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Full text of "Antioch News 05/10/2002"


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ANTIOCH PUBLIC LIBRARY DISTRI 

757 MAIN ST. 



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mmr 12/26/02 

ftHTIDCH PUBLIC LIBRARY 
757 11AIH ST 

Antioch IL 




60002-1398 





FOUNDED 1886 



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75 cents 



— 



JOKES ON Y 

llonde jokes, and < 
here to stay 

PAGE B5 



LOVE THY MOTHER 

- 

Take care of Mom 
this Sunday 

PULL OUT 







FOSTERING LOV 

Foster family 



PAGE B1 




Bunch 



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ecade 






By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 















The celebration of Centennial 
Park's 10th anniversary is really a 
celebration of the spirit of volun- 
teerism in Antioch. The celebration 
will be held on May 11 at 4>p.m. in 
the park located on Anita between 
Depot and North Ave. 

Parks department director 
Laurie Stahl said, "The whole town 



Cake and refreshments will be 
served. 

Commemorative T shirts will be 
available at the event or at the parks * 
office on 806 Holbek Dr. Nine-year- 
old resident J Kaley Lindstrom 
designed the sKirts that will sell for 
$10 each. Size range from a medium 
child's to a double extra large 
adult's. 

Parks department office manag- 
er Candace Olsen said all of the 






came together, under the direction money from the sale of .the T shirts 

In wi 









. . Axton, ._ ____ r 

build this playground in just five 
days in May (13-17), 1992." 

Stahl said she expects the cele- 
bration will, in part, be a reunion of 
those worked with the Axtons on the 
project. It will also be send-off to 
Vickie who is leaving the park board 
after 13 years of service. 

"Words cannot express how 
much I am going to miss having her 
on the park board," said Stahl. 
"She's the most amazing volunteer 
a role model for volunteerism. 
don't think I would have been so 
deeply committed to some of our 
projects without her enthusiasm." 

There will be a short presenta- 
tion about the construction of the 
playground, complete with pictures 
and a short video. This project won 
the Governor's Home Town Award. 



will go to the Centennial Playground 
Fund. She noted that this is the only 
park within the Village of Antioch 
that has its own account. V 

"The money will be used for 
maintenance or anything else that 
particular park needs," she said; 
"This 




sand and help with general clean up. 
' "The Village of Antioch public 

1 - i * '' *. * ""'■•"' t_ V C 1 



The Arbor Day event was held at works department was very Jielpftu> flag 
Centennial Park the last weekend in ) 



MikeWeis, 13, plants a 
small shrub near the 




with the planning and planting 

April J to help prepare for this cele- process," said Stahl. "Special thanks 
bration. Volunteers planted new to Ron Horton and Tom Dvorak. 



:A 



trees and bushes, mulched and 
cleaned in preparation. 

Forty students from Antioch 
Upper Grade School's National 
Junior Honors Society helped with 
the clean up efforts. Cub Scout Pack 
191 made the work its community 
service project with about 30 scouts 
and their parents volunteering to 
rake playground fibar, shovel new 



M 



D on't honk for Wal-Mart 



Landscaping 
also volunteered his time for the 
landscaping design and planting." 

Domino's Pizza and Big Bites, 
both in Antioch, donated pizza and 
hot dogs for the volunteers when 
the work was done. 

At the committee meeting of the 
whole, Trustee Dorothy Larson said, 
"A lot of work, and a lot of clean-up 
was done in Centennial Park. We 
hope that everyone will come out 
for this celebration." 



Park during an Arbor 
Day celebration. — 

Photo by David Krueger 
Parks department 

office manager 

Candace Olsen holds 
up a commemorative T 

shirt designed by 9- 
year-old Kaley 

Lindstrom for 

Centennial Park's 10th 
anniversary.— Photo by 
Julie Murphy 








By JUUE MURPHY 

Staff Reporter 



i 












"People are entitled to freedom of 

speech, but they should do it in their 

own name," said Trustee Barbara 

Porch when she announced that fliers 

are being distributed that read "Honk 

if you want Wal-Mart" and have been 

attributed to the Chamber of 

Commerce and list it's phone number. 

"Residents should know to look 

for tilings on our letterhead (not plain 

paper)," Porch, who is also executive 

director of the Chamber, added. 

"These fliers are not endorsed by 

either the Village of Antioch or the 

Chamber of Commerce." 

Porch, clearly upset that an indi- 
vidual (or possibly a group of indi- 
viduals) would create something 
and falsely attribute its origin, said, 
"These were very poorly written." 

What the Chamber is doing is 
distributing a survey to its members, 
to be kept confidential outside of a 
percentage tabulation that will be 
presented to the Village of Antioch, 
about the opinions of bringing big 
box stores like Wal-Mart to Antioch. 
Members are being asked to 
answer six multiple-choice ques- 
tions. These questions are as fol- 
lows: How knowledgeable do you 



feel you are about the impact of big 
box stores on our community? What 
type of impact do you think the big 
box stores will have on our business 
community? What is your local 
clienteles' opinion regarding the big 
box stores? What is the most favor- 
able attribute of the big box stores 
on Antioch? What is the most unfa- 
vorable attribute of big box stores on 
Antioch? What type of big box stores 
would you like to see in Antioch? 

In a later conversation, Porch said 
she wanted to make it clear that the 
Chamber isn't lobbying one way or 
another for Wal-Mart. She said, "The 
best thing we can do is educate resi- 
dents, merchants and officials about 
all the issues that surround bringing 
big box development into Antioch." 

Porch said the surveys were 
faxed to members the evening of 
May 7. "We want as many members 
to give us input as possible," Porch 
added. "There are some members 
who don't have fax machines and 
we want them to contact us so we 
can get them a copy of the survey." 

She reiterated that specific 
information in the survey would be 
kept confidential. "We aren't going 
to pass along individual comments, 
but just a tabulation of the respons- 
es," she said. 



SWALCO 



as 






k dispose 




waste properly 



By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 



Disposing of chemicals and elec- 
tronics properly can be troublesome, 
but the Solid Waste Agency of Lake 
County (SWALCO) is doing a couple 
of things to make the task easier. 

The agency is having an elec- 
tronics recycling event on June 1 at 
the Motorola in Libertyville (Rte. 45) 
from 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. 

At the committee of the whole 



meeting, Trustee Dorothy Larson 
said, "SWALCO will be accepting 
things like small appliances, office 
equipment and computers, but will 
not be accepting large appliances, 
humidifiers or dehumidifiers." 

For those who have been storing 
latex paints, SWALCO is Working 
with the Village of Antioch to distrib- 
ute free bags of crushed corncobs to 
area residents to be used to dispose 

of latex (only) paint. 

Area residents can pick up the 



corncobs at the public works build- 
ing located at 796 Holbek Dr. from 7 
a.m.-3:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. 

The corncobs are to be added in 
equal parts to the paint, mixed well 
and allowed to dry. Once completely 
dry, the open can of paint (no lid) 
can be taken out with the rest of the 
regular garbage. 

This disposal technique is only for 
use with latex paints. One 5-pound 
bag of corncobs will dry approximate- 
ly three-five gallons of latex paint 





—— ^g^^ == — 

New Episcopal Church opens doors 



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About a year after the St. Ignatius 
Episcopal Church moved out of the 
building on Main St. it called home 
since Nov. 16, 1916, it's having an 
organ recital and open house to cele- 
brate the dedication of its new organ 
as well as the new facilities. 

This event will be held on 
Saturday, May 1 1 at 3 p.m. at the 
[church now located at the intersec- 
tion of Depot and Deep Lake roads 
(about 1 mile north of Rte. 173). 



"The whole community is invit- 
ed to join us," said Father Vincent 
Eckholm, rector of the Episcopal 
Church. "This is a free event." 

The recital will begin at 3 p.m. 
Devon Hollingsworth, minister of 
music and organist at the Christ 
Church in Oakbrook, will be the 
guest organist. 

He is well known tliroughout the 
collar counties for his work with 1 5 dif- 
ferent music groups at Christ Church 



as well as a concert series and a con- 
servatory of music. Hollingsworth is 
responsible for the music performed 
on Christ Church's weekly radio and 
television broadcasts. 

Additionally, Hollingsworth has 
received national exposure for his 
organ design and consultation ser- 
vices to the churches that have sought 
his help, St. Ignatius among them. 

For more information, call 
Eckholm at 847-395-0652. 







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May 10,2002 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A3 




v 



e worthy causes 



A carnival can provide more 

than just a good time for those who 

come to take advantage of its 

^ amusements. A carnival can raise 

Carousel horses anxiously await their turn to be unloaded from m T y t0 support f? od V mtli es t fire 
the truck and become part of the action. Workers from Wine? Tetrinwus™ ™ * "^ ° f 

the 885 Civic Club. -Photos bv Julie Mumhv its motto of >Ud today for a better 





tomorrow," by raising money with 
its annual fundraising carnival to 
help about 20 different groups and 
organizations throughout the area. 
The carnival will be held 
Thursday, May 9 through Sunday, 
May 12 at Antioch's new designated 
carnival location in the parking lot 
behind the shops on the east side of 
Main St. by the Brook Memorial 
Wetland Sanctuary and 

Entertainment Center. 



"We're pleased to be able to 
help so many worthy organiza- 
tions," said member Jane Larson. 
"We make a difference by putting all 
the money we raise back into me 
community." 

The hours will be from 6-10 p.m. 
on Thursday, 6-11 p.m. on Friday, 1- 
11 p.m. on Saturday and from 1 p.m. 
to closing on Sunday. "The closing 

J 

Please see CARNIVAL / AG 






o winner cnosen 



By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 






A sunshine with a slight smirk 
crowned by the words Friday Fest is 
the winning design that- will repre- 
sent the village's newest summer 
event, soon to be Antioch tradition. 
Brian Johnson, a senior at Antioch 
Community High School created 
the winning design. 

"I knew the idea had to be basic 
to work as a logo," he -said. "I 
thought it should be happy and 
smiling because that's what you 
think of for a festival on Friday in the 

summer." 

Community . development 

director Glenda Sorensen said she 

and her Friday Fest volunteers had 

about 30 submissions from which to 

choose. She said, "We all agreed. We 

really liked this idea the best." 

The submissions for the logo 

contest came from the high school's 

advanced drawing class taught by 

Cindy Howell. 

"I asked Cindy for help, and she 



made this a class assignment," said 
Sorensen. "There were a lot of 

exceptional pieces." ■ flj 

For his efforts, Johnson wi 
to be part of the opening ceremony 




June 14, will rece 

; Iopo minted < 



receive a gift certificate from. Main 
Street Frozen Custard. 

The theme of the first week is 
"God Bless America. A special 
ute will be paid to Antioch's heroes 
who serve on police department, 
fire department and rescue squad. 
The Lakes Area Choir will perform 
from 5-6:30 p.m. and will be fol- 
lowed by the Lakes Area 
Community Band at 8 p.m. 

Fridays in Antioch will begin at 
10 a.m. with a showcase of mer- 
chants in the business district. 
"Merchants will be bringing some of 
their special wares out on the side- 
walks," said Sorensen. "It will make 
the area more festive and will bring 
attention to our truly unique 

shops." 

The rest of the festivities will 



. « 

* 

happen down by the William Brook 
..Memorial v . Sanctuary and 

Entertainment Center at Orchard 

St. and Skidmore. 

■ ■ - 

The Farmers' Market will open 
at 3 p.m. at 900 Skidmore in "the 
parking lot giving residents an 
opportunity to buy fresh goodies in 
an open market atmosphere. The 
market will remain open until 7 

p.m. 

At the same time the Farmers' 

Market is running, children will 
have the opportunity to participate 
in the Itty Bitty Barter Toy 
Exchange. "We recommend that a 
parent accompany the children," 
said Sorensen. "It's great that the 
kids will be able to swap things, but 
a parent should be there to approve 
the trade." 

Food and beverage booths will 
open at about 5 p.m. "It's possible 
that water and pop will be sold 
throughout the day," said Sorensen. 
• There, will be a concert every 
week through Aug. 30 beginning at 
8 p.m. "For some weeks, we have 



Brian •Johnson, an Antioch Community High School senior, won 
the Friday Fest logo contest. Johnson is pictured with Donna 
Bergl, Debbie Rentner, Cathy Ursin, all volunteers who worked to 
pull the festival concept together along with Glenda Sorensen, 
community development director. —Photo by Julie Murphy 



been fortunate enough to also 
schedule earlier evening entertain- 
ment," said Sorensen. 

"Let's go racing...into summer" 
is the theme for June 21. There will 



be racecars on hand from the 
Wilmot Speedway. Tony and the 
Affects will perform at 8 p.m. with a 

Please see WINNER I A6 




Classified B16 Heallhwatch ...B9 Movies .....LL 

County,. .Bl Home Marketer.............B10 Obituaries B 

Crossword ...LL Horoscope .................. LL . Sports 

toiionai ...... ...'.M1.....M..M &i uJKciiic lli 



« 




GET CONNECTED-Look for us on the Internet at WWW.LAKELANDMEDIA.COM 



Antioch residents amazingly generous 



■ 





Vol. 116 No. 19 A Lakeland Newspaper Founded 1886 



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Postmastor Sond addross changos to Antioch Mows. 30 South Whitney Stroet. P.O. Box 268. Grayslake. Illinois 60030. 






M.R. SCHROEDER 

Founder-1 904-1 986 

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Contact us by e-mail. 
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CHRIS MONTES 



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Managing Editor 



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Sports Editor 

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Public Relations Coordinator 



Display Advertising: ads6lakelandmedia.com 
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General Questions: ques0lakelandmedia.com 



he generosity of Antioch 
residents is exhibited every 
single time there is a 

fundraiser or a benefit to 

. • • • 

support either an organization pr 

an individual. 

Cathy Ursin sent me an e-mail 
and said that the benefit held for 
Micki Meyer, who is suffering from 
a rare form of cancer, raised over 
$7,0Q0. She said, "The charity raffle 
and the benefit raised $6,768, and \ 
other donations were sent to the 
First National Bank-Employee 
Owned putting the total over 
$7,000." 

Ursin said 52 prizes were 
awarded including pizza and a $500 
gift certificate from Hope Electric. 

"We also had two more televi- 
sions donated so three people won 
a television that night," Ursin 
added. . 

Ursin sends thanks to the com- 
munity on behalf of Micki's family 
and friends at Shea's Iron Works. 




. 



. . .. 




BUR 
TOWM 



Julie Murphy 



» While we're on the topic of gen- 
erosity: don't forget to put non-per- 
ishable food items out by die mail- 
box on Saturday, May 11 in support 
of the Letter Carriers Food Drive. 
All of the food collected will go to 
the local food pantries. 

Postal carrier and union stew- 
ard Todd Erickson provided me 
with a "wish list" from the 

pantries. 

There is the greatest need for 
the following items: spaghetti 
sauce, canned meats (tuna, chick- 
en, salmon, turkey), jelly, pancake 
mixj canned fruit, canned juices, 



oatmeal, cereal, peanut butter, 
noodles, Bisquick, syrup, canned 
one-dish meals (stew, ravioli, etc.), 
beans (canned or dry), rice, maca- 
roni and cheese mixes and break- 
fast items. 

Donations can also be brought 
to the retail post office, Piggly 
Wiggly, or the Baskin- 
Robbins/Dunkin Donuts. The latter 
is offering a 10-percent discount to 
those bringing in donations. 

■ 



Cruise Night is back in force at 
Main Street Frozen Custard and 
Coffee House on Thursday nights 

from 6-9 p.m. 

Specials for "cruisers" include 
single cones, root beer floats or hot 
dogs for $1. 



• « 



I 






u- 



If you have interesting informa- 
tion or anecdotes to submit for "Our 
Town" call staff reporter Julie 
Murphy at 847-223-8161, ext, 600 or 
e-mail, moor]ie@ix. netcom.com 









i 

1 



(71 









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vil 



A4 / Lakeland Newspapers 







MUNITY 



May 10, 2002 



Lifted voices, lowered heads 

Right, Nicole and Paul Jacobs along with their son Matt Jacobs, 10, of Twin 
Lakes, Wis. sing "America The Beautiful" near the William E. Brook Wetland 
- Sanctuary band shell in Antioch during the National Day of Prayer. Above, Antioch 
area residents gather to pray near the William E. Brook Wetland Sanctuary band 
shell during the National Day of Prayer. — Photos by Lynn Gunnarson Dahlstrom 








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<C<n>inm<e 



Worship With Us 

A Directory Of 
Antioch Area Churches 



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■ ' 



• 









Graceland Baptist Church. 258 Ida SI., Antioch, IL Sunday 
School 11am., Morning Worship 11am., Sunday Evening 7pm. 
Robert Williams, Pastor. 

First Church of Christ, Scientist & Reading Rm. Rte 173 
and Harden, Antioch, Phone (847) 395-1 196. Sunday School, . 
Sunday Church Service 10:30am, Wednesday, 7:30pm 

Beautiful Savior Evangelical Lutheran Church. 554 Parkway, 
Antioch. Lutheran Church • Missouri Synod, Pastor Darald 
Gruen, Phone (847) 265-2450. Sunday Worship at 9am, Sunday 
School, High School & Adult Bible Classes 10:30am. 

Heritage Lutheran Church. Lindenhurst Civic Center, 1949 Old 
Elm Rd, Lindenhurst. (847) 356-1766. Sunday service 10:00 
am, Sunday School & Bible Class 9:00 am. (summer schedule • 
9:00 am Sunday) Rev. Mark W. Anderson, Pastor. 

SL Ignatius Episcopal. 500 Depot St. Antioch Phone (847) 
395-0652. Low Mass 7:30am, High Mass 9:30am Sunday 
School & Nursery 9;30am. Rev. Vincenl Eckholm. Pastor. 



Faith Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main SL, Phone 

(847) 395-1600. Sunday Worship 8 & 10:30am., Sunday 
School 9:25am, Sat. 7pm, Rev. Gregory Hermanson, Pastor. 

Christian Day School (847) 395-1664. 

Millbum Congregational United Church of Christ Grass 
Lake Rd. at Rte. 45. Phone (847) '356-5237. Sunday Service 
10am. Children's Program 10am. Rev. Paul R. Meltzer, Pastor. . 

Antioch United Methodist Church. 848 Main St., Antioch, 
Phone (847) 395-1259. Rev. Gary Curl, Pastor. Worship 5pm 
Saturday, 8:00 & 10:30am Sunday. Children's Church 8am; 
Adult Discussion Group 9:15am; Sunday, Sunday School 
10:30am. Nursery care for children through 3 years of age from 
8:00 to 1 1:30am. Coffee and conversation after each service. 

B 

SL Peter's Church. 557 W. Lake SL, Antioch. Phone (847) 395- 
0274. Masses weekdays, 7:30am; Sunday 6:30, 8; 9:30, 1 1:30am 
& Saturday 5:30pm. Rev. Father Ronald H. Anglim, Pastor. 






Antioch Evangelical Free Church. 750 Highview Dr. Phono 
(847) 395-41 17. Sunday Worship 8:15, 9:30 & 1 1 :00am, Sunday 
School for all ages, infant thru adult, 9:30am. Children's Church 
• 11am. Awana, Youth, Women's Ministries, Men's Ministries^ 
Growth Groups, Seniors. Senior Pastor David M. Groleau. 

St. Stephen Lutheran Church (ELCA). 1155 Hillside Ave. 
Phone (847) 395-3359. Sunday Worship, 8:00, 9:30, 10:45am. 
Rev. Roger Black, Pastor. Saturday Worship Service 5:00pm 

Christian Life Fellowship Assemblies of God Church. 41625 
' Deep Lake Rd., Antioch. Phone (847) 395-8572. Sunday School 
(all ages) 9am., Sunday Morning Worship 10am., Children's 
Church 10am., Sunday Evening Worship 6:30pm., Wednesday ' 
Worship & Children's Program 7am., Tues. Women's Fellowship 
& Bible Study 9-1 1:30am. Jell Brussaly, Pastor. 



Chain of Lakes Community Bible Church. 23201 W. Grass 
Lake Rd, Antioch, Phone (847) 838-0103. Sunday Worship 
8:15 and 1 1:00. Sunday School 9:45. Children's Church 1 1:00. 
Youth, Women's, Awana & Small Group ministries. 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod). 25100 W. . 
Grand Ave. (Rle. 59 & 132), Lake Villa. (847) 356-5158. Sunday 
Worship 8:15 & 10:45am; Sunday School (3 and up) and Bible 
Study 9:30am. Christian Preschool. Rev. John Zellmer, Pastor.' 

Lighthouse Church of Antioch. 554 Parkway Ave., Antioch, 
IL (847) 838-0616. Saturday Evening Service 7:00 p.m. 
Adventure Club for Kids, Adult Bible Study Saturday Evening 
6:00 p,m. Monday Evening Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Thursday 
Evening PTSD Support Group 7:00 p.m. Senior Pastor Tom 
Barlmer. 




tori 




Dan Dugenske, Director 

This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Funeral Home 










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. 




Breakfast meeting features Mike Olhava 



■ .- . 



Antioch Community Lighthouse, 
Aglow International, is having its breakfast 
meeting on Saturday, May 18 at TNT's 
Place of Antioch at 9 a.m. 

Mike Olhava, of Hebron, 111., will be 
guest speaker. Olhava is a representative 
for Southern Wisconsin Full Gospel 
Businessmen's • Fellowship 

International. 

Olhava will discuss how two events 
changed his life. He said in the early days 



• f a 4 

his life could be described by the lyrics of a 
Frank Sinatra song "I Did It My Way" a way 
he had thought was a good way. 

A breakfast buffet will be served at 9:15 
a.m. the cost is $9. Reservations are 
requested by May 14, and can be made by 
calling either Sue Vanderstappen at 815- 
943-7456, or Janice Dewaal at 847-265- 
5060. . 

Family and friends of all genders are 
encouraged to come to this meeting. 



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Podiatrist 



FACTS ABOUT BUNIONS 



Both men and women can develop a bunion. A bunion is a 
swelling or enlargement of the large toe joint on the inner * 
side of the foot The deformity usually develops gradually and 
continues to develop until it will cause pain from shoes rub- 
bing against the enlarged bono.There may be swelling, redness 
and a deep aching pain associated with the bunion joint caus- 
ing a bursitis. 

Bunions develop from a weakness in die bone structure of 
your foot Because die instability of the bones and ligaments 
which form various joints and arches In your foot, the joints 
have a tendency to move out of proper alignment There is 
also a strong hereditary tendency to develop this deformity. 
Bunion deformities can be seen in very young children as well 
as the adult population. Bunions arc not caused by^improper 
shoe gear, but are slgnificandy aggravated by Improperly fitting 
shoes which place an unusual degree of pressure at the 
bunion joint As the bunion becomes more severe, the joint 
moves out of proper alignment and eventually arthritis will * 
damage the joint Several treatment options are available 



which help in controlling die cause of the bunion deformity 
so that symptoms do notarise or become more sevcre.Thesc 
Include alteration of shoe gear, prescription orthotics. 

If the bunion deformity becomes progressively worse, surgery 

f nay be recommended. If you are suffering from this condition, 

.feci free to contact Dr. LeeTisa for a no-cost consultation to 

discuss your condition. 

**** 

1616 Grand Ave. • Waukegan 

662-0660 

or 

Heritage Medical Center 

800 North Main • Antioch 

395-2339 



Se Habla Espanol 






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May 10, 2002 



COMMUNITY 




* * 

Lakeland Newspapers/ A5 



* i 



Letter carriers turned 
{rood collectors 

Antioch's local and rural letter carriers 
prepare for the 10th annual National 
Association of Letter Carriers (NALC) 
union food drive to be held on May 11. 
Non-perishable food items should be 
placed by mailboxes for collection. 
Collection bins will be located at the 
Piggly Wiggly, the retail post office 
downtown and at Baskin- 
Robbins/Dunkin Donuts. The latter will 
be taking collections all week and 
offering a 10 percent discount to those 
who make a donation. Pictured from 
left to right: Scott Sedlack, Jim 
McKinley, Jr., Jim McKinley, Jeff 
Pearson, Nancy Doles, Denise Gray, 
Glen Gorski, Susan Aslett, Paul Yucus, 
Vikki Stanchina, Todd Erickson and 
Mark Kosar.— Photo by Julie Murphy. 



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COMMUNITY 



* • i 



May 10, 2002 













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Earns scholarship 

Emily Martin of Antioch has earned the 
Luther College academic scholarship on 
Scholar Recognition Day 

Martin is the daughter of Ronnie and 
Kimberly Martin of Antioch. 

Phi Eta Sigma 

Tracie Zersen of Antioch has been initiat- 
ed into the Phi Eta Sigma National Honor 
Society at Illinois State University. 

Deans list 

Christy Plotz of Antioch has been named 
to the dean's list at Carthage College. She was 
recognized as a student athlete who partici- 
pated in an intercollegiate sport and achieved 
a 3.0 grade point average or higher during the 
semester of the sport. She played soccer to 
earn 



King College honor roll 

Julie Kieffer from Antioch has been 
named to the honor roll of King College. 

Earns academic honors 

Justen Kent, a student from Antioch, was 
named to the dean's list at Rockford College. 
Kent's major is business administration. 

Trustees scholarship 

Katelynn Lyons of Antioch has been 
awarded a trustees scholarship, at Coe 
College. Lyons is. the daughter of Kevin and 
Janet Lyons and will graduate from Antioch 
Community High School. 



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usic major 

Lawrence Addison of Antioch, a Music 
Perf: Commercial Music major was named as 
a probationary member of Phi Mu. Alpha 
Sinfonia. Addison is a graduate of Antioch 
Community High School. 



Emily Martin of Antioch, winner of a 
flanked by two presenters. 




uther College academic scholarship is 



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selection of '50s arid '60s- music. ators, will be back for the July 5 "Ride into 
June 28 is "Newcomers Night" and is one Summer for Kids and Music." A motorcycle 
of the evenings that will feature two bands, rally will be held in conjunction with this 
The Howells are three-piece family bluegrass event, thanks to the help of-Nielsons in Lake 
band that will play from 5-6:30 p.m. The Villa* to support the Pediatric Brain Tumor 
Repaired will follow at 8 p.m. and will play a Foundation of the United States. "We!re hop- 
variety of rock music from the '50s forward. ing to have a 'steak bake' organized for this. 
American English, the Beaties impersori- event as Well," added Sorensen.. 





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You want the best protection for your home sweet home, 
affordable price. So call your COUNTRY agent David A, Steffenhagen 
at 847-356-0080 today to find out more about finding the right 
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time on Sunday depends some on the weath- 
er and the crowd, but it's usually early 
evening," said Larson. . 

There will be unlimited ride specials on 
Thursday, Saturday and Sunday. For $14 per 
person, carnival goers can ride as many rides 
within the four time slots allotted. 

The unlimited package is available from 
. 6-10 p.m. on Thursday and from 1-5 p.m. on 
-both Saturday and Sunday. 

The. 885 Civic Club makes contributions, to 
the following organizations: Fishing Has No 
Bouridries, A Safe Place, Antioch Food Pantry, 
Lake, Villa Rescue Squad/Fire Dept., Easter 
Seals, American Cancer Society, student educa- 



'• 



■ 



:tional trips, Antioch Rescue Squad /Fire Dept, 
■^Central Baptist Children's Home, Allendale, 
PADS, Children's Wish Foundation, Christmas 
for Seniors and various other charities. 

The club meets on the first Wednesday of 
the month (unless that happens to be a holi- 
day), at 7:30 p.m. at either 885 Main St. or in 
someone's home. . . , 

"We've been around for 12-14 years^and 
we really have a good time," said Larson. 
"We're an easy group to r beiong to." 

The dues are $10 per year, and the meet- 
ing attire is casual. 

To.becbrne> member, call 847-395-3381, 
and leave a return phone number. 




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Marriott Theater 
scores big / LL3 



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F.Y.I. 

See our listing of 
local activities / LL4 



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MOVIE REVIEW 

'Unfaithful:' R-rated thriller 
gets five popcorn boxes / LL8 




ctedicated 



promoting the growth and development of children 



m 

Top; Residents of the Maravilla 
Retirement Community in Vernon 
Hills meet with Mundelein students 
as part of the Big Brothers Big 
Sisters of Lake County. Right; 
Clockwise from top, Libertyville High 
School sophomore Kate Ruby, 
Rockland School third-grader Kristin 
Lapczynski, junior Kate Pyle, and 
third-graders Emily Ames and 
Kirsten Mayberry play a game of 
cards at Rockland School in 
Libertyville. Big Brothers/Big Sisters 
of Lake County pairs high school 
students with grade school students 
to help with homework, make craft 
projects and play games once a 
week.— Photos by Sandy Bressner 




..■■•: 

a single parent isn't easy, that is why Big Brothers Big Sisters of 
County exists. The program was founded to bridge the gap of 
ngje parenthood and ensure children receive the individual atten- . 
they need. Individual attention is hard for any parent to give, 
harder to give when working several jobs to support their fam- 

ip ; Brothers Big Sisters of America (BBBSA) has remained the expert in 
yqut 1 Aentoring since its founding in 1904. In 1977 the Big Brothers and Big 
*»"-^ ^irasnlzAUorismerged into BigBrothers Big Sisters of America and the 

dquarters was established in Philadelphia, 
y the most known program that Big Brothers Big Sisters of Lake 

tounty.hasis their Core Program, a program that brings children and adults 
together ina one-to-one relationship. 

But?B/g Brothers Big Sisters of Lake County has a lot more to offer area 
youths. 

The' High School mentoring program matches students from LaJce 
County high schools with 'children in elementary and middle schools. . 
Typically, a group of about 25 high school students spend a few hours 

one afternoon per week at a partnering school interacting with 
their matches by playing games, sharing a snack, tutoring, read- 
ing books and talking. 

"The beauty about the small group programs is that they meet 
individually every week in the same building," said Big Brothers 
Big Sisters of Lake County staff member Audrey Glenn. 

According to Coordinator of the High School Mentoring 
Program, Jessica Forsyth, the goal of the program is to benefit 
the community through assisting a significant number of at-risk 
children that might otherwise experience a more negative out- 

conic 

Elementary school teachers and counselors from around Lake 
County refer the students to the program based on the presence 
of risk factors and the perceived ability of the child to benefit 

from the program. 

"This program is seen as you are very lucky if you get to be a 
part of it," said Forsyth. "It is seen as a very positive thing among 
the "Littles" (the students)." 

Because the program is so popular and because there are 
only a limited number of spaces, not everyone gets into the 

Please see DIFFERENCE / LL6 







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LAKELIFE 



Lakeland Newspapers 

^4 ■ to 



• 



May 10,2002 



* 








Richard Lewis 









6 



Ones present 

Gardening of birds and butterflies 



9 




Wendy Liebman 



Kevin Meaney 



Three comedians to 

liter Art 



at the 





Three of stand-up's hottest comedi- 
ans come to Centre East for two 
nights of non-stop laughter. Richard 
Lewis, Wendy Liebman and Kevin 
Meaney headline the Laughter Arts Festival, 
Friday, May 17 and Saturday, May 18 at 
p.m. Centre East is located in North Shore 
Center for the Performing Arts, 9501 Skokie 
Blvd. in Skokie. 

Richard Lewis' life-long collection of 
therapy-fodder has proved key to his hysteri- 
cal blend of self-analysis and pointed mus- 
ings. His candid observations of his brilliant- 
ly warped world have won Lewis acclaim as 
"the Franz Kafka of modern-day comedy." 
Currently Lewis appears as Rabbi Glass on 
the.WB's hit show "7th Heaven" and has a 
recurring guest star role as one of Larry 
David's closest friends in the "Seinfeld" 
co-creator's HBO series, "Curb Your 
Enthusiasm." Recently out in paperback on 
Plume Books, a division of Penguin Putnam, 
Inc. is Lewis' autobiographical book, "The 
OTHER Great Depression." He has also 
starred in many HBO specials and has made 
numerous television and film appearances, 
most notably opposite Jamie Lee Curtis in 
ABC's series "Anything But Love" and with 
Nicholas Cage and Elizabeth Shue in 
"Leaving Las Vegas." 



< 

Wendy Liebman's trademark delivery of 
the one-liner with the subliminal after- 
thought has earned her recognition on the 
national stage. She has performed her 
uniquely timed style of stand-up comedy 
since 1984 and has appeared on "The Late 
Show with David Letterman," "The Tonight 
Show with Jay Leno % " and "Politically 
Incorrect with Bill Maher." Liebman also 
appeared on the first "Rosie O'Donnell 
Show," where O'Donnell introduced her as 
"the funniest female comedian on the cir- 
cuit." In 1997, the American Comedy Awards 
named Liebman "Best Female Stand -Up 
Comic." 

Kevin Meaney's madcap humor, punctu- 
ated by his signature catch phrase "That's 
not right," draws on his experiences growing 
up in the center of a zany Irish-Catholic fam- 
ily. A self-proclaimed "ham," Meaney honed 
his comedy on the San Francisco circuit with 
other 'Class of 1980' graduates including 
Robin Williams, Paula Poundstoiie, Dana 
Carvey and Kevin Nealon. His recent credits 
include starring in his own half-hour comedy 
special for Comedy Central and opening on 
Broadway for friend Jerry Seinfeld. 

Tickets are $42 and free parking is avail- 
able. For tickets or more information call the 
Centre East box office at 847-673-6300. 



onday, May 13 

at 7:15 p.m., 

Lake-to-Prairie 

Wild Ones will 

present Marian Thill, who 
will give a slide presenta- 
tion showing how to cre- 
ate a tempting habitat 
for wildlife. The public 
is invited to attend. 

■ 

Wild Ones is a not-for- 

- 

profit organization that 
promotes use of native 
plants in landscaping. 

Thill's focus will be the home- 
owner who does not necessarily have a 
large amount of property but wishes to 
attract birds and butterflies. Mostly native 
plants are incorporated into her plan. 
Native plants have the advantage of requir- 
ing less maintenance and being less prone 
to insects, diseases and the sometimes- 
challenging weather conditions of the 
Midwest summer. 

Thill became a Master Gardener 
through the Chicago Botanic Garden and is 




a certified naturalist through the Morton 

Arboretum. Her .yard has been 
certified as a Wildlife 
Habitat through the 
National Wildlife 
Federation, and all of her 
gardening is focused on main- 
taining the habitat for 
wildlife. 

Thill's theme is, "If you 
invite them, they'll 

come." She believes that 
if every homeowner could 
give one little corner of the 
. yard to wildlife a vine, a berry bush- 
it could lessen the negative impact that 
development has on an area. 

This presentation is free. Handouts and 
"catalogs will be available for those who 

attend as well as information on joining the 
organization. 

The program will be held at the Byron 
Colby Barn at Prairie Crossing located at 
the west side of Route 45, one-half mile 
south of Route 120 in Grayslake. For more 
information call 847-548-1650. 










Water's Edge School invites families to May Faire 

ater's Edge School in 





Wauconda welcomes all to its 
May Faire on Saturday, May 11 
from 2-5 p.m. The event will 
feature children's activities; puppet show, 

storytelling, a pocket lady with a pocketful 
of surprises for little ones, live music, song 

and dance, refreshments, plant sale and a 
traditional May Pole dance outdoors on the 
school grounds. 

Water's Edge school is located at 200 I 
Barrington Rd. in Wauconda, at the intersec- 
tion of Rt. 176 and Barrington Road in the 
upstairs of the Federated School of 
Wauconda. - 

The school is currently accepting enroll- 
ment for the 2002-03 school year offering a 

mmmm • teen trips • golf • voileybaii 



Preschool/Kindergarten class for 3 l/2-to-6 
year-olds, and a Parent/Child program for 
ages 18 months to three years. 

Waldorf Education is the fastest grow- 
ing independent school movement in the 
world fostering the desire to learn from 
within; offering a balanced, comprehensive 
hands on education in an artistic environ- 
ment. Based on the philosophies of 
Rudolph Steiner, Waldorf aims to educate 
the whole' child—head, hands and heart. 

The school is : nonprofit and nonsectariari, 
welcoming all children regardless of race, 
sex, religion, culture or economic status. 
For further information regarding enroll- 
ment or the May Faire, call the school at « 

847-526-1372. 



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May 10, 2002 



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Lakeland Newspapers 



LAEtELIFE 3 



Northbrook-On-Ice presents 



• 









■- 



he Nprthbrook Park 
District proudly presents 
"Spinning the Dial," the 
annual Northbrook 

On Ice program sc 

'tried this year for 

performances on 

Thursday through 

Sunday, May 9-12. 
The show will 

explore six genres 

of music, highlighting popular . 
favorites from the'past seven 
decades. The setting will 
reminisce about the fol- 
lowing musical cate- 
gories: easy listening, 
movie soundtracks, 
oldies, country music ' ' "• 




and pop and rock 
tunes. Over 400 talent- 
skating students will 

perform, and with the won- 
derful costumes, lighting, props 

and scenery, the show promises to 
achieve a truly professional atmosphere 
on the ice. 

"Spinning the Dial" will be held 
. r at the Sports Center, 1730 Pfingsten 

Rd., at 7:30 p.m. on May 10; 2 and 
7:30 p.m. on May 11 and 2 and 6 p.m. • 
on May 12. 

At the close of each Mother's Day perfor- 
mance, a drawing will be held for free spa 
packages, in celebration of the Park District's 
75th Diamond Jubilee Anniversary. For more 
information, please call 84 7-291 -2993. 





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'iott. Theater production 
nocking 'em dead 





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s Highwood announces its May schedule 




ops Highwood, 214 Green Bay Rd. in 
Highwood, has prepared its new 
line-up for May, with two bands fea- 

^^ tured on Saturdays throughout the 

month. 

The Redd Holt Trio and Mississippi Heat 
will be featured on May 1 1 , the Franz Jackson 
Quartet and Matthew. Skoller Band on May 
18, and the Ken Saydak Trio on May 25. 
Fridays will feature Redeye Express Quartet 
on May 10, the Steve Ditzell Trio on May 17, 
the Frank Portolese Trio oh May 24 and the 
Gerald McClendon Quartet on May 31. 

Great performers can still be heard during 
the week. Tuesdays will showcase Steve 




■ ■ . 

...... » . > 

Frisbee/Liam Davis on May 14 and 28 and the 

Dave Flippo Duo on May 21. Wednesdays 
through May will feature Stank Willie May 15, 
the Peter Lerner Trio May 22, and the Keith 
Scott Trio on May 29. Thursdays will feature 
The Nod May 30 and Tumstyles May 16 and 
23. All performances begin at 8:30 p.m. 

Pops Highwood bar area is open from 5 
p.m.-l a.m. Monday through Saturday, with 
live music starting at 8:30 p.m. There is a $3 
cover Tuesday through Thursday and a $6 
cover on weekends. The Jazz Glub is open 
from 7 p.m.-2 a.m. Saturdays . 

Free parking is available. For reservations 
and information, call 847-266- 1313. 



take County Editor 

he Marriott Theater in Lincolnshire 
| production of the broadway classic, 
"Damn Yankees," started fast and is 
delving into weekends sold out; 
The musical follows Joe Boyd, a middle- 
aged fan of the woeful 1950s Washington 
Senators, who makes a deal with the devil to 
become the team's leading hitter and lift the 
team into first place. 

With a heart-pounding musical score 
booming from a new sound system, Bob 
Fosse-inspired choreography, first-rate act- 
ing and an intimate, 882-seat, in-the-round 
auditorium, word-of-mouth on the produc- 
tion is growing. 

The show, 2 1 !2 hours, runs through June 

The sound at Marriott is sensational, with 
a major sound system upgrade as part of me 
theater's $250,000 renovation last year. 




■ 




Above, Mary MacLeod as "Lola" in 
"Damn Yankees." — Photo by Maday 
Photography 



Although "Damn Yankees" is a bit dated, 
the baseball theme/period settings and ener- 
gy of the musical are hard to resist. 

A 9-piece orchestra is seated in a glass- 
enclosed, soundproof room behind the back 
row, stage left, with director Patti Garwood 
watching the action on stage. 

"Damn Yankees" stars Dirk Lumbard as 
Mr. Applegate, the devil incarnate and 
somewhat foppish and Mary MacLeod as 
Lola, the devil's sultry siren. Applegate and 
Lola get Joe Boyd to sign a deal for his soul, 
but with an "out clause" upon which the 
plot hinges. 

Sean Alan Krill plays the athletic, young 
Joe Boyd, and Don Fors.ton the middle-aged,, 
married Boyd. 

Musical numbers found a receptive audi- 
ence with recognizable favorites, including 
"Whatever Lola Wants, Lola Gets," and "You 
Gotta Have Heart." 

Lumbard 's Applegate draws one of the 
biggest laughs of the musical right after cur- 
vaceous Lola lures young Joe off to the side 
and sings "Whatever Lola Wants" — but is 
dismayed when Joe, regretting his deal with 
the devil and thinking of his wife Meg (Paula 
Scrofano), doesresist and exits, stage right, 
leaving a stunned Lola. 

Applegate, appearing stage left, derisive- 
ly mimics "Whatever Lola Wants, Lola Gets." 
For ticket information call 847-634-0200. 







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Banquet Facilities? 
Terrific Wednesday Dinner? 



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Also: 



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Group Outings Welcome • Gift Certificates Available 
Bar & Restaurant • Relaxed, Casual Atmosphere 



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Oae of Chkagoland's Top 50 Courses 







WAUKEGAN EvRK DISTRICT 

2800 N. LEWIS AVE., WAUKEGAN • (847) 360-4732 





• * 



ORCHARD HILLS 
GOLF COURSE 



A Waukegan Park District 
Owned Course 

38342 N. Green Bay Road 
Waukegan, IL 60087 

847-336-5118 




Friday Nife Fish Fry 4-8:30pm 

AIXU-CANEAT 

Deep Fried or Baked Cod or Catfish $6.95 



Walleye Dinner $7.95 

Shrimp Dinner $7.95 

Lake Perch Dinner $8.95 

BBQ Rib Tips $6.95 

•Fries & Slaw included* 



Robert Presley on Piano Fri. April 12, 7-i0pm 

BRYDCES HOUSE RESTAURANT 

3035 Belvidere Road 847-625-8520 



Top Butt Steak Dinner $8.25 

w/choicc of baked or fries & soup or salad 

•Plus Other Sandwiches Available • 



off ana 






ion Parties 





I 



Lunches • Dinners • Banquets 

Nightly Comfort Foods Start at $10.95 

Mon. - Country Pot Roast 

Tues. - Roast Pork Loin 

Wed. - Meatloaf 

Thurs. - Pork 

Fri. - Fresh 




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All You 
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Cany-Out • Catering 5lvai(ab(c 

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miifa auteniicamente ftfezjeana, recctas 
crctas tfefamifia. Atniyos 'Disfrulen su visita. 

gracilis! 

tic Mexican food, thrived from secret 

nidj reccipes. Wefcome 'friends, enjoy 

your dining experience. Ifianfiyou ! 








purchase of s 20 or more 

Expires 5-31-02 

84 7-54 6-6009 

2 34 Cedar Lafy 'M-, 'jfauntt Lafe 
(•Just South of '!Rat (wad 'Ave, 'J{te. 134) 

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4 LAKELIFE 



Lakeland Newspapers 



May 10, 2002 










American Red Cross seeks new volunteers 

ith more than 50 different volunteer opportunities, there is a place for 
everyone at me American Red Cross of Greater Chicago. Opportunities 



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PLANT SALE 




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' range from assisting at blood drives to providing mental health counsel- 
ing to disaster victims to teaching first aid/GPR courses. You can also 
participate in its Speaker's Bureau or assist with fund-raising events and committees. 
Volunteers are a critical part of the American Red Cross, working in neighborhoods 
and with individuals and community groups to provide these services. 

Find out how to be a part of the local Red Cross by attending a volunteer informa- 
tion session on Thursday, May 16, from G-8:30 p.m. at the American Red Cross of 
Greater Chicago facility in Mundeiein at 535 N. Like Street, one-half block south of 
Route 176. Free parking is available. For more information about volunteering or this 
information session contact Tim Jamison at 047-949- 1000. . - 

The American Red Cross of Greater Chicago stands ready to provide community 
disaster preparedness and relief, assistance to military families, international services, 
and safety and health education around die clock, every day of the year. . . <• 




, 



Donations needed 'Wheels and Keels' auction 

ave you dragged your boat out of storage yet this year? Not sure you want to 
hassle with the upkeep, maintenance and storage again? If not, donate it to 
the "Wheels and Keels" auction, . . . :■ 







Here's how: Your donation becomes live auction procee< 

m'H'rfitroWr nnnnrtiinities for hundred 



. 



youth and adults; Inspta^ mental and spiritu 

ws: accessible residential facilities; retreat, educadonal, and campinj 

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camp — m ..^^ j 

itual needs, 

in three ways: accessible residential faculties; retreat; eaucauonai, anucauiping pro- 
grams; and community involvement-including retail operations. Contnbutions to 
ministry are tax-deductible. t V 

• Cars will be added to this year's auction. The May 25 event will start at 10 a.m. As 
in years past, boats of all shapes and sizes are being donated including powerboats; 
sailboats, jet skis, rowboats, ahdpbntoon boats: Currently over 35 boats and 15 cars 

have been donated. ;^** . . 

If interested intonating, contact Jon Troast or Erik Barber at Inspiration 
Ministries at 262-275-6131. Inspiration Ministries is located at the corner of Highway 
67 and County F in Walworth, Wis. - 






Bulb sale this fall, order now 

The Lake County Extension Foundation will 
be holding its bulb sale again on Sept. 20 and 21. 
The Advance Sale Catalogues will be mailed out in 
mid-May. The advance sale has three advantages: 
10 percent discount; if you order in the spring you 
can look at what bulbs you have 
now and plan for 
additional ones; you get to 
pick from the catalogue 
what you would like 
instead of settling for what 
they have left when you 
arrive at the cash and carry 

sale. 

If you would like to be on 

thamailing list, please call the 

office at 847-432-8255 and give 

your name and address to 

Dorothy 

Start your gardens 

The Annual Plant Sale by the Gardeners of . 
Central Lake County offers mature perennials dug 
from local gardens and annual flowers and vegeta- 
bles plants started by members. All plants are sold 
at reasonable prices. 

The sale is Saturday, May 1 1 from 8:30 a.m.- 
noon, rain or shine, at the Libertyville Civic Center 
loading dock, 135 W. Church St. near Cook Library 
in downtown Libertyville. For additional informa- 
tion call Susan at 847-816-8007. 




KIDS STUFF 



■■ ■ — ii 



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isits 




irious Georg< 

Borders Bookstore, 6971 W. Grand Ave. in 
urnee will Have a special visitor at their story time 
/ent.this Saturday*, that mischievous monkey, 
Curious George! Be sure to bring your camera. He 
will be visiting Saturday; May 1 1, at 1 p.m. For 
more information call 847-249-1845. . 



SEMINARS 




......................... 



•■ * .... ....< 






Upcoming plants for this year 

New Annuals for the Millennium will be the 
free presentation sponsored by the Gardeners of 
Central Lake County on Monday, May 13. Stephen 
Hogan from The Cottage Gardens will use 
slides to tell you about 30 new annuals for 
sun and shade. Most of these will be on 
the market this spring. 

The meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m. The 
. Gardeners meet at the Evangelical Free 

Church on the southeast cor- 
ner of Garfield Avenue and 
Austin in Libertyville. The 
pubic is invited. 
" For information, call 

Susan at 847-816-8007. 



Small business start-up 

Warren Newport Public Library, 224 N. 
O'Plalne Rd. in Gurnee will be hosting a seminar 
on small business start-up on Monday, May 13 at 7 . 
p.m. Alese Campbellof the Small Business 
Development Center in Like County will describe 
what owners need to know to begin their ventures 
and the services offers by the SBDC. For More 
information call 847-244-5150; 

\ • ■ 

Stock market risks 

Adults who would like some assistance on 
how to maintain faith in the stock market are invit- 
ed to attend a seminar hosted by the Norlhbrook 
Park District. The group will gather at the Leisure 
Center, 3323 Walters Ave., on Wednesday, May 15 
at 7 p.m. to discuss the up and down sides of the 
present stock market and how its volatility affects 
the average portfolio. The workshop is designed to . 
help folks learn how to stay clear of mistakes and 
keep short-term market activity in perspective 
with long-term financial targets. For registration 
information, call 847-291-2980. 







■ 



SPECIAL SHOWS 



- . .... 

Vietnam Memorial Wall 

TB The new traveling Vietnam Veteran's 
Memorial Wall, a 240-foot replica of the original 
Vietnam Veteran's Memorial in Washington D.C., 
will be available for viewing of Navy Pier's historic 
East End Plaza now until May 19. With 16 panels, 

> 

- - • • ' • 

Continued on next page 






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akhousc & Italian Eatery 

Authentic Italian Specialties 



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The ZnZn family wants to thank the Fox Lake Fire 
Department & the Community for their support. 
Wc look forward to serving you again real soon. 



Plenty of FREE Parking 

• Dine In • Carry Out • Cocktails 

The Chinese restaurant that everybody's talking about! 
Conveniently located across from the fairgrounds. 

111 Hwy 45, Grayslake 

847-548-8882 
FAX: 847-548-2822 



Great Food-Good Times 

Steaks, Chops, Seafood 

Our "WORLD" Famous BBQ Ribs & 

The "GREAT Fish Fry 



Featuring 




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Entertainment 
Friday & Saturday 




7220 State Park Road • Fox Lake, IL 60020 

847-973-8888 

> 

Located at the Fox Lake Country Club 

Private Parties, Banquets, Golf Outings 

& Corporate Functions Available 



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"Home OS The Penny Pit 

Open Sun. & Mon. 11 ».in. • 7. a m Tues.Iial. 11 a.m. - 2:30 a.m. 



2114 - 52nd Street 
Kenosha • (262) 653-1283 

Convenient parking located across 52nd Street 

OFTEN IMITATED • NEVER DUPLICATED 

Wbcrt else can you End S0OO (quart Sect of FUN! 



B£ZS T OFttNHi F*r*MCESl BES T FOOD'S 





The Penny 



Sun. & Mon. 11a.m-2a.rn.Tues.-D.il 11 am.«2:30ajn 

■■■■:-■ 



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Coming Soosu*.. 



\WS®SJ[l§®/^§ 



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VOU CALL 

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9pm - 12am 



Best Party In Tow* 
DJ Plays Anything 
Vou Want To Hear! 
Prizes! Giveaway 





THURSDAYS 




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Ice Teas and 

■ 

2 for 1 Shorties 






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Pitchers /* 
Lite 



Party & Swimsuit Co 

Sponsored by Corona 
wear a swimsuit & get a FREE 



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RPR 
Pool Players 

Enter Tourny 



Only $25 per team 



Dancing On The 

Biggest Dance 

Floor In Kenosha! 



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- Everyone Welcome! 



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$5 Includes FREE Drinks! FREE Pool! 



Weekly 

Speedball Tourny 
Rnd LDin the pot! 



Last time it was 




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MaylO t 2002 



Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 5 



• * 






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Continued from the previous page 



each weighing 125 pounds, the traveling Memorial 
displays 58,226 names of men and women: 1,300 
remain unaccounted. There is no charge. Hours 
are Sunday-Thursday 10 a.m.-B p.m., Friday- 
Saturday 10 a.m.-midnight. 



MUSIC 






noon, Saturday noon-l:15 p.m.; June 15-August24, 
Saturday 1:45-3 p.m. Skating fees are $4 for adults, 
$3 for youths. Skates rentals cost $2. Purchase a 
coupon book often admissions and save money. 
For more information, call 047-291-2993. 



WORKSHOPS 



■mwHInmi lilH it w — ** 



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Prairie Crossing Gazebo concert series presents 









.*•.». •■■•■•■■••■••••••■•■••■••■••■••••■•■•* •••»••"•■ ••• •I""- I ...l-l>_il>H...>II)ill.liaiBI"..lUI 4 



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Ragtime conies ba M _ Hi-MiiB _ 

Max Morath will be at the Woodstock Opera 

House, 121 Van Buren St., in 
Woodstock Saturday, May ■•" 
1 1 at 8 p.m. Reserved tickets 
are $16. Spearheading the 
ragtime revival in the 1970s, 
Morath has had a long and 
happy career touring 
America with his shows 
about ragtime and popular 
music. For more informa- 
tion contact the Woodstock 
Opera House ticket office at 015-330-5300. 




-* 



- ' 



FAIR 



II..M.- m "I 



Elnow your resources 

Winchester House is proud to announce its 
First Annual Senior Fair on Thursday, May 16 from 
1 1 a.m.-4 p.m. at 1 125 N. Milwaukee in 
Libertyville. The purpose of the fair is to inform the 
senior community of various resources. • 

" The event will be held in the main dining 
room. There will be vendors from different organi- 
zation that specialize in senior services. The event 
is free and open to the public. There will be 
refreshments, as well as raffle prizes. For more 
information call 847-377-7227. 



LSAT review 

NIU has a review workshop scheduled that 
covers all the important aspects of the LSAT (Law 
School Admission Test). The first session will be 
Saturday, May 1 1 and will run. for four Saturdays, 
through June 8 from 9 a.m.-l p.m. The fee for the 
refresher workshop is $395. If you are a full-time 

student or recent alumni, the fee is $295. 
For more information, call 815-753-5200. 



Casting techniques 

Introduction to Fly Fishing will be offered at 
Gorton Community Center, 400 E. Illinois Rd. in 
Lake Forest, on Saturday, May 1 1, June 1, July 13 or 
August 10 from 9 a.m.-noon. The fee is $45 per 
person or $60 for both husband and wife- This 
course introduces all the elements of fly fishing: 
how and why it differs from otlier forms of fishing; 
the equipment and tools used; setup and knots; 
where and how various species of fish feed; selec- 
tion of flies and how to use them. Fly casting tech- 
niques will be emphasized, with hands-on instruc- 
tion and practice outdoors with top-quality rods 
and reels. Bring your own gear if you have it. 




!. 1 . * 




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MOTHERS DAY 



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SKATING 



■••••••••••*••■ 



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Summer Skating 

Enjoy public ice skating this spring at the 
Northbrook Park District's indoor ice rink at 1730 
Pfingsten Rd. in Northbrook. Skating hours are: 
May 15-June 8, Wednesday and Friday 10:30 a.m. 



See the "best of the Midwest" 

The Hancock Observatory celebrates mother- 
hood with fun for the whole family. In celebration 
of Mother's Day, mothers accompanied by their 
families will receive complinlentary admission and 
a free audio Sky Tour on Sunday, May 12. 

The Hancock Observatory is open daily from 9 

a.m.-l 1 p.m. and is located at John Hancock 
Center, 875 N.Michigan Ave. in Chicago. . 

