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Full text of "Antioch News 12/11/1998"

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AWTIOCH PUBLIC LIBRARY DISTRICT 




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Five Sections— 80 Pages 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1998 



per /75 cents 







omqiganizatipn 



Women's Club leads drive to cuddle 
children with cuddly creatures 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Puffkins creatures offer 
parents a chance to do 
something good for their 
own children as well as for 
others In Illinois— If they buy die 
Puffkins from the General Federa- 
tion of Women's dubs-Illinois 
chapter, . ... . ,'. '•"' - 

. / The Antioch Woman's Club has 
been working to help their state _- 
federation seH these special Puffldns 
creatures and to help prevent child 
abuse by "the purchase. . 

Not only have An tioch club 
members bought many of the 
specially tagged Puffkins 
themselves, bat also they have used 
them to create an award-winning 
Christmas Tree design for Victory 
Memorial Hospital. That project, in 
turn helped Lake County women's 
health services. 

Puffkins are small plush 
creatures about 4 inches in height 
rilled with polyester fibers and PVC 



bean pellets. Ail are handmade by 
Swibco and were introduced as a 
children's toy In April 1997. 

"I'm the Puffkins Lady,' said 
President Phyllis Cossarek of the 
GFWC-niinois. 

"We sell the entire line of . 
Puffldns and Puflkins keychalns, 
and ours have a sped al heart swing 
tag," she'sald. "Only our organiza- 
tion in Illinois has this PufQdns 
swing-tag." '. '-: ' ' '^v^;/ . * 
._ .Cossarek works to sell the 
■ cuddly children's toy in Illinois '■.'■.",' 
through local community women's 
dubs and by direct purchase from 
the federation-*-.-.:-, - 
. . The Puflkins are sold for $6 ($7 
by m ail, which includes postage and 
handling costs). 

"Three dollars goes to the 
prevention of child abuse. We make 
no profit," she said. 

"The selling of Puffkins has put 
us in the forefront of raising money 
for the prevention of child abuse," 

Please see PUFFKINS / A6 




Above, Antioch Woman's Club 
Art Committee members rest 
near their decorated tree, 
Home for the Holidays, at 
Midlane Country Club. The tree 
was a fund-raiser, for Victory § 
Hospital Foundation in late 
November. From .'the >; left: 
Dorothy Volkert, Carol Pavelski," 
Kris TMurphy/ : ::apd-,^ Ann: 
MacVeagft. Right, the Puffkins; 
tree^ the ^t^m^^r^tor 
provided 




activities 



fiUiheailerufo 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 

Staff Reporter 



■ i 










Warm temperatures Into early 
December have given way to robust, 
bracing reminders of just what time 
of year this is anyway. ;•' 

Decorated homes and lawns 
lead to a decorated downtown with 
lights and window displays of gifts. 

It's beginning to look a lot like 
shopping. 

But, In Antioch there is so much 
more to do. 

There Is the Holiday Lights of 
Antioch, the downtown carriage 
rides, Santa's Enchanted Castle, 
letters to Santa Glaus, and the 
special treat that shopping can be 
.with merchants who know their 
store and their customers. 

_ /There :aie the 'concerts at the. 
<hlgh school end churches. 
: :';^Metra:ls-8rjonsoting a Santa's 
Safety Train with tickets to ride to 
Chicago, for S3, .roxtrki tiip, arid a 
aLt ramget. ^'-: 
And, late at night there Is sttD 
the opportunity to stand downtown 
and look north up the street. The 
; white ! points of; I^ghr on aO the 
street's trees lead to the five pointed 
star ;on .'the side of the United 
Methodist Church of Antioch heU 
tower. . 'i>^ 

There is much to enjoy about 
Antioch. 

Once again, the Antioch 

Please see MUSIC/ A3 







ACHS's Rummel 
P.E. teacher of year 

Physical Education teacher receives 
prestigious honor from state peers 



IN IFOR 

; Hanukkahcelebration 

irf! ■Counbyside* llai^tj propilses ; jj 
to fix stench" problems 

^FtE^SEEPAGEj;i : j 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



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Debbie Rummel, Antioch 
Community High School physical 
education and health teacher, has 
been named Illinois Secondary 
School Physical Educator of the Year 
by the Illinois Association for Health, 
Physical Education, Recreation, and 
Dance. 

She received the award Friday, 
Nov. 20 at the association's 68th 
annual state convention at the 
Arlington Park Conference Center. 

Rummel received recognition for 
serving as a positive role model, 
using modem teaching methodolo- 
gy, involving students in Innovative 
learning experiences, and promoting 
an understanding of dance. 

Her impact extends beyond her 
students at ACHS, however. 

Rummel Is active in national, 
state, and regional efforts to promote 



health and physical education as part 
of the life of an educated person. 

"She really cares about what she 
is doing," said Steve Wapon, one of 
her colleagues in the department 
"She Is Miss Enthusiasm in our 
department It's very contagious. It 
helps all of us." 

That enthusiasm was on display 
at the Thursday, Nov. 5 Board of 
Education meeting when she 
described the school's physical 
education program to board 
members. 1 

She was presenting some of the 
department's professional and 
teaching activity. 

"We are in the process of review- 
ing our core competencies," she said. 

"This week we have our climbing 
wall (operational)." 

in March, the department will 



Please see RUMMEL / A3 




Debbie Rummel, who recently won a national award for Secondary 
School Physical Educator of the Year, teaches a health class at 
Antioch Community High School. — Photo by Sandy Bressner % 







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December 11^1998 



COMMUNITY 



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FROM 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A3 



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in season 




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Chamber of Commerce and Industry 
and CAN are sponsoring a residential 
outdMrCJiristmasdecoratirig contest 
wim$l,000 of prizes for winners. 

Residents must register by'tbday,\ 
Friday," Dec. 11 to; be. included in the 
contest because entries will be judged - : 
thiscoming Sunday, Dec' 13,- ■ 

The Chamber of Commerce ils ac- 
cepting registrations by telephone at 
395-2233 or in person at 884 Main Street 

Shopping downtown can earn a 
person a carriage ride around town. 
Shoppers who purchase $25 or more 
from area stores can receive a coupon 
mat wiU gwe mem a free ride, 

Thecarriagerideisavailablefrom 1 
p.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays and Sun- 
days, Dec 12 and 13 and Dec 19 and 20. 

The Enchanted Castle at Toft and 
Orchard streets offers children the op- 
portunity to personally present their 
desires to Santa C!a us. 

The Castle is open Friday, Dec 1 1 
through Wednesday, Dec 23 from 5:30 
to 8 p.m. on Mondays through Fridays. 
On Saturdays and Sundays the castle is 
open from 1 1 am to 4 p.m. 

In addition, members of the Anti- 
och Woman's Club are present to take 
photographs of children with Santa for 
a $4 donation. 

There is a Santa's mailbox near 
the Enchanted Castle, Letters to San- 
ta are supported by the Antioch 
Chamber of Commerce and Industry 
and the Antioch Rotary Club. The ad- 
dress for letters Is: Santa Claus, 100 
Toyland Road, North Pole. Children 
should be sure to place their return 
address on the envelop. 

For people who love holiday mu- 
sk, Antioch Community High School, 
Emmons School, Antioch Evangelical 
Free Church and St Peter Church will 
offer concerts. 

Antioch Community High School 
will host band and choir concerts on 
Tuesday, Dec 15 at 7*30 p.m. in the au- 
ditorium. 



The Madrigal Ensemble wulper- 
; form their annual dinner concerts Sat- 
£ urday arid Sunday, Dec 12 and 13. 

TrteFjrimorB^oolHoUdaycbri- 
> cert Is scheduled for 630 pjri; in the 
. Wghschoorauditorlum on Wednesday, 
Dec 16. V ; •- 

St Petex Church will present two 
holiday programs. . • v-' ; ' -^ : 

On Sunday, Dec 13 at 3 p.m. there 
will bea choral Christmas presentation 
of ? Welcome to Our World" Admission 
is'free. ^ . : ; : 

OnSuriday, Dec 20, Festival Arts of 
Antioch will present Handel's "Messi- 
ah" at 730 p.m. at St Peter Church. 
Choirmaster Ralph Brooke will lead the 
80-voice chorus. Chris Kusherj of. 
Grayslake, and the Tim Montalvo 
Quintet will accompany them. The fea- 
tured soloists will be Rebecca Walker, 
Eva Harper, William Chamberlain, and 
Nicholas Solomon. 

Antioch Evangelical Free Church 
will present concert pianist G. Richard ' 
Deal on Saturday, Dec 19 at 7. p.m. with 
a special Christmas program. He re- 
cendy participated in the Tchaikovsky 
Piano Competition in Moscow. 

The Metra Safety Train Is a special 
event 

Santa and his helpers will be on 
board with gifts and games for children. 

Downtown there wfl] beasafety pre- 
sentation and a train set wfl] be raffled. 

Tickets to ride Metre's Safety Train 
are sold from the Fox Lake Train Sta- 
tion. There are space limitations and 
only advance tickets are available. 
Round Uip tickets are S3 for all ages. 

The train leaves Antioch at 9 am. 
oh Saturday, Dec 19 and arrives In 
downtown Chicago at ltfc22 am There 
will be nine stops. 

The train returns lo Antioch at 
12: 15 p.m. for a 1:45 p.m. arrival at the 
depot:- vv .v _'■"'■' .'• 

Additional information is available 
from Metra's Passe nger S ervices De- 
partment at 3 1 2-322 : 6777. 




RUM MEL: Teacher honored 



host a Health Fair. 

'This year we've been able to draw 
upon our volunteer corps," she said. 
With the background they have, she said 
that she anticipated a great health fair. 

In November, she said that stu- 
dents were to receive information 
about breast cancer awareness. 

In-house skating is on the cur- 
riculum agenda. 

Rumme! discussed percentile 
rankings of the National Physical Fit- 
ness Award Program. She wants to 
use new software to improve feed- 
back about a student's physical abil- 
ity by age and gender. 

"It gives kids a good goal-setting 
opportunity," she told school board 
members. 

Students are evaluated for heart- 
lung endurance, upper body 
strength, basic ability and leg 
strength, overall flexibility, and other 
categories. These are reported to par- 
ents, she said, and feedback is en- 
couraged. 

Rummel told the school board that 
there ate students who dp this, get 
stronger, get better, and End it rewarding 

"One of the things that Debbie 
does is lead by example," said Wapon 
in late November. The lessons she 



teaches are part of her life. 

"She's a hands-on, getting stu- 
dents involved type of teacher,' he said. 
Rummel is creative in her teaching ap- 
proach and looks for ways to involve 
students in the process of learning 

Rummel has been in town for 
awhile. 

"I've been at Antioch since 1982," 
she said. "I've always wanted to be a 
teacher since I was a child. It's in my 
roots." 

She started out as a coach. Track 
and gymnastics events were her in- 
terest areas. 

"I did that for 13 years," she said. 
Then she left it and came to ACHS. 

"I put all my energies into my 
teaching," shesajd. "I get my sense of 
satisfaction from kids rather than 
athletes." ' 

Today, she is concerned with 
life-long learning. Students can in- 
corporate a concern with healthy liv- 
ing and interest in sports as part of 
their everyday life. 

"Activity is fun. Sweating is fun." 

"I want them to enjoy the activi- 
ty. I'd like to give them a taste of all 
types of activity," she said. "So they 
can use it well beyond the time i see 
them in high school." 






All I want for Christmas... 

Santa Claus, also known, as Woody Wood, talks with Kevin Madden, 6, of Antioch during a work- 
shop for kids at the Mueller-Wood Kraft in lake Villa Saturday.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



Choosey Beanie raffle to benefit A.L.L. 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Choosey Child is sponsoring a 
raffle of 12 Beanie Babies to raise • 
money for the A. L L Parent Net- 
work at Antioch Community High 
School. 

"We're raffling all ten of the 
newest releases to one Winner, plus 
Glory, . plus - Princess,"- said owner 
Barbara Porch, " I'm' calling It-' the 
TwelVe Days of Christmas Raffle;'" : 

The winner will be selected 
Thursday, Dec. 31. 

This is the second fund-raising 
event that Choosey Child has spon- 
sored to benefit the high school par- 
ent networking group. 

Raffle tickets may be purchased 
"vat Choosey Child or at high school 
events where the A.L.L. Parent Net- 
work is selling them. Tickets are $3 
apiece or two for $5, 

The Beanie Babies included in 
this raffle are: '98 Teddy (a holiday 
bear), Santa Elf (Santa Claus), Halo 
(angel bear), Scorch (dragon), Zero 
(Penguin), Pumkin (pumpkin), Beak 
(bird), Roam (buffalo), Loosy 
(goose), Canyon (cougar), Glory 
(bear) and, Princess (bear). 

Some of these Beanie Babies will 



sor 
/en! 



be retired at the end of December 
and one has a special birthdate. 

Halo has the special date 

"The birthdate of this one was 
the day Princess Diana died," said 
Porch; , : 

A.LX. Parent Network will be ■ 
selling raffle tickets to win the Beanie 
Babies at Antioch Community High 
School holiday events, according to 
memher Karen Powell. -'' r -.?V- ■■■' c ? ' 

For example; tickets will be avail- 
• able at me Madrigal Dinners', "the 
freshman basketball tournament, 
and the Band and Choir Concert on 
Tuesday, Dec. 15 at 7:30 p.m. In the 
auditorium. 

"Anytime the concession stand 
is open, well be selling raffle tickets, * 
Powell said. 

Barbara Porch said, This month, 
Ty is announcing who is going to re- 
tire before they actually retire." 

As a result, it is known that some 
of Porch's raffle selections will soon 
retire. Of the 12 toys to be raffled, 
four will be retired. They are '98 Ted- 
dy, Zero, Santa Elf, and Pumkin. 

"We will be calling the winner," 
said Porch. "That way, people don't 
need to call us." 

This is the second fund-raising 
event that Choosey Child has spon- 



sored to help the AJLL Parent Net- 
work. Barbara Porch has previously 
raffled Beanie Babies for them at the 
Chamber of Commerce's Arts and 
Crafts Fake and her store. 

That was. a wonderful fund- 
raiser," . isaid Karen'PdweU of Jhe. 
A.L.L. Parent 'Network. " 
.-■,"'- "Anottief .Individual, who : rias. 
helped the" parent network Is Joann ■: 
\, Osmond! •; She .made : . a substantial 
- .. pe rsonal donation, " according " to 

T P'oitellr^^-- '—- 2222* 

The A.LL Parent Network con- 
tinues to sell bricks that can be per- 
sonalized with messages and names. 
The bricks will be placed in a wail at 
Antioch Community High School as 
part of the modernization of- the 
building. 

"We will be selling bricks until 
next June, 1 999, " Pp well said. A ddi- 
tjonal brick sales will continue after 
that to help the network build a 
pathway, also at the school. 

Fund-raising efforts this year are 
directed to meet the A.LL Parent 
Network's commitment lo rent all 
three decks of the Odyssey cruise 
ship in Chicago. The expanded deck 
space will permit more students to 
attend the popular ACHS after- Prom 
activity. 



1 



PM & L presents 'A Christmas Carol' 



Antioch News 

Vol. 113 No, 50 A Lakeland Newspaper Founded 1886 

(USPS 027-080) Ednon»10mc» M«n**rolMtto«f*«lAuoc 

30 Soulh Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030 Look tori* on the intomot at 

(BAT) 223-8161 WWW.LPNEWS.COM 

Otiics or Puiaeallon. 30 Soum Whitney Si . 0/iytu*t, IL WOW Phon» {M 7)2»B 16 1 

Pubtitfiod "«*■>. pwtoaoJ nvU poJUflt p*H (I OriyfUXt. IL 00030 

Horn* Defavwy RW«: U* M pmyv* UK«. Cot*. ***>*» and UcH«nry Cojnot* 

tfiowttan HO 00 o»r yw by ™i P»W *> «WK» 

POHmoHer Send «Mstu ciiangei lo AnUoch NM. » Soom WMm» Sw* P.O. Box 468, Ony****- imx» 60030. 



WILLIAM H.SCHR0EDER 

Publisher 
KAREN ©TOOLE 

Circulation My. 

BOB ULMER 

Display Advertising Mgr. 

MAUREEN COMBS 

Classified Advertising Mgr. 



M.R.SCHR0EDER 

Founder- 1 904-1 986 



NEAL TUCKER 

Composition hlgrjExtcutke Editor 



Vi 



WILLIAM M.SCHROEDER 

President 

MIMI KOOB 
CeofMtt 

CORKEY GROSS 

Public Relations Manage 

VERjpjEDRHONDA HETRICK BURKE 

"WffiS&lg" muglng Editor 



PM&L Readers Theater will 
present Charles Dickens' 
"A Christmas Carol" Fri- 
day, Dec. 18 at 8 p.m. 
Bruce Weise will direct the adapta- 
tion. Refreshments follow the one 
hour presentation. 

Participants include: Peter 
Plntozzl and Courtney WUlding, 
of Island Lake, Tom Gorman and 
Terry Brady, of Lake Zurich, Tom 
Hausman and Gene LeFave, of 
Antioch, Randy Marglson, of 
Round Lake Park, Dlanne and 
Meghan Hosken, of Lindenhurst, 
Matt Conkrite, of Fox Lake, and 
Debbie and Marlene Helmke, of 
Trevor, Wis. 

The Tuesday, Dec. 15 meeting of 
the United Homeowners Associ- 
ations of Antioch has been can- 
celed due to the holidays. The next 
UHAUA meeting is Tuesday, Jan. 19. 
Members expect to have the final re- 
sults of their opinion survey about 
sewers available at that meeting. 

It Is time for my first Memorial 
Jim Mateja Desk Cleaning Giveaway. 

Jim Mateja is the Chicago Tri- 
bune journalist who writes about 




OUR 
TOWN 

Ken Patchen 



automobiles. He has sponsored a 
few of these events over the years to 
clean his desk and provide readers 
with access to the products that he 
accumulates. 

I too must now clean the desk. 

There are books, compact discs, 
hats, an autographed baseball card, 
and yo-yos in my collection. Yes, 
there is even a videotape on the op- 
tions and benefits of Refractive 
Surgery. Actually, there is so much 
more. Even a John Deere tractor. 

If you want a chance to receive 
something in the mail, this is your 
notice to send me your name and 
address on a postcard or the back of 
an envelope. Send it to: Memorial 
Mateja Giveaway, Kenneth 
Patchen, Lakeland Newspapers, 30 
South Whitney Street, Grayslake, IL, • 
60030. ^ . 

One entry per person. 



. The deadline is Wednesday, 
Dec. 23. 

My wonderful editor, Rhonda 
Hetrlck Burke, will pull the win- 
ning entries from those received. 

Obviously this clean desk give- 
away has nothing to do with Jim 
Mateja, The Chicago Tribune, their 
attorneys, or their cats. 

Eleven members of Christian 
Life fellowship Church attended a 
Youth Seminar Friday and Satur- 
day, Nov. 27 and 28 in Springfield, 
111. The theme of the meetings was 
"It's Your Turn," about remember- 
ing missionaries. 
. Those from Antioch who at- 
tended included David Cook, 
\ lohn Gelb, Shane Smith, Joe 
TCoaler, Kristl Westbrook, Gha- 
stly Soper, and Mandy Caesares. 
Adults who accompanied them 
were Pastor Jeff Brussaly, Jacob 
Jndd, Mrs, WUIiam Cook, and 
Mrs. George Magaruh. 



If you have interesting infor- '■ 
motion or anecdotes to submit for 
"Our Town" call staff reporter Ken 
Patchen at 223-8161, ext.131 or 
e-mail, edit @lnd.com.>" v " 



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' A/1 

A«l t Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



December Hi ism 



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Hastings Lake 
facility to build 
course designed to 
teach youth skills 

By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Hastings Lake YMCA will build a 
junior nine-hole golf course with The 
First Tee program of the World Golf 
Federation. 

George Babish, director of YMCA 
business development, made the an- 
nouncement'wtth First Tee officials 
on Friday, Dec. 4 to local communi- 
ty, education, and recreation leaders. 

The YMCA wants to establish a 
steering committee to help manage 
the course and youth golf program. 
Several people have expressed inter- 
est to serve on such a committee to 
Jim Scherer, Hastings lake YMCA 
Executive Director. 

"This is a wonderful project," he 
said. He plans to have a meeting with 
interested steering committee mem- 
bers in January to begin develop- 
ment of this project. 

Community leaders with skills to 
offer who would like to serve on an 
oversight steering cum m it tec can 
call Scherer at 356-'1U2<1. 

A preliminary course design in- 
cludes, clubhouses facilities, put ling 
and chipping greens, practice lesson 
tee, a 9-hole putting course, practice 
greens with 3, -I and 5 par holes, and 
a 9 -hole par [1 course. 

The initial cost estimate to con 
struct an illuminated 9- holt- pai 
three course and driving range is ap- 
proximately S500.000. although thai 
excludes a pro-shop, parking lot, and 
a ccess road. To incJudfi-Uiose.liiree 
elements may add approximately 
5700,000 to the cost or the proposal. 

The next step is to conduct a for- 
mal feasibility study. 

"The Y is interested in this pro 
ject because we are an organization 
thai helps develop people," Habixh 



said. 

"The vision simply is this: to ex- 
pose the game of golf to youth who 
may not have an opportunity to 
leam about it,' he said. 

Hastings Lake YMCA brings to 
the proposed junior golf course pro- 
ject both land and access to thou- 
sands of children who may be inter- 
ested to leam the game of golf. 

Mark Lowry, Director of Devel- 
opment for The First Tee, of Ponte 
Vedra Beach, Fla., described the re- 
lationship between Hastings Lake 
YMCA and The First Tee as they 
move forward to build the junior golf 
course. 

Lowry said that The First Tee is 
an initiative of the World Golf Foun- 
dation. It operates with an oversight 
committee that includes representa- 
tives of The Professional Golf Associ- 
ation Tour, PGA of America, Ladies 
Professional Golf Association, Unit- 
ed States Golf Association, and Au- 
gusta National Golf Club. 

Former President of the United 
States George H. W. Bush serves as 
the honorary Chairman for The First 
Ice. 

The l-'irst Tec organization will 
provide several services to local com- 
munity program and course orga- 
nizers. These include design services, 
business planning services, con- 
struction equipment discounis, 
computers and technology, a cur- 
riculum, teaching grants, golf equip- 
ment donations, Si 00,000 grants, 
public relations services, and fund- 
raising assistance. 

"There are a lot of kids who are 
mil exposed to this game," said 
l.owry. Children in rural areas do not 
have access to a course to learn or to 
play the game, Rnancial, social, and 
physical barriers exclude many olh 
ci children. 

The 1-irst Tw program seeks to 
make tlu-gameurgolfavailablctoaJI 
children. 

"ll gives kids a place to go and 
learn at their own rate," he said. 

In addition, children learn about 
careers associated with the golfing 
industry, such as course design, 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

NOTICE OF PROPOSED 

PROPERTY TAX INCREASE FOR 

VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH 

I. A Public Hearing to approve a proposed prop- 1 
erty tax increase for the Village of Antioch for 1998 
will be held on December 21 , 1998 at 7:00 p.m. at 
the Village Hall, 874 Main Street. 

Any person desiring to appear at the Public I 
Hearing and present testimony to the taxing dis- 
] trict my contact Candi L Rowe, Village Clerk, 874 [ 
Main Street, Antioch, IL (847)395-1000. 

II. The corporate and special use purpose prop- 
erty taxes extended for 1997 was $1,135,636.93. 

The proposed corporate and special purpose I 
property taxes to be levied for 1998 are; 
$1,271,913.00. This represents a 12% increase 
over the previous year. 

III. The property taxes to be levied for debt ser-l 
| vice and public building commission leases for | 

1997 was $94,746.07. 

The estimated property taxes to be levied for| 
j debt service and public building commission leas- 
es for 1998 is $275,750. This represents a 191% 
increase from the previous year. 

IV.. The total property taxes extended for 1997 [ 
| was $1,230,383.00. 

The estimated total property taxes to be levied I 
J for 1998 are $1,547,663.00. This represents an| 
increase of 25.7% over the previous year. 
Candi L Rowe 
Village Clerk 
| Village of Antioch 

1298B-2327-AN! 
December 11, 1998! 




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Jim Sherer, The First Tee Director of Development Mark Lowry, George Babish and Mary Ann Schlltz 
look over plans for a golf course at Hastings Lake YMCA in Undenhurst.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



clothing, equipment, course mainte- 
nance, and pro shops. 

"These facilities arc going to be 
built so that kids feel good about 
coming to them, Lowry said. Kids 
will feci safe, and they will feel wel- 
come. 

The benefits for children who 
play golf, according to Lowry, are 
both personal and academic. 

"We found that kids that were in 
the golf program — their grades went 
up," he said. Children who play golf 
learn to be patient, and that shows 
up in the classroom. 

"It leaches honesty; it teaches in- 



tegrity." 

Lowry said that children learn 
the rules, the skills, and the etiquette 
of dve game through golf taught at fa- 
cilities such as will be built at Hast- 
ings Lake YMCA. 

"There are 42 (courses) that are 
in some form for development as we 
j»o forth into the new year," Lowry 
said of the national program. 

I lesaid that I lammond, Ind. will 
host a ground-breaking ceremony 
Friday, Dec. IH. Another junior golf 
course is under development in 
Whealon, III., where the Tribune 
limiulatinn is developing a 9-hole 



youth course at Cantigny. 

People are needed to help devel- 
op and manage the Hastings Lake 
YMCA course. 

"We would like to put together a 
steering committee that will chart 
the course. . . ," said Lowry. 

The technical skills that are 
needed on an ideal board Include 
those for fund-raising, law, fi- 
nance, golf operation, and youth 
services. The skills may be drawn 
from the professional and ama- 
teur golfing community, as well 
as government, business and 
community leaders. 



ACHS holiday concerts set 



Three sets of holiday music 
will be performed at Antioch 
Community High School starting 
this weekend. 

Antioch Community High 
School will host band and choir 
concerts on Tuesday, Dec. 15 at 
7:30 p.m. in the auditorium. 

The Madrigal l ; .nsemble will 
perform their annual dinner con- 



certs Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 
12 and 13. The Madrigal Dinner is 
scheduled fur 1 p.m. with perfor- 
mances a i 1 p.m. and 6 p.m. both 
Saturday and Sunday. 

The l-mmons School Holiday 
concert is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. in 
the high school auditorium on 
Wednesday, Due. 16. 

The Tuesday evening Holiday 



Concert will feature Madrigal En- 
semble, a Cappella Choir, Concert 
Choir, Advanced Treble Choir, and 
Freshman Girls Glee performances. 

The Tuesday evening presenta- 
tion also will feature the concert 
band, symphonic orchestra, and 
wind ensemble. 

Admission price on Tuesday for 
adults is $3 and for students is $2. 




Come Worship With U£ 

A Directory Of Antioch Area Churches 



Graeeiend Baptist Church. 258 Ida St . Anlioch, IL 
Sunday School 11am.. Morning Worship 1lam , 
Sunday Evening 7pm Robari Williams, Paslor 

Flrsl Church of Christ, Scientist & Reading Rm. Rta 1 73 and 
Hajdeo, Antioch. Phone CB47) 395- 1 1 96. Sunday School. 
Sunday Church Service 10.30am. Wednesday, 730pm 

Beautiful Savior Evangelical Lutheran Church. 554 Parkway. 
Anlioch. Phono (847) 265-2450 Sunday Worship al Sam, Sunday 
School. High School & Adutt Bible Classes 1030am. 

St Ignatius Episcopal. 377 Man Si Phono (847) 39S0662 Low 
Mass 7 :30am.. Ugh Mass 930am Sunday Sehcd a Nursery 930am 

Antioch Evangelical Free Church. 750 HglMow Or. Phone 
(647) 395-4117. Saturday Evening Service 5:30 p.m. Sunday 
School' 9:45am, Sunday Worship 0;30, 11:00. Chidrene Church 
1 1 am. Nursery both services Awana Club. Senior Pas! a David M 
Grotoau. 

St Stephen Lutheran Church. 1155 Hilside Ave. Phone (847) 
395-3359. Sunday Worship, 8, 0:15 & 10.30. Church School 
9:15am., Sunday. Rev. Robert Trends!, Interim Pastor. 

Christian Ufa Fetkrwihip Assemblies of God Church. 41625 
Deep Lake Rd., AnrJoch. Phone (847) 395-8572. Sunday School 
(all ages) Bam., Sunday Morning Worship 10am.. Children's 
Church 10am., Sunday Evening Worship 6:30pm., Wednesday 
Worship & ChDdnwVa Program 7am., Tues. Women's Fellowship 
& Blbtrj Study 0-1 1 :30am Jorf Brussaty. Pastor. 



Faith Evangelical Lutheran, 1275 Main St.. Phone 
(847) 395-1600. Sunday Worship & 10:30am.. Sunday 
School 9.25am , Sal. 7pm., Rev. Gregory Hormanson, 
Pastor. Christian Day School (847) 395-1664. 

Mlllbum Congregational United Church of Christ. Grass 

Lake Rd. at Rte. 45. PhonB (847) 356-5237. Sunday Service 

10am, Children's Program lOam, Rov. Paul R. Mator, 

Pastor. 

United Meth odlst Church of Arrttoch. 848 Main Si. Phone 

(847) 395-1259. Worship 8:30 S. 10am., Fellowship lime 

9:30am; Sunday School 10am. Rev. Kurt A. Gamfirt, Pastor. 

St. Peter's Church. 557 W. LakB St.. Anlioch. Phone (847) 
395-0274. Masses weekdays. 7:30am; Sunday 6:30. 8, 
9:30. 11 :30am & Saturday 5:30pm. Rev. Father Ronald H, 
Anglim. Pasior. 

Chain of Lakes Community Bible Church. 23201 W. Grass 
Lake Rd, Anlioch, Phono (847) 838-0103. Sunday Worship 8:15 
and 10:45. Sunday School 9:45. Chlldrena Church 10:45. Youth, 
Women's, Awana & Small Group ministries. Pastor, Paul 
McMinimy. 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod). 
25100 W. Grand Avo. (Rte. 59 & 132), Lake Villa. (847) 
356-5158. Sunday Worship 8:15 & 10:45am; Sunday 
School (3 and up) and Bible Study 9:30am, Christian 
Preschool. Rov. John Zellmer, Pastor. 



Dan Dugenske, Director 



This Directory Presented As A Community Service By f 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 



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=■ i December 11, 1998 






POLICE & FIRE 




Lakeland Newspapers/ A5 



The beginning of a toy collection rests In the lobby of the Antloch Township Hall to be donated to 
Toys for Tots, operated by the United States Marine Corps. New, unwrapped toys for boys and girls 
are being collected throughout the Antloch area until Friday, Dec. 18.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 

Toy campaign for tots gains support 

Toys collected for 
totsthrough Dec. 18 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Area merchants, service organi- 
zations, and citizens are collecting 
toys for children who may not other- 
wise receive one for Christmas. 

Lindenhurst Community 

Queens have undertaken a toy col- 
lection drive for the Central Baptist 
Children's Home. 

Antioch Township will accept 
toys for the Marine Corps Reserve's 
Toys for Tots campaign. 

Antioch Moose Lodge #525 is 
collecting toys for children with the 
Coast Guard Auxiliary. 

The Lake Villa Rescue Squad is 
accepting toys for children. 

Antioch True Value is participat- 
ing in the Marine Corps Reserve's 
annual ToysforTots collection drive. 
The store also is collecting money 
through the sale of its "Happy Holi- 
days" music compact disc or cas- 
sette. 

Toy drive sponsors are seeking 
unwrapped, new toys in the original 
packaging for children that can be 
distributed to boys and girls. The 
toys are collected by mid-December 
to allow sufficient time to distribute 
them where they are needed. 

"We are delighted to be able to 
partner with our customers and the 
Marines. again this year to help en- 



sure that every child has a gift to 
open this Christmas," said Stan liv- 
crmoro of Antloch True Value Hard- 
ware/just Ask Rental at 488 Orchard 
Street. 

Livermore has a Toys for Tots 
collection bin in his store. He said 
that donations should be made by 
Friday, Dec 18. 

In Undenhurst, three communi- 
ty queen ambassadors are collecting 
toys for the Lake Villa- based Central 
Baptist Children's Home. 

Miss Lindenhurst Sarah Koth, 
Junior Miss Aimee Gregorin, and Lit- 
tle Miss Nikki Wilhelm have asked 
people to bring toys to the Linden- 
hurst Park District's Annual Tree 
Lighting Ceremony tomorrow, Sat- 
urday, Dec. 5 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. The 
toys will then be turned over to the 
home. 

The Central Baptist Children's 
Home would like to receive new toys 
and clothing for children of all ages, 
especially teenagers. 

The Antioch Loyal Order of 
Moose Lodge #525 is working with 
the United States Coast Guard Auxil- 
iary to collect toys for boys and girls 
at Mooseheart. 

Poole and the Coast Guard Aux- 
iliary are also collecting cans of food 
and old coats for the homeless. Poole 
will pick-up donations for the food 
drive and the coat drive. 

Moose member and Coast 
Guard Flotilla Commander Noah 
Poole will pick up donations if called 
at 356-7216. 



Antloch Township t Supervisor 
.: Timothy, :Osmond;?sa|3^that. •.the 
.township offices; will accept dona-, 
tiohs for the T6ys~ for Tots Program. 
People who wish to, drop off new, 
unwrapped toys may do so at 99 
West Route 173 (across from Ray- 
mond Chevrolet and Oldsmobile, 
Inc.). 

Lake Villa^escue Squad is collect- 
ing toys at "their station at 910 East 
Grand Avenue in Lake Villa. They will 
accept toys between 9am. and 4 p.m. 
until Friday, Dec. 18. Their Toys for 
Tots project collects toys for children 
throughout the area and distributes 
them at Christmas time. 

"Please help every child have a 
little Christmas," said Antioch True 
Value's Stan Livermore. 

He has participated in the toy 
drive with more than 2,600 other 
True Value retailers nationwide. 
True Value Hardware and the Ma- 
rine Corps Reserve's Toys for Tots 
drive last year collected over 10 mil- 
lion toys. The toys were distributed 
to 4.7 million children throughout 
the country. 

Livermore also has available for 
sale in his store a disc and tape of 
holiday music. It is called "Happy 
Holidays." 

The proceeds from the sale of 
the "Happy Holidays" tapes and 
discs by True Value Hardware are 
donated to the Marine Toys for Tots 
Foundation. The sale of the disc has 
generated over $100,000 for the 
foundation since 1996. 






I. 





J Area drivers may take a Rules of 
the Road review course at the Antioch 
Townships office on designated dates 
during the first ten months of 1999. 

People, from the Antioch, Lake 

Villa, and Newport Township area 

will be encouraged to use the course 

to refresh their knowledge of the tests 

- to obtain a driver's license. 

The course is free to everyone, 
any age, who wishes to attend. 

The purpose of the course Is to 
help applicants pass the Illinois Dri- 
vers license renewal examination. 
Drivers are informed about the cur- 
rent vision test and driving ability 
parts of the examination. 



TOiirse 



; The course also prepares appli- 
cants for the general written and road 
sign examination. •..".'; 

The course is from 930 to 1130 
p.m. • - . 

Dates scheduled for the course 
are; Jan. 22 r Feb. 26, March 26, April 
23, May 28, June 25, July23, Aug. 27, 
SepL 24, and Oct 22. 

The course will be offered at the 
township office at 99 West Route 173. 

Additional information is avail- 
able from the township supervisor 
Tun Osmond at 395-3378, ; 

The course is made possible with 
the cooperation of Secretary of State 
George.Ryan. ' 



POLIpBEIff 

Persons charged with a crime are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. 

ANTIOCH 



Minor consuming 
alcohol 

Antioch Police Officers stopped 
Daniel L Kaiser, 18, of Antioch on 
Tuesday, Dec 1 at 1:42 am. He was 
charged with consumption of alco- 
hol as a minor. He accepted the offer 
to take a Breathalyzer test (0.14). 
Kaiser was released on bond pend- 
ing a court appearance. 

Transported on warrant 

Antioch Police Officers took Jef- 
frey S. Adams, 20, of Antloch to the 
Lake County Sheriffs Office on Tues-; 
. day. Dec.' lat 5:30 p.ml Adams had G 
turned -In himself to police officers 
foran outstanding v/arrant'' "■-'•'' 

Cited for DUl 

Antioch Police Officers stopped 
Margaret E Price, 47, of Antioch, on 
Thursday, Dec. 3 at 10:05 p.m. at 
Route 59 and Lake Street in a 1997 
Chevrolet She was charged with 
causing a traffic accident and driving 
under the influence. Price was re- 
leasedon bond pending a court ap- 
pearance. 

Antioch Police Officers also 
stopped Alfredo Tellez, 28, of Lake- 
moor, 1U., on Saturday, Dec. 5 at 2:17 
a.m. traveling east bound on Route 
173 at Route 83 in a green 1996 
Chevrolet pick-up truck. He was 
charged with driving under the influ- 
ence. Tellez was released on bond 
pending a court date of Tuesday, 
Jan. 5 at 9 a.m. 

UNDENHURST 

Possession of cannabis 

■ Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped John H. Carson, 18, of Lake 
Villa, on Tuesday, Dec. 1 at 8:05 p.m. 
at Linden Plaza in a tan Chevrolet 
Monte Carlo. He was charged with 
obstructing police, open alcohol, no 
insurance, no turn signal, possession 
of cannabis, and possession of para- 
phernalia He was released on bond 
pending a court date of Tuesday, 



Dec 12 in VVaukegan. 

Justin P. Gudgeon, IB, of Lake 
Villa, a passenger in the vehicle, was 
charged with obstructing justice. He 
was released on bond pending a 
court appearance. He was then 
turned over to the Lake County 
Sheriffs Office on art outstanding 
warrant. 

■ 

Minor consumption 

Lindenhurst police Officers 
found Robert J. Neelman Jr., 19, of 
Wild wood, and Daniel P. Kelly, 17, of 
Wadsworth, behind linden Plaza on 
Wednesday, Dec. 2 at 10:13 p.m. .' '■;■'.■' 
' Neelman Jr. was charged with being 
a minor consuming alcohol. Hcde- 
/.'/cliri^theopporuiiutytotakea-' ; . 
Breathalyzer t^st. He posted bond • 
pending alcourt date In vVauk egan. 
fKelly was charged wiul Oeing a— 
minor consuming alcohol. He ac- 
cepted the offer to take a Brea thaiyz- 
er test (0.08). He was released on 
bond pending a court date in 
GraysJake. , 

Charged With DUl 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Constance K. Noodwang, 
39, of Trevor, on Thursday, Dec. 3 at 
1:48 a.m. traveling east bound on 
Grass Lake Road at the Deep Lake 
Road intersection in a tan 1979 Lin- 
coln. She was charged with improp- 
er lane use, no insurance, driving 
under the influence- alcohol, no 
seatbelt, and driving under the influ- 
ence with a Breathalyzer test greater 
than 0.08. She accepted the offer to 
take a Breathalyzer Test (0.29). 
Noodwang was released on bond 
pending a court date of Tuesday, 
Jan. 12 at 9 a.m. in VVaukegan. 

Lindenhurst Police Officers also 
stopped Constance S. Janus, 22, of 
Antioch, on Tuesday, Dec. 8 at 12:4 1 
a.m. at Third Street and Deep Lake 
Road in a 1986 blue Ford station 
wagon. She refused the offer to take 
a Breathalyzer test. She was charged 
with driving under the influence- al- 
cohol, improper lane use, and dri- 
ving off the roadway. Janus was re- 
leased on bond pending a court date 
of Tuesday, Jan. 12 at 9 a.m. in 
Waukegan. 






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A6 / Lakeland Newspapers 






COMMUNITY 



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v. 



FROM PAGE Al 



PUFFKINS: Helping children to heal 

Cossarek said, "It's really taken -off. that are assisted with the money the f or Illinois Children, and Parent- 
['m really pleased." state federation raises. These In* Child Abuse Illinois. 

There are several organizations dude: Parents Anonymous, Voices "These three organizations are 



Vtctory Health Services 

A community leader in northwest Lake County. 

Victory Sur gery and T reatment Center 

Opening in early 1999. on the 
Victory Lakes Campus , Undenhurst 

• Out-patient surgery 

• Diagnostic tests: laboratory, x-rays, 
mammograms, ultrasounds, CT 
scans and nuclear medicine 

• Physical therapy, cardiac and 
chemical dependency rehabilitation 
and massage therapy 



The Village at Victory Lakes 




Now open on the Victory hikes 

Campus in Lindenhurst 

9 Maintenance free retirement community 

• One or two-bedroom apartments 

• Two or three-bedroom cottages 

• Assisted-living suites 

• Restaurant-style dining, health and fitness 
center, guest suites, woodworking shops, 
library, chapel and convenience store 

• Planned social, recreational . educational 
and cultural aeri vines 



Victory Lakes Continuing 
Care Center 

Celebrating ten years of quality service on 
the Victory Lakes Campus in Lindenhurst 

• Long-term nursing care 

• Alzheimer's and related disorders unit 

• Respite program - overnight to M) days 

• Rehabilitation/Medicare unit - short term 

V'h rrwv Utkc\ dmimwne Carr (Tenter n lirrnscil by the Itlnum 
Deportment t>) I'liblu Health with Mt'tluvrv Certification through 
the tlciitlhiitrr Ser\ur\ Curporalum. 



Victory Health Care Center 



Located at the corner of Atkinson Road and Center Street in (iravsluke 
(not pictured) 

• Physical, speech and occupational therapy services 

• Diagnostic tests: laboratory, mammography, x-ray. ultrasound, 
holler monitoring and electrocardiogram 

• Independent physician offices 




1 



These services are affiliated with 
Victory Memorial Hospital in Waukegan. 

For more information, call 1-800-THE-CHOICE ( I -800-843-2464). 
Victory Memorial Hospital is accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, 



■ ■ 



I 



December! 1, 1998 



really great. One deals with the fam- 
ily, and one deals with education, 
aid all three combined work totally 
with the famfly to get them on the 
right track," Cossarek said 

Funds from Puffkins sales are 
also donated to CASA of Lake Coun- 

' y ' People can buy Puffkins directly 
from Cossarek. Checks can be sent 
to GFWC— Illinois Headquarters, 
175 West Jackson Boulevard, Suite 
A1915, Chicago, 60604. Gift boxing 
is available for another 50 cents per 
creature. 

"We're filling orders all over the 
United States," said Cossarek. "Col- 
lectors want the whole set with the 
heart lag." 

"They're all named; they all 
have a birthdate," she said. "We 
have a red bull that has Michael Jor- 
dan's birthday." 

That would be "Bruno," num- 
ber 6651. 

People in the Antioch, Linden- 
hurst, and Lake Villa area also can 
arrange a Puffkins order with Kris 
Murphy at 395-8739. She Is a mem- 
ber of the Antioch Woman's Club 
and has worked to raise Puffkins' 
visibility in the community and the 
club. 

Members of the Antioch Wom- 
an's Club decorated a Christinas 
tree in November to help the Victo- 
ry Hospital Foundation raise funds 
for women's health services. 

"Kris thought it up and de- 
signed the tree," said Antioch club 
President Carol Pavelski. "We were 
her art committee." 

"Our sponsor was Strang Fu- 
neral Home," said Kris Murphy. 

Dan and Joanne Dugenske 
sponsored the tree for the women's 
club. 

"We had 60 Puffkins donated 
(by club members) to decorate our 
tree," Murphy said. "Our theme was 
1 lome fur the Holidays,'" 

The tree was Riled with the do- 
nated Puffkins, including some that 
have been retired. The tree includ- 
ed a tree house and skirt that also il- 
lustrated the theme. 

"We won first place as the Peo- 
ple's Choice Award," Murphy said. 

Working to create the tree were 



- 



Muiphy/Pavelski/DorouHyyoikert; 
andArmMacVeaghi V: 

Victory Hospital Foundation r 
placed a $2,000 price-teg on the f^fi 
completed tree when it became ; 
available for sale at a large party 1 
they hosted as a fund-raiser on 
Wednesday? Nov.1'8. Trees that are 
not purchased that night are raffled A', 
during the following week at other 
events sponsored by the Founda- 
tion.* ;•■.;'-; .: .:..■''-:''; ; - . 

"They helped more than one 
organization with their tree," said • : 
Jennifer Yonah; development direc- 
tor of the Victory Hospital Founda- 
tion. ■ v ? 

Trie PuffJdhs Christmas tree 
benefited the foundation which 
used the donations to assist wom- 
en's health services in Waukegan 
and in UndehhursL The Puffldns 
purchase benefited the state federa- 
tion's work to prevent child abuse. 

The Antioch tree was eventually 
won by a family in Gumee. 

: Both state and local woman's 
club members say the Pufiklns will 
be around for awhile, 

' "PuJHdns are available all the 
time," said Pavelski "We're contin- 
uing it for the next year," 

"We'll just keep selling as they 
bring (out) new ones," said Cos- 
sarek, . 

Puffkins sales are not just limit- 
ed to the holiday season, however. 
They can be bought from the feder- 
ation at anytime of the year. 

Cossarek expects their warm re- 
lationship with Puffkins creator and 
manufacturer Swibco to continue 
into the future. 

"The president (of Swibco) is 
just excellent to work with," she 
said. "They are extremely gener- 
ous." 

A few of the names and creature 
types from the 49 available Puffkins 
include: Lucky/white rabbit, Nut- 
ty/squirrel, Paws/white cat, Ban- 
dit/raccoon, Meadow/cow, Cin- 
der/Dalmatian, Cinnamon / laiycai, 
lizzy/lamb, Magic/ uhicbm, Doif- 
tie/ladybug, Griswald/brown bear, 
and Whiskers/walrus. 

Further information about the 
several dozen Puffkins creatures is 
available at www.swibco.com. 



I 




", m It's (almost) all edible 

John Edgell carefully places cookies onto a gingerbread light- 
house he constructed in the lobby of State Bank of The Lakjjs in 
Antioch Nov. 27.— Phpto by Sandy Bressner ' 



l<8 



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December 11, 1998 



NEIGHBORS 



■ 



Lakeland Newspdpent Pki ■ 



["/.' e-*. 4 ' hv*...* • 



Name: Donna Johnson 




Home: Antioch ■ 



\. ' r. ; - - "• - 



Occupation: I'm co-owner and teacher atStepplng- 

stdneMontessbri School Iii Lindenhurst ■ • 

I'm originally from: I grewup in Des Plaines. 

I graduated from: St. Norbeit College. In De Pere, 
Wis; " 



■ -■ 



My family consists of: My husband Bob, my daugh- 
ter Emily, 19, son Derek, 16, and son Brian, 15. 

* 

My pets are: I have a dog named Charlie, a cat named Cleo, and an 
iguana. 

What I like best about my job: Working with kids. They are 3 to 6 
years old. 

The secret to my success is: Not being afraid to take a risk. 
I relax by: Going out to dinner and visiting with friends. 
Last book I read: "I Know This Much Is True," by Wally Lamb. 
Favorite TV show Is: "Buffy the Vampire Slayer." 




Favorite video: "Back to the Future." ■..;.. 
Favorite movie te:"SavmgPrivateRvan." ,' 
Favorite Restaurant: l *The stage Stop" inWilmoti Wis. 

■ ■" "/-■.•"'■,■; '' ' " ',. . ■: .: V. !■•,?■' ..;■■»• -.„>■' *V ; ' 

- ■■-■-■■.■.■ .:/. .•-'•' . . • ■ ■ •" • 

Favorite music: Classic RocL 
- Favorite band or musician: Tom Petty. 

If I Won the lottery, I would: Spend the money on my ; 

family. ,' ' '-:■ : '' .'■- .-. :' \ . 

My greatest accomplishments are: My children. 

I want to be remembered as: A person who tried to make a differ- , 

encemtheworld. . "■.' ■ 

■. ,•.•■ ■ ■■ : '-.■ . ■ -.-■■■ J ■■',■■ •'.. ■ 1 

My pet peeve Is: Self-centered people. . 

If { could meet anyone, I would meet: Hillary Rodham Clinton . 

My dream job would be: I have my dream job right how. 

If I had a plane ticket to anywhere, I would go to: Hawaii, 



If you have a "Neighbor" that you would like to see profited in this col- 
umn, call Rhonda Hetrick Burke at 223-8161. 



Grass Lake School honors 



The students of the junior 
High School of Grass Lake School 
District 36 have achieved acade- 
mic honors for the first quarter. 
They are: 
GradeG 
High honors 

Ryan Thamerus, Billy Thurl well 
Regular honors 

Keltic Davis, Kelscy Dent, Lauren 
Foerster, Jack irvin. Amy Knutson, Walter 
Malcckl, Angel Slmonlni. Kara Vojak, 
Roxane Wojnorowsld 

Grade 7 

High honors 

Melissa Shields, Lauren Thurtwell 
Regular honors 

Katy Clarke, Britany Colson, Heidi 
Gwinn, Tiffany Hodman. Christine 



Karlovitz. Korin Knutson, Ryan McHale, 
Kujn Milovanovic, William Ruder, Brit- 
tany Sufoma, Christopher Pantle 

Grade 81 
High honors 

Curtis Theel 
Regular honors 

Christian Hudson, Dlna Izenstark, 
Kurt Is Karczewski, Craig Manlscolco, 
Katie Mason, Nicole Morrison 

Grade 8 II 

High honors 

Kristlna Mosler, Missy Schramm 
Regular honors 

Chris Barred, Krista Chlnn, April 
Colclough, Kate Gilday, Chris Marquari, 
Torn Olandese, Dcanna Paice, Chad 
Thurston 



BAJA FACTORY DIRECT 

TRUCKLOAD SALE 
SAVE 20 - 30% 

Purchase from factory Reps at 
Woodland Pier 1 

414-534-5264 





by Dr. Scott Reiser, D.C. 
CHIROPRACTIC, NUTRITION, AND PREGNANCY 



There is a (airly high number of pre- 
mature and low-birth-weight babies 
bom to economically disadvantaged 
women. In response to this problem, 
the government has established nutri- 
tional counseling programs for low 
income mothers. As the general public 
has become-increasingly aware of the 
complex effects that food choices have 
on total health and well being, the 
nutritional slate of the rest of the preg- 
nant population has begun to be 
addressed. 

Proper nourishment is very important 
for a developing fetus, and no easy 
assumptions can be made about nutri- 
tion during pregnancy. It is imperative 
that pregnant women obtain informed 
nutritional counseling. 

Chiropractors study nutrition exten- 
sively and consider proper diet essen- 



tial to health. If you are pregnant, you 
should consult a chiropractor for 
invaluable dietary help. 

// maintaining your health and 
reducing stress .is important to you, 
call Round Lake Beach Chiropractic 
at 847-740-2800 to make an initial, no 
obligation consultation with Dr. Scott 
G. Reiser. Our clinic is located at 314 
Rollins Road, Round Lake Beach 
(Eagle Creek Plaza - comer of Cedar 
Lake and Rollins Roads.) 




Deal presents holiday concert 



Richard Deal, concert pianist 
and recording artist, will present a 
sacred piano concert at Antioch 
Evangelical Free Church on Satur- 
day, Dec. 19 at 7:30 p.m. 

Deal is from the Chicago area 
and has presented over 1,700 sa- 
cred and classical concerts in Eu- 
rope, Asia, North and South Amer- 
ica, including numerous solo con- 
certs in the United States. He has 
also performed with symphony or- 
chestras including an appearance 
at Chicago's historic J . Orchestra 
Hall. Deal is a graduate of the 
American Conservatory of Music, 
the Moody Bible Institute, and the 
Sherwood Conservatory, all of 
Chicago. 

Deal has been awarded several 
scholarships and has won several 



piano competitions. He has been a 
participant in several international 
piano competitions including the 
prestigious Tachaikovsky Piano 
Competition in Moscow, Russia. 

Deal arranges his own sacred 
piano arrangements and has re- 
leased five professional recordings. 
The most recent one Is entitled "Pi- 
ano Favorites," a collection of fa- 
vorite classical selections. 

You are cordially invited to the 
concert at Antioch Evangelical Free 
Church located at 750 Htghview Dr. 
in Antioch. Admission is free. 

Deal will also provide special 
music in the Sunday morning 
worship services on Dec. 20 at 9:30 
and 11 a.m. For further informa- 
tion, contact the church office at 
395-4117. 



•*--*^Lr. ?i* *. i*l ■ •"**-* --..»■_ ,-■,,. '.*,,.. -^j.-ii. -w, .t* ..'. .- 



Pierce 

Brosnan's Choice 




JtiKUit*fGMT 

Automtlic chronomt tct, 
Wilti-irotum la joomSroojl 

0MICA - S»'« ™<Jt imct >B(S, 



a 

OMEGA 

The sign of excellence 




1 imll; O- *rl US t^t t m J.-lh H ' 



510 Hawthorn Center 

Vernon Hills, IL 60061 

847.918.7300 

Fax 847.918.7323 




8 p.m., PM&L Theatre '(Orchard- ... 
and Main St) in Antioch presents 
"Annie Warbucks," 395-3055 . 

Saturday, Dec. 12 

10 a.m.76 p.m:, Wilmot, Wiscon- 
'siri Downtown Merchants Open 
_Hpuse'i*the public is irryited ,; 

11 a.m.^'pirnV, Santa's Enchanted . 
Castie open In Antioch,' pic. avail 

1 p.m.-4 p.m., Carriage Rides in : ; 
downtown area,spons6red by 
Antioch Chamber of Commerce, free 
with imerchant'cpupoh, Sun. also" 

1 p.m. and 6 p.m;/ Madrigal Dinner 
in the ACHS cafeteria/audjtonum 

2-4 p.m.*, Author John Schnurr 
autographs his book, "Solider Boy" 
at Books' Etc.,; 901 Main Street 

6:30 p.m.; Red Rose Chidlren's 
Choir with Antioch Brass Quintet, 
at First Presbyterian Church in 
Libertyviire, just north of Rte. 176 
and west of Rte. 21 

8 p.m., PM&L Theatre (Orchard 
and Main SL) in Antioch presents 
"Annie Warbucks," make your 
reservations at 395-3055 

Sunday, Dec. 13 

Judging held for Holiday lights of 
Antioch, details at 395-2233 



10 a.m., Christian Life Fellowship 
presents Three Wise Men and a 
Baby," a musical with song, 
drama, puppets, and comedy at 
41625 N. Deep lake Rd. (1/4 
mile N. of 173) In Antioch, for 
" more details, call 395-8572 

11 a*n.-4"p.m. ( Santo'c Enchanted . 
Castie open in Antioch, pit. avail 

1 p.m. and 6 p.m., Madrigal Dinner 
in the ACHS cafeteria/auditorium 

2:30 p.m., PM&L Theatre (Orchard 
and Main SL) in Antioch presents 
"Annie Warbucks," 395-3055 

Monday, Dec. 14 

12:45 p.m. Bingo at Antioch 
Senior Center, info, at 395-7120 



7 p.m. Bingo at Antioch Moose 
Lodge, Rte. 173 west of Antioch 

7-9 p.m., Financial Aid Information 
Night at Antioch Comm. H.S. 

............. ........ — ,,.«..,, * 

Tuesday, Dec. 15 

6:30 p.m., District 34 Board of 
Education meeting 

6:45 p.m. Antioch VFW Bingo, 
doors open 4:30 p.m., 395-5393 

7:30 p.m., Band and Choir Holiday 
Concert at ACHS auditorium 

Wednesday, Dec. 16 

9 a.m. - Noon Antioch United 
Methodist Church holds Parents 
Day Out, call 395-1362 

7 p.m. Antioch Park Board meets 
at village hall 

7 p.m., Emmons Holiday Concert 
at ACHS auditorium 

■-■■ ••* -•■ « - ) • ' •-' 

Thursday, Dec. 17 

7:30 p.m. ACHS School Board 
meets at Petty School 

7:30 p.m., Band Concert at 
Antioch Upper Grade School 

7:30 p.m., Fox Waterway Agency 
board meeting at McHenry 
Municipal Center, 333 S. Green 
Street, more info, at 587-8540 

GOT SOMETHING 1- 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14-day notice is needed 
for all calendar requests. 
Ask for Cristina Feindt 
223-8161, ext. 141. 



v& 



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Ao/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



December U,199R 





Dollars to 
JLd helps food pantry 



- • 



and 
putting 



Patrick White, an intern for The Loop 97.9, talks with Dunkin' Donuts franchise owner Larry Mondie 
during a radio broadcast for a food pantry drive at the Antioch store Monday.— Photo by Sandy 
Bressner 



By KENNEIH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Raskin Robbins 
Punkin' Honuis is 
broad on the (able— literally 
ami figuratively. 

-\\V are doing a holiday food 
dn\<* for the Ant inch I'antry." 
>aid larkn* Mtnak. store manag- 

llu- >ioir will complete its 
week long tood tlrivr on Sunday. 

IV. M 

1 In- dnw Marled Monday. 

\\\ : 

*lV»»plv g«i a (fee tnrdium 
aillee with a SI donation In the 
food dnve." slW said 

!ti promote the Mart of the 
(nod drive. I Imago radio station 
Willi' AM broadcast from the 
store Irom I to 2 p.m. Ihe 
appearance was preceded with 



radio promotions 'on Sunday, 
Dec. 6 to encourage people- to m 
attend. 

For the remainder of the 
week, the drive has focused on 
collecting food. 

"Bring in any canned-good 
item and save $1 off a dozen 
donuts or any cake," Mrnak said. 
Daskin- Robbins sells ice-cream 
cakes in addition to cones. 

This food pantry drive is Itm- 
itcd to Larry Mondie's Baskin* 
Robbins and Dunkin' Donuis 
store at 442 Orchard Street, near 
the Piggly-Wiggly. 

"We have a barrel for the 
food," Mrnak said. People vho 
want to donate money can Just 
drop their donation into the col- 
lection box. 

The food will be donated to 
the Antioch Food Pantry on 
Monday, Dec. 21. 



