss 1A, 1960 Ford Foir- 
lane — with 

•60,000 bodily Injury and property damage 
liability, 92.000 medical cipeose, $1,000 
accidental death. $20,000 uninsured motorist 
protection, $100 deductible collision, $25 
towing and labor coat, and actual caab value 
comprebenaive Are and theft — in 



TIOCH 



$23 



it 



Get the facts about this policy with the 




QUARTERLY 



PersonakService 



■ 

Osmond Insurance Service 

Routes 59 & 173 Phone 985 / Antioch, Illinois 



-K 



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tAiGETEN 



THE ANTIOCH NEWS. ANT'OCK tUJNOIS 



THURSbAV^RCH 16/1^1 



-V 



HtfyNatitttoOfettrwe 
Sifilrtel'iDay 

The annual St. Patrick's Day ;Par^; 

ty apohsored by the )H61y Name S6 : 
clcty of ? St Peter's Church, Antioch, 
will be^held Friday, March 17, at 
\the VFoiir- Acca'f; Channel Lake, at; 
8:30 p.m. '.: . ,;...' 

/ Thecommittee iin charge is Thom-i 
as iGibbons^chairtnah ; ?Loia Schaet-i 
er, Leroy Frank, Robert 'Helarid, 
Charles Geist; Charles i JFprester,; 
George Palaake, Daniel Dugenskl, 
Henry Apostal, :Louis]Smoc^and < the 
Rev. L.F/Hanloy,' assistant' pastor. 






I :■-. ■■■ - * 




i 



To Test CD 



arairt Hlitb Usit 

»..__.. CXI..* 





5 



^Grant High 
Superintendent, 

has announced -ihe courses .to be of 
, lered in summer school beginning 

W6rld>History, M^S^HIstory, ;QeiU 
era! iScierice, Biology, Personal Typ- 



ing, Algebra I, Generaf M&hwiiR- 
tics, Latin I (second semester) -(and; 
Spanish 1 < second semester), • 
, The second isemesterlLatin I and , 
ibol Assistant! Spanish 1 .couraesiare offered ak ian' second semester, 
tvfd P. Schmidt ' 



attempt to help the student who to 
weak In the ^ ftmdamehtali dlittie f wn-? 
^age or who was mhable \to ikeep 

pace with" -Ills Jclass and failed ^the 



Any of the courses may iba ttkta 
for Credit or ias audit counts fa* 
tereated ; persons mayjiteom^^^^ 
general office at the ihigfrschboi ft* 
the regular summer school 1 brochure 




Antioch will 
throughout the state and nation In 
mobilization for a make-believe war; 
April 2tt-29; according ito plans now 
underway ^by Civil Defense officials; 
Key officials f of ^government, rinr 
dustry and security forces -will 3par-' 
ticipate in Operation Alert, code 
name for ^the r exercise; according ito; 
Maj. Gen. J. JL; =?Homer, State s Civil; 
Defense Director. Local ;CD opera-] 
tions Will be under John L. Horan, 
CD director in) Antioch, 

The two-day exercise, the. eighth 
annual alert, is directed by the presi- 
dent, and ^is designed to test the ef- 
fectiveness iof ^emergency disaster 
plans, personnel and equipment -.--it. 
all levels under conditions 'of 
:( feigned) nuclear attack. 

Highlights during the two-day 
alert will be: a half-hour Conelrad 
emergency broadcasting test the^af- 
ternoon of April 28; posed "aggres- 
sors" who may "invade", local areas 
to dramatically probe strengths and 
weaknesses of local security against 
sabotage; simulated attack problems; 
and drops of simulated plane-carried 
bombs, missiles or a combination of 
both. 



cut down your gas ibiUs 





BIG PEAK SEASON 
BILLS 

Plan now to par for next winters heat. 
ing oil by using our convenient budget 
payment plan . . . 

{tart as early as iuno 

or as late as September. 




INTEREST 

NO 

CARRYING 

CHARGE 




"Rain or Shine PJbone 509" 

LAHTi OIL CO. 

912 Broadway 

(Just South of Water Tower) 

Antioch, III. 



FOR MORE DETAILS: 

Phone 509 or 2345 

Or Stop in At Our Broadway Office 



Adult Scouters 
Honor Volun 
Leaders March 25 



Some 800 adult Scouters and their 
guests of the North Shore Area 
Council will honor those volunteer 
leaders who have contributed the 
most to Scouting at the Council 
annual Appreciation Dinner March 
25 in the Highland Park High 
School. 

The Silver Beaver award, highest 
honor the Council can bestow, will 
be presented to four men whose 
contributions to the Scouting pro- 
gram in the North Shore Area Coun- 
cil have been outstanding over the 
years. 

A. M. Roufa, of Highland Park, 
Council Activities Committee Chair- 
man, said winners of the Silver 
Beaver award would be announced 
at the time the awards are made. 

Principal address will be given by 
Dr. Harry G. McGavran of Quincy, 
III., vice chairman of Region 7 Ex- 
ecutive Committee of the Boy Scouts 
of America. The region embraces 
Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin and 
Michigan. 

Lawrence Gougler of Winnetka, 
Council President, will also speak. 
Presentation of training awards 
will be made by Charles Page of 
Highland Park and veteran recogni- 
tion awards will be presented by 
Milton Gray of Highland Park. 

Opening ceremony will be con- 
ducted by George Gau of Liberty- 
ville and Paul Hakanen of Glen- 
view will give the welcome and in- 
troduce the speakers. 

Roufa noted that the Apprecia- 
tion Dinner program is open to all 
Scouters in the North Shore Area 
Council and their wives or husbands 
and guests. The Council includes ap- 
proximately the western half of 
Lake County, shore line communi- 
ties in the county south of Lake 
Bluff, and communities in the north- 
eastern corner of Cook County. 



g^tori if lions*, ffti 
wanted to sWp 100 pactofw dwm *• 
dimerous Yingho River hs wwa 
DliNOtwpickivonrjachoflOOboiti. 
Hmh if i boat unk he lost oidy om 
paefcm Instead of hi* entire shipment 

Tttt sum principle of "sharing Urn 
ifik* underlies our. modem system of 
(nsvince! 

Dart 100 the** ti lie risk . . M 

MMM awsyi ran . . • 

LOREND. 
SEXAUER 

390 L«kt St. Antioch 571 
Sound Service 

Representing 
Hartford Accident and 
Indemnity Company 
Member' Hartford 
Insurance Group 
Hartford. Conn. { 







thinkofitlABUICK wagon priced lowerthan 
low-price-fieldwagons...withgassavingsthatchallenge the compacts 

* - ' " ... .-. »..-•-*. ...fill th* V,„.ns tint! " Pit" WU exfact 



Why hitch yourself to a wagon with a low 
price name when you can have Buick com- 
fort, ride, go and pride -and save while 
doing itl This staler saves on gas, tires, 
upkeep like the smaller cars, yet it's all 



Buick. with the live action "giY ' you expect 
tram a Buick! Drive the Special and learn 
why in a March Popular Mechanics survey 
"No other American car has received an 
•excellent* rating this high In recent years. 