Admission in $9.50 for adults, $7.50 for seniors 
ages 62 and up, $6 for children 5-12 and free for 
children 4 and under. For information call 888- 
875-8439 or visit the web site at www.hancock- 
observatory.com. 






and Tumblin' duo 

■ 

* ■ ■ r 

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1 • * ... 

Rollin' and Tumblin' is an acoustic blues duo consisting of James Frailer, 
guitar/vocals, and John Jochem, harmonica/vocals. Drawing upon 
musical influences of the Carolinas, gritty Texas-based stylings and the 
soulful sound of die Mississippi Delta, the duo brings to life the early 
origins of blues and rock and roll; listen for joyous Chicago shuffles, slow 
blues of lost love and protest, upbeat instrumentals, slide- 
guitar moans, harmonica jump tunes, a bit of gospel and -^ mwg 

some Tin Pan Alley. (f fl|(Qj[( ' ''( 

. The concert is Friday, May 10 at 8 p.m. Admission is \y [| U >5l ?liu 

$10 for adults at the gate; children are free. Q ** 

The Prairie Crossing community is in Grayslake, i| 

one-half mile north of Route 137 on the west side of | 
Route 45. For more information call 847-543-1202. 























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Casual Fine Dining & Elegant Banquets in a Historic 
Victorian House On Highway C, Wilmot, Wl 

(262)862-9377 

Banquets Facilities for Groups of 40-200 For any Special Occasion 

O pnn For Dinner 

Twin Oaks offers superb, affordable American Cuisine 

Extraordinary Nightly Specials 
Unique Wines, Cocktails, Cappuccino and Espresso 



«•* 



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847 

^What's New 

Burgers l/3lb., l/2lb 
Strip & Rib Eye Steak 



(Formerly Roman Coin) 

-2121 



VISA 



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Ultimate Pizza 



New York 
Sandwiches 

Loin and always 



Fradillio's ■ 



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Fresh Seafood Specials Friday 

Md/WNtafbh. Grilled Salmon & More Starting at $1 
idav Hnmp^tylP Dinners l-5pm $14 



Delive. 



Close Every Day 



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Includes Bread, Soup, 5alad, Entree and Dessert 

Regular Menu Also 




nuiriLnS DAY 

Heartwood Hall Brunch 10am-l:30pm $16.95 
Restaurant Open l-6prn • Specials & Reg. Menu 

Dinner Tues.-Sat. at 5pm • Dinner Sunday 1:00 pm-7:00 pm (winler) 

.1:00 pm-8:00 pm (summer) 







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Q/T 2 Large Pizzas \ 

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6-packofSoda l 

Orchard St J Antioch 

(In Orchard Plaza) 



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442 Orchard St. 

847-395-9530 

Serving Antioch 

for 12 years 



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All menu items 

available for 

carryout 



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Includes Regular Fries & 22 oz. Drink 

#1 1 Chlcago-Sryle Hot Dog 100% Pure Beef 

#2 2 Chicago-Style Hot Dogs I00X Pure Beef. 

#3 Maxwell St. Polish Sausage 100% Pure Beef 

#4 Char-Broiled Hamburger (Cheese: .30 huo) ..'..... 

#5 Char-Broiled Chicken Sandwich 

' #6 Famous Italian Beef (Cheddar or Mozzoietla Cheese: .50 Exlro) 

#7 Famous Italian Sausage IMozzarello Cheese: .50 txlro). - . 

#8 Combo Beef & Sausage (Mozzorello Cheese: .50 Exlro).. . 

#9 Italian Meatball Sandwich (Mozzorello Cheese: .50 Eiim).. 
#10 Gyros (Yee-ros) Sandwich.. . 



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Ages 12 & Under 



Ask about our family style menu! 




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1611 Belvidere, Waukegan 

(847) 623-31177 

Banquet Facilities 
up to 90 Guests 




Served with Small Fries, Small Beverage & includes a Toyll 
id's Hot Dog (Cheese - .30 exlra) ... /7T\ ' ' ' 2 « 



Limit 2 

1 COUPON PER CUSTOMER. | 
ncceu FYPiRFq 5-17*02 OFFER EXPIRES 5-1 7-02. 

1 AtJTIOCH LOCATION ONLY. BB ANTIOCH LOCATION ONLY^ 

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Llmit2 

1 COUPON PER CUSTOMER. 
OFFER EXPIRES 5-17*02, 



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Kid's Corn Dog 

Kid's Chicken Nuggets 4 pes. 



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akeland Newspapers 



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program. 

Some of the risk factors for a child to be a 
part of and beneflt from the program include: 
poor school attendance, poor school perfor- 
mance, poor social skills, inability to identify 
and express emotions, poor decision making 
skills, conflict within the family, frequent 
location to new communities, low self- 
esteem, low income level and coming from a 
single parent home. 

"The program is very popular at the high 
school and we usually have plenty of men- 
tors," said Forsyth. 

High School mentors are recruited from 
area high school's and formally accepted for 
the program based on references from school 
staff as well as a personal .r interview with a 
BBBS case manager and a training program. 

"Libertyville- High School has two differ- 
ent programs because there were so man 
kids that wanted to volunteer," said Forsyth. 

According to Forsyth, High School men- 
tors meet with their "Littles" weekly for about 
an hour and a half. The high school students 
plan the activities for each week in conjunc- 
tion with a BBBS case manger. 
jf The high school students go to the ele- 
mentary schools after school and spend the 
afternoon with the children," said Forsyth. "It 
is great to see the response from the matches, 
they really take away a lot from each other." 

The program also gives the opportunity 
for the "Littles" to be exposed to high school 
through activities such as field trips to the 






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Rockland School third-grader Andrew 



Orsini works on a craft project with 
Libertyville High School sophomore 
Lily Ortega during a session of Top 
Cats. Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Lake 
County pairs high school students with 
grade school students to help with 
homework, make craft projects and 
play games once a week.— Photo by 
Sandy Bressner 



One day a week, after school, BBBS 
busses students to the retirement community 
where they spend a couple of hours talking to 
their senior match, playing games and having 
a good time. 

While another matches boys with mem- 
bers of the Barat College basketball team and 
another matches employees of Abbot and 
Baxter laboratories with students. 

Studies have shown that Little Brothers 
and Sisters who meet regularly with their Big 
Brothers and Sisters are 46 percent less likely 

. to start using illegal drugs, 27 percent less 

high school to attend plays, sporting events, likely to drink alcohol, 52 percent less likely to 
debates orjust to join their mentor for lunch skip school, 32 percent less likely to commit 



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Big Brothers Big Sisters of Lake County is 
continuously creating new programs to meet 
the needs of the community. 

Emerging programs include site-based 
mentoring programs opportunities that 
match adults (Bigs) with children (Littles) at 
their schools during a free period, lunch or 
after school. 

One of the programs match children with • 
residents of the Maravilla Retirement 



Community in Vernon. Hills. 



violent acts and 37 percent less likely to lie to 
their parents. 

Volunteers go through an in-depth 
screening process that includes interviews,v 
references, a background check, application 
review, auto insurance verification, a home 
visit and orientation and training. 

If. you are interested in volunteering for 
Big Brothers Big Sisters of Lake County or 
would like to get your child involved call 



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Lakeland Newspapers 




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8 LAKELIFE 



Lakeland Newspapers 



May 10, 2002 





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George & Pain Singleton 

www.reelnwviccritic.com 








■Q 




roticism, surprise, shock 
and delight are four guilty 
pleasures you might 

indulge in as you watch 

"Unfaithful." The placid calm of a 
pond completes the idyllic setting 
for the beautiful country house of 
Edward and Connie Sumner 
(Richard Gere and Diane Lane). 
This tranquillity and orderliness is 
punctuated by a strong wind, that 
literally blows everything off- 
course, and ultimately twists these 

lives to the breaking point. 
Edward and Connie have an 

eight-year-old son, Charlie (Erik Per 
Sullivan of TV's "Malcolm in the 
Middle"), who needs to be remind- 
ed to raise the toilet seat. We look 
on as the nurturing, take-charge 
Mom he's used to disappears (over- 
come by obsession). 

On a blustery day, when the 
wind seems to be at gale force on 
the streets of New York, Connie; 
with packages in tow and trying to 
hail a cab, collides with Paul 
(Olivier Martinez, "Before Night . 
Falls") in front of his Soho loft. He 
offers her bandages for her scraped 
knees. His disarming good looks 
and charm win her over and she 
agrees to go up to his apartment. 
Paul Martel is a young book dealer, 

28, Connie discovers, as compared 
with her AOish status. He is from 
France and is subletting a friend's 
loft. Paul's books share the studied 
clutter with sculptures done by his 
friend. As a token, Paul offers 




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Showtimes for May 1 0-May 1 6 
Sat & Sun Matinees in jbrackets] 

Stolen Summer (PG-1 3) 

[1:30] 4:20 6:45 9:15 
Life Or Something Like It (PG-1 3) 

11 :00] 3:45 6:30 9:30 

Deuces Wild (R) . 
[1:45]4:40 7:20 10:15 

Hollywood Ending (PG-1 3) 
[1:15] 4:10 7:00 9:50 

Murder By Numbers (R) 
[12:45] 4:00 7:10 10:00 

Last Orders (R) 

[2:15] 4:50 7:30 10:05 
Y Tu Mama Tambien (NR) 

[2:30] 5:10 7:40 10:10 
A Beautiful Mind (PG-1 3) 

[2:00] 5:00 8:00 



SiiowPlace 

Milwaukee 



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-095 



Showtimes for May 10-May 16 
Sat & Sun Matinees in [brackets] 

Unfaithful (R) 
[1:15] 4:15 7:45 10:30 

The New Guy (PG-1 3) 
[11:45] 2:15 4:45 7:15 9:45 

Spiderman (PG-1 3) 

[10:00] 1:00 4:00 7:00 10:00 

[11:00] 2:00 5:00 8:00 11:00* 

12:00 3:00 6:05 9:00 
•11:00 PM show on Fri/Sat only 
The Scorpion King (PG-1 3) 

[10:15)12:45 3:15 6:45 9:10 

Changing Lanes (R) 

[11:15] 1:45 4:30 7:30 10:10 

The Rookie (G) 

12:30 3:30 6:30 9:30 

Star Wars Episode II 

Tickets are now on sale 



FREE REFILL on Popcorn 




.';". 



New releases, currently playing 
at local theaters. More reviews of 
these and other films can be found 
under Current Movie Reviews at 
www. reelmoviecritic.com. 




! 



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Connie a book of poetry as she 
retreats when she realizes he's 

attempting to seduce her. 
The seduction works. A few 

days later she's in Grand Central 
Station phoning Paul with the pre- 
text of wanting to thank him. One 
of the most erotic scenes on film • 
plays out when Paul and Connie 
have their first encounter. Diane 
Lane gives a no-holds-barred per- 
formance as a tentative and trem- 
bling, guilt-ridden wife, embarking- 
on an affair, quickly consumed by a 
torrent of passion. Martinez* Paul is 
a master game player, anticipating 
every move of his partner. 

■ ■ 







■ 








Opening this Week 

Happenstance (Landmark 
Century): A Parisian store clerk is 
told she will meet the love of her 
life on this day. The fates, and sev- 
eral strangers, seem to conspire to 
make the prediction come true. 
Audrey Tautou ("Amelie") stars. 

* 

ESPN's Ultimate X (Navy Pier): 
Highlights on the IMAX screen of 
the 2001 Summer X Games in 
Philadelphia. 













• 



'*<-*■* s, 






. v . 



UNFAITHFUL 

Rating 

Rated R for sexuality, language 
and a scene of violence 

■ - * 

Director 

Adrian Lyne 
Starring 

Richard Gere 

Diane Lane 

Olivier Martinez 



Connie (Diane Lane) and 
Edward (Richard Gere) try to 
repair their marriage which 
has been torn apart by her 
unfaithfulness. —Photo, by 
Barry Wetcher. 







Margarita Happy Hour (Facets): A 
real life "Sex in the City" of five 
young women who discuss every- 
thing and more. 

The New Guy: DJ Quails transfers 
to a new high school with hopes of 
finally becoming popular. Eddie 
Griffin co-stars. 

Nine Queens (Music Box): Con 
men in Buenos Aires conceive and 
implement a complex plot to 
become rich that might work a lit- 
tle too well for their own good. - 




5Q2S « 





•£>■ \ Box Someone should be fired for 

fe making this movie 

2 Coxes Wilt until thfs • ' . 

moWe comes out on video 



**&&§&& 3 Boxes Expecting a bomb 





but pleasantly surprised 



£% £& &h t$j 4 Boxes Wow! 

I'm impressed 



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&% &h 5 Boxes Don't 

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115 Lakeland Plaza 



if 



SHOWTIMES— FRIDAY, MAY 10 
THRU THURSDAY, MAY 16 

NEW GUY* tPci,,] 

Frl 5:45 8:00 10:10 
Sat 1:15 3:30 5:45 8:00 10:10 
Sun/Wed 1:15 3:30 S;45 8:00 
- Monrrue/Thu 5:45 8:00 

SPIDERMAN* n>o,n 

.Frl 4:30 7:10 9:45 
Sat 1:35 4:30 7:10 9:45 

Sun/Wed 1:35 4:30 7:10 

Mon/Tuc/Thu 4:30 7:10 

MURDER BY NUMBERS [Hi 

Frl 4:20 7:20 9:55 

Sat 1:30 4:20 7:20 9:55 

Sun/Wccfl:30 4:20 7:20 

Mon/Tue 4:20 7:20 

STAR WARS: EPISODE 11*™ 

Wed 12:00 Midnight 
Thu 4:00 7:00 

UNFAITHFUL*^] Fri 415650 9:30 

Sat 1:45 4:15 6:50 9:30 

Sun/Wed MS 4:15 6:50 
Mon/Tuc/Thu 4:15 6:50 

SCORPION KING ,.,„ 

Fri 5:15 7:25 9:50 

Sat 1:10 3:15 5:15 7:25 9:50 

Sun/Wed 1:10 3:15 5:15 7:25 

MonfTuc/Thu 5:15 7:25 

* No panes or coupons 



As Connie becomes obsessed 
with the affair, she takes careless 
risks and becomes possessive of 
Paul. A chance meeting with 
friends in a Soho coffee shop pro- 
vides one of the film's funnier 
moments of guilty pleasure. 

Husband Edward, meanwhile, 

is beginning to have suspicions. He 
and Connie have been married 
eleven years and there's a certain 
harmony to the relationship that's 
off-key. A private detective is hired 
by Edward to follow his wife. 
Sumner Armored Trucks is the 
company EdwarpY owns and an 

inkling of his temper is revealed 
when he fires Bill Stone (Chad 

Lowe) on the spot for talking with 

Brinks. 

Armed with evidence, pictures. 

of Connie and Paul together, , 
Edward confronts Paul at his apart- 
ment. The two men begin a 
strained conversation, where it 
becomes clear that Edward is dev- 
astated. Gere allows us to almost s 
experience the physical pain he 
feels, which leads to a psychologi- 
cal break, when he discovers a gift 
that his wife has given to Paul. 
Exactly what happens at that 




moment may be open to interpre- 
tation, within legal parameters. 
{Note: Wliat happens in the 
moments following we choose not to 
reveal. We consider it a spoiler.) 
Richard Gere said, after reading the 
script, "I've always been interested 
in the idea that we're all unknow- 
able to each other." 

The acting is exceptional in this 
film, as well as the script, the pho 
tography and the design. It simply 
looks sensational. We liked the jux- 
taposition of scenes involving vio- 
lence or erodcism, played against 

the quiet, ordinary goings-on of a 

school play or Thanksgiving dinner. 
Stark contrasts of tone, the dark 

suits of commuters against a gray 
sky,- or the torn white plastic at the 

garbage dump flailing across a 
darkened landscape, are usually 
seen in black and white films. The 
sharpness of color and framing for 
the last shot of the film are pure 

artistry. 

"Unfaithful" is a densely tex- 
tured film. Everyone will have a bit 
of a unread they'll want.to cling to 
and discuss with friends. Director 
Adrian Lyne has loosely based this 

screenplay on "La Femme 
Infidele," a 1968 film by French 

New Wave director Claude 
Chabrbl. Lyne describes this film as 

"an erotic thriller about the body • 
• language of guilt." He should know, 
he also brought audiences "Fatal 
Attraction" and "Lolita." 



Still Playing 

High Crimes $$$% A happily 
married, successful lawyer (Ashley 
Judd) is shocked to learn that her 
-husband has a hidden past as a 
classified military operative, and is 
accused of committing a heinous 
war crime. Morgan Freeman co- 

stars. 

Life or Something Like It '99V A 
TV reporter, Angelina Jolie, re- 
examines her life when told she wi 
die the following week. Ed Burns 

co-stars. 




Panic Room 99 WW Home inva- 
sion is high on the list of crises and 
that's just what happens. Three 
men break into a NYC brownstone; 
mother & daughter see them on 
the monitor of their state-of-the-art 
security system and they scramble 
to secure themselves in the panic 
room. 



-<\/*»*/t%.' 



The Scorpion King JM The Rock 
stars in the back-story of "The 
Mummy Returns" as he batUes an 
evil ruler determined to kill 
nomads in the desert. 



j* <■*. - ^ 



Spider Man VHP The summer 
season officially opened with 
Tobey Maguire as Spider Man in 
this slick action film based upon a 
comic book character. Kirsten 
Dunst co-stars. 



M|», 



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Sat/Sun (12:00 2:35 5:10J 

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Fri. 4:45 7:00 9:15 
SaVSun (12:15 2j30 4:45| 

7:009:15 

Mon.-Ttiur. 4:45. 7:00 9:1 5 

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Fri. 3:40 5:50 8:00 10:10 

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Fri. 5:00 7:30 10.00 
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Fri. 5:00 7:30 10:00 
Sat/Sun (12:00 2:30 5:00) 
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Unfaithful (R) 

Fri. 4:40 7:1 5 9:50 
Sat/Sun (11:30 2:05 4:40) 
7:15 9:50 

Mon.-Thur. 4:40 7:15 9:50 
ThoNcwGuy (PG-13) 

Fri. 3:45 5:45 7:45 9:45 
Sal/Sun (11:45 1:45 3:45 
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Moa-Thur. 3:45 5.45 7:45 9.45 

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Fri. 520 7:40 10:00 
Sat/Sun (12:40 3:00 5:20] 
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May i 0, 2002 




Lakeland Newspapers 





Wo 





Aries -March 21 /April 20 
Many people are feeling lazy this week but not you; 
Aries. This is where you have an edge over (lie 
competition. Let your energy level work to your 
advantage at the office. 

Taurus - April 21 /May 21 
You're feeling abrasive and incompatible, Taurus. 
Nothing seems to fit or work right this week. A trea- 
sured memory has gone sour and you need the 
support of close friends. 



Gemini -May 22/June 21 
You shine in partnerships and small groups, 
Gemini, so your work relationships will go on with- 
out a hitch this week. Expect much praise for your 



efforts — you deserve it. 

Cancer -June 22/ July 22 - , 

Instead of giving a new idea or method a fair 
chance, you've cast it aside without further 
thought. Your inability to laugh at your mistakes, , 
Cancer, does not fare well with your relationships. 

* 

Leo-July23/August23 
Stop causing a commotion, Leo, the other party 
involved has already agreed to your request. While 
outside you show your fierce roar, inside beats the 
heart of a kitten. 

Virgo- Aug 2.4/Sept 22 

You're driven by honesty and efficiency, Virgo, and 



often "say it like it is." While your straightforward- 
ness can he commended, fragile people can be 
hurt by you. • 

Libra- Sept 23/Oct 23 

This week you could find yourself connecting with 
the person of your dreams. Thursday evening 
seems most promising. The spotlight continues to 

shine on you positively. 

Scorpio -Oct 24 /Nov 22 
You don't care if you're rude or clumsy this week, 
Scorpio. Nothing will stand in the way of your 
objective. You may think you're moving forward, 
but you may just be running away. 

** 

Sagittarius - Nov 23/ Dec 2 1 
You're called on an adventure,. Sagittarius, and 
you're definitely up for the challenge. Take Aries on 
the journey for a truly memorable time. This pair- 



ing is sure to produce many sparks and lively con- 
versation. 

| 

Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 
An attempt to rekindle a former relationship will 
not lead to positive ends. 'Hie river flows in only 
one direction, and in this situation, it's not yours. 
Seek solace in friends and family. , 

* . * 

Aquarius -Jan 21 /Feb 18 
You live by impulse and profit by your own natural 
brilliance, Aquarius. This week you continue to 
shine with both work and personal affairs. Ride the 
^wave of fortune. 

Pisces - Feb 19/March 20 
Celebrate your appetite for mischief with others 
who share the same sensibilities. You feel free to 
speak your mind and find many with the same 
views, especially a love match 



■ 










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C.l 






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Sunday, May 12 
Mother's Day Breakfast 

7am-i2:30pm 

Special Menu Dinner 

3pm-8pm 

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appetizers: Crab-Stuffed Portabella Mushrooms, 
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With MozzareUa Cheese & Oil 

Entrees: Prime Rib of Beef King & Queen Cut, 7 Oz. Filet Mignon, 
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Cheese Ravioli With House Marinara/Alf redo (or try bothr 



You pay $10 per person 



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cash voucher and luxury motorcoach transportation. 

Buses run Monday through Friday 



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8 AM - Gurnee 

8:45 AM - College Avenue Park and Ride 

9 AM - Arrive aj Casino 
2 PM - Bus departs 



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11 AM -Gurnee 

1 1:45 AM • Holt Avenue Park and Ride 

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imn Lai 



Marcomb's Steak House is at the Inteisection of 5A and AH in ump ukc. Wisconsin. From 
>ute 83 go west on county SA, follow to AH, turn right on AH. Marcomb s Is on the Left. 








Open Sundoyt 




(50's and 60's Rock & Roll) 

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Pool Tables 
Golden Tee Golf 
Electronic Darts 



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847-395-1515 

25196 W- Rt. 173 • Antloch 

Open Dally 1 lam-Close 





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TODAYS 

"DJ" Jason &. Dancing 

SATURDAYS 

"Live Bands" 

This Saturday, May 1 1 
Loose Shoes • 9pm- lam 

No Cover Arf 

SUNDAY ** 

Sandbar's Special Blood 
Marys (Best on the Chain) 
Watch NASCAR Here! 

Tuna Derby 

Sat. May Uth 

Reg, 7am 
Tournament 8am-3pm 



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ENTRY FEES .^^ 

Adults $10 • Children 15 & under $5 

mi) 395-8990 

Located on beautiful Lake Marie, An tloch 



Attention Fish Eaters. 

■ 

FRIDAY: We issue you a challenge 
ALL U CAN EAT Icelandic Cod 
(Baked or Deep Fried) $6.95 

Don't he cmbarrased if you say "No More!" 

We understand! 

SATURDAY: Prime Rib 
ALLUCANEAT 

$15.95 

& A0 meals ladoife soopL iabdl vegetable £ com on fbc cob 

Open Tues.-Frl. 5pm - Close 
& Sun. OPEN FOR BREAKFAST 
(Opening 




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395-6900 



Mother's Day Biriiiicli 

• Scrambled Eggs • Peppers & Eggs 
• French Toast • Sausage - Bacon - Ham 
Roast Pork • Roast Beef 'Eggplant Parmesan 

• Sausage & Peppers • Italian Chicken 

• Salmon • Egg Rolls -Tacos- Salad I 

and SWEETS TABLE! 



- 



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Under 7 Years 1/2 Price 
High Chair FREE! 
For Reservations! 



I i ** 1 1 » ^ 

Karen & Eugene "Coach" Stevens and Bruce & Usa F * nea fy?0&!&w& 



GREAT BARBIXUED RIBS «g^ 
PRIME RIB, Sfe, 

SEAFOOD & MORE! ■. 'Jffi&fM 



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ORANT • 
II wy J F Trevor, Wis., t mile North of Antloch 

262-862-2076 

Open Tucs., \Yed.,Thurs. 4.9:30pm, Frl. & Sat. 4.10pm, Sun. l-8:30pm, Closed Mon 



y Fish 



All-you-Care-To-Eat Beer Battered or 
Baked Genuine Icelandic Cod 

Early Birds 4-6pm-$7.25 t 6-10pm S8.25 
Also Perch, Baby Walleye Pike or Bluegil! $8.95 



Reservations Recommended 




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The Brytlges House Restaurant & Lounge announces the 

"Rosebud Social Club" 

The Club is open to adults who enjoy 
live entertainment and lively conversation. 

Come out and join us on the 1 st & 3rd 
Thursday in May from 7pm until midnight. 

i. A $5.00 admission fee (Ladies Free) will entitle you 
to an Appetizer Buffet and a chance to win a door prize. 
So mark your calendar for May 2nd & May 16th 
and join us for the "Rosebud Social Club . 






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1 LAKEL1FE 



Lakeland Newspapers 



May 10, 2002 



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across ;;•"., 

1. Letter 

5. __ and Venzetti 
10. Anglo-Saxon theologian, c.700 

14. Stew with chickpeas 

15. Mart 

16. Jamaica apple , 

17. Act unethically 

20. Monetary unit of Romania 

21. Knowings 

22. Integrates , 

23. Having a pleasant appearance 

25. Sick 

27. Disorderly 

28. Old World monkey 

29. Moved 

31. Essential oil 

32. Infection 

33. _ fi (slang) 
36. Most painful 
38. Has its own altar 

.40. Test ' 

41. Bryophytcs. 
45. Weight unit 

Answers 



46. Bovine disease 

47. New Zealand 

parrots 

48. Sacred 
51. Makes Taurus 

cars 

52. 1 

53. Seize 

55. Lake __, one of 

the Great * 

57. Water 

59.Stubborn 

female 

62. Implements of 

war 
63.Calcedony 

64. Utter 

65. Actor 

66. Point _ 
National Park 

67. Body that 
defines computing 
protocols 



TOWN 





New urns 




brand-new original musical by Michael Becker makes 
its premiere performance at Apple Holler's Red Bam 
Theatre. "George and Grade: A Love Story" celebrates 

_ — tlie lives of George Bums and Grade Allen* Itruns'as a 

luncheon and dinner theater on selected weekdays arid most 

Saturday evenings through the end of May. 
The price of $29.95 (plus tax and tip) 

includes Wisconsin wine and cheese, a 

full-course meal and the musical play. To 

attend the play with dessert only is $15 

(plus tax and tip).. 

All performances are by reservation 

only. Call 262-886-8500 for further infor- 
mation, to inquire about show dates or to make reservations. 
Apple Holler is located between Racine and Kenosha, on 

West Frontage Road just north of the Highway KR exit. 




•#OL£$£ 




1. German Chancellor Helmut __ 

2. One who estranges 

3. The master gland of the endocrine system 

4. Shelf ' 

5. Merchandising 

6. Endure distress 
1. Meadow bright 

8. Vacuum tube -. 

9. Island , 
10. Pampered 
ll.Samoyedic 

12. Administers 

13. Slang for fidgety 

18. Supplements with difficulty 

19. Tangle 

24. Mending 

26. Lasting records 

28. Not current 



30. Photographs (slang) 

32. Pose 

33. Proponent 

34. Aquatic mammals 

35. Agitations 

37. Neck 

39. Bird genus 

42. Sunscreen rating 

43. Some time in* die future 

44. Discharge 

46. New World vulture 

47. Underwent 

48. African country . 

49. "1836 siege" of U.S. 

50. Between parapet and moat 

54. Decide 

5& Day ^ 

58. Counteractive 

60. Amount of tin 

61. Opening 











Si Unique "Experience, 
in Seafood Vining... 

i . ... 

WHERE FRESHNESS 
IS OUR SPECIALTY 






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INDER NEW 
OWNERSHIP 



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when you buy two or more dinner entrees 

- or - 

FF 

when you buy two or more lunch entrees 

Expires 7/31/02. Limit two coupons per table per visit. Not valid with 
any othor discou nt. Not valid holidays. Not valid Sat. a()er 5:30pm. 

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 



SPORTS BAR 

Drink Specials 



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Sat. 6/1 UnDERHILL 2 

Sat. 6/8 BAD TRADITIOn 
Sat. -6/15 MICHAEL " " 






MILT TRENIER BAND 



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(Mundelein) 
Dover Straits Has Two Great Locations 



em- KARAOKE 

» EVERY FRIDAY IN MAY EXCEPT MAY 
J 9pm-2am 



• S5.00 



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Monday - Pool & Dart League Night 

$5 Pitchers! $2- 22 Oz. Drafts $3 Wells 

Tuesday - Karaoke 

50C Drafts! $3 Imports $4 Pizzas $4 Pitchers i} 

Wednesday - Ladies Night! 

$1 Pints Dom.! $2 U-Call Its ($5 Cover) &.DJ/Karoake . 

Thursday - Memory Makers DJ Service 

$5 Pitchers! $2.50 Capt'sU-Call $4 Pizzas 

Friday 

$2.50 Imports! $3.50 Pizzas 

Saturday - Check out our New Came Room 

$4 Pitchers*. $2 Shots $3.50 Pizzas 

Sunday - (NOW OPEN) - Free 

$4 Pitchers! 50c Drafts $3 Pizzas 



Mundelein > Hoffman Estates 

Route 45, just East of Route 83 Route 58, 1149 W. Golf Road 

(847)949-1550 www.doverstraits.net (847)884-3900 

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Book uour private parties here! 



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549 



Live Bands 
on Saturday 



V Spinney Run Shopping Plaza • 750 S. Hwy. 21' Gurnee 



Hours: M-Th 3pm-1 am 

Fri 2pm-2am ? Sat. 3pm-2am 

NOW OPEN SUNDAYS 

0347)223-7788 



: : Kllchon - 

'* Reopening: 

Soon 



Located 



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hi 




CLUB 

Since 19, 



3/4 Mile West of Rt. 59 
On Grass Lake Road 

25400 W.Bluff Lake • Antioch 

847-395-4050 

Thurs. 4:30-9:00 • Fri. 4:30-10:00 
Sat. 11:00-10:00 • Sun. 11:00-9:00 



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STEITZ'S 



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Has the finest food and view, on the Chain! it has been this way since 1938. 

Appetizers 

Crab Stuffed Mushrooms .*.*••••• $7.25 

Baked French Onion Soup......... $4.75 

Chicken Strips « •• ••••••••• ,...£*♦• jd 

Jalapcno Cheddar Poppers $4.75 

Fried Cheddar Cubes ; • $ 4 - 75 

Fried Mushrooms i • • f 4,75 

Mozzarella Strips $4.75 

Buffalo Style Chicken Wings - 10 Pieces $4.75 

Onion Rings ■ * * 

French Fries .................. ••••• ........jj.uu 

Soup of the Day ■ $ 3 - 00 

Light Dinner Entrees 

Leonardos Pizza •• ..........$7.uu 

Chicken Sandwich ■ ••• $u.J5 

fried teriyaki, lemon pepper, BBQ or flam broiled 

Steitz's Fried Canadian Perch Basket..... $6.95 

comes with french fries 



Bfcteitz's Boiled Haddock Basket $6.95 

comes with french fries > . 

Single Burger one 1/4 lb. patty .■....'. •••••• ...$4.95 

comes with lettuce, tomato; onion and fries 

Single Burger, two 1/4 lb. patties ....$6.75 . 

comes with lettuce, tomato, onion and fries 

Ribeye Sandwich - biggest one around! ,....$9.95 

Specials 

Ask Server for Availability 
Prime Rib Sandwich — •••• $9.J5 

Sliced Prime Rib covered with cheese and broiled 

Ask server about additional specials 

Dinner Entrees 

Served after 4:00pm. "All dinners come with soup, 
salad bar and your choice of baked potato, rice or fries. , 
Add French Onion Soup to any dinner - $2.00 

Fish 

Steitz's Boiled HaddockThis is what started it all.......$10.95 

Steitz's Fried Canadian Perch - Our Famous Fried Fish..$10.95 
Walleye Breaded in our famous batter! - Fried or Broiled$1 2.95 
Catfish Breaded in our famous batter! - Fried or Broiled $9.95 

Seafood 

Hand Breaded Jumbo Shrimp John's Favorite | 12,95 

Dijon Scallops...... • ••••• 5 5 

Dijon Shrimp '. ••♦ ••*•••••. 51 «5 

Snow Crab Four pounds of large legs..... .$20J5 

Dungeness Crab 3 Ibs.of claws yr«ll'll 

King CrabTwo pounds of split legs; eat them with a fork ..$29.95 



■ ■■ - 




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More... 

Ribeye Dinner Hand cut to the order $15.95 

New York Strip Steak Hand cut to the order....;. .$13.95 
Baby Back Ribs Full Slab $13.95 ...1/2 Slab > $9.95 

Prime Rib SATURDAY ONLY $16.95 

Pork Chops Two center cut pork chops. Very tasty! ..$10.95 

1/2 Fried Chicken never frozen ....... $8.95 

Spaghetti Dinner Secret Recipe from Germany ....$8.95 
Soup and Salad Bar... $6.95 

EXTRA'S 

Add to any dinner 

Snow Crab Legs .$4.95 Fried Shrimp . . .$4.95 

Two Piece Fried Chicken$3.95 Ribs . ... . . .$5.95 






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3/4 Mile W. of Rt. 59 On Grass Lake Road 

"LOOK FOR THE FLAGS" 




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May 1 0, 2002 



• — • 



Lakeland Newspapers 




11 






Bradley offers summer enrichment programs for high school students 



Acquaint students with nursing, physical therapy and teaching profi 





radley University, in Peoria will offer 
three one-week enrichment pro- 
grams for high school juniors and 
seniors in June on campus. 
The programs in nursing, physical thera-* 
py and teaching are designed to acquaint stu- 
dents with the many aspects of those profes- 
sions through a variety of experiences stress- 
ing hands-on participation. Participants will 
stay in Bradley residence halls where each 
room is equipped with a personal computer, 
printer and software. 



The enrichment programs will begin on 

Sunday, June 16 and conclude on Saturday, 

June 22. The cost of $325 includes six nights 

lodging, meals, entertainment and program 

costs. Applications are available on the 

Bradley web site at 
www.bradley.edu/ccd/summerenrichment, 

The deadline to register is June 1 although 

early applications are encouraged, as space 

in the programs is limited 

Participants in the nursing program will 

observe and interact with nurses in practice 



settings such as critical care, rehabilitation, 
obstetrical, medical, surgical and mental 
health units. The Bradley nursing laboratory 
will be used to practice cardiopulmonary 
resuscitation and nursing assessment tech- 
niques. Programs and tours will be held in 
clinical facilities in the Peoria area. 

The teaching program will give partici- 
pants the opportunity to assist and observe 
in classes designed for. students age five 
through twelve and explore careers in early 
childhood, elementary, special and sec- 



ondary education. 

The Physical Therapy/ Health Science 
program will introduce students to the 
physical therapy profession as well as other 
related health care careers. Participants will 



interact with physical therapists in a variety 
of real and mock practice environments and 
will include tours of several health care 

facilities. 

For more infonnation about the summer 
enrichment programs at Bradley, call the 
Program Coordinator at 309-677-2404 or visit 

the program web page at 
www.bradley.edu/ccd/summerenrichment. 



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Co-hosted by: 
Village of Gurnee, Mayor Rudny 

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Children 



adult classes 



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heavy shoe classes 
Libertyville Location 

more information, please contact 

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Barbara McNulty 

847.698 

e-mail: irshdancr@aol.com 
www.mcnultyirishdanc 












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6161 West Grand Avenue 
Please note the change to 3rd Thursday this month! 

11:00-11:30 a.m. New Member Orientation 
11:30 a.m. Registration & Networking 



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Prc-Register by: Monday, 13! 



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Call 847-249-3800 or email at: 
econinfo@lakecouiity-il.org 

For further inquiry regarding programs, events or membership to 

Lake County Chamber of Commerce 

Established in 1915 



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Favorite Restaurant 

COLONY HOU 






7#4e ^te#* Worn <w£ fan. 6&i Sfi&tiol Vay & 




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Surf & Turf -$16.95 

3 Jumbo Gulf Shrimp & 8 oz. " " 

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Smoothies 



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Prime Rib 

Queen $16 



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Chicken & Ribs- $12.95 

# All Specials Include Soup & Asparagus * 



Grass Lake Rd 




Moms recieve a FREE dessert 



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Grand Ave. 



Rollins Rd. 



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LAKELIFE 12 



Lakeland Newspapers 



May 10,2002 






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for Lunch Dinner & Late 




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All your favorite Italian dishes 
Outdoor garden patio 
# Banquets up to 1 60 



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, lovers of Italian cuisine and just plain great fo< 

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Moretti's a Chicago neighborhood favorite and 
a do whatever it takes to be Fox Lake's, too! 






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-An Ala Carte Entertainment Rcstau rant- 
Also located in Chicago's Edison Park neighborhood and the West Loop near the United 

Opening September at 1801 W. Lawrence, Chicago 



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Fox Lake 

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May 10, 2002 



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I- 







ow many hats does a mother wear? 
Too many to mention! A mother 
wears the hats of a cook, latin- 
dress, counselor, chauffeur, nurse, 
maid, teacher, and numerous others. 






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Thoughts on being a mom 

"If it was going to be easy to raise kids, it 
never would have started with something 
called labor." 

"Children are a great comfort in your old 
age; they help you reach it faster too. 

Let's face it, without our mom's none of 
us would be here! 

What does a mom do all day? 

I remember a funny cartoon on mother- 
hood that I saw many years ago. A husband 
arrived home from a hard day's work. 
Stepping over piles of laundry he made his 
way to the kitchen. He thought it strange 
that there was no aroma of dinner in the air. 
As he entered the kitchen he found his twin 
boys still in their pajamas playing in the dog 
food spilled all over the floor. 

The sink was piled high with dishes. His 
wife still in her robe was reading the newspa- 
per at the table cluttered with food leftover 
from breakfast. 

Bewildered, the husband asked, "Honey, 
what's going on?" "Well, dear," she replied, 
"Every day you come home from work and ask 
me what I did all day. Well, today I didn't do it!" 

'The Handprints' 

Handprints on the walls. What's a moth- 
er to do? When my son Ryan was in kinder- 
garten he brought home a paper with his fin- 
gerprints in a design resembling pussywil- 
lows. Next to the design was a poem: 

The Handprint 

Sometimes you get discouraged 
Because I am so small 

And always leave my fingerprints 
On furniture and walls. 

But every day I'm growing 

I'll be all grown up someday 

And those tiny little handprints 






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COMMUNITY 



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Lakeland Newspapers/ A7 







WMTDW 



Sharon Westbrook 



Will surely fade away. 

So here's a special handprint 

Just so you will recall 

Exacdy how my fingers looked 

When I was very small. 

■ 

'The Joys Of Motherhood' 

When motherhood is wearing you out, 
stop and reflect on the joys of being a moth- 
er. Write down the funny things your chil- 
dren say. I remember my daughter Kristi 
reciting "Mary had a little lamb, its "fleas" 
were white as snow." 

I was blessed to have my mother come to 
help me after the birth of each of my three 
children. With a newborn in the house meal- 
times can be very busy. It seems like as soon 
as you sit down to eat the baby cries and 
wants to eat too. 

One day my mother and I were rushing to 
get lunch on the table as the baby was sleep- 
ing. We filled everyone's plates and began to 
eat. Russell, my 5-year-old, gently reminded 
us that we forgot to pray. Grandma asked him 
if he would say the prayer. He began, "Dear 
God, thank you for this food and sorry we're 
in such a rush. Amen." 

Mother of it all 

Sunday, May 12th is Mother's Day. 
Thank your mother for instilling the values 
that made you the person you are today. Also 
remember other significant people in your 
life that helped you to be a better mom. Hats . 
off to all mothers everywhere! Have a very 
Happy Mother's Day!! 

Readers with information for "News- 
Worthy" should call Sharon Westbrook at 
847-395-3079. 










_. • ■ 




Celebration 

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of J\ging! 



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Presented by Vista Health 

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In conjunction with 
The Village at Victory Lakes and the • 
Elder College of the College of Lake County 

Enjoy a morning of inspiration 

and information 
Designed for adults aged 55 and over 

Workshops. Information Booths. 

Borders Book Table. Entertainment. 

Door Prizes. Refreshments. 



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C'OSi; $20 ($15 for Senior Spirit members) includes workshop materials, 

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entertainment, continental breakfast and box lunch 

■ 

If you'd like, leave the driving to us. For an additional $10, ride the bus from 

Waukegan and avoid the traffic and parking at the college. Bus leaves Bertrands 

Bowling Alley, across from Provena Saint Therese Medical Center on Washington 

Street, Waukegan, at 7:30 a.m.; leaves the College of Like County at 1 p.m. 

Call 1-800-843-2464 for more information. 





theMuage 



at Victory Lakes 




College of Lake County 






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Name: Giha Maglio 
Home: Trevor, Wis. 



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Occupation: I am man- 
ager at Main Street Frozen 
Custard and Coffee House 

Community 
involvement: Chamber 

of Commerce 







I'm originally from: 

Trevor, Wis. 





. 



/ 



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1 graduated from: 

Central High School 

My family consists of: My husband 

Tony, andmy mom and dad, my brother 
and my grandparents. 

My pets are: I have a dog, an alligator 
and a cat. 



things like the carnival and 
the Taste. 

Favorite TV .show is: 

"Dawson's Creek" 

Favorite band or 

musician: Madonna 

Favorite restaurant: 

O utback Steak House 

* ' * ■ - 

My life's motto is: 

Live every day like it's your 
last. 



If I won the lottery, I would: It 

would depend on how big the pot is. 



My greatest accomplishment is: 

Finding my husband. He's a hardworking, 
nice guy. 



What I like best about my town: 

I grew up here so I know it well, and I 
know a lot of people. 

The secret to my success is: It's 

not who you are, it's who you know. 

I relax by: Sleep is my favorite relaxation. 

My perfect day in Antioch would 

be: When there is good weather for 



I want to be remembered as: 

The nice lady from the custard shop. 

My pet peeve is: There are just too 
many to list. 

Most interesting person I ever 

met was: Lots of interesting people 
come into the shop. I think everybody is 
interesting. 

If I had a plane ticket anywhere, 

I would go to: Alaska. 



If you have a "Neighbor" that you would like to see profiled in this column, call 
Lakeland Newspapers at 847-223-8161. 





GOT SOMETHING GOING ON? GIVE US A CALL! 

Call 847-223-8161 or e-mail calendar@lakelandmcdia.com 
■ A 14-day notice is requested for all items. 



Friday, May 10 

Fri. 6-9 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-noon, Walk-in 
registration held at the'Lindenhurst Village Hall 
for the Girls Iceless Hockey program for first thru 
eighth graders who are residents of Lake Villa 
Twp. and surrounding areas. Registration fee is 
$45 ($30 for additional family members). A $10 
late fee will be charged after the dates of walk-in 
reg. Space is limited, first come-first serve. 
League play begins in early Sept. and runs for 
about 12 weeks. For more info., visit 
www.giha.org where you can also download forms 



83 in Lake Villa. Babies and toddlers are always 
welcome. For info., call Janet, at 847-265-1671 



Wednesday, May 15 

6:30 p.m., TOPS Weight Loss weigh-in, 7 p.m. 
meeting at Antioch Senior Center, 817 Holbeck, 
info, at 847-395-6443 or 847-395-8143 



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6:30 p.m., Lake County Parents Without Partners 
Chapter 247 holds a Newcomer Orientation at 
the Lake Villa VFW. General meeting follows with 
speaker, dancing and socializing. Event is open to 
all single, divorced or widowed parents. For 
further information, call 847-817-5687 



7 p.m., Burlington Genealogical Society meets at 
the Public Library, comer of Pine and Jefferson 
St. Call Marion at 414-763-6981 or Merilyn at 

414-728-2225 

■ . . . 

7:30 p.m., The Republican Club meets at Antioch 
Twp. Hall, 847-395-1670 



■ tu.H'1 



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•••■■•* 



Saturday, May 11 

9 a.m.-3 p.m., Second Annual Plant Sale held at 
Winchester House, comer of Milwaukee Ave. and 
Winchester Rd. Residents present vegetables, 
herbs, annuals, gift baskets and more, produced 
during Horticulture Therapy. Proceeds benefit that 
program and residents. Anyone wishing to make 
plant donations for the sale may contact Mary 
Purnell at 847-377-7225. All are welcome 



4-6 p.m., The Lake County Health Department 
will be at the Aniioch VFW Post #4451, 75 
North Ave. Immunizations of all types are avail, at 
a low cost. For more info., call the Health Dept. 
at 847-360-6761 



I IHI I Hl lH HHUfl M H ' i -""""""—""' 



<!••.. .......I- ...... -■■•••••• 



Sunday, May 12 

Mother's Day observed 



Monday, May 13 

12:45 p.m., Bingo held at The Antioch Senior 
Center, call 847-395-7120 for details 



Thursday, May 16 

8-9 a.m., Network Lake County, a business 
networking group, meets at In-Laws restaurant in 
Gumee, guests invited, call 847-548-5305 

| .M.l»IM»..ll»"-»lll«W«nWWtW"«l -M *I IM»M '"«'— """-"""""""'""""""""""''"*"*"""' 

11 a.m.-4 p.m., Annual Senior Fair held at 
Winchester House, corner of Milwaukee Ave. and 
Winchester Rd. in Libertyville. Vendors from a 
variety of organizations specializing in senior 
services will be on hand and senior resources will 
be presented. Free and open to the public, raffle 
prizes awarded. Call Quimby Ross at 847-377- 
7227 to find out more 



.................. 



M**1 



.... -• ■ ••■ 



6:30-8:45 p.m., Lake County Libertarian Group 
meets at the Ela Public Library, 275 Mohawk 
Trail (just off Rand Rd.) in Lake Zurich in Meeting 
Room A. All are welcome to join the group on the , 
second Monday of each month. For more details, 
call Eric at 847-438-7776 



12-2 p.m., Advocates for FMS (Fibromyalgia) 
support group now meets in the Community 
Building at 884 Main St. in Antioch. For more 
information call Kathy at 847-395-3716 



.*..•...<* 



.......,......-..—.............-...-......■.. 



i iiii"» i "mi i ii i Miii 



7-9 p.m., Lakes Area Community Band rehearsal 
at Antioch Community High School, information 
at 847-395-6729 



.................... 



.-.•■••••• •.* ••*•■•• 



Tuesday, May 14 

11 a.m. AARP (for adults 55 and older) meets at 
Antioch Senior Center, 817 Holbeck Dr., for more 

info., call 847-395-5068 



7:30 p.m., Northern Lake County Illinois 
Compassionate Friends Chapter meets at 
Millburn Church, .comer of Grass Lake Rd. and 
Rte. 45 in Millburn. The group assists families 
toward resolution of grief following the death of a 
child of any age and helps others be supportive. 
For further information, call 847-395-8597 or . 

847-838-0912 



...... 



•••«•••••••••••••••••••••••••■*••*»••• 



. . 



6-8 p.m., Bariatric Treatment Centers (BTC) 
support group meets downstairs at the Antioch 
Senior Center, 817 Holbeck Dr (behind the fire 
station). Call Karen at 847-395-6244 



Friday, May 17 

7:30-10:30 p.m., Lake County Astronomical 
Society meets at Volo Bog State Natural Area. 
Meeting Is followed by a viewing period starting at 
9:30 p.m. For info., call 815-344-1294 



■■■>••*■■•■.>•••••••••■••• 



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H HI WHIIK 



6:45 p.m., Antioch VFW Bingo, doors open 4:30 
p.m., call 8447-395-5393 



— ••■•" 



7 p.m., The Northern Illinois Conservation Club 
hold the monthly board meeting. For more info., 
call 847-395-NICC 



Saturday, May 18 

9 a.m.-3 p.m., Annual Plant Sale sponsored by 
the Antioch Garden Club. Held at 154 E. North 
Ave. (1/4 mile east of Main St. on the south 
side) in Antioch 



... 



....... ....... ......... .....•■••••« 



»»•.«,»••••«••*•••••••••••••••» 



7-8 p.m. Weigh to Win program held at Calvary 
Christian Center, Monaville Rd., west of Rte. 83 
in Lake Villa. Call 847-356-6181 for info. 



• ■••a ■.*■■■■• ••■•■■■ •■■■• »•»••..-.••••••»»•••«••••••••««••«•»•••»•••••*»■ 



...i......... ...................... 



7:30 p.m., La Leche League of Central Lake 
County meeting, titled "Extended Breastfeeding/ 
will be held at the United Methodist Church, on 
Sherwood, south of Grand Ave. and west of Rte. 



Sunday, May 19 

10 a.m.-4 p.m., Household Pet Cat Show and 
Competition held at the McHenry County 
Fairgrounds, Country Club Rd., just east of Rte. 
47 in Woodstock. Per services, crafts, products, 
raffles, and more for the whole family. Free park- 
ing, $3 admission, free for ages 12 and under. 
Must have registered in advance to bring pets. 
Sponsored by The Assisi Animal Foundation. For 
entry info., call 847-649-5442, for other details, 
call the AAF at 815-455-9411 



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A8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



May 1 0, 2002 





-••' 



••• ............. 



Spring musical 

St. Peter School students iocused on free- 
dom during its spring musical "Sing, America 

Sing." > t - f 

An afternoon program was presented tor 

grandparents and an evening performance for 



parents and siblings. 

Teachers retire 

Two teachers at Emmons School Dist. 33. 
will retire at the end of the school year. 

Beverly Kramer is presently the band and 
vocal music instructor. She has been in the 

district for 32 years. 

Kathy Lyman is the middle school math 



teacher and middle school team facilitator, 

She has been in the district for 15 years. 

Both have worked to make a strong differ- 
ence in the lives of the students they have 
worked with over the years. 




i * 



: 



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(in the Dominick's Plaza • Rt 1 2 & 1 34 • Fox 



Are You Suffering From 

• Neck/Back Pain • Headaches 

• Heel Spurs 

• Work Injury 



MENTION THIS 



I 



► Carpel Tunnel 
Personal Injury 



. -i i 



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FREE . 

ury Severity 
Evaluation 

Includes: 
Consultation Exam & X- Rays 






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I 






Former students sought 

Emmons School will be holding a special 
assembly on Wednesday, May 15 at 2:15 p.m. 
to honor retiring teachers Beverly Kramer 

and Kathy Lyman. 

Community members and former stu? 

dents are invited to attend the event, though 
it is especially to give Emmons students an 
opportunity or recognize the accomplish- 
ments of these teachers. 

Former students who would like to make 
a comment or share some memories of 
either, or both, Kramer or Lyman should con- 
tact the school at 847-395-1105. i 

* * . 

Cheesecake fund-raiser 

The Antioch Community High School 
AMPS (Antioch Music and Performance 
Sponsors) organization pick up for the 
Gourmet Delight Cheesecakes will be May 10. 

For more information, contact either 
Mary Ellen Casey 847-838-1305 or Patti 
Brooke 847-395-2158. 

Development screening 

Children between the ages of 3-5 years 
old are eligible for early childhood develop- 
ment screening through Antioch Community 
Consolidated Dist. 34. 

The screening is a brief series of activities 
and observations designed to identify chil- 
dren who may have a potential problem 
requiring further assessments. 

Call the Dist. 34 special education office 
at 847-838-8020 to schedule an appointment. 



«...«».« — —— — «"«■—»■ — *- 




Call Toda 



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Walk- In 
t^Welcom 



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HOURS: 

^ M-F 

J ^\& 2pm-7pm 
^Sat 9am-Noon 




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Full-day kindergarten 

St. Peter School in Antioch offers a full- 
day kindergarten program with a fi 
riculum. The program offers a variety of expe- 
riences that include phonetically based, 
hands on reading and language arts program 
as well as a hands on mathematics program. 

The program includes all subject areas 
that are meaningful to a kindergarten student 
in a Catholic environment. 

Call 847-395-0037 to schedule a class- 
room visit. Applications for the 2002-03 

school year are now being accepted. JHBi 




DdTHS 









. 



When you or someone you know needs help, you can now receive expert addiction 
treatment at All Saints Healthcare in Racine. In the first association of its kind, All 
Saints Mental Health & Addiction Services and the internationally-known Hazelden 
program, have joined together to bring this confidential, comprehensive and 
successful treatment program closer to where people live and work. 

Call us at (262) 687-8626 or (262) 687-2273. 

9301 Washington Avenue, Racine 

Only 25 minutes north of Gurnee 

www.allsaintshealthcare.com 



M>*aiA*o 









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Center for Addiction Rec 

In Association with HAZELDEN 



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Now Taking 
New Registrations 

• Ages Gwhs - 12yrs 

• Large Infant Boom 
Pre-School Included in 

3-4 year-old rooms 
Large Fenced Play Yards 

• Experienced, Loving 
Teachers - Low Batios 



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847*487*8980 

202 Harnett Rd 
Island Lake, IL 

60062 




Conner Ward and Derrick Ward, twins, Conner 
and Derrick were born March 27 at Condell Medical 
Center in Ubertyville to Grant and Valerie Ward of 
Antioch. Their siblings are Nathan, age 2 and Alicia, 
age 4. Grandparents are Darryl and Mary Klein of 
Vernon Hills; Phyllis and Larry Kapis of McHenry, 
Jan Biggs of Moline and Rick Ward of East Moline. 
Great grandparents are William Klein of Glenview; 
Jeannie Dehnicke of Mercer, Wis.; Bill and Virginia 
Sease of Cadiz, Ky.; Jeanne Vanvoltenberg of East 
Moline and Lela Ward of East Moline. 

— ; • 

Isabella Lynn Stone, a daughter, Isabella Lynn, 
was born April 7 at Condell Medical Center to 
Anthony Stone and Crystal Bems of Salem, Wis. 
Grandparents are Steve and Tina Berns of Bristol, 
Wis., Lynn Stone of Salem, Wis.; David Stone of 
Crooked Lake. Great grandparents are Ronald and 
Cathy Berns of St. Charles; Colleen and Allan Weiss 
of Purling, NY; Etta Peters of Grayslake; Reginald 
Cross of Round Lake Beach and Patricia Paulina of 
Florida. 

i 

- * 

Cecilia Francesca Pierce, a daughter, Cecilia 
Francesca, was born April 7 at Condell Medical 
Center to Gregory and Debra Pierce of Antioch. Her 
sisters are Amelia, age 8, Camilla, age 3 and Isabella 
Pierce, age 2. Grandparents are Lola DeSantis of 
Dayton, Ohio and Douglas and Nancy Riner of 
Kingsport, Tenn. 

■ 

Kathryn, Nicole Boyd, a daughter, Kathryn 
Nicole, was born April 11 at Condell Medical Center 
to George and Jennifer Boyd of Salem, Wis. Her 
brother is Mark, age 13. Grandparents are Karen 
Kuechle of Antioch; George and Mary Boyd of 
Antioch and Jerry and Marcia Kuechle of Sevierville, 
Tenn. 

