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Full text of "Antioch News 12/04/1998"

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Staff RBDOrtar ,abeted ' "'r J niJt J n ' end(!d fo ' *$? or use by irig of jhe use of the drink. Hosick later ; --"< 

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clubs around America The bottle is approached by several parents disapprov- Please see COACH / A3 




Warning: ... High 
doses ofephedrine can 

intended for use by 
persons under the age 
qflti. Keep out of the 

reach of children, 

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. From the warning 
label on Beyo nd Ripped 

dietary supplement 

produced by Van Horn 

Technology. 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



7 think it helps the community more' 

Christmas blooms for PTO 

Dutch Gardens will donate 25 percent, of weekend sales to Dist. 34 PTO 



Customers who buy trees, 
holiday decorations and 
other merchandise at 
Dutch Gardens Nursery on 
Saturday and Sunday, Dec, 5 and 6, 
will help raise funds for Parent , 
Teacher Organizations of three 
District 34 school&i— Oakland Grade . 
School, Upper Grade School, and W. 
C. Petty School. 

Dutch Garden owner Margie 
Chostner will donate 25 percent of 
this weekend's custorhersalesto the 
Parent Teacher Organizations as an 
unrestricted gift to help the schools- 
District 34's Lower Grade School 
is not participating since the school 
completed a major holiday-based 
fund-raising effort yesterday, Thurs- 



'•;. 







day, Dec 3 

"I'm hoping it does very well," 
Chostner said. "I've kept my prices 
down, and I've got a lot of good 
stock." 

Dutch Gardens Nursery has 
trees, decorations, crafts, and, on 
weekends, Santa Claus stops by to 
visit with children, ':,. "-_:■_■. :^; ... 

The nursery is located fat Route 
- ,4S and Sand Lake Road in linden - 
hursL 

This will be the first year that 
Chostner has tried this type of fund 
.- raising cveritwith a local school : .. 
system. Aluioiigh some people/ - : ' J 
seem to favor larger fund-raising 
efforts that occur at this time of the ; 
year, she said that she prefers, to 
contribute to smaller, local events. 

'I'd like to do more things like 
this," she said. "I'm trying to get 
more ideas for fund-raisers. I think it 
helps the community more." 

Certainly the initial local 
response has been good for holiday- 
time fund-raising events. Lower 
Grade School has just completed a 
successful holiday-based effort. 



Please see BLOOMS / A3 




Dusak 
isMss 
Teen 
ois 



BY KENNETH IVOCHEHSS^^ 
Staff Reporter: &-:.- 




Margie Chostner, owner of Dutch Gardens at Route 45 and Sand 
Lake Road in Undenhurst, decorates Christmas wreaths to be soW 
Dec. 5 and 6 with 25 percent of the proceeds donated to the Parent 
Teacher Organizations at Oakland Grade School, Antioch Upper 
Grade School and W.C. Petty School.-Pnoto by Sandy Bressner 






*?n ■ - .r ; 






Dusak: 

Was Little Miss 
Antioch 1388 



Pedestrians watch as the Antioch Christmas Lights Parade makes to way ; down Main Stjeet Friday 
evening, Nov ^27, where Santa Claus arrived to greet people at his Enchanted Castle.-Phoro by 
Sandy Bressner 



ceremonies in Schaumburg, DL Nov. 
27, 28, and 29. 

Dusak will now compete in the 
rMiss?Teen:USAPageant whicb/wfll 
be held in'Shreveport, La. ir> August. 
2il999^ >7=-;r ..-■■;■-:; - , '-•-.: : - ,\ ■- 
:These;eveni9 nre:afflltotcd "with 
Miss Universe Pageant; "; "£; ', 
, • "She was little Miss Antioch th 
1988,* -said momeiBem.Dusak.- 

Sister. 
Lisa Dusak; 
20, was Miss 
Antioch in 
1996. 

The 
Thanksgiving 
weekend 
pageant was 
the first that 
Amber 
Dusak had 
entered since 
. 1988. Beth 

■ Dusak said that her daughter had not 

. been Interested In pageants until last 

| year when she decided to enter the 

Miss Illinois Teen USA event At that 

time she was selected as third 

runner-up. 

In the three days after this year's 
pageant, the Carmel High School 
senior remained with pageant 
officials. 

"She's out having photographs 
done and picking out her wardrobe 
for the year,'" said Beth Dusak. 

A professional dress designer will 
work with Amber Dusak to create a 
dress .with her. In addition, other 
clothing, needed for the national 
contest, will be selected. 

The national Miss Teen USA 
Pageant includes formal wear and 
swim suit events as well as participa- 
tion in ^production number. ■ 

Teeft pageant participants will 
learn a production number Friday 
morning, the day of the pageant, and 
Will present it that evening live on 
CBS Television. 

Please see DUSAK/ A3 



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A2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



December 4, 1998 







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982 Route 59 • Anlioch IL 
\ Wo reserve the right to limit quantities PEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 

end correct printing errors mon jhubs 10 -? • r«i « sat 10-e • sun io ; 





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Decembers 1998 



COMMUNITY 



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lakeland Newspapers/ A3 



FROM PAGE Al 



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COACH: Youth players drink 
energy drink to enhance 




years gave a sport drink that's avail- 
able over the counter in health clubs 
and convenient stores across Ameri- 
ca to some members of his team, his 
son Included," Howard read. "After 
the game, It was brought to his atten- 
tion that some of the parents were 
concerned about the sport drink, so 
he thought it was in the Antioch 
Vikings' best interest that he resign 
immediately..." 

The statement went on to 
say.. ."The Antioch Vikings, for 28 
years, have never and will never give 
the message that anything but hard 
work and sportsmanship should be 
used to achieve success..." 

According to Howard, Hosick 
has had no involvement In the 
Vikings since the incident. He has 
not participated in executive 
board meetings and functions. 
1 lowever, Hosick has expressed in- 
terests in returning to the Antioch 
Vikings in 1999, a decision the 
board will review prior to next 
football season. 

"We told Tom that it would be 
reviewed prior to the 1999 season to 
see If he was going to be asked back 
In any capacity with the Antioch 
Vikings," Howard said. 

"Beyond Ripped" is a adrenaline 
enhancing drink used to increase the 



heart rate. "I don't know if Hosick 
read the label before giving It out," 
Howard explained. "From what I un- 
derstand, he was told by the place he 
bought it from that it was no worse 
than Gatorade." 

Also, according to Howard, the 
drink is sold in nearly half a dozen 
convenient stores and health clubs in 
the Antioch area. 

"I truly believe that if the coach 
thought the drink had any contro- 
versy, he would not have given it 
out," Howard said. 

According to Dan Carole, presi- 
dent of the Junior Football League of 
Northern Illinois, the board will re- 
view the complaints parents have 
made in the future. 

"I have talked with several par- 
ents with children in the organiza- 
tion, and they have confirmed that it 
did happen and that each one of the 
kids was asked to reimburse the 
coach for the drink," Carole said. "We 
will address it from the board mem- 
ber's perspective and discuss any 
possible disciplinary action." 

"As far as the Lakeland Cardinals 
are concerned, as well as other teams 
in the league, we think this is wrong 
and children should be given noth- 
ing to enhance growth or perfor- 
mance in any way." 



BLOOMS: Support PTO 



Principal Mary Kay McNeill, at 
District 34 's Antioch Lower Grade 
School, said that their school had just 
completed a "Christmas and More" 
sale. As pari of their' Market Day 
fund-raising parents also could pick- 
up greenery and boughs. 
v McNeill sold that they hod 
poinsettla plants available as part 
of their Market Day sale. The 
school obtained the holiday (low- 
ers from Marty Schwind Green- 
houses, 24296 West Townline Road 
in Lake Villa. 

"We try to buy locally," McNeill 
said. 

"This is our sixth year of doing 
it," she said. "It was very successful. 
The products are beautiful." 

"We got a lot of support from 
First National Bank— Employee 
Owned," McNeill said. The bank 
buys its holiday decorations from 
the school sale. 

"They always do it," McNeill 
said. "We appreciate that." 

Dutch Gardens is ready for the 
needs of all customers this week- 
end. Even Santa Claus is expected 
to be there from 1 to 5 p.m. on Sat- 
urday and Sunday. 

Chostner said they have four 



types of Christmas trees In a wide 
price range. 

One section of cut Balsam fir, 
White pine, and Scotch pine trees is 
available for $25. 

A second section has the same 
types of tree, but they are 6 and 7 
feet tall and cost $35. 

"I also have Fraser fir trees,"' she 
said. "They don't lose their needles 
as quickly — hardly at all, (they have 
a) a firm needle, and they have 
more of a citric smell." 

The firm needles make the tree 
easier to decorate and hold orna- 
ments. 

The Fraser fir trees are in two 
groups, one group for $50 and one 
for $75. The higher priced Fraser fir 
trees are 7 and 8 feet tall. 

"I have roping and boughs and 
wreaths," she said. There are three 
different sizes of wreaths. 

"I have a gift shop. It's like a 
craft shop with different things," 
she said. There are birdhouses, 
wind chimes, painted pots, outdoor 
items, and stuffed animals. 

The funds raised for the three 
schools will be used to improve 
and enrich the educational experi- 
ence for students. 



DUSAK: Miss Teen Illinois 



Appearing on stage is not new 
for Amber Dusak. 

"Amber has been doing local 
musical theater," Beth Dusak said. 
Amber Dusak has been on the PM&L 
Theater stage. 

"She wants to be on Broadway 



and an attorney one day," Beth 
Dusaksaid. Her daughter would like 
to attend Northwestern University. 
Amber Dusak has a brother, R.J. 
Dusak, 19, a student at Northern 
Michigan University. Her father is 
Russ Dusak. 



Antioch News 

Vol. 113 No. 49 A Lakeland Newspaper Founded 1886 



(uspsozt-obo) mu*#m* 

30 South Whitney St.. Grayslake. IL 60030 
(947)223-8161 



Mwntw ot lllinoi! Pies* Auoc 

Look tor us on the Internet at 
WWW.LPNEWS.COM 



OH.co oi PuBi.cjsi.wi 30 Souin Whitney Si. GfayUairB.il 60030 Prions [647J2M-8iei 

Published «e<ntly. poxxMal ma* poslsrje pj.'j al GmysJahe. CL COCM 

Home DH.vury [tutus $24 SO fw year in Lake. Cook, Konoina and McHoniy Count*!. 

elwwhero J+o DO per yoar try moil paid m ndvonco 

PoiinuitlSf Send udomn chanoet is Anboch Nawv 30 SoutJi Whuney Sniwl P O Boi 263 Otayslake. !!!«*><» 60030 



WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

Publisher 
KAREN OTOOLE 

Circulation Mgr. 

BOB ULMER 

Display Advertising Mgr. 

MAUREEN COMBS 

Classified Advertising Mgr. 



M.R, SCHROEDER 

Founder- 1904-1 9B 6 



t'J 



WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

President 
MIMI KOOB 

Comptroller 

CORKEY GROSS 

Public delations Manager 

Y££ffiS ™ONW I HETRICK BURKE 

audit mmdimc Managing tailor 



NEAL TUCKER 

Composition MgrjExacutive Editor 



■It'sjustso reolto the kids, they love the elves' 



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> becomes home to Santa and his elves 



Wood's Christmas creadons. 

"It's different than a shopping 
center Santa; the man really makes 
beautiful toys," she exclaimed. The 
atmosphere is amazing. It's really a 
one-on-one experience with the 
kids." 

In the middle of it all sits the man 



ByUZTHOMSEN 
Staff Reporter;. 

Can one man uphold the ihagic 
and spirit of the man in the red coat? 
People seem to think so. £ f 

Each year Woody Wood along 
with his own 'Mrs: Claus, his yirjfe, 
Shirley, and many friends,- ;; 
family. and grandchildren, • 
turn an ordinary wood shop , 
into Santa's workshop, con> | 
plete with elves. 

They build it, and people 
come. They come to see the 
shine in their children's eyes' 
as they sit on Santa's lap. 
They come to receive a 
smooth wooden ornament, 
hand-signed in gold. They 
come from a jaded, ordinary 
world, to renew their faith in 
the magic and spirit of 
Christmas. 

"One year a customer 
came in and said, 'you made 
my son's Christmas, this is 



and spent some time with the elves. 
He came out and said; "I'm going to 
tell those kids they Were wrong,"" 
said Woody. 

Last year more than 500 people 
from as far away as Wisconsin and 
Michigan crowded Into the little 
shop to sample cookies arid punch, 
and purchase the beautiful 
toys and other wood crafts 
cut from specialty hard- 
Woods that Wood creates. 
This year the Woods ex- 
pect 800 people, a rough 
estimate based on the 
amount of ornaments they 
give away. 

Elf-organizer 
Shirley hired three shifts of 
eight elves to work the two- 
day event. She purchased 
six big boxes of cookies, 
which loyal helper Mered- 
ith Breyer will give away. 
The Woods be- 
Santa lakes the requests of 3-year-old Becky Ueve In the magic of the 
from Wisconsin during last year's Santa's work- season just as much as any 
just like Santa's workshop,'" shop. Becky's family drives more than one hour child who visits, which is 
said Shirley Wood a.k.a. Mrs. each year to attend the event where they meet why they say they will nev- 
Claus, "That phrase kept go- Mends who drive from Michigan for the event. er cnar 8 e I? t r . s t^T S o real 
ing through my mind, and _ pnoto CO urtesy of the Muellers. 
that's how we started." 




Woody and Shirley orga- 
nize family, friends, grandchildren, 
and even members of a local Girl 
Scout Troop to be elves and help out 
with the toy building. 

Lake Villa/Llndenhurst Girl 
Scout Troop 190 has passed the 
Torch to Troop 512 this year, having 
outgrown their elf outfits. Co-leader 
Mona Bernhardt, of Antioch, says the 
girls look forward to the event all 
year. 

Dressed as elves, the girls sit in 
the warehouse of the woodshop. At 
long festively decorated tables, sur- 
rounded by shelves of wooden crafts, 
they build toys. The bells on their 
shoes jingle as they hop around 
helping one child string wooden 
beads and another mount wheels on 
a miniature wooden race car. Even 
Bernhardt sees the magic in Woody 



himself. Woody Wood, a.k.a. Santa 
Claus. Dressed comfortably in sus- 
penders and red pants, he looks like 
he stepped off the cover of a Norman 
Rockwell Christmas card. His eyes 
twinkle and his beard is snowy white . 
He starts growing his beard in June 
and shaves it after his Christmas 
event. Otherwise he has children 
stopping him on the street and ask- 
ing why he is dressed in khakis. 

"I'm the only guy I know who 
grows a beard for six months, just to 
keep it for two days," said Woody. 

Woody Wood's Santa Claus has 
given renewed hope to even the 
faintest hearts. 

"I remember one doubting 
Thomas. He was 4-years-old. He 
came in and said, "The kids in my 
class say Santa is a fake." He went in 



to the kids, and they love 
the elves," said Shirley. 
"We would hate to have someone 
not be able to come because we 
charged money. It just doesn't feel 
right." 

Mueller-Wood Kraft Inc.'s 
Christmas extravaganza will run 
Saturday, Dec. 5 from 10 a.m. to 4 
p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 6 from 
12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. The shop is lo- 
cated on Route 83 and Wall Street, 
just north of Petite Lake Road in 
Lake Villa. 

The custom wood craft compa- 
ny is open for business all year 
round, building toys, cabinets, and 
custom shelving The Christmas sea- 
son event is the highlight of the year. 
Brought to life by the efforts of one 
couple and their loving family and 
friends, the Santa's workshop is in its 
seventh year. 



Woman's Club starts winter rec program 



If the Antioch Woman's Club 
board approves, the club will 
be setting forth on a new, in- 
teresting project for children in 
the new year. 

"It's a two-year project called 
'The Winter Recreation Project,'" 
said President Carol Pnvelskl. 
The club will be working on the 
William E. Brook Wetland Sanctu- 
ary and Entertainment Center to 
help improve its winter-time value 
for children, 

"We're going to be putting in 
sledding hills, sheds, and safety 
fences," said the club's project leader 
Sue Allen. 

The Women's Club Board will be 
approached with plans on Wednes- 
day for events to help raise the nec- 
essary money over the next two 
years. One item on the proposed 
agenda is a quilt. 

"We're going to create a quilt of 
the weUands," said Allen. 

Members will be asked to con- 
tribute squares to make the quilt 
which will be raffled offal a future 
time and event. 

Vlnce and Arlene Tomasello 

have opened Double Eagle Sports 
Club, They have taken over the loca- 
tion where Struggles Restaurant was 
located. They completely redid the 
building. 

Now it is an indoor golf pro-shop 
and sports lounge. 



• .«■ 



OUR 

TOWN 




"1 have three golf simulators," 
said Vince Tomasello. 

Leagues have been formed, and 
people can play courses from around 
the world, such as Augusta National 
and Pebble Beach. 

David Zak is the chef. He is 
building the menu and working in a 
completely new kitchen. 

There is a fish fry on Fridays and 
specials for other evenings, such as 
Texas barbecue on Tuesday and 
prime rib on Saturday. 

A few tombstones from the early 
1800s period of Antioch history have 
been given to the Lakes Region His- 
torical Society by Wayne Sobczak. 
of Tiffany Real Estate, 549 Lake 
Street. 

"He told me about them several 
years ago," said museum director 
Alnsley Wonderilng. 

She was discussing the accession 
at the Thursday, Oct. 22 meeting of 
the society's board. 

Wonderling said that they are 
part of the very early history of Anti- 
och. One of these particular stones is 



associated with the Ingalls family. 

"God bless Wayne for going to 
the trouble to save them," Wonder- 
ling said. 

Village trustees voted to support 
the Antioch Community High 
School A.L.L. Parent Network 
B uy- A- B rick campaign. 

"We support the A.LL Network 
with post-prom," Mayor Marilyn 
ShlneOug told the village board 
members. 

Mabel Lou Weber urged the 
board to purchase a brick "large 
enough so that they know we sup- 
port them." 

The board voted unanimously to 
approve participation. 

Several months ago in his "Neigh- 
bor" profile published in this news- 
paper, Stan Livermore declared that 
Luigi's Pasta Etc. Etc. was his favorite 
restaurant. Livermore seems to have 
a handle on good restaurants. 

Luigi's Eggplant Parmegian 
Is fabulous. It has been excellent all 
three times I tried it over the past few 
months. 

Further research will be neces- 
sary. 

If you have interesting infor- 
mation or anecdotes to submit for 
"Our Town " call staff reporter Ken 
Patchen at 223-8161. ext. 131 ore- 
mail, edit @lnd.com." 






J ■ ' 



A4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 






December^ 1998 

• -■ " - ■■' ■■ ■ . 



Antioch holiday: carols, cookies, Claus kick off the season 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Friday night, maybe everyone 
in town had a list lo check twice: 

■ Shop downtown 

■ Eat supper at The Vault 
Restaurant 

■ Watch Christmas parade 

■ Sing carols at Village Hall 

■ See Santa Claus at Knchant 

ed Castle 

■ See "Annie Warbucks" at 
PM& I. Theater. 

For Antioch. it was the start of 
another December holiday with 
traditions and memories that re- 
main for a lifetime. 

For people who enjoyed an af- 
ternoon of shopping in Antioch 
with knowledgeable store owners 
to help them, and supper at a 
nearby restaurant, the liming of 
the parade thai bring-* Santa 
Clans to town < ould not have 
lu'i-n hettei. 

A I li.it) f) 111 , >ui', i die ininp.i 
Hies slnvvh lead the \\a\ up Main 
Sliwi uii'h siime t»J ilu-ni com 
pIcK'K tie* Dialed wild holidn) 
li^ills I he lesiiu- i muil was .it 
[lie ritiHs lo weh oine Simla liliu 
veil 

j heie wen 1 main jiattu iji.it 

l«$» < Oil S,< 4 JtJ I .111(1 (till S( Dill 

tumps l>u \ile mjeis. a huge ell. 
t MiiHiiuiiiu tpnupv t iiinmuniiv 

ijUeell- Hl"WII|r I mops. Ill.llll.lt 

,iiim- .mil .i fi 1 1 1 \ huge it'll iiiul 
■-il'.ei ! I ! ■ • i i - 1 1 sjlhl .Old ( il.iv el 
I nn !> ilei t.!,.'.-il ill lights 

\l lie- i .i 1 ■! ihe p. II, nil- Vtn 
t.i uas i :; : ■ ■! on the Sl.ile bank 
ol I he I .o- itawtt H'loie e.oiti^ 
to his In. itlteil l .r.tle S, int, i 
vttipjl^d it' \ llhtU 1 ' 1 W\ '" Uierl .1 

lew t lnliltetl. 

A> thy parade etiilcil. pt'upli'. 
patents. and ihtlillt M Ihiwed In 
the In, m \,imI d| \ ilhi^e Hail to 



sing songs. Hundreds of people 
present filled Orchard Street as 
they sang. 

Village Trustee Mabel Lou 
Weber was fearless with her en- 
couragement for the crowd to 
sing "Santa Claus is Coming to 
Town," "Winter Wonderland," 
"Frosty ihe Snowman," and oth- 
ers. 

"Thank you all for coming 
tonight to celebrate this impor- 
tant tradition." said Mayor Mari- 
lyn Shineflug. 

Shineflug read a village 
proclamation declaring this to be 
the official 22nd annual tree 
lighiing ceremony. 

There was more singing under 
the lit. decorated tree: "Rudolph 
the Red Nose Reindeer." "Here 
Comes Santa Claus." and "lingle 
Hells." 

Afterwards, Anlioch Commu- 
nis High School students served 
hoi chorcilate and a rich variely of 
i ookies 

I hete is no estiniale ol the 
evening s < mud si/e 

"I thought ihete was more 
limn lasi year." said Aniimh Po- 
lice Sgt l |,n Hessinii 

llrssion was wan lung uvri 
illi- line lie. it ihe I IK 'hauled t as 
lie i Inldieii ami patents weie 
pulii'Jtih wailing u< Mr Satii.i 

I watll tile Dlsnev lliu.i 
thiinr said Mai keti/ie \vei- . 
ti iiiii S. ini.t I e New \le\iii' Mm 
ua-. \ isitine lel.iiiv es 

I like I t'll 1 1 1 s.ml lh.it h. 
wanted ,i\|\stu Kiugln vyyuld a 
[in line with Vuil.i. and a lue mi 
gun* and a He.isl Uai» 

Mm haul Rie->ieiei I •>! \mt i 
oi |i wauled ( ..tint doll ami .1 hi 
« \i le 

HlUt.lllV \u ole Si hull/ ", ill 

Hound 1 ake. planned in a^k San 
la 1 l.ius |oi ,1 wedding Raitne 1 lull 
as well as a leletilhhv 

A ) Hreit. I U'ars old, ol 



NOTICE FOR PROPOSED 

PROPERTY TAX INCREASE 

FOR GRASS LAKE SCHOOL 

DISTRICT 36 

I. A public hearing to approve a proposed 
property lax levy increase tor 1998 will be 
held on December 15, 1998 at 7:00 P.M. at 
Grass Lake School, 26177 W. Grass Lake 
Road, Antioch, Illinois 60002. 

Any person desiring to appear at the pub- 
lic hearing and present testimony to the tax- 
ing district may contact Mr. James Beveridge, 
Superintendent, 26177 W. Grass Lake Road, 
Anlioch, Illinois 60002. 
II. The corporate and special purpose prop- 
erty taxes extended tor 1997 were 
$1,431,176.00. 

The proposed corporate and special pur- 
pose property taxes to be levied for 1998 are 
$1,583,127.00. This represents a 10.6% 
increase over the previous year. 
II). The property taxes extended for debt ser- 
vice and public building commission leases 
for 1997 were -0-. 

The estimated property taxes to be levied 
for debt service and public building commis- 
sion leases for 1998 are -0-. This represents 
a 0% increase over the previous year. 
IV. The total property taxes extended for. 
1997 were $1,431,176.00. The estimated 
total propertA/taxes to be levied for 1998 are 
$1,583,127.00. This represents a 10.6% 
increase over the previous year. 
Grass Lake School District #36 
December 3, 1998 

1298A-2302-AN 
December 4, 1998 




Hannah Tortorella, 3, of Anti- 
och watches for Santa Claus to 
arrive during the Antioch 
Christmas Parade on Main 
Street Nov. 27 on her dad, 
Curt's. shoulders— Photo by 
Sandy Bressner 



Imnnd l ake beach, planned to 
asi s.mi.i tor a leletubby, base- 
ball ami a bat 

( -uiHiH'V Ad.imailis. 10. of 
HmhihI I ake Park, said, "1 want a 
I eiehjhhy. N Sync compact disc, 
i i me. wnth a fake diamond, a pair 
ol h* (-bottoms, and a golden 
ih.iit, 

t histina Breii, 12, also of 
Hontnl I. ake Park, said, "I would 
tike a I eletubby, 'N Sync compact 
disi . a ring with my birthstone, 
and clothes." 

The long line of children and 
parents near the F.nchanted Cas- 
tle stretched south along the side- 
walk as everyone patiently waited 
their turn to deliver personal 
messages to Santa Claus, 
ll was a warm evening. 



Santa arrives In the Antioch Christmas parade.- 
Bressner 



— 



Author signing 'Soldier Boy' at Books Etc. 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Wilmot resident John W. Schnurr 
will be at Hooks lite, on Saturday, Dec. 
1 2 from 2 to 4 p.m. to autograph copies 
of his new book "Soldier Boy." 

This is die first book signing at 
Books Etc at 90 1 Main Stree t in Antioch, 



according to owner Dale Perryman. 

Schnurr draws upon his experi- 
ence as a rifle company commander 
during the Korean War to create this 
Civil War tale. 

Schnurr is described as a sensitive 
historian and a masterful storyteller. 

'"Soldier Boy" relives the Civil War 
through the eyes of a Union infantry- 



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receive your paper, contact your Welcome \%<m representative or call lakeland 
Newspapers at (847)223-8161. 



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man, Danny Morganroth. Like many 
of die youth of his day, Danny wel- 
comed the opportunity to fight in the 
great war between the states. Eager 
and impressionable, the impending 
horrors of the escalating conflict 
reached beyond his imagination. 

"Captured by the Confederate 
army following his unit's first real skir- 
mish, Danny faces his worse fears with 
courage and resilience even he never 
knew he had. In the process, he dis- 
covers humanity — and eventually 
love — among the 'enemy' he once 
fought so bravely to subdue." 

Schnurr owned and operated 
Fox Valley Florists from 1954 to 1994. 
He had earned his degree in agricul- 
ture at the University of Wisconsin. 

After his Korean War service, he 
was director and president of the 
Wisconsin Association of School 
Boards. He served nine years as a fire 
chief, 27 years as a manager and 
president of the County Fair, ten 
years as Chair of the County Civil 
Service Commission, and four years 
as Town Supervisor. He was a bank 
director for 18 years and served as a 
coach and official for youth athletic 
programs for 35 seasons. 

He has been married to Phyllis 
Schnurr for 45 years. They have four 
children. 

"Soldier Boy" is published by 
Noble House, Baltimore, Maryland. 
The hardcover edition is 192 pages 
and sells for $21.95. 






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December 4, 1998 






POLICE & FIRE 



■ 



. . »i . ■ ■ _ . • • ■ :';:i. : T^v-;r.. '. f .\ 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A& 



POLICE BEAT 



Persons charged with a crime are innocent until proven guilty In a court of taw. 



ANT10CH 



V* 



dates tn Woodstock, lii.pf-Thurs- 
day, Dec. 12 at 9 a/niy Tuesday, ■ 
Dec. 8 at 9 a.m., and Thursday, Dec. 

10 at 1:30 p.m. for each of the war- 






Driving under the 
influence 

Arttioch Police Officers stopped 
Roberto Ruiz-Gonzales, 22, of 
Waukegan, on Saturday, Nov. 21 at 
10:03 p.m. traveling northbound on 
Route 83 at Oak Ridge Court in a 
white 1988 Ford Fiesta. He was 
charged with driving under the influ- 
ence. Ruiz- Gonzales was assigned a 
court date of Tuesday, Dec. 8 at 9 a.m. 

Antioch Police Officers also 
stopped Leon A. Kruse, 61, of Anti- 
och. on Saturday, Nov. 28 at 7:11 
p.m. traveling eas (bound on Route 
1 73 just east of the 1000 block in a 
red 1996 Ford. He was charged with 
driving under the influence. Kruse 
was released on bond pending a 
court date of Tuesday, Dec 15. 

Antioch Police Officers also 
stopped Joseph J. Fragias, 26, of An- 
tioch, on Sunday, Nov. 29 at 12:36 
a.m. traveling southbound on Main 
Street near Orchard Street in a blue 
1 988 Ford pick-up truck. He was 
charged with driving under the in- 
fluence. Fragias was released on 
bond pending a court date of Tues- 
day, Dec. 15 at 9a.m. 



Warrant arrest 

Antioch Police Officers stopped 
Robert j. Zcman, of Salem Wis., on 
Monday, Nov. 23 at 1 1:57 p.m. He 
was a passenger in a vehicle travel- 
ing easlbound oh Route 173 near 
Route 59. Zemanwasfoundtdbe 
wanted on a warrant issued by the 
Lake County Sheriffs Office. He was 
released on bond pending a court 
date of Wednesday, Dec 16 at 9 
a.m. in Waukegan. 

Speeding leads to 
arrest on warrant 

Antioch Police Officers 
stopped Timothy L Keppler, 27, 
on Friday, Nov. 27 At 1 1:35 p.m. 
traveling westbound on North 
Avenue at the Wisconsin Central 
Railroad tracks in a 1990 black 
Mazda Coupe. 

He was charged with speeding, 
operating an uninsured vehicle, 
and driving while his license was 
suspended. Keppler was released 
on bond pending a court date of 
Tuesday, Jan. 13 at 1030 am in 
Grayslake. 

He also was wanted on three 
warrants by the McHenry County 
Sheriffs Office. He was given court 



rant charges 

Alcohol 



ion by 



minor 

Antioch Police Officers stopped . 
Bryan J. Billstein, 18, of Linden- 
hurst, oriThursday, Nov. 26 at 1:07 
a.m. in the parking lot in the 900 
block of Main Street He was ? 
charged with consumption of alco- 
hol by a minor. He declined the of- 
fer to take a Breathalyzer test Bill- 
stein was released on bond pending 
a court date of Wednesday, Dec 23. 
at9a.rn.ln.Grayslake. 

UNDENHURST 

Driving under the 
influence 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Michael L Premer, 48, of 
Chicago, on Saturday, Nov. 28 at 
9:17 p.m. at Deep Lake Road and 
Grass Lake Road in a maroon 1998 
Lexus. He was charged with im- 
proper lane use and driving under 
the Influence. He accepted the offer 
to take a Breathalyzer test (0.15). 
Premer was released on bond 
pending a court date of Tuesday, 
Dec 15 at 9 a.m. In Waukegan. 




Med^fburcha^ 




Cigarettes, lottery 
tickets recovered 



ice 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Antioch Police Officers arrested 
four individuals and charged them 
with burglary shortly after they 
robbed the Clark service station at 
Route 83 and North Avenue Mon- 
day, Nov. 30 at 2:27 a.m. 

Ail participants were charged 
with burglary and possession of 
burglary tools. They are: James 
Neely, 19, of Round Lake Beach; 
Daniel Rajski, 20, and Jill Baum, 
18, both of Round Lake Park; 
and, Scott Maynard, 20, of Round 
Lake. 

Antioch police officers were no- 
tified of the burglary when an acti- 
vated alarm sounded as the front 
door windows of the station were 
shattered. 

"Cigarette cartons were all over 



the floor,'' said Antioch Chief of Po- 
lice Charles R. Watkins. "The place 
looked like' it , had' been gone 

throughi": ; : : '. 

. A witness, who had heard the ■ 
alarm, told responding officer Sgt. 
Craig Somerviile that a pick-up truck . 
left the station, drove north on Route 
83, turned around, then drove east- 
bound on North Avenue' r ' 

Somerviile found a black podge 
Ram pick-up truck returning east 
bound on North Avenue. He stopped 
the truck in the 500 block of Main.. 
Street. " : ; ;"V 

"They had gotten lost",,. said 
Watkins. "They didn't know where 
they were." 

There were cigarettes in the back 
of the truck as well as the passenger 
compartment 

"Upon searching the vehicle, 
Sgt. Somerviile recovered a total of 
$2,523 worth of merchandise that 
was stolen from the Clark station," 
said Watkins. 

This included 657 packs of Marl- 
boro cigarettes, $892 in instant-win- 
ner lottery tickets, and $699 of other 
lottery tickets. 





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COMMUNITY 



December 4, 1998 




A small part of the Antioch Community High School Marching Sequoits Band recreates swing era 
music played by Glenn Miller for their show "1945." To the right, Margaret Fischer, Amanda 
Goblirsch, and Erin Carlson recreate the roles of the Andrews Sisters with their hit song "Boogie 
Woogie Bugle Boy." — Photo by Sheri Fries 

Sequoits salute '1945,' end season 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Antioch Community High 
School's Marching Sequoits end- 
ed their playing season and com- 
petition drills with two awards 
this year. 

The show this season was a 
salute to Glenn Miller's swing 
band music and was developed 
by Band Director John Olisar. 

"The show was '1945,'" said 
Sheri Fries, a member of Antioch 
High School Music and Perfor- 
mance Sponsors, AMPS. "The 
crowd absolutely loved h." 

The band featured "Armed 
I-'orces Salute," "Sentimental 
Journey," "Boogie Woogie Bugle 

Boy," "Sing Sing Sing, raps," 

and "God Bless America." 

"The three 'Andrews Sisters' 



who sang "Boogie Woogie Bugle 
Boy" were Margaret Fischer, 
Amanda Goblirsch, and F.rin Carl- 
son," Fries said. 

Fischer and Carlson are mem- 
bers of the color guard. 

Band members who had solo 
performances in the show includ- 
ed: Peter Gillette, Steve Latino, 
Justine Sinkus, Dan Kroeker, 
Mike Lencioni, Dana Spandet, 
Meghan Dyer, and Kenneth Ci- 
chon. 

The band participated in five 
competitions this season. 

"The Marching Sequoits took 
first place in Franklin Park, Illi- 



nois," said Fries. At Fort Atkinson, 
Wis., the band placed First in Mu- 
slcality for their division. 

The band also competed in 
Wheeling, Marengo, and at Illi- 
nois Stale University in Normal, 
111. 

Costumes for the perfor- 
mances were uniforms of the 
Army, Navy, Air Corps., and 
Marines. They were rented this 
year from Lost Eras. "It's a cos- 
tume company in Chicago," Fries 
said. 

"(We give) a big thank you to 
Lost Eras for all their help in find- 
ing the uniforms for us." 



ACHS Financial Aid Night set 






Wishing you a delightful holiday 

season and a new year that is filled 

with much hope, joy, 

and happiness. 

If you are traveling to visit family 

and friends to celebrate the 

holidays, please remember to slow 

down and to drive safely. 

Your life, and the lives of others, 

may depend on it. 

Timothy H. Osmond, GC 

Osmond insurance Sendee ltd. 

976 Hillside 
Antioch, Illinois 60002 

395-2500 



Depend on your 
hometown professionals 



Antioch Community High 
School will host a Financial Aid 
Night program Monday, Dec. 
14 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the 
school. 

Assistant Director of Finan- 
cial Aid Mark Anderson, at Lake 



Forest College, Lake Forest, III. 
wUI speak to students and inter- 
ested parents. 

The evening will cover infor- 
mation about the financial aid 
process and assistance with com- 
pleting the FAFSA forms. 



Petty food drive 
to yield pie throws 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



W. C, Petty students who wage 
the most successful food drive have 
a shot at a chance lo throw a cream 
pie at their principal, Tim Mahnffy. 

And, their teacher will also get a 
shot at him. 

W. C Petty students started a 
food drive Wednesday, Dec. 2 that 
will end on Friday, Dec. 1 1 . The food 
is collected to re- stock the Antioch 
Food Pantry. 

"We're having a contest between 
classes," said Principal Tim Mahaffy. 
There are 18 classes at the school. 

Classrooms must collect at least 
150 non-perishable food items to gel 
into the drawing for a classroom at 
each grade level that will be selected. 
A name will be drawn from the stu- 
dents In the winning classroom to 
select the person who actually will 
throw the pie. 

Pies fly Friday. Dec. 1 1 at the 2 
p.m. assembly. 

The teacher of the winn big class- 
rooms will also have a pie to throw. 

What if they miss? 

"There's no missln' about It," 



said Mahaffy. 

The winning students will be 
close enough so that all pies hit the 
intended target 

"I have to be wearing my (De- 
troit) Lions shirt," Mahaffy also re- 
vealed. 

Apparently everyone at the 
school has heard quite enough about 
the Detroit Lions. 

Detroit Lions football players are 
currently playing below fan expecta- 
tions but they do beat the Chicago 
Bears. The Lions have one of the best 
all-time running backs, Barry 
Sanders. They also have a very 
promising quarterback, Charlie 
Batch. Herman Moore and Johnny 
Morton are two very good receivers 
an the team. 

In the most recent contest be- 
tween the Detroit Uons and the 
Chicago Bears, Lions won. 

Petty School National Junior 
Honor Society members will deliver 
the donated food items to the Antioch 
Food Pan try at the Antioch Township 
Offices at 99 West Route 173. 

A food drive at Petty School last 
year yielded 1,600 non-perishable 
food items for the food pantry. 



Oakland has pancakes 
with Santa Saturday 



Oakland Grade School PTO will 
host Its "Pancake Breakfast with San- 
ta and Holiday Craft Fair" tomorrow, 
Saturday, Dec. 5. 

Breakfast starts at 8 a.m. and 
goes to noon. The cost is S3.50 for 
adults, $2.50 for 4 to 12 year olds, and 
is free for children under 4. 

The Holiday Craft Fair will con- 
tinue until 1 p.m., however. 

"It's something fun for the 
school/' said Carolyn Brugioni, a 
member of the Parent Teacher Or- 



ganization. "It's just a school 
event." 

Santa Claus will be present from 
8 a.m. to noon. There is no charge (o v; 
see him, but there is a Statia^SB for 
photographs. 

"There is a Secret Santa Shop so 
thai children under the age of 12 can 
purchase gifts for their family," she 
said. 

There is a bake sale with home- 
baked goods such as cakes, cookies, 
and other desserts. 



Twp. offers Rules of Road course 



Area drivers may take a Rules of 
the Road review course at the Anti- 
och Township office on designated 
dates during the first ten months of 
1999. 

People from the Antioch, Lake 



Villa, and Newport Township area 
will be encouraged to use the course 
lo refresh their knowledge of the 
tesls to obtain a driver's license. 

The course is free to everyone, 
any age, who wishes to attend. 

The purpose of the course is to 
help applicants pass the Illinois 
Drivers license renewal examina- 
tion- 
Additional information is avail- 
able from the township supervisor 
Tim Osmond at 395-3378. 




OPEN LATE 

PH ON THURSDAYS 

&if#hpr» till 8 pm for your 

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Wm&em In Antioch 



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. . ' " ' ■ 



December 4,1998 



NEIGHBORS 



r < T, ..•,*-, -. ., 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A7 







■• 



- 




M ■ tf&W« - •^•v':-- ; .v-' ':;■:-■■ 

Name: Patty HInk-Hennes 

Home: Antioch 

Occupation: I am owner of Patty's 
Comedy Connection (395-4465), and 
I am'a loan officer for JVS Mortgage in 
Mundeleln. 

Community Involvement: I vol- 
unteer for Footlights at St. Patrick 
Church; and I make arrangements for 
clowns to visit sick children. . 

I graduated from: Grant High 
School. : 

My family consists of: Two gorgeous boys: Michael Robert, 7, 
and Steven Christopher, 2 and a half. 

My pets are: The squirrel that lives in my wall. 

What I like best about Antioch: It's a beautiful town with won- 
derful, warm people. 

What I like best about my job: The people that I work with. 

The secret to my success Is: My sense of humor. 

I relax by: Teaching and playing with my children. 

Last book I read: "Embraced by the Light" by Betty ). Eadie, Cur- 
tis Taylor. 

Favorite TV show Is: Ally McBeal 

Favorite vldep Is: Rodney Dangerfield's "I Get No Respect. " 

Favorite movie Is: Terms of Endearment." 

Favorite Restaurant: DiMarcos in Antioch and the Auctioneer in 
Kansasville, Wis. 

Favorite music: All types, from classical to rock and roll. 

Favorite band or musician: Bette Midler, Carole King, Frank 
Sinatra. 

My life's motto Is: Treat each day as a new gift Be thankful, even 
if It's not something you needed that day. 

If I could be anyone in history, I would be: Mae West. 

If I won the lottery, I would: Buy my children a big house with 
an indoor pool and go to Disney World I'd invest the rest 

My greatest accomplishment Is: Owning my own entertain- 
ment business for 10 years. 

I want to be remembered as: A person who likes to make peo- 
ple laugh. . 

If I could meet anyone, I would meet: Michael Jordan. I'd 

like to introduce him to my children. ' ■'.' .■.-■si-lizy,:-- . . y. ,■ 

My dream job would be: Being successful at what 1 am doing 
now. 

If I had a plane ticket to anywhere, i would go to:- Monte 

Carlo. It's n beautiful, exciting place with intriguing people. 

If you have a "Neighbor" that you would like to see profiled in 
this column, call Rhonda Hetrick Burke at 223-8161. 



FOOD PANTRY WATCH 



lake Villa Township Food 
Pantry 

Sue Hanson 

Township Supervisor 

847-356-2116 

Pantry address: 

Township Office 

Caboose Park 

Grand Avenue and Fairfield Road 

Lake Villa 



Foods drives: 

Drop off at Victory Lakes Continu- 
ing Care Center, 9:30 to B p.m. sev- 
en days a week through Monday. 
Dec. 14. 

Antioch Township Food Pantry 

Timothy H. Osmond 
Township Supervisor 
847-395-3378. 



rOT<re«*t£><*r>GV«4: 



DECEMBER IS THE MONTH TO GIVE 



Put your Pain 

ill the hands of. 

a specialist! 



If any of these symptoms sound 
familiar, let us help you: 

* Headaches * Auto or Work Related 

♦Neck Pain Injuries 

* Mid-Back Pain *^er Back Pain 

*o aT • orStiflness 
Sport^unes * Numbness or Pain 

in Arms or Legs 




«! 



Whiplash 



Dr. Scott Reiser 













m i\ ^— • .-■--:-■- -— 






ROUND LAKE BEACH 
CHIROPRACTIC 

314 W. Rollins Rd. 

Round Lake Beach, IL 

(Next to Eagle Foods & Dollar Video) 

740-2800 



Look For 

Dr. Reiser's 

Talking Health 

Column 

In December 

"Chiropractic 

For Newborns" 

AutO and Wort Rotated Injuries 
Encludod, Bui Covered 100% 



;; 




.- ■ . ■■• ■ 



gs 





■'...' 






Hastings Lake YMCA Is offering a 
4-day winter resident camp program 
In late December for young people 8 
to 16 years old. 

"If your kids are looking for an 
exciting way to spend part of their 
holiday-break making memories 
and friendships that last a lifetime, 
send them to Hastings," said Mary Jo 
Boone, resident camp director. 

Winter camp dates are Sunday, 
Dec 27 to Thursday, Dec 31. 

The program Is four days and 
nights of winter activities such as to- 
bogganing on slides , swimming in an 



• >. 



indoor pool, climbing the Alpine. 
Tower, indoor and outdoor group 
games, and arts and crafts. , ■■'- 

There are two scheduled down- 
hill ski trips for all levels of skill, be- 
ginners to advanced. Also Included 
are lessons, ski equipment, lift tick- 
ets, and fun in the ski lodge. 

There Is also a dance with a pro- 
fessional DJ. 

Additional Information or a 
brochure Is available from Boone at 
356-4001. 

Hastings Lake YMCA Is at 21155 
West Gelden Road, Lake Villa, HI. 




'Holiday Lights' judging Dec. 15 



The Antioch Chamber of Com- 
merce and Industry and CAN are 
sponsoring a residential outdoor 
Christmas decorating contest with 
$1,000 of prizes for winners. 

Residents must register to be In- 
cluded in the contest so that their 
entry may be judged Sunday, Dec. 
13. 

The Chamber of Commerce is 
accepting registrations by tele- 



phone at 395-2233 or by mail or in 
person at 884 Main Street 

The Chamber will award $1,000 
worth of Chamber of Commerce gift 
certificates to winners. First prize is 
$500 of certificates, second prize is 
$300 of certificates, and third prize 
is $200 of certificates. 

Only residents in the Village of 
Antioch are eligible to enter the 
contest. 



Friday. Dec. 4 

6:30-9 p.m., Teen Canteen held at 
Antioch Upper Grade School 

8 p.m., PM&L presents "Annie War* 
bucks" at the theatre, 395-3055 ; y- 

Saturday, Dec. 5 

: 9 a;m.-4 p.m., "A Holiday : 
Happening," the eleventh annual 
Festival of Arts and Crafts at . 

^Victory Lakes Continuing Care' ■ 
Center, 1055 East Grand Aye. In 
Lindenhurst, call 356-5900 

9 a.m. -4 p.m., Annual Cookie Sate. 
& Holiday Craft show at Calvary 
Christian Center, 134 Monaville 
Rd. in Lake Villa; homemade 
cookies by the pound, live music, 
entertajnmeht, call 356-6181 

II ■!■■ HJ* U »I l>l»|>|. M Ml < |lil liMI Mli MM I llii! I IITI ■ I |TT> til IT 

10:30 a.m., Make a Christmas 
Ornament Day at Lakes Region 
Historical Society, 817 Main St. 



Make ornaments at museum 



Lakes Region Historical Society 
will host Its fifth annual "Make a 
Christmas Ornament Day," tomor- 
row, Saturday, Dec. 5 between 10*30 
and 2 p.m. 
. "We invite your entire family to 



Historical Society . 
to close two months 



Lakes Region Historical Soci- 
ety Museum will close for the 
months of January and February, 
1999. 

The Museum will re-open on 
Saturday, March 6, 1999 at 11 
a.m. It will be open every Satur- 
day from 1 1 a.m. to 3 p.m. for the 
rest of the year. 

During the time the museum 
building is closed, individual 
tours may be arranged when pos- 
sible. Arrangement for tours and 
further information is available 
from Society President Robert 
Lindblad, 847-395-0899. 



join us for an hour or two," said 
member Nancy Binder. "Make one 
ornament for the Historical Society's 
community tree and one to take 
home." 

_ Supplies ate provided to make 
theomaments. 

The Museum is in the old 
schoolhouse at 817 Main Street. 
, , J : pr add'Hfanal. information, 
people may telephone members 
Earl and Barbara Beese at 395- 
1685, or Binder at 395-1453. 




BARK N' TOWN 

BKENNELS[5] 



Boarding 
• Grooming • Pet Supplies 



Toys & Bones for Your 'Best Friends* 

27607 W. Brandenburg Rd. 

Inolesldo 

(815) 385-0632 



* am.- a pm 

TTHSfi. 

8 a.m. ■ Moon 

(oftwlma 

by ^ jp o H itg 




A Holiday Happening! 

Saturday, December 5, 1998 
9 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

Victory Lakes' 11th Annual 
Festival of Arts and Crafts 

We'll have Beanie Babies™, clocks, stained glass, 

leather crafts, clothing, furniture, jewelry, toys, 

Santas and snowmen galore and much, 

much more available for purchase! 

Call (847) 356-5900 for details. 

Victory Lakes 

Ctmtmumx 
Cure Center 

-J 

1055 East Grand Avenue • Lindenhurst, IL 
7 miles west ofRt. 94 » Affiliated with Victory Memorial Hospital 







., - .> .......... > ..■■■•-.> i 



11 a.m.-4 p.m., Santa's Enchant- 
ed Castle open, pics, avail. 

7:30 p.m., Winter Dance at ACHS 

8 p.m., PM&L presents "Annie War- 
bucks" at the theatre, 395-3055 

Sunday, Dec. 6 

8 a.m. -12 p.m., All-you-can-eat 
Country Breakfast with a visit from 
Santa (10-11 a.m.), sponsored by 
the Lindenhurst Men's Club at the 
Lindenhurst Civic Center, 1949 
Old Elm Rd., $4 donation, ages 5 
and under eat free 

11 a.m.-4 p.m., Santa's Enchant- 
ed Castle open, pics, avail. 

12*30-4 p.m., Santa and Co. at 
Muefler-Wobd Kraft, Inc., Rte. 83 
and Wall SL, Info, at 395-0005 ' 

2:30 p.m., PM&L presents "Annie 
Warbucks" at the, th^tre, 395-3055 

Monday, Dec. 7 

12*45 p.m. Bingo at Ant/och 
Senior Center, info, at 395-7120 

7 p.m., Antioch Garden Club 
meets at the Antioch Community 
Center, call Suzi at 395-3803 

7 p.m. Bingo at Antioch Moose 
Lodge, Rte. 173 west of Antioch 



7:00 p.m., PT0 meeting at Antioch 
Lower Grade School 

7:30 p.m. Lakes Area Community 
Band at ACHS. call 395-5566 

7:30 p.m., Antioch Village Board 
of Trustees meets at Village Hall 

Tuesday, Dec. 8 

9 a.m. - Noon Antioch United 
Methodist Church holds Parents 
Day Out, call 395-1362 

11 a.m. AARP meets at Antioch 
Senior Center, 817 Holbeck Dr., 
for more info call 395-5068 

6:45 p.m. Antioch VFW Bingo, 
refreshments avail., call 395-5393 

Wednesday, Dec. 9 

11 a.m., Christmas Luncheon of 
the Antioch Woman's Club with 
caroling, at Gumee Holiday Inn 

6:30 p.m. CPR classes sponsored 
by the Antioch Rescue Squad, call 
395-5511 for reservations 

7:30 p.m., Lakeland Newcomers 
Club meets at State Bank of the 
Lakes in Lindenhurst, for Info., call 
855-7434, or (815) 675-2317 

♦♦.. ...,«...,, 

Thursday, Dec. 10 

7:30 p.m., Choir Concert held at 
Antioch Upper Grade School 

GOT SOMETHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14-day notice is needed 
for all calendar requests. 
Ask for Cristina Feindt 
223-8161, ext. 141. 



ic^rmUtW 1 i jWUMfti^rf-ft'-^M^^ -* 



-— w*Ksvnrswj?tteft*t^^^. , m m 



. 



A8/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



December 4, 1998 




Jack Miller and Jim Lafontaine of the Antioch Lions Club gives a check to Wayne Sobczak and 
Steve Smouse of the Antioch Rescue Squad for the purchase of a defibrillator. — Photo by Sandy 
Bressner 

Antioch Lions Club donates 
defibrillator to rescue squad 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Antioch Lions Club has donated 
1 1 iimey lo [he Antioch Rescue Squad 
10 nllinv (lie purchase of a second 
heari-beai defibrillator. 

The donation is made by the 
Lions club in memory of members 
who have died. 

"Wi> have donated this defibril- 
lator in memory of Lions that 
passed away this year and in previ- 
ous years," said Lions Club 
President Jim Lafontaine. 



Club members have been espe- 
cially saddened this year to lose six 
members. These included Bill 
Cardiff Sr., Adrian Mueller, Kirk 
Sarmonl. Dr. W. A. Biron, Les 
Sorensen, and Nicholas Teister. 

"The squad came to us a year 
ago with a request for one," said 
lafontaine. 

Raising money *for the pur- 
chase of the defibrillator was 
accomplished in addition to 
fundraising to meet (he club's 
commitment to donate $10,000 lo 
the William E, Brook Wetland 



Sanctuary and Entertainment 
Center this year. 

A defibrillator is about the size 
of a lap-top computer. It has an 
internal computer to evaluate a 
heart rhythm. It determines if an 
electrical current can normalize a 
fibrillating heart. If the defibrilla- 
tor determines that such is the 
case, an ' electrical current Is 
administered automatically to a 
patient. 

The funds to purchase the 
defibrillator were donated to the 
rescue squad Friday, Nov. 27. 



iGet the 

Rest 




YouiNeed 



i> 



• Do YOU FEEL TIRED EVEN ALTER A FULL NIGHT'S SLEEP? 

• Do YOU SNORE LOUDLY? \ 

• DO YOU OFTEN WAKE UP WITH A HEADACHE? 

• Do YOU FEEL VERY SLEEPY OR FALL ASLEEP 
WHILE DRIVING, AT WORK OR DURING OTHER WAKING HOURS? 

• Do YOU HAVE PROBLEMS REMEMBERING OR CONCENTRATING? 

• Are you often irritable? t? 

If you answered yes to any of these questions, talk to your healthcare provider. You may 
be suffering from sleep apnea or another health problem. Treatment is available. 



Or 



The NEW Sleep Disorder Center 
at Victory Memorial Hospital 

Victory's Sleep Disorder Center provides treatment 
for sleep apnea and other related disorders. For more 
information on how the center can help you, call 



1 -800-THE-CHOICE ( I -800-843-2464). 



M 




Victory 

Memorial 

Hospital 



1 324 North Sheridan IWI 
Wuukegan, Illinois 60085 



Once a mom, 
always a mom 



Recently, the Pringle clan 
had the pleasure of tak- 
ing a nice long journey 
down to the beautiful 
climate of southwest Florida to 
visit with the retired Pringle 
branch of our family tree. 
Towards the end of our stay my 
mother-in-law scooted the girls 
off to the nearest tourist sights 
while Neal and his dad graced 
the golf course behind the house. 
1 found myself all alone for the 
first time in eight years. 

There were no screaming 
children to tend to, or crying 
babies in sight. There were no 
piles of laundry beckoning me or 
dust bunnies hopping under the 
beds. I was at a loss and truly 
didn't know what to do with my 
newly found freedom. Idle time, 
without guilt is something I 
haven't experienced in a really, 
really long time. 

I tried my hand at reading the 
daily newspaper, but when its 
actually quiet enough to compre- 
hend what you are reading, cur- 
rent events are way too depress- 
ing. Thinking a little fresh air and 
sunshine might be enjoyed, I 
rode my mother-in-law's bike 
around the quiet retirement 
community which they live. 
There was a humming in my ears 
which at first I took to be the 
birds overhead and the crickets 
in the grass. In actuality it was 
my own voice resounding in my 
head: "you should never venture 
to far from grandma's house by 
yourself." It kept repeating in my 

head as It had been repeated to - 
the girls over and over again. I 
felt guilty and returned home, 
tired and sweaty. I thought a 
swim in the backyard pool would 
be refreshing. After several laps 




JINGLE 

FROM 

PRINGLE 

Lynn Pringle 



across the water, the humming 
noise began once again in my 
head as I could hear myself 
telling the girls 953 times "you 
should never swim alone." I fig- 
ured I had enough Florida sun 
for one day anyway, not to men- 
tion the mom-complex creeping 
into my every thought, and 
grabbed a beach towel to dry off. 

The lunch hour approached 
and I rummaged through the 
fully stocked kitchen for a bite to 
eat. A big basket of bite-size 
Almond Joy candy bars caught 
my eye, so 1 innocently enough 
unwrapped one and popped it 
into my mouth. One lead to two, 
two lead to three, and a tall glass 
of ice cold milk. Pretty soon a 
substantial pile of wrappers had 
built up on the counter in front 
of me. Once again the mom- 
complex crept up from my sub- 
conscious with my own shrill 
voice ebbing into my ears as I 
had often heard myself scolding 
our girls," You can not have just 
candy bars for lunch." I paused a 
moment, meditated on the 
unspoken words, then told that 
tittle voice in my head to shut 
up, and continued eating. 

Best darn lunch I had In a. 
long time and besides,' What do 
moms know anyway? 

Readers with information for 
"jingle from Pringle" should call 
Lynn Pringle at 395-6364. 



Youth Sports 

We Want to report on your local teams 
Please call Brendan O'Neill at 223-8161 



i 



Where In The World Is Playa del 
Carmen And Why Does My 
Cruise Ship Stop There? 

by JIM WARNKEN, 

President, North Star Travel, Inc. 

You've decided to take the cruise you've always dreamed about. A western 
Caribbean cruise with slops ai Ocho Rios and Grand Cayman sounds good. But 
the brochure shows a stop ai Playa del Carmen. Playa del what?? 

Playa del Carmen is actually the closest port lo Mexico's famous beach resort 
of Cancun, Mexico. It's also a short ferry ride across from Cozumel, an island 
well known by divers around the world. 

This quaint Mexican town is also ideally located for excursions to 
archaeological sites like the Mayan ruins in Tulum and Chichcn Itza. 

If you wanl to do some shopping, take the Cancun city tour. A four-hour tour 
should run'about S30 and will include stops ot the town markets. However, 
since it's easy to find your way around Cancun, I'd suggest taking the shuttle 
offered by most ships for about S 10 and go it on your own. 

Of the many excursions to Mayan ruins, I would suggest a lour lo the walled 
city of Tulum. Located about 35 miles south of Playa del Carmen, Tulum is 
perched on a 40-fool cliff overlooking the Caribbean. A climb to the top of one 
of the temples will give you an unforgettable view. Most tours to Tulum also 
include a swimming stop at a lovely lagoon called Xel Ha (pronounced "shell- 
ha"), where fish ure so tame they will eat out of your hand. 

If you're a diver, Cozumel is where you wanl lo spend the day. With over two 
dozen reefs and hundreds of wrecks, Cozumel has something for every diver's 
interest. My personal favorite dive spot is Palancar Reef just otTihc south shore. 
Here you'll find visibility up to 200 feet and some of the most spectacular coral 
formations in the Caribbean. 

Finally, don't be confused if your itinerary shows only a one-hour stop in Playa 
del Carmen and continues on to Cozumel. 

So the problem with stopping in Playa del Carmen is not, "Is there anything to 
do?" but which of the many options do you choose. 

NORTH ^f^ STAR 

CRUISES 
Lihdenhurst 

www.northslartravel.com 



(847) 356- 



iii 






•i - -jiiifrimtt*ti¥~ ~;'r?^<i~^T^ ■ n MIW I 1 I M H Iitt w i iM 'i " '•' . 






■■•f-ii:-,ti,.i -■■ -, --:.:- 



.'■ ' ■ ' 



. 



It MIMtlMtM*lM>HII» < MMI» 1MH 




THE 
CUPBOARD 



Brendan O'Neill 



Lakeland's 
turkey time 
hoops junkies 



The Lakeland sports depart- 
ment had a very busy 
Thanksgiving holiday 
weekend, as we went to as 
many local tournament games as 
we could attend— but only after we 
scarfed down all the turkey, stuffing 
and trimmings we could manage. 
After the triptofan- induced coma 
wore off, we headed out to the local 
basketball gyms to see how our 
teams fared in this busy, holiday 
weekend. 

We saw Grayslake's Jenny Wes- 
sel, picked as our Pre-Season Play- 
er of the Year, score 10 first half 
points and finish with a quiet 16 as 
the Rams stayed perfect with a 
win at the Elk Grove Tournament. 

We witnessed the high-pow- 
ered Grant boys, led by Wayne 
Bosworth and Brandon Borror, get 
past Richmond-Burton — even as 
the Bulldogs' stars struggled from 
the field. 

We saw Warren's boys, anx- 
iously awaiting the tip-off of the 
1998-99 season, dismande an un- 
suspecting Fremd team, even with 
Pre-Season Lakeland Player of the 
Year pick Jourdain Mitot sitting 
out due to school disciplinary ac- 
tion. 

Senior center Mike Brandow 
looks like he might vie for that 
samp title by the end of the year, 
as ha "dominated the boards and 
controlled the point for the Blue 
Devjls. 

Then we hustled over to 
Mundelein High School for the 
Mustangs' holiday tournament. 
We were impressed with the bal- 
ance of a very good Mundelein 
boys team, which frustrated and 
destroyed a Round Lake squad 
which had no answers for anything 
the Mustangs did. 

Doug Rippberger, Mundelein's 
top gun, picked apart the Panthers' 
defense with precision shooting, 
driving lay-ups and sneaky steals 
which Round Lake could do noth- 
ing to stop. 

Rippberger may also be up for 
Player of the Year honors when the 
dust settles. 

As for the Panthers, They need 
to find some offensive consistency, 
as they only scored when 
Mundelein made a mistake in their 
trapping, slashing, gambling de- 
fensive scheme. 



w. 



e saw the Wauconda boys 
score 97 and 87 points in back-to- 
back games, making us wonder of 
we were asleep when we picked 
them to be a mediocre indepen- 
dent team. Then the Bulldogs lost 
to a solid Hundey team 49-46, and 
proceeded to get squashed 61-40 
by Mundelein, bringing Wauconda 
[and our thoughts of "is this team 
for real?") crashing back to Earth. 
We saw the Warren girls domi- 
nate every opponent in their path, 
led by senior center Becky Moo's 
22-points per game, and Tiffany 
Kelver's 13 points per game. This 
team looks scary...just like the boys. 



w h 



hat came out of this week- 
end is there are some very good 
basketball teams in Lakeland's cov- 
erage area, and we here in the 
sports depL are basketball junkies— 
any time, any place, anywhere. Just 
play ball and we'll be there. 

Brendan O'Neill can be reached 
'it (847) 223-8161, ext, 132; [ax 
(84 7) 223-881 0; or e-mail at 
edii@lnU:com. 







s 



I 



,-■...'■..-.. 




December 4, 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A9 




Antioch's Don Lackey throws down a two-handed dunk' against 
Lake Zurich. Lackey is leading the Antioch boys in scoring, aver- 



aging more than 15 points per game, as the Sequofts went 1-2 
in the Gold baii Tournament. — Photos by Steve Young 



Sequoits learn at Gold Ball 



ByLEEFILAS 
Staff Reporter 



No one ever said that the High- 
land Park Gold Ball Tournament 
held Wednesday through Saturday 
wasn't a topsy-turvy affair. 

But, when the smoke cleared, 
the Antioch boys basketball team 
found themselves sporting a 1-2 
record. 

The weird thing is that Antioch 
lost Friday to Highland Park, before 
beating Grayslake on Saturday. The 
irony is Grayslake beat Highland 
Park on Wednesday to open the 
tournament. 

"It was a nice win and we need- 
ed one," said Jeff Dresser, Antioch 
boys basketball coach. "It was nip 
and tuck most of the way, but we 
managed to come out on top of it." 

The double overtime affair came 
after Antioch found themselves up 
by 12 at the half before letting 
Grayslake come roaring back in, to 
pull ahead in the middle of the 
fourth quarter; 

"We were moving well in the first 
half," Dresser said. "We just didn't 



click in the second half and they got 
back into it " 

The game ended whe n 
Grayslake worked the ball 
for a minute and a half In 
the second OT, looking to 
get the last shot. With three 
seconds left, Grayslake put 
up a shot that rimmed out 
Antioch rebounded and was fouled 
with lest than a second remaining. 

With the extra free throw drop- 
ping, Antioch pulled out their first 
victory of the year, 57-55. 

On Friday, a defensive struggle 
between Highland Park and Antioch 
left Antioch with their second loss of 
the year, as Antioch was outscored 7- 
2 in the final minute of the game to 
give Antioch the loss. 

"We were two down with a 
minute to play and we just let them 
take control," Dresser said. "Our 
guys were spent in the fourth quarter 
and they took advantage of that." 

Some of the bright spots for An- 
tioch is the play of junior forward 
Don Lackey. 

"We've been getting some pro- 
duction out of him," said Dresser. 




"He hasn't been really shooting as 
well as he can, and needs to pick up 
re rebounds, but he's been a 
big player for us." 
"Also in the guard position, 
Brandon Klutz has really 
stepped up for us even 
ough he has just been 
«..~wn into the mix," Dresser 
said. 

However, the problem that Anti- 
och is facing right now is the team is 
having some trouble with assign- 
ments. 

"Guys right now are coming off 



the bench, not really sure what 
they're doing," Dresser said. "The 
good news is that we know what we 
need to do, what we nee^J to work on 
to get better, so were working on lL" 

However, for some of the Anti- 
och team, it may be learning under 
fire as Antioch will host Zion-Benton 
on Friday. 

"Right now, we aren't as far as 
I'd hoped we be, or thought we 
were at the beginning of the year," 
Dresser said. "But, were working 
on it and hopefully it will all come 
together." 



ATHLETES OF THE WEEK 




Lackey 

point average. 



Name: 

Don Lackey 
School: 
Antioch 
Sport: 
Basketball 
Yean Junior 
Lost week's 
stats: Leading 
the Antioch 
boys in scor- 
ing with a 17- 




Wessel 



59-35 Monday night. 



Name: 

Jenny Wessel 
School: 
Grayslake 
Sport: 

Basketball 
Year: Junior 
Last week's 
stats: Scored 
24 points to 
lead the Rams 
over McHenry 



Grayslake girls hoops 
offense hard to explain 



By LEE Fl LAS 
Staff Reporter 

Sometimes, when listening to 
Grayslake girls basketball coach 
Mike Muldrow, you are stunned to 
hear what is being said. 

"It's kind of a run -and- break- 
down offense that were running 
sometimes," said Muldrow, the first 
yearcoach of the Rams. "We have 
been playing a stack up and break in 
offense, and the giiis are really start- 
ing to push the ball up." 

Sometimes, you have to wonder 
if he even knows what he's saying. 

"We are running a half-court 
motion offense," Muldrow said. "We 
were working on a zone offense 
tonight." 

But, even though Mike Muldrow 
sometimes can't explain what kind 



of offense he's running, you can't 
deny the fact that the Grayslake 
Rams girls basketball team is sitting 
high atop the Fox Valley Conference 
with a 7-0 record and looking hun- 
grier than ever. 

"It's not really a run and gun of- 
fense so much as it is a half-court 
motion offense that we stack up and 
break down on," Muldrow added. 

The offense stunned people in 
the Elk Grove Tournament over the 
Thanksgiving day weekend, " as 
Muldrow and Company walked In 
and took their no-named offense to 
the floor, beating both Niles West 
and Elk Grove by 15 points a piece 
and walking out with the first place 
trophy tucked under their arms. 

Is the lady Rams' offense a 

Please see RAMS /MO 



~ 



■■:'■■'," 



'-:'■:■■ ■ ■ 



A1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



December 4,1998 



■ ■■■■■■■■■: -V-Vlv- 





leapin* leaner 

Antioch's Brandon Clutts, a junior guard, hands for a shot against Highland Park fast week at the 
Gold Ball Tournament. — Photo by Steve Young 



RAMS: Grayslake girls start season 7-0 



double-stack? A motion offense? A 
perimeter zone? How about a run- 
and-gun? 

"It could be <i run-and-gun of- 
fense if we let the girls do it, but we 
decided to go ibis way instead," 
Muldrow added. 

Friday morning Grayslake 
bounced back lrom a turkey day off 
to beat Niles West 37-22 in the first 
game of the afternoon. 

Top scorer for the game was ju- 
nior center Jenny Wessel, who 



poured in 16points, including an im- 
pressive 4-5 from the free throw line. 

In the Saturday contest, 
Muldrow added a different look lo 
his team. 

"Jenny needed to rest, so we sat 
her down and instead of playing a 
tight zone on us, Elk Grove opened 
the floor up a little," Muldrow said. 
"Before that, they packed every one 
in on Jenny, so when 1 saw the floor 
open, I decided to keep Jenny on the 
bench." 



The strategy worked, as Paul led 
all scorers with 13 points and Wessel 
added six points, only one bucket but 
pitched in four free throws. 

Then, on Monday, Wessel was 
back to her old self, scoring 22 and 
pulling down nine rebounds in a 59- 
35 FVC conference win. 
And, when it comes to the offense... 

"We really haven't changed any- 
thing from last year," Muldrow said. 

Except their losses. Now, they're 
undefeated. 



Zwolfer, boys 
hoops hopes sliced 



ByLEEFlLAS 
Staff Reporter 



Grayslake is struggling to find 
their rhythm, and a circular saw could 
be the culprit. 

"We set up our offense to utilize 
the big men we have," said Greg 
Groth, Grayslake boys basketball 
coach. "Unfortunately, we haven't 
had them both on the floor at the 
same time this year." 

The Rams, who dropped to 1-2 af- 
ter dropping two heart breakers over 
the weekend in the Highland Park 
Gold Ball Tournament, are struggling 
with timing and rhythm, aside from 
the freak circular saw injury that is 
keeping 6-6 center Steve Zwolfer off 
the floor. 

" He has an injury on his index fin- 
ger that is stopping him from catching 
the ball," Groth explained. "It's up to 
him when he can return. The injury 
can't be stitched up because the tip 
was removed. Every time he catches it, 
it opens up again and it's painful 
whenever he touches the ball." 

With the loss of Zwolfer, the 
Grayslake big game has been reduced 
to an outside shooting spree, which on 
Friday and Saturday night, didn't pay 
off. 

On Friday, Grayslake dropped a 
heartbreaker to conference rivals Lake 
Zurich by a score of, 53-39, while on 
Saturday, Grayslake lost their second 
in a row when Antioch took the Rams 
to double overtime and squeaked out 
a 57-55 win. 

During the Lake Zurich game, the 
Rams hit only four three- pointers out 
of 29 attempts, while making a total of 
16 of 56 from the field. 



"I couldn't understand it," Groth 
said. "We had great looks at the basket 
but we just shot terribly. We are a good 
shooting team but we just couldn't 
score." 

On Saturday, the game started out 
the same way Friday began, as 
Grayslake was down 33- 19 at half time. 

"It was a carry over from the night 
before," Groth said. "We started In a 
deep funk that we just had to shoot 
out of." 

The funk ended at the start of the 
third, as Grayslake went on a 15-2 run 
in the third quarter to make it a ball 
game. 

Then, with Grayslake down, 56-55 
with 1 30 left in the second overtime, 
Groth decided he wanted the game to 
end. The Rams worked the clock for 
the last shot 

"(Antioch) had a little contact on 
the ball, and it rolled on the rim and 
bounced out," Groth said. "We went 
for the rebound and fouled with half a 
second left on the dock.'' 

Groth defended his actions on the 
last second shot decision by looking at 
his bench. Three Rams players were 
out because of foul trouble and only 
two seniors were in the game. 

"At that point, I decided it was 
time to leave," Groth said. "I'd do It 
again in a second." 

"Were out of sync right now," 
Groth said. "We played well defen- 
sively. Once we get some rhythm go- 
ing, well come out of our funk. And, 
when Zwolfer can play again it'll be a 
big boost" 

Groth points to a Tuesday night 
game against Crystal Lake South as a 
yard stick as to where Grayslake is sit- 




~.-aU44#-»*--» * -* -ij«. 




by Dr. Scott Reiser, D.C. 



CHIROPRACTIC FOR NEWBORNS 



In (lie early I'ntl's, there was a great 
deal ul talk atnnil the psychological 
trauma thai an infant sulfcrs (.luring i he 
birth process, hut the physical Hauma 
that may oCCUl iliiring birth was rarely 
mentioned 

Delivery plates tremendous pressure 
on a baby's cervical vertebrae thai can 
result in displacement til the delicate 
neck structures The problem can be 
compounded by the (act that an 
infant's head is disproportionately 
heavy, placing a strain on the infant's 
underdeveloped cervical area 

Many chiropractors recommend thai 
a newborn have a spinal examination 
as soon as povsihlc after delivery*. It) 
correct any structural problems and lo 
help prevent future adjustments, and 
parents find thai pediatric chiropractic 
care is effective in reducing the inci- 



dence of colic, digestive sensitivities, 
and allergies in newborns. We mean it 
literally when we suggest that preven- 
tative health care should begin early. 

// maintninuifi your health and 
reducing stress i\ important to you, 
tall Round Luke Beach Chimpructic 
at X-I7'7-1()-2H(H) In make an initial, no 
obligation consultation with Dr. Scoll 
(i Reiver. Our clinic is located m 314 
Ridlim Road, Round Lake Heath 
traffic I' reek Plaza - corner of Cedar 
Lake and Rollins Roads.) 



iPIiisH Stuffed 

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Making a move 

Antioch's Erie White sets up his defender for a move to the basket against Highland Park last week 
at the Gold Ball Tournament.— Photo by Steve Young 



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Decembers 1998 



SPORTS 




Lakeland Newspapers/ M$: 



Rebound! Rebound! 

[Grayslake's 6-7 freshman center Eric bauer goes up for the rebound in the Rams 57-55 loss to An- 
tioch in last week's Gold Ball Tournament.— Photo by Steve Young 



[Warren Jr. Blue Devils basketball tryouts set 



Tryouts: Warren High School- 
[O'PIaine gymnasium 

Dates: Dec. 6-12-2:30 p.m. (1st 
cut) 

Dec. 13- 12 to 2:30 p.m. Teams to 
be announced. 

The Jr. Blue Devils is a boys trav- 
eling basketball program, dedicated 
to providing highly competitive play 
arid learning for 6th, 7th' and 8th 



grades. This is not a recreational pro- 
gram. 

1. Must reside within high school 
District 121. 

2. Home games played at War- 
ren High School. 

3. Season begins Jan. 3 to April 1. 

4. Teams play North Suburban 
Conference members and other 
feeder teams. ; .; ■ 



5. Head coaches have no boys In 
the program. 

6. Season fee $175- Fund raising 
and financial assistance available. 

7. Supported by the high school 
coaching staff "Traveling basketball 
is a excellent way for young players 
to Improve their skills." Chuck Ram- 
sey-head basketball coach-Warren 
HIghSchooL . '.'" ;-X * 











YOUTH ICELESS HOCKEY 




'* 


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W 


L 


T 


PTS 


Flyers 


1 


7 


2 


4 


Orr Division 








Hull Division 










Gretzky Division 










Canucks 


7 


2 


1 15 


Grades 1-2 










Lightning 


8 


2 





16 


Kings 


7 


2 


I 15 


Bruins' 1 


8 


1 





16 


Kings 


8 


2 


u 


lb 


Canadiens 


6 


4 


12 


Ducks 


B 


1 





16 


Panthers 


7 


3 





14 


Sharks 


5 


4 


10 


Stars6 


3 





12 




Sabres 


7 


3 





14 


islanders 


4 


5 


1 9 


Blues 


5 


3 


I 


11 


Canucks 


4 


5 


1 


9 


Sabres 


3 


6 


6 


Flyers 


5 


4 





10 


Islanders 


2 


7 


1 


5 


Panthers 


1 


7 


2 4 


Blackhawks 


2 


6 


1 


5 


Canadians 


2 


7 


1 


5 


Lightning 





10 





Redwings 


1 


8 





2 


Sharks 


1 


9 





2 








J 


Penquins 





9 


















Norrts Division 














Howe Division 










Grades 7-6 






Savard Division 








Grades 5-0 










Penquins 


8 


1 


1 17 


Grades 3-4 










Flyers 


8 


1 


1 


17 


StarsG 


2 


1 


13 


Blackhawks 


6 


2 





16 


Bedwings 


8 


2 





16 


Blues 


5 


3 


2 12 


Blues 





2 





16 


Ducks 


7 


2 





14 


Redwings 


5 


3 


2 12 


Penquins 


6 


4 





12 


Stars6 


2 


1 


13 




Blackhawks 


3 


4 


2 B 


Stars4 


3 


3 


11 




Penquins 


6 


4 





12 


Ducks 


3 


6 


1 7 


Ducks 


3 


6 


1 


7 


Blues 


3 


7 





6 


Flyers 


2 


6 


1 5 


Redwings 


3 


6 


1 


7 


Bruins 


2 


■7-' 


1 


5 


Bruins 


1 


8 


2 


Bruins 


3 


7 





6 


Blackhawks 


1 


9 





2 











Baseball camp 
set for all ages 

Lake County Baseball Training 
Camp for ages 9, 10, 11,12, 13 and 14 
year old ball players will have two 
sessions on Saturday and Sundays. 