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Christmas tree, O Christmas tree 



Every man knows that not 
only arc you judged by the 
car parked in your drive- 
way and the horsepower of 
the riding mower tucked away in 
(lie shed, but more importantly by 
the sheer size of the fir tree you dis- 
play in your living room at 
Christmas. Kvery year thousands of 
neurotic souls find themselves 
trekking out to a distant tree farm 
in search of thai perfect Christmas 
tree to grace their living room. 
Now, as iill of you wiio feel the 
necessity to participate in this 
nither barbaric ritual know, the day 
you pick to go out and forge for the 
perfect tree will bring rain, sleel 
and gale force winds. 

I lusbands seem to need this 
rile to feel they have contributed lo 
the Holiday season. The feel the 
unheralded urge lo parade the wife 
and kids, adorned in electric socks, 
nose warmers and ear muffs, 
around 40 acres in search of the 
cream of the crop. There is a height 
requirement, it has to be symmetri- 
cal, and the trunk must be thick 
and sturdy in order lo fit into the 
state of the art tree stand that 
awaits its arrival. 

Mom just wants one void of 




JINGLE 

FROM 

PRINGLE 

Lynn Pringle 



any bird nests. After approximately 
seven minutes of searching, wifey 
poo and the offspring are ready lo 
head back to the warming hut to 
bask in the roaring fire and warm 
the cockles of their hearts with 
some hoi chocolate. Hubby, on the 
other hand, is just getting started. 
And what a procedure it is. Each 
tree is examined from every angle, 
some grunting noises are expelled, 
and then the woodsman moves on. 
No tree is left uninspected. 

Only after the other two- thirds 
of the family have whined unmerci- 
fully for the better pari of an hour 
does the weekend lumberjack 
make his selection, scope out his 
sawing pattern, and begin the 
process of bringing his prize down. 
After the extravaganza is dragged 40 
miles back to the car, all uphill 
through snow and wind, it has lo 
be shaken ever so gently to remove 



any loose needles and hiding birds. 
Then, and only then, does the ritual 
of attaching ihe trophy to the roof 
rack with bungie cords, baling wire, 
and chewing gym begin. 

The ride home is interrupted 
every so many miles with the driver 
hanging his head out the window, 
pulling on the chords making sure 
ids latest possession does not 
become kindling in the middle of f- 
94. Of course pulling off in a way 
station would make this practice a 
hit more safety conscience— but we 
know how men are known notori- 
ously for never stopping once they 
get behind the wheel or their dri- 
ving machine. So, even though 
thousands of us promise every year 
that we are going to buy an artificial 
tree after Christmas, it is a safe bet 
to say that a good percentage of 
those folks, with their frost-bitten 
fingers sufficiently healed, will once 
again find themselves out in the 
middle of God- forsaken no where 
freezing their extremities come 
Christmas 1999. 'Tts the season. 

And so goes another "Jingle 
fro m Pringle." 

Readers with information for 
"Jingle from Pringle" should call 
Lynn Pringle at 395-6364. 



R&v, 



r^..- ,;;;;..>'.■' 






OPEN LAT 

ON THURSDAYS 

till 8 pm for your 

Holiday Shopping 

In Antioch 






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THE 
CUPBOARD 



•'-'■< -K: 



Brendan O'Neill 



Fails elevate 
goodgamesto 




Every high school has 
cheerleaders— In (heir 
matching uniforms of 
their school's colors, lead- 
ing the fans in cheers, similar to 
ones that every school has. And 
then there are the crazies In the 
stands. The group of students who 
paint their faces, wear shirts with a 
team's motto or saying on the 
front, and screaming their hearts 
out in support of their team, at the 
referees, or at the other school's 
fans. 

In my high school, we called 
them "spirit rustlers," but it seems 
that every school has Its version. 
For example, at the Mundeleln- 
Warren boys basketball game 
Tuesday night, each side of the 
gymnasium was packed with fans 
in either red (Mundelein) or blue 
(Warren) shirts, with faces painted 
and aggressive cheers being 
spewed onto the court 

Many time the cheer evolve 
into criticism of the referees, who 
may have made a couple of calls 
against a particular team. 

Most of the cheers are yelled In 
harmony with the same four-sylla- 
ble tune. If you've attended a boys 
or girls basketball game in the past 
ten years, you probably have 
heard cheers like: 

"You cantt guard Wml" - 
—Regarding a very skilled player. 

"He's our fresh-man!" 
— Regarding a very good freshman 
player. 

"Au-to-ma-tic!" 
—Regarding a player who hits free 
throws, 

"You need glass-es!" 
— Regarding a referee who misses 
a call. 

"Check the score-board!" 
— Regarding one team beating the 
other... Often done in retaliation to 
the other school's cheer. 



Geography Lesson 

During many of the local high 
school basketball games, 1 have re- 
cently become aware of the in- 
creasing role that geography is 
playing among basketball players 
while in the middle of a game. 

It Is not uncommon to hear a 
point guard shout to his team: 

"Michigan!" or "Chicago!" or 
Oklahoma!" or any one of a num- 
ber of different cities and states. 

Obviously, these teams have of- 
fensive sets or plays named after a 
successful basketball program, 
college or pro, and are simply call- 
ing the play. 

But when I was on the court in 
high school, which was not that 
long ago, we had plays called 
"Up!" "Over!" and "Sideline!" Sure, 
we had the occasional "Red!" or 
"Blue!" but that was about it. 

Not only are you likely to hear 
names of cities and states, but also 
schools: "UCLA!" "Stanford" and 
"Princeton!" are somewhat com- 
mon as well. 

I myself prefer the non-verbal 
signal calls, tike a raised first, one 
finger, two fingers, or the trian- 
gle—which takes two hands. 

In future games, I'm sure we'll 
find more quirks and Intricacies to 
litter this column with, but for 
now, it's all about cheering and 
geography. 

Brendan O'Neill can be reached 
at (847) 223-8161, ext. 132; fax 
(847) 223-8810; or e-mail at 
edit@lnd.com. 



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December 11,1998 





Lakeland Newspapers/ AS^M 




. - •->-•", ■•■■ ?... ;■-" " . ■ - ■ ■ ■■.. 

ByLEEFIlAS 

Staff Reporter 
-——-.-___„..„„__. 

Things are not always as they 
seem. 

Though Antioch boys basketball 
Is posting a 1-3 record, what's lost In 
their won-loss record Is the games 
they have played. 

Antioch has played four games 
against teams that are considered in 
the upper echelon of high school 
basketball Antioch has lost to three 
teams that have a combined 15-7 
record. The only team that has a los- 
ing record of the bunch is Highland 
Park, sporting a 2-4 record, but was 
in the same Highland Park Gold Ball 
Tournament with Lake Zurich and 
Grays lake. 

And, to make a stronger case for 
Antioch, Route 83 rivals Grayslake, a 
team that many people have pre- 
dicted to win the Fox Valley Confer* 
ence, Lakeland Newspapers includ- 
ed, i s An tioch's only win this year. 

Needless to say, Antioch coach 
Jeff Dresser and the Ilttle-Sequoits- 
that-could are playing well above 
what Is expected of diem this early In 
theyear. 

With that said, it was still another 
mark in the loss column for Andoch 
on Friday, as the Sequoits dropped a 
heart breaker to North Suburban Con- 
ference leader Zion-Benton (6-0) by a 
final score of 47-44. 

"We can take a lot of positives 
from the game this past Friday and 
work on that," Dresser said. "The 
kids played hard and with a lot of in- 
tensity. The kids are getting in sync 
on offense, which is great for our 
team." 

In the Zion game, Antioch rolled 
out to a quick lead in the first, hitting 
almost everything they put up while 
Zion struggled. After the first quarter 
buzzer sounded, Antioch led 17-8 
and was on a roll. 

"Brandon Clutts and Eric White 



'-•;■:".!■;•■•■ 



■ 




Antloch's senior forward Brian Soldano gets off a shot over a Zion-Benton defender in the Sequoits 
47-44 loss to the Zee-Bees.— Photo by Steve Young 






have really stepped us for us and 
made some big plays," Dresser ex- 
plained. "Clutts has done a fine job 
for us, arid White has been playing 
great."- , <«■ 

White led the Way for Antioch in 
the game, scoring 15 while Don 
Lackey had 13 and Matt Koss had 
eight 

The defense let Zion back into 
the ball game as Darnell Fields and 
lermaine Mayo each scored five in 
the second to pull the game to 25-19. 

Both teams faced shooting woes 
in the third, as Antioch led 35-30 af- 



ter the third buzzer, but Zion came 
roaring back in the fourth, taking the 
lead at four minutes with six unan- 
swered points that sealed Antioch's 
fate. 

White put in a three-pointer with 
just over two minutes left in the 
game to tie the game at 38. The back 
and forth contest came to an end 
when Zion made a three pointer with 
under two minutes left to give Zion 
the lead for good. 

Antioch missed a buzzer beater as 
time ran out to tie the score when the 
ball from White's hands was blocked. 



"Zion did a good job defensively 
against us in the second half," Dress- 
er jsaldL-aour defe nse improved^ 
tremendously and kept it close." 

Next, Antioch is facing another 
huge test, as 5-0 Stevenson rolls into 
town to on Tuesday. 

"The defense has improved 
tremendously over the pas t couple of 
weeks," Dresser added. "And it will 
continue to improve if the kids are 
buying into the system we are try- 
ing to run. If the kids believe in 
what were trying to do, we will get 
better." 




ACHS girls fall to Zion 32-28 

lots j 



ByLEEFILAS 
Staff Reporter 

Behind a tough defense and 
sharp shooting of Amie Carlberg, An- 
tioch pushed the envelope to near 
breaking on Saturday, but dropped a 
heartbreaker to Zion-Benton by a 
score of 32-28. 

Carlberg, who scored 10 points 
on the night, was the leading scor- 
er in the game, but she. wasn't 
enough to combat Zion's fast- 
paced defense. 

The game was a close one 
throughout, as Zion Benton rolled 
to an early 9-7 lead at the end of 



the half. k 

In the second, the shots just 
weren't falling for Antioch, as they 
managed to score only four points in 
the second quarter, while Zion built 
an 18-11 lead. 

The Sequoits would not die, 
however, as Woods group came 
storming back, holding Zion to 6 
points while putting in 9 points on 
the quarter to make the score 24-20 
at the buzzer. 

The Sequoits, who moved their 
record to 2-4 with die loss, will travel 
to Stevenson on Friday before host- 
ing a tough Warren team on Satur- 
day. 



Antioch's Erica Brown drives the baseline against Round Lake ear- 
lier in the season. The Sequoits lost to Zion-Benton 32-28 last 
week.— Photo by Steve Young 



ATHLETES OF THE WEEK 



Ntunei 

Eric White 
School: 
Antioch 

Sport: Basketball 
Yean Sophomore 
Last week's statsi 
Scored 15 points in An-.. 
tioch's 4-44 loss to Zion- 
Benton last week. :.V. 




- ■ 



r.v 



Foresta 



Name: 

Stephanie Foresta 

School: 

Antioch • 

Sport* Bowling 

Yean Senior' 

Last week's statsi 
"".Bowled a 496 to pace the 
g Sequoits in a 2230-1903 

win over N. Chicago. 



WTHS falls short in comeback 



ByLEEFILAS 
Staff Reporter 



Every team gets into a slump, 
and it may take some time for the 
team to pull itself out, . - 

This week was the slump week 
for Warren Township High School 
girls basketball. 

"We just had a long dry spell this 
week," said Bruce Campbell, War- 
ren's girls basketball coach. "It was a 
long way to Conant 1 don't know if it 
was the long drive or what, but it just 
wasn't our night". _ -■ . , 

, This week, Warren escaped a 
first half funk on Dec. 1 to pull out a 
55-26 victory oyer Palatine. before 
taking the long road to downstate 
Conant and dropping a heartbreak- 
er by a finafscoreof 41-35. - 



Beefy scored 15 points to lead all 
scorers in the final half, while the 
Warren defense held Palatine to 11 
points for the rest of the way. 

However, the emotion for the 
game against Conant was left on the 
Highway somewhere, as Conant hand- 
ed Warren their first loss of the season. 
. Warren missed everything they 
put up in the air on the evening, as 
the girls hit only 14 baskets out of 55 
attempts for 25 percent sho o tin g. 

For the first time all year, some- 
one besides Mob or Tiffany Kelver 
; led Warren in scoring, as junior 
guard Conine Scott had 11 points to 
; Moo's 10 and Kelver's 8. < 

Warren will be on the bus again 
on Friday, traveling to Mundelein .".' 
.before settling athome for a Satur- 
day night game agairist AritiochL ' f$? 1 \is* ; 



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A1 /Lakeland Newspapers 



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■ 
SPORTS 



December 11, 1998 




T . "... ■"'""■'"• •■■• : ." : ' : ^ J '' : '^r'£l : StSff* 
'•.-."•■' "/■•" : .:'■• -"•;.'■""..'-.;■. " ^■■•; : --'ivw«w 
■• _ : ■ < . ■ . ■ ''•■-•■ . - ■•■^■•■■•^ 

Going hard to the hoop 

Antioch senior guard/forward Amy Carlberg.goes up strong against a Zion-Benton defender in the 
Sequoits32-28 loss to the Zee-Bees.— Photo by Steve Young 



Rams drls continue unbeaten streak 



By LEE F1LAS 
Staff Reporter 

There could In- nu stopping 
""uiftn. 

The Orayshikr ^i (Is hiiskrlball 
team, fronted by juititii Ininv Wessel 
and a new high powm-il nllciisc un- 
der coach Mike Muldrow. is ripping 
the Fox Valley Conference apart. 

With two wins over the weekend, 
a 51-36 knock-down, drag-out win 
over Crystal Lake central, men a '38- 
32 mashing of sisier school Crystal 
Lake South on Saturday, no! lo men- 
tion the 61 -51 shellacking thai 
Woodstock look mi Tuesday night, 
Crayslake is poised fa run roughshod 
over the WC for the next two 
months. 

"We are mentally up for the chal- 
lenge," Muldrow said. "There's a few 
things we need to clean up a little, 
but were practicing it and working 
hard." 

On Friday, playing prime lime 
with the Graystake boys team lead- 
ing the night off, Wessel scored 24 



points in three quarters of play, 16 
points at the half, as Grayslake took a 
commanding 32-2 1 lead at the half. 

The offense didn't stop there, 
adding another 1 1 points in the 
third, holding Central to seven to put 
the game all but out of reach. 

On Saturday, at Crystal hike, 
Wessel exploded for eight points in 
the fourth quarter to pace a lough, 
come from behind win against 
South. 

"We came oui strong against 
Central and settled back a little bil," 
Muldrow said. "With South, we start- 
ed slower and got hot." 

Grayslake actually found them- 
selves trailing at the end of the third 
quarter 27-22. until Wessel came alive, 
helped out by junior Morgen Paul. 

On Tuesday, Crayslake scored 
early and often, never trailing while 
Wessel gave Woodstock fits under 
ihc basket. 

Wessel, on the evening scored 1 (j 
points, but the story behind (he win 
for the Rams came in the form of 
Carie Pasenelli and Carrie Hovik. 



Pasenelli scored 13 points on the 
night, with Hovik puttingninedown, 
bul the defense the two girls dis- 
played was huge, running all over the 
court, forcing errors and jumping in 
passing lanes. 

While, under the basket, Wessel 
had nine blocked shots and rejected 
anything that came near her^ 

Nine girls scored on the evening 
for Grayslake, which took a lot of 
pressure off Wessel and Company. 

"The bench played great for us 
tonight," Muldrow said. "A lot of he 
girls were feeling flu symptoms be- 
fore the game, because it's going 
around, so to get a big game from the 
bench was a huge difference in the 
game." 

"There's a few things we need to 
work on," Muldrow added. "Wood- 
stock pressed us hard, and nobody's 
really given us a problem with the 
press like that before, so that's some- 
thing we need to work on." 

Grayslake will be facing Prairie 
Ridge on Saturday in their next Fox 
Valley Conference match up. 




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Zwolfer back in 

, * 

way for Rams boys 



/■■ 



ByLEERlAS 
Staff Reporter 

If a movie was written about the 
Grayslake boys basketball team for 
the first week of the season, the cir- 
cular saw that took the tip of Steve 
Zwolfer's finger would be the main 
"bad guy." 

However, If a sequel was written 
for the second week of the season, 
the title of the movie would have to 
be: "Circular Saw II: Zwolfer's Re- 
venge." 

With the return of 6-6 Zwolfer to 
the Rams starting line-up, the Rams 
are poised lo live up to their pre-sea- 
son expectations and strike down the 
rest of the Fox Valley Conference. 

Evidence of this turn-around 
came this past week, as the Rams 
ripped off consecutive victories over 
Crystal Lake teams, a 5 1 -48 win over 
Crystal Lake South on Tuesday night, 
and a Zwolfer led 64-52 win over 
Crystal Lake Central on Friday. 

"Zwolfer practiced with the team 
on Thursday, and worked real hard," 
said Greg Groth, Grayslake boys bas- 
ketball coach. "We asked him on Fri- 
day how he felt and he said he was 
ready to go." 

And go he did. scoring 19 points, 
going 4 of 5 from the free throw line 
and pegging one three pointer in Fri- 
day nights game. 

"We didn't start him, but we 
were planning on using him In case 
of any problems," Groth added. "He 
walked onto the floor, made his first 
four shots, including a three pointer, 
lie looked good and was playing 
great." 



ATTENTION, 
SPORTS FANS! 

Do you know people who are .part 
of the local sports scene, but don'l 
get much attention? Do you have 

an idea for a sports feature? Do 
you have comments you want to 

make about sports coverage? 

Contact 

Sports Editor Brendan O'Neill At 

(847} 223-8161, xl32 -0R- 

FAX (847) 223-8810 




Wishing you a delightful holiday 

season and a new year that is filled 

with much hope, joy, 

and happiness. 

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Your life, and the lives of others, 

may depend on it. 

Timothy H. Osmond, QC 
Osmond Insurance Service ltd. 

976 Hillside 
Antioch, Illinois 60002 



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"It's a great lift for our kids to 
have him back," Groth added. "It will 
help our offense and defense having 
him return." 

With Zwolfer's return, Groth said 
he can Install the new offensive and 
defensive schemes that he's been 
keeping under wraps, designed for 
Zwolfer and Eric Brauer, the two big 
men on the court. 

"We forced 31 turnovers in the 
last game, and I can't remember the 
last tie that happened here," Groth 
added. "We have a few different 
things that we planned on doing be- 
fore the injuries that we have been 
working on in practice. Right now, 
were just taking it one day at a time." 

Zwolfer, who after he game was 
hurting from the finger injury, 
should be fine for Friday night's 
game against Woodstock, Wood- 
stock comes into the contest at .500 
and is playing hot. 

"They are a good team and 
match up well against us," Groth 
said. "(Woodstock coach) Gordy 
(Teebo) always has his kids working 
hard." 

Also, a bit of revenge will be on 
the line for Grayslake in the upcom- 
ing contest. 

"Some seniors remember 
Woodstock knocking us out of the 
playoffs In the second round last 
year," Groth added. "A few seniors 
will be looking for revenge because 
of it." 

One of those seniors is Zwolfer. 

"His coming back Is a big lift for 
this team," Groth added. "Our de- 
fense Is improving and our offense is 
improving. We had a lot of tipped 
passes in the last game, and the kids 
are excited about playing Wood- 
stock. We'll just see what happens."_ 

Cross country 
ski clinic set at 
YMCA Sunday 

By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

— — — «••■— — ••— — — — ■• — — — ——— — — — ■— — — — — — 

Hastings Lake YMCA will pro- 
vide a cross-country ski clinic Sun- 
day, Dec. 13 from noon to 3 p.m. at 
the Community Center off Grass 
Lake Road. 

The workshop will be led by 
Team Rossignol master skiers Tom 
Lawn and Jeff Tumbleson. 

The two-part clinic is free of cost 
for YMCA members but will cost 
non-members $10. The clinic is lim- 
ited to 40 participants. 

Reservations may be made with 
Kelly at Hastings Lake YMCA, 356- 
4006. 

"It's for beginner and intermedi- 
ate (skiers) over twelve years old," 
said Tom Lawn. "We're trying to get 
people into cross-country skiing who 
have not skied before or have mini- 
mal experience." 

The first 90-minutes of the clinic 
will include a classroom and video 
session. 

There will be a 30-minute dis- 
cussion about equipment and an 
evaluation of the equipment that 
clinic participants already possess 
for cross-country skiing. 

The last hour of the clinic is out- 
side on dry ground. 

"They need to be prepared for 
outdoor activity," Lawn said. "They 
need to bring ski equipment as well 
as work-out clothes." 

Instructors Lawn and Tumble- 
son are top midwest skiers. They 
compete in national and Interna- 
tional ski marathon events. Both are 
members of the American Cross 
Country Skiers Association. 

The second session will be held 
in late December or January and will 
be conducted on snow. 

"It's pleasure skiing," Lawn said. 
"People get a lot out of it." 



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December:llil998 



, Lakeland Newspapers ?A1 J 




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By BRENDAN O'NEILL 
Sports Editor 



./ 



The Grays-lake Colts, one of the 
most successful youth football pro- 
grams around, recently sent two of 
its football teams to Daytona Beach, 
Fla. duringtoeThariksgivtoghoUday 
weekend to compete In the 1998 Na- 
tlonal Youth Football Champi- 
onships against teams from all over 
the nation. 

Funny thing Is, the Lightweight 
Colts traveled the 1,500 miles to 
open the tournament against a 
cross-town rival— Lake Zurich. The 
Colts traveled down to Florida to 
playa against a team from down the 
road. 

But everyone in attendance 
agreed that ftwas much nicer to play 



a team from Lake County while bask- 
ing the glow of ah 85-degree, sun-, 
shine-filled Florida day, rather than 
a brisk and blustery filinbis after- 
noon. 

; The Colts brought both the 
Lightweight and Varsity. (Heavy- ' 
weight) teams to Florida, as both 
qualified for the championships: 

The Lightweights, composed of 
11.14-year-olds' ' weighing \2\- 
pounds or less, battled Lake Zurich 
In the first game, and came away 
with a 26-0 win. 

The first quarter went scoreless, 
but the second period saw Alex Kuz- 
manoff Intercept a pass and return It 
60 yards for the first spore of the day. 

The Colts dominated the Flames 
from then on, racking up yards both 
rushing and receiving, with the final 




TD coming on a 21-yard toss from 
rookie Corey Glynn to Joe Faldutb as '■ 
LateZurichbUtzetLV p.} "f '- 

Running backs Andrew Forshee; 
Nolan: Jones, Kevin Blederer, Jake 
Mayfield and Steve 'Hironimus led 
the team oh the ground, while re- 
ceivers Faldutb, Lance Gbrhainand; 
Blederer led the Colts receiving. '.; 
L'ifAT^elwiiri^n^t^tifcte- Lightweight 
Colts'; in 'the" championship game 
against a team from Pittsburgh. Pitt 
scored early but missed the extra 
point, taking a 6-0 lead. 

." Grayslake battled back defen- 
sively, pinning the Stealers on their, 
own one yard -line— leading to a 
safety by the Colts, [ : 
'■'■■', With the score 6-2 In favor of the 
Stealers, Grayslake used several play- 
action counters to set up a TD toss by 
Drew Gallaugher.to Forshee which 
put the Colts up 8-6. 

In the fourth period/ Grayslake 
was overrun by the powerful team 
from Pittsburgh, which scored twice 
in the final period and won 19-8. The 



Lightweight Colts" voted to retjjm to 
Florida and compete next year. 

Varsity Colts reach 
championship game 

- The Varsity Colts had i similar 
success in the sunshine state, as die 
Grayslake boys faced a team from 
Nebraska in the first roiind. 

The two opponents were very 
evenly matched, but Grayslake man- 
/ aged to squeak out the win 12-6 in 
double overtime, / 

The Nebraska team was much 
bigger and stronger than the Colts, 
but the Grayslake boys were deter- 
mined to take home the champi- 
onship trophy. The Colts first score 
came off a three-yard run by Chris 
Hironimus which capped off a 72- 
yard drive. 

The game ended with a 6-6 tie, 
and both teams went Into the first 
overtime with defense on their 
minds. Neither offense scored, and 
the two teams battled each other 



Into a second overtime. 

A great run by, Hironimus set up 
a Brian Englehardt one-yard sneak - 
up the middle to give the Colts the 
go-ahead score' 

The game was won by the strong 
defensive effort by the Colts, led by \ 
Ryan Glynn with 14 tackles, Hiron- 
imus with 12 tackles, and Mike 
Kromback with 10 tackles. . 

Offensively, Hironimus ran for 
172 yards on 23 carries, set up by 
Chad ; Deal, Dbug : : : ftahson, 
Nicholas Cho It, Mark Grossman, 
Nick Carmen, Scott Ellis, David 
Coddens, Chris i Shook, Mitch 
Kromback and Steve Hanson on* 7 
the offensive line. 

The Colts faced a team from 
Tennessee in the championship 
game, which beat the Colts 19-0 for 
the Varsity tide. 

Coach Tracy Mayfield is looking 
forward to next year, and expects his 
14 eighth graders to do well next year 
on the high school level, having 
learned much from this experience. 



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Lake County Baseball to hold baseball clinic 



Lake County Baseball is con- 
ducting its 10th annual Winter Base- 
ball Clinic This eight week clinic of 
specialized, individualized baseball 
training will be offered for ball play- 
ers from 9 to 14 years of age. 
Campers can choose either Saturday 
or Sunday classes starting, Jan. 30 or 
Jan. 31 and running through March 
20or21sL 

Classes will be divided by the age 
of the ball player in order to facilitate 
and tailor the instructions to the re- 
spective ages. The camp will teach 
the fundamental skills of baseball 
and is the perfect spot for the ball 
players to pracdWthelr skills, to per- ' 
feet individual techniques, to in- 



crease their knowledge of the game 
and to participate in their own 
'Spring Training" for the 1999 base- 
ball season. Camp will end In time 
for the ball players to participate in 
their community house leagues. 

Each week will feature a special- 
ized aspect and skill with qualified 
instructors who will instruct inn that 
training for the week, Each week will 
also feature hitting drills and time in 
the indoor batting cage. Head in- 
structor for the camp is the Director 
of Lake County Baseball, coach Art 
Mansavage, He will be assisted by his 
son, Jay Mansavage, who is in his 
fourth year with the Houston Astros; 
Mike Schiller, baseball Coach Deer- 



field High School, other minor 
league and college ball players, 
scouts and coaches from the area, as 
well as members of the semi-pro 
team "The Mustangs." 

Camp sessions will be held at the 
home of Lake County Baseball -Fort m 
Sheridan. Conveniently located off 
Sheridan Road in HIghwood. Fort 
Sheridan is the base of operations for 
the Lake County Chiefs The winter 
camp will be held at its indoor base- 
ball facility. Each session will be lim- 
ited to 30 players in order to main- 
tflinnaoptimu m rutin nf in jjtnictors_ 
to campers. 

For more information, contact 
Lake County-Baseball at 945-9606. 



EXTRA! 

* 

Call the Lakeland Newspapers Circulation DepL for (8471 740"4055 

newsstand locations or more information at \ • / 



Do you want extra 

copies of this 

week's edition? 



(Top) The Grayslake Varsity Colts: (in no order) Mike Zawojski, 
Nathan Chott, Nicholas Choot, Nick Carmen, Curtis Peters, Scott D- 
lis, Ryan Meehan, Chad Deal, Chris Shook, Brian Englehardt, Adam 
Butler, Mark Grossman, David Coddens, Chris Cash, Judd Nelson, 
Bobby Norman, Doug Hanson, John Irish, Joseph Kazikowskl, Frank 
Lesnak, Greg Brakenbury, Ryan Glynn, Mitch Kromback, Chris Hi- 
ronimus, Logan Rott, Brandon Poe, Steve Hanson, coaches Ed Ma- 
ciosek, Tracy Mayfield, and Jeff Hironimus. (Middle) The Grayslake 
Lightweight Colts: Daniel Dalzlel, Joey Falduto, Alex Kuzmanoff, Bran- 
don Atkins, Ryan Rink, Josh Fears, Mike Porter, Nolan Jones, An- 
drew Forshee, Mike Wasack, Jim Boring, Tony Rizzo, Jeff Ryan, Drew 
Gallaugher, Chad Krueger, Frank Perez, Kevin Blederer, Corey Glynn, 
Syeve Hironimus, Jake Mayfield, Dan Rohde, Eric Sottacher, coach- 
es Gery Rizzo, Don Dalziel, John Glynn, Tom Krueger and George Gal- 
laugher. —Submitted photos 




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WHEtl: New Year's Day 

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AND Dinner is Included . 

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''Jkm 2* I Lakeland Newspapers 



LEGAL NOTICES 



December 11, 1998 



Millburn School names honor roll for first quarter 



These students of MlUbum School have 
achieved academic honors for thr firM qiifit 
ler. 

Grade 4 

Straight 'A' Honors 

RachaclMmzimki 
High Honors 

Alan Amundson. Sarah Benlc, l-rin 



flerry^ Matthew Rruner, Jcnnn Dcnmnn. Darn 
[loss. Knthleen English. Benjamin Sarrnn. 
Rrinn Schmldl. l-rin Wright 
Honors 

Knirinn Riicnsiiceso, Benjamin Dellnr- 
In. Adnm Goetsch, Kristlne Griffin. Allison Ha 
(jen. Alyssa Kntris, MnryBelh Kenner. Sarah 
Moy. Incquellne Novak. Hnny Riesterer, Gor- 
don Scott. Kricn Stein, Nancy Sullivan, Daniel 




r 



Queens carol for women's health, Santa 

^ake Count> and bndenhurst Queen ambassadors participated in 
rnf Sevens Annua' l^estrvai of Trees at Midlane Country Club. The 
even: Benefit* Wcirner 5. Heaim Services at Victor} Memorial Hos- 
rita surgica renier? 1- ^noennurst ana VVaukegan. Singing 
£ — ^r-vas- C3t»;> o~ Su-oa* n»;h £2 w-ene ^xyni n?w. left to right. 
. — -■ m.iss _ -oe-'^-si %.<*>, tVi«-»ej— . _r.*e Miss Lake County 
: .- ssNe* ia=-no" o* _c*e~.-.*ilie — iod<e "^t* Junior Mtss Lake 
~r- : a* fe Af^ SwK*? ?r _t>e~r«vil>v .«_r-»0" Vss bndenhurst. 
- -**?e aTspr' — n^tr* -tm Viss ^2)ert%r£L Serari Kotti. and 
mjf- _3*e Z^ij-t". r ar **=o 5»=i~rTt=r zr _ro£r*r\_rsc Queen am- 

*teT ~r~tr ~ "t^C W? Sk§F*t§ C^JS rtC-" - - • 

L. i'-i"'1T 



Wade. Amanda Warren 

Honorable Mention 

Scott Herman. Surah Hr.tn«.|ev. 
Danielle Hwfl. «rt»p,nry GatM-hei Xtroal 
ik«ske. Peter CHllland, Shelta (loodnrlv 
Alexander Inrvi. l.lndsey lindra. lervmv 
Johnson, Anne Klltnmcy. I flitren May. I \m 
aid McGlnty, Sarah Miller. Kyle Mneltei. 
James O'Connor Samanihn Odynlec. 
Michael Poplawski. Gillie Rndgen. mrietm 
Schnlt?. Zachar\ Slade. Kristnfei Wnvniw-v 
ki. Richard Yocins 

Grade 5 

Straight 'A' Honors 

David Kent. Mark Mcwiei laroh 
Slfidc, Matthew Wade 

High Honors 

Kirzlie Rucnsuceso. Relieve, 1 Dean. 
Vutorin DeMarvo, Adam Denman, ChiiMii- 
pher Doupis, Brian Kverett. Sadie Goad. 
Nicholas lohnson. Michael Khaynt. Ilrrt Mi- 
narik, I aura Moes. Hrittncy Koscnwrin. 
Matthew Shaw. Kyle Sinkus. t >rl Stream, 
Emily Ssqfvak. I ill Tomasicwic?. Kim /ditosky 

Honors 

Irslcc Bailey, Nicole llergstnun. Aspen 
1-ridcson, Kathcrinc Rood. Kenneth llonnan. 
Rachel Haselhnrst, Theodore I ItlWapr. Hian- 
ca Jackson. Matthew ladrich, Christopher 
Jones. Ashley Ijowry. Jillian Mayers. Amanda 
McKimmy, Nicholas Pictka. Ijuin'iiU'mtli 
Honorable Mention 

Kyle Bryant, Ionian Kder. Irancis 
Fracek, Steven Gaedi. Amanda Guthrie. Ilrit- 
tanv Hepburn, Christine K.tiris. Caitlin Mc- 
1 Vinhv. Michael Nelson. Barbara Stiara. Ma'tt 
Stcdlecki. Bradv Spandet. leremy Spaso. 
IViu lenller. Michael \oss. laciyn U'ursier. 
k\V /jxMjli 

Grade 6 

Straight 'A' Honors 

leremy Meyer. Nicholas Novak, Usa 
Park Adam Sullivan 
High Honors 

Stephana 1 Allen. Kyle Hmwn, Scan Kp- 

;ve lohn brasher. Dru Green, Kimberly 

I'leer, l^iuren Huflman Olivia Kueilitlg^, 

v hei>ea|jt>selle. Martin I'azanin. Daniel lied- 

",}: \m\ Schut?, t-.nc Sw-atison. Mallory VVa- 

Honors 

a?c -r V-crevv Hr\.it: Iterman. 



First MiQJinal Bank-Employee Owned 

K E2ig]!ie 50 Travelers Club" 






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Mystery Day Trip To 

MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 1 999 

run u^-i oir n..\- it ii u >t-. m. *&gto : : &&#&*& V^v.-.^slm 
d, iid.oit-r- iMjlK-d-.t -r\Hb. ,«>*# , « n-* , -..,• L .r j fet , „:,.- :: e lMl . rv ' 
Tm ini \m1. L»f^ii a: MucncJ '. i.n.«-.*r ■ .n,,-, tir , ; . , niltU) ;■•: f . ruJi da\ 
o: tL>urr tua: jnciuae.- « ; \ im: u tn. up. m. /: ,. m r t .i. Ii , Jy But HiJ-lH 
Tht- rt-si i> n >e(_rt*t \l»l) \mJ. lx. uuci ciut- unun' u„ « „ . tl .,- »» l , 1 ^ „;,,, 
guess the next aestmaticm corr«.-cti\ vwl ^ n , r^vt' 

Call Nancy at {B47)838-BANM22b5» tor mure tnfurmat.un on how 
you can become an Eagle 50 Tra\eler!! 



First National Bank-Employee Owned 



485 Lake Street ! s nS 
Antioch, IL 60002 





36044 H. BropfesMe Drive 
fiumee.IL SHB9 



(847) 838-BANK (2265) 1 



1 Vrek Hoi. Nlrfroln* U»klm. I^ln llpple. lid- 
Wftid Kntflwi. Oclnvio U'nl, Alilunll l.ynti, 
Michelle Mntimnno, Mkllelle Mcdlnnls 
Richard Mov. Alexniulrn Stnul. Mntlltew Ver- 
diinl,IJmlsnvWrinel 

Honorable Mention 

Melissa Allen, MIU hell Alves, Ijndscy 
Anderson, l)oti»lns Halt. I'eresa llalffngtitf- 
net. Samlrn Hock, Mnlthew llitruu, llenlher 
tiill, Hevln (Itmey. Jessica linden, I leather 
[at\i. Hanlelle Kohler. Alison MncNelsh. (Jil- 
lie McKeown, Mejjalr Murjihy. Datilel Nel- 
Min. Cheryl smith 

Grade 7 

Straight 'A' Honors 

Aninmln t)e Miiiiij. I'rlk Fcutlll, Krlsly 
I r\e. Aitiniulu lloeuer. Zadmry Mtislanlrh, 
Kory Mueller. Sarah I'ark. Adam Schleser 

High Honors 

lesstcn Atctlley. litnra lleale, Molly 
lUinnet. Alyson limner, Michael Mood, Justin 
I iascnnu.Stcjihanlc Hepburn, Zachnry High- 
land. Shane Horman, t;hrlslinc Kenner. 
Colleen O'Hoitrkc, Paul Petrnitis. Amber 
Pierce, J.H, l'letka, Kelly Poplavvski. Hyan 
Helmet. Meredith Stcwnn. Michael Verdoni 

Honors 

Anthony Amundson? Krlsilnn Hur- 
chard, Cjimtyu (iK)fcy, Joshua Dcllatia, Hol- 
ly Denman. Ryan Eder, Christopher Jezlors- 
ki, Anna Kccle, IJiinn Ijconhart, Kaylo l.owry, 
Amanda Olscn, Jason Slotl. Lcllani Thor, JoEm 
Wler?.hlcki 

Honorable Mention 

Geo Bertlnf, Ross Orooks, Jessica 
lltyant. Claire Uutrlm, Jessica Martin, foei 
Meyer, Joshua Ruffncr, Amber Steward, 
Mlchele Walters 
Grades 
Straight 'A' Honors 



Megan (jowry, Amanda Meyer, Molly 

Piirike.lirluStcIn 

High Honors 

Mldmcl Dlanca, Jessica Halslon, Robert 
Jnnkc, Gregory l.ynn, (Catherine MocNelsh 
Honors 

Sean llcvcrly, Heather Darling, Thomas 
Denlson, Ashley Foster, Kristy GUJJland, Erin 
Jmippl, Juslln (Tug) Lclbolt, Michelle Raynl- 
ok, Michael Shcllon, Amrindcr Singh, Carl 
Sllmp, Sarah Tomaslcwlcz, Kristen Zditosky 
Honorable Mention 

l-Iiznbclh Andrew, Llndscy Bailey, 
Nicholas Ulockcr, Adam DovaJJna. Christine 
Cilola, Veronica Hawkins, Miranda Korbal, 
Sura McKeevcr, Aaron Sexton, John Shumate, 
Rebecca Simpson 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING 

EMMONS SCHOOL DISTRICT 33 

24226 W. Beach Grove Rd. 

Antioch, IL 60002 
The revised budget lor Ihe 1998/99 
school year (or Emmons Grade School 
will be on public display in the school 
office during regular office hours. Mon- 
day through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 
p m The Budget Hearing will be held 
on January 19, 1999 at 7:00 p.m. 

1298B-2326-AN 
December 11. 199B 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Utile Dreamers 

Dross-Up 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 21883 W. 
L.nden Ave., Lake Villa. IL 60046. 
(847)356-4224. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Nancy Ortman, 21 863 W. Linden Ave., 
Lake Villa. IL 60046. (847)356-4224. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify lhat the undersigned 
Intend(s-) to conduct Ihe above named 
business from the location (s) Indicated 
and lhat the true or real full name(s} of 
the porson(a) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business Is/are correct 
as shown. 
/S/Nancy Ortman, October 30, 1998 

The foregoing instrument was ac- 
knowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct Ihe busi- 
ness this 30th day of October, 1998. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Madelyn Freedberg 
Notary Public 
Received: November 12, 1998 
Wtllard R. Kelander 
Lake County Clerk 
1198D-2288-LV 
November 27, 1998 
December 4, 1990 
December 11, 1998 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 34578 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 

FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 

EASTERN DIVISION 

Harbor Financial Mortgage Corporation. 

Plaintiff. Case No. 98 C 2320 

Judge Marovlch 
VS 

Naksung Song, Young Song, Board of 
Managers of Ihe Antioch Golf Club 
Community Association f/k/a The Harbor 
Ridge Homeowners Association and Board 
o' Managers of the Harbor Ridge Community 
Association 

Defendants 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 3457B 

$T IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

^jok notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgment entered in the above enli- 

••v: t<tjU: on September 8. 1998 . 

U!&» T /son Special Commissioner for this court will on December 28, 1998 at 
v* *oj- rf 9 00 a m at Lake County Court House. Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the high- 
«;* tioofe- fo- cay the following described premises: 

c-a-c* ■ Lot 1 1 m Fairway Estates ai Antioch Goll Course Club Unit 2, Being a 
S»JBt3*mm o* Pan o» the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 25 
a-c '-or o* •.''* Sojtheasi Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 24, all in Town- 
s?«s £6 N&& Range 9 Ea.st of the Third Principal Meridian, and Part of the North 
-a- -j- p* Uo-.iwesi Quarter of Section 30 and Part of the Southwest Quarter of See- 
to- "V at >•■ Tywn&nip 46 Nortn. Range 10, East of the Third Principal Meridian, Ac- 
vj"3iog to the P>at Thereof Recorded January 4, 1991 as Document 2978802, In Lake 

'w'jj'i'i IIICKwi. 

i*wji 't £as€rmfc-it tor ingress and Egress tor the Benefit of Parcel 1 over lhat Part 
■„'■ v* Aivyjn Country CiuO Final Development Plan Recorded September 10. 1975 
*\. Lv.umem 1 726016 as per Court Order in Case No 72MR124 and the Antioch 
Ooj'nr, Cuo Final Development plan Revision No. 1 Recorded June 8. 1977 as Doc- 
j-,fc-i- -&417&8 as mce fully Delineated on the Plats Attached Thereto and Desig- 
'.a:ec av (ogress and Egress m the Declaration of Easements, Covenants and Re- 
strctons Reoyoed May 31 1978 as Document 1920598 Described as Harbor Ridge 
U".t (Except tr,ose Pais Released and Extinguished on the Plat of Fairway Estates 
a: Aiiiocr, Gotf Ciuo Unn 2 Recorded January 4, 1991 as Document 2978802 and 
V.^-evoge r>i^ m Lav.e County. Illinois 

**r>ji 'i Easfnfent to* ingress and Egress lor the Benefits of Parcel 1 over that 
f-ar -f farnai Estates at Antioch Golf Club Unit 2 Recorded January 4 1991 as Doc- 
..-*- *?7&&92 Described as N.ckiaus Way and Palmer Court, as Created by said 
"«* r, _a/.e Oojm, niinos 
'_>. e 2i'Xi Uciaui H»i. Antioch IL 60002 
'=/ C * 01-24-416-003 

^'* ^vj.vt&ai cm me property consist ol single family dwelling. 

La* :«j-rns 1QK crutn by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, certified funds 
ivj rel jr<js Tne bale shaft be subject to general taxes and to special assessments 
'* v'jrjw\, *r!! ijOT be open for inspection. 

T '* j^og'nent arrount y/as S380.479 33. 

UPOfi the ta»e De-.ng made the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which 
*.» vrtf.* tr,e purchaser to a Deed on a specified date unless the property Is re* 
oee"*3 according to taw. 

Fc .-itvmaton call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney. Fisher and Fisher 120 ' 
'**-.- LaSaie. ChKago. Illinois. (3t2) 372-4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under mi- 
ytf, to* tn* Saies Officer « noj required to provide additional information other than 



w, in mis rjotice 



/s/ Max Tyqn n 

Special Commissioner 

1198C-2262-AN 

November 20, 1998 

November 27, 1998 

Docombor 4, 1998 

Docombor 11. 1998 



L 



''..■■■■■ - ' . - . ■ V- ,;.-.. 



'.■ "~- m . : - 



December 11, 1998 



; 



I6RARY NOTES 



COMMUN. 




■. 



^iandNavspapen/AI* 



,^-;..fi 



MtlttHtl»l>Mt)i 



• *>»1*lf*^).a\i(ii 



....M..k...,.....„d,..<. > ■„;.,.;.. ,,.,...,...,.„.,; 

t.' ;•■'-■ ■ . -..-...."- 



oliday centerpieces New booktalk 

series for adults 



Hope Lehman-Bums will pre- 
lt a program about how to make 
' centerpieces at the Lake Vil- 
[District Library. 

Registration by telephone, at 

-7711, or at the reference desk Is 
luiredby Wednesday, Dec. 9 for a 
lum of 20 participants. 

The- program Itself will be 
'dnesday, Dec, 16 from 7 to 8 p.m. 

Children 12 years old and over 
ly participate if accompanied by 
i adult guardian. 
' There is a $10 materials fee 

ible to the instructor at the pro- 



mng adult 
iscussions 

Young adult readers 9 years old 

1 older may enjoy discussions at 

! Lake Villa District Library of nov- 

[that illustrate United States histo- 

The book to be discussed on 

lursday, Dec 10 is "Ben and Me: 

Astonishing Life of Benjamin 

i by his Good Mouse Amos." 

On Jan. 21, the book to be'dls- 

I is "Mr. Tuckett* by Gary Paul- 

The 75- minute discussions ore 
ierated by Public Services Coor- 
itor Paul Kaplan. Participants 
st at 1 and 4 p.m. each month. 
Registration Is not required. 
Parents and guardians may at- 

. Additional information is avall- 
( from Kaplan at 356-771 1. 

iuK discussions 

idults may discuss Elizabeth 

icken's The Giant's House" at 

? Villa District Library on Sat- 

the book tells the story of a 

•town' librarian and her rela- 

ship.with a boy 14 years younger 

1 herself. He has a rare medical 

ition that causes him to grow to 

9t 7 Inches and 415 pounds. 

f.The story is described as sensi- 

i and moving with much to pro - 

ice thought since their relationship 

1 romantic one. 

The book is available for check- 
It one month before the discus - 
in.- 
Refreshments are served. 
Additional information is avail- 
jle from Kim Rutter at 356-771 1. 



A'. -guest leader will discuss 
"Slaughterhouse '5" by Kurt Von-. 
negut on Wednesday, Dec. 16 at the. 
Lake Villa District Library. 

• The booktalk will begin at 2 p.m. 
and last about 90 minutes. 

No registration is required but 
seating is limited to 99 people. 

This is part ofa series of book- 
talks co-Hosted with the Grayslake 
Public Library to 1 accompany the ''. 
North Suburban,Library, System's ; 
Literary Series. Everyother month, a 
guest leader will give a booktalk on a 
book by one of the North Suburban 
Library System's visiting authors; 

A limited number of copies of 
the book are available approximate- 
ly one month before the program for 
patrons to borrow. 

Additional Information Is avail- . 
able from Kim Rutter at 356-7711. 

Holiday ornaments 

Children can make tree orna- 
ments Monday. Dec 21 at the Lake 
Villa District Library. 

Registration for the program is 
underway. 

Sessions for 3, 4, and 5 year old 
children are at 10 or 11 a.m. 

Sessions for grades kindergarten 
to sixth are at 1 or 2 p.m. 

Registration is at the Youth Ser- 
vices Desk. 

Further information is available 
by telephone at 356-77 1 1 . 

Free Terra Museum 
pass 

Lake Villa District Library has 
free patron passes to the Terra Mu- 
seum of American Art and Museum 
ofCdhtemporaryArL , "" 

The passes are available for 
check out at the circulation desk. 

Book and magazine 
sale 

Lake Villa District Library has 
books and magazines for sale. 

Hardcover books are 50 cents 
and paperbacks and magazines are 
25 cents each. Special items are indi- 
vidually priced, 

Proceeds go to the Friends of the 
Lake Villa District Library, a volun- 
teer support group. 



akdland SUM 74^4^35 



iewspapere 



TODAY! 



WINTER 
CHECK-UP 

with OIL CHANGE 

1. Oil & Filter Service (Up to 5 Quarts) 

2. Tire Rotation, as needed 

3. Complete Brake Inspection 

4. Check Radiator Cooling System 

5. Test Battery & Charging System 
6. 25-Polrtt Safety Inspection 

7. Consultation on Problems you may 
be having with your car 




most vehicles 

coupon 
expires 1-1-9 



TRANSMISSION 
SERVICE 



$ 




most vehicles 

coupon expjres 1-1-9 



N.R.F. AUTO & TRUCK REPAIR 



* " All Makes, Models & Sizes 
RVs, Motor Homes, Medium & Heavy Truck Repair 

23392 VK Apollo Ct. • Lake Villa, 1L 60046 
(Rt. 83, South of Grass Lake Rd.) 

356-4200 





Seeing St. Nick 

Kaftlln Ward, 2, of Antloch watts her turn to see Santa Claus with her father Robert as her brother, 
Anthony, 7, reveals his greatest Christmas wishes to the man In red Saturday during a craft fair at 
Oakland School In Antloch. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 



Scholarships available for female students 



Applications are now being ac- 
cepted for a $600 scholarship estab- 
lished by the College of Lake County 
Chapter of the American Association 
of Women In Community Colleges 
for a female student at CLC, The 
award will apply toward spring 1999 
semester tuition, books, fees or child 
care, -- ...it. 



Applicants must be at least 25 
years old and pursuing a one year 
certificate or an associate degree. 
Additionally, they must be en- 
rolled for at least s be credit hours in 
the spring semester and have a 
minimum grade point average of 
3.0, based on at least six credit 
hours of completed coursework. . 



Interested students must submit a 
CLC scholarship application, an 
academic transcript and a brief es- 
say describing career goals and fi- 
nancial need. The application 
deadline is Jan. B. 

Applications are available In the 
financial aid office, B 114, For com- 
, plete Information, call 543-2062. 



YOU'RE READING 
A WINNER! 



LaheLond 

P:U B L I S H E ; R S 



And the judges agree 

This year, at the Illinois Press Association Awards, 

Lakeland Newspapers brought back 

an arm load of honors- 11 in all— 

which is just one more accolade that tells us 

you are reading a quality product each week. 



lfOSPM5S 



Quotes from Best of the Press-. Wm 



NEWSPAPER DESIGN 
FIRST PLACE: 



NEWS STORY 

FIRST PLACE: 



LIFESTYLE SECTION 
FIRST PLACE: 



jj^to 




■ ■■''■■ m * fc !»rr 




"< kttl UyQUL 

nrrllrr i cftrwr of 
body cupy and 
hCKUlUK lonu l3rin 

■JKT. PINK] 11W- 

I color oktt ill AJi 
offft* vinery of 
rypop»p*i¥ and ill 
if) In. Local ran** 
■Llnahxh/ paciigrd 
■nd tmpmiLtK] 
rrude thb tn i ry u i nd 
outimonKth? 
compnlfkm 
fjonoituUlMimia 
* lUdT Witt obtWitJy 

am about the 

emnmuniry 1 * 



uKFKmriUNrvrc 



i ( ISrj^Jhfcl Kftrrflfrtl 




UltSfjTpah 

irurhrf firnl 

latan t n*£ 
LronFilai 

"Wril-wHicaiHii 
ioHnf*fli/uuary. 
Good lew HON 
Lc*cfiCT'*kn« 
inriTipttrfKlocijijJn 
himwu. Qm Job 
an « icrulilvr 1 epic 
.Our mint hivr h*J 
prryorKindv 
mmmunity ulkinfL " 





LhiisllIUnt? 

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itilrUfrSrtU'iti 

"Vrryrui^AuItty. 

lirupt tl wrii d»eptil 
ouiinddnn. 
Lbt inp vr broim 
up by muK-uann, 
good k* nut* and 
«*irmv" 



THIRD PLACE: 

• 1 Ai tocUJ amn — r vi *it 

Ehuttvlh Haitn 

• Or%twl MM -Ufil a *«r. Donna Mrtt 



HONORABLE MENTION: 



-£imimv Odrtx Uott fllat 



• tfirauarr-^l' vo. Umi^i irsntt 

m — ln Jh* Trr/uHn. 

gnmtm i I A'nIL I ™ J.Lu 



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*A3 WjMkeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 




rainflgolf; bakery , hair s£ 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reponer 



A baker, a golin , and a ban styjisi 
ii4vcM;lupjiev\ uusuieifces ui town 
iionie ol u i;, rt.s LUlUng-udtft' «' 

}UUCailgl't 

AJJofilu»a*.pu(MjnaJd.sUu;u um 
en» urn make ii lor m<-u euMume,' 

"Ihe LuiUjii; biji- M' ! > Mat 
^Ueft, ha*, upcoeu its doors Mi Oii' 
styling ifervjn** am, oiit-> uaj-iar- 
Mrrviui* lotj t; u, .u Uir M.tin Mtr< 
ajiU iVurtl) AkCiuu it,i>. 

I ILt-COf otU I -i.l'l. 

kitaru Mjtri . - .. |um< 

-.i .. pa>>utt'.td.> ivi „ ., . „ 

■ ■ W .. ,»|it*t J ilj in'f *t It 



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said. Working with hei in Auuinu 
Garcia 

' Appointments arc appreciate f 
Milfer said. "We ve hud n ptrai tthti 

uou iviu i n jot in iviilk-ui' 

"ItSptl'll wiv Ihim " Mllll'l in 

Mayor blunt-in ij; ;n Pit mom s gran 
Ufieiui^uiiutmuitt" "'IhruHnniW' 
i\ Pa* own vet \ Mipponn - ' 

■Sflll 1. 1 lort ptOPMJC" IIIW III'' 
MTV'U.l.'.SiH Hi'l MUMIU'v ITU'' ' M" 

mtaliM tt'DJiit * ililinj- '«<«■ 

ii niaiuiui' i-ivr. -i" 

Hn'iaptii' i.|'..ni'r 

IMHI « • I' | > t- *'•■ »'«' 
ii' ll (' Idl'lt - ■"• I ■ Mill* - 
llll"ll Mt|<"*UM ' M" S.il 
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ALL-INCLUSIVE HONEYMOON 






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pnva.c kach AJiu, rt rulc .r« , ^ ^Sl .\ 1.X 1 1 * ? ZZ£ *** "'" "" c 4 



amu.ny C h.h of Bermuda aic u)t»| BUl «i t |, llkti ?,„ all induce 



Iliumas anil ilic 
liuncymimiis 



NORTH ^»- S TAK 

CRUISES 
Mndenhurtit 

wwwnorthBlapmv8i.com 



(847) 356- 



iii 




tiuiivf Wii»m oriC Afttrrrt; 
juiMd^ulit aui j'jt V^fttifrdffci 
upufilft LrtidOit Lijgifc SpWlt 
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The compuier pnnides daia 
about ibe saving; speed. im ^ 1 paih, 
roLabyn, rinflarYrp hit, rmpart 2nd 
tempo. There is a mAfi\*> progr am in 

the nrcmpa Ttfr Ttctf rrc»to^ | wrn ni T >^p - 

dattons for dub setecoan. 

Zuehlsdorf hit the ball into the 
screen down an Augusta £airway and 
there was a "sdirtirnpf" sound as the 
ball hit the ground. 

That brde sound you heard was 
him going into the sand," said Vinoe 
"Iomasello. 

"Sand Wedge." said the dis-em- 
bodied voice from the caddie pro- 
gram as it recommended a dub 
choice. 

Nexi the caddie program said 
"Good shorJ" asZuenlsdorfhit the baD 
out of the sand. 

There is a driving range mode for 
those who wish to practice, not play. 

Doubl e Eagle offers open play, and 
caters to men's, women's, seniors, 
couple's, and youth league play. 

"We found these to be the most 



accurate and helpful (golf simulators) 
of the game," said VLnce Tomasello. 

Joe Sonandres said, "It has a lot of 
instructional value," 

Double Eagle also has a state of 
the art kitchen for those who wish to 
eai while they are there. 

If s a sports bar menu now, " said 
Chef David Zak. "The ultimate goal is 
to turn the menu over to steaks and 
chops for dinners-" 

"AD my soups are home-made," 
Zak said. 

They serve chili everyday, and 
there is a fresh soup of the day. 

The Italian Beef sandwich is a 
special creation 

"We serve it on a six- inch round 
roll piled high. It's a huge sandwich," 
Zak sai± ^s VTnce's recipe that has 
been mliis family." 

Reservations to play golf can be 
made at the Double Eagle Pro Shop, 
395^24 1 . Gift certificates are available 
and private parties and banquets may 
be accommodated. 



LETTER TO THE EDITOR 



Check holiday facts 

Ii h« ijuen Ui,.j^,i , fi ou , „,„.„. 

"-I. thai Uu-M- .„,.„. i* m mm Ihat 
wt- hart the f H*, t ,U: t l<tm ,,„(,((,_ W|fks 
|"'l <mi ( Ji/liirjiiu. 11^,1.^ 0M m „ , |mJMf 
Jhls in „ tnhv mt.mtulim Wi- 
Ihswi hurt anyuni- I,oni public works 
<" iny '•<|.npni.'Mi (nun pi ,|,|j c wtJrbi 
«l oui hii.jw My husband takes wm 
IMUli- and hard wr«k to tastefully dec- 
nit,iL- tiuf |„„ lhe ai Chriaimiw. 

-. the amount of tnifflc that annus 
»»«» «n*l. all ii,,. people who slop 
«nd it'll us how nice our hotihe looks 

lliMn«litmes( IMt sthfHiilhhehiird 
work Is truly uppreciHted. We do an- 
precime alllhe wonderful coiihiwiiIk 
As for (he narrow minded peo- 
l'l« ; who cainnitkeap their m) Ie, n 

^bownhusluessiyintshuuhlno. 
make any falsa btHiLnnants-ue, 



your facts right. 

Don't ruin our holidays along 

with the other people who seem to 

enjoy our illuminated Christmas dis- 
play. 



Lee Shannon 

Antioch 
P.S. Merry Christmas and thank 
you to all who have driven by and 
appreciated our gift to the village. 



FUND-RAISING GUIDE 



On-golngt A.LL Parent Net- 
work selling personalized bricks for 
AUIS memorial wall In new build- 
ing. Iirlcks $30, Plaque $60 dona- 

!S' S ,'J nformatIon: Karen Powell, 
H47-395-6600. 

On-golngj Antioch Junior Wom- 
"11 s Club is selling Entertainment 
coupon books for S35. Information: 
Jodl IJckort, B47-395-4282. 



On-going: Loyal Order of the 
Moose Lodge #525 Is selling enter- 
tainment books for $35. Informa- 
tion: call Perry Hunt, 847-395- 
4772. 

Nov. 27» "The Game of Antioch" 
on sale in downtown stores, $16.95, 
sold by Antioch Lions Club. More In- 
formation from Adam Zakroczymski, 
847-838-1790. 



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December 11, 1998 



A1 6 /Lakeland Newspapers 




06, t&e $(4u tyou TVUi ?Ud! 