Riley Dale Juszczyk, a son, Riley Dale, was bom 
April 19 at Condell Medical Center to Gisey and Julie 
Juszczyk of Antioch. Grandparents are Jerry and Linda 
O'zee of Waukegan; Susan Juszczyk of Wild wood and 
Chester Juszczyk Sr. of Ann Arbor, Mich. Great grand- 
parents are Marguerite Thomas of Zion and Rene and 
Nina DeRoover of Tecumseh, Mich. 

Colton Cooper Schubat, a son, Colton Cooper 
was born April 27 at Northern Illinois Medical 
Center in McHenry to Frank and Shannon Schubat 
of Genoa City, Wis. Grandparents are Clifford and 
Kathy Cooper of Twin Likes, Wis., Frank Schubat of 
Mundelein and Denise Harvey of Lake Villa. 



Sewer credits available 

Sewer credits are available at Village Hall, 
prior to water use, for those filling swimming 
pools or for residents with new lawns. 

The sewer credit for new lawns is a one- 
time, one-month credit. Questions should be 
addressed to Village Hall at 847-395-1000. 

Camp Crayon registration 

' Registration for Antioch residents for the 
parks department's Camp Crayon begins on 
June 1 from 9 a.m.-noon at the parks office 
located at 806 Holbek Dr. 

This pre-school program is for children 
between the ages of 3-5 years old who are potty 
trained. Classes begin the week of Sept. 9. 

A 3-year-old class will be held on Monday 
and Wednesday from 8:20-11 a.m. A 4-year- 
old class on Tuesday and Thursday from 8:20- 
11 a.m. A pre-kindergarten class for 4-year- 
olds well be held Tuesday, Wednesday and 
Thursday afternoons from noon-3 p.m. 

Children in the afternoon class must be 
attending kindergarten in the following year. 

For costs and more information, call the 
parks office at 847-395-2160. 

Pageant deadline nears 

The deadline for this year's annual Miss, 
Junior and Littie Miss Pageants is Friday, May 

10 at 5 p.m. 

. The pageant will be held on Saturday, 
June 22 at the Antioch Community High 
School (ACHS) north gymnasium. 

Litde Miss is for girls 6-8 years old, Junior 
for 11-to 13-year-olds, and Miss is for tiiose 
between the ages of 16-21 years old. 

Rules and regulations are available at the 
parks office located at 806 Holbek Dr. 

Relief efforts 

The Antioch Rescue Squad is establishing 
a drop off station at its headquarters located 
at 825 Holbek Dr. for the disaster recovery 

effort in New York. 

The American Red Cross in New York told 
the Antioch Rescue Squad that it would be in 
need of the following items over the next 10- 
14 months: Vicks VapoRub, knee pads, respi- 
rator masks, saline nasal spray, camping 
shovels, new work boots (size 10 and larger), 
large and extra large T shirts, flashlights, flash- 
light batteries, work socks, coveralls with sus- 
penders (K-Mart) and work gloves. 

Additionally, small cash donations will be 
needed to help offset the costs for shipping. 



CPU classes held 

The Antioch Rescue Squad and the 
Antioch Fire Dept offer CPR classes to the 
public on the second and fourth Wednesday 
of each month at 6 p.m. at the Antioch Fire 
Dept located at 835 Holbek Dr. . 

The fee of $5-$15 per person (depending 
on the class needed) is payable at the time of 
the class. For more information or to make 
reservations, call the Antioch Fire Dept. at 
847-395-5511. 

• ^ r 

St. Peter's singles 

St. Peter Church has a support group, St. 
Peter's Singles, that supports the emotional 
needs of those separated, divorced or wid- 
owed. The group meets on the second Monday 
of the month in the church basement 

Enter the church on the east side, back 
entrance. For more information, call eiUier 
Deacon Bob Gagnon at 847-395-3024 (e-mail 
at deacongag@yahoo.com) or Patti Vavrina at 
847-740-04 17 (e-mail dioviacon@aol.com). 



Take pounds off 

TOPS (take pounds off sensibly) meets 
every Wednesday at the Antioch Senior 
Center. Weigh-ins begin at 6:30 p.m., and the 
meetings begin at 7 p.m. For more informa- 
tion call 847-395-6443 or 847-395-8143. 

The Antioch Senior Center is located at 
817 Holbek Dr., behind the fire station. 



Bingo held at WW Hall 

The Antioch VFW sponsors bingo every 
Tuesday night at the VFW Hall on North Ave. 
from 4:30-6:30 p.m. 

The public is welcome. Pull tabs are avail- 
able, and there is a new lightening game. For 
more information call 847-395-5393. 

Community Telecare 

Community Telecare will call and give a 
daily check to those who live alone or are 
shut-in. The service is free and is provided by 
volunteers. 

For those who would like this service, or 
know someone else who would call either 

847-395-2240 or 847-395-0897. 



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JohnPhelps 






Please turn to 




_ _ _ . 0-0 

with an attitude 



for additional 
Sports Coverage 



May 10, 2002 



Lakeland Newspapers / A9 









eyes on 




By JOE PRUSKI 

Correspondent 



■■ 









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Buffalo Grove firefighters Mike Boyd 
(left) and Dave Kelly instruct Buffalo 
Grove G.C. Director of Golf Carmen 
Molinaro on the proper use of an auto- 
matic external defibrillator (AED). The 
Village of Buffalo Grove has purchased 
these life-saving devices for its use on 
Buffalo Grove and Arboretum golf 
courses this season. 





avers 






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TT A "yitli the crazy golfers we have 
\\ /\\ / aroun d these parts, it's easy to 
W W/ ove rto°k weather elements. 
W u Especially when they're having 
that career-round. 

But say a golfer goes into cardiac arrest 
and is suffering a heart attack on the course, 
whether it is from the extreme heat or a light- 
ning strike. 

Area golf courses generally have had their 
bases covered with close ties with the local 
police and fire departments being only min- 
utes away* ...••■■ 

"All of our employee's also take CPR train- "- 
ing courses," said Sam Ziccarelli, director of 
golf at Carillon North in Grayslake. 

But that extra minute can be crucial, if not 
life threatening. 

So to minimize that margin of error, many 
courses have equipped their pro shops with 
automatic external defibrillators (AED's). 

"We don't have the AED's right now. But I 
know bigger courses have them because they . 
have a lot more play," added Ziccarelli. ' 

Two tracks that have added AED's to their 
arsenal include The Arboretum Club and 
Buffalo Grove, both Village of Buffalo Grove 
courses. 

"Our staff participates in CPR training 
each year but having the AED's gives the 

. golfers the peace of mind that if anything cata- 
strophic should happen, they know we are 
properly equipped to save their life," said 
Cannen Molinaro, director of golf at Buffalo 
Grove G.C. 

According to Condell Director of Sports 
Medicine Larry Scire, that extra minute can be 

fatal. 

"You're extending the window of opportu- 
nity where saving a life is concerned," he said. 
"CPR is good because it gets the blood pump- 
ing to the brain. But while in cardiac arrest, 
the heart is unstable and fluctuating. Blood 
going to the brain is vital but doesn't necessar- 
ily mean it's converting the heart rate, or 
rhythm of the heart." 

What an AED does is it converts an unsta- 
ble heartbeat back to normal rhythm. Most of 
the AED's are hand-held devices equipped 
with full instructions. 

And if the person isn't responding to the 
AED, which can take up to three shocks, con- 
tinue doing CPR. Obviously, one of the first 
steps though is to call 91 1. 

"We hope that all golf courses, public or 
private, are equipped with these life-saving 
devices in the very near future," added 

Molinaro. * 

As a golfer for the past 30 years, I certainly 

hope so. 

I'd take a triple-bogey anytime in lieu of a 

heart attack anytime. ; 



The Antioch High School softball team is 
two wins away from a share of the conference 
championship. The only problem is, they 
have to beat conference-leading Mundelein. 
Twice. 

Antioch currently stands at 14-7 overall 
and a 6-2 record in the North Suburban Lake 
Division. Their only two losses in conference 
came last week at the hands of Stevenson. 
Stevenson is 0-2 in the league with its only 
losses coming to guess whom, Mundelein. 
In Antioch's two games against the Pats last 
week, both ended in 1-0 losses, with the sec- 
ond loss going eight innings. 

"Both were really close games," said 
Antioch head coach Jen Schultz. "We're right 
there with Stevenson, the games were just a 
flip of die coin." 

Antioch defeated Warren in both games 
of a doubleheader earlier in the week. Antioch 
won die first 7-3 before prevailing 8-2 in the 
nightcap. 

Pitcher Kristen Elstrom got the win in 
both games for Antioch, improving her record 

to 11-5. 

Antioch has gotten solid hitting this sea- 
son from Lindsey Gruber, Carolyn Cooley, 
• arid Laura Weber. They "have also been get- 
ting strong defensive support from Amanda 
Pollitt in center field and Jackie Schmidt in 

left. 

This weekend, Antioch will travel. up to 
Wisconsin to play in a four-team tournament 
against schools in Wisconsin. This is the 
team's first time playing in the Grafton 
Tournament. : 

Antioch will trjen travel to Mundelein 
May 14 for the first of two showdowns with 
the Mustangs. The Sequoits hosting 
Mundelein at Polley Field May 16 beginning 
at 4:30 p.m will follow that. 










Antioch's Kelly Wells slides safely into home plate during a 7-1 victory over 
Libertyville. The Sequoits have two crucial conference games with Mundelein next 
week.— Photo by Steve Young 



A former Mundelein assistant 
coach before coming to Antioch two years ago, 
Schultz still has ties to Mundelein, which 
make the games all that much more meaning- 
ful! 



i - - , 

Schultz. 

Although Schultz wants to see her former 
students succeed, her goal in winning both 

games isn't lost. 

"It would be sweeter to beat them 



•*• 



"There are still some kids that I taught . because they're always on top," said Schultz. 
when they were younger" and some kids I "And it's always nice to see an underdog come 
coached that play on the team now," said up." 




track lookin 







• 

Several individuals have hopes for state meet 



By JOE PRUSKI 
Corres 




Antioch's Chris Coleman takes flight 
during the long jump at the Stevenson 
Relays.— Photo by Steve Young 



The Antioch High School boy's track 
team finished 10th with 28 at the 18-team 
Lake County Invitational last week in 
Deerfield. 

"I figured that if we got any points, 
being as young as we were, it would be a 
good meet," said head coach Norm Hahn. 
Antioch freshman Anthony Baruffi took 
first in the county in the 400-meter with a. 
time of 51.1 seconds. Sophomore Michael 
Perry finished second in the county in the 
300-meter intermediate hurdles with a 
time of 40.9. One of only eight seniors, 
Ryan Jordan placed fourth in the discus 
with a length of 138.2-feet. 

Other place-winners had Andy Napier 
taking fifth place in the 1600-meter with a 



Tm hoping to finish in tlte top-lwlf. 

There will be 12 sclwols tiiere, if we 

could finish fourth it would be 

reallvuoodJ 



Antioch boys track coach 
Norm Hahn 



• i 






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The Grayslake Park District is participating 
in the Hershey track and field competition. 
The event will take place on Saturday, May 18 
at the Grayslake High School track. Ages are 
from 9-14, and the event will start at 9 a.m. 
The rain date is June 1. For more information, 
call the park district at 847-223-7529. 

John G. Phelps can be reached at 847-223- 
8161, ext. 132; fax (847) 223-8810; or e-mail at 
edit@lnd.com. 




Listen -up 

The Lake Villa Travelers get a pep talk before going out to play ball against 
McHenry in the first round of the AABC state tourney.— Photo by Samir id-Been 



time of 4:33. The 1600-meter relay team of 
Baruffi, Perry, Mike Addison, and John 
Ferris finished fourth. . 

On the season, Hahn believes that the 
team has improved and done well for the 
amount of inexperience they carry with 

them. 

Antioch lost only twice in their divi- 
sion (North Suburban Conference Lake 
Division) to Stevenson and Libertyville. It 
won duel meets against Lake Forest, 
Mundelein, and Warren in their division, 
as well as beat Round Lake and Wauconda 
in crossover meets. Antioch finished the 
season in conference with a 5-2 duel-meet 

record. 

On May 9, the Sequoits will compete 
in the North Suburban Conference meet 
being held at Round Lake High School. 
"I'm hoping to finish in the top-half," 
Hahn said. "There will be 12 schools 
there, if we could finish fourth it would be 

really good." 

Antioch will then compete in section- 
als May 17 at Grayslake. The first events 
will get underway at 4:30 p.m. With many 
of the same team's attending that section- 
al that were at the county meet, Hahn 
believes that Perry, Baruffi, and Jordan, all 
have a decent chance to advance to the 

state finals. 

"If they run a good race I think they 

can qualify," said Hahn. 






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A10 /Lakeland Newspapers 






SPORTS 



May 10, 2002 \ 



• 







occer coi 





Mr 







The well-known and established S.C. 
Chicago Kickers, directed by Grayslake resi- 
dent Tommy Soehn, have made Lake Villa 

their new home. c ^k« 

The move was orchestrated when Soenn 

moved to Grayslake and saw the need for a 

youth soccer program in Northern Lake 

County. • . • 

With over 10 years as a professional soccer 

player and now as a coach with the Chicago 
Fire, Soehn will bring the most up-to,date 
training to the Kickers. •/:;::■ . p 

The Kickers are currendy m the process oi 
building two premier soccer fields and a club- 
house on the property of the German Aid 
Society in Lake Villa. The target date for com- 
pletion of die fields is fall, 2003 and in the 
meantime, the Kickers have arranged for the 
use of soccer fields through local organiza- 

- Chicago Kickers teams will be established 



for the upcoming Fall 2002/Spring 2003 sea- 

S ° n Tryouts for the Girls' U13 and U14 will be 
held on May 10 from 6-7:30 p.m., tryouts for 
the Boys' U10 and Ull will be held on May 17 1 
from 5:30-6:30 p.m. and tryouts for Boys U 12, 
U13 and U14 will be held on May 17 from 
6:30-7:30 p.m. A make-up day will be held on 
May 18 from 9-10 a.m. for those players who 
can't attend the dates listed above. 

All tryouts will be held at the German Aid 
Society, located at 259 W. Grand Ave., approx- 
imately one mile west of Rte. 83^^^ 
Tryouts for high school boys will be held in 

October. . . , ■' ■ . 

The primary goal of the Kickers organiza- 
tion is to provide kids with the instrucUon 
they need to become successful youth soccer 

P ^Once the new fields are completed, addi- 
tional teams and age groups will be added. 



Chicago Kickers teams will be proved 
with professional trainers and a coaching 
director in order to provide the best oppor- 
tunities Tor players to be successful, tor 
additional information, call (847) 680- 0923 

or (847) 356-5311. 
. snrrpr canros will also be offered this 



summer through Tommy Soehn Socoer. 
Camps at various locations, including the 
Cog of Lake County. Professional coaches 
and players will be the instructors You can 
obtain a brochure and enrollment form at 
www.soehnSoccercamps.com or by calling 

(312) 951-1710. 



•Li 









• 



• 




Results 

Soccer 

The Lindenhurst Predators were on 

fire Sunday as it defeated Trevian, 4-1, Robert 
Node started the team off crossing a shot just 
oveT the keeper's hands for the first jg oal. 
Minutes later, Shane Hunter scored the 
team's second goal from the right side. 

In the second half, Trevian scored imme- 
diately but Taylor Westrate answered back 
and blasted the ball into the goal after a corner 
kick. Shane Hunter scored again late in the 
2nd half with a powerful kick from center. 
Keeper Danny Hourihan, with one save for the 
game, played aggressively, attacking the baU 
constandy. Odier standouts included David 
Franco, Jack McCollum, Mitchell Post and 

Andre Sippy. . • . ¥¥11 

The Lindenhurst Tornado ull 

boy's soccer team earned a 2-2 tie with the 
Buffalo Grove Avalanche. Eric Hoist and 
Joshua Oppenheim scored goals. 

Dishing out the. assists were Kyle Sytsma 

and Andy Donovan: ... _ 

Drew Jones recorded five saves while Matt 
Holmes added one in combining efforts in 

goal. ' 

Tryouts/registration 

Soccer ■ ' • . 

Tryouts for the 2002-03 Lindenhurst 

Area Youth Soccer Club will be held on 

tiiree dates during the month of May. Girls 

• aces 8-19 will try out on Sat, May 11 from 5-7 

p m.Then, boy's ages 9-14 will have tryouts on 

Sat., May 18 from 5-7 p.m. A make-up day is 

scheduled for Mon., May 20 from 6-8 p.m. , 

All tryouts will be held at Polley Field, 

^ located at the corner of Deep Lake and Grass 



Lake Roads. u . 

Players should bring soccer shoes, shin 

guards, water and a soccer ball. . 

All players are welcome to try-out, meet 
the coaches and learn about Lindenhurst s 
Premier Travel Soccer Club. . , 

For further information regarding tryouts, 
please contact Bob Baker at 847-265-0046 or 
Paul McMahon at 847-265-9601. You may also 
send inquiries to lasc@soccer.com. Interested 
players can also check out the web site 
www.eteamz.com/lasc. ■: 

Throughout the month of May, the 
Lindenhurst Park District will be holding 
registration for the fall 2002 and spring 2003 
voutii soccer seasons. Registration will be tak- 
ing place at the Lindenhurst Park District 
Community Center, 2200 E. Grass Lake Rd. 

Sign-ups are for. any youth in grades 
kindergarten through eighth-grade. The fees 
are $50 per child and $45 for each additional- 

child 4 -- '•'*•. ... , Y j a 

After May, registration will be closed and 

interested players will be put on a waiting list 
with no guarantee they will be put on a team. 

A one-time uniform purchase consisting 
of a reversible jersey and socks is required. 

Black shorts are also required and may be 
purchased if needed. Players also need to pro- 
vide shin guards. First-time players also need 
to provide a copy of their birth certificate 

when registering. ' . r 

Each fall and spring season consists of one 
practice during the week and seven games on 

Saturday. ; 

For further information please call Laura 

at the Lindenhurst Park District at 847-356- 
6011. 




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News and notes 

T'ai Chi Chih practice will, continue 
May. 18 from 9-11 a.m. at the State Bank of the 
Lakes in Grayslake. This is not a teaching 
class. For teaching information, please call 
Donna McElhose at 847-223-6065. 
Super Raffle 

The Lakeland Cardinals Football 
and Cheerleading Association had a 
huge turnout for its Super Raffle at 
Templeton's Point over the weekend; 

The top-prize of $2,500 went to John Gier, 
Sr. Gier incidentally donated $300 back to the 
Cardinals. Jerry Carlson won $1,500 for sec- 
ond while Lisa and Ron Sanchez and Randy 
Olson won the third-place prize of $500. All 
are residents of Ingleside. 

On a related note, the Cardinals will be 
holding registration for football on June 29-30 
from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Grant Community 
High School varsity football field. 

The Cards would like to thanks everyone 
who attended and contributed to the Super 
Raffle. 

Camps 

Basketball 

Trinity International University in 
Deerfield will be holding two boy's basketball 
camps this summer. Trinity Total 
Basketball Camps are designed to provide 
a fun environment that stresses individual 
fundamentals and total athletic development. 
The first camp will be held Mon.-Fri., June 10- 
14 and is a day camp for players currently in 
grades 5-9. The camp will run from 9 a.m.-3 
p.m. The cost for this camp is $140. The sec- 
ond camp will be held Sun.-Thurs., June 16-20 
and is a residential camp for players currently 
in grades 7-12. The cost is $340 for the residen- 
tial "play and $240 for the non-residential plan. 

For more information or a registration 
brochure call the men's basketball office at 

847-317-7098. 

Names in the news 

Antioch Community High School 
freshman Andrew Bar uf fi won the 400 run 

with a time of 51.1 second at the Lake County 
Invitational Boy's Track Meet at Deerfield 
over the weekend. As a team, the Sequoits fin- 
ished 10th with 26 points. There were 18 
teams in the field. 











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A1 2/Lakeland Newspapers 






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COMMUNITY 



May I ft 2002 



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Persons charged with a crime are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. 




• - 



ANTIOCH 



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DM 

David J. Dombkowski, 40, of 8531 235th 

Ave., Salem, Wis., was arrested for driving 

under the influence of alcohol on May 4 at 

1:45 a.m. on Rte. 83 north of North Ave. 
Dombkowski failed to dim his lights as he 

passed Antioch police. The officer turned 
around to follow the vehicle and witnessed it 
cross over the fog line several times "almost 
crashing into the ditch line." 

Dombkowski was stopped north of the 
border and Kenosha County Sheriffs officers 

arrived to assist. 

Dombkowski slurred his speech and the 
strong odor of alcoholic beverage was detect- 
ed on his breath as Antioch police checked 
his driver's license. He failed all field sobriety 

* , - - 

tests requested of him. 

He was arrested and transported to the 
Antioch Police Dept. where he was put 
through booking procedures. Dombkowski 
refused all chemical testing. He was issued 
citations for DUI, improper lane usage and 
failure to dim headlights. 

Dombkowski was released on $300 cash 
bond pending his May 21 court date. 

Warrant arrest 

Heather J. ChiuiTo, 22, of 587 Main St., 
Antioch, was arrested on warrant on April 27 

at 1 1 :57 p.m. at 561 Main St. 

Police observed a vehicle in the parking 
lot of a closed business. A routine check of 
Chiufib's identification through LEADS came 
back with information that she was wanted 
through Cook County for failure to appear on 
assault charges. 

Cook County requested that she be trans- 
ported to the Antioch Police Dept. for finger 
printing to confirm that Chiuffo was the cor- 
rect person wanted on the warrant. 

She was arrested and transported to the 

Antioch Police Dept. where she.was put 
through booking procedures and finger 
printed. She was placed in a cell to await the 
results. 



No valid dr 

Jose A. Segura, 26, of 1508 May St., 
Racine, Wis., was arrested for driving without 
a valid driver's license on May 3 at 4:29 p.m. 
at McMillen and Ram roads. 

An Antioch officer was nearly struck 
head-on on McMillen north of Ram. Segura 
told the officer he knew he made a mistake 
and provided a Wisconsin instructional per- 
mit. He was the lone occupant of the vehicle. 

His permit was confirmed through dis- 
patch. 

Segura was arrested and transported to the 
Antioch Police Dept. where he was issued 
citations for driving in the wrong lane and 
driving without a valid driver's license. He 
was put through booking procedures and 
released on personal recognizance pending 
his June 12 court date. 




ignizance pending 



Martin Cosio, 21, of 307 Ida Ave. was 
arrested for driving while suspended on . 
30 at 8:59 a.m. at Anita and Anita Terrace. 

Cosio was locked at 37 mph in a 25-mi 

zone. He gave the officer a valid Wisconsin dri- 
ver's license and an expired insurance card 

A check through LEADS/NCIC came back 
with information that he had a suspended 
Illinois driver's license. Cosio was arrested 
and transported to the Antioch Police Dept. 
where he was issued citations for speeding, 
operating a vehicle on a foreign driver's 

license while suspended and operating an 
uninsured vehicle. 

He was put through booking procedures 
and released on personal recognizance pend- 
ing his May 22 court date. 



LAKE VILLA 

oui 




Suspended driver 



Kurinec, 37, of 22897 Lake Shore 

Dr., Antioch was arrested for driving with a sus- 
pended driver's license on April 30 at 7:55 p.m. 

He was locked at 52 mph in a 40-mph 
zone. A check of his identifiers through 
LEADS/NCIC came back with information 
that his driver's license was suspended; 

kurinec was arrested and transported to 
the Antioch Police Dept. where he was issued 
citations for speeding and driving while sus- 
pended. He was put through booking proce- 
dures and released on personal recognizance 
pending his June 12 court date. 

Dorian A. Palmer, 19, of 34 Old MilfTrail, 
Antioch, was arrested for driving while sus- 
pended on April 30 at 9:12 a.m. on Depot at 

Center St. 

She was clocked at 54 mph in a 35-mph 

zone. A check of her identification through 
LEADS came back with information that her 
license was suspended. 

Palmer was arrested and transported to 
the Antioch Police Dept. where she was 
issued citations for speeding and driving 
while suspended. She was put through book- 
ing procedures and released on personal rec- 



Mike Wolkins, 32, of 33 E. Grand Ave., 
Lake Villa, was arrested by Lake Villa Police 
on May 2, at 2:07 a.m., while driving west- 
bound on Route 132 near Oak Lane. He was 
observed driving across the center line and 
weaving. He failed field sobriety tests. A pre- 
liminary breath test in the field yielded .201 
BAC. Wolkins refused a Breathalyzer test. 
Police determined his registration was sus- 
pended. He was charged with driving with 
suspended registration, improper lane usage 
and DUI alcohol. He was released on a $3,000 
I-bond, pending an appearance in VT 
courtroom C-402, on June 21, at 9 a.m. 

- Gerald M. Altman, 36, of 540 N. Lake 
Grayslake, was arrested by Lake Villj^^ 
on April 30, at 2:41 p.m., while driving on 
Monaville Road, west of Fairfield. He was 
observed crossing the fog line and weaving. 
After he threw a cigarette butt out of his win- 
dow, police activated emergency lights. 
Altman did not stop. Police activated sirens. 
Altman stopped at Route 59, at a stop sign. 
When directed to move to the shoulder of the 
road, the driver complied, then threw his 
hands in the air, according to a police report. 
Police found a quarter-bottle of beer on the 
floor of the vehicle. 

The driver said he did not know if the car 
was insured, as he "just took it" The owner 



was located. He said that; although Altman 
took the car without permission, he would 
not prefer charges. u 

Altman failed field sobriety tests and 
refused breath tests. He was charged with 
illegal transport of Oquor, driving with a 
revoked license, improper lane usage, driving 
an uninsured vehicle and DUI alcohol. He 
was released on a $3,000 1-bond, pending an 
appearance in Waukegan courtroom C-402, 
on May 24, at 9 sun. 

Justin A. Camper, 30, of 2017 Graystem 
Circle, Gumee, was arrested by Lake Villa 
Police on April 27, at 2:45 am, while driving 
eastbound ort Route 132 near Sheehan Dnve. 
Police observed the driver's green Jeep dri- 
ving from 18 inches to 12 inches from the 
vehicle in front of it. Twice, the Jeep slammec 
on its brakes to avoid colliding with the vehi- 
cle in front. The car in front moved off the 
road, to the shoulder, to allow the Jeep to 
pass. Police following the Jeep observed it 
cross the center line twice. - 

When stopped, the driver asked police if 

they knew of a particular officer, in what 

appeared to be an attempt to, as the police 

report alleged, "get professional courtesy." 

The driver said he had been driving with 

"cruise control" set at 40 mph. The road wa: 

marked as a30-mph zone. He told police he 

had consumed four beers at Nuttie's Bar over 

a one-hour period. He failed field sobriety 

tests and refused breath tests. 
I He was charged with improper lane 

usage, following too closely and DUI alcohol. 
He was released on a $3,000 I-bond, pending 
an appearance in Waukegan courtroom C- 

402, on May 24, at 9 a.m. 

Michael A. Cleaver, 34, of 24521 W. 
Passavant in Round Lake, was arrested by . 
Lake Villa Police on April 30, at 12:25 p.m., 
while driving westbound on Route 132 near 
Fairfield Road. The driver failed field sobriety 
tests, and told police he was on medication 
for an injury from an accident. He also said 
he was arrested the day before, in Antioch. 
He was charged with DUI an unknown sub- 
stance, failure to carry a driver's license and 
driving without registration. Police alleged he 
told them he fixes police cars, and "now I'll 
really fix them." He was released on a $3,000 
T.hnnH npndina an annearance in Waukeean 




courtroom C-402, on June 7. 

■ 



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ANTIOCH PUBLIC LIBRARY DISTRICT 



NEWSPAP 




Section 



May 10-16, 2002 




SECOND OF A 3-PART SERIE 



1 1 







?~~* 


















Sheila and Jim Denikas share the joy of their seven children, 
which includes biological children Jason, 12, and Kimberly 9 
adopted children Heavenly, 8, and Bobby, 4, and foster children 
Travis, 18, Amanda, 11, and Matthew, 9, outside their 
Lmdenhurst home.-4- Photo by Sandy Bressner 




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*» 



Lake Villa family of 11 overcomes 

hardship, thrives on lots of fun 



By DENYS BUCKSTEN 

Lake County Editor 




f Jim and Sheila Denikas were 
going to throw in the towel on 
fostering children with severe 
physical and emotional prob-. 

lems, they would have likely done 

so with Heavenly, or Bobby. 

The Denikas' J he's 31, she's 30 

__ haven't blinked yet, according to 

social workers at Central Baptist 

Family Services in Lake Villa. The 

couple with two children of their 

own, Jason, 12, and 

Kimberly, 9, have 

accepted seven 

other children into 

their six-bedroom 

farmhouse on 3 1/2 

acres in rural Lake 



"Bobby weighed only one 
pound at birth and weighed 10 
pounds at 5 1/2 months," said 
Sheila. "For a year he had a shunt in 
his head. He was zero to 14 months 
in receptive and expressive lan- 
guage and didn't walk until he was 
26 months." 

From such horrific beginnings, 
the children have taken giant leaps 
while living in the loving Denikas 
home. Heavenly is very active, 
under control and has over the last 
four years lived up to her name. 

And Bobby is in 

'Both the Denika^ have gymnastics and 

, .,,. ■ . ., plays T-ball. 

been very willing since the 1 ^h eDenikas > 

credit the interven- 



startto (do) whatever it 

■ * • 

takes to tnake it work. 



Jlieyliave utilized all the 



tion of Child and 
Family Services 
social worker 



Villa: Travis, 18; . 

Amanda, 11; twins ' services tluit are provided Robyn Ondo, .family 

(by Central Baptist and 



Mathew and 
George, 10; 
Heavenly, 8; Johnny, 
7; and Bobby, 4. 

Few child care 
professionals would 
have thought the 
less had the 

Denikas' given up ' 

on Heavenly, 4 1/2 
when they got her; or Bobby, an 
infant when he came "home" to 
Lake Villa. 

Sheila, a bubbling, fountain of 
energy, recalled that Heavenly 
"came to us with no honeymoon. 
She was kicking and screaming and 
cursing when we got hen-She was 
absolutely out of control. 

"Heavenly was our one place- 
ment who we thought would not 
last 30 days. We didn't even think 
she would last the weekend," 

— 

added Sheila. 

And Bobby, were Las Vegas to 
give odds on such matters, would 
have been given even less of a 
chance at a successful life than 
Heavenly. 



other agencies) and 
they have an excellent 
working relationship 
with CentralBaptisf 

Robyn Ondo 
DCFS social worker 



support, and the 
friendship and 
advice from their 
support groups. 

Ondo throws it 
right back at them. 
"I've been working 
with the Denikas' 
since their first fos- 
ter child placement. 
And I think they are genuinely a 
very special family, that has really 
opened their hearts to their chil- 
dren. They've really stretched 
themselves in that way." 

But, good intentions are one 
thing; practical problem solving on 
a scale of nine is another. 

"Both the Denikas' have been 
very willing since the start to (do) 
whatever it takes to make it work. 
They have utilized all the services 
that are provided (by Central 
Baptist and other agencies) and 
they have an excellent working 
relationship with Central Baptist. 
"Some of the children they 

■ 

Please see LOVE / B8 



Boom in Muslim population brings 
about need for area's 10,000 worshipp 



By STEVE SKir 
Staff Reporter 



t 



It is estimated that there are 
approximately 10,000 Muslims liv- 
ing in Lake County. Currently, no 
mosque exists for the many Muslims 
to pray or teach the faith to their 
children. 

That may soon change with the 
proposed mosque to be built at 
32059 O'PIaine Road in unincorpo- 
rated Waukegan. Plans are in the 
works to build an 18,000 square-foot 
facility on a ten-acre parcel north of 
Route 137. Planning and fund-rais- 
ing efforts have been ongoing for 
years, to bring to fruition the esti- 
mated $1.6 million facility." 



Currently, about $900,000 has been 
raised for the mosque. 

Lake County Muslims have Used 
temporary facilities in Grayslake, the 
Masonic Temple in Libertyville or 
the Civic Center for prayers. Final 
approval of access permits from the 
City of Waukegan should be issued 
soon and it is hoped construction 
can begin sometime within a 
month. 

The Islamic Foundation North is 
an organization founded by seven 
families in 1977 and at one point 
prayer services were held in a recre- 
ation room at Great Lakes naval 
Training Center. There are approxi- 
mately 2,100 people who attend Eid 
prayers at the Libertyville Masonic 




mosque 

Temple. Eid is a religious festival that 

lasts for three days and is celebrated 

twice a year. For the weekly prayers 

at the temple, approximately 250 
people attend. 

The Muslim population is grow- 
ing, not only in Lake County, but also 
across the country. The Muslim pop- 
ulation is comprised of people who 
have relocated to America, but 
according to estimates from the 
United Muslim Americans 
Association based in Palos Hills, at 
least 50 percent of the Muslims are 
people who were born in America. 
The Association tracks the growth of 
the Muslim population and records 
show that there is strong growth in 
Illinois, especially in the suburbs. 

It is hoped that by having a 
mosque in Like County, this will 
draw other Muslims to move here 
because there is a place to worship 
and educate their children. • 



Red Cross 
seeking new 
volunteers 






By JEFF ZACHARY 
Staff Reporter 



With more than 50 different vol- 
unteer opportunities at the 
American Red Cross of Greater 

Chicago,- there are \ more than 

enough positions for anyone wish- 
ing to lend a helping hand. 

To find out how to be part of the 
local. Red Gross people only need 
attend a volunteer information ses- 
sion on Thursday May 16, from 
6p.m-8:30 p.m at the American Red 
Cross of Greater Chicago facility in 
Mundelein at 535 N. Lake Street, just 
one-half block south of Route 176. 
Plenty of parking is available. 

Some of the volunteer opportu- 
nities include: assisting at blood dri- 
ves; providing mental health coun- 



Jenkins, 

as L akeland's leaders 



Publisher William H. : , 
Schroeder, of Lakeland Media, 
announced that Marc Jenkins, 
a native of Lake County, has 
been promoted to news editor 
and David Barnes of Fox Lake 
has been appointed manager 
of classified advertising. 

Both Jenkins and Barnes*- 

are. committed to the growth 

and expansion of Lakeland's 
products and newspapers. 




Barnes 



t . 



Please sec VOLUNTEERS / B8 



Jenkins 

Tliey reflect Lakeland's continuing efforts to place the newspaper's future in 
the hands of experienced and dedicated professionals, Schroeder said. 

"Besides their personal qualifications, both Marc and Dave know the 
Lake County market well and the individual needs of our readers and cus- 
tomers," Lakeland general manager Robert J. Schroeder said. 

"They are highly qualified to help Lakeland Media plan for continued 
growth and expanded service in the local business communities," Robert J. 
Schroeder said. 

Jenkins, who grew up in Wildwood, graduated from Warren Township 
High School, in Gurnee and attended the College of Lake County. He gradu- 
ated with honors with a journalism degree from Columbia College in 
Chicago. 

Please see LAKELAND / B8 




Getting down 

Becca Loeb, 11, Meghan Smith, 11, and Laura Schroeder, 12, enjoy chocolate covered strawber- 
ries during the 3rd Annual Long Grove Chocolate Fest.— • Photo by David Krueger 



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Stonewall Orchard Golf Club, 

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The May issue of Golf Digest carries a 
cover story on "PGA Free Lesson Month,"- 
and golfers must take the free lesson coupon 
from that issue to Stonewall Orchard for a 
free 10-minute lesson. It was exactly one year 
ago when Golf Magazine ranked Stonewall 
Orchard as Chicago's fourth best public 
course. 

Certain days will 
be set aside to offer 
these free lessons and 
persons* must call 

848-740-4890 for 

more information 
and to reserve a time. 
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request a lesson on any 
aspect of their games, 
from straightening out 
their drives to escaping 
from a bunker to cor- 

recdy lining up putts. Grayslake's Stonewall Orchard Golf 









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Lessons will be pro- 
vided by , Bob 
Malpede, Stonewall 
Orchard's Director of 
Golf, or Jeff Padula, 
head golf professional. 
Stonewall 
Orchard opened its doors to the public in July. 
1999. Designer Arthur Hills allowed the nat- 
ural rolling landscape to dictate a magnifi- 
cent 18-hole Lake County design, which fea- 
tures more than 65,00 fully mature pine and 
oak trees, acres and acres of rolling hills, tran- 
quil wetlands and wildlife. The course will 
open a brand-new 5,00 square foot club- 
house and dining facility this June. 

More than 3,200 PGA professionals have 
registered to serve as instructors in the free 
golf lesson program, which is being spear- 
headed by PGA of America and Golf Digest. 

"We are happy to participate in the PGA 
Free Lesson Month," said Malpede. "PGA. 
Free Lesson Month allows amateur golfer the 
opportunity to directly benefit from the 
knowledge and expertise of PGA profession 
als." From me 4,968-yard junior short course 
to. the 7,074-yard, par 72 championship lay- 
out, each hole provides its own identity while 

completely immersing the golfing public into 
nature. 

Stonewall Orchard proudly boasts "no 
houses" along its 18-hole layout, a mandate 
set in stone by Ben Sargent, the course's 
majority owner, whose family had farmed the 
land that Stonewall Orchard was built upon 
for the last 100 years. 

More information on the course is avail- 
able at www.stonewallorchard.com. 
News and notes 

P.G JL Head Golf Professional Diane 
Miller and Assistant Professional Mike 
Perez of Renwood Golf Course in Round 
Lake Beach will be offering free 10-minute 
lessons in conjunction with "Play Golf 
America," the national growth-of-the-game 
campaign sponsored by The PGA of America 
and Golf Digest Magazine. 

Throughout the month of May, P.GA 
Professionals will offer free 10-minute 
lessons to help golfers of all levels improve 
Uieir game. To date, more than 3,000 PGA 
professionals throughout the U.S. have 
signed up to participate. 

Renwood Golf Course will offer their 
Play Golf America program on Sat., May 11 
from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. To participate in Play 
Golf America at Renwood, amateur golfers 
must contact the Renwood Golf Shop at 847- 
231-4711. . 

"Play Golf America is a wonderful 
opportunity for local non-golfers to come out 
and get introduced to the game of golf, or for 
existing golfers to focus on any area they want 
to improve," said Miller, also the golf manag- 
er at Renwood Golf Course. "This is a great 
opportunity to demonstrate the expert 
instruction of PGA professionals at Renwood. 
We welcome all those who would like to par- 
ticipate, regardless of skill level." 

The PGA of America is a not-for-profit 
organization founded in 1916 to promote golf 
and enhance die livelihood of its members. 
The association is comprised of more tiian 



Club, now in its fourth year of opera- 
tion, is a participant in the PGA of 
America Free Lesson Month. The 
Arthur Hills layout features rolling ter- 
rain and wetlands. — File photo 



26,000 men and women professionals who 
are committed to growing the game of golf. 

The 2001 golf season around Lake 
County and the Midwest might be coming to 
a close but it's not too early to be thinking 
about next year. 
Sign-ups # 

Outings 

The Lupus Foundation of Illinois will 
be holding its annual golf outing at Brae 
Loche G.C. on Fri., May 10. The format will 
be a scramble format with a 9:30 a.m. shotgun 
start. The event includes a golf umbrella for 
each golfer, a snack ticket, and a late luncheon 

buffet. There will also be 
prizes and raffles. Along 
drive, best foursome 
and closest to the. pin 
are just a few of the con- 
tests diat are planned. 
The cost for the event is 
$100 per player. Anyone 
interested in just lunch, 
the cost is $40. 

Please call 773-445- 
7071 for further infor- 
mation. 

Lupus, a serious and 
chronic autoimmune 
disease, is hard to diag- 
nose, difficult to man- 
age, incurable, and at 
times, life threatening. 
Current statistics indi- 
cate that lupus affects 
adult women approxi- 
mately 10 times more frequently Uian men. 
Even though lupus is more prevalent in mis 
country than AIDS, sickle cell anemia, cere- 
■■ bral palsy and cystic fibrosis, it is the least 
known of all major diseases. 

Million Dollar Golf 

"Cidzens to Elect Eddie Washington" is 
hosting' a "million dollar hole-in-one" golf 
tournament on Sat., June 15 at Foss Park Golf 
Course in North Chicago. 

The golf package, which includes 18 

holes of golf, a continental breakfast and 
lunch, is $125 per person. 

"Hole-in-One" possibility is a chance to 
win one million dollars. Open to amateur 
golfers, only, someone could be one shot 
away from becoming Lake County's next mil- 
lionaire. Other prizes include a chance to 
make hole-in-one and win $50,000. There 
will also be a putting contest, which has a 
prize of $5,000 for the lucky winner. All cash 
prizes are fully insured. 

• Foss Park Golf Course is a meticu- 
Tously manicured and challenging 18-hole 
course, located at 3124 Argonne. Drive in 
North Chicago. It boasts of wide fairways, 
shorter rough and a practice range. There is 
also a full-service pro golf shop that offers a 
wide selection of ball and clothing. Foss Park 
Golf Course provides a first-class golfing chal- 
lenge, beautiful scenery and down-home 
hospitality. 

For exact qualifications, contest rules 
and ticket information, contact Chris 
Wakefield at 847-561-7712. 

Tournaments 

The Country Youth Classic, for 

golfer's ages 3-22, will take place June 24-26 
on five Bloomington-Normal area golf 
courses. Registration forms are available at 
local Country Insurance & Financial 
Services agent offices, or at the tournamen- 
t's web site, www.countryyouthclassic.com. 
Entries are limited and will be accepted on a 
first-come, first-serve basis. The event gen- 
erally draws golfers from all over the United 
States. 

Entry fees range from $6.0-$125, depend- 
ing on the division for which die golfer is eli- 
gible. Recognized by die National Junior Golf 
Scoreboard and Golfweek, the event features: 
one-day of practice and a long drive and 
putting contest; two days of golf competition; 
and 16 divisions with a total of 500 youth 
golfers from Uiroughout the country. 

Golf courses for die tournament include 
The Den at Fox Creek and Prairie 
Vista, which serve as hosts to the Illinois 
High School Associadon Boys state golf tour- 
naments, and Illinois State University Golf 
Courses, die site of the Gids IHSA state tour- 
nament. Ironwood Golf Course and 
Royal Links Par 3 Course also serve as 
sites for the event. 

Country Insurance & Financial Services 

is die tide sponsor of die tournament 



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May 10] 2002 



COUNTY 




Lakeland Newspapers/ B3 



Smooth election 

' L 

The first post-redistricting election and 
Uurd chadless" voting day in Lake County has 
come and gone. On the radio show "Prairie 
Home. Companion" they say the folks in Lake 
Wobegon are all above average, but it was clear 
on Election Day that the residents of Lake 
County are every bit as discerning. We had 
2,000 more ballot types than in the -year 2000 
elections. Even with 3,206 different ballot types, 
me election judges managed very well. Those 
voting for the first time since November 2000 
handled the optical scan ballot with amazing 
ease - much like coloring a lotto ticket The few 
voters who were assigned to a different voting 
site were also patient and understanding. 

The beloved actor Jimmy Stewart once 
said he never thought of his audience as cus- 
tomers, but as partners. The poll workers and 
voters demonstrated this sentiment, too. Our 
country has survived many challenges both 
past and present We succeed, in spite of acts 
of aggression, because we stand united in our 
common commitment to the tasks at hand. 
Also, much credit goes to everyone involved in 
the March 19th election - the voters, judges, 
local clerks offering absentee voting, die facil- 
ities where voting is held, election day field 
representatives^ election night workers, and 
the staff in the County Clerk's office. 

Especially encouraging and commend- 
able were the high school students who served 
as election judges. While we have recruited- 



. 




and trained 

many were unavailable' to serVe In March! 
Approximately 150 students volunteered, were 
trained and worked election day. Stevenson 
High School, and Antioch, Grayslake and Zion 
high schools were especially helpful in provid- 
ing the majority of die student judges. Our 
election judges who worked with the students 
echo that our country will be in good hands 
with die next generation. 

President Teddy Roosevelt said: It is not 
the critic who counts, not the man who points 
out how the strong man stumbled, or the doer 
of deeds could have done them better. The 
credit belongs to the man who is actually in 
the arena; whose face is marred by the dust, 
sweat, and blood; who strives valiantly; who 
errs and comes up short again and 
again... who knows die great enthusiasms, the 
great devotions and spends himself in a wor- 
thy cause. Who, at the best, knows in the end 
high achievement and at the worst if he falls, 
at least falls while daring gready, so that his 
place is not with those cold timid souls who 
know neither victory nor defeat. 

All those who participated in die election 
took part in a worthy cause. We look forward 
to having those who stayed home being a part 
of the election team in November! 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 










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quality plant that will grow well in its new 

home. Our staff can even give you a few 

ideas on where and how to plant for the 

most beautiful outcome. Stop by and ask 

about the Leiders advantage. 



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OPINIONS 



May 10, 2002 





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NEWSPAPERS 



William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 

- 

Robert J. Schroeder 

General Manager 



30 South Whitney St., Grayslake, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (847) 223-8161. e-mail: edit@lakelandmedia.com 






4 < 




EDITORIALS 







There is growing awareness on the part of both offi- 
cialdom and the public that hand : in-glove with the 
acquisition of public open space is providing for 
amenities and maintenance of Forest Preserve 
District land holdings. 

Lake County voters have been remarkably supportive of 
land acquisition efforts, approving two major bond issues in 
the past several years. Broad-based, public support for 
open space clearly is evident. At the same time, the ques- 
tion rightly can be asked, what is going to be done with the 
growing acreage? 

Forest Preserve District officials now are mulling over 
the possibility of imposing a modest tax increase to fund 
additional services and amenities. Holy Toledo! Another 
tax bite? Under the law, funding propositions must be sep- 
arate. One for purchase of land. One for maintenance and 
amenities. The successful 2000 referendum provided $70 
million for land acquisition and $15 million for maintenance 
and public safety. 

Obviously, as land holdings increase, maintenance and 
development costs go up. That's the dilemma being faced 
by commissioners. District Ex. Dir. Steve Messerli believes 
a tax increase of $10 to $20 per homeowner will fund service 
and amenity needs adequately. Before putting the ques- 
tion before voters, possibly as early as the fall general elec- 
tion, commissioners think a public opinion survey would 
be in order. So do we. They have a proposal of $25,500 
before them. That's less than five cents per resident. 

While land still is available, the Forest Preserve District 
is on the right track aggressively pursuing more land pur- 
chases. About $40 million in acquisition funds still are 
available from the 2000 referendum. At the same time, we 
think taxpayers are ready and are entitled to receive com- 
prehensive information on expanding services and ameni- 
ties. They should also have a voice in how district proper- 
ties are developed. 

• The growing Forest Preserve District without question is 
one of Lake County's crown jewels. It's going to take 
money to keep our natural gems shining. 




to mark 




rowm 






Lake County always has been a melting pot. Nearly a 
half century ago the Waukegan-North Chicago area 
was known for a richly diverse population with 
approximately three dozen ethnic and religious 
groups identified. 

Now the growing Muslim population in the county will 
make itself more evident with the construction of the coun- 
ty's first mosque. Muslim families have acquired 10 acres 
between the Tri-State Tollway and O'Plaine Road. The 
future mosque site technically is within the boundaries of 
Waukegan, but the property is more closely identified with 
Green Oaks and Libertyville, where Muslims have been con- 
ducting religious services for a number of years. 

The growing Muslim presence has been evident for a 
number of years and now is said to exceed 9,000 in Lake 
County. Muslims represent all walks of life, including the 
professions, especially health care. Lake County will be the 
last segment of the Chicago metro area to have a mosque. 

Besides being a center for religious services, the new 
Muslim facility will be a focal point for education and social 
activities. 



VIEWPOINT 



Pro football 



Jeff Zgonina, one of Carmel 
High School's all-time sports 
greats and now a star defen- 
sive tackle for- the St. Louis 
Rams, has established a foundation 
to battle pancreatic cancer, a dis- 
ease that took his father's life two 

4 • 

years ago. 

Jeff and family members toured 
Johns Hopkins University in 
Baltimore last May and came away 
impressed with the research being 
conducted to combat the fifth lead- 
ing cause of cancer death. The 
Jeffrey M. Zgonina Foundation 
came about because of their desire 
to help. "We returned home eager 
to raise funds for this worthwhile 
cause," stated the pro gridder, who 
grew up in Long Grove, but now 
makes his home in St. Louis. 

The Zgoninas will kick off fund- 
raising activities of the foundation 
by hosting a dinner/ auction at 
Stonegate Banquet and Conference 
Center, Hoffman Estates, at 4 p.m. 
Sunday, June 30. There will be a 
dinner and both silent and live auc- 
tions for friends and interested per- 
sons. 

One of Jeff s sisters, Kim 
Brunner, is helping with arrange- 
ments and accepting donations for 
the auctions. She can be contacted 
at 847-854-1256. ' 

Friendly audience 

Al Norman, nationally known 
foe of big box stores and the man 
who makes the late Sam Walton 
twitch in his grave, was among 
friends the other night when he 
described to an audience of 300 
how a super Wal-Mart is going to 
turn Antioch inside-out — or upside 
down. Known for his book, "Slam- 
dunking Wal-Mart! How You Can 
Stop Superstore Sprawl in Your 




tar forms 




iwwhiih i i wiiiiii mm ii — t«— — — ■» 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



Hometown," Norman has learned 
to speak in catchy sound-bit 
phrases perfected in numerous TV 
appearances and national media 
interviews. 

• Not to be forgotten after one- 
on-one conversation with the anti- 
box store crusader are the following 
observations from Norman: "Wal- 
Mart is not out to complement 
downtown; Wal-Mart is out to cre- 
ate a new downtown;" "Too many 
people mistake new building for 
progress;" "Wal-lvjart will not be a 
shot in the arm; Wal-Mart will be a 
shot in the head;" "Wal-Mart is not 
the beginning of competition; Wal- 
Mart is the end of competition." 

Norman is convinced that Wal- 
Mart aims to double its current ros- 
ter of three stores in Lake County. 
"Wal-Mart is out to saturate the 
area," Norman noted ominiously. 
Scary thought. Like McDonalds. 
A big box store at every intersec- 
tion? 

Favorable reaction 

Response to Lakeland 
Newspapers' recent series on how a 
gang member reorganized his life 
with the help of God has been posi- 
tive despite the fact that a part of 



officialdom still is in denial about 
the impact of gangs on daily life. A 
friend of Rick Bueno of 16 years 
standing e-mailed this column to 
express thanks for the series written 
by Jeff Zachary. "He was a trou- 
bled teen and with his experiences 
he can reach out to other troubled 
teens," the friend wrote. Rick and 
Jeff are deserving of high praise for 
their courage in collaborating on 
the series, an example of outstand- 
ing journalism. 

Family commitment 

For the past 60 years or so, car 
hopping at the Dog 'N Suds has 
been a popular entry point into the 
work day world for teenage girls. 
Still is. Only Mary and Chris 
Beckord, owners of Grayslake Dog 
'N Suds, have taken the summer- . 
time job to a new level. They make 
serving the famous root beer and 
basket food a family commitment. 
' Mary, who has the job of recruiting 
and coordinating 30 young women, 
requires that every applicant be 
accompanied by mom and dad. 
"We want parents to know our 
rules and regulations," Mary 
emphasized. Besides, everything 
runs smoother when parents know 
what time work starts or that an 
afternoon at the pool can't conflict 
with work. 

One man's family 

Ah, another Little League season 
is off and running. Last Saturday 
was a d ay at the ball park for gram 
and gramp. Nikki played her first T- 
ball game at 10 a.m. (She's a Cub). 
John, on the Brewers again, started 
the season at 5 p.m. No doubt the 
youngsters will keep up the pace, 
but can't be sure about the grand- 
parents. 




me 




Recently, I was at the 
Waukegan Moose Lodge, 
and on the same evening 
talked to two friends who 
encouraged me to continue the 
"mix" in this column of "Tell Me- 
Why" and politically-related issues. 
John Bananto, whose family was 
long known for their tasty pizza 
business, and has retired from 
Abbott, said "John, your column is 
informational and helps keep them 
on the ball." And then, Karl Kofler 
who runs K-K Construction, said 
that he and his wife, Edith "didn't 
know that I was such a comedian," 






EBNG 
IT 

THROUGH 

John S. Matijevich 



referring to the Tell Me Why tidbits. 
Thanks to them and other readers, 
here's more of the same. 

Tell Me Why— 

When people tell you that 



they'll stick by you through thick 
and thin — they thin out before 
things get thick. 

If someone is really frank with 
you — do they have to start any sen- 
tence with "frankly?" 

The important things in an 
hour-long telephone conversa- 
tion — could have been said in one 
minute. 

You won't feel as good after you 
take 10 pills and wear a frown— as 
you will when you take no pills and 
wear a smile. 

r - * 

Please see SEEING I B5 



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May 10, 2002 



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OPINIONS 




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Lakeland Newspapers/ B5 




PARTY LINES, THE LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS" COLUMN OF 
POLITICAL OPINION, IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS. 




C""^ urnee Trustees Tom 
Chamberlain and Ray 
TT Damijonaitis are push- 
J ing an inquiry Into 
whether the village is getting value 
received from the $146,000 con- 
tributed annually toward operation 
of the Like County Convention and 
Visitors Bureau. 

With Six Flags Great America 
and Gurnee Mills as major attrac- 
tions, Gurnee hauls in a cool 
$760,000 a year alone from its 
hotel/motel tax. The bureau is a 
non-governmental agency operated 
with financial support from vendors 
and participating agencies. 

Gall M. Svendsen, president/CEO of 
the bureau, says the possible drop of Gurnee 
support would be "very serious." The five- 
person bureau maintains its office in 
Gurnee, recently relocating from a spot on 
Route 21 to Grand Avenue near Six Flags. 

Challenges brewing 

Republican leaders are vowing not to 
permit State Sen. Terry Link (D-Vemon 
Hills) and State Rep. Karen May (D- 

Highland Park) to go unchallenged in the 
November general election. Link, county 
Democratic chairman, and May, represent- 
ing one of the most solidly Democratic areas 
in Lake County, ran unopposed in the spring 
primary. The political process provides for 
party slating when there are no primary 
nominees. Finding candidates for these two 
races is a major responsibility of the new 
Lake County Republican chairman, Green 






Svendsen: 

Hopes her 

visitor's bureau 
doesn't lose 
Gurnee. 



Del Re: 

Making the 
rounds for 
another. 



successful last year Uiat he's going 
for an encore Wednesday, June 5, . 
at Anuoch Golf Club. The sheriff 
said non-golfers are invited to join 
the festivities for dinner where a 
silent auction will be a major 
attraction. Reservations for four-: 
somes can be made by calling 847- 
625-9800. 

Withdrawal looms 



Adams: 

Lookingfor 
some GOP 

ringers. 



