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Full text of "Antioch News 11/27/1998"



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AfifflOCH PUBLIC UBRAfty DISffflCT 




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'If you were to Have Thanksgiving ^^j^^^ ^j^ 

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for family man 

with 90 years of 

memories 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter?' 

With 90 years of his life 
to draw upon, Bill 
Gerber can tell stories 
that almost span the 
century. The stories reflect the 
changes he had experienced In the 
world. However, at Thanksgiving his 
family comes together in Antioch 
for one event that has not changed 
very much in their life. 

"Thanksgiving has always been 
a big family event," said daughter 
Carol Brady, 51, "Everybody chips in 
and brings dishes." 

This year, they will gather in 
Antioch, again, where the family has 
lived its life. Sometimes there can be 
two dozen people at the family 
table. .' 

"It takes forever to passjhat 
bowl of potato down," Brady, said. 
"My dad, for years,' has made 
the cranberries," she said. "He's an 
excellent cook." 

"We're very traditional^ 
Extremely," she said of their holiday 
celebration. It is a meal that her 
mother, Lois (Hunter) Gerber had 
served the family for many years 

Please see FAMILY / A3 



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Above, The Max and Rosa 
Gerber family with their 
children circa 1920. Back 
row, from left: Walter, Paul,. 
Jake, Lillian, Fritz, Rudy. Row 
: two:. Rose, Simon, Max, Rosa 
with Clyde. In her . lap; Vem, 
Bill.- "Front row: Ben, Lena, 
and. Errile. Right, BIlLGerber 
remains active In Antioch 
and in the lives of his 
children. He was one of 16 
children born on a .Wisconsin 
farm In the early l&OOs, but 
was the only one to leave 
farming and try his hand- in 
business. He has lived in 
Antioch most of his life. — 
Photo provided by family and 
Kenneth Patchen 




HtMdtypcmm 
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ty KENNETH PATCHEN 

Staff Reporter 

An tioch Holiday traditions and 
memories begin downtown. 

Although adults may enjoy the 
day-afterrThanksgiving ./, shopping 
tradition, the village has created a set 
of family traditions to welcome the 
season that evening. 

For many families, the parade Is 
the start of the gift-giving season- "It 
welcomes Santa to town, 1 ! said 
, Laurie S tahl, Parks and Recreation 
Director, "He will be available at his 
castle for pictures afterward," 

The parade starts. at 650 p.m. 
near Mam and Lake streets in the 
downtown shopping district The 
parade proceeds north on Main and 
r west on Orchard streets. • % . 

"He's goinglo ride on the State 
Bank of The Lakes float at the end," 
saidStahL 

The parade consists of floats and 
groups of people. V 

"We're going to have different 

queens. from different towns," Slahl 

"p said. Miss Antioch ^Laura. -Harvey, 

Little Miss Antioch Keeley Ann 

Jhode, and Miss Lake County Fair 

^Qiieen Kaey Sehmer will be part of 

the parade. . 

"We have different fire depart- 
ments;" Stahl said. Equipment from 
\ Salem and Trevor, Wis., Lake Villa, 
I and from the Antioch Fire Depart- 
ment Fust Fire Protection District is 
expected for the parade. 

Parade units also will include the 

Please see HOUDAY IA4 



'He never stops giving of himself 



Vikings' Porter national 'Coach 



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Youth athktk 

coach chosen 

from field of 2,000 

Antioch Vikings Lightweight 
Football Coach Richard "Denny" 
Porter has been named National 
"Coach of the Year" for 1998 by the 
American Youth Coaches Associa- 
tion. 

Porter was selected from more 
than 2,000 nominations from 
around the United States and 
Canada, according to the All Star 
Sports Foundation of Palatine, 111. 

"He never stops giving of 
himself," said Kevin Rowland, direc- 
tor of the All Star Sports Foundation. 
"That was clear from all the letters 
and descriptions (we) received about 
Coach Denny." 

"We could easily write a book of 
all (of) Coach Porter's accomplish- 

Pleasesee COACH fA4 




VlWng.Ugihtwelght Football (toach Richard "Denrty^ Porter has a;^"^ 
Includes 6 straight regular season league championships. He has been named the national "Coach 
of the Year" by the American Youth Coaches Association of the Ail Star Sports Association from a 
field of 2,000 national entries.— Submitted photo ^ 1V -/ ., 



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For home delivery, call (847) 740-4035; For ads, call (847) 223-8161 



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COMMUNITY 



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November 27, 1998. 




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COMMUNITY 






Lakeland NewspapBTsf^ A3 ' 






FROM PAGE Al 



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:Antwchiriatfs 
tradition 




before her death In 1973. . 

"He really believes it is a time to 
be thankful," Carol Brady said. Her 
father Is very thankful to God for 
what he has done for the Gerber fam- 
ily. 

This year, the family gathers to 
express thanks for many blessings, 
but also for the life of their father. He 
turns 90 years old on Tuesday, Dec 8. 

On Saturday, Dec. 5 they will host 
an open house from 130 to 4 p.m. at 
Antioch Evangelical Free Church Fel- 
lowship Hall to celebrate bis birth- 
day. 

"It Is open to the public," said 
Brady. "People are Invited to come." 

Bill Gerber is a thankful man, de- 
scribed by his children as a patient 
man, and filled with personal experi- 
ences about the wo rid that his broth- 
ers and sisters did not see. To learn of 
his life Is to realize that he treated 
people decently, practiced patience, 
adapted to change, always worked to 
do a quality Job, and cared for his 
family. These reflected values that he 
learned as a youth on the family 
farm. 

"I was the only one in the family 
who had a varied life," Bill Gerber 
said. It was a family of 16 brothers 
and sisters. 

"My dad was a fanner," BUI Ger- 
ber said. His father would buy a run- 
down farm, build it up, sell it, and 
then buy another run-down farm. 

"He did that all his life," Bill Ger- 
ber said. " He was farming all the 
time." 

"I was not a favorable farmer," 
Bill Gerber said. However, he stayed 
with It. 

"We all did what (Dad) said" 

During the depression, BQl Ger- 
ber ' s father was able to find work for 
him on a farm in Lake Mills, Wis. 

"It was a big, big dairy farm," 
Gerber said. "I liked being inside." 

Working with cows was very 
much more to his liking and he de- 
veloped a skilled touch with the dairy 
herd. This led to work for a Lake For- 
est millionaire who owned a farm but 
needed someone to manage the 
dairy operation. 

"I went out there as a herd man- 
ager," Gerber said. It was not uncom- 
mon for many calves to die as a result 
of their treatment in those days. 

"1 never lost one calf. Not one. I 
knew how to handle it " 

He eventually left farm work and 
moved into town. He never returned 
to the farms. 

Bill Murphy had a Midget Eat 
Shop on Main Street in Antioch. It is 
where Gerber went to work as a dish- 
washer. 

"Then he started having me 
making hamburgers," Gerber said. 

One day, Murphy said to Gerber, 
"Here's the key. The restaurant is 
yours. " Gerber took over the pay- 
ments. 

Gerber married his close friend's 
sister, Lois Hunter, as World War II 
was developing A few days after they 
married, he was In the Army, in Ten- 
nessee, in training. 

He served all over Europe in 
World War II. 

In the military, because of his 



varied background, he worked as a 
cook, but eventually moved on to 
manage a company garage and Its 
parts. He Instituted the practice of re- 
quiring old vehicle parts in exchange 
for new parts to cut down on theft 
and misappropriation of parts. 

"That spread throughout the en- 
tire Army," he said. 

He also served as a drill sergeant 
He also would check the camps of 
German prisoners while they were on 
work details to make sure they were 
not trying to escape. His assignments 
in the military were quite varied 

"I went over on the second wave 
at Normandy," Gerber said He went 
over with his trucks right before 
dawn. 

He also served in the Battle of the 
Bulge. 

"I was In It from the beginning to 
the end," Gerber said of World War II. 

He came home to Antioch, 

After the war he worked at Amer- 
ican Motors in Kenosha for three 
years. "I worked on the line," he said 
"I had to put in transmissions." 

Getter's final stretch of employ- 
ment was at Quaker Industries in 
Kenosha. He was there for 15 years 
until retirement in 1973. Starting out 
as a sweeper and cleaner, then on 
presses, he eventually became their 
purchasing agent 

Bill Gerber was from a family of 
16 children "I was the only one in the 
family who did things out of the ordi- 
nary, not just farming I did not like 
farming" 

It was that curiosity which pro- 
pelled him into the new wodd and all 
there was to see of lL 

"My dad Is very quiet, very kind- 
hearted," said daughter Janice 
Nicholson. "He's a man who can fix 
everything." 

Daughter Carol Brady said, "He's 
very patient" 

He was patient all his life as he 
taught Carol how to use power tools 
and work with hand took. Bill Ger- 
ber was willing to share his interests 
with his children and draw them into 
his life. 

"He comes from a very creative 
family, " Carol Brady said. Many of his 
brothers and sisters are artistic 

For Bill Gerber, his artistry took 
the form of working with his hands. 
These days, he spends many hours in 
his woodcraft workshop. He builds 
birdhouses, toys, boxes, and other 
wood items. He gives some of them 
as gifts to seven grandchildren and 
two great-grandchildren. 

In addition to two daughters, 
Janice, the youngest and Carol, he 
and his wife had a son named James, 
the oldest 

"He walks regardless of weather 
conditions," daughter Janice Nichol- 
son said. 

He likes living in Antioch very 
much. "It's a small town," he said. 
"You know everybody." 

As the Gerber family gathers for 
Thanksgiving this year, they will have 
a meal that has not changed for them 
over the years. 

"Years and years ago we had 
turkey," Janice Nicholson said. "That 
is true today." 




Antioch News 

Vol. 113 No. 48 A Lakeland Newspaper Founded 1886 

(USPS 027-000) EtUKxWOtVw M«i*wofBinol»Pn»»A»»oc 

30 South Whitney St.. Qrayslake, IL 60030 Look tor us on the Internal at 

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Penmaiwr. Send •UaVuu ohcngn id AnBoeh N«w». 30 Sou* WWrw/ SMft P .0. Boa », CV»i^«. l«<^ *W». 



WILLIAM H.SCHROEDER 

Publisher 
KAREN 0T00LE 

Ocvta'Jon Mgr- 

BOBULMER 

Difplty AdY*1Mng Mgr. 

MAUREEN COMBS 

CtasHfiod AttvoillSlnQ Mgr. 



M.R.SGHROEDER 

Founder- 1904- 1986 



NEAL TUCKER 

CompoMmUgrJExtoiUve Etfflof 



WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

President 
MIMI KOOB 

Coffjptnator 

CORKEY GROSS 

PiMcRtUtionsUtmgef 



Vi 



VERIFIED RHONDA HETRICK BURKE 



The Class of '99 members of the Antioch Community High School Jobs for Illinois' Graduate Career 
Association were Installed in a special ceremony, Nov. 18. The class Includes: Front row from left: 
Jessica Holub, Lori Marquardt, Erin Hudd, ACHS counselor Jane Ross, Kristin Kerr, Karen Lochhead. 
Row two: April Lennon, Tomra Kuxhouse, Joe Bamett, Katie Mllroy. Back row: Aeron Kaster, Brian 
McNamara, Nate Cardan, Jordan Huff, Tim Brankln, David Izenstark. 

ACHS career assoc. inducts new members 

By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



New student members were ini- 
tiated and installed into the Antioch 
Community High School Career As- ■ 
sociadon Wednesday, Nov. 18 at 
their second annual ceremonies in 
the school auditorium. 

Dr. James Love, principal of the 
school, spoke to the association 
members during the ceremonies. . 

The ceremony marks the official 
membership of students in the Anti- 
och Career-Association. . - - I'Sa 

The association Is dedicated 
to service, the community, and 
the school while members gain 
knowledge of the workplace. 
y The school chapter is part of 
the Jobs for Illinois' Graduates 
program. 

Association membership 
helps students in their last year at * 
high school plan for a future ca- 
reer and perform community ser- 
vice. In addition, students learn 
leadership and team building 
skills to help assure success in the 
workplace. 

Officers of the association are: 
President Timothy Brankin; Vice- 
president David Izenstark, Secretary 
Erin Hudd; Reporter Lori Marquardt; 




Nate Carden talks with Antioch High School counselor Jane Ross 
about the jobs program. — Photos by Lynn Gunnarson Dahlstrom 



Historian Jessica Holub; and Trea- 
surer Karen Lochhead. 

Members include Joe Bamett, 
Jordan Huff, Kristen Kerr, Tomra 



Kuxhouse, Jeremy Levin, Nate Car- 
den, Aeron Kaster, Kyle Koczorows- 
ki, April Lennon, Brian McNamara, 
and Katie Milroy. 



Soldier Boy' author at Books, Etc. 



Dale Perryman at Books 
Etc. in downtown Anti- 
och will host his first au- 
thor signing books. 
John W. Scbnun* will autograph 
copies of "Soldier Boy" on Saturday, 
Dec. 12 from 2 to 4 p.m. The book 
is about a young Civil War infantry- 
man. Schnurr is described as a sen- 
sitive historian and masterful story 
teller. He lives in Wilmot and was 
the former owner and operator of 
Fox Valley Florists. 

"We're having our semi-annu- 
al bag sale the day after Thanks- 
giving " said Barbara Porch, 
owner of Choosey Child. Cus- 
tomers save 25 percent off every- 
thing they can stuff in a downtown 
Antioch shopping bag. 

"And, if they're an early bird 
shopper, between 7 and 11 a.m., 
they can save 50 percent on one 
item in the bag." * 

Given the terrific stuff in the 
store windows, this may be an ex- 
cellent time to shop in downtown 
Antioch the day after Thanksgiving 

Hastings Lake YMCA Resident 
Camp Director Mary Jo Boone 




OUR 
TOWN 

Ken Patchen 



said, "If your kids are looking for 
an exciting way to spend part of 
their holiday break making mem- 
ories and friendships that last a 
lifetime, send them to Hastings." 

The camp has a winter resi- 
dent camp program for children 
and teenagers 8 to 16 years old. It 
is four days and nights of tobog- 
ganing, swimming, climbing the 
Alpine Tower, Indoor and outdoor 
games, arts and crafts, and a 
dance. There are two downhill ski 
trips in the mix also. 

Camp dates are from Sunday, 
Dec. 27 to Thursday, Dec. 31. Call 
for more information and registra- 
tion forms at 356-4001. 

"Three of my young adult stu- 
dents have been selected to go to 
Barcelona, Spain to represent our 
country in a tournament," said 



John Seiber, of U.S. Tae Kwon 
Do Academy. 

This is an open tournament at 
which many European nations 
will be competing. 

"We're pretty excited about it," 
he said. The three who will attend 
include Timothy Walker and 
Michelle Elliott, both 18 and 
from Antioch. David Lois, 16, of 
Lilly Lake, will also attend. 

"They're all elites," said Seiber. 

The tournament is from Fri- 
day, Nov. 20 to Monday, Nov. 30, 
which includes the Thanksgiving 
Holiday period. 

There will be eight men and 
eight women from the United 
States on the trip. 

"There are sixteen competitors 
and three are right here from Anti- 
och," Seiber said. "They will be go- 
ing with the Olympic Team coach." 

Seiber's studio is at 750 Route 
173. 

"It's good to know that Anti- 
och kids are doing well," he said. 

If you have interesting infor- 
mation or anecdotes to submit for 
"Our Town" call staff reporter Ken 
Patchen at 223-8161, ext. 131 or 
e-mail, edit @lna\com. * 



■*- 









- ■- -A 



,., 



A4 J Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



November 27, 1998 




Village goes on sale for Christmas 

Bob Lindblad, president of the Lakes Region Historical Society, and Adam Zakroczymski of the An- 
tioch Lions Club and Mayor Marilyn Shineflug unveil the new Game of Antioch, available for the hol- 
iday gift-giving season at downtown shops. The Antioch Lions Club donated the first copy of the 
game to the historical society.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 




Jl 






ay 



FROM PAGE Al 



appenmg 



! 



HOLIDAY: 

Season begins 

Antioch (icrinan American < 'kih, 
l-irsi National Hank Ktnployec 
( Kvned.Thelen S;iikI and ( inivd, Na- 
lioiial l.aiulmark < >i tiiip. gill scout 
troops, the Aiilioch loyal Order of 
ilu 1 Moose. Distinctive Sij^n.-.. Inc., 
WX1.C Radio. Mr Pig Irom the Pig- 
jjjy Wiggiy Market, and First Nation 
al Hank of Chicago. 

"I here's abou I 2. r > entries so far." 
she said. "We'll play Christmas mu- 
sic ihroughnul I he town mi the 
speakers." 

The village tree lighting ceremn 
n\ isai 7 p.m. alter ihe parade. 

People are encouraged to donate 
ornaments earlier in Ihe day, before 
■I pin., that ean be placed on (he tree 
lliisyeat anil in lutine yeais. 

Parents who wisli in participate 
in the Holiday Lights of Antioch 
competition can register with the 
Chamber of Commerce and CAN. 
the sponsors, at WS-MM\ and com- 
pete lor over $ I .(100 in prizes. 



FROM PAGE Al 



■!■. 



COACH: Leads field of 2,000 

menis, both as a coach and commu- coaches suggest that the, origins of 

nity leader." stated Rowland. "The the award are based on Porter's sol 

things he has done to help kids and id commitment to community In 



families is very impressive." 

The Antioch Lightweight Foot- 
hall learn in early November owned 
a 6.1-game winning streak that in- 
cluded six straight regular season 
league championships. 

Although ii is his work as a coach 
that brings Porter national attention, 
it is the stories told of his work in the 
community that draw a special por- 
trait of his character. 

The award by the American 
Youth t loaches Association pays spe- 
cial tribute to men and women who 
have given their time on a volunteer 
basis as both a youth coach and 
community leader. This is the 2Mb 
year the award has been given. 

Porter was selected by a panel of 
nine judges with the All Star Sports 
Foundation. Nominations were 
made by member organizations, di- 
rectors, parents, players, and coach- 
es. In June, 50 candidates were se- 
lected for detailed consideration. 
The five finalists were selected near 
the end of September. 

Porter was announced as ihe 
winner. Nov. 10. 

He has been involved in youth 
activities for more than 30 years. 1 le 
has coached football, basketball, 
baseball, hockey, and golf. 

Porter is currently employed by 
Motorola, Inc. and has worked there 
over 29 years. 

I le graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Missouri 

Porter founded the Buffalo 
Crove Youth Football Association, 
the Woodficld Cubs Baseball Pro- 
gram, the Chicago Lakers Youth Bas- 
ketball Association, and the Subur- 
ban Open Youth Golf Tournament. 

The Buffalo Bills Lightweight 
Football team has won 123 straight 
games over a 12-year period. 

The Chicago Lakers 8th grade 
basketball team just captured the 
North American Youth Basketball 
National Championship this past 
summer. Porter has seven national 
and 20 state basketball champi- 
onships to his credit. 

Porter has several stale baseball 
titles. 

In the 1970s. Porter won a state 
high school title for hockey. 

I It- also has won many Amateur 
Athletic Union championships dur- 
ing the pasi 30 years. 

In 1992, he was named "Man of 
the Year" for his coaching accom- 
plishments. 

Comments by players and 



Saturday, December 5, 1998 
9 am to 4 pm 

Victory Lakes' 11th Annual 
Festival of Arts and Crafts 

We'll have Beanie Babies™, clucks, 

stained glass, leather crafts, clothing, furniture, 

jewelry, toys, Santas and snowmen galore and 

much, much more available for purchase! 

Call (847) 356-5900 for details. 





Victory Lakes 

Continuing 
C an' ( t'liwr 

J 

1055 East Grand Avenue • Lindenhurst, 1L 

7 miles west of Rt. 94 • Affiliated with Victory Memorial Hospital 



Talking 
Health 

by Dr. Scott Reiser, D.C. 



THE "DRUG-FREE" MEDICINE 



('Imupraulic is often called "drug-free 
medium:" hucmisc' chiropractors do not 
rely on prcscnplion medicines lo irem 
disease The clviropiactic view of hcalilt 
and ihe human body is very different 
(mm ihe view held hy allopathic doulnrs 
who view the tmdy as a relatively 
defenseless organism besieged by armies 
of anuigonisiic bacteria and viruses. In 
litis view, the way lo defend the body 
from such intrusion is to find weapons to 
kill the invalids The problems with this 
approach are well-known-tlK' evolution 
ul Miatns ol diug-iesistaril bacteria 
("Su|H-r (Jugs') and viruses which baffle 
medical understanding and technology 

Chiropractors lecogni/e disease as a 
process, liveryone is exposed to bacterial 
and Mial invasion, but not everyone gels 
sick because the body h;K a complex sys- 



tem of resistance lo disease The organ- 
ism will resist infection and remain 
healthy if the immune syslem. the body's 
natural defense mecliamsm, can be kepi 
sirong. Chiropractic treatments strength- 
en ihe immune system thiougli natural 
means and enable the body lo heal itself. 
// maitittltniitf> ymtr health and reiliit- 
itin \tre\\ is tmporntnt to yutl, full liintnd 
Lake Heath Cltinifirtictic in H47-7J0- 
ItttH) in nnike an mitiul, mi uhtifiiiitim 
iiwsitttaiirm unit Dr. Semt ('• Heiu-r. 
Our clinic i\ limited ut M-4 l(ttllin\ Hinul. 
lintiiut l.uke Hi ,.-i h ( l.titfle ( ieek I'luzu • 
turner nf leiUu I tike mill Itnlhns 

ll'Hltivi 



NOVEMBER 
"FOOD FOR THE HUNGRF 



NEW PATIENTS 

FREE 

EXAM & X-RAYS 

IN EXCHANGE FOR 

5 CANS OF FOOD 



volvement and his assistance to peo- 
ple off the field of play. 

"Denny cared about all of us," 
said a player from one of his football 
teams. "He made sure We did well at 
school and home activities." 

"He was more than just a Little 
League coach— he was someone 
thai helped me get to college." 

Porter himself attributes team 
success to the players who arc on it, 
according to All Star Sports Founda- 
tion officials. 

"I'm jusf the one who puts each 
learn together," Porter said. "The 
coaches who assist me and the play- 
ers who perform in the game are ihe 
ones i hat deserve most all of the 
credit for our success." 

"I have been blessed with exeep- 
lional athletes as well as Individuals 
who have coached on my team." 

An edited letter considered by 
(he judges was made public by the 
All Star Sports Foundation. !< de- 
scribes the impact of Porter on one 
young life. 

One evening a wind storm did 
extensive damage to the six-flat 
apartment lived in by one of Porter's 
players, his sister, and his mother. 

"About two hours after the storm 
hit, to my surprise, my junior high 
school football coach, Denny Porter, 
appeared at our home," the player 
wrote. 

"He immediately offered to help 
not only my family, but the other live 
as well. He secured rooms at a hotel 
nearby. He enlisted many of his 
friends who brought clothes and 
food to all of us. He personally 
moved belongings onto rental 
trucks. He stayed up all night con- 
stantly checking on the well-being of 
not only me, my mom, and sister, 
but all the others as well." ' 

The next day, Porter found six 
homes for the families. 

"Denny was back again, and 
again, and again. He never quit," the 
player told foundation officials. 

Porter remained Involved with 
the young player's family after the 
windstorm. He served as father for 
the vouth through high school. 

In his junior year of high school, 
the player found that Porter had 
lined up a college scholarship for 
him. The player went on to graduate 
from college. 

Porter has been a juvenile court 
volunteer and counselor for over 10 
years. He works with the Grant-A- 
Wish Program at Christmas time. 
During the holiday season he can be 
found at homeless shelters serving 
dinners and counseling people. 

Porter has no plans to quit 
coaching. 

"1 enjoy every moment and want 
to coach as long as I can," he said. 

"And, let's hope for the sake of 
our kids he stays in coaching," stated 
Rowland. 



FOOD PANTRY WATCH 



Lake Villa Township 
Food Pantry 

Sue Hanson 
Township Supervisor 
1147-35(5-21 16 

Pantry address: 

Township Office 

Caboose Park 

C.rnnd Avenue and Fairfield (toad 

Lake Villa 

Antioch Township 
Food Pantry 

Timothy H. Osmond 
Township Supervisor 
H.i7-:wr.:i:i7n 



Pantry Address: 
99 West Home 1 7Ii 
Antioch 



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November 27, 1998 , ' 



POLICE & FIRE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ AS 






BEAT 

: - : : '. •'■;'■'■ - ["'.. . . 

Pemnt charged with a crimen Innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. 



,.,.,,.,. ..,,,,, 



***** ■«•*»•■ 



ANTIOCH 



.wfth Dill, 
possession of Cannabis 

Ant ioch Police Officer's stopped 
Patrick S. Nolan, 39, of Antloch, on 
Wednesday, Nov. 18 at 1:54 ia.m. 
traveling east bound on Route 173 
at Tiffany Road In a gray 1987 Ford 
Taurus. 

He was charged with DUI and 
possession of cannabis. Nolan was 
assigned a court date of Tuesday, 
Dec. 8 at 9 a.m. 

Cited for DUI 

Antloch Police Officers 
stopped Rickey D. Dean, 36, of 
Lake Villa, on Friday, Nov. 20 at 
1:20 a.m. in a blue 1985 Oldsmo- 
bile. He was charged with having 
a suspended driver's license and 
driving under the influence. 
Dean was assigned a court date 
of Tuesday, Dec. 8 at 9 a.m. 

LINDENHURST 

Charged with DUI 

Undenhurst Police Officers ar- 
rested Mark A. DlSUvestro, 41, of 
Antloch, on Tuesday, Nov. 17 at 
5:28 p.m. on Grand Avenue at Mal- 
lard Ridge Drive. 

He was charged with failing to 
reduce speed to avoid an accident 
and driving under the influence. 
He declined the offer to take a 
Breathalyzer test. 

DiSilvestro was assigned a court 
date of Tuesday, Dec. 15 in 
Waukegan at 9 a.m. 

Speeder held on warrant 

Undenhurst Police Officers - 
stopped Devi D. PIttman, 22. of 
North Chicago, on Friday, Nov. 20 ' 
traveling west bound on Route 132 
at Hawthorne Court in a red 1989 
Pontiac Grand Am. Pittman was 
charged with speeding. 

Pittman was held by the Un- 
denhurst Police Department for the 
Gumee Police Department who 
had issued on active warrant for 
Pittman's arrest. 



Driving on 



suspended license 

Undenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Chad N. Kopp, 20, of Zion, 
on Friday, Nov. 20 at 3:34 a.m. travel- 
ing north bound on Route 45 at 
Haven Lane In a blue 1987 Chevrolet. 
He was charged with speeding and 
driving with a suspended license. He 
was turned over to the Lake County 
Jail for a warrant. Kopp was assigned 
a court date for Wednesday, Ian. 6. 
1999 at 9 am. in Grayslake. 

Cited for DUI 

Undenhurst Police Officers 
slopped Robert H. Foster, 31, of 
Lake Villa, on Saturday, Nov. 21 at 
1 2:26 a.m. traveling west bound on 
Grand Avenue at Emerald Lane in a 
maroon 1991 Ford pick-up truck. 
He was charged with speeding and 
driving under the influence. Foster 
declined the opportunity to take a 
Breathalyzer test. He was assigned a 
court date of Tuesday, Dec. 15 at 9 
a.m. in Waukegan. 

Undenhurst Police Officers also 
stopped Thomas J. Trierweiler, 42, 
of Undenhurst, on Friday, Nov. 20 
at 7:03 p.m. traveling west bound 
on Grass Lake Road near Federal 
Parkway. He was charged with 
speeding and driving under the In- 
fluence. Trierweiler declined the 
opportunity to take a Breathalyzer 
test. He was assigned a Tuesday, 
Dec. 8 court date. 

Fugitive from justice 

Undenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Timothy D. Roberson, 29, 
of Corinth, Mississippi, on Sunday, 
Nov. 22 at 9:20 a.m. traveling south 
bound on Route 45 at Farmington 



'<?'•' * : 



Greens In a black 1991 Chevrolet 
Cavalier. He was charged with dri- 
ving on a revoked driver's license 
and not using a seat belt Roberson 
was wanted on a warrant and was 
charged as a fugitive from justice. 
He was turned over to the Lake 
County Jail. Roberson Was assigned 
a court date of Wednesday, Jan. 6 at 
10:30 am. In Grayslake for the local 
charges. 

LAKE VILLA 

Man charged with DUI 

Lake Villa Police arrested a 
Round Lake man on driving under 
the Influence of alcohol and other 
charges after an early morning traf- 
fic stop on Nov. 20. 

Todd J, Wiley, 29, of 303 Lunar 
Drive, was arrested on charges of 
DUI, speeding, and failure to signal 
when required following a traffic 
stop at about 1:49 a.m. that morn- 
ing 

According to reports, police 
were performing a stationary radar 
for speeding at a the parking lot on 
Grand Avenue, when they observed 
a vehicle traveling eastbound on 
Route 132 at McKinley Avenue trav- 
eling 4 1 mph In 30 mile per hour 
zone. 

Police followed the car and ob- 
served the vehicle make a turn onto 
Route 63 without using a turn sig- 
nal, at which time police Initiated a 
traffic stop. 

After checking the driver's li- 
cense and registration, officers ob- 
served that Wiley's speech was 
slurred and smelled of alcoholic 
beverages. 

Wiley failed a sobriety test at 
the scene and was arrested for DUI. 
He later registered a blood alcohol 
content of .14. 

Charged with cannabis 
possession 

Two men were arrested after 
being stopped for reportedly dri- 
ving through a railroad crossing 
with flashing red lights, 

On Nov. 14 at 12:10 a.m., Lake 
Villa Police officers stopped a car 
for driving through red flashing rail- 
road lights on Grass Lake Road just 
east of Route B3. 

The driver, Adam B. Mealer, 24, 
of Antioch, reportedly told police he 
thought the gates of the railroad 
crossing were going up at the time. 
When officers asked for his license, 
Mealer gave the officer a card stat- 
ing his license was suspended. He 
also had no proof of insurance, ac- 
cording to reports. 

After speaking with the passen- 
ger in the car, Daniel John 
Naughton, 24, of Antioch, police 
found a bag of cannabis on the 
ground outside the car. Naughton 
allegedly told police it was his 
cannabis. 

Meaierwas charged with run- 
ning a traffic control device (rail- 
road red lights), driving an unin- 
sured motor vehicle and driving on 
a suspended drivers license. 

Naughton was charged with il- 
legal possession of cannabis (less 
than 10 grams). 

DUI arrest 

A Kenosha, Wis., man was ar- 
rested and charged with DUI and 
several other traffic offenses after 
his car was stopped by Lake Villa 
Police on Nov. 14. 

At about 1:57 a.m. that morn- 
ing, officers observed a vehicle 
heading eastbound on Grass Lake 
Road at Painted Lakes Road. They 
saw the car drive off the roadway on 
the right hand side and then con- 
tinue eastbound on Grass Lake 
Road to Deep Lake Road. 

After stopping at the stop sign 
for several seconds, the car turned 
onto Deep Lake Road and then 
drove into an oncoming lane of 
traffic at White Hall Court. 




By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Even In the stark reality of late 
November, the potential beauty 
of the paths and boardwalk In the 
downtown wetland sanctuary has 
begun to emerge, 

The construction work of 
Tom Hoban will be most wel- 
come. . 

Hoban is building a board- 
walk from Skidmore Street to the 
edge of a pond area within the 
William E. Brook Wetland Sanc- 
tuary and Entertainment Center. 
People eventually will be able to 
walk on a very solid structure to 
the edge of a pond. The walk will 
afford a cross-section of the veg- 
etation and landscape to the wa- 
ter's edge. 

The boardwalk Is only one as- 
pect of a summer-filled construc- 
tion schedule that has signifi- 
cantly altered the appearance of 
the area on the east side of the 
downtown business district. 

Contractors, businesses, and 
individuals have made donations 
and in-kind services through-out 
the year. Other work or supplies 
have been purchased. All of it has 
changed the appearance of the 
area east of downtown. 

Project features completed 
this year will include: parking 
lots, water retention facilities for 
the parking lots, and buried utili- 
ty lines. The grading of the enter- 
tainment center area to permit 
spring season construction is 
completed as well as paving for 
the event area along Skidmore 
Street. Even the pavement has 



been painted with yellow parking 
lines. - 

"We have started to contour < 
the elevated area east of Skid- 
more for the seating, arena,", 
LeMere said, "and we are begin- ; 
rilng to construct the sledding hill . 
for children." 

The hill for sleds will be ap- 
proximately 30 feet high with two 
runs. One is straight down with a 
lift. The second Is a curved run. 
Both will be over 200 feet. 

"It won't be ready for this 
winter, however," LeMere said. 

Two ponds have been dug. 
The walking paths are complete. 
The entrance area berms are built , 
and have been landscaped. 

The boardwalk built by Tom 
Hoban was about 60 percent 
complete In mid-November and 
should be done by December: 
There will be an observation deck 
on the boardwalk. 

Reforestation has been done 
In some areas of the wetland, and 
there are plans to do more in the 
spring, 1999. Trees planted on Ar- 
bor day continue to thrive, and 
memorial fir trees planted last 
spring by the Antloch Rotary Club 
continue to grow. The trees hon- 
or the recipient of their Commu- 
nity Service Award. 

Some of the educational op- 
portunities of the wetland sanc- 
tuary already have been used. 

"We've had our first educa- 
tion seminar and workshop," 
LeMere said. A second workshop 
and educational event about wet- 
land vegetation plantings is 
scheduled for spring, 1999, 

One of the more difficult as- 



pects of the project was burial of 
utility lines on poles behind the 
stores on the east side of Main 
Street. The work was undertaken 
by Commonwealth Edison crews 
and village employees from the 
Public Works Department. 

The need to move the electri- 
cal service was recognized about 
50 years ago but never successful- 
ly accomplished 
- In mid-October, Jeff Schrauf- 
nagel, a customer facilities engi- 
neer for ComEd, wrote to Mayor 
Marilyn Shineflug to commend 
village cooperation end employ- 
ee assistance on the work. 

"Led by Claude LeMere arid 
Wally Hennlng, the village dis- 
played an outstanding work ethic 
and teamwork approach," he told 
the Mayor. 

Schraufnagel also wrote, 
"The nature of cutting over 60- 
plus customers from overhead 
service to underground Is inher- 
ently complicated. However, 
this time, due in large part to 
your personnel, ComEd was 
able to finish this project rela- 
tively problem -free." 

Although much work has 
been completed, LeMere said 
that much remains to be done. 
"Completion for the entire pro- 
ject is estimated for the year 
2000." 

"Anyone wishing to volunteer 
for any type of work In the wet- 
lands, please contact the Depart- 
ment of Community Develop- 
ment," said LeMere. The tele- 
phone number is 395-6342. 

"There Is still lots of work to 
be done." * 



FUND-RAISING GUIDE 



On-going: A.L.L. Parent Net- 
work selling personalized bricks 
for ACHS memorial wall in new 
building. Bricks $30, Plaque $60 
donations. Information: Karen 
Powell, 847-395-6600. 

On-going: Antioch Junior 



Woman's Club is selling Enter- 
tainment coupon books for $35. 
Information: Jodi Eckert, 847- 
395-4282. 

On-going: Loyal Order of the 
Moose Lodge #525 is selling en- 
tertainment books for $35. Infor- 



mation: call Perry Hunt, 847-395- 
4772. 

Nov. 27: "The Game of Anti- 
och" on sale in downtown stores, 
$16.95, sold by Antioch Lions 
Club. More information from 
Adam Zakroczymski, 847-838- 
1790. 



Gke. 



mm bbi I 



Wishing you a delightful holiday 

season and a new year that is filled 

with much hope, joy. 

and happiness. 

If you arc (raveling to visit family 

and friends to celebrate the 

holidays, please remember to slow 

down and to drive safely. 

Your life, and the lives of others, 

may depend on it. 

Timothy H. Osmond, QC 
Osmond Insmmce Service Ltd. 

976 Hillside 
Antloch, Illinois 60002 



395-2500 



Depend on your 
hometown professionals 



■sfcSr 









■ ■ ,- ■. 




First National Bank - Employee Owned 
Eagle 50 Travelers 

Join Us For 

Christmas in the Count'iy 

at <Jiislo\ic 

Ceaawu'ig, Wisconsin 
Friday, December 4, 1998 

Price: $49,95 

Cost of tour includes round trip motorcoach 

transportation to Cedarburg, admission to three craft shows, 

winery lour, and lunch at Barth's on the Bridge. 

Phone: Nancy Rentner (847) 838-BANK 

(2265) 



[First Nations 
Bank 



485 Lake Street 
Antioch. IL 60002 



«*jh 



?KKi£? 



36044 N. Drookside Dr. 
Gumee, IL 60031 



www.fnbeo.com 



TT 



: . ■ ■■ 



; 



A6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



November 27, 1998 




Jim Bohringer of Esche and Lee Construction Company lays bricks for the addition to Antioch Com- 
munity High School, where construction Is on schedule for opening In the spring of 1999.— Photo 
by Sandy Bressner 

ACHS construction racing weather 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 

Staff Reporter 

*_-...-. — -.------- 

Construction of the new high 
school additions is on schedule and 
is expected la be ready for limited 
occupancy in spring, 1999. 



Antioch Community High 
School officials received an update 
on construction progress at their 
Thursday, Nov, 5 board meeting, 
Also, the school board approved 
contracts to keep new phases of con- 
struction on schedule. They toured 



die construction site with the archi- 
tects and construction manager. 

The school board also autho- 
rized Superintendent Dr. Dennis 
Hockney to request Illinois School 
Board officials to permit a waiver on 
mandated school days in case it be- 



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Construction at Antioch Community High School (s right on tar- 
get. School officials say despite the scope of the project there 
has been little Interruption to students attending class.— Photo 
by Sandy Bressner 



comes necessary to alter the school 
schedule, 

"Even If we get the waiver, we 
don't have to use It," Hockney told 
the school board. 

A waiver would permit ACHS of- 
ficials to change the opening day of 
school, allow use of holidays for in- 
struction, or add days to the school 
year if necessary. 

"We can't have the option if we 
don't have the waiver," Hockney 
said. 

Use of the waiver would require 
a public hearing. 

Later, school board members 
approved bids for new work related 
to demolition, concrete work, struc- 
tural steel orders, and paving. 

"It's important to get them start- 
ed," said Business Manager William 
Ahlers. He told the board that the 
school's estimates for the work cov- 
ered by the bids was very close to 
what had been submitted. 

There was a second group of 
bids which needed further evalua- 
tion. Fire protection, plumbing, elec- 
trical, and carpentry bids were held 
over for a subsequent meeting. 

School officials received an up- 
date on construction progress. 

"So far we're on schedule," Gino 
Hicchio, vice-president of Seater 
Construction Company, Inc. told 
school board officials as they loured 
ihe former front school entrance 
area. 

"We are right on schedule here," 
he said as they walked through the 
north addition." 

During the construction site 
lour, information about progress 
and final results was given to school 
officials. 

The roof for the addition at the 
former entrance area of the school 
should be in-place around Christ- 
mas. 

New window units will be added 
to the existing building that extends 
along Main Street. The new win- 
dows will ofTer improved environ- 
mental control for the building. 
They will also serve to unify the ap- 
pearance of the new and older sec- 
tions of the building. It will look like 
a coherent unit, according to Rlc- 
chio. 

The new sections of the building 
have bricks similar in color as were 



used on older parts of the building. 
"Once It gets all washed up, the brick 
will be a pretty nice match," Ricchio 
said. , Ul 

The expansion orthenorih aaol- 
tion, after construction started, has 
not been a problem. Expansion was 
possible because of a State of Illinois 
construction grant the school re- 
ceived to supplement the locally- 
funded improvements. 

Ricchio was consistently compli- 
mentary of the work that contractors 
have provided for the school's mod- 
ernization project "Every contractor 
we have hired has been excellent," 
Ricchio told school officials. "They 
are very considerate of one another." 
"It's a dream team, let me tell 
you," Ricchio said. 

The sentiments were similar to 
those expressed by Bill Ahlers. He 
told the school board that he had 
never been associated with a project 
where the subcontractors, the archi- 
tect, and the construction people 
work so well together. 

"It's been a good relationship 
from the beginning," said Ahlers. 

Ricchio said that work on the 
addition to the north addition 
would begin Monday, Nov. 9. Some 
of the parking lot adjacent to the 
north addition will be removed and 
a new turn will be placed in the 
parking lot. 

Heaters for winter work have 
been delivered. Winter closure ma- 
terial is ready to be installed. By 
Christmas, the heating boilers 
should be operational and helping to 
keep the work area warm. 

Ricchio said that he expects to be 
able to turn over some portions of 
the new addition, such as class- 
rooms, to school officials for use by 
the 1 999 spring break. Rooms that do 
not have a high-level of finish work 
should be usable by then. Spring 
break is scheduled for the last week 
of March. 

Principal Dr. James Love told 
school board officials that the con- 
struction work has not seriously af- 
fected school activities, "It's impact- 
ed us very little In terms of our day- 
to-day operation," he said. 

School Board President Phillip A. 
Delany said that there has been no 
disruption because of the construc- 
tion for the school system. 



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November 27, 1998 



NEIGHBORS 



Lakeland Newspapers/A7 



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Name: Jessica Cardls 

Home: Antioch ■ 

Occupation: Student at Antioch 
HighSchool 

Community Involvementi Youth 

group leader at JAM, 

I'm originally from: Fox Lake 

I graduated from: I will graduate 

from Antioch High School In the 
spring of '99. 

My family consists of: My mom and Dad, John and Pam, Sis- 
ters, Jenny and JU1. My brothers John, James, and Jacob. 

My pets are: A dog named Katie and cat named Itty. 

What I like best about my neighborhood: it is small and qui- 
et area by the water and I fmow a lot of people there. I love (t 

The secret to my success Is: To live everyday to the fullest 
and always keep the joy. 

I relax by: Listening to music, drawing and writing 

My perfect day In Antioch would be: Relaxing by the chan- 
nel in my back yard and having no one disturbing me. 

s 
Last book I read; "Still watch" by Mary HIggens Clarke for my 
contemporary literature class. 

Favorite TV show Is: I don't watch too much TV. 

Favorite moviojs: "Dead Poets Society" and "Little Women" 

Favorite music: Any kind really 

Favorite band or musician: Tori Amos and Tina Arena 

My life's motto is: Carpe Diem 

If I could be anyone In history, I would be: Thomas Jeffer- 
son, he was such an interesting man 

I want to be remembered as: A kind person who loved life and 
was friendly to everyone 

People who knew me In high school would say: I smile a 

lot • 

My pet peeve is: People who think that they are better than 
everybody 

My dream job would be: The D.J at my sisters and mine Coffee 
Shop 

People would be most surprised to know this about me: 

I love to sing at the top of my lungs. 

My most embarrassing moment was: I have too many to 
narrow it down. 

If I had a plane ticket to anywhere, I would go to: Back to 
the Philippines to visit. The people, the weather, it was all so great. 

If you have a "Neighbor" that you would like to see profiled in 
this column, call Rhonda Hetrick Burke at 223-8161. 



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By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Antioch Community High 
School drama students, teachers, 
and Director Michael Shehom have 
delivered another beautifully crafted 
production into the theater history of 
. this community. "The Mouse That 
Roared" was wonderful entertain- 
ment with high production values. 

What makes this presentation 
more special is that care was taken 
with details mat could have been ig- 
nored, but were not 

"The Mouse That Roared" is the 
tale of die tiny European Duchy of 
Grand Fenwick. The country's only 
export, a premium wine, Is endan- 
gered by cheaper competition from 
California growers. Grand Fenwick 
declares war with the expectation 
they will lose in order to gain the 
post-war foreign aid that always 
seems to follow defeat by United 
States military might 

Soldiers of Grand Fenwick un- 
wittingly capture a "Q" bomb and 
win the war. The United States sues 
for peace on favorable terms. Virtu- 
ally all action Is In Grand Fenwick 
with minor scenes in Washington 
and at Columbia University In New 
York. 

Jen Schuemelfeder does out- 
standing work as Glorian a, Sovereign 
of Grand Fenwick. She cares for her 
character and about Grand Fenwick, 
and it shows. She carries a lot of the 
dialogue for the play and it is well de- 
livered. Schuemelfeder Is delightful. 

Vita Gold lends enormous sup- 
port to die quality of this play with 
her role as Countess Mountjoy. A 
veteran performer, Gold does well 
with any role, apparently, but here 
she helps to create a very solid set of 
strong femalejeadsjor the produc- 
tion. She brings strenguTrange,"and 
professionalism to all of her work. 

Kyle Scott, as General Snippet, 
brings some comic gifts to the pro- 
duction. He is very good at keeping 
the humor going, even if he has to 
provoke it with one word statements 
like "fluke!" Scott has a key role, but 
not a big role. When he is on stage, 
the play is enhanced. 

There were minor characters in 
parts of the production that came 
across with strength. Ruth Gray was 
a page and she had some perfuncto- 
ry walk-on functions in the produc- 
tion. She did very well with her mo- 



ments on stage and can probably ex- 
pect to be called for larger roles. 

Jenny Groth Is an assistant aide 
to Professor Koldntz. She brings 
something to her roles that makes 
them vivid and worth watching. She 
is a strong performer. She Is enjoy- 
able here. 

There are eight Soldiers of Grand 
Fenwick. To a certain extent It Is an 
ensemble role with a few breakout 
moments for Individual soldiers. 
Standard Bearer Will Tatum, played 
with great Sgt Bilko effect by Kyle 
Tikovitsch, Is very well done. Again, 
a small role, but played with great ef- 
fect to create a strong production. I 
also thought me ensemble was very 
effective, and communicated legiti- 
mate comedy. Two soldiers, with 
their pikes, provided Kyle Scott some 
good opportunities to score some 
laughs. 

With 40 people in this produc- 
tion, the audience may anticipate 
there will be a loss of focus. Not so. 
The entire production works as a 
unit and the cast pays attention to 
one another and the flow of the ma- 
terial. 

There is some excellent off-stage 
support. The costume work and 
choices for this production are effec- 
tive. Schuemelfeder and Gold start 
the production In nice gowns of dra- 
matic white. Scott's military uniform 
is crisp and distinguishing. The tu- 
nics of the soldiers are so simple but 
enormously effective. Donna She- 
hom adds a lot of production value 
to this play with her winning cos- 
tume decisions. 

Another positive attribute of this 
play Is the set design. The need to 
quickly create a series of several 
smaller scenes was a well met chal- 
' lenge. The stagecraft crew did excel- 
lent work on the sets. 





BARK *N' TOWN 

KENNELS^ 



Boarding 
• Grooming • Pet Supplies 
Toys & Bones for Your 'Best Wends" 

27607 W. Brandenburg Rd. 

IngteskJe 

(815)385-0632 



HotrtM-WF 

■WKsff" 

Barn-Noon 



MOVIES AND TIMES START NOVEMBER 25, 1998 
•; " LAKE ZURICH (847) 550-0000 . 



• 



55 S, Rntul Rd. 



' A M tl « * UND&8ADUJS f}J33 AFTER BPM 

iKmm w twtma.tima ULTtmtmmtm 



rucpftMg.»tan«i.Tim«rHWum 



RUGRAIS*® 

FrWin. tUQ US, tSO, WS, MX MS 

Ito-Ttaimtrt.WCtWlkTJS.MQ 

ENEMY OF 1HE STATE* Q 
ABUCSUflE*® 

Fri-Sm. IttaS, 11^0, 1W0. 130, 230, 4dQ0, 7:10, fic20 
; Ite-TJiElMMA, 250,40, M0, SO) 

BABE: FIG DUMMY* m 

RLtatomrai i2«t4tta.ti4*i4*aTz\ttit2> 
: uca-ihi it* naiaattmnsuft^miaftia 

HOME hues mm 

VERY BAD THINGS m 

M*f£15,£23,«%fc4&lS 

j MEET JOE BLACK (*«) 

■ W» ISO, 430,6.00 

IS1U KNOW WHAT YOU 
DDUSTSUIUHIro 

BEHQHENnlMraASfK] 

0*1155, 150,145 

[THE WATERBOYS) 

D*1t*,t£ffl,t* 120, WW &4ft,t34?*k3a,M0 

PIEASAHTVIUJE (re-13) 

0*1130,130 



ANTIOCH (847) 395-0216 
378 Lake St. Antioch 



CAM SBwaiovBiaiQirfla 

*2 W IMBl1fltMlSrlO«ESasm 

THE WATER BOY ^d 

Wed. 6*5, m 
Q Thur. 2:15, 450, 6:45, 9fl0 



LIBERTY (847) 3G2-3011 
708 N. Milwaukee Ave.. Ubertyvillo 



*2* «oetin«wis«mKK«iH* 

I'LL BE HOME 

FOR CHRISTMAS <*> 

Wed. &30, 8:45; Thur. &30, &45 

AHTZpc) 

Wed. 6:30; Thur. 2:15, 4:30 

VERY BAD THINGS m 

Wed. 6:45, 9:00 
Thur. £00, 4:15, fc45,fc00 



, McHENRY 1 & 2 (815) 385-0144 
120-1 N. GicenSl. 



$150 mwxafNmtancmsPD* 
Mork-Thur. too 



nmwcitu two msaea/coupoNS) ■ 

nriiiiiiiin miimiTT 



iimimii 



1NG 



Fit-Sun. 030. 0s4fl 
Moo. -Thur. &« 

ft) 



Frt-Sun, iJO, 4:30 
Motu-Ttwr. i 

TOE SIEGE « 

Mon.-Thur. MO 







FHday, Nov. 27 

Happy Blrthday'.tb Clare Margaret 
prom Hortori, bom In 1902, 
member of Ladies Auxiliary of 
Antioch; VFW Post#4551 

2-4 p.m., Village of Antioch 

accepting ornaments for Village tree 
...~,. ..., 

6:30 p.m., Antioch Christmas 
Parade, Main Street and Park Ave. 

: 6:30 p.m., Antioch Enchanted 
Castle open for Santa Claus to meet 
with children 



.*■*#■*,, i 



.7 p.m., Antioch Community Family 
Christmas Tree Lighting ceremony 

8 p.m., PM&L Holiday Musical, " 
Annie Warbucks," at the theatre, 
877 Main SL, tickets at 395-3055 

Saturday, Nov. 28 

10:30 a.m., PM&L and the 
Antioch Chamber of Commerce 
present children's musician Ken 
Lonnquist at the theater, adm. Is 2 
non-perishable food items 

11 a.m.-4 p.m., Santa's 
Enchanted Castle open In Antioch, 
pictures avail., Sunday also 

• mmitt ••'••«"!, 

8 p.m., PM&L Holiday Musical, " 
Annie Warbucks," at the theatre, 
877 Main SL, tickets at 395-3055 

Sunday, Nov. 29 

2:30 p.m., PM&L Holiday Musical, 
"Annie Warbucks," at the theatre, 
877 Main St, tickets at 395-3055 

Monday, Nov. 30 

12:45 p.m. Bingo at Antioch 
Senior Center, info, at 395-7120 



6-9 p.m., The Council of Catholic 
Nurses of Lake County sponsor an 
evening of Recollection with Mass, 
supper and a presentation by Rev. 
John Hennessey, at St. Joseph 
Church (Koenig Center), 121 E. 
Maple in Libertyvilte, SlO/mem- 
bers, $15/guests, reservations at 
362-9586 or 623-9280 



5:30-8 p.m. through Fri, Santa's 
Enchanted Castle open in Antioch, 
pictures avail, for nominal fee 



7 p.m., Library Board meeting at 
Antioch Public Library 

7 p.m., PTO meeting at Antioch 
Upper Grade School 



7 p.m. Bingo at Antioch Moose 
Lodge, Rte. 173 west of Antioch 

7:30 p.m. Antioch Jaycees meet 
at Regency Inn, call 395-8035 

Tuesday, Dec. 1 

Antioch Twp. Office is accepting 
new Toys for Tots to be donated to 
Marine Corps program 

6:45 p.m. Antioch VFW Bingo, 
doors open 4:30 p.m., 395-5393 

7:30 p.m. St. Peter Council of 
Catholic Women meet at pansh 
hall, call 395-0274 

Wednesday, Dec. 2 

Sequoit Board of Directors meets 

7-9 p.m., Northern Lake County 
Quilter's Guild meets at State Bank 
of the Lakes in Undenhurst, for 
info, call Valerie at 838-2126 

Thursday , Dec. 3 

6:30 p.m., ACHS School Board 
meeting in school library 

7 p.m. American Sewing Guild 
group "Running in Stitches meets 
at State Bank of the Lakes, 
Undenhurst, call 356-0304 

GOT SOMETHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14-day notice is needed 
for all calendar requests. 
Ask for Cristina Feindt 
223-8161, ext. 141. 



- --■ 



. ,j j* -i -.-V^."i- -ini-'"l'-t :-'f ^ ■■ -■"^" " ■.•^^^■ar-MftKca j. m. 




A8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



Bank of 
Northern Illinois 

Waukegan • Gumee 
Ubertyville • Glenvlew 

847/623-3800, 



FD!€ 





HAWTHORN 

BANK 

' 208 Oak Creek Plaza 
jfyf Mundclein 

949-9000 

^tftitta/e/y ountxl, uAetts . 

the pC&ifMlSti ' f*M4f/i 

still ' maiteuf 



Vf&'S, 



November 27, 1998 








' 



November 27, 1998 



ana ,'. "V: '■ .. \ '.-':'" ", '-.\ .. '" "1 «"'V4'J 




COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A9> 









VuJce/s 

GRILL 

Great Sports Bar • Lunch & Dinner 

Private Parties • Birthdays 

Meetings *. Graduations 

H fiFMrt&s crjotir <^/(o/imi»i 

476 Liberty St. 
Wauconda 



Lakeland Newspapers would like to thank the following 
ers along with Pik-Kwik Foods Grayslake and Island Foods for 
donating turkeys to the following food pantries: Lake Villa, 
Wauconda, Cool Food Pantry and Allendale Association. 












Lake Villa • 2654300 
Vernon Hills • 918-1200 
Lake Zurich • 726-9300 

Waukegan * 473-7100 

Mctienry 

815*385*6600 , 



Thanksgiving 
Wishes from 

'rfiiite 

37517 N.Rt. 59 
Lake Villa 

173-1900, 





■ -- 



,■■ ■ 



Jioliday 

Wishes 
from 

Hawthorn Center 1 

Milwaukeejfive. <f 
downline ^pad 
Vernonjiills, IC^ 

362-6220 



COURT 

RAMADA'INN 

< 3 > acktnt)e&' srtwitaMe'foj/ 
tjait* ^Holiday ^esUvitie&: 

517 E. Hwy. 83 

566-5401 




»Mi m* \%d 




■ • '..'- ' :■:■■■■■ .,: ■ . ■■? \'--...':' - ;..; 






OX LAKI 
BOWL 

33 N. Rt. 12 
Fox Lake, IL 

587-1490 

{'Rock & Glow Bowl!' 



Leaming%ple$J 



Your Neighborhood Toy Store 

Northwest Comer of 

Rt f 76 & m&mian M. 

Mundelein 

66-4890, 




-'■'i'l.-t! .'■■'■ . • 






A10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



November 27, 1998 



^.s 



We are thankful this Thanksgiving 



As we gathered around 
the table laden with 
Tom Turkey and all his 
trimmings, the Pringle 
clan bowed their heads and gave 
thanks that we were able to par- 
take of this Thanksgiving Day 
feast. 

Our recent trip to Florida 
went well except for the two days 
we shared accommodations with 
Tropical Storm Mitch. Our true 
tribulations didn't begin until 
our return flight home to Mil- 
waukee airport. Unfortunately 
our airplane decided to fly the 
friendly skies the same Tuesday 
evening that Mother Nature de- 
cided to wreak havoc on the up- 
per midwest with gale force 
winds. In all fairness to our pilot, 
he advised us to buckle up and 
stay put— like we had a choice. 

Silting on an airplane he- 
iwct'ti two children, one green 
with motion sickness and one 
lightened beyond words, was 
nut e\at llv the perleti ending to 
U\u weeks Hi Minm Honda As 
\w literally nuked Irom side to 
Mtlr. drM t'liilmu Ihe last ii'i miles 
In iln- tunwa\ there v\.is nothing 
tit tin but pi.i\ 

MUM .umpiring thr entile 
•iivm in .1 iiiiiniic ll.it -.Imh-i 

ul I iii.il i[l<- (oril h.i'I ,ilnl I Inl 
:lii" p.«t»f!]j!i'r* 111 .i i li«il.<- nl 

W X 1 . 1 1 i.i I li"s. wh" ili'li ' 

iftSM Via' .•.><!.!- ■■ f#P -"IT :■■ 

fi .1 lifll" . rlM4 - 1'l.i.rl iMi.u 

',!- ,!; ,| i I iiijili "T I (.ill M.ttv V 




JINGLE 

FROM 

PRINGLE 

Lynn Pringle 



for good measure. At 30,000 feet 
above Lake Michigan I would 
have read from the "Torah" had I 
known how. As we made our 
wobbly descent over a blackened 
lake I knew real bone-chilling 
fear. Although the thought of 
death never crossed my mind, 
"wind-shear" and "which child 
do I grab first in the event of a 
crash" were quite prevalent in 
my thoughts. I knew I should 
have listened better to the flight 
instructions before we left Flori- 
da. 

1 couldn't remember where 
my life vest was and how to put 
those goofv oxygen masks on. We 
really didn't have much time to 
debate I he issue though seeing 
as thoughts of "who is going to 
watch die dog while we are in the 
hospiial" and "did everyone put 
on clean underwear this morn- 
ing" filled my mind. As (he ter- 
rain belou became closer and 
closci r( was hard to tell whelher 
ihe pilot was taking us there de- 
llbcialt'h tir Mother Nature had 
taken over at the controls. I kepi 
wondering about how far one 
mulil Iree I. ill before breaking 



mi 



Getting Married In The 
Caribbean 

ny JIM WARNK.EN. 

President, North Star Travel. Inc. 

Mit^.1 %mmnfi Cwui}Ve>. BttUttj! in.ii i tt.l l"i v)il- IuM ItfW. si ill ii(it Im lite lt.ii)ilii>ti.il 
wcitamn nc.ii fotvuw v.itlt .ill ii it- 1..',- n>,l t.tmiU ut .iticiut.tm e 1 luwr-.o in.im "scinnil 
'i.iii-t»," i it iVhimt ^.uliiij' until l.iu-i Hi lilt- tn t.ikr the pluni*i' .lit- tlt.HiMn^* lii 111111111110 
1, i.'liiiji a itti thr li.iin-wti.»-n ■ ■ iiMii lii-ir l.ir .iw.iv fnimlln-icl.ilii.rv 

' i-UIii- lllfli- -. .llii.l. . \ 1 ,• I l.flt'M !•■! I In- l'-.ll lntll.lllll. v ll.-M .ll'. 'ill iSPrttfl)! 

1 -I 1 .11 .1 t .HlH'f 111 i-l,Hi,l 
111- Nll-.l [l.'l'ijl.ll .Mill. II.- . I I'll ■ , • I ,|l„K,.p) will, ll I., .IM.IhJ-t- .1 Af.i.lUlt! I- 

• .11. . I \ .'-• In-ill ti -i.I.-m. . 1' .1 lit, nK |.-.)ut|i-Mn-iil A « i.li- k.iiu-t\ nl huli-k 

mi-i ni-.tiiui): r>,n *■ ti-t- - 

• Iihhm' tin- 1 -1. 111. 1 1 nl, in, I ■•■-ii . in ,.fi iii.iriu-.i <m iln- \t'rv s.ttiti- v.nlil kii uhuli 

I n,l-.. lll.l.f ■,(.«■■!>( Ilfl lu HI-- .Ill.'i.ll -.IIHl.lK till- ll|l".| [llllllir.ll III 1. 1111. in a'tj ,||| 

1.. I 1 ivv Ii. nu-viiii*.ii u--ni(» .lis.' .illt-is ...im- (jtc.it uiililm^ p.twk.ipo 

' -i .1 H.il I.-.- mini, nt l.mi.tu .1 - .tii.tllci lintels vsill Like i_.ne nl nci > limit; 
• 1 'h. ! fif "!u- inHii.tt-i in,iiti,i f i- ..-mil. .tir u-itnessi-s tthd [iluiliigrarthcr 

' hiv 1.1 tin- li.ir^.iin li.ilt-l pim-s i|HHv nHcii .1s.nl.1M1-, iIil- ll.ili.iin.is ,nt minUici 
;•■ iHil.11 tliniif Im Ui.it isl.mil '.M-<lilint! I c-t. hint- .illy (here is .1 15-day residency 
i HI1H1-I11I.-III. Kit 1v.11 wis .ut- issued Js ,1 ni.it In «rl tutuine In practice a cnuptc c .111 gel 
■ it.it f n-sl llu- llutd <l,i> nl ttu-it -,t.i> mi tin- island Just run) ilir Regislei (icnctal\ office 
in Nassau 1 it s at (lie t iit.tufl "I "stntlev ami I'.itli.itm-iit streets I, sIiiim a plmtn II), 
i-.nlou^c nJ tfclW id t- titr v itHn the iinitiliy (>i*ii< plant- lu'kjtl ssill dm and pay S-H) Lash 
A illiin an hniii yuii'se |{i>t yimt lui'llse 

Ihe itahaiuas Mmislty nl Intirisiiis 1'i-nptif hi IVoplf svcilditi}; ;itii^*t ,1111 iiircrs 
i implvs a v .nuts ul sst'dditi^ cctcnii Hues unhiding mic al thu 1 4th irenitiry Aii^iistutiaii 
t li'tslcts, ,1 si tint: nn.n.islcry. Iinuiulu in ilu- ll.1h.n11.1s ttmti I tadte in the 1't.VK 
Mini lie 1 lavntiii.' liKalmn is Nassau s llntann ( i.uiltiis 

diMtiiiU ntarricil nit 1.110 nl ilu- I! S Virnirt Klaittis (Si ( mil St I liimias and Si 
Inltni, has rcecitlly gHlleti mm Ii faster I here are Hit hlnctd tests and the eight day 
iw.siitu: peimd van mm he dune Ihrunj-h .1 Imal u-eilthnu pl.inm-r. eluninaliiiK the neetl 
In he ..11 the islands that luti^ helmr the vseddtrie 

I lu. si- islaiiils .in svhii h j;i-I1imv niaiiu-.l is .1 1 1 1 1 1 l- lumr dill'n nil are Anyuilla I 1 S d.i> 
icsidrtusi AniHa ll..|s nl papetuoik 1 ana Vt.utitiH|tie milhcsen ini.ie p.tpet vmil.. 
.iiiilesi-i>iriiiiH tiiusi he iiansl.ited itili. I ii'tu h' 

NORTH ^^- STAR 

CRUISES 
Ltndenhurst 

www northstartravel com 

(847) 356-2000 



every bone in his or her body, I 
was truly afraid I might find out 
for myself. As we got closer to 
earth, our thoughts turned to if 
we did land on the runway, as in- 
tended, would we be done in by 
some 93 mph wind gust. 

Finally the wheels hit the 
ground, but the pilot was just 
teasing us, as we felt ourselves 
lift into the air again. The wheels 
hit for a second time, but once 
again we found ourselves air- 
borne. The wheels hit for a third 
time, and for the third time we 
returned to the air. Whoever 
made up the saying "three strikes 
and you're out" deserves to have 
their finger nails pulled out one 
by one. The wheels came Into 
contact with solid ground for the 
fourth time and this lime they fi- 
nally stayed put. 

Every man, women and child 
cheered, clapped and hooted like 
it was New Year's Eve 1999. As 
we disembarked from the plane 
there was a lot of kissing and 
hugging going on amongst total 
strangers. Although shaken and a 
bit disoriented we rejoiced in be- 
ing alive and none of us even 
care that most of our luggage 
didn't show up a baggage claim. 
I'm sure the stewardess were 
throwing it over board lo lighten 
the load. Now the only remain- 
ing obstacle between us and 
home sweet home were 70 mph 
winds on 1-94 in a stretch limo— 
at least the limo driver knew the 
words to "Ave Maria" — 

And so goes another Jingle 
horn Pringle. 

Ih'fitlcrs with information for 
'Intyjv [mm Prinze" should rati 
I yttn Prfngfe ttt 'MiS--tufif4. 







Willing to SHARE 

Pat Smith of SHARE, Self Help And Resource Exchange, fills bags 
of food for Thanksgiving Saturday at the Antioch VFW hall,— Pno- 
(o by Sandy Bressner 



* - wit, 




Come WbrsB^p WitK O 

A Directory Of Antioch Area Churches 



Gtacelnnd Baptist Church 2SB Ida Si Aniioch, IL 
Sunday School nam . Wotfimg Wotship Ham . 

Sunday Evening 7pm RoOeil Williams Paslot 

Rnt Church of Chrl*t, Scientist & Raodlng Rrn. Rie 1 73 and 

Haiden, A/iuocn. Pnixm (IM7> 39SI196 Sunday School. 
Sunday Churcn Sifwo ' 30am Wednusdov, 7 30pm 

Beautiful Savior EvangaflcaJ Lutheran Church. SS4 Parkway. 
Anliocti Pnonu (B4 f] 265 24W Sunday Worertp at 9am. Sunday 
ScnoU High ScntrH i, Adult tiWo OauHS 1030am 

St Ignatius Episcopal. 977 Uiu\ St l'vr« (847) 396 0G62 Iw 
Mass 7 30am Htfi Mass 9 30am SunOay School & Nursory 9 30am 

ttnlioch Evangelical Fr*» Church. 750 rtgltvwv* O Phone 
iWTi 395-411/ Satutday Lvenmg Survico 5 30 pm Sunday 
Si.titxi 9 45am Sunday WiWup H to 11 00 CMOVon's Church 
' l am Nmsrify txilti yirviciis A Marts. Clutj 5er*or Pastor Oav«3 M 
Grduau 

St. Stephen Lulhetan Church U55 MMtN Ave Phone (64 7} 
;&j'OSQ Sunday Worship « 9 15 & 1030 Church School 
9 15am . fiunday Rov flotinn TiondtH interim Pastor 

Christian Ufa Fellowship Assemblies of God Church. 41 625 
!)«Hp mini H<t Anuoch Ptiunii (M7) 395-8572 Sunday Scttx* 
loll agvsj 9am , Sunday UofnuHj Worship 1 0am . Children's 
Chyrch 10am Sunday Evening Wotsriip C30prn . Wednesday 
vVt/ship a Quidrens Program /am lues Women's Fellowship 
A Hi . .- Study 9 1 1 30am - •? Qiiissaty. Paslor 



Faith Evangelical Lulheran. 1275 Mam Si Phone 
(947) 395-1800. Sunday Worship 8 i t0 30am . Sunday 
School 9 25am.. Sal 7om., Rev Gregorv Hermansort. 
Pastor Chrlslian Day School (8*7) 395 1664 

Mlllbum Congregitlonil UnlUd Church ot Christ Grass 

Lake Rd at Rle 45 Phone (847) 356-5237 Sunday Service 

10am. Children's Program 10am Rev Paul R MelBur, 

Paslor 

Unlled Methodist Church ol AmJoch. 848 Main Si Phone 

(847) 395- 1259 Worship 8 30 i tOam.. Fellowship Time 

9 30am, Sunday School 10am Rev Kurt A GamlJl. Pastor 

St. Peters Church. 557 W Lake St . Anuoch Phone (847) 
395 0274 Masses weekdays 7 30am. Sunday 8 30, 8. 
9 30 11 30am & SBlurday 5 30pm Rev Father Ronald H 
Anglirn. Pastor 

Chain of Lakes Community Bible Church. 23201 W. Grass 
Lake Rd . Antioch. Phone (847) 838-0103 Sunday Woratup 815 
and to 45 Sunday School 9 45 Children s Church to 45 Youth. 
Women s Awana 4 Smalt Group ministries Paslor. Paul 
McMmuny 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod). 
25100 W Grand Ave (Rle 59 » 132). Lake Villa (847) 
356-5158 Sunday Worship 8 15 & 10 45am. Sunday 

School (3 and up) and Bible Sludy 9 30am Chrislian 
Pioschoot Rev John Zellmoi Pastor 



Dan Dugensko, Director 
This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 




'96 GMC YUKON 

Slock #14660A, AM/FM CO. Aula VS. Cruse PB 
P'S. PL. P/W. PiS. PM. Keyless Remote Till Blacv 



$ 



24,995 




'97 BUICK PARK AVE. 

Stock A14651A, AM/FM Cass., V6. P/B, P/U 
P/S. Keyless Remote. Till, Auto., Cruise. P/S, 



$ 



P/W. P/M. Bluo 



20,995 






(S 




LONG TERM 
LEASING BY 

t S E » c . 903 Front St. • McHenry 



(81 5) 385-7200 



One of 

|f SALES • SERVICE • PARTS tSS 

Check out our website at www.mllchellautamall.cnm vcSotOn 



-OIVIO 



-— ~ v . ■ — __-_. . ■ ■; -■■■■■-.. r 












■ ,,-•■■<■-■■* 




■ r 4 ■ p H im HJ<mn f t+f wrt ii m 

THE 
CUPBOARD 



Brendan O'Neill 



•1 • 




sts 



■ea 

showcase skills 
ring 

oxing is a devastating 
sport. It pits man against 
man, and now, woman 
against woman, In the ul ti - 
i test of strength, skill, speed, 
endurance and strategy. Many peo- 
ple do not enjoy boxing as a sport 
ilting Its "brutality" and "stupidity." 
But boxing is a fantastic display 
)f men combining brawn and brains 
i the ring, in what I consider one of 
le most exhausting sports around. 

Last weekend, at the Fiesta 
palace in Waukegan, eight bouts 
ere featured in a night of boxing 
ich was my first exposure to box- 
lg live, and in person. 

I'm a boxing fan, and I've 
st died all kinds of fights on televi- 
lon— from heavyweights to fly - 
eights— but nothing prepared me 
- the whole atmosphere I expert - 
iced in Waukegan last week. 
The auditorium was filled with 
-school" boxing entusiasts, with a 
ig of youthful tans cheering 
fthelr favorite boxer. The room was 
, smoky and poo riy lit— exactly 
tl thought it would be. This set 
i tone for the fights to come. 
: There were eight bouts sched • 
1 for the night, with she four- 
id fights, one four-round exhi- 
lon, and one six-round fight — the 
levent 

The first fight saw Justin Dun- 
th of Milwaukee beat James Rice 
at 147 pounds in a unanimous de- 
cision; the second fight was an exhl- 
-faiiion between Steve Geilhauf and ~ 
Carlos Sanabri at 175 pounds; the 
third fight was between Gary Jones 
and Ike Porter at 1 70 lbs, with Jones 
knocking out Porter In the third 
round; Zebllef Kimbrough KO'd 
Lyle McDowell of Milwaukee in the 
third round as heavyweights; Fer- 
nando Hernandez of Chicago beat 
Kevin Miller of Milwaukee in a 
unanimous decision at 1491bs; Sam 
Merza of Chicago KO'd Mike Hugh- 
es of Indianapolis at 1561bs; Dan 
. Halverson KO'd Brian Maclin at 
heavyweight; and John Hibble beat 
Round Lake's Jose Hernandez in a 
split decision in the main event. 



■ - "; -■ . •■■ - 



- - 



November 27, 1998 - 




. " ,. . --.-1 

■ ■■■- ,-•.'-.—. ^rt-iatfJj* 1 






> fit 



1 tV 

) • 



- Lakeland Newspapers} [PA 1 





Byt£EFllAS 
Staff Reporter 



J5*ti 



When speaking of the new offense, 
Grayslake High School girl's basket- 
ball coach Mike Muldrow sees glim- 
mers of potential.' 
"It's coming along," Muldrow said. 
"We still have some things we need 
. to work on, but it's coming along." 
That same . potentially - potent of- 
fense, with the help of Lake County's 
leading scorer Jenny VVessel, 
Grayslake has rolled to a 4-0 start on 
this very young season. 
Wessel has had a week most girl bas- 



ketball players dream of, throwing 
up 77 points In die new offense as 
Grayslake has roiled over the Elk 
Grove Tournament and proven they 
are a team to reckon with, \ 
. *We have different people bringing 
the ball up on offense, and everyone 
is moving in the half court game," 
Muldrow said., "There are some 
things we really need to work on, like 
guarding up, but the girls are starting 
to understand iL" 

"I give a lot of credit to the girls," 
Muldrow added. "They new we were 
putting a new system at the begin- 
ning and they've really taken to it 



They play a lot of ball together and 
because of it, they are very effective 
in the schemes." 

On Saturday, Wessel & Company 
beat up on Zion-Benton, by a score 
of 40-19, a game in which Wessel had 
a season low 14 points, but rode the 
pine most of the fourth quarter. 
"Zion did a good job against our of- 
fense," Muldrow said, "They played 
aggressive zone against us and they 
really packed It in. We needed a good 
game from our guards and that 
helped." 

On Friday, Westmont was the victim 
of a 47-25 loss to the Rams, to com- 



plete the undefeated week. Ahead, 
the Rams will face Niies West on the 
Friday after Thanksgiving 
"Nlles West is tough," Muldrow said. 
"They are aggressive on the ball. 
Theyll meet you at half-court, some- 
times before, and trap you. It's a 
tough defense." 

"We need another big game from the 
guards to hold them off," Muldrow 
said. "They're fast and we've got to 
face that" 

Things may seem tough to Grayslake 
now, but in this young season, with 
the offense coming around, the road 
to state is golden for the Rams. 




Sequoits, Lackey fall to 
Bears in season opener 

Antioch boys hoopsters start season 
on wrong foot, look for wins soon 



By LEE Fl LAS 
Staff Reporter 



u 



nfortunately, Lake County's 
most promising young fighter, Her- 
nandez, lost his fight, which 
dropped his record to 6-2 as a pro- 
fessional and increased the distance 
between him and a nationally tele- 
vised title bout. 

The entire night was great fun, 
from the fights, to the atmosphere to 
the ring giris — 1 didn't even realize 
they soil had ring girls— it was a great 
night of boxing and local flavor that 
really can't be found anywhere else. 



L 



dbertyville's girls swim team 
took part in the Girls State Swim 
Meet over the weekend, and the 
Wildcats came home with some 
very strong performances. 