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December W1998 








eveloped and brought to mar- 
ket in less than one year, the 
Cadillac Escalade sets new 
;'• standards for performance, 
comfort and style in the rapidly growing 
luxury sport-utility segment. ' 

"Escalade offers the rugged versatility 
of the sport-utility vehicle with all of the 
styling, technical excellence and cus- 
tomer services that have made Cadillac a 
leader in the luxury car market," said 
John F. Smith, Cadillac general manager.. 

"The first truck-based vehicle In Cadil- 
lac's 96-year history. Escalade will set a 
new benchmark in the fast -growing luxu- 
ry sport-utility vehicle market," said 
Smith. 

General Motors created the full-size 
sport-utility in 1937 with the Suburban. 
The company has dominated the market 
ever since with sport-utility vehicles for 
an Infinite variety of Customers around 
the globe. GM sport utilities carry oil field 
crews across the Alaskan tundra, tow 
prize-winning racehorses through the 
blupgrass hills of Kentucky, and shuttle 
kids to soccer meets throughout the 
;^vprld^ ;T * . .... _ .. ,. ./ ^ 

"Cadillac has a unique understanding 
.7 of t h e'ar t a n d s c I o n ce. of luxury yehicles^ ; v 



rugged,' versatile sport-utilities," said ■,_ ■'. 
Smith. "Put these together, and you have 
a winning combination* the Escalade." 

With start of regular production sched-. 
uled for fall 1998 in Arlington, Texas, Es- . 
calade makes Its public debut in mid-Au- 
gust during the Concours d'Elegance in "-/ 
Monterey, California. 

In creating Escalade, Cadillac com- 



- 




1999 CADILLAC ESCALADE 




Escalade Interior 



• 



W,-A 



- - -■ •' ■ '-■' ,J^^*^^R^^\ '. ■?.-■ -?r. c^s-nt. ,&: i,*-t» » ■ .- : 



U'secfi Cam, aA ft&wwQQtil Cft^^OActa to AfttftoGfti 



w?sf?& Catr? at Rs$j Gfttwstst m jF&* [L<?fcs 



• s 



m 




Luggage rack; roof- 
mounted, flush body 
color rails 

Mirrors; heated, elec- 
torchromic 

Air bags; next-genera- 
tion, driver and front 
passenger 

Anti-lockout does not 
allow doors to be power 
locked 



1988 Chevy Suburban 

*ft#9B85* 



1992 Chevy Lumlna Euro 
Stk#PI4MA 



199* Chevy K2500 Ext 
Slk#*8TI* 



1991 Mazda RX7 

5TK JJBIm, Stk #67376 

1997 Chevy S10 Pick Up 

#P2252 



-$4,995 
-$5995 
.$17,995 
_$6995 



f994 Chevy Astro Conversion Van 

Stk #P22HA : 

1994 Dodge Conversion Van 



$8,995 
Van 
$12,995 



Slk#5130C 



1994 Mercury Cougar XR7 

Stk #6056B 

1992 Olds Delia BB Royal 

sik #mm 



1993 Olds Bravado 

Stk#&S47A_ 



$10,995 
_$7995 
_$9995 
,$10,995 



1993 Chevy Blazer 2 WD 

SU< #639BB $10,895 

1991 Cadillac Eldorado Barrllz 

Stk #P2438JL $9995 



1991 Ford Ranger -STX 

sn#6722* 



1992 Chovy C1500 
Sft#678BA2 



.$7995 



(996 Chovy 610 Pick Up 
SUt#P71B2€ 



.$10,995 
_$9995 



1993 Plymouth Orand Voyager LE 
P2«9JL_ __ !J!.$9.995 

$9995 



1992 Chevy C1500 

Slk W6736A. 

1994 Chevy O120 Conversion^ 

Stk #P227M $13,995 



199S 610 Ext 
Slh #P2333_ : 



1997 Suburban UT 
Sifc#«fi m 



-$17,995 

.$30,995 

1996 Dodge Ram 4X4 1500 . 

Stk #6T68A1 $19,995 

1997ChBvy K1500 Exl 

Sft #24(7*1 $23,995 

_$13.995 

-$11,995 

-$12,995 

-$13,995 



1996 Chevy Blazer LS 
Sft #6367* 



199* Ford P150 4x4 XLT 
Sft #21301 - - 



199B Dodge Neon R/T 
Sft #6776* 



1993 Dodge Neon Sport 

Slk#6T83A 



1908 Chovy Suburban 
Sft#9ES5* 



-$4,995 



1995 Nissan Alllma 

Slk #P4Q5B $8,995 

0988 Pord Extended Cargo Vai 

Slk #1005482 _ J 

1993 Chevy Conversion Van 

Sft#9929B 

1997 Ponllac Grand Prix OT _ 
Sft#P4Tf7 $18,995 

1996 Oldsmobllo Intrigue GL6 
Sft #9840* $20,995 



an 
-$7495 

.$7995 



1990 Toyota Camry 

m 



Sft#P40* 



1991 Chovy Cavalier R9 

Sft #9804* 



_$3995 
.$3,995 



1994 Mazda 626 ES 

Sft #3197* $10,995 

1993 Chevy K1500 XCo)> 4X4!. 

s&mm $19,995 

1995 Pontlac Grand AM OT ' 

Sft #9851* $10,995 



VuOLD 



liitlh Sillies I (.mIiiii; 



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Certified 



USED VEHICLES 



1997 Geo Prlim 

Stk #P4179 



1996 Otdo Clero 

SU#P39SJ , 



$9,995 

$9,995 

1994 Ponllac Sunblrd Coupe 

Stk #3988 $21,495 

1994 Cadillac Sedan DeVTUe 

Sik #8474* $14,995 

1993.H0hda Accord LX 4DR 
Sft #4067* 'j 



.$9995 
1996 Chevy KI500 XCab 4X4 

Stk#10128* $20,995 

.l996Chevy Tahoe IT 4X4 

VSft •tOTTEA $24,495 



11996 Jeep Grand Cherokee 4X4 

.3ft#P407Z . $20,495 

M903 Bulck LeSabre Limited . 

,,15X tBa Stk #p4isl 1 — $17,495 

'1995 Olds Cutlass Coupe 
Sft #3991. : 



1998 Olds Bravoda AWD 



.$10,995 
.$22,995 



1996 Jeep Grand Cherokee^ 

S4#P4207 $20,995 

1998 GMC Suburban 6UT 4X4,. 

.js&mm $31,995 

-1998 Dodge Duron go SIX 4X4 

Sft #9221* $28,995 

1995 Suzuki Esteem 
Sft #9792* 



.$4995 



* Plus tax, title, license & (Joo fee; All vehicles subject to prior sales; See dealer for details. 

i.com 



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D2 /Lakeland Newspapers ■ T3ifT2i!7 Y5iA?.C;j C '■ 1Z }%Uf & (MARKETPLACE 



December 11, 1$9B. 



FROM PAGE Dl 



- +*.!**• 



ESCALADE: Brings out luxury 



biiicd the best features of a luxury car 
with those of an all-weather, all-terrain 
vehicle. 

"Customers want different things from 
different vehicles," said Save Nottoli. Es- 
calade brand manager. "An Armani suit 
and a Patagonia parka are very different. 
Yei each is perfect for its intended pur- 
poses. So in creating Escalade, we had to 
keep in mind that while Escalade is every 
inch a luxury vehicle, customers also ex- 
pect it to perform well under the most 
challenging driving conditions." 

The Escalade is based on General Mo- 
tors' full-size sport-utility architecture, 
which has won numerous awards, includ- 
ing: ).D. Power Initial Quality, Kiplinger's 
Best in Class, Consumers Digest "Best 
Buy," Automobile Magazine's "All-Star" 
and MotorWeck's "Driver's Choice." 
Elegant, Functional Exterior 

On the outside, Escalade Features a 
clean, contemporary interpretation of lite 
classic spori-Lilility. Hodyeolored 
bumpers Mow into dent-resistant sculp- 
tured side panels anil integral running 
hoards, providing a look that is both ele- 
gant and (unci tonal. 

The standard running hoards, shaped 
in the wind funnel for lower drag and less 
wind rush, finish oil the lower body, Com- 
bined with Escalade's mode-rate ride 
height, these running boards make Es- 
calade one of thi" easiest sport-utilities to 
enter and exit. 

No detail has been overlooked in the 
search for the perfect marriage of form 
and function. The trademark Cadillac 
grille is molded from a high-tech compos- 
ite designed to shrug off arctic cold and 
desert heat. Reflector-optic headlamps 
feature clear lenses of high-impact poly- 
carbonate to reduce the chance of stone 



damage. 

Spacious, Luxurious Interior 

Escalade Is sized to offer luxurious ac- 
commodations for five adults, plus plenty 
of space for luggage and sporting gear. Yet 
at 201.2 inches (5110 millimeters) In over- 
all length, Escalade is shorter than many 
sedans, and its overall height of 74.3 Inch- 
es (1887 millimeters) allows Escalade to 
fit comfortably into most garages. 

Inside, the Escalade is pure Cadillac. 
The seals are tuned specifically to Es- 
calade's ride characteristics, then covered 
with soft Nuance leather with perforated 
inserts for enhanced comfort. Zebrano 
wood accents on the doors and console 
provide a feeling of warmth. The wood 
and leather steering wheel looks luxuri- 
ous and feels superb under the hands. 

Even the softer sides of Escalade were 
put through truck durability cycles. Engi- 
neers were concerned that the soft Nu- 
ance leather used by Cadillac wouldn't 
stand up to years of customers sliding in 
and out of higher seats. "In a car, you 
drop into the seat while, with a sport-util- 
ity, you slide over the edge." Nottoli said. 

So engineers built a special lest rig In 
simulate a customer sliding in and out 
over the outside part of the seat thou- 
sands of times. The seals passed with no 
wear or durability problems. 

Standard on Escalade is a Hose Acousli 
rnassfHi music system that features four 
wide-range speakers in the doors, two 
high-output speakers in the headliner. 
and a subwoofer in the console. Doth a 
single-disc CD player and a six-disc CD 
changer are standard in Escalade. 

The rear seat features independent au- 
dio controls, allowing back seat passenger 
to listen to one audio source, while those 
in the front listen to another. 




Escalade's engine 



Test Drive 

A New Escalade 

At: 

Gary Lang Auto Group 

1 107 S. Route 31 , McHenry 
815-385-2100 





"" ' " ' r ii i m ill 



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SANDY McKI 



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ALES, S 









TAFF THANKS YOU I 
US #1 DEALER FOR SATIS 
CUSTOMED r " 




VOLUME 






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fae^t&,fc&t46d<x.fee 
QuofflW buyen w/approwJ credit. Sm totponon lor detail 




HEW 1998 DOME DAKOTA 







•3.8L magnum Vt) wg. 
•Automatic time. 
•Air conditioning 
•Sliding rear window 
•Fog lam pe 



M",BP |J! gig 

"ECEUT COLLfGl UBtD 
iTO'j MuS! OUtL'Frj tlOC 



!2S?JT'^,. ^ 'SOdlng tear window 

•4M0M0 ipm bench *i) n ^j^., 

IK? 7££ ii ^--- •hHwntllwfl wiper* 

•Ml. magnum VB .j^j -f h™ 



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s»ndt 5 Discount unj 

SICIM C0UCCI GrUy 
f»QU MUSI QIMUFIi UM 

TOI»l S*»'-»iGS I41.'0 



rout ma 

H3,360 

Pi-jjtix.iitta ) te:&W6doe.lM 



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Plu'i to, m. ne, 4 m ox. foe 






M0J2OM0 taeta 
•Dual air bagi 
•Front lioor malt 
•AU-FU cauant. CO 

•stock nare-a 



rom pmct 

$ 1 6,581 

' Plus Ux. lilfc), 0c. ft «4B doc let 



1999 DODGE CARAVAN FWD 



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Seats • doth MflrXack budM knacBo - AWFM 

%-umew group ii •Owner Coajaiyni ca BoH program 

•Dam • aunoMA ::..' . ,•) addRkmal pa|0M ot qm" 

CSrT^rTS&U ^^SSS^ P ^' W 

*8pi*iS control w SMtina * 7 rmiinfi 

•SlaartngoMunw.Ult. i<4»BOMl . MM 

•Tiananitalon • 4 Mad autoniaUo •Onaiar - mdanaat laelaBai 
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17,518 



Ruttax,tl»».He.ft$46dx.tet 

cWUbw ) *i»/< W ro^c«dliwioWi>TM(orJifc l t. 



NEW 1999 PLYMOUTH 
NEOH EXPRESS® 




•2.0L 4 eyi. 1SV ang. •Pmtar aunroof 

•Automatic trana. >Dual air bap> 

•AU^U, caaattta. CO chanoaf .tm alaartng 

•Ilium, vanity tnlrron .Ciulaa control 

•Po«ar ovttkta mltron 'BuckatHMi 

•Po*«r locka, urindowa •Slock f lOOS-o 



USflP 116 3S1 

P»0 DISCOUNT IlliC 

SANDT S DISCOUNT H315 

BECEN1 COLLEGE GRAND 
ItOU MUST OUAlimt HOC 

FACTOHT B'EBATf JI400 

TOTAL SAVINGS UM* 



rouit ma 

B 2,290 

Plui Ux, tiut. lie, & We doc lee 



1998 CHRYSLER SEBRMG COHVT. JX 




stsotiiiia. - 

■ ' i niiw WcMI twcxi 

•ar* 



•rm« . rnMwa ssw a* u^ 



<arM>M ■ B«taa <M one 

•trim ■ A tpa. uo 
•Ingn* ■ til. VI tOHC J«v I 
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•Ban mi twm a > 



MSBP t!5 3T5 

Sandts Discount i;tj« 

FACTO^T ftfBATE I1UC 

BECENT COHEGE GPAD 
iMUST OUAHHi two 



youm ma 

$ 21 ,289 

. RusUx.rne.lc.&SA6doc!tM. 



-r^aj 






NO GAMES, MO GIMMICKS, NO 

YOU DON'T HAVE TO BE A SUPER STORE FOR SI 

All Prices Clearly Marked On Every Used Car, Every Day Of the Week 



*9S CHEVY tID EXTENDED PinCUP 

8lk.*i1147SST. V6, LS pkO.. AC, 

cuutlt. 



'S9 CHRTSLEB TDVN « CDUXIIT LTD. 

Sik. ft 0471 IT. Evary Option. Stale. 

*28,905 



^CHWSlttTOWiiCOiJHM 

S«V fW7U, leaded, 
, MQmar. rear air 

$18,795 



'95 CHEVY LUMINALS 

5A.lll-67».liaalClton,AJIlSe1byi 

$6995 



J 9S PLYMOUTH GRAND VOYAGS 

i»or oir, ipeocu. AI wheel dma 

$I9,995L 



'95P0NT1AC!RANSP0RT 

Sti.ft2^lylAl<iabyi' 

$10,595 



■96 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB SIT 
Sik. fMfisa AT, AC, cateetl*, till, 
erulia control. 

•13.995 



'96 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN 8E 
s<k. foeeaST. pw, pl, tin, cruiee 

control, AC. 

"15,348 



'96 DQD8E CARAVAN 

31 K tUMSBBT. AT, AC, nice unit. 

1 11.985 



'91 FORD EXPLORER 

Srk #11 -680eT. 4Dr., WT Pkg. 
AI Wheel Dme 

$5650 



'96 GRAND CARAVAN LE 

Sik. I1MT23T. Loaded, rear air. 

*14,995 



'93 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER 

Si. #12-iBIlT. LowmlB, outo, A/C 

$4995 



'97 CHEVY 1500 4x4 

Stk. tHSeer. Silverado, 350 VS. pw, 
pl, till, erulia control. 

"18,995 



'B9F150 PICKUP 

Si. 1 1 1 -47901. Auto, folic Wort 
tiowportoaon 

^2557 



'98 PONTIAC SAFAHL 

2 to ehosM. Rear airi haet, pw, pC 
tilt, crulaa control. 

»17 f 995 



'98 CHEVY S10 EXT. CAB 

Stk i11-«7S4T. LS pko,. VB. pw, pl. 
lilt, crulM conlrol. 

•15,995 



'31 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN LE 

Sik. tMASST. AT, AC, ADS, pw, pl, 
nil, ell wheel drive. 

*6995 



r 9fi HYUNDAI ACCENTS 

Sik f| Hm Feet nrajaja' AT, AC, «m*n 



Of IIUMo. Ho Honey Oown* 



'94 CHEVY 1500 CHEYENNE 

Stk t»B23T AT, AC, cataetle, till , 
crulu control. 



'89 DODGE CARAVAN LE 

81k. I104BS4T. AT, AC, pw, nil. 
erulia control. 

•2967 



'96 CHRYSLER CIRRUS 

St #1 1-6803. OJKWIb, 

4b»Uly LaocW. JUST REDUCED 

$11,995_ 



'94 DODGE CARAVAN SE 

Si. 112-68201 tow nin,cuta, 
pw.pl, cotwBe 

$7995 



'ST DODGE RAM 1508 CLUB CAB SLT 

Sik. IM004T. Too man/ eilru to 
Hit. Mutt aee. 

'19,847 



'96 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB 

Si. f 1 1-680IT AX4, lowMln, looded 

$16,995 



'95 JEEP CHEROKEE SPORT 

Si. 1 1 1 -6800T. A Dr. Auto, A/C *** 

$12,995 



'95 DODGE RAM 1500 

Stk. fMKKTT. Work truck, AT. 



'MMBDHANSEBSUPEIlCAfllLT 
Stk. fMOKT. AT, AC, till, crulaa 
control, cover. ''.• ;.» 

»! 



'96, FORD RANGER XLT 

Stk (M6S5T, Oraat work tnjck, cap. 

•7995 



•B9 DODGE SHADOW ES CPE. 

Btk. #11fl7TT. AT, air, pdl, good 
nines. 



'96 DODGE INTREPID 

Si f 12-6817. Al the top, 36KmJn 

$12,995 



'91 F0HD RANGER 

Stk. ItMTJtt. Work truck, claan 

•3775 



'89 CHEVY C3500 DUALLY EXT. CAB 

Sik. I104740T. PW. PL, lilt, cnitt* 
conlrol. 454 VB, tow mllae. 

•10.995 



F35 D0D6E RAH CLUB CAB DIE$a 

Stk. I1H73TT. M ton, pw. pl, (111, 
crulee control, Ram turbo dleeal. 

•14.995 



'94 NISSAN PATHFINDER SI 

St f8-637lT. Big liro. 
locdadt muU M 



$13,995 



'93 CHRYSLER CONCORDE 

St f 1 2-68 1 B. hmootai obndilion, 
pw, pl, cruha, cou., bw miUt 

$9995 



'96 DODGE DAKOTA SPORT 

Stk (74S34T. S epeed, AC, cseeeite. 

•8648 



'97 DODGE STRATUS 

Btk II1-S7S3. Qood mllei, factory 
warranty. 

•11,895 



'94 CHRYSLER CONCORDE 

St II I -67W. ' I C*rw, Al Opro*, 

cxoapnonol IMVHK 



'J? CHEVY SID BLAZER Ml DB. 

Stk. tlM>734T. Sporty, pw, pl. till, 
cmlee conlrol. 

* 16,995 



'95 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 

Stk eio-arazr. Extra clean, loaded 
4SK. 



•16.995 



'96 DODGE DAKOTA SPORT 
Stk. itmt«T. PW, Pt, lilt, crulee 
control. • 



'96 RAM 1500 CLUB CAB SLT 

Stk SI0-B737T. Extra nlca. loaded, 
tnardt, 360 VS. 

•17,595 | 



"'"» C-4.7 



'95 JEEP WRANGLER 

Elk- tl 1474BT. Sort lop, auto, trana. i 

*10 f 995 



$3995 



'91 CHEVY CAMAR0 .. 
Stk. tu^7*s. around arrecte.' 
leaded: 

m 



'97 PONTIAC SUNFIRE CPE. 

Stk. IM024. AT, AC, tilt, cswetta. 

•11,595 



'97 JEEP WRANGLER SPORT 

Stll2-69l4T6Cyl,cuto,lUrww 

$15,995 



'% DODGE INTREPID 

5t 112-681 iAl*v»fcyi 

$11,995 



'95 CHRYSLER SEBRINB CPE 

Stk. tMSX). AT, AC, pw, pl, lilt, 
crulee conlrol. 

•10.995 



'97 CMOS ACHEVA SEDAN 

$t 18-657*. V6,pw,pl,li, 

craiM conlrol 

$10,995 



'96 CHRYSLER CIRRUS 

St k UfflN, Loaded, pw, pi, tm, vt 

•10.980 



'95 CAVAUERCPE 

Sik tMBBr. AT, air, caaHtt* 

•8995 



'93 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 

Stfl2-68l2T.AlAatori. 
dudpoMrMdri 

$12,995 



'98 DODGE NEOH CPE HTGHUNE 

Stk 184061. AT. AC, new car ellar- 

natlva. 

•10,995 



"95 FORD ESCORT SEDAN 

Stk tr-Ul 4. PW, PL tilt, CrulM con 
trot, cuulli 



'94 CHEVY CAVALIER CPE 

Stk. 164573. S epeed. air, cauelte 

*4995 

m 



'96 PONTIAC SUNFTRE SEDAN 

Si. K8-6592. KAT. AC, til, am** 

$9995 



'97 DODGE STRATUS 

Stk fM718. AT. AC, uuelle. good 

mltei 

•11,995 



'94 SATURN SL1 

Sik. fB-6334. AT, air, caautla. 



'92 NISSAN SENTRA 

Si f 1 1 -6792. 2 Dr. Coupe. 5 Spd . 
A/C Etim, intra CUan 

$4995 



'93 MERCURY COUGAR XR7 

SA.*ll-680B.&todeon. bocfed 

$7995 



'90 FORD TAURUS 

Stk. (94720. Auto-, AC, castette, 
B9K mllee. 

•4463 



90 rDODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE 

Si. f 1 1-68061 Pw, pl, kl, crune 

$3248 



'94 GEO PRISM 

St i II -6805. After rrortw M 
ipcJer. outo. A/C aiASANd 

$6995 



'91 FORD TEMPO SDN 

Sik. IKM697. AT, AC. pw. pl. Illl. 
cmlae control. 



'91 FORD ESCORT COUPE 

Sik. i 104731. anal 2nd car. AT, air 



'97 CHRYSLER LHS 

2 k> dx»M. ladher, loaded, mini we. 

$17,595 



'91 NISSAN STANZA 

Stk. »8«sa. Hoonrool, pw, pl, Illl, 
crulM control. 



'90 MERCURY TOPAZ 

Stk I1M713. Loaded, pw, pl. J9K 



miles 



'4237 



'89 PLYMOUTH VOYAGED 

Sik »M4T74T. AT, AC. tilt. pw. pl. 
crulta conlrol. 



1782 



'91 PLYMOUTH ACCLAIM 

Stk. IMtW. VS. AT, AC. tilt, crulta 
control, caaettta. 



'98 DODGE STRATUS 

3 to chooaa. Low mllaa, pw, pl, Illl, 
crulaa control, 

•13.995 



'WrVBU^inlGmWlAPKK-lIP 

Si.fll-6776T.5Spd.,A/C 

Greet Burner 

$2362 



'96 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 

81k »1 i-6rWT. PW, PL, tilt, crulaa | 
control, 4x4. 

•21,995 



'94 DODGE SHADOW CPE | 

Stk HMS41. AT, AC, claan unit. 



'94 MERCURY TOPAZ 

Stk 1104712. Power aaat, pw, pt, lilt, 
crulaa control. 



SPECIAL OF THE WEEK 

1994 FORD CONVERSION VAN 

Mint condition. 
$7550 WHOLESALE 




'.V.'AMH.-f.r'|.VJ,',fJ!eJlj.!.TTr! 



WI,HONOR AUCIIDIT UNION AND CORPOKATI PRICINO PUNS 



Call Today and Dr.'ra Awayl 

(800) SO 1-9702 

Anlemeted CrWrt Aaenrnl HeUMie 



■ Wa ■jereerraewnenl 
14 Una A Og. T pare A Week 



• Bad Credit •No Credit • 

• JiJCigemeiits • 1st Time Buyer 
Or,' for a personal Extension 2 at 

interview, c&lt (847) 58 7-6473 




ALL REBATES 

APPLIEO PLUS 

TAX, LIC. 

TITLE 

S«6 DOC FEE^ 

APR IN LIEU OF REBATE 



-1iv 



CHRYSLER 
ViymoutFi 

Dodge 



- , V 




■Wf^"WW 



- .,- 



D4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



December! 1, 1998 ' 



Auto Marketplace Classifieds 




Cm (or Sale 



$1004500 CARS 

Potlco Impounds. 

Honda's, Chevy's, 

Jeep's and Sport Utilities. 

Musi Soil! 

1-600-522-2730 
oxl.2292. 

'B0 MAZDA RX7 GXL, red. 
loaded, leather Interior, pam- 
pered gararge kept. $7,500. 
Call (847) 223-20B5 

1905 SUBURBAN GOOD 
tires, very dean, well main- 
tained, air, automatic, 

$3.500/best. (70S) 447-4590 

1991 BUICK PARK AVE. 
Good condition, white with 
burgandy interior. $5,400 
(847) 875-3799. 



1002 CORVETTE CON- 
VERTIBLE whlto with white 
top. garage kept, 55,000 
miles. Excellent condition. 
(815)385-8466. 

1992 MIATA, RED, perfect 
condition, 10,200 actual miles, 
garaged, hard lop Included. 
Highest offer. (847) 
223-9177 

BUICK 1985 CENTURY 
WAGON Clean and reliable. 
Ashing $1.500/besl. (414) 652- 

7952 

BUICK 1992 SKYLARK 
SPORTY, fed, 4-dOOr. V6. arr, 
aulo-locks, good condition, 
$4,350/besl. (847) 356-6685. 



CHEVROLET 1995 tMPA- 

LA SS. CO. leather, 63,000 

miles, now nres, new brakes, 

loaded. Si 8.500. (847) 
395-5966 

CHEVHOLET 1997 MALI- 
BU. $12,990 (847) 223-8651 

CHEVY 1984 CORVETTE. 
$8,995 (847)223-8651. 

CHEVY 1987 CAPRICE 
CLASSIC ESTATE WAG- 
ON, looks good, runs good. 
everything works. 92,000 
miles. it.200/best (847) 
548-7950. 

CHEVY tBDS CAMABO, 5- 

bpockJ, nsv/ (ires, power wind- 
ows/lochs, hatchback, keyless 
entry, lill wheal, am/lm cas- 
sette, rjns and looks great. 
$2,C00/bosl (414) 279-0746 

CHEVY 1991 CAMARO 
RS. $4,388 (847) 587-6473 



CHEVY 1993 CAVALIER 
WAGON, loaded, power eve- 
rything, super clean, Must see 
(8-17) B3B-2135 after 6pm 

CHEVY 1995 MONTE CAR 
LO, 2-door. while with gray in- 
terior, garage kept, excelleni 
condition, highway miles, 
am/lm, FWO Asking $9,200 
(847) 395-2218 

CHEVY 1997 LUM1NA, 4- 
door, while, maroon interior, 
tuily loaded, low mites, A/C, ex- 
cellent condition. Must sell. 
Asking $l4,500/best. Please 
call (847) 223-3161 after 5pm 
or leave message. 

CHEVY. FORO PICK-UP 

Bodies, Factory-new guar- 
anteed from $1 3Q0.00. Doors 
from $89.00 Fenders from 
$50.00 Beds from $800.00. 
Bedlinars $169.00. Bumpers. 
Grills Repari Panels. Paints, 
Abrasives, windshields, radia- 
tors, Delivery, Mane (217) 624- 
6184. 

DAYTONA 1988, SUN- 

ROOF, great interior, needs 

work, $400/best. (414) 
862-9340. 



DODGE '95 RED neon, high 
lino, 4 door, a/c, auto, power 
locks, till, 3 year service, cent. 
42.000 mllQ3. (847)395-1966 

EA<SLE TALON ESI 1995. 5- 
spood manual, 40K, A/C. 
AM/FM cassette, power steer- 
ing, oxcollont condition, 
$8,700. (847) 356-5695 bo- 
foro 7pm. 

EXPRESS AUTO 
EXCHANGE 

USED CARS 

We lake consignment cars. 

No charge. 

Too busy to sell your car? 

LbI us do It tor you. 

(847) 740-1400 

1 19 W. Rollins Rd. 

Round Lake Beach. 

(Across from Burger King). 

Ask for Mike or Norm. 



1088 OLDS CUTLASS 
SIERRA SILVER MOON- 
LIGHT, A/C. hoat, power 
locks, new tires, new brakes, 
new exhaust, new radiator, 
new cam shaft. Runs great. 
Son left for Navy. Must soil. 
$1,599. Ask tor Mr. Coleman 
(414) 654-6543 or leave mes- 
sage. 

FORD 1960 MUSTANG 
COUPE, completely restor- 
able. many extra parts. $800. 
(847) 639-9283 after 5pm. 

FORD 1991 TAURUS 
WAGON GL, good condition, 
air, power. 1 -owner, ASS 
brakes. $3,500. (847) 
382-7632 

FORD 1992 MUSTANG 
CONVERTIBLE. $6,990. (847) 
223-8651. 

FORD 1896 CONTOUR 
GL. $9.475. (647)526-5541. 

FORD 1997 ESCORT LX 
WAGON. $9,865. (847) 526- 

5541. 

FORD 1098 CONTOUR 
GL. $11 ,979. (847) 526-5541 

FORD EXPLORER, 

58,000 miles. Eddie Bauor. 
low miles. 2yr. warranty. 6 disc 
CD player, (lawless condition. 
$15.000. (847) 566-4043. 

FORD TAURUS 1997, 

41.000 miles. CO changor. 
power everything, excellent 
condition, $it,200/oesl (847) 
265-2637 

HONDA 1994 CIVIC 
HATCHBACK. 56.000 miles. 5- 
speed. $7,000. (847) 
543-1289. 

HONDA 1996 ACCORD, 

$14,990. (847) 223-8651 



INFINITI 1995 J30S, 6 TO 
CHOOSE WITH SIMILAR 
SAVINGS, LEATHER, SUN- 
ROOF, $16,995. (847) 362- 
9200 

INFINITI 1995 045'S 

LEATHER. SUNROOF. 

$22,995 (847) 362-9200 

INFINITI 1996 130T. 

LEATHER. SUNROOF. 

sis, 995 i,a*"n Ma-gaga. 

JAGUAR 18*1 XJB SOVER- 
iGN. excellent condition. 
52.000 miles. $i6.500/besl 
(847) 355-8194 after 6pm 

LINCOLN 1997 TOWN 

CAR SIGNATURE, $23,965 
(Bd7) 526-5541 

LINCOLN CONTINENTAL 

1997, $23,865. (847) 526 
5541 

LINCOLN CONTINENTAL 
1992 SIGNATURE. S7.995 
(847) 395-2277 



MAZOA 1991 RX7, $6,995 
(B47) 587-3300 

MAZDA 1992 PROTEGE. 

£5^990. (647)223-6651 

MERCEDES BENZ 1971 
300 SEL, 4-door, garaged 
15yrs.. could run, good 
shape, great parts, all com- 
ptelB. $500/best. (8<t7) 
625-9851 

MERCURY 1992 SABLE 

LS 3.8L V6. A/C. ABS, airbags, 
automatic, all power, leather 
seats. 78K. Blue book $7,650, 
asking $6,650. (647) 356- 
0852. 



MERCURY 1994 COUGAR 
XR7, $7,995. (647) 587-3300 

MERCURY 1995 SABLE 
LS. $8.875. (847) 526-554 1 

MOVING OUT OF STATE 
MUST SELL 1997 Black Pon- 
liac Sunfire, 5-speed. 2-door 
sedan, A/C, cassette. Asking 
$9.900. (B47) 438-4180. 

MUST SEE 1989 Honda Ci- 
vic, manual (rans, new parts, 
excellent condition, 

$2,9i)0/bost. (847) 838-2617. 

NISSAN 1992 SENTRA, 
$4.995. (847) 587-6473. 

NISSAN 1995 ALTIMA. 

$8,995. (847) 395-3600. 

NISSAN STANZA 1991, 
$4,995. (847) 587-6473. 

OLDS 1991 98 ELITE, abso- 
lutely like new. (847) 395- 
2277. 

OLDS 1996 CIERA, $9,995. 

(647) 395-3600. 

PLYMOUTH 1895 NEON 
SON. $4,995. (B47) 587-6473. 



PLYMOUTH 1898 

BREEZE 41K, S8.975/besl. 
Red, 4-door, PS. PB. PW. PL, 
air, crulso, 4-cylincer, AM/FM 
cassette. (847) 336-1574. 

PONTIAC 1890 6000 SE. 
all wheel drive, $2,995. (847) 
395-2277. 

SATURN SC2 1893, 
$8,995. (847) 395-3600. 

TOYOTA 1987 CAMRY, 
$14.990. (647) 223-8651, 

TRANS AM, RAM AIR 1998 
Pontlac, 5.000 miles, rare 6- 
apoed, $26,000/tiost. (414) 
889-8206. 

VOLVO 1995 855 TURBO 
WAGON. LEATHER. SUN- 
ROOF, $21,995. (847) 362- 
9200. 

VOLVO 1895 SELECT 850. 
LEATHER. SUNROOF, 

$20,995. (847) 362-9200. 



To advertise In 

this section, call 

(847) 223-8161 



VOLVO 1996 855 GLT 
WAGON LEATHER. SUN- 
ROOF. COLD WEATHER 
TRACTION. $24,595. (847) 
362-9200. 

VOLVO 1998 SELECT S- 
70 GLT. LEATHER, SUN- 
ROOF. $28,595. (647) 362- 
9200. 

VOLVO 1998 SELECT 
S70-S. 12 TO CHOOSE WITH 
SIMILAR SAVINGS. LEATH- 
ER, SUNROOF. $24,595 
(847) 362-9200, 

VOLVO 1998 SELECT V- 
70 WAGONS, 13 lo choose 
from with simitar savings, 
leather, sunroof, $26,995. 
(847) 362-9200. 

VOLVO 199B SELECT V- 
70 R/AWD WAGON. LEATH- 
ER. SUNROOF. $33,995. 
(847) 362-9200. 



Qassic/AMique Can 



DOOOE 1988 CHARGER, 
collectors car. needs body 
paini and some interior work, 
97% original parts, good re- 
built engine and transmission. 
Asking $2,600/best. (B47) 
360-1868. (B47) 360-1966 
leave message 



Service & Paris 



ARE WHEELS. SET of four 
American Racing Equipment 
15x8, GM bolt pattern. True 
spoked wheels. Good shape. 
$150(847)54B-1110 

BMW WHEELS SET OF 
FOUR, to fi1 3. 5, 6. 7, 8 ser- 
ies. Mille Miglia 5 spoke 
wheels with Yokohama AVS 
ures 50% tread left, wheels in 
good shape, $700 (647) 548- 
1115. 

HOLLEY CARB, GREAT 
shape $75. Carter ihermo- 
quad. off of 440; has not run in 
years, $25. Dual point distribu- 
tor (or BB Chrysler, $25, Both 
flip up headlight doors for '69 
Charger. $25. Call after 6pm 
(847)548-1115. 

TRANSMISSIONS 

'Rebuilt 

•Warranty 

•Great Prices. 

(847) 566-2254. 



Vans 



ASTRO VAN 1985, $3,500. 
remodeled. (847) 746-3572. 

CHEVY 1988 CONVER- 
SION VAN, 75K miles. A/C. 
AM/FM cassette, tow pack- 
age, $4,000/best. Days (847) 
358-8008, evenings (847) 
587-5592, Ken, 

CHEVY 1992 LUMINA 

APV. $6.995, (847) 395-3700. 

DODGE 1989 CARAVAN 
LE. $2.967. (847) 587-6473. 

FORD 1990, 14,000 miles, 
air, full bed. captain chairs, no 
rust, refrigerator, $5,800, 
(847) 797-0779. 



For More 
Classifieds, 
See Page 6 



Is Predicting For 
A Limited Time... 




ALERO • INTRIGUE • SILHOUETTE • BRAVADA 
CUTLASS • EIGHTY EIGHT • AURORA 



•99 Olds GuftbGS 

GL Sedan , M 



,. -■, . -ji. 



'99 Oleic Eightij Eighl 
Sedan 



: 



| i||l I -|. lull) 



r .. i", (.. . , . . ■ r ' 

■ >n StOtfl 



'•Wiv^afssa-ia^iSS^sassa 



'99 Olclo 7v irora 

Sodan 






$16,695 



$20,495 



HBBH 



i '99 Olds Bravado 
AWD 

*. 1. .11 1.,. m.| <fiwwMCf? 

. 1. ,.„,., 

St* 



J 



lii-i/ji" Vij'i'i 



$31,495 



$27,995 



Extra Bonus! 




'99 Olds Silhouette 
GLS Minivan 



Gift Certificate 

with the purchase 

of a '99 Alero of Intrigue. 

(Sponsored by the Olds Dealer Assoc.) 



$24,995 



'99 Olds Aim 
GL Sedan 

1 nil in' lulu __„ — 

l'l"'M""l yS'{ / 

'■"■ "'""»'» ^^iu. /> ■wiu-^'Ycr- 
.''"rar rrrs ^y t; j ^ 


'99 Old-, 1 1 
GX Sedan 

1 mi iV> i<mu 
1 ;. |i i.| 1 n-ii 
•.ill. 11 •tr.t, 

11. .[.')> , ■ ■ 

i' : , II- 

'■:■!... 

• .■ i-:.il . 1 


- - $. - 0- 
it; 1 $16,595 



TOSH 

.'Li 



*s lS$ 



$19,595 



Visit Us On The Internet At: www.rays-cars.cpm 



wuriK-i- 

Qt'thMl.VW 

linu: HCKH'iillUJ 

QllUlillJ lVllli;l 
Aw'l IK I 

SflrvJai; HI-*7-fl. Gut 7um rlixwT^- 
PoiI'j: MF8-5,5oi7aniNoon 
Body Snap. »f 8-5. Sal Bom-Noon 

'Pfiis lax. title, lie & 
e. Rebates _, 

+ To qualified Imyets. ^^ This Act 

" Savinys ljasetl on At Time Of Sale 

coui|inrisaii of GMAC r ,_ r -.^^ m nn „, 

B-ralo approval 9.75°o vs. For Additional 

.QS^arp Savings! 

(847) 395-3600 



<..Chevy/Olds 

118 Route 173 W) 

mm 



■ 






December 11,1998 



WTO MARKETPLACE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ D5 



mm 



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ra *i< 



We Haue The 



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test inventory in tsie Country-2TO 



1 \'™^J-.' ; k:™ 



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25 Mill. From 
Schaumburg 



18 Min. From 
Arlington Heights 





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Total due at lease inception: 



T, s 184 3 m 6 „* 

ilus tax, title. He. and doc, fee: 






| 



We Haue Great Selection of Blazers, Tahoes, Conversion Vans, Coruettes, Malibus & Trucks 




'93 Plymouth Voyager Van $7,990 '98 Geo Prism 4dr. 



$10,990 '97 Chevrolet Comoro cpc. $13,490 '96 Chevy Corsica 



$7,990 



'94 Pontiac Sunfire Conv't $6,990 '90 GMC Suburban 4x4 Conv. $6,990 '93 Chevy Beretta cpe. $6,490 '94 Chevy Astro Van $10,990 

'98 Chevy Cavalier $10990 '96 Chevrolet Cavalier 2dr. $5,990 

'98 Chevrolet Cavalier $10,990 '97 Chevrolet Cavalier 4dr. $7,990 '98 Chevrolet Malibu 4dr. $12,990 

Lx.A» . w ^ e-,„ aon <osc ^ti, w u -^ c»oon 97 Chevrolet Corvette $35,990 MORE TO CHOOSE FROM 

'94 Olds Bravado 4dr. $10,990 '96 Ford Thunderb.rd $8,990 Pontiac 0rand Prix cpe . $io,990 AT SIMILAR SAVINGS! 



TRUCKS 

'93 GMC Sierra SUE P/V Ext Cab. $12,990 

\'93FordflangerXLTP/VExt.Cab4x4. $18,990 

•98 Chevy S-10ZR2 Ext Cab, 4x4. $20,990 

•93 Chevrolet 1500P/JJ $5,990 

•95 Chevrolet S-10P/U $3,490 

•95 Chevy G30 Hl-Cube $14,990 

'92 Chevy S-10 Ext Cab 4x4 $8,990 

i '94 Ford Ranger XLTP/V $7,990 

'96 Dodge Dakota P/Up $13,990 

'94 Chevy K2500 4x4 Ext Cab $14,950 

'92FordF-150XLTP/V $12,990 

'93FordF-150PiV $6,990 

'97 Chevrolet S-1 OP/UP Soon Box!! $9,990 

'92 GMC 1500 P/V $7,990 



SUVS& VANS 



'90 Jeep Wrangler 


$4,990 


'96 Chivy Express Cargo Van 


$16,990 


'96 GMC Safari Van 


$15,990 


'90 GMC Suburban 4x4 Com. Van 


$6,990 


'94 Chevrolet K-Blazer 


$17,990 


'92 Ford Winnebago Conv. Van 


$10,990 


'96 Dodge Grand Caravan LE 


MUSTSEE 


'94 Toyota 4-liunner SR5 V6, 4x411 


$16,990 


'97 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 


$22,990 


'94 Chevy S-10 Blazer 4dr. Loaded. 


$8,990 


'93 Chevrolet S- 10 Blazer 


$7,990 


'93 Plymouth Grand Voyager White, loaded, sharp $8, 995 


'93 Chevrolet Suburban 4x4 


$14,990 


'90FordAerostar Van 


$5,990 


'92 Jeep Cherokee 


$6,990 


*97 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer 


$29,990 


'91 Toyota Previa Low Miles! 


$11,990 


'94 Chevy Suburban 4x4 Super Cleanl 


$19,990 



COUPES & SEDANS 

'92 BuickRoadmaster LTD. Sharp! $9,990 

'90 Pontiac Bonneville LE $5,990 

'95 Saab 900 Blue! $15,990 

'95 Mercury Sable $9,990 

'97 Honda CMc EX cpe. $13,990 

•94 Chevrolet Cavalier 2dr. $6,990 

•96 Aatra Integra $ 14,990 

'95 Saturn Sc2 cpe. $9,990 

•92 Mazda MX3 V6 $6,990 

'96 Honda Accord $14,990 

•93 Uncoln Mark 8 S1Z990 

•95 Ford Contour $8-,99a 

•96 Chevrolet Corsica $9,990 

"96 Ford Thundervlrd Loaded sharp. $10,995 

•92 Pontiac Bonneville $4,990 

'92 Mazda Protege $5,990 
'95 Pontiac Bonneville SSEI UkeBrandNew! $17,990 



SPORTS CARS 

'87 Chevy Corvette Conv't Rcd.mnt.38K miles. WOW! 
'9 1 Pontiac Sunblrd Conv't Red, sharp. $5,990 

•92 Chevrolet Corvette $17,990 

'92 Ford Mustang Conv't $6,990 

'94 Ford Probe $8,990 

•92 Ch evrclet Comoro RS $5,990 

'94 Toyota Ceika $10,990 

'8 1 Chevrolet Corvette Super dean! MUSTSEE 

'84 Chevy Corvette Blue for foul Low low miles!! $8,995 
•94 Chevrolet Beretta 226 $9,990 

■96 Ford Mustang Alloys, loaded, red $1 1,995 

•96 Mitsubishi Eclipse $15,990 

"97 Chevy Camaro Cpe. Black Beauty. 
•97 Chevy Camaro Conv't Sharp! 
'91 Chevrolet Corvette. 
'98 Chevy Corvtftts W>MJijro00CB£'tofIteMi*" MUSTSEE! 
•92 Cadillac Monte Hard Top Conv't $22,795 



$13,995 
$15,990 . 
$16,990 



WE CARRY Commercial Trucks, Cargo Vans, Hi-Cubes, Plows, Salt-Spreaders, and! Pumps 



tYOUR COMPLETE COMMERCIAL | 
'VEHICLE HEADQUARTERS! 



^> f\ S\ COMMERCIAL VEHICLES IN STOCK • 

ZUUSAVE THOUSANDS! 



| Specialty Trucks, Dtiltiv Bodies, stake Bodies. 
Cab & Chassis, Craw Cain Diesels and Mora 




(888)223-0131 



On Rte. 120 

Between 1-94 

and Rte. 03 

In Gravslake 



-i- 





I Cavalier $7.164/$6.19Q.5Q: Blazer St 0.296/$1 3, 197,00, 






.' 



- 






*m^ 1 1 *~ » — - — -in ti-».v %*^^t*SjjjsAIJb ^J 5 tJ 5g i L . cr:r 7-.- - V v r' ..T -T- -... r ., ; jv ..:-T 



s*' 



D6 I Lakeland Newspapers 



December 11, 1998 



Auto Marketplace Classifieds 



FORD 1908 WINDSTAR 
GL,<16,898. (647) 826-5541. 

PONTIAC 19M TRANS- 
PORT, power s!do door, 
M.B95. (B47J 395-2277. . 



Four Wheel Drive 
Jeeps 



CHEVY 1880 SUBURBAN, 
$4,995. (B47) 395-3600. 

CHEVY 1993 BLAZER. 
910,695. (647) 587-3300. 

CHEVY 1994 8-10 BLAZ- 
ER.t8,990. (847) 223-8651. 

CHEVY 1998 BLAZER LS. 
813.995. (647) 587-33O0. 

DODQE 1988 RAM 
CHARGER 4x4, 5.000 milos 
on rebuilt engine, new tiros, 
towing package. Asking 
13,800/bost (815) 675-6434 
after 7pm. 

DODQE 1094 DAKOTA, ex- 
tended cab. ve, 4x4, low mile- 
age, full power. $H0O0/bcsi 
' (4i4) 694-1745 



FORD 1980 BRONCO 4x4 
with 6ft. unlmount Weslorn 
plow on It wilh 90,470 milos, 
with Doublo D big tires on II. 
$4,500. 1867 FORD RANGER 
with 109.856 miles, 5- speed 
plus reverse, $600. Call Joso 
(647) J87-94Q6. ■ 

FORD 1S91 EXPLORER, 

4WD. $5,995. (647) 3952277. 

FORD 1991 EXPLORER, 
$5,650. (847) 567-6473. 



FORD 1095 EXPLORER 
EDDIE BAUER, great condi- 
tion, perfectly maintained, 
64,000 miles, Si8,900/bost. 
(647)395-2015. 

FORD 1985 XL F-150. 4x4, 
standard cab, AJC. bedliner, 5- 
speed manual. 8-cyllnder. 
extra tires. 52,000 miles, origi- 
nal owner, excellent condition, 
$12,695. (414) 653-0370. 

FORD 1907 EXPEDITION 
4X4. S23.965. lOAT)52a-5MV 



QMC 1990 SUBURBAN 
4x4 CONVERSION VAN, 
S6.990. (847) 223-8651. 

QMC S JIMMY 1993, 
$8,995. (847) 395-3700. 

ISUZU AMIQO 1993, fully 

loaded, $5,500/best. (847) 
973-0128 or voice mail 1-800- 
255-4659 0X1.4639, 

JEEP 1994 WRANGLER. 
50K. both hard and soft top. 
clean, black, big tiros, asking 
810,900, (847) 669-7068. 

JEEP CHEROKEE 1992, 
$6,990. (847) 223-8651 -, jt 

JEEP WRANGLER 1905, 
$10.995. (847) 587-6473. 

JEEP WRANGLER HARD 
TOP 1095, $12,990. (847) 
223-6651. 

NISSAN 1994 PATH- 
FINDER SE. $14,507 (647) 
587-6473. 



Trucks/I rulers 



FORD 1989 RANQER 4x4 
EXT. CAB. $3,695. (847) 395- 
3700. 

FORD 1991 F-150 XLT 

PICKUP, slick. $6,200. (815) 
455-6765. 

FORD 1991 F-250, extend- 
ed cab XLT, Lariat Package, 
loaded. 2WD, excellent condi- 
tion running and looking, 351 
V8 full power. 95.000 miles, 
over 1/2 highway; 811,000. 
(847) 662-1460. 

FORD 1998 F-150 EDDIE 
BAUER, $15,645. (647) 526- 
S541. 

FORD 1998 RANGER XLT, 
$6.950. (847) 528-5541. 

FORD F-150 1992, 6-cylln- 
der, stick, with air, AM/FM cas- 
sette, low mileage, 
$6,500/besl. (647) 356-5949. 

TRAVEL TRAILER 21 FT., 

low miles, like new, loaded, 
$6,000. Call for details (847) 
526-8224. 



CHEVY 1993 C-1500 PICK- 
UP, Indy 500 Edrtion, 75.000 
miles, some add ons. 
$11,000/best. (647) 356-8807 
loovo message. 

CHEVY 1993 S-10 EX- 
TENDED CAB, $4,484. (847) 
587-6473 

DODGE 1993 DAKOTA, 

55,995. (847) 395-3700. 

DODGE 1995 RAM 1500 
4x4 Club Cab 5LT, short box. 
dark blue, 5.9 VB Magnum, au- 
tomatic, loaded, CD player, 
roll top cover, $17,300/best 
(414) 763-5763. 



Heavy Equipment 



1062 WD ALUS CHALM- 
ERS TRACTOR with 3pt. 2 
bottom plow and mounted cul- 
tivator, 53.000/beat. (615) 
338-1211. 

IRRIGATION PUMP & MO- 
TOR, model 6203A. 40hp, 
phase 3. Peerless pump, 4in. 
Ductal falanged, 20hp. motor 
$650. (847) 740-7380 after 
5pm 



Motorcycles 



DODGE 1996 
SPORT, $9,995. 
6473 



DAKOTA 
(847) 587- 



HARLEY OAVIDSON 1993 

custom Sportster, $1,200. 
(847) 949-8970. 



DODGE 1997 RAM PICKUP 
TRUCK. 4x4, whita, cabin and 
1/2, still under warranty, 
S22,000/besl. (847J 
740-2606. 

FORD 1964 VAN WORK 
TRUCK, heavy duty, B-cy- 
llnder, very excellent runnor, 
alt new parts, SSOO/best. (647) 
305-6000. ■ ..v.- * 



B fBJgMBMMaMgMMBHH 



Selling Your 
Car? 

Let Lakeland's Auto 
Marketplace help you! 
Call (&47) 223-8161 for 

mare Irrf onnatlonl 



1 

I 



Bffl 



LIMITED TIIVIE 




StkH 992326 . I 

■ EXCHANGE S> <m <l|l Per Month ! 
J Lease At: %/%/ ^F /39 Months ! 

■ $339 month lease/39 months. $339 1st payment/ $1000 cap. cost reduction/$450 aquisition ■ 
Ik fee = $1789 + tax, title, lie. due at lease sianinrj. 



i Bring in this ad for a Special Discount ■ 
ul thatv 



Offer ends 12/31/98. No prior sales. 



THE^EXCHANGE 

2300 Skokie Valley Rd • Highland Park 

(847) 432-9300 

Internet: \y \y w.s n a h e x c li a n ge. c 6 in 

A Division 01 Semersky Enterprises. Inc. 



" ' ■•■; :-•*■■.*■■•> - ■■•■ .:■:•-' • • ' • -- . ■.';•-,: " ...;-.. 



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„„„*t,„*«.i 






ACUSA 

• Acuro of Libertyvillo 

1620 S. Milwoukee Aw., libertyville 
680-7333 

• Pauly Acuro 

RtjuIm 41 A 22, Highland Pork 
433-8200 



• Karl Knouz Motors 
407 Skokie Valley Hwy , Loke Bluff 
604-5000 



• Anthony Pontioc/ 
GMC Truck/Buick 
2727 Bilvidtrt Rd (Rle 1201. Woukegon 
244-1010 

• Knouz of Lake Forest 
1044 N. Western Ave., lake Forest 
234-2800 

■ Liberty Auto City 
1000 E. Park Ave.. Libertyville 
362-2683 

• Mitchell BulckOldsmobile & 
GMC Truck 

903 N Front Slreel, McHenry 
(815) 385-7200 

• Country Buick/Pontiac 
B4S Main Si . Anlioch 
395-4400 



• Buss Ford 
3925 W. Routt 120, McHenry 
(815) 385-2000 

• Fo* lake Ford-Mercury Inc. 
90 S. Routs 12, f oi Lake 
587-3400 

• Lyons-Ryan Ford 
104 W. Route 173. Antioch 
395-3900 

• Celozzi Ford 

3100 Grand Ave. (Rle. 132), Wauktgan 
336-2340 

• Sessler Ford Inc. 
1010 5. Milwouktt Aw . Libertyvilte 
362-4550 

• Victor Ford 
Rout* 12 [N. of Rte. 176). Woucondo 
526-5541 

GMC 

• Anthony Pontiac/GMC/Buick 
2727 Belvidere Rd., Woukegon 
244-1010 

• Mitchell Buick-Oldsmobile & 
GMC Truck 

903 N. Front Street. McHenry 
(815) 385-7200 

• Patrick Pontiac-GMC Truck Inc. 
1120 S. Milwaukee Ave.. Libertyville 
6805000 

• Pedorsen GMC Truck 
Corners of Rtei. 45 & 173, Anlioch 
395-3700 



■■ 1 


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• Weil Oldsmobile Cadilloc Inc. 
lObG S Milwaukee Ave Liber lyvillc 
362-4100 

• Gory Long Ponliac- 
Codilloc Subaru 

1107 S. Route 31, McHenry 
(815} 385-6000 

Chevrolet 

• Bernard Chovrolot/lsuju 

I00I S. Milwaukee Ave.. Libertyville 

362-1400 

• Boehmer Chevrolel/Geo 

416 W Liberty (Rle 176) Woucondo 
526-2424 

• Classic Chevrolet Inc. 

425 N. Green Bay Rd . Waukegan 
336-4300 

• Gory Long Chevrolet/Geo 
1107 S Route 31. McHenry 

(815)385-2100 

• Roy Chevrolet Inc. 
39 N Route 12. fat Lake 
587-3300 

• Raymond Chevrolet/ 
Oldsmobile Inc. 

120 W Lake St. (Rte 173). Ant.och 
395- 3600 

• RocV.LT.boch Chevrolet 

1000 l Belvidere Rd . Groyilake 
2238651 

• Shepord Chevrolet 

930 Cornoge Ln . Lake Blull 
234 7900 



• Pauly Honda 

1111 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 

362-4300 
■ Rosen Hondo 

Rte 13 2 (Grand Ave ), Gurnee 

623-7673 




• Liberty Auto City 

1000 E. Pork Ave 1 176). Libertyville 
360-2683 

■ Gurnoo Hyundai VWOIdi 

Kit 41 !, Waihir.-jion it GutnccWaulitgori 

249-1300 



Fields Infiniti 

1121 5 Milwaukee Ave . Libertyville 

362-9200 



c25 Oldsmobile 

Gurnee Olds VW/Hyundai 

fit* 41 & Woihifiglon St. GumM/Wdultgon 

249-1300 

Mitchell Buick-Oldsmobile & 

GMC Truck 

903 N. Front 5lreet, McHenry 

(815) 3B5-720O 

• Raymond Chevrolet/ 
Oldsmobile Inc. 

120 W. Route 173. Antioch 
395-3600 

• Weil Oldsmobile/Codilloc Inc. 
1050 S. Milwaukee Ave.. Libertyville 
362-4100 

Y PONTIAC. 

• Anthony Pontiac/GMC Truck/6uick 

J???Belvvder«Rd (file I2flj, Wavltgon 
244 1010 

• Gary Long Pontioc Cadilloc 
& Subaru 

1107 S. Route 31, McHenry 

(815) 385-6000 

• Patrick Pontiac GMC Truck Inc. 

1 120 S. MilwaulM Avi.. Libertyville 
6BO-5O0O 
■ Country Pontiac/Buick 
845 Main Street, Antioch 
395-4400 



ySjSr 



ISUZU 



1 Bernard Chevrolet/lsuzu 

1001 5 Milwaukee Ave, Libertyville 
362-1400 

Jim M'Lody Oldsmobile! suzu & Nissan 
5656 NW Hwy„ Crystal Lake 
(BOO) 566-5239 



The Saob Exchange 
2300 Skokie Volley Rd. (Rle. 41) 
Highland Park 
432-9300 




Jeep. 



niRISUH 



■ Knouz of Lake Forest 

1044 N Western Ave, Lake Forest 
234-2800 

■ Lake County Chrysler-Plymouth 
540 S Green Boy Rd , Woutegan 
336-4500 

• Lake Villa Chrysler-Plymouth 
Jeep/Eogle 

130 Cedar Ave . Lake Villo 
356-2530 

• Sandy McKie & Sons 
Chrysler' Plymouth Dodge Truck 
91 S. Route 12. Foi Loke 
587-6471 

• Sunnyside Dodge-Chrysler 
Plymouth 

4810 W Elm St, McHenry 
(815)385-7220 



• Country Jeep-Eagle 
3017 W Route 120. McHen7 
(815)363-9999 

• Oelf's Jeep 

1571 Belvidere Rd.. Waukegiin 
623- 1492 

* Loke Villa Chrysler-Plymouth Jeep Eagle 
130 Cedar Ave., Lake Villa 
356-2530 

* Liberty Jeep Eagle 

1000 E. Park Ave. Libertyville 
362-2683 



Land Rover of Lake Bluff 
375 N Skokie Hwy. Lake Bluff 
604-8100 



SA1WN. 

