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Full text of "Antioch News 05/17/2002"



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AW07S? 12/26/02 

AHTIOCH PU8LIC LIBRARY 
75? HfilH ST 

Antioch 



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By JUUE MURPHY 

Staff Reporter 




The goal for Great Lakes 
Principals was to make its Wal-Mart 
presentation in "totality" at the pub- 
lic hearing scheduled before the 
combined planning and zoning 
board. While this goal was achieved, 
residents were notably upset when 
the meeting was continued to June 6 
before there was time for any public ' 
comment. 

Chair Barbara Johnson asked for 
a motion to continue, in part, 
because the parking lot lights had 
shut off at Hillcrest Elementary 
where the meeting was being held. 
Additionally, it was nearly 11 p.m. 
and it was deemed necessary to give 
the board members time to digest 
the material presented and come 
back with their questions for the 
developer and village staff. 

Tim Barrett, a partner of Great 
Lakes Principals, said Wal-Mart is 



limited food items. A super. center 
would occupy about 209,000 square 
feet and a conventional store would 
occupy about 149,000 square feet. 

"The numbers discussed tonight 
will be based on a super center 
store," clarified Barrett. 

The project, if approved, would 
sit on 67 acres that is currently made 
up of seven smaller parcels at the 
intersection of Rte. 173 and Deep 
Lake Rd. 

There are two phases to the pro- 
ject, with the first phase to include 
the Wal-Mart of about 209,000 
square feet (of that 60,000 square 
feet proposed for groceries) on the 
38 eastern acres with an expected 
completion date in 2003. The sec- 
ond phase is slated for "future devel- 
opment" on the western portion. . 

Studied done for Wal-Mart 

_ 

found that in the first full year of 
completion the village could expect 
to receive $570,000 of new sales tax 
revenue. Upon full assessment of 



looking at both the options of Super the first phase of improvements, the 

Wal-Mart that includes a full grocery 

area and a standard Wal-Mart with . Please see WAL-MART IA6 




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Un-Bear-able Fun 

Sisters 10-year-old Samantha and 5-year-old Amanda Charles ride a giant bear during the Antioch 
Civic Club's fund-raising carnival in downtown Antioch. — Photo by David Krueger 







By JUUE MURPHY 

Staff Reporter 



Warrants have been issued 
through the Antioch Police Dept. for 
Wade J. Carlson, 18, of Long Lake 
and for Douglas' J. Rogge, 20, of 
Round Lake for felony theft. 

According to Detective Sgt. 




Craig Somerville, an Antioch wonlan 
claimed to be the victim of a scam 
earlier in March. "The woman said 
she answered a newspaper ad of a 
camper for sale," said Somerville. 
"After viewing the camper, she 
decided it was not something she 

Please see CON ARTISTS IA6 



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Antioch ears open for 
phony phone solicitation 



Smoking in bed 
never acceptable 

By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 



were subjected to open flames." The 
fire originated on the mattress in the 
bedroom of the victim. 

The victim was taken to a 
local hospital and then trans- 



ferred to Loyola Medical Center. 
Sheltering arrangements for the 
other two were made through the 
Red Cross. 

Loss is estimated at $40,000. 



By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter ,- 



"It has come to the attention of 
the Antioch Fire Dept. that many of 
our area residents have been receiv- 
ing phone calls from someone who 
claims, to be representing the local 
fire department and asks them to 
contribute money,", said informa- 
tion officer Lt. Chris Lienhardt 

Lienhardt said that these calls 
are scams and are not being made 
on behalf of the either Antioch Fire 
Dept. or the First Fire Protection 
Dist. Further, neither of these agen- 
cies endorse the actions of the peo- 



ple on the phone. 

According to Lienhardt, the 
state's attorney general monitors 
the complaints of residents and 
businesses throughout Chicago and 

collar counties. 

"If you receive a phone call from 
someone who claims that they are 
calling on behalf of the Antioch Fire 
Dept. or First Fire Protection Dist., 
please document who it was who 
called, what they said and the date 
and time when they called," asked 
Lienhardt. "Then contact the state's 
attorney general's office at 312-814- 
2595 so they can follow up on the 
matter." 



Smoking in bed led to the fire 
on Spafford on May 9 in the early 
morning hours that resulted in an 
explosion and caused damage to a 
building immediately to the 
north. 

"There really aren't a lot of safe- 
ty tips to give," said Lt. Chris 
Lienhardt, information officer for 
the Antioch Fire Dept. "Smoking in 
bed is always a big no, no." 

Antioch police officers were the 
first on the scene and evacuate the 
three occupants living in the home. 
Two of the residents were helping 
the third, who suffered from critical 
burns to the head and chest. 

"Thank goodness the police 
officers got the people not just out 
of the building, but away from the 
area," said Lienhardt. "The explo- 
sion happened after that and it 
blew the front door five feet down 
the sidewalk." 

The victim was using an oxy- 
gen system due to a pre-existing 
medical condition. 

"The medical equipment didn't 
cause the fire," said Lienhardt. "The 
oxygen tanks didn't fail until they 



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Decade for Centennial 

Vickie Axton looks 




rough photos and newspaper clippings of 
Centennial Park in Antioch, as it was being built 10 years ago, 
during the park's anniversary celebration. Axton, a past chair- 
person of the Centennial Playground Committee, is retiring from 
the Antioch Park Board after 13 years.— Photo by David Krueger 



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COMMUNITY 



May 1 7, 2002 



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Persons charged with a crime are innocent un{il prove 



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ANTIOCH 



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DUi/unlawful 
possession of alcohol 

Donny L Breen, 18, of 3029 Gilead Ave., 
Zion, was arrested for driving under the influ- 
ence of alcohol and for the unlawful posses- 
sion of alcohol on May 11 at 11:49 p.m. on 
Rte. 173 at Pedersen Park. 

Police saw Breen's vehicle turn into 
Pedersen Park and turned around to pull 
behind it as the park had closed at sunset. 
The officer requested the identification of 
Breen and his passenger who didn't have 
any. The officer detected the strong odor of 
alcoholic beverage on Breen's breath. 

Both Breen and his passenger were 
checked through LEADS/NCIC/SOS with 
Breen coming back as having a valid driver's 
license and the passenger not having one. 

Field sobriety testing was requested with 
Breen failing all tests asked of him and saying 
he knew he was drunk. He was arrested for 
DUI and placed in the squad car. 

The passenger showed no signs of intoxi- 
cation and had no odor of alcoholic bever- 
age. The passenger was reportedly getting a 
ride home from the bowling alley from 
Breen. . 

During the inventory for tow, police 
found 10 bottles of beer and multiple emp- 
ties. 

Breen, who had been ill in the squad car, 
refused medical attention. 

Breen and his passenger were transport- 
ed to the Antioch Police Dept. The passen- 

* Par 
was issued a citation for DUI. 

The officer called the Antioch Rescue 
Squad to check on Breen who was still show- 
ing signs of illness. Breen again refused addi- 
tional medical assistance. 

He was put through booking procedures 
and given additional citations for operating an 
uninsured vehicle, unlawful consumption of 
alcohol and unlawful possession of alcohol. 



Reports were completed as refused 
chemical testing due to Breen's illness. He 
was released to his stepmother on personal 
recognizance pending his June 4 court date. 

Breen said he got die beer from an 
unknown subject in Trevor, Wis. 

U\KE VILLA 




Leaving accident 



Kenneth E. Zandrowicz, 30, of 1350 N. 
Milwaukee Ave., Vernon Hills, was arrested 
by Lake Villa Police following an accident on 
May 5, at 2:50 a.m., on Route 83 near Park 
Avenue. Zandrowicz had left the scene. 
Police called him on May 6 at 7:35 a.m. At 
that time, he told police "in Arizona, we can 
leave the scene of an accident." Police 

m that Illinois requires drivers to 

remain on die scene, and check of the well 
being of die other driver. He reported to the 
Lake Villa Police Department on May 6, at 
12:45 p.m. He said he did not believe he had 
struck another car. He said the other car cut 
him off while driving southbound on Route 
83 near Grand Avenue. He told police he 
passed the other car, which then followed 
him. He said he left the area to avoid a con- 
frontation. He admitted honking his horn, 
yelling and making rude gestures after the 
second car cut him off. He was charged with 
improper passing, leaving the scene of an 
accident involving damage and failure to 
report a car crash. He was released, pending 
an appearance in Grayslake Branch III court, 
on June 12, at 1:30 p.m. 

DUI 

Jeffrey G. Ultes, 21, of 251.97 W. Edgar 
Ave., Antioch, was arrested by Lake Villa 
Police on May 3, at 1:34 a.m., while driving 
westbound on Route 132 near Route 83. He 
was observed crossing lane dividing lines, 
weaving and swerving. Police made a traffic 
stop as the driver pulled into Nuttie's Bar on 
Grand Avenue. When asked how many beers 
he had to drink, Ultes allegedly replied, "It's a 



rental car." After the question was repeated, 
Ultes answered, "It's her rental car," indicat- 
ing his female passenger. Computer checks 
revealed that Ultes license was suspended in 
Illinois. He also had a revoked license in 
Wisconsin. He failed field sobriety tests and 
refused breath tests. He was charged with 
improper lane usage, DUI alcohol and dri- 
ving with a suspended license. He was 
released on a $3,000 1-bond, pending an 
appearance in Waukegan courtroom C-402, 
on June 7, at 9 a.m. 

Joanne M. Tomassetti, 42, of 22235 
Green Lane, Antioch, was arrested by Lake 
Villa Police on May 4, at 2:45 a.m„ while dri- 
ving westbound on Route 132 near Oak 
Knoll Drive. She was observed driving 10 
miles below the 30-mph speed limit and 
crossing the yellow center line. She contin- 
ued driving slowly, allegedly speeding up to 
30 mph in a 40-mph zone, and remaining at 
that speed as she drove through a 50-mph 
zone. Police activated their emergency lights 
after observing her cross onjo the shoulder 
of the road. She continued driving for about 
two-tenths of a mile. She told the arresting 
officer she knew the police chief and another 
officer. She asked if die other officer was on 
duty. She admitted drinking three beers. She 
exhibited poor balance and registered .242 
on a PBT. A subsequent Intoxilizer test yield- 
ed .231 BAC. Although she refused to follow 
instructions and resisted handcuffing, police 
did not charge her with resisting arrest. She 
was charged with DUI, DUI Over .08 BAC 
and improper lane usage. She was released 
on a $3,000 1-bond, pending an appearance 
in Waukegan courtroom C-402, on June 14, ' 
at 9 a.m. 



LINDENHURST 



- T * V 

found a flask, which had an odor of alcohol. 
Bentall refused breath tests and field sobriety 
tests. He was charged with speeding, improp- 
er lane usage, DUI alcohol, driving without 
proof of insurance, no valid driver's license 
and transport of open liquor. He was released 
on a $3,000 bond, paying 10 percent, pending 
an appearance in Waukegan courtroom C- 
402, on May 28, at 9 a.m. 

Marcella A. Cook, 37, of 2393 Quaker 
Hollow, Round Lake Beach, was arrested by 
Lindenhurst Police on May 11, at 1:26 a.m., 
while driving on Granada Blvd., near 
Columbia Avenue. While driving westbound 
on Route 132, police observed Cook traveling : 
51 mph in a 40-mph zone. She crossed the 
double yellow center line, and drifted right 
before making a left turn onto Granada, 
where she crossed through the northbound 
left turn lane. She failed four field sobriety 
tests, and after registering .106 BAC on a PBT, 
she refused a Breathalyzer test. She told 
police she had been drinking two glasses of 
wine. She was charged with speeding, 
improper turning and DUI alcohol. She was 
released on a $3,000 1-bond, pending an 
appearance in Waukegan courtroom C-402, 
on May 28, at 9 a.m. 



DUI drug: 




DUI 

John A. Bentall, 37, of 1317 Walnut, 
Round Like Beach, was arrested by 
Lindenhurst Police on May 12, at 3:18 a.m., 
while driving eastbound on Route 45 near 
Route 132. He was observed driving 51 mph 
in a 40-mph zone and repeatedly drifting 
across the double yellow center line and 
crossing over the fog line. In the car, police 



Cheryl M. Amen, 43, of 1514 

Cobblestone Court, McHenry, was arrested 

by Lindenhurst Police on May 10, at 8:36 

a.m., while driving on Route 132 near 

Waters Edge Drive. She was stopped after 

police observed her changing lanes without 

signaling, and driving 55 mph in a 45-mph 

•zone. There was an odor of cannabis in the 

car. The driver failed five field sobriety tests, 

but registered .000 BAC on a PBT. She 

attempted to walk away from the arrest. A 

Lake County Sheriffs Office K-9 picked up 

the scent of drugs on the driver's side seat 

and on the floor behind the driver's seat, but 

no narcotics were found in the car. Amen 

was charged with failure to signal, speeding, 

DUI drugs and resisting a police officer. She 

was released on a $3,000 bond, pending an 

appearance in Waukegan courtroom C-402, 
on May 28, at 9 a.m. 



... 



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May 1 7, 20b2 



COMMUNITY 




Lakeland Newspapers/ A7 





xercise is essential for good health. It 
is necessary for proper digestion 
and proper intestinal action. Lack of 
I proper exercise causes the muscles 
to become weak. A muscle not used for 10 
days loses one third of its strength. 
Coordination and balance deteriorate with 
age. Exercise helps maintain muscle 
strength and reduce the risk of falls. A mini- 
mum of 30 minutes of exercise three times a 
week is recommended. Before beginning any 
exercise program it is always wise to check 
with your doctor. FOR YOUR HEART 

Physical activity not only burns calories 
but also stimulates heart action causing an 
increased blood supply which promotes bet- 
ter circulation. 

Exercise helps to keep your arteries 
open. Just walking can help lower choles- 
terol levels and clear the arteries of plaque. 
Regular exercise usually leads to a reduction 
in blood pressure. 

For your back 

A common reason for back pain is not 
using your abdominal muscles. All the 
weight is on your back, unsupported by your 
abdominal muscles. Improving the strength 
of muscles in your back and abdomen can 
help prevent or ease lower back pain. 

For headaches 

Headaches and tension problems which 
elevate blood pressure and place huge over- 
loads on your circulatory system can be 
relieved by exercise. When you begin to 
exercise yoii will feel your body relaxing and 
tension headaches lifting. 

For depression 

According to a Duke University study 
working out for 30 minutes three times a 
week is as effective as antidepressants in 
treating clinical depression. 

Shapes in Antioch 

Recently a few friends and I took advan- 
tage of a 30 day free no obligation trial at 
Shapes in Antioch. That trial is still available 
and there are incentives and gifts if you join 
within the first two weeks. The great part of 
going with a friend is the accountability. 
Someone is expecting you to show up! We 






Sharon Westbrook 



have so much fun talking as we workout it 
hardly seems like exercise. I have to admit 
the first few times I was exhausted, but I 
don't feel that way now. 

According to Darlene Ninko, one of the 
trainers at Shapes, exercise is good for your 
health, your heart and to reduce stress. 
Darlene says, "stress and depression make 
you sore and tired." The ages of women at 
Shapes ranges from 14 to 81. "An 81 year old 
women was sent in by her chiropractor to 
strengthen her back", remarked Darlene. "She 
now enjoys walking." "A tennis player comes 
in to continue to work her muscles. A group of 
teen girls workout together and are learning 
good habits they will keep for life. Women in 
many different occupations as well as physical 
conditions enjoy working out. Darlene rec- 
ommends exercising every other day or a min- 
imum of three times a week for 30 minutes. 

Shapes which is located at 4 1 8 Lake St. is 
a circuit training system. Weight stations 
work your muscles in both directions (posi- • 
tive and negative contractions). Aerobic step 
stations are used alternately with the weight 
stations. A trainer will work with you on each 
station to find out what is best for you. As 
you workout you are on each station 40 sec- 
onds going around the entire circuit twice 
which takes only 30 minutes. When you 
become more advanced you can increase 
your times around the circuit or add weights 
upon the recommendation of the trainer. 
Shapes is open Monday through Thursday 
from 8 a.m.-l p.m. and 4-8 p.m. Fridays have 
the same hours except closing is 7 p.m. 
Saturday hours are 8 a.m.-noon. Shapes is 
closed on Sundays. 

Readers witli information for "News- 
Worthy" should call Sharon Westbrook at 

847-395-3079. 




Presented by Vista Health 

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Enjoy a morning of inspiration 

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Designed for adults aged 55 and over 

Workshops. Information Booths. 

Borders* Book Table. Entertainment. 

Door Prizes. Refreshments. 



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Cost! $20 ($15 for Senior Spirit members) includes workshop materials, 






entertainment, continental breakfast and box lunch 

If you'd like, leave the driving to us. For an additional $10, ride the bus from 
Waukegan and avoid the traffic and parking at the college. Bus leaves Bertrands 
Bowling Alley, across from Provena Saint Therese Medical Center on Washington 

Street, Waukegan, at 7:30 a.m.; leaves the College of Lake County at 1 p.m. 

Call 1-800-843-2464 for more information. 





theVIuage 



at Victory Lakvs 




College of Lake County 



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Name: Candace Olsen 
Home: Salem, Wis. 

Occupation: Office 

manager of the Antioch 
parks department. 

Community involve- 
ment: I help with all the 

programs and activities in 
Antioch. 

I'm originally from: I 

was born in Antioch, but I 
moved around a lot until 
high school. 

I graduated from: Grayslake High 
School. 

My family consists of: My husband 

Chris, daughter Charisma and I'm due in 
September with my second child. 




What I like best about my town: 

I like the small town atmosphere. 

The secret to my success is: Roll 

with the punches and my ability to adapt 
well. 



a kids book I read with my 
daughter. 

Favorite TV sows 

are: "King of Queens" and 

the ."Osboumes" 

Favorite band or 

musician: Tim McGraw 
and Cold 

Favorite restaurant: 

Baker's Square 

My life's motto is: Be 

happy all the time and don't 
worry. 

If I won the lottery, I would: Buy 

a house and set up college funds for my 
children. 

My greatest accomplishment is: 

My daughter. 

I want to be remembered as: A 

good person and a good mom. I want to 
be remembered as someone who made a 
difference. 

My pet peeve is: Fibbing. 



I relax by: Playing with my daughter. Mo ? t interesting person I ever 

»- ti-i i. • : - . .. . . . met w as: Kid Rock. I met him the last 



My perfect day in Antioch would 

be: A nice sunny day playing in one of the ' 
parks. 

The last book I read was: "Signs," 



time I was pregnant at a concert. 

If I had a plane ticket anywhere 

I would go: Either back to Germany or 
Las Vegas. 



If you have a "Neighbor" that you would like to see profiled in this column, call 
Lakeland Newspapers at 847-223-8161. 

i 










GOT SOMETHING GOING ON? GIVE US A CALL! 

Call 847-223-8161 ore-moil calendar@lakelandmedia.com 

A 1 4-day notice is requested for all items. 



Friday, May 17 

7:30 a.m., Lake County Chamber of Commerce 
networkers group meets at the Hampton Inn in 
Gurnee. For info., call 847-249-3800 



7-8 p.m., Weigh to Win program held at Calvary 
Christian Center, Monaville Rd., west of Rte. 83 
in Lake Villa. Call 356-6181 for info. 



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7:30-10:30 p.m., Lake County Astronomical 
Society meets at Volo Bog State Natural Area. 
Meeting is followed by a viewing period starting at 
9:30 p.m. Call 815-344-1294 or 847-362-0959 



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Saturday, May 18 

'9 a.m.-3 p.m., Annual Plant Sale sponsored by 
the Antioch Garden Club. Held at 154 B- North 
Ave. (1/4 mile east of Main St. on the south 
side) in Antioch 

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Sunday, May 19 

7 p.m., The Lake County Folk Club presents 
Michael Smith and Marcia Krieger performing at 
trie Greenleaf Grill, 301 Greenleaf St. in Park City 
Oust off Rte. 120). $10 admission, $8 for mem- 
bers, $5 for seniors and students. For info., call 

847-949-5355 . : 



Wednesday, May 22 

6 p.m., Countil of Catholic Nurses of Lake County 
sponsor a house Mass and a pot luck supper at 
a private home in Grayslake. Bring a dish to pass 
and a donation for a community outreach project. 
All nurses are. welcome. For info., call Mary Ann 

at 847-395-0788 



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6:30 p.m., TOPS Weight Loss weigh-in, 7 p.m. 
meeting at Antioch Senior Center, 817 Holbeck, 
info, at 847-395-6443 or 847-395-8143 



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7:30 p.m., Mothers & More meets in Grayslake. 
The group offers playgroups, mom's nights out 
and activities. Call Nancy at 847-223-9668 



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Monday, May 20 

12:45 p.m., Bingo held at The Antioch Senior 
Center, call 847-395-7120 for details 



Thursday, May 23 

8-9 a.m., Network Lake County, a business: 
'networking group, meets at In- Laws restaurant in 
Gurnee, guests invited, call 548-5305 



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5:30 p.m., TOPS group meets in Lindenhurst at 
the Victory Ambulatory Surgery Center and 
Outpatient Services at 1050 Red Oak Lane on ; 
the first floor. Call Tina at 847-265-9364 

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7:30 p.m., Regular meeting of the Antioch Village 
Board held at village hall, 874 Main St. 



8:30 a.m., Day-long domestic violence workshop 
for law enforcement professionals hosted by A 
Safe Place/Lake County Crisis Center. Held at 
CLC in Grayslake. Lunch is provided. To register, 
or for details, call Autumn at 847-249-5147 



• . . . ■ i - . 



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9:30 a.m., Lake County Genealogical Society 
holds a Round Table discussion group at the 
Fremont Public Library in Mundelein. Call Joan at 
847-587-5349 or Bobbie at 847-816-8074 



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7:30 pm, Antioch Coin Club meets in the lower 
level conference room at The State Bank of the 
Lakes, 440 Lake St. in Antioch. All are welcome. 
For more call Jo Anne at 847-395-4738 



6:30 p.m., The Lake County Mother of Twins and 
More Club meets at Joy Lutheran Church, 749 S. 
Hunt Club Rd. in Gurnee. Call 847-563-3000, 
ext. 4073 before attending 



,---.- 




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7-9 p.m., Lakes Area Community Band rehearsal 
at ACHS, call 847-395-6729 

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Tuesday, May 21 

9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Daybreak, a social activity 
program for adults in the early to mid stages of 
Alzheimer's disease or other memory disorder, 
held at the Westosha community Center in 
Bristol, Wise. Held every Tues., Thurs. and Fri. 
For info, or registration, call 262-605-6646 or 
1-800-472-8008 



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7:30 p.m., Lakes Region Historical Society meets 
at the museum, 817 Main St., Antioch, call 
Robert Lindblad, 847-395-0899 



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7:30 p.m., Irish American Club meets at State 
Bank of the Lakes in Antioch, 847-395-3942 



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Friday, May 24 

7:30-8:30 a.m., The Business Networking Group 
meets at Centre Lights Cafe next to Condell in 
Libertyville, call Dan at 847-803-9904 



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6-8 p.m., Bariatric Treatment Centers (BTC) 
hosts a dance and exercise class downstairs at 
the Antioch Senior Center, 817 Holbeck Dr 
(behind the fire station). For more info., call 
Karen at 847-395-6244 



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6:30 p.m., Free seminar for seniors, "Crime 
Prevention at Home," sponsored by Vista Health 
and presented by the Lake Villa Police Dept. Held 
at the Village at Victory Lakes, 1075 Victory Dr. 
in Lindenhurst. Call 1-888-869-1118 to register 

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6:45 p.m., Antioch VFW Bingo, doors open 4:30 
p.m., call 847-395-5393 



9 a.m.-noon, Low-cost pet vaccination clinic for 
senior citizens held at the Mundelein Senior 
Center, 1200 Regency Dr. Seniors from through- 
out Lake County are invited to bring their dogs or 
cats for free rabies shots and other shots avail- 
able at a reduced cost. For more info, on the 
clinic, contact the Lake County Health Dept. 
Animal Control facility at 847-949-9925 



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7 p.m., The Lake County Gem and Minderal 
Society meeting held at the Waukegan Public 
Library, 128 N. County St. All are welcome 



Saturday, May 25 

10 a.m., 5th Annual Spring Auction for cars and 
boats sponsored by Inspiration Ministries. 
Proceeds benefit people with disabilities. If you 
would like more info., call Jon Troast or Erik 
Barber at 262-275-6131 or visit the website at 
www.inspirationministries.org 



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7 p.m., School Board meeting, Dist. #36 



Sunday, May 26 

7-9 p.m., Open Gym at ACHS, cost $2 (adults 
only) 



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A8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



May 1 7, 2002] 



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• I mm II.II>H1»- I I •"•! 

Auditions upcoming 

Auditions will be held for Richmond's 
Memorial Hall Theatre Company's produc- 
tion of "Moon Over Buffalo" on May 20-21 at 
7:30 p.m. at the Memorial Hall Theatre locat- 
ed at 10308 Main St., Richmond. 

Laura-Nicole Musolf, director of the com- 
edy by Ken Ludwig, is looking for four men 
and four women with the ability to play roles 
ranging from 20 to 70 years old. 

There will be cold readings from the 
script. Those auditioning should bring a list of 
any perceived conflicts with rehearsal sched- 
ule. The play will run the last two weekends in 

July. 

For more information, call either 262-767- 
0150 or 815-675-6392. 

Breakfast meeting 
features Mike Olhava 

Antioch Community Lighthouse, Aglow 
International, is having its breakfast meeting 
on Saturday, May 18 atTNT's Place of Antioch 
at 9 a.m. 

Mike Olhava, of Hebron, 111.; will be guest 
speaker. Olhava is a representative for 
Southern Wisconsin Full Gospel 
Businessmen's Fellowship International and 
will discuss how two events changed his life. 

A breakfast buffet will be served at 9:15 
a.m. the cost is $9. For more information, call 
either Sue Vanderstappen at 815-943-7456, or 
Janice Dewaal at 847-265-5060. 

■ 

Sewer credits available 

Sewer credits are available at Village Hall, 
prior to water use, for those filling swimming 
pools or for residents with new lawns. 

The sewer credit for new lawns is a one- 

* L 

time, one-month credit. 

Questions should be addressed to Village 

Hall at 847-395-1000. 

Camp Crayon registration 
June 1 

Registration for Antioch residents for the 
parks department's Camp Crayon begins on 

June 1 from 9 a.m.-noon al the parks office 






located at 806 Holbek Dr. 

This pre-school program is for children 
between me ages of 3-5 years old who are 
potty trained. Classes begin the week of Sept. 
9. 

A 3-year-old class will be held on Monday 
and Wednesday from 8:20-11 a.m. A 4-year- 
old class on Tuesday and Thursday from 8:20- 
11 a.m. A pre-kindergarten class for 4-year- 
olds well be held Tuesday, Wednesday and 
Thursday afternoons from noon-3 p;m. 

Children in the afternoon class must be 
attending kindergarten in the following year. 

For costs and more information, call the 
parks office at 847-395-2160. 

Golfers' Challenge 

The Antioch Chamber of Commerce and 
Industry is hosting its annual golf outing on 
July 31 and is featuring a "hole in one" oppor- 
tunity for someone to win a new car or a new 

truck. 

Golf and lunch will be held at the Antioch 
Golf Course and dinner at the Harbor Club. 

Hole and tee sponsors are being accepted 
as well as raffle donations to ensure everyone 
has a "swinging good time." 

Call the Chamber at 847-395-2233 to 
rese«-ve a foursome or sponsorship or raffle 
donation. 

[Rescue Squad plans 
ongoing relief efforts 

The Antioch Rescue Squad is establishing 
a drop off station at its headquarters located at 
825 Holbek Dr. for the disaster recovery effort 
in New York. 

The American Red Cross in New York 
told the Antioch Rescue Squad that it 
would be in need of the following items 
over the next 10-14 months: Vicks 
VapoRub, knee pads, respirator masks, 
saline nasal spray, camping shovels, new 
work boots (size 10 and larger), large and 
extra large T shirts, flashlights, flashlight 
batteries, work socks, coveralls with sus- 
penders (K-Mart) and work gloves. 

Additionally, small cash donations will be 
needed to help offset the costs incurred by the 
rescue squad for packing and shipping. 




(•.«••»••••••••* 



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Graduation May 29 

Graduadon for the Antioch Community 
High School Dist. 1 17 (ACHS) class of 2002 will 
be held on May 29 at 7:30 p.m. 

Congratulations to this year's graduates. 

Summer school 






June 10-July 3 

Antioch Community Consolidated Dist. 
34 will be hosting summer school for students 
entering grades 1-9 from June 10-July 3. The 
classes will be held at Antioch Upper Grade 

School. 

Summer school consists of 90 hours of 

class time at the cost of $70 per class. Classes 
will be offered in diree categories: remedial, 
enrichment and sports camp. 

Brochures are available in the school 
office. Call Jason Lind, 847-838-8374, for more 
information. 

Sign up for AUGS 
summer art 

Registration is taking place for Antioch 
Upper Grade School's summer art program to 
be held July 8-26. 

The program is called exploring art and is 
designed to give students experiences that 
include aesthetics, criticism, history and pro- 
duction. There will be two two-hour long ses- 
sions. 

The first session is for those currently in 
grades 2-4 and the second for those currently 
in grades 5-8. Session one begins at 8 a.m. and 
session two at 10:15 a.m. 

Class size is limited to 25 students. The 
cost is $105. Call the school for more informa- 
tion, 847-838-8400. 

Longtime Emmons 
teachers retire 

Two teachers at Emmons School Dist. 33 
will retire at the end of the school year. 

Beverly Kramer is presently the band and 
vocal music instructor. She has been in the 
district for 32 years. 

Kathy Lyman is the middle school math 



teacher and middle school team facilitator. 
She has been in die district for 15 years. 

Both have worked to make a strong differ- 
ence in the lives of the students they have 
worked with over the years. 

Teachers honored, 
former students sought 

Emmons School will be holding a special 
assembly on Wednesday, May 15 at 2:15 p.m. 
to honor retiring teachers Beverly Kramer and 
Kadiy Lyman. 

Community members and former stu- 
dents are invited to attend die event, though it 
is especially to give Emmons students an 
opportunity or recognize the accomplish- 
ments of these teachers. 

Former students who would like to make 
a comment or share some memories of either, 
or both, Kramer or Lyman should contact the 
school at 847-395-1105. 



'i 













■ 



- 

Early childhood 
development screening 

Children between the ages of 3-5 years old 
are eligible for early childhood development 
screening through Antioch Community 
Consolidated Dist. 34. 

The screening is a brief series of activities 
and observations designed to identify chil- 
dren who may have a potential problem 
requiring further assessments. 

Call the Dist. 34 special education office at 
847-838-8020 to schedule an appointment. 

Full-day kindergarten 

St. Peter School in Antioch offers a full-day 
kindergarten program with a full-day curricu- 
lum. The program offers a variety of experi- j 
ences that include phonetically based, hands 
on reading and language arts program as well 
as a hands on mathematics program. 

The program includes all subject areas 
that are meaningful to a kindergarten student 
in a Catholic environment. Call 847-395-0037 
to schedule a classroom visit. Applications for 
the 2002-03 school year are now being accept- 

ed. 



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May i 7, 2002 







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COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A3 



amp Crayon cMldren complete course 



ParA: program graduates second class 

ofthem." 



By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 

It was a standing room only 
crowd for the BK (before kinder- 
garten) Campers graduation cere- 
mony in the lower level classroom 
of parks and recreation departmen- 
t's building. Parents, siblings, 
grandparents, and Trustee Dorothy 
Larson, on behalf of the Village of 

Antioch filed in to be part of the fes- 
tivities. 

Debbi Foerster, program direc- 
tor, said, "We know they're going to 
be great in kindergarten. Be proud 



The program is part of the 
Antioch parks and recreation 
department's Camp Crayon and 
graduated its second class of 
campers. The BK Campers pro- 
gram was specifically designed by 
Foerster to help prepare those 4- 
year-olds who are to enter 
kindergarten in the coming 
school year. 

Foerster said this has been an 
emotional year for the children 
whose first day of class last fall was 
held on Sept. 11. "This has been a 
really special class and the children 



have done much more than we even 

.«■ ^^h ^^h jB 

thought they could," she added. 

The following twenty-six stu- 
dents are ready to enter kinder- 
garten in the fall: Isabella Beilucci, 
Zachary Besson, Alejandra Campos, 
Julia DeBoer, Austin George, Jack 
Patterson Gerber, John Gossman, 
Kendric Henderson, Kacy Jonites, 
Kaitlin Karawacki, Meagan Klaw, 
Jack Kovach, Jacob Lanahan, Collin 
Lenz, Anthony James Marsiglio, 
Nicole Mellen, Danielle Meyer, 
Morgan Musich, Elise O'Connell, 
Michaeleen Pecoraro, Eric 
Pedersen, Jessica Pedersen, 
Bradford Russell, Karlie Schnider, 
Grant Smith and jaclyn Ukleja. 



- ■ 

Pomp and circum 

Julia DeBoer wait to walk down the aisle to collect her diplomas 
at the Antioch parks department BK (before kindergarten 
Campers Graduation. 




Car seat safety check May 1 




Americam Le 






By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 



By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 



V * ■ ■ ■ 



"As a parent, you take for grant- 
ed that the car seat is going to work," 
said Lt. Chris Lienhardt information 
officer for the Antioch Fire Dept. 
"Car seats are complicated and 
there is a lot getting them adjusted 

properly." 

Because many of these seats 

aren't being used asjntended, the 
fire department is conducting a 
car seat safety check on Saturday, 
May 18 from 9 a.m.-l p.m. and the 

fire station located at 835 Holbek, 
on the corner of Holbek and 
Orchard. 

"Parents have the best inten- 
tions, but studies show that the 
leading cause of child fatalities is in 
the car," said Lienhardt. 

According to the National 
Highway Traffic Safety 

Administration, up to 92 percent of 
children that currently ride in car 
seats are doing so in a seat that is not 
being used correcdy." 

The inspection is free of charge 
and the fire department will have 
certified technicians onsite to both 
inspect the seats and to offer 
instruction on the proper use of the, 

seats. 

. The fire department offers die 
following reminders to Uiose using 



car seats. 

All children under 20 pounds 
must ride in a rear-facing seat. 
Children over 20 pounds are less 
than one year old must also ride in a 
rear-facing seat, though they need 
to have one wifii a higher weight rat- 
ing. 

Never leave the carrying handle 
of an infant seat in the up position. 
These handles are not crash tested 
and will splinter during a crash. 

Children between 20-40 pounds 
heed to be in seats with a five-point 
harness system. Children between 
40-80 pounds need to be in a boost- 
er seat. 

■ 

Bulky cloUiing such as snow- 
suits and heavy winter coats, do not 
allow for an accurate fit of the safety 

system. 

Always buckle up children no 

matter how short the trip. Over 75 

percent of all accidents happen 

within 25 miles of home. 

Lap belts alone are not safe 
enough for children. Children under 
the age of 12 years old need to ride 
in the back seat of the car. 

"We at the fire department are 
concerned with all safety, not just 
fire safety," said Lienhardt. "We 
hope parents and grandparents will 
recognize the importance of these 
safety checks and stop by the fire 
station." 




Classified 

* ■ . 

County 

Crossword 

tulIQilUl MI.MMM.MM.MI W 



B19 
,.B1 
,119 



JobMarketPlace Insert 

Healthwatch B8 

Home Marketer B16 

Horoscope B6 



LflnwIIIW MIMHMMItllMIMIII 1 I I 

lYlwVlcb IMIltMlltllMlltKMII U fl 

Obituaries B14 

OpUIlb I IMI HlDIU 



GET CONNECTED-Look for us on the Internet at WWW.LAKELANDMEDIA.COM 




Vol. 116 No. 20 A Lakeland Newspaper Founded 1886 

(USPS 027-080) Editorial OMice: Mombof ol Illinois Press Assoc. 

30 Soulh Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030 Look for us on the Internet at 

847-223-8161 WWW.LAKELANDMEDIA.COM 

Ollico ol Publication: 30 South Whitnoy St.. Grayslake. IL 60030. Phono 847-223-8161. 

Published wookly. periodical may postago paid at Grayslake. IL 6O030 
Homo Dolivory Ratos: $24.50 per year In Lake. Cook. Kenosha and McHonry Counties; 

olsovmoro $40.00 por year by mail paid In advance. 
Postmaster. Sand address changes to Antioch News. 30 South Wh.tnoy Stroel. P.O. Box 268. Grayslake. Illinois 60030. 



M.R. SCHROEDER 

Founder-1 904-1 986 

DAVID T. SHERMAN 

Advertising/Markoling Manager 

JOHN LEWIS ROBERT J. SCHROEDER 

SIS *—' ^" 

DAVID M. BARNES MARC JENKINS 

Classified Advertising Manager Managing Editor 

Contact us by e-mail. 
Classified Advertising: class@lakoiandmedia.com 
News/Press Releases: edil@lakelandmedia.com 



WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

Publisher 

CHRIS MONTES 



Accounting Manager 

JOHN PHELPS 

Sports Editor 

KAREN KUESTER 

i • Public Relations Coordinator 

Display Advertising: ads@lakelandmodia.com 
Circulation: circ0lakelandmedia.eom 
General Questions: quesQlakelandmedia.com 



• Members of the Antioch 
American Legion Post 748 and the 
women's auxiliary unit will be honor- 
ing veterans in a couple of different 
ways over the next couple of weeks. . 
Poppies will be distributed in 
exchange for cash contributions on 
Friday, May 17 and Saturday, May 
18. The proceeds are used to benefit 
programs for veterans and their 
families. 

Zella Larson, chair of the poppy 
committee said, "Both the men and 
the women's auxiliary will be out on 
Friday most of the day. We stay out 
distributing poppies as long as our 
stamina holds up." 

The hours on Saturday are 
somewhat dependent on the suc- 
cess of the distribution. "In the past, 
we've always come in by noon so we 
could tally and get our deposit into 
the bank," said Larson. "If things are 
going well,, we may stay out longer 
and make our deposit on Monday." 

She added that the American 
Legion as permission to distribute 
the poppies from Armanetti's, 
Jewel, Piggly Wiggly and the Post 
Office. She said that she hopes to 
have large placards made to put at 
the entrances of these locations to 
let passersby know the poppies are 
available. 



Larson explained that the pop- 
pies are made by disabled veterans 
in both Illinois VA hospitals and 
Veteran Homes and that these vet- 
erans receive & small income for 
their work. 

Less than one week later, on 
Wednesday, May 22, the combined 
forces of the American Legion and 



*s veteran 



the women's auxiliary will be plac- 
ing flags in seven different cemeter- 
ies in the area. 

"This is quite an undertaking," 
said auxiliary member Margaret 
Cole. "We have to go through the 
cemeteries and match the names 
with what we have on our lists, but 
it's well worth the effort." 



Residents dish up 8,500 pounds food 



By JUUE MURPHY 

Staff Reporter 





Each year the National 
ociation of Letter Carriers 
(NALC) union food drive in Antioch 
fills the shelves of local food 
pantries. This year, residents carried 
8,500 pounds of food out to their 
mailboxes for carriers to pick up 

along with the outgoing mail. 

. "We will distribute the- 8,500 
pounds of food to local pantries," 
said Union Steward Todd Erickson. 
"The food collected will go to the 
Antioch Community Food Pantry, 
St. Peter's Food Pantry and the 
Antioch Township Food Pantry." 

He added, "On behalf of the 
employees at the Antioch Post 
Office, the National Association 
of Letter Carriers Branch 409 and 
the three local food pantries, a 
heartfelt thank you to each 



Antioch resident." 

An open letter written to all 
Antioch residents expressed the 
same sentiment and was signed by 

rickson, Postmaster Tom Prince, 
Ann Krumpos of the Antioch 

Community Food Pantry and 

Deacon Scott Keenan of St. Peter's 

Food Pantry. 

Co-sponsors of the food drive 

with NALC are the U.S. Postal 
Service, the United Way, and the 
AFL-CIO Community Services divi- 
sion. Other national supporters 
include the United Auto 
Workers/Saturn Partnerships and 
the Campbell Soup Company. 

Local sponsors include local 
postal management, National Rural 
Letter Carrier Association and the 
American Postal Workers Union. 

"This was really a successful food 
drive," said Erickson. "We appreciate 
everyone who participated." 



Antioch students gets scholarship her way 



Who says fast food does not 
pay? Antioch Community High 
School student Stephanie Rock is 
the recipient of a $1 ,000 Burger King 
Scholars Award. 

Rock earned the scholarship 
due to her scholastic achievement, 



work experience and community 
involvement. The award was 
announced by the local franchise, 
Spence Group Services Inc. as part 
of the 2002 Burger King Scholars 
Program. Rock was one of 1,797 
recipients throughout the United 



States and Canada. The scholarship 
was funded in parts by money 
raised by the local franchise. 

Rock has had numerous 
achievements in school and at work, 
as well as community service and 
extracurricular activities. 







Ten months ago I was writ- 
ing about a unique group 
who called itself the Silent 
Angels and who won a 
good portion of the Fourth of July 
sport and game competitions here 
in Antioch. Last week I was glanc- 
ing at the news on television and 
saw Julia Roberts making a tear- 
ful, heartfelt plea of the govern- 
ment to increase research 
spending from $3.5 million to 
over $15 million to research a 
cure for a rare disease called 
Rett's Syndrome. 

The Silent Angels is a non-prof- 
it organization established 
February 2001 to raise awareness 
and money to research a treatment 
of a devastating neurological dis- 
ease called Rett's Syndrome named 
for the scientist Andreas Rett who 
discovered the chromosomal muta- 
tion. The organization's founder 
Karin Johnson, whose five-year old 
daughter suffers from the disease 
said, "This syndrome affects one in 
10,000 live female births. It's a 
mutation of the X chromosome. 




TOWM 



Julie Murphy 



Males with this mutation usually 
don't survive birth, and if they do 
they generally don't see a first 

birthday." 

Johnson described the horrific 
symptoms: "The girls develop nor- 
mally for the first 6-18 months of 
their lives, and then they quit mak- 
ing their milestones. If they've 
learned to talk, they lose their 
speech. Then they lose the pur- 
poseful use of their hands and 
arms. If they've learned to walk, 
they lose that skill too." 

With its fighting spirit intact, 
Johnson said the group intends to 
defend all of its titles again this year 
at die Fourth of July celebration 
here in Antioch. 

Before that, however, Silent 



Angels is holding its second annual 
bowling fundraiser at Bertrand 
Lanes in Waukegan on May 26 
from noon-3 p.m. One can either 
give a donation at the door, or fill 
out a pledge sheet. 

"We need to raise money for 
research to help these girls," said 

Johnson. 

For more information, or to 
make a donation contact the Silent 
Angels at Silent Angels MJRF, P.O. 
Box 561, Antioch, IL 60002, by 
phone 262-862-9425 or by e-mail 
silentangels@core.com. 

There will be an open house to 
honor Dorothy Horan for her 80th 
birthday at the Antioch Fire Station 
on Sunday, May 19 from 1-4 p.m. 

Any and all wishing to pass 
along are birthday greeting are wel- 
come to stop by to do so. 

4 

If you have interesting informa- 
tion or anecdotes to submit for "Out 
Town" call staff reporter Julie 
Murphy at 847-223-8161, ext. 600 or 
e-mail, moorflc@ix.netcom.com 




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A4 /Lakeland Newspapers 




COMMUNITY 



May i 7, 2002 




Village will listen to public concerns 



/wuimea io act as chair ot village plan- 
ning and zoning, I feel I must respond to the 
"Village won't listen" article published in 
another newspaper ("News Sun"). The author 
incorrectly implies that the 'village board 
members will not listen to input from a group 
of Antioch residents in regard to Wal-Mart. 

Nothing can be further from the truth. 

The meeting was continued to allow plan- 
ning and zoning committee members to have 
the time to ask full and in-depth questions of 
Great Lakes Principals (presenting the Wal- 
Mart proposal). Additionally, both positive 
and negative input is deeply wanted from the 
public on this issue. 

If reported correctly, the reading audience 
could have been informed that the lights in 
the building (a school) would have been 
turned off in fifteen minutes. If that had hap- 
pened, we would have been accused of hold- 
ing a meeting in the dark. 

Great Lakes Principals presented a three- 
hour, in-depth proposal because we said we 
wanted no surprises and wanted to know, up 
front, exactly what was being proposed. 




I want to assure the public that village 
board members are treating this as a seri- 
ous issue and will reach a decision that rep- 
resents the overall needs of all the residents 
of Antioch. Trustees take an oath to uphold 
the laws of the State of Illinois and of 
Antioch. 

Proceeding forward on a petition does 
not automatically mean that an issue is a 
"done deal." Following the proper proce- 
dure allows all sides to be heard and for 
trustees to reach a decision based upon the 
facts of a case. 

In closing, I want to commend the plan- 
ning and zoning committee members for 
serving the community to the best of their 
ability. It takes a lot for an individual to self- 
lessly volunteer and sit in front of what is 
sometimes a verbally hostile crowd and con- 
duct a public hearing. 

I hope that the next meeting, scheduled 
for June 6, will be conducted in a manner in 
which all of Antioch can be proud. 

Scott Pierce. 

Trustee, Village of Antioch 




■ 

Wal-Mart will 
impact Antioch 

The current Super Wal-Mart proposal 
filed with the Village of Antioch could signifi- 
cantly impact the vitality of our downtown, or 
local lakes and wildlife and our quality of life 
all with little or no gain in tax revenue. 

Studies have shown that any increase 
in jobs by Wal-Mart is more than offset by 
the loss of jobs from businesses forced to 
close. According to a May 7 "Chicago 
Tribune" article, Winn-Dixie, a grocery 
chain is closing stores in Texas and 
Oklahoma due to the intense competition 
led by Wal-Mart. These closures will result 
in the loss of about 5,300 jobs, or 4.4 per- 
cent of its workforce. 

The village is already hurting financially 
and this proposal has it paying nearly $250,000 
in road improvements. The developer has also 
requested reimbursement wiUi interest for $1 
million estimated for the cost of providing 
utility extensions. 

The village does not need to get further 
into debt. 

In addition, studies show mat over 50 per- 
cent of the estimated sales for the new Wal- 
Mart will be captured sales from existing down- 
town businesses and existing area Wal-Mart 
stores. These captured sales will surely be the 



demise of some existing Antioch businesses. 

You would think that this proposal should 
be a moot point because it is in clear violation 
of the Comprehensive Plan written by and for 
the Village of Antioch. "The village is a com- 
munity with a pleasant, small town character 
and quality. The mission of the 
Comprehensive Plan is to preserve and 
improve the character of the village." 

A 200,000 square foot store does not fit 
into this mission statement. 

The Comprehensive Plan specifies two 
types of land use classifications for businesses. 
The category that the Super Wal-Mart falls 
under is commercial. 

The Comprehensive Plan states: "For the 
study area, it is suggested that 5 acres be con- 
sidered the maximum in order to discourage 
large centers which would have a negative 
impact upon existing downtown Antioch and 
nearby existing shopping centers, along the 
southwest fringe of downtown." 

This proposal is calling for die planned 
development of 66 acres, over 10 times the 
suggested maximum. If you feel die plan is 
outdated, work on updating the plan to reflect 
the current and future vision of Antioch. Do 
not let the current proposal dictate Antioch's 
future growth. 

Jodi Gott 

Antioch 




. Am Echod to dedicate 
grounds of future synago 



PE0PU: W 







VIS 





Congregation Am Echod (Reform) will 
have a ceremony to dedicate its newly pur- 
chased property on Sunday, June 2, from 11 
a.m.— 3 p.m. The new synagogue is planned 
for a site at. Failing Waters Business Park in 
Lindenhurst, one-half-mile north of Grand 
Avenue on Route 45. 

The celebration will include lunch, a chil- 
dren's moonwalk, a balloon-artist clown and 
musical entertainment under a tent (rain-or- 
shine) on the property. The dedication cere- 
mony will take place at noon. 

Parking will be available behind the Lake 



Forest Hospital Health Club. 

The event is an opportunity for prospec- 
tive members to meet the temple community 
and have questions answered. 

Congregation Am Echod has a temporary 
facility at 2402 Harbor Ridge Way, behind 
Waterford Commons (Grass Lake Road, west 
of Route 45) in Lindenhurst, where services 
are held each Friday at 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 
Sunday morning services are held at 2250 
Yeoman Street in Waukegan. 

For further information, call Rachel at 
847-662-1359 or Phil at 847-623-4579. 



/. 



* » 

Basic Training 

Marine Corps Pvt Joshua F. Brilla, 

son of Bardra Karda of Antioch and Steven 
Brilla of Aurora, completed basic training at 
Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego. 

Brilla successfully completed 12 weeks of 
training designed to challenge new Marine 
recruits both physically and mentally. 

Alpha Lambda Delta 

Loren Reynolds accepted membership 
and was initiated into National Alpha Lambda 
Delta Honor Society. She will be serving on 
the Executive Board of the Honor Society. 
Reynolds attends the University of Illinois 
Urbana-Champaign.A 2001 graduate of 
Antioch Community High School. 

* 



;;.-«-' 



Remax Hall of Fame 

'do Forth of Remax 
Advantage Realty in Antioch was inducted 
into the Remax Hall of Fame in ceremonies 
in both Chicago and Orlando, Fla. Forth 
resides in Antioch with her husband and 
has four grown children. She is the daughter 
of Sam and Frances Lombardo, also of 
Antioch. 

Tripp presents honors 

Meagan Tripp of Antioch and a gradu- 
ate of Antioch Community High School, pre- 
sented a paper titled "Americanisms in 
Present-Day German: Neudeutsch?" She 
participated in the Alma College Honors Day 
program. 



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Please turn to 



COUISIIfif SECTIO 



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for additional 
Sports Coverage 



May 1 7, 2002 



with an attitude 





Lakeland Newspapers / A9 



=r: 





By JOHN PHELPS 
Sports Editor 



bullies way past Sequoits 




.1 



Lupus Foundation of Illinois Executive 

Director Pat Galloway talks about the 

effects and dangers of the disease 

lupus at the first northside Lupus 

Foundation golf outing at Brae Loch 

G.C. in Grayslake. —Photo by John 
Phelps 

Now you know 



ow many people were aware that an 
estimated 1.5 million people are 
diagnosed with lupus, 90 percent of 
which are women? 
Thought so. 

Well, the Lupus Foundation of Illinois is 
here to help make everyone more cognizant. 

This chronic autoimmune disease can 
affect any part of the body. The immune system 
becomes hyperactive, attacking healthy tissues 
and organs. It's still undetermined the exact 
cause of lupus but folks, keep an eye out for the. 
symptoms, like achy, painful and or swollen 
joints, an unexplained fever over 100 for more 
than a few days, or numbness or paleness in the 
fingers and or toes. 

"We've started stem-cell research. It's suc- 
cessful but you still need to monitor the patient 
closely," said Lindenhurst's Mary Erl, a board 
member and co-chairman of the first annual 
northside Lupus Foundation of Illinois golf out- 
ing last week at Brae Loch Golf Course in 
Grayslake. Erl is also a survivor of more than 20 
years from this somewhat mysterious disease. 

She used to be on the committee for the 
southside Lupus golf outing, which has hosted 
its annual golf outing for the past eight years at 
the Odyssey Golf Club in Tinley Park. This 
year's event at the Odyssey will take place on 
Sept. 12. - 

But Erl moved north to Lindenhurst and 
thought it would be a great idea to start a 
"northside" golf outing to further aid in lupus 
research and education. 