Oaks, Mayor Tom Adams. The GOP is 

promising stellar challenges to Link by the 
May 20 deadline. 

Staying together 

Fremont Township (Mundelein) open 
space advocates, defeated in their first 
attempt in March to form a tax supported 
district to acquire open lands, intend to rein- 
troduce the measure during the 2004 elec- 
tion cycle. Atty. Rainey Ray of Wauconda, 
one of the advocates for open space, said the 
group will remain organized during the 

mandatory 23-month waiting period provid- 
ed by law. 

Golf with Gary 

A fund-raising golf outing for Sheriff 
Gary Del Re's campaign treasury was sn 



Reconsideration is being given 
by the North Chicago Unit District 
board of education to Dr. Patricia 
Pickets, Superintendent, running 
for regional superintendent of 
schools. Pickels is the Democratic 
nominee. Reports are circulating that Pickels 
might withdraw. The Republican nominee, 
Roycealee Wood, was a long-time high- 
ranking executive in the North Chicago Unit 
School District before joining the regional 
schools office as assistant superintendent. 

Hispanic slated 

Republicans are excited about the slat- 
ing of Delia "Dee" Garcia for County 
Board representative from a new Waukegan 
District. Garcia, a loan officer for a Gurnee 
mortgage lending firm, is popular and well 
connected in the Hispanic community. Both 
political parties supported remapping efforts 
to create a Hispanic district. Mary Ross 
Cunningham, an African-American, upset 
Democratic strategy by wresting the nomi- 
nation from two Hispanic candidates. The 
GOP selected Garcia over two other appli- 
cants. 



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re to 





eleyision comedian. Caroline Rhea 
says, "Two blondes walked into a 
building. You'd think one of them 
would have seen it." 
I thought dumb blonde jokes were a 
thing of the past, but apparently not. A few 
minutes surfing the web (a remarkable 
research tool that makes frequent trips 
across town to the local library unnecessary) 
revealed they are very much alive if not well. 
There are several web sites wallowing in 
dumb blonde jokes, such as these: 

Why don't blondes eat pickles? Because 
they get their heads stuck in the jar. 

Three dumb blondes are driving to 
Disneyland. They see a sign that says, 
"Disneyland left." So they turn back and go 
home. • 

% i 

As if that isn't dumb enough, the 
Internet also remains full of those timeworn 
jokes about lawyers, rednecks, psychiatrists 
and light bulbs. 

For example, how many psychiatrists 
does it take to change a light bulb? 

Only one, but the light bulb really has to 
want to change. 

And, you may be a redneck if you've 
given your gun a woman's name. 

Also online are sites that specialize in 




»!•* 



THE PRMR 
COMER 



t.-*v^ 



jerry Pfarr 




dumb men jokes, pope jokes, Mafia jokes 
and ethnic jokes. Ethnic humor may appall 
the politically correct but it is the playground 
of the irreverent. 

One day, while president, Ronald Reagan 
had an ethnic joke he couldn't resist sharing 
with a friendly pack of reporters: 

"How do you tell the Polish guy at a 
cockfight? He brings a duck. How do you tell 
the Italian guy? He bets on the duck. How do 
you know the Mafia was there? The duck 
wins." 

When it spread through the media, an 
apologetic smile and a little tap dance got 
dear old Ronnie off the hook and he 
encountered only mild rebuke. He told the 
nation he was sincerely sorry and that 
"from now on, I'm going to look over both 
shoulders and then tell stories about 



Irishmen, because I'm Irish." 

The late, great newspaper columnist 
Mike Royko did a memorable number on 
ethnic jokes many years ago. Typically 
tongue-in-cheek, Royko responded to a let- 
ter from a reader who said, "I have noted 
that you manage to upset just about every 
ethnic and racial group. However, I can't 
remember you ever saying anything infuriat- 
ing about Scandinavians. 

Because I am of Swedish ancestry, I feel 
I'm being ignored. So does my wife, a 
Norwegian-American." 

Responded Royko, "I abhor ethnic 
humor but will grit my teeth and get on with 
ithis distasteful business to fulfill this man's 
request." 

He then told about a Swedish guy and a 
Norwegian guy who separately sign up for a 
luxury cruise for $69.95. Both immediately 
get whacked by thugs, stuffed in barrels and 
dropped in a river. 

After a while they regain consciousness 
and find their barrels bobbing along togeth- 
er. The Norwegian says, "Good afternoon. 
Tell me, do you happen to know if they serve 
dinner on this cruise?" 

The Swede shakes his head and says, 
"No, I don't think so. They didn't last year." 



from ra 







SEEING 



You wonder if God made four seasons— 
so that we can buy a change of clothes. 

. When a guy tells you that he is "one of 
the boys"— you'd rather that he acted like a 
man. 

The person who reminds everyone that 
communication is a two-way street— is usu- 
ally the one who does all of the talking. 

It is hard to get ahead in the world — 
without using your head. 

' When you work long enough to get expe 
rience at a job— they tell you that you're too 
old to keep it. 

People who say they like a nice, clean 
joke — laugh a lot harder at the dirty ones. 

It makes it a lot more difficult to get 
ahead — when you keep looking backwards. 

You can repeat a lie a thousand times— 



and it's still a lie. 

It is getting near the point when mailing 
a letter— will cost more than delivering it in 
person. 

You may feel young when you whistle at 
a woman — but you're getting old if you can't 
remember why. 

When we read books on how to get 
rich— we forget that the only ones who get 
rich are the authors. 

We find it hard to believe that the 
hardest person to understand— can be 
ourselves. 

People complain about the violence in 
the movies — but not about the violence on 
the 6 o'clock news. • 

If people couldn't' talk about the 
weather — there would be many short 



conversations. 

So many people try so hard to be like 
someone else — when they should try harder 
to just be themselves. 

When someone tells you that they will 
furnish you advice for nothing— that's prob- 
ably all that it is worth. 

There is nothing easier to find than trou- 
ble — when you go looking for it. 

Those in government who do the very 
least— seem to have the most assistants to 

help them. 

Sometimes the hardest questions to 
answer — are the ones requiring a simple 
"yes" or "no" answer. 

If your team wins, it's because of their 
great talent— if your opponent wins, it's 
because they were lucky. 



LETTERS TO TH E EDITOR 

Increase unjustified 

* 

As I left the Grayslake Metra parking lot 
on Tuesday evening, April 16, 2002, 1 noticed 
the sign mat announced the parking fee 
increase from $1 to $1.50. The sign stated that 
the fee will be in line with other Metra lots in 
the area. 

I have departed from the Grayslake Metra 
station, the Round Lake Beach Metra Station, 
and the Libertyville downtown Metra station. 
Justifying an increase on our fees to those facil- 
ities, is wrong, in my opinion. 

The Round Lake Beach station is a fairly 
new station with a substantial indoor heated 
waiting area and, I believe, a section in the 
parking lot with resident only parking. The 
Libertyville station, while not as well 
equipped, does have a clean indoor waiting 
station with a ticket agent. In addition, the 
area around the station is well maintained, 
along with resident permit parking. 

Also, Uiis destination has more express 
trains downtown in the morning compared to 
Grayslake. 

I'm sure I don't need to describe in detail 
our facility in Grayslake at the end of Lake 
Street. To either a first time visitor or a passer- 
by, it creates a poor first impression. 

I would not mind paying more for my 
parking at the Grayslake station if I could get a 
better waiting room, more express trains, or a 
nicer look for our overall train stop. But, to 
pay more for an unheated, unmanned, and 
unsightly station is not the message to send to 
mass transit commuters. • 

Perhaps die Village of Grayslake should 
look for an alternative source of revenue than 
raising parking fees of those who are part of 
the traffic solution, not die problem. 

Mark O'Connor 

Grayslake 

Deserving elderly 

I understand that senior hunger is on the 
rise in Illinois, so I was shocked to hear that 
Illinois lawmakers are considering cutting 
homemaker services for the frail elderly. What 
they may not know is that it plays an impor- 
tant role in the war to end senior hunger. 
Homemaker workers prepare meals for elder- 
ly clients who cannot cook for themselves and 

whose families are not available to help,. They 

also buy groceries for shut-ins, who do not 

have families to do it for them. Some people 
have said that the Meals On Wheels programs 
can pick up the slack. The only problem is 
tliey will need more funding to cover the 
additional clients. 

Please help keep Homemaker Services in 
place for the frail elderly. Call or write your 
state legislators today and tell them that 
Homemaker Services are too important to 
cut. We can't afford to give up ground on the 
war on senior hunger. The frail elderly of our 
state deserve more. 

Ilomae Curran 
Waukegan 

Change the process 

I am deeply grateful to the Illinois voters 
and the hundreds of volunteers who support- 
ed me during my campaign for governor. I 
was overwhelmed by the outpouring of 
enthusiasm for our common goal of putting 
government back in the business of helping 
people. My message was clear and simple: the 
problems facing Illinois families require a 
problem solver, not just another politician. 

Our next governor will set the state's pri- 
orities for the next four years. We must ensure 
every child has access to a quality education, 
regardless of geography or income. We must 
endeavor to create economic opportunity for 
families in every region of the state. We must 
reduce the cost of health care, to help seniors 
and families make ends meet. We must 
address the state's fiscal crisis, to secure our 

solvency for future generations. 

Paul G. Vallas 
Candidate for governor 

Critics criticized 

Let's see. Like County has more than 400 
voting precincts with five judges on average in 
each one. My math tells me that more than 
2,000 workers are in the polls on Election Day. 
The election workers come out twice a year in 
the presidential and gubernatorial elections 
and one time in the village election years. And 
one person should be held personally respon- 
sible for everything that more than 2,000 well- 
meaning neighbors do during a 14-hour or 
longer day. Make any sense? 

The election judges serve to make sure we 
can exercise our right to vote. Ms. Gelhar and 
Mr. Lentine, unless you are willing to sign up, 
attend the training and work the 15-hour day, 

don't cast stones. 

Loyal Cullum 

Waukegan 









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COUNTY 



May 10, 2002 



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MaEting roynds .. . 

Dave Erdal, an emergency room technician at Provena St. Therese Medical 
Center in Waukegan, and volunteer Dee Abendroth, guide a tour of the emer- 
gency room for children from the AAUW Nursery School. 



JULIE promotes safe di 





in 




Digging responsibly is the only way to dig. 
The alternative could mean disaster. That is the 
core message of an aggressive education cam- 
paign, entitled "Dig Safely Illinois" launched by 
representatives of the Joint Utility Locating 
Information for Excavators, Inc. (JULIE). 

"The impact of unsafe or careless dig- 
ging practices is real and often costly-in 
terms of personal injury and damage to 
underground lines, property and the envi- 
ronment," said Mark Frost, executive direc- 
tor ofJULlE, Inc. 

"Anyone planning an outdoor project that 
requires digging, whether the project is large 






or small, should call JULIE first at 1-800-892- 
0123. The call to and service provided by 
JULIE are free to the excavator." 

Professional excavators, homeowners who 
dig in their yards, public works employees and 
underground facility owners and operators are 
the primary targets of the campaign. Common 
examples of projects that require a call to 
JULIE at 1-800-892-0123 before digging 
include putting up a fence; installing a swing 
set for children, a mail box post, new water 
feature or clothes line pole; building a deck or 
room addition; preparing a new garden area; 
or adding new trees or shrubbery. 










Students from several Lake County high 
schools were greeted by Chief Judge Jane 
Waller, Judge Christopher Starck and mem- 
bers of the Public Relations/Education 
Committee upon their arrival at the Lake 
County Courthouse in Waukegan last week. 

The students spent a day learning more 
about die inner workings of the criminal jus- 
tice system. The finalists, of the various Law 
Day competitions, together with parents, 
grandparents, teachers, principals and oth- 
ers, received their awards in the building's 
jury Assembly room. 

Judge Victoria A. Rossetti was responsible 
for selecting the finalist of the coloring, poster 
and essay contest. 

Judge Thomas R. Smoker, Judge Brian P, 
Hughes and Rosetti judged the oratorical 
competition. 

Coloring Contest winners were Mallorie Snow, 
Greenbay School; Kristina Santos, St Patrick's; 
Amanda O'Malley, Mechanics Grove; Drew Chinn, 
St Peter School; Paloma Solorio Oak Terrace 
Highwood; Alexis Geater, South School North 
Chicago; Joe Dohnalek, Walden School Deerfield; 
Tara Murphy, Robert Crown School; Martha 
Morales, Neal Elementary North Chicago; Olivia 
Amos, St. Bede Ingleside; Jon Rogalski, Shiloh Park; 
Sean Hading, St. Gilbert. 

Honorable mention in coloring were: Jenna 
Lukauskas, John Clark School; Tony Torres, St. 
Joseph Round Lake; Grant Ley, Mechanics Grove. 

Poster contest winners were: Samantha 
Matelski, St. Gilbert School; Christian Santos 
Hernandez, Andrew Cooke Magnet; Phillip 
Svoboda, Beach Park School; Kylee Butler, St. 
Joseph School; Kristina Tucci, Hooper School; 
Nathan Adler, South Park Elementary; Kimberly 
Campbell, Stanton School; Brad Kessler, Twin 
Groves Jr. High; Jennifer Van Trieste, St. Gilberts;. 

Honorable mention were Kaitlin Yoder, • 
Mechanics Grove; Simone Hlousek, Sally Potter 
School. 

Essay contest winners were: Michael Levine, 
Daniel Wright School; Jordan Douglas, Aptakistic 
School; Marissa EUenby, Shepard School; Matthey 
Kam Wai Yanik, Viking School and Emily Mott, 
Stanton School. 

Honorable mention were: Sandy Gordon, 
Shepard School; Kristin Verenski, Viking School 
and Maria Gencev, Viking School. 

Photo contest winners were Elizabeth Coen, 
Deerfield High School and Kati McKnight, North 



Chicago High School. 

Oratorical contest winners were: First Place 
Ryan Berger, Grayslake High School; Second Place 
Julie Fukes, Grayslake High School and Third Place 
Miles Cooksy, Zion Benton High School. 



Creative Rids Club 
puts on Spring play 

Third, 4th and 5th grade students will 
present "Les Mislead Play," on Wednesday, 
' .May. 15, 7:00 p.m., at W.C. Petty School Gym, 
at 850 High View Drive, An tioch. 

Creative Kids Club was founded by Cathy 
Leafblad and is a program that teaches chil- 
dren playwriting, Improv, puppets and per- 
forming. 

The plays are free to the public, but dona- 
tions are accepted. 

■ 

Native plants pickup 
being held Saturday 

* 

Advance orders from this year's Native 
Plant Sale, by the Lake County Forest 
Preserve, will be available for pick-up on 
Saturday, May 11, from 11:30 a.m. until 4 
p.m., at Independence Grove Forest Preserve, 
located on Buckley Road (Rt 137), just east of 
Milwaukee Avenue (Rt 21) and west of the I- 
94 toilway, near Libertyville. Some individual 
plants will be available for purchase. 

All proceeds from the Native Plant Sale 
benefit the Preservation Partners and Mighty 
Acorns youth stewardship programs of the 
Forest Preserves. 

Native plants naturally thrive in Lake 
County soil and weather, requiring less time, 
effort and expense to maintain. . 

They provide valuable food and shelter to 
native birds, butterflies and other wildlife. 
And native plants make a lovely and unique 
Mothers' Day gift. Place your order today. 



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OLD ELM 


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ROUTE 22 



SHOWROOM HOURS: 
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As a CLC undergrad, Jenkins was select- 
ed as a recipient for the Marshall R. 
Schroeder/ Lakeland Newspapers 

Scholarship Award. Jenkins began his 
newspaper career as a correspondent for 
the Chicago Sun-Times. He joined 
Lakeland as a reporter and then served as 
community editor before his latest promo- 
tion. • 

Barnes is a native of California. His 
newspaper career began at the Contra- 
Costa Times in San Francisco's East Bay 
area. He then joined the San Jose Mercury- 
News for 13 years where he held several 
management positions before moving to 
Iowa as the advertising manager of the Des 
Moines Register. Before joining Lakeland, 
he was a district manager for a northern 
Illinois employment-recruiting agency. 



have in their care have special needs and 
Sheila and Jim have been very open to our 
special services, and working with our 
whole treatment team." 

A reporter suspects that the kids prob- 
ably all have long lists of daily chores, 
with the older ones helping the little ones 
get dressed, and others feeding the two 
dogs and Godzilla the cat, and laundry 
day being a group effort _ but Sheila cuts 
his Norman Rockwellian speculations 
short. 

"The kids have minimal chores, noth- 
ing major," she said, explaining that Jim, 
who works 40 hours as a welder, makes 
the kids' lunches before he goes to bed at 
night, and Sheila handles laundry, cook- 
ing and cleaning chores in her "free 
time" between ferrying kids to school, 
baseball, gymnastics, doctors' appoint- 
ments, and riding herd on special school 
projects. 

Her two major tools are an appoint- 
ment book bursting at the seams and a 
12-passenger van to handle commuting 
chores. When the neighbor kids are part 
of a family activity, the Denikas' have 
another van at their disposal. 

One efficiency with the family activi- 
ties is the farmhouse itself. "We have 

neighbor kids over here all the time," she 
said. 

And her husband's childhood passion 
for baseball translated into every Denikas 
kid playing the sport. Jim coaches one 
team and helps a relative coach another. 
, One baseball team has six Denikas chil- 
dren on the roster. "If we don't show up 
it's a definite forfeit," said Sheila. 

In addition to baseball and gymnas- 
tics, there are field trips, visits to Six Flags 
Great America, zoos and birthdays, with 
the big events planned around birthdays. 

"We really have some fun birthday, 
parties, let me tell you," said Sheila. 




.Next week: The Denikas family's future. 



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Lakeland Newspapers/ B9 






eball 



Lancers work double- squeeze to perfection 



By STEVE PETERSON 
Staff Reporter . 

"; * *— •'—•'-- '••.> 

College of Like County's baseball team 
appeared to be a team on a mission in its sec- 
tional tournament games. 

The Lancers used solid hitting/good 
pitching and steady defense to dispatch Carl 
Sandburg, 11-3 and 12-1 in the three-team 
tournament. The home cooking continues 
this weekend as the Lancers host the regional 
tournament May 11-13. 

"Finishing in sec- 
ond place in the 
Skyway Conference 
was a heartbreaker, 
but it made us hungri- 
er for this tourna- 
ment," said first base- 
man Russ Schaibly. 

Freshman Ted 
Damos, from Grant, picked a good day to 
come out of a long slump. He pounded out 
four hits in the second game that allowed CLC 
to advance. ?, 

"I came in and took a little extra hitting. 
We are a very confident team now. We think 
that we can go all the way," Damos said. 

Looking at the long list of Gene Hanson- 
coached All-Americans down die right field 
line convinced the former Grant star to attend 
CLC. "I heard a lot of great things about Coach 
Hanson," Damos said. 

"Ted can be either a very up or very down 
as a player," Hanson said. 

The Lancers (37-11) used their speed in 
both games. A suicide squeeze executed per- 
fectly by Adam Donohoe gave CLC the earlv 
lead. J 

Donny Leicht mowed down the Sandburg 
hitters in the first game and Chris Ramig, from 
Antioch, kept the Chargers hitters off stride in 
'game two. "Our defense has been playing very 
well. That really helps our pitchers. We have 



'Finishing in second place in tlte 

Skyway Conference was a 

heartbreaker, but it made us 

hungrier for this tournament' 

First baseman Russ' Schaibly 



five steady guys in Leicht, Danny Braswell, 
Brad Spletter, Ramig and Brandon Wedyck," 
Hanson, said. "None are overpowering, but 
they get the job done." 

CLC led 7-1 after five innings in die second 
game and continued to pour the offense on. 

Damos "made it a 4-for-5 day with a single 
in the seventh and scored on a wild pitch. 
Jason Schuler, who doubled earlier, walked, as 
.did Dave Paddock. 

The offense kept coming all the way 
through. Damos, who plays left field, put the 

icing on his day with 
an RBI single for a 
12-1 lead. 

Advancing to the 

regionals is nothing 

new for the Lancers, 

but it is always spe- 
cial. 

"It boils down to 
who is nervous and who is not. At that level, 
they are all good teams," Hanson said. "Last 
year, we went to regionals and lost in five 
hours," he said. 

Hanson said mat experience, plus home 

field, are two things, plus talented players, Uiat 

CLC has going for its effort at home this week- 
end. 

CLC squeezes Sandbui^, 1 1-3 

According to Head Coach Gene Hanson, 
it's always a crapshoot when you try a double- 
squeeze. 

Three elements have to be in place for it to 
work. 

"First, you always have to have a good 
bunter," die coach said. Check. CLC has plen- 
tyofthem. 

"Then, you have to have a fast runner on 

second. The timing is always key and the ele- . 

ment of surprise has a lot to do with it as well." 

Check, check and check. 
Hanson's Lancers 





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BQe-SCeS 847-623-2004 



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Hours: 
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Sat. 9-3 • Closed Sun. 

wYM.ron-brianimoiorspotts.com 









state finals 
_jF€LC 

May «, ra _ 

9 a.m.-~ Elgin vs. Blackhawk 

Noon— CLC vs. Illinois Valley 

3 p.m.—Losers from first two games 

Sun., May 12 

Noon— Winners from first two games Sat. 
3 p.m.— Winner of 3 p.rri ■ Sat game vs. loser 
of noon Sun. game 
Mon., May 13 
Noon— Title game 

;^ote: Winner will host the southern Illinois 
or Region XXIV champ next weekend. From 
there, winner qualifies for Junior College 
World Series May 25-31 in Millington.Tenn. 



SIS i 1-ti ■ V° Unty ' S A o dam Donohoe s »des safely into third b ase during the 

SwILo 1 ; 3 "'? ^ ?? r l andburg in the Regi6n ,v > Section II tournament over 

ReiTn IV *JZ r raJ ! S, M e - ^ C , e " ded Up winning the eve "t ^nd will now host the 
Region IV state finals May 11-13. —Photo by Samir Id-Deen 

good hunters. 

Sophomore Adam Donohoe is the team's 
best bunter. This season, he has laid down 9- 
out-of-11 successful bunts with the double- 
squeeze on, leading to 18 RBIs. As a team this 
season, die Lancers have executed on roughly 
20-out-of-25 double-squeeze attempts. 

But last weekend against Sandburg in the 
Region IV, Section II tourney at CLC, sopho- 
more third baseman Dave Paddock got thecall. 

With one out and Tim Baum (hit by pitch) 
on diird and RickTrampke (reach on error) on 
second, Paddock laid down a beauty. 

"It was a tough pitch. It was low," said 
Paddock. "I just tried to keep the ball down." 

Paddock certainly did that. The ball 
popped off his bat into the dirt right towards 
the pitcher. 

Of course both runners were on the move. 

"The ideal placement is down the third 
base line, so when whoever picks it up to 
throw to first will have their back to the run- 
ners," said Hanson. 

But the ball hitting the dirt allowed tor tne 
extra split second. The Sandburg pitcher 
picked up the ball, saw Baum score, and pro- 






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ceeded to throw to first. But there was nobody 
home and instead of a sacrifice, Paddock had 
himself a 2-run single. 

"They (Sandburg) broke down defensive- 
ly on that one— their pitcher didn't know 
what to do" said Hanson. 

Again, like Hanson said, the element of 
surprise. The double-squeeze not only pro- 
duced two runs; It took the morale out of 
Sandburg's sails. 

Paddock's 2-run double-squeeze capped 

off a 7-run frame that put CLC well in com- 
mand at 11-3. 

George Fuchs Jed-ofT the inning with a 
line drive solo homer to left field. Other key 
hits in the game included an RBI double by 

Baum, which scored Aaron Bardy, who was 

pinch-running for catcher Jason Schuler 

(reached on an error). 

Russ Schaibly also had an RBI double that 

scored Chris Draska, who led off the fifth 

inning with a double. Starting pitcher Donnie 

Leicht scattered nine hits and struck out five 

in five innings of work. Zion-Benton product 

Danny Braswell tossed the final two frames 

for the save. 

CLC news, notes 

The Lancer baseball team has joined 
forces with Lake County Promotions, Inc. as 
co-sponsors for the antiques and collectables 
show, which will take place on the following 
Sunday's; June 9, July 14 and Sept. 8. 

The event will take place from a.m.-3 
p.m. in Building //7 on the CLC campus. 
Admission is $2. Dealer booths are $50 with 

the cost for early buyer's (6 a.m.) being $10. 
Please call 847-356-7499 or 847-356-8466 

for further information.— John Phelps 



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Green Fees $8 M-F • Seniors $7 M-F 

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Includes down pyrnt., first pymt., & security_depositr 



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SPORTS 



May 10, 2002 



. 



\ • 











April Jones of Warren (left), Zion-Benton's Janita Denham, North Chicago's 
Kewanda Vaughn, Mundelein's Lindsay Ahlstrand and Round Lake's Nicole Ross 
come down the stretch in the 100-meter dash at the North Suburban Conference 
Girls Track and Field Championships, held at Wauconda, High School.— Photo by 

Steve Young 






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meet 



■•* 



By STEVE PETERSON 
Staff Reporter 



While Lake Forest's depth carried the 
Scouts to the North Suburban Conference 
girls track crown, there .was an interesting bat- 
Se for runner-up honors. 

Libertyville garnered that honor, and will 
seek to continue momentum into the sectional 
meet at North Chicago. Other teams had solid 
individual efforts, if not school records, on the 





windy, cold and rainy 
day at Wauconda. 

"I am very pleased 
with our perfor- 
mance," said LHS 
coach Harry Carlson. 

Lizzy Proctor won 
the pole vault with a 

stunning 11 -feet effort 
for LHS and the relays 
also performed well. 

"She had the wind 
behind her on her 
jump, but I could not 
be more proud of Lizzy 
because she was out for 
three weeks with a foot 
injury," Carlson said. 

the Wildcats out- 
distanced Zion-Benton 
74-60 for second, with 
Grant taking fourth with 56 points. The next five 
were North Chicago 55, Warren 53, Vernon Hills 
50, Antioch 45, Stevenson 35 and Wauconda 18. 

The 800-meter medley took third with the 
combination of Sharon Knudsen, Jenny 
Byelick, Lizzy Jones and Laurie Klyman. The 
4x100 meter relay of Kristie Schneider, 
Byelick, Jones and Kalman took fourth, as did 
a new 1,600 meter relay lineup. LHS also 
gained a strong fourth-place effort from 
Lauren Jagiel in the 800 meters in 2:28.4. 

Antioch placed well in the jumping 
events. Lindsay Andrews took fourth in the 
pole vault, at 8 feet. Jenni Dewer took second 
in the high jump at 5-feet, 2 inches. Holly 
Clark beat out Libertyville's Ashley Gaus.in the 
triple jump. 31-3 to 31-8. 

Grant claimed two crowns. Cassie 
Howard beat Julie Bariamis of Antioch in the 
discus with a total of 124 feet, the only one to 




Round Lake's Whitney Lang competes 
in the shot put event at the North 
Suburban Girls Track and Field 
Championships at Wauconda.— Photo 



by Steve Young 



best 120. Julie Bariamis of Antioch was run- 
ner-up. Antioch held second place through 13 
events. 

Amy Lejeune of Grant had just enough for 
the final kick to win the 3,200 meter run over 
Jamie Knight of Lake Forest and Amber 
Hussain of Round Lake. The winning effort 
was 12:04.7. Lejeune is a sophomore. 

Grant placed second in two relays, the 
4x800 meters and the meet's final event, the 
x400 meters. 

» . ■ 

Hussain, mean- 
while, is the heart and 
soul of the Panthers 
squad. 

"Amber ran a good 
race, too, beating the 
old school record," 
said RL coach Bill 
Newby. "She has been 
on the varsity for three 
years now. She can 
strategize a race much 
more," he said. 

Sherlenia Green of 
Vernon Hills had an 
excellent meet, winning 
the 100 meters in a 123 
clocking, while her pre- 
lims time was 13.0. She 
beat Lamisha Hines of 
Ziori : Benton and two 






North Chicago runners in the finals. The Cougars 
4x200 meter relay team finished second. 

Warren coach Jim Lobitz was hoping for a 
strong final push in the final events to place 
his team in a contender status. Warren had 
.placed two in the triple jump, with May fourth 
and Goldbach fifth. Dana Klemm was third in 
the shot put at 35-11.5 and fourth in the dis- 
cus, 115-0.7. . 

"Dana had a personal best in both. We 
could not have asked Dana and Amber 
Dolence to do anything more," Lobitz said. 

Warren won the 800-sprint medley relay 
over Zion-Benton with a time of 1:53.2. 

"We are still running a little hurt," said 
Mundelein coach Steve Rossini. "Maggie 
Olzcyk had her best time in the 300 (second 
place 48.5) and Tammy Michally, a sopho- 
more, almost broke 13 minute in the two-mile 
(13.01.6," Rossini said. 






in 




— -* *■ *<-<-»*» -ot-^ **--**- - — -.W^fr^^.. 



- With 38 team points, the Grayslake girls' 
track team finished in eighth-place at the Fox 
Valley Conference Meet. 

Emily Plott had an outstanding meet, fin- 
ishing first in the pole vault (eight feet) and 
fourth in the 400 meter dash (1:03.5). Crystal 
Matsey also had a first place finish in the 200 
meter dash (27.2). 

The 800 meter relay team of Lindsay 
Potter, Christa Klausner, Matsey and Plott fin- 
ished third with a time of 1:56.3. 

Cassie Garcia finished fourth in the shot 
put with a distance of 31 feet, two inches to 
round out the top finishers for Grayslake. 

Both the 400 meter and 1600 meter relay 
teams rallied from the slow heat to finish in 
sixth place and fifth place, respectively. 

"They knew they were running against the 
clock and really went out to run their best," 
said head coach Sarah Palmberg. 

The girls will now compete in the North 
Chicago sectional on May 10 for the right to 



advance to the Class AA state finals in 
Charleston on May 17 and 18. 

Meanwhile, 'the boys' team is approach- , 
ing the FVC meet and competed in the Lake 
County Invite at Deerfield and in a quad with 
Jacobs, Lake Zurich and McHenry. 

At tl)e Lake County Invite", several Rams 
set personal bests but the only two to place 
were Jimmy Centella (4th, 800 meter dash, 
2:02.9) and LarsTiegan (3rd, high jump, 6'1") 
as Grayslake finished in 17th place out of 19 
teams with 10 team points'. Barrington won 

the event with 68 team points. 

The Rams fared better in the quad as six 
Rams placed, including Kevin Wood (1st 
place, pole vault), Brian Clark (3rd, pole 
vault), Centella (3rd, 1600 meter run), 
tiegan (1st, high jump), Sean Reap (4th, 800 
meter run) and Bob Applehans (4th, shot 
put). 

Grayslake will host the Fox Valley 
Conference meet on May 10. 












. . 






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' 



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May 10, 2002 






i 







SPORTS 




Lakeland Newspapers/ Bi 1 




r r~ 

Continuing the winning tradition, 
Northern Lake County HoopStars program 
has produced another winning team. In its 
first year, the fifth- and-sixth-grade girl's 
team, the Lady HoopStars, is already mak- 
ing headlines with a 5-0 record. Last week- 
end, the girls brought home the champi- 
onship from the Union Grove tournament. 

"I'm very proud of what our girls were 
able to accomplish in Union Grove, and 
extremely proud to have them in our program 
this year," said HoopStars program founder 
Gene Woltjer. 

Defensively, the Lady HoopStars domi- 
nated the boards averaging 35 rebounds a 
game. The defensive post team of Erin 
Claxton (20 rebounds), Meghan Slack (35 
rebounds), and Kelly Dones (30 rebounds) let 
little slip by. for opponents. Shana Shepherd 
also contributed 29 rebounds for the team. 
Claxton blocked three shots while Lory Shaw, 
Shepherd and Dones added two blocks. The 
Lady HoopStars allowed very few opponent 
drives. Each team member made at least one 
steal and dished out one assist. Tournament 

lers in steals included Joree Green with 19, 
Rachel Culp 14 and Shepherd 12. Every team 
member contributed to the scoring column 
for the HoopStars. Dones netted 35 total 
points, Shepherd 31, Claxton 26, Slack 23, 
Green 18, Shaw and Culp 14, Leena Gonzalez 
8, and Kelsey Amour and Destinee Wells two 
each. Paul Claxton coaches the team. 

The Northern Lake Country HoopStars is a 
traveling basketball program involving boys in 
grades 5-8 and now, girls in grades 5-6. The pro- 
gram is in its fourth-y 
expanded the number or players eacn year. 

The girl's team is new to the program this 
year, for instance. The eighth-grade boy's 
team has been with the program the longest 
and is one of best in area taking first-place in 
almost every tournament they've played. The 
program is open to anyone for 
tryouts. Currently, the program has players 
from Gurnee, Wadsworth, Grayslake, Antioch, 

Zion, Wildwood, Lake Villa and Waukegan. 
Other action 

Fifth-erade 





The Northern Lake County fifth- and-sixth-grade Lady HoopStars are off to a 5-0 
start, including a victory in the Union Grove tournament last week. The Lady 
HoopStars include (in no order) Asstant Coach Joe Shepherd, Erin Claxton, Kelly 
Dones, Rachel Culp, Destinee Wells, Leena Gonzalez, Kelsey Amour, Shana 
Shepherd, Head Coach Paul Claxton and Meghan Slack. Not pictured— Joree 
Green and Lory Shaw. 



' ■ H 



The HoopStars' fifth-grade boys traveling 
basketball team competed in their second 
tournament May 3-5 at Carthage College in 
Kenosha, Wis. The team finished the North 
American Youth Sports event with' one win 
and two tough losses. After losing the first 
game to the Wisconsin Wizards, the 
HoopStars rebounded to win their next game, 
beating the Racine Shooters 35-30. 

Brandon Paul led the tearri in rebounding 
in all three games, averaging nine per contest. 
Jake Anderson contributed 10 points and four 
rebounds against the Shooters, while Scott 
Dehnke and Taylor Furmanski each sc 
The defense was led by Chad Clai 
grabbed seven steals, John Androus with 
steals and three rebounds, and Dehnke 
Michael Brocious with three rebounds apiece. 

James Poliquin, Ryan DeRose, and James 
Zotto provided support coming off the bench. 
The team will return to Wisconsin for another 



& « 



' 1 



NAYS event in Milwaukee May 17-19. 
Eighth-grade 

The eighth-grade HoopStars went 
undefeated this weekend to capture first- 
place title in the Lake Geneva Basketball 
Tournament. The team defense dominated 
as it held every opponent to under 30 points. 
"This team has a mission and they came to 
execute", said head coach Wayne Weese, 
"This is a great group of young men." 

Leading the offensive charge in a 61-15 
victory over the Crystal Lake Lakers was Elias 
Washington with 11 points, Marvin Bembry 
(10) and Benny Morrison (eight). Ricky Green 
dished out four assists while Moore had 
three. Bembry and Moore crashed the 
boards, hauling in seven and six, respectively. 
Moore and Green led in steals with three and 
two; respectively. Bruce Cabell, Marcus 
Lewis, Washington, and Kevin Wozniak also 
had steals. The defense also combined for six 



blocked shots. Moore had two while Chris 
Brown, Cabell, Green, Malcom Tinson, and 
Washington each had one. 

In the second round, the HoopStars out- 
paced Badger Sporting Goods 54-22 as 8 of 1 1 
players had steals in the game. Lewis led the 
way with four while HoopStars newcomers 
Brett Siedlecki and Cabell finished with two. 
Washington, whose slam-dunk energized the 
team, finished with seven points. Morrison 
netted 11 and Moore eight. 

The HoopStars then handed the Oak Park 
Friars a 53-27 defeat. Washington and Moore 
controlled the boards, grabbing eight and six, 
respectively. Morrison also had two blocks. A 
balanced scoring attack was led by 
Washington and Moore with 12, Morrison 11 
and Lewis 10. Morrison added a dunk to fin- 
ish off the Friars. 

he championship pitted the HoopStars 
against the Wildcats, an AAU team with play- 
ers from Johnsburg, Crystal Lake and 
Huntley. Not to be outdone, Moore made his 
dunking abilities known, finishing with 17 
points. Morrison hauled down eight 
rebounds and Washington six. Moore also 
had six steals while Green, Washington and 
Cabell finished with two apiece. Tinson led 
with 4 assists. 



Bull 






The Chicago Bulls invite runners and 
their families to the first annual Miller 
Genuine Draft Running With The Bulls 

OK Hun on Sat., June 23. Join current and for- 
mer Bulls celebrities for a fun-filled morning. 
Following the 8K run, there will be a post-run 
party for all participants and their families. 
The party will provide entertainment, includ- 
ing a Lipton Brisk Lemonade Kid's Fun Run 
with Benny the Bull. All proceeds from the 
event go to CharitaBulls. 

For further information or an entry form, 

please call 312-455-4000 or visit the Bulls web 

slteatwww.bulls.com. 



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FOREST HOSPITAL 



Skin Cancer Screening: If You 
Can Spot It. You Can Stop It! 

LFH's CareCoach (mobile health van) is 
offering free skin cancer screenings on the 
following dates. Call 847-535-6112 for specif- 
ic times and locations or check out 
www.lakeforestliospital.com for the 
CareCoach schedule. Dates: Wednesdays, 
May 15, May 29, Tuesdays, May 28. 

Congregate Meals Program 

Join others for low cost, nutritional meals 
in the Lake Forest Hospital cafeteria on a 
daily basis. A speaker or educational pro- 
gram of interest accompanies one meal each 
month. On May 16th, the Mundelein Dance 
Group, Dance Dynamites, will perform. 
Reservations are not necessary. For more 
information, call 847-535-6176. Date: 
Thursday, May 16; Time 4:30 to 6 p.m.. Place: 
Lake Forest Hospital, 660 N. Westmoreland 
Rd., Lake Forest, Lake Forest, IL 60045. 



STARS: Start Targeting And 
Reach Success 

A weight management program for 8-to- 
14 year old children designed to build 
healthy bodies through increasing activity 
and choosing nutritious foods. This ten-week 
program includes sue individual consulta- 
tions with a registered dietitian. Call Lake 
Forest Hospital Nutrition Services at 847- 
535-6176 for information and scheduling. 
Cost: $250 for the ten-week program. 




B12/ Lakeland Newspapers 










ALZHEIMER'S 
ASSOCIATION 



Workshop on the ABC's of 
Alzheimer's Disease 

If you are concerned about someone who 
has memory problems or who has been diag- 
nosed with dementia, the Alzheimer's 
Association — Great Illinois Chapter is pre- 
senting a free education program. ABC: 
Alheimer's: Beginning to Cope, will be pre- 
sented at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, May 14, at the 
Gidwitz Place st 1601 Lake Cook Rd., 
Deerfield. The program will cover topics 
including: the difference between normal 
aging and dementia, the diagnostic process, 
what lo expect as the disease progresses, and 
how family and friends can help the person 
with dementia. The ABC program is open to 
the public and advanced registration is 
requested. To register for the ABC program, 
call the Alzheimer's Association at 847-933- 
2413. For more information about 
Alzheimer's disease and related disorders, 
call the Helpline at 1-800-272-3900. 

CONDELL HEALTH 
NETWORK 

Free Weight Management 
Orientation Program 

On Wednesdays in June - 7 p.m. Free 
Weight management Orientation Program 
every Wednesday at 7 p.m. Centre Club, 200 
W. Golf Rd., Libertyville and at Centre Club, 
1405 Hunt Club Rd., Gumee by NutriQuest, a 
liquid protein fasting program for individuals 
20 percent or more over their ideal body 
* weight; Biometrics, a computerized meal 
plan and personal training for exercise; Lean 
for Life Jr., a healthy eating and exercise pro- 
gram structured for adolescents ages 13-17, 
along with one parent; Body Talk, a weight 
management support group; Nutritional 
Counseling, one-to-one for individual needs; 
and Weight Masters, a follow-up group for 
graduates for Lean for Life. Reservations 
requested. Call Libertyville 990-5750 or 
Gumee 855-0700, ext. 4770. 

Golf Open at Pine Meadow 

Tuesday, June 4: Condell Annual Golf Open 
at Pine Meadow Golf Course in Mundelein. 
Proceeds from the 2002 Golf Open will bene- 
fit Condell's new Emergency Department 
expansion. Participants will enjoy a conti- 
nental breakfast, 18 holes of golf with a cart, 
lunch, hone-in-one, putting and golf con- 
tests, various prizes and raffle, and the 
Million Dollar Shootout. The closing bar- 
beque will feature the popular pig roast and 
closing awards ceremony. Afternoon tee- 
times for the 2002 Golf Open are closed. For 
more information or to make morning golf 
reservations, call the Auxiliary at (847)990- 
5615. 

Pediatrician Answers Questions 

Tuesday, June 4: Condell Annual Golf Open 
at Pine Meadow Golf Course in Mundelein. 
Proceeds from the 2002 Golf Open will be 



Hi Dr. Singer, 
: Today ive went shopping for new 

school clothes for our kids ai 
we run into something we haven't seen 
before and didn't expect Both of our 
kids who are 1 1 and 13 started getting 
all uppity with us because we didn't 
want to buy them the "in" fashions 
which are very expensive. We Just 
moved Into a more upscale area and I 
think* that our kids have already been 
Influenced by some of the kids here in a 
way mat we are not thrilled with. We 

want our kids to be happy, but we have 
a limited budget We also know how 
important it is for kids to fit in. We said 
"no" to the expensive clothes. Do we buy 
the stuff or not? L.L. 

■ . 

Dear L.L., 

I will start my answer with a little vignette 

_jout a client of mine. The reason I write 
about mis is that I love her style and I think it 
will clear things up for you. She also lives in a 
very upscale section of town, but grew up in a 
very small town and on Very moderate 
means. Her kids demand to have everything 
upscale. One of the things that the kids have 
a problem with is her car. You see, she has a 
beat up old station wagon that she has loved 
and driven for a long time. It's a dependable 
car and has carried them Uirough lots. 

Anyway, her 12 year old daughter hates 
the car and is embarrassed by it. She repeat- 
edly requests for her mom to pick her up in 
their other car which is more upscale. The 












Dr. Sherri Singer 



mom is not a status person and wants to 
teach her kids that, so she always picks them 
up in the station wagon. Last time I wit- ' 
nessed this gentle sparring conversation 
between mother and daughter, the mother 
looked squarely into her daughters eyes and 
with a smile 

you in another car again and I'll pick you up 
in my nightgown with lipstick all over my 
face and scratch in places you don't want to 
see!" I almost fell out of my chair laughing! 
Get my point?! 

I think this mom has it right. Kids need to 
learn that things don't mean anything. Who 
you are does! Those that define you by what . 
you have will more than likely not be your 
friends anyway. Also, you cannot give in to 
pressure like this. You have a budget to fol- 
low. Give in now and you will regret it the rest 
of your life! Supporting your kids involves 
reasonable food, shelter, affection, medical 
care and clothing. I don't think reasonable 
needs to always include the "in" fashion 
things. 

There are many ways to handle this. Let 
me just go into a couple. First, you could 



limit them to an amount of money they get to 
spend for all the clothing for school. If they 
want one "in" fashion thing and it takes all 
the money, than they just have to survive on 
wearing the other clothes from last year. I'm 
sure they still have clothes from last year. This 
way, they are getting to pick the "in" thing, 
but they are not able to run amuck with get- 
ting many of them. 

Another way to handle it is to require 
them to pay for the purchase of any "in" stuff 
on their own from birthday money or money 
from extra odd jobs they do. This way, you 
are teaching them how to work for the extras 
they want. This is never a bad lesson. Just 
don't let them hornswaggle you into feeling 
sorry for them if they don't get everything ; 
they want. No child has ever had any serious 
debilitation from getting told, "no." 

Regarding fitting in, as long as you don't 
make them wear clothes from your old closet 
(although that does seem to be the style these 
days) or that are too short or stained all over 
the place, they will find other things to fit in 
about. Certainly we don't want our kids to be 
doing anything just to fit in, right? Just food 
for thought! 

Dr. Sherri Singer is a Licensed Clinical 
Psychologist and Childhood Behavior 
Specialist. She regularly works in person with 
many readers of this column, helping them to 
significantly improve their kid's attention, 
behavior and processing skills. For an 
appointment, please call (847) 577-8832 or 
(708)962-2549. 



Unlock your own body s potential to fight cancer 



People fighting cancer or those who are 
close to someone fighting cancer should 
attend a free seminar scheduled for Tuesday, 
May 14 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Holiday 
Inn Gurnee in Gurnee, 111. 

"Beating Cancer with Science and 
Compassion, " hosted by Cancer Treatment 
Centers of America( at Midwestern Regional 
Medical Center in Zion, will focus on the 
benefits of naturopathy and pastoral care as 
components in the battle to win the fight 
against cancer. Crucial information about 
how to choose radiation therapy will also be 
presented. 

Speakers for the Cancer Fighter event will 
be radiation oncologist Bernard V. Eden, MD, 
Timothy Birdsall, ND, and Pastor Percy 
McCray. 

Eden is the Medical Director of Radiation 
Oncology at Cancer Treatment Centers of 
America} at Midwestern Regional Medical 
Center. He is well-versed in advanced radia- 
tion therapies such as intensity modulated 
radiation and high dose rate brachytherapy. 
When you need to make a decision on radia- 
tion therapy, technology plays a big role in 
you overall treatment success. You'll hear 
information that can help you make that 
decision. 



Birdsall is a naturopathic doctor with 15 
years experience in the discipline. He has 
been a featured speaker and guest lecturer at 
dozens of such events throughout to the 
United States as well as serving a two-year 
stint as editor-in-chief of "Alternative 
Medicine Review" among other publications 
experience. 

He is currently the National Director of 
Naturopathic Medicine for CTCA( as well as 
Director of Naturopathic Medicine at 
Midwestern Regional Medical Center in Zion, 

111. 

The practice of naturopathy medicine 

blends centuries-old knowledge of natural, 
nontoxic therapies with current advances in 
the understanding of health aimed at stimu- ' 
lating the body to heal itself. The synergy of 
naturopathy and conventional medicine 
allows for the recognition and encourage- 
ment of the body's inherenthealing abilities 
and cultivates an attitude of personal respon- 
sibility for one's health. ' 

McCray is the co-director of pastoral care 
for CTCA( in Zion. He has spoken at numer- 
ous engagements across the country that 
focus on spirituality as a key part of clinical 
treatment as well as experience moderating a 
weekly radio show. He administers an inter- 




ROUND LAKE BEACH CHIROPRACTIC & MEDICAL CENTER 

If any of these symptoms sound familiar, let us help you: 



* Headaches 

* Neck Pain 

* Mid-Back Pain 



* Lower Back Pain 
or Stiffness or Pain 

* Numbness or Pain 
in Arms or Legs 



* Sport Injuries 

* Whiplash 

* Auto or Work 
Related Injuries 






Now C 



upu ncture, Massage 



■ ■ 

1/ 



(847) 265-5600 



Dr. Scott Reiser 



wsie 



36735 Route 83 • Lake Villa, EL 60046 

■ 

Auto and Work'Rclated Injuries Excluded, But Covered 100% 




■PIMM I 



denominational, on-site pastoral care pro- 
gram at the hospital in Zion with a weekly 
worship service and a great deal of patient 
contact each day. 

The goal of the program is to create an 
atmosphere for patients that is conducive to 
healing and recovery through the power of 
prayer in conjunction with modem medicine 
and science, and nutrition. This is aimed at 
giving both patients and family members 
hope and compassion to improve their quali- 
ty of life. 

The Holiday Inn Gurnee is located at 
6161 West Grand Ave. in Gurnee, just west of 
the 1-94 tollway, south of Gurnee Mills Mall. 
Refreshments will be served. Admission 
is free. Anyone interested in attending the 
Tuesday evening seminar is asked to RSVP by 
calling 1-800-765-9920. Walk-ins are wel- 
come. 

Cancer Treatment Centers of America at 
Midwestern Regional Medical Center has 
been honored by Modern Maturity Magazine 
as one the 15 friendliest hospitals in the 
nation. Midwestern was also ranked second 
in Natural Health Magazine's listing of the 
Healthiest Hospitals in America. . 

Founded in 1988, Cancer Treatment 
Centers of America (CTCA) manages cancer 
hospitals, oncology practices and outpatient 
hospital-based cancer programs that employ 
a comprehensive, integrated approach to tra- 
ditional cancer treatment to empower 
patients to fight their cancer while maintain- 
ing a high quality of life. In addition to med- 
ically advanced.cancer treatments such as 
surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, CTCA 
offers complementary treatments, including 
naturopathy, therapeutic nutrition, psycho- 
logical and spiritual support, and oncology 
rehabilitation. CTCA programs and facilities 
are accredited by the Joint Commission on 
Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, 
The American College of Surgeons, and the 
American College of Pathology, among oth- 
ers. CTCA's Midwestern Regional is the only 
hospital in Illinois to receive back-to-back 
accreditation with commendation by JCAHO. 

CTCA supports progressive cancer 
' research through its affiliation with the 
Cancer Treatment Research Foundation, a 
501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. CTCA 
serves cancer patients worldwide primarily at 
its hospitals in Zion, Illinois and Tulsa, 
Oklahoma. Other facilities are located in 



• Goshen, Indiana; Portsmouth, Virginia; and 
Seattle, Washington. For more information 



~ 



about CTCA, call toll-free 1-800-577-1255, or 
visit the web site, www.cancerfighter.com. 

























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May 10, 2002 










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HEALTHWATCH 



i< 



.S 



lakeland Newspapers I B13 



Brain research shows that diet an 




exercise are 



An old adage says that aging is a state of 
mind, but new research is beginning to 
prove it. 

As brain research advances, experts are 
finding that some of the physical and men- 
tal changes normally associated with aging 
may not actually be normal at all, but 
instead, the result of treatable and pre- 
ventable health conditions. In fact, by 
some estimates, only 30 percent of physi- 
cal aging can be traced to our genes. The 
rest is up to each individual. 

According to the AARP Andrus 
Foundation, developing and maintaining 
good "cognitive health" is as important to a 
person's quality of life at any age as main- 
taining good physical health. A series of 

four new booklets, "Staying Sharp: Current 
Advances in Brain Research," provides 
information and tips based on this new 
research. The booklets were derived from a 
series of public forums that were conduct- 
ed in partnership with the Dana Alliance 
for Brain Initiatives, and featured the 
country's foremost researchers, scientists 
and physicians working in the field of aging 
and the brain. These four booklets provide 
some of the most up-to-date information 
available. 

One of the key findings of this new 
research is that diet and exercise are cru- 
cial not just for physical well being, but 
also for mental acuity at any age. 
The Importance of Diet 

The food choices we make throughout 
our lives can make a difference in the like- 
lihood for many diseases that cause pre- 
mature death or disability, including heart 
disease, cancer, stroke and diabetes. Three 
long-term studies being conducted by the 
Harvard School of Public Health have fol- 
lowed 300,000 people and suggest that: 

• a diet rich in vegetables may help pre- 
vent breast and prostate cancer 

• colon cancer is more common 
among those who eat more red meat 

• high-fat diets increase the risk of 
heart disease, stroke and some cancers 

• a diet with too many refined carbohy- 



i • 




s to living 



we 



drates increases the risk of obesity, dia- 
betes and heart disease. 

Although there are some nutritional 
changes associated with aging, for the 
most part, what was considered a healthy 
diet at 40 will still be a healthy diet at 60 or 
70. Health experts recommend a diet that 
emphasizes whole grains and fresh fruits 
and vegetables as well as other tips: 

•Drink eight to 10 cups of fluid every 
day, and make at least five of those water. 
Limit caffeinated and alcoholic bever- 
ages. 

• Reduce the amount of saturated fat in 
your diet and replace it with monounsatu- 
rated fat such as that in olive, canola, sun- 
flower, saffiower and soybean oils. 

• When snacking, choose fruits, vegeta- 
bles or whole-grain products. 

• Make eating fun by sharing dinner- 
time with family and friends, or joining 
community functions whenever possible. 
The Benefits of Exercise 

Many experts believe that regular exer- 
cise is the single most important thing any- 
one can do to improve overall health and 
well-being. New studies show that aerobic 
activity increases levels of brain chemicals 
that encourage the growth of nerve cells, 
which maybe the reason moderately stren- 
uous exercise is associated with enhanced 
memory skills. 

Some ways that exercise can help 
retain mental capacity include: 

• reducing anxiety and stress 

• improving mood and possibly allevi- 
ating depression 

• improving sleep 

• increasing energy levels 

• slowing the rate of bone loss 

• enabling the body to use insulin 
more efficiently 

> improving cardiovascular health 

• controlling weight and preventing 
obesity 

The National Institute of Aging sug- 
gests incorporating four types of exercises 
into your life. Endurance exercise, such as 
walking, helps increase stamina. Strength 

' 1 




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Beating Cancer with 
cience and Compassion 



*'t\t^ rO */r>/* 






Bernard V. Eden, MD 

Dr. Eden is the Medical 
Director of Radiation Oncology 
at Cancer Treatment Centers of 
America® at Midwestern 
Regional Medical Center. His 
practice includes advanced radi- 
ation therapies such as intensity 
modulated radiation and high 
dose rate hrachytherapy. 




May 14, 2002 
7pm to 9pm 

■ 

> 

Holiday Inn Gurnee 

■ 

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Timothy Birdsall, ND 

Tim is currently the National 
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Medicine at Midwestern 
Regional Medical Center in Zion. 




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Rev. Percy McCray 

Reverend McCray is the co- 
director of pastoral care for 
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Medical Center in Zion. 




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Naturopathic medicine blends centuries-old 
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at stimulating the body to heal itself. . 

What is better than spiritual support in addi- 
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exercise, with free weights or resistance 
weights, increases metabolism and may 
help prevent osteoporosis. Flexibility exer- 
cise, such as stretching or yoga, prevents 
and aids recovery from injuries. And bal- 
ance exercises, such as standing on one 



V 

foot, help prevent falls. 

By following these basic tips, as well as 
any advice from your physician related to 
any specific health conditions, it is possible 
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Heart health should be the front line 



Intensive treatment of cardiovascular risk 
factors is vital for people with diabetes, accord- 
ing to a series of reports from the American 
Heart Association's Prevention Conference VI: 
Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease pub- 
lished in today's Circulation: Journal of the 
American Heart Association. 

"The No. 1 consequence of diabetes is car- 
diovascular disease," says Scott M. Grundy, 
M.D., Ph.D., lead author of the executive sum- 
mary and chair of the American Heart 
Association's diabetes committee. "About two- 
thirds of people with diabetes eventually die of 
heart or blood vessel disease. We want to make 
people more aware of the problem of diabetes 
as a major contributor to the problem of car- 
diovascular disease." 

Several recent studies show that the 
increase in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk 
associated with diabetes can be lessened by 
controlling individual risk factors such as obe- 
sity, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure. 

