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Full text of "Antioch News 05/26/1995"

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Lakeland Newspapers Welcomes 136 NEW Subscribers This Week \ 



ANIIOCH 



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AM0757 12/28/95 i#f>7 

ANTIOCH TOW/SHIP LIBRARY 

757 MAIN STREET 

Antioch JL 60032 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



VOL 109 NO. 21 







THIS WEEK 



COMMUNITY 



Honor roll 

Antioch High School 
tells its honor roll 
students PAGE AS 



COUNTY 




Farm Bill brings 
mixed harvest 

Congress to debate 
legislation PAGE Bl 



BUSINESS 



.;.";. r " 




New company 
provides 
Internet access 

Lakeland netDIRECT 
brings web to county 
PAGE CI 

INDEX 

BusiNtss CI 

CaIvary Gracjuates. Bl 

CUssifiEcJ CIO 

CouNiy News Bl 

Crosworg 1 ... B20 

EdiiORiAl/OpiNiON B4 

Crccn Up B7 

HcaIiIwaicIi B7 

Horoscope B20 

Ukrlifr.... BI4 

LecaI NoTjos ..A 1 4 & C9 

UpsfRvict C7 

Movies.. BI9 

ObiiuAWEs C8 

SiKicily foR Senjor.. C4 

SpoRis: C2I 

wIiehc io EaT Out ..B22 




-fUINCKS PR€S5 




\ 



ANTIOCH MAY 26, 1995 



; L1C LlBRAR \oc>fS1?ffl?! dofPubicanon 
FOUR SECTI0NS«76 PAGES' ll ,v,a "> *>i'eet 



50 CENTS 




Memorial reflection Ws£*^ 

Morpbort of Lako qoanjy Vote roftect In a rjKqb) ropica or tho Saturday, boforo It was to moko Its dobut k\ Stroamwood foe 

Vietnam Wear Momorbl at Hmtatori Parte In Waukogan. Tho wal Momortal Day ovonts. Tho travoflng wal wll rotum Io Votnon 

b a half-slzo ropBca of tho momortat monumont In Washington Ills and Gurnoo In Juty. For moro on tho story, soo poao BM.— 

D.C. Votorans assomblod tho now wall for tho first tlmo Photo by Todd Hotsior 



Vietnam tank to be dedicated this weekend 



CLAUDIA ML LENART 



RoQionaJ Editor 

Veterans will ba remembered this 
Memorial Day with a special dedication of a 
restored military tank which saw battles In 
Vietnam. 

The restored military tank will be 
dedicated at 10:30 am., May 29. It was made 
possible through a combined effort of the 
Village of Antioch, various village 
committees, and the Antioch VI"W. Located 
across from the village hall, the tank replaces 
the older veterans memorial which included 



a gun 



Tills Is going to be without a doubt the 
most memorable Memorial Day the Vllllagc 
of Antioch Km wni. The dedication wtH pay 
great homage to our village and our country," 
said Claude l.cMere, community 
development director. 

Donations from the Antioch VFW and 
Community Action Now (CAN) liave enabled 
the Dcautincatlon Committee to spruce up 
the new memorial. Military leaders 

and government officials will gather at the 
new tank on Memorial Day. Those attending 
Include Itrigadicr General George Oliver 
Millard III, Air Force Lt. Colonel Dave Ross, 



Navy Captain Hugh J. McCullum, Senator 
Adeline C*eo»KarU, State Representative 
Robert Churchill, Slate Treasurer Judy K»rr- 
Toplnkx, as well as lor .ii officials. 

The festivities will begin .u 10:30 a.m. 
with music by the lakes Area Rand. Antioch 
Community High School. Antioch Upper 
Grade School , and Petty School marching 
bands. Other special events include a 
helicopter landing and a Humvcc, a state-of- 
the-art armored personnel carrier, such as 
those featured in Arnold Schwarzenegger 
action flicks. 
Sec DEDICATION page A10 




Ethel Pozhulls, a mombor of Anttoch's Boautfflcatlon Commit!©©, 
washos down Iho walk In Ronl of tho tank In proparatlon for 
Monday's d©dlcatlon.— Photo by Krrsl©n Johnson 



Curbside recycling to 
be offered in township 

CLAUDIA M. LENART 

f?otf ond Editor 

The days of loading up the trunk and trucking out to Antioch High 
School on Saturday mornings, in the interests of being 
environmentally responsible, will soon end for township residents. 
Curbside recycling is coming this summer to rcsidcryc of 
unincorporated Antioch. 

"We saw there was definitely a need hecausc. customers were 
utilizing the dropoff program. Now people w.tm't even have to leave 
their home to recycle," said Will Flowcjfs, director of community 
relations for Waste Management. • 

The service will only he avallab/lc for Waste Management 
customers. The company will send oitot information to customers In 
June with plans to start the program In July, There will be a 
subscription fee, but the amount luis not Wt l>ccn determined. 

Flowers said Waste Management ^received many calls from 
residents asking for curbside recycling. ^ v 

"Recycling Is one of the fastest growing partes of out business," said 

Rowers. ^^ 

Waste Management has been providing curhsldiVrecycling for 

residents of the Village of Antioch since the spring of 1991 . "** .. 

Suhscrihcrs will he Issued bins and Flowers said the standard sl/t\ 

Sec RECYCLE page A10 



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Conservation Club event 

FoSowing a program on how to attract buttof flies to your oardea Antioch area roskdonts wore 
offered the chance to buy some beautiful bedding plants. Above, A/tene Kauffman picks out 
a fushla for her garden. Kaufmann Is a master gardener and presented tho show on butterfly 
gardening. Cody and Cheyenne Raduha pick some plants for the* gardon. The program and 
plant sato were sponsored by the Northern Mnofe Conservation Club whoso mission ts educa- 
tion regarding wfkfllfo and wBdlfo habitat and conservation of natural resources.- Photo by 
Krbton Johnson 



Waterway wants options on pay r BmEfs 



TINA L SWIECH 
Staff Roportof 

When Ron Baker was elected 
to fill a seat on the Fox Waterway 
Agency's board of directors, he 
wasn't expecting any pay. 

Neither was Director Wayne 
Make. 

last year Illinois Stale Rep. 
Hubert Church ill (R-62) intro- 
duced a bill In the Mouse which 
would allow the payment of 
$3,000 a year to cadi director of 
the Agency, as well as $5,000 
yearly to the Agency chairman. 
The House of Representatives has 
approved the bill. 

The bill has already been 
passed in the Senate, explained 
Agency Executive Director Karen 
Kabbcs, but an amendment was 
made which will require another 



vote. 

"I intend to cam my money," 
said Director Baker. "I think it's 
adequate, if we do our Jobs cor- 
reedy." 

lie added that directors are 
allowed to turn In an expense 
report for fuel, which helps, but 
doesn't always pay for everything 
they do penalning to the Agency. 

Director Make agrees, I le said 
last year he turned In a total of 
$230 for gas mileage going to and 
from meetings. Sometimes, espe- 
cially when Agency meetings were 



held In Algonquin, he used a lot 
more fuel traveling from his home 
in An t loch. Directors also traveled 
to Vlcksburg, Miss, as well as 
Springfield over the last few years. 

While Blake isn't going to turn 
the salary down himself, The 
money should be an option for 
the directors," he said. 

Dr. William Dam, chairman, 
said he's going to use that 
option, and put the salary back 
into the Agency. There won't be 
any money for this chairman," 
said Dam. 



Millburn group planning 
Memorial Day service 



Lakeland < usps , 

S£**£? 027-080) 

Antioch News-Reporter 

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D0HHAJ.EVANS 



Die Historic Millburn 
Community Association, Inc. will 
host a Memorial Day service at 
the Millburn Cemetery off 
Millburn Road, 

The ceremony will begin at 2 
p.m., May 29. Members of the 
Antioch Veterans Association 
placed flowers on the gravesitcs. 

Gurncc American Ugion 
Post 77 1 's color guard is expected 
to participate. 

Refreshments will be served. 

Also, the association is plan- 
ning a house walk for July 1 6. 

Buildings on the national reg- 
istry include Millburn Congrega- 



tional Church, Martins General 
Store, Rasmusscn Home, 
Rcvenaugh Home and Art Gallery, 
White Home and Musak Home. 

An old fashioned ice cream 
social will talc place at Lauren 
Hall on the west side of the 
Congregational Church. Price Is 
$1.50. 

The house walk will l>c from 
10 a.m. to S p.m. and will cost S8 
for tickets purchased in advance, 
$10 at the door. 

For more information, call 
Millburn Congregational Church 
at 356-5237. —by STEVE 
PETERSON 



JO DAYS AKH H ROBER TS 

RHONDA HFTRJCK BURKE 

IflfXCW 



ACHS prepares to graduate 

Antioch Community High School is planning a special celebration 
to honor the graduating senior class. 

There will t>e guest speakers and performances along with speech- 
es from the graduates themselves. The ceremony will take place at the 
high school at 7 p.m. on May 31 at the north gym in the high school. 

Entertainment will be provided by the A Capclla Choir under the 
direction of Keith Cox who will sing "Come Sail Away." The Symphonic 
Band directed by John Olisar will perform "Uon King Highlights," A 
quartet, Russell Todd, lohn Schultz II, Daniel Jaspcrson and Jarcd 
Parmlcy will perform "It's hard to Say Goodbye to Yesterday." 

The faculty speaker will lie Clarence Williams and his speech is 
titled "Coming Full Circle. The senior speech titled "We the People" 
will be presented by Sarah Murray. 

Student Council President Don Bobcr and Senior Class President 
Heather Ronkowskc will also make speeches. 

Diplomas will be presented by Antioch High School Board 
President Uurcl Dahl and Rosemary Upps, board vice president 



Golf outing a success 

The Antioch Chamber of Commerce and Industry held its 
annual golf outing on May 17, hosted by Antioch Golf Club. It 
was followed by a wonderful buffet of barbecued chicken and 
pig roost at Mogan's Restaurant. The largest turnout of local 
business people for this event In recent years met with a sunny 
day, a courteous and helpful new golf coune and restaurant 
staff. The awards ceremony Included many pri/e* donated Ivy 
the supporting businesses. 

Antioch park programs 

A reminder to residents to sign up now for summer park- 
district programs. Do not delay, programs are filling up quick- 
ly. Applications can be found in the back of the tummcr pity- 
gram booklet or can be picked up at the Antioch Village JfatL 

Pageant time again 

It is time, once again for the Miss and Little Miss Antioch 
Pageants, Applications arc now available and can Iwr picked up 
at Antioch Village Hall. Miss contestants must be l>ctwccn 16 
and 22 years old. little Miss contestants must be between the 
ages of 6 and 9. The pageants will be held June 23 and 24. 

Rummage sale 'gears' up 

It is time again for the Sl Peter Council of Catholic Women 
In Antioch to begin to gear up for the 36th Annual St. Peter 
Rummage Sale. Donations can be brought to St. Peter School 
starting June 8 through lunc 20 from B a.m. to 1 p.m. 
Donations can be tax deductible and some suggestions include 
antiques, glassware, bicycles, appliances, computer equipment, 
jewelry, toys, books, shoes, tools, dishes, linens, collectibles, 
pots and pans, and clean and mended clothing. For more 
information or ifyoti need to have your Items picked up, call 
395-6744, 395*8126, or 356-6919. The sale itself will be held 
June 22 through 25. 

Father-daughter derby 

A father-daughter fishing derby, sponsored t»y the Antioch 
Girl Scouts will be held on June 10 from noon to 4 p.m. The 
derby will be held at CI. Smiths Marina on Grass Lake Road. 
Anyone interested in learning more about the Antioch Girl 
Scouts arc encouraged to call 395-1550. 

Camp Read-a-Lot program begins 

Summer readers arc invited to join the fun at the Camp 
Head -a- 1 ot program at the Antioch Public library, 757 N. Main 
SL by registering May 30 through June 10. Children from ages 
three through 12 will participate in Camp Read-a-Lot with 
plenty of special programs, fun and prizes. The free program 
will run for sU weeks from lune 19 through July 28. Special cel- 
ebrations planned for this summer's program include a magic 
show, Earthkccpcrs show, a Hobby Happening and a nature 
hunt. For more information, call the library at 395*0874 and ask 
for Mrs. Padbury. For those with disabilities who want to 
attend, contact the library in advance of the program so that 
arrangements can be made. 



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n COMMUNITY I.aW.IwkI Ncwsp»|*«s M»r 26, 1995 



rBmEfs 



Dinner dance 

Antioch Upper Grade School clghth-gradcrs will l>c gather- 
ing May 31 at 7 p.m. for their annua] dinner dance. Tills year's 
theme will be Medieval Times. Tickets cost $10 per student, but 
the cost can be offset by selling raffle tickets. A DJ will provide 
the evening's entertainment Including a video screen, balloons, 
and fog machines. 

Petty student published 

Emily Martin, a fifth-grader at W.C. Petty School has had a 
poem published in the Anthology of Poetry by Young 
Americans. Congratulations Emily. 



Computer camp will be offered 



Special adoption 



The third-graders at Oakland School have a very special 
adoption. Sponsorship papers of "Jade" a snow leopard were 
received by students from the Milwaukee County Zoo. The stu- 
dents contributed money to help feed the animal and for overall 
improvements at the zoo. 



Story hour 

Students from Oakland School will be participating in a spe- 
cial story hour on May 26. A number of "special people" will be 
stopping by to share their story telling skills. 

Committee appointment 

District 34 's Superintendent Or. Daniel Burke has been 
named to the Regional Office of Education Oversight Hoard. 
Regional Superintendent Ed Conwa made the announcement. 

Bus drivers needed 

District 34 is looking for a few good men and women to 
drive school buses for next year. The school district will provide 
all training and safety instruction needed. Call 395-0404 for 
more information. 

Summer art and choir program 

A summer art and choir program will be offered by Antioch 
Upper Grade School. Tin- cost is $40 and is open to 4th and 5th 
graders. Enrollment is limited to 40 and the program will run 
from July 17 to July 20. 



Antioch Upper Grade School 
Is offering three one-week com- 
puter camps this summer. Each 
session will cost $50 and the pro- 
grams arc geared for students in 
grades 3 through fl. 

The beginners group will 
meet from to 1 1 a.m. or noon to 
3 p.m. during the week of July 10. 
Students will learn basic comput- 
er operations along with word 
processing, desktop publishing, 
and use educational software. 



Two projects will be completed in 
the beginner's group, a greeting 
card and a story with illustra- 
tions. 

The intermediate group will 
meet at the same times, during 
the week of July 17. Students will 
lcam word processing, spread- 
sheets, databases, desktop pub- 
lishing, simple hypcrcard and 
logo programming. The projects 
include a greeting card, flyer and 
story with Illustrations. 



The advanced group meets 
the week of July 24. Topics 
include word processing, spread- 
sheets, databases, desktop pub- 
lishing, hyper card and logo pro- 
gramming, multimedia and 
telecommunications. Projects 
include greeting card, flyer, spiro- 
graph design and multimedia 
programming. 

Myers with more Information 
will be distributed to area school 
children. 



Teacher featured on national TV 



Being known in a community 
takes a lot of effort. Teacher Lauri 
Hargrove, freshmen Missy 
McCowan and Melissa Hutkus; 
juniors Mcchcllc Poplin, Keith 
Schmitt, Mark I) awe and Melissa 
Parker; senior Una Stochmal and 
Mrs. Hargrove's husband 
appeared on CBS national IV on 
"Different Drummers" with host 
Toni Tucker. 

Different Dmmmers is a show 
wiit-re teens talk and ask ques- 
tions about common teen prob- 
lems to expert panelists help 
teens sec another view of the 
problem. Audience participation 
is the main format. 

'Hie topic of the show was teen 
scxuaJity. Students asked about 
condoms in schools, if they 
should or should not be provided 



or sold, and the Issue of values 
and teaching abstinence was also 
discussed. 

ACHS was proud to have 
Hargrove as a panelist, along with 
the Rev. Ow.lc Smith of Trinity 
United Church of Christ in 
Chicago and Fr. James Dokas of 
Annunciation Greek Orthodox 
Church in Milwaukee. 

When asked why she thought 
she was chosen, Hargrove 
replied, "Because the health 
teachers at ACHS has taught a 
strong abstinence approach and I 
have spoken at many conven- 
tions teaching our program. They 
(CBS) Invited rnc back because 
ACHS has taught abstinence edu- 
cation for seven years and wc 
were alone in our philosophy for 
many years and now abstinence 



is becoming the strongest option 
for teens to live a healthy 
lifestyle." 




Laud Hargrovo 



Wfite Us 



Lakeland Nowspapors wants to hoar nows of local sporting ovonts. clubs. orrjanJ- 
za lions, otc. Black and whlto photos aro also wolcomo. Ptoaso sond nows Horns 
to Claudia M. Lonart 30 S. Whltnoy, GraysJako, 60030 or call 223-6161. 



AUGS offers 
summer band 

A summer band program is 
available to all incoming 5th , 
through fltli graders at Antiodi 
Upper Grade School. A tuition fee 
of SIM) will cover four weeks of 
Instruction induding two full band 
rehearsals cadi week, one section- 
al, one 30 minute private lesson for 
Incoming 5th and 6th graders, one 
marching hand fundamentals dass 
cadi week, one composition with 
computers dass cadi week and one 
percussion for brass and woodwind 
players. Deadline to return sum- 
mer band applications is May 2d. 

PTO elections 

Congratulations to the new Fit) 
officers at Oakland School Donna 
Blerc, l»atti Brooke, Kate Jefferson 
and Lisa Kent will be heading up 
the organization during 1995-1996. 



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Whenever you're driving 

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ANTIOCH 
MANOR 



APARTMENTS 



GRAYSLAKE 



BE SURE TO LOCK YOUR CAR DOORS 

and make sure personal belongings can't be seen. 

For pointers on auto safety, see me, 

your State Farm agent. 



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894 Hillside 

Antiocli, IL 

395-1089 



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nMgli mitTiHW— M 



M*y26, 1995 [AiUsti NtwspApcm, COMMUNITY 






_PolicE Beat 




Persons charQed with a crime are Innocent until proven 
gulty In a court of law. 

ANTIOCH 

Revoked D.L./warrant arrest 

Charts Clayton, 30, of Antiodi, was charged with resisting a 
peace officer, driving while license revoked and illegal trans- 
portation of alcohol. An officer first spotted Dayton parked at 
the Clark Gas Station on Route A3 and North Avenue while the 
station was closed. May 20 at 1:10 a.m. The officer followed the 
vehicle to Johclio Drive where Clayton ran into a wooded area, 
flic officer followed him and found him in another vehicle with 
open beer and he took off again. Also in the vehicle was Susan 
Tidcrman, 29, of Lake Villa, who was wanted on a Lake County 
warrant for a revoked license. Tidcrman was taken to the sta- 
tion and hooked. The officer returned to the area and found 
Clayton who allegedly bragged to the officer that he was only 
four feet away the whole time. Clayton was taken to the station 
and booked. 

Illegal transportation of alcohol 

Scott Kearney, 21, was charged with illegal transportation of 
alcohol and on a local littering ordinance. When an officer was 
making a traffic stop at 2:24 a.m.. May 20, on lake Street, west 
of Route 83, he observed a passenger in a car throw a beer bot- 
dc from the vehicle. 'Hie officer stopped the car and the driver 
said he was unaware the passenger was drinking, so the driver 
was released. Kearney said he panicked when he saw the officer. 
He was charged and released on a $75 bond. 

Driving while under the influence 

Matthew T. Dye, 30, of Ant loch was charged with DUI, at 
1:50 a.m.. May 22. 1 tc refused a breath test and was released on 
a $3,000 recognizance bond. 

Dante I. Parks, 32, of Antiodi was found sleeping at the 
wheel at Route B3 and North Avenue, 7:54 a.m., May 13, He reg- 
istered .1 G on the breathalyzer and was charged with a DUI and 
locked up, 

LAKE VILLA 

Don't threaten people 

Brian flrcnrtan, 19, 14Z7 Idlcwtfd, Round l.akc Beach and 
Bradley Brcnnan. IB, same address, on May 16, were arrested 
for disorder ly conduct, They were anrested alter the com* 
plainants said the two were threatening patrons at the Shell sta- 
tion. 




Dedicating Emmons addition 

Jonna Bk3«J<o, oKjhtt> grade. Norm Halford. third grado, and 
Rrott Winters, first grado, aro roady for Iho ribbon cutting at 
a dedication coromony for Emmons School's addition of 14 
classrooms. 



ft 



MISSING 



Annmarie 
Zullo 



Can Be Found At her Nov Location: 

Autumn's Hair Affair 

Rt. 173 & 83 ANTIOCH. IL 



Rescue up close 

Residents were able to see up close what happens in a real rescue operation at the EMS open 
house held in Anttoch. Rescue squads from throughout the county and Wisconsin participated. 
Above rescuo workers load a "victim" Into a helicopter.— Photo by Kevin Freely 



Kmart cashier charged with felony 



Round I-akc Reach Police arrested a cashier at 
Super Kmart after she reportedly bilked the compa- 
ny $1 5,000 over a three month period of time. 

Casscndra Saxton, 175 Devlin, Inglcsidc, was 
arrested May 22 on felony theft charges. Saxton 
allegedly had taken money from the cash register, 
shop lifted and "skip scanned" merchandise. 

On the day she was arrested, Saxton reportedly 
had skip scanned $1 13.64 worth of merchandise. 

The manager who reported her told police the 



store has three months of video whidi shows Saxton 
ripping the store off. 

Police interviewed Saxton who allegedly admit- 
ted to skip scanning merchandise once or twice a 
week and increased it to four to five times a week. 
She also reportedly told police she took approxi- 
mately $250 to $500 a week. 

Lake County State's Attorney's office approved 
the felony charges A bond hearing was set before 
she was released from |att. —by ALEC ]UNGE 




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to 1% over the Prime Rate on l-nos of $50,000 and beiow. and to 1/2\ over the Prime Rate on lines over 
S50.000. Maximum APR is 18%. There is a S25 annual fee (warved the first year). Property insurance required. 
Tho discount is not avaflablo for current Anchor Bank Homo Equity Line of Credit customers. Closing costs are 
waived on approved and dosed Unes of aod* of S25.OO0 to 5200.000. 



[708) 335-3BG3 



Mention ihti id U rcodw 
10% ofTwi*tcc 





Highway 45 at Washington • P.O. Box 270 
Gray slake, IL 

(708) 548-3000 







COMMUNITY UlalANd Ncwspajh rs Max 26, 1 999 






l 






Happy Memorial Day, when is Labor Day? 



Well, summer is officially here, 
and with the beginning of our 
short, unpredictable season 
comes a wealth of new material 
for me. I am not talking about 
summer programs or camps, 1 
am talking about all of those 
pesty things we must put up with 
over the summer that normally 
wc can avoid by being shut up in 
our houses all winter. Such things 
as bugs; all shapes, sizes and bit- 
ing potentials. Or those pesky 
ovcr-thc-fcncc neighbors who 
always seem to have their nose in 
our business. 

Then wc have the ever-popu- 
lar conking on the grill. A very 
primitive form of food prepara- 
tion that wears me nut trying to 
provide a meal for my family that 
could easily be purchased at a 
local eating establishment. The 
routine begins: You preheat the 
grill, then run into the house to 
wash and slice the tomatoes; run 
outside, put the burgers on; run 
into the house, chop the onions; 
back outside, flip burgers; back 
inside, wash and spin the lettuce; 
back outside to hose down the 
grease lire and attempt to flip the 
charred burgers; back into the 
house to slice the pickles; back 
outside to find the neighbor's dog 
eating the remains of your meal; 
the routine ends. "Everyone in 
the van, we're eating out" 

Then we have those oncc-a- 
ycar outdoor chores like window 
washing, garage cleaning and 
lawn thatching. It only gets bet- 
ter as the summer progresses. 
Wc move along to lawn mowing, 
garden weeding and pool vacu- 
uming. I have 14 rooms to vacu- 
um and one pool — want to take 
a guess which takes mc longer? 
I'll give you hint: It doesn't take 
place in the comfort of my 
home. 

I am sorry, but I'm basically a 
winter person. Summer Is Just 
too much extra work, and 
besides, 1 hate the heat. 
Anything above 72 degrees is 
enough to turn this puppy Into a 
whiny, sniveling creature— so as 
the summer heat turns up, 
"lingtc from Pringlc" may have a 
tendency to get a touch more 
sarcastic than usual. 

Now don't mention central 
air conditioning to mc, that's 
even more disturbing. 1 want my 
windows and doors wide open; 
it means less household chores 
for me to perform. Wc have 
enough windows in our house 
that on a good windy day, not 
only docs the cross breeze dust 
my entire house, if I leave out 
clean sheets and the wind Is 
whipping off the lake just right, I 
can get my beds changed with- 
out lifting a finger. 



The summer also brings those 
oncc-a-ycar events like family 
reunions and block parties. These 
arc the two groups of people you 
spend most of your time avoid- 
ing, and now you find yourself 
faced with the idea of trying to 
have a relatively good time in 
their presence without that 
pained look on your face. 

Did I mention (he other fun 



JINGLE FROM PRINGLE 




LYNN 
PRINGLE 

397-6764 



things about summer, like sun- 
burn, garden snakes and the 
annual run-in with poison Ivy? 
Now don't think I'm an old her- 
mit and sit closed up in my house 
all summer. I love the outdoors — 
there's nothing quite like sitting, 
in tunc with nature and Its 
revving lawnmowcrs, barking 
dogs and racing boat engines. 
Oh, what harmony to one's cars. 
And wc mustn't forget the one 
subject I have yet to mention — 
the fact that the darling children 
arc home all day. Oh my, will 
I iibor Day ever get here? 

Here comes summer 

l : or all you parents who arc 
getting a hit apprehensive at the 
thought of spending an entire 
summer at home with your kids, 
the parks and recreation depart- 
ment has come to your rescue. 
Iliey have classes in karate, ten- 
nis, tumbling, drawing, fishing 
and dance. They also have oodles 
of summer camps to choose 
from, such as Soccer, Volleyball, 
Cartooning, Drawing, Baseball 
and Nose Piercing 101. No, I just 
made that last one up to sec if you 
were paying attention (and just 
when you were thinking, "llcy, 
that Antioch is one hip town!**). 

For other avenues of escape 
there is always the pool, or the 
Antioch Aqua Center as it is 
referred to in the brochure. I 
personally think that sounds 
more like a title the town of l.akc 
Forest would give its swimming 
facility. "Pool" sounds tacky, but 
Aqua Center — now that's a 
classy act. 

A family season pass at 
Antioch's swimming hole isn't all 
that expensive: village residents, 
$75; township, $90; other, $100. 
Now, granted you have to accom- 
pany your children instead of just 
dropping them off at the gate and 
driving into the sunset, but It 
could be an entertaining experi- 
ence. 

Wc know wc arc all guilty as 



sin when it comes to scrutinizing 
other people in that vulnerable 
stage of dress wc call swim wear. 
At one time or another, haven't 
wc all wanted to approach certain 
sunbathe rs and say, "llcy, did 
you forget to look in the mirror 
before you walked out of the 
house Uds morning?" I look at It 
as a great way to teach your chil- 
dren the do's and don'ts of fash- 
ion — oh trendsetter that 1 am! 

So you sec, moms and dads, 
there arc lots of ways to occupy 
your children this summer and 
broaden their horizons, perhaps 
even team them a trade for future 
employment. Those fine people 
at the parks and recreation 
department arc anxiously await- 
ing your registration form, so give 
them a call at 39S-21G0 for more 
Information. 

And, just for the record, I 
won't be one of those scantily 
clad, overweight sunbathcrs you 
will have the pleasure of ripping 
to the bone at the pool this sum- 
mer. Fortunately, wc have our 
own Aqua Center here at the 
plantation. 

Hope all Is well 

Bruce and Gail Iindstrom 
have been going through some 
pretty rough weather with their 
oldest son Bradley lately. Seems 
he has been out of sorts and the 
doctors arc stumped. I think I 
speak for everyone who is even 
acquainted with this really nice 
family — wc hope the storm will 
subside and calmer seas will 
come your way really soon. 

Our prayers arc with nil of you. 
Keep mc posted, Gall.- If there's 
anything you need, I'll put the 
word out and I'm sure the folks In 
Antioch will be glad to help out 

Special thank-you 

If you will all indulge mc for a 
moment, I would like to take a bit 
of space here to acknowledge a 
truly special day and say thanks 
to Ncal and my two girls, Tricia 
and Stephanie. 

If any of you read my Mother's 
Day column, you know all I 
requested for Mother's Day was a 
chance to cur) up with some bar- 
becue chips and diet Coke and 
read the entire Sunday paper on 
my special day. Well, when I got 
home from church that Sunday 
and went upstairs to change out 
of my church-going clothes, 
there, all laid out on the bed, was 
a tray with a basket of chips, a 
two-liter bottle of diet Coke, a 
glass of ice and the Sunday paper. 
What a pleasant couple of hours I 
had. Thanks, guys, it was the best! 
And, so goes another "jingle 
from I*rlnglc." Don't forget to call 
395-6364. 




Magna cum laude 

Western Illinois Unfvorslty sonlor Jacob N. Hargrove, Antioch, 
was honored as the philosophy departmonial scholar and a 
magna cum laude graduate at WIU's Academic Honors 
Convocation which recognizes the academic achieve- 
ments of students who wero to rocotvo tholr degrees May 13. 
Hargrove received a sflver modalflon from Will President 
Donald S. Spencer. 



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May 2a, 199* lAbUsdNfwspM*« COMMUNITY 




-Shop Aivrioch- — 

Merchants host 4-day 
memorial celebration 



Great news! Antioch mer- 
chants will be celebrating 
Memorial Day throughout down- 
town starting on Friday, May 26. 
This four-day event will kick off 
the beginning of Memorial week- 
end and run through Monday, 
May 29. Monday's festivities will 
reach a peak at 10:30 a.m. with 
the beginning of the Tank 
Dedication program to be held at 
the intersection of Orchard and 
Toft Sts. 

Throughout the four-day cele- 
bration In town, you'll find red, 
white and blue balloons proudly 
waving in the breeze. 
Participating merchants will be 
offering special promotions or 
giving away commemorative 
novelties. 

Merchants invite you In to 



enjoy the traditional kick-off to 
summer that Memorial weekend 
brings. Browse through this sum- 
mer's fashions and styles you'll 
find displayed throughout town. 
Take advantage of summer sav- 
ings on fashionable apparel and 
summer time Items you'll find at 
participating shops. 

Enjoy the freshness and vitali- 
ty of the newly planted (lower 
tubs throughout downtown. And 
relish in the ambiance of our 
small-town pride in our country 
and community, which Is patriot- 
ically displayed through flags, 
banners and balloons. 

Editor's note: Shop Antioch is a 
weekly newsletter showcasing 
Antioch's merchants and retailers. 
Prepared and written by Barbara 
Porch of Choosey Child. 




Automania 

Art and Angola Kornhauser chock out a Grand Am at the Antioch Chamber of Commerce 
Automania event which features vehicles from area dealerships as well as food and entertain- 
ment.— Photo by Krlston Johnson 



-PEopU News 



COURAGE fun fair features documentary 



Wins competition 

Sam McKce of Antioch, a 
writer for Charleston, IL-hascd 
Eastern Illinois University's 
"Daily Eastern News," is the win- 
ner of the Near West Gazette's 
1995 Olga -Ollic" Tschlrlcy 
Nordhaus Feature Writing 
Competition for his article 
"I Jtcracy. The difference between 
heaven and hell. - The article pro- 
filed Howard Proctor, a man who 
hud lived most of his life and had 
once held an office Job despite 
not being able lo read until be 
joined Project PAL (Panne rs in 
Adult Literacy). McKce will 
receive $100 for winning the con- 
test 

Joins Army 

Joseph F. Kopernlk has 
joined die United States Army 
under the Delayed Enlistment 
Program. Kopcmlk, a senior at 
Waukcgan High School, will 
report to Fort Sill, Uwton, OkJa., 
in June to begin military basic 
training. He is the son of Gary 
and Unda Kopcmlk of Antioch. 
His wife, Connie, Is the daughter 
nf Frank and Millie Kltzerow of 
Antioch. 

Receives scholarship 

MaxJne Olson, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. James Olson, of 
Antioch, received a Heritage 
Scholarship Honorable 



Mention during the Carthage 
Honors Convocation. The 
award was given based on the 
excellence of her written port- 
folio and personal Interview. 
Olson Is currently a freshman at 
Carthage. 

Receives honors 

The United States 

Achievement Academy has rec- 
ognized Reglna Pcbt for acade- 
mic achievement at a United 
States National I lonor Uoll Award 
winner. Pclx, who attends 
Antlodi Upper Grade School, will 
appear in the United States 
Achievement Academy Official 
Yearbook, which Is published 
nationally. Stte \* the daughter of 
Ron Pclz of Inglcsidc and Vlckl 
Pck of Antioch. 



COURAGE (Community Outreach Uniting 
Residents Against Gang Environment) invites area 
residents to attend a June 3 fun fair to celebrate two 
years of advancements in gang awareness, educa- 
tion, Intervention and prevention in Lake County. 

The fun fair will feature the showing of the ABC- 
TV documentary, 'Project COURAGE." 

Linda Bergln, director, said the run fair will be 
held from 1 to 7 p.m. Saturday, June 3, at die College 
of Lake County. 

Some of the fun fair activities will include 
rollcrbladlng. music and a variety of gomes in the 
parVing loi outside the CLC auditorium. Inside the 
auditorium will be guest speakers, colorful displays, 
games and booths. Prizes will be awarded. 

Bergln said fun fair participants will view the doc- 
umentary at 6 p.m. In die C1.C auditorium. The doc- 
umentary will be shown on Chicago's ABC affiliate, 
ChonncJ 7 (WIS). 

Tlte regional hroademt. which flergin saJd has the 
possibility of running nationwide, b a major event for 
the communities Involved in COURAGE. She said it 



illustrates the progress made in developing programs 
that promote a healthy, gang-free environment. 

Formed in the spring of 1993 In Lindcnhurst, 
Lake Villa, Antioch and Grayslakc, COURAGE pro- 
vides such youth activities as leadership workshops, 
parades in all four communities, youth and senior 
citizen Interaction, Whitewater rafting and other fun 
events, Bergln said. 

Real estate tax bills due June 5 

The Tust Installment of 1994 real estate tax bills is 
June 5. Taxes can be paid by mail, at any hake 
County bank, or at the Lake County Treasurer's 
office in the courthouse in Waukcgan. In addition to 
their regular hours, the treasurer's office wfU be 

open Saturday, June 3, from 9 i. m to noon, and on 

Monday, June 5, until 7 p.m. 

People who are unable lo pay the fuli amount, 
should ho im.irr ifui wv will .i<«rpf partial pay- 
ments. Any partial payment* imur he made to the 
treasurer's office In Waukcgan. Partial payments 

cannot be accepted by a bank. 



May-June 
1995 



Community CaIencJar 



Lakeland 

New* paper* 



Friday 



26 



Saturday 



27 






Save money 
on your insurance. 



Auto • Life • Fire 
Truck • Commercial 

'Monthly Payments* 



Sunday 

2 pm 



28 



1 5th Anniversary 



DAN JOHNSON 

INSURANCE AGENCY 

1780 Sunset Ave. 

S.L conwf of Timber Ule Cwlcf 
(Sumet u Irwit) 

WAUKECAN 

249-4610 

We Mike House Ca/fc.' 



Tuesday 



30 



31 




Firm** Km 



Wjrtd U* tnujf*/« Ca 



y 



Wednesday 

6 p m TOPS Chapter 328 

meets at Antioch 
Manor Apt*. 838- 
l918or3950456 

7 pm Antioch Oxnmunlty 

Hep School 
Graduation 

7 pm TOPS moots at Holy 
Famiy Church. 
Lako Vila. 587-1422 
or 587-5994 



Widowed Outroach 
Network (WON) 
meets at Condell 
Day Center. 
UbertyvSlo. 362- 
2900 

Register for voca- 
tion Bible school at 
St. Mark Church. 
Undonhurst. Juno 
19 through 23. 
For more Informa- 
tion, call 356-8140 



Monday 



10:30 a.m. 



29 



Memorial Day 

Dedication 

Ceremony 



12:45 p.m. Bingo at Antioch 
Sonior Confer. 
Even/one ovor 60 
is welcome 

7 pxn. Rational Recovery 
Self Help Notwork 
meets at Antioch 
Manor Apts. 



Thursday 



Coming Up: 



"GOT SOMETHING GOING ON? CALL USI Tina Reulbach 223-8161 



COMMUNITY UIccUncI NcwspApcus Max 2b, 1 99* 









. 



Antioch High School names third quarter honor roll 



Antioch Community High 
School has named students to 
the third quarter honor roll. 
Students honored are: 

SENIORS 

Receiving High Honor* Misty 
Adkins, Lisa Aronstm, Dusko Babln, 
Grctdicn Daird, Nicholas Ballingcr, 
Michael Barr, Alyssa Bandson, Unc 
Bcnztgcr, Douglas Bot>cr, Andrew 
Bolton, Amber Boodcy, Colleen Chcsla, 
Sabrina Cox, Staccy Crh/cllo, James 
Doolittlc, Susan Doty, Timothy Doyle, 
lustin Dyer, Eric Eckcnstahlcr, Carole 
Ewcrt, Matt Fasana, Kelly Fassblndcr, 
Katie Petting, Amanda Poster, Jamie 
Gaa, Victoria Gaffrlg, Kathy Goctz, 
Sharon Gorsline, Alex Grab, Anthony 
Hale. 

Christine Hammer, Colcnc Hardy, 
Catherine Harney. Daria I lauscr, Had id 
Mauser, Adam Hcelcin, Kurt Him/, 
Lindsay Hladnlk, Amy Holbo, Jennifer 
Hovcy, Kristin Jensen, Jill Johnston, 
Tricia Kccfc, Tonya Keel, Beth 
Kirschcnheitcr, Christopher Kuccra, 
David Uwrcncc, Jason Licnhardt. 
Michelle Llpski, Harry Ijovc, James 
l-uvc, Leah Luddcn, Kevin Lucck. 
Kathcrinc Lutgcn, Keith MacNaught, 
Brian Malckc, Stephen Marchildon, 
Hobln Maston, Mfchclle Mathew, Mark 
Mazur, Shccna McPartanc, Stephanie 
Montgomery, 

Sarah Murny, Ca-.ric Nelson, 
Genevieve Osmond, Christopher 
I'asscrclla, Brian Paulus, Krisla Richtcr, 
Rashida Rihman, laimcc Rlnchart, 
Brian Roscmann, Jammic Ryan, Anna 
Sanchez, September Sannes, Amy 
Schottcnloher, Ion Schultz, II, Justin 
Scopcj, Rebecca Smallcy, Steven 
Spmnk. 'Una StochmaJ, Allison Studcr, 
Dale Thlelc, Jill Thompson, Sabrina 
Tone/, Arthur WicJdcin. James Wido, 
Ann Witbmd. lonathan Zora. 

Receiving Honors: Ronald 
Anderson, Christa Badamc, Rachel 
Beatlic, Jack Birren, William Brattcn. 
Daniel Carlson, Richard Cerk, Wendy 
Charvat, Molly Cux. Jill Craig, Nlchole 
Dcl'er, Kevin Erickson, Joshua Hemlng, 
JcBrey Fleshman, Lori Folhrick, Sara 
Gcdvllas, Heather Hacndicn, James 
Hill, Robert Holbach, Justin Jcnison, 
Dino Ka iris, Alexander Kccney. 

Ijiura Leighliter, Jeff Maura, 
Jaqudino Mo (Tat. Jennifer Moffat, Chad 
Molczan, Daniel Ncwcomh. Stephanie 
O'Neal, Erica Olson, Mldiael Peterson, 
Jason Rcdfem, David Rohrer, Bradley 
Ruhash, Jeremy Schultz, Fred Skvarce. 
Todd Staral, Jelf Slecbcr, Joshua Tabar, 
Scllna Torrt, Jason Triplett, Michael 
Tschanz, Jamie Ulm, Heidi Wlrtz. 
Stephen and Ryan Zcman. 

JUNIOILS 

Receiving High Honors; Diana 
Ahruzzl, Kevin Arft, Mary Aschbadicr, 
Kristin Beadle. Melissa Becker, William 
Bell, Noellc Rcrnabc, Annclicse 



If 



Bochm, Andrew Bogcnschulz. Mark 
Bonovltz, Jeancttc Boyd, Amber 
Brankln, Uurcn Burke, Christopher 
Carlson, Dustll Cogdlll, Katie Cox, 
Heather Cramond, Paula Cziczo, 
Andrew Davis, Colin Dent, Michael 
Dcnzd, Brian Dcnic, Dawn DcScrvl, 
Tiffany Doles, Ryan Dunn, Megan 
Durncy. Jcanna lickcrt, Lindsay 
Edwards, Herb Elmcrman, Kevin 
Fasana, Klmbcrly Fischer, Macgan 
Fleming, Matthew Fleming. 

David Gagnc, Michelle Galinls, 
Alyson Gantar, Angelina Glangiorgi, 
Jennifer Godhardt, John Groth, Jessica 
Gurtowskl, John Groth, Jessica 
Gurtowskl, Jana Hagglund, Amy Haley, 
Tad 1 lamer, r.mily Hani ng. Matt Hllnak, 
Andrew Honaker, Klra Iloskins, Karen 
Jacobscn, Dan Jaspcrson, Joanne 
Jedclc, Sharon Jcncwcln, Susan 
Jcneweln, Julie Johnson, Corinnc Julian, 
Michad Kelly, Christine Klrchncr, 
Klmbcriy Konrath, Pamela KozlorowskJ, 
Amy Kurth, Geoffrey Landnim, Angda 
(.arson, Gregory Uubc, Jason Uucr, 
Jeancttc Lcflor, Elizabeth Lennon, 
Annc-Clalrc Lcroy, Charity Utkc, Brent 
Lubeck, Thomas Marks, Walter 
Martens. 

Meghan McMahon, Matthew 
Mlodonski. Catherine Mltdidl, Jason 
Monde'! i, Brian Murphy, Sarah 
Murphy, Donna Myers, Timothy 
Nelson, F.rin O'Conncll, Mdissa Parker. 
Mukc&h Paid, Jeromic Pcdcrson, (Unity 
Peterson, lcnnifcr Peterson. Dana 
Pierson, Christine Pinto, Camlc IMcse, 
Carly Pocius, Joy Rnllcnc, Sandra 
Ruscko, JcfT Safranek, Kristen Schardt, 
Steven Sdicmmd, Matthew 
Sdiucncman, Keith Seoul. Emily Scto, 
Relxxca Sladck. Stefan Slaclck. Iristcn 
Smith, Megan Sosnowski, Rhcanna 
Stcinburg. Heather Suchy, Russell 
Todd, Aaron Totter, Tracy Virag, David 
Warren, Hrian Weeks, Elizabeth 
Wcgner. Ana Wciler, Sara WeJkr and 
Robert Zdhncr. 

Receiving Honors: Chad 
Anderson, Heather Anion, Stephanie 
Beall, Eric Burgess, Jeremiah Buss, Eric 
Campbell, Ryan (^arisen. Frank Clhlar, 
Kristin Clifford, Roshdle Comstock, 
David Cox, Tyler Garrett, Brian Gelgcr, 
Kevin Geraghiy, Bryan Goblirsdi, Mark 
Gormcly, Christopher Groh, 1-aurcn 
Haas, Ryan Haley, John Hall, Mary 
Ipscn, Douglas Jett. Matthew Kodi, 
Nathan Koepkc, Courtney Konrath, 
Christine Knza. 

Sharon U-wls, Robert Lynch, Robert 
Makl. Brian Maloncy, Heather 
Mastalcrz, Kenneth Matcckl, Nldiolas 
McCann, Justin McRac, Zack Nagel, 
Steven Nielsen, Jcrzy Olesky, Jr., 
Douglas Olson. Ervins Otankls, Trida 
Padget, Dilip Patcl, Jennifer Pattl, Kate 
Perkins, Gordon Pcrsha, Jaltnec Porter, 
Heather Pries, lisa V tiller, Onnlc 
Rajamakl, Charlie Reynolds, Daniel 
Ricpc. Adam Rubens, Patrick Runynrd, 
Tina Saloncn, Nicholas Sid>crt, Ridtard 



It 



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Sunday & Monday 
Breakfast Buffet 



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OB^ T 



u&&* 



ADULTS 

$4.95 



8 a.m. Till Noon 
AJLL-U-CAftr-EAT 

Child Under 10 $3»SO 



Slcbcrt, Scott Stevens, Anthony Toumis, 
Jodc Wegener, laura Whltmcr, Jessica 
Winsctt and Mldiad Zmuda. 

SOPHOMORES 

Receiving High Honor*: 

Jacqulyn Anderson, Megan Aronson, 
Relxx.cn Ay re, Susan Ban*, Erica Becker, 
Melissa Beckcy, Tom Bcltzcl, Erica 
Bonovltz, Kenneth Bralton, Shana 
Brown, Amber Cashmorc, Chancicc 
Ccmiak, Kevin Chudd, JdTcry Crivdlo, 
Unscy Dean, Laura Dcutsch, Aspost 
Dlamantopoulos, Steven Drcnglcr, 
Matthew Fleming. Haze) Plorcs, Brian 
Forth, Sara Fox, Erika Francisco, Carrie 
Gofron, Scott Crasser, Andrew Green, 
Alyssa Griffin, Paul Groh, Stephanie 
Hacnchcn, Lenny Hagcnow, 

Mdissa Hague, Nell Hansen, Julie 
Haslcr.Audra Hazncrs, Teresa Hebron, 
Jamie Hope, Stephen Hovcy, Norccn 
Johnson, Stuart Johnson, Cynthia Jones, 
George Kalris, Peggy Kalris, Michael 
Khora, Nlddaus Kirichkow, Rryan Koch, 
Elizabeth Kocch, Joseph Kocrpcr, Carrie 
Kowalczyk, Rebecca Krockcr, Nicole 
Larsca Erin Laudcnslagcr. 

Sophia Uarakos, Brcl Libigs, 
Tammy Und.Trisha IJvennorc, Sondra 
Lorang, Colleen McCandlcss, Marlah 
MdLlroy, Audra Miles, Amanda Miller, 
Colleen Mih'.cr, Daniel Mortcnscn, Usa 
Murphy, Nancy Naxsr, Mary Osborne, 
Staccy Parks, Rltesh Patd, Christopher 
Phillips, Arin Plcard, Ramya Pillal, 
Christopher Itacko, Mark Prosisc, Lisa 
Ravagnl, Adam Rcidd, 

Emily Reutcr, Sarah Rockow, 
Stiannon Rosbcrg. Kathryn Rosen, Usa 
Rudin, Anthony Schclb, Christopher 
Schuliz, Daryl Scott. Jamir- Silarskl, 
Melissa Slmbrowsky, April Smith, Brian 
Smith, Stephen Smith, Jamie Soblc, 
Chris So mulls, Paul Spronk, ErinTillcy, 
Danld Watklns, Jr., Christie Wcnszdl, 
Danid Wicgd, Julie Williams, Micbdc 
Wiihbrod, I>onald Voakcm and 
Stephanie ZcrbsL 

Recehdnc Honors: Brandon 
Barker, Brian Barnctt, Joanne 
Barricntos, Douglas Bcdini, Marissa 
Blasko, lason Bolton. Mattliew Booth, 



JcfT Bringcr, Heather Burrcss, Kenny 
Butler, Dcannc Dalgaard, Kclli 
DcBcrnardls, Scott DcYoung, Amy 
Dlctz, Ahmet Hcz, Danld Life ring, 
Sandra English, Shane Fielder, Joel 
Ford, Carrie Foss, Garrett Hnbn. James 
I lauscr, Matthew Hclimann, Uurcn 
Hllgcr. 

Ryan Hobson, Anthony 
I lunsbcrgcr. Mary Izzo, Emily Johnson, 
Joseph King, Nicole Krai, Alec McKlnlcy, 
Kristinc Micdcma, Jcanna Miller, Jason 
O'HIggins, Shattn Parrish, Angcllnc 
I'cderson. Daniel Pctrosko, Jason 
Podstawa, Rashid Rihman, Heather 
Rodriguez, Rlna Russell. Tammy 
Sakalowski. Theodore Saleckl, III, Eric 
Schultz, Marc Slab), Itioncmoungkh 
Syavnng, James Tournic, Steven 
Weston, Joseph Winner and Robert 
York. 

FRESHMEN 

ReceMns Wen Honors: Abigail 
Alder, Christine Barbie, Michael 
Bard/.inski, Summer Barnctt, Kevin 
Bawelklcwtcz, Emily Bcrnabc, 
Nallianld Bingham. Shannon Bonner, 
Ricky Brosc, Jr., Jennifer Cardls, Michad 
Castlglia, ixslic Chclcrbak, Timothy 
Chilcotc, Abigail Oark, Tla LYAmlimsc, 
Alexis I>ayl»uff. Richard DootlluJe. Amy 
Eng, Amanda lis tcp. Rldtard Fann, Cory 
Fauser, Jessica Fddmann, Slicrry 
Fricdlc, Radidlc I : ricsen, Dawn Fuller, 
IcITcry Gardcll, FDbrabclh Good, Amber 
Gone, Jeremy Grace, Dana Grecmvald, 
Justin Gudgeon, Jennifer Gussarson, 
Garrick Hansen, Shawn 1 1 a men. Shawn 
Hansen, Joshua Harpkc, Dauma 
Hazncrs, Reginald Hughes. 

Shaync Jacobscn, Casslc Jeffries, 
I -iso 1 1 Jenlvin. Suzanne Juzwik. Tammy 
Karg. Micbdlc Kdlcy, SlHishanah Kent, 
Frank Kcrous, James Koppa, Denisc 
Kouvdls, Julia Koval, John Knipka. Vljay 
Kumar, Kelly Kurtz. Nicole Unglcy, 
Brian Laza risky, Sarah lefTduun, Emily 
Ixvln. Erik Dps, Klrstln Lynch, Joshua 
Mack, Cameron Marshall, Melissa 
McCowan, Jennifer Minor, Kristin 
Mlndonski, laUabctb Mllchdl, Rory 
Monk. Anna Moricy, Mldiad Nidsen. 



Erin Nowak, Andrew Oupcr. 

Brccra Rihman, Annie Rinchau, 
i-rtc Hitter, Cotloen Rodriguez, Amdia 
Saxc, Kristin Scopd, Michad Sddlcr, 
Jessica Shore, Tainan Shvula, Amanda 
Skofsiad, llieodore Spr1rq[cr, Miranda 
Stanley. Kristen Terhune, Brian 
Tcnybcrry, Carrie Towns-End, Danld 
Tranter, Martha Tnnigott, Megan Tripp, 
Amy VandcrKooy, Kevin Ward, KJyc 
WUnlcwskl, Susan WoodrutT, Ddilah 
Zakcry, Amber ZdinskL 

Receiving; Honors: Josephine 
Abbate, William Adams, Sarch Amber, 
Sebastian Andino, Scott Bartcison. 
Catherine Becker, Melissa Bennett, 
Tracy Bryllnkc, Mdissa Butkus, Douglas 
Callcndo, Brian Caputo, Tiffany 
Cashmorc, Nicole Cone, Bud Davis, 
Nathan Davis, Cathlecn DcFcr, Andrr.-w 
Dhormann, Taml Edclman, William 
Ersler, Danielle I:\xrs, Kristin Franck. 
Amanda Gannon, Michael Garippo, 
Jeffcry Gchrkc, Anndlcsc Gcrlock, 
Colleen Glbbs, Christine Gobllrsch, 
Davkl Goodi, Christopher Groth. James 
HaJIbcrg, Jr„ Jotin Horan, liu Iptcn, 
Shannah Jahurrk. 

Hllzabcth Kai, Brandon 
Kallnowskl, Saa KapsaBs, lltik Kalz. 
Joseph Kcplnskl, Ray Kcrby, Brett 
King, Richan' Kirschcnheitcr, 
Michad K'»rc/.yk. Robert Kon>tan}e, 
Timothy Koutny, Sarah Krausc, 
Raymond ljBcny, Bridgctt Ixonard, 
Dayna hi veil. Kirn Malkamald, Sarah 
Mandrn, Patrick McBrldc, 

Christopher McNamara, Holly 
McNamara, Maghule Mcnoiki, Kelly 
Mlhovilovich, Klmbcrly Ncuwirth, 
Shannon O'Donncll, Gary Pearson. 

Jeremy PlucknnQc, January 
Purlieus. Kari Rlchtcr, Ui/jlx.tli 
Roscmann, Liana Rothcrmd, Scott 
Ryan, Amy Shlrvnck. Mdissa Shlpway, 
Tlicrcsa SmQcy, Rob Smith, Erin 
Sparkman, Steven S|>cnccr,CathcTinc 
Sperling. Charles Suangka, Kevin 
Sudieckl, Am!>rr Swklcrck, Sarah 
Trovillion, Joslnia Wlihc, Tiffany WtUic, 
Monica Williams, Janilc Wittig. Nkolc 
Wofltchctd, Zachcry Worshlll and 
Victoria Zupan. 




Free Hearing Screenings 

Free screenings to detect hearing loss will be offered on 
Tuesday, June 6, from 9 a.m. to noon, at Saint Tiierese Medical 
Center. The screenings v/ill be conducted by George 
Goldstein, M.D., an Ear, Nose and Throat specialist and 
member of the medical center's medical staff. 

Often subtle, gradual and painless, hearing loss may 
progress unnoticed. Both adults and children should have 
routine ear examinations and hearing screenings to detect 
problems early and help prevent loss of hearing. 

If you have any of the following symptoms, it may indicate a 
hearing impairment: 

• Sounds seem muffled, faint or distorted 

• An earache, or discharge in the ear 

• Difficulty in hearing high tones 

• Difficulties in communicating, or hearing in a noisy 
environment 

• Dizziness or nausea 

• Ringing or buzzing sounds may be heard 

For more information and to register for the hearing screenings, 
call ASK-A-NURSE' at 244-5900. 

The Life Skills Series is another way Saint Therese Medical Center 
is Making Health Happen. 






lACfnAl 26375 W. RT. 173 
3*1^ * / V # 3 Ml. WEST OF RT. 59 




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VISIT 



s=» T l\/l E N "■ S» ■ «-* 




!| COMMUNITY LMccIancI NcwspApnts M*y 26, 1995 



Recycle 



From page A 1 

Is 1R gallons. Ihc large bins will be needed considering tlic variety of waste 
thai will be accepted by Waste Management 
_J Materials which will be accepted Include: newspapers Including all 
inserts, junk mail, I IDF.P plastic such as milk jugs and laundry detergent 
containers, PET plastic (soda battles), polystyrene, aluminum caas, tin 
cans, glass jars and bottles (brown, green and dear), cardboard, and food 
boxes such as cereal boxes or macaroni and cheese boxes. 

The current drop-off program at the high school, run by Waste 
Management and the township, will end when the curbsidc program 
begins. Mowers said residents arc welcome to switch to Waste 
Management If their current provider docs not offer curtisidc recycling. 

Flight for Life helicopter 
used at two accident sites 



Two accidents in Newport 
Township required the use of 
Right for life helicopter May 20 
and 21. 

'Ihe first resulted in a Kenosha, 
Wis. resident facing multiple 
charges. 

Robert Karnes, age 311, of 
Kenosha, faces charges of driving 
too fast for conditions, driving 
under the influence of alcohol and 
aggravated reckless driving, 1 le was 
transported to St 'ITicrcsc Medical 
Center by Newport I'irc Dept after 
the May 20 accident and released. 

The passenger, Joseph 
Tnibavsl, of Kenosha, was trans- 
ported to Milwaukee Area Medical 
Center. 



According to the Like County 
Sheriffs Department report, 
Karnes lost control of his vehicle 
and it struck a tree about 2 a.m. 
May 20 at Kelly Road and Route 41 . 

The other Incident the night of 
May 21 has not resulted In charges. 

Ilot)crt Kolman, of Rosemont, 
was driving a motorcycle and 
Karen Thul of Zion was driving a 
Ford Bronco. Kolman was trans- 
ported to two Milwaukee area hos- 
pitals following the 6:45 p.m. acci- 
dent 

Newport l : ire Department 
Cbicr Mark Klrsclmffcr said he 
docs not recall if there has been a 
time when the helicopter was used 
in two incidents so close together. 




I'rom page Al 

The new tank is an M551 
Sheridan tank which came from 
Annlston Army Depot in 
Annlston, Alabama, and weighs 
in at :i4,il93 pounds. A crane was 
needed to lift it onto the cement 
platform on Toft Street When 
hilly dressed Ihc tank is 
amphibious, allowing It to travel 
on hind and in the water. 

The tank had been stored at 
the Kenosha Military Museum 
for three weeks, where local vet- 
erans volunteered their time to 
spruce it up. 

The nearly 1 0-foot tall tank, is 
roughly 9 feet wide and 20 feet 
long. When operational it held 
four crew members, however, 
the hatch has now been welded 
shut to keep curious children 
out. 



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May 26, 1999 UtUNd Niwspapm COMMUNITY 




THIS WEEK 

New season 

Antioch baseball 
looks to regional 
PAGE At? 

Youth Soccer 

7Avo Lindenhurst 
teams battle 
PAGE Al 2 

For More 

SpORTS/LEISURE 

See PAqE C21 



• 



Aivriock 



Jo. 



Kyle 
Don 



Periman powers Antioch past RL in season finale 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

"Periman— she's on Tire!" proclaimed 
Antioch softball Coach Judy Smithhclslcr. 

On fire Kelly Periman was as she belted a 
grandslam homemn in the sixth inning to lift 
the Lady Scquoits from a 5-4 deficit to a 8*5 
lead and eventual victory over Round Lake to 
close out the regular season for the 14-11 
Scquoits. 

"I just went up to the plate, kept my head 
down and went for the first pitch," said 
Periman, who roped a shot splitting the left 
and center fielders. 

"With the bases loaded, 1 just wanted to 
hit the ball hard," she said. 

Antioch was down 5-3 going into the top 
of the sixth. Erin O'Connell opened with a 
single, stole second and scored on a sacrifice 
bunt by Stephanie Montgomery. 



BASEbAll 



Major League boy* 

Flnrt National Bank Cuba 1 3, 
Lyons ft Ryarr'a Athlet ka 
Offensive Handouts were Chris 
MacMillan and Ryan Roberts. 
Defensive standouts were Tun 
haruen and Kevin OUcrt 

McDonmld'a Rocklea 12, 
Bcmhardt'a White Sox t 
Offensive standouu were 
Fielder and Dan Miliar. 
Defensive standouu were 
Mahar and Eric Black. 

McDonald's Rocldca 4, 
First National Bank Cuba 1 
Offensive standouts were George 
Girt en, Brandon White, Ryan 
Callsnan and Tim Joharocn. 
Defensive standout was Eric White. 
State Bank Glantal, 
Senior Center Brawe 
Offensive standouts were Mike Pcr- 
ronc, Bryant Popp and Justin Kent 
Defensive standouu were Jnih 
Kamlnsky, Eric Langner and Ron 
Thompson. 

Haded Yankee* 5, 
Domino's Cardinal* 3 
Otfcrulve standout was lason Loncr- 
gan. 

Defensive standouu were Ken Krull 
and Jerry Mihovllovkh. 

Pip Printing Tigers 1* 
First Chicago Bank 1 1 
Offensive standout was Eric Godin. 
Defensive standout was Alec 
Plnkowskl. 
Major League boys standing* 

W L 
McDonald's 7 

First National Cubs 5 1 

State Bank Giants 3 2 

Lyons U Ryan A** 3 4 

Senior Center Brave* 3 4 

Bernhardt'* White Sox 2 4 

Hadad Yankee* 1 4 

Domino'* Cardinals 1 S 



Minor League boy* 

Burger King 12, No Name 10 
Offensive standout* were Jarrctt Ca- 
ble. Kyle Maday and Robert Ryan. 
Defensive standouu were David 
Shmdezcr and lason Kamlsky. 

Junior gir Is 

TNT* 19, Flo'* V 
Offensive sUndouu were Jessica Or- 
tiz, Becky GUIengcnlen and Chris* 
tine Ealon. 

Defensive standouu were Kris ten El* 
strom, Jamie Knuth and Danielle 
NJcIson. 

State Bank 1 5, Thelene 1 1 
Offensive standouu were Amy 
Mueller, Brtanna Rlchter, Meghan 
Flood and Nina BalxyiukL 
Defensive standouu were Abigail 
Thomas, Llndscy Gruber, Sarah 
Groh and Bridget Stone. 

TNTa 22, Theknt 8 
Offensive standouu were Becky 
Glllcngcrtcn, Jessica Ortiz. Kelly 
Wells, Bridget Stone and Danielle 
Stahl. 

Defensive standouu were Kristin El* 
strom Jessica Ortiz. Meghan Flood 
and Laura Weber. 



Jamie Sllarskl, Courtney Konrath and 
Megan Sosnowskl all walked to load the bases 
with two outs before Periman cleared the 
bases. 

As for the pitch, Periman said, "Straight 
down the middle works for me." 

% Whot was nice, the kids were 
down by 2 or 3 runs, and they 
never gave up and they came 
back/ 

—Judy SmlthholsJof 
Antioch Coach 

Obviously. 

Actually, she might have been just warm- 
ing up for the grand slam. She also smacked a 
similar shot in the fifth inning for an RRI 
triple. After walking, Konrath raced all the 



way home on Penman's triple. Jessica 
Schrnltt singled to push Periman across the 
plate to cut Round I dike's lead to one, 4-3. 

If 5 RBIs on the day were not enough, 
Periman, who had duties behind the plate, 
also gunned down a Round Lake runner try- 
ing to steal. 

Antioch started the game with a 1 -0 lead 
In the first. O'Connell walked and eventually 
scored on a Konrath single. But the Scquoits 
had to battle from 3-1 and 5-3 deficits before 
stealing the victory away from Round Lake. 

"What was nice, the kids were down by 2 
or 3 runs, and they never gave up and they 
came back," Smlthhcislcr said. 

Silarskl notched another win on the 
mound, keeping her composure throughout 
the game as she waited for her offense to pro- 
duce. Silarski retired the last eight batters she 
Sec PERIMAN page A 1 2 



SPORTS 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Erickson, Rubash show way to state 



STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Roportor 

This time, finish! ng In second 
place was nothing to sneeze at 

Antioch High showed its 
depth of talent by gaining 70 

It has been a great 
four years. It will be 
tough handing out 
awards at the ban- 
quet They are all such 
good kids. I have never 
hod a problem with the 
effort. r 

—Norm Harm. 
Antioch Track Coach 

points and finishing a strong sec- 
ond at the Graysiakc boys track 
and field sectional Friday. The 
Scquoits gained some sweet 
revenge on Zlon-Bcnton with the 
two-point win. It was the Zee- 
Bees who had topped Antioch for 
first in the North Suburban 
Conference. 

"I'm surprised. 1 always em- 
phasized filling all events and we 



ran in all events except two and 
had 14 places. My thing is partic- 
ipation," Antioch Coach Norm 
1 1 ah n said. 

Paced by the 800-meter 
champion in Kevin Erickson and 
Brad Rubash and Mark Mazur 
carnlng seconds, the Scquoits 
beat out all teams except 
Waukegan's 135 points. 

Erickson won the 800 meters 
In 1:58, topping Waukegan's 
Garrett Turiey by six-tenths sec- 
ond. 

"He has a good kkk," Antioch 
Coach Norm llahn said of 
Erickson. 

Rubash gained second in the 
1 10 high hurdles with a 143, quali- 
fying for tiw May 26-27 state meet 
at Eastern Illinois University In 
Charleston 

"I had a good start. You try 
and attack every hurdle, and 
that helps a lot. I just try and 
get over as fast as 1 can and get 
going," Rubash said of his 
hurdles effort. 'But what I will 
most remember Is my record." 
llahn said it will be tough for 



Antioch Travelers show promise 

If the preseason is any indl* arc fitting togcthcr...with excel* 

cation, titcn the Antioch Youth lent team chemistry," said 

baseball traveling Pony "A" Gaulin, adding, "We strive for the 

team should be in for a solid kids to learn, have fun, but we 



season. ' 

Before losing 'All the pieces of the 
its final prcsca- puzzle ore beginning 
son game to st to fif together... with 

excellent team chem- 
istry. ' 

— StOVO Gaul In. 
Antioch Tiavollng Coach 



Charles 10-9 in 

the bottom of the 

seventh, the 

Antioch 

Travelers had 

strung together a 

five-game winning streak to com- Raymond Chevrolet, the Antioch 

plcte the preseason with a 5-3 Travelers will play their home 



also play to 
win." 

The team will 
play more than 
50 games this 
summer and 
will be taking 
each game one 
at a time. 
Sponosrcd by 



record. 

Coach Steve Gaulin and 
Assistant Coach Lee Quits have 
welcomed the gamc-by-game 
Improvement in their Pony- 
league players. 

"All 12 kids arc hitting, and 
we're not making the mental 
errors that hurt us as a 'B' team 
last year," Gaulin noted. 



games at Antioch Upper Grade 
School 

"litis Is a great group of kids 
who are gaining confidence 
with each game," Gaulin said. 
"If we can continue to get the 
team effort these boys have 
demonstrated, we'll go a long 
way." 

Team members include 



The hitting dramatically Tom Balrd, Luke Haley. Ray 
improve during the preseason. George, John Logan, Da;i 



During the last six games, 
Antioch outscored their oppo- 
nents 86 to 39. 

"All the pieces of the puzzle 



Shauncsscy, Ryan and Brandon 
Clutss, Gary Splllcr, Cory 
Eauscr, Ken Chlchon. Mark 
Sura), and Chris Gaulin. 



him to say good-bye to the senior 
dominated team. Erickson, 
Rubash, Mazur, Dave Lawrence 
will all be concluding their track 
careers at the EIU meet 

"It has been a great four 
years. It will be tough handing 
out awards at the banquet They 
arc all such good kids," llahn 



said. "I have never had a problem 
with the effort." 

Lawrence placed second in 
the discus with a 143 foot heave 
and was fifth in the shot put at 47 
feet, 9 inches. 

llahn said Mazur's effort in 
the 400 meter dash, 5 1 .8 seconds, 
was a surprise. 




n * 




Dove La wronco heaves a 47-foot, 9-Inch shot put for firm place In 
the sectional meet. Lawrence placed second In the discus with a 
143 throw.— Photo by Todd Helsior 












~ 



,***;.•.- 



*«> 




COMMUNITY LaIceUncI Nlws|>a ( mks M*y 26, 1999 



T 




•V 



Antioch JV diamond girls win three 





' 



After completing another busy four game week, the 
ACHS girls JV Softball team split the "I lomc and I iome" 
scries with rival Mundclcin, and scored two big wins 
over Rcgina Dominican (17-3) and Carmel (13-0). 

IVic lady Scquoits have a atrrcnt record of 15-7 
overall, with a NSC mark of 9-5, 

In the first Mundclcin game, Antioch pitcher Lisa 
Murphy ticstcd Mundelcin's sopho- 
more stand-out Katie Prc/jcll In the 12- 
2 Antioch victory. 

Murphy went the distance for 
Antioch allowing just two hits, three 
walks and three strike-outs. 



win over Mundclcin. We also played good softball in die 
second gamc.Mundclcin just played a little Ixutcr ! I felt 
our players were very aggressive, hitting against Katie 
Prczdl In both games. We made good hall contact. The 
hits Just didn't fall In the second game." 

In the Rcglna Dominican game, Uw Scquoits collect- 
ed 14 hits, Including DcSalvo (two slnglcs-douhlc), 
Dcutsch (two singles), Itockow (singlc- 



first win over 
Mundelein. We also 
played good In the 

llic Scquoits played sound defense, Second game. . . I felt 

led by liz Kocck (five nut-outs) and our players were very 

Laura Dcutsch (three put-outs, one aggressive... The hits 

asS ol' . Yc , iwi, i . ta just didn't fall in the 

Offensively, Sarah Hockow hiul two * , 

bite (two doubles, three Rills), along Second game. 
with help from Angic I'cdcrson (three — Stova Wapon 

singles) and DcAnnc Dalgaard (single- 1och JV { 

douhlc). Unda DcSiilvn, Kristin Lynch 



* We played Well in the double), Lynch (triple-single), Murphy 

(two singles), Dalgaard (single), Kocck 



(single) and I'cdcrson (single). 

Murphy pltdicd four innings, allow- 
ing one hit while striking out four and 
walking five hatters. I'rcshman pitcher 
Nicole Utnglcy pitched the final 
inning. 

Scqunit pitchers Murphy and 
Lmglcy combined for a sparkling 13-0 
no-hlt shut-out over Carmel in the 
final gain e of the week. AG IS pitdtcrs 
Issued only one walk the entire game, 
", _; while striking out four hatters. 

and Murphy all added single hits to the 10-hit attack. Ihc Scquoits continued to play sound defease try 

The second game was a rematch of die same two Dalgaard's three catches in center field. 



. v^ ; 



. v. 




pitchers. This game went to the Mustangs Ijy a score of 
6-2. Murphy pitdicd die entire seven innings, allowing 
six hits while striking out seven and walking seven bat- 
ters. 'Ilic Scquoits were able to manage only four hits. 
Lynch tripled, with singles by Rockow, I'cdcrson and 
Staccy Parks, 

Commenting on the two games, Antiodi Coadi 
Steve Wapon felt that "we played well in the first game 



Dcutsdi, Parks and l.yndi all contributed to die 
defensive effort 

Freshman players Kristin Scopcl (unassisted 
double -play), Shannah Jaburck (one assist), locclyn 
McRac and Katie Defer all gained valuable experi- 
ence at the JV level. 

Key hits for ACI IS in die game came from Murphy 
(two singles), DcSalvo and I'cdcrson. 



Linden Power defeats Stars; Rockets gain win 



Anlloch aco Jamlo SllarskJ has boon working on a chango-up on 
tho mound In preparation for regional action this wook.— Photo by 
Kovln Harvahan 



Periman 









From page Al 1 

faced to eliminate any Round I -ike hopes of a comeback. 

Silarski also appeared to be working on a change up In preparation 
for the rcgionals which began this week. 

"Some teams have been able to time her fastball as the game goes 
along, "Smlthhclslcr said. "Hopefully, flits (changctip) will give us a lit- 
tle variety." 

Antiodi was set to tiosl Grant Thursday in the first round of the 
regional. 

"The kids arc hitting the ball," Smithholsicr said. "We look forward 
to playing Grant* 

And Periman will he looking to drive those pitches straight down 
the middle. 



Power, Stars 

Two Lindcnhurst Girls" It- 14 
(cams played each other In their 
IWSL match-up with the Power 
coming away with a 3-0 victory 
over the Stars. 

The game was 0-0 at half- 
time, mostly due to some flue 
play by the Star goalkeeper. The 
First Power goal was scored by 
Kristina Giangiorgi from a 
direct kick coming from about 
35 yards out. 

Teri l^afloclic scored next on a 
nice passing combination play 
with Sarah Richardson and 
Jourdan Phillips getting the 
assists. 'Die final goals was scored 
by Phillips unassisted when she 
dug out a hall In the corner and 
was able to bend around a left 
footed shot. 



The defensive play of Katie 
Anderson, Nice! ILstcp, Kristcn 
Gamlln, Jenny Porter and Cara 
Robinson was able to bold off the 
Star attack. Jenny Rarhcra and 
Giangiorgi shared In the shut- 
out 

Despite the loss, there was 
some excellent play by the Star 
players, Including Megan 
Rlnkcnbcrg in goal, Amlc 
Carlbcrg, Mandy Fasanu and 
Megs Kollarz. 

Rockets 

The Lindcnhurst Rockets (II* 



10) improved their record to 3- 
2-2 with a 1 -0 win over Alilhsa. 