* , • 

"I thought it was very successful for our first 
one up here. We had 65 golfers," said Lupus 
Foundation of Illinois Executive Director Pat 
Galloway, also a lupus survivor who has been 
clean for six years. "We hope to have this outing 
up her every spring. If you've had a disease like 
this or similar, your perspective on life totally 
changes. You find yourself smiling more when 
you get out of bed because you appreciate the 
simple things more." 

Galloway said that the Lupus Foundation of 
Illinois received $200,000 in pledges for stem 
cell treatments at Rush Memorial Hospital in 
Chicago. In addition, $100,000 was generated 
from the Lupus Research Institute. 

Lupus is very individualized and if detected 
early, 90 percent of it is treatable. As far as treat- 
ments, there are plenty of drugs and antibiotics 
that help curtail and limit the affects. But the 
side effects from the treatments can be equally 
devastating as having the disease it self. 

"Lupus not a direct hereditary gene," added 
Galloway. "Osteoporosis, arthritis and in the 
case of chemotherapy, sterility, are some of the 
unfortunate side effects," said Galloway 

The golf outing started eight years ago 
when Tim Meehan was suddenly afflicted with 
and passed away from lupus. The event serves 
as a tribute and memorial. 

The Illinois Lupus Foundation, which 

evolved 29 years ago, also holds an annual 5k 

walk/ run over the summer. Last year, that event 

drew over 800 people. 

The Chicago Wolves and La Jolla (Calif.) 

Pharmaceuticals were proud sponsors in the 
event; 

As for general information on lupus or to 
inquire about any of the foundation's events, 
please call 773-445-7071. 






John G. Phelps can be reached at 847-223- 
8161, ext. 132; fax (847) 223-8810; or e-mail at 
edit@lnd.com. 






Perhaps the Antioch varsity softball team 
was a litde overanxious when it traveled to 
Mundelein to tangle with the North 
Suburban Lake champion Mustangs Tuesday 
afternoon. 

"That was one of the ugliest games we've 
had all year," said Sequoit head coach Jen 
Schultz, whose team was blindsided 11-0 in 
five innings. "We shot ourselves in the foot. 
It was overkill. We were so pumped about 
the game but when we took the field, we 
were intimidated. We killed ourselves in the 
field and led to lack of confidence at the 
plate." 

Mundelein's Rachel Cleaveland had 
something to do with it too. 

The junior ace kept Antioch off balance 

with the high heater all afternoon. She set 

down eight Sequoits while firing a one-hitter 

in going the distance to improve her season 
mark to 20-1. 

"She's got great movement and really 
picks her spots," said senior Trista 
Campbell, who smacked a two-run homer 
over the left field fence in a 3-run second- 
inning for the hosts. "We've also been com- 
ing in for extra hitting on Tuesday and 
Thursday morning. That's really paid off for 
us at the plate." 

Campbell finished the afternoon 2-for-3, 
including the round-tripper to go along with 
three RBI and a run scored. 

The Mundelein bats were alive early and 
often, to the tune of 14 hits off Antioch ace 
Kristin Elstrbm. 

Brandi Simon went 3-for-3 with a double, 



three runs scored and an RBI, Amber Henley 
2-for-4 with a runs scored, and Ashley 
Wierema l-for-3 with two RBI and two runs 
scored. Five consecutive singles to start the 




Antioch's Kristin Elstrom fires the heat 
during regular-season action against 
Libertyville. The Sequoits hit a minor 
speed bump Tuesday when it fell to 
North Suburban Lake champion 
Mundelein ll-O. —Photo by Steve 
Young 



game helped produce four runs, more than 
enough for Cleaveland. 

The lone hit for Antioch was a second- 
inning single off the bat of Carolyn Cooley. 

After that, Cleaveland retired the next 10 
batters to end the game. 

"Rachel's really improved a lot (since her 

sophomore year)," said Schultz, who helped 

coach the Mustangs for four years during the 

Michelle Kass era. "She's got great control. 

We we're suckered in by the high fastballs 
today." 

For the season, Cleaveland has struck out 
177 batters while issuing only 14 free passes. 

Errors didn't help the Sequoits' cause. 
They committed four on die day after going 
10 games prior with none. 

"The hoopla's over now," said Schultz, 
"We're going to keep our heads highland 
work on the basics (Wed. in practice). We get 
our throws down and work on our short 
game." ■--___- 

The two teams will square off again May 
16 at Polley Field in Antioch. First pitch is slat- 
ed for 4:30 p.m. 

"We've just been trying to enjoy ourselves 
out there," said Mustang head coach Toni 
Campbell, whose team lost its first two games 
of die season but has rolled off 25-straight 
since. 

The Mustangs, who will host the section- 
als in a couple of weeks, follow-up the return 
date widi Antioch by traveling to either NSC 
Prairie champ Zion or Vernon Hills May 10 
for the outright conference crown. 

With the loss, Antioch fell to 6-3 in the 
NSC Lake and a very respectable 19-8 over- 
all. Antioch will travel to Cary-Grove May 
21 in a final tune-up for regionals. 



Hoogerhyde's doing better, and so is Sequoit baseball 



By JOE PRUSKI 

Correspondent 



Serious injuries can sometimes be expect- 
ed in sports that have a high degree of physi- 
cal play such as basketball and football. 
However, when three-sport Antioch High 
School athlete Brad Hoogerhyde stepped on 
the mound for the second game of a double 
header against Warren High School, baseball 
proved to be the unlikely threat. 

While pitching to a Warren batter, 
Hoogerhyde found a line drive shot off the hit- 
ter's bat coming directly at his face with no 
time to react What resulted was Hoogerhyde 
on- the ground covering his face while blood 
came down the sides. 

- • 

After a spectator called an ambulance, 
Hoogerhyde was rushed to the hospital where 
he would spend the next four nights. 



The injuries suffered by Hoogerhyde were a 
broken bone in his eye socket, two broken 
bones in his cheek, and a shattered main 
cheekbone. 

Luckily for Hoogerhyde none of the 
injuries suffered had any impact on his vision. 
Tiie second day of Hoogerhyde's hospital stay 
consisted of surgery where three titanium 
plates were inserted into his cheek. 
Although the magnitude of Hoogerhyde's 
injuries was serious at the time, all that 
remains now is a swollen cheek and a swollen 
eye. 

Hoogerhyde will miss the remainder of 
this season. However, he expects to be ready 
for football season is the fall, and continue on 
as being a three-sport athlete at Antioch high 
School. 

As for his teammates, they looked to pick 
up a North Suburban Conference Lake 



Division win against Mundelein in Antioch on 
Tuesday. Taking a 1-0 lead into the sixth 
inning, Sequoit pitcher Shawn Schuler gave 
up two runs in the top half of the sixth to put 
Antioch down one run. In the bottom of the 
sixth, Antioch loaded the bases, however, 
failed to bring any runs across to score. 

After a scoreless top-half to seventh- 
inning, Antioch quickly tied the game up in 
the bottom of the frame. With a runner on 
first, right fielder Scott Coles singled to move 
the runner to diird, before a wild Mundelein 
pitch got past the catcher and allowed Nick 
Severson to score the winning run. 

With the win, Antioch improves to 21 -7 on 
the season. The seeding meeting to determine 
playoff pairings was held late Tuesday night. 
Antioch surely looks to be one of the top-four 
seeds for the upcoming regionals, which 
begin in two weeks. 




netters sixth in N 



By JOE PRUSKI 

Correspondent 




: sectionals next 



Strong play from the No. 2 singles and 
doubles netted the Antioch varsity boy's ten- 
nis team a sixth-place effort. in the North 
Suburban Conference Meet over the weekend 
atZion-Benton. 

Andrew Nichols, playing No. 1 singles for 
the Sequoits, was defeated in the preliminary 
round of the tournament by Robert Cooper of 
Mundelein in straight sets 2-6, 5-7. 

Although Nichols had a tough outing, 
Antioch's No. 2 singles player put some points 
on die board in winning the consolation tide. 
Rob Janke defeated his Vernon Hills opponent 
in die preliminary round before losing in die 
first round. Janke defeated his opponent from 
Zion in the second round. He then prevailed 
in the diird round over Warren en route to die 
consolation tide. 

In the three matches and six games that 
Janke won, he defeated his opponents by a 
combined score of 37-12. 

"The match that stood out was the match 
against Zion," said Antioch head coach Brian 
Plinske. "A couple of Umes Rob found himself 
at the net after hitting a short ball. This is a bad 



position to be in, however, it didn't phase him, 
the kid was unflappable." 

Much of die same situation occurred in 
the doubles competition for Antioch. After 
Nate Pratt and Carl Slimp lost to the Round 
Lake doubles team in two close sets (6-7, 6-7), 
while the No. 2 team fared much better. 
After a 6-1, 6-1 victory over Vernon Hills, the 
Antioch duo dropped straight sets to Warren. 
However, recovering form their losses, they 
went on to defeat Round Lake and Mundelein 

to win die No. 2 doubles consolation champi- 
onship. 

"It must be tough to play against Mark 
and Andrew," said Plinske. "When Mark can 
hit a 50-foot high lob and bounced it to within 
two feet of die baseline consistendy, you just 
know it's going to be a tough day. The only 
option (for the odier team) is to go at the net. 
When the net man (Andrew) is getting a rack- 
et on everydiing and hitting winners, there 
isn't much left. Mark and Andrew played the 
best match they have all season." 

Antioch's No. 3 doubles team of Ben 
Newton and Pro Shah started their conference 
tournament on the right foot by beating 
Wauconda in the preliminary round. 
However, after losine to Lake Forest in the first 




» 



Antioch Community High School's 
Andrew Nichols volleys to Warren 
Township's Josh Moran during No. 1 
singles play in Gurnee.— Photo by 
Sandy Bressner 

round, Newton and Shall dropped their sec- 
ond straight match in three sets to die No. 3 
Grant team. 

The Sequoits will look to carry on the 
momentum down the stretch run as it will 
compete in the McHenry sectional May 17- 
18. 















V 



> 









I 



S 



• \ 



• ■ 



A10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



May 1 7, 2002 








* 



Rematch with Stevenson 
in regional opener 

By WESLEY WARD 

Correspondent 

Earlier in the season, the Antioch's girl's 
soccer team suffered a tough 2-1 loss against 
North Suburban rival Stevenson. 

In that loss, the Sequoits found them- 
selves down two goals in the first 12 minutes 
of play. Gina Florian pulled a goal back for 
Antioch in the 20th minute, but the Sequiots 
squandered several opportunities in front of 
goal and were unable to find an equalizer. 

"We may have lost 2-1, but we thought 
that was a game we could have won," said 
Antioch head coach Charlie Trout. "We had 
plenty of opportunities to win, we just didn't 

convert." 

On Tuesday, the two teams will face once 
again in the first round of regional action. Safe 
to say, the Sequoits will be looking for a little 
revenge over the seventh-seeded Patriots. 
Pasts results will not matter come game time, 
and as hosts of the sectional, a home crowd 
will be on hand to support. Antioch. 

"Defensively, we are going to need to play 
tight and limit the mental mistakes," said 
Trout. "Last time we .played Stevenson, we 
were in a two goal whole early and that is hard 
for any team to get out of." 
Vicky Garrison, Beth Fries, Katie Lincoln and 



soccer hopin 

Katie Malcolm have been strong defensively 
for the Sequoits this season. However, in order 
for Antioch to advance to the sectional final 
and face the winner of the Lake Zurich-Zion- 
Benton game, the defensive unit is going to 
have to raise its game to another level. 

Offensively, Robyn Mortenson has led the 
team in scoring with 21 goals and seven 
assists. Mortenson and Lauren Hungarland 



to turn 



'It has been a season wliere we are 
p one day and down the next If 
the right team sJwws 

every chance of winning 

Antioch Head Coach Charlie Trout 

* 

have combined to give the Sequoits a formi- 
dable 1-2 punch on the field. 

Hungarland, with 18 assists on the season, 
became to school's all-time leader in that cat- 
egory this season and will be attending NCAA 
Division I outfit, Davidson College, next fall. 

But injuries have forced Trout to play 
underclassmen throughout the season. While 
the rtrong group of sophomores and fresh- 
men has developed significandy over the sea- 
son, the Sequoits youth has had a part to play 
in the team's inconsistency. This is best exhib- 
ited by the team's 5-1 loss against Mundelein 
last week. It did rebound however for a con- 



* ' 





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Antioch Community High School's Jenny Thompson l"^^ %^^ftS"jbt 
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Sandy Bressner 



:ing 6-0 victory over Round Lake. 
"It has been a season where we are up one 
day and down the next," said Trout. "If the 



right team shows up we have every chance of 




winning." . ■ , . 

Against the Pats, the right team had better 

show up or Antioch's season will come to an 
abrupt end. 




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May 1 7, 2002 



COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A5 










art 




announce 
how winners 





.• . 



Several ribbons and special awards were 
presented to students who participated in the 
Antioch Woman's Club art show held at the 
Antioch Community High School (ACHS). 

This is the fifteenth year the club has spon- 
sored the show. This year five of eight feeder 
schools invited and the high school itself par- 
ticipated in the show. 

The judge's choice award went to 
Cameron Van Deusen, and the visitors' choice 
award went to Ryan Burgess, both are students 

of ACHS. 

Winners in the three-week summer art camp 
program category were Marcus Sheldon of St. 
Peter School and K.J. Florman of Millburn 
School. The first alternate in that category was 
Danielle Franke of ACHS, second was Adam 
Wilson of Millburn and third was Nathan 
David of Antioch Upper Grade School (AUGS). 
Eleven first place blue ribbons were 
awarded to the following: Megan Toczel, 
Emmons School; Burgess, ACHS; Franke, 
ACHS; Brandon Booth, Emmons School; 



Adam Wilson, Millburn School; Florman, 
Millburn; Gabriel Manalansan, Palombi 
Middle School; Bryan Montgomery, Palombi 
Middle School; Mike Olson, AUGS; David, 
AUGS; and Marcus Sheldon, St. Peter School. 
Eleven second place red ribbon winners 
were selected, two each from ACHS, Millburn 
School, AUGS, Palombi Middle School and 
Emmons School and one from St. Peter 

School. . 

Fifty-five students received honorable 

mention with 10 awards each going to ACHS, 

Millburn School, AUGS, Palombi Middle 

School and Emmons School and five from St. 

Peter School. 

For fifteen years the Antioch Woman s 
Club has sponsored a special art show for area 

schools. 

The following schools were invited to par- 
ticipate in this show. AUGS, Emmons School, 
Grass Lake School, Millburn School, Palombi 
Middle School, Prince of Peace School; St. 
Peter School and ACHS. 



Joseph Wojdygo Wade IV f a son, 

Joseph Wojdygo, was born April 27 at 
Condell Medical Center in Libertyville to Joe 
and Elizabeth Wade of Antioch. 
Grandparents are Pam and Joe Wade of 
Palatine and Tom and Lynn Hanna of 
Palatine. Great grandparents are Francis 
Miller of Grand Rapids, Mich. And Grace 
Hanna of Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Cassandra Hope Graham, a daughter, 

Cassandra Hope and Cameron Walter 
Graham, a son, Cameron Walter, twins, 
were born May 5 at Condell Medical Center 
to David and Jeri Graham Sr. of Antioch. 
Their brother is D.J. Graham, age 9. 
Grandparents are Louise and Joe Gutowski of 
Antiochl; Corky and Julie Graham of Palm 
Harbor, Fla. and Bonnie and John Boldt of 
Nita, Mo. Great grandparents are Walter; 
Shirley Graham of Lakeland, Fla. and Troy 
Hamm of Fulton, Miss. 





Library plans 

trip 

Every summer the Antioch Public Library 
plans a reading adventure for the area's chil- 
dren. This year's summer reading program is 
"Reading Road Trip, USA.'.' 

In addition to encouraging children to 
read, the library has several different perfor- 
mances planned at the Lions Pavilion in 
William's Park, directly behind the library. 
Performers will ride BMX stunt bikes and dis- 
cuss bicycle safety. Additionally, there will be a 
show of exotic animals, magic tricks, juggling, 
sing songs, dance, stories, and a look back at 
prehistoric times with dinosaurs. 

Registration will take place June 1-15 at the 
children's desk in the library. 

Reading Road Trip adventurers must be 3- 
12 years old. The journey begins on June 17 
and ends July .29. For more information, check 
thn. web site www.antiochdistricdibrary.org. 



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mond wants funds restored 

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State Representative Timothy Osmond 
(R-Antioch) is calling upon members of the 
state legislature to reinstate funding cut from 
programs for the mentally ill and develop- 
mentally disabled. 

: Osmond held a press conference in 
Springfield, backing a proposal from House 
Republican Leader Lee Daniels to restore me 
funding cut from agencies managing those 

programs. 

"The proposed cuts would be disastrous 
for programs that serve our most vulnerable 
citizens," Osmond said. "Many care providers 
are already experiencing financial hardships 



due to late payments from the state. Cutting 
their budgets will jeopardize the care drey pro- 
vide to those who cannot care for themselves." 
Developmental^ disabled and mentally 
ill programs lost more that $66 million from 
the General revenue Funds in the planned 
budget for the Fiscal Year 2003. The proposal 
put forth by the house republicans calls for 
reductions in operational and administrative 
expenses in the Illinois Department of Human 
Services. Osmond noted equipment purchas- 
es, contractual services, opertion of automo- 
biles and increase in grant line items would be 
targeted for the cuts. 





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for the benefit of 



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May 18, 2002 
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Saturday, 6:30 p.m. 

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Hosted By: Slovak American Charitable Association 




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A6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



May 1 7, 2002 









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report found that Antioch would receive 
$122,000 in new property tax annually on 
property currently bringing about $25,000 in 
annual property taxes. 

Of the area defined as the prime trade 
area with Wadsworth to the east, Richmond 
to the west, Lake Villa to the south (the small- 
est leg outward from Antioch) and Hwy. 50 to 
the north, about 60,000 people, Barrett said, 
"The bottom line is that the trade area is sig- 
nificant in size in the number of people and 
hot just acreage. It's growing and it (sales tax 
revenues) is leaving." 

He also noted that 70 percent of Antioch's 
sales tax revenues come from about three 

MB^ 

sources: food, drug and automotive. "This is a 
fragile, vulnerable base," he said. "The other 
30 percent doesn't come from general mer- 
chandise." 

arrett said that 85 percent of the project 
volume, or $42 million, would capture sales 
that are currently leaving. "This project allows 
Antioch to take back the sales tax dollars leav- 
ing Antioch." 

Of the affect on current businesses, 
excluding grocery, he said, "Take a look at the 
sales tax reports. There aren't places in Antioch 
to take this volume (general sales) from." 

Chris Danos, Wal-Mart real estate man- 
ager for the chain in Illinois, Wisconsin and 
Michigan (less the Detroit metro area), talked 
about why the decision was made to come to 
Antioch and why the decision was made to 
come to the location at Deep Lake Rd. and 
Rte. 173. 

" Why Antioch?" he asked rhetorically. He 
then answered his own question and said tlia 



. 




* 

when Wal-Mart tracked its own sales within a 
10 mile radius of Antioch it found that $10 mil- 
lion in sales in other stores comes from the 

■ - 

Antioch trade area. 

^^^^^^^ tiat the chain looks for good 

east- west roads and good north-south roads 
to access the store. 

"Our stores take more than 20 acres of 
land," he added. "You're not going to find that 
downtown." 

He said the company had researched 
every piece of land along Deep Lake Rd. from 
the new high school north until it hit the wet- 
lands. "The lack of wetlands made this site 
desirable," he said. 

Linda Huff, an environmental consultant 
from Huff and Huff, is working with the devel- 
oper to ensure that if the project goes through, 
there is no impact on the surrounding lakes 
and wetlands. She said, "We are using a variety 
of practices so that there is no impact." 

Huff explained those practices as using no 
fertilizers or herbicides, sweeping the dirt that 
comes from cars so it doesn't enter the system 
with the rain and using salting alternatives. 

"We want to not have an affect on the 
environment. We want to this development to 
be zero impact/ she said. 

Bob Silhan, director of planning, ; 
and building for the Village of Antioch, made 
his comments before the meeting was contin- 
ued to June 6. Notable in his comments was 
mat while the Comprehensive Plan talks about 
preserving the character of Antioch it also says, 
under mission goals (page 12), that it sho'uld 
avoid problems such as a depleted tax base and 
increase taxes and employment in the area. 





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Commence Blushing 

Morgan Musich, with Austin George and Michaeleen Pecoraro, entertains parents 
with their rendition of "Three Little Kittens" prior to the graduation ceremony. 
Photo by Julie Murph 



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was interested in purchasing." 

Somerville said the woman met Carlson 
and Rogge through the individual selling the 
camper. They allegedly convinced' the 
woman that there was a camper in northern 
Wisconsin that would be suitable for her, but ~ 

■ • ■ 

that she would need to make up her mind 
right away. 

"The woman gave the two men $1,000 
cash for the purchase of the camper," said 
Somerville. "The men then also offered to sell 
the victim the car they were driving, and she 
gave them an additional $750 toward the pur- ; 
chase of the vehicle." 

The victim told Somerville that Rogge and 
Carlson offered to use the car to pick up the 
camper from Wisconsin, and that she has 
seen neither the men nor her money since 
that time. 

Investigation led to the positive identifi- 
cation of Rogge and Carlson, who are both 
believed to be in Florida. 

"Beware of deals that appear to be too 
good to be true and require a quick purchase 
involving cash," said Somerville. "These are 
often the warning flags of a scam." 

If convicted, Rogge and Carlson could 
face 2-5 years in prison. Anyone with infor- 
mation concerning the whereabouts of the 
two men is urged to call the Antioch Police 
Dept. 047-395-8585. 



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PD apprehends 
forger 



By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 



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Alyssa Cook, 11, 
ing a Civic Club 
Krueger 



Bumper 2 bumpers 

takes her sister Hannah, 2, for a ride on the bumper cars dur- 
fund-raising carnival in downtown Antioch. — Photo by David 



Chad Abbott, 20, of Round Lake, was 
arrested on April 4 for forgery and possession 
of stolen property. The arrest came after an 
investigation of a suspicious transaction at the 
State Bank of The Lakes in Antioch. 

Detective Sgt. "Craig Somerville of the 

Antioch. Police Dept. said an account holder 

.-.contacted die bank after receiving notice of an 

•j -unauthorized : check in the amount of $800 

that had been cashed on her account. The vie- 

tim Tiled an affidavit of forgery and contacted 

police. : ■;;..'; j:;:' 

"The suspect apparently found an old 
checkbook belonging to the victim alongside 
the road near his house, and decided to write 
himself a check for $800," said Somerville. 
"The victim wasn't sure how the checkbook, 
which was fairly old, got into his hands." 

Investigation led to the identification and 
arrest of Abbott. 

Forgery is a class 3 felony mat is punish- 
able by 2-5 years in prison upon conviction. 

"the lesson here is to destroy old check- 
books before disposing of them," said 
Somerville. 




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Dr. Lee M. Tisa, Podiatrist 

NEW ADVANCES IN BUNION TREATMENT 
NOW AVAILABLE IN LAKE COUNTY 



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I have been performing a new surgical 
technique for the permanent correction of 
bunion foot deformities. 
The technlaue Is based on Swiss bone fixation 
principal, wnlch took over 40 years to develop 
and perfect in Europe. 

;The advantages of this new procedure are many; 
'•I) Eliminates the need for cast 
immobilization after surgery; 2) May be done on 
an out-patient basis, which eliminates costly 
hospitalization; 3) Enables the patient to resume 
normal shoe gear in 3 weeks, where other 
procedures usually take '8 to 12 weeks; A) 
Immediate mobility after surgery without the 
use of crutches, walkers or cane. 
Many patients have this procedure performed 
on a Friday and return to work on Monday, 
however this is limited to those patients who do 
not stand a great deal while at work. . . 
Utilizing the, Swiss technique, the bunion 
deformity is corrected by repositioning the 



bone. The bone is then fixated in the proper 
position. The patient may exercise the joint 
immediately, wnlch promotes faster healing and 
alleviates the usual joint stiffness normally 
associated with bunion surgery. 
If you are suffering from painful bunions, please 
feel free to contact Dr. Lee M.Tisa for a no cost 
consultation to discuss your condition and your 
treatment options. 

* * * * 

1616 Grand Ave. • Waukegan 

847-662-0660 

or 

Heritage Medical Center 

800 North Main • Antioch 

847-395-2339 



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CARS, CARS, CARS 

A number of events in 
the area / LL3 



MOVIE REVIEW 

'Spider-Man' a sequal 



in 2003 / LL8 




Entertainment & Leisure 

_ i _ _ 



IDEA HOME 2002 

'Midwest Living' home opens 
May 1 7 in Antioch / LL9 






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NEWSPAPERS 



May 17-23, 2002 







or more than 20 years Lake County 
residents, as well as 22 million oth- 
ers, have tuned in each weeknight 
making Wheel of Fortune not only 
the most popular game show in America, but 
also the No. 1 -rated syndicated program on 
TV. 

Part of the show's charm is the viewer's 
ability to play along at home. Unlike many 
other game shows, Wheel of Fortune features 
puzzles and questions that most people, at 
least eventually, know the answer to. 

Most people 
think if they 
ever, got the 
chance, they 
would win a for- 
tune on the 
show. But what 
if that dream 
did come true? 

What if had the 

chance to be a 

contestant? 

How would you do competing against more 

than 10,000 other hopefuls? And if selected, 

how would you fare under the pressure of the 

lights, audience and the chance to win— or 

lose — thousands of dollars? 

I recently had the opportunity to find 
out. 

When I heard that Wheel of Fortune was 
coming to Chicago I e-mailed everyone I 
knew and told them to sign up for a random 




By Dave Sherman 
Lakeland Advertising/Marketing Manager 

chance to audition for the show. Who would 
have guessed that I'd be the one selected? 
One month after filling out a form on 
WLS-TV's web site, I received an e-mail con- 
gratulating me on being selected to try out 
for the show. At the audition held at the 
Palmer House in downtown Chicago, we 
were told that more than 10,000 people 
applied and that the number chosen was less 
than 500. 

We were broken up into audition groups 
of around 100 people, where you had one 

chance and one 
chance only to 
pick a letter for a 
puzzle that was 
projected on the 
hotel ballroom's 
wall. Your name 
was called and you 
picked a letter. 
If you got it 
right, you picked 
again. If you were 
wrong, there was no second chance. 
Ironically, on my only turn I called a letter 
that was already picked. But I guess that did- 
n't matter. 

Next was a written exam of sorts. You had 
five minutes to solve twenty puzzles that 
were partially filled in and divided into four 
completely different categories. It was hard. 
Guessing, I'd say 1 got maybe six or seven 
correct. The entire time, both during the 



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on May 2 

exam,, when it was your turn to gues 
even while you watched the others play, you 
were being watched and the producers were 
taking notes. 

After the exam we took a break. The pro- 
ducers told us that about 25 of us would 
remain after they graded the exams. After 20 
minutes they came back, thanked us all for 
coming and read the list of finalists. I was the 
last one called. 

The finalists then broke into groups of 
four and played simulated games. 1 did much 
better during my two games, although I • 
never guessed the puzzle. After an hour they 
told us that if we made it they would call us 
on Tuesday. 





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I received my call on Monday night. Ever 
heard the term "bouncing off walls"? That is 
exactly what my wife Tami and I were doing. 
I'm lucky that our cat Tanner wasn't hurt in 
the celebration. On Thursday, I was going to 
be a real contestant on Wheel of Fortune. 
The morning the show was taped at Navy 
Pier, after signing a contract that is more 
than 10 pages long, we were given the rules 
and potential categories. Did you know that 
there are more than 40 different puzzle group 
categories? Then we were sequestered by the 
"game show marshal". Ever since the quiz 



Please see SPIN / LL2 



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Lakeland Newspapers 



May 1 7, 2002 







El 




quiz show scandals of the 1950s, federal law 
has required game show security. 

After all the paperwork, we went to the 
makeup room and then finally were able to 
tour the 2,000-seat makeshift studio and 
practice spinning "The Wheel." The first 
thing that came out of every contestant's 
mouth— there were 15 of us filming five 
episodes — was just how heavy the wheel 
was. After practicing we went back upstairs 
to eat lunch and drew straws to see who 
would go first. 

I was in the first group. We had no time 
to be nervous. Immediately after being 
picked we were walked straight down and on 
stage. We never even got the chance to meet 
Vanna White or Pat Sajak before the show 
began. One minute I was eating a sandwich, 
the next I was standing in front of 2,000 peo- 
ple including my wife, my father-in-law Stu 
and his mom, Betty,and our friends, Bruce 
and Mindy. It took about five seconds to 
realize this was real. Any mistake would be 
seen in front of more than 20 million people. 
Just as the butterflies were about to hit— the 
show began. 

The pressure and nervousness then went 
away as I began to play. The biggest differ- 
ence when you are on stage, as compared to 
playing at home on your couch, is that when 




Lakeland's David Sherman spins 
again, hoping for a big payout. The 
wheel, Sherman says, was surprisingly 
heavy and a challenge to spin.— Photo 
courtesy of Wheel of Fortune/Sony 

• — 

you're at home it's always your turn. On the 
show, you have two seconds to think or you 
lose your turn. It's that quick, not a lot of 
time to think. 

About now you are probably wondering 
how I did. Unfortunately, I don't want to 
spoil the surprise. You'll have to watch Wheel 
of Fortune this Monday, May 20, at 6:30 p.m. 
on ABC-TV channel 7. 




28th Annual Wright Benefit housewalk 




he Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation 
Trust announces the lineup of pri- 
vate homes to be featured on this 
year's exclusive Wright Plus 
Housewalk. Saturday, May 18, eight private 
residences will open their doors to rare inte- 
rior tours from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 

The buildings featured are located in the 
historic communities of Oak Park and River 
Forest. 

In association with "Architectural 
Digest," Wright Plus will feature special 
programs and premiums for patrons. 



Tickets for the benefit housewalk are on 
sale now and can be purchased by calling 
708-848-9518, or on-line at www.wright- 
plus.org. Ticket price is $70 per 
Preservation Trust member (limit of 4 
tickets at discounted price) and $85 for 
each non-member. 

The proceeds from this annual house- 
walk support the education, preservation 
and restoration programs of the Frank 
Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust. Call 708- 
848-1976 for more information on the 
Wright Plus. 



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Summer classes starting June 



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.Spec/a/ teen classes 



summer 



classes 



Children 



adult classes 



inners throu 



advanced 



heavy shoe classes 
Libertyville Location 

more information, please contact 

Barbara McNulty 

847.698.4434 

e-mail: irshdancr@aol.com 



www.mcn 



ishdancers.com 






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Hollywood Arms' difficult to embrace 





The transition 
from book to 
stage often 
involves 
crossing a slippery 
slope. That's no more 
apparent man in the 
case of "Hollywood 
Arms," a new comedy 
based on comedienne 
Carol Burnett's best- 
selling 1986 memoir 
"One More Time." 

Written by 
Burnett and her 
daughter Carrie 
Hamilton, who died 
earlier this year, and 
directed by Harold 
Prince, "Hollywood 
Arms" premiered at 
Chicago's Goodman 
Theatre amidst high hopes. 

But even a solid cast and fine set weren't 
enough to hide the awkwardness of this ram- 
bling, jerky and overlong production — occa- 
sional laughs and bright touches of nostalgia 

notwithstanding. 

Act I set in 1941 just prior to World War 
II, follows Helen's (Sara Niemietz) journey 
from child to young woman. She and her 
protective fussbudgetl 
grandmother Nanny 
(the superb Linda 
Lavin who never 
breaks character) take a tiny, low-rent apart- 
ment in a decidedly less-than-glamorous 
part of Hollywood. Their room is down the 
hall from that of Helen's mother Louise 
(Michele Pawk), a hard-drinking free-spirited 
woman caught up in illusions of becoming a 
big-time celebrity reporter. 

Money is tight, and Louise's ex-husband 
Jody (Frank Wood), in and out of detox cen- 
ters and suffering from tuberculosis, can only 
offer minimal help. In one sad but amusing 
scene, to raise money the grandmother, 
mother, daughter and a neighbor's boy are 
all manning phones as the apartment is 
turned into a short-lived betting parlor. 

Young Helen's favorite escape is atop 




Donna Lynne Champlin (left), as Helen, reenacts a movie for 
her grandmother Nanny (Linda Lavin) in "Hollywood Arms" at 
Chicago's Goodman Theatre. Photo by Michael Brosilow 



H33J 




the Hollywood Arms' roof, where her pent- 
up creative energies take flight. Here the 
determined girl creates playlets and invents 
radio broadcasts for an imaginary audi- 
ence. 

By Act II, the apartment has shrunk fur- 
ther with another occupant— Helen's half- 
sister is now 1 1 and under her grandmother's 
wings. It's 1951 and a grown-up Helen 

(Donna Lynne 
Champlin) has taken 
classes at UCLA in act- 
ing, which leads her to 
New York in search of a big break. Her 
appearance on the Ed Sullivan show is eager- 
ly watched by her dysfunctional family back 
home. She's a survivor and has found the 
success mat has eluded others in her family. 

But things have gone downhill for 
Louise, whose second marriage to nice-guy 
Bill (Patrick Clear) has collapsed as her drink- 
ing has increased. 

"Hollywood Arms" has not one but sever- 
al possible focal points. Unfortunately, having 
too many stories to tell means justice cannot 
be done to any of them. 

"Hollywood Arms" runs through June 1. 
For ticket information call 312-443-3800.— By 
TomWitom 




Michael Smith returns to G 



The Lake County Folk Club presents 
Michael Smith in concert Sunday, 
May 19, at 7 p.m. at the Greenleaf 
_ _ Grill, 301 Greenleaf St. in Park City. 

Opening the show will be the club's own 
resident songwriter, Marcia Kreiger, perform- 
ing some of her own music. 

Smith is a name known to millions of 
folkies, both as a writer and performer. He has 
penned may songs which have become stan- 
dards in folk music repertoires and has set the 
standard by which the writing and perfor- 
mance of contemporary acoustic music may 
be measured. 

Over the years, Michael Smith has contin- 
ued to raise the bar with new lyrical, melodi- 
ous and insightful songs. 

A master of the guitar, Smith accompani- 
ments are intricate, interesting and skillful, 
and he manages to make them look easy. 
While many guitarists change tunings to cre- 
ate different riffs, he has no problem playing it 
all in standard tuning. 







This will be the fourth time he has played 
at the Greenleaf Grill. If you haven't seen 
Smith in concert before, you won't want to 
miss this one, and, if you are already a fan, this 
is one of the best and most intimate venues 
you are likely to see him play. 

Admission is $10, $8 for club members 
and $5 for seniors/students. The Greenleaf 
Grill is located on the east side of Greenleaf 
Street north of Rte. 120 and south of 
Washington St. 

For more information, call 847-949-5355. 



. 



Presents: 

THER0BBERBMDEGR00M 

By Alfred Uhry and Robert Waldman 

Hilarious happenings with colorful characters down in Mississippi 

in this bluegrass pickin' tall tale musical of love and marriage. 

Directed by Linda Hachmeister 

May 31, June 1, 2*, 7, 8, 9*, 14, 15, 16 

Box Office Opens May 20th 
SHOW TIMES - Evenings at 8:00 p.m. 'Matinees at 2:30 p.m. 

. Call for Reservations 

847-395-3055 

PM&L Theatre • 877 Main St., Antioch 

Visit our website @ www.pmltheatre.com 

Box Office Hours: Mon. thru Thurs: 5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. 

Saturdays: 1 1 :00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. or on performance dates 

1-1/2 hrs. before curtain. Reserved Seating. VISA/MC 



VISA 



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May 1 7, 2002 




Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 3 



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on display in BeMdere 




hen one drives down the road, 
the sweet smell of fresh turned 

earth fills the air, almost for 
certain. We know spring has 

arrived. Of course 

another tell- 
tale sign 

of spring 
is when 
on a 
balmy 
day the • 
^^ street and highways are 
tilled with the great old cars from America's 
past as the folks go cruisin*. 

There are not too many people who do 
not like the cars from the '50s and '60s, the 

early Ford Mustangs, the "big iron" of the 
muscle car era and of course the wonderful 
antique cars from the early 20th century. 
Many of these cars are affordable and 

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within the financial reach of many people, 
with' the old cars appreciating in value 12-15 
percent a year. 

If you are looking for something a little 
different to do over Memorial Day weekend, 
the Mecum Auction Company of Marengo, 
Illinois sponsors the annual Rockford Spring 

Classic Collector Car Auction and Expo at die 
County Fairgrounds in Belvidere, Ma\ 



> -■ 











24-26. 

This event will feature cars from all eras, 
all makes, all models and in all price ranges 
for those interested in buying or selling. For 
the browser, the event takes on a carnival 
atmosphere with the auctioneering, a mid- 
way filled with vendors of all things auto- 
motive and great food stands, not to men- 
tion the occasional celebrity who makes an 
appearance. 

For further information about the event 
or hotel availability, call 800-468-6999. 




C or vette and 



entries to compete at car show 




he North Shore Corvette Club, 
established in 1973, will besponsor- 
ing the 2002 "Bow Tie Extravaganza" 
Car Show beginning at 9 a.m. on 
Sunday, June 16 at Bernard Chevrolet, 1001 S. 
Milwaukee in Libertyville. Any Corvette or 
Cheyy-powered vehicle is eligible to be 
entered in this annual event. 

This is the 30lh edition of the Car Show. 
Three trophies in each of 26 classes will 
be awarded , as well as three " Best of Show" 
winners, a "Best of Club" award, and a 
"People's Choice" award. An entry fee of $20 
($25 after May 31) is required and lOpercent 
of each entry fee will be donated for the sec- 
ond straight year to the Great Lakes Burn 
Camp. 

General admission for non-participants 




is $3, with children 12 and under admitted 
free. The event features door prizes, a 50/50 
cash raffle, a food conces- 
sion and several new 
product vendor 
spaces. During the 
event, The Fairlanes will provide 
live music. Pre-registration is available on 
line through the club's web site, at 
www.northshorecorvetteclub.org. For addi- 
tional information/contact club President 

Skip Gallagher at 

847-359- 
9583. 




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Auto Enthusiasts luck off summer season with Automotion 2002 at Wisconsin Dells 




^ 

uto enthusiasts will be flocking to 
Wisconsin Dells May 18 and 19 for 
Automotion 2002, a classic auto and 
cycle show. Guests looking for an 

early taste of the summer season in 
Wisconsin Dells will also be able to visit 
many area attractions, including favorites 
like Noah's Ark Waterpark (weather permit- 
ting), tours of the Wisconsin River via 
"Duck," boat or jet boat, miniature golf and 
even a drive-in movie. . 

Held at Noah's Ark Waterpark, 
Automotion is expected to draw more than 




40,000 spectators who 
will participate in a 

variety of 
activities 
Automotion 




is centered on 
the display of nearly 1,000 classics, 
antiques and street machines. Additional 
events include a swap meet with 300 ven- 
dors, live music, drawings for cash arid 
Wisconsin Dells getaway packages, a free 
movie showing at Big Sky Drive-in Theatre 
and a "Car Corral" with vehicles for sale. 



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Face painters, clowns, a pint-sized tractor 
pull and a model car contest will also enter- 
tain children throughout the event. 

Automotion 2002 begins at 7 a.m. on 
Saturday, May 18 and concludes at 2 
p.m. on Sunday, May 19 with the awards 
presentation and getaway package draw- 
ings. All Automotion 2002 activities, 
including parking and spectator admis- 
sion, are free. 

Exhibitors at Automotion 2002 will com- 
pete for more than $5,000 in cash and prizes. 
More than 110 trophies will be presented in 



40 classes, including "Best of Show" honors 
in both auto and motorcycle categories. A 
discounted entry fee is available to pre-regis 
tered vehicles, but interested participants 
can register for Automotion on-site during 
both days of the event. 

For more information about 
Automotion 2002 or to receive a free 
Wisconsin Dells Travel & Attraction Guide, 
contact the Wisconsin Dells Visitor & 
Convention Bureau at 1-800-223-3557 or 
visit Wisconsin Dells on the web site at 
www.wisdells.com. 



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Banquet Facilities? 

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A Terrific Wednesday Dinner? 



Also: 



Group Outings Welcome 
Bar &. Restaurant 



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Gift Certificates Available 
Relaxed. Casual Atmc-sor 






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WAUKEGAN BvRK DISTRICT 

2800 N. LEWIS AVE., WAUKEGAN • (847) 360-4732 






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H«AMADA® INN OSraxtb <En«ri 
til Call"- "" «-*« «---—— 






Attention Fish Esiters! 

FRIDAY: We issue you a challenge.. 
ALL U CAN EAT Icelandic Cod 

(Baked or Deep Fried) $6.95 

Don't be embarrased if you say "No More!" - 

We understand! 

SATURDAY: Prime Rib 
ALLUCANEAT 

$15.95 

AS muis include soup, salid, reliable & com on Iht cob ' 

Open Tues.-FVi. 5pm - Close 

Sat. & Sun. OPEN FOR BREAKFAST 

(Opening for lunch soon) 




517 



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!wy. 83 ,'• Mundeleln, 1L 



visit our website: www.grandcourt.net 






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Plenty of FREE Parking 

■ 

• Dine In • Carry Out • Cocktails 

The Chinese restaurant that everybody's talking about! 
Conveniently located across horn the fairgrounds. 

111 Hwy 45, Grayslake 

847-548-8882 
FAX: 847-548-2822 



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& llnique 'Experience.. | 



in Seafood 'Dining... 
WHERE FRESHNESS 



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when you buy two or more dinner entrees- 

- or - 

OFF 

when you buy two or more lunch entrees 

Expires 7/31/02. Limit two coupons per table per visit. Not valid with 
any other discount. Not valid holidays. Not valid Sat. after 5:30pm. 

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 




ORCHARD HILLS 
GOLF COURSE 

A Waukegan Park District 
Owned Course 

38342 N. Green Bay Road 
Waukegan, IL 60087 

847-336-5118 



Friday Nite Fish Fry 4-8:30pm 

ALL U-CAN EAT 
Deep Fried or Baked Cod or Catfish $6.95 



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(Mundeleln) 
Dover Straits Has Two Great Locations 

Mundeleln Hoffman Estates 

Route 45, just East of Route 83 Route 58, 1149 W. Golf Road 

(847)949-1550 www.dOYemralts.net (847)884-3900 



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Walleye Dinner $7.95 

Shrimp Dinner $7.95 

Lake Perch Dinner $8.95 

BBQ Rib Tips $6.95 

• Fries & Slaw included • 



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Top Butt Steak Dinner $8.25 

w/choicc of baked or fries & soup or salad 

•Plus Other Sandwiches Available • 



Golf Out 



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LAKELIFE 4 




Lakeland Newspapers 



May 1 7, 2002 




GARDENING 



• • • 1 1 »• i 



Tour 







the North Shore 

to benefit American 

ociety 



Step-by-step 




■ 



■ - 





- The Morton Arboretum's popular Step-by- 
Step series of free gardening talks continues with 
"Protect Your Plants/* a proactive plan to keep 
your plants healthy and disease-free. On Sunday, 
May 19 from. 1-2 p.m., Doris Taylor will discuss 
simple yet effective ways to keep your plants 
healthy all summer long. 

The monthly Step-by-Step Gardening Series 
does not require registration. For non members 
there is a $7-per-car fee to the Arboretum. For 
more information call 630-719-2465 or visit the 
web site at www.mortonarb.org. 



years overseas or on the "homefront." These fasci- 
nating tales provide insight into our nation during 
the 1940s. Guests will be shuttled to the cemeteries 
from the City of Wheaton parking lot at the south- 
west corner of Carlton and Liberty Streets in 
Wheaton. 

Presale prices for tickets are as follows: adults 
$10; students and seniors $8; family (two parents 
and up to four children) $25. Day-of-event tickets 
are available for adults $15, students and seniors 
$12; family $35. For more information call the 
Wheaton History Center at 630-682-9472. 



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CONCERTS 



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CARNIVAL 



MHIWMHH MHHW WHIH 



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Family affair 



■***•• •>••! 



he 

American 

Cancer Society will 

present the 27th Annual 
Tour of the North Shore bicycle 
ride, Sunday, May 19, 7 a.m.-l. p.m. 

The ride will start and end at the North 
Shore Doubletree Hotel, 9599 Skokie Blvd., in 
Skokie. Rides will be distances of 3, 10, 30 or 50-mile 
routes throughout North Shore bike trails and communi- 
ties. Individual rider pledge minimum is $30 in advance or $35 
on event day. 

Route highlights include the North Branch Bicycle Trail, the Chicago 
Botanic Gardens, the Ravinia train station, Lake Michigan and scenic sidestreets A 
new three-mile route has been added this year for families with young children 

Refreshments will be available at rest stops with lunch provided at the North Shore 
Doubletree. Support vehicles will monitor the route and help will be available at each 
rest stop. Prizes will be awarded based on how much money riders raise, including 
tour hats vvindbreakers and sweatshirts as well as gift certificates and movie passes. 
There will be a tour raffle, with the grand prize of a new bike. 

For more information contact the American Cancer Society at 847-328-5147 or on 

the web at www.bikenorthshnrp.rnm 






Singin' and Swingin' 

The Ela Singers will be "Singin', Swingin' 
U.S A" at their spring show, on 
Saturday, May 18 at p.m. 
and Sunday, May 19 at 3 
p.m. at the Lake Zurich High V> 
School, 300 N. Church St. in \, 
Lake Zurich. Director Jeanine - 
Saltman will lead them on 7 

"Singin"' music by Irving ' 

Berlin and Rodgers and \ji 

Hammerstein, as well as a ™| 

Sinatra showcase. The singers 

will be "Swingin"' to such num 

bers at "All That Jazz," "Fascinating 

Rhythm" and "Bandstand Boogie." Tickets are $8 

for adults, $5 for Seniors and Students and free for 

children 12 and under. For more information call 

847-726-2011. 




Bring the family for a day of fun at AAUW 
Nursery School's Annual Spring Carnival, Sunday, 
May 19 from noon-4 p.m. Games, moon walk, pet- 
ting zoo, pony rides, prizes, refreshments and a 
silent auction are scheduled to make the event a 
great time for all. The carnival will be held at AAUW 
Nursery School, 2500 Northern Ave., in Waukegan 
(near Sunset and Greenbay). Proceeds benefit the 

school. Call 847-623-0550 for mnir> infn 




■ 

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AUDITIONS 





! 1 



-...--........ 



• •••■ 




WALKS 



•-•■■••-■■..............,. 



Your big break 






Meet history face to face 

The "Dignity, Service & Valor" Cemetery Walk 
will be presented by the Wheaton History Center 
from 1-5 p.m. on Saturday, May 18 in the Wheaton 
Cemetery and St. Michael's Cemetery. 

Hear poignant stories about World War II as 
told by costumed interpreters portraying notable 
Wheaton men and women who endured the way 



Auditions for the Memorial Hall Theatre 
Company's production of "Moon Over Buffalo," a 
riotous comedy by Ken Ludwig, will be held at the 
Memorial Hall Theatre, 10308 Main St. (IL Rte 12), 
in Richmond, on May 20 and 21 at 7:30 p.m. 
Director Laura-Nicole Musolf is looking for four 
men and four women with the ability to play roles 
ranging in age from 20s to 70s. There will be "cold" 
readings from the script and auditionees should 
bnng a list of any conflicts they might have with 
the rehearsal schedule. The play will be given the 
last two weekends of July. 

This' is the third production for this new the- 
ater company and a good chance to get in on the 
ground floor" with this active and dedicated 
group of theater enthusiasts. People interested in 
the tech work are also welcomed. For more infor- 
mation call 262-767-0150 or 815-675-6392 



Continued on next page 1 














FREE BUFFET 

You pay $10 per person 

* 

* 

You get a FREE all-you-can-eat buffet, $10 match 
cash voucher and luxury motorcoach transportation 

Buses run Monday through Friday 



7:45 AM • Waukegan 

8 AM - Gurnee 

8:45 AM • College Avenue Park and Ride 

9 AM - Arrive al Casino 

2 PM - Bus deporls Cosino 



10:45 AM -Waukegan 
1 1 AM - Gurnee 

1 1:45 AM - Holt Avenue Park and Ride 
12PM- Arrived Casino 
5:30 PM - Bus deporls Cosino 




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For inlwmolion ond rttMvolions, plioit toll: 




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SPORTS BAR 



Drink Specials 



Monday - Pool & Dart League Night 

$5 Pitchers! $2 - 22 Oz. Drafts $3 Wells 

Tuesday - Karaoke 

50c Drafts! $3 Imports $4 Pizzas $4 Pitchers 

Wednesday - Ladies Night! 

$1 Pints Dom.! $2 U-Call Its ($5 Cover) & DJ/Karoake 

Thursday - Memory Makers DJ Service 

$5 Pitchers! $2.50 Capt's U-Call $4 Pizzas 

Friday 

$2.50 Imports! $3.50 Pizzas 

Saturday - Check out our New Game Room 

$4 Pitchers! $2 Shots $3.50 Pizzas 

Sunday - (NOW OPEN) - Free Pool 

$4 Pitchers! 50c Drafts $3 Pizzas p. 



Live Bands 
on Saturday 



Hours: M-Th 3pm- tarn 

Frl 2pm-2am • Sat. 3pm-2am 
NOW OPEN SUNDAYS 



(3-47)223-7788 



ZH3S& 



— J ■»•'" Joa ^**^ *-" ■■ m ^-^ S1JLJ «J ^j* 

[Restaurant & Loun 

3035 Belvidere Road • Waukegan 

(Just west of Greenbay Road) 

'Lake County's Best Kept S ecret" 



■ 



' 



5 Kitchen 
Jjjj Reopening 
! Soon 










Check out what's happening 
at Brydges House 

# NEW DAILY SPECIALS # 

Thursday, May 16th - Rebecca Boston entertains 

at the Rosebud Social Club, 7pm. 
Thursday, (Way 16th - Chef Scan Bradley creates 

Dinner Specials 
Friday, May 17th - Chef Karl cooks at the bar, 

Noon-2:30pm 
Friday, May 17th - The Schrocdcr Trio entertains, 7pm 
Saturday, May 18th - Dine to the lovely 

background music of Chris Bennett 

For Additional Information or Reservations 

call 847 625-8520 



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^Mexican (Restaurant 

(Dine-In Carry-Out • Catering Available 

(Beinvendos B 

Comiifa autcnticamente Wfajcuna, rccetasl 
sccrctas ifc/amida. Amijjos 'Disfruten su visita. 

gracilis! j 



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Authentic Mexican food, derived from secret^ 

family receives. Wefcome friends, enjoy I 

your dining experience. 1fianllyou!\ 

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A purchase of s 20 or more 

Expires 5-31-02 



84 7-546-6009 

234 CeifarLafa $„ 'Jtyund Lafy 
('Just South of'J(aiCmadAi>e., iRu.134) 






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Lakeside Family Dining at it's Best 

PIZZA • SANDWICHES • DINNERS 



Take A Break & Enjoy Lunch ON USI 

(Drop a business card to win a complimentary lunch) 

Enjoy Our Frequent Diner Program! 