Eight weeks of class, starts Satur- 
day, Jan. 30 or Sunday, Jan. 31 and 
goes through Saturday, March 20 or 
Sunday, March 21. 

9/ 1 year olds-noon to 1:15 p.m.; 

11/12 year olds- 1 :30 to 2:45 p.m.; 

12/ 13/ 14 year olds-3 to 4:15 p.m. 

Camp will beheld at Lake Coun- 
ty Baseball's indoor training facility 
ai Fort Sheridan. 

Head coach for the camp will be 
the director of Lake County Baseball, 
Art Mansavage. He will be assisted by 
Ills son, Jay Mansavage, in his third 
year with the Houston Astros, as well 
as other minor league and college 
ball players, professional scouts and 
other coaches from the area. 

Each session is: 

• limited to 30 ball players H 

• individualized instruction 

• indoor batting cage 

• indoor pitching mounds 

• Individualized training de- 
vices. 

For more information, call 945- 
9606. 




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-', '-. ■•■ . -'■ . h ■ ■■ 

Slue Devils go 3-0 
atCafir^ 
tournament to 
start season 

By BRENDAN O'NEILL 
Sports Editor 



■■. 



The Warren boys basketball 
team was picked by many to finish as 
one of the top two teams In the 
North Suburban Conference. 

The Blue Devils opened play for 
the 1 998-99 season witha61-40 win 
over Waukegan In the first round of 
the Cermet . Thanks giving Tourna- 
ment 

Warren followed that up with a 
51*28 win over Frond and a 54-34 
win over the host Corsairs to go 3-0 
to start the season. 

In the first game. Warren was led 
by senior center Mike Bran dow, 6-5, 
who scored 22 points for the Slue 
Devils. He was followed by senior 
point guard Langston Hughes' 12, 
and Mike Kolar chipped in 10, filling 
in for Jourdaln Milot 

Milot sat out the first three 
games on school disciplinary action, 
and Kolar filled in well— averaging 10 
per game for Warren, who seems to 



be hitting on all cylinders. . , 
'•; Warren dominated Frerrid in the 
second game after a slow start that 
had the boys trailing 12-11 after the 
first quarter. ' : O 

Thanks to six points by Brandow 
and seven by Kolar In the second pe- \ 
riod. Warren led 28-17 going into 
halftone. - ,,. : " v. 

Brandow finished the game witK'-. 
15 points and 10 rebounds, along 
with three steals to. lead 'the Blue 
Devils in all three categories. 

Kolar finished with 13 points and 
four rebounds, while Hughes added 
just two points and two rebounds in 
action limited by foul trouble. 

The final game of the tourney 
saw the Blue Devils paced by Hugh- 
es' 20 points, as Brandow added 
eight and Kolar chipped In seven. 
Warren struggled In the first half, but 
destroyed Carmel in the second half, 
outscoring the Corsairs 33-10 in the 
half— including a 12-0 shutout in the 
final period. 

The Warren boys will try to con- 
tinue their hot streak Friday, as the 
Blue Devils play at North Suburban 
Conference rival Stevenson. 

Milot, Lakeland's pick for Pre- 
season Player of the Year, should 
play against the Patriots, making an 
undefeated Warren team even 
tougher. 



Help us provide complete 

sports coverage in Lake County! 

If you have results and scores of games that you would like to 
see covered by our sports section, or if you would like to sub- 
mit ideas for our sports, column let us knowl 

Contact Sports Editor Brendan O'Neill At 
(847) 223-8161, xl32 -OR- FAX (847) 223-8810 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

PROPERTY TAX INCREASE 

FOR EMMONS GRADE SCHOOL 

DISTRICT NO. 33 
County of Lake, State of Illinois 

I. A public hearing to approve a proposed proper- 
ty tax levy increase for Emmons Grade School 
District 33 for 1998 will be held on December 15, 
1998 at 7:00 p.m. at Emmons Grade School, 

1 24226 West Beach Grove Road, Antioch, IL 
60002. 

Any person desiring to appear at the public 
hearing and present testimony to the taxing dis- 
trict may contact Mathias M. Tabar, 
Superintendent, Emmons School, 24226 West 
Beach Grove Rd., Antioch, IL 60002 (847-395- 
1105) 

II. The corporate and special purpose property 
taxes extended or abated for 1997 were 
$1,255,541. 

The proposed corporate and special purpose 
property taxes to be levied for 1998 are 
$1 1 443,877. This represents a 15.0% increase 
over the previous year. 

III. The property taxes extended for debt service 
and public building commission leases for 1997 
were $125,618. 

The estimated property taxes to be levied for 
debt service and public building commission leas- 
es for 1998 are $129,442. This represents a 3.0% 
increase over the previous year. 
IV. The total property taxes extended or abated for 
1997 were $1,381,159. The estimated total prop- 
erty taxes to be levied for 1998 are $1,573,319. 
This represents a 13.9% increase over the previ- 
ous year. 
j Stan Livermore 
Secretary, Board of Education 



\ 



1298A-2309-AN 
December 4, 1998 



■■■'-.■■■■■■ 



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.—P.v.r.VVtWa.T^ttT^rS.^".^'-- "- S *' * 



. ,-v -TiVlSWieVSMyMfcUUBWBW 



A12 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



December 4, 1998 




Pumpkin contest 
winners 

Winners of the First National 
Bank- Employee Owned Pump- 
kin Decorating Contest have 
been announced. At top, the 
winners shown from left are; 
Matthew Bolton, 8, of Antioch, 
second prize; Dalton West, 8, 
of Antioch, third prize: Dakota 
West, 10, of Antioch, first 
prize; Hotly Roberts, 10, of 
Antioch, first prize; and, Randi 
Edwards, 11, of Lindenhurst, 
honorable mention. Right, the 
winners are Megan Ochoa, left, 
8, second prize; and Eric 
Ochoa, 5. third prize, both of 
Antioch. Gvvyn Sowa, 10. of 
Salem, Wis., received an hon- 
orable mention. First National 
Bank-Employee Owned is a full 
service community bank in 
Antioch and Gurnee. — Photo 
by Karen P. Kubin 



, 




Rotary to sponsor 
leadership conference 




Aniioch Rotary Club will co- 
sponsor a leadership (raining con- 
ference for Aniioch Community 
High School students from Thurs- 
day to Sunday, March 25 to 28, 

1999. 

Four students will be awarded 
all-expense paid scholarships to 
this event by the Antioch Rotary 
Club. 

The conference is held in coop- 
eration with the Rotary Youth 
Leadership Awards Program of Ro- 
tary International District 6440. 

"Students selected will attend 
the leadership program at Camp 
Edwards in East Troy, Wis.," said 
Stan Livermore, Aniioch Rotary 
Club Youth Services Officer. "The 
conference will include various ac- 
tivities including lectures, group 
discussions, leadership workshops, 
and selected recreational and so- 
cial activities." 

"Students will be selected 
through a competitive essay writ- 
ing contest," said Livermore. 
To apply for consideration, 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Utile Dreamers 
Dress- Up 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY 21863 W. 
Linden Ave . Lake Villa. IL 60046 
(647)356-4224 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Nancy Orlman, 21 863 W, Linden Ave., 
Lake Villa, IL 60046. (647)356-4224 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is lo certify thai Ihe undersigned 
intend(s) !o conducl Ihe above named 



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students should contact Ms. Phyl- 
lis lay at Antioch Community High 
School. 

Students will be selected be- 
cause they are recognized leaders 
or potential leaders. 

Through the Rotary Youth 
Leadership Awards Program, Ro- 
tary publicly recognizes the high 
qualities of many young people 
who are rendering service to their 
community through the school 
and other organizations as youth 
leaders. In addition, the program 
serves to encourage and assist 
young people in the methods of re- 
sponsible and effective leadership 
by providing them with a training 
experience. 

The conference at Camp 
Edwards will be conducted by local 
Rotarians and professionals in the 
community along with the staff at 
the camp. 

Students who want addi- 
tional information may contact 
Livermore by telephone at 395- 
4200. 



business from the locallon(s) Indicated 
and that Ihe Irue or real full name(s) of 
Ihe person(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business is/are correct 
as shown. 
/s/Nancy Ortman. October 30. 1998 

The (oregoing instrument was ac- 
knowledged before me by Ihe per 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness Ihis 30th day of October. 1998. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Madelyn Freedberg 
Notary Public 
Received : November T2, 1998 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County.Clorh 
1198D-2288-LV 
November 27, 1998 
December 4, 1993 
December 11, 1998 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 34578 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 

FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 

EASTERN DIVISION 

Harbor Financial Mortgage Corporation. 

Plaintiff, Case No 98 C 2320 

Judge Marovich 

VS 

Naksung Song, Young Song. Board of 
Managers of the Antioch Golf Club 
Community Association t/k/a The Harbor 
Ridge Homeowners Association and Board 
of Managers of the Harbor Ridge Community 
Associalion 

Defendants 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 
OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgment entered in the above enti- 
tled cause on Se ptember 9. 1998 . 

I. Max Tyson, Special Commissioner lor this court will on December 28, 1998 al 
the hour ol 9.00 a.m. al Lake Counly Court House. Waukegan. Illinois, sell lo the high- 
est bidder tor cash, the following described premises. 

Parcel V Lot H m Fairway Estates al Antioch Goll Course Club Unit 2. Being a 
Subdivision of Part ol the Northeast Quarter ol the Northeast Quarter of Section 25 
and Part of the Southeast Quarter ol the Southeasl Quarter ol Section 24, all in Town- 
ship 46 North. Range 9, East of the Third Principal Meridian, and Part ol the North 
Hall ol the Northwesl Quarter of Section 30 and Part ol ihe Southwest Quarter ol Sec- 
tion 19. all in Township 46 North, Range 10. East ol the Third Principal Meridian, Ac- 
cording to the Plat Thereof Recorded January 4. 1991 as Document 2978802. in Lake 
County. Illinois 

Paicel 2 Easement lor Ingress and Egress for the Benelit of Parcel 1 over that Pan 
ol the Antioch Country Club Final Development Plan Recorded September 10, 1975 
as Document 1728016 as per Court Order in Case No. 72MR124 and the Antioch 
Country Club Final Development Plan Revision No. I Recorded June B. 1 977 as Doc - 
umeni 1841768, as more luiiy Delineated on ihe Plats Attached Thereto and Desig 
nated as Ingress and Egress m the Declaration of Easements. Covenants and Re- 
strictions Recorded May 3V 1978 as Document 1920598 Described as Harbor Ridge 
Drive (Except those Pans Released and Extinguished on the Plal ol Fairway Eslates 
at Antioch Goll Club Unit 2 Recorded January A. 1991 as Document 2978802 and 
Stonebridge Drum, in Lake County. Illinois. 

Parcel 3: Easement for Ingress and Egress lor the Benefits of Parcel I over that 
Part ol Fairway Eslates at Antioch Golf Club Unit 2 Recorded January 4, 1991 as Doc- 
ument 2978802 Described as Nicklaus Way and Palmer Court, as Created by said 
Plat, in Lake County, Illinois. 
c/k/a 25002 Nicklaus Way, Antioch. IL 60002 
Tax IDS 01-24-418-009 

The improvements on ihe property consist ol single family dwelling. 
Sale Terms: 10% down by certified lunds. balance within 24 hours, certilied funds 
No refunds. The sale shall be subject to general taxes and to special assessments. 
The property will NOT be open (or inspection. 
The judgment amount was S380.479.33. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which 
will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a specified dale unless the property is re- 
deemed according to law. 

For information call Ihe Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Atlorney, Fisher and Fisher, 120 
North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois." (3 12} 372-4784 from 1:00 p.m. lo 3:00 p.m. Under llli- 
nois law, the Sales Officer is qoJ required lo provide additional information other than 
that set forth In this Notice. 

/s/ Max Ty son. 

Special Commissioner 

1198C-2262-AN 

November 20, 1998 

November 27, 1998 

December 4, 1998 

December 11, 1998 



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PEDIATRICS 



you as an 



INTERNAL MEDICINE 



Each 



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Dr. Lisa Ahrams 



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v*i Dr. Lawrence Amnio 



Ur. Kami Burton 



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Dr. Jellrcy Fireman 



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Dr. Lisa Gadck 



Dr. Dnrry Goldman ■•„ ** ilXX ** '*> 

-t*4ALfi » taiwvi, i *i 0r Mclante Goodcll 

5T-t-5^.< '*■ Dr. Deborah r.olsoii m '^»~^" » 

if JF*. f, , « ■ ftflj Or. Araccll Hankl 



** r ■ , • ■ . : '^.i Or. Araccll Hanklns 

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r*3«-^L *^ -i^v^j-.-^ Dr A | M3n-0f Ka 

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a doctor, 

1 847-234-6171 



Ourphysidanvare- J: 
affiliated yiihsdme 
bftfie areas' most- 
well known primary 
care, groups. These 
board-ceriified and 
board-qualified 
internists, family 
practitioners and 
pediatricians 
participate in the 
health plans listed 
below. To find out 
\ whether a doctor 
is affiliated with a 
particular plan, 
check with your 
doctors office or 
insurance provider. 

• Aetna US Healthcare 

• Beech Street Corporation 

• Blue Cross/Blue Shield 

• Blue Cross PPO 

• Community Blue PPO 

• Blue Choice (MCNP) POS 

• HMO Illinois 

• CAPP Care. Inc. 

• CCN/Medvlew Services, Inc. 

• CHAMPUS/TBJCARE 

• Cherry Electrical Products 

• CIGNA Healthcare of Illinois 

• Rrct Health/Affordable 

• HeaHhcareAs Rnest Network (HFN) 

• Healthcare Compare Corporation 

• HeatUi Direct, Inc. 

• Health Dynamics. Inc. 

• Health Marketing, Inc. (KMI) 

■ Health Payors Organization 

• HealthStar 

• Health Plan Management 

■ Hewitt Associates Managed 
Indemnity 

• Humana Hearth Care Plans 

• IMC Holdings (Intrupa Mfg.) 

• Lake County Employees 

• LaborCare 

• Managed Care, Inc. ,, 

■ MultiPlan of Illinois, Inc. 

• NYLCare of Illinois 

■ One Health Plan of Illinois 

• Oxford/Compass Health Care Plans 

• Preferred Health Network (PHN), 
(formerly Midwest Business 
Medical Association) 

• Preferred Plan, Inc. 

• Principal Healthcare of lltinois/FHP 
of Illinois 

• Private Healthcare Systems, Inc. 
(PHCS) 

■ Rush-Prudential Health Plans 

• SOLO Cup Company 

• State of Illinois Employee Plan 

• US Managed Care Organisation 

• United Healthcare of Illinois 

• United Choice PPO 

• UHQ Plus (formerty MetraHeallh) 

• UHCI Prentice (formerly Metre HMO) 

• UHCI HMO (formerly Chkago HMO) 

• UHQ Open Access 

• Wellmark/HearOi Network 



Visit our website at: 
www.laketoresthospltal.com 



■ - 



Lake Forest Hospital 



Caring for the Quality of Your Life 

/^\T}T fOlJ A member of ibe 

\V rVUOfT RUSH Syntm for Heallh. 



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A14 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



December 4 t 1998 



Church presents play 'Four 
Tickets to Christmas' 



Calvary Christian Center will 
present the dramatic musical 
"Four Tickets to Christmas" the 
second weekend of December. 

The singing Richmond Fami- 
ly goes home to Cedar Grove. 
Ohio for Christmas. Their adven- 
tures offer music and comedy set 
in 1905 that also appeals to the 
heart. 

The play will be performed Fri- 



day and Saturday, Dec. 1 1 and 12 at 
7 p.m. at Calvary Christian Center, 
134 Monaville Road, in Lake Villa. It 
also is presented Sunday, Dec. 13 at 
6 p.m. 

There is no charge to sec the 
play. 

The production is directed by 
Becca Cowart. 

Further information is available 
by telephone at 356-61 81. 



Claus stop set for Dec. 12 



Sairta Claus will stop <n Century 
21 I .I'l'ch and Associates in l.iiuk'ii 
lilifvj tin Saturday. Do 12 Inmi !) 
,i in in noon. 

i hildri'ii who wish in visit mav 



havi' a complimentary photograph 
with Santa Claus and may receive a 
(unit On in r> 21 leech and Associ- 
ates isai HM-1 Fast Grand Avenue in 
l.indenluirsl 



BIRTHS 




Skyler Emily Higgins, a 

daughter. Skvlcr I. mils, uas born 
(hi. I S. al l.nU' l-'nri'M llosnital to 
Iran Sf.irli'and Michael liiggins, 
bolfinlAniiocb Oilier siblings are 
Nicholas, age -1 and Connor, age 2. 
Grandparents are Jenm Mnlheren 
of Aniioi h aiul Susie and William 
lliggmsol Long Grove. 



Ryan Matthew May. a son. 
Ryan Matthew, was born Oct. 30 
al lake Forest Hospital to Kellic 
and Greg May of Antioch. Grand- 
parents are Martha McAdams of 
I ox Like: David McAdams of Zion 
and Barbara and Robert May of 
\ntioch. Great grandparents are 
(iladvs /onibeck and Helen Brink 



RaeAnn Angelica Leist, a 

daughter. RaeAnn Angelica, was 
born Nov 5. at Lake Forest Hospi- 
tal to I'ina and David Leist of An- 
lioch. She has a sister. Stephanie, 
age 14. Grandparents are Marilyn 
and Alfred Roth Sr., of Antioch: 
Susan YVulf of Arlington Heights 
and Jack l.eisl of Crystal !.ake. 
Great grandparents are Fay and 
Ray Gussick of Hot Springs, Ark. 

Teaghan Kenzle Callaway, a 

daughter. Teaghan Kenzie was 
born Oct. 14 at Northern Illinois 
Medical Center, McHenry to Bo 
and Lisa Callaway of Lake Villa. 
Grandparents are Terry and Chris 
Koscinski of McHenry and Lois 
Callaway of Eugene, Ore. 



Queens provide donations 

Community Queen ambassadors collected donations of household items for the Lake County Haven 
for Homeless Women and Children. The donations were turned over to the Haven at Fun Harbor. 
Community queen representatives participating In the collection were from Lake Villa, Ubertyville, 
Zion, Vernon Hills, Winthrop Harbor, Fox Lake, and Antioch. — Photo by Sharon Thode 

Wilmot hosts shopping open house 



Merchants in downtown 
Wilmoi, Wis. awill host an open 
house in their stores Saturday, 
Dec. 12 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

This Second Annual Christ- 
mas Open House is sponsored by 



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the Wilmot Business Association. 

There will be refreshments, 
prizes, and demonstrations at 
selected shops among 21 partic- 
ipants in this event. 

Santa Claus will be at the 
Mars Trading Post Inn from 
noon to 3 p.m. 

People may shop the stores 
for antiques, art, crafts, skiing 
and outdoor equipment, and see 
race cars on display at the 
Wilmot Speedway. 

The Stage Stop Restaurant 
will have refreshments from 10 
a.m. to 5 p.m. and dining from 5 
to 10 p.m. 

The Twin Oaks Restaurant 
will offer lunch from 10 a.m. to 2 
p.m. and dining from 5 to 10 
p.m. Reservations are required. 

Also available for refresh- 
ment is The Vintage Coffee- 
house. 

The Wilmot Cafe will be open 
for breakfast and lunch. 

Other participants include 
Carey Manor Bed and Breakfast, 



Wilmot Heritage Antiques, 
Wilmot Ski Hill, and Winds 
Whisper Gently. 

Also participating are Tim- 
berwolf Designs, which features 
embroidery, Timeless Creations, 
Wilmot Speedway, Crane Land- 
scaping and Design, Linnea 
Rasch Interior Design, Wilmot 
Auto Service and Convenience 
Store, and the antiques at The 
Country Cottage. 

Harrison-Holmes Gallery and 
Woodshop offers custom wood- 
working and cabinetry and 
Pleasant Company offers Ameri- 
can Girl Dolls. 

Other participants are Laura 
Cote's School of Dance, Gander 
Mountain Sporting Goods, and 
The Old Methodist Church. 

Additional information is 
available by telephone from Jill 
Anderson at Timeless Creations 
at 414-862-2412 or from Scott 
Holmes at Harrison-Holmes 
Gallery and Woodshop at 414- 
862-9758. 



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A16 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



December 4, 1998 



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'PwTifee Elves' ready 
for holiday shopping rushf / D1 1 



MOVIE REVIEW 

'Enemy of the State' 

is full of paranolditun / B6 






Lakeland 




I '■ . :':.. .. i 









Membersof the Esc^patfes skating group from the Zion Park District p^rferm^jr^plpTOSipS^it^^f^Slna^^S ' 
afternoon.— Photo to/ Sandy Bressner -•,-,- * . r7^^ ,ra ^ 



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Anthony Butera, 8, of Gumee, slaloms between cones as he prac- 
tices his moves at the Lake County Ice Sports and Fitness Center 
in Waukegan. The fitness center is home to the Lake County 
Atoms, Ubertyville Wildcats and the Carmel Corsairs.— Photo by 
Lynn Gunnarson Dahtstrom 



Even though Lake County is experiencing 

one of its most mild winters on record, wintertime activities 

keep things cool in the heat of December 



By BRENDAN O'NEILL 
Sports Editor 

It's December, and instead of 
children sledding, skiing and 
throwing snowballs, they're 
running, rollerblading and 
throwing footballs. Huh? This is 
winter in Lake County Illinois, isn't 
It? Where's the snow, where are the 
freezing temperatures? Where's 
winter? 

Many people have been asking 
these same questions — not be- 
cause they want cold, dreary days, 
but because they've come to expect 
them. This is the Midwest, afterall. 

Record high temperatures have 
washed over the Midwest, and so 
far this holiday season has meant 
outdoor activities — most of which 
are more likely to be seen in Sep- 
tember than December. But area 
businesses need winter to come. 
They thrive off snow and wind and 
the blustery Illinois December's 
that we all know so well. These busi- 
nesses cater to winter activities such 
as Ice skating, ice hockey, skiing and 
sledding. 

Lake County Ice Sports and Fit- 
ness Center (LCISFC), in Waukegan, 
is one place where children and 
adults of all ages can skate or play 
hockey on a regulation NHL-stze ice 



rink. The facility includes a brand- 
new ice rink, new locker morns, 
showers, and bathrooms added for 
the users of the ice rink. 

The rink is not open to the pub- 
lic, but all ice time is free with a 
membership to the full-service fit- 
ness center. 

Rachel Roberts, assistant man- 
ager of LCISFC, said that the ice rink 
has provided a boost to member- 
ship at the club, and the usage of 
the rink increases every week. 

"So far, everyone loves it. We've 
gotten over 100 new members who 
sign up just to skate," said Roberts. 
"It's been a real boost to our mem- 
bership." 

"The rink is our main attrac- 
tion." 

The real test for the new facility 
will be when the cold weather final- 
ly strikes, since the rink was just 
completed in July and hasn't gone 
through a winter yet 

"It doesn't look like the warm 
weather has had an effect on the 
use of the rink, but it's difficult to 
tell right now," said Roberts. 

The rink is part of a $ 1 .3 million 
renovation the club has undergone 
recently, as the club is under new 
management. One of the improve- 
ments is a new full-service bar and 
grille called The Penalty Box, ready 



to serve beverages and food of all 
kinds to warm the insides of a hun- 
gry hockey player or figure skater. 

The Lake County Ice Sports and 
Fitness Center also plays home ice 
for the Libertyville High School 
hockey team, the Carmel High 
School hockey team, and the Lake 
County Atoms (formerly the Zion 
Atoms), a youth hockey team. 

Hockey leagues seem to be the 
fastest growing aspect of the new 
rink, as the club hosts an in-house 
instructional league, and is starting 
up a men's league that grew from 
an idea that some of the members 
had. 

"The men's league started as a 
group of guys who just started to get 
together regularly to play hockey, 
and now it's turned into a whole 
league," said Roberts. 

According to Roberts, the club 
has not experienced any ill affects 
from the warm weather, but she 
does expect the popularity of the Ice 
rink to increase as the mercury gets 
smaller and smaller. 

The Zion Park District has expe- 
rienced similar fluctuations In pop- 
ularity of its ice rink, the Zion Ice 
Arena. Larry Myers, manager of the 
Ice Arena, said that the Ice Arena 

Please see WINTER /B5 



JJ33 

ID 

/ Lbkeland Newspapers 



.... -. . . .._j... _,;.,_ . j ; ... . . . ;.,. .. | ! - .'■;■, 



LAKELIFE 



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FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers! 



'Best Chrises 




is 



The Best Christmas Pageant Ever" 
by Barbra Robinson, is set to be per- 
formed by The Waukegan Community 
Players on Dec. 4 from 9:30 to 11:30 
a.m. for schools and is open to the pub* 
lie if groups are smaller than 10 peo- 
ple. If you have a private or school 
group that would like to attend the per- 
formance as a field trip, call 360-1336. 

The Saturday, Dec. 5 show tickets may 
be available at the door if not sold out, but it is suggest- 
ed that tickets be bought by calling ahead at 360-1336. 
Show times are 1, 3 and 6 p.m. Tickets are $3 per per- 
son. All performances will be at Provena St. Therese 
Auditorium in Waukegan, 2615 Washington Rd. 

"The Best Christmas Pageant Ever" is a great 
outing for the whole family, even a play that dad will 
like. The cast consists of adults and children from 
Undenhurst, Gumee, Antioch, Lake Villa, Round 
Lake, Zlon and Waukegan. Keeping with the tradition 
of the children's show the cast also consists of a lot 
of different families. 




^\ The cast and back stage crew who 
are from Waukegan are Kristina and 
Patrick Anderson; Irma Arthur and 
Krystal Sanchez; Blake Petitclair and 
Payge Whipple; Andrew, Katie and Liz 
Cotver; Katie Blckham; Nick and Mary 
Peroni; Jennifer and Eileen Rickel; 
Sarah McMillen; and Pat Minkier. 

Cast and crew members from Zion 
Include: Bryce and Kaye Smith; Lauren 
and Jan Uotta; and Cellna and Aaron Cardenas. 

Cast and crew from Antioch; Lake Villa, Undenhurst 
and Gumee include: Cathy, Stefanie and Jono Leafblad; 
Sarah and Kelly Warner; Don, John and Joe Barlow; 
Tabra and Vicki Gomski; Liz and Conner O'Keefe; Lori 
and Kayla Zenner; KJaudia Siezek, Alex McDonough, 
Barb Bam and Bridget Can*. 

The families involved this year are very supportive 
and all the children and adults involved are learning 
from this project 

The Waukegan Community Players has been in 
existence for 42 years. 




From left: Blake Petitclair as Imogene Herdman 
and Andrew Colver as Ralph Herdman in a scene 
from "The Best Christmas Pageant Ever." 



i 
| 



■ 



! 



THEATRE 

-Annie Warbucks' 

"Annie Warbucks" Is at PM&L 
Theater in Antioch on Dec. 4, 5, 1 1 and 
12 at B p.m. and Dec 29, Dec 16 and 13 
at 230 p.m. 

Director Glgi Willdlng from 
lngieside and musical director Cathy 
Miller from Salem, Wis., have assembled 




From left: Mark Badtke, Liz 
Willdlng, and Sarah Fin ley in 
"Annie Warbucks." 



a large and talented cast of all ages. 
Elizabeth Willdlng from lngieside and 
Allysa Rlttomo from Twin Lakes, Wis,, 
shore the starring role of Annie. Mark 
Badtke of Genoa City, Wis. plays Daddy 
Warbucks, and Alice Byrne from 
Undenhurst is Grace. 

The public can reserve tickets by 
calling 395-3055 or by coming to the box 
office MorL-Thurs. from 5*30-730 p.m.. 
Saturday from 1 1 am. to 2 p.m., and 
one -and -a- half hours before curtain 



time. Tickets are $10 for adults and SS for 
students and seniors. 

'Holly' 

Bowen Park Theatre is announcing 
the performances of the December holi- 
day production of "Holly." Under the 
direction of Margaret Schultz, mis 
delightful play Is based on a Russo- 
Finnish folk tale that tells the story of a 
beautiful, but vain princess who learns 
through some hard lessons that who we 



are has nothing to do with what we look 
like. She also learns that a good deed Is 
only truly good when done from the 
heart and not for personal gain. This 
non-religious play Is filled with holiday 
spirit and will be enjoyed by audiences of 
all backgrounds and denominations. 
Group performances ore being 
booked during the day at 10 a,m. and 1 
p.m. on Dec. 7-11. Due to the demand of 

Please turn to next page 




/ii>l oi ir |>ct 1 1 islon m thomjh, 
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B4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



December 4, li 



■ :• ■ 



'KldStufF offers family entertainment 

The "KldStufT performing arts series at Gorton 
Community Center, 400 East Illinois Road, Lake Forest, 
continues on a holiday vacation day, Monday, Dec. 21, 
from 10:30- 11:15 a.m. Tickets are $5, end seating is 
general admission. 

Live acting and the Muppet-style puppets of 
"Charmalne and Company Puppet Theatre" will present 
The Christmas Elf," where Willowby, a shy elf, teams 
about Christmas and the fun and fulfillment of giving. 
Encouraged by the actors, children en joy participating 
with the characters. Unique dialog livens up this original 
story. 

Playwright/Director Charmalne Spencer is a teacher 
and puppeteer wfth an MA in Reading Education and 
20 years of experience. She has performed with puppet 
theatres and conducted classes at Urban Gateways and 
the Chicago Children's Museum. 

For more ticket information, or to receive a program 
brochure, call 234-6060. 

Waukegan Park District adds choruses 

Are you between the ages of 8 and 18 and like to 
sing? The Waukegan Park District is registering for 



SPECIAL EVENTS 

\> ' i v ■ i .1; J 4 ' if ^ If 



their new choruses for the winter season. The 
Children's Chorus of Waukegan is Just for kids ages 
8-12. Rehearsals will be on Monday nights from 6- 
7:30 p.m. 

The Youth Chorus is designed for youth ages 12-18 
and will rehearse from 7:30-9 p.m. on Monday 
nights. Rehearsals begin on Feb. 1 and both groups 
will perform a concert on April 12 at 7:30 p.m. The 
rehearsals and concert will be at the Brett Theatre at 
Waukegan High School. Registration is $30. Call the 
Jack Benny Center for the Arts at 360-4742 for more 
Information. 

Daytime yoga classes at Gorton 

Barbara Spletz, Holistic Trainer and Practical Living 
Yoga Instructor, will teach classes at Gorton Community 
Center, 400 East Illinois Road, Lake Forest, beginning 
Friday, Dec. 4, from 10:30 a.m. to noon. The class runs 
until Dec. 18, and the fee is $24. 

Spietz" extensive 30-year career in education 
emphasizes a blend of Eastern philosophy with Western 
"know-how" for a practical approach to wellness. This 
class provides a safe, proven method to achieve total 
mind/body fitness by combining the 5,000-year-old tra- 



dition of uAha Yoiga with contemporary exercise phi- 
losophy. Enjoy the rewards of increased strength, flexi- 
bility, balance, and relaxation as you perform postures, 
exercises, and mental imagery. Bring a mat and a 
small, firm pillow. 

Interested participants should register and pay In 
advance. For more Information, or to receive a program 
brochure, call or stop by the Gorton office at 234-6060 
between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. weekdays. 

Children's Theatre presents 'Cinderella 1 

The Children's Theatre at Barat College presents 
Ruth Newton's adaptation of "Cinderella" featuring 
Jill Seibert as Cinderella, Scott Harris as the Prince, 
and Kara Szostek as the Fairy Godmother. Shelly 
Scovllle will play the Stepmother The Stepsisters 
will be played by Tiffany Besco, Christina Harris and 
Suzanne Larson, In riotous portrayals not to be 
missed. 

"Cinderella" runs Saturday, Dec. 5 and Sunday, 
Dec. 6 at 1 and 4 p.m. each day. Tickets are $4 
each. Group rates are available. All seats are 
reserved. To order tickets or for more Information 
call 604-6344. 



IS 



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tiiano's available Irom I Jri l-l lt» Mu'm- 
pcnormiincTN will he btinkril mJiit ihr 
firsl wi-t'k is filled I'uhlir pcrtnnnawv 
fm "I Itillv" will he on Siilunliiv. I >ei I J .H 
Klii.m.iind 1 p.m. The pnidurtHin will 
In- performed in Coodft'llcm- Hall, wild h 
ihiIv M-iil.s I (XI. in llu' lack Hewn (elite! 
I(U ihcArtv Mi |at k Henm Di in Bourn 
|';irk. Waukegan 

I (if more tnlormation. call HSU 
-I "I I 

'The Meeting' 

Hmveii I'tirk Theairel mnpam will 
hull! .uidilitnis tni |ell Melwin •, jilav ' Hit- 
Mining on I Jet 'i.md <> Innu I Jp.jtw 
ai the l;ak ileum 1 etnei 1m ihr \rts, l'i 
|acV IWnny lit . \u\\ nil \ Stwndati Ud 
m Waukegan. t..;tli hiitks are scheduled 
trimi Monday vwnmRai 7:",H1 \\ m. The 
Meeting' will In- tlitci led In 14111^1 iliici 
rrw Dfbruli Xr.iJ. 

Needed arc (/hit Jij.it k mall' Mints 
to pomay Or M.'irfiii / iithei King, li 
MalinJm \, ami Ha.shinJ. MaluiimX s 
hntlyguard. I'ruihu lion dales art- f-i-h \ 
(>. lg, 13 at H p.m. and 1-eh 7 and 1-1 ai % 
pin TliiTi'isapdssiluliiyolaii atlilnmh 
al nm utit prrturmantf 

Thi' Meeting' is aluml a licinimis 
meeting between the two great civil 
rights activists. Dr. Martin Luther King. 
lr. and Malcolm X. U is poignani. witty, 
sometimes humorous, and catches ihe 
spirits of these two historic figures. 
Because ihe length ol the play is just ovet 
one hour, additional maieriais will be 
used by die actors before the actual play. 

Auditions will be by appointment 
only and actors are asked in call :tliU- 
4741 to sel a time for iheir individuiil 
audition. Bqwen I'ark Theatre Company 
is a prolessional, non-union, non equity 
company . There is pay. 

'Clown Prince' slated 

" The Clown Prince of Wanderlust' 
is a children's show by Douglass 
I'arkhirst that will be presented by the 



Kill ha\eiN tm I im |. ". and h ( nine 
see tinv\ the naloev or peasants 01 
uliatevet the inliahilauls ol the 
strange place called Wanderlusl call 
themselves, try to make Princess Hose 
Violet laugh II she doesn'i laugh, and 
soon, she will have in marry the evil 
(iiaud Hunkleman' Oh no' Ilelp make 
hei laugh' file show will be presenled 
at ll"- Muiulelem Ibgh School audiio 
riuin Show limes are« p.m. on Friday. 
Dec 4. 2 and H p.m on Salurday. Dec 
!>. and 2 p m on Sunday, Dec (> I 01 
more inrormalion. call 566-65JI4. 

KIDS EVENTS 

Kids New Years Eve 

YNU.A Lamp Duncan is hosting a 
New Vent's V.ve overnight ior kids ages 
(1 lo I f I he piogram will slarl at I'M) 
p.m 011 Dei US and conclude nl 9 a in. 
on Jan I 

1 he inghi is (wicked lull ol games. 
sledding, lood. all camp dance, pri7.es 
and mme "1 he idea is lur kids lu have 
a great lime and lor parents to know 
then kids are in a safe place," says 
Addie Sinus, one of two directors to 
lead the overnight. The overnight is a 
perfeci opportunity for parents lo 
bring in the New Year and not have to 
find a baby-siiter. Bring your kids to 
YMCA Camp Duncan and let your kids 
bring in the New Year with B bang! 
Kona Koffey and Sinits are the two 
YMt'.A professionals directing the 
overnight program. 

The cost is reasonable and 
includes program all night long, din- 
ner, breaklasi, snacks, prizes, ami 
supervision. Hofley staled. "Our New 
Year's live Overnight program is a fun 
alternative (or ihe kids al a reasonable 
cost lor the parents." The New Year's 
Kve Overnight is held al YMCA Camp 
Duncan located near Pox Dike. 

lor more information, call Hona 
or Addie al 54[i-80fi{i. 



HOLIDAY EVENTS 

Holiday Art Sale 

TheBih Annual Holiday An Sale 
al ihe College of Lake County Is Scl 
for Dei 5-fl Wilh fine art gifts for 
everyone, ibis is the perfeci place to 
pick up gifts for tiiose hardtobuy- 
jor people on your list! The event will 
feature jewelry, wearable arl, pottery, 
paintings and photography. 

limes are Saturday. Dec. 5. 9 
a.m. lo 4:30 p.m.; Sunday, Dec. 6, I 10 
f> p.m.: Monday, Dec. 7, 9 a.m. to 9 
ji m.; and Tuesday, Dec. 8, 9 a.m. to 9 
p.m. for more information, call 543- 
24 05. 

Santa Breakfast 

Santa will be stopping by The 
Country Inn Restaurant of Lambs 
Parm lo listen lo kids' wish lists just 
in time for the holidays. Families are 
invited 10 join Santa for breakfast on 
Saturday, Dec. 5 and Dec. 12. Two 
searings are available each day at 
8:30 a.m. and 10 a.m. The breakfast 
buffet is only $8.95 for adults and 
$4.95 for children ages 2 to 10. 
Children under 2 are free. The price 
also includes a free hay wagon ride 
around the farm! 

After breakfast, everyone will 
visil Sanla's Secret Playland. There 
each child will receive a free goodie 
bag. Live entertainment will include 
music and Lambs Farm's own J0J0 
and Kiwi the clowns. The kids can 
also enjoy sand art, face painting and 
get their picture taken with Santa 
with prices ranging from $1 .50 to 
S4.50 each. 

All proceeds will benefit ihe 
vocational, residential and social 
support services provided by Lambs 
Farm for more than 265 adults with 
menial disabilities. For reservations, 
call 362-5050. 







-*v< 



THE AFTERSCHOOL CLOB PRESENTS:.. 

Thc^ght hcj /War k 

,Munchkin tennis gives your child a fun introduction to the sport of tennis! Mark 
Miller's program utilizes a smaller court, lower net and appropriately sized racquets. 
/|||\ D For Ages 3 to 5 

Miw ^ ^ e ' axec ^ & ^ an environment 

(3 As seen on Bo2ots>6iccdS;;ABC ^CB^teJe^ision 
|Ste H Register ^yW^^^^§mm 





SSBHJ-3. 1999P 



PM to 1:00 PM 
□I Cost-. $% 

Come Join Uat Call M7MB.Q771 to regi&terl 



MUSIC 



Concert series 

The Lake County Community 
Concert Association has revealed an 
exciting line-up of world class per- 
formers for its 1998-99 series. 

The 1998-99 season includes the 
following; Lee Lessack and Joanne 
O'Brien— An Enchanted Evening: The 
Music of Broadway, Sunday, Jan. 10, 3 
p.m.; Jan Gottlieb Jiracek, pianist, 
Sunday, March 14,3 p.m.; and 
Vancouver Wind Trio (bassoon, oboe 
and clarinet), Sunday, April 18 at 3 p.m. 

Tickets are sold only for the entire 
series. Ticket holders are entitled to 
attend eight additional concerts at two 
other Community Concerts locations 
in Arlington Heights and Park Ridge. 

All LCCCA's concerts will be held In 
Oriln Trapp Auditorium at Waukegan 
High School, Brookslde and McAree. 

For tickets, call Donna at 244-7465. 

Ensemble opening 

City Lights is a vocal ensemble 
that sings a variety of music from the 
1930s to the present., and has been 
singing around the Chlcagoland area 
for several years, entertaining audi- 
ences of ail ages. City Lights has in Its 
repertoire a variety of songs and med- 
leys guaranteed to entertain and also 
boasts of its fine soloists. This 
renowned musical group Is opening Its 
roster for the first time to the general 
public for new members. Limited 
openings remain for the men's and 
women's sections. If you love to sing 
and have fun doing It, call Kim at 526- 
7190 orAI at 623-1946. 



DANCE 



'Nutcracker 1 

The Barrington Youth Ensemble's 



production of The Nutcracker will be 
held on Friday, Dec. 4 at 7:30 p.m. ; 
Saiurday, Dec. 5 at 2 and 7:30 p.m.: 
and Sunday, Dec. 6 at 2 p.m. 
Performances will be at Barrington 
High School's Richard C. Johnson 
Auditorium, 616 W. Main St For more 
information, call 3B2-6333. 

SINGLES 

Singles dance set 

The Solo Singles Club meets every 
Friday at 8 p.m. at Gale Street Inn, 906 
Diamond Lake Rd., Mundeleln. There 
will be live entertainment. The age 
range Is 40-plus and admission Is free. 
For more Information, call the Hotline 
at 746-681B. 

Dream Date Auction set f 

The Midwest Chapter of the t 

Starlight Children's Foundation will "S* 
present Its 8th annual Dream Date 
Auction on Friday, Feb. 19, at 6 p.m., 
at the Park West, 322 W. Armltage in 
Chicago. The event will feature the 
auction of 26 bachelor and bache- 
lorette date packages, food from over 
30 of Chicago's favorite restaurants 
and a raffle and auction offering Inter- 
national, deluxe trip packages. Cost is 
$30 in advance, $35 at the door. To 
order tickets or for more Information, 
call (312) 251-7827. 

Snowflake dance 

The Buoys and Belles Square Dance 
Club will host a "Snowflakes Are 
Coming Dance" on Friday, Dec. 4 at 
First United Methodist Church, 128 N. 
Utlca St., Waukegan. Plus Workshop Is 
from 8 to 8:30 p.m.; Main Stream Is 
from 8:30 to 10:30 p.m. Plus Tip is al 
10:30 p.m Cost Is $3.50 per person. 

All modem western square 
dancers in the area are Invited. Light 
refreshments will be served. Call 662- 
6546 for more information. 



\(c?Jy Presents \V?^il 

■* Annie Warbucks^*** 

By Thomas Meehan 

Music by Charles Sfrouse; Lyrics by Martin Charntn 

Permission granted by Music Theatre International 

Directed by GlGt Winding 

December 4, 5, 11, 12 at 8:00 pm 

Dec. 6, 13 at 2:30 pm 

Fri. & Sat 8 p.m.; Sunday Matlneo 2:30 p.m. 
Adults $10; Students & Seniors $8 

Call for Reservations 

395-3055 

PM&L Theatre • 877 Main St, Antloch 

^^ Box Office Opens November 

PflBfl QOTCmc «Hoijf»:Moo.!hfu'Thu™-530-7J0p.m.;8*-11-2 OBT^ 

mam i i/2h^b*tOT«ho«iin».R«Mtv»da«^.vt3A/Mc \smH3 






' . 



•w - -»~ **. ■*». 



>«■«*« I^' - B* ^ ^— 1 



Decembers 1998 



-•* 






• ■ - . 
FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



: "- V •■ ! ■• " ■ '. . " ; .; 






Lakeland Newspapers/ B5 




s 







!£££■ 










. 



HI Dr. Singer, . 

I have a problem with the 
*M<atey aee monkey do 
syndr ome.* My husband 
has a pretty colorful vocab- 
ulary and uses It qojte often, 
rve tried to speak to him over 
and over again about toning It 
down, if not getting rid of It alto- 
gether. -.''-•' 

The problem Is that we have 
a 7 ear old daughter who is 
picking up the four letter words 
and saying them outside of our 
home. I am appalled by It and 
am not son of how to deal with 
this. 

Even though I keep asking 
him to stop, my husband hart 
listening to me. Be grew up with 
a mom who spoke the same way 
and he thinks It's fine to say 
these things In front of our 
child. 

I wonder if there Is any way 
for me to let my child know that 
it's not okay to say these things 
even though her daddy ts7 Z.D. 

DearZ.D. 

I think you've diagnosed this 
one correctly as the whole "monkey 
see' problem. You can help your 
child to understand this, however, I 
will say that you have some work 
ahead of you and it will not be easy. 



LIFE'S 
A BEAR 

Donna Abear 




♦ H*I HI W II I> NH l l M f 

PARENT'S 



Sheni Singer, 
Psy.D. 



The first thing I would tell you to 
do. Is to not give up on your hus- 
band. Try and get In to see a coun- 
selor with your husband to see if a 
neutral person between you might 
help to smooth some of the different 
viewpoints. I often see parents who 
are not In the same camp regarding 
behavior and the best first step 
would be to try and get both parents 
on the same team. I would be glad 
to consult with you if you'd like. 

If you cannot get your husband 
to go with you to counseling, and he 
still doesn't agree with stopping the 



language, you should probably do 
the counseling by yourself, at least 
for one or two sessions, and learn 
some strategies for how to ge t your 
child to stop doing this. There are 
behavioral systems that will work to 
help your children learn about this. 

Ifyour daughter Is held respon- 
sible for her decisions, she will 
learn. After all, there will be many 
times in her life that others around 
her will be doing things that she 
should not be involved in. 

Wouldn't it be great If from the 
age of 7, she learned to follow what 
she knew was right for her, Instead of 
what was right for others around her. 

The hard part here is that daddy 
should be a rote model and that gets 
confusing for her. You might men- 
tion those words to daddy and see if 
that might get through to him. 

The logic that I try to use in a 
situation that involves a young child 



doing things that are more charac- 
teristic of an adult, is to point out to 
both parents and children that - 
there are many things that kids are 
not allowed to do, that adults are. 

For example, adults are allowed 
to drive. Kids aren't Adults are al- 
lowed to smoke. Kid's aren't Adults 
are allowed In "R" rated movies. 
Kids aren't There are many things 
in our society that adults are al- 
lowed to do that Idds just aren't al- 
lowed to do. 

There have been a lot of kids 
that I have met who do strongly feel 
that they should be allowed all the 
same privileges that their parents 
have. This is usually a significant in- 
dicator that boundaries In the fami- 
ly need to be stronger. 

At 7 years old , it may be a little 
tough for your daughter to under- 
stand what is adult and what is child, 
but if you make clear that foul Ian- 



msmm 

daddy either, but Daddy is an adult 
and can make that decision, you are 

settingup a very important bound- 
ary for your daughter to understand 
for other future behaviors as weD. 

Obviously, die best scenario Is 
that your husband sees the light 
and stops using the language, but 
sometimes, what comes naturally, 
happens before we think. Remem- 
ber that one or two sessions might 
be helpful. Call me if you want to 
consult 

This column is for entertain- 
ment purposes only. Information 
in this column cannot and should 
not replace proper Psychological 
treatment. Dr. Sheni Singer is a Li- 
censed Clinical Psychologist, child- 
hood behavior specialist. Call in 
your questions and comments: 
(708) 962-2549. 




Donna Abear is on vacation. 



'Warbucks' heads into popular, family run 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

"Annie Warbucks" has flirted 
with sold-out performances as it 
reaches the half-way point of its 
four week run. 

Both cast and crew are enjoying 
the production, and audience re- 
sponse has been very warm and en- 
thusiastic. 

"It's going great," said Director 
Gigi WUldlng. "I'm really excited by 
the whole thing." 

"Annie Warbucks" Is a PM&L 



Theater holiday production for the 
entire family. The play itself takes 
place near Christmas, the dOg 
Sandy is a Christmas gift for Annie, 
and with singing and dancing, it is a 
production to hold everyone's in- 
terest. 

"We try in this holiday (period) 
to do family productions," she said. 
"We do draw a lot of families with 
their kids." 

The production Itself con- 
tributes to the presence of children 
in the theater. It has a largo group .of 
orphans, Annie herself, and a small 



HOROSCOPE 



Aries - March 21/April 20 
Don't beat around the bush 
when talking with a close friend 
about a personal problem. Just 
tell him or her exactly what's on 
your mind. He or she won't be 
upset with you. As a matter of 
fact, he or she will want to help 
you rectify the situation. A loved 
one needs a shoulder to cry on. 
Be supportive. 

Taurus - April 21/May 21 
Stand tall when a business ac- 
quaintance accuses you of un- 
scrupulous dealings. You 
know that you didn't do any- 
thing wrong. If you explain 
yourself, your superiors will 
believe and support you. An 
old friend asks a favor of you. 
Try to help him or her, be- 
cause you two used to be very 
close. Virgo plays an impor- 
tant role. 

Gemini - May 22/June 21 

You need to think fast on your 
feet when it comes to a family 
matter early In the week. Oth- 
ers are counting on you to 
keep the situation under con- 
trol. Just remain calm, and 
you'll come up with the an- 
swer. That special someone 
hasn't called in a while. Don't 
worry; he or she has been 
busy. Your relationship Is fine. 

Cancer - June 22/July 22 

Don't wear your heart on your 
sleeve, Cancer. Keep that 
special someone wondering 
about you until you know that 
your feelings are reciprocated. 
A friend asks a favor of you. 
Don't Immediately say yes, be- 
cause, there is some danger 
Involved. Try to help him or 



her come up with a different 
way to handle the situation. 

Leo - July 23/August 23 

This is your week to roar, Leo. 
Everything is going your way 
at work and at home. Enjoy it, 
and pamper yourself a little. 
Spend some time with friends 
whom you haven't seen in a 
while. They have some inter- 
esting news to tell you. Sagit- 
tarius plays a key role late in 
the week. 

Virgo - Aug 24/Sept 22 

A minor problem with an ac- 
quaintance ends up working it- 
self out early in the week. So, 
don't worry about it. Every- 
thing is going to be fine. A 
loved one asks for your input 
about a family gathering. Be 
honest — even if he or she 
won't like what you have to 
say. Scorpio is involved. 

Libra - Sept 23/Oct 23 

Keep your wits about you 
this week, Libra. A "friend" 
tries to pull the wool over 
your eyes when it comes to a 
personal matter. Don't let 
him or her. Instead of believ- 
ing the lies, think logically. 
That special someone takes 
you out late in the week. En- 
loy yourself. 



y 



Scorpio - Oct 24/Nov 22 

Don't try to be someone you're 
not when you meet an inter- 
esting person late In the week, 
Scorpio. He or she will see 
right through your charade. 
Just be yourself, and you're 
sure to make a good Impres- 
sion.. A close friend needs 
someone to talk to. Be there 



for him or her. 

Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 

While you face a lot of set- 
backs at work this week, 
Sagittarius, try to remain opti- 
mistic. Just work diligently, 
and you'll make progress. The 
higher-ups will be impressed 
with how much you're able to 
accomplish. Aquarius plays an 
important role on Wednesday. 

Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 

Don't be stubborn when a 
family member tries to tell you 
what to do. Listen to what he 
or she has to say, and you'll 
realize that you can't handle 
the situation on your own. Let 
him or her know how much 
you appreciate the help. That 
special someone plans a ro- 
mantic getaway. Enjoyl 

Aquarius - Jan 21/Feb 18 

Be cautious when it comes to 
a business proposition. It's re- 
ally not all that it's cracked up 
to be. Look at the pros and 
cons, and you'll see that there 
are a lot of risks Involved. Turn 
to a loved one for romantic ad- 
vice. He or she has your best 
interest at heart. Cancer plays 
a key role in your professional 
life late in the week. 

Pisces - Feb 19/March 20 

All eyes are on you when it 
comes to an important finan- 
cial decision this week, 
Pisces. Make an informed 
decision, and think about 
what's best for everyone in- 
volved. The person whom 
you've been seeing wants to 
intensify the relationship. Say 
yes. 



puppy to deiight any heart. 

"It's a very talented cast," Wind- 
ing said. Many of the principals in 
the production have appeared on 
the PM&L stage before, but there 
are many new faces. 

"The mix of the old and the new 
is good," she said. 

"The music in this, especially 
the ballads, is just wonderful. I just 
love the music- 
Remaining dates to see the . 
production are Fridays and Satur- 
. days; Dec.' 4, 5. ; ll . and 12 at a p.m. 
and Sundays*' Dec. 6 and 13 at 2:30 
p.m. 

"Sunday (Nov. 22) we were 
sold out," WlUdingsald. There are, 
however, good seats remaining to 
be sold for the remaining produc- 
tions. 

Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 
for children and people older than 
65 years of age. 

Reservations can be made at 
395-3055. The box office is open 
from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. from Monday 
to Thursday, and from 1 1 a.m. to 2 
p.m. on Saturday. 

The box office also is open 90 
minutes before curtain time. 

Alternating as Annie in the 
production are Allysa Rittorno, of 



Twin Lakes. Wis., and Liz Wind- 
ing, of Ingleside. When each of 
them is not playing the role of 
Annie, they play the role of CJ., 
one of the orphans. 

Orphans are played by Rachel 
Finkelberg and Josy Koutsoures, 
both of Antioch, Anastasia Nelson, 
of Lake Villa, Megan Hosken, of Lin- 
denhurst, Rachael Fry, of Burling- 
ton, Wis., and Katy Ihlen, of Trevor, 

.WIS..'. - V/ '"-:'' -V ~ : '■*:■■ 

Maifc Badute, of Genoa Ctty . 
: Wla., IsyVatbuckaahd Alice Byrne,) 
of Lindenhurst, is his secretary 
Grace. 

Supporting roles and chorus 
members are played by: Dolores, 
Sarah, and Bill Finiey, of Round 
Lake; and, Em Uy Martin, Lindsey 
Yates, Tom Hausman, Bruce Weise. 
Fran Jansta, and Larry Bersie, of An- 
tioch. 

Also in supporting roles and die 
chorus are: Donna, Colleen, and 
Scott Badtke, of Genoa City, Wis.; 
Kathleen Nelson from Lake Villa; 
Suzanne Magi not, of Libertyville; 
Debbie Heimke, of Trevor, Wis.; 
Terry Brady from Lake Zurich; 
Randy Margison, of Round Lake 
Park; and, Cathy Miller, of Salem, 
Wis. 



FROM PAGE Bl 

WINTER: Activities move 
indoors due to mild winter 



has all kinds of event and activities 
going on, regardless of the weather 
outside. 

"Our year is planned out in June 
and July. If we have off-season 
weather, it's difficult to react," said 
Myers. "We advertise In the local 
schools, but we know winter is go- 
ing to come. The holiday season is 
extremely busy for us," 

Busy is right The Zion Ice Arena 
is holding its normal public ses- 
sions, Tuesday through Sunday, 
which Includes a live D) skate Fri- 
day nights from 8:15-9:45 p.m.. 

Also, the Ice Arena has special 
events planned, like the Spring Ice 
Show, March 26-28, the Precision 
Skating Competition, Feb. 7, the 
Learn to Skate program, which will 
hold sign-ups Dec. 15, and the Holi- 
day Open Figure Skating Competi- 
tion, slated for this weekend. 

"We have a well-rounded facili- 
ty, with hockey teams, figure skating 
teams, the Learn to Skate program 
and party packages," said Myers. 

The Ice Arena hosts the Zion 



\. ' 



Wings, a youth traveling hockey 
team, and two skating clubs— the 
Zion Figure Skating Club and the 
Southport Figure Skating Club. 

Myers, who is also manager of 
the Zion Park District's golf course, 
said that when the weather is un- 
seasonably warm, people shift from 
the Ice Arena to the golf course. 

"Right now, the (Ice Arena) pro- 
gram is where we thought it would 
be," said Myers. "Public skating is 
down a little bit, but with the weath- 
er the way it is, people are not think- 
ing about ice skating— they're doing 
anything they can to be outside." 

Until Jack Frost decides Lake 
County has had enough sunshine, 
enough 60 and 70-degree weath- 
er, and enough outdoor activity, 
area residents will have to go in- 
side for ice skating, ice hockey 
and a chill in the air. And maybe 
local ice rinks will be filled with 
people sick of shopping, but 
wanting a taste of the holiday sea- 
son—and the feeling of frost nip- 
ping at their nose. 



■,.. .1!-.. 



'MJ'.P 



" * ■'*■*.' 



B6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



December 4, 1998 



'Enemy of the State' is a paranoia 







L- i C w.>»-j' 



You probably don't think 
twice when calling some- 
one on the phone, faxing 
them, sending them an E- 
m ail or even conversing with them 
in public. 

After seeing "Enemy of the State, " 
you will. 

Will Smith stars in the latest 
movie to play off of one of the fa- 
vorite topics of today's generation— 
paranoia. 

With shows like "Tin- X-Files " 
ami movies like "Conspiraq,- Vieor)" 
and "Hie Net," and even the ever in- 
creasing news reports of someone 
taping "private" conversations, 
paranoia is a hot topic in our high- 
tech world with ever increasing elec- 
tronic ties to one another. 

"linemy of the State" takes the 
notion of 'big brother is watching" 
and, while keeping it believable, 
pushes it over the edge on a high- 
lech thrill ride of nervous adrena- 
line. 

"Privacy has been dead for 30 
years," one of the main characters 
savs. 

' Robert Clayton Dean (Will 
Smith) quickly finds (hat out. Dean 
is a Washington D.C. tabor lawyer 



movie review 




John Kmilta 



n 



i if m 




ENEMY OF 
THE STATE 

Kaied It 

Producer 

jerry Hnickheituei 

Director 

Tony vScott 

Starring 

Will Smith 

dene llackman 

Ion Voight 

Itegina King 

Lisa Ho net 




Will Smith is the subject of some good old-fashioned spying and espionage in the skillfully done 
"Enemy of the State." The film also stars Gene Hackman and Jon Voight. 






who comes into possession uf in- 
criminating evidence die National 
Security Agency (NSA) wants, only 



EGAL 



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HOME FRIES (PGUJjf >.v gi <v>; (Jj ?•-, 

SINGMASTER (R) X •,-; JK <v M,' '< 

VERT BAD TOINGStRIX \"ir f$ ; ,-' .7; ;j' 

ENEMY Of THE SIATE |R| x ?« 3T nX f* F5 M 
RUGRAlSjCj^X'W ■;■ >-' <■- !■' R« £* :;' &r 
I STIU KNOW WHAT YOU 010 EAST SUMMER (R) 

■Ji% !F ii' "'. V' 

MEET JOE HACK |PCI3]X v s * :\ 
1HE SIEGE |R|x \m ,i' W ">> •;« 
TOE WAURBOY (PG11) x V ;■■- 4'' •■• *> 1^ 
WE WIZARD OF 01 (G)X $1 ;« ;'.■ 
I'll BE HOME fOR CHRISTMAS |PG| * ' v. Sg f/.* 
PIEASANTVILIE (PGI3| X M'. >»5 
.RUSH HOUR [PGI1I x yo 



CINEMAS -**"«> 

www.regalcinemas.com Q 



TWO DAY 

ADVANCED 

TICKETS 



ROLLINS CROSSING 18 

Rclllns Rd. Blv/n Rl 83 & Cedar lake Rd. 647-S4S-19B3 
BARGAIN MATINEES AIL SHOWS STARTING BEFORE 6PM 



l>^ — H^ l .H I U. a V«J.Ul.l .a a l l 



CALL THEATER 

FOR SHOW 

INFORMATION 



he doesn't know he has it. 

Soon he is the subject of a dead- 
ly cat and mouse chase and the cat 
has some major, technological toys. 

Using satellite tracking systems 
and an elaborate set of observation 
devices the group of government 
techno-freaks are able to get into 
every aspect of Dean's life and do as 
ihey please. 

Hie head of the corrupt NSA 
group is NSA Administrator Thomas 
Reynolds (Jon Voight), a stoically 
creepy government agent who holds 
people's lives in his hands — hands 
with itchy trigger fingers. 

Voight continues his film come- 
back of late with yet another con- 
vincing performance as a beady- 
eyed power monger. 

Will Smith lends his easy going 
persona to the role of Dean making 
tlie character and the film seem be- 
lievable and stunningly intense. 

This movie is a weLI made cross 
between two quality Rims. The good 



Genetal Cinema 

LAKEHURST 



ROUTE 43 near ROUTE 1 20 



♦No Passes * No Passes or Super Savers 

DIG atXGHAt SOUND SIR=SHRtO DOU DOLBY SURtO 
Times Valid For Friday, December •!. Only © ioob 



MOVIES AND TIMES START DECEMBER 4, 1998 

1 378 Lake St. Antioch 



.7) 444-FILM 



BARGAIN NUIHfUf IVIRY DAT 
AU.tH0W»IPOM6PM 

[ BARGAIN MATINEES ALL SHOWS BEFORE 6PM 
'INDICATES VIP TICKET RESTRICTIONS APPLY 



t M Ml SEMQHS [OVER W| & CHIUWEN 

'tX 111 & UNDCH) ADULTS ST 50 AFTEfl 0PM 

kw swoon met Hcc»*uTiumwrrm*ijDCj| 



PSYCHO* ("I 

Daily 12:30, 2:40, 4:50,7:00.9:10 

A BUG'S LIFE" (G) 

Daily 11:40, 12:40, 130, 2:50, 4:00, 5«, 6:15, 
7:10,8:30,920 

BABE: PIG IN THE CITY* (C) 

Daily 1150, 1230, £00, 3:00, 4:10, 6:20, B:30 

RUGRATS* (G) 

OS)-11:45 1 W,3«,5:« 1 7!!S,»0 

HOME FRIES (K-m 

Daily 11:40, 155, 335, 530, 755, 9:20 

VERY RAD THINGS (R) 

Oaily 12:55, £25, 435,6:45, 0« 

ENEMY OF THE STATE* (I) 

Daly 12S0, 335,530, 621,8:10, M5 

MEET JOE BIM(PG-13) 

Daily 1^0,430,6.00 

I'll BE HOME FOR CHR1STRWS (P€) 

DaDy 1:00 

PUASAinVILLE (pg-13) 

1 Daily 330, 6:10, 850 

THEWATiRB0Y(PG-i3) 

Daily IMpJjpjW, 5:40, 7:4J,9-^ 



Qf) SENIORS tWBt 601 CHILDR£H 

fUHDER HI & MJL SHOWS BEFORE £PU 

koOMJULTSWTOWN 



1 

ENEMY OF THE STATE m 

Fri., Mon.-Thurs. 7:00 
Sat & Sun. 2:00, 5:00, 9:00 



LIBERTY (847)362-3011 

70B N. Milwaukee Ave, Libertyville 



SIM 5ffllOflS(OVtflSH,CHIU)BD( 
t (UHDtnil] iUL SHOWS BEFOMSMt 
WOO ADULTS AfTtB tfU 

I'LA. BE HOME 
FOR CHRISTMAS <"> 

B«I. * Bui. a r1«, 4:1S 

ANTZ ^r*^ 

e«t. « Bun. 2:30, 4:30 

VERY BAD THINGS <"> 

Frl. 0:4a, B:4S 

Bail. O-.40. S:4S Bun. 7.1 5 

Moil - Thurm. T:1S 

PLEASANTVILXE <«-«» 

Frl. 0:30. IhOO Sal. 6.3a, a oo 
Sun. 7:00 Mon. ■ Thura. 7rOO 

FREE ChOdran'i Show Oat. 1 1;OOam 

-Mouse Hianl- 

P«rt at UteqpJM TNckM* at ■ tUUtf 



m McHENRY 1 & 2 (815) 385-0144 • 
1204 N. Green St. * 



RUGRATS 10 

Fn 530. 7.30. 9 JO Sal 130,330,4X ?30,930Sir. 
ltJO. 130. i30, ?30, 930 
ImotlTIv SJQ. 730 



BABE: PIG IN THE CITY rq 

Fn S.4S 750.9305*. I IS.330.S4S. 7i0,SM, 
|&*v1'S.330.S4S. 7.S0.9.S0 Mon TV S4S >V 



PSYCHO n 

[Fn. 430.7(10,»IS, 1130Sa1 J IS 430. 7 00 3 IS. 1130 

I Sm 2 IS, 430. 7.00, 9 IS 

|MonTru4:3q7fJ0 



I A BUG'S LIFE TO 

I Fn. 5:20.730.9.40 S3 1 . 1 00. 3 '0. 5 JO. 730.910 bur, 
11-00. 3 10, 520,730.9.40 
Mm-tru- S'20, 730 



AMERICAN HISTORY Xn 

I Fn 430. 7«. 930 Sat 2tft 430. 7 00. 930 
I Sin 200. 430. 7.00,930 
|Mon.-Tru-. 430. 7:00 



HOME FRIES *n 

I Fn. S.4S. 7:45, 9:45 Sat 1 45, 3 4S, S 45. 7 45. 9:45 Sm. 

11^5.145,5:45,7:45,9:45 

|Mori-Tru:S:45,7:45 



- TiSSTFOCrrn) £HO PASSES/COUPONS) 



SjSQ 



EEMWBfJVnifXIlOfltrjfiEN 
IlliUH^WAIStllVWllREni 



ANTZ <*> 

Sat. a Sun. 2^0. *ao 

I KNOW WHAT YOU 
DID LAST SUMMER <■) 

Fri. Ov*8, 8:43 Sat. OrfS. a>«3 
Sun, 7.*00 Mon. - Thur». 7.*00 

I'LL BE HOME FOR 
CHRISTMAS *«j 

Frl. 0:30, 6:30 Sat. 2:15, 4:16, 

0:3O, C JO Sun. 2:18, 4:1B. 7:16 

Mon. - Thura. 7:16 

FRGfi ChJIdnn'B Mwl. 

aat. t&oo a ia.-oo 
■^numii 



MEET JOE BUCK "--s 

Frl43Q,B:10SaLim«3aB:iO 
Surt im 43Q, 8:10 MovTru. 6:15 



WATERBOY -o-n 

Fit 520, 730,9^0. 11:40 Sat 1«, 3:10, 520, 730,9:40, 
UM Sun. 1:00. 3:10, 520, 730. 9:40 

Moa-Tru. Sift 730 



JERRY SPRINGER n 

Frl 5:45. 730, 1000 Sat 130. 140, 145. 7ift10C0 Sin 
130, 140, 5:45. 733. lOfll Moa-Trw. 5:45, 730 



VERY BAD THINGS n 

Fit 53ft 7-45, 1 M0 SaH Itt 115,530, 7:45,10.00 Sun. 
W 115, 530.7:45,11*00 FAn-Thur. 530, 7:45 



ISTUNHWllrTUlTYOUWUSTSlJllERR 

Fit 430,701, 930. 11:45 Sat ifla*30, 7fi0.930.il. 
Sun £00, 430,701 930 Mm-Thur. 43ft 7fi0 



45 



ENEMY OF THE STATE n 

Fit 43ft 7:10, 930 Sat 1 AS, 430, 7:1ft 930 
Sun 1 jg 430, 7^q S30 Mon-Tru. 430. 7:10 






ROCKYHOn^rKTURESHOWPI 

SM.1130 



GIRT CERTIFICATES ON SALE 



guy on the run gives the feel of Tlie 
Fugitive. "That Is combined with the 
apparent predecesso r to "Enemy of 
the State" \he 1974 paranoia film 
classic starring Gene Hackman, 
The Con venation. " 

In an obvious nod to "77je Con- 
versation" Hackman is cast In "En- 
emy" as essentially the same para- 
noid surveillance operative. In 
"EnerTiyhe has gone into hiding 
from the government which 
trained him but reluctantly ends 
up helping Dean In his quest to 
stay alive. 

Even the building in which 
Brill (Hackman) does his under- 
ground work from is almost iden- 
tical to his hide-out in "The Con- 
versation." 

It was a nice touch which added 



even more depth to this film as the 
relationship between Hackman and 
Smith gave the film a good change 
of pace. 

The plot is well laid out and the 
twists keep coming right up to the 
end 

Even though there are plenty of 
chases, explosions and character in- 
teraction the true intensity of the 
film comes from the computer 
hacking govemmenftjaddies Who 
provide the film with its paranoid 
tendencies. 

So, next time you are on the 
phone and you hear a clicking 
sound you might want to be careful 
what you say. Someone may be lis- 
tening. 

I give "Enemy of the State" four 
out of five popcorn boxes. 



BE THERE 



Crafts Fair set 

Treasures ranging from clothing 
to giftware and a wide variety of 
craft items will be on sale at the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin -Parkside Crafts 
Fair on Saturday, Dec. 5. Sale hours 
are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and more than 



i ■ ■ ■ arBTaTWaTB T ~^*** g *' w * lj** *flf rm m ' m mmmmmmm ~ """m iaji 

CLASSIC \ft CINEMAS] 



Senior, 
Children . 

Motinioi 

847-973-2800 Beg .aduli$ 
115 Lakeland Plaxa offer s pm ■ 

Junt llan of Rte. 132 & Rollins Rd. -Fox Lake 

nni n '» r " *".■„;• In all auditoriums * DICITAl 



190 artisans are expected to display 
their work. 

The Crafts Fair will be held in 
the UW-Parkside Union building 
and along the University's major 
concourses. 

UW-Parkside is easy to find. Take 
Highway A east off Highway 3 1 
(Green Bay Road) or west off High- 
way 32 (Sheridan Road/Racine St.) to 
Wood Road, south on Wood Road, 
west on Outer Loop Road, and look 
for the Union parking signs. 

For more information, call (414) 
595-2404. 



5H0WTIMES - FRIDAY, DEC. 4 
THRU THURSDAY, DEC. 10 

WATERBOY ( rc 15) digital 

Fri 4:55 7:10 9:25 

5at. 12:15 2:55 <l:55 7:10 9:25 

5un./wed. 12:15 2:35 4:55 7:10 

Mon., Tues., Thurs, 4:55 7:10 

A BUG'S LIFE' <q) d/gtoi 

Fri. 4:45 7:00 9:15 

53t. 12:00 2:20 4:45 7:00 9:15 

5un./wed. 12:00 2:20 4:45 7:00 

Mors., Tues., Thurs. 4:45 7:00 

MEET JOE BLACK (re .i 3 , 

Dally 6:55 
5at./5un./wed. 12:05 3:30 6:55 

BABE: PIG IN THE CUT m 

Fri. 4:50 7:05 9:20 

5at. 12:10 2:30 4:50 7:05 9:20 

SunJwed. 12:10 2:30 4:50 7:05 

Mon., Tues., Thurs. 4:50 7:05 

ENEMY OF THE STATE (R) 

Fri. 7:15 9:55 

Sat. 12:45 3:45 7:15 9:55 

5unJWed. 12:45 3:45 7:15 

MonyTue/Thur. 7:15 

'No passes or coupons 

FREE REFILLS 

ALL SIZES 

POPCORM & SOFT DRIflKS 

Ho diildrtn under 1 idaHW to R-rlW morln »!Ur ( N 



ShowPlaceS 

VERNON HILLS 

Milwaukee Ave-2nd Light S of <SD 
3 847/247-6958 K 



ALL SEATS S 2P° FBI & SAT 

s 1. 50 Sun thru Thurs 



Showtime* For Fri, I2/4 Thru Thurs., J2/I0 
*Sat./Sun. Matinees in [Brackcts| 

WHAT DREAMS MAY COME (PG) 

p*l:00 *4:00] 7: IS I0:l0 DIGITAL 

THERE'S SOMETHING 
ABOUT MARY (R) 

[*I2:50 *3:30] 6:50 9:30 

[*l:20 *4:05] 7:20 10:00 DIGITAL 

ROUNDERS (R) 

[♦1140 *3:45] 7:00 9:50 DIGITAL 

BRIDE OF CHUCKY (R) 

pl:40 *4:15J 7:40 10:15 DIGITAL 

NIGHT AT THE ROXBURT (R) 

1*1:50 *4:|0] 7:10 9:20 DIGITAL 

SNAKE EYES (R) 

t*l:30 *4:20]7:30 10:20 DIGITAL 

THE MASK OEZORRO(PG43) 

[♦12:45 *3:50] 6:45 9:40 DIGITA1. 

| yitlt our wbtlH tl wwwiotrMotwxom | 



Frrc Uclill en Po|jcohi t. Soil Unii- 

ALL rr-n- 



t# 



WHCflE MOVIE CQIh'C IS FUN AND fiFFOROflBLf. 



DIDITAL SOUND 



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1 



Decembers 1998 




■ . , - ■■ j . ■■ ■ 



.- « - 

F -. - , | ■' 



Lakeland Newspapers I B 7 



Get it off your chest (843)223-8073 
e-mail: lipseifwte@l|iiiews.coin 



^'■'^.""T" 






■.--...' •jj.-.r: .(rSj-t-nv-ih^. 

LAST WEEK'S QUESTION WAS: 





'• ■ 



Upeervlcobaptooo^cotinmipreserted 
land tiewspapmmakmwcmto the ssthmclty 

papers does not claim the content or the sobject matter as fact, but as the personal 
opinion of the caBer. Lakeland Newspapers reserves therffl to edit copy or to retrain' Wall rfnnpl 
tttmpHtm*nmsa^minat22S^mtaxhiat22M810 1 ore'me!latllpsBr' 
vicc@lpnews.com and leave year message 24-bom a day. Callers must leave their 
name, phone number and vfflage name. Hames and phone numbers tvffl not be printed; 
r,caSers may be called for verification 



^jproceetfVy/^ 




■':■>•■ . 



Clean up waste 

If you have a new dog in your fami- 
ly and you decide you want to live 
the American dream of 2-4 children 
and a dog, don't leave the dog 
waste on someone else's lawn. It's 
your responsibility and you should- 
n't expect anyone else to do it for 
you. 

Libertyville 

Bilingual is good 

This is in regards to bilingual class- 
es. There's a particular comment ti- 
tled "Be proficient." It states that 
tutoring and mentoring is a hurdle 
of learning the English language. A 
lot of people have good intentions 
but they tend to say they don't have 
time to do this. Most of the time it's 
free, and most people say they're 
too busy. Bilingual classes are a 
good thing and I do believe the chil- 
dren need to speak English as best 
they can to be taught It, but having 
someone there that speaks Spanish 
can correct them. It takes a long 
time for them not to be embar- 
rassed about what they're saying. It 
becomes Ignorance if we don't 
teach this. Bilingual classes educate . 
everyone. 