The game's only goal was 
scored in the second half by 
Robyn Mortcnson. Miranda 
Knrbal and Kristina Gopp assist- 
ed on the goal. 

Other players turning In out- 
standing performances were 
Tanya Pari, Frin Pcacy and Calllc 
Check. 

The Rockets will be playing 
In the Park Ridge Tournament 
over the Memorial Day week- 
end. 



AUTO LOANS 



CREDIT TURN DOWNS BECAUSE OF: 



■POOR CREDIT 



CREDIT •JUDGEMENTS 



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B-ball camp set Missing Links Golf League 
j^Sj^S*| : I ;!« looking for permanent and 

skills for boys entering fourth. ;>SUDSTllUTC ICC nTICfUDCfS. 

through nintlvgradc. AntlOCh Golf Club 

Two one-week camps will *> „ __ ,— f - 

be given June 13-16 and June <; Wed. EVeniligS Tee KJlT 

19 * 2 dost for the camp is $25 for I \ ^j* A ''^ S ^ ZS0 ' L* 

one week. Tor more ifnonnation, | If Interested, Contact Tim Clary f at 223-4430 

call the school at 395-1421. 



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M*y 26, 1995 UhUsd NrwspApm COMMUNITY 




rt_V I" >-'.^=r-l-;, J?!. 




Baseball season rests on regional 



Last leg 

With tho oxcoplion of Stevenson's Tammy Rondo, Anttoch's 
Mogan Dumey was tho only county frock compotltor that 
roachod tho stato finals. Tho Junior flnbhod 26th In the 3.200- 
moter run with a time of 1 1 :50. Antloch also sent high Jumper 
Trlcla Koefo fo the state track meet.— Photo by Stove Young 



Radebaugh, doubles duo 
earn state bids for Rams 



A doubles team will l>c mak- 
ing history no matter what hap- 
pens while the top singles player 
will also he looking to gain some 
respect for the Grayslakc High 
tennis program. 

Ihosc will l»c the objectives as 
the Hams doubles team of Chris 
Wirsing and Josh -— ■■ ■■■ ■■ ' 

SESS 'We both have 

gles compete at the QOOd OfleXeS. 
state tennis tour- ... , . 

We took lessons 



at Oak Park 
and Ubertyville 



ncy May 26-27. 

Wlrslng and 
Shipley became die 
first boys camed 
the trip to Hcrscy » 

High hosted meet OVef Tn & bUfn 

at Arlington mer. We had to 

Heights with a . , ., , , 

fourth-place finish WOW at It, tOO. 



at the Grant sec- 
tional. Radebaugh 
earned the trip by .. 

earning second 
place In singles. 

Wirslng and Shipley's key 
match with rival Wauconda's 
Justin Thlcl and Corey Wilson. 
The Hams had downed the 
Uulldogs three previous matches. 
A 6-4 loss In the second set was 
not about to stop the Rams' 
young duo. 

That made them just play 
that much harder/' Rams Coach 
Paul Keller said. "It is a matter of 
pride." 

That pride showed as the 
sophomores, won the third set 6- 
2, the same score as the first set. 

"They have matured physi- 
cally and mentally and they have 
more skill than last year," Keller 
said. 

"I knew we were going to 
win/' Wlrslng stated. "I did not 
have any doubts." 

"We played real bad the sec- 
ond set. We did not have confi- 
dence In ourselves/' Shipley said. 

The duo lost to seniors Kevin 
Hughes and R.J. Frick of 
Mcllcnry In the third-place bat- 
tle, but the state bid had been 
secured. 

What is it that makes this 
doubles team dick7 

"I think it Is just that we arc so 
mudi alike," Wirslng stated. 



— Chrt* Wlrslng 



KEVIN HANRAHAN _________ 

Staff Report or 

And let the second season begin, 
Antioch's boys baseball team ended its confer- 
ence season on a winning note by sweeping 
Mundclcin 3-0 and f>-2. Eric Eckenstahlcr threw a 
o nc- hitter in game one, and Kevin Arft gave up one 
earned run In the second game indicating that the 
pitching Is In top form as the ====== 

^dS&SESSE-, 'We'll treat the first 

over Mundclcin Improved gfO/Tie like the World 
Antloch's conference record to 7- SerfeS OHd then 
9, jumping the Sequolts ahead of . . , 

Mundclcin In the conference ™OV6 OH. I WOUld 
standings for sixth place. 

In the regional, Antloch 
earned a fifth-place seed and 
were set to face No. 4 seed Grant 
Thursday. ZIon- Benton, Warren 
and Waukcgan gained the top 



"We both have good reflexes. 
We took lessons at Oak Park and 
Ubertyville over the summer. We 
had to work at it, too/' he added. 
Itadcbaugh was the second 
seed after gaining 16 wins In- 
cluding the Northwest Suburban 
Conference title. 

— ■ ■ - ■ ==a He bad two 
two-set matches in 
the first two 
rounds over Chris 
Hint of Mcllcnry 
and jesse Ream of 
lohnsburg. He 
downed Drew 
Wolfbcrg of 

Crystal Lake 

Central In three 
sets 6-2, 2-6, 6-1 to 
cam the title 
round against 
Crystal Lake 

Central's Matt 
___________ Larson. 

"He is much 
more consistent this year. He and 
I .arson had some long rallies," 
Keller said. 

"I am definitely more ag- 
gressive. I go to the net more," 
Radebaugh said. 

"I had it, but I let it slip 
through. Ills (Larson's) coach 
told him to go to the net and that 
is when he did his best/' 
Radebaugh stated. 

Keller is pleased with the way 
the NWSC champs performed 
against the bigger Crystal Lake 
schools and Mcllcnry and 
Antloch. The Rams were fourth 
with 16 team points. Crystal Lake 
Central won with 26 points and 
Crystal Lake South was runner- 
up with 20. Mcllcnry edged 
Grayslakc for third with 19 points. 
Finishing behind the Rams 
were: Antioch with 15 points; 
Wauconda with 10 and Round 
I,akc with 8 and lohnsburg had 4. 
I lost Grant did not score a point. 
The Panthers' highlight came 
at singles were Tom Longlcy won 
a first-round match. He downed 
Pete Ncubcrgcr of Grayslakc 
before losing to Dusco Rabin of 
Antioch. 

Rabin and Radebaugh 
planned to workout together 
before the state meet. 



like to get post 
Grant and get a 
shot at Son, the No. 
_ ? seed, but you 

mrec"7eId7rwhUc""GrayiiakT, have to ploy One 
Round Lake and North Chicago QQrHQ Qf Q time. ' 
rounded out the bottom three p QU j p om , 

$cc i s \ , Antloch Coach 

%Ve lost to some teams that 

we should have beat, which came .. . 



back to haunt us In the seeding," said Antloch 
Coach Paul Petty. 

Although Grant was shooting to capture the 
Northwest Suburban Conference title, Petty liked 
his chances against the Rulldogs in the first game. 

"We'll treat the first game like the World Scries 
and then move on," said Petty, "1 would like to get 
past Grant and get a shot at Zion, the No. 1 seed, but 
you have to play one game at a time." 

The Scquotts were hoping to catch some non- 
conference games against Buffalo Grove and 
Carmcl to prepare before rcgionats began. 

"Pitching will definitely tell the talc, and we have 
to score some runs," Petty noted of the pending 
regional games. 



If the last two games against Mundclcin were 
any Indication of Antloch's pitching and hitting sit- 
uation, the Sequolts look to be competitive. 

Following Eckcnstahlcr's one-hit effort, Arft 
attended to the duties on the mound and kept the 
Mundclcin batters off balance. 

He threw three innings of no-hit ball before 
Mundelein's Andy Kupsak scraped an opposite field 
= hit In the fourth. Arft scattered six 
more hits. The Mustangs broke the 
shutout in the fifth with an 
unearned run, and they crossed 
the plate again in the sixth. Arft 
pitched out of bases loaded situa- 
tions in both the fifth and sixth 
innings. 

"He battled out of some tough sit- 
uations," Petty said of his No. 2 
starter. 

Antioch's offense gave their pitch- 
er an early cushion by scoring two 
quick runs in the first inning After 
Craig Curtis singled and Stuart 
Johnson reached on a fielder's 
choice, Eric Campbell connected 
fora2-RRIh)L 

In the second, Mike Peterson 

earned an infield hit. Jim Groth scored Peterson 
with a 300-foot triple to deep ccntcrileld. [ohnson 
then knocked Groth home with an RBI-single to 
take the 4-0 advantage. 

"We've been hitting the ball hard, and some of 
our kids are beginning to get out of their slumps," 
Petty said. 

Campbell nailed a triple to open the third, and 
scored on an Kckcnstahlcr smash to second base 
that was too hot to handle. Eckenstahlcr eventually 
reached home on a Justin McRac sacrifice fly. 

"When you score some runs and slap the ball 
around, it makes the errors less hurtful," Petty said. 
The remainder of Antioch's season now rests on 
getting past cadi game In the regional. 



Rams offering three levels of football camp 



Grayslakc Community High School football 
coach Dan Dillon will be offering three levels of 
football camps this summer. 

The first will be a youth football camp. It wilt 
run June 12-16, Monday through Friday from 9 
to 1 1 .m. Cost is $20. 

Beginning football techniques will be 
offered for incoming high school freshmen and 
sophomores from June 20 - July 20 on Tuesdays, 
Wednesdays and Thursdays from 1 1 a.m. to 1 
p.m. and Thursdays from 6 to 8 p.m., four ses- 
sions a week. Cost Is $25. 



Advanced football techniques for high school 
Juniors and seniors will be offered from June 20 - 
July 20. It will be held Tuesdays, Wednesdays and 
Thursdays, 9-11 a.m. and Thursdays, 6-8 p.m., 
four sessions a week. Cost is $25. 

Ail camps will t cacti appropriate skills and 
drills at all positions including special teams. 
Reginning and advanced camp will have an 
emphasis on strength and conditioning de- 
velopment. 

For more information, call Dillon at 223- 
3563. 



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of us would like to pay. 

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unbounded access at a cost you'll just love. For example, sending an e-mail to a relative 
overseas will cost you as much as talking to your next door neighbor.* 

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COMMUNITY UkcUnd Niws|.«|ims M«y 26, 1 »9 J 



i 



» 



Residents raise funds for waterway dredging 



TINA I. SWIECH 

Staff Reporlor 

Thanks to residents In 
Dutch Creek and those on the 
Johnsburg Channel, dredging 
their waterways arc being done 
in the first simultaneous Fox 
Waterway Agency project ever. 

Iioatcrs in the two residen- 
tial areas of Mel lenry Township 
were told dredging was no 
problem in the badly needed 
sites. The only snag was, who 
would pay for the hauling out of 
the silt? 

Residents in the upper scale 
Dutch Creek neighborhood, as 
* well as yacht club members 
raised $40,000 for trucking. 
Coordinated by resident ]oc 
Miller and Itud Hansen, the 
project called for homeowners 
using Dutch Creek to each con- 
tribute an assessment of $200 
each. Two other residents 
donated $2,000. 

Agency officials said the last 
time Dutch Creek had been 
dredged was 35 years ago. 
Miller explained, when the 
creek worsened, his neighbor- 

r- Wrjte Us -, 



Lakeland Newspapers 
wants to hear news of 
local sporting events, 
clubs, organizations, etc. 
Black and whfte photos 
are also welcome. 
Please send news Items 
to Claudia M. Lenart 30 
S. Whitney, Grayslake, 
60030 or call 223-8161. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

SUPPLEMENTARY 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

FOR WITHDRAWAL 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Prtmo Time 

Cedar Mooting 

ORIGINAL DATE FILED: August 6. 
1092 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This b 10 certify thai Iho lolowlng 
rvirnixl parson's) tvivluivo withdrawn 
from l (mi business organization 
described abovo and hosmave no lur • 
Ihor connection or financial rxonrsl In 
said business Withdrawal anal bo 
etloctrve: May 9. 1095, 
Thomas A. VilelMi 
45460 N. Mildred 
Antloch, Illinois 

fit Mrs. Patricia Viands, spouse 
(deceased) 
May 9. 1995 

Tho taregolng inslmmnnt was 
acknowiodgod boloro mo by I ho por- 
sons Intending to withdraw Irom the 
businoss this May 9, 1095. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Eva M. Rrvora 

Doputy Counry Clerk 

nocolvod: May 0. 1005 

Wllard R. Holandor 

Ink/) County Clerk 

059SC-791-AH 

May 19, 1005 

May 26, 1005 

Juno 2. 1005 



hood became "a dead commu- 
nity." 

Miller commended the use 
or the amphibious buckhoc on 
the projects. He called it a "bril- 
liant concept," especially since 
the area was so closed off, other 
equipment couldn't get 
through. 

Residents on the )ohnsburg 
Channel got together and each 
paid their portions which were 
around $150 per family. Close 
to $4,500 was raised by the 
Channel dwellers. 

'Flic Agency hired some of 
the trucks to haul away the tons 
of silt from J. M.S. Cartage in 
Mcllcnry. 

One of the truck drivers on 
the project happens to also be a 
resident of the johnsburg 
Channel. Joel Stcinman was 
instrumental In organizing the 
contribution project. 

Stcinman remembers well 
what the Channel was like 
before the dredging began. "It 
was rough getting boats In and 
out," he said. Much of the 
problem came after Hivcrvicw 
Drive was washed out by heavy 
rains two years ago, 
"Everything swept Into the 
channel," said Stcinman. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
REGULAR MEETINGS 
Tho First Fire Protection Drstrid of 
Antloch Towrohp wii hold tholr regu- 
lar montlxy public meetings on Iho 
Second Thursday ol every month at 
/ 30 p. m In the r ire Safory Bulking, 
035 Hofbok Drive, Antloch, 1L 00002 
commencing with tho Juno, 1905 
meeting and thereafter. The next reg- 
ular mooting wil be hold on June 8, 
1005. All Interested persons are vwl- 
edto attend 

JoAnn D. Osmond, Secretary 
First Fire Protection District 
ot Antloch Towmhp 

050SD-608-AR 
May 26. 1905 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

SUPPLEMENTARY 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

ADOITION OF NAMEStS) 

TO BUSINESS 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Prime Time 

Cedar Rooting 

ORIGINAL DATE FILED: August 6, 
1002 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

Thb b lo eerily that tho porson(s) 
listed below b/are to be added lo the 
list ot por&on(s) owning, conducting of 
transacting the above named busi- 
ness cftodrvo: May 0, 1005. 
Mrs. Patricia J. VUolkb 
P.O. Box 202 
Antloch, tllnoks 
tfJ Mrs. Patricia VlWWs 
May 0. 1005 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before mo by the per- 
sons) Intending to conduct Iho 
buelnas this May 9, 100S. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Eva M. Rivera 

Doputy County Clerk 

Rocervod: May 0, 1005 

Wllard R. Helandet 

Lake County Clerk 

O5O5C-70O-AR 

May 19, 1005 

May 20, 1005 

June 2. 1005 




Officials and residents stand near the Dutch Creek Channel where dredging Is being done In order 
to got boats In a out of the area easier. Johnsburg resldont Joe Miller said Dutch Creek was once a 
sought after place to live. Wbon the channel became silted In after a number of yean, suddenly, tho 
neighborhood was "a dead community, 1 ' ho said. Now McHonry County Fox Waterway Agency 
Director Marshall Lowe, left, stands noxt to Agoncy Chairman Dr. William Dam; Agoncy Project 
Coordinator John Lap© and Dutch Creek rosldonts Joe Miller and Bud Hansen.— Photo by Tina Swtoch 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 

IN THE ORCUfT COURT of THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 

LAKE COUNTY - IN PROBATE 

In the Matter oMhe Estate of 

WILLI AM JOSEPH WOLFE No. »S P 4M 

Deceased 

CLAIM NOTICE 
Notice b gfven ot the death of Wlftam Joseph Wolo. of Lake Vila Township, 
lllnois. Lofton ot office wore booed on May 15, 1005. lo Barbara Samuetson, 
37002 N. Terry DnVe West, Lake VBa Township. IL 00040 whose attorney b Jack 
C. MardoUn. 10t E. Doorpafh Suite 702, Lake Forest, IL £0045. 

Claims against the estate may be Hod In the office of the Clerk ot the Ctrcut 
Court at IS N. County Street, Waukegan, limots 60OA5 Room C- 104 or wHh rep- 
resentative, or both, on or before November 27. 1095 which date b not loss than 
months from tho date of the Oral publication of thb nouce and any ctslm not lied 
wf ntn thai period b barred. Copbs ot this claim fled wlh tho Clerk must be maaod 
or dobvored lo the representative and lo to attorney wthln 10 days aftar it Is lied 

Barbara Samuatson 
(Representative) 
Jack C. MardoLsn 
(Attorney) 



0S06D-610-LV/LN 
May ?6. 1005 
June 2. 1005 
June 9. 1095 



FILE NUMBER: 
PETmONER: 



OWNER: 
PROPERTY 



■ 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 

LAKE COUNTY - IN PROBATE 

In the Matter of the Estate of 

MARGARET L GROVES No. »S P 460 

Deceased 

CLAIM NOTI CE 
Notice b given of Ihe doalh of MARGARET L GROVES, of Lake Vita, IL 
Loiters ol office were Issued on May 8, 1005, lo NORMA K. WELCH. 16705 Ri. 
173, Wadsworth, IL 60083 whoso attorney is JAMES LUMBER, 307 Lake Street . 
Arriioch, IL 60002. 

Claims against Ihe est alo may bo filed In the office of the Ctork of the Circuit 
Court el 18 N. County Street, Waukegan, Itlnota 60065 Room C-104 or wlh rep- 
rosenlalfvo, or both, on or boloro Novombor 20, 1 095 which dale Is not loss than 
6 months from Ihe date ol the first puWkalton of thb notice and any claim not filed 
within thai period la barred. Copkn of thb claim fled wlh the Cleric must be 
mailed or delivered lo tho roprwonlalrve and to the attorney within 10 days after 
It b lied. AVNofTTWK.WfilCrl 

(RopreserxaDvo) 
fsJ James Lumber 
(Attorney) 



059SC-799-LVAJJ 
May 10, 1005 
May 26, 1005 
June 2, 1005 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
PLANNING A ZONING BOARD 

VILLAGE OF ANTtOCH 
PZB95-8 

Antloch Cornmunty Consoftdated 
School District Numbor 34, 
by Dr. Daniel Burke, Supednlendenl 
650 Hyhvww Drive 
Antloch. IL oooo? 
(7M) 395-0712 
same as petllonor 

The property- hvquostton b slualed on 0» north side of 
Illinois Route 173, on the south side of the southerly pari 
ot Highvlew Drtvo, and east of Sequol Creek. It b pari of 
tho parcel kJenlliod on the Lake County Tax Maps as PIN 
02-O7-301-OO4; and legally descrbed as: 
Lois 10 and 1 1 and part of Lot In Smart's Rldgemoor 
Manor, being a subdivision of part of Section 7, Township 
46 North, Range 10, East ot the Third Prlncpal Moddun. 
accordkig lo Iho Plat thereof recorded Docember 15, 1056 
as Document 10141 10 In Book 34 of Puis. Pago 04, said 
part betrij dnsatmd as toeow* Commen ci ng ol tfw» easterly 
most comer of sakj Lot 0; thonce nortnwestorty along a 
northerly line of said Lot 0, a distance of 60.05 loot to a 
point of curvature m said Ine: thence northwesterty along 
a curved northerly Ine of sakl Lot having a radius of 
t M 37 loot a chord ccstance of 63.16 toot; thence eouthorty 
a distance of 292.04 loot to a point on the southerly Ine of 
said Lot 0, 100 feet westerly ot On soutfnasl comer thereof, 
thence easterly along the southerly line of sakj Lot 0, a 
dblance of 100 loot 10 the southeasterly comer thereof; 
thence northeasterly along the easterly Ine ot said Lot 0, 
a dbtanoa of 261 26 leel lo Om point of beginning. In Lake 
County, Mtiob. 

A Certned Plat of Survey, daled Apr! 17, 1005 and prepared 
by Nel J. Lee. Regfefered Mnob Land Surveyor b submfftod 
wlh and made a part of the petlton. 
PoUbnor b requesting a zoning amendmeri from the 
existing R-1 One-tamify Dwolmg District lo R-S, Mutple- 
lamty DweBng District. 

Petllonor requests the zoning change In order lo alow lor 
Ihe construction ol one apartment bulking on each of the 
three existing lots for a total of 35 lo 43 dweltng unrts 
Thursday, June 8, 1005 
7 JO P.M. 

Board Room. VUego Hal, 
674 Mam Street 
Antloch, IL 60002 
Al persona desiring to appear and be heard thereon lor of against said peti- 
tion may appear al sakl hearing and be heard. 

Barbara Johnson, Chairman 0595O-Bt1-AR 

Planning & Zoning Board May 26. 1005 



REQUEST: 



PROPOSAL: 



DATE: 

riME. 

PLACE: 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 
NAME OF BUSINESS. Balloon Magic 
AOORESSfES) WlfERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 41679 N. 
Lotus, Antloch, n. 60002; P.O. Box 
549. Fox Lake. IL 60020. 
NAME(5) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADORE SS(ESJ OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT' 
fNO OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Jamb E. Dugo. PO. Box 549, Fox 
lake. 1 60020. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This b to otflty that the imdersJgned 
intondfi) ,0 conduct the above named 
business Irom it* bcatlon(s) Irxftcal- 
ed and that the true or real ful 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
are correct as shown 
Jarrx* E. Dugo 
Apr! 25. 1005 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) interning to conduct Ihe busi- 
ness this 25th of Aprf 1905 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Cheryl L Barters 

Notary Pubic 

Received AprS27, tOOS 

Wllard H lietander 

Lake County Or* 

0S05B-76O-AR 

May 12. 1095 

May 19. 1005 

May 26. 1005 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED 0USINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Holmes 

ire odors 

ADORESS(ES) WHERE BUSWESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TTtANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 265 
Hickory Lane. Antkxh. U 60002. 
NAME(S) ANO POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADORESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CON-DUCT* 
tNG OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS' 
Shelty lielmos. 265 Hickory Lane. 
A/xtoch. IL 6000? 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

Thta is to certify that the undorswjnod 
tntend(s) lo conduct the above named 
business Irom tho location(t) Indkat- 
ed and that Ihe true or real lul 
name(s) of Iho person(s) owrang, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
She ty Holmes 
May 1, 1095 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intendng lo conduct Ihe busi- 
ness thb May 1, 1005. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Carmen E. Tore 

Deputy County Clerk 

Received: May 1, 1005 

Wllard R. Hetander 

Lake Courtfy Clerk 

0506B-787.Afl 

May 12. 1005 

May 10, 1005 

May 26, 1005 






Ma? 26, 19t* LAblwd NcwspApcRS COMMUNITY 



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Farm Bill brings mixed harvest to economy 

— Part two in a five-part series 



RHONDA HETBICK BURKE 
Editor in enter 

The sounds of hammers ring dearer In 
Lake County than the sound of a rooster 
crowing to wake a farming family for Its early 
morning chores, yet one- 
third of take County is still 
in agricultural use— that 
equates to 75,000 to 80,000 
acres. The top crops contin- 
ue to he com and soybeans. 

National statistics show 
that each American farmer 
feeds 128 people. Because 
of programs such as the 
Farm Dill, food has 
remained a bargain for the 




ChANqiiNCj 
Fi eUJs 



income goes for food* In ihe 1930s, nearly 25 
percent of disposable family income was 
spent on food. During the same period of 
time, the number of farms 
have been reduced from 7 
million to 3 million nation- 
wide. 

Some argue the major rea- 
son why food cost has not 
escalated in the past 50 years 
is because of federal pro- 
grams including the Farm 
Bill The national legislation 
Is reviewed every five years 
and will go to vote before 



American consumer even In times of drought Congress this summer. Legislators will likely 

and flooding. In the 1990s, slightly more than begin debating the bill in July. 

11 percent of every dollar of disposable while many sec the often controversial 



Farm BUI as legislation which keeps farmers 
from working, the bill actually regulates food 
cost by removing capitalism from the farm- 
ers. 

•If we had to chargeAtfH$«tt>0l?&it| 
cost to produce a gallon of milk, tt^ price 
would be at least triple," said Jon'Schorl & 
director of national legislation for th<Ailttioi3h, 
Farm Bureau. 'Federal programs have kept 
prices low while farmers have absorbed the 
Increased cost of producing food at 1930 mar- 
ket prices." 

What has resulted is the loss of a free- 
market economy for farm products. The situ- 
ation Is one that doesn't rest comfortably in 
total with farmers or lawmakers. 

'Machinery Is very expensive as is the 
cost of administering federal programs relat- 
ed to chemical use and land preservation," 
See FARM BILL page B6 




Pot© Tokampo examines a 
handful of hybrid teed com 
before planting. Hold back by 
rainy weather, farmers are 
quickly running out of time to 
plant crops and still have them 
mature before fan.— Photo by 
Todd F. Hebler 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



THIS WEEK 

TIF offers false 
promises 

Tax increment financing 
not always right tool 
PAGE B4 

Powerful 
medicine 

Managed care provides 
answers in health care 
crisis PAGE B7 

LakeTilla high 
graduation 

Calvary Christian 
graduates first class 
PAGE Bl 1 



Historical 'free-love' home burns 



History comes 
to life 

Vets brings World War 
II (o classroom 
PACEB14 

'Crimson 
Tide' a hit 

Movie Picks says plot 
engaging PAGE Bl 9 



TINA L SWIECH 




Staff Report or 

Stale Fire Marshals arc Inves- 
tigating a blaze at the home of a 
former frcc-lovc group, and old 
sanitarium which took nearly a 
dozen hours to extinguish. 

The 90-year-old structure 
located on Woostcr Lake In unin- 
corporated Grant Township was 
burned to the ground Tuesday. 
Seven fire departments helped to 
put out the Inferno which sturt 
before the crack of dawn. 

lor a number of years, the 
thrce~cforyM»ctucJe«J structure set 
back on Hellvue Lane near WUton 
Rd., remained vacant 

Caretakers kept watch on the 
property up until several years 
ago, according to local residents. 
In 1905, the longest lived 
Utopian Society In U.S. history 
built the mansion. The group, 
the 'Spirit Fruit Society" were 
chased out of Ohio, so it's 
founder, Jacob Bcilhart moved 
members to Ingtesidc where they 
were not bothered, according to 
Diana Dretske, archivist from the 
Ukc County Historical Museum. 
Bcilhart died later in 1908. 
Ills body was buried near the site 
of the home. 

After he passed away, the 
Utopian Society moved to 
California where the group was 
disbanded in 1928, explained 
Dretske, 

Later, the large structure was 
used as a sanitarium and a health 
resort. Some people believed it 
was owned by* the Kcllogg's 
Company. 

Longtime resident Kim Eudy 
said she remembers the vacant 



building well and always knew to 
stay away from It. 

"It was always a spooky 



used to sec it over the water on 
the lake. "You didn't want to go in 
there," Eudy said. 



It was always a spooky place. You didn 't 
want to go In there. ' 

— Kim Eudy 
WoosJor Lake resident 



place," explained Eudy. She said 
her home was directly aero** 
from the old building, and she 



Fox Lake Fire Captain Ken 
Buchardt explained his depart- 
ment as well as the Illinois State 



Fire Marshal's arc investigating 
the fire which started suddenly 
around 4 a.m. 

A total of 163, 100,000 gallon 
tanks were used to put out the 
blaze which burned nearly all day 
long. Baxter Labs on Wilson Rd. 
helped replenish tanker trucks 
when they were empty. 

Around 60 firefighter* from 

Lake Villa, Graytlakc, Round 

Lake, Antioch, Spring Grove, 

Wauoonda and Fox Lake assisted 

with their trucks and manpower. 




Richard A. Ho©hn©, cW©f ©ngln©©r of Fox Lok© Fir© Station 2 looks ov©f tho rubbl© aflor a noar 12- 
hour bkn© was ©xtlngubhod at m© silo of an old sanltaHum and ft©«-lov© society homo In Ingtosld©. 
Illinois Fir© Marshals at© currontty Investigating rh© fir©.— Photo by Todd HolsJor 

Ewalt finding new deputy clerk role challenging 



JENNIFER WH1SENAND 
Staff Reporter 

After only a couple of days in the Lake 
County Court House, newly appointed 
Deputy Clerk Susan Ewalt has her hands full 
learning the ropes. 

"I have been involved with community 
relations for many years and one of the key 
issues here Is providing good customer ser- 
vice to our county residents," Ewalt said. 
"Right now I am learning how the office works 
and working with the vital records,* she 
added. 

l^ikc County Clerk Willard Helandcr 
appointed Ewalt as Deputy Clerk May 9 and 
she began her duties May 15. 



"Susan brings to our office not only excel- 
lent organizational ability and professional- 
ism, but the important people skills that will 
help us offer our customers the highest possi- 
ble level ot service," Helandcr said. "Ilcr role 
in the vital records and elections areas will set 
a new standard for face-to- face customer ser- 
vice," she added. 

For the last several years, Ewalt has oper- 
ated a community relations/marketing busi- 
ness specializing in materials for not-for- 
profit and public sector dicnts. Prior to that 
she was a private contractor for a Lihcnyville 
marketing firm and was a columnist for the 
Dally Herald 

With many years of community service 



under her belt, Ewalt is a member of the 
board of directors of MainStrcct Ubcrtyville 
Inc., a not-for-profit organization which pro- 
motes historic preservation and rcvitallzation 
in the downtown area. 

She has also served as a member of the 
Condcll Medical Center Hoard of Directors 
and was president of the hospital's auxiliary. 

Ewalt has lived in l.akc County since 1972 
and has resided In Ubcrtyville for 16 years 
with her husband Norris and two daughters 
Miclu-lle. 2-1 and Kclli. 21. 

Ewalt holds a bachelor's degree from 
Purdue University and is currently working 
towards a master's degree in communica- 
tions at DcPauI University in Chicago. 



WajcAV-' 




■■mm 



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COUNTY UkUnd NtwspApcRS M*y 26, 1995 



Radio operators to practice skills in field exercise 



Every disaster has one com- 
mon denominator — the need 
for reliable communications, 
under adverse conditions, both 
locally and to the world. Often 
communications arc provided 
by amateur radio operators, or 
"hams." 

The Lake County Radio 
Amateur Civil Emergency Service 
(RACES) will participate in an 
internationally sponsored exer- 
cise simulating disaster condi- 
tions from 1 p.m. Saturday, June 
24, until 1 p.m. Sunday, June 25, 
at GOO W. Winchester Rd., 
Libcrtyvillc. They will be located 
In an open field by the Lake 
County Ucpt. of Transportation 
in Libcrtyvillc. 

On this weekend, known as 
Field Day, thousands of "hams" 
throughout North America set up 
and operator emergency stations 
free of commercial power to sim- 



ulate the worst possible condi- 
tions. This gives the operators the 
experience necessary to provide 
communications .when normal 
channels arc disrupted or 
unavailable, due to natural or 
manmadc disasters. 

RACES members support the 
National Weather Service with 
Skywarn severe weather spotting 
and other local community activ- 
ities. 

Visitors arc Invited to tour the 
Emergency Operating Site. Ham 
operators will be available to 
answer questions about their 
equipment, procedures and the 
public service role that amateur 
radio plays in Lake County. 

For more information, contact 
Jim Lang at 285-3571 (days) or 
438-5918 (evenings), GH Pilz at 
362-7851 (days and evenings), or 
Don Whitney at 576-61 16 or 381 - 
2386 (evenings). 



Hit the links at fund-raiser 




i 



: 



Join Cincinnati Bengal wide 
receiver Tom Waddle, former 
Chicago Bears Ron Rivera and Jim 
Morrisscy and other sports celebri- 
ties at the eighth annual Celebrity 
Golf Outing for the lake County 
Forest Preserves' Youth 

Conservation Corps (YCQ on 
Wednesday, June 14, at 36-holc 
Countryside Golf Course near 
Mundctcin. 

11k; event begins with lunch and 
free use of the driving range at 10 
tun., followed by a shotgun start, 
scramble golf outing at 1 1:30 a.m. A 
cocktail reception will l>c held at 5 
p.m., followed \ry a western barbe- 
cue dinner, auction and prize dis- 
tribution at 6 p.m. In a Texas-style 
tent Tliis year's auction features 
round-trip tickets to anywhere in 
the continental U.S., a variety of 
autographed sports gear and more. 
The $99 fee includes the golf 
outing, a cart, lunch and western 
barbecue dinner. A dinner-only 
ticket is available for $24 per per- 
son. Reservations arc required and 
must be made by June 6. 

A variety of sponsorship levels 
offer corporate foursomes a full day 
of golf, as well as photos and lunch 
with sports celebrities, dinner and 
prizes. 

Proceeds benefit the YCC, a 
summer conservation Job program 
for Lake County youth between the 
ages of 16 and 18. Since 1974, the 
YCC program lias employed hun- 
dreds of teenagers In the Lake 
County Forest Preserves. Ail youth 
salaries arc paid through donations 
from businesses and Individuals. 
The goals for this year's YCC golf 
outing Is to raise enough money to 
fund 44 positions. 

For more information on corpo- 
rate sponsored foursomes, or to 
make a" reservation for the YCC 

Share in the 
trail bike rally 

Help mark National Trails Day 
with the Lake County Forest 
Preserves and the Lake County 
Mounted Posse on Sunday, June 
4, from 1 to 3 p.m. at Half Day 
Forest Preserve" near Vcmon 
Hills. Join the forest preserve staff 
and members of the Mounted 
Posse for a demonstration of the 
safest way for hikers and bikers to 
pass horses on the trail. 

The Lake County Mounted 
Posse demonstration is free and 
open to all ages. The bike rally is 
$3 per person ($2 for Lake County 
residents). For more information 
call 948-7750. 



Lake County R .A.C.E.S. member Wayne Est©* watches as canoe racers paddle by his check point at 
Celebrity Golf Outing, call Bob m °- *° during races on me Des Ptalnes River, May 21. Est©* logged In canoe numbers to ensure afl 
McCammon, forest preserve super- racw * made It to his check point safety. Amateur rack) operators from Lake County R-A.C £.$. were 
intendent of support operations, at positioned at several points along the race course from start to finish to help monitor me race— Photo 
52M7B2, at. 26. b Y C * n * ^^ 



Time For A Change? 



rnt.lt J A dEUcA AAf 








It's Easier Done Than Said! 



CUSTOM HOMES ANTIQUE STRUCTURE RESTORATIONS 
LUXURY HOTEL RENOVATIONS ADDITIONS REMODELING 

LOOK AT SOME OF THE THINGS WE DO TO CREATE BEAUTIFUL PROPERTIES 

CARPENTRY • CUSTOM CABINETS * HARDWOOD FLOORS * PLASTERING * DRY WALL • TILE • ELECTRIC 

PLUMBING ♦ ROOFING • EXCAVATING * DEMOLITION • GRADING * LAND CLEARING * CONCRETE • SEWER • SEPTIC 

KITCHENS * BATHS * GREAT ROOMS * SUN ROOMS * SCREEN PORCHES ♦ LIBRARIES • OFFICES 

TENNIS COURTS • PARKING AREAS * PONDS • GREENHOUSES • CA2EB0S ♦ OUTBUILDINGS 

McVee Development Group 

Builders Developers General Contractors 

Consulting Const. Management Finance 

Richmond, Bllinois 

1-800-715-4442 

TELEPHONE 815-678-7003 FACSIMILE 815-678-2238 

ILLINOIS WISCONSIN INDIANA MICHIGAN 




»i m i ii im in' i 






. 













Maj 26, im UbU*l NcvipApcw COUNTY f 




At A GIance 




Alligator not found 

ROUND LAKE BEACH— Police and Illinois 
Department of Conservation (DOC) officers have not 

found an alligator which was 
reportedly seen swim- 
ming in the water 
by two different 
residents. SgL Jeff 
Hopkins said 
experts he has con- 
tacted indicated it 
would be extreme- 
ly unlikely an alll- 
f> y,*. gator would be In 
VAA/Pl, y the water because 
of the cold water 
temperature lie said the gator 
would normally be on the 
ground. Neither police or DOC 
officials have spotted an alligator. 

Combined meeting a hit 

LAKE VI LLA-Ukc Villa 
Elementary District board mem- 
bers met with the mayors of 
Lake Villa, Undenhurst and 
Round Lake Beach to discuss 
school impact fees. Each village 
has students in the district 
School Board Member Tom 
Yingling was encouraged by the 
turnout and the support of the 
area mayors. Round Lake Baumaunk 

Heights Mayor Terry Lumpkins said it was a good 
opportunity to put everybody on the same page. 
Undenhurst Mayor Paul Baumunk stressed the impor- 
tance of impact fees agreements which pay a fair share 
to school districts. 

Seat belts being checked 

POX 1AKB— "Ok* It, orTicket - b the word on the 
streets in Fox Lake this weekend. Police Chief fames 
Busch announced officers in his town will be cracking 
down on drivers through a program sponsored by the 
Illinois Department of Transportation (1 DOT). The 
emphasis will be on scat belt usage, driving under the 
influence, and speeding violaUons, explained the 
chief. The Fox Lake Police Deportment will receive 
reimbursement for a grant from IDOT for hiring over- 
time police officers during tills Memorial Day week- 
end. 

Safety Boating jveek 

CHAIN O* LAKES— The Fox Waterway Agency 
reminds boaters May 20 to May 26 is 'Safe Boating 
Week." Boaters arc encouraged to sign up for boating 




safety courses through the Coast Guard Auxiliary or 
local Power Squadron. Many boating courses arc also 
available through area park district programs. 
Information on Coast Guard Auxiliary classes can be 
obtained by calling Millard or Loretta Rutkowski at 
(708) 359-0797. Power Squadron course information is 
available by calling (708) 296-8777. Safety Inspections 
will take place at the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary loca- 
tion at the Agency office located on 45 S. Pistakcc lake 
Rd. 

Gurnee bank robbed 

GURNEE— A Gumcc bank was robbed of an 
undisclosed amount of cash. The robbery took place 
at 12.10 p.m. May 20 at First Midwest Bank, 3555 W. 
Grand Ave. in Gurnee. The suspect is a male black in 
his late 40s or 50s and Is dean-shaven. 

Bike path section wins nod 

GURNEE— A village-wide bicycle path will Include 
a street on the cast side. Trustees voted unanimously 
to approve a bicycle path for the Boulevard View right- 
of-way, despite neighbors' objections. The village's 
bike path will consist of 60 miles when completed. 

New building obstructs radar 

VERNON HILLS— Vcmon Hills trustees approved 
a new 4-story building for PNC Mortgage despite 
claims by the Federal Aviation Administration that the 
building will Interfere with a radar beacon that Tracks 
incoming and outgoing planes from OH arc 
Internationa] and other airports. The 200,000 square- 
foot building falls within the clear -zone of the former 
Nike missile site, where the FAA radar is located. 
Village officials said the FAA requirements fall outside 
the village's authority, and any standards that need to 
be met should lie handled between the developer and 
the FAA. More than 800 employees arc expected to 
work In the new building. 

Police to air cable program 

VERNON HILLS— Vcmon Hills Police arc prepar- 
ing to air quarterly or monthly cable television pro- 
grams on about police work. Similar to television's 
"COPS" program, police officials said a variety of pro- 
grams will discuss crime prevention techniques, crime 
of the quarter and small discussions about police 
work, training or new laws. Police officials said they 
hope in Increase the rapport between the community 
and the police department. 

Dist 75 community finds focus 

MUNDELEtN— District 75 has decided to reopen 
the old Lincoln School, to help ease the crowding 
problem within the elementary schools and to get the 
fifth-graders back Into the elementary and out of the 
middle school. The district is seeking community 




Input In how the school should be utilized. One idea 
Is to create a magnet school which will focus on tine 
arts, technology, computers or the many other Ideas 
that were brought up In the two District Advisory 
Research Team (DART) meetings. DART wUi be decid- 
ing from the ideas that wv re brought up and will let the 
community know the plans for the school In the fall. 

Eckmann leaves NWMC office 

UBETrrwiLUv-I Jbcrtyville Mayor Jo Ann 
Eckmann is involved in many different programs, com- 
mittees and dubs throughout 
Lake County, one of which is the 
Northwest Municipal 
Conference, NWMC The NWMC 
is a regional association of 3S 
municipalities and townships 
working in a cooperative effort 
to resolve many community 
concerns. Eckmann has been 
president of the conference since 
May 1994 and has turned the 
office over to Park Ridge Mayor Eckmann 
Ronald Wietccha, who will serve the 1995-96 term 

Science team scores high 

CRAYSLAKE— The Grayslake Middle School 
Science Olympiad team has improved their standing 
over last year, finishing 20th in the 1995 national com- 
petition. The team placed in the top ten In six events 
with one national champion. This is the best finish 
ever by the Science Olympiad team after 3 consecu- 
tive trips to the national competition. 

Speed limit under study 

GRAYSLAKE— The Village Board of Trustees will 
soon be considering whether or not to raise the speed 
limit along Atkinson Rd. now that a traffic study has 
been completed for the 1.6- mile stretch. Residents 
living along the road protested last fall when they dis- 
covered the village intended to raise the speed limit 
along the road they say is already unsafe because of 
speeding. The village agreed to hold off the move 
until pedestrian improvements were completed and a 
traffic study was done. 

County workshop a success 

LAKE ZXJR1GB— The fourth annual Countywtdc 
Surface Water Management Workshop held In Paulas 
Park was a resounding success. Event organizers said 
the more than 100 people attending were committed 
to saving and improving the lakes, ponds and stream 
ways in their areas. The event was moved to the 
southwestern portion of lake County after three years 
In Lake Villa, giving area residents with private ponds 
a chance to learn more about them. The event was 
co-sponsored by the Lake County Health Department, 
Lake Zurich and the lake Zurich Property Owners 
Association, among others. 



Agency budget approved, 
water rate unchanged 

The board of directors of the Central Lake County loint Action 
Water Agency approved the agency's annual budget for the fiscal year 
beginning May 1. This Is the fourth annual operating budget for the 
agency, which began delivering treated lake Michigan *atcr in 1992 to 
12 central Lake County communities with a population of 130,000. 

The $I3.3-million budget includes $3.6 million for operations and 
maintenance expenses, $.B million for capital related Items and $8.8 
million to fund the repayment of debt. Revenue from water sales pro- 
vides 75 percent of the revenue. Anodicr 17 percent comes from a ref- 
erendum approved property tax 

Due to growth within the agency's jurisdiction, and the use of some 
prior year revenues, the agency is able to maintain the wholesale rate 
for treated water at $1.65 per thousand gallons, the same rate initially 
charged. 



Coalition to hold meeting 
on teen pregnancy June 1 

A Lake County Coalition on Teen Pregnancy meeting will be 
held on lune 1 from 9:30 to 1 1:30 am. at Warren Newport 
Library, 224 O'Halne Rd., Gumcc Dan Rodriguez of the Health 
Reach ainic, will make a special presentation on Its services 
and will bo followed by a coalition business meeting. 

The Lake County Coalition on Teen Pregnancy b a support- 
ive network of Individuals and programs dealing with pregnant 
and/or parenting teens, providing county-wide advocacy and 
awareness regarding teen pregnancy and parenting issues. 

The Coalition meets the first Thursday of each month 
(September through June) at the Warren Newport Library and 
would welcome attendance. For more information, contact 
Hobble Leonard at 336-5212, ext. 260, 




STATE BANK OF THE LAKES 

WILL BE CLOSED 

v*u** MONDAY, MAY 29, 199S 



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EDITORIAL Ukt Ian<I NrwspAptRs M*y 26, 199 5 



Give your meaning 
to Memorial Day 

Fifty years ago our little corner of northern Illinois 
(it really was little in those days), was getting ready 
to observe Memorial Day with the joy and relief that 
war in Europe had ended earlier in the month. On 
the 1945 holiday, three more months of fighting 
would remain in the Pacific. 

Energized by the event of Dec. 7, 1941, many 
young men from this community had been in uni- 
form up to four years. Life here and abroad was 
never the same. 

Sadly, some of the young men from our town 
never came home. We observe Memorial Day to 
pay homage to their sacrifice. We also observe 
Memorial Day as a tribute to all Americans who 
donned the uniform to serve their country. 

On this 50th anniversary of V-E Day, let us rekin- 
dle the spirit of Memorial Day. Take time to honor 
those who, as one writer put It, "helped save a 
world on fire." Hang out the flag, observe a 
moment of silence. Recite a prayer. Allow yourself 
to give meaning to a momentous day. You'll feel 
good about yourself. 

Tax dist. offers 
false promise 

One of the realities of this area's rock'in growth 
and roil'in development is the phenomenon of 
"pocket stagnation.*' Despite a robust economy, 
boarded up buildings and weedy parking lots can 
result when a retail chain goes bust or distant cor- 
porate captains make a decision to relocate. 

With alarming frequency, village officials turn to 
the creation of a special taxing district featuring tax 
increment financing (TIF) to fix the problem. We 
say alarming, because the downside of TIFing can 
be as vexatious as the unsightly, stagnated area 
itself. 

Like a siren song, the TIF district beckons to chase 
away the weeds and replace the boarded windows ■ 
with displays of merchandise. TIFs were created by 
the state in 1977 to give municipalities a tool to 
attack blight and ruin. Basically the TIF provides 
for "freezing'' real estate taxes while allowing the 
growth portion of additional taxes created by new 
growth going to defray bonds sold to provide fund- 
ing for improvements to the property. 

Mundeleln is the latest Lake County community to 
take a look at TIF financing. Stung by the relocation 
of a huge discount store and the shuttering of a size- 
able retail lumber outlet, Mundelein officials natu- 
rally are anxious to acquire viable new businesses 
and replenish the flow of lost retail sales tax. 

The confusing, complicated TIF law has achieved 
some notable results in areas like East St. Louis. But 
the dog-chaslng-hls-tail financing, as we stated, has 
a downside that rules useagc only as a last resort 

Schools hate TIFs because of the tax freeze, In 
some cases up to 23 years. The law has been 
abused by suburban sharpies. TIFs provide below- 
market financing that typically gives developers an 
unfair advantage over local merchants. In this 
regard, TIFs are patently unfair. One little dis- 
cussed feature of TIFing is putting the whole real 
property ofthc municipality on the line to guaran- 
tee bonds. 

In our opinion, traditional development employ- 
ing conventional funding is much preferred over the 
razzle-dazzle, smoke and mirrors of special tax dis- 
tricts. Underwriters love TIF's because of the 
municipal guarantee feature and profitable paper- 
work. 

While the go go features of TIF's might be beguil- 
ing and workable on paper, old-fashion bootstrap- 
ping leaves a good taste for all and still works, espe- 
cially in a locality where the economy is strong. 
Mundeleln has a lor going-^a handsome $80,000 
budget for economic development; Mundeleln 
Pride, a privately funded, civic redevelopment orga- 
nization; intelligent leadership, a'nd a viable market. 

That combination of resources is sure to work. 
Give It a chance. 



-WhAT reacIers ARE sAyiNq... 



Reform advocates won't tire 

Editor 

Well folks, Senate bill 541 income tax, went 
down in flames and once again our fine legislators 
agreed that there is an absolute need to adequately 
fund education but not at the expense of their re- 
election chances. 

Why there arc so few people out there absolute- 
ly. outraged amazes me even more than the elfish, 
arrogant attitude of so many of those buffoons we 
elected. Senator DcAngclis and the IS legislators 
who voted for this hill arc to be commended for 
their statesmanship in trying to convince the 
Republican leadership that children should and 
must he the absolute priority of this or any state. 
Thank you.AIdo and all of you with the guts to do 
what Is right. 

To the rest of you In the Senate, I guarantee you 
that we will not go away nor will we work any less 
vigorously next year to insure that you arc not re- 
elected. Perhaps you will get the message next year 
when you arc once again working for a living The 
Democrats will be more than happy to rcassumc the 
leadership role in Springfield if you cannot unite for 
the kids. 

Michael D. Turay 
Crete 

Clustering hurts senior housing 

Editor; 

Assisted senior housing proposed by the Lake 
County Housing Authority is desperately needed, I 
hope when my time comes I can just move across 
my backyard and into one ofthc apartments. 

However, what the majority of my neighbors in 
Wauconda and myself arc objecting to, is putting 
five low Income houses together In one-half block. I 
recognize the need Tor low income houses, but they 
should not be clustered together, as is being pro- 
posed. 

I, for one, would rather sec the building of a larg- 
er, two story senior home to utilize the land at 
Daniel and Minerva Streets. If necessary, put one 
single family home there, but scatter the other four 
throughout the village. 

M. Jocllcn Gaschlcr 
Wauconda 



Withholding vote hurts 

Editor, 

People don't realize that not voting on election 
day is a powerful weapon to be turned loose on the 
politicians. 

Politicians depend on large voter turnout to get 
reelected and to ram through their tax referendum*. 

It's a proven fact that more changes have been 
brought about by low voter turnout than by a large., 
turnout. 

Threatening to switch parties docs not intimi- 
date the politicians, but telling them that you won't 
vote at all— boy, oh boy— they hate to hear thatl 

Now is the time to start telling the state legisla- 
tors up for reelection in 1996 that if nothing Is done 
to change school funding and other problems, that 
then you arc going to withhold your vote. 

Oh, they hate that! Even the locals hear this kind 
of response from the voters. 

TomVaughan 
Wauconda 



Observe kindness to animals 

Editor. 

People should rcmcml>cr that wc share this plan- 
et with many animal species, both wild and domes- 
tic, and It behooves us to be stewards of their envi- 
ronment as well as our own. 

Why Is there such a tremendous surplus of cats 
and dogs? 

1 ) Mainly because ton many people who acquire 
a pet do not provide a permanent home. Shelters 
arc loaded with adult dogs and cats that have I wen 
discarded by their original owners. 2) Pet owners 
allow their pets to breed, hut only two out of every 
10 kittens and puppies find a permanent home. 3) 
Many purebred breeders arc practicing sloppy over- 
breeding that results In severe health and tempera- 
ment problems. 4) Some pet stores and private 
homes serve as nutlets for the despicable "puppy 
mills" that mass produce under brutal conditions 
animals that arc often diseased. 

Pet overpopulation can he controlled If (lie fol- 
lowing guidelines arc adhered to: 
Don't acquire a pet unless you can commit (o 10 to 
Sec LETTERS page B5 



C L/ I I KJ I V 1 1\ L Newspapers 



-ViEwpoiNT 

Recording memories 
leads to happy life 



BILL SCHROEDER 
PubDihor 

Take It from Don Dcustcr, that 
elusive critter, happiness, can be 
corralled. 

A former Republican state legis- 
lator and one-time Capitol Hill 
legislative aide, Dcustcr has 
achieved warm support from fel- 
low llotarians for a talk he has 
worked up entitled, "Keeping 
Happy Memories." 

Now tho long-time Sylvan Lake 
resident who maintains law 
offices In Ubcrtyville is ready to 
take his theories on the road. 

Happiness, according to the 
Dcustcr Doctrine, stems from 
happy memories. You don't 
have to be a pollyanna or erase all 
of life's jolts from your memory 
to be happy, Dcustcr insists. 

AH you need to do is maintain a 
diary. That's a trick Dcustcr 
learned from his grandfather, a 
Congregational minister. The 
other secret is keeping the diary 
handy, like your bedside. The 
secret behind making the diary 
depository work Is writing in It 
every day, Don says. Well, almost 
every day. "Some days, nothing 
really important happens. So you 



don't write," Dcustcr admits. 

While Don and his wife, Kay. 
have dined with the president 
(Nixon, when the Dcustcrs were 
in in the U.S.capitol), and have 
kept company with political big- 
wigs in both Washington and 
Springfield, It turns out that the 
little things in life arc most 
Important. 

like when the wrens arrive, or 
the first tulip appears in spring. 
Hie birthday of their dog, Duddy, 
has a place in the Dcustcr diary. 
When all is said and done, the 
date a daughter gets her first new 
car Is important as the years go 
by. 

That's the kind of stuff that 
makes Its way into the Dcustcr 
diary — and pithy sayings, plus 
newspaper clippings. 

"Years later when you read 
about those happy events, you 
feel good. Happy memories 
moke you happy." 

In his talk, Dcustcr relates 
how he first learned about the 
importance of memories and a 
good memory from the late 
James Kemper, the legendary 
insurance mogul Tor whom Don 
served as secretary after finish- 




ing law school. 

Don weaves Into the happy talk 
some down-to-earth realities of 
being in public life. "Every politi- 
cian Is on an ego trip." (Rorrowcd 
from U.S. Rep. Henry Hyde). 
The minute you leave politics, 
nobody knows you." 

Hand-in-hand with cataloging 
happy memories, is learning to 
find the bright side of adversity. 
Dcustcr laughs easily about two 
crushing back-to-back defeats 
that ended his political career. 
"At the time it was a disaster. 
Now I took back and rcalt/e that 
the defeats allowed mc to enjoy 
life, have time for myself and my 
family for the first lime in years." 
lite Dcustcr Doctrine Is that 
everyone is In the pursuit of hap- 
piness. If wc learn to tiang on to 
the happy memories, we'll l>c 
happy. It's really that simple. 
Oh, yes, Keeping a diary helps. 
******* 

Bill Schrocder offers editorial 
commentary every Tuesday on 
lake County life presented by 
STAR Channel 3/UJi, Cable at 

5:20 and 7:30 p.m. 






I 



U.Ik 
I of 
liti- 
/vcd 

(IrJ. 

tics, 

glnR 
gio 
rsity. 
two 
feats 
irecr. 
istcr. 

! dial 

enjoy 
id my 
:ars." 
s Uiat 
fliap- 
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i'U Ikj 
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itorial 
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Hay 26, 199? UbUNd Ntwsp*pfM COUNTY ff fB 



Line starts forming for Nostra soccessor 



Party lines, lakeland Newspapers col 
umn of political commentary, is prepared 
from staff reports. 

If Recorder of Deeds Frank Nostra 
decides to retire — don't bet on this one — 
the Uric is beginning to form for his suc- 
cessor. 

Already the dean of Illinois recorders, 
Nostra would set some sort of record by 
winning another term, He'd be well Into 
his 90's with another victory under his 
belt 

lust In case, Fox Lake Trustee Alberta 
Meyer has let It be known that she would 
be available to run as a Republican for 
recorder in 1996 if Nustra retires. Meyer is 
a longtime employee in the recorder's 
office. 

Just surfaced as a potential recorder 
candidate is a familiar name to Lake 
Coonty voters— Vernon Hills Village Clerk 
Katfcy Rya> Party lines was informed that 
Ryg, a Democrat, is being encouraged to 



run regardless of what Nustra decides 
about his future. 

Ryg, defeated a year ago In a bid for 
county clerk, feels there still Is a sizable 
section of the elec- 
torate that would 
like to sec at least 
one Democrat In 
county office as a 
balance to 

Republican domi- 
nation. 

Some Joker— A 
Party Lines reporter 
fell hook, line and GrinnoU 
sinker for one of Sheriff CUnt G rlnneli's 
favorite openers these days. Asked about 
his wife's health, the sheriff replies with a 
straight face, "Haven't you heard? Marian 
left mc" 

Anyone acquainted with the Sheriff and 
Mrs. Grinncll knows that they are models 




of marital Miss. Clint waits for the listener 
to regain consciousness, then breaks Into 
a broad grin and explains, "She's on a trip 
In Europe with her sister." 

• • • 

Only oae way— Vernon Hills Police 
Chief Gary Knpaak didn't attempt to dis- 
guise his displeasure when John F. Cuneo 
Jr. ruled that he wanted a family heirloom 
painting returned, no questions asked. 

Kupsak, who wanted to retain a 19th 
Century painting stolen from the Cuoeo 
Museum for evidence, learned from 
Cuneo that there's only one way of doing 
things — the Cuneo way. 

Vernon Hills sleuths thought they could 
trace the thieves through old newspapers 
wrapped around the painting taken during 
a benefit gala from the house where Cuneo 
grew. up. But he told police, "Forget It!" 
And he meant it 

• • • 

How to win— County GOP Chairman 



Lauren 



loho ScfauHen told a midwest 
Republican conference In Green Bay how 
to win. Attendees marveled how Lake 
County politics Is dominated by 
Republicans, 

• • • 

Token demo— State 
Beth Gash (D- 

Highiand Park) Is 
getting over the 
uneasy feeling of 
being introduced at 
governmental con- 
ferences as THE 
Democrat She hap- 
pens to be the coun- 
ty's lone 
Democratic office 
holder, albeit a 
small corner. Cash 

Gash advocates a moderate stance for 
Democrats who want to get things done — 
and remain in office. 




Letters 



From page D4 

20 years or the lifetime care of that pet; 
don't let your pet breed; consider adopt- 
ing a homeless pet from a shelter (where 
purebreds are also avail a W c) ; avoid the pet 
stores and other outlets that deal with 
puppy mills; when purchasing a purebred 
puppy or kitten, demand to sec the par- 
ents and require a health certificate from a 
local veterinarian; obey the law— keep 
your pet at home so that it will not become 
a stray In a shelter. 

Obviously, too many animals are being 
bred by pet owners, purebred breeders 
and puppy mills. Make sure your pet does 
not contribute to the problem. For 
reduced-cost spay/neuter assistance, send 
a SASE to LCAPA, P.O. Box 106, Corner, II. 
60031. 

Beverly J. Salo, President 

Lake County 

Animal Protection Assn. 

Politicians avoid vote 

Editor: 

The spring legislative rush is here again 
with another proposal to expand rivcrboat 
casino gambling in Illinois. 

Proponents would lead us to believe 
that this is the easy solution to the practice 
of deficit spending by cities and state trea- 
suries. Two groups appear to make money 
on rivcrboat casinos, the license holders 
and the government. 

What a comfort to realize that the peo- 
ple telling us they can and will control 
gambling are themselves the benefactors. 
The same politicians who are establishing 
more rivcrboat casinos distribute the 
money generated by them. These same 
politicians accept political contributions 
from the casino owners that profit from 
their establishment 

This profit sharing arrangement adds 
little integrity to their ability to regulate 
rather than promote gambling. Once 
entrenched, gambling profiteers will con- 
tinue to pressure legislators for more 
lenient and expanded rules in order to 
"compete" with boats from other states 
and raise more revenues for the state. 

The Republican controlled legisla- 
tures* task Is to improve the quality of life 
for residents rather than jump on the false 
hope that gambling will enrich the state 
coffers. Republican platforms promote 
hard work, family values and good educa- 
tion as the keys to financial success and 
then propose casino gambling as the solu- 
tion to governments financial problems. 
They raise up the merits of our democrat- 
ic system, yet the Illinois House sits on 
IIB-481 that would allow citizens the right 
to decide on additional gambling. 

Will legislators approve additional 
gambling because It makes Illinois a better 
place to live and raise our families? The 
legislature should halt the expansion of 



gambling and move forward with HB-481 
that will allow Illinois voters decide. 

Roy Sackschcwsky 
Alliance For Better Government 

Antioch 

Depke doesn't get it 

Editor 

I've read several letters to the editor 
about the Yorkhouse Road controversy in 
Waukcgan. This expensive road extension 
would Impact everyone In the county with 
a gasoline tax. It Is also a terrible waste of 
our money, Mr. Depke doesn't get. it. yet 

Douglas Plow 
Lake Villa 

Don** fall for power grab 

Editor 

U.S. history is filled with cynical power 
grabs using the cover of "stopping extrem- 
ism." John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry 
became an excuse for Southern secession. v 
The corruption of "black radical" recon- 
struction governments was the alibi for 
the KKK and Jim Grow. A few anarchist 
bombings were the mask for a bloody 
crackdown on organized labor. The refusal 
of some socialist leaders to be drafted was 
the pretext the Wilson Administration 
used for the "Palmer Raids" (an attempt to 
destroy a Socialist Party that was siphon- 
ing off votes from the Democrats). 

The actions of a few Japanese spies in 
Hawaii led to the confiscation of Japanese 
American property and concentration 
camps. The "threat" of the civil rights and 
anti-war movements was used by 1JJJ and 
Nixon to spy on and otherwise Intimidate 
their enemies. 

Now we are urged to pass the Omnibus 
Counter Terrorism Act (II.R. 896 and 
SJ90) to "prevent another terrorist bomb- 
ing." This bill would allow a unilateral 
declaration of the president to classify an 
organization as terrorist, putting Its bank 
accounts under government control, 
opening all its records to government 
agents, prohibit it from raising funds and 
deny the group Its constitutional right to 
confront accusers whose identities could 
be sealed by the government 

In their zeal to crush their pro-gun and 
pro-life enemies and prop up a besieged 
president, liberals have forgotten that 
every political movement has its fruit- 
cakes — the anti-war movement had the 
Weathermen, the civil rights movement 
had their "Burn, Baby, Bum" types. Some 
animal rights activists bomb laboratories. 
A handful of environmentalists sabotage 
construction sites, A 'conservative' presi- 
dent could wreak havoc among their pet 
causes with the same weapon they want to 
give Clinton. 

Well, as we used to say in the '60s, 
•Scratch a liberal, find a Fascist" 
Confident of their ability to manipulate 



the system, determined to force a "racist. 
reactionary" population to their will, liber- 
als never worry about too much govern- 
ment power. And maybe the Republican 
Establishment knowing Clinton is proba- 
bly doomed, wouldn't mind handing die 
next Republican president a perfect tool to 
crush his enemies. But the rest of us better 
wake up and protest this power grab 
before It's too late! 

Grant D. Noble 
Lake Forest 

Hidden garbage tax 

Editor: 

From an economic standpoint the 
monies rendered to die host communities 
for Countryside Landfill are and will be a 
hidden tax, passed on to us as increased 
operational costs In our garbage bill. We 
already experienced a substantial Increase 
last fall. Call It an "anticipated landfill 
expansion tax," if you will. USA Waste Is In 
business to make money, not give gifts. 

A new state-of-the-art landfill is in 
order, away from the environmentally 
sensitive, existing site. 

Raymond L Lacrobc 
Grayslake 

Food safety threatened 

Editor. 

The enforcement of sanitation and 
food safety regulations faces extinction in 
Lake County. The Lake County Health 
Dept (LCHD) plans to replace code 
enforcement Inspections with educational 
sessions. 

The LCHD will provide restaurant 
operators and workers with an education 
for their business at taxpayers' expense. 
Only conditions deemed by the LCHD as 
major threats to food safety are to be dis- 
cussed during educational sessions. 
Conditions deemed minor threats to food 
safety are to be Ignored. The LCHD execu- 
tive director has stated publicly that the 
market will control minor threats, like 
poor sanitation, by customers staying 
away. The new FDA sanitation and food 
safety code for restaurants does not sup- 
port the LC! ID's abated enforcement plan, 
nor is the weakening of enforcement 
required by state or federal laws. 

Restaurant operators do not like being 
regulated and this new approach will pro- 
vide relief. For example, operators have 
never liked the Inspection score. The scor- 
ing method needed updating, but instead of 
updating, the LCHD will eliminate scoring. 
This leaves inspectors without an objective 
way to measure restaurant sanitation and 
food safety management fScoring b recom- 
mended in the new FDA code) 

Operators will be relieved of unan- 
nounced Inspections; Inspectors must 
make appointments. When sanitation or 
food safety violations occur, the LCHD 



plans to respond with additional educa- 
tional sessions and hope for corrections 
rather than take enforcement action to 
assure corrections. 

Operators will be liberated from 
enforcement inspections and food safety 
violations can be attributed to poor educa- 
tion by the LCHD. Restaurant operators, 
who should be responsible for good sani- 
tation and food safety and should be regu- 
lated, have gained control of the regulator 
In Lake County. Is It Just a coincidence that 
the enforcement of food safety regulations 
for restaurants has been sabotaged since a 
restaurant operator became president of 
the board of health? 

Ross E. Goodrich, Ph. I ). 
Registered Environmental Health 

Specialist 

In feet Jon Control Specialist 

Grayslake 

County not responsive 

Editor. 

Many motorists who travel up and 
down Rte 41, past the reconstruction of 
Steam School Rd., may want to ask the 
question: If Steam School Rd. is closed to 
traffic, why are thousands of cars every 
day, being stopped by a stop light at Rte 
41 and Steam School Rd. every two to 
three minutes? 1 sent a letter to Martin 
Buchler, the head of Lake County Div. of 
Transportation, asking this question. I 
suggested two solutions; 

•The lights flash yellow for Rte 41 traf- 
fic, and rcu for both Steam School Rd. and 
the little driveway that is opposite of 
Steam School Rd. 

•Install temporary sensors to stop Rte 
41 traffic for when there is construction 
trucks or when there is the rare occasion 
that someone must get out onto Rte. 41 
from that driveway. 

Much to my surprise, neither of these 
apparent solutions were a solution to their 
traffic engineer. First, he said that Illinois 
docs not have "flashing red/yellow* lights 
at Intersections, as does Wisconsin and 
many other states. He said that this could 
pose a safety problem. In Wisconsin, there 
are many such Intersections where this is 
done successfully and safely. 

Secondly, he tried to explain to mc that 
they don't have sensing mechanisms to use 
for this situation. Am 1 to believe Lake 
County DOT traffic engineers don't have at 
their disposal appropriate kinds of sensing 
devices to detect this approaching traffic? 

Unfortunately, these responses are lame 
and will not satisfy anyone reading this. As I 
cited to the lake County DOT, this b a typi- 
cal example as to why people arc not happy 
with governmental agencies. They arc not 
proactive in responding to the problems of 
their customers, the public 

PhilDziki 
Trevor, Wis. 



3 : . 



1 










5fi COUNTY UkrtANd NcwspA f >£Rs M*y 26, 1 99* 



Farm bill 

Frontpage Bl 

said Peter Tekampc, Fremont Township 
supervisor and life-long county farmer. 
Tekampc and other farmers recognized 
that if food prices arc to stay low, the gov- 
ernment must continue some support. 
However, they arc also in favor of the gov- 
ernment allowing the farmers to respond 
to market changes and in eliminating cost- 
ly government regulations pertaining to 
fertilizers and conservation measures. 

Despite, the price-setting benefits of 
the Farm Bill, it often becomes a hot issue 
of debate in the hails of Congress because 
money from the farm bill is tied to USDA 
programs such as the school lunch pro- 



Number of U.S. Farms 




■30 '40 '50 "55 "60 *65 70 75 W "85 "86 '87 



gram and food stamps, which arc easily 
earmarked for "reform" by legislators. Just 
last week, trie House adopted a budget 
which will reduce agricultural spending by 
$38 billion by the year 2002. 

"'Hie I louse plan calls for $9 billion in 
reductions during the next five years and 
$17 billion in reductions within seven 
years," said Scholl. The proposal causes 
us a great deal of concern but our commu- 
nity recognizes the need to balance the 
budget as the foremost priority of the 
nation. Farmers arc asking, however, that 



our representatives look at the bill fairly 
and not ask us to take more than our fair 
share of cuts." 

Rep. Phil Crane (R-8th) says his sup- 
port of the Farm BUI is uncertain because 
of what he terms "needless" regulations 
tied to the bill Including specific programs 
for farmers for crop rotation, acres tilled 
and the use of fertilizers and other such 
products. 

In addressing a group of Lake County 
farmers at the Farm Bureau he said he 
believes farm programs should be separat- 
ed from food stamps and school I undies. 
"We need to bring the programs for 
farmers home to be administered locally" 
said Crane who favors flexibility 
in planting to maintain profi- 
ciency and less government 
intervention into the lives of 
farmers. 

Tekampc agrees the federal 
government cannot possibly 
micro-manage farms effectively. 
For example, the soil in Mel lenry 
County is soft and sandy, there- 
fore not requiring fall plowing. 
By comparison, l-akc County's 
clay soil more resembles con- 
crete. 

Congressman John Edward 
Porter iH-loth) is in favor of 
many of the cuts outlined in agriculture by 
the House. Porter was called upon to lead 
the eh urge against sugar subsidies in 19B7. 
"Our view of the American farmer is 
colored hy history," said Porter. They're 
aren't many family farms left in the nation, 
they arc now mostly corporate farms so 
what we end up doing is subsidizing cor- 
porations. The fann bill is corporate wel- 
fare and we can't afford it." 

Porters also disagrees with the farm 
bill because not all farm products arc sub. 
sidi/.cd. 




1 






l£^» 



■'''* ' ' 



lf.VV»- 









During a break In fho rainy woamor, Polo Tokampo usos no-till mothods to plant 
com. Because of growing fedora! conservation restrictions, many farmers have 
been forced to limit plowing, In spite of Lake County's hard, clay-basod sod.— Photo 
by Todd F. Holslor 



"It is ironic to me in a nation where we 
say smoking is unhealthy, that we subsi- 
dize tobacco farmers," Porter said. "\Vc 
don't subsidize carrot or lettuce farmers. 
We let the market place dictate what farm- 
ers should grow." 

Pete's cousin, Don Tekampc, agrees 
the government should have never 
become In- - • ■ ■- 



Porter believes cuts in the farm bill 
will not cause major Increases in the cost 
of food. 

"The consumer will be protected 
because the market place will determine 
the cost of food," Porter said. "Agriculture 
is the only business In this country where 
we have command economics. We should 

put the egg in 
of 



voivcd in price 'L/Vh//e many see the often 

controls but , , . - _.... 

now fecis a controversial Farm Bill os 

complete with- legislation which keeps formers 

IZ*L™*\ from working, the bill actually 

farm economy regulates food cost by removing 

in shambles. cap ft Q n sm fr 0m fh e farmers. ' 

I he resulting rr 

effect would be ■■--,■■■■ ■ — ■ . . . , ■ 

similar to the Soviet Union going to capi- 
talism overnight. The end result will be 
much better but the system was so 
impugned by controls it Is first going 
through utter ruin before it can right itself. 



the basket 
freedom." 
The Illinois 
("arm Bureau is 
urging legisla- 
tors to support 
the conserva- 
tion reserve 
program, which 
— — — — — — -^— subsidizes farm- 
ers to place portions of their acreage In 
conservation casements for environmen- 
tally sensitized land and supports allowing 
American farmers to compete fairly in the 
worldwide market. 



Lydia Schroeder celebrates 
90th with family open house 

Family members and friends took advantage of a sunny 
spring day to share a 90th birthday observance with Lydla M. 
Schroeder, whose husband founded a group of community 
news weeklies In Lake County. 

Mrs. Schroeder spent a 
busy Sunday afternoon with 
well wishc rs, including a group 
of retired employees from the 
newspaper company. ' 

It first she admonished her 
daughter-in-laws "not to fuss" 
about tier birthday, but after 
an open house ended she 
admitted, "Yes, it was a nice 
day. I was happy to see so 
many old friends." 

She was an active partici- 
pant In her husband's busi- 
ness, serving as subscription 
manager for a number of 
years. When the system was 
computerized, she took over 
supervision of out-of-town 
subscription delivery. 

In this capacity, Mrs, Schroeder came In direct contact with 
scores of subscribers. It was not uncommon for her to receive a 
message, "Tell Mrs. Schroeder that we're leaving for Sarasota 
Monday and that we want the paper delivered to Florida during 
the winter. " 

Some readers stopped In the Lakeland Newspapers' office to 
give her their address changes personally. In this way, she got to 
know them on a first-name basis. . 

When she retired at age B3, Mrs. Schroeder was the oldest 
employee of the company that also publishes die Great Lakes 
Bulletin and the Market Journal shopper paper. 

She now lives a quiet life, sharing her home on Long Lake with 
a full-time caregiver. Her hobbles are reading and keeping tabs on 
grandchildren and a growing number of grcat-grandchlldrcrL 

The open house was planned by Mrs. M. Robert Schroeder of 
Antloch and Mrs. William 11, Schroeder of Long Lake. 

Mrs. Schrocdcr's parents were pioneer farmers in Vernon 
Twp. The house where she bom, a 100-year-old structure on 
Oakwood Rd., served as the Vernon Hills Park Dlst 
headquarters for many years. 