The Anti och News la your ONLY 
local NEWSpaper. 




!••••••••••••••"• 



,«••••••• •!*•■.« • • ••• wraefr • ■ « 



BUICK SPECIAL 

THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS - QQ) 

SEE YOuHoCA^ v- " f „, « 

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When We Finance Your Cor 

• We guarantee prompt action. 

• Use your own insurance agent if you desii 6 . 

• Borrowing from our bank builds your bank 
credit, always useful if you would ever 
need other types of loans. 

• You do not need to be a customer to lolre 
advantage of our low rates. Stop in. 




CONSULT 



FIRST NATIONAL 



For Home, Business and Industry 




Member Federal Depettt Insurance Cofporetlen 



FIRST 






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The bank with the revolving 

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USC OUR CONVCNIENT SIOiWALK WINPQW 



NO WAITING. No delay. No red tape. The 
great advantages of comfort, convenience, clean- 
liness and economy found only in gas heat can 
now be yours to enjoy right away. 

Register now at your nearcit Northern 
Illinois Gas Company office. Your gas heat 
permit will be issued immediately. 

CONVERSION TO OAO HBAT IS 

IASV, generally takes less than a day. By 



acting now, you can still save on this season's 
fuel bills.. Get the facts, too, about our con- 
venient payment plan— the easy way to pay for 
economical gas heat. 

COOL WITH OAS, TOO. Did you know 
that the flame that heats also cools? Be sure to 
ask us or your heating contractor about sum- 
mer comfort with gas central air conditioning, 
the perfect companion to gas heat. 



NORTHERN 
A ILLINOIS 



Service around the clock 



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^■vaty dtlMii or resident of the 
UnHad SUt«, Including minor 

iffiSP^»*V^ a ' hl <** ; i ]r0i « income o* 
$000 or more in 19W, muii /lie* 
moral income tax return, HtroJd 

R All, Director of Internal Revenue 
f$r the Chlctfo District, reminded 
today. ; -.■!. 

Qthe V-2 withholding Ux state- 
ment it one of the most important 
documents of a Federal income tax 
return, _- _, ; 

"Since moat taxptyers were sub- 
ject to withholding during 1M0, at- 
tachingofrormW-Jiaobvictulyr^ 
quired to complete the return," AH 
Hid. _>'.:'£=:.:-,-...; -v-" '-" 

In a Jtflnt return, where both 
husband and wife worked, the W-2'a 
for each mutt be attached, he said. 

When either or both parties to a 
return held more than one job dur- 
ing 1 WO, all W-a't mutt be attached, 
he added. T\ 

"Refunds cannot be paid without 
required W-2'a, credit cannot be 
given for taxes withheld, and fail- 
ure to include the stateraeht will 
mean return of the incomplete form 
to the taxpayer/with the possibility 
of consequent late filing and inter- 
est or other charges being added," 
All said. 



To Place Society or 

News Items Call 

Antioch43 



4 



THi ANTIOCH N EWS, ^ANTiOCH, II UNO.S 



GopWdmen 






rubber stamps 




SMCIAL 
ModavTe-Order 

Type Orochvre 



lagpeved 
ATtJRIS 



SMKA' 
afazaVt Rubber Stomp Co. 

foSerrfconeKI 6-1*0* 
424 €ttft*n Round lake, IN. 



f HOW'S 

/ CHRISTIAN > 

V SCIENCE ) 

V HEALS J 

Merc* 19 

WBXB— TV, CUeage 

The letit far Healing ay Preys* 

Former nurse explains how she was 
cured of arthritis. 



nnqrie' 



Several hundred Republican wom- 
en from throughout lllinoft are ex- 
pected to attend their annual spring 
meeting here in Springfield March 

as.- % ?:.s . ; - ; ^-'V .:.;■-:••? =,| 

Sponsored by the Illinois Federa- 
tion of Republican Women Clubs, 
the 'program will begin at 8:30 am, 
in the Hotel Leland, according to an 
announcement by Mrs J. P. Schlsf- 
ly, Jr., Alton, Federation president. 
-The program will open with a 
breakfast, followed by a Board of 
Directors Meeting at 30 a.m. A panel 
meeting at 11 a.m. will feature top 
Republican leaden from both 
Houses of the state legislature i^dltW 
cussing "What to Expect In SUte 
Legislation in 1961? 

The panelists will be state sena- 
tors Arthur J. Bid will. River Forest, 
majority leader; George . E. Drach, 
Springfield; majority whip; and 
state representative* William E. 
Pollack, Chicago,' minority leader, 
and Robert T.McLoshey, Monmouth, 
minority whip. I 

Secretary of State Charles F.'Car- 
pen tier and Clerk of the Supreme 
Court, Mrs, Ear le Benjamin Searcy, 
will address the group at luncheon. 

At 2:1ft p.m., Operation Abolition, 
a film of the California student riots 
against the U. S. House Un-Ameri- 
can Activities Committee will be 
shown. The movie documents the 
Communist infiltration into our 
scholastic life. 

At 9 p;m. seminars will be held 
for club presidents and members, 
with the program concluding at 4:00 
p.m. 

Reservations for the annual Spring 
meeting are being handled by Mrs, 
John G. Ruckel, Downstate Conven- 
tion " Chairman, 1020 South Mac- 
Arthur Blvd., Springfield. 



%ii 



*"'i-f, 




'fmi^fi&MM. 



BRISTOL, WU. — Plans for the 
Kenosha : County Holste^in-Frieslan 
Association dinner March 23 were: 
announced at the recent annual 
meeting of the organisation held at 
the Waldo and Epplng farm in the 




w&m .»*« 



.'. 



GOVERNMENT 

, SURPLUS SALES 

NOW onyofw con buy DIRECT from 
US- GOVERNMENT SURPLUS DE- 
POTS, by mail for yourself or for re- 
sale. Cameras, binoculars, can, Jeeps* 
trucks, boots, hardware, office ma- 
chines and equipment, tents, toots 
and tens-of-ihousonds of other Items 
•t a fraction of their original cost. 
Many (terns brand new. For list of 
hundreds of U.S. Government Surplus 
Depots, located In every State and 
overseas with pamphlet "How Gov- 
ernment Can Ship Direct To You/" 
plus procedures , HOW TO BUY and 
how to net FREC SURPLUS, mail 
$2.00 to SURPLUS SALES INFOR- 
MATION SERVICES. P.O. Box No. 
1818. Washington 5. D.C. 



Enf dinmitt Ope* far 
Special III Pragf an 

QuaMJied high school students 
may apply until May 1 for enroll- 
ment in a cooperative work exper- 
ience program conducted by the de- 
partment of business education in 
University of Illinois College of 
Commerce and Business Adminis- 
tration. 