Fox Lake 

Get rid of stickers 

I got my mail out of the mailbox re- 
cently and you know what was in 
there? The vehicle tax stickers! 
When you see 300-500 of them that 
don't buy the stickers, the village is 
wasting money sending these out. 
If people aren't going to enforce the 
law, I say get rid of the stickers! 

Island Lake 

Waste of tume 

I would like to comment on last 
week's question; should Congress 
have released the Lewinsky tapes? I 
say no. I listened to them for maybe 
30-40 minutes, and that's the last 
I've heard, I don't care about them. 
As for this weeks' question, if we 
should go ahead with impeach- 
ment hearings, I say no. John Porter 
knows full well it's a waste of time, 
money and effort. There are far 



more things to be done in Wash- 
ington than to try to impeach a very 
popular president. 

Ut's take a look Mumte ' e ' n 

How would you like to retire at 55 
with $100,000 or better? Just get 
into the school administration. 
That's the word out there in col- 
leges. It's time we take a look at ad- 
ministrative salaries and state man- 
dates, which require us to spend for 
those extra jobs. Don't kid yourself 
about the strength of the teacher 
union lobbyists. Big business creat- 
ed down-sizing. Maybe that's 
something we should learn, but not 
at the expense of the classroom 
teachers and our kids. 

Ingleside 

Official duties 

In regards to the Round Lake Beach 
police, I saw an officer around the 
1400 block of Cherokee Ave. drop- 
ping off groceries* and fixing his 
door, while on the other hand, they 
had to pull over young boys with 
three or four squads if they have 
their pant legs rolled up a little too 
high. I realize there's a. problem 
with gangs, but I think this Is getting 
out'of hand. T'thlnk" they" should 
concentrate more on their duties 
rather than their unofficial duties. 

Round Lake 

Go to Lake Villa 

This is in response to "Anything to 
win." I'd like to applaud Lipservice 
for printing this. It's about time 
somebody stands behind the Anti- 
och Viking parents and I'd like to 
applaud the parent or parents who 
put this article in last week. I am 
very sorry what happened to your 
boys happened. We experienced a 
problem with the same coach a 
few years ago. We did what we 
were supposed to do and it was 
shrugged off. I'm happy to say we 
put our son in the Lake Villa youth 
football program, it might not be 
as advanced, but those boys had 
fun. Lake Villa does registration 
the same time as Antioch does 
each year. Think about It. It's a 
good program. 

Antioch 



The Fox Lake Christmas Parade or- 
ganizers deserve a "well done" and 
"thank you" for the parade on Nov. 
28. The weatherman treated the pa- 
rade with an outstanding perfor- 
mance, just like Mayor Pappas 
treats Fox Lake. Also, a thank you to 
Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus and the 
Elves at the Grant High School 
breakfast. Well done, and Merry 
Christmas! 

Fox Lake 

Don't rush it 

I'm calling about the people who 
are putting their Christmas lights 
up and turning them on before 
Thanksgiving. I don't think that's 
right, they should do it after 
Thanksgiving. 1 don't mind the 
lights, but wait until after Thanks- 
giving. 

Libertyville 

Don't blame anyone 

Here's to the person that said 
"blame it on Renquist" over Clin- 
ton's sexual scandal. How about 
blaming the person who commit- 
ted these acts with an Intern? You 
shouldn't blame it on anyone else 
but Clinton. 

Fox Lake 

Clean up trash 

I live in Lake Zurich and I've called 
th e village,' talked to my repre's en - 
tatives, called Wal-mart, Dom {nick- 
's and Jewel and asked them to pick 
their litter up. I think the stores that 
do business in our community 
should pick up the garage that's all 
over the neighborhood. Why don't 
other citizens call and demand that 
this be picked up? 

Lake Zurich 

Help us find TTY 

The TTY phone at Gurnee Mills 
mall is broken and there's no sign 
for TTY. Where can deaf or hard of 
hearing people find TTY in Gumee 
Mills mall? There are 33,000 hard of 
hearing and 7,000 deaf people who 
live in Lake County. Please put the 
signage where deaf people can find 
TTY in the mall and fix TTY. We 
have rights to make a call in the 
mall like hearing people do. There 
are many pay phones for hearing 
people, but only one TTY In the 
mall. 

Mundelein 



Promote the right idea 

The Fox Lake area has just lost an- 
other nice' restaurant with a view 
that's very necessary for the tourist 
trade that could save this ghost 
town. Three years ago the owner 
greedily planned 18 condo units 
knowing the restaurant wouldn't 
have enough parking space to be 
successful. Is there a new owner? 
Doesn't matter, just think about the 
loss to the community. Variances 
have been denied because of a 
bunch of spoiled homeowners and 
a board that just doesn't get it. The 
people who moved here first never 
complained about the restaurant, 
they considered It an asset. A lot of 
the nicer restaurants in our area 
have bumed down, or been lost to 
development THere's only three or 
four on water. Tourists won't come 
to Fox Lake to stay If they are only 
offered restaurants overlooking a 
highway. They can stay home and 
do that. Trustee Folman had the 
right idea, he just forgot to push for 
it. 

Ingleside 

Great American? Ha! 

I keep seeing all these articles and 
television programs promoting 
Mohammed All as a great American 
■ hero.,' Why are .people forgetting^ 
that this man; changed his, name [ 
^■aha'rellgiori^fr order 1 ttf avoid the ' 
draft and Vietnam? This is a fighter 
who doesn't mind beating the pulp 
out of another person, but won't 
fight for his country! Why are peo- 
ple making him out to be such a 
saint and a hero? Just because he's 
got Parkinson's disease? I know 
plenty of normal everyday people 
who have a lot of hurdles in their 
way that have acted more brave 
and displayed more heroism than 
this draft dodging coward! 

Antioch 



is providing a dignified, peaceful 
and painless way for people to em- 
bark on their next journey when 
their journey on earth has come to 
a painful close. For those people to 
say euthanasia is wrong must have 
never experienced the agonizing, 
slow death of a loved one, or faced 
a debilitating, painful disease 
themselves. What does the quanti- 
ty of life matter when the quality is 
so poor? 

Libertyville 

Let's play already 

What is the NBA waiting for? When 
I see the players and owners squab- 
bling over millions of dollars and 
there are hungry people laying in 
the curbs of our cities, what is 
wrong with the world? There are 
about 20-25 players who are mak- 
ing millions of dollars, and that's 
what is holding up the NBA season. 
These players don't want to budge 
when it comes to their salaries. 
Come on, Michael Jordan, Karl 
Malone, Patrick Ewing, and the like, 
you couldn't spend all the millions 
you have in a lifetime, so what are 
you waiting for? Let's end this and 
start giving people some basketball 
enjoyment! If you don't do it for the 
fans, do it to end those stupid com- 
mercials they're ailing with Dyan 
Cannon and that annoying big- : 



Kmoudi,'. Splice LeeV 



i^K^A r-: 




I think they should leave Dr. 
Kevorkian alone. What he's doing is 
a service to human beings. Can you 
imagine being trapped in a body 
that is for all intents and purposes 
dead already? Or being in horrible, 
agonizing pain with no end in 
sight? If I were to experience this 
with either myself or a close rela- 
tive, I would invite Dr. Kevorkian 
into my home with open arms. He 



'Libertyuilfe' 

Furby shmurby 

l can't believe ail those idiots out 
there are going nuts over these new 
Furby toys. Why don 't you just wait 
until after Christmas to buy them? 
Kids don't know the difference. 
This is all just a made-up plot for 
the stores to sell toys big-time. 
Don't you see this happens every 
year? First it was the Cabbage Patch 
dolls, then three years ago it was 
Tickle Me Elmo, last year it was Sing 
& Snore Ernie, and now it's those 
Furby things. Don't even get me 
started on Beanie Babies, either! 
The manufacturers deliberately 
"create" a short supply so it causes 
a frenzy! I refuse to get caught up in 
this Furby stuff. I'll wait until 
Christmas is over and the shelves 
are overflowing with them to buy 
one for my kids — and they'll prob- 
ably be on sale, too! Wise up, every- 
body! 

Mundelein 




PERSONAL INJURY 

AND 

WORKERS COMPENSATION 

The Law Offices of 
Douglas Rallo 



il « ■■■ r 1 i 




6n South Milwaukee Avenue 

Libertyville, Illinois 60048 

tel 847-816-8780 

fax 847-816-9001 



Concentrated in 

Auto Accidents 

Workers* Compensation 

Wrongful Death 

Medical Malpractice 

Product Injuries 

Slip and Fall 

Dog BiTESr 

All Serious Personal 
Injury Cases 



—The Chicago Tribune has reported that 
Doug Ratio's "pioneering legal theory" on 
valuing the lost en/oyment oi life, "is credited 
with winning millions of dollars lor people 
severely injured or for the survivors of those 
killed by the negligent conduct of others" 

—Newsweek Magazine has written that 
Ratio is "on the cutting edge of an idea 
taking hold across the country," and.Hhat 
his concept is being used tn court "to win 
large damage awards for accident victims" 

Douglas Rallo 

Mr. Rallo has nearly 20 years experience in 
helping injured parties. He is listed in 
Who's Who in American Law, and is a past 
chairman of the Medical/Legal Committee 
of the Lake County Bar Association. 



**. 




LICENSED IN ILLINOIS AND WISCONSIN 



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B8 / Lakeland Newspapers 




HOT SPOTS 



December 4, 1998 



December^ 1998 



HOT SPOTS 



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BEETLE BEACH 



Location: 

On Lake Marie, at 25630 W. 

Dressel Rd. in Anlioch. 

i 

Telephone: 

(847) 838-0626 

Hours: 

Closed Tuesday, open from 3 lo 1 1 
p.m., Monday through Thursday; 
from 3 p.m. to 1 a.m. on Friday, from 
1 1 p.m. lo 1 a.m. on Saturday and 
from 1 1 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Sunday. 

Menu: 

Chicago style pizza, fish boil 
(Icelandic Cod) Mexican food, BBQ 
chicken and ribs, 1/2 lb. burgers, etc. 







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A family restaurant usually has a casual decor with a come as 
you are friendly attitude. Beetle Beach is comfortable restaurant that 
has food and entertainment for each and every member of the fami- 
ly at reasonable prices. 

Located on Lake Marie, at 25630 W. Dressel Rd. in Antioch, 
Beetle Beach is known for its full line of delectable Chicago-style 
pizzas. Add to that, grouper yellow-fin tuna'filets, or the hearty one- 
haif pound burgers and you have family food extraordinaire. 

Since some like it hot, Beetle Beach holds Mexican Night, with 
all its Latin palate pleasers, every Thursday. 



m\ -Jf fl Ev^?Pr|Hky;>seafood lovers'thiqk that they have diea" and.gone 
to culinary Heaven after experiencing Beetle Beach's fish boil. // 

The Icelandic Cod/BBQ chicken combo for $8,50, or the triple « 
threat BBQ chicken, ribs and cod is a full house of good eattn'. 

Beetle Beach and its courteous, friendly and professional staff 
want you to bring the kids along when you take that casual time out. 
After a savory meal, patrons are invited socialize, shoot a little pool, 
play a game of darts, or try yourJuck on the bowling machine. 

Beetle Beach also has a full-service bar and offers "Nice and . 
Easy" nostalgic music on Friday; and a wide variety of live entertain- 
ment on Saturday. Next summer there will be an outside boat bar to 
add to the fun. 

Beetle Beach is closed on Tuesday, open from 3 to 1 1 p.m., 
Monday through Thursday; from 3 p.m. to 1 a.m. on Friday, from 1 1 
a.m. to 1 a.m. on Saturday and on Sunday, from 1 1 a.m. to 10 p.m. 
Call (847) 838-0626 for more information. 



Gift Certificates Available for Convenient Holiday Shopping 

— Sunday: Tru-wiie TrmMe&j — 

(847) l^-lMM 

602 N. Milwaukee Ave. • LibertyviUe 

lucs.-Thurs. 1 1-9; FrL-Sat. I I- 10 



presents 

Holiday Catering 

Are you planning a home, office or corporate party? 
Let us do the work so you can relax & entertain your guests. 

From pick ups and delivery to full service parties. 
Pteose give us a call for menus and pricing. 

HICKORY HOUSE BBQ 

15 Commerce Drive, Grayslake 







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'.Ernie G-:. 11 
Fall Menu Till dose 



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Graysllake Piggltj Wiggiy 

815 Center Street (847) 223- 1560 





847-838-0626 | 

.CW . .:• : .'25630 W. DresselRa: '" & 

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The "Pig" Knows How To Party... 



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Order Your Christmas Dinner NOW From Our Deli 

INCLUDES: 10-12 lb. Turkey ■ 2 lb. Stuffing 

1 lb. Gravy • 4 lb. flashed Potatoes 

I lb. Cranberry Relish 

£ ^ ^% a n Fu,ly Cooked 

i IDr^ Hea, * Eat 

(Deluxe Available 
Upon Request) 



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Order Your Holiday 
Party Trays Now From Our Deli: 

• Cold Cut, Cheese. $ 4 O 9 9 

Vegetable Trays u O 

12" - 14" - 16" - 18" $*2 f^99 

(Seafood or Specialty Tray Abo Available) $0 



T»ci>tiBr!c"ji'^-vT>TTSijnis«fsv/'<:r-i'. ■ ->n-j-.-v,- i^i. J ^i£iWie^"rriivi!»iiai*T=n^-ss^t.j.^.:y<s^?i^aE*;.^»'jrCTsacaca!S3iBa»B 



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Surf n' Turf 
w/Champagne Toast 



847-223-2575 

18490 W Old Gages Lake Rd. 

Gages Lake -0 

Reservations Accepted 



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orson 




Chinese Rt-stauramt 



The Best Chinese Food 

In The Area... 

And Our Customers 

A re Tlie Critics 



Chappy holidays 

FREE CHRISTMAS GIFTS 
IVMH YOUII 0«r)f(f 

FROM DEC. 18-24 
yai.vrmi* 

.1111 N.MIIfl) 



Plenty of Free Parking 



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• {Jim* In • ( .irr\ * uu * i m kl.nl*> 
& The Chinese Restaurant That Everydooy's Talking About % 

so W 

W Conveniently Located Across Front Fairgrounds 
111 S. Hwy. 45 Grayslake 

(S47) i4S-S8$2 Lux: $4?} i3H-lt&2 

i lu l on n no -i rai hii< in i u; - 






Provides Lavish Quality, 

Friendly, Professional Service 

and Affordable Elegance 



^-* 



Call Randy to Book 
Your Event Today 

| (847) 223-6900 

A 1 54 S. Seymour Downtown Grayslake p 





IS TUE a WED THUR a SAT SUN 6 MON 

T-Bone 20-22 oz. Alaska Snow Crab Legs 1 /2 Slab 



12™ 



^SrcKSS Porterhouse 26-28 oz, 



ALLU-CAN-EAT CRA&LEG5 • M6" 

gus Prln 
10 97 



Ribs 

fndUctesiiuffed potato & sabd bos) I 




Vukb's GRILL 



-I7fi W. l.ihcny 

Hi |7<, 1/Hmilcl-.. of Rt. 12 

Waucimiln 

(M7) 526-0002 



Prime ^h Champagne Crunch 
From 10:00 A.M. - 2:00 p.m. 

Incredible All You Can Eat 

Sunday Champagne Brunch 

Awesome Array Including: 

•Fresh Carved Slow Roaslcd Prime Rib 
•Shrimp Cocktail 
•Chicken, Pasta, Fish 
•Omelel Station •Eggsio Order 
•Eggs Benedict 
•Sausage, Bacon, Potatoes 
•Belgian Waffles wish Fruit Toppings 
•Our Famous Salad Bar with over 30 items 
•Assorted Fresh Pastries 
•Danish, Rolls, Bagels 
i And MORE... over 50 items 




476 W. Liberty 

Wauconda 
(847) 526-0002 




Puk&'$ GRILL 



American Pub & Eatery 

Call for nuirc informnlion 

(847) .S2f,-(MM)2 

$15.95 Adulls mm • 12 and under 

5 und under FREE 








# 



BARB 
GRILL 



86375 W. Jft. 1 73, Antlach, IL 

847-395-1707 

B t/3 Miles West of Rt, 59 



•fflfflt 

l&reakhst 

Served Sunday 8am-12:30pm 

All You Care To Eat Buffet 

limcfv 

Served 7 days a week 

Mon.-SaL 11am-3pm 

Sunday 1pm-5pm 




mm ms 

Ttwmer 

Served fiftfay <S Saturday • 5-9:30<m 

ALL YOU CARE TO CAT 

FISH FBY $5.95 

CRAB IBS $1655 

GRAB LEGS, SHRIMP & WAUEYE 

COMBO $1655 

All served with soup & salad bar 
FULL MENU ALSO AVAILABLE 



Open Mon.-Thurs. 11am-Midnight; Fri.&Sat. 11am-3am; Sunday 8am-Midnight 




JOIH UX? 



GAME ROOM COMING SOON 

yuan US FBJP A Y 

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Sunday Football Specials Walleye FishFrv • *8 



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Mings 



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Ala Carle 10 ot; $9.95 ; EnbwlOoi: $11.97 ' 
" , A la Carte 14 bzj" $11,97 Biiieeii ozj:$13.94 '-' 

OPEN FOR BREAKFAST 
9 am Saturday & ; Sunday 

& KnwwGmm&SAinmHiw 



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_^..,. ,.. . ,,. ^-,.: - l8490.W/O1d.Gages Laks RrJ.rCages Like • 
FOOQ & D jim (947\:223^2S7B^ 



of china 

The Finest in Mandarin and Szechwan Cuisine 

Elegant Dining with a Casual Almosphe 




ftiixjutf FidllUet 
AvULjb!fUf)(o3« 




5572 Grand' Ave., Gurnee, IL 60031 
Phone (847) 662-2929 • Fax (847) 662-6099 

All Major Credit Cards Accepted 




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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT PREPARED BY LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 

HOME & GARDEN 



B1 0/ Lakeland Newspapers 



December 4, 1998 



Chicago Botanic Garden offers winter advice on protecting plants 



As you prepare your yard and garden for 
the winter, the Chicago Botanic Garden's 
Plant Information Service suggests a few tips 
to ensure that healthy plants and trees will 
emerge in the spring. 

General Garden Care 

Many winter injuries common to 
plants can be avoided with a few precau- 
tionary practices: 

• Start with right plant in the right loca- 
tion. 

• Choose disease and insect -resistant 
species first. 

• Know the appropriate culture to grow 
your plant to its healthiest potential 

• Plants that have been weakened by 
fungus, disease, insects or environmental 
stress are more likely to succumb to winter 
injury than are their healthy counterparts. 

After carefully preparing your lawn and 
garden for the winter, follow these simple 
guidelines: 

•Try not to walk repeatedly on frozen 
turf. 

•AFTER the ground has frozen hard 
and IF there is no snow cover, mulch gar- 
den beds with evergreen boughs or several 
inches of healthy, shredded leaves or com- 
post. Mulching prematurely, before the 
ground has frozen, creates a warm, moist 
environment under the mulch where fun- 
gus, disease and rodents can flourish. 

• Distribute snow loads equitably 
around small plants when shoveling snow 
from the driveway or sidewalk. 

• Avoid using chemical tickers that 
may damage plants. Use sand as an alterna- 
tive. 

• Perennials or small woody plants thai 
have heaved during periods of freeze/ thaw 
should be gently pressed Into the ground 



with your hands. 

Evergreens 

Since evergreens lost moisture through 
their needles all winter long, they require a 
good supply of water in the root zone. Spe- 
cial care should be taken during the winter 
months: 

• Water evergreens until the ground 
freezes. 

• During short periods of winter thaw, 
water evergreens, especially shallow-rooted, 
broad-leaved types such as rhododendrons, 
azaleas or boxwoods. 

• Protect evergreens in the path of salt 
spray by erecting burlap barriers. As soon as 
the ground thaws, remove the burlap and 
water well. 

■ Remove heavy, wet snow from ever- 
greens immediately. Gently lift underneath 
the boughs with a broom. Be careful not to 
bounce the branches as this may cause 
damage. 

•Wait until growth has returned before 
pruning any brown, winterkill areas on 
evergreens. 

Newly-planted shrubs 
and trees 

Recently planted ornamental trees and 
shrubs should be monitored closely: 

• Check for rodent, rabbit and squirrel 
damage. These pests will gnaw bark above 
and below die snow level. 

• Encircle vulnerable trunks with chicTc- 
en wire fencing. 

• Rotate different types of deer repel- 
lents for best results. Deer will browse twigs, 
buds and many types of evergreens. 

• Do not remove ice that has formed on 
tree branches. Wait until the Ice melts. 



Celebrating 50 Years In Grayslake "H- 
AW Booking for furnace 
Clean & Check 

It heats 

your home more 

evenly, yet it 

uses less fuel. 

A miracle? 
Nope, a Trane. 



The secret of the Trane XV 90 gas furnace's 
nearly miraculous performance: a variable speed 
blower and 2-stage gas valve. The XV 90 produces a 
steady flow of warmth for wonderfully even comfort. 
It can operate at lower speeds, and it's over 90% 
efficient. So it's incredibly economical to operate. 
Incredibly reliable, too, with a lifetime warranty. 
Seeing is believing. So call us today. 





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112 CENTER STREET* GRAYSLAKE, IL 60030 

223-0211 

The Trane Company's 1997 Distinguished Dealer Of The Year 
H y 1997 Wall Of Fame Award 



rather than risking damage to the 
branches. 

• Wrap young, softwood tree trunks 
with a protective cover during the win- 
ter. Remove the cover as soon as spring 
arrives. Sun scald or frost cracks may 
develop when a tree h eats up on a sun- 
ny winter day and then freezes quickly 
as temperature falls at night. Immature 
trees facing south or west that are ex- 



posed to rapid temperature fluctuations 
are particularly susceptible. 

For additional winter gardening tips 
and answers to all your gardening ques- 
tions, call the Chicago Botanic Garden's 
Plant Information Service at (847) 835- 
0972. Plant Information hours are 10 
a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday; 
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday; and noon 
to 4 p.m. on Sunday. 



A great gift idea-Flavored vinegars 

I 



t seems very hard to believe that the 
Christmas season is upon us-but accord- 
ing to the calendar (not the weather) It 
most certainly is. I thought it would be a 
good idea to think about gifts geared to a gar- 
dener, or those that would appeal to almost 
anyone who appreciates homemade and 
original items. Many gardeners enjoy cook- 
ing — I tend to believe that the two go hand in 
hand. 

An easy to make and a great gift idea is 
flavored vinegars. You start with purchased 
white wine vinegar and heat it with berries, 
citrus peel, or exotic passion fruit or 
tamarind. As the mixture cools, the vinegar 
absorbs the flavor and color from the added 
ingredient. 

Poured into pretty bottles, these vine- 
gars make attractive gifts, simple to use and 
store. Here are suggestions to include with 
such a gift (or keep for your reference.): 

Splash any of the vinegars over crisp 
greens. Try them without added oil for light 
and satisfying salads. 

Try with vegetables, raw or cooked. Use 
tamarind or lime vinegar as an ultra-lean dip 
for cooked artichokes. Sprinkle orange or 
lime vinegar on cooked asparagus. Cook red 
cabbage with berry vinegar. Add orange 
vinegar to cooked peas or onions. Drizzle 
berry or passion fruit vinegar on baked win- 
ter squash. 

Perk up fruit for salads or dessert. Try 
berry vinegar on mangoes and berries, or- 
anges, watermelon; passion fruit vinegar on 
mangoes and berries; orange or lime vinegar 
on oranges, kiwi fruit, berries; any citrus 
vinegar on melons, avocados, papaya; 
tamarind vinegar on bananas, pears, pa- 
paya, and oranges. 

Use with meat, poultry, or fish. Splash 
on cooked foods, or use as a marinade. To 
marinate, put meat in a plastic bag and add 
enough vinegar to moisten; seal and chili 
one to four hours, turning occasionally. Then 
broil, barbecue or roast. 

Some great tasting combinations are: 
tamarind or passion fruit vinegar with pork, 
Iamb, or chicken; citrus vinegars with fish; 




GARDEN 
JOURNAL 

LydiaHuff 



berry vinegars with poultry or lamb; citrus or 
tamarind vinegars with beef or venison. To 
find combinations you enjoy, drop a little 
vinegar onto a bite of food and experiment 
with flavors. 

These vinegars keep at room tempera- 
ture up to four months. Fruit in the bottle 
slowly falls apart but is not harmful. Simply 
pour through a strainer and discard fruit; 
add more fruit to bottle, if you like. 

Flavored Vinegar 

3 cups white wine vinegar 

Fruit for flavor 

2 tablespoons honey 

Combine vinegar, fruit flavor, and hon- 
ey in a three quart pan. Cover and bring to a 
boil over high heat. Remove from heat and 
let stand, until cool. Pour vinegar through a 
funnel Into a one quart bottle. Close tight; let 
stand at least one day . Use or keep at room 
temp for four months. 

Fruit flavor. Berry vinegar. Rinse and 
drain four cups fresh raspberries, blueber- 
ries, or strawberries or use one package (12 
or 16 ounce frozen). If desired, set aside one- 
fourth cup berries. Add remaining fruit to 
vinegar and heat as directed, preceding. 
Pour through strainer. Add reserved fruit to 
filled bottle. For citrus vinegar use one- 
fourth cup finely shredded lemon, orange or 
lime peel. Heat as directed, preceding. Bottle 
with the peel. Passion fruit vinegar. Scrape 
pulp from sbc ripe passion fruit, about two 
inches in diameter. Add pulp to vinegar, heal 
as directed. 

Garden questions may be sent to Garden 
Journal do Lakeland Newspapers, 30 S, Wfiit- 
ney St., Grayslake, IL 60030 



Victory Lakes hosts craft 
festival for holidays Dec. 5 



The eleventh annual Festival of Arts and 
Crafts is scheduled at Victory Lakes Continuing 
Care Center from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, 
Dec. 5. 

Area artists will exhibit work In a variety of 
media at "Holiday Happening." This includes 
stained glass, leather crafts, jewelry, paintirtg, 
and sti tchery. 

Items for sale include Beanie Baby acces- 
sories, Santas and snowmen, clothing clocks, 
decorations, ornaments, centerpieces, holiday 



stockings, and more. 

Art and crafts for sale are suitable for gift 
giving, home decoration, or personal use. 

There is a light lunch available for a small 
cost. 

Proceeds from the Victory Lakes' resident's 
craft booth, refreshments, and craftsmen 
booth fees will benefit Victory Lakes residents 
through the resident council. 

Additional information Is available from 
Bobbl Pinka at 356-5900. 



Fox Lake Craft Show Dec. 5 



Christmas shopping can get off to a start at 
the Fox Lake American Legion Hall Saturday, 
Dec. 5 at a Beanie Babies/Crafi/ and Collec- 
table Show from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

A few tables for additional vendors are still 
available. 

The show also will feature Barbie Dolls, 
diecast cars, and gourmet food packages. There 



will be hourly door prizes awarded. 

There is a $2 admission charge for adults, 
$1 for Senior Citizens, and 50 cents for children. 

The legion hall is located at 703 Route 12 in 
Fox Lake. A map with directions is located on 
the Internet (www.expresive.com/show.html). 

Vendors who would like to participate may 
obtain additional information at 847-395-0707. 



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■ »**■ '■ »„. »— 



HOSPICE 
OF ILLINOIS 



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•• . . :' * 



Volunteers sought 

Hospice of Illinois Is currently 
seeking volunteers. Volunteering 
with hospice allows someone' a 
unique opportunity. Volunteers are 
needed In many areas — those willing 
to attend to the needs of patients and 
family, perhaps by reading, running 
errands, or helping with household 
chores; those willing to support fam- 
ilies and friends during the grieving 
process; office volunteers; those will' 
Ing to make phone calls, send notes, 
assemble craft projects or send 
baked goods. 

Hospice volunteering allows 
participants to be creative and give 
the special gift of yourself that only 
you can give. Volunteers truly are the 
heart of hospice. Training is provid- 
ed. For more information, call 
Denlse Palumbo at (647) 296-281 1. 



ALZHEIMER'S 
ASSOCIATION 



Alzheimer's 
support group 

The Greater Chicagoland 
Alzheimer's Association sponsors 
the following Alzheimer's Support 
Groups: Victory Lakes Continuing 
Care Center, 1055 E Grand Ave., 
every third Wednesday, at 4 p.m.; 
and VA Hospital, Building 134, 3001 
Green Bay Rd., 1st Floor Conference 
Room, every third Sunday, at 1 p.m. 

The support group is made up of 
caregivers and family members of 
those with Alzheimer's disease or a 
related disorder. The group focuses 
on emotional support, sharing expe- 
riences and educational updates. 
They are free and open to the public. 

For more information, call 933- 
1000. 

Support group 
I meetings set 

The ..Greater Chicagoland 
Alzheimer's Association presents 
the support groups in the following 
areas; Iindehhiirst at Victory Lakes 
Continuing Care Center, 1055 East 
Grand Avenue, on the third Wednes- 
day of the month, at 4 p.m.; and Lib- 
ertyville, Manor Care Libertyville, 
1500 S. Milwaukee, on the first Tues- 
day of the month, at 7 p.m. 

The support groups are made 
up of caregivers and family members 
of those with Alzheimer's disease or 
a related disorder. The groups focus 
on emotional support, sharing expe- 
riences and' educational updates. 
They are tree and open to the public. 

For more information, call the 
Chapter HELPLINE at 933-1000. 

LUTHERAN GENERAL 

Cancer support 
groups offered 

Lutheran General Hospital 
sponsors a variety of cancer support 
groups, services and programs for 
persons who have been affected by 
cancer. All of the meetings are free 
and held at the Lutheran General 
Cancer Care Center, 1700 Luther 
Lane, Park Ridge, with no registra- 
tion necessary, unless otherwise not- 
ed. 

• Brain Tumor Support Group: A 
support group for brain tumor sur- 
vivors, their family and friends (all 
ages), 7:30 to 9 p.m. the third 
Wednesday of every month, 2nd 
floor conference room. For more in- 
formation, call Syril Gilbert, 723- 
5475. 

• Cancer Care Support Group: A 
general support group for cancer 
survivors, their families and friends 
(all ages), 7 to 8:30 p.m. every Thurs- 
day, 2nd floor conference room. For 
more information, call Rhea L Free- 
man at 475-1771. 

• Melanoma Support Group: A 
support group for melanoma sur- 
vivors and their families and friends 
(all ages), 6 to 7:30 p.m., the fourth 
Tuesday of every month, 2nd floor 
conference room. For more infor- 
mation, call 723-2500. 

• Together We Share: A support 
and activity group coordinated for 
teens who have or have had cancer. 
Call Jan Welter, 723-8336. Registra- 
tion required. 



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'.-■■■'"■""■'■"■' .' ' ' ' '■ '•■■■'- ■'"■' 



■ .'•■ 



\*M I 1 

December 4, 1998 





n 






Lakeland Newspapers/ B1 ■%'-. 



Pear Tree 'elves 



Let the volunteer "elves" of the 
Pear Tree Gift Shop at Good Shep: 
herd Hospital help you find the right 
gifts for everyone on your holiday gift 
fist. The gift shop, which is located In 
the lobby of the hospital, Is operated , 
by the Auxiliary of Good Shepherd 
Hospital. 

This year's theme, "Snowmen 
Warm the Heart," features a wide va- 
riety of holiday gift selections includ- 
ing festive ornaments and other hol- 
iday home decor items. Shoppers 
can also find sweaters, jewelry, sleep- 
wear, money clips and pewter key 
chains as well as golf and fishing-re- 
lated gift items. 

The Pear Tree also carries baby 
and children's clothing and toys, in- 
cluding the popular Beanie Babies, 
when they are available. If you're 
looking for a unique gift or some- 
thing special for that someone spe- 
cial on your holiday gift list, stop by 
the Pear Tree Gift Shop. Proceeds 
from the Pear Tree Gift Shop are do- 
nated by the Auxiliary to benefit 
Good Shepherd Hospital services. 
The Pear Tree is open Monday 
through Friday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., 
Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 
Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. 

Good Shepherd Hospital is lo- 
cated at 450 W. Highway 22 in Bar- 
rington. 




From left, volunteer Pear Tree "elves" Carol Feltault of Hawthorne Woods; Eifine Hansen of Cary 
and Joan Bicknase of Gary display some of the Items available for purchase at the Pear Tree Gift 
Shop at Good Shepherd Hospital. — Submitted photo 



New procedure provides 
alternative to hysterectomy 



There is a new procedure avail- 
able at the Lake Forest Hospital for 
pre-menopausal women who expe- 
rience excessive menstrual flow due 
to benign causes, but are not good 
candidates for drug therapy. As an al- 
ternative to a hysterectomy, LFH has 
introduced the ThermaChoice™ 
Uterine Balloon Therapy™, a uter- 
ine balloon catheter heat system. 
Unlike hysterectomy, which takes 
out the entire uterus, Therma- 
Choice™ therapy just destroys the 
lining of the uterus by the use of heat. 

"This is a revolutionary new pro- 
cedure that significantly reduces 
menorrhagia (excessive menstrual 
flow) and in some cases eliminates 
the need for gysterectomy," said Dr. 
Robert Harlman, vice chairman of 
Lake Forest Hospital's department of 
Obstetrics and Gynecology. "A flexi- 
ble balloon is inserted into tile uterus 
and then inflated with a sterile fluid. 
The fluid is then heated, which de- 



stroys the lining of the uterus — re- 
ducing or eliminating menstrual 
flow." 

The outpatient procedure takes 
about a half hour and, according to 
Jody Jesse, director of Surgical and 
Ambulatory Services, a large per- 
centage of women are successfully 
treated with this procedure and do 
not require much time and can be 
performed with general anesthesia." 

Because the procedure melts the 
uterine lining, it is not recommend- 
ed for women who would still like to 
bear children. Patients can expect to 
rest under supervised care in outpa- 
tient recovery for one to two hours 
following the procedure and return 
home the same day. 

According to Dr. Hartman, this is 
a minimally invasive procedure that 
typically does not produce much dis- 
comfort and allows most women to 
resume norma] activities the same 
day the procedure is performed. 




Yury M. Shklyar, M.D. 

FAMILY PRACTICE 
BOARD CERTIFIED 

(847) 548-5063 

X-Ray and Laboratory on Site 



NOW TREATING ACUTE/CHRONIC PAIN WITH 
MATRIX - NON-INVASIVE TREATMENT 




Specialty Includes Treatment Of: 
Adult * Pediatric Diseases Joints Disease 



Headaches 

Back Problems 

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome 

Diabetic Neuropathy 



Peripheral Vascular Problems 

Obesity 

Varicose & Spider Veins 

Various Skin Lesions Removal 



PHYSICAL 
THERAPY 



- ' .' 



School Physicals & Vaccinations 

Affiliated with Condell Hospital 
W for Conveniently Located at 

Appointment 



ffiEii The New Conde " Med'cal Building 

toSiLti m u70 East Be,videre Rd - Suite 202 
ta&Ue 



Grayslake, Illinois 60030 



In Case 0/ 

Emergency - 

24 Hour 

Availability 



Auxiliary donates $200,000 

The Auxiliary of Good Shepherd Hospital recently presented Rus- 
sell Feurer, Good Shepherd chief executive, with a check for 
$200,000 representing a significant part of their fund-raising 
pledge for 1998 to the hospital. The funds will be used to help 
support a new Point of Care computer system adding sophisti- 
cated documentation abilities to the patient bedside in all pa- 
tient rooms including all medical/surgical units, intensive care, 
and the special care nursery. From left, accepting the check is 
Russell Feurer, Good Shepherd chief executive; Wini Schezinger, 
Auxiliary co-president; and Pat Lenhart, Auxiliary co-president. — 
Submitted photo 



• IS 




FOOT FACTS 

From The Foot Doctor 
DR. GRIFF J. WINTERS & ASSOC. 

Speofafong in Reconstructive Foot & Ankle Surgery 

HEEL PAIN first thing in the morning. Is usually due to a heel spur of bursi- 
tis. Surgery is not usually Indicated. Rather conservative treatment, such as 
strapping or custom supports (orthodontics) will relieve the pain. 
If you have the above symptoms or any other foot discomfort, you may contact 
Dr. Winters for a NO COST CONSULTATION to see If there may be an answer 
to your foot pain. 

*tiy thm American Board of Pediatric Surgery 



770 Bnrron Blvd. 
(Rte. 03) 



223-4000 



Grayslnke 



. 



• 



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■%» 



B12 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HEALTHWATCH 



December 4, 1998 





Dr. Rcnuka Ocsal 



caoKssas 



**Jni* 



Or, Diane Fondrlcsl 



Dr. Barry Goldman ;, .-. 



t^bffigatf 



f , '.V Dr. Deborah Cutson 



.-- Or. LlsaCadck 

Dr. Mrlanic GoodcH i 



low is prime time to pick a primary care 

physician who's committed to helping 

you achieve a higher level of health. 

And we have so many caring ones to pick (mm! 

Each of our highly skilled and experienced 

doctors is dedicated to working with 

you as an individual. 

Each is backed by the comprehensive 

services of Lake Forest Hospital. 

Our Strength 

In Primary 

Care Is 




INTERNAL MEDICINE 



Dr. Lisa Abrams 



1% 



Dr. Wendy Hoiman 



Dr. Araccll Hanklns 
Or. Ronald Kallcn j. 1 



VTJr^ftgu 



Dr. Jerome Kaltrnan 



Dr. Alexander Kamlnsky 



-v?**^ 



Dr. Fetissa Krclndlcr 



Dr. Alien Krlssbcrg 



The Root 

Of Good 

Health. 



Ml Dr. Jennifer Capcilo j •? 
Dr. Mark Cliyna , ,._ . ■ ._■ ■-,'■•'.*..- 

•Vf***^* . .■ . , Dr. JayEhrl 

Hnwn DfiYnncnJIan J- „ ._ , - a . ■ - U 

, J Dr. Robert Franklc 
Dr. Pamela Fennowald £/fc »JWjrif ^TS', 
.-.*- .• -_.-**. -^^ Dr. Robert Furman ,. 
Dr. Michael Franks g *fojrSU&SrS& & -? 

*- , ^^v^t^«- 3 CIaS5 4 



Dr, Hoscp Oeyrmenjlan 1/ 



■ Dr. Jeffrey Garland 

Dr. Mark Grcenbcrgor -'.-'i 



Or. Steven Karris 



Tm * f\ 



$m 



wmm 



Or. Charles Hlnman 



Dr. Chac Han 



Dr. Kcnnelh Hayes ■* s 






5T -*?"■■, 



Dr. Arthur Lastn 



Dr. Sharon Libit 



Or, Sherwood Libit 



Dr. Wendy Letts 



&A 



^m 



Or. John Kyncl 



Dr. Joel Klein 



' 



Dr. Milosiava Kyncl 



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Dr. A|ay Madhanl 



Dr. James Jupa 



^%*iu^ 



lr, Steven Lasln 



Or. Jim McClurc 



MjgJ 



^sJsS&i 



Dr. Manaochehr Sharitl 



Or. Lisa Tybor 



',£ *- T * « 



**s 



Dr. Susan Shelnkop 



Dr. Nandlnl upadhyay 



fm> 



Dr. Mark Rlcdmati 



Dr. tvana Ruftolo 



Dr. Andrew Savin 



Dr Adam Rubinstein 

,*- .~m*.t^. 'jJr-^ Dr. Robert Schwartzenberg 
Or, Gary Schaftcl #£' - - .i— -. ;« ■ ■-. •; 



Dr. Gordon Wood 



Or. ftalesh Sharma 



M. , 









Dr. Mohammed Slddiquc _'-. 



Or. Victoria Spcvak 



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Dr, LlisaTack Or. John Tasiopoulos \- V 



/ n, u ich n ,,.„,, m i el,,™ -* Dr. Donald StGlnmullc-r |V ' Dr. Llisa Tack Dr. 

#-, Dr. Krlshnaswami Srlram -» ■ ' ,- »_._»- -^ . .— •• i .« 



Or. David VigsJcr 



Dr. Robert Vollero 



Dr. Robert Woli 



ttikhJl 



Or. James Kim Z'W* • Or. Samuel Lesplnasse 



Or. Daniel Lynch 



Dr. Jonathan Parker -l-'^VjL^ Or. David Soo ?& 



Dr. Dennis Thaln 



Dr. Robert Thnln 



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• - -; .v. «?n' :*' - 






For help in s< 
or for more inform; 



a doctor, 

ill 847-234-6171 



Our physicians are 
affiliated with some 
of the area's most 
well-known primary 
care groups. These 
hoard-certified and 
hoard-qualified 
internists, family 
practitioners and 
pediatricians 
participate in the 
health plans listed 
below. To find out 
whether a doctor 
is affiliated with a 
particular plan, 
check with your 
doctor's office or 
insurance provider. 

• Aetna US Healthcare 

• Beech Street Corporation 

• Blue Cross/Blue Shield 
■ Blue Cross PPO 

• Community Blue PPO 

• Blue Choice IMCNP) POS 

• HMO Illinois 

• CAPP Care, Inc. 

• CCN/Medview Services. Irtc 

• CHAMPUS/TRICARE 

• Cherry Electrical Products 

• CIGNA Healthcare of Illinois 

• First Health/Affordable 

• HeaithcareAs Finest Network iHFN) 

• Healthcare Compare Corporation 

• Health Direct. Irtc 

• Health Dynamics, Inc. 

• Health Marketing, inc. (HMI) 

• Heallh Payors Organization 

• HeatthSlar 

• Health Plan Management 

• Hewitt Associates Managed 
indemnity 

• Humana Health Care Plans 

• IMC Holdings (Intrupa Mlg) 

• Lake County Employees 
•LaborCare 

• Managed Care. Inc. 

• MultiPlan ol Illinois. Inc. 

• NYlCare ol Illinois 

• One Heallh Plan ot Illinois 

• Oxlord/Compass Heallh Care Plans 

• Preferred Heallh Network (PHN), 
(formerly Midwest Business 
Medical Association) 

• Preferred Plan. Inc 

• Pnncipal Healthcare of lllinois/FHP 
ol Illinois 

• Private Healthcare Systems. Inc 
(PHCS) 

« Rush-Prudenlial Health Plans 

• SOLO Cup Company 

• State of Illinois Employee Plan 

• US Managed Care Organization 

• United Healthcare of Illinois 

• United Choice PPO 

• UKCI Plus (lormerfy MetraHealth] 

• UHCI Prentice (formerly Metra HMO) 

• UHCJ HMO (formerly Chicago HMO) 

■ UHCI Open Access 

■ WellmanVHealth Network 



Visit our website at: 
www.lakeforesthospltai.com 



Lake Forest Hospital 



Caring for the Quality of Your Life 

fa\ DT TCLJ Am«nb«oflhe 

Vl/ IMJOri RUSH Syntm for Holth. 



SM 



.'"'■■■ : '' ■' j •': ... " ~'i-~'~ .7".'- ■'..'.' 



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December 4, 1938 HEALTHWATCH 



-■-. 



. ■ 



Lakeland Newspapers/S'tS ' 



»■«*■■ 



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:?!!■ 



Women who routinely perform self-examination can save 




N inety- tvvo percent o f earry stage 
breast cancers are curable. That's why 
women are urged to protect them- 
selves by breast self -examination. 

Quick Steps 

Choose a day each month that 



wfli be easy for you to remember. It's 
best to use the fingertips of your 
three middle fingers to examine your 
b reast Always use your left hand for 
your right breast, and vice versa. Use 
both a circular motion and a vertical 
{up and down] motion. 



- Check for any lumps, hard knots, 
swelling,' dimpling or ; thickenin g. 
Also observe for abnormal change In 
size, shape, color or discharge. 

In front, of a mirror 

Visually check both breasts with 



your arms at your sides; slowly raise 
your arms, while paying dose atten- 
tion for any swelling or change In your 
breasts or nipples; with hands on hips, 
lean slightly forward and flex your 
chest muscles, again visually checking 
for changes. 



Lying down 

Place a pillow under your right 
shoulder, put your arm behind 
your head, then examine your 
breast and armpit 

Repeat the same procedure 
with the other arm. 



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I travel a lot. So 1 know one of the most important 
things you ean take with you is peace of mind. 
That's why I want to tell you about the new benefit 
railed U.S. Travel Advantage - " in the Aetna 
U.S. I leallhcare Golden Medicare Plan". 

Now with U.S. Travel Advantage, you can receive 
the same quality health services at home and when 
you travel to one of the many Aetna U.S. 1 leallhcare 
Golden Medicare HMO plan locations around the 
country. And with U.S. Travel Advantage, your 
coverage is expanded for travel up to 12 continuous 
months. 

The travel benefit is even great for those who wan I 
to recover from surgery near a loved one or friend. 

The Aetna U.S. Healthcare Golden Medicare Plan 

includes more benefits than traditional Medicare 

di\i\ most supplements at no extra cost. Now with 

U.S. Travel Advantage, you can lake those benefits 

on the road. 

Whether you travel a lot or a little, find out more. 
Call l-8(X)-585-5588 for more information on the plan, 
a complete listing of approved service areas for the travel 
benefit, and a copy of our free brochure, 
IAS. Travel Advantage". 

1-800-583-5588 (Toll Free) 

or TDD#l-800-628-5323 for hearing-impaired 

C/Etna 

US Healthcare 

Golden Medicare Plan 

You'll feel better with us. 



< ;•/ 



Pari ici pa l iii<4 locations: 






Tampa • Orlando • Phoenix ■ San Diego • Los Angeles • San Francisco • New Orleans • Baton Rouge • Atlanta • Seattle 
Chicago ■ Cleveland • Cincinnati • Columbus • Philadelphia • Pittsburgh • New York Metro Area • Connecticut • New Jersey 



You 



*Paid endorsement. Anyone living in Cook, DuPagc, Will, Kane and Lake Counties in Illinois and Lake County in Indiana with 
Medicare may apply. You must be entitled to Medicare Part A and continue to pay your Part B premium ancf Part A if applicable, 
must use network providers except in an emergency or urgent situation. Aetna U.S. Healthcare of Illinois Inc. has continuous open 
enrollment. Coverage provided through Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs), some of which are federally qualified. HMOs have 
Medicare + Choice contracts in approved service areas. Anyone entitled to Medicare Part A and enrolled in Part B may apply. As with 
other Medicare HMO plans, benefits, service areas and premiums are subject to change on January 1 of each year. The U.S. Travel 
Advantage feature is not available in all service areas. 



lU'rill'SOIWll Artn.i V.S. Ilr.illln.irv- tin. 



s \ i, i, r, '■ ';■% (, K 

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■'.'. T5 



B14 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HEALTHWATCH 



December 4, 1998 



Dr. Sonya Sharpless 
understands the impor- 
tance of early detection and 
treatment of breast cancer. 
As a breast cancer surgeon 
and surgical oncologist at 
Lake Forest Hospital, she 
recognizes the need for 
women to understand their 
options and to become 
an informed partner in 
tieatment decisions. 

At Lake Forest Hospital, 
she is joined by a team 
of highly skilled surgeons, 
medical oncologists, 
radiation oncologists, 
therapists, nurses, nutri- 
tionists and other caring 
professionals This team 
specializes in educating 
3aMrit5 nhnul cancer and 
'irlpini: : h r,*m m,'ikr the 
right r.Muicps tor tieatment. 



j ■ ~" 

.** Most Prvfcm-il I Impilal 
II "■ I'iirOaiKrr lrt;ihiu-iil 
In '11k- \ri;i 



"1 



' & \ m & tt^Ak&!J^ *bVyAM**2tt 





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Together, these experts 
offer Lake County women 
the most comprehensive 
array of advanced diagnos- 
tic and treatment options, 
including sentinel lymph 
node biopsy, 3-D conformal 
radiotherapy, stereotactic 
core needle biopsy 
and cutting-edge drug 
therapies. 

Today, more and more 
women with breast cancer 
have brighter prospects 
for the future. And at 
Lake Forest Hospital, we're 
helping them get there. 

For information 
about our breast 
health services or for 
a physician referral 

M 'm call 847-234-61 98. 

JSSfc 

' ww$$0 V' sit our website at 

www.lakeforesthospital.com 



My Patients Have Breast Cancer. i_i_i 



They Also Have A Future. 



._, GSM racaa nsm pwaBBsai 








Lake Forest Hospital 



Caring for the Quality of Your Life*' 



(DRUSH 



A mrmlxT iifllir 
RUSH Sy.irn.fo. I ItJil, 






mnaa 



-. 



IMIMM W«lll«iy|J| 




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December 4, 1998 






Lakeland Newspapers / B 1 5 



«'.' - -,- _ -" 




:■■ ■ •■■:.;*•■•■ : ■ ■ 



■ * . ' ■ 






-.•-■■. ' 



1 



BOYS 



■ ■'.■;'••..■. 



■ ■ 



PLAYER OF THE YEAR 

Jourdain Milot 

Junior forward 

Last year averaged 13.8 pts per game, 7.5 rebs 

per game as Warren finished 15-9, 9-5 NSC 



■ 



< 



FIRST TEAM 



Milot 



G Langston Hughes— Warren 

G Doug Rippberger— Mundeleln 

F Wayne Bosworth— Grant 

F Jourdain Milot— Warren 

C Mike Brandow— Warren 

HONORABLE MENTION 

Alex Frank— Grayslake 

Don Lackey— Antioch 

Ryan Schreen— Libertyville 

Matt Schaeffer— Libertyville 

Brandon Horror— Grant 

Nick Leider — Cnrrnel 

Nate Mau— Wauconda 

Paddock— Wauconda 

Brett Serve— Mundeleln 

Graham Beatty — Mundeleln 

Mike Kolar— Warren 
Derek Williams — Round Lake 






PLAYER OF THE YEAR 

Jenny Wessel 

Junior center 

Last year averaged 17.3 pts per game, 

11.0 rebs per game and was named 

1997-98 Lakeland Player of the Year 



GRAYSLAKE EYECARE 

s- - - 

' Optometrist 

Professional Vision Care For The Entire Family 
• Vision Analysis • Eye Health Check • Glaucoma Testing 

Special Emphasis In Contact Lenses 

• Any & All Types Of Lense Fitting Including Bifocal 

■ Previous Problem Cases Welcome 

661 N. Lake St. 223-7600 Grayslake 



DRS. SELLKE & REILY 

Specialists in Orthodontics for Children and Adults 
Skillfully creating spectacular smiles for over 25 years 







BRACES BY 
DRS. SELLKE & REILY 






i I IS Main Si \iiriiK h MK «JUt* Hi N Singer tftaviUfc* .V I 'tr'fi 
hjll ( rieCIHUHHl U.nrkC|'jri 111. Ill* 

SEE OUH HELP WANTEO AD IN THE CLASSIFIED SECTION 



VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH 

& 

PARKS AND 

RECREATION 

DEPT. 



874 Main Street 

Antioch, IL 
(847)395-1000 




GIRLS 




Wessel 



FIRST TEAM 

G Allison Farrington— Libertyville 

G Tiffany Kelver— Warren 

F Becky Moo— Warren 

F Heather Hynds — Mundeleln 

C Jenny Wessel— Grayslake 

HONORABLE MENTION 

Amy. Springer — Grant 

Jackie Oclon — Round Lake 

Erin Earl — Johnsburg 

Nora Graham — Carmel 

Molly Meredith — Libertyvilie 

Tricia Thomas — Libertyville 

Thania Sanidad — Mundelein 

Elena Pagan — Mundelein 

Katie Gofron — Antioch 

Maura O'Brien — Carmel 



WESTWIND VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave.. Zlon 

1, 2 & 3 BEDROOMS - FREE HEAT 

Appliances • On-Site Manager • No Pets 

Starting from $495/mo. 

Call Martha & Issac 

(847) 746-1420 

or BEAR PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

(414)697-9616 



^ WHEW ;ujtv^-^ 

UPTOWN 
FAMILY SALOON 

26228 N. RT. 83 
MUNDELEIN, IL 

NOW HIRING - ALL POSITIONS 
SEE OUR AD IN CLASSIFIED 




BILLER PRESS 

966 Victoria 
Antioch, IL 

(847)395-4111 (847)395-1203 
Fax (847) 395-4232 




Fast, 

Affordable, 

Quality printing 




tSV ?/*>/.; Jf-unemt <Homc of ^4ntioch 

IO$\ South /M<Un Street 

/tntiodi, M OOOOJ 



84J-395-4000 



Dan Dugenske, Director 



,,,..■<■ * 



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B16 / Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKEUFE 



December 4, 1998 




-.V:i 

I 



" I 




T II Pi. 

U II L 

STYLE LAMINATE FLOORING 

WEAR WARRANTY 
STAIN WARRANIY 
FADE WARRANTY 

IS NOW ON SALE! 




ALL 
IS YEARS! 




f ?'?.;■■ 



OR $2.69 PER FT. MATERIAL ONLY 



Always The 
Bargain At. . . 



T II D [ 

I I U il T 



FLOORING 



DESIGN 




740-2700 

Rollins Road (1 Block West of Cedar Lake Rd.) - Round Lake 

STORE HOURS: Mon.-Thurs. 9-8; Fri. & Sat. 10-5:30; Closed Sunday 




----- - • - . ■ ' ■■-—■ : 



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Oi UlMkeki^Newspdpers ) C 



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et.com 



December $1998 







. ■ . ■ • . . .. fft?.--'.' ■ ,.-■-..- 




changes for 1999 Saab 9-5 



**rfa 



The new Saab 9-5 combines the 
best elements of Saab heritage 
with advanced automotive and 
aviation-inspired technology to 
provide highly responsive performance 
with a strong emphasis on advanced road 
dynamics and superior man-machine in- 
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gives the Saab 9-5 a powerful appearance 
and a very competitive drag coefficient of 
only 0.29. The 9-5's sporty profile is sup- 
ported by an all turbo engine range, four- 
wheel Independent suspension, an ex- 
ceptionally strong body structure and 
features a broad range of new safety in- 
novations. 
New All-Turbo Engine Choices 

The new Saab 9-5 Eco power engines 
are designed to provide a unique combi- 
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the high torque output achieved at low 
and mCd range engine speeds^ providing, 
quick acceleration on3-;SWon^1t-thei£^3 



With four four valves per cylinder and 
dual overhead cams, the asymmetric Tur- 
bo V-6 develops 200 hp @ 5,000 rpm, and 
is matched exclusively with an electron!- 




Please sec SAAB 9-S / D2 1999 SAAB 9-5 



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iinerMpaniOr 

The new Saab single-bank turbo 3.0L V- 
6 is the world's first asymmetric tur- 
bocharger design. An exhaust manifold 
integrated low-pressure turbocharger on 
the front cylinder bank feeds compressed 
air to the entire transverse-mounted en- 
gine, boosting low-end torque to 229 lb. 
ft. at only 2,500 rpm. True to Saab's en- 
gine design emphasis on maximum 
torque availability, the maximum torque 
plateau extends all the way to 4,000 rmp. 



ALL Your Favorite Options 1 ALL Your Favorite Cotois' 
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— $> _ 



llfatid Ctii-j cil Raymond Cho*vy/Old& In Antioch 



. •• . V. 




Used Cars at Ray Chevrolet in Fox Lake 



■Vt 



Wrieelbase, in.: 106.4 in. 

* BRAKES: Four-wheel disc 
with power assist and anti- 
lock braking system (ABS) 

• POWER 1HAIN: Fuel Injec- 
tion-Sequential, multi-port, 
electronic, retumless 

'MSnPBASEPOCt 
$29,995 

1999 FEATURE 
HIGHLIGHTS 

•Side airbags now 
provide head and torso 
protection 

• New force-reducing 
front seat belt and pre- 
tensioner design 

• SE models available 
with either 2.3L four or 

3.0L V-6 

• Ventilated 

Seats 






I960 Oirru Gubvrbon 
tttfttt! 



-$4,995 



l993Nit*onMllmo 
StfWOM 



.$8,995 



1994 OMC Suburban SLT ix* 

ttfNSU $20,995 

1993 Omvu Conversion Von 

a mm $7995 

1997 Pontloc Ota nd Prix OT 

»«Wtn $18,995 



1998 Oldimoblie Intrigue 0L9 

» «MM $20,995 



1993 Solum 6C2 
Sft#3S30B 



.$6995 



1991 Chevy CavoUer R9 

s»«80u 



.$3,995 



1994 MOlda 624 £9 
Sd[«1SH 



1993 Chevy K1500 XCob 4X4 

SftiNHJ 

1995 Pontlac Grand AM OT 

S&WS3U 



-$10,995 
.$19,995 
410.995 



1997 Geo Prlim 



1996 Olds Cera 
Stfc #P39i2 



1994 Pontloc Sunblrd Coupo 

Sx#)98B 



-$9,995 
-$9,995 



-$21,495 



1994 Cadillac Sedan DeYlUe"" 

ss#wu 

1993 Hondo Accord LX 4DR 
S4«06W 



1996 Chevy Kl 500 XCob 4X* 

Sflr#!0126» 

l996Chevy Tohoe UT 4X4 

SftMITBA 

1996 Jeep Grand Cherokee 4X4 

SI *P40ei $20,495 

1995 Bulck LeSobre Llmflod 
1SK Ufa Sx #M19S 



-$14,995 
_$9995 
-$20,995 
.$24,495 



1995 Olds Cutlass Coupe 
Six #3991 



199S Olds Bravado AWD 
Srx#MiH 



1994 Jeep Grand Cherokee 

5ft«F42IT7 

1998 GHC Suburban 9LT 4X4 



-$17,495 
-$10,995 
.$22,995 
-$20,995 
-$31,995 



1996 Dodge Durango SLT 4X4 

Sk«HU $28,995 



199* Chevy Kl 500 Ext 
SatHtM 



1992 Chevy Uimlna Euro 
SXI57UU 



1994 Chevy K25O0 Ext 

Satan* 



1991 Maida RX7 



1997 Chevy 610 PICK Up 
HUB : 



.$17,995 
_$5995 
-$17,995 
_$6995 
.$8,995 



199* Chevy Astro Conversion Van 

a mm $12,995 

1994 Dodge Conversion Von 
»«1« 



1994 Hereury Cougor XR7 

sawm 



1992 OWa Delta 68 Royal 

saircaiA 



1993 Olds Bravado 
S&tWM 



1993 Chevy Blazer 2WD 
S&fOSSI ' 



.$10,995 
-$7995 
-$9995 
.$10,995 

510.895 



i Bolli Slntes Failure IDO's 

/Rfll R nl Diiislfcally Rmlnccil 

Ti j Ti l'«e-Diivn«s. Musi All! 

H (Snlii i:hiti:k i:i!iiiii*!ii 



Certified 

USED VEHICLES 



1991 CodlUoc Eldorado Barrlri 

s&tnuu 

1991 Ford Ranger SIX 
SAK7ZU 



1992 Chevy C150Q 
tttCTW 



1996 Chevy 610 Pick Up 
SxMIflK 



1996 Chevy Toho»4x* 
W»0odS!k#taU 



1992 Chevy 0500 
a#S7M 



1994 Chevy G120 Conversion 

afffflW 

1998 810 Ext 



1997 Suburban LT 
n«J1H 



1996 Dodge Ram 4X4 1500 
S1«7BH 

1997 Chevy K1500 Exl 

S* #1117*1 



t996 Chovy Bloier L9 
SHH635?* 



1997 Chevy Monte Corto L9 

S&iUU 

1996 Dodge Neon R/T 
»K]7H 



1996 Dodge Neon Sport 

atwrai 



-$9995 
^$7995 
-$10,995 
—$9995 
.$23,995 
_$9995 
-$13,995 
-$17,995 
.$30,995 
-$19,995 
.$23,995 
-$13,995 
-$13,995 
-$12,995 
-$13,995 



* 



m> 



Plus tax, title, license & doc fee. Alt vehicles subject to prior sales: Sea dealer for details. 

Visit Us On The Internet At: vAvw.rays-carg;com 



'-&? 



Chevy/Olds 



Winner 

oi rho 
i99fl Tim*! 
Mciiiozin'" 
QiioUly 
Doalei 
Award 



<4#y 



(847) 395-3600 f^kf ^.-- mwww 

Rrvlltfi \1~^ *&*^"^ M+'V-9,Sot9-6 

r\uunri/j _^<iwrr. nT7n, ani7nmNoon 

AntlOCh I'-nii nrir'. •,.,i7.iniHi«>n 

_*~^ U-Jdy 'jliup 11 V 0''j. 'j<jI Hum Noon \ 



'zmmz 




Sale Hours: 
M-F 9 9. Sal 9-6 
C*t?iyiCf) HrHir". 
H-F7'j. Sol Ocim-Noon 



Chevrolet 



hj (847)587-3300 

^^C- 39 N. Route 12 

"*""-\ Fox Lake 



- ■. : •'.•* 



X 



■■ 



■ ■ 












D2 l Lakeland Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



December 4, 1998 



t> 



FROM PAGE Dl 



SAAB 9-5: Performance and safety 



cally controlled 4-specd automatic trans- 
mission with driver selectable sport, 
economy and winter shift modes. 

The 2,3 L four-cylinder engine is fitted 
with an aluminum alloy, twin -cam head 
with four valves per cylinder, twin bal- 
ance shafts and a small, responsive and 
fntcrcooled Saab light pressure turbo 
(LPT) system. The 2.3L Ecopowcr engine 
produces 170 hp at 5,000 rmp and 207 lb. 
ft. of torque at a mere 1,800 rpm. This po- 
tent engine's broad plateau of maximum 
torque remains constant all the way up to 
3,600 rpm, and Is available with a 5-speed 
manual or 4-specd automatic transmis- 
sion. 

Both engines feature new electronic 
"drive-by-wire" technology, controlled by 
the latest generation SaabTrionic engine 
management system, which also moni- 
tors and controls and Saab Direct Ignition 
timing, fuel injection rate and maximum 
turbo boost pressure. The new asymmet- 
rically turbocharged 5*01 V 6 engine 
marks the first application eif Saab's pow 
erful Trionic and Direct Ignition systems 
on a V-6 engine 
New Chassis and Suspension Systems 

The new Saab 9 5 loilmvs the Saab phi 
losophy thai responsive perlnmiam v anil 
good handling are mi.i|mi i nnlnhumrs m 
driving salei\ IheSaab'i '< s ibavMs lias 
been extensively de\eh>prd itipmvide 
predictable and (Vvfwijvrve i ttnfaid thai c 
stable, well halam ed ami lnre,ivme. in dil 
fifUlt situations 

The Saab ')V\ i Itassis and tnll> mde 
pLMulenl suspension provide the best pos- 
sible halani t of dire* tinuai viability and a 
comfortable, well controlled ride A strul 
type front suspension is matched to a 
new split rear axle used for the first time 
on a Saab. Isolated from and rear sub- 



frames lessen disturbances more effec- 
tively and provide important insulation 
from noise, vibration and harshness. 

All versions of the Saab 9-5 are 
equipped with a new generation of elec- 
tronically controlled ABS as standard. 
This system also incorporates electronic 
brake force distribution {EBD) that works 
under hard braking before the ABS is acti- 
vated. EBD automatically maximizes the 
Krip available at each wheel independent- 
ly to reduce stopping distances. The V-6 
Turbo engine also includes an integrated 
electronic traction control system that 
operates on the front brakes or reduces 
engine torque automatically to prevent 
wheelspin on slippery surfaces. 
Real-life Sa fety Structure 

Saab engineers have always viewed oc- 
cupant safety as one of the most vital at- 
tributes of a car's design. All safety work 
al Saab is based on the Real-life Safety 
concept - that Saab cars must be as safe 
as possible in accident situations that oc- 
cur in ihe real world. It's one thing to de- 
sign a car that performs well in controlled 
laboratory tests, it's entirely another to 
design a car that performs well in the infi- 
nitely variable conditions of the real 
world In help ensure the collision quali- 
ties nt new Saab models can be predicted 
as realis(u ally as possible, Saab cars are 
designed using 25 years of real-life safety 
data accumulated by Saab experts in 
studies of more than 5.000 actual road ac- 
t idents 1-urthermore. all new Saab mod- 
els are subjected to more than 40 different 
crash tests, although only 1 1 are mandat- 
ed by government standards. 

As a results, the horseshoe shaped front 
structure of the Saab 9-5 incorporates 
three robust load paths on each side of 
the chassis that distribute crash loads 




SAAB 9-5 interior 

more effectively and spread energy away 
from the passenger compartment as 
much as possible. The body structure of 
t lie Saab 9-5 is designed to deform pro- 
gressively in proportion to the impact 
speed. This design gives the 9-5 a pre- 
dictable and consistent crash behavior, 
virtually regardless of what obstacle the 
car encounters. 

The Saab safety cage around the pas- 
senger compartment is made from an ex- 
tremely rigid system of high-tensile steel 



members. Biomechanical studies of side 
impact injuries have resulted in a special 
collision deflecting side structure that 
Saab calls its pendulum "B" pillar. Simply 
put. kinetic energy from a crash is like 
water or electricity in that it will always 
take the path of least resistance. In Saab's 
pendulum "B" pillar our engineers have 
designed-in the path of least resistance to 
deflect crash forces away from the upper 
parts of the human body, which are more 
susceptible to injury. 




*> . 3»- 



\ 






December 4, 1998 




: . ■*■■■-. ,■- ... « -*-.'. ', ■ . ■ - . * .-,-'. . . .■' ■, i ■ - ■ '■ ■ ■- 

1 '. ■' - '-" ■ ■■'-" "''■%"■ . ' *■'.."- .-■_.■ ■■-.'."'': '. ' - .. '■' . '- ' 

AUTO MARKETPLACE ■,„■•■;. J^ceiM^smeri/ P3 




,ii.uTJi -:■■' 



■,r;.. 



LAKE COUNTY S 




aas» 



■ ■■,■■■• -•- ■■ 



fiimsi.i:R 

"Plymouth 

Dodge FOR RA" 

QotlgeTruchs SALES, SERVICE 




RATING US #1 DE. 



ill H" • j 

■■:»• 



OR SATISF 
REFERRALS IN 




NEW 1999 DODGE 
INTREPID 4 DR. 



•Sada-c^ 
•Otda 



cUiWrfaodilxtM 
mote*' 

•Cfcs* ' Wf»w> . 



■ faring eoiw»- * 

•teanaion-ttpad 

•Dafcx#»--lanr.-«*" 

• Mrtn-I***»j*«rw«. 



•Ga*wpreWlpodcij*20T 
•G-kwarpebrtd pafage 1*1 
•AaeonJac" 

•Cage- ntt - torf art 



17,518 

IViteu,lilW,lie.&t46doc fee 
Ouotnad buy-i w^piS^ei^^ XjNnn for detail. 



NEW 1998 DODGE DAKOTA 




•nan* ted ***#«« HP window 

•tmty*o tp"* ""* •tm *"•*■ 

• Floor malt .tni«fTTui«iM »'i»rj 

•Auto Iran* I* ep**dl .Cveioma* pnHarmd «*» J 18 * S4B 

o)9L m^nufn v» .flu** «u tag* 

•All eonHnonUH) (Stock nxt* 




•3.BL m»gnum ve wig. 
•Automatic Iran*. 
•Air conditioning 
•Slhllng r»»r window 
•Fog Imp* 



MI.BM 
IlStt 

s»nd7soi5COuni «h« 

fltCfld COlLtCt GRAD 
(¥OU MUSI OUAli'Yl * J w> 

TOUl SAVINGS l«» 



«4t»0M0**atl 
•Dull ■' tag* 
•from lloormat* 
•AM-FM CUM"*, CO 
•Stock wn-e 



row PRict 

n 6,581 

Bus t», IHH. Be. 1 U6 doe lee 




•Hart generation 

tii bag* ' 
•Auto Iran* WJOD 
•Air conditioning 
«4 whan dec btakae 
•2.TLD0HC24v*M 

angina 

•Power (tiering 
•CrulM control 
M vnaal Ind- louring 

tutpenilon 



use* l 1 ' 4 * 3 

*M3 O.SCOUNT IH»» 

SAND* S DiSCOuM ur«» 

BECtNl COHl'Gf O«A0 
HQU UUSt OUALlUfl t«« 



'_•.■■ SAVINGS '' ! '■ ' 



rout ma 

M3,360 

pint Ux, title . Be . & MB doc. P*l 



>MMI moi*iMl 

.<.k.W •!o'»B" J'fWW 

■hrM<mt« 
•uiiru turn •Cufafn 

■doth tnoiV 



NEW 1999 PLYMOUTH 
NEON EXPRESS© 



fc oiscouit ij« 

(ACIOdr flUAK 
iMUSI QUAS.IFYI 11W0 

1ANCH S DUCOUHt 12)0« 

»(CtSl COUtSEGRAO 
iMUSt GUALSFTI - HM 

1QUL SAVIN6S t«»4 



roui met 

»1 9,999 

Plus iM.ime. lie. 4*46 doc. lee 





•Tlltwhaal <FIoornujla 

•Raardafroel •Child proleelton toclu 

•Tifttadguu .Ramote hoodnrunli 

•Power window* relaea* 

•Powar door lock* *And rnuch mont 

•AUfFM *l*n>0 can*. 'Slk. MOOT* 
•Buekal ***** wleon»ola » 

cupholdar* 

,Qmg* p«ck»g* 

$18,606 



Piusto, tit*, lie. 4 M6 toe tee 
aibixiA 

ii,awJK 



•2 OL * cyl. 1SV «ng. 
•Automallc Irani. 
• AM-FM, C»it*H*. CD ehm B *r 
•Ilium, vanity mirror* 
•Powar oulildi mlrron 
•Powir lock*, window* 




MSBP^ tl6.3» 

PUG 0ISC0UN1 *"» 

SANDY S DISCOUNT HOIS 

BfCENt COLLEGE GB»ND 
IVOU MUST QUALIFY) IIM 
FACTORY REBAtt HSM 



•Powar lunroof 
•Dull llr bag* 
•TIH IIMrtng 
•Cnjiw conlrol 
•Buckal Mill 
• Slock 11007-0 

YOUR PMICt 



BRAND NEW 
1998 CHRYSLER SEBRMG CONVT. JX 




Dock HUH 

•Mipipo Mmelv* tuck* 
• II" *u»n aMMMng »™u« 
*TPnll ■ lirt 9 bh'ii 
•YhM ■ P31VMBU *S" ** »"~^ 
■ttaanAg - n*m taai po» 

•TrKlion tc«I^ 

.*.•»«. miuotl <WO 4*t 

•Tim* • **J ■*• 

• (KOnllLVtlOHClX W1 

• BW1 ■ KM"OC« M *lO»I' a™™ 
ftCScrwetr »4»c 

.m Djtlv. wiwr «wmi««w pnorK" 

•omowmi.f* 



10TAL SAVIHSS UMS 



M2,290 j 

Plus Im. fit". Be. 1 W6 doc lee I 



SANDY S OlSCOUM 
FACTORY REBA1E »>«» 

RECENI COLLEGE GRAD 
lUUSl QUALIFY! »»W 



>L**Tna>trunh 

■ 8c«3 M<Wt M 
•MM*!*, tfi rttHV -tr>lT 

*l**rrti*w pO»a- NrWM *o*° ■* •» 

•CO £«*Wflli two" 
B|*M«p0*V flrrr* •■*■? 

• Tru** H* tow w»f«ivt»»> 
■ T'FiafHh] I|1IHI pn*-*Jl 

rout raici 

$21 ,289 

' Plus ta. tnje.se. 5 146 4x. So* 






NO GAMES, NO 
HI DON'T HAVE TO BE A 



All Prices < 



'» CHEKY SiO BtTEHDED HOtUP 

sir. an-oTWT. ve, L8 pkg.. *c. 

CUHll*. 



'95CHEVYLUJWNA15 

SfV. ill -*79fl. nd daon. Al Ttw Top 

$6995 



■MCHmiBTOWiOTHmira. 

Stk. tlMniT. E-rtrif opllon. Silt* 



'96 CHRYSUHI TOWM « COUHTRY 

Bik. *M714. U>adad. laathai, ran 



'98 PLYMOUTH GRAND VOYrUlER 

Slk ftMflOST. Loaded, raw iff, 
Spaclal 



'92 K»U) RANGER 5UPE8 CAB 

SA. 1 1 1 -477347. V6, Auto, A/C E*o. 
FJwaChon 

$4995 



*28,995 «19 P 995 



*lr. 



•19-995 '17,995 



'96 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE 

Btk. taeeSBT. PW. PU H«. cruli* 
conlrol. AC, 



*15.348 



'SB PONTIAC SAFARI 

2 lo cnoo**. Reef air t haat, pw. pi. 
till, crulMconlroL 



'98 CHEVY S10 EXT. CAB 

stk. iit-erMT. ls pkg.. ve. pw. pi. 

tilt. crulM control 

*15, 



'96 DODGE DAKOTA CLUI CAB SLT 

Slk. IM590. AT, AC, caAMtta. lilt, 
crulta control. 

» 13,995 



'96 HYVMOAJ ACCENTS 

6tk 111*861 Fad. waraill. AT, AC. wHm 

*6995 

Or tlWHe. Ho atOParDown' 



'94 FORD rUNGED SUPER CAB XLT 

Stk tg«36T. AT. AC, lilt. erulM 
conlrol, cover. 



'96 FORD RANGER XLT 

SIX efrBBBST. Graal work truck, cap. 



'B9 DODGE SHADOW ES CPE. 

Stk. I11-BT77. AT, air. pdl. good 
mlla*. 



'96 DDDGE DAKOTA SPORT 

Slk. IIM730T. PW, PL, e™!" 

conlrol. 

'9995 



'96 RAH 1500 CLUB CAB SLT 

fllk. f 1M727T. EJitra ntea, loaded, 
boardi. 360 VS. 

»17.595 



•94 CHEVY 1500 CHEYENNE 

Sit ISwaST AT, ACreaaialt*. »». 
cnjlu conlrol 



'96 DODGE CARAVAN 

Slk. »10-66»T. AT. AC, nice unit 

'11,985 



'91 FORD EXPLORER 

5s**1l-4804T.4Dr.,XlJrV 
AS>rVlie«ilDnve 

$5650 

'96 GRAND CARAVAN LE 

Slk. *1<WT25T. Loaded, rear air. 

*14,995 



'91 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN LE 

Slk. tMoSer. AT. AC. AB3, pw, pi. 
Illl. all wheal drh-a. 

*6995 



'96 D0DGI DAKOTA CLUB CAB 

Ml 1 1 1 -O801T. 4X4. Low WW*. LootW 

$16,995 



■69 ODDGE CARAVAN LE 

Slk. f10«MT. AT, AC, pw. lilt. 
cnjlM control. 