Losing weight can have a great impact on a 
dangerous pre-diabetic condition called the 
metabolic syndrome, says Grundy, who is also 
a professor of internal medicine at the 
University of Texas Southwestern Medical 
School in Dallas. The metabolic syndrome is a 
prediabetic state characterized by abdominal 
fat, low-levels of high-density lipoprotein, .high 
levels of triglycerides and high blood pressure. 

"One-third to one-half of the people with 
this syndrome eventually develop diabetes, but 
metabolic syndrome can lead to cardiovascular 
disease even before you get diabetes because of 
the high blood lipids and cluster of risk factors," 
he says. 

The rise in type 2 diabetes in children and 



adolescents is a disturbing trend, the authors 
say. It is likely due to obesity and sedentary 
lifestyle, and increases their risk of early CVD. 
Grundy says that merely calling diabetes a risk 
factor underestimates its effect on cardiovascu- 
lar disease because the consequences are so 
far-ranging-from heart attack and stroke to kid- 
ney disease, heart failure, diminished heart 
function and problems in both the large and 
small vessels, like those in the eyes. 

There are two forms of diabetes. Type 1 
diabetes results from a failure to produce insulin, 
and it most often begins in childhood or adoles- 
cence. It accounts for 10 to 15 percent of all dia- 
betes. Much more common is type 2 diabetes, 
which results from insufficient production of 
insulin, poor response to insulin (insulin resis- 
tance) or both. People with type 2 diabetes often 
have other risk factors for CVD too, such as high 
cholesterol and obesity. Type 2 diabetes is usually 
brought on by obesity, but susceptibility to it 
varies considerably in the population. 

"In the last few years we've learned how 
important it is to treat cardiovascular risk fac- 
tors in patients with diabetes and how much 
benefit can be derived," says Grundy. 

With many other ailments, mere are a lot of 
treatments or aspects of disease management 
that patients can do on their own, he says. 
However, diabetes is one condition in which 
physician involvement is critical. , 

A person's risk for CVD can be obtained 

inexpensively and non-invasively, she adds, 

citing the Framingham risk score as the "gold 

standard" for CVD risk assessment. It requires 
only a doctor's office visit to assess blood pres- 
sure, weight, smoking status and a blood sam- 
ple to check cholesterol levels. 




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4 

B14 / Lakeland Newspapers 



May 1 0, 2002 







This season's trends inspire individuality 



- # 

Dare to be different. Imagine a sink-into- 
it sofa covered in a mixture of plush, floral ta- 
pestry and chenille then trimmed with long 
eyelash fringe; or a period-style accent chair 
covered in a bold, playful Buffalo plaid. This 
season designers are gravitating towards 
wonderful and unexpected mixtures of classic 
furniture styles dressed up to have fun. 
According to T.J. Schmitz, an upholstery de- 
signer for Arhaus Furniture, an 18-store re- 
iler specializing in exclusive, quality home 
furnishings, "Look for a retailer that offers 
plenty of design options and encourages cre- 
ativity with fabric combinations, textures and 

trims/' 

A custom-looking sofa or chair that ex- 
presses your individuality can be created eas- 
ily by working with coordinating fabrics and 
interesting trims. A good furniture retailer will 
offer advice on how to coordinate multiple 
fabrics and textures on a piece of furniture. 
"Go for that signature piece in your home: A 
great-looking sofa or chair and ottoman. But 
make sure it fits into your home ddcor and 
withstands everyday use," says Schmitz. 
"Look for great-looking upholstered pieces 
that are a bit out-of-the-ordinary in their 
shape, scale or fabric. These core pieces can 
help build or rebuild the decor in your room." 
This season, exciting new mixtures of fab- 
rics, colors and shapes should give furniture 
shoppers some creative inspiration. "Keep in 
mind," says Schmitz, "that seeking out 
unique pieces of furniture for your home 
doesn't label your decor 'trendy' - it simply 
makes your home more personal, comfort- 
able and fun." 
Fabric Finds for 2002 

Smooth twills are making some exciting 
statements in bold colors such as red, gold, 
copper, raisin and rich shades of brown. 
Black and khaki are popular classics that are 
being revisited in fabric combinations such as 
toiles, florals, bold stripes and checks. In up- 
holstery, shades of green are still strong staple 
colors to pull a room together. 

Embroidered chenilles and tapestries also 
are finding their places in home fashion this 
season. Ethnic inspired sofas, chairs, and 
even classically-styled ottomans covered in 
kilim rugs have an appealing worldly influ- 
ence and work beautifully in an eclectic room 
setting. 




Today's upholstery styles are easier 
than ever to personalize. Arhaus Furni- 
ture's Chateau Sofa combines a lus- 
cious combination of five coordinating 
fabrics with the sturdy elegance of a 
solid hardwood frame. 

According to Schmitz, furniture designers 
are thinking more about the versatility of a 
sofa or chair by using companion leathers 
and fabrics on opposite sides of cushions and 
pillows. This built-in versatility allows a con- 
sumer to change the look of a room instantly 

with a quick flip of a cushion. 

Details, Details ... Delightful Details 

This season, sofas are ready to take center 
stage with glamorous, vintage-inspired sil- 
houettes that are updated and fresh for to- 
day's home decor. The classic look of beauti- 
fully-tailored, fitted backs and sculptural 
arms are emphasized by decorative trims and 
interesting kick-pleats. Interesting cording, 
twisted brocade and long, loopy eyelash 
fringe are all the rage for dressing up a sofa, 
chair or ottoman. And don't forget about nail 
heads. Oversized or miniature, these are a 
handsome detail. 

"Think of trim as that special, personal 
accessory," says Schmitz. "Just like your 
wardrobe, the unexpected details are the 
ones that give your furniture a touch of per- 
sonality and can pull a look together," 



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Ready to buy upholstered furniture? 
It's like buying a good suit 



Like the best suit in your wardrobe, a sofa 
is the foundation of your room setting. The 
piece you choose should allow for versatility 
and be an expression of personal style. "Pur- 
chase a sofa as a staple item to your personal 
style -- just like a good suit," says Schmitz. 
"But always consider the construction and 
durability as well as the fashion statement it 

makes." 

Shop for excellent craftsmanship, high- 
quality fabrics and materials that will with- 
stand the test of time and use. That way, your 
sofa investment should last 10 to 15 years. 
Here are some helpful shopping tips for up- 
holstered furniture: 

* Solid Framework. A structurally sound 
frame provides the best comfort and durabili- 
ty. Look for construction that uses solid hard- 
wood, kiln-dried to a moisture content of 8 
percent or less. A well-made upholstered 
piece also incorporates firmly anchored, 
eight-way, hand-tied springs in its base. 

* Testing, Testing. Test a sofa or chair in 
the store by wiggling its ami. It shouldn't 
move or squeak, but should feel solid. Also, 
press your hand against the decking, or plat- 
form, under the seat cushions. The less you 
feel the spring, the better the construction. 

* Warranty. Frame warranties often indi- 
cate furniture quality, according to Schmitz. 
Usually, the longer the warranty term, the 
more well-made the product. 



* Hefty is Good. Check cushions for their 
heft. Fine furniture uses high-density (around 
the 1.8-density mark) foam cushions 
wrapped in down or other soft material. This 
padding should be channel-stitched like a 
down comforter, to prevent it from shifting 
and settling to one side of a cushion. Foam 
and padding bagged together inside a cush- 
ion keep these materials intact and create a 
desirable "crown" along the cushion's sides. 
Furniture arms should also be padded, keep- 
ing the appearance and feel of wood framing 
completely unexposed. 

* Attention to Detail. Fine tailoring - an- 
other sign of good craftsmanship -- uses tight, 
straight stitches for strength and neatness. 
Finished seams, particularly on slipcovers, 
prevent fabric from fraying when it's washed. 

* The Look. Look for upholstery with fab- 
ric focal points that are centered on cushions, 
pillows and backs. Also, be sure patterns 
match where seams meet. "Pattern matching 
requires a significant amount of fabric and 
marks good quality," says Schmitz. 

* Lasting Beauty. Your fabric choice might 
well depend on who will be using your furni- 
ture, and how. For instance, if your sofa is Fi- 
do's favorite snoozing spot, stay clear of nub- 
by fabrics that snag. A tightly woven material, 
such as tapestry, provides extra durability. 

Gently used furnishings, on the other 
hand, might warrant fine linen or silk. 

















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THE FRIECMy LITTLE OFFICE A<2lia®$S FR©£1 THE LAKE! 



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Stanton bay spacious ranch home with full basement 
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Covered patio and big yard just perfect for those back 
yard picnics. Move in & enjoy for only $139,900 











ONE OF A KIND!! 

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Where else can you find a lot right on Fox Lake? 
Listed just in time for spring and summer. Bring the 
kids, the dogs, and don't forget the boat! Not many 
waterfront lots arc left, so don't delay! S167,900 











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SPRING GROVE 

Ranch home on double wooded lot. This beautiful, 
immaculate home has 3 bedrooms and 2 full baths, 
a full basement, and a huge brick patio! Priced to 
sell at 5173,900 



UNIQUE 2-STORY 

This 3 bedroom, 1 .5 bath home has a stone exteri- 
or. Completely remodeled! Huge living room and 
family room with brick fireplace. Private deck off 
master bedroom. Laundry room on 2nd noon So 
much more to this great home for $179,900 




ALMOST NEW HOME HAS MUCH TO OFFER! 

Located in Duck Lake Woods, you have a great 
private lake almost in your own back yard! 
Spacious family home has a full basement and a 
2.5 car garage. Plenty of room for the growing 
family in a friendly neighborhood! Look over your 
big fenced in yard from your huge wrap around 
deck! All of this & so much more for S185,000 



BETTER THAN NEW! 

Move-in condition. Low maintenance brick/vinyl 
quad-level family sized home. Professionally land- 
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High Schools. A great deal at 5210,000! 







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This home won't last in Countryside East. What a 
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NEARLY NEW 

This great home has 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths and a 
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& is adjacent to the nature preserve. $249,900 



For your free package of information on the 
Chain O' Lakes area please feel free to contact us 



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Commercial 



Department 



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Crystal Lake 



(847) 381-0808 (815) 459-5400 



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(815)344-1033 





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May 10, 2002 



J . 



MOTHER'S DAY PULLOUT 






■ 



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£ v i PiantprQ •Herbs • Rose Bushes 






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797 Waveland Ave. 

(847) 662-7303 



1/2 Block East of Rt. 41 
1/2 Block North of Grand Ave. 
Hours: Nlon. - Fri 9-8 • Sat. 9-5 • Sun. 




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©2002 American Honda Motor Co., Inc. 



A Tradition Of Quality 

1775 Pro-V Tiller. The 1775 Pro-V is one 
of the most popular boats in the history of the 
Lund Boat Company. It offers serious anglers 
a top-of-the-line fishing design that is also 
| easy to trailer and store. Everything about 
this boat is built for speed and functionality, 
and it offers unique Pro-V engineering for the 
ultimate fishing advantage. 



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We are Celebrating our 82nd YEAR! 

We are the oldest Lund Dealer in Lake County. Our customers are still important 

to us and we service what we sell. Buy the Best for Less at: 







112 Miles 



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MOTHER'S DAY PULLOO 




May 1 0, 2002 











What wouldn't your mom do for you? 
Nothing. She can always be relied upon - to 
share both the good and the bad -- and the 
only tiling she asks in return is bragging 
rights to your accomplishments. Isn't this 
lady deserving of a special gift on Mother's 
Day? 

Swarovski --trie world's largest manu- " 
facturer of full cut crystal - certainly thinks 
so and to prove it, they are offering a limited 
edition crystal 'Mom' pendant necklace. 
Instead of bestowing disposable flowers or 
chocolates, giving Swarovski's 'Mom' pen- 
dant necklace - a delicate silver chain with 
alternating crystallized letter and heart 
cubes, creatively spelling mom — is a lasting 
way to show you care. The whimsical neck- 





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788 Barron Blvd. (Rte. 83) 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

847-223-1160 

Open U'cd.-Tlnti's. Ipm to 5pm Fiilpm-6pm 
Sat.& Sun. I2pm-4pm 



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lace also reverses to reveal an alternate pat- 
tern, providing the benefit of two necklaces 
in one. Attractive and meaningful, the neck- 
lace comes beautifully packaged in a double- 
tiered pink box, with a rose image and laven- 
der bow accented breakaway top. A perfect 
gift from dad, baby or child to mom on 
Mother's Day, this unique pendant necklace 
also makes a thoughtful gift from a friend to a 
new or expecting mom. 

Already a hit with the celebrity set, 
actresses Holly Robinson Peete, who is cur- 
rently in her second pregnancy, and third 
time mom-to-be Marlee Matlin have been 
seen roaming around LA proudly sporting 
their necklaces and a glowing smile.Jaime 



Bergman (Son of the Beach), who is expect- 
ing her first child with actor David 'Angel* 
Boreanez shordy, recently wore one during a 
photo shoot for the April issue of Pregnancy 
magazine. After all, letting the world know 
" that she is a proud mother is mom's ~ 
favorite thing to do. "My role as a mother is 
most important to me and I want to let the 
world know," says Josie Bissett (formerly of 
Melrose Place). "Swarovski's 'Mom' necklace 
is a fun, fashionable way to do exactly that." 
The Swarovski 'Mom' pendant necklace 
retails for $65 and is available at department 
and specialty stores nationwide; as well as 
Swarovski Gallery Stores in major cities. For 
local outlets, call (800) 426-3088, 





i * 



Jan Hubert of Antioch holds her son 
Carson, 8 months, during a Look What 
I Can Do session at the Condell 
Medical Center in Libertyville. — Photo 
by Sandy Bressner 



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Champagne Brunch 10:30-3:00 

Fresh Carved Sirloin of Beef 

• ■ 

Fresh Carved Roast Turkey Breast 
Fresh Carved Glazed Ham 
Stuffed Shells 

Codfish dejohnge 
Eggs* Benedict 
Omelet Station 

Belgium Waffles French Toast Under 5 F ree 

Our Famous Salad Bar 

Assorted Fresh Pastries, Danish, Rolls 

And lots MORE... 



^ 1 8.95 Adults 

$8. 95 12 am 



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CARVING STATION: 

Sirloin of Beef 
Roast Tom Turkey 
Glazed Ham 
The Chef's Pasta Station 



Chicken Cordon Bleu 

BBQ Baby Back Ribs 

Crabmeat Stuffed Orange Roughy 

Our Famous Salad Bar 

Sweets Table 

And lots MORE... 



West 



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May 10, 2002 



MOTHER'S DAY PULLOUT 











The earliest Mother's Day celebra- 
tions can be traced back to the spring cel- 
ebrations of ancient Greece in honor of 
Rhea, the Mother of the Gods. During the 
1600s, England celebrated a day called 
"Mothering Sunday," on the fourth 
Sunday of Lent (the 40-day period leading 
up to Easter). "Mothering Sunday" hon- 
ored the mothers of England. 
* During this time many of England's 
poor worked as ( servapts for the wealthy. 
As most jobs were located far from their 
homes, the servants would live at the 
houses of their employers. On Mothering 
Sunday the servants would have the day 
off and were encouraged to return home 
and spend the day with their mothers. A 
special cake, called the mothering cake, 
was often brought along. to provide a fes- 
tive touch. 

As Christianity spread throughout 
Europe the celebration changed to honor 
the "Mother Church" — the spiritual 
power that gave them life and protected 
them from harm. Overtime the church 
festival blended with the Mothering 
Sunday celebration. People began honor- 
ing their mothers as well as the church. 
In the United States, Mother's Day was 
first suggested in 1872 by Julia Ward 
HbWe (who wrote the words to the "Battle 
Hymn of the Republic") as a day dedicat- f 
ed to peace. Ms. Howe would hold orga- 
nized Mother's Day meetings in Boston, 
Mass. every year. 

In 1907, Ana Jarvis, of Philadelphia, 
began a campaign to establish a national 
Mothers Day. Ms. Jarvis persuaded her 
mother's church in Grafton, West Va., to 
celebrate Mother's Day on the second 
anniversary of her mother's death, the 
second Sunday of May. By the next year, 
Mother's Day was also celebrated in 





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This cake has now become an Easter cake but originally it was given by servant 
girls to their mothers when they went home on Mothering Sunday. Recipe 
courtesyofwww.britannia.com. 



Cake Ingredients 

• 1 cup butter, softened 
1 cup light muscovado sugar 
4 eggs 

1 cup self- rising flour 

1 cup Sultanas 
1/2 cup currants 

1/2 cup Glace" cherries, quartered 
1/4 cup chopped candied peel 
Zest of 2 lemons 

2 teaspoons mixed spice 



Filling and topping ingredients 

1 pound almond paste 

2 tablespoons apricot jam 
1 egg, beaten; to glaze 






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Philadelphia. 

Ms. Jarvis and her supporters began 
to write to ministers, businessmen and 
politicians in their quest to establish a 
national Mother's Day. It was successful, 
and by 1911 Mother's Day was celebrated 
in almost every state. In 1914, President 
Woodrow Wilson made the official 
announcement proclaiming Mother's Day 
as a national holiday that was to be held 
each year on the second Sunday of May. 
While many countries of the world cele- 
brate their own Mother's Days at differ- 
ent times throughout the year, there are 
some countries, like Denmark, Finland, 
Italy, Turkey, Australia and Belgium, that 
also celebrate Mother's Day on the sec- 
ond Sunday of May. 



1. Preheat oven to 300 F. Butter and line the base and sides of an 8-inch deep round 
cake tin with buttered greaseproof paper, 

2. Place all the cake ingredients in a large bowl and beat well until completely 
blended. Place half the mixture in the prepared tin and level the surface. 

3. Take one-third of the almond paste and roll it out into a circle the size of the tin. 
Place it on top of the cake mixture. Spoon the remaining cake mixture over and 
smooth tli e surface. 

4. Bake for about two hours until well-risen and firm to the touch. Cover with foil 
after one hour if the top is browning too quickly. Allow the cake to cool in the tin 
for ten minutes before turning out onto a wire rack to cool completely. 

5. When the cake has cooled, brush the top with a little warmed apricot jam and roll 
out half the remaining almond paste to fit the top. Press firmly on the top and 
crimp the edges to decorate. . • 

6. Mark a criss-cross pattern on the almond paste with a sharp knife. If desired, 
form the remaining almond paste into 11 balls. 

7. Brush the almond paste with beaten egg and arrange the balls around the out- 
side. Brush the tops of the balls with egg as well. Place the cake under a hot grill to 
turn the almond paste golden. 

8. Decorate with crystallized flowers such as violets, primroses and jonquils, if 
i desired. 



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25276 W. Crass LaI<e Rd.-ANTioch 

Treat Mom to a Special Day witHi us 

Mothers IDay Brunch Buffet 






10:00 am 






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$15.95 Adults • Kids 1 and under FREE! 

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PIease caII & maI<e youR reservations rocky: 

47-395-933© 

OpEN TuEsdAys-SATURclAys at4:00pm ; CIosecI MoNclAys 



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Lobster Tail .$19.95 

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MOTHER'S DAY PULLOUT 



May 10, 2002 



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NEWSPAPERS 

ivould like to thank all those who entered "My Mom's 
the Best" contest. 









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10870 Rt. 83 Antioch, 11. 60002 

(847)395-1211 



Celebrating 45 
Years of business. 




Your Gardening Angels 




REMEMBERS: 

HURT FINGERS 

& STICKY 

KISSES - YO U 

REMEMBER 

MOM WITH 

FLORAL ACRES 

*u 3 Bo^ 



'We're the full service 

florist, just down the 

street. ..same location 

since 1957. Same great 

quality & always 

sensibly priced.. 



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MOTHERS DAY 
IS MAY 12™ 

REMEMBER YOUR 

MOM WITH A FRESH 
ARRANGEMENT OF 

CARNATIONS, 
DAISIES, MVMS, ETC. 



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Cash & Carry 

Compare to $35.00 




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Rt 45 (3/4 Mile North of Rt 173) • Antioch 

(Formerly Koeune's Flower Farm) 

847-395-0101 



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Hours: M-F 9am-5pm • Sat 9am-4pm • Sun 9am-3pm 



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Jan's Traveling Birds available for parties, 

Call For Details!- 



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May 10, 2002 



MOTHER'S DAY PULL-OUT 



Lakeland Newspapers I C5 



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Stop ih aiid visit our 4©Q : -f- acre Nursed and 



Garden Center Facili 



Lawn 



• we are a premier landscape and nursery grower of. hardy Wisconsin nursery stock, offerin 
a large variety of shade and ornamental trees, shrubs, evergreens, perennials and annuals. 

• Our Landscape Supply Yard offers a wide selection of mulches, paving brick, decorative 
stone, accent boulders and retaining wall products. 

• Contact our Landscape Department for custom landscape; design and installation. 



7530 





th Ave. (Corner of Hwy . 






sconsnmi 




537- 




111 






<Q)<D)(Q) 




Commercial & Residential 

www.brcezyhillniirsery.com 



WE ALSO CARRY 



ALL 



LARGE VARIETY OF ORNAMENTAL/SPECIALTY EVERGREENS 
EXOTIC FOLIAGE & FLOWERING PLANTS 



MISS KI 




■ 



LILAC 



Compact upright growth habit. 

Dark, glossy, green foliage in 

summer. Purple buds open to 

fragrant icy blue flowers? Full sun. 

H-5' W-5* 

< . 

B&B Reg. Price $28.00 

SALE PRICE 
$21.99 



ARISTOCRAT 

PEAR 

Pyramidal to oval growth habit. 

Waxy dark green glossy leaves in 

summer turning yellow to red ih 

the Fall. White flowers in the 



Spring. Full Sun. 

2.5* SALE PRICE 
$149.99 



BEAUTIFUL 
LARGE 




ASKETS 

$12.00 OR 
3 FOR 






1 1 






Hours : 
Mon.-Sat. 7-7 
Sun . 9-4 . 



ANNUAL 



• ■■ 





- 



PERENNIALS 




•PANZIES 

• MARIGOLDS 

• GERANIUMS 
•VERBENA 
•PETUNIAS 

AND MANY 







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Let Mom relax on Mother's Day. Viiit our showroom 

for a huge selection of recliners. 

You're sure to find a comfortable match for Mom! 




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WHY WE'RE #1 IN NORTHERN ILLINOIS 

• FREE FINANCING • OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 'FREE SET-UP 

• FREE DELIVERY • NO DOWN PAYMENT • COMPLETE SERVICE 



Home of Nationally Advertised 
Name Brands At Discount Prices 



• - 










• Serta 

• Broyhill 

• Chromcraft 



Cochrane 

Lane 

BenchCraft 



Sealy Upholstery • LA-Z-BOY 



• Pulaski 

• Englander 

• Rowe 

& Many more 



SERTA AND ENGLANDER 














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Take A Look At Our 
Huge Selection 

* 

Of Fine Bedding 





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CHROMCRAFT TABLE & CHAIRS 

Formica lop Table with 4 Swivel/Tilt Chairs. 5 PCS. 











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URGE SELECTION STARTING AT 






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AND 
UP 



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LANE 3 PIECE 
SECTIONAL 

With Double Recliner 
STARTING AT 






AND 
UP 



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3 PCS. 

■ 
- 

Dinettes & 

Dining Rooms 

Featuring 

Broyhill 

Continental 

Tapestry 

SAVE LOTS 
0F$$$ 









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Where driving a little 
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ON RT, 83,1 MILE SOUTH OF RT. 173 



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— _ 

Hours: Mon & Fri 9am-8pm •T, W, Th 9am-6pm 
Saturday 9am-5:30pm • Sunday 1 1am-4pm 



• FREE DELIVERY 

• IN-HOME SET-UP 



Rt. 1 73 


North ▲ 




CO 
00 

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1 Rt. 132 


GrandAve. 



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1 Mile South of Rt. 173 



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MOTHER'S DAY PULLOUT 



May 10, 2002 






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WADSWORTH, IL 60083 (847) 662-2932 



Elana Teplitz plays a game with her son Logan, 2, during a Lag Ba'Omer festival 
at Viking Park in Gurnee. — Photo by Samir Id-Deen 












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MTOSERY _ 

GARDEN CENTER 

Sale Dates 5/6/02 - 5/12/02 



Celebrating 
20 Years In Landscaping 



Flowering 

Shrubs for 

Mother's Day 



■ 






• • 



Dwarf Flowering 
' Almond or* 



2 Gal. Spreading 

Juniper 

Large Plants 

Wiltonii, Old Gold, or Andorra 

REG. $19.99 



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Beautiful 
Selection 






' 



PRICE 



-. 






Mum to 

All Moms 

Sat. & Sun. 

5/11 &5/12 



Hanging 
Basket 



Kwanzan 



Planters /Cherry Trees 



KY. 



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Blooming Large Pink Flowers 

Reg. $125 



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Colorful 

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Annuals & 
Vegetable Plants 

Are \nm 



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Budding 

Rose Bushes 

for 

Mother's 



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Buy 2 Get 3rd 






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All types and sizes 

Lavender, Pink, Gold Mound, 

Gold Flame, Little Princess, 

Snow Mound, 



Bird Baths 
Fountains 

Benches, Et< 

Great 
Mother's D 

Gifts 



Perennial 
of the week 




Ferns 

over 25 varieties 




31776 N. Hwy. 12 
Volo, IL 60073 

i*rn/ rr / 815-344-9000 
AD/O Oil / Fax: 815-344-9569 

Open Daily 8-6, Sun. 8-5 






out*^ 



RICLH3IV3@ti\g® 

5511 N. Hwy 12 
Richmond, IL 60071 

815-678-7200 
Fax:815-678-7045 

Open Daily 8-6, Closed Tues.Sun. 8-5 



visit our web site at: www.castlcgardens.com 



• 



Hwy. 50 & 194 

Kenosha. UM 



262-857-7000 



ACTION 
TERRITORY 

FAMILY FUN PARK 



Affordable 



■ i 



Family Fun 



www. 




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ini-Golf 

Go-Karts 
sitting Cages 

Paintball 

4 

Video Arcade 
Climbinq WalB 



Great Place for Birthday Parties & Group Outings! 










Sp 



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Buy 1 Round of Mini Golf— Get 1 Free! 

(One coupon per person, on rounds of equal or lower value) 
Expires 5-31-02 DA-0 11-02 



WWA^WVW^^WWU^^VdWW 






966 Main St. 
Downtown Antioch 

847-395-8383 



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SAVE $2.00 



i 




i Made with delicious DO® 
i chocolate and vanilla soft 
\ serve and a layer of chocolate 
j fudge and chocolate crunch. 

J Limit one coupon per customer, 
i Redeemable only on items selling 
J at regular price. 

&&MJ^£& Sates 

At participating Dairy Queen' Stores. 




O AM DO Corp/1995 
• fl#g TU AM DO Corp 



J Dairy Queen* 



Knl^tS^K 1 ^ 5 2f a .P^^Ponsors of the Ch.ldren's M.racl« 
Network. wt>K* benefits local hospitals tor ch.ldicn. 



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Julie Sheeran and her 5-year-old son Brian work on a writing project while help- 
ing out with her son's class at the Lindenhurst Early Childhood Center.— Photo 
by Sandy Bressner 



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Three-year-old Jordan Davis goofs off with his mom, Anita Davis. — Photo by 
Sandy Bressner • 








Garden Center 





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847-526-9657 

(Won. -Sim. 8am-5pm 
1255 E. Liberty, Wauconda 

(1/4 Mile W. of Fairfield on lit. 176) 






TWiC 








P&SS 





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wamrn M§g©m¥MiiiT ©if 

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Annuals 
• Perennials 
Premium Hanging Baskets 



(With This Coupon) 



Valid Thru 5.12.02 





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UETS 



Sunday, May 12th - 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

Call For Reservations 

•Breakfast Buffet featuring Lox & Bagels & More 

; •Lundmn Buffet featuring Salad Station with Crabmeat Salad, Potato Salad, Cole Slaw & 

much more. • Plus all your favorites including: 'Carved Pork, Ham, Lamb •Prime Rib of Beef 

•'ftirkey & Stuffed Chicken & More. • Sweet Table & a variety of fresh fruits and much more. 

Adults $19-95 ChUdren $11.95 10 & under 

Children under 4 Free 

Complimentary flowers for all mothers 

■ 

333 W. Mill St. (at Rt. 176) Wauconda, Illinois 60084 



Fax (847) 526-9504 



Ph (847) 526-9488 



iBlMnmim 



Certificates 

Available 

At Both 

Locations 



' ■ .in; 



Day Spa 



Nails * Salon 



North of Rollins Rd. on Hwy 83, Round Lake Beach 

7-543-1820 



Tan & Nails 

Corner of 120 & 45, Grayslake 84M, 



0503 




1/2 Hour Facial 
1 /2 Hour Massage 

w/pedicure 8L manicure if 

Save«20> if ^ 



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B ) ELEMENTS 

Expires 5-31-02. Must present coupon to receive 

discount. Not valid with any other olfer. n 








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Expires 5-31-02. Must present coupon to receive 
discount. Mot valid with any other olfcr. _ 

mil 




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fr^Manicure &. Pedicure □ 

1 Hour Facial 'as 

D 

1 Hour Massage i| 





all for 









Expires 5*31*02. Must present coupon to receive 
».- discount Not valid with any other offer/ _ 

Lai wma c=3 czn c=mmm ■■ c=i r^i c£J 







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^p Expires 5-31-02. Must present coupon to receive 
"^ discount Not valid with any other offer. 




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C8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



MOTHER'S DAY PULL-OUT 



May 10, 2002 



■ NEED A 
i DEPENDABLE 
CRAFT? 







Answer Your 



DEE 




BUYING or SELLING Your Boat! 

OTR SPECIAIT 






■ 



••'•''— •»*'/ 




■mvk^ui 



■ 



mr Boat Too Big lb Come To Us? 
Then FIl Come To You~ 

Ask For Captain Scott =•* 



. - ■ 



. 





• INTEBKmttEKTElUOn 

• WE CLEAN EOAIS 
• WE SERVICE BOATS 

t • WEffilLBOATS 

SEHVKESAimySAyAIUBtE 

• finX FIBERGLASS 

nEPAmsHop _^_ 

PAWT SHOP - TOUCttUPS TO 
COMPUETE GEL COATS 




WE DO IT ALLS! 



S) Z?oflf Detailers & Brokers 

^Ps/x/* auto marine appearance center 

24681 W.GRAND AVE. (RT. 59) •INGLESIDE' 847-606-2886 „■ . ...™ n ,n™„ 

RESTORATIONS • DETAILING • MACHINE BUFFING > WAXING ; FIBERGLASS REPAIR * CUSTOM GRAPHICS PINSTRIPING 



Call For An 
Appointment N( 





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EJBD Giiii 



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\Pfmm Ouifo 



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FoBtstt EVHgnon • LoGsster Tail 



Crab Legs • Lamb Chops 



SeafoooO ° PiSsta and Moo'e 



($47) S95-S 



"Scrwaiag 11 am- 10pm 
Reserv. Accepted 



25385 W. Rt. 173 
Antioch,IL 60(0)02 





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Get Great Deals! 

erydSy low prices are reduced even more through Mai 

14 Kit. Gold •Diamonds •Gemstpnes • Rings 
•Earrings • Pendants • Bracelets •Watches 

V • Necklaces • Pearls • Sterling Silver 

"') This is the time to buyV 

. - FRI. 10AM-6PM 

1QAM-4PRI 27 N. Rt 12 • Fox lalie 847-587-5334 








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An Elegant Independent 
Senior Living Community 



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- 60 units: studios, 1 & 2 bdrm with private bath and kitchenette 

- 24 hr. staff and emergency response system 
-Three meals daily 

ALSO - Spa & Wellness Center, Computer Alcove, Beauty/Barber Shop, Activities 



Should the need arise, the staff of Provena Home Care 
can offer more comprehensive assistance with 



daily activities and personalized care. 



Lease by the month with minimal deposit 

For Private Tour Call (847) 746-2147 

3521 Sixteenth St., Zion, I L 



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Rolling Hills Place provides services that will free 
you from unwanted responsibilities, so you can 

enjoy the best years of your life. 




ms Provena 

Home Ore 



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"BOY ANY 5 TANS 
GET 1 FREE 



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GET 5 FREE 

Valid thru 5-3 1-02 



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Designer Trend 



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Set $45 

Valid thru 5-31-02 



Lit (Scitiilcates -Aval 



847 



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WILSON ROAD, 
INOLESIDE 



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Treat Mom Special" 
feat heir to MmmA Smndlffiy, 

* * 

May 11 






the 



Takemoor 




1/4 mile East of the Longhorn on Rt 120 2 miles West of Rt. 12 on Rt. 120 



IRJEUL SERVOO [EGSOJ^C 




Served 9 a-m. 
until 2 pjn. 



so feet of SuimptiLflous Brunch Buffet 

Including: EGGS & OMELETTES MADE TO ORDER 

• Bacon 

• Ham on the Bone 

• Full Dessert Table 

,1a Adults 



Waffles 
Sausage 



Ham 

Full Salad Bar 



Roast Steamship of Beef 





Children Under 10 





Children Under 3 



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Also featuring the LIVE music of "Dick Jess" during brunch for your listening pleasure. 

■ 

Then Beginning at 3:00 p.m. 
DINNER at the 





IFonQIl ©pcBim imn©imua jpfluns 




Such as: 



Roast Leg of Lamb 
Roast Loin of Pork 
Prime Rib of Beef 






Pasta 

Seafood & Other 

House Specials 



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Reservations Appreciate 

2 1/2 miles West of Rt. 12 on Rt. 120 • 





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May 1 0, 2002 



Lakeland Newspapers/ BIS 



' - 



Murlin 




arshall 




Age 81, a resident of Port Orange, 
Fla. since 1902, and formerly a resi- 
dent of Round Lake Beach since 1954, 
passed away Thursday, April 25, 2002 
at home. He was born May 9, 1920 in Argyle, 
Minn. He was a veteran of the U.S. Marine 
Corp., serving during WWII. He owned and 
operated Busy "B" Restaurant in Round Lake 
Beach with his wife, Loretta until 1967. He 
owned his own airplane and held a commer- 

_ Jllc retired from 

United Airlines as a foreman of ground equip- 
ment at O'Hare Airport. He was a trustee in 
Round Lake Beach and also a police officer. 

Survivors include two sons, Leslie 
(Carmella) of Grayslake and Bruce (Marilyn) 
of Port Orange, Fla.; one daughter, Marilyn 
Shaver of Lindenhurst; five grandchildren, 
Wendy, Michael, Michelle (Jim), Adam and 
Eric; two great-grandchildren, Hillary and 
Andrea. He is preceded in death by his wife, 
Loretta in 1996; son-in-law, Dan in 1996; par- 
ents, sister and "Charlie." 

Memorial services will be held at LI a.m. 
on Saturday, May 11 at Calvary Presbyterian 
Church, 510 Cedar Lake Rd., Round Lake with 
Rev. Lisle Kauffman officiating. In lieu of 
flowers, please send donations to the Greater 
Round Lake Area Fire Protection District. 

Lillian J. Wyszynski 

Age 90, a lifelong resident of Lake County 
passed away May 3, 2002 at the Winchester ' 
House in Libcrtyville. 

She is survived by her step-daughters, 
Sandra Papnek of Chicago and Nancy Jaegers 
of Coloma, MI. She is preceded in death by 
her husband Peter in June, 1992. 

Services were held May 7 at noon at the 
Strang Funeral Chapel and Crematorium Ltd., 
Grayslake. Fr. Milorad Loncar from Most Holy 
. Mother of. God Church officiated. Friends of 
the family visited from 11 a.m. until the time 
of service. Interment was at Woodlawn 
Cemetery in Forest Park following the service. 

Clyde Ervin Wendt 

Age 70 of Grayslake passed away 
Tuesday, April 30,' 2002 at his resi- 
dence. Born July 26, 1923 in Tigerton, 
Wis., the son of the late Arnold A. 
Wendt and Marie Beyersdorf. Clyde graduat- 
ed from Tigerton High School in 1941 and 
enlisted in the U.S. Army on Jan. 6, 1943 and 
was honorably discharged in 1946. He labored 
as a carpenter the remainder of his life, except 
for a period of time when he worked in the 
Iron Mines in Ishpeming, Mich. He settled 
with his family in Grayslake in 1954, serving 
as secretary of the Zoning Board and Planning 
Commission in the late 50s. He sang in the 
choir at the United Protestant Church in 




Grayslake where he and his family were mem- 
bers. A member of the American Legion Post 
659 of Grayslake; VFW Post 02245, a lifetime 
member of Rising Sun Masonic Lodge 115, 
serving twice as its Worshipful Master; AFAM 
of Grayslake; member of Scottish Rite Bodies 
in the Valley of Chicago, and Chicago and 
Chicago Northeast Illinois District Council of 
Carpenters and Carpenters Union Local 250. 
He leaves his loving wife, Betty (nee 
Battisfore) whom he wed on July 24, 1943 in 
Waukegan; daughters, DuAnn (Ralph) 
Schwartz of Bowling Green, Ky., Randee 
(Michael) Kuzma of Grayslake; son, Dale 
(Patricia) Wendt of Third Lake; eight grand- 
children and five great grandchildren; sister, 
Florence Myers of San Diego, Calif.; brother 
Howard Wendt of Palmer, Mich. He is preced- 
ed in death by his sisters, Dorothy Umbarger 
and Alice Trottier; brother Ervin Wendt and 
grandson, Craig Schwartz. 

Funeral services were held May 4 at the 
United Protestant Church, Grayslake with the 
Pastor William Owen officiating. Interment 
followed at the North Shore Garden of 
Memories in North Chicago. Friends of the 
family visited at the Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake on May 3 
from 4-9 p.m. Memorials may be made to the 
United Protestant Church in Grayslake in 
memory of Mr. Wendt. 

Robert E. Stephenson St\ 

| Age 72 of Beach Park passed away 

Saturday, May 4, 2002 at the Condell 

Medical Center in Libcrtyville. After 

his retirement, he enjoyed ovcr-the- 

road driving, but also was a bus driver for the 

Woodland School District in Gurnee. Bob was 

also a veteran of the U.S. Army. 

Surviving are his wife, Lois (nee Stay) 
Stephenson; two children, Colleen (Arnold) 
Weinfeld of Lansing, Mich., and Robert 
(Elizabeth Swanson) Stephenson Jr. of Vernon 
Hills; five grandchildren; a brother and a sis- 
ter. He is also survived by several in-laws, 
nieces and nephews. He is preceded in death 
by his parents, Bert and Emma Stephanson 

and his brother. 

Funeral services were held 1 1 a.m., May 9 
at the United Methodist Church, 429 Brainerd 
Ave., Libcrtyville. Interment followed at 
Pineview Cemetery in Beach Park. Visitation 
of family and friends was May from 5-8 p.m. 
at the Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, 
Libertyville. Memorial contributions can be 
made to the American Lung Assn., 1440 W. 
Washington Blvd., Chicago, IL 60607 in his 
memory. 

Anna M. Kaminski 

Age 87 of Libcrtyville, passed away 
Sunday, May 5, 2002 at her home. She was a 





Tuner al TDirecto 



toy 




.JUSTEN'S ROUND LAKE 
FUNERAL HOME 
222 N. Rosedale Court 
(Rosedale at Cedar Lake Road) 

(847) 546-3300 * 
Nancy Justen & Mark Justen, 

Directors 

Additional Locations in 

McHenry and Wonder Lake 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

(847) 395-4000 

Dan Dugehske, 

Director 

SPRING GROVE 

FUNERAL CHAPEL 

8103 Wilmot Rd., P.O. Box 65 

Spring Grove, IL 60081 

(815) 675-0550 
Toll Free (888) 394-8744 
Kurk P. Paleka, Director 




STRANG FUNERAL 

CHAPEL AND 

CREMATORIUM, LTD. 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake, IL 
i^J\ (847) 223-8122 

YvJ a David G. Strang 

and 

Richard A Gaddis, 

Directors 

K.K. HAMSHER 
FUNERAL HOME, LTD. 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Rd., Fox Lake, IL 

(847) 587-2100 

Kenneth K. Hamsher, 

Debra Hamsher Glen, Directors 



RINGA 
FUNERAL HOME 
122 S. Milwaukee Ave., 
Lake Villa, IL " 
NEWSPAPERS (847)356-2146 
84 7-223-8 1 6 1 Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 





former employee of the International 
Harvester Corp. and retired from the Sears- 
Roebuck Corp. in Chicago. 

Surviving are her daughter, Joan 
(Howard) Murphy of Libertyville; five grand- 
children; and five great grandchildren. She is 
preceded in death by her husband, John 
Kaminski in 1975; by a sister and her brother. 

Prayer service was held May 8 at the 
Burnett-Dane Funeral Home in Libertyville 
and services continued to St. Joseph Church 
for a funeral mass. Interment was at St. Joseph. 
Cemetery in River Grove. Visitation of family 
and friends was May 7 at the funeral home. 
Memorial contributions can be made to 
either Condell Hospice or masses would be 
appreciated. 

Harry E Jones 

Age 76 of Lake Villa and Sunrise 
Beach, Mo, passed away April 24, 
2002 at his home surrounded by his 

family. He was a US Navy veteran of 

WWII and retired after 40 years as a pressman 
for the R. R. Donnelley Co. 

"He is survived by his wife of 51 years, 
Alberta (nee Henderson); four children, 
Charles Sr. (Sue) Jones of Enterprise, Ala., 
Donna (Dean 'FlenV) Evans of Wayne, Howard 
(Cathy) Jones of Wayne, and Dawn R. Jones of 
Lake Villa; 11 grandchildren and 11 great 

grandchildren. 

Memorial services were held April 24 in 
Wayne. The Symonds-Lakes Funeral Home 
and Crematory, Grayslake handled the 
arrangements. Interment was private. 

Edward M. May 

Age B2 of Spring Grove, passed away 
Tuesday, April 30, 2002 at his home surround- 
ed by his family. He was born in Ringwood, 
the son of the late Josephine and Peter May. 
On Aug. 22, 1941, he married the former. 
Luella Miller at St John the Baptist Church in 
Johnsburg. He was a former member of St. 
Peters' Catholic Church and served as an 
usher for many y ears. 

He is survived by his wife, Luella; his chil- 
dren, Judy (Earl) Howe of Harvard, Harvey 
(Terry) May of McCullom Lake, Theresa 
(Michael) Milligan of Nova Scotia, Canada, 
Eileen (Barry) Gwizdala of Johnsburg, Vern 
(Joann) May of Cary, Gloria (Larry) Deguisne 
of Johnsburg and Larry (Jill) May of Evanston; 
23 grandchildren; 10 great-grandchildren, 
brothers and other relatives. He is preceded in 
death by his sons, Daniel and Joseph; a grand 
daughter, Elizabeth and a sister. • 

Funeral services were held May 4 at the 
Spring Grove Funeral Chapel, Spring Grove. A 
funeral mass was held at St. Peters Church in 
Spring Grove. Interment was at St. Peters 
Cemetery in Spring Grove. Visitation was at 
the funeral chapel on May 3 from 3-8 p.m. In 





Grayslake. 

Surviving are her children, Linda (Don) 
Hankins of Gurnee, Jerry (Deana) Paddack of 
Palatine and Ryan Paddack of Green Oaks; 
two grandchildren; her mother, Alice (Frank) 
Tenikat of Benld; her former husband, Gerald 
Paddack of Mundelein and a sister. She is pre- 
ceded in death by her father, Joseph Mornini. 

Prayer service was held May 7 at the 
Burnett-Dane Funeral Home in Libertyville 
and services continued to St. Joseph Church 
for the funeral mass. Interment was at 
Ascension Cemetery, Libertyville. Visitation 
was held at the funeral home from 3-8 p.m. on 
May 6. Memorial contributions can be made 
to Carmel High School in her memory. 

Richard A. Wiese 

Age 64 of Lake Zurich, passed away April 
24, 2002 at his home surrounded by his fami- 

He is survived by his sister-in-law, Kathy 
Wiese, numerous nieces and nepliews and 
the entire Jenks family. He is preceded in 
death by his parents, Robert and Edna (nee 
Isom) Wiese and two brothers. 

Friends gathered for a memorial service . 
on May 4 at the St. Peters United Church of 
Christ in Lake Zurich. The Symonds-Lakes 
Funeral Home and Crematory in Grayslake 
handled the arrangements. Interment was 
private. 

Michael Hale Foster 

Age 29 of Gurnee passed away April 21, 
2002 at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, 
Chicago. He was born May 29, 1972 in 
Somerset, Ky., and has been a resident o'f 
Gurnee for the past three years. 

He is survived by his parents Ernie and 
Mary (nee Stevens) Foster of Somerset, Ky. 

Funeral services were held April 25 at the 
Somerset Funeral Home with interment to 
follow at the Somerset Cemetery. Local 
arrangements were handled by the Symonds- 
Lakes Funeral Home and Crematory in 
Grayslake. 

Mary 'Marcella' Knox 

Age 77 of Waterford, Wis; Formerly of 
Spring Grove passed away Monday, April 29, 
2002 at her home. She was born in Chicago, 
the daughter of the late Frank and Anna 
(Polka) Vyskocil. On Jan. 2, 1944, she married 
Ralph Knox in Chicago. 

Survivors include her husband, Ralph; 
seven children, Kathleen Neumann of 
Waterford, Wis., Robin (Laurel) Knox of 
Evergreen, Colo., Ralph Jr. (Maryjune) Knox of 
Green Bay, Wis., Mary (Ronald) Kobeluch of 
Des Plaines, Richard (Gina) Knox of Wilmot, 
Wis., Susan (Dave) Klcinmeyer of Brookfield, 
and John (Terry) Knox of St. Louis Park, Minn, 
and a sister. She was the grandmother of 13 




lieu of flowers, memorials would be appreci- and great grandmother of six. 



ated to "Special Needs Group Home" or the 
May Family, c/o Spring Grove Funeral Chapel, 
8103 Wilmot Rd., Spring Grove, IL 60081. 



John W. Huss 

Age 78 of Kenosha, Wis., passed 
away Wednesday, May 1, 2002 at the 
Sheridan' Nursing Home, Kenosha.A v 
Wis. John served in the U.S. Army V Raymond 




Visitation was May 5 at the Spring Grove 
Funeral Chapel, Spring Grove. Funeral Mass 
of Christian Burial was held May 6 at St. Peter 
Church, Spring Grove. Interment was at the 
parish cemetery. Those desiring may make 
contributions to the American Cancer Society 

irUier memory. 




during the Korean Conflict and worked at 
American Brass in Kenosha, Wis. 

Surviving are his sisters, Katherine 
(Frank) Hekenberger of Bristol, Wis., Theresa 
Kempf of Debary, Fla., Elisabeth (Jerry 
Cusumano of Las Vegas, Nev. And Rosina (Joe) 

Hellstern of Antioch. 

Funeral services were held May 4 at the 
Strang Funeral Home, Antioch. Interment was 
at St. Joseph Cemetery in River Grove. Friends 
called at the funeral home May 3 from 4-8 

p.m. 

Mary Louise Paddack 

Age 61 of Green Oaks, passed away sud- 
denly Friday, May 3, 2002 at the Condell 
Medical Center in Libertyville. She was 
employed as a math teacher at Carmel High 
School in Mundelein and also a part time 
math teacher at the College of Lake County, 




Age 80 of Antioch, passed away 
Monday, May 6, 2002 at St. Therese 
Medical Center, Waukegan. Before 
his retirement he had worked for 
the Abbey Press in Benet Lake, Wis. as a 
printer. He had served in the US Army dur- 
ing WWII. 

Survivors include three sons, Richard of 

Antioch, Raymond Jr. (Denise) of Lake Villa 
and Roy of Dallas, Tex.; a daughter, Lillian 
Zcman of Antioch and seven grandchildren. 
He is preceded in death by his first wife, 
Martha; his second wife, Patricia; a son, 
Ronald on April 20, 2001 and a brother. 

A Memorial Mass will be held at St. 
Benedict Abbey, Benet Lake, Wis. Interment 
will be private. Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch handled the arrangements. For fur- 
ther information call Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch at 847-395-4000. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice is hereby given that Roberts 
Road Mini Storage, 4015 Roberts Rd., 
Island Lake, IL 60042 will sell or dis- 
pose of property for non-payment of 
rent and other fees. The sale will take 
place on 5/16/02 at 9:30am on units 
106 Daniel Misurelli, 905 Danielle 
Rowe, and 11 19 Bill Wojdakowski. All 
contents sold to highest bidder for 
cash. Immediate removal required. We 
reserve the right to withdraw any or all 
property prior to sale. 



1002A-4698-WL 

May 3, 2002 

May 10, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
Notice is hereby given that 
AFFORDABLE SELF STORAGE will 
dispose of goods for non payment 

from: 

i 

Unit No. - 64 belonging to Scott 
Johnson consisting of miscellaneous 
household goods and tools. 

Disposal of the items will take place 
at Affordable Self Storage, 133 So. 
Route 12, Fox Lake, IL on May 18, 
2002 at 10:00 A.M. 

1002A-4692-FL 

May 3, 2002 

May 10, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Trendy 

Treasures 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Wholesale/ 

Retail-Gift Items/Homo Decor/Etc. 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 155 B. N. 
Milwaukee Ave. «118, Lake Villa, IL 
60046, (847) 589-0777. 
P.O. Box 6187 Lake Villa, IL 60046- 
6187, (847) 589-0777 (voice/fax) 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 



PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Todd R. 
Schaeler, P.O. Box 6187, Lake Villa, IL 
60046-6187. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the porson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Todd R. Schaefer 



s 



April 26, 2002 

The foregoing instrument wa 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 26th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/ Eloanor A. Petruska 

"Notary Public 

Received: Apr 26, 2002 

Willard R. Holandor 

Lake County Clerk 

1002A-4689-LV 

May 3, 2002 

May 10, 2002 

May 17, 2002 



I 



I 
i 




B1 6/ Lakeland Newspapers 




LEGAL NOTICES 



May 10,2002 







i 



i 



4, 

>' 

I 



y 






i< - 




• PUBLIC NOTICE 
VILLAGE OF ROUND LAKE ANNUAL WATER QUALITY REPORT 2002 

Est© Infrome contlone Informaclon muy importanto. Taduscalo o hable 
con algulcn que lo entienda bien. 

This years report will not be mailed to our residents. 
Purpose 

Each year the Village will issue a report ol this type to provide information 
about tho quality of our drinking water as well as details on the source of 
our water, how it is treated, and what it contains. The reports are being 
issued In compliance with the requirements of the Safe prinking Water Act 
and are also intended to demonstrate the Village's commitment to provid- 
ing a safe and reliable supply of drinking water for our residents. 
Background 

Since 1992 the Village has purchased water from the Central Lake County 
Joint Action Water Agency (CLCJAWA). CLCJAWA is an intergovernmen- 
tal cooperative, formed by the communities it serves: Grayslake, Gurnee, 
Lake Bluff, Libertyville, Mundelein, Round Lake, Round Lake Beach, 
Round Lake Heights, Round Lake Park, and tho County of Lake repre- 
senting the unincorporated areas of Knollwood/Rondout and Wildwood 
and tho Village of Vernon Hills. 
The Water Treatment Process 

All drinking water In tho Village of Round Lake comes from Lake Michigan. 
This surface water source is treated by CLCJAWA at the Paul M. Neal 
. Water Troatmont Facility in Lako Bluff. The water is pumped from Lake 
Michigan and then undergoes a treatment process designed to assure 
constant contaminant removal and production of clean, safe drinking water 
that is also aesthetically pleasing. There are two features of the treatmont 
process, which provide unique capabilities. First, water from Lako 
Michigan goes through'a primary disinfecting step using ozone, which has 



-■ 



been found to be highly effective in removing contaminants and in deacti- 
vating disease-causing pathogens. And, finally, the treated water passes 
through filters of granular activated carbon, which remove any remaining 
contaminants and particles from the water and has also proven to oe pro- 
ficient In eliminating problems sometimes encountered with unpleasant 

tastes or odors. 

The Village's Delivery System .. f 

Once the treated water reaches Round Lako. It Is handled In one of two 
ways. The water is either stored in our 500.00C .gallon ground storage 
reservoir, located at our booster pump station on Nippershik Rd.. or it can 

be pumped directly Into the distribution ^^ m SXSS!iS^ has 
lion .located near the Village Hall on Cedar Lake Rd The V "age als o has 
two 750,000 gallon elevated storage tanks (water towers) These^ato 

towers are tilled as needed from either the NI PP 8 ; sln l R . d P U ^" l n a, R d n ° n 
the Cedar Lake Rd. pump station. One tower is located I on Wi son Rd in 
,the Valley Lakes subdivisions, the other is located on Panther Dr. in 
industrial park. 

■ 

. prescribes limits on the amount of certain ^J^^^wZ^ 
by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) impos 
os fewer restrictions for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide 




the same protection for public health. Our tap water quality is consistently 
monitored by the Village, by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency. 
IEPA) in the CLCJAWA Water Quality Lab, and by several other "third 
Darty"'labs. This aggressive water quality assurance program is 
unmatched: bacteriological tests are conducted mugh more often than 
required, water clarity monitored every second, and over 360 contami- 
nants are monitored on a routine basis. Water quality is judged by com- 
paring our water to USEPA benchmarks for water quality. One such bench- 
mark is called the Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG).The MCLG 
Is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no 
known or expected risk to health. This goal allows for a margin of safety. 
Another benchmark is a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL). An MCL Is 
the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed In drinking water. An MCL 
is set as close to an MCLG as feasible using the best available treatment 
technology. 

The water produced by CLCJAWA has never violated any water* 
quality standard. 

However, of the. 360 contaminants monitored, minute quantities of some 
regulated compounds do exist. The table below lists all of the regulated 
compounds detected in our water, even in the most minute traces. The 
table lists the compound detected, the. level found, the range of detection, 
the ideal goal for public health (MCLG), the highest level allowed by regu- 
lation (MCL), the last sample date for the year, any violations, and the 
sources of these compounds. The range of detection column specifies the 
minimum and maximum amounts of each compound detected. If the two 
numbers in the range of detection column are identical, there was only one 
sample analyzed during the year. Compounds listed In italics were mea- 
sured by CLCJAWA, all other compounds were measured by the Village. 



Compound (Units) 


Level 


Found 


Detections 


Arsenic (ppb) 
Barium (ppm) 


1.1 


0.018 


Beta/Photon Emitters (pen) 


1.000 . 