Among the guests was her brother, William If. Meyer, who 
formerly resided in Ubertyvllle before retiring to a small farm 
near Richmond. 




Increase in fires by children 
prompts warnings from officials 



Lydla M. Schroodor 



SPENCER SCHEIN 

Staff Roportor 

When little Tlmmy" or 
"Jamie" finds a cigarette lighter 
around their homes, get curious 
and accidentally start a fire, the 
first reaction parents probably 
have Is to tell them not to do that 
again. 

What may be seen as trau- 
matic Is now becoming com- 
monplace: more and more kids 
arc playing with fire. 

"It is becoming too com- 
mon," said Terry Mastandrea, 
I>ake Zurich fire chief. "It Is an 
everyday occurrence." 

Cigarette lighters used to be 
more difficult for young hands to 
use, he said, some needing (lints, 
others too expensive and some 
too big for small fingers to oper- 
ate. Now lighters arc sold as 
cheap as five for one dollar, and In 
some cases only require die push 
of a button for a constant flame. 

During the holidays this past 
December three young children 
caused major property damage 
fires to their homes playing with 
fireplace lighters, which arc 
longer than an ordinary dispos- 
able lighter found at any conve- 
nience store or gas station. 

lust this month the depart- 
ment was called out to another 
residential fire. Tills time the 
blaze was started by a two-year- 
old boy. Officials are not exactly 
sure how the toddler got a hold of 
the lighter, but do know the dam- 
age It caused. 

The youngster set fire to the 
mattress his mother was sleeping 
on In their apartment at the it and 
Motel In Klldccr die afternoon of 
May 5. The unidentified woman 



suffered first and second degree 
bums to her legs and was taken 
to Good Shepherd Hospital near 
Lake Harrington for medical 
treatment 

Both the boy and his parents 
were brought In for a counseling 
session with fire officials, but 
Mastandrea said approximately 
one-third of the other families 
Involved in similar situations 
refuse to accept help, which can 
be dangerous. 

"If the parents habits have 
not changed, it could happen 
again," said Mario II. Tristan, 
manager of die department's fire 
prevention bureau. 

In 1994, the department 
responded to 12 fires set by 
young children. Only eight of 
their families sought counseling. 

Mastandrea said while the 
simple solution might be telling 
the children what they did was 
bad, he sees it on a much larger 
level. 

The biggest problem is we 
cannot hold a two-year-old 
responsible for being curious," 
he said, "live problem lies with 
the parents. 

The children do not buy the 
lighters.* 

Willie people may not think 
twice about leaving a lighter on a 
coffee table In a family room, 
Mastandrea said they should 
consider die lighter in the same 
way they would a loaded pistol. 

All lighters made In or 
shipped Into the United Stales 
have to he child resistant as of 
July 1994 according to the 
Consumer Product Safety 
Commission 

The lighters arc required to 



include features making it diffi- 
cult for young children to ignite 
them after 10 minutes, even after 
they arc given Instructions. 

"It docs not make the lighters 
child proof, it just makes It more 
difficult for the children to use,* 
he said. 

The lighters have a safety 
mechanism that needs to be 
engaged in order to ignite the 
lighter. They also have a fixed 
flame, compared with other 
lighters which can have a flame 
as high as five- Inches at the push 
of a button. 

The commission tested the 
lighters on children ages three 
and one* half to four and one* 
quarter years old. lighters meet 
the new safety restrictions If the 
child could not ignite the lighter 
in five minutes, and then could 
not in 10 minutes after being told 
how to do It If 85 percent of the 
children cannot make the 
lighters work, they meet the new 
restrictions and can be sold. 

This Is a tremendous help for 
us," said Tristan. "Unfortunately 
there arc still a lot of lighters out 
there that do not have this fea- 
ture." 

Among the manufacturers 
who have complied with the safe- 
ty measures and arc now selling 
them on the market arc Die and 
Cricket. 

Hie Lake Zurich Fire 
Department can be contacted for 
additional assistance through the 
Youthful l : i resetters programs. 
Or contact the "Youthful 
Rrcsctters Hotline" at 1-800-44G- 
1589 for (he name and telephone 
of a Fire Prevention Educator 
who can provide help. 






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Bereavement support 

Losing a friend or relative 
at any age Is an emotional 
and often times a devastat- 
ing experience. Lake Forest 
Hospital offers two support 
groups to families who expe- 
rience grieving at the loss of 
a loved one or family mem- 
ber. The Bereavement 
Support Group meets the 
second and fourth Monday 
of each month at 7 30 p.m. 
I n the library at Westmore- 
land. Nursing Center, which 
is located on the campus of 
Lake Forest Hospital. Call 
234-5G00, cort 6446 for fur- 
ther information. 

UTS, bereavement 

Resolve Through Sharing 
Bereavement Services sup- 
ports parents who have lost 
a baby through miscarriage, 
ectopic pregnancy, stillbirth 
or newborn death. Tlus 
gTOUp meets on the third 
Tuesday of each month at 7 
p.m. In the Westmoreland 
Nursing Center. Call 234- 
6161 for further details. 

Cancer support group 

Meets die fourth 
Wednesday of each month 
at 7 p.m. In the Outpatient 
Oncology Waiting Room. 

Cull 234-5600, cxt 6445. 



Viciony-MriviORiAl 
Hosi/iiaI . 



Narcotics anonymous 

Meets every Monday at ft 
p.m., at Victory Memorial 
Hospital, 1324 N. Sheridan 

Rd,, Waukegan. No registra- 
tion required. Call 360-4090. 

Families anonymous 

Support group meets 
every Wednesday at 7:30 
p.m. at 1324 N. Shcridam 
Rd, Waukcgan. No registra- 
tion required. Call 360-4090 
for information. 

Joy of Parenting 

'I he second Saturday of 
every month Joy of 
Parenting classes are held at 
Victory Memorial Hospital, 
1324 N. Sheridan Dr., 
Waukcgan from 10 a.m. to 
non. The class teaches new 
parent skills essential for 
caring of new babies such as 
bathing, feeding and safety. 
The dass also discusses nor- 
mal behavior patterns, 
sleeping patterns and 
changes in the marital rela- 
tionship. Spanish speaking 
classes are also available. 
Cost of the dass Is $10. 
Interested parents should 
call die New Family Center 
at360*4l21. 

Cardiac 

Rehabilitation 

The Cardiac 
Rehabilitation Programs at 
Victory Memorial Hospital, 
1324 N. Sheridan Rd., 
Waukcgan, provide an exer- 
cise and life-style change 
program for adults with 
diagnosed cardiac problems 
or those at high risk of 
developing heart disease. To 
develop an Individualized, 
monitored program, call 
360-4131. 



Managed care is a powerful medicine 



Anyone who paid attention during last 
year's national health care debate couldn't 
help but learn that the U.S. has the most 
expensive health care system in the world, 
with annual spending near $1 trillion, about 
one-seventh of our economy. However, there 
appears to be a cure for what ails the eco- 
nomic side of health care. It's strong medi- 
cine and it comes In a package labeled "man- 
aged care" 

The costly malady that has afflicted the 
U.S. health care system In recent years began 
with government policy shortly after World 
War II. Well Intcntioncd legislation like the 
Hill-Burton Act promoted the construction of 
hospitals while other laws discouraged hospi- 
tals from consolidating resources with other 
hospitals in a community. As a result, many 
cities and towns that could be well served by 
one or two hospitals saw three or four spring 



up. Each had Its own inventory of state-of- 
the-art technology and a full roster of special- 
ists. Today, in many dries one In every three 
hospitals Is empty. 

Because most Americans have been insu- 
lated from the economics of health care— sel- 
dom seeing a bill or having to consider cost — 
the entire health care system has been 
immune to normal economic forces. As the 
supply of services and facilities in the system 
eventually outstripped demand, prices did 
not fall as would be expected in most sectors 
of the economy. Instead, costs rose. With 
fixed costs as high as 60 percent, hospitals 
chose to ratchet up the level of competition to 
attract more patients. They purchased more 
technology and added more specialized ser- 
vices, often duplicating that which was avail- 
able at nearby hospitals. Some even created 
marketing departments to attract patients. 



The cost of health care continued to rise. 

When employers began to see the Impact 
of employee health benefits on the bottom 
line, there was a demand for action. The near- 
ly overnight switch to managed care plans Is 
widely credited with quickly dampening the 
cost increases facing so many companies. 
Now the task is to correct the basic structural 
weaknesses in the nation's health care system 
using managed care's unique ability to 
reduce the utilization of services without 
adversely impacting quality. A recent 
Congressional Budget Office report noted 
that the most efficient HMOs can reduce 
patients' use of health services by 19.6 per- 
cent while maintaining levels of care that arc 
"roughly comparable" to other types of health 
plans. 

While the excess capacity In our health 
Sec MEDICINE page B9 



HEALTHWATCH 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Chicago area doctors enlisted for study 



The National Heart, Lung and 
Blood Institute (NHI.ttl) has 
enlisted the help of local physi- 
cians in the largest clinical trial 
ever conducted of drugs to con- 
trol high blood pressure and high 
blood cholesterol 

The study's results could 
affect the treatment of millions of 
Americans — about SO million 
Americans have high blood prcs- 
sure, or hypertension, and about 
52 million Americans have high 
blood cholesterol. 

"'Die results of this trial arc 
eagerly awaited by doctors every- 
where,* said Dr. Claude Lcnfant, 
director of the NIILBI. "The trial 
will assess the benefits of differ- 
ent types of drugs used to treat 
high blood pressure, and of one 
used for high blood cholesterol. 



"We could not accomplish this 
trial without the commitment of 
the participating physicians," 
Lcnfant continued. "The trial b a 
huge undertaking. Altogether, it 
involves about 400 doctors and 
40,000 patients nationwide, 
including more than GO Veterans 
Affairs (VA) physicians and thou- 
sands of American veterans. 

"About 55 percent of the 
patients will be African 
Americans, who are especially 
vulnerable to developing high 
blood pressure and lis complica- 
tions." 

The NHI.HI Is part of the 
National Institutes of Health 
(NIH), located in Bcthcsda, Md. 
The NIH is a federal agency that 
supports biomedical research, 
including basic, clinical and cpl- 



Healthworks® offers no smoking 

In an effort to help members of the community who wish to quit 
smoking. Hcalthworks® or Highland Park Hospital will offer a daytime 
class schedule in lune for Smokeless®, a smoking cessation program 
that uses stress management, nutrition education, positive reinforce- 
ment and patented negative smoking techniques to break the smoking 
habit 

On June 7, a free orientation meeting will launch the program's 
Preparatory Phase, offering participants an opportunity to meet the 
instructor and to receive details about how die program works. 

The Treatment Phase begins the second week. Comprised of four 
one-hour sessions, die participant will learn the patented techniques 
to quit smoking for good. The final Maintenance Phase introduces 
additional techniques to protect against a return to smoking and to 
strengthen one's ability to live comfortably without cigarettes. 

Additional dass dates arc: Treatment Phase classes will be held 
Monday, June 12, through Thursday, June 15. Maintenance Phase 
classes will be held on Monday, June 19, Wednesday, June 21, and 
Monday, June 26. 

Please call 480-2685 to register for the orientation. The total eight- 
session program cost is $150. All sessions will be held from 1 to 2 p.m. 

'Nurse Next Door' program to start 

Caregivers Home Health announces a new program. Nurse Next 
Door, a personal home care support system. It Includes an In -home 
evaluation by a nurse, blood pressure check, home safety check, nutri- 
tion review, mobility assessment, social support assessment and infor- 
mation about other services available. 

The purpose of the Nurse Next Door program is to help people stay 
in their own home. The resource nurse will check in on Individuals 
weekly to detect early changes and prevent future problems. The staff 
of Caregivers Home Health have been helping people recover at home 
for over 25 years and have the experience to recognize changes. 

This type of service Is not covered by Medicare (which typically pays 
for short-term Intermittent care for homebound people widi acute or 
recurrent Illness). There Is a single monthly fee based on visits re- 
quested. 

Tor information on the new program, interested family members 
can contact Barb Pcdraza, RN. at 551-9444 or stop by the South 
Harrington office at 33 W. Hlggins Rd., Suite 3030. 



dcmiological studies. 

VA doctors and patients arc 
participating in the trial under 
the auspices of the VA Medical 
Research Service, an agency of 
the Veterans Health 

Administration, which supports a 
wide range of medical research. 

Called the "Antihypertensive 
and Llpld-Lowcring Treatment to 
Prevent Heart Attack Trial,"' or 
Mi HAT, the Nil I. HI study will 
cost about $85 million and will 
last nine years. 

High blood pressure and high 
blood cholesterol increase the 
likelihood of heart disease, the 
leading cause of death in the U.S. 
Stroke, kidney disease and other 
vascular diseases also arc more 
likely in persons with these con- 
ditions. 

Treatment for both conditions 
typically starts with lifestyle 
changes, including increased 
physical activity and weight loss 
for the overweight. A healthy, 
low-saturated fat. low-choles- 
terol eating plan is advised and, 
for high blood pressure, avoiding 
excess salt and sodium and limit- 
ing alcohol consumption. 

When those changes do not 
lower blood pressure or choles- 
terol enough, then drug therapy 
Is needed. 

Drug therapy for high blood 



pressure once involved few 
choices besides diuretics. But * 
other drugs arc also now used, 
including caldum channel block- 
ers, alpha blockers and 
angiotensin- converting enzyme 
(ACE) inhibitors. Some believe. 
these three newer drugs better 
reduce heart attacks or have fewer 
adverse side effects than diuretics. 
But the claims have not been 
proven and the newer druf^ can 
cost much more than diuretic*. 

Similarly, new Up id -lowering 
drugs — HMC-CoA reductase 
inhibitors, — are now (>cing used 
to lower h|gh Wood cholesterol. 
While they work well to lower 
cholesterol, they have only been 
shown to reduce heart attack 
deaths and deaths from all causes 
in older adults in one study and 
their ability to prevent events in 
African Americans and in hyper- 
tensives Is not yet proven. 

Both high blood pressure and 
high blood cholesterol strike hard 
at older adults. For this reason, 
patients enrolled in All. HAT 
need to be at least age 55. They 
also must have met other 
requirements. Once in the study, 
they receive free medication. 

Patients interested in finding 
out more about ALUIAT arc 
encouraged to check with their 
doctor. 




Eye opener 

Victory Adult Day Caro member BiBie Fleming, of Zlon gets 
her eyes chocked by Eyo Care Center of Lake County 
employee Sytvta Cantu ot Waukegan. The center was offor- 
*X3 froo screenings to adult day caro members. 



—o.\n»«.«tf»-«»iB»» o n i mm i tr- awni WW ■ " ■ MWi p i imft »ii i> ' HH 8i«« 




I HEALTH WATCH UktlANd Ncwsfupr« M*y 26, 1995 



. 



Hospital offers quit 
smoking program 



A slx-scsslon Freedom from 
Smoking program developed by 
the American Lung Assn. will he 
offered at Good Shepherd Hospi- 
tal from 7 to 8:30 p.m. beginning 
Wednesday,, May 31. 

Sponsored by Good Shepherd's 
Health Evaluation Lifestyle 
Programs (HI;LP) department, the 
program Is designed to make quit- 
ting a less stressful experience by 
helping smokers develop better 
ways to cope with situations that 
trigger die desire for a cigarette. 

During the sessions, smokers 
develop an Individual plan of 
action to quit. In addition, they 
learn relaxation techniques, how 



to identify triggers and ways to 
avoid weight gain. 

Freedom from Smoking is of- 
fered In six 00-mlnuic sessions 
over a five-week period (May 31, 
June 7, 14, 16, 21 and 28). The 
cost is $100 per person* 

For more information or to 
register, call HcalthAdvlsor at 1- 
800-474-327U. The stop smoking 
program also can be provided 
onsitc at area businesses and in- 
dustries. Good Shepherd Hospital, 
a part of Advocate Health Care, 
one of the largest health care 
organizations in the Chicago area, 
is located north of Harrington on 
Ilwy. 22, two miles west of Rte. 59. 



Volunteers needed for camp 



I 1 : 



The Muscular Dystrophy Assn. 
is looking for young men and 
women age 16 years or older to 
become a part of the MDA sum- 
mer camp program. 

This year's MDA summer 
camp will be held in Ijakc Villa 
and will consist of two onc-weck 
sessions, June 10 to 17 and June 
17 to 24. 

Volunteers willing to spend 
the week at camp arc needed to 
act as companions to a child or 

Asthma drug 
FDA approved 

The l*ulmonary and Allergy 
Drugs Advisory Committee to the 
U.S. Food and Administration 
(FDA) voted by a seven to one mar- 
gin to recommend that Ijcutrol® 
(zllcuton) be approved for market- 
ing. Discovered and developed by 
Abl>ott Laboratories, zllcuton Is the 
First in a new class of compounds 
that will lie used for the treatment 
of chronic asthma, an illness that 
affects one in 20 Americans, The 
symptoms of asthma, which 
include wheezing, coughing and 
shortness of brcatJi, can range from 
mild to life-threatening, 

"Zllcuton Is thought to treat 
both the inflammation and bron- 
choconstriction associated with 
chronic asthma," stiys Bruce A. 
Wallin, M.D., vice president, 
immunoscicncc, cardiovascular 
and ncuroscicnce development 
at Abbott Laboratories. "With Its 
dual effects, wc believe zilcuton 
represents the first major 
advance in the treatment of asth- 
ma in the last 25 years." 

Zllcuton Is die first In a new 
class of compounds called 5- 
llpoxygcnasc inhibitors that block 
the formation of leukotriencs. A 
family of naturally-occurring sub- 
stances in the body, leukotriencs 
are powerful mediators of airway 
Inflammation and also have an 
early and direct effect on 
brondioconstrictioa 

The committee commended 
Abbott for the studies it presented 
while it asked for additional data 

"As the first In a new and unique 
class, zileuton can provide a toot to 
learn more about asthma. For 
example, it can help elucidate ways 
in which die biology of asthma may 
differ in different patients," Dr. 
Wallin added. "We arc pleased to 
comply with die committee's . 
request to study asthma In different 
patient populations, such as Indi- 
viduals with mild asthma, and 
remain confident that zileuton will 
be a welcome new choice In die 
asthma arsenal" 

The committee also recom- 
mended that Abbott work with 
the FDA to provide sufficient in- 
formation about side effects in 
package labeling. 



young adult with muscular dys- 
trophy. It's a wonderful opportu- 
nity to perform a valuable com- 
munity service and enjoy a week 
of summer camp, free. 

For further information and 
an application form, call 290- 
0060. 




Steps to fitness 

Step aerobics classes, open to the public, are held twice each week at Victory Memorial 
Hospital In Waukegan. Enjoying this workout to bettor hoalth are Monica Rettkj of Wadsworth, 
Mary Kingsbury of Mundeleln. Laverna Johnson of Waukegan and Luanna Sholton of Beach 
Park. For more Information on classes, call 36CM131 . 



Cholesterol Concerns? 




"My cholesterol dropped 90 
points and I lost 75 pounds of 
body lal. I leel like a new 
person!" 

Jtn Anitnon 
S»n Dirge. diifomis 




•With the help ol Body Wise, 
I am finally in control. Alter four 
months on the product. I've said 
farewell to 70 pounds of scale 
weight and my cholesterol has 
dropped 76 points!" 

Jamtt Snifstr 
Lika diiira, Witeentin 



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I reduced my body tat by 25 
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M(1M 




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tood choices that f made. 
Ai a resuB, my body tat 
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My Cholesterol Dropped 65 Points in One Month! 

"Within one month of starling the Body Wise products, I lost two 
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Are You Heart Smart? 

Cardio Wise* is a uniquely formulated nutritional supplement by Body Wise Internal ional, Inc., for a 
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For Further Information 

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Max 26, 1 W UbUwd Nfw*pAf*«s HEALTH WATCH 



Premature children do well 



One in two middle-class chil- 
dren who arc less than two 
pounds, three ounces at birth; 
but arc reared in an environment 
of strong parental support, can 
function in a regular school class- 
room at age 7 without need for 
any special services, according to 
a researcher at Loyola University 
Medical Center, Chicago. 

Although standardized test 
scores show this group to be 
somewhat lagging behind their 
peers, the study dispels pes- 
simistic notions that the majority 
of extremely low birth weight 
infants will experience major dif- 
ficulties in their ability to func- 
tion in school. 

Approximately 30 percent of 
the extremely low birth weight 
group require some special edu- 
cational assistance, such as 
speech therapy, tutoring or learn- 
ing disability resources, yet arc 
able to remain In a normal class- 
room, the findings showed. 

Fewer than 20 percent of those 
studied proved seriously men- 
tally or physically disabled, said 
Carey Halscy, child development 
specialist at Loyola and principal 
investigator for the research. 

Her study, one or the first In 
the United States to track the 
long-term development of ex- 



Medicine 



trcmcly low birth weight children 
and the only one to focus on m id - 
dic-dass families in which pover- 
ty and other socioeconomic 
problems are not factors, was 
presented In a poster presen- 
tation at the meeting of the Soci- 
ety for Pediatric Research In San 
Diego. 

"We were able to examine the 
effects of prematurity on a child's 
development and performance In 
school without the kinds of 
socioeconomic Issues that 
obscure and override biological 
factors," Halscy said. 

Parents of children in the 
study group tended to be college 
educated and worked In profes- 
sionally-related occupations. 

"Even with optimal socioeco- 
nomic environments, however, 
one of two extremely low birth 
weight children docs require some 
special educational services and 
20 percent arc functionally dis- 
abled," she reported. Testing pin- 
points weakness on all develop- 
mental testing measures com- 
pared to matched peer groups of 
higher birth weights. 

The lower the birth weight, 
the greater the need for special 
education services in the first and 
second grades," Halscy said. 

A battery of tests was con- 



ducted to determine each child's 
cognitive abilities, vocabulary, 
visual-motor integration and 
behavior at age 4 and again at age 
7. Standardized teacher report 
forms were also used to review a 
child's classroom performance at 
age 7. 

Extremely low birth weight 
children significantly trailed their 
peers on all test measures, 
including general cognition, 
memory, vocabulary, perception 
and performance. However, de- 
spite the lower scores, the ex- 
tremely low birth weight children 
still fell generally within the lower 
portion of the average range for 
each test, Halscy said 

She added that serious com- 
plications, such as severe brain 
hemorrhaging, during an Infant's 
stay in the neonatal unit did not 
necessarily predispose that child 
to any later significant handicaps. 

In terms of illnesses or physi- 
cal handicaps, no child In the 
extremely low birth weight group 
had developed a serious chronic 
illness; none was blind or deaf, 
although one child was blind In 
one eye; and the Incidence of 
milder diseases such as asthma 
was comparable to that among 
children born in the normal 
weight range, Halscy reported. 



From page D7 

care system Is so pervasive that it 
may take several years to bring 
Into balance, the beginnings of a 
trend arc dearly visible. In order 
to trim costs, some hospitals have 
resorted to stuff reductions. Mora 
frequently, hospitals are turning 
to creative solutions such as 
coordination of resources within 
a community in place of unbri- 
dled expansion for the sake of 
competition. Other hospitals arc 
training workers to be more ver- 
satile and arc merging some 
departments. Still other hospitals 
have begun looking toward new 
uses for portions of their facili- 



ties. Georgetown University 
Hospital in Washington, D.C, for 
example, plans to turn a vacant 
unit Into a long-term care facility. 
Physician* are also respond- 
ing to the managed care explo- 
sion. The Council on Graduate 
Medical Education has predicted 
that by die year 2000 there will be 
a shortfall of 35,000 primary care 
physicians who are essential to 
the success of managed care. On 
the other hand, there is a forecast 
of a surplus of 1 15,000 specialists. 
But there arc trends developing 
which could change these predic- 
tions. An increasing number of 
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Keep on fmckiiY 

The Lako County Society for Human Dovotopmont Is pleased 
to receh/e a Dodge Ram truck from Abbott laboratories. 
The donated truck was presented by Abbott employees 
Judy Soghigbn and Ray Fkxes during a visit to the agency in 
2Jon. The keys were presented to LCSHO Director Al Taylor 
and Director of Development Arleno Demb. 



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HEALTH WATCH Ukclwd NcwspApcus M*y 26, 199* 






Habitat celebrates 
home construction 



At a Habitat of Humanity 
groundbreaking ceremony, 
Yvonne Leek and her three chil- 
dren stood on an empty lot In 
North Chicago that will hold 
their new home. The Leek's 
house will be built by the Abbott 
Chapter of Habitat of Humanity. 
Abbott laboratories contributed 
significant funding toward 
materials for the construction of 
the home, which will be built by 
Abbott volunteers, 

"We're all so excited. It's like 
a dream come true," said Leek. 

The groundbreaking ceremo- 
ny was attended by Robert L 
Parkinson, senior vice presi- 
dent, Abbott Laboratories, 
chemical and agricultural prod- 
ucts division; Robert Stone, 
building commissioner for the 
city of North Chicago; Jack 
Jordan, assistant building com- 
missioner; and representatives 
from the Abbott Chapter and 
Habitat for Humanity Lake 
County. 



"Abbott employees, the city 
of North Chicago and Habitat 
for Humanity arc all working 
together to make the Leeks' 
dream a reality," said Parkinson. 
"We're very proud to be a part of 
this effort." 

The Abbott Chapter of 
Habitat for Humanity was estab- 
lished in HW3 and completed its 
first house last year in North 
Chicago, The chapter also 
helped renovate two buildings 
in Lake County. One of the 
buildings is used as a daytime 
referral center for Ukc County's 
homeless. 

Habitat for Humanity, estab- 
lished in 1976, Is a worldwide 
organization that builds homes 
and sells them to low-Income 
families on a no-profit, no-intcr- 
cst basis. The families arc select- 
ed on the basis of need, ability to 
make a low mortgage payment 
and a willingness to help con- 
struct the homes of others as 
well as their own. 



Victory Lakes... The 
Natural Choice 




Rest assured, you will make the right choice when 
you choose Victory Lakes for your loved one. Our 
residents and families say it best... 

"Very good - the best. I didn't want to go home." 

**My grandfather was very comfortable with his 
surroundings and the friends he made here. I made a 
very good decision in bringing him to Victory Lakes. 
Thank you for being so good to him." 

"For the short time she was there, she found everyone to 
be helpful and friendly.. .she'd like to return." 

"Relatives and friends gave me high praise for choosing 
such a pleasant place for mother." 



We offer: 

• Medicare certified, short term care and 
intensive rehabilitation. 

• Quality long-term, skilled nursing care. 

• A specialized "Sunshine Wing" for those 
who suffer from Alzheimer's disease. 

Come visit anytime. Call 356-5900 for information or 
a free tour. 




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Representatives from Habitat for Humanity, mo City of North Chicago, Abbott Laboratories and the 
Leek family help break ground on the lot of the house to bo built by the Abbott Chapter of habitat for 
Humanity. The house was underwritten by Abbott Laboratories. Present wero project manager Craig 
Hoffmann, North Chicago building commissioner Robert Stone, Julio Donovan of mo Habitat for 
Humanity of Lako County, Abbott senior vice president of chemical and agricultural products Robert 
Parkinson, Yvonno, Charleston, Tyrone and Toltoya Leek and the Rev. Joe Doorman from mo 
Immanuol Baptist Church. 




At Victory, we stick to the 
latest surgical techniques. 

F 

L. ndoscopic surgery, frequently 
referred lo as "band-aid" surgery, 
has become the surgery of choice 

for many procedures. Patients 
appreciate the shorter May (often 

outpatient or overnight), the 
smaller scar and the faster recovery 
time that endoscopic surgery can offer. 



Endoscopic surgery is being 

widely used in a variety of areas 

including gynecology, general 

surgery, gastroenterology, TMJ, 

orthopedics, urology and sinus 

surgery. Other applications arc on 

the horizon. Additional minimally 

invasive procedures arc performed 

for ophthalmology and 

otolaryngology (ENT). Ask your 

doctor to recommend a surgeon 

who practices at 

Victory Memorial or 

call Physician Referral at 

t-800-THE CHOICE (843-2464). 

We'll supply the band-aid. 



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M*y 2&, 1 999 UbUNd Nc wsp*pf k CALVARY CHADS 





Congratulates Class 

of 1995 




Graduating class crowning achievement for Calvary 



Through the years the founders of 
Calvary Christian School never lost sight of 
the school's goal, to have a graduating senior 
class. In 1995, 14 years of working, dreaming 
and planning will pay off With the school's 
first graduation dass. 

On May 26 at 7 p.m. eight students will be 
the first high school seniors to graduate from 
a Lake Villa high school. Calvary Christian 
School officially opened In the fail of 1903. 

"The goal of the school from the begin- 
ning was at some point to have a senior 
dass," said Principal Rodney Davis. 

In 1901. concerned parents at Calvary 
Temple began the process for opening the 
school. They didn't like the direction publk 
schools were taking and felt a change was In 
order. 

To that end the church, Calvary Temple 
and volunteers helped organize and build a 
school. The first school house had first to 
eighth-grade classes and some combined 
dass rooms. 

From the beginning the school was dif- 
ferent than public and private schools. The 
emphasis bona Christian education, where 
students arc taught from a Christian per- 
spective by Christian teachers. 

"The textbooks and the dasscs, math, sei • 
encc and English arc all taught with Christian 
textbooks written by Christian publishers. 
Students learn to think critically and learn to 
make the right choices," Davis said. 

Davis, who has been principal for almost 
three years says quality Is one aspect that will 
never be sacrificed at Calvary. Teachers work 
with students to get the most out of the stu- 



dent's capabilities. 

"They am expected to do their best Even 
if they aren't the best students they are 
expected to do the best that they can. Wiat k 
going on tills county is people aren't getting 
the best and are settling for less," Davis said. 

What a students gets at this school the 
student has earned. Nothing Is given. 

"Students can't just go to dass and get an 
A. They have to earn It They have to put forth 



the effort to get the grade," Davis said. 

In terms of quality, Calvary seniors per- 
formed quite well on the ACT test One stu- 
dent earned a 33 out of 34 on the ACT tests. 
Also Ave cf the students scored in the high 
20s. 

A seven-room dassroom addition 
this year has given more space for cur- 
riculum and programs. The band earned 
the right to play at the state music edu- 







September— my senior y cad 
I can't believe it** finally h ere. 
Thii school year will be so tun! . 
(Nine- months, then I'm done!) 

Oct o bcr— *ma t ft th ril 11 
The air now has bit o f chill. 
Study, party, have to run! 
(Eight months, then I'm done!) 




November— what a drag. 
My happy spirits start to sag. 
Tests and papers are no fua 
Oust seven months, then I'm done!) 

December— here ai last! 

It comes with icy, frozen blast 

So what? Christmas break has cored 

(Six months until I'm done!) 

January— Happy New Year! 
Look at your schedule; shed a tear. 
So little time, so much to be don. 
(Five more months and then I'm gone!) 

- 
■ 

February— hearts and flowers, 
Finishing papers after hours. 
Auditions too, without a doubt - 
(Four months more until I'm out!) 



"Please, children, do 

not frighten us 

With your woes a nd 

senloritis. 

You still have four 

months to go!" 

Oh bow those months 

do pass so slow) 

March— are we done 
yet? 

They keep ui here for 
torture, MrxL JoyCrowtrwf 

How I wish the time would fly. 
, (Three more months? I'm going to did) 

April — please let me out! 
I'm going crazyl f want to shout 
' "Let us seniors go our ways!" 
(Two months, I'm counting days!) ■ 

May— It's finally herd 

Count the days; give a cheer! 

I want to graduate right now. 

(tut one more month? Tefl me how!) 

Graduation, here at last 
This whole year has been a blast 
I'm gone, Tm oti t I'm college-bound: 
I survived senloritis, sale and sound. 
—byJoyCrowther, Valedictorian 



QUALITY CATERING INC. 
QUALITY .SS^sX. 

QUALITY LaJtatVUU 

CongrohJctfcs The 
doss of 1995. 

first Senior Class Of 
Colvorv Christian 

Best Of Ludi To ABU 




KBS I Deep Ufc Da*i httA 



i Congr atnlttttoM 



Seniors! 



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cation day in Springfield. 

The school has added German and home* 
economics this year as well as an innovative 
life skills dass. In life skills, students learn 
practical things that will help them in their 
day-to-day life. Students learn how to bal- 
ance a checkbook, service their car, repair 
things and sew, 

Davis said curriculum is geared at a fas t cr 
pace then public schools. Students have a 
cho ice of a wide variety of daises to choose 
from. The school is preparing for state certifi- 
cation. 

Classroom sizes arc kept lower to provide 
more indrvidtalBed instruction. No dass has 
more than 25 students in it. 

The school's band Is one of the area's 
ixist Karen Kurtz helped finance the band's 
equipment through fund raisers and now has 
35 students in the band. 

Calvary has excelled in athletics as wdt 
The boys soccer and the girls volleyball teams 
were conference champions. 

Enrollment has increased each year. 
Attendance b at 245, up from 1 45 about mree 
years ago. 

Through the years Calvary's prindpals 
Included Nancy Mohn, John Backus, Frank 
Lohazza and Davis. The pastors during that 
time were Darrdl Hcndridcson and John 
Walker. 

Mohn will give the commencement 
address to this years graduates. 

Calvary still Isas openings for the next 
school year. For more information about the 
school or to tour the facility, call Davis at :i5T>- 
619a— by ALEC |UNGE 



ana 
vroa r>less Iou 



ongressman 






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Congratulating The 1st 



•* 
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j 
** 
** 



^^^•»*»//*»v s «A****^v»^*»v*^/«»**/^* , %»v*»»»**»*»^%*w l ********** 



Graduating Class Of 
Calvary Christian School 




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As children grow, 
what do you want 
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We give them the tools to 
think for themselves, 
providing an education that 
stresses biblical values. 



Offering a quality Christian 
Education for children in 
Kindergarten through 12th grade. 

Calvary Christian School 



Congratulations Class of 1995 (708) 356-61 98 






H9BH 




CALVARY CHADS UkcUNdNcw^ApcRS M*y 26, 1995 



I 




Congratulates Class 
of 1995 




Kelly Davis 

My first year at Calvary was extremely 
fun. I had been home schooled for my first 
two years of high school, so It was nice to 
have more than just my brother and sister In 
my class. 

My second year was more fun, because 1 
was used the to atmosphere, and became 
very sodal. I got involved in volleyball and 
chccricading, put on a play at Christmas, and 
was voted student council vice president 

As I look to graduation, I am sad because 
I will miss all my friends and tlic fun we lwd. I 
am also happy though because this fall 1 plan 
to attend Don Roberts Beauty Academy. I 
would like to someday open my own salon. 
With die skills and determination I liavc 
learned at Calvary, I feel I can accomplish tills 
or any other goal 1 may have. 

Pamela Sheedy 

This is my third year at Calvary. My fresh- 
man and senior year 1 was in volleyball. 
Calvary is a good place to avoid all of the peer 
pressure at public schools. After high school, 
my friend and I arc getting an apartment I 
would like to go into cosmetology someday. 

Jennifer Davis 

This is my first and last year at Calvary 
Christian School. 'I his school has helped me 
with a lot of struggles tliat 1 have had. 1 "he 
teachers have l>ccn great in helping me with 
my decisions. At die beginning of the year I 
didn't even know what I wanted to l>c doing 
for the rest of my life. All 1 know was that I 
wanted logo to college. Everyone has 
helped me so much in figuring out finances 
and where to attend college, 

I decided to attend the College of bike 
County tliis summer and fall, while working 
to save more money. By next spring 1 hope 
to l>c going to Purdue University in Indiana, 



the University of 
Minnesota, or the 
University of Wisconsin. I 
hope to cam a degree In 
accounting or interior 
decorating with a definite 
minor In German. • 

This year at Calvary 
has been a diallcngc, but 
It Is definitely worth iti 



Class of 1995 



Congratulations to the first 
senior gaduating class of Calvary 
'Christian School, Lake Villa. 

Patricia Waldenstrom, Aaron 
Paul, Troccy Kurtz, Kelly Davis, 
Pamela Sheedy, Kris ty Drushlnin, 
Joy Crowthcr and Jennifer Davis. 



Aaron Paul 

I was bom in lliocnix, Ariz., which hap- 
pens to be the most beautiful place In the 
United States. My family is moving to 
Hawaii this summer which leaves mc with 
the decision of going or staying. The answer 
Is quite otjvlous! My goals for the future arc 
getting a steady job. 

Joy Growth er 

On May 26, 1 will be graduating as vale- 
dictorian of Calvary Christian School's first 
senior class. Graduation night will mark the 
end of my sixth year here at Calvary. I trans- 
ferred here from another Christian school 
after sixth grade. 

The first tiling that struck mc when I 
came here was how friendly everyone was. 
The teachers worked onc-on-onc with mc 
when I needed help and worked hard to 
uphold Calvary's high academic standards. 

Calvary has a great music program. My 
involvement in band, pep band, and choir 
opened up many doors for mc, such as die 
Zion Qiambcr Orchestra, IMEA District 
Choir, and Association or Christian SclwoLs 
International (ACSI) Music Festivals. 

Thcsmallncss of our student body 
enabled mc to be in many programs. 
Throughout high school I've Ixrcn involved 
in poms, hand, pep hand, choir, ycarl>ook, 
school paper, and student council. 



Kfl 



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Vat" 

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.«*> 






Of 1 995 



The First Graduating 
Class of Calvary 
Christian School 



MAIN OFFICE 

1777 N.Cedar Lake Rd. 
Round Lake Beach, IL 

708-546-2111 



MEMBER FDC 

EQUAL HOUSING 

LENDER 



BRANCH OFFICE 

Avilon & Goodnow 
Round Lake, IL 

708-546-8444 



* -___ -_w • * • _■ * -__r *___ m ■ *" " * * * 



■••■ 
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Next year, based on the 
preparation I received at 
Calvary, I will be In the 
honors program at 
AtJgustana College in 
Rode Island. This prepa- 
ration helped me to 
receive a half-tuition 
scholarship as well as 
$1 ,500 per year Tor music 
1 intend to major In math or science. 

Tracey English 

Twelve years ago I was die first student 
to ever enroll In Calvary Christian School. 
I've participated in basketball, softball, soc- 
cer, ycartxxilc, student council, and band. 

Over the years I lwvc received 14 first 
division band medals, two soccer MVI*s f and 
a basketball MVP. I was student council 
treasurer and ycadxwk editor my sopho- 
more year, student council president my 
junior and senior year, and I have been the 
drum major in the band for four years. I am 
also an honor student and I'm a Missioncttc 
leader at my home chu rch. 

I love been accepted at Northern IHinots 
Univ. where I plan to major In math education, 
minor in physical education, coadiing, play in 
die University kind, and participate in sjxutv 

Cavalry Has wonderful teachers, they 
really care about you. Throughout the years 
I've come to really love this school and Its 
staff. I hope I can be as caring and dedicated 
as my teachers have l>cea 

Patricia Waldenstrom 

Ibis Is my ninth year at Calvary 
Christian School. During the nine years I 
have been in band for eight years, cheer- 
leading for four years, yearbook committee 
for three years, volleyball for one year, and a 
student council representative for one year. 



I have enjoyed going to Calvary, the 
teachers all listen and they care about the 
students. They also emphasize Christian val- 
ues. 11 ic band program is excellent and I'm 
really glad I joined band. I've had many 
opportunities that I wouldn't have had if I 
had got to a d iff c rent school. Their sports 
program is good, ft gives all the students a 
chance to participate. 

During my senior year, I have attended 
the cosmetology program at Lake County 
Area Technology campus. I plan to finish my 
hours there and take dasscs at CLC next year. 
I want to get my business degree so someday 
hnight be able to open my own salon. 

My years at Calvary will be nine years III 
never forget 

Kristy Drushlnin 

1 have l>ccn attending Calvary for five 
years now. In that time I have t>cen involved 
in student council, volleyball, baskctlrall and 
chccricading. Because of the small dasscs • 
you really get to know both the teachers and 
the students. In alxurt five years I plan on 
finishing college, moving to Arizona, and 
marrying the man of my dreams! Right after 
high school I'm going to work for a year and 
save up money for college. 





DAN'S 
VENDING 

Fox Lako.1L 00020 

FULL UNE VENDING 
AND COMMISSARY 

Beat Wfehes To The 

Class Of 199$ 
CaLtxray Chnfstfcxn. 



Brad Kupscha 



70&-587-U48 

S4SoytonRd. 
Fox Uko,IL 




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A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 



Congratulations 
To The 1995 
First Senior Class Of 
Calvary Christian School t 

May you realize 

your ambitions and 

fondest hopes in the 

years ahead. 

Walden Square and 

Center Street Square, 

Grayslake 



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J You Did It Patty and Tracey £ 



' 



..... ■■;-..■ 



M*y 26, 199? UbU»d NfwspApces CALVARY CRAPS Bfl 



•T^- • 








igs^iS 



We, At Calvary Christian Learning Center, 

would like to congratulate 

the first senior class of 

Calvary Christian School 

Our Best Wishes For The Future!! 

Meeting Your Daycare And Preschool Needs 

134 Monaville Road 
Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Call: 708-265-0580 




Congratulations! 
To All Of the Seniors 

MlheFirst 

Graduating Class At 

Calvary Christian 

School 



From Calvary Christian Center 

If you are looking for a church home, 
give us a try for 30 days! 



Service Schedule: 

Sunday AM Sunday School 

Morning Worship 
Sunday PiYl Evening Worship 



\ \ Tuesday Night Youth Group 

\ \ Wednesday Night Bible Study 



Activities For All Ages 



9:00 AM 
10:00 AM 
6:00 PM 



7:00 PM j 



7:00 PM 







LAKELIFE UIceUnH NewspAfxw M*y26, 1995 



Lake County Vetz complete replica of Vietnam Memorial 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

With the 50th anniversary of 
V-E Day and V-J Day this year, 
World War II veterans from 
across the country and their fall- 
en comrades truly deserve all the 
salutes they get this Memorial 
Day Weekend. 

But Lake County Vetz also has 
something very poignant to offer 
to solemnize those who fought 
and perished in Vietnam. 

The Waukegan- based group 
just finished building a half-sized 
replica of the Vietnam Wall 
Memorial on display in 
Washington, D.C. The mobile 
wall will travel wherecver It is 



requested and will make Its debut 
Memorial Day Weekend In 
Strcamwood. 

"It's satisfying. It's been a long 
project, and It's finally come 
together," said Stan Adlcr of Lake 
County Vetz, who helped put the 
finishing touches on the wall 
before it embarked for 
Strcamwood. 

The all-aluminum wall stands 
5-foot, 2-inches tall at its tallest 
peak and ftrctches for 240 feet A 
black, powder paint gives the wall 
a mirror-like reflection much like 
the wall in Washington. All 58,196 
names of American soldiers who 
died in Vietnam arc engraved on 
the wall. 



LAKELIFE 



Lake County Vetz raised more 
than $80,000 through public 
donations to fund the project 

"A lot of the money came 
from veterans and their families, 
but public support has grown In 
recent years. I think everybody is 
trying to make up for the first 10 
to 15 years when we were 
shunned," Adlcr noted. 

As one of the largest traveling 
memorial walls in the^country, 
Vietnam and veterans organiza- 
tions arc beginning to make their 
request to display the wall at spe- 
cial events. After traveling to 
Strcamwood, the wall will depart 
for Rochester, Minn., and return 
Sec REPLICA page D15 




Stan Adter end Jim Gave remember those who torf the* Ives In 
Vietnam at Ihe ropfca of too Vietnam Meniotfdlrw Lake County Vote 
bull. Thornod^wiliovelthoa>unliy.-FtKto 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 




World War II veteran Gerhard Bergman reads from the headlines 
ot the day, bringing history to life tor high school students.— Photo 
by Todd F. HoWot 

World War II 
brought to life 
in class for 50th 
Anniversary 



Staff Roportor 

The text books were dosed as 
Ubcrtyvillc High School's world 
history students stepped back 
Into the 1940s with residents of 
the Hawthorn Lakes Retirement 
Community in Vernon Hills. 

The residents came to share 
their experiences In the batde 
and on the home front during 
World War II to give students an 
up close and personal view of 
what the war was really all al>ouL 
The four Hawthorn Lakes res- 
idents, Gerhard Bergman, 
Raymond Lascoc, Belle Ulscoc 
and Virginia Evans, each told 
their own story of the war. 

Gerhard Bergman was drafted 
when he was 28 years old, leaving 
his wife and baby at home to 
serve his country for two and a 
half years. 

During his service, Bergman 
fought under General George 
Patton, and received numerous 
medals Including five battle stars, 
a Presidential Citation, a Bronze 



Star and a Purple Heart because this was right after Pearl 

Bergman fought in the Batde Harbor was bombed and we fdt 

of the Bulge at flagstone and In we had to go, because we had to 

the Battle of Normandy and his end the war somewhere," 

unit helped achieve the surrender Bergman said 

of Gotha, Germany. Raymond Lascoc volunteered 

"My unit was the first to for active duty in 1940 and served 

encounter a small concentration under General Patton for only a 

camp called OfwJruff," Bergman short time before becoming a 

said. "We were stunned when we training officer for the armored 

found the camp, over 3,200 bod - division. 

Ics were found B 



and only 50 or 
60 live prison* 
crs were actual- 
ly found," he 
added. 

B ergm an 
said many of 
the men is his 
unit were very 
angry and some 
even got sick 
from what they 



l H 



Not in vain * may 
be the pride of 
those who survived 
and the epitaph 
of those who feli. ' 

— Winston Churchill, 

speech In the 

House of Commons 1944 



"I met thou- 
sands of officers 
while in die ser- 
vice, three are 
stiU lifelong 
buddies of mine 
and I am still In 
touch with IB 
other buddies," 
Lascoc said. 
Lis cue also 
served on an 
island off the 



saw at the concentration camp. coast of Japan, until the atomic 
"The battle was pretty fierce bombs were dropped In 1945. 



where I was," Bergman said. "Yet 
we only lost a few of our men, and 
one was my buddy," he added. 

Not all the men in the service 
were volunteers; many were 



"After Japan surrendered, 
Belle and 1 stayed in Germany far 
seven years," Lascoc said "Over 
83 percent of Germany was 
destroyed and my Job was to help 



drafted Into the service during rebuild the city," he added. 
World War II and attitudes about Lascoc became part of the 

serving in the war varied. military government and was 

"Many of us wanted to go Sec WWII page B17 




Bolto Lascoo and nor hus- 
band, Raymond Lascoo, llvod 
In Germany for sovon years 
after the war and helped to 
rebuild the country.— Photo 
'S&Y I by Todd. F. Helslor 







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Mandy Panther looks at a medal Raymond Lascoe received from the ctty of Pforzheim , Germany 
for his work In rebuilding the ctty after World War II. The sophomore said the experience was a great 
way to team about history.— Photo by Todd F. Hetsler 







1AKEUFE UiUncJ NcwspApcfts M*y 26, .?• J 



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Kids Fare 



Long Grove Strawberry Festival 
offers two free performances 



The 13th annual Long Grove 
Strawberry Festival is offering 
free performances for kids by two 
professional children's theatre 
groups during the weekend of 
June 24 and 25. In addition the 
whole family can enjoy the cele- 
bration, which salutes strawber- 
ries in almost every form, includ- 
ing shortcakes, pics, ice cream 
and covered with . chocolate. 
Musical groups will play through- 
out both days. 

On both Saturday, June 24 
and Sunday, June 25, the Puppet 
Place will present 'Peter 
Cottontail" in Apple tlaus 
Square, with the show scheduled 
hourly from noon to 3 p.m. On 
Saturday only, the little Caboose 
Theater will perform' "Oliver's 
Strawberry Patch" from 1:30 to 
3:430 p.m. on the Mill Pond 
Lawn, northeast of the crossroads 
of the historic village. 

Long Grove, with ample free 
parking, Is near the intersection 
of Routes 53 and 83 in Like 

Replica — 

From page B15 

to Lake County July 14-16, when 
It will be displayed during the 
Vcmon Hills Summer 

Celebration. It will also be on dis- 
play at the Gurncc American 
Legion July 20-29 before making 
stops in Wheeling* Hoffman 
Estates and various locations in 
Indiana. 

"We take requests as people 
gel Information," Adlcr said. The 
more people who find out about 
It, the more people who want to 
use It." 

Donations will be accepted at 
the site when the wall Is dis- 
played. Proceeds benefit Vietnam 
veterans and their families. 

"We use the funds to retrain 
veterans and help them get Jobs," 
said Adlcr, who served with the 
Amcrlcal Division In Vietnam 
from 1968 to 1969. 

He added) "I have' had pretty 
good luck in my life, and It's grat- 
ifying to help others to get a job 
and rejoin the community. And 
men the guys we help, give back 
into the community by helping 
others," 

Red Cross gala 
set for June 2 

The air will be charged with 
excitement on the evening of 
Friday, June 2, as the Mid- 
America Chapter of the American 
Red Cross holds Its 1995 gala, "A 
Touch of Red," at the Chicago 
Hilton & Towers. 

This year's event will Ik co- 
hosted by radio personality Dean 
Richards of WGN-AM and televi- 
sion anchor/ reporter Lisa Kim of 
WBBM-TV Channel 2. 

The evening will begin with a 
silent auction that offers such 
popular Items as getaway trips to 
the Cal-A-Vle Spa In San Diego 
and weekend packages at the 
Knickerbocker Hotel, Hotel 
Nikko and the Double Tee Guest 
Suites. Vacation packages to 
l*aris, Ijondon, Maui, New York 
and Los Angeles arc also up for 
auction. 

Tickets for this year's gale arc 
$150 per person. To charge tick- 
ets by phone, call TickctMastcr at 
(312)902-1500. 

Tor more information, call the 
American Red Cross at (312)440- 
2203. 



County. For more information, 
call 634-0888. 

Plan now for summer fan 

Parents can spring forward 
and begin planing now for sum- 
mertime youth nature programs 
in the Lake county Forest 
Preserves. For a free brochure on 
the 1995 Summer Youth Nature 
program scries, call Rycrson 
Woods at 948-7750. 

Among the programs being 
offered are "Knee-High 
Naturalists", "Young Naturalist", 
"Eco-Advcnrurcs " and "Nature 
Explorers." 

JanJor golf lessons 

Golf lessons for 10-to-15- 
ycar-olds will be offered from 
June 3 through August 26 at the 
Lake County Forest Preserves' 
Countryside Golf Course near 
Mundcleln. 

The four- week junior golf pro- 
gram is offered once each month 
through the summer at the 



course's driving range. 
Beginning June 3, July and Aug. 
5, Saturday morning junior golf 
lessons axe offered from 9 to 10 
a.m. Thursday morning junior 
golf lessons arc schedule to begin 
on June 29 and July 27, from 10 to 
11 am. 

Teaching professionals have 
designed the classes to introduce 
youngstcrsto golf In a fun and 
informative manner. Basic and 
advanced swing skills, and the 
game's rules and etiquette will be 
taught Gass size is limited to six 
students, guaranteeing personal 
attention. Pre- registration and 
advanced payment is required. 
The fee for each four-week Junior 
golf program is $35. Golf balls 
will be provided but participants 
will need to bring a putter, a #3 
wood club and a f 7 iron club. 

Register In person at 
Countryside Golf Course, located 
n Hawlcy Road, just west of Rotes 
60 and 83, near Mundclcin. For 
more information, call 566-5544. 



—Into tIhe Niqkr- 

Friday 

Roots Rock Society, reggae, at Cabana Beach Q ub, 1 550 N. 
Rand Road, Palatine, 776-9850 . . . Underwater People, 
* rock, at Durty Nellies, 55 N. Bothwell, Palatine, 358-9150 ... 
Street Corner Bine, big band blues, at S! i ce of Chicago, 36 S. 
Northwest Hwy., Palatine, 991 -2150 . , Mnngo Jam, psy- 
chedelic rock, at Shades, 21860 N. Milwaukee Rd., Dccrficld, 
634-BLUE . 

Saturday 

Chameleon World, tribute to Talking Heads, and Beggars 
Banquet, tribute to Stores, at Shades . . . Underwater 
People, rock, at Durty Nellies . . . J.D. Smith on piano at 
Madison Avenue . . . Big Shoulders, Jazzy Windy City blues, 
at Slice of Chicago . . . Kevin Purceil & the Nlgbtbttrnerm, 
blues guitar, at Cabana Beach Club . 

Coming soon 

Cabana Beach Club will hold Blues Fcst in the 'Burns on 
Friday, June 2, and Saturday, June 3. Internationally-renowned 
blues artists Lonnle Brooks and Junior Wells take the stage. 
There will be a $7 cover both nights. Showtimcs for both 
Friday and Saturday arc 10 p.m. until I a.m. — by CLAUDIA 
M.LENART 



Write Us 



Lakeland Newspapers wants to hear news of 
local sporting events, clubs, organizations, etc. 
Black and white photos are also welcome. 
Please send news Items to Claudta M. Lenart 30 
S. Whitney. Graystake. 60030 or call 223-8161. 




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For more Information, call Lakeland Newspapers 
Client Services (708) 223-8161. 
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Auditions 

CcntcrStagc will be audi- 
tioning Tor all parts In Its sum- 
mer production of "The 
Sound of Music,"* to be per* 
formed July 2R, 29 and Aug. 3, 
4 and 5 In Lake Forest. All 
ages, including children, arc 
Invited to try out— children 
arc requested to prepare a 
song from the show. 

Adult auditions will be held 
Tuesday, June G and 
Wednesday, June 7, from 7 to 9:30 
p.m. Auditions for children will be 
held on Saturday, June 10, from 10 
a.m. to 3 p.m. All auditions will be 
held at the Gorton Community 
:r« Center, 400 IL Illinois Rd. In Lake 
Forest. For further Information, call 
234-6032. 

'I Shot My Rich Aunt' 

Tito Kirk Players will be winding 
up their 29th season with a presenta- 
tion of *I Shot My Rich Aunt" on June 
2 and 3. Tills play about an aristocrat- 
ic English family has plenty of very 
proper laughs to spare. The produc- 
tion will be held In the Mundclcin 
I ligh School auditorium, beginning at 
is p.m. on Friday and Saturday. 
Tickets a re $6 for adults, S3 for seniors 
and children under 12. For Informa- 
tion, call 566-6594. 

Shady Lane 

A new musical review at Shady 
Lane Centre In Marengo will run 
every Saturday through June 3. Some 
Wednesday matinee performances of 
"Shady Lane Presents" arc also 
scheduled. 



Music performed Includes a spe- 
cial trip back to the soft hits of the 
'40s and '50i, show stopping 
Broadway numbers, some comedy 
and, also, great new country music 
Dinner and theater packages arc 
$37.50, and lunch with mallncc Is 
$28— both Include tax and Up. Show- 
only tickets arc also available. Call the 
box office for reservations at 568- 
3270; group rales available upon 
request 

Stage Two moves 

SinRc Two will be moving to 214 
Green Bay Rd. In Ulghwood, a neigh- 
borhood famous for Its diverse din- 
ing-out options, with 25 restaurants 
all within a single square mile. 

In the meantime, Stage Two fin- 
ishes out their final season in 
Waukcgan, 12 N. Sheridan Rd. f with 
the midwest premiere of "Sometimes 
All They Need" through June 4. Call 
Stage Two at 662-70B8 for further 
ticket Information. 

Second City 

Second City Northwest, 1701 W. 
Golf Rd., Rolling Meadows, will pre- 
sent "The Madness of Curious 
Ge6rgc,"on Thursdays, Fridays, 
Saturdays and Sundays. 

"Curious George" swings through 
the jungle of American politics, paus- 
ing only to observe the flight of right • 
winged hawks, endangered doves 
and scores of lame ducks, while 
encountering xenophobic pen-pals, 
serial kilter groupies and the anxious 
Inhabitants of a doctor's waiting 
room Call the box office at B06-1S55 
for ticket Information. 




• Friday Fish Fry 

• Fish Specials 

• Fish Boil 1st R 3rd Friday 

Marisrf of He* E^tind BoiW 
DiftMn 2*4 & 4th Friday 





Full Menu Tool 
Starf/ng *t $6.9S 



Serving Golfert Special Lunches 
Starting 



■ t 11:00 a.m. Dally 



R$t$m Out Bttitti Hill F$t All Yttt SpttUI Quutlmt 

1413 Hainesvitle Rd. cvlC OOC7 
Round Lake Beach 040-0^0 1 



Best Summer Camp 
Value in Midwest! 




Ray Meyer's Basketball Camp 



Three Lakes, Wisconsin 



Only $325 

per week! 



Includes : 

Food, lodging, transportation 
Expert basketball instruction 
Swimming, boating, game room 
One-week sessions beginning June 26 

Call now for reservations/information: 
312-325-7520 (Weekdays) 



'Hello, Dolly' 

Marriott's Lincolnshire Theatre 
presents one of the most popular 
musicals of all time, playing through 
June II. Performances arc 
Wednesdays at 2 and B p.m.; 
Thursdays and Fridays at 8 p.m. 
Tickets to all performances arc $32.50 
Reservations can be made by calling 
the theatre box office at 6340200. 

Summer music 

The Midwest Young Artists 
will sponsor a summer music 
program for Instrumental 
music students who want to 
keep up their music perfor- 
mance over the summer. 

Included will be a Senior 
Orchestra and Jazz Ensemble, 
which meet two nights a week 
for six weeks In June and July, 
and a Chamber Orchestra 
which meets mornings from June 12 
through 24. 

Alt rehearsals will be al Nllcs 
North High School, directly ofT 1-94 it 
the Old Orchard l-lxli. For Information 
on the program, call 328-9998. 

Adlcr Center 

The David Adlcr Cultural Center, 
1700 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libcrtyvlllc, 
will present Reel to Reel, a trio of 
Chicago-based Irish music virtuosi 
on Friday, May 26. The special con- 



M' 




cert will be held at B p.m. at. the 
Libcrtyvlllc Civic Center al 135 
Church SL In downtown Llbcrtyvillc. 

And, Kathy Kaltfck and the Little 
Rig Rand, one of the most renowned, 
progressive bands on the national 
blucgrass circuit, will appear at the 
Adlcr Center at an B p.m. concert on 
Friday, June 2, at the Adlcr Center. 

Admission is $8 for adults, S5 for 
members, seniors and children under 
16, Advance tickets arc recommend- 
ed for the blucgrass program. Call the 
center at 367-0707 

Tunes at noon 

The Chicago Music Mart at 
DcPaul Center, State and Jackson in 
the concourse level performance 
center, continues its concert scries 
that arc free and open to the public 
For Information, call (312)372-0771. 

Thursday, June 1— Tunes at 
Noon'— Crow's Nest music presents 
Popa Cubby, vocalist, guitarist in the 
Texas Roadhousc tradition. Outside 
plaza— Lovic Lee, blues; 5:30 p.m. 
mamba lessons. 

Friday, June 2 — Tunes at 
Noon"— Musicians dub of Women 
presents a musical Interlude featur- 
ing Tamara Rlngus, violinist. Outside 
plaza — blues. 

Oratorio Singers 

The New Oratorio Singers will 
hold the last of a scries of workshops 
on May 30 with Allan llcatherington, 



Music director. The coil for the ses- 
sion is $7.50, and will begin at 730 
K.m. and run approximately two 
ours. The location for this year Is 
Salem Methodist Church, 115 W. 
Lincoln, Barrlnglon. To register, call 
604-1067. — 



< 



Print exhibit 

The David Adlcr Cultural 
Center presents "Contem- 
porary Prlnti.'a traveling 
exhibition or prints co-pub- 
lished by University Galleries 
and Norman Editions 
Workshop, Illinois Stale 
Unlv.'s print research and 
publishing facility since I9B8. 
Comprised of 14 editions of 
lithographs and Itagllosby 10 

artists, the prims will be exhibited 

through June 24, 

Watercolors 

Members of the l<akcs Region 
Watcrcotor Guild of Illinois will hold 
a Juried watcrcotor exhibition at 
Anderson Arts Center, 121 66th SL, 
Kenosha, Wis., through July 2. Gallery 
hours arc Thursday through Sunday, 
1 to 5 p.m. l-'or further Information 
call (414)6530481. 

Open studio 

Highland Park Is home In many 
working artists. The Suburban Fine 
Sec FY1 page B 







SILXcO^tiAZ Vridatlion 

& Tar (quay By the Lake 

gftj NV Present 

* gove WsWn §the dfisrL 

Sunday, June 25, 1995 

champagne brunch or an early evening buffet 
^ Fashion Shows 1 pm & 4T pm 

Tickets Are Available For Sale June 3 



Tickets arc $10 per person and must be 
purchased in advance. Seating is limited. 

For more information 
call Hazel at (708) 223-3166 





a^pSKEfP? 



The lake in the desert 

by JIM WARNKEN, 

PRESIDENT, NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

It was a hot, dry Nevada summer day. I had just driven through 
milos ol desert on my way back to Las Vogas from a vts'rt to 
Laughlin. I decided to take a sido trip to Lake Mead before catching 
a late-night flight back to Chicago, I made the turn onto Hwy. 93 and 
drove through the town of Boulder City. Just at the edge ot town, a 
sight appeared which, after a day of desert driving, sure looked like 
a mirage. 

For miles in either direction was one of the most beautiful lakes I 
have ever seen. Deep blue water with cliff-lined shores as far as the 
eye could see. And all this in the middle of a Nevada desert! This 
was Lake Mead. 

Only 30 miles southwest of Las Vegas is the largest man-made 
lake in the Western Hemisphere. By dumping a few million yards of 
concrete in just the right spot on the Colorado River, the Army 
Corps ol Engineers created a lake (and Hoovor Dam) that extends 
some 115 mites with 550 miles of shoreline. 

This lake In the desert provides a diversion from the nightlife and 
glitter of Vegas. Boating, swimming, fishing, waterskiing and even 
scuba diving are provided by six marinas along the lake. 

The Lake Mead recreation area is administered by the National 
Park Service. Admission to the park aroa is free. There is a visitor's 
centor, opon daily, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and is located four miles 
northeast of Boulder City. You can even take a self-guided tour with 
the help of a recorded tape available at the center. 

So the next time it's 100 degrees in Vegas, grab your swimsuit 
and head "south on Hwy. 93 for a day of fun on the lake in the 
desert! 



2234 E. Grand Lindenhurst, 
24 Hr. Recorded Bargains - 356-2000 

(708)356-3010 



fc 



WeIcome I 
WAqoN 

Helpful Civic information to 
acquaint you with your com- 
munity. Call the Welcome 
Wagon representative so 
that she may visit you. 

Antloch 

Jocatta Rhonda 

838-3430 545.1845 

Fox Lako/lnglosldo/ 

Jonmlor 
740-3*30 

Gray* lako 
Lok« Villa 
Wild wood 

Viola Unda 

336-5971 223-1607 

Gurnoo 

Part Ltoda 

223-6498 735-O650 

Lako Zurich 

Ann 
540.5790 

Llbartyvlllo 

Safe 
66Q.1S99 

Lincolnshire 
Urty 
945-3161 

Llndonhurtt 

Marilyn 
505-4233 

Long Grovo 

Klldoor 

Hawthorn Woods 



Dabby 
949-6167 



Mary 
435-0287 



Mundololn 
Karen 

308-4263 



Round Lako 
Phebt Pam 

223-5504 545.1554 

Spring Grovo 

Chris 
973-1202 

Vornon Hills 

Larry 
945-3161 

Zlon/ 
WInthrop Harbor 
Karen Orvatta 

395-5529 672.1705 

You are entitled to a complimentary 
subscription from your hometown 
newspaper. To receive your paper, 
contact your Welcome Wagon rep- 
resentative or call Lakeland News- 
papers at (708) 2234161. For in- 
formation about positions with the 
Welcome Wagon cal Maria at 
(708)577-3637. 



■ 

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P- 
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May 26, Iff 5 lAiiMtd Nn^p*pf « LAKEUFE 




F.Y.I . 



Fromp»gcB16 

Arts Center It sponsoring an 'Open 
Studio" vyhcrc for the first time you 
can see the unique environments In 
which these artists develop their 
Ideas, and enjoy refreshments and 
conversation. First slop Is the 
Suburban Fine Arts Center, 1913 
Sheridan Rd., where you pick up a 
ticket, map, raffle ticket and Instruc- 
tions. Tickets arc $7. Hours are 
Monday through Saturday from 9 
a.m. to 5 p.m. For further details and 
ticket Information call 432-1888. 

Art, music classes 

The David Adler Cultural Center In 
Ubcrtyvillc is offering a variety of art 
and music classes. Included Is an art 
camp, painting, drawing, dotlmaklng, 
painting on silk and watcrcolor* 
Music dasscs offered Include cham- 



ber, Suzuki talent education, Orff- 
Schufwerk pre school music and folk 
and ethnic music lessons. The sum- 
mer session registration deadline is 
June 7. Call 367-0707 for details. 

Exhibi tors wanted 

A special Invitation is being 
extended to qualified area artists and 
craftspeople to be among the 
exhibitors in the annual Grove Arts 
and Crafts Experience, to be present- 
ed by the American Society of Artists 
at the Grove Center, Lake-Cook ltd. 
and Rtc. 83, Buffalo Grove, Saturday, 
June 17. 

Potential exhibitors in this juried 
show are Invited to submit four slides 
or photographs or work representa- 
tive of that which they wish to exhibit, 
one slide or photograph of their dis- 
play set-up, a self-addressed, 
stamped business-size (No. 10) enve- 



lope — resume/show I (sling also help- 
ful. Additional Information may be 
obtained from the American Society 
of Artists at P.O. Box 1326, Palatine, 11. 
60078, (312)751-2500; or call 991- 

Local artist featured 

The College of Lake County is fea- 
turing oil paintings by Doris Vofpc of 
Lake Forest, and Lars-Birger 
Sponberg of Decrficld. The exhibit' 
will continue through June 23 at the 
Community Gallery of Art, 19351 W. 
Washington St., Graystake. Volpe's 
exhibit features Intimate and delicate 
stlllllfe paintings »that capture 
moments of happiness and hard 
times. Sponberg's paintings repre- 
sent colorful landscapes of the 
Midwest. Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 
4 JO p.m. Monday through Friday. For 
information, call Steve lones at 223- 
6601, cxL 2240. 



WWII 



From page Bl 4 

sent to help rebuild a city In 

Germany called Pforzheim, 

which Is 25 miles north of 

SruggarL 

Lascoc was given the award for 
outstanding service, for what he 
had accomplished hi Germany. 

During Lascoo's time in the 
service, his wife, Belle, traveled 
with him all but six months of his 
services. 

"I worked with the war effort 
and became a nurses aid who put 
in over 1.5O0 hours of service," 
Belle Lascoe said. 

Belle also followed her hus- 
band to Germany where she 
helped her husband rebuild 
Pforzheim in Germany. 

"Wc arc still In contact with 
the current mayor or Pforzheim, 
who continues to thank us for 
laying the foundation for the 
city's reconstruction," Belle said. 

Women were not only over- 
seas helping with the war efforts, 
they were also stationed on the 
home front 

Ninety-one year old Virginia 
Evans remembers working In a 
. county building In Detroit, Mich., 
In 1942, when she was asked to 
volunteer with the Office of Price 
Administration {OI'A). 

The OI'A was created to set 
prices on goods that were In short 
supply and they rationed every- 
thing from meat and sugar to 
gasoline. 

Evans not only helped out 
during WWII, she was involved 
with WW!. 

"During World War I. I was 
helping out in recruiting men 
into the Army and Navy," Evans 
said. 

Evans stated that everyone 
was collecting all types of Items 
from fat to scrap metal 

*l remember listening to the 
radio when I heard about Pcari 
Harbor, and I felt pretty damn 
good when 1 heard wc dropped 



the bomb on Japan," Evans said. 
The news ran through the coun- 
ty building and it became a big to 
do," she added. 

After working a full eight- 
hour day, Evans would volunteer 
at the office where people 
received their ration stamps. 

Evans would also check 
restaurants in the Detroit area to 
make sure they were not violating 
any pricing laws. 

The food was rationed and 
everyone was using food 
stamps," Evans said. "Food was 
not the only thing that was 
rationed, shoes and stockings 
were also on the list," she added. 
Leather was rationed during 
the war, so leather shoes were not 
being made. Without leather, 
shoe companies began making 
plastic shoes. Between 1941 
and 1946 no automobiles were 
made and during 1946 there was 
a waiting period of two or more 
years to receive an automobile, 
Evans stated. 

The four war veterans were 
dressed In their uniforms from 
the war and they brought in 
many Items for the students to 
view Including food stamps, 
ration stamps, newspaper dip- 
pings, awards and scrapboojes 
full of war memorabilia. 

World History Teacher Kristi 
Forlster and her students asked 
many questions of the veterans 
and listened In awe to the many 
stories that were told. 

"This was a great way to learn 
about history; you can actually 
talk to the people who were 
involved In that part of history 
and get their reactions of what 
the war was actually like," said 
Ubcrtyvillc High School 
Sophomore Mandy Panther, 16. 

Foristcr stated that the stu- 
dents have been studying WWII 
and she thought the program- 
would be a great change of pace 
for students. 



W&&M 






DINING ROOM, 
LOUNGE & DECK 



I 



OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 
FOR LUNCH & DINNER 



• loin Our lYioiullv SitilV... 

YOlIi HELP IS WASTED 



; Ami .w i : 

; IliHiii* \n\v!;| j 

call ii* today (708) f)7«-02;J5 
200 X. Forest - Fox Lake 




Virginia Evans, 91, tolls the stu- 
dents about hor experiences 
working for the government 
during both world wars.— 
Photo by Todd. F. Hetster 



-SpEciAl Events— 

Sports card show at Lake County Museum 

More thin 20 tables of sporlscard dealers and collectors from 
throughout the Chicago area will display their cards from 11 a.m. to 4 
p.m. at the Lake County Forest Preserve Museum on Sunday, May 28. 
Fee is $2 for adults, 75 cents for children and students ages four through 
17. Call 526-7878 for more information 

> 

Spring conceit to be held in Harrington 

The Harrington Children's Choir, along with the Barrtngton Men's 
Choir, will perform a spring concert on June 3 at 730 p.m. at Richard C 
Johnson Auditorium. Harrington High School, 616 W. Main, Barrtngton. 
For more information and tickets, call 487-2124. 

Textile arts exhibit at Coneo Museum 

"Ceremony, Ritual and Legend, " a textile arts exhibit will be shown 
at (he Cunco Museum and Gardens, 1350 N. Milwaukee Ave. In Vernon 
Hills. Call 362-3054 for exhibit information. 

Car show, swap meet at fairgrounds 

The 13th annual Skip's Fiesta Drive-In Reunion Car Show and Swap 
Meet it Lake County Fairgrounds (Rtcs. 120 and 45) will be held June 4 
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. General admission is S6. For information, call (M2- 
8792. 

Spring fling dollhouse show set 

More than 80 dealers from over 20 states will be presented at the 
1 1th annual Spring Ring Dollhouse and Miniature Show and Sale will be 
held at 400 E Ogdcn Ave.. (Rtc. 34). West mont on June 3 and 4. Hours 
are Sctarday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. . Sunday from 10 a.m to 330 p.m. 
Admission It SS for adults, S3 for children under 12. Workshops wilt be 
available. For more Information call 469-4649. 

Celebrate at St. Demetrios Greek festival 

Sl Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church of Waukegan will present 
their Greek Festival *95 on the festival fairgrounds located on O'Plaine 
Road between Rtc. 137 and 120, Waukegan, on June 8 through 1 1. Enjoy 
Greek food, entertainment, carnival rides and more. Festival times are 
June 8, 5 to 1 1 p.m.; June 9, 10. 1 1 from noon to midnight. Admission to 
the festival b free. For further Information call 623-0 190. 

Enjoy miniature doll, toy show June 1 1 

'Orphans In the Attic" is sponsoring the 199S Dolls, Toys, Bears, 
Miniatures show and sale on Sunday, Jun 1 1 at the Holiday Inn- 
Southeast, 3521 Evan Acres Rd., Madison, Wis. 0-90 exit 1428). Show 
hours are 10 a.m. to 430 p.m. Admission b S3 for adults, SI for children 
age 6 to 12, under 6 are admitted free. Dealers from several stales will be 
exhibiting Items such as antique and collectible dolls, bears, toys and 
miniatures. For further information call. (414)255-4465. 