* Saturn of Libertyville 

1160 S. Milwaukee Ave . Libertyville 
3626600 

• Saturn of Waukegan 

500 5 Green Bay Rd., Woukegon 
360-5000 




ma 




• Antioch Dodge 
105 Rte. 83. Anlioch 
3950200 

■ Fohrman Auto Marl 
2725 Belvidere Rd , Woukegon 
336-3510 

• Millor-Krueger Dodge 

119 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
362-3800 
j e Sandy McKie & Sons 

Chrysler-Plymouth Dodge Truck 
91 S. Route 12. fox Lake 
587-6471 

• Sunnyside Dodge-Chrysler- 
Ptymouth 

4810 W. Elm St., McHenry 
(815) 385-7220 ' 



• Fox Lake Ford/Mercury 
90 S Route 12, Fox Lake 
587 3400 

• Libertyville Lincoln/Mercury Inc. 
941 S. Milwaukee Ave.. Libertyville 
367-1700 

• Lyons-Ryon Ford-Lincoln-Mercury Inc. 
104 W. Route 173, Antioch 
395-3900 

• Don McCue Lincoln-Mercury Inc. 
660 W. NW Hwy., Borringlon 
382-5600 

• Mitchell-Potts Lincoln/Mercury 
907 N. Front St., McHenry 

(815) 385-0403 

• Rosen Lincoln-Mercury 

100 N. Green Bay Rd., Waukegan 
623-7673 



Libertyville Auto City 
1000 E. Park Ave., Libertyville 
362-2683 

Rosen Mazda 

100 N. Green Boy Rd., Waukegan 

662-2400 



• Gary Long Pontiac Cadillac Suboru 
1111 S Route 31, McHenry 
(815) 385-6000 

• Liberty Subaru 

1000 E. Park Ave.. Libertyville 
3622683 

$ SUZUKI 

\»l imixh' » ho int m •!(»■' 

• Liberty Auto City 

1000 E Park Ave.. (176) Libertyville 
362-2683 

® TOYOTA 

• Classic Toyoto 

425 S. Green Bay Rd , Waukegon 
336-4300 

• Pauly Toyoto 

5417 NW Hwy, Cryjlol Lake 
(815)459-7100 

^# 

FAHftVERGNUGlN 

• Liberty Nissan Volkswagen/Kio 
921 S. Milwaukee Ave.. Libertyvillo 
6808000 

• Gurnee VW Olds Hyundai 

Rr* 414 Wojhinglon St . Gurnet/Wouktoon 
249-1300 

VOLVO 

• Fields Volvo 

1121 5. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
362-9200 



-*•. 







■ 



'% HIPP' 

December 11, 1998 



; .- .-■'■■•■. '-;- ■-,,;.-.. 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



- - " " - - - ..,-^t-r*j'j 



Lakeland Newspapers/ D7 



■»r^ i"TW**';HVwV-'- v ■ 



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'' ■■ tVN-ll i ■':■'- V--'.'.. fc :,-r; V'^V V v - : .'/''wL*rv 



\Mfm& $49,145 





hdudbgt 1700 refund 



KR Mo/39 MO. pka tx*,&k & iamw. 



ME 

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Q-iSiwaxty rtatma Incite Imiher* .. 

Driwr A fistwetcn- Seua •, CrUb».Giintn4 null : 
Setting Whed hiowtei Catiok .Side Window: 
D$hm >7Uty Wheels t power Window, tola ■ 

&Wm*IUMM6ti&Se&vsmm\/i 




M.500 <a» jrt Inoiptfea. 
induing a WOO refund- 
, , «W#Ma«iry deposit, 
JXIfcW&VmUSQ rrw W tfufi flit, 
fiy MOV39 Mor ptatp. ttfc & bro. 



, toti Cottporiras . 



C i ww t rt f wish leather, ftww Sunopf < 

Alkr Mkffu ♦ Air top • ftwr Drttr A PttiHnpr 

Aim * CFC-Fn* AIC • ym-btUpiai tmtrman 



vrctim&'i 



$ 



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jea&ee vs.ooo dw *t in«ptta»t 
J% M) #i hdudlng • WOO refund- 
J/UU abUtMuritycbpoift, 

>CTM0742MO/pl^t^ttk&te<nM.: 



G20 fiwirwrej Include: CD Player, , 
Keyfcw ! 'ErilijV'' Awwr Mrufcw* & ■ % 
LoOtVABS, Frimt Side Air Ba& Air 
Conditioning, Automatic & Morel jl 1 
1 2,000 mlfo« por yoar M .•- 



iWiiOu-MSm, 
Caaetu • Siot Mr 






MmM; *37,295 

$ 33, 






*V50Q Ax st bwption. 
InduAig ■ MOO refund- - 
abWncjrftyd*pbdt, 
pkat450ao?iiSajfw, 
FWMQ739MO. plu»t»xtio«ftlctn».' 



QX4 buurv f<aamrj fftdttifc; Leather. ■ , v. 
' Sunroof >, Eletamk 4-WD • CD Sou ■'. ■ 
jwrfto Sntnn • A£r Ba«r Ktyfeu £niry ' , 
• CFOPmAjC* Power Driver A nui(?3«r;; 
Stea • Steerint Wheel Mounted QuUe 
Qmtwl * ShtelYindow Dtfogsen : Full Size 
Sure « J6* A%» • 60/40 nSDoun Rear,.' 
5teB.*ftwrrw»iJwi'ti>d»Mtrroff' 



3. 9X°pr FINANCING FOR UP TO 60 MO. 




I N F I N I T I . 



1121 S. Milwaukee Ave. Libertyville • 847.362.9200 
Visit Us on the Web: www.fieldsauto.Gom 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^S^^SK^ & all^mlif^b^ymMmush infiiiitLjii 



•-■ ^" si* ■ - ■ •■ 




>'-,:.•:■>->.*•. L 's> ■■; ■ . - : .>:',:• *.?■<'",>,**■*> 



^^^^^m^^^^mm^^^^^^^^^S: 




mg-pnce 



1998 87015/ 

; Silc»568J!-d«mo-Silvef/Gr3phiie 
$ik«S70Wl.'rro - Gretn/fmory 



. ". $29,290*; 



.:.;-: 




70A\VD 



199S.S7gmSV:. 

!«U.tc CD ru>rr, Qirrui^ Control. Trio Cro6S £ ountry 



yStk#9V35^erho^fyflr/T>ut| 
Sik.?07i3-demo - Cicy/Taupe 

Iingpricew,S26,958* 




Fully; )i53tkd. 
Sdc#08 3-1 -demo, :' ; ; [ . I _ : .' 1 ; - • ;;: 
\ ■Slirt'i/Cujphite" ';,- ':V.. : j: ..■-.'; ;> v-': : :,;. ■: 

selling priced . $32;995^ 



Coid/lftia. Si 

ill 



«m— ■ 




'! I 



• Over 40 All Wheel Drive Vehicles In-Stock for immediate delivery 

• Special lease and APR Programs on '99 models: 6.9% APR up to 60 mo.* 
•APR Programs on all '98 models: 3^9% up to 60mo.t , 



Over 100 new Volvos in stock & ready for immediate delivery 



V#-||-|^ 1121 S. Milwaukee Ave. • Libertyville •847.362.9200 
VUliVU Visit^Js on the Web: www.fieldsauto.com 



WDurol 




*6.9% APR financing available for up.to 60 mo. on '99 models, f3.9% APR financing on all '9& models for up to 60 months. This cannot be used in conjunction with a demo 
priceunless you add $1500 to the sale 'price. Add tax, title,& license. Smart Buyers always read the fine print. 



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» . 



D8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



December 11,1998 




We Ordered Too Many Cars! 




APR Financing 
On Almost Every 
Chevy & Pontine 



1000 

Vehicles 
to Choose 



'We're Overstocked! 



up to 



Cash Rebates 



PONT1AC 




CHEVROLET 

(New 1)9 Chevy Cavalier Coupe ^S/|R;3) 




E£l*fc 




•*««»• Full Factory Equlpmen 

New 39 Che vy PHnn4-Doo r $ 





New ^ Chevy Malibu Sedan 




BLOWOUT 

$21 



AUTOMATIC, AIR CONDITIONING 

MLfCWBtt AM/TO C*u«U,Pmr lack*, nawCMRMit Mem! 

New £8 Chevy Tracker 4X4 $«j J QQf} 

CONVERTIBLE I 

AUTOMATIC, AIR 
CONDITIONING 

CO Rnif. *X4, Ak» WhMh. 
*uiom*l< LKU<CJ Frort HvtJI 

13945 

k Q991T 
>ik.«ctnna Full Factory Equipment 

' ss $ 1Ji8f§7IIJ 

shShGES 
HARD- 
TO-FtND 
"JET-BLACK" 
55 Package, Ground Efforts, Brickyard Spollor, Power Moonroof 

Ilk <CW1 JJ Cuitom WHwll, Powtf Drtvtr 54 tl. Fully L«d«) Hlth Option I 

^yj Chevy Ling] 





M.IMMwBntll 



W Month 
Financing 
Available 



5700 V- 8 



4 Captain 



New "98 



■ B— IBLtCtltOI 

Automatic, Air Coorjttloriiria, CO 4 Casjette. Power 

Mlrrort ft Antenna, Running Boards, Bhom Soli, 

{moid Start w/ AlwrnKgYlgi Entry, Rear Air ft Hb»I 



£taJtaKrLS4X44>Dr. SOO^QQ 

ffifAMMa 



1300 V6 Engine. CD/Cassette Player!" 

Automatic, Air, Power Windowi & Lock*, Power Mlrrora, UflQale, 
IS Decor, Alloy Whwli, Overhead Console A 4-door 

!8 ChewAlftPick-Up LS $^"| 495' 

LOADED WITH OPTIONS 

«-5p«lfc^.i!^AJrConiMw«na Ilea 
U,i*»?r*Vrt.ajittU,l5B«ea 

tlk. ICtlCT •*-,•«• mm 

AB-NewW Chevy SiveradLj^ ^* ' 75 

$WW- S - ^. Available 






S 178S5 




|U»CpO«M 



Lists 

NewHSCh 




ptionsl 

• Un 
Invoice 



4% Under 




New *98 Chevy F ull Size E it Cab 4X4SOafl 

4X4 v a*«b* *ZO. 



PONTIAG 

NowtwiKflBikt $ 12895 

® S 169|r 



l«-V»tv» 4-Cy0rtd*r. Pow*f Or»v** 5 R**r Detroit ** «" 

New "99 Pontiac Grand Prix GT 




km uaaca*tf0n4t 



New W Chevy TOwe 4x4 



CAN YOU 
& BELIEVE IT! 

KLICaiDM HIM I 




•ULlWIOt 

Options! 




New 18 Chevy Suburban 




'32.970 



^j^ ry^Tnmrh y eBSS ^ 



kv. m Mm o«* fern 
tn.niaM 




'■99 Pontine Grand Am 

[Financing for 



Air Conditioning, 
ABS, Dual Air Bags 

$ 1 5.195 

AUTOMATIC. Air CondHkmina C**«u». 2.4L Tw in fJun 






$ 20478 

® $ 2l28ir 



Airiomatle, Air, V9 Engbw, CD Ptayw. K«yt*«> Entry, 
ItiLiWiM Pow«f Window! I Lock*. AB8 A Dual A kb*p» 

New Pontiac BanneviUes> fc i4v^vv^$r 




ill 



New Cadillac DeVilie 

SAVE 
'1Q3G2 



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Daniel Bell, who is originally: from Israel, lights the menbrah with their Waukegan home In preparation for Hanukkah.— Photo by 
his family, wife Carol arid children Aaron, 6, and Shoshana, 3, in Sandy Bressner 







Celebration of Hanukkah keeps ancient miracle alive 



By SPENCER SCHE1N 
Staff Reporter 



The celebration of 
Hanukkah is an ancient 
custom in which Jewish 
people remember a mir- 
acle which kept their religion 
alive. The miracle occurred more 
than 2,300 years ago. 

The Festival of Lights, which 
the celebration is often called, be* 
gins, Sunday, Dec. 13 




had desecrated the Central 
Temple in Jerusalem." 

' Judah Macabee (Macabee 
means hammer and his broth- 
ers formed what in modem 
terms would be called a "guer- 
,'rilla' , army. 

"They conducted guerrilla- 
type raids and eventually de- 
. feated the Syrians and drove 
them out of Jerusalem and out 
■ of the temple," Gimpel said. 
Daniel and Carol Bell of Waukegan give "The miracle of Hanukkah 



A group of Jews, known as the early Hanukkah gifts; a Jewelry set and is the defeat of the larger army 
Macabees, were in hiding from a yo-yo f to their children Aaron, 6, and by the few," he said, 
the Syrian-Greek ruler Antibchus Shoshana, 3.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 0nce they regained control 



who took control ofthelr land. 

"They were under Syrian rule, and the Syrians 
forced the people in their concurred land to pray to the 
Greek gods," said Allen Gimpel, cantor of Congregation 
Am Echod of Waukegan and Lindenhurst, "and they 



of the temple, the Macabees 
cleaned it and rededlcated it to its Holy Purpose. 
"One of the temple rituals was the maintaining of 

Please see TRADITION IBS 




Aaron Bell, 6, wears a yarmuike while he plays dreldel with his 
family In their Waukegan home. Hanukkah begins Dec. 13.— Pno- 
to by Sandy Bressner 






V - m 



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/ Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 



- 

■ "■". ■ i 

December 11; 1998 



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«S. 



" .-. " 



December 11,1998 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers I B3 



8 -.v.; 




, As the holidays approach, families V; 
engage in age 6W traditions such as \ 8 
tree trimming or caroling. For many fam- 
ilies, this also includes an evening at * 
the ^theatre, enjoying the timeless clas-': 
sic,- -The Magic of the Niiteracker.lFbr ■ : 
10 years, Daricenter North has been a' 
part of this holiday tradition as audience 
members, as young as 4 years old, 
dream of one day dancing the role of 
Clara with her. handsome Nutcracker Prince. 

As Dancenter North celebrates Its 10th anniversary 
production of The Magic of the Nutcracker,'' Emily 
Malkowski, age 12 of Mundelein and Annelyse 
Freyman, age 10 of Libertyville, celebrate a dream 
come true: dancing the rote of Clara In the highly 
acclaimed ballet "When I round out that I was sharing 
the rote of Clara, I was happy and shaking," says 
Malkowski. Annelyse explains, "I was just shocked. I 
thought I would be considered for Clara when I was 13 
or 14; not 10." 

The role of the Nutcracker Prince will also be 




shared by Matt 
Pospeshil,ag9ofof 
Buffalo Grove and 
James Kopecky, age 
10 f ofUkeVilIa. . 
'Bom stored feelings 

cfewtomertand 
are very confident In 
their anticipated per- 
formance, "I feel very 
comfortable,'' explains James. "This 
rote has made me push myself to 
be the best 1 can be," Matt added; 

Jen years ago, Dancenter 
North's founder, Cheri Undetl, 
brought to life Tchaikovsky's time- 
less holiday classic, 'The Magic of 
-the Nutcracker." The production successful opened In 
December of 1989 and has grown to become a highly 
acclaimed production, described as Imaginative and 
engaging" by Dance Magazine's Ann Barzel. 

"Each year we add something new; It could be new 




costuming, sets or choreography,'' 
says executive director and choreo- 
grapher Lindeil. "This keeps the 
production fresh and exciting for 
everyone, even those who attend 
every year," she continues. ! 

■ Nutcracker will include a tal- 
ented cast of 120 singers, dancers, 
gymnasts, actors as well as a core 
group of professional dancers, 
Including Marc Darting and Joseph 
Rogers, formerly of the Milwaukee 
Ballet 0, 

, The Magic of the 
Nutcracker" will be presented at 
Libertyville Community High 
School's Butler Auditorium, 708 
West Park Avenue in Libertyville. Performances are 
Dec. 12 at 3 p.m. and Dec. 13, 19 and 20 at 1 and 5 
p.m. Ticket prices range from $18 to $9 with all seats 
reserved. For more information or to reserve tickets, 
call 367-7970. 



THEATRE 



'Annie Warbucks' 

"Annie Warbucks" is at PM&L 
Theater in Aniioch on Dec. 1 1 and 12 at 8 
p.m. and Dec 29, Dec 16 and 13 at 230 
p.m. 

Director GSgi Willdlng from 
Inglesldeand musical director Cnthy 
MUler from Salem, Wis., have assembled 




From left: Mark Badtke, Liz 
Willdlrig, and Sarah FInley in 
"Annie Warbucks." 



a large and talented cast of all ages. 
Elizabeth Willdlng from Inglesldc and 
Allysa Rlttorrio from Twin Lakes, Wis., 
shire the starring role of Annie. Mark 
Badtke of Genoa Oty, Wis. plays Daddy 
Warbucks, and Alios Byrne from 
Lindenhurst is Grace. 

The public can reserve tickets by 
calling 395-3055 or by coming to the box 
office Monday-Thursday from 530-730 
p.m., Saturday from 11 am. to 2 p.m., 
and one-and-a-half hours before curtain 



time. Tickets are $10 for adults and S8 for 
students and seniors. 

'Holry' 

Bowen Park Theatre is announcing 
the performances of the December holi- 
day production of "Holly." Under the 
direction of Margaret Schultz, this 
delightful play Is based on a Russo- 
Finnlsh folk tale that tells the story of a 
beautiful, but vain princess who learns 
through some hard lessons that who we 



are has nothing to do with what we look 
like. She also learns that a good deed is 
only truly good when done from the 
heart and not for personal gala This 
non-religious play is Oiled with holiday 
spirit and will be enjoyed by audiences of 
all backgrounds and denominations. 
Group performances are being 
booked during the day at 10 am. and 1 
p.m. through Dec 11. Due to the 

Please turn to next page 



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Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



December 11, 1998 



I 

I 

I 



Swedish Glee Club presents Julmiddag 

Waukegan Swedish Glee Club will present its 
annual Julmiddag (Christmas dinner and concert) on 
Saturday, Dec. 19 at 3 p.m. at 
the Scandinavian-American 
Cultural Society, 2323 N. Wilke 
(Frontage Road), Arlington 
Heights. The concert begins at 3 
p.m. followed by a buffet dinner. 

Directed by Carl Johansen and 
accompanied by Ruth Porikos, the 
Glee Club will welcome the holiday 
season with traditional carols and 
old Swedish and Norwegian 
favorites. 

Guest artist Robert Orth, bari- 
tone, will enhance the program with several solos, 
accompanied by his wife Jane. Orth is well-known as 
an opera singer who has appeared in numerous pro- 
ductions throughout the United States. 

Cost of the dinner and concert is $30. Tickets 
can be obtained by calling Jim Edfors at 437-9467. 

'KidStuff offers family entertainment 

The "KidStuff" performing arts series at Gorton 
M = 




Orth 



SPECIAL EVENTS 

Community Center, 400 East Illinois Road, Lake 
Forest, continues on a holiday vacation day, Monday, 
Dec. 21, from 10:30-11:15 a.m. Tickets are $5, and 
seating is general admission. 

Live acting and the Muppet-style puppets of 
"Charmalne and Company Puppet Theatre'' will pre- 
sent The Christmas Elf," where Willowby, a shy elf, 
learns about Christmas and the fun and fulfillment of 
giving. Encouraged by the actors, children en Joy par- 
ticipating with the characters. 

Playwright/Director Charmaine Spencer is a 
teacher and puppeteer with an M.A. in Reading 
Education and 20 years of experience. She has per- 
formed with puppet theatres and conducted classes at 
Urban Gateways and the Chicago Children's Museum. 

For more ticket information, or to receive a pro- 
gram brochure, call 234-6060. 

Quilt artist Fahl presents trunk show 

The Anderson Arts Center, 66th St, Kenosha, 
Wis., will present a Lecture and Trunk Show featuring 
Quilt Artist Ann Fahl. The lecture, entitled "Ann Fahl — 
A Lifetime of Quilts," will be offered Saturday," Dec. 
12, from 2 to 4 p.m. In the East Gallery of the 
Anderson Arts Center. Admission to the lecture is $10 



per person and includes admission to both the Gallery 
of Trees at the Anderson Arts Center and Christmas at 
Kemper in the Durkee Mansion of Kemper Center. 
Tickets will be available at the door. ' ■ 

Fahl Is a quilt artist working In Racine, Wis. and 
her work is published and exhibited across the United 
States, and Is Included in the collections of 
Northwestern Mutual Insurance Company, Neiman 
Marcus, and Rlpon College. She Is a three-time prize 
winner at the prestigious American Quitter's Society 
Show in Paducah, Ky., as well as other national and 
international competitions. 

For more information, call (414) 653-0481. 

Visual Arts Center has gift ideas 

For late holiday shopping on Saturday, Dec. 19*2- 
5 p.m., come to Waukegan Visual Arts Center (WVAC) 
at 533 Grand Ave., Waukegan; consider a creative gift 
of framed or matted artworks. Original watercolors, 
oils, or prints from Ink renderings will be on display at 
the studio of Lain! Zinn at WVAC. A limited number of 
her seasonal cards as well as note cards, of animals, 
music and cityscape scenes, will also be available. 

For appointments through Dec. 24 or for more 
Information, call Lain) at 336-9503. 



A 



driiumf <il la-ii scar (Iicii'm.iv bradtfi 
linn.il |irrlnfritiiinrN iiViiil.ilik' linrn [)<-i 
1-1-111 llirsc ;icrionii.iiuvs trill hi" 
booked alter tin- first week is lillnl 
Public jK'rlontiaiuc lor "Molly" will he 
on Saturday, Dei 12 al Ida in .mil I 
p.jn Tin- pirnlm Hon will he pnforuK-ri 
in (ioodldlow Mall, ulmhonly \rats l(X) 
in die lack Ileum ( r'tlU'r lot ilii' Arts, t'l 
JriCk Ileum Mi in ll'iwi-ii Park, 

U'auki'K'i'i 

I hi more iiiIijiiii.mhjm. ■ all <M> 

47-11 

KIDS EVENTS 

Kids New Years Eve 

Y.Mt \ i amp I hint an is hosting ft 
New Ye.n's \.w nveini^lil lot kids a^es 
li u> I i Ihe pttigrani will statl al A..V) 

n in on Drt M ami amrlmlr at 'l a in 

'hi Ian 1 

J hi' iii:;lii is |).n Li il lull o| Raines, 
sliildiiij;. Intnl. all i .imp d.nu e. prizes 
and limn- Ihr idea fs for kills to have 
a fiieai lime and |oi parents in know 
iheir kids ate in a sale place." says 
Addie Smils. one of two directors In 
lead tire overnight. The overnight is a 
perleci opportunity lor parents m 
bring in the New Year and not have to 
find a baby-siller. Bring your kids lo 
YMC.A Camp Duncan and let your kids 



ELMM£fe^M 



FOX LAKE iJ!H-*3 



! 



847-973-2 8 0O ,,.,. „)„„$_• 
115 Lakeland Plaia altcrSpm 9 
Juniflon af Rre, 132 I Rellint Rd.-Fox tokt 

I" In all audltoilumi + DIGITAL 



US 



SHOWTIMES - FRIDAY, DEC. 11 
THRU THURSDAY, DEC. 17 

A BUG'S LIFE m digital 

Fn 7 05 9 15 

Sal 12 05 2 20 <1 05 7 05 9 15 

5un/Wed 12 05 2 20 405 7 05 

Mon , Tue5 , Thurs 7 05 

STAR TREK 9' m digital 

Fn 7 10 9 50 

5at 12 00 2 15 4 55 7 10 9 50 

5un/Vued 12 00 2 15 4 55 7 10 

Mon , Tue5 , Thurs 7 10 

BABE: PIG IN THE CITY m 

Fri. 7 00 

5at. 1210 2 50 150 

Sun /Wed 12:10 2 50 4 50 700 

Mon., Tues., Thurs. 7 00 

MEET JOE BUCK ( ra -isj 

Frl./5at. 920 

WATERBOY ( ra -isj 

Fri 7:20 925 

5al 12:20 2 55 455 7 20 925 

5un./Wed. 12:20 255 4:55 720 

Mon., Tues., Thurs. 7:20 

ENEMY OF THE STATE m 

Fri. 6:50 9:35 

5at. L245 5:45 6:50 9:35 

SunJWed. 12.45 5:45 6:50 

Mon/TueyThur. 6:50 

PATCH ADAMS m -is) 

5neah5at. 7:00 
'tto panes or coupons 

GIFT DOLLAR$ 

THE PERFECT HOLIDAY GIFT • $10 PER BOOK 
Ho tU'Mren undr ( admitted la R-faled Wjjfaj ifler 6 PM 



WHERE KOUie GOING IS FUN ANO AFFORDABLE 



luing in ihe New Year wiih a hang! 
Hona Hoffey and Smils are the two 
VMCA professionals directing the 
overnight program. 

Ihe cost is reasonable and 
iik hides program all night long, din- 
ner, breakfast, snacks, prizes, and 
supervision. Roffey staled. "Our New 
Year's live Overnight program is a fun 
alternative for the kids at a reasonable 
cost for the parents." The New Year's 
I ve Overnight is held at YMCA Camp 
Duncan located near l : ox Lake. 

I or more information, call Hona 
or Addie at 545-8086. 

HOLIDAY EVENTS 

PM&L reader's theatre 

I'MM has a big treat for those 
who eii|oy lite story of Scrooge, Tiny 
I mi. and the t.iaihit family. A 
Header s Theatre presentation of "A 
(.hiistmas Carol" will be given al the 
I'MM, Ideal re, 1177 Main St., Anlioch, 
on l : riday, Dec. 18 al 8 p.m. Admission 
is free. 

The famous story by Charles 
Dickens has been adapted for Header's 
I 'hea i re and directed by Hruce Wcise 
from Anlioch. It will last approximate- 
ly one hour, and refreshments and 
conversation will follow. 

Cast members are Peter Pintoz/i 
hum Island Lake, Tom Gorman and 
Terry brandy from Like Zurich. Tom 
llausman and dene I.ePave from 
Anlioch , Handy Margison from 
Hound Lake Park, Diaune and 
Meghan llosken from Lindenhurst, 
Courtney Willding from Ingleside, 



Mall Conkrite from Fox Lake, and 
Debbie and Marlene lleimke from 
Trevor, Wis. 

Santa Breakfast 

Santa will be slopping by The 
Country Inn Restaurant of Lambs 
Farm lo listen lo kids' wish lists just 
in time for Ihe holidays. Families are 
invited to join Santa for breakfast on 
Saturday. Dec. 12. Two sealings are 
available; B:30 a.m. and 10 a.m. The 
breakfasl buffet is only S8.95 for 
adults and S4.95 for children ages 2 
to 10. Children under 2 are free. The 
price also includes a free hay wagon 
ride around (he farm! 

After breakfast, everyone will 
visit Santa's Secret Playland. There 
each child will receive a free goodie 
bag. Live entertainment will include 
music and Lambs Farm's own Jojo 
and Kiwi the clowns. The kids can 
also enjoy sand art, face painting and 
get iheir picture taken with Santa 
wilh prices ranging from $1.50 to 
$4.50 each. 

All proceeds will benefit the 
vocational, residential and social 
support services provided by Lambs 
Farm for more lhan 265 adults with 
mental disabilities. For reservations, 
call 362-5050. 



MUSIC 



Concert series 

The Lake County Community 
Concert Association has revealed an 
exciting line-up of world class per- 
formers for Its 199B-99 series. 



ir 



LAKE COUNTY SPORTSMEN & 
GUN COLLECTORS' SHOW 



I 



i 



TABLES 
WF rl AVAILABLE 
^r FOR DEALERS!, 



■~J 



Illinois' Largest 

Gun Show! 

Over 650 

Exhibitors 



I 



FREE 
PARKIMfiti 



"SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1098 

BUY « SELL * TRADE 

Firearms & Related Items, 
Military Surplus & Antiques & Collectibles 

Held at 

LAKE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS 

Rte. 120atRte.45 

Neai 1 94 ■ £iit horn <H West on flic 120 Fairgrounds appim 3 ml« W on Hto. V 
Enter Fairgrounds Irom Rte 1 20 or Ccnicr Si 



ADMISSION 
ISOOADULIS 

t>flU5fi£NUHKFtl2FREI 



SHOW ALL 
INDOORS 



OPEN TO THE 
PUBUC8A.M.-2P.M 




For Information call Lake County Gun Collectors 



P.O.Box 1667 
Arlington Hts.,.IL 



847/577-8380 



The 1998-99 season Includes the 
following: Lee Lessack and Joanne 
O'Brien— An Enchanted Evening: The 
Music of Broadway, Sunday. Ian. 10, 3 
p.m.; |an Gottlieb jiracefc, pianist, 
Sunday, March 14, 3 p.m.; and 
Vancouver Wind Trio [bassoon, oboe 
and clarinet), Sunday, April 18 at 3 
p.m. 

Tickets are sold only for the entire 
series. Ticket holders arc entitled to 
attend eight additional concerts at two 
other Community Concerts locations 
in Arlington Heights and Park Rldgc. 

All LCCCA's concerts will be held 
in Orlin Trapp Auditorium at 
Waukegan High School, Brooksfde and 
McArce. 

For tickets, call Donna at 244- 
7465. 

Ensemble opening 

City Lights is a vocal ensemble 
that sings a variety of music from the 
1930s to the present, and has been 
singing around the Chicagoland area 
for several years, entertaining audi- 
ences of all ages. City Lights has in 
its repertoire a variety of songs and 
medleys guaranteed to entertain and 
also boasts of its fine soloists. 

This renowned musical group is 
opening its roster for the first time to 
the general public for new members. 
Limited openings remain for the 
men's and women's sections. If you 
love to sing and have fun doing it, 
call Kim at 526-7190 or Al at 623- 
1946. 

Handel's Messiah 

The Antioch Community Chorus 
Is again preparing for the Christmas 
portion of Handel's Messiah which 
will be presented at St. Peter's Church. 
557 Lake St., Anlioch, on Dec. 20 at 
7:30 p.m. 

The 00-voice chorus made up of 
singers from all over the northern Lake 



County area is under the direction of 
Ralph Brooke from Antioch, and will 
be accompanied by Chris Kusher from 
Grayslakc on piano and the Tim 
Montalvo Quintet. 

Professional soloists arc Rebecca 
Walker from Zion, soprano; Eva 
Harper from Lake Villa, contralto; 
William Chamberlain from Chicago, 
tenor, and Nicholas Solomon from 
Decrfleld, bass. 

The event Is sponsored by 
Festival Arts of Antioch and made 
possible by the generosity of busi- 
nesses in the area as well as many 
supporting friends. It Is a Christmas 
gift to all lovers of music and a won- 
derful way to prepare for the 
Christmas season. 

For more information, call 395- 
1333, 



SINGLES 



Singles dance set 

The Solo Singles Club meets every 
Friday at 6 p.m. at Gale Street Inn, 906 
Diamond Lake Fid., Mundeleln. There 
will be live entertainment. The age 
range Is 40-pIus and admission Is free. 
For more Information, call the Hotline 
at 746-6818. 

Dream Date Auction set 

The Midwest Chapter of the 
Starlight Children's Foundation will 
present its 8th annual Dream Date 
Auction on Friday, Feb. 19, at 6 p.m., 
at the Park West, 322 W. Armltage in 
Chicago. The event will feature the 
auction of 26 bachelor and bache- 
lorette date packages, food from over 
30 of Chicago's favorite restaurants 
and a raffle and auction offering Inter- 
national, deluxe trip packages. Cost Is 
$30 in advance, $35 at the door. To 
order tickets or for more information, 
call 1312) 251-7827. 



ffpm&lM 

(<?// Presents \^M| 

»* Annie Warbucks*^ 

By Thomas Meehan 

Music by Charles Strouse; Lyrics by Martin Charnln 

Permission granted by Music Theatre International 

Directed by GIGt Willding 

December 11, 12 at 8:00 pm 
Dec. 13 at 2:30 pm 

Fri. & Sat. 8 p.m.; Sunday Matinee 2:30 p.m. 
Adults $10; Students & Seniors $8 

Call for Reservations 

395-3055 

PM&L Theatre • 877 Main St., Antioch 
Box Office Opens November 9 

tefl Bo* OKico Hows Mon thfu Thiwa. 5:30-730 p m ; Sat. 1 1 -2 GtfT^ 
W*« I I .'? tirs Union: stiowli™ rtDinrved Seating VI5A/MC fi3t5 










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Decemb er llj 1998 ^ 



■■•■.: 



FOR YOUR E NTERTAINMENT 







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■". V-Wi-' 



^ : v"^fe*;^ 




J he IMAXfilm format has 
been surxessftil for a hum 
"Tofyeaisifeatiirthga 
._ge screen; state-bf-the- 
art.sound and. very detailed and vfc 
brant images which have captivated % 
audiences .of all ages/ ■ - ' ~ 

But in the pastlMAXtias only 
shown documentary-type Alms, in 
the National Geographic sryJep : 
which tells a story through' pictures 
and words, but is not as well put to- 
gether nor as compelling as a tradi- 
tional movie. ; ;' : ; 

All that has changed with IMAX's 
T-fle*: Back to the Cretaceous. "This 
is a movie on the huge IMAX film 
format, but with a scripts and plot- 
line similar to that of a traditional 
movie. The one exception to the reg- 
ular IMAX movies, and the tradi- 
tional films, is that T-Rex'ls shown 
in amazing 3-D. 

The audience must wear high- 
tech 3-D headsets— not the red and 
blue paper glasses from the '50s, 
'60s and 70s. These headsets are 
battery powered, and each lens 
"opens" and "closes" at a rate of 48 
times per second, which helps to 
enhance the 3-D effect 

The movie begins with doctor 



■ ■ 



' ■ ■■■ 
• ■.-.. 

M 



• ■■ 



T-REX: BACK 

TO THE 
CRETACEOUS 

Director 

Brett Leonard 

Starring 

Peter Horton 
Liz Stauber 



S S^^SfiS^Eil^^" * *«m»m, 3-D «£ ^ «. 



TWO DAY 

ADVANCED 
TICKETS 



EGAL UVO DAY 



CINEMAS ^ 

www.regalclnemos.com , } 



ROLLINS CROSSING 18 

Hollins R(I Ulon Rl HI i. Ci'C.ir Like till 847-5-16-4933 
HipflAiV VAJt^EESALL SHOWS STAHfl'.C BEFORE 6PM 



s t.-i ciiiim : 

ill ALL Auditorium- 



I JACK FROST (PQ) 

1(12:15 12:55 230 3:05 4.W5.20) 6:557:409:15 I020DW 
STAR TREK: INSURRECTION (PG) 

(12:20 1:102:404:05 5:00) 7& 7160 9:40 IChlOow 
P8taWfB)(1220 1:15245 4:15 5:10) 7:107:459.45 IINQdw 
A BUG'S UFE(Q) (12.10 12:40 220 2:50 4:30 5:10) 6:50 

7:25 9:10 9:50 on 
BABE: PIQ IN THE CITV(Q) (12:25 2:404:50) 7:30 
ENEMY OF THE STATE (R) 

(12:50 120 3:504:20) 6:50 7:15 9:35 10 OSow 
THE flUORATS MOVIE (OWllOO 1.002:00 3:00 4:00 

5:00) 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 o» 
THE WATERSOYtPO-13) (1230 3:00 6:05) 730 10tlStW 
VERY. BAQ TUNOS (R) - „ . (3:1 0&2S1J; EaiifcOS mo 
RINQMASTEn (H) (12.05 2:25 4:45)705 10:20 Dla 
HOME FRIES (PO-13) 1000 DM 

MEET JOE BLACK (PO-13) (12:60425) a05 on 
THE SiEOE (H) 9:45 Dm 

I STILL KNOW WHAT YOU DID LAST SUMMER(R) 

7:3510:15dw 
IXLBE HOME FOR CHRISTMAS (PO) (12:15 2:55 5:1 51- ma 
AHTZ(Pa> . - , r • .. . : : ; (1Z4B)D» 



♦ t la Passes * No Passes or Su|)cr bavcis 

OlG - tUGHAt SOUND StPsSHJllO DOl = DOlRYSHKfO 
Times v.ilul f-oi Friday! DcccmDct 11. Only O I'JM 



Hayden, a paleontologist, as he 
searches for dinosaur bones at a dig 
site in Alberta, Canada. Hayden 
stumbles across an unknown fossil 
which looks like a large dinosaur 
egg- 

Hayden's daughter, Ally, is a 16- 
year-old high school student active 
in paleontology and is working to 
follow in her father's footsteps. She 
meets him at his museum lab, 
where he and his team are cleaning 
and studying the fossils they 
found. 

Ally is working on a computer 
program that likens the stride of a 



_.. — „,„. , , XWXt uci.n w uie cretaceous, 
spectacular, and the 3-D effects are very compelling. 



Tyrannosaurus Rex to that of an os- 
trich, when the museum shuts 
down, leaving her alone In one wing 
of the museum. 

She accidentally bumps the mys- 
terious, egg-shaped fossil that her 
father had placed on his desk, and 
the egg rolls onto the floor, cracking 
in several places. 

Ally picks up the fossil, and a 
strange gas emits from the egg, waft- 
ing over her. She begins to halluci- 
nate that the environmental exhibits 



in the museum are really part of the 
prehistoric world, and she is some- 
how wisked away to the Cretaceous 
period. *■ 

In this hallucination, she ob- 
serves various dinosaurs and even 
paleontologists from the past The 
payoff of her altered state is a run-in 
with a T-Rex, which is amplified 
with the 3-D headset 

IMAX did a wonderful job with 
this traditional-style 3-D film. 
The visuals are spectacular, and 



the 3-D effects are very com- 
pelling. 

My only criticism is that I 
would like to have seen more of 
the dinosaurs, and get more de- 
tailed characters and plotlines. 
The characters in "T-Rex" serve 
more as narrators than anything 
else. 

I give " T-Rex: Back to the Creta- 
ceous" four popcorn boxes out of a 
possible five, and I can't wait for fu- 
ture IMAX productions. 



.. (., •■ ■ 



.». 



/-T^n General Cmema 

(<€) LAKEHURST 



[ROUTE 43 near ROUTE 120 
IT) 444*FILMonia 



„ jjuVMAllMtlf iViltpAY 
AUIH0W1W0AI6W* 



■HOWTIMES FOR 12/11 THRU 12/17 



[BARGAIN MATINEES ALL SHOWS BEFORE 6PM 
'«T^pfKETRESTOCT10HS APPLY 



Be a foster parent 

You cannot change the fact 
that thousands of Illinois children 
have been abused, neglected or 
abandoned. Perhaps, you con help 
one child to love and trust again. 
Catholic Charities of Lake County 
•is seeking families and individuals 
to temporarily care for children 
ranging in age from Infancy to 18 
years. 

Families of a 11 religious, racial 
and ethnic backgrounds are wel- 
come to attend an Informational 



^L^3-KsBe^e£A«s-o?%tt£^^ 



^g^g£ftg^ggiT*T»^ii W z>^m 



meeting on Tuesday, Aug. 25 at 7 
p.m. at Catholic Charities', 671 S. 
Lewis Ave., Waukegan: For more 
Information, call 782-4244., 

Family Circle drop-In 

A parent-child program wel- 
comes parents with their children* 
newborn to age 4, to weekly drop-in 
mornings. A chance for parents to 
get together, exchange ideas, and 
discuss common concerns while 
children play. Facilitated by staff 
trained in child and family develop- 
ment Meets every Monday and 



Irugratsm 

I FA. 5:30. 7:31 930 SSL 1:30, ISX 530. 730. 930 
I Swi 13ft 330, 53a 730. 930 
I Man-Thi 530730 



•** "LAKE ZURICH (847) 550-0000 
i 755 S. Rond Rd. 






*••*•♦•••*•*•* 




BABE: PIQ IN THE CTTY pi 

IfiL 430, 630 S*. 230. 43a 630 
I Sin 230, 430, 630 Moa-TH*. 430 

Ir^SXmSsSaLZt* 430, 7:00.915 

IStn. £15. 4:30,7:00, 9:15 

I Mon.-Tlu: 430.7:00 



I A BUG'S LIFE ro 

IFA. 520, 73ft 9:40 Sal. WH, 3:10. &20. 730, 9:40 

|Sun.l:(n,3:ia52a?3a9:« 

I Moa-mr. £20730 



I STAR TREK P"4 

I Fri. 4:45, &15. 7:15. 8:40 940 H«> Sal. 1:15. 2:t5. 3:*S. 
1 4:45, MS. 7:15. 8:40, 9:40 11:00 S»n 1:15. £15. 3:45. 
1 4:45, 6:1 5, 7:15, 6:40, 9:40 Mon-Thu. 430. 5:00 7:00 
1 730 i 

1 HOME FRIES *m " 

I FiL 7:45 SA 330, 7:45 Sua 330 7:45 
|Mai-Thut7:45 



MEET JOE BLACK f*« 

IFA, 630Sal830Sun.B30Mon.-T1u.630 



I" mmm wsmmm 5207309:40. 

1 1 1:40 Sun. ISO, 3:1 0. 520 730 9:40 
|Moa-Tlu:S2a730 



JEBRYSPRMOEHn 

I FA 5:45, 730 VX» SjL 130 3:40 5345. 7i0 1000 
I Sua 130 3:40, &<5, ™. 1QW Mcn-Tm.5:45, 7:50 

IVERY BAD THINGS W 

1FA530 9:45 Sal 1:15,5309:45 Sua 1:15, 530 9:45 
lMav-T(W.5:30 



STABTJIfciHSURBECT10H*(K> 

FA. 11 M. 12:15,20, 2* 435. 4S, 8:45. 7:15, K6, US 
Sal 11^5, IMS, 2fiS. 2* 42S, 4S5. WJ, 7:15, *», M5 
S«i - Thir. 1 1 J«5, 1215, 2* 23S, 425, 455, CC, 7:15, MS, 
«5 

JACK FROST m w _,„ 

FA 1220 225. 4«, KB, 6:40 S*l 1220, 225. 4J0, KB, t« 
Sun.'- Th». 1220, 225, 430 KB. B* 

PATCH ADAMS* (ki 

SnMkPmftwStLTdD 

PSYCHO* (R) 

FA. 1230 2-M. 430 7:00 9:10 3*. 1230. 2:40, 430 7« 1:10 
Sux • Tlu. 1230 2:40 4SO 7«, »10 

: A BUG'S LIFE* m 

Frt. 11* 12:40 150 250 4fl>, 5S0 KB, 7:10 KM, 120 
Silt1:4012#ll1»^4»L«n,«:1S,7:ia*3a» a » 
Bun. ■ ite 11:40 12:40. 150 2* 4S0 Mft «*S 7:10, MO 
120 

BABE: PIG IN THE CITY* (G) 

fSmwi «S KS,«0 ttL 12:102:15, 420 
Sun, • Th* 1 W0 2:1 5, 420 KB, KB 



: BUGRATS* to 



ijasssBasaaKu. 

Sua£00.43u.m 9:1!iMon.-ThLf.43O7J0 
Sua 1:45. 430,7:10 9i0 Mon.-T1U- 430 7:10 

RtSmSoS ift»waja«« ... 

I Sua 1J03flO, 520 7 ^940 Moa-ThJ. 520 730 

iRoqffHOfgwwcTijggiow^ 



GIFT CERTIFICATES ON SALE 



FA, 11«, ISIO 3:40 5*0 735, K» SA 11«, 1*, *40 5:40 
T3S, KB Suv - thus 1I«. 1*1. t40 5.40 73S, KM 

HOME FRIES ««•«> 

Sin. - Tftut 11>t0 13S, KB, 530 

VERY BAD THINGS TO 

FA.730»*)«A7fll1 1 »:4fl 

Sun.-T!w.r30.»:« 

ENEMY OF THE STATE (H) 

tUL-VlM. 1230*35, 820 W 

MEET JOE BLACK tre-u) 

miiH430l«ULH043O«0 

Sja..1ta»ffl.43S,«ai 

THEWATERB0Y(PG-13) 

Fn\11^1^)*W07>40k««lt1l*1*l,WO5*lJ=4O 

M B « J y.Tm.H ; <ai)W.Ma,wa,T*,Mo 



ANTIOCH (847) 395-0216 : 
378 Lake St, Antioch 



, / UU lUHDER 11) a ALL SHOWS BEFORE GPM 

P SflOMUlJSArTERSPM 

EHEMY OF THE STATE (R) 

Fri,Mon.-Thurs.7:00 
Sat & Sun. 2:00, 5:00, 8:00 



LIBERTY (847)362-3011 

. 708 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyvllle 



ssnon&nvEnm cmmBi 

>~J m (UHOfflllllAirftOWSBEFOBEWH 
■" H03 ADULTS AFTintfM 

Frt.. Mon. - Thur ». 6;40, 9*0 

ANTZ <poi 

Sat. i Sim. StOO. 4:15 

PLEASAHTVIIXE tro-ia) 

Sal. & Sun. 6:15. 0:45 
Frl.. Mon. - Thuro. O:10, 8:4B 

FREE Children's Show Sot. 

11:00am 

- ANASTASIA" - 

PartofUbertyvfflft'a 
"Dickons of « Holiday" Celebration 



. McHENRY 1 & 2 (815) 385-0144 • 
1204 N. Green St. . 



ANIZm 

Bat «• Sun. 8S30. 4J0 



Thursday morning, 9*30 to 11 a.m. t 
First Presbyterian Church, 219 W: 
Maple, Libertyville. Fee is $5 per 
family per session or six sessions/or 
$25. (The first visit Is free.} Form ore 
information, call Laura Hansen at 
367-5991. The drop-in is sponsored 
by Youth & Family Counseling. 

Parent Group meets 

The Parent Group offers sup- 
port and education groups for 
parents of teenagers as well as 
younger children. The Parent 
Group meets in Zion, Gurnee, 
Waukegan, Grayslake and Lake 
Villa. All groups are professionally 
led and offer no-cost child care 
during meets. For more informa- 



•HESTRICTED {NO PASSES/COUPONS) 

IT 






VEHTMD .. 
Frl. 8:45, 8:48 *M*J Bj4* 9M 
Bun. 7:00 Man. • Thum. ?iOO 

FIX BE HOME FOB CHBISTIIIilS vn 

SaL & Sun. 2:10, *;16 

HOME HUES #Mfj 

Frt. 8:30, Ot30 8-t. 8:30, &30 

Sun. 7s1S Mon. - ThUr*. 7riB 

FHEE Children - * Movie 

Sat. 10-00 »1fcOQ 

• AnaataalB* 1 *- 



ShowPlaceS 

VERNON HILLS 

MilwaukM Ave-2nd Ught S of® 
m B47/247-B95B E 



ALL SEATS s 2?° FRI & SAT 

s 1. 50 Sun thru Thurs 



Shotrtimes For Frt, Ml I Thru Tfiun., \W 
*Sat./Sun. Matinees in | Brackets] 

WHAT DREAMS MAY COME (PG) 

[M:00 *4:00] 7: 1 5 10:10 DIGITAL 

THERE'S SOMETHING 
ABOUT MARY (R) 

[*I150 *3:30] 6:50 9:30 

[*l:20 *4:05] 7:20 10:00 DIGITAL 

ROUNDERS (R) 

[*I2:40 *3:45] 7:00 9:50 DIGITAL 

APT PUPIL (R) 

[*I:I5 *4:I5] 7:40 10:15 DIGITAL 

NIGHT AT THE ROXBURY(R) 

[*|^0 *4:I0] 7:10 9:20 DIGITAL 

SNAKE EYES (R) 

[*|:30 *4:20]7:30 10:20 DIGITAL 

THE MASK OF ZORRO (P&I3) 

[*I145'*3:50] 6:45 9:40 DIGfTAL 



tion on the next meeting date, call . 
AmyHudson at 263-7272:' ; 

Solo Singles to meet 

■■■ The Solo Singles Club meets 
every Friday at 8 p.im at Gale 
Street Inn at 906 Diamond Lake 
Road in Mundeiein. Admission fs 
$3. For more informadon, call 
487-5659. 

Home schooling events 

The Chain of Lakes Christian 
Home Educators Association has 
many events planned this year, in- 
cluding summer gatherings, field 
trips, pizza reading program, art 
fair, adult meetings, a drama/mu- 
sic show, high school bowling, 
and a graduation ceremony. For 
more information, callTerri Clark 
at 587-7268. 




MARCUS THEATBES GIFT CEBTIFICAHS 
AVAILABLE AT THE THEATRE BOX OFFICE 
no oeww ilea t km hmso how 
— a wwjiim *i - 



GURNEE 



Wand Ave. Weil 




IH0WT1MIS FOI fVL 1J/I1 TH«J THJRS, 15/1? 
STAI TKfc IHSUUKDON |Ky X (TWO tai) 

1150. t£5, 205. 310. 420, 525, HO. 740. 855. 1000 
JACK HOST (F0)X 1225.235,450,715.925 

PSTCHOWX 1l45,IOO,200,3t5,42S.530,645.7S5.9(»!0!(l 

jutniuNHiSToryxnqx 1155,230.500,730,955 

AIUGSLIrt(0)X 1Mil2ai5m4D0,520.eS72i.tt93D 
IAIIt B IOINTHIOTY(0)X SAT 1150. 210. 435. 920 

fTL SU - TH 1150. 21 0, 435, 655, 320 
EUZAUTHWX 145.430,710.950 

HOMinuisirouix 1250,255,500.705.910 
uNOMAsramx 120.325.53e.r40.wa 

VmiADTHNOSmX 1235.250,505,720.935 

tK(MTOFTHiITATi(l)X 1245, 330, 630. 703. 915. 945 
KUGUIl (01 <s X 1200. 205, 410. 620, 830 

I SM «NOW WFUI YOU DO IAST HJMMa (I) 

. . V\, :. -'1215,225, <«, 700, 810 
MinJ0lllACK(rt}l3)X 1230.405,745 

misiioirux - _ 1220.245,510.735,1005 
mi wmtjuot TCiax 1215, 215, 415.615. sis, 1015 

miITOWrMOlilT7*A$(«J)X 100.305,510 
PATCH JOAMSWlJIX AWWCD SHOW UT 11/1 J 700 
S*tM3Af^a^0rWCATOrOrSEBfflra& 
MUOiUHtOlX W I M0 1250. 300L 580, 725. 830 



£S? 



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/ Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



December JJ, 1 998 



How to shave time off your holiday shopping 



Tis the season to give, and so in 
today's column I am going to 
give something to the men of 
this world — I am going to 
give them some credit 

I must admit that 1 don't often 
give credit to men for, say, their supe- 
rior handling of life's little chores and 
responsibilities. Especially at this 
time of year when they are, once 
again, given equal name billing 
alongside their wives on hundreds of 
gaily- wrapped packages to their chil- 
dren, friends and family, despite the 
fact that the contents of the packages 
are a complete mystery to them. 

In other words, when the kids try 
to con good old dad Into giving them 
hints about their gifts, I have com- 
plete confidence that they'd have bet- 
ter luck questioning the Sphinx 

Of course, by the time they're 
through pumping Dad for informa- 
tion, they'll think they were talking to 




LIFE'S 
A BEAR 



:w¥ *W& Donna Abear 



the Sphinx. They assume he's talking 
in riddles when he says things like, 
"You kids want a hint? OK - your pre- 
sent is a gift, and it comes in a box..." 
in reality, he just doesn't have a clue. 

But once in a great while, I am 
struck by the idea that men are capa- 
ble of far more practical behavior and 
efficiency than those of us who re- 
move their beard hairs from the sink 
would normally believe. Of course, 
this could just be because I was blow 
drying my hair in the bathtub again, 
but I still think this theory has merit. 

So, here goes my idea - and hold 



on to your credit cards, girls, because 
this one is a shocker - MEN ARE 
MORE EFFICIENT SHOPPERS 
THAN WOMEN. 

I know this might seem hard to 
believe. I mean, how much shopping 
do men do? Not much. Which is ex- 
acdy my point Their lives are not 
wasted spending hours and hours 
wandering through a mall, which 
leaves them time for more Important 
things, like wasting hours and hours 
in front of a television set. 

We, on the other hand, have been 
known to brag that "Shopping is my 
life!'" Of course it is - that's about how 
long it takes us to get it done. 

Men approach shopping in a 
cool, matter-of-fact manner. They 
decide what they want and they go 
after it "Me need tool. Me go to 
hardware store. Me buy tool. Me go 
home and watch football." 

The female approach, on the oth- 



CRITIC'S CHOICE 



'Mere Mortals'-comedy with an edge 



A good dose of comedy can be 
the perfect tonic for coping with 
gloomy winter nights and the hectic 
pre-holidays mania. 

"Mere Mortals," the newest col- 
lection of short comedic plays by 
david Ives, offers such a restorative, 
though some of the medicine is decid- 
edly more palatable than merest. Ina 
two-hour span, the production being 
staged by Chicago's Organic Theater 
Company through Jan. 3, races along 
witli six (count 'em!) different plays. 

The first act gets the edge, it opens 
with "Mere Mortals," in which three 
high-rise construction workers invent 
preposterous identities forthemselves- 
each one more bizarre than the next 



"l-oreplay" is an inventive shtick 
that's set on a miniature golf course 
and eventually involves three cou- 
ples, each featuring a carbon copy of 
the same would-be Romeo. The 
scene's the same but because their 
dates have unique personalities, the 
outcome is different each time, 

a hilarious mortality play, "Time 
Flies," featuring two Mayflies (Wen- 
di Weber and Alan Kopischke), is the 
best of the lot. They meet hours after 
their birth-only to learn the sad truth 
that they have a life span of but a sin- 
gle day to eat, mate and breed. Ives 
uses this as an outlet for some deli- 
cious but silly puns. 

Act II entertains with a short play 



about an ordinary, unemployed 
young man who decides his self-es- 
teem needs a shot In the arm, so he 
casts himself for a day as the French 
Impressionist Degas. "Dr. Fritz" is 
another playlet about mixed identi- 
ties. On the downside, "Speed the 
Plow," Ives' spoof of playwright 
David Mamet (four plays in seven 
minutes) proved less rewarding; it 
was too self-conscious. 

Director William Pullinsi, noted 
for his work at the late Candlelight 
Dinner Playhouse and Forum The- 
ater, gets the most out of his six- 
member cast The theater is at 2851 
N. Halsted. Ticket information: 
773/404-4700. —By Tom Witom 




OMFUAMT 

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[net Direct 



nBp;rr-OT335B 



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er hand, bears more resemblance to 
a laboratory experiment where they 
feed hallucinogenic mushrooms to 
mice and then watch them try to get 
through a maze: "Ukel told my hus- 
band when I left this morning, I am 
just going to buy a gift for Aunt Em 
and go home - Oh, WOW. Look at 
this blouse. And it's on sale, can you 
believe it? FAR OUT! I'll just pick this 
up and -WATT. This vest would go 
perfect with it It is so darling! OK, 
that's it - I'm not going to buy anoth- 
er thing...except ...NO! I don't believe 
this. I have been looking for a red 
dress in this shade forever! Where is 
that dressing room?" 

in our own defense, I should 
point out that while men save a great 
deal of time shopping, it is women 
who save their men a great deal of 
money. Not that they always appre- 
ciate it Once I came home and said, 
"Honey, you will not believe It * I 
SAVED you $400 today! " Instead of 
being thrilled, he just kept asking me 
in a nervous voice, "Yeah, but how 
much did you SPEND?" 



Anyway, my point is that I think 
that we could cut our Christmas 
shopping excursion time in half this 
year by merging our female bargain 
hunting instincts with the male's \ . 
more efficient and focused approach. 

How? Well, I suppose we could 
buy ourselves some blinders- similar 
to those worn by racehorses - so ihat 
we're not distracted by all those "70 
percent off signs". 

Of course, that might leave us a 
little too vulnerable to "nag" jokes. 
Besides, 1 think I have an even better 
solution. One that saves us time 
without sacrificing our looks or our 
shopping enjoyment 

Which is why I'm suggesting that 
we girls try something different this 
year. Let's rip our Christmas shop- 
ping lists Into two halves - and give 
one half to someone we love! 

Preferably someone who can 
gro w facial hair. 

Questions or comments for 
humorist Donna Abear can be sent to 
Lakeland Newspapers, 30 S. Wiutney 
St., Gravslake.JL 60030. 






• * f .«*Yr* •*!*.•»* —+.*i».,„.,m , 



FROM PAGE Bl 

TRADITION: Celebration of 
Hanukkah keeps miracle alive 



the constant light," he said. A meno- 
rah, a seven-branch candelabra, was 
kept constantly lit 

"When they recreated the tem- 
ple, there was only enough purified 
oil to keep the menorah lit for one 
day," Gimpel said. 

"The miracle (of Hanukkah) was 
that oil lasted for eight days while 
new oil was purified," he said. 

*•***■-■ »"«"WaA*»g thame of 

Hanukkah is it is a holiday of reli- 
gious freedom, where those people 
fought to re-establish their beliefs 
and to rededicate their holy places," 
Gimpel said. 

The candelabra in the Central 
Temple had seven candle holders. 
Modem menorahs have eight candle 
holders to remember the eight days 
of the miracle, Gimpel said. 

The menorahs also have a ninth 
candle holder for the Shamash, 
which is used to light the odier can- 
dles. 

Each candle represents one day 
of the miracle. The number of can- 
dles lit each night recognizes the 
number of days the miracle lasted 
that day. 

Special Hanukkah candles are lit 
at sundown each night of Hanukkah, 
which is the start of all Jewish holi- 
days according to the Jewish calen- 
dar. Gimpel said the Book of Genesis 
mentions evening before day when 
describing the days of creation, 
which is used for the Jewish calen- 
dar. 

Prayers are sung at the lighting of 
the candles and are repeated each 
night 

"They signify our thanks to God 
for that miracle that helped many 
centuries ago, and for God's contin- 
ued protection to this day," he said. 

Traditional Hanukkah songs are 
sung, games are played and potato 
pancakes, called latkes, are cooked in 
oil, ail to remember the miracle. 

Dreidel is a game played by the 
Macabees themselves. It Is a four- 
sided top with Hebrew letters on 
each side. "The letters signify four 
words in Hebrew," Gimpel said, 
"which translate to the following 
phrase: A Great Miracle Occurred 
There." 

The dreidel can be spun as a 
children's game for coins, and de- 
pending on what side the dreidel 
falls on, money is put in, or taken 
out.ofthepot.hesaid. 