Teal Spencer, Jill Chmura, 
Megan Michel and Catie Scott fin- 
ished 10th in the 200 free relay in a 
school record 139.91; Chmura, 
Spencer, Scott and Laurel Liberty 
took 16th in the 400 freestyle relay 
and set a school record with a time of 
3:40.06; Spencer tied for 16th in the 
50 free and just misses a school 
record in 25.04; and sophomore 
Lindsay Bebout set a school record in 
the 100 fly with a time of 1:00.03. 
Look for a season wrap-up story 
about the Wildcats in coming weeks. 

Brendan O'Neill can be reached 
at (847) 223-8161; fax (847) 223- 
8810; or e-mail at edit@lnd.com. 



Let's get ready to nimble! 

Round Lake's Jose Hernandez, shown here as he walks toward 
the ring last weekend at the Fiesta Palace In Waukegan, lost a 
split decision to John Hibble by a score of 59-55, 56-58, 56-58 
for his second loss In his professional career.-— Photo by Brendan 
O'Neill 



Despite junior Don 
Lackey pumping in seven 
baskets and leading the 
team with 16 points from 
his forward position, An-. 
tlo ch lost a nail-blter to a 
rebuilding Lake Zurich 
team by a score of 63-58 
in the first round of the 
Gold Bali Tournament 
being held in Highland 
Park on Monday night. 

Sophomore Eric White was the 
other shining star in the Antioch 
toss, nailing two 3-pointers in the 
game, and walking away with 
14 points on the evening. 

Antioch stuck with 
Lake Zurich In the first 
quarter, trailing 15-11, but 
then bounced back with 
13-9 advantage in the second 
period, giving the Sequoits a 28-2B 
tie at halftime. 

Antioch again stayed neck- 




Lackey 




and-neck with the Bears, scoring 
12 points to Lake Zurich's 13, but 
still remained within striking dis- 
tance entering the final 
period. 

Problems came at the 

start of the fourth quarter. 

The game was at a virtual 

deadlock, as LZ held a 37 - 

36 lead over" Antioch, 

when LZ's John Lavin 

stepped off the bench and 

nailed down two 3's in 

the first minute of the 

quarter, to pull ahead 42-36. 

From there, Antioch couldn't 
pull back into the game, as they 
were out rebounded and out hus- 
tled to end the game. Antioch 
allowed the Bears to score 
26 points in the fourth 
quarter, overshadowed 
by the Sequoits 22 in the 
nod. 
nnuoch does have a chance at 
redemption Friday night, playing 
in the second game on Friday 
night at 8 p.m. in Highland Park. 



Lady Blue Devils hoopsters win two; improving 



Warren girls win two early-season games, but have long way to go 



By LEE Fl LAS 
Staff Reporter 



Though his team is riding a 2-0 
wave after the first week of the sea- 
son, Warren girls basketball coach 
Bruce Campbell Is not resting well. 

"Our half court offense is still not 
clicking," Campbell explained. "Also, 
our defense needs a little work after 
letting up 20 points in the fourth of 
the last game." 

Perfection is so hard to come by. 

Even though giving up 20 points 
in the fourth to Regina on Saturday, 



the Blue Devils still managed to hold 
on by a score of 63-41 in the second 
game of the week long Deerfield 
Tournament 

In the first game, Warren put 
away a miserable Highland Park 
team by a final score of 49-15, a game 
in which senior center Becky Moo 
and senior guard Tiffany Kelver both 
outscored the entire Highland Park 
offense. 

"We played good defense on Fri- 
day and had a big edge on rebounds 
in the game, which led to the low 
point total on their part," Campbell 
said. "The rebounds took away a 




Lackey 



ATHLETE OF THE WEEK 



Name: Don Lackey 

School: Antioch 

Sport: Basketball 

Yean Junior 

Last week's stats: Scored 16 points in Antioch 's 
63-58 los to Lake Zurich in the boys basketball sea- 
son opener. 



number of their shots which 
helped." 

After an 8-8 first quarter in Fri- 
days contest, one would have ex- 
pected a lot closer game. Warren, 
however, shut down Highland 
Park, giving up only seven points 
in the final three quarters, while 
racking up 4 1 points the rest of the 
way out. 

Leading scorers in the game 
was Moo, who walked away with 17 
points and 12 rebounds, while Kelver 
added 16 points on the afternoon. 

"We were a little tight in the 
opening quarter of the first game of 
the year," Campbell said. "We woke 
up after the first period and got it go- 
ing." 

On Saturday, the offense came to 
life while the defense took the after- 
noon off, as Regina scored 20 points 
in the final quarter of the Warren 63- 
41 win. 

Moo added 24 points to her 
weekend total and picked up 14 re- 
bounds underneath the glass. Kelver 
added 13 points and 9 rebounds, 
while Corrinne Scott threw in 12 



points and six assists on the after- 
noon. 

"They were playing a very ag- 
gressive defense, so we worked the 
ball inside to Moo and she got the 
ball up," Campbell said "A couple of 
others, stepped up to help out, Cor- 
rinne Scott and Octavia Bonds were 
big for us." 

Bonds turned a stand out defen- 
sive performance, creating havoc for 
Regina with seven steals and three 
assists on the afternoon. 

Warren jumped out to 17-7 lead 
in the first, which was Campbell's 
key to the game. 

"The secret to the game was get- 
ting out in front early, I think," 
Campbell said. "That and our de- 
fense." 

Like Campbell pointed to earli- 
er, the defense almost let Regina 
back into the contest 

"We need to work on our de- 
fense a little, plus there's always a 
few situations that we will work on 
for the week," Campbell said. "I real- 
ize we have a long way to go. We are 
just maintaining to get better each 
game, especially with some tough 
teams coming up in the next couple 
of weeks." 



155 






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A12 / Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



November 27, 1998 



LAKELAND'S TOP 5 
BOYS BASKETBALL TEAMS 



1. Warren 

Neck and neck with Zion -Ben- 
ton as the team to beat the North 
Suhurban Conference. With lasi 
year's starters Mike Brandovv (6- 
5), Langston Hughes (6 0) and 
Lakeland's Pre-Season Player of 
the Year Jourdain Milot (6-2), the 
Blue Devils" have what it takes to 
win early and often. Also look for 
strong plav from Mike Kolar (6-L>) 
and Joel Walker IS- 1 n as the two 
seniors saw some court lime last 
season. 

2. Grayslake 

l-'xpri liilinns rtm high loi lh(- 
Hams, just in llint second mmmhi 
in the powrrlul h'\ valley < mi 
fereiue I Ills team has a tfre.il 
combination ol si/e and speed 
with r > 10 Mike Heverlv. h f) Alex 
I rank, li-6 Steve /vvollei and I*- 7 
Irosh J ru Hauei I his could pui 
up some big nutnbeis in Ihf I\ ( . 
and fans should eujova run and 
gun sivle 

3. Mundelein 

t ua< h IVirv Uilhi-lm again 

,)s .i icon lli.il i an vlniol with 

ln-sl ttl iIm in Senior guard 

m IhppN rp'i h J will lie the 

'••.,.!■! 'hi* >i|!rriM- hul 

•■ ». - , ■ .'.II ,ii-n Jfiid a 

■ ■ i tlrp.u rmenl 

- . ,>n fliMMire of 

: ■ is 'iic center 

I h -I Paul 

'i.tdilionalh 



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ilu 



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small Mustangs an inside pres- 
ence. Look for Mundelein to 
make a run for the top of the NSC 
with a balanced inside-oulside 
attack 

4. Grant 

The Bulldogs will score, 
score... then score some more. 
This should be one of the most 
potent offenses in the area, with 
sophomore phenom Wayne 
Btisworth (6-0) returning for his 
junior year, and streaky senior 
Brandon Borror (60) should look 
in fill ii up even more than last 
veai Hoswnrih is the key, averag- 
ing just under 20 points a game 
last year, and Borror hit five and 
six :t pointers on more than one 
(ittasinn— but the Bulldogs need 
more consistency. The Bulldogs 
an. 1 di'fuiitely ihe scariest of the 
independents this year. 

5. Antioch 

Anlioch is a team lhal could 
be a real threat in the NSC. or 
could suffer a bunch of last-sec- 
ond losses. The Sequoils will miss 
graduate Chris Groth's IB-points 
per game, but coach Jeff Dresser 
has some solid talent up front in 
juniors Don Lackey (6-4), Jim 
Richardson Hh-2) and 6-7 senior 
Man Koss. Bit the backcourt re- 
mains shaky, with S*3 sophomore 
I ric While a projected starter, 
and the other spot slill up in the 
air. 



LAKELAND'S 1998-99 PRE-SEASON 
BOYS BASKETBALL PREDICTIONS 



North Suburban 

.- iii Benton 

...irren 

Mundelein 

l.ibertyvillc 

Antioch 

Stevenson 

N.Chicago 

Like forest 

Fox Valley 

Grayslake 
Cary-Grove 
lake Zurich 
Dundee Crown 
CL Central 
Jacobs 
Woodstock 
CL South 
Prairie Bidge 



McHenrv 



East Suburban Catholic 

St. Pa l rick 

St. Joseph 
Marist 



St. Viator 
Cannel 
Noire Dame 
Marian 
Holy Cross 
loliet Catholic 

Big Northern (Red) 

lohnsburg 

Independents 

Grant 

Wauconda 



YNERGYS 



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265 -1005 117 C edar Ave., Lake Villa 

Welcomes 

Kathy 

tlillebrdnd 

ds our new stylist 

over 20 years 
experience 



coupon 



j $1Q00 O ff , 

■ any color service when done by Kathy I 

L expires 12r31-98 I 

^m ^B ^M adm ^m t^ ^n ^h mm m »J, 

Hours: luesdcm 9-5:30, Wednesdaij 12-8 
Thu Jau 9-8 Fridai, 9-5 SaUau 8-4:30' 




Rah, Rah! 

Antioch Viking cheerleaders Miranda Mohar, 12 , and Kim Gustafson, 12, both of Antioch, cheer on 
the Vikings in the championship game against the Grayslake Colts Nov. 15.— Photo by Lynn Gun- 
narson Dahlstrom 




Sequoits success 

Antioch sophomore Eric White, shown here last year against Mundelein, should be a key factor in 
Antioch's backcourt, and the Sequoits' success.— Photo by Steve Young 



Women's fastpitch team seeks players 



The l.indenhnrst Fastpitch 
Softball program has announced 
plans lo sponsor a women's open 
age fasipiich softbail leant for next 
summer. Ibis team is for women 
over 19 years of age who wish to 
continue playing softbail on the 




A 



TAVERN & GRILLE 
Wed., December 12 

STRANGE 
BUT FEW 

9:30 p.m. - ? 

n Sal, November 28 
^ Tett Your Talents 

Karaoke 

9:00 p.m. - ? 

Jo/0 at hr 

Miller lite &MGD Specials 

Wed. $1.50 Bottles 

# Thurs. 5 Do Taps 

38730 Deep Lake Rd. 

Lake Villa 

356-3701 




competitive level. The team will 
play approximately 30 games and 
compete in a couple of weekend 
tournaments. The players select- 
ed for this team will determine the 
schedule and team name. Tryouts 
and registration will be conducted 
on Jan. 10,1999, The continued 
growth and popularity of fastpitch 
softbail has created the need to 
form this team for the enjoyment 
of the participant who has interest 
in fastpitch softbail and to contin- 
ue the development of college 
players. 



This new open age team will 
join the already established 12, 14, 
IB and 18 year old girls traveling 
teams sponsored by Lindenhurst 
l-'asipitcn softbail. All team tryouts 
will be held on Jan. 10,1999. 

Anyone who has interest in 
the tryouts for any of these teams 
is encouraged to contact either of 
the program directors: Mitch Kot- 
larz 356-9547 or Steve Haenchen 
265-0749. The, Lindenhurst J-'ast- 
pitch Softball hitting and pitching 
school is already in progress and 
has limited space available. 



U-19 Power girls beat speed 4-2 



**-. 



The Lindenhurst Power 
wrapped up their regular season 
with a 4-2 victory over the l.ake for- 
est Speed. Some well -executed pass- 
ing and multiple assists were the or- 
der of the day. 

Teri LaRoche opened the scoring 
with a left footed shot lhat arced over 
the LF goalkeeper into the upper 
right hand corner. The play was set 
up by a long throw-in from Christy 
Plotz to Sarah Richardson who 
passed the ball over to LaRoche. 
Richardson then scored a goal of her 
own, taking a pass from La Roche 
who had received a long through 
pass from Amie Carlberg, Jamie Wis- 
mer scored the third goal on a beau- 



tifully executed one-time volley offa 
Richardson crossing pass. Richard- 
son then tallied the final score, drib- 
bling in and pushing the ball by the 
keeper who had come out to cut off 
the angle. That play was set 

up by two well- placed passes from 
Carlberg and Rachel Cashman. The 
defensive play of Lauren Beatty, Nic- 
ci Kstep, Kristen Gamlin and Jourdan 
Phillips helped to preserve the win. 
The Power finished the out- 
door season with a 12-8-3 record 
which included a First Place finish 
at the Racine Lighthouse Classic. 
They will take some time off for a 
few weeks getting ready for the In- 
door season. 



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A14 / Lakeland Newspapers 



LEGAL NOTICES 



November 27 t 1998 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Fiscal and Shared Services Center 

Financial Outreach Services 

100 North First Street, Springfield. Illinois 62777-0001 

Aniioch Comm. Consolidalod School District *X 800 N. Main Street. Anlloch. IL 60003 

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR PUBLICATION 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED Juno 30, 1096 

(Section 10-17 of the School Code) 

SIZE OF DISTRICT IN SQUARE MILES: 37.75; NUMBER OF ATTENDANCE CENTERS; 4; NUMBER OF CERTIFICATED 

EMPLOYEES: FULL-TIME 121. PART-TIME 46; NUMBER OF NON-CERTIFICATED EMPLOYEES: FULL-TIME 52; PART-TIME 

1 10; AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE: 1832.7; NUMBER OF PUPILS ENROLLED PER GRADE: PRE-KJNDERQARTEN 37; 

KINDERGARTEN 191; FIRST 184; SECOND 233; THIRD 207; FOURTH 214; FIFTH 227; SIXTH 216, SEVENTH 234;EIGHTH 

215, SPECIAL 20. Total Bomorrtaty 1978. TOTAL IN DISTRICT 197B. 

TAX RATE BY FUND (IN %) 

EDUCATIONAL 2.0760; OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE .1750; BOND AND INTEREST 0; TRANSPORTATION 
091 0. MUNICIPAL RETIREMENT .0500; SOCIAL SECURITY .0490; FIRE PREVENTION AND SAFETY 0; TORT IMMUNI- 
TY .0450; CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS 0; SPECIAL EDUCATION .0200. VOCATIONAL EDUCATION BUILDING 0; OTHER 
0140; DISTRICT ASSESSED VALUATION; $294,525,027; ASSESSED VALUATION PER ADA PUPIL $160,70553; TO- 
TAL BONDED INDEBTEDNESS June 30, 1997 $0; PERCENT OF BONDING POWER OBLIGATED CURRENTLY: 0.00. 

(ASSETS ■ VALUE OF CAPITAL ASSETS ■ BASIS OF VALUATION USED) Land • 1 .862.536 - Cash; Buildings - 6.050,01 1 
• Cash ; Equipment - 2,633.804 Cash. 

QR&SS PAYMENT FOR CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL ANT 10CH COMM. CONSOLIDATED DISTRICT M4 
Salary Range: Less Than S 1 5.000 

" Baun. D.; Bemocko. S, Black, M.;Blue, P; Boemer. L; Brinkor, D.; Brussaly, G: Bunge. 
Hahn, N . Hartfitnger, M.; Hauser. M., Houghton. B.; Haute. J.; Wink. J.; Kruthere, F. Ley- 



McKeruie. 
Sanders. L 



Moore. N. Nelson. C ; Ortiz. M.; Ostrowskl, D. 
Schaufei. W .. Stone. D . Virag-HiB, T..' Vitucd, L. 



Payant, R.; Pelkus, M.; 

Wafgren. J.; Walsh, M,; 



Anderson, J.; Balrd. D., Bareky. E. 
C ; Casey. 0.; Dawson, L, Genet. M 
man. L: Loebman, B.; McAlonan, W 
Reese. A; Rosario, J , Rolhermol. M 
Ware. H.; Watson, N . White, S 
Salary Range: 515,000-524.999 

Bertana. P.; Blasius, K . Bremer. K GiWay. H . Hungartand, . Lawn, S , Lezon. C: Mooter, K.; Rabinak, B.; Vrlelk). L; 
Wallberg. B., Websier, M 
Salary Range $25,000-539.999 

Allie. J , Anday, S . Annes. J . Bessette. F . Besller. C . Biank. J . Bomes. S , Bryant, A. Burke. M.; Corns, N.; DownanJ, C; 
Downing D Erdmann, J . Flynn. L . Godsey C . Gritlm, M . Gunlhor. M , Gutka. C; Henning, A; Henning, G.; Hicks, R.; 
Hcchsletier j Hovey. C Jester K . Johnson K . Jordan. «., Kano, M . KJotsnot, K.; Und. C; Dndborg, K.; Marshall, J.; Mc- 
Conahay, C .; Monges. M . MoWor. C . Owons L Poulson. A . Robinson. A.. SchoonfekJor, K.; SiockowskT, T.; Siglef. D.; Stgour- 
noy, M .. Smiih. W , Slaver. S . Sltlrwell. M Slumpy S Teegen. B . Tobm. T . Tomton. T; Trout. D.; Walker. E.; Wojewoda, L; 
Yanca.J. 
Salary Range $40,000 and ove* 

Alberts, S.; Bockor. R . Behling. J Blauser . P Boir. K , Brown. A , Brown, R.; Bryant. C: Burke. A;' Burke, 0.' Bush, E.; Carl- 
son. H .' Classey. C . Donzel. J . Dipnno. K . Esen. R . Faith. L . Foust, L. Gehrko, S.; Main, P.; Harrison. L; Hastings, P.; Hewitt, 
R Hotrnan, E., Hook, E . Hopkins. J , Johnson, . Johnson. L . Johnson, P.; Ketry, D.; Kerr, D,; Kufalk, J,; UenhardL J; Lough- 
in. D , Mason, J . Mahaffy. T . McNeil. M . Miller. C . Modca. B . McJitor, T; Nelson. J.; OcrrwaL W.; Owens, W.; Porotka. B.; Outst 
J . RjcharrJs. E , Robinson, J . Rowland, G . Segersten. M . ShaHer, J.; Sheldon. M.; Shule, R.; Stahmer. N ; Stevens, S.; SOdfoio- 
Sori* S . Thomborough. P . Walsh, B . Zofler. M. 

QROSS PAYMENT FOR NON-CERTIRCATED PERSONNEL 
ANTIQCH COMM. CONSOLIDATED DISTRICT #34 
Salary Range Less Than $15,000 f """X 

Acker, M Anderson C Axion. V Baba C . Baird. T . Berttel, P.; BermAn, P ; Betahcourt, C ; Bivona, M.; EUocher, R.; Bock. 
S . Boitori. G . Borfa 8 Brooko. P . Bucott. R . Budruwert, L; Burke. L; Bums, A; Bush, D.; Bynum, P ; Caliaohan, K.; Cargile, 
v!canson.G Chess L Chwski, M Church R Clark, H; Clary. C.;CrandaJI. L; Creaney. M.; Crwello. D; DaJinla. F.; DeAr 
mendi. N . Dudley. J . D/iu'a W . Erfenng. S . Felde, L; Ferrara, J.; Foust. L; Gawtik, T.. Gorsuch. A; Green, C; Grinde. B. 
Hariman. W Hetmtjrodl. N . Hiatt. S . Horan J Hovorka, D ; Hull. R.; Ihlenfeldt, J.; Johnson. Ft.; Jones, D.; Jorgensen, C. 
Kudingo, P , La Rocco J Lattey K Landi V . Loatherborry. C; Uonhordl, J.; Lowe. N; Lubbock, B.; Marches!, L; Marion 
M Marra. L MichalaW J Moats A Nckerson. P . Nckerson. R.; Niemirjc, A; Niles. M . Nobler. P.; Notaiiano, P.; Notarta/w 
V Paddock. K . Perrme C Pcone R Peters. C , Pingef, T ; Plotz. L. Richard, C; fliordan, B : Roeker, K.; Roover, J. 
Rogers. K . Roman. J Roy D Rudis D . Sable, M . Scheidt, J . Schiemann, B ; Schmidt, G.; Scott, K.; Solbner, S.; Scurto 
B ShanVs C Shepparo E Si-o'/ewski. M ., Sladok. S . Spaulding, R , Slemke, F ; Slemel. L.; Sl/atlord, R.; Svoboda, C. 
SwawJr.J Tayio' J Thiol 1 Thompson. J , Tidden. J . Todd, T .Toney, L. Triplet!, J.; Tumor, M.;Venjonck, R.; Wade. E. 
Warner D Warner J Wame" L »Vober, W , Wennslrom. C , Whrto/Brown, A . Wilton. D . Wolf, M , Yearout, M.; Zeller. M. 
Salary Range S ' 5 000 S2<s 999 

Aker K Andrews K Bfus^i B . Forresl. C . Haines. R . Hanrahan. P Hauenslsin. I . Hauonsiein. J ; Henderson. L.. Kr> 
cnopoius J Lccascio M UjDeck. L . Marscek. C Mohr R . Money, C Pettorsen. D , Rogers. C . Schneider, D.; Scollay, 
D Scon K Shela J S^i" P . Tack. P 
S.iWrv Range S?5 000 S39 999 



Baumonn, C. 1 Harp. K.; KoDorowskl. P.; Marshall. N.; Ours. R.; Ovorocker, G,; Ovarocker. I.; Plan. J.; Pluctennlk, S.) Plu- 

dennik. T.; Waiczak. E.; Wilton, B.; Wilton, S. 

Salary Range: $40,000 and over 

Hausor, K t , ,^ r ,..„ 

VENDOR LISTING 

8th Dav Consultino Tralnlna $2 312 96; A.B.S. Associates Inc. $3,700.00; AT.&T. $1 ,223.65; Ace Hardware $1 ,339.44; AdoV 
son Wastwl SnoXn$17^25 fho Advertiser $2,322.24; Aetna Truck Parts $1 .009.82; Alliant Food Sorvteo Inc. $15,192.78; 
American Academic Suppliers $37,429.65; American OutTrttoni $5.B42 ,01; Amortoch $26,708^48; An^aslTC $39074 31; An- 
dorson Post Control $2,729.50; Anbctor Inc. $1B.089.61; Anticch Auto Parts $5.156.1 1; Antfoch Floorlm $12,123,31 :VTJlaQe of 
Antioch $516620AcploCompulef$11 .777.30; Area Glass 4 Mirror Co. $ 1 . 1 45.26; Atlas Martin Rro Extlngutehef $1 ,730,82; 
Audio Visual Express $1 ,600.96; Auto CMch & Parts Sorvlvo $2,997.33; Auto-Jet Muffler Corp, $3,104.28; AvalOfV Petroleum 
Company $43,468.85; B&R Eroctors $1,185.00; B.N. Woll Lines Company $21,300.82; Balfour $1 .87^ 1.44; Bank of Illinois 
$51 B33 74 Bauer John M. $4^1 1.50; Janet Bohltng $3.8 17.67; Boll Industries Inc. $3,766.Bfi; Best Buy $1.20939; BBer Press 
and Mfa" Inc. $4 07900; Dr. John Boarinl $18,170.00; Brads Printing $1,455.00; Budgotoxt $2,572*1; Bureau tor At Risk Youth 
$1 244 68- Buroau of Educailon & Research $2,335.00; Burgess, Anderson & Tote $3,222.58; Daniel Burke $2,577,04; C.D.W. 
Computer Centers Inc. $24,496.13; Cambridge Properties $100,000,00; Chancery Software $3,575.00; Chem-Rite Products 
Co $5 687 39- Chicago AEYC $1 .292.00; Children's Hoallh Market, Inc. $10.93200; Circuit City $1,226,91; Cisco Systems 
$21 932 00' Clinlcaro Corp. $3,813.00; Cwnmonwoalth Edison Co. $197,674.27; Communications CHroct. Inc. $4,78335; Com- 
pumaslQf $2 135,00- CompUSA Inc. $71,321.57; Copley Newspapers $1,215.96; Countrystylo, Inc. $37,753.72; Crekjhton 
Manning Inc $14 975.00; Data Cable Services, Inc. $t,642.00; Data Comm Warehouse $13,859.83; Dell Maritetlng LP. 
$121 ,781.95; Developmental Resources, Inc. $1,246.00; Diamond Bros-Arcola Agoncy $42,860.00; Douglas TV $2,265.00; 
Kurt Ouohr $2,529.00; JusUn Cyer $2,485.00; EM.C.-Paradlgm Publishing $2,884,83; Eder Rlodel & Co. $5,150.00; Educa- 
tional Design, Inc. $5,303.33; Educational Resources $6,085.89; Elan Financial Services $4,107.08; Boctronlc Tax Deposit 
$445,075.12; Tho EJton Corporation $9,995.30; Encyclopedia BrHannica, Inc. $1,520.85; Enorgy MaslefS Intnl. $27,259.37; 
Fodorol Supply $1 1 ,562.82; Rrst Nalionol Bank of Antioch $601 ,179,69; Fotlott Library Resources $3,271.64: Fbrtres Grand 
Corporation $1 , 1 95.00; Fox Rhror Foods Burtlngton $9,468,65; Frenchy's Inc. $1 ,062.90; Freund IntomaUonal $5588.63; Frey 
Scientific Co. $1,371 ,14; G.C.J. Construction $4,450.00; Gantar & Demartinl LTD $7.01 0.00; Susan Gehrfng $9,388,58: Geo. 
R. Breber Music Co. $1 ,599.57; Geotraln Corp. $1 ,990.00; Glonklrk $2,978.06; Goodman West EJectno $3,967^3; Global Com- 
putor Supplies $2, 1 7Z27; Grand Stage Co. $7,772.00; Greon Associates Architects $6,570,00; Greg lasofl Sporta $1 ,700.79; 
H.M.O. Illinois $14,282.48; Haydons Sports Center $3,445.88; Hearth Ran Management, Inc. $361,180,98; Hertt Furniture 
Systems $1 ,974.75; Highsmrth Co. $9,462.59; Hill-Behan Lumber Co. $1 .525.86; Hodges Lotzzl Eisonhammor $38,145.44; 
Horace Mann Ufe Ins. Co. $82,015.03; Houghton Mifflin $2,867.78; I.S.0.LA.F.+ $88,077.09; ILL Assn School Boards 
$7,793.00; ILL Lawn Equipment Inc. $40,268.00; ILL Municipal Retirement $208,363.97; ILL Play Surfaces $3,300,00; ILL Prin- 
cipals Assn. $1,973.53; ILLCO Inc. $1,101.21; lUini Power Products $1,807.19; International Musical Supply $1,139.94; Jays 
Foods LLC. $1,713.83; Jewel Food Store #160 $3,225 96; K-Log Inc. $2,937.17; Keller Inc, $1,840.00; Kenneth J, Kogut & 
Assoc. $1,90000; Deborah Kerr $5,20024; Laidtaw Transit. Inc. $39,930.75; Lake County Educ Services $11,188.07; Lake- 
land Publishers $1,307.00; Laminatod Products, Inc. $2,309.93; Lanier Company $4,157.42; Larson & Petersen $1,229.18; 
Leach Enterprises Inc. $1,621.74; Tho Learning Company $1,69980: Lessons In Leadership $4,980.00; Liberty Mutual Ins. 
Group $70260.50; James Lienhardt $2,168.93; Lois Tiro Shop $9,565.44; Love A Teacher $3,998.42; Lucent Technologies 
$1,959.60; MJ.M. Consulting $3.47324; Mac Warehouse $9,175.65; Magg Software $3,231.00; Tim Mahaffy 53,45621 ; Sieve 
Manderscheid $1,696.00; Martin Peterson Co., Inc. $10,809.80; Janice Mason $1,588.08; Maxim Robuiiders Inc. $1,236.95; 
McGraw-Hill $10,803.98; Meier's Outdoor World $1,460.95; Moairds $2,368 29; Motz Baklrtg Company $7,829.89; Micro Ware- 
house $3,720.69; Mid-West Truckers Assn. $2,368.60; Micro Systems $1 ,155.00; Midwest Visual Equipment $1 ,343. 13; Mod- 
em Building Material $1 ,073.20; Modem Curriculum Press $1 ,773.38; Morris Press $1 ,966.65; N.D.I. Solutions $3,425.00; Nad 
Business Furniture $1,262.75; Natl Louis University $1 1,571.00; Christine Newton $12,359.35; North American Sail Company 
$1 ,263.05; Northern Illinois Gas $20,878.38; Nugom Risk Management $3,500.00; Offlcemax $1 7,174.40; Olson Transporta- 
tion Inc. $3,819.00; Ombudsman Educ. Services $2,200.00; Orchard Medical Center S.C. $9,233.86; Paylos Sports Inc. 
$1,366.10; Paulsen's Comm. Truck Repair $3,495.52; Podoreen Bros. Implement $6,789.79; Piggly WJoafy #10 $2,146.98; 
Teresa Rudennik $1349.02; Postmaster $5,002.48; Print Rus $10,151.71; The Psycholoflical Corp. r.508.28; Qui Corp. 
$7,393.30; R.&G. Consultants $10,843.40; R.M.B.S.I. Inc. $1,686.95; R.R.P. Inc. $7,404.20; Raymond Chev/DSds $1,009.63; 
Road All About It Inc. $1.14435; Regent Book Co., Inc. $6,847.49; Regional SupL of Schools $1 ,832.00; Resource Data Sys- 
tems $ 1 .000.00; Riverside Publishing Co. $3.722. 1 5; Rourko Publishing Group $ 1 ,354.60; Theresa Sartflo $30,855.00; Sax 
Arts & Crafts $1 .981 .91 ; Saxon Publishers Inc. $4,471 .57; Dtanna SchnoWer $1 ,796.51 ; SchxtotJc Ire. W.818.11; School Bus 
Parts Co. $10,792.39; Grass Lake School Dtel. #36 $13,844.34; Antioch School DHL #1 17 $12,690.86; School Health Corpo- 
ration $5.326.1 1; School Specialty Co. $4368.67; Schod-Tech. Ire. $1,975.11; Scope Shopc* Ire. $1, 345^ Secuiltylhkfrom 
Ameritech $5,560.58; Dr. Nancy Scott $1 ,785.00; Judith Shaffer $1 ,018.91; Shulfsburo Creamery, Inc. $4,281 ,43; Silver Bur- 
den & Glnn $17,852.76; Diane Sneddon $1,462.57; SoloB Software, Inc. $1,204.12; Sorensen Insurance $1,387.60; Special 
Ed Dist of Lake Co. $495,574.71; Specialized Data Systems $744.25; St Peter School $1.016.1 1; St Terese Medical Center 
$1,778.76; State Bank of the Lakes $104,217.97; Susan Stevens $1,129.06; Sundance Publ. & Distributor $4,412.51; Superi- 
or Paving $24,257.00: Sysco Food Service $20,784.16; Teacher's Retirement Systom $466,1 87.52; Toctwology Masters, Inc. 
$5,240.61; Techslar America Corporation $35,717.40; Telex Communications. Inc. $1,160.00; Thelon Sand & Gravel; Inc. 
59.734.86; Tippet $20,678.00; Tom Haloy Communications $7,81 5.21; Tudor Publishing Company $3,250.00; U.S. Postal Ser- 
vice $3,588.40; U.S. Realty $45,000.00; Unity School Bus Parts $1 ,059.67; V.P.C. $1 1 ,555.00; Vortec, Inc. $5,995.00; Victo- 
ry Health Services $12,327.50; Votlmer & Assoc. $3,753.80; W.W. Grainger Inc. $5,605,41 ; Ward-Brodt Music Co. $1 ,372,50; 
Waste Managomerrl North $9,908,60; Waukesha Whoelsalo Foods $47,134.48; Wlnnobago Software Co. $2,776.95; Wis- 
consin Restaurant Supply $2,610.75; World Almanac Education $1,549.47; The Wright Group $1,544.84; XPEDX $1,019.20 



STATEMENT OF ASSETS AKO LIABILITIES RISING FROM CASH TRANSACTIONS/STATEMENT OF POSITION Junt 30, IBM 





ACCT 




OPEflAHONS 


BONO 




UUWOPAL RETIREMENT/ 


SliEVJDCWSTTtXTOW 




ASSETS 


NC 


EDUCATION 


AND MAINTENANCE 


AND INTEREST 


TRANSPORTATION 


SOOALSECLWTY 


DWALIUPROVByiENT 


WORKING CASH 


Cuwentas?£*; ■■:■:, 


















• Cair 


■".' irjs 


WM3677 


SI 02661' 


S3M07 


$553,304 


$275,915 




441J365 


1 Oe Accru« Assets (GAAP; 


* 
















ARacii Uemiiaiion 


















1 Taws Recewatte (GAAP) 


1'0 
















* Accounts RKeNBtte IGAAPl 


'» 
















s ua»- to Eflucaiionai turn 


tS" 
















I .Da^ lo Operates ana 


•s? 
















va/iienance Fi/q 
















750.000 


' JHfiloTransponawr.j.^ 


■i3 
















8 Loan Id f>e P'evenno'' r: Sa'c. 


•'A 
















9LoantoOlfw f j'«s 


V. 
















10 Inventory 


m 
















tt Investments 


•v. 
















i? Oil* Cu'ieni Assets 


'99 
















lAracfi itcuratiffii 


















U TOTAL CURRENT ASSfTS 




Yi M3 677 


SI0266H 


530207 


$553 J0« 


$275,915 


so 


$1,191,885 


' Lme 2 snouHt rtfufle accounts ' 30 


'« IK 18' 


'K 















RENT 



FIRE PREVENTION 
AND SAFETY 

$3,165 



SO 



$3,165 



LiAfliUTIES AND FUND BALANCE 
CURRENT LIABILITIES (*0H) 

1 Accrued labilities (GAAP) 

2 Corporate Personal Property 



STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES RISING FROM CASH TRANSACTIONS/STATEMENT OF POSITION June 30. 1MB 



4Q6 



Repfaramert Tai Artapabon Notes PayaBe 
3 Anoopation Warrants Payable 
* Anbajabon Noes Payable 

5 Teachers' Orders Payable 

6 State Ax) Artjopabon 
Certificates Payable 

7 Loan trom Educational Fund 
6. Loan bom Operators 

and Manlenance Fund 

9 Loan from Transportation Fund 

10 Loan Irom Woring Cash Fund 

11 Payroll Deductions Payable 

12 Oelened Revenue (GAAP) 
(3 Due to ActMty Fund Organizations 
H Oitier Cunem Liabilities 

(Attach tiemtzabonj 
t5 TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES 

16 Reserved Fund Balance 

17 Unreserved Fund Balance 
IB TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES 

AND FUND BALANCE 



4C8 
409 
410 












431 

432 












433 

434 

450 
474 
490 

499 


6603 


750000 








703 
704 


6.603 
$2,497,074 


750:000 
$276.61 \ 



$30207 



$553,304 



SJ25540 
$149,975 




$2.503 677 


$1,026,611 


$30,207 


$553,304 


$275,915 










' Lne I should ndude accounts 402, 41 1-415, 420, «i. 442. 461 

STATEMENT OF REVENUES/EXPENOrTURES DISBURSEOrEXPEHOfTURES, OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES). AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES FOR THE YEAR 



RECEIPT&HEVENUE5 

1. Local Sources 1000 $6,758,485 $1,196,325 $1,916 

2 Ftow-Thr ouoh Revenue from 
One LEA to Another LEA 

3 State Sources 

4 Ffidflfcji Sources 

5 TOTAL DIRECT REVENUESflECEIPTS $8,662,237 $8,662,237 $\,l98.3i 
6- Receftt/Revenues for 

On^ehalf of Payments 
7. TOTAL RECEIPTS/REVENUES $9,101,632 $1 196.325 

DISBURSEMENTS/EXPENDITURES 

8 Instruction 

9 Supportrvj Services 
10. Community Services 

1 1 Ncflprogrartmed Charges 
12. Debt Services 

13 TOTAL DIREa DISBURSEMENTS/ 
EXPENDITURES 

14 Disbtnanerts/ExpenrJIurDs tor 
0n-6erefl Payments 

15. TOTAL DiSBURSEMENTS 

EXPENDrTUflES 
1 6 Excess ol Direct Receipts/Revenues 

Over (Under) Direct Disbursements/ 

Expandiluies $236,027 

OTHER FINANCING SOURCES AND Acct 
(USES) Mo. 

17. Other financing Sources TOOO 

IB.CtiorFnareinQfiJses) 8000 

19. TOTAL OTHER FINANCING 
SOURCES ANO (USES) 

20. Excess of Receicts,Revertie and 
Other finardng Sources Ovet (unda) 
DatJEsrf anrj Oder financing Uses 

21. WNOBALANCESJuty 1,1997 

22. Other Changes in Fund Balances Increases (Doer eases) 
2&HJNDBALANCES>lurtt30,199a 12,497,074 $276,611 $30.20? 
'GASQS!ater™rlNo.24:AoxuTtinga.ndFfiar^ 



1000 


$6,756,485 


2000 




3000 


1.606.918 


4030 


296.834 


* 


$6 662.237 




$439,395 




$9. 10! .632 


Fund 




No. 




1000 


$5,389,139 


2000 


2.546,656 


3000 


21,426 


4000 


468.989 


5000 




1 


$6,426,210 




$439,395 




$6,665,605 



$1502.264 

35.719 

4.191 

$1,542,174 



$1,542,174 



($343,849) 



1,916 



5.867 
$5,667 

$5,867 
($3,951) 



$325,453 

522.987 
$1,916 

$349,440 

$779,929 

2.463 
$782,392 

$782,392 

$67,048 
2,750 



$339,518 



$849,440 



$339,518 



76.746 

266.075 
777 



$343,598 



$343,598 



IH080) 





$1,191,685 

$1,191,665 

ENDED Junt 30,1998 

$75,923 



$3,165 
$3165 

$250 



$339,518 



$75,923 



$75,923 



$250 



$75,923 



$250 







(1.916) 









1,916 


(1.916) 


2,750 

t 





$236,027 
2,261.047 


($341,933) 
618,544 


(5.867) 
36.074 


S69.79B 
483,506 


($4,060) 

279.995 







$553 J04 



$275,915 



$75,923 
1,115,962 

$1,191,885 



2.915 

$3,165 

1198D-2281-AN 
November 27, 1998 



- 



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Lakeland ., 
Newspapers 




Gurnee residents Xiaoyan X) and Charles Safiran swing to Big Band musfc during a 
dance lesson at Dancenter North In Ubertyvllle. tower right; Lori Loef of An'tioch 
dances with David Douglass, also of Antioch, during their Advanced Swing Dancing 
lesson. —Photo by Sandy Bressner 

Auft got a thing 
if you ain't got Swing 

From dance clubs, to vintage clothing stores to pop tunes; 

Swing's makin' a comeback 



ByUZTHOMSEN 
Staff Reporter 



m 



Suspenders. Spats. Mary 
Janes. Flowered dresses. 
Style. 
Men lead but women 
decided how closely. 
Big Band Sounds. 
Taking lessons from your grand- 
parents or great-grandparents. 

This isn't your daddy's rock n" 
roll, this is grandpa's Jitterbug and 
grandma's Swing. 

The hottest craze sweeping the nation is de ja vue to 
the early 1940s. 

Dressing up in suspenders and spats has replaced 
ripped t-shirts and the grunge look for many 20-some- 
thing couples. They share the dance floor with couples 
who remember Swing in its heyday, before the Japanese 
bombed Pearl Harbor and nearly a generation before 




America would be Insane for Elvis. 
"Swing is a lot of fun," said Jerry 
Jones, who was taking his second 
lesson at Dancenter North in Uber- 
tyville along with wife, Eva. "There 
is a lot of stuff you can do in a small 
space. We like the kicking steps, I 
think it sets you apart from basic 
steps to do that. " 

As he surveyed the 50 dancers in 
the room learning the Swing Jon 
Lehrer, instructor at Dancenter 
North in Libertyville, commented 
on the dance's recent surge in pop- 
ularity. 

"I think it's the ultimate rebellion. They aren't doing 
their parent's dance; they're doing their grandparent's 
dance," he laughed. 

"Swing dancing is all about style," continued 

Please see SWING IB7 







taA4«***BP« 



/ Lbkeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 



November 27, 1998 




476 W.Liberty 
Rt. 176 1/8 mile east of Rt. 12 
Wauconda 
(847) 526-0002 j 




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I I Eggs to Order 
V Sausage^ Bacon, Potatoes 

Belgium Waffles with Fruit Toppings 
Our Famous Salad Bar with over 30 items 
Assorted Fresh Pastries 
Danish, Rolls, Bagels 
And MORE... over 50 items 

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November 27, 1998^ 



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FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers / B3 




Lincoln Part Zoo will Trip the Lights 
Fantastic" when It opens this year's 
ZooUghts Festival, presented by First 
Chicago, a BANK ONE company. In Its 
fourth year and already a Chicago holi- 
day tradition, ZooUghts is a 36-nfght 
event featuring more than 100,000. daz- 
zling lights, entertainment, children's 
activities, Ice carving, gingerbread hous- 
es, a kiddle train and more. 

This year's opening night will feature a special 
appearance by Redmoon Theatre, a local theater group 
that uses innovative masks, puppets, costumes and 
other props to stage spectacular performances. The 
actors will provide festival-goers with masks and lead 
them on a parade around zoo grounds. 

At 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 27, David R Bolger, an 
executive vice president of First Chicago and a 
Lincoln Park Zoo board member, and Lincoln Park 
Zoo Director Kevin Bell will flip the switch to illumi- 
nate enchanting displays of polar bears, penguins, 
lions, rhinos, giraffes, elephants and more. The festi- 




■-X' 



val also will feature 
whimsical holiday 
scenes, such as ani- 
mated snowmen 
which Juggle and Ice- 
skate and a snow 
castle. 

ZooUghts runs 
from Friday, Nov. 27 
through. Sunday, Jan. 
3 (closed Dec. 24 and 25). The 
event Is open from 5:30 to 8:30 
p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 
from 5:30 to 10 p.m. Fridays, 
Saturdays and New Year's Eve. 
Tickets are $6 for adults, $4 for 
children 4 through 12 and free for kids 3 and under. 
Zoo members receive a $2 discount with their mem- 
bership cards. 

The event also features a variety of family activities, 
including rides on a children's train, a delightful ginger- 
bread house display, and holiday crafts. After strolling 




the grounds, guests can warm up at 
Park Place Cafe, the zoo's new 
restaurant, with dinner, hot drinks and 
{other seasonal treats while enjoying 
hightry musical entertalrirnerrt And 
Santa will be on hand to hear holiday 
hopes and wishes. The Santa area is 
sponsored this year by Allstate 
Insurance Company. 

Started in 1868 with the gift of a 
pair of swans, Lincoln Park Zoo is 
the oldest zoo in the country and 
one of the last free zoos nation- 
wide. Formerly managed by the 
Chicago Park District, the zoo in 
1995 was privatized and now relies 
more heavily on corporate sponsorship, individual 
contributions, membership and special events. 

Tickets for ZooUghts are available at Gateway 
Park Pavilion or each night at the gate. For more 
information, or to purchase tickets by phone, call 
(312) 742-2283. 









THEATRE 



.,...»..* -it r 



'Annie Warbucks' 

'Annie Warbucks" bat PM&L 
Theater In Antloch on Nov. 27, 28, Dec. 4, 
5, 11 and 12 at 8 p.m. and Dec 29, Dec. 
16 and 13 at 2:30 p.m. 

Director Glgi Willding from 
Ingleside and musical director Cathy 
Miller from Salem, Wis., have assembled 



a large and talented cast of all ages. 
Elizabeth WUlding from Ingleside and 
AUysa Rlttomo from Twin Lakes , Wis., 
share the starring role of Annie. Mark 
Badtke of Genoa City, Wis. plays Daddy 
Warbucks, and Alice Byrne from 
Lindenhurst is Grace, 

The public can reserve tickets by 
calling 395-3055 or by coming to the box 
office Moa-Thurs, from 5*30-730 p.m., 
Saturday from 1 1 am to 2 p.m., and 
one- and -a- half hours before curtain 



time. Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 Tor 
students and seniors, 

'Houy 

Bo wen Park Theatre Is announcing 
the performances of the December holi- 
day production of "Holly." Under the 
direction of Margaret Schultz, this 
delightful play is based on a Russo- 
Flnnish folk tale that tells the story of a 
beautiful, but vain princess who learns 
through some hard lessons that who we 



are has nothing to do with what we look 
like. She also learns that a good deed is 
only truly good when done from the 
heart and not for personal gain. This 
non-religious play Is Oiled with holiday 
spirit and will be enjoyed by audiences of 
all backgrounds and denominations. 
Group performances are being 
booked during the day at 10 am. and 1 
p.m. on Dec 7-11. Due to the demand of 
last year, there may be additional perfor- 
mances available from Dec 14-18. These 



performances will be booked after the 
first week is filled. Public performance 
for "Holly" will be on Saturday, Dec 12 at 
10 am and 1 p.m. The production will 
be performed in Goodfellow Hall, which 
only seats 100, In the Jack Benny Center 
for the Aits, 39 Jack Benny Dr In Bo wen 
Park, Waukegan. 

For more Information, call 360- 
4741. 

Please turn to next page 




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. Waukegan, g (847) 473-0234 1 Open Monday - Friday Mam-Spm - Saturday 10am-5pin.Su; 



Ham- 



; ■ 
■■."•• 



B4 



/Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



November 27,- 1998 



Waukegan Park District adds choruses 

Are you between the ages of 8 and 18 and like to 
sing? The Waukegan Park District is registering for their 
new choruses for the winter season. The Children's 
Chorus of Waukegan is just for kids ages 8-12. 
Rehearsals will be on Monday nights from 6-7:30 p.m. 

The Youth Chorus is designed for youth ages 12-18 
and will rehearse from 7:30-9 p.m. on Monday 
nights. Rehearsals begin on Feb. 1 and both groups 
will perform a concert on April 12 at 7:30 p.m. The 
rehearsals and concert will be at the Brett Theatre at 
Waukegan High School. Registration is $30. Call the 
Jack Benny Center for the Arts at 360-4742 for more 
information. 

Daytime yoga classes at Gorton 

Barbara Spietz, Holistic Trainer and Practical Living 
Yoga instructor, will teach classes at Gorton Community 
Center, 400 East Illinois Road, Lake Forest, beginning 
Friday, Dec. 4, from 10:30 a.m. to noon. The class runs 
until Dec. 18, and the fee is $24. 

Spietz' extensive 30-year career in education 
emphasizes a blend of Eastern philosophy with Western 
"know-how" for a practical approach to wellness. This 
class provides a safe, proven method to achieve total 



SPECIAL EVENTS 

mind/body fitness by combining the 5,000-year-old tra- 
dition of Hatha Yoga with contemporary exercise phi- 
losophy. Enjoy the rewards of Increased strength, flexi- 
bility, balance, and relaxation as you perform postures, 
exercises, and mental imagery. Bring a mat and a 
small, firm pillow. 

Interested participants should register and pay In 
advance. For more Information, or to receive a program 
brochure, call or stop by the Gorton office at 234-6060 
between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. weekdays. 

'Antiques Appraisal Days' at Gorton 

"Antiques Appraisal Days," Gorton's very own ver- 
sion of the popular PBS program, "Antiques Road 
Show," will continue at Gorton's Community Center, 
400 East Illinois Road, Lake Forest. Dates are set for 
the first Thursday of each month, and the next is 
scheduled for Dec. 3, from 10 a.m. to noon and 1 to 
4:30 p.m. Cost is $20 for three or fewer items. 

Special guest appraiser Manya E. Sheehan will run 
the program. She has been an appraiser for the past 12 
years in Chicago, New York, and Washington, D.C. For 
eight of those years, she was the Director of Decorative 
Arts Department and Senior Appraiser for Chicago's 
leading auction gallery, Leslie Hindman Auctioneers. In 



addition, Manya is a regular contributor to the "Queries'' 
column of Art and Antiques magazine. She writes a 
monthly column, "Antique Answers," for the Pioneer 
Press, and appears regularly on television as a guest 
decorate arts expert She specializes, in furniture, 
porcelain, glass, textiles, silver, Oriental objects, paint- 
ings, and prints, and has been a contributing expert on 
the "Antiques Road Show" program. 

Interested participants need not register in 
advance; attendees simply sign In when they arrive. For 
more information, call 234-6060. 

Children's Theatre presents 'Cinderella' 

The Children's Theatre at Barat College presents 
Ruth Newton's adaptation of "Cinderella" featuring Jill 
Seibert as Cinderella, Scott Harris as the Prince, and 
Kara Szostek as the Fairy Godmother. Shelly Scoville 
will play the Stepmother. The Stepsisters will be played 
by Tiffany Besco, Christina Harris and Suzanne Larson, 
in riotous portrayals not to be missed. 

"Cinderella" runs Saturday, Dec. 5 and Sunday, 
Dec. 6 at 1 and 4 p.m. each day. Tickets are $4 
each. Group rates are available. All seats are 
reserved. To order tickets or for more information 
call 604*6344. 



'The Meeting' 

Hmvi'ti l';irk Theatre Company will 
hold auditions for Ml Stetson's play ' I In 
Mi-i-titif! on Pit. fi Jind » from I -I p m 
at tin' lark lirnny I "enter lor the Arts, il'l 
larUU-nnyDi .jii-ilofT N Sheridan lid . 
in Wanke^m, Call hacks are scheduled 
[nun Monday evening at 7:.i() p.m. The 
Meeting' will he directed by fjuesl direr 
lur Dehrah W.il 

Weiled are three hlack male at lors 
to portray I >i Martin I ntliet kin^ h 
Mali olin V and Kashad. Mali ulm X's 
liihlvpianl I'lndlu noil dates ate I eh V 
ti y I t .ii Kpm ami leh Tainl J I .ti I 
p til I hen- is a pN-.\|lnlit\ i -I all .till til run 
al nm mil |ii'itniiiian< <■ 

Hie Miftioi; is ahum a In iilum-. 
nu'i'luiK between the twin (Brail mil 
rivJus wctivVsis. Dt . NVanin Utthet Winn. 
It umVMaldAinX U ispo'ij»nani \viuv 
xaiiicf/itifs himmmus. and catches the 
spirits of these two historic figures, 
liccmse the length of the piny jj, just over 
one hour, additional materials will he 
used b\ the actors hetote the a( tual pla\ 
Auditions will heh\ appniniuieni 



only and ac'ors are asked to call 3(i<) 
471 1 to set a lime for their individual 
audition Howen I'ark Hicatre Company 
isapiolessturial. non-union, non i'i|illty 
company. II tea 1 is pay. 

KIDS EVENTS 

'Clown Prince' slated 

'The Clown Prince of Wanderlust" 
is a children's show hy Douglass 
I'arkhiisi that will he piesented hy the 
Knk riayeisiin Dei -I. r > mid I* Come 
s.ce liuw the natives III peasanlv 01 
v\!uic\ri the inhabitants ol the 
sii.nii:r plat e tailed Wa ruler lusi tall 
iheiiiseUes. n\ in make I'niu ess Hose 
V inlet lau^h II she iloesii t faugh, ami 
soon, she will huve to marry the evil 
I'rtWJMi lVvinVU»m«iV Oh nn' \\e\yi make 
het laugh! The show will he presented 
af the Mnndelein High School aiidiln 
titim Show limes are H p m. on I -ndiiy. 
De« I, J and II ji in on Sanuday, Met 
'i.arulJ |i rn on Sunday, Ih-i (,. Nil 
mote mlormatioii, mil Sliti fif»«i4 



Pierce 
Brosnan's Choice 




S**m4lf«f GMT 

Agtom^tK rhiotiomrlr 

•Ndttt WtitftMl (a jonm/'ooolt 

(WI^A \#i\; fn*rJr tincf ifi^B 



a 

OMEGA 

The sign of excel lence 




Rpttand's 

JEWELERS 



510 Hawthorn Center 

Vernon Hills, IL 60061 

847.918.7300 

Fax 847.918.7323 



Kids New Years Eve 

YMCA Camp Duncan is hosting a 
New Year's live overnight for kids ages (i 
to [3. The program will sian at 4:30 p.m. 
on Dec. :i 1 attd conclude at 9 a.m. on 
Jan. I. 

The night is packed full of games, 
sledding, food, all camp dance, prizes 
and more. ' 'The idea is for kids to haw a 
great time and for parents 10 know their 
kids are in a safe place," says Addie 
Smits. one of iwo direclors to lead the 
overnight. The overnight is a perfect 
opportunity for parents 10 bring in the 
New Ycni and not have in find a baby- 
sitlet Bring ymii kids to YMCA Camp 
I him an ami let your kids bring in the 
New Year with n hang! Hona ItofTey and 
Smits are the two YM( A professional 
directing the o\L-riiiglii prugntffl. 

llie rnsi is reasonable and includes 
program all mglii long, dinner hn-aklast. 
siiiick-s, prizes, and supervisim i Hotley 
suited, "i )ur New Year's live | hemight 
program is a fun alternative lor the kids at 
a reavuiahle cost for die parents." The 
New Year's Kve Overnight is held at YMCA 
( -imp Duncan located near Fox Lake. 

For marc information, call Ronaor 
Addie at 546-B086. 

HOLIDAY EVENTS 

Holiday Art Sale 

The Hih Annual Holiday Art Sale at 
the College ofl^ke County is Set for Dec. 
f> It. Willi fine art gifts for everyone, this Is 
the purled place to pick up gifts for those 
hard-io-lniy-for people on your list! The 
event will feature jewelry, wearable art. 
potlery, paintings and photography. 
Times are Saturday, Dec. 5. 9 a.m. lo 4:30 
p.m.. Sunday, Dec. 6. I to S p.m.; 
Monday. Dec. 7.9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and 
Tuesday, Dec. B, 9 a.m. lo 9 p.m. For 
more information, call 543-2405. 

Santa Breakfast 

Santa will be stopping hy The 



Country Inn Restaurant of Lambs Farm 
lo listen to kids' wish lists just in time for 
the holidays. Families are Invited to join 
Sania for breakfast on Saturday, Nov. 28, 
Dec. 5 and Dec, 12. Two scatlngs are 
available each day at 0:30 am, and 10 
a.m. The breakfast buffet is only $8.95 for 
adults and S4.95 for children ages 2 to 10, 
Children under 2 are free. The price also 
includes a free hay wagon ride around 
the farm! 

After breakfast, everyone will visit 
Santa's Secret Ployland. There each child 
will receive n free goodie bag. Live enter- 
tainmenl will include music and Lambs 
Farm's own Jojo and Kiwi ihe downs. 
The kids can also enjoy sand art, face 
painting and get their picture taken with 
Santa with prices ranging from $1.50 to 
$4.50 each. 

Ail proceeds will bcncfil the voca- 
tional, residential and social support ser- 
vices provided by Lambs Farm for more 
than 265 adults with mental disabilities. 
For reservations, call 362-5050. 



SINGLES 



Dream Date Auction set 

The Midwest Chapter of the 
Starlight Children's Foundation wUl pre- 
sent its 8th annual Dream Date Auction 
on Friday, Feb. 19, at 6 p.m., at Ihe Park . 
West, 322 W. Armitage In Chicago. The 
event will feature ihe auction of 26 bach- 
elor and bachelorctte date packages, 
food from over 30 of Chicago's favorite 
restaurants and a raffle and auction 
offering international, deluxe trip pack- 
ages. Cost is $30 in advance, $35 at the 
door. To order tickets or for more Infor- 
mation, call (312} 251-7B27. 



MUSIC 



■ ..,-..... 



Concert series 

The Lake County Community 
Concert Association has revealed an 



exciting line-up of world class perform- 
ers for its 1998-99 series. 

The 1998-99 season Includes the fol- 
lowing: Lee Lessack and Joanne 
O'Brien— An Enchanted Evening: The 
Musk of Broadway, Sunday, Jan. 10, 3 
p.m.; Jan Gottlieb Jiracek, pianist, 
Sunday, March 14. 3 p.m.; and 
Vancouver Wind Trio (bassoon, oboe 
and clarinet), Sunday, April 18 at 3 p.m. 

Tickets are sold only for the entire 
series. Ticket holders are cnUtled to 
attend eight additional concerts at two 
other Community Concerts locations in 
Arlington Heights and Park Ridge. 

All LCCCA's concerts will be held in 
Orlln Trapp Auditorium at Waukegan 
High School, Brookslde and McAree. 

For tickets, call Donna at 244-7465. 

Ensemble opening 

City Light* U a vocal ensemble iHm 
sings a variety of music from the 1930s to 
the present, and has been singing 
around the Chicagoland area for several 
years, entertaining audiences of all ages. 
City Lights has In Its repertoire a variety 
of songs and medleys guaranteed to 
entertain and also boasts of its fine 
soloists. This renowned musical group is 
opening Its roster for the first time to the 
general public for new members. 
Limited openings remain for the men's 
and women's sections. If you love to sing 
and have fun doing it, call Kim at 526- 
7190 orAl at 623.1946 



DANCE 

, ii.., 

'Nutcracker 9 

The Barrington Youth Ensembles 
production of The Nutcracker will be 
held on Friday, Dec. 4 at 7:30 p.m. ; 
Saturday, Dec. 5 at 2 and 7:30 p.m.; 
and Sunday, Dec, 6 at 2 p.m. 
Performances will be at Barrington 
High School's Richard C. Johnson 
Auditorium, 616 W. Main St. For more 
Information, call 382-6333, 




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-V 



mvember27,im j^TO^ 




Lakeland Newspapers! B5 



f I The proliferation of home ;■-" 
■ computers and time-chal- : 
I lenged households has 
';$** spawned what has nowbe- 
come a staple of the holidays: the : 
Christmas newsletter. Unfortunate- 
ly, this "staple" has earned a reputa- ' 
tion of scorn equal to that of the 
. dreaded Christmas fruitcake. 

. So,\^at exactly Is wrong with a 
Christmas newsletter? WeU, first 
lef s takealook at what the newslet- 
ter Is replacing. >'• : > 

In the pre-computer era, folks 
either bought a box of Hallmark 
Christmas cards, or ordered their 
own customized cards with family 
photos or just their names pre- 
printed inside. If you were a dose 
friend or family member, there was 
usually a hand-written note or letter 
enclosed with the card, meant just 
far you. (Well, maybe it was meant 
just for you - there's no way to know 
for sure If the same letter was sent to 
everyone, with just the name 
changed, unless you compared 
notes with your relatives.) 

Today, In place of the card and 
letter, you'll often receive only a 
newsletter— the same one, in fact, 
that everyone else is going to get. 
Maybe it will be hand-signed; 
maybe not. Maybe it will be printed 
on some decorative Christmas - 
themed stationery; maybe noL 
Maybe you'll enjoy reading it; but 
then, maybe you also enjoy cleaning 
the cat litter box. 

Some of you readers may be 
saying to yourselves, "So? What's 
the big deal, Abear? I don't see 
what's wrong with sending a Christ- 
mas newsletter. Who's got time to "*' 



DonnaAbear 



write letters to 50 relatives anymore? 
Arid why give our hard-earned mon- 
ey to Hallmark? Besides; this way, 
we can update everyone at once on 
all of our family news." 

Good answer. But there's one 
big problem - first off, you're cheap. 
How much does a box of lovely 
Christmas cards actually cost? I 
mean, try hanging those Christmas 
newsletters up on a ribbon on your 
wall. Not very attractive, I can tell 
you that 

But most importantly, the 
biggest problem is not with what 
you're writing about, It's HOW 
you're writing It 

You see, we don't want to hear 
about your perfect family. We don't 
want to hear about your perfect chil- 
dren, and your perfect life and your 
perfect job, ya da ya da ya. Why not? 
Because we don't believe a word of 
it! 

This is the '90s, people. We 
want realism. We want truth. We 
want smut, if you have any (and be- 
fore you say that's not true, then 
who exactly is watching the Jerry 
Springer show and who is buying all 
those National Enquirer newspa- 
pers?) 

In other words, we want to "feel 
your pain," If only so we can read it , 
arid soy, "Well; dear, 1 guess our lives 

• T -'»- -.-*■• »•*--. •'- »''i/«-.*7- -i 'ir\:;v; .-*-. * . 



really aren't that tough!' 

I'm not kidding! Why do you 
think people watch soap operas, • 
which are filled with characters 
whose lives are a mess? Because 
that way, we can feel good about 
ourselves In comparison! 
'■■'* So makeybur friends and rela- 
tives happythls year - tell them the 
truth) Is your husband ch eating on 
you? Rat on the scumbag! Has your 
teenager decided to pierce her; 
.tongue, her navel, both ears and her 
nose? Let us know! Better yet send 
pictures! 

Of course, 'tis the season to be 
jolly, so try to write these things with 
a positive spin. For example, The 
children are doing very well this 
year. Tommy only got one deten- 
tion Instead of his usual 25. Of 
course, it was for punching out a 
teacher, but we still see it as an im- 
provement" 

Seriously, though, what most of 
us would like to hear in your 
newsletter is what's REALLY going 
on In your life, good and bad. Tell 
us from your heart Remember, 
you're not running for political of- 
fice - you're communicating with 
people who care about you. 

And, If you can't bring yourself 
to be honest or, at least entertaining 
then how about sending a card in- 
stead. 

If nothing else, it will look good 
on the wall. 



Questions or comments for hu- 
morist Donna Abear can be sent to - 

Lakeland Neivspapers, 30 S. Whitney 
Sir; Orawfatoei'IE 6OO30r* iya ** r ~" 



CRITIC'S CHOICE 



ft^t* *•+*<»■**. -LmwmW 



HOROSCOPE 



Aries - March 21/April 20 
You have big dreams this week, 
Aries, but don't get carried away. 
If you only focus on what you 
want to happen, you will miss 
some important things that are 
going on right in front of you. Pay 
attention to those around you; 
they are trying to tell you some- 
thing. Leo plays a key role. 

Taurus - April 21 /May 21 
While you don't like to be the cen- 
ter of attention, you will be early in 
the week. Don't shy away from 
this situation; you are more than 
capable of handling it. Just be 
yourself, and you're sure to Im- 
press everyone. A close friend 
needs romantic advice. While you 
want to help, don't. He or she 
won't listen to what you have to 
say. 

Gemini - May 22/June 21 

Be prepared, Gemini — It's going 
to be a long week. Every time that 
you think ydu've accomplished 
something, a problem will arise. 
Don't get discouraged. Instead, 
put in the extra effort to finish 
things correctly. It will be worth It 
in the long run. A loved one offers 
you some constructive criticism. 
Listen to him or her. 

Cancer - June 22/July 22 

Your sense of humor will pull you 
through a difficult family situation 
late In the week. Share your 
laughter with the others Involved, 
because they need It as much as 
you do. That special someone 
has a romantic evening planned. 
Let him or her know how much 



you appreciate the thoughtful- 
ness. 

Leo - July 23/August 23 
A close friend gets into trouble 
this week and needs you. Don't 
judge him or her; just do your best 
to help. Your efforts will be ap- 
preciated. An interesting stranger 
asks you out. While you're in- 
trigued by him or her, say no. 
Something just isn't right about 
the entire scenario. 

Virgo - Aug 24/Sept 22 
Several co-workers are depend- 
ing on you early in the week, Vir- 
go. Don't let them down. Stay fo- 
cused on the task at hand, and 
don't get sidetracked by personal 
matters. You'll have plenty of time 
to concentrate on your love life at 
the end of the week — once your 
work is done. Aries is involved. 

Ubra - Sept 23/Oct 23 

You have an easy week in front of 
you, Libra. So, enjoy yourself. 
You are ahead at work, and your 
romantic life is going well. Spend 
time with loved ones whom you 
haven't seen in a while. They 
have some interesting news to tell 
you. Sagittarius plays an impor- 
tant role late in the week. 

Scorpio- Oct 24/Nov 22 

Don't let your ego get the best of 
you at an important business 
meeting this week, Scorpio. Van- 
ity only will make you lose ground 
with your associates. The person 
whom you've been seeing wants 
to Intensify the relationship. Is that 
what you really want? Think 



•■-*- - ■ - •"■ 

about the answer before you talk 
with him or her. 



Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 
Be honest — and gentle — when 
talking with a business associate 
who has feelings for you. Let him 
or her down easily, because you 
don't want to damage the profes- 
sional relationship that you two 
have. An old friend turns to you 
for help. Do what you can for him 
or her. 

Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 

Don't get too caught up in your 
work early in the week, Capricorn. 
While you have a lot of business 
to take care of, you also have a 
loved one who needs you. Don't 
turn your back on him or her; 
you're the only one who can help. 
The friend of a friend wants to get 
to know you better. Say yes. 

Aquarius - Jan 21/Feb 18 

Keep your eyes and ears open at 
work this week, Aquarius. Some- 
thing is going on, and everyone is 
getting nervous. Try to find out 
what's causing the commotion, 
but don't get upset until you know 
all of the facts. A loved one has 
an Important question for you. An- 
swer it honestly. 

Pisces - Feb 19/March 20 
Co-workers need you to do 
something for them. While you 
don't like to be In this situation, 
there's nothing that you can do to 
change it. Just work hard to get 
things done. A close friend asks 
for your help with a family matter. 
Don't get involved. 



. ■ ! 




~9 



e an inv 







,L Doctrov/s 1975 novel 
"Ragtime" captured Ameri- 
ca's changing cultural, por 
lltical and economic evolu- 
tion from the turn of the century to 
World War 1. 

Now the epic musical adapta- 
tion, with a buoyant 50-member 
cast, Is doing the same on stage. 

From Scene 1 it's obvious the 
production Is built on the highest 
theatrical values. There were no dis- 
appointments for the long-awaited 
curtain call at the magnificently re- 
stored Oriental Theater In Chicago 
(renamed the Ford Center for the 
PerformingArts). 

Director Frank Falati, a Chica- 
go theater veteran, has assembled 
an outstanding group of perform- 
ers. Right off the bat there's a 
kaleidoscopic view of the time: the 
smug upperclass Eastern Estab- 
lishment, the oppressed black 
working stiffs and the downtrod- 
den newly arrived immigrants. The 
tension between the three is al- 
most palpable. 

The sets, wonderfully choreo- 
graphed by Graciela Deniele, 
change rapidly from Ellis Island, 



Broadway,. Harlem, Perm Station, 
Atlantic City and Manhattan's Lo w- 
ef East Side. The characters, too, in- 
termingle— Henry Ford, LP. Mor- , 
gan, Harry Houdml, Emma Gold- 
man, Sanford White and Evelyn 
Nesbit 

Ultimately, the story comes 
down to one involving three fami- 
lies: one upper-middle class, white 
Anglo-Saxon Protestant; one social- 
ist immigrant Jew and one Harierh 
black. The lives— and very souls— of 
these fragmented people become 
entwined. 

"Ragtime" presents a broad 
canvas but manages to convey a 
sense of intimacy, Its characters are 
more flesh arid blood than card- 
board silhouettes, from the Tateh 
(played by Peter Kevoian), the street 
artist who finds there's interest In 
his "moving pictures" to Coalhouse 
Walker Jr. (played by Hlnton Battle), 
the jazz pianist who finds justice an 
illusive concept 

This is a show that will excite 
and delight— and never bore. It's 
settling in for an open run, and tick- 
et information is available at (312) 
902-1400 — By Tom Witom, 




A scene from "Ragtime" at the Ford Center for the Performing Arts, 
Oriental Theater, 24 W. Randolph, Chicago.— Submitted photo 



ffpm&Jm 

,(<4>J/ Presents \^*J| 

«& Annie Warbucks^ 9 ^ 

By Thomas Meehan 

Music by Charles Strouse; Lyrics by Martin Chamin 

Permission granted by Music Theatre International 

Directed by GiGi Willdina 

November 20, 21, 27, 28 at 8:00 pm 

December 4, 5, 11, 12 at 8:00 pm 

November 22, 29, Dec. 6, 13 at 2:30 pm 

Fri. & Sat B p.m.; Sunday Matinee 2:30 p.m. 
Adults S10; Students & Seniors $8 

Call for Reservations 335-3055 

PM&L Theatre • 877 Main St, Antloch 
Box Office Opens November 9 

mB«<OfncoHouf»:Mon.lluu"rhufv5:3&-7JOJxm.;SoL11-2 OK^) 
1 1/2 hra. bctom ahowilmo. Reserved Soaiino- VISA/MC H?*3 ■ 



.-.'■■' ' ' ■ '. ' ■ ' 



. • 



1 



B6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



November 27 t iSBB 



'Wizard of Oz' even more impressive on 



• y :vr^V,-./. ; - 




More than a quarter of a 
century has passed 
since "Tfie Wizard of 
Oz"has appeared in 
theaters. 

The Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 
classic from 1939 was re- released 
Nov, 6 in a digitally remastered form 
by Wamer Bros, as part of the com- 
pany's 75th Anniversary, giving au- 
diences a chance to see the film the 
way it was meant to be seen, on the 
big screen. 

"Vie Wizard ofOz" is one of 
those films not considered as a huge 
success at first release, but with an- 
nual televised airings has become a 
classic, much like "It's a Wonderful 
Life." 

These annual showings have not 
ruined the film, and perhaps have 
added to the splendor, as a vast ma- 
jority of the audience knows the film 
inside-and-out, yet still can see and 
hear nuances of the film that are 
somewhat hidden on a televised 
edition. 

And those who have not seen 
the film will have a glorious experi- 



EGAL 



TWO DAY 

ADVANCED 

TICKETS 



CINEMAS 

www.regoltfncmai.coin ' t j 



ROLLINS CROSSING 18 

Rollins Rd. Blivn fil 83 A Ccdai Lake Rd 847-5-16-19BJ 

BARGAIN UANNEES ALL SHOWS STARTING OEFpRE 6P-M 



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In ALL Auditorium* 



Call 

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For Shows 

And Times 



•No Passes * No Passes or Super Ssvcis 

DIG s DIGKA1 SOUND SIRcSKCIO DOl s KXM SHSIO 
Times Valid For Fnday, November 20. Only <D 1098 



General Cinema 

LAKEHURST 



ROUTE 43 timt ROUTE 120 



347144 

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AUfMOWtl 



444-F1LM. 



I IVIIT DAY 

16PM 



I BARQAWMATWEE3 All SHOWS BEFORE 6PV 
INDICATES V5P TICKET RESTTUCTWKS APPLY 



I STILL KNOW WHAT YOU 
DID LAST SUMMER n 

|Wed. Ttnz, Sua £00, 430, 7:00, 930 
Int & SaL tOO, 430, 7:00, 930, 11:45 
I Mon-Thur. 430,7:00 



WATERBOY (KM* 

Wed, Thur., Son. 1:00, 3:10. 520, 730, 9:40 
fit &. SaL 1:00, 3:10, 520, 730, 9.40, 1 1:40 
Moa-ThLT.520,730 



ENEMY OF THE STATE n 

Wed-Sun. Ifl), 4:00, 630, 730, 930, 1030 
Mon/Thcr. 4:00. 630, 7:00 



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movie review 




Spencer Schein 



THE WIZARD OF OZ 

Haled G 

Dlretor 

Victor FlemminL! 

Starring 

Judy Garland 

Frank Morgan 

Hay Bulger 

Bert Lihr 

Jack Haley 

Billic Burke 

Margaret Hamilton 

Clara Blandick 
Charley Grapcwin 



From left, Bert Lahr as the Cowardly Uon, Ray Bolger as the Scarecrow, Judy Garland as Dorothy, 
and Frank Morgan as the Tin Man are just as entertaining as when "The Wizard of Oz" first arrived 
in theaters in 1939. 



encc, as the color and sound have 
been digitally enhanced, and the 
sepia tones used in the beginning 
and ending sequences seem 
brighter in a dull kind of way. 

The film has been released in 
two versions — in its original 1939 
format thai looks more square, and 
the modern wide screen. 

Watching the film on a large 
screen seems to give the characters 
more room to move and dance 
around, and makes ihem larger than 
Jife. 

Judy Garland as Dorothy Gale 
gives a performance when she was 
l(> years old thai rivals any perfor- 
mance of almost ail other actors two 
or three times her age, with her vo- 



cal range giving her command over 
everyone else in the same scene, 
whether it be in Kansas or Oz. 

Ray Bolger as the Scarecrow ap- 
pears to have more room to bounce 
about. The Munchkins dazzle in 
their colorful and extravagant cos- 
tumes, and Margaret Hamilton as 



Miss Almira Gulch and the Wicked 
Witch of the West gives a dazzling 
performance in her dual roles, play- 
ing the villaness in Kansas and in 
the Land of Oz. 

And viewing Munchkinland, the 
Emerald City, the Yellow Brick Road 
and the Poppy Field in Technicolor 



is a real treat. 

Hearing the now well-known 
songs from the film through Dolby 
Digital Stereo Sound in a true the- 
ater setting is as wonderful as seeing 
the film itself. 

Performances of the now classic 
songs elicit smiles from the audi- 




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Toy Shower continues 

The Catholic Charoties Annual 
Toy Shower, now In its 51st year, 
continues through Dec. 19. All kinds 
of donated toys are being collected 
in the hopes that they will bring 
smiles ho m the 1 1,000 children 
who are clients or Catholic Charities. 
Many gifts for infants, youngsters 
and teens have already been re- 
ceived at Catholic Charities and In- 
sure One sites. 

individuals and groups may 
drop off donations, of toys and cash 
to purchase gifts through Dec. 19 
from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Mon- 
day through Friday at The Catholic 
Charities Northwest Suburban of- 
fice, 191 1 RohlwingRoad, Rolling 
Meadows. l : or more information, 
call 870-0560. 

New Beginnings to meet 

New Beginnings is a social sup- 
port group for the divorced, wid- 
owed, separated, remarried and sin- 
gle of all faiths. 

Meetings are held every Mon- 
day at 7:45 p.m. in th lower level of 
St. Hubert Church, Flagstaff and 
Crand Canyon Sts., Hoffman Es- 
tates., 885-7700. Donation is $2. 
The first visit is free. New Begin- 
nings' 24-hour hotline is (312) 661- 
2940. 



BE THERE 



Knitting GuUd 
seeks members 

A new knitting guild, the Nifty 
Knitters Knitting Guild, affiliated 
with the Knitting Guild of America, 
has been formed. The purpose of 
the guild is to promote the ad- 
vancement of the craft of knitting 
througrueducation and charitable 
works. Interested knitters with any 
level of experience should call, 
362-8133 or 362-5433 for informa- 
tion. 