Carlson Pianos 

Memorial Weekend 

PIANO SALE 








Sample 
Savings 



Baldwin Acrosonlc 
Everett Console 
Kawci Console- 
Kimball Spinot 
Kimball Gf and 
Kohlof A Campbell 
Oakland Upright 
Piano Disc Player Piano 
Stoinway 6* 0' Grand 
WurUrzer Spinel 
Yamaha Digital Piano 
YarnohaS'rCrand 

PltCM toCfcJd* D*|y«y * Tuning?! 

Many *th w enoffiY . 




$5001 



CUT OUT THIS AD AND 

SA VE £ 

This ad Is worth up to $500* toward 

music, accessories, CD's, or gifts 

with tho purchase of a piano from 

Carlson's. Must be prosonted prior 

to purchase of instrument. 

•or 10* of piano purcnaa© prtco. wNchewor h less. 



1 ' fr 

Holiday Hours 

Frl 11 -8 

Sat 10-4 

Sun 1 - 4 

Mon 11 - 5 



■■■■■■■■■■■i^iMH 



•a 



3701 Durand Ave.(Hwy JJ) f Racine 

Elmwood Pkua Shopping Center 

(414) 554-9991 

6 Miles East of 1-94 on Hwy 1 1 



HBHa 



u-~ : - ■ ~ 




LAKELIFE Ukd/v** NewspADERS M*y 26, 1995 



1 



I 

: 
1 



LIFE'S A BEAR 



DONNA ABEAR 




What time is it when an 
elephant sits on your fence? 



Well, that depends. When I 
was 5, the answer would have 
heen — "Time to get a new 
fence — Ha, ha, ha, ha, ha!" That 
was a very funny riddle when I 
was 5. Of course, when I was 5, 
everything was funny, even that 
joke about the toilet and the Star 
Spangled Banner. You know the 
one, where... never mind. 

Now that I'm. ..(well, I'm not 
5}... if someone asked me "what 
time is it when an elephant sits 
on your fence" I would he hard 
pressed to find anything humor- 
ous in that "Don't tell me this," 
I'd cell them. "Did anyone get his 
license numl>cr7 How about a 
description— was it an Indian or 
African elephant? What do you 
mean you don't know? Well, Isn't 
that just my, luck— victim of a jtif 
and run\ Suppose I'll Just add 
'repair the fence' to my 'lo do' 
list— us if I needed anything more 
to doll- 
After which I would stomp 
around for a while and make 
angry sighing ;md growling nois- 
es with my throat. Not very 
attractive, but it relieves stress. 
(Which in turn, prevents embar- 
rassing rides to the hospital in an 
ambulance. Trust me.) 

The point of this tittle anec- 



dote Is that time has very differ- 
ent meanings to children and 
adults (and I needed a good title 
for this week's column.) For 
instance, tell a 5 year old that he 
has to wait 5 minutes until din- 
ner. You may as well have told 
him to wait 3 days In line at (he 
grocery store next to the rack of 
candy with no money lo buy any. 
"I : ivc minutes? Five minutes? 
OOOOOIIII, Mom— I'm really 
hungry. I can't wait FIVF; MIN- 
UTEST 

Now tell a woman that she 
has only five minutes left l>cforc 
It's time to leave for a party. "FIVE 
MINUTES? How can I get ready 
in five minutes? I have to fix my 
hair, put on my makeup, straight- 
en the kitchen, pick up the sitter, 
change the baby.,.OOOOCJHHI 
THAT'S NOT ENOUGH TIMET 

Did you notice any differ- 
ence? Of course you did — there 
arc no dummies reading ibis col- 
umn! So what docs it all mean? It 
means that lime actually goes 
faster as you get older. Yes— this 
is a proven scientific fact— I saw it 
on "Nova for Housewives" just 
last week. 

So, although you had 24 hours 
In a day when you were a child, 
by the age of 40, you now have 



ftecome a feature home of the month 

flm iftxt fifing in f/oar ffftvtm hnutm ? On tfott hmxi n npM.taf rnnm (o tjtit 
m.utif m 7 ///*.> alxutf that ntvt ttnr.k alt thn noitjhhom nrn nnw'otm of? Or thn 
/ipnr.inf rnnm tfoujunt rrjnofirJrjf} 

IF tf vi mjntf roadinrj ahout thn fpjiturn hnma of thn month in thn fit 
ffomn {taction of LnhJnnd CftUMfmnert, ami tMUifti (ikn to noon Latn County 
tiottr rjintjnf hontr. t.ntt fin.'.r/fr tone at LnMantf (Yrja&pnprifA, 223-8 1(t f 
for tfnfnitn. 



only 20 (you lose one hour a 
decade). What's worse, you have 
even less time if you're a parent, 
which Is multiplied by the num- 
ber of children you have. For 
example, if you have one child 
you have 4 hours less, or 16 hours 
in a day. Which means that since 
I have four children, I have only 4 
hours in a day. filial explains 
why sometimes I can spend an 
entire day In my bathrobe. By the 
time I change the baby, get the 6 
year old off to kindergarten, feed 
baby breakfast and put her down 
for her nap, It's already tomorrow!) 

Right about now, there arc 
hundreds of mothers out there 
slapping themselves in the fore- 
head and yelling, "1 knew it. I 
always knew that from the 
moment my first child was born, 
there was no longer enough time 
In a day anymore." A few special 
fathers arc nodding in agree- 
ment, although there remains a 
suspiciously large number who 
can't relate. "What docs that 
mean? Will I miss the reruns of 
M.A.S.H.?" 

Yes, thanks to "Nova for 
Housewives," we now know that 
time really is shorter, and that 
children aggravate the situation. 
So what can wc do? Well, perhaps 
we can take a hint from that TV 
commercial where Michael 
Jordan Is running through the 
desert and mountains looking for 
wisdom. 

You know the one, where he 
finally reaches the top of the 
mountain and the little bearded 
wise man says, "life is short. 
Hurry up," 



u 



I don't want my home to be like everybody 
else's. At the same time, I don't want to 
be too different. I guess I'm an independent 
traditionalist. What I really want is something 
that's going to last without going out of style. 



*> 



"This is 
what I'm 
looking 
for." 




...It's on Sale along with much, 

much more Memorial Weekend. 



RED TOP PLAZA 

1330 S. Milwaukee Ave. 

Uberfyvlile • 367-0009 

Store Hours: 

M-Th 10-8; R S 10-5; Sun. 12-5 

Open Monday May 29 10-3 




RIAL WOOD . AFFOAOABLV PfllCtO 



Good food 

Break out grill this weekend 

CLAUDIA M. IENAET ° , 

Roolonai Editor 

Memorial Day weekend is the traditional time to break out 
the grill. But you don't have to be traditional when it comes to 
barbecue sauce. Hie following recipe is from Shepherd's Garden 
Seeds catalog and incorporates some of the fresh herbs you may 
have growing in your garden. 

F.njoy it over grilled chicken or fish or spoon it over potatoes 
or rice. 

Lemon Thyme BBQ Sauce 

3 tablespoons white wine vinegar 

1 tablespoon fresh lemon Juice 

2 teaspoons nil on mustard 

1 shallot, minced 

6 scalllons, white part only, chopped (reserve tops for 
garnish) 

2 tablespoons chopped fresh lemon thyme 
1/4 cap chopped fresh parsely 

3 tablespoons vegetable oil 
3 tablespoons olive oil 
Salt and pepper to taste 

Combine all Ingredients and mix well. Add salt and pepper 
to taste. Let flavor develop 1 /2 hour before serving. Makes 3/4 
cup. 




We're working to 
protect you— 
but we need 
your help! 



Our most important goal at Natural Gas Pipeline Com- 
pany is to safeguard everyone who lives and works along 
our pipeline route. But as hard as we try, we can't do the 
job alone. We need your help to spot and report pipeline 
emergencies so we can react promptly. And we need your 
cooperation to prevent accidents from happening. 

Help prevent pipeline accidents: 

,• Call BEFORE you dig, drill, blast or doze. 

• Watch for our signs at road, railroad and river cross- 
ings, at fence lines, ditches and other sites. 

• For no-cost location of underground facilities, call the 
24-hour "JULIE" number (1-800-892-0123) to reach 
Joint Utility Locating Information for Excavators. Indi- 
cate the county, township and section in which you will 
be working. Please call two working days in advance. 





Signs of a pipeline emergency: 

• Hissing or shrill SOUND. 

• Unusual BLOWING dirt or dust 

• Persistent BUBBLES in water. 

• DYING PLANTS amid healthy ones. 

• FIRE or EXPLOSION near pipeline. 

To report a pipeline emergency: 

• Phone 1-800-733-2490, our toll-free, 24-hour line. 

Steps to take In a pipeline emergency: 

• Evacuate the area immediately. 

• Avoid potential ignition sources. 

• Warn others to stay away. 



■utniiii 



Natural Gas Pipeline Company of America 



A U.OCON COftP CWWWV 







May 26, If f * UJdAftd Ncwsp*pcK LAKELIFE 




Be TNere 



MoviE Pick 




'Crimson Tide' release a fine vessel 



Widowed outreach group to hear speaker 

Widowed Outreach Network of Like County, consisting of widowers and 
widows of all ages, will meet on May 28 at 2 p.m. at the Condcll Conference 
Center, 700 Garfield, UbcrtyvUle The program will be "The Way It Was" by a 
national speaker. Dinner a t a local restaurant is op Hon si The group also attends 
plays, lakes rivcrhoa t trips and other social events. For further information, call 
3G2-2900, cxt. 6275. 



Solo Singles plans Memorial Day picnic 

Solo Singles, an organization of single people who meet at the Princess 
Restaurant In UbcrtyvUle on Wednesday nights, will hold a Memorial Day 
Picnic starting at noon May 29 at Lakcwood Forest Preserve (Rte. 176 and 
Fairfield Rd.), Wauconda (Shelter "A"). Bring a dish to pass. 

And, on Friday, June 2, the group will hold their Friday Night Dance at 
"Manfrcds" at the Holiday Inn (Rtcs. 45 and B3), Mundclcln, to celebrate their 
new location. For more Information call 816-1011. 



WdNEscky 



Networking at breakfast meeting 

Expand business contacts throughout the county. loin dynamic business 
men and women meeting weekly a on Wednesdays at 7:15 a.m. at Denny's 
Restaurant. Rte. 41 and West Park Ave, In Highland Park. For further Informa- 
tion, call Charmalnc Eslcp at 548- 1010, or Gatynn Sarver McKcnzIc, 662-01 19. 



TliURsdAy 



Girls' club to hold membership registration 

The Lake County Area American Girls* dub will hold membership registra- 
tion on.Iunc 1 from 4 to 7:30 p,m In the lower level of the Vernon Hills Village 
Hall. The hall Is located on Evergreen Dr., off Rte. 45 east of Buttcriicld Rd. The 
club is for girls who will be In first grade and up, and is bated on (he Pleasant 
Company's American Girl books, dolls and crafts. There b a $15 annual mem- 
bership fee for this not-for-profit club. For more Information call Cathy Mack at 
566-17B0. 



CoMiNq Soon 



Senior Day to be held at Christian center 

Christian Singles, a group (age 50 and up) composed of those who arc wid- 
owed, divorced or never married, meets at Calvary Temple, 450 Keller Ave., 
Waukcgart On Monday. June 5, the group will sponsor a Senior Day at Camp 
Timber-Ice Christian Center. Registration ii at 930 a.m, followed by activities 
of inie*t>«t throughout th« morning and afternoon. Including lunch and dinner. 
Cost It J2:i 2.1; transportation, 15. Drivers arc needed. Call 662-5910 for reserva- 
tions or information. 

Irish American Club meets In Antloch 

The Irish American Club holds monthly meetings at the State Rank In 
Anikich on the tail Thursday of every month at 7:30 p.m. All arc welcome to 
attend. Call 395-3942 for additional Information. 

Unity of take Co. to study 'Quest' 

Unity of Lake County meets at the VFWHall, 293 Peterson Rd. In 
UbcrtyvUle. A study group examines "The Quest,* an individual spiritual jour- 
ney at 7:30 each Thursday evening Call Fae Cole at 68008 19 for further Infor- 
mation. 



Let us deal at once with the 
minor flaws In "Crimson Tide," 
the Hollywood Pictures release 
about threatened nuclear war, set 
on a ballistic nuclear submarine, 
the USS Alabama. 

The movie is not consistent 
with current Navy policy on 
many issues including the repre- 
sentation of Sailors as chain 
smokers who arc grossly over- 
weight 

The chief of the boat (COB) 
played -by George Dzundza would 
never pass a physical readiness 
test, He also wears the hat of a 
commissioned officer In the 
opening season of the movic- 
whlch further adds to Its unrealis- 
tic portrayal of sailors. 

Let the fat boys go and the 
cigarettes bum. They don't mat- 
ter anyway. We arc left with a 
gripping suspense story about 
the problems American military 
leadership may have dealing with 
post-Cold War breakaway Soviet 
republics. 

Told from the perspective of 
the crew of an Ohio-class ballis- 
tic-missile submarine, the film 
focuses on two key characters. 
Commanding officer Capt. 
Ramsey (Gene Hackman) is an 
elder statesman of ballistic-mis- 
sile subs, taking new executive 
officer It. Cmdr. Ron Hunter 
(Dcnzel Washington) aboard his 
boat. 

These two actors have an 
almost-electric on-screen ani- 
mus. Alabama crewmembers try 
not to take sides when the two 
clash over an incomplete mes- 
sage directing a pre-emptive 
nuclear strike on a Russian mis- 
sile base. 

The base has been cornman- 



MOfYlllly MEETING;* 



Study group to meet 

Unity of Lake County meets at the 
VFW Hall, 233 Peterson Rd. In 
Libcnyville. A study group meets at 
7:.io p.m. each Thursday evening to 
study "The Quest" an Individual spir- 
itual |oumey. Sunday worship service 
from 9 to 10 a.m. with guest speakers. 
For further Information contact Fae 
Cole. 680-0819. 

ClilldServ 

Thc Lake County Business 
I'artiKTsbip Child Care Initiative U 
looking for responsible and nurturing 
adults to provide quality Infant and 
toddler care In their home. By becom- 
ing part of this unique partnership 
you can receive many benefits Includ- 
ing: running your own business, 
assistance with child referrals, and 
much more. For more information 
call Dena Thompson at ChildScrv, 
263-2200. 

Parent Group 

The Parent Group sponsors weekly 
Parents Anonymous support groups. 
Fridays from9 to 11 a. m. Thursday In 
Vernon Hilts from 7 to 9 p.m. and In 
/.inn on Tuesdays from 8 to 9 p.m. 
and Wednesday from 3 to 4:30 p.m. 
For more Information call 263-7272. 

Divorce support 

A women's divorce support group 
meets twice a month on Wednesday 
evenings. Call Lisa at 680-4106 for 
more Informal ion. 



General Cinema 

LAKEHURST 



I ROUTE 43 near ROUTE 120 
473-4200 

CRIMSON TIDE 
Plays on hw screens (R) 
20% 230, 430, 5.-00,7:00, 
730.ft30,UM0 

MEKAR03 

[ays on two screens (R) 
1:30.2:45. 4:15. 5.30. 7:15. 820.IO00 

CASPER 

Plays on tw> screens (PG) 
1-06,200, 115, 430, 530. 7:00, 
7:45, 930, IftOQ 

HAD LOVE 

1^,3:15,530,7:45, 1E00(PG13) 

FORGET PARIS 

1:00, 3:10. 520, 730, 9:40 (PG13) 




Donzol Washington, Goao Hackman 



decree! by partisan rebels, who 
have threatened to launch mis- 
siles against America. 

Ultimately, the crew must 
take sides. Weapons officer I.t. 
Peter Incc (Viggo Morten sen), 
communications officer I.t. Roy 
Zimmcr (Matt Craven), and other 
submariners arc all swept up in 
the action. The action includes an 
extremely wcil-sct offensive 
move by an Akula-dass Russian 
fast-attack sub against the 
Alabama. The acting is tight and 
believable by all players. 

Dream Quest Images, Inc., 
under the visual effects supcrvi* 
sion of lloyt Yeatman, produced 



A LITTLE PRINCESS 

1:45, 330, &00(G) 






SSSSS 223-8161 



FRIDAY 

8:00, 1000 (R) 



MY FAMILY 
1:45,420, 7:10, 9:45 (R) 



JOHNNY MKEM0H1C 
1:20,330,5:40.7:50. 1003 (R) 



BAAVEKEART 

1:15, 4:45. 8:15 (R) 



high-quality footage for this film, 
which rivals any submarine pic- 
ture made to date. 

It would be easy to rave exten- 
sively about "Crimson Tide." To 
do so would ruin the story and 
finish. It Is emotional, captivat- 
ing, and very full of plot. The 
soundtrack is both powerful and 
limp— mostly classical, and 
badly-plugged -In mainstream 
rock. Viewers likely won't notice 
it. 

"Crimson Tide* rates 4.75 
stars out of 5, losing points only 
on ennui. It Is rated "R" for lan- 
guage and some violence. — by 
JEFFREY P. BROWN 



Belvidere Mall 

Theatres 662-741 

Belvidere at Lewis in Waukegan 



B 

B 




Amplo Parking 
C ANDYM AN II (R) 

F«/iw»l To TTv* FtMtl 
Dairy &. 13-9 33 

NEW JERSEY 

DRIVE (R) 

fit A Uorv-Thtx. -. OS .' • ■, J *o 



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* 1 .50 all ooats all sfrows 
fj THE BRADY BUNCH MOVIE (PC) 

LI Sat. ft 9rf« 1:00-3 00-9 00-7. 15 -»30 

E PULP FICTION (R) 

JJ FA. A Mon.-Tbt*«. ft X>+ 30 

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[] Gal iSrfi, I0O-JOO-7J0 

BOBBBEHaaOBCaeBSBUSaBSEHBSBSHHHOBaOB 



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f GURNEE CINEMA h 

GURNEE MILLS SHOPPING MALI • 703-655-9940 




FRIDAY, MAY 26 THROUGH THURSDAY, JUNE 1 




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L| AOVMC* bO**4 U» Mi 


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CJNEpUx OdEON THEATRES 




C>«/tiji Oman 



RIVERTREE COURT 



Ca*per' (rc> (dts st*rwo> (on i «t»*m) 

Frt, Tu»-Thu (1000:13) 5;20-7:40-1000: Sat-Man (11 OO) I OV3 15-330-7:40-1000 



Crimson Tide < K> (Doltryf («n 2 »<-!»■*«•> 
Fa Tt^THu (1 tOI 404J050?) tO>7J04 UtU.Stl Mon (11 IWl l0.i«0-JJOSO3400-7JOA45^55 



Forget Parim' (ro-i\) (Dolby) 
Frt. 1 v^-Tbu (?.V>-5ii)) 7«V*A3; Sal-Mon (12CO) 2J0-5O0-7JO-VA5 



BravehearV <JU mis tXRiuU 
Prt. Tui-Tbu (1 OD-4 JO) B a> 



BravehearV <K> (DT5 st«r«o) 

Pn, Tuc-Thu f2i»> 3 JO-ofJO; Sii-Mim 2CO-3JO-*00 



Mad Love <rG-13HDolt>yl 
Frl, Tw«^Thu ( 1 f\>-1 1 0) 3-20-730.* 40. ^i '-U (I iCO) 3:10-3 20-730-9 40 



HAWTHORN CENTER 



Die Hard: With A Vengeance' (R) (DT* p. K mi> 
Frt. Tu-Thu (130-4.O0) 6 45-9M-, S*l-Mon (1JO) 4^)0^6 43-»30 



Die Hard; With A Vengeance' ttu <DT5 Si**m) 
Fri-Thu 7 JO-IOOO 



A Little Prince** ici 

Frt, Ti*r-Thu (1:15-3 13) 3:13; S*l-Mon (1:13) 3:13-3:13 



French Kit* (PC-U) 
Frt. Tu*-T>u 0:13-430) 7JOO-MO; *Ul-Man U:15) 4 -3O-7:0O-9;30 



Johnny Mnemonic' <Rl (Dolby) 

Fn. TW-Thu (1OO-JCO-5O0) 7JO-*45; Ail Mon (lflO) 3X10-5 O0-7J0-9^5 



CUT CtnTinCAT15 OM Silt 




a 1AKEUFE UklAnd NpwfttpcK M«y 26, 199 J 



' 



CROSSWORd 



ACROSS 

1 Soviet news 

agency 
5 Yellow or 

Coral • 
8 Adopt an 
. attitude 
12 Like TV 

cartoons 

14 Arab chieftain 

15 Geometric 
curve 

16 Signet or 
solitaire 

17 Capitol VIP 

18 Talks idly 
20 Makes small 

talk 

23 Kind of poker 

24 Embraces 
25 --of the 

Lost Ark* 

28 Past 

29 Search 
diligently 

30 Corrida cheer 
32 All together 

34 Heavy hammer 

35 Court contender 

36 Takes the 
part of 

37 Raye of comedy 

40 Pointed tool 

41 Discharge 

42 "The Captain's 
— " (movie) 

47 Maze runners 

48 Periodic table 
listings 

49 German river 

50 Health resort 

51 Methods 
DOWN 

1 tnvtiation to 
dance, pcrlups? 

2 Actress — Alicia 
3-Iitile-i-clio- 
4 Slings 




rHOROSCOpE 




5 Telegram period 

6 Shocking sea 
creature 

7 Able to conform 

8 Marcher's big 
event 

9 Pass over 

10 Trig function 

1 1 Work units 
13 Burrows and 

Vigoda 

19 Uncouth 

20 Haifa 

ball root it dance? 

21 Vast 

22 Greek 
competition 

23 Mud volcano 



25 Gives new 
form to 

26 The — Not Taker 

27 Swing oti a pivot 
29 Track event 

31 They loop the 
Loop 

33 Have significance 

34 Kind of fungus 

36 Did the crawl 

37 Written reminder 

38 Surrounded by 

39 Popular side dish 

40 General region 

43 Jungfrau 

44 Once — lifetime 

45 Pig's place 

46 Double curve 



Answers 




Haas aaa aaaa 



ARIES (March 21 10 
April 19) A valuable busi- 
ness lead comes from an 
unexpected quarter this 
week. In fact, you're really 
in for quite, a shock over 
who this person is. A 
friendship reaches a critical 
juncture this weekend. 

TAURUS (April 20 lo 
May 20) Advice you 
receive about a financial 
matter is likely lo be con* 
Hiding, Take time lo sifl 
through everything that's 
being proposed. Spur-of- 
the-moment (ravel has 
romantic overtones. 

GEMINI (May 21 to 
June 20) It will take you 
and a partner a while before 
you're ready to decide on 
your next financial move. 
You could find a co- 
worker's behavior some- 
what manipulative (his 
week. Take heart. This per- 
son is all smoke and mir- 
rors. 

CANCER (June 21 lo 
July 22) A light touch is 
best where romantic inter- 
ests are concerned. Try not 
to let jealousy or posses- 
siveness enter the picture. 
Work progress could be in- 
termittent if you allow 
yourself loo much lime to 
daydream on the job. Con- 
centrate more. 

LEO (July 23 to August 
22) You could meel with 
romance through the job 



this week if single, Be sen- 
sible about spending if out 
shopping later in the week. 
A situation with a relative 
could be at an uncomfort- 
able stalemate. However, a 
friend comes to the rescue. 

VIRGO (August 23 lo 
September 22) A lensc 
situation at work could lest 
your resolve. Others aren't 
playing by the rules and 
you're angry at the injus- 
tice. On a brighter note, 
spontaneous entertainment 
is fun later in ihe week. 
Romance comes unexpec- 
tedly to singles. 

LIBRA (September 23 to 
October 22) Visitors who 
drop by will brighten your 
week. However, make sure 
you balance your leisure 
lime equally with work 
lime, It's not a good idea lo 
slack off on the job. News 
that you've been waiting 
for comes this weekend. 

SCORPIO (October 23. 
lo November 21) A situa- 
tion with a relative will 
remain difficult until one of 
you makes the first move lo 
reach a solution. Don't be 
too proud lo take that first 
conciliatory step. This 
weekend, romance and 
pleasure interests are a 
delight. 

SAGITTARIUS 
(November 22 to Decem- 
ber 21) It will be difficult to 
communicate with an un- 




reasonable person whose 
mind is already made up. 
Don't even bother trying. 
This person, will have lo 
leam the hard way. You'll 
make a special purchase 
later in the week. 

CAPRICORN (Decem- 
ber 22 to January 19) Avoid 
financial dealings with un- 
scrupulous types. It could 
lake more lime than an- 
ticipated to complete a 
project. However, co- 
workers are willing lo pilch 
in and help. Local travel 
leads lo a pleasant surprise 
this weekend. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 
to February IS) Power-play 
tactics are much in 
evidence in business (his 
week. Stay out of this and 
you'll end up on lop even- 
tually. Do your best lo 
avoid an unpleasant con- 
frontation on the 
homefronl. Garage sales 
appeal ibis weekend. 

PISCES (February 19 lo 
March 20) Somebody 
who's all wrapped up in 
their own bitterness is best 
left alone. You want lo 
reach out to this person but 
don'i even try. Later, you'll 
be making a new friend. 

OI993 (7 K i*| Fi •»«»>. » S;-«i 




Fairfield Material & Supply, Inc. 

"Decorative Landscape Material" 




MEMORIAL WEE KEND SPECIAL 5/26-5/79 

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AFUUUMEO? 

PAVELOC PAVING BRICK 

CUSTOM COLORS AVAILABLE 



GREAT SELECTION, GREAT PRICES & SERVICE YOU DESERVE 

10 North Fairfield Rd., Round Lake (Located Between Rt. 134 & RL 120) 



m 788-740-3203 

Monday-Friday 7-6; Saturday 7-4; Sunday 9-2 




m 



ike County 1 * Oldest' 
Simplicity Dealer 



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January 1,1996* 




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Outdoor Power 

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SERVICING SOUTH ERN 

WISCONSIN AND LAKE COUNTY, 

ILLINOIS FOR 30 YEARS 



RILEY'S LAWN EQUIPMENT 

H Sales •Service •Parts 

£?l 1971 N. Dilley's Rd. Gurnee . 

(708) 623-7924 



■ 



\ > 



■ 



J 

J 






1 MilC West 
of 59 on 173 
AHTIOCH 
| '395-8623 



«% 




v3 NURSERY CENTER inc. 
LARGE SEiaTlOX OF 

TREES & SHRUBS 
PERtWIALS & ASSI'AIS 

cmcoauiai BAGGED SOILS, 
„£»jl« nEBO BATWESnHBBAM 



M-F8-8 
SAT.8-6 
SUN. 9-6 



iji; 



HASCBO BASSOS 




HARDWbOD OAK MULCH 



FREE ANTIOCH 
DELIVERY 



MEGA DISCOUNT NURSERY 







Fancy 



* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

A 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

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SHAMROCKGMN CENTER 



21714 Rt. 176 • Wauconda 

1/4 mile West of Rt. 12onRt. 176 

526-0040 

—ALL 2 1/2" SHADE TREES- 



Including Red Maples. Bradford Pears, 
Autumn Purple Ash and many others 

$ 200 Qfl Planted 

J 00% G UARANTEED 






May 26, 199? LJccUwd Ntwsp*pe«s,.tAKEUfg g 




Mill Creek 
Nursery 

CLOSED MEMORIAL DAY 

40960 MILL CREEK RD., WADSWORTH, 1L 
H^tinv i nr ALLY GROWN 

* SHADE TREES «♦ PERENNIALS 

^ORNAMENTALS ^GROUNDCOVERS 

^EVERGREENS 
NEW HOURS: 8 A.M.-6 P.WLSUN.j^SAT\ 

Best Quality Ever Blooming Hybrid 
SHRUB ROSES Pink - Rod - White Only M 5.95 

Phone 708-838-0501 

Dktttfons to M* Crook Nursery: 41 No* ^^^^^rv Stga 
w^tnfisi Irrtorsoctioo) Mifl Crock Rd., Loft on y«v* ro^ "2 "fa to **»»¥ > 



«*", *~i .*• • 



.r -.*/"£ * v * 






.^-^■5Sia»f' :r " 



~t*%»*V 



...and parking lots 

• Seal Coating • Patchwork 
• Crack Filling 

Protect and Preserve 
Reasonable rates. Call for a FREE estimate 

(708) 740-4051 By BID 



W 




Innovative D esigns for Today's Sm art Customers. 
Trimmers UWWWIIflBITHI m Tillers s» 



New and on Sale! 



*v 



& 



dS30cd 

■ ct/V t .»f m* 



dUOad 






1,V»^ 



HTC-12 

Vl ^._ rt .^— tf«v] aifti »-»"• * '•* 1 3 rvt*» 
4«w* ***** • wft •»•< **• 



RILEY'S LAWN REPAIR 

1971 N. DILLEYS RD. 
GURNEE, IL 60031 

708-623-7924 



GROWER EQUIPMENT 

294 EAST BELVIDERE RD. 
HAIKESVILLE, IL 60030 

708-223-3100 



E njo v C e n t ra I A i r W i th'o u | 




r T"Fhtc j 

I HONEYWELL J 

EXTENDED PARTS J CHRONOTHERM j 

AND LABOR . N IOHT SETBACK \ 

J WARRAMTYl EEB THERMOSTAT I 

LT" "S'iVirS'S X — *£?£! imSZZ? J 

iH^0RIC ,FREEES,nMWES 



Heating & Air Conditioning Co. 



VffAUKEGAN^ 662-4792 
LINDENHURST> 356-6355 



WE SERVICE 
WHAT WE SELL 

We Carry 



TORO. 



Haren*t you done 
without i To ro 
long enough?® 



Ingersoll 

formerly 



Cast 



We've got lt%e power. 

LAWN-BOY® 

Making it easier." 



HimvmviWiWMlM 



McCI-URE'S GARAGE 

^ . Sales Service • Repairs - 
Lawn ©-Snow Equipment 

4409 Grand Ave., 
Gurnee,IL 

662-282* • 662-1050 



*!$Sm 



dSOHtf 



Mvntwi 



DHBMI 



WmVBVH 




LAKLELIFE [AiUttd NnwpApcRV M*y 26, 1995 






OPENING MON., MAY 29 

J& &oMenGBani/a 

^IBr Finest Chinese Imperial Cuisine 

Dine In •Carry Out •Delivery 

Daily Lunch Specials 11:30-2:30 p.m. 




Grand Opening Speciall 

Complimentary appetizer for each minimum 
$10 dinner order. Dine In or carry-out. 



Open 7 Days A Week 

Mooday-Thursday 11 30 i m -0 00 pjn. 
Friday-Satufdiy ll^Otm-IOOOpm 
Sunday 12.-00 ijti.-9.00 pit). 

422 Lake Street 

(In Lake Street Plaza) 

Antloch, IL 60002 




(708) 838-1088 
(708)838-1688 



it lit situ & 

Step fladfc /n 7fm<r <£ 
Relive The 30 f s On The 

Chain O'lJikcs 
New Hours: 

Mon., Wed., Thurs. 4-9 p.m. 
Fri. 4-10; Sat 11-10; Sun. 11-9; Closed T\ics. 





DAILY DINNER 
SPECIALS 



40-50 Items 
On The Salad Bar 

25540 \V. Bluff Ln. 

OfrGraa Uke ltd., Anlioch 
(708) 395-4050 




Waterfalls 

715 W. Rt. 173 • Anlioch, IL 6O002 

708-395-2212 oq*****^*!,*.*, 

WEDNESDAYS PASTA/PIZZA BUFFET 

1*3.95 Marti $4.fi5CWdr«nUnd«10 $1.95 tnHtf<t*» 








THURSDAYS INTERNATIONAL BUFFET 

$6.95 Adum $4.fl3Chfl»oo Under 10 H.MhttgWuur 



{ FRIDAYS 
/ $7.95 Adults 



SEAFOOD BUFFET 

$4.95 Cn**co Undor 10 $1 .95 In *7>tf*lr 



J StfTUflDyiYS PRIME RIB BUFFET 

$11.95 aaa $5.95cn*rtnu.idwi0 $1.95lnH0ch»t 

SUNDAYS BRUNCH BUFFET 9-2 
$6.95 Ad*i $4.95 Ch**«n unuof io $1.95 hrttfxtii^ 
Banquets For All Occasions 



a& 




Sejsure J oini 



OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 
FOR IvUNCH & DINNER 



M<m<iNryi Bay WsdbsM 

Enjoy our newly expanded 

deck area with drinks and 

food on the deck. 

New Frozen Drink Specials 

Live Entertainment 

on Sunday and 

Memorial Day Monday 

Open 11 tt.m. • 2 a.m. and 
11 a.m. - 3 a.m. Friday & Saturdays 




Dock Wliile You Dine 



ZMV\. Forest - F«>* 'Lake: 







Doyle's Pub & Eatery 
perfect for the family 

You'll get no arguments from Mom, 
Dad, or the kids when you're going to 
Doyle's Pub It liutcry, because there's 
something for everyone! 
Doyle's, located at 5604 Mill 
St. In Richmond, is a casual 
family eatery where Dad 
can relax and have a beer 
and the kids can play ln 
the downstairs game 
room until the delicious 
food Is ready. 
Doyle's is owned by 
Jeanne and Pat Doyle, who 
live in Spring Grove. Jeanne said the 
restaurant business is in Pat's blood since his 
grandparents arc the ones who built the former Rustic 
Manor In Gurncc, which his mother Marjoric owned. 
"In fact", Jeanne said, "we have a lot of Pat's mother's 
recipes, including her famous barbeque sauce that we 
use on our RIIQ Ribs, which is our Saturday Night 
Special." 

Everything at Doyle's Is affordable and homemade, 
including ail sauces, soups, munchics, pastas, pizza, 
and apple pic. Doyle's Steak and Chicken Fajltas arc 
popular entrees, along with the Friday Fish Fry 
featuring Beer Battered Cod, your choice of potato, 
corn fritters, and cole slaw. Doyle's also features 
entrees with Black Angus Decf, including a variety of 
delicious burgers. Start your meal off with a selection 
from the "Munchcttcs" menu like "real" Buffalo 
Wings, breaded vegetables, nachos, soup, chill, and 
more. The "Specialties" menu offers delicious choices 
like Reuben, Rib Eye Steak, Gyros, and Italian Sausage 
sandwiches. Pizza, cold sandwiches with soup, 
Salatas, and a special Kids Menu arc also available. 
Jeanne says Doyle's chef "Tlbby" specializes in 
Mexican food, so you've got to try something Mexican 
on the menu at least once! 

Doyle's Is completely remodeled in a casual, green, 
"Irish" decor and scats approximately 150. Doyle's 
even has plans to open a beer garden in the future. 
The downstairs game room is also available for 
catered parties and special occasions like rehearsal 
dinners, birthdays, anniversaries, and more, for up to 
B0 people. 

For great food and atmosphere for parents and 
kids alike, visit Doyle's Pub & Eatery, 5G04 Mill St., 
Richmond, (R1S) 678-3623. Hours arc open daily at 
11 a.m. until 10 p.m. on weekdays and 11 p.m. on 
weekends, and Sundays until p.m. Closed 
Mondays. Doyle's is open on Memorial Day, 
Monday, May 29, when they will feature 50« 
domestic tappers. 



U B*r4t+*\n Steak & Seafood 
jrtttWWO Banquets 

Fine Dining, Casual Atmosphere 
Wtrt tltrt To Stm Tou, Our 30tlt Tr*r 

DINE WITH US ON 

MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND 

MAY 26 - 29 




MAKE US YOUR BEFORE AND AFTER BOATING STOP 
FOR FINE FOOD AND CASUAL AWRE1 



Open Regular Hours All Weekend and Monday 

(Off-Track Wagering With Our Fine Dining Room Service ) 
Days Inn Located Next Door 

Banquet Rooms For All Occasions 

Member McHenry County Rottaurant Association 

1/2 Mile North Of Rt 173 On U.S. 12 - Richmond, IL 

FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 

815-678-2671 





Where To 
Eat Out 




Italian American Dining 




i"$3"oooff"i 



Any Large 
Pizza! 

DINING ROOM 
CARRY OUT 

OR DELIVERY 



On Route 85. Just North of Rollins 
Round Lake Beach 

223-7010 



I 
I 

| OtTcf expire* t/»/»S. 

Limn I coupon \<n viui. 
per uMc. Coupon not 
vtlid with *ny other «pc- 
cUlor promotion 

l| 

a 



COUPON 



FEATURE 

or THE 

WEEK 



ttmJ&K 



-7 



V 



M 



%>*>!&** 




*$<* 



VDB & EATCCy 



Join Us For 

MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND 

Food and Drink Specials 

Enjoy Our HOMEMADE: 

Soups 

m,^ Salads ^fr 

^p Sauces ^p 

Munchies 

Apple Pies 

FRI. MIGHT - Fill Frf SAT, HICHT • 

Milli'5.75 IGit *2.75 
|Eirlf8irH-5 r .ii. '$.«) 

Don't Forget Our Fajitas and Daily Specials 

f Optfl Al Mftffioriol 

5604 MillSt. I Jj^tSh 

Richmond, IL 6007t C Op^ iuun 
(815) 678-3623 \ ^^ 



Lhri Eiltrfiimif 
til 'Untie Mmr Riw - 



TTTTyTTTTTTTTyTTTT^TTV* 



JERRY'5 

Voted #1 Mexican 
Restaurant 

DAily LuNck & Dinner Spcc'uls 

FRIDAY & SATURDAY 

SPECIAL;-*^ 

• CliipoTU RoASTtd Duck 

• RoastecI PoRk 

• RoastecI BeeF TENdcRloiN 

• ChipOTiE New YoRk Strip Roast 

These entrees ARE TRvly delicious! 
PRIVATE ROOM AVAILABLE! 

• No SmoIukc, A«u • tU*dic»ppf<J Ace iviibli 

TERRY'Q 

v I MEXICAN V 



MEXICAN 
RESTAURANT & BAR 

JTjttS N. SEYMOUR 

w mundelein.il 

(IN IHC HAWIEY COMMONS) CARRV.OUT 

HOUMl 
■ATIKUY 11 NOON - 10 PV'CLOSEO SUNDAY rAX 566-9590 



5&6-9530 



**»»*% 



M«r 2», 1»» l^fat** 1 N"*""** t*KEUrelj| 



B cr^r~n RED : 



E 
f 
6 

H 
I 
J 
K 
L 
H 
H 

P 
Q 
R 




Why Not Try Our 

CARRY-OUT 
TONIGHT? 

FREE DELIVERY*! 



Serving the Best Homemade 

Food Cooked Fresh To Order! * 

Where Friends & Family Meet f 

Daily Breakfast & Lunch Specials * 

OHN7DAYSAWIIK * 

HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 6 a.m. to 2 pm V 

SaL7"m.to2 P .m.,Sun.7a.m.to1p.m „ 

mile noon ot tfe *«* the" ** T^n^bZ * 

Owners: Duanc & Susan Habjan R 



Delicious 

►Homemade Italian 4 

Baf Sandwiches 



WerViGratctRia 
•Double Deck 
•Thick Crust 
•Pan 



HOT DOGS 

Carry-Out Or 
Dine-In 



. RJs Eatery an 

p a The Outback Bar &i 



Ai 



526-0060 



495 W. Liberty Sl (Rt 176) 

Actom From Liberty Squire 

WAUCONDA 



Memorial Day Weekend SpecWs 

Butt Steak Dinner $9-95| 

; Includes Own Roasted Potatoes, \fe8*»M«, 
I Choice Of Soup Or Salad, Garlic Roll 

raatsu^Broned Burgers $3-™ 

1 Watch For Our Father's Day Brunch 
June 18. 9 a.m. -2 p.m. 
Call For Raaervatlona S2&O06O ^ 

Ti \ik thr h' 1 '" mnhp * He * ier . m 
* /o/w us Friday May 26th For * 



AMERICAN 



* 

* 



All you can eat $7.95 

*tf*- Fish Fry .W.9| 

* Crab Legs Y%V C 

Sg' traded Shrim p $12.9 5 

HiltMrdg Y Karaok e 1 RM. • 1, AJLJ 



*Sur«j*r Hours 
* ArtBacfc 

inch 



itovuimvLK 



$JG5WBft (708) 3^»35 -JgJ * 



■ **3 



ntioch 

[Golf Club 

PybUc Welcome 

NOW OPEM WED 
THRU SUN 

All Yon Caa Eat 

Wed. - Pasta Bar $196 
Thurs. - Select Your 
Own Steak Night 
Fri - Ail You Can Eat Fish Fry 91 M 
Sat - Alt You Can Eat 
Prime Rib Buffet SH.W 
8un.-10ajn,2pjn. %£*&& 
Champagne Brunch ■»■ * r9t 

Sun. 4-8 p.m.; Sun. Night Buffet $i0.« 
Banquet facilities fori*w peo«- 

•MEETINGS 

.SHOWERS •W?°°I NQS 
.GOLF OUTINGS 

Families Welcome . 40180 B. Ht W 

|TM. 39S-4S00 ftMTlOCH 



1«» t Grind km. ♦ Undwhnl 
f*ont3S6-2M0 



THE BEST 



FULL MENU IHCLUDES: Appetizers • 
Salads •Soup •Sandwiches 
•Pasta *Chlckcn • Ribs 
•Heart HealtfiyHeiM 

Join Us Tonight! 

THE SILO 

Bt. 176, Lak» Bluff 

t7Q8 ) 234-6660 



»*... 



• "~ *»Jt5 5» 



Diolag Room 
•Cocktail Lounge 
•Karaoke Sat. 
•Catering 
•Baaaact Facilities 



Daily Spet 

*» Drfr Species (adaiafW**) «Smd** • 

Roast Chicken With Si«P Dtestag 

New YoA Strip St** 
Grilled Shrimp-Oo-A-Sfck 

Closed 

ScKffiie Pike, AlMJ-Cin-E* 
prime Rib Dinner 



Hotac 

iloc/Tbur*. 4 
FflVSrf.+llpm; 



*94 and '95 
„ Vfinner 
^^ Of Best SteaM 

4-10 pjft. ' 

zfttn+f p-m. ■ 



•Of 



IISl IOOO 






COLOSSAL « 01 STEAKS • Sag* I .WJJgH^ 

^bw • sanx» • pwi w * o*ibi 

Tbetiaa ttbenyost can waki fbe drfcockf 
XMimt S*it*vtmSUTir,z/J'I09'> 

SIIILQmiwodDrtw, 9watwmtt i*lr^l 
Gumee o«*Ba^ | 

356-5200 |" 




r. i 



. i 



ijryT 



nhinese Restaurant & Lounge 



BNE D1N1MO 4 SfHRTTS 

Prime Rib 



MfYfdttWyTuttd^ 

(roM4iai0pju 

Onry'B.W 



l 



NOW OPEN 
6:30 A.M. 

Mooday-frklay 



Serving 



Only 
fteAiuran* 

panoroxvc 
**<* I Contii 

c^allrirtitl^i'P m^ 

tdetim&liwtv** "Cities ** UP to iJv .J 



LUNCH BUFFET 

Wednesdays & Fridays 

(Ukdmnt Location Only) 



Ive- 



t i.irbor 



7ftBif8l|^88^ 



OPEN? 
DAY* A 



rduts 



3*1 N. 



t^^fcfc* *****t 




[slzzmie 



Three Chdce*. each setvod w«h sauteod 
bci pec^ and red cntem, lca»^> 

dar choow and mid »aba. OargrBod 
Boel. Chicken or a CorrdnaSon d fcem. 
ffsyourdedstonlfJ* 



6RILLED CHICKEN 
FETTUCCINI 

Srta of grfled chtten tonden w*e«d 

hah romano choeae- »o»W 



BEST BUFFALO 

WINGS 

CXjt crtt^ reck^l Served ^carrots, 
cote** & fakM cheese dresaina. Hot or 
Screamlntf »XW 



^fe for the Food and Stay 



j W&n* SB «n »"» »" " «« «** "^SS 



..1tV:'-^>~ , .V j-.,:1 



Tke Buflfelss^^ 









Singles Bar 



Tl 



The Buffo 10 Is Where Vou Belong 



LSSSK&j 






u ■ 
■ I 




LAKEUFE UkcUNd NcwspApcRS Mxy 26, 1999 



Where To 
Eat Out 



FEATURE 

OF THE 
WEEK 





Daily 
Dinner 






SERVED TUESDAY - SUNDAY 

(Except Saturdays) 

May 30th-June4 

Breast of Chicken Mars:iln . . . "."-> 

Pork Kal>ol> $ 10.95 

linked Halibut $ 1 1.95 

Veal Lvmoney X^.^/3 

BBQ Back Ribs $ 13.95 

Caiuol aUtrt, modtmifly fsrtctd, by rtitr\atia\ charge cards octrjlrd. 



mxt (Eoimtrg J§rjmr£ 

^Kcstnurmtt &: ^Bnuqurt ^TntxWixtts 
Gracious dining in the Wesley Stars Country Estate 





Rte. 120 & 45 - Grayslake • (708) 223-0121 
Your Hosts, Bill and Kris Govas 



PittltO - Friday & Saturday Dinner, Sunday Brunch 



Country Squire a perfect place 
for a relaxing family dinner 

Leisurely family dinners where you can sit 
around and chat over a delicious meal.. .if you 
haven't tried it, get your family together and give it a 
whirl. Vou'II probably wonder why you didn't do it 
sooner. 

When Country Squire came up with the "Specials 
for the Week", they weren't certain how their 
customers would respond to the items that weren't 
on the regular menu. Well, they found out.. .due to 
the overwhelming response, a 5th week was added to 
the special menu, so look for the weekly ads. They've 
even repeated items because customers have asked 
them to! 

Country Squire's full course dinners arc cooked to 
your order (they wouldn't have it any other way!), and 
like their regular dinner menu, you'll enjoy their 
famous L'izy Susan (some folks call it a meal in Itself), 
a salad with choice of dressing and potato, vegetable, 
beverage, and dessert. This, along with your entree, Is 
a great combination for a reasonable price! 

The regular menu hasn't changed, so you'll 
definitely find your old favorites! Just remember... the 
specials arc served beginning on Tuesdays after you 
see their advertisement in the paper, and continue 
every day except Saturday. Response to the Sunday 
dinners have been terrific! A lot of families arc 
remembering the way It used to be with those Sunday 
family dinners at Grandma's, and It's nice that so 
many folks arc celebrating those days at the Country 
Squire without the hassle of cooking up a storm. 

Country Squire may look expensive, but they're 
not. They offer the finest food and service at 
everyday prices. Casual attire is welcome. Open 
Tuesday through Sunday for lunch and dinner. 

Country Squire appreciates their customers, 
whose suggestions arc always welcome. Drop by for 
a delectable meal soon at Country Squire, 19133 
Route 120 in Grayslake, 223-0121. 




ICKIE'SPLACE 

RE5TAURAMT & LOUHQE 

1211 M. RIVER ROAD 
McHEMRV, IL 600Z0-4543 

815-385-2014 

Spend Your Memorial Day 

Weekend With Us And Enjoy Family 

Dining On The Beautiful Fox River. 

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Hospital hosts golf outing 

WAUKEGAN-St. Thcrcsc Medical Center will host 
the 14th annual STAR Hospice Golf and Tennis Outing 
at Kemper I-akcs Golf Club in Long Grove June 21. A 
round of golf on an award -winning course, plus break- 
fast, lunch and dinner arc included In the golf package, 
and participants will have chances at raffle prizes, 
including a $1,000 first prize, $500 shopping spree at 
Gurncc Mills and a foursome golf package at Kemper 
Likes. Raffle tickets arc $5 each at the foundation 
office. Call 360-2041 or 360-21 83. 

Shop gets just desserts 

ANTIOCH --I n what is fast becoming the year of the 
customer, Larry Mondic, owner of the Antloch Baskln- 
Robbins, was honored by Baskln-Robbins USA with the 
Extra Mile .Service Excellence Award and Ihc Marketing 
Excellence Award. These arc two of five awards offered 
In the company's 31 Excellence Awards program. 



M* y 2e, 1995 UbUNd NcwspADCRV BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



Mondie's Antioch Baskln-Robbins is a three- time (con- 
secutive years) winner of the Marketing Excellence 
Award, 

Highland expands recycling 

WAUKEGAN— Highland Corp., a metals and paper 
rccydcr, lias added 25 percent more capacity to meet 
the growing environmental needs of its Industrial 
clients. The company added 5.000 square feet of new 
storage, for a total of 20,000 square feet, to service take 
County industries' growing demand for corrugated 
box, computer paper and metals recycling services. 
Operating out of its Waukcgan facility since 1988, 
Highland returns more than $1 million a year to Lake 
County's economy through pay-out of waste it buys 
from customers for recycling. 

Small business tax breaks 

SPRINGFIELD— Ihc Illinois Chamber of 
Commerce announced the passage of legislation 
designed to give small business owners the same tax 
breaks on health care costs currently reserved for 



incorporated firms. House Dill 1810, sponsored by Sen. 
Rill Peterson (R-Long Grove) passed the Senate by a 
vote of 42-12-1. It previously passed in the House by a 
vote of 115-0-0. The legislation will give sole propri- 
etors, partners in a partnership and shareholders of 
A ^ubchapter S corporations the ability to deduct 100 
^rfir^fftk^fc^li^cji^^ from 

their slaty J^wnc^tjixcs. ^rrcnrrywirUnCil, on C cor- 
porations are aftowcQ'm d&fkltthclr heallh care insur- 
ance prcmruHfcft&;dto5C#,to|ing business. 

Wickstrom honored again 

HARRINGTON— For the second year In a row, 
Wickstrom Ford has been honored for their outstand- 
ing customer service with the Chairman's Award from 
Ford Motor Company. Each year, customers determine 
the winners of the Ford Motor Company Chairman's 
Award. Wickstrom Ford is proud to be part of this 
select group once again. The Chairman's Award 
dembnst rates the success of Wickstrom 's ongoing 
efforts to combine the best vehicles with the highest 
level of customer satisfaction. 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE &S*?-* 



I 

1 






THIS WEEK 

Antiques for 
sale 

Volo auto museum 
holding auction 
PACE C2 

People on the 

move 

People changing hats in 
Lake County business 
PAGEC? 

Closing and 
moving 

Tips for doing transition 

smoothly 

PAGE C5 



STOCK WATCH 



Highland Lake pilot previews Boeing 777 



Chang* Dtv. 
4 l/H S0.84 



BILL SCHROEPER 
Pubfahor 

June 7 will t>c a red tetter date 
for United Air lines and CapL 
Denis I ) m ida. 

Hun's the day UAL's new 
777— the heralded computer 
controlled, "fly by wire" Triple 7 
from Boeing — goes into service. 

That's also the first day that 
Darida and a select group of se- 
nior pilots who have I wen train* 
thj* for the futurfsUc aircraft will 

have their first opportunity 10 
take to the air in th« two-cn^lnc 
plane tltai combines the features 
and paytoad of a 747 and DCI0, 
work horses of commercial avia- 
tion for 30 years. 

Welcome to the world of sim- 
ulated flying. 

Darida, who has been flying 
for 31 years, gave mcml»crs of the 
Grayslakc Round Tabic, a group 
of retired executives, a preview of 
preparations for introduction of 
the compute ri/.ed marvel UAL 



will feature on long trips like 
Chicago to Paris or Frankfurt and 
Chicago to Honolulu. 

No. 229 on United** list of 
fl.OOO pilots, Darida put in five 
weeks of training in preparation 
for commanding a 777 — all in a 
British-built simulator that has 
artificial "feel" built-in to the 
controls. 

"One simulated training flight 
had us Undine in a *oow storm In 
l*Cuardla. We could see tracks in 

the snow on our computer and 
feel bumps on the runway. " 

Capt. f>arh!u, a nwldent of 
Highland Lake, finished the five- 
week course at Denver on April 
27 with an appreciation for the 
new age of flying where comput- 
ers arc taking over. 

"1 spent about four months 
learning to qualify as a flight engi- 
neer on a DC6. In those days, part 
of the training was learning how 
the airplane was built For the 
Sec PLANE page C2 




Hlghand w rosldoni Captain DonU ^t&fflfigffi 
hta next homo In mo air. Ho is one of tho fow who will fly lt» now 
Booing 777.— Photo by Todd F. HoWor 



Grayslake companybrin^web' to County 



Company Price 
AhlxiU 38 7/8 
Albiatc 30 5/8 -3/4 
AmcrU«:h433M -1 
ATM* 50 -l 1M 

Baiter 34 r— - 

Brunswick 183/4 -4 3/8 

Unicom 265/8 -1/2 

D. Winer 46 7/B -5/0 

Kemper 47 

McDonalds 36 5/8 -1/8 

Motorola 62 +3/4 
peoples En. 25 3/4 4l/B 

Qkr.Osks34 "3hl 

Sara Lee 27 

Scars 56 7/8 +3/8 
UAL 116 1/4-1/4 

W*lgrccrw465/a -1/4 
WMXTech, 28 1/8-3/8 
Chary Elcc 14 1/4*3/4 
Brwn. Ferris 36 +7/B 

Local nocks were mixed this 
week, but Brunswick is down 10 
percent after being downgraded 
by a bnikcrage firm. Use this as 
a buying opportunity. 

Stock Watch provided by 
Noah Seidenbetft of Edward ft 
Janet A Co* Grayslake. 




Lakeland 
browsing 



notOIRECT 
mogaiina 



iSm fallal*, to computac M via Ih. lnt«n.l.-Photo by Todd F. Hob** 



Start Roportor 

If a family didn't own a televi- 
sion in the 1950s, they were con- 
sidered behind the times. In the 
1980s it was a VCR. Now. it is a 
home computer and will soon be 
a connection to the web. 
What is a web connection? 
The worldwide web, or 
Internet, is a massive collection 
of computers linked via tele- 
phone lines. 1 here arc cuncntly 
50 million subscribers to the 
Internet worldwide through vari- 
ous local outlets and the num- 
bers arc growing by one million 
per month. One third of US, 
homes have a personal computer 
and half of those are already 
equipped with a modem for on- 
line service. 

Just like cable television, sub- 
scribers pay a monthly fee to join 
the web, then pay extra for 
upgrades. The problem, espe- 
cially in Lake County, has always 
been the need to make a long dis- 
tance phone call to link up. U 
your computer is browsing the 
web for two hours each night, 
you could accumulate a 60-hour 
See WEB page C2 





BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE UIceUncI NcwspApctrs M*y 26, 1 99 5 





From page CI 

long distance phone bill at the 

end of the month. 

With Lakeland nctDIRECT, a 
new direct link to the Internet via 
a modem hook up through 
Grayslakc, those budget consid- 
erations will soon disappear. 
Roughly half the county will have 
unlimited access to the entire 
Internet by making a 5-ccnt 
phone call. The rest of the coun- 
ty will only pay a few cents per 
minute. 

"I remember what my phone 
hills were when my kids went to 



college. With the Internet and 
mailboxes, you can talk to your 
kids on the computer," said 
Corky Gross, marketing director 
for Lakeland nctDIRKCr. 

Gross was referring to an elec- 
tronic address that is established 
for everyone who joins the 
Internet He said many major 
colleges arc now allowing stu- 
dents a free electronic mailbox. 
What is more exciting, users arc 
not restricted to talking to family 
members via mail. With a satel- 
lite uplink, you can be conversing 
with someone in Australia in vir- 



tually real time. 

Beyond electronic mail, 
Lakeland nctDlRLCT also offers 
subscribers unlimited education, 
entertainment and Information. 
Whatever Is on the Internet is 
yours to sec. This Includes access 
to magazines, newspapers and 
libraries worldwide. This means 
no more going to die library just to 
read the editorial page of the New 
York Times. If there is a legal 
question, dial up the Harvard Law 
Ubrary for expert help. The 
Internet phone book is now 700 
pages and growing rapidly. 



Volo auto museum holding auction 



To some, instant access to 
worldwide Information may be 
scary and somewhat confusing. 
To help, Gross said Lakeland 
nctDIRECT offers Instruction, an 
Information disk, a handbook 
and technical support. He advis- 
es people who still need to 
upgrade their computer with a 
modem should purchase one no 
slower than 14,400 baud. To real- 
ly fly, the lakeland Net Direct 
hub can support those with a 
modem capable, of 28,800 bps. If 
people don't feel comfortable 
doing their own shopping for 
modems, Gross said a technician 
can even come to the home for 
installation. 



The "Chicago '95" Collector Car 
l-xpo and Auction will celebrate 1 1 
successful years of Krusc 
International and Volo Antique 
Auto Museum join events on June 
9, 10 and 1 1 , when 500 of the finest 
vintage cars arc offered for sale on 
-the museum's complex. 

"Our partnership with Dean, 
Mitchell and Stuart Krusc Is like an 
addition to our own family busi- 
ness," said Rill Grams, co-owner of 
the Volo Antique Auto Museum 
and Antique Malls with his brother 



Greg. "It is a highly successful 
melding of years of collector car 
experience and expertise by each 
of our family owned and operated 
enterprises. Our museum is cele- 
brating its 34 th year." 

The June expo and auction 
will feature quality collector cars 
representing antiques, classics, 
milestones, muscles and more in 
a wide value range that offers 
enticing opportunities for both 
novices and experienced collec- 
tors. Tills outstanding event is 



open to the general public, buy- 
ers and sellers. Ridding consign- 
ment details may be obtained by 
calling Krusc International at 1- 
800-968-4444 or Glen Kocts at 
Volo auction headquarters, 
(815)385-8408. 

The Volo auction begins 
June 9 at 6 p.m., June 10 and 11 at 
10 a.m. General admission is $8 
for adults and $3 for children 12 
and under, which includes the 
auction, expo, museum and 
parking. 



Plane 



Prom pager CI 

Triple 7, we were taught how to 
use the computers," the veteran 
airman related. 

When he makes his first 777 
"revenue" trip (with passengers), 
Darida will rank No. 3 in seniority 

: on UAL's contingent of 777 pilots. 
The new two-engine plane has 

■ 50 percent more thrust and will 
operate safely with one engine- 
even on take off, according to 
Darida. Looks of the Triple 7 arc 
deceiving," Darida remarked, 

',. pointing out that Hoeing delib- 
erately kept overall appearance 
to resemble other models in the 
Roclng commercial fleet. 

The 777, however, will employ 
she wheels on each landing gear 
Instead of the conventional four. 



Unlike older aircraft, where 
physical strength was sometimes 
required of pilots, the 777 only 
requires knowledge of which tog- 
gle switch to employ for both 
normal conditions and an emer- 
gency. "One of the first things 1 
had to learn was not using my 
hands," Darida stated. 

With only two pilots in the cock- 
pit, pilots will be "working harder" 
despite the zenith of automation. 
"For one thing," CapL Darida 
joked, "die 777 pilots had to learn 
to fly and talk at the same time." 

While automation has re- 
placed the third pilot on the flight 
deck, Darida emphasized the 777 
is equipped with self trouble- 
shooting devices and hack-up 
check lists. 



This is what you get with 
other internet services... 





This is what you 
will get by 
subscribing to the 
Lakeland netDIRECT 
internet service... 



Many internet services only provide a portion oF the internet, and charge more than most 
of us would like to pay. 

Coming soon From Lakeland Publishers, Inc. - a new internet service which will provide 
, unbounded access at a cost you'll just love. For example, sending an e-mail to a relative 
overseas will cost you as much as talking to your next door neighbor.* 

For more information about 
this new service, dial (708) 223-8199. 



. So, everything sounds great 
but what Is unlimited access to 
the worldwide Internet cost? 
Through Lakeland nctDIRECT, 
which will be operational by the 
first week In July, the subscrip- 
tion fee Is $25 per month. For Ini- 
tial subscribers, die company Is 
offering the fourth month free. 
For information or to subscribe 
call 223-8199. 

With Lakeland nctDIREC, the 
future of the web Is already here 
in I -ike County. 

Oh, what a tangled web we 
weave, but there's so much good 
stuff to receive. Just think what 
Shakespeare could have done 
with the knowledge. 



Capt. Darida, who maintains a 
personal aircraft at Kenosha Air- 
port, couldn't say enough about 
the new airplane he is about to 
command. I Ic described how the 
Triple 7 has a built-in self-right- 
ing feature to prevent dangerous 
steep banks. If ncccssury, the 777 
could be programmed to land it- 
self. 

United will operate the 777 
with 300 passengers alUiough the 
aircraft could be configured to 
carry a maximum 440 persons. 

The slightly-built, soft-spoken 
pilot will close out his commer- 
cial flying career as a 777 com- 
mander, tic faces mandatory age 
GO retirement rules. The Triple 7 
will he a capstone for a distin- 
guished career. 



rSDIR 




'Appfes to most ofuifcfl Gouty. Ptoasa ca* tar Main oboJ your a.ta. 



.." 



SUBSCRIBE TODAY! 

223-8161 Lakeland 

^™^™^^ ^^ ^^ * Newspapers 



"ASK THE MAYOR" 

SPEAK DIRECTLY TO YOUR COMMUNITY'S 
MAIN MAN THE MAYORI 

LIVE - 

THE FIRST THURSDAY OF EACH MONTH 
6:30 P.M < CHANNEL3 



GURNEE MAYOR 
DICK WELTON 

Friday, June 2 




Cable 

of Lake County 



BIG HIT 

of the WEEK 



lei 




2 YEAR CD 




*1000 minimum opening balance. 



SEE YOUR HOMETOWN TEAM 



Members Of The Northern States Financial Group 



FIRST FEDERAL BANK, 



Waukegan 

Matison it Count/ Street 1 429 Urwii Ave. 
(706)6234064 (706) 240*6307 

6384 Gr^rxJ Av». » fnt) 24SW312 



BANK OF WAUKEGAN 



Waukegan 

1001 N. Lewi 
(708) 244-6000 



Green Bay fW 
At Grand Ave. 
{TOR) 244*000 



Antioch 

Rl W at Gran Laka Rd . (706) 39&6S22 



^ThaAnftualPorconUigo Yiold (A P.Y.) 19 otfocLvo through May 31, 10-95, 
1 Penalty may bo imposed for oarty withdrawal. Foaa may reduce (ha earnings 
"oft *he 'becount ; L * * * 2 * r 



"-^'CTSwnm 



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«( 




M* r 26, 199? LaLiUmI Nmr»p(*s BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 




MJURphy on ReaI Estate 



Jerri Murphy 



Getting family moved in and out on closing day 



Finally the day comes when the 
"drill" begins and one family b 
moving out of the house and the 
new buyers move in. The problem 
arises when both parties need to 
have the funds from their respec- 
tive doslngs, before they can dose' 
on their new residences. This pre- 



sents a bit of a challenge logisticaUy 

for each party taking occupancy of one family b not yet moved out. 



their new homes. which means the other family can't 

A way to circumvent this prob- move in yet and the moving trucks 

lem comes at the acceptance of the arc lined up blocking normal traffic 

contract to purchase. If each party and everybody gets a bit cranky, 
asks to "rent' the house for one day The attorneys involved arc not 

after the dosing, there Is likely to be always in favor of this kind of 

less hassle on the actual day of dos- solution for several reasons. The 

ing. Typically, what happens b that first reason b because they may 

the parties arc trying to dose, and want to have a "hold out", of 




New mobility 

Fox Lake Chamber of Commerce members celebrate me 
grand opening of the Hidden Cove CeliJar store. Present 
wero: Chamber Director Sherry Doyle, Chamber President 
Alien Sturgos, owner Ray Freoman and Chamber executive 
secretary Diane Freeman. In bock are Chamber Director 
Trudy Helios, co-owner Rena Freeman co-owner of the 
Anltoch celuiar storo Anglo Freeman. Fox Lake Trustee and 
Chamber Director Jim Sogjn and Chamber Director Borne 
Clary. 



funds to cover the parties not 
vacating as agreed, or any poten- 
tial damage to the premises dur- 
ing the day the title and owner- 
ship have been transferred. Then 
the question of who holds the 
funds, who docs the inspection, 
etc, need to be 'addressed The 
other question that needs to.be 
agreed on b the amount of the 
"daily" rent. The contract may 
have a provision for a penalty rate 
If possession. 

This problem b avoided if one of 
the parties has already moved out 
Then the final "walk-through* or 
inspection of the premises b easier 
for the buying party to sec If all of 
the personal property that b to be 
left with the home b still on the 
premises, and any latent damage 
that may have occurred between 
the time of contract acceptance 
and the closing date. It is, of course, 
easier to walk through a home that 
b empty for an inspection instead 
of one that has moving boxes, peo- 
ple and furniture all over the place. 

Another bsuc b how the home 
b left after all the ermines* of pack- 



ing and moving have been com- Murphy Is a broker associate with 

pleted. It b always a hassle to ReMax In Ubertyville, Send qttes- 

move out and then try to find the tionsf suggestions with a self- 

time, energy and dcaning tools to addressed, stamped envelope -to 

spruce up the house after the Murphy at 1344 S. Milwaukee 

move. Editor's note- JTerri viie, Lihertyville, IL G004B, 



•Utlft Help YcuG*tB*ck on Your FEETr 



cKIE 



LAKE COUNTY'S LARGEST 
CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH 
DODGE-DODGE TRUCK 

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FOX LAKE. IL I * W%# ' W ' 

Meet Our Service Professionals 

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I SENIORS UkcUNd Newspapers* M*y 26, 1999 




fOtt 




Lakeland 

Newspaper i 



Tips for staying on top of 'aging' insurance policies 



Some things In our lives are plain and 
simply less Interesting to deal with than 
others. For most of us. Insurance fends 
io be one of those things. As people 
grow older, their Insurance needs often 
change and that can cause a real 
problem If coverage hasn't been 
adjusted appropriately. 

According to Michael Stoeckel, 
owner of the Lechner-Stoeckel 
Insurance Agency In Mundeleln. most 
people have the tendency to get Insur- 
ance In place when they're young and 
then don't give It very much thought 
after that. It's not unttl something unfor- 
tunate happens and people find out 
they're not adequately covered that 
they realize the need to make some 
changes. 

Insurance needs change not only 
with lifestyle adjustments but also as 
people mature. The most dramatic 
changes seem to happen around the 
age of 50. That's a very Important time 
Io review Insurance coverage. Use 
these tips to help evaluate Insurance 
needs: 

• Take an Invontory of your signifi- 
cant personal property. Many people 
over the ago of 60 have expensive fur- 
niture, electronic equipment and many 
other valuable possessions, but may not 
be fully aware of their combined value. 
So, look them over, write down Informa- 
tion on them, photograph them and 
then store that completo Inventory In a 
safety deposit box or other protected 
place, 



• Have a professional appraise your 
antiques, artwork and other valuables. 
Once these Items are gone, It's very dif- 
ficult to establish their true value If II has- 
n't already been determined and 
recorded. 

• Get your monoy's worth by taking 
advantage of specialty servlcos 
offered by Insurance companies for 
"mature" people, such as consumer 
advtsory boards and defensive driving 
courses. . For example, the "65 
Alive/Mature Driver" course developed 
by the American Assn. of Retired 
Persons (AARP) and offered by many 
Insurance companies not only teaches 
road safety, but If also frequently enti- 
tles participants to discounts on their 
auto Insurance. 

• Review your Insurance regularly to 
make sure It still matches your current 
needs. For Instance, If you've had the 
same car with the same auto Insurance 
for several years, you may want to 
check the blue book value of that car. 

. If It's quite low, you can save a substan- 
tial amount of money on premiums by 
simply dropping collision and/or com- 
prehensive coverage. 

• Ask your agent about ways you 
can got maximum coverage without 
paying higher prices. For example, by 
Increasing your automobile collision 
deductible from $200 to $600, you can 
save up to 35 percent on promtums. 

• Check your policy llmitsl When 
Insuring your home, find out how much 
It would cost to completely rebuild your 




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while you wait. 

Please Call For An Appointment & Present Coupon For Discount. 

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trained volunteers to meet the individual needs of terminally Hi patients and 
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house. It's a good Idea to Insure your 
home for no less than the replacement 
cost. 

• Consider Insuring personal property 
at replacement cost. Thb extra cover- 
age means your Insurance company 
will pay you the cost to replace any 
ltom(s) you lose without figuring depre- 
ciation on them. 

• If your home Is part of a larger 
group of homes— such as a condomini- 
um or townhouso— find out where the 
association's responsibility ends and 
yours begins. You may find that you can 
eliminate some of your coverage and 
save money once you have this Infor- 
mation. For Instance, If you discover the 
association b responsible tor the walb of 
the unit, you might be able to eDmlnale 
that portion of coverage from your 



Insurance. 

• Avoid buying the often pushed 
and sometlmos unnecessary Insurance 
on a rental car. Many rental companies 
don't mention that the Insurance you 
cany on your car may also cover rental 
cars used In the U.S. and Canada. 
Check with your agent on the orient of 
your current coverage before spending 
the extra money. 

• Check out the Insurance discounts 
you're entitled to as port of Iho grow- 
ing, "mature* market. Recent research 
shows older Americans tend to be more 
cautious drtvore and are abo very care- 
ful about protecting their belongings.' 
Based on that information. Hanover 
Insurance groups people 50 and older 
together and of fore them reduced 
rates due to their lower risk as a group. 



A few heart-hitting facts 

The warning signs of stroke are: Sudden woakresscfriimbnossoftnofaco, 
arm or leg on one stele of the body: sudden cfirrnessoflossofvhk^partk^jlarty 
In one eye; loss of speech or trouble (okbg or urck*starYiina speech; sudden 
severe headaches with no apparent cause; and unoxplalnod dtezinoss, unsteadi- 
ness a sudden fate* especially along wtth any of the previous symptoms. 

To reducethe risk of heart disease foBow these American Heart Assn. 
dietary guidelines; Keep saturated fat to loss than 10 percent of calorios. 
total fat to less than 30 percent of calories, cholesterol to toss than 300 mg 
per day, and socfium to less than 3,000 rng per day. 

An estimated 58 percent of adult Americans have blood cholestorol lev- 
els above 200 mlllgrams per dedltec a levol at which the risk of cotonary 
heart disease begins to rise sharply, says the American Heart Assn. 






•z* 



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"My grandpa - 

is building a beautiful/ affordable 

place for you to live in Wauconda./* 

GOOD NEWS SENIORS 
ALL ADULT COMMUNITY 

Harmony Village in Wauconda 

• A manufactured home community 

on Barrington Road, 3 Blocks South of Rt. 176 

• One bedroom, one bath homes start at $39,900 

• Two bedroom, two bath homes start at $49,900 

• High efficiency, low cost heating & air conditioning systems 

• Monthly lot rents include: 

•Ground maintenance 

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• 24-hr. area for garbage disposal 

• Street Lighting 

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• Basic Cable TV 

New in '95 Senior Services & 
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Delivery scheduled for June, July, Aug., 1995 

• Call (708) 52^Sp,00;fqr appointment M For "Grandpa'' Or George 



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M*y2A, 1995 Uflwd Ncwsp*pc« $EN1 ORS 



f 







tanning; the good, the bad and the ugly 



DAVID FERST 

A good estate plan protects your 
assets during your Hfotimo and. upon 
death, provides for the orderly transi- 
tion of your assets to the desired heirs. 

The plan coordinates wills, trusts, 
guardianship of children, property 
ownership. Incapacity and other 
details to meet your objecth/es. These 
are Interesting topics to discuss, but 
very difficult to deal with when It con- 
cerns your own situation. 

Many are surprlsod to loarn (a) 
Ihore may bo an estate tax due 
before assets can be passed to the 
heirs, (b) how large their taxable 
estate Is. and that (c) each state has 
created an "estate plan" If you die 
without one. 