The origin of the dreidel is said to 
come before the defeat of the Syri- 
ans, when the study of religion was 
prohibited, Gimpel said. When Jews 
would gather to study, they pulled 







i 




out a dreidel anytime the Syrians 
came around and pretended to be 
playing, he said. 

The frying in oil of latkes is a tra- 
dition in many Jewish -American 
homes. In Israel, Jews also fry 
donuts in oil. 

Hanukkah is considered a family 
holiday by many people, including 
Daniel Bell, a congregation member 

who lives In Waukegan with his wife 

Carol and their children Aaron, 6, 
andShoshana,3. 

"It is a mora family- oriented hqjajg, 
iday," said Belt 35, who lived in Israel!^'- 
for 20 years before moving to 
Waukegan six years ago. 

In the Bell household, the chll-,|| ; 
dren make their own menorahs out p 
of wood, clay or other materials, in 
order to get them involved in the 
holiday. Games are played and 
songs are sung after the candles are 
lit to keep die children near the 
menorah, Bell said, 

Gimpel, 48, and his wife, Kay, 
have two college-age children. 

The giving of gifts is based on an 
old tradition of giving small gifts and 
small amounts of chocolate coins, 
known as Hanukkah gelt 

"The tradition of giving gifts on 
Hanukkah, and more so the giving o: 
gifts on each night of Hanukkah, is a 
modem 'tradition' brought on by tht 
culture we live in," Gimpel said. 

Modem merchandising and the 
thought of keeping up with the gift 
giving of Christmas so children do 
not feel "cheated" has played a big 
role in the giving of gifts on each 
night in some families. 
, Hanukkah, in technical terms, Is 
considered a minor holiday on the 
Jewish calendar, Gimpel said. 

Being such, there are no special 
Hanukkah services, although some 
congregations do hold gatherings 
and parties. There are also several 
ways of spelling Hanukkah— 
Chanukah and Chanuka are other 
acceptable spellings. 
- Congregation Am Echod is hold- 
ing a Hanukkah dinner on Dec 13. 
The congregation has about 125 
families from Waukegan and north- 
west Lake County. 



To Subscribe To 
Your Hometown 
News Call 740-4055 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 






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December 11, 1998 

Lakeland Newspapers/ B7 

223-8073 

ice@Ipnevvs.coin 

Lfa*nricalsaphor»-Mcofwmpns^ ;,h». 

iwNempapira makes m claim to the amimUcfty of the sUtsn^ 
PWdouBOttMn Via content or the subject matter as fact, but as ths persona! 

•fimptMaganmsaga. Call lit at 2234013, fax In at 225-8810, or e-mail at llpser- 
VKWpmtMm and loan your message 24-iom a day. Callers must /saw their 
name, phone number and tillage nami Names and phono numbers wfH not be printed: 
tomawreillenmayhcaMforvertncatkiii 




'M : '- 



ren^/s it appropriate to begin putting up Christmas decorations? 




'- 



Not a peep 

Countryside Landfill by Grayslake is 
under close scrutiny by the county 
board for violations concerning ex- 
ceeding height limitations for older 
problems and for unreported dump- 
ing. You won't hear a peep from vil- 
lage manager Ellis or Mayor Carey on 
this Important civic problem be 



formance just like Mayor Pappas 
treats Fox Lake," we have a $15,000 
gazebo and no grocery store. Fox 

Lake Cab Is charging senior citizens tnat me wor 'd heavyweight champl- 

so much money to go to Jewel and on ga ve U P a great deal o n his s tan d 

come back, people are volunteering °f °ls convictions. It would have 

to take the senior citizens. What been ver Y e *sy for Ail to accept the 

about that? If I were the mayor, 1 draft, serve his two years. He would 

would have been up on the roof nav , e De $ n a showcase in the Army 
pounding nails to keep our grocery 



clrradfuJ.paJrtiuldiseasewithoutany . Landing and the Fox Lake Chamber Prinf ehmu tiitiAC 

chance of fall recovery. of Commerce on the fine Christmas r nul-ellOlf UUTOS 

Antioch Township parade oflast week. Congratulations '-•"* m calling about the fact that Regal 

«i'c tha fli-nat net also to the winners. I'd also tike to CIr »emas doesn't put its show times 

1 9 UIC gl &J ICM congratulate the people who distrib- ta tne P a P er - l ve Deen ^ng to call 
In reference to the Individual from 
Antioch who wrote a paragraph 
about Mohammad Ali, I would sus- 
pect that that individual Is unaware 




with no risk to him. But he refused 



cauiP nf thp mnnpv um am fc nm .k D pounaing nans to Keep our grocery mu > " u »»* «* <"*"• om ne reruset 

as&asKssssS aSK-SkS? ssfisttBStts! 



dump In host fees. How did we get in 
this position? 

Grayslake 

It won't worn 

I can't believe that Fred Bingham 
and Pat Harvey after eight years in 



office as trustees are going to try to Z "* ™ffi r ?. 2E5 TIT 10 
oass off this "Shnn ici«„H i «irp- fnr ^ e cou P} e ta College Trail having a 



formance! He gets credit for nothing 
in Fox Lake. 

Fox Lake 

On the fence 

The old shunning technique. That's 
what's happening again, only now to 



the practice of throwing candy onto 

the street degrading, unsanitary and times, what good is it? 

unsafe. Perhaps a new method of 

distribution could be Instituted 

Ingleside 

Where's my bill? 

I've got kind of a strange question 
that might be interesting to your 
readers. Has anyone in Lake County 



legal, Immoral, undeclared, and un- had troublegettingtheireiectric bill? 

constitutional war In southeast Asia. I haven't gotten a bill since July. My 

It would seem to me that Mo- power Is still on and they're just 

hammed All, by word and deed, has compiling it month to month. 



pass off this "Shop IslandLake" for 
the big cure-all for the problems in 
town. I guess they're going to use it 
to get them into office when the elec- 
tions come up this winter, but I don't 
think it's going to work. 

Island Lake 

Thanks to coaches 

This is regarding the Antioch Viking 
story. I'm a parent who's had two 
kids in the program for the past she 
years. Thanks to the coaches for giv- 
ing up 15 hours a week to teach my 
kids and thanks to .the coaches for 

notcaUr>a rt Ui n a r.m>| UjB,pje n ^ ff o»XMj» 

months during the season. And 
thanks to the co ach who waited with 
my son after practice while I was 
stuck In traffic. Thanks to the coach- 
es who stored 5,000 candy bars In 
their homes so my kid can afford to Diirjp 0£00f 6 
nbv football throueh fundraisers, Jg^^g^ anywhere where 



play football through fundraisers, 
and thanks for taking 20 minutes to 
make sure my son's helmet fit when 
his head was shaped like a triangle 
when he was a pee-wee. I can forgive 
you when you admit a mistake and 
handle it immediately. For those ra- 
bid parents who were so incensed, 



fencing dispute with Grayslake, who 
have deep-sixed the whole matter 
with the village attorney. We've got 
to get along in this down, so Village 
Manager Ellis, Mayor Carey, and 
most of the board should drop their 
"them and us" attitude, come out of 
the bunker, and try shaking some 
hands. 

Grayslake 

IPs their right 

I thought when you owned land, it's 
your land. If you want a fence, it's your 

hom othenTwho use yourUd for vote ^ b^**"^^" of P eo " 
paiWng. Not bo tnRoundLake Beach. P le > rantvotefot y°^ agt ^- I1 j telHin 
What needs to change, guys? . •_■ :■",- :■ -. . • . -waw*B«n 

loundLakeBeach | 'J Jfe W jfh dignity 

I believe that Illinois should en- 
dorse physician-assisted suicide. 
I've had many family members die 
in agony with long, horrible 
deaths. They've lost their homes, 
and their families have been left 
with nothing, with everything go- 
ing to medical care. I think i 



shown a great deal more courage, 
fortitude and strength of conviction 
than the individual from Antioch 
who made these comments. 

Gumee 

Vote to impeach 

This year I voted Republican. I 
helped elect John Porter. I voted for 
him because I want to Impeach Clin- 
ton. The American people should 
wake up and know what's going on. 
The man lied to the grand jury. How 
do you tell your children it's okay to 
lie? When you lie, you lie. There's no 
ifs, ands, or buts about it. Porter 
knows that Maybe he can't do any- 
thing, but he'll go down in record 



Fox Lake 

Good job, but.. 

I would like to respond to the com- 
ments titled "Well done." I believe 
that the Fox Lake Christmas parade 
organizers did a good job, butl don't 
believe Mayor Pappas treats Fox 
Lake like that Of all the mayors this 
town has had, he's the most crooked 
and self-centered. He gives certain 
trustees favoritism. What kind of 
mayor is this? I didn't vote for him 
and I don't think the rest of the town 
needs him. 

Fox Lake 



They're not telling me when I'll get 

an electric bill, they say I'm okay for 

the time being and I can pay whatev- 

er amount I want 1 wonder what I'll 

have to pay when I do get the bill. 

Maybe someone can figure out 

what's going on. If you're experienc- The qulrldness of Grayslake politics 

ing the same kind of problem, let me 

know. 

Lake Villa 



Support 'em all 



there are such rude young people. 
They leave dog waste on the lawn 
and they harass you with your kids. If 
you don't have kids, you're a witch of 
some sort who doesn't fit into their 
lifestyle. I've never met a more igno- 
rant group of people. This Christmas 



maybeiftheygotoffthecoachand SBJBSS5SS3K 
donated a few minutes of their own "VV ^ an f sawd Wte te £ ch 



time and they'd gain a better per 
spective of the issues. 

Antioch 

We know ifs you 

I would like Mayor Pappas of Fox 
Lake to quit using Lipservice to make 
himself out to be a wonderful mayor. 
Korpan's Landing has always put on 
a beautiful Christmas parade. As for 
the comment "an outstanding per- 



ing their children bad values. 

Lake Zurich 

Absolutely 

I would like to comment on this 
week's question, should Illinois en- 
dorse physician-assisted suicide. Ab- 
solutely! You can bet your bottom 
dollar that 1 would commit suicide 
without thinking twice if 1 had a 



you're in agony and you know 
you're going to die, 1 think you 
should have a right to choose 
whether or not you should die ear- 
ly and peacefully rather than slow- 
ly and in agony. I say leave Dr. 
Kevorkian alone, he's doing a 
wonderful job for those people. 
He'd be the first one I call if I were 
in that situation. 

Antioch 

Great parade 

I would like to commend Korpan's 



At least try 

This Is in response to "Bilingual is 
good." 1 was in Wal-mart the other 
day and a parent was speaking Span- 
ish to their children. It's fine if they 
can't speak the language, but they 
should at least try .to speakEngjti§bj£K 

Round Lake 

Qoahead 

This is In response to "Don't rush it 
This is America, people can do what 
they want. If they want to put up 
Christmas lights fn July, let them! 

Libertyville 

Why the bad rep? 

I just want to leave a message about 
real estate agents have given Round 
Lake Beach a bad name, not the 
community. Recently, we listed our 
house and our realtor told us our 
house would have a hard time selling 
because it has a Round Lake Beach 
name. The community we live in 
we've lived in for years and it's a 
great community. I don't know why 
it's getting such a bad rap. We have a 
movie theater, a lot of grocery stores 
and shopping. We live in Country- 
walk and really like it. 1 think it's un- 
fair that realtors give us a bad rap, we 
don't deserve it. 

Round Lake Beach 



has reached an all-time low. At the 
last village board meeting, Mayor 
Carey encouraged all Grayslake citi- 
zens to support not all Grayslake 
businesses, but just businesses in the 
chamber. Not very supportive of a lot 
of businesses that pay taxes. 

Grayslake 

Mohammed Ali. So quickly people 
■ forget And let" s hot omit our draft- 

dodg^ng president. All the wrong 

people axe glorified. 

Antioch 

Talk to your lads 

This Is to the parents of Gavin 
North and Gavin Central. They 
need to talk to their children about 
acts of sexual assault or suggestion 
from one child to another. 1 per- 
sonally am dealnig with the school 
district for acts taken place on my 
children. They say their hands are 
tied, but they have this thing about 
teaching sexuality at the school. I 
have two children being passed 
notes saying "sex, sex, sex after 
school, yes or no, 1 love you" and 
another child being fondled by an- 
other child and yet the school dis- 
trict insists there's nothing that can 
be done. Parents need to talk to 
their children to find out if things 
are happening to their child as well. 

Ingleside 




PERSONAL INJURY 

AND 

WORKERS COMPENSATION 

The Law Offices of 
Douglas Rallo 




it- 



6n South Milwaukee Avenue 
Libertyville, Illinois 60048 

TEL 847-816-8780 
FAX 847-816-9OOI 



Concenunied m 

Auto Accidents 

Workers' Compensation 

Wrongful Death 

Medical Malpractice 

Product Injuries 

Slip and Fall 

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-The Chicago Tribune has teponed that 
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Mr. Rallo has nearly 20 years experience in 
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chairman of the Medical/Legal Committee 
of the Lake County Bar Association. 




LICENSED IN ILLINOIS AND WISCONSIN 



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B8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 



December lh 1998 



December 11, 1998 



HOT SPOTS 






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B10 I Lakeland Newspapers 



HOME AND GARDEN 



December 11, 1998 



Effective, easy-to-use 



By Robert Perilla 

People love flowers and plants but often 
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unsure how to care for them. As an individual 
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Perilla's top 20 



1. To keep your flowers lookinjg better and 
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creasing the vase life of your flowers. 

2. Not sure how much sunlight hits a par- 
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drangea, ft thrives in bright, moderate and very 
little light. 

3. Aloe everybody. Keep an aloe plant in 
the kitchen. It's juice offers quick relief from 
cooking burns. Aloe plants like water, so make 
sure the soil is moist, but don't mist the leaves 
or you will kill the plant. 

4. Maximize vour pleasure from gladiola. 
To assure a full and spectacular display, make 
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open when vmt buv them. 

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7. Decorating a buffet with flowers? Keep 
the flowers away from fruit. Fruit gives off eth- 
lene gas which accelerates the aging process of 

flowers. 

8. They may be beautiful, with dramatic 
pink, white and blue flowers, cyclamen are 
beautiful plants. However, they can cause ill- 
ness if accidently eaten. Be sure to keep them 
away from children and pets. 

9. When the water is a vase starts getting 
low, don't dump it and start all over. Rowers are 
happier when you just top off the existing wa- 
ter by adding some that is fresh. 

10. Daffodils make a house look homey, 
but be careful. They secrete a poison into the 
water that can be deadly to any other flowers 
you put in the vase, 

11. The most important thing you can do 
to make your flowers last is use a vase that is 
clean and freshly washed. 

12. First things first. When you bring flow- 
ers home, cut the stems at an angle and place 
them in fresh water for a nice long drink before 
removing their wrapping. 

13. Iris item. When buying Iris, make sure 
that they are showing color on the buds or they 
mav never open. 

14. . Speak to your plants? Whether or not 
this really improves their health, one tiling is 
certain: if you don't give your plants proper nu- 
trients and sunlight, nothing you say to them 
will help grow. 

15. Just like humans, flowers rest more 
comfortably at night when its cool. Try a lower 
thermostat setting in the evening and walch 
your flowers perk up in die morning. 

1 6. Gardenias are a hearty variety whose 




A few simple care tips can make your fresh flowers last longer. 



TOKO 



If It doesn't 

well return 

your dough* 



NO MONEY DOWN 
NO INTEREST 
NO PAYMENTS 
UNTIL APRIL 1998 

"To Qualified Buyers 



J 



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deans down to the pavemcnl 

■ 3 hp winterized engine 
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'GRAYSLAKE 

GRAYSLAKE LAWN ' 
. SALES, INC. 

RLl20&Slusserk 




white (lowers set off the dcor in any living 
room. Remember these flowers require light, 
but avoid putting them in the sunny part of the 

room. 

17. Want to eat lunch in your backyard, 
but can't stand the bugs? Try decorating the 
area around your table with pretty Hose Gera- 
nium or Lemon Geranium plants, which are 
effective at keeping many small bugs away. 



18. If you want to encourage continuous 
bloomingof the plants in your garden, remove 
the flower head after it finishes its bloom. 

About the author: Robert Perilla has 
written articles and newsletters and pro- 
duced films on powers and plants for 16 
years. Courtesy of Article Resource Associa- 
tion, www.aracopy.com 




r 

|*T jk "7" ith Christmas just a few weeks 
1 f\ / away, I thought I would expand 
1/ 1/ on the idea of gifts for the loved 
w w ones in your life. Many of us 
who love to garden, do so for many obvious 
reasons, one of them is the desire to get back 
to nature. In our gardens, we can exercise 
some control over what we eat, the flowers we 
grow for their beauty and scent, and the herbs 
we choose to grow for many purposes. 

Flowers and herbs are natural remedies 
for just about anything that ails you. 1 have 
expanded my garden to include many scent- 
ed herbs and blooms to use therapeutically 
Aromatherapy has become quite "trendy" 
these days. I have to confess, though, nothing 
takes my stress and "blues" away more than a 
bath made with fine oils and soothing herbs, 
lust the smell oflavender and lemon halm 
makes me feel better, that is the whole con- 
cept behind aromatherapy, Some scents are 
relaxing and soothing to the nerves, while 
others are used to refresh and invigorating to 
the senses. 

Among the oils that promote relaxation 
and alleviation of stress are lavender, sandal- 
wood, ylang ylang, lemon balm, and rose. Oils 
which are stimulating are basil, rosemary, 
lemon, pine and clary sage. Also invigorating 
are eucalyptus, juniper, ginger, and grape- 
fruit. 

Getting back to a little rest and relaxation, 
you can help create a peaceful retreat, and in- 
dulge the senses and nurture the soul, within 
the privacy of your home. Vou can create that 
feeling of "getting away" without ever leaving 
the tub. An hour of aromatherapy will make 
you feel like you had the whole day off. Essen- 
tial oils are the major player in this scenario. 

Why not share these secrets with your 
loved ones? You can indulge someone's senses 
with a gift of essential oils and herbs and 
recipes for them to create their own spa at 
home. An attractive basket with scented can- 
dles, a bath pillow, loofahs, bath brushes, and 
a combination of essential oils would be per- 
fect. Especially for someone who rarely has 
time to indulge themselves. 

And believe me, once they experience 
that serenity that comes from enjoying aro- 



■l< •- u 



the heart 




GARDEN 
JOURNAL 

lydia Huff 



. forward to time to 



matherapy, i 
"get away." 

Here are some easy recipes to include 
with the gift: 



Bath Salts 

Add six to eight drops essential oil to fol- 
lowing mixture: 

1 teaspoon of Baking Soda 

2 teaspoons Epsom Salt 

3 teaspoons Sea Salt 

Mix well. Add to bath water. 

The above bath salts can be made ahead 
in larger amounts. The typical amount used 
for the bath is two tablespoons, 

Bath Oil 

Mix six to 10 drops essential oil in two 
teaspoons of vegetable or seed oil (canola, 
safflower, soy, or sweet almond oil); add to 
bath and swish. 

Milk Bath 

Wonderful in winter for dryskin 
Mix sue to 10 drops essential oil in 1/4 to 
1/2 cup of heavy cream, buttermilk or pow 
dered milk (to make a paste} then add to 
bath. 

Aromatic Honey Bath 

Soothing and anti-inflammatory. 

Mix sbc to 10 drops essentia] oil in 1/4 cup 
honey, then add to bath water. (Can also add 
one or two Vitamin E capsules by cutting end 
off gel cap and squeezing the Vitamin E oil 
into the honey. Mix well. 

Garden questions may be sent to Garden Jour- 
nal, do Lakeland Newspapers, 30 S. Wliitney 
St., Grayslake, 1L 60030 






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MINDING 
YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 

Don Taylor 



even 





positive 
itude 



[ n the past eleven years I've 
[worked with more than 2,000 
[business owners and preven- 
fture entrepreneurs. I've seen 
wtype of business and person- 
Fstyte you can Imagine. I'veex- 
encod moments of despair and 
eat jubilation. 

forking as a consultant, coun- 
, coach and friend, 1 And busi- 
| owners a fascinating breed 
fare living the American dream 
lost of them are realizing lev- 
(success that men and women 
ier lands can only dream 
It 

get, in America where ail citi- 
lave won the lottery of life, not 
ane Is successful. While some 
re the brass ring of success-of- 
ler failure-others just keep 

tat separates the successes 

le failure? Why do some 

j the top while others toll on 

■he bottom? Why do so many 

Hi for success and so few find 

IThere are many reasons for sue - 
fcrtany self-help books purport 
fthe factors. On their lists you 
i Kd knowledge, skills, determi- 
Bn, attitude, perseverance, ere- 
Buy, drive, focus, goals, hard 
Poricloyalty, self-motivadon and 
rdozens of others. I certainly agree 

that these are-criUcol'etieecayftie- 

tors. 

However, I've noticed among 
the varying lists that one trait or 
characteristic Is always present. 
That one is attitude. 

Attitude is both an equalizer 
and evaluator. Attitude flies higher, 
runs further and smashes adversity 
faster than any other trait Attitude 
is the catalyst of success. Yes, other 
ingredients must be in the mix, but 
the presence of a positive attitude 
changes the outcome forever. 

Attitude builders 

• Understand (hat attitude 
Isnliablt Developing a positive 
attitude is not a one-time enlight- 
enment. A positive attitude Is a 
habit of thought* You begin to cul- 
tivate a positive attitude by chang- 
ing your focus. 

• Develop a positive focus. 
To build a more positive attitude, 
focus on the results you want and 
the outcomes you wish to create. 
As your focus shifts from the nega- 
tive things that might happen to the 
positive things you want to happen, 
your attitude will improve to match 
your expectations. 

• Shut out or avoid negative 
thoughts and people. I've 
worked with negative people who 
wanted to become more positive. 
However, their friends continually 
pointed out past failures and cur- 
rent shortcomings. Even though 
they knew they had potential for 
better things, the constant barrage 
of negativity pulled them down. If 
you find yourself In this situation, 
find new friends. Life is too short to 
let others influence your attitude. 

• Dont wait for someone to 
jump- start your attitude. Be a 
self-starter. Changing your attitude 
begins with your desire to be more 
positive. If you earnestly desire to 
change, you can. Remember no 
person cares more about your atti- 
tude than you do. 

• Take control. Someone 
once said that all motivation is self- 

Pleasesee TAYLOR IC12 



, 






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Lakeland Newspapers/Si $ 



A higher profile can lead to more sales 

at industry events. If you are less 

The first key to becoming One astute observation in the article 

perceived as an expert b to Is publicity enough. Simply listen to 
raise your visibility among «■ questions and answer them dl- 
your colleagues and the reedy and completely. Remember to 

use complete sentences; "yes" or 
"no" responses are not quotable. 







4^ in Gurnee 



^S^S^f C j? m,ly a £ d su PP° rtera patter at the new site on Richard Savora, Vlnce Scavo, Mayor Richard Welton. Tony Aueeltl 

Grand Avenue in Gumee r Front row, at left of sign; Julie Augelll, Kay Fred Abdula and Serree ScheskJe Crated uZr^E^km^^ 

AugelH, and Natalie Washto In stroller. Front of sigh at itftl»E left; Jim ^SvW^KS^^^&mK 

Washko, Cindy Augelll and Taylor Washko. Behind sign, from left; Leaser and Brad NIctersoT-Sc "oySan o> S™ 



How to be an expert 



[ he first key to becoming 
perceiyed as an expert b to 
raise your visibility among 
your colleagues and (he 
general public The second is to be- 
come a source for useful, credible in- 
formation rather than for overtly 
self-promotional public relations. 
While the first factor Is understood 
by most executives, the latter can be 
difficult for some. They tend to feel 
that their public profile must be ac- 
companied by direct publicity about 
their firm. In fact, the association of 
your name with opinions and data 
about your industry as a whole lend 
credibility to you and your business. 
Self-promotion has the opposite ef- 
fect 

Be Quoted 

Getting quoted in trade, busi- 
ness or consumer publications puts 
your name in front of readers' eyes 
and makes them remember you. 
The article in which you appear does 
not have to be a profile of you or 
your business; a simple statement 
that sheds light on a topic of interest 
within a larger context raises your 
profile and that of your company. 

Sending out regular press releas- 
es about new products, financial re- 
sults, or other company develop- 
ments will help keep your business 
in editors' minds. Even if they 
choose not to cover the story high- 
lighted in each release, they will be 
likely to think of you for future arti- 
cles on your industry or area of spe- 
cialization. 

In this age of online research, 
one quote begets others, as editors 
search databases of past articles for 
potential sources on a given subject. 
To increase your chances of being 
quoted, make certain you respond to 
reporters' calls right away and try 
your best to accommodate their 
deadlines. 

Do not attempt to control the in- 
terview or steer it toward topics you 
want to promote, and avoid trying to 
work in the name of your company 
or its brands into every sentence. 



Once you have gained a reputa- talninga brief summary of your idea, 
don as an expert through so me of a descriptio n of the tar get audience. 

how long it will take you to complete 
the book, and an outline of the 



Commission Research 

Journalists and authors are al- 
ways on the lookout for statistics and 
research that will strengthen their 
stories. Sponsoring research, there- 
fore, can be a method of getting your 
company's name published fre- 
quently. Each time the research you 
have commissioned Is d ted in print 
or on air, your organization should 
be credited. 

The data your firm sponsors 
should address an unfilled niche so 
that it avoids competing with re- 
spected data from established 
sources. Offbeat, humorous research 
can serve a purpose by generating 
significant media play over a short 
period, but serious, useful informa- 
tion will have a much longer shelf 
life and will apply to many different 
types of articles over time. 

You should be prepared to up- 
date the information as often as nec- 
essary to maintain its significance. 

Speak PubDcJy 

Appearing on panels or as a 
highlighted speaker at industry 
events is an effective method of in- 
creasing your company's profile 
among peers. It is best to focus on 
industry trends, how-to information, 
business forecasts or other topics of 
interest and, as always, to avoid self* 
promotion. If you address the sub- 
ject at hand in an organized, inter- 
esting fashion, you and your compa- 
ny wUI gain recognition by associa- 
tion. 

Some speaking engagements, 
particularly those for general busi- 
ness audiences, can generate high 
speaker fees. The primary reason for 
saying yes to public appearance op- 
portunities, however, is to keep your 
company In the minds of your busi- 
ness colleagues. 



well-known, you or your publicist 
can contact the organizations that 
sponsor forums of intrest Send a let- 
ter stating your desire to be a speak- 
er and outlining some potential top- 
ics, along with a biography. This 
process may not lead to engage- 
ments right away, but will help build 
a foundation for future appearances. 



Write an Article 

Authoring an article in a maga- 
zine or newspaper is another effec- 
tive way to gain the aura of expertise. 
These efforts most frequently appear 
as opinion pieces or guest columns 
in trade magazines, but some busi- 
nesspeople write how-to or other 
styles of articles-or even regular 
columns- in business publications or 
local newspapers. Writing such a 
piece creates the perception among • 
readers that you know what you are 
talking about, as long as the work Is 
well-researched, accurate, and to the 
point 

To submit an article, send a one- 
page letter to the Editor, Managing 
Editor, or Articles Editor listed on the 
publication's masthead. Succinctly 
propose your idea and outline how 
you will support your points, who 
you will interview, and why you are 
the right person to write the piece. 
(Send along a copy of your resume 
as well.) Be familiar with the publica- 
tion to which you are submitting 
and slant the article toward its 
needs. 

WriteaBook 

Writing a book is perhaps the ul- 
timate path to becoming recognized 
as an expert Some books by execu- 
tives contain Information and advice 
pertaining to a specific industry and 
are therefore tailored to a narrower 
audience, while others are memoirs 
or general business books that ap- 
peal to a wider readership. 
Check bookstores for titles that you 
respect and that are compatible with 
how you envision yours. Approach 
the publishers who released these 
books. Send them a proposal con- 



planhed content' 

There is no need to send the 
finished manuscript or to write the 
book before submitting your idea. 
The act of putting together the 
proposal will help you hone your 
thoughts; if your concept cannot 
be easily explained in your pro- 
posal or if you do not have ade- 
quate information to create an 
outline, either you have not given 
your idea enough thought or your 
concept is inappropriate for a 
book-length work. 



Investigate Using 
iCoUaborai 



a 



rator 



Executives often find they lack 
the time, inclination or expertise to 
prepare a speech or to write an arti- 
cle or, especially, a book. If so, they 
have they option to seek out an in- 
dependent contractor such as a 
ghostwriter, collaborator, publicist, 
consultant or speech wri t er. Some 
businesspeople may find that com- 
pleting the project on their own is 
more fulfilling personally but in 
many cases, these professionals help 
speed the process. They may even 
represent the difference between 
simply hoping to become an expert 
and actually becoming one. —By 
Karen Raugust 

Karen Raugust is a Minneapolis- 
based independent business writer. 
She contributes to more than 20 trade 
and consumer publications, ranging 
from Publishers Weekly and Anima- 
tion World to Produce Business and 
American Artist She has also written 
five books, including Merchandise Li- 
censing for the Television Industry 
(Focal Press), and has contributed 
chapters to several books by otlier au- 
thors. Her company, Raugust Com- 
munications, provides editorial and 
marketing consulting services to en- 
tertainment companies, artists, non- 
profit groups and other business or- 
ganizations. 

Courtesy of Article Resource Asso- 
ciation, www.aTacopy.CQm, 



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B12 /Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 



Below are real estate transactions for villages in and around the Lakeland 
Newspapers circulation area. Listed are the property address, property buyer, 
and purchase price. 



Grisilda Gonzales, $129,500 
1220 Patrick Drive, Michael & 
Cathy M. Greene, $208,000 



Round Lake 



Fox Lake 



32 Lakeside Lane, William P. Ryan, 

$109,000 

16-2 St. Thomas, Stephen & Teresa 

Ford, $52,500 



Grayslake 



Lynch, $346,500 
25159 N. Abbey Glenn, John & 
Margaret Dudek, $ 11 1 ,000 
B Stonehaven Drive, Jill & Brian 
Thompson, $336,000 

Ingleside 



1282 Berkshire Lane, Dannie E. & 
LoriK. Wilson, $189,610 
354 Clarewood Circle, Christopher 
Kain, $247,700 

884 Essex Circle, Julie Kment, 
$120,400 

893 Essex Circle, Sebastian C. Gal- 
lo & Nancy Sundmacker, $124,500 
674 Indian Path Road, Keith & 
Stacey Anderson, $282,31 1 
17555 W. Woodland Drive, Antho- 
ny & Sue Ann Tartol, $212,000 
1344 Woodside Court, Robert J. & 
Emma K. Gaetano, $245,640 

Green Oaks 

949 Benson Road, Cindy & Mark 
Hahn, $342,000 

Gurnee 

7051 Bentley Drive, Lance S. & 

Anna M. Hemmerich, $224,000 

17542 Bridie Court. Michael P. 

Yedinack & Katherine M. Rancy. 

$199,000 

7606 Cascade Way, Stephen J. & 

Janie L Lauienschlager, $301,404 

7713 Cascade Way, Steven C. & 

Wanda Gerael. $276,547 

4681 Kings way North. Richard 

Zand7.il ko & Marlene Proctor, 

$233,000 

735 Penny Lane. David D. & Sheila 

A. Weber, $392,000 

Hawthorn Woods 

7 Darlington, David & Kimberly 



34686 N. Lakeside Drive, Bill L. & 
Nancy C. Shafer, $223,900 
26155 W. Boesch Place, Barry & 
Valerie Sorensen, $152,000 
20371 W. Vista Court, Guy & Eliza- 
beth Goodwin. $223,849 

Lake Villa 

38638 Deep Lake Road, Michael A. 
Bruce, $66,837 

25208 W. Buena, State Bank Of 
The Lakes, $153,000 



1502 HalnesviUe Road, Manuel 
Caucino & Maria Caucina, 
$101,150 

Round Lake Beach 

1033 Crescent Court, Peggy A. Car- 
penter & Henry Condalaria, 
$81,200 

343 E. Stanton Court, Shawn & 
Karen W. Tanasaka, $147,986 
27 E. Washington Street, Douglas 



A. Kras, $97,500 

221 N. Channel, Somphong Scot- 

tanun t ana, $97,500 

2287 N. Salem Lane, Giovanni & 

Gloria Suarez, $166,252 

40 Redhead Court, Vincente Mer- 

cado, $178,500 

130 W. Lindsay Drive, Robert 

Swiatek Jr., $121,750. 

2007 Westview, Jennifer L Hoehn, 

$86,000 



December 11, 1998 



422 Osage Street, Robert Voete, 
$140,000 



Wauconda 



26490 N. Highway 59, Gerald F. 
Zamiski, $83,000 

439 N. Main Street, Arvilla Ann Pe- 
terson, $120,000 



Information provided by 
Record Information Services, Inc. 
in St. Charles. Vie company pro- 
vides public record data for Lake, 
DuPage, Cook, Kane, McHenry, 
Kendall and Will counties includ- 
ing new incorporations, business 
licenses, bankruptcies, foreclosures, 
judgments, mechanic liens, state 
and federal tax liens, residential 
and commercial real estate trans- 
fers, building permits, DUI arrests, 
divorce reports, sheriff sale foreclo- 
sures, (630) 365-6490, public- 
record.com. 



Iibertyville 



1 1 13 Crestfield, Brynn A. Fulker- 

son, $216,000 

1215 Loyola Drive, J. Douglas 

Brownridge, $352,000 

30431 N. Center Street, Mary E. 8* 

Marcey Bentley, $136,000 

1 5245 Oak Spring Road, Thomas 

M. Giurewitz, $415,000 

lindenhurst 

541 Beck Road, David J. Labovitz, 

$145,500 

2630 Franklin Court, Gregg & 
Dawn Rothermel, S255.443 
748 Monroe, Leslie J. & Ceceilia M. 
Powers, $165,000 



Mundeleln 



703 E. Maple Street. Juan Mancilla, 

$106,000 

140 N.Prairie, Phillip Maki, 

$135,000 

26247 N. Walnut, Armondo & 



PEOPLE IN THE NEWS 




Anzelc 



Anzelc offers service 

Deborah W. Anzelc, CPA, is 
now offering 
personalized 
services to 
small busi- 
nesses and 
individual 
clients from 
her office at 
1876Qsprey 
Lane in Lib- 
ertyville. 
Anzelc ser- 
vices in- 
clude: bookkeeping and account- 
ing, payroll services, financial state- 
ment preparation, mew business 
start-up assistance, preparation of 
business tax returns and personal 
tax returns, accounting software is- 
sue and consultations. 

She can be reached at (847) 
362-8881. 

DelPOmdarme snares 
Pivot Point scholarship 

Lara Defl'Omdarme of Ver- 
non Hills recently received a $6,000 
teacher training scholarship to con- 












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a toll-free call 

Mention CODE 5763C when calling 

http://www.us-netdirect.com 



we 
accept: 



VISA 



tinue her cos- 
metology ed- 
ucation. The 
scholarship 
was awarded 
by Pivot Point 
International, 
a global hair 
and beauty 
education 




DeirOmdarme 



company. 

Dell'Om- 

darme recently graduated from Pivot 

Point's Schaumburg campus. 

LCAR announces 
award winners 

The Lake County Association 
of Realtors®, at its Eighth Annual 
Awards Breakfast, announced the 
recipients of its Realtor® of the 
Year, Associate Realtor® of the 
Year, Affiliate of the Year and Dis- 
tinguished Service Award. 

The 1998 Realtor® of the Year 
was awarded to Larry Fates, Bro- 
ker Owner of Re /Max Advantage, 
Antioch. Fales has been involved in 
Lake County Association of Real- 
tors® since 1979, and has served as 
President in 1993. Fales worked for 
Coldwell Banker and Century 2 1 

Lnjiu.Ei upctitng Ills Hc/Mm office In 
1985. 

1998 Associate Realtor® of the 



Year was awarded to Ruth Ann 
Heller of Koenig &S trey, Iiber- 
tyville. Heller began her career In 
1983, and has served on several As- 
sociation committees. In addition, 
she has served on the Foundation 
for the Prevention of Child Abuse, 
and served as President of the 
Grayslake Exchange Club. 

Affiliate of the Year 1998 was 
awarded to Gay Walker of Northern 
Trust Bank. Lake Forest Walker joined 
Northern Trust in 1985, and was pro- 
moted to Second Vice President in 
1 997. Walker has served as Chairman 
of the Affiliate Committee at the Asso- 
ciation for the past two years. 

A special Distinguished Service 
Award was presented to Executive 
Vice President Peggy Koyser. The 
Distinguished Service Award was 
given in recognition'of her dedica- 
tion and caring over the past nln 
eyears she has served the Associa- 
tion as Executive Vice President. 

Richardson 
named director 

Yvonne Richardson has been 
named director, quality assurance de- 
vice operations in the hospital prod- 
ucts division of Abbott Laboratories. 

Richardson holds a B A in 
chemistry and philosophy from 
Knox College in Galesburg, 111., and 
on M.D.A. in management from 
Lewis University in RomeoviJIe. She 
resides in Naperville. 



NEW BUSINESSES 



'*'**■"•--- — .-- 



Congratulations to the following 
new Lake County businesses: 

• Triumph Enterprises, 2237 N. 
Masters Lane, Round Lake Beach. 
Owned by Gene Prather and Dr. Jean 
Zeigler. Call (B47) 548-5663. 

■ Home Improvement Network, 
005 Hawley Cl., Mundelein. Owned by 
Pete Thomas. Call (847-604-4949. 

• Wildfire Pet Resort. 25829 W. 
Bonner Rd.. Wauconda. Owned by 
Maureen Tobias and Roger Tobias. 
Call (847) 526-7335. 

*Tukesbrey Distribution, 35167 
N. Randhill Dr., Ingleside. Owned by 

lohn Tukesbrey and Kathy Tukesbrev 
Call (847) 587-2687. 

• Harvest Credit Card Services 
1174 Berkshire Ln.. Barringion. 
Owned by Lawrence V. Lima Sr. Call 
(800)931-0533. 

• Calico Garden, 789 Main St 
Antioch. Owned by Gina Thecsfield 
Call (847) 395- 122G. 

• A.S.S Trucking. 3493 1 N. Helen 
Cl., Ingleside. Owned by Steven S. An- 



FROM PAGE Cll 



derson. Call (847) 587-3192- 

• Little Dreamers Dress- up 
21863 W. Linden Ave., Lake Villa 
Owned by Nancy Ortman. Call (847) 
356-4224. 

• R & J Cycleworld. 18952 West 
Oak Ave., Mundelein. Owned by 
Richard L. Raines. Call (847) 566-6354 

• Learning Worldwide, 949 Man- 
chester Rd., Lake Zurich. Owned by 
Michael C. Rydel. Call (84B) 550-8335. 

• Telemar Communications, 
1054 Hidden Lake Dr., Buffalo Grove. 
Owned by Christopher J, Lone. Call 
(847)215-5243. 

• Peter's Equipment Rentals, 170 
Montclair Rd., Vernon Hills. Owned by 
Henry L Sanchez. Call (847) 680-7993. 

• 444 Lake Cook Road Property, 
444 Lake Cook Rd.. Deerfield. Owned 
by Morris M. Meister. MD and Janet J. 
Melstcr. Call (312) 222-6653. 

• JMB Associates, 741 Toma- 
hawk Trail, Round Lake Heights, 
Owned by John F. Moriarty. Call 
(847) 740-2866. 



TAYLOR: Seven keys to 
creating a positive attitude 



motivation, While others may en- 
courage you. you must take control 
of your actions and attitude. No 
one can make you have a bad day 
unless you allow them to. No one 
can stir your anger, change your fo- 
cus or steal your initiative if you 
take control of your attitude. When 
it comes to your attitude, you're in ' 
charge so take control. 

• Look to the future. No 
matter how many times you relieve 
past mistakes, you can't change 
anything. Forget the past and focus 
on what you can do instead of what 
you should have done. Your future 



is much more important than your 
past. After all, you'll spend the rest 
of your life there. 

• Help others. The best way 
to improve a bad attitude is to reach 
out to others who are less fortunate 
than we are. This holiday season 
reach out to someone who needs 
help. I guarantee a double benefit. 



Don Taylor is the co-author of 
"Up Against the Wal-Marts." You 
may write to him in care of "Mind- 
ing Your Own Business, " P. O. Box 
67, Amarillo, TX 79105. 



. .. 



■ ■ 



-.■---• 

■■ ■..■•■ :■■■ ' ■ .,-.! . •-. 



.UTHERAN 
GENERAL 



-• 



programs 

Pediatric Oncology Family 
.roup: A support group for family 
lembers of children with cancer, 
ited at Lutheran General Chil- 
e's Hospital, 1030 a.m. to noon, 
lie second Saturday of every month, 
kt Lutheran General Children's Hos- 
pital, Yacktman Pavilion, 2nd floor, 
family Resource Center. For more In- 
jrmation, call Linda Bensing at 723 - 
7A7. 

• Sisters In Survival: A support 
>up for breast cancer survivors, 

leir families and friends (all ages), 9 
11 am the third Saturday of every 

lonth, first floor, lobby. Call 465- 
16 or 827-7875. 

• School Oncology Program: An 
-service for school staff when a stu- 

lent (pre-school through 12th grade) 
las cancer and is being treated at 
itheran General Children's Hospi- 
1. Call Kristine Even, 723-5962. Reg- 
stradon required. 

_ first 
1, safety courses 

Lutheran General Hospital offers 

> safety courses to the community: 

lerican Red Cross Infant and Child 

>R, and Community First Aid and 

fety. 

The five-hour American Red 
Iross Infant and Child CPR course 
aches how to recognize and care for 
3rea thing and cardiac emergencies in 
its and children. It also includes 
formation on how to prevent in- 
ies to Infants and children in and 
)und the home and in play areas. 
st is $47. 

The nine-hour Community First 
Id and Safety course discusses ways 
i recognize and care for cardiac and 
>rea tiling emergencies In adults and 
ldren. It also encompasses a first 
Id component that covers cuts, 
apes and bruises; bums; bleeding 
introl; how to minimize the effects 
if shock; injuries to bones, muscles 
rand joints, such as sprains and 
strains; and sudden illnesses, includ- 
ing poisonings and heat and cold 

emergencies. Costjs $54. .. 
f Both courses are sponsored 

'through Lutheran General's commu- 
nity education department For 
schedule information or to register, 
call 1-800-323-8622. 

H.O.LD. support 
group offered 

The Pastoral Counseling Center 
of Lutheran General Hospital offers a 
Healing Our Lost Dreams (H.O.LD.) 
support group twice a month for per- 
sons who have experienced pregnan- 
cy and infant loss. 

Meetings are held from 7 to 8;30 
p.m. the first and third Tuesdays of 
each month at the Pastoral Counsel- 
ing Center, 1610 Luther Lane, Park 
Ridge. 

Parents, grandparents and other 
family members are Invited to attend 
the sessions, share their feelings with 
others who understand what they are 
going through, receive support as 
they move through the first season of 
grieving, serve as resources for each 
other, and gain new perspectives on 
life. The group facilitator Is ii Cotton 
Fite, Ph.D., licensed clinical psychol- 
ogist and director of the Pastoral 
Counseling Center. 

For more information, call the 
Pastoral Counseling Center of Luther- 
an Genera! at 518- 1800. 



VICTORY MEMORIAL 
HOSPITAL 

Asthma awareness 

Asthma Awareness is a unique 
one-on-one program which brings 
a person with Asthma together with 
a professional asthma counselor. 
Together, they work to manage the 
disease on a daily basis, identifying 
personal triggers for attacks, devel- 
oping healthy activities and learn- 
ing about medications. Asthma 
Awareness is offered through the 
Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation 
Department at Victory Memorial 
Hospital, 1324 N. Sheridan Rd., 
Waukegan. For more information, 
call 360-4131. 





December 11, 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers I B 1 3 



'.. ' 




Aesthetic Laser 
also removes 
hair arid tattoos 



■■ 






Laser technology, which has 
contributed to major advances In 
medldne In the last decade, is about ; 
to replace other methods of remov-. 
ing spider veins, birthmarks, age ' 
spots, tattoos, unwanted body hairs 
and other skin imperfections that 
can cause embarrassment and dam* 
age self-esteem. 

A new aesthetic laser called the 
Versa Pulse Is so advanced that It 
eliminates some skin pigmentation's 
that previously could not be re- 
moved. It permanently removes 
coarse, dark hair that would typical- 
ly grow back after plucking, shaving, 
waxing or chemical treatments. Even 
large, multicolored tattoos can be 
erased without leaving a scar or skin 
that lacks natural pigmentation, two 
conditions that can result from der- 
mabrasion and cryosurgery. 

"The new aesthetic laser is a 
blessing for both men and women 
who are self-conscious about ugly 
hairs or markings on their skin," says 
Dr. Leon Tcheupdjian Forrester,' a 
Chicago-based cosmetic surgeon. 
Their problems can be fixed with no 
incisions or Injections. There is little 
to risk to surrounding tissue. The 
laser treatment is fasfarid'virhially' 
painless." Dr. Forrester explains that 
the new laser produces different col- 
ors of highly concentrated light, with 
particular colors absorbed by specif- 
ic pigments in the skin. Most other 
lasers emit only one color of light, so 
several separate lasers are needed to 
treat skin problems. 

"For hair removal, light from the 
laser is absorbed by the pigment in 
hair follicles, vaporizing the pigment 
and destroying several follicles at a 
time," he says. "It is much faster than 
electrolysis treatment And, there is 
no risk of electric shock, infection, 
pitting or scaring." 

Dr. Forresterbelieves the process 




Above and right: Tattoos can 
now bo removed painlessly 
without scarring or damaging 
skin pigmentation, reports 
Chicago cosmetic surgeon Dr. 
Leon Tcheupdljan Forrester, 
who uses advanced laser tech- 
nology. His Versa Pulse system 
also removes birthmarks and 
unwanted halr^^^i:;-*.. 



is affordable for most people, de- 
pending on the extent of their prob- 
lem. 

"The cost is modest for people 
bothered or tormented by lesions 
and hair growing where it should- 
n't," he states. "Most people, in 
fact, want to look good and feel 



good about themselves. They wel- 
come a process that isn't tempo- 
rary and doesn't require frequent 
maintenance, like makeup or 
shaving." 

Dr. Forrester speaks from expe- 
rience. He founded the Liposuction 
Institute in 1984, and his Liposuction 



and Cosmetic surgery practice has 
grown rapidly with offices in 
Chicago's Water Tower Place. Ar- 
lington Heights and Oak Brook. 

The Versa Pulse C Aesthetic 
Laser that he now uses in his practice 
is manufactured by Coherent Inc. in 
Palo Alto, CA 



Kiddy gift registry: Boon or bomb? 



Hi Dr. Singer, 
1 recently heard 
about something 
that I wondered If 
you had also heard about A 
store has taken to the Idea of 
a kiddy gift registry. I don't 
mean a registry of gifts for a 
pregnant mom to be. I am re- 
ferring to a service that peo- 
ple use like a wedding reg- 
istry for their kids at holiday 
and birthday time. 

Kids actually go into the 
store and have a salesperson 
go around with them holding a 
scanner and the kids pick out 
everything they want and It 
goes on the registry. 

People then go to the store 
the child Is registered at and 
buy those gifts. I heard about 
this through a friend of mine 
and I Instantly had abad reac- 
tion to it I'm not even surjp of 
why I had this bad reaction, It 
was just my gut feeling. 

Have you heard about 
this and If so, what do you 
think? 

Signed., .Amazed mom! 




PARENT'S 
PUCE 

Sherri Singer, 
Psy.D, 



Dear Amazed, 

I think I did hear a little about 
this from a friend of mine, although 
we really can't mention the name of 
the store involved. My response ac- 
tually took two different tracks. 

My first reaction was concern. I 
felt that kids, especially young ones 
might not be able to understand the 
concept well enough and when 
they don't get everything they 
picked out, their reaction might 
range from mild disappointment to 
" blow-the-roof-off tantrums. " 

My other concern, as was also 
my friends concern, was the idea 
that this might give kids the idea 
that they can have everything they 
want. That isn't always realistic. 

Now for the other 
thoughts. ..From a marketing stand- 
point, what a boon! I'm sure the 



store owners are thrilled with this 
concept, since, it opens doors for 
tons of business. 

Additionally, this certainly takes 
the guesswork out of whether the 
child will like the gift or no L Every 
gift is a "sure shot" winner! Unfor- 
tunately, the other thing this does, 
is it takes away the element of sur- 
prise for the child. Gifts are pre- 
dictable at that point. Many of the 
younger ones might not remember 
what they signed up for later any- 
way, though. 

This idea also prevents the need 
for repeated returns. The store 
spends a lot of money on returns 
which in turn drives prices up. 

From this standpoint, it is an 
excellent idea. We don't normally 
think in terms of what a store would 
need to deal with in terms of money 
or returns, however* anything that 
costs the store more money, even- 
tually costs you more money. 

To summarize, I think that if 
parents can explain this well 
enough to a child and make sure 
that the child understands the con- 
cept, it can be relatively harmless if 
not positive. 



I think that parents need to tell 
their kids that they might not get 
everything on their list 

They also need to explain that 
this doesn't mean that (hey are en- 
titled to everything they want and 
see. lust like anything else in life, if 
there are sufficient limits and 
boundaries, it can work and also be 
somewhat fun. 

Think about it from your own 
perspective when you were 8 years- 
old. What would you have thought 
about it then? I don't know about 
you, but my heart breaks every time 
1 see a kid get his or her feelings hurt 
at a birthday because the birthday 
child didn't really like the present 
bought for them and was very open- 
about iL This maybe able to im- 
prove some of those things as well. 

This column is for entertain- 
ment purposes only. Information in 
this column cannot and should not 
replace proper Psychological treat- 
ment. Dr. Sherri Singer is a Licensed 
Clinical Psychologist, childhood be- 
havior specialist Call in your ques- 
tions and comments: (708) 962- 
2549. 



B12 /Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Below are real estate transactions for villages in and around the Lakeland 
Newspapers circulation area. Listed are the property address, property buyer, 
and purchase price. 



GrisQda Gonzales, $129,500 
1220 Patrick Drive, Michael & 
Cathy M. Greene, $208,000 

Round Lake 



Fox Lake 



32 Lakeside Lane, William P. Ryan, 

$109,000 

16-2 St. Thomas, Stephen & Teresa 

Ford, $52,500 



Grayslake 



Lynch, $346,500 
25159 N. Abbey Glenn, John & 
Margaret Dudek, $11 1,000 
8 Stonehaven Drive, Jill & Brian 
Thompson, $336,000 

Ingleside 



1282 Berkshire Lane, Dannie E. & 
LoriK. Wilson, $189,610 
354 Clarewood Circle, Christopher 
Kain, $247,700 

884 Essex Circle, Julie Kment, 
$120,400 

893 Essex Circle, Sebastian C. Gal- 
lo & Nancy Sundmacker, $124,500 
674 Indian Path Road, Keith & 
Stacey Anderson, $282,3 1 1 
17555 W. Woodland Drive, Antho- 
ny & Sue Ann Tartol, $212,000 
1344 Woodside Court, Robert J. & 
Emma K. Gaetano, $245,640 

Green Oaks 

949 Benson Road, Cindy & Mark 
Hahn, $342,000 

Guraee 

7051 Bentley Drive, Lance S. & 

Anna M. Hemmerich, $224,000 

17542 Bridle Court, Michael P. 

Yedinack & Katherine M. Raney, 

$199,000 

7606 Cascade Way, Stephen J. & 

Janie L Lautenschlager, $301,404 

77 13 Cascade Way, Steven C. & 

Wanda Gerzel, $276,547 

4681 Kingsway North, Richard 

Zandzilko & Marlene Proctor, 

$233,000 

735 Penny Lane, David D. & Sheila 

A. Weber, $392,000 

Hawthorn Woods 

7 Darlington, David & Kimberly 



34686 N. Lakeside Drive. Bill L & 
Nancy C, Shafer, $223,900 
26155 W. Boesch Place, Barry & 
Valerie Sorensen, $152,000 
20371 W. Vista Court, Guy & Eliza- 
beth Goodwin, $223,849 

Lake Villa 



1502 Halnesville Road, Manuel 
Caucino & Maria Caucina, 
$101,150 

Round Lake Beach 

1033 Crescent Court, Peggy A. Car- 
penter & Henry Condalaria, 
$81,200 

343 E. Stanton Court, Shawn & 
Karen W. Tanasaka, $147,986 
27 E. Washington Street, Douglas 



A. Kras, $97,500 

221 N. Channel, SomphongScot- 

tanuntana, $97,500 

2287 N. Salem Lane, Giovanni & 

Gloria Suarez, $166,252 

40 Redhead Court, Vincente Mer- 

cado, $178,500 

130 W, Lindsay Drive, Robert 

Swiatek Jr., $121,750. 

2007 Westview, Jennifer L Hoehn, 

$86,000 

Wauconda 



26490 N. Highway 59, Gerald F. 
Zamiski, $83,000 

439 N. Main Street, Arvilla Ann Pe- 
terson, $120,000 



December 11, 1998 



422 Osage Street, Robert Voete, . 
$1 40,000 

Information provided by 
Record Information Services, Inc. 
in St. Charles. Vie company pro- 
vides public record data for Lake, 
DuPage, Cook, Kane, McHenry, 
Kendall and Will counties includ- 
ing new incorporations, business 
licenses, bankruptcies, foreclosures, 
judgments, mechanic liens, state 
and federal tax liens, residential 
and commercial real estate trans- 
fers, building permits, DUI arrests, 
divorce reports, sheriff sale foreclo- 
sures, (630) 365-6490, public- 
record.com. 



38638 Deep Lake Road, Michael A. 
Bruce, $66,837 

25208 W. Buena, State Bank Of 
The Lakes, $153,000 

LlbertyvlUe 



1 1 13 Crestfield, Brynn A. Fulker- 

son. $216,000 

1215 Loyola Drive, J. Douglas 

Brownridge, $352,000 

30431 N. Center Street, Mary E. & 

Marcey Bendey, $136,000 

15245 Oak Spring Road, Thomas 

M.Giurewitz, $415,000 

Iindenhurst 

541 Beck Road, David J. Labovitz, 

$145,500 

2630 Franklin Court, Gregg & 
Dawn Rothermel, $255,443 
748 Monroe, Leslie J. & Ceceilia M. 
Powers, $165,000 

Mundelein 

703 E. Maple Street, Juan Mancilla, 

$106,000 

140 N. Prairie, Phillip Maki, 

$135,000 

26247 N. Walnut, Armondo & 



PEOPLE IN THE NEWS 




Anzelc 



Anzelc offers service 

Deborah W. Anzelc, CPA, is 

now offering 
personalized 
services to 
small busi- 
nesses and 
individual 
clients from 
her office at 
1876 0sprey 
Lane in Ub- 
ertyville. 
Anzelc ser- 
vices in- 
clude: bookkeeping and account- 
ing, payroll services, financial state- 
ment preparation, mew business 
start-up assistance, preparation of 
business tax returns and personal 
tax returns, accounting software is- 
sue and consultations. 

She can be reached at (847) 
362-8881. 

DeirOmdarme snares 
Pivot Point scholarship 

Lara DeB'Omdairne of Ver- 
non Hills recently received a $6,000 
teacher training scholarship to con- 



illl 







month or less! 




Wsi'fusonf/ie/nferneta! 
us-netdirect.com 



net Direct 



1-877-netDIRE 



a toll-free call 

Mention CODE 5763C when calling 

http://www.us-netdirect.com 



we 
accept: 



£ js *2| ^&*A 



tinue her cos- 
metology ed- 
ucatioaThe 
scholarship 
was awarded 
by Pivot Point 
International, 
a global hair 
and beauty 
education 




Dell'Omdarme 



company. 
Dell'Om- 
darme recently graduated from Pivot 
Point's Schaumburg campus. 

LCAR announces 
award winners 

The Lake County Association 
of Realtors®, at its Eighth Annual 
Awards Breakfast, announced the 
recipients of its Realtor® of the 
Year, Associate Realtor® of the 
Year, Affiliate of the Year and Dis- 
tinguished Service Award. 

The 1998 Realtor® of the Year 
was awarded to Lany Fales, Bro- 
ker Owner of Re/Max Advantage, 
Antioch. Fales has been involved in 
Lake County Association of Real- 
tors® since 1979, and has served as 
President in 1993. Fales worked for 
Coldwell Banker and Century 2 1 

uu(uioupcnlng)il3 nc/Maxofnce In 
1985. 

1998 Associate Realtor® of the 



Year was awarded to Roth Ann 
Heller of Koenig &S trey, Uber- 
tyville, Heller began her career in 
1983, and has served on several As* 
sociation committees. In addition, 
she has served on the Foundation 
for the Prevention of Child Abuse, 
and served as President of the 
Grayslake Exchange Club. 

Affiliate of the Year 1998 was 
awarded to Gay WoDcerof Northern 
Trust Bank. Lake Forest Walker joined 
Northern Trust in 1985, and was pro- 
moted to Second Vice President in 
1 997. Walker has served as Chairman 
of me Affiliate Committee at the Asso- 
ciation for the past two years. 

A special Distinguished Service 
Award was presented to Executive 
Vice President Peggy Kayser. The 
Distinguished Service Award was 
given in recognition'of her dedica- 
tion and caring over the past nin 
eyears she has served the Associa- 
tion as Executive Vice President. 

Richardson 
named director 

Yvonne Richardson has been 

named director, quality assurance de- 
vice operations in the hospital prod- 
ucts division of Abbott Laboratories. 

Richardson holds a B A in 
chemistry and philosophy from 
Knox College in Gaiesburg, III., and 
on M.BA. in management from 
Lewis University in Romeoville. She 
resides in Napervilie. 



NEW BUSINESSES 



Congratulations to the following 
new Lake County businesses: 

■ Triumph Enterprises, 2237 N. 
Masters Lane, Round Lake Beach. 
Owned by Gene Prather and Dr. Jean 
Zcigler. Call (847} 548-5663. 