Be a foster parent 

You cannot change the fact 
that thousands of Illinois children 
have been abused, neglected or 
abandoned. Perhaps, you can help 
one child to love and trust again. 



Catholic Charities of Lake County 

la seeking tamUlcB and Indlviauuta 

to temporarily care for children 
ranging in age from infancy to 18 
years. 

Families of all religious, 
racial and ethnic backgrounds 
are welcome to attend an infor- 
mational meeting on Tuesday, 
Aug. 25 at 7 p.m. at Catholic 
Charities , 671 S. Lewis Ave., 
Waukegan. For more informa- 
tion, call 782-4244. 




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V 



November 27, 1998. 



■\;.< 



_w^:; .. ;'.■ ■ - ■-:- '■■ ... , .-.' 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



FROM PAGE Bl 

'""" > » ""»■' si 

SWING: Grant's music 
spans a generational comeback 




Lakeland Newspapers/ B 



Lehier.*f t*s a way to dance with a : 
girl or giiy and touch them without . 
beingsexual." 

Lehrer, a professional dancer 
with Gus Giordano Jazz Dance of 
Chicago, has been teaching swing In 
Ubertyviliefor about six months. 

Lehrer and his partner Mel anie . 
Damiano teach East Coast swing at 
the dance, center, a six-count basic, • 
step dance that Is easy to learn. 

For $8 per lesson at Dahcenter " 
Norm, you can take three basic . 
swing classes and three advanced, 
with a half hour of free dancing to 
practice after each lesson. 

"Anyone can do Swing, " said 
Damiano. "It's a more relaxed 
dance than ballroom and everyone 
adds their own style." 

Swing is also fun and good exer- 
cise, according to Damiano. Once 
you learn the basic step, you can do 
any of the moves. The basic step is a 
rock side to side, facing your partner 
about 10 inches apart, hands 
clasped at waist level. As the man 
steps forward, the woman steps 
backward, and the step starts again. 
Different styles of swing just add ex- 
tra steps or hops to this basic move. 
Eventually spins and aerials can be 
added as well, making the dance 
even more athletic 

Most of the responsibility in 
Swing dancing falls on the man. He 
must guide the woman around the 
floor, keeping her out of the path of 
other spinning bodies. In swing 
dance, etiquette is very important 
The woman generally decides how 
close or how far apart the two will 
dance. Along with the dance popu - ' 
i lority, clubs that cater to swing . 
d m cere havp emerged bv the. _^;<cV- 
ChlcagoIuiicJ area. /.vA , s.--i»/**;?---.v: 

Stepping Into some modem 
swing dubs is like stepping back In 
time. Laughing, scariet-Iipsticked 
girls stand around the edge of the 
dance floor In flowered dresses. 
Staring at their high-heeled Mary 
lane's, they glance up at the action 
on the floor, waiting to find a part- 
ner who will swirl them out into the 
Jitterbug. The only nod to the '90s is 
that women ask men to dance just 
as often as men ask women. 

The unique appeal of swing 
dance is the politeness of it all. On 
the heels of such super sexual 
dances as the Lambada, swing 
harkens back to an innocent World 
War II era when the idea was to for- 
get one's cares and have fun. Young 
G.I's danced to the sounds of Count 
Basie or Benny Goodman's 
"StompuV at the Savoy" and forgot 
the war for a moment 

Now, the pendulum has swung 
again toward dancing for the pure 
teamwork and movement of it. 



Swing danc ing as a phenomenon Is 
.■once again sweeping the nation. 
Swing has. a colorful history, stud- 
ded with talented musicians and 
dancers. _r. : ■ 

Rock and Roll was not even 
bom yet when Swing hit the east 
and west coasts, with eight-count 
west coast and six-count east coast 
- swing styles setting the trend for the 
■ rest of the nation. ■ ' . 

• '-The liridy Hop, developed in 
.the 1920s, is the grandfather of ail 
Swing dances. It was a dance bam 
In the black community of Harlem, 
in New York City. Unlike the formal 
Ballroom, the Lindy Hop was the 
first dance to allow partners to sepa- 
rate and dance independently. 

The Lindy Hop was supposedly 
named by "Shorty George" Snow- 
den, In response to a reporter's 
question. "Shorty George" was the 
most famous danceratthetimeat 
Harlem's Savoy Ballroom. 

The Lindy spread quickly 
through the white community in 
the 1930s and '40s where it was 
modified and called the Jitter- 
bug. Other forms of Swing in- 
clude the Shag and the Balboa 
(west coast). 

In Chicago swing has spawned a 
whole sub-culture of bands, clubs, 
lingo and even clothing stores. 

Eight piece bands like the Van- 
guard Aces and die Cherry- Poppin' 
Daddies play at the clubs, so those 
who don't dance can watch the 
band. Some be-boppin swing songs 
have even invaded the airwaves on 
popular radio stations. A recent Gap 
„ . commercial oh television Is e vi - . 
dencc of all the mainstream publici- 
ty Swing is getting. .,.* *, ........ _•«.-, 

. Clubs like thti Voodoo Nlftht- - 
dub and Liquid In Chicago offer 
lessons and then dancing until the 
wee hours. With their mix of trendy, 
kitschy decor and big open wooden 
floors, they barken back to a bygone 
era. The one thing that reflects the 
present is the $10 cover charge at 
the door. 

"Swing is style in the way people 
dance, style in the way people dress, 
and style in the way they talk," said 
Lehrer, speaking of Swing "lingo". 

You hear people refer to them- 
selves as "hep cats." When someone 
spots a girl with nice legs, he's liable 
to say, "Take a gander at those 
gams." 

Dazzle'm Boutique in Rich- 
mond is celebrating its fourth year 
as a seller of vintage '40s clothing 
for men and women. 

Swing is addicting, noted 
Lehrer, adjusting two dancer's arms 
down to waist level. People build 
whole lifestyles around it 
Newlyweds Christine and 



Matthew Everett of Libertyviil e have 
been bitten by the Swing bug. 

"We had a Swing band at our 
wedding three weeks ago. We didn't 
want a typical DJ or band," said 
Christine. -■■ 

'"-. The couple started taking 
lessons last summer and has gotten 
quite good. Their favorite move is . 
something called "the Mooch," a '■':' %.;, 
move where partners kick between 
each other's legs. 

According to Christine, Swing, : 
dance lessons were part of a com;' '.'- 



promise with Matthew. He agreed 
to take the lessons if she would . 
learn to play golf. 

Swing dancing's popularity 
con tinues to grow. "How many 
dances do you know with people 
from 15 to 50 sharing an Interest In 
the same music?" asked Christine. 
"Nothing Is a wrong move, every-' •> 
thing Is ok." \ - 

For more Information on Swing 
dancing lessons call Dancenter - 
North, 540 N, Milwaukee Avenue, 
Ubertyvflle,at367 T 7970. 



A "Swing's the Thing" work- 
shop will take place Nov. 28 at 
Miller's Hayloft Banquets, 3702 N. 
Route 31 In McHenry, Hourly 
Swing lessons start at 2:30 pirn, 
and tickets cost SB in advance or 
$10 at the door. 

• - You can call the Chicago 
Swing Dance Society at 
(312) 409-491 lfor the latest hot 
spots to dance in the city. Check but 
SwingOutChicago.com on the web 
for i nforma tion on everything from 
history of Swing to lessons. 



CROSSWORD 



l4>||>l>l.|Ht>>ll4|Hi|, 




answers: 



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Clues ACROSS 

1 . Challenged 
4. Deceives 
8. Cheer 

10. Entertainer 

1 1 . Undergarment 

12. Bards 

1 3. Emerged from an egg 

14. Canopy 

1 5. More foggy 



18. Acknowledged 
20. Cloth border 

22. Slang for former townie 

23. Herbs, variation 

24. Chopped up 

25. Small, tame pet 

Clues DOWN 

1 . Military march 

2. Crockett's cap 



3. Vanity bureau 

5. Chronic 

6. Disconcert 

7. Russian, for one 
9. Ben, writer 

1 6. Conceived of 

1 7. Pioneered 

19. Mangles, beats 
21 . Maori war dance 



Your News is Our News! 

Call us with your story ideas at 
(847) 223-8161 or fax us at (847) 223-8810 




Thousands M 

Computer Products 

At Great Prices! 




Exhibits! Seminars! 
Workshops! 

Computer Job Fair! 

(Bring your resume) 



Lake County Fairgrounds • 847-662-081 1 

Rt. 120/Belvidere Rd. & Rt. 45 • 4 Miles West of 294 • Grayslake 



ADMISSION $6 OR $5 WITH COUPON AT THE DOOR J 



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/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 



November 27,199$ 



November 27,1998 



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Location: 

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Telephone: 
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Kftehen hours: 

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For comfortable and casual family dinning at its best/amid the wooded 
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Acres of oak trees and lots of golden oak paneling comprise the warm 
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Jesse Oaks can be your favorite place to stop for a drink, or a delicious 
home-cooked meal, or even a place to celebrate a special occasion in an 
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There's a new separate game room at Jesse, Oaks where you can shoot a 
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Jesse Oaks offers delicious Homemade pizza, an oyster and shrimp bar, 
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Make reservations for your holiday party early and don't forget about the 
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Jesse Oaks is open from |1 a.m. to 2 p.m. for lunch, with daily lunch spe- 
cials. Dinner Is served Monday through Thursday from 4 to 9 p.m.; from 4 to 
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November 27, 1998 



Protect trees now 
against winter damage 



Winter is approaching soon. As much as 
we worried about the boa weather ahead, we 
are aiso worried about our trees and shrubs, 
and hope that they will survive the snow, ice, 
winter cold and winter sun. The effect of win- 
ter conditions can be more severe on trees 
which are stressed. Even the salt used for de- 
icing streets and sidewalks is injurious for the 
health of the tree. There are several things 
homeowners can do to insure plants' survival 
or lessen damage. 

The first protection you can offer for your 
trees is to site them in a good location de- 
pending on the annual weather. Certain areas 
in tlie home landscape have a different cli- 
matic condition from their surroundings. 
These areas, known as microclimates, should 
be understood and used for planting appro- 
priate trees. A professional arborist can help 
vou choose die best tree and the ideal loca- 
tion to plant the tree around your house. 

in winter, the ground around the root sys- 
tem of the plant or tree freezes, slopping or 
slowing the circulation of water in the tree. 
This is a greater problem for evergreens. Since 
evergreens hold their leaves in the winter, 
they lend to absorb moisture from ihe leaves 
since the rooi system is frozen, which make 
the leaves dry and fall off. Winter winds also 
draw precious water out of the leaves. In or- 
der to avoid this, some evergreens are 
sprayed with an anti-desiccani (usually a 
wax-like substance) that holds moisture in 
the leaves. 

On cold winter days, when the sun shines 
it heats up ihe bark of (he tree to a tempera- 
ture which stimulates cellular activity. As 



soon as the sun's rays are blocked, the bark 
temperature drops quickly killing the active 
tissues. This causes "sun scald," the symp- 
toms of which are elongated, sunken, dried or 
cracked areas of dead bark. This can be pre- 
vented by wrapping the trunk with a com- 
mercial tree wrap, plastic tree guard or light 
colored material which reflects the sun and 
reduces the temperature changes in the bark. 

Snow and ice can break branches and 
topple the entire tree. Pruning your tree be- 
fore winter storms move in make it better 
able to carry the extra weight of Ice and snow. 
Branches can be thinned to reduce their sur- 
face area and wind resistance. Some multi- 
stemmed trees and shrubs can be cabled or 
wired together so that they do not lean out- 
wards, and the extra weight can be shared by 
all the stems. It is best to hire a professional 
arborist for selective thinning or cabling. 

Mulch around the tree acts as insulation 
between ihe root system and the outside cli- 
mate. This helps retain moisture in the root 
system and reduce the fluctuation of soil 
temperature. Make sure that the ground isn't 
frozen and has enough moisture before you 
add the mulch, and make sure that no more 
than 2 to 4 inches of an organic matter like 
wood chips is used. 

If you are unsure on how to protect your 
trees this winter, consult a professional ar- 
borist who can advise you on the best ways to 
preserve your trees. You can find a NAA- 
member arborist close to you by calling the 
National Arborisi Association, 1(800)733- 
2622, or by a zip code search on the NAA's 
web site: http://www.nadarb.com. 



TORtt 



(f ft doesn't snow, 

we'll return 
your dough*. 



NO MONEY DOWN 
NO INTEREST 
NO PAYMENTS 
UNTIL APRIL 1998 

"To Qunlilicil Buyers 



TQRO* cor 1000 

SHOWTHROWER 

• Patented Power Curve® rotor system 
cleans down to the pavement 

• 3.5 hp wlntertred cnrjlrw 

• 20* clearing width 

• Throws snow up to 25 teet 

■ Lightweight, yet powerful design 
is easy to use 




T0R0* CCR~ 

P0WERLITE 

SNOWTHROWER 

• Exclusive Power Curve® rotor system 
cleans down to the pavement 

• 3 tip winterized engine 

• 16" cleaning width 

» Folding handle for easy, 
compact storage 

• Throws snow up to 25 teet 



We off en FREE professional assembly 
on etenr Tom* Smrarthrover (• * $40 nlue) 



' Manufaciuma will refund • portion of tha Manufacturer', Su^gaiUd PremDlioittl Priit if Ihe loiil I'jdii 1900 iratunal muwla 
■aligned mow reporting ilaliun ii lain Ihtl 40% of Ihe hiilDncll averift. 5c« deaiir 1st eomplrtr dna.li C19DB the 1m.. Compan 

" for qualified bufffl on Toio'i Revolving Charge Plan. S» dealer for delaila. 
Price aubjecl In local dialer oplion. 



II for retail*. 




252S 



■ ■ - ■ • - 



•GRAYSLAKE* 

GRAYSLAKE LAWN & FEED 
SALES, INC. 

Outdoor Power Equipment 

fit, 120 & SluBscrTJl. 



\»f 



3 BS a OBaaCI S 






847-223-6333 



•LAKE BLUFF* 

GREG'S LAWNMOWER 

And Small Engino Repair 
701 Rockland Rood (Rl. 176) 

SL 047-295-3080 







1 



. .- 



Gardening reaps many 
benefits-Including privacy 



Besides the obvious reasons to start 
gardening, such as making life more 
beautiful, more colorful adding fresh 
vegetables to your table, there are 
countless other benefits to this hobby. If you 
have not made the commitment to begin 
gardening perhaps some of these benefits 
will help make up your mind to start a garden 
this spring. To get the most of your garden 
you must understand what a garden can do 
for you. Once you begin to explore the possi- 
bilities you can begin to decide what you 
would like to Include In your garden. 

When I need time to think and just have 
a "time out" I love to go into my backyard 
and get "lost" in my thoughts among the 
flower beds. It is Important to include a pri- 
vate space in your landscape. A get away se- 
cluded from the hustle and bustle of every- 
day goings on. This can be yours, If you begin 
b y creating a private area for your own plea- 
sure. This concept is very therapeutic, too. 
For privacy, you will need to have garden 
walls — either constructed or planted, that shel- 
ter you from the rest of the world. This kind of 
shelter Is called a screen. They can be made of 
clumps of shrubs, hedges, vine covered trellis, a 
fence, or a wall. For sitting areas where the 
neighbor's yard is level or lower than your own. 
a four or five foot screen provides psychological 
privacy. You have a barrier between your gar- 
den and beyond, but you can still see and ap- 
preciate the sky and the trees. 

You probably do not have to enclose your 
entire yard to achieve the desired effect of 
privacy. But if an area of your yard has an es- 
pecially unattractive view that you would 
nuhcr not sue, the neighbors old junk cars 
(far instance) pur your privacy screen there. 

In your backyard, or any other private 
area, you can use screens to line the edge of 
your property, You can also use them inter- 
nally, perhaps to close off your sunbathing 




GARDEN 
JOURNAL 

Lydia Huff 



are, There arc certain areas that you would 
not want to screen, naturally, places with 
great views, for Instance. 

Here are some screens that you can use 
effectively In your backyard. By the way, de- 
ciduous plants drop their leaves in winter 
and rcsprout In the spring, Evergreens ore 
plants that hold there foliage throughout the 
year. 

Deciduous hedge shrubs that drop their 
leaves In the winter, provide a screen during 
the growing season, when you will most like- 
ly be outdoors. Pius, many shrubs have the 
extra bonus of pretty flowers and beautiful 
handsome fall color. 

Evergreen hedge evergreens that reach 
four or five feet In height work real well, You 
can leave them unpruned for an in formal 
hedge or clip them Into a formally sheared 
hedge. Be patient, though, even fast growing 
shrubs take several years to fill out. 

Tall perennials you can develop a quick- 
growing screen to fill a modest sized opening 
by planting clumps of ornamental grasses, 
delphiniums, or other tall perennials. These 
plants create a flowing, less solid screen that 
will die back to the ground In winter. 

Hnvo a boll planning next years retreiil. 

Unlll next ilmo, poiico. 

Garden questions may be sent to Garden Jour- 
rial, do Lakeland Newspapers, 30 S.Whitney 
St., Grayslake, IL 60030 



The scents of the season 
give lasting memories 



How can you give an innovative gift to 
loved ones this holiday season that will make 
them feel truly special? Perfume has always 
been an easy option, but is often depicted as 
the choice of last minute shoppers. This year, 
you can give the gift of scent In on entirely 
new way that expresses thought and original- 
ity—fragrance for the home. And with an in- 
spiring range of home fragrance items on the 
market it Is easier than ever to Indulge friends 
and family without breaking the bank. 

Scented candles have been created this 
season using ingenious packaging that Is per- 
fect for the creative gift-giver. From frosted 
glass jars and shimmering metallic boxes, to 
terracotta bowls for a more earthy look, can- 
dles are offered in every shape and size. For 



the holidays, Laura Ashley has produced a 
classic candle with a fun French twist — a gold 
pot shaped in a graceful fleur de lys design. 

Adding fragrance to your own rooms is 
the perfect way to spoil yourself and also 
transforms your home into a welcoming holi- 
day haven. Use classic Christmas scents such 
as cinnamon and apple to warm the atmos- 
phere. Laura Ashley's tall cinnamon sticks in 
glass jars not only scent the air but look ele- 
gant too. 

Other options Include filling bowls with 
spicy pot pourri, spraying a festive fra- 
grance into the air to envelop visitors as 
they enter, and, to truly be the perfect host, 
offering aromatic mulled wine to stimulate 
the senses. 



Taking the stress out of holiday parties 

• Select recipes that you feel comfortable 
with. Mix dishes that cun be fixed In advance 
with those diat need to be prepured during 
the party. 

• A crusty baguette, served hot from your 
oven, will add dimension to almost anything 
It accompanies. At $2 a loaf, it's the ultimate 
affordable luxury. 



Unless your name is Martha Stewart, 
throwing a holiday dinner party can be stress- 
ful. The very thought of deciding whom to In- 
vite and what to serve can turn even the most 
well-meaning host Into a Grinch. 

It doesn't have to be that way. Intimate 
holiday dinner parties are a great chance for 
friends to get together and unwind. Crystal 
goblets and complicated souffles are simply 
not necessary. 

Bob Blumer, author of "The Surreal 
Gourmet Entertains," offers the following tips 
on how to have a dinner party that won't spoil 
your holiday spirit. 

Menu planning 

* Make just a few dishes, but make each 
one memorable. (Distinctive + Robust = 
Memorable.) A finger food, salad and festive 
entree should satisfy any guest's hunger. 



A 



Setting the stage 

• There is no such thing as an inadequate 
space for a dinner party. Overcoming spatial 
shortcomings adds spontaneity and pleasure 
to the evening. If your dining room is too 
small, move the table Into the living room. 

• Be prepared, but If that doesn't work, 
For more tips, see "The Surreal Gourmet En- 
tertains" (Chronicle Books, $16.95), or visit 
http://surrealgourmet. com 



1 



i 



i 



rm^jfKmmBjfa^SBMIf^^ 



LAKE COUNTY 

Confidential 

clinics offered ■v-f .-" v 

The Lake County Health.De-j. 
partment offers confidential walk-' 
In clinics for the screening and | 
treatment of sexually transmitted 
diseases each week at the following 
times and sites: 

Tuesdays, 8:30-10:30 a.m., 
Belvidere Medical Building, 2400 
Belvidere Rd., Waiikegan; Thurs- 
days, 4:15-6:30 p,rh. r Belvidere Med- 
ical Building, 2400 Belvidere Rd., 
Waukegan, 

Treatment and screening will be 
provided on a walk-in basis during 
the listed times with fees on a sliding 
scale determined by ability to pay. 
However, no one will be refused 
treatment due to inability to pay. For 
more information, call the Health 
Department at 360-6520 or 360- 
6891. 

Free health 
care programs 

The Lake County Health Depart- 
ment offers several programs at no 
charge to eligible pregnant women, 
mothers and children who live in 
Lake County. 

Child Health Conferences, or 
Well- Baby Clinics, are held each 
month in Zion, North Chicago, 
Round Lake and Waukegan. Parents 
who wish to bring their children 
must call 360-6731 for an appoint- 
ment. 

The Special Supplemental Food 
Program for Women, Infants and 
Children (W1Q provides supple- 
mental foods and nutrition educa- 
tion to mothers and their children 
under 5* For an appointment, call 
360-6781. 

The Prenatal Clinic offers med- 
ical care and health education dur- 
ing pregnancy to qualified low-In- 
come women. For an appointment, 
call 360-6715. 

AIDS/HIV 

support groups 

The Lake County Health Depart- 
. ment sponsors ongoing information 
and support groups in Waukegan for • 
persons who ore HIV antibody posl- 

dve and persons who have been di- 
agnosed as having AIDS, 

One group meets from 7 to 8:30 
p.m. every Tuesday at the lower lev- 
el conference room in the Belvidere 
Medical Building, 2400 Belvidere 
Rd„ Waukegan. The second group 
meets every Monday from 1 1:30 a.m. 
to 1 p.m., also at the Belvidere Med- 
ical Building. For more information 
on these groups, call 360-6891 or 
360-6520. 

Free breast, cervical 
cancer screens offered 

Free breast and cervical cancer 
screenings are offered to eligible 
Lake County women through the 
Illinois Breast and Cervical Cancer 
Project, located at the Lake County 
Health Department. Through the 
Project, women can receive, at no 
cost to them, a complete medical 
examination, a clinical breast exam 
and a pap test, as well as referral for 
a free mammogram at a local hos- 
pital. Ongoing yearly exams and 
medical follow-up are also provid- 
ed. 

Women 50 years of age or older, 
who are underinsured or uninsured, 
and whose family income does not 
exceed 200 percent of federal pover- 
ty guidelines, are eligible for this free 
program. Examinations are done at 
the clinics of the Lake County Health 
Department and are by appoint- 
ment. To Inquire about eligibility, 
call the Lake County Health Depart- 
ment at 360-2917. 

Crisis counseling 
available to residents 

The Lake County Health Depart- 
ment offers walk-in and telephone 
crisis counseling and referrals for 
Lake County residents experiencing 
emotional stress. This is a service of 
the Coordinated Area Treatment 
Services (CATS) Program at 1819 
27th St., ZIon. 

Counselors are available 24 
hours a day. For assistance, call 872- 
4242. (This number is also used for 
the TDD, hearing Impaired phone 
line.) 



1 



November 27, 1998: 





-■•' ;*£■' .\V ■■■.;!?>> ■ i Vy # 



. - Lakeland Newspapers/ B11 




2 



... I . : , . 



rents 



. . ■■ - .■ •- '■ 



A free video now available at 
4,400 Blockbuster Video stores na- 
tionwide can help parents determine 
whether their child's sneezing/ snif- 
fling, and watery eyes are most likely 
the result of allergies or the common 
cold. Often confused with colds and 
other upper respiratory conditions, 
allergies often go undiagnosed and 
untreated, yet more than 5 million 
school-age children suffer from the 
disorder. 

The video. Children and Allergy; 
Recognizing and Treating Childhood 
Allergies, is a comprehensive guide 
providing information and insight 



from a leading specialist In pediatric 
allergies, The Informative 57-rrUnute 
program is available for free rental at 
Blockbuster Video stores nation- 
wide, The video is also available for 
free -of- charge by calling toll free 
800-522-7300, and will be sent to 
callers after they answer a few ques- 
tions about their allergies. 

Narrated by pediatric allergist 
Dr. Susan Wynn, Fort Worth Allergy 
and Asthma Associates, Children 
and Allergy opens with anecdotes 
from real families about how aller- 
gies affect their lives. According to 
Dr. Wynn, allergies can negatively 




Impact children's school experience, 
Approximately 2 million school days 
are lost each year as a result of chil- 
dren's allergies. 

Acknowledging the Impact of al- 
lergies on children and their families, 
the video is designed to help parents 
sort through the confusing symp- 
toms that define colds and allergies, 
detailing how parents can begin to 
differentiate the conditions and seek 
medical help if they suspect allergies. 
Among the many questions plaguing 
parents answered in the video are: 

• What Is an allergy? 

• Who gets allergies? 



What are the symptoms and 
causes of allergies? 

• How are allergies treated7 
-■> »Is it a cold or and allergy? 

Children , and Allergy will' be 
available In the free rental section of 
participating Blockbuster stores. 

The Children and Allergy video is 
made available by Sobering Labora- 
tories, the U.S. prescription pharma- 
ceutical marketing arm of Schering- 
Plough Corporation, a research- 
based company engaged on the dis- 
covery, development, manufactur- 
ing marketing of pharmaceutical and 
healthier products worldwide. 



■ - 




f your summer 
was filled with 
physical activity, 
you may be won- 
dering how to main- 
tain the momentum 
through fall and win- 
ter, when colder tem- 
peratures and waning 
daylight hours sap mo- 
iyaUopi'**- 






Keep your motivation to exercise and get fit this winter 



lazzercise, Inc, 

She offers the following tips: 
• Get the right clothing. 

Many of your favorite outdoor sum- 
mer activities can be done well into 
the fall as long as you have the ap- 
propriate gear. Wear layers, begin- 
ning with long-sleeve cotton T- 
shlrts and/or turtienecks topped by 
nylon or water-resistant windbreak- 



Discover weight training, dance ex- 
ercise, indoor cycling classes or 
cross-country skiing. Look at winter 
as a great opportunity to expand 
your exercise horizons rather than 
diminish them. 

• Keep a workout diary. Writing 
down your workouts can be a great 
way to stay motivated, especially If 
you note your progress along the 



^mLPitcrrHm^g^tnan^ warm.tip _. . . way Wrffw rfrwim *Aih ? t arifrrf ty ymi - 



did, for how long and how you fclf 

• Take advantage of community 
facilities. Retail malls all over the 
country are opening their doors eariy 
for "mall walkers." Likewise, many 
community centers and colleges 
open their fitness facilities lo the gen- 
eral public during specified hours. 

• Set a special winter training 
goal, if you've picked up swimming 
for the winter, set a goal to swim a 
certain distance in a certain lime. 
Or, start training now for a spring 
road race. 

"Cooler temperatures don't 
have to bring an end to your phys- 
ical activity," Missett affirms. "To- 
day more than ever Americans 
have access to clothing, equip- 
ment, programs and facilities 
which allow them to keep moving 
all year long." — Courtesy of Article 
Resource Association 



pants are readily available at sport- 
ing goods stores along with light- 
weight gloves and hats. A reflective 
vest is also a good investment as the 
daylight hours dwindle. 

• Move your workouts In- 
doors. Tennis courts, jogging 
tracks and treadmills, swimming 
pools, basketball and volleyball 
courts, etc can all be found indoors 
as well as out. Check your yellow 
pages for community facilities, such 
as health clubs, colleges and univer- 
sities and community centers. 
The latter two often have open 
hours for the public when the 
facilities can be used for free 
or for a nominal fee. 
•Try a new activity. 
When the snow finally forces 
you to hang your in-line skates or 
bicycle up for the winter, consider 
tackling a completely new activity. 



^iswl^^ /.' total body r^ta«luM 

m-UnesiStlng'jo 'weight halnmg ^n alternate ' ;*Ja^Theyj9^ 




Spice Up Your Workout 

|i&i||ya^ 

' h program'nMybu losing yourVpMtitejore»Wv 

#bpost:;-;;^- : ;:';;-.->^ ;i0{ 
One of the greatest b 

l- , '"!^glnju^.tiiat)mtjd6esn%5wm.t6 heal.-Iii : ;; •,- p^. 
■ktroduclhg a hew exercise activity maybetHe) .>?) •%'{£?£ 

perfect way to mamtalnyourflmessosybure- . ';;-m^Seiaitg:.Weil , 
& cu'perate/ltfsalsbme 

5 Partidpating W £ 

•^body.fat percentage is auseful tool for deter- j< ■■> ""£ *£«-:?; *ti^inL"r ■ - 7_^r-^f - : e ■'-■'? 
^mlhlnj^ 

"mortitoringreal success; f^vV;v: "i; ; ■. 
y $£ A heal thy weight is riot always reflected by: 
> the bathroom scale. Knowing your body. com-: 
; 'position )nbut ratio of fat to lean body m^a is a;, 
much'more accurate and objective measure of. 



- 



$: 'day after dayputs you at risk for overuse in-j 
$» juries; By ;varytogyour ip&ii^t^ur.i>oc^\vlll;> 
v: become efficient af perforrhbg a y^der variety 
flipf tasks; leaving'all of yburmi^esstohgef.H 
. ydu are interested in improving your pofbr-i, . 
' i- ; manbe m a spe^csport 

perts believe abra-traiiithg wUl help, ^ as peak ; 
f* ■ performance In anyphysical activity usuoily.In 
' volvesmbretiianonephydcalattiib^ 



■e^erierice:- 



• u 



isa general trend otbody fatieuuctioh over 
time. 

V ', Fitness experts rw^ 

ranges of 18 to ^percent forewomen ^imder a^e f; 
40; 10 to 16pjeraimti^ to 



hedu^'aridfitriess. ; r ^-'-:'=27p«fcantJprwomen'j^es4^ 

There areseveral bbdf compo^ "2° percentfpr men ages40 to^^weyer ac-^- 

u.jjiiiv.! •ceptoblebbdyfotpercente^ 



■ .Thereare two basic ways to ln« 
usdnihgmtoypw 



cahoot to do completdym 



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——,-...; -J— 



. • 



B12 flnSceland Newspapers 



HEALTHWATCH 



November 27, 1998 



Annual JDF fund-raising 
'Faces of Diabetes' gala set 

Chicago's largest fund-raiser sets 
sights on $1.5 million goal 



,n '.hicitjt'j on r:\6as D^r . ; 
:h* fuv^njle Diabetes Foundation 
JDF ' itvaivr Chicago Chapter aiJJ 
hmi its ISth .innuaJ Chance ni .1 
[ (Mime G.-i)y. 'Faces of [)fab#'ti*v fn 
Hope of j Cure ' in the ldkt"»i<l«* 
Hallroom ;ir McOirmjok P!;io' 
feme* C Tm'e I .hairrnan .ind 1 H ! 
of Mesirow Financial irwl .1 f hrciyo 
reMd«?nt will .ijjain rhair (hi* 
•f'/i.-ninn'') worn 

I "he f h;mry of .j I ili'timr 1 wil.i ps 
' hiragn \ largest lunilraiMiiK event. 
•itinKiinji thousands of thr < nv\ top 
lO'tal '■nrpnrah* and nvir leaders 
Uisl yesir ncarlv 1 (MX* giiesls raised 
II 1 million of tfte fundrnMnfl jjnal 

[Ins .car 1 ( -ala will emphasize 
Iwtih tun and mmfnrt fur (he anlici 
pafinj J (>f)0 giiesls Hrsl and fore 
ili'isf the event has been moved 
Irom ihe smaller Mi'f.urnmk Flare 
south to 1 he tjifceside liallrnrtm In 
.in 'ommridtili' and seat a larger 
number uf guesls Attendees tan 
look forward m an enhanced silent 



jnd ute auction. Jinner and danc 
mg 

'ike past years, the (".ala again 
will hold us drand Prize 
Sweepstakes featuring the winner's 
choice of a Ferrari or SI 00.000 cash. 
First place prize will he his and hers 
matching Holex watches and the 
drawing's second prize will be a 
barge inp for two through France 
with airfare courtesy of American 
\1rl1nes [he evening will he capped 
with a performance by Motown 
recording greats, Itte Spinners, and 
.1 performance by special guests The 
Vlighty Blue Kings. 

Once again, lilen Tollman. JDF 
board member, and his wife have 
challenged the chapter to raise 
SI 00.000 or more in new r>r 
increased gifts with the promise of 
SI 00,000 in marching funds. This 
challenge, which was enthusiasti- 
cally mei Insi year, was made In 
honor of the Tullmans* niece, 
Ashley, who fins diabetes. 



Cosmetologists, don't miss... 

( nnancement 
<Vra/i'(//es for ( >anccr /a//enfa" 



u Jmaae 




A Free Seminar For Cosmetologists 

And Tour C/ieno Who Have 

Experienced Cancer Therapies 



Earn three Continuing 
Education credits... 

and (earn how to better 
serve your clients. 

Find out how to enhance the appearance and body 
image of individuals receiving chemotherapy and 
radiation treatment. Topics include: 

• Skin care 

• Njul maintenance 
•Wig options, head coverings, and styling tips 

• Cosmetology demonstrations 

• Nutrition and herbal treatments 

• Understanding cancer, staying healthy... and more 

Monday, December 7, 1998 

9 am - 2 pm 

Midwestern Regional Medical Center 

2520 Elisha.Zion IL 

Admission is free, but space is limited and 

registration is required. 

Lunch will be served. To pre-register or obtain 

more information, 

call Kathleen Payton at (847) 872-6062. 

Receive three Continuing Education credits for attending... 

and have your safon fisted as a preferred service provider In the 

Cancer Resource Guidt, distributed at Midwestern Regional Medical Center 

and at the Cancer Resource Center located in the 

Gumee Mills shopping center. 



2E TRE 



CANCER 
TKEAIXEHT 
OXTERS 
OFAMBOOT 




Midwestern! 

2520 Btsha. Son. IL 
www.C3ncffDenier.Qom 



Holidays offer time 
to give thanks 



I wanted let usi' iliis week's ml 
umii id give ihunks lor nuinv 
[flings. I'm Imping ihiit my 
thanks causes you 10 think nf 
the things that vnu are iliiinkful fni 
We all huve nuinv things in our 
lives thai we tuny lake for gnmteil 
it's good tn lake a good Intik it! all 
that we have, al least once a \ear. if 
not more! 

Thank you to all of my readers 
for taking the lime out each week i<> 
took for my column. I have had a 
loi of people call and tell me about 
how they cut out and save my 
columns and (his just warms my 
heart to no end! t truly appreciate 
each and every one of you! 

Thank you to all of my clients, 
To all the people who have allowed 
me to become a part of their lives 
in order to help them get to a 
stronger place. It Inspires me to see 
someone improve in so many ways. 

Thank you to all of my PACE 
kids and families. I gel such a thrill 
seeing each one of you work so 
hard and Improve so much In such 




PARENT'S 
PLACE 

Slwrri Stnm 
ftv.l). 



i\ short llnus' My true gift Is watch- 
ing you guvs bloom and go uirlhor 
than you ever have before! 

Ihrtiik vou to lakeland 
Newspapers fot this wonderful col- 
umn I enjoy writing tihoul these 
topics so much ami I truly uppreci- 
ate the forum vou have given me. 
as well as the work that goes Into 
producing the column. 

[hank you to the professionals 
out (here who have called and told 
me about their views in response to 
my columns. I believe that no mat- 
ter how educated any of us are, we 
can always leam from others! 

Thank you to my family for all 
you have taught me over the years. 
No family is ever perfect, but If 



there is love and support, perfec- 
tion can't be far behind! 

Thank you to G-d for this won- 
derful life! We all have our chal- 
lenges each day. The strength to 
face them Is what makes life so 
wonderful! No matter what the sit- 
uation is, thank you for the strength 
needed to face it. Thank you for all 
the gifts! 

Thanksgiving comes but once a 
year. Maybe we would all feel a tit- 
tle lift each day if we could think 
about our list of thanks once a week 
or maybe even more! Again, have a 
happy Turkey Day and see ya next 
time! 



This column is for entertain- 
ment purposes only. Information 
in this column cannot and should 
not replace proper psychological 
treatment. Dr. Sherri Singer is a 
Licensed Clinical Psychologist, 
childhood beliavior specialist. Call 
in your questions and comments-. 
(70S) 962-2549. 



Arnold family chiropractic celebrates first year 



Dr. Uura Wells and Dr. Jeff 
Arnold have completed their first 
year of practice in Grayslake. 

The Arnolds utilize the Activator 
Methods Chiropractic Technique, a 
gentle yet highly effective system 
designed to specifically align and 
restore spinal balance without 
undue strain and stress on the 



patient. The Activator Method 
Technique Is one of the most well- 
researched techniques In 
Chiropractic. Because of the accu- 
racy and light forces used, 
Activactor adjustments are safe, 
suitable, and comfortable for all 
types of patients. 

Arnold Family Chiropractic Is 



located In Waldln Square Center 
at 100 North Atkinson Road in 
Grayslake. Hourse are 9 a.m. to 
noon and 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. 
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 
and 9 a.m. to noon on Tuesday 
and Saturday. 

For more Information, call 
223-8343. 




Life Skills Series 

Sponsored by the behavioral medicine 
department at Provena Saint Thercse Medical 
Center, free! To register, call 847-360-2280. 



Conflict Resolution Training Sessions 

Making Peace: Learn to Resolve Conflicts by 
Improving Your Listening and Communication Skills 

Dec. 2 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Provena Saint Therese. For more 
information or to register, call (847) 360-2280. 

Parenting and Child Development 

What Parents Can Do To Help Their Kids 
Succeed In School 

Dec. 9 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Provena Saint Therese. Presented by 
William Lee, Ed.D. For more information or to register, call 
(847) 360-2280. 

/ hilif Living Issues for Adults 

Learn To Feel Better About Yourself 

Practical strategies to improve self-esteem, Dec. 16 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. 
at Provena Saint Therese. Presented by John Jochem, Psy.D. For 
more information or to register, call (847) 360-2280. 



£S 



9tt Provena 

Saint Therese Medical Center 

What every hospital should be* 

2615 Washington Street 
Waukegan, IL 60085 
847-249-3900 
www.sainttherese.org 






November 27, 1998. 



HEALTHWATCH 




i-ri..t' 



Lakeland Newspapers/Si 3 






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Not every hospital makes it to the top. 

Provena Saint Therese Medical Center and Provena Home Care/Hospice recently earned accreditation with 
commendation, the highest level of accreditation awarded by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of 
Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). Only 15 percent of accredited hospitals receive accreditation with 
commendation, and we are proud to be one of them. 

As the only Catholic hospital in Lake County, we are dedicated to providing expert health care with an 
attitude of service and compassion that sets us apart. Here at Provena Saint Therese Medical Center, you'll 
find a team of committed physicians, employees and volunteers whose number one priority is taking care of 
you and your family. Because that's the way a hospital should be. 

9K Provena 

Saint Therese Medical Center 
What every hospital should he m 

2615 Washington Street 
Waukegan, IL 60085 

For a physician referral, call (847) 360-2600 
or visit our web site: www.sainttherese.org 









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November 27, 1998 



Alzheimer's 
a major 
health issue 
for women 

Forfeiting where you left your 
car keys is one thing; forgetting your 
child's name is another. F : or the mil- 
lions of Americans with Alzheimer's 
disease, confusion and memory loss 
are all too reiJ. Unfortunately, this 
devastating disease is increasing ai 
an alarming rate and, pariinilaily. In 
women. 

Alzheimer's disease i urrenilv 
affects four million Americans and is 
one of die most luiiuiiuii chimin 
diseases ol older people. Sftier itic 
risk of Al/ht'imer's disease mi ishisms 
ciramaiitalh will) advancing age. 
women — who have a longer hie 
expectancy than men arc ilrspm 
portionalelv .illecleil Untruth 
women ((impose 71' pericnl nl tin* 
(J.S, [itipulation age Il. r > .ind oldei. 
and nearly one hall ol this gioiip lias 
Al/Jielliie/'s disease 

Hut e\peMs ptrdul that the 
iiumhcr ul Americans with 
Alzheimer's disease will mnie than 
doithle hy the vear L'Ofin lo l-l mil 
lion— most of whom will he women 
To help women hefter nndei 
stand Alzheimer s disease and its 
implicatiotis, the Al/heunei's 
Association is encouraging women 
lo learn more ahoui the disease \ ia a 
national awareness initiative As pan 
of thru education eltort, the 
Alzhcimei's Association lias devel 
oped a hroi huie tilled Women and 
Al/lieimei 's Disease, uluili [no 
vides uonien wilh valu.ihle inlorma 
lion tin lulling ihe wainine, signs ol 
the discisi- tie.ilnienl upturn's .tiid 
uaregivvt Ups 

/lie Al/lieinier's Assm lalion 
with ^'011 1 h.iplefs n.ilirumide, is (he 
onh national vuluni.in 'organi/aiiou 
dedicated lucnuqurnug Alzheimer's 
disease ihroogh research, and to pro 
siding information and support to 
people with the disease and their 
families. The Association is live lead- 
ing funding source for research after 
the federal government. 

Services provided hy die Greater 

Chicagoland Alzheimer's 

Association include a network ol 

family support groups, a helpline for 

informaUon and support, referrals to 

community resources, educational 

programs and advocacy for research 

into the cause, treatment and cure 

for the disease. 

To leam more information on 
Alzheimer's disease, current 
research, patient care and assistance 
for caregivers, contact the Greater 
Chicagoland Alzheimer's Associa- 
tion at 933-24 13. 

The following is a list of facts 
regarding women and Alzheimer's 
disease: 

• In the U.S.. an estimated four 
million people suffer from 
Alzheimer's disease. This number is 
projected to increase to 14 million by 
the year 2050 - mostly affecting 
women. 

• Women comprise 72 percent of 
the U.S. population age 85 and older, 
witli nearly half of this group having 
Alzheimer's disease. 

• Based on current projections, a 
female bom in 1994 has a one in six 
chance of developing Alzheimer's 
disease if she lives to an average life 
expectancy of 80 years. For women, 
this lifetime risk is greater than the 
lifedme risk of breast cancer. 

• Eighty percent of caregivers are 
women - usually the wife, daughter 
or daughter-in-law of the person 
with Alzheimer's disease. 

• Fifty-five percent of caregivers 
are spouses, 35 percent are adult off- 
spring, five percent are siblings and 
the remainder are other relatives or 
paid providers of care. Following 
spouses, daughters of Alzheimer vic- 
tims are the next most IJJkely family 
members to assume the role of pro- 
viding primary care. 



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1998 M 



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DECEMBER 



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A t M i i) w k s r i- r n R P <; r o n a i. M b d I c al C en ter 



7?:£2 



Mammogram: $49 

All month. I>\ a|Mioiiitmciil 

\ ni.iiitiiiniM'.iMi (.hi lief|! illicit I'i'-isi i.m '■' hrli'ic tftJl.m mv <n lii I .imllinh: On 

..nun', .nidi .nis! no s mii.|..'.iii!: -j" . iiIn mil hilh e\|»l.im llic pi<Ki<liiiv .iiiswei 

mm .iin-slinii- .[iiiliomf>lcli whii MMWiKtAH iwM '" fc* lli.m ill iinnnles 

10-sullsHlll hi Mill I. M I »ll -I Kl.ll P'JlS S.U ,.||1 I • - 1 .III .I|l|1llll1llllelll. |ll'-,lM-l.l|l 



M 



i inn 



Free Screening: Blood Pressure Check 

III month. In appointment 

H.it! Mtui l>!.'t.,l i'iiismiii (Ihikulln i lii.illlu.tn pi nil ssii.n.il .il mil ul llle pll\*-l 

, , IM ,,jli, i - n-l.-il In li iiv (.ill tin i'Ium. i. in . IpmM mum in iit.ilsi .in .i|i|>iniililieiil 

Influenza Immunization: S10 

\ll month 

\| lir.-li n-i, t Ilili li,.l .IK |Hii|>ll lis M.tlMil .l»i .lllll illlh'l lIlllsiUllll i lllllUU ill 

,1! ssi v Mu li .»>. i jhlnn.iM ill. il .mil |inliiimi.tn diseases iii ili.ihiles ituilllus ,iiul pen 
ij. U ||]i „i w i-.iKi-JH if itriitiiiiu ^vliiii |i> iii.iki- .in .i|i|iiiiiilitictil Ini ,i llu slinl |ile,N' 
i. ill inn .'I ilu [iliiMii.in ■■lliii-s lisictl IhIiih iii .(tlrnil .1 u.ilk in i linn 
Walk-in Clinical Midwestern Regional Medical Center: 
Saturday December 5 9 a.m. - l ) p.m. 



CPR Class: S25 

Monday, December 7 6 - 10 p.m. 

( ;ii ilisK- am-M. hreuihiiiK iuiirnimiun iuitl thnkiiig are likMlirealeiiiiitt situations ulilcli 
mimic last, skillful inierveMinn by ;t ii-.tiiutl |iervjn. U-.ini hirtv In initiate CI'R ami 
other life sniiij! tti Imiuues dtiriiii; ;ui evening class presculid In ;t certified Ainerinin 
Keil doss liNniimr (Jjivs >i/e Ls limited. To regiMer. plea.se calf MWiMlHll 

Support Group: Breast Cancer Support Group 

Monday, December 7 : 7 - 8 p.m. 

\ snppun "iniip lor women aJfccted In brcasi cancer. Slwre ixpenenies. explore 
ideas. ;iml I'VpreSJ wnir firlinp aiutiii^ a tyonp ol wnnifit wlm know uhat \nu re 
^iiinii ilirniiuh biranse IheVve been iheiv inn. 1'nr iimre mftinnatinn and in'reuisliT 
plr.iHeall.srrihUSK. 

Free Clink: Children's Immunization Clinic 

Saturday, December 12 9- n a.m. 

MrtheMem ;mtl lite Like Count* lle.tllli Diiiaiimnil team tip m prmidf Inw-coM 
immiini/:iimiis for iliiklnn tltiiini! a ualkin clinic at lite Imspitd I'nr more inlnnna 
tiiui. plesiM' iiill N C/tClMHil. 



Ai C \ N C E R R E S O I! R C E CENTER 



Nutrilional Counseling Service 

Ml monih 

\ iri:i-inni ilii'liti.ui «1i.u spei i.tli/es ill i iiinplrllHIII.in lliililtitiii.tl llier.ipv is ;i\;nhib)e 
■••I in |uisii||iii nit jiliiiMi wiiiMili.itimi IIims.i peisottafi/ed sfmee loramone 
ikIri iv.iih- |u Icvini mi hi .iltHtit tlie rule nl initniiuii in disease |ire\ciilinn, ur.ilnu'nl 
• ii iiinun I i.tm i.iiiiii pit-MiiliDii liiutt'Jll cnilirol. mhii' iililuuliuli/ed. scieillili 
. .ill\ h.iM il pi 1*111. mi «ill | ii mi unit npiiin.ll lir.ihh .mil l)eiielii ilit' wlmle lamily Our 

inn iiimiN i- .i|m> .iv.nl.iftli in prcNiti niiimiiiiiLt\ ednc.ilioiial pruitnitiis 1'nr di1;uls 
n-.iitliiir' ..in iniiniiMii.il s.imu-s nr insiitidiilean appniirinienl. pli-ii.se ail I 

MHl <l,|i JSJJ 

Mammogram: $49 > m L ■ i . 

Walk in Wednesday or by appoinimeni ^ 

Ivin Wnlm-siLiv iin .ippiiiiiiituiil isiinrsvin tin ,i in.iiiMiinitr.iiii .it lhe(. uuei 
Hi-simiii i.e. ui |nsi\\.ilk in st'^i ihc.ippiiiiiiiiieiiihiHik. .mil in lesstlian >n mimiii-s 
miiii iii.Hiiiiir> , .:i.iiiHullbt ciiiupleiril In .1 i.ii'iim.iml uiiim teiiluuis uiiav;iiii; spni.ilM 
i nsi is \ i'i in* liiilntu H-.uliiiL' .mil iiitiiliiel.iluiti t» .i ho.ud (eilllietl i'.ldlti|n'4isl 

\ppiiiiiimenls .in .ilsii .t\.ul.iltli iliiMii'Jioiil the Hirk I'le.ise call Will/ 1 ' I.H 1><11 



Free Screening: Coloreclol Concer Home Test 



>&ediu*sda\. December I 



. . , . 1 1 r ..•..,.•»(..<• 



10:00 - 12 imhvii 



I m|mMi Lll i .ilu 1 1 i Min nf. 'tii <'iM>< 'i< '|in nil ili.KginMil i ,ui« r|s .illri tin'.- llinl .mil 
VMiniiHr.ll -iV" Mi \ i;ii|i'i' ■!■. i l^ilin 1- ^ iletnl- '»ni « #1 til* f.ill'. u.lllllll'.' 
■i'/ji- Imlitni lil'fiil it 'lit •■•ki: Kim ■ ■ ■* n riu.ir. kit .mil Ii.im wiiti i|ins||iiii. 
111^'Hiillr .m.ui'ii l-ii •'>•>■ . ,r < ',i i . I- M-,-,i-.iii pli-.n i -ill Mi<l"l (U lh.ll 

Free Advice: Ask ihe Nutritionist 

Wednesday. December I 12 noon - i p.m. 

\ nvj'jruci iiiiiiii.ui ttlwi | m i.ili/i^ in i iniipliimiiLir mill iiimii.iI lliti.i|i\ in .njiLihli 
Hi .uldl ess Mini iiiiliilinii.il i mu el n- .tin |Htpnl.ii i hiiiiiiuiiiiv nlliimv. is liniilitl In s. 
iiiiinili' miiMiluinit lime |H-mnls I'le.tsi [ all .is M mil .is jMisvililr |u senilV iiAtt luiir 
slui IaiiihIi-iIIit lui s4i\Hi-iuiisiiluiiiiii nuv Ih- M-tiiiimicmlcil il ihltlktl inloniu 
IliHi p iii|iint-i| Iii tti.ike ,111 .ippiillllllieill i. lit SI HI/ 1 ) ill 1S11 



Free Health Talk: Countdown to a Healthy 1999 

Thursday, DeceniberJ 7:00 • 8:30 p.m. 

10 sleps In" a IikiIiIikt iliw will.be jtresenitil In a retaMiretl diniii:ui (ki mu vonr In 
nl e\iiiM5 mid CrjiNv'olT ck'in [ kmm wlun ch;utne> n» make Iltese tlitttn mii^s 
inm> will slum uiutiim ais\ n is m make'ite.iJlliKT loud chuk^ ihai will Iviuiii \nnr 
wliule lainiK I'd nvNer. plai.se aill S(KI/») tl) JK22 

Free Talk: T'ai Chi Chih! Joy Thru Movement 

Wednesday. December 9 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. 

I ai Uii ( Jitli is a sntiple. aLsyto-leam. muntit; [tiufiLKititi lunti. I ;u (In ( Jn!i is imf a 
itianial art Innn or ;ut e\ereise limn T ai (Jii c Jul i Ills l<> llirftniy niuveimtiis an<l 
mu- pose, ili.ii ;Ue peHnnnnl snlih. iiiiiiinumish anil ellonli-ssU ami can Ih- dune liv • 
:t>iMHH* reistnlleNS ul ujje tir pli\vica) CihiiIUhhv II is i^nnii in h> ahiliiv in imnuillaieh 
iniiaiice the lluw itl tiieiT^ in liie Imih \\ ilk wu\\\m' I ;u ( Jti (luh praaice one max 
espeneme enli;uuiil plnwail anil mental pei1urm;uice I or ni;ui\. n helps improved 
hal.mce IiIikhI pressure cimirnl. .ml m Mii-ns ;uul p.un reikiaioii :uul ntliamwl relax 
.until Mtenik^ will paim ipate in tins T ;u C3f] t Juli tmiti el:Lss led lw Dunua \lc 
IJlinse. a (.eiiilinl T ai (Jii (Juli lustniitnr ;uut Indi'iH'inleni (iiiiiracl I' ai (Jii I'hih 
liisiniiiuj- at ihe (.nicer Wellness Cviuer m \niilihrinik Plaise dress cumfnaihk itnd 
Imni; sih ks ui \u-.ir still suktl s|hkn Tu ri-^Mer. pk-.tse call S4HJ/ 1 ) ill 2S22 

Free Talk: Using Magnets to Improve Your Health 
and Performance 

Thursday. December 10 7 - 8:30 p.m. 

I nit! mu il lie use ul maiyuts can help muii achv li-ei. hack, link :uul/or sluHililer 
ilisn»uiliiii. ellmu. wnsi or kmi' pains Masyiets are ;iImi iimiI fnr people who ;ta' 
alw,i\s dial, lack em*®, are siii>smiI oiu. nr h;miV4. iruuhli' sltlfWljl Or Manm 
Marks and assnnalc will e\plam whai ill millinn |Hiiple alrt-aik know - ihe bendil ul 
usiii" maaiefe. in impruve haillh ;utd/nr |n-rionuance Musi pfnfi-ssioiutl s|Kias Uiuils 
.lie utili/iim niniyu-is lui thetr plavers |)r Murks will e\pl.un liuw. maiyiils cui 
rii hariic Mtur eiteOjv. liiihl sin-ss. ^le^■p Ix-ller and help \uur ,iche> and jkuiin To rei; 
Ner. please call HIM i/>) p mil 

Free Screening: Blood Pressure 

Thursday. December 17,. 8:30- i 0:00 a.m. 

Have \nur blood pressure checked In a hr.ililtaue proloMonal tti rejysier. 
plr.Lva(]lw«iiA)io isil 



For more information and to register for a Healthy Habits program, 

please call 800/940-2822 

Locations: 



(iurnee 

<.tniiri h'estiimv (.vitivr 

tiiirnee Mills l.nnaiue II 

(<ril^ (,r;uul We 

SOtl/'JiH-IKJJ 



\\;»u ke^an 

lamily medicine 

dlen I'lnra Medical Clmu 

KlifMilen Mora \\e 

XC/l\ l )y\ll 



(iurnee 

I ii Unit tl media lie 

III 1. Kills \.in(n 

^S lower t.i'iHii 
sr/2(>s l )*)(Hi 



Like Villa 

Immly i ■ ui.'vriiid meilienie 

\n I'edro I'alr. a\ 

Ih l.ulma Manil 

Or Oais\ \iulaleon 

Wl N Milwaukee We 

S|-/^h.d(vtl2 



l.indenhtirst 

lamily medicine 

Or Seunoii Maslovsk; 

.'On I. l.rand \\e 

Ki _ /.«(i hl.il 



Midwestern 




" f <■ I o jj v ! M I I) I l ' \ 1 1 F N T E II 



Uauke|>:ut 

lamdy i "■ internal medicine 

Or I'edro I'aln-av 

Or luhna Marul 

Or 0ais\ \ndaleon 

J^lh Uuslnn^lDii We 



Vidncsterii/CICl 
Hijfl Ivlisha We 

-sr/N"2-n(»| 



/.ion 

lamily i- mleriial medicine 

Or I'edro I'alu a\ 

Dr Luhna Marul 

Or Oaisv \ndali-on 

0)11 2 _ lliSireel 

S i7K~2 nSK 



www.cancercenter.com 




CANCER 
TREATMENT 
CENTERS 
OF AMERICA" 

Winning Iht lighl agjinvi t jnici, every day " 



November 27, 1998 



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Lakeland Newspapers/ Biff- 



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B16 7 Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 



NovemheY^Yii^B 



f-SfJ-i 



Get It Done Right! 






rpet Your 
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_ n T II D_L 

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STORE HOURS: Mon.-Thurs. 9-8; Fri. & Sat. 10-5:30; Closed Sunday 



fii! 



:'.! 




;■'"." . ' 



.-.•• ,,'V.Vr.: 



irtli**- 



Lakeland 
Newspapers' 



Section 



• - •.■<"«. ; ; 



1998 



m-i 




. .--., . 



^PRfroSnC LIBRARY DISTRICT 



7U/o Late County tree farms open 
for holiday season this weekend 



By KENNETH PA7CHEN 
Staff Reporter 



THIS 

WEEK 




WHAT'S IN A NAME? 

Getting a kick out of 
football names 

PLEASE SEE 
PAGE C5 



CHRISTMAS TUNE 

Cash registers will jingle 
according to sales predictions 

PLEASE SEE 
PAGE C7 



KNOWING YOUR 
MERCHANT 

See our special 
Christmas pullout Inside 

PLEASE SEE 
PAGE C15 



Alan Benedeck and his son, Michael, operators of the Family 
Christmas Tree Farm in Lake Villa, survey some of this year's 
stock. Shoppers can begin chopping down their own trees Nov. 
27. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 



Energized by Thanksgiving 
dinner and awash in holl- * 
day emotion, many family's 
think of the need for a dec- 
orated tree in about a month. 

In Lake County, families can dri- 
ve a short distance to cut their own 
tree and bring it home for the holi- 
days. 

Two tree farms in Lake County 
allow tree cutting and provide the 
setting to revisit a holiday tradition 
for young and old alike. 

The Family Christmas Tree 
Farm is located northwest of Lake 
Villa at Petite Lake Road and Route 
59. 

Hayden Tree Farm is at 428B0 
North Hunt Club Road, a little more 
than a mile north of the Route 173 
and Hunt Club Road intersection. 

"We encourage people to make 
ran outing of it," said Alan Benedeck, 
jfci.co-bvynerwith Ed Sullivan of the 
[-^Family ChrlstmasTree Farm. "We 
kind of created an entire family ex- 
perience with our farm." 
'''-!■' People can find their Scotch 
Pine In the fields and cut it down or 
select a pre-ciit Balsam. The farm 
has refreshments, such as hot 
chocolate and coffee, and seasonal 
crafts in the dairy barn built in 1873. 

"We have animals the kids can 
pet," Benedeck said. 

Sullivan refurbished a one- 
horse sleight with a red velvet seal 
that is popular for family pho- 
tographs. 

Pat Hayden encourages people 
to shop and chop for their trees ear- 



ly to assure the best selection. 

"Our visitors enjoy the old fash- 
ioned feeling of hiking around the 
farm in search of their perfect tree 
and enjoying the outdoors," said j 
Hayden. "It really gets them in the 
Christmas mood." 

Hayden Tree Farm offers Scotch 
pine, Douglas fir, Concolor fir, White 
pine, and Spruce as well as two 
types of potted trees, Black Hills 
Spruce and Dwarf Alberta Spruce; 
They also have natural decorations 
for the trees. They also have 
wreaths, swags, cut boughs, roping, 
and doorway arches. 

Both Family Christmas Tree 
Farm and Hayden Tree Farm offer 
visitors ail that is needed to enjoy 
the experience. They have saws to 
cut down trees, twine to tie them to 
cars, and many reasons to linger. 

Hayden's farm is extensively 
landscaped, has two lakes on the 40 
acres, and walking trails. They have 
sleds for pulling children and trees. 

Benedeck said, "We have the 
hayrack trip out to the fields,™ 

"The best day tacorne.outis. ,. 

Friday because it's the least crowded 
and you can take more time to look 
around," Benedeck said. "We're 
open from 830 a.m. to dusk." 

"We start (selling trees) the day 
after Thanksgiving and go to the 
20th." Benedeck said. Their farm Is 
open only on Fridays, Saturdays, 
and Sundays. 

Hayden Tree Farm also opens 
the day after Thanksgiving on Fri- 
day, Saturday, and Sunday from 8 
a.m. until 4 p.m. as well as anytime 

Please seeinEE FARM IC6 



Consensus plan draws 
mixed reviews from 
environmentalists 

Some say plan is 'a good start', 
others wonder if it will open the 
door to more development 



By JOHN ROSZKOWSKI 
City Editor 



A plan designed to bring envi- 
ronmentalists and business leaders 
In Lake County together still has yet 
to satisfy everybody's concerns. 

Between 100 and 150 people 
from Lake County attended a meet- 
ing on "A Consensus Plan for En- 
hancing and Preserving Lake Coun- 
ty's Quality of Life." 

Initial audience reactions to the 
plan at the meeting were mixed. 

Bill Holleman, chairman of Illi- 
nois Citizens Action, an environ- 
mental group in Lake County, said he 
felt the plan lacked long range goals 
for dealing with the serious environ- 



mental issues facing the county. 

"I think the question has to be 
asked: how much (development) is 
enough?" he said at the meeting. 
"This plan doesn't address how much 
is enough." 

"What we have here is a plan for 
economic development, with envi- 
ronmental protection thrown in as 
an extra," he added. "I think we're ap- 
proaching things backwards." 

Someother environmental lead- 
ers took a more favorable view. 

Evan Craig, chairman of the ex- 
ecutive committee for the Siena Club 
in Lake County, said while the group 
has some concerns, the plan is a 

Please see MIXED REVIEWS /C6 



Forest preserve hopes 
anniversary brings luck 

Upcoming ballot referendum 
seeks $55 million to pay for new 
land acquisition, improvements 



By JOHN ROSZKOWSKi 
City Editor 



As the Lake County Forest Pre- 
serves celebrates its 40th anniversary 
this year, officials are hoping voters 
will make a special contribution to 
the forest preserves' future next year. 

On April 13, 1999, a referendum 
will ask voters if they support an in- 
crease in their taxes to pay for a $55 
million bond issue for new land ac- 
quisdon and preservation of existing 
habitat, new trails and other im- 
provements within the system. 

Robert Buhai, president of the 
Lake County Forest Preserves Board, 
said now that the November election 
is over, efforts will Increase to edu- 
cate the public on why the improve- 
ments are needed. 

"Our board is proposing this ref- 
erendum because they feel its nec- 



essary to maintain a balance be- 
tween open space and growth in the 
county," said Andy Kimmel, director 
of environmental education and 
public affairs for the Lake County 
Forest Preserves. 

The district is seeking $35 mil- 
lion to pay for acquistion of new land 
for the forest preserve system, ac- 
cording to Kimmel. A successful ref- 
erendum in 1993 paid for the pur- 
chase of 1,700 new acres of forest 
preserve property, he said. 

In addition to new land, the ref- 
erendum would provide about $20 
million in improvements to the ex- 
isting forest preserve system, such as 
adding new bike and walking trails, 
preserving prairies, woodlands and 
wedands, protecting endangered 
species, and upgrading historic 

. Please see ANNIVERSARY I C6 



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November 27, 1998 



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Mundelein eyed as university site 

Mundelein— Mundelein Is still being eyed as a possible 
location for the proposed university center. Two spots in 
Mundelein, including an office complex and golf course prop- 
erty, came in first and third on the University Center Task •;.,:; 
Force's list of 15 prospective sites, ' 

The task force has narrowed their list down to eight, with 
t he College of Lake County being second on the list The eight 
property owners will make presentations to the Lake County 
Board on Dec. 1, with the board making It's recommenda- 
tions to the Illinois Board of Higher Education on Dec. 3. 

Volunteers needed for gift wrap 

Gurnee— Habitat for Humanity is looking for volunteers 
to wrap gifts at Gurnee Mills. Their annual gift wrap, which 
has been held In the past at Lakehurst Mall, is an event held to 
raise money for the organization, which builds homes for low- 
income families. 

Gift wrapping will begin on Nov, 27 and continue until 
Dec. 24. Volunteers will work four-hour shifts, and may sign 
up for any day except for Monday or Saturday. For customers, 
gift map will cost SI or $2 for most gifts. 

Those interested in volunteering should call Habitat for 
) lumanity at 623- 1020 to schedule a shift 

Fire sprinklers recalled 

Wauconda— The Wauconda Fire Department is asking 
everyone with fire suppression sprinklers in their home or 
business to make sure they do not have Omega fire sprinklers, 
which have been recalled due to a defection.. 

The company that manufactures this brand is offering full 
replacement of the system to all owners of Omega fire sprin- 
klers. 

The Omega Sprinkler Recall and Class Action Hotline is 
(800) 896-5685, or on the web at www.Omegarecall.com. The 
Omega Sprinkler Customer Service Line is (800) 927-5291. 

Korpan's Christmas Parade 

Fox Lake— The 42nd Annual Korpan's Landing Yacht 
Club Christmas Parade and Children's Party is scheduled for 
Saturday, Nov. 29, with more than 70 entries expected to par- 
ticipate. 

Jack and Kimber Kiesgen, longtime members of the Grant 
Township Highway Department, are grand marshals for the 
parade, which kicks off at 1 1 a.m. from the Korpan's parking 
lot, 112 E. Jjokeview, traveling toPorest Avenue, turning pnto„^ 
Oak Street and onto NIpperstnk, merrsduth to Grand Avenue' 
and east on Grand past the entrance to Lakeland Plaza, pro- 
ceeding past the reviewing stand and then onto to'Grand 
High School. 

The parade should last one hour, and is followed by the 
club's annual children's party, with more than 300 youngsters 
expected to attend. 

Village hires full-time assistant 

Volo — The village board approved the hiring of a full-time 
administrative assistant to help the village through its "grow- 
ing pains." 

Judy Rutishauser, who currently works part-time at village 
hall, was promoted by the village board Nov. 10, and officially 
starts in her new role Jan. 1 , 1999. She has worked for the vil- 
lage since Mardh 1997. 

Impressionist painter discussed 

Lake Villa — Art historian Jeff Mishur will discuss the im- 
pressionist painter Mary Cassatt at the Lake Villa District Li- 
brary Wednesday, Dec. 2 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. 

Mishur will have an interactive slide discussion about the 
Chicago Art Institute's Cassatt exhibit. He will examine Cas- 
satt's place within Impressionism. He will discuss the chal- 
lenges she faced as a woman artist. 

No registration is required for this program. 

Porter named 'Coach of the Year 1 

Antloch — Antioch Vikings Lightweight Football Coach 
Richard "Denny" Porter has been named National "Coach of 
the Year" for 1998 by the American Youth Coaches Associa- 
tion. 

Porter was selected from over 2,000 nominations from 
around the United States and Canada, according to the All 
Star Sports Foundation of Palatine, 111. 

"He never stops giving of himself," said Kevin Rowland, 




'•;•■ "'V'., •'- ;'■ •" '■ : '*-/" = ? ■>;;-':'•"' ■ 



On ice 

8-year-old Alyssa Orawiec of Beach Park performs 
during a specialty show sponsored by the Zion Park 
District at the Zion Ice Arena Saturday afternoon.— 
Photo by Sandy Bressner 



'director of th e All Stat Sports foundation; "That was clear from 
all the letters and descriptions (we) received about Coach Den- 
ny." ;■/ i>~i I'/:;.-.;; 

"We could easily write a book of all (of) Coach Porter's ac- 
complishments, both as a coach and community leader, " stat- 
ed Rowland. "The things he has done to help kids and families 
is very impressive." 

The Antioch Lightweight Football team in early November 
owned a 63-game winning streak that included six straight reg- 
ular season league championships. 

The award by the American Youth Coaches Association 
pays special tribute to men and women who have given their 
time on a volunteer basis as both a youth coach and communi- 
ty leader. This is the 28th year the award has been given. 

Porter was selected by a panel of nine judges with the AH 
Star Sports Foundation. Nominations were made by member 
organizations, directors, parents, players, and coaches. In June, 
50 candidates were selected for detailed consideration. The five 
finalists were selected near the end of September. 

The final winner, Richard Porter, was announced Novem- 
ber 10. 

Safe School Seminar planned 

Waucondo— In light of all the violence affecting schools 
nationwide, Wauconda High School Principal Jack Raybum 
has decided it is time to expand on the community feeling at 
the school as an attempted way to shield W1IS from distur- 
bances. The high school community is invited to attend a Safe 
School Seminar on Monday, Dec. 14, at 7 p.m. at WHS, 555 N. 
Main St., in the library. 

"We are as safe as any school, but we know we are as vul- 
nerable as any school," he said. Representatives from the ad- 
ministration at the school and Wauconda Unit District 1 1 8 are 
scheduled to speak, as are representatives of the Wauconda 
and Island Lake police departments. 

"It is not just a school problem, it is a community effon." 
Raybum said. "We need their input," Rayburn said. 



Antioch welcomes Santa 

Antioch— Although adults may enjoy the dayrafter- 
Thanksgiving shopping tradition, the Village of Antioch has 
created a set of family traditions to welcome the season Fri- 
day evenipg, Nov. 27; -" ;. : • 
■ ,. Forjnany families, the parade Is the start of the gift-giving 
season; "It welcomes Santa to town," said Laurie Stahl, Parks j "■ 
and Recreation Director. "He will be available at his castle for 
pictures afterward.'* 

The parade starts at 630 p.m- hear Main and Lake streets • 
in the downtown shopping district The village tree lighting :.- 
ceremony is at 7 p.m. after the parade. 

"We have cooldes, hot chocolate, and caroling," said \ 
Stahl; 'v • ■. "'■■'. ■ ' ;: 

If it is not possible to visit Santa on Friday evening when 
he arrives in town, parents also can visit during the next few 
weeks. The Casde is open Friday, Nov. 27 through Wednes- 
day, Dec 23 from 5*30 to 8 p.m. on Mondays through Fridays. 
On Saturdays and Sundays the castle is open from 1 1 a.m. to 4 
p.m. 

Cost of wetland under scrutiny 

UbcrtyvUIe— The LibertyviUe Township Board of 
Trustees received the appraisal of the half-acre of land along 
route 45 prompdng the Board to propose the appraisal of 84 
acres the Township already owns. 

The appraisal valued the unbuildable wetland at 54300 
for the ,578 acre of land causing the board to revisit a similar 
matter. In 1991 the previous Township Board purchased 84 
acres of unbuildable wedand for S2.259 million. 

Current Township Supervisor F.T. "Mike" Graham wants 
to have the 84 acres appraised to find out if the previous 
board "squandered S2 million in public funds". The appraisal 
would cost between SI, 500 and $2,000. Graham said if the 
numbers for the half acre along Route 45 reflect the cosi of 
the 84 acres then their is a real ethical problem with the pur- 
chase by the previous board. 

Township Attorney Mike Duffy said he is not sure what le- 
gal action could be taken but he is looking into the matter. 

Two men suspected of burglary 

Fox Lake— Two men who are being investigated for a 
rash of burglaries throughout Illinois were taken into custody 
by Fox Lake Police on Nov. 19. 

According to Fox Lake Police Chief Ed Gerretsen, Richard 
Earl Thompson, 33, of 1212 N. Rock City Road in Ridott JJL 
and Christopher A. Steele, 28, of 204*1 Galena Ave. in Freeport 
III, were arrested while trying to break into the P&J Chicken 
Restaurant at 286 E Grand Ave in Fox Lake. 

"Both men are from west Illinois and have no ties to the 
area," Gerretsen said. "They are being Investigated as to 
whether they are linked to other burglaries across four coun- 
ties." 

Police have contacted law enforcement agencies in Oval, 
Stevenson, Jo Davis and McHenry about a possible link with 
burglaries in those locations. 

Steele and Thompson are being held on 550,000 bond in 
Lake County Jail. Police are also investigating as to whether 
there are possible probation or parole violations from either 
Steele or Thompson. 

Family threatens to sue village 

Grayslake — A Grayslake family has threatened to sue 
Mayor Pat Carey, the building department, and the village as 
a whole over a fence erected along their back property line. 
The issue, startingS months ago with the building depart- 
ment, is whether the fence is in compliance with Grayslake 
village ordinances. 

The Nov. 1 7 village board meeting became heated after 
Stacy Braverman stood up during public comment and de- 
manded an answer on the fence issue. 

"How does a person have a problem with the building de- 
partment for eight months and nobody knows about it?" she 
asked. 

Braverman presented trustees with a time line outlining 
the steps taken on the fence issue. Trustee Dean Johnson 
commented that the issue may need to be reviewed. 

According to Braverman, Building Commissioner Kevin 
MCrory gave his verbal approval to the Braverman's fence 
plans on March 30. Braverman noted they were told no 
additional written permission was needed, and they 
would receive the permit in a couple of days. 



... 



up any 



STAY TUNED 

Lakeland Newspapers 11 editions in coming weeks for: 



ALL-LAKELAND 



TEAMS' 

■\ •■- ' 

Lakeland picks its 
Pre-Season All-Lakeland 
First and .Second teams 



•-vg 





HOLIDAY 
ACTIVITIES 

Area residents provide 

recipes and fun activities for 

the holiday season 



HAPPY HANUKKAH 

Often overshadowed by Christmas; Hanukkah is celebrat- 
ed by thousands of Lake County residents 




■•■'■- ' • i'--. V . '■'. -—%>•- ,-': : - -'. ji . -,», 



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C4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OPINIONS 



November 27, 1998 




William H. Schroeder 

Publlthar 



William M. Schroeder 

Prosldont/CE.O. 



Neal Tucker 

Executive Edltor/Compoiftlon Mgr. 



Rhonda Hetrick Burke 

Managing Editor 

30 South Whitney St., CraysSake, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (847) 223-8161. E-mail: edlt@Ind.com 



EDITORIALS 





Mountain's' odor. 



to miss 



onsidering the very visible mini-mountain of (rash protrud- 
ing into the liori/on in central \nkv County, you'd think offi- 
cials woulil have an easy lime keeping labs on operations at 
Countryside l-andfill on Hie. IVA. 

The bounty of Like and tlie Village of Grayslake are paid hand 
some "host fees" while height limits and odor control have been no- 
Ineablv ignored. As for monitoring the unsightly, hut necessary facil- 
ity, public guardians know the answers, but as the old saying goes. 
" I Lev can't think of the questions." 

Audrrw t^uigley. executive director of the Solid Waste Agency o) 
I akel <nmu is at a loss as to .how allowable vertical boundaries have 
brrn [gnmed I he strong odoi of sewer gas swirling about Country- 
side L .null ill is .iiuibuted lo ineffective methane processing (the an- 
swer j. hul i\h\ t ant operators do something ( get ready tor a cjues 
Iroru abnut 1 1 n ■ smell? 

( mmr\ Board Hep. Sandy Cole(R-Grayslake) has called foi an in- 
dependent stiive\ lo be paid by Waste Management, the operator 
That'sa worthwhile suggestion, bill (another question) what has 
Quigley and ( .o. been doing ihe pasl several years? 

In fairness, it should he noted (hat complaints have triggered a 
new system providing for the filing of reports every ffl days; it new 
odor control svsii-m has been pill in place- -|usi in tiiiit' — so tfie 
sweet smells u| ihe holidays Won't be drowned' out. 