How large Is your estate? For a 
rough estimate, start with your not 
worth. This Includes your home. Invest- 
ments, retirement plan assets, person- 
al property and collectibles. Add to It 
the fair market value of your business 
Intorosts. Add tho doath benefits of oH 
life Insuranco owned on your life. Tho 
total may surprlso you. 

If tho total oxcoeds $600,000. you 
oro subject to estate taxes with some 
exceptions, such as assots passed to a 
spouse or a charity. The first dollar over 
$600,000 Is taxod at 37 percent and 
this tax Incroases to 60 percent for 
estate assets In oxcoss of $2,500,000. 

By the way, the fair market vatuo of 



business Interests are often the subject 
of debate between an estate and the 
IRS. Establishing their value, prior to 
your death, may eliminate years of 
delay and Unnecessary expense In the 
handling of your estate. 

The Inclusion of death benefits of 
life Insurance Is tho shocker for most 
people. A key benefit of life Insurance 
Is that the proceeds are paid free of 
Income faxes. However, to avoid 
estate taxes requires additional plan- 
ning. 

Finally, If you are too busy or dislike 
dealing with estate planning, the 
State of Illinois has prepared a plan for 
you. With the assistance of the courts, 
they will determine the guardian of 
your minor children and who will get 
your assets. Would you want your 18 
year old teenager, an adult by law, to 
receive an inheritance of $500.0007 

The loss of a loved one Is devastat- 
ing, but the lock of an estate ptah can 
have far reacting consequences. The 
emotional turmoil and friction can 
affect your family, your business and 
decisions rotated to financial matters. 
A lack of or bad estate planning can 
be very costly; therefore, seek out 
assistance from a professional. In the 
tang run. It may be a small price to 
pay. 

David Font. CLU ChFC. h a regis- 
torod representative of Financial 
Network Investment Corporation, a 





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companies. Ferst can be contacted 
at his branch office. (815)459-4550 or 
personal office, 991-8040. or write to 
him at 865 £ Wllmetto SL Unit 1, 
Palatine. IL 60067. 



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SENIORS UktUwi Newspapers M*y 26, 1995 




f or Senfous 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Seniors should know signs of age-related macular degeneration 



What Is age-related macular 
degeneration? 

Ago-retated macular degen- 
eration (AMD) b an oye disease 
1hat Is present to al leas! a mild 
degree In millions of older 
Americans. It Is a leading cause 
of visual loss in this country. 

AMD affects the macula, a 
small portion of the retina. The 
retina Is the light-sensing norve 
tissue lhat lines Ihe Inside of Ihe 
eye. All parts of the rellna con- 
tribute to sight, but only the 
macula con provide the sharp, 
straight-ahead vision that Is 
needed for driving and reodlng 
small print. 

As a person ages, harmful 
changes may occur In this small 
but Important area of the rotina,' 
causing difficulties In reading 
and other tasks that require 
good central vision. Scientists do 
not know why tt^ese macular 
changes occur. But aging evi- 
dently plays a major rota In the 
process. That b why It is known as 
ago-rolatod, or senilo. macular 
degeneration. 

Do people with age-related 
macular degeneration goner- 
ally go blind? 

No. Although AMD Is a load- 
ing cause of visual loss. If Is 
Important to know that the 
majority of people wilh AMD 
continue to have almost normal 
vision throughout their livos. Even 
those who are sovorely alfected 
do not Ipso all iholr sight, bul 
retain enough to move about 
Independently and make use of 
helpful devices called low vision 
aids. And for a limited number of 
people who devotop a rapidly 
worsening form of AMD that seri- 
ously endangers vision, thore b a 
sight-saving treatment devel- 
oped through research. 

Who gets age-related mac* 
ular degeneration? 

Usualy. AMD does not devel- 
op untl a person b 65 or older. 
But a few people are affected 
by the disease while stilt In their 
40s or 50s. 

A person's chances of devel- 
oping AMD are greater than 
average If ho or she has a near 
relative with the dbeaso. 
Sclenlbts are now trying to learn 
what other factors might place 
a person at risk for AMD. 

What are the signs and 
symptoms of AMD? 

Most people with AMD have 
a form of the dbeaso that devel- 
ops very slowty. It Is called the 
*dry" form. In It, tiny yellowish 
deposits called drusen develop 
beneath the macula. Abo, the 
layer of llght-sensittve eels In the 
macula becomes thinner as 
some eels break down. These 
changes typically cause a dim- 
ming or distortion of vision that 
people find most noticeable 
when they try to read. 
Generally, If one eye has dry 
AMD, the other eye will abo 
have some signs of the condi- 
tion. Thus the person with dry 
AMD may eventually have vtsu- 
al problems In both eyes, 
Howevec the dry form of AMD 
rarely causes total toss of read- 
ing vbion. 

A much greater threat of 
visual loss arises when the dry 
form of AMD grves way to the" 
*wet~ or neovascular form of 



the disease. 

This condition artses In a small 
percentage of AMD patients. In 
It, now blood vessels grow 
bonoath the macula. Theso 
abnormal vessob leak fluid and 
blood, causing Iho llght-senslltvo 
colb near them to sicken and 
die. Thb process generally pro- 
duces marked dbturbance of 
vision In the affected eye: 
Straight lines look wavy, and 
later there may be blank spots In 
Ihe field of vision. 

If the leakage and bleeding 
from new vesseb continue, 
much of the nerve tbsue In the 
macula may be killed or ln|ured 
within a period of a few weeks 
or months. Such damage can- 
not be ropalred because the 
nerve celb do not grow back 



once Ihey have been 
destroyed. 

Although only a small per- 
centage of people with AMD 
develop the neovascular form, 
they make up the vast majority 
of those who o>q3or1enco vbual 
loss from AMD. 

A few years ago. a nation- 
wide clinical sludy supported by 
tho National Eyo Institute (NEI) 
found that there b a treatment 
that can help most people 
whose sight b threatened by the 
wot or neovascular form of 
AMD. Thb troatment b called 
laser photocoagulation. In It, 
powerful light rays from a laser 
are directed Into the eye and 
focused at a thy spot on the 
macula. The aim of ihe laser 
treatment b lo preserve vision by 



destroying abnormal blood vos- 
seb. 

In fhe NEI-supported study, 
laser treatment reduced Ihe risk 
of severe vision toss by more 
than half In people"*wllh neovas- 
cular AMD. However, thb treat- 
ment b best applied soon after 
the new blood vosseb develop, 
before they have reached and 
damaged Ihe fovea— tho cen- 
tral part of the macula. 

Can overyone with AMD 
benefit from laser treatment? 

No. Laser photocoagulation 
b of value only to tho relatively 
few poople wt>3 have tho neo- 
vascular form of AMD, with now 
blood vessob actively growing In 
the macula and threatening to 
cause serious vbion toss. There b 
no evidence that laser treat- 



ment b of any value for people 
with the dry form of AMD. Also, 
because tho laser cannot 
restore vision already lost from 
AMD, ar\ eyo whose macula has 
been badly damagod by thb 
dbeaso would not benefit from 
laser treatment. That b why It b 
so Important for AMD— and 
neovascular AMD In particular— 
to bo'defoctod earty. 

Drusen and tho other macu- 
lar changes typical of dry AMD 
cannot bo seen by the person 
who has thorn, but are vfcfcte to 
an oye care spoclofist excmninlng 
the eyo. Anyone who b rridaTo- 
ogod or older should visit an eyo 
care specialist reguJarfy to bo 
checked for oarty signs of AMD, 
glaucoma and other oye db^ 
oases that are Inked to agfog. 




1 
+1 



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Card Account 

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Connection Savings" Account 





1 



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First of America 

Connections Savings 



Who says one and one is two? With our 
new First of America Connections Savings 
Account, it's not. If you already have a 
First of America deposit, loan or credit card 
or open a new one with us, you'll earn an 
APY of 4.00% on your new First of America 
Connections Savings Account. And since 
your bank deposits are FDIC-insured up 
to $100,000 per depositor, there's no risk. 
You can open yours with just $1,000 today. 



Maintain that $1,000 minimum and 
there's no monthly maintenance charge. 
It's all part of our First of America 
Connections program which rewards 
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on just about every new account you 
open with us. It all adds up to remarkable 
savings. 

Stop by any of our convenient locations 
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FIRSr°FAIVlRIG\ 



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; ;» <imn.. t y^;i r ^|j » ■ w^ :> ^i »t.. . 



I 




LIPSERVICE 

It's tIhe T/\lk of tNe 

Get it off yourc cUest (708) 22 



M*r 26 f 1995 UfcUmJ NcwspApces UPSERVICE 



TOVX/f\J 

5-8075 



UpsorAco fe o phono-ln column presented as a feature of 
Lakeland Newspapers. Lakeland Newspapers makes no ctaim to 
the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland Newspapers does 
not claim the content or the subject matter as tact but as the per- 
sonal opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the 
tight to edit copy or to refrain from printing a message. Coil in at 
223-8073 and leave your message 24-hours a day. Although the 
call b anonymous, please leave your village name. 





Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Clean it up 

Vonila McConnolfi tottor to tho 
poopto of Wcrjconda lj tho uflimato 
oxompto of tho pot caSng tho kottto 
block. Vonlta'i good friend. Jim 
Eschonbouch chanQod Wouconda 
pottles forovof by bringing in big 
money to tho campefgn from out- 
itdo iho city. Eschonbouch also got 
his favorlto contributor to tuo 
Eichonbouch'i oppononl at tho lost 
mlnuto. Thoy also sprood runoc s that 
should Eschonbauch't opponont 
wn. tho city of Wouconda would 
havo to pay for tho iawvit'i rosurt. 
ThH tawsvit was droppod wrthout tho 
porson ovon showing up. 
Eschonbouch and McConnol start- 
od and contlnuo dirty polilics. 
Vonita. poopio in gloss housos 
shouJdn't throw stonos. 

Leave Gator alone 

I !.vf> In Round lato and noticed 
this wookond that a bunch of VJds 
woro on tho lako with nots In boat i 
frying to catch this "angator*. I was 
amazod that rf Ihofo Is an effigator 
out thoro that parents onowod thok 
chfldron to go out thoto and do 
this, I'm from Rortda and t woukJ 
rocommond that If you soo an af»- 
gator, cofl tho pofico dopartmont 
and tot thorn hands© ft. bocouso 
you won" I wtnl 

How do you know? 

In roipomo to "Systom a Joto.* who 
satd J! was irnpovuoto that tho /ury 
could convict o rnan of toxuoi 
atxxto strtcrry on o cnid't word. 

How do you know that This chad It 
not totfvj tno trtrth? Tho human 
body Is a wondrous thing rt has tho 
abfcty to block things out In ordor to 
pxotocl Itsolf. or until tho mind can 
accopt what has happonod. I 
ogroo that thoro aro casos whoro 
chridron might bo lying- but that 



probably doesn't happon too 
off on. Thai's why wo havo psychol- 
ogists, jurtos and Judgos. who can 
offor tboir opinions and professional 
expertise on each case. The Idoal 
solution Is for those that havo tho 
need to abuse children to got tho 
right professional help so they don't 
do It at afl. 

Back to basics 

Since wo began busing all ovor tho 
country to batanco social prob- 
lems. It took away money from 
oducatlon to pay for buses and the 
children aro obtaining pooror edu- 
cations. An busing is doing is dMd- 
tng tho people and wo aro getting 
gang wars, racist problems, and 
now rofigSous bigotry. Busing was a 
big mtstako. Wo should go back to 
tho pubtc schools and loach mod • 
ing. writing, arithmetic and sci- 
ence. If poopio want special agon- 
dav they should pay for It them- 
sorves. If tho government is going 
to pay for ail thoso soedals. then 



WHY 




TIRED OF DIETING? 

WHY NOT TRY A SUCCESSFUL 
ALTERNATIVE! 

l ogo woioht in ont v 5 HvPflglil 
Session? ?nri tonm HOW to 

•Think Thin and Think Heillhy! 
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•Enjoy regular exercise 
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Yo u CAN Succeed! 

Call lor information 

James R. Baker 

Certified Hypnotherapist 

356-2675 




A 




The cost of a cracked wtna- 
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your wanet But NOVUS can fix 
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For your enjoyment of backyard birds" 

Don't Forget Father on 

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right gift for dad. 




those who don't havo children 
should be exempt. Why should 
childless poopio pay for all those 
spodals? We're being discrtmmat' 
od OQonitt 

Take responsibility 

I oro very disappointed with an arti- 
cle In lost week's paper on the 
oxtonded school year. Jim Hofrz 
and tho school board aro trying to 
blamo the toachor's union for the 
Idas bolng in school until July 6. 
Remaps what the school board 
should do is tatco fosponstoilry for 
all tho Has totd to the parents and 
Was during the strike, that tho days 
the kids wont to school and 
crossed the ino would bo counted 
toward the 176 state mandated 
schooldays. 

Needed service 

I'm colling about an ar\\do In the 
paper about two weeks ago on 
*Doo Doo Pooper Scoopors." It 
was a nice article and a groat lor- 
vtce. It's a sorvfee wo definitely 
noed for hearth reasons and other- 
wise. 

Wrong message 

I'm cofflng from Antloch and I was 
shockod to find out that tho Antloch 
Upper Grado School holds a " ttdcto 






•Sounds of Nature 
Tapes & CD's 
•Books 

RcdTopPhua Onnh 

1322 S. Milwaukee Ave* aVr*fe 

Ubcrtyvillc, Illinois 60048 Mon.-Fri. 10-6 
CBchlnd Burger KmjO a! Srt.««" ""IWf 

549-9990 Sunday 12 "* 



Casino rNfight* for tho Teen Canteen. 
I'm wondering what typo or mes- 
sage & sent to tho tdds? It's astound- 
ing that grown-ups aro leaching kids 
to ptay craps and Back Jack. 
Shouldn't wo teach Was how to read 
and write rather than garnblo? 

Don't pass blame 

I'm responding to the cotter who 
blamed the Republicans for tho 
Oklahoma bombing tragedy. How 
Ignorant can you got? Tho real 
people to blame aro Iho ones 
who actually did tho bombingi 
You might not 03*00 with Bob 
Dole. Newt Gingrich, and Rush 
Limbough. out that doesn't moon 
Just because they're out thoro get- 
ting tho word out and spooking 
out that those bombors have to 
act on what thoy say. We havo 
froo spoech In Itts country, but 
thoso people havo gone too far in 
oxprosslng their views. How can 
murdering innocent poopio and 
especially children solve tho politi- 
cal problems of tho world? Finally. 
If you don't like how things aro run 
In this country, why don't you trav- 
el tho world and check out other 
environments tike Ethiopia. Zaire, 
t Vlotnam. etc.? Maybe their sys- 
tem Is moro to your liWng. As for 
me, I prefer tho good ol* USA. 



and ovon though wo'ro not per- 
fect, we're Iho best country in the 
world. Random acts of viotonco 
ore not going to soh/e our prob- 
lems. Why don't you organize 
yourself and form a group that 
meets and talks about and maybe 
solves some of the problems we 
havo? Wouldn't that be moro 
constructive? 

Not in a hurry 

. I was at tho stoplight at Hainesviao 
Road about to turn left onto Rto. 
120 tho other day, and when the 
light turned groon the car behind 
mo immodtatoty honked, signifying 
that I was moving much too slow 
for her taste. What's the big hurry? 
I barely hod time to respond 
before this woman On Morcedos) 
hod to honk hor horn. She must've 
been watting foe tho light to turn 
green and had her hand hovortng 
above hor horn in order to honk It 
as soon as it turned green. Why so 
impatient? It's because of attitudes 
ttko that, tnat wo havo so many 
needless accidents these days 
Stow down, tho world won't ond if 
you don't got to your dosfingaflan 
in the fastest possible tlmo. Mayoe 
next year you should fry out for the 
tndK3napo5s 5Q0. you'd bo in your 
dory. 



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! 



Wallace A. Manz, 

. Ago 71, a resident of Trevor, WI for the past 7 years, 
formerly of Fox Lake, IL for many years, died Saturday, 
May 20, 1995 at Good Shepherd Hospital Inllarrlngton, 
II. He was bom on June 29, 1923 In Chicago, II. to 
Walter and Anna (Schultz) Maiu. Mr. Manz was 
employed for over 20 years with the Slccpcck Printing 
Company in Ucllwood and had been a member of the 
Chicago Graphics Union Local 45B of Chicago, IL a 
member of the I loly Name of lesus Catholic Church In 
Wllmot, Wl and was a Veteran ofW.W. II having served 
with the U.S. Marines. 

Survivors include his wife Lorraine !•'. nee Charvat 
Man/, or Trevor, Wl wldi whom he was united with in 
marriage on April 8, 1944; 2 sons, Robert Manx of Us 
Vegas, NV and Paul (Peg) Manz of Wauconda, IL; 1 
daughter, Frances "Fran" (Warren) Mroz of Lake 
Villa ,11,; 3 grandchildren, Lesley Mroz and jarcd M roz of 
Lake Villa, IL and Li.ta Manz of Wauconda, IL 

Friends of the family called from 5-9pm on Monday, 
May 22, 1995 at the K.K. Mamsher Funeral Home, 12 N. 
Plstakce Like Rd., Fox Ukc, (The Chapel On The Ukc). 
Funcnil services were conducted at 10:00am Tuesday. 
Rev. Father Eugene IaiIz ofTiclatcd. Burial followed in 
the Holy Name of lesus Cemetery, Wilrnot, Wl. 
Memorials would be appreciated to the Wauconda Fire 
Department / Rescue Squad. 109 W Liberty, Wauconda, 
IL fiQOlH. For additional Information call (708)987- 

Joseph C. Parfitt, 

Age 93, of Antlnch, IL passed away Tuesday, May 18, 
1995 at Victory Lakes Continuing Care Center, 
Undcnhtirsl, 11. He was born June 5, 190] in Sheffield, 
England the son of the late Joseph and Mary Ann 
(Cooper) ParflU. He came to Chicago in 1921 and has 
lived in Ant loch since 1947. He was a member of the 
United Methodist Church of Antloch. He was also a 
memher and past master of the Scquoit Masonic 
1-ndge #827 AF & AM, member and past patron of lire 
O.L.S Antloch Chapter #428, the BBS Civic Club and 
the Northern Illinois Grand Lecturers Association. Mr. 
Parfitt retired in 196G after 22 years of service for ILF. 
Goodrich Company of Akron. Ohio. On July 4, 1925 he 
married Hazel M. Bond in Forest Park. IL and she pre- 
ceded him In death on April 14. 1991, 

Survivors include 1 brother, Kenneth (Doris) Parfili 
of Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2 nephews. James 
(Theresa) Jones of Round Ukc Beach, IL and ILK 
(Barbara) Jacobus of Foley, Alabama and 1 niece, Caml 
(Doug) Morton of Centcrville, Virginia. He was also 
preceded In death by 1 brother Allan Parfitt In 1953. 

Funeral services were held on Saturday. May 20, 
1995 at United Methodist Church. Antloch. IL Pastor 
Kurt Gamlln officiated. Interment was private. 
Arrangements were handled by Die Strang Funeral 
I lome. 1055 Main St. (Rt 83). Antloch. In lieu of flowers, 
those desiring may make contributions to the Scquoit 
Masonic Lodge 0827, Antloch, IL 60002 or the 
American Cancer Society In his memory. 

Genevieve II. Fedyn, 

Age 81, of Antloch, formerly of Chicago, passed away 
Friday, May 19, 1995 at her home. She was born April 2, 
1914 In Chicago, the daughter of the late Joseph and 
Helen (Walaszczyk) Zurck. She moved to Antloch In 
1994, Mrs. Fedyn was a member of St. Peter Church of 
Antloch and the Polish National Alllanco, On November 
30, 1940 she married I^opold Fedyn in Chicago and he 
preceded her In death on November 3, 1987. 

Survivors Include 1 sister, Kvclyn /Jontck of Antloch; 
1 nephew, Robert (Shirley) Zlontek of Antloch and 1 
. niece, Thcrcsc (John) Kaspcrskl of Lindenhtirst. IL She 
was the great aunt of 6. 

Funeral services with Mass of Christian flurlal was 
held on Monday, May 22, 1995 at St. Peter Church, 
Antloch, IL Interment was at St. Adalbert Cemetery, 
NUcs, IL Those desiring may make contributions to 
Star Hospice in her memory. Strang Funeral Home. 
Antloch, was In charge of arrangements. 

Peter Jackson 

Age 48, of Waukcgan, IL and formerly of Lake 
Forest, IL, passed oway on Sunday, May 21 , 1995 at his 
home In Waukcgan. Mr. Jackson was born on May 1G, 
1947 In Chicago to John IL lackson and Margaret 

! (Mario) Cameron Jackson Glrton. 

Survivors Include 1 sister, Lorl Flalley of 
Minnetonka, MN; 3 nieces, Brooke Flatlcy Hear of 

iMlhncapolU^ MN, Allison Flatlcy Cleary of Falls 
Church, VA and Leslie Flatlcy of Minneapolis, MN. He 

'was preceded In death by his parents. 

. 1 Graveside services and Interment were held on 

.Thursday, May 25, 1995 at Glen Cemetery, Paxton, IL 
Lamb Funeral Home, 303 N. Church St, Gibson City, 
IL handled the arrangements. Rev. Harry Fiwood offi- 
ciated. A memorial service will be held at t:00pm on 
Friday, May 2G\ 1995 at the Marsh Funeral Home, 1521 
Washington St., Waukcgan, IL with visitation from 12- 
1:00pm at the Marsh Funeral Home.' 



Kenneth R. Liebert, 

Age 47, of Llndcnhurst, IL passed away Wednesday, 
May 17, 1995 at the Libcrtyvlllc Manor FJttendcd Care 
Facility, Libcrtyvlllc, IL after a lengthy Illness. He was 
born In Chicago, IL on October 10, 1947. He lived in 
the Lake Villa - Llndcnhurst area all of his life. He was 
a member of St. Mark Lutheran Church In 
Llndcnhurst, IL He was a veteran of the Vietnam War 
having served In the U.S. Army. He was employed by 
Motorola Corporation. He was active In coaching 
with die Llndcnhurst Soccer League and the Youth 
Icclcss Hockey Association. 

He is survived by his wife, Patricia, nee Page; his 
children Lance, 1-ric and Dylan. Also surviving Is his 
father, Albert of Lake Villa and his broiher, Al. He was 
preceded In death by his mother Frieda and his sister 
Martha. 

Funeral services were held on Saturday, May 20, 
1995 al the Rlnga Funeral Home, 122 S, Milwaukee 
Ave., (Rt. B3), Lake Villa, IL Rev. Roger Pcttman, 
Pastor of St. Mark Lutheran Church, officiated. . 
Interment was in Warren Cemetery, Gurncc, IL 

Evelyn P. Freund, 

Age B2, or Ukc Villa, II. passed away Saturday, May 
20, 1995 at the Ukc Bluff Health Care Centre, Ukc 
Rluff, IL She was born February 19, 1913 In Spring 
Grove, II. the daughter of the late John and Theresa 
Huff Clark. She and her husband had farmed In the 
Antloch and Inglesldc area for several years She was a 
member of St. Peter Church of Antloch and past 
President and Poem Reader for (he council of Catholic 
Women of Si Peter Church. She was honored as the 
Woman of d)c Year for the ACCUM Catholic Women, 
l-vclyn was a very active member of the Choir of Sl 
Peter Church and also played Mrs. Santa Oaus for 
many years. She was a member of the A.A.H.P and 
Senior Citizens, the forevcrver young club and the 
American Legion Auxiliary of Antloch. She was a for- 
mer conk at SL Peter Rectory and worked at the Frostcc 
Foam Co. In Antloch for many years. On September*), 
1913 she married Peter P. Freund In Hound Ukc, IL and 
he preceded her In death on August 17. 1965. 

Survivors Inlcudc I son, Henno M. (Mary) Freund of 
Jngleside, IL 2 daughlcrs, Patricia Kerr of Waukcgan, IL 
and Elizabeth (Robert) Price of Omaha, NL\- 1 sister 
Unna Slough of Waukcgan, IL Site was the grand- 
mother of 23 and (he great grandmother of 11. Beside 
her husband she was preceded In death by 2 daughters, 
Marlene Peters and Marie Rlanklcy and an Infant son 
lacklc and by 9 brothers and sisters. 

Funeral services will) Mass of Christian Burial was 
held on Wednesday, May 24, 1995 at St. Peter Church, 
557 Ukc St,, Antloch. Interment was in St. Joseph 
Cemetery, Round Ukc, IL following committal prayers 
at Ascension Cemetery, Ubcrtyvillc, IL Arrangements 
were handled by the Strang Funcnil Home, Antloch. 



Pauline Thieme, 

Age 84, or Fox Ukc, IL, passed away Sunday, May 
21, 1995 at Victory Ukcs Continuing Care Center, 
Llndcnhurst, IL She was born June 27. 1910 In 
Thurnau, Germany coming to the U.S. In 1928 to the 
Chicago area. She lived In Park Ridge, IL before moving 
to Leisure Village, Fox Uke, IL In 1972. She was a mem- 
ber of the Companion Shepherd Dog Club and the 
A-A.R.R She was a farmer member of the Wcstwood 
Evcngcllcal Lutheran Church of Elmwood Park, IL 

Survivors Inlcudc 1 daughter, Wilma (Milton) Kosar 
of Antloch, IL 1 brother August Walter and 1 sister 
Grctho Klostcr both or Germany; 2 grandchildren 
Jeffrey Scott Dyson of Ukc Shasta, CA and Taml 
(David) Gregg of Stoughton, WI. She was the great 
grandmother of 6. She was preceded In death by her 
first husband Max Thieme and her second husband 
Julius Thlcmc. She was also preceded In death by 6 
brothers and sisters. 

Funeral services were held on Wednesday, May 24, 
1995 at the Strang Funeral Home, 1055 Main SL, (Rt 
83), Antloch, IL Rev. Charles Miller of St. Stephen 
Lutheran Church of Antloch officiated. Interment was 
In Arlington Cemetery, FJmhurst, IL 



Donald R. Norton, Sr., 

. Age 58, of 14200 1 (orion Rd., Bristol, WI passed away 
Friday, May 19, 1995 at SL ljukc Hospital, Milwaukee, 
WI. A life long resident of Kenosha County he was bom 
November 8, 193G In Kenosha the son of Russell and 
Aurelia Kastcn Horton. Don was a farmer and operated 
with his family the I lorton Brothers Grain and Trucking 
Co. which has been In operation for three generations. 
He also had operated with his family the former ILC 
Horton and Sons Hay, Grain and I -red Co for many 
years and was a member of the Kenosha County Farm 
Bureau. Don was an avid deer hunter; played and 
coached Fast Pitch Sofball In Kenosha County and had 
served In the 32nd Division of the Wisconsin National 
Guard. On February 9, 1957 he married Patricia Schocn 
In Kenosha. 

Survivors Include his wife Patricia; 2 sons, Daniel 
and Dale of Bristol; 2 daughters, Cindy (Kevin) Maglnn 
and Debbie (Michael) dark both of Bristol; his parents 
Russell and Aurclla Horton of Bristol; 2 brothers, Lcroy 
(Rosemary) and Russell Jr. both of Bristol; 1 t liter, 
Bonita (Thomas) Bobula of Bristol. He was the grand- 
father of 6. 

Funeral services were held at 11:00am on Tuesday, 
May 23, 1995 at the Strang Funeral Home, 1055 Main 
SL, (RL B3). Antloch. IL Interment was in South Bristol 
Cemetery, Hwy 11, Bristol Twsp., Wl. 



DeatIh 





The Deadline for Obituaries 

and Death Notices is 5 p.m. 

on Tuesday 



HARVEY 

Marie L Harvey. 94, of 
Libcrtyvlllc. Arn 

McMurrough Chapel, 
Libcrtyvlllc. 
JAMES, SR. 

Norman E. James, Sr., 67, 
formerly of Antloch and 
Ukc Villa. Arn Private. 
JOHNSON 

Wallace John&on, 66, of 
Mundetcin. Am Krhtan 
Funeral Home, 

Mundetcin. 
KELLOGG . 
Clyde Kellogg, 80. former- 
ly of Ubcrtyvillc. Arn 
McMurrough Chapd, 
Ubcrtyvillc 
KRUECER 

IX- 1 ores I. Knieger, 56, of 
Hawthorn Woods. Am 
Stlrlen Piper Funeral 
Home. Harrington. 
MARTIN 

Violet Martin, 87. of 
Hawthorn Wnods. Am 
Krlstan Funeral Home, 
PC. M untitle in 
NOEL 

Richard I. Noel. 80. or 
Ubcrtyvillc. Am Burnett* 
Dane Funeral Hume, 
Ubcrtyvillc. 
O'BRIEN 

John L% O'Brien, 72, of 
Ubcrtyvillc. Am 

McMurrnuRh Ch*p«t, 
Ubcrtyvillc 
PARMALEB 

David W. Parmalcc. 60. of 
liland Ukc. Am 
Wauconda Funeral Hook-. 
Wauconda. 
SOBOWIC 

Barbara Sobowic. 98, of 
Harrington A r r. Ahlglim & 
Sons Funeral Home. 
Palatine, 
VOLTE 

Raymond Volte, 64, of 
Buffalo Grove. Am 
Glucckert Funeral Home, 
Arlington Heights. 



In 




Our freedom flourishes because many 
made the ultimate sacrifice 



As we solute the men and women of our 
armed forces on Memorial Day, wc must also 
take the time to say thank you to the following 
people and organizations who have decorated 
the graves of our deceased veterans - 



ffl w.l!5 

Litwin f& 

In loving memory of 

Walter Litwin, 

Veteran VS, Coast Guard, 

WW It, ttbo pasted mmmy 

September JO, 1994. 

Wc thank you, God, for tins 

gpodrnanubowisour 

husband, father, grandfatrw; 

broiher, uncle and friend. 

We pray for him with |oy. 

We ftaw Itmd turn 

during life ind will 

remember him after death. 

Loved and sadh/ missed. 

" Wife Jo, Dee, 
Donnette & Bill, 
also brothers 
jn & sisters ej 



American Legion 

Round Lake Post 01 170, Round Lake, IL 
Lake Region Post #703, Fox Lake, IL 

Avon Center Cemelery Association, 
Grays lake, IL 

m and all Owse who gave their time freely to honor so many. 



Justen's Round Lake Funeral Home 

222 N. Rosedalc Court 
Round Lake, IL 60073 

(708) 546-3300 

Mark L Jttstcn - Owner/Funeral Director 
Jeffrey E. Jordan • Manager/ 

Ftmeral Director 



i&,:\ 




If your family member's .'grave dues not have a flan from your cemetery, we will 

he happy to supjply you \yiih one free of charge. Please call us at the Ftilivraii 

Home to set up an appointmentTo pick up a JTIatf, -Monday thru i : ri(lav/9am-3mii 



•£»STR«H»aM£S»;t'3M»a»**S 




- ' - T ~ ■ — - _ — 3 








May 26, 1995 UbUwd NnwpApcK CLASSIFIED 




OBITUARIES £*^ d LEGAL NOTICES 



i 




FuneraI DiRECTORy 



JUSTEN'S ROUND LAKE 
FUNERAL HOME 

222 N. Rosedale Ct., Round Lake, IL 

(708) 546-3300 

Jeffrey Jordan, Manager/Director 

Mark Justen, Owner/Director 

GEORGE R.JUSTEN& 
SON FUNERAL HOME 

3519 W. Elm St, McHenry IL 

(815)385-2400 
Mark Justen, Owner/Director 

JUSTEN'S WONDER LAKE 
FUNERAL HOME 

761 1 Hancock Dr., Wonder Lake 

(815)728-0233 

Valerie Kessel, Manager/Director 

Mark Justen, Owner/Director 

RINGA FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave,, Lake Villa. IL 

(708)356-2146 

Robert J. Rlnga, Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St, Antioch, IL 

(708) 395-4000 
Dan Dugenske, Director 



Strang Funeral Chapel, Ltd, 

410 E. BtlVIDERE ROAD • CRAY5LAKE • 223-8122 

Whenyou are bereaved\the last thing 
you need is to worry about making the 
right decisions. That's where we can 
help. 

Our experts will efficiently guide you 
through the funeral process, advising 
you of costs and options the whole way 
through. And we make it our business to 
insure that your wishes are adhered to 
in every way. 

We believe that all the details that* 
make up a dignified service realty 
matter. But what matters most to us is 
your overall satisfaction. 

Call us...we care! 

Serving Cray-dike and Round Lake Since J 898 



It 



REMEMBER 

YOUR LOVED 

ONES WITH 

AN 

IN 
MEMORIUM. 

TO PLACE 
YOUR AD CALL 

(708) 223-8161 



Sometimes an 

old-fashioned 

*ong 

Bring us a 
thou&it of you; 

Sometimes a 

flower as we 

pass along, 

Oraskythatis 
blue; 



Or a silver 

luting in the 

clouds, 

When the sun is 
peeping 

through. 

All of these 

things, make us 

think of you. 



Griefnotes 

It is not possible to give an absolute answer to 
this question. Every individual reacts to loss a bit 
differently. We can expect Intense grief during the 
first few weeks after a loss. In the following three or 
four months our feelings of grief may be strong as 
we encounter many reminders of the death. After 
that we will begin doing new things for ourselves, 
yet continue to miss our loved one. We may become 
frustrated as we attempt to do things the deceased 
once did for us. As a second year without the 
deceased begins we may find our feelings of 
loneliness and sadness have lessened. As we 

How long does grief 
last? 

develop new relationships and do more things for 
ourselves our grief will diminish and we will be able 
to restore hope and happiness to our lives. Our 
grief, however, may never completely disappear as 
our memories linger. 

5G % tfamshtr 

JwumtMmt LuC 




U H. Pletake* Lake Rosd. Foi Lake. Illinois 
Ifc Cfuspttori tfit tafy' 

Serving Jbu Jlnytimt . . . Anywhere 

Phone: (708) 587-2100 • (815) 385-1001 



public Notice . 

Oavfn School Orthd *37 
eaaka computer companies 
to bkf ram cornputer tab. 
Please pick up spocBfca- 
Uoro al cteirtd effico: - 
2S77SW. Highway 1S4 
' tngtesicte.IL 60041 
Spaca can Mao be faxed 
by caflng 5*6-0338 Bt» wfl 
bo opened on Juna S O 
1000 AJUl 

OttKO-621-GfKi 
May 20. i»05 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
fan Lake Grada School 
Dtatrtct 114 la seeking bfcb 
(or contracted lood services 
for Ifw 1005-1096 schoel 
yaar. Qualfted parties ara 
requested to Wd ■ "coal per 



BW specification* ara 
available by contacting the 
Supsottencter* at 706-567- 
6275 or FAX 706-587-8296 . 
Ai bkJa rnual ba returned by 
a 00 AM on June 13, 1995 to 
the Forest Grade School, 
Fas Lake. Mnoto. 

05950620-Gen 
May 26. 1905 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Request a Notice ol Uan 
Sato be PuMahed on the fol- 
lowing Rated Unas. LIEN 
SALE WILL BE HELD: Date: 
6-22-95; Time; 1:00 pjn.; 
Location: Wauconda Set 
Storage. 500 Rand Road. 
Wauconda. L 60064. 

Una No. 245 • John 
Wtemam. P.O. Box 67791, 
Carol Stream, ft. aotaa 
Heuaehold * Mtec Mm 
Furretem.Ooae*. 

Ural No. 450 - Anthony 
Ferrarte, 360 Bnarwood Dr . 
Cryelaf Laea. t OOOM; 
Household A Utec »erm. 
C ta rie a . Toy. 

UnN No. 150 • Jim 
Comerford, 3506 Wrtota Hd, 
McHenry, B. 60050; 
Household A Misc. Rem*: 
Skte. Poles, Boot*. Records 

Una No. 026 • Denote 
Peetech. P.O. Box- 333. 
Wauconda. IL 60064; 
Household & Mbc Rems: 
Fumflure. Toob 

Unk No. 006 • Kennalh 
Hedges, 26725 N. Pheasant 
Trait. Wauconda, IL 60064; 
Household & Misc. Rema; 
Deak, Chair*. Shelving. 
Honda Generator. 

Ural No. 212 - Gary LUh. 
30360 Chtrdon, Gravstafce, 
IL 60030; Household A Utac. 
Iterrsu Circular Rack, Chair, 
Pad. 

Una No. 337 - Catherine 
Ftores, 500 E, Lakashore Dr.. 
Barrtogton. IL 60010; 
Household A Mrsc Roms: 
Moped, Dkl Bate. Work 
Bench. Automata* KI. 

UnR No. 446 • Carol 

Stanley. 720 Ltoerty St., 

Wauconda, IL 60064; 

Household & Mtsc Rem*: 

Christmas Tree. Fan*. Boxes. 

0595D-623-Gen 

May 26. 1995 

June 2. 1995 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

REQUEST FOR BIDS 

VBageotftmLake 

301 S. Route 59 

Fox Lake, Bant* 60020 

SeaW bids *rtl be receded to the of tot of the V.lago Clerk. 

301 S, Route 59. Fax Lake, tanota. 600SO urct tO^Oam on 

June MM, 199S tor. a 1»tt dump truck tor the Northwest 

Regional Factory Specffcaflon* may be picked up at: The 

VOtege of Fox Lake, Mark tha seated anvetope "Bid tor 1994 

Dump Truck". Btos a* be open on June 5, 1995 at 10:00 am 

m the councf chambers ot tho Fox Lake VMtege Hak. 

Tha right H reserved by the Vsteg* ol Fox Lake to rated any 
oralbid*. Susan J. MoNaay 

Vtiaga Clerk 

050SO-61643en 
May 26. 1995 



PUBLIC NOTICE - 
WANTED TO LEASE 
OFFICE SPACE TO THE 
STATE OF R.LMOIS 
The State of BBnokt artlctoete* the need to tease office apace 
to tha area of Lake VHa. LtotexursL Fax Lake, Gnysiake, or 
Round Lake. 

Tha State of fftoota desires to tease approxknately 4>XO0 
rentebte square test of modem office apace alared or bust lo 
tha State of Ssnot* apecftlcattone todudkig maintenance sec- 
vices wth perUng tor 22 varactea. The apace altered to rent 
must meet reaukemerxs of af appBrarea Ute Safety Codes. 
■note Accessbify Code, and Amsricens wth DtaabAltesActof 
1990. 

The space wtl be used as a ctowi direct service opanaion 
Any proposal nuS be accorrpanted by evidence of owner* 
shp or authorUation to f«pre»enl o w n e rs r a p. 

Detatsof recyarerrien ts and proposal opening ara contained 
h lha Proposal Form and Requkernent Package which can be 
obtained by wrung to ffw Depar tm ent of Cerfral Manegemanl 
Services, Real estate Ovtalon, 721 Sfraflon Office Butdkig. 
SprtngTialcL Knots, by June 12. 1995. making raterence to tha 
Request lor Proposal No. 5383. 

HQTE£Pmfo*&WSTb9mt)nmmiktmcoriKK*wm9* 
Prapoaaf Form and Requismenl Package and In ffw envatope 
that wtl be prevkfted In thts pacfcagB 

The State raee r va * the ngri to retect any end ai proposal*. 

05*5O-«22-LVAJ4/FL*3URL 
May 70 . 11 



Check the 

Classified 

Section 

Eacu 

Week 

. wjien 

Looking 

for a New 



Job! 



L 



AOVERTBEMENT FOR BOS 



2-M4 

tad 



or Na Aise we a e. Lake Court?. a*no*s 

I pnxiDuai for a n^f» iia*>ly 

i of weear* vetege praperty. 

; can be oOtaSied a*onc 

Vstega of Haeieevtat 

S3 w. BaMdate Road 

Hasrwsvtle. L 60O30 

AI btoders mid be Insured and bonded. 

Bids must be recewed at 63 W. BeMdera fid 

no later than Juna 13. 1995 ai i?00pm Bdoc*mno 

to be held on June 13. 1995 at 7 JO pm 

ki tha CouncR C t va n x j ei s . 

The Vtiaga has the dg« to retect any or aft tad*. 

Deborah J. LRU* 

Deputy VStoga Clark 

Wage of Haksaewtai 

05050616-Gen 
May 26, 1995 
June 2. 199S 
June 9. 1995 



LEGAL NOTICE 
PUBLICATION IS EASY AND 
CONVENIENT IN LAKELAND 

NEWSPAPERS 

ubfic bodies, attorneys, businesses and pri- 
vate citizens lo use the publications of 
Lakeland Newspapers for convenient, effi- 
cient and economical publication required 
for Legal Notice by the State of Illinois 
statutes. 

Legal notices may be placed in person at 
our centratry located business office, 30 S. 
Whitney St.. Grayslake. 60030, or sent by 
mail or FAX, 708-223-8810. The telephone 
number is 708-223-8161, 
The 13 community newspaper publications 
of Lakeland Newspapers meet all the statu- 
tory requirements for Legal Notice in Lake 
County, 111. Our rates are economical and 
our deadline is the latest in Lake County. 
We regularly provide publication service 
under the tightest time restrictions. 
The Lakeland staff is experienced in the 
unique requirements for Public Notice. We 
are ready to assist you with your questions 
and all your Public Notice needs. For ques 
lions and rate information, please call 
Brenda Conner at (708) 223-8161 . ext. 128. 
Let us serve you with Legal Notice publica- 
tion. Thank you. 

The Publisher 
Lakeland Newspapers 



\ 



N 



J 

\ 




H CLASSIFIED UkilAfd NiwsnApcRS Ma* 26, 1999. 



CLASSIFIED 
GUIDE 

WM$%£%^%$Wf' ■■■■■■■ 

NOUNCEMENTS 



Notices r „.; 

lost A Found 1 — 

I iVV iiiiilitiinlitiitimriHtHti 
PCfSOfDUS •eweeaeeee.fet*! 

nUulutlV... 

[Justness Pcnoails 
Financial .—...., 



"■> ■ ■ K.^.m.i r>*Hiiii|i 

• ■•■M'MOtWM • »■ ♦«•*•■««»» «•»»•• im'liil 

............................... 



EMpioyMENT 



....no 

-„.I20 

...125 

.-.130 

...135 

140 



Ildp Wanted Put Time.. 

I Idp Wanted FuUTlme 

Employment Agenda .,„... 
Business Opportunities ..... 
SluiUons Wasted ....„„„„ 

Child Ore... — . 

School/1 nitmcUon I 

■2 



PH M+T***»»* »' 



....219 

220 

._.221 
.„.225 
.„.228 

240 

....250 



MarI<et Guide 



Antiques .„„.„„..„„„....„,..„„ .„„ 

ApplUnCCS IIWHWIIWW Mill III IH»W III MBlMMMIlTl 

Barter/Trade _.„ ..._.....„,,._.._ 

Biturc£ rafts ,.._.._.._ 

BUldingMiiolxli.— — ;* 

l!u\lncsVOfTice Equipment „ „...„„_ 

KJcctr onl oAVmpu icn . . . . -.._......„„.. 

Farm Guide . 

firewood..... ■■.■.. ■ „ .».. -_ 

G arMf/RiuTiTURr Soles 

Good Things to EA«»Mwn«Ui»<Ma 

Horses A Tindi,.;.^.!!, ■■■-.! !■■ ...:,~~.mi~i*m,~ r 

Household Goods/Funs aire. 

brwn/Girdeu - —.* 

Mlricriliwous ......... ... ........... »»„».... 

Medical Equip/Supplies . 

Musical Instruments _.. . ._ 

IVts & Supplle* ...,«»»».M»«. K ...«»«....n.w«_» 

Restiuranl Equipment » ................. 

Tools A Machinery - — 

Wanted To Buy..™—- „ ~ 

ReaI Estate 



..................... 



liomes For Sale 

Homes For Kenl. .......... . 

Homes Tantrd...„_ w „„..„ 

Homes BUlden 

Coreio/To*ti Homes ..„™.„ 

Mobile Homes ...... 

Apartment* For Rent ..„„.„„. 

Apartment! Wanted . 

Apvlloma To Share 

kooms Fot Rent.——™-.., 
Rundingf ....«...Tr,....«. ..-.-.. 
Business Property For Sale- 
Business Property For Renl. 
Inv»unenl Property. 

Mortgage Services... , 

Farms ..!».•.««>.»<..—_•»..» 

Vacant Lcrts/AGrtajce 

Resorts/Vacation Rentals 

Out of Area Property _, 

Cemrtcry Lob — «'_— — 

Real tiiale Wanted. 

Real Estale* Mist 



,...*..,»..---■.. 



ReCREAtiONAl 



....301 

..-.km 

....308 
....310 
..-314 
._31B 
.„.320 
...J24 
....328 
.-330 
-.334 
-338 
1-.340 
....344 
...348 
-350 
-354 
-358 
-360 
...364 
-368 
-.370 



....500 
...504 
...508 
-.510 
...514 
..-518 
-520 
.-524 
.-.528 
..-.530 

—534 

-.538 
..-540 
.-544 
....548 
.-.560 

. ... jOti 

568 

..-.570 

S74 

—578 



Rflcresflonal Vehicles. 

Soowrnobflc/ATV's 

llojUVMoV)rVLlc 

Camping .— — 

TriwVacaUoo ..„— . 
Sports Equipment ...... 

Airplanes .„—...-.-„ 



.704 
.708 
.710 
..714 
-.718 
-.720 
.724 



Transportation 



Can For Salt — 

Rental/Leases ....... 

dasslc/Arilque Can....... 

Sertce & Parts 

Car Loins/Insurance.. .. .. 

Vans 

Four Wheel Drtwyjeepi . 
Trucks/Trailen ..-.,.-.— 
Heavy Equipment ►,.—- 
Mo*orryd«...... ........ . 

Wanted To Buy... — -...„ 



-804 
.808 
.810 
...814 
...8K8 
„.B24 
-.828 
-834 
...838 
.844 
...848 






Service Di rectory 

Appliartces Repair .„„- — . . ._.—».—., 

Pt M IOCTS ... .......... ».,.,......,, — . ........ ....... ...—...— .....■■■.....-..- 

<!ijp<HTj coning. ...................................... ................... 

ConcR'toAjCfDcnt .„.„.,..._ 

L^unition/lnjtnjction ............ .. „.„_.„„„..„ 

flettrtal — 

FucwdOd ,.4........ „,.,..♦ 

I jfTl fTyf llin ■#•*##***•****• HtHMIH.HIIMMl4tHH»lftH 

lleaayAlrCooAuontof 

UBUBjCKWPK bfHI<«n»IHni*lH)4tlllHltlHHlltlUtttMn*H)intt|HtM»*l 

■ Laundry^ ~*»rrg. . 

Legal Set — .— 

Medical Servu s «.,-._— 
Moving/Storage .—„„.,.. 

lbtint)rajp/l)econ!trix.- „ 

PanLegal/Typtnji Serrkcs . 
Plurnblnp,. ........................ 

Pools - — 

Pressure Wasbi ng....... ... .... 

Professional Service 

rtadlo/tV Repair. 

. KdlKKJPJin^ * *. ...„.,,.,,..,. — , .... 

KQlLfllivS >itHMf»iip.BWt»rtwi«ntHiH***"""**ww*wwwH niy i w y nMW (i 

Kcttfinftfttdiug... , ■ «-—*•** 

fcinri^f,, ,., '■ 

J 12 &t"IrT0P...»..t.. ,...,1 - 

I rors/ruiiis >> >w » ii n «i»***«pfMt ' i» n« i " ' >' i " '*i nmi iii n ii» 

Wfflflillr iiiinirTiiiTi ^^— J .>.— »m.^.«m. . ^^^.^.„ 

Mi5Ciiluicous Sonlccs ,... : ■■- 



■ JIIM >■**■■■«' 



«r"f.** 



S03 

906 

six 

....515 
518 

Z524 
.__S27 

. , — Jj4J 

.533 

,„..S36 
.-S39 

Jnl* 

—S45 

-.548 
-.551 
, — 554 
-S57 

^.560 

563 

S66 

...-.569 

S72 

S75 

......578 

........ 0» I 

, .,bwl 

37' 

- J/U 

—..993 

-if] 

.— -J99 



disTRiburioN 



Kcnoitlin 

Cotintv 




Metro 
— ^Milwaukee 
RR 



«*uwk<'«)unty 



Lakeland Newspapers Classifieds Appear in J 3 Newspapers! 

Anliocii News-Reporter • Round Lake News • Lake Zurich Enterprise • 

Lake Villa Record • Mundclein News • Warren-Newport Press • 

Grayslake Times • Fox Lake Press • Gurncc Press • Lindcnliurst News • 

Vernon Hills News • \Pauconda Leader • LJbertyvllle News 



HOW TO PLACE A ClASSiHED AD 



@ 



BY 
PHONE ... 



Call (708) 223-8161 




n v Ukeland Newspaper i 

u ' P.O. Box 260 

MAIL ... Crayibkc, IL 60030 

IN 30 S. Whitney St., 

PERSON ... Grayslake 



«-»j BY FAX... (708)223-8810 



DEADLINES 

Direct Line .....Tucs. 5 pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party ..Wed. 10 am 

HOURS 

8 am - 8 pm Mon.-Thurs 

8 am - 6 pm Friday 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



gj pffl f M 




v,-. 



. . .-i»rt t^i^MIIHHHIBVMMilHBMMMHWalK 



$ 



110 


Oobca 



120 


Free 



125 



Pcruwals 



110 


Notices 



110 


Noicrs 



Congratualtfons 

James Randal Cove 

ACJiS Class of 1995 

~We are so very proud ofyoulll 

Cove. 
Mom. Mike and Michael 





A BEAUTIFUL CHAPEL 
WEDDINQ In th« Smoky 

Mour,n,ni rjjtt.nburo't L'"'« 
LOO Chtp«l Chjrrnlnj. ruitic. 

Qordtri U»ttont\ P«rfc. A 
dr«*m weddmg la fit youf 
bwdg.i, t-BOO-554.!45t. 



Wr. DO NOT KHOWIHOLY 
ACCEPT AOS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 
FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 
UMN. For mor* trtomution. 
ploasfl conUa tf« llumarw 
Society. 



w 
199S(L*u*vd 



D 



125 


Pmneuli 



(fli ifl) t$ (8s i© (Ji ($) tfl) i© (Js i8j i© (J) iji (© tfi) C? C" © (fl) (© 

| Happy 23rd Birthday % 

% n^CME BEAR .gf S 








May Uic luck 

of the Irish bring 

you time outs. 

straitjackcts, mills and beer 





Love, ^^ § 

Door Knob^ 





(Q) (0) <Q) !0I (01 10> (r$ 0) (0i t$ (Q) 0) ($ (0) iQ) (0 (Qi (Qi t$i t$ !0 

WrlERE TO WORSriip 



REFORMED 

IWewc inkle Sludy Gfimp lhat tetkt ta hooof Chrirt In out lOtdy of (he 
I WordoTOod. Wc art icciiii| othen wtu wvM to jotn ui for ktwui Mody 
lof Gud'i Word and warm Gviitun frtkiwthlp. We mrct each l«d'i I>i> 
Jc% cr irif 6.<D p m at 5rKpi)tnJ of the LaLea Lutheran CliuKh. 3U I; 
I WaUun; too Avt , GriyilaLc, tL Quit »th of Rt. S)). h* marc tnfunm- 
Itwn call (70S) MR-7123. Wt hold t6 the hUturk rcformol tundud* 



ATTEKTtOti 
CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 
II you hcvr |>i*rii tlu»*irv<! 
• ilrfftiBdH wtth the t«kr 
lajul N«-w*r>aprrB you may 
rrrfhre a im»lr »<1iii< aUU 
inriii from >iKM)w-r firm re 
fjurninK paymrnt (or UlU 
whrrlktitif, Tn rrcrtve prop 
rr rretlit to your «rrounl 
■u |u)niini!» lor youT Lake 
Unci Nc»»p«prr» advertutnc 
itiual Itr mmtle a* invul/ni 
»ik! dlirrtrd to: 

LakcJaft4 rtcvijxr*" 

l«0 l*i]U 

30S.Wtiltfl«yM. 

OraymUU, IL eooao-oatUl 



115 



Lui&Fotmd 



N0TJCE JO ADVERTISERS 

Plrtiao chock your «d on n» FIRST Insertion date. In the 
ovent.ol an error or omission, wo will be responsible lor 
ONLY the FIRST incorrect insertion. The newspaper will be 
responsible lor only the portion of the ad thai is in error. 
Please notify the Classified Department in the event of an 
error within 1 week of run date. CANCELLATIONS must be 
made prior to 3 p.m. on the Tuesday beforo publication. 

Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to property clas- 
sify si advertising,' edct or delete any objeolionabta wording, 
or, reject any advertisement for credit or policy reasons, 

All Help Wanted advertising is published undor unified 
headings. LakeUnd Newspapers does not knowmgfy accept 
help wanted advertising that In any way violates tho Human 
RighHAcL 

Payment in Advance is jRequired for These Ads: 

•Advertisers out of Lakeland circulation a/ea 

•Business Opportunities •Mob>)o Homes •Situations Wanted 

•Debt Disclaimers •Qarago and Moving Sales 

Tourtd and Giveaway Ads am FREE, 

No pals wjfV be consrdered for gnreaway. 

WE ACCEPT: CSD^S 



10ST/ GRAY AND orange 
cocfcJdJeL Round Lake Beach 
ares lost, may 2tst. Call Dawn 
(706) 740-7636. 

FOUND JACKET IN Central 
Park In Grayslake. Must de- 
scribe color, kind arid sLra. 
Found over 3/woeks ago. Call 
or leavo rrarssago lor Laura or 
Aaron (706) 223-2430. 

FOUND SET OF KEYS, 
Ralph Florist, In Fox Lake 
slore, mother* day weekend. 
Call to Wontrry. (700) 
5e7-*244. 

TENT FOUNO ON May Bth 
In Coltogo Tral Subdrvfclon. 
Call (708) 54&-13P7 atlor 



■MARTHA JEAN, YOU wO 
arwsys be irw aunohlne of my 
Ms. Happy Omday loday, ir 

A DADY TQ> CMEflttH. 

W«1rs a down to earth profes- 
sional couple btomsod wt h lov- 
ing famines, tentnc trieods, 
satisfying career* and a fufa> 
aig He together. A baby would 
make our lie complete. Can 
we wetcom* your baby tiso 
our nurturing household? 
We'd love to tasVfl Call Cathy 
and Maurice (708) B4»-e7iB 
(oottfrd) 

ADOPTION A LOVINO 
a+OICI _ li would be m dream 
come true to open our home 
lo your precious chBd, We 
ofler a Uetsne ot kwe. stabUy, 
security and tamty vskies. Ws 
sympalhtoe with your orrhcu* 
decision and welcome the 
chance lotak wthyou. Please 
cal Dob & Nancy i-aoo-ft?6- 
7070. 

ADOPTION A LOVINO 
CHOiCfL Wann, caring Ian* 
ly of three war* to adopt a 
baby. Accoutiar* Dad, stay at 
home Mom and en adopted 
big brother wart lo gfve your 
chid an The love, security and 
happiness N deserves white 
you he*) us complete our (ami- 
ty. Cal cotted Ait A Sandy 
(708) 223-7269. 

LOtS I UET you Sunday at 
Lamb's Fsrm Music F on I 
would Ike to see you again 
CaJ me Ron (815) 430-6856. 

WOOF, WOOF, n* PATCH- 
ES. I would love lo piay wth a 
baby brother or sister. My par- 
ents. Brad and Ginger, who 
are 33 and 30, are unable lo 
have cbiWren. They are a lov- 
ing. Inardalry secure, educat- 
ed couple, who love me, but 
also want lo share the love In 
Ihelr hearts with your chid 
Help our dream ot a, family 
come Irue through ADOP- 
TION. Call my pamrts tt t- 
800-5RAT7LE 0-600-572- 
68S3), or their attorney. Gton- 
na, al 1-800-24 1 -S384. Ex- 
pense* paid. 



ADOPTION. Lev*. Aftectlen. 
Pretecde*. Security, Oppo* 
turhy. Levshiar. ' le-vtftg 
trftanoaSy at cum couete 
p-f,<r. ««i thi» *nd nwre, Fi*- 
time Mem. legal, Ce«W»n- 
t.»i. tr»«nt«« I- 1 1 

JetwSutie I00O-SOIS3SO 

OHM ADOPTION gt»« my 
sen tha vary beat atari In fife, 
I CHOSE r»i p*'««t«. II 
you're prvgnanl. unaur* wtvat 
la do c*> Mary, nonprol.t 
C.nt.f boobijowm 



130 



Anctkaas 



COLLECTABLE 
FIREARMS AUCTION 



OVER 2000 LOTS 



0»ete3»ws at *ewi 
ArSo«> A StelM 

OwSOrWaMin 
ftjAro 0t«U B «n*m Cunt 

o«»aCtaa 

ra*e*M Uartaf to Cot ffaej AeW 

«Bass\ D*s i r*3m Krt^ W*as 

■Uatary Arias 

WvSasa t yadars A sssa a *aa 

•Otgnal Cot Doo***** 



June 4th, 5th & 6th 



era at) be eaM a eSS Sat. 
Arm >d noon lo Ism A 
r*r , Arm «?> *-j-> 
. to am to* pit 

AuraonCcmnenosi Suv. 4 ta 
Use ,41*** *304js 

sttarHesstrtnn 

Cu»*ra.r, Cm-t* 

exar^Sf.UAr-.i. 



135 



Buaoni frnomLl 



I 



I 

V 
P 

I 

* 

: 

: 

J 



3 t 






TO ORDER AFUUCOlOfl' 

CAIAIOC OR FOR MORI IHf 0. 

CALll-eOO-238-8022 




Hunasai ot BeaejM R**s ** 

tftt^Mn auA as |a»s»**jsj 

STtaca*. MarkiL Partar. Savna, 

m Ueasw. Fa***ja*«, CuC 

OmAtt Ostr, frarxra Utrtxtm 

H1R.LC Sne\Lsiavar. 

Uoaaoafs. Pajoe Oawam. 

Waaeaner isi ■*** . 




flock Island 
Auction Company 

10SO 36th Avenue 
Mollne. Illinois 612C3 



SJIU 5,4 LOTTO 

FACTSSS. You ooukj be s 
winner loo Itave the lad*. 
On* year* prior winning 
numbers, ptus stats on how to 
pic* tbe neud winner*. Send 
S3.00 checs^rtoney order to: 
SOUND DECISIONS. P.O. 
BOX 6115, LINDEN- 
HURST, ILL. 60046. 




frrmr 



EiaiailMHIHiB 



SERVE EVERYONE 



• 



-^ 






M*y26 r 199y LakUNd Nnvspapcw CLASSIFIED 



I 




-i** 






aaaa* M 



219 



tWpTartcd 
Part-Time 



219 



lldpVmled 
Part-Time 



HOUSECLEANIHQ DAY- 
TIME, FULL/PART-TIME 
(706)487-1156. 

TAKE WEIGHT OFF FAST 

and own SSS bi lt» process. 

Cal (BOO) 42|-22t3, Of (708) 

487-2213. 



HOME TYPISTS 

PC iBcn needed 

[ 545,000 income potential. | 

CaU 1-^962-8000 

&LB4458 



SERVERS 

Part Time Weekends 

Starting at j&OQ/boor 

Call 

^ (708)438-00U rg 



RETAIL 
MERCHANDISER 

Ntrioail Jcwilry'Acceiaoriei 
Sendee compioy »«»t FT REP 
far the Game ire* Dvtia 
taclade teftore nertSanduiaf. 
lartttory control aad crJcnnr. 
Mcreh*.-.d:iir-( ctpehcacc J 
ptm. Plea* all our trice mil 
try Mir Mux. l-flOO-MS-JOW 

coJetm 



SEffGEf? 

Help make 

children's 

clothes 

Need Serger 

(708) 432-2452 



M MMM I 

) /'romiflwil Opunln* \ ', 
far Hmturm, 

Drp+ntlnbU, 
HrtpnnsibU 

Pmrum 

to teork in 

So-KUl Ktnnml 

Mon.-Frl. 

9*m-2pca 

Mutt liite animal* 

Please Coll 

: 81:Hf)9-M90 



4S»#tl M »t MMM » 



Iadministrattvtc 

CASHIER 

The Nortfarm BMouOmrf 
on Afcphoa— and Subatant* 
Abuac EMCASAi aeeka tBoa- 
r»!rd usimduaJ to cover 
aArrmoa and early eveninc 
hour* in our Wtufctpn 
offc*. MTTlir, UJOaa 
SOOpra. arW: fl:COpa» 
aOOpa and every other S*t 
ftXkm • l-SOpta. Mu»« be 
•bte to wt to CDOcexmtion 
**liocbcr* Custacorr ■ervtor 
attitude rnjuJrnl M*U» &cd 
trading aklBa nece*Muy. 
iwttr-<u*i a ptua. f*Ml tltne 
wvhbmrSt* Contact 

Laura Lajngley 
11 IS Greenwood Ave. 

WiHkefia. 1L 600S7 

(708) 244-4434 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



Experienced Server 
Days & Evenings 

Htfllcress 
Restaurant 

m 5. Ftand Rd. * Lata Zurich 
(JOB) 438-0180 



Food Service 
Opportunities 



Muat enjoy working In 
the kitchen! No experi- 
ence necessary. Flexible 
schedule, competitive 
wage tt benefits. . 

Call (70S) 395-8360 

Adc for Psal Tjunp or 
Tom Chmara 



BUS DRIVER 

I Storting June 26th J 
$9.00 per hour 
5 hours per day 

Contact 
Miss Holloway 

1(7031 244-00451 



ii iinllliilllliiumnliii >' 



OFFICE SUPPORT I 
POSITION 

AriiUble in emr Sorth brook | 
lib. Permanent, 15-20 bowi £ 
(fWtiMe) Duties Isdt4c| 
diu entry, ouilia^t. onkr 
procesaiaf tad lir&t men- 
bt y. CaD Sue. 

.(70S) 205-0113 

toe. 



SERVICE REP 

I Part time earning ol W 
Ipcrhrxir.Orrr to day- 
Jilme hours per week 
scrvfclnjt * i^reeting 
Icsrd depL In (he Round 
[Lake Ilcach area. 

Strut resume with 

phone number. 

SS number and 

this ad to: 

P.O. Box 410 
TavtorvUJe.IL 62568 



DOCK 
WORKERS 

Part Time 

. 912.00/Hour 

CCX Coo -Way Central Hqxraa 

tun openlt^t for Dock *Uim 
•t Its MundchUn UrnUnaL 
Mm! huw Oexlberfy to tun 
late *ftrrni««ii/ntrimfi 

Appbcanu must be at loast IB 
year* of aav and tie able to 
p**a a dmi acreeiv rmtft 
han&r* and farkfeft txpcfl 
enrc preferred 

tnlereatnt tadftrkluala MUST 
AJTI.Y IN PtKSOS between 9 
AMMIK brforc JUNE Ut 
at 

CCX CON-WAY 

CENTRAL EXPRESS 

957 Tower Road 

Muudeleln. IL 60060 

NO PHONE CALLS 

CCXu onrotai' 
oppcrtufltOy mplovtr 



RETAIL INVENTORY 

Thai yssr-rotnd psft time position off era p*d UStfincj, 

llejubte hotxs and $6,25 per hour to start. Immndajta 

work lYsUble day ss wait M EAV work tvmlable. 

For/o/ofmetfoncal/ 

(70S) 662*9277 



CLERICAL/RECEFnONlST 

Applicant ihould baw eareQent communlciUon ikilU 

type SOvt-pm. WordPerfect 6. 1 wul en)oy varied office duties. 

psxt itmc could become full time. 

PUau respond to: 

P.O. BOX 816 

Wauconda, IL 60084 



atBBiimffliniiHiiMmiminiinituinniinitinniuuttnuiiumruiniHitiiiiK 

PART TIME SUMMER § 

§GROUNDSKEEPINC HELP WAKTED| 

Monday through Friday hour*. ErnerieAoi a plus a 
§ ConUct Wwody WOUsrxw, Woodlsad School Dt»Uvt »'J>. | 
17370 W. C*4»s Lske R±, G*«ss Uke 

C708) 816-1531 1 

!iuimmimuiiiiiinfl«iuitM^^ 



BnlcndcrtStWaJtmi 

Apply In Person 

BLUE HERON 
CAFfc&BAR 

405W,NorlhwtitHw}. 
Barrtnctes 



■BBC15BBB13CCECBt5B 

i Sctrretary/Typlst S 

S for church In McHenryS 
r ares. 2 hours weekly, log 
Bhours per month. FleaseB 
t call between 9am • Noon. B 

| (708)497-3024 | 

BbbbbbbbbbbbbebB 



220 



lldpWffilni 
FnllTfrne 



ATTEifnon 

CLASSIFIED 
ADVERTISERS 

If you hawr plaeed eUanificd 
advcrUatnf trllb the Uke- 
land Ke«*patpeni you may 
rrcehre a misleading ilale 
meni frern another Drm rr 
i|uestln| payment for thta 
aoVerUatng. 7b receive prop- 
rr credit to your aecnunt. 
afl paytaenta for your L«)w 
btnd Ncwvpapcra athrrtlatnt 
mu»l be made aa Iftroleed 
■ndfSreeted ia 

takataaal rtoanpapara 

ro MINI 

M I. VWtMr s. 

OrayatoSa. n, oooso-oaot 



KELPI MtXPl HELP! I need 
poopto wt» spesJc Spenish* 
Chinese* Enoash* ftsltan* 
German or French, to he*p ex-, 
pend my business locety, ns> 
Itonslh; end Irserratlonsiy. 
Part-time $500*1 ,500mTOrh. 
Futt-tlme 12.000- 

Sd.OCXVmorith, Irom your of- 
noa or home. I wti trsri the 
rtc/4 people. This Is your 
chance, dom pass I up' Cei 
lor interview 000-606-343*. 

OIUVW - OS.OWTH. txysK- 

SI0N. OPPORTUNITY. ..FIND 
IT AT lUfiUHQTONI 

OTfU^nonKawt. horn* waahty 
I* fyjrtfmJ). etartk-vg par wp to 

a;<=.-~.w. »oo t*ir*+ 

llonfKMrfl U torn lottH V««« 
M. SuaiUMOTOtl MOTOft 

CASStfRS: i nco JCl>l tMC 
toe 

kwn*4>tM fuO Urn* p««*wt* 

».*.;. fo/ d-t.l m.th M 

tea. • I .' >v Sl«riin0 pay M*h 

tipiiH«i, nil karwani p»c»- 
«0«. 4-eav «werk wa«k. 
JoMnirud T'jnip-.ft lie , Dai 
>aojnaVtA STS-?g>0:6S. 

SAUS/MANAOtA TRAIMCE: 
NOW WftlWOI 2 FuS-tkna 
5»:«i, Manaoar. Tralnaaa. 
Outlaa: Cuitomar m*n/tt* and 
outaida »»W» on aitabtiihod 
iak< fault. Complata u»*v 
Ing • 1 1600.00 Far Month To 
Stan. Oualflcatfont; 21 ♦ 
w4tb ear. bondabla. amb»- 
tkoui. Cai Paftonnai Otftca 
1800 977 MOO »-7 E0E-. 

FFUEK0LY TOTS AND OITTS 
hti apaningi lor damonttta- 
tora in yov ana. Patt-tima 
hra, futtlma pay. »va* B00 
Kami. Catebrating our 40th 
annn-anary. Cal 1-900480- 
4875. 

HAR0LO ivis TRUCK1MO 
hinng drtvafa. Fraa dnvar 
Uam<ng II vou q ,t.\ t Stu* 
dantt vwakoma. Expananca 
pay up to 38 cant* par mite. 
EacaMnt bonafrta: 1 800- 
043 0863. 

DRIVERS 2 OWNtH OP1RA 
TORS Maka tha Slap Up to 
Vm ti.it With Foa M«rw«tt * 
No Eait/Wa«t Coait 'Horn* 

Weakly 'Eiceaant Canal ti 
80033322ta 

ATTENTION DRIVER TEAMS 
• 16.000 IN BONUS Paid 
monthly, quarterly & y a arty 
PLUS TOP MILEA0E PAY 
401 IK) Plan. *&O0 SIGN ON 
BONUS . Other paid benafrta. 
-Vacation -Health and Ufa * 
Dead Haad •Mat«Vta T ovar> 
Loaiang & Unloading. COVE- 
NANT TRANSPORT Sofca 
and Taama caS 1-80O441. 
4334 Student! and Drtving 
School Oradi. C*3 1-BOO- 
330 6428 



Home 

IplPROVCplEriT 

Sales 

Itip ji<IIM»H** i! « pj«d- 

I l«ttbj« *«p»«H£; ** *} I J*'Uj, 

i .ill t-iwt&^ii: 



220 



BelpVaated 

FuU-Ttoe 



CIsAUFfEUR 

I Full/Part Tom. WtH Trsia. | 
Muat be ZS years old sad 

I hare a food dririna; record. I 
Call (708) Sf9-0020 end 



HUMAN RESOURCE 

ASSISTANT 

FT-M-F 

OiOanng nonh auburtan bank 
hcaSng company aaaSs Bparv 
ahoad (iifeeiun 2 yean) HR. 
aaaartant aldsad St mtar. W atq. 
data aray. AVEEO ragUaSona, 
ADP payrol eyilern, tic 
CiClSant WarpaoKnaJ tMSi, 
aa* iSrter, acAa to work in a 
pmftmi a maajraraara. Plaaae 
aand isaume aAaasty rMory In 
conAdance to 

Director/ of 

Human Resources 

First Waukogan 

Corporation 

On* S. Genesee Street 

Wauksgan, IL 60035 



COOKSl 

Full Time 

Cooks for 
Dietaiy Dcpt 

Contact 
Vol Johnson 

Mount 
St. Joseph 

(708)438-5050' 



■ SCHEDULING 
COORDINATOR 



WAREHOUSE 
POSITI ONS 

aa — ■ > % aaAaat paS. 



r-^»". •• aa*t*U !■■■■. 
warni pm mm rf aai m. kr 

voaormx. un iit.aii 
prfw. c -— . n. aauL ru 
craai m-tot. v, r»__ c>aa 



220 


BelpWaateal 

FBU-Tltne 



220 



Help Wattled 
raO-TlBW 



220 



Help Wanted 
Foil-Time 



New Dirt 

MotortocM interior nuniifaaur 
a ku of«ela| tar penoe to 
dean baide of ajourboncs dur ■ 
n| bvildini sad »hca fiaitfaed 
Part time 12-3 M-P or Full Tone 
9-3. Benefit*. Apply n penoe. 

Liberty Coach 

1400 Morrow Ave. 

N. Chicago 
CLOSE TO BASE 









CUSTOMER SERVICE 

Eooer to two WM&ioi w«h upbeat r<fi enorgy 
. CutfofriefSorvico-GerwoloflSceiirfeComp^ 
144-0O16 

J _>uperior JbersonoeL 



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NOW 
HIRING 



hlr ptrjiit%ett 



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a 50 Positions 

a Starting up to $6Vtv. 

a Days/Nights 

* Fufl/Part Time 

* Weekends onr/ 
available t\ 
school's out 

AppiV 'n 
person 

5300 Grand Ave. 

Gumee 

Monday-Friday 

EO€ m* 



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* 



CUSTOMER SERVICE 

REPKESENTATrVE 

(Cashier) 

FUiftmeaJ arses. 

MlrnsbanatoaTaJde: 

■UetoJ 4 Lfl* raxi-oa 
■CducsSonaJ Ajsacancs Pncjrsrn 

•PadVK3ton&H*Sryi 
<ODeyRavte«r 

AMOCO 

, FOOD SHOP 

ORAYSUUCe 

J4J35 f* *S A WaanriMon 

LAKE ZURICH 

450 S Rand*: 

WHEELING 

ViZ. 5. Peine**! 