• Home Improvement Network. 
805 Hawley Ct„ Mundelein. Owned by 
Pete Thomas. Call (847-604-4949. 

• Wildfire Pet Resort, 25829 W. 
Bonner Rd.. Wauconda. Owned by 
Maureen Tobias and Roger Tobias 
Call (847) 526-7335. 

• Tukesbrey Distribution, 35167 
N. Randhill Dr., Ingleside. Owned by 
John Tukesbrey and Kathy Tukesbrey 
Call (847) 587-2687. ' 

• Harvest Credit Cord Services, 
1174 Berkshire Ln. ( Barringlon. 
Owned by Lawrence V. Lima Sr Call 
(800)931-0533. 

• Calico Garden, 789 Main St 
Antioch. Owned by Gina Thcesfield.' 
Call (847) 395-1226. 

• A.S.S Trucking, 3493 1 N. Helen 
U.. Ingleside. Owned by Steven S. An- 



derson. Call (847) 587-3192. 

• Little Dreamers Dress-up, 
21863 W. Linden Ave., Lake Villa 
Owned by Nancy Ortman. Call (847) 
356-4224. 

• R & J Cycleworld, 18952 West 
Oak Ave., Mundelein. Owned by 
Richard L Raines. Call (847) 566-6354. 

• Learning Worldwide, 949 Man- 
chester Rd., Lake Zurich. Owned by 
Michael C. Rydel. Call (848) 550-8335. 

• Telemar Communications, 
1054 Hidden Lake Dr.. Buffalo Grove. 
Owned by Christopher J. Long. Call 
(847)215-5243. , S 

• Peter's Equipment Rentals, 170 
Montclair Rd., Vernon Hills. Owned by 
Henry L Sanchez. Call (847) 680-7993. 

• 444 Lake Cook Road Property, 
444 Lake Cook Rd., Deerfield. Owned 
by Morris M. Meister, MD and Janet J. 
Mcister. Call (312) 222-6653. 

• JMB Associates. 741 Toma- 
hawk Trail, Round Lake Heights. 
Owned by John F. Morlarty. Call 
(047) 740-2866. 



FROM PAGE Cll 



TAYLOR: Seven keys to 
creating a positive attitude 



motivation. While others may en- 
courage you, you must take control 
of your actions and attitude. No 
one can make you have a bad day 
unless you allow them to. No one 
can stir your anger, change your fo- 
cus or steal your initiative if you 
take control of your attitude. When 
it comes to your attitude, you're in * 
charge so take control. 

• Look to the future. No 
matter how many times you relieve 
past mistakes, you can't change 
anything. Forget the past and focus 
on what you can do instead of what 
you should have done. Your future 



is much more important than your 
past. After al!, you'll spend the rest 
of your life there. 

• Help others. The best way 
to improve a bad attitude is to reach 
out to others who are less fortunate 
than we are. This holiday season 
reach out to someone who needs 
help, I guarantee a double benefit. 

Don Taylor is the co-author of 
Up Against the Wai-Marts " You 
may write to him in care of "Mind- 
ing Your Own Business, " P O Box 
67,AmariUo, TX7910S 



--'i 



I 
-J 



I 
I 
I 

1 
I 



kl 



.J 



■ 



rHt??VW 



LUTHERAN 
GENERAL 



.■• - .- 



Ongoing programs 

• Pediatric Oncology Family 
Group: A support group for family 
members of children with cancer, 
treated at Lutheran General Chil- 
dren's Hospital, 1030 ajrt to noon, 
the second Saturday of every month; 
at Lutheran General Children's Hos- 
pital, Yacktm&n Pavilion, 2nd floor, 
Family Resource Center. For more In- 
formation, call Linda Bensing at 723- 
7747. 

• Sisters In Survival: A support 
group for breast cancer survivors, 
their families and friends (all ages), 9 
to i 1 am the third Saturday of every 
month, first floor, lobby. Call 465- 
9046 or 827-7875. 

• School Oncology Program: An 
in-service for school staff when a stu- 
dent (prc-school through 12th grade) 
has cancer and is being treated at 
Lutheran General Children's Hospl- 
lal. Call Kristine Even, 723-5962. Reg- 
istration required. 

Co mmunhy first 
aid, safely courses 

Lutheran General Hospital offers 
two safety courses to the community: 
American Red Cross Infant and Child 
CPR. and Community First Aid and 
Safety. 

The five-hour American Red 
Cross Infant and Child CPR course 
leaches how to recognize and care for 
breathing and cardiac emergencies in 
infants and children. It also includes 
information on how to prevent in- 
juries to infants and children in and 
around the home and in play areas. 
Cost is $47. 

The nine-hour Community First 
Aid and Safety course discusses ways 
to recognize and care for cardiac and 
breathing emergencies In adults and 
children. It also encompasses a first 
aid component that covers cuts, 
scrapes and bruises; bums; bleeding 
control; how to minimize the effects 
of shock; injuries to bones, muscles 
and joints, such as sprains and 
strains; and sudden illnesses, includ- 
ing poisonings and heat and cold 

emergencies. Cost is $54. 

Both courses are sponsored 
through Lutheran General's commu- 
nity education department. For 
schedule information or to register, 
call 1-800-323-8622. 

H.O.LD. support 

group offered 

The Pastoral Counseling Center 
of Lutheran General Hospital offers a 
Healing Our Lost Dreams (H.O.LD.) 
support group twice a month forper- 
sons who have experienced pregnan- 
cy and infant loss. 

Meetings are held from 7 to 8:30 
p.m. the first and third Tuesdays of 
each month at the Pastoral Counsel- 
ing Center, 1610 Luther Lane, Park 
Ridge. 

Parents, grandparents and other 
family members are invited to attend 
the sessions, share their feelings with 
others who understand what they are 
going through, receive support as 
they move through the first season of 
grieving, serve as resources for each 
other, and gain new perspectives on 
life. The group facilitator is R. Cotton 
File, Ph.D., licensed clinical psychol- 
ogist and director of the Pastoral 
Counseling Center. 

For more information, call the 
Pastoral Counseling Center of Luther- 
an General at 518-1800. 



VICTORY MEMORIAL 
HOSPITAL 

Asthma awareness 

Asthma Awareness is a unique 
one-on-one program which brings 
a person with Asthma together with 
a professional asthma counselor. 
Together, they work to manage the 
disease on a daily basis, identifying 
personal triggers for attacks, devel- 
oping healthy activities and learn- 
ing about medications. Asthma 
Awareness is offered through the 
Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation 
Department at Victory Memorial 
Hospital, 1324 N. Sheridan Rd„ 
Waukegan. For more information, 
call 360-4131. 



December 11, 1998 




Lakeland Newspapers I B 1 3 




Aesthetic Laser 
also removes 
hair and tattoos 

Laser technology, which has 
contributed to major advances in 
medicine in the last decade, is about 
to replace other methods of remov- 
ing spider veins, birthmarks, age 
spots, tattoos, unwanted body hairs 
and other skin Imperfections that 
can cause embarrassment and dam- 
age self-esteem. 

A new aesthetic laser called the 
Versa Pulse is so advanced that It 
eliminates some skin pigmentation's 
that previously could not be re- 
moved. It permanently removes 
coarse, dark hair that would typical- 
ly grow back after plucking, shaving, 
waxing or chemical treatments. Even 
large, multicolored tattoos can be 
erased without leaving a scar or skin 
that lacks natural pigmentation, two 
conditions that can result from der- 
mabrasion and cryosurgery. 

"The new aesthetic laser is a 
blessing for both men and women 
who are self-conscious about ugly 
hairs or markings on their skin," says 
Dr. Leon Tcheupdjtan Forrester, a 
Chicago-based cosmetic surgeon. 
"Their problems can be fixed with no 
incisions or Injections. There is little 
to risk to surrounding tissue. The 
laser treatment ts fast'atfd'virf Ualiy 
painless. * Dr. Forrester explains that 
the new laser produces different col- 
ors of highly concentrated light, with 
particular colors absorbed by specif- 
ic pigments in the skin. Most other 
lasers emit only one color of light, so 
several separate lasers are needed to 
treat skin problems. 

"For hair removal, light from the 
laser is absorbed by the pigment in 
hair follicles, vaporizing the pigment 
and destroying several follicles at a 
time, "he says. "It is much faster than 
electrolysis treatment And, there is 
no risk of electric shock, infection, 
pitting or scaring." 

Dr. Forresterbelieves the process 






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Above and right: Tattoos can 
now be removed painlessly 
without scarring or damaging 
skin pigmentation, reports 
Chicago cosmetic surgeon Dr. 
Leon Tcheupdljan Forrester, 
who uses advanced laser tech- 
nology. Hts Versa Pulse system 
also removes birthmarks and 
unwanted rjajf^^s^.^v;- ^vi-*^ 




is affordable for most people, de- 
pending on the extent of their prob- 
lem. 

"The cost Is modest for people 
bothered or tormented by lesions 
and hair growing where it should- 
n't," he states. "Most people, in 
fact, want to look good and feel 



good about themselves. They wel- 
come a process that isn't tempo- 
rary and doesn't require frequent 
maintenance, like makeup or 
shaving." 

Dr. Forrester speaks from expe- 
rience. He founded the Liposuction 
Institute In 1984, and his Liposuction 



and Cosmetic surgery practice has 
grown rapidly with offices in 
Chicago's Water Tower Place. Ar- 
lington Heights and Oak Brook. 

The Versa Pulse C Aesthetic 
Laser that he now uses in his practice 
is manufactured by Coherent Inc. in 
Palo Alto, CA 



Kiddy gift registry: Boon or bomb? 



HI Dr. Singer, 
I recently heard 
about something 
that I wondered If 
you had also heard about A 
store has taken to the Idea of 
a kiddy gift registry. I don't 
mean a registry of gifts for a 
pregnant mom to be. I am re- 
ferring to a service that peo- 
ple nse like a wedding reg- 
istry for their kids at holiday 
and birthday time. 

Kids actually go Into the 
store and have a salesperson 
go around with them holding a 
scanner and the kids pick out 
everything they want and It 
goes on the registry. 

People then go to the store 
the child Is registered at and 
buy those gifts. I heard about 
this through a friend of mine 
and I Instantly had a bad reac- 
tion to 1L I'm not even suye of 
why I had this bad reaction, It 

was Just my gut feeling. 

Have you heard about 
this and If so, what do you 
think? 

Signed.. Amazed moml 




PARENT'S 
PUCE 

Sherri Singer, 
Psy.D. 



Dear Amazed, 

I think I did hear a little about 
this from a friend of mine, although 
we really can't mention the name of 
the store involved. My response ac- 
tually took two different tracks. 

My first reaction was concern. I 
felt that kids, especially young ones 
might not be able to understand the 
concept well enough and when 
they don't get everything they 
picked out, their reaction might 
range from mild disappointment to 
"blow-the-roof-off tantrums." 

My other concern, as was also 
my friends concern, was the idea 
that this might give kids the idea 
that they can have everything they 
want. That Isn't always realistic. 

Now for the other 
thoughts...From a marketing stand- 
point, what a boon! I'm sure the 



store owners are thrilled with this 
concept, since, it opens doors for 
tons of business. 

Additionally, this certainly takes 
the guesswork out of whether the 
child will like the gift or not Every 
gift is a "sure shot" winner! Unfor- 
tunately, the other thing this does, 
is it takes away the element of sur- 
prise for the child. Gifts are pre- 
dictable at that point. Many of the 
younger ones might not remember 
what they signed up for later any- 
way, though. 

This idea also prevents the need 
for repeated returns. The store 
spends a lot of money on returns 
which in turn drives prices up. 

From this standpoint, It is an 
excellent idea. We don't normally 
think in terms of what a store would 
need to deal with In terms of money 
or returns, however, anything that 
costs the store more money, even- 
tually costs you more money. 

To summarize, I think that if 
parents can explain this well 
enough to a child and make sure 
that the child understands the con- 
cept, It can be relatively harmless if 
not positive. 



1 think that parents need to tell 
their kids that they might not get 
everything on their list 

They also need to explain that 
this doesn't mean that they are en- 
titled to everything they want and 
see. just like anything else in life, if 
there are sufficient limits and 
boundaries, it can work and also be 
somewhat fun. 

Think about it from your own 
perspective when you were 8 years- 
old. What would you have thought 
about it then? 1 don't know about 
you, but my heart breaks every time 
1 see a kid get his or her feelings hurt 
at a birthday because the birthday 
child didn't really like the present 
bought for them and was very open- 
about it. This may be able to im- 
prove some of those things as well. 

Tliis column is for entertain- 
ment purposes only. Information in 
this column cannot and should not 
replace proper Psychological treat- 
ment. Dr. Sherri Singer is a Licensed 
Clinical Psychologist, childhood be- 
havior specialist Call inyour ques- 
tions and comments: (708) 962- 
2549. 









. . - 






B14 / Lakeland Newspapers 



,■•■'■ 
HEABTHWATCH 



- ■-■ "■.'--. . 

! 



' ' ■■'■";S 



December 11,1998 





We've got a good reason to smile. 



*.■.■ 
-■ > 









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Id- 



Not every hospital makes it to the top. 

Provena Saint Therese Medical Center and Provena Home Care/Hospice recently earned accreditation with 
commendation, the highest level of accreditation awarded by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of 
Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). Only 15 percent of accredited hospitals receive accreditation with 
commendation, and we are proud to be one of them. 

As the only Catholic hospital in Lake County, we are dedicated to providing expert health care with an 
attitude of service and compassion that sets us apart. Here at Provena Saint Therese Medical Center, you'll 
find a team of committed physicians, employees and volunteers whose number one priority is taking care of 
you and your family. Because that's the way a hospital should be. 

»k Provena 

Saint Therese Medical Center 



Cr) 



What every hospital should be 

2615 Washington Street 
Waukegan, IL 60085 



For a physician referral, call (847) 360-2600 
or visit our web site: www.sainttherese.org 





.- 







Decembern,199B 



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Visit us on the Internet at us-netdirect.com 



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accept: 



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a toBI-free call 

http://www.us-netdirect.com 



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Bj $ {Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 



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December 11,1998^ 



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IlltW showroom or call for an in-Jwme decorating consultation and free price 
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ComEd woifeamirtdttie clock 



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ByJOHNKMJTTA 
Staff Reporter 



We may not be in Kansas any- 
more, Toto, butChicagoIand could be 
just as bad with wind gusts of up to 60 
miles per hour knocking out power 
all over this week. /- I "••-.■•■wj^uwune 

<£' eK * County customers had alreadv had 

toacategorythreehurricane. nS^ biggest problem 

In LakeCounty was a 34,000 volt pole 
that broke at Route 137 and Route 43 
near North Chicago because It affect- 
ed other smaller supply lines. 

By the time of the report at 2 p.ra 
Tuesday the problem had been fixed, 
he said. 



"This Is the type of storm we don't 



>see," said Commonwealth Edi- 
son public affairs agent Joe Trexler. 

The series of storms coupled with 
relentless winds have left people 
throughout the region without elec- 
tricity. 

Trexler said that type of storm is 
the toughest to handle because as 
soon as power Is restored to one area 
the winds knock power out some- 
where else. 



There were no large areas of pow- 
er outage, maybe a maximum ofl2 to 
15 customers In an area, Trexler said. 

That however makes restoring 



.reuse. power more difficult because Deonlp 



_ — -—«*•* fr/unrci. 111 uUtg, 

where storms persist, crews from oth- 
er companies or even other states 
may be called In, Trexler said. 

On Wednesday morning, the lat- 
est report before going to press, 
300,000 customers had been re- 
stored, said Harlan Dam, also a pub- 
lic affairs agent with GomEd: 



company knows about it. If the area 
without power is very small the pew- 
er company probably does not know 
about It, he said. 

The power company also advis- 
es people to avoid downed power 
lines. If you see a downed power line 
calll-BOO-EDlSON-L . . 




.J'tfbrtherri -region 
which is primarily Lake County, Dam 
said. • . ' •":. '"y.v^-'- 

Estimates at the time were that 
power would not be restored to all 
customers until Thursday, Dam said. 





woodland areas. Because of dvSal habltat^hr^^ ! !n^ t "??» "ndertogs In permanently wet 
Uke County ,* 50yeM.^£$JT£%*™™^s™ not been offlcteay sighted In 

A %ewt' day dawns 

(^nml^ewtj^rmxgesafteTmoTetMrim^ 






PARTNERS 

Education, business, 

community leaders 

reap awards 

PLEASE SEE 
PAGE C9 



MERGER MANIA 

Crystal ball predictions about 
bank conglomerations 

PLEASE SEE 

PAGE CI 1 



TOUGH AT THE TOP 

County board power shift also 
requires accountability 

PLEASE SEE 

PAGEC4 



ban becomes 

hot topic in 
Lake County 

ByJOHNROSZKOWSKI 
City Editor 

The Lake County Health Depart- 
ment says leaf burning poses a haz- 
ard to people with asthma and respi- 
ratory problems and is urging the 
county to ban or restrict burning In 
unincorporated areas. 

Dale Galassie, executive director 
for Lake County Health Depart- 
ment/Community Health Center, 
made a presentation to the Lake 
County Board Tuesday to address his 
concerns on the leaf burning issue. 

Galassie said the health depart- 
ment is urging all municipalities, and 
unincorporated areas of Lake Coun- 
ty, to consider a leaf burning ban — 
or to at least place restrictions on the 
times when burning is permitted. 

"Currently, there is a belief by the 
Board of Health that some type of re- 
striction or ban should occur," 
Galassie told the County Board. 

Galassie said the evidence is 
growing that leaf burning in the 
county has contributed to health 
problems among people with asthma 
and respiratory illness. 

"The Board of Health issued a re- 
port on asthma in August, and based 
on data, clearly there's been a rise in 
emergency room admissions and 
lung-related (problems)," he said. 

Galassie urged the board to adopt 
a draft resolution to address the leaf 
burning issue within the next six 
months. 

Please see BAN fC6 



ry since anyone has seen hide nor 
hair of the Central Nev^t, : a tiny 
species of salamander, in Lake Court' 

ty- r 

Recently, however, Russ Hen- 
dricks, a natural resource technician 
with the Lake County Forest Pre- 
serve, unexpectedly came across the 
newts while surveying for different 
natural species at the Grant Woods 
Forest Preserve near Lake Villa. 

He first discovered one of the 
newts in early October while looking 
under a log In a wooded area of the 
forest preserve. 

"Every once in a while, you'll 
turn a log over, and there it was," 



^ii«pwiW.>- 



since the last Central Newt sighting, 
in Lake County was reported in the . 

1940s. ■ -.^v -■/' • :; " - : ■;--" 

"This Is the ;" first; documented 
Lake.i County, .observation" '.since;', 
1942," said Ken Mlerzwa^aCehrial : 
Newt expert TheTastreported newt 
sighting was In the Deerfield area. 

Mierzwa saidjhe Central Newt 
variety is typically found farther east, 
such as In eastern portions of Michi- 
gan and hi New York 

The Central Newt has been 
found in some areas of Cook and Du- 
Page County, but are typically quite 
rare in northern Illinois. 

"They're here but they're not 



n* in tkva P3^on#' 




The % newts are generally olive 
green or olive brown In color, with a 
f&yiSlfi^imdita&enyi Jttty are a dlstoh r 
V relative of the blue sported Salomon - 
der, which Is one of the most com- : 
mon - species of salamander In 'the • 
county,^ ;;:, V* * 

'■') ■■" Hendricks said J the newts can 
live. between seven to id years. Hie 
first two to three months of a newfs 
life Is spent Ih the water In a larval 
stage Over the next two to three 
years, during the juvenile or "eft" 
stage of their development, they live 
on land, growing to about 3 inches in 
length. Eventually, they grow gills 
and move back to the water, where 
the spend the rest of their lives and 

Please see NEWT /C6 



■ . 



••>■ 



Landfill targeted by health officials 

Illinois EPA and county health department investigate 
height, odor problems at Countryside Landfill 



ByJOHNROSZKOWSKI 
City Editor 

The Countryside Landfill in 
Grayslake may be In trouble with 
both the Lake County Health De- 
partment and the Illinois Environ- 
mental Protection Agency, which are 
looking into potential violations at 
the landfill. 

The IEPA is looking Into poten- 
tial violations that the landfuT ex- 
ceeded its permitted contours in dis- 
posing of waste. Meanwhile, the 
county health department has filed a 
notice of violation for an odor prob- 
lem at the landfill. 

Andy Quigley, executive director 
of the Solid Waste Agency of Lake 
County tSWALCO), said he was in- 
formed back In August by Waste 



Management that the landfill ex- 
ceeded the contours by adding about 
107,000 cubic yards of waste in an 
area outside of its permitted bound- 
aries. 

Lynn Morgan, a spokesperson 
for the Countryside Landfill, said 
what happened is a section of the 
landfill was filled sooner than in- 
tended, and "within that area, there's 
a very small area of the landfill that's 
irregularly shaped." 

"It's not a matter of the height of 
the landfill and itls not a matter of the 
size of the landfill at its base. Ifs some 
pockets on the sides that project be- 
yond the design contours." 

She said the problem affects less 
than one percent of the landfill's to- 
tal capacity of 14.4 million cubic 
yards. 



Clearly a mistake was made," 
she said. "Essentially, what we've 
done since discovering the mistake Is 
focus on correcting the situation." 

Last week, the county health de- 
partment issued a notice of violation 
for odor problems at the landfill. 
Mike Kuhn, solid waste specialist for 
the Lake County Health Department, 
said the department recently began 
to receive complaint calls from resi- 
dents near the landfill and In 
Grayslake about the odor. 

"We had noticed the odor had 
been stronger (this year) than in the 
past In the past month, we started 
receiving calls from area residents 
about the odor," he said. 

Kuhn said he did not know at 

Please see LMiDFttl tC6 



_ . _. 



UNNING TO INSANITY PLEASE SEE PAGE / C5 



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C2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



■ 



COUNTY 



November 13, 1998 





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Offer available on Diamond Cabinets in their 
Advantage, Signature and Custom Deluxe Series. 



A reflection of heart and home. 

*Of eojJal or lesser value. Sec store for details. Expires I 1/30/98 





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KITCHEN & BATH DESIGNS 



• Cabinetry 

• Plumbing Fixtures 

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• Remodeling Services 






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Ct^e^i5^#£tSiV^fftttUranc»'« 




November 13, 1998 



. 



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COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapen COIMH^M 



[if *»' 











.A DIGEST OF 



. . . ' ■ - I i - 



STORIES MAKING HEADLINES THROUGHOUT OUR REGION 






$&■-$$ 



■•■: 



Football player killed in car wreck 

Johmsburg— Daniel A- Smith, a standout football, track . , 
and wrestling letterman at Johnsburg High School, was killed 
when his car swerved off the pavement on Pioneer Road In ■ 
Johnsburg on Thursday, Nov. 5 at roughly 430 pjm. 

He was pronounced dead at Northern Illinois Medical Fa- 
cility in McHenry after a 15 minute extraction from his Blue 
Chevrolet Geo. '%t®&f 

Accordingto McHenry County Coroner Rick Lonnigro, '- 
the cause of death was due to severe head and cervical in- 
juries stemming from the car accident 

According to reports from Lonnigro, the Geo crossed the 
center line, at which time Smith over corrected from the spin, 
hit a utility pole before rolling on the side of the road. The car 
came to a stop on Its side. 

ACHS, Rotary sponsor Career Day 

Antioch— More than 14 dozen students and six dozen 
volunteers will meet Tuesday, Nov. 17 to explores their mutu- 
al career interests. 

Andoch Community High School students and adults 
with careers will participate in the annual Career Shadowing 
Day program co-sponsored by the Antioch Rotary Club and 
die high school. 

Senior and juniors spend a day with people to leam about 
their careers. This career program has been moved to the fall 
season so mat students can use the information they obtain to 
help make work or schooling decisions. 

Chief Judge Ray McKoski is the breakfast keynote speaker 
at the ACHS cafeteria. Program participants will have break- 
fast together from 8 to 9 a.m. After McKoski's address, partici- 
pants will go to their day-long career sites. 

Career volunteers who have agreed to have a students 
with them through the day will provide transportation and 
lunch for the students. 

Driver flees from five car accident 

Graysloke— A driver who fled on foot from a five car acci- 
dent he caused, has been arrested. According to police re- 
ports, three people were injured in the accident and taken to 
Condell Medical Center. 

Sergio Guzman, 22, of Round Lake Beach, left the scene of 
" the accident on Route 120 east of Route 45, after plowing his 
r Pontlac 6000 into the b ack of another car, causing a reartend 
h; J chain reaction that Involved five vehicles.: -J '.- - ;v *.; w" : .' 
The vehicles mvolvedyirere Guzman's Pontlac, a Ford ' 
• Taurus, a Honda CRV, a Hyundai Accent/, arid aHyundal Ex- 
cel. &$0^%£^/:y&>r ■"■*'•" 
Holiday gifts discussed at CBCH 

Lake Villa — Parents can learn what the most popular 
books and toy gifts will be during the upcoming holiday sea- 
son on Thursday, Nov. 19 at 7 p.m. at the Bright Beginnings 
Children's Center at the Central Baptist Children's Home 
campus In Lake Villa. 

"We're sponsoring a lecture at Bright Beginnings," said 
Joyce Heneberry, coordinator of marketing and volunteers. 
The program will help parents know what is of interest to their 
children, 

"We've put together a nice evening in three segments," 
Heneberry said. 

"One is a representative from Books Etc. in Antioch," she 
said. "Dale Perryman is going to talk about what books kids 
really want." 

The second part of the program will have a Walmart rep- 
resentative who will talk about the hottest toys of the season. 

The third speaker is Susan LoSavio, Director of Programs 
at Bright Beginnings Children's Center. She will speak about 
peace in the curriculum. 

Bright Beginnings Children's Center is on the campus of 
the Central Baptist Children's Home on the east side of Route 
03 north of the Grand Avenue and Route 83 intersecdon in 
Lake Villa. People may follow signs to the children's center 
once they enter the campus. 




■•• 



N 



Alleged sex abuser in jail 

Island Lake — Steven L Horowitz, 33, remains behind 
bars in the McHenry County Jail after being charged with sex- 
ually abusing a 15-year-old boy about six months ago, author- 
ities said. 

Horowitz was arrested Nov. 6 in Bloomingdale by 10 offi- 
cers from multiple agencies, instead of what he thought was 



Not just a passing fancy 

Ubertyville High School's varsity football team was 
ousted from the playoffs by Napervllte North 28-21 in 
overtime; Quarterback J.C. Harrington , above, was 
named Lakeland Player of the Yeararid led the Wild- 
cats to a perfect 9-0 record In trie regular season. The 

/Wildcats finished the year 10-1.— Photo by Sandy 

' Bressner 

going to be a second meeting with a 15-year-old Carol Stream 
boy who he allegedly sexu ally abused in his Island Lake home 
toward the end of May, said Island Lake Police Chief James M. 
Eccles. 

Horowitz, former owner of the now closed Java Joe's cyber 
cafe in Grayslake, was charged with two counts of Aggravated 
Criminal Sexual Abuse and one count of Attempted Aggravated 
Criminal Sexual Abuse, police said. All three charges are Class 
2 Felonies, and each charge carries a penalty of 3 to 7 years in 
jail, police said. Horowitz is being held on $125,000 bond, and 
is scheduled to appear in McHenry County Court on Nov. 1 2, 
authorities said. 

Accident kills man, hurts woman 

Wauconda— A Lake County Sheriff s Office investigation 
team is trying to determine how an accident occurred, in a field 
near the T-intersection of Wilson Road and Route 60 near Wau- 
conda, the night of Nov. 8, injuring Jacqueline Bowles, 25, of 
Round Lake, and killing Christopher Young, 27, of Fox River 
Grove, authorities said. 

Young was driving a 1998 Chevy Blazer southbound on Wil- 
son at around 7:30 p.m. when the vehicle left the roadway, en- 
tered a field and continued on for 190 feet before landing on its 
top, authorities said. He was pronounced dead at the scene at 
8:30 p.m., while Bowles, the passenger, was flown by helicopter 
to Lutheran General Hospital in Park Ridge where she was 
treated and released earlier this week, authorities said. 

"Some witnesses at the scene said the vehicle made no visi- 
ble attempt to stop before it left the roadway," said Sgt, Fred 
Heidecke of the sheriffs office, 

LCFB names new president 

Volo— Farming is a business usually passed down from 



generation to generation, as it takes a lot of work to make an 
honest buck. '■•-•■ - .<--' ; . :';-'''. ■ '''.:■' V ■' ; -^. ■:>■'' ,v : 

Eric Nielsen, 42, is not of that mold. The new president of 
the Lake County Farm Bureau purchased a 35 acre farm with 
his wife Kathy In 1980 after graduating from the University of 
Illinois. As president for 1998-99, Nielsen wants to promote 
Illinois agriculture as more than just com and soy beans. "Illi- 
nois is the largest horseradish producer in the United States," 
he said. "They produce peaches in Southern Illinois." 

He also wants drivers to understand farm machinery can 
only travel so fast, and is asking everyone to have a little pa- 
tience on the roadways. , 

Big Hollow Road contract set 

Foot Lake— A contract has been awarded to Berger Exca- 
vating of Wauconda for $2.7 million to resurface Big Hollow 
Road through the village. The project has taken 1 1 years to 
get this far, and according to Lake County Board Member 
Bonnie Thomson Carter (R-Ingleslde), a pre-construction 
meeting will take place in December, with construction tak- 
ing approximately 130 days to complete. 

"Two lanes will remain open during construction, except 
at Red Channel, where signals will be used to move traffic on 
one lane," she said. . 

Carter said she would work with the contractor to ensure 
frontage property owners have as little disturbance to re- 
maining trees and driveways. 

Dist 79 may fight development 

Round Lake— Superintendent Gary Mical is protecting 
his schools, even if it means appearing in court. 

He and Fremont School District 79 are being asked to ap- 
pear In court to respond to a request for declaratory judg- 
ment This is a legal request by the village of Round Lake Park 
and developer the Alter Group on whether the Tax Increment 
Financing district (TIF) used to finance the village's 575 acre 
business development was flawed or not 

*. "We are asking the court to review the agreement and de- 
clare it valid," said Round Lake Park attorney Albert Wysocki. 

Superintendent Mical has major objections to TIF dis- 
tricts in general. Under TIF District terms, property taxes are 
frozen at current levels for up to 23 years. 

"We're not going to be able to access any of the taxes we 
feel we should legally be able to receive," said Mical. 

Despite the fact the development is mostly commercial, 
Mical feels any time an entity, whether residential or busi- 
ness, goes on die tax rolls it supports the schools. Unless it is a 
TIF District Covering 34 square miles, Fremont School Dis- 
trict receives very little state or federal funding. Roughly nine- 
ty-five percent of school dollars come from local taxes, said 
Mical. 

Hastings Lake YMCA offers camps 

Lake Villa— Hastings Lake YMCA will offer two special 
holiday camping programs in late December. One program 
is for children who want a special daytime holiday experi- 
ence. A second program is for those who prefer a short stay 
away from home. 

Registration for these two camp programs is now open. 

The Hastings Lake YMCA has a Holiday Day Camp for 
children 5 to 12 years old, and a four-day sleep-over Winter 
Camp for children 8 to 16 years old. 

Session one of the day camp is scheduled for Monday. 
Dec. 21 through Thursday, Dec. 24. The program is from 9 
a.m. to 4 p.m., although extended hours are also available. 
The program ends at 1 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 24. The camp 
is closed Friday, Dec. 25. 

Session two is scheduled for Monday, Dec. 28 through 
Thursday, Dec. 31 (until 1 p.m.). The day camp program is 
closed on New Year's Day. 

"We have extended-care hours for working parents," said 
Siwek 

"The member rate per session is $85," said Siwek. "The 
non-member rate per session is $100." 

People can register for the day camp program at 356-4000. 

The winter camp program is from Sunday, Dec. 27 
through Thursday, Dec.31. Parents may call 356-4001 or 356- 
4002 to request a brochure and registration forms. 

The cost is $285, payable with a check or credit card. "We 
have an early bird special of$40-offif paid in full by Nov. 
30th." 



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PRE-SEASON 
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Lalekand previews area 
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LIGHT UP THE NIGHT 

Annual charity; event Festival of Tre es 
raises funds for. Victory Memorial Hospital 



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C4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OPINIONS 



November 13, 1998 



•v ii 



■ 



Lakeland Newspapers 

William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 



William M. Schroeder 

Pretldant/CE.O. 



Neal Tucker 

Executive Ed i tor/Com poii (Ion Mgr. 



VIEWPOINT 



Rhonda Hetrick Burke 

Managing Editor 

30 South Whitney St., Grayslake, Illinois 60030 
Tel: {847) 223-8161. E-mail: edlt@lnd.com 



EDITORIALS 

County board's 

green color reflects 

campaign style 

Mainstream Republicans have a fight on their bands in (he 
next several weeks as leadership on the county board is 
up to grabs. Tor the first time, the so-called "green" can- 
didates have the majority of votes on the board which 
has been traditionally divided into three categories— pro-develop 
meal Republicans, environmental Republicans, and Democrats. 

The pro-development Republicans have been in a downward Spi- 
ral since the defeat of Hob Depke. former chairman, by Al U'cslerman 
iwo years ago. 

those still serving on the hoard who are often associated with the 
pro-developmem group are: John Schulien. Stevenson Mountsi'er. 
1'amela Newton. BobC.rever. David Sloltnan, Mary Henllie and !im hi- 
Belle. who has often been considered a Republican independent for 
his support of the environmental faction in some key votes. 

HmironmcittaJ Republicans are: Judy Martini. Su/i Schmidt. Ron 
nie Thomson Carter. Liny l.eafblad, AlU'esierman. Diana O'kelly. 
SandyCole, Carol Calabresa, Martha Marksand (he newly elected 
turret fa McCarley. 

I )emocrats on the board include. Angelo Kyle. Audrey Nixon. ( *m - 
til Spielman. Robert Ruhaj and llie newly elected: Hob Sabonjian and 
Peggy Shorts. 

l ; oi those keeping scoic that's si-ven pio-devrlupmrni members. 
W pro-environment candidates and six Democrats, easily giving the 
pro-environment bloc the majority 

Sahott]innaiul ShotK will likelv li i it- up in support til <i inn etui 
mitfticni (.-.uidid.iieforcoium board chairman in Deiembci I noli loi 
iJie i email Democrats m (jkeh continue making deals with the pro 
development grouji tin leadership pnsiiions. 

TliMOLild result m ;i |j I ] voting block lor the group 
What dues this mean? 

Voters have responded to the grass-roots ellortsol the pro-envi- 
ronment candidates in their door-lo-donr campaign style. People re 
spond to candidates who work at meeting them Throughout the 
country, the electorate seems tti be rejecting "party-picked candi- 
dates" (or those who seem more like them. 

On the county board, look for the pro-environment majoritv to try 
t« put the brakes on the passage of the county's unified development 
ordinance, which has received unfavorable reviews from many for be- 
ing weak on enlorcement standards. 

And look for the pro-environmental group to elect Martha Marks 
as President of thelorest Preserve and either AlWesterman or Inn l;i 
Belle, a compromise candidate as Chairman oi the Hoard with either a 
Democrat as vice-chairman or Suzi Schmidt 

The pro-environmental group will also have to remember it is nm 
always easy to be the leaders leadership comes with accountability 

4 cent gasoline tax 
spun as 'user fee' 

Like liberals and federal bureaucrats who depict proposed tax 
increases as "investment," a growing number of l;tke County 
politicians refer to a proposed four-ccnts-a-gulltm local gaso- 
line lax as a "user fee." 
This is the tack being taken by County Hoard Chairman I Job Crev- 
er who, whether he likes it or not, has the task of talking up an unpop- 
ular new tax to a populace growing restive over ever-crowded road- 
ways, but wary about paying more taxes. In an interesting bit of logic, 
Grever says highway users creating the traffic jams ought to pay to get 
rid of them. 

Revenue experts employed by the county see an additional four 
cent gasoline tax translating into $10 million extra. Illinois already 
has some of the priciest gasoline in the nation widi the state collecting 
19 cents a gallon. In Lake County, we get back a tenth of a cent for 
each gallon, 

Director Martin Buehler of the Lake County Division of Trans- 
portation already has the proposed new highway income "spent." 
He'd like to widen Washington St, from the Gurnee area west of 
Grayslake and complete four laning of Butterfield Rd. all the way from 
Rte. 45 to Rte. 21. These are among priorities of a lengthy 2005 trans- 
portation plan 

Before the local gasoline tax debate gets more complicated, we'd 
like to get some answers to the question, considering lack of funding, 
how do so many new real estate developments qualify for safety and 
so-called "capacity projects"? 

Further clarification of Chairman Grever's"user" concept might 
also be In order. We're wondering if there are any highway users who 
might qualify for a tax exemption. Bet more than a few car owners 
would go for that one. Nothing like sticking it to the other guy. 



Voters in a mood for 
new-breed views 






Ti 
i 



here are near and far indi- 
cators on the political hori- 
zon, both subtle and sledge 
hammer-like, that electors 
are in the mood for n new breed of 
office holder. 

Former pro wrestler Jesse "the 
Hody" Ventura, the new governor 
of Minnesota, is the poster boy for 
n new-type official. Ventura sym- 
bolizes the colorful, unknown can- 
didate who appeals to voters will- 
ing to gamble, maybe even inject a 
1 tone of mischief into the electoral 
process. 

Abrasive, offensive Geoffrey 
Fieger failed to gel elected governor 
of Michigan running on a platform 
of insults and outrageous charges. 
Hut his unconventional style won a 
nomination. Success in November 
nexl time? 

Closer to home, Democrat Susan 
Garrett, exemplifying North Shore 
style and League of Women Voters 
zeal for good government, easily de- 
feated Republican Christopher 
Stride for a spot on the Lake County 
delegation in Springfield, Stride was 
painfully stereotypical of the stiff, 
pin-striped legal types inhabiting 
the Illinois General Assembly, far too 
many of whom masquerade as lead- 
ers. 

Now comes AJan Prouty, 18, and a 
senior at Grant High School, taking a 
seat on the Fox Lake Council, in a 
bold gesture by Mayor Jim Pappas to 
experiment with youth in the stodgy, 
often boring process of municipal 
government Prouty's only experi- 
ence in the public eye was serving as 
homecoming king. He can vote, but 
he can't purchase liquor legally. He's 
too young to qualify for standard 
banking criteria for a mortgage, bur 
Alan will be passing judgment on 
the village's S14 million budget and 
setting down personnel procedures 
for village employees older than his 
parents. 

If youth will be served, a commu- 
nity in America's heartland isn't the 
only spot where lack of life's experi- 
ence will be tested in the tough bvtsi- 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



ness of government Carsten 
Schneider, 22, this fall was elected to 
the German Parliament, it's 
youngest member ever. What a 
country! 

By rejecting lawyers, MBA types, 
the wealthy, the well-known, the ex- 
perienced, a portion of the elec- 
torate appears more than ready to 
experiment with youth, off-beat 
types, athletes, entertainers, un- 
knowns. The nation laughed when 
the late Sonny Bono took a seat in 
Congress. He turned out pretty 
well. Who knows what Sonny might 
have accomplished in government 
had he not met an untimely death? 

Get ready for more Jesses, Geof- 
freys, Susans and Alans. 

Election aftermath 

Lawn signs have replaced car 
bumper stickers as the political 
statement of choice . . . Isn't it about 
time that the big paper in Chicago 
buries its policy of referring to victo- 
rious conservative Republicans as 
mavericks? The big paper pundits 
are giving away their true feelings . . . 
Lack of the straight party punch did- 
n't seem to slow the voting process . . 
. More than a few Lake County vot- 
ers expressed the opinion that De- 
mocrats Marlene Runyard and Lyn- 
da C. Paul ran for the wrong offices. 
Might we see more of them in the 
future? 

For sheer class, none of the can- 
didates exceeded Associate Judge 



. -. 

Teny Brady for exhibiting grace in 
defeat Newly elected State Rep Tim 
Osmond (R-Antloch) showed sur- 
prising growth in transferring from 
local politicking to regional cam- 
paigning. . « For the record, the 
Lakeland Newspapers editorial 
board had a .1000 batting average 
on local candidate endorsements 
and missed on only two state of- 
fices... 

Goodies for Gurnee 

A proposed four cent per gallon 
gasoline tax is getting favorable con- 
sideration from a few Lake County 
Board members for an odd reason— 
they fear mat after Gumee Mayor 
Dick Welton gets all the necessary 
roadway improvements for his 
grandiose entertainment village that 
there won't be enough money left to 
buy a truck load of cold patch for 
county roads. 

Prom pushers 

All summer and fall, a group of 
Grayslake moms and dads billing 
themselves as Prom Parents has 
been flitdng about raising money so 
their offspring can have the time of 
their lives next spring at prom time. 
Excuse me, is this relic writer miss- 
ing something? What are the kids 
doing for themselves? 

Undercover subject 

Never let it be said that students 
at Libertyville High School don't get 
to the bottom of things. Their stu- 
dent newspaper devoted n. dbubto I ' ■ 
page spread in the latest edttlori to 
what kind of underwear is preferred 
by modem teens. A survey of 349 
students found such interesting 
facts that 47 percent of female stu- 
dents buy their underwear at Victo- 
ria's Secret. Thirty-nine percent of 
LCHS students prefer bikini style 
underwear. 

Student reporter Liz Springer 
concluded that "underwear is ex- 
pressing the way you wani to feel, so 
never keep it a secret." 



Garrett a fresh face in government 



One of the surprises in the 
November election was 
the fairly substantial victo- 
ry by Susan Garrett for 
Suite Representative in the 59th Dis- 
trict, li is the district that Robert 
t hurchill took some partisan glee in 
t arvingout to hold it in GOP control 
lor Id years. The "best laid plansof 
men" sometimes go awry and this is 
one that came back to bit the map- 
mukers. 

When the Republicans carved 
out districts to benefit their party, 
they created a "safe" 30lh Senate Dis- 
trict a "safe" 59th State Representa- 
tive District, and a "safe" 60th Repre- 
sentative District Rep. lauren Beth 
Gash surprised them right off the bat 
and won the 60th in 1992.Then Sen- 
atorTerry link surprised them by 
taking away the safe 39th Senatorial 
District in 1996. Susan Ganeti com- 
pleted die "hat trick" by her win in 
the 59th. 

1 hear different persons taking 
credit for Susan Garrett's strong vic- 
tory. The credit belongs to one per- 
son — Susan Garrett 

When I met Susan Garrett over a 
year ago, I told people that I met 
someone who has outstanding po- 
tential as a public servant. She 
proved it as a candidate. For some- 
one who never held public office, 
she grasped the give-and-take of the 
political whirl, she knew what it 




• 

SEEING 

IT 

THROUGH 

John S. Matijevich 



takes to win office, and she set about 
as her business to do what it takes. 

Right off the bat she told me 
that she would be a "different" type 
(jf candidate; that she would not be 
beholden to party leaders or special 
interests. 

Another thing that Susan Garrett 
was emphatic about was that she 
bring tugetiier die diverse Interests 
of the district In other words, she 
would give as much time and atten- 
tion to the needs of theWaukegan - 
North Chicago area as she would to 
the Lake Ikjrest-lake Bluff area. 
When she convinced me thai she 
would work hard to represent fairly 
the entire 59lh District, I told her thai 
I would walk door-to-door to help 
her get elected. 

A year ago in November, Susan 
Garrett started her long journey to 
victory by getting voters to sign her 
petitions of candidacy as she stood 
In front of the North Chicago post of- 
fice. She received the necessary sig- 
natures. She made it her business to 
campaign at the North Chicago post 



office every Saturday thereafter and, 
for a whole year, she only missed 
two, when there were unavoidable 
conflicts. 

Susan Garrett would greet peo- 
ple at the post office from 9 to about 
1 1 a.m. and then I would come there. 
Then, she and I would go in 
Waukegan and North Chicago to 
campaign door-to-door for at least 
four hours. There aren't many candi- 
dates who can really say that they 
enjoy campaigning door-lodoor. It 
is not easy. It can be tiresome. But i» 
is always worthwhile. 

Garrett seemed to enjoy meeting 
people, and that is when I knew dial 
she would not only win her election, 
but she would be a responsive and 
responsible public servant when she 
took office. She took to heart what 
citizens talked td her about 1 have 
always maintained that the better 
public officials are the ones who, 
when they make public decisions, 
can look at the many faces that they 
met as they campaigned and relate 
to the problems that those people 
have in their daily lives. 

As in everything, hard work pays 
off In politics too. Of all of the cam- 
paigns in Lake County, no one 
worked harder than Susan Garrett. 
She was relentless. She ran a perfect 
campaign. If you think that Susan 
Garrett worked hard as a candidate, 
just watch her as a public official. 




«*y&i* 






November 13, 1998 






■ ' 



OPINIONS 



.uft 



■ - .- 




Lakeland Newspapers/ C5 



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PARTY LINES 



PARTY LINES, THE LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS' COLUMN OF POLITICAL OPINION, 

IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS. 

GOP leads in dirty tricks dept. 



Losing stale representative as- 
pirant Christopher Stride 
disavowed connection with 
an 1 1 th hour dirty tricks 
leaflet drive conducted in Waukegan 
and North Chicago that depicted his 
female democratic opponent as a 
djamond-loving richie who lives in a 
Lake Forest mansion. The anony- 
mous flyer asked,' "Is this. who you 
want representing you in Spring- 
field?" Minority voters saw through 
the ruse and voted heavily for Susan 
Garrett, quickly seen as a budding 
comer and future Democratic star. 



Martha in chair 

Early handicapping is viewing 
County Board Rep. Martha Marks 
(R-Riverwoods) as a strong candi- 
date for County Board chair. She 



stands tall with Republican inde- 
pendents and is considered one of 
the brightest and brainiest of the 25 
member Lake County Board. Marks 
is a published author. 



Up side-stepping 

Longtime Republican opera- 
tive and former County Board 
member Donna Mae (the Up) 
litwller will lose her cushy 
$5 1,696 Job as a drivers license 
training coordinator with the Sec. 
of State's office. That's a given with 
Democrat Jesse White taking 
over. But Litwileris expected to 
find a spot somewhere on the gov- 
ernor's patronage list which her 
boss George Ryan will be filling. 

Other Ryan underlings won- 
dering about the future include 



Green Oaks Village trustee Vir- 
ginia Wood (managerial assis- 
tant) Shawn Depke (managerial 
assistant) and Jim Stanczak (dri- 
ver's test aide), who could be a 
double loser since the Waukegan 
Republican was defeated for re- 
election to the County Board. 



...TV- ''v.--'-.. 



Next in line 

Township Trustee Steve 
Smouse Is being mentioned as the 
most likely successor to Antioch Su- 
pervisor and State Representative- 
Elect Tim Osmond, who is com- 
mitted to holding only one job. 
Smouse is a carbon copy of Os- 
mond, employed as an insurance 
broker, involved with the Antioch 
Rescue Squad and deeply involved 
in community affairs. 



hy in the name of 
Pheidippidcs would - l 
anyone want to run a 
marathon? It doesn't 
look like fun; have you ever seen a 
person smiling while running a gru- | 
eling distance? 

Yet, more than 20,000 willing 
sufferers reported to the starting line 
for the recent Chicago Marathon, 
and 17,093 made it to the finish line 
26.2 masochistic miles away. 

Some 200 of them were Lake 
County people, about 140 men and 
60 women — everyday folks like you 
and me, except with motivation. 

It all started with Pheidippidcs 
in 490 B.C. The Persians were invad- 
ing Greece and their armies met on 
the plain of Marathon, about 26 
miles from Athens. The Greeks were 
outnumbered but scored a big up- 
set, they kicked some Persian pants. 

Unable to find a phone booth, 
the Greek general sent his swiftest 
runner, Pheidippides, to carry news 
of the victory to Athens. He reached 
the city and gasped, "Rejoice, we 
conquer," then fell dead, a war casu- 
alty, an overworked two-legged 
telegram. 

When the ancient Olympic 
Games were revived in 1896 and 
held In Athens, a 26.2-mile race was 
included and called the marathon. 
The Lake County runners in the 
recent Chicago Marathon were 
mosUy in their 20s or 30s. John Kiser, 
37, of Grayslake, finished 266th. Also 
among the fastest 300 or 400 were 
AndrejTosic, 42, of Gumee; BUI 
Zeck, 41, of WUdwood; Simon Peter 
Kyameaddle, 28, of Mundelein; and 
Kenneth Osmun, 30, of Round Lake 
Beach. 

Among the women, Amy Weber, 
26, of Highland Park, was 1 74 th. Also 
among the faster amateurs were 
Jennifer Phillips, 27, of Vemon Hills; 
Rebecca Morgan, 33, of Libertyville; 
and Katrina Meyer, 29, of Gumee. 

The top places, as usual, went to 
professional marathoners from 
lands where self-punishment is still 
popular, such as Kenya, renowned 



for its distance runners. 

I had the post - race pleasure of 
chatting with Kenneth Osmun, a 
Navy lieutenant stationed at Great 
Lakes the last three years. From Hol- 
ly, Mich., he was a distance-running 
star in high s cho ol and th e n a small- 
college All -American. Marathons are 
a natural extension of his sport, he 
has done four including the famous 
Boston Marathon last spring. 

Osmun does the 26.2 miles in 
just under three hours. To prepare 
he runs about 50 miles a week. His 
wife, Adrienne, who also ran for Hol- 
ly High, is In tune with Ken's dedica- 
tion. So is their 4-month-old Collin 
who, buckled up in his stroller, en- 
joys short trots with his daddy. 

"Running Is a hobby now," says 
Osmun. "It keeps you in shape, feel- 
ing good about yourself. I'm not as 
competitive as I was in college; I'm 
more comfortable, but you know 
that the more work you put in the 
month before the race the less you 
will suffer." 

Ah, yes, the suffering 
"With me," Osmun says, "it's 
typically the legs, the quadriceps 
start hurting. You almost get to the 
point where your legs are numb, like 
you're running on empty." 

Distance running is called "the 
lonely sport" but Osmun and a for- 
mer high school teammate changed 
that in the Chicago Marathon. He 
and Bob Jacobs of Cincinnati, the 
best man at the Osmuns' wedding 
decided to run the 26.2 miles side by 
side. They chatted and laughed 
along the way, talking each other 
through the bad times, and crossed 
the finish line together. 

Imagine that, distance runners 
smiling! 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Libertyville athletes show true sportsmanship 



It has been my pleasure to watch 
the Libertyville Community 
High School football team a 
number of times this season. 
Never have I been more Impressed 
with this group of young men than I 
was at Naperville Northr 

Participation in a sport is meant 
to provide a wide variety of learning 
and life experience for our kids. One 
of the most important is strength of 
character. This is a very talented 
group of athletes, but it was their 
strength of character in the face of a 
seemingly hopeless situation that 
carried the day. The way these young 
men refused to acknowledge defeat 
near the end of regulation play was 
outstanding. I was very happy that 
my 9 year old son and 1 had the priv- 
ilege of watching them play. 

Randy Kuceyeski and his coach- 
ing staff have greatly enhanced the 
educational experience of these ath- 
letes. Congratulations to Randy, his 
coaching staff and to the student 
athletes. 

Richard Friedenberg 

Board Member LCHS Dist 128 

Vemon Hills 

Don't make enemies 
of neighbors 

There appears to be a dismaying 
trend in Lake County for villages' to 

<innpx Irmrlc that ara r>nnttminnc apn. 



graphically but fall inside neighbor- 
ing school district comprised mostly 
of taxpayers from surrounding vil- 
lages. This way, officials from the an- 
nexing village can pursue their own 
agenda and that of their corporate 
developer benefactors without hav- 
ing to be accountable at the ballot 
box. This has occurred in the Big 
Hollow School District, whose tax- 
payers have just been forced to 
cough up $7.5 million for a new 
school to house the children from 
Round Lake's Valley Lakes subdivi- 
sion (among others), but cannot vote 
to punish the Round Lake officials 
who sold them out to the billionaire 
Pritzker family and their surrogates, 
the Penguin group. 

It is happening again, this time 
to' the taxpayers of Fremont School 
District, who will be frozen out of 
corporate tax benefits for the next 23 
years as a result of the TIF district 
proposed by Round Lake Park and 
their friends the Alter Group, even as 
district enrollment rises exponen- 
tially as a direct result of that TIF de- 
velopment To add Insult to Injury, 
the Village of Round Lake Park is now 
suing Fremont District to stop them 
from taking steps to protect its tax- 
payers and Its children from the dev- 
astating effects their neighbors to the 
north are planning. 

I am willing to assume that the 
mnvnr nnH nther villaee offiJals in 



Round Lake and Round Lake Par are 
decent, caring individuals. Perhaps 
even some of the developers are 
people of integrity. How, then, can 
they sleep at night knowing that they 
are imposing these burdens on their 
neighbors while abdicating respon- 
sibility for what they have done? 

Village officials, please under- 
stand: development that does not 
pay its own way is no longer wel- 
come in Lake County. And it is never 
prudent policy to make enemies of 
one's neighbors. 

Mary Kay Fislier 
Round Lake 

Sheriffs Dept. needs 
increase 

I am writing in regard to the Lake 
County Police. As an advocate for 
lower speed limits and encouraging 
drivers to adhere to posted speeds, I 
would like to thank the Lake County 
Police for their support in WUdwood. 
Wild wood, as in other areas, has 
problems with people speeding 
through our community without re- 
gards to the speed llmlL The Home- 
owner's Organization ofWildwood 
promoted the new 25 mph speed 
limit and also met with the Lake 
County Police to enforce the new 
speed limit With their help, drivers 
in Wildwood have shown heightened 
awareness of and adherence to the 
nnsteci sneed limit 



I am aware of the fact that the 
Lake County Police has 480 square 
miles of County roads to patrol and 
has limited manpower to accom- 
plish this task It has come to my at- 
tention that the budget for the Lake 
County Police has not seen an in- 
crease for a number of years. As a 
resident of Lake County, I would like 
to appeal for an increase in their 
budget The population of Lake 
County has increased considerably 
thereby adding to the responsibility 
of the Lake County Police. 

The bottom line is I am greatly 
appreciative of the efforts of the Lake 
County Police and feel their budget 
deserves an increase in order to bet- 
ter serve the needs of Lake County 
residents. 

Susan Kroncke 
Wildwood 

Hell house serves no 
Godly purpose 

This past Halloween weekend a 
"Hell House'' was held at Calvary 
Temple Assembly of God Church in 
Waukegan. No doubt most people 
thought this was just another spook 
house where youngsters enjoy being 
scared. It was not According to the 
Friday, Oct 30th News Sun, the 
opening scene shows a dead youth 
in a casket A guide who is also pre- 
sent relates that the dead youth is a 
homosexual who has died of AIDS 



and that he has joined "all the rest of 
the perverted soulds in hell." As a 
faith community that welcomes and 
affirms gay, lesbian and transgender 
persons, we deplore this negative 
and demeaning portrayal. From our 
experience we find gays, lesbians, 
and transgender people to be sensi- 
tive, loving kind and compassionate 
Our faith convinces us that God does 
not consign persons to hell based on 
their sexual orientation. Love, not 
fear and hate, are at the heart of faith 
and the way of Christ 

We also object to the use of a 
Halloween spook house as the venue 
for presenting this negative stereo- 
type of homosexuality. Using the 
spook house to promote a particular 
point of view not clearly stated 
ahead of time takes unfair advantage 
of not only our young people but 
their parents as well. 

For those who experienced this 
scene at the Calvary Temple and felt 
uncomfortable by it, know that there 
are faith communities, (ours for 
one), that are sensitive and nonjudg- 
mental, and that will walk with you 
as you struggle for self-identity. For 
those in the Christian and secular 
community who are troubled by this 
portrayal of homosexuality, let your 
protest be heard loudly and clearly. 
Dennis Moiko, Moderator 
First Congregational United 
Church of Christ, Waukegan 






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C6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



November 13, 1998 . L j 



County recounts 108 
precincts from election 



ByJOHNROSZKOWSKI 
City Editor 



An apparent computer glitch led 
lo the election recount of 108 
precincts in Lake County last week. 

Lake County Clerk Willard He- 
lander said the problem was caused 
by a computer malfunction that af- 
fected the counting of some of the 
precincts in the judicial retention 
races. 

"The recount didn't change any- 
thing as far as the outcome of who 
won or which public (referendum) 
ballots passed." said Helander. 

The recount was done last l : riday 
after the County Clerk's Office had 
discussions with State's Attorney 
Mike Waller and the Illinois Slate 
Board of Uleciions on bow to pro- 
ceed. 

"It went very smoothly." He- 
lander said of the recount. "It took 
them about an hour and half to do 
the I Oil precincts." 

The problem was apparently 
caused In* a benl pin on a cable con- 
necting the hallo! counter to ibe 
computer, resulting in some of the 
votes in the judicial retention races 



not being counted. County Clerk's 
officials discovered the error about 
midnight on election night as they 
were tabulating the final election re- 
sults. 

Helander had initially planned to 
recount only the ballots for judicial 
retention. However, Lake County 
Democrats balked, saying all races in 
the 108 precincts should be counted 
to ensure the integrity of the election 
process. There are a total of 403 
precincts in Lake County. 

After discussions with Waller and 
the State Board of Elections, He- 
lander decided to do go ahead with a 
complete recount of the affected 
precincts. 

Lake County Democratic Party 
first vice chairman Peter Couvall said 
the party is satisfied now that the 
complete recount was done. 

"The bottom line is it's over," he 
said. "It didn't really change any- 
thing." 

I lowever. Couvall said he feels it 
was important to recount all of the 
races in (he 101! precincts: "If we did- 
n't recount everything, (here'd al- 
ways be the question in the back of 
cv erybodv's mind: Is this accurate? 



FROM PAGE CI 



NEWT: 

Species returns 

lay eggs. 

Ken Klick, a restoration ecologist 
with the Lake County Forest Preserve, 
said habitat changes that have oc- 
curred over the last 50 to 60 years in 
the county have adversely affected 
the newt's environment. 