Place 10 carry out or delivery orders & your next 

12" pizza is FREEH 







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May 1 7, 2002 



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Lakeland Newspapers 



Continued from the previous page 




SEMINAR 






' ■ .". ■ M^ .. T M ^ ^ .,_, 



Corn mo mi ty 

The Vista Surgery and Treatment Center in 
Lindenhurst, in conjunction with the Lake Villa 
Police Department, will present a free community 
education seminar 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 21 
The seminar, "Don't Be a Victim," will address 
crime prevention at home. The Lake Villa Police 
department will discuss everyday crime and fraud 
schemes that affect people and ways to prevent 
cnme from entering your life. 

"Don't Be A Victim" will be held at 6:30 p.m. 
on Tuesday, May 21, at the Vista Surgery and 
Treatment Center. The center is located at 1050 
Red Oak Lane in Lindenhurst. To register for this 
free program call 880-869-1 1 18. 



• 



Miss Illinois Teen USA pageants are the official 

PiqaT^JSI lh ? nali °nolly televised Miss Teen 
USA, Miss USA and Miss Universe pageants, jountlv 
owned by CBS Television and Trump VducW 







GLASSES 



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FUND-RAISER 



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■ • • • 



Plant sale 

•„.. ^ Plant sale will be held at the north end of the 
Pik Kwik parking lot on Grayslake on Saturday, 
May 18 from 9 a.m.-noon. Perennials, biennials 
starter plants, garden gifts and free advice from 
experience gardeners, can be purchased or 
obtained. Proceeds help fund educational and 
community projects. Come to the Grayslake 
Greenery Garden Club's Plant Sale. 







APPLICATION 



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........................ 



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Miss Illinois and 
Miss Teen Illinois 

Applications are now being accepted for the 
2003 Miss Illinois USA and Miss Illinois Teen USA 
Pageants to be held Nov. 22, 23 and 24 in the 
Grand Ballroom of the Hyatt Regency McCormick 
Place in Chicago. All contestants will receive an 
expense-paid weekend of pageant events at the 
hotel. If you are interested in participating, please 
write to Illinois Pageant Headquarters, P.O. Box 
59064, Dept N, Potomac, MD 20859. Letters must 
include a recent snapshot, name, address, phone 
number, age and date of birth. The Miss USA and 



Women 

. Fly Fishing for Women Only will take place on 

Saturdays, May 18, June 15 and July 27 from 9 
a.rn.-noon. The fee is $45 per person. The empha- 
sis is on the technique of fly casting itself, with 
hands-on instruction and practice outdoors with 
top.quality equipment. If you have your own gear, 
bring it. Students will leave with the ability to con- 
sistently make casts that will catch fish, whether in 
local ponds or more exotic locations. Classes are 

!? ,?^ e Gorton G °mmuniry Center, 400 E. 
Illinois Rd, in Lake Forest. 

American bistro 

America's favorite meals will be created at a 

Northbrook Park District cooking 
class, scheduled on Wednesday, 
May 22 from 7-10 p.m. adults will 
prepare delicious foods made 
popular at favorite local bistros," 
including steak and fries, salmon 
fillets with roasted root vegetables 
or stuffed cornish hens. Bring your 
appetites and enjoy taste-testing 
your kitchen creations. Class will 
be held at the Leisure Center, 3323 

Walters Ave. For additional registration 
information, call 847-29 1-2980? ' 




LAKELIFE 5 




Two folk groups in 



concert at the M 









THEATER 



II 



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...... 



Boys will be boys 

Village Theatre of Palatine is pleased to 
announce the third production of its 53rd season, 
"All My Sons." The drama is directed by Larry 

Boiler and produced by Tom Gorham. 

All performances are at Cutting Hall, 150 E. 
Wood St. in Palatine. Show dates are; May 24, 25, 
31, June 1, 2, 7, 8, and 9. Friday and Saturday per- 
formances are at 8 p.m., Sunday matinees are at 
2:30 p.m. Reserved seating is available by calling 
the Village Theater box office at 847-358-2506. 
Tickets are $12. . * 



he Country 
Express and The 

Hartland Express 

will be peforming 
at the Masthouse, 528 E 
Calhoun St., in Woodstock 
on May 18 at 8 p.m. 

The Country Express 
will perform a wide 
variety of music— 
bluegrass, gospel, 
R&R, and originals by 
Mitzi Fritz —spe- 
cializing in country, 
with old and new 
songs to reach a 
wide range of audi- 
ence. Mitzi is an 

excellent singer/sonc- hHi t^ i_i j ~ . .. 

writer with a Deana ^ u ,,da Hadaw ay. Del Hadaway, Mitzi Fritz are 
Carter sound. Milda The Co "ntry Express 

Hadaway is an experienced singer with a Patsy Cline sound, who has a unique ability 
to harmonize. Del Hadaway is the band. He incorporates his drum machine with a 

unique style of flat-picking playing bass lines, rhythm and lead all 
at one time. A fun hand-clapping act for young and old. 

Chris Strong and Roger Schiller are Hartland Expre^, 
two hard-dnving performers. They bring to the stage tried- 
and-true songs and comedy bits, guaranteed to make you 
laugh and sing along. They also love to extemporize. They 
will vynte verses, even whole songs, on the spot or on a break. 
This is what makes them so unique. With outstanding guitar 

,iw te J u f 1 , banj '° pIaying l0 add t0 meir vocaI mix, it is no wonder 

Uiat tliis duo has stood the test of time. Joining Hartland Express will be Wendy 

Proulx, who adds third-part harmony, guitar and mandolin accompaniment. 

K.ui) tlTolollr^ U,e mu™ ° P , enings at 7:30 P' m - To reserve ticke *s call 
mi™ iS ° r f "T 1 him at W"eloom@maneL For more information call ' 
H15-338-M3LK(3655) or check www.woodstockfolkmusic.com 




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OPEN: TUES.-THURS. 12-9, FRI. 12-CLOSE, SAT. & SUN. 11-CLOSE 

PARTIES OF 8 OR MORE 
PLEASE CALL AHEAD FOR RESERVATIONS 

73 • AnrJoch • 847-395-4550 



Wednesday- Seniors Nite Out 5-10pm 
Dinner Specials $6.95 & Dancing 

Friday - ALL U CARE TO EAT Fish Fry 
$7.95 (Includes Salad Bar) - OR - 
Fish Fry w/Slaw & Potatoes $4.95 

* 

■ 

Saturday - PRIME RIB BUFFET 

Also includes Breaded Pork Cutlet, 
Italian Sausage w/Peppers, Salad Bar 
& more ALL U CARE TO EAT 




\ ■ 




DAIRY QUEEM 

©W ANTIOCH 
966 Main Street 

847-395-8383 

One Half Mile North Of 
Route 173 On Rt. 83 
ntown Antloch 



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Serving Hot Dogs, BBQ's, 
hi Chicken Sandwiches & Salads. 



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Wed.-Fri. - ALL U CAn EAT 

Blue Gill • Walleye • Lake Perch • Icelandic Cod 

(All entrees Include soup or salad, Chef veg. & choice of potato) 

Sat. - PRIME RIB 

SUM. - Breakfast Served 7am-ipm 




Closed Monday • Sun.-Tues.-Thurs. 4-9pm 
Fri. &. Sat. 4-10pm • Fri. Karaoke 10pm 

(262) 881-2225 

Marcomb's Steak House Is at the Intersection of SA and AH 

In Gimp Lake. Wisconsin. From Route 83 go west on county 

SA, follow to AH. turn right on AH. Marcomb's Is on the Left 




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Hkum Oa^s 




Country Inn 



Casual Fine Dining fit Elegant Banquets In a Historic 
Victorian House On Highway C, Wllmot, Wl 

(262)862-9377 

Banquets Facilities for Groups of 40-200 For any Special Occasion 

Open For Dinner 

Twin Oaks offers superb, affordable American Cuisine 

Extraordinary Nightly Specials 
Unique Wines, Cocktails, Cappuccino and Espresso 





Fresh Seafood Specials 

Sauteed Whlteflsh, Grilled Salmon & More 




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Starting at .$14,95 



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Sunday Homestyle Dinners l-5pm $14.95 

Includes Bread, Soup, Salad, Entree and Dessert 

Regular Menu Also 

5pm • Dinner Sunday 1:00 pm-7:00 pm (winter) 
1:00 pm«8:00 pm (summer) 



Dinner Tuos.-Sa 






^tSTAURAN T 

Hwy JF Trevor, Wis., 1 nUlc North of Antloch 

262-862-2076 

■ 

Open T\im., Wed., Thurs. 4-9:30pm, Fri. & Sal 4-10pm, Sun. 1.8:30pm, Closed Mon. 



Friday Fish Fry 

AH-you-Care-To-Eat Beer Battered or 
Baked Genuine Icelandic Cod 

Early Birds 4-6pm-$7.25, 6-10pm $8.25 
Also Perch, Baby Walleye Pike or Bluegill $8.95 















List your favorite HOT SPOTS 

restaurant for our monthly drawing 

o win a '40 gift certificate. 





■ 










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Reservations Recommended 





Favorite Restaurant: 

Mail to: Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 • Grayslake, IL 60030 




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Lakeland Newspapers 




1 7, 2002 



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With great- appreciation ' 

The 24 th Classic Car Rally presents $46,656 to fight childhood cancer. The total 
raised to date is $401,003 since the first Rally in 1978. From left, Dennis 
Schellin, past president of Long Grove Lions Club; Marianne Schellin; Janice 
Kreissel; Jerry Rtzpatrick, secretary and treasurer of Corinne Kreissel Memorial 
Foundation Inc.; and Vicki Spatt-Ballweg of the American Cancer Society. 



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• * 



Disney World's quartet performs in Elgin 



The Elgin Barbershopper chorus, 
chapter quartets and two guest quar- 
tets will be presenting the 56th 
annual show titled "The Fabulous 
Forties," Saturday, May 18 at the Elgin 
Community College Performing Arts Center. 

The "Hummdingers" quartet, from 
Disney World, will make a rare Illinois 
appearance. This quartet is a regular per- 
former at Disney World, singing, dancing 
and charming its way into the hearts of 
millions. 

The "Chordiac Arrest" quartet bills itself 
as "The doctors who located the funnybone." 
This hilarious group will keep you in stitches. 

Ticket prices for the 3 p.m. show are 
$14.50 for adults, $12.50 under 18 and over 
.64. The 8 p.m. show is $14.50 for all seats. For 
i tickets send a check payable to Elgin 




The "Chordiac Arrests" a comic barberr 
shop quartet, will be performing their 
hilarious doctor's routine May 18. 

Chapter, SPEBSQSA, Inc. to: Tom Short, 75 
Edwards Avenue, Dundee 601 18,.or call 847- 
836-0910, or the box office at 847-622-0300 
for additional information. 









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Lakeland 



LAKELIFE 7 









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8 LAKELIFE 



Lakeland Newspapers 



May 1 7, 2002 





er come 













George &Pam Singleton 

www.recUnoviccritic.com 




Wlien we line up to see 
summer "family fare 
films" based upon 
comic book charac- 
ters, our expectations tend to be 
low. An interesting film that adults 
will enjoy— probably not. "Spider- 
Man" is a pleasant surprise; the act- 
ing, special effects and the plot are 
excellent. It's on target for its audi- 
ence of teenage boys, but be 
warned that the violence, in our 
opinion, is not appropriate for the 
many toddlers we saw in the the- 
ater. Movies adapted from action 
hero comics don't always equate to 
being Disney-like, so please use the 
ratings as a guide rather than 
depending on the advertising 



SPIDER-MAN 

Hating 

PG-13 for stylized violence 

and action 

Director 

Sam Raimi 

Starring 

TobeyMaguirc 

Kirsten Dunst 

Willem Dafoe 

James Franco 

Rosemary Harris 

Cliff Robertson 



miteou 



$0 75 • All Shows Before 6 pm 

O. • Students & Seniors 

Only $6.00 Adult Evening Admission 



RlVERTREE COUR 

701 N. Milwaukoo • VERNO 

(847) 816-8228 




% 



Showtimes for May 17-May 23 
Sat & Sun Matinees in [brackets] 

About A Boy (PG-13) 

[1:00J4:00 7:00 10:00 
Changing Lanes (R) 

[1:30)4:15 7:10 9:50 
The Scorpion King (PG-13) 

[1:1513:45 6:45 9:15 
The Rookie (G) 

[12:3013:30 6:30 9:30 
Deuces Wild (R) 

[1:45)4:40 7:20 10:15 
Last Orders (R) 

[2:15)4:50 7:30 10:05 
Y Tu Mama Tambien (NR) 

[2:30)5:10 7:40 10:10 
A Beautiful Mind (PG-13) 

[2:00] 5:00 8:00 







^ 



Showtimes for May 17-May 23 
Sat & Sun Matinees in [brackets] 

Star Wars Episode 2 (PG) 

11:00 2:30 6:05 9:30 

12:00 3:30 7:00 10:20 

1:00 4:30 8:00 
Unfaithful (R) 

1:15 4:15 7:45 10:40 
The New Guy (PG-13) 

11:45 2:15 4:45 7:15 9:45 
Superman (PG-13) 

11:15 2:00 5:00 8:15 11:00* i 

12:15 3:15 6:30 9:40 

12:45 4:00 7:30 10:30 
•11:00 PM show on Frl/Sat only 




Tobey Maguire 



en Dunst star in the action adventure Spider-Man.— Photo by Doug Hyun 



machine of the studio in making a 
decision on which films your chil- 
dren should see. 

Peter Parker (Tobey Maguire), 
who ultimately discovers his powers 
as Spider-Man, is a dorky teenager 
who lives with his Uncle Ben and 
Aunt May (Cliff Robertson and 
Rosemary Harris). They get along, 
though maintain a distant relation- 
ship not uncommon for a teenage 
boy who is starting to feel like a 
man. Their home is next door to the 
girl of his dreams, Mary Jane. 
(Kirsten Dunst), known as MJ. 
Peter's had a crush oh her since first 
grade; she hardly knows he's alive. 

On a school field trip a spider 
bites Peter and almost immediate- 







Box Someone should be fired for 
. making this movie 



Boxes Wait until this 

movie comes out on video 



% if£ 3 Boxes Expecting a bomb 

but pleasantly surprised 








:&- 



'£&&h&h:A Boxes Wow! 

I'm impressed 



Boxes Don't 

miss this movie! 



*J*h >"~"\ i'"^, ,^*\ 5 






akeland Plata 



alter 6 pm 



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SHOWTIMES— FRIDAY, HAY 17 
THRU THURSDAY, MAY 23 

SPIDERMANVm 

Frl4:30 7:10 9:50 

Sat 1:35 4:30 7:10 9:50 

Sun/Wed 1:35 4:30 7:10 

Mon/Tuc/Thu 4:30 7:10 

STAR WARS: EPISODE II* -,<q 

Frl 4:00 7:00 10:00 

Sat 1 0:00 1 :00 4:00 7:00 1 0:00 

Sun 10:00 1:00 4:00 7:00 

Wed 1 :00 4.00 7:00 

Mon/Tuc/Thu 4:00 7:00 

NEWGUYVm 

Frl 5:45 7:45 10:15 

Sat 1:15 3:30 5:45 7:45 10:15 

Sun/Wed 1:15 3:30 5:45 7:45 

Mon/Tuc/Thu 5:45 7:45 

UNFAITHFUL* „ 

Frl 4:20 6:55 9:30 

Sat 1:45 4:20 6:55 9:30 

Sun/Wed 1:45 4:20 6:55 

Monrruc/Thu 4:20 6:55 

SCORPION KING pa,,, 

Frl 5:20 7:35 9:40 

Sat 1:10 3:15 5:20 7:35 9:40 

Sun/Wed 1:10 3:15 5:20 7:35 

Mon/Tue/Thu 5:20 7:35 

• No pane* or coupons 



EF[ME[E 

v 










V 



Ask for a 

DIRECTOR'S CLUB CARD 

DIGITAL SOUND 

ON EVERY SCREEN! 

No children under 6 admitted to R-ratcd movies oftw 6 PM 



www.classiccinemas.com 

WHERE MOVIE GOING IS FUN AND AFFORDABLE 






ly, his DNA begins to change and 
he is turned into a different person. 
Before the day is over he no longer 
needs eyeglasses, becomes more, 
muscular and finds he can walk up 
walls. He discovers his superior 
strength, the ability to climb, jump 
and spin a web that moves him 
between buildings. He becomes a 
self-confident young man with 
"other worldly" physical powers. 

Spider-Man uses his powers for 
good and he soon becomes a folk 
hero. The only thing missing at this 
point in the film is a villain; provid- 
ed in true villainous form by 
Willem Dafoe as Norman Osbom. 
Dafoe is probably the best bad guy 
around ("Clear & Present Danger" 
and "Shadow of the Vampire") . 
Norman is a rich scientist, con- 
cerned about losing a contract to a 
competitive firm, and decides to 
use himself as a guinea pig for the 
next stage in his research. The 
experiment goes haywire and he 
becomes The Green Goblin, arch- 
enemy of Spider-Man. He too has 
extraordinary powers, and, while 
some of their battles are notewor- 
thy, the second half of the story 
lacks the strong drama created 
early in the film. Because Norman's 
Green Goblin is the product of an 
experiment gone wrong rather than 
innate evil, while we don't want 
him to out-spin Spider-Man, we are 
able to maintain a measure of com- 
passion for him. 

The highlight of the film is a 
wrestling match Peter enters when 
he wants to win $3,000 by staying 
in the ring with Bone Saw (Randy 
Savage) for three minutes so he can 
buy a car to impress MJ. He invokes 
his powers as Spider-Man and this 
experience in Peter's life teaches 
him an unforgettable lesson about 
responsibility. Unfortunately, it is a 




New releases, currently playing 
at local theaters. More reviews of 
these and other films can be found 
under Current Movie Reviews at 
www.reelmoviecritic.com. 

* 

Opening this Week 

* 

About a Boy. Hugh Grant is the per- . 
feet cad as a single man, posing as a sin- 
gle father, out to snare women. Then he 
meets a 12-year-old boy who turns his 
thinking around. Rachel Weisz and Toni 
Collete co star. 

■ 

American Adobo (Landmark 
Century): Filipino-American families try - 
to build a bridge between their former 
homeland and America. 

Star Wars Episode II -. 
Attack of the Clones] 

George Lucas brilliantly fills in more of 
the back-story of the Star Wars saga. 
Combining a compassionate love story 
that holds its own with action 
sequences that are literally and visually 
mind-boggling. Never before has there 
been a digital movie with CGI that is in 
the same solar system with. Episode II. 
Make the effort to see the film on the 
largest screen possible at your local 
multiplex Stars Natalie Portman, . 
Hayden Christensen, Ewan McGregor 
and Samuel L Jackson. 

Still Playing 

ESPN's Ultimate X W J(Navy 

Pier): Highlights on the IMAX screen of 
the 2001 Summer X Games in 
Philadelphia. 




Maguire jumps through fire in 
the title role in the action 
adventure Spider-Man. 



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costly lesson as well. Never assume 
that when you leave a person that 
you will see them again. 

Kirsten Dunst gives a rather 
understated performance here. 
Norman's son Harry (James 
Franco) is going out with MJ and 
he's a friend of Peter's. Harry adds 
texture to the plot and by the end of 
the movie he is bent on revenge 
against Spider-Man (whose real 
identity remains a secret), because 
of a deadly misunderstanding. 

The final scenes clearly set up 
the sequel. As much as we like this 
film, what we find most interesting 
is Peter's transformation to Spider- 
Man, more than the battles that 
ensue with his nemesis. Box office 
receipts have reached a record 
breaking $227 million to date. This 
will ensure that we will see more 

* 

tales spun for Spider-Man. Spider- 
Man II plans are already set for 
early 2003; by the end of die week 
they may be setting up for III and 
IV. 



-AKEHURSTGINEM 



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|STAR WARS: EPISODE ll(PG) •(12:30 3:50) 7:15 10:30 
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TAR WARS: EPISODE ll(PG) « 0c(1:00 4:20) 7:30 10:45 
BOUT A BOY (PG-13) (12:10 2:35 S:00) 7:25 9:40 
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ICE AGE (PG)- (12:00 2:105:00)7:00 

HE SCORPION KING (PG-13) 9:00 

[CHANGING LANES (R)« ID REQUIRED DO (12:10 

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ANIC ROOM(R) • ID REQUIRED(12:10 2:50) 6:40 9:20 
Mil ROOKIE (G) (12:20 3:10)6:35 9:20 



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Timos in [paronthosis] 
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High Crimes 'SLMi* A happily 

married, successful lawyer (Ashley Judd) 
is shocked to leam that her husband 
has a hidden past as a classified military 
operative, and is accused of committing 
a heinous war crime. Morgan Freeman 
co-stars. 



• '» 



Life or Some tiling Like It JW 

A TV reporter, Angelina Jolie, re-exam- 
ines her life when told she will die the 
following week. Ed Burns co-stars. 

The New Guy: DJ Quails transfers to 
a new high school with hopes of finally 
becoming popular. Eddie Griffin co- 
stars. 



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1. Musical composition 
5. Launched Apollo 
9. Hymn 

14. To the highest dei 

15. Epic poem 

16. Suspension of breathing 

17. Away from wind 

18. Animal groups 

19. Plate for Eucharist. 

20. Horse gear 
22. Excessive hunger 

24. Wooden strip forming 
part of a fence 

25. Rodents 

26. Medieval fiddle 
29. Enclose or envelop 
31. Craze 

34. Embarrass 

35. Each 

36. Brew 

37. A young male horse 

Answers 






38. Constellation: The 
ram 

40. Scamp . 

41. Linear units 

42. Negative 

43. Speak 
44. Shag rug 
45. Offense 

47. Juice pressed from 
apples 

48. Apparel 

49. Appear like 
51. The elbow 

53. Foretell 

54. Continuous por- 
tion of a circle 

57. Turn outward 

58. Yowl 

« 

60. Taxonomic group 

61. Later 

62. Canopus's constel- 
lation 

63. 

Diving 

bird 

64. Room 




Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 9 



65. Obsolete 

DOWN 

1. Asian 
nation 

2. Field game 

3. Habits 

4. Most 
abrupt 

. Small Asian 
country 
between India 
and Tibet 
6. Celestial 
point 



7. Land 

8. Act towards others 

9. Government 
10 Expanse 

1 1 . Negative 

12. English court 

13. Innumerable 

21. Famous composer 
23. Faces 

26. Motor car 

27. Flowering tree 

28. Strong very light wood 

30. American state 

31. Capacitance unit 

32. Winged 

33. Counsel 

38. A negatively charged 
atom 



39. Gown 

40. Gusto (Italian) 
43. Saffron 

45. Fourth highest peak in 
the world 

46. Subatomic particle 
48. Unimproved 

50. Herb , San Francisco 

columnist 

51. Avow 

52. Spanish baby 

53. Having a sound mind 

54. Swiss river 

55. Fold, crease 

56. A compact mass 

57. Encourage 

58. Scoundrel 

59. Bundle 





Elmhurst College Concert 
Choir to tour Grayslake 

Elmhurst College Concert Choir will be touring northern 
Illinois and Wisconsin May 17-21. They begin their tour 
on Friday, May 17 with a free public concert at St. 
lames Catholic Church at 7:30 p.m. in Rockford. 
The trip also includes participation with Grayslake 
Community High School. 

The choir, directed by Susan Moninger, will perform selec- 
tions by composers Gabrielli, Daley and Christiansen, and 
Moses Hogan. Contemporary music by Russian composer 
Kalinnikov and Norwegian music by Ellingboe. 

The Concert Choir is an auditioned group of students from 
a variety of majors who sing traditional and contemporary 
choral music. The choir maintains a long-standing tradition of 
touring throughout the United States, performing in bom 
churches and schools. 



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"Midwest Living" magazine is proud to present Shaker 
Grove, the Midwest Living Idea Home 2002. According 
to Dan Kaercher, editor-in-chief of the magazine, the 
home's design, accented with Shaker touches, is a 
return to simple elegance and grace with a strong 
family focus. Located in Landmark Pointe on take 
Antioch in Antioch, the Idea Home is open to the pub- 
lic May 17-31 and will be featured in a special section 
in the October 2002 issue of the magazine. 






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Serving Antioch 
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May 1 7, 2002 





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Females 

seeking Males 




Males 



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PETITE, VIVACIOUS 

DWF, youthful 60s, with charisma 
and sincerity, seeks a caring gentle- 
man, who enjoys thoator, 'dining, 
music, sharing quality time. 
Someone who will hold my hand. 
1T345360 

LOOKING FOR YOU 

Outgoing, with passion WF, 42, 
57", 145lbs., blue eyes, enjoys wo- 
rking out, sports, kids, music and 
movies. Seeking WM, 35-50, hand- 
some, outgoing, active, romantic, 
for friendship first. TT352794 

WILL THERE BE 
Chemistry when we meet one an- 
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WPF, 49, 5'8", 135lbs. ( enjoys bik- 
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Looking to meet SWM, 35-50, for 
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STARBUCK'S 
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OLD-FASHIONED VALUES 
Sweet, honest, caring SWF, 57, 
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Seeking honest, sincere SWM, 52* 
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1T352786 

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SWM. 61 , 1 85lbs, no children, em- 
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7T347528 _ 

STARTING OVER 
Widowed WM, 72, Taurus, loyal, 
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ly, LTR. TT346671 ■ 

LETSTALKI 

Outgoing, friendly SWM, 45, 5'8". 
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dining out, movies, friends and con- 
versation. Seeking honest SWF, 35- 
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MUST LIKE KIDS 
SWM, 38, 225lbs, Wond/bluo, mu- 
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MAN FOR ALL SEASONS 

Widowed WM, 43, 5'6", 155lbs, 
brown/blue, Libra, non-smoker, 
attractive, honest, spontaneous, 
enjoys festivals, fairs, and, zoos. 
Seeking woman, 28-43, for LTR. 

1T420514 



ENJOYS LIFE 

SWM. 67, 200lbs, hazel eyos, 
loves dancing, dining, romance, 
quiet evenings, seeks SF, 60-70, 
for LTR. TT352792 ' 

HOT SUMMER DAYS . 
SWM, 58, 5'H", 180lbs, Aries, sm- 
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summer days, dinners. Seeking 
petite woman, 50-60, S-5'S', with 
chemistry, for LTR. 7T4 13305 

HOW ABOUT A DATE? 
SWM, 30, 6T, 200lbs, browrvbro- 
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sports, the outdoors. Seking SF, 21 - 
40, who would like to get to know 
mo. TT370250 

LETS CATCH A MOVIE 
WM, 28, 6'2", 163lbs. browrvhazel- 
green, very honest, hard-working, 
seeks SF, 18-46, for dating. Race 
not important, as long as you have 
a god sense humor.- TT374529 

UR THE SUNSHINE 

Of my life, the apple of my eye. 

you're everything to this muscular, 

well-built, good-natured WM, 38, 

likes working on cars. Seeking 

earthy, laid-back WF, 27-49. 
P352790 ■ 

GIVE A CALL 

Outgoing, with humor WM, 60,. 
6'2", slim, smoker, enjoys choss, 
music and dancing. Seeking WF, 
40-60, slim, attractive, intelligent, 
for friendship first, possible LTR. 

TT352795 .__ 

ATTENTION JENNIFER 
You responded to my ad, "Into So- 
mething ReaT , WM, 29. You did 
not leavo your phone number, ple- 
ase leave a number for me to con- 
tact you! TT352796 




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GUIDELINES; LAKELAN0 PERSONALS are for adults 18 or over seeking monoQamous relationships. To ensure your safety, carcfutty saeen all responses. Fust 
meetings should occur m a public place. AMaevubons are permitted only to indicate gender p* defence, race, and religion. We suggest your ad contan a self* 
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the right to revise ccpy contain^ objectionable phases; to reject In Its sole discretcn. any advertisement on account of its text This publcabon assumes 
no responsibility lor the content or reply to any LAKELAND PERSONALS ad. The advertiser assumes complete liability for the content and all replies to any 
advertisement or recorded message and for any claims made against this publication andKs agents as a result thereof. The advertiser agrees to indemnify 
and hold this publication, its employees and its agents harmless from all costs, expenses (ncludiig reasonable attorney fees), liabiLties and damages result* 
«g from or caused by Vie publication or recording pLxed by the advertiser or any repfy to any such advcrtiscmenL By using LAKELAND PERSONALS, the 
advertiser agrees not to leave hisrtier phone number, last name or address in his/her voice greeting. Not all boies contain a voice greeting. 




ABBREVIATIONS 


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Divorced 


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H Hispanic 


N/D 


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Gay 
White 
Asian 

Slnglo 
Jewish , 
Professional 
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May 1 7, 2002 











Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 1 1 



Discover 





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occa 





Tom Witom 







Tody Adams, chef at Boston's Rialto 
Restaurant, refers to her hands-on cook- 
ing style as artisanal. That is, she cooks 
m from scratch. And she shares her secrets 
*Hn a new book loaded with straightforward 
recipes, "In the Hands of a Chef ' (William 
Morrow, 2002). 

"When I ask yc 

there is always a reward in the depth of fla- 
vor," Adams explains. The recipes reflect 
knowledge she gleaned from extensive trav- 
els. 

We first encountered socca crepes in April 
during a three-day sojourn in Nice. These 
tasty rustic crepes, made from chickpea 
flour, are sold by street vendors and working- 
men's cafes. Adams elevates die dish with an 
outstanding spinach-herb-feta filling. Her 
recipe, made in a nonstick pan/yields about 
16 thin crepes six inches in diameter. Serve 
mem as an appetizer or, with a salad, as a 
light entrde. 









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M1H 

Socca Crepes with S 

Socca; 

2 cups chickpea flour (available in Italian 
markets and at health food stores) 

1 1/4 cups water, plus more if needed 

3 extra-large eggs, lightly beaten 
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil 

2 tsp. kosher salt 

1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 

Extra virgin olive oilfor cooking the crepes 
Filling: 

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil 



5 garlic cloves, finely chopped 

1 lb. flat-leaf spinach, trimmed of thick 
stems, washed and dried 

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 
1/2 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley 
1/4 cup chopped fresh bregano 
1/4 cup chopped fresh mint 
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro 
1/2 lb. feta cheese, crumbled 

2 Tbl. extra virgin olive oil 



Do ahead: The socca can be made a day or two in advance, tightly wrapped and refriger- 
ated until ready to use. 

1. Combine the flour, water, eggs, 1/4 cup of olive oil, salt and pepper in a large bowl 
and beat well. Allow the batter to sit for 30 minutes. 

2. Stir the batter, then check the consistency. It should be the thickness of heavy 
cream. If the batter is too thick, add more water, 1 tablespoon at a time. (You will have 
about 3 cups of batter.) 

3. Heat 1 teaspoon olive oil in a small nonstick saute pan over medium heat. Ladle 
about 3 tablespoons of batter into the hot pan, then quickly tilt the pan to make a thin 
even circle of batter about 6 inches across. Cook the socca until it just starts to color, 

. . . from the pan (it should come free easily), flip 

it, and cook the other side, adding more oil as needed. Transfer to a plate and repeat with 
the remaining batter. Stack the socca as they finish cooking so they don't dry out. You 
should end up with around 20 crepes. Select the best 16 and set the remainder aside for 
another use (hint: with powdered sugar, jam or honey for breakfast). If you're making the 
socca ahead, let the stack cool completely, then wrap tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate 
until you're ready to use them. 

4. To make the filling, heat 1/4 cup of olive oil and garlic in a huge saute pan over medi- 
um heat until the garlic becomes aromatic, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the spinach, cover and 
cook until wilted. Season with salt and pepper. Drain, if necessary, and let cool. Add the 
chopped herbs and crumbled feta to the spinach, mixing well. 

5. Lay the 16 socca on a counter. Imagine each socca as a clock face and distribute the 
spinach mixture evenly among the socca, placing it in the upper right quadrant of each 
crepe (between 12 o'clock and 3 o'clock). Fold each crepe in half (along the 3 o'clock-9 
o'clock axis) then in half again so it's folded in quarters. 

6. Preheat the oven to 200 degrees F. Place a platter in the oven. 

7. Heat a large saute pan over medium-high heat. Add the olive oil. Add the folded, 
crepes and cook, turning once, until golden brown and crisp on each side, 3 to 5 minutes. 
You may have to do them in two batches. Transfer to the warm platter as you finish them. 
Serve warm or at room temperature. 



1 




Bluegrass comes 



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to Woodstock 




Charlie Waller & The Country Gentlemen 

The Woodstock Opera House will be 
hosting a bluegrass event Saturday, 
May 18, at 7 p.m., when Charlie 
Waller & The Country Gentlemen 
will be performing, with special guest The 
Karl Shiflett & Big Country Show. 

Since 1957 the name Charlie Waller & 
The Country Gentlemen has been associated 
with the finest sounds in bluegrass music. 
The reputation has been built on solid foun- 
dations, which have endured evolutionary 
changes and created a legend. 

The Karl Shiflett & Big Country Show is 
an all-acoustic, traditional country music 
show, dedicated to the preservation and per- 
formance of the original American musical 
art form known as bluegrass music. 

Every facet of this group's show, from 
their traditional one-microphone setup to 
their '50s- style stage outfits, can transport a 
listener back to a time when giants like Bill 
Monroe and Flatt & Scruggs still ruled the 
country landscape. Their infectious enthusi- 
asm for classic bluegrass, their incredible use 
of dynamics and their consummate profes- 
sionalism remind fans why some of those 
early bands were so appealing. 

Reserved seating is $22. For tickets, call 
815-338-5300. The Woodstock Opera House 
is located at 121 Van Buren St. in Woodstock. 




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Stcakhousc & Italian Eatery 

Authentic Italian Specialties 








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Eat & Have Fun at POXf 'S 
Great Food-Good Times 
TTWF Steaks, Chops, Seafood 
Our "WORLD" Famous BBQ Ribs & 

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Featuring 
Live Entertainment 
Friday & Saturday 



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Across from Fox Lake Fire Department 



The ZaZu family wonts to thank die Fox Lake Fire 
Department & the Community for their support. 
We look forward to serving you again real soon. 



7220 State Park Road • Fox Lake, IL 60020 

847-973-8888 

Located at the Fox Lake Country Club 

Private Parties, Banquets, Golf Outings 

& Corporate Functions Available 



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Lunches • Dinners • Banquets 

Nightly Comfort Foods Start at $10.95 
Mon. - Country Pot Roast * includes 
Tues. - Roast Pork Loin I All You 
Wed. - Meatloaf t Con Eot 

Thurs. - Pork Schnitzel J Salad Bar 



Fri. - Fresh Fish Specials 





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Lakeland Newspapers 



May 1 7, 2002 



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we're gonna do whatever it takes to be Fox Lake's, too! 



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SPORTS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A1 1 






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AAA Girls (9-and- 10-year-olds) 

Angels 15, Cubs 6 

L. Moore of the Angels went 2-for-2 and 
scored two runs in the victory. Moore also 
gave up two runs and fanned four in tossing 
two innings on the mound. R. Tack led the 
Angels offense by going 2-for-3 with two runs 
scored. Tack also pitched two innings, giving 
up one run while striking out five. 
White Sox 21, Angels 7 

K. Undstrom Went 2-for-2 and scored two 
runs for the Angels. Moore gave up three runs 
and struck out four in two innings of work. 

Major Boys 

Braves 1 , Yankees 

Grimm then fanned 18 batters in firing 
one-hit ball over six innings as the Braves 
earned the shutout. K. Karagiorgas was sad- 
dled with the loss. The Yankees used three 
pitchers (W. McMinimy, K. Karagiorgas, & L 
Tijerina) that combined for a no-hitter and 16 
strike outs. ■ 





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Giants 12, Cubs 2 

Winning pitcher Ball faced 13 batters 
struck out seven and Moser struck out three 
of the six batters he faced in the Giants win. 
Losing pitcher Laine faced 10 batters and 
gave up six hits. Cieslewicz, Nosek and 
Buhrmester each had hits for the Cubs while 
McDermott did an excellent job catching for 
the winners. 
Braves 14, Cubs 8 

Grimm picked up 'the pitching win while 
Z. Morrison was saddled with the loss. H. Fales 
smacked two hits, including a double, and A. 
Cashmore and M. Quinnett each had two hits 
for die Braves. L. Buhrmester pounded out 
three hits for the Cubs in the losing effort. 

Other results 

Giants 6, Yankees 3 

The Giants gave the Yankees their first 
loss. Winning pitchers were A. Ball and N. 
Matiovick. Big hits came off the bats of Harris 
and W. Ritcher. K. Karagiorgas had an inside 
the park home run for the Yankees. 
Yankees 9, A's 2 

Pitchers K. Karagiorgas, W. McMinimy 
and L Tijerina combined for the win on the 




Alicia Szczepaniak, 12, Christina 
VanDallen, 11, and Hannah Karstedt, 
12, members of the Cubs Softball 
junior league, duck under an umbrella 
during opening ceremonies for the 
Antioch Youth Baseball and Softball 
Leagues at Williams Park. — Photo by 
Sandy Bressner 

mound. The trio pitched a one-hitter while 
combining for 15 strikeouts. Big hits were by 
W. McMinimy with his first out-of-the-park 
home run. Other big hits were by J. Puhr with 
a triple and L Tijerina with two doubles. 
White Sox 5, Cubs 4 

A.J. Nauseda pitched complete game 
and struck out 14 hitters while giving up only 
three hits. The White Sox won the game in the 
bottom of the sixth by scoring two runs. The 
winning run was driven in oh a hit by M. 
Perrine with 2 men on base. 

AAA Girls 9-and- 10-year-old 

Cardinals 12, Mariners 5 

Highlights: T. Martin, K. Browning and 
T. Martin each tossed two innings for the 
pitching win. M. McDonald, Martin and A. 
Voykin each doubled. 
Angles 15, Cubs 6 
White Sox 15, Mariners 2 



Allendale Association's :-. > 

Annual Spring Gjreennouse Sale 

Come help suhhort (fie children of Allendale (m 
hurcnasma items arown hu tne children, 



FrL, May 1 7, 
Sat., May 18, 
Sun., May 19, 



Tfats, Vegetables, 7-ferks, 
Warming baskets andTAorc! 



Allendale's 
Bernard B. Rinella, Jr., Horticulture Center 

Grond Avenue and Of field Drive 
Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Phone: 847-356-2351 
Web Site: www.Allendale4kids.org 



When you or someone you know needs help, you can now receive expert addiction 
treatment at All Saints Healthcare in Racine. In the first association of its kind, All 
Saints Mental Health & Addiction Services and the internationally-known Hazelden 
program, have joined together to bring this confidential, comprehensive and 
successful treatment program closer to where people live and work. 

Call us at (262) 687-8626 or (262) 687-2273. 

- 

9301 Washington Avenue, Racine 

Only 25 minutes north of Gurnee 

www.allsaintshealthcare.com 



ALL SAINTS 



mr 



HEALTHCARE 



CENTER FOR ADDICnON RECOVERY 

In AuocUtfon wlih HAZELDEN 



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Results )^^i^!^M^M 

Soccer 

The U-10 Lindcnliurst Predators ral- 
lied and came from behind to beat the Cary • 
Defenders, 3-1. Stephen Korosis, John 
Androus and Shane Hunter (PK) scored for 
Lindenhurst. Eric Hibner and Shane Hunter 
were credited with the assists. Keeper Danny 
Hourihan made five saves. Solid offensive 
play by Jack McCollum and an outstanding 
defense made up of David Franco, Georg 
Katres, Taylor Westrate, Mitchell Post and 
Robert Nogle helped secure the victory. The 
Predators current record for the spring is 3-1. 

On Saturday, the Predators faced the 
Palos Hills Poseidon Soccer Club when they 
played them on the Chicago Fire's home field 
in Naperville. The Predators defeated the 
Poseidon, 2-1. Nogle scored both of the 
Predators' goals with Hunter receiving credit 
for one assist. 

Then, on Mother's Day, the Predators 
were victorious over the Schaumburg Blazers, 
2-0. Hunter scored one goal while dishing out 
an assist. Nogle scored the second goal with 
Korosis giving him the assist. Hourihan played 
an outstanding game in goal and was credited 
with one save. Other standouts for aggressive 
defensive play include Katres and Post. 

The Lindenhurst Tornado U-l 1 boy's 
soccer team lost a close 3-2 decision to the 
Libertyville Orange. Andy Donovan and Eric 
Hoist scored the goals while Jarrett Jespersen 
and Joshua Oppenheim dished out assists. 
Matt Holmes recorded three saves and Joshua 



Larson two while sharing time in goal. 




Sign-ups/registration 

Soccer 

Tryouts for the 2002-03 Lindenhurst 

Area Youth Soccer Ciub for boy's ages 9-14 
will be on Sat., May 18 from 5-7 p.m. A make- 
up day is scheduled for Mon., May 20 from 6- 
8 p.m. All tryouts will be held at Polley Field, 
located at the corner of Deep Lake and Grass 
Lake Roads. 

Players should bring soccer shoes, shin 
guards, water and a soccer ball. 

All players are welcome to try-out, meet 
the coaches and learn about Lindenhurst's 
Premier Travel Soccer Club, 

For further information regarding tryouts, 
please contact Bob Baker at 847-265-0046 or 
Paul McMahon at 847-265-9601 . You may also 
send inquiries to lasc@soccer.com. Interested 
players can also check out the web site 
www.eteamz.com/lasc. 

News and Notes 

Come and join a big league celebration! 
Catch the action at the Avon Township 
Youth Baseball Complex in Hainesville 

on Sat., June 1 beginning at 10 a.m. The event 
will mark the dedication of the newly renovat- 
ed ballfields with amenities made possible 
through the Illinois First Grant Program. 

A grand-slam line-up of hot dogs, ice cold 
soda, peanuts and cracker jacks wil be avail- 
able for America's favorite past-time. 

To R.S.V.P., please call Debbie Puder at 
847-546-8558, ext. 212. 



A 



He's Country Cotta 

■ 

Folk Art V Fine Handcrafts ¥ Country Gifts 

Country & Primitive Furniture 



901 Main St. 

Antioch, IL 60002 

847-838-4292 



Mon.-Thurs. 10-8 

Fri. 10-8* Sat. 10-5 

Sun. Noon - 4 











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money that's readily available for a variety of uses. 



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you wish. And now, at State Bank of The Lakes, your home equity 
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COMMUNITY 



May 17, 2002 



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NEWSPAPERS 



May 17-23, 2002 






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TO'DRID) OH A 3-PAE3T SERIES 



GLCli 



over 









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Jim Denikas coaches his 12-year-old son Jason during their 
Brewers baseball game at the Lake Villa Baseball Park. Jim and 
his wife, Sheila, have adopted two children through Central 
Baptist Children's Home, care for three foster children and their 
two biological children.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



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Lake Villa family of 11 looks to thefutu 



By DENYS BUCKSTEN 
Lake County Editor 



As Jim and Sheila Denikas' 
family has grown from 
their two biological chil- 
dren to include seven fos- 
ter children, the young Lake Villa 
couple could be worrying about the 
future and all the things that could 

go wrong. 

But a funny thing is happening 

on the way to gray hair and wrin- 
kles. It seems as if the Denikas' are 
too busy, working too hard, having 
too much fun and are too involved 
in the present to worry much about 
the future. 

The family, who live in a six- 
bedroom farmhouse on 3 1/2 acres 
in-rural Lake Villa, includes: Travis, 
19: Tason. 12; Amanda, 1 



Matthew and George, 10; Kimberly, 
9; Heavenly, 8; Johnny, 7; and 
Bobby, 4. Jason and "Kimmy" are 
the Denikas' biological children. 

Two of the foster children have 
been adopted, and except for 
Travis, who is of legal age, the 
Denikas' expect to adopt the four 
other kids, now placed in their 
home through the state's foster care 

program. 

The Denikas' began caring for 

foster children by contacting 

Central Baptist Child and Family 

Services, just down the road in 

Lake Villa. Central Baptist social 

worker Robyn Ondo said the 

Denikas' energy, optimism, and 

poise and determination in the 

face of serious obstacles have 

i 

Please see LOVE / B. 



By DENYS BUCKSTEN 

Lake County Editor 



Job Marketplace 2002, on May 30 
at the College of Lake County in 
Grayslake, has drawn over 90 
employers. 

The popular annual fair will be 
held from 1 to 6 p.m. in the college's 
gymnasium, at 19351 W.Washington 
St., a half-mile west of Route 45. 

The heavily attended annual 
event is sponsored by IETC Partners 
and Career Resource Center, 
Executive Placement 

Consultants/EPC Staffing Services, 
Lake County Area Vocational System, 
Lake County Education to Career 
Partnerships, and Salem Services, 

Inc. 

This year, some of the major 
employers are: Abbott Laboratories; 
Baxter Healthcare; police agencies in 
Lake and Cook counties; Condell 
Health Network; Midwest Bank; 
Hewitt Associates LLC; Kelly 
Services; Lake County government 
and Forest Preserves; Manpower; 
Marriott Lincolnshire; Matthews 
Employment; Medline Industries; 
Six Flags Great America; I^ustmark 
Insurance; United Parcel Service; 
and United States Army Recruiting. 
Lakeland Media, which pro- 
duced a special advertising section 
for Job Market Place 2002, will have a 
booth at the fair. 

In past years, with employers 
aggressively recruiting during record 
low unemployment, over 200 com- 
panies vied to get into the annual 
spring event at the college, and some 

were turned away. 

Conversely, the fair 

In recent years employers have 
sent representatives to the fair who 
are actually in the position to do the 
hiring. Conversely, a job applicant 
meeting a company representative is 
able to sell himself or herself in per- 
son, instead of simply relying on a 
resume sent through the mail. 

Preceding the job fair by nine 
days are Pre-event Workshops for Job 
Seekers, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on May 
21; and Pre-event Workshops for 
Employers, 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on 




Former U.S. Senator Paul Simon prepares to give a lecture on 
public policy and education to several Lake County administra- 
tors at the College of Lake County in Grayslake. Next to him is 
his wife, Patti.— Photo by Samir Id-Deen 




• 



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CLC speech addresses policy impact 
education, shortcomings of schools 



By DREW GRANGER 

Staff Reporter 



Please see JOB FAIR IB2 



Public policy creates public edu- 
cation, Former Senator Paul Simon 
told a group of listeners at the 
College of Lake County, May 9, and 
leaders are needed to help shape 
that creation. 

Simon related a tale of an 
unpublicized trip to schools on 
Chicago's west side. On this trip he 
saw first hand what leadership can 
mean. While one school's principal 
was escorting Simon through the 
halls he noted the students did not 
show much potential. Simon said he 
saw this notion reflected in the 

■ 

school. 

At a second school on that trip, 

Simon said he encountered a princi- 
pal who had "fired-up" the students 
and faculty. To ease the cycle of 
poverty and its effects on the stu- 



dents, the school was bringing in the 
parents to help them improve, their 

education. 

"My final message," Simon said 

while closing his speech, "is not to 
just do your assigned job. You have 
to do the extra things." 

Simon's speech, part of the col- 
lege's Lessons in Leadership pro- 
gram. Covered the impact of public 
policy on educational issues and 
what could be done to improve edu- 
cation. 

Admitting he could be contro- 
versial, Simon made a point to stress 
areas he felt should be concentrated 
on to make the most of the average 
American students education. 

Simon believes that the school 
year should be linger for elementary 
and secondary education students. 
He mentioned the longer lengths of 

Please see SIMON /B2 



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May 23. Both workshop programs will be 
held at the Grayslake campus. 

The Job Seekers workshops will include 
interview techniques; resume review by pro- 
fessionals; internet job search; overcoming age 
barriers; and career success for ex-offenders. 

The employer workshops will include 
interviewing techniques; wage and hour 
issues; searching for a new persona for human 
resource professionals; pros and cons of arbi- 
tration; and immigration basics. 

Terri Berryman, director of Career and 
Placement Services at CLC; and Lois Long, 
with the Illinois Department of Employment 
Security, said the economic slowdown the 
country is experiencing is reflected in the job 
fair makeup. 

"This vear is like 1992-93. wIWa iiro t.m ra 



not getting a lot of employers, but we will have 
a really diverse pool of companies," said 
Berryman. "There are some really legitimate 
opportunities for people attending the fair. 

"Although the number of job listings for 
full time jobs and co-op programs (similar to 
internships) has slowed down significantly in 
the last year, we are seeing it picking up." 

The key for job seekers, said Berryman, "is 
flexibility and patience. And you should use 
multiple resources when you're looking for 
findingjobs." 

Berryman said one measure of the fair's 
success has been the employers who keep 
coming back. "Employers who have actual- 
ly recruited at the fair always say how suc- 
ssful they were in getting really good 
employees " 



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made the family strong 

"I think they are genuinely a very special . 
family," said Ondo. "They've really opened 
their hearts and stretched themselves in that 
way. They're very willing to be a part of what- 
ever it takes to make it work and are strong 
advocates for me children in their care." 

When Jim Denikas, a welder since high 
school, was seriously burned on the job last 
year in Kenosha, the extended family of Jim 
and Sheila's parents, grandparents, neighbors, 
and support group friends kicked in big time. 

Food was cooked and brought to the 
farmhouse; laundry was done; Jdds were fer- 
ried to their many school and sports activities, 
counseling and doctors' appointments; and 
even the staff at the Kenosha hospital where 
Jim stayed for nearly three weeks, re-defined 
visiting hours. 

"The kids were terrified to be without their 
daddy," said Sheil. "Our kids were able to go to 
the hospital and the nurses said (some of 
them) could stay there in sleeping bags." 

Jim had to endure the fears of returning to 
a job in which he had caught on fire, but a job 
nonetheless that comes with a substantial 
paycheck. 

"After the accident I was gunshy about 
returning to work, but not anymore," said Jim. 

The reality is that Jim will be working as a 
welder for many years to come, to meet the 
family's financial obligations. 

"Jim talks about retirement." saM Shpila 



for a long, long time." 
, *..«, „» U1 w unlikely event of death, of one 
or both parents, their families will step in, 
because the young couple, by words and 
deeds, have dedicated their lives to giving the 
children "a sense of permancy," said Sheila. 

"If anything happened to me or Jim," said 
Sheila, "we definitely have enough family and 
friends to go around, to take care of the chil- 
dren." 

That said, it's interesting that the Denikas' 
have already looked to the future, especially 
the bright side, when "we'll have to hire a ban- 
quet hall for family functions," and the even 
brighter side, said Sheila, "when the kids are 
grown, and we'll take another look at bringing 
more kids into our home." 

By then, said Sheila, producing a list on 
notebook paper, printed in pencil, the Denikas 
kids will be doing their own part to care for the 
young, the elderly and the needy. 

According to the list, Jason plans on 
becoming a teacher; Amanda a pre-school 
teacher; Heavenly, whom the Denikas' 
thought wouldn't last the Weekend when first 
brought, kicking and screaming into their 
home, a counselor; Kimmy, a teacher or coun- 
selor; George, a cook; Matt, the manager of a 
McDonald's Restaurant; and Johnny, a police 
officer. 

Bobby, with approximately 14 years before 
entering the job market, is undecided; and 
Travis is looking. 

And most important, whatever paths the 
children pursue, they'll never be going it alone. 









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Western European and Japanese school years 
in comparison to the 180-plus days an 
American student averages per school year. 

"when a Japanese student graduates from 
secondary school, he has been in school 
longer than an American student with a 
Bachelor's Degree," Simon said. 

' Simon said die reasoning originally behind 
the length of the average school year, so chil- 
dren could help with harvests, is outdated. 

Simon acknowledged it would cost more 
to keep the students in school longer, with 
increased teacher salaries and an building 
improvements, but he says the benefits would 
be telling. 