OUftttEI 

] 350 N Huni i CM) Rd 

jaasosQaaoiaSeaa 



3 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
TECHNICIANS 

MFS Telecom, Inc., an established Industry leader, 
provides high quality talecornrnon cations systems 
and services to business and govornrnent customers 
nationwide. We are expanding our Network 
Operations Control Center and are looking for quali- 
fied krvdrviduals to perlorm voice grade, DS1 and DS3 
remote testing; retrieve, interpret, and analyze alarms; 
act as a liaison between customers and operations, 
and perform other centrafced operational functions. 

Two to five years of telecommunications control cen- 
ter, technical operations, or related military experience 
and/or an AA/BA/BS in Telecommunications Is 
required. 

We offer a competitive compensation and benefits 
package. For consideration, please mafl your resume 
to: MFS Telecom, Inc., Dept. T605. One Tower Lane, 
Suite 1600, Oakbrook Terrace, IL 60181. Equal 
Opportunity Employer. V/e promote a smoke-tree, 
drug-free environment. ! 

MFS Telecom, Inc. 



■«««ta*t******s* 



com join a wimixG team: 

Lakeland Newspapers is experiencing rapid growth thanks to you! As a 
result of your support we have the following positions available: 

PART TIME MAIL ROOM 

Thursdays guaranteed, Mondays and Fridays on an on-call basis. 

DATA EVIKT/CLERICAL 

Excellent customer service and communication skills required. Full/pan 
time. Data entry experience preferred. 

lUECEVnnONl&tT 

Full or pan-time. Must be able to handle busy twitchboaud with multi- 
ple lines and various office duties. Candidate mast be pleasanL profes- 
sional and enjoy wording with the public. 

PHOTO SmtlSGERS 

Handle a variety of assignments. Must have a reliable car, camera equip- 
ment and be able to work under deadline situations. 

FART TLME STAFF IWOTOGRAPHER 

Applicant must have own equipment, reliable car and be able to work in 
deadline situations. Send resume, portfolio to Attn: Todd Heislcr, Photo 
Editor. 

NEWS CORR£SPOi^DEi\T^/SllUlVGERS 

Openings on our expanding editorial staff for news correspondents, 
stringers, business writers, and feature writers. Will handle a variety of 
assignments. Must have reliable car and be able to work under deadline 
situations. Contact: Rhonda Burke. 

REPORTER 

Experience preferred with background in photography helpful. Will han- 
dle a variety of assignments. Should be familiar with copy editing and lay- 
out. Must have reliable car and be able to work under deadline situations. 
For interview appointment contact: Rhonda Burke. Editor-in-Chief. 

CUEVT SERVICES 

Inside sales experience preferred, but willing to train right candidate. 
Hourly pay plus commissions. Work flexible day or evening hours. 

ADVERTISING SALES 

The candidate will be responsible for field sales calls, developing a key 
area in Lake County and must possess excellent skills in interpersonal 
communication, creativity and personal responsibility. The candidate 
must also be self-motivated and able to work with minimal amount of 
supervision, enjoy variety and be able to handle multiple tasks. An auto- 
mobile is necessary (gas compensation will be made). If you are profes- 
sional, energetic and possess all of the above characteristics we are inter- 
ested in talking to you. A candidate should have previous sales experi- 
ence. Please send resume to, or call Donna Jeanne Evans. 

Lakeland Newspapers offers a friendly, fast-paced, energetic, team ori- 
ented environment. If you enjoy variety in a challenging atmosphere, we 
want to talk to you! 

Please apply in person or send resume to appropriate person. 

Lakeland 



Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St 
Grayslake, IL 60030 



EOEM/F 



1 



wasp**-" 




CLASSIFIED UlaUwl Nt*s»ApfRv M*r 26, 1995 



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- 



I 







.„,.,......,. .. 

MINT 

VoSfotM/f&t/ , ris.>. ..,'■■■. 




220 



Help Wanted 
Foil-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fall-Time 



KoenernanrTs 

Sausage 

Company 

Full Time 

SALES CLERK 

for DELI 

Will train. Must bo ablo lo 
work wookonds 

Apply in Person 

27090 Vofo Village Rd. 

(2000 ft. E.ol U.S. 12) 

Volo, IL 
815-385-8260 



DIMarco's Restaurant 

Good aaJrudr, rrat appearance mil 
v-iILnpwt id wrkorij m-ed apply 

• Wai tresses/Walters 

• Bus Help 

Call Doom 9 708-395-^3 



GENERAL OFFICE 

Typing, Hing, mtc. gwsra) 
o*c* (Mm Sow: PC a*#a * 
plut Entry InvH con»<lr«<»d 
P*d modcal muanco. 6 ho*- 
day*. Laha BWI taction 

Caff Mr. WllUmm 

(70S) 295-3000 



RECEPTIONIST 

JENNY CRAIQ It looking lor 
•ntttuslattlc. trtondty ft depend' 
•bit pe-rtont to antwor phooat, 
acftedula appointmenta. racata) A 
•lock food/tuppbaa ft inventory 
con tret. 

W« od«ri oomp«mrva oompnnta- 
Hon package ft opportunity lor 
canaar advancement FOR POSI- 
TIONS IN THE OURNEE ft VER- 
NON HILLS CENTRES, PLEASE 
CALL 700/360-8745. and at* tor 
ROSE. EOE 

JENNY CRAIG 

Weight Loss Centres 



Admin. Assist/ 
Receptionist 
-Libcrtyvillc- 

Immcd FT permanent potition 
available Tor an oryimrrj. detail 
oriented individual w/feood intrr- 
pcrional tkitlt to join our team 
Eip. with MS Word for Windows 
pre fared. Vie offer i full benefit 
package. Plcaac tend reiume to: 

Vacita Const ruction, Inc. 

14045 Pctronclla Dr., M 

Libertyville. IL 60048 

Attn: Vicki Sfcrra 

or fax: 70B-9I 8-1054 

(No Phone Calls Please) 



Security 

Midwestern Regional 
Medical Center has the 
following opportunities for 

rrsjxiiisiblr Individual!! 

•SECURTTY* 

Convenience 

•1 1:30pm -Ram* 
•Other Shifts* 
IYcMous security experi- 
ence needed. 

COMPETITIVE WAGES! 

GREAT FLEXIBLE HOURS! 

GOOD BENEFITS! 

For consideration, please 
apply In person: Human 
Resources, 2501 Emmaus 
Street; Zton. IL 60099. coe 
m/f/d/v 

Midwestern 

Regional 

Medical Center 



Banking 

It's Teller Time 

At NBD in 

Lake Zurich 

NBDBanklnLakaZuncn 
hat Immediate opportuni- 
ty* available lor fnendty, 
dataji-oriented mdviduat* 

with haavy caih handling 
•■pen* nee 

As a Teler at ND0. you'l 
enjoy competitive wage*. 
aicolent bonaStt and a 
fnondty community bank- 
rig atmoapnere 

II it'i tune tor a now 
earner check ui out For 
onmbdiate contldari'.ion. 
please can our Human 
n*tourc*t Deoertnwtt at 

708-364-3330 



Bookkaeplng/GlBrical - FulMimo 

CTPA firm eeckt ununited. eclf-moUvatrd individual to handle a 
variety of ofnee and accountlnt: duttea Including payroll proer»»- 
Ina. central Vrdeer keypunching, word proCeaatnC. tailing and 
•r round receivable, EapexlenrTTn these arraa la required. Ileaae 
forward reiume* to. 

Personnel Department 
4193 Grove Ave. Gumee, IL 00031 




oov (T.'MV 



WOMEN & CHILDREN'S PROGRAM 

The Northern Illinois Council on Alcoholism and 
Substance Abuse operates an Intensive outpatient day 
substance abuse treatment program for women and their 
children in Waukegnn. North Chicago and Zlon areas. 
Till* earning program has the following employment 
opportunities available: 

SUBSTANCE ABUSE COUNSELOR 

Must be certified or certifiable In alcoholism and sub- 
stance abuse counseling with experience in women's 
Issues Including substance abuse, domestic violence and 
sexual abuse Issues. 30 hours per week with benefits. 

PART TIME OUTREACH WORKER 

Involve* transporting clients to and from site as well as 
conducting visits and transporting to appointments. 
Must be familiar with women** Issues and working with 
low-Income population substance abusers. 20 hours per 
week. 

Contact: 

Joann Jacobs 

(70S) 785-8660 



General Opportunitie* 

^COME 




r 4JH US 




Cola* Parmer, a worldwido distributor ol iclonliiic instruments, It moving to 
a now slotoof-lho-art facility In VERNON HILLS this July. Como look at the 
oppor I unities our growing company haj to ollor: 

DISTRIBUTION CENTER 

Enlry-lovol and supervisory positions 

MIS 

Tochmcal sorvlco, programming and lot odmlnlslrolivo positions. 

CUSTOMER SUPPORT/SALES 

Excollont phono skills and compvlor literacy required, 

TECHNICAL CUSTOMER SERVICE 

Uso your Natural Scionco undorgradualo dogreo ond knowledge 
ol laboratory equipment. 

ACCOUNTING 

A/P and A/R positions availablo. 

INTERNATIONAL 

Export, order coordination and customer service positions available, 

Wo offer full and part-time positions as wall as flexible schodules. and tho 
opportunity to work for on industry loader with an oxcollent salary and bonofils 
package. 

We invite you to stop by our facility in the CONTINENTAL 
EXECUTIVE PARK (just South of the intersections of Route 60 & 21) 
any weekday from 8am-4pm to complete art application. Please 
use the warehouse entrance, OR, you may send a resume 
(INDICATING POSITION OF INTEREST), with salary history to: : 

Colo-Parmer Instrument Company 
Human Resgjurces Department 
625 E. Bunker Court 
Vernon Hills, (L 60061 

An Equal Opportunity Employ ArVF 




Former 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fall-Time 



- 



220 



Help Wealed 
Fall-Time 



RECORDS 

DEPARTMENT 

CLERK 

Tor Norther a llllnoii Council on 
Mcoholiwn and Substance Abutc 
i MCASA) li Mr kins i Hrcordi Of rk 
for our Round Lake off-rr Hours art 
Tucvdty-Fridty 11 im - 7 pm and 
Stturdi) 7 am - *J:J0 pm. Skill* 
required Indude typing (40 wpm). 
• nrd prorrtilfii; (Multlrnite pre 
(erred) and filing. Thli poiition 
Inrobcj heavy client contact If you 
trr i team ptiycr » tS rood romniu- 
nJcalion akula, pkav contact: 

Anne Spirit 

NICASA 

31979 N. Fish Lake Road 
Round Lake, IL 60073 

(708) 546-6450 



Ratal 

•STORE ASSOCIATES* 
Full & Part Time 

CMcagotand'a laryawt rataeer o* 
f-yie wmee end ipmt n. aeetung 
eneryetc, cuttomer onented odt- 
viduala tor our Waukeoan kxMkx* 
lo pod cm a varM? of store lunc- 
tiona. Ou.il Sod peraona mutt be 
over 2t years ol age. able to Ift 
40-50 tot and able to work day 
and evening hours Previous nrtail 
experience preferred. 

We otter opportunity lor advarice- 
ment, sttractrva comoenaation 
and a complete bsneft 1 pacJkage. 
For conalderalion, please app*y m 
person art: 

GOLD STANDARD 

1501 N. Lewis 

Waukegan 

Equal Opportunrfy Employer 



ffi» 



=*s 



BURO 

KIN 



g Fox Lake 



& 



is now hiring cashiers and kilchon holp for both 

day and night shift. Starting pay up to $5.25 per 

hour. Full and port limo positions availablo. 

Apply at 20 S. Rt. 12 or call 
(708) 587-1414 after 2:00 p.m. 




If you are working 
more than 50 

hours a week for 

less than $600 

per week... 



You Can Do Better!! 
At Schwan's Ice Cream 

We offer a full benefits program and excellent 

opportunity for advancement. You must be at 

least 21 years old and havo a good driving 

record. Openings for the Northom Suburbs. 

NOW INTERVIEWING. 

For Appointment Call: 
1-800-336-7569 

An Equal Opporturvry Employ* M/F 




I How To 
Survive 
The Job 
Search 

By Nuncy Sukol 

Q: Dear .Search. 1 hive been wurkifli aa I aecrctary to a V-P of a 
im!l company for the put eleven yeara. My ulary it in lac hijh 
30' i with no befletli* eacept fur paid bolkiayi. My computer aiillt 
are limned to WordPerfect » Inch I taufhi mytelf when it Tint came 
out and my hou purchued our cumputo for the ulTite My lyplnf 
ipeed ti totnewbete in toe bifth 50 worn ranj;e, and I hive been (he 
right hand lo thii iilea profeaaional for to long and now be it mov. 
big out of itite. I cannot uproot my family and therefore I am aeca.- 
tag other employment. The Inurvtewt that I have been on have 
resulted in two otTcn of iccrctariil employment with very reputable 
corporation*, (nimea withheld). The problem ii my ulary. I am find- 
ing that both offered me a ulary of S26-SM.50') but I turned them 
both down due lo the tow wagca. lioth corporationa were turprited, 
they uiJ, ti my turning down the poailiona, but 1 need to hold out 
for more money which I am accuuooicd to. I don't feel I abouU ket- 
tle for leu. What u the going rate for a aecrctary with cloen yeara 
eapenrn; e wiih only WordPctfrct? Am I being unteaionaWe? What 
do you aufgctl? Thank you. J.K. • LibcrtyviQc. 

A: Deu J K. No one likea to take a cul in aalary if at all poatihlc. 
Tbcrc drca come i lime, however, with caaci of longevity, where one 
can literally be priced out of the market. Thit can eaaity be under- 
atood while employee* uaualty receive Incrcaae* in aalary once pa 
year. The raitea after eleven ycari can add up, thua putting you in a 
iilary calc^ury (hat eaceeda current market. Cunentty, (depending on 
the level of aocrctary and cacluding entry level} tecretanal pmiuora 
in our a/ea range from SZO-SKJ.fJOO My augge&iiin it to realue that 
there are companlea out there than can utilize your ulenia and cape- 
riencc and not only offer you a reapcctablc aalary, but bcneflta galore, 
which of courte you arc nut uted to having At thit time I would tug- 
geat that you weight out any and alt often with the benefit package 
looked upon aa waget aa well. The two corporation! you mentioned 
(although 1 held out their namea) are well retpecicd when it comet to 
talary and bencfita While you are uted to receiving only holiday pay 
foe the patt eleven yeart, you could now benefit from receiving ben- 
efiu auch at Medical. Oer.it l. Vition. Tuition. 401 K. PmTn 5hanng 
and n) rnanj other t<nef i u out there thai cmployert are taking advan- 
Uge of to boott employee tpuit and productivity. While you men- 
tioned that you have turned down these twoopponunitica, perbac* the 
dour baa not a lammed thui It probably would not hurt to contact the 
individual* who made the offen lo you and lake a chance thai (he 
potntont are alill a vtil tbk With a bit of explanation, pabapt one can 
be your* Let, me know bo* iiturnt out. (Vd lack, 

Note: Nancy Saioi it a licentcd personnel nrofrtaiuoaj 
•nd Pi rt idem of Superior Pcfauancl In Gumee ' ii 

LerjOTcanbetmwNaitcyii^*^^^^ 1 ' 1 
OumeclLfjOOJl. ji *f*-f): . t* 



220 



Help Wstnttd 
Fall-Time 



220 



Help Wauled 

FuU-Tlme 



1 



GENERAL OFFICE 

Computer knowledge ond a 

love (of variety. Can today. 

244-0016 



peiior JLcrsoantil 



FACTORY HELP NEEDED 

Manufaciurcr of Power Dry Type Traruforrncnt 
-Paid Vacation Schedule - Free Life Imurance 

Paid Holidays - Major Medical, Dental, 

Prescription Drug 
SS0.00 per month 
-Overtime Available - 40 1 K A Profit Sharing 

Appliciirofu being taken at: 

0.LSUN ELECTRICS COaRPORATION 

10901 Commercial Street 

Richmond, IL 60071 

(815) 678-2421 

Equal Oppurtunily Employer 



• 






-. T jvVJt-**<» J <£.<*>■'**»*."»>* »■''* 




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af 

/ 

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Cooks 

Servers 

Host/Hostess 

FLEXIBLE HOURS 

Our penple en)oy kvp wnget, performance-baaed tosen- 
tivca.paa) vacation. 401 K rssn, beabhAlentaV life co>mge 
and much much mere' So if you're ready to be rr» ardod 
for doing a good job. bnng your skint lo thit kxalioa. 

Cracker Barrel 

Located at corner of 

1-90 & Grand Ave. 

1 block from bus stop 

Gurnee, IL 

708-244-1512 

Please apply in person 

Monday thru Friday 8am - 8pm 

An IxjuaJ Opportunity Employer 



I 

l> 

/ 

I 
I 



DECOREL 

We an? over 90 j-ears old and are ihe world'* 
largest manufacturer of picture frame* St framed 
art Wi; currently have portions open In the fol- 
lowing areas: 

PRODUCTION PLANNER 

We currently have an excellent opportunity for an 
assembly production scheduler with high volume 
consumer products experience in an 
AS400/MAP1CS environment. Excellent compen- 
sation and benefits package. Address resume Attn: 
Dennis Burke. 

SENIOR BUYER 

We are seeking an experienced purchasing profes- 
sional. The ideal candidate will have a mm of 5 
yrs. purchasing experience in a nunufacturing 
environment, understanding of the IBM AS400 
manufacturing system and superior negotiating 
skills. Experience in buying lumber avid wood 
related products is preferred. Ability to perform in 
a fast paced environment w /limited supervision is 
required. YSfc offer a good compensation and bene- 
fits package including 401 (K) 

MAINTENANCE/ 
TECH SERVICE PERSONNEL 
Ut/2nd Shifts 
Seeking several reliable individuals to join our 
maintenance and technical service dept. on both 
1st and 2nd shifts. Candidates must have their 
own tools, strong electrical background and good 
mechanical ability. Experience with automated 
equipment a plus. Must have 3-5 yrs, experience in 
the maintenance or technical field. We offer an 
excellent salary and benefit package Including 
401 K. 

MASTER SCHEDULER 

We are seeking an experienced production sched- 
uling professional. The ideal candidate will have a 
min. of 5 yrs. production scheduling experience in 
a manufacturing environment, solid background 
in inventory control and scheduling a variety of 
operations in a high volume environment. Must 
have experience with MRP systems and multi- 
plant scheduling. We offer a good compensation 
and benefits package including -tOl(K). Address 
resume Attn: Dennis Burke, j 

Send resume w/salary or apply in person to: 
Decbrel Inc., Attn; Dan Marqucz,444. E CowtLuvd, 
Mundeletn,IL6O060. EOE. '. 



r ' 



— . 



I 

If ■ 

f 1 



m rm tm 



May 26, 1999 LaIciUmJ NrwspApc«s CLASSIFIED 



■- ■ -...,.. . .:...,. 




220 



I Hp Tanks! 
rufl-Tlmc 



220 



IHpWaakd 

PaBTmw 



AUTO BODY SHOP 
Needs: 

•Botfyman "Shop Helper j 

•Receptionist 

•Tool Truck Driver 

(Toa) eas-toso 



WAREHOUSE 

IMMlD»AT£OflNINCS 
in SW UixAn. 

•On** rVlrrs 
AVnt hi*r a CAt OR 

REMEDY 

(708> 470-0970 



u.-. ... ... . — - . - •■- - - - -j 



■BBBBeOCfJfJOB BEI5 a 

|T£i\CII£IfSg 

ri Full time 4c part Umen 
£j afternoon* needed for J; 
RGrcentree-Moiorold in B 
rUbertyvUIe. NAEYCg 
S accredited. g 

n Call B 

E<708) 5&&-7500& 



•COOKS 
•WAITSTAFF 

Full or Part Time 

ylTT^y /n Penon 

LAST CHANCE 

SALOON 

129 Center Si. . 

Grayslake 
(708) 2230082 



Its looking for expenrncedi 
|Kr*t4urant Management! 
[Personnel for one of ourl 
{Northern IL Restaurant*. I 
JfLiffllrnt starting salary! 
land benefit*. Fot morel 
{into, call Tim: 

(70S) 473-4230 



SHEET METAL 
WORKER 

I for rrMdniiul and tight I 
commetxtaJ work, 1 to 2 1 
I yean of experience. 

Fleaae Call 

NOBTHEBN 
AIB SYSTEMS 
(708)223-8877 



BANK TELLER 



Libert yvi tie bank is seeking 
an experienced teller. Some 
Saturday work required. 
P.iwrlfTKt ft krwrlfdrc 



CtflHlflil: Cash handling 
experience. Customer ter 
vice background. Pleasant 
ft positive personality. 

CaU ANYTIME: 

aM)-W.5X31rjtrm»afOJ 

to OJBpkte ta lutnroiox] 

tekpbeae te^J teuton 



LICENSE & 

TITLE CLERK 



based Kifk Ptauce it aecUaf 
la eaptricaccd license and 
ttfie ckrk fur full tir.t pou- 

(us Eix«iimii_A_lw*I-. 



tdxt_ri4uirtd: 1 ye** 1 ♦ •*>•; 
aaal cmrxrteace. Wwkiai 
katmWut* of aaoaur vesicle 
inkproceMMf 

Call ANYTIME: 

f7M| $49-5131 HxUwfcs MO 

to tamj4rte an AtAaAASnl 



I ELECTRONIC 
ASSEMBLERS 
We arc in need of auemblcn 
to ■aerobic ckxtro-rnechan- 
ical products. Indiridusb 
lhoukl hist loldcnBg and 
electro-mechanical astern- 
biy eipehence. Apply at 

DANAHER 
CONTROLS 

1675 Del any Road 
Gurnet, IL 60031 






2 



TIRED OF RETAIL HOURS?? 

A* a TELLER yw would a-jrt NO last e*es»i hours (only 7;X> oa | 
Fridays) and Sp SflftdayiM Wc are areaing OUTGOrNO. depend- 
able uMidtae* *riia * tubk »ort record *bo haw custocwr coo- 1 
tact, r.iii aptitude, Uyboanii&f, mi cuft tuadkag cipcneacc tol 
work » * ana &a i icaa l cnwgrmmL Wc currently K**c Ml k fun 
tine opmiap it Goracc 

If yew hn* the qmhfrtyn an arc looking for, atop by the branch [ 
nearest yoa or the foDcrrtag adirm to fjfl oat u apptkitioa: 

Advantage Bank FSB 

2580 Sheridan Rd. • Zion, IL 60099 



I.OLSL1A7H 



220 



BelpWaaled 

Fnll'Tlme 



220 



HelpWaaled 

FuU-Time 



LLMO 
DRIVERS 

[Ovor 25 yoara of ago wttil 
Idoan driving rocord! SMtsI 
lavai'.abt*; 4am-Noon/l 
woekdaya. Noon-V«3nignv I 
wookonda. tJtporionco| 
I roqulrod * Drug tested 

1 0'Hare - Midway] 
Umoualrte 

708-S87-61S1 



$$ SUMMER 

CASH$S 
, TELEMARKETING 

SPAtD DAILY S 
Ful a'xl pirt line 
up 10 $£<! .R«r 

.weekV/atrar..- ; 

Munddein ■ 
{703)949-9240 
Atk for lifr, V.t'fj- 



Ihousekeeping 

Full & part time. Must be 
able to work weekends & 
holidays. Apply In porson. 

ADVENTURE 



L 



3732 Grand Ave. 
■ Gurneo 



COMPUTER 

TECHNICAL SUPPORT 



Immfdlit r oprnlny. Full (icic 
poiitioa wjth Ijbcrijrville- 
Oiled Wondcrlic Peritonei 
Tett, Inc. Provide PC technical 
tuppon liid uoubleshooUni 
for softwire ind birduire. 
Eaptriia c i. A. kmuk&Mt 



rttiukid: Eiteaiitc DO<» A 
Wmdowi ktio«ledfe pre 
f erred. Cuuomcr icrvke/utet 
cipcrience li a plat 

Call ANYTIME: 

(706) 549-5831 Ettaskn 550 

to complete »n aalomued 
Ickphanc »;>pltciiicn. 



FUUTIME 
JUNE-SEPT. 



U SO* 2Sft*. Assat ri 
prop of rnaais and caunup 

laiilwin llllll—l 
Assst n btaktng. tinanrq & 

mincf harcfyman roparr. 
*4.25-5SVrr 

CaJ M-F between 

10arT>-5pm 

(708) 740-5010 

ask for Carotyn or Kovin 



© 



tunite Hen Pantry. 

NOW HIRING 
2ND SHIFT 

Full and Port Time posi- 
tions avoitable. Seniors 
welcome. Appry In per 
son 1o White Hen Pantry 

1306 Cedar Like Rd. 
Roand Lake Beach 

-t>r^ 

1015 FskfkM Rd. 
Reend Lake 



DIRECT CARE 

Would you like 1o spend your summer In a 
challenging & rewarding job? We work with 
people who have autism. In a group home 
setting, located In 1he Gumee area. Variety 
of shifts avoflabie. Must have driver's Bcemo. 
$6.607hr. to slart. 

Caff Supervisor at 2G3-O097 

EOG 



I 



COMMUNITY 
SERVICE OFFICER 

Village of Gumee 
Police Department 

The Gumee Police Dep a rtment u iceiint; in hire a full time 
Community Service Officer. Applicants must have a valid 
Dhver't License, Hifh School diploma, or couiviicnt. and be 
of high moral character. Applicants should alto be self -moti- 
vated, conscientious to detail, work well with the public, and 
witling lo learn. Applicants must be willing to wrrk all shifts 
Applicanti nuv be requaed to submit to a written examination. 
and oral interview. Starting pay b S20.6R9. A 40 hour week set 
by the Police Department. Excellent benefits Applications arc 
available at the Gumee Police Depart m ent, 45K7 Grand Ave.. 
Gumee. EL 60031. Applications will be accepted from 16 May 
1995, at 8fl0 AM to May 31. 1995 at 3 00 P.M 



■■■ aEaRBm — --y 



.,: '"■:■ '. : . :.; 



AL OppORTUINiTIES 



PHTHCAL THDUn ASUaTWrT 

r-i-mt rr.*l mm* I to ta*»a FT*. 
.k m ^»* f Om*m flmmim **o» 
•»« mm. «. m > *-. Amoo*** fr mm 




MENTAL HEALTH 



nwa tf i Uiivi :»7*. r Oru 

* MM a >a j » usw »-o ■ ^■a— r 
waning *f- 1"* pt<o*to\ •«•> 
uijc«4«*Jw -T- mm>mt *+qm. 
P— Ml «^ - « U««%*ca Ana Uhvar 
►•*< CW. ► O 8ca I 111 Oa^ft C% 
UW.I'U^M 



wwaa 


•SURQIC AI TECH* 


Mttwri Conm NmbM *»» *» 6w^ to 


*T ft^BjM Vwnm upww pr*7** 


»m *J~?-M *» -. »*xrt an ;rr-»-« ) 


>»i «-. **/- car « -»- .ijrm; 


■«;3 Cone «agp tfti* IU'{H>*»|| 


;»-* i*} uOi ■! r« i i m: r-jrwH' • 


Vtp v ^h« to — r» * -■* to HA 


HOiXAM) eOHtMJtfTT HOIKTU, 


Ml m !>*»■■ A«, MM, HI 


•Max tme. a i* a*4-aan. iol 



MEDICAL LAB TECH 



'■am *j« »• pa X m t< va.t f«Mic« * 

Cat. M«piW •>* mti t«n4 
!■* KJI. aWWl K T 

TAJ.. W K ■, 

nw «h m. wt •*•♦« «>«|)W 
Hmuioi 



g- 



CNA & Homecare 
Professional 

Do you want to work for 
dome care company 
that provides benefits, 
training, flexible hours 
and competitive wagesff 
If you enjoy the elderly 
we have hourly and live* 
in positions available. To 
join our proud team of 
exceptional caregivers 
pleasc,call 
(708) 398-0671 



TQ 



LPN/RN 

Immediate opening for 
1 full dme 9pm- 6am. 
Must Include wcelends- 
lf interested contact 
CindaySabey DON. 

C708J 538-5050 

Mt. St. 

Joseph 

a Lake Zurich ,-h 
_^_ — LTJ 



Hwaeal 

*taMHAQ tOAtTM COlTOt* 
Hh FT opwwm lor "OB av v 
'UwS-Surg RVt. t Ptr r uam%, 

' n»* o$r*ot\ «f/U*mmogr»pH« t 
Coup %MJ(Art bans rv>f 3 pd 
ftooc . atC UkAt lm U;.»i.j bf 
AJamKa S«nd MUM or CaJ HR, 
UAXtlLAQ HEALTH CtHTER, 
Don m, KoUMM. AX WT12 
(907)442-3311 E.0E7AA. 



CNA'S/NURSING ASSISTANTS 

i v.'r work around your schrdule! W% havr flex hours, great 
i tuning sxury. offer shift duTcfrntuJ and will pay to train 
l you in this position.. Full + part time positions aviiLibk. 
COME CHECK THE EXCITEMENT OUT AT. 

! CARE CENTRE OF WAUCONDA! 

176 Thomas Ct. 

Wauconda, IL 6008-4 

526-5551 



220 



B dp Wan Led 
Fall-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
FBIL 



•NAIL 
TECH 

Wanted to work 

in buay tanniruj 

aalon in Grayalake, 

Please Call 

(708) 225-0303 



District Soles Manager 

V« tn Krijci a Daarks Stks 
Mictarr far 6* Vtdkrtxs ires. 
Caa on ap t» 501 1* war. Ma* 

»« sUr to aefl. An lop ui **»- 
age a amtoq to i aycistc pmt- 
to( Vaiam. Saks a?rririxxj 
pas. Srfid rcsunr laJ wiirj Iuj- 
larj to r5C Krvcor. l$V ViVfcn 
Otkr inoir • Sadat 107. 
SefaanaaWi. IL Ml?) «r Nx 
(7(«) J0J^». 



[ Direct j 
i Care I 

jDvect Care Workars fo/| 

I HA/DO worrtn n mst-B 
dor sjJ setwyj Ful or Part ■ 
| tme o avaeaoa Prmi'-vJ 

Ia^jsmooni, evfrwyys andB 
weekends We a«e commt- g 
(led to quauy resx3«ntaig 

I care If rtJerositid pWvijcb 
cat GaJ Becker. 

: (708)438-5050 

! Mount ! 
I St. Joseph | 

Lake Zurich 




CHILDCARE 

*>rjo» trxzaCc. Jpc? a W 
nj kr oyrrtoail Saaaa far 
hMn eroxxl pfaccn 
th»u£*ax r< C^ur-lir*: 
arts. taacoLxc ;«? k tit 
cnSst irfemos a mat 
i27S-tPV«t CaS 70MB- 
(] 1 1 to m op is a^ectaffl I 



k 4;ilfcvi^ii»a«t=rti | 

r trtttir r^fc Tfartsaje; p 



NEW ACCOUNT 
RKPRESENTATIVR 

[—BpVatC 



ilk 
rtnoaac] I ««- ■ itv» -1 *** {**- 
Mutf rma x Ubcrljmfi* u wckjtt 



far i fr?»r» ula [t/(h«aiI 

tprrtrnrt.l iiwrtnxxJieaarK. 

ulu ffpencart, b»«o«w»t«S 
•: . • ri of | ■*! *:.i. i •:*-■*. Flovra 
■hi (it* id |«acr«t« ar* Kunui. 
EttttoniMiii riwailh 
Cnaknaaajg a* alma la rtnrlaf an 

Call ANYTIME: 

(708) 549-5831 Exlemba 555 

to complete an tuxxnitol 
irfeprxjoe apclicauoti. 



$27 f OOO - $30 v 000 TO START 

E j CTTWncrd MjuitiTMrcr M*dwrm< with ftrctno) twcS pound. 
Our LaLt BKtff rlJml nrrdi 70a E «riirr* p«v. bnnwv And rrx-*i±*} 
tnurnr «*il*bU ho you 00 thf firrt day trxt tttrt work. Apr4 r ■< 

w 



N STAFF SERVI 

134 Center Street, Grayalake 
(708) 548-4200 

M-F M. VWdnodAV until 7 pm by appt tO£. 



Analysts/Programmer 

TTielcn Sand & Gravel Inc., Antioch, IL 

Duties: Plans, develops, tests and documents computer 
programs, applying knowledge of programming tech- 
niques and computer system*. Evaluates user requests 
for new or modified program, consults with user to 
identify current operating procedure*, and clarify pro- 
gram objectives. Formulates plan outlining steps 
required to develop program using structured analysis 
and design. Minimum 2 yrs. experience with each of the 
foUowing: SyAtwm PDP-11 RSTS/E, VAX VMS, MacOS, 
DOS U Windows Nr>rwork< Ethernet t^anguxgi' VAX 
Basic Understanding of Telephony, Spreadsheets, and 
any OOP Language a plus. 

Send resume to DP Search Committee, Thelen Sand tt \ 
Gravel Inc. 2S955 W. Rl 173, Antioch, IL 60002 



~3 



Superior 
Opportunities 

Bookkeeper. S22K 

Customer Service $23K 

Payroll A/P, A/R. S20K 

Tellers $16-S18 

Assembly. S5 50 -$6°° 



pcrior JCcfsoanel 



244-OOI6 



Waideei" Management 

Looking For A Challenging Canter? 

Ha/doe's franchiso has immediate openirjoa 
for aoorossn/e inckviduals with proven leader- 
ship skills, the ability to motrvata employees 
and the desire to succeed. 

Starting C 
Salary: v 

Up TO 



25,000 



BENEFITS: 

j Ixrtewi tatrj * ato«S» Q 
3 rail Vao*aa Dartal Hnt mr 
JhMlfaBiM 3 




OpportunKiea avallablo In laland Lake, IL 
and Southeastern Wisconsin areas. 

S«nd resumes to: 

Waidees: 

Attn: Rex McCoy 
10OOVV. aUvsmaBBd. 
Pewauke-e Wl 63072 
Fax • 414/521-2110 . 

NmiMVfiM 



220 



HdpWafcd 

PttBTime 



COLLECTIONS MQR, 

US Rrandai. tot, a awi»g Snans* earn- 
pmf *« r« JaUawv MS «|» a>*a. M* 
*irmi oc«v«3 to" a Cdhcan t*/. 
^ n m » «■ aueraMa *»-« 
rtojary. WMMMXaK. wnl am- 
|H*>« p»J. Ind. an ti;*wr» 4CU 

aan n*«w avto i«# wa aw to c rx> . 
»*• 74a, wa,.Aw.i r . ks aataseTAS 
FaRfMUtTi 



•c: 



Teachers €? 
Assistants 

r.» Wfr. ••«, **e m «i |i| iii i 

rSaU Caw C^M#r. Taulf ■»■ > J 

<708) 634H082 



J 



^ NOW ^ 

TAKING 

APPLICATIONS 

•MECHANIC 
•CUTTER 

|(708) 52648581 



GENEM, OFFICE 



LibenTy*Uk-t»a*e<l Woaderlk 
PtnanocJ Tot has an itatnolt- 
ste opeaiB{ f or a 
Sorrier RfprrwntallTi Cat 



Sit • Dau entry A rr,><- ,,t 
mxha duuet id our ATB lest 
icortog icpumeat. PC eipen 

ce required 
CcS ASYTWE (TDD 5«-5Ul 

larompklt our ■■laanatfd 
aaafaatliia Ik a*fr fua i adw air 
■M taScasSaa of taa faaiaM ht 

«h»rh r « »iA Ut rpptj. 



WORK I 
"] for the 
J BEST! 

vn p Pt? Hsu* •E<T-^.n 4 1 j 
* ' Pari UcA:.t»i . s ,' 

merry 

maids 

Libertyville 

708 367-0B00 



815-344-4740 



MAINTENANCE 

MECHANIC 
MULTI-CRAFT 

mt Cotviw* •• l aw t s) 
»* ra taa— I tt M a n w ar— 



•nerval 
lignaa 



I A*tri • m a a a>i I n 
aaaaaoi r«u»-c • •>■« «■• 




«». unr*«mi 

*«ai>Tt 1) J? r#m 



aaid .acaAan. pmti heaucrA ■ co-o 
'tim ' ■■Vn c«r» p«r> m,»r.j aaa) 
■ •*• ura. wao« a)A«4 



X«i^d B-pat«n« aVbW (and *•* 



Emptoymoot Supanrlsor 

rli^ffiASTEaCORPCfWTON 

P.O. Box 560847 
Crujrlon*. NC 28256-0647 



= 



yjin!!i!!i!ii!iiiiiiiiuiiiii;iiiiii;n:ii^ 

1 SECURITY ! 
1 OFFICERS 1 

S Imutedisie Opening* In = 

Northbrook & S 
s Decrflcld areas H 
i *Prrnuum Pay 

• I eJ.-ihm rnrnded = 

*iKE£LifetRsunuK;e 
•FTIEE fi-K "rfsMratitw 
s -1H' I v-v r.-itniec, 

= •Medical 

= •Tuix/fl k^unbunemert 

= *raid Vaouoos 

S 'EsctiTaitBentfits!! 
, </>/) f y In tenon 

§ real & limn. 10mm ■ J/** B 

iGUARDSMARKl 

| l590 5.MihviukeeA«c. I 
iSuiie 205 • LJbert)viue, LLg 

j 708-3(17-7935 I 

Iimmijinimimijuiiiiiiiiiiiiitiuifl 



i 

=5 
= 

3 






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CLASSIFIED LvlcclANct NrwspApm Max 26, 199$ 




220 



Help Wonted 
Rill-Time 



CELLULAR SALES 

Looking for Retail Salftt Paopla. 
Hourly ♦ commlaalon A benefits, 
Full/Pail lima. CoBular and pag- 
ing oxperionco helpful. Crfi the 
manager al (708) BltMBOfl OR 
visit Trinnflle Eloclroolea at 
Hawthorn Mall. 



New Burma Grove 
Beauty Sjook 

hi* pcwltlora open In 
Ihr (oIknr1n| utu: 

(•BoMldni >M»iairi«u 
• Shiapoolm •EttcptiodtU 

Call (708) 587-5667 



•SOCIAL WORKER 

{MASTERS LEVEL)* 

i™*i opening tar ic/fg luimt > Iho< 

•octal aorUf Duat* mcVo* out**** 

PBMWaaSBfl COffV Hlary pkit t»n»«!» 

pv»»»« t*nd m»*m» wl Mea ewoaa to. 
Jim Daanuth 
PLAINS AREA 
MENTAL HEALTH CENTER 

f. o . a* 1 1 t a ch »w* m . ia • io tl 
MHW 



HVAC SHEET 

METAL 
INSTALLERS 

Qualified and Expenenced 

Goad piy and benefits 

Ploaso coll 

1708) 265-1400 




Driver/ { 



{ fow Truck J 

JCDl preferred. Matt art in F«$ 
?LAi uu Eiptfltnctd only J 
knftd apply. 

SElflilTiYlUilKeNAj 
k, MMWrMlMrMrriM \ 

; DHiytonU.* ha lab - 



IS 



si 



SHEET METAL 
INSTALLERS 

SmaII HVAC company tv 

MiajMf AN (ftptakftTfd 

ihm hiiaI iirmllta. 
ExCillrni oppcarnWrty lot 
am Anbitiout U**d voalu-K, 
individual. CaII Kaimna, 



I (708) 546-4328| 



n 



220 



Belp Wattled 
Full-Tlme 



15a 



CREDIT ANALYST 



US Ft***, IPC • grtMttiQ *WI01 «** 

n 5 r»*i awwwe. jnMnMrj ■* »•> 
(WtilWdiia iac aaa ri b JM W Jfj** 

t*r.i«»on paetaga, mckjarq «**£* 

«iru nan. Pa»ae ■md)r»'<*«« ■ 



P.O.I 



T4» 



TaTjibijf "" 
EtOaV 



|tra-a«M 

r* 
-w- 



DEWTAL OFFICE 
ADPUNISTOArOR 

Reliable, people-oriented, 

aclf-atartr-r to munap* front 
oflios. Northbrook Eiperienc* 
preferred. Benefit*. 

(708) 564-2180 



SECURITY TECHNICIAN 
tarSta Uattt a CanaaaaaaMa Mm • 

tap M fce Be**, »» eel ■*»«•»« w 

w « wi ol» tovn taa> 

■i« faugro* tkmtane I 

nMWdM nrv«*>iio i 

SM ksntrq m™ i*>a naif* to 

Btg Sky SMurttv 

■fM*H* • ataCHH, WT 



laoow 

aw» W aaag at iitrnm ******* 

roe 



P Full Time ^ 

Screen Print position 

with Wiuconda company. 

Vailrty of duties. Day*. 

Self aurtcd. Will train. 

^(708) 526-9*9% 



QUE HACERES 
D0MEST1C0S 

Tiempo complolo tlompo 
partial. Dovo podor tiabojaf 
lot fines do somanas y dias 
(oslrvos. ApKquo on persona 

ADVENTURE 

INN 

3732 Grand Ave. 

Gurnee 



iainiuitiiiiimimMiiiuntiniiimiui 
| Customer Service 

|Mk)mI atjpplir* cfcttnbUw 
HtJcrnVM tl vrfVun * wy 
— Ort*il-mnyJcd euUomer trrvm»iE 
srrp In l*W ardor** (,<**■*■ = 
Slnifui'k% rmprditr tftd pntcrti£ 
3iiifc»i ini vmty invmlary on|| 
= CV'T. Mrumurn I >*j' irtourelg 
= CSK" r«prr>mr^. Trn-^i in trgu-S 
~ tar ;> it 'k.! ■ 

| Call Remedy Staffing 

(708) 509-3100 | 
ititiiitintiiiiiiniiiimiiniiiiiiiinitr;. 



228 


Situaom Vinlni 



PRICE IS RIGHT cleaning 
Mtvtot. CaH today for froo ov 
tlmale (70«)4B7-7415. 

Prompt. fftoorJy aervtco. 



240 



Qald Care 



! POSTAL JOBS 

$12.20 per Iwurto B 
start, plus benefit n. ] 
1 Carriers, sorters, clerks. 1 
maintenance. For an 
application and exam j 
information, call ; 

1-800-8194916 I 

Ext. 9, Bam-Spm, 7 dayi I 



■ 



. 



SALES/PHOTO 

Outgoing, energetic 

individuals to work 

OLD TIME PHOTO 

■t GREAT AMERICA. 

Call Ashley Photo 

(708)360-0510 

EOEMFDV 




Business 
Opportunities 




Basin ess 
Opportunity 



WANTED - WORKING PARTNER 

Io operate smal nursery (3-4 ocres ♦) with focflfloi for o 
□root GARDEN CENTER on a busy Nahway next to 
Dndenhursl. Appflcont must bo energetic, honojt and vory 
rotioble. Knowledge of plant* tree* and busnoj a mutt. Trw 
b a fjoat opportunity for ttto right person with option to own 
the business. Owner Is retiring. taJ»r»|yj Jn f0fV tow cafl 
f708) 35cV6271 or rnoU resume to:,Oeok3ida Nursery. 20766 
Gross Lake Rd.. Lake VIBa 160046. 



240 



Child Care 



EXPERIENCED CHILD 

CARE wanted In my home, 
24/ hrs. i week, lor summer. 
12' 10/ hrs. school yoar. Non 
smoker, references requost- 
Od. Cal Kalhy (708) 720-2343. 

EXPERIENCED MOM OF 
1, with unfcersJty dogroo, can 
offer oxcelonl child earn In hor 
LbortyvUo home. Unsurpasl 
roforoncos. (700) 010-1647 
No»y. 

LAKE VILLA MOM has tult- 
llme opentnos. Cloan, nolo 
and happy place Io bo. Call 
Calhy (70S) 350-2300. 

LICENSED EXPERI- 
ENCED PROVIDER has 
openings In her homo day* 
cam. Structured actlvfikia, nu- 
Irllous food and lots of TLC. 
Country WalkrTtound Lake 
Beach. Cad Dobble (700) 
205-1514. 

LOVING MOTHER OF one, 
would liko lo walch your ?* 
chid In my Round Lako Coun- 
Iry Wok home. Lots ot toys 
and TLC. (700) 350-7055. 

MOM WILL BABYSIT In 
my Round Lak4 Beach 
home. Meale and snacka 
provided. Hues, toys and 
playmates. 6am-S:30pm, 
Monday-Friday. Just 2* 
openings. (70S) 

740-0306. 



ATTENTION 
PARENTS 

If yon arc In training, a 
(I lil) seeking parent or 
college student with 
children and need 
affordable daycare. 
Please contact Miss 
Holloway ^ 708-244- 
0015 or Mldcc Crews 
9 Round Lake Head 
Start 708-740-781 1. 
Our daycare hours arc 
from 6am til 6pm. 



■CBBBCIBt30CBI9DCBM 

"daycares 



1 



g Seeking working par- E 
Bents with children B 

§ between the ages of 3 ri 
& up for summer pro- S 
Egram. For more Infor-B 
nmailon please contacts 
gMlss Holloway*? 708- S 
{J244-0045 or Midge 5 
BCrcws if 708-740-781 1 B 

5 In Round Lake. r> 

B B 

■BEBBEEBBBBBBBBB 



250 


ScrKxi/inOructor! 



CARINQ MOTHER OF 2 
would tovo to watch your chttd- 
r»n In my new Gumee homo. 
Lot* ot TLC. C^jrwonlenlty lo- 
cated tor your convenience. 
FurVparttlmn and week-ends 
■vajabte. Please ask lor Don- 
Ise. (700) 373-7742, (015) 
477-0731. 

CHILD CARE NEEDED IN 
MY MUNDELEIN HOME. 2- 
k-dants, lutvtlme. 7:30am-6pm. 
Bandja (700) 040-0275. 

LITTLE TREASURES 
HOME DAYCARE 

•licensed 

•DoponcJablfl 

*Non-smokof 

. •1-opwJnrj 

•Fultlmo 

(700)540-2410 

Orayslako 

LOOKING FOR HIGH 
SCHOOL gut to care lor 10yr. 
boy during summer vacation 
In Island Lake. (700). 
526-0740 after Open. 

LOV1NQ MOTHER OF 1 w« 
watch your children In my 
Round Lake Beach homo. 
Lots erf TLC provldod. Reasbrv 
abto rales. Cal Cindy lor mora 
BTtormatloa (700) 740-3700. 



TUTORING IN MY home. 
Masters degree In reading. 
Specialist In teaming ctaaabl^ 
tioa (700) 356-2220. 




MEMORIAL WEEKEND AN- 
TIQUE SHOW t SALE, May 
27 K 20. 1995 Sat. 10am- 
7pm & Sun. 10am-4pm Na- 
tional Guard Armory, 1016 S. 
Main, Oloomlngton. IL. Ad- 
million 13.00 



304 


Appluncn 



DISHWASHER, KEN- 

MORE, 1YR. old. portable. 
$300, 2 white daybod Irames. 
175 each. (414) 697-17ug 
Ail er 4 pm. 

ELECTRIC SEARS DRY- 
ER, 3yrs. old, »200*>esl. 
(700) 305-3450. 

KENMORE ELECTRIC 

DRYER. Excellent condrtlon 
52O0, (70fl) A55-1426. 



310 


Bioirs/CrifiJ 



324 



FarmCaide 



Oitrich Chlcki I1.6O0 —3 
moi.t Emu Chick* 1600 —3 
mo i. + Micro Chipped, Provtn 
Breadof* alio For Salt. *Dan 
Cradar Farma* 1 -3 14- 356- 
0591 



330 



Garage 
RumnuRC Sale 



ESTATE SALE- COLLECT- 
IBLES, lOSO's fumtturo, a bo 
womons doming, TVs and 
small terra. N. Unden, Fox 
Lake, oil Grand Avo. Friday- 
Saturday only. Pam-5pm. 

LAKE ZURICH-CHEST- 
NUT CORNERS (Ouentln & 
Cuba Rd). 300 lamtly. Lots ot 
kids cwrws and toys, Friday 
Juno 2nd, Salunlay Juno 3rd., 
0am-4pm. 

MULTI FAMILY GARAGE 
SALE, June 2nd & 3rd, 9am- 
4:30pm. 630 Watervlew, 
Round Lake Park. Lakeviow 
Estates (HaJnsvMe Rd., North 
ot Washington). Chickens, fur- 
niture, nlk-naks, steals and 
doab. 

MULTI-FAMILY RUM- 
MAGE SALE Fri-Sal 0-5. 
Lots ol tumlture. 610 Bono 
Ptalno Gumoe. 

GARAGE SALE SATUR- 
DAY AND SUNDAY, MAY 
27-21 9AM-3PM. 1916 
AWARD TRAVEL TRAIL- 
ER, MANY ANTIQUES, 
FURNITURE. MUCH MIS- 
CELLANEOUS, NO 
CLOTHINO, TOYS, DISH- 
ES. CASH ONLY. 210 
SHERIDAN CT. WAUKE- 
GAN. (OFF SHERIDAN 
ROAD BETWEEN GREEN- 
WOOD AND OLEN 
FLORA) 



CRAFTERS WANTED 
FOR June 24th show In Fox 
Lake. Please can (700) 
507-7074. 

CRAFTERS WANTED, 

SHOP In Lake Vina. 
S35Annnttv No^ontracts. no - 
commission, no-servtc* 

hours, tor more information 
cal (706) 265-0065. 



340 



ilr»UMnold Goods 
Furniture 



EASY CHAIR, SOFA and 
Loveseat, Blue, Mauve. 
Cream, »550. LEATHER 
sola and bvesoal, $050. Lx- 
celers conrJtkon, MUST SELL! 
(700)540-1 O40. 

QUEEN ANNE STYLE bed- 
room, complolo 61,100. Din- 
ing room *•(, S 1.7O0. OAK 
bodroom Ml S1.20O, Oak 
dlnlngroom - b«i S1.90O, 
ALSO Sleigh bodroom sal, 
61,745. All In PERFECT con- 
dition. MUST SELL) 
(70fl)546-104S. 

MODEL HOME CONT- 
ENTS, Sola/Loveseat set. 
Hurxor Green and Crartwrry, 
new S595, also ptakts etc. Din- 
ing room sots, bedroom sets. 
From Builders Model Home. 
(708)320-4110, 

3P1ECE BLACK LEATH- 
ER Irvlngroom set. 
61,700/besl. 2-dmssers and 
headboard, 6300. (706) 
&a9-351 7 evenings, 

6-PIECE BLACK 

WROUGHT IRON PATKJ 

table and ctwks. Like new. 
tjaO. (706) 566-0926. 

BRASS BED QUEEN with 
deluxe onhopedlc mattress 
set. Now never used. Sacrifice 
6300. Dettirery snrYlabas. (700) 
374-0002. 

ENTERTAINMENT CEN- 
TER BEAUTIFUL contem- 
porary oak, 4-ploco with light 
bridge, glass doors, 6-1/2ft. 
long. Sacrifice $775. BED- 
ROOM beautilul contempo- 
rary honey oak, complete set, 
almost new. Must see. Sacrt- 
fioo SI. 075. (70B) 374-0802. 

FOR SALE LIVINGROOM 
couch, ight neutral cobr. Ex- 
cotenl condttlon. 6000A>esl. ?• 
end tabios and cotte table with 
marble lops. 632S1)esl. Excel- 
lent condition (700) 
356-1062. 



340 



Hoaschold 
GoodVFurnimre 



MAYTAG WASHEfVDRY- 
ER, GAS, white, 2yrs. old. Ex- 
colors: condHlon, S600. Honda 
lawn mower, 3yrs. old. Very 
good condition, $350, (700) 
501-3614. _" 

WATERBED NEW WAVE- 
LESS mattress, king sfee, 
$200. New twin mattress, firm, 
$45. Kitchen lablo and chairs, 
$75. (700) 740-2563 Of (700) 
540-2011, 

FOR SALE ROYAL upright 
vacuum ctaaner seldom used, 
hko new. Excolionl bargain. 
Reasonable offer accepted. 
(700) 395-1049. Cal between 
4prn-6pm. 



344 


Jcwdrr 


BRIDAL RING SET. 14 
carat Gold wth rlamond. Size 
7. $700toest. (700) 587-4627 
Leave Message. 


348 


UwaAjaruVn 


QUALITY DEPENDABLE 
LAWN MAINTENANCE. 
Reasonable rales. (706) 
305-5063. 


350 


Jfccrilabeout 


24IN. WOODBURNINO 
STOVE, 36ln. wood burning 
stove. All in exceknl concf- 
Uon. (706) 244-5514. 



S4INX78IN 3 PERSON spa 
novor been outside. Mauve 
swtri color, ihp motor wtih 
heater and cover. 

$1.0OQ»est.(81S) 344-0770. 

A MEMBERSHIP TO All 
Season Resorts and Coast lo 
Coast Resorts (706) 
546-6130. 

SUNOUE6T WOLFF TANNING) 
6E0S. Gommardal • Homa 
Uftrta From 1199.00. Ouy 
Factory Direct and SAVtl 
Cafl TOOAV for NEW FREE 
Color Catalog. 1 •800-442- 
9197 

PRESSURE CLEANERS NEW 
FBI 13O0 1340. 2tOO «6tS, 

3soo tas9 • Ht.nd. a&oo 

11,099. Factory dlract' T««- 
fr«». prompt dattvan/. C»H 2*- 

hrs FREE catalog I-D00-464- 

WASIt(9274|. 

HOMEOW«E*.< WANTEO - 
KAYAK POOLS la looking tor 
Damo Homaaflai to tflaplay 
lha ntw maintananc* Umm 
KAYAK POOL Sava Otou- 
tanda of f • I wtU) thla uniqiM 
opportunity. CALL NOWI 1- 
600-3 1KA YAK. 

ELEQANT BRIDAL GOWN 
and veil Eve of Maady as fea- 
tured In Urido Magazine, sire 
7. PakJ $1,500, asking $600. 
(706) 244-3432. 

POOL. 16X30, JACUZZI 
filer, vacuum, winter and solar 
cover, ladder, needs Oner. 
$700. (708) 655-1700 after 
6:00pm. 

QUEEN SIZE WATERBED 

with headboard and frame, 
$200. Air condoioner, $350. 
Largo II ah tank wth lots ol ao 
ceaaorles, $150. Huge papa- 
sen chair with pUow, $50. 
Mulching lawnmower, $60. 
Bunk bed, desk, chair, book- 
case, was 5 1,200. now $250. 
FrtgkUre dishwasher, 2yr. 
warranty. $200. Waahoftfry- 
er, $350. .2-end tabkn. 1 -cot- 
lee table, $75. Sony Stereo 
system with 5 -disc player, 
doubao cassette, arnpttwr , ?■ 
targe speakers, $S00Vbesl. 
Mini 4-clsc player with doubto 
cassotte, $200. No reason- 
able offer refused. Moving to 
smaller home (70S) 

570-O337. 



354 



Mnkal Equip 
Supplies 



FOR SALE- 10 white triple 
track storm windows. Uke 
new, used 6 months, Sbo 
20 , x55*. Bast offer. (708) 
395-1002. 

FRENCH COLONIAL 01- 
NINQROOM SET. Dresser, 
tablo 6-chalrs and carver. 
jcoo.bosl. Young persons 
bedroom sat. canopy bed, 
bedside locker, desk and. 
shelves and dresser. 
$J0Obest. Almost new rroi- 
tress (708) 367-6022. 

MATCHING COUCH AND 
sleeper sola. L-shape wth end 
ottoman. Good condtbn. Paid 
$4^00. $200>bes1.(708) 

306-6606 



LARK 3 WHEEL scooter, 
used tor physlcaty Impaired, 
excellent condition (708) 
627-3623. 



DIABETICS) Med.- 

cara/lnauranca blttad dlract for 
Tait ttripa, IniuOn. Glucoma- 
tan t mora. Lrttla or no out- 
ofpockat M. Satlaf action 
Guaranteedl liberty Madical 
Supply. 1 000-762 0026 



358 



Musical Irttlrurocob 



360 


rVUaSuppli« 



360 



PcUaSuppika 



WHAT'S SO DIFFERENT 
A80UT THE HAPPY JACK 3- 
X FLEA COLLAR? fT WORKS! 
Now avaallabla for eatal At 
farm faad & hardware atoraa. 

AKC LAB PUPPIES. Yelow. 
black and chocolalo males. 
Private breeders. To good 
homes only. Ready 0/25. Call 
jodiy, Carol (708) 034-6400. 

CHAMPION MINIATURE 
PINCHERS. Excelent blood- 
linos, $350/ea. (314) 230- 
3069. 

FOUR YEAR OLD Shopard 
Hound. Excellent with kids. 
Needs Wg yard. Very lovoable. 
(708) 487-7415. 

LABRADOR AKC YELLOW 
end black puppies, bom 
March 25th, ready May 2Sm. 
Dewctaws removed, shots 
and parents on promts- 
09.(414) 652-2624 



LOWREY ORGAN, MAGIC 

Gonlo 44, doubto keyboard, 
with toot pedals. $50atwsl. 
,(414)657-7606. 



DACHSUND FEMALE 

1YR. old, WaefcAan. pedigree, 
$200. (706) 740-0338. 

PET GROOMING FOR 
dogs and cats. All sizes end 
broods. Calf Monday-Thurs- 
day after 820pm, Friday-Sun- 
day 7am-0pm. (615) 
363-4166. 

ST. BERNARD, NEU- 
TERED male, 3-1/Zyre. ok). 
Sweet. Needs large fenced 
yard. Must be onN dog In lamt- 
ly. (615) 675-6001 leave mes- 
sage. 



370 



WtoltdToBay 



Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDtTPOH. or Paris. 
Also JUKE BOXES, MUSIC 
BOXES, Nickelodeon end 
Coke Machines. Paying 
CASH! Call (706)96S-2742. 




S33 


lUsdynuB 



S48 



Legal Services 



HANDYMAN WANTED 

FOR Oght yard work. No mow- 
ing or raking. Wauconda area. 
526-6002. 



S39 



tkusdutpatf 



DISCOUNT OtVORCC No 
Lawyar (Uncontatta^tf) 150. 
Our kit ahowl you how. Eaty 
inatructleot with aaampSat, 

AM rtquSrad SSno<f forma. 
Fraa information and aatn- 
(action euarantea. I-OOO- 
703-2343 



I WILL CLEAN your house 
wwakty or bt-atookty. Wtf thor- 
ough and cty>endabk*. Non- 
smoker. Relerenoes, (706) 
546-3750 bave i 



S54 


Movtog^Storaje 



CHRtSTtE-S CLEANINO 

SERVICES. Ouafty cleaning 
lor a price you can aflord. Cal 
lor tree estimate. (706) 578- 
0445, pager (706) 242-6400. 

fNinuTe"Naid| 

I Cleaning Service % 

FOR YOUR 
\ HOMEOROFHCE { 

% Expcn'mcr - References % 

$973-0467 a 

tz«««««««<JI 



S42 



A STORAGE ON WHCEIS 
Local mover has encJosod ira> 
bas saorege moving van trss> 
era evaiabte lor your short 
term storage. YOU LOAD 6 
LOCK OR CONSULT US. 
(706) 395-6544. 

MOVING?? CALL BOO The 
Mover. Fumture; pianos; 
safes; rastaunsnl av^pmenl; 
Light rruachinery. Lil gate 
van and smal crane trucks. 
PACK RAT Enterprlsee. 
(7oe>«7-n»s«. 



S72 



Proioiaoaal 
Serrtces 



Lndjcapiag 



'UNCLE TOM'S ROTO- 
TtLUNG SERVICE.* Hoto- 
tiSng and landscaping sJnco 
1063. (706) 546-7102. 

ROTOTtLUNO SERVICE, 
GARDENS, lawns. Reason- 
able rales. Jim (706) 
040-4362. if no answer 
paeasa bwiva message. 



WORD PROCESSING. 

RESUMES, REPORTS, 

TRANSCRIPTS, MAIL- 

INGS, etc. lleasoneble pric- 
es, Etreningnawekend hours 
available (TOO) &46-620S 
Manoeth 



S93 



TrccsvTtaau 



1VIOLCH 



tSojyJ 
IJSojti 






^tdMOiiKa^aml 
Sa wtirrl Cajjr 
CrdrO-jp. 

alia Ttpaai* 

• LcxlaadSaa4 

Ftv Dtk iryCfk C*nh AnfdiJ 
ffi 00 fur yd n ifwJ muii 

(706)876-0111 

(800) 503-5150 



TREE & STUMP 
REMOViUa 

Land Clearing 
Seasoned Hardwood 

Nordstrom TYee 
Experts Co. 

{Futh/ Insured) 

708-526-0858 



S99 



Scniots 



Mike's Hardwood 
MULCH 

•W Oak '25 per ye. 
^aiarlMaldi'JOBwyi 

Kk^Oiawaoadapa'BOprrr* 

•Brad, waoakkaai »20 arr yi 

Top Sod Avatttbk 

Sf* tiding AMittltlt 

rree Dtfivtry 

708-546-3613 
1-800-430-6262 



WAXING OR TWEEZWG 

OH NO! 

Try permanent hatr removal 

tor men and women. L apt, 

dan, arms, legs, back, butts. 

bfcWs Ceruned. Artvpm ap- 

poktmorti. 3-iocaflom Free 

brochure and consutafloa 

ELECTROLYSIS 

BY SHERRY 

(706) 244-1640 Main office. 



AX real wtju *S*rtir% to thai nrm^t^a k a^«J U t* FcJcil ?* 

otni-iiwa baaad ea race, cater, ratlajaa, to, kanaVaf, hamad aafta er 
ealotul ort pa, ar aa USertioa ta auks aay audi arekrtnoa, 
oiaSSSBBS, ta tat ult, rental ar laanria| at beuUaa, 



la aas'fan. h« IXatk llj=an Bc^i Kct pnKU* 
aaaa an hanky alarmed tut i] eaxlinai awartMal t» anOaaat aa aa aqua] 



Tiriiriylataa(earrfrrlnilna.fdfarla-(iaiaiirdilkaiatt>Tlaiiitill 
aWall-»Q649SOKN 



i=r 









3 



- 






"■-'". .. _. ■ 



■ix ... -»J 



— ., 



May 26, 1795 UbkvJ Ni^Aptr. CLASSIFIED 







U h:ii:s \CW 
On the Market 



[OFFICE SPACE) 
FOR RENT 

In Lake Villa 

Prise Location. 

For Information 

P If ate CoU 

(708) 587-8436 

or 
(708) 358-1330 



500 


-Homes For Sale 



500 


Homes For Sale 



500 



Homo For Jole 



•FOX I 



1 



GUILDER CLOSING OUT 
HOUSES AT REDUCED 
PRICES! Ready tor your Urn- 
•y . Al have energy efftrtor* ' 
thermopam windows, 2x8 
wafts (R-20). R-38 c*«Inrjj. 
FIN ANCINO AVAILABLE, 
i contact salt, rarttoptton po*- 
&L*o on somo 

'CRYSTAL LAKE -2- story. 
3-x bedroom. 2ai garage, 
eooded lot. nf*of rights. 

-«-iJ*©.fJow S 1/4.000 

i LAKE • LARGE 

-UXE CEDAR/BRICK 2* 

wih Engash baeemerrt 

I -acre*. 4-bedroom. ? 5 

lbs. |acu/zL nreplace. 3-car 

Too many upgrade 

Rati Rawly to move-In 

iS J? »|000. Mow $255,000. 

• Mchenry ranch a-bed- 

room. ? 5 bams. ? S-garag* 
Engish basemen*, dock, vaul* 
od t'eKngs Must soo" 
HO» PQa ^ NowSi64ja00, 

*LOO HAVE UWOCM COS*. 

STMUCTIOH: FOR SALE 

'■ "CRYSTAL LAKE • Brick* 

t Cedar 2B00*qJL. a^edroom 

k mncti. 3.5 cat garage. 

V O 4 0.OOO. NOW 5379/00 
"Let's UiLh 
WAUCONOA-tSlAND 
g|AKE • TrHevei 3-c*earoom. 
Trim stage U ta-ooo. 
Now jvw.900 
lanch 3-b*droom, 2-bath, 
bejemert- Near compb- 
I l iO.POO Now $1 59J0OO 
IcHENRY-ULY LAKE 

1*1/2 bath ranch, 
garage. S 129.000 

IcCULLOM LAKE 

•era datuza 3-bedroom 

3-car garage. Ful 

. fiao-OPO Now 

:all quilder direct 
save oh above 

>US£S. (701) S26-*30€ 



SALE BY OWNER Fc* 
»iYBf/Tk4*3A/i Beaullul 2- 
3bodroom UJuj horna, 
t-TOOsq ft, 2-1/2 cat gang* 
overlooking Fo* RVor 
118S..000. (414) 534-2234. 

'OR SALE BY OWNER 
law construction OuaMy 
3 bedroom. 25 bath. 2 
lory, ruB bes-ament, al oaX 
beautfful tot, ncv a park 
new appAancet r> 
$130,000. CaI for Ap- 
tmert. (4 14)889-8563. 



f o« Lake 

INV 




ALERT 



urJ 

bfl 



WATERFRONT. 
INCOME PROPERTY 

1 Homes, 4 rentals toUl. 
Very good income, adja- 
cent tot also for site. 24-w, 
notice needed to show. 
Asking $310,000 

For private appointment 

call (jyne Jone* or |an VSS'le 

3674686 FjJU Of 240 

RE/WAX 
Suburban 

i:W4 5.hu'rwaukecAw. 
Libertyville, Illinois 



BIO HOME SMALL PRICE. 
5-bodrooms, 3-baths, den, 0V 
ntngroom, bkj now kitchen, 
first floor laundry room, bail- 
ment, dock. PrudenUal Pre- 
ferred Property. 3208.000. 
Lon Qfuhfks (70S) 541.5000. 

You CAN , own your own 
home I No dowry *,ym« n t on 
MAm material*. *rtf»c{,-v« 
conitrucuon firuncJrtg. C*S 
MJ«* Hornet tod»y. 1-800- 
343 2884 ext',1. 

LIBERTYVILLE OPEN 
HOUSE . 1715 SUNNY' 
VIEW, SATURDAY AND 
SUNDAY. MAY 27-28 1pnv 
4pm. Wooded 1/2 acre lot.'- 
Cedar contemporary ranch. 
Light oak oatm kftchaa Al 
new apptanoat, 3-bodroorm, 
1*1/2 baths, fireplace, ?■ 
daefcs. 2-car detached ga- 
rage. $153,900. (708) 
10-3830, No Agents, 

NEW CONSTRUCTION In 
SPRINO GROVE. Newest 
MA*xfvtstort*. Ranches, and 2- 
stonas. Deslgnad for your 
needs. Starting under $200. 
FUTURA CUSTOMS. (70S) 
546-2080. 

SPRING GROVE BY OWN- 
ER. Cory 24>odroorn, 1-bsth 
ranch. 1-1/2 car garage, new 
osfc ktchsn and bath, wood 
burring fireplace and cedar 
lanced yard. $100,900. CaI lo 
i (81 5) 875-2501. 



NEWER HOME FOR SALE 
'A Landscaped pa/adrte' 3- 

bedroom, 2-bath, 2-tnxk ga- 
rage, tufi unfinished base- 
mont. slualod on double loL 
Calhodrat ceaVrg In Ivtng and 
dkwtgrooms, klchen and mas-* 
ler beroom. Dinfngroom has 
glass patio doors out to wood- 
en dock. Central air. water sof- 
tener and al other appliances 
kiduded. Fantasy design gold- 
fish pond wth patio and fro pi 
A-oa. Inckjdes 100x85 water 
front tot wth boat dock adja- 
cent to house. (708) 
073-0183. 



CAMBRIDGE COUNTRY 
2 story, 3 bedroom, 1.5 
both, Irving, dining room, 
oat -in kitchen, (amity 
room, 2 car garage, ftre- 
ptace, wood deck and 
fenced yard 

$168,900 
(708) 566-0798 



MONTH-TO-MONTH 
RENTAL. Avatabte June 1st. 
Wldwood, 5-fOom. 2-bed- 
room home. $875/month. 
Round Lake Park, 7-room, 2* 
bedroom, with 2-1/2 car ga- 
rage. $72Smvnth. Cat Doris 
lor Information. HOME 
TOWNE REALTY (708) 
223-7355. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 5- 
bo dro om, 1*1/2 bath, Grays- 
Lato schools. $8SO/month plus 
doposlt and utilities. (708) 
548-3720. 

HON 2-BEDROOM 

RANCH, stove and refrlgsra- 
lor furnished. Avalabte June 
1-4. $59u/rnor<h, renter pays 
uusltos. Security and refereno- 
aa raquvad. (708) 872-4086. 



GURNEE TOWNHOUSE 
END ural. Woodtand Has, 
new sodSon. 34098 Whfla Oak 
Ln. PnVale patio, faces woods. 
2-bedroom, loft, 1-1/2 baths. 
oMngroorn, 2*1/2 car garage. 
air. neutral decor, all appflano- 
es. window treatments. Aval- 
abte now. Fkndbto toase. (815) 
478-8221, pager (815) 532- 
4894. 



514 



CoooVTcwo Homes 



WAUKEGAN DUPLEX, 

TEN rrinutes from base. 2* 
bedroom. 2-balh. laundry 
fecMies. $850ymonth plus uta> 
Das. Credl check. No pats. 
(708)336-9123. 



Michael Lescher 

"Your Link to the Chain" 



I OPEN HOUSE | 

Son day, May 28 

1 • 4 p.m. 

Sr*wlo^f*-rCon*-x1cr. 

3tMdr.2IA2rxrnU 

txiso 2corgarogAoi 

opc*anc« r-ctxkKi 

Oot trm/dock. on 

Ibea/fiibt. WJpcvoi 

ctosng coth and 1 

port. A9angSI3 ( ?. X 

OA fer drocJcru: 
(414) 669-6563 




New Ranch, Boat Slip, 
Nature Preserve 

D*J we oat your attention? This 3 bedroom ranch feature* 
a Q'eat room with catrwdral ce<fcng. fvepiaca A sitters to 
cedar decs ovoftocJun-j a natuo presorve. Groit maT.ior 
surte. waBt-out basament 8 3 car girago on wooded 1/2 
acre In the Chain O* Lakes' newest devs^xment for 
8240,800. June Completion. 



Re /Max Advantage 

(708) 395-3000 




MILLRACE 

The inrtovstrve design of r* 2584 square toot MaVace presents a Boor plan that la not on* a»»c- 
twa, but luncbonaL Tha conSgursDon permrts ■ free-flow ol foot iraffc throughout ff»e home. 

Slep into the barrel vsufled errtry and a cascade of water from the handsome fountain rnparts a 
tnervjy g/ee*ing Visitors can store coats and rain gear in the nearby doset 

Oroeey berwd r» fountain, a wood stove spreads wanrrrh rrto a targe, open Sv-ng room VautMd 
ceftngs and r**n skytghts onhsneo th* cciy area, whore famrfy and friends can gamer for good cov 
vtxsston, or play the latest board game. 

The wafc-througn kitchen wd cortatrvy please the cook in the house. The abundance of teatu-es 
hart aaows rrwals to be prepared and served wd. ease. Rxmal meals may be eaten to the a^aeam 
fcvwg room. wh*e the oatng bar and nook Kxommodato less kvmal occAStora AddnonaJ tetchen tea- 
tores rtdude: a targe wak-n pantry, appiance comer, raised dahwasher, Wand coowap, and a gen- 
erous garden wvtdow. When tve weather Is nee. sot up the bartjocue on tne covered back deck. 