VIEWPOINT 



English never dull; not 




Kids struggling with gram- 
mar and literature lessons 
will love what Pat Gonder. 
an English Instructor at 
College of Lake County, has to say 
about the earth's most universal lan- 
guage. 

English in difficulty to master 
ranks first or second, rivaled only by 
Chinese, maintains the amiable 
teacher whose livelihood and hobby 
both center on the meaning of 
words. To describe the challenge of 
learning English, especially for per- 
sons with another primary lan- 
guage, Gondcr explains, "English al- 
ways is shifting and changing." 

Russian, by the way, ranks high 
for difficulty. 

Gondcr provided members of 
the Grayslake Round Tabic, a group 
of retired business executives who 
meet weekly for breakfast, with an 
interesting and lively topic talking 
about tbe meaning and derivation 
of words. Yes. studying the English 
language may be a rugged task, but 
it's far from dull. 

I lere's an example of how the 
CI.C instructors approaches his sub- 
ject; 

"Getting fired" is the most com- 
mon expression for involuntary dis- 
missal from employment. Tired" 
derived from the medieval cusiom 
of burning down ihe home of a per- 
son who had fallen out of favor or 
who was no longer seen as useful by 
fellow villagers. Gonder stated. See. 
words have meaning. 

(louder says he is fascinated by 
all the new meanings that have 
crept into the language through the 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



advent of computerization. "A stu- 
dent told me that he needed some 
'down time,' meaning some time 
off." "Hoot up" also has come to 
meaning to start or initiate action, 
Gonder observed. 

The CLC language expert says 
truth in the expression that "lan- 
guage is power" is illustrated power- 
fully by all the hair splitting that goes 
on the government and the courts in 
a "nation obsessed with litigation." 
As f 'resident Clinton asked, "What is 
the meaning of 'is',?" while under- 
going questioning by the Starr Com- 
mittee. 

Curious expressions confound 
students. Gonder asked, "Why do 
we drive on a parkway, yet park on a 
driveway?" The penchant in mod- 
ern English useagc for "double 
speak" adds to learning difficulties. 
Gonder said he was stunned to learn 
that people don't die in hospitals. 
"They contribute to a 'negative bed 
count'." Whether a student or not, 
you can't help but cringe at how 



English is twisted and tortured, 
Gonder takes a sympathetic 
view of persons studying the English 
language with all Its quirks and sur- 
prises. "I feel sorry for students." 
He didn't describe his feelings at 
grading dme. 

Gonder, by the way, Isn't a total 
bookworm. One of his side activi- 
ties is volunteering at the Grayslake 
Recycling Center. 

Pass in review 

You know the years are slipping 
by quickly when the children of 
friends starting retiring. Max 
Sanders, 57, the highly successful 
basketball coach at LlbertyvUle 
High, is leaving the court after 20 
years. I was writing sports when his 
dad, 1 larvey, was coaching at Liber- 
tyville. Max was wearing knee pants 
then, maybe even diapers. 

More Gurnee tax- 
income 

Auto magnet Bob 
Rohrrrrrman corning to Gurnee Is 
an example of the rich getting 
richer. Rohrman, yes, but also 
the Village of Gurnee which al- 
ready leads Lake County munici- 
palities in sales lax income. 

One man's family 

Pop wasted the lost warm fall 
day raking leaves instead of putting 
up Christmas lights. At least the 
Thanksgiving deadline for outdoor 
decorating was met. Why is It al- 
ways cold and raw on the day out - 
door lights are bung? 



Atfit* ♦ 






site if County gets University 




he Lake County Buaid 
has created a I ask t-oice 
that will sonn recom- 
mend to the Illinois 
loani of I liglu'i l-.clucatioii a sin- 
hi Lake (mint v to be designated 
for a four year University i. enter. 
It is noi a "given" that Lake Coun- 
ty will be awarded the designa- 
tion, but with the strong lobbying 
by corporate giants like Abbott, 
there is a strong indication thai 
we are "in the ball park." 

First things first. 

We can never underestimate 
the importance of having a four 
year university system of educa- 
tion, so if it is located anywhere 
in Lake County we are all the 
winners for it. 1 barken back to 
the day when we voted to estab- 
lish the College of Lake County, 
and it is hard to believe that it 
was not "an open and shut case. 
There were pessimists at the lime 
and it took a couple of referen- 
dums to pull it through, but I 
don't believe that anyone can 
now doubt the value and impor- 
tance of a higher institution of 
learning being located in a com- 
munity. 

The first "caller" for the uni- 
versity was a downtown 
Waukegan site because the 
News-Sun has donated its down- 
town building to the city of 
Waukegan. I believe that it is im- 
portant to re-develop downtown 
Waukegan and the lakefront, but 
I'm not too keen on the News- 
Sun building being what people 
want for a college site. 

When a site is chosen, I be- 
lieve that we must consider what 
location will make for an excel- 
lent university, both short-term 
and long-term. From that stand- 
point, I believe that serious con- 
sideration should be given to the 
Lakehurst shopping complex. To 
me, It has a location with easy 
transportation access. It seems to 



SEEING 

II 

kzZi THROUGH 

■Wl John S. Matijevich 



me that conversion of the build- 
ings to university classrooms 
would be done very easily and 
economically. It lias plenty oi 
parking and room for expan- 
sion. It has a rim of business 
building and room for expan- 
sion. It has apartment housing 
along Lakehurst Drive and 
Route 4:t. The sile would be near 
Abbott Park and other corporate 
centers. 

What I don't know is how 
many dollars it will lake to pur 
chase the Lakehurst complex, h 
will never again, 1 believe, thrive 
as a shopping center, so ihere 
may be some value to convert! it 
into a center for higher educa- 
tion. Short and long-term, I be- 
lieve thai it has the greatest po- 
tential. 

For those who believe that 
the use of the News-Sun building 
can be a boon to downtown revi- 
lalization, I have serious doubts 
about that. The downtown site 
does not meet most of the crite- 
ria set for a university location. 
My second choice for a Uni- 
versity Center, in Lake County 
would be a sile adjacent to the 
College of Lake County. The suc- 
cess of CLC proves that it is ac- 
cessible enough for residents of 
Lake County. The availability of 
parking and plenty of property 
for future expansion make the 
site one that should be consid- 
ered. 

I believe that a University 
Center must be a "free standing" 
site but locating it near or adja- 



cent to a community college can 
be beneficial. There are many 
community college students who 
don't go beyond their two year 
studies because ol tuition costs 
at universities, ihe navel neces- 
sary to study at public four year 
institutions of higher learning, 
noi being able to schedule col- 
lege studies with their Work 
schedules, and other factors. 
I hiving a university near a com- 
munity college tan make it so 
much easier for community col- 
lege students to complete their 
studies. 

Loi many years, many of us 



tried to excite higher education 
policy makers into the need for 
promoting a university in the 
Lake County area. We were al- 
ways competing with the existing 
universities which thought that 
building anything here would be 
a competitive drain on their re- 
sources. Now, the impetus has 
come from the corporate world. 
There is a drain of talent that 
must be filled at the corporations 
located in suburbia, and particu- 
larly in Lake County. 

As usual, when corporations 
speak, policy makers listen. In 
this case, what is good for the 



corporations will be good for the 
economy of Lake County. It will 
be good, too, for many Lake 
County citizens, who would not 
otherwise get the opportunity to 
receive a college education, And, 
nowadays, with the computeriza- 
tion and technology so necessary 
to survive in today's world, spe- 
cialized educatiorf is so impor- 
tant in the workplace. 

Wherever it may be located in 
Lake County, we welcome with 
open arms a University Center. 
We must not fight over who gels 
it. We must fight together to see 
that we get it 




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November 27, 1998 



, , '■ 



OPINIONS 



Lakeland Newspapers / C5 



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PARTY LINES 



PARTY LINES, THE LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS' COLUMN OF POLITICAL OPINION, 

IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS. 



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Russell: Putting off 

retirement. 



Maravelosi 

Recommends 
replacement 



Porter « A/of 

backtnglmpeach- 
ment of Clinton 



Is riverboat gambling issue 
making a comeback? 



Attorney Glenn Selden- 
feld, one of the partners, 
in the proposed Fox River- 
boat Casino, Fox Lake, has 
been circulating In political arenas 
again. Might be a connection with 
the fact that outgoing Gov. fun 
Edgar has fresh ideas about ex- 
panding gambling. 

Coming back? 

Grayslake Trustee Bob Rus- 
sell, one of the longest serving vil- 
lage officials in Lake County, has 
changed his mind about retiring at 
the end of his current term. He was 
among the first to get nominating 
petitions In circulation. 



Remembering dad 

Newly elected County Board 
Representative Bob Sabonjlonto 

juvenile antics over where he will fit 
In the reorganized board is mindful 
of his late father's knack for produc- 
ing headlines. Whatever he comes 
up in the future, it's doubtful that 
Bob Jr. can top his dad's switch from 
the Democratic party to the Repub- 
lican, a shocker three decades ago, 
when the original Bob Sabonjlan 
was mayor of Waukegan. 



Backing off 

Illinois Congressman John 
Porter (R- Dist. 10) was among the 
Republicans In Congress last week 
saying It was time to put the Lewin- 
sky matter behind the nation. 

Porter told Chicago's NBC-5 
that he would not support an im- 
peachment vote against President 
BUI Clinton. 

Following the release of the 
Lewinsky tapes and the outcome of 
the November election, several 
House Republicans have backed off 
the impeachment proceedings. 

Porter's reaction comes as no 
surprise, he has often stood on his 
own against Republican party ideals. 

Recommending 
replacement 

Toso Maravelas has been a 
Village Trustee In Antioch since 
1995, After the November voting, he 
announced that he will not seek re- 
election. Maravelas has a strong 
record of community involvement 
and is active with many groups in 
the Antioch area. 

"I'd like to see Rich Kufalk take 
my spot," Maravelas said. "He's very 
well liked. He's known In the com- 



munity. He has been in township 
level politics. He has served the 
community well." 

Kufalk may be very busy this 
spring. He also has taken a co-lead- 
ership role with the District 34 Citi- 
zens Referendum Committee that 
will try to tell people about the 
school bond referendum. 

Leadership award 

Highland Park Mayor Ray- 
mond Geracl is being recognized 
for more than his foresight with the 
Town of Fort Sheridan these days. 
Opportunity, Inc., a Highland Park 
based organization which employs 
the disabled,, awarded Its Handlca- 
pable Leadership Award to the 
northshorc Mayor. '■ - 

Rainy day fund 

Even with a budget surplus, Illi- 
nois State Treasurer lady Boar 
Ibplnka Is planning for tough eco- 
nomic times. She proposed legisla- 
tion last week which will earmark a 
$600 million revenue stabilization 
or "rainy day" fund to help Illinois 
through tough economic times. The 
bill calls for automatic transfer of 
money to a special revenue stabi- 
lization fund. 




Ah, football! It's a brutal 
sport but so much fun to 
watch, and so lending Itself 
to the bestowing of — or 
should we say the saddling with — 
nicknames. 

During a lifetime of random we 
have had the Glpper, the Galloping 
Ghost, the Horse, Sweetness and 
now (of all things) the Running 
Lump. 

Wouldn't you just love to be . 
known as die Running Lump? Sorry, 
but thanks to the sports media that 
label, probably for life, belongs to 
the University of Wisconsin's wide- 
body ballcarrier, Ron Dayne, a 5- 
foot- 10, 255-pound college junior. 
(He prefers to be known as the Great 
Dayne!) 

The Glpper, of course, was 
George Glpp, the Notre Dame star 
of 80 years ago, Through the 
decades and across the gridirons, 
football fans have been thrilled by 
the likes of Illinois' Red Grange, 
known as the Galloping Ghost; 
Wisconsin's Alan (the Horse) 
Ameche; and the Chicago Bears' 
Walter (Sweetness) Payton, to 
mention just a few. 

Wouldn't life be duller without 
football? And wouldn't It be less fun 
without nicknames, If we couldn't 
laugh at ourselves by calling mam- 
moth men Tiny and bald men Curly? 
If men couldn't call their wives Cup- 
cake and women couldn't call their 
husbands Butthead? 

Some of us escape being nick- 
named but it Isn't easy. Sometimes 
your surname will do you in. if it's 
Waters, friends may call you Muddy, 
If it's Rhodes, they'll call you Dusty. 
Andersons are most Ukety to be ' 
called Andy and Petersons become 
Pete. 

My personal Peterson friend 
grew up next door to a neighbor 
who called him Pete while he was 
just a tyke. When a tittle brother 
came along, the neighbor labeled 
that Peterson "Repeat" 

With Wisconsin's Running Lump 
now headed for the Rose Bowl, we're 
reminded of that lovable icebox- 
sized Chicago Bear of a few years 
ago, William "Refrigerator" Perry. 



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THE 

PFARR 

CORNER 

JerryPfdri 



■'■-. 

(Whatever happened to the Fridge?) 
Other memorable football nick- 
names Include Broad way Joe Na- 
math, Bronfslaw (Bronko) Nogurski, 
Slingin' Sammy Baugh, Norman , 
(Boomer) Eslason, Mean Joe Green, 
Ed (Too Tall) Jones, Dandy Don 
Meredith, and YA. (the Bald Eagle) 
TRde. 

Current nicknames are even 
more outlandish.. Consider Ben 
(and the Amazing Technicolor 
Dream) Coates of the New England 
Patriots, Andre (Bad Moon) Rlson of 
the Kansas City Chiefs, Eric (Steep- 
ing with the) Blenlemy of the 
Cincinnati Bengals, and Curtis (My 
Favorite) Martin of the New York 
lets. 

Football certainly has outpaced 
baseball In the nickname game. 
Where today are such baseball per- 
sonalities as Leo (the Up) Durochen 
Joltin' Joe DlMaggio, the Yankee 
Clipper; Ted Williams, the Splendid 
Splin ten Willie Mays, the Say Hey 
Kid; Stan (the Man) Musial; Ducky 
Medwlck; and Dizzy and Daffy 
Dean? 

Well, we do have Sammy Sosa 
but, as sociologists have observed, 
baseball is what we were, football is 
what we have become. 

Ronald Reagan acquired the 
nickname "the Glpper" by portray- 
ing the Notre Dame star in the 1940 
movie, "Knute Rockne, All-Ameri- 
can." 

Our funny little 20-month-old 
grandson, Zachary, already has a 
similar sobriquet, "the Geether," be- 
cause when he began exploring the 
gift of speech one of his first expres- 
sions was "gee th." 

Now, of course, he is way be- 
yond that. For example, he can say 
really big and important words like 
watermelon and Grandpa. 



¥,r 



m 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Village ethics law puts foxes in charge of hen house 



While 1 would be the first 
to agree that a strong, 
enforceable ethics law 
is needed In Vernon 
Hills, this new one just passed does 
not fit the bill. The reason it all came 
about was because of the question- 
able activities of the very board peo- 
ple that now make up the ethics 
commission, Byrne and Cashman, 
with Henley In the wings as First al- 
ternate. 

Byrne and Henley billed the vil- 
lage for their personal use of village 
cell phones, an unauthorized ex- 
pense. Byrne, Cashman, Henley, 
Emery and Koch billed the village 
for personal meals and drinks at 
Legend's Sports Bar, and unautho- 
rized expense that was never reim- 
bursed to the village. Allstar Gym- 
nastics, Cashman's family business, 
somehow managed to avoid virtual- 
ly any enforcement of village codes 
for over six months, and the chang- 
ing of the Cuneo's annexation agree- 
ment to allow his use of their prop- 
erty is certainly suspect. Wonder 
what their rent is? 

The commission should be 
made up of independent personnel 
so that abuse, which could easily 
take place under the present set up, 
doesn't occur. The same situation 



occurs in the way election commis- 
sions are made up. The foxes are In 
charge of the hen house, and the 
hens are getting slaughtered unfair- 
ly. Maybe the next village board can 
improve on this. Did Jim Heier get 
credit for his brave role in cleaning 
up the doo doo at the village hall? 

Steven T. Klein 
Vernon Hills 

We need open spaces 

Escape from the Asphalt curse; 
take time out from the suburban 
sprawl and journey down by the Des 
Plaines River or the North Share 
trails. 

There are many miles of them 
around your liberfyviile Township; 
from Liberty Prairie to the north to 
Canterbury Circle in the south; But- 
ler Lake, Adler Park, Old School and 
more. All are easily accessible, so 
please get out there for some peace 
and quiet. 

Your dollars helped put in these 
recreation areas; so bring your kids 
and their buggies, your bikes, or 
your sleds, and yes, even your 
wheelchairs. There are lots and lot's 
of wild life out there to watch and 
enjoy. We must stand up to the very 
rich, mostly out of town developers, 
one more time. 



Who are trying to build on every 
inch of this Township, and seem to 
have a choke hold on most elected 
officials. Look at what they have 
done to traffic and flooding. Genera- 
tions of kids to follow will be proud 
of our vision. We need ball fields 
now. Vote "YES" in February on the 
open space question. 

Tom Lynch 
Libertyviile Township Trustee 

Give thanks 

As the Thanksgiving season ap- 
proaches, we give thanks for the na- 
tion and its bounty— and for the 
American spirit that continues to 
tend, through the ages, our democ- 
racy, our Constitution, and the insti- 
tutions of our government. 

I give thanks, as well, for the op- 
portunity to have participated in the 
democratic process — and to the vot- 
ers of Illinois for the privilege of rep- 
resenting them in the United States 
Senate. 

1 will do my best 

Peter G. Fitzgerald 
U.S. Senator-elect 

A vital message 

The letter from Dennis Moisio, 
moderator of the 1st Congregational 
United Church of Christ, in the Nov. 



13 edition needs to be responded to. 
He condemned the "Hell House" put 
on by the young people of Calvary 
Temple Assembly of God in 
Waukegan as being bigoted and de- 
meaning because it presents a "dead 
homosexual youth who has died of 
AIDS and that he has joined all the 
rest of the perverted souls in hell" 

In America, Mr. Moisio is enti- 
ded to believe anything he wishes. 
But, if he thinks that portrayal (s big- 
oted, then Mr. Moisio's argument is 
with the Bible and not with "Hell 
House." At numerous places in the 
Bible homosexuality is denounced, 
even called an abomination. 

Mr. Moisio goes on to say, "Our 
faith convinces us that God does not 
consign persons to hell based on 
their sexual orientation. Love, not 
fear and hate, are at the heart of 
faith and the way of Christ." 

Again, he is free to believe any- 
thing he wishes, but what we believe 
has to be based on some kind of ob- 
jective reality or it Is merely wishful 



thinking or personal preference, 
none of which should impress any- 
one who is concerned with the truth 
about a given issue. Faith for faith's 
sake is not very useful if it runs 
counter to the revealed Word of God 
which has illuminated Western cul- 
ture and established America as the 
fairest and most prosperous nation 
in history. The most com- 

pelling question for us to answer is, 
"What is the most loving response a 
Christian can show a homosexual? 
Mr. Moisio's "church" hasphosen to 
"affirm" homosexuals without advis- 
ing them of what the Bible says 
about what happens to anyone who 
continues to live in their sin without 
repenting and allowing the blood of 
Christ to redeem them. 

Hats off to the youth who worked 
hard on the project and are willing to 
lovingly present an unpopular but vi- 
tal message to our increasingly law- 
less and selfish culture. 

Ed Moore 
Antioch 



Letters welcome 

Letters to the editor are welcome. They should be on tobies of general 

interest, approximately 250 words or less. All letters must be signed, and 

contain a home address and telephone number. The editor reserves the 

right to condense all letters. 



— ■ 



■ ■ ■■ : 



.'.' 



C6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



November 27, 1998 



Lake County adopts 
$511 million budget 



By JOHN ROSZKOWSKI 
City Editor 

Lake County Board members 
unanimously approved a $31 1 mil- 
lion budget, which provides for in- 
creased manpower for law enforce- 
ment and the court system. 

The $311 million budget pack- 
age, approved by the board at the 
November meeting, represents a % VI 
percent Increase over last year's bud- 
get of $296 million. 

I.ake County Administrator K;irl 
Nollenberger expects revenues and 
expenditures to balance in the new 
fiscal year The new fiscal year slarls 
Dec. I and runs through Nov. .10, 

wsk 

"It's a balanced budget. It's con 
tinning the fiscally conservative poli 
lies of the county and ensin ring thai 
we make il wiihiii.'MJdaysol llie year 
IMHHJin good financial roiidilion ." 

Nollenberger said stalrwide ta.\ 
■caps limited .mv substantial budget 
im nMscs Inn "we wen- still able in 



add a few positions in the criminal 
justice system to respond lo the In- 
creasing (demands ) of the court sys- 
tem, state's attorney's office and 
sherirTs office." 

A lotal of 15 positions were 
added in the budget. Twelve of the 
new employees will be in the area of 
law enforcement or the courl system, 
according to Nollenberger. That In- 
cludes two attorneys and a secretary 
in the stale's attorney's office, one 
new attorney in the public defender's 
office, two sheriffs deputies, and six 
new personnel in the area of court 
services. 

County Hoard Chairman 
Robert Crever said the increased 
demand being placed on the court 
system due lo criminal activity is 
also placing a greater strain on the 
counly budget. 

"One of the areas we're Stlttg- 
gliiig with is the court and judicial 
system been use those ureas are ex- 
panding and (revenues) arc not 
Keeping pace, " he said. 



FROM PAGE CI 

MIXED REVIEWS: Environmentalists unhappy 

til groups represented in developing tlon dedicated to preserving natural 



. 



good first slep. 

"We think the consensus plan 
has some merit," said Craig. "It's a 
good start. We're glad the business 
leaders of Lake County are becoming 
more Interested In preserving our 
open space," 

Craig said he thinks It's impnr- people together. 

to continue the consensus build However, County Hoard member 

he Sierra Club would Carol Calabresa (District 15-Llber- 



tant 

itvg process 

like to see municipalities get on board 

with this," he said. 

The next step in the process, ac- 
cording to County hoard Chairman 
Hoberl Crever, will be lo present the 
plan to the hake County Municipal 
'.eague, which meets Nov. I!l. TIlV 



open spaces, and Charles Bartcla of 
the area support center of Manpow- 
er, presented the plan at the Nov. 12 
meeting. "- < H ' 

O'Keefe and Battels outlined the 
plan's four major goals which are: 
The need for a strong economic base 
In Lake County, the need to preserve 
and/or develop land through com- 
lyvllle) said she believes the plan pre- prehemlve planning policies; the 
sents a "real opportunity" to bring need to preserve the county's unique 
environmental and business groups natural resources aridcultural her- 



l he plan. 

"Before I'll sign on, you'll have to 
Include some environmental groups 
active In the county to the table," she 
said. "To continue (o exclude these 
groups is not a good way lo bring 



together. 

"We need to have a consensus of 
business and environmental lead- 
ers," she said. "I hope everyone can 



eague represents lite 5$ municipali slay ai the tabic? and continue work- 



AIDS Day commemorated 



h 



Wmlil Mi's 
miiir t(H pci i 



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■\\v in U.mkrg.m. imilrs ihr jiiih 
.fa: to iilfrriil .in iijirn house /nun 
{ i'i f.n ," |.i mi Pfuvuied will te 
hulls,- ioi.ii -. |!!|ui : [ii,ilintl tegaltl 
1 1 u: |iini'.i.iM' ■ .mil m'i v ices a\ ail 
,ihlc ,*i fin' ! hi h'H .mil rehesli 
H'f!;i'- 



\r tin- conclusion nj theopt'ii 
Iihum- Haihata liuhatdson, Corn 
iii-i t>] I .ike ( otintv. will lie pre 
vi-nii'd uilh the lust Hey Hiad l.ul/ 
i i.iiii!iimiii\ seivii ■!' Awanl I vents 
wti) hi' loJImved. In a candlelight 
vigil anil pmccssion to iirsi Con 
giegaiHin.il Church, 'A20 (liand 
Aye in Uaukegan. loi a memorial 
sen in- in icmcmhet v those whom 
AID'S has taken I mm Us. 



ties In Like Counly 

Tom Adams, president of the 
Lake County Municipal League, at- 
lended the meeting and indicated his 
initial support for the consensus 
plan. Stale ]\np. Mark heaubien (It- 
Mtindelein) said he also supporls.(lie 
consensus building process. 

However, some audience mem- 
bers slid had concerns about envi- 
ronmental issues. 

John Malijevich. a former I)e 
mocralic state representative from 
North ( Chicago area' for ^(i years, saiil 
he leli the commiitee wliich dcvcl 
oped the plan reflected primarily 
business and development interests, 
and there were lew environmental- 
ists represented, 

"I ihoughl there should lie more 
inclusion of cnvironinc nialisis in the 
pian." said Malijevich. lie added thai 
there were no minorities or union 
members represented on the com- 
mittee. 

Counly Hoard member Sandy 
( 'ole (Disirict 1 1 (irayslake) agreed 
there were not enough environmen- 




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ing together because that's what it's 
going to lake." 

The consensus plan was devel- 
oped by an ad hoc committee formed 
in early IW7 to ease die confronta- 
tional lone of discourse on natural 
preservation and economic develop- 
ment issues that has existed since the 
counly unveiled its strategic plan In 
September l<)95. 

Commiitee members Joyce O'- 
Keele, associate director of lite Open- 
lands Project, a noli profit organlza- 



Itage; and the promotion of polices 
(hot support affordable housing, Infill 
development, transportation alterna- 
tives and infrastructure Improve- 
ments. 

O'Keefe said the committee will 
meet again In January to discuss 
feedback from the meeting and to 
put together a proposal on how to 
proceed in the future. 

"I thought it was a good kickoff 
for the plan," she said. "The people 
were Interested and seemed to be 
ready to begin the dialogue, but 
clearly there's a lot of work to be 
done. I'm hoping we'll be able to 
turn these ideas into action very 
soon." 



TREE FARM: 

open this weekend 

by appointment. They close Sun- 
day, Dec. 21. 

Ucnedeck said the key to 
keeping a tree fresh is to water It. 
He provides care Instructions to 
people who buy their trees. 

Hayden said that a properly 
maintained fresh-cut tree will last 
indoors for six weeks with mini- 
mal needle loss. She recommends 
cutting a half-inch off the tree 
stem, plunging it into boiling wa- 
ter, and then never letting it dry 
out. Hayden said that boiling wa- 
ter should be added to the base as 
needed. 

The boiling water softens tree 
sap and allows it to take up more 
water. She said to keep the tree 
away from heating outlets, radia- 
tors, and fireplaces since they will 
dry out the tree more quickly, 

Henedeck said their trees are 
llie final result of much care over 
the years as they grow. It makes 
idem special and very attractive. 
"We started planting trees in 
19H9, he said. "We just keep 
planting trees every year." 

"In April, we hand plant about 
1,000 trees," he said. 

The trees replace harvested, 
dead, eaten trees. Beer like lo eat 
the tree tips. Once tree lips are re- 
moved, the tree does not grow 



Two farms 



properly. 

Trees are trimmed for four to 
five years before they are sold. 
The trimming will hold growth to 
about a foot a year. 

"This way it forces growth to 
move In on the iroo," ho said. "So 
that is how you got a nice atiapo.'*- 

"Dress for an outside adven- 
ture," Benedeck recommends. 
"Dress like you're going to a 
farm." 

That means gloves, boots, and 
coats. 

Although the amount of time 
to find, evaluate, reconsider, de- 
cide, cut, and return with a tree 
can be relatively short, there 
may be other reasons why fami- 
lies remain among the trees 
longer. 

"If there is snow out there, 

people can bring a sled along," 
Benedeck said. He has even seen 
wagons head out to the field filled 
with children along for the ride 

Pat Hayden encourages peo- 
ple to bring their own sleds in 
case all of theirs are In use. The 
skid type of sled works best when 
snow is scarce, she said. 

Por further information, peo- 
ple can reach Hayden Tree Farm 
at 395-4127 and Family Christmas 

Tree Farm at 949-5760. 



ANNIVERSARY: Forest 
preserve hoping for luck 



structures like the I jike Counly Mu- 
seum. 

While the total amount of the 
referendum may seem high, the cosl 
lo individual taxpayers is minimal, 
according to lluhai. 

A brochure provided by (he I ,ake 
County Forest Preserves shows thai 
the estimated increased cost for the 
owner of a SIOO.OUO home on their 
tax bill would be only $9. 1 3, while the 
owner of a $ 1 50,000 home would pay 
an additional S14. 13. 

Huhai said a survey in April 
showed thai more than 60 percent of 
residents supported a modest tax in- 
crease for the forest preserves. 

"We think it has a great opportu- 
nity to pass. Our county survey 
showed that people like the forest 
preserves and they were willing to in- 
vest a small portion of money to do 
that (pay for improvements to the 



system)," he said. 

The Lake Counly Forest Pre- 
serve District was founded in 195B 
and this year marks its 40th an- 
niversary. 

Over the next several months, 
forest preserve supporters will inten- 
sify their efforts to promote the up- 
coming referendum. 

Kimmcl said a speakers bureau 
will give speeches and a video pre- 
sentations to various groups 
.throughout the county about the ref- 
erendum, outlining in detail the ben- 
efits. A mass mailing will also be sent 
out in March to registered voters in 
households throughout the county, 
he said. 

"We've started a few things to be- 
gin the process of letting peope know 
about it," he said, "Obviously, we'll 
do a lot more of it as we get closer to 
the election." 



m, 






. ■ 



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MINDING 
YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 

Don Taylor 




Reflections - 
What do 
you see? 

It seems, as we grow older wc 
spend more time pondering 
the past. Memories tend to 
grow sweeter with the passing 
of time. The normal human psyche 
is good at forcing out negative 
memories and reinforcing the posi- 
tive. 

Thanksgiving Is for most Ameri- 
cans a time of reflection, a time for 
looking bock and remembering all 
the good things we enjoy. We get 
together with family and friends 
and celebrate. And, well we should. 
Wc ore most blessed. As a nation, 
as b people and as individuals we 
have it so very, very good. 

Unfortunately, in the fast-paced 
life we live today, we often forget 
how good it Is. We lose track of our 
blessings. We spend too much time 
in the rat race chasing the cheese 
with little thought to the rapid pas- 
sage of life. 

All too often It takes a cata- 
strophic event to bring us to our 
senses. It may be the death of a 
loved one, a life threatening disease 
or the loss of a job. Then suddenly 
we come face-to-face with our own 
reflection. Who are we? Are we 
contributing anything meaningful 
to society? We ask ourselves, "Is 
this all there is?" 

This Thanksgiving season let 
me encourage you to become 
proactive in your pondering. Don't 
wait until life brings you up short 
with one of those litUe "unexpect- 
eds." Take time right now to reflect 
on all the good things in your life. 

The Bible offers a wonderful 
guide for pondering in Philippians 
Chapter four, verse eight. The New 
International version reads tike this: 
"Finally, brothers, whatever is true, 
whatever is noble, whatever is right, 
whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, 
whatever is admirable - if anything 
is excellent or praiseworthy - think 
about such things. 

Some positive 
ponderings 

1 am thankful for our great 
country and the blessings and op- 
portunities our citizenship bestows 
on us. Our Nation is the most ac- 
tive, productive and successful in 
the history of mankind. I am glad 
our founding fathers passionately 
debated the issues of government, 
economic guidelines and personal 
freedoms. With all its shortcom- 
ings, this nation is still an example 
to the world. I would never trade 
my citizenship for any other. 

I am thankful for my family her- 
itage. A heritage that taught me 
that hard work, honest sweat, in- 
tegrity and following the "Golden 
Rule" are all cornerstones of accept- 
able character. A heritage that rec- 
ognized we must earn respect, pro- 
tect a good name and leave things 
better than we found them. 

I am thankful for my faith. It 
was first taught to me at my moth- 
er's knee. Many great men and 
women have proven those early 
teachings by the way they have con- 
ducted their lives. The gospel of Je- 
sus Christ is a divine reality for me. 
My faith sustains me when nothing 
else can. How grateful 1 am that 
God designed such a grand plan. 

I am thankful that many of this 
world's greatest treasures are at the 
same time both free and priceless. 
Those I treasure most are; love, 
friendship, health, the splendor of 
sunrises and sunsets, the freedom 

Please see TAYLOR /C8 




November 27, 1998 



Lakeland NewspaperstCI^ 







organize 




A group of Lake County busl- 
nesspeople have announced their 
Intention to charter the first new 
commercial bank to be located in 
Grayslake In over 57 years. An appli- 
cation for a permit to organize a 
bank to be called Northway State 
Bank was filed with the Illinois Com- 
missioner of Banks and Real Estate 
on Nov. 10. 

Pete Rath, who will serve as 
chairman of the new bank, stated, 
"Our goal Is to bring locally owned 
community bonking to the Grayslake 
area to service both the persona] and 
commercial needs of our customers. 
Grayslake Is an Idea] location for a 
new bank. It is positioned in the cen- 
ter of the dynamic growth being ex- 
perienced in Lake County. 1 am look- 
ing forward to the challenge and 
hard work of creating this new insti- 
tution in our area." 

The incorporators of the pro- 



posed bank Include Peter J. Rath, 
until recently a First Vice President 
with the First National Bank of 
Chicago; Anthony M. Augelli, the 
President of Anthony Pontiac, 
Buick and GMC; Frederic J. Holt- 
grcn, President of Hydra Corpora- 
tion; John W. Lynn, President of 
Stack on Products; David A. Novak, 
President of Lyn Den Inc.; and 
David L Waldron, Principal of Vi- 
sual Pak Inc. and President of Blis- 
ters Inc. Each of the Incorporators 
plans to serve as a member of the 
bank's board of directors. 

Joe Tomasello, who will be- 
come the President and a director 
of the de novo bank said, "In this era 
of bank consolidation, it is exciting 
to be one of the founders of a local- 
ly owned and controlled bank fn 
Grayslake. Pete and I are longtime 
friends who have been bankers in 
this area for many years. We share 



the belief that a bank should strive 
to become part of the bedrock of its 
community through its service to 
the Individuals, institutions and or- 
ganizations located in the commu- 
nity.'* 

Rath will be Chairman of the 
Board of the new bank. Rath, who 
lives in Wauconda, has been a 
banker for over 28 years. At the First 
National Bank of Chicago, he was 
Senior Commercial Lender for the 
Northwest Division of the Commu- 
nity Banking Group. The bank will 
be managed by Tomasello, who will 
serve as President. Tomasello has 
been a banker for over 25 years and 
until recently was Senior Vice Pres- 
ident at the Bank of Waukegan and 
a Vice President of its holding com- 
pany, Northern States Financial 
Corp. 

Also associated with the new 
bank is Philip Moran, who will act 



as Vice President of Operations and 
has been a banker for over 3\ years 
with experience in data processing, 
proof and cash management sys- 
tems. 

Michael J. Ellis, Grayslake Vil- 
lage Manager and Treasurer, said, 
"It'.s great that local Lake County 
business people decided to start an 
Independent community bank In 
our town. The location will serve as 
an anchor of our planned Route 83 
and Center Street Corridor Devel- 
opment." 

The new bank will require the 
approval of the appropriate regu- 
latory authorities, a process which 
will take several months. Capital- 
ization of the bank is expected to 
be accomplished in early 1999 
through a public offering of stock. 
The offering will be made by 
means of a prospectus to local in- 
vestors. 



Holiday economic outlook 

The ringing you hear 
is cash registers, as 
strong spending's ahead 



Santa's gift to the nation's retail- 
ers for the 1998 holiday season will 
be cash registers ringing up 5.8 per- 
cent more in sales than a year ago, 
according to Diane Swonk, deputy 
chief economist of The First Nation- 
al Bank of Chicago. 

And the registers should be even 
more active in the Midwest, she said, 
where analysis" of preliminary sales 
tax receipts data for Illinois suggests 
a gain of 6.9 percent over a year ago. 

"Consumers are not expected to 
play Grinch this year, and it's likely 
that retailers will be surprised by the 
strength of spending," Swonk said in 
her annual Christmas edition of One 
View of the Economy, her monthly 
newsletter. "But we've learned not to 
be against U.S. consumers — espe- 
cially when they have money in their 
pockets." 

According to Swonk, among oth- 
er encouraging signs as die holidays 
approach are recent efforts by the 
Federal Reserve Board to shore up 
investor confidence. "Such moves 
have helped to reverse one of the few 
negatives in the ouUook for Christ- 
mas spending: a correction in equity 
prices," Swonk said. "The Wall Street 
bears will be wrong — again." 

In the strongest gain in holiday 
retail sales since 1994, Swonk point- 
ed to a bias among consumers for 
"big ticket" items over clothing and 
other traditional Christmas items. 
She said strong gains should be ex- 
perienced in furniture, appliances 
and vehicles, while consumer elec- 



tronics sales, including computers, 
will also remain relatively robust. 

Dlscounters'and high- end retail- 
ers are expected to share more of the 
gain in the general merchandise cat- 
egory than traditional department 
stores, said Swonk. 

She attributed this to several fac- 
tors, including die fact that much of 
the nation's acceleration in wages 
has occurred among entry level 
workers, who are more likely to shoo 
at discount stores. Moreover, dis- 
counters tend to carry a greater se- 
lection of consumer electronics. 

Swonk added that higher in- 
come households, having benefitted 
from mortgage restructuring and the 
recent rebound in equity prices, will 
buoy retailers catering to the upper 
brackets. 

On the pricing front, Swonk an- 
ticipates a mixed bag on discounting 
and the direction prices take. With 
retailers having ordered cautiously, 
inventories should be held in check, 
and thus, discounting minimized. 

However, she said, "With the 
bulk of price competition from Asia 
still ahead of us, we can expect to see 
particularly aggressive pricing in 
consumer electronics and vehicles." 

First Chicago is a subsidiary of 
BANK ONE CORPORATION, the na- 
tion's fifth largest bank company, 
with assets of more than $235 billion. 
BANK ONE is a major commercial 
bank nationally and the leading 
business bank in the Midwest and 
Arizona. 




Participating in the groundbreaking for Volkwagen Credit, Inc., 
are, from left: Douglas E. Shehan, vice president, The Alter Group; 
Richard M. Gatto, senior vice president, The Alter Group; Klaus D. 
Schuermann, president, Volkwagen Credit, Inc.; William David- 
son, process leader, finance, Volkwagen of America, Inc.; Michael 
R. Carroll, senior vice president, Trammel Crow Automotive Real- 
ty Services, Inc. — Submitted photo 

Alter Group breaks ground for 
Volkswagen Credit building 



The Alter Group, a national cor- 
porate development and build-to- 
suit firm, announced the develop- 
ment of a 65,000-square-foot corpo- 
rate office building In Libertyville, for 
Volkswagen Credit, Inc., a subsidiary 
of Volkswagen of America, Inc., an- 
nounced Michael J. Alter, president. 

The facility, to be developed on a 
build-to-suit basis on a 7.5-acre site, 
will be an automotive-financing cen- 



ter serving Volkswagen customers 
throughout the United States. The 
building will be located in the 100- 
acre Lincoln Commerce Center, lo- 
cated at Winchester Road and 
Franklin Boulevard, northwest of 
Libertyville. 

According to Douglas E. Shehan, 
vice president of The Alter Group, 
completion of construction is sched- 
uled for July of 1999. 



Flatlander's beer named as an 'ultimate beer' in book 



The 80 Schilling Ale of Flat- 
lander's Restaurant and Brewery, 
Lincolnshire, has been named as one 
of the world's great beers in the book 
"Ulitimate Beer "written by Michael 
Jackson. 

The 192-page book by the world 
beer gum is an adventure of educa- 
tion into the world of beer. The 
book, filled with dozens of four color 
pictures printed on glossy paper, dis- 
cusses "What makes a gTeat beer." 

It also looks into "Why do beers 
taste the way they do? For any beer 



style, which are the best brews avail- 
able? And which beers do you drink 
to accompany which foods— from 
appetizer through dessert? 

Discussing Flatlander's 80 
Schilling Ale, Jackson writes: 

"People from the Midwestern 
U.S. states sometimes self- mockingly 
call diemselves fiadanders. Brewery 
is on the premises of a spacious restu- 
rant in the Illinois town of Licolnshire. 

"Despite the town's English 
name, the brewery's most notewor- 
thy product is a very authentic Scot- 



tish ale: typically full in color and 
textured in body, with a dryish, very 
fainty peaty maltiness. Scottish malt 
is used." 

An honor 

Brewers Kris Huber and Antho- 
ny Carollo describe the beer as offer- 
ing a balance of malty sweetness, 
roastlness and hop bitterness. 
Roasted barly is used to provide the 
dark rich color. They said the name 
of the beer is derived from the Scot- 
tish brewing tradition of naming 



brews based on the price of ale. 

TimLukoski, managing partner, 
said, "I am thrilled by this honor. We 
know we have great beer. To be rec- 
ognized by others for having one of 
the great beers of the world is a huge 
thrill. The entire staff at FlaUander's 
is excited about his honor." 

Lukoski said he was told the 
book has just gone into bookstores 
worldwide at a price os$29.95 a copy. 
He added that he hopes everyone 
will try this beer to team what a great 
ale is all about 



"vm 


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.-..•■■ ' '', 



Co /Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE 



November 27, 1993 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Below are real estate transactions for villages in and around the Lakeland 
Newspapers circulation area. Listed are the property address, property buyer, 
and purchase price. 



Hawthorn Woods 



4 Wellesley Ct, Bradley & Julie l.iven- 
good, $425,845 

Ingleslde 



66 Kiverwoods lid, Steven & Terry Lux- 
enberg. $286,150 

Undenhurst 



Antloch 



659 Briarwood Cr. David & Cindric Dzi- 

ki, $269,286 

363 Joren Tr, Bret & Trade Reynolds, 

$115,500 

700 Summerlyn Dr, Peter & Kimberiy 

Bognar, $157,484 

712 Summerlyn Dr, Randy & Mary 

Chappell, $143,900 

903 Tiffany Farms IU), John & Joyce 

Aparo, $175,600 

25007 W. 2nd Si. Sean Mors, SI 00.0(10 



Fox Lake 



36-3 Bermuda, John ft Marjorii 1 

Krulsch. $25,000 

184 Howard Ct. Chase Manhattan 

Rank. S 18 1,30 1 

38 N. Route 12. Siaie Hank Of The 

lakes, 5260.000 



Grayslake 



370 Ashford Lfl, lames &■ Hchei a\ We 

her, $236,440 

:!39 Cekhell Ave, Karen (ieurue. 

SI 12.000 

HOL' leanne ( i. John ft Sandra Limln . 

Sl'Hliddd 

il.'.n ]r,it]!i('( t. Clunk niatnmiv 

m% sIuvm'jM |-val,o/t'an.5ll l '."i0t] 
KUdl'.itiim.ii ' I MiMitft-C "InN.i 
Ihili.inlMin.S.'H'ir: 



417 Reagan, Jacqueline Hosgroof& 
Daniel Bosgroog, $177,000 
!8475wSpringwood Dr, Robcrl & 
Denicc Kraft. $229,490 

Gurnee 

1542 Auburn. Timothy Anderson. 

$120,000 

649 Beth, Beverly Graafsma, S90.000 

7010 Buchanan. Matthew Coze, 

$127,000 

4572 Covenant Ct, Mark Lopaika. 

5230,000 

1 198 lladlcy Cir. Dan left Amelia Vina"., 

$291. fBL' 

430 Magnolia, Scon Brown' & Mmiira 

|ack.son-hrown.$]IH,f»0(l 

3:»!(i2 ,Y Summerfield Dr. James & Ion 

Meier. 526 1.996 

339 1 5 N. Summerfielcl Dr, Tom 

[amanna & Swferrfe Limaan. $3(M,H2(i 

34 15 I'anfii , Kellv Steamis* lohn 

Huvvaert.Sl2H.ObO 

MO Prairie ( >ak Hd. I )ale Si ( :alherine 

H.nicnslem. SI 87.900 

31021 While Oak I. ii. James Smith, 

SI 10.00(1 

Hainesvllle 

I Id I- Littleton Ii./liei]g|H)i«K'l.ii|i]ii 
Ding. SlfjJ.'iW 

17IMillw,tter Dr. (.liMtiplin^fm.i 
Amlerseii. SI 62,27(1 



504 Garfield Rd, Andre Petruzza. 

$131,000 

36934 Waicrside l.n. Leonard Hirca, 

$65,000 

Lake Villa ^___ 



1 1 15 Bcvelry Dr, Atam & Zareena 

Mirza, $184,560 

505 Blnckstone Ci, Mark A Sonya 

Vollmer, $219,578 

21798 Rngle, l-dwin Umpieere. 

$117,000 

73 Picldstone Dr. lames KLIr/abell) 

Crosswhite.S 183.06(1 

37100 N. Bonnie Hrae Hd, Harry Zdi 

loskuy, $283,250 

37139 N. Piper l.n, Donald llamel. 

5108,500 

34808 Havineen'si Dr. Monira Malain. 

SI 38.350 

728 Sun lake Rd. Scull 8 I lealher (.ole- 

man. $169,819 

18729 IV. I.azv Acre, Violet Smkovidi. 

S2l(i.331 

821 WoodhillCl, I )ana Ashley & 

Michael Li wreiu'e. S 18.683 



LibertyvHle 



fi 1 4 I Jownuig Rd, Scab v &■ Kimherlv 

Hess. $23(1.000 

618 Roosevelt Di, Hri.nl Kadonsky. 

$249.50(1 



Lincolnshire 



(.OxtordDr, Rnhard Milliner K I'alnuu 
I'nip. $346,000 



421 Ashwood, Elizabclh Petrovic, 

43 1 Ashwood Ct. Arnold Huhtilin & He- 
len Huhtclin. $120,900 
620 Coony. Rhonda & Robby Naylor, 
$158,000 
232G t Grand, Stephen Baczunski. 

$122,000 

21 19 Old Elm Rd, Travis & Amara 

Mielke, $117,500 

67 Stable Way, Joseph & l.inda 

Tomasiewicz, $190,385 

40 Stafford Cir. Daniel & Carol Nelson, 

$319,740 

719 Summit Ct, Waller & Mary Klus, 

$185,000 

713 Sycamore Ct, lime Beverly, 

$143,868 

Mundelein 

1222-b Hallantrae, Julie Krallk, $91,000 

1 209 P. Bradwell, David Benham, 

$101,500 

102 1 l : ranklin St, Timothy & Susan 

Phanco, $321,252 

1543 Green view. Sherry & Cory Smith, 

SI 22.500 

654 Unwind Dr, Mitchell Sacks. 

$230,000 

26795 LjiigmeadowCir. Robert Bowes 

& Ursula Oswald, $88,500 

26248 Midlothian Rd, Robert Wiese. 

$220,000 

527 S. Seymour, Carol Vatadcz, 

SI 14.000 

540 Slaceda Dr. Renzo Cola, $240,000 

1 119 Thomas Blvd. UsDepl OfHud, 

$191,567 



_ RE^IBK 

t|^i^ ^ ^-- Center 



(Shii 



Each Office independently 
Owned and Operated 



fSr 



LINDA SPARKS 

Multi-Million Dollar 

Producer 

847-223-7878 

100 Atkinson Road 
Grayslake, Illinois 60030 

(847) 740-4471 



< 



. . '. ; .■;•■•-■.,-: ■..-'■■ ■■•■ 



ATTENTION RENTERS!! 

STOP PAYING YOUR LANDLORD'S MORTGAGE!! 

INTEREST RATES HAVE NOT BEEN THIS LOW IN 30 YEARS!!! 

DOWN PAYMENT ASSISTANCE POSSIBLE!! 

IF YOU DON'T SEE IT HERE, TELL ME WHAT YOU WANT AND I'LL FIND ITU! 

LINDA SPARKS 

(Direct) 847-740-4471 



«t-i 



r 



'4fm 

A ti'li 'V%i 



WHY RENT?? $79,900 

Great two-bedroom townhome in desirable subdivision. 
Large living room w/planked ceiling & new carpeting. Great 
oak kitchen w/lots of cabinets, new dishwasher, eating 
area and sliders to deck. Two good size bedrooms and 1.1 
baths, Attached garage. Low assessment for well-main- 
tained area. Don't wait. These don't come along often!! 

Linda Sparks (Direct) (847) 740-4471 



SELLER TO PAY 1 POINT!! $112,900 

Motivated seller to help with buyer's closing costs!! Sharp 
newer raised ranch with sooo much to offer!! Open, airy 
great room, ceramic entry, vaulted ceilings, skylight and 
full basement with finished family room are just a few of 
many features. Two full baths. Tons of storage. 2nd lot 
available! Must see to appreciate. Call now! 
Linda Sparks... (Direct) (847) 740-4471 




-■ - - ■ St'V*''-.' 

,- - M0^ y Ml.:' 

■•'■$ &t^'o»* rati 



»'; ■. t--: -.■■■■■:.<l. , -.»i >-^- 



SPRAWLING RANCH $149,900 

Wonderful updated ranch with water rights to Loch 
Lomond. New furnace, air conditioning and hot 
water heater. Updated oak kitchen features lots of 
cabinets, eating and laundry areas. Huge living, din- 
ing and family rooms have just been carpeted. 
Three season room adds to your enjoyment. Freshly 
painted. Large yard & garage. Hurryl 
Linda Sparks (Direct) (847) 740-4471 



LOCATION! LOCATION $151,990 

You deserve to come home to this desirable NEW town- 
home community close to the toliway. Lovely, premium 
location. Volume ceilings, neutral decor, bay window, 
attached two-car garage, finished family room. Great con- 
temporary kitchen w/blg island/breakfast bar, pantry, slid- 
ers to deck and large eating area. Too much to list. Low 
assessment, Gurnee Schools, 

Linda Sparks (Direct) (847) 740-4471 




AFFORDABLE LUXURY!! $172,900 

1993 contemporary 2-story has it allll Premium pond loca- 
tion backing to open preserve. Cedar fenced yard 4 2-tier 
deck. Four bedrooms. 2.1 baths, hardwood floors, new car- 
peting 1st floor family room wftrick fireplace overlooking 
E reserve. Great view from almost any room. Full finished 
asement just completed! Lake Villa schools. What more 
do you want?? Must see. Call now. 

Linda Sparks (Direct) (847) 740-4471 



SO BIG. ..SO BEAUTIFUL $309,900 

Gorgeous contemporary 2-story on premium lot. 
TEN rooms featuring vaulted ceilings, hardwood 
floors, trackless carpeting and neutral decorating. 
1st floor den, a kitchen any woman would love with 
tons of oak cabinets, built-in desk, walk-in pantry 
plus island w/breakfast bar! Full basement. Newer 
subdivision, convenient location!! Call for brochure! 
Linda Sparks (Direct) (847) 740-4471 



20578 W. Hwy 176, Cambridge Homes, 

$300,000 \r '■"'-' - 

634 Woodhave, Doris Mathews, 

$116,500 

619 Woodhaven, Elizabeth Rosenberg 

$114,500 

Round Lake 

499 W. Railroad Ave, Yannls Lazariptis 
$105,000 - '.' ; . p 

32B W. Whispering Oaks, Jason Mat- 
lock, $134,485 

61 6 Warrior Dr, Ralph & Alice Bonifer 
$46,000 

Round Lake Beach 

922 BayviewDr, Christopher & Jennifer 

Wilson, $110,000 

24 1 E. Wildflower Ln, Jerome & )oni 

Bell, $174,563 

336 Meadow Green Ln, Paul Donovan 

$60,700 

222 N. Channel Dr, Armando Hajcra, 

$102,500 

1307 N. Sunset, Jay Joy, $89,900 

2433 N. Wuaker Hollow Ln, Connie 

SchawnkJ & Vlckl Sandberg, $154,743 

532 Pheasant C(6, Sharon Ghozati, 

$116,000 

1408 Rldgeway Ave, Christopher & 

Beth Patsis, $96,000 

509 W. Orchard Ct, Edward Packham, 

580,000 

2001 Willow Ridge Dr, Juan&Cristina 

Velazauez, $122,000 

1529 Woodbine, Jorge Juarez & Janet 

Juarez, $101 ,000 

1423 Woodridge, Kevin Whited. 

$84,000 

Round Lake Park 

301 Clifton Dr, Armando & Ana Upez, 

$78,000 

428 E. Uke Shore Dr, James & Sally 

Hahn, $143,500 

Wadsworth 

3010 N, Forest Hills Ct. Gail & John 
Bell, $304,932 

Wauconda 

755 Appoloosa Tr, Robert & Tasha 
Baird, $304,007 

420 Dunbar Rd, Robert Havel & Rose- 
marie Havle, $ 16,500 

440 Oakwood, Timothy Van Ryswyk, 

$100,000 

803 Wauconda Rd, Stephen & Jud/rh 

Lawn, $135,000 

Wildwood 



33448 N. Mill Rd. William Kipp, 

$115,000 

17835 Twin Lakes Blvd. Michael Trii- 

thardt. $117,000 



Information provided by Record 
Information Services, Inc. in St. 
diaries. The company provides pub- 
lic record data for Lake, DuPagc. 
Cook, Kane, McHenry, Kendall and 
Will counties including new incor\)o- 
rations, business licenses, bankrupt- 
cies, foreclosures, judgments, me- 
chanic liens, state and federal tax 
liens, residential and commercial real 
estate transfers, building permits, 
DUI arrests, divorce reports, sheriff 
sale foreclosures. (630) 365-6430, 
public- record.com. 



FROM PAGE C7 



TAYLOR: 

Thanksgiving 
reflections 



of choice, the coming of Spring, 
truth and the promise of eternity. 

I am thankful for life's litde lux- 
uries - indoor bathrooms, Oreo 
cookies, soft beds, new friends, old 
Corvettes, pizza, hot showers, cold 
Diet Coke, cheeseburgers, comfort- 
able shoes, Buddy Holly's music, 
well-behaved children, funny sto- 
rk's. Gene Stratton Porter and Zane 
(irey's books and my cordless drill. 

I am thankful for you. Yes, dear 
friends, if you did not read, I would 
not write. I wish you a glorious hol- 
iday season and your most success- 
ful year ever. 

Don Taylor is the co-author of 
"Up Against the Wal-Marts." You 
may write to him in care of "Mind- 
ing Your Own Business." P.O. Box 
67,Amarillo, 7X79/05. 







awssara-a 



■ 



>:.■■■; 



•■..-... .. - - - - .,••' 

> 



November 27, 1998 




■•..'■_ V. 



Lakeland Newspapers fiOB 




Get it off your chest (847)223-8073 
Fax (847) 223-8810 e-mail: lipseryice@lpnews.cqm 

Upservlce Is a phone-In column presented as a feature of lakeland Newspapers. Lake- 
land Newspapers makes no claim to Vie authenticity of the statements, lakeland News- 
papers does not claim the content or the subject matter as tact, but as the personal 
opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to edit copy or to retrain Interact fc a lA/fl 1 1 
ftom printing a message. Call In at 225-8973, fax In at 225-8810, or e-mail at Upser- " ■ 

Ytce@lpnews.com and leave your message 24-hours a day. Gaiters must leave their 
name, phone number and village name. Names and phone numbers will not be printed; 
however, callers may be called for verification. 



THIS WEEK'S QUEST ION IS; 






"■■ vL:' 



A veteran? 

I saw President Clinton laying a 
wreath at Arlington Cemetery on 
Veteran's Day. Why Is it that he can 
call himself a veteran? 

Lindenhurst 

Poor planning 

I'm in School District 1 18 and 1 can't 
understand, as a senior, that they just 
built the new school at Cotton Creek 
and put over $6 million in it, and in 
one year, they had to put two addi- 
tions onto it. I think something 
should be done because seniors are 
set on a fixed budget and I think we 
should have a change in the school 
board. Gel some of those people out 
that don't know how to plan things. 

Wauconda 

Attitude's the question 

In response to the bilingual issue, of 
course we should be bilingual. lan- 
guage itself is not the problem, atti- 
tude is the question here. If people 
come by choice into this or any oth- 
er country, it behooves ihcm to enter 
legally, prepare to learn and obey the 
laws, contribute to the whole society, 
acquire employment, pay taxes and 
learn the language. If they come only 
to queue up together, create a pow- 
er base, establish a political system 
and economy like the once which 
they fled, what's the point? They 
should stay in their own country and 
make a life. No other immigrating 
people have come with lists of de- 
mands, protests, or whining claims 
of discrimination. You invited your- 
self here and until you are citizens in 
good faith, you are guests. Guests 
have privileges, not rights. Privileges 
are granted, rights must be earned. 

Grayslake 

Bad rap not deserved 

1 agree with "Tired of bad rep." I also 
live in Round Lake and moved from 
a more popular suburb of Liber- 
tyville. Here we have open space, 
clean air, and nice homes. We aren't 
a huge suburb and like it the way it is. 
We don't want the uncontrolled 
growth of Gurnee and Grayslake. 
Here you can drive around the 
streets with no congestion. Round 
I>ake is a wonderful place to live, just 
don't tell anybody so we're not over : 
crowded. We like our small town at- 



mosphere. We do need to speak up, 
it Is a wonderful place. 

Round Lake 

Not registered 

This Is for Mayor Jim Pappas. Point 
of information, the appointment 
that he made of 18-year-old, he's not 
even a registered voter In Fox Lake. 1 
just thought he would like to know 
that. He appointed someone. who 
doesn't even vote in the town. 

Fox Lake 

Smoke outside bus 

I'm a senior citizen in the Wauconda 
Township area and 1 was just won- 
dering if the township realizes what 
their responsibility is regarding se- 
nior transportation? As far as anyone 
driving the buses, do they realize dri- 
vers have to take drug tests and phys- 
icals? Not only that, but there's no 
smoking on the bus, I've heard some 
people make remarks about the 
transportation manager, that he has- 
n't had a physical in eight years. If a 
driver wants to smoke, he should get 
outside and smoke, even if there's no 
one in the bus. 

Wauconda Township 

Going overboard 

This comment is In regard to the 
question about bilingual classrooms. 
In my opinion, the county and the 
country's schools are going over- 
board to accommodate Hispanic 
students. What about other nation- 
alities, don't they exist? Give them 
every opportunity to learn English, 
but let's not spend money in bilin- 
gual services so they don't have to 
learn English. They want to get the 
benefits of the country, but don't 
want to become part of it. 

Mundelein 

Should be outraged 

Residents of Antioch should be out- 
raged that the village is going to join 
the Northwest Municipal Confer- 
ence with the yearly membership of 
$3,500 of taxpayer money. This posi- 
tion underscores the commitment of 
village bureaucrats to increase de- 
velopment, Increase bureaucracy 
and increase taxes. Let's wake up 
and kick these guys out, 

Antioch 




PERSONAL INJURY 



WORKERS COMPENSATION 

The Law Offices of 
Douglas Rallo 



jX-J-c 




6i i South Milwaukee Avenue 

LlBERTYVILLF., ILLINOIS 60048 

TEL 847-816-X7KCI 

LAX 847-816-90OI 



I'm In complete agreement with 
"Leave my money alone." The Interest 
on taxes, savings accounts, Is awful 

Antioch 

No official language 

I'd like to respond to numerous calls 
telling people to learn the language. 
I'm In shock at the ignorance of my 
fellow citizens. Let the record show 
that the United States doesn't have an 
official language. People have as- 
sumed for years that English Is the of- 
ficial language, but the fact remains 
that English is not the official lan- 
guage. For 30 plus years, citizens and 
a handful of state representatives have 
fought to make English the official lan- 
guage. Year after year it has died in 
Congress. Four years ago it came close 
to being official, but was voted down 
by Congressmen and Senators. 1 think 
that those of you who feel strongly 
against bilingual education should 
make this a law and make it happen. 
Educate fellow citizens and spread the 
word. Ijei your voices be heard. Don't 
assume anything 

Mundelein 

Thanks for recognition 

Thank you to someone who recog- 
nized the Cardinal cheerleaders for 
their competition on Nov. 7. My 
daughter worked very hard in the 
competition, as did all the cheerlead- 
ers. I was kind of upset that none of the 
newspapers had anything about it in 
their papers. Congratulations, Koitiin, 
and all the Cardinal cheerleaders, you 
did a great job! The coaching staff is 
wonderful, too. Thanks for recognizing 
the cheerleaders. 

Lake Villa 

Blame Renquist 

There's really only one person we 
can blame in the country over this 
mess with President Clinton, and 
that is the Chief justice of the United 
States, William Renquist. If he had 
delayed all the sex scandal matters 
until after the president left office in 
2001, and had him tried after he left 
office, none of this $50 million would 
have been spent. In my opinion, he's 
not playing with a full deck 

Libertyviite 

Cover RLHS athletics 

The Round Lake News does not cov- 
er the Round Lake High School 
sports. I'm an athlete and I notice 
during the football season, there 
wasn't one headline for Round Lake, 



not when we beat Grant or 
Mundelein. Now our girls basketball 
team Is undefeated and what do we 
read about? Grant! Grant's not even 
In this town. There's more kids here 
that go to Round Lake than Grant 

Round Lake 

Feather in the cap 

This is in response to "Clean up 
leaves." Bully for you, for you have 
your health. Not everyone can be as 
good as you. I'm sure you'll get your 
feather In your cap one of these days. 

Antioch 

Anything to win 

What has coachingcome to? I guess it 
takes anything to win. On Oct. 1 8, An- 
tioch Lightweight Vikings played 
against Mundelein. The assistant gave 
the entire team a bottle of "Beyond 
Ripped," which is nothing less than 
liquid speed. The bottle said "not for 
sale or use by anyone under the age of 
18." Not only did he give It to them, he 
made each of them pay $2 for it. If 
McGwire can't drink this in baseball, 
why can our kids drink it in youth 
football? Supposedly he resigned, but 
the president is still introducing him 
as a board member. And he has actu- 
ally been asked to come back and 
coach next year. Thank you, Antioch, 
for not standing up for our kids. To all 
teens in the Lightweight level of the 
JNLFI football league, watch out 
what's on the sidelines during the An - 
tioch game, it's not water. 

Antioch 

Tax money going north 

Our tax money going north. Did you 
know most fly-by-night Christmas 
tree lots are from Wisconsin or Michi- 
gan? When you buy from them, 
you're supporting their communities. 
Let's buy from our own communities 
and support them year round. 

Libertyville 

Appalled 

I'm calling in regard to the check- 
cashing in Lindenhurst. I think it's 
appalling that everyone in the 
Round Lake area is being stereo- 
typed as having bad checks. I 
moved to this area from Evanston 
four years ago. The gangs in 
Evanston are nothing compared to 
the Round Lake area, and 
Evanston has a better reputation. 
Evanston is a worse town as far as 
the gangs. I would have sued the 
cashier and the Store. 

Round Lake Beach 



Not for sale 



The Grayslake Park District should 

decide in the taxpayers' interests, 
that no private enterprise should be 
guaranteed use of park land in the 
future just because they plan on 
making a donation to the park dis- 
trict Are you listening, executive di- 
rector Lashbrook? We're tougher 
here than Crystal Lake. The use of 
our park land is not for sale. 

Grayslake 

Astute observation 

I would like to share an observation 1 
made a few months ago at a 
Grayslake village board meeting. A 
major topic of the evening was the 
Carillon development on Drury 
Lane. Several citizens approached 
the board to give their opinion. May- 
or Carey asked them to identify 
themselves by name. When she 
spoke to the developers, everything 
was on a first-namo basis. This sim- 
ple observation Is an indication of 
where Grayslake is today and, unfor- 
tunately, if changes aren't made, 
where Grayslake is heading. Every- 
one except Trustee Doros voted for 
the development. As is often the 
case, the mayor and majority of the 
board did not listen or respond to the 
concerns of the residents. 

Grayslake 

Forget about it 

I'm getting a little sick and tired of 
reading about a traffic fatality that 
happened almost three years ago. If 
you want to do something for 
Nathan, put a headstone on his grave 
in Ohio and forget it I think it's 
ridiculous for the Village of Round 
Lake Beach to donate land for a 
memorial for one traffic fatality. It 
makes more sense to me to honor 
our veterans who have lost their lives 
for our freedom. 

Round Lake Beach 

Figures were accurate 

This is in response to the grandfather 
who didn't vote for the Stanton 
School referendum. The figures that 
the school board put out were accu- 
rate. The figures that came out anony- 
mously were not accurate. I called the 
assessor and they confirmed that The 
buses aren't intending to come down 
the hill on WoodJock, they're coming 
from the other end. The plan was 
made with the best use of roads there, 
existing buildings and the land that's 
available. 

Fox Lake 




Concu'ilulecl m 

Auto Accidents 

Workers' Compensation 

Wrongful Death 

Medical Malpractice 

Product Injuries 

Slip and Fall 

Doc; Bites 

All Serious Personal 
Injury Cases 



The Chicago Tribune »w ppprted that 
Doug Rj'>.' s pionepmig legal theory" on 
valuing :'v ,ft en/oyment of Me. "is credited 
« :>' i". ■"•••rip nvti'ons of dollars for people 
M-vfr 1 i "tt.'ed or foi the survivors of those 
• e.f /h Vie njgbgent conduct of others 

■Newsweek Magazine has written that 
Ratio r$ "on the cutting edge of an idea 
taking hold across the country." and. that 
his concept is being used m court "to win 
■jrge damage awards lor accident vicunas" 

Douglas Rallo 

Mr. Ralto has nearly 20 years experience in 
helping injured parties. He is listed in 
Who's Who m American Law. and is a past 
chairman of the Medical/Legal Committee 
of the Lake County Bar Association, 



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November27 t 1998 



THIS WAY TO WEALTH 



Saving for college expenses 



Putting children through col- 
lege is one of the largest ex- 
panses most families will 
ever face. Hora child horn 
today, the cost of tuition, room, 
hoard and other expenses will likely 
approach S 1 25,000 for four years of 
public college and an astounding 
$270,000 for four years of private 
college. 

Most people will use a combina- 
tion of four main strategies to aim 
mulati' the funds needed for college 
The strategies van' in how the account 
is taxed, who controls the investment, 
iind how the asset is viewed when ap 
plvingfor financial aid. 

I lie (out strategies we will dis 
Liissiiic I he new education IKAs. 
i Ustodtul in < nunts. parents invest 
r i i*-i 1 1 ii< i minis and variable lite in 
MIMIlie 

When .i im.iiK i,:l aidoffit nun 
si.l< \\a r ink) '■, m-eu ilu-Uirmul.i 
itMjil i ■>n>M' , l ll!'' p.urnts' mi nine 
.isscisii. :i>. sin |. n- ■ name, .ism-is 
til the pate:,' ■ rw.» rtltdfa i»st n! 
srliuulmg Ueuil, " "1 d up rhr \m 



sics of all those strategies. 

Education IR& As of Ian I. 

anyone can make annual cash con- 
tributions of $500 per child under 
age IB into an education IHA. The 
contribution is not deductible, but 
the earnings grow tax-deferred. 
Withdrawals for qualified higher ed- 
ucation expenses are lax free and 
penally free. 

II any balance remains in an 
lulucalinn IRA after all education 
expenses are paid, ihe account can 
he rolled over to another family 
member who is eligible. II the reap 
lent reaches age .10 and die balance 
has imi been lolled over, it will be 
< r inverted to a regular investment 
.u i -011111, wiih income taxes and a in 
pen fin penalty. 

Am lainilv with joint income 
owl SI "id. (H Hi and singles within 
i iinieovei S'lfi.tltM) cannot make Ihe 
lulli ontiibution. Monev in ,in I dn 
taiion IHA may lowei the student •> 
(jii.ililit .ition lot liiuiu la] old 

Custodial Account: l"hl*te 
.il-n known as the Unilied I. tit to 
IimI \. i H(iMA)oi die Unilied 



Trust for Minors Act (UTMA). The 
investments are made in the child's 
name. Investment income is typi- 
cally taxed at the child's lower rate. 
Transfers are allowed up to $ 1 0.000 
a year per child without incurring 
gift taxes. Many people do not like 
this strategy because at majority age 
(age t B or 2 1 ) the child has com • 
plete control of all assets. 

Once the money has been put 
into this type of account for the 
child, it cannot be undone. To qual- 
ify for financial aid. some of this as- 
set must be used to pay toward col- 
lege expenses. This is often referred 
to as "The Red Porsche Trust" he- 
cause when a child is still very 
young, the parents do not know if 
die child will have the maturity to 
handle a large chunk oJ monev or 
blow it all on a red Porsche. 

Parents Investment Ac- 
count: Ihe best part of this strategy 
iv that patents relain complete con - 
I ml 4i| the assets Because the funds 
ate not death set aside lor the 
i hild the patents have access m the 
limine itiijhejge^^iRYt^ifliW! 



child does not go to college. This is 
not a very efficient strategy because 
the money is taxed at the parents* 
higher tax rate. A portion of these 
assets are counted in ihe financial 
aid formula. 

Variable Life Insurance: This 
is a popular strategy for parents 
who want to retain control of the 
assets, have tax deferred growth, 
and not reduce a student's eligibili- 
ty for financial aid. Parents of a 
young child purchase variable life 
insurance on themselves or the 
child. Part of the premium goes to 
purchase death benefit on die par- 
ent's life in case they die loo soon. 
Another part of the premium is in- 
vested in several mutual fund like 
sub-accounts. These sub-accounts 
grow tax free. Money from the low 
interest policy' loans can be received 
tax free when properly arranged. 

livery situation is different. Your 
financial representative should 
clearly detail die risks and rewards of 
each option.— By Alan Fricdlander 

Man tried lander is a Regis- 



tered Representative with Oak 
Brook Securities. Friedlandefs 
practice specializes in helping fami- 
lies and businesses make financial 
decisions. For a free consultation 
call 823-8095. 



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Lakeland Newspapefs/G't 1 



Legislative Forum on Senior issues planned in Lake County 



Members of Congress and of the Illinois 
General Assembly from Lake County have 
been invited to participate in a legislative fo- 
rum on issues of particular Interest or con- 
cern to seniors, on Friday, Dec. II. 

The forum will be held from 8:30 to ap- 
proximately 1 1 a.m. at the Lake Forest-Lake 
llluff Senior Center, 400 E. Illinois, Lake For- 
est. The forum is open to the public, and 
reservations are not needed. Refreshments 
will be served. 

The primary topics of discussion will 
he the regulation of assisted living, state 
support for the Community Care Program, 



and Medicaid eligibility for seniors living 
at home. Other topics of interest to se- 
niors may also be discussed, as time al- 
lows. 

United States Representatives Philip 
Crane (8th District) and John Porter (10) 
have been invited but they may be in ses- 
sion in Washington; they may be represent- 
ed by aides. 

The following state legislators have also 
been invited to participate: Adeline ]. Geo- 
Karis (Dist. 31st) Terry Link (Dlst. 30), Kath- 
leen Parker (Dist. 29), and Willi am E. Peter- 
son (Dist. 26); and Representatives Mark H. 



Beaubien, Jr., (Dist. 52nd Dist), Elizabeth 
Coulson (Dist 57), Susan Garrett (Dlst. 59), 
Lauren Beth Gash (Dist 60), Sidney Mathias 
(Dlst 51), Andrea S. Moore (Dist 61), and 
Timothy H. Osmond (Dlst 62). 

The Lake County Senior Services Coali- 
tion and the Northeastern Illinois Area 
Agency on Aging are co-sponsoring the fo- 
rum. 

For further information, contact Eric 
Weakly at the Northeastern Illinois Area 
Agency on Aging, (800) 528-2000. 

The Northeastern Illinois Area Agency 
on Aging is a nonprofit organization respon- 



sible for developing and coordinating a net- 
work of services for older persons through^ 
out ah eight county area In north-eastern .' ' 
Illinois. The Agency informs and advises - 
public and private agencies and the general - 
public of the needs of older persons living In 
the area, and acts as an advocate on their * 
behalf. The Agency serves DuPage, Grundy, 
Kane, Kankakee, Kendall, Lake, McHenry, 
and Will Counties. Other Information about 
the agency and other topics of interest to the 
elderly and links to other resources are 
available at the agency's web site: 
wwwageguide.org. 



Six tips for a good night's sleep 



Everyone deserves the luxury and com- 
fort of a good night' sleep. Science cannot 
tell us exactly why a body needs steep and 
how much, but medical research confirms 
the wisdom behind the old Irish proverb: 
"Good sleep is the beginning of good 
health." 

Sleep restores not only physically but 
mentally as well. These six simple tips can 
help you sleep well and wake up refreshed: 

•Think of you bedroom as the relax 
room. Make sure the environment is rest- 
ful, it should be quiet and stress-free. Ad- 
just the temperature to a comfortable lev- 
el and dim the lights. Sleep on a firm mat- 
tress with clean sheets. 

•Spend 15 minutes relaxing before retir- 
ing. Take a warm bath. Read a book, listen to 
soft music. Drink a glass of milk. 



•Establish and maintain a routine. Follow 
your own body clock; some people feel rested 
with six hours sleep and others need eight 
hours. Always wake up at the same time, no 
matter what time you go to sleep. 

•Avoid heavy exercise, alcohol and drugs, 
caffeine and cigarettes immediately before 
going to bed. 

•Once in bed, relax your body, muscle by 
muscle. To help you relax try spending five 
minutes doing a mental "guided imagery" ex- 
ercise, focusing on each body part (I.e. left 
calf, right calf) from scalp to toes. 

•Try sleeping with a contour pillow. It's 
designed to follow the natural contours of the 
neck and head to support and align the body 
as nature Intended, while therapeutic foam 
fingers adjust to the individual. 



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Senior honored for 
making impact in 
corporate America 



Betty Pesek, 73, of Lake Forest is the Inau- 
gural recipient of the first Kanbay Incorporat- 
ed s Board of Director's Honors Award at a 
company dinner heldat the Oak Meadows 
Golf and Banquet Facility, Addison. 

The award was established 
this year to recognize the one em- 
ployee who has made exemplary 
contributions that have had the 
most Impact throughout the com- 
pany. 

The recipient of the first Kan- 
bay Board of Director's Honors 
award really does raise the bar to 
new heights," said Raymond 
Spencer, Kanbay's chief executive 
officer. "This person demonstrates 
a level of excellence to which we 
all can strive." 

Betty Pesek joined Kanbay as a 
receptionist in June, 1995. Several promotions 
later, she is executive assistant with a broad 
range of dudes. Earlier this fall, Kanbay relo- 
cated from the north side of the city to Rose- 
mont, and Pesek coordinated all aspects of 
the move. 

"Betty has the sensitivity to recognize the 
uniqueness and values of people with whom 




Pesek 



she Is working and to do whatever necessary 
to release those gifts," Spencer said. "Certainly 
In the move we saw the full range of her peo- 
ple skills— from accolades to employees to 
no-nonsense communication with con trac- 
tors. The common denominator 
was respect and love." 