Simon stressed the implementation of for- 
eign language instruction at every level of edu- 
cation. 

He said the United States is the only 
developed nation that does not require foreign 
language instruction. Simon related a tale of a 
trip to the former Spanish Sahara where he 
visited a primitive, one room school building 
in which the students lacked such basics as 
pencils. Yet in that school room the students 
were learning a foreign language. 

Simon admitted that such actions would 
be hard to implement, but several programs 
have met with resistance in the past, and have 
been enacted into law. As examples, Simon 
gave the G. I. Bill, the Marshal Plan, and a bill 
he helped with, requiring school districts to 
offer GED courses. 







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The best and the brightest of Like County's 
students of all ages received their due at the 
annual Illinois Principals Association breakfast 
held at the . Lake County High Schools 
lechnology Campus in Grayslake. 

The IPA invited each member school to 
select outstanding student graduates, based 
on their ovvn criteria. In all, 44 students were 
recognized. 

Debbie Feeney, assistant principal at J.J. 
Pleviak Elementary. School in Like Villa, one 
of tlie annual program's coordinators, said the 
award winners, in addition to excelling in the 
classroom, are students who "are truly making 
a difference for their school, community and 
county, by setting a standard of excellence." 

J| Those receiving awards were Hen Korom and 
Tristan GandolU of Antioch High School; Mark 
Czervionke and Danni Parpan of Antioch Upper 
Grade School; Dean Gillmore and Ryan Neal of B.J. 
Hooper School; Charles Williams and Carolyn Florczyk 
of Beach Park School; Jonathan Kohl and Ruth 
Eisenberg of Caruso Middle School; Kate Martino and 
Cal Clinge of Cotton Creek School; Dan Kurland and 
Tommy DeGaimo of Elm Place School; Katie Sprague 
and Nick Schwall of Emmons Grade School; Kate 
Guama and Jimmy Litz of Fremont Middle School. 

Awards went to Tina Gallinati and Brand! 
Browning of Grant High School; John Krampien and 
Nichole Starr of Grayslake High School; David 
Roman and Crlstina Quarrato of Hawthorn Option 
School; and Amber Rayniak and David Puplava of 




Grant Community High School senior 
Brandi Browning is congratulated by 
Principal Marilyn Howell after receiv- 
ing a student recognition award from 
the Illinois Principals Association,— 
Photo by Sandy Bressner 

Lake Co. Tech. High School. • 

Awards also went to J.D. Hermann and Dan 
Webster of Ubertyville High School; Zachary Nelson 
and Enn Horvath of Lotus School; Marvin Reynolds 
Armelia Holmes of North Chicago High School; 
Mereccdes Gcncngel and Michael Scott of J. J. Pleviak 
School; Daniel D'Arcy, David Curie, and Morgan 
Stumbras of Roslyn Road School; Christopher 
Robinson Kaela Munster of Stanton School; Sam 
Evans and Brittany Wcitzman of Taveime Middle 
School; Xochiti Garcia and Joey Re of Wauconda 
Middle School; and Christina Knudson and Chris 
Mayer of Wauconda High School. 




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A Safe Place/Like County Crisis Center is 
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NEWSPAPERS 



William H. Schroeder 

Publisher • 

i 

- Robert J. Schroeder 

General Manager 

30 South Whitney St., Grayslake, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (847) 223-8161. e-mail: edit@lakclandmedia.com 




EDITORIAL 



Ease 




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eldom mentioned anymore as a relief to mid-county highway 
congestion is continuation westward of four-lane Route 120 
(Belvidere Road) which abruptly becomes two lanes at a point 
in Wildwood east of Route 45. 
Officially, the westward extension is known as the Grayslake 
Bypass because plans designed a half century ago call for Route 120 
to swing south of the existing highway and bypass both Grayslake 
and the Round Lake area. Grand plans for northern Illinois highway 
construction conceived after World War II called for a four-lane 
Route 120 connecting with Route 12 in McHenry County. 

Reasons why four-lane Route 120 never advanced beyond 
Wildwood are somewhat of a mystery. When asked about the 
abrupt juncture, Martin Buehler, director of the Lake County 
Department of Transportation, responded with a candid, "I don't 
know. Remember, I was in high school then." He said the abrupt 
ending probably had something to do with funding. The portion of 
Route 120 running west from Waukegan became Jour lanes in the 
early 1960s. 

Buehler acknowledged that a centerline for the Grayslake Bypass 
is in place and that both the bypass and extension of Route 53 are 
integral parts of the Lake County Transportation Improvement 
Project, Lake County's "bible" for highway improvements. The 
bypass came in for mention in a rather off-hand way when the 
Illinois Tollway Authority and Illinois Department of Transportation 
studied transportation needs two years ago. 

Tiie mystery of the Wildwood "funnel" heightens when consid- 
ering how highway traffic in a growing Lake County would be flow- 
ing smoother today if the four lanes were built westward as originally 
planned. This newspaper has campaigned diligently over the years 
for expansion of east-west arterials. The bypass would have been a 
forerunner of that concept. 

Thousands of frustrated motorists have bought into the concept 
that the 53 extension is the only way to ease gridlock in Lake County. 
As we have stated from time to time, the Route 53 extension is unre- 
alistic for a number of reasons. As illusory as the controversial pro- 
ject is, politicians keep hammering way for 53, even getting elected 
on what has become a bogus concept. 

In contrast, the bypass is not hypothetical. In a very real sense, it 
is half built. A large portion of the right-of-way already is owned by 
the state of Illinois. The bypass is a highway construction project 
awaiting completion. 

A strong argument can be made for the Grayslake Bypass provid- 
ing many of the answers to congestion that advocates claim for the 
Route 53 extension. Certainly, enough money and study time have 
been frittered away on Route 53 to build well beyond the present ter- 
minus point of four-lane Route 120. 

Gurnee, Grayslake, Libertyville. Mundelein and the Round Lake 
area all have a vested interest in completing the high speed, limited 
access corridor provided by a four lane Route 120 though the center 
of the county. Work on Route 120 would serve as a catalyst to 
improve connecting arterials. 

We think it's high time to put completion of the bypass on the 
front burner. Shake off the mothballs on the bypass and let's REAL- 
LY do something about easing gridlock in the mid-county area. Are 
elected officials and business leaders afraid to tackle the project? 




The 'Fymimen 



i 



Four-lane Route 120 narrows to two lanes at Wildwood 
leaving highway modernization at 40-year standstill. 
Photo by Sandy Bressner 



OPINIONS 



May 1 7, 2002 




VIEWPOINT 




won 






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Viisions of the County of 
Lake using the full 
of government to 
cate a cor n 
lution of a lease gaff recail heavy- 
handed tactics and threat of con- 
demnation employed 20 years ago 
to acquire Forest Preserve open 
space. 

That "Big Brother" strategy 
comes to mind as the county works 
out of an imbroglio resulting wheh 
Farmer Petersen planted 100 acres 
of corn on county land adjoining 
Winchester House and 
Transportation Division headquar- 
ters in Libertyville without benefit 
of a lease. 

Politicians trying to figure out 
who goofed are pouring salt in 
long-standing wounds with die 
dwindling agricultural community. 

Farmers have been suspicious 
ever since the county had the atti- 
tude, "We want your land for a 
Forest Preserve. Sell it or we'll take 
it." Scars left over from the con- 
demnation era remain to this day, 
complicating efforts to add public 
open space holdings. Too bad, but 
that's another story. What's before 
county officials is working out their 
problem wiUi Petersen, one of the 
handful of custom farmers who 
rent land from the county and 
other owners of agriculture land. 

What is known is that Petersen 
planted the land, which he has 
been working for 40 years under 
county leases, without benefit of "a 
formal lease this year. Someone 
goofed. County Board Rep. Pam 
Newton (R- Vernon Hills) reportedly 
said something like, "Go ahead and 
plant. We know you." When it was 
learned that Petersen planted, a 
chorus of responses spewed forth 
like a spring deluge. Board Chair 
Suzi Schmidt (R-Lake Villa) said 
Petersen was trespassing. Oh? 
Rep. Diana O'Kelly (R-Mundelein) 
said unauthorized planting is not 
covered by county licensing ordi- 
nances. Sounds likely. Rep. Sandy 
Cole (R-Grayslake) made a stand 
for open and competitive bidding. 
Well, yes. Rep. Steve Mountsier 
(R-Barrington) said the county 
should reimburse Petersen for the 
seed. Welfarism? Rep. Bonnie 
Thomson Carter (R-Ingleside) said 
"whoa" to the reimbursement sug- 
gestion. An idea was floated that 
the crop should be confiscated and 
sold to the highest bidder. Oh, oh. 
Sort of Soviet-like. Another sugges- 



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BILL SCHROEDER 



Publisher 



tion surfaced to spread sludge over 
the land as part of a spoils disposal 
method in connection with the 
dredging of nearby Butler Lake. 
Aha. The dreaded coverup. That 
idea was dropped in a hurry 
because of dark connotations. 

When last we checked, even as 
the first blades of com poke 
through the rich black soil, the 
mess had been dropped into the 
lap of State's Atty. Michael Waller. 
Probably a first for Mike, who is 
more used to dealing with murder 
and lesser fonns of serious law- 
breaking. Well, Mike. It's your 
baby now. 

Here's another suggestion. 
Simply admit someone goofed and 
draw up a lease for 2002. Won't 
even have to back date it. That 
might be illegal. Question? What 
in the world would the County of 
Lake do with 100 acres of corn? 
Just a thought: Anyone care to say 
"oops"? 

Calling all snowmobilers 

John Lindbergof Cary, presi- 
dent of the Riverbend Benders 
Snowmobile Club, writes 
asking followers of this column — 
and fellow snowmobile fans — to 
write letters in support of snowmo- 
biling in Yellowstone and Grand 
Teton National Parks. 
Environmentalists are flooding die 
National Park System with calls to 



ban snowmobiling. The official 
comment period ends May 29,. 
2002, so the time to write is now. 
Lindberg says the outcome of 
National Park decisions will affect 
snowmobiling everywhere, includ- 
ing Illinois and Wisconsin trails. 
Because of space limitations, we're 
able to list only one website to sub- 
mit comments: Illinois Association 
of Snowmobile Clubs— 
www.ilsnowmobiIe.com. 

Congratulations 

Martin "Marty" Buehler has 
been reappointed County 
Engineer/Director of 
Transportation in action taken by 
the Public Works and 

Transportation Committee of the 
Lake County Board. The reap- 
pointment requires consent of the 
Illinois Department of 

Transportation (IDOT). The reap- 
pointment becomes effective July 
16, 2002. Buehler is a career coun- 
ty employee, joining the then Lake 
County Highway Department after 
graduation from the University of 
Illinois. 



Where _ 

Despite the distractions of 
modern society, Reta Wilcox, CEO 
of the Illinois Crossroads Council of 
Girls Scouts headquartered in 
Vernon Hills, says the organization 
is stronger than ever. Locally and 
in the region, one of every five girls 
between the ages of 5 and 17 within 
Crossroads Council is a Girl Scout, 
compared to one in every nine girls 
elsewhere. The council serves 
more than 33,000 girls and 10,250 
' adult volunteers in 102 communi- 
ties in northeastern Illinois. The 
council is high tech, offering a 
wholesome computer experience 
to girls with an approved website. 
Teenage girls go online anywhere 
from twice a week to several times 

a day, according to a Girl Scout 
study. 



Guest 

» 

commentaries welcome 

Lakeland Newspapers welcomes guest columns by our readers on 
topics of general interest. Anyone interested in writing a column can 
contact Publisher W.H. Schroeder at (847) 223-8161. Submissions 
may be mailed c/o Lakeland Newspapers, P.O. Box 268, Grayslake 
IL, 60030 or fax to (847) 223-8810. Deadline is Friday at noon. 






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May i 7, 2002 




OPINIONS 



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PARTY 





POLITICAL OPINION, IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS 




he Republican 
"mystery candi- 
date" ready to 
take on State 

Senator and Democratic 

County Chair Terry link 

could turn out to be 

Shields Township 

Supervisor Charles C. ' 

Fitzgerald IV. 

GOP leaders have 
been promising not to let 
Link run unopposed in 
the November general 
election. 

Fitzgerald has solid 
party credentials and is 
well-liked in the township 
post that serves citizens in 

North Chicago, Lake Bluff 
and Lake Forest. 

Link is a veteran legislator representing 
Vernon Hills, where he resides, and North 
Shore communities. No Republican filed for 
the primary. The candidacy will be firmed up 
in a slating process according to state statute 
that has a May 20 deadline. 




Peterson: Returns 
in Oct. for fund 
brunch in 

Lincolnshire. 




Center approved 

Grant Township's new $1.4 million 
administrative center was toured by mem- 
bers of the Lake County Township Officials 
Association Wednesday night. The center wi 
serve the Fox Lake-Ingleside community. 
Supervisor Gordon Klesgen said the build 
ing, located in a rural area, received rave 
reviews. Officials from Lake Villa Township 
and Ela (Lake Zurich) Township provided 
buffet food service for the visitors. 

Back to October 

Jan Zobus, legislative aide for State 




Our little Lakeland family had a rea- 
son to celebrate last week when 
one of us graduated from 
Antioch's village preschool, also 
known as Camp Crayon or B.K. Camper 
(Before Kindergarten). 

No, no, it wasn't me. I think I graduated 
from preschool when I was 14. As comedian 
Jeff Foxworthy says, "You might be a redneck 
if your dad walks you to school because 
you're in the same grade." 

But back to the subject. Our incredibly 
bright 5-year-old grandson, Zachary Besson, 
graduated from preschool along with 25 
classmates. They are the college class of 
2019. 

The graduation hall was packed, stand- 
ing room only behind the seats, as grandpar- 
ents and parents, and other parents toting 
kids under 5, savored the program presented 
by their precious and precocious tots. 

Cameras and VCRs were everywhere, 
capturing the event on film and tape. When 
my generation was young, a child might 
have his picture taken once in a while, 
maybe. Today's kids become the subjects of 
albums full of photos and mountains of 
movies. We used to teach them to say 
mommy and daddy, now their first words 
include "Cheese!" 

The B.K. Campers will be moving to the 



President 
George W. Bush 

The White House 

1600 Pennsylvania Ave., NW 

Washington, D.C 20500 

Vice President 
Richard Cheney 

Old Executive Office Bldg., 

17th St., & Pennsylvania Ave., NW, 

Washington, D.C. 20501 

United States Senators 
Peter Fitzgerald 

SD555 Dirksen Senate Office Bldg., 



Churchill: Help 
wanted signs posted 
for aide in legislation. 



Waller: Candidate 
enjoys sharing with 
fellow jurist. 



Sen. Bill Peterson (R-Long Grove), assures 
that this year's Sunday brunch date is 
"carved in stone." Always attracting a capaci- 
ty crowd at Marriott Lincolnshire, the event 
is set for Sunday, Oct. 6. Last year an August 
event was scheduled and later postponed 
until November due to schedule conflicts. 
Peterson supporters like October because of 
delightful fall weather. 

Getting noticed 

Congressman Mark Kirk's recent 
Saturday morning breakfast at Hackney's on 
Lake in Glenview turned out to be a rare 
opportunity to showcase Cook County 
Republican candidates who don't always get 
to bask in the limelight. November candi- 
dates from Cook County getting attention 
with top-of-the-ballot Republicans included 
Maureen Murphy, Board of Review; Rev. 
Chris Bullock, County Board president; 
Ron Swick, sheriff; Kathy Thomas, county 
clerk; James Pleczonka. assessor, and 



Sandy Tristano, 12th 
District sub-circuit. 

Job opening 

Bob Churchill, 

Republican nominee 
for state representative, 
is in the market for a 
legislative aide. BUI 
Snodgrass of 
Waukegan, fonnerly on 
the Churchill staff, took 
over similar duties for 
State Rep. Tim 
Osmond (R-Antioch) 
when Churchill left the 
General Assembly sev- 
eral years ago for an 
unsuccessful bid for 
state office. Snodgrass, 
retired superintendent of North Chicago 
High School, relishes his support work for 
Osmond. He says he had nine enjoyable 
years on the Churchill staff. 

Team play 

Chief Circuit Court Judge Jane Waller 
and Judge Steve Walter teamed up to share 
the proceeds of a fund- raiser Wednesday 
night at Country Squire in Grayslake. Both 
are running for retention. 

New interest 

Assistant State's Attorney Torre 
Newson is being credited with igniting new 

interest among Waukegan Republicans. 
Newson, township GOP chairman, has 
vowed to increase involvement of minorities 
in party affairs while electing a Republican 
state representative and county board mem- 
ber. A recent township meeting was consid- 
ered "the best in years." 






raduate from preschool 





TOE 
OTRNEG1 



Jerry Pfarr 



BIG SCHOOL in the fall, kindergarten. Their 
graduation was both happy and emotional. 
Imagine the 26 tykes marching in to the 
majestic music of "Pomp and 
Circumstance," wearing little red mortar- 
boards and carrying rolled-up diplomas. 

For die audience, they acted out nursery 
rhymes such as, "Mary Had a Little Lamb," 
"Itsy Bitsy Spider," "Twinkle, Twinkle Little 
Star" and "Humpty Dumpty." 

. They also performed a short play and 
sang songs as a chorus. Some in the audi- 
ence couldn't help puddling up a bit as their 
lovable little ones went through their paces. 

"Frasier" television star Kelsey Grammer 
tells college graduates the three keys to real- 
world success are talent, intention and 
tenacity. The kids at Camp Crayon learned 
some other keys to success: picking up their 
toys, making many friends and sharing. They 
enjoyed party days, went for walks, learned 



songs, built things with blocks and assem- 
bled puzzles. Adorning the walls were 
posters with pictures of each child along 
with their answers to questions such as 
"what I want to be when I grow up" and 
"favorite foods." 

If we adults can just hold on for a 
while, long waits at doctors' offices may be 
over. There may be medical glut. Morgan 
Musich, Kendric Henderson, Eric Pedersen 
and Julia DeBoer all say they want to be 
doctors. 

Kacy Jonites wants to be "a hospital doc- 
tor" and Jaclyn Ukleja an animal doctor. 

Jacob Lahahan and Austin George want 
to be policemen, Nicole Mellen a teacher 
and Karlie Schnider a princess. 

Our Zachary says he wants to be an 
astronaut, but last year we was going to be a 
doctor, so that ambition is subject to change. 
As a grandpa, I visualize him pitching for the 
Cubs, playing quarterback for the Packers or 
maybe replacing Tiger Woods as the world's 
best golfer. 

Favorite foods of the little graduates 
ranged from "apples, bananas and pears" to 
"shrimp and scampi and asparagus" to "eggs 
and toast" to "banana splits" to "strawber- 
ries and ice cream." 

Naturally, being our offspring, they have 
excellent taste. 




LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Illflll 



uencin 





n President George W. Bush's lexicon 
there are, apparently two different types 
of terrorists. The first is the Type A 
Terrorist, the second is die Type B ter- 
rorist. They are, indeed, very different. 

* The Bush Type A Terrorist fires upon, or 
otherwise threatens Americans, or in some 
rare cases, America's allies. Obviously, a 
blemish on a civilized world, the Bush 
method of eradication is to kill, "detain," or 
otherwise remove from circulation from the 
aforementioned civilized world. There is, nor 
shall there be, any discussion with their 
leader, Osama bin Laden, concerning alter- 
native methods, political or otherwise, 
designed to halt America's effort to stamp 
out the contagion of Type A Terrorism. 

The Bush Type B Terrorist attaches, to 
his/her person, certain powerful explosives, 
goes to a mall, market, cafe, or pizza parlor 
crowded with Israeli civilians, and detonates 
those powerful explosives, killing the inno- 
cents, young and old. He/she thereby has 
perpetrated a mere glitch on the screen of 
President Bush's view of the brave, new 
world of the future. The Bush method of 
eradicating the Type B Terrorist is to send 
forth a high ranking diplomat to discuss a 
political settlement with Osama bin Laden's 
counterpart in the Type B camp, Yasser 
Arafat. 

It should be noted that the Bush pre- 
scription is subject to change from day to 
day depending on what his advisors say, or 
what the advisors of our "friends and allies" 
say. I never knew that the French, the 
Spanish, the Egyptians, die Moroccans, or 
the Saudis were part of the president's cabi- 
net. They apparenUy have more influence 
than anyone else. It's called: "governing by 
committee." 

Hank Jacoby 

Wauconda 



» * 

Who's watching? 

Former An tioch Mayor Marilyn 
Shineflug claims she had no knowledge of 
the actions of former Village Administrator 
Tim Wells, which resulted a huge deficit for 
the village treasury. Tim Wells has been 
indicted for those actions and faces severe 
penalties in a court of law. The former mayor 
is quick to point out that she has not been 
indicted or accused of any criminal activity. 
Consequently, she claims, the village of 
Antioch should pay her legal fees, which 
resulted from the investigation. 

What a clever attempt to create the 
impression she has the support of the gov- 
ernment and the people of Antioch. In get- 
ting our financial support, we must conclude 
she is innocent of any wrong doing and was 
only working in our best interest all along. 

What is not being said here is that it was 

her job to know what her staff was doing. It 

was her job to oversee the people working 

for her and insure the safety of village funds. 

She is ultimately responsible for the fiasco 

created by the misappropriation of the Dolly 

Spiering bequest to the senior citizens enter, 

even though Tim Wells has nobly saidhe'is 

solely responsible. 

Ralph H. Antonelli 

Antioch 



Letters welcome 

Letters to the editor are welcome. They 

should be on topics of general interest, 

approximately 250 words or less. All letters 

must be signed, and contain a home 

address and telephone number. The editor 

reserves the right to condense all letters. 




Washington, D.C, 20510; (202) 224-2854; 
fax, (202) 228-1372 or 
230 S. Dearborn St., Rm„ 3900, 
Chicago, IL, 60604; 

(312)886-3506 

e-mail: 
senator_fitzgerald@ritzgerald.senate.gov 



* T 



Richard Durbm 

332 Dirksen Senate Office Bldg. 
Washington, D.C, 20510; (202) 224-2152; 
or 230 S. Dearborn St.,Rm„ 3892, 
Chicaao, IL, 60604; (312) 353-4952; 
e-mail: dick @ durbin. senate. gov: 
Web site: www.senate.aov/~durbin 



Representatives In Congress 

8th District - Philip M. Crane, 

233 Cannon Office Bldg., 

Washington, D.C, 20515; 

(202) 225-371 1; or 300 N. Milwaukee Ave., 

Ste., C, Lake Villa,IL 60046; 265-9000; or 

1100 W. Northwest Hwy., Palatine,IL60067; 

358-9160; Web site: www.house.gov/crane 

10th District - Mark Steven Kirk, 

1531 Longworth House Office Bldg., 
Washington, D.C. 20515; (202) 225-4835; 
or 102 Wilmot Rd., Ste., 200, 
DeerfieldJL 60015; (847) 940-0202; 
or 301 W. Washington St., Waukegan, IL 

60085; (847) 662-0101 



Illinois State Officials 

Gov. George Ryan, 

State Capitol Bldg. Rm., 

207, Springfield, IL 62706; 

(217) 782-6830; or 

James R. Thompson Center, Ste. 16-100, 

100 W. Randolph St. Chicago,IL 60601; 

(312) 814-2121; 

Web site: www. sta te. il. us. 

e-mail: govenor@state.il.us 



For highlights of Illinois and services contact tho 

State of Illinois page website 

i 

address: www.stotc.ll.us 









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C0UM1 




May 17, 2002 








Aries - March 21 /April 20 
Takethe initiative when it comes to a finan- 
cial opportunity this week, Aries. You can 
earn much. Don't let this slip away, because 
you won't have another chance like it. 

Taurus-April 21/May 21 
You can accomplish anything as long as you 
stay focused. Don't let an acquaintance 
stop you from reaching an important goal 
this week; don't get distracted. 

Gemini- May 22/June 21 • 
A business associate gets you involved in a 
difficult situation early in the week, Gemini. 
Keep your anger in check until you find a 
way out of this mess. 

Cancer - June 22/July 22 

Don't keep vour feelings bottled up inside 



on Wednesday, Cancer. You need to talk to 
someone. If you don't, you're just going to 
make yourself miserable. Open up to a 
loved one who is always there. 

Leo -July 23 /August 23 
This is your week to celebrate, Leo. You 
finally receive the good news that you've 
been hoping for. Revel in it. Those closest to 
you will share in your joy. Capricorn plays 
an important role. 

Virgo -Aug 24/Sept 22 
Several people are counting on you to com- 
plete an important project by Thursday, 
Virgo. While this puts a lot of pressure on 
you, don't get overwhelmed. 

libra- Sept 23/Oct 23 

Don't take a close friend's comment the 



wrong way, Libra. This person doesn't 
mean to insult you; he or she is just joking. 
Lighten up a bit and learn to be the life of 
the party. 

Scorpio - Oct 24/Nov 22 
You have a busy week ahead of you. So, 
don't slack off. While you just want to relax, 
you know that you can't right now. Instead, 
buckle down and get to work. 




to force you to do something with which 
you don't agree. You know the difference 
between right and wrong and what this per- 
son's asking is wrong. 



» c 

V 







Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 
Everything appears to go wrong this week, 
Sagittarius. However, don't get discouraged. 
Things aren't as bad as they seem. If you 
take the time to examine the situation, 
you'll realize that you're doing well. 

_ ■ 

Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 

Stand your ground when a loved one tries 



Aquarius- Jan 21/Feb 18 

You have a full to-do list this week, 
Aquarius, but don't let this upset you. If you 
set your priorities and work .diligently, you 
certainly can get everything accomplished 
easily. 



Pisces - Feb 19/March 20 

Keep your sense of humor about you early 

in the week, Pisces, because you're going to 

need it when you get some discouraging 

news from a loved one. Try to laugh at the 

situation. 



Lake Comity CDDamrDbeir ©f Cemmeirc 







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©iff ©ytDOD 



June 1 9, 2002 - Midlane Golf Resort - Limited to Lake County Chamber Members and Their Guests 








Locker 
Lunch 



Entry Fee Includes: 




■» 



1 8 holes of golf 
Happy Hour open bar 
Buffet dinner 



Group photos • 

On-course beverages • Entry for Chamber raffle 

Golf cart • Great prizes after dinner 

- 

Pricing for the event is $155 for a single and $580 for a foursome. 

t 

Lake County Chamber of Commerce 

522 1 West Grand Avenue 




******* 

* LAKE COUNTY * 



Chamber 



* 



• 

* 
* 










Tel: I -847-249-3800 



Gurnee, IL6003 
ax: I -847-249-3892 



E-mail: econinfo@lakecounty-il.org 



of 
Commerce 



Continuous 

Sarvlca . if- 

■ lnc« 1815 3f ** 



STRENGTH THROUGH DIVERSITY 



Lake County Chamber 

of Commerce 

Continuous Service 



Since 1915 





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May i 7, 2002 



COUNTY 



■ 

eland Newspapers/ B7 




[River Trail 

Bozo Boijic of Kovilic Construction works on the new Des Plaines River Trail exten- 
sion at Route 120, east of Route 21. The extension fills the gap, allowing patrons 
to travel from the Wisconsin border to Lake-Cook Road.— Photo by Sandy 
Bressner 



Crash cour 







Emergency medicine students drill skills 



By DREW GRANGER 

Staff Reporter 



A mock disaster in the automotive colli- 
sion repair shop at the College of Lake County 
technology center gave EMS students a 
chance to test themselves in a real-life situa- 
tion. 

With multiple injuries on multiple sub- 
jects, the students were forced to think quick 
and think smart to render aid. 

Despite some errors in procedures, the 
students, a combination of EMS students and 
Fire Fighter training students performed well. 

No, things don't always right on drills," 
EMS instructor Ruth Schiller said. "We've all 
been on drills that have gone wrong. That's 
why they are called drills." 

• An evaluation team made up of former 
students, most of whom are now working as 
EMTs rated the students. The overall review 
was positive despite some flaws, including a 
first in the program's decade-plus of exis- 
tence. 

"I've done this now for 10 to 12 years and 
I've never had any one 'die'," Schiller said. 
That streak came to an end when the students 
failed to notice an medical information 
bracelet on one of the victims which would 
have alerted them to the fact the subject was 
only suffering from a food allergy. 

Local emergency personnel from Gurnee, 
Grayslake, Fox Lake and Round Lake were on 
hand to lend support and equipment to the 
students. 

Greater Round Lake Fire Department 
Captain Tim Preidis said he could understand 
why the students were having such difficulty. 

"When you have a whole bunch of people 
watching, it's a little different then what you 
do in the field," he said. He added the drill was 
similar to what he went through in his train- 
ing. 

"You 're actually watching and bringing 
back memories of what you did," Priedis said. 




Preidis added the local departments sup- 
port the program because it allows them to 
identify those individuals who may want to 
make a career as an EMT. 

"You could see the up and coming peo- 
ple," he said. , 

. The drill is part of a nine month instruc- 
tion program held at the Lake County 
Technology Campus. The course meets for 
two hours, Monday through Friday. 

The staged accident consisted of a mishap 
in an automotive repair facility. Six victims 
awaited the students, including the departed 
allergy victim. Each student had an assigned 
position and was expected to carry out the 
duties of their position. 

The situation was very realistic for some 
including the area coordinator. As one pro- 
fessional who spoke to the coordinator said 
at the debriefing, the coordinator was 
"booted" from the immediate scene and 
had trouble communicating with the staff 
actually on scene, as has happened in actu- 
al situations. 

Even the professionals however were 
more pleased than disappointed. 

The students quickly became their own 
worse critics. Libertyville High School student 
Mark Mechlin called the experience hard but 
good for learning. 

"We've never been in a situation this com- 
plex.," he said. "It definitely showed us what 
we need to work on." He added better com- 
munication was needed. 

Antioch resident Brittany McMahon said 
if the class was to go through another drill they 
would be ready for it. She agreed wit h 
Mechlin that the exercise was difficult. 

"It was hard, but fun at the same time," 
she said. 

Schiller said the confusion would be help- 
ful for the students. 

"It's a good thing," she said. "These kids 
are going to be beating themselves up over it, 
but It is a learning experience." 



i 

Coroner given Ruth Rosengarden award 



Michael J. Waller, State's Attorney of Lake 
County, awarded Barbara Richardson, Lake 
County Coroner with the first annual Ruth H. 
Rosengarden Victim Service Provider Award. 
Rosengarden served as a victim/witness 
counselor in the State's Attorneys Office's 
from 1980 until her death in 1997. 

The award was established to honor vic- 
tim service providers who possess the com- 



mitment to victims that Rosengarden demon- 
strated. 

Waller said, "Barbara Richardson is con- 
stantly in contact with families of crime vic- 
tims. The warmth, compassion and concern 
she extends to the families provide a measure 
of comfort during an extremely difficult time. 
Richardson embodies the spirit of the Ruth 
Rosengarden Award." . 



Red Rose choir to sin 




twice 



The Red Rose Children's Choir of Like 
County will present two Spring Concerts on 
Sunday, May 19th at the Vernon Hills High 
School. Two programs are planned for 2:00 
pm and 4:30 pm. 

Both concerts will feature the Master 



Singers and the Chamber Choir. The 2:00 
pm concert will feature the Prelude Choir 
while the 4:30 pm concert will feature the 

Concert Choir. 

Tickets are $10 and seating is reserved. For 
more information please call 847-548-8432. 







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Mq yon a Senior Citizen ©r db you 

km©w a SeiiidDir fflaat steinM toe 



King or djueen for the day? 



AFM\ Mesirow 
Mm\\ Financial* 

Lake Forest 
Hospital 




MEDIA 



County 



<i|jp First Midwest Bank 

. oeEES^Af t*t ms you wsnc to go. 

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ind Queen for the day". 



Senior's Day 2002. The event will be on Wednesday, June 1 9, from 



the 



st be written on one 8V2 "x1 1 " sheet answering: 

''Why I should be King or Queen for the day? 



! 




Winners will receive prizes such as: 
dinners for two, theatre tickets, free 
bowling and other fine goods and 
services. 



Winners will also be honored at the 
Senior Day Celebration 2002 and 

must attend. 



2001 King & Queen: 
Paul Affinito & Alice Pokryfke 



Submit Entries on 8V2" x 1 1" sheet to: 



Seniors Day 2002 
King & Queen Contest 
c/o Lakeland Newspapers 
30 S.Whitney St. 
Grayslake, IL 60030 




Name: 



Address: 







Sponsored by: 





MEDIA 



Mesirow 
Financial* 



Lake Forest 
Hospital 



«|wr First Midwest Bank 



-f-=^.£- ~As far as you want to go. 



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LAKE FOREST HOSPITAL 



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Skin Cancer Screening: If You 
Can Spot It, You Can Stop It! 

LFH's CareCoach (mobile health van) is 
offering free skin cancer screenings on the 
following dates. Call 847-535-6112 for specif- 
ic times and locations or check out 
www.lakeforesthospital.com for the 
CareCoach schedule. Dates: Wednesdays, 
May 15, May 29, Tuesdays, May 28. 

Congregate Meals Program 

Join others for low cost, nutritional meals 
in the Lake Forest Hospital cafeteria on a 
daily-basis. A speaker or educational pro- 
gram of interest accompanies one meal each 
month. On May 16th, the Mundelein Dance 
Group, Dance Dynamites, will perform. 
Reservations are not necessary. For more 
information, call 847-535-6176. Date: 
Thursday, May 16; Time 4:30 to 6 p.m.. Place: 
Lake Forest Hospital, 660 N. Westmoreland 
Rd., Lake Forest, Lake Forest, IL 60045. 

A Mind/Body Approach to 
Menopause 

Practice of relaxation and self-care tech- 
niques can contribute to symptom reduction 
during this transitional time. Peg Cronin, 
MPH and Ann Rowland, MS will offer a mini- 
version of the extensive six-session lifestyle 
change program that is offered through the 
Health & Fitness Institute. Call 847.535.6112 
for reservations. Date: Tuesday, June 18 
Time: 7 to 8:30 p.m. 

CONDELL MEDICAL 
CENTER _____ 

Condell's Community Education 

Tuesday, May 21 at 7 p.m.: Condell's 
Community Education program presents 
"Management of Arthritis: A Physical 
Therapy Approach." Presented by K.D. 
Roesler, PT, Cindy Shuler, PT, and Scott 
Beckman, P.T. Discuss pathology, principles 
of exercise on both land and in water, and 
posture. Allen Conference Center, 700 
Garfield Ave., Libertyville. Free. Call (847) 
990-5770 to register. 

Widowed Outreach Network 

Sunday, May 26 at 2 p.m., Widowed 
Outreach Network meeting for individuals 
coping with the loss of a spouse. Through its 
programs, the group bridges the gap 
between initial shock and grief to recovery 
and helps widowed people accept their new 
roles. Call (847) 990-5275. 

VISTA HEALTH 
NETWORK 



Prepared Childbirth for Teens 

This class provides information on the 
birthing process that is designed for the 
teenage mother-to-be. Meets from 7 to 9 
p.m. for five classes. Call 847-360-4297, ext. ' 
5218, for location and dates. 

Prepared Childbirth 

Expectant parents are instructed in the 
labor and delivery experience as well as 
breathing and relaxation techniques. Meets 
four consecutive weeks. Classes available in ' 
Waukegan and Lindenhurst. Call 847-360- 
4297, ext. 52 1 8, for location and dates. 

Cholesterol Screening 

Choose from total cholesterol and glu- 
cose ($10) or total cholesterol, HDL LDL ratio 
and triglycerides ($25). Fasting required. Call 
1-888-869-1118 to make an appointment 
between 8:30 and 10:30 a.m; Tuesday, June 3 
Provena Saint Therese Medical Center; 
Tuesday, June 1 1, Vista Surgery and 
Treatment Center; Monday, June 17 
Victory Memorial Hospital; Thursday, June 
20, Lake County Court House, 18 North 
County Street, Waukegan 

- 

MIDWESTERN 
REGIONAL CENTER 

Beating Cancer Mind, Body & 
Nutrition 

The nutrition program is designed to 
build up the body, prevent malnutrition, 
reverse the effects of nutritional decline and 
stimulate the body's natural cancer-fighting 
ability. Cancer fighters are empowered with 
nutritional options and made aware of can- 
cer fighting foods they can add to their diet 
based on their own goals. THIS SEMINAR IS 
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. WALK- 
INS WELCOME May 20, 2002, 7-9pm, 
Orlando Marriott Downtown, 400 W. 
Livingston Street, Orlando, FL 32801. Call: 1- 

800-765-9920 





B8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



May 1 7, 2002 




■ 







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not be the best answer in 



enviroiMnent may 

behavior 




HI Dr. Singer, 

My child is 8 years old and I 
understand that he is a terror in the 
classroom. My husband and I are 
wondering If he might just be bored 
and acting out because of that. Is it 
wise for us to ask the teacher to 
change tilings in the classroom for 
him. In other words, make it more 
challenging for him or make it more 
for his needs? G.Z. 

DearG.Z., 

While I believe that kids should be in 
the correct academic placement for their 
abilities, and I think a little bit of extra 
work if finished early would be o.k., I am 
strongly against the idea of changing set- 
tings or environments around kids. 
Custom making or making special circum- 
stances around a child who is misbehav- 
ing, for that misbehavior, is telling that 
child that the world will change for his or 
her every need. This is a dangerous con- 
cept to teach our kids and will impede 
their ability to function normally as an 
adult when situations are usually never 
custom made for people. I will go so far as 
to say that I believe that too much of this 
is going on in our country already and is 
some of the reason behind the huge 
growth in overindulged bad behavior we 
are seeing from kids. 

When kids misbehave, we do need to 
assess the situation, and make sure that 
we have the appropriate educational 
placement, limits, consequences and 
expectations set up. We need to do this 
without the child knowing that we are 




Dr. Sherri Singer 



91 



running circles around him. He needs to 
feel important, but not overly important 
or more important than other kids. 

One good example of a contrived situ- 
ation that makes me nuts is when a child 
who is acting out is required to sit right in 
front of the teacher's desk so the teacher * 
can keep cueing him or her to get back on 
track. That situation is sending a strong 
message to the child that he or she needs 
to have another human being in front of 
them at all times for him or her to keep 
control of his or her behavior. I have 
worked with enough out of control kids 
and the parents of those kids to know that 
even the kids that seem to need that con- 
stant human intervention really do not 
need that if the right system of behavior 
change is employed constantly and cor- 
rectly. It is very important that the child 
learns to behave because of his or her own 
need to, rather than due to the fact that 
another person is there to bring them 
back to subject. That person will not be 
there for the child's entire life to bring him 
or her back to task and therefore, it is a 
bad habit to set up. It is a simple case of 
dependence on self versus dependence on 
others. 




A tomato a day 
keeps the oncologist away. 



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That may not be entirely true but it is true that tomatoes, along with 
many other foods, have been proven to have cancer fighting properties. 

In fact, studies have shown that just five servings of fruits and vegeta- 
bles daily can prevent as much as 20 percent of all cancers. The cancer 
fighting benefits of proper nutrition apply to those who have been diag- 
nosed and treated for cancer as well. 



But keeping proper nutritional habits can be very complicated, especial- 
ly when challenged with the rigors of traditional cancer treatment. If 
you add in complications from an unhealthy liver, renal system, or dia- 
betes, the proper roadmap for nutrition gets even a little more gray. 

That is why consulting a nutritionist can be just what the doctor 
ordered. Your one-hour consultation is a phone call away. Kim Dalzell, 
PhD, RD, LD, is an oncology nutritionist with over a decade of experi- 
ence in the cancer treatment field. She is the program director for holis- 
tic nutrition services at Cancer Resource center in Gurnee, 



Mention this ad to get 

10 percent off the cost of your 

first one-hour consultation. 

Call Kim today at 856-1220. 



d&fik 



~*S%JK* 



CANCER RESOURCE CENTER 



>bur number one 



•h* 



and k^mnation mbuoi cancer. 



AT MIDWF.STEHN REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER 



If we want to do right by our kids, our 
entire job as parents and teachers is to 
train them and have them practice for the 
adult world they will have to live in every- 
day. The hard part about this is that we 
live in an adult world that does not usually 
change to the every need of every adult in 
it. We all have needs and we all) get bored. 
As a matter of fact, most of us find much 
of the tedious grueling parts of our work 
boring and sometimes intolerable, but we 
still need to do them. Even if we love most 
of our work, there are still jobs to be done 
that are not fun and not entertaining. We 
still need to do them. We can do this, 
because somewhere along the way, we 
learned how to handle ourselves in school 
etc. in spite of our boredom. We learned to 
continue our work in spite of our needs. It 
was expected that we behaved anyway. It 
also helped that if we didn't do it, there 
was usually something worse waiting for 
us. I can remember being in 4th grade and 
getting caught fidgeting with opening a 
pack of gum and putting a piece in my 
mouth. We were not allowed to fidget and 
worse yet, we were not allowed to chew 
gum in school. How barbaric, huh!?!? 
Anyway, the punishment was having to 
put the gum on my nose and stand in the 
corner for a 1/2 hour, in front of the rest of 
the class. After the punishment, guess how 
many more times I repeated the behavior? 
You're right! Never' again! Back then it was 
called good limit setting. Good punish- 
ment! Memorable punishment. Today it 
would be called a lawsuit for humiliating 
the child. When I think about that, it does- 
n't surprise me about how much misbe- 
havior we have going on in our society by 
our kids. It makes me sad for them! 

The difference I see now is that I rarely 
see good behavior required from kids 
regardless of the situation. What I see 
more often is immediate diagnosing and 
changing of the circumstances around the 
child. I see labeling of the child and 



Please see SINGER IB9 



Charity fund- 
raising ball a success 

T ■ 

The unofficial results are in, enough to 
qualify the 16th annual Sweetheart Ball 
fundraiser sponsored by Assistance in 
Healthcare Foundation as a rousing success. 
This year's guests to the annual ball could be 
deemed a very generous group. 

The estimated total for his year's ball is a 
whopping $60,000 to help qualifying patients 
and families in need for the coming year. That 
figure put the charity event ahead of last year's 
results widi more fund-raising yet to come 
during this calendar year. 

The ball featured a dinner/dance and a 
silent auction that acts as the major fund-rais- 
er of the year for the charitable organization. 
The event also featured a special "capsule 
table" of smaller items and a 50/50 raffle. Each 
year, Assistance in Healthcare receives com- 
munity and business support for the ball in 
the form of donations of items for the silent 
auction, sponsorships for the event and/or 
cash donations. 

The main sponsor for the event, sched- 
uled this year at the Crown Plaza North 
Chicago in Mundelein, was Cancer Treatment 
Centers of America at Midwestern Regional 
Medical with a capacity crowd of 360 atten- 
dees. 

Assistance in Healthcare, a not-for-profit 
501 (c)(3) foundation, provides grants for the 
non medical expenses, assisting patients and 
their families who have become financially 
distressed as a result of their fight against can- 
. cer and other catastrophic illnesses. 

Throughout last year, a monthly average 
of 30 patients or patient's families were 
helped by the funds raised. Other than the 
costs associated with the ball itself, all the 
funds raised by the volunteer organization go 
to patients or their families who have demon- 
strated need. 









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May 1 7, 2002 



HEALTHWATCH lakeland Newspapers I B9 









[CD 9 

19© 



overblown sympathy, for the child because 
of that diagnosis. I see adults running 
around the child trying to change every- 
thing around the child instead of helping 
the child learn the self-control required. 
Instead of training the child how to handle 
the boredom or how to keep on track any- 
way, we quickly whisk the child, into a new 
circumstance or recommend medication. 
This does not always help the child com- 
pletely. It just prolongs the problem. 

All kids get bored sometimes. All kids 
misbehave when they get bored. This is 
how they make a boring situation more 
fun. iVs a fact of life. We all did it! It didn't 
mean we were not in the right setting or 
not challenged enough. It did not always 
mean that we had ADHD. Some things are ' 
interesting and some things, by nature, 
are boring, however, we have to learn to 
handle them all. In the program I run; I 
watch kids everyday learn how to handle 
their behavior effectively even in the face 
of monotonous boredom. Not only is it 
absolutely possible to train kids to attend 
even when they're bored, I will go as far as 
saying that it is absolutely imperative for 
all kids to learn how to do this before age • 
10. 1 have seen some of the worst behaving 
kids come in and learn through correct 
limit setting and practice, how to do any 
work they are asked to do. 

I don't mean to sound gruff, however, 
I get very worried for the kids today. I see 
them being very aware of all the diagnosis 
names and use them very readily when 
they don't want to do something or do not 
want to be held responsible for some- 
thing. This is so dangerous to their futures 
I can't even express fully how much. 

My thoughts are these: Make sure of 
their capabilities. Make sure their place- 
ment is correct. Make sure you know what 
you are doing to set the right limits (if 
unsure, you can call me after July 9th .) 
Make sure to follow through on your lim- 
its. Make sure that your child is held 
responsible for bad behavior always. Make 




sure your child does not know about any 
work you are doing to improve his or her 
behavior. They should not be able to iden- 
tify themselves by the "problems" they 
have. This will become their reason for not* 
being able to do things correctly. They 
should also not feel that lots of adults are 
dancing around them to make things easi- 
er for them. Bad move when it is done! It 
puts them in the middle of their own diag- 
nosing and can be used by them later. 

Give them the tools to be successful! 
Do not give them the means to find excus- 
es for bad behavior. It's that simple. 

Important note: Dr. Singer's maternity 
leave is between April 19th, 2002 and July 
9th, 2002. She is currently not taking calls, 
answering messages or scheduling new 
appointments. Beginning July 9th, 2002, 
she will begin to take calls for new 
appointments. Dr. Singer does not see 
people on an emergency basis and advises 
people that if they are in an emergency of 
any kind relating to their child, they need 
to consult the closest emergency room 
for evaluation and referral. Although she 
will not be seeing people during her 
maternity leave, you can still catch her 
column each week right here at Lakeland 
Newspapers. f 

Dr. Sherri Singer is a Licensed Clinical 
Psychologist and Childhood Behavior 
Specialist. She regularly works in person 
with many readers of this column, helping 
them to significantly improve their kid's 
attention, behavior and processing skills. 
New to Dr. Singer's practice is her very 
powerful "Tic Mark System of Behavior 
Improvement in Kids." This system has 
promoted unbelievably fast behavior 
change both at home and school with very 
little work from parents and teachers. Dr. 
Singer continues to help kids with improv- 
ing attention, distractibility, self control, 
focus and processing in her Total Success 
Program. For an appointment, please call. 

(847) 577-8832 or (708) 962-2549. 







We Are Looking For A Few Good People 
That Bad Things Have Happened To. 





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As We Recognize 
NATIONAL NURSING HOME WEEK 

We will start by thanking our dedicated staff 

for making the environment safe and 

comfortable for our Residents. 

Sheridan Health Care Center provides the 
very best of care right here in your own community 

Their commitment to our Residents is to 
give compassionate care on an individual basis 



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: 847-746-1744 



www.sheridan.cjb.net 



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SPORTS 



May 17, 2002 



dmLEGJE SPORTS 




■ 




AREA ATHETES MAKING THE GRADE 



After a heartbreaking loss in the opener of 
the Junior College State baseball tournament, 
College of Lake County had little choice. 

"It was do or die," coach Gene Hanson 
said of the second game, with Elgin. 

After a 6-4, 4-run ninth inning loss to 
Illinois Valley, the Lancers were up to the 
challenge. They survived the first day with an 
8-5 win over Elgin. 

Dan Lecht got the win on. the mound for 
the Lancers, who led early and never looked 
back. A home run by Warren grad Russ 
Schaibly got the Lancers off on the right foot 
in the second inning. 

Alex Frank singled and scored a run; 
Dave Paddock had 2 singes; Chris Draska had 
a 2-run single; Jason Schuler had an RBI walk, 
walked again and scored and George Fuchs 
had a single and scored a run. CLC made 8 
hits be enough for the win. 

"Right now, I would say our hitting is car- 
rying us. We made some costly mistakes on 
defense today," Hanson said. 

The loss to IV, when no hit went deep 
into the outfield in the final at-bat, meant 
CLC Had to come from the losers bracket and 
win three games to make the NJCAA Illinois 
state finals. 

Still, Hanson said a 38- 13 record going in 
to the Tuesday battle against the Elgin-IV 
loser is still something to be proud. 

Other regional highlights 

Augustana College 

Baseball 

Former Antiocli Sequolt Reggie 

Hughes scored the final run in a 10-8 victory 
over Wheaton. For the season, Hughes is bat- 
ting .312 with five homers and 3 1 RBI. He also 
has 50 total bases and has a .538 slugging per- 
centage.In the field, Hughes has a fielding 
percentage of .984 while recording 173 put 
outs. The Vikings overall record stands at 24- 
14 with the CCIW tournament this weekend 
at Elmhurst College. 
Men's track and field 

Former Grayslake Ram and Antiocli 
native Jeff Iindeman earned a third-place 
finish in the pole vault with a leap of 14 feet, 
1 1 inches at the College Conference of Illinois 
and Wisconsin championships, held at 
Carthage College in Kenosha over me week- 
end. Teammate Brandon Vahl (Waukegan 



Lancer baseball on brink of state finals 




CLC's Rick Trampke slides safely back 
during the Region IV, Section II tour- 
nament last weekend. The Lancers are 
one win away from the state finals. — 
Photo by Samir IdDeen 

H.S., Lindenhurst) finished fifth in the 800 



run with a time of 1:55.82. 
Men's tennis 

Libertyville native and former Wildcat 
Matt Deans concluded the spring tennis sea- 
son with a 7-5 record in singles and 6-4 over- 
all mark in doubles action. As a team, the 
Vikings finished the 2002 campaign 12-6 
overall record, including 5-2 in the CCIW. 
Softball 

Former Mundelein pitcher Michelle 
Kass took some numbers on the mound in 
her inagural season in Rock Island. 

Kass ended up being the top pitcher for 
Augie this spring, compiling an 11-6 record 
with a 1.23 ERA in just over 113 innings of 
work. Kass struck out 126 batters on the year 
while allowing just 16 free passes. She also 
had two saves to her credit. 

For her efforts, the freshman has earned 
College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin 
Second Team All -Conference honors. The 
Lady Vikings finished 27-15 overall and 8-6 in 
the conference. 









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Elmhurst College 

Softball 

Junior Jen Weller (Vernon Hills, 
Stevenson H.&) went 2-for-3 in a 2-1 loss to 
Wheaton. Weller then went 2-for-4 in the 
Bluejays' 6-3 win over North Central. The 
Softball team is currently 8-25, 2-12 in the 
College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin 
Baseball 

Sophomore Ken Shipbaugh 
(Wauconda, Wauconda U.S.) singled in the 
game winning run in the eighth-inning as the 
Bluejay baseball team slipped past Illinois 
Wesleyan 3-2. Shipbaugh then went l-for-3 
as the Bluejays lost to Illinois wesleyan 3-0. 
The Bluejays are 12-19 overall and 6-10 in the 
CCIW. The sophomore then went 2-for-5 
with two stolen bases and two ntns scored in 
a 10-8 victory over Augustana. Elmhurst also 
downed Millikin 6-1 as Shipbaugh went 3- 
for-4 with a double, RBI and a runs scored. 
Sophomore teammate Brad Grout (Lake 
Villa, Antiocli H.S.) was 3-for-3 with a stolen 
base and three runs scored in a 14-4 win over 
Rockford. 
Men's track and field 

Sophomore Peter Bebber (Island 
Lake, Wauconda H.S.) took seventh in the 
pole vault at the Norm Park Invitational over 
the weekend. Teammate John Hartmann, 
also a sophomore, captured first-place in the 
high jump. Hartmann, who also placed third 
in the long jump, had a winning leap of 6-feet, 
4-inches in the high jump. Hartmann has 
provisionally qualified for nationals. 