The left wwg of toe home tocorporatas s smal storage room, wrto bufl-in Irontng board, a modest 
ouest surta w3h pnvat* bato, end the luxurious master tuna. Here, toe roomy sleeping area n skyu. 
as Is toe prrvaie spa. Other amaraoes include a separata vanay and tky« prtvate batoroom, wnh show- 
er and overtired tub. _ 

The rtgrit wv*g has two taJr-sued bedrcoms. each w«h sn-ple closet space A ful bath is in between. 
A itatrcase n the halway leads to a 430 square loot ar-c 

Make soma popcorn, and you and your guests can s4 in comfort and watch yot* tavonte mcvw to 
me farrwy theater, cornpieta wO» bysiHn entaruinment cemer. A sUeabie utfity room. w*t deep sink 
sbuts the theater. • 

The two-car garage has s shop-ttortgo area wan lonc^bo^^ work bwxh.Also housed rwa is the 
r-rwgy eftcicrt soUr water heating s>-4tr*-n 

For a study kt of ma UlLLRACE (334-150]. send $10 00. to Landrrark 0*vgr», P.O. Do« 2307- 
LP60. Eugene, C*R 97402 (Be surf to speciy pan narre & nurnber). For a co?ecix>n of pUn books 
featurrvj our most poputar home pjan*. send $y) to tandmanc 



FOR RENT 

Waukegan Townhouee in 
quiet ncij-hbrxhood near St 
Thcrwe.^ BR, stove, 'fridge, 
C/A, full basement w/laun- 
dry hook-ups. SadO/i 



2 BR Delux* Unit, secured 
entrance, stove, 'fridge, dish- 
washer, A/C coin operated 
laundry, Zion. SadfVao. 

1 month security deposit. 

no pets, good credit a must. 

Call Russ, Nancy or Judy 

al 22*4800 



518 



MoMe Moras 



MANUFACTURED 
HOMES: BUYING, tefltog. 
need fkianctog. or an appras- 
sal tot us heap. Ctoan updat- 
ed, 2 8 3 bedroom homes In 
area parks. Stogie*, doubles 
and aspAndo*. New tingle 
and sodtonal (34>*droom) on 
dtaptay at our new tocaflon 
Russel Rd. A Old Hwy, 41. 
Parts and service, mobee 
home atoraga. Serving Late 
and Kenosha Counties since 
1952. Lehman** Manufac- 
tured Homes. (70S) 
■38-1 MS. ' 

MODULAR! - OOUBlf WlOES 
• SINOUW10CS • TWO 
STORY MODULAR ON DIS- 
PLAY! FOUNDATIONS 
BASEMENTS ' GARA0.ES • 
WELLS * SEPTJCS.WE DO tT 
ALL It FREE STATEWIDE 

oarvERY/srr. R1L£Y 

MANUFACTURED HOMES I- 
800-708-1541 

TOOAY'S MANUFACTURED 
HOMES ARE M0R£ HOME 
THAN YOU IMAGINED. 
MANUFACTURED HOMES 

ARE WELL-CONS TRUCTED 
AND BEAUT IFULLY 0E- 
StONEO TO MEET YOUR 
HOUSING NEEDS. FOR MORE 
INFORMATION ABOUT 

MANUFACTURED HOUSMO. 
CALL THE ILLINOIS MANU- 
FACTURED HOUSING AS. 
30CUT1ON AT 1-8O0-2S2- 
9406. 



520 



Apanrersb For Rax 



EAST ZION DEST VALUE 
***StucBo. $385/monlh pkrs 
eledrtc, heat paid. Lease/se- 
curfy depot!. No pets. Sec- 
tion 8 not available. Credit 
check. (708) 831-5388. 

EAST Z1ON-0EST VALUE, 
"*1 -bedroom lumtohed. 
$4 IS/monlh ptus utMlet. 
Hardwood floors Laese/se- 
curty deposl. credl check 
and references S«ctlon 6 not 
rwaiacee No pets (708) 831- 
5388. 

GHAYSLAKE 1-8ED- 
nOOM OVERLOOKING lor* 
est preserve. Poof utlftes, ca- 
ble, appAances, garage. AvaA- 
abl* July 1st. No pets. Securi- 
ty. $660ffl**nth, (708) 
W-73S3 

GRAYSLAKE AREA 

LARGE l-bedroom apart- 
ment on frst floor, to kwefy 
nekjttoorhood. Huge waft-In 
ctoset Orvtla rnsnager. LlaV 
ryfoom. Securty deposM pka 
i-*4erencas. $585Anonlh. (708) 
273-00.**? 

GRAYSLAKE AREA SPA- 
CIOUS, new. 1 -bedroom 
apartment wflh den,- waah- 
er/dryer. (taposaf una Securi- 
ty depots plus references 
$fl^*month. (708) 223-0022. 



IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 

EASTERN DTYtSI ON 
Harvest Savings Bank. FSS tVa Dubuque 
Savings and Loan Association 

Plaint". Case No. 94 C 6646 

VS. * Judgo NORDBERG 

Ronakj Fme and EBon S. Firw. Norwest 
Fmandaf fikiobi Inc. and Household Ratal 
Services, . 

Defendants. 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSI ONER'S SALE 
PUR RLE NO. 37048 

(TT IS AOYtSED THAT a«TERESTED FARTIES OWSULT THOR 
OJffli ATTORNEYS BEFORE BflXXNG AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Pubfie Nottoa b her«by grvan pursuant to ■ Judgement 
enter od to the above ernstd cause on JmM OJZ 1999 

I. Alan Uifla. Special C-ommistioner for this court wj on Juty 5. 
1995 at fhcThour of 1 ^0 p.m. at the front door of the Lake County 
Courthouse. 18 N. County Street. Waukegan, Illinois, tel to the 
highest bidder for cash, the folowmg described premises' 
32 Montgomery Lane. Vernon HM, 1 80081 

T he inrprovements on 1h9 property consist of tingle tam»y. 
akrminum wth brick, raised ranch with an attached garage. 

Sale Terms: f 0% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, cert-fied funds No refunds The tale thai be tubfect to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The properly wfl NOT be open for inspection 

The Judgment amount was $99,533.84. 
. Upon the tale being made toe purchaser w>J recerv* 
Receipt of Sale which wJ entse the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified data unless the property a ledeemed according to taw 

For tofermation can the Sales Orfcer at Ple-rrtrTt Anomey. 
Frsnor and Foi^t, 30 Norto LaSaOe. Chcago. fl-no* (312) 372- 
4784 trom 1:00 pm to 3.00 pm. Under tanas law. the Sales 
Off cor rs QQJ requred to provide eddrbonal rntormaoon othor man 
that set forth n mi* Notice. 



IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF HUNOrS. 

EASTERN DIVISION 
HOME SAYINGS OF AMERICA. FJL 

Ptainutf(s), 

V. Case No. 92 C C699 

AHMED UUSHTAO SYED, ZED A 
PARVEEN SYED bAJm ZEBA P.l- 
SYEO and TCF BANK SAVINGS. FSB 
Defendant's). 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby grvan thai pursuant to a 
Judgment of Foreclosure entered in fAe above entitled 
cause on March 3. 1995. Alan Goru mtt on June 30, 
1995, at the hour of 9.30 am at front door ol tho Lake 
bounty Courthouso. IB North County* Waukegan. 
Umots, soft to the highest bidder for cash, to wit 
903 East Liberty Street 
Wauconda. IL 60084 

The property is improved with a singlo family resi- 
dence. 

Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance 
within 24 hours, by ccrtifiod funds. No refund*. 

The Judgment, amount was $1 14,099.93. 

The property wil NOT be open for inspection. 

Upon payment in ful of the amount bid. the purchaser 
wis r ocervo a Certificate of Sale which will entrbo the pur 
chaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of 
the sale. 

For information call Luann Reda, McBride Baker A 
Coles. 500 West Madison Street, 40th Floor. Chicago. 
Ilinces 60661. (312) 715-5700. 



IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 
EASTERN Division 
Bankers Trust Company of Ce:-"o*Tvn NA as 
Trustee Under Trust Ayeament Dated 
Ms-ch 1. 1992. Series 1992-1. 

Piarrcfl. Case No. 93 C 7732 

VS Judge Norgl* 

David C. Kroger and Manna M Kreger, 
Amoncan General Finance 
Defendants 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OUR FILE NO. 280SS 
(TT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 
OWN. ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 
Pubic Ncece a hereby g-ven pursuant to a Judgement 
entered n mo above entted cause on Decem ber 18. 19 94. 

I. Mai Tyaon, Special Osmmrjiioner for this court wii on June 
14 , 1995 at me hour of 930 am at the kont door of trve Lake 
County Court House. Waukegan, IB N. County Street. 
Waukegan. ttinois. sell 19 the fr-gnest bidder for cash, the follow- 
ing descrtoed premises: 

26910 W H-ghiard Avenue, Berrtngton, IL 80010 
The n-provemonts on me property consist of smgto larrury. 
brick constructed, two story dwefling with sn attached garage. 

Sale Terms; 10% down by certified funds, balance witntn 24 
hours, cervfed funds. No relunds. The sale thai be subject to 
genoral taxes and to special assessments 
The property wil NOT be open tor inspection. 
The fudgme n l amount was $120,016.81. 
Upon me sale bong made the purchaser will recerv* a 
Certfcate of Sale when wtl entitle the purchaser lo a Deed on a 
tpeciftod date unless me property is redeemed according to law. 
For tok*fm\s&bn eel the Sales Offcer at PtanCtrs Anomey, 
Fisner and Fisher. 30 North LaSaBo. Ctvcago. tftnois (312) 372- 
4784 fcom 1.00 pm to 300 p m . Under tsnors taw, the Sates 
Officer is Dal required to provide additional mlormat-or other than 
mat set forth in this Notice 



-ifci 










1 CLASSIFIED UkclANd NiwspApcns Mat 26, 1999 



520 



Apartment* 
For lent 



520 



Apartment For Rail 



520 



Apartments 
For Rent 



520 



Apartments 
For Rent 



538 



Busiocw Property 
For Rent 



560 



Viani UKMcrcaftt 



568 



Out Of Arts Proptrt) 



FOX LAKE (2) bedroom 
npartmorta. In a park-lko sot* 
ling. PARKWOOD APART- 
MENTSJ (700) 5B7-0360. 

FOX LAKE WATERFRONT 

LARGE 1- bod room apart- 
ment. Air condllonlng, laundry 
tocllitlos. Hoal Included. 
SSGO/moniti plus socurtty. 
(706)602-0034. 

UNION GROVE, Wl. 2-twO- 

room aparlrnores. FREE heal. 
Now carpel. Going Fan. Mini 
blinds. Clow lo schools. No 
pots. From Moo/month. (414) 

442-6844. 

WAUKEQAN- 1 BEDR- 
OOM APARTMENTS, Vic- 
torian aetllno, off atreat 
parking, Available now. 
S4S0/month and up. (708) 
330-0144. 



uimimi i niin i mtin i r 



I 



STATIONSIDE \ 
VILUGE 

5215 11TH AVENUE i 
KENOSHA, WI 

Luxurious LMag 

Apartmatt A Townbouscs 

2 Bedrooms • 2 Baths 

Mull Blinds 

Appliances 

Ganges A wlihlc 

ttcvaiors 

No Prta 

Call (414) 656-1010 

mumniimiminimi iii 



IMPERIAL TOWER A 
IMPERIAL MANOR 
QUIET BUILDINGS 
LARGE SPACIOUS 

APARTMENTS 

AIR CONOrriONING 

PRIVATE BALCONIES 

LARGE CLOSETS 

• PRIVACY WALLS 

CONVENIENT LAUNDRY 

FACILITIES. 

CALL (700) 244-0222. 

NICE 2-BEDROOM 

APARTMENT In Wujkooan, 
downstairs flat In house. Nice 
yard, gars no. laundry (acill- 
Uos, basemont storage. Avail- 
able June. $585/month plus 
uilBitos (708) 240-1089 afler 
5pm. 



************ 
* InglesJdo * 

i ••300. 00 J- 

St. Soctjrlty Deposit * 
it on it 

* On* I Dm Bedroom* 

J •Spacious J 

J -Privets Balconies 



LAKE VIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS. Large 1+2- 
bedroom apartments Lake Vil- 
la. $555 and Scao/month. 
Hoal water, air Included. 
(708)356-5474. 



ISPRINGINTO I 
d DEEP LAKE « 
* HERMITAGE j- 
^ sPAaous i ^ 

A BEDROOM S LTIES 4 
V •Free pu bcxL i 

cootdnjt & wucr ^ 

Air CoodUJoDcr 1a « 
cachunlt f 

* 



1 



IMPERIAL TOWER 
& IMPERIAL MANOR 

Quid BuMnp 

Urp SpxJooi ApaniMots 

.Air Conditioning 

Prrrte Bilconks 

' IsiptQoua 

Prh»qf»Bi 

Cotrvtnicri Lxmdry hriliks 

CALL 

(708) 244-9222 



jL, • U'jJ)-U>- will Carprtlnj? 
«JI 



! 

• 



•Ample closet space 

•Appliances Included 
•Tennis A 
Basketball Courts 
•Laundry bdUtles la 

building 

$545 ® 

149 N. Milwaukee * 

Lake Villa, IL T 

(708) 356-2002 






•Short term leases avail. £ V^+fr-tf- 

Lake view 



t 



J Lakeview J 
* Apartments * 

* (708) 587-9277 * 

* •g-wiato-aicKM* 
************ 



iv rr 



^ 



1/2 OFT 
lfnadVa 



LEX OS SHOW YOU ja 
A NEW WAY OF LIFE iA> 

'Spacious Floor Plans %\ 

•Large Kitchen Windows VJC* 

•CentralAtr W 

'Go* cooklnp, water, 8t heat Included -a^, 

WAraR'SEDGEAPAirrMENTS fr 

250 S, Route 59 ytf 

Incleslde/FaxUke #• 

s(\ £j 708-587-6888 



I 



•^3* _« u ?-. n £ uH! - :,: ! yj Anita 



tmrmm 
aajW fry t-l-M 

AnUoch's 

flnast 2 bedroom 
apenments. 1 bar* or 
1-1/2 baths. Balcony 

or pa Do. Extra 
itorsja. No Pats. 
Asa about senior 
crtban hcenttves. 

Rent %2uAno. * tec 

(708) 836-0655 



WESTWIND 

VILLAGE 

APARBffilTO 

2200 Lewis Are., ZJon 

Appliances • Custom Blinds 

On- siic Manager 

So Pets 

Call 

Martha & Isaac 

(708) 746-1420 

Ltj 



ISLAND LAKE OF- 
FICE/RETAIL apace tor rent. 
High vtaablfty. DtractV on busy 
Rt.178. Private office, plua 2- 
conforence rooms, plus recep- 
tion, and work areas, 
i.ioosqll. $d3Srmorsh (708) 
526-799 9, 

t aaani*M*^Baaaaaaaaa^a«a*^a4SB^M*^fti^ft^Baa*^*^'aaaMass* 

LAKE ZURICH Downtown 
Main Street. No wly remodeled 
Proteaslonai/Medlcal. Up lo 
1200sq.f1. plua Urge lobby, 
storage. (708) 586-2252. 

OFFICE SPACE 180- 
432SQ. ft. available. Third 
lloor Ant loch. Best view ol 
downtown. UlUlles Included 
AvaBable June 1st. (708) 
395-6501 days. 

WAUCONDA - GREAT 
Main Street tocatbn-SOOsqTL 

Newfypalnlod.CalC.DavWal 
(706) 618-3500. 



FREE SEPTIC/WELL 
FIRST FIVE LOTS SOLDI! 
Hurry, choice 1 to 4*1/2 acre 
wooded, roling, levet home- 
slas near Fox River just North 
ol Unots border In Burlington, 
i20 .ooo- Sc 7,000. Detaas. plat 
can OWNER today) (414) 
421-6582. 

LAKE FRONT LOT 
cott.x345tl. On EaM Loon 
Lake, Antloch. Not bu.Wable at 
present. Owner w» co*«p w»lh 
buyer to make bufdable. (706) 
531-0657. 

VACANT LOT 880, Petae 
Lake SubdMslon. Lake Vila, 
Wooded, 56x256 Irregular 
shape. Buttdabte. WaWng ds- 
tance lo lake, private park and 
swimming area. S35.000. 
(706)200-0964. 



I LAKE MURRAY, 5C 
PrVrn Ua* p*op. cartriay tacit- 
«-J inSC 10 acm w<h afbncl 
isoo* td tho-f'<-*. t*e*f-J**tl 
, -a-wrl } hr. dri* lo (tw btacK fr.l 
to m***!**** tnThtMafttrt,! 



HlJn-IIio-vby« 

Call 803-781 -1868 



MICHIGAN 

1 UU LAKE ESTATES 

140 rrt Iron CMOncp tn* 
KiSj-iuool.aoOOae X hem*. air. 
2 U b*. 2 tvi bt*a X rpia en 
100* We trcnaaa 1009 CCC Also 
jioo -4. ft ham. aa, aba, 
fm -.fed. 135- feoretgt. tftW. 
CsJ Kay WMBsk Cam RaaSxaa, 61 s- 



530 



Rooms For ! 



Round Lake 

CommarrcioJ 
Store Front Units 
trith 600-800 •<ptar« fW< 
U«al«d dowmown R«U»d 
Lake on C«l«r l.»k- I'd 
M fM I frr-ai U«in lUUfra. I 
Ufiil «TtiLlU« •rldl luv 1 
Unlr^jwm apl. wilk ilo* tfrsaU 
COTUMffrciaJ limii'ii im*. 
Aj-jpl* p« rVln- • *»d»U* . 

(708) S46-749I 



LAKE GENEVA 
AREA 

2-1/3 acre heavily 
wooded lots 

Perk tested for coevcnlioetl 
t-rpdc lyuc-i. Nmri) (as, elec- 
tric and fibone al kst line. I lortca 
allowed. 3 mik» cut of Lake 
Cenrva on Manondale V.6 

(414) 248-2019 



MICHIGAN 

40 if ilea North of Uuskegott 
By Owner * 49 acres 

to itvrmnwn tnar ai )n 



(Om to n Saw n ail aAw 38 ywara) 
400 toot baach en GSrer Ute 
tCTOtt I'om OAMO DUME5 Lit 
Otvatopment Icr co<po<aee/eamp 
ne*ai canaw c« dr we i wrea aei tor 
(xv*i* *«Utei II J U §1*473- 

itoatu «■ ta*j^?sj 



564 



RrtorWaoioo 
Rentals 



NORTHERN MI. 

***** Lata 204" ttnoacseae 
WMWt Wj jaa j SjSsy Z taary, • tt 
fxr-*. txnal dr*xj n!v*taMi nv, 3 

6t\ BjSSeaJ SUVOcn A br««i*««T 

to i ear gat, tMaffa* m^romx 
lurjn home or Ideal lad A 
lan^aMr. row eoo wojfcj OMfta 

A8SUM f«sir% Sls.T17.ttSO 

•r aoo-717 saeo. 



FURNISHED SLEEPING 

ROOM SOOAper week. Refer- 
oocos. (708) 566-2665. 

PROFESSIONAL FE- 

MALE, looking for same, to 
rent 3-bodroorn house In Fox 
Lake. Bedroom wtth private 
bath. SlOO/week plus haf utu- 
llos. Available immedtatery. 
Full access to house. Please 
cal Kalhtoen (706) 567-4524. 

ROOMMATE WANTED. 

Large roon wtth aflached bath, 
laundry and kitchen prtvloges. 
No drinking or drugs allowed . 
S340/monlh. utlWios Inckxled. 
(706) 740-0813 Rose. 




LAKELAHO NEWSPAPER'S 

CLASSIFIEDS 

(708)223-6161 



SUMMER COTTAGE. Fur- 
rsshed, s i * a pa I. East Loon 
Lake. Aftloch, Season only 
May-September. (706) 

&31-0657. , 

' Check The 
Homes In 
Lakeland 

Classifieds 
Call 

(708) 223-8161 



MONTANA 

Red Lodge. 2.79 ac w/14S2 si 
noma. \Awy low catme. Ofeet 
rewement area Mtna, trees, 
Pnvacyl 1/4 ml nearest neigh- 
bors. 1 hr Yelowstone Pk. 
t370K ODO By owner. Cal 
4064464424 tor detaJFav 




tL • Very pvL ft secluded 

SO ee»*t en lev* rwkesl lake atong 
r^avioMiWw Zh«a aswseaeatel 

ChcS9a AJ r*\jr» t*r>mx*l fc-> 
tm nr/i & art paved nmX to> 
uw.« sewn ot teo iwalxc « 

betfc4tor DyOwwt 

309-697-8465 



LAKELAND MORTGAGE MARKET 



(A Service Of Mortgage Market information Services And Lakeland Newspapers) 
day's bost rates 



Call for tooay 

& financial updates... 

708/312 976-8500 75c/mlnute 

http7AArww.interest.com 



Wtl 



TW1 



mvm 



uxx 



cart 



5% 
5% 



f 



708-295-5554 



Block & CO. 

6 - lyrARM* O/Cal 

B 30-yrFix* (VCaR 

ZERO POINTS, ZERO COSTS. 

NO APPH, NO TITLE, NO BANK FEES. 

(A) 2S4 Market Square Ci. , Lako Forest 60045 



60* rJaysTiidi/Rrf 
GO+tey*?udUM 



wri 



rm 



nun 



%aom i oo 



can 



Midwest One Mortgage Services 708450*5000 

7.B9 30yrF« (V300 5% 60oays 
8 30yiFHA 0V265 *3% 4S08ys 

65 lyrARM' 0V265 3% 45days 'FHA 

Leu than perted credit, we servs you loo! Se hibla EsparViL 
(0) 501 W. North Ave., Molrose Park 60160 



15 yr Mortgage Rates 




tntm 



n» 



Central Federal savings 

7.5 2yT/6mo.ARM 0/750 10% 

7 lyrfBmaARM 07750 10% 

Fl vc year fixed pymnL rate adjusted semiannually, 
Jumbo toanj also available. Ratts win vary. 
(C) 1601 W. Belmonl Ave., Chicago 60657 



312-528-0200 

60 days 
60 days 



U.S.A. Mortgage Corp. 

7.89 30yrFo* 0/350 5% 
6.75 lyrARM 07350 5% 
85 MyrFwt 07350 5% 



708-456-0090 

60 days *IH0A 
60days 2$ 
60 days ♦ Jumbo 



Columbia National Bank 

855 30VTFIX 07290 10% 
625 lyrARM* 0/290 10% 
7.7S 571 yr ARM* 07290 10% 

Suburban (708) 775-6606. 

(0) 5250 N. Harlem Ave., Chicago 60656 



312-775-7500 

60 days 

•Con!. A Jumop 
"Cool. S Jumbo . 



Liberty Bank for Savings 312-792-1031 

7.75 30/15 Balloon 1/300 10% 60 days 
725 5yrBanoon 1/300 10% 60days 
7.375 7yrBaDoon 1/300 10% 60 days 
Jumbo I »ro pL loans available. Pteasa call forrstis. 
(C> 71 1 1 W. Fosler Avo„ Chicago 60656 



^s* 



atany wr prga- wrJi *• w hm offices In Florida 5e hath EipaftoL 
(Q) 7234 W, North Ave. Sio. Mil, Elmwood Park 60635 



30 yr Fixed Mortgage Rate Comparison 



3 & 5 yr ARM MORTGAGES 

based on O points 




30 St 15 yr. Fixed Comparison 

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FJxed Rate Mortgages 



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Consumers or lenders, 
call Robin at 706-834-7555 



1 ! Of UO Hl.no,. H«iKl«m>il Uoflgtg* LtC«rr»«« i •. 
(A) Uae^mj» IWi^, ([(/Unrt^j. \Ux*Bt. (C) tW* fJ)J tia^Vji A 
ton IW!«w *ii*=i to di*^. irtroa i%*c* fturr»yO«>«: i/i»l 
lntotm»fcori Hteg»n»anSy ODtrpSwl by Moflg^s* tiaAal tricjmaton 
S*«vic««, nol aflawlwj •*» any hwicial knaiaubon m r**l Mill 

Iyw*, and la be S swad lo tM aca«*la UJ hal «wr«r«*d 
o Copjr^j 190/, iiee, iw*. itwo, tboi. i w? ten, icea. itos. 
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1 yr ARM 




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May 26, 1995 LaIccUmJ NcwspApcH CLASSIFIED 




568 



Out 0( Arts Propcrt) 



\Kt LOT SALE! E«ut«-S«9 
tmttkt* vy/privata lake 
rcett In Kantueky, from 
1900. Financing,, Free color 
jchure, C*M now 800-858- 
133. tit 33S0 V/ood!*nd 
eraa 



MISSOURI 

|10 ac certo ranch. 1t4 yr 
Id. 6800 iq. ft Colonial 
lanslon. 5 br, 5-1/2 ba (il 

a), Ai trx» •monrtie*. 28 mL 

Sprtogttd (SW MiMourt] 

Il .S Milton. Oy owner. C«I 

17-466-3355 For Deiaile, 



NEBRASKA 

crime, boautful ro&ng 
tOOOAc$45CK& ICO Ac 
l75Kdo«dod land, 2br homo 
ea. farm & pasture land. 
from pound. 5 ml from 
Dyownor, 

Coil 308-626^343 



TEXAS 

1, 110 Acres near SanAngeto 
l Colorido Rwor. Strong cat- 
i country. Sopo r door, quad, 
1/2 rrsnorsl SuUt*o 
largo da try operation. 
Itvo C Lcw.VAgont CeJ 
1 0-733-1 MO tar details. 




OREGON 

Roseburg on iconic 
Umpqua Rrvor. 3ac, 

. 1-3Mba. 2300sq.tt., 
, wolor rights, (rocs, 

acy. $285,000. By 
Ca!1 503-496-3119 

dotalis. 






UTAH 

0*n 1000 acfM of your own 
flVw rangoiand tucked eoa*wt 
fv> ldir>o state Una. Hunt 
biidi. c*oo- En)oy owning 
fometung of your own cov 
od w«i tree*. $250 par ac 
ownor. C*3 601-77O-ai64 




MICHIGAN 

MIDLAND COUNTY 



lata Jot »a a kA. Pm* be* 

tCA IWautM tkAMU kwn kg 
Ok*. Tim* **kmiJ e»op r* p«l 
ejorarpoflt I3*OXByo-«W 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

you tuwt pUmt cU»«.Vil 

nriutnc Mth UV L*lw 

rxl Kc«-»;'«{</» you m*y 

f*vrrr* » ■olalradlna' *Lalc 

fras ar»4f>rf firm rr 

lfi( paymrttl lor (hta 

>»:rv» Td rrrrfvr prop> 
rrrdit to your •< taunt. 
(MtynvmU i* your Lmkt 

f lr w p«>W »hrnU»jrn 
it br ramie at Umtrrd 
(ttrrrlnl In 

taidiaa 1 aimMiMin) 
ro »*I 3CV1 

so a. waJt*wy at. 

onjriUi.*. il eooso-aiea 



570 


Qrxvry loti 



t-CEMETARY LOTS, 

1IGHLAND M«morUJ Park. 
JrxVf current vahio. 

H.70Oboth. (7061 872-4741, 



f.'iWiS Ihtlimf.. 



iDti;»KU»v;ixsKyi 



Check Here 

in the 

Lakeland 

Classifieds 

Before You 

Buy! 

Call 

708-223-8161 




704 



Recraearui 
Vehicle* 



710 



Boafa/MoCotV 
Etc 



SJ.000 LESS. WINNE0A- 
OO, 1089, 2Bfl.. daan, toad- 
, ad, low rrilM. $26,000, 24fl. 
Molorhomo. $6,000. (708) 
526-7006. 

1M1 FORO CLASS B Mo- 
lomomo Van, 20,104 miles. 
One owner. Fuly aal con- 
tained, 'Musi ael due lo death 
li farnty.* J 19.000. (706)546- 
4473 
(708)356-1442. 

MOTOR HOME, 1984 
Toyota wth new axle. Mooring 
al safety require moots. 
56,000 rnjiea. Vary good conrJ- 
iwn. 17 mfiea par gallon. 
aieaps 4. $7,300Vbest.(70a) 
940-1647. 

RECREATIONAL TRAIL* 
EH, 24FT. aiaopa 7. sol con- 
tained, 2 eating drmrtos. large 
refrigerator, new Urea, great 
lor camping. 2 wardrobe cab*- 
nets, targe bathroom, original 
owner, custorrrnade. $3,900 
MUST SEE4706) 4 S3- 1666. 




710 


BoiVMoton/Bc 



17FT. BOAT, FISHING and 
water ail 66 raiy. 67 Johnson 
SSrp outboard Easy loader 
traaer wth electric winch. Roal 
good condiwn Oarage kept. 
Vi .200 best. 2-down ringera, 
4-thhlng poios wth roots, tack- 
b box wan lures, 5250. Con- 
tad John ST. (706) 223-4748 
home, (70C) 546?636 work. 

1975 CLASSIC 22FT. 
Oattn CrutMr, 166 Merc 10. 
tandem E'Z Loader traaer. 
Must soil (706) 731-1272. 

1864 NACRA (.0 CATA- 
MARAN SAILBOAT WITH 
TRAILER. $1,500/BEST. 

CALU70C) 336-1223. 

IMS 1IFT. STINGRAY 
boat open bow w*h lBOhp. 
how*, l u l w and 
boat oqytpmonl. Sd^OOtwst. 
1706) WW-^45 

1818 4-W1NNS LIBERA- 
TOR 3$0-Z70rp OWC Cetom. 
thru hut exhaust. AMTM ca. v 
tetta wth wealhorband rarjo, 
depth Under, cudoy cato*n 
Coctpt cover and Otrunl cov- 
er. Caauna tandem axie traaer. 
515 ,500, (414)857-2652. 

1616 DYMA-TRAK UFT. 
ftihand aid. Low hours, many 
eitraa. mttm condatlon. 
56,650(706)843-0331. 



1991 20 FT. WITH CUDDY CABIN 

V6 Crvovy 43 h. 28 hxxn on boot ood onoino. Power 

iteenna. M aougoi $ ortea sto-ei prop. Trrjtcf end 

eittcs tvAjdod. S9800 cr pott botf o«et 

708-356-5474 
B&6sa&sss6i€«!«B&ess* 




710 



BoabVMotor*/ 
Etc 



ALUMICRAFT 

Hfl. wthlraJhsr. 

Bring caahfl 

Marriage perxSng sale if 

(706) 587-3244 

leave rnoaaage. 

BOAT 1979 CENTURY 230 
Cuddy. 231L bng. V ■« Chovy 
OMC, IO wth traitor. Urge 
cuddy cabin, new carpel, blge 
pump. Dual bartenea with 
switch. Now speakers, Ben- 
nett trim cab, head, 5-propa, 
Includes Kneoboarris, tube, 
aid-rope, |acfceU, etc. Mce, 
dean, large, attractive boat. 
J5,S00 (708P95-5940 
(706)636-1133. 

BOAT FOR SALE . 14R. tv 
bergtasa fishing boat and trail- 
er, SOhp. Johnson $450.(706) 
567-9113 

BOAT FOR SALE. 20ft. 
Crostlnar. dosed bow, 168hp 
Mercrutsor, low hours. E-Z 
Loader traler, Sony, Murrmrv 
bird, lota of extraa. 
t3.7SO*Jaa1. (706) 546^6659. 

BOAT FOR SALE. Mirage 
1969 to, whfe over blue, 4S4 
engino, cudd/ cabin. Includes 
traler, depth gauge, alarm 
system, tul cover and al ao- 
casaonaa. Eaceaert condHion, 
less than 300hrs. Asking 
5?1 r 000 (815) 385-1406 
evontngs. (706) 835-3622 
days. 

BOAT GAL AXIE 18FT. 
Open Bow SO V8 IO. CaJdna 
trator, new Herlor. Must soef 
54,0Oabost reasonable offer. 
Ask lor Ron (AIL) 365-2000, 
or after Gpm (815) 385-5470. 

CHRISCRAFT CATALINA 
1965, 29tl., 225hp. canvas, 
low hours, asking $20,500. 
Must set. (706) 350-5521. 

GALILEE 15FT. SAIL- 
BOAT and trator. extra aaas 
$1.200. <414)B7/-P6S3 

■ AIL OO AT tFT. Boston 
V/haier Squal. '$350t«st. 
(706) sar-5cr», 

SEA-GOO'S 2 lo choose 
from $3,100 and $3,400. 
Many extras, (706) 526-6120. 

SHORE STATION BOAT in 
7000 ti capacty, 3yr old 
electric Ml. Uke new. 

55.000 (708) 26S-t?ae. 

OOAT LIFT, CANOPIES, 
SNOWMOBILE, PON- 

TOON. AND JET SKI 
TRAILERS BY TRITON. 
Check my pricos. Dans Surf & 
Turf. 1-600-646-2744. 



9 J MERCURY 

OUTBOARD MOTOR, 

$450. 

(706) 567-3244 

leave message. 

SPEED AND SKI BOAT 1Bft. 
Concord Mactt 1, outboard, 
traler, open bow, 17Shp Mer- 
cury 08 mjoded, nose cone, 
fa/dralc transom, fufl gauges, 
storoo, 2 SIS props, 60»MPH. 
excelent condition. 

$6,400megollabio. (708) 

587-O302. 



1994 JOHNSON, SOHP out- 
board motor, tner, long shaft, 
aledrtc start. Used 2-llmea. 
Asking Sl,950.feesl. (706) 
223-1609. 

27FTJIN. CONCORDE 

CABIN CRUISER. Al IDar- 
gtass, 10-1/211. beam, 225hp. 
twin 318 engines, Mi camper 
back, depth finder, sumlog. 
hater, VHF rao», fufl gaftey, 
hot water, shower, eleopa 6. 
Prtvate party. (312) 478-5200 
or (312) 415-0534. 




714 


Cunptflg 



720 



SpOflS bfmfaU k 



10-SPEED WOMANS 
BIKE, $50. >see« gAdor. steel 
frame, $40. No checks. (70S) 
546-2916. 

20IN. BMX AUBURN wth 
araya rims. OK nock. Boss 
cranks, 'must sea.* $450. After 
4:30pm. (708) 39S-2556 

■FT. POOL TABLE, 1/2ln 
state. 2yrs. old, aacnTice at 
5650 (414)862-2306. 

GOLF EQUIPMENT COM- 
PLETE mens rigtt hand gofl 
dubs, bag wth put cart. Good 
condtkm. $75. (706) 

587-1312 



TREADMILLS 0«t Sartou* 
About rriytk»l Trtrwii. Fu« 
S«kdion Of Ratldanbal 6 
Comm«rci*l Unit*. Buy Fac- 
tory Dfcact 6 SAVE! C*3 
Totfay tor FREE Color (Uulofl 
1-800-553-5443 



BOW HUNTINO EQUI^MtNT 
BOW MUWTERS OtSOOUHT 
WAHOtOOSE. AMERICA'S 
LAnOEST ARCHERY SUP- 
PtlER. STOCKS OVER 5O00 
BOWHUHTlfJO (TEVS AT JO- 
*0H OfF RETAIL CALL I- 
COO-735-7ft07 rOA FREE 160 
PAQE CATALOG 



For 




service. 







1872 TRAVEL MATE 
CAMPER, sJoepii 3-«, pro- 
pane stove, wafer pump, sink, 
cooler, thdgo. Good condttton. 
Sl.lSObost. (708) 726-7215. 

1990 COLEMAN POP-UP. 
stoops 6. garage kept, sMc. 
stove, awning. Used less than 
len times. Mint condition. 
$3.500. (706) 223-6945. 

POP-UP CAMPERS NEW 
1995 Flagstaff. 6-sleeper. 
wide body, furnace, 3-way re- 
frigerator, battery pack. Only 
$2^96, tadory outlet (706) 
?<XS-9600. 



your classified ad. 

If you can't afford to be tied up on 

the phone, save time. Use the 

Lakeland Newspapers' fax line. 

Fax your ad to us in care of 
"Classified". Indicate ad 

classification and the weeks 
you would like it to run. 
Well take it from there! 

If you have any other questions 

about faxing your ad, call us 

at (708) 223-8161. 

FAX: 

(708) 223-8810 

Use the handy coupon below. 

Classified Ad 
Order Blank 

! Word Rate AdS 15 words Vj.25, 1? lor each addict word (pre-paxi) 

15 words 755, 15* lor oadi addiional word (lo bo brJod) 
(Pnvato Party Orty} 

Count words. Phone numbers and 
hyphenated words count as one word. 

Write Copy Below: 



i 



Name: 

Address:. 
Town: 



Run Ad (date): 

Under What Category:. 



Phone: 



Enclose check & mail to: 

Lakeland Classifieds 

30 S. Whitney EO. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

or FAX (708) 223-8810 

We also accept Visa & Master Card 
For more information, call 



(708) 223-8161 






^. 



n i tW j» W ifci " »tl 



■ mm 




CLASSIFIED Uk/lANfl NcwspApcn May 26, 1999 



1 



s 



1 







804 



Cars For Sale 



804 



Car* For Sale 



814 



Sccrlte A Parts 



824 


Vans 



834 



Truckj/Irakn 



1969 CORVETTE COUPE 
350/300. Numbors ma!ch, Au- 
tomatic, power steering, 
power brakes. Gold extortor, 
black Interior. Real sharp. 
511.S00AMSI. (708) 973- 
1154. Leave message. 

1971 CAMARO Z-28, lutty 
roslofod, 350 LT1, 1500 
miles on engine. S 10.000 toesl. 
Ask for Scan, afier 5pm. (706) 
540-6043 

1977 BUICK REGAL, while 
with bkio Landau, good condi- 
tion, 350 V-fl, Eagto tiros and 
spoko hubs, sharp looking, 
3650 (706) 540-2006. 

1977 PORSCHE, 924. Ex- 

clont condition. 60.000 ork> 
nal mHos Novor soen wtnlorl 
Asking 54,900. (708) 
fM0-O667. ■ 

1980 OLDSMOBILE CUT- 
LASS Supremo. Good cond^ 
lion. Priced to selll (414) 
877-2847 

1982 CAVALIER, RUNS 
grout. Musi sell quickly. 
S550.foQ3t. (708) 205-1556. 

CORVETTES 1053 to 1003. 
Over 1501 0n« Loc*tlon! 
Mottly 1072 & older. FREE 
Catalog! 410-592-5006 Fan: 
4t0'603<4242 PROTEAM. 

Boi 006. Napoleon. Ohio 
43545 CORVETTES 

WANTCDII 



1984 BUICK GRAND Na- 
tional, t-type, loaded, high 

.mllos, black and charcoal. 
$4.S0OA>oat, Runs good. (414) 
270-6133. 

1964 MAZDA RX7. Lealhor. 
sir, sunrool, crulso, now 
clutctvtransmlsalon. Excellent 
condition Must soo. Must sel. 
S3,S00*»Sl, (708) 073-06'jQ. 

1985 QUICK SKYHAWK, 
custom, 2-door, 4-cyllndor, 
automallc. 7 IK cortKiod mitos, 
air. nnvlm tleroo, til. Original 
owner, Excellent condl- 
lkjn.(708) 398-6608 
$1.65fMx)sf. 

1968 MAZDA 323 4 -door, 
70K. $2.900toOSt. (708) 
356-1815. (708) 938-0541. 

1966 SILVER MERCURY 
TRACER WAGON.. Excelenl 
condition. Ownor moving 
abroad. $2,600rbost. (706) 
367-8022. m 

1989 CIVIC, 4-DOOH, 5- 
spood, air conditioning, 
$5,400 (706) 587-1034 arlcr 
fipm. 

FORD PROBE GL 1989. 
black with gray Intortor. 61,000 
miles. 5-speed stick shift, 
am/tm sloroo, 33.300. (708) 
520-7533. 

EAGLE TALON 1993, atfck 
shit. 38,000 miles. Uko now, 

310.995. (414)551-0132. 




1991 PLYMOUTH LASER 
RS. Automallc, alr-condalon- 
!ng, powor-wtndows, AM/FM 
cassotto with oqualzor. Grey 
60.000 miles. $9,000, • (708) 
740-1609. 

1993 ' FORD PROBE, S 

speod, very clean, good eondi- 
ilon, power sunroof, air condh 
tiontng, arrvtm cassofle stor- 
oo. Stl^OOibost After Cp.m. 
Ask for Donna.(4 14) 843-4 154 

1994 GRAND PRIX SE, 3.1, 
automatic, air, am/tm cas- 
sotto, ti'i. cruise, remote si art, 
koytoss ontry, ground offods, 
20k. Must soil! Sic.ooo or 
best offer. After 6pm. (708) 
244-Q756. 

CAMARO 1987 Z-28. V-B- 
TPt, auto, many opflons. 1* 
owner, dean, 120k mllos 
$5,200. (706) 72&-2B30. 

CAMARO 1967 Z-28. V-fl. 
TPI, auto, many options. 1 
owner, clean, 120k mllos 
35,200. (708) 726-2B30. 

CAMARO RS 1990, while. 
londod, T-lops. warranty. 
60,000 mllos. Asking 
SO.SOGVbost. (708) 240-0953. 

CHEVY LUMINA, 1990 tAo 
Now. Original Owner, Whlo 
With Rod Inlortor, Loaded, 
35,000/Bosl Call Evenings 
(708)783-9013 or Loavo Mcs- 
sago. , 

CORVETTE 1966. 
RED/RED glass lop, automal- 
lc, good condttton, runs groat, 
8BK mllos. $8,800. (706) 
940^273. 

EAGLE 1092 TALON TSI. 
turbo, 5-spood, powor sun- 
root, )ot black, front wheel 
dnVo, loaded. 50K, oxcolont 
condition. 310.995 (708) 608- 
3967 days, (708) 540-6462 
evenlnns. 

TOYOTA TERCEL 1967. 
maroon 2-door. hatch-back, 
auto-lrans $2,700.(708) 

740-4061 Please teavo mes- 
sage. 



1988 MERCURY GRAND 
MARQUIS. Vory good condi- 
tion, loaded. Widow must sol 
now! $5.500. (708) 367-0304. 

MUSTANG GT 1986, au- 
tomatic, air, T-tops, stereo, 
now tiros, battery. Depend- 
able first car. 32.500/bost. 
(708)623-7187. 

PONTIAC FIREBIRD, 

1991. Extra doan. low mllos, 
automatic, tul powor, asking 

$0,000.(414) M 3-2255. 

TOYOTA SUPRA 1987. 

Whlo with red Interior. Targol 
top. Real good condition (need 
tiros 8 rims) $7,950A>ost, Con- 
tact John Sr. (708) 223-4748 
home, (708) 546-2835 work. 



CHEVY, FORD PICKUP Bod- 
i««. Factory-new, guaranteed 
from 1 1300,00. Doors From 
IBO.OO, Fender* From 
150.00, D«di From 1800,00, 
Bedlinere 1169.00. DUMP- 
ERS. GRILLS, REPAIR PAN- 
ELS, PAINTS, ABRASIVES, 
WINDSHIELDS. RADIATORS. 
Delivery. MARK'S 217B24- 
0184. 



MOVING MUST SELL. 
1966 Oodgo Van. NO rust, 
body completery restored, 
undor coaled prim. Ready tor 
you to customize. Original 
283, 3-speod transmission, 
also 318 onglno, automatic 
Iransmtssion. All parts tndud- 
od, plus many moro. $1,500. 
(708) 740-1045 



824 


Yam 



810 



CJasiicMnlirruc Can 



"1973 CLASSIC" MER- 
CEDES-BENZ 53,000 miles 
280SE 45. 8 cytlndor, fuel ■> 
Joction. Has all rhe same 
features as a $35,000 Okl- 
smoblto Aurora, Instead ot air 
bags and antlock brakes. It 
has powor sun roof, and ail 
stainless stool exhaust sys- 
tem. Priced to sell.(708) 
567-1642. 

CLASSIC 1981 TRIUMPH 
TR7, 56.000 original miles. 
$3,000*081. (708) 356-1037. 



814 



ScrrJccaPwu 



CARRIAGE AUTO BODY. 
Ovor 40yrs. ot serving Lako 
Countyl Certified Irtsuranco, 
computer and fax avalLiblky. 
Professional and Personal. 
Miliary woicomo. (708) 336- 
0334. fax (706) 336-0742. 
1200 Sunset. Waukegan, 



1987 F-350 14FT. cubo 
van, 7tl.-6in. head room, groat 
runner. $6,000/bos1. (815) 
344-0770, 

1987 F-350 14FT. cube 
von, 7ft Oh. hoad room, groat 
shapo and runner. $6,000. 
(815) 344-6770. 

1968 E3S0 FORD CLUB 
WAGON, set up lor contrac- 
tors. Good condlion. 44 .500 
Call allot Opm. (70S) 
740-0454. 

89 FORD E1S0 Corworsion 

van 

70k highway mllos, whto. E»> 

collonl condition. $8,500. 

(414) 245-2665.(414) 

245-2005. 

DODGE CARAVAN 1994. 
Good condtion, 38.000 high- 
way rnlos, Must soil S 14,095 
(706) 249-1505 7:30am- 
4 30pm or leava message on 
voice mall oxl, 11. 

MINI-VAN 1088 AERO- 
STAR. Excellonl condition, 
now ongfne, now shocks, 
$5,500. (706) 587-2320, 




1988 SPORTSMAN 3SFT. 
travel traler. Excellent con* 
flon. 37,000-cash. (708) 
356-7991. 

1969 FORD F-1S0 pickup, 

6 cylinder with cap. $6,600. 

Good condition. (706) 
526-2763. 

CHEVY S-10 1980 Pfclt-Up 
Truck, Like New. Original 
Owner. * Low-Mileago. 
$5,500«osl Evenings (708) 
783-9913 or Loavo Message. 



838 



l|cr?v QqurpoKot 



828 



Four Ited Drive 



1982 TOYOTA 4X4, 5 

speed with 35ln. tkes. Good 
work truck. Ask for Tim. (414) 
862-0247 

1987 CHEVY BLAZER, 
Tahoo odilon. 4-whoel drfva. 
$3,500. Noods work. Cal be- 
toro 2pm or after 8:30pm. 
(708) 546-1871 Nick or Ror> 
na. 

1992 GMC JIMMY, 1 -own- 
or. under warranty. Loadod. 
(708) 438-0009 ovorttngs. 
(700) 450-5007 days. 

FORD 1991 EXPLORER, 
Eddy Bauer Edrtlon, high high- 
way mftas. Rum great. 
$10.0O04>fl!J. (414) 
843-3433 attar 5pm weak 
rwghta. 

JEEP 1963 WILLYS. 
44,000 original mflos. Now sod 
lop, rtrns and suspensaon, Too 
many extras lo tea*! $3,295. 
(414)537-4548 



CLARK SCRAPPER, Hu- 
ll self loading, new motor, 
chains, sprockets, rollers, 
ready to work. $14,500. (708) 
567-7008. 



844 



Moiortyda 



1967 HONDA, CBR 1000F, 
low msos, garage kept, groat 
condition, $2,300. (708) 
546-8244 

1993 HONDA SHADOW 
DELUXE VLX, saddlebags, 
now wtndshlekj, new cover, 
garage stored. $4.000,besl 
(708) 26S-6335. 

1993 KAWASAKI NINJA 
rxfl. great shapo. $4,600»jesl 
After 5pm (708) 358-0765 



848 



Txnlrd To Buj 



WANTED SUBARU BRAT. 

In vory good condatan. 

Call evortngs 

(708)587-1737, 




THE WINNING TEAM 

AHD IH£ 

OAS&flCDS 
£TYOU 

tmf ftf rou 

WAW7 10 GO 




I 



"It's Rented! 

I ran my ad in the Fox Lake Press and the other 13 
Lakeland Newspapers and the apartment rented within 
the two week run. I always get good response from your 
paper. 

Thank you." 

D.S., Barrington. 

* 

"My washer and dryer SOLD the same day the paper 
came out. The caller saw it in the Round Lake News. 
Thanks Lakeland for the quick response!" 

R.R, Libertyville. 

"The response was overwhelming! We had to cancel 
our ad after the first week on our Fox Lake house. We 
only wished we had 30 houses to rent for all those who 
called. 

Thank you Lakeland Newspapers!" 

C.L., Lake Zurich. 



"I was delighted that I got quite a lot of calls after 
placing my ad in the Lakeland Newspapers. I got the 
house rented right away. " 

K.C.,Niles. 

"/ always have good luck with your papers. I've run 
ads with the Fox Lake Press for eight or nine years and 
have always rented the apartment right away. " 

R.S., Mt. Prospect, 

• "We often place our Real Estate advertising with 
Lakeland Newspapers because we know by placing them 
in the Classifieds we are covering all the areas we need. 
Wlien our busy office needed additional personnel natu- 
rally, we placed our ad with Lakeland Newspapers. 
The response to our ad was remarkable. It provided us 
with a variety of people to interview as well as those to 
keep on file for the future. " 

M.L., Antioch. 



What A Standing Ovation 
Looks Like On Paper. 

Lakeland Newspapers Classifieds 

Phone: (708) 223-8161 
Fax:(708)223-8810 



30 S. Whitney. St., Grayslake, ; JTJ60J030 




P 



•m 



Mar 26,1995 UkUwi NtwspApcRs CLASSIFIED 





Ploy Bottor G olf with JA CK N1CKIA US 

!&S\ MM 

Jw9 c 




OVT OOOD GOLFERS 

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PLKXEt> 



tun 
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__ ,^_ ^^ n^ ^p^ amm mm mm mm ■ 

pESCAPE Open to the Public 

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{•ESCAPE GENOA_CITY ( , WISCONSIN 




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FROM TUG 
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TO TMfc 

LOITM<X/r 

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«A|SIMG THE MKM>. 



lUGLL- COWOtTlOMED 
^ feASlOA. 



rt* jfo to Mln.'SouU»eisc of Lake Genev* 

I M. at Wdtmeod. tL CHwy 124 IW). Cwti«* on US 12 **ft ifbr I 

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Enjoy Country Peace St Quiet In 

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Baoquet room* for all occwions 

Golf Vacation package specials 

ResJInfo. 414-279-5281 
Golf 414-279-6311 



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m*hi\<; SPECIAL 

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$20 UKrKKNDS $12 WKhKDVYS 

Willi IIIMulhiN IM'.'-.V 









Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 



To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



; SERVICE, INC. 

FACTORS 

"Call Us For Fast Courteous Service' 

33265 N.Rte. 45 

Wfldwood. ILL 60030 

(708)223^682 

RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL 




SIDING & TRIM ^^SO 

SEAMLESS GUTTERS 

WINDOWS • DOORS 

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Rep air & las u ranee Work 

(708)438-6634 



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Estimates 



Quality 

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Guaranteed 



JACK'S 
REMODELING 

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Dormors • Siding • Soflrt 
Window* • Oocks • Bathrooms 

FREE ESTIMATES 
plus references 

CALL JACK AT 
(708) 546-3759 



i 




~#2Cda, i 
kh Psychic \ 

ir^i Specialist \ 

I There are torcoa Ihal can keep you from I 
j reaching your goals. Gida can hetp you | 
Jin removing the sturnbSng blocks- She. 
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| G4da. psychic epociaJist - let the power | 
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FACE, PALM & AUHA READINGS | 
_7p8-265^278 | 



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SMITH 

SPRRY-BRUSH & RCfLIt 



WATERSEAL 
PAINT - STAIN 



Siding, trim, wood, dfywort biock 
-'stucco, cone tot o. - 

g W© hove trw oip«r*pcp ana tw ctw'pmcw 
-feto co ifvo Jos ng*t 
Fioe Ctltmafcs Reasonable Rates 




(708) 244-2202 ASK FOR MEL 



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Tree 

Service 



•Tree 9ttaovm *Trcc Trtmmiflj 

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(Spfarbirigert 



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Basement Remodeling 
,y^ Kitchens 

^£5^*. Renovations 
Design Services Available 

Call (708) 678-6015 





winnow 

Putty &. Paint Service^ 

•Gia« Replacement .4S X 
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• FREE ESTIMATES* 

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ARCHITECTS 

r". f. ! r,v Crn-.trviot'mi ; 

MUSETTI 

•'.■d.ASSGCiA r : jg .• 
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Kfin t«t" IK«Ul4.tl I M tin 

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•NO JOB IS TOO SMAU," 
FREE ESTIMATES 

ll<«< ^f^-M>4C> 





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DBCKS& 
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Ptoit uUe*. baxha, wbed bum*, wipm 

ind window ptuxm & 10 fcnlt Made of 

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AFTER SrOO P.M. 



TO PLACE 
YOUR AD HERE 

CALL 

708-223-8161 



The Contractors* Network 

j ^j Remodeling? 

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Hundreds of Contractors Checked-Out 
and Ready to Work for YOU/ 

FREE REFERRALS TO QUALITY CONTRACTORS 

(708) 548-F*l4NfiD> 



DONT FORGET 

AN IMPORTANT 

PART OF YOUR 

SPRING 

CLEANINGI 

CLEAR VIEW 

WINDOW 

CLEANING 

FOR A THOROUGH-PROFESSIONAL 
JOB CALL LOU- 

708-363-8715 



J DECK SAVERS + J 

Pressure Washing j^ 

Restoration - Staining ^ 

J »Decks •Siding 

fP • Fences * Docks J 

& Pressure Treated Wood Is ^ 

jl Not Wcatlicrproon A 

INSURED A 

J (708) 395-8428 J 



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SVARAS 
INSTALLATIONS 

RESJDESTTAl ROOFtSQ 

COSTRACTOR 
BLAXD LAKE. ILUSOIS 

(708) 516-2304 

FAX (7M) ( JM7« 

{•irving Norttmm tlUnoi* 

mnd Southm mtf rn WlmcotmkfJ 

•KaoaBne *Raaonl mmpnmjl «r«i 

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Cedar Shln^< *Holifkd Bitmnca FUi 

Kaofing Sv*rcm» •Skjli.fhl t»talbijf« 

ml/or wphetaioa »^«i :t j leak 

rqala with gt««r*«*r«d ranh* 

•Qiissiey cmila fl**htng 

(cut into marlar jobila) 

AS rooft immi immmi f<W m* H»tl «i» •»<) 

Pfc«v« j«J Etfictmt Srrnct 

*r d>«f » li* ^^01 *•" fmrntit}. Whttker 

it it eat jfciftf ir b iv rtpixtd of om milfr 

m»/. yrair e*0 u iMpotrnV to *tf 

C*U U>doj far fir* ttdmau 
ttmm Uomnml 



> ] mMlmmfmmmmmWmmi 




tm%h For 

• Aluminum Cant 

• All Other Scrap Metals 

Induttrtal Aceeunts Wtkoaie 

Chicago Surplus 

11304 260th Avenue 
Trevor. Wl 




* ALUMINUM 8 
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*' Window Trim - References 

■ i j 

w ; ysnyl Replaccmeni Winoovv*: 
*; Work Guaranteed - 

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ilBEAGLE SIDING CO. 

* (708) 526-7222 



Artistic g 
PAqes 

Offering Macintosh 

computer systems and 

consulting with 10 years 

of desktop publishing 

_j experience _. 

(708)395-7229 ~ 



« t 



iii 



EEL= 



CLASSIFIED UktlfvNd NcwspApttts May 26, 1995 



Newspapers Is Your 



s 



uwm 



TO PLACE 
YOUR AD HERE 

708-223-8161 



-To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



• 



G,Si» Service 1 

Carpentry* Electrical 
Plumbing 

AH phases of home 
remodeling & repair 
FREE ESTIMATES 

(708) 587-0937 



Stcffen's Computer 
Service 

Over 8 Yeaiu? 

CoMinrreit Expeiuewx 

CoMrimn Base Sekvice 

•I'miliim S»Hff 'nolof Srmncf 4 Prkrtf 

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*«** im r* #p- • «# —'* ■ « « rr(«* 

r/to*ir 70H-7HMKZI 

fax 70H-7HMfi£0 



r rr*» r »»fMfMj - *ff * Jjrf rrrr/ 



CUSTOM BUILT * 
DECKS $ 



Duractean 

Rated best by 
Independent tests 

Carpet & 

mm. 9 ■ 

Furniture 

Cleaning 

CALL 

TODAY! 



m 



587-2356 
Duraclean 

SPECIALISTS 



Duracloan't 
"Gold Standard of Excollenca" 

(or ovor 60 years 



FROM 



SQUARE 
FOOT 




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Tree Service 



COMPLETE. INSTALLED. 



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FREE ESTIMATES 



SUN=HWEN DECKS 



708-587-8151 

TIUANCItlCi AVAILABLE 



mm 



♦Complete Tree Ctre 

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FREE ESTIMATES - FULLY INSURED 

(7081 949-0036 





Sales & Service 

MOTOROLA 

BRAVO 

lodmfer 

•Pager 

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•Ail Connect Chargee 1 

•On* Month Alrtlme 

•FREE VOICE MAIL -Mor*i c*fl I 

Action Beeper Corp. I 

546-9690 I 

(OOP) 4T»T2aa Bound Lmkm Baech | 



Wo^ 



S&S Builders 

Custom 

Homes & 

Remodeling 

• FREE ESTIMATES * 

on 

Kitchen Remodeling 

and Wood Decks 

(708) 872-8171 



J 



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D0H7 THROW AWAY 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING fT TO OUR 
LAMP DOCTORS, 
FOR REPAIRS. 

WARREN ELECTRIC INC. 

33261 N. Highway 45 

Wlldwood, IL 60030 

(708) 223-8601 




td 



IMA \ 




B£werks 



•Bcscmciti *Homc Impttnaacst 
•Bemodeting •Decontlsg * llardvood floors 

Michael Uckemacher, Owner 

(708) 566-7389 

INSURED 



AREA RUGS FROM 
YOUR SCRAP CARPET! 

CARPET BINDING 
FRINGING 
REPAIRS 

i COMPLETE CUSTOM fit>0 SERVICES 

CUSTOM BINDING SERUICE 

I 708-566-6734 

PICKUP & DELIVERY AVAILABLE < 



HeatWwe 

Sales and Service 



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SEASONAL 

AIR CONDmONING 

PREP 



E.P.A. Certlfled-Insured 
Free Est.-Scnlor Dis. 

740-4127 

SubadtirrofFnrSur Rtst.Strr 



WICK'S TOPSOIL 

good QUAiny 

PULVERIZED TOPSOIL 

6yds.to7>xLs* $80.00 

12 yds. to 14 yd*. $120.00 

Include* Local Del. 
Smaller qiunades miL Call for Price* 

708-367-6566 
815-344-7928 




PREMIUM CONCRETE 
Construction Inc. 

Foundations • Retaining Walls • Additions ♦ 

Sidewalks • Driveways • Patios • Stamped 

Concrete • Exposed Aggregate 

Residential 708-546-9956 Commercial 



We offer 90 Days Same As Cash 



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the fastest 

route for your 

business* Call 

for rates 

223-8161 



WICK'S BLACKTOP CO. 

Rtsidcatisl Commerdml 

v Blacktop driveway* p 
Fr* e Parkin* Lot* r gty 

£5** 



Private Roads 



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SEALCOOTNC DOSITHG BLACKTOP 

(Neighborhood Diicounu) 
Patch Wbtk AvalUhie 

708-3G7-65G6 olS-344-7928 



fflTOflffffifffl 



Precise 

— — "*, 
Painting 

Interior/Exterior 

Now Construction, or wo 
can make it look like now 

CALL 546-2860 
OR 395-0490 & 

nfflpflWWIMHfllBgl 



I GINO'S 
DECORATING 

Painting & Staining 

Call New 

Free Estimates 

Affordable Rales 

Fully Insured 
Quality Work with 
Written Guarantee 



L 



Ucen»ed Insured 

WILWOOD 
ELECTRIC CO. 

SERVICE • RESIDENTIAL 

COMMERCIAL • NEW CONST. 

REMODEL • DESIGN 

TELEPHONE 

(708) 223-3311 




tyedd'mcj ^witations of 
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A /iir runt fnc wnt |*rwiirlffiy. 



Free Ettlmate* 



Can for a fr*t consultation in your hom«: 
(708) 265-0956 



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Gi K>h>c A*l A 0»m»« 




/ 



£$7* From $29 



BUYING 

Aluminum Cans 

•COPPER 'BRASS 
•AUTO RADIATORS 
•LEAD •ALUMINUM 

A- 1 RECYCLING 

96 Honing Rd., Fox Lake, IL 

(708) 587-0788 

•or- 

1000 Rand Rd(RL 12), Unit 212 
Wauconda, IL 

(708) 526-0760 

HOURS: 
Mon.-Frl. 
9 a.m,-5 p.m. 
' SaL 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 

^. Closed 12-12:3 ^J 



DECKS PLUSi 

CONSTRUCTION 
QENEatAL CARPENTRY 



• Custom Decks • Portfx* 

■ RoomWcfljons • Basemori RemodoSing 
• BaShrooms-KichonB • Custom Carpertty 
• knpfowments & Repairs' 




INSURED * BONDED 
FREE ESTIMATES 

(414) B8S-8442 

PImm Ca> Gjuy KotkJU 




IWA SOD FARM] 



h 



#1 Kentucky Bluegrass 
Blended Sod 

Peat or Mineral 

Forklift Delivered 

Phoflg (414) 895-2725 \\ 



Helmut Mayer 

Roofing all npes and raiain. 

Sk^'li&hts nscaled and leaks fixed 

Interior & Exterior Painting, Staining, 

and Varnishing. Gutters cleaned and 

repaired. Pressure washing. 

Tuck Pointing and Caulking. 

18 Years of Service ' 

Insured Free Estimates 

(708) 526-6789 



* A 

i I'CW LANDSCAPE CO. INC, A 

A IA«0SCAP£D£SCKERS»C0MTWC10RS A 

* Sttving Lcfy County Sintt I960 A 

* »Comput8r OosQn *So©ding 

* 'Flagstono Patios 'Sodding 

A «Stono Walls 'Planting 4 

A •Texturo Gardens 'Grading A 

* 1 (708)746-8953 | j 

lliiliiAiiiAiA 



I Don't Lose Your Home 
STOP FORECLOSURE 

|We Buy & Sell Homes - We loan Money] 

Lease Option • Sale Lease Back 

1 VA's and Assumeables • Fast Closing 

No Qualifications 

WE CAN HELP - PLEASE CALL 
IK hr. Phone Stoke 

(708) 945-8235 

Scott - Leave Message 



• *.ui '. 




'lib Arrowy mi sw«f. no waif/ns^C^ 

Jbl/SJNESS rtANS • liZSUMES AND MORE 
CALL FOB ADDITIONAL SERVICES OFFERED 
t WE THE PEOPLE BUSINESS CENTER 
^' (708) 548- 1300 f 



LAWN 
MOWING 

Aff ordAbt«, affkknt &* thoroujh 

Enjoy your 
wookoods wrhllo 

I take caro oi 

your lawn. Ask (or 

Logan or loara 

meuage at 

(708) 546-6746 

Round Lain At** 






AURSEN & 
LACKMAN<b. 

Window & Door Replacement 

Service You Can Trust 
_ Free Estimates 

Depend 



(708) 838-5300 



zr::.'\ 



M*y 26, 1995 UkiUsd Nrwsp«4KW SPORTS/LEISURE 




olf trainer gains PGA status 



INA L. SWIECH 



»aff Roportor 
As a young boy, Gary William 

Shastal enjoyed playing football 

tnd baseball. But there was 

Something he loved even more 
While enrolled at Marion 

Central High School In • 

Woodstock, Shastal laid 

lown Ills shoulder pads 

ind baseball bat and 

>ptcd for a putter. "I quit 

lascball to play golf,* 

cald the co-owner of the 

'ro-Clrdc Golf Training 

Center in Spring Grove. 
[Now Shastal, 39, has just 
(been deemed a "Class A •"'- ■ ■' 
[professional Golf Asso- 
ciation (PGA) Pro. 

At just 10 years old, he began 
[learning the sport which would 

make his parents proud. When he 
jwas but a teen', Shastal was 

known throughout the area as a 

"strong junior golfer." 

One of his first jobs was cut* 

ting the green at the then 

named "Countryside Golf 



Course" In Lake Zurich. 
• Later, Shastal attended col- 
lege with the help of athletic 
scholarships. He attended the 
College of Lake County and 
Southern Illinois University in 
Carbon dole. 



At just 10 years old he began 
learning the sport which 
would make his parents 
proud. Now Gary Shastal , 
ajgolf trainee has gained 
PGA status. 



Shastal, a golf instructor at 
Pfo-Qrde was awarded the title 
of Class "A" PGA Pro after going 
through an apprentice program 
and then a series of exams. 

The tide includes some fringe 
benefits, said Shastal Now he can 
get Into private golf dubs to play 
the sport anytime. Ills mother, 
Millie Shastal, said her son has the time. 



been "getting calls left and right 
from people 'who want to take 
lessons from a pro." 

Gary, said his mom; Is no 
longer playing with mediocre 
golfers. Now it's all the cream of 
the crop for the Antioch resident. 
__. Millie, and her hus- 

band Clarence (Gary's 
dad) said they arc "very, 
very proud" of their son. 
*Wc hope it continues," 
said Millie who added she 
knows the competition is 
tough. 

Having competed In 
the sport for the past 29 
__ yean, Shastal explained 
some pointers for young 
players. He said that national 
competition by the age of 18 is 
very Important if golfers wish to 
make it successfully as a PGA tour 
player. 

He also suggested, "Attend 
lots of seminars," and "Never say 
you know everything." Shastal 
says he use this advice himself all 




Gary William Shastal displays his plaque of recognition for gain- 
ing PGA pro status. 



SPORTS/LEISURE 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



THIS WEEK 

Sophomore 
shines 

Cornicl's McMahon 
makes most of 
opportunities 
PACE C22 

Weekend 
twinbill 

Engines roar at Wilmot 
for Memorial Day 
PACE C22 

Triathlon gets 
participants 
in. shape 

The Lake County Family 
YMGA in Waukcgan will be 
having a Spln-ShuffiVSplash 
Indoor Triathlon through 
June 19, The month-long 
triathlon Is open to high 
, school ages and older. 

Participants will have 
more than one month to 
complete the triathlon, 
which Includes Spin 300 
jnlnutes by biking, Alrdynlng 
or rowing, Shuffle 360 min- 
utes by walking or Jogging on 
the track or treadmills and 
Splash 100 minutes of swim* 
mlng or kickhoarding in the 
pool 

"Thei Indoor triathlon ''Is 
designed to help keep every- 
one, urcd-up with exercising 
at a time of year when most 
people stop," states Kari 
Kopp, 'event coordinator. 

Tlic cost for the program 
is $12 for YMCA members 
and $42 for non-memrjers. 

To register call die YMCA 
at 360-9622. 



Tbrface gives baseball field workers chance in rain 



STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Roportor 

It is Monday and after a 
sunny morning, the rains come 
two hours before a slew or base' 
ball and softball games are 
scheduled to begin. School buses 
arc turned back and plans from 
parents to umpires to the media 
all change. 

Springs such as the one area 
baseball and Softball teams has 
just concluded arc unusual. .April 
saw 2d of 31 dates experience 
one form of moisture • raindrops. 
or snowflakcs of one kind or 
another, the number of games 
impacted by weather could have 
been worse. 

Many schools and tittle 
leagues are using Turf ace as the 
first line of defense. 

."It depends on the price you 
put on a rain out." James R. Cocns 
of Conscrv FS, a Wauconda firm, 
said. 

Thc^roduct Is manufactured 
to the rigid specifications of the 
major league and NIT. 
groundskcepcrs. It Is used at 
places as diverse as Wriglcy Field 
to College of Lake County to 
many colleges and park districts. 
Including Soldier l-'icld. 

"It stabilizes the soil and you 
can get on the field and play a lot 



faster," Grant Coach l-cc Raddatz 
said. 

Grant's field workers Nick 
Miller and Lee Pearce have done 
a tremendous- job with the aid of 
Turfacc. this spring, Raddatz 
commented. 

The two most common field 
maintenance problems arc com- 
paction and moisture control. If 
not corrected, these problems 
reduce the quality of play, threat- 
en safety of athletes and increase 
the liability of responsible par- 
ties," a brochure on Turf ace 
states. 

"You want a nice, even hop 
on the skin portion of the dia- 
mond," Cocns said. 

Cocns attends field mainte- 
nance seminars given by the 
Cubs. The Cubs groundskecper 
Prank Caparclliti shows how the 
product works and how fast It can 
soak up a puddle. 

Turfacc MVP improves water 
flow, promoting a healthy root 
system. During dry weather, the 
water Is slowly released, keeping 
the needed amount of moisture. - 

Turf ace comes In two brand 
names - Turfacc MVP and 
Turfacc Quick Dry. 

"You do not have a good field 
unless you have pride in how it 
See TURf ACE page C22 




URFAQt 



mract 



•-■-»* 




P*~**~ 




Jim Coons of Consorv fs shows off a bog of Turfoco. The product 
Is usod to holp mako baseball and softball floldi playable despite 
wet weather. 



Rivera saves best for last in helping CHS relay squad 



Ruben Rivera was disappointed with the 
way the Graysiakc sectional track and Held 
meet started. 

Rut not how it ended. 

With cheers "Rubcn t Ruben" coming 
from the CarmcJ faithful lined up along die 
track, Rivera helped the 1,600* meter relay 
team qualify for the state meet in 3:25.7, edg- 
ing Waukcgan by a little more than a second. 

Rivera finished second In the 100 meter 
dash in 10.9 to Waukcgan's Shawn 
Cunningham. 

A flare up of an ankle Injury caused him to 
be scratched from the 200 and 400 meter 
dashes. 

'I saved It for the mile relay," Rivera said. 

He took the lead early In the 49-sccond leg 



after receiving the baton from Tine Hidalgo. 
Mike Carbon and Tim Roder ran the first two 
legs. Rivera said he plans to rest some before 
next weekend's state meet 

Carmcl Coach Jim Halford and the rest of 
the coaches knew Waukcgan would run away 
witli the tide and the Hull dogs did with 135 
points. Carmcl gained 25 points. 

Jeremy Garbutt gained a third place in the 
000 meters, but few third places qualified for 
the state finals at Eastern Illinois University 
May 25-26. 

Halford was also pleased with J J. I .arson's 
effort In the shot put. 

, Libertyviilc scored 32 points and was led 
by Andrew Willgrcss' second -place finish In 
the 3,200 meters In 9:41.4. Jeremy Amdt of 



Waukcgan won it in 9:30.0. 

"It w^& a hard race. He (Amdt) pushes us 
all along," Willgrcss said.* 

"Willgrcsr ran a very good race," Coach 
Ron l-ong said. 

Willgrcss was able to use his trademark of 
a strong kick to heat out the third-place fin- 
isher, Mike Ray of Warren. 

WUlgrcss was third in the 1,600 in 4:29.0. 

The 000 meter relay's effort by Dustin 
Smothers, Dave Mawrockl, Steve Curtis and 
Scott Stcaley also turned some heads in gain- 
ing fourth place. 

They are improving week by week and 
had a strong week of training," he said. 

Bob Iju it. was third in the pole vault with a 
12 foot effort 




SPORTS/LEISURE UIccIawI NfwspA|KRS M*y 26, 1995 






McMahon makes most 
of chances for Carmel 



Two baseball contests Mike 
McMahon will not soon forget 
both took place in the same week. 

McMahon, a sophomore, 
won two games and a pair of 
homers as Carmel High's base- 
ball team won three times. ' 

"It was a great remembrance 
he will always have," Carmel 
Coach Chuck Gandolfl said. 

The Corsairs knew of the tal- 
ent of the sophomore, but were 
waiting for the right time for his 
first varsity start- That came in a 
four-inning stint in a 6-2 non- 
league win over Warren. 

McMahon then had a grand- 
slam homer and a double as 
Carmel downed St. Joseph 1 1 -3 in 
the nightcap. Carmel won the 
opener 1 -0 Saturday. - 

"We knew he had the poten- 
tial, but we did not sec a reason to 
bring him up when we were 
struggling," Gandolfl said. 

The wins give Carmel u 5-12 
Hast Suburban Catholic 
Conference record and 12-15 
overall heading into the final 
week of the regular season. The 
Corsairs, 'the fourth seed of the 



Cary-Grovc regional, host cross- 
town rival Mundclcln May 25. 
The winner advances to the 10:30 
a.m. semifinal May 27 in Gary. 
The final is 4 p.m. May 29. 

Steve Golebiowski gained tile 
save in the win over the Blue 
Devils. Ryan Dahm had a 2-run 
double and Adam Haravon had 
3-of-4 with 2 RDIs as Carmel 
gained double-digits in wins. A 
three-run seventh inning put the 
game away. 