The program is open to students 
who intend to earn a bachelor of 
science degree in either secretarial 
training or business teacher educa- 
tion. 



Iter program 
will be offered for the fint time 
next month to Lake County high 
school students, alt was announced 
today by John M. Sacuto, Executive 
Director of United Cerebral Palsy, 
The program has been arranged 
through the cooperation of the Lake 
County Public schools. " S< 

V It consists of a four-week course 
to train youngsters of high school 
age In caring, for cerebral palsied 
and other handicapped children in 
their homes. The course will be con- 
ducted on Saturday mornings be- 
ginning April 15 at the Liberty ville 
High School, Butler Lake Building, 
West Park Avenue, LlbcrtyvJUe. It 
is being coordinated by L. D. Vuil- 
lemot, director, Special Education 
district. 

Sacuto stated that there has long 
been a need for qualified "baby sit- 
ters" for handicapped children. He 
stated that a liat of the students who 
successfully pass the course will be 
made available to parents of such 
children.;, 

The course will offer practical 
training by professional persons Jn 
basic care of the handicapped child. 
Included will be instructions In 
proper feeding, dressing, communi- 
cation, and play-time activities. Lec- 
tures and demonstrations will be 
conducted by therapists, special 
educators, and social workers. 

The program will also be of Inter- 
est to students who are considering 
entering fields of education related 
to the handicapped child since it 
will offer an introduction to persons 
experienced in these fields. 

Applications for the course will be 
available at Lake County High 
Schools or may be obtained by writ- 
ing L. D. Vuillemot, Special educa- 
tion District, Highland School, Lib- 
ertyville. 



of Bristol. The dinner will be 
at 7!30ip.ih;iatthe^Kenosha County' 
Conservation Club building, south- 
west of Bristol, Guest speaker will 
be Dr. Z. E, Helzer, chairman of the 
University of Wisconsin Dairy Hus- 
bandry department. He will speak 
and show slides on "Dairying in 
Russia". Tickets are available from 
any member of the organ ization. 

Roger Sherman, Wilmot, land] 
Chris Hansen, Sturtevant, were re- 



elected directors for two-year terms, 
In the reOrgahlsatiof) of the beard 
of directors, the following were re- 
elected: Sherman, president; George 
Clausen, Rl, Kenosha, vice presi- 
dent; Elmer Barthel, Salem, secre 



Ungton, treasurer. 

Walter Klrchner, Garden PrSirie, 
111., <spbke on the /Trends in Doiry- 
ing", at the barn meeting attended 
by about 40 dairy men of the !area;f 



: Sherman announced that 
Springer, Salem,; Gene 
Bristol, and Henry Rlchter, ,. 
will serve on the Youth Commi 
The Twilight Meeting commttteia 
Will be: Leroy Dyson, Cecil HilLRt, 



mm, hhhvi mi HHifitnniiir mis- jTmmm ;uwi:«w,Wf u/puii| v^niiwumi, 

tary; and Leroy Dyson, R 5, Bur- Kenosha, ai^ Hansen. The TwilJgh* 



Meeting will be held at the Sher- 
man Farm in ^Julyy - f*'W y ^ 
The Waldo-Epping farm is cwned 
by James Waklo and operated by 
Claude Epping. :^-. ::■>:■ .^m 





savings 



■■I 



TtUmU 

■ Tffffffffris f *tn af f. 




;•-:.' 



Only Paloon has th« Winning Combination of flit 
world's most-wantod oompao* faaluraa 



'Birflw Spirit' os Tap 

At Orant Mar. 24-26 

Grant High School students will 
present Blythe Spirit on March 124 
and 25. According to Thespian Ma- 
gazine the Noel Coward work is the 
nation's third most commonly pro- 
duced high school play. 

The seven scenes and three acts 
take place in England and involve 
the return from the dead of a prom- 
inent novelist's wife as the result 
of a seance held by the exotic, biz- 
arre Madame Arcoti. 

Proceeds from the play go to the 
senior class from whom tickets may 
be obtained. 



^inintTTiiiTmitniniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiiHfnitiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiti 

Warehouse Sale 



Licenses Suspended 

Leslie J. Cunningham, Gurnee, 
and Michael J. Ferrigan, Ingleslde, 
were among 15 Lake Countlana 
whose licenses were suspended last 
week for three violations, according 
to announcement by the office of 
Charles F. Carpentler, secretary of 
state. 



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0MM tin Ml Mai irtfMMl Una •SKflMl 1 «*■ «Ml 



f f f reus roaopMtf a now and on ms 

hkon Winning Deal 




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Lyons ck Ryan Ford Sales 

939 Main Street - Antioch 770 

If You're Intereited in on -*??> Usee) Xaw — to Sure to See Your Ford Doejfor 



/4(t itCHl . * . *H0 DESI8NED FOR 



and SUPPLIES 



LUMBER - BUIL0IN8 MATERIALS I 



NAILS 

Reg. Price SPECIAL PRICES 

32,000 ft. LUMBER — at o SPECIAL PRICE $80.00 per m ft. 

150 - 4" V culli Cedar Potti 63e 40c 

6400 lbs 16 D Common Nail* 19c lb. 7c lb. 

2000 lbs. Mlic. Common Nolls 16c lb. 7c lb. 

900 Ibi. no. 12 D Common Nolls 15c lb. 7c lb. 

700 lb*, no. 10 D Common Naili 15c lb. 7c lb. 

1400 Ibi. no. 20 D Golv. Nails 17c lb. 7c lb. 

130 bast RAINBO FLAME Charcoal Bviq. ..$1.69 bf. $1.00 per bo. 

Plastic Table Legs, pretinlshcd 4" high 3.90 set $2.50 set 

Plastic Table Legs, prefinlshed 12" high .... 5.95 set 3.75 set 

Plait k Table Legs, preflnlshed 14" high .... 6.49 set 4.00 tet 

Short lengths — all type mouldings 02e Im. ft, 

250 Bdls. ODDS Asphalt ft Asbestos Shingles 1.50 per bdl. 

Beyers Eniivotor (for ese in septic tanhs 

and sesspools) 2.59 eo. 1.95 ae. 

15 - WEISER Entrance Door Lech Sets 14.00 eo. 9.00 aa. 

Rural Meilbexes *•« «•• 

City Meilboxes '.7$ «*• I4rf ae. ,, 

For Outdoor Cooking - Majostk G«t«, 

Fire place Model 30 20.50 10.00 

Sew Horse Brockets ».00 t— »• 

Plneaclae ta $3400 — 5 Yean te Pey 

ANTIOCH LUMBER 

TRtnami COAL CflMPAMY r^g^G 

lYBRYTMINO TO BUILD ANYTHtHO 

nwem — Anrtseb IS esti 14 

Defy 7ttO to BrOO 




ty>u-- 




"SPECIAL 
PURPOSE 

Savings 
Accounts 



AT 

State &oh6 at *4«t(ocA, 

sssv w ■••'w sr*f*w B ^ we 1 • sr sy ■ w 

It's wise to save, you've heard It said 
for rainy days that lie ahead. 