The award was a complete 
surprise to Betty Pesek. "When I 
heard my name I was so 
stunned," she said. "This com- 
pany has made such huge leaps 
during the past year, in every as- 
pect. I can think of so many oth- 
er deserving people who have 
worked so hard for Kanbay 's 
growth and success." 

Betty Pesek is 73 years old. She is 
a 47- year resident of Lake Forest 
Kanbay Incorporated is an infor- 
mation management consulting firm en- 
abling clients to leverage organizational 
knowledge through the development of cus- 
tomized business solutions. With headquar- 
ters in the Chicago area, Kanbay has offices in 
Hong Kong, North America, the United King- 
dom and a software development center in 
India. 



NEED BACK ISSUES? 

Call Lakeland Newspaper's Circulation DepL at 
(847) 223-8161 



SENIOR SOCIAL SERVICES 



Education 

Exercise 

Recreation 

Travel 

Full-Course Meals 
Meals On Wheels 



Investigation of 
Elder Abuse/Neglect 

Employment Training 
& Placement 

Information & 
Assistance 



Outreach 
Assessment 
Case Management 
Emergency Support 
Shared Housing 

Choices For Care 
Nursing Home Prescreening 



TheiCATHOLIC 
[CHARITIES 

Of THi IKKDCCIU (V CHtCiOO 

&UPAS&IQM IN ACTION StHCI 1B1 T 



TOLL FREE NUMBER: 
1-800-942-3930 

Cathol ic dunlin docs not disfriminitt on ihe outs of religion, so. race, rutionil 
onpn, sexuil preference, ot economic slaws in its employees, volunteers, or dienis. 



Volunteers Always Needed And Welcome 

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OBITUARIES 



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C 1 2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



November 27, 1998 






A Rineral Home Serving 
All Your Needs 

cr 50 Years Of Caring, Dignified Service 




Family Owned & Staffed 

•> Traditional Services 



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DEATH NOTICES 

CALDER0N 

l .tmslina Calriemii. age O til ( .uiiii'i- 
Arr. Marsh hmcral Hiimh-hj Guniiv 

GUND1ACI1 

Dorothy I., Gundlach, age 77 (il Park ( .uy 
Arr: Marsh luneral I lome nl ( aimer 

SEGER 

l.yle Carl 'Hash' Seger. age 76 nt Warisworih 



The Deadline 
lor Obituaries & Death Notices 
is 10 a.m. on Tuesdays. 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Funeral Directory 



JUSTEN'S ROUND LAKE FUNERAL HOME 

222 N, Rosedale Court (Rosedale at Cedar Lake Road) 

(047) 546-3300 

Nancy Justen, Jeffrey Jordan, Directors 

Additional Locations in McHenry and Wonder Lake 

K.K. HAMSHER FUNERAL HOME, LTD. 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Rd., Fox Lake, IL 

(847)587-2100 

Kenneth K. Hamsher, Debra Hamslier Glen, Directors 

RINGA FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2146 

Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

Dan Dugenske, Director 

(847) 395-4000 

SPRING GROVE FUNERAL CHAPEL 

8103WilmotRd., PO. Box 65, Spring Grove, IL 60081 

Kurk P Paleka, Director 

(815) 675-0550 or Toil Free (888) 394-8744 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL AND CREMATORIUM, LTD. 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake, IL 

(847) 223-8122 

David G. Strang and Richard A Gaddis, Director 



Arr Salaia ( ,utner ! imetal 1 (nine 

VOLE 

l-.nne Voir. age 1>1 u! Vernon 1 tills 
Arr McMummgh Chapel. I.iberiyvillr 

BROWN 

Donald II ttrowti. age 94 of Mmulelcin 
Arr KriMan funeral Home \H. 
Muiidelein 



J 



tomple" On Dec. 3>. I9G6. she married Archie Dean Hale in 

Survivors include her lu..st.and, Archie; doughy 
Cassandra (Jtobcrt) Umnr and one son An.hony Charles 
Hole bo.h of Trevor, Wis, one erandsor. Andrew Lemar of 
Trevor Wis : her father. Andrew |. (Carol) Hullis of Ml. Dora, 
Fla. and her mother. Merle Unite of Grayslake and one 
brother. Hoheri Hullis of Grayslake 

Rineral Services will. Mass of Christian Hunnl wen- held 
at St I'rtcr Church. Aiitmch 

friends and family visited al ill.' Strang liinrral I lome or 

Anlioch 

Inlennerii waspuvate 

In lien ol (lowers, ijonaluuis lor Masses would be appre- 
ciated by llu' laniih 

Michael L Cray 

Age >l of lake Villa, passed away al his home on 
Wednesday. Nov IH. I'WH atler a very hrave and short bailie 
with cancel I le was ho.u in ( JilCOgp. I eh I B, 1944 and lived 
m Grayslake mosi of his Ijjfr I If began working a( a very early 
age as a child model tJpmi graduoimg Irom Grayslake 
(.« immunity High School, he became a third generation 
IHHV local 114 electrician He then enlisled in the U.S. 
Marine (orps and served Irom Augi.sl l!H>3 to October 1966 
and then relumed to the Union until lune 1990. He donated 
hnursnltiirieasa I'aik7l. Hkitt Scouts of America, leader wilh 
pari disiiii I ]>iugranis such as soil hall, youth baseball and 
!<n>lhall His hobbies included woodworking and fishing, 
hui, mosi oi all Ins beloved grand, hildren. 

Mr leaves n» survive his wile. Peggy (Schneider) of 34 
years, (us sons, Hubert 'h-ggyi liray and Steven Gray: iwo 
very special grandchildren. Icnnifer l.ynne and Michael 
I dwin. all of lake Villa, dear mece. Ambur Burnup of /ion 
and no<»d Inerul. Tim Hart; his three brothers, Wayne of 
California, fhrhnrri (Helene) of Round lake Beach, and 
Hiomas (Judyi uf Chicago and his sister. Georgia Gray of 
Zjoii and many other relatives 1 |e is preceded In dealh by his 
parents, < a-nrgc and Dolores and a brother, Robert. 

M.isn id the Hesiirrettion was celebrated at Si. Gilbert 
Calhnln ( (inn h ( .layslake with Rev. lames E. Mcrold, offici- 
ating 

friends o| thi' lamih visited at Strang I-'uncral Chapel 
and ( rrtiiainfium. I id . ( •rayslake 

Intniurui Itillowi'd at \von l!eiiire Cemetery, Grayslake. 

Martha Juhl 

Agr ItHi n; | irjdtfnhursi passed away Friday, Nov. 20, 
I't'i/t ,u \ 'i, inr\ (jikes ( nniniuing Care Center, Undenhurst. 
She was ho; n. 1 -eh j t . 1 WM in lakewood, Ohio, the daughter 
of the late Karl and Dorothea (Thompson) Anderson. She 
had moved to libertyville in plKli, to Wauconda in 1929, lo 
Antioch in I9tv» and then to l.indenhurst in I9B8. On June 1, 
1929 she married Nels M luhl in Waukegan and he preceded 
her in death on Ian. 1. 1H7H. lor many years she was a home- 
maker at various private estates 

Survivors include several nieces and nephews and grand 
nieces ami nephews In addition to hei parents and hus- 
band, she is preceded in dealh by three brothers. William. 
Can" and Andrew Anderson ami by five sisters. Kalherine 
Volkman, Klrabeih lenlon. Mane Anderson, I aura Renlncr 
and Uorolhy Nickolay. 

luneral Services and iniermenl, were private al lite 
Hillside Cemetery in Antioch. 

Arrangements were made by Sirang luneral Home of 
Antioch. 

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Victory 
Likes Continuing Care Center, 1055 Grand Ave.. 
I Jndenhurst. II., G0015 in her memory. 

Dorothy C. Pederson 

A(je B4, formerly of Antioch, passed away Wednesday, 
Nov. 18, 199B al Winchesler I tousc, Libertyville. She was born 
June 21, 1914 in Chicago, the daughter of the late Fred and 
Caiherinc (Ryan) Zcason. She had lived in lake Villa, for 20 
years before moving to Antioch in 1962 and later lo Fairchild. 
Wis. in 1977 for several years. Mrs. Pedcrscn mothered and 
cared for many fosler infants in her earlier years. On Ian. 6. 
1934 married irvin II. "Pete" Pcdersen in Waukegan, and he 
preceded her in death on April 14, 19B3. 

Survivors include her ihrce children, whom she gave 
unconditional love; Kenneth (lune) Pederson of Bristol, Wis., 
Gail (lames) Fields of Anlioch and Lorclta (Randall) Bussonc of 
Grayslake; one brother, Fred (F.unlce) Zeason of Andoch and 
one great aunt, Lorclla I layes of Elgin. She was a loving and car- 
ing grandmother of 13 grandchildren and 23 great grandchil- 
dren. In addition lo her husband, she is preceded in death by 
one brother, Raymond Zeason and one sister, Ruth Hills. 

Funeral Services were held al the Strang Funeral I lome 
of Antioch, 

Interment was at I lillsidc Cemelery, Anlioch. 

In lieu of flowers, those desiring may make contribu- 
tions to the Winchester House Library Fund, 1125 N. 
Milwaukee Ave,, libertyville, 11,60040 in her memory. 

Doris Dagens 

Age 70 of Brighton, Mo., formerly of Anlioch, passed 
away Saturday, Nov. 21, 1991! al University of Illinois Medical 
Center al Chicago. Chicago. She was born May 6, 1920 in 
Abbergaveney, South Wales. Greai Britain, the daughter of 
Ihe late John and Annie (Shepherd) Meadows. She came to 
the United Stales on May 6. 1950, living in Chicago, for many 
years and later Anlioch. before moving to Brighton, Mo., a 
short lime ago. She was a member of Sacred I lean Church in 
Missouri, a fonner member of Si Peter Church, in Anlioch 
and Ihe Anlioch Women of ihe Moose Chnpler 735. On July 
10, 1947, she married Thomas Dagens in Dmdon, England. 

Survivors include her husband. Thomas; four children. 
Henry (Janet) of Johnsburg. Christopher of Wheeling! 
Emmcti (Jalayne) of Hurlingiort, Wis. and AnnMarie (Jeff) 
Phillips of Spring Grove; her stepmother, Gladys Meadows of 
Great Britain; eight grandchildren, Dawn, Sean, Christopher 



Deann, Amanda, Kyle, Devln and Jcnna and three great ! I 
grandchildren, Justin, Katie andAlmq 15 brothers and sUterj 1 ? ' 
and many nieces and nephews. : , v 

Funeral Services with Mass of Christian Burial were held 
at St. Pclcr Church, Spring Grove, with Pastor Andrew Plesa. 
officiating. '•' ' |S|p 

Friends and family visited at the Spring Grove Funeral ' 
Chapel, Spring Grove. , ■ »> " I 

Interment was private. 

I 

Elsie Frazier Am all 

Age 92, a former Inglesldc resident, passed away Sent. 
28. 1998 In Dade City, Fla She and her first husband of 52 
years, Walter I. Frazler, operated a poultry business and farm 
on Route 59 from the 1930s to the 1950s, when they devel- 
oped It Into Knollwood Park and Knollwood Hills 
Subdivisions In Fox Lake. They also had been active lone ' 
term members of Inglesldc United Methodist Church before 
they iraveled extensively and moved to Florida. 

Bom May 17, 1906, In Clarendon, MY, she is preceded In 
death by Mr. Frazler in 1978, and by her second husband 
John Arnall of Dunedin, Fla., in 1983. 

She is survived by many nieces and nephews, including 
Robert (Irene) Griffin of Fox Lake and Antioch; Fred (Nellie) 
Griffin of Gumec; Frances (fiual) Richards or Union Grove, 
and Arthur (Lorclta) Griffin of Genoa City. Wis. 

Memorial Services were held in New York Stale. 

Charles Blckett 

Age 74, a longtime resident of Lake Villa, died Monday 
Nov. 16, 1 998 at the St. Thcrcse Medical Center In Waukegan! 
He was bom In Chicago, on Sept. 3, 1924 and had been 
employed for 40 years as a carpenter for Great Lakes Naval 
Base In North Chicago, before his retirement. 

Survivors Include: his wife, Kathcrine Bickelt (formerly 
Kaihcrinc Andreggen) of Lake Villa. Other relatives survive as 
well as many good friends. 

Friends of the family were Invited to a Catholic Funeral 
Service at K. K. Hamsher Funeral Home, Fox Lake (The 
Chapel on the Lake). 

Prayer Services and interment were held al St. Mary's 
Cai nolle Cemetery, Evergreen Park. 

Veronica C. Cavert (nee Lucius) 

Age 82 of Round Lake Beach, passed away Wednesday, 
Nov. 18, 199B at the Manor Care Facility in Ubertyvillc. She 
was bom Sept. 30, 1916 in Chicago. A resident of Round Like 
Beach for over 48 years. 

She leaves her daughters, Judy (Raymond) IVterson of 
Round Ijikc Beach, Veronica (James) Doll of Alton. Mo. and 
her son, Curtis (Karen) Cavert of Greensboro, NC; five grand- 
children and four great grandchildren- She is preceded In 
dealh by her husband, Curtl* on Nov. 27, \D94 r m*ia,i,mr,,„ r . 
enis, Frederick (Nellie) Lucius. 

Memorial Services will be held al a laler dale. 

Iniermenl was privately held. 

Strang Funeral Chapel and Crematorium. Ltd.. 
Grayslake were entrusted with the arrangements. 

Memorials may be given to the St. Paul Lutheran Church. 
420 Greenwood. Round Lake, IL 60073 in her memory 

Edith 'Edie' Kukla (nee Baldwin) 

Age 75, a lifetime resident In the Inglcside, and Im Like 
areas died Wednesday, Nov. 18, 1998 at the Northern Illinois 
Medical Center, in McHenry. She was bom in Lake Villa, on 
Dec 16 1923 to Edgar and Martha "Marie" Inee Hariwigi 
Baldwin'. She nitended Grant Community High School where 
she served as president of her class, and had qualified as ihe 
Illinois Stale Typing Champion. She weni on to U.uri 
Reporting School in Chicago for (wo yean, before her mar 
riage lo Theodore "Nick* Kukla She was Inter active with the 
Shady Lane PTO, the VFW Women's Auxiliary in Fox lake, and 
remained active wilh her Schools' Class Reunion activities 

Survivors include: her children. Kristtne (Charles) trail 
of Tierra Verde, Florida. Terri (Klaus) Malcnke of Camanllo 
Calif.. Peter Kukla of Antioch. Joseph (Nancy) Kukla «i 
Richmond; her grandchildren, Mikcy and Andy Kukla, Jeffrey 
and loey Kukla, Rachel Pratt and Heather Malcnke; her 
brother. Jack Baldwin orTomahawk. Wis. She is preceded in 
dealh by her parents, and her late husband, 'Nick" Kukla on 
Sept. 4, 1994. 

Funeral Services were held at the K. K Hamsher Funeral 
Home. Fox Lake (The Chapel on the Lake), with ihe Rev 
Nathan Anderson, officiating. 

Interment was at Grant Cemetery in Ingleside. 



Strang Funeral Chapel 
& Crematorium, Ltd 




V'/\ 



ULLUUL^ 



FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED 

100 YEARS 

OF DEDICATED SERVICE 

1898-1998 

410 East Bchidcre Road 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

(847) 223-8122 

David G Sirang • Richard 1 Gaddis 
Directors 






. - 






November 27, 1998 



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K * -*.r» 



q© 



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.'■ 



LEGAL NOTICES 



QE 



. •• ! 



Lakeland Newspapers/ G13 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
The proposed 1999-2000 School 
Year budget for the Big Hollow School 
District #38 to available for review in 
the school district office focated el 
34699 N. Highway 12, Ingleslde, IL 
Office hours on school days are 8:30 
rj.m. lo 4:00 p.m. 

1188D-2282-FL 
November 27, 1998 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Utile 
Dreamers Dress-Up 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OH TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 21863 W. 
Linden Ave., Lake Villa, IL 60048. 
(847)356-4224. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESSES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Nancy Ortrnan, 21863 W. linden Ave., 
Lake Villa. IL 80048. (847)356-4224. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
intend (s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Nancy Ortrnan, October 30, 1998 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 30th day of October, 1998. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/a/Madelyn Freedberg 
Notary Public 
Received: November 12, 1998 
WUIard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
1 198D-2288-LV 
November 27, 1998 
December 4, 1998 
December It, 1998 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Calico Garden 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 789 Main 
Street, Anlioch, I L 60002. (847) 395- 
1226. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Qino O. Thoosflofd. 780 Main Street, 
AntloCh, IL 00002. (047) 305-1226. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is lo certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) lo conduct the above named 
business from the tocalion(s) indicat- 
ed and thai the true or real full 
namels) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
/s/Gina D. Thees field. November 4. 
1998. 

The loregomg instrument was 
acknowledged before ma by the per- 
son{s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 4 in day ol November. 1998. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/a/Linda rVL Wright 
Notary Public 
Received: November 4. 1998 
Willard R. Helander 
Late County Clerk 
1198B-2255-AN 
November, 13, 1998 
November 20. 1998 
November 27. 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 
NOTICE TO BIDDERS 

Notice is hereby given that Vernon 
Township, Lake County, Illinois, here- 
by solicits competitive sealed bids lor 
the Assessor's Office addition at 3050 
N. Main St., Prairie View, IL 60069. 

Drawings and specifications may 
be obtained or Inspected at Vernon 
Township, 3050 N. Main St., Prairie 
View, IL. Bid documents will Include 
one (1) set of drawings and one (1) 'set 
ol specifications of bid forms. A single 
lump sum bid shall be taken for the 
complete work. 

A certified check or bid bond in the 
amount of 1 0% may be required with 
the bid to guarantee the bidder will 
enter into a contract and furnish 100% 
performance bond if awarded the 
work. 

All bids to be submitted shall be 
sealed and delivered lo the Township 
Office, attention William E. Peterson, 
Township Supervisor, 'Assessor's 
Office Addition Bid* and received not 
later than 10:00 a.m.. January 5, 
1999, at which time (he bids shall be 
opened and publicly read. 

The Township reserves the right to 
reject any proposal lor failure to com- 
ply with all the requirements of this 
notice or anyot the bid specifications 
and bid summary documents; howev- 
er it may waive any minor defects or 
informalities at Its discretion. The 
Township further reserves the right to 
reject any and all proposals or to 
award a contract which in Its judg- 
ment, is In the best Interest of the 
Township. 
Barbara Barnabee 
Town Clork 

1198D-2296-GEN 
November 27, 1998 



. ■ • 



' f PUBUC NOTICE. 
FISHER AND FISHER . RLE NO. 34455 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 
Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation f/k/a 
Chemical Residential Mortgage Corporation, 

Plaintiff, 
VS. case No. 98 C 1944 

Judge Coar 
Daniel M. Ramirez, The Board of Managers of the 
Woodland H Ills Condominium Association 
Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

0URF1LENO.344M . 

(TT 13 ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDOIKO AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgment entered In the above entitled 

cause on Juhr SB. 1898. 

I, Howard Rubin, Special Commissioner for this court will on January 5, 1999 at the 
hour of 2:00 p.m. at the front door of Lake County Court House, 18 N. County Street, 
Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described premis- 
es: 

Unit 3F In the Townhomes of Woodland Hills Condominium, as Delineated on Survey 
of Part ol the South East 1/4 of Section 20, Township 45 North, Range 11, East of the 
Third Principal Meridian, In Lake County. Illinois Which Survey Is Attached as Exhibit 
"A" to the Declaration ol Condominium Recorded October 30, 1985 as Document 
23959087, as Amended from Time to Time. 
C/K/a 17575 W. Walnut Lane. Gumee, IL 60031 

Tax ID! 07-20-400-049 The improvements on the property consist of single (amity 
dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, certified funds. 
No refunds. The sale shall be subject to general taxes and to special assessments. 
The property will NOT be open tor inspection. 
The judgment amount was 5105,81933 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which win 
errtitte the purchaser to a Deed on a specified date unless the property is redeemed 
according to law. 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney. Fisher and Fisher, 120 
North LaSaDe, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372-4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under 
Illinois law. the Sales Officer Is nal required to provide additional information other than 
that set forth In this Notice. 

Isi Howard M. Rubin 

Special Commissioner 

11 980-2292 -GP 

November 27. 1998 

December 4. 1998 

. December 11, 1998 

December 18, 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 

FOX LAKE PUBUC UBRARY DISTRICT . 

LAKE AND MCHENRY COUNTIES, ILLINOIS 

STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

Fiscal Year July 1, 1997 - June 30, 1998 

BEGINNING BALANCES BY FUND: July 1. 1997: Library Fund 5248,020.28, 
Building Equipment Fund 5238.586.77; Working Cash Fund $45,263.99; Building 
Maintenance Fund $33,828.88; FICA Fund $8,549.12; 1MRF Fund $17,049.64; 
Insurance Fund 55,652.19; Audit Fund 52,080.58. TOTAL CASH ON HAND July 1. 
1997: $597,061.43. 

RECEIPTS: Tax Revenue-Levied $513,513.70; Personal Property Replacement 
Tax $14,868.91; Fines end Fees $11,904.95; Photocopy Income $e,928.B4; 
Videotape Rentals. $15,683.00-, Impact Fees $7,063.50; Donations. $749.94; Per 
Capita Grant $19,208.75; Other Grants $20,002.35: Interest $31,337.90; Other 
Income $3,285.90. TOTAL RECEIPTS: $644,847.74, . ,,. 

DISBURSEMENTS: Salaries by catsrjory: Salaries. Professional $51,204.30: 
Salaries. Poraprofesslonal $53,216.15: Salaries. Nonprofessional 5107,446.80; 
Salaries, Maintenance $3,383.23. TOTAL SALARIES: $215,230.48. By staff member: 
Bark, Harry $51,204.30; Clark. Kevin 55,304.15: Dobosiewicz, James 57.810.00; 
Hopkins. Marietta $3,564.00; Hopper, Susan 521 ,897.75; Hyland, Thomas $4,944. 1 1 . 
Johnson, Theresa $21,405.81; Lobaza, Cynthia 531,810.34; Lojdl. Violel $24,158.66; 
McClam. Marilyn $16,623.64; McMillan, Jennifer $4,253.53; North, Sarah $34634; 
Roden, Joan $7,081. 26; Schrieder. Marilyn 55,714.28; Skiltino. Marilyn $6,354.71; 
Soeiss, Holli 51,346.10: Wohrly, Cindy 51.413.50. 

VENDORS: American Bindery Midwest (Operating Expenses) 51.530.56; 
Amentech (Operating Expenses) $4,755.40; Baker & Taylor (Printed" Materials) 
$39,742.94; Baker & Taylor Enteriainmeni (Non Print Materials) $1,845.94; Bleck & 
Bleck Architects (Building Construction) S4.520.00; Commonwealth Edison 
(Operating Expenses) S22.545.61; Computer Systems by Orlando (Operating 
Expenses) $2,410.90; County Collector (Operating Expenses) $1,365.38; Demco 
(Operating Expenses) $1,50988; Evoy. Kamschuite, Jacobs & Co. LLP (Operating 
Expenses) $1,950.00: Fox Lake Postmaster (Operating Expenses) $1,410 17; Gale 
Research Inc. (Operating Expenses) $4,839.49; Gaylord Brothers (Operating 
Expenses) $1,076.11; William E. Gngg (Operating Expenses) $3,675.00; House 
Beautilul Inc. (Operating Expenses) $2,047.50; Hucker Electric Company (Building 
Construction) $5,767.95; HW Wilson Company (Printed Materials) $2,061.00; IMRF 
(Fringe Benefits) $23,619.13; Industrial Appraisal Company (Operating Expenses) 
$1,160.00; Internal Revenue Service (Fringe Benefits) $16,465.14; Jerry Vik 
Constructions (Building Construction) 527,000 00; Joe Meyer Tree Service (Operating 
Expenses) $1,400.00; Juergensmeyer & Associates (Operating Expenses) 
$4,339.00; Lakoland Publishers Inc. (Operating Expenses) $1,197.14; Lakeland 
Larson Elevator Corp (Operating Expenses) $1,281.28; Lakeland Community Bank 
(Fixed Assets) $23,053.32; UMRiCC Health Insurance Program (Fringe Benefits) 
$19,621.94; Lorenz Construction Corp. (Building Construction) $66,516.50; Lucent 
Technologies (Operating Expenses) 56.18544; Major Hill Insurance Company 
(Operaling Expenses) 57,000.00; Movies in Motion (Non Print Materials) 55,467.23: 
NBwsbank (Non Print Materials) 52,122,00; NICOR (Operaling Expenses) $3,522.93; 
Northwest Municipal Conference (Operating Expenses) $1,419.10; Phoenix 
Commercial Cleaning (Operating Expenses) $3,867.00; Quill Corporation (Operating 
Expenses) $1,266.81; Reed Elsevier New Providence (Operating Expenses) 
$2,310.00; Simplex Time Recorder Company (Operaling Expenses) $1,175,75; 
Social issues Resources Series (Non Print Materials) $1 ,000.00; Superior Paving Inc. 
(Operaling Expenses) $1,490.00; Thermodyne Mechanical Services (Operaling 
Expenses) 53,536.05; Turner Subscriptions (Printed Materials) $7,177.81; U.S. Postal 
Service (Operaling Expenses) $1,500.00; Village of Fox Lake (Operating Expenses) 
$1 ,082.36; Waste Management North (Operating Expenses) $1,270.48; All other ven- 
dors less than $1,000.00: $19,762.95. TOTAL VENDOR DISBURSEMENTS: 
$359,863.19. TOTAL ALL DISBURSEMENTS: $575,093.67. 

CASH ON HAND June 30, 1998: Library Fund $327,102.59; Building Equipment 
Fund $229,001.40; Working Cash Fund $47,579.81; Building Maintenance Fund 
$22,614.49; FICA Fund $12,935.35; IMRF Fund $19,796.29; Insurance Fund 
$5,989.11; Audit Fund $1,796.48. TOTAL CASH ON HAND June 30, 1998: 
$666,815.50, 

State of Illinois ) 

)SS 

County of Lake ) 

I, Richard E. Wend, being duty sworn on oath, depose and state that I am Ihe 
Treasurer of Ihe Board of Library Trustees ol Ihe Fox Lake Public Library District, Lake 
and McHenry Counties. Illinois, and lhat the foregoing slalements as to said District. 
of monies received, from what source, giving Items and all monies paid out, to whom 
paid and Iho amount, is for the fiscal year ended June 30. 1998. 

7s/Rlchard E. Wend 
Treasurer, The Board of Library Trustees 
of the Fox Lake Public Library District. 
Lako and McHenry Counties. Illinois 
Subscribed and sworn lo before me thi3 23rd day of November, 1998; 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Melody Krapl 
Notary Public, Slate ol Illinois 

' 1198D-2300-FL 

November 27, 1998 



» -" •..'.'^■•.-V-i!' ,„- 
PUBUC NOTICE 

FISHER AND FISHER 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT j 

FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILUN0I3 

EASTERN DIVISION 

Aames Capital Corporation, 

Plaintiff, 



FILE NO. 34764 



. 



I 



Case No. 98 C 2670 

Judge WILLIAMS, 



■ . 

" . r ' . ■■■ 



VS. , 

- • 

Daniel Bonnes a/k/a Dan Bonnes and Debbie 
Bonnes, Consumere Cooperative Credit. Union 
and Board of Managers of the Property 

Owners Association for Lots 1-41 of Sunset 

Ridge Phase 1, . - .;. 

Defendants, 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OURFILEM0.347B4 

(TT 18 ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice (s hereby given pursuant to a Judgment entered In the above enti- 
tled cause on September 16. 1998. 

I, Thomas Johnson and Tina Douglas, Special Commissioner for this court win on 
December 30, 1998 at the hour of 1:30 p.m. at the front door of Lake County 
Courthouse, 18 N. County SL, Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, 
the following described premises: 

Lot 6 In Sunset Ridge, Phase I, Being a Subdivision of Part of the Southwest 1/4 
Of Section 18, Township 46 North, Range 12, East of the Third Principal Meridian, 
According to the Plat Thereof, Recorded March 9, 1994 as Document Number 
3504524, In Lake County, Illinois, 
c/k/a 1710 Daybreak Lane. Zton, IL 60099 
Tax ID • 04-18-306-013 

The Improvements on the property consist of single family, wood frame, two story, 
wfth an attached garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, certified 
funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to general taxes and to special assess- 
ments. 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 

The judgment amount was $171,597.95. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which 
will entltJe the purchaser to a Deed on a specified date unless the property Is 
redeemed according to taw. 

For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney, Fisher and Fisher, 120 

North LaSalle. Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372-4784 from 1*0 pm to 3:00 p.m. Under 

Illinois law, the Sate Officer Is ool required to provide additional Information other 

than that set forth In this Notice. 

/a/ Tnomaa Johnson 

/a/TlnaDouQlaa 

Special Commissioner 

1198C-2261-WD 

November 20. 1998 

November 27, 1998 

December 4, 1998 

December 11, 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 

Gray slake Community Park District 

STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

YEAR ENDING MAY 31, 1998 

BEfflHUE: >-•..- ~\ :• 

Property taxes from all funds $628,081 Replacement taxes $13,664; Interest Income 

$41,210; Rentals $2,903; Dtinations/Grants 5283.734; Recreaiion Fees $362,366: 
Miscellaneous $3,901. Total revenues $1 ,335.867. 
PAYROLL DISBURSEMENT 

Sarah Alalmo 52158.01; Holly Anderson $1828.75; Knsti L. Anderson $517.50; Krislin 
C. Anderson $21923.10; Mark Anderson $1856.82: Melinda Ash $40.25; Chris Bakk 
$405; Tiffany Bailatin $1662.63; Sandi Baumann S3330.00; Christine Bozich 
$2368.22; Terr! Campanile $11391.88; Emily Charuhas S1217.05; Kristi Chirempes 
$1783.14; Elizabeth Cuellar $4448; Alan Ounker S9053.63; Pamela Ford $2437.84; 
Shannon Fricilone $532.81; Tinanie Garbowtcz $118.45: Janet Glertych S7345.40; 
Amy Goodman $8679.79; Ashlee Gossell $ 1632.50; Kevin Healy $218.50; Debbra 
Heffernen $5718.98; Andrew Hoffman $24038.43; Lindsay Jarosz S1084.50: Malia 
Johnson S123.75; Cynthia Kamp 5168.00; Adam Katz S8121.77; Jeremy Kaup 
S90.00; Tiffany Kincaid $417.50; Karen Kobernick $9648.54; Beth Krath S4543.26 
Cassie Krumrey Sl555;Teme Larson $3396; Robed Lashbrook $39230.66; Heather 
Lawrence $1978.50; Rachel Leimbach $2446.50; Rachel Lesinski $447, Ron Lorenzo 
$10461.52; Pamela Mania $51038.41; Amle Miner S30; Jason Mule 5620.38: Daniel 
Nerrolh $9936.82; Oarlane Placxo $578; William Pompeo $971 52: Lisa Raihle 
$94.00; Shari Raven $3200; Bobbie Rrvelll $137.50: Kelly Roberts $2171.13; 
Stephanie Rockenbach $1628.19; Carrie Roseman $1449.25; Benjamin Saam 
55125.37; Traciy Simomni $198; Michael Synders 528046.23; Terese Sullivan 
56626.09; Karolyn Teal $3564.78; Devon Townsend $145.76: Robert Varno $2556.59: 
Joseph vbeke $22602.97; Tracy Wagoner $2824; Loraine Wilder S258: Patrick Willm 
$1957664; John Wilson $71 102.19; Sandra Wilson 56984 75. Juliela Young 
$3689.88; 

TOTAL PAYROLL DISBURSEMENT $443,612.78 
ACCOUNT PAYABLE DISBURSEMENTS OVER S1 000.00 
Ameritech Cellular Services $1130.03; Amentech $7803.13; American Express 
$7228.53; Ancel. Gllnk. Diamond. Cope & Bush; $21075.59: Apollo $1778.00; Astro 
Sports & Tours $2160.00; Aramark Uniforms $1216.58; Adolf Keifer $1544.20; Bank 
of Northern Illinois $7440.00; BSN Corporation $2720.89; Cary Grove Park District 
$1000; Chicago Ttlte & Trust Co. $1000.00; Christopher Burke Engineers $3691.1 1; 
Cilgo $2846.53; CLC $1824,33; Commonwealth Edison $10876.14; Clean Cut Tree 
Service $1500; Conserv FS $1666.05; Cost/ Copy Consultants $2974.90; Costume 
Gallery $3374.13; Court Aces $3462.00; Curtain Call $2824.75; Daily Herald 
$1670.61; Dansco $4907.76; Discount Dance Supply $1352.05; Falcon Consulting 
$1815.64; Ellisville Redbird Baseball lub $1300.00; Falih Baptist Church $7440.25; 
Falcon Consulting Ent. 51815.64; First America Bank 533923.04; 1st Midwest Bank 
$22380.56; Fox Valley Printing $2677.00; Fundamental of Sports $10606.40; 
Grayslake School District 46 $28980.25; Grayslake High School District 127 
$6881.60; Grayslake True Value $2595.15; Great Lakes Officials Association 
$6198.50: Grower Equipment & Supply Co. $4880.79; Guaranteed Mutual Life 
$2070.45; Gymnastics Factory $7671.50; Hagg Press $20592.52; High 5 Sportswear 
$3425.70; IAP0 $7493.51; IMRF $31830.60; IPRA $5226.00; Identity Sportswear 
$6799.07; IL Dept. ol Employment Security $5600.00; IL Dept. of Revenue 
$12116.00; Imprest Fund $19088.70; IPEHN $12979.84; Illinois Play Surfaces IPS 
$3120.00; Jerry's Parkway Foods $1205.40; J.L. Hammett Co. $2730.07; Kent 
Desormey $6178.00; Lakeland Publishers, Inc. $1570-31; Landscape Concepts Inc. 
546687.50; Nancy Lakin $3090.00: Lewi3 Equipment Co, $16067.61; Lexington 
Homes $67700.00; Loshlns Dancewear $2678.47; Libertyville Tennis Club $6034.50; 
M.A.S.A $2932.19; Miller Area Heating $3079.31; Melrose Pyrotechnics Inc. 
$5000.00; Miracle Recreation $1179.24; NAEIR $1671.01; NOA Umpires Association 
$2142.84; Northshore Gas $5340.47; Ogorek & Associates $7132.00; Olson Bros. 
Recreational Surfaces $1725.00; Olson Transportation, Inc. $1776.00; Olson Oil Co. 
$1326.25: PDRMA $16328.50; Performing Arts Group $2265.00; United States Postal 
Service $2700.00; Peter Schaudt Landscape Architects $24,184.00,- Pulte Homes 
$43550.00; Quail Creek Homeowners Assc. $3054.00; Quill Corporation $1877.93; 
R.A. Adams Enterprises, Inc. $3021.00; Reliable Office Supply $3612.70; 
Rockenbach Chevrolet $7384.97; Rock Plumbing $1397.90; Round Lake Area Park 
District $4040.00: Rudlg Trophies $2992.57; Santo Sport Store $ 9254.13; Stratford 
Banquet $2842.80; Synnestvedt Nursery $1019.50; Taylor Made, Inc. $14384.04; 
Team Sport Pro, LTD. $10234.21; USCM// Midwest PEBSCO $3570; Vandguard 
Financial Service $3247.56; Vermont Systems $16817.48; Village of Grayslake $ 
3373.25; Waimart $1491.99; Waste Management of Lake County $2029.45; Joan 
Whitt $2060.00: Wolohan Lumber $1 381 .38; Woodland School District 50 $1 174.24; 
Worlds Finest Chocolate S6000; Young Rembrandts $3621.00. 
TOTAL ACCOUNT PAYABLE DISBURSEMENTS OVER $10oq ,O0 is $754,831.47. 
TOTAL ACCOUNT PAYABLE DISBURSEMENTS UN R ER 5^ 0, 00 , IS 
$ 79,588.75. TOTAL ACCOUNT PAYABLE DISBURSEMENTS $034,420.22. 

11B8D-2298-GL 
November 27, 1998 



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November 27, 1998 



LEGAL NOTICES 



Lakeland NewspaperskQl 4;i 



I* 



SCHOOL DIGEST 

Technology student 
ambassadors 

Students, Miehele Tyminski. 
a senior from Lake Villa; and 
Rmily Friedman, a junior from 
Wadsworth, have been named 
Technology Campus Student 
Ambassadors at the College of 
Lake County. In addition, ihey 
will hold a seat on the Director's 
Council for Student Success, 

Outstanding writer 

Senior, l : .rin Walsh of 
Undenhursi is be inn honored as 
an outstanding writer by the 
National Council ol Teachers of 



English. She is one of only 41 
high school seniors in Illinois, 
668 in the country, receiving this 
award. The 1998 NCTR 
Achievement Awards in writing 
recognizes writing excellence 
based on the student's samples of 
their best prose or verse, and on 
impromptu themes (hat are writ- 
ten under supervision. Winners 
names arc published in B booklet 
that is sent to directors of admis- 
sions at il.uon two and four year 
colleges and universities, to 
members or the U.S. Senate and 
House of Ik'prescntativcs, to 
stale supervisors of Knglish and 
to NOT leaders. 




Free Adoption Seminar 

Anyone contemplating adoption should 
attend this informational seminar 

Wednesday, December 2, 1998, 7:00 P.M. 

hirnily Coiinseliitf* Clinic 
PHUOWesi Hifjlmm 120 ■ (iniysliike. Illinois 600.10 

Infants and toddlers available from: 

t Imw I'hI.iikI. Vii'lfhim. lluliMn.i. liuvsia. India and Guatemala 

Spat* is limited, please rail 847-223-8107 to rcglstnr 
or fur more information ask for (Jinny Mann. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

•...■•- • •• '.I ,', H.t.|i>"i] A '. **■ 



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a> '?: •. 

'.AMI >. A'*, Pf>V ■' I . t I- 

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STATE. OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

-,, , ,_, , .. i_ ii ,. .. , _. «... ,. , i 

.f»f<-rid<si l*> .o'idM I ttir ,»fiuw i>,lrn»'iJ 
I>usin<?5S /ri)'» Hie «i> .i/n»i)Sl ifijti ,ir 
ety ann rr^i rn,> f,,„. , . ,,.,, •,,. 
■ ,|-..,. . • •(„. ....... , . ,.,- - .. ,. 

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v:n|s inli*nr|nig In tfjniluEl t'W: IjuS' 

noss nns am nnf rji NovonJtiei 199B 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

i» Barbara lortono 

Notary Public 

Received November 5. 1998 

Wiiiaro R Helander 

Lake Counly Clerk 

1198B 2260-FL 

November 13, 1996 

November 20, 199B 

November 27. 1998 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMEO BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS Triumph 
Enterprises 

ADDRESS(ES| WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY 2237 N 
Maslors Lane Round Lake Beach. 1L 
60073 (847)516 5663 (street) PO 
Box 1470. Lake Villa. IL 60046 frnai' 
mg) 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES| OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Gene Prather. 2237 N Masiers Lane. 
Round Lake. IL 60073 (64 7)546 
5663 Dr Jean Zeigier. 2237 N 
Masiers Lane. Round Lake Beach il 
60073 (847)548-5663 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is lo certify thai the undersigned 
inland (s) lo conduct I he above named 
business from the local ion(s} indicat- 
ed and lhat the Irue or real full 
name(s) ol the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or Iransactmg the business 
is/are correct as shown 
/s/Gene R. Prather. November n. 1998 
/s/Dr. Jean Zeigier. November 11,1 996 
The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son{s) intending lo conduct Ihe busi- 
ness this I llh day of November, 1998. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Sandra L. Juenger 
Notary Public 
Received: November 12, 1998 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake Counly Clerk 
119BC-2276-RL 
November 20, 1995 
November 27, 1998 
December 4, 1998 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

r.AWF OF BUSINESS JMB 

A>s>ii i,-<tr-s 

AHJIRISS.IS WHf Hf BU5INCS5 
\ TO Br f .ONDUCTl b OR TRANS 
A T r t.J 'N THIS COUNTY 7-t I 
" " Ili.'IWh Tr,-).. Round L.lkr> Hivq'ilS 
, 'iUuM '847,740 2fi66 
'.A'.'f '-, ANP POST Of I K,i OH 
"■ ' : >i Ni f APtJHt Virf S, OF Tut 
i-l I'-.'jM-S (JWNiNCi t.ONDUCT 

•. , • u mum a< <\nu n.iMNi ss 

' ' i V I" ,|''( '•! ' ' " I" 1V.I- I'.l! 

is .■ : i i* :" :■- '■: &' ' i 

rt.-.r ;.v, .'hM. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ; 

This * fi< certify trt.il rrip uninvsigriffj 
"iiTKirv t" ( -indLji.; ;iii> .iixivi' rta'Mrvl 

:..-,• i's>. ft i'»i en. jij' .inrm.s, .Mij.i.i' 
<-a .I'.'i » ,).! |.f'r if,i« mi mil 'u 
• ,i" .• .. .,' :'<v |jL''Siiiiis, owning, con 
:.i ■ -'ig .,< ;r,insnctihtj the uusincbb 
is arc L'j"f[.l as shown 
s John f Monany November 10. 
1MB 

Tne loregomg mslrumenl was 
acknowledged beloie me by the per 
bonis) intending lo conduct Ihe busi 
nessthis lOlhday of November. 1998 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Deborah J Sylkaus 

Nolary Public 

Received November 17, 1998 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1 1980-2289-RL 

November 27. 1998 

December 04, 1998 

December it, \ 998 



PUBLIC NOTtCE 
ASSUMEO BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS Learning 

Worldwide 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 

IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS 

ACTED IN THIS COUNTY 949 

Manchester Road. Lake Zurich. IL 

60047 (847)5508335 (Street) PO 

Box 849. Lake Zurich. IL 60047 

(84 71550 6335 (MMtng) 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 

RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 

PCRSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT 

ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS 

Michael C Rydei. 949 Manchester 

Road. Lake Zurich. IL 60047 847 

7262926 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 

COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify thai the undersigned 
mtend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locauon(s) mdicai 
ed and thai the true or real lull 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting Ihe business 
is/are correct as shown 
/s/Mtehael C Rydel November 
16.1999 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by ihe per 
son(s) miendmg to conduct Ihe busi- 
ness this 1 6lh day of November. 1 998 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
is; Susan E Espmoza 
Notary Public 
Received November 17. 1998 
Willard R. Helander 
Laka County Clerk 
1198D-2290WL 
November 27, 1998 
December 4, 1998 
November 1 1. 1998 



More than $450,000 
raised for NICASA 



Contributions totaling more 
than $450,000 have been pledged 
to the SI. 16 million capital cam- 
paign of the Northern Illinois 
Council on Alcoholism and 
Substance Abuse, reports Sarah 
Cattcrson, chnir ol* the fundrais 
ing effort. 

Catterson, divisional vice- 
president for corporate purchas- 
ing at Abbott laboratories, said 
Abbott and Kemper Insurance 
Co. each have pledged S200.000. 
In addition, she said, in-kind con- 
tributions have been made for 
improving the agency's electronic 
information system by Kemper. 
Motorola, Cisco and Seamnn, 
Whiteside and Associates. 

"We are very grateful for the 
generosity of our early donors 
and hope that more support will 
be forthcoming for this impor- 
tant cause," she said. 

The capital campaign com- 
mittee hopes to reach its goal by 
the end of M)9!l. she said. 
"NICASAV reputation for helping 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMEO BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS Hnrvosl Crodrt 

Ca'd Sorvicos 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY 1174 
Berkshire Ln Barnngion. IL 6O010 
|800l 931 0533 ISIroot) 1935 S Plum 
Grove Rd *10B Palatine. IL 60067 
•6001 931 0533 (mailing) 
NAMFlSl AND POST OFFICE OR 
Mi SIDL'NCE ADDRESSES) OF THE 
I'f RSONrSl OWNING CONDUCT 
ING OR TRANSACTING FtuSlNESS 
L3wr>nc<! v Luna '-• u 74 Berkshire 
C" Hiiii.'n]t"' ; |r 60010. 'h-171 550- 
1563 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

Tins is lu certify lhat Ihe undersigned 
miend(s) lo conduct the abovo named 
business Irom the location(s) indicat- 
ed and thai the true or real lull 
name(s) of Ihe person(s| owning, con- 
ducimg or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown 
/s/Lawronce V Ltma Sr . November 2. 
1998 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per. 
son(s) inlendiing lo conduct Ihe busi- 
ness this 2nd day of November, 1 998. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Laurence Allon Elliott 
Notary Public 
Received November 4, 1998 
Willard R Helander 
Lake Counly Clerk 
1198B-2258-WL 
November 13, 1998 
November 20. 1998 
November 27. 1998 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS Wildfire Pel 

Resori 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 

IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS 

ACTED IN THIS COUNTY 25829 W 

Bonner Rd . Wauconda, IL 60084 

(847) 526-7335 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 

RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 

PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT 

ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS 

Maureen Tobias. 25829 W Bonner 

Rd . Wauconda, IL 60064 (847) 526 

7335 

RogBr Tobias. 25829 W Bonner Rd , 

Wauconda IL 60084 (047) 526 7335 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 

COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is lo certify that iho undersigned 
miend(s) to conduci ihe above named 
business Irom ihe local ion(s) mdicat 
ed and thai the true or real full 
namo(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacimg ihe business 
is'are correel as Shown 
/s/Maureen Tobias, Ociober 31. 1998 
:s/Roger Tobias. October 31. 1998 
The loregomg instrument was 
acknowledged bolore me by Ihe per 
son(s) intending lo conduci the busi- 
ness ihis 3rd day of November, 1998 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/S/Judilh D Amore 
Notary Public 
Received Novembers, 1998 
Willard R Helandor 
Lake Counly Clerk 
1198B-2257-WL 
November 13. 1998 
November 20, 1998 
November 27, 1998 



people improve their lifestyles is 
very well known," Catterson said. 
"This capital campnign will allow 
us to increase the prevention and 
treatment programs offered to 
residents of this fast-growing 
region." 

Catterson snid the commit- 
tee is counting on individual 
donors to play a role. She said a 
Community Giving Tree has been 
created lo identify and perma- 
nently recognizx* all those who 
contribute to the capital cam- 
paign. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice is hereby given thai SAFE- 
WAY SELF STORAGE, 1100 W 
RolimB Road, Round Lako Heights. IL 
60073. will sell Ihe porsonal goods 
from iho following units lo satisfy iho 
lion of SAFEWAY SELF STORAGE 
(Seller) tor rental and olhor charges 
duo 

UNIT#3055mI0 
OCCUPANT-Rondy Miller 
CONTENTSDesk, Two Dresaor, 
Microwave Oven. Wicker Stand, 
Lamp, Box Spring & MotTross and 
many boxes 

Those items and all iloms stored 
m the abovo units will bo sold lo the 
highest bidder for cash Removal of all 
items Irom iho promises musl bo with- 
in lhroo days from dnto of sale and a 
socuniy band poslod to covor same 

Salo will bo hold on Docombor 
5lh. 1998. on iho promises of SAFE- 
WAY SELF STORAGE. 1100 W. 
Rollins Road. Round Lake Heights. IL. 
60073. (Fairfield and Rollins Roads) at 
approximately goo io Noon. SAFE- 
WAY SELF STORAGE rosorves Iho 
nght to wilhdraw any or all ot Ihe 
abovo montionod items prior to sale 

NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCI- 
DENTS 

1198C-2279-RL 
November 20. 1998 
November 27, 1008 



PUBLIC NOTICE \ 
The Spring Grove School District . ' , 
#1 1 Board ot Education Mooting .'.'■ 
scheduled for Oecember-22, 1998 at I 
7:00 PM has been changed to ' 
December 15, 1998 at 7:00 PM, The 
date has been changed because of 
the Wlnlor Break. Spring- Grove 
School District rvi l'a December meet- 
ing is scheduled for December 15, 
1993 at 7:00 PM, Spring Grove School 
is located at 2018 N. Mala -St/eel, 
Spring Grove, Illinois. 

Submitted by: 

Kaihryn Herrora, Secretary 

Spring Grove School District H 1 1 

Board of Education 

1198D-2283FL 

November 27, 199B 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION , : " 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Tukeabrey 
Distribution 

AODRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 35167 N. 
Rondhlll Dr., Ingleslde, IL60041,{B47i 
567-2687. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON'S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
John Tukesbroy, 35187 N, Randhill 
Dr.. Ingleslde, IL 60041. (847) 587- 
2887. Kathy Tukoebroy, 35167 N. 
Randhill Dr.. Ingtoskje, IL 60041 . (847) 
587-2687. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
iniond(a) to conduct the abovo named 
business from Ihe locatlon(s) Indicat- 
ed and (hat the truo or real lull 
namo(s) ol Ihe person(B) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting iho business 
is/aro correct as shown. ' 
/S/John Tukesbroy, October 28, 1998 
/a/ Kathloon J. Tukesbroy, October 28 
1996 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before mo by Ihe por- 
son(s) Intending lo conduct the busi 
noss this 28th day ot Oclobor, 1998 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/M. Krerowscz 

Nolary Public 

Received: October 29, 1998 

Willard R. Helandor 

Lake County Clerk 

1198B-2253-FL 

November 13, 1998 

November 20., 1096 






I 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

FISHER AND FISHER 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 
EASTERN DIVISION 
Harbor Financial Mortgage Corporation. 
Plaintiff, 



.-..— -, 



RLE NO. 3457B 



Case No. 98 C 2320 
Judge Marovich 



vs 

Naksung Song, Young Song, Board ot 
Managers of the Antroch Golf Club 
Community Association f/k/a The Harbor 
Ridge Homeowners Association onrj Board 
ol Managers o1 the Harbor Ridge Community 
Association. 

Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 34S78 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES] 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant lo a Judgment entered in the above enti- 
tled cause on September 9. 1998 . 

I. Max Tyson. Special Commissioner for this court will on December 28, 1998 at 
the hour ot 9 00 a.m at Lake County Court House, Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the 
highest bidder for cash, ihe following described premises: 

Parcel 1 Lot 1 1 in Fairway Estates ai Antioch Golf Course Club Unit 2, Being a 
Subdivision of Pan of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 25 
and Part ol the Southeast Quarter ot the Southeast Quarter of Section 24. all m 
Township 46 North. Range 9, Easl of the Third Pnnclpal Meridian, and Part of the 
North Half of Ihe Northwest Quarter of Section 30 and Part of the Southwest Quarter 
ol Section 19, all in Township 46 North. Range 10, East ol the Third Principal 
Meridian, According lo the Plat Thereof Recorded January 4, 1991 as Document 
2978B02, m Lake County. Illinois 

Parcel 2 Easement for Ingress and Egress for Ihe Benefil of Parcel 1 over thai 
Pan ol ihe Antioch Country Club Final Development Plan Recorded September 10. 
1975 as Document 1726016 as per Court Order in Case No. 72MR124 and the 
Anhoch Country Club Final Development Plan Revision No. 1 Recorded June 8, 1977 
as Document 1841768. as more fully Delineated on ihe Plats Attached Thereto and 
Designated as Ingress and Egress in the Declaration of Easements, Covenanls and 
Restrictions Recorded May 31. 1978 as Document 1920598 Described as Harbor 
Ridge Drive (Excepi those Parts Reloased and Extinguished on the Plat ol Fairway 
Estates at Antioch Golf Club Unit 2 Recorded January 4, 1991 as Document 
2978B02 and Stonebndge Drive, in Lake County. Illinois. 

Parcel 3 Easement for Ingress and Egress lor Ihe Benofils of Parcel 1 over Ihai 
Part of Fairway Estates at Antioch Golf Club Unit 2 Recorded January 4, 1991 as 
Documeni 297B802 Described as Nicklous Way and Palmer Court, as Crealed by 
said Plat, in Lake Counly, Illinois 
C/H/a 25002 Nicklaus Way. Antioch, It 60002 
Tax ID l> 01-24 -418-009 

The improvements on the properly consist of single family dwelling. 

Sale Tomis 10% down by certified lunds, balance within 24 hours, certified 
funds No relunds The sale shall be subiecl lo general taxos and to special assess 
ments 

The property will NOT bo open lor inspection 

The ludgment amount was $380,4 79 33 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which 
will entnle tho purchaser to a Deed on a spocified date unless the property is 
redeemed according to law 

For information call the Safes Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney Fisher and Fisher. 120 
North LaSailo. Chicago. Illinois (312] 372-4784 from i;00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under 
Illinois law. the Salos Officer is noJ required lo provide addilional intormalion other 
than that set lorth in this Notice 

tit Mail Tysgri 

Special Commissioner 

1198C-2262-AN 

November 20. 1998 

November 27, 1998 

December 4, 1998 

December 11. 1998 






November 27; 1998,' 



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C1 6/ Lakeland Newspapers HOLIDAY SPARKLERS %November27, 1998 





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OUU. HOME IS : 
YOUli I IOME 

Come visit us & see 
the difference. 

•24-1 lour Nursim* Care bv a licensed ande^ir-^ 
ljfl| stall ^jjL 

•Three delicious meals served in our dining \ 
room 
Special diets and snacks 
Daily activities with frequent outings 
Physical/Speech therapy 
I • Pastoral services • Recreational therapy 
\ • TV Hook-ups in every room 





LLCREST 

Nunlrtg Onter 



847-546-5300 

1740 N.Circuit Dr. 

Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 



Jieavenly 

HOLIDAY FROM 

J[ilacdpartments 






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Door Decorating Contest 
at Hillcrest Nursing Center 





Hillcrcsl Nursing Center is proud to 
announce their 2 nd annual Holiday Door 
Decorating Contest. There are 117 interior 
doors that need to be decorated for the holiday season, and we 
hope all of them will be decorated. Church groups, business own- 
ers, municipalities, and kids of all ages participated last year in 
this successful event, and we look forward to seeing them again. 
Door decorating starts December I s ' and ends December 13 lh with 
a dessert and refreshment parly following on the 15 th at 6 p.m. 
The Door Decorating Contest is a unique way to bring the com- 
munity together to celebrate the Christmas season. Joel Crabtree, 
spokesperson for Hillcrcsl, says, "Giving of one's self and shar- 
ing from within are two things that make this season so joyous". 
Hillcrcsl Nursing Center invites communities in Lake County to 
participate in this event. Participants are sure lo have a good time 
and make a difference in the lives of many seniors. High school 
choirs, church groups, and families are welcome to sing 
Christmas carols at Hillcrest during this season. For more infor- 
mation, and to sign up, please contact Joel Crabtree at Hillcrest 
Nursing Center at (847) 546-5300. 



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November 27, i99a HOLIDAY SPARKLERS Lakeland Newspapers/ d 7 




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An atmosphere filled with sunshine and 
the beautiful beaches of the Hawaiian Islands 
has been recreated by a local tanning salon to 
help people get ready for the coming 
vacation season when many people 
have a warm weather destination; 

Owner Ylckl Carlson and her 
professional staff at the Hawaiian 
Island Tropical Tan and Nail Salon, 
located at 34825 Wilson Rd, at the 
corner of Rte. 134 and Wilson Rd., 
In Ingleside, offer the best avail- 
able tanning equipment and ac- 
cessories even if you are staying 
home and merely need to add a 
little color to your life. 

All employees have completed the training 
certification of the Smart Tan Network and all 
the tanning beds are maintained well beyond 
the manufacturer's recommendations. Hero 
safety is as important as relaxation. 

This Is where you'll find the area's only in- 
door beach, while each tanning bed is located 
in a private room with cool and tranquil sur- 






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Besides carrying a full-line 

of tanning lotions with tropical 

brand names, a full-line of Koala 

( Gold hair care products, hairwraps 

S are also available. 
Hawaiian Island has re- 
■ .-I cently added a full-service nail sa- 
lon offering complete manicure 
and pedicure services. 

Gift certificates for the 
coming holidays are available. On 
Dec. 7, Hawaiian Island will host 
its second annual Christinas party with donuts 
and coffee In the morning and appetizers plus 
served In the afternoon. All customers are in- 
vited to register for the special drawing. 

Hawaiian Island Tropical Tan and Nail Sa- 
lon is open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., Monday 
through Friday and from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on 
Sat. Call (847)546-8600 for an appointment or 
more information. 



• • 




awaiian Island 

Tropical Tan & Nail Spa 

34825 Wilson Road, Ingleside 
( Route 134 & Wilson Road) 

546-8600 




Full Service Nail 

Acrylics, gels, fiberglass, manicures, pedicures & more. 
Featuring Creative Nail & China Glaze nail products! 

Make your appointment today for the holidays. 

Remember — 

§ift certi/icflfes make tite perfect present for that iiarcf-to-sltop-for person. 
They're quick, east/ & conueitieiil! 



Stop in Monday, December 7th for our 2nd Annual Customer 

Appreciation Christmas Party, along with special savings, 
^Ifawihgjs & more! '^0^i^}^^J^liiS& (m 




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Typical days at the Jungle Gym feature 
classes in kickboxing, step aerobics, 
strength training, sports conditioning 
and body sculpting taught on the only 
powerlifting and kickboxing stage in 
Lake County. For those who care to 
work out on their own, Jungle Gym 
has two floors of the latest exercise 
and weight training equipment. 



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A HEALTH CLUB THAT REALLY CARES 
ABOUT "YOU" AND YOUR RESULTS. 

• Free personal training with every membership 

• New, top of the line equipment 

• Classes for all ages 

Tots • Kids 6-10,9-14* Adults • Seniors 

VARIETY OF CLASSES 

•Sculpting 

•Cardio *Kickboxing 

•Toning •Children's Tumbling 

•Power Dance "Sport Conditioning 

•Strength Training 

Day-care facilities, sauna, steam room, 
super tanning beds, locker rooms and so much more. 

The only club in the area with a 
kickboxing and power lifting stage. 

Linden Plaza On Rte. 132 (Grand Ave.) 

Lindenhurst 
847-265-5000 



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C 1 8/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HOLIDAY SPARKLERS 



November 27, 1998 








goes cellular for the 




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Wauconda business keeps families 

in touch during busy holiday 
season and throughout the year 



This is the? season when we 
think of family, that's why 
a family owned and oper- 
ated business, Advanced 
Audio Systems, hopes to make 
your family's holidays happier 
when you give your loved ones (he 
latest in cellular phones l>y Cellu 
lar One. 

Usin^a cellular phone when 
i-VL'i you are, and/or a paging sys- 
tem from Aiivanieil, enables 
everyone to he eonstautly in loudi 
and reathahle, anytime of the dav 
tir iii^lit. 

Advaiueil Audio Systems 
iiwncis, Carol and Kevin I ),iltc>n, 
have been in the audio .sWrms 
husinrs". suit r I'lDi. I oealed at 
i>l i U I i!iiii\ si m W'auiniitl.i. 
\thaiu I'd sfW'i (-ili/es in the sides 
.Hid mst.iJIatiiui nl tai audio s\s 
rem- iriitiili -t.tiK ke\ less enliv 
,i|.n ins i rllulai [vltotii's, pagfrij^ 
systems, and mm h mote 

I et AdViim e lurni.sh urn v\Hh 
(lie height o] i oiumunitatinn ( mi 
wnirmvs. in this tlavol twritv 
nieiu t's galoie' 

I he buttons and then well 
trained, protessinnal stall sline iu 
bring families and businesses into 



the next century with the latest in 
quality audio systems. 

Imagine safely and comfort- 
ably starting your car while you 
enjoy the warmth of a crackling 
fireplace before you venture into 
the wintry night. What better 
Christmas gift than a remote start 
from Advanced. 

What leen doesn't feel grown- 
up and what parent doesn't feel 
easier when I hey are in constant 
communication with a paging 
system. This is a slocking filler 
that gives back to the giver a hun- 
dred (old. 

Advanced"* paging systems 
aie a must in today's business 
world Advanced gives a lifetime 
nanantee. the liteiime id the cat, 
on all automobile audio installa- 
tions. 

Advani ed Audio Systems is 
npeii honi Ma in In T>:.H! p.m.. 
Month) . Wednesday and I liday, 
liotu !> a.m. to i> p in., I uesday 
and Thursday, ami horn '■ am to 
noon on Saturday 

t.ive the gltt that's on the cut 
ting edge o| the new millennium 
h\ t ailing IH-l?j-lfJ7 22S5 lor more 
information 




i 



Advanced Audio Systemes owners, Carol and Kevin Dalton, specialize In sales and installation of car 
audio systems, cellular phones and much more. Give a gift on the cutting edge of the millennium 
by shopping at their store.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 




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ADVANCED AUDIO/ CELLULAR 

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Customize Punch amplifier installations with 
Punch Link and endbells. Now available in 
chrome, gray, and raw. The raw aluminum 
finish is designed to be painted to custom 
I colors lor trick installations. 



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615 West Liberty (RT. 176) ■ Wauconda, IL 60084 

(847) 487-2255 



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'* 1-SS8-889-0899 
Fax 847-8S8-08S0 

E-Mail - 8alton8@ix .netcom.com 
w«ro.Baltoiwna*1%c<m 






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in Gurncc Mills 

Assorted Juicers 

While quaiiUties iaal. 

Some models discontinued 

JC3. JC6 



&rwe 797 use Entrance C or D 



ajr saviaigs.« 

Prom Salton Time i HaiT DrjT ^ 

^jSBT" *■**■* close6ut 

Holiday Prices I ..—-.^ Values to 

$ 9 M / 8 19' B / 8 39 9! 

Values to $80 
Men's * Women's 

ST 7013. 7014.7016 



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$g99 



Values to 

*35 rK ' 



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George Foreman Grills |l.ne«u» 

1 t..(«Tn!in .Jr. Model JM 1 f : W 



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OHIO Reg '49- 
OBAO Reg. '79' 

6QQBB 

orge Foreman Cookbook 1 •> 



. Juiceman Jr. Model JM I JLW 
I0g>» I t 4 horse power motor Reg ■.-*•-> 

09" I Juiceman U Model JM2 m J 179 

Wtm I i/2 horsepower n 10 ^ 1, - 

Also on sale Juiceman 
Elite Series 



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Belgian 
Waffle 
or Sandwich 
Maker 



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Bolton 
Assorted 

Bice 
Cookers 
3-14 Cup 
Size 






TBB60 He« no' „*K„ 
1 to 1-1/8, Sib. loaf else 

Ml oiher BreadmaXers 1 
at Holiday Prices 



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Your Choice 
Holiday Special! ^gglV 

WM3C, "WM4, SA4 j 

Dessert Depot 

Salton 

pisaelle Maker *"<■ 

Maxim 

Donut Bites mi..- 

Salton 
Peanut Butter 

Machines $o-l 99 

Salton 

Yogurt Maker •/«» 

Beg 'J^ 

Salton 

Hot Air 

popcorn Popper *:« 

Maxim 

Gr0 pe Maker cub 

SO 1 99 



53 ^=V. 

sr '£ '&, 

Salton Vitamin Bar 

fl Tier Steamer I £^99 tO $ 1 A" 

■VP5 1^ *^* Bi '^'"^^^j**^ 

Caf e Cappuccino 



Gino's Bast 
Pizza Maker 

$99" 



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Sauce or 
Crust 

Mix from 
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jaopo. set. $50**^ 

Your Choice 

EX4B01dt 

EX90kit 

Holiday Special! 

Tftka an aatra lO* OFT all 

_ JUpnaao HactUnaa 

FARBERWARE* DEPARTMENT I 

_«„ Electric ^JwwiMEJ 
PERCOLATOR j^y^pans 

'39** ,,-iulnl.uW-l ■»*""• QM 

lAQti "'* '** 

»B9 M >'<v -'' 



Maxim Toasters 

Utcrodilp Control. CoolTbu^ 
^=4 2 Slice Wide Mouth ET6. ET9 

$ 1 Q®9 

4 s:/:^ uv^i-anie at s'.mllai- savings 



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SALTON CAFE 

$79" 
89" 



I •three For All 

Reg. M09- 



I Three for Ail Flos £ 
Beg. '\29- 



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Electric 
COFFEE XJBNS 9MWokfl 

•ISO," •l/« l ^ ,ul ^" ,^ "'■^ 

h«j ■ 1 a- »t WW 

'ITS** T<H-iUl»l-."«'»» k 



Salton 
Presents 

TacoBell 

Kitchen 

Originals 

Holiday Special! 

^ ? 5 - " ,! 9 " holiday Special 

nr Nutritionist 10 piece 
GOOKWABESBT 



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*ei Uei tver j~- ** 

8i»OW 1-5*15* SUn:**'* ^* 



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Asst.Looney 
Tunes 
Character 
Coffee Mug w/Mug Warmers 
Values to $Q90 to $ 1 A M 

•20- W * 

Bugs Bunny or 
Marvin Snow Cone Makers 

Holiday $Ja4" 



MPT f '-a^ 



Special! 



F-* '26 



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Herahey 

AsMTtadOln 

i tenia Cookla Jar, 

KlaeCandUa* 

Cryatal 

•24" 



lOQBtsT 

FHJHJCT5 IgJ 



Boozie Story 
Book Dolls 



Cookie Jar $ 1 Q9B 

Classics BclUiayBpad' 11 A«7 

SM9 to 1 Q» 

Holiday Bp»dalt * g 



Andy Warhol's 
Art Dinnerware 

8 5 M to $ 9 M «cn 



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Father 

Christmas Pattern 
i6Vl*aaMt 

*99 M 

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OOMTCiTUmMtntfaatAlM 
AnllabJ* aad ob flsltf 



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C20 /Lakeland Newspapers HOLIDAY SPARKLERS, November 27, 1998 







Santa with tasty treats 



As he passes Uirough your house this 
Christmas Eve. try leaving Santa a delicious 
cup of hot chocolate and a large piece of cake. 
The following recipes, courtesy of "neat That! 
Cookbook" (Chapters), by Ann llndgman, 
certainly will please Santa and warm him up 
as he travels throughout the world delivering 
toys to delighted girls and boys. 

HOT CHOCOLATE 

Mokes 1 cup 

/•'or each cup 
I cup milk 

1 ounce unsuwet 
ened chocolate, 
grated 

2 tablespoons 
sugar 

Hi teaspoon 
vanilla extract 
in/ttitmall 

In a small 
sain cp;m over 
liiM Ileal. 

whisking 

t nnslanlK. 
I jcil [n 
p'tliri tin- 
milk. 

< hoeulale 
and sugar until 

ihev rcit h H boil, and the chocolate melts and 
(lie sugar dissolves Stir in ihg vanilla extract, 
il using. Serve immediately. 

BELGIAN BUTTERCAKE 

Makes 1 2 to 1 6 wedges or about 32 pieces 




2 cups sifted nil-purpose flour 
1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar 
V4 teaspoon salt 

M cup (1 12} sticks unsalted butter 
Milk for painting the top 

Preheat (he oven to .'150 I , witb a rack in 
the middle. 

In a medium bowl, stir together die Hour. 
sugar and salt. First cut In the butler with a 

pastrv blender 
or 2 knives; 
then gently 
knead il in 
with your 
hands 
The 
dough 
will be a 
little 
crumbly. 

Press 
the dough 
into the 
inltom ol 
either a *t 
iltct) pie pan til 
an H-mrh 
square pan 
11111 die top 
til ihebullei 
cake Willi il 
(liisiiy brush 
dipped 111 milk 
Hake die butted ake far) _'"• til "W mm 
utes, (ir until it's ,1 pale i:olileii biuv\ n I vi n 
cool lor I r ) minutes I ill M lilln llllll ueile.es 
it you Used llie pie pan til iritn wfvr.tti^ ll 
von used the -i|i..ur piifi Sr-i\e at oiiimi 
temperalini' 




HAPPY HOLIDAYS! 



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PROMPT 
FREE DELIVERY 



Full Service Pharmacy 

The Fairy Collection ***»■ 
Castagna Collectibles «*#*# 

Fannie May Candies 

426 N. Milwaukee Ave. 
■* Downtown Libertyvitle 

362-2005 V^O 



103 Years of keeping kids 



Featuring Accessories & 
Oakley Sunglasses 



Christmas Layaways 







DDO MAIN ST. • ANTIOCII, IL 60002 

847-395-6500 







Ijk... 

* I 



From our , 
Family to yours, 
have a Happy 
Holiday Seaeori. 



AMERICAN FAMILY 

CJI ■!■■ 111^. 

AUTO H0U£ BUSINESS HSALTHUFE 

Ho«(»(»-lfafaA«IS37B3 




M7-223-2&&d 









■ 




Will Present A 

MM tfa&hion Show 
$ Sunday, 

Jan. 10, 1999 
ft lit wola Banquets, 
-fox take 



bridal Solon 




Tickets wilt he available in 'December. 
CallJIazct at r >46-:i ID<) 

Silk-tN'jIaz ( B tidal Salon 

240 N. Cedar Lake Road * Round Lake 

546-3199 

Mon&Thuts 12-7. Tuos & ft.. 12-5. Sal 11-3. Closed Wed S Sun 



j!8s^m&%®83MF&Z-: 




SlexMmcd attention 
h 3tet*attefl'& gift 

Petranek's Pharmacy, located at 426 N. Milwaukee Ave., has served 
the Libenyville area under various ownerships since 1872. John Csiha 
went to work there in 1978 and took over as owner 15 years ago. 

Amid today's generic assembly-line pharmaceutical service, Csiha, 
his wife Diane and son Joseph, and their courteous and efficient staff, 
strive to operate a quality and up-to-date full-service drug store, en- 
hanced by old fashioned individual attention to their patron's needs. Pe- 
tranek's is one of the few pharmacies that still delivers to their cus- 
tomers' doorsteps. 

With careful attention to every detail, Petranek's features prescrip- 
tion compounding, offering to custom mix difficult to get prescriptions. 
A wide variety of surgical supplies and convalescent aids are always 
available at Petranek's. 

The pharmacy specializes in Riling veterinary prescriptions, making 
them more palatable for your pet by adding a favorite flavor to their 
medicine like beef, chicken or apple. 

With the arrival of (he holidays, Petranek's is the place where you will 
find that perfect gift for thai special someone. 

Prom the buildings of the Ix'fton Christmas village, or a beautiful 
l.cfion figurine, to names like Caslagna of Italy or statues by Ue Bortin. 
and the Pairy Collection by De/.ine. lo while marble statues by Parros, or 
a delectable box of the finest Panny May candies, Christmas shopping is 
easier, quicker and less expensive at Petranek's. 

Don't forget the wide selection of Gibson greeting cards. 
The pharmacy is open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., Monday through 
Friday; from B a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and from 9 a.m. to 
1 p.m. on Sunday. For more 
information, call 
(847)362-2005. 



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November 27, 1998 HOLIDAY SPARKLERS Lakeland Newspapers/ C21 \- V^j^wjmmj*^.' 



■^•yi'^ai^v, ''^■i'' !* -»#*■*. 





■ 



Besides driving the cleanest vehicles in 
town, patrons of the Super Wash car and van 
wash, located on the comer of Rollins Rd. and 
Washington St, across from the Dog ' N Suds, 
in Ingleside, now have the chance to win a 
1999 Ford Truck. 

It's easy, the next time you're looking for 
an environmental friendly car wash, 100 per- 
cent EPA approved, go to Super Wash and 
register for the truck drawing. 

It seems cleanliness is contagious at Su- 
per Wash since it's the cleanest place in town, 
turning out the cleanest cars, vans and pick- 
up trucks in town. 

"Your cars will never get water spots," say 
owners Pat and Paul Schneeweiss, "As long as 
we keep using clean and pure water that 



comes pure and spotless from filters through 
an osmosis machine," 

Dirt and grime on vehicles is disposed of 
through an environmentally appealing 
process. Fourteen gallons of soiled water from 
each car wash is piped into water treatment fa- 
cilities designed to protect the environment In- 
stead of running into it or storm drains. 

Super Wash offers two automatic drive- 
through and three do it yourselves booths 
available for the type of cleaning the cus- 
tomer prefers. This Is the touchless car wash 
system that also offers a spot free rinse. 

Super Wash is open seven days a week, 24 
hours a day with atten dan ts on duty from 8 
a.m. to 5 p.m. Call (847)587-9507 for more in- 
formation. 





■ V . ■". raaaal '- ; 



WIN 

1999 FORD RANGER 

OR 

$10,000 IN CASH 




50 WINNERS 

^Socasheac 




i0 WINNER 



(cole* and options may varyi 





***** Lucky Win* 1 * 

Super Wash tokens make great Christmas gifts! 
The perfect gift for the person with everything! 

(Bnndpa, Grandma, your toss, teacha; bus dim, and your maankr.^l^m^gr^shxidngsM^) 

ON SALE NOW UNTIL JAN. 3 rd , 1999 



4 WASHES FOR $12 
SUPER SPECIAL 10 WASHES FOR $25 





Corner ot Rolls 



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02.2.1 Lakeland Newspapers 



HOLIDAY SPARKLERS 



November^?, 1998] 



The Christmas tree ts usually 
the focal point of holiday spirit In 
the home, and every tree reflects 
the traditions of the family that dec- 
orated it. 

In the Victorian era, people rev- 
eled in rich colors and textures. So, 
they adorned their Christinas trees 
with nosegays, silk tassels, paper 
and fabric fans, ornate glass orna- 
ments, ropes of pearls and gold 
beads, and cornucopias. During the 
winter evenings before Christmas, 
Victorians would create these beau- 
tiful ornaments and place them on 
their trees. 

To bring a 19th-century holiday 
into their home this year, people 
can create their own authentic Vic- 
torian decorations with these in- 
structions from "365 Ways to Pre- 
pare for Christmas" (Harper- 



(O? fecorate the tree with (QjActorian grr/pML 



Collins), by David E. Monn. 




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Small gold or white dolly 

Fabric rose 

1 2 Inches of ribbon 

that matches the rose, 

L2- Inch thick 

Tape 

Stick the stem of a fabric rose 
into the center of a small gold or 
white doily, pinch it so it gathers 
around the flower, then turn it over 
and secure tightly with tape. Tie a 
12-inch length of 12-inch matching 
ribbon once around the tape, and 



leave the ends as streamers. Use the 
stem to attach to the tree. 

For a more romantic look, use a 
red heart -shaped doily. You also 
could use a larger doily and wire to- 
gether bunches of dried flowers, like 
tea roses, baby's breath, heather 
and statice. Por a seasonal touch, 
add some cinnamon sticks. 

i 



Round dolly 
Small fabric or 
dried flowers 



W 



Glue 
Wire 

Cut a round dolly in half. Accor- 
dion pleat the half dolly into a fan, 
and attach a cluster of small fabric 
or dried flowers to the front of il 
with glue. Attach to the tree with ■ 
wire. 