Bromodichloromethane (ppb) 


0.8 


Chloroform (ppb) 


7.39 


Fluoride (ppm) 


■ 1.05 


Lead 


9 


Nitrate (ppm as Nitrogen) 


. 0.2 


Nitrate & Nitrite (ppm) 


0.2 


Sodium (ppm) 


6.1 

i 


Total Trihalomethanes (ppb) 


8.190 


Turbidity (% acceptable) 


100% 


Turbidity (NTU) 


0.08 



Range of 

1.0-1.2 
0.018-0.018 

1 .000-1 .000 
0.8-0.8 
7.39-7.39 
0.99-1.14 

exceed AL 

0.2-0.3 

0.2-0.3 

5.7-6.4 

8.19-8.19 

100%-100% 

0.03-0.08 



MCLG 

(AL) 

none 

2 



N/a 

N/a 

4 



10 

10 

none 

N/a 

none 

none 



MCL 

Date 

50 

2 

50 

N/a 

N/a 

4 

(15) 

10 

10 

none 

80 

TT 

5TT 



Last Sample 

7/16/01 

7/16/01 

12/19/00 

9/21/01 

9/21/01 

12/5/01 

9/30/99 

8/7/01 

8/7/01 

7/16/01 

9/21/01 

12/31/01 

12/31/01 



— • 



Violation 

Source , 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 



Primary Compound 

Erosion of natural deposits 
Erosion of natural deposits 
Decay of natural deposits 
By-product of chlorine disinfection 
By-product of chlorine disinfection 
Added for dental health 
Corrosion of household plumbing 
Naturally occurring 
Naturally occurring 
Erosion of natural deposits 
By-product of chlorine disinfection 
Lake sediment re-suspension 
Lake sediment re-suspenslon 



NTU 
pCi/L 



Abbreviations and what they mean: 

(AL) Action Level is the level of lead that triggers special treatment or 

other required actions by a water supply 

Nephelometric Turbidity Units is a measure of water cloudiness. 

pico Curies per liter. The MCL for beta; particles is 4 mrem/year. 

EPA considers 50 pCIL to be a level of concern for beta particles 

pos/month means the number of water samples that contained 

colilorm bacteria per month 

parts per billion or micrograms per liter (//g/L) 

parts-per-million or millgrams per liter (mg/l) 

Treatment Technique refers to a required process intended to 

reduce a contaminant level In drinking water. 

nol applicable **■ 



Ppb 

ppm 

TT 



N/a 
Lead: 

Thero is no. detectable load in tho water that CLCJAWA provides to each 
community. Somo homos with old load serv/co lines, lead plumbing, or lead 
soldor, may have lead in Ihoir water. To minimize this contamination, the 
Illinois EPA requires phosphate addition to our wator in very low quantities, 
of 0.3 ppm orthophosphato. This commonly used food ingredient coats the 
inside of your plumbing with a thin film. Tho film reduces the level of lead 
that may enter your water. 
Sodium: 

There is no stato or federal MCL for sodium. Monitoring is required to pro- 
vide information to consumers in case you are concerned about sodium 
intake duo to dietary precautions. If the sodium level in our water was 
greater than 20 ppm, and you were on a sodium restricted diet, you would 
be advised to consult a physician. 
Turbidity: 

Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of the water. CLCJAWA monitors it 
because it is a good indicator of water quality and the ellectiveness of their 
filtration and disinfection systems. Turbidity is monitored every six seconds 
by instruments and every four hours in the lab. 
Additional Contaminant Monitoring 

Our system also monitors for substances in water for which no standards 
have boon sot or for contaminants lor which wo are not required to monitor. 



We take the Initiative to check our water for things that concern the public 
and the scientific community. In 1999, this additional testing included 
among numerous other things, asbestos. No asbestos was detected In the 
water entering the CLCJAWA water treatment plant. 

Contamination Sources In Drinking Water 

Our tap water comes from Lake Michigan, a surface water source. With a. 
depth of 900 feet. Lake Michigan Is the largest lake in the United States, 
formed as glaciers retreated north during the last ice age. The Great Lakes 
contain approximately 20% of the fresh water on Earth's surfaced. More 
water evaporates off of Lake Michigan each minute than CLCJAWA pumps 
in an entire day. Since the United States and Canada formed the Great 
Lakes Water Quality Agreement in 1972, Great Lakes water quality has 
steadily improved. The Illinois EPA will complete a source water assess- 
ment of Lake Michigan by May 2003. As this information becomes available 
it will be incorporated in future Water Quality reports. 

Both tap and bottled water come from rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, 
reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or 
through Ihe ground, it dissolves naturally occurring materials and can pick 
up substances resulting from the presence of animal or human activity. 
Contaminants that may be present in untreated water include: 

• Microbial contaminants such as viruses and bacteria can be naturally 
occurring or may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, 
and livestock operations. 

• Inorganic contaminants such as salts and metals can be naturally occur- 
ring or result from urban storm water runoff, wastewater discharges, oil 
and gas production, mining, or farming. 

• Pesticides and herbicides come from sources such as agricultural and 
residential storm water runoff. 

• Organic chemical contaminants including synthetic and volatile organic 
compounds are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum pro- 
duction but can also come from gas station's, urban storm water runoff and 
septic systems. 

• Radioactive contaminants can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil, 
gas, and mining activities. 



Immuno-Compromlsed Persons 
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants In drinking water 
than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as per- 
sons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone 
organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disor- 
ders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from Infections. 
These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health 
care providers. The USEPA and Center for Disease Control (CDC) guide- 
lines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of Infection by 
Cryptosporidium and other microbial contamints are available from the 
USEPA Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1 -800-426-4791 . 

Public Meetings 

. The Village Board meets on the first and third Monday of each month, and 
the public is 'always welcome to attend any of these meetings. Village 
Trustee Donald Newby is also a member of the Board of Directors of CLC- 
JAWA, which meets on the fourth Wednesday of each month. CLCJAWA 
provides tours of the water treatment facility, and stalf members are also 
available for public speaking or for school visits. Please contact the Village 
or CLCJAWA for more information. 

.... • * * < 

Information Resources 

The Lake County Health Department may be contacted at 847-360- 

6747. 

For specific information about CLCJAWA, our water's quality, a com- 
plete water quality report of all tested contaminants, or any other 
water related question, contact Davis R. Clark at 847-546-0962 or 
Melanle VanHelrseele at CLCJAWA, 847-295-7788. Or, visit our web 
page at www.eroundlake.com or, the CLCJAWA web page at www.de- 

lflwa.com, 

1002B-4711-RL 
May 10, 2002 



f 






H 



r. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Unmarked 
Productions 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Multi-Media 
(Wob Design/Graphics, Video 
Production, Animation) 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1842 
Princeton Ct., Gurnoo, IL 60031 , (847) 

672-8682. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Richard E. 
White II, 1842 Princeton Ct., Gurnoo, 
IL 60031, 
(847)672-8682. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed intond(s) lo conduct the abovo 
named business Irom tho location(s) 
indicated and that tho truo or real full 
namo(s) ol tho porson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Richard E. White 
April 19, 2002 

The forogoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 19th day of April 2002. 



*». 



*. 



OFFICIAL SEAL 
Isl Eleanor A. Potruska 

Notary Public 

Received: Apr. 19,2002 

Willard R. Holander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002D-4681-GP 

April 26, 2002 

May 3, 2002 

May 10, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Wostin's 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Retail Sales 
Safely Equipment & misc. 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 34823 N. 
Peterson Ave., Ingleside, IL 60041, 

(847) 546-1973. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Betty J. 
Wostin, 34823 N. Peterson Ave., 
Inglosido, IL 60041, 
(847) 546-1973. Patrick C. Westin, 
34823 N. Peterson Ave., Ingleside, IL 
60041,(847)546-1973. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that tho under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct tho above 
named business from tho location(s) 
indicatod and that the truo or real full 
namo(s) of tho porson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting tho business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Patrick C. Wostin April 16, 2002' 
Isl Betty J. Westin April 16, 2002 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct tho busi- 
ness this 16th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Joseph C. Torres 

Notary Public 

. Received: Apr 22, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002B-4701-FL 

May 1 0, 2002 

May 1 7, 2002 

May 24, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: McClure's • 
Garage 

NATURE/PURPOSE:* Auto Repair, 
Towing Service, Gas Sales, Small 
Engine Sales & Repair 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 4409 
Grand Ave., Gurneo, IL, (847) 662- 
1050. 

P.O. Box 158, Gurnoo, IL 60031. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Joyce Fallos, 
5016GlendaleSt., 
P.O. 158, Gurnoo, IL 60031, 
(847) 662-1050. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that tho under- 
signed intond(s) to conduct the above 
namod business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
namo(s) of tho person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting tho business 
is/are correct as shown. 

The foregoing instrument was 
. acknowledged before mo by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct tho busi- 
ness this 18th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Daniel E. Stolarick 

Notary Public 

Received: April 22, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002D-4684-GP 

April 26, 2002 

May 3, 2002 

May 10, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Century Storm 
Damage Restoration 
NATURE/PURPOSE: . Insurance 
Restoration, Replace Roofs, Siding, 
Gutters 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 781 S. 
Midlothian Rd. #355, Mundelein, IL 
60060, (443) 250-2426. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Todd Joseph 
Reynolds, 7160 B&A Blvd. Ferndale, 
MD 21061, 

(443) 250-2426. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the abovo 
named business Irom the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Todd Joseph Reynolds 
April 25, 2002 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 25th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 
Isl Eleanor A. Petruska 

Notary Public 

Recoived: Apr 25, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

. 1002A-4694-MN 

May 3, 2002 

May 1 0, 2002 

May 17, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Romance in a 

Bag 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Mail Order 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 28362 W. 
Maple Ave., Barrington, IL 60010, 
(847) 382-4872. 
529 W. Liberty St., #261 Wauconda, IL 

60084, (847) 382-4872. . 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Deborah A. 
Eneberg, 28362 W. Maple Ave., 
Barrington, IL 60010, (847) 382-4872. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Deborah A. Eneborg 
April 29, 2002 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before mo by tho por- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 29th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Diano Neri 

Notary Public 

Received: May 2, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1 002B-4708-WL 

May 1 0, 2002 

May 17, 2002 

May 24. 2002 



i 



i 






May 10, 2002 



LEGAL NOTICES 



: 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B1 7 






! 



• 









PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Creative 
Custom Carpentry 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Carpentry 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 2809. 
Glenarye Dr., Lfndenhurst, IL 60046, 
(847) 356-6888. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Rodney 
Massie, 2809 Glenarye Drive, 
Lindenhurst, IL 60046, 
(847)356-6888. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Is/ Rodney Massio 
April 20,- 2002 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 20th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Is/ Desrie Colson 

Notary Public 

Received: Apr 23, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1 002A-4697-LV 

May 3, 2002 

May 10, 2002 

May 1 7, 2002 







. 

















PUBLIC NOTICE 

Pursuant to Section 4-4 of the Park 
Code, the Gurnee Park District has on 
file for public inspection the proposed 
Budget and Appropriation Ordinance 
of said Park District. Anyone wishing 
to examine this ordinance may do so 
during business hours until May 21, 
2002, at the Park District Olfice, 4374 
Old Grand Avenue, Gurnee, Illinois 
60031. On May 21, 2002 at 6:45 p.m. 
a public hearing on the Budget and 
Appropriation Ordinance shall bo held 
at the Park District Olfice located at 
Viking Park Community Center, 4374 
Old Grand Avenue, Gurnee, Illinois 
60031. The public Is invited to attend 
and participate In this hearing. 
Donna Kolar 
Secretary 
Board of Park Commissioners 

1002B-4703-GP 
May 10, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Treasured 
Memories 

NATURE/PURPOSE: To produce 
videos and DVDs that include still pho- 
tos & videos put to music. 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 40791 
' North Prairie Ave, Antioch, IL 60002, 

(847) 395-5502. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Janet Quist, 
40791 North Prairie Ave, Antioch, IL 

60002, (847) 395-5502. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 

COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Janet Quist April 25, 2002 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 25th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/ Sandra Lavelle 

Notary Public 

Received: May 2, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002B-4706-AN 

May 1 0, 2002 

May 17, 2002 

May 24, 2002 






■r 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice Is hereby given that GRASS 
LAKE STORAGE & PACKAGING, 
20765 W; Grass Lake Road, 
Lindenhurst, IL 60046, will sell the 
personal goods from the following 
units to satisfy the Hen of the GRASS 

LAKE STORAGE & PACKAGING 
(Seller) for- the rental and other 
charges due. 
UNIT- #510- 10x10 
OCCUPANT - Eric Feldman 
CONTENTS - Crib, Computer 
Monitors, Strollers (3), Life Jackets, 
Cooler, Water Skis, Weights, 
Miscellaneous Boxes 
UNIT -#502 -5x10 
OCCUPANT - Russell Hille 
CONTENTS - Air Compressor, Plastic 
Chairs, Chest of Drawers, Fertilizer 
Spreader, Chest, Coffee Maker, Hose, 
Work Boots, Miscellaneous Boxes 
UNIT -#526 -10x15 
OCCUPANT - Louis Lanciloti 
CONTENTS - Speakers, Fan, Bed, 
Fake Plant, Lamp, TV, Chest, Ladder, 
Golf Clubs, Tiro, Hockey Stick, Art, 
Miscellaneous Boxes 
UNIT -#,104 -5x10 
OCCUPANT - Shannon Miller 
CONTENTS - Poster, . Crib, 
Miscellaneous Boxes 
UNIT -#514 -10x10 
OCCUPANT - Ron Ruhl 
CONTENTS - Sofas, Table, Flower 
Pot, Speakers, Fan, Lamp, Vacuum, 
Platlc . Chairs, ' TV, Chests, 
Miscellaneous Bags 

UNIT -#323 -10x20 

OCCUPANT - Randall Schoenke 

CONTENTS - Chairs, 2 Tires, Floor 

Fan, Battery Powered Car, Vacuum, 

Golf Clubs, Table, Sofa, Stroller, Water 

Skis, Miscellaneous Bags 

1 002B-4709-LV 

May 10, 2002 

May 17, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: J.F. 

Landscaping 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Landscaping 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1035 
McAlister, North Chicago, IL 60064, 
(847) 578-2848 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Juan Luis 
Retamar, 1035 McAlister, North 
Chicago, IL 60064, 
(847) 578-2848. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full . 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are' correct as shown. 
Isl Juan Retamar April 29, 2002 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 29th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

7s/ Ivette M.Diaz, Notary Public 

Received: Apr 29, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002B-4707-GP 
May 10, 2002 
May 17,2002 
May 24, 2002 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: YESSI ENGI- 
NEERING 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Engineering 

Services 

• ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 624 
Meadow Lane, Ubertyville, IL 60048, 
(847)' 367-6728. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Richard L 
Afflerbaugh, 624 Meadow Lane, 
Ubertyville, IL 60048, 
(847) 362-8342. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
Indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
' /s/ Richard L Afflerbaugh 
April 25, 2002 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 25th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/ Ivette M. Diaz, Notary Public 

Received: Apr 25, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002A-4693-LB 

May 3, 2002 

May 10, 2002 

May 17, 2002 



acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 23rd day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/ Eleanor A. Petruska, Notary Public 

' Received: Apr 23, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002A-4695-RL 

May 3, 2002 

May 10, 2002 

May 17, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Bevins Rool 

and Building Maintenance 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Roof and 
Building Maintenance 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 324 E. 
Clarendon Dr., Round Lake Beach, IL 
60073,(847)740-6590. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING David 
Burkhead, 324 E. Clarendon Dr., 
Round Lake Beach, IL 60073, (847) 
740-6590. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) • 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

- This is to certify that the under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business, 
is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ David Burkhead April 23, 2002 
The foregoing Instrument was 




PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Room Lift 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Home 

Decorating 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 403 S. 
Second Ave, Ubertyville, IL 60048. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Sandra 
Hawes, 403 S. Second Ave., 
Ubertyville, IL (847) 367-1104. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the locatlon(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. . 
/s/ Sandra B. Hawes 

April 26, 2002 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 26th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/ Mary V. Kay, Notary Public 

Received: Apr 26, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1 002B-4704-LB 
May 10,2002 
May 17, 2002 
May 24, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Eagle Trading 

Company 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Wholesaling, 

Import-Export 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 

IS TO BE CONDUCTED ORTRANS- 

ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 324 N. 

Emerald St., Mundeleln, IL 60060, 

(847) 566-6303. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Scott Antes, 
324 N. Emerald St., Mundeleln, IL 
60060, (847) 566-6303. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Scott Antes April 25, 2002 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 25th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 
Isl Margaret J. Blanchard 

Notary Public 

Received: Apr 25, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002B-4705-MN 
May 10, 2002 
May 17, 2002 
May 24, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Independence 

Fence 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Installation of 

Fences 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 202 E. 

Clarendon, Round Lake Beach, 

60073, (847) 445-7674. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
. ING OR TRANSACTING Moises . 
Colon, 202 E. Clarendon, Round Lake 

Beach, IL 60073, 
(847) 445-7674. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of Ihe person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Molsos Colon May 3, 2002 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 3rd day of May 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Eleanor A. Petruska 

Notary Public 

Received: May 3, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002B-4700-RL 
May 10, 2002 
May 17, 2002 
May 24, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Timothy 
Garden Care 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Garden Care ~. 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 27827 
Weslend Drive, Spring Grove, Illinois, 
60081,(847)587-6921. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Timothy A. 
Douglas, 27827 West End Drive, 
Spring Grove, Illinois, 60081, (847) 
587-6921. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Timothy A. Douglas 
April 16. 2002 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 1 6th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Mary T. McGovern 

Notary Public 

Received: Apr. 18, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002D-4686-FL 

April 26, 2002 

May 3. 2002 

May 10, 2002 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Ideal Trim 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Trim Carpentry 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 378 
Clarewood Circle, Grayslako, IL 
60030, (847) 548-8997. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Richard B. 
Foley, 378 Clarewood Circle, 

Grayslake, IL 60030, 
(847)548-8997. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to cortily that the under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the locatlon(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the buslnoss 
Is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Richard B. Foley 
April 12,2002 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 12th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Beverly Ann Turzy 

Notary Public 

Received: Apr. 22, 2002 

. Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

4 1002D-4680-GL 

April 26. 2002 

May 3, 2002 

May1 0,2002 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Hired Pan 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Personal Chef 
Service - Homebased 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 202 West 
Trail, Grayslake, IL 60030, (847) 223- 
6141. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Charles 
Ventura Jr., 202 West Trail, Grayslake, 
IL 60030, (847) 223-2639. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certily that the under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the abovo 
named business Irom the locatlon(s) 

Indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the porson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Charles Ventura Jr. May 6, 2002 
The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before mo by the per- 
son^) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 6th day of May 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 
Isl Eleanor A. Petruska 

Notary Public 

Received: May 6, 2002 

. Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002B-4710-GL 

May 10, 2002 

May 1 7, 2002 

May 24, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Design 
Annalysis 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Graphic Design- 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 17876 
West Braewick, Gurnee, IL 60031, 
(847) 347-3796. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Anna M. 
Kellar, 17876 W. Braewick, Gurnee, IL 

60031 , (847) 347-3796. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 

COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certily that the under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the abovo 
named buslnoss Irom the locatlon(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Anna M. Kellar 
April 15, 2002 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 1 5th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 
Isl Deborah Ann Robles 

Notary Public 

Recoivod:Apr 18, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002A-4690-GP 

May 3, 2002 

May 10, 2002 

May 17, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT LAKE 

COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
LAKE FOREST BANK & TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID P. HARRIS, not 
personally but as Trustee on behalf of West Family Trust, and Illinois Trust under the 
provisions of a Trust Agreement dated December 2, 1991, DONALD W. WEST, 
HEIRS, DEVISEES AND LEGATEES OF BONITA B. WEST, DECEASED, REBECCA 
WEST JAQUETTE, SUSAN DIANE WETSLAYTON, CAROLYN ANN WEST, 
DOROTHY R. WEST. CRYSTAL POINT CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, 
UNKNOWN OWNERS and NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS. Defendants, CASE NO. 01 

CH1184. 
Pursuant to a Judgment made and entered by said Court in the abovo-ontitled 

cause, GARY DEL RE, Sheriff of Lake County, Illinois, will on June 3, 2002 at 9:00 

a.m. at 25 S. Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue, Waukegan, Illinois, sell at public auction, 

the following described premises and real estate mentioned In said Judgmont: 

LOT 108 IN CRYSTAL POINT CONDOMINIUM NO. 6, AS DELINEATED ON SUR- 
VEY OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PARCEL OF REAL ESTATE (HERE- 
INAFTER REFERRED TO AS PARCEL): LOT 3 IN CRYSTAL POINT OF LAKE FOR- 
EST, BEING A RESUBDIVISION OF WOODVIEW ACRES IN THE WEST 1/2 OF 
SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 44 NORTH, RANGE 12, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCI- 
PAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 14. 
1970, AS DOCUMENT 1455893, AND RATIFIED BY DOCUMENT 1457371, WHICH 
SURVEY IS ATTACHED AS EXHIBIT "A" TO DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM 
MADE BY THE EXCHANGE NATIONAL BANK OF CHICAGO, A NATIONAL BANK- 
ING ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER TRUST AGREEMENT DATED AUGUST 
15, 1972 AND KNOWN AS TRUST NUMBER 23787, RECORDED AS DOCUMENT 
1707917, TOGETHER WITH ITS UNDIVIDED 3.70 PER CENT INTEREST IN SAID 
PARCEL (EXCEPTING FROM SAID PARCEL ALL THE PROPERTY AND SPACE 
COMPRISING ALL THE UNITS THEREOF AS DEFINED AND SET FORTH IN SAID 
DECLARATION AND SURVEY), IN LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS TOGETHER WITH AN 
EASEMENT FOR PARKING PURPOSES IN AND TO PARKING SPACE NOS. 42 
AND 43, AS DEFINED AND SET FORTH IN SAID DECLARATION AND SURVEY. 

P.I.N.: 12-28-108-089-0000 

Address: 1260 N. Western Avenue, Unit #108. Lake Forest, IL 60045. 

Improvements: Condominium Apartment 

Sale shall be under the following terms: 10% Cashier's or Certilied Funds duo at 
the Time of sale. Balance due by Cashier's or Certified Funds within 24 hours there- 
after. 

Sale shall be subject to general taxes, special assessments and any prior first mort- 
gages. 

Premises will NOT be open for Inspection. 
For information: Donald Newman, Plaintiff's Attorney 

11 S. LaSalle Street #1500 
Chicago, IL 60603 
Phone: 312/641-6693 

This is an attempt to collect a debt pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices 

Act and any Information obtained will be used for that purpose. 

1002A-4696-GEN 

May 3, 2002 

May 10, 2002 

May 17, 2002 



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COUNTY 














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IHlorae o&waders sought . 

Subjects are wanted for the investigation 
of a home invasion that occurred on April 4, at 
1680 Bell Ln, Libertyville. At 1:15 p.m., subject 
No. 1 a male Hispanic, height 5 
'-10", weight 165 lbs., 25-30 
years of age, wearing dark work 
clothing, knocked at victim's 
residence and lured victim to 
rear of the property under the 
pretense that the subject was a 
contractor with the village of 
Libertyville, removing dead 

trees. 

Subject No. 2, a male Hispanic, height 5'- 
8", weight 200 lbs., 45-50 years of age, 
attempted to enter victim's residence through 
side entrance door. Victim confronted subject 
No. 2 grabbed the victim to delay the victim's 
entry into the residence. Other subjects were 
inside the residence at that time. Subjects No. 
3, a male Hispanic, height 5'-10", weight 165 




lbs., 30 years of age and subject No. 4, a male 
Hispanic, height 5'-ll", weight 165 lbs.,^30 
years of age were battered victims after being 
confronted by the victim inside the residence. 
The victim received injuries to his right arm 
and shoulder. 

Subjects fled the area in a newer red mini 
van, unknown make or model. 

The police would like to 
remind everyone to call when 
suspicious activity or a suspi- 
cious person is observed, and 
do not try to confront suspi- 
cious subjects yourself. 

If you have any informa- 
tion about this crime or any 
other felony crime or felony 
fugitive, contact Crime Stoppers at 847-662- 
2222. Also, abuse of the elderly is a crime, so 
lets not forget to report this type of crime as 
well. 

If your information leads to an arrest you 
could be eligible for a cash reward of up to 

$1,000. 

Crime Stoppers want your information— 

NOT your name. 



i . 



May 1 0, 2002 






Fashion fun 

Tom Poulos of the Waukegan Police Department, Chris O'Neill of the Highland 
Park Police Department and David Douglass of the Gurnee Fire Department 
model business clothing during the Lake County Chamber of Commerce 4th 
Annual Fashion Show and Luncheon at the Midlane Golf Resort in Waukegan. — 
Photo by Sandy Bressner 



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CondelllPA makes Managed Care choices easier. 



With the Condell Independent Physicians 
Association 's convenient, comprehensive 

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care resources and extensive physician 

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membership, the choice just got easier 



Co »Ml tPA.af Mat 



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ON VENIENT: Condell Health Network 



offers an expansive network of comprehensive 
healthcare resources for your family throughout 

Lake County. 



•Cornm u „ lty Care Het 1 "° D HM °«> S/PP0) 



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(PPO) 



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OMPREHENSIVE: Condell Independent 
Physicians Association (IPA) offers 259 local 

physicians, 102 primary care (90% board certir 

fied) and 157 specialists (96% board certified), 
all committed to your family's total health and 



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(PPO) 



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well-being and all providing healthcare under 
your PPO, HMO or POS plan. 



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OMFORTABLE: A hospital and doctor 

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For a complimentary 
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(847)990-5876. 






Healthcare, BlZT." " £ ' Ae »> 
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Member of Condell Health Network • www.cotuleIl.org 









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HOWTO MACE A CLASSIFIED AD 

By Phone Call: 847.223.8161 
ByEax847.S 

By Mail: Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 

■ ■ ■ - , 

Grayslake, EL 6 
In Person: 30 S. Whitnev 



Grayslato 



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DEADLINES 

Direct Line.... 



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.Mon. 5pm 
Classified (Business & Private Party).WecL10am 

HOURS 



51 ir/.Ics 
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McHcnry 



McHenry 
County 



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24mB«» 
to Chicago 



Ad appears in 11 Lakeland Newspapers! 

AntiochNews • Round Lake News 
Lake Villa Record • Mundelein News 
Wadswovlh News .• Grayslake Times 

Fox Lake Press • Gurhee Press 
Lindehhurst News • Wauconda Leader 

Libertyville News 



8am-5pm 



•••■>•« 



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VISA 





You may cancel your ad before 11 tun. on IHday lor ibo 
follow 1 1 itf w c rk'H publication. 
Plonoo Cbccic Your Ad 

In the event of an error, lakeland Newnpapcni will lio 
recfporwlblo for only the find Incorrect InMcrtlon and only 
the portion of the ad Uiat \n In error or rendered umgIcmii. 
I'loaae contact the Clarified Department Immediately tn 
cam of error. 




Notices 




Notices 



v- 




ARE YOU A SINGLE 
PARENT? 

Parents without Partners 

is a not-for-profit 

organization devoted to 

the interest and welfare 

of the single parent and 

their children. 

PWP members plan 

educational, support, and 

social activities for" 
children and adults on a 
monthly basis. For more 
information on how you 
can become a member, 
please call our hotline 

(847)817-5687. 



IN SEARCH OF 
DAVID JAMES BARNDT 

JR. Information on his 

whereabouts needed due 

to child support evasion. 

Please call (847). 365-0508 

to leave a message. 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

II you have placed classified ad- 
vertising with the Lakeland 
Media you may receive a mislead- 
ing statement from another firm 
requesting payment for this ad- 
vertising. To receive proper cred- 
it to your account, all payments 
for your, Lakeland Nowspnpors, 
Market Journal & Great Lakes 
Bulletin advertising must bo made 
as invoiced & directed to: 
Lakeland Modia 
PO Box 268 

30 S. Whitney St. 

- Grayslake, IL 60030-0268 



MUNGLE'S 
LANDSCAPING 
WE DO IT ALL!! 
'Weed & Edge 
Flower Beds 
•Tree & Hedge Trimming 
'Mulch 
'Power Wash or 
Staining, Decks & Fenc- 
es 'Tilling, Small Flower 
Beds & Gardens 
•Spring Clean Up. 

(847) 826-9619, 

home (815) 344-2279, 

pager (847) 333-7383 

"FIREWOOD 

AVAILABLE." 



. NEED DENTURES? 

New dentures available In 

just one day for 5650/set, 

S350/single plate. 

Other dental services 

available. 
Call Dr. Richard Lin 

(847)872-3041. 



DONT LET EXTRA pounds 
upset you! Get rid of them 
forever. Safe, all natural, 30 
day money-back guarantee. 

' Toll free 866-373-2306. 



DONT LET EXTRA pounds 
upset you! Get rid of them 
forever. Safe, all natural, 30 
day money-back guarantee. 
Toll free 866-373-2306. 



SUBMIT YOUR LAKELAND 

CLASSIFIED ADS ON THE 

INTERNET! 

Visit http://www.lpnews.com/ 
to place your ads conven- 
iently. Ads appear on the In- 
ternet, in all Lakeland Pa- 
pers... The Great Lakes Bul- 
letin and The Market Journal 
for only S23.00 for 4 lines 
(approx. 16 words), then only 
.60c for each additional line. 



v - 



1 --,1/ 



GRAYSLAKE 

SHERRY'S 

ELECTROLYSIS 

(Permanent Hair Removal) 

ALSO OFFERING 

WAKE UP 

With 

MAKEUP! 

MICRO TATTOOING of 

•EYEBROWS 

•EYELINE 

•UPLINE. 

FREE Brochures. 

(847) 249-7446. 

f It's easy to ^ 
• subscribed to » 

; MEDIA • 

\ (847) 245-7500 J 



SURROGATE MOTHERS 

WANTED 

Fee plus expenses for 

carrying a couple's child. 

Must be 18-35 and 

previously had a child. 

Steven Litz, Attorney 

(317) 996-2000. 



THE ROUND LAKE Area 
Public Library is seeking 
proposals to provide ac- 
counting services to the 
Library for the fiscal year 
2002-2003, starting July 

1 , 2002. 

Please e-mail Paul 
Deane at 
ria.lib.il. 

a copy of the 

requirements for 

proposals. 




Go To Lake County's Information Website 



"%«/ 






EVENTS' 




. 



uowtos 




REAL ESTATE 



■ ... 



*WVi 



FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 
(847) 223-0514 








Free 



WEDDING 
ENGAGEMENT 
ANNIVERSARY . 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

To announce a wedding, 

engagement or anniversary, 

call (847) 223-8161. There is 

a short form to fill out and 

return. Forms can be mailed 

or faxed to you. Photos are 

welcome. Fees are listed on 

the forms. Mailing address: 

Lakeland Media, 

30 S. Whitney St., 

Grayslake, IL 60030. 

•Attn: Bridal Sec. 

Phone number or questions: 

Call Nancy Thielsen 

(847)223-8161, 

ext. 143. 




Lost & Found 



FOUND BRACELET, APRIL 
26th, at. Abbott, in ladies 
room. Please call to identify. 

(847) 223-7289. 




DID YOU FIND Someones 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dept., and get your 
results, FOUND ads aro 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
(847)223-8161. 



ATTENTION 
PET OWNERS 
We Do Not 
Knowingly Accept Ads 
For Froe/Glvoaway 
Animals 
If you must give up your be- 
loved pet, please consider 
these suggestions. 
•Free animal ads suggest that 
there is something wrong 
with the animal, or that it has 
no value. 

•Some people who respond 
to these free animal ads are 
impostors and are only con- 
cerned about making a profit 
and not the animal's welfare. 
•Charging a fee to a potential 
pet owner confirms the re- 
sponsibility of pet ownership 
for an entire lifetime of that 
pet. For more information, 
please contact the Humane 
Society. 

ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad In 
the Lakeland ' Classifieds. 
Free and Giveaways are run 
at- NO '.CHARGE! (We dis- 
courage any pet ads). Dead- 
lines: 10am Wednesdays. 

(847) 223-8161, ext. 191. 




Free 




Personals 



DONT THROW AWAY or 

store your unwanted musi- 
cal instruments. I will come 
and pick it up for FREE. 
Call (847) 970-7388. 

DONT THROW AWAY your 
old exercise equipment. I 
will come and pick it up for 

FREE. (847) 970-7388. 

FOR SALE OR GIVE AWAY 
ELECTRONIC ORGANS Vin- 
tage Hammond and popu- 
lar Lowrey will be given 
away to worthy church or 
civic group. Both need work. 
Collectors can acquire either 
or both on a "Best Olfer* ba- 
sis. Use as musical instru- 
ment or furniture. Ham- 
mond has dual consoles 
with steps. Call (847) 546- 
3217 after 6pm. 

USED SPINET PIANO. Give 
away to good home tor the 
hauling or would make ex- 
cellent center piece for 
piano busting party. Call 

after 6pm. (847)546-3217. 



ADOPT: YOUR BABY De- 
serves The Best-Love, 
Happiness, Devotion & Se- 
curity. Expenses Paid. Sta- 
cey & Nathan. 1-800-549- 
1280. 

ADOPT: YOUR BABY De- 
serves The Best--Love, 
Happiness, Devotion & Se- 
curity. Expenses Paid. Sta- 
cey & Nathan. 1-800-549- 
1280. 

NEED DENTURES? 

New dentures available in 

just one day for S650/set, 

S350/single plate. 






Other dental services 

available. 
Call Dr. Richard Lin 

(847) 872-3041. 



GET SKINNY BY SPRING 

SEXY BY SUMMER 
Lose up to 30LBS. FAST. 

www.thodiet4u.net 
Or phone 

1-800-935-2857 






NEED TO SELL THAT 
EXPENSIVE ITEM? 

Call (847) 223-81 GX 



■ 






«H «> 




■ 

Egg Donors 

Needed 






Give the gift of life to an infertile couple 
Our program is completely anonymous 
24 hour/7 day support 




For information call 

(847) 656-8733 

The Center for Egg Options Illinois, LLC. 




Personals 



CHILDLESS COUPLE 
WISHES TO ADOPT! 

Dear Birthmother, 

We hope you hear our plea.. 

H...Home filled with endless 

love for your baby 
O...Only you hold the key to 

answering our prayers 
P...PIease trust us to carry 

out your wishes 
E...Every moment you'll 
• remain in our hearts. 

We promise to make your 
dreams for your baby come 
true. MEDICAL, LEGAL, 
COUNSELING, COURT AP- 
PROVED LIVING EXPENS- 
ES PAID. CONFIDENTIAL. 
Please call our attorney 708- 

957-6846. 




Financial 



$SCASHSS IMMEDIATE 

CASH for structured settle- 
ments, annuities, notes, ac- 
cident cases, and Insurance 

payouts. (800) 794-7310; 

» 

GET OUT OF debt free. 
Stop collection calls; reduce 
payments up to 50%, lower 
interest. Non-profit, licensed, 
bonded. Call 1-800-847- 
6410www.amerix.com 



GET OUT OF 
DEBT FREE! 

Stop collodion calls, 
reduce payment:, up 10 

50%, lower interest. Non 

profit, licensed, bonded 

Call toll-free 1-800-847-6192 

www.amorix.com 




NEED NEW MORTGAGE?- 

Behind on your 
mortgage payment? 

Bankruptcy 
Foreclosure 
• We can save your 
home!!! 
Call the DEBT DOCTOR at 
C.M.S. 800-267-6726 

SELL YOUR STRUCTURED 

ANNUITY PAYMENTS. New 
laws allow you to sell your 
structured settlement pay- 
ments. Call the oldest com- 
pany in the business. Settle- 
ment Capital 800-959-0006. 

SELL YOUR STRUCTURED 

ANNUITY PAYMENTS. New 
laws allow you to sell your 
structured settlement pay- 
ments. Call the oldest com- 
pany in the business. Settle- 
ment Capital 800-959-0006. 

STOP FORECLOSURE!! 

Behind on mortgage? 
Don't File Bankruptcy 

Save your home. 

Guaranteed Service 

800-915-9704 Ext. 325. 

"U.S. Mortgage Assistance" 

STOP FORECLOSURE!! 
BEHIND on your mort- 
gage? Don't file Bankrupt- 
cy We can help you save 
your home. Guaranteed 
Service. 800-915-9704 Ext 
225 "U.S. Mortgage Assis- 
tance". 





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B20 / Lakeland Newspapers ' 



— » 




Help Wauled 
Part-Time 




Help Wanted 
• Part-Time 




— 



Assist Schools with 

Fundraising 

S1 50 + per month 
Very Flexible Schedule 

George at 

847-265-2860 

If not in. ..will send 

information 

Leave name/ 

address/phono 




EXPERIENCED 
BARTENDER! 

Apply in person. 

Ask for Kris. 

RJ's Eatery 

1913 E. Grand Avenue 

Lindenhurst, IL 



CUSTOMER SERVICE/ 
MGR - PART TIME 

Four Seasons Storage 
in Llbertyville is seeking 
an individual with excel- 
lent customer service and 
computer skills. 
2- 4 days per week 
S8.50 hour, no evenings. 

Call Brian 
847-247-4440 




V. 



ENSIVE ITEM? 




i ■ l \wm 

■ ■ 



-8161 






'■■■■':>■. 




£ GENERAL OFFICE 

HSeeldng Mature individual Mpffij&noT£? 
jjfor PA evening position. m - A ^flf^ 

< 

= Duties include: cashier, filing & phones. 

r M - F 4pm - 10pm, 

i Sat. hrs. vary. 20-25 hrs per week. 




©SI 



ROLE 



Belvidcrc Rd., Gray slake, IL 60030 




or f/o 



Lakeland Newspapers is looking for outgoing 
people who are looking for a great part-time job. . 

You will be selling classified advertising for 11 
different Lakeland Community Newspapers, The 
Great Lakes Bulletin &The Market Journal^ 

Monday-Thursday 4:30-8:30pm 
Hourly rate + commission. 

For interview 
call Lisa 

(847)223-8161 
ext. 191 





TO PLACE AH AD WITH LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 

CaU (847) 223-8161 





Tills Is the season to earn 
extra cash by joining Laldlaw 
as a Bus Driver. With us, 
you'll help budding students 
get to school. In addition to 
valuable experience and a spring in your step, you'll enjoy: 

• $ 12.23/hr. tos 
» Paid Training 



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NO nights or weekends required 
Blue Cross/Blue Shield Medical 



Summers/Holidays OFF (but available) 

Advancement Opportunities 

Independent Work Environment 

Pre-school children may ride on bus with 
parent driver (most locations) 



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If you or anyone you know has o valid driver's license, is at least 
21 years of age, and has nol had a suspended license for 3+ years, 

call us now at: 

1-800-319-8721 

Buffalo Grove, Arlington Heights, 
Vernon Hills, Wheeling 




OVER 20 LOCATIONS SERVING THE CHICAGOLAND AREA 

Equal ( )| ijx u lunlly Employer. 



- v^ e 



wSWngonthep^ g 



• 






• Part Time Telemarketing. 
-$)• Base pay plus Commission. 
! Daily Contests and Incentives. 



No experience needed, 
training provided. 



\ 



«« Hours: Mon. - Thur. 5pm - 8:30pm 
■w Sat. Dam - 2pm 

Call Cara after 5pm at 

(847)245-7500 



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IF1EDS 



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May 10,2002 







Help Wanted 
Part-Time 




Help Wanted" 
Part-Time 




Help Wanted 
: Full-Time 




Help Wanted 
Fuli-Time 




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INTERESTED IN A 

PART-TIME JOB THIS 

SUMMER? 

Aqua Pool & Spa Pros is 

looking for motivated, 

reliable individuals to fill 

immediate openings. 

Salary will be based on 

experience. , 

Give us a call <& 

847-265-5280 

Ask for Brian 




LIKE TALKING ON THE 
PHONE? 

We have the job for you. 
Now hiring part-time 
positions. Mon-Thurs., 
5pm-8:30pm. Sat. 9am- . 
2pm. Base pay plus com- 
mission. Call Cara after 5pm 

(847)245-7500. 



McHENRY PRO BASS 

NEED A FISHING ROD AND 
REEL REPAIR PERSON FOR 

STORE SERVICE. 



4& CALL OR 

i ■ - 

t STOP IN 

AND ASK FOR MARIE 

1-815-363-1307 

2920 NORTHSIDE AVE 

UNIT B 

McHENRY 



JBk 

- - . 

• Day Tlmc/Flcxiblc 
Hours 

• Minimal Paperwork 

• Ideal Job For Retired 
.Persons 

• Maintenance 
Knowledge 
Preferred, however 

... 

we will train. 
To apply please stop by 
the wtisb at 1750 
Orchard Lane in Round 
Lake Beach or call 
800-633-7625 ext. 269 
between 8 a.m. —4 p.m. 
est E.O.E. 




<%•<* 



*»»* 



S800.00 WEEKLY IN- 

COME Mailing our Sales 
letter from home. No exp. 
nee. FT/PT Genuine offer. 
Free supplies. Call 1-630- 
408-8831 ( 24 hours ). 

"FEDERAL JOB OPPOR- 
TUNITIES" Government 
hire pay up to S48/hr. plus 
full benefits. Free call 877- 
282-4091 ext. 100 Postal 
ext. 53 civil. 



_=; 



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ATTENTION; 




Work From Home 

MaD orttor business nosdi fiolpl 
$;00-$7,000/mo. 

Full Training. Free Booklet. 

( 888-5M-7751 -) j 

www.frecdomistodreani.com 



ilH > l** * M» «* U> * M I > 



ANNOUNCEMENT! HIRING 

FOR 2002. Postal posi- 
tions/federal hire $13.21- 
$24.50/hour. , Full bene- 
fits/pd. Training/pd. Vaca- 
tion. No experience re- 
quired. 7:30am-11pm CST. 

1-888-726-9083x1700. 

AVON WANT AN office with all 
the comforts of home? Work at 
home. Avon representatives 
work 

when and where they choose. 

Let's talk (888) 942-4053. 

BARTENDERS $250 PER 

SHIFT Potential bartending 
in a fast paced environ- 
ment. No experience neces- 
sary. All shifts available. Call 

1-800-806-0084 ext. 201 



. 






WANTED PART-TIME 

Outgoing, fun, depend- 
able people to fill server & 
bartender positions. 
WEEK-ENDS A MUST 

% Apply in person <P 

LAST CHANCE SALOON 
129 Center St. 
Grayslake.il • 

847-223-0082- 



.<-^ 




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TELEMARKETING 
APPOINTMENT SETTERS 






Up to $18.50 per hour!!!! 

flours 3-8 pm M-F & 4 Hours on Sat. 

NO SELLING. NO COLD CALLING 

$8.00/HOUR+BONUS.AVG 

$18.00 AN HOUR 

EASYTO LEARN 

CALL DOD AT 847-566-4140 

1-4 PM ONLY. MUNDELEIN 




???LOOKING FOR 

SOMETHING NEW??? How 
about delivering Cars & 
R.V.'s Nationwide? Up to 
30K + Call free877-520- 
1007.X1001. 



BARTENDERS MAKE $100- 
$250 per night. PT/FT. No 
experience needed. Call 
nowll 1-866-291-1884 ext. 

3060. 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



"FREE TO TRAVEL?" Fun- 
Sun-Travel-Coast to Coast., 
Fast Growing Sales Com- 
pany Seeks Wild & Highly 
Motivated Girls / Guys 
18+. Travel - Training - 
Transportation Provided. 1- 

866-871-2274. 



Attn Nurses! 

Alpha Christian Registry 
offers exciting employment 
opportunities in private home 
care and relief staffing. Alpha 
offers medical insurance reim- 
burscment, retirement bene- 
fits and paid vacations. Time 
and a half paid for Mother's 
Day. Need time off periodical- 
ly? Alpha nurses choose when 
& where they want to work. 

Call (847) 551-3700 

. JCAHO/EOE 



r — r 



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DENTAL 

ASSISTANT 

Lake Forest Office 

has F/T opportunity 
for a dental assistant. 

Experience 
preferred, but will 
train right person. 

GREAT WORK PLACE 
TERRIFIC BENEFITS 

NO EVENINGS 

Call Nancy 

(847)234-6659 



DRIVER- OWN YOUR, own 
Truck- No Money Down, 
Low Weekly Payments-L/P 
Plan-'99 & ;oo Eagles. 
Company drivers and 00s. 
Boyd Bros. 800-543-8923. 



* ■ 




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HEY KIDS WANT YOUR 

OWN SPENDING MONE Y? 

EARN SUMMER 
VACATION Si sJOVy 

Step right up and join the 
Lakeland Newspaper Sales Crews. 




' i 






AMERICA'S AIR FORCE 

Jobs available in over 150 
specialties.Enlistment Bonus 
•Up to $10,000 Student 
Loan Repayment 'Prior Serv- 
ice Openings High School 
grads age 17-27 or prior serv- 
ice members from any 
branch. 

Call 1-800-423-USAF or 

visit www.alrforce.com 
U.S. AIR FORCE 



DRIVER-COVENANT 
TRANSPORT Now offering 
per diem pay for Experi- 
enced Teams, Solos, and 
Trainers. 

O/O-Solos/Teams 83c plus 
fuel surcharge. NO CDL? No 
problem. We school, no 
money down. Licensed by 
SBPCE, School located in 
Stuttgart, AR. 

Call 1-888-M ORE-PAY 
(1-888-667-3729). 



* Win Prizes! 

* Earn spending money selling our 

neu/s paper door to door. 

* After school/evening and Saturday hours. 

* Transportation and training provided. 

Call (847) 245-7500 




I 




National maid service is looking for 
team members. Great pay & bonus. 
Cars, training & equip, provided. M-F day- 
time hrs. Friendly working environment. 

(847)362-0332 



VY* Y 



-• ,**t* 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



COST ENGINEER 



We are a leading consumer products manufacturer located in 
a far northwest suburb of Chicago. We are looking for a Cost 
Engineer with a minimum of 3+ years of manufacturing experi- 
ence. This new position will be responsible for development of 
the Engineering and Costing modules of our ERP system. The 
position will be accountable for creating and entering product 
structure and costs for new and existing products, as well as Ihe 
complete integrity of the product master database. 
Demonstrated skills in problem solving, computers, effective 
written and oral communications and excellent interpersonal 
skills are required. Must be a self-starter able to initiate ideas 
and develop them through to full implementation. 
Company olfers competitive compensation and benefit package. 
Please send resume with salary history to: 

Box TIT, Lakeland Media, 30 S. Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030 



Customer 
Service 



PERFECT JOE 



Earn $8 - $10 hr to START 

Approaching Customers & Registering them for£BEE 
Demonstrations on various Home Improvements. 

• NO experience needed 

• PAID training 

• FLEXIBLE hours 

- 

• Inside major retail chain. 

• START immediately. 

• MGMT., opportunities, $10 & UP1 



. * 



Lakeland Media 



is looking for a part time 

DRIVER with flexible hours 

1 5 — 20 hours week. 

Retirees welcome 



p#» 




CfflUfl C©47) 245-7500 



T 

Must have valid driver's license 

r * 

& insurance 





Euro 



Tk^WNMI*. 



fin iiuerviett 



one: (800) 215-8712 or 



046 Ask for Flctch 





TELESALES: Bold Technologies "Ltd is seeking telesales 
reps for Business to Business calls. Candidate will possess 
an enthusiastic attitude, excellent phone skills and the abili- 
ty to set appointments- and contact current database. 
Experience in computer system sales, accounting applica- 
tion, or alarm/security industry preferred. 

If this describes you, send your resume to: 

i- BOLD TECHNOLOGIES LTD. 

1680 N. Dclany Road, Gurncc, IL 60031 

Fax: 847-625-5500. E-mail jerry@boldgroup.com 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



DRIVER-JOIN OUR FAMILY 
& SPEND TIME WITH 

YOURS. Regional company 
dirversl HOME WEEKENDSI 
GREAT PAYI Cedar Valley 
Transport: A smaller friendli- 
er company 1-888-791-9235. 






DRIVER-YOUR EXPERI- 
ENCE PAYS AT SRT. Now 
hiring experienced OTR driv- 
ers to run 48 states and Ca- 
nada. Class A CDL required. 
Sign-on bonuses for 1 year 
plus experience. Student 
graduates welcome. Call 
SRT today 1-877-244-7293 
oM-877-BIG-PAYDAY. 

DRIVER/CDL(A)...KLLM RE- 
GIONAL. UP to 38C. 'Con-, 
dos, home weekly. Great 
benefits, 401 K, $10,000 bo- 
nus. EOE. Contact 800-925- 
5556 or KLLM.com 

DRIVER/CDL(A)...KLLM RE- 
GIONAL. UP to 38c. Con- 

dos, home weekly. Great 
benefits, 401 K, $10,000 bo- 
nus. EOE. Contact 800-925- 
5556 or KLLM.com 

DRIVERS & 0/0: EXPERI- 
ENCED FLATBEDI Great 
Earningsl Paid Twice 
weekly; NO Forced Dis- 
patch; 100% o/o: Fleets 
Welcome: Equipment 

Available/ Lease Purchase 
Availablell CRST / MA- 
LONE: 800-490-5248. 

•; ••• 

DRIVERS READY TO RUN? 
Milesl In-cab e-mail. Friday 
paydays. 2-day orientation. 
Health insurance. 401 K. 
OTR, Class A CDL required. 

800-745-9670. 



1 T 



DRIVERS: MARTEN 

TRANSPORT, LTD. OTR 

drivers needed. 33c per 
mile with 1yr. tractor trailer 
experience. Class A CDL re- 
quired. Medical/dental/life In- 
surance. NOW .HIRING 

TEAMS. Call today at .1-800- 
395-3331 or visit our web- 
site www.marten.com 

. 

DRIVERS: NORTH AMERI- 
CAN Van Lines is expand- 
ing their Flatbed Fleet. No 
prior Flatbed experience 
necessary. Tractor and 
Trailer lease .and pur- 
chase programs., available: 
Minimum of 1 year tractor 
trailer driving experience 
required. Call 1-800-348- 

2147DeptlLS. y • 1 

EASY WORKI 

NO EXPERIENCE 

$500-$1 ,000 part-time at 

home stuffing enyelopes. 

For free information send 

self-addressed, 

stamped envelope: 

R&J Enterprises 

Mailing Services, Inc. 

P.O. Box 402 
Ingleside, III. 60041. 

EASY WORKI GREAT payl 
Earn $500 plus a week. 
Mailing circulars & assem- 
bling products at home. 1- 

800-267-3944 ext. 135. 

www.easywork-greatpay.com 



ESCAPE THE 
CORPORATE RAT RACEI 

Be Self-Employed. 

Mail-Order/lnternet. One- 

on-One Training. Free 

Booklet. 

www, 

888-239-1494 





■SSISTANT 



Seeking full time Office 
Assistant (assisting field 
sales manager from 
office) for leading manu- 
facturers' rep. agency In 
Wauconda (NW Suburbs). 
Working knowledge of 
Windows '98/2000 and 
Microsoft Office pro- 
grams (Word, Excel, 
Outlook) A MUST. ' 



• f 



Fax Resume to 

~ - 526-018 



Or.C; 

And 



0-30 



END 



UNIVERSAL WORKER 

Senior Independent Living 
Community seeks a full- 
time Universal Worker for 
our 2:30-11 :00 pm shift, 
. Laundry, housekeeping 

and dietary duties. 
Health care experience a 

plus. 

Apply In person: 

Rolling Hills Place 

3521 1 6th Street 

Zion, II 60099 



— 






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Lakeland Newspapers/ vsz* I 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




' - i 



1 lelp Wanted s 
Full-Time 



i . 



' 



Yardmen! Bunkers! Loadbiulders! 

Earn Top Pay! Get Top Benefits! 

Work for the Top Company! 




DaCLDCbJLib'L 




OL-f»* 



guilders' Ctiotcc 



I 



Division of Carolina Holdings in Grayslakc is 
now accepting applications for experienced 

LOAD BUILDERS ! 

Apply in person from 7:3.0 - 5:00 

Monday through Friday @ 939 S. Rt. 83 

in Grayslakc or call Duane at 

(847) 223-3250 ext #233 

Equal Opportunity Employer 
. Drug Free Environment 




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The Village of Antioch's Combined Planning Commission 
and Zoning Board is seeking a part-time, contractual, 
recording secretary. This individual will be expected to 
attend evening meetings, (usually two Thursdays per month 
starting at 7:30 PM), read aloud the legal notices of hear- 
ings, swear in those persons wishing to testify, prepare min- 
utes of meetings, and perform other secretarial functions 
related to specific requests that come before the Planning 
and Zoning Board. 

Minimum qualifications; a high school diploma or GED 
equivalent, plus two (2) years of full-time secretarial experi- 
ence. 

Please submit letter/resume no later than 5:00 PM on 

Thursday. June 1 3. 2002 to: 

Director of Planning, Zoning & Building, 

Antioch Village Hall. 874 Main Street. Antioch. IL 60002: 

e-mail: pzblddir@antloch-il.org; 
FAX: (847) 395-9482. 





"r-Tiirn-iwa—i 




GRANT COMMUNITY ' 
' HIGH SCHOOL 

is how accepting ; 
applications for 
maintenance mechanics 
•'' and custodians. 

Resume and Application 
can be submitted 

Grant Community High 

School 

285 E. Grand Avenue 

Fox Lake 60020 



NO PHONE CALLS 

PLEASE ■ 






LET THE GOVERNMENT 

start your business. Grants, 
loans, Hud tracers $800/wk. 
Free incorporation. Free 
merchant account. Free 
credit card processing soft- 
ware. Send SASE to: Gov't 
Publications, 1025 Connecti- 
cut Ave. NW Suite 1012 
Dept. S, Washington, D.C. 

20036. 1 -800-306-0873. 

www.capitalpublications.com 

t 
1 , 



MEDICAL BILLING, THE 

One That Works, Your 
Home Business, Training, 
Your PC. FREE WEBSITE, 
90 DAY MONEY BACK, 1- 
800-291-4683 ext 407. 




. Medical 
Opportunities 



Health Cam 

Great Pay, 

Good benefits. 

Shift andWeekend Differential 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



New Year . . .New Career! 

Rvu'piiim/Mcd Asa $IO/hr 

Corporate Collection . . . .$25K 
H.R. Admin $35-$38K 

Hol.uir.Hil Mgr $27K 

Dujvr/Asst $30K 

Telemarketing $8-9/lir 

Banking/Branch Mgr . . .$38K 

Superior Personnel 

847-549-0016 




■ ■ ■ ' v 



iAAAAIA 




THE COLOR OF 
MONEY/AUTO 

II you dig cash, like getting 
it and handling it, and you have 

experience as a 

license and title clerk, you need 

to work lor our lar 

northwest suburban 

dealership! 

Great benelits: 
health, dental and 401 K. 