But we maintain it's Just as wise 
to save for what most satisfies! 

Save for an auto, nothing to it . . • 
saving is the woy to do it. 

Save for the youngster's education , , . 
save your way to a dream vacation! 

Save for the home you'll always treasure . . . 
It's fun to save when you save for pleasure! 

Choose your goal, open your new "Special Purpose" account, save a reg- 
ular amount each payday, and before you know it . ♦ your goal is reached* 
Saving is made easier too with our 24-hour envelope depository located 
in the bank foyer . . . and our Save-By-Mail service with postage paid 
both ways* 

m OPEN YOUR ACCOUNT WITH ANY AMOUNT • 




All Deposits Insured 
To $10,000 By The 

Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corporation 




Students 

5th Through High School Grodss, 

Don't Forget To Enter 0"f 

Centenniol Essay yVriting Contest — 

See Us For Details 



mm 




THE HOUR IS LATE 



would be under Communist control today.'* This 
month he writes, "Our greatest need now is to go 
on the offensive and make the ideology of Moral 
Re-Armament the policy o! our government and of 
our people. Only then can Japan survive the testing 
years ahead and play her part in saving Asia, from 
tyranny. Our experience last summer shows that 
you cannot answer ideological attack without an 
ideology. At the crucial hour men in labor, youth 



A MEBIOA 18 AT. WAX. A W8T WO 810 losing. 

A We are under attack by Godless Com- 
munism on a world front and Godless materialism 
on the home front. Selfishness, perversion and divi- 
sion within our borders are the forces through which 
Communism takes over. 

«* ^^SSSS^^^JSS^S^S' 6 #& P« fitic8 ' ***** m Mowl Re-Armament, 'stood 

we are not fightingit. Republicans and Democrats — ^ f d to compromise ^th evil." 

it ia the same. We move heedless and headless UF „ JrrTvT 7*mS™&\1 • 4 b1 %. r* *u 

without an ideology against an ideological enemy. „ Barber Gabriel Marcel, enunent French Cath- 

America is in danger ol losing her life and the Free oUc philosopher, conrniemang on the development 

World its freedom °* tma * orce m Ja P an » wrote, "In Tokyo a few 

Guns, dollars' and diplomacy alone are no monthsagoIsawtteimpMtoceofa£t^tfalwing 

match for'anen^yTohSaUthwe but advances *g*%^ & ***** * SSM CTSfg* J™ *» 

America needs an ideology. A change of pohcy afc atake " 
is not enough. We need a change of motives and 

character. A great cleansing and uniting, force for THE CONGO 

hfe. We are aU responsible. ieVret of Uberation for AfnW M men must think 

These are no weapons with which to wui the how to g ve this mora i basia to tne country." 

struggle for the hearts and minds of the millions • . . . . . «.!.:„«„.„».««„* 

of-the world. And no USIA can make them so. . At the height of the emergency to government 

The fact is thatmillions who would never join ^ ^^JSS^^TS^Xc^^SL 

the Communist party make its advance inevitable SS5Cfti?WJaSir^ 

by the way they live! broadcasts are stiU continuing. 

Chancellor Adenauer of Germany said, "Com- Commanders of UN contangente from 13 na- 

munism is a false ideology. But it is an ideology !™ n8 requested, showings, of the BfilA fflmi and 

and can only be met with moral and spiritual Meolo^J^Bgfagi^toW. gtttogtonaal 

weapons. We are in an ideological battle. Therein year 140 Congolese leaders have attended Moral 

lies the decisive task. It may last decades, but it Re-Armament Assemblies w America and Switzer- 

must be won. A nation with an ideology is always on wmo» 



Ravines, former Communist and delegate to the editorial said, "A vMddimna totion ofi ti* afarugglo 



of free people everywhere to roll back the advance 
of cWrmnism." Of Muriel Smith, the drama critic 
wrote, "She quite possibly sang and acted her way 
into an Oscar nomination." .,". 

• The South African National Board of Censors 
has unanimously passed The Crowning Experience 
for unlimited distribution. 

In the prologue of the film, Joel McCrea, one ol 
Hollywood's most distinguished stars, says, "The 
future of the world depends on millions making the 
right choice. Many do not know the real America. ( 
But The Crowning Experience is the kind of pic- 
ture the world is waiting to see, because it por- , 
trays the true America to which the whole world 
can and will respond." 

To produce further such films, Moral Re-Arma- 
ment has completed a television film studio on • 
Mackinac Island, Michigan. Broadcat ting describes 
it as "One of the most complete television plants in ' 



Comintern, founder of the Communist Party In 
Peru, says: "The basic problems of Latin America 
are not under-development, but corruption and 
Communism. While our countries welcome economic 
aid; alone it cannot touch the root problem. With- 
out a moral ideology, it may even aggravate the 
problem. The best export the United States of 
America or any nation can send to Latin America 
is Moral Re-Armament." 

Army officers from Argentina and Peru, dockers 
from Brazil, cabinet ministers and coffee workers, 
industrialists and student leaders have been among 
thefmany hundreds of Latin American delegates to 
the Moral Re-Armament Assemblies at Mackinac 
Island, Michigan, and Cauz, Switzerland. 

In the port of Rib de Janeiro where strikes and 
lawlessness had created what the papers called "a 
reign of terror," dockers trained in Moral Re-Arma- 
ment brought a revolutionary answer. They united 



the rival unions, they fought corruption, they drasti- the nation ... to put free nations on the offensive 
cally reduced the turn-around time of ships, they in the world-wide battle against Communism." 
held the first democratic election in the history of -^ 

FOR GOD'S SAKE; 



i 



the offensive. A nation without an ideology is self- 
satisfied and dead." 

Because we do not live an ideology we fail to 
recognize those who do. We were fooled by Mao 
Tse-tung. We were fooled by Castro. In our blind- 
ness we are led by those in our own press and govern- 
ment whose task it is to make Communists look, 
like harmless reformers till they are safely in power. 

Our greatest sin has been to cheat the world 
of the nation-saving truths upon which America 
was founded. Our destiny is to free the world of 
tyranny. Instead, we have cashed in our fighting 
faith for a soft materialism and retreated before the 
greatest tyranny the world has ever known. 

"Men must choose to be governed by God or 
they condemn themselves to be ruled by tyrants." 
In William Penn's words lies America's death sen- 
tence. Or her one hope. 

The hour is late. But not too late to turn to 
the answer. 

There is an answer. It is the moral ideology that 
rearms the living and thinking of men everywhere. 

It is Moral Re-Armament. 