White or gold dolly 
Ribbon 
Dried flowers 
Glue or staples 
Ribbon roses, optional 
Cut a quarter wedge out of a 



white or gold doily, and wrap the 
rest around until you have a cone 
shape; glue or staple together. If you 
wish, add a small bow and some 
ribbon roses to the front; attach a 
ribbon loop for hanging. Fill with 
dried flowers. For.a more natural 
look, use handmade paper. Cut out 
a circle pattern 12 inches in diame- 
ter, then cut into four wedges; roll 
each into a cone. If you wish; stencil 
on some leaves or a design before 
forming the cone. V 1 ■ '■■•? : ','■ : 
Take some children's party hats 
in bright colors, tie the elastic into a 
knot to shorten it, and filiwith the 
dried flowers or, as a treat for the 
children, popcorn or small (not too 
heavy) Christmas candles. Hong on 
the tree by the elastic band; if the 
candy is too heavy, use a glue gun to 
attach a ribbon loop. 



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C24/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HOLIDAY SPARKLERS 



November 27, 1998 




Second Federal Savings and 
Loan Association of Chicago 
was firsl organized on Sept. 30, 
1882, and incorporated on Oct. 
3 r 1882 under the name of Good Shepherd 
Building and Loan. This was 1 1 years after 
the great Chicago Tire, which devastated the 
lives of a majority of the citizens of Chica- 
go. Thus, five men com- 
bined their resources and 
founded what would soon 
be known as Second Feder- 
al Savings and Loan Associ- 
ation. 

These men were inn 
cerned with the hettermt'iti 
ol socieiv as a whole, fhe 
association (hat they orga- 
nized was, and still is. a vi- 
tal pari of ih*- growth ol the 
coniinuniiv— "1111: CO.M- 
MIJMTVMl.V[)|-:i)C()H- 
NKH." These men focused 
on planning for the luture. 
As it does today. Second 
Federal enthusiastically 
participated in civic allairs. 
I his was a time when the 
first cable car [[unspoiled 
Chicago passengers at the 
speed of eight miles per 
lour. The people of Chica- 
go enjoved their first mall 
i'li milk and saw their first 
Hat iron. Picture horse 
drawn carriages, high silk 
hais and ready made dress 
es. This was the lime ol llie 
beginning ol otir association. 

On April 10. I'iifj'4 .atl application tt/SSS 
suhmifled lor conversion into a federal sav 
itlgs ,uid loan named Second 1 cderul Sa\ 
rugs iiiul I n.iii Assm latino ol Chicago. I he 
t liar n-t was gianh'd In die 1 -edeia! Home 
loan bank hoard Sun v. I'CM, when tinea 
go hosted the World's l-air. a lot ol expan- 




Second Federal 
Savings and Loan; 



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sion and change has taken place within 
Second Federal. Yet. this modernization 
has not affected the family oriented bank- 
ing (hal (hose five initial men strived for. 
lour consecutive generations of one family 
have been working for the continued suc- 
cess ol Second federal Savings. Thus, Sec- 
ond ledenil strives to make you a part of its 
lamily. We appreciate the dedication ol our 





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November 27, 1998 



HOLIDAY SPARKLERS 




Lakeland Newspap 



Women have learned how to 
s elect a great wardrobe for easy 
daytime wear. Office attire and 
looking good for lunch or meetings 
has become effortless. However, the 
one gUtch — !ri the otherwise per- 
fect closet — continues to be what 
to grab for a schedule filled with 
dinners out or given in, "cocktail" 
gatherings, or other holiday special 
occasions. 

Never fear — the little black 
dress is back. Wondering where it's 
been? The popularity of the little 
black dress dates back to Audrey 
Hepburn in "Breakfast at Tiffany's" 
and has gone somewhat in and out 
of fashion focus ever since. The 
pouf and "Dynasty" dressing took 
over in the '80s, and the early '90s 
gave way to skintight giam that was- 
n't for everybody. 

The re-entry of the little black 
dress Into the holiday limelight re- 
flects the needs of women nation- 
wide: "Give me a dress that's great- 
looking, flatters me and makes me 
feel special — without feeling like a 
fashion victim." 

Here are some helpful tips from 
Donna Morgan, the designer for the 
label that bears her name, on how to 
make your holiday little-black-dress 
style as new as your latest acquisi- 
tions, - 

• Keep accessories to a mini- 
mum. Even the smallest amount of 
jewelry looks special when it has a 
great black dress behind it. 



l^lst to the 
Occasion pbf 

<HoUda\{ '<?8 

It's going to be a long winter, so 
why settle for just one dress code? 
This season, it's all about contradic- 
tions: maximum vs. minimal cover- 
age, embellishment vs. simplicity, 
millennium edgy style vs. cool and 
classic— and your holiday wardrobe 
should provide just the right look 

• Maximum vs. minimum — 
Show off dramatic length and cov- 
erage with this season's long coats, 
dresses and pants — or go to the 
opposite end of the spectrum with 
simply revealing and barely-there 
strapless dresses, strappy camisoles 
and sexy skirts. 

• Embellishment vs. simplicity 
— Tis the season for glamour and 
romance. This season offers an ar- 
ray of beaded and lace dresses and 
camisoles as well as simple and easy 
cashmere-blend sweaters: the 
camisole, the crew neck, the V-neck 
and the cardigan ... this season's 
"must have." Silhouettes are slim 
and sexy. Necklines are plunging, 
and skirts are pencil thin. 

• The new millennium vs. the 
classics — Glam-rock inspires sharp 
and sleek dressing for the new mil- 
lennium. High energy is apparent 
throughout the season with liquid 
metal stretch dresses, silver splatter 
painted shells, asymmetrical 
seamed skirts and three-quarter- 
length tops. Classic menswear styles 
still inspire the female dresser with 
everything from the pure white shirt 
to the sexy man's style suit, with or 
without pinstripes. 

Gray Is the color du jour and Is 
seen in every shade from charcoal 
to silver. Simple and understated 
pieces mix and match with rich and 
juicy colors like iridescent fuchsia 
and electric blue that make the sea- 
son sizzle. 

The GUESS Collection speaks to 
the confident, modern and daring 
woman. Visit the Guess web site at 
hUp://www.guess.com on the Inter- 
net. 



■ • For a more spectacular effect 
on a big night out,- a pair of earrings 
with sparkle will do the trick. 

• Show off those earrings with 
hair In ah updo if the neckline of 
the dress is high'. If you have short 
hair, slick it back for a bit of drama. 

• A scoop or plunging neckline 
looks best with hair down, and for 
those with shorter hair, keep the 
look soft 

• Little bags are for little black 
dresses. 

• Sheer hose, whether nude or 
black, make the little black dress 
look modem. 

• There have never been more 
choices for shoes. Base heel height 
on the hemline. The shorter the 
dress — try a high heel. It flatters 
the leg for a long, lean line. 

• Patent or plain — suede or 
satin. Fabrications for shoes are 
now seasonless. Select a shoe that 
reflects the design elements of the 
dress, Beaded or shimmering de- 
tailing could call for a shoe with 
shine. A matte finish to fabric might 
signal suede. 

• Shawls are a great way to wrap 
up your holiday night out in a little 
black dress. Soft or sheer, a shawl 
around bare shoulders adds glam- 
our, as well as keeping chill at bay. 



"And, remember," notes Mor- 
gan, "you truly can take the little 
black dress anywhere. It's the per- 
fect must-have in the closet for 
those holiday occasions you've 
planned for and the ones you 
haven't 

"I've designed dresses that work 
for women in sizes that range from 
petite to 16, and have infused the 
collection with detailing that I be- 
lieve makes dressing up fun — not 
frivolous," she adds. 

To receive a free Donna Mor- 
gan "Little Black Dress Book" that 
contains highlights from the Don- 
na Morgan black-dress collection, 
as well as tips on how to best wear 
the little black dress, you can write 
or fax your request to Donna Mor- 
gan, 530 Seventh Ave., 14th Floor, 
New York. NY 10018; fax: (212) 
575-4775. 



The little black dress Is back! 
The popularity of the little black 
dress dates back to Audrey 
Hepburn in "Breakfast at 
Tiffany's" and has gone some- 
what in and out of fashion fo- 
cus ever since. 





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»C26 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HOLIDAY SPARKLERS 



November 27, J998 



STOCKING THE PERFECT PANTRY 

for unexpected holiday visitors 






r 






So, you've just finished a long 
day at work and you're ready for 
some serious relaxation. You toss 
the mail onto the coffee table, un- 
opened, sink down onto the couch 
and kick off your shoes. That's when 
it hits you — the holiday season is 
here again and you haven't done a 
thing to prepare! You've got festive 
feasts to plan, lists to make, cards to 
write, gifts to buy, halls to deck. But 
how will you find the time? Your 
panic is interrupted by the sound of 
the doorbell announcing another 
inevitable holiday season reality: 
unexpected guests. As much as 
you'd love to be a gracious host, all 
you can find in the kitchen to offer 
your guests is a can of stale peanuts 
and half a carton of milk (hat's 
passed the expiration date. 

It doesn't have to be that way. 
With a litde advance planning, you 
can be ready for anything (or any- 
one) this holiday season. Simply 
adding a few key items to your regu- 
lar grocery list during that crucial pe- 
riod between Thanksgiving and New 
Year's can help make last- minute 
entertaining a pleasure instead of a 
pain. I lere are a few items no holiday 
kitchen should be without: 

• ( lourmet cheeses — A cheese 
board is a quick and easy option for 
rnti'riainine. holiday diesis. Simply 
arrange a few wedge* of 'cheese on a 
tiaiing board or dinner plate, sur- 
rounded by crackers or slices of 
l-Yench bread. It your guest traffic is 
fairly light, choose varieties that will 
slay fresh in Ihe refrigerator for a 
week or two. I inn. aged cheeses. like 
(,iuida. Swiss and Cheddar, will last 
up to three weeks Soller cheeses, 
like Hi ii- and < .oigoii/ola, should be 
I'.ilenwilliHi.iweiiol purchase. 



• Fresh bread — Forget about 
kneading the dough yourself; just 
pick up a fresh loaf of crusty French 
bread from the comer bakery or 
grocery store. Baguette slices are 
perfect with holiday spreads and 
cheeses. Don't worry about the 
bread going stale; if guests don't 
come calling, you can always serve 
it with dinner. 

•Assortment of crackers — When 
there's no fresh bread in sight, crack- 
ers make excellent paruiers for im- 
promptu cheese trays and dips. liven 
after die package has been opened, 
crackers will stay fresh for weeks in an 
airtight container or zippered plastic 
bag. Some elegant choices include 
C jut's Croissant Crackers and Jacob's 
Cream Crackers. 

• Champagne or sparkling wine 
— Nothing makes your guests feel 
truly welcome like a shimmering 
glass of Inibbly, so keep a chilled 
bottle in the refrigerator throughout 
the holiday season, thai way, when 
visitors pop in. you'll he ready to 
pop (he cork! For a special treat, 
pick up a bonle of Louis Hocderer 
Unit Premier. If French champagne 
isn't in your budget, California 
sparkling wines offer a delicious 
and affordable alternative. Iloederer 
Instate I.Trmilage is one of the crit- 
ics' favorites — and it costs less than 
many of its French cousins. 

• ( ;ookies for grown-ups — 
( ,'ookies are no longer the exclusive 
domain of children and blue furry 
monsters. Delicate, sophisticated 
cookies line the grocery store shelves, 
so be sure to hring home a couple va- 
rieties during the holiday season. For 
a sweet treat, try I'epperidge Farm 
Milanos or Can's Butter Cookies 
Topped With Milk Chocolate. 



• Coffee, tea and hot chocolate 
— For those cold winter days, offer 
last-minute guests a steaming cup 
of freshly brewed coffee or tea. Try 
something special for the holidays, 
like hazelnut-flavored coffee or cin- 
namon tea. Hot chocolate also is a 
welcome cold-weather treat. 
I laving just two of these holiday 
kitchen essentials on hand will al- 
low you to whip up this recipe from 
Gourmet magazine at the drop of a 
hat or the ring of a doorbell. It's de- 
licious, elegant and as simple to 
make as toast. 

GOAT CHEESE TOASTS 

Makes 12 toasts 

2 V2- inch - th ick diagonally 
cut slices of Italian or 
French bread 
Olive oil for brushing the 
toasts 
VA 11). soft mild goat cheese 

On a baking sheet, broil the 
bread slices under a preheated broil- 
er about 3 inches from the heat for 
one to two minutes on each side, or 
until they are golden. Brush one side 
of each toast lighdy with the oil. 
Spread the oiled sides evenly with 
(he goal cheese, covering diem com- 
pletely, and sprinkle the cheese with 
pepper to taste. Return the goal 
cheese toasts to the broiler and broil 
litem for one minute, or until die 
cheese is slightly melted and glisten- 
ing. Serve the toasts warm or at room 
temperature. Serve with champagne 
or sparkling wine. 

With a little advance prepara- 
tion and some well-chosen kitchen 
essentials, you will be able to greet 
your drop-in visitors with warmth 
and grariousnuss. 







In case of holiday guest emergency: pop corkf 




The Holidays 
Are Unveiling At 



Gurnee Antique Center 



Visit our Victorian Living Room decked out for the season 
with a tree and antiQue toys, then browse in a holiday 
wonderland of Quality antiques from our 200 dealers. 



Ask About Our 



Gurnee 



Located Just Off 1-94 In Gurnee. 

Take Dilley's Road South olTGrand Avenue to 

Northridge; Follow Northridge to 

Gurnee AntiQue Center Building. 

HOURS: 

Mon.-SaL, 10-5 Sun.. 12-5 



(Antique^ 



Center 



5742 Northridge Drive 
Gurnee, Illinois 6003 1 

(847) 782-9094 



.J-.J, 



*«ti- 






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vember 27^1998 







HOLIDAY SPARKLERS 



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Ah, the joy of Christmasl 
jugliout December we bask in 

stive music, the brilliancy of 'the 
^rations and the warm feelings of 
J will. But when the calendar 

: over to January, the bills over- 
Jmour bank account, the bath- 

i scale tilts upward and our out- 
| on life is as grim as the desolate 

i r landscape, 
le holiday season doesn't have 

ignal the downfall of sound 
iding habits. By taking a close 

at your motivation for holiday 
[ding as well as careful conslder- 

i of your budget, your Christmas 
|r can spread into January and 
End. 

)r. Don Johnson, associate pro- 
Srof Psychology at Northwestern 

pge, Saint Paul, Minn., has pin- 
several reasons why con- 
tend to overspend and 

idulge during the long holiday 

itlODB — A certain 
of expectation comes with 
Jtmas, from giving expensive 
i serving (and eating!) expen- 
food. "Our perceptions of ex- 
itions and desire to give quality 
[may lead us to go beyond our 
ret realities," Johnson says, 
[ugh we may not try to out-do 
in giving, we may think that 
1 at least match what others 
Jye to us. It can create an ex- 
live guessing game. Setting fi- 
:ial limits on gifts may help." 

iphasls — Whether it's 
iugh retail marketing techniques 
ltural traditions, the holidays 
j 'an emphasis on overspending 
[overindulging. "We become pre- 
ipied with the holidays, it grabs 
'attention and holds it tight," he 



says. 



Escape— The holi- 
days are often seen as an 
escape from reality and 
the everyday, Johnson 
adds. "It's as If the holi- 
day season gives us permission to ex- 
ceed budgets and act financially bet- 
ter off than we really are." 

Excitement — "We are ener- 
gized by the excitement of Christ- 
mas: the music, the decorations, the 
shopping It gets lis psyched up and 
shifts our focus, sidetracking our 
concerns over budget and debt," 
Johnson says. 

Entertainment— The increase 
of activities — office parties, church 
events, family gatherings, 
school celebrations — also 
causes us. to overextend. 
"Sometimes there's pressure 
to participate," Johnson ex- 
plains. "We don't want to lose 
our chance for the promotion 
at work by not going to the of- 
fice party. We don't want to 
be called Scrooge by the 
neighbors if we bypass a party. But 
sometimes we have to say 'No' and 
stand by our decision as being the 
best for our family." 

Eating — The holidays also 
gives us permission to overindulge in 
foods we don't usually eat, Johnson 
says. Thanksgiving and Christmas 
are a time for extravagant meals and 
expensive gifts of food. Caterers, 
spendy party platters from the local 
supermarket and the delectable 
goodies all add up in both the budget 
and waistline. 

But Christmas doesn't have to 
result in weight gain and financial 
loss. "The obvious advice is to start 
Christmas shopping early; before La- 
bor Day. Look for inexpensive gifts 
that have meaning from the heart, 



Overindulgences can dim festive SSShm'Swu'. 
memories for Mrest of the year 3S5S 



not just the pocketbook," he says. "If 
you are shopping during the rush of 
the holidays, keep in mind that a sale 
at Christmas Isn't necessarily a sale." 
Be sure to comparison shop and 
we aware of prices; check other 
stores suggests Robert Elfstrum, 
C.PA, associate professor of Busi- 
ness Administration at Northwest- 
emu "Resist the temptation to buy in 
a hurry just to check someone off 
your gift list. Look for legitimate 



western, agrees. "You 
have to be candid and truthful with 
yourself about your spending habits 
and budget allowances. It takes dis- 
cipline to set a budget and stick with 
it It takes even more discipline to 
pay off the bills on time." 

Elfstrum advocates setting up a 
family budget for the entire year, not 
just for Christmas. "Plan the budget 
with your spouse and base theyear's 
budget on the past year's expendi- 
tures and future expectations. In- 



clude the children in the 
Tow have to be candid and tntthfid with pTO cess; it's a great tool for 

y 'ourself about your spending habits and teaching financial manage - 



budget allowances.' 

R. Stephen Davis, 

associate professor of Business 

Administration at Northwestern 

sales; those are usually long before 
the holidays. Also, check the sales re- 
ceipt before you leave the store be- 
cause cashiers and scanners do 
make errors. The bar code process is 
not mistake-proof." 

There's nothing wrong with 
shopping the after- Christmas sales, 
Elfstrum suggests. "Use them as a 
family outing, a teaching tool. Maybe 
even make a family agreement to do 
your Christmas shopping after 
Christmas." 

Johnson suggests setting goals 
for behavior and knowing your 
boundaries. "Decide to attend a cer- 
tain number of parties, eat certain 
types of food and limit your spend- 
ing to a certain amount per person. 
Know when to say 'when' and be 



ment 

Davis points out that per- 
sonal financial management 
requires attention to the de- 
tails. Keep the receipts, use 
basic bookkeeping skills, keep 
your check register up-to- 
date and track credit card bills. "Us- 
ing credit cards is easy, fast and con- 
venient; but it also delays the In- 
evitable. Counting out cold, hard 
cash has an immediate and direct 
impact on your budget." 

Use credit cards for recordkeep- 
ing, not as a financial device, Elf- 
strum stresses. "Have just one credit 
card, not several It's too easy to lose 
control with several cards and mse 
track of how much is on each. When 
the bills come in with $500 on one 
card and $1,000 on another, that's 
when those 12 to 24 percent interest 
rates really add up." 

Davis stresses that the Thanks- 
giving to Christmas period is crucial 
for retailers so shoppers should be 
careful of sale promotions, credit of- 



fers and retail • competition ' "For 
. most retailers that four-week period : 
brings in 50 to 60 percent of their rev- .-'- 
enue for the entire year. They want 
and need your business." »•;.. ■', '": 

With that for mind, Davis says 
that Christmas can be an excellent 
time to' make your money work for 
you. "Some credit cards offer a 1 to2 . 
percent rebate. If you always pay off 
your bill each month, then you'll 
save by using a credit card." 

Another financially savvy tip is 
using the 12 months no interest/no 
payment offer. "If you have the cash , 
put It in savings for the year to accrue 
1 interest, then pay off the bill. You'U 
come out ahead," Davis suggests. -- 

Elfstrum also suggests incentives 
for saving money. For example, cut 
down on the number of times you 
eat out each week and put the mon- 
ey saved into a vacation account 

More importantly, Elfstrum 
points out that Christmas is about 
God's gift "As Christians, we should 
use our resources to help others. Use 
the money you've saved by sound 
money management to give to the 
many charitable food, clothing and 
toy campaigns at Christmas." 

Johnson agrees, "Find a family or 
a charitable organization in your 
community or within your church 
and help them with a meal, simple 
useful gifts or a special outing. 
Christmas is the time of year to think 
and act beyond ourselves." 

For more information, contact 
Naomi L Bloom, Public Relations 
Director, Northwestern College, 3003 
Sneliing Avenue North, Saint Paul, 
MN 551 13-1598. Phone: 612-6331- 
5274 E-mail: nlb@nwc.edu. 



Courtesy of Article Resource Asso- 
ciation, www.aracopy.com 



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Banks are people, too 



m 

The first National Bank of McHenry 



Somewhere through annuals to 
time, the word "bank" and "stuffy" 
always found their way into the same 
sentence together. Who started that 
anyway? Okay, maybe at some point 
in time your bank had a "stuffy" man 
In a pinstriped suit with a pocket 
watch sitting in an office only ap- 
proving loans for HIS friends and 
family. What if YOU wanted to see 
him? That's where the fun began. 
You quickly found out through his 
secretary that there was a very nar- 
row window of appointments avail- 
able Usually between a two martini 
lunch and an afternoon golf outing. 
During which time, he probably was- 
n't listening to you anyway because 
he was A) a bit tipsy or B) more con- 
cerned about which club to tee off 
with on that pesky 165 yard 6th hole. 
Either way, going to "the bank" was 
about as much fun as watching Ethel 
Merman sing. 

Well, we're pleased to announce 
that's not how business is done 
these days. Banks are "fun," "cool," 
"hip," "rad," "dapper," "with it," 
"dynamite," "Jaunty," "awesome," 
"jive," "svelte," "buff," "chic," etc.At 
least we tike to think we're in touch. 
From Art Bell to Zydeco, you'll find 
that The First National Bank of 
McHenry is full of people with strik- 
ingly different personalities and in- 
terests. And we've been hard at 
work knocking down that tradition- 
al "bank" image. 

Of the 40 or so employees of The 
First National Bank of McHenry, 
some of the highlights include a 



loan officer who actually thinks 
"Dharma and Greg" is funny, a teller 
who can be found on many week- 
ends in full dresser riding in many of 
the Harley Davidson poker runs, a 
new account representative who en- 
joys the 80s retro room at Chicago's 
Polly Esther's, a bookkeeper who 
adopts greyhounds, and an opera- 
tions officer who admittedly watch- 
es nearly 12 hours of television a 
day. We like to think of it as our own 
personality cocktail. Remarkable, 
the mixture works. 

There is no better time during 
the holiday season to see us in ac- 
tion. Each of three offices puts up 
their own holiday decorations. At 
the Elm Street Office in McHenry, 
the employees have even created a 
themed Christmas tree. From Hay- 
ward,*Wis., to Key West, Fla. the em- 
ployees have been gathering orna- 
ments for The First National Bank of 
McHenry's "fishing tree." Decora- 
tive ornaments include mariners, 
rowboats, fishing reels and nets. The 
garland is of fishing twine and lures 
mixed in with pine cones. After see- 
ing all 12 feet of this tree, it's quite 
apparent that this isn't some corpo- 
rately erected holiday decoration, 
but rather one that the employees 
actually took the time to put up. 
Why? Because they care (or they re- 
ally like fishing). 

So, the next time you venture 
into our bank, look beyond the 
computers and the desks. You'll see 
the people sitting behind them. And 
we're one of you. 



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TO ALL OF OUR FRIENDS 
AND NEIGHBORS 





m wish you a safe and 

PROSPEROUS HOLIDAY SEASON 

ni 



The First National Bank of McHenry 




660 East State Road - Island Lake, IL 60042 

(847) 526-1770 



Member 
FDIC 







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C28 Lakeland Newspapers 



HOLIDAY SPARKLERS 



November 27, 1998 




pntee up the holiday table 
with a traditional dessert 



A fresh, full tree dripping with tinsel wui 
sentimental ornaments, mistletoe over the 
doorways, eggnog in die punch bowl — what 
would the season be without these holiday 
symbols scattered throughout the house? 
Among the foods that are traditionally linked 
with Christmas, fruitcake automatically 
comes to mind. This year, how about adding 
another tradition to the table? A delicious 
Twelfth Night cake. 

Marly Twelfth Night cakes were haked 
with a bean in one side, a pea in the other 
and a number of cloves throughout Idncu- 
mented to a party at Whitehall. I(ii:»i. The 
host or hostess cut the cake into equal 
slices for the guests, with men receiving 
slices from one side and women bom the 
other. The man who found the hean be 
came king of (he least: the woman whn 
found the pea became ihemieen; those 




who found the cloves were courtiers. 

The king of the feast could order his sub- 
jects to play his favorite game, dance, sing, re- 
cite poems, play charades or anything else. In 
some circles, the king would have to host the 
parly the next year, and the queen would 
have to make (he next year's cake. 
According to one custom, the youngest child 
present distributed the pieces. Among the 
French Creoles, a napkin would be placed 
over the cake while it was being cut and 
.served so that il the bean was exposed, no 
one would see il. 

The following recipe is perfect to serve to 
family, friends and other visitors to help cele- 
brate (his festive holiday season. 

Twelfth Night Cake 

1 pound butter 

2 cups light brown sugar, 
firmly pocked 

1 teaspoon baking soda 

2 pounds seedless raisins 
3/4 cup almonds, blanched 

and chopped or cut Into strips 
9 eggs, separated 
3 1/4 cups flour 
2 teaspoons mace 

2 teaspoons cinnamon 

3 pounds currants 
1/2 cup citron 

1/2 cup candled peel, cul Into strips 

In ,1 l,M|;r I Mini t ir.itli lln 1 luillri .mil I 
1 up n| die Mlgat 11 nltl light hi .4 m palate 
hitul hi'.it llh' i't:j:vnlk". until 'Mi- k .mil 
|i mini miImh-iI .mil 11KI iIh'iii lu the butlt'i 
-•iig'U nnvluii- lit annthci hnul. heal Ihe egg 
win lev mi ml villi, lull inn (In. I 1 ild in ,1 second 
i u|i 11I tight hmun Migai, .uul add litis in the 
lii si imxtuir hi a howl, sill the flour, mace. 
1 nmanuin and baking soda; slir in the cm 




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Like all kids, Steve Clement/, had fun with his toys. When he had children ol his 
own, his interest in toys continued, only now he thought that toys should not only he 
fun, but they should be educational, proving that learning can belun. 

His search for such toys has turned into a successful family business. 
Creative Pun, with his wife Gloria also joining in the educalinna] en- 
joyment. 

Now that "toy' season is here, the four Creative lun locations tfAfli 

are featuring such well-known educational toy brands as brio , '5*«* 

and Thomas the Tank lingine, wooden railroad s\s- ^~~-^&dri 

terns. oSF' 1 

To help stretch that Christmas shopping 
money, from Friday through Sunday after 
Thanksgiving, Brio, Playmobil and Thomas ih 
Tank Engine toys will be available at 20 perce 
off. 

Creative Fun also offers toys that give 
insights to science, nature, animals, and a 
wide variety of children's books, stuffed an- 
imals including the collectibles by TY, 
Koosh outdoor toys, key chains, and much 
more. 

For gifts that children can play with and 
learn from, from Infants to early teenage, 
Creative Fun's four locations are in Wau- 
conda, (847)487-8697; McHenry, (815)759- 
9340; Lake In the Hills, (847)B54-7080, and 
in Woodstock, (815)334-B697. 

The Woodstock store is open Monday 
through Friday, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m..; the other stores from 10 a.m. to B p.m.; Satur- 
day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and on Sunday from 1 1 a.m. to 4 p.m. 





ranis, raisins and almonds. Add the Hour-fruit 
mixnire to iheegg-bulter-sugar mixture. 
Combine the citron and candied peel, and set 

aside. 

Line iwo 12-inch round pans with waxed 
paper, buttered on both sides. Fill each pan 
Mi full, adding layers or citron and candied 
peel ( lover looselv wilh buttered paper, and 
lii- into place. Steam (he cake for three hours. 



and then bake il I VI hours In a slow oven 
[300 FJ or bake it for 4 hours at 275 F without 
steaming. The cake is done when it Is firm to 
the touch and a wire cake tester comes out 
clean and dry. Hun a knife around the Inside 
of die pan, and remove the cake when nearly 
cool, frost with a thin, white Icing, and deco- 
rate wilh figures of birds, animals and flow- 
ers. 



('hrtHtntdti 
POINSETTIAS 

Tup Quality Grown In Our 
Own Greenhouse 





Orrw.ru Ol 

CJunlily Plant 

Valeml Since 

19V 






e. up 



Cash & C/irry 



W 

Cut Into The 
('hristmas Spirit 

Slop in and experience (he 

Sights. Sounds and Smells nf;i 

liaditinn.tl ("hristmas. 

Yes wc ha\e Fancy Fresh 

Greens, l>tmr Suags, Mistletoe 

Gailand. Nubile T'ir. Holly, 

etc . etc 




Fresh Evergreen 

WREATHS 

I „argc 24" decorated 
with pine cones & bow, 

$4A49 



Only 



10 



Artificial 
CENTERPIECES 

5 go $||99 





i 



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A.M. 



your Gard^m 

ANTIOCH (1 Mile S. Of Btf J 




mem 



5 il ly* mW% 



5535; 



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iVe at Creative Fun Toys 

have been busy getting ready 

for Christmas! 



TBa® Mas x 

TEE TANK ENGINE & EMENDS 



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Our new store in 

Lake in the Hills 

is now open & our 

Woodstock store has 

moved & expanded! 

Now.. .we'll help you 

get ready too, with a 

great sale!! 



20% 



OFF 



Brio, Playmobil and 

Thomas the Tank Engine 

Friday, Alov. 27th thru 

Sunday, /Vov. 2Qth 



567 W. Liberty St. 

Wauconda 

(847)487-8697 

The Woodstock 

Square 

124 Cass St. 

(815)334-8697 



■iWS 



1777 Richmond Rd. 

McHenry 

(81 5)759-9340 

2360 W. Algonquin Rd. 

Lake In tho Hills 

(847)B54-7080 



. - . ■ 



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. ■ • ■ : "■_ ■ .' '■"'",■' ...... ■ , ■• . *',■'.'■' ■' ' ••■,■- ■ " . 



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,vember27, 1998 HOLIDAY SPARKLERS lak^^^m^/l^ & Smmm& 
~~ ~ ' 1*1 






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success 



It seems we all spend a large portion of our lives peering 
through glass of some sort Maybe its through the windows of a 
home, an office, a car, or a boat, even wistfully staring at a beauti- 
fully gowned mannequin in a store window, or wearing corrective 
lenses for reading, etc. 

We've all heard comparisons like, "As smooth as glass," "As 
shiny as glass," "As clear as glass," and "Sharp as glass." 

For more than 30 years, Jim Moulton has been bringing shim- 
mering shine, sleek smoothness, cool clarity and sleek sharpness 
Into his customers' lives by selling and Installing fine quality glass . 
products. 

Moulton has been the owner and operator of Nu-Diamond 
Glass on Rte. 12 in Fox Lake for 14 years. 

The friendly and professional staff at Nu-Diamond sells and 
installs commercial and residential auto glass, windows, glass 
doors, minors, shower doors, table tops, etc. 

Visit the Nu-Diamond showroom to see their extensive line of 
glass products, practical and decorative, including examples of 
sandblasting, acid etching, mirror walls and other custom and 
creative glass products. 

Make someone happy at Christmas time by giving them a 
beautiful glass product by Nu-Diamond. The glass company is 
open, Monday through Friday, from 8 a,m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, 
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and on Sunday, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Call 
(047)587-2226 for more information. 



Jfc & £ A & It & Jk & A & Jk 



-•+».. «» * .~ «.. .—.... 



-■,. •■■•., 



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^:Stay Warm & Cozy 
This Christmas 

Patio Storm Doors 

What They Do 

1. Create a dead airspace between 4. Added security (has a lock) 
them and your patio doors • 5. Eliminates most draft and 
good insulation condensation 

2. Solar collects daylight -Free Heat 6 * R * d " ces heatin S and air 
i n -i it r *u -i conditioning bills 

3. Prolong life of your thermoglass 

now protected from weather 




NU-DIAMOND 



GLASS CO*, 




24 HOUR 

RESCREENING 
SERVICE 



ALSO 

WINDOW REPAIR 

AVAILABLE 



39 S. ROUTE 12, FOX LAKE ;|| 
SHOWROOM ON ROUTE 12, 
ACROSS FROM McDONALD'S 

TOLL FREE 
1-800-255-0340 

(847)587-2226 




■57 * 

Installs ovor your existing patio door 



!£Sl 




Michael Jordan Autographed Picture 
Drive Away Getaway Trip 
Jim Flanigan Autographed NFL Football 
2 Tickets to a Blackhawks Game 



* *~ 



. • ■ . - 



Fill out the entry form below and take it to one of 
the fine merchants listed for your chance to win. 
(Additional tntq forms are available at each location.) 



I 



NAME: 



I 



ADDRESS: 



CITY: 



| STATE: 



ZIP: 



I 



TELEPHONE: 



DOYOU CURRENTLY SUBSCRIBETOA LAKELAND PAPER! YES NO 



DROP OFFYOUR 

ENTRY AT ANY 

OF THE 

FOLLOWING 
PARTICIPATING 

LOCATIONS: 




American Family Insurance 

Roger Lutz 
108 Center Street, Grayslake 

Mutual Cellular 

960 E Rollins Road, Round Lake 
3563 Grand Avenue, Gumee 

PigglyWiggly 

8 1 5 Center Street, Grayslake 

Silk-N-Haz 

240 Cedar Lake Road, Round Lake 

Tailwinds 

Country Faire Plaza 
Routes 45 and 120, Grayslake 

Second Federal Savings 

Corner of Route 12 & Grand Avenue, Fox Lake 

Hawaiian Island Tropical Tanning Spa 

34825 Wilson Road, Ingleside 

Radicom 

2604 N. Chapel Hill Road, McHenry 

Super Wash 

Corner ofWashington & Rollins, Ingleside 

Learning Express 

NW Comer of Route 1 76 & Midlothian Road, Mundelein 

Taylor Rental 

3621 Grand Avenue, Gurnee 

Nu-Diamond Glass 

39 S. Route 1 2, Fox Lake 

Dr. Antonio Chua Lee 

363 N, Main Street, Wauconda 
1 1 05 W. Park, Suite I , Ubertyvtlle 






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C30/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HOLIDAY SPARKLERS 



November 27, 1998 




homemade with lov© 





5^™~J»*^ 





Remember how proud you fell giving 
mom or dad that frosting-smudged 
plate of lovingly decorated cookies? 
For most children, making a special 
gift and grandly presenting it to a parent, 
grandparent or favorite teacher becomes a 
highlight of the holidays. To capture thai 
magic for your own little elves, turn your 
kitchen into a kid- friendly bakery. 

Schedule baking for early in the day. Ores*, 
kids in comfortable, washable clothes. Hull tip 
sleeves and tie hack longhair. Head through 
the recipe together and give each child all age 
appropriate task, lie sure to follow the n*i ipe 
exactly and avoid substituting ingn-dtrnts 1 1 
tJu'r the quirk or old fasJiinned <>,its will e,i\*' 
good results in all pj flii'v m ip<"« 

Wlu'ii it's innr to ilrntralr. sit \mingi-i 
kills at a < hildsi/c liililc and put dn iiwimns 
in n<in1m\ik;il)lc Imfcl* <>r miflliii t»«* A |'l-i s 
in (||ii[i[|iithlirii(',)tliilii-t,ililcv\ill>itii|ilil\ 

cleanup 

CHRISTMAS GRANOLA 

•I cup'- tjimkei mih <iunk oi ulti 

lihht'iiirit hhi nuked 

I J i lip -h'Ctttti'tt < in nut)! 
t J i up i hupped pit tin ^ 

I .'. up hour. 

1 ■1,111' hut ,, , f-itltCihUlllli»lCI M-f<I- 

1 -Uup I ." *. * hlUIrr tit 
maw in*: '"<'iW 

J fop gutted mange five! 

j fop. i-unillu 

I -'J hp ^nitiililt uttitiiunu 

I '■] fop Mill uprumat' 

! h (jj/u/iL/i.Ti/Miv/i ninheuie^ >il»>iii I 
I 1 1 r</M 

Heal oven tu 1 .mli'Uirrs t miilimr .ill 
innu'tlH'Ulst'Mi'pl i tanln-l i u-s m laigr Imul 
mix well Spread evml\ in TaHi inch |el|\ 




roll pan. 
Bake -10 minutes or 

uiuilgr.Nleii brown, stirring even- H> minutes. 
(teuiine gtaimla Iroin oven; stir in cranberries 
( mil completely in pan. Store tightly covered 
Up in I week. Makes (i 1/2 cups. 

Spoon granola into airtight glass or plasik 
j.iis. canisters, cellophane gill bags Hie closed 
vmiIi i ilihun) or etuj)ly oatmeal tubes. Ahead 
nl mm', paint designs on jars with pain mark 
ets in sponges and paints, cover oatmeal 
tubes mih gilt wiap, in decorate gift bags with 
1>h1h1,i\ sinkers 

HOLIDAY 
CUPCAKE CONES 

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I I hi linking prnt'dci 

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l'-iiup:i'.'\iuk>hiitti-i in 
mntgarme. softened 

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Northwest Corner ot Rle. 176 & Midlothian • Mundelein 

Hours: Mon. Hues. Wed. 9:30-7:00 • Thur.-Fri. 9:30-8:00 
Sat. 9:00-6:00 •Sun. 11:00-5:00 

847-566-4090 



shredded coconut, small candies, 

candy sprinkles 

I leal oven to -UK) decree*. 

Arrange tec cream cones upright 

in 13x9 -inch baking pan; set 

aside. In medium bowl, combine 

Hour, oats, cocoa powder, baking 

powder, sail and baking soda: 

mix well. In large bowl, beat 

sugar and butter until well 

blended. Add bananas, milk, 

eggs and vanilla; beat well. 
Add dry ingredients; mix just 
until moistened. Hill ice 
cream cones almost full. 

Hake 35 to .'IB minutes or until 
wooden pick inserted in center cones 
out clean. Place baking pan con 
taining cones on wire rack; cool 
completely. Frost tops of cup- 
cake cones; decorate as desired. U't frosting set 
before handling cones. Makes 24 cones. 

Stand decorated cupcake cone Inside a 
red or green paper cup or a clean glass mug. 
Place cup in the center of a targe square of 
cellophane; gather the edges of the cello- 
phane together and tie closed with raffia. 

OATMEAL COOKIES 

l cup butter or margarine, softened 




* i 

/ cup firmly packed brown sugar ' 

1/2 cup granulated sugar 

2 eggs 

2 This, milk 

2 tsp. vanilla 

1 314 cups all-purpose flour 

1 tsp. baking soda 

112 tsp, salt (optional) 

2112 cups Quaker oats (quick or old 
fashioned, uncooked) 
2 cups red and green candy-coated 
chocolate pieces 

Heat oven to 375 degrees. 
Beat butter and sugars until 
creamy. Add eggs, milk and 
vanilla; beat well. Add com- 
bined flour, baking soda and 
salt; mix well. Stir in oats and 
chocolate pieces; mix well. 
Drop dough by rounded 
lablespoonfuls onto ungreased cook- 
ie sheets. Bake 9 to 10 minutes for a 
chewy cookie or 12 to 13 minutes for a 
crisp cookie. Cool 1 minute on cookie 
sheets; remove to wire rack. Cool com- 
pletely. Store tightly covered. Makes 
about 4 dozen. 

Arrange cooled cookies 
in the shape of a Christ- 
mas tree on a study tray or foil-cov- 
ered cardboard. (Place two cookies at the 
bottom of the tray for the trunk; top with 
a horizontal row of four cookies followed 
by a row of three cookies and a row of 
two cookies. Complete tree by placing a 
single cookie at the top. Use dabs of 
frosting to keep cookies from sliding). 
Decorate with candies using frosting as 
glue. Wrap in cellophane and attach a 
star to the top. 




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5 Minutes from IL Border 

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November 27, 1998 



HOLIDAY SPARKLERS 



Lakeland NewspapersflQ3 1 




As the holiday season ap- 
proaches, Christmas col- 
lections are carefully un- 
packed and dusted off so 
they may fulfill their duty of warm- 
ing the hearts and homes of those 
who have cherished them through- 
out the years... 

The art of collecting 

Angels, candles, linens, dinner- 
wore, and even Santa Clauses are 
just a few of the traditional holiday 
collectibles that are creatively dis- 
played in homes across the country. 

Surprisingly, holiday collecting 
is one of the fastest growing seg- 
ments of the entire collection in- 
dustry. Growth in the collectible in- 
dustry as a whole is expected to 
nearly double in size by the year 
2001. "Holiday collections have be- 
come so popular because of the 
personal creativity and style they 
express, along with the incredible 
warming effect they can have on a 
home," says Alan Boehmer, interior 
designer and stylist for Coming 
Home with Lands' End. 

According to a Market Facts 
survey commissioned by Coming 
Home, 60 percent of holiday deco- 
rators will add collectibles to their 



holiday decorations this year. An- 
other 60 percent will display family 
heirlooms to warm their homes for 
the season. 

Creating timeless 
Holiday collections 

As with all collections, it is im- 
portant to get the most out of all 
your holiday collectibles by select- 
ing pieces carefully and following 
some other rules of the trade. Ac- 
cording to Boehmer, there are sev- 
eral tips that can help collectors 
make the most of their hobby. 

Make selections from the 
heart — To get the most enjoy- 
ment from your coilecUons, select 
pieces that express your individual 
style and creativity. Purchases 
based strictly on price can leave you 
stuck with pieces you don't truly 
appreciate. 

Choose quality over 
quantity— A smaller, complete 
collection in mint condition is more 
valuable than a larger collection 
that is in average condition or is in- 
complete. 

Enduring the test of time — 
To preserve a collection over time, 
store the collection away from ex- 
cessive heat, cold, moisture, and di- 



rect sunlight 

Fo recasting future value — 

Look for pieces that will increase In 
value over time. The following fac- 
tors Indicate that a collectible has 
the potential to increase in value: 

• Limited edition items 

• Originals, as opposed to com- 
memoradves 

• Short-term availability 

• Collectibles designed with 
quality craftsmanship 

• The first of many versions 
This season Coming Home of- 
fers an exclusive Lynn Haney Santa. 
The Pine Lodge Santa comes with a 
festive fabricated gift-and-storage 
box and a certificate of authenticity 
signed by Mr. Haney. 

Coming Home is the specialty 
home products division of Lands' 
End, Inc., offering high quality, clas- 
sically styled products coordinated 
for the home. New to Coming 
Home this season is the introduc- 
tion of hand-forged, wrought iron 
fireplace accessories and handcraft- 
ed collectibles like the Lynn Haney 
Santa. For a free Coming Home cat- 
alog call 1-800-345-3696 or visit our 
website at www.landsend.com/ch. 

Courtesy of Article Reso urceAs- 
social ion, wiyur.aracopy. com 



- . . . 



Lynn Haney has been designing and producing the handcrafted 
pieces of the Lynn Haney Collection since 1987. This season, 
Haney designed the Pine Lodge Santa exclusively for Coming 
Home. The heirloom-quality sculpture is hand-painted and sells 
for $275. 



ist in Time for HoEday Gift-Giving: A Delicious and Nutritious Cookbook 



A new concept in cooking will 

lake a welcome gift to food en- 

lusiasts on your holiday shop- 
ling list. Mayo Clinic 

> extending its 
lealth and nu- 
trition ex- 
jertise to 
jroduce 
i cook- 
wok that 
)rovides 
simple so- 
lutions for 
sating well. 
"The 

oncept 

feating j? 

/ell 

leans 
mjoying 
i wide 

ety of foods 

iui offer maximum nutrients and 
lavor," says Dr. Don Hensrud, 

layo Clinic. "This type of food 
be savored and enjoyed for its 




flavor, while it contributes sub- 
stantially to maintaining good 
health." 

Containing 140 recipes, all 
based on the latest information 
about nutrition, 
"The Mayo CI in- 
ic/Williams- 
Sonoma 
Cookbook" 
features 
recipes that 
are easy to 
make and Tit 
for every day 
and every oc- 
casion. 
'What 
you eat 
affects 
how you 
feel and 
how well 
you will live in the years ahead. 
And, how you feel about your eat- 
ing habits is important, too. 
These recipes create foods that 



Bright Beginnings 

Children's Bookstore 



3 DAY 




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NOV. 27 NOV. 28 NOV. 20 

10% OFF All IN-STOBE MERCHANDISE 




Center Street Square 

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Open Sundays 

Nov. 29-Dec. 20 
Ham*4pm 



offer 'guilt-free eating,'" says 
Hensrud. 

The new cookbook includes a 
full-page color photo of every 
recipe and gives a complete nutri- 



tional analysis and cooking tips. 
An introductory chapter covers 
the latest information about food 
and health. The book can be or- 
dered directly from Mayo Clinic 



for $29.95, plus shipping and han- 
dling, by calling I -800-291 - 1 128, 
ext. 300, Mondays through Satur- 
days. It also is available at 
Williams-Sonoma stores. 



RJB • The Mostalria Store 

The Bubbler 



: ind Gifts For Hveryone„.a( RIB. 



Bobbing Head Dogs & 
Dashboard Hula Girls 
Classic Car Picture Frames 
& Ri. 66 Signs & Calendars 




Rockola CI) Jukebox 




Flamingo Gifts 

For The 
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RJB Casl of Favorites - 

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Classic Styling 

Updated 

For Todays Music 

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Single or Album Play ff. 

Other Styles t^ 

Available- *~ 

Rockula Corvette, 
llarley Davidson 

Pinball 
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Neon Signs & Clocks mm^m^tm 





Slot Machines 





45 rpm Records 

Large Selection In Stock at RfB 



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Diner Furniture 
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Currenl-Oldies-Country 
Christmas Tides Available 



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451 N. Lake (Rt 45) 
Downtown Mundelein, IL 60060 

(847) 949-0056 

On Rl 45. 2 Blocks South of Rt 176 

Store Hours 

Monday-Friday 9am -6pm 

Saturday 9am-5pm 

Sunday llam-5pm 



■ :;-;y ; ">'i'y 



Oil • r • ■ 






-W. 






:-_;:>,. ^- : : ; v^.%«^^>^^iii=H5a5i==== 



C32/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HOLIDAY SPARKLERS 



November27, 1998 



"Wines in cyberspace: Surf your way to great gift ideas 



"The Internet," It is frequently said, "will 
change everything." It is certainly changing 
the way people leam about a favorite topic — 
wine. And while there are many wine books, 
people are increasingly turning to the Internet 
for information and finding it a valuable re- 
source for holiday gift ideas. 

There are hundreds of web sites devoted 
to various aspects of wine, wine tasting and 
wine collecting. The best sites provide infor- 
mation in an interactive, fun way, often not 
possible with print: 

- The Robert Mondavi website 
(www.mondavi.com) offers an extensive col- 
lection of recipes, each with a wine recom- 
mendation. Visitors can sort the recipes by the 
type of dish they want to prepare or, with the 
click of their mouse, by the type of wine they 
want to serve. Like many wineries, Mondavi 
offers a free email-based newsletter to visitors. 

- France's famous first gn>wth. Haut- 
Brion (www.haut-brion.com), offers a search- 
able database of information about the vin- 
tage years of this i^rcm wine going back to the 
iast century. 

- Italian Wines 
(www.italianrnadt.Moni/wini'/di'fanlt.htiii) 
provides colorful wine vintage charts indicat- 
ing the quality of the wine produced each year 
and including even the more obscure wine 
producing regions of Italy. 

■ Want to gel off the beaten track? What 
about Indian wine! The World Wine Web 
IWYvw.wineviru-om/english.html) offers a 
complete on-line wine encyclopedia orga- 
iti/fd by country l.'f 1 of (hem, by the way). It 
includes extensive, colorful maps (hat show 
the wine prr (during regions, alone; with a 
guide in their wines, and complete pricing 
.ind informaimn .md serving recommenda- 
tions. In case you're curious about what to 
drink with your cum*, Royal Maharashtra is 
the sole Indian wine producer listed. 

Rut even uiih these online resources, 
rinding just ihe righi information can be time 
consuming. Luckily, Wine [ cchnologii's has 




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With automatic links to a wide variety of Web sites, 
Robert Parker's Wine Advisor and Cellar Manager 
makes It easy to find an abundance of wine-related 
information on the Internet. 



made it as easy as a mouse click in the newest 
version of its widely-known wine CD-ROM, 
Robert Parkers Wine Advisor and Cellar Man- 
ager, 

In a recenl review, "Tin 1 New York rimes" 
described this unique software as, "a sophisti 
cated database manager ... for people who 
crave wine data by the magnum." 

A highlight of the new CD-ROM is its in- 
novative approach to surfing the "World of 
Wines on the Internet". Thousands of wines 
are automatically linked to relevant sites on 
the World Wide Web. These would typically 
include the winery's Web site, site(s) about the 
particular region where the wine was pro- 
duced, and sites about the type of wine or va- 
riety of grape. 

The links can even serve as a convenient 
guide to purchasing the wine directly from the 
winery or from a conventional or web-based 



wine retailer. For those not 
ready to totally abandon books, 
the guide to wine E-commerce 
even helps you locate titles that 
are related to a particular wine. 
A new "quick search" fea- 
ture, which works just like the 
familiar search engines on the 
Internet, makes finding the right 
wine much simpler. Just enter 
one or more full or partial key- 
words about wine and click a 
button. The matching wines 
come up in seconds. 

As the user's attention 
moves from wine to wine, the 
list of links tracks automatically. 
Simply click on an interesting 
Web site description and the 
browser goes directly to that 
particular site. Wine Technolo- 
gies will be offering updates to 
the wine Web sites from its own 
site through an update feature 
built directly into the software. 
To understand the soft- 
ware i i is necessary to know about Parker, who 
"The Times" acknowledges as — "the best- 
known and Ihe mosl influential wine critic in 
America today." 

Though trained as a lawyer, Parker began 
thinking back in 1 975 about writing his own 
"independent, consumer's guide," largely be- 



cause of the paucity of reliable information on 
wine quality. The result was his newsletter, 
"The Wine Advocate," Since the publication's 
premier issue in 1978, Parker's reputation has 
grown to the point that "his influence Is un- 
paralleled in the history of wine journalism" 
according to the influential British wine maga- 
zine "Decanter." 

When Parker and Wine Technologies col- 
laborated some five years ago they had the ul- 
timate software for the serious wine consumer 
and/or collector in mind. The latest version — 
released in October, 1998 — is a major step 
forward toward this vision. It provides a data- 
base consisting of virtually every wine re- 
viewed by Parker in "The Wine Advocate,'* 
from the beginning of 1992 through the end of 
1997. In all, this comprises nearly 25,000 tast- 
ings for more than 2 1 ,000 different wines 
(Parker often revisits particularly great wines, 
accounting for ihe excess tastings). 

The software Is available on CD-ROM for 
any Windows 3.X or Windows 95 IBM compat- 
ible PC. It is now available In a deluxe gift box 
— just in time for the holidays. Detailed Infor- 
mation is available at Wine Technologies' Web 
site at www.winetech.com. You can download 
a free demo version as well as free sample is- 
sues of "The Wine Advocate." You can also 
purchase the software on-line using the com- 
pany's secure ordering page. 

(.curtesy of Article Resource Association, 
wunii. aracopy. com 




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foinflers 

lOtfi ^Annual Diotiday Concert 

Saturday, December 5, 7:00 pm • Sunday, December 6, 3:00 pm 

Viking Park Dance Hall • 4374 Grand Avenue, Gurnec, Illinois 

$5.00 Adult / $5.00 Student (6-18 years) f'F4W udininlon far children ttmhr 5/ 

Tkkcn may be pimfhascd in advance ai ihe Curtice 1'ark District main office or from any chorm mettilxt 

ticket* wilt tic available ji the door Inr more information plcnu- call 62 1-77SS 
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• Fresh Wreaths 

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Ramada Inn 
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t 



■{ 






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November 27, 1998. 



' .■ ..',.'". •*;'.* ■'•■..' • ' 



*' "•'*-' " * .• • - ... , - 



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HOLIDAY SPARKLERS 



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"•' ; -.-■ • ■ ■.-. . .-. . . , .. . 

. * •i--i.\J.. 



JjzkelandNewspaper 



•*iF»»WJ V>4**.' » 



V* 



imelsofthe 
essence and accord 
ing to the 1998 
Christmas Report, 
jliday decorating 
fno exception, 
lis new study, 
inducted by De- 

tment56,alead- 
Ig maker of holiday 
Dllectibles, trim and 
ftware, found that while 
jarly two-thirds of 
lericans enjoy decora t- 
Jg, most people (67 per- 
entj devote less than one 
iy to this time-honored 
idiiion. In fact, 

l percent of people 
send less than two hours 
|ccorating. The holiday 
)cris at Department 56 
Iffcr 10 quick and easy 
(ccorating ideas to 
take the most of those 
precious hours. 

1 . Use cards and photographs, 
ioliday cards and old photographs 
lake simple decorating accessories, 
lang them with colorful ribbon 
round a doorway, window or on a 
lirror to add a personal touch to 

you r holiday decorations. As new 
is arrive, add them to the display. 

2. Start a holiday collection. 
[Collecting decorations saves time 
[and helps establish a theme 
[throughout the house. It also pro - 
f vides friends and family with great 
■gift Ideas! More than half of Ameri- 
cans decorate with collectibles - the 
most popular collections are orna- 
ments, figurines, angels, Santas and 
lighted villages. 

3. Use ornaments anywhere. 
Add a festive touch by hanging 
ornaments in unexpected locations 
like doorhandles, backs of chairs 








and 
from 
curtain 
rods. Orna- 
ments can also be used as napkin 
rings or be tied on packages with a 
gift bow. 

4. Let it glow. Use candles to 
create a warm, magical atmosphere 
in any room. Try using scented 
candles to create a holiday aroma 
or place floating candles in glass 
dishes and accent with fresh greens, 
berries or pi necones. Luminaries 
lined in hallways or on staircases 
help set the holiday mood. 

5. A touch of spice. Bundles of 
herbs and cinnamon sticks make 
charming centerpieces and hanging 
wall decorations. In addition, they 
fill the home with traditional Christ- 
mas scents. 

6. Festive dress. Fill your house 
with love by dressing up the family 
during the holidays. Tie a ribbon 
around the dog's neck or wear a 



holiday apron. 

7. A tisket. A tasket. Use bright- 
ly colored baskets to display your 
holiday treasures. Fill a basket with 
ornaments and use it as a center- 
piece, keep a basket of wrapped 
holiday treats near the front door to 
welcome guests, or display a holi- 
day Village collection in a basket 
and place it on the hearth. 

8. Holiday greens. Wreaths and., 
garland made from fresh greens, 
decorated with fruit and small orna- 
ments ore perfect for surfaces such 
as fireplace mantles and armoires. 

9. Use what you have. Linens, 
silver, china and crystal used In in- 
teresting ways make stunning holi- 
day tables. Stacks of plates, crystal 
goblets filled with ornaments and 
silverware tied with a bow are 
unique decorations and add charm 
to the holiday meal. 

10. light it up. Strings of white 
lights quickly add a festive touch 
just about anywhere. Wrap them 
around house plants, down the 
banister or even around the bath- 
room mirror. 

Free "Celebrate your 
Home" brochure 

In its new "Celebrate Your 
Home" brochure, Department 56 
presents more than a dozen Ideas 
to help families become better dec- 
orators, entertainers and gift-givers. 
Consumers can receive a free 
brochure by visiting the Depart- 
ment 56 web site at www.depart- 
ment56.com or calling 1-800-LIT- 
TOWN (1-800-548-8696). 

Courtesy of Article Resource As- 
sociation, www.amcopy.com. 




r 






ew wjeurS 



ue 



1998 



Jf 



$159 



OO 



per klmj-brdded \uiw 
per nlt)ht 



• Complimentary cooked-to-order breakfast buffet 
from 8:30 a.m. to 12 noon. 

• Complimentary Manager's Reception served In our 
atrium from 6 to 8 p.m. 

• Spacious two-room suite with refrigerator, 
microwave and wetbar. 

• Enjoy full use of our Indoor pool, sauna and 
exercise room. 

• Pool open until 10 p.m. on December 31, and 
reopens at 8 a.m. on January 1. 

• Ask about special rate for January 1 . 



Lftu for reservations at 

(847) 945-4500 




or 



1-800- EMBASSY 



Rate based on auattabtUty. Tax not Included. 
Non-refundable deposit after 12/24/98. 



EMBASSY 
SUITES 8 

CHICAGO NORTH SHORE 

1445 Lake Cook Road 

Deerfield, Illinois 60015 

847/945-4500 






Lakeland Newspapers 





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Kama 



lie - 



PHASE CHECK HI THOD Of PAYMENT TOO PBEFED 



Card* . 

Is. Da 



tmnd payment tot 
Lakeland Nmpiptn 
Circulation Dapf. 
P.O. Box 188 

Grayslaka, II 60O30 



Choose One: 
U Anliuch News 
U Rix Like Press 
D Crayslakc Times 
Q Gurnet' Press 
Ll Lnke Villii Record 

L| Utl<Tly\illl!NlMS 

U LirulcirfuiiM News 
ut Muiiiicitiih News 
Q Koiiinl Lake News 
D Wauiondn Leader 
U Wjutsworth News 





^ 



^ fjooth* ttraunti apoly OKor *V*U OKtrroti }i 1 998 Locii eo^»y only I 

M? OOtSuTS BaAlng/lRobbtns: 



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November 27, 1998 



.034 / Lakeland, Newspapers 



COUNTY 




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No Contracts 
No Credit Checks 
No Monthly Bills 




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960 East Rollins Road 

(awoss from Blockbuster Video) 



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la AGo Cellular i»rvie« li riorKtfon<toM#. Not re'ipoiwiblt for low, thtft, or tmotrthortaif uw of ; 
fAffe^t;^tf^yM<Jqy»ho» rmitbOlaW,, mm ond ru>d«poitf« will fat UnnJiwttd.^1^^ 






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Sales 
Service 
Rental 
Repair 

Laser Printer 

Monitor 
Repair 



Sides of Apple Macintosh & Mac. 

eiaot ***■ Cwwun, nc At npn i«ai tajk ma H *«*. ftp » MUM wo**** ted Miei«»afStm^e*A^contM». he-Mr 
s.scrfc). tier* APR. Mftf to ro*#r toMH « «mw An* c*»ig*»)to tw Ma •* om *am *• » t«wi«««a*i c* ««cfi ch«i<j» m*n -~ 



Whoa. 



Because you can own an iMac 

for less than $29.99 per month* 

and you get a coupon book 

with $2,000 in possible 

additional savings, for things 

like software, games and 

accessories. And the first 

payment is not due for 120 days. 



IS 

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We have Apple 

System Upgrade 

8.5 with Sherlock. 

Bring your 

PowerMac to its 

fullest ability. 



Come sec us 

Saturday, November 28th, 

ai the 
Computer Country Expo 

at the Lake County Fair Grounds 
. Exhibit hall 2, booth 21 a " 



Stop by our 

Grand Opening 

Saturday, December 5th 

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Special guests: 

Jason Cornell 

from WXLC 102.3 FM 

U a.m. lo 2 p.m. 

Stan Malinowski 

Renowned Photographer 
Talk With Manufacturer Reps From: 

Apple Computer 

Newer Techonoglies 

Asante 

Umax Scanners 

Drawings and door prizes 

2232 Grand Avenue 
Lindenhurst, IL 60046 

(847) 356-6666 

Fax: (847) 265-5670 

Web Site: http://mall.lnd.com/azo/ 

Address: dtprrjac2@lnd.com 

Apple Certified Technicians / Se habla espafiol 



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C36 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



November 27, 1998 



^mle*%iified ^fuici 






SfLtwo 


unetmentt 


■ - 






MO 


1j>M A Found 




115 


Free ....... 




120 


i't'fMin.iK . . 




. . ..125 


Auctions 




130 


Hu.Mncvs Personals 




135 






140 


■ ■■:■■ >r»'-.-,- . " . 


1 


Help Warned Part-Time 




2iy 


Help Wanted lull-Time 




220 


Employment Agencies 




221 


Business < Ippartunilic. 




225 


Situations Wanted 




22H 


Child Care 




2-10 


Sc.rmnl/ Inst ruction 




2511 


J^i-nrhrt tjpg HlJ* 




Antiques 




3i n 


Appliances 




vw 


Harict 'I i:tik- 




vw 


Ua/.iiirvC r.ilN 




Mil 


llinlilini; Maleii.ils 




1U 


ItUSIIll'SS ( IfllLC I i|lll|Hlll III 




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lll.tdtiiip Mir. 

lliiikliis Ml'' 

C.irpcnliy . . M- 

<;npet ( Iciinmj: S I S 

C'liik-rclc/Ceinenl SIN 

Dry Wall . . S21 

l:il ileal inn/1 nsinicl ion S24 

lilectrical . . S27 

l-'ircwiitiU S30 

I l;nutvin;iii . . . S3'* 

Ifculing/Air Cunilil inning . S3fi 

Housekeeping S3*J 

l.yndstaping . . . -S42 

Uiundry/Clcaning, H45 

Legal Services S4K 

Medical ScrviceN SS I 

Moving/Sioragc S54 

Painting Decorating S57 

Poralegal/Typing Services SMI 

Plumbing Sfi.1 

Pools S66 

Pressure Washing SnV 

Professional Services , -S72 

Radio/TV Repair • • - S75 

Remodeling S7K 

Resumes SK I 

Roofing/Siding SH4 

Storage SH7 

Tax Service ..,,, S90 

Trces/Plunis S l J3 

Wedding S96 

Miscellaneous SV9 



& 



iftrilfution 



Kenosha 
County 



IWIn Laksi Sllvtr Ulul 



K»noih« 




Johniburg 



McH«nrv 



Cryltd 
Calm 

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tiountv 






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Wauk*g«ny 

PiiK 

^ North 

— -fetatn Chicago 

N Oikl"*-^ 



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lilind UK* Mundtliln 

Wtuconda /C\V»moi uturtyvlHt 



North 



Oirrtngton l»|(b Zurich 

Kildatr 



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HI II 



Lskt For*ft 



Birrlnglon 



Long 
Grov« 



MighlBnd P«rk 



Datrfltld 



Pdtiln* 
Cool* County 



Ouffilo Qtavt 



Nodhbrook 



U.kcliind .Wuspupirs' (lass.ncds Apiun. in I I Xovspnpers! 

Aniioih Wws • Koiii"! IJtfhtf Smtww * Uhc VJtki Uccard 

Mmulilcin Xcwh • Wiulswdiili .\cvvs • (irayslalu- Iinics 

lux UiUc IVcss • (innicc Pivss • I,indt.-nhiirst News 

Wnufoncla Leader • I.il>crl\"\ilk" News 




HOW TO PLACE A 
CLASSIFIED AD 






BY 



BY 
MAIL 



IN 



BY 
FAX 



CALL 



Lakeland 
Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 



30 S. Whitney St. 
Grayslake 



(847)223-2691 



DEADLINES 

Direct Line Tues. 5pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party...Wed. 
10am 



8am-8pm Mon.-Thurs. 



asiirie 



f 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



125 



Penorub 



140 


Financial 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



ERRORS: 



We slnve to eliminate 

enors fuf it one should 

vecw piease repon it 

■nmtHiitVPiY JS w£ can be 

'csfjiJf'SiDie 'ot HW 'irsf two 

? .VPP»S I". 'I » 

HO ADJUSTMENTS CAN 

BE MADE UNLESS THEY 

AFFECT THE MATERIAL 

VALUE OF AN AD 



DID YOU FIND Somoones 
PET or Special Lost Afticlo? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Depi . and gol your 
results. FOUND oda ore 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
|847)223B161 



120 



Free 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

II -.nil It. Hi' Jil.li I'M i l.lsMflrrl 
(IwMIMHU Willi lllr- L.iKr 

Uiilil S* , w-.p.ipi-i*. vim iu.i\ ir 
nw .1 iiiisI.-.mUijU %l.il»'uirnl 

Itnill . 1 1 1 ■ I r 1 1 1 ' I 111 111 M-lftlnM 

1I1K |t,umi ill l.n litis .iflvi-nls 
Inu I" t.'i rivi- ptM|K't » i ril 

Il ill ."-ill .M i lilllll .lit p.lV- 

in. iii- l"t -.iuii l..rki iiitnl 

".■■.i^ip.i(i>(v .uk ri n sum 

isl Id lti.nl'- i» llil'i.l- fl| 
.mil ijll'i li'il Ii- 

l.ikfUiiil Newipmper» 

TO tlux 26H 

30 S. Whitney St. 

GfayiUkr. IL 00030-0208 



Fax us your info, 
Co place your ad 

(847)223-2691 



HYPNOTHERAPY 

Trie Hohsnc Approach lo 

Good Health 

Slop Smoking 

Lose Weight and More 

FREE CONSULTATION. 

(847) B16-4951 



IF YOU HAVE 

FURNITURE TO SELL, 

A cor, or appliances, II 

you are having o Garage 

Sale or If you have o 

house to sell or apartment 

to rent. 

Call Lisa before 10am 

Wodnoeday to place 

your ad hore. 

(847)223-6161 

oxl. 140. 

WRITE FOR YOUI 

■X-Mns Cards 

* Wadding Invitations 

•Shower/Party Invitations. 

■Handwritten. 

* Reasonable rates. 

Call (815) 363-5330. 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 
FREE,GIVEAWAY COL- 
UMN. For more inlormalion 
please contact the Humane 
Society 

FREE LUXURY BUS RIDE 

TO POTAWATOMI 

BINGO. 

BRAND NEW 1999 BUS! 

Monday-Tuesdoy- 

Thursday. 

Pick-up 4:30pm at 

Hampton Inn, Gurnoo. 

Rldo 10 times and get a 

Iree package ot specials 

Hollywood Casino. 

December 13th & 15th. 

4:t 5pm., poy $15 and gol 

$15 back, 2-sesslons. 

Double pay out during the 

month of December. 

Call for Information 

(847) B31- 1094. 

FREE PICK-UP SERVICE. 
I will haul away your unwanted 
row boat, canoe, outboard 
motors, or lishmg gear FREE 
Call (847) 566 2019 alter 
5 30pm 

PLUS SIZES! 

WOMEN'S LINGERIE! 

CALL FOR FREE 

CATALOG. 

(847) 634-1307. 

ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad in ihe 
Lakeland Classifieds Free 
and Giveaways are run at NO 
CHARGE! [Wo discourage 
any pet ads), Deadlines 10am 
Wednesdays (847) 

223-6161. exl 140 



125 


Penonals 



HEALTHY WOMEN 

N1HIHITJ3IEID 

$3500.00 Compensation 

Healthy women, age 2I)-.W, 

needed lo serve j\ anonymous 

egg dnnors.. Dunoit will he 

rcquiicd in take medicaltiin. 

blood screening and undergo 

minor surgical procedure We 

arc imcicMed in all ethnic 

hackgruundv Multiple locations 

available. If interested call 

ARK 773-327-73I5 

Settoui Inquiries Only 



ADOPT: AFFECTIONATE^ 
PROFESSIONAL couple 
(doctors) dedicated iheir ca- 
reers lo caring lor others. We'll 
give your newborn everything 
life holds, especially OUR 
LOVE. EXPENSES PAID DA- 
VID/BETH 1-800-754-3077 



LOSE WEIGHT 

LOOK & FEEL 

GREAT 

EARN EXTRA INCOME 

OR DISCOUNTS 

ON PRODUCTS. 

HERBAUFE 

Call Kathv. 1847) 395-8053 



ADOPTION CAROL AND 

Tony (ages 31 and 32) will 
give your baby what ovary 
child doservos: unconditional 
love, financial security, a great 
education (Carol is a teacher), 
and a stay at home mom. We 
want lo help you through this 
difficult lime. Call CAROL AND 
TONY at home 1-888-223- 
8391 xB184. 

ADOPTION 

IS AN OPTION 

Dear Special Blrihmolher. 

We're Brad and Use, 

a stay-at-home mom and very 

dovoted lather. We would love 

to give your precious child a 

wonderful lite, lull of 

opportunities, and lots of love. 

We know this is a very 

ditficull. 

important decision lor you 

Lot's talk and plan your child's 

tutufe logethfjr 

Medical legal counseling 

and court approved 

living expenses paid 

Conlidentiat 

Please call our attorney at 

(708) 957-6B30 

IT PAYS 

TO LOSE WEIGHT! 

LOOK GOOD. FEEL GREAT' 

EARN EXTRA INCOME WITH 

HERBALIFE 

TOLL FREE 

(677) 500-SLIM 

LOOK GREAT! 
LOSE WEIGHT! 
MAKE MONEYI 
(847) 940-9689. 

LOSE WEIGHT 
AND FEEL GREAT! 

We can show you how 

with Herbalite 

Independent Distributor 

Call (847) 546-4275 

METABOLtFE356fnn 

Natural diet supplement 

Lose Weighi & Feel Great 

Just in lime lor Ihe holidays. 

independent Distributor 

(647) 263-3876 

http:\\cyber- 

maiL20QO.tom\slores\ 

metabolite 

WAXING OR TWEE2ING? 

Try elocttolysls 

(permanent hair removal) 

and permanent cosmetic 

mako-up. 

(eye brows, eye and lipttne), 

Sherry (847) 249-7446. 

WHY BE FAT? Amazing new 
weight loss system developed 
by lop Illness specialist. Send 
$15.95 plus $300 shipping lo. 
Body Complete, 2066 Rich- 
mond Rd., Suite 434, McHen- 
ry, III. 60050. 

PLUS SIZES! 

WOMEN'S UNGERIEI 

CALL FOR FREE 

CATALOG, 
(847) 634-1307. 



"CASH $$S NOW For your 
structured settlement, annuity 
and lottery payments. Great 
Lakes Settlement Funding, 
Ltd. Call today 600-636-9790. 

NEED CASH? IMMEDIATE 

cosh paid for future sortiomoni 

payments, lottory winnings 

and lite insurance policies 
trom terminally ill policyhold- 
ers. Call Singer Asset 1-800- 
605-5007. www.smgeras- 
aet.com 



fl 



Substitute School 

Bus Driver 
GDL License required. 

Office hours 
8:J0 AAL to 3:30 RM. 

BIG HOCiOW 

SCHOOL DISTRICT 

(847)587-2632 



219 



fldp Warned 
Pnrt-Tirnc 



LOVE TO DECORATE? 
NEED TO ORGANIZE? 

New Party Plan! 

Hiring consultants and 

booking shows. 

A Great Way lo Start off the 

Now Year. 

Call 1 -800-639-45 16. 






Help Wanted - Pari Time 

Handyman/ 
Mechanic 

to work with 

disabled worker 

Monday through Friday 

mornings 

Must have own cat 



Part Time 
Gene ml Office. 

Jcort{,iri().\ 

Call Cathy at 
847-680-9200 



5847-680-3064] 




' ^PaiUatqi placed 

■^-cybui*^riiio^!-^ 

^847&£Mo1& 



INVENTORY 
TAKERS 

•Students 

welcome (must be 

18 yrs. old) 

•Regular 

Part-time 

positions 

•Days - Nights - 

Weekends 

•Great 2nd Income 

•$7.50 to start 

Equal Opp. 

Employer 

RGIS INVENTORY 
847-662-9277 



Amoco 

Retail Clerks Needed 
-flexible hours- 



Benefits include 
educational assistance, 
competitive wages & 
optional health coverage, 
-apply in person- 
ask for Dawn 
Corner of Rt. 1 2 & Hwy 
1 20 in Volo 

ask for Pattie 
Corner of Rt. 22 

& Rt. 12 
in Lake Zurich 




y >' V V^r* VV~V " 



t^*OCBl 



Pmmcnitn tvtdttm 
irmd*ty*tf» 



PERMANENT 

PART-TIME MANAGER ', 

& ATTENDANTS 

NEEDED 



GURNESUP&WASH 

FneouTy. MtyMg KMOUM wfo MM I pSSSt team fliuufe 
Co perform (fi« Inlawing otoes 

• CiMtomir Sinricf • Minimi) Ptptrmork ■ Uflht Milntwinci • 

• Wnor Mtehinlul Rtpiir* - 

♦ Fkiiik ictwduing atalaata. some wmlend hours ape* 
:' • CompeOtM wages ottered 

£ •QvuoARACfJfenfti/lMMb 

. •fcrfijrthtrirfomwtjancA1MX33.7e25bew*tn9amto4pm&X. 



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■ : • ■ ■ 



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■■ ■ 



I 

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I 




November 27,1998 - ;.y.. !. : ; 



■ ■'-■'. "■>; . '.. 

CLASSIFIED ^ 






r ^{ XaJtei^fi^>fe^gpg»ffg« /Jgj»^^ 



219 



Help Wauled: 
Part-Time v.. 



1 



'.".(.': w*> '.* ;,:>"■ 



Cook/ Dietary 
Aide 



RT. Employee Heeded for, - 
various duties In kitchen. / ; 
Musi be dependable & .-, 
self-starter. Weekends rcQulred 
w/exlra J. Promotion 
opportunities available. 
Must be able lo read and write 
English. Apply In person at 

(CARE CENTRE 

OF WAUCONDA, 

176 Thomas Ct., Wauconda, IL 

<B47) 526 SSSI 




Help warned 
V Part-Time* 



219 



Help Wanted, 
Part-Time 



Do you love to talk? 

'Well we've goi the job for you! We 

need 3 outgoing people who are 

looking for a great part-time job. 

Monday-Thursday evenings and 

Saturday days doing telemarketing. 

Base rale plus generous commissions. 

Experience a plus but will train the right 

person, For more information call Dick, 





Help Wanted 
, Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Rul-Hflie.' . 



SECRETE 
LOOKING FOl 
/HOtlDAYC 



■ 



IES 
EXTRA 



H? '•%'■£,$£%' ft 

t>P« if WPM, WP, Wlndowi, MS Wotlu, . ■ 

DiCTAptiO« A pll* * WM lutM 

Uqki to linvy phontt > Good p*y 
Colliqi STudmn wiUimtl 

CaU Hydrw CoiipopuTioN 

27491 MilTonRoAd 

WAucoNdA, IL 60094 

(847) 540-7000 on 

Fax besumc to (047) S40*S076 



umi m» " 






P/T,TypelOrcq;TMH, 
EMU Mu|t be energetic, - 
organized, experienced. - 

"" moUvmted 
Teacher Mtt$4 F/T, exp. 