Illinois College 
(Jacksonville, IL) 
Baseball 

Former Round Lake graduate and 
Round Lake native Tito Carillo was 
named to the All-Midwest Conference 
Second Team. The. sophomore relief pitcher 
led the Blueboy staff in conference games 
with a 4.05 ERA while limiting opponents to a 
.245 batting average with 10 strikeouts in 13 
innings of work. He finished with a 2-0 record 



, 



in 11 appearances this season. 

As a team, Illinois College finished the 
2002 campaign 7-21, including 3-9 in confer- 
ence play. 

Iowa Wesleyan College 
(Mt Pleasant, la.) 
Softball 

Former Grant High School graduate 
and Fox Lake native Danielle Jakes was a 

* ■ * 

first-year member of the Tiger women's soft- 
ball team. Jakes was awarded the Tiger Award 
by her teammates for her outstanding quali- 
ties on and off the field of play. 

" Jakes, who played with the varsity and 
junior varsity clubs, logged four innings of 
playing time with the varsity Tigers. She had 
one hit in three at-bats and scored a run while 
stealing one base. 

Jakes is the daughter of Dan and Sandy 
Jakes of Fox Lake. She is studying elementary 
education at IWC. 

The Tigers finished the 2002 season 34- 
14 overall, including second in the Midwest 
Classic Conference. 

Lakeland College ' 

Former Mundelein Mustang pitcher 
Steve Pluchiskl helped Lakeland College earn 
a conference title. The freshman is one of the 
starting pitchers. This spring, Plucinski fanned 
77 batters in 64 innings. Plucinski also plays sec- 
ond base when not on the mound. At the plate, 
he hit a robust 355 that included 13 doubles. 

News and Notes 

Barat College 

The Rockford Lightning announced that 
former Rockford assistant and former Barat 
College (Lake Forest) coach Chris Daleo 
will be the teams new head coach. 

As head coach of Barat last winter, 
Daleo's Bulldogs finished 33-6 overall while 
ranking second in the NAIA with a 98 points 
per game average. The Bulldogs earned a trip 
to the Div.-III NAIA Final Four before being 
eliminated. In 1999-00 Barat went 24-9 while 
leading the nation in scoring at just over 100 
points per clip. 

Daleo, 37, is originally from Chicago and 
has lived in the Rockford area for the last eight 
years. He and his wife Karen have one son, 
Satchel, 5, and one daughter, Maris, 3. 



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SPORTS 




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Lakeland Newspapers/ B^ 1 





state 




By STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Reporter 



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4 

With the event itself only in its second 
year, girls pole vaulters are indeed trailblazers 
for future generations. 

One may look back in 10-12 years and 
think of the nine Lake County girls state meet 
qualifiers and think off 

their efforts as stan- 
dard-setting. Led by 
Libertyville junior Lizzy 
Proctor, with a winning 
effort of 11 feet, the 
group stands a good 
chance to fare well in 
the state meet at 
Eastern Illinois 

University this week- 
end. 

"Lizzy was just her 
usual self in the pole 
vault. There are a lot of 
girls who can go 10-feet, 
5-inches to 11 feet in the 
state," said LHS coach 
Harry Carlson. 

Sophomore Leslie 
Korotka placed third at 
9-3. 

The qualifiers 

included one from 
Grant and Antioch. 
Grant qualified Alexis 
Wittlieb, a junior, in 9-0 
while Antioch's 

Amanda Wagner and 
Lindsey Andrews, a 
sophomore and a freshman, qualified for 
Antioch with 9-0 and 8-9 efforts. Emily Plott, a 
Grayslake sophomore, rounds out the quali- 
fiers at 8-9, the minimum standard. 

"Vaulting in the area is tough," summa- 
rized Grant Coach Jim Cramer. 

"I really wanted to qualify. The competi- 
tion really helps a lot. I did a 7-6 last year and 
increased it by two feet. I worked on every- 




Libertyville's Lizzy Proctor competes 
in the pole vault at the IHSA Girls 
Sectional at North Chicago High 
School. Proctor will be making the 
trip to Charleston for this week- 
end's state finals.— Photo by 
Steve Young 



thing in my technique. The main thing was to 
try and work on my turning," said 

Wauconda's Kortoka. 

She chose the event in a matter-of-fact 
fashion, after joking around with the coach. 
She works out with the boy's pole-vaulters. 

Lake Forest ran away with the team sec- 
tional title, but Libertyville took home hard- 
ware, too, with its NSC 
Lakes Division crown. 
The meet featured East 
Suburban Catholic 
Conference champ 
Carmel, NSC meet 
champ Lake Forest and 
Fox Valley Conference 
runner-up McHenry. 

Carlson was 

pleased with his team's 
fourth-place effort (56 
points) and individual 
qualifiers. Proctor 

returned to competition 
in the high jump and 
qualified widi a 5-feet 
effort. 

Sophomore Mia 
Supanich-Winter of 
LHS won the 3,200- 
meter run in 12:05 in 
edging Jamie Knight of 
Lake Forest. "She ran a 
great race for the two- 
mile," Carlson said. 

"Kelly Hansen real- 
ly wanted to qualify in 
the 400 and 800, but she 
did well with her best 
times," Carlson said. 

Stefanie Bechler, a junior, finished second 
in the 1,600 meters for the Wildcats. 

Grant's Cassie Howard led area athletes in 
the field events. The junior was one of five 
qualifiers in the shot put with a second-place 
effort of 38-feet, 4.5 inches. She was also sec- 
ond in the discus with a 120-01.0. 

"Cassie has the school record in the shot 



and the discus, too. She worked real hard in 
the weight room in die off-season to be a big 
time thrower. She wants to throw in college, 
and I think that she can do that," Cramer said. 

"I was nervous, but coach is a great moti- 
vator. You just have to get into that mindset," 
Howard said. 

Vernon Hills and Carmel did well in qual- 
ifying individuals and 
relay teams. They both 
qualified, running sec- 
ond and third, behind 
North Chicago's pace, 
in the 4x100 relay. 

"Our relays did 
well, with the 4x200 
with Kelly Coleman, 
Katie Quill, Sara 
Kwasigroch and Keri 
Coleman," said Carmel 
coach Jim Halford. CHS 
was third in mat race, 
behind fellow state 
qualifiers North 

Chicago and Vernon 
Hills. 

Junior Sherlenia 
Green had a good meet 
for the VHHS Cougars, 
with a qualifying sec- 
ond-place effort in the 
100-meter dash, in 12.3. 

"She looks to win," 
Sallade said of Green. 

Sallade likes the 
fact that his relay run- 
ners will all be back 
next year. The 4x100 is 
Myriah Landesman, Jacqui Leffler, Emilie 
Clark and Green. 

Warren's highlight came at the end of the 
meet when freshman Nadine Panton quali- 
fied in the 200 meter dash in 25.8, making her 
first trip to Charleston. Rival Lamisha Hines of 
Zion-Benton won the event by a tenth of a 
second. 




Grant's Ashley Davidson lets one fly 
during the discus competition at 
the sectional meet held at North 
Chicago High School.— Photo by 
Steve Young 



for Antioch. She was fourth in the 300-meter 
low hurdles, and qualified in the triple jump, 
finishing second to Carmel's Keri Coleman. 
She just missed in the long jump at 16-6, fin- 
ishing in third. 

"She really peaked at the right time. She 
just wants to win and has a great work ethic," 
said ACHS coach Brent Pitt. 

• Clarke said the end 
of the event is when she 
feels strongest. 

Julie Bariamis, a 
sophomore, was third in 
the discus. Sara 
Brzezinski had a strong 
third in the 800-meters 
in her final race for 
Antioch in her senior 
year. 

Highlights for the 
Rams in addition to 
Plott, included senior 
Crystal Matsey ending 
fourth in the 100-meters 
(13.1). Kirstine Pearson 
was fifth in the 1,600 
meters. 

Round Lake's 

Amber Hussain, a junior, 
gave her team its lone 
highlight in the 3,200 
with a fourth-place 
12:14, 

"She is talking 
about some off-season 
workouts. The cross 
country courses go from 
2 to 3 miles and she 
always does well in longer races," said coach 
BillNewby. 

Final team scores: Lake Forest, 95.92; 
North Chicago, 68.17; Johnsburg, 62; 
Libertyville, 56; Vernon Hills 47.17; Zion- 
Benton, 46.17; Antioch, 45.42; Carmel, 35; 
McHenry, 34; Grant, 31.25; Warren, 26.5; 
Grayslake 17.25; Wauconda, 10.67; Mundelcin 



i 



Holly Clarke, a senior, had a strong meet 9.5 and Round Lake, 4. 









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SPORTS 



May 1 7, 2002 



LOCAL GOLF DIGEST 



Sign-ups 

Outings 

The GLMV Chamber of Commerce 
presents an Open Networking Luncheon 

at Four Winds Golf Course in Mundelein on 
May 24 beginning at 11:30 a.m. 

The event will feature networking, a 
cookout luncheon and group golf lessons. A 
round of golf is optional. 

The cost for just lunch is $15, for golf, 
which includes an electric cart, $32. The group 
golf lesson and networking opportunity is 
free. 

Please call the GLMV at 847-680-0750 for 
further information or to sign up. 

Come and join former Chicago Bears' 
players, linebacker Jim Morrissey and wide 
receiver Tom Waddle for the 2002 Youth 
Conservation Corps Golf Outing Wed., 
June 26, at Thunderhawk G.C., Lewis Ave., 
Beach park. 

Join celebrities from Chicago sports 
teams and local PGA professionals for golf, 
dinner and fun in support of the YCC. 

Check-in, lunch and driving range 
instruction will be from 10-11 a.m. That will 
be followed by a shotgun start, scramble for- 
mat. 

There will be a hole-in-one, closest to the 
pin and long drive contest on designated 
holes. 

Following golf will be cocktails, a bar- 
bequc banquet and awards ceremony begin- 
ning at 5 p.m. Silent and live auctions and raf- 
fles will also be available. The cost is $275 per 
player for everything. The cost for just dinner 
is $50. 

For further details or to sign up, please 
call Bob McCammon at 847-362-0400. 

The Round Lake Area Parks 
Foundation will host its first-ever Send a 
Kid to Camp Celebrity Golf Outing on May 

23 at Renwood Golf Course in Round Lake 
Beach. 

Former Chicago Cub and Hall of Famer 
Billy Williams will be the honorary celebrity 
chairman for the event. Williams will be 
joined by another former Chicago Bear and 
current Round Lake Area Park District 
Commissioner, Curtis Gentry, who will serve 
as emcee for the event. 

Round Lake Area Park District interim 
Executive Director Peggy Dohr said the foun- 
dation's first fund-raiser will help send under- 
privileged kids to the district's summer day 
camp program. 

The cost for the event is $150 per person 
and includes 18 holes of golf, breakfast, lunch, 
drinks, snacks and giveaway's. There will also 
be a raffle drawing. 

For non-golfers interested in attending, 
the cost for lunch only is $30. 

For further information, please contact 
Dohr at the park district office at 847-546-8558 
or Renwood Head PGA Professional Diane 
Miller at 847-231-4711. 

Carmel High School in Mundelein will be 
hosting the annual Carmel Golf Classic at 
Midlane Resort in Wadsworth Fri., June 7. 

A grilled lunch beginning at 10:45 a.m. 
will kick-off the festivities. That will be fol- 
lowed by a single shotgun start at noon. There 
will be a variety of hole events with special 
prizes. Throughout the day, players will have 
full access to the driving range, putting green, 
clubhouse and locker rooms. 

Following golf will be a dinner and recep- 
tion. 

FThe cost'for.the event is $150 per person, 
whicrj includes everything. The cost for a four- 
some*is$600. 

All proceeds have generally been donat- 
ed back to the Carmel High athletic program. 

Please contact Kevin Calcaterra at 847- 
566-3000, ext. 390 for further information or to 
signup. 

This year, Carmel is celebrating 40 years 
of providing an excellent Catholic education 
to our community. 

Tlie LaCASA-Zacharias Center is now 
accepting reservations for women golfers and 
enthusiasts for the Fifth Annual Women's 
Golf Invitational on Mon., June 17. The 
event will be held at the Marriott's 
Lincolnshire Resort in Lincolnshire. The day 
begins with a continental breakfast and regis- 
tration at 7:15 a.m. This will be followed by a 
shotgun start at 8 a.m. with a scramble format. 
Special guest speakers, Ann and Jennie 
Goodman will highlight an awards luncheon, 
silent auction and 50/50 raffle at 12:30 p.m. 

The fee of $225 per person covers the golf 
and luncheon. Awards will be handed out to 
top teams and all participants will receive tee 
gifts. Special feature holes and a hole-in-one 
car challenge for a Lincoln LS will be spon- 
sored by Rosen Motors. Play is limited, so 
please respond by June 7 to reserve a spot. 

To register for the golf outing and for 



additional information, please call Joe 
Howard of LaCASA at 847-244-1187. 

Tournaments 

The Illinois PGA is accepting applications 
for the 2002 Illinois Junior PGA champi- 
onship. The boy's tournament will be June 
19-20 at Oak Brook Golf Club while the girl's 
will play June 24-25 at Green Garden Country 
Club. Junior golfers wishing to enter can call 
847-729-5000 or check out the web site at 
www.ipga.com. 

The North Shore Youth Health 
Service will hold their first fund-raising 
event; the Hitting the Links for LINKS golf 
outing at Hillcrest Country Club in Long 
Grove on Mon., June 10. Registration begins 
at 10 a.m. with lunch at 11 and golf with a 
shotgun start at 12:30 p.m. The rain date is 
June 17. 

The entry fee is $200, which includes 18 
holes of golf, valet service, lunch, beverages 
throughout play, and post-tournament 
awards reception with generous hors d'oeu- 
vres and an open bar. A silent auction, prizes 
and souvenirs for golfers will also be included. 
The Porsche Exchange will also be providing a 
Porsche Boxster as the hole-in-one prize. 

Non-golfers can attend the awards recep- 
tion for only $50. The awards reception begins 
at approximately 5:30 p.m. For further infor- 
mation, please contact LINKS at 847-441- 
6191. 

Junior events 

The Country Youth Classic, for golfer's 
ages 3-22, will take place June 24-26 on five 
Bloomington-Normal area golf courses. 
Registration forms are available at local 
Country Insurance & Financial Services agent 
offices, or at the tournament's web site, 
www.countryyouthclassic.com. Entries are 
limited and will be accepted on a first-come, 
first-serve basis. The event generally draws 
golfers from all over the United States. 

Entry fees range from $60-$125, depend- 
ing on the division for which the golfer is eligi- 
ble. Recognized by the National Junior Golf 
Scoreboard and Golfweek, the event features: 
one-day of practice and a long drive and 
putting contest; two days of golf competition; 
and 16 divisions with a total of 500 youth 
golfers from throughout the country. 

Golf courses for the tournament include 
The Den at Fox Creek and Prairie Vista, which 
serve as hosts to the Illinois High School 
Association Boys state golf tournaments, and 
Illinois State University Golf Courses, the site 
of the Girls IHSA state tournament. Ironwood 
Golf Course and Royal Links Par 3 Course also 
serve as sites for the event. 

Country Insurance & Financial Services is • 
the title sponsor of the tournament. 

News and notes 

P.G JL Head Golf Professional Diane 
Miller and Assistant Professional Mike 
Perez of Renwood Golf Course in Round 
Lake Beach will be offering free 10-minute 
lessons in conjunction with "Play Golf 
America," the national growth-of-the-game 
campaign sponsored by The PGA of America 
and Golf Digest Magazine. 

Throughout the month of May, P.G.A. 
Professionals will offer free 10-minute lessons 
to help golfers of all levels improve their 
game. To date, more than 3,000 PGA profes- 
sionals throughout the U.S. have signed up to 
participate. 

Renwood Golf Course will offer their Play 
Golf America program on Sat. f May 1 1 from 1 1 
a.m.-3 p.m. To participate in Play Golf 
America, amateur golfers must contact the 
Renwood Golf Shop at 847-231-4711. 

Stonewall Orchard Golf Club, 
Chicago's first Arthur Hills-designed course, 
located in northwest suburban Grayslake, will 
offer free 10-minute lessons throughout the 
month of May in connection with "PGA Free 
Lesson Month" as designated by PGA of 
America. 

• The May issue of Golf Digest carries a cover 
story on "PGA Free Lesson Month," and golfers 
must take the free lesson coupon from mat 
issue to Stonewall Orchard for a free 10-minute 
lesson. It was exactly one year ago when Golf 
Magazine ranked Stonewall Orchard as 
Chicago's fourth best public course. 

Certain days will be set aside to offer 
these free lessons and persons must call 848- 
740-4890 for more information and to reserve 
a time. 

Players can request a lesson on any 
aspect of their games, from straightening out 
their drives to escaping from a bunker to cor- 
rectly lining up putts. Lessons will be provided 
by Bob Malpede, Stonewall Orchard's 
Director of Golf, or Jeff Padula, head golf pro- 
fessional. 

More information on the course is avail- 
able at www.stonewallorchard.com. 



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The Carmel High School football team 
completed its best season in school history 
last fall, going 11-2 and advancing to the semij- 
finals of the Class 6A State Tournament 

Because of their success, seven seniors 
will play football beyond high school, all on 
the Division III level. 

Quarterback Matt Roe, running back 
Patrick Adrien and offensive linemen Mike 
Zeifert and Matt Lyons will continue their 
careers in Rock Island as members of the 
Augustana College football team. Running 
back Eric Luna will play for Elmhurst College • 
in the fall, while linebacker losh Bruenning 
heads south to Decatur as a member of 
Millikin University's football team. 
Linebacker Bobby Magna will also play- 



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beyond high school, choosing to attend 
Dakota State University in Madison, SD. 

"This is the most we've had since 1996 when 
we had 10 guys sign," said Carmel Head Football 
Coach and Athletic Director Andy Bitto. 

"We've got a bunch of guys who love to 
play football because at the Division III level 
they don't get any scholarship money. It's 
good for the program because we get expo- 
sure having kids play at the higher levels." 

Roe set four career records at Carmel dur- 
ing a three-year stint on varsity en route to 
being named the Corsairs' Most Valuable 
Player. He set records for the most points 
scored (250), most passing yards (1,913), most 
all-purpose yards (4,308) and a tie for the most 
touchdowns with 37. 

Luna set the school record for most rushing 
yards in a career with 3,159. He also set season 
records during the 2001 campaign with 1,791 , 



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yards rushing, 22 touchdowns and 140 points. 

Tight end Sean Walker will head the 2002- 
03 class by the time next fall rolls around. 
Walker is already generating interest from 
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May 17, 2002 




/Edward L. Adams 

• — Age 82 of Antioch passed away 

Thursday, April 25, 2002 at St. Therese 
Medical Center, Waukegan. Ed served 

in the U.S. Army during the Normandy 

Invasion where lie was a recipient of a Purple 
Heart. 

Survivors include three daughters, Virginia 
(Garth ) Rockey and Judy (Phil) Moffat both of 
Antioch and Pam (Drew) Malone of Lombard; a 
daughter-in-law, Sue Adams of Tampa, Fla.; 16 
grandchildren; 31 great-grandchildren and a sis- 
ter. He is preceded in death by his first wife, 
Dorothy on July 26, 1979; his second wife, Joyce 
Burgdorf on Sept. 7, 1999; a son, Thomas 
Raymond Adams and great-grandchild, Jared 
Adams. 

Funeral services were held April 27 at 
Strang Funeral Home of Antioch. Interment was 
private. Friends called at the funeral home on 
April 27. 

Margaret Barbara Payne 

Age 02 of Round Lake Heights, passed away 
Saturday, May 11, 2002 at Provena Saint Therese 
Medical Center in Waukegan. Born in Chicago 
on April 10, 1020, she is the daughter of Emil and 
Freida (nee Cherie) Schneider. 

She is survived by her sons, Allen (Elie) 
Payne, and James Payne, both* of Round Lake 
Heights; her sisters, Freida Kroger of Houston, 
Tex. and Virginia Schueler of Schaumjjurg; nine 
grandchildren; numerous great grandchildren; 
nieces and nephews. She is preceded in death by 
her husband of 56 years, Charles W. Payne, and 
brother, Emil Schneider. 

Friends visited the Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium Ltd., Grayslake on May 15 
from 4-8 p.rn. Burial was at Ridgewood Cemetery 
in Des Plaines at 10 a.m. on May 16. Memorials 
on behalf of Margaret Payne may be made to the 
Payne Family. 

Elise Camille Swanson 

Age 86 of Grayslake, passed away Saturday, 
May 11, 2002. A long -time resident of Round 
Lake Beach until 1986, when she moved to 
Grayslake. 

She is survived by seven of her children, 
Madelyn Staack of Round Lake Beach, Kristi 
(Michael) Todd of Huntington. Beach, Calif., 
' Nancy Staack of Long Beach, Calif., Vernon 
(Elaine) Staack of Spokane, Wash., Paul (Eileen) 
Przybylski of Hibbing, Minn., Stephen Staack of 
Round Lake Beach, Theodore Staack of 
Grayslake; daughter-in-law, Lucille Staack of 
Tinley Park; numerous grandchildren and great 
grandchildren, and by her kitty "Mouse." She is 
preceded in death by her l]usband ( Theodore 
Swanson in 1986 and her son, Richard Staack in 
1994. 

Friends visited at the Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium Ltd., Grayslake on May 14 
from 5-9 p.m. Funeral service was held at the 
funeral chapel on May 15. Commital services 
were private. 

Patricia Harris 

Age 40 of Miami, Fla., passed away unex- 
pectedly on April 19, 2002. She was born in Key 
West, Fla., the daughter of Mary and the late 
Reginald Wells. 

She is survived by her husband, Charlie; 
son, Jessie Lee; mother, Mary Wells; sister, Mary 
Lou (Dan) Slazes. Also surviving are her friend, 
Don Riley and other relatives. She is preceded in 
death by her father, Reginald Wells (USN. RET.) 

Piivate services were held in Florida. 
Information: Ringa Funeral Home, Lake Villa. 

Ryles E. Genger 

i Age 76 of Boyton Beach, Fla., passed 
away May 7, 2002 at Highland Park 
Hospital in Highland Park. He was a 
WWII veteran and was Commander of 




the Legion Post 409 in Marathon, Wis. 

He is survived by his wife, Jeanette; sons, 
Steve (Xiaochen) Genger of Gurnee and Kevin 
Genger of Gurnee; sister, Lauraine Romang of 
Marathon, Wis.; and a brother. He is preceded in 
death by his parents. 

A private memorial service will be held at a 
later date. Arrangements were handled by Strang 
Funeral Chapel and Crematorium Ltd., 410 E. 
Belvidere Rd., Grayslake. 

Helen Longshore 

Age 86 of Rockford, passed away Sunday, 
May 5, 2002 in Lake Bluff. She was the daughter 
of the late Thomas and Grace Lynch. Helen 
received her masters degree from the University 
of Illinois and was a librarian in the Rockford 
High School system for the past 40 years. 

Surviving are her brother William Lynch of 
Redwood City, Calif, and her dear friend 
Elizabeth Reents of Rockford. She is preceded in 
death by her husband Fritz Longshore. 

Private services were held at the Burnett- 
Dane Funeral Home in Libertyville. Memorial con- 
tributions can be made to Save-A-Pet, 31664 N. 
Fairfield Rd., Grayslake, IL 60030 in her memory. 

Dragutin Milanovic 

Age 87 of Vernon Hills, passed away sud- 
denly Saturday, May 11, 2002 at the Condell 
Medical Center in Libertyville. He was a veteran 
of the Yugoslavian National Army and was a 
POW in Germany during WWII. 

Surviving are his wife, Vukosava Milanovic 
of Vernon Hills; three children, Dragan Milanovic 
of Phoenix, Ariz., Olga (Paul) Saniuk of 
Northbrook and Zoran Milanovic of Vernon 
Hills; and two grandchildren. 

Funeral services were held May 13 at The 
Most Holy Mother of God Monastery in Third 
Lake. Interment followed in the Monastery 
Cemetery. Visitation was held at the church until 
the time of services. Arrangements were handled 
by the Burnett-Dane Funeral Home in 
Libertyville. 

■ 

William A. Stone 

Age 80, a Fox Lake Leisure Village resi- 
dent, died Friday, May 10, 2002 at 
Victory Hospital in Waukegan. He was a 
Lt. Commander in the U.S. Navy, having 
served his country for 23 years before his retire- 
ment. He served as Commanding Officer of the 
U.S.S. Price in the Atlantic, was an Executive 
Officer of the USS R.A. Owens Naval Destroyer, 
serving on ships ranging from LST's to Aircraft 
Carriers. 

Survivors include his wife of 55 years, 
Delores M. "Mike" Stone of Fox Lake; his sons, 
William B. (Joann) Stone of Antioch; his daugh- 
ter, Eileen (Brian) Russo of Lake Villa; and six 
grandchildren. 

Friends of the family called on May 13 from 
4-8 p.m. at the K. K. Hamsher Funeral Home, Fox 
Lake (The Chapel on the Lake). A Catholic 
Funeral Mass was celebrated on May 14 at St. 
Peter's Catholic Church, Spring Grove. Burial fol- 
lowed in the Church Cemetery. Masses will be 
appreciated by the family. 

Narbeth S. Wilber 

Age 96 of Cleveland, Ohio, passed away 
Friday, Feb. 1, 2002 at the University Hospital in 
Cleveland. She had taught grade school in the 
Chicago School system and also in Grayslake 
and Maywood. 

Survivors include her daughter Frances 
(Carter) Brough of Whitney, Tex.; three grand- 
children; seven great-grandchildren, and other 
relatives She is preceded in death by her parents, 
E. Merton and Sarah Jones; by her first husband, 
Frederick Hodgson in 1969 and by her second 
husband, Glenn C. Wilber in 1999. 

Funeral services were held May 11, at the 
Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, in Libertyville with 



the Rev. Frances Brough, officiating. Interment 
followed at the Lakeside Cemetery. Visitation 
was one hour prior to the services on May 11. 
Memorial contributions can be made to the 
Lakeside Cemetery Renovation Fund, P.O. Box 
500, Libertyville, IL 60048 in her memory. 



\ 



7 



Gerald F. Culp 

Age 39 of Round Lake Beach, died Friday, 
March 8, 2002 at Condell Medical Center in 
Libertyville. He was a graduate of Round Lake 
High School in 1980 and was an avid fisherman. 

Survivors include his four children, Mary Jo, 
Gerald, Angel and John Culp, all of Round Lake 
Beach; his best friend, Gerri Lin Elitzer of Round 
Lake Beach; three nieces; a brother and his dog, 
"Muscle." He is preceded in deadi by his parents. 

Visitation was from 5-8 p.m. at lustcn's 
Round Lake Funeral Home, Round Lake. The 
funeral blessing was May 9 at the funeral home 
with the Rev. Robert Fitzpatrick officiating. 
Interment was at Ascension Cemetery in^/ 



Wallace D. Jones 

Age 88 of Antioch passed away Friday, May 
10, 2002 at St. Therese Medical Center, 
Waukegan. The son of the late Guy and Iva 
(Corzett) Jones. On March 26, 1935, he married 
Irene Jackson and she preceded him in death on 
Dec. 1, 1990. 

Survivors include one daughter, Sharon 
(Jack) Ester of Antioch; five grandchildren, eight 
great grandchildren and his dear friend, Lily 
Godlewski. In addition to his wife, he is preced- 
ed in death by a daughter, Marilyn Harper on 
Jan. 1, 1968. 

Funeral services were held May 14 at Strang 
Funeral Home of Antioch with Rev. Theophilus 
Carroll of First Christian Church of Gurnee offi- 
ciating. Interment was at North Shore Garden of 
Memories, North Chicago. Friends called at the 
funeral home May 14 until the time of services. 
Those desiring may make contributions to the 
f Antioch Rescue Squad in his memory. 




Libertyville. Memorial contributions would be 
appreciated by the family to the Culp Children 
Educational Fund. 

Aleksander Stojanovich 

Age 86 of Simi Valley, Calif., passed away 
Sunday, May 5, 2002 at his home. He was a mem- 
ber of the Christ the Savior Serbian Orthodox 
Monastery in Arcadia, Calif. 

Surviving are his wife, Nata; two sons, 
Dushan (Ljiljana) Stojanovich of Des Plaines and 
Peter (Diane) Stojanovich of Franklin,. Wis.; four 
grandsons. 

Funeral services were held May 10 at The 
Most Holy Mother of God Serbian Orthodox 
Monastery in Third Lake. Interment followed at 
the monastery cemetery. Visitation was held at 
the time of service in the monastery. 
Arrangements were handled by the Burnett- 
Dane Funeral Home in Libertyville. 

Manfred A. Newberg 

Age 86 of Libertyville, passed away Sunday, 
May 5, 2002 at the Condell Medical Center in 
Libertyville. Manny enjoyed golfing and was a 
past president of the Chicago Astronomical 
Society. 

Surviving are two sons, Donald (Pamela) 
Newberg of Mettawa and Thomas (Sally) 
Newberg of Vernon Hills; four grandchildren; sis- 
ters and a brother. He is preceded in death by his 
wife, Dorothy on Aug. 15, 1995 and by his par- 
ents, John and Lilian Newberg. 

Funeral services were held May 10 at the 
Burnett-Dane Funeral Home in Libertyville. 
Interment followed at the Ascension Cemetery. 
Visitation was from 4-9 p.m. on May 9 at Jhe 
funeral home. Memorial contributions can be 
made to the American Heart Assn. In his memo- 
ry. 



Bernice 'Beazee' Zakis 

Age 77 of Antioch, passed away suddenly 
Saturday, May 11, 2002 at Victory Memorial 
Hospital', Waukegan. She enjoyed spending 
time with her grandchildren. 

Survivors include a daughter, Jacki (Ted) 
Bolton of Antioch; one son, Paul Zakis of Trevor, 
Wis.; three grandchildren and a friend of the 
family, Ed "Dude" Herrick of Antioch. She is 
preceded in death by her husband, Paul L. Zakis 
in 1963. 

Friends called May 14 at the Strang 
Funeral Home of Antioch. Services and inter- 
ment were private. Those desiring may make 
contributions to a family memorial in her 
memory. 




Forrest 'John' E. Barchenger 

Age 71 of Lake Villa, passed away 
Monday, May 6, 2002 at Condell 
Medical Center in Libertyville. The son 
of the late, Edgar Barchenger and Edith 
Forbes,and was a veteran of the US Army, serv- 
ing his country during the Korean War. 

He leaves his wife, Regina (nee Johnson) 
whom he wed on June 15, 1953 in Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa; son, Gerald (Jeanna) Barchenger of Aurora, 
Colo.; four grandchildren; sisters and brothers. 
He is preceded in death by his daughter, Dixie 
Lee Barber in February, 2000; sisters and broth- 
ers. 

Funeral services were held May 10 at the 
Strang Funeral Chapel and Crematorium Ltd., 
Grayslake with the Pastor Patricia Allen-Stewart 
of the Lake Villa United Methodist Church offici- 
ating. Entombment followed at Highland 
Memorial Park Cemetery in Libertyville. Friends 
of the family visited at the funeral chapel on May 
9 from 4-8 p.m. 





Qreat 
Thank You 



To all those who came to our aid on the 
evening Adam passed away especially, Greg 
and Roberta Kleinschmidt, Brian and Diann 
Pomeroy and Patrick and Yvonne Neal. 

To all those paramedics, policemen 
and firemen who responded on Jan. 17, 
2002. 

To the emergency room staff at Condell 
Hospital. 

To all those that attended our 15-year- 
old son Adams wake on Jan. 20. 

To all those who sent flowers or cards 
in memory of Adam. 

To all of Adam's friends who have 
memorialized him and who continue to give 
us support. 

To all of our friends at Prince of Peace 
for your continuous prayers. 

j To Father Yanos, Father Dombrowski, 
John Lorbach, Cindy Bauer and Mrs. 
Ostrander for the beautiful memorial and 
prayer service. 

To all those who sent cards and/or gifts 
for Andy (11 years old) when he was in the 
hospital for his pacemaker/defibrillator 
surgery on Feb. 11. 

To all of those that have supplied us 
with nourishment through the months. 

To all those that have prayed for our 
family in our time of tragedy. 

It has been a very difficult year for our 
family and we don't know what the future 
has in store for us. With God's guidance and 
you, our friends, we will get through it. 

On behalf of the Adam J. Kausak fami- 
ly: Don, Colleen, Andy and Alex, we say 
<THANK YOU AND GOD BLESS." — 






JUSTEN'S ROUND LAKE 

FUNERAL HOME 

222 N. Rosedale Court 

(Rosedale at Cedar Lake Road) 

(847) 546-3300 
Nancy Justen & Mark Justen, 

Directors 

Additional Locations in 

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(847) 395-4000 

Dan Dugenske, 

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122 S. Milwaukee Ave., 

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(847) 356-2146 

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B16 / Lakeland Newspapers 




May 1 7, 2002 






torm watching: thermometers 







provide the numbers you need 



'.- 



As the sun rises higher in the sky and the 
earth begins to warm, it's not only animals 
that come out of hibernation. 

When warm spring weather finally arrives, 
'it's all about being outdoors. People can't wait 
to spend time gardening, doing yard work and 
enjoying activities such as hiking, biking, 
camping or just soaking up some rays. To 
make the most of spring and summer, people 
need more information: the temperature, 
humidity, barometric pressure, and whether 
any storms are lurking over the horizon. 

Fortunately, there are thermometers that 
fit the bill for the weekend gardener, the 
grilling enthusiast, the weather aficionado or 
anyone in between. And with various celebra- 
tions just around the comer, from Mother's 
and Father's Days to graduations and summer 
weddings, thermometers make a great gift 
that's also practical and attractive. 
Accurate weather information 

If it's weather information you're after, 
look for digital thermometers and weather sta- 
tions are the latest trend. These handy devices 
incorporate wireless monitoring technology 
and provide the convenience of having a mon- 
itor on a table inside the house with a weath- 
erproof sensor outdoors, in the attic or wher- 
ever you would like it to be. Acu-Rite's models 
feature easy- to-read LCD screens that display 
both the internal room temperature as well as 
the temperature for up to three remote sen- 
sors with a range of up to 100 feet. They also 
function as clocks with snooze alarms and 
day /date displays. 

The more advanced models will give you 
barometric pressure and humidity readings 
and alert you to weather changes and impend- 



"Real Estate Comer" 




DO YOU 

KNOW YOUR 

HOME! 



by Holly Blanchette 
ReMax Grand 



~\ 



PREPARE FOR A HOME LOAN 

Few people are fully prepared when 
they apply for a home loan. Begin your 
presentation with a personal Financial 
statement. Include credit references, work 
history, past performance on other mort- 
gages or loans, and current earnings. 
While the house serves as collateral, you 
must still demonstrate your abilty to make 
payments in addition to meeting your 
other obligations. If you cannot demon- 
strate thatryou are creditworthy, the 
lender may required co-signer on the note. 

Yourreal estate agent, in constant 
touch with the mortgage market, can be 
instrumental in opening doors for you. 
From the start make your agent your ally 
in your campaign for a home loan. © 

HOLLY BLANCHETTE 

at ReMax Grand, 
(847) 587-8200 ext. 137. 



J. 



Washington Mutual 



Homes come in al! sizes, 
so do our loans! 



Free Advance Loan Approvals! 



Chris Perrelle 

Senior Loan • 
Officer 

(847) 205-6485 




ing storms. If you want to monitor the temper- 
ature of your lily pond or swimming pool, the 
weatherp roof sensors also come with a sub- 
mersible waterproof probe. 
If you are really into precision, Acu-Rite's 
newest model, available this spring at Wal- 
Mart, will give you not only accurate weather 
readings, but also will synchronize to the offi- 
cial U.S. atomic clock in Boulder, Colo. 

Whether you need to know when to flip 
the burgers or when to flip yourself to get an 
even tan, a combination thermometer/clock 
on the deck is handy during warm weather. 
Many combination models or sets are avail- 
able, in designs ranging from a bright mosaic, 
to garden herbs, to sea shells. Look for sets 
made from durable sculpted resin to with- 
stand outdoor use and still provide accurate 



time and temperature information. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

The Fox Lako Fire Protection District Meeting sched- 
ule as follows: 

Location: Fire Station A3, Molidor Road, Ingleside, 
Illinois 
Time: 7:00 p.m. 

June 13, 2002 
Aug. 8, 2002 
Oct. 10, 2002 
Jan. 16, 2003 
' April 10, 2003 
May 8, 2003 
. RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED, 
CHARLES N. TRONVIG 
SECRETARY/TRUSTEE 
Fox Lake Fire Protection District 
April 2002 

1002C-4716-FL 
May 17, 2002 




PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Dynamic Carpet Cleaning 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Carpet Cleaning 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS IS TO BE CON- 
DUCTED OR TRANSACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 325 
Redbud PI., Bulfalo Grove, IL 60089, (847) 229-1394. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR TRANSACTING Herman Perilla, 
325 Redbud, Bullalo Grove, IL 60089, (847) 541- 
1518. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undersigned intend(s) to 
conduct the above named business from the loca- 
tions) indicated and that tho true or real full name(s) 
of the person(s) owning, conducting or transacting the 
business is/aro correct as shown. 
Is/ Herman Perilla 

The foregoing instrument was acknowledged before 
me by tho porson(s) Intending to conduct tho business 
this 7th day of May 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/ Laura B. Dunbar 

Notary Public 

Received: May 7, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1 002C-4723-GEN 

May 17, 2002 

--••• May 24, 2002 

May 31, 2002 



**-'. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Design Annalysis 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Graphic Design 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS IS TO BE CON- 
DUCTED OR TRANSACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
17876 West Braowick, Gurnoe, IL 60031, (847) 347- 
3796. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR TRANSACTING Anna M. Kellar, 
17876 W. Braowick, Gumee, IL 60031, (847) 347- 
3796. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that tho undersigned intend(s) to 
conduct the above named business from the loca- 
tions) Indicated and that tho true or real full name(s) 
of the porson(s) owning, conducting or transacting the 
businoss is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Anna M. Kellar 
April 15, 2002 

Tho foregoing instrument was acknowledged before 
mo by the person(s) Intending to conduct the businoss 
this 15th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/ Deborah Ann Robles 

' Notary Public 

Received: Apr 18, 2002 

I; -•-...: \ Willard R. Helander 

Lako County Clerk 

1002A-4690-GP 

May 3, 2002 

May 10,2002 

May 17. 2002 



Gabrielle & Lawrence Caswell 

On June 8 the wedding of Gabrielle Kozucti and Lawrence Caswell will take place in New 
Buffalo, Mich.. 

The reception will be held at the Whittaker Woods Country Club in New Buffalo. 

A bridal shower was given by Catherine Caswell at Dover Straits Restaurant in Mundelein. 
There were 100 guests that attended the shower. 

The bride is the daughter of Tim Schultz and Roberta Kozuch of Chicago. She is employed 
at the North Shore Community Bank in Wilmette. 

Lawrence is the son of Carolyn and Alan Caswell of Antioch. He graduated from 
Waukegan East High School and earned a degree in Human Resource at the Northern Illinois. 
University. Lawrence is employed at Abbott Laboratories as a project manager. 



.. PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Hired Pan 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Personal Chef Service - 
Homebased 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS IS TO BE CON- 
DUCTED OR TRANSACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 202 
West Trail, Grayslake, IL 60030, (847) 223-6141. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR TRANSACTING Charles Ventura 
Jr., 202 West Trail, Grayslake, IL 60030, (847) 223- 
2639. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undersigned Intend(s) to 
conduct the above named business from the. loca- 
tion^) indicated and that the true or real full name(s) 
of the person(s) owning, conducting or transacting the 
business is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Charles Ventura Jr. May 6, 2002 

The foregoing instrument was acknowledged before 
me by the person(s) intending to conduct the business 
this 6th day of May 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 
I si Eleanor A. Petruska 

Notary Public 

Received: May 6, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002B-4710-GL 

May 10, 2002 

May 17, 2002 

May 24, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Independence Fence 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Installation of Fences 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS IS TO BE CON- 
DUCTED OR TRANSACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 202 
E. Clarondon, Round Lake Beach, 60073, (847) 445- 
7674. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR TRANSACTING Moises Colon, 
202 E. Clarendon, Round Lake Beach, IL 60073, 
(847) 445-7674. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undersigned Intend(s) to 
conduct the above named business from the loca- 
tion^) indicated and that the true or roal full name(s) 
of the porson(s) owning, conducting or transacting tho 
business is/aro correct as shown. 
1st Moises Colon May 3, 2002 

Tho foregoing Instrument was acknowledged before 
me by the porson(s) intending to conduct the business 
this 3rd day of May 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 
Isl Eleanor A. Petruska 

Notary Public 

Received: May 3, 2002 

..' Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002B-4700-RL 
May 10, 2002 
May 1 7, 2002 
May 24, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice Is hereby given that EXTRA CLOSET, 849 
Anita Street, Antioch, Illinois 60002, will sell tho per- 
sonal goods from tho following units to satisfy the lien 
of EXTRA CLOSET (Seller) tor rental and other 
charges due. 
UNIT NO. -10605x05 

OCCUPANT- Kimberly & William Holstrom 
CONTENTS - Television, Women's Clothes, Window 
Fan & Boxes. 
UNIT NO. -12210X15. 
OCCUPANT- David Florek 
CONTENTS - Dresser, Snowboard, Schwinn Bicycle 
& Golf Clubs. 
UNIT NO. -13110X15x15 
OCCUPANT- Patricia Conrad 
CONTENTS - Television, Boxes, Dresser, Beds, 
Couch & Exercise Bicycle. 

These items and all items stored in the above 
units will be sold to the highest bidder for cash. 
Removal of all items from the premises must be with- 
in three days from date of sale and a security bond 
posted to cover same. 

Sale will be held on May 25, 2002, on the premis- 
es of EXTRA CLOSET, 849 Anita Street, Antioch, 
Illinois 60002 at approximately 9:00 to 12:00 noon. 
EXTRA CLOSET reserves the right to withdraw any or 
all of the above mentioned items prior to sale. 
NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCIDENTS 

1002C-4721-RL 
May '177 2002 
May 24. 2002 



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PUBLIC NOTICE 

TO: James D. Klndberg 

410 S. Barrington Rd. 

Wauconda, IL 60084 

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE 
Your right to use space(s) 403 at Wauconda Self- 
Servlce Storage, 500 Rand Rd., Wauconda, IL 
60084, has terminated and you no longer have 
access to the stored property. DEMAND FOR PAY- 
MENT IS BEING MADE WITHIN 14 DAYS. The 
stored property is subject to a lien In the amount of 
S487.00. This amount will continue to Increase in 
accordance with tho terms of your rental agreement 
until paid or tho property is sold. They are itemized as 
follows: 

DATE: 5-13-02 RENT $440.00 INVENTORY 
$30.00 LATE FEE $17.00 

DUE DATE 5-13-02 BALANCE $487.00 TOTAL 
DUE: $487.00 

THIS SUM MUST BE PAID IN FULL BEFORE 5-10- 
02 OR THE PROPERTY WILL BE ADVERTISED 
FOR SALE AND SOLD. Any excess proceeds of the 
sale over the lien amount and costs of sale will bo 
detained by the owner and may be reclaimed by you, 
or claimed by another person having a court order or 
other judicial process against the property, at any time 
for a period of 2 years from the sale and thereafter the 
proceeds will revert to Wauconda Self-Service 
Storage. 

General description of Goods: Mattress, Boxes, 
Shelf, Cabinet 

Date and Location ol Sale: June 3, 2002 @ 1:00 
p.m. WAUCONDA SELF-SERVICE STORAGE, P.O. 
Box 505, 500 Rand Road, Wauconda, IL 60084 
You may pay this sum and may contact the owner at: 

(847)526-5055 

1002C-4729-WL 
May 17, 2002 
May 24, 2002 



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"May 1 7, 2002 



LEGAL NOTICES 



. 



Lakeland Newspapers! 'B1 7 



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PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Eagle Trading 
Company 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Wholesaling, 
Import-Export 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 324 N. 
Emerald St., Mundelein, IL 60060, 
(847)566-6303. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Scott Antes, 
324 N. Emerald St., Mundelein, IL 
60060, (847) 566-6303. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s). 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Scott Antes April 25, 2002 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 25th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 
Isl Margaret J. Blanchard 

Notary Public 

Received: Apr 25, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

, Lake County Clerk 

1002B-4705-MN 

May 10, 2002 

May 17,2002 

May 24, 2002 









PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: YESS! ENGI- 
NEERING 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Engineering 
Services 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 624 
Meadow Lane, Libertyville, IL 60048, 
(847) 367-6728. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Richard L 
Afflerbaugh, 624 Meadow Lane, 
Libertyville. IL 60048, 

(847) 362-8342. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting. the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Richard L. Afflerbaugh 
April 25, 2002 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 25th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Ivette M. Diaz 

Notary Public 

Received: Apr 25, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002A-4693-LB 

May 3, 2002 

May 10,2002 

May 17, 2002 



a 






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PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice is hereby given that GRASS 
LAKE STORAGE & PACKAGING, 
20765 W. Grass Lake Road, 
Lindenhurst, IL 60046, will sell the per- 
sonal goods from the following units to 
satisfy the lien of the GRASS LAKE 
STORAGE & PACKAGING (Seller) for 
the rental and other charges due. 
UNIT- #510- 10x10 
OCCUPANT - Eric Feldman 
CONTENTS - Crib, Computer 
Monitors, Strollers (3), Life Jackets, 
Cooler, Water Skis, Weights, 
Miscellaneous Boxes 
UNIT -#502 -5x10 
OCCUPANT - Russell Hille 
CONTENTS -Air Compressor, Plastic 
Chairs, Chest of Drawers, Fertilizer 
Spreader, Chest, Colfeo Maker, Hose, 
Work Boots, Miscellaneous Boxes 
UNIT- #526 -10x15 
OCCUPANT - Louis Lanciloti 
CONTENTS - Speakers, Fan, Bed, 
Fake Plant, Lamp, TV, Chest, Ladder, 
Golf Clubs, Tire, Hockey Stick, Art, 
Miscellaneous Boxes 
UNIT -#104 -5x10 
OCCUPANT - Shannon Miller 
CONTENTS - Poster, Crib, 
Miscellaneous Boxes 
UNIT- #514 -10x10 
OCCUPANT -Ron Ruhl 
CONTENTS - Sofas, Table, Flower 
Pot, Speakers, Fan, Lamp* Vacuum, 
Platic Chairs, TV, Chests, 
Miscellaneous Bags 
UNIT -#323 -10x20 
OCCUPANT - Randall Schoenke 
CONTENTS - Chairs, 2 Tires, Floor 
Fan, Battery Powered Car, Vacuum, 
Golf Clubs, Table, Sofa, Stroller, Water 
Skis, Miscellaneous Bags 

1002B-4709-LV 
May 10, 2002 
May 1 7, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Westin's 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Retail Sales 

Safety Equipment & misc. 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 34823 N. 
Peterson Ave., Ingleside, IL 60041, 
(847) 546-1973. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Betty J. 
Wostin, 34823 N. Peterson Ave., 
Ingleside, IL 60041, 
(847) 546-1973. Patrick C. Westin, 
34823 N. Peterson Ave., Ingleside, IL 
60041,(847)546-1973. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
Indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Patrick C. Westin April 16, 2002 
Is/ Betty J. Westin April 16, 2002 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 16th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Joseph C. Torres 

Notary Public 

Received: Apr 22, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002B-4701-FL 

May 10, 2002 

May 17, 2002 

May 24, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Room Lilt 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Home 

Decorating 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 403 S. 
Second Ave, Libertyville, IL 60048. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Sandra 
Hawes, 403 S. Second Ave., 
Libertyville, IL (847) 367-1 1 04. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above . - 
named business from the locatlon(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s), owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Sandra B. Hawes 
April 26, 2002 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 26th day of April 2002. 



OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Mary V. Kay 

Notary Public 

Received: Apr 26, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002B-4704-LB 

May 10, 2002 

May 17, 2002 

May 24, 2002 



^--« 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Century Storm 
Damage Restoration 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Insurance 
Restoration, Replace Roofs, Siding, 
Gutters 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 781 S. 
Midlothian Rd. #355, Mundelein, IL 
60060, (443) 250-2426. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Todd Joseph 
Reynolds, 7160 B&A Blvd. Ferndale, 

MD 21061, 
(443)250-2426. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the porson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Is/ Todd Joseph Reynolds 
April 25, 2002 

The foregoing instrument was 

acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 25th day of April 2002. 



OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/ Eleanor A. Petruska 

Notary Public 

Received: Apr 25, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002A-4694-MN 

May 3, 2002 

May 10, 2002 

May 17, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Romance in a 
Bag 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Mail Order 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 28362 W. 
Maple Ave., Barringtoh, IL 60010, 

(847) 382-4872. 

529 W. Liberty St., #261 Wauconda, IL 

60084, (847) 382-4872. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Deborah A. 
Eneberg, 28362 W. Maple Ave., 
Barrington, IL 60010, (847) 382-4872. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
Is/ Deborah A. Eneberg 
April 29, 2002 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per; 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 29th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Is/ Diane Nori 

Notary Public 

Received: May 2, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1 002B-4708-WL 

May 10, 2002 

May 1 7, 2002 

May 24, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Electronic 
Medi-Claims Management 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Electronically 
Process Medical Claims to Insurance 
Cos. 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 612 D. 
Shoreline Road, Lake Barrington, IL 
60010,(847)381-1596. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING B. James 
Zelsdorf, 612 D. Shoreline Road, Lake 
Barrington, IL 60010, (847) 381-1596. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the porson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Is/ B. James Zelsdorf 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 3rd day of May 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 
Isl Heather S. Mahoney 

Notary Public 

Received: May 7, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002C-4719-WL 

May 1 7, 2002 

May 24, 2002 

May 31, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Bevins Roof 
and Building Maintenance 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Roof and 

Mm ^dl 

Building Maintenance 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 324 E. 
Clarendon Dr., Round Lake Beach, IL 
60073, (847) 740-6590. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR ■ 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING David 
Burkhead, 324 E. Clarendon Dr., 
Round Lake Beach, IL 60073, (847) 
740-6590. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the truo or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Is/ David Burkhead April 23, 2002 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before mo by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 23rd day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 
Isl Eleanor A. Petruska 

Notary Public 

Received: Apr 23, 2002 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002A-4695-RL 

May 3, 2002 

May 10, 2002 

• May 17, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, 

LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
PROBATE DIVISION 
PUBLICATION NOTICE 
Independent Administration s 

TO: X CREDITORS AND CLAIMANTS 

UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES* 

1 . Notice is given of the death of ANN S. HACKETT, who died on November 8, 
2001, a resident of Lake County, Illinois. 

2. The Representative lor the estate Is, MARY HACKETT SPERZEL. 

3. The Attorney for the estate Is: Timothy G. Carroll, Carroll & Wall, 70 West Madison 
Street, Suite 620, Chicago, Illinois 60602. 