'2967 



'96FORDF150 , 

Si • 1 1 -07971 ftfcU Bouw Sup* O* 
aai, Orir 32K MJo, Al Th* V. 1 t>wr 



UlLSSa 



'92 DODGE DZ50 CARGO VAN 

Slk liT*7«8T.318Ve. lots ot ilk 

*3995 



'95 JEEP WRANGLER 

51k. < 1 14746T. Sort lop, auto. Irani. 

•10.995 



'97 PONTIAC SUNFIRE CPE. 

Slk. IMK4. AT, AC. 1111, cawall*. 

•11.595 



'95 CHRYSLER SEBR1NG CPE 

Slk. 104630. AT, AC. pw. pi, Illl. 
emit* conlrol 



'94 DODGE INTREPID 

Stk. f 11-6750. Loaded, pw. pi, tut. 
cruli* conlrol. 
*< 



'91 FORD RANGER 

Stk tTWDST. Work Iruek, clean 

•3775 



! '96 CHRYSLER CIRRUS 

Slk iM6T4. Loaded, pw, pi. tilt, VI 

•10.980 



'9! RAM 250 CONVERSION VAN 

Slk. *114T62T. Loaded, AC. pw, pi, 
1111, crulta conlrol. 



'97 CHEVY 1500 4x4 

Slk f M5B9T. Silverado. 390 VS. pw. 
pi. Illl, crulM conlrol. 



•18.995 



'89F150PKKUP 

St*, ell o790T. Auto, &ak Wort 
Tronipgrfcifcon 



'96 CHRYSLER CIRRUS 

Si 1 11 -6903. a5KMiV». 
AinoUry loodad JUST REDDC£0 



>11995 



•M CHEVY SIO EXTtKOED CAB 

SA lM-o802I.V6.Ejdroaeon 

$4484 



'95 JEEP CHEOKii SPORT 
st et i -osoai. 4 l>. 'im, a/c, 4x4 

$12,995 



1'B9 CHEYY C3500 DUALLY EXT. CAB 
Slk. I1M740T. PW, PL. lilt, crutsi 
conlrol, 454 V8, low mllel. 
•10.995 



'95 DODGE RAM 1500 

Stk. IMMCT. Work truck, AT 



'97 DODGE RAM 1500 CLUB CAS SLT 

Slk ISWOAT. Too menjr-ett™* l0 
Uil Mull M*. 

•19.847 



'94 NISSAN FATHHNDtH St 

Slk IM571T. Big lire*. Loaded, 
mull *ae. 

•14.587 



'93 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB SPORT 

Slk. *9-M65T. AT. AC, Illl, crulu 
control 



'95 DODGE RAH CLUB CAB DIESEL 

Slk. flM737T. 1* ton, pw. pi, lilt, 
crulta conlrol. Ram turbo dlatal 

•14,995 



•10.995 



'95 PLYMOUTH NEON SDN 

Slk. *T«16- Bunroof. S epaad. air 
clearance 




'94 NISSAN SENTRA CPE. 

Slk. f 1 1 ■6776. Sapaed, air, eaiaatle. 
»l 



'97 OLDS ACHIEVA SEDAN 

Slk. *fr6374. V6, pw, pi, lilt, crulie 
conlrol. 

•11,575 



'95 CAVALIER CPE 

Slk. *»4W7 AT, air. caitem 



'96 DODGE DAKOTA SPORT 

Stk • 7«24T. S ipeed, AC. casHili 



»8648 



'94 CHRYSUR CONCORDE 

SrV III -6796 I Owner, Al Opro™. 
cjmcltond Runner 



'93 PONTIAC GRAND AM GT 

Stk. *S*407 VB, pw, pi. Illl. cnjlM 
conlrol. 

•7862 

% DODGE NEOH CPE HIGHUNE 

Slk. #6-6»l. AT, AC. naw car alter- 
naliv* 

•10,995 



'96 PONTIAC SUNFIRE SON 

Slk 164503. KAT. AC, Illl, cumIU 

•10,588 



'90 FORD TAURUS 

Stk. tWTJO. Aulo- AC. cattalti 

65K milsi. 

•4463 



•91 CHEVY CAMARO RS 

Slk. *1 1-6745. Around altacla, 
loaded. 

•4388 



•91 NISSAN STANZA 

Slk. 164625. Hoonnwf, pw, pi. Illl. 
crulta control. 



>4995 



SO MERCURY TOPAZ 

Stk 1104713. Loaded, pw, pi. *« 

ml It* 



'97 CHRYSLER CONCORDE 

Stk. §104710. Loaded, good mllet. 

•14,342 



'97 DODGE STRATUS 

Stk 10471B. AT.AC.eaatalte, good 

mllM 

•11,995 



'94 SATURN SL1 

Stk #64564. AT, elr, eestelH 



'96 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVT 

Slk. #64436. PW. PU tin, cnilae con- 
lrol Clearance. 

•14,499 



•4237 



69 PLYMOUTH VOYAGED 

Slk. #1147T«T. AT, AC. Illl pw, pi, 
crulie control. 



1782 



"91 PLYMOUTH ACCLAIM 

Slk t»4646.Vo,AT.AC.III1.erulaa 
control, cuaatie 



■gi FORD TEMPO SON 

Stk #104687. AT, AC, pw. j* "» 
crulta control 



'91 FORD ESCORT COUPE 

Slk. #104731. Great Ind car. AT all 



'97 OODGE STRATUS 

Slk. #114753. Good mile*, factory 
warrant; 

•11,895 



•9! CHEVY SIO BLAZER M 7 OR. 

Slk. H04734T. Sporty, pw. P'. t'». 
crulta conlrol 

•16,995 



■95 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 

Slk #1.047327 Entre clean, loatfwl, 
ASK 

•16,995 



'95 FORD ESCORT SEDAN 

Slk. #74514. PW, PL lilt, crulta con 
irol. caatette. 



'92 NISSAN SENTRA 

ill 6792 2 Dr. Cot 
A/C. Etfro, Ejoto (. 

$ 499 5 



Si #11 4792 2 Dr. Coup*, S Spd 

ItroOeon 



*97 CHRYSLER LHS 

Slk #2locnoo*a Laelhar. loaded. 
mull tea 

•17,995 



'98 DODGE STRATUS 

3 10 cltoote Low mllaa, pw. pi. tilt. 
crulaa conlrol. 

•13.995 



Si #M-i779T iSpd.A/C. 
Gno>*4nwr 



$2362 



'98 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 

Stk #1147661 PW. PL, Illl. crude 
control, 4x4. 

•21,995 



'94 OODGE SHADOW CPE 

Slk #84641. AT, AC. clean unit 

•5567 



'g4 CHEVY CAVALIER CPE 

Slk #84573. 5 .peed, air, eaiMtle 

•4995 



'94 MERCURY TOPAZ 

S(k #104712, Power wet, P*. pi. MIL | 
crulta conlrol. 

•4995 



SPECIAL OF THE WEEK 

innflrnAKihrADMMM/r.OAMn\/nVAr,FP 



I / rU \/(U « '•< >"• " v *** M 7 w »- " 

2 LEFT, 5E packages, rear air, save thousands 

$ | g 995 WHOLESALE 




Call Todiy and Driv* Away I 

(800) 501-9702 

AutMiaMw Cnrtll A»t«»»l HaUKw 

Ha HtaakH • M» Paparww* 

•H* tabarr*u«M«t 

U Hamt A Pat. 7 0«n A Wtak 



Wl HONoTTuOlSlUNK C CO.PO»»r-. l C l HO-tAN» _ __ 

.Bad Credit -No Credit .Repossessioi 




.judgements - 1st T""»f„ B "y er 

in torview, call 



tta47t 587-6473 




ALL REBATES 
APPLIED PLUS 
TAX. LIC. 
TITLE 
146 DOC FEE. 
lAPR IN LIEU OF REBATE 



CHRYSLER 

Vlymoutfi 

Dodge 



(847) 

587-6473 

91 S. Route 12 in Fox Lake 



"So Habla Espanol" 



W 



i 1 i 



.: 



-tRl 



l 



I] 



........ 



D4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



Auto Marketplace Classifieds 



- /,•■'-/ 



December 4, 1998 



Can for Sale 



-90 MAZDA RX7 GXL. rod. 
Inaded. loalher interior, pam 
porod garargo kept $8,000 
Call (847) 223-20B5 

1005 BUtCK SKY HAWK ro 
butll mechanics. Si,0G0/bosi 
(647) 587-4342. 

1085 SUBURBAN GOOD 
liros, very clean, well main- 
tained, air. automalic, 
S0,500/besl (70S) 447-4590 

1067 SUBURBAN, NEW 

transmission, 350 motor. 3yrs 
old. motor needs minor work. 
S1.2O0 (847) 546-7457 

1981 BUICK PARK AVE 
Good condition, while with 
burgandy interior $5,400 
(647) 975-3799 

1992 CORVETTE CON- 
VERTIBLE while with while 
lop. garage kepi. 55.000 
miles Excellent condition 
(615) 3B5846S 

1997 PONTIAC GRAND 
Am Green 20,000 milos 
Good condmon SII.50Q 

OBO (847) 548-6826 

BUICK 1985 CENTURY 
WAGON Clean and reliable 

Asking $1,500'bOSt (4 14) 652 
•952 



BUICK 

WAGON 
3300 



1994 
S8 995 



CENTURY 
[84 7| 56.* 



CADILLAC 
OEViLLE. 

385 2100 



S23 990 



1998 

(Bi5i 



CHEVROLET 1990 COR- 
SICA, S2 995 (847) 356 
2530 

CHEVROLET 1995 IMPA- 
LA SS. CD. leather. 63 000 
miles, now tiros, now brakes 
loaded. $18,500 [6*71 
395-5966 

CHEVY 1984 CORVETTE, 
58.995 (B47) 223 8651 

CHEVY 1991 CAMARO 
RS. $4,388 (847) 587-6473 

CHEVY 1991 CAVALIER, 
$2,990. (615) 3B5-2100. 



CHEVY 1993 CAVAUER 2 
24 CONVERTIBLE, S9.990 

(815)385-2100, 

CHEVY 199S BERETTA 
S5.990. (815) 3852100 

CHEVY 1096 CORSICA 

S7.99Q. (815)385-2100 

CHEVY 1007 LUMINA, 4- 

door. while, maroon mtonor, 
fully loaded, low miles, A/C, ex- 
cellent condition. Musi sell 
Asking $14,500/I>ost. Ploaso 
call (847) 223-3161 aftor 5pm 
or leave mossage. 

CHRYSLER 1990 LEBAR- 
ON 55K miles, airbag, lull 
power, digital dash, drives 
good, stereo equipped. 
S3.500/besl. (773) 585-3717. 
(773) 259-4729 

DODGE '95 RED neon, high 
lino. 4 door. a/c. aulo. power 
locks, tut, 3 year service, com 
42,000 miles (647) 395 1966 

DODGE 1991 DYNASTY. 
$2,995 (847) 587-3300 

DODGE 1995 INTREPID 
ES. $5.995 (847) 244-1010 

EAGLE 1994 VISION ESI. 
$5,995 (847) 395 3600 

1986 OLDS CUTLASS 
SIERRA SILVER MOON- 
LIGHT. A/C. heal, powc 
lochs, now (ires new brakes 
now o»haust. now radiator 
new cam shari Runs gronl 
Son left lor Navy Must sell 
$1,599 Ask lor Mr Coleman 
(414) 654 6543 or leave mes 
sage 

FORD 1992 TAURUS GL. 

$2,995 (847) 244 1010 



FORD 1993 TAURUS SE- 
DAN, $4,595. (647) 356-2530. 

FORD 1995 PROBE GT 5- 
speod, 3 IK, power W/L laser, 
red, $12,500 (647) 526-2644 
leave mossage. 

FORO 1997 ASPIRE, 
$6,BB8. (B47) 587-3400. 

FORD EXPLORER, 

58,000 miles, Eddie Bauer, 
low miles, 2yr. warranty, 6 disc 
CD player, flawless condition, 
$15,000.(647)566-4043. 



HONDA 

4-DOOR. 

3600. 



1903 ACCORD LX 

$9,995. (647) 395- 



FORD 

WAGON. 

2530 



1093 
$2,595 



ESCORT 

(847) 356 



FORD 

WAGON. 

2530 



1993 

$3,595 



ESCORT 

(847) 356 



FORD 1993 ESCORT. 

$2,988 (B47) 587-3400 

FORD 1093 PROBE GT. 

V6. loaded, keyless entry, 
remote slam, excellent condi- 
tion, $7,000. Must sell. Krisly 

(414) B43-3B56. 



HONDA 1094 CIVIC 

HATCHBACK. 56,000 mllos. 5- 
speed, $7,000. (847) 
543-1289. 

HONDA 1995 ACCORD 

EX. $11,990 (615)385-2100 

HONDA 1906 CIVIC SE 
DAN. $10,995 (647) 356 
2530 

HONDA CIVIC STATION 
WAGON, 1989, silver, au 
tomalic. very reliable, mam- 
tonanco completely up lo 
dale. $2.500/bosl (64 7) 
548-2132 

HYUNDAI 1990 ACCENT, 
$5,995 (847) 587 3400 

HYUNDAI 1096 AC- 

CENTS, S6.995 (84 7) 587 
6473 

HYUNDAI 1998 ELANTRA 

4-door. black, all power op 
lions, under 11K mites, like 
now $l0.800/besl Moving 
must sell Can be soon at Na 
honal Pndo Auto (414) 697 
1332. (414) 697-7781 bet 
ween 4 30pm- 7 30pm 

INFINITI 1995 J30S. 6 TO 
CHOOSE WITH SIMILAR 
SAVINGS. LEATHER. SUN 
ROOF. $16,995 647) 362 
9200 

INFINITI 1995 Q45S 

LEATHER. SUNROOF, 

S22.995. (847) 362-9200 

INFINITI 1996 130T, 

LEATHER, SUNROOF. 

$19,995. 4647) 362-9200. 



ISU2U STYLUS 1901, 
black, manual shift, great ster- 
eo, air, maintenance com- 
pletely up-to-date. New pump, 
brakes. battery etc. 

$4,500/besl. (847) 548-2132. 

LINCOLN 1088 TOWN- 
CAR DESIGNER SERIES, 
80,000 miles, 1 -owner, excel- 
lenl condition, plush every- 
Ihlrtg. $3,500. (414) 
857-7515. 

LINCOLN TOWN CAR 

1966, S2.990. (815) 385-2100. 

LINCOLN TOWNCAR 
1085, dark gray, loaded, de- 
cent shapo. Book value 
$3,600, asking $2.400/bosi. 
(B47) 587-0806. 

MERCEDES 1980 BENZ 
450 SEL. musl see, 
$4.Q00/besl (847) 336-3634. 

MERCURY 1888 COUGAR 
Looks sharp, runs great, tittle 
rust. $1.600 (847) 526-7139 

MERCURY 1088 SABLE 

3 0. automatic, runs good, 
body rough, needs healer 
core. $500 (414) 878-5078 
after 4pm or weekends 

MERCURY 1991 CAPRI 
MR2 TURBO CONVERTIBLE 
rod 55K. loaded. 5 speed, o» 
colionl condition $5 500 
IB47) 566 2160 

MERCURY 1992 TOPAZ 

*GS SPORT COUPE $i.?95 

(B4 7) 244 1Q1Q 

MERCURY 1903 COUOAR 

DOSTONIAN. $7,995 (b-»7| 
567 34QQ 

MERCURY 1994 COUOAR 
XR7, $7.995 847) 587 3300 

MOVINO OUT OF STATE 
MUST SELL 1997 Black Pon 
tiac Sunfiro, 5-spood. 2 door 
sodan, A/C. cassette Asking 
$9,900. (B4 7) 438-4180 



NISSAN 1991 STANZA 
$4,995. (847) 587-6473. 

NISSAN 1993 ALTIMA. 
$5,995. (847) 587-6473, 

NISSAN t995 ALTIMA, 
$8,995. (847) 395-3600. 

NISSAN 1995 MAXIMA, 
$12,990.(815)385-2100. 

OLDSMOBiLE 1994 CUT- 
LASS SUPREME, white, no 
rust, excellent condition. 2- 
door, 68,000 miles. Asking 
$8,500.(414)652-0197, 

PLYMOUTH 1903 LASER, 
$6,990. (647) 223-8651. 

PLYMOUTH 1985 NEON, 

£4,990,(815)365-2100. 

PLYMOUTH 1996 

BREE2E 41 K, 58.975/besl. 
Rod. 4-door. PS. PB, PW, PL, 
air, cruise, 4-cylinder, AM/FM 
cassette. (847) 336-1574. 



PLYMOUTH 
BREEZE. $9,995. 
2530. 



1997 
(847) 358- 



NEW CHEVY 
ER COUPE. 
385-2100 



1999 CAVALI- 
$9,990 (815) 



NEW PONTIAC 1999 

GRAND AM, $15,195 (815) 
385-2100. 

NISSAN 1990 240SX, 

$995 (647) 356-2530 



PONTIAC 1979 TRANS 

AM, yellow, 403 Olds. 54,000 
miles, garage kept, now sus- 
pension, rocondllionod heads 
and much more. $6,000. (B47) 
566-6013 

PONTIAC 1902 GRAND 
AM SE 4-door. $3^95 (847) 
244-1010 

PONTIAC 1892 GRAND 
PRIX. $4,995 (847) 356-2530 

PONTIAC 1996 FIRE 
BIRD, $10,990 (615) 365 
2100 

PONTIAC 1006 GRAND 
AM GT loaded. 6 IK. whito. 
CD, sunroof. 4 door. 

$il.500/bosl (847) 

550-1876 

PONTIAC 1997 GRAND 
AM. $11.990 (615)365 2100 

SATURN 1094 3L1. 

$6.995 (847) 587 6473 

TOYOTA 1903 COROLLA, 

$5.995 (647)223 8651 

TRANS AM, RAM AIR 1996 
Pontiac. 5,000 miles, raro 6- 
speed. $28,000/0051 (414) 

eB9-«20S 



VOLVO 1805 885 TURBO 
WAGON. LEATHER. SUN- 
ROOF. $22,595. (847) 362-' 

9200. 

VOLVO 199S SELECT 850, 
LEATHER, SUNROOF, 

$20.995. (847) 362-9200. 

.VOLVO 1998 655 GLT 
WAGON, LEATHER, SUN- 
ROOF, COLD WEATHER 
TRACTION, $24,995. (B47) 
362-9200. 

VOLVO 1990 SELECT S- 
70 GLT, LEATHER. SUN- 
ROOF, $28,595. (847) 362- 

9200. 

VOLVO 1998 SELECT 
S70s. 12 TO CHOOSE WITH 
SIMILAR SAVINGS, LEATH- 
ER. SUNROOF, $23,895. 
(847) 362-9200. 

VOLVO 19BB SELECT V- 
70 W/teONS 13 TO CHOOSE 
WITH>SIMILAR SAVINGS, 
LEATHER. SUNROOF. 

$26.995. (647) 362-9200. 

VOLVO 1998 SELECT V- 
70, R/WD WAGON. LEATH- 
ER, SUNROOF, $33,995. 
(847) 362-9200. 



Service & Parts 



ARE WHEELS. SET o( four 
American Racing Equipment 
15x0, GM bolt patlern. True 
spoked wheels. Good shape. 
$150 (847)548-1115. 

BMW WHEELS SET OF 
FOUR, to fit 3, 5. 6. 7. 8 ser- 
ies. Mills Mlglia 5 spoke 
wheels wilh Yokohama AVS 
uros 50% tread loft, wheels in 
good shape. $700 (847) 548- 
1115 



TIRE CHANGER, ALL tool 
plus. 4yrs old, excellent condi- 
tion. $1,800. (815) 3B5-0724. 



For More 
Classifieds, 
See Page 6 




EXCHANGE 

Lease At: 

$339 month lease/39 months. £339 1st payment / S1000 cap. cost reduction/$450 aquisition I 





S JSS£S^ 0.9% for 36 months 

i99e wtth approved 2.9% for 48 months 

^SSmfcti** ft* 60 months 




■-■•■■'^'^gswra 



Offer ends 12/31/98. No prior sales. 



THE ^EXCHANGE 

2300 Skokie Valley Rd • Highland Park 

(847) 432-9300 

i . 
Internet: wu&w.saabcxch ange.com 

A Division Of Semersky Enterprises, Inc. 



mm&m$ 




1997 GMCt TON EXT. CAB DUALLY 

««4HV*ato»tafea. *Aifr 



1997 GMC1 TON CREW CAB DUALLY 

2H. CO* atoar, Infer ft$ 
bxte!se& total ttrttmiy 



Ml 



1996 PONTIAC 

^ DAMs 10, 995 



1996CHEVYS10BUZEB 

4*4. 4 tar. V6 S-jtiQflfl 

a/c. loaded lll|J UU 



1996CHEVTS-1Q6LAZER 

UUdar.LS.tf $ 



11900 



a 



19M MERCURY SA&E 
4obtxvB.automarX $A(W)C 
a,ftipo*g j /' 



19&4 GMC 6000 SERES T0PK1CK 

VtocLfei&srjednSivT. 
body Mga. tor nfe 



SAVE 



1993 GMC RALLY VAN 3/4 TON 

8 passenger. VS automatic $4 n AQC 
ar.kaJaj lUi"jj| 



19SJGMCSJM 

VMi4. 4 tor, SLT package, $ 

r\for^lfi^^OptEri ' 



6895 



1993 DODGE DAKOTA 

2*4. V6. 

Sspeedair ^ 



5SS5 



1992CHEVYHMNAAPV 

V5. automate, air. § 

7passengc 



6995 



1989 FORD RANGER 
4X4 EXT. CAB 



'36951 





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PEDERSEN GMC TRUCK 

"The Truck People" 



Since 1936 



AflfflOCH, IL • 847-395-3700 

1 Comers of RL 45 & 173 



December 4,1998; .. 



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AUTO MARKETPLACE : 



Lakeland Newspapers/ D5 



ROCKENBACH CHEVI 



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I'tfiftii^li!. 



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■ ■ *£&'< *-**£» "■.- -i ■? 



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ILLINOIS' #1 NEW AMD USED VEHICLE RETAILER 



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r„; s 271 



30 
mo 



Jotal due at lease Inception: $586 plus tax, title, lie, and doc, fee ^ 



; I IS •801 






36 

mo 



Lease *3|4* 



For 



36 
mo 



Jotal due at lease inception: $670 plus tax, title, lie, and doc, fee^ 



Jotal due at lease Inception: $679 plus tax, title, He, and doc. fee. 



1*22 



■,.'--,' '■ -y.-T-; *■ " 



•»!5e»- 






I 



THIS WEEK'S 
HOT LIST 



'92 Chivy CI 500 Silverado ExtCabPlckUp $11,990 

'93 Plymouth Voyagtr Van $7,990 

'97 Toyota Camry $14,990 

'97 Chtvroltt Molibu $12,990 
'96 Cadllht Seville SIS Pearl While, w/uinroof, Sharp! $25,990 

94 Olds Bravado 4dr. $10,990 

'97 Chtvroltt Comoro cpe. $13,490 

'93 Chivy Btrtttacpe. $M90 

91 Nissan 300ZX 2x2. J- fops, Leather $12,990 

'98 Chtvy Cavalier $10990 

*97 Chtvroltt Corvette $35,990 

'94 Jttp Grand Cherokee $11,990 

•90GMCSubiaban4x*tottv. $6,990 

'95JtepWrangttr $10,990 

V7 Plymouth Ntontdr. $7,990 

'96 Pontiac Grand Prix cpt, $10,990 

'97 Chtvroltt Astro awd van! $16,990 

'91FordBroncoBd<SiBautr $9,990 

W Chtvy Cavalltrtdr. $11,490 

'97 Plymouth Voyagtr Van $13,990 

MORE TO CHOOSE FROM 
AT SIMILAR SAVING SI 



MORE -THAN 



Vehicle: 
In 



TRUCKS 

'93 GMC Sierra SLE PR) Ext. Cab. 

'98 Ford Ranger XLT P/V Ext. Cab 4x4. 

*93 Nissan King Cab 4x4 SE V6. 

'93 Chevrolet S-IOPAJ Ext. Cab, V6. 

'95 Chevrolet S-10 P/V 

'97 Chevy S~TO Ext Cab 4x4 

'92 Chevy S- TO Ext Cab 4x4 

'94 Ford Ranger XLT P/V 

"96 Dodge Dakota PAJp 

'94 Chevy K2500 4x4 Ext Cab 

•92 Ford F-1SO XLT P/U 

•93 Ford F-l 50 PA/ 

'97 Chevrolet S-IOP/VP Sport Box!! 

"94 Ford F350 Crew Cab Dually 



$12,990 

$18,990 

$9,990 

$0,990 

$8,490 

$79,990 

$8,990 

$7,990 

$13,990 

$14,950 

$12,990 

$6,990 

$9,990 

$18,990 



--'■--. : • ..>•;■-.■-• ■■:• ;•■■- ■ 



COUPES & SEDANS 

'92 BulckRoadmaster LTD. Sharp! $9,990 

'90 Pontiac Bonneville LE $5,990 

'93 Toyota Corolla Red & Ready! $5,995 

'95 Mercury Sable $9,990 

•97HondaCMcEXcpe. $13,990 

'94 Chevrolet Cavalier 2 dr. $6,990 

'96 Acura Integra $ 14,990 

«95 Saturn SC 2 cpe. $9,990 

'92 Mazda MX 3 V6 $6,990 

'96 Honda Accord $14,990 

'97 Plymouth Breeze $10,990 

•95 Ford Contour $8,990 

'96 Chevrolet Corsica $9,990 

"96 Ford Thundmrblrd Loaded, sharp. $10,995 

'95 Chevrolet Lumlna $10,990 

'92 Mazda Protege $5,990 

'95 Pontiac Bonneville SSEI Like Brand New! $17,990 



WE CARRY Commercial Trucks, Cargo Vans, Hi-Cubes, Plows, Salt-Spreaders, and Dumps 



SUVS & VANS 

'95 Jeep Wrangler Hard Top 

'96 Chevy Astro Con v. Van 

'96 GMC Safari Van 

'90 GMC Suburban 4x4 Conv. Van 

'94 Chevrolet K-Blazer 

'92 Ford Winnebago Conv. Van 

'96 Dodge Grand Caravan LE 

'94 Toyota 4-Runner SR5 V6, 4x411 

'97 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 

'94 Chevy S-10 Blazer 4dr. Loaded. 

'93 Chevrolet S-IO Blazer 

'93 Plymouth Grand Voyager White, loaded, 

'93 Chevrolet Suburban 4x4 

'90 FordAerostar Van 

'92 Jeep Cherokee 

'97 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer 

'91 Toyota Previa Low Mites! 

'94 Chevy Suburban 4x4 Super Clean! 



$12,990 

$15,990 

$15,990 

$6,990 

$17,990 

$10,990 

MUSTSEE 

$16,990 

$22,990 

$8,990 

$7,990 

sharp! $8,995 

$14,990 

$5,990 

$6,990 

$29,990 

$11,990 

$19,990 



'87 Chevy Corvette Con v't Red, mln t, 38K miles. WOWt 

'91 Pontiac Sunblrd ConVt Red, sharp. , $5,990 

'89 Chevrolet Comoro Z2B ' $5,990 

'92 Ford Mustang Conv't $6,990 

'94 Ford Probe $8,990 

'93 Plymouth Laser $6,990 

•94 Toyota Cetlca $10,990 

'8 1 Chevrolet Corvette Super Cleanl MUST SEE 

'84 Chevy Corvette Blue for You! Low low miles!) $8, 995 

'94 Chevrolet Beretta Z26 $9,990 

'96 Ford Muttang Alloys, loaded, red. $11,995 

'96 Mitsubishi Eclipse $15,990 

"97 Chevy Comoro Cpe. Slack Beauty. $13,995 

'97 Chevy Camaro Conv't Sharp! $15, 990 

•97 Mitsubishi Eclipse GS $18,990 
•98 Chevy Corvette* Prt-Dmen. 3 ID CHOOSE! Save Thousands!!! MUSTSEE1 

•92 Cadillac Allan te Hard Top Conv't $22,795 



>S\ 



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AH Drtces Dlus lax. true; lie. and $44.58 doc fee.all Incentives applied.?, 0% APR on approved credit for max, : 4,B mpmha onj 
RbqKISr amniS i o? fiST 1 May effect final sale prtce.-Kfotto be.used wltfi any other factory, proflrama prfdverUsad 
•^iJS Wrt J2.0M mllw Der 

50- Malibu $8,460^9.396.45; Conversion Van $11;844/$15,608.39; Venture $11 .376/1 3,938.75: Bl 



Ivehk 



iew:'98$?S 



■^nGonymi6h'yin%H(A^M\^6vyt 



i qualified buyers wim 
Cavalier $7.1 64758" 



MCials/'iBasMJ onaBBJiohth cfosBtJ-endleasei'pIus tax, title.' license and doc;ree;tfirouprt GMAC 

ftermlnsJor^AU factory ratette^d tn«j^ 

ar$1 0.298^13.197.00; S-1 $8.984/$7.341 .64. gr Mu8tfav« completed basic tralnfe -■ ■ 






Oon t Make A $1000 MIS1AKE 



Truck Dealer 
In The Midwest 



2000 VEHICLES ALWAYS IN STOCK 



"1999 Cfte¥M CawaMefN 7^1999 Ciiev» MallbBN /T999 Cliew» S-10 Picli l>B 



9.495 



L ^ $ i8a 



36 
mo 



13495 



36 mo 



19.295 



Lease! 
For 



36 mo 



J otal due at lease inception: $400 plus ta x, title, lie, and doc. fee^ 



Jotal due at lease inception: $486 plus tax. title, He, and doc. fee. 



Jotal due at lease Inception: $395 plus tax, title, lie, andUoc. fee. 



. . 






■■-;'• ■""*-. ■■■■-■'-•'■■.■ ":-- • * ■ -- ■' * ---" : _^ ■ * . 



. 



1999 Chewy Blazer 4x4w 1999 Chewy Weniurex /1999 Chew Comiersion M 






. - 



■?)."■ ■ 



D6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



December 4, 1998 






Auto Marketplace Classifieds 



Vans 



ASTRO VAN 1985, $3,500, 
remodelod. (847] 74&-3S72, 

CHEVY 1988 CONVER- 
SION VAN. 7SK miles, A/C, 
AM/FM cassette, tow pack- 
age, $4.000rt>osi. Days (847) 
358-8008, evenings (B47) 
5875592. Kan. 

CHEVY 1992 ASTRO 
CARGO VAN EXT, new 
tires, brakes and exiiausi, ex- 
ceptionally clean, $4,950/besi. 
tB47) 395-6655. 

DODGE 1969 CARAVAN 
LE, $2,967, (B47) 587-6473. 

DODGE 1995 GRAND 
CARAVAN SE, $11,990. (815) 
3852100. 

DODGE 1995 RAM 250O 
SLT VAN, 12 passenger, 62K 
miles, ABS, alrbag. power 
windows, new brakes/tires 
and alignment, drives excel- 
lent body excellent condition. 
$10.90Q/besl Call Robert 
(773) 585-3717, (773) 259 
4729 

FORD 1991 AEROSTAR 
AWO VAN. S4.990. (847) 223- 
8651 

FORD 1995 WINDSTAR. 
S9.995 (847) 587- 3400 

PLYMOUTH 1992 VOYAG- 

ER, $2.995 (847) 356 2530 

PLYMOUTH 1993 VOYAG- 
ER, 85,000 mites air. cruise 
control, lapo player new 
bolis/brakos and iires, $6,000 
(414) 279 6 370 after 5pm 

PLYMOUTH 1995 VOYAG- 
ER. $8.595 (847) 587 6473 

PONTIAC 1994 TRANS 
SPORT. $4,995 (847) 5B7 
6473 



CHEVY 1894 $-10 BLAZ- 
ER. $6,990. (847) 2236651. 

CHEVY 1995 BLAZER 4X4 
$12.995. (847) 587-3300. 

CHEVY 1996 BLAZER, 
$11.990 (815) 385.2100 

DODGE 1989 RAM 
CHARGER 4x4, 5.000 milos 
on rebuilt engine, new tires, 
towing package. Asking 
$3,e00/bOSt, (815) 675-6434 
atter 7pm, 

DODGE 1994 DAKOTA, ex- 
tended cab, VB, 4x4. low mile- 
age, full power, $14,000/besi. 
(414)694-1745. ' 

FORD 1992 EXPLORER 
SPORT 4x4, $10,988. (847) 
587-3400. 



CHEVY 1M3 C-1500 PICK- 
UP. Indy 500 Edition, 75,000 
miles, some add ons, 
$11.000/best. (847) 356-8807 
leave message, 

CHEVY 1994 S-10 PICKUP, 
$7,990.(816)385-2100. 

CHEVY 1B95 S-10 EX- 
TENDED CAB, $8,990. (815) 
385-2100. 



DODGE 1989 
PICKUP. $2,988, 
3400, 



RAM 50 
I847) 587- 



To advertise In 

this section, call 

(847) 223-8161 



FORD 199S EXPLORER 
EDDIE BAUER, great condi 
lion, porloctly maintained. 
64,000 miles. $20,500/bosl 
( 84 7)395 2015 

GEO 1993 TRACKER 4x4. 
$ 5.990 (815) 385-2100 

ISUZU AM1GO 1993, fully 
loaded $S.500/bos< (i47) 
973 0128 0' voice mail 1 800 
255 48590X14689 

JEEP 1993 WRANGLER. 
SS.995 (847) 356 2530 



NISSAN 1991 PATH- 

FINDER 4X4 SE. $8,995 
(847) 395 3600 



DODGE 1994 DAKOTA 
SLT. $5,545. (847) 587-6473. 

DODGE 1995 RAM 1500 
4x4 Club Cab SLT. 6horl box, 
dark blue, 5.9 V8 Magnum, au- 
tomatic, loaded. CD player. 
roll top cover, $17,300/besl. 
(414) 763-5763. 

DODGE 1906 DAKOTA 
PAJ. $13,990. (647) 223-8651. 

DODGE 1997 RAM PICKUP 
TRUCK. 4x4, white, cabin and 
1/2, still under warranty. 
$22.000/best. (847) 
740-2606. 

FORD 1991 F-250, extend- 
ed cab XLT, Lariat Package, 
loadod, 2WD. excellent condi- 
tion running and looking, 351 
V8 full power. 95,000 miles, 
over 1/2 highway, $11,000. 
(847)662-1480 

FORD 1991 RANGER, 
$3,775 (847) 587 6473 . 




FORD 

SPLASH. 
34O0 



1994 
$7,988 



RANGER 

(847) 587- 



TnJckVTnulpn 



Four Wheel Dnte 

J<T|M 



CHEVROLET t993 BLAZ- 
ER 4 door, red, 4WO. sharp, 
loaded. $i2.500/besi 1993 
BUICK LESABRE 51.000 
miles, no rust. *-door. S8.000 
(410\857-2605 

CHEW 1001 S-10 BLAZER 
4x4, 55.935. (B47) 244-1010 



1991 S-10 PICK-UP, excel 
lent condition, $3,200/besi 
Full size shonbed cap. $200 
(414) 537 4054 

CHEVROLET 1992 1500 
SILVERADO PAJ. 59,950 
(847)223-8651 

CHEVY 1090 1500 SILVER 
ADO PICKUP, &4.095 (047) 
244-1010. 



FORD 1994 RANGER XLT 
P/U. $7,990 (B47) 223-8651 

FORD 1994 RANGER XLT 
AM/FM cassette, A/C. plum, 
64 K miles, great shape. 
$6,700. (847) 662-9397 

FORD 1996 RANGER XLT. 
California Truck, low mites, 
must see, 59,995 (847) 
740-0573 

FORD F-150 1992. 6-cylm- 
dor, stick, with air. AM/FM cas- 
sette, low mileage. 
$6.500/best (847) 356-5949 

NISSAN 1383 KING CAB 

4X4 SE. 10.BDQ |847> 933- 
065 T. 



oetDireot 



Mention CODE 5763 



■t.' 



*' -4- fjrG"™n?fc ~ 




etdirectcom 




ACURA 

Acuro of Libertyvilte 

1620 S. Mitwoulee Ave., liber tyville 

680-7333 

Pouly Acuro 

Routes 41 & 22, HigKlond Part 

433-8200 



Karl Knauz Motors 

407 Skokis Valley Hwy., lake Bluff 

604-5000 



• Anthony Pontioc/ 
GMC Truck/Buick 
2727 Belvidere Rd |Rit 120). Woukegon 
244-1010 

• Knouz of Lake Forest 
1044 N Western Ave . Lake forest 
234-2800 

• Liberty Auto City 
1000 E Park Ave . bberlyville 
362-2683 

• Mitchell Buick-Oldsmobile & 
GMC Truck 
903 N Irani Street. McH<>nr> 
(815) 3857200 

• Country Buick Ponliac 
B4S Main Si . Amioch 
395 4400 



Buss Ford 

3925 W. Route 120, McHenry 

(815) 385-2000 

Fox Lake Ford-Mercury Inc. 

90 S. Route 12, Fox Lake 

587-3400 

Lyons-Ryan Ford 

104 W. Route 173, Antioch 

395-3900 

' Celozzi Ford 

3100 Grond Ave, (Rt*. 132), Waukegan 

336-2340 
■ Sessler Ford Inc. 

1010 S. Milwaukee Avt . Liberiyville 

362-4550 
> Victor Ford 

Route 12 (N. of Rte 176), Wouconda 

526-5541 



Anthony Pontioc/GMC/Buick 

2727 Bolvidere Rd.. Woukegon 

244-1010 

Mitchell Buick Oldsmobile & 

GMC Truck 

903 N Front Street. McHenry 

(815)385-7200 

Patrick Pontiac-GMC Truck Inc 

1120 5 Milwaukee Ave . libertyville 

680-5000 

Pedersen GMC Truck 

Corners of Rtes 4b 4 1/3. Anlioch 

3953700 






• Weil Oldsmobile Cadillac Inc 
1050 S Milwaukee Ave , l-beftvville 
362-4100 

• Gary Long Pontioc 
Cadillac Subaru 

1 107 S Koula 31, McHenry 

(815)385-6000 

CHEVROLET 

• Bernard Chevrolet/lsuzu 

1001 S Milwaukee Ave liberlvville 
362 140D 

• Boohmer Oiovrolot/Geo 

416 W Liberty (Rte 176) Waueondo 
526-2424, 

• Classic Chevrolet Inc. 

425 N Green Boy Rd . Woukegon 
336-4300 

• Gary Lang Chevrolet/Geo 
1107 S Rouie 31, McHenry 
(815)385-2100 

• Ray Chevrolet Inc. 
39 N Route 12, Fox Lake 
587-3300 

• Raymond Chevrolet/ 
Oldsmobile Inc. 

120 W Lake Si (Rte 173), Anlioch 
395- 3600 

• Rockenbach Chevrolet 

1000 I Belvidere Rd . Graysloke 
223-865) 

• Shepord Chevrolet 
930 Carriage In. Lake Bluli 
234 7900 



Pouly Honda 

1 1 II S Milwaukee Ave . Libertyville 

362-4300 

Rosen Honda 

Rte 137 (Grond Ave ). Gurnee 

623-7673 




Liberty Auto City 

1000 E Pork Ave ( 176). Liberiyville 

360-2683 

Gurnee Hyundai VWQIds 

Rie 41 & Woihinqlon St . Gurnet YVotikegan 
249-1300 



Fields Infiniti 

1121 S Milwaukee Ave . Liberiyville 
362-9200 



ISUZU 



FJernord Chevrolet/lsuzu 
1001 S. Milwaukee Ave., libertyville 
362-1400 

Jim M'lody Oldsmobile-lsuzu & Nisson 
5656 NW Hwy., Crystal loke 
(800) 566-5239 



Jeep. 



rilHIMEH 



• Knouz of Lake Forest 

104 4 N. Western Ave . Lake Forest 
234-2800 

• Loke County Chrysler-Plymouth 
540 S Green Boy Rd . Waukegan 
336-4500 

• Lake Villa Chrysler Plymouth 
Jeep/fcogle 

130 Cedor Ave , Lake Villa 
356-2530 

• Sondy McKie & Sons 
Chrysler-Plymouth Dodge Truck 
91 S Route 12, Fox Loke 

587 6471 

• Sunnyside Dodge Chrysler 
Plymouth 

4810 W FlmSl.. McHenry 
(815) 385 7220 



• Country Jeep-Eagle 
3017 W. Route 120, McHenry 
(815)363-9999 

• Delf's Jeep 

1521 Belvidere Rd . Woukegon 
623-1492 

• lake Villa Chrysler-Plymouth Jeep Eagle 
1 30 Cedar Ave. loke Villa 
356-2530 

• Liberty Jeep Eagle 

1000 E Pork Ave.. Liberiyville 
362-2683 




Land Rover of Loke Bluff 
375 N Skokie Hwy, Lake Bluff 
604 8100 




Antioch Dodge 
105 Rte. B3, Anlioch 
3950200 

Fohrman Auto Mart 
2725 Belvidere Rd , Waukegan 
336-3510 

Miller-Kruogcr Dodge 
119 N. Milwaukee Ave., libertyville 
362-3800 

Sondy McKie & Sons 
Chrysler-Plymouth Dodge Truck 
91 S. Roule 12, Fa* Lake 
587-6471 

Sunnyside Dodge-Chrysler- 
Plymouth 

4810 W. Elm St., McHenry 
(815) 385-7220 



• Fox Lake Ford/Mercury 
90 S Roule 12, Fox Loke 
5873400 

* Libertyville Lincoln/Mercury Inc. 
941 S Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
367 1700 

• Lyons Ryan Ford-lincolnMercury Inc 

(04 W Route 173, Anlioch 
395-3900 

* Don McCue Lincoln-Mercury Inc. 
660 W. NW Hwy., Borringlon 
382-5600 

• Mitchell-Potts Lincoln/Mercury 
907 N. Front St., McHenry 

(815) 385-0403 

* Rosen Lincoln-Mercury 

100 N. Green Boy Rd., Waukegan 
623-7673 



Libertyville Auto City 
1000 E. Park Ave.. Liberiyville 
362-2683 

Rosen Mazda 

100 N, Green Boy Rd., Waukegan 

662-2400 



<Z£> Oldsmobile 

Gurnee Olds VW/Hyundoi 

Rt* *1 i Washington Su Gurrsw/Wouktgan 

249-1300 

Mitchell Buick-Oldsmobile & 

GMC Truck 

903 N front Street. McHenry 

(815)3857200 

Raymond Chevrolet/ 

Oldsmobile Inc. 

120 W Raole 173. Antioch 

3953600 

Weil Oldsmobile/Codilloc Inc. 

1050 S Milwaukee Ave . Libertyville 

3624100 

PONTIAC 



TEE 



Anthony Pontiac/GMC Truck/Buick 
VV Btivdtit Rd (Rt« I20|. Woukegon 
244- 1010 

Gary Lang Pontiac Cadillac 

& Subaru 

1107 S Route 31. McHenry 

(815)385-6000 

Patrick Pontioc GMC Truck Inc. 
1120 S Milwaukee Ave, Libertyville 
680-5000 
■ Country Pontioc/fluick 

U*L Kin-- Llr-al. A»«w* 

395-4400 



mm 



• The Saab Exchange 
2300 Skokie Volley Rd. (Rte. 41) 
Highland Park 
4329300 




SATUIN. 

Saturn of Libertyville 

1160 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 

362-6600 

Saturn of Woukegon 

500 S. Green Bay Rd., Woukegon 

360-5000 




• Gary Long Pontioc Cadillac Subaru 
lit! 5. Route 31, McHenry 
(815)385-6000 

• Liberty Subaru 

1000 £ Pork Ave., Libertyville 
362-2683 

$ SUZUKI 

14k jmitfK uhmMnAlHH'' 

• Liberty Auto City 

1000 E. Pork Ave.. (176) Libertyville 
3622683 

® TOYOTA 

• Classic Toyota 

425 S. Green Boy Rd , Waukegan 
336-4300 

• Pouly Toyota 

5417 NW Hwy. .Crystal Lake 
(815)459-7100 

Fahrvjugnugln . 

• Liberty Nissan Volkswogen/Kio 
921 S, Milwaukee Ave., Liberiyville 
680-8000 

• Gurnee VW Olds Hyundai 

Rii tl&VvoshinaionSt.GuinMAYouleiwn 
249-1300 

VOLVO 

• Fields Volvo 

1121 S. Milwaukee Ave,, Libertyville 
362-9200 



p * *» » te ii ' i« yi iffm i V **^^. 



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Section 



INTIOCH PUBLIC LtDi^WSTRIC- 










I 



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'It started 14 years ago as a hobby' 

Shining 
light 



Entrepreneurs 'part-time 
holiday business shines 



By LESUE PIOTROWSK1 
Staff Reporter 



It's impossible to miss: 
Grayslakes Hillside Restaurant 
on Route 03 has been trans- 
formed Into a bright holiday 
wonderland. A Tew miles west, 
l)i no's Den in Fox 
I j-.k.- and the Blue 
Hay Restaurant in 
Hound Lake Beach 
are aglow with 
Christmas decora- 
tions. 

Robert Oehme 
oflnglesideisthe 
man who draped 
134 strands of col- 
orful lights around the Hillside 
Restaurant. He has made a business 
out ftfdecoraling restaurants and 
homes during the holidays. 

"It stoned 14 years ago as a hob- 
by," said Oehme. "My regular busi- 
ness was slow and I started decorat- 
ing part-time. Now it Involves two 



'My regular business 
was slow andl started 

deconating part-time. 

Now it involves two 

employees and myself 

Robert Oehme 
HotUiay Lights owner 



employees and myself." 

Oehme runs Holiday Lights by 
Robert Oehme with hJs brother, 
Dale Oehme, and nephew Larry 
Undquist. He uses his own designs If 
his customers lack Ideas. 

"l.donl use any statues, every- 
thing Is my own design," Oehme 
said. "I do trees of 
lights that are S feel 
by 10 feet, with 
their own star top- 
pers." 

It usually lakes 
Oehme 17 hours to 
complete both the 
Interior and exteri- 
or of a restaurant. 
Homes take less 
time, approximately seven hours, 
si nee Oehme is usually hired to only 
do the outside of houses. 

He uses strands of lights to 




Ingleslde resident Robert Oehme, who Is also a carpenter, adjusts some of the Christmas lights he 
installed Inside the Las Vegas Restaurant in Antioch. Oehme has decorated businesses and homes 
throughout Lake County and part of McHenry County during November and December for 14 years. — 
Photo by Sandy Bressner 



outline doors, windows, patios, 
roofs and chimneys. More lights 
are used to cover bushes, shrubs 
and trees. 

"It took us four days to do the 
entryway of the Meadowwoods 
Subdivision In Gumee," Oehme 
said. "We used 174 strands of lights 
to outline trees, bushes and land- 
scaping stones." jfe-.->.t 

-The display at Meadowwoods is 
. U-.40 fe# tall and <8Q.fee jMjfeBjSt v . 



Oehme's major accomplishment re- 
mains the Hillside Restaurant. 

"My design won first place In 
the Chamber of Commerce light 
contest," Oehme said. 

Oehme's customers not only 
have the luxury of seeing their 
buildings tit up by hundreds of 
lights, they dont have to lift a finger 
to take anything down.. . ! 

"We remove everything the> ■ 
week after Newyears." said Oehme. 



Thus for, Oehme has decorat- 
ed seven restaurants and 14 
homes as far north as Antioch, as 
far south as Lake Cook Road, as far 
east as O'Plalne Road and as far 
west as McHenry. 

While he spends nearly all his 
time decorating during November 
and December, he runs his regular 
business, CJJJs Remodelingand 
Hoofing Company, the rest of the 
year. 



wto% 



YOUR 




OWN BOSS 

Franchises 
allow you 

to do 

successlul 

work m 

your own 

community 

PLEASE 

SEE 
PAGE C7 



A good government 
step or a bad choice? 

Reactions mixed on state senator's 
proposal to elect County chairman 



By JOHN ROSZKOWSKI 
City Editor 



- - - - 



fIGHt NIG'rW 

Boring in Lake County 
a growing success 

PLEASE SEE 
PAGE C4 



t\ [tt|i|Misa[ lii liavr tin- Like 
(.utility Hoard iliatriniin elected at 
l.irjjr is drawing praise in ttrmrijilni 
lers — and fire mini urhpft 

Stale Sen Tem l.mk 
ill-Vermin Hills) sun! his 
piupusal, mliiiw.H large 
election's tit ;tll comities 
Willi a population over 
MllMXll), is ii "good gm- 
entineiii sicp" designed 
III clisiiiiiiile hiiikiiiiiin 
(ioIiiiis 

Hut Djiuiuieiits til tile 
iiLt-.E'.nu- ,nv coiicemi'il it 
Will lipi'll II "lilll ill 
win ins" l.lut luillil.iclsi 
,ill\ lAi'ili'iiMiinm.'li'ii: 

..IiIIimIIU ,ih,h lllllll Mil 




■ : 'tL ':.,. 

Seo out spacml 

pull-out section 

for Christ mas 

PLEASE SEE 

INSIDE SECTION 



l!iA'.i-.i'i ! ' ■ '■ • 

ill lllTiis|--I-> -I :!■•!'. mill 

|»,.l I .' i ' ■ 

ill '. 

i-.lr.i-i i 

Mill':!,; ! 
I., I" 

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Foreman: 

Would run for 

elected counly 

hoard chairman 

position 



She said running acoutitywide cam- 
paign Mi) be very expensive, be- 
tween SSO.WH I and S I OO.fllW. ivhich is 
heytmil the means of the average 
person 

"li it costs tliiil much to go conn- 
lywido. It nuly gives a ilmncc in the 
jieiijile with lli.n knnl ill 
money." shewn! "li ntis 
the balance tu limit ii) 
anvoise who i.iii i.irr 
lliigesttiMMirtttoiirs ' 

l.liru-nlh. tile I lAr 
( jiimty IhMnli lliiiliii.il) i- 
t'fKiseiihviiioiiliiinnol.ii 
least [2 lllellllii'ts nil (In 
ll-incniiWl hn.ini lltl- 
jtiitlliiiii). she s.tnl lie'lji- 
rosiue |ic«iivU' Iiiiiii ilil 

ll-l fill |l.l!lsn! IlirilUltlll 
.Ill' [I'jllI'Mllll^l 'a|i!]|' 

ejunj: mi ,ni'Tiij:i- tniil 
.!!.• on mm' Iw.m) •rn-ni 
ti.-i i;'ii-.,|i|kiii,,i,.n loin 
: •. . n . ' 1 1 . n , 

■. t(.«IH-|'l'] .....I III. I NHWUf 



County will have 
more time to choose 
university center site 



Task force now 
has until February 

By JOHN ROSZKOWSKI 
City Editor 

A cuuniywidc itisk ftiree tmw lias 
until h'liriuirv Huli'tiile ujiiin lliesne 
Mil « new lliiiversiiv tinier nl I .ike 

i in 

I lie llliui us Hi i.jt, | >i| lllejtei I tin 
< .itinil has ilei ulisl tn |misIi h.ii k lis 
iiuii't.ilili' hn site seli-t in mi iiniil lii 
i el nl Tt In i;[M r lllc i oiliiH iiimm l 1 1] or 
!*■ fC'.teH JlfN^jflti In, .ll|,,|j-v 

■ i ,;!■. ■...- !--i lift, it 

i - ■ . •;.. .:,.'■ !..,.". 



sites oifcrs a lot of potential and I 
can't see paring them down any fur- 
ther at this point," he said. 

On Tuesday, presentations were 
made by representatives from each 
of the sites. The remaining sites under 
consideration include: 

■Tile College of Lake County ai 
tintyslakc. The college has presented 
plii ns lu locate the new university on 
,i 1 4 -acre parcel of land near the cam- 
pus Washington Street entrance. The 
t allege Board on Nov. 2-i passed a 
te-iiliilitiii in support i >f locating the 
uimetsm ut the tiraysliike site. 

■ iin- 1 mum liirm property lo- 

i.ii'.l ,it Untile jl .ii'il Uuicltesier 
■■■ tin I iln-iiMiI!,- 1 hf miriTl". owns 
, '• ,.-| •< . -, * ' L r'„t if ilic l,i 



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Rental 
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Laser Printer 

Monitor 
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Because you can own an iMac 

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Grand Opening 

Saturday, December 5th 

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Special guests: 

Jason Cornell 

from WXLC 102,3 FM 

II a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Stan Malinowski 

Renowned Photographer 
We Are Also Expecting 

Mike Hossak and John McFee 
of the Doobie Brothers 

Talk With Manufacturer Reps From: 

Apple Computer 

Newer Technologies 

Asante 

Umax Scanners 



Look For Special Pricing On Epson 740 Color Printers 



Drawings and door prizes 

• Drawing for an iMac 







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on the Odyssey 

• Drawing for Backstage Pass for 2 
to the Doobie Brothers Concert 



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December 4, 1998 



COUNTY 



Lakeland Newsp&p^rs CCppX /C3 



AT A GLANCE 



iiii- 



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.yjiiffi 



■ ; -va^ 



A DIGEST OF STORIES MAklNG-HEADLINES THROUGHOUT OUR REGION 

\\ Bra ■" - : 





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PM&L 'Sleuth' Audition Dec. 14 

Antloch— PM&L Theater is looking for two good men 
and technical crew members for their next production 
"Sleuth." '- 

The audition will be Monday, Dec. 14 at 7:30 p.m. at the 
theater, 877 Main Street in downtown Antioch. 

There are two roles for 2 men in the suspense drama writ- 
ten by Anthony Schaeffer.. . ;'„: 

The production also seeks people who wish to work on the 
technical crew. They are invited to the audition. 

Donna Badtke, of Genoa City, Wis., will direct the produc- 
tion. 

"Sleuth" will run for three weekends starting Friday, Feb- 
ruary 5. 

Further information is available by telephone at (414) 279- 
2204 or 395-3433. 

Rash fire injures worker 

Grayslake — A flash fire injured a mechanic on Nov. 27 at 
Nurthem Illinois Mack, a truck repair facility located at 22570 
west Highway 60 in Grayslake. 

Injured during the flare-up was a 38-year-old McHenry 
man, who was transported to Condell Medical Center. 

According to reports, the employee received first and sec- 
ond degree bums on his face from a flash-fire that occurred 
when a welding torch he was using came within close proxim- 
ity to a can of flammable liquid. 

Mundelein resident stabbed at bar 

Mundeleln — A Mundelein resident was stabbed while 
trying to break up a fight at Sandy & Gwen's Bar and Grill, 707 
Diamond Lake Road, on Nov. 22. 

Police Investigator Marc Hergott said between five and 10 
Hispanic males entered the bar with nunchuks and began an 
argument with a patron. The bartender stepped in the stop 
the altercation. The victim then stepped in, aftd got hit with 
the nunchuks and stabbed in the chest. He was transported to 
Condell MedicaJ Center and placed in the Intensive Care Unit. 

This incident is currentiy under investigation. 

Gurnee Mills adds 10 new stores 

Gurnee— According to Joe Szymaszck, General Manager 
of Gurnee Mills, the mall is adding 1 new stores, bringing it 
to full capacity. 

Among the stores being opened are the Ralph Lauren Polo 
Jeans Oudet, Casual Corner Woman, ToyCo., World of Sci- 
ence, and Whispers. Also opening will be Serpent Safari, >. 
• -: • vv^icija customers con sec a variety of reptiles rrom_aU,.'QVerthe,' 
world, including an Albino Alligator. 

Szymaszek "said traffic at the mall is up 16 percent this year. 

Coach sells 'Beyond Ripped' 

Antloch — A board member for Antioch Viking Football 
resigned his post in November following a surge of controver- 
sy after giving teen players he coached a drink that is used to 
enhance adrenaline in players during athletics. 

The drink, called "Beyond Ripped," is a sports-type drink 
which is sold in health clubs around America. The bottle is la- 
beled, "...recommended for use by people at least 18 years of 
age. 

According to reports, Tom Hosick. a volunteer coach for 
the Antioch Vikings who coaches children 12, I3and 14 years 
old in the lightweight "B" division, purchased the drink for his 
players from a store in the area. He then brought it to the field 
and sold it to the kids for $2 a bottle prior to a game in No- 
vember. 

Candidates seek office 

Undenhurst— Paul F. Baumunk will seek re-election as 
Mayor of Lindenhurst with the Community First Party in 
April, 1999. 

I le will join his re-election drive with incumbent candi- 
dates Village Clerk Marilyn Gregorin and Village Trustee Carl 
N'urlin. 

Two new trustee candidates also will be part of the Com- 
munity l-irst Party ticket. They are Kay Knapp and Ken 
( v.yzewicy.. 

Baumunk said the Community I'irst Party will have a posi- 
tive campaign to further the volunteer-based attitude of Un- 
denhurst. 

"It is a volunteer-based community, a positive communi- 
ty, h community with a vision for the future," Baumunk said. 




Lighting the way 

Larry Deatherage, an employee of Thomsen Electric 
Services In Grayslake, installs Christmas lights to vil- 
lage trees Nov. 27.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



"It will be a positive campaign." 

The Mayor said that when he ran eight years ago, he stated 
/that he did not know all the answers but that he would sur- 
round himself with the best people and work with them to 
make good decisions for the community. 

"I've been able to surround myself with some excellent vol- 
unteers and utilize their resources to help make decisions," he 
said. He believes that the Community First Party ticket repre- 
sents a continuing commitment to that goal. 

Woman illegally refills prescriptions 

Fox Lake—Patricia Ann Keenan, 35, of 212 Burden Lane in 
Twin Lakes Wis. was arrested by Grayslake Police on Nov. 25 at 
3:26 p.m. for unlawful dispensing of a controlled substance and 
furnishing false or fraudulent information. 

According to authorities from the Fox Lake Police and the 
Grayslake Police Department, Keenan, between the months of 
March 1998 and November 1998, unlawfully refilled prescrip- 
tions that had run out without proper authorization. Also, au- 
thorities added, that Keenan would refill the prescriptions, the 
place false information into the Walgreen's computer about 
the drugs being issued. 

Authorities also stated that Keenan refilled prescriptions on 
24 separate occasions while employed at Walgreen's in Fox 
Lake and on four separate occasions as a Walgreen's employee 
in Grayslake. 

Grayslake Police are citing Keenan for one count of unlaw- 
ful dispensing and for two counts of furnishing false infonna- 
tion. Fox Lake Police are charging Keenan with two counts of 
unlawful dispensing. 

Unlawful dispensing is considered a class A misdemeanor 
and punishable by one year in jail as well as a SI 000 fine for 
each individual count. 

League of Women Voters chapter folds 

Ubertyviile — The Libertyville-Mundelein Area (LMA) 
League of Women Voters has announced in will be disbanding 



due to a lack of leadership. . . ■ .,_.,■ ,- •.-,- 

The League will hold its final annual meeting in the spring 
of 1999, said Judy Berliant, a member of the LMA League. The 
Ubertyville-Mundelein Area League has was chartered in 
1968. • : " "■■ "■' ; ' ;!.••% ■■.''■:'"' :' 

Due to dwindling membership numbers; however the 
members of the LMA League met with representatives of the 
state League on Nov. 1 1 and voted to disband following the 
next annual meeting. 

The LMA League has been without a board of directors for 
more than two years and virtually without any governing 
body since July of this year. 

Berliant said the lack of leadership in the LMA League 
stems from time constraints on everyone involved. 

Kiwanis expands its horizons 

Fox Lake— A new service organization with a focus on 
helping children has formed In the village. The Kiwanis 
Club of Fox Lake was chartered Oct. 30 with 27 mem- 
bers, and since has held three meetings and added two 
members. 

The club was formed by its president, Dusty Slmonf, 
a Fox Lake resident since June, who has belonged to Ki- 
wanis for 1 1 years, most recently to the Woodstock Ki- 
wanisdub. "We are a community organization and our 
focus is young children," Simoni said, "and that is actu- 
ally our theme— Young Children Priority One." 

Suspended doctor charged 

Waukegan— An Antloch man who used to own his own 
medical practice in Wauconda and Waukegan has been in- 
dicted by the Lake County Grand Jury on two charges of prac- 
ticing medicine without a license, authorities said. 

John Bellucci, 58, who has had his medical license sus- 
pended since July 1997, is being accused of administering a 
Hepatitis B vaccine shot to an Infant who was brought to his 
daughter's Waukegan medical office in March, authorities 
said. 

He was arrested in October 1995, and charged with 27 
counts of felony delivery of a controlled substance. Bellucci 
pleaded guilty to four of the counts as part of a plea agree- 
ment in June 1996, and was sentenced to two years felony 
probation, four months work release and was ordered to do 
public service, Strickland said. 

Shoppers warned of thieves 

Wauconda — Police have issued a warning to be careful 
when shopping this holiday sftason, after having recentiy in- 
vestigated a number of complaints of stolen wallets and purs- 
es. 

Two more cases were reported last week, involving 
two Wauconda women who had their wallets stolen 
while shopping at lewel Food Store, 547 W. Liberty St., 
police said. Police are advising people to be on alert 
when others bump into them, request help, want to talk 
or drop things. "They may be intentionally distracting 
you on purpose," police said. 

Purses should be kept zipped or snapped close and 
held close to you, and should never be left in a shopping 
cart, police said. Wallets and other valuables should be 
kept in front pants pockets or in an interior coat pocket. 

CBCH receives grandparent grant 

Lake Villa— Central Baptist Children's Home has re- 
ceived a federal grant from the National Corporation for Na- 
tional Service to implement a Foster Grandparent Pro- 
gram in Lake County. 

The grant is $468,000 for a two-year period and will 
cover the cost of approximately 88% of the total expens- 
es needed to administer the program. It offers people 60 
years and older opportunities to serve as mentors, tutors 
and care givers for children and young people. 

Foster grandparents must meet certain income eligi- 
bility requirements and be at least 60 years old. In addi- 
tion, they must love children and be willing to devote 20 
hours of service a week. 

Foster grandparents participate in pre-service orien- 
tation and training workshops throughout their service. 
They receive a modest tax-free stipend, assistance with 
transportation, meals during their service, and an annu- 
al physical exam. 




Pick up any of Lakeland Newspapers 1 1 



in coming weeks for: 



ANGEL 
KEEPS GIVING 

Car dealer continues to aid 
family in need ' 



i 



\ J 




NEW 
LEADERSHIP 

County Board 
elects chairman 



HAPPY HANUKKAH 

Often overshadowed by Christmas, Hanukkah is celebrat- 
ed by thousands of Lake County residents 




<n»ntfffM 



■ *' ' - ■-■■..... •■vrT 




f^ffi88^ ; iV ; *jii'.^;^A»i..-.34..:>-r?-. s ''. , ui.-' :i W-:. :■>■ :-r. -z;?^^^^*^ ^-s^-j^v, 




• Sales 

• Service 

• Rental 

• Repair 

• Laser Printer 

• Monitor 
Repair 



Sales of Apple Macintosh & Mac. 

C1 ?.fe** CornfutBf - •*■ M "*"» fWWWO- *CP* ■*> <n" Apple logo sn njgfcienjd tTBdemanu and Wac a a irademai* of Ajjple Compute*. Int -93 monWy 
paymmtaofsasi based on ■ pohtipH tnul ot Si ,329 nnoithg ot manuSaaunjrt nggeled ratal pnee o( J1 J4S00 [rcitrckiOng al laiei, ih^^rifl ana IS tees) 
pis a one-ome orgnason tea at 6.0%. RrH psymsnl <rl to dug epproonately 120 days after loan asburwmenL The momwy uansWa rate equals Bie pnroe raja 
published in ThaVttd Street Aximsl on tta W bu»lneo o^ o( onch mofWi paji 3B0% rf^O A» ol Ntoworrtw 7. l998.maRaeis it.90% (B.00% pnmarajepkj) 
1WKJ- 1187% APR sjojw to monWif increase or ctocreasa Any cftangefa) to mo Rate ■» talis effect on aw fifth twines Oay ot each cafentfar moen and wii erteeJ the 
OOlar amount ol your monOiry payments. East) toon subied to Cf*df! approval. No oown payment reojucecL No prapaytwii penalty 




P\ 



Because you can own an iMac 

for less than $29.99 per month* 

and you get a coupon book 

with $2,000 in possible 

additional savings, for things 

like software, games and 

accessories. And the first 

payment is not due for 1 20 days. 




Stop by our 

Grand Opening 

Saturday, December 5th 

10 am. to 5 p.m. 

Special guests: 

Jason Cornell 

from WXLC 102.3 FM 

11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Stan Malinowski 

Renowned Photographer 
We Are Also Expecting 

Mike Hossak and John McFee 
of the Doobie Brothers 

Talk With Manufacturer Reps From: 

Apple Computer 

Newer Technologies 

Asante 

Umax Scanners 



Look For Special Pricing On Epson 740 Color Printers 



-""b :-_v..,.>. '.v. -.\.,, . • ■■ . :-.- 




— Drawings and door prizes — 

• Drawing for an iMac 

• Drawing for Dinner Cruise for 2 

on the Odyssey 

• Drawing for Backstage Pass for 2 
to the Doobie Brothers Concert 



We have Apple 

System Upgrade 

8.5 with Sherlock. 

Bring your 

PowerMac to its 

fullest ability. 



Business & Home Computing Solutions 

2232 Grand Avenue 

Lindenhurst, IL 60046 

(847)356-6666 

Fax: (847), 265-5670 
Web Site: http://inall.lnd.com/azd/ - 

Address: dtpmac2@liid!com '10M 

• Apple C^firfTechnidans/Sehablaespanoi:.': v >-* 5 




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December 4, 1998 



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'Y&JBOm'-.' ■ 
COUNTY 






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Lakeland Newspapers COUNTY /C3 



AT A GLANCE 



• • J '"-;' 



- 



A DIGEST OF STORIES MAklNGiHEADLINES THROUGHOUT OUR REGION 



■ 



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ix'V-., 



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PM&L 'Sleuth' Audition Dec. 14 

Antfoch— PM&L Theater is looking for two good men 
and technical crew members for their next production 
"Sleuth." ;. ■ " ^/-■j'.': •■.,:■ -^t:'-' \ 

The audition will be Monday, Dec 14 at 7:30 p.m. at the 
theater, 877 Main Street hi downtown Antioch. 

There are two roles fo"F2 men in the suspense drama writ- 
ten by Anthony Schaeffen.', ',:!■■' :-;. ' - 

The producUon also seeks people who wish to work on the 
technical crew. They are invited to the audition. 

Donna Badtke, of Genoa City, Wis., will direct the produc- 
tion. 

"Sleuth" will run for three weekends starting Friday, Feb- 
ruary 5, 

Further information is available by telephone at (414) 279- 
2204 or 395-3433. 

Rash fire injures worker 

Grayslake— A Dash fire injured a mechanic on Nov. 27 at 
Northern Illinois Mack, a truck repair facility located at 22570 
west Highway 60 In Grayslake. 

Injured during the flare-up was a 38-year-old McHenry 
man, who was transported to Condell Medical Center. 

According to reports, the employee received first and sec- 
ond degree bums on his face from a flash-fire that occurred 
when a welding torch he was using came within close proxim- 
ity to a can of flammable liquid. 

Mundelein resident stabbed at bar 

Mundelein— A Mundelein resident was stabbed while 
trying to break up a fight at Sandy & Gwen's Bar and Grill, 707 
Diamond Lake Road, on Nov. 22. 

Police Investigator Marc Hergott said between five and 10 
Hispanic males entered the bar with nunchuks and began an 
argument with a patron. The bartender stepped In the stop 
the altercation. The victim then stepped in, and got hit with 
the nunchuks and stabbed in the chest. He was transported to 
Condell Medical Center and placed in the Intensive Care Unit. 

This incident Is currently under investigation. 

Gumee Mills adds 10 new stores 

Gurnee — According to Joe Szymaszek, General Manager 
of Gumee Mills, the mall is adding 10 new stores, bringing it 
to full capacity. 

Among the stores being opened are the Ralph Lauren Polo 
Jeans Outlet, Casual Comer Woman, ToyCo., World of Sci- 
ence, and Whispers. Also opening will be Serpent Safari, •'■' 




Lighting the way 

Larry Deatherage, an employee of Thomsen Electric 
Services in Grayslake, Installs Christmas lights to vil- 
lage trees Nov. 27.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



"It will be a positive campaign." 
-• .-.- The Mayor said lha't when he ran eight years ago, he stated 
GSW Ij ^yft^ j^ g^ g gig gg^ ™!!JL of re P tUes ^B^^^^^^tri'a>he did not know all the arisyyers but that he would sur- 
round himself with the best people and work with them to 
make good decisions for the community. 

"I've been able to surround myself with some excellent vol- 
unteers and utilize their resources to help make decisions, " he 



" /world, including ; an Albino Alligator. 

-''•' -.'i-Szymaszek-said traffioat the mall Is up J 6 percehtthls year. 

Coach sells 'Beyond Ripped' 

Antioch— A board member for Antioch Viking Football 
resigned his post in November following a surge of controver- 
sy after giving teen players he coached a drink mat is used to 
enhance adrenaline in players during athletics. 

The drink, called "Beyond Ripped," is a sports-type drink 
which is sold in health clubs around America. The bottle is la- 
beled, "...recommended for use by people at least IB years of 
age." 

According to reports, Tom Hosick, a volunteer coach for 
(he Antioch Vikings who coaches children 12, 13 and 14 years 
old in the lightweight "B" division, purchased the drink for his 
players from a store in the area. He then brought it to the field 
and sold it to the kids for $2 a bottle prior to a game in No- 
vember. 

Candidates seek office 

Lindenliursl — Paul E. Baumunk will seek re-election as 
Mayor of Lindenhurst with the Community First Party in 
April, 1999. 

He will join his re-election drive with incumbent candi- 
dates Village Clerk Marilyn Gregorin and Village Trustee Car! 
Nurlin. 

Two new trustee candidates also will be part of the Com- 
munity First Party ticket. They are Kay Knapp and Ken 
Czyzewicz. 

Baumunk said the Community First Party will have a posi- 
tive campaign to further the volunteer-based attitude of lin- 
denhurst. 

"It is a volunteer-based community, a positive communi- 
ty, a community with a vision for the future," Baumunk said. 



said. He believes that the Community First Party ticket repre- 
sents a continuing commitment to that goal. 

Woman illegally refills prescriptions 

Fox Lake— Patricia Ann Keenan, 35, of 212 Burden Lane in 
Twin Lakes Wis. was arrested by Grayslake Police on Nov. 25 at 
3:26 p.m. for unlawful dispensing of a controlled substance and 
furnishing false or fraudulent information. 

According to authorities from the Fox Lake Police and the 
Grayslake Police Department, Keenan, between the months of 
March 1998 and November 1998, unlawfully refilled prescrip- 
tions that had run out without proper authorization. Also, au- 
thorities added, that Keenan would refill the prescriptions, the 
place false information into the Walgreen's computer about 
the drugs being issued. 

Authorities also stated that Keenan refilled prescriptions on 
24 separate occasions while employed at Walgreen's in Fox 
Lake and on four separate occasions as a Walgreen's employee 
in Grayslake. 

Grayslake Police are citing Keenan for one count of unlaw- 
ful dispensing and for two counts of furnishing false informa- 
tion. Fox Lake Police are charging Keenan with two counts of 
unlawful dispensing. 

Unlawful dispensing is considered a class A misdemeanor 
and punishable by one year in jail as well as a $1 000 fine Tor 
each individual count. 

League of Women Voters chapter folds 

UbertyvlIIe— The Libertyville-Mundelein Area (LMA) 
League of Women Voters has announced in will be disbanding 







Pick up any of Lakeland 




'& -'—■J.—:-' :■'*■ 



ers 1 1 editions in coming weeks for: 



ANGEL 
KEEPS GIVING 

" •:■: ■ , . ! 

Car dealer continues t6 aid 
family in need V, 





i7' 






*u 




• 


•iv ■ 

Mi 


* 




I 


.•.>.., 


11 -' 




•■ 




NEW 



*,?■ ','l^i 



County Board 
elects chairman 



HAPPY HANUKKAH 

Often overshadowed by Christmasi Hanukkah is celebrat- 
ed by thousands of Lake County residents 




due to a lack of leadership. 

The League will hold its final annual meeting in the spring 
of 1999, said Judy Beriiant, a member of the LMA League. The 

Libertyville-Mundelein Area League has was chartered In 

1968. - ; -. - ' ■'. ' "■:*■ 

Due to dwindling membership numbers however the 

members Of the LMA League met with representatives of the 

state League on Nov. 1 1 and voted to disband following the 

next annual meeting. 

The LMA League has been without a board of directors for 

more than two years and virtually without any governing 
body since July of this year. 

Beriiant said the lack of leadership in the LMA League 
stems from time constraints on everyone involved; 

Kiwanis expands its horizons 

Fox Lake— A new service organisation with a focus on 
helping children has formed in the village. The Kiwanis 
Club of Fox Lake was chartered Oct. 30 with 27 mem- 
bers, and since has held three meetings and added two 
members. 

The club was formed by its president, Dusty Simoni, 
a FoX Lake resident since June, who has belonged to Ki- 
wanis for 1 1 years, most recently to the Woodstock Ki- 
wanis Club. "We are a community organization and our 
focus is young children," Simoni said, "and that is actu- 
ally our theme— Young Children Priority One." 

Suspended doctor charged 

Waukegan— An Antioch man who used to own his own 

medical practice in Wauconda and Waukegan has been In- 
dicted by the Lake County Grand Jury on two charges of prac- 
ticing medicine without a license, authorities said. 

John Bellucci , 58, who has had his medical license sus- 
pended since luly 1997, Is being accused of administering a 
Hepatitis B vaccine shot to an infant who was brought to his 
daughter's Waukegan medical office in March, authorities 
said. 

He was arrested in October 1995, and charged with 27 
counts of felony delivery of a controlled substance. Bellucci 
pleaded guilty to four of the counts as part of a plea agree- 
ment in lune 1996, and was sentenced to two years felony 
probation, four months work release and was ordered to do 
public service, Strickland said. 

Shoppers warned of thieves 

I Wauconda —Police have issued a warning to be careful 
when shopping this holiday season, after having recendy in- 
vestigated a number of complaints of stolen wallets and purs- 
es. 

Two more cases were reported last week, involving 
two Wauconda women who had their wallets stolen 
while shopping at Jewel Food Store, 547 W. Liberty St., 
police said. Police are advising people to be on alert 
when others bump into them, request help, want to talk 
or drop things. "They may be intentionally distracting 
you on purpose," police said. 