HERE IS THE ANSWER 

Throughout 1960 the ideological force of Moral 
Re-Armament has been at work in crisis points 
across the world. 

GERMANY * 

On December 10, 1960, Bonn newspapers an- 
r nounced Chancellor Adenauer's launching of an 
•' ideological offensive for Moral Re-Armament in the 
German Federal Republic. 

The newspaper, Westdeutsche AUgemeine 
wrote: "At last we go on the offensive. Moral 
Re-Armament gives democracy the moral backbone 
it lacks today." 

f 120,000 people, including 17,000 officers and 
men of the German NATO force, have seen the films 
and plays of Moral Re-Armament in recent weeks. 

One of these plays, Hoffnung (Hope), was 
produced and performed by coal miners from the 
German Ruhr, many of them leading Communists 
before being won to the ideology of Moral 
Re- Armament. 

' Another play, The Tiger, was written and acted 
by Japanese university students, veterans of the 
Tokyo riots who had found an answer at the Moral 
Re-Armament World Assembly at Caux, Switzer- 
land, last summer. This play will shortly visit 
America. 

A senior officer of the Ministry of Defense 
states, "The news of what MRA did for the Army 
is rolling like waves into the Ministry, breaking 
on our desks." 

JAPAN 

Following the riots last June, Prime Minister 
Kishi said, "But for Moral Re-Armament Japan 



"We would have known a more terrible catas- 
trophe but for the. films and action of Moral Re- 
Armament in our country," said Jean Bolikango, 
Minister of Information and National Defense. 
"Through Moral Re-Armament we have seen the 
way to save our country from Communism and set 
her on a new road." 

WEST AFRICA 

President Tubman of Liberia, in March I960, 
speaking in the Executive Mansion to members of 
his Cabinet, the Diplomatic Corps and other leaders 
of his country, said: 

"All over the continent and across the world 
an ideology is rapidly fostering the secret of God- 
centered unity, creating incorruptible leadership 
and giving direction to nations that have missed 
their way. I invite the leaders and people of Africa 
to join in this supreme task and to give priority to 
the moral re-armament of our nations. Moral Re- 
Armament is the ideology of freedom. It is the 
ideology which Africa needs today." 

iNDIA 

In the elections of February 1960 the non- 
Communist forces won a significant victory in the 
state of Kerala which for two years had been Under 
Communist control. Mannath Padmanabhan, leader 
of the liberation struggle, publicly called this "an 
MRA-inspired victory/ 1 Writing in the New York 
Journal* American, January 3, 1961, he said: "The 
15,000,000 people in Kerala —Hindu, Christian 
and Muslim — stand together with Moral Re- 
Armament to turn the tide of Communism in Asia 
and the world." 

In the face of the constant threat from Red 
Chinese troops across the northern border, patriotic 
Indians have just concluded a National Assembly 
for Moral Re-Armament "to launch an action ade- 
quate to turn back Communism in the country." 



the port, defeating the Communist candidates. Now 
they have told the story in a film, Men of Brazil, 
which is speaking to the world. 

ITALY 

In the recent municipal elections, the Com- 
munist-led coalition gained one million more votes. 
If -this trend continues in the national, elections this 
spring, the country could have -a Communist gov- 
ernment. 

Equipped with plays and films, a Moral Re- 
Armament force is now in Italy to turn the tide. 
They were invited by Italian leaden including 
Prince and Princess Castelbarco Albani, whose fam- 
ily gave a Pope to the Church, and Signora Maria 
Dosio, leader of the rice workers of Italy, and a 
Marxist until she returned to her Catholic faith 
after meeting Moral Re-Armament. 

The plays went first to Milan, heart of indus- 
trial Italy and to Sesto San Giovanni where 80% 
vote Communist. After one performance a Com- 
munist said: "Unless we get this answer there 
will be a blood-bath in Italy by spring. This is our 
one hope." 

SWITZERLAND 

An MRA force with its plays and films was 



WAKE UP! 

The evidence is inescapable. We need now fee 
act. When will America begin to fight the ideological ! 
war and make Moral Re-Armament her national 
policy? 

Washington, clean, straight and God-directed, 
would be an invincible force leading mankind to its 
destiny. 

The urgent need is for patriots — Democrat 
and Republican, labor and management, black and 
white, young and old — who will put right what is 
wrong in their own lives and in the life of the nation. 
Such men will take on the task of arming America 
' with her true ideology. 

It means absolute standards of honesty, pur- 
ity, unselfishness and love, applied drastically, per- 
sonally and nationally. It means men accepting the 
guidance of God. Definite, accurate, adequate in- 
formation can come from the mind of God to the 
minds of men. It comes to those who listen and 
obey. It is the new dimension of statesmanship. 

Dr. Frank Buchman, bom in Pennsylvania, 

initiator of Moral Re-Armament, has done what no 

welcomed in the Catholic monastery and convent other American has done. He has not only seen the 



schools of eastern Switzerland last autumn. His 
Grace Dr. Bernardus Kaelin, Abbot Primate of the 
world Benedictine Order, 1947-59, addressed the 
MRA World Assembly at Caux. He said, "The 
ideology of Moral Re-Armament can win all men 
because its standards are universally valid. It is 
not a religion, nor a substitute for a religion. It is 



need for an ideology but has given a lifetime to raise 
up a world force of men and women trained and 
committed to fight and win the ideological war. 

The governments of France, Germany, Greece. 
Japan, Free China, the Philippines, Thailand ana 
Iran have decorated him with their nation's highest 
honors. In recent months leaders from 16 African 



not a sect. It has four mighty pilars — absolute nations have urged him to come to their countries 



honesty, purity, unselfishness and love— on which 
human living must be based. It is a new way de- 
signed to forestall a false ideology. May it win 
the world.* 9 

General Henri Guisan, war-time commander 



before it is too late. In America 97 Senators and 
Congressmen said in a message to him, "You are 
giving a uniting idea to nations which can turn 
the ideological tide in the world today." 

Speaking to a World Assembly for the Moral 
jn-chief of the Swiss Army, gave tins message to Re-Armament of the Nations at Mackinac Island, 
his people in the foreword to the MRA handbook, Michigan, Dr. Buchman said* 

throughout the Free ' 
can be dangerous, ft 
right plays the enemy's game. We must not allow 





front us today." 

AMERICA 

In 1960 America produced a supreme weapon 
in the war of ideas — the MRA picture in Techni- 



sons, to go about without ah answer. It simply 
enslaves them. It is not good enough. It will drive 
them to the same philosophy that rules our oppo- 
nents. We shall never create an inspired democracy 
that way. Men must learn to have a faith that wm 



FREE CHINA 

In the spring of 1960 the National Assembly 
unanimously voted "to give every assistance to the 
advancement of Moral Re-Armament in Free China" 
and invited Moral Re-Armament to send regular 
task forces to "assist and advise us." It further re- 
quested that every year Chinese delegations should 
take part in MRA Assemblies. The first trainees 
are now at Caux, Switzerland. 