Faxes only: 

312-957-0972 

eoe 



WANTED: 

Mature & Enthusiastic 

Person to assist in busy 

Chiropractic' ofllce. Experience 

I welcome, but not necessary. Will 
train. Call (847) 546-4220 

to schedule appointment 



Lakeland's Classified 
Deadline is 

1 1 :00A.M. Wednesday 
Call: (847) 223-81 61 or 

« » * 

Fax: (847) 223-2691 



Victory Lakes lias ihc following posi- 
tions available for dedicated, hard- 
working people In our long term 
care facility and our retirement com- 
munity. 
LPN/STAFF RN— Full time, pari 

lime, and per diem, livening and 
night positions available; must be 
licensed in Illinois. 
CNAs — Part lime and per diem. 
Day, evening and night positions 

» - 

available. 

DIRECTOR OF RESIDENT 

CARE— Full lime, night shift. Musi 
have valid RN license and CPR certifi- 
cation; 3 years management exp in a 
long-term care selling preferred. 
ACTIVITIES ASSISTANT— 
Full lime, 9am-5:30pm. Assist in 
planning, organizing and directing 
resident activities. Previous experi- 
ence In a long-term setting preferred. 
Ability lo work well with dementia 

residents required. 
MAINTENANCE ASSISTANT 
TRANSPORTATION —Full 
lime, 80 hours, day shift. CM. license 
with "P" endorsement. Transport 
residents within a 15-mile radius lo 
appointments, shopping, etc. 
Previous experience with seniors 
preferred. 

FLOOR CARE— Full Time, days. 
Previous floor care exp. preferred to 
include bufTing, waxing, use of chem- 
icals, and knowledge of equipment. 



Full benefits package avail- 
able if you work at least 40 
hrs. in a two-week period; 
contact us to, learn more 
about our NEW shift differen- 
tial, 

Please apply in person at 

the 



\msvmr> 



Llndc 

Call 847-356-4551 






W£E 



eJianna@VlstaiIealth.co 

KOF. 




Help Wanted 
Full-lime 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 






Help Wanted 
Full-Time 






guanine 
Pantry Person 

Daytime Hours. 
Tuesday - Sunday 

pxp. in salad & sandwicl 

preparation necessary. 

Apply to Bill or Gus. 

fhe Country SquircJ 

RTS 120 & 45 
Grayslakc, IL 

■&i7-.??i-nni 





GENERAL OFFICE/ 
.DATA ENTRY 

Assist the Bookkeeper In 

Data Entry, Accounts 

Receivable and other 

duties. Small oflice variety. 

Full time permanent 

position. Full benelits. 

Send msumn or apply 

•• In person:. 

Lube Oils Inc. 

345 Skoklo Hwy. 

Gurnco, IL 60031 

847-249-2330 



GO WITH A WINNER! CFI 
Now Hiring Company, 
Owner Operator, Single 
and Teamsl Ask about our 
2-week Spouse Traing Pro- 
gram in automatic tranmis- 
sion Truck. Call 1-800- 

CFI-DRIVE 
Website: www.cfidrive.com 

GOVERNMENT POSTAL 
JOBS 

S18.35/hr. Wildlife jobs 
$21.60/hr. 

Paid training. Full benefits. No 
ex- 
perience necessary. Application 
and exam information. Toll free 
1- 

888-778-4266 ext. 1 51 . 

GOVERNMENT-IS HIRING 
2002 S40,000+/annually 
federal benefits/pension 

paid training. Call toll free 1- 
866-809-8008, 7am-10pm 
CST Mon-Sat. n Postal ext. 
9500, police ext. 9501. 



Medical 
Opportunities 



/How T© 
SuM e wnwe TTflne 
Job Search 

By Nancy Sakol 

B I had contacted (company name withheld) over the tele- 
phone that had been advertising a job in the paper. .The 
position was in middle management and in the salary range of the 
company I had just left after 8 years. After a short discussion I 
was asked to come in for an interview. The person on the other 
end said that she was in the Personnel Departmcnt.and that my 
qualifications sounded just like what they were looking for in 
their company. We set up the interview for the next day. I arrived 
for a 10:00 interview approximately 35 minutes late due to traf- 
fic congestion. When I arrived, I was told by the receptionist thai 
the party I was supposed to meet with would no longer be avail- 
able to rjicct with me because I arrived so late unci would not be 
rescheduling the interview. I was appalled. After fighting the traf- 
fic and being told that I wouldn't be seen or rescheduled; 1 
became angry with the receptionist and said that she should call 
the person in Personnel and tell them that I was here and would 
like the opportunity to explain why I was a little late. She refused 
to call the person stating that they were now in another interview 
and she would not interrupt them. I said I would wail. After 40 
minutes went by and I saw what appeared to be another candidate 
leaving. I asked the receptionist to please find out. She asked me 
to please have a scat. She made a call and the hung up. Much to 
my surprise within a few minutes I found myself escorted out of 
the building by two security officers who waited until I drove my 
car off the premises. I can not believe this company went to such 
extremes all because I was 35 minutes late and wanted the chance 
to explain myself. 



A m NEVER arrive late for an interview. Always prepare yourself 
■ by testing out the route* alternative routes and leaving early 
enough lo allow for traffic congestion. It is better to be 10 minutes 
early than 5 minutes late. The receptionist was doing her job when 
she told you that you would not be interviewed and not resched- 
uled. These 'were obvious orders she was given to tell you should 
you show up. To argue the issue with her was out of line. To wait 
around aficr you were told this by her was also unacceptable and 
was more than likely regarded as strange behavior. Apparently it 
seemed as though you where not willing to take "no" for an answer. 
When security was called, il was more than likely at the discretion 
of die receptionist which she had every right to do. After reading 
this, I hope you can lake a look back and put yourself in Ihc posi- 
tion of the receptionist and the interviewer. The interviewer had 
every right not to reschedule your interview. The fact is you didn't 
show up on lime or even contact ihcm to say you were running late 
for what ever reason. If you had at least called, you may have found 
out that they were willing to push your interview to another time or 
that the interviewer had back to back interviews and would not have 
been able to fit you in. Il was all in the way you chose to handle the 
situation. Don't blame the interviewer for your lack of interviewing 
etiquette. That also includes putting the receptionist in an awkward 
position. Just for the record, 35 minutes is more than, "a little late" ! 







■ A 



numes 

.Rirsaipirsfor 

Home health . 

F/T or P/T fill shifts. 

Hex scheduling. 

Priuate Duty. 

Benefits for F/T. 

nniERicnn 

HOIHE HEALTH 

1-800-872-4427 



Note: Nancy Sakol is President and CEO of 

Superior Personnel, Inc in Gurncc and Vernon Hills. 

Letters and resumes may be sent to Superior 

carcers@aol.com. You may also visit our website: 

www.superiorpersonnel.com 







MEDIA 




Medical 
Opportunities 




Medical 
Opportunities 



zz 



— 



UN 

Hospital 





D 



System 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



OWNER-OPERATORS 
RUN Midwest Region Or 
Southeast-Home Weekly. 
Steady Refrigerated 

Loads. Top Percentage 
Pay - Base Plate Program - 
Own Lightweight Tractor - 
Sunco Carriers - The All 
Owner-Operator Company. 
Call Mike 1-800-908-8844 • 



Restaurant Manager 
Experience 
Necessary. 
Call Kris. 

847-356-6833 

Tuesday-Saturday 
10am-4pm 






OWNER OPERATORS 

NEW. Pay Packago up to 
09 cpm. Loadod & Empty., 
Homo Wookly. 00% drop / 
hook. Mldwost Roglonal 

runs. Class A CDL / 2 

years oxp. 1-B0O-20O-2G23. 



SALES 

Seeking Solos Professional 
tor our Residential/Commer- 
cial roofing team*. Salary 
plus commission, health 
Insurance, retirement plan, 

company vehicle This 

position otters high Income 

potential working with a 

growing local company. 

Fax resume to: 

847-587-9931 

Or Call 

847-587-9932 



WE'RE GROWINGI MORE 
FREIGHTI MORE MILESI 
MORE MONEYI Now, we 
need YOU! OTR/REGION- 
AL, either way you get 
MORE! 1 year experince. 
HEARTLAND EXPRESS 1- 
800-441-4953. www.heart- 
landexpress.com. 



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V 



Machine Operators 

• H.S. Diploma or equivalent 
• One year machine operating experience 

• Pay range is $7.50/hr. to $9.5G7hr. 

• 1*, 2 nJ and 3 rd shifts available 

CNC Operators 

• H.S. Diploma or equivalent 
• Minimum 6 months CNC experience 

• Pay range is $97hr. to $1 1/hr. 

Please apply at: QPS Staffing Services 
1807 Grand Ave., Waukegan, IL 60085 

847-263-1100 



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1 Salary plus Comm. 

». Health Ins. .. - 

• Dental Ins. - VSi^*^ &&iSsAi^' M&& 
> Disability & Life V^^V^^: 

'i 0lK .«- \^mm0^^^^ 

• Gas allowance \ otw wv " Wl 

• Cell phone allowance vv »- ■ -«*t **- 

• Must have car V ^ w '**? - f^se^^g 



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ncjw 



Send resume to: 
David Sherman 
Display Adv. Manager 
c/o Lakeland Media 
30 S. Whitney St. 
Grayslake, IL 60030 
-or- 
sherman@lakelandmedia.com 






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Medical 
Opportunities 




Medical 
Opportunities 



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a 

We are more than a healthcare provider; we are a team of professionals working 
together to serve our patients and their families; we are one heart and soul serving our 
community though our multiple locations; and we want you to join us! We are looking 
for dedicated professionals to join our team at Kenosha Medical Center and the all-new 
St. Catherine's Medical Center opening this summer. We have opportunities ton 

Registered Nurses • CCU Nurses • OR Nurses 
Surgical Techs • Speech-Language Pathologists 
Medical Techs • BioMedical Technicians 
Respiratory Therapists • Radiology 
Techs • CNAs • LPNs • Unit Secretaries 



Manufacturing 

-►I RRADIAT O R O PE RAT O R 

Worldwide Slcrill/alion Company Willi 
u branch In (lurncc Im un inimtxliulc 
opening for u (iumnu Irradiator 
Operator, Reliable self-sianer will be 
responsible for system operation, 
sadiy, verification of product count & 
quality, forkllfl. documentation & 
process control. PC skills & flexible 
work schedule. MMKI/hr lo start. 
Full benefit package, bonuses & 
opportunity for advancement. 
MA, l(H)3 Lakeside Dr., Gurncc, IL 

60031. Fax: (847) 855-6123. Email: 

iKiniuiip^scluiinilHir^Mcii^'iiIcs.ctini 

iYo pbone mils. E0EAVF/IW 




Business 
Opportunities 









We offer a competitive salary, excellent 
benefit package and most importantly, an 
opportunity to work with the leading 
healthcare system in Kenosha County. 
Send your resume to United Hospital 
System, Human Resource Department, 
6308 Eighth Avenue, Kenosha, Wl 53143. 
Phone (262)656-21 16 Fax (262)653-5780 

Email H R@ 




$1500 a month PT 

$4500-$7200 FT 

WORK IN HOME 

International company 

needs supervisors and 

assistants. Training. 

Free booklet. 

www. 1 23weallhplus.com 

(888)230-5947 










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BE FINANCIALLY INDE- 
PENDENT Minnesota com- 
pany needs honest, de- 
pendable person. Restock 
retail/commercial accounts 
with name brand products. 
4-6hrs/wk. Earn $50,000 po- 
tential. $8,900 investment. 
Good credit. Financing avail- 
able. 1-800-463-6678. 



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mm? -on a 112 

Hours: Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. • Sun. 7 a.m.-3 p.m. 

Lake County Fairgrounds, GRAYSLAKE, 

1000's of Treasures!!! Glass Grinding Available!!! 
Admission $4.00 - Early Buyers Sat 9-11 a.m.-$15 

NEXT SHOW June 8 & 9 




McHenry Country Fairgrounds, WOODSTOCK, IL 

Woodstock Antique and Collectible Fair 
Sunday, May 26 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. 










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Business 
Opportunities 




Child Care 



i'- 



9 


EMBROIDERY 

& 

DIGITIZING 

All Equipment & Clients. 

You can bo as busy as 

you want to boll 

Owner retiring. 

$39,000. 
(847)548-5511. 

• 


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SEEK AND DEMAND QUAL- 
ITY CHILDCAREll Full & 
Part-Time openings avail- 
able. Experienced a de- 
pendable, CPR/First Aid Cer- 
tified, excellent credentials. 
Contract & deposit required. 

(847) 587-0736. 



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ESTABLISHED VENDING 
*> COMPANY FOR SALE. All 
machines, accounts, parts & 
inventory. Serious inquiries 
only (847) 497-3284 alter 
5pm. 

fl IF WE COULD SHOW YOU 

HOW TO MAKE AN 

EXTRA $300-$1000/MO. 

WORKING 3-10HRS. 

A WEEK. 

Would you be interested? 

www.mypctowork.com 



Immediate . 
Openings 
Work In Home 

$$$$$ free information 

800-311-6142 

www.freedomshines.com . 



> 



TURN KEY BUSINESS For 

Sale 

Cellular, Paging and Music 

Call for pricing 

(847)740-4910 
(847)630-1029 



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WORK AT HOME 

Financial Freedom 

No door-to-door 

PT/FT 

Call toll free 

866-736-7844 



DAYCARE OPENINGS, ALL 
ages, Grayslake area, rea- 
sonable rates. - (847) 

543-4238. 

EXPERIENCED MOM WILL 

care for your child In my lov- 
ing Grayslake home. -Eng- 
lish and Spanish speaking. 
Please call Audelia (847) 
543-4380. 

EXPERIENCED NANNY 
LOOKING to babysit In your 
home. Have references. 
Reasonable rates. English 
speaking only. .(847) 587- 
2418. 

GURNEE MOM Loving 
mother will care for your 
child or children in a fun, lov- 
ing, safe home, full and part- 
time positions available. Lo- 
cated near 41 and Grand 
Avo. (847)625-8316. 

KATHLEEN'S KIDDIE KAM- 

PUS has current and sum- 
mer FT/PT openings, fun & 
educational. (847) 

672-9081. 

SUMMER KIDS! CINDY'S 

Daycare has 2 openings lor 
3-7yrs. old. (847) 587-0691. 



? 



Want to Save 



BigBuclcs? 

LAKELANDS 

CLASSIFIEDS 

CAN HELP YOU FIND 

THE RIGHT 

EMPLOYEES FAST!! 

TO PLACE YOUR JOB 

OPPORTUNITIES IN 

OUR CLASSIFIED 

SECTION, JUST CALL 

MONDAY-FRIDAY, 

8AM-5PM. 

, (847) 223-8161 or 

Fax . 

(847) 223-2691 




Appliances 



ELECTRIC DRYER, runs 
groat, $75/bost. (847) 

356-6929. 




School/Instruction 



ESPANOL 

Spanish tutor. 

Grades 5th-8th. 

Call Giselle 

(847)331-1382. 

NORTHEASTERN NORTH 
CAROLINA EDUCATION 
JOB FAIR. May 25th. 9am- 
1pm. Rocky Mount, NC. 19 
school systems. Register 
on line at ' 
www.schoollink.net/nepanc 

or (252) 459-5248. 

LEARNING TO READ CAN 
CHANGE YOUR LIFEI 

•Professional tutoring 

services. 
•Adults and children 

welcome. 

•English as a second 

language. 

•Reading, comprehension, 

grammar, phonics, writing • 

skills. 
•Test prep/vocabulary 

enrichment/ISAT. 
Available days and even- 
ings. 
Very reasonable ratesl 
Mrs. Jordan. 

(847) 473-3686. 




Bazaars/Crafts 




GURNEE COMMUNITY 

CHURCH 

ANNUAL 

GARAGE SALE 

4555 W. GRAND AVE. 

GURNEE 

Friday 

May 10 8am-6pm 

Saturday 

May 11 8am-12noon 




Building Materials 



HABITAT RESTORE SEMI 
TRUCKLOAD SALE-ALL 
NEW!!! Windows, , doors, 
trim, lighting, shutters, wall- 
paper, paint. Great prices! 
Selected doors S10. Plus 
much more new and used. 
Open Tuesdays, Wednes- 
days, Thursdays, 9-6; Fri- 
days, Saturdays, 9-1. Lorrell 
Business Chtr., 1 mile south 
of Buckley Road (137) on 
Hwy. 41, North Chicago. 
Benefits Habitat for Humani- 
ty Lake County. (847) 
623-1020. 




May 10, 2002 




*m 



• ■ 



Building Materials 





Garage 
Rummage Sale 



STEEL BUILDINGS 

SALE: Versatile, depend- 
able all steel. Looking for 
an excellent value and 
quality service? Call for 
free brochure, www.senti- 
nelbuildings.com.Sentinel 
Buildings, 800-327-0790, 
Extension 79. 



■ 



Electronics 
Computers 



NEED A COMPUTER BUT 
NO CASH? You're ap- 
proved. Financing GUAR- 
ANTEED. No cash needed 
today. Bad credit Okay. No 
credit check. No credit turn- 
downs. 1-877-727-4255 
WWW.PC-CREDIT.COM 




OAK FIREWOOD FOR 
SALE. (815) 385-3854 
Johnsburg. 




Garage 
Rummage Sale 



GARAGE SALE MAY 18 & 
19, Nlmitz' Housing, 4135-B 
Skipjack Ct. Clothes, toys, 
lots of misc. Reese 20K 5th 
Wheel hitch, exc. cond., 

$350. (847)689-8348. 



GARAGE SALE 

1 DAY ONLY 

SATURDAY MAY 11, 

8am-5pm. 

35360 Nielsen Ave., 

Round Lake, ILL . 

Playstation & PS2 Games, 

27" TV, furniture, 97'SeaDoo 

XP, kitchen electronics, etc. 



GARAGE SALE 1560 Ports- 
mouth Ct., Grayslake, (Eng- 
lish Meadows). May 18th & 
1.9th., 8am-3pm. Sporting 
goods, cameras, clothing, 
housewares, jewelry & 
more. 

* 

GARAGE SALE 2195 Mill- 
stone Dr., Lake Villa (Sweet- 
water Mills Sub.). Thurs. 5/9, 
Fri. 5/10, 8am-3pm. Sat. 
5/11, 9am-noon. Loads of 
baby stuff, women's clothing 
14-26, & lots more. 

GARAGE SALE LOTS of 

stuff. Microwave, freezer, 
stove, clothing, baby crib, 
light duty covered trailer, old 
cameras, computers, 

books, sofa, lawn mower & 

many more. Interesting 
items. 17920 Gages Lake 
Rd., Gages Lake. May 10th- 
12th, 10am-3pm. 

GARAGE SALE ROUND 
LAKE BEACH, FURNITURE 
HOUSEHOLD ITEMS, STAR 
WAR COLLECTIBLES. 218 
WOODLAND. SATURDAY 
MAY11TH9-5. 



* K * • 



' 



GARAGE SALE, MAY 9TH, 
10TH, 11TH, 9-3pm, 1315 

Mayfair Ln Grayslake, The 
Links of English Mead- 
ows. Come see all an- 
tiques, furniture, architec- 
tural items, old windows 
and doors. 



GURNEE COMMUNITY 

CHURCH 

ANNUAL 

GARAGE SALE 

4555 W. GRAND AVE. 

GURNEE 

Friday 

May10 8am-6pm 

Saturday 

May 11 8am-12noon 



INTERLAKEN RIDGE & IN- 
TERLAKEN WILLOWS Two 
Subdivision Garage Sale. 
May 16 & 17, 9am-4pm. 
May 18, 9am-12 noon. Off 
Butterfield & Winchester In 
Libertyville. 



PARKVIEW SUBDIVISION 
May 16, 17, 18, 19. Across 
from Round Lake Library, 
on Hart Rd. or off Fairfield 
Rd., between Hart & Nipper- 
sink. 



STANTON POINT 

SUBDIVISION 

Multi-Family 

Friday, May 10th, 

Saturday, May 11th. 

9am-5pm. 

Rt. 59 & Stanton Point Rd., 

Ingleside. Follow signs and 

watch for balloons. 



AFTER YOU'VE HAD YOUR 
BIG SALE, and there is still 
things that just did not go.... 
Call us at LAKELAND News- 
papers and run it under the 
"FREE or Giveaways" classi- 
fied column. FREE ADS are 
NO CHARGEI (847) 
223-8161, ext. 191. 




Horses & Tacks 



BEAUTIFULLY COLORED 
REG. PAINT YEARLING. 

Imprinted, calm, easy to 
work with. Asking $2,500. 
Call Sandy (847) 587-1979. 

PAINTS & QUARTER 
HORSES, all types avail- 
able, over 70 head. (815) 
378-9310. 



MAKE YOUR CLASSIFIED 
ADVERTISING EVEN MORE 
EFFECTIVE with a FREE 

classified listing at 

www.lakeil.com 
<http://www.lakeil.com>. - 
Lake County's NEW web 
site. 

.ROUND BIRD CAGE, 45in. 
high, w/accessories, $8.00; 
old wooden 4-person toba- 
gan, $10; 2 microwaves, 
small, $10, medium, $15, 
hardly used; 2 air condition- 
ers, small, used twice, $25, 
1-large older model, $40. 
(847) 587-0142 leave mes- 
sage. 




a ■ 



SIX YEAR OLD APHA 
GELDING, EXCELLENT 

PLEASURE OR TRAIL 
HORSE, OUTSTANDING 
MOVER, MUST SELL, 
$4,000.(847)746-4611 




Household Goods 
Furniture 



BEAUTIFUL BLUE SOFA 

sleeper, . 2 coordinated wing 
chairs, 2 end tables. All for 
$300.00 OBO. Please call 
(847)740-1 650. 

BED QUEEN MATTRESS 

set, new never used, in plas- 
tic, $210. Delivery and 
frame available. (847) 
955-9986. 



THREE PIECE COFFEE 
TABLE, 2 matching lamps, 
3/mo. old, $330; 3-twln 
headboards, $15/ea;. new 
leather jackets; mens size 
' Ig. & med., woman's small,. 
$20/ea; Camel seats, 
$1 00/ea.; Sony PlayStation 
II, $260, games separate; 
Nintendo, $65; games & ac- 
cess.; PlayStation games & 
access., only $25; Sega Sat- 
urn, $60; w/6 games & ac- 
cess; Super Nintendo, $50; 
4 games; Sega Genesis 
$45; 10 .games; Hardly 
used, like new. (847) 

546-2337. 




lawn/Garden 




BRAND NEW 2 loveseats, 
taupe, - soft velour, 

$275/best. (847) 526-4162. 

BRAND NEW QUEEN SIZE 

LUXURY PILLOW TOP 

MATTRESS SET. Super 

thick & comfortable. Retail 

value $1,019, sell $249. 

Can delivery. (847) 
687-5030. 



CARPET SALE 30% OFF 

ALL CARPET. We Install 
next day. Free estimates. 
Nobody can beat our prices. 
LUIGI'S CARPET (847) 
740-4173. 

- ■ 

COMPUTER ARMOIRE, 

WALNUT . finish, 

42"wx24"dx77"h. Originally 
$1,200. asking $600/best. 

(847) 265-5266. 

DININGROOM TABLE "& 
chairs (no leafs), credenza 
& buffet, oak kitchen table & 
credenza, formica table. Call 

Rose (847) 740-4091, 
10am-7pm. 

DO YOU NEED TO 
SELL AN INEXPEN- 
SIVE rTEM FOR 
' $100 OR LESS? 
GET YOUR AD IN THE 
11 "LAKELAND" HOME 
TOWN PAPERS, THE 
GREAT LAKES 
BULLETIN 
& 
THE MARKET JOURNAL 
FOR ONLY $6 PER WEEK 
BY CALLING 
(847)223-8161 
ASK FOR LIS A. 
EXT. 191 

FIVE PIECE WALL UNIT. 

TV armoire, lighted book- 
case, lighted glass unit 
w/drawers, 2 corner shelf 
units. Oak & oak veneer. 
By Basset. Mission style. 
Beautiful!! Asking $1,800. 
For info, call (847) 548- 
2091. 

FOR SALE, TYPEWRITER 
STAND, ELECTRIC TYPE- 
WRITER, TWIN BED 
FRAME, SOME KITCHEN 
DISHES AND LAMPS. (847) 
855-0019. • 

HAVE DOWNSIZED QUEEN 
SIZE- SOFA BED 

S100.00/BEST. 2 Twin 
beds, wood frame, 
$25.00/pc. Maple Magna- 
vox Stereo Console & 
much more. 847-223-5210. 



LIKE NEW COUNTRY DI- 
NINGROOM SET, table 
w/leaf, 6 high back chairs, 
buffet w/glass. door, lighted 
hutch. Priced low $1 ,000. 

(847) 526-4689. 



SIMMONS 6 DRAWER 
WHITE DOUBLE DRESS- 
ER, & mirror unit. Great for 
little girls room, $300/best. 

(847)548-2091. 



MARIGOLDS 72 PLANTS, 

$9.95; Impatiens, Begonias, 
48 plants, $11.95. Hanging 
baskets. Geraniums. Veget- 
able plants. All pets, unruly 
children and grouchy spous- 
es must remain in the car. 
Ludyjan (262) 547-0682. 



MUNGLE'S 
LANDSCAPING 
WE DO IT ALLII 

•Weed & Edge 
Flower Beds 
•Tree & Hedge Trimming 
•Mulch 
•Power Wash or 
Staining, Decks & Fenc- 
es *Tilling, Small Flower 
Beds & Gardens 
•Spring Clean Up. 

(847)826-9619, 
, home (815) 344-2279. 
pager (847) 333-7383 
"FIREWOOD 

AVAILABLE." 



USED LAWN MOWERS 
$40 & up. 3 Roto tillers. 
8hp. elect, start riding mow- 
er, $225. (847) 740-2415 

after 6pm. 




Clothing 



FULL LENGTH BLACK 
SEAL SKIN, M/L, 

S200/best. (847) 566-0990. 




Miscellaneous 



DO YOU NEED TO SELL 

THAT INEXPENSIVE ITEM 

FOR $100 OR LESS. 

GET YOUR AD IN THE 

11 HOME TOWN PAPERS 

THE 
GREAT LAKES 



& 

THE MARKET JOURNAL 

FOR ONLY $5 PER WEEK 

BY CALLING 

(847)223-8161 

EXT 191 
ASK FOR LISA. 

* 

MODEL SHIPS WOOD con- 
struction. Tug boats, sail- 
boats, schooner (Christmas 
Tree Ship), fishing trawler, 

30"-60", $150-$475. (262) 
249-9695: 

NEED DENTURES? 

New dentures available in 

just one day for $650/set, 

$350/single plate. 

Other dental services 

available. 
Call Dr. Richard Lin . 

(847) 872-3041. 

t 

NASCAR MAILBOXES, 

MOST numbers, S60-S75. 
also Harley's. (847) 

223-0433. 

LIKE NEW BABY CRIB; 

18cu.ft. older Amana 
upright freezer; 8x7' wooden 
garage door; 48' antenna 
tower; 7x14' utility trailer with 
aluminum cover; approx. 
500 red bricks. (847) 
223-2703. 



LITTLE TYKES DUMP 
TRUCK SANDBOX/POOL, 
$50.(847)497-9316. 



DININGROOM SET, $400; 
Sony 10 disc CD changer, 
$75; Pro-Form cross walk 
treadmill, $300; king size wa- 
terbed, $50. (815) 

578-1942. 



TOTEM POLES CEMENT, 
SIX FEET TALL, $75.00 A 
PIECE. ANTIQUE WIRE 
WHEELS $40.OO-$50.00 
EACH. (262) 857-9323 



MASTECTOMY PRODUCTS 
LOOK better in fashion- 
able, . ,new lightweight 
forms & swimwear. Great 
new bras. Medicare billed 

direct. 1-800-755-7880. 

FREE CATALOG 

or 

buy on-line @ www.libera- 

torfashions.com 

$3,200 WEEKLY! MAILING 
800 brochures!- Guaranteed! 
Free supplies/postage. Mail 
LSASE: Celebrity Mailers, 
16625 Redmond Way #M233- 
C6, Redmond, WA. 98052. 
www.celebritymallers.com 

* 

FOUR MICKEY THOMP- 
SON BAJA RADIALS, 30x9- 

,1/2x15 tires, brand new, 
$325. Craftsman wood chip- 
per, 6.5hp., used 3 times, 
like brand new, $400. (847) 

546-4877. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS 
AFFORDABLE-CONVENI- 
ENT Tan at home. Payment 
from $25/month. FREE 
color catalog. Call today' i- 
800-842-1305. 

www.np.etstan.com 

TWO COMPUTER DESKS, 

(1) $100, (1) $50; exercise 
unit, chin/dip/VKR station. 
' sUper strong Parabody 
(MFR) unit, $400. reg. retail, 
asking $250; 2 ultra tall (6'4 
or taller) sports coats, never 
worn, ' $50/ea; (847) 
367-8186. 

Too Much Stuff! Fax ma- 
chines, $25; cellular 
phones, S25-S30; mobile-& 
home cordless phones, 
$20; bicycles, many parts & 
motorcycle parts, $80; 
some tools; lawn mowers, 
need repair, $20; IBM Selec- 
tric 3, $95; chairs, $40. All 
negotiable. (847) 

564-0313, (847) 322-9731 

leave message. 




Medical Equip 
. Supplies'" 



MEDICARE PATIENTS 

USING INHALERS •Albuterol 
•Atrovent •Combivent *Ser i 
event ' "Azmacort 'Flovent 
•And all other inhalers. Did 
you know MEDICARE cov- 
ered therapy is NOW avail- 
able to qualified patients. 
MED-A-SAVE 1-800-538- 
9849 ext. IL5. 

« 

NEED DENTURES? 

New dentures available in 

" just one day for $650/set, . 

$350/single plate. 

Other dental services 

available. 

Call Dr. Richard Lin 

(847)872-3041". 




Musical 

lnstnunenLs 



ELECTRIC GUITAR BLACK 
IBANEZ GUITAR WITH 
HARDSHELL CASE, EX- 
CELLENT CONDITION, 
$4,500. (847) 548-2856. 

■ 

FOR SALE OR GIVE AWAY 
ELECTRONIC ORGANS Vin- 
tage Hammond and popu- 
lar Lowrey will be given 
away to worthy church or 
civic group. Both need work. 
Collectors can acquire either 
or both on a "Best Offer" ba- 
sis. Use as musical instru- 
ment or furniture. Ham- 
mond has dual consoles 
with steps. Call (847) 546- 
321 7 after 6pm. 




PeLs & Supplies 



AKC BOXER PUPS, ready 
May 1, $600. (815) 
378-9310, call 8am-1 Opm. 

BLOODHOUND AKC PUPS, 

born 3/23/02, vet checked, 
males, $400, females, 
$450. (630) 837-3696, 

(815)765-9020. 

, 

DACHSHUND PUPS, AKC, 

minis. S350-S450. (262) 
743-2224 Lake Geneva. 



^ 



May 10, 2002 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Lakeland Newspapers / B23 



, - 



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■ 







Pels & Supplies 




Homes For Sale 





I* , 



Homes For Sale 




* * 

Homes For Sale 




Homes For Sale 




~> 



1 



REEF AQUARIUM 125 gal- 

loh with oak stand, comes 
with 300lbs. base rock, 
150lbs. aragonite gravel, 
and reef filter, S590/best. 
Must sell. Will separate. 

(847)223-8992. 






WIRE FOX TERRIER PUP- 
PIES, AKC reg., home 
raised, non-shedding, aver- 
age wt. as adults 18LBS., 
males & females avail. (847) 

336-5955. 


















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•i 



. it 






Wanted To Buy 



SWEPAYCASHS 

TV'S, VCR'S, DVD'S, HOME 

STEREOS, 

CAR STEREOS, 

TOOLS, JEWELRY, 

MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS, 

GAMES, ETC. 

CALL TRADER JON'S (847) 

740-5000. 






K 



r-3 




A BUYER OF ITEMS be- 
fore 1950, wood furniture & 
misc. One item or whole es- 
tate. Good condition or re- 
storable. (847) 356-6261. 

BUYING OLDER OR AN- 
TIQUE RIFLES, pistols, shot- 
guns. Vintage Arms of Illi- 
nois. Licensed. (847) 
548-0433. 

Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
Parts. Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coke Machines. 
Paying CASHI Call 
(630)985-2742. 



'•Til. Homes For Sale 



S O DOWN HOMES 

Gov't & Bank Foreclosures! 

HUD, VA, FHA. 

SO to Low Down 

No Credit O.K.! 

For Listings: 

800-501-1777 
ext. 9203. 



GURNEE RANCH F.S.B.O. 

Grandwood Park Sub., 3- 
bd., 1-1/2 ba., A/C, 1-car 
gar., deck overlooking Ig. lot 
w/mature landscaping. Re- 
modeled kitchen has oak 
cabinets & new appls. Fully 
painted for immediate occu- 
pancy. On line tour @ 
byowner.com #9600. 

S1 56,900. Call for appt. 

(047)265-0153. 



CAMP LAKE, WISC. 
F.S.B.O., 5 ml. N. of ILL. 
1,840sq.ft. 2-story house + 

1,400sq.ft. 2-story gar. work- 
shop. Zoned B-2 & C-1. 3- 
bd., 2-ba., Ig. livingroom 
w/fireplace, Ig. kitchen w/is- 
land, oak trim, lots of stor- 
age, ceramic tile, carpeting, 
full bsmt., gas furnace A/C, 
maintenance free exterior, 
decks, landscaped yd: w/pri- 
vacy fence, all appls. Lake 
access. Immediate occu- 
pancy. Asking S1 64,900. 
(262) 723-4883 weekdays 
10am-2pm, anytime wee- 
kends. 

■ 

CHAIN O'LAKES LAKE- 
FRONT VIEWS. HOMES 
FOR SALE. 3 & 4 bodroom, 
2-ba., gorgeous view. Ser- 
ies Inquiries only. Prestigi- 
ous lakefront living. Range 
from $250,000 to 

$600,000. (847) 293-2000 
(WE ALSO BUY LAKE- 
FRONT HOMES) GINS- 
BERG ENTERPRISES. 

CHARMING 3-BD. RANCH, 

very nice inside. Beautiful 
master w/fireplace and vault- 
ed ceiling. Huge open kitch- 
en w/hardwood. Full partially 
finished basement and 2- 
car gar. All this for 
$1 27,500. Calls welcome 

(847) 201-1705. 

www.2buyhomes.net- 
ad#20575. 

COUNTRY WALK SUB., 

Lake Villa School Dist. #41. 
3-bd., 2-1/2 ba., 2-story, 
bit. 1996, 2-story foyer, liv- 
ingroom, formal dinlrigroom 
w/french doors (or possible 
den), familyroom, kitchen 
w/2 pantries, C/A, full unfin- 
ished bsmt. All appls. & 
window treatments includ- 
ed. Also enjoy huge back 
yd., w/privacy fence, deck & 
swing set. Located on cul- 
de-sac street, close to park, 
Metra & shopping. 

$189,900.(847)265-6165.' 

ENJOY PISTAKEE 

BAY/CHAIN O'LAKES with- 
out paying the price tag!! Pri- 
vate pier & beach rights 1 
blk. awayl 3-bd., 2-ba., all 
brick ranch w/full bsmt. "2" 
< f/p, C/A, 1/2 acre woodedl 
$226,000. Century 21 Care, 
Carol Bradley (815) 344- 
. 4240. 



I BUY HOUSES. (847) 782 
1629. 



Following yet another burst of mis- 
chievious behavior Muffin and 
Crumpet serve a "time out" in the 
laundry room tub. They live with 
their people and pups, Kukla, Fran 
u^^l^U; : ,. and Ollie, at Foxficld Farm, south- 
w: west of Lake Geneva, \VI. 

y.fi 

May, 2002 




F.S.B.O. GAGES LAKE 

Woodland/Warren Schools. 
Lakerights/lakeviews. Large 
updated 9-rm. Cape Cod, 
on double lot, 3-bd., 3-ba., 
beautifully fin. bsmt. family- 
room w/bar, new " 2.5 car 
heated gar. w/attic. Asking 

S224K. Call (847) 

223-6236. Brokers Wel- 
come. 

FANTASTIC HOUSE COLO- 
NIAL 4-5 bdrm., glorious 
yard, rough piping in gar., in- 
tercom system throughout, 
hardwood floors. (847) 

680-3124, (847) 255-6330. 



FOR SALE BY OWNER 2- 
story contemporary, across 
from Midlane Golf Course, 
Gurnee Schools, city water 
and sewer, C/A. 4-bd., 2-1/2 
ba., masterbedroom balco- 
ny, large deck, livingroom 
fireplace, full bsmt, 2-car 
gar., formal diningroom, ap- 
pliances stay. Attractively 
priced. (847) 249-3325. 

FOR SALE OR RENT 2124 
BURR OAK, LINDEN- 
HUIRST. 2-bd., 1-ba:, att. 
gar/laundry, Ig. fenced yd., 
new appl. $134,750. (847) 
265-0147. 

p 

FOX LAKE NEWER 2-story, , 
4/5 bd., 3-ba., full bsmt., 2- 
1/2 gar., on 1/2 acre, laker- 
ights w/own boat slip, on 

Dunn's Lake. $275,000. 
(847)587-5661. 

GAGES LAKE 2-BD., 1-ba., 

new oak & granite kitchen, 
new bath, oak 6/panel 
doors, new windows, 2-1/2 
car att. gar., C/A, one house 
from lake, across from park, 
privacy fence, corner lot. 

$169,000. (847) 548-4234. 

GAGES LAKE/YVARREN 
SCHOOLS 3-bd., 2-ba., liv- 
ingroom with large stone 
fireplace, lakefront park & 
use of boat launch, 



GRAYSLAKE 

Links of English Meadows 

1298 CHURCHILL LN. 
BEAUTIFUL 

3 or 4 bd. home; 2.5 ba., 
on Ig. lot, in great family 
neighborhood. Huge bright 
kitchen, with island, plan- 
ning desk, and lots of cabi- 
nets. Spacious familyroonii 
with custom bit. media cen- 
ter, and recessed lighting. 
First floor office, large mas- 
ter 

bedroom, with spacious 
master bath. Loft overlook- 
ing 2-story livingroom, 
spectacular finished bsmt., 

with playroom and gym. 
Lots of storage space 
throughout. Elementary 

school in M l 

subdivision, top school dist. 

$284,000. 
Call (847) 543-1492. 



GRAYSLAKE BEAUTIFUL 5- 
BR. home, 3-1/2 ba., 3-car 
gar. Great lot backs to field 
and golf course. Located in 
great family neighborhood. 
Gourmet kit. w/island, Cor- 
. ian cntrs, 42in. cherry cabi- 
nets, sliding doors to deck 
adjacent to lovely sunroom, 
spacious familyroom w/FP & 
bit. in media cntr., 2-stry LR, 
sep. DR. Bright walk-out LL 
w/Pergo floors. Full 
4,200sq.ft. of living, Incl. 
lower level. Elem. school in 
Subdiv. Award winning 
school dist. L.P. $349,900. 
Agent owned. Call Coldwell 

Banker (847) 465-3675. 

GRAYSLAKE HUGE 

ROOMS, 3-bd., 2-ba., 3-fire- 
places, bsmt., screened 
porch, deck. Walk to lake, 
H.S., town. Enhance this 
style. Lasting value. Imme- 
diate. Hot Buy $206,000. 
Florence Emling, ReMAX 
CENTER 1-800-211-RELO. 

GRAYSLAKE WATER- 

FRONT HOME on small 
lake. 4-br., 1-3/4 ba., LR, 



HEBRON F.S.B.O. 2- 
STORY house. 2-bd. & den, 
1-1/2 ba., large roorn, fire- 
place, screened porch, 2-car 
gar., large fenced corner lot. 
$132,900.(815)648-4119. 

GRAYSLAKE HOUSE FOR 
SALE Won't last long. 4- 
bd., 2-1/2 ba., 2-car gar., 
w/full bsmt. In exclusive sub- 
division. Many upgrades. 
Must see. Craig Stein, Koe- 
nlg & Strey/GMAC. (847) 
360-3225. 

i 

HUNTLEY 4-BD., 3-1/2 ba., 
3 cars., raised ranch on 1- 
1/3 acres. Beautiful area. 
11 rooms, 3,300sq.ft., 2 fire- 
places, 10yrs. new. Near 
schools, churches, golf, ten- 
nis, shopping. I-90, Rt. 47. 
Price reduced $375,000. 
Open House, Sunday 1pm- 

4pm. (847) 669-2831 . 

I BUY HOUSES 

Anyslzoi 

Any price. 

Cash. 

(630)268-7908. 



$141,000. Will co-op with D *' «*!" kitC *!"Jl™, 

buyer broker. (847) "/fireplace. laundry/craft 



548-0629. 




GENOA CITY, WISC. 7yr. 
old 3-bd., 2-ba. ranch on 
large city lot. Central air, 
paved drive to an additional 
26x32 gar., $169,500. (262) 
279-0494. 

GRAYSLAKE 4 OR 5 br. + 
den, 3.5 ba., cul-de-sac 
home in great family neigh- 
borhood, 2-car gar., bright 
kitchen with island, formal liv- 
ing & diningrooms, 2-story 
familyroom/entry foyer, fin. 
bsmt. (office, gym, entertain- 
ment, storage), new roof, 
siding & carpet 2002, beauti- 
ful woodwork throughout. 
$319,900. 785 Wexford Ct. 
(847)548-4465. 

- 

JUST LISTED-FAR NORTH 
WAUKEGAN BEAUTY ON 
1/2 ACRE!! Only $130,0001! 
100'x200' beautiful yard. 
Lovely ranch w/hrdwd floors, 
eat-in kitchen, 3rd. bdrm. fin- 
ished in bsmt. Park like back 
yard w/patio, pond & 
fenced. Heated 2-1/2 car ga- 
rage. A MUST SEE!! Call 
Brenda TODAY! (847) 
360-3311 ext. 310. REMAX 
SHOWCASE GROUP. 



room. 2-car gar., large prof, 
landscaped lot, 2 decks. 
Custom built & beautifully 
decorated. $234,900. (847) 
223-7854 after 5pm, any- 
time weekends. 






GURNEE TOWNHOME 

F.S.B.O. Spacious 2-bd. + 
loft, 2-1/2 ba., in quiet subdi- 
vision. Eat-in kitchen, 1-car 
gar., hrdwd. floors, fireplace 
& much more. $160,000. 
(847) 855-0235, (847) 529- 
7484. E-mail: 




GURNEE WESTGATE SUB- 
DIVISION 3-bd., 1.5 ba., 2- 
story Heritage, brick fire- 
place in familyroom, cathe- 
dral ceilings, att. 2-car gar., 
bsmt., nice lot, neutral col- 
ors, low taxes, in great con- 
dition, $214,900. (847) 
336-4576. 




GURNEE/OPEN HOUSE 12 

noon - 4pm., Sundays. Bri- 
dlewood 2-story home, built 
in 1993, vaulted ceilings, 
many upgrades. 4-bd. 2-1/2 
ba., by owner, no realtors 
please. $249,900. Leave 
message on answering 
maching for private show- 
ing. 18121 Banbury Dr., Gur- 
nee. (847) 855-1013. 




NEED 
RESULTS 





Buying? 



• A 




Attention Dog Owners! 



. 



LOVE YOUR DOG, BUT NOT THE I 

CRUNCHED FOR TIME? 

f LET US SCOOP & REMOVE 




Trading? 




THE WASTE FOR YOU! 
Jo messy/smelly garbage cans & 

• Enjoy more free time 
• Entertain in your yard agaii 

SER VICE P ROVIDED: 
• Once a week • All weather/All 

• Reasonable Rates 






Lakeland 

Newspapers 

to place your 

ad 

today! 

(847) 
223-8161 

Fax: 

(847) 

223-2691 



LAKE VILLA IF YOU LIKE 

large open floor plan, with 
every upgrade, this is it. Vo- 
lume ceilings throughout, 3- 
bd., 2-ba. ranch, $289,000. 

(847)561-4954. 

IF YOU'RE MOVING 
OR JUST NEED MORE 

SPACE 

Call A.J. Self Storage, 

Round Lake, 

For all your storage needs. 

Reasonable rates. 

Clean, safe, secure. 

(847) 331-1778. 
ILLINOIS CHAIN O'LAKES 

Lakefront large 2-story, 3- . 
bd., 2-ba., bsmt., 2-1/2 car 
gar., separate fenced lot 
w/2300sq.ft. building, 

w/power & gas, pier, many 
extras, $460,000. (847) 
395-1439. 

INGLESIDE FOR SALE BY 
OWNER Raised ranch, laker- 
Ights, almost new, 3-bdrm., 
2-ba., fin. familyroom, 2-1/2 
car gar., large backyard, ad- 
jacent to Gavin School prop- 
erty, C/A, blacktop driveway, 
freshly painted, new carpet- 
ing, refrigerator, stove, dish- 
washer, washer/dryer, no re- 
altors. $159,900. (847) 
587-7008. 

INGLESIDE F.S.B.O. 4-bd., 
2-ba. -newly remodeled, 1- 
acre, fully landscaped 
w/trees, waterfall and pond. 
2-studio apts. for extra in- 
come. Waterfront, lakerights 
& more. Reduced 

$275,000. (847) 973-1838 

alter 6pm. 

INGLESIDE F.S.B.O., 

2400SQ.FT. ranch on 1 
acre. 4-bd., 3-1/2 ba., all 
season porch, 18x36 rec- 
room, formal diningroom, 
18x36 inground pool, 

$279,900. (847) 587-6635. 



LAUDERDALE LAKES-ELK- 
HORN plus boat slip and 
beautiful 4-bdrm. home in 
Baywood Estates. 3-car 
gar., screen porch, great 
'views, etc., etc. $229,900. 
(262)742-3639. 

LINDENHURST PERFECT 
RAISED RANCH. 10 MIN. 
TO MALLS, TOLLWAY, 45 
MIN. TO O'HARE, 4-br., 2.5 

ba., 2.5 att. gar., fin. bsmt. 
$219,900. Best taxes in 
Lake County. F.S.B.O. 

(847) 265-9982. 

LINDENHURST F.S.B.O. 
4YRS. new. 4-bd., 2-1/2 
ba., 2-story w/full extended, 
partially finished basement. 
2-car att. gar., on cul-de- 
sac. Professionally land- 
scaped. Extended family- 
room, off of eat-In kitchen. 
Asking S224K. (847) 

265-5425. 

MOTIVATED SALE/RE- 

DUCED ROOMY R.L.B., 4- 

bd. raised ranch, more 
room, partially finished full 
bsmt./possible in-law, new 
furnace, A/C, humidifier. 
Link fence back yd./side 
dog run, room for any size 

gar. (847) 546-3425. 

MUNDELEIN 4-BD., 2-BA., 

raised ranch, walking dis- 
tance to schools, churches, 
parks, shopping, train, Mu- 
ndeleln Days. $188,600. 

(847) 566-8013. 

* • 

MUNELEIN 3-BD. RANCH, 

full bsmt., well maintained 
and updated, $194,900. 
By appt. (847)566-1230. 



TEN ACRES 3 to 4 bed- 
room house, Ig. barn and 
Pole barn, 2-car gar. with at- 
tached shed. 15 minutes to 
I -94. Kenosha County, 
Brighton Township. 

$339,900. (262) 878-1625. 



TWO SEPARATE BUILD- 
INGS 1 acre property. 4-bd., 
4-ba., 3700sq.ft„ 3-car gar. 
Tavern across to property 
sits 85-100 people. Full 
kitchen open all year. long. 
Powers Lake, Wise. 
$385,000 negotiable. Imme- 
diate possession. (773) 
914-2525. 

WADSWORTH. 1 ACRE, 3 

bedroom ranch, 2.5 bath, 
dining room, and den/office. 
New kitchen, family room, 
all season room., finished 
basement, 2.5 car garage (> 
■fireplace, a/c, and morel*- 

847-623-4113, $325,000. 

WATERFRONT PROPERTY 
TOTALLY renovated 

3600sq.ft. lakefront home. 3- 
bdrm., 2-1/2 ba., includes 
finished walk-out bsmt., all 
new electric, new heating & 
plumbing, Whirlpool mas- 
terbdrm., & laundry facilities 
on second floor. New C/A. A 
must see, with a beautiful 
scenic view. (847) 

967-6175. 

WAUKEGAN 2-BD., 1-BA., 

2-car gar., completely remo- 
deled, full basement, situat- 
ed on a fenced corner lot. 
$134,900. James Ander- 
son, CBS Realtors, (847) 

374-9377. 



OPEN HOUSE 
Sat. 5/1 1,1 -5pm. 
Island Lake, 1036 Revere 
Ln. Attractive and well 
maintained 3-br. ranch, 
full bsmt w/finlshed rec 
room, 2-car gar., large kitch- 
en, beautifully landscaped 
lot with deck and patio. 
FSBO $185,000. 

(847) 526-9409. 

PALATINE FOR SALE BY 
OWNER 21 5K. Brick ranch. 
3-bd., with wood lloors, 1.5 
ba., full bath includes lime- 
stone floor and shower, 
granite countertop, heated 
mirror and whirlpool tub. 
Large kitchen with oak cabi- 
nets, wood beadboard and 
ceramic floor and back- 
splash. Ceiling fans in kitch- 
en and bedrooms. Custom 
wood blinds throughout. 
C/A, 2.5 car detached gar. 
plus shed. Large deck and 
stockade fence for privacy. 
All appliances stay. Move-in 
condition, must see. 1025 
Lilac Dr. Call for appt. (847) 

359-6884. 



ZION 2103 RAVINE Near 
Beulah Park. Newly remo- 
deled 2-bd., 1-ba., w/loft ex- 
pansion, frpl., bsmt., wash- 
er/dryer, $112,900. (847) 
361-1733. 




Homes For Rent 



MCHENRY HOLIDAY HILLS 
3-BD., 1-ba., 1-1/2 car gar.. 
1st., last, security, referenc- 
es and credit check, 
$1,050/mo. (815) 

344-4022. 



HOMES & APTS. FOR 
RENT $475/mo. & up, plus 
security. 1/2 hour North of 
Gurnee in Racine, Wise. 
•Credit check. 'No Section 8 
or Government vouchers. 
•Pets O.K. 'Appliances in- 
cluded. 'Walking distance to 
Lake Michigan. (847) 333- 
0713. 



INGLESIDE 3-BD., 2-BA., 2- 
car gar., $1,225/mo. + sec. 
No pets. Agent owned. 

(847) 367-8686, ext. 208. 



INGLESIDE NEWER 

RAISED ranch. 3-bd., 2-ba., 
fenced in yard, 2 blocks 
from" the Chain. Asking 
$154,800. Will consider all 

Otters. (847) 587-9208. 



PARK CITY COMPLETELY 

remodeled kitchen, 3-bd., 2- 
ba., 2-car gar., new fire- 
place, new windows in 
bsmt.. all new appliances. 
36ft. heated pool, 3 hot tub. 
2-tiered deck, plus thou- 
sands spent in landscaping. 
For Sale by Owner, no real- 
tors please. $189,900. 
Looking to close in June. 

(847) 217-7022. 



ISLAND LAKE MINT condi- 
tion 2-bd., 2-ba. townhome. 
C/A, laundry, att. gar. Avail- 
able now. $975/mo. (847) 
609-5503. 



•* 



LINDENHURST 3-BD., 2-car 
heated gar., agent owned. 
$1,200/mo. + sec. (847) 
367-8686, ext. 208. 



INGLESIDE SPACIOUS 

RANCH. View of beautiful 
sunset with private lake and 
park. 4-bd., 2-ba., 2-car att. 
gar., walk out bsmt., large 
corner lot, many extras. 
34595 N. Park Ave. 
$200,000. Appt. only (847) 

516-5834. 



LAKE MILTMORE VIEW 
AND ACCESS, LINDEN- 
HURST SCHOOLS, 2-story, 
4-bd., 2-ba., wood floors, 
huge fin. english bsmt., 2- 
story 2.5 car att. gar., on 1/3 
wooded lot. F.S.B.O. 
S234K. (847) 356-6685. 



SADDLEWOD IN WAUCON- 
DAI JUST FAR. ENOUGH 
AWAYI And yet minutes to 
shopping, highways and 
schools. This 7yr. new 2- 
story home features 4-bed- 
rooms, 2.1 baths, full Eng- 
lish basement. An office, 
and a sunroom + the laun- 
dryroom all in the first floor. 
The master suite offers a 
large soaking tub, separate 
shower and double vanity 
sink. The basement awaits 
your finishing touches with a 
wall of windows to bring in 
all natural lighting. 2-fire- 
places, 3-car gar. and pro- 
fessionally landscaped yard 
provide the finishing touch- 
es! Price Reduced. Call 
Marge, J. S. JAMES REAL- 
TORS (630) 582-1777. 



LIBERTYVILLE 2-BD. UNIT 

in 2 flat, completely remo- 
deled, $995/mo. Avail, now. 

(847) 609-5503. 



LINDENHURST CUTE 2- 
BD.,*1-ba„ 2-car gar., avail- 
able June 1st. $1,100/mo. 

(847) 533-8529. 



TWIN LAKES, WISC. 
NEWER 3 BDRM. home, 2 
full baths, basement. 2-car 
garage, C/A, deck, 5 ap- 
pliances. $1,150. 262-279- 
5930. 



LAKE VILLA DERING 
WOODS New 2 story, 4-bd., 
master suite with Jacuzzi, 
gourmet kitchen, 2nd floor 
laundry, 2-1/2 ba., tray ceil- 
ings, oak trim, fireplace, 
walk-out bsmt., front porch, 
2-car gar., 1 acre wooded, 

$319,000. (847) 528-0552. 



SILVER LAKE, WISC, 444 
N. Riverside, 4-bd., 2-ba., 

1900sq.ft., $124,900. (262) 
930-8505. 



ROUND LAKE PARK Newly 
bit. 4-bd. home, 2-ba., 
washer/dryer, deck, gar., 
near train & lake. (847) 

256-4118. 



LAKEFRONT HOME W/EX- 
TRA lot on Diamond 
Lake/West Shore Park. 4- 
bd., 2-1/2 ba., 2-1/2 car gar. 
Newly remodeled kitchen, 
rooms overlooking lake. 

$549,000. (847) 566-6234. 



SUBMIT YOUR LAKELAND 

CLASSIFIED ADS ON THE 

INTERNET! 

Visit http://www.lpnews.com/ 
to place your ads conven- 
iently. Ads appear on the In- 
ternet, in all Lakeland Pa- 
pers... The Great Lakes Bul- 
letin and The Market Journal 
for only $23.00 for 4 lines 
(approximately 16 words), 
then only .60c for each addi- 
tional line. 



VOLO QUIET NEIGHBOR- 
HOOD. Cozy 1-bd. home lor 
rent, 2-car gar., S950/mo. + 
security. No pets. No Sec- 
tion 8. (815) 344-5008. 