For example, in the 1930s, non- 
native plants such as the European 
Buckthorn were introduced to the 
area for landscaping purposes. These 
plants reduced the natural vegeta- 
tion, which provided ground cover 
for the newts against predators. 

Development and the reduction 
in the water level due to the county's 
population growth have also impact- 
ed the newt and other amphibious 
species, he said. 

"The habitat requirement for the 
newi is that it needs permanent water 
and the water needs to be in a wood- 
ed area," he said. "Permanent wood- 
land water is kind of rare in this area." 

Klick said the Lake County Forest 
Preserve is practicing several conser- 
vation techniques to help improve 
the habitat for animal and plant life. 
For example, in the Grant Woods 
Forest Preserve, there have been con- 
trolled bums to eliminate non-native 
plants and the area has been rcseed- 
ed with native plants. 




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LANDFILL: Health dept, 
EPA claim violations 



this point what enforcement ac- 
tion might be taken against the 
landfill. He said that issue will be 
discussed with the Lake County 
State's Attorney's Office and the 
IEPA. 

Morgan said the landfill is ad- 
dressing the odor problem. 

"We're taking aggressive steps 
lo expand (the landfill's existing 
gas collection and destruction) 
system," she said. "We think we're 
on track to substantially reduce 
landfill odors." 

Meanwhile, Jeff Sutton, a 
spokesman for the IEPA, said the 
agency's Maywood office is look- 
ing into the alleged violations that 
(he landfill filled beyond its per- 
mitted boundaries 

"If it appears there's a violation 
of the permit conditions, or a vio- 
lation of the Environmental Pro- 
tection Act, then a notice would be 
sent to the facility," Sutton said. 

Sutton said if a violation notice 
is sent out, the facility would have 
a chance to respond in writing. 

Sutton said it's too early to 
speculate what, if any, penalties 
would be assessed against the 
landfill. However, EPA regulations 
provide that fines of up to $50,000 
could be assessed, he said. 

At the Lake County Board 
meeting on Tuesday, several board 
members expressed concern about 
the poiential violations. 



The board voted to table an in- 
tergovernmental agreement be- 
tween SWALCO and the county, 
under which the county would 
have been paid $1.1 million for 
landfill space that has already been 
filled in at the landfill. The board Is 
expected to revisit the Issue in De- 
cember. 

According to Quigley, about 
900,000 cubic yards of waste have 
been disposed of at the landfill — 
in an area that was originally des- 
ignated by the county for landfill 
expansion purposes — from Octo- 
ber 1994 to February 1997. 

The $1.1 million, which would be 
paid by Waste Management, is to 
compensate the county for the accu- 
mulation of waste in a section of ihe 
landfill that was intended to be used 
for future expansion, he said. 

Some County Board members 
expressed disbelief that it took the 
landfill's owners two and a half 
years before they recognized a 
problem existed. 

Sandy Cole (District 11- 
Grayslake] said she feels indepen- 
dent testing needs to be done by 
the county to ensure that these 
types of problems don't persist in 
the future. 

"How are we going to prevent 
this from happening in the fu- 
ture?" she said. "The only way 
we're going to be able to do that is 
by a site survey." 



BAN: Leaf burning rights may 
be in jeopardy 



The board took no action on the 
resolution at the meeting, but 
Galassie thinks there was a consen- 
sus by the board "to bring this issue 
to a close in the next six months." 

Currently, Galassie said there are 
20 communities in Lake County that 
have burning bans and another 1 5 to 
17 which have restrictions on the 
limes when leaves can be burned. 

Board members at Tuesday's 
meetings were divided over whether 
a leaf burning ban is a good solution. 
County Board member Suz,i 
Schmidt (District 3-Lake Villa) said 
she thinks the board needs time to 
carefully study the issue before mak- 
ing a decision 

If a ban was enacted, Schmidt 
said many residents in unincorpo- 
rated areas would have no way to 
dispose of a targe number of leaves 
— unless a cost-effective alternative 
is found, 

"There is a problem of what do 
you do with all these leaves," she 
said, adding, "This is an issue be- 



cause a lot of people don'i have ihe ^ 
money to get rid of all these leaves." 
Board member Robert Neal (Dis- 
trict 2-Wadsworth) said he doesn't 
believe a ban is the answer. He be- 
lieves people can be educated about 
when and how to burn leaves so that 
people in nearby residences won't be 
impacted by the smoke. 

"I think education can go a long 
way. I'm against completely banning 
burning," he said. 

However, board member Sandy 
Cole (District 11-Grayslake) agrees 
with Galassie that leaf burning poses 
a potential public health risk and be- 
lieves the board should consider a 
ban. 

She said Condetl Hospital sees a 
large number of children and elderly 
patients with respiratory problems, 
and those problems are often trig- 
gered by leaf burning. 

"It really is an acute health is- 
sue," Cole said. " If we can do this one 
thing to improve the quality of air in 
our county, let's do it." 



3? 



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PATRICIA'S 
AMISH FURNITURE 

41055 N. Rt. 83 
Antioch, IL 

(1 mile south of Rt. 1 73) 

395-4886 

HOURS: M-THUR. 10-6 

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SUN. 11-4 






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. 






/November 13, I9$i 



Get it off your chest (847)223-8073 

Fax (847) 223-8810 e-mail: lipsemce@lpnews.coin 

Upservice Is a phone-in column presented as a feature of Lakeland Newspapers. Lake- 
land Newspapers makes no claim to the authenticity of the statements. laketandNews- 
papers does not claim the content or the subject matter as fact, but as the personal 
opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to edSt copy or to refrain 
from printing a message. Call In at 223S073, fax In at 223-8810, or e-mail at (Ipser- 
vice@lpnews.com and leave your message 24-hours a day. Callers must leave their 
name, phone number and village name. Names and phone numbers will not be printed; 
however, callers maybe called for verification. 



rf^.LA$r 






OTii^QUESTION WAS: 



'S QUESTION IS 



^uid^^^mm 




I want answers! 

I would like to see responses to some 
of ihese people's questions under- 
neath diem so I don't have to wait so 
long for a reply. These people ask 
questions and I don't know what the 
answers are and would like to know. 
I think (he real estate transactions 
are great. I can find out what homes 
in my area are worth without having 
to bother with real estate people. 
Keep it up! 

IJbtrtyi'ille 

lit others expand 

I live in Ixike Zurich and the village 
has told us we rrced a larger post of- 
fice. We've expanded the fire depart- 
ment, we're expanding the schools, 
the library will need to be enlarged. 
Now we 're enlargingall these tax-free 
facilities in our village and yet the 
communities surrounding us don't 
have these services and expect us to 
supply tlii'in. I think these other peo- 
ple should supply their own services 
urn! diiOheir own wells for water. 

l/ike/.u rich 

On On. 29, my hraiitilul C'.twicoiate 
/.ah was struck a/id killed In a 
garbage truck on (inwdAw. hirst, to 
the man who ivas driving the truck, 

how dare you not stop! Second, to 
the people n ho did stop, I thank vou 
very much. Third, to those of you 
who have animals, keep them on a 
leash or keep an eye on them, ft only 
takes a second. 

Uunur 

Enforce laws 

I'd like lo know who's in charge of 
the police department in Island Uke 
and why they aren't out enforcing 
laws being broken all the time? When 
il rains, you can go walch these guys 
with windshield wipers going with 
no headlights on. 

Island Uke 

Out of hand 

I think Halloween has gotten way out 
of hand. People are starting to treat il 
like Christmas, We had 200 children 
come to our home for candy. They 
were cute and it was nice, but seven 
hours of handing out candy is too 
much. We had our home vandalized 



by J 4 -year-olds. It's just too much. 
We had to stay home two evenings 
just for that. It's loo much for people 

lo expect. 

Uberryi'ille 

There she goes again... 

There goes Carol Jonites widi sewers 
like last time. She had a large crowd at 
the meeting, but they were hastily 
against sewers. She was also insinuat- 
ing she represents all of incorporated 
area; she doesn't. As a person was try- 
ing to ask a question, the speaker said 
to quiet down. He tried to finish, then 
a man with a Inon Like jacket opened 
his loud mouth and hollered also to 
shut up, which brought the crowd 
down on him. If Jonites wants sewers, 
then she should move where there's 
sewers instead of putting seniors and 
young homeowners deeper in debt, 
and ifthevsell (hey would have to pay 
the additional $25,000. The speaker 
said (hat if you have nine lots you have 
nine votes. I own two lots, but could- 
n't vote because I didn't live here. Also, 
when 1 move out here. I still couln't 
vote tor mayor of Antioch because 1 
live in an unincorporated area, hut if 
they put sewers on the ballot, the peo- 
ple ol Auhoi ii I ownship pan vote lor 
il, which they will because n would 
lower the user fee in Antioch. Also, is 
17! R MI. J group getting a grant from 
I nx Waterway Agency? 

Antioch 

What a shame 

This is for live readers of l-'ox bike. 1 
have a question. Do you go and buy a 
12-pack of pop, or maybe two bottles 
of beer, a couple of cigarettes, or go to 
a movie and buy a tub of popcorn 
once a month? If so, why didn't you 
vote for the Fox l.ake school referen- 
dum, because il wouldn't have cost 
more than those things each month. 
Our kids need an education, livery 
other town around here, their school 
referendums went through. 1 don't 
know, the plaza's falling down, we 
don't have a grocery store, and you 
don't feel we need to update the 
schools. Next time this referendum 
comes up, vole yes. I'm an upset 
grandmother, thanks for listening. 1 do 



Keep up 

First of all, I'd like to say, five 
years before Roy Gundelach was 
hired to the Fox Lake Waterway 
Agency, nothing was done. After 
he was hired, he got 40 channels 
done. If (he office people couldn't 
keep up with Gundelach, the of- 
fice should have hired someone 
who could, not fire him for mov- 
ing too fast. 

Ingieside 

Back to nothing 

Thanks to Chairman Dam, not only 
did he get Roy Gundelach fired, but 
five other men were laid off. Of 
course, il looks like me Agency's back 
to doing noihing once again. 

Fox Lake 

Check minutes 

1 went to some of the board meetings 
at the Fox Waterway Agency. Check 
your minutes. Gundelach notified 
the board of what he was doing 30 
days before he put the earth dam in. 
Don 'l you listen to your own people, 
or do you just sit there and hear 
nothing? Until something happens, 
and then you put the blame on 
everyone else. Looks like we have an- 
other Karen Cabot. 

Fox Lake 

No choice 

This is in respqnse to the person ask- 
ing why Lotus School District wasn't 
absorbed into Fox Lake District 1 14. 
There was no option there. It was 
done as a mandate of the state be- 
cause Lotus was going to go bank- 
rupt. There was no choice. 

Fox Lake 

Learn language 

This lady that's so upset about the 
village not having a Spanish -speak- 
ing lady to help her when she comes 
in, should go back where she came 
from, or learn the language. It's not 
the village's responsibility to provide 
someone to make her heard. She 
needs to learn the language. The lan- 
guage of the United States is English 
as far as I know. 

Round Lake Beach 

Speak English 

I'm calling because about a month 
ago, I was at an open house for a vil- 
lage school, and it upset me because 



fair chance. I commend her on the 
job she s doing. 

Round Lake Beadt 

Pick up signs 

This is In regard to the elections that 
were just completed. It would be 
nice If the candidates who won or 

cudmhv.utncBh.B*. sgssja'iSteai 

Applebees, Itaiias'. need I say brenleftonthestrcekhlAways bv 



don't know our language, they 
shouldn't live here. 

Round Lake 

We have plenty 

I'm responding to "Need more eater- 
ies. " I think they're wrong, because we 
have a lot of places to eat We have 
Sammie's, Scottie's, Willie's, Boston 



Thomas', need 
more? 

Round Lake 

Tired of bad rep 

I live In Round Lake and I'm tired of. 



churches, etc. 



Gumee 



I'm calling to respond to "Where's the 



the bad reputation In our town. It's traffic lights" In the Nov. 6 Lioservice. 

very nice and peaceful and a nice L too, feel there should be a traffic light 

place to live. The Realtors are the on Nicole and Rollins roads Iwasina 

ones who are putting us down, say- car accident there. Someone pulled 

ing we are not like Llbertyville. Yes, outfrom Nicole and ran into mylane 

we are not like LibertyviUe. We don't Unfortunately, my story and thcirsto- 

have all the traffic congestion, and ry didn't match, and I'm fighting it In 

people with their. noses in the air. We court I do feel there is a light needed 

have a nice, quiet little town in the there because of all the traffic comlne 



country. We have beautiful new sub- 
divisions with nice homes. We have 
farms and a nice rural atmosphere, 
What we need is for people to talk up 
Round Lake, not tear It down. 

Round Lake 

No more expenses 

I'm calling to response to this week's 
question, should Lake County tax- 
payers pay for services to accommo- 
date the Hispanic population. My 
answer Is no. Wepayenodghftaxes to 
the state, federal government, and 
county. Why should we pay more to 
accommodate a certain group of 



from the stores and new houses. 

■ Fox Lake 

Just a hunch 

I'm calling In regard to the lady who 
complained about the Round Lake 
Village Hall. This Is just a hunch, but 
maybe she should learn to speak 
English if.she's In America. Maybe 
she's an illegal Immigrant and wa 
should coll INS. Learn the language 
of our country! . 

....,, Round I .alee 

Get a life 

This is In response to "Bring back 



i 



-■M 



people? It's not fair and isn't right to 'lady." There's nothingwrong with the 

« • ?_ « 1 • _!._ T» l-lKll IJ_I1 V«.. 



think there should be hate crime laws, a ^ ter tne y said lneir announcements, 
and yes, Wannstedt should be fired ' me y re P c ated it in Spanish. 1 ihink 

Fox Lake {hMs . BS - Tnis is t,ie u n'«ed Slates, 
and I'm not prejudiced, but if people 



everyone else. The language in 
America is English, they need to 
learn English, not us paying for 
Spanish interpreters for them. 

Ingleside 

David doing great 

This is in response to last week's 
message saving "Give some back," 
about Mary Davis. The comment 
said that Mary Davis is married to the 
mayor of Round Lake Beach. If the 
person knew their politics, they 
would know that she is not married 
to the mayor, her husband is Lance, 
and he has done extremely well in 
helping the Round Lake School Dis- 
trict in building the new building be- 
hind the high school. He did this as a 
donation, along with the other peo- 
ple who worked on this project Mary 
Davis is doing an excellent job. To re- 
place her, we'd have to spend more 
money. This person isn't giving her a 



Round Lake Beach Village Hall. You 
stated being Hispanic, you're not 
treated very friendly. Isn't it amazing 
you can speak English when you want 
to? Our country consists of two lan- 
guages, English and Spanish. I am 
Polish. Where's mine? What about (lie 
Italians, Germans, Irish and others? 
Get a life and learn the language. If 
you still want to complain, learn Eng- 
lish and have fun. 

Round Lake Beach 

Way to go, Pappas 

I think the Mayor of Fox Lake did a 
wonderful thing to appoint the 18- 
year-old to the board. It should in- 
spire many other 16- to 18-year-old 
girls and boys. Maybe some of our 
companies in Lake County should 
do the same thing. Give the young 
ones a good start in life, instead of 
joining gangs or quitting school. 

Fox Lake 





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Doug Raiio's "pioneering legal theory" on 
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killed by the negligent conduct of others' 

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... 



Seeds of Srriallness 

Fifteen factors 
for failure 

(Part One of a 

two-part series) 

It Is easy to write a formula for 
success. It must be, because 
hundreds have done It. Just 
slip into any good bookstore 
and look at the books In the "self- 
help" section. 

You'll find dozens of current 
titles. You will also find several 
"oldies but goodies" that have 
racked up 20 printings or more. 
There are books by movie stars, 
sports figures and coaches, corpo- 
rate CEO's and professional speak- 
ers. All of them promise to reveal 
the secrets of success. 

You can "Think and Grow 
Rich," "Awaken the Giant Within" 
and team "How to Win Friends 
and Influence People." Now 
friends don't be hasty In your 
judgement here. I am not putting 
down any of these books or any 
others tike them. I've read more 
than 100 of these "self-help manu- 
als" and I've gleaned something 
positive from each one of them. 

However, this column isn't 
about success, it's about failure. 
It's not about greatness, it's about 
smallness. It will show you how to 
plant the seeds of failure that 
guarantee a dismal, small harvest 
in your life. 

However, some of you may 
read between the lines.: You may 
just decide to take a step or two - 
away from failure, toward success. 
But, that's your choice. 

Sowing Failure 

• I didnt know. This is a 
classic failure seed, and a great ex- 
cuse. You will never know every- 
thing, but you can know some- 
thing. You don't need all the an- 
swers in advance, but you do need 
a sense of direction. The differ- 
ence between a classic failure and 
a great success may be the win- 
ner's words, "I don't know, but I'll 
find out." 

• I didn't believe I could. 
The failure is right. If you don't 
believe you can, you can't. On the 
other hand, if you believe you can, 
you're also correct. When there is 
little to lose by trying and much to 
gain if you succeed, by all means 
give it your best shot. 

• They wouldn't let me. This 
is a classic loser's kernel. Let me 
interpret: "Theywouldn'tletme" 
means "1 didn't really want to try." 
Remember, no one can keep you 
from becoming a success but you. 
Triumph is nothing more than 
"umph" added to "try." 

• I didn't plan. For many 
people, planning is a misunder- 
stood process. Failures make this 
simple process seem difficult. 
Planning has three steps: 1) Know 
where you are, 2) Decide where 
you want to go, and 3) Determine 
the steps required to get from 
point one to point two. 

• It Isn't my Job. I'll guaran- 
tee your failure If you'll say, "It is- 
n't my job," frequently. Failures 
avoid action. They don't look for 
solutions, instead they complain 
about the problem. 

• I dldnt learn from my 
mistakes. Proverbs 26:11 says, 
"As a dog returns to his vomit, so a 
fool returns to his folly." The only 
value of mistakes are the lessons 
they teach. You'll have to be a 
good student If you're trying to 
climb above failure. . 

• I dldnt have time. Check 
me out on this one. I think failures 
have the same amount of hours 

Please see TAYLOR /CIO 




November 13, 1998 ] - 



l ?,.".'f.*V* "•■ . 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C 9 




A recruiter explores 



inedmplfyefs 
dilemma 

This time of year, It seems that 
everyone has advice for job seekers. 
Seminars ' on resume-writing 
abound. Newspaper columns prolif- 
erate. Visit your local book store, and 
you'll find tons of shelf space dedi- 
cated to the topic Everyone, It 
seems, has something to say on the 
subject 

But— as one wise old sex educa- 
tion teacher used to say— It takes two 
to tango. There are two parties In- 
volved In the hiring process. How of- 
ten do you find advice directed to the 
other partner In the hiring dance, 
namely, the employer? 

"Right now, employers are hav- 
ing a p art icularly difficult time," says 
Cathleen Faerber, owner of The 
Wellesley Group, Inc. of Lake Zurich. 
The 11 -year old executive search 
firm serves many of the area's top 
corporations, as well as national gi- 
ants. 

"When the economy is good and 
employment is high, there are fewer 
candidates to draw from. Unlike in 
the 19B0's, many people are unwill- 
ing to relocate, the labor market is 
that much tighter." 

What's an employer to do? Ac- 



cording to Faerber, the first tiling is 
to reevaluate its hiring criteria. - 

Says Faerber, whose clients In- 
clude those in highly-technical 
fields such as finance and pharma- 
ceuticals— "Some employers are 
very rigid about, qualifications. 
They want so manyyears of highly- 
specialized experience, plus very 
specific degrees ... sometimes, even 
from particular universities. It be- 
comes quite a challenge to find a 
candidate that meets all these spec- 
ifications." 

The solution? "Sometimes I have 
to tell my clients to focus less on spe- 
cific technical experience and more 
on skill sets. If you find a person with 
the right skills, you can train them on 
the particulars." 

In addition, says Faerber, to 
draw top-performers, employers 
need to offering compelling incen- 
tives. Because she participates in 
hiring negotiations every day, Faer- 
ber knows exactly what people 
want right now. 

The sign-on bonus, for example, 
continues to be a highly-persuasive 
hiring incentive. Another is offering 
new employees a full year-end 
bonus, even when they only qualify 
for a pro -rated bonus their first year. 

Besides the obvious, money, 
what lights up a candidate's hot but- 
ton? "It's not about job security any 
more," notes Faerber, "Because the 
job market is booming And it's not 



about benefits, because most bene-. " 
fit packages are pretty standard these 
days." "What people really want is 
extra vacation time. Everyone asks 
about it An employer who Is willing 
to b'e flexible is going to have a real 
advantage." * ■' 

Most corporations link paid va- 
cation days to length of service, 
which discourages an established 
employee from switching compa- 
nies, A worker with four weeks of va- 
cation, for example, will think twice 
about a moving to a company that 
gives him or her half that Says Faer- 
ber, "One of my clients solved this 
dilemma by "grandfathering" vaca- 
tion time for new hires. If you have 
ten years of work experience when 
you join the firm, you receive the 
same amount of vacation as the em- 
ployee who's been with the compa- 
ny that long" 

Other successful hiring strategies 
include a generous, well-publicized 
employee referral program. Accord- 
ing to Faerber, "Employees usually 
know other professionals In their 
field. A savvy employer can tap Into 
that The most effective referral pro- 
grams rely on cash awards or airline 
tickets, although one of my clients 
has had great success offering free 
airline miles." 

Corporations should consider 
offering a wide range of perks de- 
signed to please employees. "They 
should definitely be thinking in 



terms of day care vouchers and tu- 
ition refunds; However, even small-. 
; er perks, like dry-cleaning pick-up, 
can build -good will" Employers 
must realize that they can't delay 
their decisions when it comes to hir- 
ing because good people get hiring 
quickly. vf^.v. 

The smart employer Is always 
looking for ways to attract, hire and 
retain top-performers. Says Faerber, 
"There's no question about i t, a com- 
pany Is only as good as its people. 
The wise employer knows this ... and 
treats its people accordingly. That 
way, when the labor market gets 
tight, like It Is right now, they still 
come out ahead." 

Tips for hiring 

the best people - 

1. Don't get hong up on de- 
grees: Don't be so rigid about qual- 
ifications. If you find a person with 
the right skills, you can train them on 
the particulars. 

2. Offer compelling Incen- 
tives: The sign -on bonus continues 
to be a highly persuasive hiring in- 
centive. Extra vacation time Is also a 
favorite perk. 

a. Offer an employee referral 

program: Reward employees for 
recommending other professionals 
they may know in the field. 

4. Strike while the Iron Is hot 
Don't delay a hiring decision ... good 
people get hired quickly. 



like Cou^ site, awards grants 



A whirlwind of excitement and 
energy electrified members and 
guests following a power breakfast 
brokered by the Lake County Educa- 
tion-to-Careers (ETC) Partnership at 
the College of Lake County (CLC) 
Thursday, Oct. 29. 

Education, business, and com- 
munity leaders shared their perspec- 
tive insights on how to better pre- 
pare all Lake County learners for 
meaningful careers and to strength- 
en growing partnerships between 
schools, businesses, and service or- 
ganizations. 

In addition to building momen- 
tum between members and poten- 
tial new members, the Lake County 
ETC Partnership unveiled its new. 
web page and allocated nearly 
$84,000 in funds to 10 different 
school/business partnership initia- 
tives. 

Keynote speakers included: Dr. 
Gretchen Naff, CLC President; Jean- 
nie Hamilton of Walgreens and a 
Lake County ETC Partnership co- 
chair; Susie Morrison, Illinois State 
ETC Coordinator; Barbara 

Oilschlager, Lake County ETC Part- 
nership co-chain William Pepito of 
Abbott Laboratories; Charles Bartels 
of Manpower; and Russell Peterson, 
CLC vice president of education af- 
fairs. 

Bartels, who heads Manpower in 
Lake and McHenry counties, listed 
the main ingredients employers look 
for in potential employees. He said 
successful employees are prompt 
and dependable, take pride in their 
work, foster teamwork, apply math 
and science skills, embrace emerging 
technologies, and are critical 
thinkers. 

Together "parents, educators, 
and employers help people to be- 
come, to self actualize, to be expres- 
sive. We have the opportunity to be 
the fertilizer to unlock the soul," said 
Bartels, speaking from a business 
perspective. 

Morrison, the newly appointed 
chief of the statewide education-to- 
careers initiative, said ETC partner- 
ships such as Lake County's bring 




Representatives from various school/business partnerships attended the Lake County Education- 
to-Careers Partnership breakfast and accepted grants on behalf of their local school/business part- 
nership. Sitting In the first row, from left: Lena Gublotta, Lake Zurich Unit District; Lynn Morrow, 
Lake Zurich Unit District; and Paula Bleneman, Round Lake Unit District. Standing in the second 
row, from left: Bemie Fallaw, MacLean-Fogg; Kathy Bell, Mundeletn High School; Charlene Parris, 
Abbott Laboratories; Mey Spencer, Project Pass; Elh/n Zimmerman, Round Lake Unit District; and 
Marge Rankin, SEDOL Standing, third row, from left: Ken Philips, Round Lake Unit District; Jeanne 
Kearby, Round Lake Unit District; and Dennis Szymkovlak, Mundeleln High School. Standing, last 
row, from left: Daniel Christensen, Round Lake Unit District; Ed Bates, Project Pass; Lou Marello, 
Waukegan High School; and Angelo Kyle, of the Lake County Board .^Submffted photo 



relevant learning and foster real- 
world applications to students as 
they make the transition from school 
to work or from one career to anoth- 
er. 

"If we are successful, we will im- 
prove the quality of education for all 
students. Students will make in- 



formed choices; they will become 
lifelong learners.. .and they will de- 
velop competencies and confi- 
dence," said Morrison, who oversees 
39 partnerships across the state and 
called the Lake County Partnership 
the "lighthouse" of partnerships. 
The Partnership also presented 



for the first time its new web page. 
The Internet address of the web site 
is www.neurorriancer.nu/clc/. The 
easy-to-navigate site offers quick 
links to Lake County Partnership in- 
formation such as mission/vision 

Please see PARTNERSHIP /C10 









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C10 /Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 







Below are real estate transactions for villages in and around the Lakeland 
Newspapers circulation area. Listed are the property address, property buyer, 
and purchase price. 



Antloch 



762 Crekk Bend Rd, Stancly Paioackl & 

Christine PotocU. $226,438 

353 Joren Tr, Norman & Virginia Geary, 

$113,000 

42236 Lakeview, Douglas Graf, $122,000 

38548 N. Drexel Blvd. Lillian Bond, $1 10,000 

39935 N. Hidden Bunker Ct, Ronald Tlmm, 

$120,040 

872 Tiffany Farms Rd, Michael Mmcmahon 

& Diane Mcmahon, $218,081 

22520 W. Lillian, Angela & Benita Villa, 

$189,000 

475 Winsor Dr, Bellv Meyer, $ 156,000 



Washburn, $112,000 

4Z60 Woodlawn, Simon Si Sandrah Harri- 
son, $153,000 

Hawthorn Woods 

3 Canterbury Ln, Mark & Gall Chmelar, 

$315,000 

I2HighpoinlDr, Amcriquest Mortgage, 

$270,000 



Ingleslde 



Fox Lake 



195 Jancl Ct, William & Madeleine /olmson, 

$165,200 

52 Pistakee Lake Rd. Keith Koepke & Robert 

Wallner. $82,500 



26288 Blackhawk Ave, William Ronsman & 

Tracy Elliott, $101,000 

27614 Luana Dr. Matthew Propst, $123,000 

710 S. Ri 59, Robert & Conna Campbell, 

SI 20.000 

25067 W. Rollins Rd, John Hauser, $155,000 

26164 W. Vista Ct, John Britt, $158,986 



Lake Villa 



Grayslake 



33600 Gagett-ood Ct Stephen & He Am- 

ponin. $173,000 

22 Oak St, Liek Oak Inc. $156,000 

240 S. Lake Si. Thomas & Dorothy Bamber, 

SI 99.500 

208 Windjammer Ln. lames & Barbara 

t;»Jdman.S!B9.5O0 



Gurnee 



5489 Barmvood. Michael & Chrislie Paiton. 

SI 92.500 

.1615.1 Fdgewatcr Ct. liradlev QotiLs, 

SI 44.900 

28 1 jncaMer Ct. Krrlinrti S. Pvggv Baron, 

5117.900 

.UOMaii'sijc ( i. Allan & Lisa i.anduyi, 

SJ59.5W 

33843 \ sumirn'rCirlu" Dr. Arthur & Nicole 

Ki-nah. $253,722 

XW22 S Summerfield Dr. Stephen & Mari- 
anne li'iiskf. S.tJT,000 

i 148 0,ikmiMd«w (,"i. Virginia Warfiekl. 

SL'lO.ttXI 

333 Si Andrew* In. I : c Ye & Wenjie Sun. 

S.196,000 

5.1H4 ntrjiniu Ct, llavmond & Linda Smith. 

SI 87.500 

(i55 U'atcrhury Ave. Michael & Cvndi liar- 

m, $267,842 

650 Whitney Ct #202, Gordon & Luella 



1371 Carriage Ln. Thomas Reis. $156,400 

37861 Douglas Ln. Kathryn Anderson, 

$157,500 

37423 N. Grand Blvd. Alan A Andrea Woods, 

$139,400 

818 Savanna Springs Dr, Joe & Bene Brown, 

$203,000 

746 Sun Lake Rd, Paul & Carolyn lohnson, 

$17,646 

It 2 1 Wilshire Ln, Bvron & Jennifer Luccfc 

$178,760 

6 1 5 Winchester Ln, Ch ristopher Twardy, 

$121,000 



UbertyviUe 



1401 Braxton Rd, Scon Lynn, $330,000 

630 Carter St. Christopher & Larua Sweeney. 

S279.000 

4 18 E. Austin Ave, Christopher & Lisa 

Kennedy, $214,000 

1 19 E. Ellis, Todd & Susan Goeks, $186,000 

104a L Winchester, George Gillespie, 

JO I QQQ 

I I2N. Third Si, Mary Glynn, $189,700 

318 S. Milwaukee Ave, Vincent Chrisiri- 

walanasaj & Tunee Chrisiriwaranasai, 

$255,000 

606-fS. Milwuakee Ave, Sally Bartlett, 

$90,000 

305 W. Camargo Ct, Fario Fahmy, $454,704 

4561 W. Gavin Ln, Lan Zhang & Zhangxin 

Cong. $342,677 

348 W. Lincoln, Timothy & Kathryn Wagner, 



$172,000 

222 Woodland, Robert St Margmet O'Hara, 

$193,500 

Undenhnrst 

469 Barn Swallow Dr, John Daniels & Kelly 

Daniels, $234,236 

449 N. Crooked Lake Ln, Fernando & Bertha 

Rocha, $193,008 

517 Nortbgale, Mark & Donna Tennerman, 

$159,000 

2013 Spmcewood, Deborah Helde, $134,500 

Mundelein 

230 Dallon Ave, Joshua & Georgia Hogan, 

$134,500 

1 4 1 Godwin, Lona Gaul, $ 1 1 1 ,500 

1 15 N. Ridgemoor, Gerardo & Erika Mal- 

danado, $132,000 

37 Parliament, Angel Schumacher & Angelo 

Galasso, $173,000 

18981 -3c Rose Ct, Massoud Faghihi & Kathy 

Rlce-faghihl, $49,000 

19624 W. Martin Dr, William & Heidi 

Schimpr, $220,000 

Round Lake 

543 W. Wheeling Rd, Janet Devita. $186,9 1 1 

Bonnd Lake Beach 

299 Eagle Creek, Gabriel Pasko, $124,000 
1116 Lotus Dr, George Kreiling & Irencw 
Krieling, $109,000 

306 Meadow Green Ln, Reinaldo & Ann 
Cortes, $64,000 

2387 N. Old Pond Ln. Michael Adrowskl, 
$133,000 

1502 N. Park Dr, Errol & Victoria Smith, 
$93,900 

2453 N. Periwinkle Way. Todd Tichendorf & 
Maria Zidman. $169,000 
2227 N. Quaker Hollow Ln, Mark t Christi- 
na Johnson, $152,266 
2231 N. Sedgefjcld Ct, Wayne Mariett, 
$160,165 

1610 Ridgeway, Daniel Ratzke, $108,000 
22855 W. Lakeview, Dawnell Horn & James 
Block, $157,500 

Round Lake Heights 

1804 Tomahawk Tr, Michael Lyong, $65,000 

Round Lake Park 

304 E. Washington, Richard & Susan Russell, 

$64,500 

14 E. Willow, Mark Weger, $87,500 

Wadsworth 

307 N. Southern Hills Dr, Douglas Wide- 
burg, $187,460 




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Waaconda 

783 Uplzzan Ln, Michael Dulen, $281,712 

I52NorthAve, Grand Premier Trust And 

Investment, $668,500 

27080 Ridge Rd, Alexander Shldeler, 

$114,000 

33 6 Still water Ct #1 4-01 , John & Kathleen 

GifTord. $138,000 



November 13, 1998] 



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FROM PAGE C9 



' •••■■_ ■■ 



TAYLOR: Failure factors 



each day as those who succeed. 
We all have the Ume. The ques- 
tion Is do we use our Ume wisely? 
I gave up television when I began 
writing this column eight years 
ago. Subsequently, I conceived 
and co-authored one book and 
have written another. This col- 
umn now reaches business owners 
in all 50 states and 40 foreign 
countries. I don't feel that I've 



■ - . 
wasted my time,. 

Next week in part two, I'll 
share more seeds of failure. I hope 
you'll never plant them. In any 
event, don't miss part two. 

Don Taylor is the co-author of 
"Up Against the Wal-Marts." You 
may write to him in care of "Mind- 
ing Your Own Business, " P.O. Box 
67, Amarillo.TX 79105. 



PARTNERSHIP: Unveils 
web site, awards grants 



statements, committee structures and 
members, fundlngappllcatlons, and a 
calendar of events. It also links to oth- 
er partnership web sites across the 
state. The site also has room to expand 
and offer links to specific Lake Coun- 
ty school web sites. 

"Hopefully, this will generate 
more ideas out of our schools, our 
businesses, and o ui partners hip," not- 
ed Pepito, who is also a member of the 
partnership's steering and marketing 
committees. 

In the spirit of education -to -ca- 
reers, the web site was designed and 
developed by Deerfield High School 
students Chris Laures and Patrick Cor- 
rea. 

Furthermore, 10 different 
school /business partnerships were 
awarded grants to pursue their local 
education- to-careers Initiative In their 
school communities. The Lake Coun- 
ty Partnership disbursed a large sum 
of seed funds it received from the state 



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and federal government earlier this 
spring. Award winners Included: 

• Round Lake Alternative and 
Continuing Education Services and 
Manpower, $7,884; 

• Magee Middle Schoolln Round 
Lake, Burger King, and K-Mart, 
$10,000; 

• Grayslake Middle School and 
Barat College, $3,200; 

• Lake Zurich Unit School, Cam- 
bridge Bank, Dycast, Exxon Chemical, 
and LaSalle Bank, $8,865; 

• Mundelein High School, Mo- 
torola Technical Education and Doc- 
umentation Center, MacLean-¥bgg, 
National Alliance of Business, and the 
University ofWIsconsin Center for Ed- 
ucation and Work, $10,000; 

• SEDOL, Gurnee Grade, Wood* 
land, and Warren High School. S4,oop: 

• Project PASS and Mundelein 

High School, $10,000; 

• Waukegan High School and Ab ■ 
bott Laboratories, $10,000; 

• North Chicago Middle School 
and North Chicago/Great Lakes Par- 
ents Council, $10,000; and 

• Round Lake High School and 
Manpower, $10,000. 

Oilschlager, the main thrust be- 
hind the Lake County Partnership, 
was encouraged by the energy gener- 
ated by the speakers who rallied die 
membership, by the unveiling of the 
new web page, and by the distribution 
of education-to-careers funds to the 
local school/business partnerships. 

"Everyone was charged with ex- 
citement following the meeting," 
Oilschlager said. "This will hopefully 
serve as a springboard to launch this 
partnership into an even greater and 
stronger future as we bring education- 
to-careers to those who benefit most 
by it— the students, schools, business- 
es and Lake County," 







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crs, cm 

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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT PREPARED BY LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 

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November 13, 1998 









Lakeland Newspapers/ 01 1 



THIS WAY TO WEALTH 




'&tir5 K iiit*i^^ «' q • ' 




"ardly a day goes by with- 
out hearing about a pro- 
posed or finished bank 
.merger. Over the last few 
years, banks and financial Institu- 
tions have been consolidating at a 
feverish pace. 

Since the future of such mergers 
cannot be accurately predicted, this 
leaves the public with a question of 
how long these mergers will last 
There is also a question as to the op- 
portunity to benefit from such con- 
solidation. 

There is significant evidence 
that these mergers will continue 
well into the future. This is due to 
the recent changes in interstate 
banking regulations. 

The change of the interstate 
banking regulations has enabled 
banks to venture past their borders 
to expand their market scope. When 
a bank has a desire to expand their 
market scope, it is usually most effi- 
cient and profitable to acquire an 
existing bank in a geographic area, 
eliminating the high cost of starting 
up an entirely new branch. Because 
of the high start up cost, the bank 



that Is being acquired has the ability 
to be sold at a premium price (a 
higher price than Its current value), 
increasing the banks stock price 
substantially. . 

Bank mergers also have the abili- 
ty to increase profits by streamlining 
their operations. This is usually ac- 
complished by consolidating their 
operations and eliminating many 
positions and departments that are 
not needed The increased profit also 
increases the banks stock price. 

Due to tod ay's low interest rates 
and Inflation, banks are able to 
maintain their profitability due to 
greater investment margins between 
the rate at which they loan money 
and the interest they credit their 
customers. Banks have many cus- 
tomers being charged very high in- 
terest rates on their credit cards and 
other high-risk loans. This rate is 
much higher than the interest rates 
they credit their customers saving 
accounts and CDs, leaving the bank 
with another large profit center. 

Before one thinks of investing in 
any sector, they must always be 
aware of the potential risks of such 



an investment Financial Institu- 
tions are subject to adverse effect of 
volatile interest rates, economic re- 
cession, increased competition 
from new entrants in the field, and 
Increased regulation. 

Because of the opportunities 
that exist with bonks, many invest- 
ment firms have established mutual 
funds Investing primarily in this 
area. A mutual hind allows you to 
Invest in a diversified portfolio that 
is professionally managed, reducing 
your overall risk. If you would like to 
receive a free report on the best 
bank funds on the market, please 
call 1-800-542-8289, or write 601 
Skokie Blvd., Suite 504, Northbrook 
60062.— By David Hennings 

David Hennings, an author 
for this Way To Wealth, is senior 
advisor with Jerome Alexander 
Associates, working with individ- 
uals and businesses to help them 
achieve their financial goals. For 
more information write to Hen- 
nings at 601 Skokie Blvd., Suite 
504, Northbrook 60062, or call 
him at 564-9371 (outside Chicago 
area (800) 542-8289. 



!<&«.; 



inresforsw 



rVJ?- 



The individual retirement ac- 
count (IRA) Is one of the top choices 
for retirement planning. That fact 
was confirmed in a survey by Zurich 
Kemper Investments. - 

Kemper asked its sharehold- 
ers their opinions on IRAs and re- 
ceived one of the strongest re- 
sponses ever. Respondents were - 
asked to rank from one to nine 
their preferences for retirement 
planning, including savings ac- 
counts, government securities 
and other investments. IRAs 
placed second in the ranking, be- 
hind pre-tax employee plans such 
as 401(k)s and 403{b)s. Twenty- 
three percent of the survey re- 
spondents ranked IRAs their top 
retirement planning method, and 
36 percent said IRAs were their 
second choice. 

What's the appeal of the IRA? 
More than 60 percent of those sur- 
veyed said building a retirement ac- 
count that compounds free of taxes 
is the biggest benefit Only 32 per- 
cent viewed the annual tax-de- 
ductible contribution most impor- 
tant. 

The survey also asked opinions 
on ways Congress could enhance 
IRAs. Sixty-seven percent of respon- 
dents favored an increase in the an- 
nual contribution limit. A close sec- 



ond (60 percent) wanted higher in- 
come eligibility limits for deductible 
contributions. Two other features 
respondents wanted were tax-free 
withdrawals (29 percent) and the 
ability to use IRAs for more than re - 
tirement (30 percent). To some de- 
gree, these needs are addressed by 
the new Roth IRA. 

The Kemper survey reveals that 
investors are taking retirement 
planning seriously —r as they 
should be. Future retirees may 
face a different financial environ- 
ment than today's retirees.. Will 
Social Security be there? How 
about Medicare? How will invest- 
ments be taxed? Will your compa- 
ny retirement plan — if you even 
have one — provide enough? 

The message is. clear: Re- 
sponsible working taxpayers . 
must plan their own retirement. 
Fortunately, Americans have sev- 
eral good opportunities to do so. 
If you aren't yet participating, 
you owe it to yourself and your - 
family to start today.— fly Noah 
Seidenberg 



Noah Seidenberg is affiliated 
with Edward Jones Investments in 
Grayslake. For more information, 
call 223-1908. 



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YOUR NEEDS ARE CHANGING. FIRST OF AMERICA ^ CHA^INS#TQO. 



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7 




First of America is now National City. 

More resources to help you. More ATMs to mm you. More people 
to advise you. Uese are just a few of the benefits you'll gain when 
First of America becomes National City. You know where you're going 



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life. Now, through National City, you have a partner who can 
connect you with the right investment opportunities, financial services 
and advice. Take charge of your Mg|JQ|^3| CHV 

FOLLOW YOUR OWN LEAD: 



financial future. Follow your own lead. 



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C12 / Lakeland Newspapers 



November 13, 1991 



Before You Choose 
a Funeral Home, 



Ask This Question: 




"Who Owns the Company" 

When you ask us, we'll tell you, "We do." Because our home has been fam- 
ily-owned and family-managed for generations. And we believe that makes 
a great difference In the care and service your family receives. So be sure 

you ask the one simple question that lets you know who's in charge. 
Because it can also let you know exactly how personal the service will be. 

Our Family serving your family 

to help you in your time of need. 
K.K. Hamsher Funeral Home Ltd 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Road, Fox Lake, Illinois 

1 Block West of Rte. 12 - 1/2 Block North of Grand Ave. 

"The Chapel on the Lake" 



(847) 587-2100 



(815) 385-1001 



DEATH NOTICES 



ALCALDE 

ladnlu Alcalde fyfflp W\ ol Hound Lake 

Heath 

Arr: Ringa hmerul Home, Like Villa 

FIDDYMENT 

Eileen M FicUlyment (nee I imuiieri age 

7<)o( tiurnee 

An Ciiitnee'Saliitu l utuTiil Hume. 

durnre 

GIBBS JR. 



I lenry A. Gihbs Jr., age 74 of Mundclein 
Arr: Kristan Funeral Home, Mundelein 

KIRKHAM 

Kale Kirkliam, age (15 of Libertyvillc 
Arr: McMurrough Chapel, Libertyvillc 

ASHLEY 

Marie I. Ashley [nee McConnaughhay) age 
75 of Mundelein 

Arr: Glueckcrt Funeral Home, Ltd.. 
Arlington Heights. 





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Obilu 


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•ies & Death Notices 




is 10 


a. 


in. on Tuesdays. 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Funeral 



lUSTEN'S ROUND LAKE FUNERAL HOME 

222 N. Rosedale Court (Rosedale at Cedar Lake Road) 

(847) 546-3300 

Nancy Justen, Jeffrey Jordan, Directors 

Additional Locations in McHenry and Wonder Lake 

K.K. HAMSHER FUNERAL HOME, LTD. 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Rd., Fox Lake, 1L 

(847)587-2100 

Kenneth K. Hamsher, Debra Hamsher Glen, Directors 

RINGA FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2146 

Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

Dan Dugenske, Director 

(847) 395-4000 

SPRING GROVE FUNERAL CHAPEL 

8103 Wilmot Rd., P.O. Box 65, Spring Grove, IL 60081 

Kurk R Paleka, Director 

(815) 675-0550 or Toll Free (888) 394-8744 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL AND CREMATORIUM, LTD. 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake, IL 

(847) 223-8122 

David G. Strang and Richard A Gaddis, Director 




Rose C. Buchardt (nee Hertel) 

Age 56 of Fox Lake and Ingleside for the past 35 years 
nnd a farmer resident of Fremont Center. Died on Monday, 
Nov. 9. I99B at her home In Fox Lake. She was bom at 
Libertyvillc on Sept. 0, 1942. She was the daughter of the late 
John and Laura Tekampe Hertel who were pioneer farmers In 
the Fremont Center area. She attended the St. Mary's 
Catholic Church at Fremont Center where she was baptized 
and confirmed and for the past 35 years has been a member 
of St. Bedc Catholic Church in Ingleside. While a member of 
St. Bede Church, she was a member and a past president of 
the Ladles Sodality; a member of the St. Bedc Women's Club; 
a longtime member of the St. Bede choir an ardent worker 
and supporter of the St. Bede Church summer festivals; a 
member and former president of the Fox Lake Garden Club; 
a former member and coach for the Grant Township Utile 
League baseball program. Mrs. Buchardt was the manager of 
the food and beverage office at the Fox Lake Country Club. 

Survivors include her husband Kenneth G. Buchardt 
with whom she was united In marriage on May 4, 1968. Also 
surviving are a son, Kenneth J. (Mlschell) Buchardt of Fox 
Lake; two grandsons, James Raymond and Kyle James 
Buchardt, both of Fox Lake; rwo brothers, Otto (Delores) 
Hertel of McHenry and Paul (Judy) Hertel of Fremont Center, 
two sisters, Rosella Ullrich of Turtle Lake, Wis. and Margaret 
(Stanley) Schmitt of Spring Grove; many nieces and nephews 
and great nieces and nephews and other relatives survive. 
She is preceded in death by her son James Buchardt In 1992 
and by one brother AJ Hertel and by her parents-;-. 

The Buchardt family invite friends and ncljj 
attend her visitations from 3 to 9 p.m. on Friday., 
the K. K. Hamsher Funeral Home, 12 N. Plstakec^CafceJtd.,' 
Fox Lake (The Chapel on the Lake). 

A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Saturday, 
Nov. 14 at St. Bedc Catholic Church, Ingleside. 

In lieu of flowers, the family will appreciate memorials 
for St. Bedc Catholic Church, Ingleside. 

Gertrude Mann 

Age 83 of Islington, Conn., formerly of Antioch, passed 
away Thursday, Oct. 29. 1998 in Connecticut. She was born in 
Germany, the daughter of the late John and Elizabeth (Moll) 
Lippert, she had lived in Antioch for many years before mov- 
ing to Ellington 13 years ago. She was a former member of 
the United Methodist Church of Antioch. On Oct. 1 1, 1937. 
she married Robert Mann in Indiana and he preceded her in 
death Oct. 15. 1997. 

5urvivors include her daughter, Faye (Alan) 
Maslromatteo of South Windsor, Conn, and four grandchil- 
dren. Jeffrey Krueger, Lynn Mastromatteo, Lori and Rou 
Cady. 

Graveside services with burial of crcmalns will be held 
al 1 font Saturday, Nov. 14, at Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. 

Memorial funeral services were held in Vernon, Conn. 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch handled the local 
arrangements. 

Polly Ann Blocker (nee White) 

Age 51, a former longtime resident of Pistakee 
Highlands, McHenry and of luka, Miss., died Tuesday, Nov. 3, 
1998 in McHenry. She was bom on July 25, 1947 in luka. Miss. 
10 Alvic and Emmer White, and had been a housewife in the 
home. 

Survivors include: one son, Duane (Laura) Blocker of 
Ingleside; three brother and two sisters; one grand daughter, 
Snmantha Blocker of Ingleside; and her dear friends Kay and 
Dick Widrick of McHenry. She is preceded in death by her 
husband, Kenneth Edward Blocker, and by her parents. 

Private services were arranged by the K. K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home, Fox l.ake (The Chapel on the Lake) 

Shirley A. Johnson 

Age 39, of Fox Lake, passed away on Friday, Nov. ti, 1998 
at her residence. Born on March 24, 1959 in Chicago, a resi- 
dent of Fox bike for the past six months formerly of Hound 
Like. Shirley enjoyed her grandchildren and had a wonder- 
ful zest for life. 

She leaves her daughter, Rcnca (Darrin) Auckland of 
Round Lake Park; son, Chris Johnson of Round Lake Park; 
mother, Edith Collins of Grayslake; two grandchildren, 
Kristen and Kerry; five brothers and fiancee, Robert 
Boardman of Fox Lake 

Funeral services were held at the Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake with the Rev. James 
Merold, pastor; Queen of Peace Catholic Church, North 
Chicago, officiating. 

Interment followed at Avon Centre Cemetery, 
Grayslake. 

Margaret A. Macile (nee Hallesar) 

Age 92 of Round Lake Beach passed away Nov. 6, 1 998 at 
her residence. She was born Nov. 6, 1906 in CoUinsville, Penn. 
Mrs. Macllc had made her home in Round Lake for over 25 
years. A member of the Grandma's Club, Round Lake Happy 
Seniors, and a former member of the Long Lake Civic 
Organization. 

She leaves her daughter, Margaret Lehto of Chicago, 
Catherine Mathias, Thomas and Robert Fragale; loving 
grandmother, great-grandmother and great, great grand- 
mother; sisters, Emma and Ethel. She is preceded in death by 
her husband. 

Vinclcnt Memorial Services will be held at a later date. 

Arrangements were entrusted to Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd. Grayslake. 



Wesley H. Biastock 

Age 83 of Grayslake passed away Saturday, Nov! 7, 19981 
at Condell Medical Center In UbertyvUle. He was bom Jan.[ 
1 4, 1915 in Benton Harbor, Mich, and had made his home in I 
Waukegan for over 51 years. A resident of Grayslake since] 
1989. He retired in 1969 from U.S. Steel of Waukegan where I 
he was employed as a Master Mechanic. In retirement he 
worked for the Waukegan School District as an electrician for 
over 10 years. 

He leaves his loving wife; Winifred (nee Brown) to whom 
he wed on Aug. 19, 1939 In Waukegan; sons, Leland (Judy) of 
Harvard and Dennis Biastock of Alaska; five grandchildren 
and five great grandchildren. He Is preceded In death by his 
parents, August (Anna) Biastock; sister, Dorothy In Infancy 
and his brother Loverno. daughter-in-law, Jean Marie In 
1994. 

Services and Interment were privately held. 

Arrangements were entrusted to Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd, Grayslake. 

Memorials may be given to the Heart Menders Clinic, 
c/o Condell Health Care Foundation Condell Medical Center 
801 S. Milwaukee Ave., libertyvule, IL 60048. 



Silas W. Cornelius 

Age 77 of Antioch, passed away Sunday, Nov. 8. 1998 at 
Northern Illinois Medical Center, McHenry. He was bom 
June 27, 1921 in Carlinvillc. the son of the late James and OHIc 
(Lowe) Cornelius. He had lived In Downers Grove, where he 
was a member of the Masonic Grove Lodge 824 before mov- 
ing to Antioch in 1965. Mr. Cornelius was a car salesman at 
several dealership, retiring in 1982. Previously, he and his 
wife operated Clarendon Hills Cemetery, Darien, for many 
ears. On March, 12, 1945 he married Pcarle Todd In Alton. 

Survivors include his wife, Pearlc; one son. James 
(Debra) ofWausau. Wise, and one sister, Flo (Don) England of 
Springfield. He was the grandfather of Kelly and Rachel. 

Funeral services were held at the Strang Funeral Home 
of Antioch. 

Interment was at Clarendon Hills Cemetery. Darien. 

Those desiring, may make contributions to the 
American Lung Association in his memory. 



Grace 'Thelitis' Olsen 

Age 74 of Grayslake. passed away on Thursday, Oct. 29, 
199Q at her residence. She was born on May 19, 1924 In 
Grayslake and remained a lifelong resident. Employed as a 
secretary with the Grayslake Gelatin Co. for over 54 years. An 
avid ice skater and was a member of the Chicago Figure 
Skating Club. 

She leaves her sister, Arlene E. Olscn ofGrnyslake. She is 
preceded in death by her parents, John and Doris Olsen. 

Memorial service was held at the Good Shcphcia 
Lutheran Church in Lake Villa with Rev. John Zellmcr, pastor, 
officiating. 

Interment was privately held. 

Local arrangements were entrusted to the Strong 
Funeral Chapel and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake. 

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be given to the 
Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 25100 W. Grand Ave. Lake 
Villa. IL 60046. 

Helen C. Herber (nee Grinus) 

Age 85, passed away Thursday. Nov. 5, 1998 at 
Winchester House in Libertyvllle. She was a resident of 
Hound Lake Beach for the past 20 years. 

She leaves her son, Howard Herber; grandchildren. 
Tammy (Robert) Hopp, lames (Joan) Herber. Christopher 
(Patricia) Herber; great grandchildren, Nicholas, Cameron, 
and Carter; her sister. Estellc Kerpan. She is preceded in 
death by her husband, George Herber, sister, Vera Peterson 
and brother Barney Grinus, 

Friends and family visited at the Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake 



Please see page CI 3 



Strang Funeral Chapel 
& Crematorium, Ltd 




vj-Vy 



RDE^ 



FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED 

100 YEARS 

OF DEDICATED SERVICE 

1898-1998 

410 East Belvidere Road 
Grayslake, EL 60030 

(847) 223-8122 

David G Strang •Richard A. Gaddis 
Directors 






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November 13^1998 

From page /C12 

t Interment was held at Highland 
Memorial Park In LIbertyville. 

In lieu of flowers, donations may 
be made to the American Cancer 
Society. ■ 

Bemice 'Bertha' Usalis 

Age 91, a Fox Lake area resident for 
many years and a Leisure Village resident 
for the past 13 years, died on Nov. 6, 1998 
at her home. She was born on July 19, 
1907 at Chicago. Mrs. Usalis was a mem- 
ber of St. Peters Catholic Church In 
Spring Grove, and she was a former 
employee with the Honed Hosiery Co, in 
Chicago, before her retirement 

Survivors include, one daughter, 
Arlene (Gerald) Furbush of Lake 
Zurich; three grandchildren, Cathy 
(Thomas) Demarke of Palatine, Jeffrey 
(Mlchele) Furbush of Crystal Lake, 
Karen (David) NofTs of Palatine; and by 
nine great grandchildren. Also surviv- 
ing are two sisters, Helen Kroje of Fox 
Lake, and Valerie Scholburg of Largo, 
Fla.; nieces and nephews. Mrs. Usalis is 
preceded in death by her husband. 
John A. Usalis on Sept. B, 1997; by two 
brothers, Charles and Clem Nauscda 
and by one sister. Dorothy Pctrocios. 

Friends and family visilcd at the K. 
K. Hamsher Funeral Home, Fox Lake (the 
Chapel on the Lake) 

A Funeral Moss was held al St. Peters 
Catholic Church In Spring Grove. 



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OBITUARIES/LEGAL NOTICES 




Lakeland Newspapers/: C 1 3 



: Interment was at SL Peters Catholic 
Cemetery, Spring Grove. 

KimMajewsld 

• Age -32 of Antloch, passed away . 
suddenly, Sunday! Nov. 1, 1998 on 
arrival at Northern Illinois Medical 
Center, McHenry. She was born Nov. 
4, 1965 In Melrose Park. Her family 
moved to Lake VHJa in 1971 and she 
was a 1983 graduate of Antloch 
Community High School. She partici- 
pated with the Brownies and Girl 
Scouts. Her hobbles Included volley- 
ball,' Iceless hockey, boating and Ice 
skating and other athletics. Currently 
she worked for School District 41 In 
Lake Villa, as a bus driver. On March 
7, 1995. she married Steven Majewskl 
In Florida. 

Survivors Include her husband, 
Steven; her son, Scott; her mother, 
Jeanlc (nick) Kranz of Ormand 
Beach, Fla.; her father, Steve (Judith) 
Kosco of Lake Villa; her maternal 
grandparents, Angeline and Jasper 
Donald of Chatom. Ala.; her brother, 
Scan Knsco and sister, Windy Kasco 
both or Ormand Beach, Fla. and her 
pet companions, Winnie and Drew. 

Funeral services were held at the 
Strang Funeral Home of Antloch. 

Private cremation was held. 

In lieu of flowers, donations may 
be made to a trust fund for her son at 
the First National Bank Employee 
Owned, 4B5 Lake St., Antloch, IL 60002. 



William B. Solomon 

. Age 64, : passed away on Monday, 
Nov. 2, 1998 at his home In Round Lake 

Park. He was born on Oct. 21, 1934 In 
Manltou Springs, Colo. William served as 
a Corpora] in the Marines during the 
Korean Conflict. He was a 10 year mem- 
ber of the American Legion In 
Mundcleln. He was a construction esti- 
mator for General Services 
Administration. William was also a mem- 
ber of the Avon Players in Grayslake. 

He Is survived by his wife, Barbara J. 
-(nee Casey); his mother, Anna Solomon; 
his sons, Patrick (Dawn) Solomon, and 
Casey Solomon; his grandchildren, 
Eleanor and fames, his sisters Imogene, 
Anna Lee, Wanda, Nellie and Amy; and 
his sister- In-law, Patricia Casey and 
' brothcr-ln-law, Lawrence Casey. He Is 
preceded In death by his father, Clarence 
Solomon; his sister, Emma; and his 
brother, Ronnie. 

Family and friends visited at the 
Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake. 

Funeral Mass of the Resurrection took 
place at St. Joseph Church In Round Lake. 

Interment took place at Queen of 
Angels Cemetery, Sandwich. 

In lieu of flowers, donations may be 
made to the American Cancer Society. 