General Ho Ying-chin, wartime premier and 
commander-in-chief of the Chinese armies, said, "If 
we had had Moral Re-Armament, we would never 
have lost the mainland. Only with Moral Re-Arma- 
ment can we recapture the mainland from Com- 
munism." 

LATIN AMERICA 

At a time when printing houses, radio stations 
and TV channels in Cuba are turning out Com- 
munist propaganda for the hemisphere, Eudocio 



color. The Crowning Experience, It poses the choice Sf** *? 10 ?*?* revol « t,on - M we can spread this 

co all men everywhere of Moral Re-Armament or 2 VOlut, K l J ft t enou § h w © can save America and 

Communism. The story was inspired by the life of £ e worId v Vr&eas we have this revolution there wfll 

the great educator Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune, "* ^revolution of chaos. 

bom of slave parents, who rose to be advfaer to Tt needs this stronger dose. Sin leaves us with 

Presidents. Stars of the film are Muriel Smith, ™cba dull, heavy thud. The blood of Jesus Christ 

Broadway's original "Carmen Jones," and Ten- His Son deanseth us from all sin.' That is the dis- 

nessee-born Ann Buckles of the New York cast of covery everyone is looking for. That is the answer. 
Pajama Game. "Then you will have a wonderful example that 

The Crowning Experience had its world pre- the whole world will want to follow. You will have 
miere on Broadway last October. Stars from Holly- an America to which the wise and honest can re- 
wood, 300 UN delegates representing 73 countries, pair. And that is what the world expects today of 
and leaders from every walk of New York life were America. You will have a battlecry of freedom, and 
among the distinguished audience who packed the that is what America wants. You will have a democ- 
theater. racv that is really inspired. 

In its Academy Award qualifying run in Holly- "Then our young men and our old men will 

wood The Crowning Experience premiere drew the fight as Lincoln fought of old. Our young men will 

greatest star-studded audience for many seasons, know what to fight for and our wars wfll be won. 

In a front page story The Hollywood Reporter And we shall be at peace with all men and the 

stated that the film topped the week's box office whole world. 
business in Los Angeles. "The hour is late. Here is the answer. For 

The Los Angeles Herald and Express in an God's sake, wake up!" 



./)., 



,.:■}. 



/• 



This page, like alt the action of Moral Re-Armament, is financed by the sacrificial gifts of men ana women from all walks of life, determined 
to bring this answer to America and the world. Contributions, which are tax deductible, and requests for information, may be sent to 
Moral Re- Armament, 640 Fifth Avenue, New York 19; 833 South Flower Street, Los Angeles 17; Cedar Point, Mackinac Island, Michigan 

MORAL RE-ARMAMENT 







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if®! 



►AY/ MARCH m 1961, 



TMg AKfTtbCN NIWS. ANTIOCH, II^INOIS 



• 'A^ v t3*i?wn<iry tatttfear hat tota A 
<S#i>tj«i if an iinimwkd dan motSM»v 

1To4«anfitviriill«b<mt«w(»mftn 
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s «s*Mic»i of«c«, mk <m m i«*£ 







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veUrtni, have bc«n onAtha^mova a 
ftraat daal during tha paiTtohiPr 



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M§ yaar haa baan f laiuiad as a 
lima to wateame back all .Lagtofi* 
nalrta of iha patt 

Antiofili Post offkiala *r* pnm- 
inf lists ! oi ;*ojhiiar inafnbaw,^ who 
willba conttctad ano^lnvttaditojatr 
tend ?• r^Walcoiiw i ^a*! *Wr*y *J^ 
lag' . iha .Ihtfd iwaak of March, tha 



at one time member a;a* The Amer 
tean Legion in ^thair formar 7Com-| 
munltleg hav« moved and 'have, teat 
touch with the Legion. 

Th* national ofganlsatton of The 
Amarkan Leglonsnaaigrown from a 
small band b^AiftF/iafvicemenjwho 
gathered In Paris, Trance^ on Maich 



Central High SchOoTi Dance Band 
participated in a tecent ; contert at 
^iffiwaukee Boya Club, along 
with band* from Brookfield,,>Wau- 
*eiha3arahvUle^^uwetowi §Kati| 
oi ha and other louthem Wiscomin 
communities, -f -v '^Sj|pf.^^ 
Memberi of the Central High 



••via 
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a COAL CO. I 

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pvQI BOAiOID 
INDIVIDUAL HUMS 
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18-17, 1M», to a membership of ^ 
tOO.000 veterans Of three wars. >It W 
the world'a largest veteran* organ!- 
lation, wim^^000fpoato>iVomfc^ 
to coast and in 28 territorie* and for* 
eiihi^couritrlaf/fligibiltty^to^ 
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War I), Dec ,7. 1M1 to *apt. 1^1945 
(World War II), June 25, 1»M to, 
July 27;-1993 (Korean Action). 

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Brooks, State Commander of the 
Illinois : American Legion. _\ 




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• Fes' Information •■ • 
2 Weleome W«f on, phone $ 

"pHONI ELLIOTT 6-7013 



WELCOME WAGON 



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To Place an ad.«« 

Phone Antioch 43 



mjol 

High school aeniori were r«<rtgiy] 
invited (to enter *he Eleventh jNa^ 
tlohal Lawrence ;s8. ; Mayers -MJm-j 

oriel ^acel**M^ C^^pif 
pr5e In the contest b a $1,000 JJ. S. 
Saving i Bond. Nine -second priiea 
of $100 U. S. Savings Bondi.each 
and 15 thlrd-prlie Peace Medallions 
will also^bevawardedr :m 

^To enter the ^contest, high school 
seniors must; write an i essaf^ofw 
wore than 2^)00 words on one of^wo 
topics. The first topic: ''Describe 
what you consider to be 'the major 
facets of ihe national purpose that 
ihould be adopted Which would Inu 
prove the human ^ cbnunuhity,;halt 
the arms race and inspire' nations to 
work for pernwnantpeace/Virl>ased 
on a statement by CI* Sulzberger. 
The second topic: ''Describe some 
"great purposes M which you feel ex- 
ist and to Which Americans ihould 
be dedicated themselves. Then des 
cribe how each' citizen as an indi 
vidual could contribute to the ful 
flllment of these great purposea.^ is 
based on a statement by 
Lippmann. 

First prize presentations were 
made in 1959 by President John P. 
Kennedy and in 1900 by Mrs. Elea- 
nor Roosevelt. Each year a panel of 
distinguished citizens is selected to 
judge the' winning essays and last 
year consisted of Thomas K. Finlet- 
ter, former Secretary of the Air 
Force; the Honorable Kenneth B. 
Keating, Senator from New York; 
Inez Robb, syndicated columnist; 
and Arthur K. Watsch, president of 
IBM World Trade Corporation. 