•Preferred 

•SobaUtnte TcKhcni 

F/T, P/T 

Northbrook location 

Fax resume* ta 

(S471 305-1530 




fcisalotico; 






InstaUerfi 



M »»» 



Needed 

r /r/ng Bonur 

'^Southern Wl- 

W Northern IL area 
(Buifder8,lnsulaUqnf. 

B15)fe75-008& 




OMS 






Christmas is coming! Make 

up to $15 per hour!' 

Wc arc looking for outgoing 

Individuals who arc 

interested In making 

money! If you like talking 

on the phone and enjoy 

working In a friendly team 

environment. this job could 

be for you. Telemarketing 

sales Monday through 

Thursday 5:00-6:30 p.m. 

Saturday 9 :OOa.m. -2:00p.m. 

Hnse rate plus generous 

commissions. Call Dick for 

more Information 

(047) 740-4038 



Now 's your chance to cash in on your free time. 

Ijjktland Ntwtpapert it now accepting application* far part 

time telephone tain, A work from our Grajilake office. No 

experience neceitarj (but a plust. 

RETIREES 

COLLEGE STUDENTS 

HOUSEWIVES 

Mutt enjoy talking to people. Hourly wage plut bonus. Average 
St 0-15 per hour or more. 

HOURS: 

Men.-Thurt. 5:00p.m. • S:iOp.m. 
Day Uaurt Sat. 9:00a,m,-2:00p.m. 

For Interview Call 
Dick (after Noon) K 

Lakeland Newspapers 

(847) 740-4035 



■»»•■*•*■■*■■»*■■■■■■■■■■■•■«■■■•■■■■«•■■»■»■ >■■■■« 



* 



SttOWPlLOW OWNERS 

Qpmmms 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fuil-Time 



• • • • • 



•••••*••** 



BOBCAXOWNERS 
OPERATORS 

Tbp Pay! 

Plenty of work. Guaranteed hours. 
No wait for your money. Paid gas. 

(847) 272-1747 



■ 
■ 
* 

:■ 

: 



■•■•*•*>>*•■■■•■«■ ■>■■•■>••.■■■■*«■■■•....... ...... 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fuli-Tfme 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuU-TimL' 



AG POSITIONS: AGRON- 

OMY S5SK; Plant Manager 
S50K; Sales S38K; Applicator 
$40K; Seed Sales $45K; GPS. 
Precision Manager $45K. Bill 
Meyer. Agra Placements Lid., 
Lincoln, II. 217-735-4373. 

ASSEMBLE ARTS, 

CRAFTS, Toys In your spare 
time. Earn CASH! Phone work, 
typing, sewing, electronics, 
more. Great Pay. CALL 24 
hour information. 1-800-795- 
0380 Ext, 21. (SCA Network) 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you have placed classified 
advertising with the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may 
receive a misleading state- 
ment from another firm re- 
questing payment for this 
advertising. To receive prop- 
er credit lo your account, 
all payments far your Lake- 
land Newspapers advertising 
must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

Ijkriand Newapaperi 

PO Box 368 

30 8. Whitney Bt. 

QrayiULke. IL 60030-0208 



AVON PRODUCTS- 

START a homebased busi- 
ness. Work flexible hours. 
Enjoy unlimited earnings. Call 
Toll Free (888) 561 -AVON. 

BE YOUR OWN BOSS1! 

Need extra cash? 

Join THE HOMEMAKER'S 

IDEA COMPANY. 

Be the first in your 

neighborhood lo sign up as a 

consultant for our great party 

plan. Flexible hours and lots of 

fun, wonderful products. 

Call today tor into. 

I -600-639-4516. 

DRIVER - INEXPERI- 
ENCED? Ask about our com- 
pany sponsored training. We 
have raised pay for ALL our 
drivers, and we otler top con- 
ventional equipment. U.S. Ex- 
press 888-936-3338. 



DRIVER BUD MEYER 

Truck Lines Refrigerated Haul- 
ing '$1,000 sign-on bonus tor 
experienced company drivers 
'Solo drivers start up to 33c 
solos drivers and contractors 
CALL TOLL FREE 877-283- 
6393 GRADUATE STUDENTS 
1-800-338-6428, 



DRIVERS - O/O'S DEDI- 
CATED LANES, Short & 
Long Haul For Van & Flatbed. 
100% Owner Operator Co. NO 
Forced Dispatch, Malone 
Freight Lines 800-366-6361 , 



DRIVERS AND TEAMS: 

Starling pay up to 37e/rnlle. As- 
signed Frelghtllner conven- 
tionale, improved speed 
stance, excellent miles, time 
home every 7-10 days in most 
areas and more. Experienced 
drivers call Heartland Express 
toll-free 1-87-PRO-DRIVE. 
Owner Operators ask about 
88e/mlle. Call 1-8-PROFIT- 
PRO, E.O.E 



DRIVERS COMPANY AND 
OWNER OPERATORS Van 

opportunities •$41.000/yr. 
average 'Home weekends 
'Assigned late model equip- 
ment 'Free medical *No NY 
city 'Class "A" w/Haz. CallfeOOt 
788-7357 LANDAIR TRANS- 
PORT, INC. 



DRIVERS/CDL-A GAINEY 
TRANSPORTATION. Up to 

4ie/ml. (Up to'36e/ml. start). 
Solid benefits. Satellite 
equipped late model conven- 
(lonals. CDL Training avail- 
able. 1-800-738-0708. 



EASY W0RKI 

NO EXPERIENCE 

$500-$1 ,000 part-time at 

home stuffing envelopes. 

For Ireo Information send 

self-addressed, 

stamped envelope: 

R&J Enterprises 
Mailing Servtces, Inc. 

P.O. Box 402 
Inglesida, III. 60041. 

OTR CLASS A Drivers: We 
pay you for your best. Come 
earn what you deserve. Up to 
35c/mile plus bonus and bene- 
fits. Easy no S down lease pur- 
chase program available. Call 
800-643-8308 or 3384. 

OWNER OPERATORS 
NEEDED. .82 CPM, Home- 
time. Toll and plate program. 
Lumpers paid. $2000.00 aver- 
age per week. Call Jack at 888- 
881-3750. 

PET CAREI ENERGETIC 

dependable person, various 
duties involving pets. Must be 
flexible and available 7 
days/week Including wee- 
kends and holidays. Call only 
between 10am-5pm, Monday- 
Friday, Shel-Ray Pat ShaJet 
(414) 657-2163. 

TST EXPEDITED SERVIC- 
ES - Needs cargo Vans & 
Straight Trucks for OTR expe- 
dited shipments. Excellent pay 
package - $500 Instant sign- 
on bonus. 1 -800-456-6539. 

WES MASTER: POSSIBLE 

lull time position. Musi have 
excellent HTML, Pearl, JAVA, 
and CGI knowledge. Visit our 
site at ftt1p:\\thepower- 
store.com then E-mail resume 
to dpowe.r@thepower- 

store.com 



tOO XING PCS 
ACAUEXCHAMCE 

CUSTONOUt SEBVICE 



■Ar-N 



Stl appointments tor 6w hutnt 

jjrmrfft) QMisulttng firm In Hflnott. 

Work In our eomfgrtaM* Duftsto 

Omri oMca. fTlPT hours 

mflsbt*. «•*» ttMftr ♦ «smrt»- 

ston/baunrlMntflt*. Csllcottit 

B00-U1-2M1 tor InUrvt**. 

_ 



Oil JiFitK 6:60 PJJL 
(tnS) 334-993? 



DRIVERS/OTR-CRST 
OFFERS TUITION-FREE 

training and a guaranteed |ob. 
NO EXPERIENCE NECES- 
SARY! Earn up lo $30,000 first 
year. Min. Age 21, no felonies. 
Call CRST 1-800-504-2778 
EOEVmf 




HAIRSTYLIST 

| CHAIR RENTAL I 
j AVAILABLE, NEW 5 
5 UPSCALE SALON.S 
f CALL GINNY i 
B (847) 838-2200 = 



OBDBaeaoaBBHBBBasc-sBa 



Get an "AT coir Success!! 

XWKE THIS QUIZ! 






.^'.\u ; ,-'-:v 



Yes No 

[~jlj ^° y° u "k c t0 carn monc y ? 

f~ir ] Do you like people? 

DC] D° y° u ^ ave a P' 113511111 P hone voice? 

I 1 1 I Do you want part-time work in a 
friendly environment? 

If you answered yes to any or all of the 

above, you can start earning dollars plus 

commission in LAKELAND'S Client 

Services Department 

Please send letter of interest to: 



Attn: Maureen Combs 

c/o Lakeland Publishers 

\ P.O. Barx 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 

or fax to 

(847) 223-2691 

aaenBHHBaBBBBBsoaBBnMBanoBaBBanoeBooBBB! 






BE H UE AT , 

THBrarasi 

We're now talcing application* 

at our new Lou Perrinc'tfBurgcr King 

location from fanvSpm 

Hwyll & Rt. 173 

Wadtworth, Illinois 

W«'rt hlrinf Immtdlitaly far tht followlnf full 
and part tlma positions: . .,■;:■■' ■ 



CLERKS/CASHIERS 
» ASSISTANT MANACERS 
SALARIED & HOURLY MANAGERS 
- COUNTER & KITCHEN STAFF 



Wt offer paid training, compcthrvt wips up to ; 
$7lhr. flexible houn, rjjtcounud mea 

(TOwth opportunldti and a naw work «mrlron- It 
l immediate Interview call: 847-838- jl 

AMERIKING A 

tqutl ppportunhy •mplojir f 





,.'.'-.. 



220 



Help Warned 
Full -Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



fit Dress Barn 



OIL TECH 

tube Pnrt tooUag forma 
affiac*. 

pita 

SjcpeuiaJAC9 prafcfTfta 

batwOltndn. 

V/eekemds * must 

Apply mt 770 £. RoBSas RdL 

ftoizad Lake Beach, U. 



■MMWWWMWMW 



DRIVERS 

Immed. Openings. 
Aiv you on the Road to 

Success' 

If not change Lines nuw 1 

Luciano RrfrigtfratLii 

Transptirf offers. 

*^k per mile to Co 

Ori vers /Teams start at »* 

"97 Volvo conventionale 

vv/Big Block Engines 

Cct milcs...but 

get home, too! 

We're big enough to pay 

well but small enough lo 

■cire about our people! 

Call Jim in Chgo 
800-637-51 S« or 
M) in Recruiting 

600-753-61*5 



WiIjtwm. Anwnu's drugdm k«)t>. 
tuirertly h« ihe fcilWing opportunity 
Jvjibbie * our cwpwHr hnil()uirtrn 
in Dwrfwltt, II: 

PHARMACY ADMlNISTRAflVT 

ASSlSTAfVT 

It! UfM(> iMicnnult QtiVr tt^d h 
\ irdi Urimf; t«rtul and wti((en 10m 

mumcjlKjri i«d 

inirr|n^vKijl ^lills jnil pirvvKiv iiimm 

i^niivr typetyinff J'r ri^irrd Irtrjl 

(imiKiiir mil br drtjll-wifhitj, »rM 

urjiniwi, flexible, independent jnd 

Mr lo lundlr multiple i.ijls jl une 

lime. Pharnucy eipenente t plm. 

for immediate twwSrraMw 
null or bi lo. 

WALCREENS 

■'OOWIird Rd 

Dfpt. .MSCDD 
Dmtdd II W01S 
f«. M79I 1-23)1 

Or complete i resumj unlmr it 
www.wjlefrem.CDfn undei 
"Corparale Opjmriunilin* 

IDI 



m 



Success Is Our 




At Oresa Barn, wt? wear success well . We're one o( America's 
fastest growing and most financially stable career apparel 
retailers with over 700 stores nationwide We have stores 
located in Palatine. Huntley, McHenry. Lincoln Village and 
Morton Grove Now Accepting Applications Solid career growth 
opportunity, competitive pay and great benefits 

■ MANAGEMENT 

■ SALES ASSOCIATE 

You must be outgoing, confident and possess good communi- 
cation and customer skills Retail experience is a must lor 
management positions 

Please call or send resume to Kim Collins. Dress 8arn, 727 
E Dundee Rd . Palatine, IL 60074, Phone 847-358-7813 
{Fax B47 -358-7848) Equal opportunity Employer 



DRESS BARN 




GcnnlOlfa 

■ COORDINATOR ■ 

nUTURE HEALTH 

Al I tie hi and Park Itoirnlal. a leading 
250-bed medical facility, vc have die 
resources lo make your career a 
rewarding one! We need a dedicated 
individual lo coordinate all aspecti of 
our Mobile Meals. Intel and Lifeline 
program Will also supervise volun- 
teer) and plan for hum eipos I such as 
reallh fairs and mcclmei). 

Requires Mrone clerical sJiills in the 
following; typing, word processing, 
computer, dola enlrv. telephone. 
orauVrilten crjmmimication and urga- 
ruiation. We need someone with a 
hip h energy level, patience and a 
strong comiTiiUnent to strvjng the 
older adult. Some flexibility in sched- 
uling is required, such as occasional 
evenings and » crlscnds 

li-mtanl resume to Jean illln-ilt. HR 
Consullant. IIKIHLASH I'ARK HOS- 
i'l IAL. 71B Cilcnum Ave . Highland 
I'arV. II. 00035 l : « tS47 1 480-383^ 
I'.-mail jellioiltf'hptKispiirg 

■ HIGHLAND PARK! 
HOSPITAL 

A Mrrnher i*l 

.S,<nh»riicin Mtalihcjic 

In.T nyllift | 



Do you enjoy variety? Do you enjoy a 

challenge? Do you thrive in a fast-paced, 

dynamic environment? If so, you could be 

the person we're looking for! Lakeland 
Newspapers is looking for someone to join 
our exciting sales department You will be 
a success if you possess organizational and 
communication skills and are self motivat- 
ed. If you are interested in this exciting 
opportunity please send your resume to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 




Crayslake, IL 60030 

Attn: Maureen Combs 



M 



Ik 



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C38 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



November 27, 1998 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full -Time 



H.V.A.C 

New Construction 

Installer 

EXPERIENCED ONLY 

V. OLSEN Heating & 

Air Conditioning, Inc. 

Lake Villa, IL 
(847) 356-3581 






Que RACERSB 

nBM£8TiCB8 

Tlempo complete o 

tlempo porclal Dote 

poder tiabejoi lot 

tines de semanos y 

dios tostivos Aplique 

en persona 

ADVENTURE INN 

3732 Grand Ave. 

Guinoo 



.»■..»**. ....... ...... 

WILDLIFE JOBS 
lo $2 1.60/1 m 

INC HI-NI-.IMS (.AMt 
WAIMIiNS. St< uuriT. 
MAINTI-NANCI-. I'Allk 

HANC1-HS N't MM' 

NITIMI) KtH AIT AM" 

KXAM INN M. All 

I IUHI HI I IMC, I XI .Mil.' 
HAM '"I'M ■' I >-\VS Ich. mi 



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Klltll ORRfElt 

suns/ 

HMIKSWOH'JTI 
P.O. 

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■ntliC, ■*.'• ' Pill i I 

tf&C* iS fflVA'd,' *<Uf 

rUHHSf ttAV! 
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$$$ ejt rw/i $$$ 

C/1SH FOH THE 

HOLIDAYS 

t,l,'inurkttin\! 

%S $Wht 

f nil linn tl<n < <" 

, ,ul\ tvtiitm:^ 

( ',/// kutm 

549-0016 



6 



,Siif»rfior 

IVrvolHid 



AERIAL 
EQUIPMENT 

In Whct'lmg IL rm> 

imm«dialu opening,'. 

un our mc|hi SiHtfl 

[3 30 pm 1?00.im] 

il Join our team « f lochm 
1/ cians Lo repair mudi 
I urn/heavy duty trucks £ 
equipment We offer 
;in Bxccllcnl benuliLs 
package S some 
in-house training 

Call Dan but on* 

4 DO p m or Miku aftnr 

4 00pm 

at (847)3980620 



M'l IM»KM i H.IM IK 

ItllHM I I >!■•■ "»', M 

StT.i; --t i" ; iry> -n i i' '. ' i> ' 

;**ltnm .. ii PiS Mir h" (hmi 

lr-,: --f.-ul.! I"-^- - If'MI '. 

Il.r.i • ' .i-.i-'| " ■" • •' ill N't. 

|.- ', ,.."1 .■ \ ■' *Vf* 

■||MSi '. ' |W» i «i !« ' ' '* 

I .'..I* i .1^ II *-T- " i" 1" I?*'* 

I ,, . .,. ,,-.}■.« vj , rut •' i -'i 

rn'K ojj ml i j i<t.', i>' '■■''■ 
rrmiMrVijiiirinf; i-«i^lni(; pru i-w 
i»* FVii'n iiTir h l Af^LnnHf 

■•.Iit.iMi',.1 AIVI'.V rjwwfti II 

HHI p ».><>■.>. fhl'M- .|ll.lllln,l||lHl» 

.^ -<Tt i .fi.iiii'iii'iii) i,|i|i\ iii.ii 

ulli'tv i ■ .mi), vil.irs ^ i n I >i .■!>- 

[•Umm fiitn.irl ii'^nnii' 

I llliSlMI 1 1 llj Ii V" I I* 1V - 

Mlit IIKM,-.i 
llmls..n.lS-((ir47 



ACS SyslcniN iSr 1 M[.-iihi-iuij; lljt tus imrui-ihalf 

"|H-miii's In] ilu InUiiwin^ 

"t mtumff Stuiif Vli:<l)-il In h^i.iII .in.1 fyuvnh- iilmiii nj I'l 

IAN ,imt I \S nlji.-.l . 1 .MH..111.U1. \\„^ ii.m- il\ HS ilci'fi-i' in 

li'l.vli-il lii-lil hi i' 1 (til* iM'lt >»t' lrtliiiii.il 11u.H11.lmn in I i\N 

.iiliniii'in.iiiit " .!• i.-i ti mhH'iiii H1.11111 i->p ,111 \|i|' i'i|iitpiiH'iil 

lllilllillli)- i!ui' .■■,! M <iljI.Ii - 1 ti|- ii) I \S ,,ilupi.|i,|,l> 

•lU'lli IH-vk \ilniiniMi.tliit I.. |.<it ) II .flin ami v.. ul ii., 1, .in 

.Kiini-i inni .i.iilii-ut.iiinii iiiirff.iii.iti jiuHi'vtui)* M.mii.iiii I'M 1 \l 
liil's M If. I 1 1.11. HVUS ili'i'H'r Iti ivtillit hrlit it i-i|i,k j.:,i\ ,-.). 

■'"■ ' lll|i ■"! 'I'-'iM 'i n I \N iiliiiui 'ii.iim 1 vj ii| it, I, u|,j,i.iM m.Htii 

.<f in \I'I-ii|iii|-ii.i • liitf.li.i-.-iii-il.U.liw,,, „,..,| ,,,,,,, .1) VN 

, Mill)'.. 11. 1,1. \,(,(,i |»i , in.,, i,.,ii,ii 1, ,11. h,.|, ■., ,.,|,., t| 

Vll.lKvl M I'll-:-! ill.llul 1 l,lll|.| IJ«'l.,lilC I \% Vl.il, ,.., t 

%rl*t«!*» 1 1| \'„ili»t .iiul hiIhi vi„i,|,„ („,m[ii.iiv 
Inliti- ti il ,\ '.iii.ililu-il ,,inili. ,nu. m.nl in i.i, m-mimii . 

mil .ll.lf H 11 ^inlrllirill' In 

AI'S Svsiiins A Knuimirini;. Int. 

5tM Viking l>riu' 

\ iri-iiiM lltiult. \,\ 2.U52 

Atln: lliiiiiaii RiMHirii-\/|)^'N/\Vt; 

I'nx: |757)6.AI-Ht.MI 

KOE/M/F/IVV 




^;f.Jmn)flSdiiate openlngs.for Individuals lo assist 
iwwiiii i day-to-day oparailons In branch locat'on. 
ffllbiiiliaa will Include setting up papers 
^ioryeiiyeryias well as for 
iBiQrlal- absence of distributor. 
Trent' openings (n'.ths following locations: 

Grayslake 
take Zurich 

}Work34iKours a day -with flexibility In starting and 
^^rvdingjfmes. Starting pay la^9.62/hr. plus benefits 

' ^^llilfilfilfil^lilfilfHS^r^HillillH^ 



For more information call: 

(847) 427-4333 




220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



ASSISTANT 
MANAGER 

Lube Pro's looking for jn 

.HSKfjnf manager. Previous 

Ctpcricnce required. 

Salary plus commission. 

Weekends a must. 

Apply at 778 t. Rollins Rd 

Round lake Beach, 11 




EXPERIENCED F/T 
PAINTERS NEEDED 

lor 

Altmann Drywall & 
Painting 

|...,ll.ll HI Will M. 'Mill 

i -.ill 

(847) 526-8273 



y ( .C/'7i»"- 

'RtCtftttOHttt 

Witt m it /<"' /•"•<■*' '*"' ' 

„.„.„, nt /<.»' ..-"ir <-."'« 

,,,,li>ti'i iillr'nulinil 

\„„„,/.iii ' ••»>!'>»<■• '■■'"■" 

,.,. ,,„!»•■ r,t AHPft "•'"■' \ 

, lW , .if will/ irtutnr In ' 

ilimi/rlrln Animal llmptlat 

//.!.» W. MaplrArr- 

Mundrlrln. II. 



SALES 
CONSULTANT 



Immediate opening 
in our Lighting Fixlure 

Showroom for a 

reliable and detailed 

ntionled person 

CAIL (847)223-8691 
ni lax rcFunio in 
(847) 223-8693 




front desk 



Yift'DeOTtxjier tott 

l{Xt,nwur 

ADVENTURE INN 

JKOGranOfce 
GuiKe. it 60031 



|i|UI><l<< »» i' ' I 




i ,i.,ii „■,: iii.tritii.it inni mi -U iin c»pcricnrcJ iruii driver -', l J 

!..i|.i,i i,|>.iriilililiuii in ihr ( hiiMgnliind and Southern « 

Wiv, nriMn .in ,i iju.ililml (..trulutalcs. must be aMc In \ 

iiMilil.ini .M ui.iii Ii'*: frmtit* Ailtltlmn.il duiics include J 

t ..ulitu' -inil unliMilui): luitK Mftrjlmg g Imtlifl and {^ 
.,..i.i,iii< ,ii ill, s|i^kii«irii I imiinnci.il l)||vu'«, I nensc 
i \i nut i i'i«»l iln.iiii: ii'ihiJ iciiuiifd ('llnlplrhl'^M^l■ 

Hi ». trl- I' I, l .t).-! I l)ll.ll ' l|l[HI|lUllll> I WploH'l I 

Si h.i tiMum, ;ititl \,il,in fi-i|uiifiiHnK iii a 

tluiuun ItiMHirm a 

I'.t). Ilm 9H5 m 

I jkt Ccntia. UiM-uriMn S3 N749K5 M 




ELECTRICIAN 

Immediate opening tor 

Ronldontlal/Commorcial 

with 4 years minimum 

ox per Ion co. 

Benefits include: 

Vocation, Holiday, 

Honltli & Lifo Insurance. 

847-223-4682 
Contractors 

Electric 
Services Inc. 



J% 



.,. 



NEEDED A FEW GOOD 
EDUCATORS 

North Chicago School District is hiring 
for the following positions: 

North Chicago School District 
is hiring Tor the following positions: 

1 • I'rc-SchiHjl Tenchcr - muttt have a 

I y pr 04 ccrtincnllon 

2 - I^IJ Tench*™ 
2 - RD Tcnchrn* 

1 Title I KciicilnfiTciicher < High School) 
1 - lltHnEunl/iCSI. PniRrnm Coordinator 
l.unchrnom SupcrvlMirs 
Snbsiitoic Truchcni 

Send or Tax a letter of application, a resume 
and copies of certifications to: 

Director of Human Resources 

2000 Lewis Avenue 

North Chicago, IL 60044 

Fax: (847)689-7348 



^F 



Graphic Artist 

WANTED 

,. To work in a creative atmosphere 

designing display ads. Candidates 

must know OuarkXpress for Macintosh. 

Experience in Photoshop, Illustrator, 

and Freehand helpful, but will train. 

Must have good typing skills. Please 

mail resume and salary history to: 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 

Attn: Ad Services 

Supervisor 
30 S.Whitney St., 
Grayslake, IL 
60030 




Internet 
Opportunities 



Lakeland netDIRECT, Chicagoland's 
premier Internet access provider, has 
ground floor opportunities for people 
interested in the Internet. We are 
looking for a Project Administrator 
to coordinate the development of the 

web sites for businesses and 
organizations. If you are interested in 
creating a future with a rapidly grow- 
ing organization, fax resume to 
skw, (847) 223-8810 
or e-mail: skw@us-netdirect.com 



•fc 



* 




OF BOTH WORLDS 



11 you've dreamed of a career opportunity with a 
company ihat encourages your contributions, values 
your input and supports your continued success, then 
visualize yourself at Jewel-Osco 

Our rapid expansion throughout the Northern IL 
suburbs has created several openings lor those who 
possess a customer-first altitude and the leadership 
and communication abilities necessary to meet a 
diverse array of retail challenges. 



JEWEL OSCO 

Store Management Trainees - Management Trainees 
Department Manager Trainees 



In return, we provide an excellent compensation pack- 
age which Includes hea'lth/Ille insurance, 401 K, and 
merchandise discount. For an immediate interview, 
forward your resume in confidence lo: Oaco 
Drug, Attn; Marty,3030 Cullerton Drive, Franklin 
Park, IL 60131, FAX; 888-541-5793. EOE M/F/D/V 

Jewel-Osco 



www.amBrlcondrugBtorea.com 



REASONS to work for 
Pleasant Com pany: 

1 Friendly Work Environment 

2 Generous Product Discounts 

3 Weekend Premium Pay 

4 Bonus 
Pleasant Company, maker of high quality 

children's books, dolls, and accessories, is now 
hiring full-time seasonal employees. 



CATALOGUE FULFILLMENT - $7.30 PER HOUR 



Day Shift: 7A.M. -3:30 P.M. 

Pick, pack and load orders. Previous 

production / fulfillment experience desired. 



ORDER PROCESSORS - $7.90 PER HOUR 



Process-customer phone/ mail orders. Good verbal 

communication skills and prior computer or data 

entry experience required. Must type 30 wpm and be 

available to work a minimum of 20 hours/week. 



STOP IN BETWEEN 8:00 A.M. & 4:30 P.M. TO APPLY 



or Call 414-862-7578 if you have further questions. 



PLEASANT! 
COMPANY! 



12400 Pox River Road • Wilrnoi, Wisconsin 



1 1 



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November 27, 1998 




.■ . , 



Lakeland Newspapers / C39 



220 



Help Wanted: 
• Full-TTmeU' 



{ffmudekeeplng 

Full &iparitime, 

Must be able to 

work weekends 

b\ holidays, Apply 

In person: 

ADVENTURE INN 

3732 Grand Aye. 

Gurnee 



Private , 
Kindergarten Toachar 

• t.Ctrtfn) 

hit u'i> 
•fetlcrMiLi 

CHILD CARE TEACHER 

• FJThe 

• Ejperu-Tce I 
[ducal on rtqprtd 

•fop Pay 
We offer ai (rmowtMj Khod with a 
dsvHbpnentd approach 

FLFAiTCAiL 

(S«/T) 356-2288 




^ 



/<j work 
an e'emehta. 

disabled student, 

.:7 -5 /io«« per'ddyi'^ 

'- y'$lS^ 20 per hour' % 

based on experience: 

PlcalsecaM Catty Friar 

$Sf-238S 

"School 




OfficE Position 

Are you nflmblf., 

f- NERQCtit AfSfl flJN 10 

U'Onk with? If you ItAvr 
bAsic towputtR skills, 

MCtltCAl OR cJlNIAl olflCC 

"txptnitNct A«d cood 

AiitNiioN io dcTAil, OUK 

busy ohaI surtqtny ollict 

MAy be itic pUcE (on 

youl This Ironi oflicr 

posliioN REQuints full- 

TJME llOURS ((MO WEEk' 
ENiJl) AINld tAlARV h 

bAsid uoon cxpEnfENCt. 

CaII 

(047)625-5915 

to fiNd out Monf . 



'« HIRING J' 

! — : ;-".-■ I 

I ALL POSITIONS ] 

•ASSISTANT k 

I 

I UPTOWN 
FAMILY 
I SALOON 

k 26sa« North nte. 83 k 
L Mundeleln, IX | 

" 847-949-7900^ 



MANAGER 
•HEAD COOK 

APPLY IN PERSON 



* 



220 



Help Wanted 
' Fml-Tlme 



220 



Hdp Wanted 
ml-Hmer? 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuU-Ttoe- s 




odom dorirDhsffico ih 
Undenhurat is seeking'' 
an enthusiastic, ' 
salf motivated 
dental hygiordst 
Salary based on experi- 
ence. Excellent benefi 
package available. 

Please 
(8^7135 
VIonjdaytbru 

V 





Maintenance 
■ GENERAL FACTOR? 
MAINTENANCE 

(and Slilfil 

WI ARE ■ leading ml{. of components 
for the loud speaker industry Ktktnf i 
■elf lUrttr for second ahlfl opening. 
Manufacturing background Including 
elrclrlcil or mechanical up. rq Apply 
In person or stnd/faa |8*7-395-88C21 
resume to James Wttigil In MR Dtpt., 
ornllg<7-395-SUI 

HaW»]t tpaaktr 

Pttxiseti. lac 

905 Anita Ate. 

Antloch, IL G0002 



li|M«l<liMitlMI<MHM. *i 



Host/Hostess/Dining 
Room Supervisor 



Day & weekend hra required (or 

elegant restaurant. Experience 

in Tine dining service & war) 

slatl supervision service 

necessary. Must be well 

groomed and personable. 

Contact Tod or Karon 

for Interview. 



Country Squire 
Restaurant 



His. 120 s 45 Gray stake, IL 
(B47) 2234)121 



Security Service- 
Access Control 
Screeners 
Full & Part-time 
Soaking mature, ratioblo 
individuals for work as 
scrvenors to operate, 
package x-raya & metal 
datoctore at the 
Lake County Courts 
$7/hr storting & benefits 
Call Andy Frain Services 
for Interview 
1630} 830-3B30 



The Prudential Insurance 
Company of America is 
seeking bright and energetic 
people for a sales career in 
insurance and financial ser- 
vices. We offer full training, 
competitive benefits and a 
training allowance up to 
S600 per week. For more 
information call Michael 
Fletcher Q> 

(847) 680-6265 x364 

Ff ■£ M.T7NAI 

MHA-MIOU 

ED WJ 

($ Prudential 
Insurance 

Corporate Address: 
751 Broad Street 
Newark. NJ 07102 




220 



Help Wanted 



«'r' *ft-i-A">'L 



220 



w!«i l »'<'V 



: JlebWtnied^ jj 



220 



Rmil CUrIcs NEEdcd 

^tKtiU-Heitft- 
Btmllti focludt fdvcAik»Al 

AiilflVHCl, COMptllliVf WATfl* 
& OpHOHAl ll( till I CQWKAqt. 

Aik lot Dxwtn 

Counts ot Ri. 12 & 

Hvy 1 20 IrtVoh 

Aik Ion PaiUi^ 

CosmsnlRt, 22 & 

I2ht4, Zivich 



^$|Q75 

Plicc your word rate ad Io 1 1 

LikeltDd papen. Great Lakei 

Bulletin, Market Journal and 

on the Internet, all for 1 19.73 ! 

Price based on 13 words 

or fewer. Deadline li 

Tuesday 500 pm. Call Liu 

(847) 223-8161 



COMPUTER/NirrWOnK 

TECHNICIAN 

Arc you looking for n 

CAilEf-n not just a job? 

If you said yes, North 

Shore Business 
Technology has wh.it 
you've been looking for 
•Locally owned since 

1938 
-Vendor for Major 
Manufacturer 
-Attractive HencfUs 
Package 

-Competitive Wages 
-Microsoft Windows NT 
Server experience 
preferred 

Send Resume: 

North Shore Business 

Technology 

91)4 SHth Place. Ste, 100 

Kenosha, WI 53144 

c/o John Meyer 



INVENTORY 
SPECIALISTS 

NATION'S LARGEST 

INVENTORY SERVICE 

We have immediate 

openings for 
Manager Trainees. 
QUALIFICATION^ 

Applicants must 

possess strong 

Motivational and 

Customer Service 

Skills. 

WORKING IN 

LOCAL AREAS 

Salary starts at 

$30,000 

Auto/travel 

allowances 

EXCELLENT BENEFIT 

PACKAGE 

• Medical 

• Dental 

• Vision 

• 401K 
Send resume to: 

RGIS INVENTORY 

SPECIALISTS 

127 E. Lake St. #301 

Bloomingdale, IL 

601 0B 





Great Lakes 
REPORTER 

Great Lakes Bulletin has an opening on 

its expanding editorial staff. Experience 

preferred with background in photography helpful 

Will handle a variety of assignments. Will be 

working with a varied schedule and must be able 

to work under deadline situations. 

For interview appointment fax resume to: 

Bill Schroeder, Jr. 

General Manager at 

(847) 223-8810 



U looking to lin the foDowtng positions. 



. full lime ' 

• BnalMHocL/Hoftett 

part time 6*.rn. - lO&m. 

Apply In person 
1809 N* Milwaukee Ave. . 

a Ubotyvfflc ^^ 



Start a Home-Based Business. 

Work Flexible Hours. 

Enjoy Unlimited Earnings. 

AVON 

Call Toll Free (800) 735-8867 








ruil-Tlmc 



-.*y 






By Nancy Sakol 



""!—■ 



USMBdm 

With the new year fast approaching, Jenny Craig 
embraces an exciting new concept and antici- 
pates record breaking growth. We arc seeking 
self-driven, enthusiastic people who can help 
motiyate others. Must have a strong commitment 

to customer service and be able to handle a 

diverse workload in a sales focused environment. 

Strong communication, listening and phone skills 

are a must. Ability to work a flexible schedule 

(evenings and Saturdays). Paid on-going training, 

Medical/Dental, 

401 (Ki, and opportunity for advancement. 

Call Tracy at B4 7-360-8747 or 4 14-546_- 1 630 

or Fax resume to 414-546-2565. 



■ ■■ii »i»nmiiwip»— 




Po iwn love childr en? 



Local daycare / preschool look- 
ing for qualified teachers, aids, 
after school club leaders. The ideal 
candidates will have experience, edu- 
cation and / or CDA. Full time and part 
lime positions available. Please call 
Calvary Christian Learning Center at 
847-26S-0580 for more information. 
134 MonavilleRd., Lake Villa, IL 



Qy||iavTb«nworidngonanBijl^rrKntforihepaJt31/2rnontritforiiie 
(name withheld) company to hire me fora permanent position. I have been 
wanting to be hired permanently by this company since I started here. My 
co-worien, while although 1 tm con sldered i 'temp', treat me like one of 
the bunch and Indude roe In everything. When I was hired here 1 was told 
by lite agency that placed me here dull could be hired on by the company 
after three months. So here I am two week! part the limel was supposed to 
be a permanent employee and getting upset that 1 have bear put on hold. 
By not getting any answers, I am led to believe that the company is poui- 
bly dedding that they do not want to hire me. ffthls b so, 1 wish that they 
WTwIdlctmefcnowwIanriMWoalhinTUlWtomyttpncyrepresen- 
tative on two occasions who has Ignored my telephone calli with an, '111 
call you back*. I was hoping you could add some Insight to the situation 
with the hope that you could guide me on what to do. 1 was hoping to be a 
permanent employee before the end of the year to I could gel medical ben- 
efits. I have paid alot for the COBflA policy I had at my old employer and I 
could use the extra help. I have induced my phone number and address lor 
you to get In touch with me. Thank you far your help. J.K - Lake Villa 

A:Fint off, thank you for your letter. I am sorry to hear that your represen- 
tative of the employment agency that you ire working with Is not keeping 
In touch with you regarding the quntions you have posed fortunately, I 
am very familiar with the company that you are currently placed at and 
knowing them as I do, I can see why you are anxious to be a permanent 
employee. I can tell you that the policy of the company Is to be as sure as 
possible that they are getting the right employee far the position, prior to 
taking them on as a permanent employee. I will alto teO you that (hey, as 
well as other companies, are more apt these days to act with caution when 
taking on the responsibility and expense of the permanent hire. This Is not 
uncommon. I wul also tell you that while you were brought in far a tempo- 
rary to permanent hire, this holds no guarantees. It means the company It 
trying you out and should they dedde to hire you after a given tlme_they 
can. On another nole_paU>nce Is a virtue! By getting yoursdf all worked up 
over the fact that things are not happening as quickly as you would like 
them to be, may be tending off some bed signals to people who are the 
decision makers of that company. They may all of i tudden be seeing 
another tide of you In the past weeks that Is more like a jekyfl and Hyde per- 
sona, and if this be the case, I can guess thai you may warn to think about 
the way that you have been acting at the office toward those persons who 
are the deciding factor In your future and then decide whether or not you 
are willing to wail it out in i professional manner This also would mean in 
refrain from answering those parties with the attitude to whkh you may 
unknowingly be coming across. In response to your concern that your rep- 
resentative ol your employment agency is evasively responding to your 
request, I would give him or her one last try, and then If you gel nowhere, 
or put off again... I would go over their head io their supervisor. This person 
should be act i ng as you r go -between. If they were doing their job prone riy. 
they would have given you the same advice I just have. Cood luck to you, 
and if ynu should find yoursell down the road in need of employment ser- 
vices, please keep Superior Personnel in mind. 

Letters can be sent to Nancy Snkol 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers. 
P.O. Box 268. Graysiitkc. IL 60030 




CLASSIFIED ADS GET 

RESULTS! 

TO PLACE AN AD 

CALL 

PAULA OR DARRELL AT 

847-223-8161 






/nieme&Web-0eveiopmenf OpportunitlesT*"* 

Lakeland netDirect, Chicago's 

premier Internet service provider, 

has ground floor opportunities 

due to rapid growth. 

'Marketing Manager - Internet /Web Development 
1 Project Administrator - Web Development 
• Technical Support - Internet 
> Telemarketing Reps ■ Web Development 

if you are interested in creating a 

future with a rapidly growing 

organization, fax resume to 

skw, (847) 223-6810 

or e-mail: skw@us-netdirectcom , 



mil ■AjlsMQtMflMI 



The Holiday Season Is 
Just Around The Corner 



We offer the right m be— 



*' »*'*,'£.• /Til' .:<■•■ V' i ;.-.>■»;: t-V,'...-.'.-;. r \'j ,}'<';- -•ft----," ■ .. :• 1 



I 






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Let our qualifier 
"Classified Chefs" cook 
up an ad for you. 

Call (847)223-8161 
today! 






'•ffJS'jcr 



.-..• -- _•■ 



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; - 4 



**c :•*£*.* .--i /-i-.v.- ■■-, -c vr!—* 



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C40 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



November Z7, 1998 



AAedical Opportunities 




328 



Firewood 



ri*;«<».>'.vffi»t>i*«.TW*<ifWr.-< 



l r5VF ^-7trT CTTT V^M- * j £Sa 



$15-$35 PER HOUR 
Easy medical billing. 

Full training. 
Computer required. 

1-800-251-6661 
ext. 222 






Immediate) full timo 

position available in our 

Lake Zurich Intermediate 

Care Facility. Will be 

responsibility lor 
planning, developing, 
implementing, and super- 
vising case 
management activities 

lor MFVDD women 

Bachelor's Degree and 

one year experience wilh 

MR/DD population 

required 

Conlnci Gofl Becker 

Mounl Snlnf Joseph 

Lake Zurich 
(847) 438-- l 5050 



CNA 



P.M.s& NIGHTS 

Wc oMt-'i exc oil, in il.irung 
iwv W 1 WW |vr Mr ♦ top ben 
tills lit ,>|i|jlicdii!s RNs and 
l.l'Ns .in- wvIkuik. to apply 

1(11 CNA (KISHllM" «il 
mniMvil Kill's Out (tettfpl is 

ii-ukiii'i Iih nil*, plow* rr 

Sr PI .iv.iiirthli' A|i|>tv in 

txTwjn.n CARI ("INTKl 

Ol WAHCOM'A 17t. 

I lumut* Cl . Wfltll nllil.t II. 
(H47) r»2(> Vflfil 



Enhance Your Career 

With A National Leader 

In Cancer Care! 

■i Treatment (enters (tf America. a 



W„h our haunlul g *'"<' """' ">''"' '""' 



LPNs 
Try Somthino New!!! 

..,. pi ,".<• ■» i". f.i '» 'i .1 ,-' 
f. .!'.• ■ I-"-' ; " ■'•'" r*>.»i*ci< 
>.i. i .i .-■. •■ ■ .!■ ciccllenl 
,.,..,■ -...•• iPNs ■• ■'■- 
a- ; ' "■■ 
•FT '.' ' ' . " ' ' * ; " 
•f»t .•.••- ■ •■• ■ *•' ■'■ 
i ■ ■ : i 
M - ; • ' 

■..i'.r ••■ ' : ■ 

•,,<•>■ f.. i.-'.i' ■ • ' -' 

W .nil'- ' i ■ J 

■ •'■. ■■ . !"' 

: *> • 

I iikr < .i.i'il. M'l i' l 
Ju«riiiir I n> »'i-* « 

'ticn*\l' ' ■ .k'.'MU 
«.! ' »,r,? Vih- 



MEOICAL RECORDS 

TRANSCRIPTIONIST 

Part Time 

»-»fCl WMIWjl M OSP**' "-" 

j,. ,.„ ,.%,.( p.m lime i<>»>i"in 
'i«i xo ■ T x , *;ai mtaf"&Q n 

i>i;u»-i"i r ^ J IWt»li " JW 
i r».»- in>*H^V J "*& 

(ji ymtn wiigi (* Jiul u "S VK) 
i f#v . *j> i*i/*i'> ri' T IJreU 

rem; ' • • , A'V * f- tW* 

in! Ac:* V3* »■.■>.**&**'*•' 
.I..I-. i'.f frtff'r l* • <■'>< 

|[..ii».t;> ■ ■'*«* <it'- .■•■«'*' 

• <i*. ! , ■(' 'fSMPIr " 

■ ■.,-n.c ** - !"• 

VICTORY 

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

■ (,'J '. Srw-'ifcr 'VI 

,Va ... i;.r it ft#r£' 

.•• «t; iaiJ' T 

., -.!' i>*,4;<; 

■ • "i .- ■■ 



»', a«- .UrV/nrvr^/i ^i.;nn/ Merf/rti/ (enter. t wt „t (ana 

tlllltl „ ullh ,„ t ,vM.v,/ Invtrr m uu,on,me , M < <"-' ^'' ^ ^^ ^^^ 

/./, i m / - * «* . "- —"" '"""""7 ffrSSSSS S5«-i 

„ r /.»■>,./,■ ««»./ Mr " /"'""' " "'"'" H '" r ' 4 "" r ,A '" 1 ""■ " 

Radiology Openings: 
• Mammography Tech * 
fart Hhic 
• Nuclear Medicine Tech • 
lull-Tune 
• Radiologic Tech • 
Full Tune 
• Radiation Therapy Receptionist • 
l-'ull Time 
AUtOm » uh the opportune m be purl uf an innovative, pmgrewiv, pmignm. » e «tir> an ,mt 
iUMi'tW >>•>»■"' m* ' <<»</""""<"" t'aeka K e Ihr rumiitewtum. please fax lend or e mail teuunr 
tl.Vt 1 1 'lUNti SAIAKY IHSIt >«)> ft) Jeanate /'flitescr. Human RcuHtnei ^20 rli\ha Ave . 
/ton II (itXl'Wf'W S47 H?2 <>2?2 I mint jeamue pflttfxrrWmrmi i U ill "in 



BEANIE BABY SHOW 

Paradiso Rostauront, 

2964 Sheridan Ave.. 

Zlon. 

9am-5pm. 

Every Wodnosday through 

Docombor 23rd. 

[Q47] 29B-7012. 



CRAFT FAIR 
Yaegor School 
Oil Lewis Ave. 
North Chicago. 
Saturday December 5th, 

10am -2pm. 

Call tor more Information 

(647) 6B9-6306. 



314 



BuildirtR Materials 



FIREWOOD 2 YEAR sea* 
soned Firewood, delivered. 
Mixed wood. 1-face cord, $65; 
1 -full cord, Si 65. Oak, 1-laca 
cord, $75; 1-hill cord, $195 
(220 ploces In face cord). Stak- 
ing available. (B47) 546-0656. 

FIREWOOD OAK, $50 
face, $135 cord, picked up. 
Delivery extra. (414) 
634-6960. ' 

MIXED HARDWOODS, UN- 
SPUT LOGS BY THE TRUCK 
LOAD, $200 DELIVERED, 
(847)917-5200. 




Midwestern wr 

H I i. i n ". \ I «_r_P.L« jLl U 

Imanrrow \ tlinpUat Today. 

I itu.tl t fj'fi'iTufytt. tmj'hilrl 



STEEL BUILDINGS SALE: 
40x60x14. $8,187. 50x75x14, 
S10.760. 50x100x16. 
$14,63t 60xt O0XT6. $18,683. 
Mini-storage buildings. 
40*180. 38 units. $17,818, 
Free brochures www. sentinel- 
txjiidmgs.com. Sentinel Build- 
ings. 800-3270790. Exten- 
sion 79 



320 



BeclronicJ 
Computers 



CAMCORDER. PANASO- 
NIC VHS MODEL AQ-196, 
protossional/industrtal. Never 
usod Cost $1,300, sacrifice 
S625/ bost (847)451-4052. 

IBM COMPUTER WITH 

monitor, word processor and 
pernor Asking $250.00 O.B.O. 
Call (847) 638-0787. finer 
4 00PM. 



225 



mm;iT > 
cmh: 

I i:i ,\ ; i ja%' \\> <i I.'-; n 
|. ii \1KI >l> uoiiumi in 
icMtlcntiiil SL'tlinj:. 
Ail sillily iiv;iiliiblc 
l ; uli iimc or 
l';irt iimc. Wc arc 
commuted lo qualiiy 
residential cute 
Contact 
Gail Becker 
Mount Saint Joseph 
Ijake "Zurich 
847 -438-5 »5i 



LARN S400 

. :> 4 tl ."<:- 

■ i 'My. 

••■■ ir>irn(;'ic!i-r[ 
J% N.ilufal 
i 8151 455 7339 



IMMEDIATE 

OPPORTUNITIES 

FaslOSt Growing 

Home Based tk.sintiv-. 

No Sales. (nvenUiry 

or Investment 

Stan Today 

www Mepius (.u"> 

To ordor cmcr ptn *5f/J4V2 

Got youl pin « lK;i; 

Billy (647) 782 8490 

THOUSANDS POSSIBLE 

EACH WEEK! 

Earn money processing 

mail at home 

Send St 00 and SASE to 

Bright Futures 

P O Bote B6. 

Wauconda III 60084 



'J- 



225 



lluiinrsi 
I)|i(>cinunitir-s 



A PERFECT 
PART-TIME BUSINESS 1 ! 

2 hoursfday earns you 
linancial Ireodom 
24 hour message 
(888) 273-5775 

BUSINESS 

IS EXPLODINGI 

Every home and business 

needs our product 

Ground floor opportunity 

positioned lor tremendous 

growlhl 2 minute message 

1800 659-1790 

CALLING ALL LAKE COUN 
TY MOMS"! Bnghl Becj.n 
nmgs Family Day Care Net 
work is looking lor nudurmg 
responsible, creative individu 
al's who would like lo start 
Iherr own buisness white slay 
mg at home with (hair children 
II you live in Lake or McHenry 
County and would like assis 
lance in getting licensed, on 
going technical assistance 
training, equipment lending 
and child referrals this pro 
gram is for you. For more in 
formation on how lo become a 
quality Infant and toddler day 
care provider in your home 
call Dena Thompson ai (847) 
356-4112 

WANT TO REACH 8 MIL- 
LION HOUSEHOLDS? You 
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pers reaching more than 8 mil- 
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work) 



UNLIMITED INCOME 
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*No Inventory 

*No Inviistnumi Required 

For more information tall 

(B47| 949 6451 



I.i'JSirXAS 

4 1 1 <jit ii it> 

In Antitxh Illinois Ua 

I 11 , i-.i| v ill IV. if s|n<, Irij 

■i urn Irfsy" Antique and 
C i)IU-( litilf llusini-s". 

mi Uulfs Ihi- S-I'l'i Ulin 

ilm-nttirs i i iiim|miiii 

,inri iri\riil(!tv il,il,ili,i>.c 

. I nil .iw.inl » IllM.ilttf 

Inlr-r tii-l vile . I\yi«'( is 

rclifinU linl i\ill tillci 

Ir.inviti'in .isMst.im i- 

Atlf.H lively prii i il ,i| 

Sl7 r i.l)0ll. 

1414) «77'l(l r .tl 



228 


Siluaitons Wanted 



CARPET INSTALLERS 

LOOKING FOR SIOE 
JOBS. Used carpel may be 
available. Reasonable rates, 
Contact Scolt (847) 

973-9247 

HUSBAND AND WIFE with 
Collie looking for 2-bedroom 
apartment in exchange for 
cleaning, light maintenance 
etc, 30yrs. experience. (847) 
451-4 B52. 



SUBSTITUTE 

DIRECTORY 

The following 6cliot)k need 

suhstiiutfs on a continuing basis, please contact the 

names lisleii below for further information. 

Vdhti E. Stevenson lli^h School District #12S 

Uvi i Mi'viumui l)rt\f. Liiudlit.slnn;, ll.dOtXt'i 

(Jathut IVrsuiliii-l (K'i7) d.Vt 4(HM] 

\puikisic - Tripp School District #102 

l^lWiil.lliiiriti.htlll.llul'irirti' II.MKIK') 

U >iio t l.jun'! K;imlcz;ik 

Bin Hollow School District #3K 

•\>\.-r\\ \\i,y \: in^Miii*. ii.iton-ii 

( -HUtit W I'llulltHT ' : 

l);i^ School / North hrook 
l-il«|luii.lir id nil, Nnillilirrx.k Il.frfMMiJ 

tunitut lA'Stmli-r ... ■ 'i : 

Decrneld School District « 109 

St'Urrlti'ldUil Ilirrlii'U II. hlllllS 

cwiiiHi i'h\iih x-j:: (k-d «hs ihii 

(Iross Liikc Scliool District »3(> 

ilil""\X r.r.iss l.akr Kiiail \ulintli It Ultltti 

(jilttiltl I'.ll Rn\\ nt Stir OVi"! VJi ISS0 

(iru>shikc School District *N() 

t^i \ l".itii-n I'.Kil iii.eAiki ILUMKii 

(mitiiit i in I .ihr. \lttH' iSt'i in ■=, 1 1 - , 1 1 

Ihiutliorn School District #73 

!l:wlliiiriil',irkM.;i\ \i-rn«ni UilK. || U)Uh\ 
(.iiiilttil Muri Kirna iH-i7l ^1" J27») 

lake niuff School Dislricl #6S 
1.11 K Shirtti.tnl'laii'. l.tkiUli]lf ll.dtKiti 
(juttttii Jean Ann 11 kLm in x 1 1 (X) 7 ) *$l i)i()o 

Ukc Forest Elemeiitar) Sclmols 
"jS\X Ik'i'qiaih. Lake Ftue&t ILfiOQ<$ 
i.tinlittt Karen Allie (Hpi d(h m^ 

Like Forest llif>h School District #115 

i.Ss Nnrih McKuih Kiuil, Lake fatm, U.Um^ 
(.onhtti WnulyAiilnm x | |K IH-D iy\ WiOl) 

Lake Villa ScJtool District #i 1 
HI Mi Kinlev. Lake Villa. ll.htKMd 

OmlMt Kathv. wrf) v%2W 

North Chicago Comimmity Unit School Dist. #187 
Join i Ij-wis Ave , North Chicau". II. <*M" 
Ctmlttit Mona AniLMnuiK I.S-I?) fkV)HIS0 

NortJiem Suburhan Special Education District 
7fif) Rwl Oak l.aiie. HiKltlaiul I'ark. ll.fi(K)« 
Contact liill Chans (Hi7> KS1 .. 

Wauconda School District #1 IK 
555 N Mam, Waticui ula. ll.M0.S-i 

Contact Kadty x-HK IK-C) SJ(>-?(»tKI 

Waukegan Public Schools District #60 

1201 N Sheridan Ril , Waukegan. II. fiQOffi 

Contact Personnel mi) ido 5-104 

Wilrnclte Public Schools 
6I5 \iK\x\ Rtl , Wilittt'tle, It. fi(KK) I 

Contact: Susan (loodnow (K.|7) j%. j.^q 

Woodland School District #50 

1 7370 Gages Lake Road, Gages Lake, ll.hOOW 

Contact: Michelle 




PROJECTION 
VOX TV, 46ln. 
(847> 680-7830. 



MAGNA- 
5700/best 



chilis 



'^! 



ORNER 



,»C*'»V1: M 



A NANNY IS WHAT WE 
ARE LOOKINO FOR, Are 

you her'' infant care needed 
in our Gurneo homo. M-F, 
8am-4pm Non-smoker Own 
transportation Call Michael & 
Christie (847} 336 2208 Ret- 
or encoa required. 

BABYSITTER NEEDED 

POSS1BLEY 2 il necessary. 
m our Round Lake home. AM 
shitl and afternoon shili to 
take care of handicapped child 
when he's not in school (847) 
546 0997 



MOTHER OF 2 will provido 
day care in my Grayslake 
home Please call (847) 
543 0889 

SEEKING RELIABLE, PA- 
TIENT and loving child care 
tor 3 children, ages S2. 8, and 
2 My homo Two days por 
week and evory other woe 
kond References required 
Barnnglon/Fox River Grove 
area (847) 277 0263 



CALLING ALL WORKING 
PARENTSIII Winter is |ust 
around the corner, have you 
planned your children's day 
cars yet 1 Immediate openings 
tor children ages 6 wooks and 
up are availablo in Bright Bo- 
rjinning's Home Day Caro Net- 
work Far more In'ormolfon on 
how to enroll your child in a 
conveniently located, quality 
day care homo please call 
Dena Thompson at (847) 356- 
4112. SPACES ARE LIMITED 
SO CALL IMMEDIATELY 

CHILD CARE - Fun. Clean. 
Caring Child Care in my home 
(847) 731-1197 

FOSTER HOMES NEED- 
ED! Wanted good, nurturing 
individuals to provide tempo- 
rary homos lor children ages 
birth to adolescent. Training. 
support, compensation, day 
care provided. Contact Cathol- 
ic Charities/Lake Counly. 
(847) 782 4242 or (847) 782 
4243. 



304 



Appliances 



250 


SchooHnslniction 



(K47) 856-.tf>05 



BE AN AUCTIONEER 

Intermediate (1) woek term 
slarts December 7, 1998 Free 

Catalog 

Continental AuctioneerSchooi 

P O Box 346 

Mankalo, Mn 

560020346 

(507) 625 5595 

GRADUATE LEVEL 

PERFORMANCE 

STUDENT LOOKING 

FOR PROSPECTIVE 

STUDENTS TO BEGIN A 

STUDIO IN GURNEE, 

Experience in ages 

4yrs 10 Adult. 

Resume and ielerences 

available upon request 

Call Moqan 1847) 782 1293 

PIANO LESSONS 

IN MY LAKE VILLA HOME 

OPENINGS 

Now for students 

Cyrs to adult 

Over 25yrs experience 

REASONABLE RATES, 

(847) 356-2780 



GE FRIDGE, ALMOND, 

21 Q cuH, side-by-srde, like 
new, $350. GE double oven 
range, boltom oven sell-clean- 
ing, almond, excelleni condi- 
lion, St 75 (847) 362-0536 

SMALL CAPACITY, HIGH 
EFFICIENCY WASHER-DRY 
ER. $450. (847) 543-0409. 



310 


BaraarvCrafts 



301 


Antiques 



ATTENTION ANTIQUE 

DEALERS Auntie's gone but 
her Italian Provincial Furniture 
livos on! Same with dad's solid 
oak and naugahyde couch 
and chair with end table. Other 
odd and sundry ilems avail- 
able All in excelleni condi- 
tion. Serious inquiries only 
Call lor appointment (847) 
587-8990 leave mnss*n«> 




Garage 
Rummage Sale 



HUGE OARAGE SALE 826 
Cedar Lake Rd„ Round Lake, 
Saturdays & Sundays thai No- 
vember, weather pormrrUnfl. 

AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIO SALE, and there 
is still things that Just did not 
go.... Call us at LAKELAND 
Newspapers and run II 
undor the 'FREE or Givea- 
ways* classified column. FREE 
ADS are HO CHARGEt 
(847) 223-6161. ext 140. 



338 


llona&Tscks 



STALLS AVAILABLE. IN- 
DOOR/OUTDOOR arenas, 
wash rack, turnout and stall 
cleaning 7 days a week. Bar- 
rington location. S275/month 
(647) 487-6893 for more In- 
formation! 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



"SHAR JOY'S 
BEANIE BABY BASH" 

Holiday Inn-Gurnee. 

8161 Grand Ave 

Friday November 27th 

1 0am - 1 0pm 

Sunday November 29th 

10am-4pm 

Adults • $2 00 

Cnildren ■ Si 00 

(undor 2 tree) 

(847) 785B351 

11TH ANNUAL FESTIVAL 
OF ARTS AND CRAFTS 

Saturday, December 5lh. 

9am- 

4 pm 

Victory Lakes Continuing 

Care Center 

1055 East Grand Ave. 

Lindenhursl. 

Beanie Babies, clocks, stained 

glass, leather crafts, ctoihmg. 

furniture, jowolry, toys. 

Santas, snowmon and more 

Call (847) 356-5900. 

BEANIE BABIES 
BEANIE SHOW 

Holiday, current, rolirod 
Fairfield Inn. 

6090 Gurneo Mills Circlo East 

1 1/27/98 

11:00am to 6:00pm. 



3 BUND MICE 

Decorative Mini Blinds. 

Valances and Wall Borders 

tor Children's Rooms. 

Call lor free brochure 

l-oOQ-307-4956 

BRASS BED QUEEN wilh 
now deluxe never usod mat- 
Iross sot, S245 Black iron co 
nopy queen bed. complelo. 
$360. Delivery available 
(847) 374-1455 

DESIGNER MODEL 

HOMES FURNITURE 

CLEARANCE! 

Solu/Iovooon! Ml, 

hunier green, $495 

Sofa, white. $350 

Solalovcsoat. 

earth tones, $595 

Also: Plaids. Florals. 

Leathers and More. 

Diningroom sots, 10-piece: 

Cherry. $1,395. 

Mahogany. $2,395. 

Oak 51.695. 

Other sets available. 

Also: Bedroom Sets. 

from $995. 

(847)329-4119. 



FORMAL DININGROOM 
TABLE, 6 navy blue uphol- 
stered chairs, tin. thick bev- 
eled glass top with dark hard- 
wood base. $2,400 new, ask 
mg $700. Excelleni condition. 
Must see to appreciate. (847) 
973-0460. 

IF YOU HAVE 

FURNITURE TO SELL, 

A car, or appliances, If 

you are having a Gorego 

Sale or if you hove a 

house to soil or apartment 

to rant. 

Call Lisa before 10am 

Wednesday to place 

your ad here. 

(647) 223-6161 

oxl. 140. 

KING SIZE WATERBED 

frame and heater, headboard 
with mirror. All equlpmenl. no 
mattress. Musi go. Lake Villa 
area Best offer. Take It away 
(847) 973-0473. 

LIKE NEW LIVINOROOM 

3-pieco sectional, modern, 
black with gold (rim, glass 
cocktail table with end table, 
has brass and black legs, 
lamp also available. 
$1.B00/bosl. (B47) 623-4991. 

LOVESEAT RECLINER, 

KITCHEN table wilh 4-chalra, 
excellent condition. (414) 
657-1741. 



OLD PINE CABINET Irom li- 
brary. 2 twin brais bods, di- 
ningroom table chrome and 
mirror. Oriental trunk. Kimball 
theatrical organ, $50. (847) 
367-1692, 

QUEEN SIZE WATERBED 

with headboard, no flotation 
mattress, bumper pads, excel- 
lent condition. $125.00. (847) 
395-1966 

THOMASVILLE SOLID 

MAPLE DINING TABLE 
wilh 2 leaves and 5 chairs. 
$325. (847)548-1740. 






-6* 



i 

■ . 

Si 



" 



. r n 



November 27, 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers/; G4 J? 




•»;•.(; 




HE 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Harartr^Jc; 



FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 34764 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 

NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 

Aames Capital Corporation, Plaintiff, - '■■.■:. 

Caw No. 98 C 2670 
VS. Judge WILLIAMS- ' 

Daniel Bonnes a/k/a Dan Bonnes and Debblcm Bonnes, 
Consumers Cooperative Credit Union and Board of Managers 
of iho Property Owners Association for Lots 1-41 of Sunset 
Rldgo Phase I, Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE OUR FILE 
NO. 34764 OT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES 
CONSULT THEIR OJflQl ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT 
FORECLOSURE SALES), . 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgment 
entered In the above entitled cause on September 18. 1988 . 

I, Thomas Johnson and Tina Douglas, Special 
Commissioner for this court will on December 30, 1998 at the 
hour of 1 :30 p.m. at the front door of Lake County Courthouse, 
18 N. County St,, Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder 
for cash, the following described premises: 
c/k/a 1710 Daybreak Lano, Zlon, IL 60099 
Tax ID » 04-18-306-013 

Tho improvements on the property consist of single family, 
wood frame, two story, with an attached garage. 

Sato Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No rotunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

Tho property will NOT be open for Inspection. 

Tho judgment amount was $171 ,597.95. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle tho purchaser to a Deed on 
o specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to 
law. 

For information call tho Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attornoy, 
Fisher and Fisher, 120 North LaSalle. Chicago. Illinois. (312) 
372-4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois taw. the 
Sales Officer Is Dfll required to provide additional Information 
other than that set forth in this Notice. 



PUBUC NOTICE 
FISHER AND FISHER FILE HO. 34456 

IN THE UNTIED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 

Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation t/k/a 
Chemical RosJdorrUal Mortgage Corporation. 

Plain lift, 
VS. Case No. 98 C 1944 

Judge Coar 
Daniel M. Ramirez, The Board of Managers of the 
Woodland Hills Condominium Association 

Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NQ. 34453 ^^^^^ 
(FT IS ADVISED THAT WIERESTED WUTTlEa CONSULT THEIR 
DJKH ATTORNEYS BEFORE BJDOMd AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is horoby given pursuant to a Judgment entered 
h the above onWtod cause on Jury 28.1996. 

I, Howard Rubin. Special Commissioner for this court will on 
January 5, 1999 at the hour of 2:00 p.m. at the front door of Lake 
County Court House, 18 N. County Street. Waukegan, Illinois, sell 
la the highest bidder for cash, the following described promises: 
C/k/a 17575 W. Walnut Lane. Gumee, IL 60031 
Tax ID* 07-20-400-049 The Improvements on tho property consist 
of single family dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. Tho oak> shall bo subject to gen- 
eral tanas and to special assessments. 

The property wilt NOT be open for inspection. 

The judgment amount we* $105.81 0.33 

Upon the eak* being made the purchaser win receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Doed on a 
specified date unless the property la redeemed according to' law. 

For Information can the Soles Officer at Plaintiff* Attorney. Fisher 
end Fisher. 120 North LaSaflo. Chicago. Illinois. (312) 372-4784 
from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p m. Under Illinois law, the Sales Officer b 
Got required to provide additional Information other than that set 
forth In this Notice, 
/a/ Howard M. Rubin 
Special Commissioner 



350 



Miscellaneous 



354 



Medical Equip 
Supplies 



AEROBIC RIDER EXER- 
CISE MACHINE WITH ris- 
er, excellent condition, like 
now. Original $300, besl offer. 
(847] 973-0473 after 6pm. 

ARIA 12 STRINQ ACOUS- 
TIC GUITAR, $300. SEGA 
GENESIS. controls plus 
games, $150/best. 8ft. Black 
Astro Truck Cap, sliding wind- 
ow, mint condition, $700/best. 
(414) 654-6676 leave mos- 



ARIA 12 STRING ACOUS- 
TIC GUITAR. $300, SEGA 
GENESIS, controlls plus 
games. $l50/best. 8ft. Black 
Astro Truck Cap, sliding wind- 
ow, mint condition, $700/best. 
(414) 654-8676 leave mes- 
sage. 

ESTATE SALE - Dining 
room labiu, 6 chairs and 
hutch. Console T.V.. mi- 
crowave and more. 24 North 
Pistakee Lake Road. Bldg. 24, 
past Harr.shires. (847) 
973-0633 

1/6 scale Traxxas Monster 
Buggy. Nltro powered Ofna Pi- 
rate 10. Call lor price {847} 
338-8843. 

I SNOWMOBILE 1979 YA- 
MAHA 440, runs. $500/best 
1(847)740-1384. 

SPYDER PAINTBALL GUN 
20oz. C02 tank with on-off 
valve, Scott Soft Armer Ther- 
mal Mask. Great condition, 
constantly mafntolnod. Coll 
evenings, leave message. 
(847) 223-1530. 

WINDSOR UPRIGHT IN- 
DUSTRIAL VACUUM, ver- 
sa malic, with 2 motors, on 
board attachments, now in 
box, cost $550, will sell for 
| S225/bosl, (847) 451^t952. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS. 

TAN AT HOME Buy DIRECT 
land SAVE! Commercial/home 
[units from $199. Low rnontrtly 
I payments. FREE color cata- 
log. Call today 1-800-842- 
11310. 



GREAT NEWS! DIABfcl- 
ICS... Medicare pays for test- 
ing supplies, YouVo seen us 
on TV. Liberty Medical Supply. 
No uplront cost. Satisfaction 
Guaranteed. Free shipping. 1- 
800-514-7776. (SC A Network). 



MEDICARE RECIPIENTS: 
ARE you using a NEBULIZER 
MACHINE? STOP paying full 
price for Albuterol, Atrovent. 
etc. solutions. MEDICARE will 
pay for them. We bill Medlca-e 
for you and ship directly to 
your door. MED-A-SAVE 1- 
800-538-9849. 



358 



Musical Instruments 



PIANO FOR SALE in excel- 
lent condition. 6-l/2yrs old, 
made in Amorica by American 
Craftsman, $650, (847) 
223-0729 leave messago 



360 



Pets & Supplies 



BICHON FRISE TO GOOD 
HOME. Moving cant take her 
with us. (847) 57B-0242. 

FOR A FEW pennies more, 
gel latest technology in liquid 
warmers. HAPPY JACK LIOUI- 
VICT delivers actives better 
than older formulas. Feed and 
hardware stores. (WWW.HAP- 
PVJACKINC.COM) 

GERMAN SHORTHAIR 

POINTER, AKC. 9/weoks 

old. 1-maie, 1 -female, first 
shots, dawdaws, ready now 
Excellent hunters and family 
dogs (414) 694-6816. 

HORTON FARMS. INC. 
FEED STORE 

High Quality Hay. straw, feed. 
Purina Brand food tor dogs, 
cats, sheep and much more. 
We deliver too! 
t/2 mile North of Illinois- 
Wisconsin border. 
Call today (414) 657-2525 
Monday-Friday 
8am.5pm. 
Saturday 8am-3pm 



FISHER AND FISHER : 'r . ~ FILE NO. 34570 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 

NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 

Harbor Financial Mortgage Corporation, Plaintiff, 
VS. . Case No. 98 C 2320 

• ' •,.'.''- ■' Judge Marovfch 
Naksung Song, Young Song. Board of Managers of Iho. 
Antloch Golf Club Community Association f/k/a The Harbor 
Rldgo Homeowners Association and Board of Managers of the 
Harbor Ridge Community Association, Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 345TB IT T IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED 

PARTIES CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE 

BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant tq a Judgment 
entered In the above entitled cause on September 9* 1998 . 

I, Max Tyson, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
December 28, 1998 at tho hour f 9:00 a.m. at Lake County 
Court House. Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for 
cash, the following described premises: 
c/k/a 25002 NickJaus Way, Aniioch, IL 60002 
Tax ID « 01-24-418-009 

The Improvements on the property consist of single family 
dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT bo open for inspection. 

The judgment amount was $380,479.33. 

Upon tho sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on 
a specified date unless the property is redeemed according to 

| aw 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 120 North LaSalle, Chicago. Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1.-00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer is rjpj required to provide additional information other 
than that sot forth in this Notice. 



"™^^~"™^"^ PUBUC NOTICE 
FISHER AND FISHER FILE NUMBER: 34455 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF tLUNOI3 EASTERN DIVISION 
Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation UUa 
Chemical Residential Mongaoo Corporation. 

Plamblt, Case No 96 C 1944 

VS Judge COAR 

Danlol M Rarmoi. Tho Board of Managers oi 
tho Woodland HJh Ccndommwn Association 
Oolondants 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COM MISS ION ERS BALE 

OURRLEN0.3445S 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR fMN 

ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 
Pubkc Notca rs hereby given pursuant to a Judgment entered in the above 
ontnlod cause on July 29.1998 

I, Howard Rubin. Spocfal Comrruvsimer tot ttro court mil on JANUARY 5, 
1999 at tho hour d 2 00pm at Iholronl door of tho Lako County Courthouse, 
18 N County Si, WaiAogan Illinois, son to the highest tuddorlor cash, the Al- 
lowing described promises 

(A/a 17575 W Walnut Lano. Gumrjo. IL 60031 Tai ID* 07-2O-4OO-W9 
Tho improvements on iho property consist oi single tamiry dwelling 
SaJo Terms 10% down by collided funds, balance within 24 hours, cortj 
lied funds No lelunds Tho sale shall bo subject to general lam and special 
assessments 

Tho property will NOT be open lor nspocuon. 
The hidgrnorrl amount was $105.01033 
Upon the talo being made tho purchaser wii rocctvrj a Corticate or Sale 
when will oniiUfi Iho purchosor lo a Oood on a spodfiod dare unless mo prop- 
erty Is rodoomod according to low 

For information call Iho Sains Otfeor at Plamtiifl's Attorney. Ftshor and 
Fisher, 120 North La Sane. Chcngn. Illinois (31?) 372-4784 Irom I 00 pm lo 

300 pm 

Undoi Illinois law. the Sates Ollcer is qs) loquired to provide additional mlor 
■nation other than (hat sot <orth in this Notice 

i v' Howard M Rutwi 
Special Cornmiasioncr 



360 



Pets & Supplies 



JACK RUSSELL TERRIER 
PUPS (Wishbone). Ready in 
December. UKC, $600. (414) 
652-1702. 

LICENSED DOQ CARE 

IN MY HOME 

While you're away. 

Call Florence 

(847)966-6319. 

STANDARD POODLE 

PUPS, AKC, ready to go. Vel 
checked, first shots, de- 
wormed, cream and black, 
$500, (414) 763-4277. (414) 
763-3274. 

PIT BULLS BEAUTIFUL 

brindlos and blue brindles. 
6/woeks old, papered. 4- 
mates, 3- females, starting at 
$250. (BAT] 973-0277. 

W*I*S*H RESCUE 
HAS many purebred 

Siberian Huskies 
available for sdloptlon- 

9/monfhs & older. 

$150 donation to cover 

our medical expenses; 

spay/neuter, vaccination, 

HW tost/praventatlve. 

(847) 740-3066 
www.wlahroBcue.com 



Attn: Classified 

Advertisers 
Deadlines for ads 

are 10:00 a.m. 

every Wednesday 

Morning. 



MAINTENANCE r-Hfct *- 
BEDROOM, 2-balh ranch In 
Southwest Beach Park. -Roc- 
room with pool table, largo 
deck overlooking fenced-in 
bach yard, privacy galore. Lo- 
cated near' B lanchard and 
Green Say Roads, $129,000. 
(647) 623-8339. 

MCHENRY HUD REPO 

Nice 4-bodroom', 2-bath. 

Asking $80,000. 

Can 'Your Pcpo Specialists' 

Ryan & Co. 

(847) 528-0300. 

POSSIBLY THE BEST 
VALUE IN QRAYSLAKE. 

Recently remodeled, 3-4 bed- 
rooms, 1-bath, full basement, 
vinyl sided. Within walking dis- 
tance of schools, lake, train 
station and town. Excellent . 
value $110,900: (B47) 
223-1131. 

RACINE 3441 DAISY Lane 
3-bedroom ranch, 1-1/2 
baths, rocroom with fireplace, 
1,177 6q.lt. Desirable South 
side location. $99,900. (414) 
554-4651. 

THREE BEDROOM 
RANCH In one of the nicest 
neighborhoods In Waukegan. 
Hardwood floors, C/A, 1-1/2 
balhs, full basement, large 
beautiful yard. Immediate oc- 
cupancy. (647) 623-6982. 
(847) 662-0196. 

TWIN LAKES LAKE Mary - 
Celebrate tho Holidays in your 
brand new horn el Great 
room, cathedral ceiling. 3 bed- 
rooms, 2 baths, kitchen, family 
room, attached 2 car garage, 
carpeting, gas forced air/cen- 
tral air. Maintenance tree. 
Groat lako rights with boat slip. 
509 Bird St., $142,900. (414) 
877-3952 

YEAR' OLD RANCH HOME 
Lake Como. Corner lot 
lOOft.xlOOh. 3-bedroom, 1- 
1/2 bath, large kitchen with 
dining area and patio doors 
leading to wood deck, large liv- 
Ingroom, open concept, at- 
tached 2-1/2 car garage, full 
basement, municipal sower 
and water, newly paved 
streets, lakerigrrts. 10% down 
6-1/2% interest. $790/month 
for 25yrs. Reduced price 
$129,900. immediate occu- 
pancy. (414) 534-7676 or 
(414) 248-1857 ask tor 
Claude. 

35TH PL 1714 Kenosha 
North side, by owner. 4-bed- 
room brick ranch, hardwood 
floors, brick fireplaces, large 
fenced in yard. Open House 
Saturday-Sunday, 12-4pm or 
(414) 654-7992. 