4. Claims against tho estate may be filed on or before November 17, 2002." Claims 
against the estate may be filed with the Clerk of the Circuit court, 18 N. County 
Street, Waukegan, IL 60085, or with the Representative or both. Any claim not 
filed within that period is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the Clerk must be 
mailed or delivered to the Representative and to the attorney within 10 days aftor 
it has beon filed. 

5. The estate will be administered without Court supervision unless an interested 
party terminates independent supervision administration by filing a petition to ter- 
minate under Article XXVII 5/28-4 of the Probate Act (755 ILCS 5/28-4). 

1002C-4714-GEN 
May 17, 2002 
May 24, 2002 
May 31 , 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

TO: Jeremy R. Adams 

212 PinetrooRow 

Lake Zurich, IL 60047 

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE 
Your right to use space(s) 006 at Wauconda Solf-Servlce Storage, 500 Rand 
Rd., Wauconda, IL 60084, has terminated and you no longer have access to the 
stored property. DEMAND FOR PAYMENT IS BEING MADE WITHIN 14 DAYS. Tho 
stored property is subject to a Hen in the amount of $433.00. This amount will contin- 
ue to Increase in accordance with tho terms of your rental agreement until paid or tho 
property is sold. They are Itemized as follows: 

DATE: 5-13-02 RENT $391.00 INVENTORY $30.00 LATE FEE $12.00 
DUE DATE 5-13-02 BALANCE $433.00 TOTAL DUE: $433.00 
THIS SUM MUST BE PAID IN FULL BEFORE 5-10-02 OR THE PROPERTY WILL 
BE ADVERTISED FOR SALE AND SOLD. Any excess proceeds of the sale over the 
lion amount and costs of sale will be retained by the owner and may be reclaimed by 
you, or claimed by another person having a court order or other Judicial process 
against the property, at any time lor a period of 2 years from tho sale and therealtor 
tho proceeds will revert to Wauconda Self-Service Storage. 

General description of Goods: Clothes, Table, Shelving Unit, TV, Grill, Dresser, 
Chairs & boxes 

Date and Location ol Sale: June 3, 2002 ® 1:00 p.m. WAUCONDA 

SELF-SERVICE STORAGE, P.O. Box 505, 500 Rand Road, Wauconda, IL 60084 

You may pay this sum and may contact tho owner at: (847) 526-5055 

1002C-4725-WL 
May 17, 2002 
May 24, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH 

JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 

PROBATE DIVISION 

Estate of ) 

ELEANOR KLEIN, ) No. 02 P 354 

Decoasod ) 

C L AIM NO T IC E 

Notice is given of the death of ELEANOR KLEIN, of Ingleside, Illinois. Letters of 
Office were issued on May 3, 2002, to RALPH W. KLEIN, of 5016 Pinehurst Ct., 
McHenry, Illinois 60050, and EDWARD H. KLEIN, SR., OF 1404 Channel Beach Ave., 
McHenry, Illinois 60050, as Independent Administrators, whose attorney Is RONALD 
RUNKLE, CLARK & RUNKLE, P.C., 236 Center Street, Grayslake, Illinois 60030. 

Claims against the estate may be filed in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court 
at 18 N. County Street, Waukegan, Illinois 60085, Room C-307 or with representa- 
tive, or both, on or before November 29, 2002, which date is not less than 6 months 
from the date of the first publication of this notice and any claim not filed within that 
period is barred. Copies of this claim filed with the Clerk must bo mailed or deliv- 
ered to the representative and to tho attorney within 10 days after it is filed. 

bL EP WAR P K LEIN & E DW A R D H , K L EIN. SR. 

Independent Administrator 




RONALD RUNKLE, Attorney 

1002C-4715-GL 
May 17, 2002 
May 24, 2002 
May 31. 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS 

Public Notice is heroby given pursuant to a Petition on filo in tho Village Clerk's 
office of Fox Lake, that a public hoaring will be hold on June 12, 2002 at 7:30 p.m. in 
the Village Hall, Fox Lake, Illinois, to hoar tho Petition of Frank Miller, owner of tho 
following described real ostato to-wit: 

PARCEL1: (EXCEPT THAT PART THEREOF, DESCRIBEp.AS.FOLLOWS.Vrl I . 
COMMENCING AT A POINT IN THE NORTHERLY LINE OF SAiD LOT, 66.39^ " 

FEET EASTERLY OF THE NORTH WEST CORNER -.THEREOF. THISti 

POINT BEING THE INTERSECTION OF SAID NORTHERLY LINE WITH 

THE EAST LINE OF A 66 FOOT EASEMENT: THENCE EASTERLY ALONG ! ' 

SAID NORTHERLY LINE, 187.71 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY. ,,, . 

ALONG THE NORTH EASTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT. 94.95 FEET; THENCE 

SOUTH WESTERLY AT RIGHT ANGLES TO SAID NORTH EASTERLY n 

LINE, 180 FEET; THENCE WEST 123.7 FEET TO A POINT IN THE EAST 

LINE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED EASEMENT, 21 4.42 FEET SOUTH OF 

THE PUCE OF BEGINNING, THENCE NORTH ALONG SAID EAST LINE, 

214.42 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING); AND EXCEPT THAT PART 

THEREOF DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE MOST 

EASTERLY CORNER OF SAID LOT; THENCE SOUTH WESTERLY ALONG 

THE SOUTH EASTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT, 367 FEET; THENCE NORTH 

WESTERLY PARALLEL TO THE NORTH EASTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT; 

135 FEET; THENCE NORTH EASTERLY PARALLEL TO THE SOUTH 

EASTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT, 367.0 FEET TO A POINT IN THE THE 

NORTH EASTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT, 135.0 FEET NORTH WESTERLY 

OF THE PLACE OF BEGINNING; AND THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY 135.0 

FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING, IN WILLIAM TONYAN'S NIP- 

PERSINK ACRES, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTH EAST 

QUARTER OF THE SOUTH EAST QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 

45 NORTH, RANGE 9, EAST OF THE 3RD P.M., ACCORDING TO THE 

PLATTHEREOF, RECORDED JANUARY 17, 1958 AS DOCUMENT 978697, 

IN BOOK 1598 OF RECORDS, PAGE 339, IN LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 

Location of tho property is: Wost on Nipporsink, South of Route 134 

Tho common address Is: 27135 W. Nipperslnk Blvd 

Petitioner is requesting tho following: RozonotoRI 

Said Petition is available for examination in tho Village Clerk's office at tho Village 

Hall in Fox Lake, Illinois. 

All interested porsons are invited to attond said hearing and bo hoard. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ron Stochl, Chairman 

Fox Lako Zoning Board of Appoals 

Dated at Fox Lake, Illinois 

This 8th day of May, 2002 

1002C-4717-FL 

. May 17, 2002 



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B18 / Lakeland Newspapers 



LEGAL NOTICES 



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PUDUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Hands-On 

Training 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Teachers 

Workshops 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 141 
Partridge Ct., Grayslake, IL 60030, 
(847) 543-8434. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE ' 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Jodl Clno- 
Mars, 141 Partridge Ct., Graylskae, IL 
60030. (847) 543-8434. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Jodi L Cino-Mars 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 13th day of May 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 
7s/ Eleanor A. Petruska 

Notary Public 

Received: May 1 3, 2002 

Wiliard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002C-4728-GP 

May 1 7, 2002 

May 24, 2002 

May 31, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Trendy 
Treasures 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Wholesale/ 
Retail-Gift Items/Home Decor/Etc. 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 155 B. N. 
Milwaukee Ave. #118, Lake Villa, IL 

60046, (847) 589-0777. 

P.O. Box 6187 Lake Villa, IL 60046- 
6187, (847) 589-0777 (voice/fax) • 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Todd R. 
Schaefer, P.O. Box 6187, Lake Villa, IL 

60046-6187. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 

COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Todd R. Schaefer 
April 26, 2002 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 26th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/ Eleanor A. Petruska 

Notary Public 

Recoivod: Apr 26, 2002 

• Wiliard R. Holander 

Lake County Clork 

1 002A-4689-LV 

May 3. 2002 

May 10. 2002 

May 17, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice is hereby given that SAFE- 
WAY SELF STORAGE INC., 1100 W. 
Rollins Road, Round Lako Heights, IL, 
60073, will sell the personal goods 
from the following units lo satisfy the 
lien of SAFEWAY SELF STORAGE 
(Seller) for rental and other charges 
due. 

UNIT NO.- 10610X25 
OCCUPANT- Richard Smith 
CONTENTS - Bicycles, Home 
Electronics, Yamaha Guitar, PV Blues 
Amplllior & Furniture. 
UNIT NO. -22510X10 
OCCUPANT - Jack Rocho 
CONTENTS - Bicycle, Upright Tool 
Cabinets, Apartment-Size Washer & 
Many Boxes. 
UNIT NO. -32005X10 
OCCUPANT - Cathorina Soma 
CONTENTS - Antiquo Rocking Chair, 
Weedwacker, Bed & Plastic 
Containers. 
UNIT NO. -34005X10 
OCCUPANT- Chrissy Kwak 
CONTENTS - Oak Furniture, China 
Hutch & Bod 

Theso items and all items stored 
in the above units will bo sold to the 
highest bidder for cash. Removal of all 
items from the promises must bo with- 
in throe days from date of sale and a 
security bond posted to cover same. 

Sale will be hold on May 25, 2002, 
on the promises of SAFEWAY SELF 
STORAGE, 1100 W. Rollins Road, 
Round Lake Heights, IL 60073, 
(Fairfield and Rollins Roads) at 
approximately 9:00 to 12:00 A.M. 
SAFEWAY SELF STORAGE reserves 
the right to withdraw any or all of the 
above mentioned items prior to sale. 

NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCI- 
DENTS 

1 002C-4720-RL 
May 1 7, 2002 
May 24, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Treasured 
Memories 

NATURE/PURPOSE: To produce 
videos and DVDs that include still pho- 
tos & videos put to music. 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 40791 
North Prairie Ave, Antioch, IL- 60002, 
(847)395-5502. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Janet Quist, 
40791 North Prairie Ave, Antioch, IL 
60002, (847) 395-5502. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- . 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Janet Quist April 25, 2002 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 25th day of April 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Sandra Lavello 

Notary Public 

Recoived: May 2, 2002 

Wiliard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002B-4706-AN 

May 10, 2002 

May 17, 2002 

May 24, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: BONJOUR 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Retail Clothing 
& Ebay Sales 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 53 W. 
Lakeshore Drive, Barrington, Illinois 

60010,(847)487-0315. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Jan 
Bongiorno, 53 W. Lakeshore Drive, 
Barrington, IL 60010, 

(847)487-0315. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the above 
namod business from tho localion(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting tho business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Jan Bongiorno 
May 3, 2002 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 3rd day of May 2002. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 
Isl Margaret J. Blanchard 

Notary Public 

Recoived: May 3, 2002 

Wiliard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002C-4713-GP 

May 17, 2002 

May 24, 2002 

May 31, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS 

Public Notice is hereby given pur- 
suant to a Petition on filo in the Village 
Clerk's ollico of the Village of Fox 
Lako, that a public hearing will be held 
on Juno 12, 2002 at 7:30 p.m. in the 
Village Hall, Fox Lake, Illinois, to hear 
tho Petition of George Novak, owner 
of tho following doscribod real estato 
to-wit: 

PARCEL 1: Lot 1 19 in William T. 
- Sullivan's Hillcrest Subdivision on 
Fox Lako, Boing a Subdivision of 
that Part of tho Southwest Quarter . 
of Section 10, Township 45 North, 
Range 9, East of tho Third 
Principal Meridian, Lying North of 
tho Northorly Right of Way Line of 
tho Chicago, Milwaukee and St. 
Paul Railway, According to tho 
Plat Thereof, Recorded April 5, 
1922, As Document No. 210529, 
In' Book -L- of Plats, Page 1 , In 
Lako County, Illinois 
Location of the property is: Two lots 
South of Cypress on the West side of 
Hillcrest 

The common address is: 8 Hillcrest 
Petitioner is requesting tho following: 
A fourteen (14') foot rear yard setback 
variance. 

Said Petition is available for examina- 
tion in the Village Clerk's office at the 
Village Hall In Fox Lake, Illinois. 
All interested persons are Invited to 
attond said hearing and be heard. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ron Stochl, Chairman 

Fox Lake Zoning' Board of Appeals 

Dated at Fox Lake, Illinois 

This 8th day of May, 2002 

1002C-4718-FL 
May 17, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE' 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Creative 
Custom Carpentry 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Carpentry 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 2809 
Glenarye Dr., Undenhurst, IL 60046, 
(847) 356-6888. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Rodney 
Massle, 2809 Glenarye Drive, 
LindenhurstJL 60046, 
(847)356-6888. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify .that the under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
Indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Rodney Massie 

April 20, 200 2 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged beforo me by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct tho busi- 
ness this 20th day of April 2002. 

■ 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Desrie Colson 

Notary Public 

Received: Apr 23, 2002 

Wiliard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002A-4697-LV 

May 3, 2002 
May 1 0, 2002 
May 1 7, 2002 





PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Pretty in 
Porcelain 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Sale of 
Porcelain Dollmaking Greenware, 
Supplies & Classes 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 36288 N., 
Wilson Rd., Ingleside, IL 60041, (847) 
587-1846. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Brenda 
Herron, 36288 N. Wilson Rd., 
Ingleside, IL 60041, (847) 587-1846. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 

COUNTY OF LAKE )W/K~^ 

This is to certify that tho under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Brenda J. Herron 
May 6, 2002 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before mo by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 6th day of May 2002. 



OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Isabel Araiza 

Notary Public 

Received: May 9, 2002 

Wiliard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002C-4712-FL 

May 17, 2002 

May 24, 2002 

May 31, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: J.F. % 
Landscaping 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Landscaping ' 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1035 
McAlister, North Chicago, IL 60064, 

(847) 578-2848 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Juan Luis 
Retamar, 1035 McAlister, North 
Chicago, IL 60064, 
(847) 578-2848. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that tho under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from tho locatlon(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Juan Retamar April 29, 2002 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 29th day of April 2002. 



OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Ivette M. Diaz 

Notary Public 

Recoived: Apr 29, 2002 

Wiliard R. Holander 

Lake County Clerk 

1002B-4707-GP 
May 10, 2002 
May 17, 2002 
May 24, 2002 



May 17,2002 




PUBLIC NOTICE 

TO: Jacqueline Smith - Murray 
78-C Foxwood Ln. 

N. Barrington, IL 60010 

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE 
Your right to use space(s) 043 at Wauconda Solf-Servlco Storage, 500 Rand 
Rd., Wauconda, IL 60084, has terminated and you no longer have access to the 

stored property. DEMAND FOR PAYMENT IS BEING MADE WITHIN 14 DAYS. The 

stored property is subject to a Hen in the amount of $292.00. This amount will contin- 
ue to Increase In accordance with the terms of your rental agreement until paid or the 
property is sold. They are itemized as follows: 

DATE: 5-13-02 RENT $250.00 INVENTORY $30.00 LATE FEE $12.00 

DUE DATE 5-1 3-02 BALANCE $292.00 TOTAL DUE: $292.00 

THIS SUM MUST BE PAID IN FULL BEFORE 5-10-02 OR THE PROPERTY WILL 

BE ADVERTISED FOR SALE AND SOLD. Any excess proceeds of the sale over the 

lien amount and costs of sale will be retained by tho owner and may be reclaimed by 

you, or claimed by another person having a court order or other judicial process 

against the property, at any lime for a period of 2 years from the sale and thereafter 

the proceeds will revert to Wauconda Self-service Storage. 

General description of Goods: Boxes, Skis, Post Cards, VCR Recorder 

Date and Location of Sale: June 3, 2002 

WAUCONDA SELF-SERVICE STORAGE, P.O. Box 505, 500 Rand Road, 

Wauconda, I L 60084 • 

You may pay this sum and may contact the owner at: (847) 526-5055 

1002C-4726-WL 
May 17, 2002 
May 24. 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, 

LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 

PROBATE DIVISION 

PUBLICATION NOTICE 

Independent Administration 

TO: _JLL CREDITORS AND CLAIMANTS 

UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES* 

1. Notice is given of the death of FRED H. DAUGHERTY, who died on October 19, 
2001, a resident of Lake County, Illinois. 

2. The Representative for the estate Is, JOY E. DAUGHERTY. 

3. The Attorney.for the estate Is: Timothy G. Carroll, Carroll & Wall, 70 West Madison 
Street, Suite 620, Chicago, Illinois 60602. 

4. Claims against the estate may be filed on or before November 17, 2002.** Claims 
against the estate may be filed with the Clerk of the Circuit court, 18 N. County 
Street, Waukegan, IL 60085, or with the Representative or both. Any claim not filed 
within that period is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the Clerk must be mailed 
or delivered to the Representative and to the-attorney within 10 days after it has 
been filed. 

5. The estate will be administered without Court supervision unless an interested 
party terminates independent supervision administration by filing a petition to ter- 
minate under Article XXVII 5/28-4 of the Probate Act (755 ILCS 5/28-4). 

1002C-4722-GEN 

: May 17,2002 

May 24, 2002 

May 31 , 2002 



ia • * 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
• ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Petition on file In the Village Clerk's 
office of the Village of Fox Lake, that a public hearing will be held on June 12, 2002 
at 7:30 p.m. In the Village Hall, Fox Lake, Illinois, to hear the Petition of Michelle & 
Charles Stein, owner of the following described real estate to-wit: 

Lot 1 in John W. Kreuser's Subdivision of Lot 21 in Bonslott's Subdivision of 
Eagle Point, being the Southwest Fractional Quarter of Section 9, Township 
45 North Range 9, East of the Third Principle Meridian, According to the Plat 
of said Kreuser's Subdivision Recorded August 3, 191 1 as Document 136865 
, in Book "I" of Plats page 1 9 in Lake County Illinois. 
Location of the property is: Eight houses from the end of Eagle Point Road 
The common address is: 180 Eagle Point Road 

Petitioner is requesting the following: A one point five (1'5") foot side yard variance 
and a six point four (6'4") foot front yard variance. 

Said Petition is available for examination in the Village Clerk's office at the Village 
Hall in Fox Lake, Illinois. 
All interested persons are invited to attend said hearing and be heard. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ron Stochl, Chairman 

Fox Lake Zoning Board of Appeals 

Dated at Fox Lake, Illinois 

This 10th day of May 2002 

1 002C-4724-FL 
•'■>.;•• May 17, 2002 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT LAKE 

COUNTY, ILLINOIS 

LAKE FOREST BANK & TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID P. HARRIS, not 
personally but as Trustee on behalf of West Family Trust, and Illinois Trust under the 
provisions of a Trust Agreement dated December 2, 1991, DONALD W. WEST, 
HEIRS, DEVISEES AND LEGATEES OF BONITA B. WEST. DECEASED, REBECCA 
WEST JAQUETTE, SUSAN DIANE WETSLAYTON. CAROLYN ANN WEST, 
DOROTHY R. WEST, CRYSTAL POINT CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, 
UNKNOWN OWNERS and NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendants. CASE NO. 01 
CH1184. 

Pursuant to a Judgment made and entered by said Court in the above-entitled 
cause, GARY DEL RE, Sheriff of Lake County, Illinois, will on June 3, 2002 at 9:00 
a.m. at 25 S. Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue, Waukegan, Illinois, sell at public auction, 
tho following described premises and real estate mentioned in said Judgment: 

LOT 108 IN CRYSTAL POINT CONDOMINIUM NO. 6, AS DELINEATED ON SUR- 
VEY OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PARCEL OF REAL ESTATE (HERE- 
INAFTER REFERRED TO AS PARCEL): LOT 3 IN CRYSTAL POINT OF LAKE FOR- 
EST. BEING A RESUBDIVISION OF WOODVIEW ACRES IN THE WEST 1/2 OF 
SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 44 NORTH, RANGE 12, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCI- 
PAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 14, 
1970. AS DOCUMENT 1455893, AND RATIFIED BY DOCUMENT 1457371, WHICH 
SURVEY IS ATTACHED AS EXHIBIT "A" TO DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM 
MADE BY THE EXCHANGE NATIONAL BANK OF CHICAGO, A NATIONAL BANK- 
ING ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER TRUST AGREEMENT DATED AUGUST 
15, 1972 AND KNOWN AS TRUST NUMBER 23787, RECORDED AS DOCUMENT 
1707917, TOGETHER WITH ITS UNDIVIDED 3.70 PER CENT INTEREST IN SAID 
PARCEL (EXCEPTING FROM SAID PARCEL ALL THE PROPERTY AND SPACE 
COMPRISING ALL THE UNITS THEREOF AS DEFINED AND SET FORTH IN SAID 
DECLARATION AND SURVEY), IN LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS TOGETHER WITH AN 
EASEMENT FOR PARKING PURPOSES IN AND TO PARKING SPACE NOS. 42 
AND 43. AS DEFINED AND SET FORTH IN SAID DECLARATION AND SURVEY. 

P.I.N.: 12-28-108-089-0000 

Address: 1260 N. Western Avenue, Unit #108, Lake Forest, IL 60045. 

Improvements: Condominium Apartment 

Sale shall be under the following terms: 10% Cashier's or Certified Funds due at 
the Time of sale. Balance due by Cashier's or Certified Funds within 24 hours there- 
after. 

Sale shall bo subject to general taxes, special assessments and any prior first mort- 
gages. . 

Premises will NOT be open for Inspection. 
For information: Donald Newman, Plaintiff's Attorney 

11 S.LaSalle Street #1500 
Chicago, IL 60603 
Phone: 312/641-6693 
This is an attempt to collect a debt pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices 
Act and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. 

1002A-4696-GEN 

May3,2002 

May 10, 2002 

May 17, 2002 



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May 17,2002 



HOW TO MACE A CLASSIFIED AD 

By Phono Call: 847.223.8161 
By Fob 847.223.2691 

By Mall: Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, PL 60030 
la Person: 30 S. Whitney St., 

Grayslake 

DEMJIJNES 



Direct Line « , — ....~..........Mon. 5pm 

assllied (Business & Priva te PartyUVecMOam 

HOURS 

8 mn-5pni*.~ .....~. ~.~»~*~ Mon.-T ( YL 



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You may cancel your ad before 11 un. on I-Yiday for Iho 

following wtsek'H publication. 

FU*m Chock Year Ad 

In Uio event of an error, Lakolaitd 'NtnvMpopeni win bo 

rtwpomitbto for only Uie flint Incorrect Insertion and only 

tho portion of Uio ad that In In eiror or rendered umgIom. 

HeaHo contact Uie UoKwiflod Department Immediately In 

caho of error. 



CLASSIFIEDS 






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xa 11 Lakeland Newspa\ 

' Antioch News • floand Lafce iVews 
La/re V7//a 7?eco/ f d • Mundelein News 
Wadswortli News • Grayslake Times 
Fox Lake Press • Gumee Press . 
Lindenhurst News • Wauconda Leader 

Libertyville News 




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Notices 



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ARE YOU A SINGLE 
PARENT? 

Parents without Partners 

Is a not-for-profit 
organization devoted to 
the interest and welfare 
of the single parent and 
. their children. 
PWP members plan 
educational, support, and 

social activities for 
children and adults on a 
monthly basis. For more 
information on how you 
can become a member, 
please call our hotline 

(847) 817-5687. 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

II you have placed classified ad- 
vertising with the Lakeland 
Media you may receive a mislead- 
ing statement from another firm 
requesting payment for this ad- 
vertising. To receive proper cred- 
it to your account, all payments 
lor your Lakeland Newspapers, 
Market Journal & Great Lakes 
Bulletin advertising must be made 
as invoiced & directed to: 
Lakeland Media 

PO Box 268 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslako, IL 60030-02GB 



4 . 



DONT LET EXTRA pounds 

upset youl Get rid of them 
forever. Safe, all natural, 30 
day money-back guarantee. 

Toll free 888-373-2306. 



GRAYSLAKE 

SHERRY'S 

ELECTROLYSIS 

(Permanent Hair Removal) 

ALSO OFFERING 

WAKE UP 

With 

MAKE UP! 

MICRO TATTOOING of 

'EYEBROWS 
•EYELINE 

•UPLINE. 
FREE Brochures. 
(847) 249-7446. 



Notices- 



IN SEARCH OF 
DAVID JAMES BARNDT 

JR. Information on his 
whereabouts needed due 

to child support evasion. 

Please call (847) 365-0508 

to leave a message. 



■ i - 




MUNGLE'S 
LANDSCAPING 
WEDOITALLIl 

•Weed & Edge 
Flower Beds 
'Tree & Hedge Trimming 
'Mulch 
•Power Wash or 
Staining, Decks & Fenc- 
es Tilling, Small Flower 
Beds & Gardens 
•Spring Clean Up. 
(847) 826-9619, 
home (815) 344-2279, 
pager (847) 333-7383 
"FIREWOOD 
AVAILABLE." 



SUBMR- YOUR LAKELAND 

CLASSIFIED ADS ON THE 

INTERNET! 

Visit http://www.lpnews.com/ 
to place your ads conven- 
iently. Ads appear on the In- 
ternet, In all Lakeland Pa- 
pers... The Great Lakes Bul- 
letin and. The Market Journal 
for only $23.00 for 4 lines 
(approx. 16 words), then only 
,60c for each additional line. 



SURROGATE MOTHERS 
WANTED 

Fee plus expenses for 

carrying a couple's child. 

Must be 18-35 and 

previously had a child. 

Steven Litz, Attorney 

(317)996-2000. 




Lost & Found- 




Free 






FOUND DRY WALL STILT at 

Butterfield & Allenson Rd. In 
Mundelein. (847) 

949-9577. 

LOST COCK ATI EL "PATCH- 
ES", in McHenry area, off 
Riverside, on 5/6. Please 

call (815) 385-2702. 






DID YOU FIND Someones 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dept., and get your 
results, FOUND ads are 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
(847)223-8161. - 




DONT THROW AWAY or 

store your unwanted musi- 
cal instruments. I will come 
and pick it up for FREE. 
Call (847) 970-7388. 



ATTENTION . 
PET OWNERS 
We Do Not 

Knowingly Accept Ads 
For Free/Giveaway 
Animals 
If you must give up your be- 
loved pet, please consider 

these suggestions. 
♦Free animal ads suggest that 
there is something wrong 
with the animal, or that it has 
no value. 

•Some people who respond 
to these free animal ads arc 
impostcrs and arc only con- 
cerned about making a profit 
and not the animal's welfare. 
•Charging a fee to a potential 
pet owner confirms the re- 
sponsibility of pet ownership 
for an entire lifetime of that 
pet. For more information, 
please contact the Humane 
Society. . . . . 



AVOID BANKRUPTCY, 

SOLVE DEBT PROBLEMS. 
Rebuild credit. T.I.F. can 
help! Call for a confidential 
application.. 1-888-772- 

8248. 



BE DEBT FREE - Years 
Soonerl Low Paymentsl 
Reduced Interest I Stop 
Late Feesl Stop Collec- 
tors! FAMILY CREDIT 
COUNSELING Non-profit 
Christian Agency. FREE 
QUOTE www.famllycred- 
it.org RECORDED MES- 
SAGE. 



GET OUT OF debt free! 
Stop collection calls; re- 
duce payments up to 50%, 
lower Interest. Non-profit, 
licenses, bonded. Call toll- 
tree 1-800-8476410 

www.amerix.com 



WEDDING 

ENGAGEMENT 

ANNIVERSARY 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

To announce a wedding, 
engagement or anniversary, 
call (847) 223-8161. There is 

a short form to fill out and 

• return. Forms can be mailed 

or faxed to you. Photos are 

welcome. Fees are listed on 

the forms. Mailing address: 

Lakeland Media, 

30 S. Whitney St., 

Grayslake, IL 60030. 

Attn: Bridal Sec. 

Phone number or questions: 

Call Nancy Thielsen 

(847)223-8161, 

ext. 143. 




Lost & Found 



FOUND BIKE IN Wildwood. 

Must identify. Ask for Chay. 

(847) 223-9833. 



Go To Lake County's Information Webs 




- \. 








■*■*»«!* 






wmm- m* 









FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 
(847)223-0514 



DON'T THROW AWAY, your 
old exercise equipment. I 
will come and pick it up for 

FREE. (847) 970-7388. 




FOR SALE OR GIVE AWAY 
ELECTRONIC ORGANS Vin- 
tage Hammond and popu- 
lar Lowrey will be given 
away to worthy church or 
civic group. Both need work. 
Collectors can acquire either 
or both on a "Best Offer" ba- 
sis. Use as musical instru- 
ment or furniture. Ham- 
mond has dual consoles 
with steps. Call (847) 546.- 
3217 after 6pm. 



ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad in 
the Lakeland Classifieds. 
Free and Giveaways are run 
at NO CHARGE! (We dis- 
courage any pet ads). Dead- 
lines: 10am Wednesdays. 

(847) 223-8161, ext.1 91. 



CHILDLESS COUPLE 
WISHES TO ADOPT1 

Dear Birthmother, 

We hope you hear our plea.. 

H...Home filled wilh endless 

love for your baby 
O...Only you hold the key to 

answering our prayers 
P...PIease trust us to carry 

out your wishes 
E...Every moment you'll 

remain in our hearts. 



We promise to make your 
dreams for your baby come 
true. MEDICAL, LEGAL, 
COUNSELING, COURT AP- 
PROVED LIVING EXPENS- 
ES PAID. CONFIDENTIAL. 

Please call our attorney 708- 

957-6846. 




GET SKINNY BY SPRING 

SEXY BY SUMMER . 
Lose up to 30LBS. FAST. 

www.thediet4u.net 

Or phone 

1 -800-935-2857 





Financial 




SSCASHSS IMMEDIATE 

CASH for structured settle- 
ments, annuities, real es- 
tate, notes private mort- 
gage notes, accident 
cases, and insurance pay- 
out (800)794-7310. 



or Fax (847 



-269 1 





Personals 



<$ 4? 




Egg Donoi 
Needed 







i 



i . 



infertile 




Our program is completely anonymous 
24 hour/7 day support 




For information call 

(847) 656-8733 



LLC 



GET OUT OF 
DEBT FREE! 

Stop collection colls, 

reduce payments up to 

50%, lower Interest. Non 

profit, licensed, bonded. 

Call toll-fro© 1-800-847-6192 

www.amorix.com 



NEED MONEY??? LOANS 
FROM S100 TO $500 On- 

Line at www.calusfor- 
cash.com Call now 866- 
819-8169 Loans by County 
Bank, Rehoboth beach, DE 
Member FDIC. Equal Op- 
portunity Lender. 



NEED NEW M6RTGAGE? 

Behind on your t 
mortgage payment? 

Bankruptcy 

Foreclosure 

We can save your 

homelll 

Call the DEBT DOCTOR at 

C.M.S. 800-267-6726 



SELL YOUR STRUCTURED 

ANNUITY PAYMENTS. New 
laws allow you to sell your 
structured settlement pay- 
ments. Call the oldest com- 
pany in the business. Settle- 
ment Capital 800-959-0006. 



STOP FORECLOSURE!! 

Behind on mortgage? 

Don't File Bankruptcy 

Save your home. 

Guaranteed Service 

800-915-9704 Ext. 325. 
'U.S. Mortgage Assistance" 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 




Help Wanted 
tiill-Time 




Sat., May 18 



Events at Independence Grove 

16400 Buckley Road 

libertyville, IL 

Meet new people & earn citra money 

WORK ON THE BEACH & NO NIGHTS 

Ttic positions are for Bright, Smiling. 

and Hard working Individuals. Now 

hiring wall staff, counter, and conccss. 

help for our busy summer sexson. 
Weekends a mustl Can't make It— |ust 

drop us a note at 
|obs@c\tn tsatlndcpcndcnccgrow.com 

or 847-247-1 II 1 

If you (on'l hove fun-why come lo work? 



ffl MM I tlTll t tt tlll U f MMM 




ATTENTION] 




Work From Home 

Mall opdor business needs holpl 

$J00-$7,0G0/mo. 
' Full Training. Free Booklet. 

( 888-*l5-775a ) 

www.frccdomistodream.corn 



$1,000 WEEKLY POSSI- 
BLE. Mailing brochures from 
home. Easy. Free supplies. 
Genuine opportunity. 10800- 
749-5782 (24hrs.). 




STOP FORECLOSURE!! 
BEHIND on your mort- 
gage? Don't file Bankrupt- 
cy We can help you save 
your home. Guaranteed 
Service. 800-915-9704 Ext 
225 "U.S. Mortgage Assis- 
tance". 




Help 
Par 




■ ' 



BOOKEEPER 

Seeking reliable 

individual for full 

bookeeping duties of 

busy 3-branch company. 

Minimum 2 years 

bookeeping experience 

including knowledge of 

Quickbooks, A/P, A/R, 

customer invoicing, bank 

reconciliations, payroll, 

etc. Apx. 25-30 hours/wk. 

Gurnee location. 
References and resume 
' required. 

(847) 263-7929. 



Find I 







<&«?} 223,8 




CUSTOMER SERVICE/ 
MGR - PART TIME 

Four Seasons Storage 
in Libertyville Is seeking 
an individual with excel- 
lent customer service and 
computer skills. 
2 - 4 days per week 
$8.50 hour, no evenings 

Call Brian 
847-247-4440 



= 



, 



INTERESTED IN A 
PART-TIME JOB THIS 

SUMMER? 

Aqua Pool & Spa Pros Is 

looking for motivated, 

reliable individuals to fill 

immediate openings. 

Salary will be based on 

experience. 

Give us a call ® 

847-265-5280 

Ask for Brian 




LIKE TALKING ON THE 

_ PHONE? 
We have the job for you. 
' Now hiring part-time 
positions. Mon-Thurs., 
5pm-8:30pm. Sat. 9am- 
2pm. Base pay plus com- 
mission. Call Cara after 5pm 
(847)245-7500. 



Small company assem- 
bling electromechanical 
samples and prototypes is 
looking for steady part 

time help. 

Company, Is located In 

Wauconda 

Flexible hours. 
10 to 30 hours per week. 

Will train proper person. 

Call: 847-526-5031 

Ask for Chris 




Help Wanted 
full-Time 



$800 WEEKLY POTENTIAL 

mailing our sales letters 

from home. No experience 

, necessary. • FT/PT. Genuine 

opportunity. Free supplies. 

Call (708) 431-6800 (24 

hours). 






To Place An 



&ra>) 



;dkelan 



•^ 



L 



or Fax 



777LOOKING FOR 

SOMETHING NEW??? How 
about delivering Cars & 
R.V.'s Nationwide? Up to 
30K + Call free877-520- 

1007.X1001. 



AMERICA'S AIR FORCE 
jobs available in over 150 
specialties, plus: *Up to 
$18,000 Student Loan Re- 
paymenfHigh Tech Train- 
ing * Tuition Assiatance 
High School grads age 17- 
27 or prior service mem- 
bers from any branch, call 
1-800-423-USAF or visit 
www.alrforce.com U.S. 

AIR FORCE. 



ANNOUNCEMENT! HIRING 
FOR 2002. Postal posi- 
tions/federal hire $13.21- 
$24.50/hour. Full bene- 
tits/pd. Training/pd. Vaca- 
tion. No experience re- 
quired. 7:30am-11pm CST. 

1-888-726-9083x1700. 



AVON ENTREPRENEUR 
WANTED Must be willing 
to work whenever you 
want, be your own boss, 
and enjoy unlimited earn- 
ings, Let's talk (888)942- 
4053. 



BARTENDERS $250 PER 
SHIFT Potential ■ bartending 
in ' a fast paced environ- 
ment. No experience neces- 
sary. All shifts available. Call 
1-800-806-0084 ext. 201 



BARTENDERS $250 PER 
SHIFT Potential bartending 
in a fast paced environ- 
ment. No experience neces- 
sary. All shifts available. Call 

1-800-806-0084 ext. 201 



$$$$$WEEKLYI STAY-AT- 
HOME. PROCESSING 
HUD/FHA Mortgage Re- 
funds. No Exp. Req. FREE 
Information Call 1-800-449- 
4625 ext.7507 



DELIVERY DRIVER 

Wanted 6 days a week. 

Weekends a must. Great 

payl Must have good 

driving record. 

Apply at: 
Lovln' Oven Cakery 

Route 83... 

Just north of Rollins Rd. 

(In The Sweetwater 

Crossing Shopping 

Center). 



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CLASSIFIEDS 



May 1 7, 2002 



>;! 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 





Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



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Lakeland Newspapers Is looking for outgoing 
people whojirc looking for a great part-time Job. 

You will be selling classified advertising for 1 1 
different Lakeland Community Newspapers, The 
Great Lakes Bulletin & The. Market Journal. I 

Monday-Thursday 4:30-8:30pm 
Hourly rate«+ commission. 

For Intei 
call Li 

(847)223-8161 
ext. 191 




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DENTAL 

ASSISTANT 
Lake Forest Office 
has F/T opportunity 
for a dental assistant. 
Experience 
preferred, but will 
train right person. 

GREAT WORK PLACE 
TERRIFIC BENEFITS 

NO EVENINGS 

Call Nancy 

(847)234-6659 



DUKES AMERICAN 
GRILL 

is looking for waitstaff 

FT/PT. Cocktailers, and 

line cooks p.m. 

week-ends. 

847-526-0002 




up and join the 
cv/spapcr Sales Crews. 





pemmc mqmey 
szumq <wn jiswpa< 

SCHOOL/ WS MUG HOURS 




DRIVER - COVENANT 
TRANSPORT NOW OFFER- 
ING PER DIEM FOR EX 
PERIENCED TEAMS, 

SOLOS "AND TRAINERS. 
0/0 - SOLOS / TEAMS- 83c. 
CALL 1-888-MORE-PAY (1- 
808-667-3729. 




EASY WORK! 
NO EXPERIENCE - 

S500-S1 ,000 part-time at 

home stuffing envelopes. 

For free information send 

self-addressed, 

stamped envelope: 

R&J Enterprises 

Mailing Services, Inc. 

P.O. Box 402 
Ingleslde, III. 60041. 



FULL TIME AUTO 
MECHANIC 

for well established full service 
station. ASE certification a plus. 
Excellent opportunity tor a reli- 
able, dependable, self starting in- 
dividual. . 
ONLY SERIOUS INQUIRIES 

NEED TO CALL 

847-662-1050 
& R ft ft ft ft ft ft « 



DRIVER - OWN YOUR OWN 
TRUCK-NO MONEY DOWN, 
LOW WEEKLY PAYMENTS- 
L/P PLAN-'99 & '00 EA- 
GLES. COMPANY DRIV- 
ERS AND 00S. BOYD 
BROS. 800-543-8923. 







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Just call to 
subscribe to 



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MEDSA 



(84 7) 245- 7500 



O 
O 



DRIVER'S: MARTEN 

TRANSPORT, LTD. OTR 
DRIVERS NEEDEDI 33c 
PER MILE WITH 1 YEAR 
TRACTOR TRAILER EX- 
PERIENCE / CLASS A 
CDL REQUIRED. MEDICAL 
/ DENTAL / LIFE IN- 
SURANCE. NOW HIRING 
TEAMS II CALL TODAY AT 
1-800-395-3331 OR VISIT 
OUR WEB SITE 

WWW.MARTEN.COM. 

DRIVERS & 0/0'S EXPERI- 
ENCE FLATBEDI GREAT 

EARNINGSI PAID TWICE 
WEEKLY: NO FORCED DIS- 
PATCH; 100% 0/0; EQUIP- 
MENT AVAILABLE; 
FLEETS ' WELCOME: 
LEASE PURCHASE AVAIL- 
ABLE!! CRST / MALONE: 
800-490-5248. 



SALES 



WINDOW TREATMENT SALES 
NORTH & NORTHWEST SUBURBS 

EMPIRE HOME SERVICES Is 

the nation's largest shop-at- 
home carpet company, cur- 
rently operating In 15 stales & 
rapidly expanding across the 
nation. Our recently launched 
Window Treatment division Is 
continuing strong growth & we 
are looking for EXPERIENCED 
Sales Reps to join us. Backed 
by a strong industry leader & 
brand name products, our reps 
enjoy high closing percentage, 
greater Chicagoland travel & 
no Sundays. We provide all 
leads, commissions paid week- 
ly. Particular experience with 
in-home sales, window treat- 
ments or home products Is a 
plus. Want to earn more & trav- 
el less? Tired of lackluster earn- 
ings & long hours' 

Call 773-509-6956 
Fax resume to: 773-442-6559 

Or email: 

li.nvt8cmplrccarpct.coni 

REFER TO JOB CODE WTSLS 




GENERAL OFFICE/ 
DATA ENTRY 

Assist the Bookkeeper In 

Data Entry, Accounts 

Receivable and other 

duties. Small office variety. 

Full time permanent 

position. Full benefits. 

Send resume or apply 

in person: 

Lube Oils Inc. 
345 Skokic Hwy. 
Gurnec, IL 60031 

847-249-2330 



SE 



GO WITH A WINNER! 
CFI NOW HIRING COMPA- 
NY, OWNER OPERATOR, 
SINGLE AND TEAMSI ASK 
ABOUT OUR 2-WEEK 
SPOUSE TRAINING PRO- 
GRAM IN AUTOMATIC 
TRANSMISSION TRUCK. 
CALL 1-800-CFI-. DRIVE. 
WEBSITE: WWW.CFI- 

DRIVE.COM. 



POSTAL 



jobs 



GOVERNMENT 
JOBS 

$18.35/hr. Wildlife 

$21.60/hr. 

Paid training. Full benefits. No 

ex- 
perience necessary. Application 
and exam information. Toll free 
1- 

888-778-4266 ext. 151. 



O 




DRIVERS - 
READY TO 
PAYDAYS! 
CAB E-MAIL 
TATIONI 
SURANCE, 
CLASS "A 



ARE YOYU 
RUN? FRIDAY 
MILESI IN- 
2-DAY ORIEN- 
HEALTH IN- 
401 K! -OTR. 
' CDL RE- 



ESCAPE THE 
CORPORATE RAT RACE1 

Be Self-Employed. 

Mail-Order/Internet. One- 

on-One Training. Free 

Booklet. 

888-239-1494 



MOTIVATED HARD-WORKERS 

WANTED: Growing company 
seeking honest, career-minded 
employees with a positive atti- 
tude! Physical work that is 
mentally stimulating. Paint- 
ing/trades exp. perfected. 
COMP. SALARY, TRAINING 
AND BENEFITS. Please call 
847-362-5111. 







How T© 

Survive The 
Job Search 

By Nancy Sakol 









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Q m When is it lime to give up on contacting a company you 
■ have interviewed with? I have interviewed with several 
companies over the past 4 weeks. 1 am interested in working for 
two of the companies. Both of these companies offer the type of 
work environment thai attracts me and the positions being offered 
is the type of work I have experience in. I feel as though I am a 
good candidate for both. I sent out thank you notes to both par- 
ties yet I have heard nothing from cither. 1 placed several calls to 
them hoping to keep my name in the running. There have been a 
few times when I don't leave a message because I don't want to 
appear to be a pest. Should 1 continue to try to get in touch with 
them or docs it sound like a waste of time? A. B. (via E-mail) 

A m Keep in mind that in this economy, there may be dozens of 
■ persons ihcse companies are interviewing for this position! 
Some corporations will feel they have found their candidate and 
make an offer. Others may choose to check out all possible candi- 
dates before making a decision. There arc pros and cons to both. Of 
course if a company chooses a candidate, it could lake some lime 
to negotiate an offer, pre-employment screening and then the hope 
that the candidate they have chosen will actually accept the offer. If 
not, then the company usually goes back to the interview mode. 
Then there is the other side in which is the corporation wishes to 
explore all candidates before making any decisions. Depending on 
the amount of candidates applying for a position this process can 
lake a lot longer than the candidates want to wail. The company 
risks losing candidates who interviewed in the beginning. I have 
seen many companies come forward after a two month interview- 
ing process to select one of the original candidates, only to find that 
person has moved on to another position elsewhere, thus forcing 
the company to either choose a runner-up candidate or start the 
whole interviewing process over again. If your question is, arc you 
wasting your time on companies that arc not getting back to you . . 
. I will offer you this advice ... it is wise to send a follow-up letter 
or card as you did on both counts. It is also wise to try to contact 
the company within the first two weeks after the interview if you 
have not heard from them. This keeps you in the forefront. I would 
limit my repeal calls to. once every two weeks. To make repeated 
telephone calls only ge\s annoying and you don't want to be per- 
ceived as annoying in the interviewers mind. To hang up without 
leaving a message is just as bad due to the technology of Caller I.D. 
They will know you called and how many times. And a word of 
caution. Don't believe everything you hear about blocking your 
telephone calls. The facts would floor you if you are used to block- 
ing calls. Do not put all your eggs in one basket. Continue to look. 
Your sense of urgency to be employed may not be the same sense 
of urgency a company has to hire. Who knows, a position just as 
desintblc may be right around the comer. Should the opportunity 
arise that you gain employment elsewhere and then low and behold 
one of these two companies makes you an offer, then you will have 
an opportunity to weigh out your options. Don't wait around on the 
outcome. Good luck. 

Note: Nancy Sakol is President and CEO of 

Superior Personnel, Inc in Gurnec and Vernon Hills. 

Letters and resumes may be sent to Superior 

careers@aoi.com. You may also visit our website: 

www.superiorpersonnel.com 



QUIRED. 800-745-9670. 

DRIVERS: NORTH AMERI- 
CAN VAN LINES IS EX- 
PANDING THEIR FLATBED 
FLEET. NO PRIOR 

FLATBED EXPERIENCE 
NECESSARY. TRACTOR 
AND TRAILER DRIVING EX- 
PERIENCE REQUIRED. 
CALL 1-800-348-2147 

DEPTHS. 

• 

EASY WORK! GREAT pay! 
Earn $500 plus a week. 
Mailing circulars & assem- 
bling products at home. 1- 

800-267-3944 ext. 135. 

www.easywork-greatpay.com 



FINANCIAL SECRETARY 

Waukegan rnotorsports in 
need of financial secreatry. 
Previous sales and com- 
puter experience required. 
Evening and Saturdays re- 
quired. Non-smoking envi- 
ronment. Call 847-623- 
9196. 



FRIENDLY TOYS AND 
GIFTS has openings for 
party demonstrators & 
managers! Home Decor, 
Gifts, toys, Christmas. 
Earn cash, trips recogn- 
tlon. Free information. Cal 

1-800-488-4875. 

P/T TECH SUPPORT = $$$ 

Provide phone or onsite 
support. Join' free 

www.QuikTechUSA.com 



Lake County, IL CPA firm 

is looking for a recent 

college graduate with a 

degree in accounting. 

Candidates should be 

' interested in both auditing 

and tax practice. 

If you would like a position 

with a future, consider 

applying for this position. 

Applicants should send 

resumes and handwritten 

cover to: 

M. David Cain, Sr. 

Milburn Cain & Co. 

4237 Grove Avenue 

Gurnee, IL 60031 



I 



« 



Growing Lake County manufacturing co. has imme- 
diate opening for full time person. Duties include: 
loading trucks, stacking materials, shipping & 
receiving materials. Qualified individual must have 
communication skills and fork lift training certifi- 
cate. Excellent starting wage and benefits available 
for candidate with required job 
skills and reliable work history. 

Apply in person at: ■ A'-mbi Mns/^-r v 

Air-Drivc, Inc., 
4070 Ryan Road, 
Gurnec, IL 60031 ^Mflnauufv 



Lake County, IL CPA firm 
is looking for a senior/su- 
pervisor level accountant. 
Candidates should be inter- 
ested in both auditing and 
tax practice. If you would 
like a responsible position 
with partnership potential 
and are tired of travel or 
high stress work, consider 
applying for this position. 
Applicants should send 
resumes and handwritten 

cover letter to: 

M. David Cain, Sr. 

Milburn Cain & Co. 

4237 Grove Avenue 

Gumee, IL 60031 







AUTO SERVICE TEACHER 
AND TEACHER AIDE. 

F-T Begin August 16, 
2002. M-F Significant 
work exp. In auto service 
field. ASE Cert. & teach- 
ing exp. preferred. 
Call Jeff Brierton, Assist. 
Dir. for Personnel & 

Admin. Serv., 

(847) 223-6681 , ext. 

6002, fax resume to Tech 

Campus, (847) 223-7363. 





Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time" 



m^ 



LET THE GOVERNMENT 

start your business. Grants, 
loans, Hud tracers S800/wk. 
Free incorporation. Free 
merchant account. Free 
credit card processing soft- 
ware. Send SASE to: Gov't 
Publications, 1025 Connecti- 
cut Ave. NW Suite 1012 
Dept. S, Washington, D.C. 
20036. 1-800-306-0873. 

www.capitalpublications.com 








Great Pay, 

Good Benefits. 

Shift & 

Weekend 

Differential! 



victory Lakes has Ire fofcwing posfons 
available for dedcated. hardwrking peo- 
pe in our bng term care facity and our 
refan^caTTmunty. 

Maintenance Assistant 
Transportation: Ful 6rre, 80 hours, day 
shft CDL fcense wUh V endorsement 

Transport residents wthh a 1Smb 
radius to ar^ointmerte. shopping, etc 

Previous experience wffli seniors pre- 
ferred. 

Floor Care: Ful Brno, days. Previous floor 
care e>perfence preferred to include buff- 
ing, waxing, use ofcherrieds and taoM- 
e^ofeqirpment 

Ful benefits package avaSabe i you work 
at feast 40 hours In a 2 week period; con- 
tact us to bam more about our NEW shift 
dBerenfiaL 

Please apply In person at 
our Continuing Care Center 

1055 Grand Avenue 

(just cast of Deep Lake Rd) 

Lindcnhurst, IL 

or call: 847-356-4551 
FAX: 847-3564599 

ehanna@vistahealth.com 

EOE 



Retail 

GREA 
OPPORTUNI- 
TIES 

Wolf Camera, is hiring FT 
sales and Lab Associates 
to join our Gurnee loca- 
tion. Candidates should 

be 
energetic and love work- 
ing with the public. Experi- 
ence 
in sales and/or 
photography is a plus but 
not a requirement. 
Competetive pay and 
excellent FT benefits 
Including associate 
discounts. Please apply 
in person or call (847)856- 
1823. EOE 

WOLF 
CAMERA 

www.wolfcamerB.com 



STAY CLOSE TO Homell 
For 1 YEAR EXPERIENCE 
makeS .35/mile RUNNING 

REGIONAL! More experi- 
ence pays- morel Home 
every 5-7 days, Great 
milesl HEARTLAND EX- 
PRESS 1-8-4414953 

www.heartlandex- 
press.com. 




Summer counselor 
positions available! 

* 

For those who enjoy 
working in an outdoor 

environment with 
children ages 6-15, this 
Job is for youl Programs 
cover art, drama, sports, 
and nature. Call 
Girl Scouts- 
Illinois Crossroads 
Council 
1-847-573-0500 
ext. 2606 or e-mail 
tbuyle @ ilcrossroads.org 
tor more information. 




New Year . . . New Career! 

Receplion/Med AssL . . . .$lG/hr 

Corporate Collection $25K 

H.R. Admin $35-$38K 

Restaurant Mgr ...... .$27K 

Buyer/Asst $30K 

Telemarketing $8-9/hr 

Banking/Branch Mgr ...$38K 

Superior Personnel 
847-548-0016 

mwmwwmm' 



*•,-• 




Mechanics/Boat 
& Motor Riggers 
Immed Openings/Mis- 
souri. Immed Oppty for 

. Boat 
& Outboard Riggers, De- 

tailers & Mechanics. Mar- 
ine 
certification pref'd, but will 
train w/righl exp. Lg Mid- 
west retailer. FfT yr round 
employment. Smithville 
Marine, Joann, Smithville, 

MO 
816-532-4000 



""V" *"'"" * 






Want to Save 
BigBuclcs?? 