Purses should be kept zipped or snapped close and 
held close to you, and should never be left in a shopping 
cart, police said. Wallets and other valuables should be 
kept in front pants pockets or in an interior coat pocket. 

CBCH receives grandparent grant 

Lake Villa— Central Baptist Children's Home has re- 
ceived a federal grant from the National Corporation for Na- 
tional Service to implement a Foster Grandparent Pro- 
gram in Lake County. 

The grant is $468,000 for a two-year period and will 
cover the cost of approximately 88% of the total expens- 
es needed to administer the program. It offers people 60 
years and older opportunities to serve as mentors, tutors 
and care givers for children and young people. 

Foster grandparents must meet certain income eligi- 
bility requirements and be at least 60 years old. In addi- 
tion, they must love children and be willing to devote 20 
hours of service a week. 

Foster grandparents participate in pre-service orien- 
tation and training workshops throughout their service. 
They receive a modest tax-free stipend, assistance with 
transportation, meals during their service, and an annu- 
al physical exam. 






■■ ■. 

-■ : _ - 

. . - ■ 



. 



■ 



Hfiggj . -..-■, ; . -•' " •'• . . ■ . 






• ■ | . 



C4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OPINIONS 



December^ 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers 

William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 



William M. Schroeder 

Pro»ldent/C.E.O. 



Neal Tucker 

Executive Editor/Composition Mgr. 




Rhonda Hetrick Burke 

Managing Editor 

30 South Whitney St., Grayslake, Illinois 60030 
Tel; (847) 223-8161. E-mail: edlt@lnd.com 



EDITORIALS 



», county 
need road repairs 

Gov.-F.lect George Hyan during tiis successful campaign 
had a lot to say. and rightly so. about improving educa- 
tion. No argument there. And the continuing debate 
over the feasibility of a third airport in Peolone came in 
for plenty of campaign oratory. I ; ar too much, in our opinion. 
But the incoming governor, and this is both surprising and 
disturbing, didn't have much to say about the deplorable condi- 
tion of Illinois roads and bridges. 

Our state has the dubious distinction of having some of the 
worst roads in the U.S. A civic and planning group in Chicago es- 
timates that Sl(» billion m basic repairs and renovation is needed 
in the next five years for roads and mass transit. A study found 
about S(i billion is available through federal sources: about S3. 3 is 
available from normal stale sources. 

The challenge lor Gov Hyan is finding the more than S6 billion 
additional. (Ian I lit* Education Governor also become the Road 
building Governor? A dual identity would seem to be in order. 
Lake Gotintv has mure than its share of the 2,600 miles and 
1. 100 bridges said to be badly in need of repair in Illinois. Wed 
like to suggest that I akc County's delegation to Springfield, more 
bipartisan and inexperienced than ever, do its part in formulat- 
ing a new approach lew planning and funding road building and 
bridge repairs. 

ffli'mv. Hyan and the General Assembly face up to road and 
bridge needs, there undoubtedly will be a major public debate 
ovei raising vehicle registration fees, increasing the state gasoline 
tax and ending the practice of diverting user fees to cover a por- 
tion of expenses in the secretary of state's office. Analysts say 
these ilmv xiurces could produce S4H 1 million a year, not a bad 
suui inu.mi that S(i billion or so shortfall fin the period 1999 io 
J001 

lUuul lunding debate could well overshadow school funding in 
(lie i Dining months. 

II u sounds like ibis newspapei is coming out four square for 
an era of road and bridge building, you've got it. 1 low does this 
square with our continued opposition to a four cent per gallon 
Lake County gasoline lax? We'll stand opposed to the county 
gasoline tax until convinced that the money raised will be spent 
wisely. In recent years, county highway spending has been more 
dictated by political favoritism than need. 

Voters did a good job of overhauling the Lake County Board in 
the fall election. The new look undoubtedly will play out with 
new leadership. New occupants of the county power chairs and 
our Springfield representatives will have an opportunity to formu- 
late constructive policies how local highway monies can he uti- 
lized. 

We can't wail to hear what they have to say about future high- 
way spending in Lake County. 



Newcomers revile 
hometown changes 

There is an innate peculiarity of human nature that drives 
newcomers or recent arrivals to lock their new found 
hometown in some kind of Time Warp or deep freeze the 
status quo. 
Consider the kinship between the neighbors of O'Hare Inter- 
national working feverishly to ward off airport expansion and a 
group of Gurnee residents opposed to Six Flags Great America ex- 
pansion to include a water theme park, full-service resort and 
conference center, and housing for seasonal employees. 

Planners disparage the opposition to change as "drawbridge 
mentality." Politicians tend to shrug off the fervor employed by 
newer residents to maintain the status quo. O'Hare wouldn't be 
the international crossroads for air travel that it is and Gurnee still 
would be a bedroom community if the "I've got my castle and the 
heck with everyone else" attitude were permitted to prevail. 

Gurnee residents opposed to Great America expansion have 
organized Citizens United for a Residential Village (CURV) to 
enunciate their belief that the project on 134 acres adjacent to the 
Tri-StateTollway will increase traffic, lower property values and 
hurt the quality of life. 

That argument has been sounded before in Gurnee and still 
newcomers are attracted. Why do they come? Kind of makes 
you wonder, doesn't It? 




VIEWPOINT 



Fight night a hit; 
a downtown spark 



Prizefighting is a rapidly 
growing spectator sport in 
Uke County. The boom in 
the "Manly Art" is taking 
place in a former movie theater on 
Genesee St. in creaky downtown 
Waukegan. 

A night at the fights at the Fies- 
ta Palace, in an earlier life the 
Academy Theater and one of four 
Waukegan movie houses, is really a 
guy's thing. Lots of stogies, pitch- 
ers of beer, male bonding, renewals 
of old friendships — all this a back- 
drop to fledgling pugilists more en- 
thusiastic than talented out to 
make a name for themselves and 
make a few bucks. 

Drawn by a card featuring two 
locals, Jose Hernandez of Round 
Lake Beach, a crew-cut 130 pound 
youth with flying fists, and heavy- 
weight Dan Halvorson of Mcilenry, 
the Palace was packed for an eight 
fight card on a Friday night when a 
biting wind sweeping off Lake 
Michigan testified that the season 
was deep into November. 

Businessman Larry Christian, 
better known for a siring of soft ice 
cream shops, put together the 
whole show that included a luxe- 
doed ring announcer, blaring mu- 
sic, a couple of high-heeled card 
girls, a well-stocked cigar bar and 
three stations dispensing beer 
products supplied by one of the 
evening's sponsors. 

Hernandez and Halvorson 
brought their own cheering sec- 
lions, including Dan's parents from 
Wauconda. Jose's fans were disap- 
pointed that their favorite got out- 
pointed by a Milwaukee slugger 
with a jaw of stone. But Dan made 
his boxing debut a success with a 
third round knock out. They don't 
call him "The Terminator" for 
nothing! Out of town talent was 
"imported" from places like Indi- 
anapolis, Milwaukee and St. Louis. 
Chicago, too! 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



Fans arrived early, mainly to 
banter with friends. The atmos- 
phere was like a class reunion or 
company picnic. One couple even 
had a three-month old baby in tow. 
"Geeze," growled a hard-scrapple 
retiree wearing a logo cap. "You'd 
think (hey would want a babysit- 
ter." A scholarly type remarked to 
your reporter. "What a marvelous 
mix of humanity. A demographer's 
delight. So eclectic," I think he 
meant there were fans surrounding 
the ring from all walk's of life. 

A group of Waukegan leaders is 
reviewing plans from nationally 
known experts to revitalize down- 
town. None of the heavy thinkers 
has mentioned Friday night fights. 
Maybe because it's so obvious. 
And a success already. 

O'Hare traffic plan 

Curbside loitering for passen- 
ger pick-ups is a thing of the past at 
O'Hare International arrival termi- 
nals — at least for the holidays. In 
something called by Chicago police 
the Heavy Traffic Plan, officers are 
stationed every 80 to 100 feet to 
prevent "dwelling" motorists from 
waiting for passengers to arrive 
curbside, 

I tried to "hide out" on a turn- 
ing lane of the turn around, but a 
patrol car with a flashing spotlight 



and a claxon horn spiked the plan. 
Passenger pick-up is allowed, but 
the travelers have to do the waiting 
at (he curb, not their drivers. 

Do you suppose that creating 
customers for the S3 fast park for 
passenger pick-ups has more to do 
with the Heavy Traffic Plan than 
heavy traffic? 

Called to Mesa 

Some interesting possibilities 
are arising for the Chicago Cubs 
over the call to Mesa next spring of 
Grayslake's Scott Stahoviak as a 
non -roster player. 

Playing both third and first 
base besides DH'ing, Stahoviak, 29, 
apparently fell out of favor with 
brass at the Minnesota Twins 
where he was a regular as recently 
as two years ago. An injury didn't 
help. They cut him after a 1998 
season in Triple A. As a journey- 
man with multiple skills and a 
well-honed professional attitude, 
Scott at this stage of his career has 
the makings of an ideal utility man 
and pinch-hitter for the Cubbies. 
He'll fit their salary cap and pro- 
vide some left-handed punch off 
the bench in late innings. Could 
Stahoviak become a home run 
threat with that friendly right field 
at Wrigley? Notch up that doubles 
stroke, Scotty, and we'll all come 
and see. 

Mavericks no more 

When is a majority not a ma- 
jority? When viewed through the 
eyes of a reporter for a Chicago 
daily, according to members of the 
coalition of independent Republi- 
cans and newly elected Democrats 
who have the votes to elect a new 
Lake County Board chairman and 
shift policy away from rampant 
growth. They are chuckling over 
the big paper's referral to them as 
"mavericks" 1 1 times in a post elec- 
tion article. 



Guest commentaries welcome 

Lakeland Newspapers welcomes guest columns by our readers on topics of general interest. 
Anyone interested in writing a column can contact Publisher W.H. Schroeder at (847) 223-81 61 . 
Submissions may be mailed c/o Lakeland Newspapers, RO. Box 268, Grayslake !L 60030 or 
fax to (847) 223-8810. Deadline is Friday at noon. 



& 






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December 4, 1998 



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OPINIONS 






Lakeland Newspapers/ C5 



•vJir* : jV' a : 



PARTY LINES 



. - ■ 



PARTY LINES, THE LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS' COLUMN OF POLITICAL OPINION, 

IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS. \ :i i 3 



Lead 




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It may take a coin toss to deter- 
mine who will head the Lake 
County Legislative delegation 
in the next session of the Gen* 
era! Assembly. 

Both State Rep. Andrea Moore 
( R- Libertyville) and State Rep. Lau- 
ren Beth Gasb (D-Highland Park) 
have equal seniority. Each won a 
fourth term Nov. 3. 

The leadership question arose 
with veteran State Rep. Bob 
Churchill (R-Lake Villa) bowing out 
Dec. 3 1 . Through seniority and ties 
to Republican leadership, Churchill 
was the unquestioned leader of the 
Lake County delegation for a 
decade. 

"We've been spoiled by Bob's 
leadership experience and close- 
ness to Lee Daniels (minority 
leader), remarked Moore, who 
complimented Gash as an "asset to 
our county." 

Traditionally, the representatives 
put partisanship aside when issues 
of importance to the entire county 
are on the table. Moore described 
delegation, relationships as "helping 
each other." 

Of course, when the chips are 
down, everyone acknowledges that 
the say so falls to Lake County, grand 
dame of politics, State Sen. Ade- 
line Geo-Karls (R-Zion). 

'Cap' for Jack 

•-^Hohdra fctUI tra coming the way 
of former County Treasurer Jack 
"Red" Anderson, who is heading 
Into retirement after 40 years of 
public service, 30 in elective office, 
A reception Sunday, Dec. 13 at 
Parkway Restaurant, Waukegan, will 
be the capper. Guests are being 
asked to bring a toy for the Toys for 
Tots drive. Red will be on hand from 
3 to 6 p.m. to gather the toys and 
thank friends. 

McGee at podium 

Incoming Illinois schools chief, 
Dr. Max McGee, former Deerfieid 
elementary superintendent, will be 




Moore; 'County's 
senior Republican 
in state house 




Gash; Bern may also 
share leadership role 




Mule: 'Accuses 
fellow trustee of 
grandstanding 

returning to Lake County to make 
his first public address after swear- 
ing in ceremonies. McGee will be 
guest speaker at the quarterly 



breakfast club gathering sponsored 
by State Rep, Andrea Moore (R- 

LibertyviHe). Club members will 
convene at 7:30 p.m., Friday, fan. 8 
at Condell Medical Center, Liber- 
tyville. 

Conflict of interest 

College of Lake County President 
Gretchen Nash Is among the panel 
that will recommend a site for a four 
year university in Lake County, Al- 
though the panel, won't make the fi- 
nal decision, some might consider 
Gash's placement on the panel a 
conflict of interest. Her employer, 
the College of Lake County, is one of 
the top sites under consideration for 
the campus. 

Pre-election fireworks 

Grayslake Village Trustee Peter 
Mule 1 is charging fellow trustee 
Cheryl Doros with grandstanding 
in preparation for the spring elec- 
tion following a controversy over a 
resident's fence. Mule called Doros" 
reaction and criticism of the village 
staff, "a knee jerk reaction to "pile 
on" village employees. 

The matter has been referred to 
the village's attorney. 

Doros says she was only seeking 
information on how the matter was 
handled by village employees. 

A heayenly smile 

ilUhoiVbepMrment of Natural 
Resources Director Brent Man- 
ning was at the Antioch Lions Wild 
Game Dinner Wednesday, Nov. 18 to 
announce a major state grant and to 
visit with old friends. 

"Bill Brook was a personal 
friend of mine," said Manning. 

He said that Brook had done a 
lot for the natural resources of the 
area and mentioned Red Wing 
Slough as well as the many organi- 
zations Brook helped to create" and 
build. 

Manning said that he hoped that 
BUI Brook could hear all of it that 
night. 



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rn>;jzm : ~_ : 



t's been breezy and balmy in 
Lakeland, our little pocket of 
paradise, but elsewhere around 
the globe violent weather has 
cost the world a record $89 billion 
this year, ecologists say. 

Hurricanes, storms, floods, 
drought and fires have wreaked dis- 
aster and destruction, and killed 
32,000 people. 

But here, except for windstorms 
that felled trees and temporarily left 
many of us without heat, water, 
power and telephones, we have 
been bathed in Pacific air. Late-No- 
vember temperatures sashayed se- 
ductively in the 60s. 

Ah, but we know well how sud- 
denly the weather can go from 
dreamy to dreary. Winter (nature's 
way of saying bleep-bleep) is en 
route Will this one be as mild as last 
year's, or will we suffer some of 
those nasty stretches of way-below- 
zero days that knock dear old 
ComEdforaloop? 

As Longfellow wrote in The Song 
of Hiawatha, "Oh the long and drea- 
ry winter! Oh the cold and cruel win- 
ter!" 

Weather being so fickle, fore- 
casters hesitate to peer too far into 
the future but folklore attempts to 
offer us a longer look For example; 
"If ant hills are high in iuly, win- 
ter will be snowy." 

"Squirrels gathering nuts in a 
flurry, will cause snow to gather in a 
hurry." 

"A warm October, a cold Febru- 
ary." 

"Flowers bloomin' in late au- 
tumn, a sure sign of a bad winter 
comin'" ■ % ■■ '■;-- '■■• •'■■ "'■■'•■' 

"Onion skins very thlri, mild 
winter coming in. Onion skins thick 
and tough, coming winter cold and 
rough." 

"A tough winter is ahead if birds 
migrate early, squirrels' tails are very 
bushy, and woodpeckers and bees 
build their nests high in the trees." 
"The wider the brown band on a 




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PFARR 
CORNER 

JerryPfarr 



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woolly bear caterpillar, the milder 
the winter." 

Meanwhile, speaking of snow 
jobs, we have received a letter from 
John Soeth, the president of those 
rascally rogues known as the 
Burlington (Wis.) Liars Club. 

John reminds us there is only a 
week and a half remaining before en- 
tries close in the club's annual con- 
test to select the Worid Champion 
Liar for 1998. The contest was bom 
69 years ago, in 1929, and the winner 
always is announced on Dec. 3 1. 

Lies should be sent, along with a 
$1 entry fee, to the Liars Club, 179 
Beth Court, Burlington, Wis., 53105. 

It's an amateur contest, John 
Soeth points out Politicians are 
considered professional liars (espe- 
cially our president) and thus are in- 
eligible 

Championship lies from past 
years often were about the weather. 
For example: 

"We had such a terrible wind- 
storm, the velocity of the wind had 
telephone lines stretched out so far 
that when I phoned my neighbor 
across the road I was charged $17.60 
for a long-distance call." 

"The floods were so bad last 
spring the turtles climbed out of 
their shells and Used them for 
boats." 

"It was so hot you could take a 
hamburger patty out of the freezer, 
toss it into the air and when it came 
down it was cooked well-done." 

"It was so cold last winter, I saw 
a politician standing on a street cor- 
ner with his hands in his own pock- 
ets." 



Letters welcome 



~i 



Letters to the editor are welcome. They should be on topics of general 

interest, approximately 250 words or less. All letters must be signed, 

and contain a home address and telephone number. The editor reserves 

the right to condense all letters. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 




g a step backward 




r. Martin Luther King, 
Jr., I believe, never 
would have imagined 
that the commemora- 
tion of his birthday would be des- 
ignated a national day of obser- 
vance. His mission — which ulti- 
mately gained the respect he was 
rarely afforded in life — became 
the legacy by which we remember 
this great leader for Civil Rights. 
The late 1960s clearly were differ- 
ent times, and the man we one 
day would honor for his courage 
and vision had predicted that the 
"may not make it to the mountain" 
with the people that stood with 
him. He didn't think he would live, 
let alone be the remembered in 
the future for remaining true to 
his convictions. Sadly, he was 
proved correct on his first point 
but thankfully not his second. 

More than three decades since 
his passing, I never would have 
imagined that the commemora- 
tion of Dr. Martin Luther King's 
birthday would be disregarded by 
the Mundelein Village Board. The 
late 1990s clearly are different 
times, which is precisely the rea- 



son to meet our responsibility of 
acknowledging and properly honor- 
ing all that Dr. King accomplished on 
behalf of all Americans. 

On me evening of Nov. 23, the 
Mundelein Village Board had the op- 
portunity to pass a resolution calling 
for a paid holiday for the village staff 
on Dr. King's birthday and to not hold 
village meetings on that evening. Al- 
though Ray Semple and I voted in fa- 
vor of Uiis reasonable and appropri- 
ate resolution, it was defeated due to 
the four "no" votes by the remainder 
of the Board. 

Our nation began celebrating Dr. 
Martin Luther King's birthday during 
the 1980s— under the leadership of 
President Ronald Reagan. The Village 
of Mundelein continues to progress 
in many meaningful areas. But in re- 
gards to paying homage to the mem- 
ory of a champion of human as well 
as Civil Rights, on Nov. 23, 
Mundelein— in my view— took a gi- 
ant leap backwards. Is this the lesson 
we want our children to learn? I think 



not. 



Steven M. Powell 

Village Trustee 

Mundelein 



Assisted Living 
Bill needed 

As seniors share Thanksgiving 
with family and friends, the most 
common reason offered for 
thanks is their continued inde- 
pendence. Often times seniors are 
forced into traditional nursing 
homes before they need nursing 
care, because they fear living 
alone, they need a little help with 
personal care tasks, or simply 
someone to check on them. For 
these seniors, there is hope — a 
new type congregate housing 
called Assisted Living. 

Sadly, Illinois has not made 
assisted living a priority. Because 
Illinois has failed to pass legisla- 
tion regulating assisted living fa- 
cilities, a crisis has occurred. Se- 
niors have no idea what product 
is being sold when they see "as- 
sisted living" advertised. Some 
operators are finding loopholes 
that enable them to run facilities 
outside of any regulation or over- 
sight. In addition, the develop- 
ment of assisted living programs 
in Illinois lag behind other states, 



absent a licensure code to stimu- 
late the industry. 

The Illinois Legislature has an 
opportunity to change this by 
calling SB 743, the Assisted Living 
and Shared Housing Establish- 
ment Act, this fall. Passage of this 
bill will provide licensing and 
common sense regulation of as- 
sisted living establishments. It 
will provide a guarantee to the 
consumer of the basic package of 
services they can expect. It will 
bring oversight to facilities that 
are currently operating without 
any regulation. 

Call your state representative 
and ask them to provide more se- 
niors with the opportunity to re- 
main independent longer by call- 
ing SB 743 for a vole. 

Rosella McCarthy 

President of Lake Villa AARP 
Township Chapter 3978 

CBS promotes snuff film 

Imagine my surprise to watch 
me CBS sponsored program "Sixty 
Minutes" show Jack Kavorkian, medi- 
cine's serial killer, in a snuff film. To 



define a "snuff film" to gentler read- 
ers, it is a film that shows one person 
actually killing another. Distribution 
of snuff films or tapes is illegal in 
many jurisdictions. In this film seg- 
ment, Jack Kavorkian is shown actu- 
ally injecting Thomas Youk, age 52, 
who was in the last stages of Lou 
Gehrig's disease, with a fatal dose of 
potassium chloride. 

This trial balloon will only in- 
crease the debate over euthanasia. 
Although the media refuses to print 
any information on the partial-birth 
abortion technique or on the devel- 
opment of the unborn child under 
guise of "sensitivity" of their viewers, 
they readily showed this film of an 
actual murder. The fact that a net- 
work can make money by this de- 
grading event tells us that the media 
only covers those events that they 
want legalized. The real crime is that 
tiiis patient's life was snuffed out 
rather titan receiving loving palliative 
care in his greatest time of need. 

Shame on CBS and the people 
who stood quietly by and have hot let 
their voice be heard. 

Bonnie Qulrke 
Libertyville 






' 



C 6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



December^, 1998 



Funding could be obstacle to 
proposed University Center 



FROMPAGFCl 



........... 



.-■'■-■ 



ByJOHNROSZKOWSKJ 
City Editor 



A proposed University Center of 
Lake County may have one more 
major hurdle to overcome — how to 
pay for the project 

Members of the county task 
force assigned to choose a site for the 
university center were informed that 
the county may not currently have 
the legal authority to help finance die 
proposed center. 

1 jike County Assistant State's At- 
torney Mitch Hoffman told the Uni- 
versity Center Task Force at a meet- 
ing on Tuesday that the county may 
lack the statutory authority at this 
point to use county funds for con- 
struction of a stale university facility. 



To obtain such authority may require 
a statutory change from the Illinois 
Genera] Assembly, he said. 

The issue, according to board 
chairman Robert Grever, is that high- 
er education is not one of the desig- 
nated functions of county govern- 
ment, and therefore, there may have 
to be a modification in state law to al - 
low the county to participate in the 
cost sharing for die project. 

"We would have to have some 
legislation to give us thai authority. 
They (the General Assembly) would 
have to give us some enabling legis- 
lation to allow us lo participate," he 
said. 

I lowever. Grever said he has met 
with area state legislators about the 
matter and is optimistic the matter 



will be resolved to the county's satis- 
fication. 

"At this point in time, I don't see 
any major opposition to allow us to 
bring this forward," he said. 

The total cost of building die pro- 
posed university center is estimated at 
between $19 to $23 million, which 
would be split between the state and 
the county. The county's portion 
could be satisfied by a combination of 
local funds, orpublicorprivate dona- 
tions of land and money. 

The county board met on Thurs- 
day and the proposed university 
center project was one of the topics 
of discussion. He said he expects the 
board will consider a variety of fi- 
nancing options for funding the pro - 
posed facility. 



BAD CHOICE: 

can choose its fate 







COLLEGE OF LAKE COUNTY DIGEST 



CLC Jazz ensembles 
presents concert 

An exciting evening of big band 
music will be presented by ilir Cu\ 
lege of hake County's Monday and 
Tuesday Night Jazz ensemble*. Tjie 
concert, directed hy jazz hand dim - 
[fir Urine* Mack, will he held al 7:'30 
p.m., Dec. KJ in the Mainst;ige The- 
atre of the Performing Arts Huiliiing. 
Admission is free. Tor information, 
rail 543 -2300. 



Gospel Choir 

presents Holiday 
concert 

The Colli/p' of lake County's 
Gospel Choir will preseni its annual 
holiday concert at 7 p.m.. Dec. 5 in 
the Waukegan High School auditori- 



um. The program will feature perfor- 
mances by the CLC- Gospel Choir, di- 
rected hy Mark Cosey of Waukegan; 
Rev. C.I.. Fairchild's "Voices ofGrea i 
I aiih" from Waukegan; and "I ligher 
{.ailing," a gospel choir group from 
Mobile. Ala, Admission is free. For in- 
formation, call |ol laan Cotton at 543- 
2112. 



Prairie spirits 

presents winter 
dance concert 

The College of Lake County's 
Prairie Spirits Dance Theatre will 
present its winter dance concert ti- 
tled "Heaven and Earth" at 7:30 p.m. 
on Dei . II and 12 niui ^:H() p.rn on 
Dec. I'i in (he Studio Theatre of the 
Performing Aits liuikling on the 
Grayslake Campus. 



"Heaven and liarth" is a dance 
drama that combines visual, literary 
and musical images of heaven and 
earth designed by great artists. Kach 
work is inspired by an artistic arti- 
fact—poem, play, song, architec- 
ture, painting, myth, etc., represent- 
ing some aspect of heaven or earth. 
Tickets are $5 general admis- 
sion and S'l for CI.C students, alum- 
ni and senior citizens age 65 and 
over. The program is free for chil- 
dren underage 10. 

Prairie Spirits is a community 
dance group founded by Leslie 
I lopktns, a CLC philosophy instruc- 
tor. The multicultural group con- 
sists of students, adults and children 
ranging in age from 8 to 50 years. 

lor tickets, call the box office at 
593-2300. Visa, MasterCard, Discov- 
er and American Lxpress are ac- 
cepted. 



I 



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POWERS AUCTION SERVICE 



ESTATE SALE OF DANIEL G. BURNS 

DATE: Saturday, December 12. 1996 

TIME: 1000 A.M. • REAL ESTATE TO SELL AT 1200 NOON 

OPEH HOUSE DATES: Docomber 5th & 6th Irom 10.00 A.M. lo 4 00 P.M. 

LOCATION: 28712 Lemon Rd., Mundclcin. IL hom 176 & 60/B3 Easl lo Lemon FW North 

3rd house on loft. Watch lor auction signs 

REASON: To seiHe eslele ot Daniel G. Burns 

REAL ESTATE: 4 bedroom brick ranch, 2 balh, kitchen, nowly remodeled, living room 

lull basement, 2 car attached garage 956 sq It., oak floors, brick paiio. hot waicr heat 
1350 sq. fl. 

Machine shod 36 x 63. V» insulated, hoisl lor hiring engines. wo<k benches, shelving, 
2 - 12' overhead doors, wood stove heat, 2 1 acres 

Renal property, 2 bedroom. 1 bath, living room, kitchen, brick patio. 740 sq. It 
TERMS. 10% down day of saJe. All linancing should bo arranged prior lo bidding. Balance 
due at closing. 

INFORMATION: B15-45S-T496 or 608-943-6 T26 atior 6:00 P.M. Please clip & save this ad. 
HOUSEHOLD: 2 - hand made quilts; 3 - alghans, AUI big screen TV; JVC VCR; Match- 
ing love seal & sola sleeper, Coffee table; End tables; Wooden kitchen table w/5 chairs, 
Queen bedroom set; Highboy drosser; 2 - night elands; Dresser w/mlrrw; Queen postorbod! 
Highboy dresser. Dresser w/mlrror, Assorted lamps. Hideaway bed. Computer desk, 4 
drawer wooden Mb cabinet; Desk; Misc. oMce equipment, Whfrlpoot washing machine, 
Amana heavy duty dryer, Utility sink w/stand; Celling tans; Humidifier; Hamilton mixer; 
Single hospital bod; Ollice chair; Campcooksct, Intercom, 2 window air conditioner; 13" 
TV; Troo lights; Sllverton Coronet; 15" color TV; 1957 Groliers Encyclopedia sot. Na- 
lional Geographies '72; Naval history books; Time Llle books (Seafarers); Suitcases. 
Wooden door In frame. 30" x78" Interior. White metal lawn fumliuro; Hoi Point heavy 
duty dryer w/aulo dry control, Whirlpool 4 cycle washer; Folding chairs; GoK clubs; 4 
drawer tile cabinet. 

TRUCKS A TRAILER: 1982 Ford 429 4V 800 flatbed, sides, stack rack; 1984 Ford 
F700flalbed. sides, stack reck, 1985 Ford F150 pickup; 198S Suburban Chevy; Trl axlo 
trailer w/ramps, ptnnlo hook; Dodge 300 Power Wagon dump truck, slat board 16 pieces. 
1954 Oldsmoblla (runs); 1976 Chovy 1 ton (now paint); 196B Chevy pickup (no rust); Trl 
axle 20' trailer, 1976 travel trailer. 

EQUIPMENT; I.H. 3082 backhoe attachment; Grapple arm; Scars riding lawn mower, 
Toro push mower; 6' pulverizer cultivator; MF. 40 tractor w/loador; Soil preparer 3 pi., 
4' snowblowor attach,. Snow plow. 

CONSIGNED BY NEIGHBOR: Hopper box; Wllimar load runner. 8 tender, 8 Ion 
w/tldeboard, 8" side auger, 2 parts, cable operated (or 2</i ton truck all attachments. 
TOOLS A MISC.: 2 • fuel barrels, Hand powered loots. Ryorson stool edging; Bricks; 
Landscapo rakes; Shovels; Forks; Picks; Wheelbarrows; Comant mlxor; Hand PHD; Tree 
dolly, Robin EY15 compactor; Whet saw; Stlhi TS 350 Super cement saw; 100 Champ 
heater: Nlpco heater, Aluminum canoo; Scaffold sections; Gas grills; Florescent light fix- 
tures; Stainless steel sink; Fertilizer spreaders; Landscape screen; 4 - gas powered motors; 
Formica aheetlng; MIG 2 welder; Hnrnlschfegor wolder; Trailer hitch; Electrical panel. 
Plexiglass; Plywood; Tarps; Gas containers; Doors; Battery charger; Coleman tanlern, 
Coleman camp sieves; CB radio; Wire; Boxes; Conduit benders; Conduit; Recessed light. 
Copper tubing; Clamps; Pipe wrenches; Chain saws; Ladders; Sleet benches; Shop vac; 
Saw horses; Air compressor, Wayne Model 6 158 SHO; Lincoln electric welder AC-225-S; 
2 - Craftsman radial sows; 3200 BTU torpedo hoator; Gang box; Mushroom healer; In- 
gorsol A/C; Parts washer; Caso Jumpln jack; Dryer; Underground ductwork. 
SNOWMOBILES: Arctic Cat; Ecilgre 440-7 tor parts; 2RS80 Arctic Cat; Sled; Misc. parts. 



TERMS: CASH OR GOOD CHECK. ALL ITEMS TO BE SETTLED FOR DAY OF 
SALE. MUST HAVE DRIVER'S LICENSE TO REGISTER FOR BIDDER NUMBER 



! -"'■ 



SALE MANAGED BY: Powers Auction Service, Crystal Lake, IL • 815-455-1496. Mike 
Powers, Crystal Lake, IL- 61 6-455-1 496 or Dan Powers. South Wayne, Wl - 60B-439-3760. 



POWERS 



[AUCTION SERVICE] 



the county Is going to take." 

The current system for selecting 
county board chairman encourages 
potential candidates to trade com- 
mittee chairmanships or "pet pro- 
jects" for individual members' votes, 
Link said. He said whoever can get 12 
votes has control of the board. 

He said his plan would allow the 
public to decide what direction the 
county will take. 

"You'd have more stability and 
more direction going to this form of 
government," he said. 

The legislation, which Link plans 
to introduce to the General Assembly 
in January, would apply to all coun- 
ties with populations over 500,000 in 
Illinois. He said Lake County Is the 
only county that size that doesn't 
currently elect its board chairman at 
large. 

Even though the proposal Is only 
in the discussion stage at this point, 
one potential candidate has already 
expressed an interested in vying for 
the chairmanship if it was elected at 
large. 

Fred Foreman, former U.S. At- 
torney and Lake County State's At- 
torney, said he would be Interested 
in running for county board chair- 
man if it becomes an elected posi- 
tion. 

"1 was asked whether I would run 
and 1 said I would take a serious look 
at It," he said. 

Foreman supported an unsuc- 
cessful attempt to change the coun- 
ty lo an elected county executive 
form of government about 10 years 
ago. The plan was soundly defeated 
by Lake County voters, but he thinks 
much has changed since then. 

"The benefit of having a county 
board chairman elected at large is 
you would have someone that would 
be accountable to all areas of the 
county, rather than the particular 
area their elected from," he said. 

Foreman said he does not be- 
lieve the argument that having an at- 
large election allows only the wealthy 
to run for office. He said several 
countywide officeholders currently 
run at large such as the sheriff, state's 



attorney, circuit clerk and countv 
clerk. ' 

Some concerns have been 
raised, however,, oyer whether an 
election at large might actually take 
away voter choices' on issues like 
spending and taxes, 

Board Chairman Bob Grever said 
there b some concern that electinga 
chairman at large could open the 
door for Lake County to become a 
"home rule county," Currently, the 
county U not home rule. 

'The ability of taxing bodies to 
approve more taxes and fees Is what 
some people seem-fearful of," he 
said. 

"I don't know If there is a lot of 
support for us becoming a home rule 
county," he added. 

Grever said he has requested the 
State's Atomey's office to review with 
the Illinois Attorney General's Office 
to determine if such a plan might af- 
fect home rule status. 

State's Attorney Michael Waller 
said the research he has done so far 
Indicates electing a chairman at large 
would not force the county to be- 
come a home rule entity. 

Waller said the county's home 
rule status would only change if the 
county decided to go to with elected 
county executive, which is a different 
form of government than an elected 
board chairman. 

"Lake County Is non home rule, 
and electing the chairman at large 
would not affect that status," he said. 

Still, Jim Tarbet, a resident of 
Lake Zurich who opposed a referen- 
dum to bring home rule In that com- 
munity, said the law on that issue is 
not so clear. 

' Tarbet said the Illinois Constitu- 
tion provides tliat thoso- council* 

who have elected chief executives are 
home rule communities. He said he 
believes the language is vague and 
could be interpreted to mean not 
only county executives, but county 
board chairmen elected at large. 

"It just opens up a whole can of 
worms and I don't see any of those 
issues being necessarily good or re- 
sponsive," he said. 



SITE: University Center 
needs home in Lake County 



be convened into university facilities 
and a vacant 23-acre parcel on the 
south edge of the campus. 

■Village Green Golf Course at the 
comer of Winchester and Midlothi- 
an Road in Mundelein. Plans are to 
convert the 96- acre golf course into a 
business center park, which devel- 
opers say could also house a univer- 
sity center campus. 

The task force learned that two 
sites, Abbott Park and Raspberry 
Farms, were removed from consid- 
eration at the request of the proper- 
ty owners. 

"The owner of Raspberry farms 
doesn't have the property on the 
market," Grever said. "Abbott just 
said they were not interesting in of- 
fering it (their property) at this time. 
I would assume they're going to use 
the property for their own use." 

Sevener said he believes the 
county's University Center Task 
Force could have made a site recom- 
mendation in time for the State 
Board of Higher Education's Dec. 15 
meeting in Chicago, but the board 
decided there was no reason to rush 



the decision. 

"It's a real time consuming 
process to select a site," he said. 
"There are a lot of considerations 
that need to be taken into account." 

Some of the factors that are con - 
sidered in selecting a site include the 
proximity of the proposed university 
to major population areas and high- 
way interchanges, library access, and 
cost considerations. 

"The cost of the site has an im- 
pact on the total cost of the project, 
if we have to purchase a site, it's 
something we have to figure In our 
final budget recommendations," he 
said. 

The state plans to allocate about 
$2 million in planning funds for the 
new university center in its fiscal year 
2000 budget, and another $2 million 
in operating funds for staffing pur- 
poses. 

Once construction funds are al- 
located, he said it will take about two 
years to build the facility. 

"If everything goes well, we're 
looking at opening the new universi- 
ty center in the fall of 2001," he said. 






t 



Letters welcome 

Letters to the editor are wetcome.They should be on topics ot general Interest, 

approximately 250 words or less. All letters must be signed, and contain a home 

address and telephone number.ThB editor reserves the right to condense all letters. 

Send tetters to: Lakeland Newspapers, Attn: Letters to the Editor 
30 S. Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030 



Jl 



. -• ■ 



■ ■' ■ l ^'- — , 




MINDING 
YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 

Don Taylor 



Is the truth 

always 

important? 



No this is not a political 
column. It has nothing 
to do with our Nation's 
president. It's not even 
about tying. 

This column is about truth. I 
tricked you into reading this far 
wish that terrific headline. But, 
the question remains: is telling the 
truth always important? 

The following information is 
true. I'll leave it up to you to de- 
termine if any of it fs important. 

Trivial Truths 

• Bookseller magazine gives an 
annual award called "The Odd Ti- 
tle of the Year Award." The 1994 
winner was Highlights in the His- 
tory of Concrete. I assume the 
book was produced in hard cover. 

• There are lots of ways to say 
"stupid." For example: cerebrally 
challenged, mentally deficient or a 
few clowns short of a circus. 
There are more: as smart as fish 
bait, doesn't have all his or her 
Cornflakes in one box, his belt 
doesn't go through all the loops 
and she has a body by Fisher with 
brains by Mattel. 

• We say, "the phone is ring- 
ing," but in reality all new phones 
chirp, beep, buzz or twinkle. 

■ Baseball would be more in- 
teresting if hitters got paid $1,000 
for a single, $2,000 for a double, 
$3,000 for a triple and $10,000 for 
home runs and agents 'go t noth- 
ing. 

• Baseball would be more in- 
teresting If pitchers got paid $100 
per strikeout, had to give back 
$100 fpr-eaeruwalk and received 
$10,000 for each win. 

• In 1929 folks had to work 19 
minutes everyday to pay their fed- 
eral income taxes. In 1989 the dai- 
ly time had risen to 1 hour and 47 
minutes. {Kinda makes you want 
to take that first hour and 47 min- 
utes off doesn't it?) 

• Will Rogers said, "Alexander 
Hamilton started the U.S. Treasury 
with nothing - and that was the 
closest our country has ever come 
to being even." 

• Nearly 70 million sets of the 
game "Trivial Pursuit" have been 
sold. 

• The Wright brothers made 
four flights on December 17, 1903. 
Their first flight - the one that is 
recorded in history - was the 
shortest of the day. 

• The average person doesn't 
use a semicolon very often. Most 
aren't sure how to use one correct- 
ly; nevertheless, they use them 
anyway. 

f * A full-size car at any rental 
agency really isn't. 

• A double bed is perfect for 
one. 

• The average American 
spends more than 4 hours per day 
watching television. 

■ There is no garbage disposal 
problem in California. They turn 
their garbage into television pro- 
grams and movies and ship it all 
over the world. 

• If George Washington had in- 
vested the quarter he allegedly 
threw across the Potomac River, 
his heirs could pay off the National 
debt. 

• They don't make clabber like 
they used to. 

• If you spend money on it, it's 
a hobby; if you make money on it, 
it's a business. 

• You can arm your soul for 

Please seeTAYLOH /C8 



December 4, 1998 




M*e *. ' ■' 



1 \- Lakeland Newspaj. 



CPA Society offers small business deduction checklist 



Managing your business for 
profitability involves effectively man- 
aging your taxes. The Illinois CPA 
Society points out that with changes 
resulting from the new tax law, it's 
especially Important for small busi- 
nesses to review their tax situation 
and eligibility for tax deductions 
carefully. Here are some things to 
keep In mind when preparing 1997 
tax returns and planning for the up- 
coming year. 

Bigger deductions for 
health Insurance premiums 

Under the new tax law, if you're 
self-employed and paid for your own 
healthcare insurance in 1397, you 
may deduct from gross Income 40% 
of health Insurance costs you paid 
for you and your family. The de- 
ductible portion rises to 45% for 1998 
and 1999 and continues to increase 
gradually until it reaches 100% in 
2007. However, keep in mind that 
the deduction is limited to your 
earned income derived from your 
business for which the insurance 
plan was established. 

Coming out ahead 
with expensing 

Businesses are eligible to write 
off immediately up to $18,000 for 
equipment and other depreciable 



property put in service in 1997 
($18,500 for 1998) rather than depre- 
ciate those costs over a period of 
years. To qualify for the deduction, 
the equipment must be put Into ser- 
vice during the year for which you 
take the expensing deduction. Be 
aware that the expensing deduction 
Is reduced dollar-for- dollar once the 
cost of property put Into service In a 
your exceeds 4200,000. 

Boost retirement savings 
and gain deductions 

As an employer, take advantage 
of tax benefits association with 1RS- 
qualifled retirement plans for you 
and your employees. Contributes to 
IRS- qualified retirement plans, such 
as simply plans and 401 (k)s, are de- 
ductible, and no tax is paid on the 
earnings that accumulate until ben- 
efits are collected, usually at retire- 
ment There's no better way to low- 
er your tax bill while helping yourself 
and your employees save for retire- 
ment 

Getting even on bad debts 

If your business cannot collect 
on a receivable, you may be eligible 
to deduct the amount of the bad 
debt. Companies that use the accru- 
al method of accounting must 
deduct a bad debt in the year it be- 



comes partially or totally worthless. 
Be sure to keep a paper trail of your 
collection attempts in the event you 
need to substantiate your deduction. 

Travel, meals, and 
entertainment expenses 

Travel expenses that are neces- 
sary and ordinary to your business 
typically are fully deductible. Meals 
and entertainment expenses are 50- 
percent deductible, provided that 
the primary purpose of the meal or 
entertainment expense Is to transact 
business. In other words, you must 
expect to gain some business benefit 
as a result of the expense. 

However, in some instances, 
employers maybe able to deduct 100 
percent of the meal cost. For years 
beginning after 1997, such deduc- 
tions are allowed if the meal is pro- 
vided on company premises for the 
convenience of the employer. 

Victory for the 
home-office crowd 

If you work regularly and exclu- 
sively from a home office, you may 
be entitled to claim a home -office 
deduction on your tax return. How- 
ever, even if you don't qualify this 
year, as a result of tax law changes, 
you may be entitled to a tax deduc- 
tion down the road. Here's why. Ef- 



fective for tax years beginning after 
1998, a home office qualifies as your 
principal place of business if you use 
It to conduct the administrative or 
management activities of your busi- 
ness where you it to conduct down 
the road. Here's why. Effective for 
tax years beginning after 1998, a 
home office qualifies as your princi- 
pal place of business if you use it to 
conduct the administrative or man- 
agement activities of your business 
and there is no other fixed location of 
the business where you conduct 
substantial administrative or man- 
agement business activities. 

This new definition benefits 
those self-employed persons who 
manage a business from their 
homes, but also provide a service or 
meet clients at another location p for 
example, a doctor who sees a pa- 
tients at local hospitals but conducts 
the business administrative or man- 
agement activities from a home of- 
fice. 

The Illinois CPA Society Is the 
state professional association repre- 
senting over 26,000 certified public 
accounts throughout Illinois. For in- 
formation on additional CPA Society 
programs, events, products and ser- 
vices, individuals can visit the Soci- 
ety's Web site at http://www.ic- 
pas.org. 



Franchises offer a 

way to work, live in 
community of choice 



Franchise businesses are at- 
tracting an enthusiastic audience of 
self-motivators looking to live and 
work in their communities of 
choice. "We're actually focusing our 
expansion efforts on smaller retail 
markets because of the continuing 
population migration away from 
the larger cities," notes Russell L 
Cooper, senior vice president and 
general manager of GNC Franchis- 
ing, Inc., a subsidiary of General 
Nutrition Companies, Inc. 

The shift is reflected in U.S. 
Census Bureau statistics, which 
show central 



cities losing 3 
million people 
while suburbs 
gained 2.8 mil- 
lion from 1996 
to 1997. 

"This trend 
provides fran- 
chises such as 
ours with a win- 
win situation, 
particularly with 
the baby boom 
generation," 
Cooper contin- 
ues. "Not only is a significant per- 
centage of this age group interested 
in launching their own business, we 
see them escaping from the hassles 
of big city living by seeking out 
smaller communities. That leaves 
us with a pool of potential fran- 
chisees living or desiring to live in 
the same communities we're tar- 
geting as top expansion markets." 

And, GNC is not alone. Other 
retailers are focusing increasing at- 
tention on small to medium-size 
markets. Although sales volumes 
may be lower, so are operating 
costs, rent, theft and employee 
turnover. 

Why franchising? "In many in- 
stances, franchising provides a 
greater chance of success as the 



'In many instances, 

franchising provides a 

greater chance of success as 

the franchisor has already 

invested a considerable 

amount of time and money 

perfecting the operation of 

the business' 

Russell L Cooper, 
GNC Franchising, Inc. 



franchisor has already invested a 
considerable amount of time and 
money perfecting the operation of 
the business," Cooper explains, 
Benefits of operating a fran- 
chise business include: 

• Access to the expertise and 
knowledge of the franchisor, which 
can greatly shorten the learning 
curve for a franchisee. Ongoing 
training and support services also 
are included in most franchise busi- 
ness agreements. 

• Pooled funds for advertising, 
marketing and promotions. Many 

franchise opera- 



tions have na- 
tional and co-op 
programs where 
money is con- 
tributed by the 
franchisor and 
franchisees, 
making regional 
and national ad- 
vertising and 
promotional 
campaigns pos- 
sible. 

« Brand recog- 
nition and credi- 
bility. Launching your business un- 
der an established name has dis- 
tinct advantages. 

What should you consider be- 
fore investing in a franchise busi- 
ness? 

• Research the franchisor. Ask 
for franchising materials and annu- 
al reports. Spend time at the library 
getting any third-party information 
(e.g.: magazine and newspaper arti- 
cles, business surveys, etc.) you can. 

• Determine the amount of cap- 
ital you will need to launch your 
business (including franchise fees, 
renovation costs, rent, staff salaries, 
utilities, etc.) and to maintain ade- 
quate cash flow, especially during 
the first two years. 

• Get a detailed report of the 




Franchise businesses like this GNC store are attracting an en- 
thusiastic audience of self- motivators looking to live and work in 
their communities of choice. Although sales volumes may be low- 
er, so are operating costs, rent, theft and employee turnover. 



support services— training, market- 
ing, advertising, purchasing, etc — 
provided by the franchisor. Are they 
adequate? 

• Review the franchise offering 
circular and agreements carefully. 

• After considering each of 
these factors, identify your personal 
and professional needs and expec- 
tations and determine whether the 
franchise opportunity will meet 
your expectations. 

To capitalize on the potential 
that smaller markets represent, 



many franchisors have created spe- 
cial incentive packages, such as the 
one offered by GNC Franchising 
which includes a reduced down 
payment, deferred fees, special 
terms and grand opening assis- 
tance. For more information, call 
GNC Franchising at 1-800-766- 
7099. 

For more information, contact 
Melissa Harrell, GNC Franchising, 
at 1-800-766-7099. 

— Courtesy of Article Resource 
Association, wivw.aracopy.com. 



w 



Co /Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE 



December 4, 1998 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 



■ -■•Mi^lll . 



Below are real estate transactions for villages in and around the lakeland 
Neivspapers circulation area. Listed are the property address, property buyer, 
and purchase price. 



Grayslake 

561 Pheasant Court, Michael & Pa- 
tricia Thompson. $92,500 
1073 Potomac Court, Philip & 
Rhonda Hugues, S32B.994 
1 422 Sunflower Circle, Countryside 
Landfill, $388,782 
1050 Williamsburg, Brian & Mary 
Dunham, $265,200 

Gurnee 

5860 Heather Lane. Mary Lyon. 
$114,000 

353 14 Juniper, jose Silva. $ 1 40,000 
7834 Mountain Ash Court. Timothy 
& Lori Wallwork, $175,000 
507 Old Walnut Circle, Joseph & 
Deirde Carnett, $352,730 
35923 W. Barberry Lane, Branko 
Kolevski. $180,000 
162 Wellington Circle. Uoyd Burke 
& Charmainc West. $160,500 
1907 Windsor Court, Pamela Mey- 
er, $128,000 

Libertyville 

219 Adler, William & Christine An- 
derson, $295,000 

I626R Arlington, Mark Kakenmas- 
let.SNH.OOO 

319 Hyatt. Brian Albrechi & 
Shubana llahisubramaniam. 

$43:kOI1U 

27f> \ Uirlii'ld. jmlilli Solar/. 
$131,000 

4lfi S. St'veiith Avenue. Marhara 
karnis.SritUMH) 

4I;">S Seventh Street. )"lin K!t>rke& 
Sit/anna l-erehee. $13 l l.l)t)() 
201 1 Trenton Kuail. John & Sallv 
Nirm/vk. SK.lxOnn 
30fi W liulf Road, N'unn.in K I.or- 
raine Iripnnv. $2()L'.:"i(IM 

Lindenhurst 

HHHi l.lnnvond, I-einaiHJt] \\\U\ 
real, S\'itt.0l>0 

Mundelein 

lOOAlesandiat.ourl. Mark Maiden. 



$240,000 

517 Buckingham, Stephen & Janice 

Fakhourv. $158,000 

343 N. Pershing. David Muntz, 

$105,000 

906 S. Ridge, Wilmer Davila & Be- 

nigno Vargas, $97,000 

285 Willow, Garret Pick, $75,000 

1623 Woodhaven Court. Andrew 

Acebal & Tari Doehring, $127,500 

Round Lake Beach 

221 E. Pembrook Court. Corttv.a 

Success, $128,200 

14 13 Hickory, Juan ZepedaA Maria 

Hernandez, $69,000 

2354 N. Scott Court, Melissa Cotter, 

$125,000 

201 Wildwood Drive, Stephen 

Simth. $91,000 

Wadsworth 

2669 N. Augusta Drive, Douglas 
Reimann, $109,870 
2816 N. Southern Hills Drive. 
Robert & Shirley Byrne. $257,860 

Wauconda 

910 Woodland Road, Gary & Jnvie 
Gallagher, $208,410 

Wildwood 

18133 Lindenwood, Lawrence & 
Tina Shinsky. $136,000 



CBCH receives grant for its 
foster grandparent program 



■»."j**..' 



:-f'-i^.' 



Information provided by Record In 
formation Services, hie in St 
Charles. The company provides 
public record data for Lake. Da- 
mage, Cook; Kane, Mcllenry, 
Kendall find Will counties including 
new incorporations, business licens- 
es, bankruptcies, foreclosures, judg- 
ments, mechanic liens, state and 
federal tax liens, residential and 
atmnivrcial real estate transfers, 
building permits. Dill arrests, di- 
vorce reports, sheriff sale foreclo- 
sures. f6:tf» ;w5-64.w. public* 

iccoJil.toin, 



FROM PAGE C7 



TAYLOR: Is the truth 
important in your business? 



the battles of the day. if you load a 
little prayer the first thing each 

morning. 

• If you want to enjoy success, 
learn to be genuinely happy over 
the success of others. 

• Your nose filters and humidi- 
fies about 500 cubic feet of air 
each day. 



Devore earns 
certification 

William Devore, of Beach Park, 
executive director of the College of 
Lake County Foundation, has been 
granted the 
designation 
of Certified 
Fund Rais- 
ing Execu- 
tive (CFRE) 
by the CFRE 
professional 
certification 
board. De- 
vore earned 
thecertifica- 



• John P. Kennedy graduated 
sixty-fourth out of his high school 
class of 1 12. 

• You'll get a bang out of this. 
Alfred Nobel, the Swede who gave 
cash awards to writers and scien- 
tists (now known as the Nobel 
Pri/.e). invented dynamite. 

• You can dream a life, or live 
a dream. 



Don Taylor is the co-author of 
"Up Against the Wal-Marts." You 
may write to him in care of "Mind- 
ing Your Own Business." P.O. Box 
67. Amarillo, TX 79105. 




Devore 



tion after satisfying education and 
professional experience require- 
ments and passing a comprehensive 
examination of the knowledge and 
skills required of a fund-raising ex- 
ecutive. 

He is a former president of the 
Zion-Benton Township High School 
Board of Education and the Lake 
County Family YMCA. 



Central Baptist Children's 
Home has received a federal grant 
from the National Corporation for 
National Service to implement a 
Foster Grandparent Program in 
Like County. 

The grant is $468,000 for a two- 
year period and will cover the cost 
of approximately 88% of the total 
expenses needed to administer the 
program, h offers people 60 years 
and older opportunities to serve as 
mentors, tutors and care givers for 
children and young people. 

Foster grandparents must meet 
certain income eligibility require- 



ments and be at least 60 years old. 
In addition, they must love children 
and be willing to devote 20 hours of 
service a week. 

Foster grandparents participate 
in pre-service orientation and 
training workshops throughout 
their service. They receive a modest 
tax-free stipend, assistance with 
transportation, meals during their 
service, and an annual physical 
exam. 

Foster grandparents can vol- 
unteer in schools, hospitals, day 
care centers, and other Institu- 
tions. The heart of the program is 



one-on-one dally attention pro- - 
vided by the grandparents; This 
special care helps young people 
grow, gain confidence, and bV- ; 
come productive members of so- - 
ciet > r -,T h ^ benefits to Individuals;/: 
and communities are viewed by S 
child care experts as both immedi- '■■' 
ate and everlasting. 

Founded three decades ago, the 
Foster Grandparent Program has 
provided young children and elder 
adults a chance to grow. They give 
care and attention everyday to * 
more than 80,000 children and- 
youth. 



Toy drive for CBCH 
children by Great 
Lakes Credit Union 



PEOPLE IN 
THE NEWS 



Members of Great Lakes Cred- 
it Union will donate new, un- 
wrapped gifts and monetary do- 
nations, 

The goal for this year's cam- 
paign is rjo break last year's dona- 
tion total of S2.RO0, which helped 
make the holidays happier for 75 
children. 

People are encouraged to 
make donations at all Great Lakes 
Credit Union branches. For every 



dollar donated, a link will be 
added to paper chains displayed 
in all credit union branch lobbies. 
Great Lakes Credit Union has 
been a sponsor of the Central Bap- 
tist Children's Home for 21 years. 
CBCH provides a temporary place 
for children who have been re- 
moved from their home and helps 
place them in foster homes. They 
also provide other family assis- 
tance programs. 



$1 million mark 
passed in April 

Pat Bell, Tina Henry, Pen- 
ny Bracher, David Seller, Fran 
McBrlde, Andy Herrmann, 
Todd Seller, and Bridget Abra- 
ham passed the $1 million mark 
in 1998 sales production during 
the month of April, reported M.J. 
Seiler, co-owner of t he Liber- 
tyville based firm of Century 21 
Kreuser and Seiler. 

All are longtime Lake County 
residents experienced in helping 
people buy and sell new and exist- 
ing homes throughout all of Lake 
County. 



J 






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December 4, 1998 



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A Funeral Home Serving 
All Your Needs 

Over 50 Years OF Carina, Dimiillcd Service 



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DEATH NOTICES 



BUITENWERF 

Gertrude Buitenwerf (nee Vanderkamp), 

age 86 of Chicago 

Air: Knollcrest Funeral Home, 

Lombard 

MC GRATA 

Edward H. McGrath. age 64 of 

Wauconda 

Arr'. Kissclburg-Wauconda Funeral 

Home, Wauconda 

HAGGARD 

Willie May Haggard, age 91 of 

Libertyville 

Arr: Ahlgrim and Sons Funeral Home, 



Lake Zurich 

WILSON 

L. Dale Wilson, age 85 of Libertyville 
Arr: Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, 
Libertyville 

SHARKEY 

Edward F. Sharkey, age 93 of Wauconda 
Arr: Kissclburg-Wauconda Funeral 
Home, Wauconda 

TOCZYLOWSKI 

Irene F. Toczylowski age 82, of Lake 

Zurich 

Arr: Ahigrim and Sons Funeral Home, 

Lake Zurich 



IvakelaiiflL 

N.ewspajpcrs.l ; • ■ * : -■ ' 



Funeral Directory 






I USTEN'S ROUND LAKE FUNERAL HOME 

222 N. Rosedale Court (Rosedale at Cedar Lake Road) 

(847) 546-3300 

Nancy Justen, Jeffrey Jordan, Directors 

Additional Locations in McHenry and Wonder Lake 

K.K. HAMSHER FUNERAL HOME, LTD. 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Rd., Fox Lake, IL 

(847)587-2100 

Kenneth K. Hamsher, Debra Hamsher Glen, Directors 

R1NGA FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2146 

Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

Dan Dugenske, Director 

(847) 395-4000 

SPRING GROVE FUNERAL CHAPEL 

8103 Wilmot Rd„ P.O. Box 65, Spring Grove, IL 60081 

Kurk P. Paleka, Director 

(815) 675-0550 or Toll Free (888) 394-8744 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL AND CREMATORIUM, LTD. 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake, IL 

(847) 223-8122 

David G. Strang and Richard A Gaddis, Director 



Marguerite O. Freeman . 

/ Age 90, of Grayslake, passed away Nov. 26, 1998 at the 
.Mount Carmel Nursing Home, Burlington, Wis. She was bom 
In Chicago, March 4; 1908 and had made her home In 
Grayslake over 35 years. She had been employed with Illinois 
Bell Telephone Co. over 40 years and attained the position of 
supervisor Tor many years retiring In 1980. ' 

She leaves her cousins, Aiuialorralne (Harry) Eckberg, 
Paddock Lake, Wii; Martin (VWlma) Speck, Buffalo Grove 
and Dorothy (Earl) Ash, Mesa, Ariz. She is preceded In death 
by her parents Lillian Ross Freeman and Algot Freeman as 
well as her cousin David (Mary) Speck. 

Funeral services were offered at the Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake. 

Interment was private. 

Memorials may be made to the United Protestant 
Church In her memory . 

Susan Margaret Dobson (nee Hall) 

Age 51 of Littleton, Colo passed away Wednesday, Nov. 
18, 1998 at her home She was bom in Waukegan, grew up in 
Grayslake, lived in Rockford for 17 years, lived In Oshkosh, 
Wis. for four years end a current resident of Littleton. Colo. 

She leaves her husband, Don Dobson; her daughter, 
Shannon (John) lackson, Roscoe; her son, Ryan Rtzpatrick, 
Deiavan. Wis.; her father. Edwin Hal), Grayslake; four sisters, 
Cheryl (Anthony) Blrong, Union Grove. Wis., Kathryn 
Sledleckl, Ubertyville. Jennifer (Russ) Waiters, Louisville, Ky„ 
Cynthia Smith, Conifer, Cola; her brother Kenneth (Sally) 
Hall Memphis, Tenn.; her grandson, Andrew S. Jackson; 
eight nieces and nephews and a host of many friends. She is 
preceded In death by her mother, Audrey Hall. 

A Memorial Service was offered at the United Protestant 
Church, Grayslake with the Rev, Judith Wang, officiating 

Interment was at Chapel Hill Cemetery, Littleton, Colo. 

Memorials may be made to American Cancer Society for 
Breast Research in her name. 

Madeline M. lurman 

Age 75 of Ingleside, passed away on Monday, Nov. 23, 
1998 at St. Therese Medical Center, Waukegan. Bom on May 
13, 1923 In Curbensville. Penn. Madeline has been a resident 
of Ingleside the past eight years, formerly of Antigo. Wis. 

She leaves her children, Margaret Thomas of ingleside, 
George (Pam) Turrnan of Hixson.Tenn., John (Suzle) lurman 
of Ft. Meyers, Ha., Patrick Turrnan of Ingleside, Joseph 
; " IFablnan) Turrnan of Ft. Bragg. NC; liueej grandchildren, 
3?'rLarry^>Iames,'and ; jdrdan; two great graftd£ttildreh,~ Brooke 
and Halley; her two brothers, John and AnthdnwShe is pre- 
ceded In death by her husband, George, her pbiknts and 
brother, Michael. ^ v^ 

Funeral Services were held at the Strang FuneraTChapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake with the Rev. Lisle J. 
Kauffman of Calvary Presbyterian Church, Round Lake, offi- 
ciating. 

Graveside services were held at St. Wenceslaus Cemetery 
in Antigo, Wis. 

Bernlce €. Skutas 

Age 89 of Salem, Wis,, passed away suddenly, Sunday, 
Nov. 22, 1998 at the Mt. Carmel Medical and Rehabilitation 
Center, Burlington, Wis. She was bom Nov. 30, 1908 in 
Chicago, the daughter or the late Joseph and Caroline 
(Zllvitis) Skutas. She was a graduate of the Chicago Art 
Institute and the University of Chicago and had taught Art in 
Chicago before WWII. During WWII and the Korean Conflict, 
she served in the U.S. Army, Signal Corp., retiring in 1967 as 
a Lt. Col. She lived in Antioch before moving to Salem, Wis. 

Survivors Include two nieces, Fausta (Charles) Reynolds 
of Salem, Wis., and Joanne (John) Buck of Chicago; two 
nephews, Joseph Krupinski Jr. of Dolton and Joseph (Karen) 
Skutas Jr. of Downers Grove; four great nieces; one great 
nephew; three great, great nieces and three greaV great, 
nephews. She is preceded in death by two brothers, 1 
and John Skutas and one sister, Fausta Krupinski. \ i 

Private services with Military Honors were hel 
Lithuanian National Cemetery, Justice. 

Arrangements were entrusted to the Strang Funeral 
Home of Antioch. 

Melvin W. Carlson 

Age 86, passed away on Oct. 24, 1998 at Seminole 
Nursing PavilJion, Seminole, Fla. 

He was a painter for many years and a veteran of WWII 
which he served for five years. 

Beloved husband of Edna, father of Melvin G., a loving 
brother of Vivian Hobley. 

Memorial services were held in Seminole, Fla. 

He will be missed by many friends. 

laimi LaFleur (nee Martinen) 

Age 85, a Fox Lake resident for the past 48 years, and a 
former resident of Chicago and Michigan, died Sunday, Nov, 
29, 1998 at the Alden Terrace Nursing Home in McHenry. She 
was bom on Jan. 7, 1913 in Michigan to Otto Martin and 
Hilda Martinen, and had been a housewife and mother In 
her home. She enjoyed knitting cooking and baking for her 
family. 

Survivors Include: two sons, Terrancc-tDebbie) LaFleur 
of Fox Lake and Martin (Josephine) LaFleur of St. Petersburg, 
Fla,; 1 1 grandchildren, 10 great grandchildren, and two great, 
great grandchildren also survive, as well as nieces and 
nephews. She is preceded in death by her late husband, 
Francis S, LaFleur on June 23, 1978 by two sons, James and 
Glenn and by her daughter, Diane Schock on May .19, I99B 



and .by her three sisters, Hilda, Verio and Aunl. 
' Friends visited at die K-fCHariisher Funeral Home, Fax 
Lake (The Chapel on the Lake) 

Interment was at Grant Cemetery in Ingleside ' : 
^Memorials for the American Cancer Society, 1300 N. 
SkokieHwy,, Suite 104, Gumee, TL60031-2145 will be apprc- 
ly. ' ■ -"' : '' : ' ; ' '*•' •■" ':' 




dated by the family.. 
Dorothy M. Bautch 

Age T 70rdied.iri her home at The Caroline' House, 
Thursday, Nov. 28, 1998. A native of Mauston, Wis., she was a 
retired bookkeeper with the town of Lake Zurich. She had 
lived in the Tucson, Ariz., area for lQyears: • • ; ; ; 

She Is survived by three daughters, Dr. Vicki Bautch of 
Plttsboro, Doreen Daniels of Ben Hur.'Va., Sheryl Bautch of 
Champaign; one son, Richard Bautch of South Bend, Ind.; 
one sister, Evelyn McDonald of Lyndon Station; Wis.; three 
brothers, Gerald Rogge of Lyndon Station, Wis., Charles 
Rogge of Chicago and James Rogge of Port Deposit, Md.; and 
one grandchild. 

A Funeral Service was conducted at the Newman Center 
by Father Philip Leach. 

Memorials may he made to Triangle Hospice, 1804 
Mardn Luther King Hwy., Durham, NC, 27707. 

Arrangements were made by Walkers Funeral Home of 
Chapel Hill. Chapel HJ11.NC. 

Roberta E. Quirk (nee Rassmussen) 

Died Saturday, Nov. 28, 1998 at her home. She was a 
resident of Ingleside, formerly of Chicago. 

Beloved wife of Lawrence T. Quirk; dear mother of 
Thomas Graziano, Ingleside, Lawrence Quirk, Jr., 
Ingleside, Sean Quirk, Ingleside, Peter (Denise) Quirk, 
Chicago, Thomas (Tammy) Quirk, LaPorte, Ind., Frank 
(Amy) Quirk, Antioch, Vicki (David) Graziano -Smith, Fox 
Lake, Donna (John) O'Neill, Arlington Heights and Geri 
Quirk, ingleside; fond daughter of Elizabeth Rassmussen . 
Turner of Villa Park and the late Robert Rassmussen. 
Grandmother of 10; great grandmother of one; sister of 
Rosemarle (Paul) Hauge, Darien and the late Robert 
Rassmussen, killed in action In Viet Nam. 

Family and friends visited at the K. K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home, Fox Lake, (The Chapel on the Lake). 

Funeral Services were held at St. Bade Catholic 
Church, Ingleside 

Interment was at Millburn Cemetery, Millburn. 

Memorials for Catholic Charities would be appreci- 
ated. 

Marguerite G. Nelson 

Age 91 , of Antioch, passed away, Sunday, Nov. 29, 1998 at 
Victory Lakes Continuing Care Center, LindenhursL She was 
bom April 12. 1907 in Antioch, the daughter of the late 
Lyman B. and Artemissie (Emmons) Grice. She was a lifelong 
resident of Antioch. She was also a life member of SL Ignatius 
Church , a 50 year I ife member of the OES, past secretary arid 
member of the Antioch Womerfs Club and. member of the 
Women of the Moose 725 all of Antioch. Mrs. Nelson carried 
on the family insurance business, known as Grice Insurance. 
In 1969 the business was sold and became Sorensen 
Insurance Agency. In April of 1962. she married Lester L. 
Nelson and he preceded her in death on October of 1970. v. 

Survivors include one son. George (Arvis) Nelson of 
Pleasant Prairie, Wis.; one daughter, Charlene (the late Floyd) 
McKJnriey of Canyon Lake, Tex.; six grandchildren; 10 great 
grandchildren and two great, great grandchildren. In addi- 
tion to her husband, she is preceded in death by one son, 
Jack Nelson and one daughter, Jane Meyer. 

Funeral services with Mass of Christian Burial was held 
at St. Ignatius Episcopal Church, Antioch with Fr. Vincent 
Eckholm, officiating. 

Interment was at Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. 

Friends and family visited at the Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch, Antioch. 

Those desiring may make contributions to the St. 
Ignatius Church Building Fund in her memory. 

Bruce 1. Dalgaard 

Age 80, a life long resident of Antioch, passed away 
Saturday, Nov. 28, 1998 at his home. He was bom July 13, 
1918 in Antioch, the son of the late Andrew and Linda 
(La Plant) Dalgaard. He was a member of St. Peter Church 
and a 1936 graduate of Antioch High School. He served In the 
U.S. Army from 1943 to 1946 with the 556th Engineer 
Battalion in the South Pacific and was a member of the 
American Legion Post 748 of Antioch. After 40 years of ser- 
vice, he retired in 1977 as a supervisor for Commonwealth 
Edison in Waukegan. On March 26, 1940, he married Lena 
Pedersen in Antioch. 

Survivors include his loving wife Lena of 58 years; two 
sons, Bruce R. (Carol) of Northfield, Minn, and Kirk A (Joan) 
of Glendale, Ma; three grandchildren, Erik, Evan and Bret; 
two sisters, Andrea Goode and Lila Palinski both of Antioch 
and numerous nieces and nephews. He is preceded in death 
by two brothers, Armand and Winsor.- 

Funeral services with Mass of Christian Burial was held 
at St, Peter Church, Antioch. 

Interment was at Hickory Union Cemetery, Newport 
Twsp. 

Friends and family visited at the Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch, Antioch. 

Those desiring may make contributions to St Peter 
Church, Rush Hospice Partners, 660 Westmoreland, Lake 



Please see page C10 



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C10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



LEGAL NOTICES 



December 4, 1998 



More than $450,000 
raised for NICASA 



Contributions totaling mote 
than $450,000 have been pledged to 
the $1.16 million capital campaign 
of the Northern Illinois Council on 
Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, 
reports Sarah Catterson, chair of the 
fundralsing effort. 

Catterson, divisional vice presi- 
dent for corporate purchasing at 
Abbott Laboratories, said Abbott 
and Kemper Insurance Co. each 
have pledged $200,000. in addition, 
she said, in-kind contributions have 
been made for Improving the 
agency's electronic information sys- 
tem by Kemper, Motorola, Cisco and 
Seamon, Whiteside and Associates. 

"We are very grateful for the gen- 
erosity of our early donors and hope 
that more support will be forthcom- 
ing for this important cause," she 
said. 

The capital campaign commit- 
tee hopes to reach Its goal by the end 
of 1999. she said. Reaching the goal, 
Catterson said, will enable NICASA 
to: 

• Increase capacity to treat more 
community members addicted to 
alcohol and other drugs. 

• Increase the reach of preven- 
tion programs throughout Lake 
County. 

• Improve service effectiveness 
through the ability to conduct out- 
come studies. 

Catterson said the $1.16 million 
goal focuses on four capital projects: 

I. Women and Children's 
Center- Purchase and expansion of 
the facility would help expand the 
"Welfare to Work Initiative" 



From page I CI 3 

Forest, IL 60045 or the American Cancer 
Society in his memory. 

Alda Jones 

Age 80, of Fox Lake for 30 years, 
passed away Nov. 28, 1998 at Lake Forest 
Hospital. She was bom Aug. 28, 1918 at 
Grand Rapids, Mich. She was an admin- 
istrative assistant for a trucking compa- 
ny. 

Survivors include, her husband, 
William John Jones of Fox Lake; children, 
Marilyn (Charles J.) LaValle of Burbank 
and Raymond (Carol) Good of 
Burlington, NC; grandchildren, 
Raymond Godfrey (Elizabeth) Good of 
Ashburn. Va., Holly Marie Good of 
Grayslakc, Charles John LaValle Jr. of 
Burbank and Laura (Michael) Krail of 
Burbank: great grandchildren, Margaret 
Elizabeth Good of Ashburn, Va., Michael 
Matthew and Kimberly Lauren Kreil 
both of Burbank, Charles J. LaValle III of 
Burbank. 

Graveside services were held at 

Lithuanian National Cemetery in Justice. 

Funeral arrangements were made 

by Kelley and Spalding Funeral Home, 

Highland Park. 

Barbara Lynn Miller 

Age 49 of Antioch. passed away 
Sunday, Nov. 29, 1998 at Lake Forest 
Hospital. She was born June 5, 1949 In 
Chicago, the daughter of the late 
James and Gertrude (Donohue) 
Bennett. She grew up in Oak Lawn and 
had lived in Florida for five years 
before moving to Antioch in 1992. She 
worked as the Community Service 
Officer for the Antioch Police 
Department from 1993 to 1996 and 
also did electrolysis at Coconuts 
Tanning in Antioch. On Dec. 3, 1988, 
she married Danford Miller in Tampa, 
Fla. 

Survivors include her husband, 
Danford; two sons, Chris Gordon of 
Oak Lawn and Tim BranJkin at home; 
two brothers, Thomas (Maureen) 
Bennett of Paios Heights and James 
Bennett of Trevor, Wis. She had many 
nephews, nieces and cousins. 

. Funeral services were held at the 
Strang Funeral Home of Antioch. 

Interment was at the Millburn 
Cemetery, Mlllbum, 



2. Client Services Outcomes — 
Implementation of an information 
systems plan would decrease service 
costs, enhance productivity and 
provide tools for outcome studies. 

3. Renovation project — 
Renovation and retirement of the 
debt at the Waukegan facility would 
decrease fixed costs and expand 
capacity. 

4. Program Development 
Endowment Fund— The establish- 
ment of an endowment fund would 
reach more youth and adults in need 
of prevention and treatment ser- 
vices. 

"NICASA's reputation for help- 
ing people improve their lifestyles is 
very well known," Catterson said. 
"This capital campaign will allow us 
to increase the prevention and treat- 
ment programs offered to residents 
of this fast -growing region." 

Catterson said the committee is 
counting on individual donors to 
play a role. She said a Community 
Giving Tree has been created to 
identify and permanently recognize 
all those who contribute to the capi- 
tal campaign. To be painted on the 
entrance to the Women and 
Children's Center, a giant oak tree 
will be decorated with brass name- 
plates of all contributors to the capi- 
tal campaign. The oak tree, as tile 
official tree of Illinois, symbolizes 
strength and sturdiness and repre- 
sents the agency's vision of a strong, 
health and prosperous community. 
Judy Fried, NICASA's executive 
director, praised Catterson for her 
leadership. 



Those desiring, may make contri- 
butions to the American Cancer 
Society in her memory. 

Eugene II. 'Gene' Walaszek 

Age 73, a well known resident and 
business owner in Fox Lake for over 50 
years. Died at the Methodist Hospital 
at Rochester, Minn, on Nov. 30, 1998. 
He was born in Chicago on Ian. 13, 
1925, the son of John and Tillic 
Walaszek who were pioneer jewelers in 
the Chicago area. Mr. Walaszek and his 
wife Harriet owned and operated the 
Walaszek Jewelry store on East Grand 
Avenue in Fox Lake for 50 years. Before 
their retirement from this business, 
their son, Gregory joined their busi- 
ness. He was a longtime Fox Lake vol- 
unteer fireman on the Fox Lake Fire 
Depl. and later became a retired mem- 
ber until his death. During his active 
years on the department, if answering 
a fire call. Mr. Walaszek would place a 
sign in the jewelry store window, 
"Gone to a fire." He was a member of 
St. Bedc's Catholic Church in Ingleside 
and was a member of the Knights of 
Columbus. Mr. Walaszek was a charter 
member of the Villa Desiderata and is 
a present member of its board. A vet- 
eran of WWII having served with the 
Navy Construction Battalion, and is a 
longtime member of the Lakes Region 
American Legion Post 703. 