COZY 3-BEDROOM. 2- 
BATH hillside ranch with fin- 
ished basement. View of Pe- 
tite Lake with access lo Chain 
O'Lakos. Motivated lo sell. 
$110,000. (847) 838-^722. 



504 




EXECUTIVE-' ■ RANCH 
NEAR; GLEN FLORA 
COUNTRY CLUB, 3,000 

plus sq.ft., 3-1/2- baths,. 
$265,000. In-law apartment. 
Call 6pm-9pm In pace m be r, 
(8471625-1314. .. 

FIVE . ROOM RANCH: 
across the street from park 
and Lake . Mlltrnore, 2-1/2. 
miles to Metra Station. Fire- 
place, C/A, main floor laundry, 
basement, attached garage, 
$115.000/best. (847) 

740-7692. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

ADULT COMMUNITY. 

•New 1997 

Manufactured h orris - 

1 -bedroom, 1-bath 

with garage and recroom. 

Includes: washer/dry or, 

stove/refrigerator, 

off street parking. 

$54 900 

1995 i -bedroom, 1-bath, 
carport and shod, 

$39,900 ' 

1996 2-bedrrjom. 2-bath 
with garage, $50,900.. 

(647) 526-6000 
leave massage. 

LAKEVIEW OF GAGES 
LAKE In private subdivision. 3- 
bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, at- 
tached 2-1/2 car garage, large 
famliyroom, oak kitchen, fire- 
place, deck overlooking beach 
across street. Woodland and 
Warren schools. $132,000. 
(847) 223-4259. 



• -;-. -- v ANT10CH V ■■• 
2-Bedroom Dotlhouse.: 
"'; ;-'.tarrp rooms. . - ~ : -: 
, Ready to rent 
. Come and see. . 
$700/month. ... 
ALANWOOD 
ASSOCIATES 
(847)223-1141., 

KENOSHA SOUTH SIDES* 

bedroom, dlningroom, forced 
yard, garage, $650/mon'h . 
(647)662-6669. 

MUNDELEIN 3-BED- 

ROOM RANCH HOUSE, 2- 
FULL BATHS, NEWLY RE- 
MODELED, S950/MONTH. 
NO - PETS. AVAILABLE 
12/1. (847) B37-<043. 

RENT TO OWN 2-bedroom 
+ loft, 2-1/2 bath, 1-car ga- 
rage, full basement- Town- 
house In Gumee. Pets OK, 
$l.250/month." For more info, 
call (847) 855-9541, or page 
Tony (647) 203-0301. 

VERNON HILLS 1-BED- 
ROOM condo, extra clean. 
nice view, new appliances, 
$730/month, all utifties Includ- 
ed, Available 12/1. (847) 
459-7531. 



518 


Mobile Homes 



504 


Homes For Rent 



370 


Wanted To Buy 



GUHNEE 2-BEDROOM, 2- 
BATH, 5th floor, targe balco- 
ny, large courttertops and cab- 
inets. Beautiful Heather 
Ridge. Indoor parking, golf, 
tennis and many more ameni- 
ties. $94,500. (847) 
616-6420 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 3- 
bedroom, 2 -car garage, huge 
kitchen with all appliances, 
new carept. All for $93,000. 
NATIONAL REALSTAR, Carta 
(630) 924-6953. 

TOWN HOME STONE- 
BROOK GURNEE. 3-bed- 
room. 2-full baths, livlng- 
rDom/dJnlngroom, plus break- 
fast area, A/C, 2-car attached 
garage, $140,000. Appoint- 
"wrfl (B47) 855-2B68. 

TWIN LAKES, WISCON- 
SIN 3 -room house for rent, 
with basement lor storage, 
quiet, safe area, school, 
church and stores near by, 
$450/month, $450 security. 
2yr. lease. Available 12/1/96. 
Contact (708) 795-0055. 

WONDER LAKE 7306 Cir- 
cle Lease/option, t or 2 bed- 
room cottage, new electric, 
new bath, $675/month, pets 
OK, large lot, lakerfghts. (815) 
338-2579. 



MOBILE HOME 12X48, 
newly decorated, stored in Elk- 
horn. Wise. Must sell. $3,900. 
(708) 453-5948. 

MODULARS DOU- 
BLEWIDES - SINGLEWIDES 
• ILLINOIS LARGEST DIS- 
PLAY OF MODEL HOMES. 
FOUNDATIONS. BASE- 
MENTS. GARAGES, SEPT- 
ICS - WE DO IT ALU! FREE 
STATEWIDE DELIVERY/IN- 
STALLATION. RILEY MANU- 
FACTURED HOMES 1-600- 
798-1541. 

SPACIOUS 1691 PARK- 
WOOD 26x66, 3-bedrooms. 
2-baths, 2 sets patio doors to 
large deck, sun room, fire- 
place, central air, skylights 
and garage. Must see. Price 
greatly reduced. $81,900 Wa- 
terford. (414) 514-2530. 



520 



AnartmentirbrReni 



AFFORDABLE ZION 
CLEAN 3-bedroom home. 1- 
1/2 bath, all appliances, good 
area, large yard. Non-smok- 
ing. $750 plus utilities. (414) 
634-9387. 

FOX LAKE 1-BEOROOM 

apartment. Newly redecorat- 
ed. Appliances included. Pri- 
vate off street parking. Avail- 
able immediately. (847) 
973-9139. (647) 526-3341. 

ZION EAST SIDE 2-bed- 

room, carpeted, dinlngroom. 
fenced yard. Good credit and 
references required, no pets, 
$660/morrlh. (647) 831-5388. 



LOOK WHAT'S COMING LP 



IN Lakeland 



Newspapers 



COUNTRY BOUTIQUE AN- 
TIQUES (Established sinco 
1966) is interested In buying 
silvar. china, paintings, jewel- 
ry, glassware, furniture and 
other old objocts ol Interest. 
(847) 546-4295. 



PIANOS WANTED, CASH 

paid for most Grand Pianos, 
any condition. Also small 
uprights, in good condition. 
(414) 726-2440. 

Slot Mfichlitos WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
Perls. Alto JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIO BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coko Machines. 
Paying CASH1 Call 
f 630) 985-2742. 



"HOT REAL ESTATE HOMES WAITING FOR YOU** 

REAL ESTATE SECTION 

2x1 WITH PHOTO 

ONLY$25 00 VOL SAVE $1 4.00 
CALL YOUR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE TODAY AT 

223-8161 
EXT 110 OR 112 









This 4 br. 2.5 ha, huge family 
room w/fircplace. dining room, 
large kitchen w/brcakfaM 
nnok. Huge bonus room and 
so much more! 

$000,000 
Lakeland Rcaliv 
847-000-00 










3i®fSf 


91 







Lakeland 

Newspapers 






ir 



I 



nil i*i-i 






C42 / Lakeland Newspapers 



._. .- «. — — ^i, -~ ^*^ ~~. « ^^^Bje^m^Saa^SZi SBESJSSSSsSS j»*~-"— **« — — * 



CLASSIFIED 



BROVMM 



■ ' ' ■ ■;,•>!■ 



November 27, 1993 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



GURNEE 2-BEOROOM, 

GREAT location, washer/dry- 
er hook-up, C/A. no pets. Ap- 
plication/lease. S8507month 
plus security. (847) 244-6199 
weekdays 9am-5pm 

QURNEE/WAUKEGAN 
NORTH SHORE 
APARTMENTS 

At Affordable Prices 

Spacious 

Luxury Lrvtng 

Elovalors 

On Sue Statt 

Good Location 

Easy to Toll Roads 

IMPERIAL TOWER/MANOR 

(847) 244- 9222 

LAKE VILLA LUXURY 1- 
bedroom apartmenl, with 
beautiful views overlooking 
Deep Lake includes vaulted 
ceilings, washer/dryer mi 
crowave. ample storage 
S820/month Available Jaflu 
ary I si Sub- lei fill September 
wilb oplion to onicnrj ie,isc 
Call Jon |B47| 265 ,1786 



2 BDRM CONDO- 

ONLY $66,900- 

NORTH BLUFF AREA 

r.TnrtuI MM A Kl It7 J «>»> 

mill ~ '.' full kllh Nr.'li.i 1 i ii|--|nl 
[|[>I||> [vn!rt! Ilfw ** M — k " «t ^ ir** 

l>»r wjtrr hr-iiri A n»»ir I rtiir.il 

Jir rir.pl.nr. ,WL \ ptiriu 

< . nfirrt i luh -111* lulu * r>"'l 

■ rum. utitlj A iluHk'ilv 

rOttNI:KSfOrVI. 

j.l I ■! NfrlKlj 
iM^lKTi IMS/Will 



Classified Ads Get 

> Call Darre Up r 
Paula to place 
,- your ad. 
847.223.8161 



•■vs. 



WESTWiND 

VILLAGE 

APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave,, Zion 
1,2 & 3 BEDROOMS 

FREE HEAT 

Appliances • On Site 

Manager • No Pels 

Starting from 

S495/mo. 

Call Martha & Issac 

(847) 746-1420 

or BEAR PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

(414)697-9616 



LAKEVIEW 
APARTMENTS 
LA Large I t 
S6i0 S'45 m, ■•■ 



TERRACE 
LAKE VIL- 
.' !»■;!■ V*>5 
1 «'«tMt A.t 



tt" a • 

3«>6 S-JT4 



■■. ,. :>\i 



WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

ADULT COMMUNITY 

r-ci" -• . ■ 

••.... i: I- : ■• • ■ :■- '*£ 

V ;■>■'* 

.%*••■ ■ mss,i ;*■ 



OAKRIDGE VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 



Offering AfforttaMc Housing for 

Qua lifted Applicants. 

I urn-nth \t ■ epi tng Application* nil oiii 

1 .V J Iti-iltniilTl Apaitfltt'lfls 

Slap in lit 

299 Oakridge Court in Antioch 

I It ttlll 

847-395-4840 
1 -800-526-0844 TDD 

Manager! by Mentlmn Group Inc 



m 



/ION EAST SIDE 



84' 



;.M 



ZION EAST SIDE, 'si 'nx ■ 

slut)"- ic.it p.i i : ■ iLnen cO''' 
Aas^t" ,1'yi" ii.ii ■iN»> No 
:*•:•. s-U" .' ■ "-'■:•■ r'-s 
-f - -, 84' BT MRU 



RECYCLE 





/Vf W LISTING 
FOX LAKE 

( m ¥j> i « ft < i "f rft •< r y > > 

r.irv r*i If.mMiil 
itm »AW f 1* .« n- hit 
< \ki\ r/r-.'i,'ii rn ''>'*■ ' 

In tin mil , ' r / 1, ,•,'.' i 

/mi»' H-.irunni; i,ii/'r 

iWi ■ i'iIiiii^ I* mm* 1 kill lull lii)i\tMil 

ix.ilkiml I I i>i.itf>tfl I' U.irt. in 

>, Iw-iK tl/l'l '**> />« nit in- mlii 

I rtfir.n f //».«-,! Mr vni' //v'^ Sf.irc/nic 

rw-.rrn ^.; - i i"'". r^u I i *t r. 

. rf .■ iu.»/ ftitV.ii/r-'K'ir. lit. lit 'In if i tmi 



t tmi i < ' mii . .'i * mi 
r -■ »i m inditi 
mm . iii rovrtl" 



All-Subs 

REPOS 

Low down! 

"CALL" 

A com pan * van inn iitisl 

■MKMHKk itknrr.m SIMS'.' 

I.tlwrij kc In*.-. 

UMi$y)-tiUHt 



LAkEwood VilUqE Apartments 

In IsUmt LaUi an(1 CuAysUkE 

OlIntiM, AilnmlAbli IntusiNC, Ion o^lilitrl aj^IkanK. 

now At ( hh'ini, A|>pli( aiions ion ouit. 

• / ,/, 4Nr/ f bidtifioM ip4«r.Mf.srs 

( i/fwf \th A\>\iUI>lt fa kU\<l IaKi 

• } \mlmxm trrUN/fr^tes 



I'lMM 1*11 III" WCKII l\lll|IW»ll(lN till *|1|1<)|MWIM il 

(tt-1/) M-htiU ll)l)M («tK)j WMWH 

|.\IiIU.1Hk| VlH,\(,| .\]H||lM|>l |% |>,lli|l\\IM«.4lK 

.'.uii,! .' ti> Mi titili^N r.«ni|i, i-.i 



m 



MICHAEL LESCHER 

"Your link to the Chain" 



GOV'T 
FORECLOSURES 

McHcnry 4 Br. Newnr. $60,000 
Crystal Uke 2/3 Br. .S41. 100 4 

S7S.600 
Carpontcr5ville 4 Br. $73,000 

Call for Showing 

Low down/make offer! 

WESTERN REALTY 

630-495>6100 

847-778-2962 




Fox Lake 4 Bedroom... 

on a double lol l block Irom school, shopping, lrain & bus 
Buri m 1 989 i his home lealures an oversize master or with 
sliders lo balcony. 2 lull baths (one w/whirlpooi) & 2 5 car 
garage tor S129.000 



[/MAX Advantage 

(847) 395-3000 
iv iviv. realtor, coin'/ebtctigo/lescher 




tM.V 



WM 


Child (.ire 



CHILD CARE ■" my home 
Excellent reierpncrs f> 30a,rn 

10 6 30pm H47 




LOVING CHILD 
CARE IN MY 
GRAYSLAKE 
HOME. Hot lunch 
nutritious snacks, educational 
toys and tots ol TLC 34 years 
experience Will lake 6mo to 
6yrs Please call tor many ref 
erences or to visii and 
observe 

847-S55-OO00 



M c H o n r y / 
Johnsburg mom 
of ? will watch your 
\T\0) cinld hi my home 
Big fenced backyard, large 
playroom, no pete, non smok- 
ing, and plenty ot love 
Available Manday'Friday 6am 
lo 6pm Break'asl. lunch and 
snacks wrll be provided 
Please call Sue 
847-555-0000 



CHILD CARE in your home or 
mine References available 
847-5550000 



LICENSED DAYCARE m my 

home Excellent references All 
ages are welcome Also will 
watch you< school aged child 
before and a lie school 847- 
555-0000 

NEWBORN TO 5 YEARS 

5 30am lo 8 30pm 847-555- 
OO00 

CHILD CARE IN YOUR HOME 
OR MY HOME. Lei your 
child(ren) spend Iheir day 
learning exploring and having 
(on Certified n> CPR 847- 
555-0000 



Word Rate Ads 

15 words $9.75 

150 for each 

additional word 

(pre-paid) 

Ad with border 
and logo 

15 words $14.75 

15$ for each 

additional word 

(pre-paid) 

PRIVATE PARTY 
ONLY 



J 



Classified Order Blank 

Use the handy coupon below. Count words. 

Phone numbers and hyphenated words count 

as one word. Write copy below. 



I 
I 

I 
l 

1 
i 



Lindose check & mail lo: Lakeland Publishers, 30 S. Whitney P.O. Box 268, 

(iraysluke, IL ttXOO or fax (847) 223-2691. To place an order by phom.- call 

Lisa at (847) 223-8161 ext. 140. We also accept Visa & MasterCard. 



'T 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 
l 

I 
I 

I 
I 

I 
I 
I 

I 
I 
I 

I 
I 

I 
I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
-J 



530 


Rooms For Rr rtt 


SEMI-FURNISHED 
QUIET, clean, convenieni 
S200 10 move. S70/wk (847) 
360-9568 


534 


Business Proixrty 
Tor Sale 






CAR WASH HAND, <n detail 
shop. Lake Bluff. S35K. (847) 
328-7194 



// llracl i i- e ,/Ip art men I fj v i /I g 



MiaiFOR SALE BY OWNER 
Small Trucking Cn. 

5 frcijihlliner 

Iracltirs: 5 slaintcss 

slecl trailers food 

grade w/pumps & 

insulated Very gtmd 

cond. Apprnx 

20 mi. tr 

tirand Kapids. Ml 

Cull 616-748-'>33«> 

iiik Tor IIiiIhtI mil) 
or 1% nmlir 




jflntioch Manor 

445 Donin Dr. 

AnUoch, IL 60002 

395-0949 




( Deep J&keJ-termilagp 
149 Milwaukee Ave. 
Lalce Villa, IL 60041) 

356-2002 



On-Sitc Maiiugcmcnt & Muintcnuiicc 
Personnel 
All AmeniUcs 
Laundry FaciliUes In Each Building, 
Attractive Landscaped Grounds ^^ 
Metra StaUon Nearby 






Cqull Homing 
OpportunlM»»^'.[l 

:.- "Smi 



WISCONSIN 

(So.)- Meal 

I'mci-vMiit! I'latil 

l ; ut Sale by Owner 

Slaughtering, letail & 

wholesale 

Siaie-mspeeled. HSIM 

capable I Lis laige 

enoleis. Iiee/ei &. 

snmkeluiiise liieUules 

all puieessmg & 

slaugltlenng ei||tfnl 

I.ih. d in Black Rarlh. 

W|,20nn W nC 

Madison ?.V)9K 

Jim 608-767-3940 



Linus (338-01 1 ) is a home 
that has Deen created by 
dreams II is made up ol 1 .554 
square feel ol living area. 909 
square leel ol garage, and 
optional basement and atlic x 
plans lhal would add an addi- 
tional 3.080 square feet il need- 
ed The exterior is brick and 
wood linish wilh many exira 
louches added There is a cov- 
ered porch on the Iront and n deck on the right side ol the home The deck contains a 
waterfall made ol rocks, and Iwo pools, one near (he master suite and the other overlooked 
by Ihe garden window ol Ihe kitchen 

The kitchen is uniquely located lo Ihe right ol the Iront door, wilh a cabinet accessible 
pantry (or ease ol restocking next to the entry Wilh the U-shaped counter area, the kitchen 
is open and airy, mainly due to the garden window over the sink The dishwasher is central- 
ly located in an island in the kitchen 

The Great Room look is very popular now and the Unus has a large living room wilh a 
comer fireplace lhal would qualily as a Great Room H is a large open area, directly off Ihe 
kiichen and the entry A hall bath is set in the hall area ofl ihis room, easily accessible. 

Two matching bedrooms are in rear ol Ihe home, each containing a large walk-in closel 
and ils own private linen closet To add a Hair to Ihe rear exterior, Ihe bathrooms and the tub 
have been slacked out away Irom the main line of Ihe rear wall Glass block has been used 
n the tub area lor extra light. The bathrooms oil each bedroom both contain a hall balh wilh 
the shared tub area II is a unique design and yel very private for each bedroom. 

The utililyroom is located near the iwo bedrooms and contains a large counler wilh a 
sink and told down ironing board The stairs lo the attic and lo the basement are located 
around the outside area ol the utility room 

The master suite has ils own pnvale balh with two sinks and a shower. It also has a 
targe walk-in closet The linen closet is in Ihe corner, hidden by the door to Ihe suite. There 

are sliding glass doors onlo the deck 



AUndriurl 

juu rviigiu 



r 



t i 



P 



- 5 



B 



*i Hi* is' j iM.rc; 
1, 






and ihe waterfall. 

The Linus would be a dream come 
true to live in as its space has been 
used to provide all the luxuries. 

For a study kit ol Ihe Linus (338- 
Ot 1LP60) send St 4.95. to Landmark 
Designs. 33127 Saginaw Rd. E.. 
Cottage Grove, OR 97424 (Specify 
plan name & number for kit). For a col 
lection ol plan books, send $20.00. or 
save by ordering the kil and collection 
together lor $29.95, or call 
1-800-562-1151. 









'i i 



■ 



November 27, 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



■■ ■.•-: ' 



Lakeland Newspapers / C43 



■ 



I 



• 



ie 



ol- 
ar 

>n 



538 



Biuinew Property 
FbrRcht 



560 






568 



OutOfArcaP'rbpcrt) 



FOX LAKE NEW lake vlow 
offices on Grand Avenue. 
Starting at $275/month.' (847) 
587-1615. '.':'■-■. 

HAVE LARGE BUILDINQ 
IN LINCOLNSHIRE AREA 
(or Antique Shop, Coffee Shop 
of both. (847) 917-6200, , 

SILVER LAKE, WISCON- 
SIN, tBOOsq.ft. unit with 4 of- 
fices. (414) 843-3705. 

TWO STORAGE UNITS, 
(1) 45x50,(1) 45x38. Also Of- 
fice Space available. Days 
(847) 356-2922, evenings 
(847) 395-7898, 

WAUCONOA AREA IN- 
DUSTRIAL AND' SHOP 
SPACE FOR RENT 

I.OSOsq.fL unit, $695 plus se- 
curity. Available December 
isi. 2400icj.<1. POLL 

BARN with concrete floor. 
Hoat, electric, outside storage 
can be added. Office trailer 
available. $595 as Is. Available 
12/1/98. Days (847) 
526-5000. evenings (847) 
528 0420 leave message. 

V RICHMOND CAB 
LOT or YOUR 
BUSINESS USE 

Brick hldgonRl. 12. 

1 bay. office, garage & 
sales lot. Excellent 
visibility. Alternate 
use OK S79Vmo. 

Land Mgmt. 

815-678-4334 



MCHENRY/MARTIN 
WOODS, HEAVILY: wooded 
1 1 acre on' cul-de-sac. (815) 
344-4269. >; . : 

TWO LOTS BOTH, 6.5 acr- 
es, Brighton Troy Glen Subdl- . 

vision; gorfloous.rsllla,* trees, 
views of. ponds, $60,000- 

$80,000.(414)552-2775. 

VACANT LOTS PARTIAL- 
LY wooded, sewers available 
In Fall. 110x100. North East 
Gumee. Ashing 

$35,oooa$45,ooo. Call for de- 
tails (847) 244-61 81. 



704 



ReCRattond 
: Vehicles. 



720 



Sportt Equipment 



r 



804 



Cars For Sale 



804 



Can For Safe 



568 



Out Of Area Property 



-* *mm*Ms 



"--■"--^- 



Arizona Best Buyt 
Beautiful hiitoric properly in 

ice nic NW Ariz- Pri vste 
. 40 Kit rtnch putcti now 
■valltble from only $395/«el 
Near Colorado River, tithing, 
boating, gambling. Stunning 
iutucti 8l mtn vlewi. Prinine, 
luih high deicit covered with 
Ugum, yuccu, palo vcrde», 
Joihuii. No qu»1. Igw'dcwa. 
*Jnt icrnu. 1001. water/miner- 
• ■ «I righU. Title i mured, 
lurveyed, good tccai. Selling 
full Mwi ie« v Open dtily. 

Stagecoa ch Trails 



1889 TRAVEL TRA1LEH 
CAMPER, 1611., fully loaded, 
fiberglass outside, A/C, heat, 
fridge, TV, propane/electric 
compalable. Bathroom with 
shower. Only sleeps 2. MUST 
SEE1I $2,300., (847) 265-0203. 

SMALL RV SLEEPS 4. new 
tires, well maintained, $3,500. 
(847)587^1343., 

1989 TRAVEL TRAILER 

CAMPER, 16 n., fully loaded, 
fiberglass outside, A/C. heat, 
fridge, -TV, propane/electric 
compatable. Bathroom with 
shower. Only sleeps 2. MUST 
SEEM $2,300. (847) 269-0203. 



i FOR , SALE • Nordic . iracx 
$275.00 . (sella @ $600.00); 
Rowing Bike - $50.00. Both 
like new. Cat) (847) 543-1965 
loavo message. 

1990 POLARIS 1NDY 500- 
SP. Good shape. High and 
low Windshield,' 96 studs. 
$1300.00 (Mi) 274-2027 



804 


Cars for Sale 



CHEVY 1964 CORVETTE,/ 

$8.095. (847)223rfl6S1,'' - 

CHEVY 1991 :. CAMARO 
R3. $4,388. (847) 687-6473. 

CHEVY .1991 CAVALIER, 
$2,990. (816)385-2100. : 

CHEVY 1993 CAVALIER Z- 
24 CONVERTIBLE; $9,990. 
(815)365-2100. - 

CHEVY 1995 BERETTA 
$5,990. (815)385-2100. 



• WHD4'? ; EXPLOR E R , 
56,000 mifos, Eddie Bauer, 

, few miles ,"2yr. warranty, 6 disc 
CD player, flawtasa condition,' 
$15,000. (647) S6S-4043;- 

HONDA 1993 ACCORD LX 

4-DOOR, $9,995: (847) 395- 

3600, : :" : :. : ■••":::•,.-•'■ 

HONDA 1994 CIVIC 
HATCHBACK, 56,000 miles, 5- 
spood, $7,000. (847) 
543-1289. 



ASSUME PAYMENTS, 

HARDY, ARKANSAS, 

$98.54/month on 5+ Ozark 
Mountain acres, tail trees, 
Spring River access, excellent 
hunting/fishing, good country 
road. Walking " Realty 1-888- 

809-7722. 

SO. COLORADO RANCH. 
53 acres - $32,900. Bring your 
horses and ride out to one of 
the last groat ranches In CO. 
Nice fields wtlh outstanding 
Rocky Mm views. Yr. round ac- 
cess, toi/oioc. Excellent financ- 
ing. Call now 718-678-6387 

ll llll l W ll 



"abases 



urn ewe 

8avona Van 

Excellent Condition 

B7K mllei 60300 

9MM, 

Cm?) S40-7000 nays 

[8A73 Ci3B-3333 Eve 



s mm n - no M i Himu t 



»•«•»*»»****■•••*•*■>■•*«**««•*•*■***•** 






FLORIDA. 2 homes in 
St. Pete/Tampa Bay, " 
FL Executive WTF- v - 
3BR/2.5BA/6c-gar, bit 
1990, 3027 sf, deep 
water dock, Gulf 
access, cath ceils, 
great rm. wide open 
wtr. Offered at S4201C 
Also Exec. 

3BR/2BA/2c-gar, great 
rm, fir plan w cath 
ceils, frpl & incredible 
master suite w/garden 
tub. S273K. Pvt golf 
course community 
vv/24hr sec, 2 marinas 
& club mem. avail. 

Carmen Miranda 
Realty 

800-527-1840 xl8 



708 



Snowmohlla/ATV'i 



J 



544 


Mortgage Sc-mu-j 



J EDWARDSBURG, 
j MI-ForSaleby 

Owner. Juno Lake 
! Channel front. 68421 j 



NO OOWNPAYMENT? 

PROBLEM CREDIT? Own 
the home you need now, with- 
out a big downpaymanl. Com- 
plete financing il qualified. Do- 
George Home Alliance 1-800- 
343-2884. 



N. Channel Pkwy. 
! 3BR/1.5BA tri-levcl, I 

■ 

: 



1600sf, lc-gar. 

$195K. 
616-699-7257 



: 




tWnw , 



ATTENTION 
CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 
tr you have placed classified 
advertising with the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may re- 
ceive o misleading statement 
from another firm request- 
ing payment for Itisj odvertls- 
tng. To receive proper cred- 
it to your account, all pay- 
ment' tor your Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

muil be made a* Invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Newspaper* 

PO Box 208 

30 6. Whitney SI. 

Onqralahe. IL 00030-0208 



1990 POLARIS INDY 600- 
SP. Good shape. High and 
low windshield, 98 studs. 

$1300.00 (847) 540-8068. 

1091 POLARIS INDY 
TRAIL New shroud, rebuilt 
front end and powder coaled, 
rebuilt clutch In 1097. Low 
mileage, very clean. Must see. 
$2,000/bost. Jeff (847) 
573-9347, 

SNOWMOBILE 1994 ARC- 
TIC 580 EXT, $3,500. (847) 
265-6935 leave mossaoo. 

1091 POLARIS INDY 
TRAIL New shroud, rebuilt 
front end and powder coated, 
rebuilt clutch In 1997. Low 
mileage, very dean. Must see. 
$2,000/best. Jolf (847) 
573-9347. 

1998 POLARIS 250 TRAIL 
BLAZER ATV. electric start, 
automatic, still under warran- 
ty, cover Included. $3,500. 
(414)537-4271. 

ARCTIC CAT 1996 Klttycal. 
good condition, $800. Call 
evenlnas (847) 587-0218. 



720 



Sporti Equipment 



$10f>$500 CARS 

Police impounds. 

Honda's, Chevy's, 

Jeep's and Sport Utilities. 

Must Sent 

1-800-522-2730 

ext.2292. 

'90 MAZDA RX7 GXL, red. 
loadod, leather interior, pam- 
pered garaifje kept $8,000. 
Call (847) 223-2085 

1885 QUICK SKY HAWK re- 
built mechanics, 51.000/best. 
(847) 587-4342. 

1985 SUBURBAN GOOD 
tires, very dean, well main- 
tained, air, automatic, 
$3.500/t»sL (708) 447-4590. 

1987 SUBURBAN, NEW 

transmission, 350 motor. 3yrs. 
old. motor needs minor work. 
$1,200. (847)548-7457. 

1991 BUICK PARK AVE. 
Good condition, white with 
burgandy Interior. $5,400 
(B47) 975-3799. 

1092 CORVETTE CON- 
VERTIBLE white with white 
lop, garage kept. 55,000 
miles. Excellent condition. 
(815) 3858488. 

1997 PONTIAC GRAND 
Am Green 20,000 milos. 
Good condition. $11,500 
O.B.O. (847) 548-8826 

BUICK 1985 CENTURY 
WAGON Cloan and reliable. 
Asking $1.500/best. (414) 652- 
7952. 



CHEVY 1996 CORSICA HONDA 1995 ACCORD 
$7,990. (61 5) 385-21 00. . EX, $11,090. (815)385-2100. 



CHEVY 1097 LUMINA, 4- 
door, whrto, frtaroori interior, 
fully loaded, low miles, A/C, ex- 
cellent condition. Must sell. 
Asking $14,500/best Please 
call (847) 223*31 81 after 5pm 
or leave message.' 

CHRYSLER 1990 UEBAR- 

ON 65K mites, alrbag, full 
power, digital dash,* drives 
good, stereo oqulpped, 
$3,500/best f773) 585-3717, 
(7 73) 259*4729. 

DODGE '95 RED neon, high 
line, 4 door, a/c, ituto, power 
locks, tilt, 3 yea: service, cent 
42,000 miles. (847)395-1060 

DODGE 1991 DYNASTY, 
$2.995. (847) 587-3300. 

DOOQE 1995 INTREPID 
ES. $5,995. (847) 244-1010. 



HONDA 1090 
DAN,. $10,995. 
2530. 



crvic 

(847) 



8E- 

358- 



EAGLE 1994 VISION 
$5,995. (847) 395-3600. 



ES1. 



1986 OLDS CUTLASS 
SIERRA SILVER MOON- 
LIGHT, A/C, heat, power 
locks, new tires, new brakes, 
new exhaust, new radiator, 
new cam shaft Runs great. 
Son left tor Navy. Must soil. 
$1,599. Ask for Mr. Coleman 
(414) 654-6543 or leave mes- 
sage. 



FORD 1992 TAURUS 
$2,995. (847) 244-1010. 



GL, 



BEAUTY GLOVES 

100% -Cotton -while. 

Protect days, beauiify nights 

Includes beauty tips and gift. 

2/pr./$5.00. 

P. West. 

P.O. Box 549. 

Fox Lake, III. 60020. 



ATTN: 

INVESTORS, 

13%+++ Return on 

investment condos. 

5mi to Disney 

World. Guaranteed 

rental. Brokers 

welcome. Brian 

Pierson 



SO. COLORADO RANCH. 
53 acres - $32,900. Bring your 
norsos and rfdo out to one of 
the last great ranches in CO. 
Nice fields with outstanding 
Rocky Mtn views. Yr. round ac- 
cess, tel/elec. Excellent financ- 
ing. Cali now 718-676-6367 
Hatchet Ranch. 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



1997 KS KAWASAKI PRO 
CIRCUIT 125. $3.800/bes1. 
(847) 356-5949. 

AEROBIC RIDER EXER- 
CISE MACHINE WITH ris- 
er, excellent condition, like 
now. Original $300. best offer. 
(847) 973-0473 after 6pm. 

SOLOFLEX WITH LEG at- 
tachments, hardly used. 
$650/bosl. Treadmill, SJ5Q. 
(847) 746-8579. 

1997 KS KAWASAKI PRO 

CIRCUIT 125, $3.B0O/best. 
(647) 356-5949. 



BUICK 

WAGON. 

3300. 



1994 
$8,995. 



CENTURY 
(847) 5B7- 



FORD 

WAGON, 
2530. ' 



1993 
$2,595. 



ESCORT 
(847) 356- 



CADILLAC 199B 
DEVILLE, $23,990. (815) 
365-2100. 

CARS S10O-5500 POUCE 
Impounds 1980's-1997's Hon- 
das, Chovys, Jeeps and Sport 
Utility. Must sell. 600-772- 
7470 ext. 7040. (SCA Net- 
work). 

CHEVROLET 1000 COR- 
SICA, $2,995. (847) 356- 
2530. 

CHEVROLET 1995 IMPA- 
LA SS. CD. leather, 63.000 
mites, new tires, new brakes, 
loaded, $18,50Q. (847) 
395-5966. 



FORD 

WAGON, 
2530. 



1993 

$3,595. 



ESCORT 
(847) 356- 



FORD 1993 ESCORT, 
$2,988. (847) 587-3400. 

FORD 1993 PROBE GT, 
V6, loaded, keyless entry, 
remote start, excellent condi- 
tion, $7,000. Must sell. Kristy 
(414) 643-3656. 

FORD 1993 TAURUS SE- 
DAN. $4.S9S. (647) 356-2530. 

FORD 1995 PROBE GT 5- 

spood, 31 K, power W/L laser. 
red, $12,500. (847) 526-2644 

leave message. 

FORD 1997 ASPIRE, 
$6,888. (847) 587-3400. 



HONDA CIVIC STATION 
WAGON, .1989, silver, au- 
tomatic, very reliable, main- 
tenance completely up-to- 
date, $2,50o/best. (847) 
648-2132, 

HYUNDAI 1999 ACCENT, 
$5,095. (847) 587-3400. 

HYUNDAI 1096 AC- 
CENTS, $8,995. (847) 587- 
6473. 

HYUNDAI 1998 ELANJRA 
4-door, black, all power op- 
tions, under 11K miles, like 
new. $10.800/besl. Moving 
musl sell. Can be seen at Na- 
tional Pride Auto (414) 697- 
1332. (414) 697-7781 bel- 
woon 4:30pm 730pm. 

IF YOU HAVE 
FURNITURE TO SELL, 

A ear, or appliance*, If 
you art having a Oarage 

Sale or If y ->u have a 

house to sell or apartment 

to rant 

Call Use before 10am 

Wednesday to place 

your ad here. 

(847) 223-6161 

axt 140. 

INFINm 1995 J30'S, 6 TO 
CHOOSE WITH SIMILAR 
SAVINGS, LEATHER. SUN- 
ROOF, $16,995. .847) 362- 
9200. „ 

INRNm 1995 Q45'S 
LEATHER. SUNROOF, 

$22.995. (647) 362-9200. 

INFINfTI 1996 130T, 

LEATHER. SUNROOF, 

$19.095. (847) 362-9200. 

ISUZU STYLUS 1991, 
black, manual shift, great ster- 
eo, air, maintenance com- 
piotoiy up-to-date. New pump, 
brakes. battery etc. 
$4.SO0/best (847) 548-2132. 

LINCOLN 1988 TOWN- 
CAR DESIGNER SERIES, 
80.000 miles. 1 -owner, excel- 
lent condition, plush every- 
thing, $3,500. (414) 
857-7515. 




. ,— ^-» *.*--■ - . ' 



-S3" 



C44 / Lakeland Newspapers 



jgjji rijgB»Wiij^itiagg<igg^^^^^iKptigSggj i.^ii^ar^fa^^s-J-- — ■ 



CLASSIFIED 



.•■"■ ■ ■ - 



November 27, 1998) 



804 



Can For Sale 



804 



Can For Sale 



804 



Cars For Sale 



824 



V*ro 



EEffl 



LINCOLN TOWN CAR 
1966, $2,990, (BIS) 385-2100. 

LINCOLN TOWNCAR 
1980, dark gray, loaded, de- 
cant shape. Book value 
$3,600, asking $2,400/best. 
(847) 587-0806. 

MERCEDES 1980 BENZ 

460 SEL. must see, 
$4,000/best. (847) 336-3834. 

MERCURY 1988 COUOAR 
Looks eharp. runs groat, llttlo 
ruBl, $1 ,600. (847) 626-7139. 

MERCURY 1988 SABLE 
3.0, automatic, runs good, 
body rough, needs heater 
core, $500, (414) 878-5076 
after 4pm or weekends. 

MERCURY 1991 CAPRI 
MR2 TURBO CONVERTIBLE. 
red, 55K, loaded, 5-spoed. ex- 
cellent condition. $5,500 
(647)566-2180 



PLYMOUTH 1999 NEON, 

$4,990, (815)385-2100. 

PLYMOUTH 199B 

BREEZE 4 IK. $B.975/boel. 
Red, 4-door, PS, PB, PW, PL, 
air. crulBe, 4-cyllndor, AM/FM 
cassette (847)336-1574. 



PONTIAC 1996 GRAND 
AM QT loaded, 81K, white, 
CD, sunroof, 4-door, 
$M,500/bost. (847) 

550-1878. 



PLYMOUTH 
BREEZE, $9,995. 
2530. 



814 



Service & PartJ 



1997 
(847) 356- 



PONTIAC 1979 TRANS 

AM, yellow, 403 Olds, 54.000 
miles, garage kepi, now sus- 
pension, roconditlonod hoods 
and much more, $6,000. (847) 
566-6013 



MERCURY 1992 TOPAZ 

GS SPORT COUPE. $1,795 
(847)244-1010 

MERCURY 1993 COUOAR 
BOSTONIAN. $7,995 (84?) 
587-3400 

MERCURY 1994 COUQAH 

XR7, $7.995 84 7)587 3300 

MOVINO OUT OF STATE 
MUST SELL 1997 Dl.uk Pon 
1iac Sunlire. 5 speed. 2 door 
sedan AC cassutlu As>»"g 
S9.900 (8d7| 438 4100 



NEW CHEVY 

rn coupe 

JU5 2 tOO 



1999 CAVALI 
$9 990 iOI5) 



NEW PONTIAC 1999 

CiHAND AM Sli 195 18151 
38b 2 tOO 



NISSAN 
$995 iB-K 



1990 
U% 2530 



240SX. 



NISSAN 1991 STANZA 
$4,995 (B4 7l 587 64 73 

NISSAN 1993 ALTIMA. 
$5 995 (847) 587-6473 

NISSAN 1995 ALTIMA. 

S8 995 (0471 ZCfi 3600 

MAXIMA. 

TOO 



NISSAN 1995 
$12 990 181!, 185 



OLDSMOB1LE 1994 CUT- 
LASS SUPREME, white mi, 
rust, oxcollent condition. 2- 
door. 68.000 milas. Ashing 
$8.500 f414) 652 3197 

PLYMOUTH 1993 LASER, 
$6,990 (847) 223 8651 



PONTIAC 1992 GRAND 
AM SE 4-door. $3,995 (847) 
244-1010 

PONTIAC 1992 GRAND 

PRIX. $4,995 (647) 356 2530 

PONTIAC 1906 FIRE- 
BIRD, $10,990 (615) 385- 
2100 

TOYOTA 1993 COROLLA. 

$5.995 (847) 223B651 

TRANS AM. RAM AIR t998 
Poniioc. 5.000 miles, raro 6 

speed. $20.000/bosi (414) 
889 8206 

VOLVO 1995 685 TURBO 
WAGON. LEATHER. SUN 
ROOF, $22,595 (847) 362 
9200 

VOLVO 1995 SELECT 850. 
LEATHER. SUNROOF. 

$20.995 (647) 362-9200 

VOLVO 1998 855 GLT 
WAGON LEATHER. SUN 
ROOF. COLD WEATHER 
TRACTION $24,995 (B47) 
362 9200 

VOLVO 1998 SELECT S 

70 GLT. LEATHER SUN 
ROOF $28 595 (847) 362 
9200 

VOLVO 1998 SELECT 
S70s. 12 TO CHOOSE WITH 
SIMILAR SAVINGS. LEATH 
ER SUNROOF $23 995 

|84 7| 362 9200 

VOLVO 1998 SELECT V 

70 WAGONS 13 TO. CHOOSE 
WITH SIMILAR SAVINGS 
LEATHER. SUNROOF. 

$26,995 (847) 362-9200 

VOLVO 1998 SELECT V 

70 RWD WAGON. LEATH 
ER SUNROOF. $33,995 
(B47j 362 9200 



ARE WHEELS. SET of four 
Amorlcan Racing Equipment 
15x8, GM bolt pattern. True 
spoked wheels. Good shape. 
$150. (847)548-1115. 

BMW WHEELS SET OF 
FOUR, to fit 3. 5, 6, 7. 8 ser- 
ies. Mllle Miglla 5 spoke 
whoois with Yokohama AVS 
tiros 50% tread loll, whoois in 
good shape, $700. (647) 548- 
1115 

CLASSIC QUARTER 

PANEL SALE. Mustang, Com 
aro. Nova. C hovel ie. Cutlass. 
Mopars. Ponliac. Chevrolet, 
morel TRUCK PANS, FLOOR 
PANS DOORS, FENDERS. 
BUMPERS New and Califor- 
nia Rust free. MARK'S PLAT- 
ING & SUPPLY 217-824-6184. 

HOLLEY CARB. OREAT 

shape $75, Carter thermo- 
quad, oil ol 440. has nol run In 
years. $25. Dual point distribu- 
tor lor BB Chrysler. $25 Both 
flip up headlight doors lor '69 
Chorgor, $25 Call alter 6pm 
(847) 548-1115 

TIRE CHANGER, ALL tool 
plus. 4yrs old. pxcollont condi- 
lion. $1.800 (815)385 0724 

TRANSMISSIONS 

•Rebuilt 

•Warranty 

•Great Prices. 

(847) 588-2254. 



DODGE 1095 GRAND 

CARAVAN SE, $11,990.(815) 
365-2100. 

DODGE 1995 RAM 2500 
SLT VAN. 12 passenger, 62K 
miles, ABS, olrbog. power 
windows, now brakoa/liros 
and alignment, drives excel- 
lent, body excellent condition, 
$l0,900/besl. Call Robert 
(773) 585-3717. (773) 259 
4729. 

FORD 1991 AEROSTAR 
AWD VAN, $4,990. (847) 223 
B651. __ 

FORD 1996 WINDSTAR, 
$9.995. (847) 587-3400. 

PLYMOUTH 1892 VOYAG- 

ER, $2,995. (847) 356-2530. 

PLYMOUTH 1993 VOYAO- 

ER, 85,000 miles, air. cruise 
control, tape player, now 
bolis/brakoB and tires, $6,000 
(414) 279-6370 after 5pm. 

PLYMOUTH 199B VOYAG- 
ER, $6,595. (847) 587-6473. 



Four Wheel Drive 

AMIGO 1993, fully 

$S.500/bes! (B47) 



834 



Trucks/Trailers 



S33 



Itindynun- 



isuzu 

loaded. 

973-0128 or voice moll 1-B00- 

255 -4859 oxl.4669 

JEEP 1993 WRANGLER, 

$8,995 (847) 356-2530 



JEEP CHEROKEE 1992, 
$8,990 (847) 223-865T 



NEW CHEVY 1998 BLAZER 
4x4. $22,489 (815)385-2100 

NISSAN 1991 PATH- 
FINDER 4X4 SE, $8,995 
IB471 395-3600 

GEO 1993 TRACKER 4x4. 

$5.990. (815) 385-2100 

Trucks/Trailr-rs 



DODGE 1996 DAKOTA 
P/U. $13,990. (647) 223-0651- 

FORD 1991 F-280, extend- 
od cob XLT. Lariat Package, 
loaded. 2WD, oxcollent condi- 
tion running end looking, 351 
V8 lull power, 95,000 mllos, 
over W2 highway, $11,000. 
(647) 682- HBO, 

FORD 1991 RANGER, 
$3,775. (B47) 567-6473. 



THE HANDYMAN NO job 

too omo.ll. Painting, carpentry 
and repair work. Roaeormblo 
rales and free .estimates, 
1647)223-7724:- 



S39 


Housekeeping 



FORD 

SPLASH. 

3400 



1994 
$7,968. 



RANGER 
(847) 587- 



834 



828 



Four Wheel Drive 
Jeeps 



CHEVROLET 1993 BLAZ- 
ER 4-door, rod. 4WD. sharp. 
loaded. $l2,500/bost. 1993 
BUICK LESABRE 51,000 
mllos, no rust, 4-door. $8,000 
(414) 857-2605 

CHEVY 1991 S-10 BLAZER 
4x4, $5.995. (647) 244-1010 

CHEVY 1994 S-10 BLAZ 
ER, $8.990 (847)223-8651 

CHEVY 1995 BLAZER 4X4 
$12,995 (847) 587-3300. 



824 



Vnns 



ASTRO VAN 1985, $3,500. 
romodolod (847) 746 3572 



CHEVY 1988 
SION VAN, 75K 

AM;FM cassetto. 
age $4 000<bost 



CONVEH- 

milos, A/C. 
low pack 

Days |B47) 



358 8008. evenings (647) 
587 5592 Kon 

CHEVY 1992 ASTRO 
CARGO VAN EXT, new 
tires, brakes and exhaust, ex- 
ceptionally clean. $4,950/besl 
(847)395 6855 

DODGE 1989 CARAVAN 

LE $2,967 (847) 587-6473. 



CHEVY 1996 BLAZER, 

$11.990 (615) 385-2100 

DODGE 1885 RAM 

CHARGER 4x4. 5,000 milos 
on rebuilt engine, now tiros, 
lowing package. Asking 
$3,800/bost (815) 675-6434 
after 7pm 

DODGE 1994 DAKOTA. Ox 

tenrJBd cab, V8, 4x4. low mile- 
age, lull power. $l4,000/bosl 
(4 14)694 1745 

FORD 1992 EXPLORER 
SPORT 4x4. $10,988 (847) 
587-3400 

FORD 1995 EXPLORER 
EDDIE BAUER, groat condi- 
tion, perfectly maintained, 
64,000 miles, $20,500/best. 
(647) 395-2015. 



S100-S500 JEEPS 

Police impounds 

Hondo'B. Chevy's. 

and Sport Ulilltios 

Must Sotll 

I- 600-522-2730 

oxl 2292 

1991 S-10 PICK-UP, excel- 
lent condition. $3.200/bost 
Full size shodbod cap, $200. 
(414)537-4054. 

CHEVROLET 1992 1500 

SILVERADO P/U, $9,650, 
(847)2238651. 

CHEVY 1990 1600 SILVER 
ADO PICKUP, $4,995. (847) 

244-1010 

CHEVY 1993 C-1000 PICK- 
UP, Indy 500 Edition, 75.000 
milos. Borne add ons, 
$11,000/bosl (847)366 8607 
leovo mossago. 

CHEVY 1994 S-10 PICKUP. 
$7,990. (615)385-2100 

CHEVY 1995 S-10 EX- 
TENDED CAB. $8,990 (815) 
385-2100 



FORD 1994 RANGER XLT 

P/U, $7,900. (847) 223-6651. 

FORD 1994 RANGER XLT 
AM/FM cassetto, A/C. plum. 
84K miloB. groat shape. 
$ 6,700 (847) 662-9397. 

FORD 1990 RANGER XLT, 
California Truck, low miles, 
must see, $9,995 (847) 
740-0573. 

FORO F-160 1992. 6-cyltn 

der, slick, with air, AM/FM cos- 
sollo, low mileage, 

$6,5O0/bos! (847) 356-5949 



■|T8 A DIRTY JOB' 
CLEANING SERVICE. 

And wo'ro willing to do It. ' 
For all your cleaning needs, 
call us at (647) 646-7403. 

NO TIME FOR 
CLEANING? 

But need tho job dono right? 

Call Mario. 

I cloan weekly or 

bi-weekly only. 

Non-smoker. 

References. 

(047) 346-3759 

loavo mossago. 

DOUBLE KK KLEANING 
Reasonable rates, Depend- 
able. Free In-Nomo Quote ■ 
Coll Kim (847) 546-3408. 



S72 



Protoilorml 
Services 



NEW 1099 
SUPERCAB, 
587-3400. 



FORD 
$16,099 



F-150 
(847) 



NEW 1099 FORD RANG 
ER. $10,465 (847) 587-3400 



NISSAN 
4X4 SE. 
6651. 



1903 KING 
$9,990. (847) 



CAB 
223 



WRITE FOR YOUl 

•X-Mat Cards 

' Wadding Invitations 

*Showar/Party Invltetlona. 

'Handwritten. 

• Reasonable rates. 

Call tttji 363-5330. 



838 



Heavy Equipment 



S78 


Remodeling 



DODGE 1989 
PICKUP. $2,968. 
3400 



RAM 50 
(B47) 587- 



DODGE 1994 DAKOTA 
SLT. $6,545. (847) 5B7-6473. 

DODGE 1996 RAM 1500 
4x4 Club Cab SLT, short box, 
dark blue. 5.9 V8 Magnum, au- 
tomatic, loaded, CO player, 
roll lop cover, $l7.300/best. 

(414) 763-6763. 

DODGE 1007 RAM PICKUP 

TRUCK, 4x4. white, cabin and 
1/2, still under warranty. 
$22.000/bost. (847) 

740-2606. 



1962 WD ALLIS CHALM- 
ERS TRACTOR with 3pl 2 
bottom plow and mounted cul- 
tivator, »3,0Q0/boal (815) 
338-12)1. 

IRRIGATION PUMP & MO- 
TOR, model 6203 A, 40hp, 
phase 3. Peerless pump, 4in. 
Ductal falangod, 20hp. motor, 
$650. (847) 740-7380 after 
5om. 

1962 WD ALUS CHALM- 
ERS TRACTOR with 3pt. 2 
bottom plow and mounted cul- 
tivator. $3,000/besl. (615) 
338-1211. 

IRRIGATION PUMP & MO- 
TOR, model e 203 A, 40hp, 
phase 3. Peerless pump, 41n. 
Ductal falangod, 20hp. motor. 
$650. (847) 740-7380 alter 
5pm. 



DC TILE WE install floor end 
wall tiles ot all kinds. Remodel 
all bathrooms and kitchens. 
Froo ostlmatos. (647) 395- 
0777. 

JACK'S 

REMODELING 

^Basement Flnishlncj 

•Famllyroomt 4 omcorooms 

■Electrical A Plumbing 

■Kitchens & Baths 

■Vinyl Replacement Windows 

■Soffit Fascia. 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(647) 546-3759. 



SS7 



&onie 



STORAGE SPACE FOR 
BOATS, cars, RVs. New build- 
ing, cement floor. (647) 395- 
0394. 



ilLakeland MALL DIRECTORY &* 

iJ T^X/fen F S S M T W T ^ 




* 

<* 

tf 

% 




Visit Santa 

at your 

favorite 

mallt 



■fainteS*. 



A WOO PLACE TO CROP fcr EAT 

GURNEE MILLS, 

GURNEE, IL, 

(847J 855-7800 



Old Orchard Center 

I34 Old Orchard Rd. 


11/20 
10-9 


11/21 

10-7 


11/22 
11-6 


11/23 
10-9 


11/24 
10-9 


11/251 
10-9 


11/26 
DL0SED 


Skokie, IL. 
(847) 674-7070 


11/27 
9:30-10 


11/28 
9:30-10 


11/29 
10-7 


11/30 
9:30-10 


12/1 
9:30-10 


12/2 
9:30-10 


12/3 
9:30-10 


Woodfield Mall 

Golf Rd at Route 53 
Schaumburg.IL 
(847) 330-1537 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


11/20 
10-9 


11/21 
10-9 


11/22 
11-6 


11/23 
10-9 


11/24 
10-9 


11/25 
10-9 


11/26 
CLOSED 


11/28 
7-9 


11/29 
8-10 


11/29 
10-8 


11/30 
9-10 


12/1 
9-10 


12/2 
9-10 


12/3 
9-10 


Gurnee Mills Mall 

6170 W. Grand Ave. 
Gurnee, IL 
(847) 263-7500 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


11/20 
10-9 


11/21 
10-9 


11/22 
11-6 


11/23 
10-9 


11/24 
10-9 


11/25 
10-9 


11/26 
CLOSED 


11/27 

9:30 
9:30 


11/28 

9:30 
9:30 


11/29 
10-7 


11/30 

9:30 
9:30 


12/1 

9:30 
9:30 


12/2 

9:30 
9:30 


12/3 

9:30 
9:30 


Hawthorn 
Shopping Center 

122 Hawthorn Center 
Vernon Hilts, IL. 
(847) 362-2600 


F 


s 


S 


M 


T 


w 


T 


11/20 
10-9 


11/21 
10-7 


11/22 

11-6 


11/23 
10-9 


11/24 
10-9 


11/25 
10-9 


11/26 
CLOSED 


11/27 
9:30-10 


11/28 
9:30-1 C 


11/29 
10-7 


11/30 
9:30-10 


12/1 
9:30-10 


12/2 
9:30-10 


12/3 
9:30-10 




GESBWT 

R Us 

Gurnee Mills BlveJ 

Gurnee 

C847) 855-8*97 

Mow accepting 
applications 




m&cmsit&jfim&^j^^ 




9k 



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November 27, 1998 



'ij. Lakeland Newspapers f C4S 



f 




Lakeland Newspapers is your 




To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you hare ptarcd ctem&n] 
adtrtillatnf, with the lake- 
land Ncanpapcn you may re- 
ceive a miileading atateaeal 
from another Qnn request- 
ing payment r« UUs mirata- 
trig. To receive praficr aed- 
n to yout account, all pay 
menu Tor your Lakeland 
Newspaper i advertising 

muM b* made a» invoiced 
awl directed to 

lakeland Kcvapapen 

PO Boa 263 

SO & Whitney Si. 

Crayalake, tL 6OO3O-02&8 






-wV? 



h Toa can be debt Free fa j 

S fo 5 5/5. including your 

mortgage, do the money 

you are aovr making. 

For free information call 

(847) 243-5645 



h*M 




DONT THROW 
AWAY THAT 
OLD LAMP, 
tS BRING IT TO OUR 
LAMP DOCTORS 
FOR REPAIRS. 
WARREN ELECTRIC EVG 
33261 N. HIGHWAY 45 
WILDWOOD, IL 60030 

(847) 223-8691 



* 

* 



* 



{ Painting^^Wallpapering 
2 Expert Installation 
♦ ft{CT$j?abnV&Viny| 



I ( 847j^5-8428 j 




4— U Pointing 



irflnlenor ft Exlenor Pointing 

d'Oiywol Repairs 

tf Paper Removoi 

2J we Retinon Garage Doors 



rf Rotted Wood Replacement 

of AktmnuRl Siding Pointing 

(rf Handyman Wort 

Cf We Repair Loose AHjminLro Siding 



MYMn 



FREE ESTIMATE 

(847) 356-9282 
Jim Fay- Owner 

oaaflioba. 



FANTASTIC FIR1WOOP 



^y 



2-YMR OtPSmO*£X> NARPSWOP 
OAK, ASH. MAPLE, CHERRY $65 
100% OAK $75 (FC) 
(847) 546-3613 
(815) 344-9522 



(FC) 



ill 



l fi 7 ^^;: 



|^0tr^0^262Qffl gP 




Lower your ELECTRIC BILL with our ENERGY PERFOR MANCE SE RVICE 

HEATWAVE 

Heating ■ AiV Conditioning 

(847) 740-4127 

Fax (847) S46-08SS 

We Service All Makes & Models 
Fully Licensed & Insured _ K ., 

All Work Guaranteed 
W* accept All Ui|or 
Credit Card* 




mO'ltliOML I 

llmiCl J 



COUPON 



PRESEASON SPECIAL 



I 



I 



PRECISION FURNACE 
TUNE-UP 

lOiVLY $39,951 

WITH THIS COUPON 




All Wired, Inc. 

647.296-9900 
PmurSySv^gUta. 
Cook. MMng and 



CompuMn • Homa Thamr • Pnona* 

• Free Estimate* 

• Ahny* Reasonably Priced 

• HomeTheaini 

• Cm to rt Wcit Q ifld, Ow JBe ! 

• Dc*r Pro-Lo5«i Doty Ogaal & THX 

• DSS & Orad Duo IrcKaSaSon Avaiatia 
•UATV(Artaor*).CATV(Cac*W) 

• Phone, Modem ft BON Unm 

• Phone Sylvan* avatebla 

• Ck*edCaoulTV(CGTV) 
a Heme Thadftar AAjtDfnsfion 

• Candena* 6 ID B Remote* |g ajtt ONE 

• CnrnpuSar Me^wortt Da*gn and tnaiairsqr, 

• Compukv Control Voir Whota Houa* 

• Wfhoki Hooaa Spaafcar SytOama 

• Front and Rev PrcjaCboA Spectfev 

e TV QJUfjubon SjMdllMN (MuBlpki TV») 

• One Souk* (DSS. Cat* Box) To el TVs 

• Caler D on on* or M TVk ta four house 

• V\Tc*a Hc>jsa Rarncrta Ccrtrol 

• QaMMKiaj Sound Sysiama (70 VMJ 

• Qonftwioi Room*. Tret^Q Roomt 

• We Of attar our eaaawtem 

Check us out on ft* Web 
f<rJ«ne* www.alhmrwlinccom 

Cornrntc oa l « RaaidfOar a IndurtnaJ 







•Htm* *t O^Ui 



\a**lUl U (847) 838 




OINTRACIORSEl^aHCSBMC^ 

ELECTRICAL CONTr^CTORS 
"Call Us For Fast Courteous fierwee" 

33265 MRte. 45 
■ Wudwood, IL 60030 

(847)223-4682 

RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL 




IS3 







■ 



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i-;n'-'»»J5i'is» _ «*<^ 1 * 1 






C46 J Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



November 27, 1998 




Lakeland Newspapers is your 




To Place 
Your Ad Here 




To Thfrf Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



847-2234161 



Jt&ke Online! 

www.lake-online.com 

Lake County's Hot Spot on the WWWI 

Your All Inclusive Guide to 

Lake County and the Internet I 



• it ml 



Internet Studio 
www.theistudio.eom 

Just the Facts. . . 

FACT: Salei Online 1997 $21.8 Billion 
FACT: 12.000.000 Get Online In 1998 
FACT: First Year Web Site ROI 246% 

•Core 5" Starter Web Sites 
J795 00 Including Training 

Don't ignore the facts. 



Businos* is like rowing a 



at upstronm. You h.nvo no 
choice but to go ahond or you 
will go back. " 



847-395-9115 

391 Like Street Downlown Antloeh 



T. _— ~, -. 
CON STRU CTION 

OFFERS: 

• General Contracting 

• Interior Trim • Remodeling 

• Siding, Soffit, Fuda 'Addition* 
■ BatenMtit Ft nl i htn g 
• D*«lu/5cr«*n Porches 
. • Window Replacement 

♦ .Dryw»nC#Palnting a 
u( Quality Work 

' GUARANTEED!!! 

..lfi Call t«47> S37-0677 

Aak for Tony 
i < Fully Ineared 




~ AFFORDABLE 
HOME REPAIRS 



HANDYMAN SERVICl. 



Save money by using America's 

largest handyman service 

insured, bonded, guaranteed 

(847) 726-1061 




OFFICES IN 30 STATES 



DHmr.ih W. An/dt 

■ |tf |-<tairf **i ln*ln*kMJ U* **** *u<wnlr»t 

*i\ »* ; ■*■: AM.' l*rrr*tiDf WUfidn WHUa 

\ k> k i ■■■ ' »> l fVM* V.i |il » Vl '*i ' """ *'»*t'"*. 
.1 fcr.iv^ " <,At.-../MW\'.i 1 » ■ «»t*iJe >■■!*• MM* 



- H - * * . 5*: » -r' -■ • * x "** 
■ 4^,i^n<H, M»flW**i r»***> 




&*£] If REE I STUMP 

i > * 



REMOVAL 




Land Clearing 
; ; Wholesale Seasoned 
Hardwood 

Nordstrom 
Tree Experts Co. 

(fully Insured) 

(847) 5264)858 

:«eeeee»*eeeesiisi e e«* 



■i>- 



CREATIVE EXTERIOR CONCEPTS, INC 



tgp Save 10% Up to $500 2£ 



Siding 

Vinyl Windows 
- Bays & Bows 
• Patio Doors 



Roofing 

Soffit & Fascia 
■ Gutters 
> Doors 



Licensed, Insured and Bonded 



C847) 726-lOfrO 



GROUND UP CONSTRUCTION 



INSURED SNOWPLOWING 



AND SALTING 



COMMERCIAL - RESIDENTIAL - INDUSTRIAL 
24 HOURS A DAY - 7 DAYS A WEEK 

CALL NOW FOR QUOTE • ACCOUNTS AVAILABLE 



CALL NOW FOR 
BEST RATES! 



10% OFF WITH THIS AD 



MOBIL (847) 514-9770 
OFFICE: (847) 548-9261 




CREATIVEC0M1 

YOUR COMMUNICATION 

j; EwirTrs 

• TV & CABLEJACrC INSTALLATION 
■ HOMETHEATEB" SYSTEM INSTALLATION 

• CLOSED CIRCUIT TV (CCTV) 

• CUSTOM WIRING 

• TV, VCR; PHONE, SATELLITE HOOKUP 

15%Off WlthThis Ad 
(847) 973-9466 



• RESIDENTIAL • COUUEACVU. • INDUSTRIAL 



Licensed 

Iniured 

FREE! 

Estimates 



RQOJFjKl(3i 

; SIDING;&TR 
SEAMl : ESS:,G®^S^ 

^vDECks;*M 

: ':R^air:&;.irisur^ce^ 

? (847):438-60d4 or ,1 

; : V. V (8^7J:550^953BM ' 



E 



Quality 

Cratttmanihlp 

Guaranteed 



-. ' V-*' * ; " Kj" V;'7j/R t 



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m 

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Typr^ t Graphics 



If you have 
an image to uphold... 

Let CSP design your image. 

CSP can design an image that 
will make an impression. 

•^o Design 9 brochures 9 f tiers* Inserts 

• /3cfe # Business Cards 

•find More 

Call: (847) 244-6966 
or e-mail: csp63@megsinot.net 






\ 



CABLEBpXES 



WHY RENT 

OWN VhUK <>\\N 



]OU \l l.M\.|OK ItKWII^ 



, 1-888-800-8078 



-^y^- 



SEASONED 2 YEARS 

Mixed Haniwoods S73 F.C^ 

Oak $85 EC. 

Cherry, Birch & Hickory $94 EC. 

Separated $105 EC 

DISCOUNTON 2 OR MORE 

CXED/T G4X2SACC£PTED X . 
STACKING Al'AILABLB 

m, (W»7t-oiir 




-The Bodies 
Love Correction" 



DMMKIHG 
WATER 

Hugged by R.O * 

Kissed by U.V* And 

Caressed By A.C.* 

Bottled and 

Distributed By 

The 

Ecowater 

Store 

'Jtiviaion of. Ui~ft-J~ 
fjtUxpiiAt*, 3 tic 

1-800-397-1480 

Reverse Osmosis, Ultra Violet, 
Activated Carbon 




lECKS PLUS 

CONSTRUCTION 

• GENERAL CARPENTRY 
• Custom Decks 

•Porches 'Room Additions 
•Basement Remodeling 
• Bathrooms - Kitchens 
•Custom Carpentry 
Improvements & Repajn! 
tKTUHEO B BOHDU> 




C414) 899^443 

IVase C*l) Cuy Kolkiu 



Ttir holiftU appmarh to s<K)rf htalth 

STOP SMOKING - LOSE WEIGHT 

Slop irrational [can - managr strru ■ 

firms vour life 

FREE CONSULTATION 

TV imelimt thtrapy that works 

< AU. THt CENTER FOR HABtT CONTROL 

12S NEWBERRY AVE Rm f 

UBERTWllLL. U. 

847-816-4911 

n<\llJ F. WOLD i Hf Uasitr ll\jimmK 



GROUND UP CONSTRUCTION 

"CempUtt "BMliitog tn2 ^tmeitling < ^rem r tkt tpeunl Up" 
CARPENTER / GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED • RELIABLE • QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP 



r> — ?m. — ~^~^ 

SPECIAL ON ROOFS & BASEMENTS NOW! 
~ABW6r* 



COLOR COPIES 

AT DISCOUNT PRICES 

•LOW M1NIMUMS 
•PlCK-UP/DELIVERY AVAILABLE 
PUT YOUR PHOTOS ON YOUR FLIERS 
S BIRTHDAY INVITATIONS 
■BVJ ALSO AVAILABLE 

IK ENTERPRISES 
847-721-6004 on 
B47-838-6003 
e-mail IKPRISES8A01. COM 




led abttu 



■«*■ 



FRA1SER HAMUN, 3RD GENERATION CONTRACTOR *$££$ BBB 

EWSMESS BUREAU '■ 

MOBIL: 847-514^770 • OFRCE: B47-548-9261 • PAGER 708-701 -BUILD 



\ .lit* tut 

. Aluminum dn». 

• All Other Scr.ip Mouls 

/ndusrfi.W Accounts Wvlcami' 

Chicago Surplus 

1 1304 260th Avenue 
Trevor, Mil 

ttx-ot.on iiew3t VW 1 rrnie west ol 83 ft C hjrn 
Mtxm on 2B9m St voei io tell 2 biocu 

Mon.-Frl. 9:00am - 5pm 

Saturday 9:00am - 3pm 

closed 12 - 1 foi lunch 

1414) U2-2517 




You*H never get stuck with usl 



We olTer 24- hour: 

• Snowplowing 

• Salting & Sanding 

• Snow removal 



• Sidewalk shoveling 

• Loader and domptruck 
services 

• Bulk salt & sand delivery 



Small & large lot contracts Call for a free estimate! 

Lake County Snowplowing & Salting 
847-362-9400 - Fax 847-362-9435 J 



^^^^^if^^^Mtf^- ' .'". '■■ '"'■' ■■'■:'' ' - : -'r'^:': '.■'■ : - : '^ : :- WiM&& '■ ^S'^' ■-'. ^§S 
\November27, 1998 ,_. /- v COUNTY 







. ■ '■■■ ■ .■■■: 

HWnB'-f-v'j" . 



" " [.; '■■■ 



'-885-0808 




CS$£ 



1*83-889-0899 - - 

Fax 847-85&b83fr 

E-Mail- salton8®iK,nQtcom.com 
W$% www.salton-masim,com 

W^^n^imM^M^SW^^^ 

Holiday Prices 

. VaJues to $50 
Men's & Women's 

• ST 7Uin, 70Mi70l6 



»■.: - ',-/' ■•"- 



ih'V- 



•C--.-> 




Assorted Juicers 

199 



While quantities last. 

Some models discontinued 

JG3.JC8 




George Foreman Grills 



OB 10 tteg. "40 S 29P* 

OBfiO Reg. '79 9 &SP B 

WBOHeg 109 S 99*" 



.■ ; 




K».rt.lll 




ieorge Foreman Cookbook 5 13 B 



Belgian 

Waffle 
or Sandwich 
Maker 



Your Choice 
Holiday Special! ^ggg^ 

WM3C, WM4, SA4 




The Juiceman 

Juiceman Jr Model JM I t9 
I 4 horee power moior He* S(W 90- 

Juicoman II Model JM2 «m 17 J7^ 
MZ horsopower motor 

Also on sale Juiceman 
Elite Series 




Let us help you 
celebrate with our 
savings... 

Hair Dryer 
Closeout 



■■ . ■ 

....... -K'- 



<& 







^Values to 

: *35"° 






Asst. styles-discontinued fr refurbished 
Limited Quantity 



kuft* 



iW? 



— ^F^ 7 ^ 

•— <— Citrus 8 Speed 
Juicer Hand 



Salton 
Assorted 

Rice 

Cookers 

3-14 Cup 

Size 

$ 1S 99 to $gg99 

Salton Vitamin Bar 
B Tier Steamer 

S SS 

VP3 




5g9 fliwr.nl 
I nr»*l 



Dessert Depot 

_ m 



8 Speed 0an 
Hand Opener 
Mixer w/Knife 
Sharpener 



BRKADMAN® 
BKEAPMAKTTOS 

$BAM 

TB440 Heg. '99 OV 
1 to 1-1/8 tt>. loaf aise 

6QQ9S 

TEB60 Heg. 119- Off 

1 to I- 1/8, 8 m. loaf sise 

All other Breadmakers 
av Holiday Prices 



m* 



Gino's East 
Pizza Maker 



Sauce or 
Cnut 

Mix from 
*4"ea 



■'. 




$A99 to $ 



99 



Salton 

Plnelle Maker m* 

Reg 29 ^ „ gyuQ 



s 19' 



Maxim 
Donut Bites : u 

Reg '29- 8 85 89 

Salton 

Peanut Butter 
Machine m fi 

Salton 

Yogurt Maker vh« 

Beg '19- 

si 409 

Salton x ^ 

Hot Air 

Popcorn Popper tm 
Reg n 4- $Q99 

Maxim 

Crepe Maker mk 
. Reg. '39- ^81" 





Cafe Cappuccino 

aopcset. $C7A99 

Reg. '89- Oe7 

Your Choice 
EX4BOklt 

EX99kit 



** ; a^y . Holiday Special! 



Met in «itra IDS OFT all 
SjHHSMQ M i rhlnw 



FARBERWARE 9 DEPARTMENT 



PBBCOLATOH S 6 ^ 1 ^. 

FryingPans 



i»~ lulnlMi UmI ndilrt 




kM 



&, 7Q 

M»-(f 'If f CT 

■- lUlslu tlHl PQ Doom ^QQ M 

m m. 



Maxim Toasters 

Microchip Control. Cool Touch 
■ rf 2 Slice Wide Mouth ETT6, BT9 ,.1 

$i 

f^ Si'.ctr uvtu.aoie ui s::rJ.uj' savings] 





SALTON CAFE 
$r«Q99 

$3999 



Three For All 



TfcrMForAllFhii 
Reg. '129~ 






Asst. Looney 
Tones 
Character 
Coffee Mug w/Mug Warmers 

Bugs Bunny or 
Marvin Snow Cone Makers 



.,„_ _ ,,-.., Electric 
COFFEE URNS __ _ 

ijjgoWOKS 

^> '179- 





T at KlltllWI »1««1 Wok 



B 89" 



Salton 

Presents 

TacoBeil 

Kitchen 

Originals 

Holiday Special! 

Sis* ?t 4 tj; s$f ."'«*: 

Tm Uet :ver. 'H. 'IB* 

Mr: PtoS ?w«s- •5|" 




■is- Holiday Special 

V Wutritionlrt Tio nteef 
Now $ 89" 





Bl^CK • 



HoUday $ <| A 99 

Snedal! * * We f 



■25 



Ml mimr Iwflmy Tiim- 
flm*ll FJseinc»lA(HJli»fH»"* On Mum 



Booxie Story 



clS^ s Book DoUs 




";.'/.? 



• ■ 




Hcr»h.«y 

AuortodQift 

Items Cookie Jar, 

KU» Candlea *■ 

Cryatal 



^■/> 




Andy Warhol's 
Art Dinnerware 



-itf}- i*-H ,, /«i.Mti' 



8 B M u,»9"«ca 



!,•-* r> :■■ J.- 




Father 
Christinas Pattern 

16 Piece j«t 

*99»* 

OUwr carirtnut* P*£Umt Also 
ATtiUbl»*ndanPMS»l 



Cookie Jar « « f\oa 

ClaSSiCS B»lld«TBf*cl*II X" 



Oreo By Block 

Jan, MaSF Kg|i, CoeU* Hi w 



■ «a.^ s*s a uttj: 'JW3 

•CO MAC rC'Ali HAS A : AS.'.' »? 
•SflAKvC UJUABY BtAJi 



99 



Coakl* J»r» 
''" HolU«7apKUII 



^"-^' ii 



$mi to » am 



Block Lead 






•14" ht M H 



.*■ 



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C48 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



November 27, 1998 









IT'S MORE THAN A MOVIE!™ 



WWW. 



inemas.com 



.•■.■■.-■•■ - . • 

■ ; . -.,-. ■ - ■■'. > - ,, ■■■■-■ .- -■''."■ V . • ■ 




■ 



. !■■: J -;-'-r: 

-. i 

.-.-■ V-V ■ 




iilTHi 




On Rollins Road between Route 83 and Cedar Lake Road, Round Lake Beach, Illinois. . 

All Stadium Seat Auditoriums 

18 Wall To Wall Screens • 3,900 Seats 



Gourmet Cafe 

Is serving hot drinks & baked goods 



High Back Chairs 

with retractable cuphoWer armrests 




Large Concession Stand • Customer Service Counter 

Credit Card Sales Accepted at Box Office 

DTS, SDDS & Dolby Digital Sound 

Equipped for the Hearing Impaired 

2 Day Advanced Ticket Sales 

Handicap Accessible 

Video Game Room 




h 



A BUG'S LIFE (G)' (12:10. 12:40 2:20 2:50 4:30 5:10) 6:50 THE RUGRATS MOVIE (G) (12:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 MEET JOE BLACK(PG-13) (1250 4'25) 800DIG 

7:20 9:10 9:40 DIG 4:00 5:00) 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 DIG THE SIEGE (R) (115 4-10) 700 935 DIG 

BABE: PIG IN THE CITY (G) (12:25 12:55 2:40 3:05 4:50 THE WATERBOY (PG-13) (12:30 3:00 5:05) 7:10 7:45 9:20 10:15 DIG | STILL KNOW WHAT YOU DID LAST SUMMER (R) 

520) 7:10 7:40 9:30 10:00 DIG .VERY BAD THINGS (R) (12:45 3:10 5:25) 7:50 10:05 DIG (12:15 2:45 5:15) 7:35 10:15 DIG 

* ENEMY OF THE STATE (R) RINGMASTER (R) (1210 230 450) 7-15 1020 DIG L,V,NG 0UT L0UD < R > 7:30-9:50 DIG 

1:20 4:30 6:50 7:20 9:40 10:10 DIG mr,umHOIC " W D«W <<-<™ «-wj '." iu.^uuiu CNRIWlimtffti 

HOME FRIES (PG-13) {12:15 2:30 4:40) 6:55 9:15 DIG ' LL Bt MUML ™ H ^ MRIST MAS (PG) 

* = No Passes or Super Savers AMERICAN HISTORY X (R) (1:10 4:05) 7:25 10:10 DIG j H£ W)ZA RD OF OZ (G) 



(12:50 3:50) Dl 



m