LAKELANDS 

CLASSIFIEDS 

CAN HELP YOU FIND 

THE RIGHT 

EMPLOYEES FAST!! 

TO PLACE YOUR JOB 

OPPORTUNITIES IN 

OUR CLASSIFIED 

SECTION, JUST CALL 

MONDAY-FRIDAY, 

8AM-5PM. 
(847) 223-8161 or 

Fax 
(847) 223-2691 




I KM*. 

I 

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i 

i 



. 




Teacher 



r 




Medical 
Opportunities 



; P-T Begin August 16, 2002. J 
• "M-K Significant work exp. j 
if In machine trades field, i 






i Teaching exp. preferred. 4i 
J Call Jeff Brierton, \ 

\ Assist. Dir. for Personnel \ 
\ & Admin. Sera, \ 

j (847)223-6681, J 

i 

i 

-::': ! l 

:•! 
i 
• 










The Village at Victory Lakes 
fceriated Liiiiij; Cuitu Li .slcK 



| ext. 6002, fax resume to 
Tecb Campus, 

(847)223-7363. 



■■■;- : : 



m 



■ I 



I 




Management, Assistant Management 

Positions Available. 

Full Time & Part-Time Positions Too! 



In^ Certified Nursing Assistants. 
We have one full time evening, 
and one full time day position 
available for persons certified 
in Illinois. 

Full Ix'nefits package available 
if you work at least -10 hours in 
a two week period; contact us 
to learn more about our NEW 
shift differential 

Please apply in person at 
our Continuing Care Center 

1055 Grand Avenue 

(just ca$t of Deep Lake Rd) 

Lindcnhurst, IL 

or call: 847-356-1551 

FAX: 847-356-4599 
chanria®vlstahcaIth,cont 



Great benefits, 401k, competitive salary. 

Looking for individuals who like a 

challenge and a fun place to work! 

Call Dave: 847-625-8080 
or Mike: 847-549-6565 



People who read 

IAKELAND MEDIA 

are 




It all starts with Newspapers 



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May i 7, 2002 



CLASSIFIEDS 



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Lakeland Newspaper I B21 




HclpWanted 
Full-Time 




Help. Wanted 
Full-Time 




, Help Wanted : 
Full-Time 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 






Management, Assistant Management 

Positions Available. 

Full Time & Part-Time Positions Too! 

Great benefits, 40lk, competitive salary. 

Looking for Individuals who like a 

challenge and a fun place to work! 

Call Dave: 847-625-8080 
or Mike: 847-549-6565 




College 



FAIR 



ake County, 
















• Salary plus Comm. 

• Health Ins 

• Denial Ins. 

• Disability & life 

• 401K 

• Gas allowance 

• Cell phone allowance 

• Must have car 







Send resume to: 
David Sherman 
Display Adv. Manager 
c/o Lakeland Media 
30 S. Whitney St. 
Grayslake, IL 60030 
-or- 
slierman@lakelanclmeclia.co 






nnro 






i \ 



1 1 




SUBSTITUTE 

IDIIRIECTOm.Y 




^0 

The following schools need sub- 
stitutes on a continuing basis, 
please contact the names listed 
below for further information. 




Bachelor's Deg 







Aptakistic - Tripp School District #102 

1231 Wciland Road, Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 
Contactlynn Turk J .(847) 353-5670 

Fremont School District #79 

28855 N. Fremont Center Road, Mundclein, IL 6006( 
Contact: District Office (847) 566-0169 

Grayslake School District #46 

625 N. Barron Blvd., Grayslake, IL 60030 

Contact: Jan Fabry .'.(847) 223-3650 

Grayslake Community High School 

400 North Lake Street, Grayslake, IL 60030 
Contact: Marilyn Grace xl 132 (847) 223-8621 

Lake Forest Elementary Schools 

95 W. Dcerpath, Lake Forest, IL 60045 

Contact: Karen Allie ,. (847) 604-7423 

Lake Villa School District #41 

131 McKinlcy, Lake Villa, IL 60045 

Contact: Kathy (847) 356-2385 

North Chicago Community Unit School 

District #187 

2000 Lewis Ave., North Chicago, IL 60064 

Contact: Dr. Heinz (847) 689-8150 

Wauconda School District #118 

555 N. Main Street, Wauconda, IL 60084 

Contact: Lorric Hernandez (847) 526-7690 

Waukegan Public Schools District #60 

1201 N.Sheridan Road., Waukegan, IL 60085 
Contact: 1IR Department (847) 360-5404 

Winthrop Harbor School District #1 

500 North Avcnue.Winthrop Harbor, IL 60096 
Contact: Dist. Office (847) 731-3085 

Zion-Benton Township High School #126 

One Z-B Way, 21 & Kenosha Rd, Zion, IL 60099 
Contact: Lori Kreye (847) 746-1202 









.■-; 









'\ 




^» *^ 



*« * • 



. - . . . . '• ■■ %*•• 



MAY 30, 2002 1 I'M - ftlWl 



Learning Resources, an 
award-winning educational 
company, will be conducting 
interviews for. 
•Administrative Assistant 
Supervisor 
•Marketing Manager 
•Public Affairs/Advertising 

Manager 

•Editorial Director 
•Production Artist 
•General Warehouse 
Visit our booth at the College of take 
County, Grayslake Campus on May 
.Win. If unable to attend Job fair, 
please send resume to: 

lobs@lcarnlngnsourccs.com 

Fax: 847-816-5066. Learning 

Resources Is an Equal Opportunity 

Employer, website: 

learningresources.com 





Medical 
Opportunities 




Medical 
Opportunities 






\J> 



- 




■-* 



L?LToven to 
hiring 



J1URSES 

RITS 6 UMTS for 
Home health . 

F/T or P/T fill shins. 

Hex scheduling. 

Private Duty. 

Benefits for F/T. 

nmemenn 
Home health 

1-800-872-4427 



Great Pay, 

Good Benefits. 

Shift & 

Weekend 

Differential! 







ETA Culscnalrc will 

beconductlng interviews for 

MARKETING ASSISTANT 

GENERAL WAR EHOU SE 

SR COPYWRITER 

IT MANAGER 

Visit our booth at the College of lake 

Count); Grayslake Campus on May 

30th. If unable to attend job fair, 

please send resume to 

FAX: 847-816-5066. Email: 

jobs®ctacuIscnalrc.com. 

Website: ctaculscnalrc.com 



headaches 
faster 

leading 

foraund. 



Most 

Lake/and 

Media 

advertisers 

have reported 

that their ads 
in Lake/and 
Media often 

draw a better 

response than 

their ads in 
other papers. 

Try it for your- 
self and see. 

(847) 
223-8161 



Healthcare 

PHYSICAL 
THERAPIST 

• 

Immediate FT position lor 
our Gurnee outpatient or- 
thopaedic center. Outgo- 
ing, energetic individual 
receives comp. salary, 
flexible hours & benes. 
New grads welcome. 
FCE's a must. Will train if 
necessary. Call 

HealthSouth 

Robin Flory 

30 Tower Court Ste A 

Gurnee, IL 60031 

I Phone 847-336-7468 
Fax 847-336-3923 




MEDIA 



Manufacturing Hfc ' 

IRRADIATOR OPERATOR 

Worldwide Sterilization Company with 

a branch In Gurnee has an immediate 

opening for a Gamma Irradiator 

Operator. Reliable self-starter will be 

responsible for system operation, 

safety, verification of product count & 

quality, forkllfl, documentation & 

process control. PC skills & flexible 

work schedule. $11 .OQ/lir to start. 

Full benefit package, bonuses & 

opportunity for advancement. 

IRA, 1003 lakeside Dr., Gurnee, IL 

60031. Fax: (847) 855-6123. Email: 

nonnanp®sdaumtwrj^slcriBenlcs.com 
No phone calls. E0E M/W 



CNA'S 

PART-TIME, FULL-TIME 

AND LIVE-IN 

CAREGIVERS NEEDED 

FOR HOME CARE 

CASES. 

AVALON HEALTH 

SERVICES 

847-223-3341 



Victory Lakes has the following posi- 
tions available for dedicated, hard- 
working people in our long term care 
facility arid our retirement community. 
LPN/STAFF RN: Full time, part time, 
and per diem. Evening and night posi- 
tions available; must bo licensed in 
Illinois. 

CNAs: Full time, part time and per 
diem Day. evening and night positions 
available. 

DIRECTOR OF RESIDENT CARE: 
Full time, night shift Must have va'id 
RN license and CPR certification; 3 
years management experience in a 
long-term care setting preferred 
ACTIVITIES ASSISTANT: Full time, 
9am-5:30pm. Assist in planning, orga- 
nizing and directing resident activities. 
Previous experience in a long-term car 
setting preferred. Ability to work well 
with dementia residents required. 



Full benefits package availablo if you 
work at least 40 hours in a 2 week peri- 
od; contact us to learn more about our 
NEW shin differential. 

Please apply In person at 

our Continuing Care Center 

1055 Grand Avenue 

()ust cast of Deep Lake ltd) 

Undcnhurst, IL 

or call: 847-356-4551 

FAX: 847-356-4599 
channa@vist.ihealth.com 

EOE 





Medical 
Opportunities 







■ - 1 > 




HELP 

POTRZEBNE PANIE DO PRACY W DOMU STARCO'W 

*.■■■:.* 

PRZYUCZYMY DO ZAWODU. DZWON' PO INFORMACJE 



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POD NUMER (847) 546-5300. PROSIC AGATE. 

CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANTS 



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HILLCREST NURSING CENTER IS COMMITTED TO THE 
HIGHEST LEVEL OF CARE FOR OUR RESIDENTS. IF YOU 
ARE UNHAPPY WITH YOUR CURRENT POSITION, PLEASE 
COME IN AND MEET WITH OUR STAFF AND RESIDENTS 
AND LET US SHOW YOU OUR WONDERFUL FACILITY 



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HDILILC1R11EST " BJURSilN© CENTER 



ALAN ROSENBAUM 
CIRCUIT DRIVE/ROUND LAKE BEACH, 

(847) 546-5300 




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Hospital 





D 



System 






i 

We are more than a healthcare provider; we are a team of professionals working 
together to serve our patients and their families; we are one heart and soul serving our 
community though our multiple locations; and we want you to join usl We are looking 
for dedicated professionals to join our team at Kenosha Medical Center and the all-new 
St. Catherine's Medical Center opening this summer. We have opportunities for: 

i 
» 

Registered Nurses • €<£i Nurses • OR Nurses 



Surgical Techs 



Language Patholog 




Medical Techs • BioMedical Technici 



Respiratory 



Radiology 



Techs 



NAs • LPNs • Urals Secreta 



We offer a competitive salary, excellent 
benefit package and most importantly, an 
opportunity to work with the leading 
healthcare system in Kenosha County. 
Send your resume to United Hospital 
System, Human Resource Department, 
6308 Eighth Avenue, Kenosha, Wl 53143. 
Phone (262)656-21 16 Fax (262)653-5780 
Email H R@uhsi.orR 








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CLASSIFIEDS 




Medical 
Opportunities 



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SAINT MARY'S 
. . . What Mailers 



Sl. Mary's Hospital In Saginaw, MI Is a 
268'bcu tertiary fadllty w/slgniflcanl 
satellite & outpatient activities how 
moving Into Centers of Advanced 
Medicine In key service lines a major 
regional referral center for cardiac, 
neurological, trauma, burn & cancer 
center. 

Director of Quality Resources 
We seek an exp'd & creative Masters 
level Nurse to lead & reshape the mis- 
sion of the Dept. of Quality Resources. 
Dept. manages Quality Improvement, 
Cite Mgmi, Quality Assurance, 
Utilization Review, Infection Control, 
Clinical Data Mgmi & JCAHO readi- 
ness. Organization Is evolving a case 
mgmt approach & new director has 
responsibility for shaping this effort. 
Must have 5 or more yrs case mgmi 
exp plus progressive leadership roles 
& exp In quality resources & exp fn a 
matrix-managed organization. 

Nurse Manager Orthopedics 
Energetic Individual to spearhead die 
leadership of the Orthopedic Nursing 
& the 3I'bed orthopedic unit, collab- 
orating w/a dynamic team of Nurse 
Mgrs. Slate of Mich. Registered Nurse 
lie. & BSN reifd, Masters degree 
desired. 3-5 yrs progressive mgmt 
exp, demonstrated leadership & com- 
miinicalloii skills, outcome focused. 

Progressive Step-Down 
17-bed unit. BSN, Masters desired 
w/al least 2 yrs acute care leadership 
exp, operational efficiency, customer 
service/satisfaction & highly devel- 
oped interpersonal & learn building 
skills. 

Human Resources Consultant 
Human Resources Generallst w/5+ 
yrs exp. Bachelors degree in a related 
field rcu/d. Musi demonstrate knowl- 
edge of a broad range of HR func- 
tions, processes & procedures. Exc 
Interpersonal skills necessary to con- 
sult & advise leadership. Analytical & 
problem solving skills a must. 
Imaging/Radiology 
SIGN ON RONUS! F/T & P/T POSI- 
TIONS AVAIL, ALL SHIFTS! 'Sonogra- 
pher (Ullrasound)-Grad of Allied 
1 1 call 1 1 & Education accredited sonog- 
raphy program. Certified by ARDMS In 
OU/Gyn, abdomen & vascular tech- 
nology. •Radlographer-Grad of AMA 
approved school of radiologic tech- 
nology, ARRT registered or registry 

dig- 
Also Available in Radiology 

•Nuclear Medicine Technologist-Grad 
of a Nuclear Science accredited col- 
lege program. Registered &/or certi- 
fied by ARRT (n), CNMT or be registry 
elig. At least I yr exp as a Nuclear 
Medicine Technologist desirable. 
•Computer Tomography (CT) 
Technologist-Grad of accredited 
Radiologic technology program 
w/tralnlng in CT scanning. AART reg- 
istered in Radiology, AART registered 
or registry elig. In CT. 

Pharmacist 
BS or PharmD, Ml pharmacy lie. & 
controlled substance lie. req'd. Flex 
scheduling options, decentralized 
clinical services. Training avail for 
candidates w/no previous bospilal 
exp. F/T & P/T positions avail. 
Saint Mary's offers competitive wages 
it an exc bnfts pkg that Includes no 
cost full family medical & dental cov- 
erage & matching 4()3b. 




S150K PER YEAR Whole- 
sale Travel Business. 
Travel Agents Call you! 
Protected territory .Prbv- 
enTraining/Support Excel- 
lent Benefits. 13 Years in 
Business. S25K Invest- 
ment. 800-729-9051 

www.leisureresource.com 

.■ ' 

ATTENTION: NATIONAL 
PRE-FAB COMPANY SEEK- 
ING AREA DEALERS11- 
Construction / Sales. Ex- 
perince an asset! Excel- 
lent Income Opportunity!!, 
S5.000 investment. De- 
tails: 1-888-755-2538 



BE FINANCIALLY INDE- 
PENDENT Minnesota com- 
pany needs honest, de- 
pendable person. Restock 
retail/commercial accounts 
with name brand products. 
4-6hrsAvk. Earn S50.000 po- 
tential. S8.900 investment. 
Good credit. Financing avail- 
able. 1-800-463-6678. 



EARN EXTRA MONEY dis- 
tributing pharmaceutical- 
grade herbal supplements 
from a worldwide leader. 
To get an info packet or 
more information, cali 1- 
800-869-4640 or connect 
to www.himalayausa.com. 




. 



Business 
Opportunities 



EMBROIDERY 

& 

DIGITIZING 

All Equipment & Clients. 

You can bo as busy as 

you want to boll 

Ownerretlrlng. 

$39,000. 
(847)548-5511. 



ESTABLISHED VENDING 
COMPANY FOR SALE. All 

machines, accounts, parts & 
inventory. Serious inquiries 
only (847) 497-3284 after 
5pm. 

IF WE COULD SHOW YOU 

HOW TO MAKE AN 

EXTRA S300-S1000/MO 

WORKING 3-10HRS 

A WEEK. 

Would you be interested? 

www.mypctowork.com 




Child Care ' 



DAYCARE OPENINGS, ALL 
ages, Grayslake area, rea- 
sonable rates. (847) 

543-4238. 

GURNEE MOM Loving 
mother will care for your 
child or children in a fun, lov- 
ing, safe home, full and part- 
time positions available. Lo- 
cated near 41 and Grand 
Ave. (847) 625-831 6. 

NORTH BARRINGTON/IS- 
LAND LAKE openings for inf- 
ants/pre-schoolers In my 
home. (847) 516-4281, Kel- 
ly. : 




School/Instruction 



ESPANOL 

Spanish tutor. 

Grades 5th-8th. 

Call Gisollo 
(847)331-1382. 



LEARNING TO READ CAN 
CHANGE YOUR LIFEI 

'Professional tutoring 

services. 

' 'Adults and children 

welcome. 

•English as a second 

language. 

•Reading, comprehension, 

grammar, phonics, writing 

skills. 
•Test prep/vocabulary 
enrichment/I SAT. 
Available days and even- 
ings. 
Very reasonable ratesl 
Mrs. Jordan. 

(847) 473-3686. 




Bazaars/Crafts 




J402: Instructions fora Granny 

Square, Pineapple stitch, or 

Striped afghan to crochet. 

Crochet 1/2 circle hearth rug or 

table runner. Also in full color is a 

see stitch or tumblin ribbon 
ofghan to knit Clear instructions. 
5 afghans, table runner & rug. A 
great value. This pattern is $3.15 
plus $1.50 shippings handling. 




Make Checks Payable To: 
Reader Mail, Dept. 56101 

Box 520, Ludington, Ml 49431 

Print name, adress, zip, 
pattern number and sizl , 

VISA 4 MASTERCARD mm 
numiff A tipiralion daU. 





Building Materials 



LAMINATE FLOORING, DI- 
AMOND PLATE, PRAIRE 
PINE, NEVER opened, in- 
cludes, padding, glue and 
spacer, 75sq.ft, $150. 

(847)587-3217. 




Building Materials 



i 




Garage 
Rummage Sale 



MUST SELL!! STEEL 

BUILDINGS. Choose from - 

30x48, 40x48, 40x120, 
80x128, 100X105, 

100x208. IDEAL FOR ALL 
USES. HUGE DIS- 

COUNTS11 SPRING / SUM- 
MER DELIVERY 1-800-866- 
2784. ,, ;Ih 



;.re 




Firewood 



OAK FIREWOOD FOR 
SALE. (815) 385-3854 
Johnsburo. 

Garage 
Rummage Sale 





GARAGE SALE MAY 18 & 

19, Nimitz Housing, 4135-B 
Skipjack Ct. Clothes, toys, 
lots of misc. Reese 20K 5th 
Wheel hitch, exc. cond., 

S350. (847)689-8348. 

GARAGE SALE FRI. 5/17, 
9am-6pm; Sat. 5/18, 9am- 
4pm; Sun. 5/19, 9am-3pm. 
26813 85th SL, Salem, 
Wise. (Hwy 50 W past 83, 
turn left on Hwy. F, follow 
around log home on legt). 
Several families involved. 
Quality ladies clothes, very 
Ig. mens clothes, loads of 
knick-knacks, kitchen pro- 
ducts, baskets, ' Halo- 
ween/Christmas items, 
some antiques, dresser, 
stereo, TV, much more. 

GARAGE SALE FRI. 5/17, 
Sat. 5/18, Sun. 5/19. 605 
Monterrey Terrace, McHen- 
ry. Gas oven, new 8x10 
shed, in box, toilet fixtures & 
lots more. 

GRAYSLAKE SIX FAMILY 
GARAGE SALE Thurs. 
5/16, Fri. 5/17, Sat. 5/18, 
9am-3pm. Good quality and 
name brand clothing, sizes 
infant to teen. Women's 
clothing, all sizes. Furniture, 
Little Tykes, household, 
bike. West Trail Subdivision 
(West of Lake St. on 
Washington, left on Haryan 
Farms, right on West Trail, 
left onLaurie Ct. 

GURNEE BRIDLEWOOD 
SUB. 10th Annual Garage 
Sale. Over 40 homes. May 
16th -18th., 8am-4pm. 
Enter off Grand Ave. at 
Hutchlns or Brldlewood 
Ave. Sponsored by Balrd 
& Warner Real Estate. 
Look for our signs. 

GURNEE STONEBROOK 
CROSSINGS SUBDIVISION 
SALE, May 16th-1 8th 
9am - 4pm New Sales Daily. 
Grand & Stonebrook Dr. 

HAINESVILLE GARAGE 
SALE Furniture, lamps, 
stuff. Sat. 5/18, 9am-5pm. 
202 Centennial Dr. (Cranber- 
ry Lakes Sub). 



HUGE MOVING/GARAGE 
FRIDAY ONLY 5-17 114 

High Point, Roundlake, oak 
dining set, queen bedset, 
dressers, microwave, file 
cabinet, rocking chair & 
LOTS MOREI (847) 

546-5961 SALE 



INTERLAKEN RIDGE & IN- 
TERLAKEN WILLOWS Two 
Subdivision Garage Sale. 
May 16 & 17, 9am-4pm. 
May 18, 9am-12 noon. Off 
Butterfield & Winchester in 
Libertyville. 



MAY16-18TH9AM-5PM 
386 BRITTAIN GRAYS- 
LAKE(west of Lake street 
south of 120) Collectibles, 
furniture, x-mas, floral glass- 
ware.(847) 543-1178 



MOVING SALE ANTIQUES, 
furniture, knick-knacks, eve- 
rything must go. Thurs. 
5/16, Fri. 5/17, Sat. 5/18., 
9am-4pm. 25321 W. Chica- 
go Ave., Ingleside (near 
Long Lake train station) 
look for signs. . 



MOVING SALE SAT. 5/18, 
Sun. 5/19, 9am-3pm. 353 
Sagebrush Circle, Round 
Lake. 



AFTER YOU'VE HAD YOUR 
BIG SALE, and there is still 
things that just did not go.... 
Call us at LAKELAND News- 
papers and run it under the 
'FREE or Giveaways" classi- 
fied column. FREE ADS are 
NO CHARGE! (847) 
223-8161, ext. 191. . 



NEIGHBORHOOD SALE 
STARTS OFF IN WAUCON- 
DA Lakeland Estates 
12 houses 
FRI 5=17 
Sat5-18 

Anderson Rd between Rts 
59&176 Furn., Jet ski, de- 
signer clothes, home decor, 
housewares, Hargrove Art 
and MUCH MORE. (847) 
526-8343. 



VENDORS WANTED 

New FLEA Market 

Opening soon in Antloch 

Spaces inside and out. 

Call (815) 363-0233. 

WADSWORTH GARAGE 
SALE 14145 Oak Knoll Rd. 
(from Wadsworth & Delany 
N. to Oak Knoll). Years of 
knick-knacks, dishes, lamps, 
some furniture, clothes, 
chest freezer. Sat. 5/18, 
Sun. 5/19, 9am-3pm. 







Horses & Tacks 



BEAUTIFULLY COLORED 
REG. PAINT YEARLING. 
Imprinted, calm, easy to 
work with. Asking $2,500. 
Call Sandy (847) 587-1979. 

PAINTS & QUARTER 
HORSES, all types avail- 
able, over 70 head. (815) 
378-9310. 

REGISTERED 4 TENNES- 
SEE WALKING HORSES, 2 
Mares 10 and 11 years 
old, 2 Geldings 5 and 6 
years old, Priced to sell, 

847-625-0459, (608) 

524-21 60, evenings. 



Household Goods 
hurniture 




BED QUEEN MATTRESS 

set, new never used, in plas- 
tic, $210. Delivery and 
frame available. (847) 

955-9986. 



BRAND NEW QUEEN SIZE 

LUXURY PILLOW TOP 

MATTRESS SET. Super 

thick & comfortable. Retail 

value $1,019, sell $249. 

Can deliver. (847) 
687-5030. 

CARPET SALE 30% OFF 
ALL CARPET. We install 
next day. Free estimates. 
Nobody can beat our prices. 

LUIGI'S CARPET (847) 
740-41 73. 



COMPUTER 
WALNUT 

42"wx24"dx77"h. 
$1,200, asking 
(847) 265-5266. 



ARMOIRE, 

finish, 

Originally 

$600/best. 



CRATE FURNITURE SET 
(This End Up), long couch, 2- 
chairs, 2-sets pillow covers, 
clean, good condition, 

$275.(847)395-1570. 

DININGROOM TABLE & 
chairs (no leafs), credenza 
& buffet, oak kitchen table & 
credenza, formica table. Call 
Rose (847) 740-4091, 
10am-7pm. 



DO YOU NEED TO 
SELL AN INEXPEN- 
SIVE ITEM FOR 
$100 OR LESS? 
GET YOUR AD IN THE 
11 "LAKELAND" HOME 
TOWN PAPERS, THE 
GREAT LAKES 
BULLETIN 
& 
THE MARKET JOURNAL 

FOR ONLY $6 PER WEEK 

BY CALLING 

(847)223-8161 

ASK FOR LISA. 

EXT. 191 



FIVE PIECE WALL UNIT. 

TV armoire, lighted book- 
case, lighted glass unit 
w/drawers, 2 corner shelf 
units. Oak & oak veneer. 
By Basset. Mission style. 
Beautiful!! Asking $1,800. 

For info, call (847) 548- 
2091.' ^ 



FOR SALE, TYPEWRITER 
STAND, ELECTRIC TYPE- 
WRITER, TWIN BED 
FRAME, SOME KITCHEN 
DISHES AND LAMPS. (847) 
855-0019. 



GRANDMA'S DINING 

TABLE AND BUFFET, 
BEAUTIFUL EARLY Ameri- 
can style, maple table, in- 
cludes 3 leaves, 4 pads, 
buffet has lots of storage, 

S800. 847-209-8982. 






■ i ,. 







Household Goods 

■ 

Furniture 





LIKE NEW COUNTRY DI- 
NINGROOM SET, . table 
w/leaf, 6 high back chairs, 
buffet w/glass door, lighted 
hutch. Priced low $1,000. 

(847) 526-4689. 



o.*_ 



MAKE YOUR CLASSIFIED 
ADVERTISING EVEN MORE 
EFFECTIVE with a FREE 
classified . listing at 

www.lakeil.com 
<http://www.lakeii.com>. 
Lake County's NEW web 
site. • 

OAK BEDROOM SET FOR 
SALE (2) 2-drawer night- 
stands, dresser w/3-draw- 
ers, 2-cabinets & lighted mir- 
ror, armoire style chest w/2- 
drawers. Retail price $1,400, 
asking $700. Please call 

Kris (847) 291-0030. 






■ 



ROUND BIRD CAGE, 45in. 
high, w/accessorles, $8.00; 
old wooden 4-person toba- 
gan, $10; 2 microwaves, 
small, $10, medium, $15, 
hardly used; 2 air condition- 
ers, small, used twice, $25, 
1 -large older model, $40. 

(847) 587-0142 leave mes- 
sage. 

SIMMONS 6 DRAWER 
WHITE DOUBLE DRESS- 
ER, & mirror unit. Great for 
little girls room, $300/best. 
(847)548-2091. 

* 

THREE PIECE COFFEE 
TABLE, 2 matching lamps, 
3/mo. old, $330; 3-twin 
headboards, $15/ea; new 
leather jackets, mens size 
Ig. & med., woman's small, 
S20/ea; " Camel seats, 
$100/ea.; Sony PlayStation 
II, $260, games separate; 
Nintendo, $65; games & ac- 
cess.; PlayStation games & 
access., only $25; Sega Sat- 
urn, $60; w/6 games & ac- 
cess; Super Nintendo, $50; 
4 games; Sega Genesis 
$45; i 10 games; Hardly 
used, like new. (847) 
546-2337. 



SOFA burgundy velour, 
Queen Ann, 6/mo. old, 
$350 or make offer. (847) 
746-7561 . 




Lawn/Garden 



LANDSCAPING MULCH, 
ANY AMOUNT, $ 10.00 per 
cubic yard loaded on your 

truck $ 18.00 per cubic yard, 
delivered. (847) 395-8877. 

MARIGOLDS 72 PLANTS, 

$9.95; Impatiens, Begonias, 
48 plants, $11.95. Hanging 
baskets. Geraniums. Veget- 
able plants. All pets, unruly 
children and grouchy spous- 
es must remain in the car. 

Ludyjan (262) 547-0682. 



. 



MUNGLE'S 

LANDSCAPING 
WEDOITALLII 

•Weed & Edge . 
Flower Beds 
•Tree & Hedge Trimming 
•Mulch 
•Power Wash or 
Staining, Decks & Fenc- 
es •Tilling, Small Flower 
Beds & Gardens 
•Spring Clean Up. 

(847) 826-9619, 

home (815) 344-2279, 

pager (847) 333-7383 

"FIREWOOD 

AVAILABLE." 



USED LAWN MOWERS 
$40 & up. 3 Roto tillers. 
8hp. elect, start riding mow- 
er, $225. (847) 740-2415 

after 6pm. 



WOODS RM-59 3 point fin- 
ish mower. Very Good Con- 
dition. $650. 847-973-9793. 




Clothing 



FULL LENGTH BLACK 

SEAL SKIN, M/L, 

$200/best. (847) 566-0990. 



LADIES BLACK FRINGED 
BRUSHED leather Harley 
jacket, small 8, like new, 

$125.(847)973-8210 



WHITE WEDDING DRESS, 

size 12, paid $300, will set- 
tle for $150/best. (847) 

973-1291. 



Mdy it Zbbh 




Miscellaneous 




Musical 
Instruments 



DO YOU NEED TO SELL 

THAT INEXPENSIVE PTEM 

FOR $100 OR LESS. 

GET YOUR AD IN THE 

11 HOME TOWN PAPERS 

THE 

GREAT LAKES 

BULLETIN 

& 

THE MARKET JOURNAL 

FOR ONLY $5 PER WEEK 

BY CALLING. 

(847)223-8161 

EXT 191 
ASK FOR LISA. 

NASCAR MAILBOXES, 

MOST numbers, $60-$75. 
also Harley's. (847) 

223-0433. 

MASTECTOMY PRODUCTS 

LOOK better in fashion- 
able, new lightweight 
forms & swimwear. Great 
new bras. Medicare billed 
direct. 1-800-755-7880. 

FREE CATALOG 
or 

buy on-line @ www.libera- 
torfashions.com . 

* + 

DID TOU TAKE FEN-PHEN/ 
PONDIMIN/REDUX? There 
is a REAL POSSIBILITY 
you are eligible for 
$250,000 in Compensa- 
tion. Call Toll Free 1-877- 
851-9765 



FOR SALE OR GIVE AWAY 
" ELECTRONIC ORGANS Vin- 
tage Hammond and popu- 
lar Lowrey will be given 
away to worthy church or 
civic group. Both need work. 
Collectors can acquire either 
or both on a "Best Offer" ba- 
sis. Use as musical instru- 
ment or furniture. Ham- 
mond has dual consoles 
with steps. Call (847) 546- 
3217 after 6pm. 



$3,200 WEEKLY! MAILING 

800 brochures! Guaranteed! 
Free supplies/postage. Mail 
LSASE: Celebrity Mailers, 
16625 Redmond Way #M233- 
C6, Redmond, WA. 98052. 
www.celebritymailers.com 



ARC WELDER, CRAFTS- 
MAN 295 amp, $350; 6in. 
bench grinder, 4amp, $40; 
concrete mixer, Ig. electric, 
$250; two Sears A/C's, 
6,000BTU's, $50/ea; tread- 
mill, Lifestyler electric, $125; 
Frigidaire electric clothes dry- 
er, $75; lawn mower, self- 
propelled, Briggs & Stratton, 
$75; treated wood deck 
planks, $2/ea; 17ft. Crestlin- 
er boat, w/trailer and boat 
lift, $2,000/best. All items in 
Fox Lake (708) 599-0998. 



HOMEOWNERS WANT- 
ED!!! KAYAK POOLS is 

looking for demo home- 
sites to display our New 
■Maintenance Free" Kayak 
Pool. Save thousands of 
$$$ with this unique oppor- 
tunity. Call NOWIII 1-800- 
31 -KAYAK Discount code: 
522-11 5. H 

SPAS - HOT TUB BUYERS, 
BUY DIRECT FROM MANU- 
FACTURER. SAVE S1000 - 
$1500, 14 MODELS $2495 - 
$4995, VIDEO, PRICES, 1- 
800-869-0406 GOOD LIFE 
SPAS, LINCOLN, NE. 
GOODLIFESPA.COM. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS 
AFFORDABLE-CONVENI- 
ENT Tan at home. Payment 
from $25/month. FREE 
color catalog. Call today 1- 

800-842-1305. 
www.np.etstan.com 

WEATHER AND EMERGEN- 
CY REPAIRS OF BARNS, 
HOUSES AND GARAGES, 
CALL WOODFORD BROS . 
INC. FOR STRAIGHTEN- 
ING, JACKING CABLING, 
AND OTHER WEATHER RE 
LATED REPAIRS, FREE ES 
TIMATES 1-800-OLD-BARN 

WWW.1-800-OLD- 
BARN.COM. 

AIR COMPRESSOR, 5 gal- 
lon tank, good condition, 

$75. (847) 680-6258. 




Medical Equip 
Supplies 



MEDICARE PATIENTS 

USING INHALERS Albuter- 
ol - Atrovent - Combivent - 
Serevent - Azmacort - Flov- 
ent and Others. Having 
Difficulty? Breath Easy 
Again. Medicare covered 
liquid therapy may be 
available if you qualify. 
MED_A_SAVE 1-800-244- 
1919 ext. IL2002. 




PIANO CROWN STAY baby 
grand; orig. $20K, mint 
cond., asking $5K/best. 
Moving must sell. (847) 

438-6997. 




Pels & Supplies 



BLOODHOUND AKC PUPS, 
born 3/23/02, vet checked, 
males, $400, females, 

$450. (630) 837-3696, 
(815)765-9020. 



BUNNIES LITTLE BABY 
DWARFS, $15. Easy-care, 
quiet, clean, delightful pets. 

(847) 223-7477. 



COCKATIELS 2 FOR $70; 3 
for $100; 4 for $130. LOVE- 
BIRDS 2 for $90; 4 for 
$175.(847)689-0728. 



MIXED BLUE HEELER 
PUPS, 10 WEEKS, 1ST 
SHOTS AND WORMED, 
$40 ' FEMALES, $30 

MALES OR BEST OFFER. 
(815)998-2281 



WIRE FOX TERRIER PUP- 
PIES, AKC reg., home 
raised, non-shedding, aver- 
age wt. as adults, 18LBS., 
males & females avail. (847) 

336-5955. 




Wanted To Buy 



$WE PAY CASHS 

TV'S, VCR'S, DVD'S, HOME 

STEREOS, 

CAR STEREOS, 

TOOLS, JEWELRY, 

MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS, 

; GAMES, ETC. 

(IN WORKING CONDITION). 

CALL TRADER JON'S (847) 

740-5000. 

Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
Parts. Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coke Machines. 
Paying CASH! Cali 

I985-2742. 



630 



it'" 




Homes For Sale 



$ O DOWN HOMES 

Gov't & Bank Foreclosures! 

HUD.VA, FHA. 

$0 to Low Down 

No Credit O.K.I • 

For Listings: 

800-501-1777 

ext. 9203. 

CAMP LAKE, WISC. 
F.S.B.O., 5 mi. N. of ILL. 
1,840sq.ft. 2-story house + 
1,400sq.ft. 2-story gar. work- 
shop. Zoned B-2 & C-1. 3- 
bd., 2-ba., Ig. livingroom 
w/fireplace, Ig. kitchen w/is- 
land, oak trim, lots of stor- 
age, ceramic tile, carpeting, 
full bsmt., gas furnace A/C, 
maintenance free exterior, 
decks, landscaped yd. w/pri- 
vacy fence, all appls. Lake 
access. Immediate occu- 
pancy. Asking $164,900. 
(262) 723-4883 weekdays 
10am-2pm, anytime wee- 
kends. 



CHAIN O'LAKES LAKE- 
FRONT VIEWS. HOMES 
FOR SALE. 3 & 4 bedroom, 
2-ba., gorgeous view. Ser- 
ies inquiries only. Prestigi- 
ous lakefront living. Range 
from $250,000 to 

$600,000. (847) 293-2000 
(WE ALSO BUY " LAKE- 
FRONTB HOMES) GINS- 
BERG ENTERPRISES; 



CHARMING 3-BD. RANCH, 

very nice inside. Beautiful 
master w/fireplace and vault- 
ed ceiling. Huge open kitch- 
en w/hardwood. Full partially 
finished basement and 2- 
car gar. All this for 
$127,500. Calls welcome 
(847) 201-1785. 

www.2buyhomes.net- 
ad#20575. 




Gov't Foreclosures 

Round Lake Beach, 3 br.$174K 

Round Lake, 3 br.$ 10 IK 

Round Lake, 2 br. $57K 

Waukcgan, 3 br. $93K 

Gurncc,2br.$120K 

Zion,3br.$8IK 

Make offer, investors welcome 




! 






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May 17, 2002 



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CLASSIFIEDS 



Lakeland Newspapers I I ' i3 



Homes For Sale 



COUNTRY WALK SUB., 

Lake Villa School Dist. #41. 
3-bd., 2-1/2 ba., 2-story, 
bit. 1996, 2-story foyer, Trv- 
Ingroom, formal dlningroom 
w/french doors (or possible 

den), famllyroom, kitchen 
w/2 pantries, C/A, full- unfin- 
ished bsmt. All appls. & 
window treatments includ- 
ed. Also enjoy huge back 
yd., w/privacy fence, deck & 
swing set. Located on cul- 
de-sac street, close to park, 
Metra & shopping. 

$189,900. (847) 265-61 65. 

ENJOY PISTAKEE 

BAY/CHAIN O'LAKES with- 
out paying the price tagll Pri- 
vate pier & beach rights 1 
blk. awayl 3-bd., 2-ba., all 
brick ranch w/full bsmt. "2" 
f/p, C/A, 1/2 acre wooded! 
$226,000. Century 21 Care, 
Carol Bradley (815) 344- 
4240. 

RS.B.O. GAGES LAKE 

Woodland/Warren Schools. 
Lakerights/lakeviews. Large 
updated 9-rm. Cape Cod, 
on double lot, 3-bd., 3-ba., 
beautifully . fin. bsmt. family- 
room w/bar, new 2.5 car 
heated gar. w/attic. Asking 

S224K. Call , (847) 

223-6236. Brokers Wei- ' 
come. 

FANTASTIC HOUSE COLO- 
NIAL 4-5 bdrm., glorious 
yard, rough piping in gar., in- 
tercom system throughout, 
hardwood floors. (847) 

680-3124, (847) 255-6330. 
FOR SALE BY OWNER 2- 

story contemporary, across 
from Midlane Golf Course, 
Gurnee Schools, city water 
and sewer, C/A. 4-bd., 2-1/2 
ba., masterbedroom balco- 
ny, large deck, livingroom 
fireplace, full bsmt, 2-car 
gar., formal diningroom, ap- 
pliances stay. Attractively 
priced. (847) 249-3325. 

FOX LAKE NEWER 2-story, 
4/5 bd., 3-ba., full bsmt., 2- 
1/2 gar., on 1/2 acre, laker- 
ighls w/own boat slip, on 
Dunn's Lake, j $275,000. 

(847)587-5661. 

• 

GAGES... LAKE. 2.-BD., 1-ba., 
new oak & granite kitchen, 
new bath, oak 6/panel 
doors, new windows, 2-1/2 
car att. gar., C/A, one house 
from lake, across from park, 
privacy fence, corner lot. 

$1 69,000. (847) 548-4234. 

GAGES LAKE/WARREN 
SCHOOLS 3-bd., 2-ba., liv- 
ingroom with large stone 
fireplace, lakefront park & 
use of boat launch, 
$141,000. Will co-op with 
buyer broker. (847) 

548-0629. 

GENOA CITY, WISC. 7yr. 
old 3-bd., 2-ba. ranch on 
large city lot. Central air, 
paved drive to an additional 
26x32 gar., $169,500. (262) 
279-0494. 

GRAYSLAKE RENOVATED 
RANCH, 3-bd., 1-ba., wood- 
ed fenced double lot, 
hrdwd. floors, big rooms, 
new windows, siding & kitch- 
en, appls., low taxes. OPEN 
HOUSE Sat. 5/18, 10am- 
3pm, Sun. 5/19, 10am- 
7pm. 352 Slusser. Must sell. 
$157,900.(847)548-0912. 



KE 4 OR . _.. . 

den, 3.5 ba., cul-de-sac 
home in great family neigh- 
borhood, 2-car gar., bright 
kitchen with island, formal liv- 
ing & diningrooms, 2-story 
familyroom/entry foyer, fin. 
bsmt. (office, gym, entertain- 
ment, storage), new roof, 
siding & carpet 2002, beauti- 
ful woodwork throughout. 
$319,900. 785 Wexford Ct. 
(847) 548-4465. 



^^.GRAYSLAKE 

Links of English Meadows 
1298 CHURCHILL LN. 
BEAUTIFUL 
3 or 4 bd. home, 2.5 ba., 
on Ig. lot, in great family 
neighborhood. Huge bright 
kitchen, with island, plan- 
ning desk, and lots of cabi- 
nets. Spacious famllyroom, 
with custom bit. media cen- 
ter, and recessed lighting. 
First floor office, large mas- 
ter 

bedroom, with spacious 

master bath. Loft overlook- 
ing 2-story livingroom, 
spectacular finished bsmt., 
with playroom and gym. 
Lots of storage space 
throughout. Elementary 

school in 

subdivision, top school dist. 

$284,000. 
Call (847) 543-1492. 



GRAYSLAKE HUGE 

ROOMS, 3-bd., 2-ba., 3-fire- 
places, bsmt., screened 
porch, deck. Walk to lake, 
H.S., town. Enhance this 
style. Lasting value. Imme- 
diate. Hot Buy $206,000. 
Florence Emling, ReMAX 
CENTER 1 -800-21 1-RELO. 



GRAYSLAKE WATER- 

FRONT HOME on small 
lake. 4-br., 1-3/4 ba., LR, 
DR, eat-in kitchen, Ig. FR 
w/fireplace, . laundry/craft 
room. 2-car gar., large prof, 
landscaped lot, 2 decks.. 
Custom built & beautifully 
decorated. $234,900. (847) 
223-7854 after 5pm, any- 
time weekends. 

GURNEE RANCH F.S.B.O. 

Grandwood Park Sub. 3- 
bd., 1-1/2 ba., A/C, 1-car 
gar., deck overlooking Ig. lot 
w/mature landscaping. Re- 
modeled kitchen has oak 
cabinets & new appls. Fully 
painted for immediate occu- 
pancy. On line tour @ 
byowner.com . #9600. 

$156,900. Call for appt. 

(847)265-0153. 

GURNEE TOWNHOME 

F.S.B.O. Spacious 2-bd. + 
loft, 2-1/2 ba., in quiet subdi- 
vision. Eat-in kitchen, 1-car 
gar., hrdwd. floors, fireplace 
& much more. $160,000. 

(847) 855-0235, (847) 529- 

7484. E-mail: 




GURNEE WESTGATE SUB- 
DIVISION 3-bd., 1.5 ba., 2- 
story Heritage, brick fire- 
place in familyroom, cathe- 
dral ceilings, att. 2-car gar., 
bsmt., nice lot, neutral col- 
ors, low taxes, in great con- 
dition, $214,900. (847) 
336-4576. 



HEBRON F.S.B.O. 2- 
STORY house. 2-bd. & den, 
1-1/2 ba., large room, fire- 
place, screened porch, 2-car 
gar., large fenced corner lot. 
$132,900.(815)648-4119. 



GURNEE/OPEN HOUSE 12 

noon - 4pm., Sundays. Bri- 
dlewood 2-story home, built 
in 1993, vaulted ceilings, 
many upgrades. 4-bd. 2-1/2 
ba., by owner, no realtors 
please. $249,900. Leave 
message on answering 
machlng for private show- 
ing. 18121 Banbury Dr., Gur- 
nee. (847) 855-1 01 3. 




' Homes For Sale 



GRAYSLAKE HOUSE FOR 
SALE Won't last long. 4- 
bd., 2-1/2 ba., 2-car gar., 
w/full bsmt. In exclusive sub- 
division. Many upgrades. 
Must see. Craig Stein, Koe- 
nlg & Strey/GMAC. (847) 

360-3225. 



HUNTLEY 4-BD., 3-1/2 ba., 
3 cars., raised ranch on 1- 
1/3 acres. Beautiful area. 
11 rooms, 3,300sq.ft., 2 fire- 
places, 10yrs. new. Near 
schools, churches, golf, ten- 
nis, shopping. I-90, Rt. 47. 
Price reduced $375,000. 
Open House, Sunday 1pm- 
4pm. (847)669-2831. 



I BUY HOUSES 

Any size. 

Any price. 

Cash. 

(630) 268-7908. 



LAKE VILLA IF YOU LIKE 
large open floor plan with 
every upgrade, this is it. Vo- 
lume ceilings throughout, 3- 
bd., 2-ba. ranch, $289,000. 

(847)561-4954. 

IF YOU'RE MOVING 
OR JUST NEED MORE 

SPACE 

Call A.J. Self Storage, 

Round Lake, 

For all your storage needs. 

Reasonable rates. 

Clean, safe, secure. 

(847)331-1778. 

ANTIOCH CHAIN O'LAKES 
Lakefront large 2-story, 3- 
bd., 2-ba., bsmt., 2-1/2 car 
gar, separate fenced lot 

w/2300sq.ft. building, 

w/power & gas, pier, many 
extras, $460,000. (847) 

395-1439. 

INGLESIDE FOR SALE BY 
OWNER Raised ranch, laker- 
ights, almost new, 3-bdrm., 
2-ba., fin. familyroom, 2-1/2 
car gar., large backyard, ad- 
jacent to Gavin School prop- 
erty, C/A, blacktop driveway, 
freshly painted, new carpet- 
ing, refrigerator, stove, dish- 
washer, washer/dryer, no re- 
altors. $159,900. (847) 
587-7008. 

INGLESIDE F.S.B.O. 4-bd., 
2-ba. newly remodeled, 1- 
acre, fully landscaped 
w/trees, waterfall and pond. 
2-studio apts. for extra in- 
come. Waterfront, lakerights 
& more. Reduced 

$275,000. (847) 973-1838 

after 6pm. 

INGLESIDE F.S.B.O., 

2400SQ.FT. ranch on 1 
acre. 4-bd., 3-1/2 ba., all 
season porch, 18x36 rec- 
room, formal diningroom, 
18x36 inground pool, 

$279,900. (847) 587-6635. 
INGLESIDE NEWER 

RAISED ranch. 3-bd., 2-ba., 
fenced in yard, 2 blocks 
from the Chain. Asking 
S1 54,800. Will consider all 
offers. (847) 587-9208. 




OF THE 









LAKEFRONT HOME VWEX- ^q SEpARATE BU|LD . 

fn„ /wi« JUL ST"? INGS 1 acre prcpoty- 4 " bd - 

LakeWest Shore Park. 4- 4 . b 37 oosqV 3-car gar. 
bd., 2-1/2 ba., 2-1/2 car gar. Tave „ acro £. «„ 

USS[ 'i^Lli^tl'l- sits 85-100 people. Full 

kitchen open all year long. 



rooms overlooking lake. 

$549,000. (847) 566-6234. 

INGLESIDE OPEN HOUSE 
Sat. 5/18, 26280 Vista Ct., 
1pm-4pm. Tanneron Bay, 
Rt. 12 & 134. 2-story town- 
home "Shows like a model". 
Move right in. 2-bd., + loft, 1- 
1/2 ba., fireplace, skylight, 2- 
car gar. $159,900. Jean 
Dziadus, Baird & Warner 
(847) 823-1855 ext. 571. 

INGLESIDE SPACIOUS 
RANCH. View of beautiful 
sunset with private lake and 
park. 4-bd., 2-ba., 2-car att. 
gar., walk out bsmt., large 
corner lot, many extras. 
34595 N. Park Ave. 
$200,000. Appt. only (847) 
516-5834. 

LAKE MILTMORE VIEW 
AND ACCESS, LINDEN- 
HURST SCHOOLS, 2-story, 

4-bd., 2-ba., wood floors, 
huge fin. english bsmt., 2- 
story 2.5 car att. gar., on 1/3 
wooded lot. F.S.B.O. 

$234K. (847) 356-6685. 

LAKE VILLA DERING 
WOODS New 2 story, 4-bd., 

master suite with Jacuzzi, 
gourmet kitchen, 2nd floor 
laundry, 2-1/2 ba., tray ceil- 
ings, oak trim, fireplace, 
walk-out bsmt., front porch, 
2-car gar., 1 acre wooded, 

$319,000. (847) 528-0552. 

LAUDERDALE LAKES-ELK- 
HORN plus boat slip and 
beautiful 4-bdrm. homo In 
Baywood Estates. 3-car 
gar., screen porch, great 
views, etc., etc. $229,900. 

(262) 742-3639. 

LINDENHURST PERFECT 
RAISED RANCH. 10 MIN. 
TO MALLS, TOLLWAY, 45 
MIN. TO O'HARE, 4-br., 2.5 

ba., 2.5 att. gar., fin. bsmt. 
S219.900. Best taxes in 
Lake County. F.S.B.O. 

(847) 265-9982. 

LINDENHURST F.S.B.O. 
4YRS. new. 4-bd., 2-1/2 
ba., 2-story w/full extended, 
partially finished basement. 
2-car att; gar., on cul-de- 
sac. Professionally -land- 
scaped. Extended family- 
room, off of eat-in kitchen. 

Asking S224K. (847) 
265-5425. 

MOTIVATED SALE/RE- 

DUCED ROOMY R.L.B., 4- 
bd. raised ranch, more 
room, partially finished full 
bsmt./possible in-law, new 
furnace, A/C, humidifier. 
Link fence back yd./side 
dog run, room for any size 

gar. (847) 546-3425. 

MUNDELEIN 4-BD., 2-BA., 
raised ranch, walking dis- 
tance to schools, churches, 
parks, shopping, train, Mu- 
ndelein Days. $188,600. 

(647) 566-8013. 

MUNELEIN 3-BD. RANCH, 
full bsmt., well maintained 
and updated, $194,900. 
By appt. (847)566-1230. 

NO BANK QUALIFYING 

Owner financing 

Private investment Group. 

Liquidating all properties. 

So if you have been turned 

down, try us. Down payment 

required. Call now for 

details. (847) 838-3374. 



Powers Lake, . Wise. 
$385,000 negotiable. Imme- 
diate possession. (773) 
914-2525. 

PALATINE FOR SALE BY 
OWNER 21 5K. Brick ranch, 
3-bd., with wood floors, 1.5 
ba., full bath includes lime- 
stone floor and shower, 
granite countertop, heated 
mirror and whirlpool tub. 
Large kitchen with oak cabi- 
nets, wood beadboard and 
ceramic floor and back- 
splash. Ceiling fans in kitch- 
en and bedrooms. Custom 
wood blinds throughout. 
C/A, 2.5 car detached gar. 
plus shed. Large deck and 
stockade fence for privacy. 
All appliances stay. Move-in 
condition, must see. 1025 
Lilac Dr. Call for appt. (847) 
359-6884. 