Sponsor of the essay contest, the 
Lawrence S. Mayers Fund, Inc. is a 
non-profit organization dedicated to 
the search for a permanent world 
peace based on justice and order. 
Entries must be postmarked not 
later than May 1, 1961 and should 
be mailed to Lawrence S. Mayer 
Essay Contest, 750 Fifth Ave., New 
(York 19, N. Y. ^ 

High Daily Production 
Reported for 2 Farms 

Ravenglen Farms, Antioch, has 45 
completed production records aver- 
aging 14,104 pounds of milk and 597 
pounds of butterfat, according to 
lactation average reports by the Hol- 
atein-Frlesian Association of Amer- 

led. 

Lactation averages are calculat- 
ed on two milkings a day over 305 
days, and weighing and testing was 
done under supervision of Univer- 
sity of Illinois, as part of the offi- 
cials herd testing programs of the 
national group. . 

High production was also announ- 
ced by the Ayrshire Breeders Asso- 
ciation for an animal of Spinney- 
Run Farm, Liberty ville. The cow, 
Spinney Run Fair Alice Second, re- 
cently completed an official record 
of 10,349 pounds of milk and 465 
pounds of butterfat during twice 
daily milkings over 305 days. This 
record is more than 16 quarts of 
milk per day average. 



n 



GEM SELFUNLOADER 




WITH HNCERTIP CONTROLS 



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neutral without using clutch. 

Q Positive front-roller 
chain drive sends a high- 
speed flow of forage or grain 
from box to blower. No slip- 
pi ng of the wide, ribbed 
rubber cross conveyor . . . 
ten-a-minute unloading. 



Q Gehl metal parts are of 
welded structural steel. 
Boxes are of fine-grain, 
specially treated, matched 
lumber. They're available 
with 2, 4 or 6-ft. sides. Stand- 
ard length is 16 ft. Can be 
built shorter or longer to fit 
your needs. 



. r^^^W 5 *^^"^^^ 



OAaL/% 



Y.7. -JiV-. :;;■''*■ 



$&: 



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GEHL 



STOP IN AND LOOK IT OVER 

PEDEf^EN BROTHERS IMPLEMEKT CO. 

PH AOTWCH. iuihois 

I i « 




e>"' 



. , "■' 






We proudly present our carefjiUi I chosen «^°»«jj 
thousands of Si's most beautiful SPRING SHOHS. au 
X* me nationally advertised. The cream from the 
iSSSSf^^i^me offer a uMe Wfoi^nent 
T^andeolors. See them Nou>, whOe selection is 

■ ■-'- -»- .' ' ■ : -~-" f — 

or Women for Men 






Pointed To«t - R«m«l To«a - High ho*h# 

m edT«m heel, end M^lSTlSi'" 
Stride - irftlsh Twiftter - Sendler - Trios 
Mostly $6.97- $13.99. 



SHp-one - Tlee - Coiuoh - The Ijy Hon Jee fc 
and the hond-rtttched ^v f ^/li " 

Mesteglc - Wettboro - $8.95 - $24.95. 



for Children 



wSondSondler.Jr. From $4.95 to $0.95. 



■ UllDlll lWI IH I M 



, m i , i ! ■"' mmmmmmmmmnu 

iiiJIS^ FREE 

■"*" ^«r thP T Adiea. C offee. 



mm — '■■ '""*"* 



mini inn "** 





* 



Ph«m292 



## ' a g 



USED CAR CLEARANCE! 

nuiYMlKB llliHSIOT(milllS...mW(aUH»...liaWT»M! 



ran 




YOU'VE HEVffl SEEN SUCH VALUES! NOWS THE TIME TO JJY! 



srsss^^S 1SSSS22ZSS& 

SEE YOUR IOCAI AWWORIBP CHtVBOtfT DEMEB 






DRIJC CHEVROLET, INC 

865 Main Streel Antioch Phone Anfoch 56 



I 







W&tm 

m 



Strawberries 





Win A Trip 
To Paris! 



You still have time to enter the excit- 
[ing "What's New at Jewel" contest. You 
may win an all-expense trip for two to 
Paris and London flying via Pan American 
Jet Clipper. Entry blanks are at your neigh- 
borhood Jewel. Enter soon! 




Hurry 
Ends Saturday 




Je\A/ eL TEA c o.. 



\Y* C ' 



Eu&ufday Lou* ~73uceA Cfo (JotA, Ev&ujcfaAj Need* 



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£&*£&&£* 



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f^SiSIKTISN 



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tlllSl|If 



I lihgton High School last week, 
il i Receiving *he A rating*Htaat en- 
lltliie them to ^reaentiWihnot in 
' the district competition wetem: 
WJLMOT, Wis. — Sight Witmoi Vincent Cwilen, public speaking; 
WOA School speech students have 1 Michael Gallagher, Theresa Powers, 
d preliminary events i and are j declamation; Dorothy Rebteek, non- 
^?fbr^e^dls^ic^!<OrenslcVcon-; brlglrial/aoratory;- Alfred lEggert,' 
«t ; Whitewater, Wis.; on March four-minute speech; Terry AveryV 

Allan Pelz, original oratory, iand 
Francis Mattts/ Interpretative read- 
ing. :^ : . ■ -;v-' ■ - ' ":-',:■-.■/■■ "" 



iMSssammxm 






»»«MMMMMMMM > M » M 




1 "A/v- 



MOOSE 
TOPICS 



11 



I American Red Cross tends a help- 



To Dismiss Strlitaet ' iS ^ ***' * — *"** 



;>«>»#. 



fluy brought some honors from 
k* league competition held at Bur- 




TM JMBL BOX 

''■'.'■ -■■ «04 MAIN STtUT 

ANTfOCH, lUIMOtS 

IWATCMW ii CLOCKS RIPAIRIO 

W«t<h Cfcysts* "£ HtM — i^ tT^^i^f 

CHA* W WYAW, fto**** 



1 



* 







There will be a 49ers party on 
Saturday, March 10; at 8 p.m. at the 
Antioch Moose Home, Come in -cos- 
tume. V i- C';&&WM&£ , i&£ : - 

There will be priies and- dancing 
;by the Twi'Lighterf. Food-will be; 
served.'. 

The Winner Legion No. 14, Legion 
of The Moose Spring Ceremonial, 
will be held at the North Chicago 
Moose Home, 700 Broadway, ;Sun^ 
day, March 19. Initiation of candi- 
dates will be at 2i30 p.m: Theremin 
be awards for sponsors. Dinner will 
be served family style at 8 130 p.m. 
There will be entertainment.; Bring 
the Ladies. 



All the newt of Antioch and, *&> 
daity in The Antioch New*, 



How -the power of 'Qod : set forth' 
in the Bible brings peace and har- 
mony will be the topic of ?i lecture 
oh Christian :SScwce ?to jbe^givehl 
Monday, March 20, 'by ^toiencf 
Middaugh of yLo* Angeles, Calif. 