Survivors include his wife, Harriet 
G. Walaszek (nee Katsaros) with whom 
he was united In marriage on Nov. 22. 
1947 at Chicago; one son. Gregory 
(Sheila) Walaszek of California: one 
grand daughter, Alisha; one grandson, 
Christopher; two great grandchildren. 
Sienna and Jadelyn; one brother Ted 
(Marge) Walaszek of Fox Lake: one sis- 
ter, Emily Wallace of Oak Park; nieces, 
nephews and other relatives survive. 
He is preceded In death by his parents, 
brothers and sisters. *""- 

Family and friends visited at the K. 
K. Hamsher Funeral Home, Fox Lake 
(The Chapel on the Lake). 

A Funeral Mass was celebrated at 
St. Bcde Catholic Church In Ingleside. 
Interment was at Cole Cemetery 
In Spring Grove. 

In lieu, of flowers, the family 
requests memorials for the Villa 
Desiderata, 30115 Bayview Road, 
McHenry.IL 60050. 



Waxman appointed to Board of Health 



Michael Waxman, of Deerfield, 
has been appointed by the County 
Board to a three year term on the 
Lake County 
Board of 
Health. He 
will work 
with other 
Board of 
Health 
members to 
establish 
programs 
and policy 
for the Lake 
County 
Health Department and 
Community Health Center to pre- 
vent disease and disability, and pro- 
mote health for County residents. 

Waxman is currently a local 
Consultant for Polaris Group, a 
national healthcare consulting 
organization whose home office is 
in Massachusetts. Prior to this he 
was Vice President of Marketing 
and Development for Excelkare, 
Inc., a Northbrook-based provider 
of therapy services to nursing 
homes, hospital and school sys- 
tems. He has also worked in 




accounting and financial positions 
for a number of other healthcare 
and health management organiza- 
tions during his 20 year career, 
including Salomon J. Dayan, 
Ltd/Health First, Dunhlll and 
Spencer, Van Dyke Health Care 
Services, the Visiting Nurse 
Association,. and Iri-City 
Community Mental Health Center. 
Waxman received both his 
Bachelors and Masters Degrees In 
Business Administration from 
Roosevelt University, in 1967 and 
1970, respectively In addition to his 
other experience, he has long been 
active in teaching, having served as 
an instructor at Purdue University- 
Calumet, Northeastern Illinois 
University, Thornton Community 
College, the American Institute of 
Banking, Columbia College, 



Webster University, Lake Forest 
Graduate School of Management, 
and University of St Francis. ■" 

"I believe that Waxman's finan- 
cial acumen, especially in the field 
of healthcare management, will be 
a tremendous asset to the Board of 
Health," commented Dale Galassle, 
executive director of the Lake 
County Health Department and 

Community Health Center. -.— ■ 

- 1 ..-'•■ ' ';'■. .... * 



% 



'!■ 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
SEEKING BIDS FOR SCHOOL 

SIGN- 
District 1 14 is seeking bids on the 
construction and Installation of a dou- 
ble sided school latter board sign. Call 
for Information and specifications. Fox 
Lake Grade School District 114, 17 N. 
Foresl Avenue, Fox Lake, B47-587- 
8275. FAX 567-8298. ■ 

12S3A-2314-GEN 
December 4, 1998 



: I 

I 



THE DEADLINE 

FOR LEGAL 

NOTICES IS 

TUESDAY 

AT 10 A.M. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
NOTICE TO BIDDERS 

Separate sealed bids are sought for the purchase of Miracle Playground 
Equipment or Approved Alternate, for the Gurnee Park District's Prairie Oaks Silo 
Park. 

Bids will be received by the Gumee Park District at their office at 4374 Grand Ave., 
Gurnee, Illinois until 1 1 :00 AM (Local time) December 18, 1998 and Ihen at said office 
publicly opened and read aloud. Bid will be awarded at the regular meeting of the 
Board of Park Commissioners on January 19, 1999 at 7:00 p.m. 

The Gurnee Park District reserves the right to reject any and ail bids and blddBre 
and waive all technicalities. All proposals submitted will be valid for a period of sixty 
(60) days. The Gumee Park District reserves the right to award all or any portion of 
these bids. 

The Information for Bidders, Form of Bids, Form of Contract. Plans, Specifications, 
and other Contract documents may be examined at the Gurnee Park District, 4374 
Grand Ave., Gurnee, Illinois 60031 . 

Each bid must be placed In a sealed envelope, addressed to the Olrector, Gurnee 
Park District, 4374 Grand Ave.. Gurnee, Illinois 60031, and Identified "Prairie Oake 
Silo Park Playground Equipment" 
Gumee Park District 
Victoria Paddock 
Board Presjdent 
December 4. 1998 

1298A-2315-GEN 
December 4, 1998 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
REPORT OF CONDITION 

Consolidating domestic subsidiaries of the Anchor Bank of Groyalako in the state of IL, at the close of business 
on September 30, 1998, published In response to call made by 



Statement ol Resources and Liabilities 



Dollar Am ouniH ir. 



26,860 

318 





Thousands 

ASSETS 

Cash and balances due from depository institutions: 

Noninterest-bearing balances and currency and coin 
Interasl-bearing balances 
Securities 

Held-to-maturity securities 
Available-for-sale securities 
Federal funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to resell: 
Loans and lease financing receivables: 

Loans and leases, net of unearned income 
LESS: Allowance for loan and lease losses 
LESS: Allocated transfer risk reserve 

Loans and leases, net of unearned income, allowance, and reserve 
Trading Assets 

Premises and fixed assets (including capitalized leases) 
Other real estate owned 

Investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries and associated companies 
Customers' liability to this bank on acceptances outstanding 
Intangible assets 
Other assets 
TOTAL ASSETS 

Losses deferred pursuant to 12 U.S ( C. 1823Q) 
Total assets and losses deferred pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1823(j) 
LIABILITIES 
Deposits: 

In domestic offices 

Noninterest-bearing 6,568 

Interest-bearing 39,428 

Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase: 
Demand notes Issued to the U.S. Treasury 
Trading liabilities 

Otner borrowed money (Includes mortgage indebtedness and obligations under capllalized leases): 
With remaining maturity of one year or less 
With remaining maturity ol more than one year though three years 
With remaining maturity of more lhan three years 
Bank's liability on acceptance executed and outstanding 
Subordinated notes and debentures 
Other liabilities 
Total liabilities 
EQUITY CAPITAL 

Perpetual preferred stock and related surplus 
Common stock 
Surplus 

Undivided profits and capital reserves 

Net unrealized holding gains (losses) on available-for-sale securities 
Total equity capital 

Losses deferred pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1823(J} 
Total equity capital and losses deferred pursuant lo 12 U.S.C. 1 6230) 
Total liabilities, equity capital, and losses deterred pursuant lo 12 U.S.C. 1B23Q) a 

We, the undersigned directors, attest to the correctness of this statement of resources and liabilities! We 
declare that It has been examined by us, and to the best of our knowledge and belief has been prepared In con- 
formance wilh the instructions and is true and correct. 



1,725 
904 


9,882 
9,650 



26,542 



1,632 







2.746 

470 

53,551 



53.551 



45,996 




17 








858 
46,871 



300 

6,296 

51 

33 

6.680 



6,680 

53,551 



Gary F. Spahn 



John R. Burnett 

I, Scott W. Hamer, Vice President & Cashier of the above-named bank do hereby declare that this Report of 
Condition is true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief. 

/s/Scotl W. Hamer 
10-30-98 

1298A-2313-GL 
December 4. 1998 






* ■ ■ ■ -' • .:_--■" ' • ' 



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December 4, 1998 



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E2/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS 



December 4, .1998 



Christmas 'Tree! 

Tips on selection and care 







- ■■ 



I 



■ 



I 

■ 



Un or many families, se- 
lecting and decorating 
the Christmas tree marks the 
true beginning of the holiday 
season. Choosing the right 
tree and providing it with the 
proper care can add to the 
festive atmosphere you cre- 
ate. Several species are grown 
and sold across the United 
States. Some of the more 
popular ones include: 



Douglas Fir: Especially popular in the Pa- 
cific Northwest, this tree is full, light weight, 
green in color and features 3/4 to 1 • 1 /2-inch 
soft needles. It's known to have good needle 
retention and is good for warm environments 
(e.g. rooms with a fireplace). 

Balsam Fir: With needles ! 12 w I inch long, this tree is 
known for its attractive color, form, fragrance and good needle 
retention. 

Scotch Fine: A very popular Christinas tree, the scotch 
pine has very long needles ( I ■ 1 12 to 2- 1 12 inches) and good 
needle retention 

Eastern Red Cedar: More plentiful in the southern states, 
this tree tends to he dark in color, and dense with a strong aro- 
ma. However, yon may have to deal with sticky needles and a 
short houselife. 

Blue Spruce: Spruce needles are short (1/2 to 1 -inch long) 
and stiff, file trees arc usually bluish gray and dense with a 




(I 



nice aroma and symmetrical form, but they tend to lose their 
needles quickly in warm rooms and cost a bit more. 

Arizona Cypress: A steeple shaped, the Arizona Cypress is 
pale-green to gray-green in color. Tire needles are extremely 
tiny and quite plentiful. 

Before you buy 

• Before heading out to your local Christmas tree lot or 
farm, decide where you will place your tree. Measure the area 
for height and width to be sure you select an appropriately- 
sized tree. 



• If you're purchasing a pre-cut tree, 
gently pull on the needles. If the tree Is 
fresh, very few will come off. Next, shake 
the tree vigorously. If green needles fall off 
look for another tree, at Is common for 
brown needles to fall when a tree fs shak- 
en; this is NOT an Indication that the tree 
is too dry.) Try breaking a few needles. 
They should be flexible, fragrant and sticky 
if the tree Is fresh. 

Display and care 

• If there Is a lag time between purchase 
and set up, store your Christmas tree in a 
sheltered, shady and unheated area. Make 
o fresh cut at the base of the trunk and 
place the tree in a bucket of water. 

• When you're ready to place your tree 
In a stand, make another straight fresh cut 
across the base of the trunk. Your stand 
should hold at least one gallon of water. (A 
fresh cut tree will absorb as much as one 
gallon of water within the first 24 hours, 
and can use one or more quarts a day 
thereafter.) 

• Keep your tree away from heat 
sources, such as fireplaces, TVs and radfators. Check electric 
lights and connections — do not use worn, frayed wires or 
cord, and always unplug your tree lights when no one is home. 
Never place open flames on or near your Christmas free. (AHA) 

(This information was gathered from the National 
Christmas Tree Association, www.christree.org, and the 
University of Nebraska-Lincoln Institute of Agriculture and 
Natural Resources Cooperative Extension, 
www. ion r.unl. edu/pubs/Forestry/88-866. h tm.) 

Courtesy of Article Resource Association, www.ara- 
copy.com 



tO*>° 









&A7-2Zd-2de>8> 




Roger Lutz 



From our 
Family to yours, 

have a Happy 
Holiday Season. 



AMERICAN FAMILY 



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December 4, 1998 






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... ■ . , . . \- :■ '■ .. . . 

HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS 



■ ■■ - . ■■■ ■-■ r.- .':-. 






LakeI^Neu^ipm/-B3 








If you have a doll collector oh your 
gift list, this holiday presents a 
, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to 
begin a Disney collection that will con- 
tinue to be treasured through the years. 

Mattel, Inc. [MAT: NYSE], the worldwide licenser for Dis- 
ney Collector-Dolls, has unveiled the 1998 Disney Collector 
Doll and Toy Collection, a unique series that is available for a 
limited time. 

Accented with special holiday designs, including sequlned 
holly leaves, bells and mistletoe, the Disney Holiday Collec- 
tion has something for everyone, including: 

Holiday PrincessTM Snow White celebrates the holiday 
season in her blue velvet and white jacquard gown and festive 
white faux fur muff decorated with sequlned holly leaves. 
Snow White is the third in a series. 

Pedte Holiday PrincessTM Collection, the three 3-1/2 inch 
dolls, Cinderella, Snow White and Belle, are miniature replicas 
of the festively dressed originals. Each Princess has lovely 
rooted hair, is fully poseable, and comes with a doll stand 
printed with the doll name and year Introduced. 

Cinderella's Royal Holiday CarriageTM, a holiday- themed 
re-creation of the carriage from Walt Disney's Cinderella, is 
equipped with moveable horses and galloping sounds. The 
carriage includes a 3- 1/2 inch Cinderella doll dressed in a holi- 
day outfit 

Holiday HeroTM Buzz Lfghtyear, from the film "Toy Sto- 
ry", is the only holiday- themed Buzz Lightyear available. This 
hero says four holiday phrases, has laser lights, and is adorned 
with mistletoe. Boys will love going to infinity and beyond this 
Holiday Season with Holiday Hero Buzz 

The authentic Disney Limited Edition Collector Dolls, in- 
spired by long-time Disney favorites, offer something special 
for everyone. The collection includes: 

Cinderella, the beautiful fairy tale princess from Walt Dis- 
ney's Sim "Cinderella, " is dressed in a long, blue satin gown 
and "glass" slippers, including rhinestones that replicate 
sparkles of fairy dust from her Fairy Godmother. With her au- 
thentic Disney sculpturing, detailed features and rooted eye- __ 




the 1998 Disney Holliday Collection, featuring dolls 
such as Holiday Princess Snow White, is perfect for 
collectors who fancy Disney memorabilia. 

lashes, this special doll looks like a princess on her way to 
meet her Prince Charming. It Is the fourth doll In the Signature 
Collection Series. 

Evil Queen, the cunning and beautiful Evil Queen from 
Walt Disney's classic "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" is 
dramatically dressed in a vibrant, purple satin gown and a 
black velvet cape accented with a white satin collar and faux 
fur trim. The box that was sent with the hunter to retrieve the 



le doll. The 
Eva Queen Is the fourth In The Great Villain CoUectibhTNi/ 
Imperial BeautyTM Mulan, from the 1998 summer ani- 
mated Disney film, is dressed in a glamorous red and gold tra- 
ditional Chinese ensemble, which contrasts beautifully with . 
her ivory skin and jet black hair. Her accessories include a 
golden tasseled shawl and an intricately detailed golden head- 
piece. Mulan is the second doll for the film Premier Edi- 
tionTM. • ^ ' -'--'■ .:y : ' : i 

■ Debuting as theflrstof the series in the Daytime Drama Col- 
lectionTM, the Erica Kane Doll Is sure to turn some heads, as she 
does on television daily. The soap opera diva and queen, of glam- 
our from the popular ABC daytime drama "AU My Children," is 
stunning as a collector doll in the satin, off-the-shoulder gown 
that she wore to the Crystal BalL Rhinestone jewels, a sparkling 
clutch purse and a black velvet stole complete the fashionable 
ensemble, which captures the star's sophistication and fashion 
sense. As the first in the series of collector Daytime Drama Dolls, 
Erica is brought to life by her authentically sculpted face and 
beautifully, rooted up-swept brown hair. 

In addition to dolls, Mattel is re-introducing classic Disney 
toys for a limited time. These authentic Disney toys will take 
adults on a nostalgic trip down memory lane. 

The 60th Anniversary Fisher-Price Disney Standard Char- 
acter Wooden Pull-Toys, Mickey Mouse Drummer and the 
Donald Duck Xylophone, were meticulously recreated from 
the 1930s and feature animated movement and sound pow- 
ered from a pull-string. The pull-toys are made out of real 
wood and hand-painted — they're so authentic they are 
stamped with a Fisher Price reproduction seal so there Is no 
mistaking it for the original 

Mattel's Mousegetar Ir., a 14-inch guitar originally pro- 
duced in 1957, recaptures the magic of the Mickey Mouse 
Club. The mini-guitar features a raised Mickey Mouse face 
and a crank that plays the official "Mouseketeer" theme song. 

Pinocchio, an all-time favorite created by Walt Disney, is a 
genuine, fully-functional, wooden marionette handsomely 
dressed in red woolen pants, black velvet vest, and his signa- 
ture yellow felt hat adorned with a real feather. Pinocchio is 
featured with a wooden display stand and a brass handle and 
name plate. 

Courtesy of Article Resource Association, unvw.aracopy.com 




-A-Grandparent 



OUR HOME IS 
YOUR. HOME 

Come visit us & see 

the difference. \ \- 

• 24-Hour Nursing Care by a licensed and 
caring st&ff 

•Three delicious meals served in our dining 
room 

• Special diets and snacks 

• Daily activities with frequent outings 

• Physical/Speech therapy 

• Pastoral services • Recreational therapy 
•TV Hook-ups in every room 






ILLCREST 

Nursing Center 



847-546-5300 

1740 N.Circuit Dr. 

Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 



Hillcrest Nursing Center 
employees have known for 
over 25 years the rewards of giv- 
ing the gift of love to the elderly. 
We would now like to share those 
rewards with the community by 
inviting you to adopt a grandparent 
(one of our residents). Remember 
giving can take many forms. It can 
be the traditional gift, sharing a 
smile, holding hands or lending an 
ear. If you have the small amount 
of time it takes for any of these, 
then you qualify for Hillcrest's 
adoption program. For more infor- 
mation or to adopt a Grandparent 
please call Ronda at 546-5300. 
Happy Holidays. 




phi; 



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E4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS 






Decembers 1998 



^xmuHkd, that caeft tmetn&c, & 



I reserve the heritage of your family 
** J by mixing it up in the kitchen this 
holiday! Cooking with family members 
of all ages and stages is a wonderful way 
to pass on the tricks of the trade and 
your own traditional seasonal delica- 
cies, notes Sue Zelickson, editor of the 
"Minnesota Heritage Cookbooks." 

What is your heritage? Where did your favorite recipes 
originate? Now's the perfect time to call your rejatives and 
learn the secret ingredients that make their pumpkin pies so 
perfect and their watermelon pickles so crisp! 

Zelickson offers the following recipes from the Minnesotaa 
Heritage Cookbook Volumel to add to your family repertoire: 

Staa&t twtkey, 

1/4 pound melted butter 
3 cloves garlic 
1/4 teaspoon ginger 
1/2 teaspoon seasoned salt 
1/8 teaspoon paprika 
Dour 

10 pound turkey 

Combine the first six inpt'dimis. using enough flour lo 
make paste. With hands, nib 

mixture inside and out- 
side of turkey. Place in 
large pan and bake un- 
covered at 325 degrees 
for 2- 1/2 hours or until 
brown, basting often. 
Cover with aluminum 
foil tent and cook for 2- 1/2 
hours more or until turkey is 
done and leg moves easily. 




Recipes to share this holiday 




May stuff with your favorite dressing. 
8 to 10 servings 

M&uueigUm JOatmhaAe 

(tAin OMe~afiaped cecftiea.) 

1/2 cup whipping cream 

3 eggs 

1 cup sugar 

1/2 cup melted butter 

1-1/4 cups Dour 

lard or peanut oil for frying 

powdered sugar 

Whip the cream. Beat eggs lightly and add to the cream. 
Add remaining ingredients. Bake on a krumkalce iron on top of 
the stove. Turn the iron once while baking each cookie. Re- 
move krumkake from the iron with a spatula. Roll at once 
around a wooden krumkake roller, cool and remove. For an 
added touch, cookies may be filled with sweetened whipped 
cream and strawberry preserves. 

Yield 6 dozen 5-inch cookies. 

£jiglbfi plutn -.pudding. 

(Prepare 4 to 6 weeks before Christmas) 
1 pound citron 

1/2 pound candled lemon peel 
1/2 pound candled orange peel 
1/2 pound pitted dates 
1 cup blanched almonds 
l pound currants 
1 pound seedless raisins 
1 pound seeded raisins 

1 pint brandy 

2 cups silted flour 
1 teaspoon cinnamon 
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves 
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger 
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg 
1/4 teaspoon mace 
1 teaspoon salt 
1 pound ground beef suet 



1 cup fine dry bread crumbs 
4 eggs 
4 ounces currant Jelly 

Matd&auce: 
1/2 cup soft butter 

2 raps powdered sugar 

1 teaspoon brandy or vanilla 

Finely cut the citron, lemon and orange peel, dates and al- 
monds. Place in a large mixing bowl and add the currants and 
raisins. Pour the brandy over the fruit mixture and let soak for 
24 hours, stirring frequently. Sift the flour, spices and salt to- 
gether and mix with the suet and bread crumbs. Combine this 
mixture with the fruit. Beat the eggs until very light and stir 
into mixture. Then stir in currant jelly. 

Grease well one large or twp 
small steamed pudding molds 
(coffee cans can be used, using 
foil as a cover). Pour batter into 
molds, secure covers tightly, 
and place in large kettle 
with water reaching 
1/3 up the mold. 
Bringwatertoaboil, 
cover and simmer 
gently for 4 hours. Check fre- 
quently to make sure water has 
not evaporated. When done, un- 
mold and wrap In cheesecloth well 
moistened with brandy. Wrap in foil and refrigerate until 
Christmas. To serve, put pudding back in molds and steam as 
above for 1 hour. Serve with Hard Sauce. 

To make Hard Sauce, beat butter and powdered sugar un- 
til smooth. Flavor with brandy. 
12 to 16 servings. 

For information about "The Minnesota Heritage Cook- 
book, " a collection compiled by the Minnesota Division of 
the American Cancer Society, call Ginny Mies (612)925- 
6370, 

Courtesy of Article Resource Association, www.ara* 
copy.com 



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This Season. We Aren't Just Fixtures Anymore 

INTRODUCING OUR 

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December 4, 1998 



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HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS 



Lakeland NeWspapefis/BB 









Tips for keeping holiday 



■ ■ . 






-'■.,-,- .. • - '-'. ■ • ■"■ • 





■ 



For better or worse, the holidays 
have a tremendous emphasis on 
food. Sharing traditional dinners 
and festive desserts is a favorite way to 
celebrate the season. But, weight gain 
during these weeks has become a tra- 
dition all its own. 

"Every year it's a familiar struggle, " notes fitness expert 
Judi Sheppard Missett. founder of Jazzercise. "We resolve not 
to gain weight during the holidays, only to face tempting treats 



at every turn. But there are ways to take part without going 
overboard" 

Missett offers these tips for keeping pounds off as you en- 
joy (he season: 

• Plan ahead for "fun" eating. When a party is on your 
schedule, eat lighdy that day — but be sure to eat Arriving to 
an event hungry is a sure way to sabotage your efforts. Take 
small portions of your favorite foods, so you won't fee! de- 
prived, then shift your focus to good conversation with other 
guests. 

•Drink plenty of water. Although this is important year 
round, drinking a glass of water every one to two hours can 
also curb your appetite. 

• Lighten your own holiday recipes. There are many ways 
to lower the fat and cholesterol in your favorite recipes, such 



as using half the oil, substituting low or nonfat sour cream and 
cream cheese for.the regular varieties, and replacing whole 
eggs with egg whites or egg substitutes. 

•Don't rush your meals. It takes up to 20 minutes after 
you've eaten for hunger to dissipate. You're less likely to 
overeat if you take it slowly. 

"Make exercise a priority. "It's nearly impossible to avoid 
overeating at some point during the holidays," admits Missett. 
"But that's okay if you keep up with your exercise program. 
Have a firm workout schedule in place for November and De- 
cember and an occasional indulgence won't have a lasting ef- 
fect." 

Courtesy of Article Resource Association, www.ara- 
copy.com 



Pick the right apple! Favorite recipes for fair favorite fruit 



Apple season is in full swing and favorite 
recipes are resurfacing In family kitchens. For 
the very best taste, it's important to pick the 
right apple for the job. Below are some guide- 
lines. 

For eating: 

If you like them sweet, choose Red Deli- 
cious, Golden Delicious, Criterion, or Gala. If 
you prefer your apples tart, try Granny Smith, 
Jonathan, Macintosh, or Rome Beauty. 



For salads: 

lust about any variety will do, but Red 
Delicious, Gala, Golden Delicious, Granny 
Smith, Jonathan and Pippin usually top the 
list. 



For pie: 



Golden Delicious arid Pippin make excel- 
lent pies, but Granny Smith, Jonathan, Wine- 
sap, Jonagold and Gravenstein are very good. 




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Yes we have Fancy Fresh 

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For sauce: 

Try Gravenstein, 
Golden Delicious, 
Granny Smith, 
Jonathan, Pippin or 
Macintosh. 



For baking 




Rome Beauty are considered 
best, followed closely by Golden Delicious, 
and Jonagold. 

Used often in salads and desserts, apples 






provide entrees 
with delicious 
flavor, too. 
Whether you 
visit a local or- 
chard and pick 
your own or find 
your favorite va- 
rieties at the gro- 
cery store, apples 
are a tasty indication 
that autumn has ar- 
rived! 

Courtesy of Article Resource Association, 
www.aracopy.com 




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E6/ Lakeland Newsp, 



apers 



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KBHMggw *i" \.J> 



Hi 



HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS 



December 4, 19S8\ 




the home can be quick, easy and festive 









ecorating the home is an important part of the 
holiday season. Children and adults aJike can't 
wait to trim the tree, hang the stockings and 
string the lights. For many, it's as traditional as Christmas 
dinner itself. 

However, it seems like the holidays get more hectic every 
year, giving people less time to put up all of their decora- 
tions. Thankfully, decking the halls doesn't have to be a 
time-consuming project. In "365 Ways to Prepare for 
Christmas" (HarperCollins), author David E. Monn offers 
people quick and easy decorating ideas that can fill their 
home with the holiday spirit in virtually no time at all. 



• Lay sprit vs iiU'verjjrrrnson ihf m;m 
(HpiriT. (JircaJ ;i s(niif> of ivliili- lights l»() 
lirvon vvirt'i through rhrin. and nestle some 
tolltrn'lifcs ;imkf thv greens. 

* Haw* several ililjrretsi sizes of ptnn 
sein'.i jitofs in ra< liepuls in b.iskeis. and 
add trailing ivy, 

• Cover (hi- manid or a wide wiiidowsiH 
wiili a bed of Spanish moss, and luck in 
pieces of ivy and hotly, pinecones, and 
some mils and fruit. 



• t ; ill i-«idu>pots. terracotta pots or bas- 
kets with pmecoiies. and plaie them on ihe 
mantel or iviwlowsills. 

• Use wooden howls, baskets, and 
stoneware and ceramic pitchers and 
cachepots for a country or rustic look. 

• Festoon gates, railings and lampposts 
with garlands of greens dotted with 
pinecones and holly; add strings of white 
lights. 

• Drape a long rope of greens over the 



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front door, letting it fall halfway to (he 
ground on each side. Attach a red velvet 
or satin bow over the doorway, and encir- 
cle the garland with a streamer of the 
same ribbon. Frame the entry further by 
placing a full red poinsenia plant on each 
side of the doorway. 

• Hang a holiday wreath with a 4-inch- 
widc silk ribbon right onto a mirror In the 
entryway or over the mantelpiece. 

• Fill a woven basket with large 
pinecones interspersed with clusters of 
delicale baby's breath; thread tiny white 
lights throughout, hiding the wires under 
the pinecones. 

• Tie an iridescent wire-edged ribbon 
around a basket holding fruit, and finish 
with a festive bow. 



• Place extra mirrors around the house 
during the holidays to add to the glow by 
reflecting and multiplying the special ef- 
fects of your decorations. 

• Wind strands of tiny white Christmas 
lights and greens around and up the banis- 
ter; tie large plaid ribbons along the way. 

• Place a polnsettia or flowering plant 
on every step, peeking through the banis- 
ter. 

• Hang flat snowflake ornaments on the 
fire screen to create an Interesting illusion 
against the warming blaze. 

• Use a galvanized pail for an Ice buck- 
et, and tie a big calico bow or two Western- 
style bandannas around it for a casual 
country look to add a festive touch to a par- 
ty- 



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HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS 



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Lakeland Newspa^ 



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' Santa Claus Is only one of niariy ■ : 
Christmas giftbrtogers, and was hot ■ ■; 
always trie jolty fat man in a red suit 
weknowtoday; ;; 
•Thousands of years before Christ, 
the Scandinavian god Odin rode 
through the world at midwinter on his 
eight-footed horse Skipnir, bringing 

jp iHis son ThbrVgod of fanning, thunder, and war, made his 
home iri the far Norths His weapon was lightning, his color red. 
At midwinter he fought the gods of ice and snow, and con- 
quered the cold. ... 

At the same season, the gentle German goddess Hertha de- 
scended with her gifts of good fortune and health. 
v The Christian religion brought the end of such pagan gods, 
in form at least Later, as St Nicholas and Father Christmas, 
they reappeared in spirit 

.' Bom in Asia Minor In the fourth century, the boy Nicholas 
grew up to become a bishop. Legends tell of his kindness, his 
love for children, and of miracles he brought about On an 
ocean voyage to the Holy Land, tie was said to have quelled a 
tempest and restored life to a dying sailor. He was also said to 
have brought three murdered schoolboys back to life with love 
and prayers. 

A certainnoblerhan with three daughters and no dowries 
for them had nowhere to turn. When the first daughter was 
ready to marry, the good bishop Nicholas tossed a bag of gold 
into the house at night Later the second daughter also received 
a mysterious bag of gold. When the third daughter's turn came, 
the nobleman kept watch and saw the bishop toss another bag 
of gold into the house. The bishop begged the girl's father not to 
tell, but the news got out 

The third bag of gold, it was said, fell into a stocking hung by 
the chimney to dry. This, some believe, is the reason we hang 
up Christmas stockings. 

Stories of the bishop's generosity spread. Anyone who re- 
ceived an unexpected gift thanked Nicholas. 

Six hundred years after Bishop Nicholas' death, the Russian 
Emperor Vladimir visited Constantinople. There, hearing all the 
wonderful stories, he decided to make Nicholas the patron saint 
of Russia In time, word of the kind bishop passed through 
northern Siberia into Lapland - to the people of the reindeer 
sleds. 

Statues and pictures show the saint with three bags of gold. 
Merchants of northern Italy took him for their patron, placing 
three gilded balls before their doors. Since the merchants lent 
money at times, the golden balls became the symbol of pawn- 
brokers. 

St. Nicholas Is the patron of a number of cities in Europe. In 
Greece, many boys are still named for him. And there is hardly a 
seacoast in any Catholic country without a chapel dedicated to 



^jf^W^SWftsif #ii&^&*i 'A«vUjii.; 



■■\^:Hin^vm0imi&i, 



Santa Clans Through the Ages 



him. For Nicholas is the patron saint of 6aflors,^weUascMdrerL Dr. 



E^rpM^W^^WTVpftWQhWtn^ Symbols: 
Holly, Reindeer, and tt 

The anniversary of his death, December 6;came so close to 
Christmas that, in many countries, the two merged. In Germany | 
and the Netherlands, however, St Nicholas Day remained " 
apart V; -<: ;V ''' '• > "'^' ; W ■':■;'■>■■■■ 

Dutch children were told that St Nicholas, or Slnterklaas, 
sailed from Spain with a Moorish helper. They filled their shoes 
with hay and sugar for his horse and woke up to find them filled 
with huts and candies. In homes where Siiiterklaas appeared in 
his bishop's robes in person , he usually resembled the father or 
oldest son, and knew a great deal about the children's behavior. 
At that rime, St Nicholas carried a birch rod as well as presents, 
In case the children misbehaved. Today he is more kindly. 

Children in old Czechoslovakia believed that SvatyMikulas 
was brought down from heaven on a golden cord by an angel 
When Svaty Mikulas arrived on Christmas, the children rushed 
to the table to say their prayers. If they did well, he told the angel 
who came with him to give them their presents. 

In parts of the Alps, "ghosts of the field" cleared the way for 
St Nicholas. Behind them came a man wearing a goat's head, 
and a masked demon with a birch switch. 

In the Berchtesgaden district of Germany, twelve young 
men dressed in straw and wearing animal masks danced along 
after St Nicholas, ringing cowbells. At each house, after gifts 
were given, the masked men drove the young people out and 
beat them, or pretended to. A symbolic punishment for idleness 
or misbehavior, It was once part of a pagan ritual to ensure 
crops. 

At the prow of the ship in which the Dutch sailed to the 
New World in 1630 was a figure of St Nicholas. He wore a 
broad-brimmed hat and held a long-stemmed Dutch pipe. 

The writer Washington Irving described him in 1809 as a 
chubby little man with a jolly smile, drawn by a team of rein- 
deer. 

This portrait so delighted Dr. Clement Moore of New York 
City that he wrote "A Visit from St. Nicholas, "the famous poem 
that begins " Twos the night before Christmas,..". 

A family friend heard Dr. Moore read the poem to his chil- 
dren, and copied it down The next Christmas he sent it to a 
newspaper, the Sentinel in Troy, New York. It appeared in De^ 
cember, 1823, without the author's name. 

All who read It were delighted with St. Nicholas as Dr. 
Moore described him: "He had a broad face and little round bel- 
ly, That shook when he laughed like abowlfulof felly" 

Dr. Moore, himself a professor of Divinity, felt it beneath his 



■..*.-■■, ~. 



X-Ste 



.;, dignity to admit that he had written ; . 
the poem It was many years before' 
xhedi&;'.:''-: : .: r ;v";': ■,:>\ : -^,-.^ \ '-■■':''}. ■ 
j|| \ Read and loved by children and % . .'■■"'■: 
■ grownupsyikeea^ 
poem won still more friends for the ^' 
new, jollier St Nicholas. " £• 
^; Thomas Nart,vtfliodVew a series!- 
|f ; : of Christmas cartoons forifarper's - 

Weekly, remembered tiiePelzhickel, qTBmyNUlwlas, of 'his 
childhood in Bavaria. In a famous cartoon of 1866 he showed : 
Santa Iri his workshop with his record of the goodandbad 
deeds of all children: In the picture were the sleigh and reindeer, . 
stockings hung by me fireplace, and the Christmas tree. The 
red-faced, roly-poly Utile man had become the Santa Claus 
Americans know today. "■';■ , 

i Back in the sixteenth century, Martin Luther had declared : 

that St Nicholas was robbing Christmas of its true meaning. As . 

' aresult, inmuehof Germany7and inpartsof Switzeriand, the . 

OiristCMd/C/iTOfJWwi became the gut giver. ; I- : ' /^ . •; 

The gifts of the Christ Child are brought by^tib messenger, a 
young giri with a golden crown Who holds a tiny 'Tree of Light" 

Swedish children Wait eageriy for Jtdtomien, ,'a gnome '■'.% 
whose sleigh Is drawn by the Julbocker, the goats of the thunder 
god Trior. With his red suit and cap, arid a bulging sack on his 
back, he looks much like me American Santa Claus. • 

In Denmark, too, the gift bringer Julemanden carries a sack 
and is drawn by reindeer. Elves known as Juul Nisse are said to 
come from the attic, where they live, to help with the chores 
during Yuletide. The children put a saucer of milk or rice pud- 
ding for them in the attic. In the morning they are delighted to 
find it empty. 

In Poland the children's gifts are said to come from the 
stars, while In Hungary the angels bring them. Children of Syria 
receive theirs from the Youngest Camel on January 6, which is 
Three Kings' Day. 

Children of Spain, Mexico, Puerto Rico, the Philippines, and 
such South American countries as Argentina and Brazil, also re- 
ceive their gifts at this time, but from the Three Kings them 1 
selves. 

Italian children, too, are given gifts on Three Kings' Day, but 
the gift bringer is La Befana, the same ageless wanderer known 
in Russia as Baboushka 

La Befana refused to go to Bethlehem with the wise men 
when they passed her door. The Russian Baboushka misdirect- 
ed them. Both women have searched for the Christ Child ever 
since. On the eve of Three Kings' Day they wander from house 
to house, peering into the faces of children and leaving gifts. 
English children wait for Father Christmas, known to their 
ancestors as Christmas itself. Driven underground by the Puritan 
ban on celebrations, the gray-bearded old gentleman reappeared 
during Queen Victoria's reign. In time he had acquired reindeer 
and sleigh, a sack of toys, and a home at the N orth Pole. 



<«** 



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'U. '■?, 



men gamer tneir 
gifts of the season at 
Leider's Garden Greenery. 



What would the holidays be like without the 

vibrant color and majesty of poinsettia plants? Whether 
they are placed at an entryway or as a centerpiece, as hearth decor or 

Christmas tree accompani- 
ment, poinsettias are a 
beautiful way to make the 
holidays festive. These 
plants are also great gifts 
for that special hostess, 
faithful friends, and those 
relatives we greet during 
the season. 

Our poinsettia plants are 
grown right in the green- 
house, for outstanding 
quality and color clarity to 
stay healthy all through 
the holidays and well into 
the new year. Stop in and 

see our display of red, 

white, and pink plants, as 

well as our poinsettia trees. 

Christmas Trees 
_ ^ Live Wreaths & Roping 

j j Bl | [)FD§ r ™ A! ' ^ Uf lEKioor/0uujoOI ' SeaiOF ? 3, Decorating 

GARDEN GREENERY INC. 

Located in Grayslake on the comer of 
Rte. 83 and Lake Street 

(847)223-2422 





HOURS: 

Moa-Fri., 9 alni to6 pJTL) 
Sat & Sun, 9 aifn. to 5 p.m. 



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E8/ Lakeland Newspapers 




W ii HU I LLTil^j ■ ^[..yr ■ tiy-V'tr i - ■* ftr- — J-*-^ 'wwhjw- 



HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS 



Qecember4,j998 



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■ ra*» ■ BKa ■ mu ■ on o ^=m u Man 

present Hits coupon upon opening a | 
checking or savings amount... . 

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hiifcey or ham from your . 

— ._.._._ mmmm _ «*r>mv> BH Jewel food Store I 

Comer of Route 12 & GraiidAveriui/ FoxTaice 




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.£10/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS 



December 4, 1998 




Homemade 






sweet treat 

ift-giving can be one of the most enjoyable aspects of the holidays 

— and one of the most tiring. While you love to give gifts to your 

relatives and friends, walking through crowded stores searching 

for those "perfect" presents can take a lot out of you. 












■ 
".-■ 






This year, gel creative. Give themed gift baskets that you 
put together yourself. Whether baking utensils and a delicious 
recipe or fluted glasses and a refreshing beverage, your pre- 
sents will touch the hearts of all who receive them — and help 
you get in and out of stores quickly. 

When making these baskets, add color, aroma and flavor 
with citrus fruits. Navel oranges, lemons, grapefruit and tan- 
gerines, as well as mandarins and tangelos, will be available 
throughout the holiday season, according to Sunkist. These 
sweet, juicy citrus varieties, from California and Arizona, can 
be the perfect addition id brighten up your holiday gifts. 
Here's a sweet idea from Sunkist that is sure to please the bak- 
er on your gift list: 

A gift of 
baking pleasure 

A shiny baking sheet and cooling rack are the base of this 
present, l-rom there, any number of baking items can be 
added — a holiday-colored oven mitt, wide cookie spatula, 
cookie jar. Arrange some Western-grown oranges and lemons 
in a small kitchen basket and enclose a recipe card for Ix'inon- 
I -illed Star ( lookies. Add some greenery and a festive bow, 
wrap everything in cellophane, and you've got a heartwarming 



Lemon-filled 
Star cookies 

Makes about 2 dozen double cookies 

2W cups all-purpose Dour 
11/2 teaspoons baking powder 
L4 teaspoon salt 
\fl cup batter or margarine, softened 
1 cup sugar 

I egg 

Grated peel and Juice of 1 Sunkist lemon 
(3 tablespoons Juice) 

Thick Lemon Curd Filling, well -chilled (recipe follows) 

Stir together flour, baking powder and salt. 
In large bowl, cream together butter and sugar. Add egg, 
lemon peel and juice; beat well. 

Gradually stir in dry ingredients, blending well. 

Divide dough into three parts. Pat each into a thick round, 
and wrap well in plastic wrap; chill 30 to 45 minutes. 

On lightly floured board, roll one-third of the dough at a 
time to Ifl-inch thickness. Cut with a lightly floured 3-inch 
star-shaped cookie cutter. Remove the center of half of the 
cookies with a 1-inch round cookie cutter. 



Place star shapes on well -greased cookie sheets. Lightly 
sprinkle tops of cookies with additional sugar. Bake at 375 F for 
7 to minutes, or until lightly brown on edges (do not over- 
bake). 
Remove, and cool on wire racks. 

To fill cookies: Spread a scant teaspoonful of Thick Lemon 
Curd Filling on the bottom side of each whole cookie; cover It 
with a cutout cookie, top side up. Let cookies stand a bit for 
the filling to set. 

Thick lemon curd filling 

Makes about 1 cup 

3 eggyolks 

34 cap sugar 

Grated peel of L2 Sunkist lemon 

lulce of 2 Sunkist lemons (0 tablespoons) 

14 cap butter or margarine 

In saucepan, lightly beat eggyolks; add remaining Ingredi- 
ents. Cook over low heat, stirring constantly until mixture 
thickens and boils, about 10 to 12 minutes. Cool, cover, and 
chill well. 

Note: Any leftover filling can be used as a spread on muffins 
or as a topping on ice cream or frozen yogurt. 




Find a quality gift for 
everyone on your list. 

Visit our Victorian Living Room decked out for 

the season with a tree and anliQuc toys, then 

browse in a holiday wonderland of 

Quality antiques from our 200 dealers. 




Ask About Our 



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;1 1/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS 



December^ 1998; 






./• 




. •• ---.-.• • - ..■ -• ■ 



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J 





he very mention of the word "Christmas" can bring 

back memories of the family enjoying a delicious meal 

>gether. You almost can taste the roast turkey, cranberry 

iold, Christm^.co,okies.and all the traditional family fa- 

lorites. Everyone has a special dish to prepare for the occa- 

pon, right down to the eggnog for the holiday toast. 



White you don't want to break with tra- 
|tlon, you certainly can add to it this year, 
i addition to eggnog, why not serve a 

ich? Or, you may want to add a new 
jssert to the menu. A change is sure to en 

ice the festivities. 

"Time -Life Old-Fashioned Christmas 
xikbook" (Time-life) offers a range of 
leas for cooking, baking, dining, entertain- 
ig and gift-giving. It has more than 250 in- 
^national recipes for classic favorites, as 
[ell as old standards with original twists, 
rom appetizers and soups to meat and 
safood to candies and desserts, the book 

i help you add new flavor to your family 
leal. 

Understanding that the holiday season 

i hectic, the cookbook presents practical 

rategies and iried-and- true tips to help 

>u plan ahead. There also are 20 menu - 

llannfng suggestions to keep things orgn- 

sd. 

This year, enhance your family celebra- 




tion right from the start These punch 
recipes will add new flavor to the tradition- 
al family 
toast. 

Mock Champagne 
Punch 

Makes about 1 V2. quarts 
1/3 cop sugar 

1 cup water 

1 cup white grape j nice, chilled 

1/2 cup orange juice 

l quart ginger ale, chilled 

In a medium-size saucepan, bring the 
sugar and water to a boil. Boil the mixture 
for 3 minutes. Remove the pan from the 
heat, and cool the sugar water. When it is 
cool, pour it into a punch bowl over ice 
cubes or an Ice ring. Add the grape juice 
and orange juice, and stir, lust before serv- 
ing, add the ginger ale. 



Cardinal 
Punch 

Makes about 1 a'4 quarts 
2 1/2 cups boiling water 
2Tbls, black tea leaves 
1/4 tsp. ground allspice 
1/4 tsp. ground cinnamon 
1/8 tsp. ground nutmeg 
3/4 cup sugar 
2 cops cranberry Juice cock- 

1/2 cup orange juice 
1/3 cup lemon /ulce 
1 V2, cups cold water 
1 lemon, thinly sliced 

Place the tea in a large 
bowl, and pour the boiling 
water over it. Add the all- 
spice, cinnamon and nutmeg, 
cover the mixture, and let it 
steep for 5 minutes. Strain the 
tea into another bowl, and stir 



Throw a great party without 
throwing your money away. 



IF you've invited moie guesft than you hove drain or con'l 
imagine people toting o formal meal on paper plate, then you 
need lo go Id Taylor Rental. You (an renl everything from tables 
ond chain lo china and glassware. We even have tents lot big 
outdoor parties and popcorn mochines lor the kids. 



Dear Santa, 

I've been ready good this gear. I landed a 

roll, and got 4 buoys at 3S off. So...l was 

wondering if you could stop by Munson Ski 

Inboard Water Sports- they're the largest 

dealer of walerski and wake board 

equipment in the Midwest and the best part 

is that the m& equipment is on sale, you 

can save big! If you are uncertain about 

which brand of equipment, gift certificates 

are available! 

Love, Markie 
P.S. Since I've been so good maybe you'd 
consider a new Malibu or MaslerCraft 
Ski Boat, too. Like you, I like red. 




One Block North of Routes 12 & 120 In Volo 
(888) 488-BOAT • www.munsonski.com 



■ 



year 



In the sugar. Add the fruit juices 
and cold water, and stir. Cover the 
bowl, and chill for several hours. 
Float a slice oflemon in each 
glass. 



Hot Spiced 
Cranberry 
Punch 

Makes 2 quarts 
2 lemons, 

thickly sliced 
24 whole cloves 

cups cranber- 
ry lulce cock- 



2f 




i*- 



2 cups lemon- 
ade, fresh or 
made from 

frozen concen- 
trate 

lAtsp. ground 
cloves 

12 tsp. ground 
cinnamon 
VZtsp. ground all- 
spice 
1 cup sugar or honey 
12 cinnamon sticks (optional) 

Stud the lemon slices with the whole 
cloves to float on top of the punch. In a 
large enameled or nonreactive pot, com- 
bine the cranberry juice, lemonade, cloves, 
ground cinnamon, allspice, honey, and cin 
namon sticks, if you are using them, and 
simmer the punch over low heat for 15 
minutes. Serve in a 2- to 3-quart punch 
bowl, or keep the punch warm in a deep 
chafing dish or an electric cooking pot. Of- 
fer the cinnamon sticks as swirlers, if de- 
sired. 



Garnishing 
The Punch 
Bowl 

To give a decorative, yet 
practical, touch to your 
holiday punch 
bowl, add scar- 
let berries set 
In a crystal , 
wreath of 
ice. 
To make the ice 
wreath, choose 
cranberries or 
cherries and the 
leaves of plants 
like mint, ver- 
bena or rose 
geranium, 
- and freeze 
them in a 
ring mold 
filled with 
water or juice. 
Make sure to use 
only edible plants and fruits. 
Never use holly or mistletoe, which 
are poisonous. 

To prevent the decoration from floating 
to the top while the liquid Is freezing, make 
the ice in stages: 

Arrange the fruits and leaves on the 
bottom of the mold, and pour in only 
enough liquid to cover them. 
Freeze the layer until firm. 
Add another layer of liquid and more 
decoration, if you wish, continuing until the 
ring is full. 




Ho, Ho, Ho. 
Low, Low, Low. 






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. ■. . 



E12/ Lakeland Newspapers HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS December 4> 1998 



-=? 




* * 





special occasion traditionally is celebrated with a 
champagne toast. Many people enjoy having wine 
with their dinner. Doctors even say that a glass of red 
wine a day can reduce the risk of heart attack. 




wiiif lu'Ki'nniriK 
to play a 
/ yr rater mfa ii 
mryilay lilt", ymi pru 
haw several people 01 
who want io learn niu 
matiw hnnk miiv he il 




To help t'veryiuie I 
connoisseur, "101 Ism 
(Dorling kindersley! o 
everything 1mm ililiev 
and the various' tvpes 

st'ss VviiK, 1 ami proper stormy aru! prepara- 
tion methods. This pock el- size reference 
ptMt' puts information at people's finger- 
tips, giving them quick answers to their 
questions. 

One major concern many people have 
is knowing what type oT wine to serve with a 
meal. According to "101 Essential Tips: 
Wine," balance is the key. Food and wine 
need to complement — not overpower — 
each other. Neutral food is best with fine 
wine. When possible, regional food should 
_he teamed with its local wines. However, 
personal preference should be the deciding 
factor. 

When planning a meal, people can use 
these basic guidelines: 

3)jied£cd 6alad& 

If there is lemon or vinegar in the dress- 
ing, the wine should be acidic to balance it. 
Greens that are bitter also should be served 
with an acidic wine. Light, dry whites, 
which are more acidic than reds, suit sal- 
ads. Sauvignon blanc is a good choice. 

5M di&fisA 

The sauce fish is cooked in or served 
with makes all the difference when select- 
ing a wine for the meal. Creamy sauces 




need high acidity and effervescence, so 
choose dry whites. However, fish cooked in 
red wine will taste good with a red wine. 
Oak-aged Chardonnay is a good match for 
smoked fish. 

The effervescence of sparkling wine is 
the perfect foil to the soft texture of egg 
dishes, while at the same time not drown- 
ing out the eggs' subtle flavor. 

Sikh cuid vt&cuny fead& 

Medium- to full-bodied white wines 
best match the creaminess of rich sauces. 
The buttery flavor of Chardonnay particu- 
larly complements buttery sauces. Avoid 
very frurty wines. 

3iet and &picy, faad& 

Ice-cold beer is a better match than 
wine for really spicy foods. However, if you 
want wine, sweetness sometimes proves a 
good contrast to spices. Try a Gewurz- 
iraminer. 

Siexvdij. fme 

Following the golden rule of balance, a 
heavy meal should be teamed with an 
equally weighty red. A full-bodied, tannic 
wine, like Cabernet sauvignon, is an ideal 
match. 

Fruits that are high in acid can make 
wines taste metallic and thin. In general, 
drink sweet white, late-harvest or sparkling 
wines. 

Sweets usually taste unpleasant with a 
very dry wine. Dessert wines are the obvi- 
ous choice, but some argue that they're 
best enjoyed alone. 

CAeeae (uuwd 
Sweet wine, especially Port, comple- 
ments blue cheeses, and flavorful hard 
cheeses need full, rich wines. However, 
avoid heavy reds with soft cheeses. Very 
strong cheeses can overwhelm any wine. 




ONE OF THE FOLLOWING GIFTS: 



Michael Jordan Autographed Picture 
Drive Away Getaway Trip 
Jim Flanigan Autographed NFL Football 
2 Tickets to a Blackhawks Game 



out the entry form below and take it to one of 
the fine merchants listed for your chance to win. 
(Additional entry forms are available at each location.) 

_ | 

I 

I 

I 



NAME: 



I 

I ADDRESS: 

| CITY: 

| STATE: _ 

I TELEPHONE: 

I DOYOU CURRENTLY SUBSCRIBE TO A LAKELAND PAPER! YES 



ZIP: 



DROP OFFYOUR 
ENTRY AT ANY 

OF THE 

FOLLOWING 

PARTICIPATING 

LOCATIONS: 




American Family Insurance 

Roger Lutz 
108 Center Street, Grayslake 

Mutual Cellular 

960 E. Rollins Road, Round Lake 
3563 Grand Avenue, Gurnee 

PigglyWiggly 

815 Center Street, Grayslake 

Silk-N-Haz 

240 Cedar Lake Road, Round Lake 

Tailwinds 

Country Faire Plaza 
Routes 45 and 1 20, Grayslake 

Second Federal Savings 

Corner of Route 12 & Grand Avenue, Fox Lake 

Hawaiian Island Tropical Tanning Spa 

34825 Wilson Road, Ingleside 

Radicom 

2604 N. Chapel Hill Road, McHenry 

Super Wash 

Corner of Washington & Rollins, Ingleside 

Learning Express 

NW Corner of Route 176 & Midlothian Road, Mundelein 

Taylor Rental 

3621 Grand Avenue, Gurnee 

Nu-Diamond Glass 

39 S. Route 12, Fox Lake 

Dr. Antonio Chua Lee 

363 N. Main Street, Wauconda 
1 05 W.Park, Suite I.Libertyville 



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{Decemberf, 199$ 



HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS 



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Lakeland Newspapers/E13 



in.'L'^lTv;,,,;;) 



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899-0899 
888-0830 llftl 

E-Mail - saltonfi@ii iietSCwm 
wwwa aIton-maxlm.com 

ill Outlet in Gur nee Mills with Our 

■ ■. }/: ;'.- ' : r gpw» 797, U*t Entranca C or P " .„ 'i??y&S~ f) -.• ■■ ■■:■■ ^-\-^' : ^y^. 




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Let Us Help You Celebrate 



••• 



&&■'■ 



££* 



Assorted Juicers 






l99 



From Salton Time 
Asst. Famous Brand Name 

Watches 
Holiday Prices 



r -■■■-■ 

While quantities last. 

Some models discontinued 

JG3.JCQ 




George Foreman Grills 



OBIO Actf. '40" 
OBSO Reg. '79" 






******* sggBB'^ 



Bl» 



leorge Poraman Cookbook 8 13 BS 





Belgian 

Waffle 

or Sandwich 

Maker 



Your Choice 

$1799 

Models 

WM3CBLK, 

WM3C, WM4, 8A4 



Dessert Depot 



$993^191 



Values. to $80 
Men's & Women's 

ST 7013, 7014, 7018% 



TheJuiceman® 

Juloaman Jr. Model JM1 $ 79 B9 
1 /4 horsepower motor Holiday Priced 

Juloeman H Model JU2 *<J179 M 
1/2 horsepower motor Holiday Priced 

Also on sale Juiceman* 
Elite Series 





Salton 
Assorted 

Bice 

Cookers 

3-14 Cup 

Size 

$| eee to $BQ99 

Salton Vitamin Bar 
8 Tier Steamer 

$ as 

VP3 






9Q apodal 
Priced 



Citrus B Speed Can 
Juicer Hand Opener 
Mixer w/Knife 

Sharpener 



i99 to 



99 



^ I Saltan 

Pizzella Uffalcar .mis : .\ u 
'I Reg. •&>" $^^99 



Donut Bites mno 

Reg. '29" ^SS 9 ' 

Salton 

Peanut Butter 
Machine pbi . 



Reg. '49- 



199 



Salton 

Yogurt Maker rue 

Reg. '19- 

$1499 

Salton Hot Air 
Popcorn Popper pea 

Reg. '14- $Q99 



Maxim 

Crepe Maker cmb 

Reg. '39" ^21" 





Cafe Cappuccino 

so pc a sot. $BA99 

Heg. '89" 02J 

Your Choice 

EX450kit 

EX99kit 

HtoMni 



•vmnnsam 




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I Nutritionist 10 piece 

II COOKnrABE 
SET 

Reg. $179.99 - :. 

: $Cft99 

Now 





BREABMAN™ 
BKEiUBMAKERS 

TB440 Reg. '99- 59 
1 to 1-1/8 lb. loaf stee 

TBS60 Hog. ♦lie™ ©9 
1 to 1-1/8, 8 Ih. loaf size I 

All other Breadmakers 
at Holiday Prices . 



Gino's East 
Pizza Maker 



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IN 1 ". •■ ' 



Sauce or 

Groat 

Mil from 

•4"m. 




Maxim Toasters 

Microchip Control, Cool Touch 
2 Slice Wide Mouth ET6, ET9 

$ | Q99 

Rog>29- JL^^y 

4 Slice available at smllar savings 



Tuk» «d eattrt 10% OFT W 
Bipraaao Iboblaaa 








Asst, Looney 

Tunes 
Character 
Coffee Mug w/Mug Warmers 

*®L* •9 Wta »14 M 

Bugs Bunny or 
MarTin Snow Cone Makers 

99 

Reg. '26°° 



FARBERWARE* DEPARTMENT 

PBBCOLATOR Electric 

FrvingPans 

2-4 cup m» ^SS^L 

2-8 Cup - «49 M «* w $ 79 S9 

2-12 Cup - 8 B9" ^. IJM . yy 

COFFEE URNS E 160 * 1,10 

1 2-22 Cup -'1 19" Woks 

12-36 Cup- •139" ■>/■*■■*««—•«»• 

12-55 Cup -JW9^ TgtjuiataMitMiwjk 



^^t,^^7"r> - 1 ^\lv ' 




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$3999 



Three For AH 
J?ey. 'JOS" 



Three For ASPhu 

J?e^. 'IBS" 





flip. *5(*" 
All pUibp Ptirtxirwttro* Product \Muo Prtan] 



s 79°° 
989" 



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All other hooaay TuneJ 
Small Blactrloal AppUuwu On 8i!o. 



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Booxie Story 
Book Dolls 




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«aRAHtfil«iAflVB£AJI 

•TWIKI. TWTflai. UTTLE KAfl 



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|99 





Salton 

Presents 

TacoBell 

Kitchen 

Originals 

ID' Dipper I.^Qof Oooto 'H" 

Big INpprr 3 QL Slav Cooler 'W 

SuUFg4a4)IttaODQter '%¥* 

to KaOtea Grill MS* 

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Assorted am 

ltttou CooUa Jar, 

FQju Candida * 

OiyaUJ 

$ 24 M 














Cookie Jar 
Classics 



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Andy Warhol's 
Art Dinnerware 

A* S bourn Campbell* 
Soup CoUaotlon 

$ 5 D0 to $ 9 80 .ach 

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Father 

Christmas Pattern 

leMaceaet 

$ 99 M 

JRe*-. 'ISO 

OJfiaT GZuiitmu PittvnM Alto 
AnUiblt and as Sili / 



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Oreo By Block 

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$ 14 Mt0, 34 M l 




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HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS 



December 4, 1998 



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'English *Eggno£ (Pound 
Cafe with pouring sauce 

ll/4ceggnog 

3 large eggs 

1 pkg. (1 lb. 2 1/4 oz.) yellow cake mix 
l/4c batter (remove from 

refrigerator 30 mln. 
before use) 

2 tsp. ground nutmeg 
l tsp. vanilla extract 

Combine eggnog, eggs, cake mix, butler, 
nutmeg and vanilla in large mixing bow!. Beat 
with electric mixer on low (o blend ingredi- 
ents. Beat on medium for two minutes. 

Spoon into a greascd-and-floured fluted 
tube pan and bake in a 350 degree oven for 40 
to 45 minutes. 

Remove from oven; cool in pan on wire 
rack for 10 minutes. Cnrefully invert over 
cooling rack and complete cooling. To serve, 
slice and serve with Pouring Sauce (recipe fol- 
lows). 



Touring Sauce 

4 large egg yolks 

3Tbsp.fiugar 

1 l /4 c milk 

1 /2 c whipping cream 

1/8 tsp. salt 

1 tsp. vanilla extract 

Beat together egg yolks and sugar in small 
bowl with electric mixer until the color of the 
yolks has lightened (2 to 3 minutes). Set aside. 

Whisk together milk and whipping cream 
in heavy saucepan over medium heat; bring 
to a boil. Gradually whisk boiling mixture into 
beaten yolks. 

Return mixture to saucepan and cook 



over medium heat, whisking constantly, until 
mixture coats a spoon. Do not let boll. Whisk 
in salt and vanilla. 

Cool completely. Serve sauce with cake 
slices. 

(Kjvanza Sweet (Potato (Pie 

3 large sweet potatoes 

(approx.21/2lbs.) 

4c(approx.)water 

1 stick (1/2 c) butter 

1 1/2 c sugar 

2Tbsp. Dour 

3 large eggs (remove bom 

refrigerator 30 mln. before use) 
l /2 c whipping cream 
I tsp. banana extract 
1 tsp. grated nutmeg 
1 1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon 
1 (lo-in. diameter) unbaked, 

deep dish pie crust homemade 

or purchased) 

Peel sweet potatoes; cut into 1 -inch 
chunks. Bring to a boil in water in covered .1- 
quart saucepan. Reduce heal and cook until 
tender, about 20 minutes. 

Drain and discard water. Place sweet 
potatoes in large mixing bowl and beat with 
electric mixer on high until smoothly 
mashed. (You should get about 3 cups of 
sweet potatoes.) Cut butter into several small 
pieces. Add butter pieces to potatoes and 
beat until thoroughly blended into potatoes. 
In small bowl, whisk together sugar and 
flour; add to potatoes, beating until blended. 
Add eggs, cream, banana extract, nutmeg and 
cinnamon, beating until blended. (Mixture 
will be thick.) 

Spoon into prepared piecrust and bake 
in a 350 degree oven for about 1 hour and 1 5 
minutes or until center of pie is firm. Remove 



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pie to cooling rack. 

Cool for at least 15 minutes before serv- 
ing. 

Austrian Mushroom 
Toasts 

11/2 (3/4 c) sticks butter, divided 

1 lb. button mushrooms, sliced 

I c onion, diced 

S Tbsp. sour cream 

1/2 c stemmed fresh parsley, 

loosely packed 
1 hard-cooked egg, peeled, sliced 
lisp, salt {or to taste) 
1/2 tsp. ground black pepper 
48 thin French bread toasts 
or crackers 

Melt 4 tablespoons butter in large non- 
stick skillet. Add mushrooms and onions; 
saut£ for 6 minutes or until mushrooms are 
soft. Pour into trainer; drain off any liquid. 
Cool mushroom mixture to room tempera- 
ture. 

Place mushroom mixture, remaining 1/2 
cup butter (cut in pieces), sour cream, pars- 
ley, egg, salt and pepper in food processor fit- 
ted with metal blade. Pulse until mixture is 
finely minced. 

Spread about 1 tablespoon on each 
French bread toast; place on baking sheet. 
Rroil until bubbly. Serve hot. 

(Native American Mapte 
Corn Muffins 

1 1/3 c flour, sifted 
2/3 c yellow cornmeal 
2 tsp. baking powder 
1 /2 tsp. baking soda 
1/2 tsp. salt 



2 large eggs (remove from 

refrigerator so mln. before use) 
2/3 c buttermilk (remove from 

refrigerator 30 mln, ; 

before use) . 
1/3 c pure maple syrup 

1 stick (1/2 c) butter, melted 

Whisk together flour, cornmeal, baking 
powder, baking soda and salt; set aside. 

Beat eggs in medium mixing bowl; stir In 
buttermilk, syrup and melted butter. 3. Stir 
dry Ingredients Into egg mixture, just until 
combined. Divide batter evenly among 12 
sprayed muffin tins or 24 mini muffin tins. 

Bake in a 425 degree oven for about 15 
minutes (regular muffins) or about 9 minutes 
(mini muffins) or until lightly golden. Serve 
warm. 

Native American Wifi 
(Rice Soup 

2 c water 

1/2 c wild rice, uncooked, 

rinsed in cold water, drained 

1 stick (1/2 c) butter 
1 1/2 c onion, diced 
Ooz. fresh button 

mushrooms, sliced 

2 tsp. stemmed, minced fresh 

rosemary or 3/4 teaspoon 
dried rosemary (crumbled) 

3/4 c flour 

8 c chicken broth 

1 tsp. (or to taste) salt 

1/2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 

1 c whipping cream 

2Tbsp. sherry or dry white wine 

Place water in medium saucepan; add 
wild rice and bring to boil over medium heat. 
Reduce heat to Jow, cover and simmer for 






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SUB-WOOFERS 



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Punch Link and endbells. Now available in 
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615 West Liberty (RT. 176) ■ Wauconda, IL 60084 

(847) 487-2255 



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HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS 



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Easy recipes for these holiday dairy 
deserts are included In the new 
brochure, "Traditional Ethnic Holiday 
Recipes,: offered by the Wisconsin Milk 
Marketing Board. Clockwise from top 
right; Mexican Eggnog Mousse Pudding 
with Raspberry Sauce, Kwanza Sweet 
Potato Pie, Bohemian Kolache with 
Apricots, St. Nicholas Day Spice Cook- 
ies, Italian Chocolate Walnut Biscotti, 
English Pound Cake with Pouring 
Sauce, and a plate of ethnic-style 
cheese made by Wisconsin's skilled 
cheese makers. 

about 45 minutes. Do not drain; set aside. 

Melt butter In 5-quart Dutch oven or ket- 
tle over medium heat. Add onion and mush- 
rooms y .SauttJ.about3. minutes, until vegeta- * ., 
bles soften. Add rosemary. 

Add flour gradually to mushroom mix- 
ture, cooking and stirring until flour is blend- 
ed in. Do not let flour brown. Slowly whisk In 
" icken broth until mixture is well -blended. 
fCook, stirring frequently over medium-high 
[heat, until mature boils. BoQ 1 minute. 

Stir in reserved wild rice and any remain- 
ing liquid, salt and black pepper. 

Stir in whipping cream and sherry; do not 
let boll. 

Serve immediately, 

(Btidin de %pmpope para 
9{avidad 

lc eggnog 

I c milk 

3 large egg yolks 

1/2 c sugar, divided 

I/8tsp.salt 

1 -in. piece stick cinnamon 

1 envelope unflavored gelatin 

2 Tbsp. cold water 



ITbsp.rum 

ltsp. vanilla extract 

1 c whJpplngcream 

Scald eggnog and milk by heating togeth- 
er in small saucepan over medium heat for 
about five minutes or until temperature 
reaches 180 degrees. Set aside. 

Beat egg yolks with all but one tablespoon 
sugar until pale and thick. Add salt and stick 
cinnamon. 

Whisk 1 / 4 cup of hot milk mixture into beat- 
en egg yolks. Pour yolk mixture into remain- 
ing hot milk mixture. Cook, whisking con- 
stantly, over medium-low heat, until mixture 
coats the back of a metal spoon and thickens 
slightly, about 4 minutes. Do not boll. Set 
aside. 

Soften gelatin in cold water and let stand 
5 minutes. Whisk Into milk mixture to dis- 
solve gelatin. Remove stick cinnamon; dis- 
card. Add rum and vanilla. 

Chill in refrigerator until mixture be- 
gins to set, about 1 1/2 hours. 5. Whip 
cream with remaining one tablespoon sug- 
ar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into milk 
mixture. Pour into 8 glass dessert dishes. 
Chill until set. Serve with fruit sauce 
(recipe follows). 

Jruit Sauce 

1 pkg. (10 oz.) frozen raspberries or straw- 
berries with sugar, thawed. 

Process berries in blender until smooth; 
strain out seeds if desired. Pour into glass 
pitchen pass with Rompope. 



<Bofietman %p(achz 

8 oz. cream cheese (remove from refriger- 
ator 30 min. before use) 

. '1 lb. (2 c) butter (remove from refrigera- 
tor 30 nSnTbeToreuseY * 
2 c (approx) floor 
1/2 tsp. salt 

1/2 tsp. vanilla extract or 
1/4 teaspoon lemon extract 
l can (12 oz.) apricot filling 
As needed powdered sugar for 
dusting 

Combine cream cheese and butter in 
mixing bowl with electric beaters, or work 
with hands to combine thoroughly. Add 
flour, salt and extract, blending until mix- 
ture forms a workable dough. Chill dough, 
covered with plastic wrap, for several 
hours in refrigerator. 

Divide dough into 4 parts. Roll each 
on floured surface with rolling pin to 1 
1 / 16-inch thickness. Cut into 2-inch 
squares using a sharp knife or fluted pas- 
try cutter. 

Place a scant 1/2 teaspoon filling in 
center; fold over two corners pinch to 
seal.* 

Bake in a 350 degree oven on parchment 
paper-lined baking sheets until cookies are 





jngzrs 

lOtk Annual MoCiday Concert 

Saturday, December 5, 7:00 pm • Sunday, December 6, 3:00 pm 
Viking Park Dance Hall • 4374 Grand Avenue, Gurnec, Illinois 

$5.00 Adult / $3.00 Student (6-18 years) (Free admission for children under 5) 
Tickets may be purchased in advance at the Gurnec Park District main office or from any chorus member 

Tickets will be available at the door. For more information please call 6257788. 
Refreshment* fcrrcd after the performance. The Viking Park Singers arc a M,, ; -— . Eg 

community chorus sponsored by the Illinois Arts Council and the Curncc Park Disirict %f 



T»S1 



auiunz 

AKK DISTRICT 




Create a warm feeling in (he air (his 

holiday season with floral gifts & 

decorations from 

(prunella 's 
Mower Shoppe 

■ Po inset lias • Grave Blankets 
• Fresh Wreaths 

21 W, Grand Ave. • Fox Lake, I L 60020 

(847) 973-2343 



puffed and golden brown on bottom, about . 
IS to 20 minutes.' Watch closely at end. 

Remove to cooling rack; when completely 
coo], store in covered tins until ready to serve. 
Dust with powdered sugar. 

Arrange on paper dolly-lined trays to 
serve. 

Note: The pastries may be made up to a week 
in advance and refrigerated In tins, tightly 
covered. 

"Hint: To help seal pastry, dot two cor- 



ners with egg wash (1 egg white beaten with 1 
tsp. water). Pinch the comers so that egg 
wash helps seal the pastry. 

Place on parchment paper-lined baking 
sheets and place in refrigerator 5 minutes to 
firm up. Remove from refrigerator and bake 

as directed above. 

- i - 

Copyright 1997, Dairy Council of Wis- 
consin. All rights reserved. For more infor- 
mation visit the Wisconsin Milk Marketing 
Board on the web at www.dcwnet.org. 



"»T 



Bring in this ad to receive 

MP OFF 

Your Personalized 
Christmas Card Order 

Expires 12/16/98 




LUxa 



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966 Victoria 
Antioch 

(847) 395-4111 

(847) 395-1203 

Rax: (847)395-4232 



BILLER PRESS 

"We're Your Type" 

See Our Selection Of 

PERSONALIZED 

Christmas Cards 

Beautifully Designed For 

Personal Or Business Use. 



HOURS: 

Monday-Friday 8 am to 4:30 pm 
Saturday 8 am - 12 pm 






ew i/jear5 
Cve 1998 



$159 



OO 



per king -bedded suite 
per night 



" Complimentary cooked-to-order breakfast buffet 
from 8:30 a.m. to 12 noon. 

• Complimentary Manager's Reception served In our 
atrium from 6 to 8 p.m. 



• Spacious two-room suite with refrigerator, 
microwave and wetbar. 



V 



• Enjoy full use of our indoor pool, sauna and 
exercise room. 

• Pool open until 10 p.m. on December 31, and 
reopens at 8 a.m. on January 1. 

• Ask about special rate for January 1 . 
L^aCl for reservations at 

(84?) 945-4500 

or 




1-800- EMBASSY 



Rate based on availability. Tax not Included. 
Non-refundable deposit after 12/24/98. 



EMBASSY 
SUITES 8 

CHICAGO NORTH SHORE 

1445 Lake Cook Road 

Deerfield, Illinois 60015 

847/945-4500 



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El 6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS 



December 4, 1998 




*-% V --^'V l ** 






Lowest Prices jpu 
Six Mo 



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*|o Qualified Afrpi 




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For details 
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Notices 
lxjst & Found 

Fre« ; 

Personal! 

Auciions 

Business Personal? . 
Finunclut ......... 

P M7~ 



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.,110 
..115 
..120 
..125 
..130 
. .135 
,..140 



Help Wjnied Part-Time 
Help Warned Full-Time 
Hmpioy iiicui Agencies 
Business Opportunities 




.■*■«*>> 



...219 
...220 
221 
225 



Situations Wanted 228 

CMId Cure | 240 

School/Instruction , 250 



Antiques ' 301 

Appliances 304 

llurtL-r/Tnidc 308 

Bazaars/Crafts 3(0 

Building Materials 314 

Busit!ess/Offit.-c Equipnirni 31S 

Electronics/Computers 320 

Farm Guide 324 

Firewood .328 

Ciarage/Rumiiiat!? Sales 330 

Good Tilings To Hal 334 

Horses & Tack 338 

Household Goodt/Funmurc 340 

Jewelry 344 

luiwn/Gurdcn 348 

Clothing . . .349 

Miscellaneous ... . .350 

Medical Fqiiip/Sunplici . 354 

Musical Instruments - ■ .358 

Pets & Supplies 360 

Restaurant Equipment . 364 

loots & Machinery 368 



■■.-■■ ■ ■ ■ -.' •■'-- 




Homes Vm Sale 

Homes For Rent ■ ■ - ■ - 

Homes Wanted 

Homes Builders 

Coiido/Tiiwu Hon res 

Mohile Humes 

Aparlmciris |-'or Rent . 
Apartments Wank'd 
Apl/Htvmes To Share ... 
Rooms Kir Rein 

lluiidmgs 

Business I'mpeny Hoi Sale . 
Business Property Poi Rem 
Investment Properly 

MiirrpjuL Services 544 

■ Purnu . . j. .' ., w . . . v ..». . S48 

Virgin Lots/ Acreage . . . . . . 560 

Resorls/Vai'iiliorr Reinuls , , . .564 



.500 
.504 
508 
.510 
514 
518 
520 
.524 
.528 
.530 
.533 
.534 
. .538 
540 



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Cemetery Ijits 
Real P.siate Wanted 
Real lisljle Misc 

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Kecreatioiml Vehicles 
Siiowniohiles/ATVs 
Boals/Molois/F.tc 
Camping 

Travei/Vaealiuii 
Sports FqiiipriiL'tii 

Airplanes 



crcattoriat 



568 
570 
574 
578 



704 
70S 
710 
714 
.718 
720 
.724 



Cars t\>r Sale 

Renlal/I.eases 
Classic/Am itpie Cars 
Services ft Paris 
Car l.oHiis/li)sm;mce 

Vans 

Four Wheel Drive/ Jeeps 
Trueks/Tririlers . 
Heavy lupirprireilt 
Moloreycles . 
Wanted To Buy 



.804 
.808 
810 
.814 
HIS 
.824 
828 
.834 
.838 
844 
.848 



Appliances Repair 

Blacktop 

Builders 

Carpeulry 

Carpet Cleaning 

Coiicteie/Centettl . . 

Dry Wall 

Rduealiou/lnsn iiciion 

Electrical . . . 

Firewood 

Handyman 

Heating/Air Coiidttroitirig 
Housekeeping 



S03 
.S06 
SOT 
SI2 
SI 5 
SIH 
S2I 
S24 
S27 
S30 
S33 
S36 
£39 



Landscaping ..... ,S42 

l^rundry/Cleaning S45 

Legal Services S48 

Medical Services .S5I 

Moving/Storage ... . S54 

Punning Decoratirig ..... S57 

Parulegul/Typing Services S60 

Plmnliing S63 

Pools S6G 

Pressure Wushing S69 

Professional Services "2 

Radio/TV Repair . . S 7 5 

Remodeling S7B 

Resumes S8I 

Koitling/Sidnig ... - S84 

Storage • - - ^87 

Tax Service • 590 

Trces/Pliinls , •••• SW 

Wedding 

Miscellaneous • 



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Lakeland Newspapers' Classifieds Appear in 11 Newspapers! 

Antioch News • Round Lake News • Lake Villa Record 

Mundcleiii Ne^vs • Wadswortli News • Grayslake Times 

Fox Lake Press • Gtirnee Press • Lindcnhursl News 

Wauconda Leader • Libcrtyville News 



HOW TO P1A 
CLASSIFIED 

BY 
PHONE (847)223-8161 

oy I Ukeland Newspapers 
VTah P.O. Box 268 
MA,L Grayslake, IL 60030 



IN 30 S.Whitney St. 

PERSON Grayslake 



% 






BY 
FAX (847)223-2691 



^; : . 



■■■• 



■ 



A 



Direct Line Tues. 5pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party... Wed. 10am 
HOURS 

8am-8pm.... Mon.-Thurs. 