WADSWORTH HOUSE 

COUNTRY living, 1-1/2 acre, 

3-bd., 1-1/2 ba., 2-car gar., 

S1,400/mo. (847) 
244-7971 . 



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• • 



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Homes For Rent 




Condos 
Townhomes 



WHY ARE YOU RENTING? 

Mortgage payments will be 
less than your rent pay- 
ment. Everybody gets a 
home. No down payment 
home loans available. No 

costs consultation. 999 

Plaza Dr., SCH, ILL. Call 

Tom Ischkum. 847-605- 
8287. 




Condos 
Townhomes 



ANTIOCH GOLF COURSE 

Wooded end unit town- 
home on green and pond. 
Immaculate! 2-bd., loft, 1- 
1/2 ba.. daylight bsmt., ele- 
vated deck, private porch, 
vaulted master, many up- 
grades. 5155,900. OPEN 
HOUSE Sat. 12-5pm. 
http://bolins1 .tripod.com 

_ ' 

CHAIN O'LAKES WATER- 
FRONT TOWNHOME COM- 
MUNITY. 2-bd., 2-1/2 ba., 
fireplace, garage, all ap- 
pliances, many upgrades, 

S1 32,500. (847) 587-7891. 

See: forsalebyowner.com 
ID/M0009143. 

FOX LAKE ACCESS to 

Chain. Waterfront condo. 2- 
bd., 1-ba., all appls., wash- 
er/dryer, eat-in kitchen, large 
balcony w/ alt. storage 
room. Clubhouse w/swim- 
ming pool, marina, pvt. 
beach, tennis court & securi- 
ty. $86,000. (847) 

417-1831. 

FOX LAKE ACCESS TO 
CHAIN. Completely remo- 
deled 2-bdrm., 1-ba. New 
kitchen, bathroom, wash- 
er/dryer, dishwasher. Beauti- 
ful view. Swimming pool, 
marina, private beach and 
security. $84,500. (847) 587- 
5301 . 

. - a ' 

GRAYSLAKE TOWNHOME 
2-BD., 1-1/2 ba., whirlpool, 
vaulted ceilings, loft, 2-car 
gar., exc. School District, 

$167,000. (847) 548-3696. 

GURNEE CONDO FOR 
SALE 1-bd., 1-ba., wash- 
er/dryer In unit, heated gar., 
huge balcony. Brand new 

light hardwood floors, new 
paint, updated kitchen cabi- 
nets. Pool, tennis, golf, se- 
curity. 590,000. (847) 
549-9813. 

GURNEE F.S.B.O. 2-BD., 1- 

ba., approx. ' 1, lOOsq.ft., Ig. 
2-car gar. Lots of closet, 

5127,000. (847)855-4684. 

TOWNHOME FOR SALE 
Lake Bluff, Hamptons E 2- 
story, 3-bd., 2-1/2 ba., Ig. 
windows, cathedral ceiling in 
livingroom and master bed- 
room, master bath has Ig. 
tub, 3-huge walk-in closets, 
ceramic tile in kitchen, break- 
last room, laundry, baths 
and foyer, 2-car gar., patio 
and flower garden, 

5229,000. (847) 498-7796, 
(847)615-8557. 



HARBOR PARK-KENOSHA. 
NEW luxury 2 bd. condo in 
new lakefront community 
surrounded by parks, walk- 
ing/bike paths and harbor. 
Top floor with balcony. 
Breathtaking views of Lake 
Michigan. 2-full baths, whirl- 
pool, double marble vanity, 
walk-in closets, washer/dry- 
er. Underground garage. 
Short walk to Metra Station. 
S1,200/mo. + utilities, sec. 
dep. & ref. No pets. (847) 
356-2000, ext. 102. 

ISLAND LAKE WATER- 
FRONT TOWNHOME. 2- 

bdr., 2-ba., 1-car gar., 
S125K, or $1,200/mo. rent. 

(847)875-8819. 
LIBERTYVILLE CONDO 

F.S.B.O., 2-bd., 2-ba., all 
appliances including wash- 
er/dryer. Asking $132,900. 

(847)319-1206. 



MUST SEE 1-BD, condo in 
Vacation Village, newly re- 
modeled, conveniently locat- 
ed to parking, Chain ac- 
cess, furnished optional, 
$54,500. Call for appt. (847) 
587-3244. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 2- 
bd., 1-1/2 ba., 1-car att. 
gar., newer furnace & 
appls. Asking S73.000. 

(847) 740-4030. 

VERNON HILLS NEWER 
TOWNHOME FOR RENT, 4- 
bd., 3-1/2 ba., familyroom, 
garage,- 2300sq.ft. Steven- 
son High School. Available 

immediately. $2,500/mo. 
Long term OK. Purchase 
option. Broker" (847) 477- 
8311. 




Mobile Homes' 



1990 SKYLINE MOBILE 
HOME 16'x70'. 2-bd., 2-ba., 
C/A, Ig. shed, newer carpet, 
front kitchen, appliances in- 
cluded, on a shaded lot, 
across from Browns Lake in 
Burlington, Wise. 

$21,000/best. * (262) 

534-2067. 

BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY SET- 
TING, 3-bd„ 2-ba. manufac- 
tured home in Wheatland Es- 
tates, Lot 86, corner lot. 
Very spacious, recent im- 
provements. MUST SEEI 

$44,900. (262) 537-2314. 
DOUBLE WIDE 3-BDS., 3- 

full bas., master walk-in clos- 
et, and hot tub, fireplace, 
1900sq.ft., S48,000/best. 
(262) 537-3546. 

DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE 

HOME, remodeled, 3-bd., 2- 
full ba., $30,000. (847) 
740-9476. 

KENOSHA, WISC. LARGE 

2-bd. Mobile Home for rent, 
in small quiet park, 

$595/mo. rent, includes lot 

fee. (262)818-6221. 



Laundry Facilities 



Library 



Community Room w/ Fireplace 

Must see to appreciate 




Oakridge Village Apartments 

299 Oakridge Ct., Antioch 

Offering affordable housing for 
qualified applicants. 

^Wheelchair accessible, 1 bedroom. 
Managed by Meridian Group, Inc. 



'»■ V - 




Mobile Homes 






Call today 



'800) 526-0844 T 



DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE 
HOME 3-bd., den, eat-In 
kitchen, 2-ba., Jacuzzi ' in 
masterbath, gas frpl., formal 
dlnlngroom, all appl., cov- 
ered carport, deck & shed, 

$47,500. 9002 Sheridan 
Rd., Kenosha, Wise, Lot 
#202 

(847) 223-7066. 



KENOSHA, WISC. LARGE 

2-bd., like new cond., great 

location, small quiet park, 
S19.900/best. (262) 

818-6221. 

ROLLO HOME IN RETIRE- 
MENT PARK behind Sears, 
new furnace and large shed, 

$1 8,000. (262)658-4261. 

ROUND LAKE MOBILE 
HOME FOR SALE, 2-bd., 1- 
ba., $11,000. , (847) 

740-9476. 

■ 

SKYLARK 1995 PARK 

MODEL, waterfront location 
on Grass Lake in Antioch. 1- 
bd. completely furnished, 
A/C, heat, waterfront 
screened deck 10'x16', 3 
season enclosed room. 

S29.900. (815) 578-9824 
after 4pm, (847) 806-1401 
days. 

• 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

LOCATED IN AN OVER 55 

COMMUNITY 

'1 -bedroom, 1-bath 

$48,900. 

•1 -bedroom. 1-1/2 bath 

$34,900. 

*2- bedroom, 1-bath 

Start @ $49,900. 

•2-bedroom, 1 -3/4 bath, 

Start @ $46,000. 

*2-bedroom, 2-bath 

Start @ $36,500. 

•3-bedroom, 2-bath, 

$47,900. 

Some include carports, 

sheds, screen room, 

decks, garages. 

. (847) 526-5000 

leave message. 

WHEATLAND, WISC. 1978 
Marshfield 14x80, 3BR/2BA 
all appl. Was $15,000, 

S10.000/FIRM. (847) 

395-0659. 



Apartments 
For Rent 



Beautiful, Bright, Spacious, Affordable 

Senior Housing 

for active adults 62 or better 

Brand New 1 & 2 BEDROOM APTS. 
Access Controlled Elevator Building 

Amenities include: 





FOX LAKE WATERFRONT 

CLOSE to train station, very 
good view, 1bd. & 2-bd., 
from $550-$850/mo. Call 
Moon (847) 223-0993. 

FOX LAKE. STUDIO. Vaca- 
tion Village. $520/mo. 
KARE Management. 847- 
367-0890. 

KENOSHA, Wl. HISTORIC 
LANDMARK BUIILDING, 3- 
bd., hardwood floors, 9ft. 
ceilings, crown moldings, 
2,000sq.ft., security locked, 
elevator, includes heat, wa- 
ter, trash removal, 
S1 ,200/mo. (262) 

657-7598. 



CLASSIFIEDS 



May 10, 2002 






KENOSHA, WISC. LARGE 
2-bd., yard, att. gar., ap- 
pliances, great location, 
S995/mo., sec. dep. re- 
quired. (262) 818-6221. 




Apartments 
For Rent 



LIBERTYVILLE 1-BD., 1- 

BA., completely, remodeled. 
Elevator building, down- 
town. S895/mo. .+ sec. NO 
PETS. Avail. June 1st. (847) 
895-7729. 

_ 

N.E. WAUKEGAN BEAUTI- 
FUL 1-BR apt., totally remo- 
deled and furnished, heat in- 
cluded, $655/mo + sec dep, 
1yr lease. (847) 244-0840. 



WAUCONDA 1-BD. APT., 
NEWLY DECORATED, heat 

& hot water Included, 
S635/mo. Lease, security 
dep., ref. No pets. Avail- 
able immediately. (847) 
433-0891. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
WALK TO EVERYTHING 

. New beautiful 2-bd., 2-ba., 

w/att. 1 -car heated gar. 

$925/mo. + sec. No pets. 

Available June 1st. 

(847) 526-0420, eves. 

(847) 526-5000 days, 

leave message. 



Apt./I Iomes 
To Share 




LINDENHURST HOUSE TO 
SHARE w/female or single 
mom, private livingroom, Ig. 
bdrm., private bath, sepa- 
rate entrance, on 7 acres, 

$500/mo. (847) 265-0773. 



ROUND LAKE OWNER of 
new 3-bd., 2-1/2 ba. fur- 
nished townhome in lovely 
wooded area, looking to 
share (gentleman pre- 
ferred). Close to Metra. 
S500/mo. includes utilities. 
Available immediately. (847) 
740-8786. 




Rooms For Rent 



GAGES LAKE ROOM FOR 
RENT, in private house, full 
house privileges, $125/wk.+ 
sec. dep., includes utilities. 

(847)997-6817. • 



■ 



GRAYSLAKE . i 

RosldeAtThoOld 
Barron Houso 

Furnished Rooms 
Available to responsible, 
Non-Smokers/Drinkers. 



$110-$150/wk. + $300 
Assurance Deposit. 

■ 

Rent Includes DSS TV, 

Utilities and kitchen 

Privileges. Laundry facilities 

& exercise room available. 

(847)223-4113 
. (847)561-7622. 



LAKE VILLA LARGE FUR- 
NISHED ROOM FOR RENT 
I'd responsible non-smoker. 
Includes ' utilities, cable, 
kitchen & laundry. Off of Rt. 
59 & 132. $400/mo M $150 
dep. (847) 769-8262, (888) 
821-1078. 



'I 



Business Property 
For Sale 



® 






ROOMS FOR RENT 
S100/wk. plus security. (847) 

356-3980, (847) 356-9707. 

Crooked Lake Resort. ■ 



LAKEVIEW TERRACE 

APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA, Large 1 & 2 bedrooms, 
S715-$840/month. Heat, wa- 
ter, air included. (847) 

356-5474. 



. 



BEAUTY SHOP COM- 
PLETE 4 station beauty 
shop. Lost lease, must 



move out 
$3,700/best. 
344-4022. 



of 



garage. 
(815) 



Off the Beaten Path by ehc Hodecker 

OK! OK! ... You wanna know the real 
reason I don't want to go to the party? 



I never learned the chicken dance. 



EXTREMELY LUCRATIVE 
WIRELESS PHONE & 
PAGER SALES & SERVICE 

CO. Excellent location in 
Northwest Suburbs. 

$249,000. SERIOUS INQUI- 
RIES ONLY. Cell (630) 204- 
4000. 




Business Property 
' For Rent 



ANTIOCH 1.200SQ.FT. 

BUSINESS area for rent, 
asking S600/mo'„ on Lake 

Ave. (773) 792-9582. 




ROUND LAK 
2,700 - 5,400 Sq. Ft. 

CommVlnd/Warehouse 

w/overhead door and office. 

Ask for Tom or Chris 

(847) 740-7000 

' Crlchton Rentals 



FOX LAKE OFFICE SPACE 
2 units, 600sq.ft., plus, each 
S550/mo. per unit, discount 
on both. Includes heat, elec- 
tric. By train station. (847) 

456-7350. . 

Lake In The Hills. Industri- 
al property for lease. Pyoatt 
& Rakow Roads. 2000 Sq. 
Ft.. 450ft. of office, 12lt. 
drive in door, 14ft. clear. 
847-381-1234 



RICHMOND 

Bam for your 
storage or hobby 

S298.00 A MONTH 

Land Management- 
(815) 678-4334 




V 



\\ 



♦ Fountain Head ♦ 
Corporate Center 

Rt. 12 Superior 5500 s.f. - 

$2340/mo. GROSS! For 

Industry or Business, 500 s.f. 

a/c ofc., 480 volt/3 i'liasc, 

i dock, 2 OH doors, 18' .ceil- 

; ings in a quality landscaped 

setting. Additional 2750 s.f. 

%f adjacent available! 

:ji ij; ;|; :ji ij; ;j; 

2750 s.f.- $1092/mo. ,250 

s.f. ofc, 208 volt/3 Phase, 

OH door, dock, 18' ceiling. 

■ " ■ * 

»!• ... ... ... -u •}• 

. * *•>' '•» **s ••* *•» 

8096s.r.\v/7l6s.f,of 

Office plus Mezzanine with 

Private Depressed Dock 

$3298.00/mo. 

LAND MANAGEMENT 

(815) 678-4771 



WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

1100sq.ft. warehouse 

with large overhead door . 

& restroom. Includes sewer 

and water. 

Available Immediately 

S745/mo. + sec. 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message. 




Investment Property 



TWO ROOMS. One fur- 
nished, $350; 1 unfur- 
nished, $300. Recently re- 
modeled home, share utili- 
ties. (847)731-0471. 



FOX LAKE, BEAUTIFUL 5 

flat, panoramic view of lake, 
double deck patio, base- 
ment, $365,000. (847) 
498-1418. 



MP 








FOX LAKE 1-bd., 2nd floor, 
$600/mo. + utilities. No 
pets. (847) 546-4107. 




Apartments 
For Kent 



Apartments 
For Kent 





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a". I*. •«". f.r- 






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IV *l 



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Ask about our move 
in special 

• Brand New • 

• Walk in Closets 

• Cable Ready • 

• Central Air • 



IN WAUCONDA 
All 2 Bedroom lty2 Baths 

* ■ 

Ceramic Tile in Kitchen & Baths 
Gas Forced Air Heat 
Patio with Privacy Fence 



All Appliances + Full size Washer/Dryer in each unit 



■- 



Vacant Lots 
Acreage 




Real Estate 
Wanted 



ANTIOCH 1.1 ACRE corner 
lot in Regency subdivision. 
Septic plan approved for 4- 
bd. house, septic and 
house plans included. 

S67.500. Eves. (847) 
395-6195, days (847) 938- 
3920. 



FIVE PLUS ACRE BUILD- 
ING SITE, rural setting, 

(847)251-2639. 




NEW COMPANY IN AREA 
needs executive homes to 
lease with option to ;i pur- 
chase. (773) 637-7531. 



FOR SALE 80 Acres, 
Kenosha County, 21 acres 
Prime Development property, 
wooded with pond. Qualified 
buyers call 262-877-8309 - 
or E-mail 
markwegner@msn.com 

RINGWOOD (NEXT TO MC- 
HENRY) 2.5 BEAUTIFUL 

ACRES! Mature oak trees; 
Quiet, secluded subdivision 
surrounded by conservation 
land; Must seel Won't last 
at S98.400. Call Noelle at 

847-650-1537. 



SSSSSSSSSSSSS5SSSSSSSS 

WE BUY HOMES! 

ANY AREA!! 

ANY CONDITIONI! 

ANY PRICE!! 

CASH!! 
FAST CLOSE!! 
(847)838-3376. 

SSSS5SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS 




Recreational 
Vehicles 



•'/i.. 



WILDERNESS 40 ACRES 
Woodrutf. Minocqua, Wise, 
area. Wooded w/stream & 
pond, S89.000. (715) 
366-8764. 



DODGE 
ROYAL 




Resort/Vacation 
Rentals 



PANAMA CITY BEACH 
Sandpiper Beacon Resort: 
From $39 (1-2p. arrive 
Sun/Mon - FREE night. Re- 
strictions). Pools, river ride, 
suites, bar, Jacuzzi, parasail- 
ing. . 800-488-8828. 
www.sandplperbeacon.com ' 



1974 SPORTSMAN 
TURTLE TOP 
CAMPER VAN. 360-2V mo- 
tor, automatic. California 
van,, hew brakes, exhaust & 
much more. Doesn't require 
any emission testing. Needs 
some engine, work. Must 
see! $1,500 or best offer. 
Call after 4:30pm 

9;00pm. Chuck Sr. 
455-5938 



until 
(815) 







Out Of 

Area Property 



JAYCO 1997 EAGLE 

CLASS C MOTORHOME. 

exc. cond., 14,000 mi., 
sleeps 6, generator, full 

bath, kitchen micro., 
stove, fridge, must sell, 

$35,000. (815)675-6177. 




Snowmobiles/ 
ATV's 




COLORADO CREEK 

FRONT-40 acres-S36,900. 
Enjoy rolling fields overlook- 
ing year round creek with 
spectacular Rocky Mountain 
views. 300 days of 
sunshine. Just 1 hour Color- 
ado Springs. Only one avail- 
able. Excellent financing. 
Call RCR now 1-877-676- 

6367. 

HARDY, ARKANSAS: AS- 
SUME payments S99.96 / 
month on 5 Ozark Mt. 
Wooded Acres, Spring 
River Access, Excellent 
Hunting / Fishing. Tall 
Trees. 1-888-830-6384. 

LAKE BARGAIN 3+ ACRES 
- $24,900' WITH BOAT 
SLIP. Beautifully wooded, 
spectacular views, deeded 
access to 35,000 acre re- 
creational mountain lake in 
Tennessee - near 18 hole 
golf course. Paved roads, 
utilities, perked. Excellent fi- 
nancing. Call now 1-800- 

704-3154 ext. 279: 






POLARIS 1999 SCRAM- 
BLER 500cc 4x4. adult rid- 
den, very, very low hrs., 
push button 2 wheel to 
4WD, rear rack, K & N air filt- 
er, bright red, performance 
muffler, garage kept. Invest- 
ed S7.500, all receipts, 
S4.000/firm. Tom (847) 322- 

6666. 



SKIDOO MX380 2002, 
brand new, no miles, with 
cover, extra belt & auto re- 
verse, $2,900/best. (708) 
902-5019. 




Boal/Motors/Etc. 



. .. 



% 






■ 
■- .■ 

■ : 






I 
1 




NEW LOG CABIN on 3 

acres with free boat slip & 
private lake access. Tennes- 
see mountains. Near 18 
hole golf course. $69,900. 
Terms call 1-800-704-3154 
x234. 




cr»o«tu->n 



i.-.-».-.»*i i-. r.-w, .s ,-.■. 



* . > * a ■ ■ * 



... :mumv i iimitMmm x: 



TWENTY ACRE REPOS- 
SESSIONS Take over 
S89.92 payment. SAVE 
$1,0001 Only 30 miles East 
of bustling El Paso, Texas. 
Roads surveyed, money 
back guarantee. 1-800-843- 
7637. 
www.sunsetranches.com 

• 



19' SAN JUAN TYPE DOR- 
SET CABIN BOAT. Sleeps 

2-3. 2 year old interior, AM/ 
FM Cassette Stereo, sink & 
more. 65HP Johnson motor. 
Asking S3.000/best offer for 
complete package. . Call 
Chuck Sr. after 4:30-9:00pm. 

(815)455-5938 

— ■ 

MARLIN AQUARIUS OUT- 
BOARD, 1973, 17ft., with 
1982 Evinrude 150hp., 6- 
cyl., electric start motor. 
1973 17ft. SINGLE AXLE 
SPARTAN TRAILER includ- 
ed, S1.550. Good ski boat. 

(847) 634-2323. 

BAYLINER 1988 21 FT, 
GOOD CONDITION, new 
top, new upholstery, 
$5,000/best (847) 

623-9998. 

CUSTOM 

BOAT LETTERING. 

(847) 587-7256. 



■ 









'ZT- ... 



1 T 



■ 



rr— -. 



May 10, 2002 



CLASSIFIEDS 






VSW+*** 









• 



• r"% #■% jr* 1 

Lakeland Newspapers/ dZO 




•n 






I - 









■ 







: 







' 



-• 









i 



< 








■ . , ■ 
Boat/Motors/Etc. 




Boat/Motors/Elc. 




Cars for Sale 




Cars for Sale 







Vans 




Trucks/Trailers 




Handyman 



1993 FOUR WINNS 235 
SUNDOWNER, '5.7 I/O, 
cuddy cabin, under 300 
hours, excellent condition, 
S20,500/best. Includes all 
Lake Michigan fishing equip- 
ment. (847) 872-3580. 

1996 REGAL 222SC 

CUDDY 5.7 Merc, full, can- • 
yas, fully loaded, Shorelan- 
der trailer, good cond., low 

hrs., 316,900.- (847) 

973-0832. 

ALUMICRAFT 14FT., 15HP. 

motor, w/trailer, 

S1,500/best. 16ft. Hobby 
Cat Sail Boat w/trailer, 
S800/best. 30ft. R.V. w/gen- 
erator, $1,000/best. Wood- 
en gun cabinet, S50/best. 
Or trade. (262)757-0413. 

ATLAS PIER, 10 sections, , 
complete, . good condition, 
some brand new, $2,000. 

(847) 973-9793! 






BOAT LIFT Aluminum 
3,5001b. capacity, Shore- 
Master, electric motor, new 
canopy, $2,800. BASS 
BOAT 1987 17ft. Cajun, 
dual console, 150hp Black 
Max XR4, $5,200. (847) 
395-8655 after 4:30pm. 

BOAT LIFTS NEW, full war- 
ranty, electric, aluminum. 
3,0001b., $2,995; 4,5001b., 
$3,495; 6,0001b., $3,995; 
9,0001b., $4,695; 12,0001b., 
$5,495. Call for details. 
(847)973-9420. 

SAILBOAT 27FT. " SEA 
QUEST ", $2,500 69 Con- 
test- 27 includes sails, ra- 
dio, pfd, auxiliary equip- 
ment 10 hp Mercury out- 
board. 847-863-7993. 

FOUR WINNS 1993 19FT., 
190LE, open bow, I/O SL 
engine, mint condition, trail- 
er, numerous accessories in- 
cluded. (847) 858-3006. 



ELECTRIC HARBOR 

All New Aluminum 

Shore Stations 

CANTILEVER 

1 .OOOIbs. - $850 

i,500lbs. - $995; ' 

2,500lbs. -$1,830; 

3,500lbs. - S2.220. 

VERTICALS 

2,000lbs. -$i;495; 

3,000lbs. - $2,260; 

. 4,000lbs. - $2,695; 

ALL ELECTRIC 

■ 5,000lbs. - S3.995. 

USED STEEL 

2,000lbs. - $795; 

3,000lbs. -S1.495up; 

6,000lbs. - S2.995 up. 

Also custom built lifts 

8.000 to 20,000, call for 

quote. Now carrying 

complete line of Aluminum 

Pier Sections & Roll-A-Dock 

starting at S39.95/foot. 

^ny station sold in April 

Free delivery $1 00. 

. Free assembly $150. 
Free delivery to your loca- 
tion wet or dry. (Up to 
5,000lbs). (Quotes for cus- 
tom 
installations) 
Call (847) 338-9369 
For appointment 
to see models. 

SALT WATER FISHING 
GEAR Penn Senators rods 
& reels, radio, down rigger & 
more. (847) 548-451 8. 

SWITZER 21 FT., BEAUTI- 
FUL shape, 225 motor. 
Must sell, baby on the way. 

$6,500. (847) 973-0634, 
(847)340-6177. 

SYLVAN 1992 ELIMINA- 
TOR 19 FT., 115hp. Evin- 
rude, low hrs., $6,200. 
(847) 543-0110. 

SYLVAN 1995 18FT. 
BOAT, trailer & 150hp Evin- 
rude motor, ace. & much 
more. $10,500/best. (630) 
561-0561. 



BUICK 1989 ESTATE WAG- 
ON, 8 passenger, 140K, 
exc. cond., $2,500. (847) 

623-5961 . 

CADILLAC 1994 CON- 

.COURS NORTH STAR, load- 

ed, runs/looks like new, well 

maintained. Must See. 

(847)336-3535. 

CHEAP BASIC TRANSPOR- 
TATION Ten . to choose 
from. Price S1.000 to 
$2,000. Call (847) 

361-4970 for details. 




Cars for Sale 



OUTBOARD MOTOR, 25HP 

N Evinrude, 1975 rebuilt 1999 

never used; very good 

cond., $575. (847) 

516-1495. 



1977 VOLKSWAGON CON- 
VERTIBLE BUG, fuel inject- 
ed, new electric, runs great, 

$6,500.(815)578-9824. 



Me Advantage Of These Home 
Sen/ice Providers Found In 




MARKET 




The 1st Week of Every Monti 



ASPHALT 
RESTORATION 

"ataman m tumns 

■SlUUBB KMBS a IIIUIIBOHT- 

847-438-8008 

www.asphaltstore.com 



Family Owned & 

Operated Since 

1958 



CARPET 

O 

R 907 Diamond Lake Rd. 

N Mundelein, IL 
E www.thecarpetcomer.Gom 



American Eagle 
Service Corp. 

Complete Plumbing Service 

SowerRodding/Televising & Locating 

All Work Guaranteed 

847-733-7223 



Brimmer 
Contracting 

"We Do It All" 

Licensed Bonded Insured 

847-872-1465 




ASHLEY 

FURNITUF 



824 Rollins Road 

Round Uke, IL 

60073 



Advantage 
Property Service 

A Landscape & Property 
Maintenance Corporation 

1 -865-596-LAWN 



You'ro always busy and 
cleaning Is a chore... 
Lot us tidy up for you! 

- ■ - • 

PRO-MAIDS 
847-514-6855 



Heating & Air 

Conditioning 
FREE ESTIMATES! 

847-526-9082 



c 



.^lon Elecfr/ 

v Industrial 

Commercial 

Residential 

847-304-2740 



Interstate 
Roofing 

Licensed and Fully 
Insured 

847-356-9017 




CHEVY 1971 IMPALA 4 
DOOR, TEXAS CARi A 
FEW EXTRAS, $2400 OR 
BEST. 847-489-8085 

CHEVY 1987 CORVETTE, 

red, 4-spd., $8,300. (847) 
587-0847 between 4pm- 
8pm. o 



NISSAN 1991 STANZA, 

fully loaded, runs good. 

1992 MAZDA MPV, 4WD, 7 

seats, very good condition, 
hwy. miles, $4,950. (847) 

546-2337. 

PONTIAC 1989 FIREBIRD 
Formula 350 Fast Fast, 

$4,494 847-587-3400. 

PONTIAC 1989 FIREBIRD, 
black, J-tops, Formula 350, 
newer engine, $3,000. (815) 
578-0899. - 

PONTIAC 1993 BONNE- 
VILLE SE, auto., A/C, PAN, 
P/D/L, cruise, power seat, 

exc. cond., $4,200. (847) 
587-1119. 

* + 

PONTIAC 1998 GRAND AM 

"A Diamond' , $6,493, 847- 
587-3400.am . 




CHEVY 1993 CAVALIER 4- 
cyl., auto., air blows cold. 
Moving, must sell. 

$1 ,900/best. (262) 

878-2639 after 3:30pm. 

CHEVY 1999 CAVALIER, 
red, A/C, CD player, sun- 
roof, power windows, power 
locks, keyless entry. 

$9,000/best. .(262) 862- 
9094. 

CHEVY SPLIT BUMPER 

CAMARO 1972, shell only, 
no motor, no trans., pri- 
mered, ready to paint, Ford 
9in. rear end, tubbed, 10 
point cage, 4 wheel disc, 
4in. cowl hood, $2,500/best. 

(847) 740-7679. 

CHRYSLER 1988 NEW 
YORKER, _new brakes, 
transmission, cruise, good 
shape, $3,200/best. (847) 
526-7055 after 4pm. 

1997 CHRYSLER SEBRING 

convertible, all power, ABS, 
am/fm cassette, CD, great 
condition, $8,000. 

(847)949-5622: 

CLASSIC CAPRICE 1987 
STATION WAGON, good 
running car, $2,100/best. 

(630)561-0561. . 

DODGE 1998 DAKOTA 
CUSTOM, 80,000 miles, 
asking $13,500. (847) 
395-5248. 



PONTIAC 2000 SUNFIRE 
GT, black, Sports Coupe, 
10,000 mi., sunroof, power 
everything, AM/FM CD play- 
er, new tires. Very clean 
$13,000/best. Must sell, 
moving out of country. 

(847) 540-0007. 

PORSCHE 914 1972, new 
paint, runs O.K., needs 
some work, $1,850/best. 

(847)973-9087. 

AUTO AUCTION 
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 

SALVATION ARMY 
Every Saturday, 9am. 
Over 150 cars, boats, camp- 
ers & motorcycles to bo 
sold weekly 
to the highest bidder 
at no reserve. 
Opening bid $100. 
(847)662-0100 



DODGE 1989 RAM CON- 
VERSION VAN, exc. runner! 
passes emissions, has new 

exhaust system, brakes, 
back rotors, starter, alterna- 
tor, battery, $1 ,750/best. 

(847)528-1064. 

DODGE 1994 CARAVAN 
SE, V6, tinted glass, keyless 
entry, dark green, very 
good cond. $3,500/best. 

(847) 275-0660. 

FORD 1990 WORK VAN, 6- 
cyl., w/ladder racks, 80,000 
original miles, $1,650. (847) 

395-8662. 

FORD 1998 WINDSTAR, 
great buy, S7.488 847-587- 
3400 

GRAND CARAVAN 1990, all 
power, needs no work, new 
brakes and tires, 92K, good 
cond., passed emissions, 
$3,500.(847)548-2561. 

PLYMOUTH 1999 GRAND 
VOYAGER, exc. cond., 
11,000 mi., all power, 

$14,000/best. (815) 578- 
0899. 



FORD 1998 F150 Club Cab 
XLT #1595. extra clean; 
11.988 847-587-3400. 

FORD 1999 RANGER, 
Super Buy. Save, 847-587- 
3400. 



GMC 2000 3500 4x4 
DUMPTRUCK, A/C. AM/FM, 

elec. trailer, brakes, under 
15.000 mi., 1yr. left on war- 
ranty. Never used for plow- 
ing, $25.500/best. (262) 
862-9390 eves. 

INTERNATIONAL SCOUT II 
1974. everything original, 
project vehicle, does run, 

$400/best. (847) 858-3366, 
5-9. 



LOOKING FOR ODD JOBS 

Carpentry 

Electrical 

Plumbing. 

No job too big or too small. 

FREE Estimates. 

Fully Insured. 

(847)587-5151, 

(815)578-8511. 




DEBBIE'S CLEANING. 
SERVICE! 

•Spring Cleaning. 

'Over 21yrs. Experience 

•Weekly. Bi-Weekly, 

•Monthly. 

FREE Estimate. 

(847)263-7216. 



MUST SELL 20FT. Wells 
Cargo Consession trailer, 

fully loaded, ex. cond. Call 
for details (815) 385-9395. 



r 




Motorqtlcs 




Sport Utility 
Vehicles 



FOCUS 2000, SPORTY Fun 
$9,998, 847-587-3400. 

f 

FORD 1991 TAURUS power 

windows, locks, mirrors, 
seats. Leather, moonroof, 
keyless entry, clean, must 
see. $2,000/best. (847) 
543-1747. 

■ 

FORD 1993 TAURUS, 

$1 ,900/best. (847) 331- 
5456, (847) 740-7316 after 

6pm. 



SUBMIT YOUR LAKELAND 

CLASSIFIED ADS ON THE 

INTERNET! 

Visit http://www.lpnews.com/ 
to place your ads conven- 
iently. Ads appear on the In- 
ternet, in all Lakeland Pa- 
pers... The Great Lakes Bul- 
letin and The Market Journal 
for only $23.00 for 4 lines 
(approximately 16 words), 
then only .60c for each addi- 
tional line. 

THUNDERBIRD 1997, 

CLEANEST In Town. V8 

7,998 847-587-3400.. 

* . 

VW J ETTA 1996 S2K, 

green, 4-dr., sunroof, new 
tires, automatic, exc. cond 
and runs, $7,000. (847) 
968-4412. 



CHEVY 1989 S-10 BLAZER 
4WD, black, 80,000 mi., 
A/C, A/T, fair cond. needs 
some work, $1 ,300/best. 

(847)615-8218. 

1997 FORD F150 4x4, XLT 

extended cab, excellent 
considtion, 13,750 or best. 
847-223-8592 

CHEVY 1987 SUBURBAN 

4x4, 350cu.in„ very good 
cond., lots of new parts, 

$5,500.(847)587-1616. 
FORD EXPLORER 1999 

4x4, Eddie Bauer, Super 
Savings, $ 12,988, 847- 
587-3400. 

GRAND 1998 CHEROKEE 
LTD, All The Toys, 16,995 

847-587-3400. 

JEEP 1990 GRAND Chero- 
kee limited, $ Save $ , 847- 
587-3400. 

JEEP 2000 WRANGLER 
SAHARA, dual top, fully 
loaded, exc. cond., 37K. 
Asking $19,000/best. (847) 
838-3498. 



DIRT BIKES 1999 Polini X1 
Works bike, new pistons, 
rings, clutch and spare tire, 
$1,100/best. 1997 Suzuki 
RM80, $1.400/best. (847) 
561-4900. 

* 

HARLEY 1997 ULTRA 
CLASSIC CUSTOM EFI. 

stage 2 kit, custom paint, 
lots of chrome. Must see. 
$16,900/best. (262) 

742-5406. 

HARLEY 2001 DAVIDSON 
FXDXT DYNA T-SPORT, 
8,000 miles, extras, 

$15,500.(815)338-7038. 

HONDA 1984 VF700S SA- 
BRE, 14,800 mi., exc. 
cond., $2,400. (847) 
845-4977 leave message. 



HOME SWEET HOME 
15yrs. Experience. 
Homes, Apartments, Offic- 
es. A service you can trust. 
Call Carrie 
(847) 526-2651 eves. 

■ 

MAID JUST 4 Ull Office or 
house. Company coming 
from out of town? Spring 
cleaning got you down? 
Work all day or just don't like 
to clean? I , Doll (847) 

223-7564,(847)571-3318. 

SPRING IS HERE 

I do Windows 

Carpet Cleaning 

Power Dock Wash 

Call Gary for FREE 

estimate. 
(847) 651-2684, coll. 





Wanted To Buy 



800CHARITYCARS.ORG 
DONATE YOUR Vehicle di- 
rectly to the original, na- 
tionally acclaimed Charity 
Cars. 100% charity-not a 
used car dealer/fundrais- 
er. 1-800-Charity ( 1-800- 
242-7489 ) www.BOOchari- 

tycars.ORG 

MUSCLE CAR WANTED 

Running or not, any condi- 
tion, whole or part. Cash 
waiting. (414)483-8850. 







Service & Parts 



FORD 2000 TAURUS, 
Super buy $9,988 , 847- 

587-3400. 

• ■ 

FORD ESCORT 2000, Like 
new, $6,493, 847-587-3400. 



GEO METRO 1992, me- 
chanic owned, new tires, 

86K, $500/best. (847) 858- 
3366,5-9. 




GRAND AM 1998, Sporty & 
Fun, Loaded, , 6,998 847- 

587-3400. 



HONDA 1994 PASSPORT, 

4 dr, 4WD, CD player. Very 
good condition, $4,800/best 
Call between 3pm-6pm, 
please. (847) 741-9419 



ENGINE: FORD 302 Dipped 

& Bored. New pistons, rings, 
rods, oil pump, heads, Boss 
302 chrome cam covers & 
oil pan. Never run, 
$1 ,000./best 

FORD 302 C Code H.O., 

$200/best. 

FORD 302 Headers, $1 50. 
(815)385-6408 

FIVE BLACK AMERICAN 
RACING WHEELS AR767 
15X7 W/20 12X1.5 LUG 
NUTS AND 4 CENTER 
CAPS, 5 FIRESTONE WIN- 
TERFIRES 215/70R15'S. A 

$550 value for only $400, 
only 1yr. old. Call Rob (847) 

224-0590. 

FOUR KONIG 16" VIL- 
LIANS WHEELS, no tires, 
off a Grand AM, $450. 
(847)543-1716. 



JIMMY 2001 4X4, pewter, 
power windows, power 
locks, keyless entry, remote 
start, CD player. Like brand 
new. Asking $19,900. (262) 
m818-1405. 

* ... 

SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 
1999, 4-dr., blue, grt. 
cond., 44,000 mi. Asking 
only $12,000. No accid- 
ents. (361) 834-8203. 




JIM'S CUSTOM 
CARPENTRY 

Interior/Exterior Remodeling 

at affordable pricing. • 
No Job too Big or Too Small. 
Call for FREE estimate. 
Contact James 

(847) 246-3070 or 
lager (847) 237-3339. 




Tnicks/Trailers 




Carpet Cleaning 



CHEVY 1986 3/4 TON P/U 
TRUCK, 27K, western plow 
and new salt spreader, new 
tires, runs like new, $3,500. 
(847) 800-5306. 



SPRING IS HERE 

I do Windows 

Carpet Cleaning 

Power Deck Wash. 

Call Gary for FREE 

estimate. 
(847) 651-2684, cell. 



CHEVY 1988 4X4 2500, 

new motor, new tires, very 
dependable, $3,200/best. 
(847)856-6151. 




Dry Wall 



HYUNDAI 1995 ELANTRA- 
DARK green, runs good, 
needs transmission, 

$1000.00/best. (847) 

623-8832. 



LADDER RACK FOR 
pickup, $120/best. 

668-1956. 



small 
(847) 



CHEVY 1994 SILVERADO 
6.5 diesel Turbo, 53,000 mi. 
$11,000. (847) 623-5419, 
(847) 420-2850. 



CHEVY 1996 C3500, 
Ready To Plow. Save. 847- 
587-3400. 



J. R.'s DRYWALL SERVICE 

All repair, new work & some 

painting. FREE estimates. 

Work Guaranteed. 

Call Jason or Tonl 

(847) 875-5483, 
(847) 265-2764. 

Electrical 




CLEAR CARE 
ADVANTAGE 

WINDOWS & SIDING 
IAKE VILLA, IL 

847-973-3333 



AMERICAN 
WATERPROOFING 

Residential & Commercial Work 
Backed by Written Warranty 

847-537-4200 



LAKELAND IS OPEN 
24 HOURS 

If you need to place an ad 
in Classified, call us at 

(847)223-8161 ext. 191 

and leave a message. 

We will get back to you by 

the next business day. Or 

you can fax our 24-hour fax 

line at (847) 223-2691 . 



MADRI-GRAS FINAL 
TOUCH DETAILING, 
GRAND OPENING SPE- 
CIAL 1ST 30 CARS FULL 
DETAILING $60.00. Special- 
' 1st in detailing cars, boats, 
trucks, vans, mobile homes, 
etc. Specialists always on 
duty. Hrs. M -Sat 8:30 • 
5:30 847-409-2244 



CHEVY, FORD PICKUP 
Bodies, loctory new and rust 

free. Doors From $09. 

Fenders from $58, Bods from 

$900, BodlinersS145. 

'Bumpers, Grills. Repair 

panels, Paints, Accessories, 

Mirrors, Radiators. Delivery. 

217-824-6184 

www.marxauto.com 



TELEPHONE AND TV WIR- 
ING. SAVE 20-70% OFF 
PHONE COMPANY RATES. 
30YRS. EXPERIENCE 

WITH AMERITECH. In- 
stallation and repair. Call 
Mike (847) 546-8388. 




Miscellaneous 
Services 



©ACORN Self Storage 




MERCURY 1975 GRAND 
MARQUIS, 460 V8, good 
cond., nice cruiser, $800. 

(847) 546-6983. 



TIRES FOR SALE GRX 
60R15, 4/ea. 195X65R15, 
6/ea. 215x70R14,. 5/ea. 

(847) 244-2584. 



FORD 1985 F-250 XLT, 
4X4, Extended Cab Pickup, 
Western Plow, new battery, 
A/C. Needs tune up. 
$2,400/best. 

(815)385-6408 



Be DEBT FREE-Yoors Soonerl 
Low Paymontsl Roducod Itorostl 
Stop Late Fees! Stop Collectors! 
Family Credit Counseling. Non 
Profit Christian Agency. Freo quote 
www.tamilycrodit.org Rocordod 
Message 1-800-729-7964 




Vans 



1255 Town Line Rd. (Rt. 60) 

LOCATED ON ROUTE 60, BETWEEN 

THE VERNON HILLS SHOPPING 

CENTER AND LAKE STREET 

(RT. 45). MUNDELEIN 



MERCURY 1987 MARQUIS. 
LIBERTYVILLE. Color blue, 
leather top, deluxe.model, 4- 
dr., % exc. cond., .ex. ext., sen- 
ior's car, $1,300. (847) 
680-7765. 






ASTRO 1994 UMC CON- 
VERSION VAN. 6-cyl., new 
tires, mechanic main- 
tained, $4,895/best. (847) 
769-8262. 




Landscaping 



HELLIOUS 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

•Excavating 

•Grading 

•Demolition 

•Trucking 

•Sand 

•Gravel 

•Top Soil. 

(847) 587-7008. 



MUNGLE'S 
LANDSCAPING 
WE DO IT ALU! 

•Weed & Edge 

Flower Beds 

•Tree & Hedge Trimming 

•Mulch 
•Power Wash or 
Staining, Decks & Fenc- 
es •Tilling, Small Flower 
Beds & Gardens . 
•Spring Clean Up. 

(847)826-9619, 

home (815) 344-2279, 

pager (847) 333-7383 

"FIREWOOD 

AVAILABLE." 



H. BROTHERS 
LANDSCAPING 

SPRING CLEAN UP. 

•No Job Too Small 

•Quality Workmanship 

•Mowing 

•Tree Trimming 

•Rower Beds 

•Tree Planting. 

•Free Estimates 

•Fully Insured. 

Round Lake, III. 

(847) 546-4617 or 

(847) 420-2850.. 




Remodeling 



DC TILE WE We install ce- 
ramic, vinyl tile, Parquet, 
and Pergo floors. For free es- 
timates call (847) 395-0777. 
pager (708) 988-8504. 



DON'T LOSE SLEEP 

OVER CONTRACTOR'S 

NIGHT MARES. 

Call G.M. Construction 

• Ask for Gary. 
Ovr 25yrs. experience. 
Specializing in: 
•Room Additions * 
•Basements 
•Bathrooms 
. 'Kitchen Remodeling 
•Replacement Windows. 
No job too big or too small. 

(847) 644-9304. 



JACK'S 
REMODELING 

*Basement Finishing 

•Familyrooms & Olticerooms 

'Electrical & Plumbing 

•Kitchens & Baths 

'Vinyl Replacement Windows 

•Soffit Fascia. 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(847) 546-3759. 

THINKING OF 
REMODELING? 

Kitchens 

Bathrooms 

Basements. 

Give us a call for a FREE 

estimate. 

(847) 587-51 51 
IMfft 57R-R511. 



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CLASSIFIEDS 



May 10, 2002 



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It's Tome to be Debt Free 

You can be debt free years sooner with a Debt • LOW Payments 
Management Plan from FCCS. • Red UCG Interest 

— _ f 

We have helped thousands of Illinois families > No Credit Check 
and Individuals just like you. • Stop Late Fees 

• Stop Collector Calls 

• Enroll Online 




Credit C 



For your peace of mind, 
we offer you .M^ 



'fflfitisfoe** : •■< 



_ i: Tor nrour Entire Family 

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• FLAT RATE • GUARANTEED ACCEPTANCE! 

• SELF-EMPLOYED OR NOTJ-NO INCREASE! 

• MEDICAL DISCOUNTS ON: 
Dodor • Denial • Vision • RX & More! 



Homeowners 



I r 




^ 



iiit it ■ iIIwduiii card Muerain *nd itotiultmuranct.- *«•. (Not available In VT ) 



(Not available In VT.) 



Kayak Pools is looking for demo homesites to 
lisplay our New "Maintenance Free" Kayak Pool, 
ave thousands of $$$ with this unique opportunity. 

CALLNOWU 1-800-31 KAYAK 

Discount Code: 522-C13 




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Will do small 

custom cabinets, 

carpentry, 

painting, and 

odds & ends 

wood working 

847-223-8150 






Specialist I 

Power Washing 
& sealing. Deck 

& aggregate 
FREE ESTIMATES 

847-231-6499 








* 



Call for 
estimate. 



(847) 245-3400 

or 

(847) 477-3589 



CONTRACTORS ELECTRIC 
SERVICE, INC. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

"Call Us For Fast Courteous Service" 

33265 N. Rte. 45 
Wildwood, IL 60030 

■^847) 2X3-4682 

RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL 



DON'T THROW AWAY 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING ITT0 
OUR LAMP 
DOCTORS ' 
FOR REPAIRS. 






WARREN ELECTRIC INC 

33261 N. HIGHWAY 45 
WILDWOOD, H, 60030 

(847) 223-8691 



HAIL DAMAGE? 



• Siding 



Roofing 



• Gutters • Soffit & Fascia 

"20 Years Of Experience ... 
. . . Dealing with Insurance Claims" 

MEMBER GRAYSLAKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 






The 

„ Home 
Improvement 

Network 




** 



For Every Home Improvement Project" 
"One Call Gets You 3 Free Estimates 
"A Free Contractor Referral Service 










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Don't hire a contractor you know nothing about!! 
We refer pre-screened quality contractors to you for your convenience!! 




Kitchen, Bolhroom & Batemenl Remodeling, Siding, 
Window, Doom, Rooling, Gotten & Skylights, 
londicoping, Retaining Vlalli, VJatcr fountain* & 
Gardens, Brick Paving & Concrele Pafioi, Walkways & 
Drivewoyj, Healing, Cooling & Venlilafion fyjfemi, 
Room Arfdifions, New Homej & New Garage Buildf, 
Cobinef Re-facing, Acrylic lub Syslcmj & lub 
Resurfacing, Wood & Vinyl Decks, Gazebos & Fences, 
floor Inslollalion of lile, Marble, Wood & floor 
Refinishing, Suhroomj, Scrcenroom, Sprinklers & 
Lighting fyslems, Painting, Slaining, Sealing & 



Pressure Washing, Settlement Problems, Basement 
Crack & leak Correction, Custom Wood Working, 
Handyman Services, Retractable Awnings, and. 

Cuslom Cloiels. 

^ 

Call Now for your 3 Free 

Estimates: 



37-0633 



www.thehomeimprovcment.com 




BASEMENT FINISHING 

• BATHS 
CUSTOM BUBLT WET BARS 



BOOKSHELVES & CABINETS 




3T.T 



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Horiion Remodeling Inc 

"Custom basements are our specialty." 




• Custom Basement Finishin 

• Full Service Remodelin 

• Kitchens/Baths 

And Much More!!! 

Let us give you a FREE estimate on turning your basement 

into the living space you've dreamed of. 











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Old World Craftsmanship 
Financing Available 
Free Estimates 



PJRJ 1 -1/2 hp Garage Door 



Opener with 2 Remotes 

with purchase of garago* 
Limited Tlmo Offer. Restrictions Apply. 




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IN YOUR 
PROFESSION 

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AD IN 

LAKELAND'S 

DIRECT LINE! 



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Projects to small for your 

contractor? They are our 

specialty. Carpentry, Electrical 



and Plumbing. 



Insured 
847-263-1425 








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Health Food Store and Juice Bar 

3900 Washington, 17-Q 
Gurnee, EL 60031 (847)263-1780 

s a C Everything Must Go! 




Complete Air 
Conditioner 

■ 

System 



As Low As 

$1549 00 



MONTHLY 

PAYMENTS 

AS LOW 

AS 

00 




PER MO. 




FURNACE & 

AIR CONDITIONING 
COMBO As Low As 

$2649°° 







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Family Owned 
A Operated for 
years 





Heating and Air Conditioning 

PALATINE (847) 358-7100 • WAUCONDA (847) 526-9082__ 

-49 Not valid with any other offer. www.alltemp.net 




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"Dependable, Professional, 
Bonded and Insured" 



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Guaranteed 






merry maids. 

m 0*1 Ins thin? to worry *W 




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CLEAN. 
WHAT A 
GREAT 

GIFT FOR 
MOM! 



Alpine Tree J^k 



ervice 



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ffosf Service 
Fullv Insured 



SAWVELL TREE SERVICE 



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Residential, 

a , Commercial. 



FREE estimates* 
Fully Insured. 

(847) 566-9372 



Trees Cut 

• Stumps Remnued 
•Lot Clearing 

Residential/Commercial 



-4993 





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847-740-8070 






af. OUTSHINE 



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LTIES 



& PLANTING 

•Gradlng-seed-sod 

"louldcr-outcropping 
& block walls ' 

Flagstone-pavers 
" lucstonc 

Drainage systems 
& corrections 

Cleanup/mulching 

free Estimates/fully 
insured 

847-587-8787 



MULCH & TOPSOIL 

Shredded Hardwood ... .$30.00 
Shredded Blond Cedar . . .$35.00 

Play Mat .......... $35.00 

Premium Dark $35.00 

Cedar Chips .......... .$35.00 

Dyed Red Mulch : . .$42.00 

Red Cedar .$53.00 

Cypress..... .$53.00 

CREDIT CARDS OK 

Also pulverized topsoll, garden 
mix, mushroom compost, sand, 



First 



k tlmc customers call 

for info about 

discounted 

rate! 



* Residential 

* Commercial 

* Industrial 










Fully Bonded and Insured. All English speaking staff. 



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SURE 



(800) 303-5150 






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* PINE TREE * 

IPAIHTIHG & DECORATING IMC. 

$95.00 Spring special, per 
room two coats same color) 
no trim. Size limit 12x12. 
Colors available at extra cost. 
Wc offer Installation of ceram- 
ic tile, custom carpentry, 
wallpaper removal and instal 
latlon. PalnilnK Interior and 
exteriors for residential or| 
Icortimerclal properties. 

Insured, free estimates avail-] 
able 

Antioch 847-838-5853 



SAMCO 

PAINTING & DECORATING 



'(JLT Tills JOBOON 
lUGIITTHKriKSTTlMK 



• Interior/Exterior 
Thorough Preparation 
& Application 

• Drywall/Thping 
• Stalnlng/Reflnlshing 
Powerwash/Scalcoating 

For a Prompt FREE Estimate 

(847) 992-0766 



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Precision Painting 
Decorating 



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Residential - Commercial j 
| Interior - ExteriorJ^ 

•Wall Paper 'Docks 
•Power Wash 

free Estimates. Over 
'" Yrs. Experience 

847-548-1214 



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Fill)' Insured 






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Can Help, FREE Estims 
We Make Housecalls! 






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Interior 




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• Lawn Fertilization 

• Weed & Crabgrass Control 

• Core Aeration 

• Grub Control 



•Tree Fertilization 

• Insect Spraying 

• Disease Control 

• Consultation & Analysis 



.?* 



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IEE ESTIMATES 

Your Satisfaction 
U Gatmuitood. 



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>_ . _ 



Family-owned Lake County Business 

847-731-203S 

No annoying soles calls 
No telemarketing 



Ttistic Painting 

I* Faux Finishes • * Custom Art Painting 

Sponging -Ragging Characters * 
Rag Rolling -Painted Borders 

«.- - TcxUircd Walls & more •Kids Rooms Arc Our 
afmm Specialty 

/«7?£/j ESTIMATES. 



George & Jul! (847) 548*8083 



WmP.i 





. 



ROYAL GARDENS 
LANDSCAPING 

eehly Lawn Maintenance 
Seed/Sod/Grading • Landscape Installation 
• Retaining Walls • Perennial Gardens 

Call Melissa Today (847) 973-9000 for your 

$H "^ es,lmatc - 3E 

£<?/ our friendly staff lake care of your landscape needs. 

Office Hours 8-5 ffl-F, 8-12 Saturday 



Wfe saved you time 
We did the research 



Call 847-223-81 61 to 
effectively reach 
300,000 readers weekly 





Attention Dog Owners! 



LOVE YOUR DOG, BUT NOT THE I 

CRUNCHED FOR TIME? 

LET US SCOOP a REMOVE 



THE WASTE FOR YOU! 

\o messy/smelly garbage cans & s 

• Enjoy more free time 
• Entertain in your yard again 

SERVICE P ROVIDED: 
• Once a week • All weather/All 3 

• Reasonable Rates 










WSJ 



■ ■ ' 
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DEAL! 

PLACE AN 

FOR 4 WEEKS, 

GET 2 ADDinONAL . » 

WEEKS fflffi! o| r i 



847'223«8161 




uh Rooms 



4 + 1 



Decks, Fences, Playsets, 
Piers, Boat Houses, Gazebo 

Walk Ways stonc-Brlck-Wood-Concrctc 

• Lighting * Sheds 

• Green Houses * Sprinklers 

• Ponds & Fountains * Retaining Walks 

• Pools & Spas * Sea Walls 







MAY 1 © & -1 1 

Hours: Sat. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. • Sun. 7 a.m.-3 p.m. 

Lake County Fairgrounds, GRAYSLAKE, IL 

1000's of Treasures!!! Glass Grinding Available!!! 
Admission $4.00 - Early Buyers Sat. 9-11 a.m.-$15 

NEXT SHOW June 7 & 8 ^ M „ „ 

McHenry Country Fairgrounds, WOODSTOCK, IL 

Woodstock Antique and Collectible Fair 
May 26 Sun. 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. 





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COUNTY 



May 10, 2002 








- 




BB0W 





on providing you with the comprehensive, coordinated care a woman needs at every age. Throughout your 
life, our Women's Health Services is the one place to turn for personalized care of body, mind and spirit. 



•_. 



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FOR WOMEN, 
THERE'S JUST ONE. 



Lake