Miss Middaugh will speak in the 
Central Grade School auditorium. 
Paddock Street at McHenry Ave- 
nue, Crystal vLak«iailt|p.m, under 
the auspice* Of First ' Church of 
Christ, 'Scientist, Crystal Lake. H#r 
subject will be "Christian Science: 
The Science tof Pure Christianity" 
The lecture is free and members 
have Invited the public to attend. 

A native of Colorado, Miss Mid- 
daugh is currently on a nationwide 
speaking tour as * member of The 
Christian Science Board of Lecture 
ship. / 



the sprmg floo<U m thepbett^lUe, 

Ourttee, and Fox Lake areas, the.na ' 



iional or fahiiatioit gav* ifct -%ifc* 
County chapter 17,405 to jjoylds) 
assistance (food, dothlng, shelter, 
ah^meolcalfcajw) to thos* who war* 



unahle^'heip ihetnielve*, 




- SIMP HIM ANtVl 

UJMIIt # HAtDWAil 

S10IHa*SASHC 

Grass Lake 



MlUWOfttt 




ffceaw As**** 0*0 



SRASS LAKt ROAk> 



FOR BITTER MEALS AND BIGGER SAVINGS MORE 




w- 



• * • 



i • 



I 1 



[iVl 



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■tkx 



1 ,..- 'Jg-siii r 






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STEAK 



vismm 



SUPER-RIGHT QUALITY— FULL COT 

These "Super-Right" steaks will make your dinner a 
memorable occasion . . . they're so juicy, tender 
and full of flavorl. Selected from fine, grain-fed 
beef . . . they're carefully trimmed for value. 



£ 



EVERDAY LOW 
COFFEE PRICES! 



• A&P Brand 

• Hills Bros. 

• Maiwtll Houso 

• Folftr's 
•Manor House 



MJ. TIN ONLY 



Hills Bros. 



Drip or 
■•quUr 



21b. f I It 
tin 



Saear-Mf M Bsnslsts, Relied and TIsi 

Rump Roast 

l^aptr-RIgM Iriskaf 

Corned Beef 

rrta •--«. Mtt> *f MP Fnieh Frits with 

Pork Patties 



Sirloin Tip 
or Round 



Excess 

Fat R*mov*d 



Fresh or Smoked 



lb* 



or Vest 
Frozen 



19-ox, 
pkg. 



k Pork Butt Roast 

1 Liver Sausage 

| G Sliced Bacon 

A Oven Ready Bucks 

89c Fresh Lake Smelt 



Of Steal 

Stip«r<Righr tfc. 

Super 



Right 



Atlgood 
Stood 



£45* 



6«nuln« 
Long blond 

Rntof 
Sooaon 



lb. 



Maiwtll House x hSS Ifc'V 



Del Moete Brand 



3 



SO-oi. $ 



tins 



1 




■athroom Tissue In Cello Bag 



Scot Tissue 8 a 89 

2 1 39' Starrs Pis ftJKc 
firapsfnil » 2tT55* OrasgsSUflos 
Fig Bars 



GOHSgO C.mUki 



G 

49* 




POTATOES 



IDAHO 

RUSSET 

U.S. No. I 

GRADE 



10*59 



«*40« 



rog*Sf« 



Fresh Carroh ££ ^10* ftpstss tSC 3^,49' 
Oshm *£!&*. 3 £ 19* Pascal Cetery Si 2 ^ 29° 



Zioa 

Stood 



2 ;, 39* Brick Gtaeso y£L < 49' Dtaws T »J^Si 



aim 
ptt. 




Srsts Saktago Sj. 



5 1 



ANN 
PAGF 



■^/w*«*£ 



&/*#*&, 



7 



ANN PAGE PURE 








PRESERVES 

PEACH, APRICOT OR PINEAPPII 



I LB. 



MR 



29 




Ti« lelOM ••** lll*ttr*t«i 

DKTIOMIY 

Help your cMd In school with • 
New Dlctionery designed sped- 
flcelry for young people In grade 
school. 



99'. 

BUY A BOOK A WEEK! 



COMPLETE YOUR 

SET IN SIX 

SHORT WEEKS 






^EFEEMILLFLS 

IRESR-(S0UNii IIAVttt 
YOU CANT GET IN A CAN! 

MUD AND MUtOW 

3-LB.BAO 1.LB.BAO 

$ L65 57« 




tfcs c r[HK*o«*«i 



MaiK •mtUMJ 



VfewetM * Wtmy 



14* 



«5< S2LS* 






H««rt'« 
Delight 



41-ei. 

II* 



Sail 

Brand 




*%a 



liait 

six* 

5-ex. 
luke 

28- 



39 e Cucumber Pickles 
49 e dexola Salad Oil 



Klotn»« 
Brand 



Apricot Nectar 
Dry Detergent 

PepsodentToothpaste £ 69° Table Napkins 

Rice S. ^55 e Laundry Starch 

Chinese laid SS "3 29 6 Argo Gloss Starch 

Chinese Maid & 2 '-' 25 e Argo Corn Starch 

Tomato Paste S3 3 S 32 e Scot Towels 

■ilnot for Whipping "'»IO e Waldorf Tissue 

Saf-T Cones & Cups S I9 e Soft-Weve Tissue 

Frenchette Dressing '£ 37' Kitchen Klenzer 



Boml't 

Sr«nd 



|sr 



PllfO 

Vagotobl* 



29* 

mm sits 



Foro 

Lovelier 
Complexion! 



fell. 



2 r 49 



Unit 
All PurpoM 



Smooth 
Totturo 

For 
Cooling 



Strong 
Absorbent 

Bathroom 
3e Off Deal 



12-ox. 



hory *iar Soap 
Ivory Facial Soap« M - -1 

Pertonel M 
She 4 

2 



2IW ftQt 
slxe OV 



slxe 



oalet 



29* 
29* 



Granulated 
Soap Powder 



larg* 
pigs. 




Ivoiy Dar Soap 
" c Ivory Sn 
* l7< Ivory Soap Flakes 2 SB 69 

""* NCc 

Pkl. 19 

34* 
^27' 



1*11 



I* 
Ptf- 



Scour* 
Peb, Pans 



4 
2 

2'r29° 



Handy 

Detcfgent 

faciei Quality 
Pastel Colon 



12-tx. 




Ivory Liquid 

Camay Soap 

Camay DathSoapd2 £ 29 c 



3X29' 




ww oa»AT atwwic • tActnc ga cws»*h» < woe, 



AP S°P er M ar ' {et 

mit -«t.t .' . 1 ■ . *.. -. < .| _ . '(8l:,«,.ift '»i life* . 



AU PRICES EFfECTIVE THRU MARCH ItSSt