PARK CITY COMPLETELY 

remodeled kitchen, 3-bd., 2- 
ba., 2-car gar., new fire- 
place, new windows in 
bsmt., all new appliances, 
36ft. heated pool, 3 hot tub, 
2-tiered deck, plus thou- 
sands spent in landscaping. 
For Sale by Owner, no real- 
tors please. $189,900. 
Looking to close in June. 

(847) 217-7022. 

SADDLEWOD IN WAUCON- 
DAI JUST FAR ENOUGH 
AWAYI And yet minutes to 
shopping, highways and 
schools. This 7yr. new 2- 
story home features 4-bed- 
rooms, 2.1 baths, full Eng- 
lish basement. An olfice, 
and a sunroom + the laun- 
dryroom all in the first floor. 
The master suite offers a 
large soaking tub, separate 
shower and double vanity 
sink. The basement awaits 
your finishing touches with a 
wall ol windows to bring in 
all natural lighting. 2-f ire- 
places, 3-car gar. and pro- 
fessionally landscaped yard 
provide the finishing touch- 
es! Price Reduced. Call 
Marge, J. S. JAMES REAL- 
TORS,^) 582-1777, . 

SILVER LAKE, WISC, 444 

N. Riverside, 4-bd., 2-ba., 

1900sq.ft., $124,900. (262) 
930-8505. 

TEN ACRES 3 to 4 bed- 
room house, Ig. barn and 
Pole barn, 2-car gar. with at- 
tached shed. 15 minutes to 
I-94. Kenosha County, 
Brighton Township. 

$339,900. (262) 878-1625. 

WADSWORTH. 1 ACRE, 3 
bedroom ranch, 2.5 bath, 
dining room, and den/office. 
New kitchen, family room, 
all season room,, finished 
basement, 2.5 car garage, 
fireplace, a/c, and more! 

847-623-4113, $325,000. 

WATERFRONT PROPERTY 
TOTALLY renovated 

3600sq.ft. lakefront home. 3- 
bdrm., 2-1/2 ba., includes' 
finished walk-out bsmt., all 
new electric, new heating & 
plumbing, Whirlpool mas- 
terbdrm., & laundry facilities 
on second floor. New C/A. A 
must see, with a beautiful 
scenic view. (847) 

967-6175. 









ja Following yet another burst of mis- 
chievious behavior Muffin and 
Crumpet serve a "time out" in the 
laundry room tub. They, live with 
their people and pups, Kukla, Fran 
and Ollie, at Foxficld Farm, south- 
west of Lake Gencva.WI. 

MAY. 2002 




Attention Dog Owners! 



LOVE YOUR DOG, BUT NOT THE I 

CRUNCHED FOR TIME? 

LET US SCOOP & REMOVE 



THE WASTE FOR YOU! 
No messy/smelly garbage cans & scoops 

• Enjoy more free time 
• Entertain in your yard again 

SERVICE PROVIDED: 
• Once a week • All weather/All year 

• Reasonable Rates 




Homes For Sale 



WAUKEGAN 2-BD., 1-BA., 

2-car gar., completely remo- 
deled, full basement, situat- 
ed on a fenced corner lot. 
$134,900. James Ander- 
son, CBS Realtors, (847) 

374-9377. 

WILDWOOD F.S.B.O. 

17983 Gages Lake Rd. 2- 
bd., 1-ba. ranch, new siding, 
windows, etc. Come take a 

look. $149,000. (847) 
543-7770. 

ZION 2103 RAVINE Near 
Beulah Park. Newly remo- 
deled 2-bd., 1-ba., w/loft ex- 
pansion, frpl., bsmt., wash- 
er/dryer, $112,900. (847) 
361-1733. 




Homes For Rent 




$ O DOWN HOMES 

Gov't & Bank Foreclosures! 

HUD, VA, FHA. 

$0 to Low Down 

No Credit O.K.I 

For Listings: 

800-501 -1 777 
ext. 9208. 

FOX LAKE AREA 3-bd. 
cape cod, water rights to 
Chain, deck, immediate oc- 
cupancy. No pets. No smok- 
ing. Near Metra & Rt. 12, 
Military welcome. $950/mo. 
+ sec. & utilities. (847) 
362-3637 leave message. 

MCHENRY HOLIDAY HILLS 
3-BD., 1-ba., 1-1/2 car gar., 
1st., last, security, referenc- 
es and credit check, 
$1,050/mo. (815) 

344-4022. 

■ 

LINDENHURST 3-BD., 2-car 
heated gar., agent owned. 
$1,200/mo. + sec. (847) 
367-8686, ext. 208. 

LIBERTYVILLE MINT 2-BD 
UNIT IN 2 flat. $995/mo. 
plus utilities. (847) 609-5503 

LIBERTYVILLE MINT 2-BD 
UNIT IN 2 Hat. $995/mo. 
plus utilities. (847) 609-5503 



LIBERTYVILLE MINT 2-BD 
UNIT IN 2 flat. S995/mo. 
plus utilities. (847) 609-5503 

■ 

LINDENHURST CUTE 2- 

BD., 1-ba., 2-car gar., avail- 
able June 1st. $1,100/mo. 

(847) 533-8529. 

VERY NICE NEWER 3 

BDRM. home, 2 full baths, 
full basement, 2-car garage, 
C/A, deck, 5 appliances. 
Twin Lakes, S1,095/mo. 

262-279-5930. 

REMODELED 1 BED- 
ROOM, 1 CAR GARAGE, 
with basement and big lot, 
$925/mo. security. (847) 

223-0004. 

ROUND LAKE 2-BD. 

house, newly decorated, 
quiet area. Available June. 

S75Q7mo. (847) 696-0087. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 1 

BEDROOM HOME, garage, 
nice yard, park across 
street, next to school, 

$750 plus deposit. (847) 
223-0004. 

ROUND LAKE PARK Large 

3-bd., 2-ba. home, finished 
bsmt. with storage & laun- 
dry room, close to train, 
school & lake. $995/mo. 
plus utilities. Avail. June 1. 
(847) 639-5896, (847) 962- 
5896, leave message. 

ROUND LAKE PARK Newly 

bit. 4-bd. home, 2-ba., 

washer/dryer, deck, gar., 

near train & lake. (847) 
256-4118. 

VOLO QUIET NEIGHBOR- 
HOOD. Cozy 1-bd. homo for 
rent, 2-car gar., $950/mo. + 
security. No pets. No Sec- 
tion 8. (815) 344-5008. 



WADSWORTH HOUSE 

COUNTRY living, 1-1/2 acre, 

3-bd., 1-1/2 ba., 2-car gar., 

S1,400/mo. (847) 
244-7971. 





:• 





WHY ARE YOU RENTING? 
Mortgage payments will be 
less than your rent pay- 
ment. Everybody gets a 
home. No down payment 
home loans available. No 
costs consultation. 999 
Plaza Dr., SCH, ILL Call 
Tom Ischkum. 847-605- 
8287. 




Homes For Rent 



WINTHROP HARBOR DU- 
PLEX, available July 1st. 
Quiet, 2-bd., 1-ba., bsmt., 
gar., C/A, stove, fridge, dish- 
washer, washer/dryer. 
$730/mo. + utilities. No 
pets. (847) 223-6269. 



ANTIOCH GOLF COURSE 

Wooded end unit town- 
home on green and pond. 

Immaculate! 2-bd., loft, 1- 

1/2 ba., daylight bsmt., ele- 
vated deck, private porch, 
vaulted master, many up- 
grades. $155,900. OPEN 
HOUSE Sat. 12-5pm. 
http://bolins1 .tripod.com 

CHAIN O'LAKES WATER- 
FRONT TOWNHOME COM- 
MUNITY. 2-bd., 2-1/2 ba., 
fireplace, garage, all ap- 
pliances, many upgrades, 

$132,500. (847) 587-7891. 

See: forsalebyowner.com 

ID#10009143. 

FOX LAKE ACCESS to 
Chain. Waterfront condo. 2- 
bd., 1-ba., all appls., wash- 
er/dryer, eat-in kitdhen, large 
balcony w/ att. storage 

room. Clubhouse w/swimS 
ming pool, marina, pvt. 
beach, tenn 5 s court & securi- 
ty. $86,000. (847) 

417-1831. 

FOX LAKE ACCESS TO 
CHAIN. Completely remo- 
deled 2-bdrm., 1-ba. New 
kitchen, bathroom, wash- 
er/dryer, dishwasher. Beauti- 
ful view. Swimming pool, 

marina, private beach and 
security. $84,500. (847) 587- 
5301. 

GRAYSLAKE TOWNHOME 
2-BD., 1-1/2 ba., whirlpool, 
vaulted ceilings, loft, 2-car 
gar., exc. School District, 

$167,000. (847) 548-3696. 

GURNEE CONDO FOR 
SALE 1-bd., 1-ba., wash- 
er/dryer in unit, heated gar., 
huge balcony. Brand new 
light hardwood floors, new 
paint, updated kitchen cabi- 
nets. Poof, tennis, golf, se- 
curity. $90,000. (847) 
549-9813. 

GURNEE F.S.B.O. 2-BD., 1- 

ba., approx. 1,100sq.ft., Ig. 
2-car gar. Lots of closet, 

$127,000. (847) 855-4684. 

ISLAND LAKE WATER- 
FRONT TOWNHOME. 2- 

bdr., 2-ba., 1-car gar., 
$125K, or $1,200/mo. rent. 

(847)875-8819. 

LIBERTYVILLE CONDO 
F.S.B.O., 2-bd., 2-ba., all 
appliances Including wash- 
er/dryer. Asking $132,900. 
(847) 319-1206. 

MUST SEE 1-BD, condo in 
Vacation Village, newly re- 
modeled, conveniently locat- 
ed to parking, Chain ac- 
cess, furnished optional, 
$54,500. Call for appt. (847) 

587-3244. 



ROUND LAKE 2 LEVELS, 
LIKE NEW, 3-bd., 2-1/2 ba., 

end 'unit, "2'^ar 



gar., 



$133,500. (773) 068-3156. 

Lakeview Realty " 1 " 



'« t» 



r 



!'! if 



ROUND LAKE BEACH 2- 
bd., 1-1/2 ba., 1-car att. 
gar., newer furnace & 
appls. Asking $73,000. 

(847) 740-4030. 



v 




TOWNHOME FOR SALE 
Lake Bluff, Hamptons E 2- 
story, 3-bd., 2-1/2 ba., Ig. 
windows, cathedral ceiling in 
livingroom and master bed- 
room, master bath has Ig. 
tub, 3-huge walk-in closets, 
ceramic .tile in kitchen, break- 
fast room, laundry, baths 
and foyer, 2-car gar., patio 
and flower garden, 

$229,000. (847) 498-7796, 
(847)615-8557. 



VERNON HILLS NEWER 
TOWNHOME FOR RENT, 4- 
bd., 3-1/2 ba., familyroom, 
garage, 2300sq.ft. Steven- 
son High School. Available 
immediately. $2,500/mo. 
Long term OK. Purchase 
option. Broker (847) 477- 

831 r. 



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B24 I Lakeland Newspapers 




Mobile Kcir.es 




Mr.cile Homes 



1520 SKYUNE MOBILE 
HOWS lerxTOr, 2-fcd. F 2-fca., 
C/A„ Rj seed, newer carper, 
front fctcr.en y appliances in- 
cluded, co a shaded lot, 
across from Browns Lake- irs 
Surtingtcnv Wise 

S2tXCGtesr.. (262) 

2C67. 



ROUND LAKE MOBILE 
HOWE FOR SALE 2£d„ T- 

Da.. Stt.CCCL (S47); 

74G-S47&. 



- * 



beautiful country 

TUNG, 3-fcd, 2-fe& rnanufec? 
tured heme in Wheatland! Es- 
tates, Let 66, corner let. 
Very spacious, recent im- 
provements MUST SEE! 

SW.SCGl (262) 537-23T4. 

DOUBLE WIDE 3-SOS, 3- 
full: tea,,, master walk-in clos- 
et, and hot tub, fireplace, 
TSCGsq.ft, S4a,C0O/besr 

(262> 537-2546: 



DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE 

HOME, rsmcdeied. 3-bd.. 2- 
full ba., S30.COO (847) 
740-9476.. 

DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE 

HOME 3-fcd, den, cat-m 
kitchen, 2-ba., Jacuzzi in 
mastemam, gas frpf., formal 
diningroom, all appl,, cov» 

ered carport, deck & shod, 

547,500. 0002 shoridan 

fid., Kenojiha, Wise, Lot 

»202 

(047) 223-7000. 

DOUDLEWIDE MOUILU 
HOME 3 BEDHOOMS. 2 

full baton, ntjwly reino* 
doled in Cambridge CI; 
Round Lake $30,000.00. 

(047) 740-0470 
KENOSHA, WI8C, LAtlGB 

2-bd. Mobllo Homo lot lent, 
in small qulot park, 

S595/mo. ronl, Includoti lot 
fee. (262)810-0221. 

KENOSHA, WISC. LAROG 
2-bd., like now cond., groat 
location, small qulot park, 
S19,900/best. (202) 

818-6221. 

LAKE ZURICH MOBIL 
HOME QUIET wooded park, 
2-bd., 1-1/2 ba„ 900sq.ll., 

large deck, private boach, 
lake rights. MUST SEE. 

$42,000.(847)726-1986. 

MODULAR -DOU- 

BLEWIDES- SINGLEWIDE- 
ILLINOIS LARGEST DIS- 
PLAY OF MODEL HOMES1 
FOUNDATIONS BASE- 

MENTS. GARAGES SEPT- 
ICS AVE DO IT ALL 1 FREE 
STATEWIDE DELIVERY 

AND INSTALLATION. 

RILEY MANUFACTURED 
HOMES. 800-798-1541; 



SKYLARK 1935 PARK 
rttOQEL,. waterfront lecatiem 
en Gra33 Lake in Anticeh. t - 
fcd. completely furnished;. 
A7C; heat,. waterfront 
screened! deck, t0'*-r6'„ 3 
season) enclosed rbarm. 

523,300. (St 5); 573-9624 

after 4pn% (347) EC6-t40t 
days 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

LOCATED IN AM OVER 55 

COMMUNITY 

•T-fcedrccm, 1-batn 

S43.90O. 

•t-bedroom, 1-1/2 bath 

534.900. 

•2- bedroom, 1-balh 

Start G $49,900, 

•2-bedroom, 1-3/4 balli, 

Start to $40,000, 

•2-bedroom. 2balh 
Start <at $30,500. 

•3-bodroom, 2'bathi 

$47,000, 

Sorno Include umuoiIb, 

shodo, screen iuoim, 

docktt, Mutagen. 
, (047) 026=0000 
leave merjeaye. 



— . 



WIIUATLANU, WIBC. 1970 
Mntstillctd 14*00, HUMfe'DA 
nil nppl. Was $16,000, 
$10,0Q0/PIRM, (M7) 

006-0089 




\|MttlUCHLS 

l\iv \W\\[ 



HOUND LAKt MelGM'ral 

IMPKOOM \\\ OrNU.Y Ml;- 

MQQ&t£&!ft£S Wukv 



BARK.VHCCO 1*S7 14X72, 
3-cdi. Zrca.. C A atl appls.. 
Stmciii -vi-\ Schools, 
tfix22!t cecs. shed Asking 

SlTl^CCC. [347) 244-5366 
Settve trresss^e. 



LLC -OU5 :\ RETIRE- 

'.'.{L :, v~ r.a,~K t**v-»d Sftars, 
rraov; turrracs 21-^2 ta! 1 ^ shesj. 



ANTIOCH & WAUKGGAN 
2ION, NtlWLY MEMO* 

di.i 1 i). 1 & L> bedioom 

npnrtrnonts, all appllanceri. 

Walk trom tranapottalion. 

NO PETS. Intincdlate occit* 
pancy, (U47) 35tHJ400, 

FOX LAKE, STUDIO. Vaca- 
tion Village: SSS&toiO. 
KARE Managerrenl. S47- 

367-0890. 

GRAYSLAKE 2 BDRUL 
downstairs apt. Great 5or 
commuters, across from 
train. S725 Includes 1s1 
month's rent & security. 
Gas, water, sewer and gar- 
bago incuded. Available 

nowl (047)370-0333 

GURNEE NEV/ER TOV/N 
HOME. 2 BEDROOM, 2-1/2 
ba., 1-1/2 car garage, cen- 
tral air, washer dryer, ^?- 
pllances, eat in ktoteti, Tirft- 
place, prrvate path baci^ re- 
landscaped courtyard, m&t 
shops, available Jura 6ffr, 
Sl.500/mo, {fUT) 

573-0170, 

KENOSHA Tito *ViT, 
Ave. Uhqo 24xJ WftyflfafiG 
oa, wanhftf/dryfcf, Q&fSQG 
Excellent schools *m mKgtr 
borfiood Upper f760/rr»<5 
lower $ooo/mo.-, plus \mr^ 

& sec Avail. Immedffttefy 

(262)942-1500. 




— ;s.:and Lake and Grayslake 

'rrrraDtr bcts^ng jot quatttiod applicants, 
•^iov.arceparij appicatcas to/ our: 









FlRatjij: ciilll fr;r, mcrr?; irrfcrrraticiT. 01: zpcclrzr.GKL at 




CS4TJ) 223-66 4 4 
IBD# CSW©} 526-OjS^ 4 

*A4rfn»iiitmu- Ins, 



tti 







S e n i «_____ 

Jem oxctifrii- odubss 62 mrBtztfterr 

Bftundi Nfew II & 2 BEIDi^OOM APffS. 
AccssjF Ctenccofflfdl EIl»raton*Ba3bffirig 



Utearv 






conn 




armumta 
ForHent 



KENOSHA, W1SO. LARGE 

2-td, yard;, atr.. gar., ap- 
pliances,, great location,, 
SSSS/ma^ sec. dep. re- 
quired. (252)1816-5221. 

LAKEV1EW TEHRACE 

APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA, Large 1 4 2 bedrooms, 
S7t5-SS4C/month. Heat, wa- 
ter, air included. (e47) 
356-£474 



LI8ERTYVILLE 1-BD., 1- 

BA., completely remodeled. 
Elevator building, down- 
town, $895/mo. + sec, NO 
PETS, Avail, Judo 1 fit, (047) 

895-7729, 



N.E. WAUKEOAN BEAUTI- 
FUL 1-un apt., totally romo- 
doled and tutfilsluid, houl ln- 
cludod, $060/itiu i boo dep, 
lyrlGHfiu. (1147)244-01140. 



FOX I.AKU 1«bd„ and floor, 

$000/mo. • iiiitliloB. No 
pdlfl. (U47) 640*4107, 

WAUCONDA 1-UD, APT,, 
NEWLY DECOI1ATUD, hOttt 

•; hot wutor Inaludad, 
$600/mo, Loobo, Bouurlly 



dp 
ab 



),, ret, No polB. 
e immtjdlololy. 



133-O0U1. 



Avail- 

(M7) 



WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
WALK TO EVERYTHING 

New beautiful 2-bd., ;• w.\ , 

w/att. l-carlietttodoof. 

$y2G/»io. 4- Bed, No potu. 

Available June t nL 

(047) 5200420, gvob. 

(047) 020-6000 days, 

leave uioBoage. 




AnlVlloinoii 
lb Shaiv 





NEAR GURNUE MILLS 

Townhouse to share. Your 
own bedroom, bath, garage 
space, patio, $625/mo. 

(047)055-0614. 

GREAT LADY 

SEEKS HOME 
TO 

SHARE! 

-a- -a -i i -.a- a- 
PART TIME 

MOM, 35, seeks 

home to share. 

Got space? Like 

kids? Courteous, 

respectful, clean 

v/ornan seeks a 

home in Lake 

Osumy, Call ' 

847-740^445. 



mum ilax€ @w\m a 

rr^ $$& v put r>*- r«»r' 

rtiftiirtri wwtM'wrtW ir? rtw»i^' 

fftW# (is^iMlistiWrti ryf^- 
74rWf7r.r. 



fcWfflgfcFlfyffl 




QAOt-ti t.AK6 ROOM r=6fi 
RPNf. in pff/fiW R01«4y full 

ape dnp„ laciudAA utifitliifi 

t047)007-fUt17 




GRAYSLAKE 

R***i» At The Old 
Sarrcrt Hocs« 

frUmi^ec Rccms. 
Av/alaCif? to wjjccrsjbti?^ 
fllbrrvrmc ><« rr3/On'r itsrs. 

sint»aasa/(Mik, * sjcoj 

AutBironcs. Deposit; 

Fern: irtdiiiiea, CSIS tt/;. 

UfttflHeffiamUHHcitraTi 

frrn'/imjmr, Uaund^yfecililtefB 

& e>^m:n« rnnim avaiiauJe. 

((T47))222i-i.*nTai 
((1*17)) 5fnV77i22i. 




ffCCTAIS ftCm RBttUT 

3J!fl»-fflnm). (fJM^)} .:!fltnft7rj77,. 

(l» nn>!a? fl liaKcr Rtfimft . 




^j Eustaess Proper^ 
For Sale 



ARKANSAS-MARINA, FULL 

SERVICE. On Clean 

02ark3 Bull Sboals Lak«, 
Sc£flK All types of proper- 
ties a'/ait. V/ortow Land Co, 

Rand/ 888-565-1899 



BEAUTY SHOP COM- 
PLETE 4 otallon beauty 
shop. Loot leano, muot 
move out ol gnrflt/o, 
$3,700/boftt, (010) 

344-40?2, 



HARLIiUION, SO • tlpo- 

dally Conofolo HnnlrioHo, 

Owner fnllflnu. 20lf old 
)fornlor oo. lixtallnu mm 
o plane, I'rofllttbio con- 

Iraclfl In place for Bpring & 
Buiiifrior, ^tJty good bum 

o/oxu gruwtti pot'l. 043«:i07- 
2414 or write; C Stone, 
do Auklund Plantation, 
405 Crow Hill Plantation 
Dr, Oooruotown, SO 20440 



BXTRBMBLY LUCRATIVE 
WinGLE98 PHONE & 
PAGER SALES & SERVICE 

CO, Excollont location In 
Nortliwool Suburbs. 

$249,000. 8ERI0US INQUI- 
nlES ONLY. Coll (030) 204- 
4000. 



1?MQ FCCM15. Gnu fun- 
miiitiHti. £HKD; H unfun- 
mtulRdi. T;:t:ir; rT«crfnitiv rn> 
rmntifllHtl noimr,, omirre Mini- 

:tff«R. (|T<i75)7!J^-Td7?n. 



I LOHIDA (CENTRAL)-FOR 

SALE by Owner. Well- 
ont'd Podoortlc SHOE 
STORE & repair ohop, 24 
yro oarno loc, specializing 
custom orthotics & diabe- 
tic loor care. Lg soloction 
orthopodlo & comfort 
Bhoos. Owner retiring. 
Will train. 
Frank 407-020-4111 




Htislncss Property 
For Sale 



MlCHlQAN(UPPEn PENIN- 
SULA). UAI1 & RoBtauront. 
Unique erjtabllBhment on 
the St. Mary's River. Groat 
loo lor ouBtomera to vlow 
the ttelyhtetB while they 
enjoy dinner. Seats 100 
people. 350 ft Water tmtge. 
Room tor tutther develop- 
ment. Spoils business 
lateo For Sa)e, Owner tinc'g 

avail. Diane 506-297-2772 
lor 800-708-4677 access 

Code 02. RE MAX 




| Business froperry 
For Rent 



AhmOCH -1.200SQ.FT. 

BUSINESS area for rent, 
asking $600/mo„ on Lako 

Ave. (773) 792-9582. 

FOR LEASE 5.300SF. waro- 
house space divisible In 
units of 3,2G0sf. and 
2,050sf, Call Trl-Stato Realty 

(047)360-1376. 

POUND LAKE BEACH 

2,700 • 5,400 Sq Ft. 

r»rnrn /lndA/ZarehouBe 

'Pi/ov<3iman door and otfico, 

feb tof Torn or Chris 

(M7) 74O-70OO 

C<iv.ftt/io nr? n la I a 

111 

UUfi IH TrK Hlrtft, IrXfUfitfl* 
«i fitGD&tfy tVir" m&f>. Pyoalt 

& ftmw fmdt MX) 0q. 
i*v. 4^<5fi of m<.&, fJJfl 

dilv* irT d6Gf< f4ff Cl^flr, 
(W/^f.-IKH 






RICHMOND 

t'/UhJiO A MONTH 

(fi1t;)fi7/i ---4XM 




♦ f v <»tifit»lfft llrail ♦ 

Corporate Center 

III. 12 8u|witor WW ft.f. - 

JJiiU'mo tJROSSl lor 

Imlustiy or HuMnwi, '•OO si 

*'C Ofv .. 1H0 wll/.U'luisr. 

lUk. : OH itiHMS. W'fXlk 

tn^* U\ * (^uilit) 1 Uuibca^l 

0i sKUsc^. AiUUiUuwJ ;7>0 si 

* * * * * >h 

':75J?s.l-$t091'W4\*i5Cl 

s.£. efc, 2(;& vcl^J Phase. 

Otttli;cr,.(iuck, 1ST ceiling 

Lr5f «j * * * * 
, *l«rrs.g.w/7t<Vi.f. c£ 
ff3flfi2f:pllia.Mifzzanuiu 'viUL 

KZ'Jil.flil/miii. 



goo : *; i \* 

Afay i 7^ 2002 





Off the Beaten Path* by Eric Ho&cker 






WAUnCWDAIWSTGWWI 

T^rntlnn;'t: WArntlcuna.* 

wrlhiinrrjif .iv/irttRnit rlnnr 

& mstmnim. Incdlutmnumver 

aiuLA/attwT. 

AvnilatMteJmrnwtfinmiv 

37?«yrmn. n awe 

((W75)®fHaHiro 

lliH\'/f:miraiiirpe. 



FOX LAKE, BEAUTIFUL 5 

flat panoramic vfcv/ of lake, 
doubre deck patio, base- 
ment. $365,000, (847) 
49a-1418. 




Vacant tot* 
Acreage 



ANTIOCH 1.1 ACRE comor 

lot In Regency subdivision. 
Septic plan approved for 4- 
bd, house, septic and 
hoiif.e plans includod. 

$07,500. Evos, (847) 
305-01 9G, days (847) 938- 
3020, 

FOR SALE 00 Acres, 
Konoshn County, 21 acres 
Prime Development property, 
wooded with pond. Qualified 
buynro call 202-877-8309 
or E-mail 
markwognor@msn.com 




Resort/Vacation 
Rentals 



7 NIGHTS / 8 Days Air and 
Land Package " Sunny 
Days 6 Romantic Even- 
ings' starting at $1032 at 
Divi Carina, US Virgin Is- 
lands. 1-877-779-9700, 
visit wwvAdivicarina.com. 



MICHIGAN-FAMILY 

RENTALS, Secluded, very 
clean lake & sandy beach. 
Lux rentals. Boat launch, 
cable TV, VCR, Jacuzzi, 
sleeps 8-12. Starling at 
S000-1600 wkly. 'Avail 
Immed* Diane 906-297- 
2771 or 800-708-4677 ac- 
cess code 02. RE MAX 



PANAMA CITY BEACH 

Sandpiper Beacon Resort. 
From $49 (1-2p. arrive 
Sun/Mon • FREE night. 
G/6/02 - 5/24/02, Restric- 
tions). Pools, rlvor ride, 
BUltes, bar, Jacuzzi, para- 

sailing. . 000-400-0020. 

www.nandplpoiboa- 
con.com 







Out Of 
Area Property 



MCALLISTER, Wl 

(80mi N. of Green Bay/Mar- 
inette Co.)-For Sale by 
Owner. Exc hunting land 
w/yr round home, apprx 
30ac. Mostly wooded. 
$150K. 

715-732-0537 



FARM FOR SALE IN WIS- 
CONSIN 27 acres In West- 
ern Kenosha County, 7 
miles north ol Antioch, ILL. 
Immediately south of Bong 
Rocroatlonal area. Con- 
sists of largo dairy barn, 
polo barn with heated 
workshed, 3 silos & 3 bd. 
house. Buildings in good 
condition. Barn can be 
converted for horses. 

$510,000. (202) 537-4047. 

KENTUCKY" 10 ACRES 
$f/»00 DOWNI 105 MONTH. 
1 TO 10,000 ACRE 
TRACTS WATER AND 

ELECTRIC .OWNER FI- 
NANCING AP PROVED 

WITH DOWN PAY MENT. 

WWWACTIONFIT 

Tnn.COM 270.271-2530 

LAND FOn SALE IN WIS- 
CONSIN 7 miles North ol 
Anllooh, ILL. 11 plus acres 
in Western Kenosha Coun- 
ty, Immediately south ol 
Itono necreatlonal area, al« 
ready pinked, with barn & 
uataue. Nice building site. 

$Ulfi,0O0. (202) 507-4047, 



f 



liliy Agues! 



« 



pan 



urge to eat their young? 




■*-?t 







MEDIA 



.'» 






Out Of 
Area Property 




RecreaUonal , 
Vehicles 



RIVERFRONT BARGAIN 
$20,900. OWN GOR- 

GEOUS FRONTAGE 

ALONG ONE OF KEN- 
TUCKY'S BEST TROUT 
FISHING RIVERS. MUST 
SEEI FINANCING CALL 
NOW 1-800-704-3154 EXT 
535. 

S. COLORADO RANCH 40 
ACRES W/ WELL $49,900. 
ENJOY ROLLING FIELDS 
WITH SPECTACULAR 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN VIEWS 
300 DAYS OF 

SUNSHINEI JUST 1 HOUR 
COLORADO SPRINGS. 

ONLY ONE AVAILABLE. 
EXCELLENT FINANCING. 
CALL RCR NOW 1-866- 
696-5263. 



DODGE 1974 SPORTSMAN 
ROYAL TURTLE .TOP 
CAMPER VAN. 360-2V mo- 
tor, automatic. California 
van, new brakes, exhaust & 
much more. Doesn't require 
any emission testing. Needs 
some engine work. ' Must 
seel $1,500 or best offer. 
Call after 4:30pm until 
9:00pm. Chuck' Sr. (815) 
455-5938 



»• 



1 -. 



JAYCO 1997 EAGLE 
CLASS C MOTORHOME, 

exc. cond., 14,000 ml., 
sleeps 6, generator, full 
bath, kitchen micro., 
stove, fridge, must sell, 

$35,000.(815)675-6177. • 




Real Estate 
Wanted 




FIVE PLUS ACRE BUILD- 
ING SITE, rural setting, 

(847) 251-2639. 

NEW COMPANY IN AREA 

noods executive homes to 
leaso with option to pur- 
chase. (773) 637-7531. 

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 

WE BUY HOMES! 

ANY AREA!! 

ANY CONDITION!! 

ANY PRICE!! 

CASH!! 
FAST CLOSE!! 
(847) 838-3376. 



HONDA 3 WHEELER 
200ATC, adult driven, 

$1,000.(847)366-2659. 

POLARIS 1999 SCRAM- 
BLER 500cc 4x4, adult rid- 
den, very, very low hrs., 
push button 2 wheel to 
4WD, rear rack, K & N air filt- 
er, bright red, performance 
muffler, garage kept. Invest- 
ed $7,500, all receipts, 
$4,000/lirm. Tom (847) 322- 
6666. 

SKIDOO MX380 2002, 

brand new, no miles, with 
cover, extra belt & auto re- 
verse. $2.9007best. (708) 
902-5019. 



E^ 



BH 



Kccnutioiul 



in 



Boat/Motors/Bc. 




140n AsiMiial 



BY 




HOW At: 




Illinois Beach State Park 

Zion, Illinois 
Thursday thru Sunday 
May 30th to June 2nd 

Mtotojr Homes • Ttavel Trailers • 5th Wheels 

Qass B Van Compels • Tent Camper 
Truck Cauncineis • RVs Yn th Rear Cax^o Area 



19' SAN JUAN TYPE DOR- 
SET CABIN BOAT. Steeps 
2-3. 2 year old interior. AM/ 
FM Cassette Stereo, sink & 
more. 65HP Johnson motor. 
Asking S3,C0Gbest offer for 
complete package. Call 
Chuck Sr. after 4:30-9.0Cpm. 

(B1 5) 455-5938 

MARLIN AQUARIUS OUT- 
BOARD, 1973 T 171L, with 
1982 Evinrude 15Qhp„ 6- 
cyL fc electric start motor. 
T973 t7tL SINGLE AXLE 
SPARTAN 1 TRAILER includ- 
ed. StJSSa Gccd ski. fccaL 
(847) 6 




tsss 

CUOOY S7 Itferc .. full, can^ 
vas,. fiilly/ leaded: Shcrelan^ 
der trailer,, gccd cordis lew 
hre.., S16,SG0, (247) 



SO AT LIFTS NEW T fufC war- 
ranty electric* aluminum-.. 
3,CCQIb. t . 52.SSS; 4,5G0tbi, 
sa^SSs 5;CQGIb. v $3,335; 
S,CGCIb:„ S^SSS; T2,CC0lb. r 
S5\4S5i. Calli fcr details. 

(«147); 370-34201. 






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May i 7, 2002 



y 



* ^* * 




Boat/Motors/Etc. 



ALl 




--CLASSIFIEDS 



Cars for Sale 






UMICRAFT 14FT., 15HP. 

motor, w/trailer, 

S1,500/best. 16ft. Hobby 

Cat Sail Boat w/trailer, 

S800/best 30ft. R.V. w/gen-. 

erator, 51,000/best. Wood-' 

en gun cabinet, 550/best. 

Or trade. (262)757-0413. 



CHEVY 1988 MONTE 
CARLO SS, full power, T- 
tops, all original, clean car, 
$5,800/best. (847) 

782-9116 after 6pm. 




Sport Utility 
Vehicles 



ATLAS PIER, 10 sections, 
complete, good condition, 
some brand new, $2,000. 
(847) 973-9793. 

CUSTOM 

BOAT LETTERING. 

(847) 587-7256. 

ELECTRIC HARBOR 

All New Aluminum 
Shore Stations 

CANTILEVER 

1 .OOOIbS. - S850 

1,500lbs. -S995; 

2,500-lbs, -$1,830; 

3,500lbs. - 52,220. 

VERTICALS 

2,000lbs. - $1,495; 

3,000lbs. - $2,260; 

4,000lbs. • $2,695; 

ALL ELECTRIC 

5,000lbs. - $3,995. 

USED STEEL 

2,000lbs. • $795; 

3,000lbs. - $1 ,495 up; 

6,000lbs. - $2,995 up. 

Also custom built lifts 

8,000 to 20,000, call for 

quote. Now carrying 

complete line of Aluminum 

Pier Sections & Roll-A-Dock 

starting at $39.95/foot. 

Any station sold in April 

Free delivery $1 00. - 

Free assembly $150. 
Free delivery to your loca- 
tion wet or dry. (Up to 
5,000lbs). (Quotes for cus- 
tom 
installations) 

Call (847) 338-9369 

For appointment 

to see models. 



- 



CHEVY 1993 CAVALIER 4- 

cyl., auto., air blows cold. 
Moving, must sell. 

$1,900/best. (262) 

878-2639 after 3:30pm. 



CHEVY 1999 CAVALIER, 
red, A/C, CD player, sun- 
roof, power windows, power 
locks, keyless entry. 
$9,000/best. (262) 862- 
9094. - 



CORVETTE 1978, 350 MO- 
TOR, NEW FRONT 
END/brakes, 61,000 miles, 
anniversary year, white 
with red interior, garage 
kept, runs excellent, 

$9,500, (262)843-4058. 



DODGE 1998 DAKOTA 
CUSTOM, 80,000 miles, 
asking $13,500. (847) 

395-5248. 



FORD 1993 TAURUS, 
$1,900/best. (847) 331- 

5456, (847) 740^316 after 
6pm. 



FORD 1994 ESCORT LX, 4- 

dr., new exhaust system, 
fairly new tires, brakes, re- 
done, no rust. Runs great, 

$1 .800. (847) 223-2785. 



FORD 1995 EXCORT WAG- 
ON, EXCELLENT CONDI- 
TION, runs great, original 
owner, $3,500. (847) 

872-4647. 



SAILBOAT 27FT. M SEA 
QUEST ", $2,500 69 .Con- 
test- 27 includes sails, ra- 
dio, pfd, auxiliary equip- 
ment 10 hp Mercury out- 
board. 847-863-7993. 

TILT TRAILER, 5X8FT., 

good condition, single axle, 

$300/best. (847) 249-8402. 



HONDA 1994 PASSPORT, 
4 dr, 4WD, CD player. Very 
good condition, $4,800/best 
Call between 3pm-6pm, 
please. (847)741-9419 




Sports Equipment 



SCUBA FULL PACKAGES 
S799+I Regulators $179+; 
Pressure gauges $99+; 
BCD's S249+I Major 
Brandsl Free catalogl 
Aquatic World (262) 

567-7339. W/MMM 

www.aquaticworld.net 




CADILLAC 1994 CON- 
COURS NORTH STAR, load- 
ed, runs/looks like new, new 
brakes, tires, batt., pumps. 
Coach top roof. Sharp. 
Must See. (847) 336-3535. 

CHEAP BASIC TRANSPOR- 
TATION Ten to choose 
from. Price $800.00 to 
$2,500. Call (847) 

361-4970 for details. 

FORD 1995 ASPIRE, good 
condition, $2000.00 (847) 
366-2659. 



JUST IN TIME FOR SUM- 
MER 1993. Ford Mustang 
LX Convertible, 4-cyl., all 
power, A/C, am/fm cas- 
sette, custom rims, 25,000 
mi., $7,800. (847) 

356-3972. 

LAKELAND IS OPEN 
24 HOURS 

If you need to place an ad 
in Classified, call us at 

(847)223-8161 ext. 191 

and leave a message. 

We will get back to you by 

the next business day. Or 

you can fax our 24-hour fax 

line at (847) 223-2691. 

PONTIAC 1989 FIREBIRD, 
black, T-tops, Formula 350, 
newer engine, $3,000. (815) 

578-0899. 



PONTIAC 2000 SUNFIRE 
GT, black, Sports Coupe, 
10,000 mi., sunroof, power 
everything, AM/FM CD play- 
er, new tires. Very clean 
$13,000/best. Must sell, 
moving out of country. 

(847)540-0007. 

VW JETTA 1996 S2K, 
green, 4-dr., sunroof, new 
tires, automatic, exc. cond 
and runs, $7,000. (847) 

968-4412. 





BSBSBS, 










MM 




— 



Md 







MEDIA 




AUTO AUCTION 
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 

SALVATION ARMY 
Every Saturday, 9am. 
Over 150 cars, boats, camp- 
ers & motorcycles to be 
sold weekly 
to the highest bidder 
at no reserve. 
Opening bid $100. 

(847)662-0100 



CHEVY 1994 S10 BLAZER, 
4 WHEEL drive, great condi- 
tion, loaded with leather 
package, 77,000 miles, 
$5,000 /0b0.(847) 

838-6581 




SUBMIT YOUR LAKELAND 

CLASSIFIED ADS ON THE 

INTERNETI 

Visit http://www.lpnews.com/ 
to place your ads conven- 
iently. Ads appear on the In- 
ternet, in all Lakeland Pa- 
pers... The Great Lakes Bul- 
letin and The Market Journal 
for only $23.00 for 4 lines 
(approximately 16 words), 
then only ,60c tor each addi- 
tional line. 



CHEVY S10 BLAZER 1991 
4X4, 4 DOOR, GREY, V-6, 
AIR, POWER WINDOWS/ 

LOCKS/ steering/ brakes, 
cruise, F/T 4 wheel ABS, 
new front brakes/ serp. bit., 
bit, tensr and more. One 
owner. All records. $3,500. 

(847) 265-7038. 



JEEP 1995 GRAND CHER- 
OKEE LIMITED, loaded, 
leather interior, power seats, 
rebuilt trans, with warranty, 
exc. cond., $8,500/best. 

(847) 973-8285. 




COUGAR 1969 CONVERT- 
IBLE, NEW MOTOR, clean 
body, $4,500.00/Best. 

244-7290 



Service & Parts 



JIMMY 2001 4X4, pewter, 
power windows, power 
locks, keyless entry, remote 
start, CD player? Like brand 
new. Asking $19,900. (262) 
m818-1405. 





Trucks/Trailers 



ENGINE: FORD 302 Dipped 
& Bored. New pistons, rings, 
rods, oil pump, heads, Boss 
302 chrome cam covers & 
oil pan. Never run, 
$1,000./best 

FORD 302 C Code H.O., 
5200/best. 

FORD 302 Headers, $150. 
(815)385-6408 



ANTIQUE Z28 1987, 
$3,200. 1988 work Van 
E250, $980; rebuilt V8's, 
4x4's; rebuilt 1989 

Cheyenne, Western uni- 
mount. 32-35 S. 1985 
shortbed plow, $1 ,500; 
1982 shortbed, part out, 

350 V8 1979 3/4 ton; 1985 

S-10 red, black step sides, 
$3,200; slide in camper , 
$600. (847) 395-2669. 



FOUR KONIG 16" VIL- 
LIANS WHEELS, no tires, 
off a Grand AM, $450. 

(847)543-1716. 




Vans 



CHEVY 1986 3/4 TON P/U 
TRUCK, 27K, western plow 
and new salt spreader, new 
tires, runs like new, $3,500. 

(847) 800-5306. 



ASTRO 1994 UMC CON- 
VERSION VAN, 6-cyl., new 
tires, mechanic main- 
tained, $4,895/best. (847) 
769-8262. 



CHEVY 1988 4X4 2500, 

new motor, new rims/tires, 

bedliner, very dependable, 

$3,200/best. (847) 

856-6151. 



ASTRO 1996 LT, EXCEL- 
LENT condition, Dutch 
doors, CD/cassette, hitch, 

74K, $8,500.00 , 847-516- 
4685. 

DODGE 1994 CARAVAN 
SE, V6, tinted glass, keyless 
entry, dark green, very 
good cond. $3,500/best. 

(847) 275-0660. 

PLYMOUTH 1999 GRAND 
VOYAGER, exc. cond., 
11,000 mi., all power, 

$14,000/best. • (815) 578- 
0899. 




Sport Utility 
Vehicles 



CHEVY 1987 SUBURBAN 

4x4, 350cu.in., very good 
cond., lots of new parts, 

$5,500.(847)587-1616. 

GRAND 1997 CHEROKEE 
LIMITED LOADED, mint 
condition, 50K, 

$14,000.(847)680-3249 



CHEVY 1994 SILVERADO 

6.5 diesel Turbo, 53,000 mi. 

$11,000. (847) 623-5419, 
(847) 420-2850. 

CMI TOP OF THE t'lNE 
WHITE TRUCK- CAP for 
2001 Dodge Ram 1500, 
shortbed. Brand new condi- 
tion, $750/obo. (847) 

875-7588 

FORD 1985 F-250 XLT, 

4X4, Extended Cab Pickup. 
Western Plow, new battery, 
A/C. Needs tune up. 
$2,400/best. 

(815)385-6408 

FORD 2000 F250 SUPER- 
DUTY XLT-EXT cab long 
bed 7.3 diesel, 6 speed 
4x2, Reese 5th wheel hitch, 
tow package loaded, 30k 
miles, excellent condition, 
factory warrenty, 110 gal 
aux fuel tank, tool box, 

$23,500.00, (847) 

223-9180. 

INTERNATIONAL SCOUT II 
1974, everything original, 
project vehicle, does run, 
$400/best. (847) 858-3366, 
5-9. 




Lakeland Newspapers t 





Trucks/Trailers 



GMC 2000 3500 4x4 
DUMPTRUCK, A/C, AM/FM, 

elec. trailer, brakes, under 
15,000 ml., 1yr. left on war- 
ranty. Never used for plow- 
ing, $25,500/best. (262) 

862-9390 eves. 



MUST SELL 20FT. Wells 
Cargo Consession trailer, 
fully loaded, ex. cond. Call 
for details (815) 385-9395. 




Motorcycles 



BUELL X1 LIGHTNING 

2000, 1,200 miles, $9,000. 
(847) 336-8159. 



HARLEY DAVIDSON 1999 

HERITAGE SPRINGER, 

$17,900. (262) 857-3095 

after 5pm. . 



MOTORCYCLE 1988 

HONDA ' SHADOW 

1100,clean must see , 

$1.500VOBO(815) 

344-8503 




Wanted To Buy 



800CHARITYCARS.ORG 
DONATE YOUR vehicle. 
100% goes to the original, 
nationally acclaimed Charity 
Cars. Tax deductible. Free 
tow 1-800-Charity (1-800- 

242-7489). 



MUSCLE CAR WANTED 
Running or not, any condi- 
tion, whole or part. Cash 
waiting. (414)483-8850. 




Carpentry 



JIM'S CUSTOM 
CARPENTRY 

Interior/Exterior Remodeling 

at affordable pricing. 

No Job too Big or Too Small. 

Call for FREE estimate. 

Contact James 

(847) 246-3070 or 

pager (847) 237-3339. 




Carpet Cleaning 



SPRING IS HERE 
I do Windows 

Carpet Cleaning 

Power Dock Wash. 

Call Gary for FREE 

estimate. 

(847) 651-2684, coll. 




J. R.'s DRYWALL SERVICE 

All repair, new work & some 

painting. FREE estimates. 

Work Guaranteed. 

Call Jason or Toni 

-- (847)875-5483, 
(847) 265-2764. 




TELEPHONE AND TV WIR- 
ING. SAVE 20-70% OFF 
PHONE COMPANY RATES. 
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1255 Town Line Rd. (Rt. 60) 

LOCATED ON ROUTE GO, BETWEEN 

THE VERNON HILLS SHOPPING 

CENTER AND LAKE STREET 

(RT. 45). MUNDELEIN 












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CLASSIFIEDS 



May 1 7, 2002 ' 




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CLASSIFIEDS 




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FREE ESTIMATES 

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No annoying sales calls 
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Your local radio DJ isn't the only 
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NEWSPAPERS 




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B28 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



May 17, 2002 



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Dog park fun 

Lake Villa resident Bill Wickert plays with his dogs Rocky and Sheeba at the Lake 
County Forest Preserves' new dog exercise area of Duck Lake Farms in 
Lindenhurst.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 







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is, 



Tom Adams, chairman of the Lake 
County Republican Party announced that 
the officers and members of the party's 
executive committee for the next two years 

will be: 

Tom Adams, county chairman; Sen 
Adeline Geo-Karis-vice chairman emeritus 
and parliamentarian; Myron Siegel-l st 
vice chairman (an attorney residing in 
Bannockburn); Steve Mountsier-2 nd vice 
chairman (County board member and 
chair SMC); Ken Arnold-3 rd vice chair- 
man (businessman and past chairman 
Warren Township); Ray Card-secretary 
(businessman and Waukegan resident); 
Jack Martin-treasurer (businessman from 
Libertvville); Betty Niemi-county chair- 
woman (committman from Grant 

Township. 

Lillian Golonka-Antioch Township 
chairman; Bob Powers-Avon Township 
chairman; Ron Colangelo-Benton 
Township chairman; Dick Kosner-Cuba 
Township chairman; Marianne Bailey-Ela 
Township chairman; Edwin Sullivan Sr.- 
Fremont .Township chairman; Nancy 
Kubalanza-Grant Township chairman; Ted 
Livengood-Lake Villa Township chairman; 
Virginia Wood-Libertyville Township 
chairman; Ellsworth "Mike" Mills-Moraine 
Township chairman; Betty Rae Kaiser- 



Newport Township chairman; David 
Barkhausen-Shields Township chairme 
David Stolman-Vernon Township chair- 
man; Peter Karlovics-Warren Township 

chairman. • 

Jim Eschenbach-Wauconda Township 

chairman; Torrie Newsome-Waukegan 

Township chairman; . Edward 

"Ted"Anderson-West Deerfield Township 

chairman; Guy Glenn Garrison-Zion 

Township chairman; Steve Simonian- 

Cochairman, finance committee; 

Fernando Salazar-"Co chairman, Outreach 

committee; William Dam, MD-8 tn District 

State Central committeeman; Sen. William 

Peterson-10 tn District State Central com- 



Lease for 36imonths. $2399 Due at inception. 
Includes down pymt., first pymt, & security deposit.- 






mitteeman. ^ c\v. ; 

Adams said, I am extremely pleased 
with the great talent and commitment that 
is represented by the members of this gov- 
erning board and look forward to working 
with them and the nearly 400 precinct 
committeeman comprising our county 

central committee. 

" Our agenda is to open the doors and 
put out the welcome sign for all persons 
who are Republicans and those who share 
our common values. We will build on the 
base of voters that we already have and 
certainly continue to be the dominant 
political party in Lake County." 



Art in the Woods auction set 




Lease for 36 months. $2999 Due at inception. 
Includes down pymt., first pymt., & security deposit. 



By JEFF ZACHARY 
Staff Reporter 



i" 



With all the hard work being done by 
Round Lake Schools Community Unit District 
116 school board member Ann Welk, the "Art 
in the Woods" fund-raising auction could 
really be one heck of a show. 

"Personal invitations have been mailed to 
more than 50 art galleries in Lake County to 
attend the Art in the Woods Auction," said 
Welk. All Lake County schools participating in 
the auction will benefit," she added. 

The Auction date is June 9th, from 10 a.m.. 
until 4 p.m. at the Hart Woods in the Round 
Lake Area Park District located on Route 134 
and Hart Road in Round Lake. 



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Donations of artwork from students, staff 
and friends is being requested to display at 
this "silent" auction. 

"Several pieces have already been collect- 
ed, but more are needed to make this auction 
a success," said Welk. 

There are nearly 400 art* students at the 
Round Lake High school and 20 of them have 
just had their artwork featured at the Great 
Frame Up store located in Vernon Hills. 

Four of .the students, Dominick Cirell, 
Kristan Ruiz, Krystal Chayer and Deanne 
Anderson will now have their artwork dis- 
played at the Thompson Center in Chicago. 

For more information on the "Art in the 
Woods" silent auction, call Ann Welk at 847- 
721-9247. 










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- 



• 



.ease for 36 months. $3589 Due at inception. 
Includes down pymt., first pymt., & security d 



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Carmel election results for fall 






f 









■*-* 



The following students have been 
elected to Carmel High School Student 
Council and Class Boards for the 2002-03 
school year. 

Executive board: President, Matt 
Orschein-Hawthorn Woods, 1st vice presi- 
dent, Kevin Jackson-Lake Zurich, 2nd vice 
president, Allison Castillo-Gumee, recording 
secretary, Molly Day-Kildeer, corresponding 
secretary, Liz Coffey- Kildeer, treasurer, Roy 
Hilo-Gurnee. 

Senior board: Patrick Graham- 
Libertyville," Matt Meyers-Lake Zurich, 
Meredith Walton-Barrington, Sarah Fairfield- 



Hawthorn Woods, Rachel Dezelan-Gurnee, 
Nicole Hauser-Lake Villa 

Junior board: Becky Smith-Mundelein 
Brandon Ziemann-Antioch, Alex Bieschke 
Grayslake, Patrick Kimener-Grayslake, Peter 
Scalzitti-Hawthorn Woods, Meghan Duffy- 
Ingleside. 

Sophomore board: Yared Ogunro- 
Libertyville, Ryan Meehan-Grayslake, Katie 
Quille-Mundelein, Anthony Cipolla- 
Wauconda, Jessie Kipp-Long Grove, Shawn 

Egan-Mundelein. 

Freshman class officers will be elected in 

the fall of 2002.