Mike Hurcns was the hero of 
the first game against St. Joseph 
Saturday. His first homer of the 
year, in the sixth inning, was the 
difference. He had a triple in the 
second game. 

"He had been struggling - 
hopefully he is coming out of it," 
Gandolfl said. 

Eric Ames had the visiting 
Chargers guessing with an effec- 
tive fastball. 

The Corsairs arc looking to 
regain -that toumcy magic that 
took them all the way to the state 
quarterfinals last year. 

"You can throw out the 
record books," Gandolfi stated. 



Grayslake gymnasts place at state meet 



The Grayslake Gymnastics Factory Team girls per- 
formed well at the USA Gymnastics level 6 Illinois 



Name 


Town 


Vault 


Laura Zastoupll 


'Gurnec 


R.50 


Jessica Reuss 


Venetian Village 


9.00 


Ashley Kuhn 


Gurnce 


B.85 


Lindsay Kelt man 


Lindenhurst 


9.20 



Slate Championship meet held at the Cunco Estate 
and hosted by All Stars Gymnastics In Mundclcln. 

Ban Beam Floor All-around 

H.Q0 B.40 9.12 34.02 

R.B5 B.95 9.20 36.00 

8.65 B.50 B.72 34.72 

B.60 8.80 9.02 35.62 



Hawthorn Lanes hosts PBA Regional 



Four Allstar gymnasts 
compete at state meet 

Allstar Gymnastics of Mundclcln hosted die Lcvcj 6 State Meet at 
the Cunco Museum and Gardens in Vernon Hills on May 20 and 21. 

Four IjcvcI 6 gymnasts from Allstar competed in the meet Kaccy 
Hill of Vernon Hills; lade Huffhlncs of Aritiock lamle Mllarski of 
Vernon Hills; and Ashley Parker of Buffalo Grove. 



The best in the Midwest will 
match strikes and spares at 
Hawthorn Lanes May 26 through 
28, bowling for more than 
$20,000 in prize money in the 
Amcritcch Cellular PBA Regional. 

The tournament Is expected to 
field perhaps its strongest line-up 
of national and regional profes- 
sionals since the inception of the 
event In 1990. 

Defending champion Mike 
Nape of south suburban Blue 
Island will face such prominent 
opponents as Dave and Dale 
Trabcr, Brad Sncll, Steve Jaros, 
Tony Cariclfb and 1992 Hawthorn 
champion Bill Swanson. 

Non-professionals will be rep- 
resented by former Team USA 
member and 1992 Amateur 
Bowler of the Year Vincc Biondo. 

Since the national tour will be 
on Its spring hiatus at the time of 
the regional, such fan favorites as 
Pete Weber (who won the 
Prceport, III., regional in April) 
and Marc McDowell arc likely to 
be on hand to tunc up their 
games and take a shot at the prize 
money. 



The 40-lane facility enables a 
full field of 160 to take to the 
lanes, Including host Bill Splgncr, 
winner of three PBA national and 
seven regional titles. 

"Besides the better known 
howlers, there is a depth of talent 
In our regional program," adds 
Spigncr. "Someone we haven't 
heard of may break through for 
the first time." 
• Activity begins May 27 with a 
practice/autograph session for 
the pros from 4 to 6 p.m. At 7 
p.m.', there Is a pro-am squad 
scheduled for junior bowlers as 
well as adults. 

The entry fee for the Junior 
pro-am is $18. Each entrant 
receives a pair of Hawthorn 
Lanes tube socks, the PBA's 1995 
official program, a free game 
coupon from Hawthorn Lanes 
along with trophies for the win- 
ning scores. 

Adults may bowl either the 
Friday evening squad or Saturday 
at 7:30 or 9:30 p.m. A nine-pin, 
no-tap format will be used with a 
$1,000 top prize at stake (based 
on 200 entries). Each amateur 



teams with a different pro each of 
the three games, ultimately com- 
ing up with a cumulative doubles' 
score. Hie entry fee for adults Id 
$42. 

In addition to the no-tap fea- 
ture, amateur bowlers receive a 
handicap based on their league 
averages. For more information 
about the pro-am call 367-1600. 

Qualifying in the pro tourna- 
ment begins May 27 at 8 a. in. and 
continues through the early 
evening until all bowlers have 
concluded 10 games. At that 
point the field will be cut to the 
top 24. 

Match play for the 24 survivors 
commences May 28 at 9 a.m. 
After 16 matches, the leading five 
bowlers enter the stcpladdcr for- 
mat finals for the exciting conclu- 
sion. 

'Counting the pro-ams, quali- 
fying and match play, the pros 
will be bowling more than 30 
games over a two- day span," 
explained Spigncr. "You have to 
be well trained to thrive In a 
regional tournament It uses a 
professional format" 



Name 


Vault 


Floor 


Beam 


Bart 


All-around 


Ashley Parker 


9.0 


8.80 


8.50 


8.80 


35.10 


Kaccy Hill 


8.40 


8.80 


8.35 


9.25 


34.80 


Jade Huffhlncs 


8.65 


8.80 


7.75 


0.20* 


33.40 


Jamie Mllarski 


8.50 


9.025 


7.95 


7.80 


33.275"* 



Summer golf lessons offered at Countryside 



Turface 



From page C21 

looks. We have parents and friends of the baseball program who get 
some things, but is the players who do all the work," Carmel Coach 
Chuck Gandolfi said. 

"Turface keeps it hard and lets you play on wet days," lie said. 
Although a game at Holy Cross was already canceled after an off- 
agutn, on -again battle with rain on a Monday, the Carmel field was 
playable by 4:30 p.m. 

"I was not sold on it until three years ago," CIjC Coach Gene 
Hanson said. 

The lancers groundskecper, Brian Peterson, convinced Hanson to 
use some of the product then and it is now part of the weapon against 
rainouts. 

Ubcrtyvillc and Stevenson High both use the product and both arc 
known for getting games in - despite the weather. 

Stevenson and Waukcgan's Bowcn Park will be hosting baseball 
regional semifinals May 27 - with enough of the product at the ready. 
Conscrv FS has been In business since 1928, at its Wauconda site for 
eight years. For more information on Turface, call 526-0007. 



Sharpen golf skills tills summer with lessons 
offered at the Lake County Forest Preserves' 
Countryside Golf Course hear Mundclcln beginning 
May 30. Both private and group lessons for adults 
arc available with qualified teaching professionals. 

The group program Is. a four-week scries of one- 
hour lessons designed for adult beginners. Starting 
May 30, morning lessons arc offered from 10 to 1 1 
a.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and from 9 to 10 
a.m. on Saturdays. Evening lessons are offered on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6 to 7 p.m. Class size 
is limited to six students, guaranteeing personal 



attention. Pro-rcgUtratlon is required. Tito fee for a 
four- week program is $45. 

Private lessons provide one-on-one instruction 
and are designed for golfers of all abilities. Lessons 
can be arranged to suit the student's schedule and 
are taken by appointment only. The fee is $30 per 
lesson. 

Balls arc provided for both group and private 
lessons, but students should bring their own clubs. 
Countryside Golf Course is located on Hawley Road, 
just west of Rtcs. 60 and 83, near Mundclcln. For 
more Information or to register, call 566-5544. 



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May 26, 1995 UbU*d NnwpApcw SPORTS/LEISURE 




f 



Johnson leads CHS into playoffs 



In a five- win season, there has 
not been a lot Carmcl High's soft- 
ball team could count on. 

One notcablc exception In a 
frustration season is Brldgctc 
Johnson* Whether at third base or 
at the plate, she has been a leader 
for Coach Kay Kcchn's team. 

Johnson nearly gained the 
cycle in a 19-15 Carmcl loss to 
Antloch. She had a single, double 
and triple. 

"She was struggling, but she 
made some adjustments In her 
stance and now she is hitting the 
ball solid," Kcchn said of 
Johnson, 

Johnson, with the big game 
against Antloch, raised her bat- 
ting average to .384 l>cforc the 
first-round regional game with 



Warren High. 

Kcchn said Johnson has 
played well at third base, com- 
mitting just 3 errors, all on 
throws. 

Also having big games for the 
Corsairs were Amanda Slake, a 
junior center Udder. She had a 3- 
of-4 game. 

Emily Woods Is Carmcl's lead- 
ing hitter with a better than .530, 
average. 'She Is not a power hit- 
ter but she hits the gaps," Kcchn 
said. 

Carmcl was no -h It by Bcnct 2- 
0. "We played a tremendous 
game. We had a lot of people out 
of position," Kcchn said. 

The Redwings will be a con- 
ference opponent next year. 

Carmcl did pick up a 10-4 



non-conference win over 
Graysiakc. Beth Stolarik gained 
her fourth win. 

Adricnne Cutten, Woods and 
Beth Stolarik had a pair of hits 
each. 

Stoarlik (4-9) was in com- 
mand with 9 strikeouts. 

Carmcl's approach to the 
Warren game, a team Carmcl lost 
to 6-3. 

"The pressure Is on them. We 
played pretty tough but had some 
costly errors," Kcchn said. 

At stake was a spot In the. 
Mundclcln regional semifinal 
May 27 in the second morning 
. game, 20 minutes after the end of 
the first game contest 

Mundclcln hosts Grayslakc- 
North Chicago winner at 10 am 



Wilmot hosts weekend twinbill 



Twice (lie action is slated for 
the Memorial Day weekend at 
Toft Auto Racing's Wilmot 
Speedway. 

Starting things off on Saturday 
will be a rescheduled 1994 event 
The richest modified event ever 
held jn Wisconsin, the $1,000 to 
win JM. Oil Modified Shootout, 
will headline the all open wheel 
program. 

Postponed due to weather at 
the end of last season, the 
Shootout features 10 cars going 
for 10 laps. The competitors 
earned special points through a 
dash scries throughout the year. 

Leading the list of those quali- 
fied to compete is 1994 Wilmot 
runner-up and Modified Racing 
Assn. Champion* Jimmy Utteclv 



Jr. of Kenosha. Uttcch has moved 
Into a winged sprint car this sea- 
son, but plans to bring out last 
year's car with a fresh engine for 
the event. 

"We've been waiting for this 
since last fall," said Uttcch. who 
finished second by 22 points after 
leading until what ended up be- 
ing the last night due to in- 
clement weather on the sched- 
uled final night 

Dennis Spitz. 1994 Wilmot 
Champion and current point 
leader, is unbeaten In the first two 
nights of the season. Spitz has led 
every lap of the two feature wins, 
and also won his heat race. 

The car seems to be coming 
together at just the right time," 
•old Spur. "I can't wait for the 



Shootout It's what we've been 
aiming for." 

On Sunday, history will con- 
tinue to be made at "Wisconsin's 
Gay Center of Speed." 

Bud lite presents the season 
debut of the North American 
Sportsman Series, which comes 
to Wilmot for the first time ever. 

Special grandstand admission 
for the May 28 program is $5 for 
everyone age 13 and older, while 
all those age 12 and under will be 
admitted free. 

John "Cudaman" Pochlcr of 
Ubcrtyvillc, four-time Wilmot 
champion with the 1994 sports- 
man crown along with spectator 
stock titles in 19R5, '87 and '88, is 
planning to make his return in his 
Mopar powered Dodge M inula. 



Three newcomers take flags at Wilmot 



Dave Moulis of Johnsburg scored a repeat feature 
win In the sprints Saturday at Toft Auto Racing's 
Wilmot Speedway. 

Kenosha's Dennis Spitz made if four- for- four this 
season by winning both "his heat and the 20-1 np 
modified heudllncr. 

Carl Gclcr of Johnsburg won his first career fea- 
ture ever in the new IMCA modified main. 

Rubicon's Romy Haas took Ills first main event In 
two seasons In the mini-sprints. 

Dr. Ken Johnson or Paddock Like, Wis. chalked 
up his first mini -modified main win in his first night 
out. 

Jeff Fcrkin took the early lead In the 25 -lap sprint 
main until he spun In turn three on the third lap, 
bringing out the caution. 

Spitz inherited the lead on the restart, but 
Moulis shot his Fox Lake Harbor/K.C.'s Log 
Cabin Maxim to the Inside to take the lead on the 
restart 

Spitz put Ills Carmln Construction/ Kacblcr 



Carmel students precision skating champs 



Congratulations to Dchncl 
Kluzak from lake Zurich, a 
sophomore at Carmcl High 
School in Mundcleln, and Nicole 
I'icrinl from Hawthorn Woods, a 
senior at Carmcl. They arc USFSA 
National Precision Skating cham- 
pions. 

Dchncl and Nicole arc mem- 
bers of the Starlets, a junior preci- 
sion skating team based In 
Harrington. They and their team- 
mates traveled to San Diego, 
along with 2,000 other skaters 
from around the nation to com- 
pete in the 12th annual precision 
skating championships. 

The championship was com- 
prised of over -75 teams com- 
peting at seven different levels. 
The teams all qualified for the 
competition by competing at 



sectional meets. 

The Starlets placed first at the 
Midwestern Championships to 
qualify for national competition. 

Precision figure skating is the 
fastest growing figure skating dis- 
cipline. Tills competitive sport 
originated In the 1970s in 
Michigan and Ohio, and today 
lSU-sanctloncd competitions arc 
held all over the world. 

Precision skating will be an 
exhibition sport at the 1998 
Olympics and could be an 
Olympic event as early as 2002. 
Next year, the first official worid 
competition will be held in 
Canada. 

Dchncl will skate with the 

I Starlets again nfext'ycar. Tills will 

be her fourth year as a Starlet 

and her ninth year of precision 



Co. AVcstcch Auto modified into the lead at the drop 
of the green and lead wire to wire for the second 
straight week. 

"I'm going to have to get In better shape," said a 
tired, but happy Spitz, who also runs sprints. 
"Starting the season like this is great We can't wait 
for next week's JM. Oil Modified Shootout That's 
what we've been gearing for and tilings are coming 
together just right* 

Ccicr put his Sheet Metal Supply 1993 Metals & 
Moore mount into the lead at the start of the 1 2-1 a p 
IMCA modified feature lead. A long yellow flew on 
lap two for a spin, but failed to slow Gcicr's consis- 
tent run for the win. 

This feels great It's been a long time coming," 
said Gcicr, a 29-year-old auto mechanic who won 
his first feature In eight years of racing. 'Hie car ran 
great- 
Johnson put his Antioch Dental Center/ Rob's 
Auto Marine 1994 Enemy Race Cars machine in 
front and was never headed 



skating. The Starlets' first place 
finish means they will again rep- 
resent the U.S. at international 
competitions. 

Dchncl also plans to contin- 
ue as an Individual freestyle 
competitor. She placed first in 
Moves in die Field, and third in 
original program at the 
Southport competition. 

Nicole will be leaving the 
Starlets next year when she goes 
to Miami of Ohio Univ. where she 
will skate with their precision 
team. 

They wUl also represent the 
U.S. at international compcti- 
' tions based on their third place 
finish at this year's national com- 
petition. Miami of Ohio is the first 
university to recognize precision 
skating as a varsity sport 




Bear bound 

lake Zurich's Jen Carbon reprosontGd tno Lady Bears af the 
gjris stale track meet. The senior has competed In six differ- 
ent events at the state meet for the last four years. This year 
she tried her chances in the 200-meter dash and the long 
Jump.— Photo by Stove Young 



New volleyball mentor 
has big plans for Rams 



Shelly Hubert's enthusiasm 
for volleyball can be easily de- 
tected simply by mentioning the 
upcoming fall season. 

"It was one of my goals since 1 
was In. college. It Is a privilege to 
be the head coach at Graysiakc 
High," Hubert said. 

Hubert has big plans for the 
Rams as she is taking over for 
Dan Staccy, who resigned earlier 
this year. She Is working on nam- 
ing assistant coaches now. 

"There will be off-season con- 
ditioning and we will have a 
camp in July. Also, we will have 1 2 
girls at the Stevenson summer 
league for the first time. That will 
help our prc-scason work," 
Hubert said. 

Hubert, a physical education 
teacher, lettered for four years at 
Millikin University in Decatur. 
she was a setter and team MVP 
her senior year. She set records 
for assists for Millikin. 



She was a track and field and 
volleyball letter-winner at 
Watcska High. The 1986 senior 
team made it to the Sweet Sixteen 
before losing to Coal City in die 
Class A, small school tourney. 

The Rams plan to build 
around returning players 
Courtney Caldwell. Amy Artlet 
and Erin Lopez. Two freshmen. 
Jessica Hcfcr and Abby JCarlovitz 
have dub experience. 

The new head volleyball men- 
tor credits college coach Joe 
Sutfin and Staccy as having big 
Influences. She was an assistant 
coach for three years. 

Hubert coached the Rams 
junior varsity to third place in the 
NWSC last year. 

But come August, Hubert's 
enthusiasm and desire for 
Graysiakc to break Marian 
Central's and-or Johnsburg's 
hold on the league title will be 
easily seen again. 



Organization, helpers keys to 
well-run meet: starter Harland 



STEVE PETERSON 



Staff Roportor 

It is a question which has perplexed track and field fans since the 
first dual meet or Invitational meet was scheduled. 

Why is it that some meets arc quick while others drag on until 
almost the bewitching hour? 

"A lot of it is the organization of the bullpen." Dick Harland, 
starter, said. 

I lariand is a familiar person at track and field meets as he has been a 
starter for many years. He said the bullpen area where athletes report is 
critical because that is where athletes should receive tlieir Instructions. 

"You have to be alert to what is going on around the track." 
I lariand said. 

Harland, who is a cross country coach at Antioch High, said he 
prefers the atmosphere of the conference meet as opposed to the sec- 
tional. 

"You know more kids," he said of the league meets. 

Harland had praise for the way Graysiakc ran its sectional Friday. 
The only controversy occurred when a- North Chicago athlete left the 
bullpen area. He was scratched from his event. 

Harland said the weather has an impact • this spring has been par- 
ticularly cold and wet. That is until a 65 degree night for track section- 
als at Graysiakc and Stevenson. 

The Rams sectional was over by 9:15 p.m. the one at Lincolnshire 
a little past that. Some meets, such as the North Suburban Conference 
girls meet, has had a post 1 1 p.m. finish. 

Some schools have brought the computer age to track and field, 
while others prefer the pencil and chart method. 




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v.v.'.y.yy.* 






Oreck XL 4 lb. Super Compact Canister 

•Weighs only 4 lbs. but has the power of an upright to 
handle all your above the floor cleaning needs. 

•Powerful enough to lift a 16 lb. bowling ball. 



mm 



•:•:•»»»:< 




M**;*^ 'BONUS — Purchase 

.•.-,■.•.■.•.■.■,■. v.v v.v.v.%y.w '.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v I IK urn or dllU 

i#p™ our SUPER CANISTER 
&mmmm and receive a 7-Gallon 

mwKwmsffikW- Wet/Dr v- 0reck SWAMP 

UTILITY VAC FREE 

•Retail Value $79.95 

•Powerful and versatile 

•Picks up anything, wet or 
dry. Great for overflow, 
stopped up sinks, etc. 

•Converts to blower 









OR BEAT All 
MAIL ORDER 



JACKS VACUUM CENTER 

■ 1814 Grand Ave. (1/2 Bik. Eastbftewis) 

WAUKEGAN (708) 336-8300 



Offer 

Expires 

,6-15-95 



w 



»;*,*.'.*.» .t.»..*.»r ••* m . 



I III 1 



M*7 26, 1 995 LdzUnd Ntwsp*p£« HOME & CARDEN § 




jfpTtie & 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



FOCUS 



Visit these fine businesses 



A to Z Rental Confer 

127-129 South Rt 12, Fox Lake 

(708) 5B7-6750 

All Temp Heating & Air Conditioning 

124 E. Liborty, Wauconda 
(70B) 526-9082 

Breezy Hill Nursery & Landscape 

Supply, Inc. 

7530 288th Ave. (Hwy. 50), Salem, Wl 

(414)843-3886 

Caravelle Lighting 

9307 So. Rt 12." Richmond 

(815)678-4550 

Cedar Hill Nursery 

21854 W. Hwy. 22, RL 22 4 Quentin Rd 

(708) 540-8474 

Mark Cook's Garden Center, Inc. 
101 East Main St, Lake Zurich ■ 
(708) 438-2120 

Culligan Water 

Eastern Lake County (708) 459-1550 

Western Lake County (708) 526-6661 

Dependable Swimming Pool Servico 
124 South Rte. 83, Grayslake 
(708)223-1606 

Distinctive Kitchen Designs 
203 S. Main St, Wauconda 
(708) 526-7822 

Gordon House of Casual Fum'rturo, Inc. 
1707 Rand Rd., Palatine 
(1 blk. No. of Dundee Rt. 68) 
(708) 359-2020 

G aje bo Craft 

617 S. 4th Ave.. UbortyvfBe 

(708) 367-6931 

Grayslake Feed Sales Outdoor 

Powor Equipment 

81 E. Borvidere 

(Rte. 120 & Slusser St). Grayslake 

(708) 223-6333 

Edward Hines Lumber 

1100 Rand Road 

(Rt 12 & Bonner Rd.). Wauconda 

(708) 526-9000 

Inlorstate Farm & Garden 
U.S. Hwy. 45 & Kenosha Co. K, 
Bristol, Wl 
(414) 857-7971 

J & L Pool Co.. Inc. and Pitt's 

Water Care 

700 W. Rt. 120,McHenry 

(815)385-1368 

Jack's Vacuum Center 
1814 Grand Ave., Waukegan 
(708) 336-8300 



Patricia's makes it 'Old World' 



JZS, Inc. 

32531 N. Center Lane, Grayslake 

(708)546-2316 

Loidor's Garden Greenery 
34755 N. Hwy. 83. Grayslake 
(708) 223-2422 

M & L Flooring Outlet 

Comer of Rt. 12 & Bonner Rd., 

Wauconda 

(708) 526-5815 

MSM Landscaping Services, Inc. 
Route 45, Vernon Hills 
(708) 949-8433 

Magic Carpet Cleaners 
(708) 223-7456 

Meier's Outdoor Worid, Inc. 
145 S. Sayton Road, 
Fox Lake 
(708) 587-7711 

Patricia's Amish Fumiture/Giftware 
395 Lake St... Antioch 
(708) 395-4780 

Paul's Grayslake Farm Market 

and Garden Center 

804 E. Betvidero Rd. (Rt 120), 

Grayslake 

(70B) 548-1350 

Joe M. Pesz Landscaping & 
Excavating, Inc. 
4705 S. Roberts Road, 
island Lake 
(708) 639-9321 

Precision Window & Door 
25090 S. Old Rand Rd.. 
Wauconda 
(708) 520-5775 

Ralph's Florist & Greenhouse 

10 N. Forest Fox Lake, 
(708) 587-8244 

11 S, Fairfield, Round Lake 
(708)546-2185 

Qutg's Greenhouse 

Rt. 83. (60) N. of Midlothian, 

Mundolein 

(708) 566-9130 

Schmidt Implement Company, Inc. 
8841 Antioch Rd., Hwy. 83, 
Salem, Wl 53168 
(414) 843*2326 



Marty Schwind & Sons Greenhouses 
Off Grass Lake Rd., 
1 blk. East of Rt 59, Antioch 
(708) 395-3995 

Window & Wall Concepts 
827 E. Center St. Grayslake 
(708) 223-3267 



Wc at Patricia's offer solid oak furniture 
made the Old World way. If you want a spe- 
cial sized piece of furniture, give us your 
dimensions and we'll do the rest We arc a 
family-owned and operated business, 
open 7 days a week. 



Wc are one of Illinois' largest Yankee 
Candle dealers, and also carry Amish 
prints and many other smaller gift ideas. 
Sofas arc currently on sale, with 800 to 
1,000 different fabrics to choose from, so 
come on in and browse! 



Breezy Hill offers landscaping and more 



At Breezy Mil Nursery, located at the 
intersection of Hwy. 50 and B Silver Lake 
Comer, you can get all your full scale land- 
scaping or do-it-yourself needs. 

Breezy Hill boasts a 150-plus acre 
nursery that furnishes perennials, annu- 
als, trees and shrubs. 1 no supply yard Is 
stocked with decorative stones, treated 
timbers, and mulch for all you r needs. Full 
service landscape design and installation 
is available at Breezy Hill. Designs for 



landscapes, pavers, brick walkways, reten- 
tion walls, and waterfalls are available. As a 
matter of fact, Breezy Hill can be located 
by watching out for the waterfall on Hwy. 
50 and B on the north side of the road. 

Whether you have a landscaping or 
greenhouse/nursery need, come to Breezy 
Hill, or call them at (414) 843-3886. Hours 
arc Monday through Friday, 8 am. to 6 
p.m.; Saturday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and 
Sunday, 9 am. to 4 p.m. 



f 



Welcome to Springl 

Lakeland Newspapers is proud to offer this Home and Garden 
Focus. During this time of year, many of us are outside enjoying 
the spring weather and beautifying our homes and lawns. 

We hope this special section Inspires you to patronize these fine 
businesses, who all wish to guide you in achieving your home 
improvement and beautification goals. 



Donna J. Evans — Display Amortising Manager 

Hopo Stoddard — Edtor 

RosoDo Lov« — Layout Coottf nator 

Todd F. Hoisior — Cover Photo 
Robert Q. Vftjffi — Cover rendering 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 




Corner Hwy. SO & Hwy. B 

Salem, Wisconsin 53168 

(414)537-2111 (414)843-3886 



RETAIL HOURS: 



Li 



Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. 
Sat. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 
Sun. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 



& Landscape Supply, Inc. 



GREENHOUSES 

NOW OPEN 



Patricia's Giftware 








ONE STOP FOR All YOUR 



S^~ JJttj <^ GARDEN AND IANDSCAPE NEEDS 

^~%/ t**"\? 54 and 1% Plant Flats 

Sy $<*noo 



Accra turn 

Alyssum 

Aster 

Begonia 

Browallia 

Celosia 



10 



per flat 



Cole us 
Cosmos 
Daisy 
Dianthus 



Dusty Miller 
Impatiens 
Looelia 
Marigold 




Nieotiana 
Pansy 
Petunia 
Portulaca 



Complete line of furniture in solid oak. 

Handcrafted The Old World Way 



Sofas By Smith Bros. Atou* 
Oft Smlett Orer 100 
Different fabrics 



MroAucintOur Yankee Candle Club! 

We're One Of The largest Yankee 

Candle Dealers In Northern IL 



395 Lake St., Antioch 
V (708) 395-4780 



Open Mon.-Thura. 10-6; FrU 10-7; 
Sat 10-5 & Sunday 11-4 



$475 

4" pot I 

'Geraniums »VincaVine •Spikes 

•Tuberous Begonia 

"New Guinea Impaticns 



Many varieties of 

PERENNIALS to choose from 

2.5*-4'-6"-1Ca!. 

75$ - *6 




LANDSCAPE SUPPLY YARD 

FOR THE DO-IT-YOURSELFER 

Wide selection of •Decorative Stones & Gravels 

•Retaining Walt Stone -Pavers Brick 



<2 



Complete Landscape Design 
Shade Trees •Shrubbery • Evergreens 



* 







SJ HOME cV GARDEN UkWI Nlw^hrs M*y 26, 1995 



'J-\ome <£ (Z or den 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



FOCUS 



Great sales, service at Interstate Farm 



Interstate Furm & Garden has built a 
reputation for good service since the 
mid- 1940s. Family owned by Bob and 
Judy I^ngachcr since 1972, when they 
took over the business that Judy's fatiicr 
started, they pride themselves on being a 
small business that does their very best 



for every customer that walks in tin: door. 
Interstate sells tawn and garden parts and 
equipment such as Troy Bilt Bolcns, 
llofco trimmers and mlnl-tlllcrs, and 
Itoulan Pro chain saws and trimmers. 
Service on lawn and garden equipment is 
offered as well. 



Magic Carpet Cleaners keeps customers happy 



Magic Carpet Gcancrs is dedicated to 
satisfying their clients with their carpet 
and upholstery cleaning needs. Owner 
Mark Hummel insists that his company 



has no hidden costs, and prices for clean- 
ing include preconditioning. The majority 
or business is by referrals and repeat busi- 
ness, which keeps their customers happy. 



CLEAN YOUR CARPETS 

Jjjjv 1 4 per room (2 rm . mm.) 



(wool carpets excluded) 



Other Great Savings: 



Sofas* 
Loveseats* 
Chairs* 
Stairs* 



*38 

$ 26 

*16 

•1 



Oil 



'most fabrics 



NO HIDDEN COSTS 

Pre-conditioning 
is 





^k^A^j^S^S,^^^ 




ODOR OR STAINS! 

Ask us about our groat rntost 
OOPS! 




Lot tho pros do HI It's onalor. faslor A loss 
oxponslvn. Profosslortnl Mourn clnnn mothod. 

Magic Carpets Cleaners 

708-223-7456 

Lake County % s Best! 



No Travel Hassles - Vacation at Home! 



Doughboy is a quality constructed, hot dip, galvanized 
steel pool Made in U.S.A. Check out our prices today. 



(taj^lhteg) 



Sahara 

for under 

$ 5100 



Specifications: 

•94*x94*x37* 

•6 Jets standard (many mora optional) 
•Water capacity: 550 gallons 
•Spa Pack with 2 HP pump, 1 HP 

blower 
•220 volt equipment system 
•25 sq, ft. rainbow top load filter 
•Hard Covor 

•Choice of dozens of acrylic skin colors 
•Cabinet available in Cedar or Rod wood 
•Commercial and Residential 
applications 







W i 



wet 



1 Ray a I portable ^v 

fifiiSpgj spa 

The Sahara i« just right for a romantic getaway in 
your own backyard. Come discover the Sahara 
and why we say Royal Spaaahhh. . 




BJoGuord 



We Carry A Complete Line Of Swimming Pool 
And Spa Chemicals, Equipment And Accessories. 



Dependable Swimming Pool & Spa -^ 



gg) pB2] 124S. Rte.83 

[^J Grayslake (708)223-1606 



Mon.-Tu»-tn 
WMl.'fhw.94 

S-jn I0-J 



(ten 



Gazebo Craft fills niche for precision product 

David Bell, owner of Gazebo Craft, saw a need for a precision -built product and, 
putting his experience in cabinet making and mathematical studies to good use, 
Gazebo Craft was created. Hell stated that crafting a gazebo Involves a great deal of 
precision and mathematical skills beyond the average carpenter, and that's where 
Gazcbo.Craft comes in. All the gazebos crafted at Gazebo Craft arc well-proportioned 
in classical designs of Western Red Cedar, and can be customized to your Individual 
taste. A well -crafted gazebo adds a romantic touch to your outdoor landscaping, and 
who couldn't do with a little more romance in their livcs7 Call Gazebo Craft in 
Ubcrtyvttle at 367-6931. 



K 



m 



?s 



"Excellence in Exterior Woodivork' Ciuitom Gazebos, Decks <fi Exterior Design 



* Beautiful classic designs incorporating 
furniture quality Joinery precision 
milled in top quality western red 
cedar for strength and durability. 

■ Ornamental copper top and solid brass, 
bronze, and stainless steel hardware for 
minimal maintenance and enhanced 
appearance. 

* Adjustable outdoor lighting and fan crralc 
elegant ambience for outdoor dining and 
entertaining. 

* Heavy duty screens and 1.5" thick 
attractively detailed screen door 
provide relief from in sects 




Call Today For Your Free Estimate! 




Tfic Rctmit Is A Product Of 
Unmirpasxcd <£• Uniform Quality 



S | Starting 



Prom $5,750 



SB 



GAZEBO CRAFT 

Libertyville 

Contractor Inquiries Welcome 708"O u7"6931 _A 





Mulching Mowers 

FREE 'TIL 




UtOM '359 Phs MBS Blade 

Available now with No Inter**', Na Mmy Down 
and No Payments until September 21. 1995 when 
you qualify for the TROY-BILT* Easy Pay Plan! 

• Mow up to 40% FASTER with no dippings to 
bag, collect or dispose of. 
• FREE Fertilizer • 

Clippings are mulched 
back into your lawn as 
FREE fertilizer. 





• Convenient single 
lever height 
adjustment 

• Variety of powered 
and push models. 
• Exclusive 7-Year Warranty 
(ask for details) 



OFFER ends 
.5/31/95 



OlWiCjrtmWw.hc 

• *imUX ****** h< mm Ham m w nfv+qtnmtMwi. Ht#lttt tat* }\, IWotW be** 
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MA.Mt, UN.Nt.ND.ftk.Jtl.WA > w4Wl~lt% KS- ItKr^cufnlliaOGof l**xi lU^wreniM. 
1 1 %% on trtf 1100 rfMaict. tXk 0KtKfu.SC - lt»l\. n- I J b** Wt - IB* a* em fr»* 



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***** <rwp n p|«t* uutpt tar mrtwutf «. CI. K u O. cr U, uo W w K, W> . 0". ** to I 



iitvztt 



I 



Interstate Farm Equipment, Inc. 

(VS. Hwy. 45 & Keoosfaii Ox K) l9805-60th SL 
Bristol* Wi Sil&i 

414-857-7971 

Sales - Service - Parts 




■■-.."■- 1 



Max 26, Iff $ Ubksd NnwpaptK HOME & GARDEN R 




J~pme & (Zarden 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



FOCUS 



Grayslake inventor gives portion of sales to women's shelter 



Anyone who has ever tried to sunbathe 
in an unfenced yard, have a romantic bal- 
cony dinner in full view of condo neigh- 
bors, or take a nap on the deck will under- 
stand why Janet Smart invented the 
patented' FantazeTM Portable Privacy 
Screen, which premieres in the Chicago 
area this spring. 

"I was tired of having to choose 
between privacy and enjoying the out- 
doors," the Grayslake businesswoman, 
mother, and inventor asserts. 

"I invented Fantaze Tor people like me, 
living in developments where fences were 
restricted, living In high-density areas with 
small yards, or in townhouscs or condos. We 



want to be outdoors, but still enjoy a sense 
of seclusion and privacy when we want 11" 

This sense of privacy Is achieved when 
Fantaze, shaped like a giant, half-round fire- 
place fan, is opened to its generous six-foot- 
high, clevcn-foot-long size. The fan opens 
easily for impromptu outdoor fun, and dos- 
es just as easily to a compact, portable size 
that weighs only about 18 pounds. 

Because it is portable, the unit can be 
set up on a dock or at poolsidc, as well as 
on decks, on terraces and in yards. 
Commercial uses include hotel, restau- 
rant, trade show, and photographic appli- 
cations where temporary or semi-private 
areas arc desired 



Leider's makes gardens grow 



In business since 1973, [.cider's 
Garden Greenery provides their cus- 
tomers with everything to make their 
gardens colorful and plush. There's 
literally hundreds of varieties of 
plants and flowers to choose from. 
I cider's produces all of their own 
spring bedding plants. 

Leider's, a family owned business 
for 22 years, supplies landscapes and 
shopping centers with their annuals, 
in addition to the local homeowner 
who needs the perfect garden touch 
to the inside or outside of their home. 
Steve I eider takes care of all the 
growing at Leider's, and wife Marti is 
the store and business manager. 
Steve's father Richard Leldcr, who's 



been in the business for 60 years, Is 
also on hand to tend his expertise. 

I rider's is open year-round, with 
their inventory changing with the sea- 
sons. When August 1 st rolls around, 
I aider's will offer fall garden mums, 
and come September 1, fall bulbs such 
as tulips and hyacinths will be avail- 
able. Halloween time brings pumpkins 
and com stalks, and In the winter 
Leider's will supply you with poinsct- 
tlos, Christmas trees, wreaths, and 
other holiday trimmings. 

Visit Leider's for all your garden- 
ing needs (open Memorial Day). 
Hours arc 9 am. to 8 p.m. Monday 
through Friday; and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Saturday and Sunday. 




Janet Smart enjoys a bit of privacy with 
Portable Privacy Screen— Photo by Todd 

Constructed of powder-coated steel 
and sturdy awning fabric in more than 20 
fashionable solid colors and patterns, 
Fantaze Is designed and constructed in the 
U.SA to the highest outdoor furniture 
standards for years of use. The fan requires 
minimal installation (hardware included) 
and fits Into an umbrella stand or ground 
receptacle, even through a deck. 

Smart's concern for comfort and privacy 
Isn't limited to product invention. Smart 



the help of her Invention, the FantazoTM 
F. Hebier 

contributes a portion of each Fantaze sole to 
the shelter, "A Safe Place," in Lake County. 

" Feeling a li ttlc safer, having a little more 
sense of 'personal space* is very important 
to everyone these days," Smart observes. "I 
like to think Fantaze makes it easier to 
spend more relaxing time outdoors." 

Information on where to purchase 
Fantaze Portable Privacy Screens Is avail- 
able by phoning FZS, Inc at (708) S46- 
23ia ' 





ifcair 

Surround yourself 

with spring flowers 

and the beauty of 

Mother Nature's handiwork 

Our Bedding Plant 

Deportment is filled 

with a wide assortment 

of colorful annuals, 

hardy perennials, and 

lush hanging baskets. 



m 




Instant Privacy — 

when and where you need it! 

The Fantaze can be yours 



>-.' 



^a 



Phone: 223-2422 

Located 2 Miles North of Grayslake On The Comer of Rte. 83 & Lako Street 



The affordable, portable, 
new alternative to fences! 

Perfect for Yard, Deck, Patio. 
Townhome, Poolsidc and Docksidc 

Available at — 

S 61 S Landscaping 

flwr 17J, I mk W vf Hwr 39 in Ant*xh 

Country Bumpkin 

Cwnff of tll*1fy and Gdmtt m MstndrUin 

Milaegcr's 

DosAs Art Oirty 32), 7 Hi\ S J 4 MiU RJmRmine 



:*i* 



<pitn® 



M 
I 



32331 N .Center Lane 

Gnysbkc, 1L 60030 

(708) 346-2316 

Call for color brochure} 




!fl HOME & GARDEN Ukiksd Ncwsp^pi ks M*y 26, 1995 



[ 



Home & (garden 






Lakeland 

Newspapers 



FOCUS 



Cedar Hill Nursery is the 
place for unusual plants 



Cedar Hill Nursery owner Dennis 
Wootcn saw a need for supplying people 
with unusual varieties of plant materials 
because he saw a great deal of nurseries 
selling the same varieties. Because of his 
forestry and landscape design hack- 
ground, lie was aware that other varieties 
of plants arc just as adaptable to this area 
as the more common ones. 

Wootcn worked for a wholesale nurs- 
ery before deciding to open his own busi- 
ness In 19(15. Wooten's staff is educated in 
the field as well. landscape designer 
Laurie Vos has a horticulture degree and is 
on hand to assist with customers' needs. 



Cedar Hill Nursery carries only the 540-0474. 



best quality plants and concentrate on 
their large variety of perennials, if there's a 
plant you want that Cedar Hill doesn't 
have, they'll get it for you. They're so con- 
fident about (heir products that Cedar Hill 
offers a two-year guarantee on all trees 
and shrubs. Maple, oak, ginko, birch, dog- 
wood, crabapplc, and fruit trees arc some 
of the varieties available. 

Cedar Hill is open year-round and 
stocks up on pumpkins, bird seed, and 
Christmas trees in the fall and winter 
months. If you've got a taste for the unusu- 
al, visit Cedar Hill Nursery at 21054 W. 
Hwy. 22 In Lake Zurich, or call them at 



Window & Wall Concepts 
makes you feel at home 



Window & Wall Concepts, Grayslake 
makes you feel at home in their designer 
showroom while assisting you with your 
decorating needs. Our experienced 
designers can assist in making the right 
decorating decisions to fit your personal 
tastes. On display in the showroom are the 
latest styles in custom draperies, top treat- 
ments, blinds, wall coverings, and coordi- 
nating mom accessories. The design pro- 
fessionals arc experts in narrowing down 
the best selections and providing the best 
decorating solutions for your home. 

The staff enjoys working with cither 



existing room settings in order to create a 
new look, or starting from scratch for the 
new home owner. "We have an extremely 
satisfied clientele, which is evident by our 
high repeat and referral business," said 
owner Barbara BertJcr. "We always go the 
extra mile to please our customers." 
Custom work can take anywhere from 2 to 
4 weeks, depending on availability of 
materials, whereas blinds and shades typ- 
ically can be delivered and installed within 
a few days. "This Is a great t>cncfit for new 
home owners who have nothing on their 
windows upon moving In," said Bcrtlcr. 



Paul's Grayslake Farm Market 
serves your needs year round 

Paul's Grayslake Farm Market provides the freshest, highest quality products to 
Its customers year round. Springtime brings flowering plants along with annuals and 
geraniums; summertime brings farm fresh produce that people come from miles 
away to get like fresh picked daily sweet com, Michigan peaches, and Kentucky vine 
ripe tomatoes. Fall brings pumpkins and Halloween special events, and with winter 
comes Christmas trees, all kinds of holiday trimmings, and firewood. Whatever the 
season, Paul's Grayslake Farm Market can accommodate your needs! 




'stafcejarm 





Center 




PLANT NOW 

We Have A Large Selection Of Vegetable Plants 



f OP SOIL 

A With Any 
▼Purchase 

(40 Lb. Bag) 



M 



Choose from our wide 
assortment of annuals 
and large flowering 
hanging baskets. 



804E.BelvidereRd.(Rte.120) 
GRAYSLAKE •548-1350 




S -■ Across from the drive-In 



CREATIVE WINDOW FASHIONS 
FOR YOUR HOME 



•Custom Draperies 
•Vaiances & Toppers 
•Cornice Boxes 

•Bauooh/Roman Shades 
•Custom Bedding & Pillows 



•Vertical & Mini Blinds 
•Pleated Shades 
•Duette Shades 
•Silhouette Shades 
•Custom Shutters 



•Reupholsterv & Slipcovers •Roller Shades iauo m*m\ 

HunterOouglas 



WINDOW FASHONS 



Call for Rn in Nome decorating consultation 
nnd free price estimates in the convenience 
and environment of your own Nome 



Mofl.-Thun. 10-8 



be wm H " n: syKNft 



10-6 



WINDOW & WALL CONCEPTS 

827 E. Csnler Stmt • Grayslaks • 223-3267 

(Piggly Wiggly Plaza -t Center & Atkinson) 



Plants for every Purpose 

We have expanded our sales yard to bring you an even 
wider selection of plants and garden supplies than ever 
before. Over 8 acres of material to choose from. 
Here are a few Items that we cany... 



Trees to provide 

SHADE 

A "growing Investment,* trees provide 
shade as well as beauty. 8' to 10' 

Clump River Birch $169.98 
Bradford Pear $199.98 

Red Sunset Maple $229.98 



m 

j. .^.v 



Plants for 

PRIVACY 

Plants to screen out unwanted views 
and add privacy for outdoor living. 

Techny Arborvitae 

4' b&b 
White Pine 
Austrian Pine 



$49.98 

$39.98 - $229.98 
$69.98 - $299.98 






nzsr 



-w>T* 




« 



M 




Shrubs for Colorful 

BORDERS 

A variety of flowering shrubs for a 
continuous flow of color throughout 
the seasons. 

Meadowlark Forsythia.3' 

Create a flowering hedge $24.98 

Variegated Dogwood $24.98 

Miss Kim Lilac 3' $34.98 

Autumn Jazz Viburnum $29.98 



Cedar Hill Nursery 

21854 W. Hwy. 22 • Lake Zurich, IL 

(708) 540-8474 

1 



M 



\ i 



Max 26, 199$ I^IamI Newspaper HOME & GARDEN 




j~pme & (garden 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



FOCUS 



Culligan solves water problems 



Culligan has been a world leader in the 
water treatment industry for over 50 years. 
The Culligan dealership has been serving 
the area since 1935, 

Culligan offers a multitude of services 
such as water conditioning, high quality 
drinking water, bottled water, salt delivery 
service, iron removal, and the treatment 
of Like Michigan water for chlorine. The 
experienced staff at Culligan Is ready to 
take care of all your water needs and offers 



a 24-hour emergency service. 

A new service Culligan is offering is 
area water clinics. Tree water testing for 
hardness will be done on site 

Custom service Is important to 
Culligan employees, so they strive to be 
helpful. They will resolve any problems 
quickly and efficiently. Whether you need 
delivery service, solutions to water prob- 
lems, service on equipment ora free water 
analysis, the Culligan people are there. 




Grayslake Feed Sales has it all 




MOKL 20464 21" 

super staaa.' mower 

Save '70°° 

Reg. '619" 

NOW ONLY 
$54^95 



• Get your Super 
Rccyelcr* mower today 
and p.iy no interest 
charge *til Oct. I. • 

• Gel a cleaner, healthier 
lawn without bagging. 

• Toro patented Kickers 
& Accelerators" chop 
clippings finer, even in 
tall grass. 

•Toro* 5 Year Total 
Coverage Warranty.' 

• Hurry, limited 
lime offer. 



TORO 



Other Recycler Models 
Starting at '229" 

When you want it done right™ 



r **/..< W-n »v i 



It all began back in 1940 when Leo 
DcMcycr started the business on 
Bclviderc ltd. in Grayslake, then strictly a 
feed and grain service business. In the 
early '50s, the feed and grain business 
moved to another location in Grayslake, 
and die building on Bclviderc used as a 
warehouse. In 1972, the building was 
once again put to use when Grayslake 
Feed Sales/Outdoor Power Equipment 



began operation. Rich DcMcycr, I-eos 
son, runs this end of the business, stating 
that their main focus is selling and servic- 
ing gas powered outdoor power equip- 
ment such as chain saws, trimmers, and 
lawn tractors. DcMcycr said that the store 
sells "the best quality equipment avail- 
able." And if you ever need parts or ser- 
vice Tor any of your outdoor lawn equip- 
ment, call (TOO) 223-6333. 



Dealer offer* 6 .GRAYSLAKE FEED SALES. 



Outdoor Power Equipment 



.proff«ionAl Aswmbly Which Include f\ . 1 .' II ' -.^- L ?„ 

s.t UP s«vic, n<iA«*d JU „ m .^ Uiiiuoor rower tti 

•Factory Tratntd MtchMiicfl * 

.Author^ «.»«;, *«,*« Rt -j 2 q & siusser St. 

•Genuine Toro PaiH 




Trust The Experts^ 




For Your Hone 




Top Quality Water 
A Name You Trust 




-And Your Garden 



Eastern Lake County - 708-459-1550 
Western Lake County - 708-526-6661 




-*-■'• 






■**/ 



. 












i 



1 
I 
[i I 





HOME & GARDEN UkrUwl NcwspApcRS M*y 26, 199$ 



'l~\pme <& (garden 



Lakeland 

NcwBpnpcrs 



FOCUS 



Edward Hines Lumber offers 
complete building materials 



Edward Mines Lumber has supplied 
quality lumber and building materials to 
homeowners and those in the building 
and remodeling industry throughout 
Chlcagoland for over 100 years. 

Hines Lumber in Wauconda maintains 
inventory on everything needed for build- 
ing or remodeling and has a well-trained 
sales staff on hand to estimate projects 
and answer questions; A fleet of delivery 
trucks arc available and offer next day 
delivery on in stock items in most coses. 

The store stocks Scmco clad casement 
and double hung windows and patio 
doors. Kitchen cabinets arc available from 
Decora and American Woodwark along 
with high quality faucets from Mocn and 
Price Pfistcr. 



For those who do not wish to do it 
themselves, Mines offers the Installed 
Sales program. Anything from storm win- 
dows to complete room additions can be 
done by Mines Professional Installation 
Contractors who achieve quality work 
guaranteed by Mines. 

Dc sure to check out Mines and Its 
complete line of products and services. 
Mines operates 23 retail lumber yards, a 
roof and door truss manufacturing facility, 
a prchung door/mlllwork plant and a win- 
dow distributing center. 

Store hours arc 7:30 am. to p.m. 
Monday through Friday; Saturday fl VLtrt to 
5 p.m.; and Sunday, 9 am. to 4 p.m. Call 
526-9000 for all of your building and 
remodeling projects. 



MSM Landscaping is 
'reconstructing your land' 



MSM Landscaping Services is your 
complete landscaping design company, 
specializing In landscaping installation 
and maintenance, hauling, brick paving 
design and installation, and winter ser- 
vices. 

Landscaping Installation Includes 
planting, sodding and grading, shrubbery, 
flowers, seeding, trees, brick pavers, and 
retaining walls, 

MSM I iindsca ping's maintenance ser- 
vices Include providing all the services you 
ui\}$it not have time for. weekly services, 



spring and fall clean-up, aeration, power 
raking, grass cutting, edging, bush and tree 
trimming, fertilizing, and cultivating. 

MSM also hauls pulverized top soil, 
sand, gravel, rocks, railroad tics, mulch, 
and more. 

Utilize MSM for brick paving Installa- 
tion on your patio, sidewalk, driveway, and 
courtyard. They offer a full one year war- 
ranty on brick installation labor and a 
complete line of concrete services. 

For a free estimate, call MSM 
Ijindscaplng at (700) 949-8433. 




Setvice 



949-8433 

Vernon Hills, IL 

Call Today For Your 

FREE ESTIMATE 

Reconstructing Your Land" 



Rosidontial & Commercial 
Senior Citizen Discounts Available 



Announcing Early Season Discounts On Spring 
Cleanups and Yearly Fertilizing Contracts... 



LAWN MAINTENANCE 



• Spring Cleaning • Power Raking • Aerating • Grass Cutting • Bush Trimming 
• Edging -Tree Trimming • Fertilizing • Cultivating • Gutter Cleaning 

• Wood Chips • Shredded Bark • 



PLANTING 



•Sod • Flowers • Bushes • Trees • 



HAULING 



• Black Dirt • Sand & Gravel 
• Rocks • Railroad Ties • 



\n f 



(Top Soil, Chips, Mulch, Sand, Pea Gravel); j MULCH 
Play Ground Supplies */"» A Kfi 

$ 15OFFi $ 10OFFi *5 OFF ii *24m 

3 YD. MINIMUM 



8 Yd. Minimum 6 Yd- Minimum J 2 Yd. Minimum 
Will) This Ad • Expires August 31, I99S 'Valid On Delivery Price 



I I 

I I 

I I 

I I 

I I 

I I 

I l 

.J L. 



ANY SOD JOB LANDSCAPING, 

OR PLANTING DESIGN 

AND INSTALLATI ON 

20% OFF 



.., r . 



13% OFF 

ON ALL OUR 

BRICK PAVING & 

RETAINING WALL SERVICES 



.J L. 



Schwind has three generations of experience 

Marty Sch wind & Sons Greenhouse ti Florist has been serving the northern 
Illinois area for 21 years. Raising and selling plants has been a ihrcc-gcncratlon occu- 
pation for the Schwind family. Ijocatcd cast of Rtc. 59 on Grass Lake Rd. In Antioch, 
Schwind's can take care of all your spring and summer flowering needs, and has 
fountains, an ornamental stone garden, and decor from Henri StudloTM. Schwind's Is 
open dally from 8 am. and Sunday beginning at 9 a.m. 




EST. 1889 



Marty Schwind & Sons* 

Greenhouse & Florist 



East of Rtc. 59 on Grass Lake Rd., flntioch ■ 395-3995 




> 



. 



.. u 



..-".^ 



It's Spring - Time At Schwind's! 



•Paiisies 
►Geraniums 
►Bedding Plants 
'New Guinea 
Impatiens 
'Herbs 
'Perennials 




Rose Bushes 
10" Hanging 
Baskets 




POTTING SOIL 

PEAT MOSS 

TOP SOIL 



Sec Our New Line Of Statuaries 
Fountains & Afore By Henri Studio 



Open Dully 8 a.m.; Sunday 9 a.m. 



J 





A deck can add additional beauty and value 
to your home, We offer a wide selection of 
decking and accessories in redwood, cedar, 
and treated pine. Your dream deck can be 
created visually wiih the use of our design 
spot computer. 



g^3k 




Activity centers can help your children enjoy 
the great outdoors tins summer. Wc can work 
wiili you to custom design juM the right 
combination set for your family. 



SCOUT WITH EAGLE'S NEST CLUBHOUSE 

Fencing provides security and privacy to your 
home, wc offer several styles in cedar, spruce, 
and treated pine. 





A gazebo is the ideal selling for outdoor entertaining 
and family dining. The gazebo kit is delivered to your 
home 85% complete. Wc provide complete 
instructions to finish ihc assembly, or you can 
arrange installation packages starling at *2i>95. 

120 DAY FREE FINANCING AVAILABLE ON ALL OUTDOOR PROJECTS 

SEE STORE FOR DETAILS 



EDWARD 

HINES 

4 LUMBER 



1100 Rand Road 

tComorol Rand Rd. & Bonnor) 

(708) 526-9000 

BE SB m 



WAUCONDA 




VOHNCR rd 




OUR DEBT PRICE PROMWfi 

n fou c*n U*J • ctsranUy a4vwbt*4 [*«:• »H««*>ar* krwM than outft to* an n*tfM Ham tound nMkd, %hem in r* 

corr\*llat*, mi «M wm\ rrvafch L (CtatwxAt, dufinow, mslakai q, (ttm c*-rx4 t* honotwf). 

HOURS' 
Monday thru Fffcjfiy 7:30 a.m. to 8:00 pjit. » Saturday 8,00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. • Sund*y 9Mt a.m. to 4:00 p jn. 



Ma? 26, 1999 UktU*d Nwrtp/ipm HOME & GARDEN R 




J-feme & ("garden 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



FOCUS 



Precision Window & Door 
fulfills customer's needs 



Since 1983, Precision Window & Door 
has built a reputation for determining 
what best fits their customers' needs and 
then supplying thai to them. 

Owner f l-arry MacKay says, Precision 
Window it Door can supply you with 
storm doors, replacement doors, and 
garage doors, as well as storm and replace* 
ment windows in vinyl, fiberglass, and 
wood. 

"We sell through education," said 
MacKay, explaining that the staff at 
Precision Window it Door takes the time to 

Flooring Outlet 
provides profes 

Flooring Outlet's professional sales, 
office, and installation departments arc 
available to make the customers' purchas- 
es the most satisfying cxpcri?.icc they 
have ever had. 

Their efforts are to create a tv.'.ncss for 
the future generations of both c Homers 
and employees. Their goal is to be the cus- 
tomer's No. 1 total flooring store. Flooring 
Outlet is dedicated to providing the best 
possible pricing, service, and warranties 
available. 

Flooring Outlet, family owned and 
operated by Mike and Debbie Ijcvin for 20 
years, is a member of Carpctmax, an orga- 
n ballon dedicated to buying for, selling to, 



explain their products to customers in 
their showroom, in order to best fit their 
myriad of products to their customer's 
particular needs. 

MacKay also stressed that his staff is 
always well-versed with their customer's 
home and that they do all their own work. 

Owens Coming fiberglass windows arc 
a popular item simply because of the qual- 
ity behind the name Owens Corning. Steel 
doors arc becoming increasingly popular * 
because they're energy efficient and 
durable. 

continually 
sional service 

and servicing the retail carpet customer. 
As one of the largest purchasers of floor 
coverings in the world, Carpctmax assures 
you of the lowest price and highest quality 
In the Industry. Through the Carpctmax 
No fault Protection Han, the excellence of 
the product is guaranteed. In fact, their 
motto Is, "If you're not satisfied, we're not 
satisfied.'' 

Flooring Outlet's inventory also 
Includes shectgoods, vinyl tile, hardwood, 
ceramic tile, and a large area rug program 
with over 250 available in stock. 
Customers can have their purchase 
Installed professionally, or can be done by 
the do-it-yourselfer. 



Distinctive Kitchen Designs 
run by 'designing women' 

Distinctive Kitchen Design's showroom is located at 203 S. Main St. in Wauconda. 
Browsing Is encouraged and their accommodating staff is available to answer any 
questions you may have. They not only are designers of cabinetry for kitchens and 
baths, but for any room in your home. Distinctive Kitchen Designs remains one of 
the few kitchen and bath shops owned and operated by women in the Cnicagoland 
area 






- 







Country, tt'i the kwk ih* male* you lec\ at home. It't mum. invuinj tni tppcilias AnJ W,..»i M.xlc m&uoiul 
ctbtaeti *ei the moot McticotouiJy crated, with rinnhci a»j uylca t> nut the moti ducnaiifttting country ctmootv- 
tern, they're the bat tdllnc line of ctufexn built kitchen* in Amencj. 

If you're ioicrctied la country tluitci. Hop hy our thnwrotwn rrom hnKiiJi l-> (-ranch. SH*Lcr in VVtoruu «nd 
beyond. »e tuvc the "mood irukcn" you're lontlaf foe 

Distinctive Kitchen Designs 

203 S. Main Street. Wauconda, IL 60084 

(708) 526-78212 Monctay-Fneijy 830-5. S*tunlay By Appo*tfm«M J 



GET SAVINGS IN AN INSTANT! 



RECEIVE An Instant Rebate On 
Owens-Coming Fiberglas* Windows. 




Receive an instant rebate of 
•25 per Owens-Coming Fiberglas 
Window you purchase before 
June 30, 1995*. There's no limit 
to the number of Instant Rebates 
you can receive. See your local 
Owens-Coming dealer for details. 

Look for complete details at: 



KQDCgi 



PRECISION 



Window & 
Door Co. 



25090 S. Old Rand Rd. 
Wauconda, IL 60084 

(708) 526-5775 





OWENS 
CORNING 



' Minimum »v*iiw purdu*.' r> liu- 
Mutf tu\c the Ur*-t Arpm Rl 



250 
AREA RUGS 

in slock starting from $31.00 on up! 

Persian, Southwest, 
Borders, Dhurries 

Also a fine in stock selection of carpets, 
ceramics, vinyl & sheet goods 

M&L'S FLOORING OUTLET 

Comer of Rt 12 & Bonner Rd. • Wauconda 

(708) 526-5815 





Aus. t jj SB ma 

CM**®" 1 * 



Professionally Installed 
or Do-lt-Youraolf 



World ol Diffarenco Ouoanioo 

riot KatlViod. 



■rax 



lislfflaik 



HOURS: Mon. - Fri. 6-8 

Sat. 9-5 Sun. 10-3 







S{3 HOME cV GARDEN UIccIancI NcwspAfHks M*y 26, 1995 



Home & garden 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 






FOCUS 



Quigs brings beauty to 
homes inside and out 

Quig's Greenhouse opened In the spring of 1987 and has been growing ever, 
since. Quig's plants arc grown on the premises from seeds or cuttings and Include a 
large variety of herbs, perennials, and vegetables, as well as annual bedding plants. 
Hanging baskets and planters arc a specialty, with old fashioned moss baskets for 
replanting. Available in May arc a wide selection of flowering annuals, including 
Clcome, Blue Salvia Farinacea, and many varieties of Cosmos, Scented geraniums in 
many unusual fragrances arc available, as well as birdhaths, windchimes, cedar lawn 
swings, and terra cotta planters. While you're shopping, stop In for breakfast or 
lundi at Quig's Restaurant! 




\ 



IVh A Great Weekend For Planting!! \ 

Choose From A Wide Selection Of 

Balding Plants & 
Perennials! 

Banging Basketm & Planter* Or 
Bring Your Own in For f/« 7b JFfff.'.*.' 

• Bird Feeders • Bird Baths 
• Lawn Swings 



1 «&fr"' 








mm 


m * 




w* 


tt- $?■$ '** 




(to • c3 


^ 


rwf ~ -^ wt.i^^j 





"Mr Have lOO'.s Of Unique Gift 
Items for Your Home & Garden! 




Hours: 

Tues.-Sun 

&-5 p.m. 



RL 83, (60) M. oi MMiian Rd. 
Mundeksin 



Greenhouse & Gift Shop* 

566-9130 




JOHN DEERE 



YOUR LAWN 



HEADQUARTERS 

SCHMIDT IMPLEMENT HAS BEEN SERVING LAKE COUNTY 
& SOUTHEASTERN WISC. FOR OVER 70 YEARS 



The John Deere STX38 with its 

12.5 hp engine, 38" mower and 

tight 15 inch turning radius is a 

great value at just 

*1999 00 



-r'y,,,r-, 



/ 



The 425 Garden Tractor takes care 

of big jobs fast with its 20 hp 

engine, 54" or 60" mower and 

optional 4 wheel steering. 






'"Interest Rate 



Moil Model** 



IMPLEMENT 
COMPANY s 



jo—ttum 



OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE SINCE 1923 

HWY. 83, 5 Ml. NORTH OF ANTI0CH 

SALEM, Wl • 414-843-2326 • HOURS 7-5 MON.-SAT. 

•Subject (o ipproved cretin. 10% down r»ymait required 7.9* n for term of 24 mocuhi. (*ber f«ct A 
(crrni available. Non commcrdaj uac only. Offer codi June 30. 1995, foe (elect tnodcli only. 



Schmidt Implement Company 
a tradition in farm equipment 



Schmidt Implement Company has 
t>ecn operating In Salem, Wisconsin since 
1923. Dave Schmidt represents the fourth 
generation of the family Involved In the 
business, with his dad Rohcrt being the 
third. 

Schmidt Implement's main function Is 
selling and servicing farm equipment, 
both big and small. Some of the bigger 
brands sold arc John Deere and Gchl prod- 
ucts. A big part of Schmidt's business Is 
also lawn and grounds equipment. 
Customers come In for lawn tractors, 
stand-behind mowers, string trimmers, 
chain saws, etc 

If there's ever a problem with a cus- 



tomer's farm equipment, they can bring it 
to Schmidt's for repairs or parts. With 
Schmidt's eight qualified service techni- 
cians, they got the Job done quickly and 
correctly. As far as parts, there's over 25,000 
items on hand to make sure Schmidt's has 
just the part you need. And If for some rea- 
son, the part you need isn't available, John 
Deere provides next day service for parts. 
Incidentals like batteries, oil, belts, and 
more arc also available. 

Dave Schmidt says that he, dad Robert, 
and mom Louise, along with the rest of the 
staff at Schmidt's, strive to be friendly and 
helpful to each and every customer that 
walks in the door. 



Need casual patio furniture? 
Visit the Garden House 



Whether you have a small patio/ bal- 
cony or a large deck, the Garden House of 
Casual Furniture, Inc., located at 1707 
Rand Rd. in Palatine, can handle your 
needs. Not only docs the Garden Center 
carry outdoor/casual furniture, but a wide 
variety of wicker and rattan items for year- 
round use is available, and has one of the 
largest selections of such in the Like 
County area 

What's also nice about the Garden 
Center, open year-round, Is mat If you have 
a decor that's hard to match, the Garden 
Center will help you design and coordinate 
patio furniture and accessories to fit your 



decor to a tec. Accessories on hand 
Include porch plants, lamp stands, table- 
cloths, ashtrays, outdoor lights, candles, 
and much more. 

Patio furniture In aluminum, weather- 
proof wicker, and teak wood (which 
requires no maintenance) Is available, 
along with a variety of cushions to Tit the 
design you choose. 

The Garden Center, owned by Bob 
Trocstcr, Is celebrated its 25th anniversary 
this year. Visit the Garden Center now to 
take advantage of not only the spring sale, 
but this time of the year brings the largest 
selection of merchandise. 



SPECIALLY PRICED 

IN STOCK 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 




the 



Uoyd/FkmtJcrs 

Lloyd Loom* • All-Weather Wicker 



Garden House palatine <r-.2) 



furniture 



&kt 30 rMi In Bustncu 



Helping People Have Fun in the Sun Since I960 



(1 Block N. Of Dundee Rt 68) 
1707 Rand Rd. 

359-2020 



ftUy26, 199$ UfcUwd NnrtpApcts HOME & GARDEN 




'J-pme & fZarden 






Lakeland 

Newspapers 



FOCUS 



All Temp's got the advantage 



All Temp Heating and Air Conditioning 
offers its clients the advantage of old-fash* 
ioncd quality, workmanship and prices 
since 1946, growing along with the commu- 
nities they service, "Wc specialize in high 
efficiency heating and cooling systems for 
residential and commercial replacement 
and new construction,'* said Adam Kern, 
company president Ail Temp's service, 
installation, and design teams arc on the 
cutting edge In today's market In fact. All 
Temp has been selected as one of only ten 
recipients out of several hundred contract- 
ing firms to receive the Circle of Excellence 
Award from Lennox, inc. The award recog- 
nizes outstanding accomplishments by 



Independent Lennox dealerships. 

Their factory-trained service techni- 
cians arc continuously updated with die 
latest information and methods so All 
Temp can give you 24-hour service for 
peace of mind and year-round comfort 
"Our focus on quality brings clients back 
to us for all of their comfort needs as well 
as their neighbors," said Mr. Kcm. 

By maintaining a modern facility 
stocked with top-of-the-linc equipment, 
All Temp can offer you the finest heating 
and air conditioning products for years of 
trouble-free operation. In fact, their 
Planned Service customers also enjoy pri- 
ority scheduling. 



Mark Cook's Garden Center 
fulfills all landscaping needs 



Since 1986, Marie Cook and his mother 
Maureen, have been taking care of the 
needs of their loyal customers. Mark Cooks 
Garden Center, located at 101 E Main St In 
I^akc Zurich, Is where you can go to pick up 
most any gardening or landscaping need, 

Mark Cook describes their business as 
a retail garden center, landscape designers 
and contractors, and nursery stock grow- 
ers (through their nursery In Woodstock, 
Illinois). High quality products, personal 
service, and competitive prices keep cus- 
tomers coming back. 

Some of the items you can find at Mark 
Cooks include water gardening products 
Including items for waterfalls, ponds, and 
aquatic plants. Design and Installation of 



paver patios, walks, driveways, and natur- 
al stone patios and walks arc available, 
along with hems like bird feeders, bird 
houses, bat houses, bird baths, deer feed- 
ers, pond and lake herbicides, algaecidcs, 
and garden accent products. Usual prod- 
ucts like annuals, perennials, trees, shrubs, 
and evergreens, arc also on hand. 

Mark Cook's Garden Center is open 
year-round. Christmas trees, wreaths, gar- 
land, and bird seed, feeders, and 
Sweeney's deer feeders, in addition to 
horse and livestock foods are available In 
the off-season during winter. 

Visit Mark Cook's Garden Center, or 
call them at (700) 438-2120 for further 
information. 




NARK COOK'S 
GARDEN CENTER 

IMC. 



*Perenn!aIs * Trees, SriRubs, Evergreens 
AnnuaIs * GRouNd Covers 

* Water Lilies * Mar^naI PIants 

* Boq PIants * UnusuaI, Rare, DwARf, 
*Koi & Gold Fish DiFFereht Trees & SriRubs 



CoMplcTE LANdscApE DesiqN & Construction 

Open 7 DAys A WtEk 



^*J 



K3M 



458'2120 8B 



r 



101 B. Main St 
Lake Zurich, 1L60047 






Joe M, Pesz Landscaping 

unique services 

At the family owned and operated Joe M. Pesz Landscaping and Excavating, 
Inc., they pride themselves on offering their customers a unique service. Not only 
can they provide all your landscaping needs, but they can dig foundations, install 
septic and sewer systems, and install retaining walls of stone or timber. Once this is 
completed, Pesz Landscaping can begin your landscaping plans by sodding or 
hydni'Sceding your lawn and planting plants and shrubbery. Once everything is 
complete, Pesz Landscaping offers maintenance of your landscaping. Whatever 
your landscaping needs, count on Joe M Pesz Landscaping. 



Joe M. Pesz 

Landscaping & Excavating, Inc. 
4705 S. Roberts Rd. • Island Lake, IL 60042 

(708) 639-9321 

We Offer Professional, Experienced, 

Insured Services For Industrial, 

Commercial and Residential Accounts 

Maintenance 

Sodding • Patio & Walls 

Hauling & Excavating 

Septic & Sewer Installation 

Personalized Service 
Since 1957 - Call Us 

SB 98 




"Hydro-Seeding Our Specialty' 



1 




LENNOX - 

PRE-SEAS0N 
SALE 

ENDS 
JUNE 2, 1995 

LENNOX- 




BUY A r ^'fW AmCWUITK» W O«»«*TTMO 

AIR CONDITIONER OR FURNACE 

OUR BEST PRICES 

EVER! 





All Temp 



HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING^ 

WINNER OF THE 1995 LENNOX 
CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE AWARD 

FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED AND SERVING OUR COMMUNrTY FOR OVER 46 YEAR 

WAUCONDA g£3 PALATINE 

124E.Ub*rtySL(176) WW Hwy. A Smith Rds. 

526-9082 BSD 358-7100 




XT* UltZltDVCCV,* 




S2 



25 



sa 



- 4 




HOME & GARDEN UlaUwd Ncwsp»ptRS May 26, 199? 



""H^^ffW. 1 - 1 ,-..-, - '-■- -■■■ *•• " ■ ■ •■ • — ^^-^-^^ 

Thuis. 8am-6pm • Fri. 8am-6pm • Sat 8am-4pm » Sun. 10am-2pm * Mon. 8am-6pm 




I 2) Lifetime VViH guarantee 
3) Custom Pools to Fit Any Bac 

IN STORE FINANCING AVAILABLE 

^Fast Approvals • No Down Payment 



. 








:z«: 



**** 




i- ^w » h i i ii n i i i » I'lWqi m ! . ill i h i ii ' i f 
i 1 1 ■ ■— 1—^*1— — ■ > " " ' " 




■ /M\. V£ 



£f-" 



12' x 24' Rectangular 
INGROUND 



15* x 30' Oval 
INGROUND 



INCLUDES 

POOL PACKAGE, 

INSTALLATION 

AND 3* DECK! 

SALE 5?j ^^ ^ ^* 
YOURS FOR ONLY 

$103.00* 

PER MONTHI 

' II !■ ' . ;■ 



INCLUDES 

POOL PACKAGE, 

INSTALLATION 

AND 3» DECKI 

sale $ 12 f 495 

YOURS FOR ONLY 

$130.00* 

PER MONTHI 



16' x 36* Grecian 
INGROUND 

POOL 

INCLUDES 

POOL PACKAGE. 

INSTALLATION 

AND 3' DECKI 

SALE s 1 5,99 

YOURS FOR ONLY 

$166.00* 

PER MONTHI 



.": ■ : :■■--:- ■ 
^w^ct^j.i.11 ..l» m -i'T i iM l~ff.;i i, 
»— nil i ™-»«~— — — — 



20' x 40* Rectangular 
INGROUND 



INCLUDES 

POOL PACKAGE, 

INSTALLATION 

AND 3' DECK! 

SALE S 17 5 99i 
YOURS FOR ONLY 

$186.00* 

PER MONTHI 




Up i i«i i imp 



Ifitf 



I Oil 






INTO "HOT" WATER , , . . 
i) 

i 



1 




105,000 BTU 
HEATER^ 

WJLL HEAT 

ABOVE 

GROUND 

POOL OR 

SPA 

' GALE1 

s 765 



15S.000 BTU lM,00Ojmi 
HEATER HEATER, 



WILL HEAT 
1G*x32' 

OR 

SMALLER 

POOL 

€65 



WILL HEAT 
18'X3G* 

OR 

SMALLER 

POOL 

r 8ALEl 



i-.- 







i 




¥¥MV 

FIRST AND ONLY 

ABOVE GROUND PORTABLE POOL HEATER 
100,000 BTU PROPANE POOL HEATER 






RWPAK'S NEW RP2100 HEWER 





;P 



■A 



;20S.OOO BTU 
HEATER 

WILL HEAT 
20* X 40* 

OR 

SMALLER 

POOL 

SALE! 

mm 



i 335.000 BTU 
f&HEATER 

WILL HEAT 
20" X50" 

OR 

SMALLER 

POOL 



.-^_j»"-f^ 



; SALE! 




GETTHEJ&L& 
RAYPACK ADVANTAGES: 

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• FROtlCDOM -ftus* AT A spccuu. 

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* No professional installation required 

• Easy to assemble 

* No electric needed 

• 2- Year limited warranty 

* Stores easily in winter 

• Requires very little maintenance 



• LESS PROPANE TANK