8am-5pm ...Friday 




CM." %' % r W 

mx -is -as ■. 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



110 


Notices 



120 


Frtt 



125 


Penonals 



125 


Personals 



219 



HelpWwiled 

Ptvrt-Tiiric 



ERRORS: 

We strive to eliminate 
' errors, but if one should 

occur, please report it 
immediately as we can be 
responsible for the first two 

■ (2)meka.onty. , 

NO ADJUSTMENTS CAN 

BE MADE UNLESS THEY 

AFEECTTHE JWATERWL 

* VALUE OF AN AD : 



COORDINATE AN ESL 

Program this Bummer. Interna- 
tional student exchange or- 
ganization soaking dynamic 
persons to organize English 
Language Programs for In- 
coming Japanese and Thai 
exchange students. Recruil 
host famines - develop curric- 
ulum • organize field trips - 
oversee teaching of English 
classes. ESL certification pre- 
ferred. Good slipened for 
qualified coordinators. Inter- 
ested? Call Sara at 1-800-333- 
3802, exl. 225. 

HYPNOTHERAPY 

The Holistic Approach to 

Good Health, 

Stop Smoking 

Lose Weight and More. 

FHEE CONSULTATION. 

(847)816-4951. 



WRITE FOR YOU! 

*X-Mq» Cards 

* Wedding Invitations 

*Shower/Party Invitations. 

•Handwritten. 

* Reasonable ratsa. 

Call (815) 383-6330. 



HEALTHY WOMEN 

Pa iPtTHITl) TRTn) 

$3500.00 Compensation 

■ Healthy women. ire e 20-33. 

needed lo serve ,is unonymaui 

egg donors. Donon will be 

required lo take mctliculion, 

lilood screening und undergo 

minor surgical procedure. We 

arc inlcrestcU in all ethnic 

backgrounds. Multiple locations 

j vail utile. If interested call 

AHR 775-327-73 15 

Srrimi.1 /iMJutrirt Only 



WE 00 NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 
FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 
UMN. For more Information, 
please contact the Humane 
Society. 

6-1/2 FOOT ARTIFICIAL 
AUSTRIAN PINE. CHRIST- 
MAS TREE. (B47) 244-9434. 

FREE LUXURY BUS RIDE 

TO POTAWATOMI 

BINGO. 

BRAND NEW 1999 BUS1 

Monday-Tuesday- 

Thursday. 

Pick-up 4:30pm at 

Hampton Inn, Gurneo. 

Ride 10 times and get a 

free package of specials. 

Hollywood Casino, 

December 13th & 15th. 

4:15pm., pay $15 and get 

$15 back, 2-sesslons. 

Double pay out during the 

month oJ_ December. 

Call fartnfarmatlon 

(847) 83lll084. 

FREE PICK-UP SERVICE. 
I will haul away your unwanted 
row boat, canoe, outboard 
motors, or fishing gear FREE. 
Call (847) 566-2819 alter 
5:30pm. 

PLUS SfZESI 

WOMEN'S LINGERIE! 

CALL FOR FREE 

CATALOG. 
(847) 834-1307. 



ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad In the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are at n at NO 
CHARGE) (We discourage 
any pet ads). Deadlines: 10am 
Wednesdays. (847) 

223-6161. ext. 140. 



125 


Personals 



115 



Lost & Found 



LOST NOVEMBER 23RD. 

in the vicinity of Round Lake 
Beach, duffel bag and purse. 
No questions asked. Need 
glasses and medication. (847) 
497-3444, {847)5870291. 

DID YOU FIND Someones 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dept., and get your 
results, FOUND ads are 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
(847)223-8161. 



A BABY LOVED ADOP- 
TION Mom's at home, Dad's 
a business executive. We love 
hiking and the outdoors, mu- 
sic, and life's simple pleas- 
ures. Please let us give your 
baby a lifetime of love and op- 
portunity. Edith and Barry i- 
800-816-1001. 

A BABY TO CHERISH 
ADOPTION 

Susan Is a nurse who adores 
baking, crafts and travel. 
Cary works in the family 

business, loves sports and Is 
a tender and affectionate 
husband. We ere eager to 

give your baby our complete 

love and lots of advantages. 

CALL SUSAN AND CARY 

1-600-717-1347 

(at homo). 



ADOPT: AFFECTIONATE, 
PROFESSIONAL couple 
(doctors) dedicated their ca- 
reers to caring for others. We'll 
give your newborn everything 
life holds, especially OUR 
LOVE. EXPENSES PAID. DA- 
VID/BETH 1-800-754-3077. 

ADOPTION 
IS AN OPTION 

Dear Special Blrthmother. 

We're Brad and Lisa, 

a stay-at-home mom and very 

devoted father. We would love 

to give your precious child a 

wonderful life, full of 

opportunities, and lota of tove. 

We know this fa a very 

difficult, 

Important decision for you. 

Let's talk and plan your child's 

future together. 

Medical, legal, counseling 

and court approved 

living expenses paid. 

Confidential. 

Please call our attorney at 

(708) 957-6830. 

ADOPTION: FULL-TIME 

MOM and devoted dad will fill 
your baby's life with love and 
laughter. Expenses paid. Call 
Ann & Ed al 1-800-288-0061 
Thank You. 

IT PAYS 

TO LOSE WEIGHT! 

LOOK GOOD, FEEL GREAT! 

EARN EXTRA INCOME WITH 

HERBAUFE 

TOLL FREE 

(877) 500-SUM. 

LOOK GREAT1 
LOSE WEIGHT? 
MAKE MONEYl 
(847)940-9689. 

LOSE WEIGHT 

LOOK & FEEL 

GREAT 

EARN EXTRA INCOME 
OR DISCOUNTS 
ON PRODUCTS. 

HERBAUFE 
Call Kathy...(847) 395-8053 

LOSE WEIGHT 
AND FEEL GREAT! 

We can show you how 

with Herbalffe. 

Independent Distributor. 

Call (847) 546-^275. 

METABOUFE356rm> 

Natural diet supplement. 

Lose Weight & Feel Great 

Just In time for the holidays. 

Independent Distributor 

(847) 263-3876 

http:\\cyber- 

mail2000.com\stores\ 

metabolite 



PLUS SIZES! 

WOMEN'S LINGERIE! 

CALL FOR FREE 

CATALOG. 
(847) 634-1307. 



PLEASE HELP US 
ADOPT! Musica) mom, athle- 
tic dad, married 1 1 years, lov- 
ing parents to 2-adopted pre- 
schoolers hoping to adopt 
your precious baby. We live In 
an activity-filled comfortable 
home with 2 lovable mutts In a 
close-knit neighborhood full of 
children (many adopted). Med- 
ical, legal, counseling and 
court approved living expens- 
es paid. Confidoniial. Please 
call our attorney at (708) 957- 
6833. 

WAXING OR TWEEZING? 

Try electrolysis 

(permanent hair removal) 

and permanent cosmetic 

make-up, 

(ays brows, eye and lipllne). 

Sherry (847) 249-7446. 



140 



Financial 



BANKRUPTCY $78*. 
STOPS garnishments. Guar- 
anteed valid since 1991. Di- 
vorce $99+ Low caost Debt 
Reduction and Foreclosure. 
Avoidance services available 
without bankruptcy. Fresh- 
Start 888-395-8030 

NEED CASH? IMMEDIATE 

cash paid for future settlement 
payments, lottery winnings 
and life Insurance policies 
from terminally ill policyhold- 
ers. Call Singer Asset 1-800- 
605-5007, www.singeras- 
set.com 

S 8 8 6 8 8 8 8 6 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 



LOVE TO DECORATE? 

NEED TO ORGANIZE? 

New Party Plan! 

Hiring consultants and 

booking shows. 

A Great Way to Start off the 

New Year. 

Call 1-80O-639-4518. 



EXPERIENCED 
WAITSTAFF 



Full or part time, must bo 
wilting to work evenings.. 
Looking for mature individ- 
uals who are interested In 
long term employment with 
an established restauranL 

$100 Xmas Hiring Bonus! 

Call Armando 

(847) 566-0475 

El Barrio Restaurant 

Mundaleln 



S 
9 
S 

S 
9 

9 

9 
S 

s 

8 
S 
8 
S 
S 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
9 



INSTANT 
CASH 

We hold the title 

tojonrcw* 
You keep the cat 

1 Ho Credit Check 

15 Mia Approval 






INVENTOIkY 

TAKERS 

•Students 

welcome (must be 

IB yrs. old) 

•Regular 

Part-time 

positions 

•Days - Nights - 

Weekends 

•Great 2nd Income 

•$7.50 to start ' 

Equal Opp. 

Employer 

RGIS INVENTORY 
847-662-9277 



f 



• (847) 249-5500 ; 

8888888888888818 

ATTENTION 
CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 
if you have placed clasalfled 
advertising with the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may re- 
ceive a misleading statement 
from another firm request- 
ing payment for Ihls advertis- 
ing. To receive proper cred- 
it to your account, till pay- 
ments Tor your Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

La t i fUn d Newspapers 



Make money 
for Christmas! i 

We are looking for highly 
energetic individuals to 
work in a fast paced friend- 
ly environment preparing 
newspapers for delivery. 
Thursday from 8:00 a.m. to 
8:00p.m. Grayslake/Round 
Lake area. This is perfect 
for anyone looking to 
make extra cash!!! 
Call Karen for interview!! 
(847) 740-4035 



•** —*———*— -»_«. ■^T'^^.T-r;v7?T;777'3!?~ slXi - 






=»- 



014 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



r • 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 


Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



LOOKING FOR 
| SANTA | 

IN ROUND LAKE 

BEACH FOR 

WEEKENDS 

DECEMBER 5A0 

DECEMBER 12 A Rj 

WILL TRAIN 
we SUPPLY SUIT 

EXCELLENT PAY 

r.ALi 1-800-969-2'MO 

EXT K ?.1 



Permanent 

Purl-Time 

Work days. Evening* 

and/or weekends for 

your home lo own 

extra Income. 

Weekly paycheck to 

*chcdutc pickups of 

donations for well 

known charitable 

ontanirallort. 

din 4-6/week 

IVtr more tnlo, call 

630-5I5-57GG 



< lui'imj. it .T>mm£' M*|,r 
up r>* SI>|»W how" 

• •-N i nn»NM in ;'^l; ^ 

-*-.*»»l ' > . . A, . .-i.L . ,, 

.%• , s, ,\ri,vi* aim cn'i'i 

■•%-. tv\| •, * h v*.V\ loam 

fst+i i.*,m>iit *hi* s*l* tiftt'M 

>*>• *-> »%»., 1ir-lrfiJM\«*liil£ 

llkl ***.vsi*\ '-.i.-nfll 

■ "- . ..-.t V *> * V |M<1 

V* -, n * ,\1a ■• " l\V <1 

'«*i * » i^ ■ * ifr -r-v... 



Soci.il Service* 
NIGHT MONITOR 

'Vt : hi' . yip Wiirwi 

.!• ,».V'>(l.l/ /uvt/f'i t .III' 

-.1. ' r* •. * frvo.oje £" '» 

Iliw4 itvi*»jui;Aj i hi 

mvtiMitfv fi> fVVil 'ilt" 

.>,". ' *w/W\ r»>ii#i 

I j ... ki-itil ilStiWW ii' 
*!•?«% »-.*li, *i »* 1 iiiil.i«I 
\l' H.iiilm 

l\ t ll.n I II 

t\ i , ,•••.1.1 II htVWI 

•■i. ;U ' ..*(• i't(' I 

1 1 'I 



SN0WPL0W OWNERS 
OPERATORS 



■ 






BOBCATOWNERS 
OPERATORS 

lop fitty! 

I'lciHy nl work, (iu.ininicrtl Ihmiis 
\n wail toi viun milium. Paul ^.h 

(847)272-1747 



>.•> ...i.tin.... ••'■' 



■....•.ii 








,s -V '."V'MA/'S 

\n i in i 



r' .f i - 4, - - , i »' a* j,- *f* * J»e J.i'ln f^ i I 'f 

- J u*Iiiiii*<* riprkii*- * W.nr.'Hfi Hsp^rwWI • i rjfftl M*ifi(ar<4tiu « 

' Mj-uc U#trV«iin *l livpair • ' 

'*.«.*•*■ "i. n fc i .;-■■-.> J*>c I"' C«KM>«' ■ * * -«*M 

iix. ( , a/ I a;: (U»nu AmMm 

1 '»• \*tr""T' *•*.- ' *■•«• jl * J* 1 * 'f ' ' f - ** ,liatT ' * * r 




rime on 
your 
I hands? 



N ,iu \ ti'Uf t/ni/Uf fit iili/i HI MM \niir frrt Unit 
tjltktmJ ."».» >jw^'i li ••»» j..ijH'«i V^ 1 ""'"" /'" **■"' 
,.«. libfU.ui^ mJ«>. 4 M»i /iw* »»' <i'anUl< •>//).« AW 

CMJJiGhMVDKMS 
itaVShW'tVKS 

Jj^-Jj fMr Ai**' uv anM« 

«0c/*iV 

Fw Interview Call 
Pick (after Noun) 

Lakeland Newspapers 

(847) 740-4035 



1 



IrXrtflflflR - .PflftflftW^fl 



Amoco 



Retail Clerks 
Needed 

■flexible hours- 

|ll1».!\ln i. h*|l> 

i^ii* tihstfow0tifii !• 

, cog rMw wni"' A 

• I'll. ii-H Iw.illh i (wti^i 

opp^ m p*f ion 

• lu *» IMW'i 

1.V nV**> 

,iu l< l\l»'l' 

■ ,»rH*,-fl,'l H 

si," i; 

f - [ . in ' ,\n M 

juuuuuywuuuuyuuuwuuujyutj 






Pampered Chef 

noods moro consullonts 
to demonstrate quality 
kitchen lools at homo 
kllcnon Bhows. A vera go 
S15/S20 hour commis- 
sion. No experience 
necessary*. Call Linda 
(847) 249-1015 






Calling all Full limtrs 

Who Want Stmie Extra 

Cash!! 

\\(,ik Uiciif fm hifhh 

rtfifriii mitniikiih towDti 

(i a /ijif jHH nf UwnSs tnvwm 

mrnl /t/r/kifinjf nr « ijmpr t% 

U" iitU\n\ Ihuruiil) 

lumSlVWI 10 SIX) I'M 

(tfuwInir/Koumt hiU area 

Mm ii>h mil rur wtt plrni\ of 

lime fi» tft I'* »<'«' full itntffnt' 

urui nwir r Urn tiuh rinr' .Vi> 

ifV€ nil »ii/'' ntrdtd. tvl must 

br ph\ hi <j//» uWr hi li/f tmaW 

buiullti 'Ipaprt 

i <jtf Aiti-o In' mirntfrn" 



\MIHh: 

IIUllAL CARRIER 

SUIIS/ 

W/IDSWOHTR 

P.O. 

• $10.54 PER HOUR 

'MUST PASS 

DRUG TEST. POLICE 

CHECK. A DRIVING EXAM 

'MUST HAVE 

OWN VEHICLE. 

PH (B47) 662-6825 
FOR MORE INFO 



JU0WP10W 

SuB-COIUJuiCfOHS 



Nttdtdfor Wider '98 

(iuaranterd pajmrntfor til 

plowy Musi hart drpmdailr 

rrhirtr with plow, and full cor- 

rrage Inmranct, and titan dri- 

ring history. Ideal Sut tonlrac- 

Ion ihould hart 2 jtart of 'mi- 

dtntial tnowpfawiag exptri- 

tart. ExttQtnl pay A Inctntirt 

propam. Call 847 -6 1 $-0X00 

and ask for Writ or Miit P. 



PART TIME 



b 

lu 



b 



DELIVERY ORfVERS 

Mike op to $8«$ 1 0/hour 

(fmnf hm Yg\U Ortrtn t<*n%* 1 inuranc*) 

Please apply in person or call 
WM OUNDO'S PIZZA 

843 Rollins Rd 
Round Lake Beach 
847-546-7744 



Wf 



FOOD SERVICE 



Part Time 



Vulory Liko Continuing Ciire'Ccntei n 
U'ckinj; .. Ii.u Jwuikni(^ dcpcnti.iblc di- 
I't.iry ,iiiii!,tnl lo work pjit-timt', in our 
• Umii .ind motli-m lonp-lcrm cue facil- 
ity You will .unit with |H(-p,w,itioo ,ind 
irivmni; (il mc.ili ,ind iiiacki ^nd m.nn- 
t.iin >.imt,ir> cnviionmcnt in the kitchen 
.in. I iliiini|> Kn.in Mm! enjoy wOlking 
«itt. tl». r M.-ily t».. y ol 16 JO • il 16 pt -i 
tujiii li.m.l , I. ,c,,n ul i-xprntTici- plui 
|ll|tt/u,r' ( Ki-n.l .lilf(-|ci,|,,,J j, u | | )r ilffltl 
I'llMIC ,*|l}<ly III IH-MI.II 

VICTORY LAKES 

Continuing Care Center 

UJ'j'i f t.i.in.J Ave 
Imil.-nlnml. II fiOO-H, 

I'l. Ml 'Vi •mm 




\ Gi'l an "A" for Success!! 

1 TAKE THIS QUIZ! 



fob fjij 



■ KITi 1 HI J 

1 J [ ] I '" '»"H liU l«i l .1111 Illy I 

\ I [_ J I'" \"U Ilk* |ll njlli ' 

A \ 11 I |J " V*W ll.ls. .. |.U., .nit |,|,.„|r •,,,„ r 

I — 1L_J !><> V>" u.inl |i.nl luiir vMiit in ., 
In. mil j I'llvinniitu III I 



If >ou Mum* TWl ycj, lo any 01 u || | |J U . 

ubo>t', >ou *uii ilai i lumiiiy dolluib v U, h 

cunuiii^iou in I.Akll ANDh flknt 

St'j-vU'iV) l)c-|)ui luifiii. 

Pitas e smut letter uj interest in. 

Al tu; Maui c- 1 n l :u«iilia 

c/o Uikeluua Publishers 

P.O. Box 268, CiciysliUie, II. 64)040 

orfkxti) 

(847) 223-2691 






nMmtvneMTrvifVifvvvnnnnnnnnn n BODannaanaoaaa 



220 



Hdp Wanled 
PuD-Tlme 



AVON PRODUCTS- 

START a homebasod busl- 
iioss. Work tloxiblo hours. 
Enjoy unllmilod comings. Call 
Toll Froo (686) 581-AV0N. 

BE YOUR OWN BOSStl 

Nood oxtra cash? 

Join THE K0MEMAKER3 

IDEA COMPANY. 

Bo the first In your 

neighborhood lo sign up as a 

consultant (or our groat party 

plan. Floxlbio hours and lots of 

tun, wondarfu) products. 

Call today for Info. 

1.800-639-4518. 

DONT JUST MOVE ovsr, 
movQ up. Con-Way Truckload 
Sorvicos Is more than just a 
■Trucking Company," CWT 
Drivers rocofve paid health In- 
surance for themselves and 
their family., .Paid holidays and 
vacations. Company paid life 
Insurance and 401 K. Family 
rider program, assigned new 
and lale model convantlonals. 
Frequent home lime, direct 
deposit, competitive pay and 
much moro. Let us tell you 
moro about CWT and how you 
can be moro than 'Just a Driv- 
er.' Call 800-668-CWTS 
cwt.job@con-way.com Con- 
way Truckload Services CWT 
Is an EOE. 



Ti<.\vi:i.Ar,i-;\T 

in* Tniiiice 
l-'ull nr Pari Tliiu*. 



JlltlS. I l.llll-ll.ll ft JlllIN 

t';ill Kim nr M;ti«ji- 

S47-J)4I)-I(>4() 



|Banking 

CALL CENTER 
REPS 

Starting at 

$10.05/hour 

Normal hours 

8:30 am-5:00 pm M-F 

Crcai Ukes Credit Union is 
looking for several people to 
work in our call center. Our 
Call Center handles a variety 
of inquiries from members 
relating le our products and 
services. The ideal candi- 
date will have: 

Excellent Customer 

Service Skills 

Great Interpersonal Skills 

Ability to work in a fast 

paced environmeni 

ilasic PC experience a 

phis! 
If vim like to work in a fast 
paced, team oriented envi- 
rtmrnent then apply today! 



TELLERS 

Full ant] Port Time 

Arc vmi tired of retail? 
Would ymi like tu make at 
least Sfl.?5 and get better 
hours? If you have: 

("ash Handling 

experience 
I •Customer Service skills 
• InUTpersunuI skills 
Then apply at ('real l.nkes 
( Jt'dil Union! We offer on- 
sitr li;iiniii|>, career devei- 
iipmt'tii. tuition reim- 
l)iusi<nieni ll)IK, med- 
Hiil/iliniiil t much mure! 



LOAN DATA 
ENTRY REPS 

(7iuii-'l:'io pm 
or 12 pm -ft mil) 

I'Ullei im lt|i||. Iltpuilillg 
lllillieit ii|i|i||i nitons lintl 

mi piling unlit titiot mil- 
lion H'lnle.l |o t| M - M . InatujB. 
Idi-iil i ■mdiiluuis will have 
•liiut noiiy mtpurUmru, 
I'taii i'< anis. nM-dUttni 

lIllDllli-ltiiiitiUVllln 

•'»>i|t|>ly. |i|i'iihn 
lllllll/lllll/tl 111. Ill 

Omuillti in 
Ann -HnllihH 

•ilt.il IrtLin,! (,1,1k |||||,|f t 
/W!)liiuim|| ( iytt u ,„| 

Moiilii lm,i U o. || tiimm 

t*!-* UN / 1 lit*/ ti /im 

I* mill fttt&Bkuaij 

m 



■ ■ -w^ 

■ •: ■ 



December 4,1998 



220 


Help Wanted 
Pull-Time 



220 



HelpWanlcd 
Full-Time -. 



HOMEWORKER3 NEED- 
ED MAKE S347 weekly Cut- 
ting ID cards. Part-time 
2hrs./ovonlng. Immediate 
openings. SASE: Med Tag, 
358., S. Main, *47-180, 
Orange. Ca. 92868. (SCA Net- 
work). 

PET CARE1 ENERGETIC 
dependable person, various 
duties Involving pets. Must be 
flexible end available 7 
days/week Including wee- 
kends end holidays. Call only 
between 10am -5 pm, Monday- 
Friday. Shel-Ray Pet Shalet 
(414) S57-2163. 

LICENSED LIF F A HEALTH 
AGFNT NEEDED. Quality pro- 
ducts, high commissions with 
advance before issue and 
benefits. (Must qualify for ad- 
vances & benefits) Call: 1-800- 
252-2581. 

ATTENTION 
NEED 43 people 
to lose S-100'br 

All natural. 
Or. Recommended. 

Free shipping. 
Call 702-881-2196. 

DRIVER BUD MEYER 

Truck Unas Refrigerated Haul- 
ing "$1,000 sign-on bonus lor 
experienced company drivers 
'Solo drivorB start up to 33e 
solos drivers and contractors 
CALL TOLL FREE 877-283- 
6393 GRADUATE STUDENTS 
1-600-338-6426. 



DRIVERS AND TEAMS: 

Starting pay up to CTC/mlle. As- 
signed Frelghlliner convert- 
donate, Improved speed 
stance, excellent miles, time 
home every 7-10 days In most 
areas and more. Experienced 
drivers call Heartland Express 
toll-free 1-87-PRO-DRfVE. 
Owner Operators ask about 
88f/mlle. Call 1-8-PROFfT- 
PR0.E.O.E ■ '- 

DRIVERS COMPANY AND 
OWNER OPERATORS Van 

opportunities- •Wl.OOO/yr. 
average *Home . weekends 
'Assigned late model equip- 
ment •Free medical *No.NY 
city •Class *A* w/Haz. Cad 600- 
788-7357 LANDAIR TRANS- 
PORT, INC. 

DRP/ER8/CDL-A OAINEY 
TRANSPORTATION. Up to 

sic/ml. (Up to 36c/ml. start). 
Solid benefits. Satellite 
equipped. tate model conven- 
tlonals. CDL Training avail- 
able. 1-800-738-0708. 



EASY WORKI 
NO EXPERIENCE 

S500-S1 ,000 part-time al 

home stuffing envelopes. 

For free Information send 

setf-addressed, 

stamped envelope: 

R&J Enterprises 

Mailing Services, Inc. 

P.O. Box 402 
InglDsldo. III. 60041. 



siirariiTE 

DIRECTORY 

The following schools need 

substitutes on a coatinuuig basis, please contact the 

names listed below for farther information. 

AdlaJ E. Stevenson High School District #125 

Two Stevenson Drive, Lincolnshire, JL 60069 

Contact; Personnel (847) 634-4000 

AptakisJc - Tripp School District #102 

1231 W'oiland Rd, Buffalo Groic, IL6O0S9 

Contact: Laurel Karolc*jak (847) 634-5338 

Big Hollow School District #38 
34699 N. Hwy 12, Ingleside, It 60041 

Contact: Ms. Buchner (847) 587-6800 

Day School / Northbrook 

3210 Dundee Road, Northbrook 1L60062 

Contact: tide Snyder (847) 205-0274 

Deerfleld School District #109 
517 Deerftetd Rd. Deerficld, IL60015 

Contact: Phyllis x-222 (847) 945-1844 

Grass Lake School District #36 
26177 Vf Gra<xs Lake Road, Anlioch, IL 60002 

Contact: Pal Reed or Sue (847) 395-1550 

Grayslake School District #46 

450 N Barron Blwl., Grayslake, IL6OO30 

Contact -Jan Fabry x-1100 . . (847) 223-3650 

Hawthorn School District #73 

201 Hawthorn Parkway, Vernon Hills, 1L60O61 

Contact: Shari Keena (847) 367-327S 

Lake Bluff School District #65 

121 E. Sheridan Place, Lake Bluff, IL 60044 

Contact, jean Amundson x-14 (847) 234-9400 

Lake Forest Elementary Schools 
95 W. Deerpatii, Lake Foresi IL 60045 

Contact: Karen Allie (847) 604-742? 

Lake Forest High School District #115 
1285 North McKinlcy Road, Lake Forest IL 60045 

Contact: Wendy Antrim x- 118 (847)234-3600 

Lake Villa School District #41 
131 McKinlcy. Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Contact: Kalhy (847) 356-2385 

North Chicago Community Unit School Dist. #187 
2000 L'wis Ave., North Chicago, IL 60064 

Contact: Mona Annslrong (847) 689-8150 

Northern Suburban Special Education District 
760 Red Oak Lane, Highland Park. IL 60035 

Contact: Hill Charts (847) 831-5100 

Wnuconda School District #1 18 
555 N. Main, WaucoiHla.IL 60034 

(hntmt Ktiiliy x-10l (847) 526-7690 

Wmikcgiui Public Schools District #60 

2111 N. SlitTttlun Hil , Waukcgan, IL 60085 

Omtittt IVrsiiitnel (847) 360-5404 

Wllittclt-o Public Schools 
ftl-1 liwini Ril. WHnwuc, ll. 60091 

flwiArrf; Mi (looiltiow (847) 256-245C 

Wnoillmtit Nchtinl Oltttrf ct #90 

I7.V/I) llatjw Ukt* llwtl, (ihkw Ukv, IL 60030 

timM Mlvlittllo (847) 856-3605 






■ . 



...... _ : ■„ 



rrrr^r 



* < '*— <*>«..~.. SwTTfi 



- . > .-- ; 1 



December 4, 1998 



CLASSIFIED 









I 



220 



Help Wanted i 



220 



Help Wanied ■ 



WILDLIFE JOBS 

to$21.60/HR 

INC BENEFITS. GAME 
WARDENS. SECURITY, 
MAINTENANCE PARK 

RANGERS. NO EXP 
NEEDED. FOR APR AND 

EXAM INFO CALL 

1 -000.313-3505, EXT 2407 5 
8AM - 9PM, 7 DAYS fds Inc \ 



EXPERIENCED F/T 
PAINTERS NEEDED 

for 

Altmann Diywall & 

Painting 

Located in Wauconda. 
Must have references. 

CaO . 

(847) 526-8273 




The Job 
Search 

By Nancy Sakol 



Dear Search: 

On an Interview last month, I was told that If the 
position was offered to me, that 1 would be paid at a 
specific salary plus benefits which included medical 
and dental coverage. The employer went on to say that 
should I opt not to take the medical and dental cover- 
age, that I would be paid at a higher salary. I personal- 
ly was intrigued by this as my husband has excellent 
family coverage and the additional benefits are nice, 
but unnecessary. Is this a new trend? 
G.D.-Llbertyvllte 

Dear G.D.: 

I hear more and more of employee oriented com- 
panies that want to cut unnecessary costs wherever 
possible and eive back what they can to their employ- 
ees. Quite often, with a duel income family, one or 
both providers may have complete family coverage 
included in their package. While Insurance is a great 
benefit in any position, there may be a contribution to 
the company on the part of the employee to obtain 
these benefits. If both parties are contributing to their 
Insurance package it may be an unnecessary expense 
and little advantage. Of course one can say you can 
never have too much insurance, however, If it is cost- 
ing additional monies out ofyjuir. pocket and It isn't 
needed, you have 12a much. There are employers who 
are taking this into consideration and in doing so have 
found that quite often they are giving out Insurance 
when not needed by the employee and In turn are 
offering the employee a higher salary if the employee 
chooses to waive the insurance package. In many cases 
the difference can be substantial, however, insurance 
packages do vary, so if you or anyone you know should 
run up against this type of situation again, please be 
sure to obtain a copy of the employers insurance pack- 
ago and weigh it against your spouses policy to be sure 

that your family is covered' as thoroughly as possible; 
Be sure to look for things such as maternity coverage, 
disability coverage ana emergency room services to 
name a few. 

Dear Search: 

Just a note to say thank you for the information you 
give us to us readers every week. Job hunting is a diffi- 
cult task to begin with, but it is nice to know you dedi- 
cate your column to help others with sound profession- 
al advice. Keep up the good work! A.P.- Vernon Htlls 

Dear A.P.: 

Thank you. Your note was much appreciated. 



rofes- 
umee. 



Note: Nancy Sakol is a licensed personnel p 
sional and President of Superior Personnel in Gi 

Letters can be sent to Nancy Sakol c/o Lakeland 
Newspapers, P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 






Lakeland Newspapers / CI 5 .! 






220 



Help Wanted 
Full-time- 



>:■;>:; AWIHOH-o;,^;-' 

' Wanted: Inilrurrrtnt Flight. 

., ■ ,■ Instructor -, . j 

F/T immediate. wiukegtn 

Airport. M7-2W-S190IH 

or mill returns to 

Stick & Rudder, 2341 W. Beich 

RAWiukeoanlL 60087 

Fix M7-24&-S195 ' 






- » 



tOiirafloland's premier: 
: IntemEt Service I 
: Provider Is in search : 
of a Web Developer | 
due to rapid growth. : 
This individual will : 
j work wirh customers : 
: and develop sites. : 
: Knowledge In HTML : 
: and IAVA Script ! 
: required. If you are : 
: Interested In creating : 
:a future with a rapidly: 
: growing organization, : 
: rax resume to skw. : 
: 18471 223-BBIO or : 
l e-mail: { 

skw@us- j 

S nelhfiredrom : 



INVENTORY 
SPECIALISTS 



NATION'S LARGEST 

INVENTORY SERVICE 

We have Immediate 

openings for 

Manager Trainees. 

QUALIFICATIONS 

Applicants must 

possess strong 

Motivational and 

Customer Service 

Skills. 

WORKING IN 

LOCAL AREAS 

Salary starts at 

$30,000 

Auto/travel 

allowances 

EXCELLENT BENEFIT 

PACKAGE 

• Medical 

• Dental 

• Vision 

• 401K 
Send resume to: 

RGIS INVENTORY 

SPECIALISTS 

127 E. Lake St. #301 

Bloomingdale, IL 

60108 



Pleasant Company: 

1 Friendly Work Environment 

2 Generous Product Discounts 

3 Weekend Premium Pay 

4 Bonus 

Pleasant Company, maker of high quality 

children's books, dolls, and accessories, is now 

hiring full-time seasonal employees. 



CATALOGUE FULFILLMENT - $10.00 PER HOUR 



Day Shift: 7A.M.-3:30 EM. 

Pick, pack and load orders. Previous 

production / fulfillment experience desired. 



STOP IN BETWEEN 8:00 A.M. & 4:30 P.M. TO APPLY 



or Call 414-862-7578 if you have further questions. 



Pleasant 
com pany 



12400 Fox River Ttoad • Wilmot, Wisconsin 



220 



Help Win ted 
. Full-Time: 



220 


■..HelpWuttd-.' 
Full-Ume ■>'■ 



220 



IWpWmicdX' 



220 



rilelp Wanted - 
" -'; ., FulMbneK ' 



.Distribution I ;-P. V;. nfFi ■ ' ■ 

IF YOU'RE LOOKING v 

FOR A FART-TIME 

WORK SCHEDULE... 

THEN KEEP READING! ! ! 

PICKERS & PACKERS 

Cole-Parmer' -Instrument Company Is an 
International distributor and manufacturer of scientific 
Instrumentation products servicing educational/ 
technical communities, Industrial firms and govern- 
mental agencies. We currently have opportunities with 
great hours: 

$8.00 Per Hour!!! 

PICKERS & PACKERS 

Full & Part-Time 

We are looking for bright, dependable, hardworking 
individuals with good communication skills and a 
strong customer service orientation. 

We encourage internal advancement while ottering, an 
outstanding work environment. Please call or send/fax 
resume or letter of Interest: 

Clare English 

623 B. Bunker Court 

Vernon Hills, IL 60081 

PH: 847-540-7600 Ext. 5023 

FAX: 847-540-1515 

e-mail: 

HR@coleparmer.com 

Cole-Parmer 

Instrument Company 

An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F 



• -~ " ~* W v 


f" ■* 


ELECTRICIAN 




Immediate opening for, 




Residential/Commercial 




with 4 years minimum' 




. experience. 




Benefits Include: 


•: 


Vacation, Holiday, 




Health 4 Ufa Insurance. 




847-223-4682 


' 


Contractors 


• .: 


Electric 




Services Inc. 



Lake lilulT Service Company ii 

loofcinf Tor 11 CLERICAL 
ASSISTANT (Mominp MF, or 
Pull Time) The Gerical Aiiistarii 
will be rciponnble for pruviilinp 
adiuiniiir.ilhe help lo our man- 
agement itafT. Ideal candidalc 
will luve excellent telephone 
ililli with a iironf cuilomcr ler- 
\Kt focui. * ttofVinf knowledge 
of pencral office equipment 
including fiu and copy 
machine i. and be computer liter- 
ate with tome experience uiinf 
Winder* i 93. Light typing and 
filing it required, hi it ■ valid 
dnvtf'v hcenie and i ran » pulia- 
tion Experience in Building. 
Maintenance or cuml ruction ii 
helpful, but not nccmory To 
ichrdute an interview, please call 
847-613-0300 or hi reuime in 
confidence lo 847 61 5 0783 and 
,nl tar Rick or Mile P 



RETAIL 




-***/.^" 



Aj part ol uiic uf the uttnt-gruwing n-Uil derailment (tore cluim in America, Canon Pirie Srolt if Co., 
it M*rcliing lor talented inaivuluali to join our teun at yarioui ChicajfalanJ hKalioni. Wi- are eumiltly 
renovating our tnoc aepartmenlj to include new linef and a new Inoli. If yiw Ihinb you can earr)- lorvanl 
our tradition of (juality and Mrviec with lite tame eiitiiuiium and dedication that liai made in tlte hi^ltlv 
■ucctiilul company vc an today, we Invite you lo explore one of Iho (olkiwing opportuuiLin. 



(jxbertenced (Jhoe 



Department Managers 

If you have at loil 1 year'a retail management osperience; excellent .irrfaniialirinal, inlerpcrHinal, 
and nterclianifiiin^ ■Idlla; alioe laic, experience; and Imnw Imw lo pnmde leaderfkip to achieve 
htiaiiwM plana, then we want tn liear from you. 



cM 



'we S A L E S ASSOCIATES 

Inull-Tlme, lart-Time t' Seaninal. GuaranleeJ hourly watfea Llween S7.50-5l().frO for Ofl-daya 
with the opportunity lo incrvate uit iiuiiinmiiiri. 

vJ'e offer excellent coiujx'iirflinn and lieiiefili iucludiiif; healtli/deutal intnrance, 4()||lj). paid h,.ln!.iv« and 
eacalinni. retirement plan, a iViuniut .lnninJc iiierclmidiR' dttcounl. ami nincii niure! t'lcaae .tup hy 
your ueareil Caruiu Pirie Stotl c> Co.. tu complete an application. 

A MemlKT ul SAKf InconKiraleu Croup. 
An hiptal Oiiporlunity LtnpLiycr. A Onii; fereening Company. 




"\ 



Do you enjoy variety? Do you enjoy a 

challenge? Do you thrive in a fast-paced, 

dynamic environment? If so, you could be 

the person we're looking for! Lakeland 
Newspapers is looking for someone to join 
our exciting sales department. You will be 
a success if you possess organizational and 
communication skills and are self motivat- 
ed. If you are interested in this exciting 
opportunity please send your resume to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 



V 



P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

Attn: Maureen Combs 



J 



©RIVERS 

Luciano RcrrigerajciJ 
Transpprt oiTcrs: , 

* Home often ■■". 
*30tf/miloCo. v 

DrivcriTTcarns' . 
'siartal 34(t .'• 

* 97 Volvo conven- 

tiunals vv/Big 
Block Engines. 

Gel Mites...Bm Get llmiie 
Tw>! We'rr bis eiiminktti 
ptty well, bin utiaUeiitwjfli 
to rtitr ubnui aur people! 
JjjninChgo"' 

800.637-5154 

, or M J in Rccruiling 

800-753-8165 



- V* 

-. 

: 
" 

i 

■ 



DRIVERS 

Immed Openings. 

Forgotten What 

Home Looks Like? 

Let Us Refresh 

Your Memory. 

'Teamster carrier 

*Good wages 
'Health & pension 

or 

•Blue Cross Health 

"Dentol *401K 

'Assigned 

Air-ride tractors 

Owner Operators 

welcomel 



. GRA-BEU. IfiUCK LINE, INC I 
800-632-5300x3624 | 



ACCOUNTANT 

Great Lakes Crcda 
Union is looking for an 
Accountant lo assist in 
ihc preparation of finan 
cial and board reports, 
cost accounting, and 
external call reports. This 
person will also mainiain 
ledgers and other pro- 
jects as assigned. Ideal 
candidate will have a BA 
degree in Accounting or 
Finance with at Icasl 6 
months experience; 
spreadsheet development 
and maintenance 

required. 

Mail/fax resume with 

salary history to: 

Aim: Staffing, CLCU 

2525 Green Bay Road 

Nonh Chicago, IL 60064 

Fax: 847-887-8798. 

E-mail: 



Restaurant 



Tired of Late Hours & No 

Benefits? 
Then check out our new. beau- 
tiful a upscale private restau- 
rant overlooking a torest pre- 
seive in the Lake 
Villa/Ltndenhurst area Earn 
competitive pay. sltiltweeh- 
end'hohday differentials, and 
gteat benefits including paid 
vacations & holidays, medical 
& dental plans, discounts on 
Victory Memorial Hospilal ser- 
vices, company sponsored 
pension plan, luitiorvcerfifica- 
tion reimbursement, 5 MUCH 
MOHE' 

PART TIME COOK 

At least 1 year of fine dining or 
banquet cooking experience 
needed lo work night and 
weekend shifts. Flexibility a 
plus Duties include cooking 
and preparing dally specials 
and a la carte Hems, setting up 
the service line and assigning 
tasks io prep assistants. 

FT & PT PBEP ASST 

At least 1 yr prep exp needed 
for flexible day & evening 
shifts Responsible lor prepar- 
ing daily menu & maintaining a 
sanitary department 

Apply In person between 

7 30am-7:00pm Mon-Sun 

at the Village at Victory Lakes 

1055 Grand Avenue 
(just east of Deep Lake Road) 
■ Ltndenhurst, IL 
Ph |B47) 356-4551 

eoe 









.-•i-i. .-» -— 









■r— J!^— «^"^5? 






^VA J —*!■>'■ > a i a i. a -l*.»^jy**^»»p 



jBSEsSSSSSS 



. : : ;-^.SkKi 



1$B 



C1 6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSSIFIED 



December A, 1998 




»\ Help Wanted 
,J Full-Time 




r 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



MOLD MAKER 

Ininied Opening Colorado 
Looking lor hikers, skiers, fly 
fishermen, rock climbers & 
camping enthusiasts who ore 
also qualified to build & main- 
tain plastic injection molds or 
program & operate CNC wire, 
EDM sinkers S 3 axis mills in 

Hie Rocky Mtn region 

Career patfis leading to mold 

design, product development 

or program mgml posilions 

avail to qualified applicants 

Do you like to travel'' Gel 

your passport DTM Products 

is a fast-growing div ol a 
multinat'l contract rnlr otter- 
ing competitive wages, great 
brills & relo assistance to 
qualified candidates 
Resume DTM Products. Ime 
h.R Manager 
630 Monarch Park Pint* 
Ntwot CO (10S03 
Fa* 303-GM O^FjJ 
COE 



Teaching Assistants 

Mundelem School District 75 is hiring the 
following FT teaching assistants 

• I - Elem Bilingual Assl lluenl in Spanish and English 

• 1 - Middle School Inclusion Assl 

• 2 - Middle School Building Assts 

• 1 - Elem Remedial Reading and Main Asst 

BA preferred. 30 semester hours required. 
Salary range - SB 00-S9 25/hr based on exp and/or eclucalion 

Send Resume lo 

Or Ray Partridge. Superintendent 

330 N California Ave Mundelein, IL 60060 

847-949-2700 



••...•..•.•...••.•....». 



SYSTEMS 
ADMINISTRATOR 



Chicagoland's pre- ', 

mier Internet 1 

Service Provider is • 

in search of a \ 

Systems : 

Administrator due : 

to rapid growth. [ 

This individual will ■ 

manage the UNIX • 

• and NT systems. If * 
■ you are interested : 
: in creating a future '. 
\ with a rapidly grow- \ 

• ing organization, fax] 

l resume to skw, \ 

i (847)2234810 : 

; or e-mail; : 

'. skwQus-nfJtcfirectcom I 
: : 



DISPATCHERS 

Ah |in|!|> ■ 'llli-i Irn ft li -itinri ti M . -».trt ti i.» -U .ri> - ^.i I -.1. - '.i)i. Ja, tIiii.i 
<Mi |P. ii. |. u JK u ill • ■ 1. It. I ■ ■' it' V Sk ill', r. ■ • Ir-J '■ It' I ' I." I"' '■" I"" «l " " '" > 
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.j.,|llil|..t.' .*!■■ .'.'i -Jtill »lh|in It tl'l'ln ■]"■! >"l -.li'll 
I | in ,.,,, '.it.l i lr r<. %\l l.li' In™ '.-i'i.'. in,' iii'l'T 

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,i ■, ',,.. .... I", I j ■) .-.. !+»:. J -...Iln. '■- I'-t. I Ml. 

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. ,,. ,., | yijij j-.y, 



i 

: 



• 



f 



JOIN THE AiCE TEAM! 

Be Pari Ol A Winning Team' 

• Accounts Receivable 

• Accounts Payable 

• General Office 



WE RE GROWING OUR COMPANY Positions avail- 
able <'i I few Libclyvilli? Location Tho positions are fuil 
lime Computer skills are helpful We will train the right 
person Organizational skills, attention lo detail, ability 
to mr*;t rJearihnes and set pnorilies and a willingness 
to siiccet.-tl will be characteristics of Ibe person who 
UK tfiL'se openings Bmielit package includes 

msiiranCL' discount. 401k/ Prolit Sharing. 

vacation pay and more Apply in person or call 

Ac(< Haidware 

ifiTi Pfilnrson Road 



V, 



l.ilifirtyvillo, ILB004H 
IR47) 3fi2-339l 



J 




OPPORTIUI\IT 



hfiMnlhiW full 'Him pi-i\i 
linn u\ tulublf hi mil 

I iiti /inn li biiirmnlitiu 
(tin I tu iht\ Wift iu 

liSjHm^hlf i»i ./'(rwiwiii; 

di 1 1 /n/iri/t,' ""'' '■ufin i\ 
MM i irw iiiuihlvi nit ill 
m in mi i Ini MK/HI i 

1} HUH t\ Hill tu ln< \ 

l>r\!rri ami <>m .< m 

< ifyftinui- Hiih UH/i)t> 

pi'j'iiUlltini ii'ifiutril 

CtnldcL Cdil Decker 

.MtuiU Saint tKsiph. 

Ldke Zurich 

(S47) 40£-5«C> 



f k*.!* 



LPNs 

'Ixcollont oppoiiuntty wrffi 

vaiiflry i autonomy 

'(ttonsivo training piogrom 

'5roDlo. pwfoiSJQnoJ orooni/ahon 



" I : "'.-'• •••':. ,' ".. 

-'»■ .' ', : ■ .'• : ,-■ n- 

■fTNioflfi 

'PJ [voningt 

PPfV alio OrtJfa&fe 

'-'' * f"- i;i'. 

* J" *'* * t **f ••' '" ' j' 
I" (..*;"■ ', ,;.. > -. ; 

Cat Thoiow frylidolo 
W-6&2 JP3I 






il5-&25 PER HOUR 

Easy medical billing 

Full training. 
Computer required 

1-800-253-6661 
ext. 222 






PUCE YOUR 

MEDICAL 

OPPORTUNITY 

HERE. 

CALL 

847-223-8161 



I Health care 




RN/LPN 



** DIRECrA 
CARE 

Direct Care Workers 

for MR/DD women in 

residential setting. 

All shifts available. 

Full Time or 

1'jrl Time. We arc 

committed lo quality 

residential care. 

Contact 

Gail Becker 

Mount Saint Joseph 

Lake Zurich 

847-438-5050 



Our 1 20-bed Continuing Care Center currently 
hai two opening* m the following areas 

Alzheimers Unit 

You'll work 4-9pm, 3 days one week and 4 days 
the following week. 

Medicare Unit 

You'll work 3-1 1 :30pm, 3 days one week and 2 
days the following week. This position includes 
paid holidays, and health/dental plans are 
available. 

Both positions require rotating weekends. You 
must be caring, dependable and licensed in 
Illinois. For immediate consideration, please fax 
847-356-4599 or apply in person at: Victory 
Lakes Continuing Care Center, 1055 East 
Grand Avenue (just east of Deep Lake Road), 
Lindenhurst, IL 60046. eoe m/f/d/v 



Victory 

Lakes 

I Continuing Care Center 




r 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




D 



Help Wanted ' 
Full-Tlme | 




E 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




r 



HelpWantcd 
Full-Tlme 



Banking 

Friendly, community 

bonk seeks 

experienced, lull- Ume 

proof operator and 

general bookkeeping 

assistant 

Daytime hoars 

Apply in person or 
call Scott Horner 
of 847 548-3000. 

Extension 14 



1 Catering Deff 
Worker 

F.T. CATERING DEI) 

| WORKER AND CATERING 

AGENT NEEDED FOR 

CORPORATE FOOD 

SEBViCE IN 

NOHTHBROOK AREA. 

M-F, BENEFIT PACKAGE 

INCLUDED. 

I CALL FOR APPOINTMENT 

847-948-3970 

E.O.E. MFDV 



CONSTRUCTION: 

PROJECT ASSISTANT 

Duties win Include bid preparation, various support tasks 
for all Project Managers, data entry an AS/400 and PC. 
creating and updating spreadsheets, correspondence, 
and filing Successful candidate will be part of a support 
team Must be able lo work well with both field and office 
personnel under pressure of deadlines. Please either 
send resume with salary history (including level of profi- 
ciency In Microsoft Word. Excel and Access) to 
Aldrldgo Electric, Inc., 28572 N. Bradley Road, 
Uberfyvlllo. IL 60048. Attn: PA, or Fax lo (847) 680-9730. - 

EOE 



SYMS 



AN EDUCATED CONSUMER 
ISOUHBESTCUSTOMEH 





Retail Management 

SYMS, the leader In off-prize retail, represents 
more designers and brand name softllne manu- 
facturers lhan any other retailer In America With 
44 stores and plans for continued growth, we are 
seeking candidates for our Chicago marital. Out 
current locations include 

*GLRNEE *NILES -ADDISON 

If you enjoy the challenges of store manage- 
ment, have an outgoing personality, and have 
retail mangement experience - Syms wants to 
speak to you 1 

Wo are looking candidates Ion 

Department Managers and 
Assistant Store Managers 

Resumes can be sent to: 

SYMS Corp 

One Syms Way 
Secaucus, NJ 07094 

Attn: MD 
Fax:(201)902-0758 

Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D/V 



( .towing Service Company in Lake Blult is actively seeking FT 
ADMjNISTKATIVE COORDINATOR The candidate will be 
ri'vpomiltk.' for the efficient dr id professional daily operations of 
itie nllicr- Dulie* include answering and transferring Incoming 
tt'lurihone calls Front line resolution, follow-up. and tracing of 
ry|>ii..>l customer service issues. Providing administrative support 
r.) ki-v nMnagemcm stuff. Completing special proiccts including 
rm« %ik-s and marketing devices Candidates must have a high 
scWjI diploma and a mintumum of 2 years of previous office 
expcftewee. txcellenl computer and typing skills, and knowl- 
i- ( k)i- of common software especially MS Office Suite Is 
M-.|uin-<l Ideal candidate will possess excellent telephone 
ctmu.-ile pioblem solving, arid Interpersonal skills with a Strong 
cuMorm-i service locus Competitive pay and benclils For 
cunikiiTatwin please call 847 6150800 and ask lor Rick or fax 
n-.urm' ir conltdcnce lo 847 615 9783 



Start a Home-Based Business. 

Work Flexible Hours. 

Enjoy Unlimited Earnings. 

A VON 

Call Toll Free (800) 735-8867 



t CUSTOMER 

SERVICE 

REPRESENTATIVE 



m 



1. eaclitig mtg ol sod gooc co^o- 
nents has immed opening lor a 
cusiomei service rep responsible 
lor dealing wtextemal & internal 
cusiomers as well as handling cus- 
tomer invoicing & backup swilctv 
board/phone coverage Ideal can 
didale will have: 
* 2-3 yrs cust sve exp 

ably In manufacturing) 

Computer Literacy 

Outgoing/pleasant personality 

Team player approach 

. Fax: (847-491-1730} 



*-.i].iia R.Mi£l" 
I tdu .limit 

I »|.,Tll|l«l- 







AERIAL 
EQUIPMENT 

In Wheeling, IL has 
immediate openings 
on our night shift 
(3 30 p.m. -12 00 am) 
Join our team of techni- 
cians to repair medi- 
um/heavy duty trucks 6 
equipment. We offer 
an excellent benefits 
package & some 
irvhouse training. 

Call Dan before 

4.00 p.m. or Mike after 

4:00 p.m. 

at (847) 39B-0620 

1 



l liMMs; I l.lli: 

Inlirv tif*i>. 



WANTED 

A FEW COOP f-DUCATORS 

CHARACTER, EDUCATION, ACHIEVEMENT... 

KAIStNGTHE STANDARDS fN DISTRICT 187 

Director of Technology and Information Services 

l imiiiu'iu'iiir.iti' with r^n'rii'iiti' 
ll.-Rlu'ltir's IVfiree nr lii^lwr 

\ or iiKiri' \ i'.us in tartuwriugs I lie- Nurth C tuciiRii ^cluxil Dislncl l!- mVKiiis nu 
imln idtial w itli lliu ,il>ilil\ lu'dUiftiMiw sv<.lcin imililcms to kwn .nul ir.iiu vnrt- 
ous iimtsoI Jiiirront .lpplic.iiion .inJ clfucinclv foimtmracati.' aint fm\e 
nrnhlriiis I Ins |frwili slicuikl .iIm> 1i.hl' the ,ibilil> to pnu uk' I'dur.ilu'ii.il 
IlmiIitvIiip lu'il in iinpri" i"il ■■tiuli'iil |H'rlonn.incf niul son ices n'l.ili'il ui viuJi'iit 
.isM'ssmi'iil in acCHfttance witli llu- \ isinn, .goals a ml oliiitluvs of Hit m IuhiI ilis- 
iriii. Inur.l ihiIiiv .iiul .itliutiiiMr.iltse [iriKfiliin'S Musi -ilsn \v l.nuili.u ivilli 
uHMMirfUK-iii, n-M'.mli .nut i.'\.ilu,iiitin pMciiccs. 

I )«i lntvr 7. I^ift 

|J«ui'IJilH'r'J. IWfln DimihIht II, IWK 



(Mill |{ i'lMllOXMU'l \ rrt-Sclinnl U'.uln'i (iiuinI Iwh-a hpc W cerlilicalum) I U liMiliers. I 
I, ,uli.rv I illc I lA'.ulu^ liMil«-r |1 lij;!' ScIi.h.Ii. BilniKu.il/ 1 SI. rro K ram C oonliiiAl.ir. I i.iulir«>oiii 
■s*.ljiiiv,t*tXl4 lr.jiln.TN Aii'i' ^nil Siihsliluk- U'.ulu'r'. 

SmuI nr Li\ IrlU-r nl .ici'licilion, ,i rt-Muiu- ami ttfffliss nl cc'rlilnalli'iis In 

Uirvilnr nl llkiiii.ni Hfsniin'Vi 

2IKK) U'uis A\l>iiul' 

Ni>rll> ( lntn«i>. II «X)44 

i-.n ■fmfwi'-rwt 



ui) 



ih> 



rin.- I'nirJcrtiial Insurance 
Company of America is 
seeking bright unci encrgelie 
ptoplc hit a *alci career in 
insurance and flnancial ser- 
vices Wc offer full training, 
competitive benefits anil a 
training allowance up to 
SMK) per week. For more 
information call Michael 
Fletcher @ 

(847) 680-6265 x364 

EOE M/F'NfM 

MHA-W-IO!) 
EP W7 

<jg Prudential 
Insurance 

Corporate Address: 
751 Broad Street 
Newark, NJ 07102 



Internet I 
Opportunities 

Lakeland netDIRECT, Chicagoland's 
premier Internet access provider, has 
ground floor opportunities for people 
interested in the Internet. We are 
looking for a Project Administrator 
to coordinate the development of the 

web sites for businesses and 
organizations. If you are interested in 
creating a future with a rapidly grow- 
ing organization, fax resume to 
skw, (847) 223-8810 
or e-mail: skw@us-netdirect.com 



1 



^■^^ ) g^^v^.^.j,/ ! v v ^^^_~it.:i^y^'^>^ 



December 4, 1998 



CLASSSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers /..CJ.Tji 



■ - 



220 



Help Wanted , 
Full-Time ; 



Ho&F.mmiomu 

We will train person w/a love 

of photography & good work 

habits. Equip, camera & 

benefits Included 

Local territory. 

Carreq'd70&33M713 




220 



Help Wanted, ; 
Tull-Tlme 



220 




Local 

daycaie/preschool 

looking for qualified 

teachers, elds, after 

school club leaders. 

The ideal candidates 

will have experience, 

education and /or CD A. 

Full time and part time 

positions available. 

Please call 

Calvary Christian 

Learning Center at 

847-265-0580 for more 

information. 

134 Monaville Rd. 

Lake Villa, IL 



OK BOTH WORLDS 



If you've dreamed of a career opportunity with a 
company that encourages your contributions, values 
your Input and supports your continued success, then 
visualize yourself at Jewei-Osco. 

Our rapid expansion throughout the Northern IL 
suburbs has created several openings for those who 
possess a customer-first attitude and the leadership 
and communication abilities necessary to meet a 
diverse array of retail challenges.. 



JEWEL OSCO 

Store Management Tr.iinuus Management Trainees 

Department Manager Trainees 



In return, we provide an excellent compensation pack- 
age which includes health/life Insurance, 401 K, and 
merchandise discount. For an Immediate interview, 
forward your resume in confidence to: Osco 
Drug, Attn: Marty,3030 Cullorton Drive, Franklin 
Park, IL 60131, FAX: 888-541-5793. EOE M/F/D/V 

Jewel-Osco 



www.smorlcandrugstores.com 



Admlntitrcirt 



Come find out about 
the many benefits that 
working temporary 
can offer you! Salom 
Services inc. will 
have our recruiters at: 

The IETC Center 

221 Geneseo 

Waukegan, IL 

from 9AM-2PM 

Tuesday, Dec. 8th. 

Must have reliable 

transportation. Please 
call or come for im- 
m ediate employment 
in the Northwest 
suburbs. 

847-537-7007 



=y lHr.HM)f.uimnuman 

Paid Advortlsomont 
. www.Balomgervlcos.com 



RcsmunnNT opcming soon in dccrhcld 

;tK'%^ ; ^rVrtfi5^»;vii*ilfi-^ — — — __l--' 




atom 

GRILL 



Come Join Our Italian Family! \Wre now luring for all positions at 
our soon to open Decrfidd. truly Italian, full service restaurant! 



SCAVCRS 

v.aiv up to $500+ par uicch 

(salary & tips} 

HOST STAFF 

Earn up to $ 1 par hour 

0USSCAS 

Earn up to $3004- par UlCCti 

BflHTCNDCnS 

Ham up to $600+ par waok 



COOKS 

Earn up to $12 par hour 

DISHWfiSHCftS 

Earn up to $8.50 par hour 

SINGCflS 

Earn up to $9 par hour 

(plus tips) 

FULL & PRRT HM€ "f ICXI8LC 
DRV i CVCNIHO SCHCDUICS 

"TONS OP GRCRT BCMCFlTSt Tuition assistance program. fxnlthdub member- 
ship, car buying assistance, free employee meals, paid vacations, insurance, day 
care discount and more all in a fun and very festive working atmospliere! 

RPPLV IN MASON AT OUR NIUJ LOCATION: 
Men-fri 9am-6pm & Sol 9<un-Moon ob 

667 take Oaok Rood, right next to tlte Dafidd Mara Station! 



enf>al»Hmmitfm0l*]mmtf 



Help Wanted 
.full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 5? 
Full-Time p- 



220 



■ Help Wanted 5 
Fun-Ttoie-'.: 



COSTCO 

WHOLESALE 



NOW OPEN! NOW HIRING 

Costco Wholesale, the nation's leading cash & carry retailer, ranks among 
the industry leaders in wages and benefits. Join our team of over 49,000 
employees providing products and services to our 27 million members 
worldwide! 



Now Interviewing for these positions and departments: 



• SERVICE ASSISTANT 'CASHIERS 

• MERCHANDISERS • FRESH FOODS 

• STOCKERS • FOOD SERVICE 
$8.00 to $15.00 per hour based on experience 



To apply, visit our Schaumburg location at: 

1375 North Mcacham, Schaumburg, IL 

(just west of Woodfielc! Mall) 

or Fax us at (847)969-0912 



. Costco Wholesale is an equal opportunity employer 



220 



..^ — ■ ;=?» / 

-■■- ' vr- - , \ 



.'. Help Wanted "'■* 
!;,. :; FuU-Tline^^ 



■ 

Wis: 




i a medicdtion rnan- 
dgement company 

bcisefyin £iberh$ille^& 

astic aridtnertiefic sales and f iril f ormatiM system 

professionals. We have immediate openings in the 

following areas: 



r \ ,%:» -...-,..;. 



''• '.•■■ ;-A 



Sales 

etouBtfiaaateB 

Responsibilities include training and on-site support of our automated medication 
management system for health care providers throughout the country account 
management of site pharmaceutical utilization; sale and placement of incremental 
product offerings, and incremental revenue growth through current sites. Excellent 
sales, training, communication/ organization skills end computer literacy required, 
health care background a plus. 75-95% travel. 

Regional Account Manager - Managed Cera 

Selected Managed Care Professional will drive the sales end marketing effort of 
our product and services to Pharmacy Benefit Mgrs, Reg. Managed Care Accts, 
and at-risk integrated delivery systems. Based in Libertyville, this sales professional 
will be responsible for the Western Region of the United States and will establish 
strategic relationships with MCO's to increase sales of our medication manage- 
ment products, secure authorization to include physicians in their pharmaceutical 
provider networks, and to negotiate favorable reimbursement rates. 30% travel 
required. BA/BS required. Graduate education in business, pharmacy, or other 
health care field is preferred. Min. 3 yrs of sales experience working with PBMs or 
MCOs required. Extensive knowledge of pharm. benefits and managed care market 
trends req. 

National Account Manager 



■ 

. 

■-■ 



A proven sales professional will drive the sales and marketing effort of our medica 
tion management software products and services to large physician groups across 
the United States. This individual will be responsible for establishing strategic rela- 
tionships and increasing sales of our medication management products. Sales 
experience working with health care or software a plus. Travel required. 

New Buaina sa Account Manager 



Responsible for growing pharmaceutical sales through proactive telephone com- 
munication with new prospects, 2 years sales experience, excellent phone skills fi 
computer literacy required. Medical/ pharmaceutical background a plus. Some 
travel required. 

Computer/Information Systems 

Product Support Help Desk 



Seeking an entry-level computer enthusiast to provide telephone technical support 
to our customers throughout the county. Knowledge/ experience with Windows 
95/NT is required, SQL server and network troubleshooting experience a plus. 
Problem solving ability, technical and telecommunications skills required. Atlscripts 
is a Microsoft Solution Provider. 

Software Tester 



Responsible for reviewing requirements and writing system test cases from soft- 
ware specifications, executing system and regression tests and documenting 
defects. Familiarity of software development process and knowledge of testing 
methodology recommended. Automated testing experience is a plus. 

Visual C++ Developer 



V 



The application is a 32-bit, 3-tier client server running on Windows NT/ 98 and 
Microsoft SQL C++, MFC, and SQL is COM/DCOM ActiveX is a plus. 

We offer an excellent work environment, competitive salary and benefits package 
including 401 (k). Forward resume/salary history to: 







-: 



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Inc. 



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UbBrtyvillB, IL BDOAB f % ; 

hcom 
ng 

Visit purmtebsite: www. allscripts. com:, ■;<■ 



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C 18 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



December 4, 1998 



220 



Help Vailed 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Tinw 




ri Hdp Wanted 
'J Full-Timc 



FULL & FART TIME 
• KENNEL HELP 

Days & Evenings 
Available 

Wort m a last paced 

environment 

No Experience Required 

Apply n Person 

Mutulfinn Anunjl Hotpnul 

//.'-Ml MnpitMe 

Munjflftn, II 

\\t f^vnt i dlti 
ptrtii* 



SALES 
CONSULTANT 



Immediate opening 
in our Lighting Fixture 

Showroom for a 
reliable and detailed 

oriented person. 

CALL (847) 223-8691 
or lax resume to 
(847) 223-8693 



$$$ EXTRA $$$ 
CASH FOR THE 

HOLIDAYS 

Telemarketing 

$S - $M\r. 

Full - time days or 

early evenings. 

Call today 

549-0016 



@ 




Guinea 
Opportunity 



uprrior 

Personnel 



{custodial ; 
i full time [ 

J McHenry High School J 
I ServiceMaster is seeking I 
I custodial help al McHenry ■ 
[ High School Contact Mary J 
j or Mike al 815-344-7170 , 
■ Moo - Fn 8am to 1pm 

Applications available al J 
J District Maintenance Olfice. J 
I 4724 Cryslal Lake Rd . | 
| McHenry. IL6Q0r>0Oi Mx | 
I resume to (015) .144-71 /9 ■ 



Cabinet Maker. 
2 years minimum 
experience. Trade 
show experience 

a plus. Must 

read blueprints. 

Benefits package. 

Call 
(847) 54G-S786j 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If ynii liiivr plitrnl clititMfli'il 
nrlvc-i li.slKfl Willi Itif Lake- 
land Nrus|)ii|>fr>i yii ni.n 
trerlvf ,1 MUitlr-iulInC Mate 
mriK lii'in ivnullirr flrpii i<" 
<|iirMiii)! |«,ivriii-nl li>i Itll* 
.lilvrHIMllH T.i ri-ri-lir l»in|i 
n , mil! !■' W'Hi •■' • ""»' 
.ill n.iuiinu- i-'i win I •■!>'' 

I.lllll VrW»p.>t""l - .|.ll> lll-itlli 

mnM I'f tii.hI' ''» iiiiwi'ird 
.l.ri.l 'III'-' •■<■<'■ <<• 

L»kd*nd Nrw.rMp*"™ 

PO Box 368 

30 S Whfinry SI. 

Gr»v»l»kr. IL 60030 U 3 OS 



I PRESSMAN-tXP'D 




experienced mi 
insuicrtlen 

installers 

Needed 

Hiring Bonus 

Southern Wl 

& 

Northern IL area 

Builders, Insulation 

(815) 675-0085 

RICTPNONISI/ 

till KT Mil P 

III I. IIMI- 



■■ma, , ,ii M l( -.j r, «■. 

I |:>hl ,.■■ f, i M I",: '..' m 
' i-|. HI , -Hl.i J i >i| . '. • 



Opcititon 

Owner Operators. 

be home every 

wknd & still avg over 

S.I/'mi(lD&Mr)fof 

runs only in the 

midwest I ease pur 

chase plan avail 

800-537-6601 



•. . m' in tii'' - . ■ -j 

'.., ,..v:.-. | v'< i n .'.i \ 

M- A'.!- . ll.»,fl I' ..-.>■!• . 

n ii M'i'iil ■ I «■ I ■! ■.' 
H \| i ". i I. if -.1 i . .'. F» 
(■..'!» '.VI '.l i ; t .v.i i a. 

•<i :*t m \ • 

84? 549 971 4 

HiMAil '■! 

Wi BAKER RtJ: 

I ftXE ftUUFf. IL 6004.1 



LEGAL SECRETARY 

Experienced 



Security Service- 
Access Control 
Screcners 
f nil £ Pan time 
Seeking mature rtilinhle 
liietiintfaiila tor work as 
scrviinen, to operate, 
fhirknge » r.iys & mvlnl 
(tatacwrh i*t the 
Uikti Cmitity Court:, 
$7 r»- htiirtitxj & benefits 
Cill Amly t nun Services 
lor Interview 
IGiiOi 8P0 38i'0 



i 



AMOCO\ 



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7*,'l. b\ J J iT',M.| 



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JINGLE BELLS! 
Ring in the New 
Year with a New 
Career! Call the 
acctg. place- 
ment experts at 
Matlhews TODAY! 



Billing 
Credit 
Payroll 
A/P Supv 
Acct Mgr 
Cost Acct 



S20 S22yi 
$26 S30yr 
$.30 S33yr 
S40S45yi 
S40S50yr 
S45 SSSyr 
' » ». •. i. t 



'M 1 . & 



m 



ffl'SIIITII' to: 

Hri».[ c»t p Iju 1 Ollices 

210 i:. Smtc Ht! 

P.O. Box '6 14 

Island Lake. 11. 60042 



Construction 
Superintendent 

C' v -i'-a ' >r lanit'- 

irnjusc.ii HVAC Rt-ir.^ I 
{ iC'ji'i.! ,'Kllw •" vrs *'!*.[/■ 
«' |irti|t.'i-,1 .rcSponSitiillty 

Re-sinne 

PifinBrgy. Inc 

1651 King sway Ct. 

Sle E 

Attn John Hale 

Trenton, Ml 48183 



^A«A«AAAAAA AAA A « 

JSPKC1AI. M)Ll AIIOM 
i l)\YS(IH«ll. 

i-« ••■, •. 
<■•■-.• . . . 

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•i-je'r't.rr. -,i , f ■ 
• Tfariwr U»» f T 

Tt*t1»ri.f r T.P7 
•"M-lWwiwt lAtafnn 

r*i *c^»rwi i". 




I on 1 Nurse 

to work til ii lh»rf »ir/i 

u'l r!cmrntur\ ffjird 

tltHiHt d Miiilnu 

if lu.tti)', prr jA/v 

5/5 - $20 per fwiir 

hiiM <i im I'yptTttHi t 

t'ltdw call Caih\ rritir 

i<S-i7i ,<56-:.«.S 

lake \illaSchtni! 

tihinci 841 



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s OPTICAL , 



1 



J Receptionist/ 



Need Experienced j 

i . 5 

Dispenser \ 

1 for private office S 

1 




y^^jr^m^^^^jt^jr^^jr^ 



Banking 









RETAIL SAULS 

C'mragolarKl's laslesl groanig lumtuu, 

1 tHecuoiiics and appluncs leuiw is 

"jo-wig Kj< M time Sj| K Uss^uies 

*nc nan itv twsl Iw Bwmsetyos axj 

*SW cu5larv<\ Ko Mies eitwneicLi 

. iK^rO*^ Af ■ pmxte st^onw. wi ijmu) 

Virjiig Musi tn' ail gwiia and OnMii 

syienleo and »anU>g to help cusltxtws 

■nd nei n«<ss 0u intrs Aisooates 

<ar T V *] an hou 01 coonnssibn, ntuch 

•. v^«< A.eageeammgsriaicmj 

^i I2i*i «im jscn potailiai 

: V»fTi tr laree aUiareemanl 

3j«vlt5 Pr^tJsd Now Itnng at 

'3CC "i t *«Ti A,* , rtajieean. IL 

W0NS0N 

EC€ HT v.-h: 




UNITED STATES 
POSTAL SERVICE* 

The United States Postal Serves a arrpf&ng appHcaCjcrs fcr 
PWCE3B9^0BTrSUTtKAfCDBJv^TrpCSTEN3 

nntPosTomcsfsjAT 

*£K7hEASTB3N OJBURBAN (FSSSTm AREA THRS) 

Submit apjsBcationa between 1 1/30/98 and 12/06/98 
Jet Choices: • CTTY CARRIER Salary $27219 to S37.831 
' CLERK Salarf S27219to 537.831 

• M&L HANDLER Salary S2323 1 to S36.076 
Ho* To Apptf Use our automated telephone aochcation by 
caSng 1^00331-0753. 

:!J.Jiimi.!U:!l-.ll.,!.!.|| III | | M AVIJM 



MAINTENANCE MECHANIC 

Hi>CC€-l SCAC-a. P'OOXri s. ■;»;, ',-■ ~ s - ,'5^,^. q. jjj^gj 

"c "-o'c-s -s see" '<; '.'a.'Ti-a-cii '.*»:■ -■*^- -^ 'q- 'si & 

-^.airterarce 'etj^ ' s r ^ ^-v. ^-.e 134 v-e%'ftc« 
ScreOyiirg Mecnar <;«■ "ac 'e -e^a • oc^'e'ee 
feouired Ejcei'er.t ce-^e'-" iacK.^e "'"," J i'a , 'g /sordr- 
i^edicai Ofi'-tai arc-UJ'' Se^r: '»•*„'- e a^^; ? De-sc 
fa/ res^i^e »«R salary 'ecu'e^ef-s 'c 64.'? -^8- 7333 

h^dc^ii S&eciai PfoojcJs c: 

Mainre-'irce Joe. 

407 E Hawey S'reer 

Mur<^ie>r IL 5OO60 

Equal OpOOftur-t/ ErT■0 J c»/^' , 



umkwc ran 
a oaera uiawc* 

CtlVTOMWI SWVICK 

%t\ Appalnbncnt* for lh« tnl«t 

grmlnfi «)n.ulli|i« »lrm In Wlnoli. 

Wort In ow eemfortitil* Ourtilo 

gimonti. FTiPTIW«l 

«■!■■&»•>. Ma*" M.oefli» • eomirti- 

HonflJoouVb-n*nii. L«fconJt 

000.M»-)MS torlnltrvtm. 




INSTALLER 

Immed Opening- 

Hayward, CA. 

For natural slone. 

Must have exp. 

510-670-0393 



„*♦********* 

DRIVERS-OTH & SINGLES 

U S Postal Service Contraclor 

rvrrtts (jiMllflcd Driven with 

r*p S 1 5 05 pet hour Bring 

MVR .uicl physical to: 

CONTRACT TRANSPORT 

a/SO W BZnd Place 

Iumicc, Illinois 

I 888-883-4509 

LOL/AAP 

************ 

„, t. ■■■ ■ 1 .• /x^xxr.31 
. Adminittralive Assistant 
Si-,- Ljkj' l.rxdtion 

.' .' nif i<>riJ pforess 

Z ' ; ,/")'rm<) 'jipnrti 

>i . ■ ! i-'ii'-.j ilnlobtlici C 

.-i : .< 1 f^ irteptitwiil dulivi >» 

Po li.-* 'J'M 3 

AMmr. II f>(KHI2 S 

; • ).,. « . 1 HtM)M2 17 r ,l & 



Kindergarten TeocHar 



CHILD Ct\RE TEACHER 

•FulTnc 

• i jper«nce t 

Education reo>ireJ 
•■fopPtm 
«e offer on nnovathe jchool with a 
doekopnentd opprOOcK 

(1_f«ICAlL 

«f 7) 356-2288 






225 



Business 
Opportunities 



"EXCELLENT PRORTS- 
LOG HOME WHOLESAL- 
ERS** Join proven 18yr. Log 
Manufacturer 16 kiln-dried log 
styles, starting $9,800. Exclu- 
sive territory. Mr. Buck 1-60O- 
321-5647. Old Timer Log 
Homes. 

BUSINESS 

IS EXPLODING! 
Every home and business 

needs our product. 

Ground floor opportunity 

positioned tor tremendous 

growthl 2 minute message. 

1-800-559-1790. 

CALLING ALL LAKE COUN- 
TY MOM'SM! Bright Begin- 
ning's Family Day Care Net- 
work is looking tor nurturing, 
responsible, croalive individu- 
al's who would like to start 
their own buisnoss while slay- 
ing at homo with their children. 
If you livo in Lake or McHenry 
County and would like assis- 
tance in gotling licensed, on- 
going technical assistance, 
training, equipment lending, 
and child rBfarrnls this pro- 
gram is lor you. For more In- 
formation on how 10 become a 
quamy infant and toddtot day 
care providor in your homo 
can Dona Thompson at (847) 
356-4112 

MAIL ORDER BUSINESS 

EXPLODINGI 

Work from Homo. 

Earn S499-$2.400/mo. PT. 

S5.000/mo. FT. 

Need help now! 

Call Tiacy (800) 204-7048. 

www.neweslway.co m/ 1 065 . 

POSTAL LOOPHOLE 
PROFIT Diroci marketing 
packages. Proven, no experi- 
ence necessary. P/T OK. 24hr. 
800-638-4456 oxt. 148. Invest- 
ment reaquired. (Varies do 
penping on package de sired) . 

THOUSANDS POSSIBLE 
EACH WEEK! 

Earn money processing 

mail at home. 

Sena si 00 and SASE to 

Bngnt Futures, 

P O Box 86, 

'iVauDonda. I" 60084 



WANT TO REACH MIL- 
LION HOUSEHOLDS? You 
can now placo your ad In more 
than 800 suburban newspa- 
poro reaching more than 8 mil- 
lion house holds around North 
Amor lea with one simple call at 
a low, low cost. For details call 
000-358-2061. (SCA Not- 
work). 

YOUR OWN TRAVEL agen- 
cy needed locally. Investment 
J7.900. PT/FT. Funl Easy! 

Outstanding travel/tax bene- 
fits. Comprehensive train- 
Ing/ongolng support. Free 
tape. (800)299-9740 



BE YOUR OWN BOSS 

in this Gurnee 

beauty salon. 

Turnkey business with 

gross sales of 

5200,000. 

Good track record. 

Eight stations. 

Transition training. 

Seller Rnancing possible. 

545,000. 

For more Information, call 

CENTURY 21 Sunshine 

at 847-360-9200 

Ask for Fred 




228 



Snaiioru Wanted 



CARPET INSTALLERS 
LOOKING FOR SIDE 
JOBS. Used carpel may be 
available. Reasonable rates. 
Contact Scott (B47) 
973-9247. 

HUSBAND AND WIFE with 
Coffle looking for 2-bedroom 
apartment in exchange for 
cleaning, light maintenance 
etc. 30yrs. experience. (B47) 
451-4952. 



250 


School/Instruction 



GRADUATE LEVEL 

PERFORMANCE 

STUDENT LOOKING 

FOR PROSPECTIVE 

STUDENTS TO BEGIN A 

STUDIO IN GURNEE. 

Experience in ages 

4yrs. to Adult. 

Resume and references 

available upon request. 

Call Megan (847) 782-1293, 

PIANO LESSONS 

IN MY LAKE VILLA HOME 

OPENINGS 

Now for students 

6yrs. to adult. 

Over 25yrs. experience. 

REASONABLE RATES. 

(847) 356-2780. 



301 



Antiques 



ATTENTION ANTIQUE 

DEALERS Auntie's gone but 
her Italian Provincial Furniture 
lives on! Same with dad's solid 
oak and naugahyde couch 
and chair with end table. Other 
odd and sundry Items avail- 
able. All in excellent condi- 
tion. Serious Inquiries onty. 
Call tor appointment (847) 
587-8990 leave message. 




|j 'BaaaaAursftj 



Svi 



BEANIE BABY BASH" 
Holiday tnn-Gumee. 

6161 Grand Ave. * 
Friday December 4th. 

5:30pm -10orn, 

Admission $2.00 Adults 

$1.00 Children. 

(047)333-3549. 

11TH ANNUAL FESTIVAL 
OF ARTS AND CRAFTS 

Saturday, December 5th, 

9am- 

4pm. 

Victory Lakes Continuing 

Care Center 

1055 East Grand Ave. 

Undenhurst. 

Beanie Babies, clocks, stained 

glass, leather crafts, clolhlng, 

furniture, Jewelry, toys, 

Santas, snowmen and more. 

Call (847) 356-5900. 

BEANIE BABIES 

BEANIE SHOW 

Holiday Beanies. 

Fairfield Inn, Gumee. 

6090 Gumee Mills Circle East 

December 5th. 

11am-4pm. 



BEANIE BABY BASH 

Holiday Inn Gumee, 

6161 Grand Ave. 

Sunday December 6lh, 

9am-4pm. 

(847) 395-6744. 



BEANIE BABY SHOW 

Paradise Restaurant, 

2964 Sheridan Ave., 

Zon. 

9am-5pm. 

Every Wednesday through 

December 23rd. 

(847) 298-7012. 



CRAFT FAIR 

Yaeger School 

Off Lewis Ave. 

North Chicago. 

Saturday December 51h. 

I0am-2pm. 

Call for more Information 

(8471 689-6306. 



GREAT LAKES TOY AND 

COLLECTIBLE SHOW 

Sunday, December 6. 

Lake County Fairgrounds 

Grayslake, III. 

9am-2pm. 

Admission $4. 

For mono Information 

(830) 773-2833. 

SHAR JOY'S 
BEANIE BABY BASH 

Holiday Inn, Gumee 

6181 Grand Ave. 

Saturday December 5th, 

9am-4pm. 

Admission $2.00 Adults 

$1. 00 Children. 

(847)785-8551. 



314 


Building Materials 



STEEL BUILDINGS SALE: 
40x60x14, $8,187. 50x75x14, 
$10,760. 50x100x16, 

$14,631. 60x100x16. $16,683. 
Mini-storage buildings. 

40x180, 38 units, $17,818. 
Free brochures, www.sentinel- 
bulldings.com. Sentinel Build- 
ings. 800-327-0790. Exten- 
sion 79. 



320 



Electronics 

Computers 



IBM COMPUTER WITH 

Windows 3.1, $160. (847) 
546-0647 after 7pm. 




CALLING ALL WORKING 

PARENTS!!! Winter is just 
around the comer, have you 
plannod your children's day 
care yet? Immediate openings 
for children agos 6 wooks and 
up aro available In Bright Be- 
ginning's Home Day Caro Net- 
work. For more Information on 
how to enroll your child In a 
convonlonily located, quality 
day caro homo please call 
Dona Thompson al (847) 356- 
4112. SPACES ARE LIMITED 
SO CALL IMMEDIATELY. 



FOSTER HOMES NEED- 
ED! Wanted good, nurturing 
individuals to provide tempo- 
rary homos lor children agos 
birth to adolescent. Training, 
support, compensation, day 
care provldod. Contact Cathol- 
ic Charltlos/Lako County. 
(847) 782-4242 or (647) 782- 
4243 



BABYSITTER NEEDED 
POSSIBLEY 2 if necessary, 
in our Round Lake home. AM 
shift and afternoon shift to 
lake care ol handicapped child 
when he's not in school. (847) 
546-0997. 

SPRING GROVE HOUSE- 
WIFE will provide daycare In 
my home, 6/months & up. Call 
(B15) 675-6718. 



A NANNY IS WHAT WE 
ARE LOOKING FOR. Are 
you her? Infant care needed 
in our Gurnee home, M-F, 
8am-4pm. Non-smoker. Own 
transportation. Call Michael & 
Christie (847) 336-2208. Ref- 
oronces required. 

CHILD DAYCARE IN Qur- 
noo homo. Monday-Friday, li- 
censing ponding. Call Mary 
(647) 855-7859. 






MP 'HJ l.ii. 



—, * , *«B4 i„ v - ^-i.u i/,., '.,.(*;-; <&& tt-:;Vr-j.-^*S!i^^--: 7 ^;^:-i^j^^'^-^Si5? 



«^^-»»^j-.» 



December 4, 1998 



■ • ..:■•' 
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CLASSSIFIED 



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*•";-- 



Lakeland Newspapers-/ JS^9l 



328 



Hrwood 



-•::■, 



FIREWOOD 2 YEAR sea- 
soned Firewood, delivered. 
Mixed wood, 1-fara cord, $65; 
1-tull cord, $165. Oak, l-faco 
cord. $75; 1-fuD cord, $195 
(220 pieces In face cord} . Stak- 
Ing available. (647) S46-0856- 

FIREWOOD OAK, . $50 
face, $135 cord, picked up. 
Delivery extra. (414) 

654-8960, - 

FIREWOOD SEASONED 

HARDWOODS. Mixod- 

J65/F.C. Oak-$75/F,C, Prompl 
free delivery (847) 247-1700. 



330 



Garage 
Rummage Saie 



EVERYTHING MUST QO 
MOVING SALE FRIDAY 
DECEMBER 4TM, BAM- 

NOON, SATURDAY ' DE- 
CEMBER 5TH., 8AM-4PM. 
Lota of "Stuff." Toys, house- 
hold Items, bedroom furni- 
ture, couch, some Antique 
Kerns, clothing, miscellaneous. 
220 N. Alleghany, Grayslake. 
(847) 223-5SS8. 

AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIO SALE, and Ihere 
Is still things that Just did not 
go... Call us at LAKELAND 
Newspaper* and run it 
under the 'FREE or Givea- 
ways' classified column. FREE 
ADS ere NO CHARGE) 
(847) 223-8161. ext. 140. 



338 


Horso attacks 



GOOD 2ND CUTTING HAY 
AND ROUND BALES. (414) 
537^1218. 

HORSES BOARDED 

DUSTY ACRES NORTH 
Has 3 stalls available. 7 day 
turn-out. Indoor arena, quality 
care plus more. Call Judy 
(847) 395-1577. 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



3 BUND MICE 

Decorative Mini Blinds, 

Valances and Wall Borders 

for Children's Rooms, 

Call lor tree brochure. 

1-800-307-4956. 

neDHOOM OITT KINGl.lUo, 

triple dresser." 2-nlghtstands, 
headboard, new mattresses, 
very good condition, $250. 
(647) 948-0783- 

BRASS BED QUEEN with 
new deluxe never used mat- 
tress set, $245. Black iron ca- 
nopy queen bed, complete, 
S360. Delivery available. 
(847) 374-1455. 

DESIGNER MODEL 

HOMES FURNITURE 

CLEARANCE! 

Sofa/ioveseat set, 

■ hunter groen, $495. 

Sofa, white, $350. 

Sofalovesoai. 

earth tones, $595. 

Also: Plaids, Florals, 

Leathers and More. 

Diningroom sets, 10-piece: 

Cherry, $1,395, 

Mahogany. $2,395, 

Oak $1,695. 

Other sets available. 

Also: Bedroom Sets, 

from $995. 

(847)329-4119. 

KING SIZE MATTRESS 

AND BOX SPRING excellent 
condition. $150. Available Im- 
mediately. (847) 680-0651. 



FORMAL DININGROOM 
TABLE, 6 navy blue uphol- 
stered chairs, 1ln. thick bev- 
eled glass top with dark hard- 
wood base. $2,400 new, ask- 
ing $700. Excellent condition. 
Must see to appreciate. (847) 
973-0460. 

FURNITURE MUST GO. 

Kitchen table and chairs, mas- 
ter bedroom furniture, TVs, 
6/month old Maytag wash- 
er/dryer. Best offer. (847) 
249-3897. 

GE SIDE-BY-SIDE 
FRIDGE wilh Ice and water 
service In door. Large section- 
al with nid-a-bed. 10-speed 
bike, 1 -mountain bike, Nordic 
Trac. 5ft. drafting table with 
Vemco drafting machine. GE 
washer/dryer. (B47) 
2S5-7062. 

GUN CASE, WALL mount, 
holds 6 rifles, with 2 drawers, 
cherrywood stained. $100. 
(847) 891-6800 days, (847) 

973-2490 evenings. 

KING SIZE WATERBED 

frame and heater, headboard 
with mirror. All equipment, no 
mattress. Must go. Lake Villa 
area. Best offer. Take II away. 
(847) 973-0473. 




Household Goods 
Furniture 



LIKE NEW UVINQROOM 
3-pleco sectional, modem, 
black with gold trim, glass 
cocktail table with, end table, 
has brass and black legs, 
lamp also available: 
$1.600Vbest (847) 623-4991. 

LINK TAYLOR OAK CHINA 
CABINET, like new, $500. Pad- 
dle boat, $200. (815) 
344-2298. . , - 

LONQABERGER 

Must soil, many collector's 

and classic baskets and 

accessories. Low prices. 

Saturday, 

December 5th. Only 

11am-4pm, 

35082 N. Edgewater Ln. 

Ingtealde, III. 

(647)587-1443. 

OLD PINE CABINET from li- 
brary, 2 twin brass bods, di- 
ningroom table chrome and 
mirror. Oriental trunk. Kimball 
theatrical organ, $50. (847) 
367-1692. 

QUEEN. SIZE WATERBED 

with headboard, no flotation 
mattress, bumper pads, excel- 
lent condition. $125.00. (847) 
395-1966 

SIX PIECE SECTIONAL, 
$300. Lamps, $20. End tables, 
$40. Exercise 'Body by Jake 
Hip & Thigh,* $150. (B47) 
223-3112. 

SOFA FLORAL PATTERN, 

large cream roses with rasp- 
berries, blues/greens, 
92ln,x36in. Excellent condi- 
tion. Must see. $450/best. 
(414) 534-3374. 

ZENITH 1BIN. TV, nice cabi- 
net, $25/bOSt. (4141 942-1245. 



348 


Lawn/Garden 



JOHN DEERE 185 HY- 
DROMATIC LAWN TRAC- 
TOR with 46ln. mower, 38ln. 
enow thrower, weight and 
chains. $1,350. (847) 
395-6407. 



350 


Miscellaneous 



AEROBIC RIDER EXER- 
CISE MACHINE WITH rlB- 
or, oxcollont .condition. Ilka . 
new. Original $300/besT offer. ' 
(847) 073-0473 after 6pm. 

BEAUTY SHOP EQUIP- 
MENT 2-slyllng stations, 5- 
halr dryers. 1 -shampoo bowl, 
1 -shampoo chair, 1-llfl chair. 
Excellent condition. Best offer. 
(847) 537-7393. 

1/6 scale Traxxas Monster 
Buggy. Nitro powered Ofna Pi- 
rate 10. Call for price (847) 

338-8843. 

RC 4X4 TRUCK HPl RS4MT 
with a Futaba radio, $400 in- 
vsted. $250/b03t. (847) 
973-1353, 

SLOT MACHINES/JUKE- 
BOXES. GREAT gifts for 
your home. Direct from Vegas. 
$395+ UP. FREE CATALOG 1- 
800-442-7568. 

SNOWMOBILE 1979 YA- 
MAHA 440, runs. $500/best. 
(847) 740-1384. 

SPYDER PAINTBALL GUN 
20oz. C02 tank with on-off 
valve, Scott Soft Armer Ther- 
mal Mask. Great condition, 
constantly maintained. Call 
evenings, leave message. 
(847)223-1530. 

WINDSOR UPRIGHT IN- 
DUSTRIAL VACUUM, ver- 
eomallc. with 2 motors, on 
board attachments, new In 
box, cost $550, will Bell for 
$225/best. (847) 451-4952. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS. 

TAN AT HOME, Buy DIRECT 
and SAVE! Commercial/home 
unite Irom $199. Low monthly 
payments. FREE color cata- 
log. Call today 1-800-842- 
1310. 



354 



Medical Equip 
Supplies 



GREAT NEWSI DIABET- 
lCS..,MedIcore pays for test- 
ing supplies. You've 6een us 
on TV. Liberty Medical Supply. 
No upfront cost. Satisfaction 
Guaranteed. Free shipping. 1 - 
800-514-7778. (SCA Network). 



Altn: Classified 

Advertisers 
Deadlines for ads 

are 10:00 a.m. 

every Wednesday 

Morning. 



358 



Musical IrarlrumenU 



370 



Wanted To Btij' 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homo For Sale- 



i 



514 



EP1PHONE j; GUITAR, 

MODEL S^310, new, full war- 
ranty., ■■ Stralncastor -Copy. 
Black, maple, ! Fretboard. 
$175. (847) 265-3810; W~ 

PIANO FOR SALE In. excel- 
lent condition, 6-1/2yra. 'old, 
made In America by American 
Craftsman, $650. (847) 
223-0729 leave message. 

SCHAFFE BROS. & CO. 
UPRIGHT' PIANO,, good 
condition, $150/besl. (847) 
263-1646. 



360 


Pets & Supplies 



BLUE AND GOLD MACAW, 
3yre.\ old; male, friendly, talks, 
(2) cages Included. 'Great 
Christmas Gin/ Asking $800. 
(414)694-2401. 

CHOCOLATE LAB 
CHRISTMAS PUPS AKC, 
bom 11/t2, 6-females, 4- 
males. Show quality. Great 
with children. Intelligent. Good 
companions. $500. (847) 
623-9038 after 5pm. 

DACHSHUND PUPPIES, 
AKC, miniature, black and 
tan, smooth, males, 9/woeka, 
vet checked, 1st. shots, cham- 
pion bloodlines, $350. (414) 
653-2199. 

FERRET lyr. old, cage and 
all supplies, $100. QUAR- 
TER HORSE 7yr. old, rog., 
$3,000/0081. Experienced rid- 
Of. (647) 740-7599. 

FOR A FEW pennies more. 
get latest technology In liquid 
wormers. HAPPY JACK UQUI- 
V1CT delivers acuves better 
than older formulas. Feed and 
hardware stores. (WWW.HAP- 
PYJACKINC.COM) 

FOR SALE FULL BRED PIT 
BULL, male, best olfer. (847) 
740-3134. 

FROM SANTA GERMAN 

Shepherd Pups AKC, shots, 
dawormed, ready to go. Ask- 
ing $250/ea. (414) 654-7923. 

GREAT CHRISTMAS 
GIFT ALASKAN MALA- 
MUTES, AKC Registered 
pups, born 10/20/98. Mates 
$450, females $500, (815) 
344-k?680. 

HOHTON FARMS, INC. 
FEED STORE 

High Quality Hay, straw, feed. 
Purina Brand food for dogs, 
cats, sheep and much more. 
We deliver tool 
1/2 mile North of Illinois- 
Wisconsin border. 
Call today (414) BS7-2525 
Monday-Friday 
Bam-5pm. 
Saturday 8am-3pm. 

JACK RUSSELL TERRIER 

PUPS (Wishbone). Ready in 
December. UKC, $450. Great 
gift from Santa. (414) 
652-1702. 

LICENSED DOG CARE 
IN MY HOME 

While you're away, 

Call Florence 

(847) 968-6319. 

PET GROOMING, 10 years 
experience. Dog and cat a 
grooming. Open Monday - 
Saturday. New clients wel- 
come. 3400 Kehm Blvd.. Park 
City, IL (847) 249-3755 

PUPPIES, YELLOW LAB 

CROSS, 1st. shots, wormed. 
6/wesks old, S85/oa. Great 
Christmas Gift. (414) 
878-1812. 

ROTTWEILER PUPS AKC- 
OFA large boned, homo 
raised. (847) 550-1986. 

SHIHT2U PUPPIES, AKC 

registered, 1st shot. 2-maJos, 
black and white wilh masks, 
6/weeks old, $350. (815) 
675-6192. 



COUNTRY BOUTIQUE 'AN-, 
T1QUE8 ^Established T since 
1966) ; Is Interested In buying 
silver, chlha, paintings, jewel- 
ry, glassware, furniture and 
other old objects of Interest 
(847)546-4295: 

JUKE BOXES WANTED- 

ptay 78'b, Wurtrtser, will pay up 
r'to $2,000 on condition (414) 
961-2113. ■■ '- -' 

PIANOS WANTED, CASH 
paid for most Grand Pianos, 
any condition. Also smalt 
uprights, In good condition. 
(414)726-2440. 

Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY .CONDITION- or 

Ports. Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Cako Mochlnns. 
Paying CASHI Call 
(630)985-2742. 




35TH PL 1714 Kenosha 
North eido, by owner. 4-bed- 
room brick ranch, < hardwood 
doors, brick fireplaces, targe 
fenced In yard. Open House 
Saturday-Sunday. 12-4pm or 
(414) 654-7992. 

FIVE ROOM RANCH 
across the street from park 
and Lake Miltmore, 2-1/2 
miles lo Metre Station. Fire- 
place, C/A, main floor laundry, 
basement, attached garage, 
$115,0O0/best. (847) 
740-7692. 

WAUCONDAINTOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

ADULT COMMUNITY. 

Ntw1997 

Manufaclurad home 

1 -bedroom, 1-bath 

with garage and recroom. 

Includes: washer/dryer. 

stove/refrigerator, 

off street parking. 

$54,900. 

1995 1 -bedroom, 1-bath, 
carport and shed. 

$39,900 

1996 2 -bedroom. 2-bath 
with garage, $50.900.. 

(847) 526-5000 
leave message. 

INQLESIDE/FOX LAKE 

*139,B00. MAKE -i OFFER. 
7yr. old raised ranch In like 
new condition. B-rooms, 3 
baths. 2nd kitchen, in-law pos- 
sible, lake rights. large 2-1/2 
car attached garage. Cedar 
deck, new air conditioning, 
naw quality carpel and ceram- 
ic doors, many more up- 
grades, great location near 
Menard's and new Jewel food 
slore. (773) 282-5407 or 1- 
800-917-5848. No agents 
please. 

LAKEVIEW OF GAGES 

LAKE in prl vale subdivision. 3- 
bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, at- 
tached 2-1/2 car garage, large 
famllyroom, oak kitchen, fire- 
place, deck overlooking beach 
across street, Woodland and 
Warren schools, $132,000. 
(847) 223-4259. 

LILY LAKE, WISCONSIN 

Very nice large 3-bedroom 
ranch, with garage, secluded 
area. $135,000. (414) 
537-4410. 

MAINTENANCE FREE 3- 
BEDROOM, 2-bath ranch In 
Southwest Beach Park. Rec- 
room with pool table, large 
deck overlooking lenced-in 
back yard, privacy galore. Lo- 
cated near Blanchard end 
Green Bay Roads, $129,000. 
(847) 623-6339. 

PARK CITY 3-BEDROOM, 

1-1/2 bath ranch with 2-car ga- 
rage, lenced yard, dock, C/A, 
full basement. $132,000. (647) 
336-^819. 

POSSIBLY THE BEST 
VALUE IN QRAYSLAKE. 

Recently remodeled, 3-4 bed- 
rooms, 1-bath, full basement. 
STANDARD POODLE ^V' sided. Within walking dls- 

PUPS, AKC, ready to go, Vek ,an f^ °' schools, lake, train 
checkod, first shots, de 



YEAR OLD, RANCH HOME 
Lake 1 'Cbmo.'" 'Corner lot 
lOOft.xIQOft, 3-bedroom,' 1-' 
1/2 . bath, large kitchen . with 
dining area and palJo doors 
leading to wood dock, largo Ifv- 
Ingroom, open concept, at- 
tached 2-1/2 car. garage, full 
basement, municipal sewer 
and water, newly- paved 
streets, lakerights, 10% down 
6-1/2% Interest, S790/month 
for ■ 25yrs. ' Reduced - "price 
$129,900. Immediate occu- 
pancy. (414) 634-7876 or 
(414) 248-1857 ask . for 
Claude. 

AD-Subs 

REPO'S 

Low down! 

-CALL-v 

A company yoa can trust 

•MEMBER BETTEP. BUSINESS* 

Liberty Re. Inc. 

630-539-6200 



wormed, cream and black, 
$300 & up. 'Lasting Christ- 
mas Gift* (414) 763-4277. 

(414)763-3274. 

TO CARING HOME 
11/monih old male Black Lab 
Mix, all shots and neutered. 
(847)543-0181. 

Wt*S*H RESCUE 

Purebred 

Siberian Huskies 

available for adoption- 

9/months & older. 

$150 donation to cover 

our medical expensea: 

spay/nauter, vaccination, 

H w test/preventsllve. 

(847)740-3066 



station and town. Excellent 
value $110,900. (647) 
223-1131. 

BANDALL, WISCONSIN 

CEDAR and brick hillside 
ranch. 3500sq.ft, natural light 
cascading thru numerous sky- 
lights, situated on 7,5 heavily 
wooded acres, just north of 
state line off Wilmot Rd., 
$360,000. Call for appoint- 
men! (414) 862-9622. 



BY OWNER THREE BED- 
ROOM RANCH In one of the 

nicest neighborhoods In Wau- 
kegan. Hardwood floors, C/A, 
1-1/2 baths, full basement. 
large beautiful yard. Imme- 
diate occupancy, (847) 
www.wUhretcuBxolTp'---^- 69 ^' ( M7 > 662-0196. 



^/I <:■:■: ■ (■' ' •■■• 




WHATS 






^EWSflfll: 



'i',KS 






MARKET?: 



. 2 BDSM CONBO- - 

OIVLY $66,900- 
NOBTH BUuTF AREA 

Cococr of fU * I A. Ri 1 37. lttorj 

unit v»/2 full hash. NtMnl ewprted, 

frcthlj painted, new wtado**, new 

htxtrtftrbertrr&nxxc. Ceotnl 

air, ft jrptia . deck & patio. - 

County dab amenities, pool, 

rani ■, umu & ctuHmnc 

CORNERSTONE 

aikforBnod* 

(M7)tT2-])ll/tm. 



504 


Homes For Roil 



OPEN HOUSE 



Sunday, Dec. 6th l2-4pm 

991 Martingale. Round Lake 

Beach, IL Wonderful large 

family home In Fox Chase. 

Finished Basement. 
Central Air. 4 Baths. 

(847) 336-7333 



^URNEE™ "™ mm ^ 

I Beautiful 1/2 Duplex _ 
in outstanding \ 

Goll course community. 
| 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, | 

1st floor master suite. 
| Lovely oak cabinots & floor I 

In kitchen 6 family room. 
I Caih ceiling In Uv & dining I 

I rooms Full basement, 
attached 2 car garage 
Sensational! 
Ceil Jayne Jones or 

Jan White 

ReMax Suburban 

(847) 387-8686 

Lext £13/240 I 

«■«• »«*» *■» ■■>■ aJJ 

^URNEE ' 

I Great family home! 
3BD; 2 1/2 Blhs; extensive I 
I remodeling. New kit. wain- I 
sooting thru tarn rm & hall. I 
I random plank wood fir, fire- I 
place, atrium door to tret- * 
I lised deck. Lg mast suite, I 
' finished rec rm, bsml, 2 1/2 ' 
I car gar; gas heat & cen air I 
Si 59,900 
Call Jan While or | 

Jayne Jonas 
ReMax Suburban I 

(647) 387-8686 
ext240C13 \ 



QRAYSLAKE 3-BED- 
ROOM, 1-BATH, attached 
garage, available December 
20th, $l,100/month, plus se- 
curity deposit. (847) 
249-3540. 

LAKE VILLA 2-BEDROOM 
house, wood floor kitchen with 
Island, totally remodeled, 
huge fenced yard, 
$i,050/month. (847) 
902-6515. 

TWIN LAKES, WISCON- 
SIN Brand new construction, 
large 3-bedroom house, no 
pets. S995/month. (414) 
537-4410. 

TWIN LAKES, WISCON- 
SIN 3 -room house lor rem, 
with basement for storage, 
quiet, safe area, school, 
church and stores near by, 
$450/month, $450 security, 
2yr. lease. Available 12/1/98. 
Contact (70S) 795-0055, 

WONDER LAKE 7306 Cir- 
cle Lease/option, 1 or 2 bed- 
room collage, new electric, 
new bath, $675/month, pets 
OK. large lot, lakerights. (815) 
338-2579. 



GU RNEE '2-BEDR00U;- 2- 

BATH 5th floor, largo balco- 
ny, large count ertops and cab- 
inets. Beautiful" Hoathor 
Ridge. Indoor' parking, golf,' - 
tennis and marry mora ameni- 
ties. .: $84,500:;. (847) 
. 816-6420",; - -:■•-■-;>■; ■'. 

UBERTYVILU CONDO 

AVAILABLE NOW 2-bod- 
room, 1-1/2 baths', all ap- 
pliances, close to train/shop- 
ping, $62S/rnonth, (647) 548- 

7204. -' '. .-.■■■■•;■■■■-■ ■■ . i 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 3- 
bedroom, 2-car garage, huge 
kitchen wHh - at) appliances, 
new carept All for $83,000. 
NATIONAL REALSTAR, Carta 
(630) 824-6953. 

VACATION VILLAGE 1- 

BEDROOM, available Imme- 
dialefy, $550/month. Remax 
HNW, Ftoyd Edwards. (847) 
436-6200 ■■ i 

VACATION VILLAGE 2- 
BEDROOMS, available Im- 
mediately, $890/month. 
Remax HNW, FJoytf Edwards, 
(847)436-6200. ' 

VACATION VILLAGE 

LARGE STUDIO, 

$450/month, available Immo- 
dlately. Remax HNW. Floyd 
Edwards. (647)436-6200 

^URNEE™ | 

I Remodeled to the rnaxl 
j Super new oak cablneted | 
kitchen, new white eppU- , 
ances & new NO-WAX ' 

I Doors In kitchen & bath. 
Guest bathroom on 1 si j 
I floor remodeled, bedroom 
suite 2nd floor,, near new I 
carpeting, central air. Very 
! affordable at $75,500 
1 Bedroom - 1 1/2 Baths ' 
Townhouse. 
CallJan White or 
. Jayne Jones 

ReMax Suburban 
| (847) 387-8888 em. 240/213 I 



518 


Mobfle Homes 



514 



Condo/Town Homes 



FOX LAKE FOR RENT VA- 
CATION VILLAGE CON- 
DO, 2-bedroom, waterfront. 

Boating, tennis, pool, winter 
sports facilities, $6B5/monlh. 
(847) 256-6290. 

QRAYSLAKE TOWN- 

HOUSE FOR SALE Newer 
carpets, hardwood floors, up- 
dated kitchen and balhs, 
breakfast bar opans to family- 
room, basement has 3rd. bed- 
room or office. Owner may 
carry downpaymonl, $87,500. 
Gene Schuster REMAX (847) 
256-6880. 



MOBILE HOME 12X48, 
newly decorated, stored in Elk- 
horn, Wise. Must sell. $3,900. 

(708) 453-5946. 

MOBILE HOME 2-BED- 
ROOMS, 1-bath, 14x60, all 
appliances stay, satellite, can- 
trat air. (847) 541-6320. 

MODULARS - OOU- 

BLEWIDES - SINGLEWIDES 
- ILLINOIS LARGEST DIS- 
PLAY OF MODEL HOMES. 
FOUNDATIONS, BASE- 

MENTS, GARAGES. SEPT- 
ICS - WE DO IT ALUI FREE 
STATEWIDE DELIVERY/IN- 
STALLATION, RILEY MANU- 
FACTURED HOMES 1-800- 
79B-1541. 




The 2045 square foot 
Glamour could be an excel- 
lent choice for a young family 
wishing to purchase a home 
with a little more space for 
growing children. This can 
also be a great buy for empty 
nosters who still need room 
for returning college students 
and other overnight guests. 
The Glamour has an 

attractive exterior of easy to care tor lap siding, topped by a long tasting shake roof. A 
two-car garage wilh storage shelves, side entrance and built-in workbench lor the 
hobby enthusiast, laces to the front. 

A covered porch, with waist-high railing is a welcome sight to visitors, and a great 
place to relax on warm summer evenings. Step into the entry of the Glamour and the 
openness of the floor design becomes evident. Immediate to the left of the entry is the 
vaulted living room. This Is the perfect place for after dinner coffee and conversation 
while basking in the warmth of the corner fireplace. 

The U-shaped kitchen has been placed In a position lhat the cook In the household 
will surely appreciate. Equipped with an Island recycling center, garden window, eating 
bar and walk-in pantry, meals can be easily prepared and served in either the adjoin- 
ing breakfast nook or the nearby dining room. The rear of the walk-in pantry opens to 
a convenient utility room wilh access lo the garage. 

The Isolated master suite features many amenities not usually found in a house this 
size. Among them are a big walk-In closet, security system and private bathroom wilh 
skylight, separate tub and shower, twin basin and personal access to back deck. 

The other sleeping quarters, on the opposite side of the Glamour, consist of of a 
large front bedroom and a smaller back one. They are divided by a full bathroom. One 
of these bedrooms could easily be converted for use as a den, sewing or exercise 
room. 

Completing the floor plan is a-jguosi 
room/home office with plenty of closet space 
and a private deck thai Is covered for protec- 
tion from the weather. 

For a study kit of the Glamour (336- 
1 10LP60) send $14.95, to Landmark 
Designs, 33127 Saginaw Rd. E, Cottage 
Grove , OR 97424 (Specify plan name & 
number for kit). For a collection of plan 
books, sand $20.00, or save by ordering the 
kit and collection together for S29.95, or call 
1-800-562-1151. 



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C20 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



December 4, 1998 



518 


Mobile Homes 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

ADULT COMMUNITY. 

New 1097 _ 

Manufactured home 

1 -bedroom, 1-balh 

with garage and recroom. 

Includes: washer/dryer, 

Stovo/rofrlgorator, 

of) street parting 

$54,900. 

1995 1 -bedroom, i-balh. 
carport and shed, 

$39,900 

1996 2-bedroom, 2-bath 
with garage, $50,900. 

(847) 526-5000 
leave message. 

SUPER CLEAN MOBILE 
HOME. Now furnace and 
wafer heater, cabinets galore. 
larger bath. Must sell. 
SS.OOO/best. (847) 249-2805 



520 



ApartmaiuForRcni 



AFFOHDABLE ZION 
CLEAN privaie. 1 -bedroom, 
good area. yard, garago, no 
smoking. S«5 (■*!-»> 
634-9387 

FOR RENT 2 brand new 2 

Dedroom apartments Down- 
town Graysiawe Ceramic tile 
cable TV centra) an gas neat 
incl washer d'ye' plenty o' 
parking C'ose 10 pverytrung 
$800-5850 month ffM71 223 
1908 _^_ 

GHAYSLAKE 1-BED- 

ROOM UNIT, dean o^e: 
launpry appliances jiiities .n 
eluded S595 momn No pets 
Non-smoke' (8 47) 735 1719 

QURNEE 2-BEDROOM, 

GREAT location, wasrwdry- 
er hook -up C A. no pets Ap- 
plication lease S650'montn 
plus security (8J7i 244 6199 
weekdays 9am- 5pm 

GUHNEEWAUKEGAN 

NORTH SHORE 

APARTMENTS 

At Affordable Prices 

Spacious 

Luxury Livmg 

Elevators 

On Site Staff 

Good Location 

Easy Vo Toil Roads 

IMPERIAL TOWEFUMANOR 

(847! 244-9222 

ZfON LARGE 2-BED- 
ROOM, appliances included. 
S60Q/month plus security. No 

pels (84 7} 872-O200. (B47) 

204-0376 



LAKE VILLA LUXURY 1- 
bedroom apartment, with 
beautiful views overlooking 
Deep Lake. Includes vaulted 
ceilings, washer/dryer, mi- 
crowave, ample storage. 
$820/month. Available Janu- 
ary 1st. Sub-let till September 
with option to extend lease. 
Call Jon (647) 265-0788. 

LAKEVIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA, Large 1 & 2 bedrooms, 
$610-$745/monlh. Heat, wa- 
ler, air included. (847) 
356-5474. 

NORTH CHICAGO 2-BED- 
ROOMS, heat included. 
Great location. $600/ month 
(647) 578-1226. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

ADULT COMMUNITY. 

Dream studio 

Includes all utilities 

Available December 1st 

$595/monih plus security 

No pets 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message 



ZION EAST BIDE 2-bed- 
room, carpeted, dlnlngroom, 
fenced yard. Good credit and 
references required, no pets, 
S660/monlh. (647) 831-5388. 

ZION EAST SIDE beautiful 
2-bedroom in great location, 
5525/month. No Section 8. 
WIN consider pets. (647) 
234-1093. 



BARGAffN 
SHOPPER 



560 



Vacant Lot/Acreage 



568 



hit Of Area Property 



530 



Rooms To Rent 



MATURE NON-SMOKING 
female preferred, to share 
lovely townhome. $400/monlh 
plus t/2 utilities, references 
and deposii. (847) 740-9512. 

SEMI-FURNISHED 
QUIET, clean, convenient 
$200 to move. 570Avk (847) 
360-9568. 



533 



Buildings 



Ft )R RENT. 

Ilritimmlu-J B1C ."Hit. 

_'rul tltioi .ip.mimni 

unlitirs mi huli'il 

Umtintim I vc.ir Ii\im* 

tin jul\ (i,ij>rs I J In* 

^itf'i Mil 

Century 21- j 
Russ Cwaltney 
847-223-4800 I 



GHAYSLAKE MULTI USE 

buildings Center Street Fast 
growing area. Historic down- 
town. Great location. Sale or 
lease (847) 543-4343 



538 



Business Property 
For Km I 



WESTWIND 
VILLAGE 

APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave., Zion 
1,2 & 3 BEDROOMS 

FREE HEAT 

Appliances • On Site 

Manager • No Pels 

Starting trom 

$495/mo. I 

Call Martha & Issac 

(847)746-1420 

|or BEAR PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

(414)697-9616 | 



La kE wood VillAqE Apartments 

\h IsLaniJ LaIu an<J CRAysUkc 

OlintiNi, AfloitcJAblt liousira, lent quaIi'mFc) ipplir anK. 

now « crpiiisc, .\pplii AiioNs fon Quit: 

• / ,?, A\d } bflltiOOW ADAUIMfMS 

tumusih AiAiUbU m l\U*d IaIu 

• f bidfxxM /uuaIiihiis 

til am ( *ll ion worn islfiltMtiim on *|j|x>i-,imi m a|: 

(84 /) 11 >-/)(.44 I0U» (800) >?6-OM4 

l.*l.i am «l VilUl^ A|mhhiim \\ |MN)lnvi< >**H> 

MHNM,m1 Il> MlnitlU* I ,lil;tr|l. Int. 



FOX LAKE NEW lake view 
offices on Grand Avenue 
Siarling at 5275'monlh (047) 
587-1615 

HAVE LARGE BUILDING 
IN LINCOLNSHIRE AREA 

for Antique Shop, Coffee Shop 
or both. (847)917-5200. 

STORE OR OFFICE FOR 
RENT located in Rollins Road 
Shopping Center, Round Lake 
Beach, newly painted and car- 
peted (847) 223-4900 



TWO STORAGE UNITS, 

(1) 45x50, (1) 45*36 Also of- 
fice Space available. Days 
(847) 356-2922. evenings 
(847) 395-7898 

WAUCONDA AREA IN- 
DUSTRIAL AND SHOP 
SPACE FOR RENT 

I.OBQsq.tt. unit, $695 plus se- 
curity Available December 
1st 2400sq.ft. POLL 

BARN with concrete floor 
Heat, electric, outside storage 
can be added Office trailer 
available $595 as is Available 
t2/t/98. Days (847) 

526-5000, evenings (847) 
526-0420 leave messaae 



RICHMOND CAR 
LOT or YOUR 
BUSINESS USF, 

Itrick hklu on Hi. 1 1. 

1 t>ay, office, canine ifib 
sales lot Lxccllcnl 
visibility Alicnwic 
use OK 57 l >S/mi) 

Land Mgmt. 

815-678-4334 



L 



A 



OAICRIDGE VILLAGE 
AjPARTM ENTS 



Offering Affordable Housing for 

Qualified Applicants. 

Currently Accepling Applications on our 

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments 

Stop in at: 

299 Oakridge Court in Antioch 

Or call: 

847-395-4840 
1 -800-526-0844 TDD 

Managed by Meridian Group. Inc. 




544 


Mortgage Services 



NO DOWNPAYMENT? 

PROBLEM CREDIT? Own 

ihe home you need now, with- 
out a big downpayment. Com- 
plete financing if qualified. De- 
George Home Alliance 1-800- 
343-2884. 




DO YOU HAVE 

SOMETHING TO SELL 

FOR $76 OR LESS? 

Place your ad In this section 

for only $3.00 for 1 words or 

less. Musi be prepaid. 

Call Lisa (647) 223-8f61 

oxt. 140 or send the ad with 

with your paymenl 10: 

Lakeland Publishers, 

P. O. Box 268. 

30 S. Whitney St ., 

Grays lake til. 60030. 

Alien: Usa. 



MCHENRY/MARTIN 
WOODS, HEAVILY wooded 
t acre on cul-de-sac. (815) 
344-4269. 

TWO LOTS BOTH 5.5 acr- 
es, Brighton Troy Glen Subdi- 
vision, gorgeous hills, trees, 
views of ponds. $60,000- 
$80,000. (414) 552-2775. 



VACANT LOTS PARTIAL- 
LY wooded, sewers available 
In Fall. 110x100, North East 
Gurnee. Asking 

$35,0O0&$45.000. Call for de- 
tails (847) 244-8181. 



i_a ■ * r *■■■•■-* -.-.-.* 



Arizona Bast Buy) 

Bciuiiful hlitorie property in 
icenlc NW* ArU. Private 
40 acre ranch parcels now 
available from only $395/act 
Near Colorado River, fulling, 
boa ling, gambling. S running 
lurueu & nun view*. Prliiine, 
lu ih high ckien covered with . 
taguaros, yuccai, palo verdei, 
Joshuas. No qual. low down, 
xinl termi. 100% water/miner- 
al righti. Tide insured, 
lurveyed, good access. Selliog 
fasti Must see. Open daily. 
Stagecoach Trails 
1-800-711-2340 



: 



commnltfrarig: 
model oa 2nd tee, 

great wlm, lg om 

2e-$ar, WOOsT, 
800-755-0086 




Soil your property 
quickly through ' 
Lakeland • 847.223.8161 



LEGAL/REAL ESTATE 



FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 34578 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 

NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 

Harbor Financial Mortgage Corporation. Plaintiff, 

VS Case No. 98 C 2320 

Judge Marovich 
Naksung Song. Young Song, Board of Managers of 1he 
Antioch Goll Club Community Assoclalion f/Wa The Harbor 
Ridge Homeowners Association and Board of Managers of Ihe 
Harbor Ridge Community Association, Defendants 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO, 3457B (IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED 

PARTIES CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE 
BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgment 
entered in Ihe above entitled cause on September 9. IPiffl - 

I. Max Tyson. Special Commissioner for Ihis court will on 
December 28. 1998 at the hour of 9.00 a.m. at Lako County 
Court House. Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for 
cash, Ihe following desenbed premises: 
c/k/a 25002 Ntcklaus Way. Antioch, IL 60002 
Tax ID #01-24-418-009 

The improvements on the property consist of single family 
dwelling 

Sale Terms 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and lo special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 

The judgment amount was $380,479.33. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will roceive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on 
a specified dale unless the property is redeemed according to 
law 

For information call ihe Safes Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher. 1 20 North LaSalie, Chicago. Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1 00 pm. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer is doj required lo provide additional information other 
than that sel forth in this Notice. 



FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 34887 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE, 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 

Chase Manhnilan Mortgage Corporation f/k/a Chemical 
Residential Mortgage Corporation 1/Wa Margaretten and 
Company. Inc , Plaintiff. Case No. 98 C 2885 

VS Judge Ptunkett 

Daniel Freeck and Susan M Fromm-Freeck. Chicago Tille and 
Trust Company, as Trustee. Defendants 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OUR FILE NO. 34887 (IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED 
PARTIES CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE 

BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 
Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgment 
entered m the above entitled cause on August 27. 1998 . 

I. Max Tyson, Special Commissioner (or Ihis court will on 
January 15. 1999 althehour of 9 00 a m at Lake County Court 
House. 18 N County St . Waukegan. Illinois, sell to the highest 
bidder (or cash, (he lollowing desenbed premises: 
c/k/a 352 Buckingham Dnve. Graystake IL 60030 
Tax ID * 06-25-313-01? 

The improvements on the property consist ol single family 
dwelling 

Sale Terms 10% down by certilied funds, balance within-24 
hours, certified lunds No relunds The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and lo special assessments. 
The properly will NOT be open lor inspection 
The iudgment amount was $172,269.03 
Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate ol Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on 
a specified dale unless Ihe properly is redeemed according to 
law 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney. 
Fisher and Fisher, 120 North LaSaile, Chicago. Illinois (312) 
372-4784 trom 1 00 p m lo 3 00 p m Under Illinois law. the 
Sales Officer ts qpJ required lo provide additional information 
other lhan thai sel forth in this Notice 



FISHER AND FISHER ^ FILE NO. 34764 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 

NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 

Aames Capilal Corporation, Plaintiff, 

Case No. 98 C 2670 
VS. Judge WILLIAMS 

Daniel Bonnes a/k/a Dan Bonnes and Oebbiom Bonnes, 
Consumers Cooperative Credit Union and Board of Managers 
of the Property Owners Association for Lots 1-41 ol Sunset 
Ridge Phase I, Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE OUR FILE 

NO. 34764 (TT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES 

CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT 

FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgment 
entered in the abovo entitled cause on September ]$ , 1g9 Q . 

I, Thomas Johnson and Tina Douglas. Special 
Commissioner for this court will on December 30, 1998 at Ihe 
hour of 1:30 p.m. at the front door of Lake County Courthouse, 
1 8 N. County St., Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder 
(or cash, the following described premises: 
c/k/a 1710 Daybreak Lane. Zion, IL 60099 
Tax ID « 04-18-306-013 

The improvements on the property consist of single lamily, 
wood frame, two story, with an attached garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certilied funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT bo open for inspection. 

The judgment amount was $171,597,95. 

Upon Ihe sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on 
a specified dale unless the property is redeemed according to 
law. 

For information call Ihe Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney. 
Rsher and Fisher. 120, North LaSalie, Chicago. Illinois. (312) 
372-4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the 
Sales Olticer is noj required to provide additional Information 
other than th3t set forth in this Notice. 



FISHER AND RSHER RLE NO SlSfa 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURTFOR TOE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS ^EASTERN DMSION 
Bankers Trust Company, as Trustee of Amresco Residential 
Securities CorppratJon Mortgage Loan Trust 1998-1. Under 
the Pooling & Servicing Agreement Dated as of 
February 1, 1998, PteJnfiff, 

Case No. 88 C 2998 
^' •Judge COAR 

, 2?J&£i?>~ M, £ ,donodo and L" 13 & Monoonedo, Defendants 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE ^QURjTLE 
^tiSL^m (TT 13 ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES 
CONSULT THEIR Q m ATTORNEYS BEFOREBIDDINQ AT 
FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Publte Nollce Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgment 
entorDdin the above entitled cause on Aufnirta. iimpi " 

I, Thomas Johnson and Tina Douglas, Special 
Commissioner for this court will on January 13, 1999 at the 
hour of 1:30 p.m. at the front door of Lake County Court 
H £i?*\ 18 N Y ""^ SL - w autegan. lIDnota. seD to the highest 
b W^wrjash,tr»foTwwing described premises: 
c/k/a 2012 Lawson Boulevard. Gumee IL 60031 
Tax ID I 07-1(M0W>19 

The Improvement! on the property consist of single family 
dwdiina wood frame, two stcVy arri attactrt ga/age. 

^°|«™s;10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certl tied funds, No refunds. The sale shall be subject lo 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property MJB NOT be open for Inspection. 

The judgment amount was $229,954.38. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser wiD receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on 
aspodfied date unless the properly Is redeemed occordlftgto 

For information can the Sales Officer at Plalntjfrs Attorney 
Rsher and Rsher, 120 North LaSalie. Chicago, tfflnots. (312) 
3/2-4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the 
Sales Officer Is QCJ required to provide additional formation 
other than that sot forth In this Notice. 



public times 

FISHER AHP FI8H CT V: : " IU MO. S44aa 

IN THE UHTTEt) STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 

Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation f/k/a 
Chemical Residential Mortgage Corporation. 

Plalntrf!, 
VS. Case No, 88 C 1944 

Judge Coar 
Daniel M. Ramirez, The Board of Managers of the 
Woodland HIBs Condominium Association 

Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

mm RLE NO. 34458 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED FAiniES CCrfWUO^THeR 

QttH ATTORNEYS BEFORE BDOWO AT roREO^SUnESMES) 

Public Notice ta hereby given pursuant to a Judgment entoroa 
In the above entitled cause on Jutygfl-IBPft. 

I, Howard Rubin, Special Commissioner for this court win on 
January 5, 1999 at tho hour of 2:00 p.m. at the front door of Lake 
County Court House, 18 N. County StreeL Waukegan, Illinois, son 
to the highest bidder for cash, the tolowirigdescribed premises: 
C/k/a 17575 W. Walnut Lane, Gumee, IL 60031 
Tax ID* 07-20-400-049 The Improvements on the pnJP^ty consist 
of single family dwelling. „. _ . 

Safe Terms: 10« down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be Bubject to gen- 
eral taxes and to special assessments. 

Tho proporty will NOT be open for Inspection. 

The judgment amount was $105,619.33 

Upon the sale being made the purchasor will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchasor to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property Is redeemed according tolaw. 

For Information call tho Sates Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney^ Rsher 
and Rsher, 120 North LaSaile, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372-4784 
from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 pjn. Under Uilnob tew, the Sales Officer h 
QQl required to rjrovide additional Information other than that set 
forth In this Notice. 
/a/ Howard M.Rubin 
Special Commissioner 




■ 
■ 




■» « i w «^»_"fc— ^-;-»» wlrfva-^-V,-** 



. , . . "~*" -——- fi; 









December 4, 1998 



CLASSSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers t C2f 



568 



Out of Area 
I.,"; Property" 



■>".. -r .., 



ILLINOIS (Central) 
(QhlMpttlnQ "J>lnis. 

BOOac development adj. 
KJckipoo Sute Park, loc'd ne*r 
Danvilie, 1L Becoming known 
throughout the Midweii it 1 of 
the moit unique feecmlional & 
rttlremen I Uttt In (he U.S . Thi» 
develbpmenl often wooded lout 
thu tre'5tc, iorne with their own 
pvt stocked pond, others situated 
on I to 4pvt fakes, exclusive lo 
our clients only. Unique oppty 
for those who ire looking for i 
wknd retretl or ■ anee-in-i-llfe- 
time rclireroenl oppty. Imagine 
fishing in your backyard or hik- 
ing into ■ beautiful ndj. line 
put, or m evening stroll down 

Wandering Forest Road. 

Whispering Pines often this & 

so much more. We also offer 

consul Ulion on construction 

& local fine's;. Let us make your 

dreams come true. 

Call for appt & allow Us lo 

accommodate you as our guest 

for the night in a comfortable 

executive suite. 

For more Info call 

800-668-0655 
217-497-8733 

c-mall 
westlakeduivllle.net 



704 



Rexreulonal 
Vehicles 



1089 TRAVEL TRAILER 
CAMPER, ten., fully loaded, 
fiberglass outside, A/C, heat, 
fridge, TV, propane/electric 
com pat a bio. Bathroom with 
shower. Onh/ sleeps 2. MUST 
SEEI1 $2,300. (647) 265-0203. 

SMALL RV SLEEPS 4. new 

tires, well maintained, $3,500. 
(847) 587-1343. 



708 



SnowmobOes/ATVs 



1893 ARCTIC CAT S802. 
Fox Shocks, carhldea, studs. 
excellent condition, $2,600. 
(815)675-1399 after 5pm. 

4 WHEELER 1990 PO- 
LARIS 2x4, Magnum 425. 500 

mllos. Asking 43.BOO. (947) 
54CF-73P4-.'-- * ' 

NEW 1995 YAMAHA V- 

MAX 600LE, driven one wee- 
kend, under 200 miles, asking 
$4,000. (647) 395-7207. 

SNOWMOBILE 1994 ARC- 
TIC 580 EXT. $3,500. (847) 
265-6935 leave message. 

SNOWMOBILE 1997 YA- 
MAHA 700 Triple Venlero, 
only 232 miles. Used 1 sea- 
son, brand new 2 place trailer. 
$9,000 Invested, $6,900/best. 
(847) 548-0558. 



710 


Boat/Motora/Eic 



1977 MONARK FISH/SKI 
I75hp Merc, EZ loader trailer, 
$2,000/best. (615) 385-8670. 

1985 17"Ft. THUNDER- 
CRAFT Cracked hull, good 
1 40hp Merc, EZ loader trailer, 
new seats. $1 ,000/best. (847) 
550-8051. 

CHRIS CRAFT 1005, 22ft. 
Scorpion 212 with 150hp Evin- 
rude, $1,895/best, SEA RAY 
1975, 22ft. immaculate condi- 
tion. Cuddy cabin with head, 
only 450hre., full mooring cov- 
er, full camper top and full 
teak swim platform, 
$5.800/best. EZ LOADER 
-TRAILER, double axle, 
60001b. capacity, $1.29S/best. 
(847)223-5441. 

PONTOON SALE 

FIRST OF A KIND SALE 

Due to last year's shortages 

Woodland Is offering a 

guarantee for Spring 

delivery. Color, Style, Size, 

Date, Motor (YOUR WAY)I 

Low prices, low finance rates. 

AND we match up to 51 ,000 

down on selected models. 

A great family gift from a 

great family company. 

Woodland Pier 1. 

Open Tuesday thru 

Saturday until 

December 19. 

(414) 534-6264. 




1997 KS. KAWASAKI PRO 
CIRCUIT 125, $3,800/best, 
(847) 358-5949. 

AEROBIC RIDER EXER- 
CISE MACHINE WITH ris- 
er, excellent condition, like 
new. Original $300, best offer. 
(847) 973-0473 after 6pm. 



804 



Can for Sale 



$100-$500CARS 

* • *i Police Impounds. • 
^riohda^.Chevy^, '■ 
Joop's and Sport Utilities. 
" ■■' . MustSeM &, 
'■ , ■■ 1-BO0-522-2730 , 



6X12292. 



r 



*00 MAZDA RX7 GXL,' red. 

loaded, leather interior, panv • 
pared garargo kept $7,500. 
Cafl (847) 223-2085 .-,' .", 

1985, SUBURBAN ' GOOD 
Ures, very dean, woli main- 
tained, air, 'automatic; 

S3,500/best (708) 447-4590. . 

■ 

1991 6UICK PARK AVE. 
Good condition, white with 
bur'gandy ' Interior. $5,400 
(847) 975-G799. . 

1992 CORVETTE CON- 
VERTIBLE white with white 
lop, garage kept, 55,000 
miles. Excellent condition. 
(815) 385-8468. 

1992 MIATA, RED, perfect 
condition, 10,200 actual miles, 
garaged, hard top Included. 
Highest offer. (847) 
223-9177. 

BUICK 1885 CENTURY 
WAGON Clean and reliable. 
Asking $1,500/besl. (414) 652- 
7952. 

BUICK 1992 SKYLARK 
SPORTY, red, 4-door, V8, air. 
auto-locks, good condition, 
$4.350/be3t (847) 356-6685. 

INFINITI 1995 JSO'S, 6 TO 
CHOOSE WITH SIMILAR 
SAVINGS, LEATHER. SUN- 
ROOF, $16,995. (B47) 382- 
9200 

INFINITI 1895 045'8 

LEATHER, SUNROOF, 

$22.995. (847) 382-9200. 

INFINm 1998 130T, 
LEATHER, SUNROOF. 

$19,995. (847) 362-9200. 

JAGUAR 1991 XJS SOVER- 
IGN, excellent condition, 
52,000 miles, $16,500/best. 
(847) 356-8194 after 6pm. 

LINCOLN 1997 TOWN 
CAR SIGNATURE. $23,965. 
(847) 526-5541 . 

LINCOLN CONTINENTAL 
1997, $23,865. (847) 526- 

0SS41 ■\aJ^n^ c»-J» j^'s..,.*- « ' ' ! 

LINCOLN CONTINENTAL 
1882 SIGNATURE, $7,995. 
(847) 395-2277. 

MAZDA 1991 RX7, $8,995. 
(647) 587-3300, 

MAZDA 1992 PROTEGE, 

$5,990. (847)223-8651. 

MERCEDES BENZ 1971 
300 SEL, 4-door, garaged 
ISyrs., could run, good 
shape, great parts, all com- 
plete. $500/best. (847) 
625-9851. 

MERCURY 1992 SABLE 

LS 3.8L V6. A/C. ABS, alrbags, 
automatic, all power, leather 
seals, 78K. Blue book $7,850. 
asking $6,650. (847) 356- 
0852. 

MERCURY 1994 COUGAR 

XR7, $7,995. (847) 5B7-3300. 

MERCURY 1995 SABLE 
LS. $8,975. (647) 526-5541, 

MOVING OUT OF STATE. 
MUST SELL 1997 Black Pon- 
tlac Sunfire, 5-speed, 2-door 
sedan, A/C, cassette. Asking 
$9,900. (847) 438-4180. 

MUST SEE 1989 Honda Ci- 
vic, manual trans, new parts, 
excellent condition, 

$2,900/best. (847) 838-2617. 

NISSAN 1992 SENTRA, 

$4,995. (847) 587-6473. 

NISSAN 1995 ALTIMA, 
$8.995. (847) 395-3600. 

NISSAN STANZA 1991, 

$4,995. (847) 587-6473. 

OLDS 1891 9B ELITE, abso- 
lutely like new. (847) 395- 
2277. 

OLDS 1996 CIERA, $9,995. 
(647) 395-3600. 

PLYMOUTH 1995 NEON 

SON, $4,995. (B47) 567-6473. 

PLYMOUTH 1898 

BREEZE 41 K, $8.975/best. 
Red, 4-door. PS, PB. PW, PL, 
air, cruise, 4-cyllnder, AM/FM 
cassette. (847) 336-1574. 

PONT1AC 1990 6000 SE, 

all wheel drive, $2,995. (847) 
395-2277. 

SATURN SC2 1993, 

$6,995. (847) 395-3600. 

TOYOTA 1997 CAMRY, 
$14,990.(847)223-8651. 



804 



Cars For Sale 



804 


Cars For Sale - 




Four Wheel Drive 
'■ y Jeeps 



834 



Trucks/Trailer* LHtf*] Houakeq*J| 



CHEVROLET 1995 IMPA- 
IA SS,' CD,' leather, t33,000 
miles, now, tires, new brakes, 
loaded,. $18,500, (847) 

: 39s-s9ee.'..-.-^v --••■•■•;. >•■•">'' 

CHEVROLET 1897 MALI- 
BU, f 12,990. (647) 223-8651 . : 

CHEVY- 1884 CORVETTE, 
$8.995. (647) 223-8651; ... > ' 

• CHEVY 1967^ CAPRICE' 
CLASSIC ESTATE: WAG- 
ON, looks good, runs. good, 
everything works, 92.000 
miles. $l,2007besL- (847) 
548-7950. 

CHEVY 1988 CAMARO, 5- 
epeed, new Ures, power wind- 
ows/locks, hatchback, keyless 
entry, lift wheel, arn/fm cas- 
sette, runs and looks great, 
$2,00Q/best (414) 2T9-Q7A6. 

CHEVY 1991 CAMARO 
RS, $4,338. (847) 587-6473. 

CHEVY 1993 CAVALIER 

WAGON, loaded, power eve- 
rything, super clean. Must see. 
(647) 833-2135 after 6pm. 

CHEVY 1995 MONTE CAR- 
LO, 2-door, white with gray In- 
terior, garage kept, excellent 
condition, highway miles, 
am/fm, FWD. Asking $9,200, 
(847) 395-2218. 

CHEVY 1997 LUMINA, 4- 
door, while, maroon Interior, 
fully loaded, low miles, A/C, ex- 
cellent condition. Must sell. 
Asking $14,500/bost. Please 
call (647) 223-3161 after 5pm 
or leave message. 

CHEVY, FORD PICK-UP 

Bodies, Factory-new guar- 
anteed from $1300.00. Doors 
from $89.00 Fenders from 
$50.00 Beds from $800.00. 
Bedllners $169.00. Bumpers, 
Grills Repari Panels, Paints, 
Abrasives, windshields, radia- 
tors, Delivery, Marx (217) 624- 
6164. 

DAYTONA 18B8, SUN- 
ROOF, great interior, needs 
work, $400/best. (414) 
662-9340. 

DODGE '85 RED neon, high 
line, 4 door, a/c. auto, power 
locks, tilt, 3 year service, com. 
42,000 mllB3. (847)395-1968 

EAGLE TALON ESI 1995. 5- 
speed 'manuW' 40K-, ,:L A/C, 
AM/FM cassette, power steer- 
ing, excellent condition, 
$8,700. (847) 356-5695 be- 
fore 7pm. 

EXPRESS AUTO 

EXCHANGE 

USED CARS 

We lake consignment cars. 

No charge. 

Too busy lo sell your car? 

Lei us do it for you. 

(847) 740-1400 

1 19 W. Rollins Rd. 

Round Lake Beach. 

[Across from Burger King). 

Ask tor Mike or Norm. 

198S OLDS CUTLASS 
SIERRA SILVER MOON- 
LIGHT, A/C, heat, power 
locks, new tires, new brakes, 
new exhaust, new radiator, 
new cam shaft. Runs great, 
Son left for Navy, Must sell. 
$1,599. Ask for Mr. Coleman 
(414) 654-6543 or leave mes- 
sage. 

FORD 1868 MUSTANG 
COUPE, completely restor- 
able, many extra parts, $800. 
(847) 639-9283 after 5pm. 

FORD 1891 TAURUS 
WAGON GL, good condition, 
air, power, 1 -owner, ABS 
brakes, $3,500. (B47) 
382-7632. 

FORD 1992 MUSTANG 

CONVERTIBLE. $6,990. (847) 
223-8651. 

FORD 1990 CONTOUR 

GL, $9,475. (847)526-5541. 

FORD 1897 ESCORT LX 

WAGON, $9,865, (847) 526- 
5541. 

FORD 1998 CONTOUR 

GL, $11,978. (647) 526-5541. 

FORD EXPLORER, 

58,000 miles, Eddie Bauer, 
low miles, 2yr. warranty, 6 disc 
CD player, flawless condition, 
$15,000. (847) 566-^1043. 

FORD TAURUS 1997, 
41.000 miles, CD changer, 
power everything, excellent 
condition, $ll,2O0/best (847) 
265-2637. 

HONDA 1994 CIVIC 
HATCHBACK, 56,000 miles. 5- 
speed, $7,000. (847) 

543-1289. 

HONDA 1996 ACCORD, 
$14,890.(847)223-8651. 



TRANS AM, RAM' AIR 1998 
. Pontlacys 5.000 mBes, rare 6- v „ 
speed, 'S2S,000/bestr- (4.1 4) ,' 
669-6206.:. .:■••;- ' ■■- il •■; !■>, 

VOLVO .1998 . 655 TURBO 
WAGON, LEATHER, 'SUN- 
ROOF, $21 ,999, ' (847) 382- 

. 6200./ ■■■'■■-. :. ' ' ' : .",- '■■ 

; VOLVO 1998 SELECT 650, 

LEATHER, ,.; SUNROOF,-' 
$20,995. (847) 382-9200. ' 

VOLVO 5 1996 655 . GLT 
WAGON LEATHER, SUN- 
ROOF, COLD WEATHER 
TRACTION, $24,595. (647) 
362-9200. 

VOLVO 1998 SELECT S- 
70 GLT, LEATHER, SUN- 
ROOF, $28,595. (847) 362- 
9200. ' . . 

VOLVO 1996 SELECT 
S70S, 12 TO CHOOSE WITH 
SIMILAR SAVINGS, LEATH- 
ER, SUNROOF, $24,585. 
(847) 362-9200. 

VOLVO 1998 SELECT V- 
70 WAGONS, 13 to choose 
from with similar savings, 
leather, sunroof, $26,895. 
(847) 362-9200. 

VOLVO 1698 SELECT V- 
70 R/AWD WAGON, LEATH- 
ER, SUNROOF, $33,995. 
(647) 362-9200. 



810 



Qaslc/Anlique Can 



DODQE 1868 CHARGER, 
collectors car, needs body 
paint and some Interior work, 
97% original parts, good re- 
built engine and transmission. 
Asking $2,600/best. (847) 
360-1868. (847) 360-1968 
leave mess age. 



814 



SerHce&Ptru 



ARE WHEELS. SET ol four 
American Racing Equipment 
15x8,. GM bolt pattern. True 
spoked wheels. Good shape, 
$150. (847) 548-1115. 

BMW WHEELS SET OF 
FOUR, to fit 3, 5, 6, 7, 8 ser- 
ies. Mllle Miglla 5 spoke 
wheels with Yokohama AVS 
Ures. 50% tread left, wheels In 
good shape, $700. (847) 548- 
1115. ■■• - 

HOLLEY CARB, GREAT 
shape $75, Carter Ihermo- 
quad, off of 440; has not run In 
years, $25. Dual point distribu- 
tor for BB Chrysler, $25. Both 
flip up headlight doors for '69 
Charger. $25. Call after 6pm 
(647) 548-1115. 

TRANSMISSIONS 

•Rebuilt 

•Warranty 

•Great Prices. 

(847)566-2254. 



824 



VlTB 



ASTRO VAN 1865, $3,500. 
remodeled. (347) 748-3572. 

CHEW 1988 CONVER- 
SION VAN, 75K miles, A/C, 
AM/FM cassette, tow pack- 
age, $4,000/best. Days (847) 
358-8008, evenings (847) 
587-5592, Ken. 

CHEVY 1992 LUMINA 
APV. $6,995. (847) 395-3700. 

DODGE 1889 CARAVAN 

LE, $2,967. (847) 567-6473, 

FORD 1990, 14,000 miles, 
air, full bed, captain chairs, no 
rust, refrigerator, $5,800. 

(847) 797-0779, 

FORD 1988 WINDSTAR 

GL. $16,998. (547) 526-5541. 

PONTIAC 1994 TRANS- 
PORT, power side door, 
$6,995. (847) 395-2277. 



IWGfflC 

-Havana van 

Excellent Condition 

E7K miles 613,500 

©JL0. 

C8A7} 540-7000 Days 

CB47} 438-3333 Eve 



M « M « M » mm i nM ii n i M »ii 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 
ADVERTISERS 

If you have placed classified 
advertising with the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may re- 
ceive a misleading alatement 
from another firm request- 
ing payment for Uila advertis- 
ing. To receive proper cred- 
it to your account, all pay- 
ments Tor your Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

must be made as invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Nrnpspen 

PO Box 208 

30 S. Whitney BL> 

OiryUfcc.lt 60030-0368 



C H EVY 1 983 ' S U B UR B AN , 
$4,9954647) 3953600^,'. 

CH^VV..^IW-tiBLAZER,: 
$10,895. (847) 587-3300. 

CHEVY. 1994 S-10 BLAZ- 
ER, $9;980..(647) 223-6651. 

CHEVY 1696 BLAZER LS, 
$13,995. (647) 587-3300. ' '; 

— ^ ^^ mm ^^^^^^ m M a mm J 

DODGE ■'-:■'■-■'< -1988 ; RAM I 
atARQER;4K4,,8 ( O0O miles 
on rebuilt engine'/ new Ures, 
towing package.-. Asking 
$3.600/best (816) 675-6434 
after 7pm. ' ' . ■ [ 

DODGE 1994 DAKOTA, ax- 
tended cab, V8, 4x4, low mile- 
age, full power, $14,000/best 
(414)694-1745. 

FORD 1688 BRONCO 4x4 
with 6ft. unlmount Western 
plow on It with 90,470 miles, 
with Double D big tires on II, 
$4,500. 1987 FORD RANGER 
with 109,656 miles, 5-speed 
plus reverse, $600. Call Jose 
(647) 487-9406. 

FORD 1991 EXPLORER, 
4WD, $5.995. (847) 395-2277. 

FORD 1991 EXPLORER, 

$5.650. (847) 587-6473. 

FORD 1995 EXPLORER 
EDDIE BAUER, great condi- 
tion, perfectly maintained, 
64,000 miles, $18,90O/bsst. 
(847)395-2015. 

FORD 1995 XL F-150. 4x4. 
standard cab. A/C, bedllnor, 5- 
speed manual, . 6-cyllnder, 
extra tires, 52,000 miles, origi- 
nal owner, excellent condition, 
$12,995. (414) 653-0370. 

FORD 1997 EXPEDmON 
4X4. $23,965. (647) 526-5541. 

GMC 1990 SUBURBAN 
4x4 CONVERSION VAN. 
$6,990. (647)223-6651. 

GMC S JIMMY 1993, 
$6,995. (647) 395-3700. 

ISUZU AMIGD 1693, fully 
loaded. $5,500/best. (847) 
973-0128 or voice mall 1-600- 
255-4859 6X1.4689. 

JEEP 1994 WRANGLER, 
50K, both hard and soft top, 
clean, black, big Ures, asking 
$10.900. (647) 669-7088. 

JEEP CHEROKEE 1992. 
$6,990. (847) 223-8651. 



JEEP WRANGLER 1995, 

$10,995. (847) 5B7-6473. 

JEEP WRANGLER HARD 
TOP 1995, $12,990. (847) 
223-6651. 

NISSAN 1994 PATH- 
FINDER SE, $14,537. (847) 
587-6473. 



i ,-_ „".. 



FORD F-1B0 '■; 1992,'6-qfflri-- 
: der.'sl^'wWialr^AWFMcaa- 

'■' *ette, : ' J V ' low -''.*-' mileage, 
v'; $e,SO0VbesL (647) 356-5049.- .. 

TRAVEL TRAILER ; «FT.i 

'low miles,' (ike new,, loaded, 
$6,000. Call for details (847) 




CHEVY 1993 C-1600 PICK- 
UP, tidy 500 Edition. 75.000 
mites, some add ons. 
Sll.OOOVbast. (847) 356-8807 
leave message. 

CHEVY 1993 S-10 EX- 
TENDED CAB. $4,464. (847) 
587-6473. 

DODGE 1993 DAKOTA, 

$5,995. (847) 395-3700. 

DODGE 1995 RAM 1500 
4x4 Club Cab SLT, short box. 
dark blue. 5.9 V8 Magnum, au- 
tomatic, loaded, CD player, 
roll top cover, $1 7,300/best. 
(414)763-5763. 

DODGE 1998 DAKOTA 
SPORT, $9,995. (B47) 587- 
6473. 

DODGE 1997 RAM PICKUP 
TRUCK. 4x4, whits, cabin and 
1/2, still under warranty. 
$22,000/bost. (847) 
740-2606. 

FORD 1984 VAN WORK 
TRUCK, heavy duty, 6-cy- 
llnder, very excellent runner, 
all new parts. $5O0/best. (847) 
395-6088. 

FORD 1669 RANGER 4x4 
EXT. CAB, $3,695. (647) 395- 
3700. 

FORD 1991 F-150 XLT 
PICKUP, Stick, $6,200. (815) 
455-6765, 

FORD 1991 F-250, extend- 
ed cab XLT, Lariat Package, 
loaded, 2WD, excellent condi- 
tion running and looking, 351 
V8 full power, 95,000 miles, 
over 1/2 highway, $11,000. 
(647)662-1480. 

FORD 1995 F-150 EDDIE 
BAUER. $15,645. (847) 526- 

5541. 

FORD 1996 RANGER XLT. 
$8,650. (647) 526-5541 . 




1982 WD ALUS CHALM- 
ERS TRACTOR wlUt 3pL 2 
bottom plow and mounted cul- 
tivator,. $3,000/besL (815) 
338-1211. .....■;.'• 

IRRIGATION PUMP & MO- 
TOR, model 6203A, 40hp, 
phase 3. Peerless pump, 4in. 
Ductal falanged, 20hp. motor. 
$650. (647) 740-7380 after 
5pm. 



■■ .':'■ • ■' 
';;TOAWRty£«S^ 

' CLEAN tNG SERVICE, 
fl And wtfre wfflsng to do fc 
For aB your cteaning r**d*, 

cafl ut at (847) 648-7403. 

" NO TIME FOR V 
CLEANING? 

But need ttw M> **» **$** 
• CaB Maria., 
Ideanwaeldyof \- 
/:,l*wi>efdyoiiry. . 
. Non-amoker. 
«* .- Rafaforkws'. .' 
(847) 546-3759 ; 
leave massage. 



.- 



S42 





FALL CLEAN UP. Trimming. 
cutting down trees,- blackdlrt, 
sod, mulch, .planting. All your 
fall clean up work. (815) 
385-5807;,* 



Classified Ads Crct 



■ 



Biisulia. 

G^parrcllor 

Rmlit to place 

yourad. 



S72 



ProteukMuu 
Services 



WRITE FOR YOU I 
*X4taa Card* 

• Wadding invitations 

•Showtr /Party IrtvltiUona, 

•Handwritten. 

• Reasonable rates. 

Call (BIB) 363-5330. 



844 


Molorcyclei 



S78 


Remodeling 



HARLEY DAVIDSON 1993 
custom Sportster, $1,200. 
(8471 949-6970. 



848 


Wanted To Buy 



USED CARS AND TRUCKS. 
Cars up to $300. Trucks up lo 
$500. Running condition pre- 
ferred. (847) 740-6245. 



S33 


Handyman 



THE HANDYMAN NO job 

too small. Painting, carpentry 
and repair work. Reasonable 
rates and free estimates. 
(847) 223-7724. 



DC TILE WE Install floor and 
wall tiles of alt kinds. Remodel 
all bathrooms and kitchens. 
Free estimates. (647) 395- 
0777. 

JACK'S 
REMODELING 

# Basement Finishing 

•Fami!yrooms 4 Office rooms 

'Electrical & Plumbing 

•KJtchons 4 Balhs 

"Vinyl Replacement Windows 

•Soffit Fasda. 

FREE ESTIMATES 
(947) 546-6759. 

RICK'S REMODELING 

COMPLETE Carpentry. 

Days, nights and weekends. 
No job too big, no job too 
small. (647) 740-4303. 




Let our qualified 

"Classified Chefs" cook 

up an ad for you. 

Call 

(847)223-8161 

today! 




— 



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CLASSSfFIED 



December 4? 1998 




PLACES TO GO... 
THINGS TO DO 



Coming In Decemberl 





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WAUCONDA 
WURKANI IIC.ION 

CRAFT 

SHOW 

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CLASSIFIEDS GET RESULTS. TO PLACE YOUR 
WORD RATE AD, CALL LISA TODAY 847-223-8161 
















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>L\lXl3, STORES, & SERVICES * 

DIRECTORY 



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Grayslake 

(847) 223-2787 



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Old Orchard Center 

,34 Old Orchard Rd. 
Skokie, IL. 
(847) 674-7070 



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IGolt Rd :x \ M(juU) f>3 
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(847) 330-1537 



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Gurnee Mills Dlvci 

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/ Lakeland Newspapers 



'■'■ ' '"■ :, / '- 



COUNTY 






December 4, 1998 II 

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HEBD CREDIT fAST? 




1-800- 
800-2766 

Sea OWED 



757 RIVER OAK5 DR 

cALUMncnxi 

708-891-1700 

8343 W. NORTH AVI 

ME1ROSI MRKt 

708-345-2222 

3657 W. BELMONTs 

773-889-0312 

1379 NO. MILWAUKEE 

773-235-9000 

2301 W. 95TH STs 

773-445-1888 




FURNITURE • APPLIANCES • ELECTRONICS 




3401 W. 47TH 5Tt 

773-376-3400 

4630 SO. ASHLANDi 

773-376-3401 

SUPERSTORES AND 



HOME OF THE CREDIT CONNECTION 

HEW HOLIDAY HOURS: Monday-Friday 10AM - B:30PM • Saturday MOAM - 7PM • Sunday 1 1AM - 6PM 



CLEARANCE CENTERS: 

2750 W. GRAND AVIt 

773-645-1600 

61 22 NO. OARKSTi 

773-381-0800 

0530 SO. COTTAOIt 

773-873-8999 



ApONSON 



DIRECT 
TO MEXICO 



^^mmm*™*^