Anne Stauder 

Age 73 of Naples, Fla,, passed away 
on Wednesday, Nov. 4, 1998. Mrs. Stauder 
moved to Naples, Fla, in 1984 from 



Round Lake, where she was a resident for . 
28 yeah. In Round Lake, she was. presi- 
dent of the Round Lake Consolidated . 
Schools PTA arid Round Lake High 
School Band Boosters. In Naples, Fla, she 
was an active member of the Naples Park 
Area Association and the Naples Park 
Neighborhood Watch. 

She Is survived by two daughters, 
Sharon (Michael) RoslnskI of Round Lake 
and Susan (Tom) Rotello of Rockford; 
grandchildren, Brenda, Beth, Zak, Ell, 
Noah and All; and special friends, Edna, 
Richard, Gloria and Jeff and many other 
close friends In Florida. She Is preceded 
In death by her husband of 41 years, 
Joseph R. Stauder. 

Services were private. 

Arrangements were made by Hodges 
Funeral Chapel, Naples, Fla 

Donald Ross Burr 

Age 65, a wonderful husband, father, 
grandfather and great grandfather, died 
Monday, Nov. 9, 1998 In his home. Mr. 
Butt had been a resident of the Fox Lake 
area for the past 45 years, and a winter res- 
ident or Pine Island, Fla. for the past seven 
years. He was formeriy of the Lombard- 
Glen Ellyn area He was bom In Chicago, 
on May 7, 1933 to Lucie n and Margaret 
(nee Carlson) Burr, and was a veteran of 
the U.S. Marine Corp. He had been 
employed as an operating engineer for 
over 35 years retiring In 1995. He had 
worked with Milwaukee Railroad lor 15 
years. He was also Involved with the 



building of Watts Marina and the Rustic 
. Harbor Marina He was a member of the 
Operating Engineer Local ." 150 of 
Lakemoorand the Lakes Region American 
: Legion Post 703 of Fox Lake, the American 
Power Boat Assoc, the Aircraft Owners 
. Pilot Assoc,' and a former member of the 
Harmony Resort Snowmobile' Club. 
Among his many passions, he wnsa mem- 
ber of the Cortlno Boat Racing pit crew, - 
racing at Blarney Island, and had also 
flown his own Cessna 182 Skytarie plana 
He was an avid fisherman, anil had 
enjoyed tinkering with anything mechan- 
ical, but he was most grateful for his fami- 
ly, and his many good friends. 

Survivors Include, his wife, Margaret 
'Bobbie 1 (nee Whitney) Bum his children, 
Carl 'Rick* (Sharon) Burr, Pam (Terry) 
Frank, Darryl Burr, Brad Stlttgen, Beth 
(Danny) Roder; five grandchildren, Jody 
(Marcl) Burr, Ben Frank, Taml Shelhamer, 
Jamie Burr and Donald Burr, one great 
grand daughter, Amanda Frank; one 
brother, Warren (Pat) Burn two sisters, 
Carldeon (Robert) Rosenwinkel and Pat 
(Fred) Sitz. He is preceded In death by his 
parents, and by a brother, Luclen "J.R." 
Burr Jr. 

Arrangements far private services 
were conducted by the K. K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home, Fox Lake (the Chapel on 
the Lake) 

The family will appreciate memori- 
als for the Northeastern Hospice of 
Illinois, 410 S. Hager Ave., Barrlngton, IL 
60010 







: 






PUBLIC NOTICE 
ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Fiscal and Shared Services Center 
Financial Outreach Services 
100 North First Street 
Springfield. Illinois 62777-0001 
Mlllburn C.C. Dlst. 24 
18550 Mlllburn Rd„ Wadsworlh, IL 60083 
ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR PUBLICATION 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED Juno 30, 1 998* 
(Section 1(M7 of the School Cod*)** 
SIZE OF DISTRICT IN SQUARE MILES: 16.6; NUMBER OF ATTENDANCE CEN- 
TERS: 1; NUMBER OF.CERTIFtCATEDEMPLOYEESr FULL-TIME 41; PART-TIME 5; 
NUMBER OF NON-CERTIFICATED EMPLOYEES: FULL-TIME 8; PART-TIME 12; 
AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE: 509.36; NUMBER OF PUPILS ENROLLED PER 
GRADE:*** PRE-KINDERGARTEN 10; KINDERGARTEN 69; FIRST fit; SECOND 64; 
THIRD 65; FOURTH 55; FIFTH 50; SIXTH 55: SEVENTH 63; EIGHTH 58; SPECIAL 0; 
Total Elementary 550; NINTH 0; TENTH 0; ELEVENTH 0: TWELFTH 0; SPECIAL 0; 
Total Secondary 0. TOTAL IN DISTRICT 550. 
TAX RATE BY FUND (IN %)**** 

EDUCATIONAL 2.300; OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE .263; BOND AND 
INTEREST .477; RENT 0; WORKING CASH .050; TRANSPORTATION .193; MUNICI- 
PAL RETIREMENT .040; SOCIAL SECURITY .074; FIRE PREVENTION AND SAFETY 
0- TORT IMMUNITY .100; CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS 0; SPECIAL EDUCATION .020; 
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION BUILDING 0; OTHER SEDOL 1MRF .013; OTHER 0. DIS- 
TRICT ASSESSED VALUATION: $64,788,710; ASSESSED VALUATION PER A.D.A. 
PUPIL $127,196. TOTAL BONDED INDEBTEDNESS JUNE 30. 1997: $2,980,000; 
PERCENT OF BONDING POWER OBLIGATED CURRENTLY 67%. 

(ASSETS - VALUE OF CAPITAL ASSETS - BASIS OF VALUATION USED) Land - 
46,477 - Audit Report; Buildings ■ 3,773,844 ■ Audit Report; Equipment - 707.3B3 - Audit 
Report. 

* Based upon the Illinois Program Accounllno Manual for Local Education Age ncies. 
"When publishing this report in the newspaper, type requirements must be in accor- 
dance with 715ILCS 15/1. 
***As reporled on the Fall Housing Report. 

****Example: If the lax rate for educational purposes is $1 .84 per $100 of EAV, it is shown 
as 1 84%; not as the percentage it is of the total tax rate. 

GROSS PAYMEN T FOR CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL 
CERTIFIED PERSONNEL-Salary range: Undor $15,000 (Substitutes) 
Apfel Stacey K.; Alwood, Richard A.; Casey. Donna M.; Cox, Susan M.; 
Fredlani.Meredllh L; Hall, Lowell M.; Hay, Patricia J.; Hoetzer, Geneen M.; Houtz, Judith 
L- Johnson, Kathleen Y; Kopff, Stacy I.; Kreutziger, Penny; Mackowiak, Jean M.;Martm, 
Robin F.; Owen, Jon; Pann, Angela; Paulsen, Colleen A.; Polenzani, Grethen M.; Rahmel, 
Betty;Redlng, Nancy A.; Rothermel. Marsha; Siegel, Jeanne M.; Tschanz, Anne; 
Turnbull, Thomas G.; Williams, Frances N.; Yonke, Georgainn. 
CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL-Salary range: Less than $15,000 
Rohlwing. Wendy A.; Smurthwaite. Susan J. 
CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL-Salary range: $15,000-$24,999 
Brosch, Debra L; Craft, Lisa A.; Vroegop, Pamela J.;Warren. Stephanie A.; Wyelh, 
Stephanie; Zaranto, Rebecca A, 

CERTIFIED PERSONNEL-Salary range:$25,000-$39,999 

Addison, Monica N.; B. Steckleln, Janet D; Baker, Virginia; Becker, Tara; Block Nancy J.; 
Bogenschutz, Peggy J.; Chamernlk, Daniel P.; Chamernik, Kelly R.; Contort!, Jean M.; 
Click Sean D.;Hogreva, Debra I.; Jacobs, Sandra J.; Jendrzejewski, Laura; Kantor, Dana 
S ' Kopfl Susan; Mark, Kathy; Norgard, Janis; Rathunde, Joanne M.; Reu, Martha J.; 
Schapira, Maureen P.; Schwartz, Janet K.; Shule. Sandra; Sinkus, Gail; Sllmp, Sharon; 
Spandet, Diane C; Stan!, Judith; Woynowskl, Mary Kay. 

CERTIFIED PERSONNEL-Salary range: Over $40,000 

Ames. Diana; Brown, Barbara; Cybul, Gary L; Qreisheimer Chnsjne M ; Kucera, 
Cheryl; Menzer, James P.; Norgard, James R.; Overman, Beth E.; Piitman, Carolyn P.. 

Sitz, Margery D.; Sutton, Martha A. „„„«>„*,»„;, 

S GROSS PAYMENT FOR NON-CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL 
NON-CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL-Salary range; Under $15,000 

cilnne Diane- Cvbul Cory J.; Elferlng, Noel; Grasty, Barbara E.; Harpke, Linda J.; 
S^S^S^llStWSlt" Kucera, Chrlstophe J.; Muter., Michelle R.; 
K^DO^&rpSnm CjfnWa G.; Petrovlc, Dragon; Schwartz, Melissa B.; 
Smlfh DebSie U Stewart, Kathy; Trbovlc, Mlllca; Usmlller, Kathleen M.; Yeaton, Lesley 

NON-CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL-Salary range: $15,000-$24,999 

mMEWniSpEBSOUNEL-StiW «*« $25,000.$39,999 
Hanna. Bernadette L, Stevens. L yda L^ ^^ 

crtn , MWM INSURANCE 17 672 00; STATE BANK OF THE LAKES 988,213.68; 
ItSI OF IlSs 3 596 40; SUN LIFE OF CANADA 5.957.00; SUTTER & 
SSaSJ^SSStSSSaD 12,048.60; T.H.f.S. 8,283.15; TEACHER'S RETIRE- 
Scffi wtrJ 133 287 85TECHSTAR AMERICA CORPORATION; 19.76B.10; UNIT- 
ED^SUAL ™1S OofviRCO 3.126.00; WASTE MANAGEMENT OF LAKE COUNTY; 



2,442.13; WISCONSIN DEPT. OF REVENUE 4,730.16; VENDORS UNDER $1000.00, 
67,623.14; ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE 41.724.96; K-LOG. INC.; 3,465.60; 
DANA S. KANTOR ED. S 3,483.73; KEMPER INSURANCE COMPANY 2.000.00; KEM- 
PER INVESTORS LIFE 2.150.00; KRANZ, INC 1.864.06; CHERYL KUCERA 2,450.00; 
L.C.E.S.C. 5.865.39; LANDSCAPE CONCEPTS, INC. 3.376.00; LEARNING SERVICES . 
1.005.65; LESTER MATERIALS 1.336.00; UNDENHURST POLICE DEPT. 1.200.00; 
LYONS 6,458.79; MAC BASE USA 12,238.00; MAC MALL 2.455.87; MAC ZONE 
1,620.24; MAC-RES-Q 2,689.00; MCGRAW HILL BOOK CO. 1,168.87; MELLEN SEP- 
TIC 11,792,00; MELLON FIRST UNITED LEASING 3,707.21; JAMES MENZER 
2,224.10; MIDLAND PAPER 3,237.18; MIDWEST VISUAL 2,720.00', MILBURN CAIN & ■ 
COMPANY 5,O0O.OO;MlLLBURN CC^ SCHOOL DIST. #24. 7.B44.Q2; MtLLBURN ■■^•> 
'. IMPREST ^FUNDit4,BBaaTvMOBVU OIL' e;eCrT^»«.N«nOt4Al.SCHOOUBOa/LA10LA\N 
- TRANSIT 22,393.23; -'NORTH COOK EDUCATIONAL SERVICE ;: CENTER 2306,00;. ,~, 
NORTH SHORE GAS 3.141.24; NYSTROM 1.084.95; OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY OF 
LAKE COUNTY 22.305.00; OUTLOOK WINDOW FASHIONS 2,482.00; PACE COMMU- 
NICATIONS SERVICE CORP. 1,923,50: PHOENIX COMMERCIAL CLEANING 
23.896.83; PHONIC EAR 1.007.75; PATRfCfA PONDELL. P.T. 5,377.50; PRENTICE 
HALL SCHOOL DIVISION 7,890.32; QUILL 1,195.00; GARY RABINE & SONS 
25.930.00; JOANNE RATHUNDE 3.783.00; REGIONAL SUPERINTENDENT OF 
SCHOOLS 1,100.00; JANE REU 1,543.00; RIGBY EDUCATION 1,409.08; S.E.D.O.L 
67 646.84; SAMMONS PRESTON 1,202.67; SCC CLEANING COMPANY 18,939.96; 
SCHOOL SPECIALTY SUPPLY CO. 16.112.94; SILVER BURDETT 14,148.58; SIMON 
& SCHUSTER 5.015.46.A SPECTRUM DECORATING 7,325.00; ACCESS EQUIP- 
MENT CORP. 1,275.00; ACE HARDWARE 1,839.46; AIMEE 1.091-25; ALARM DETEC- 
TION SYSTEM OF ILLINOIS 2,849.16;AMERICAN EXPRESS FINANCIAL ADVISORS 
5,928.00; AMERITECH 9,225.05; AMGAS 7,591.49; AMOCO OIL 4.743.12; ANTIOCH 
ROOFING & MAINT 5,1 50.00; ANTIOCH SCHOOL DIST. #34 1 1 ,535.23; APPLE COM- 
PUTER INC. 1 1 ,248.00; ARAMARK CORP. 1 ,590. 1 6; ARAMARK UNIFORM SERVICES 
4 856 76- BAKER & TAYLOR 2,664.76; BANK OF ILLINOIS 18,254.76; BEACH PARK 
DIST #3 4 280.85; BLUEBIRD LEASING 29,789.19: BOLLER CONSTRUCTION COM- 
PANY 343 29848; 303 CAB ASSOC. 21,212.50; CARL FISCHER OF CHICAGO 
1 289 28- CHALLENGER DAY SCHOOL 11,850.94; CLINICARE/EAU CLAIRE ACADE- 
MY DIV 35.350.74; COMMONWEALTH EDISON 34,465.34; COOPERATIVE 90'S 
HEALTH PLAN 142 833.78; COPLEY NEWSPAPERS 1,468.15; COUNTRYSTYLE, 
INC 9 893 24; DATA CONTROL AND RESEARCH LTD 1,203.15; DELTA DENTAL 
PUNS OF ILLINOIS 19.792.03; DEMOULIN BROS. & COMPANY 2,516.98; DEYOUNG 
TRUCKING & EXCAVATING, INC. 22,772.72; ELECTROSTATIC PAINTING 3,056.00; 
ELFERING FARMS 1 ,304.00; THE ELTON CORPORATION 3,912.30; EQUITABLE LIFE 
13 854 00; EVERYDAY LEARNING CORP. 6,376.22; KATHY FENDEL 1 ,290.00; FIDELI- 
TY TAX EXMPT SERVICE CO, 2,200.00; FLINN SCIENTIFIC INC. 1,195.07; 
GRAINGER, INC. 1,502.08; GRAND SPORTING GOODS 1.104.90; GREG LARSON 
SPORTS INC 1,097.03; HARCOURT BRACE JOVANOVICH 6.293.24; ANN HEAVEY, 
MS CCC-SLP/L 1 ,062.50; HIGHSMITH COMPANY, INC. 24.51 1.17; HODGES. LOIZZI. 
EISENHAMMER, RODICK, KOHN 2448.28; HORACE MANN INS. CO. 3.680.00; 
HOUGHTON MIFFLIN CO. 1 1 ,005.51 ; ILL MUNICIPAL RETIREMENT FUND 26.368.00; 
ILLINOIS ASSOC. OF SCHOOL BOARDS 1,380.50 



Please see page Cl 4 



Lakeland Newspapers is interested 

in hearing news of local Events, 

Clubs, and Organizations. 

Please send news items to: 

Rhonda Hetrick Burke, 
30 S. Whitney St., Grayslake, 60030 

Tel. 223-8161 

Fax 223-8810 

PHOTOS ARE ALSO 
WELCOME 






-•~. w.._ 



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•i j. J m 



November 13, 1998 



LEGAL NOTICES 



Lakeland Newsj. 



Hags®, -.--sera 



1 Novembe 



From page IC13 




j 



STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND UBIUTIES R.S.NG FROM CASH TRANSACTIONS/STATEMENT OF POSmON June 30, 1998 



A ■ 



Ifii.'j".',. • ' 

If-.'.."- ; .;-'.->>3 

I ' 



ASSETS 

CURRENT ASSETS (100) 

1 Cash (Accounts 101 through 105] 

2 Other Accrued Assets (GAAP) 
(Attach Itemization) 

3 Taxes Receivable (GAAP) 

4 Accounts Receivable (GAAP) 

5. Loan to Educational Fund 

6. Loan to Operations and 
Maintenance Fund 

7. Loan to Transportation Fund 

8. Loan to Fire Prevention and 
Salety 

9. Loan to Other Funds 

10 Inventory 

11 investments 

12 Other Current Assets 
(Attach Itemization) 

13 TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS 



ACCT. 
NO. 



EDUCATIONAL 
$347,790 



OPERATIONS 
ANO MAINTENANCE 

5219.372 



BOND 
AND INTEREST 

$222,269 



TRANSPORTATION 
$82,607 



MUNICIPAL RETIREMENT! SITE ANO CONSTRUCTION/ 

SOCIAL SECURITY CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT 



WORKING CASH 



$64,487 



$183,459 



110 

120 

151 

152 
153, 

154 
155 
170 
180 

199 



nREPREVENTIOfi 
AND SAFETY" 

fl: : ;-^M r . 

■i.v'v i'"'.- 

1 



■ 1 



■. ■■•' ■,' . 



4.415 
$352,205 



$219,372 



$222,289 



$82,607 



$64,487 



1,000,000 
$1,183,459 



1 Une 2 should include accounts 130, 140, 162. 181, 192 



STATEMENT OF ASSETS ANO UABlinES RISING FROM CASH TRANSACT,ONS,STATE M ENT OF POSmON June 30. ,999 



CURRENT LIABILITIES (400) 

1 Accrued Liabilities (GAAP) 

2 Corporate Personal Property 
Replacement Tax Anticipation 
Notes Payable 

3 Antrppation Warrants Payatte 
t Anticipation Notes Payable 

5 Teachers Orders Payafle 

6 Slate Ad Anticipation 
Certificates Payable 

7 Loan tiom Educational Fund 
% Loan' irom Operations 

and Maintenance Fund 
9 Loan t'dtT Transportation Fund 
'0 LfflBflHa* Wo*mg Casn Fund 

1 1 Payroll Deductions Payable 

12 Oelerted Revenue iGAAPl 
,3 Due to Activity bflSS 

Organizations 
y Omer Current Liabilities 
tAttacn Itemization) 

15 TOTAL CURRENT LI ABILITIES 

16 Reserve Fund Balance 

1 7 Unreserved Fund Balance 

Ifi TOTAL CURRENT UABIUTIES 
AND FUND BALANCE 



406 
407 
408 
409 

410 

431 

432 
433 
434 
450 

474 

JB0 

499 

703 
704 



325 000 



.u-iti;,, as 



S32&,000 

5237967 
5(2T0,762j 

S352.205 



$219,372 
$21 9.372 



$222,289 

$222,289 



$82,607 



$82,607 



564,487 



$64,487 



51.183,459 



$1,183,459 



Une 1 should Include accounts 402, 41 Ml 5, 420, 441, 442, 461 



M --— -SSSSiSSS SSBBBBKKSr— — "— 



RECEiPTSiREVENUES 

1 Local Sources 

2 Flow Thtougn Revenue Irom 

One LEA to Another LEA 2000 

% Slate Sources 3u00 

4 Federal Sources 4000 

5 TOTAL DIRECT REVENUESI.RECEIPTS- 

6 ReceiptsiRevenues tot 
OnBehall ol Payments 

7 TOTAL RECEIPTS/REVENUES 
DISBURSEMENTS/EXPENDITURES 

Function No 

8 Instruction 1000 
■9 Supporting Services 

10 Community Services 

11 Nonprogrammed Charges 

12 Debt Services 

13 TOTAL DIRECT DISBURSEMENTS, 

EXPENDITURES 

14 Disbursements/Expenditures' tor 
On-Behalf Payments 

15 TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS 
EXPENDITURES 

16 Excess ol Direct Receipts/Revenues 
Over (Under) Direct Disbursements/ 
Expenditures 

OTHER FINANCING SOURCES AND Acct 



3000 
4000 
5000 



8.3VB 

69B.B37 

1.3.769 

$2,245 496 

$144,124 
$2,389,620 



51.765,156 
365.617 

■65,251 
19.391 

$2,215,415 

5144.124: 

$2,359,539 



$201 .366' 



$201,368 



$304,036 

73.616 
5377.652 

5377.652 



$115,668 

145,334 
$261,002 

5261,002 
$197,166 



$54,745 



5818,622 



529.964 



554,745 



554.745 



524,375 
31.792 



5818,622 



5818,622 



5520.347 



S29.964 



$29,964 



No. 
7000 
8000 



(USES) 

17. Other Financing Sources 

18. Other Financing (Uses) 

19. TOTAL OTHER FINANCING 
SOURCES AND (USES) 

20. Excess ot Receipts/Revenue and 
Other Financing Sources over (Under) 
Disb./Exp. and Other Financing uses 

21. FUND BALANCES- July 1,1998* 

22. Other Changes in Fund Balances 
Increases (Decrease) 

23. FUND BALANCES-June 30, 199B 



$30081 



$103,234 



5103.234 
\ 

$133,315 
(106.110) 



$27,205 



5210,958 

5210.958 
_SJ?.59Q] 

511.093 
5(11.093) 



5(20,683) 
240,055 



5219,372 



278,603 
$278,603 

5278,603 
$99,049 

$5,531 
$(5,531) 



$93.51 B 
128,771 



5222.2B9 



5240,772 



5140.: 



$56,167 



556,167 



$20,230 



S[lv 



5520,347 



5520,347 



$298,275 



$56,646 



529,964 



$29,964 



5(56,646) 



520,230 
62.377 



582,607 



$(29,964) 



511,422) 
65,909 



S64.4B7 



5241,629 
941,830 



51,183.459 



. GASB Statement No. 2* Accounting and Financial Reporting lor Certain Grant, and Other Financial Assist^ 



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November 13, 1998 



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CHRISTMAS WALK 

Sunday. November 22nd, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

M o« the Christmas season b^the ^^^^^T 
open on this special ^■^"SttteStoj.e. the whole family, 
and free carnage ndes oMhe %™£™»^ » Wa£ 



LIGHTING OF THE HISTORIC SQUARE 

Friday, November 27th, 7 p.m. 

before a^^ And E|joy The Music And Enjoy A Free Cartage R.de 



■»-„«- CARRIAGE RIDES 
W ^FiisrcWicwso "^ 

1 The First Nalional Bank ol Chicago 



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lifec 



<tK«aaoUt\bttT\c 



iit hi '"' •*'■•■ r-=t)Si ■ ». .'•■' ■ | Via 'ride ilcltets lof&n ppen-olr 

^p^«i*#i* ^^^^^^^^^^«^|^^^S^^fe If! have tickets: 



ANNUAL CHRISTMAS PARADE 
AROUND THE SQUARE 

Sunday, November 29th, 2 p.m. 

He,p S ree, S anta as he comes to Woodsto C for Christmas, and join him afterwards ^refreshments. 

Shop Woodstock 
During The Holidays' 
Extended Daily Hours 

Coordinated 
by 




2254-WD 
13, 1998 




■ 



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C1 6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



>FI 



Bank of 
Northern Illinois 

Waukegan • Gumee 
Ubertyvflle • Glenvlew 

847/623-3800, 



F5S€ 





TIAWTHOQN 

DANK 

■208 Oak Creek Plaza 
Mundelein 

949-9000 

gtivaiiJi/ astvtetft ttAete 
\jhc peuonnl touch 
siifl mtUteaf 



COUNTY 



• N6vemberi3,1998 






jffwst. 



November 13, W8 



COUNTY 



j&kd^Ne^ 



:"^:~P '' '?■ 'I 






Lake County 

'Sportsmen & Gun 

Collectors' Show 

Sundays 
Nov. 15 & Dec. 20 

Lake County 
Fairgrounds 

Rt. I 20 & 

m 45 



GRILL 

Great Sports Bar * Umdi & Dinner 

Private Parties • Birthdays 

Meetings* Graduations 

476 liberty St. 
Wauconda 













laiieiasers 









are 



Lakeland Newspapers 

stiq 
Wauconda and 
Cool Food Pantry (Waukegan} and Allendale Association 



-'■;-'■£/- 






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CHRISTOPH'S 
AUTOMOTIVE 

Import a & Domestic 

Auto Repair 

Specializing in Acura & Honda 

1244 IN, Milwaukee Ave. 
Liberty ville, IL 6004S 

,918-8100 



. • .; 














Jiolidxxy 

Wishes 
from 

Hawthom Center! 

Milwaukeejlm. # 
Vernonjiills, LC i 

362-6220 



\k,/ 



OX LAK! 
BOWL 

33 N. Rt. 12 
Fox Lake, IL 

587^1490 

L'^ocJk & Glow BowW'i 






WW 

-■ ■ : Vi -i"t>! 



.^f^-.^TI' 



- 









\ - 



r MANP0WEI 

LBke Villa '2654300 
Vernon Hills • 918-1200 
Lake Zurich • 726-9300 

Waukegan • 473-7100 

McHenry 
815-3854600, 




LeamingExpM 



Your Neighborhood Toy Store 

northwest Comer of 

Rt m & Mdloffian U 

Mtmdele'm 

66-4990, 




I REALTY 
m WORLD 

UlBKDKLR NETWORK 



TIFFANY REAL ESTATE 

Jack Fields, GRI 

549 Lake St. • Antioch 

395-1010 

Voice Mail 
374-6231^ 




! V-fW* 










>. ■»!■<;• ; ..^ia AttJaCTipMM 



^^a^assaiafflfflSss^ 



■^SH^l?li 



/ 



C^8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



£2lm*ifted 4mfuide 



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Notices 

Lost & Found . . . 

Free . . . 

Personals 

Auctions 

Business Personals 
Financial 



Help Wanted Part-Time 
Help Wanted Full-Tin>e 
employment Agencies 
Business Opportunities 
Situations Wanted 
Child Care 

School/lnsuuc li on 

v. rjrj;^*nr" — *~-c* 



Antiques 

Appliances 

Barter/Trade 

Ila/4ar<k/( 'rafts 

HusldKig Maicrtalv 

lliiMiK-%s/orricc Euuipiiirm 

l-lj-clronics/Compulrrs 

[•"aritiCrtJidc 

I'lfdWlHHJ 

(iaranr/Kiiniinattc &tfe* 

(iixxl 'flnngs To Hal 

Morses fit 'lack 

Household (kxhJs/Fu tin lure 

Jewelry 

I jwnAijrdcn 

Clolhltl)! 

Mi\Lfll.iru-ou\ 
Medical iuiuip/Su[>|ilii-t 
Mustc.il I in iru merits 
Pels A Supplies 
Restaurant lujuiprnrlil 
T<x>h A Macliincr> 
Wanted To Buy 

Monies l-'tu Sale 
Homes l-'or Kent 
( Ionics Wjnu-d 
Hiuiifs limldcrs 
t 'iitido/Tovsii HiiiTit's 
Mobile Homes 
Ap.iitmcnls l-oi Kent 
Apatinienis Warned 
Apt/Uoim-s To Share 
Kottins f : ot Rem 
Building . . 

Hus'meii Property l*«r Sate 

Uu&tucu I>io(rciiy Vvii Haiti 

tuvc^liiscill l*ii>l*c»\y 
Mt«i|lii}ie Set vices 

1-arnis 

Vjl-jiIiI I .< H±/A in-J(lr 
Kcjurii/Vji.u(ii>r> KciKiiJs 
Out Of Area fniperty 

Cemetery l-oti 

Real Estate Wauled 
Real Estate Misc 

Z^+fercaliortiil 

Recreational Vehicles 
Snowmobiles/ ATVs 
lioats/MoKirs/Hn.' 
C 'a taping . . 
Travel/Vacation 
Spwu» Hquipmeiu 
Airplanes 

Cars For Sale 

Rental/Leases 

Classic/ Antique Curs 

Services & Parts ... 

Car Loans/ Insurance 

Vans 

Four Wheel Drive/Jeeps 

Trucks/Trailers . . 

Heavy Equipment . . 

Motorcycles 

Wanted To Buy 

'ervlce.mmiltrcgibrtf 



110 
115 
120 
125 
130 
135 
140 



.219 
220 
221 
.225 
.228 
.240 
250 



301 
304 
308 
310 
314 
318 
320 
324 
.128 
3.10 
334 
.138 
340 
344 
348 
349 
ISO 
.154 
158 
.160 
364 
368 
370 





704 
.708 
710 
714 
.718 
.720 
.724 




804 
808 
,810 
.814 
.KI8 
H24 
828 
.834 
.838 
.844 
.848 



Appliances Repair ... 

Blacktop 

limldcrs 

Carpentry 

Carpel Cleaning 
Concrete/Cement 

Dry w -«ll 

Rducalion/lrislruclioii 
Hlectrical 
Firewood . . 

Handyman 

Heating/Air Conditioning 
Housekeeping 




Landscaping . , 542 

Laundry/Cleaning S45 

Legal Services S48 

Medical Services 55] 

Moving/Storage -.-,.. S54 

Painting Decorating S57 

Paralegal/Typing Services , S60 

Plumbing ...... S63 

P°°ls .......... S66 

Pressure Washing S69 

Professional Services S72 

Radio/TV Repair , 575 

Remodeling . . . jj-jg 

Resumes 5g [ 

Roofing/Siding .,,. 534 

Sl °rage S87 

Tax Service S90 

Trees/Plants . . ... . . . . , . , ... S93 

Wedding S96 

Miscellaneous ...... . . . . .. . . . S99 



CLASSIFIED 



November 13, 1998 




iitrivution 



Kenosha 
County 



Twin Lakes Silver Uto^jff.y^.B mtpl 



Kenosha 




HOW TO PIACEA 
CLASSIFIED AD 



B Y CALL 

PHONE (847)223-8161 

□ v Lakeland Newspapers 
bY P.O. Box 268 

MAIL Grayslake, IL 60030 



IN 30 S. Whitney St. 

PERSON Grayslake 

BY 
FAX (847)223-2691 




Lakeland Newspapers' Classifieds Appear in 11 Newspapers! 

Antloch News • Round Lolce News • Lake Villa Record 

Mundelcin News • WadsworUi News • Grayslake Times 

Fox Lake Press • Gurnce Press • Undenhurst News 

Wauconda Ixadcr • Libertyvillc News 



...Tues. 5pm 



DEADLINES 

Direct Line • 

Classified 

Business & Private Party... Wed. LOam 

HOURS 

8am-8pm..., Mon.-Thurs 

8am-5pm FndayJ 




msii 



ffimdt 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Notices 



n 



125 


Personals 



125 


Personals 




ERRORS: 

We strive to eliminate 
errors, but if one should 

occur, please report H 
immediately a? we can be 
responsible for in© first, two | 
• ■A:V,i(2) woeka only; J;l' ' 

NO ADJUSTMENTS CAN 
BE MADE UNLESS THEY j 
AFFECT THE MATERIAL 

54 VALUE OF AN AD > 

8mm & 16mm FILMS 

Professionally transferred to 

VHS video. 
Call Jim (847) 973-1022. 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If yuii have placed classified 
advertising Willi the Lakr- 
laiid Nrwspn|KTs you mny re- 
ceive a misleading statement 
from another rirni request, 
lug payment (or iliis ndvrrlls. 
log, To receive proper crcil- 
II lt> your account, all pay. 
incitts lor your Lakeland 
Newspapers nclvrrlimng 

must be made aa invoiced 
and directed lo: 

Lakeland Newspaper* 

PO Box 268 

30 8. Whitney St. 

Qrmy (lake. IL 60030-03 68 



WRITE FOR YOUI 

*X-Mas Cards 

* Wedding Invitations 

Showor/Party Invitations. 

•Handwritten. 

* Reasonable rales. 

Call (81 S) 383-B330. 

IIEA1XKY WOMEN 

■FtjmJBUBlBBD 
$3500.00 Compensation 
i Icaldiy women, age 20- .13, 
needed to serve m unonyinom 
egg donon. Donon wilt be 
required lo lake medication, 
blood screening and undergo 
minor surgical procedure, we 
are interested in all ethnic 
backgrounds. Multiple locations 
available. If interested call 
ARR 773-327-7315 
Serious Inquirirs Only 



«»» > *« ■»»■ ***» ■ ** 



115 



Lost & Found 



CLUB SINCERE 

A local singles club in the 

Northwest Suburbs. 

Wq gel together at a 

neighborhood bar. 

No cover charge. 

No gimmicks- 

Join now. 

Ladies join Iree. 

(647)516-8644. 

DARNELL 21 
BOOK LOVER SERVICES 

Books at bargain prices 

'Unique Book Gift Baskets 

"Shut-In Reader Service 

* Bargain Book Fairs & Much 

More. Free list of services and 

free book information. 

Call (847) 638-3221. 

FREE BUS RIDE 
TO POTAWATOMI 

BINGO. 
Monday-Tueaday- 

Thursday. 

Pick-up 4;30pm at 

Hampton Inn, Gurnee. 

Ride 10 times and get a 

freo package of specials. 

Hollywood Casino, 

November 3rd., 

4;15pm., pay $15 and gel 

$15 back, 2- sessions. 

Call for Information 

{BAT} B31-1094, 

HYPNOSIS BY DAVID 

The Holistic Approach to 

Good Health. 

Stop Smoking 

Lose Weight and More. 

FREE CONSULTATION. 

(847)810-4951. 



$500 REWARD LEADING 

TO LOST DOG, Doberman, fe- 
male. Lost near Rt. 173 & 45 
on 9/30/98. (847) 625-9345, 
pager (847) 992-0277. 

FOUND ORANGE AND 

white male cat in Gurnee off of 
Grand Ave. by VFW hall, Sat- 
urday evening 11/7. Too 
sweet to be a stray. (847) 
740-1379. 

REWARD OFFERED FOR 

the return of escaped yellow 
headed grey sCockallel. Last 
seen Murphy School area. 
Please call (847) 546-9439 
leave message. Family misses 
htm. 



DID YOU FIND Someones 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Depl., and get your 
results. FOUND ads are 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
(847)223-8161. 



'PSYCHIC 
READINGS 

BY 
SILVANA 

•Curious about your 

future? 

•In Love? 

'Confused? 

Psychic, Palm & Torot 

Cards. 

TSyrs. Experience. 

Remember, I am a true 

Psychic born with power, 

and I will help youl 

If you aro unhappy, 

discouraged, or In 

distress, I can help you. 

A few minutes of 

consultation will have 

your mind at ease. 

All Readings are Private & 

Confidential. 

Housecalls Available. 

Special 50% off all 

readings. 

Two locations. 

(847) 550-8478 

(847) 540-8284. 



WHftMM 



120 


Free 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 
FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 
UMN. For more information, 
please contact the Humane 
Society. 

FREE TV AND VCR, don'l 
work. (847) 680-3275, 



ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad in the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are run at NO 
CHARGEI (We discourage 
any pot ads). Deadlines: 10am 
Wednesdays. (847) 

223-8161. ext. 140. 



A BEAUTIFUL 

DREAM...ADOPTIONI Your 
dream of giving your baby a 
wonderful family life and a 
great future is possible. We're 
a happily married, financially 
secure professional couple 
eager to adopt a baby. Let's 
talk. CALL RUTH AND FRED 
1-800-320-9686 anytime. 

ADOPTION 
IS AN OPTION 

Dear Special Blrthmother. 

We're Brad and Lisa, 

a stay-at-home mom and very 

devoted father. We would love 

to give your precious child a 

wonderful life, full of 

opportunities, and tots ol love. 

We know this is a very 

difficult, 

important decision lor you. 

Let's talk and plan your child's 

future together. 

Medical, legal, counseling 

and court approved 

living expenses paid. 

Confidential. 

Please call our attorney at 

(706) 957-6830. 

ADOPTION MY HUS- 
BAND, Nate and I are young, 
energetic and family oriented. 
Nate will be a great dad. He's 
patient, has a wonderful sense 
of humor, and loves being a lit- 
tle league coach. I'll encour- 
age creativity, curiosity and 
learning as a stay-at-home 
mom. BETSY AND NATE 888- 
836-9001, 

LOSE WEIGHT 
AND FEEL GREAT! 

We can show you how 

with Herballfe. 

Independent Distributor. 

Call (847) 546-^275. 



ADOPTION PLEASE 
BLESS our family with your 
newborn. Devoted stay at 
home mom, prolessional dad 
promise unlimited love, care, 
kisses, hugs, security. Allow- 
able expenses. Sandy & Paul 
1 -800-952-9092. 

AH ADOPTION MINI-LET- 
TER Wo are a loving couple 
hoping lo adopt. Mary will be a 
full-time mom & Greg will be 
an Involved & devoted dad. 
We will share story telling, 
laughter, family activities and 
all of our love. You will never 
have to worry about your 
child's future. To find out 
more, call our lawyer. SARA, 
at (773) 509-0099 or (877) 
5090099 (toll free). 

IT PAYS 
TO LOSE WEIGHT! 

LOOK GOOD. FEEL GREATI 
EARN EXTRA INCOME WITH 

HERBAUFE 

TOLL FREE 
(877) 500-SLIM. 

LOOK GREATI 
LOSE WEIGHT! 
MAKE MONEYI 
(847) 940-96B9. 

LOSE WEIGHT 

DURING 
THE HOLIDAYS 

Improve your 
health and energy 
GUARANTEED!! 

( Free Samples/with orders). 
Call Kamy...(B47) 395-7653. 



PLEASE HELP US 

ADOPTI Musical mom, athle- 
tic dad, married 1 1 years, lov- 
ing parents to 2-adopted pre- 
schoolers hoping to adopt 
your precious baby. We live In 
an activity-filled comfortable 
home with 2 lovable mutts in a 
close-knil neighborhood full of 
children (many adopted). Med- 
ical, legal, counseling and 
court approved living expens- 
es paid. Confidential. Please 
call our attorney at (708) 957- 
6833. 



BANKRUPTCY S7B+. 
STOPS garnishments. Guar- 
anteed valid since 1991. Di- 
vorce $99+ Low caost Debt 
Reduction and Foreclosure. 
Avoidance services available 
without bankruptcy. Fresh- 
Stan B88-335-8030 

ELIMINATE 

ALL YOUR DEBT 

(including Mortgage) 

In 5-7years with your 

CURRENT Income. 

For free brochure send 

SASE to: FDR Marketing, 

PO Box 733, 

Grayslake, IL 60030. 

NEED A LOAN? Bad credit 
or no credit? We can help. 
Free to call 1-800-931-1118 

ext. 609. (SCA Network). 

INSTANtCASJf 

Auto TiUe loans 

-(B47)249-55O0 






219 



Help Wanted 
Pan -Time 



HOUSE CLEANING! 

Residential Houses! 

Daytime, flexible hours. 

Good salary. 

(847)487-1155. 



LOVE TO DECORATE? 
NEED TO ORGANIZE? 

New Party Plan! 

Hiring consultants and 

booking shows. 

Great Christmas catalog. 

Call 1-800-639-4516. 



WANTED 

96 SERIOUS PEOPLE 

To Lose Weight. 

100% Natural. 

Dr. Recommended. 

Limited time. 
Call (647) 526-4271. 

WAXING OR TWEEZING? 

Try electrolysis 

(permanent hair removal) 

and permanent cosmetic 

make-up, 

(eye brows, eye and Upline), 

Sherry (847) 249-7446. 

PLUS SIZESI 

WOMEN'S LINGERIE! 

CALL FOR FREE 

CATALOG, 
(847) 834-1307. 



PART TIME 

SCHOOL 
CAFETERIA 

11:00 -2:00 

Mon-Fri 

Call: 

847-587-2561 

X248 

8:00- 11:00 sun. 




Q?M/fc£Sl 




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H» mi l ' «ii»n i T * "•• i "i ■ ■' —-■■■-. i , v . r i j^ 



November 13, 1998, 



' H. 



I 



I 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers/ CI 9 



^.^-^.-i.. 



^^M <fi* 



219 




219 



Hdp fated :- 



- !"< 'if*& v : wl? ?&*1fS»&i# 



G oo k/Di clary 
Aide 



P.T. Employee needed for " V 
various duties In kitchen. , ' 
Must be dependable & 
self-starter. Weekends requdrcd . 
w/extra $. Promotion 
opportunities available. . 
Must be able to read and write 
English. Apply In person at . 

CARE- CENTRE 

OF WAUCONDA, 

1 76 Thomas Ct., Wauconda. IL 

(847) 526-55S1 






Part -Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
.Part-Time,,. 



i&< 



Fbrproduct 

sanpingMosrbe 

energeficcncla 

pet lover 

Cd 1-S00-726-O031 



^ — ~--- L ~----~r , ^-~- Lj '"f 






ACCOMPANIST Tor 

ADULT CHURCH 

CHOIR 

Must be available for 
. Wednesday evening 

■ rehearsals & one 

Sunday morning service 

I per week. If interested > 

please contact Barbara 

Klcinat (847)336-2392 

Gurnec Church 



»VWVW»«< ' 



Vfli :* 



■ 
i 

i 



Christmas if i 
Coming! t TOtike up to 
■ . $lBp9Thaartt. 

( Wa *r* looking for oat/oiruj 

— todiomllrfnjiTitKmrfir 
; j»o Ufc» taOcbtfM tft* . •-■■"' 

* trtandly tacfll CMima- 
mot, ttu# >* eooM f* far 
ypofndjmT toftof Ml — 

'*■'..' ' SiSQtaBiSOpja* 
■ Hu*nupjiu patron* 
- ■ ■ mmmtitlaai. 
gaHJC«rtn/ar- 
iaor# inform* tico. 



, " *. - .: ,': 



Amoco 



Retail Clerks Needed 
-flexible hours- 



Benefits include- 
educational assistance, 
competitive wages & 
optional health coverage, 
-apply in person- 
ask for Dawn 
Corner of Rl. 12&Hwy. 
l20inVo!o 

ask for Patlic 
Comer of Rt. 22 

& Rt. 12 
in Lake Zurich 




HP n 



Looking for a 

flexible working 

schedule? Work from 

borne ffTte" rinTHf 

Bppointmenl* of ixnaD 
homtfaold good* far » 
welHmmra charitable 



4^bi-ywctkMnrtbe 

reliable, Ibrdetalli 

pleaiccaU 

V(630> 515-5786^ 



< Wonted: 
< 

* ParHimo data cnlry ► 
! people to Input Infor- > 

< mot ion at the Lake ► 
J County Courthouse. J 
i Computer experience > 
j hclpfuL Speed accu- * 
, racy and reliability a , 
i must. Compctilfvo > 



| hourly rate offered. 



all lef I Molcalf at 
>30-3©5t6490 I 



TBlomarkBiirKjTart-TlinB 



Time on 




Now 's your chance to cash in on your free time, 

lakeland Newtpapert it now accepting application! for pan 

lime i tit phone talet, A work from our Gray slake offict. No 

eiptrienct ntctnarj ibul a pluty 

RETIREES t 

HOUSEWIVES 

Mult enjoy talking to people. Hourly magrpfut oonui. Areraie 

SID- IS per hour or more. 

HOURS: 

Man.-Tburt. 5:00p.m. • S:iOp.m. 

Oaf Hours Sal. 9:O0a.m.-2:00p.m. 

For Interview Call 
Dick (after Noon) 

Lakeland Newspapers 

(847) 740-4035 




4 Flexible hours. Please k 
| call lef I Mctcalf at r 
\ 630-3©5t6490 



Attn: Classified 

Advertisers 
Deadlines for ads 

are 10:00 a.m. 

every Wednesday 

Morning. 



Graphic Artist 

WANTED 

.To work in a creative 

atmosphere designing 

display ads Candidates 
must know QuarkXPress 
lor Macintosh. Experience 

in Photoshop, Illustrator. 

and Freehand hetplui. 

but wifl train. Musi have 
good typing skills 

Please mail resume and 

salary history to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

; : Attn: Ad Services;^ 

_L.. Supervisor ^"''v 

' 30 S.Whitney St. 

Graysfako, IL 60030 



MinDHHiiiimtilM,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,„,„ 

SNdWPLOW OWNERS 
OPERATORS 

••••••••• • * m m • • • • • •••••••«£ 

BOBCATOWNERS 
OPERATORS 

TbpPay! 
Plenty of work. Guaranteed hours. : 
No wait for your money. Paid gas. 
(847)272-1747 





Do you love to talk? 
Well we've got the Job for 
fyoul We need 6 outgoing people 
who are tooking For a great 
part-time Job. Monday- 
Thursday evenings doing 
telemarketing. Base rate plus 
generous commissions. Experience 
fa plus but we will train the right persoi 
For reoco Infbroa+ion call Karen 
Ml) 7YO-H03S 





RETARIES 
G-fOWEX 

', hu put-iUy ok hom';" 




fypi:65iWPM;-.W^« N dow,^S;Woitv 



_ ColIfr^Srud 

CaU : H ydtuVCoap'oBATio^i .-, 
2J49T MHtonRoaiI;---' 



- WAucoNdA^ILn6Dd845 

f»C^' / "^8471 540/7iinO ffift 



*& 



847:) 540>7iDdO orI 



Driven 



Looking To 

Gobble Up 

A Great Job? 

Starting Pay; 

$9.45 Per Hour 
• Paid Training/Holidays • Monthly Bonus 
Credit Union • Stock Purchase Plan • Tuition Aid 1 

: Part-Time Vtork . DawaENJP^KIDS? 

For Great Full -Time Behefits! ^Theri i they Need ^YbuJ v^ 

NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! • HIRING NOW! 

Applicants must be at least 21 years old with a good driving record. 
Drug screening required. Calf today to schedule on interview. 

847-680-9305 



3 Get an "A" for Success!! . E 

llAKE THIS QUIZ! 

a 2 ri 

m~ — ■ H 

B Yes No 1 

a [~1 [" J Do you like io earn money? 

I i 'j H Do you like people? 

! J Do you have a pleasant phone voice? | 

jj Q D Do you want part-time work in a 

| friendly environment? B 

a 1 

g If you answered yes to any or. all of the ,i 

ci above, you can start earning dollars plus 

| commission in LAKELAND'S Client 

Services Department. 



Please send letter of interest to: 



Attn: Maureen Combs 

J c/a Lakeland Publishers 

i RO. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 68030 1 

or tax to 

<847) 223-2691 

SBBBHBBnBBBHBBOBBBBOOBBHDOOBBBHDHOOHOBBBD 



NORTHERN 

LAKE 

COUNTY 

ROUTES! 



Ryder 



Student Transportation Services 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



AVON PRODUCTS- 

START a homebasod busi- 
ness. Work flexible hours. 
Enjoy unlimited earnings. Call 
Toll Free (866) 561 -AVON. 



BE YOUR OWN BOSS!! 

Need extra cash? 

Join THE HOMEMAKER'S 

IDEA COMPANY. 

Be me first in your 

neighborhood to sign up as a 

consullanl tor our greal party 

ptan. Flexible hours and lots of 

fun, wonderful products. 

Call today (or Info. 

1.800-639-4516. 



ASSEMBLE ARTS, 

CRAFTS, Toys in your spare 
time. Earn CASH! Phone work, 
typing, sewing, electronics, 
more. Greal Pay. CALL 24 
hour information. 1-800-795- 
0380 Ext. 21 . (SCA Network) 



RELOCATE TO MILD wln- 
ters/sunny summers. Advertis- 
ing representative needed for 
newspaper group in Puget 
Sound area, Washington. Es- 
tablished list. $20-$25K/yr. Io 
start. Great benelits. Moving 
allowance. Call Becky (360) 
568-4121. 



220 



'''ffeipifanted 
-* FiiMlmW 



220 



n'HdpmfTtor 



RiMlnie 



•DONT.'JUdT MOV&ioverVr, 

. move up.' Corf Way Trucktoad 
Servjcte I* morejthan just a 

' Truckfrig ; ^Cdmparn/,*^ CWT , 
Drivers receive paid health In- - 
surance . for. Ihemsefves • and : 
their family.,. Paid holidays and' . 
vacations. Company paid lifo 
Insurance^and^oiK Family 
rid or. program, assigned new 
end late model converrUonaJs. 

j Frequent home time, . direct 
deposit, competitive pay and 
much more. Let us tell you 
mora about CWT and how you ' 
can be more than 'Just a Driv- 
er.' Call 800-666-CWTS 
cwt.job@cori-way.com Con- 
way Trucktoad Services CWT 
banEOE. - -■' '. 

DRIVER BUD MEYER 
Truck Unes Refrigerated Haul- 
ing ■$ 1 ,000 sign-on bonus for 
experienced company drivers ■ 
.'Solo drivers start up to 33* 
solos drivers and contractors 
CALL TOLL FREE 6T7-Z83- 
6393 GRADUATE STUDENTS 
1 -800-333-6428. 



DRIVERS COMPANY AND 
OWNER OPERATORS Van 
opportunities •Wl.OOO/yr. 
average *Home weekends 
■Assigned late model equip- 
ment *Free medical •No NY 
dry "Class 'A* w/Haz. Call 800- 
788-7357 LANDAIR TRANS- 
PORT. INC. 



DRIVERS OTR - Your future 
has arrived. Great pay and 
benefits. Top of the line con- 
dos. CDL-A Cat! Butler Trans- 
port 800-528-7825, 



DRIVERS: HEARTLAND 
EXPRESS off ere starting pay 
up to 37c/mile. Late model, as- 
signed conventional, excel- 
lent miles, time noma even/ 7- 
10 days In most areas and 
more. Experienced drivers 1- 
87-PRODRIVE. Owner opera- 
tors ask about 88c/mile. Call 1 - 

HOME TYPISTS. PC users 

needed. $45,000 Income po- 

; - tentlat. Call 1-800-513-4343. 

i''«.i.,Bajtf-7a66 tSCA,»H*NO««J:r- 




EASYWORKlt 

NO EXPERIENCE 
$500-51 ,000 part-time 

;.. home BtLrfflnQ envelopes; - 
' For free Information send 

^■V'-/'--Mlta*l'8ssed. ■ 
stamped envelope: 
■ . R&J Enterprises 
Mailing Services, Inc. 
P.O. Box 402 
. tnpieslde. III. 60041. '••;■' 

GET PAID $15-*30 per ; 
hour processing Insurance ;"/ 
claims for local doctors office.' . ' 
Complete training, provided. 
Computer' and modem re- '• 
quired. Call 800/942-8141. 
EXT. 82. , . .•■•-'■ .'-■• -:' ■ ' 

great opportuni- 
tiesii fehtiuzer/aq: 

Chem Applicators Agrono- - • 
my/Safes GPS . Specialists, jk 
Several openings In several 
states. Competitive wages, ex- 
cellent benefits. Call or send 
resume to; Farmland Place- 
ment Services, P.O. Box 7305. 
Dept. 32, Kansas City,' Mo. 
64116-0005. 800-822-8263, 
Ext 5924 or 6809 Fax:816- 
459-6200 EOE. FPS@Famv 
land.com 

wvw.FPS®FBxmland.com 
Farmland Industries, Inc. 
■Pround lo bo farmer owned.* 



WE NEED PROFESSION- 
AL owner-ops to haul our 
loads. 1993 or newer tractors, 
please. BOc all miles plus as- 
sistance with permit financing. 
Call 800-843-8308 or 3384. 






, -■:' 






f S 



OTR CLASS A Drivers: We 
pay you for your best. Come 
earn what you deserve. Up to 
35c/ml)e plus bonus and bene- 
fits. Easy no $ down lease pur- 
chase program available. Call 
800-843-8308 or 3384 



PET CAREI ENERGETIC 

dependable person, various 
duties Involving pets. Must be 
flexible and available 7 
days/week Including wee- 
kends and holidays. Call only 
between tOam-Spm, Monday- 
Friday. Shel-Ray Pert Shalot 

(*A4) 837-2AC3. 



1. '■-." * . 



; 



How To 

Survive 

The Job 

v^eojrcxi 

^%^-VvV^I By Nancy Sakol 




Q: HELP!!! I am having a terrible time rinding employ- 
ment. I need to make at least $9.00 per hour in order 
to make ends meet. I am willing to work any hours, 
including overtime as needed. I have experience with 
computers, typing, customer service office, etc My 
problem is, every time I call on a job, or go on an 
interview, they sound very interested, until they hear I 
have taken off 1 1 months to be with my 1 1 month old 
daughter. 1 explain I did not want to leave her with a 
stranger, and that 1 now have an old friend who 
babysits. Each time they respond, "We'll get back to 
you". Also, 1 really only have one job reference {they 
speak extremely highly of me), as my employer prior 
to the last has gone out of business. I have been des- 
perately looking>for two months. 1 am a single mother 
and am nearly out of my savings. Could you please 
help me locate a job, or tell me where I am going 
wrong? Thank you. 
D.C. -Lake Villa 

Dear D.C. 

Thank you for your letter and for being wise enough 
to include your telephone number. Due to that, and 
as of the printing of this letter, 1 was able to contact 
you to set up an appointment for you to come in and 
meet with me personally. While meeting with you at 
first, I didn't understand your inability to find 
employment and why other people would keep you 
hanging saying, "we'll get back to you". I was con- 
cerned that perhaps you needed to leam some fol- 
low-up skills. However, after our initial meeting, I was 
able to help you secure employment at a rate of pay 
that you requested in your letter. While you were 
excited at the offer...you however...disappeared.This 
is where I chose to tell you not to blame everyone else 
for your misfortune in the job search. And perhaps it 
is that you all of a sudden were able to find something 
on your own. If so, congratulations. It is clear in either 
way however, that my initial feeling was correcL.,you 
do need to learn follow-up skills. 



Letters can be sent to Nancy Sakol 
c/o Lakeland Newspapers, 

P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 



^- I ^*^»— *** ^-i— t. »4W.. 



>MMu 



— «w< 



B/^i-ii" 



—!-»«*_ — -»'— ■ i i--^«tJi-5E« p ^ y.;t j' y- , "-*ri*-? i' ? iJf ' 



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I 

I 



C 2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time' 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



DELIVER 



Want to earn up to $200 per week and be 

your own boss? The Daily Herald Is al 

looking for adult, independent M 

personnel for newspaper delivery in the 

Lake County area. 2-3 hour routes 

available between the hours 

of 2am & 6am, Monday thru Friday; 

2am-7am, Saturdays, Sundays, 

and Holidays. 

For more information call... 
(847) 427-4333 



"JZetefjtUnLsi 

Work' irfif'/hfi pat^d tmi- 
nmmen T?Dayss sottie tarti 
r vtiyn$s; ai{tmaanj ., 
Satutfay&'CwjtUter experi- 
ence nrquired'App)y,tnp*' r - 
son.ar xend risbme ltv\ 
MundtteinAnvtab Hospital 

:-, -I'mi/ftitin&Ave. '" 

Mundcltin. IL 
So phone calls pints*. 



Retail Managers 

New Gnveev? 




Administrative 
Assistant 



Sales office in Wauconda. 

Excellent secretarial skills. 

Computer skills, Windows 98, 

MS Word, PowerPoint, Strong 

oral & written communication 

skills Salary range S23K- 

S25K based on experience 

Call Bruce 

(847) 526-0155 

Fax:(647)526-0186 



Check out Jewel-Osco lor 'he "one Hop i"op ' lo< 
all your career needi We offc our managers ihe iio- 
bilify ond rewordi of lOrmng a S 19 billion retail food 
and drug company wtlh the chance to advance ond 
learn now skill* along ihe way Our «t step develop- 

monl program can help got you ihoto il you hove inn 

domo lo lucwod 

loin hi ond onioy an oxcoplional componialion pack, 
ago which .Deludes heollh/life insurance. 40 IK and 
tr mefcJtondijc discount For on immediate interview, 
fo'wart/ your roiumo in canttdanca lo. Osco Drug, 
Attn: Marty, 3O30 Cullerton Drive, Franklin 
Park, 11 6013). FAX; 888-54 1 -5793. 

Jewel-Osco 



www.amorkandrugitorGS.cc.nl 
EOE M/F/D/V 



COME GROW 
WITH US! 

Due to phenomenal 

Qiovt'th Post Bearing 

Company is telocoting 

dom Wheeling to 

Waukegan in feoiuoty 

We hove immediate 

openings tor the following 

positions 

■ Data Entry 

{Data Ptoc&ssing Depl ) 

■ Data Entry 
(inventory Conttot Depl ) 

• Putcnaslng Ctotk 

• Expedite! 



these positions require PC 
skills, an obtllly to Interact 
woll with ofhers, & strong 
organizational skills We 
offer competitive wages 
health/ aentai/lite insur- 
ance 40IK profit shoring 
Please mall/fax resume 
INDICATING POSITION OF 
INTEREST or fill out an 
application ot 
Peer Bearing Company, 

241 W. Palatine fid. 

Wheeling, IL 60090. Fax: 

(647) 870-3337. 

EOE m/f/d/v 



r— rr — ■ ! H "!'»' n , -- »> - T'- f^.,— ^ — , - !■ ■" .. ' ■ " ' ■! ■ ■ » ) »W l lJtJil^JHltfM| i WWI h Wl »« tl »Ti a Mg»WlWIHB» 



Seasonal 
Opportunity 




Reasons to work for 



Pleasant C 



Qmpanyj_ 



1 Friendly Work Environment 

2 Generous Product Discounts 

3 Weekend Premium Pay 

4 Bonus 
Pleasant Company, maker of high quality 

children's books, dolls, and accessories, is now 
hiring full-time seasonal employees. 



CATALOGUE FULFILLMENT - $7.30 PER HOUR 



Day Shift: 7A.M. -3:30 P.M. 

Pick, pack and load orders. Previous 

production / fulfillment experience desired. 



ORDER PROCESSORS - $7.90 PER HOUR 



Process customer phone/ mail orders. Good verbal 

communication skills and prior computer or data 

entry experience required. Must type 30 wpm and be 

available to work a minimum of 20 hours/week. 



STOP IN BETWEEN 8:00 A.M. & 4:30 P.M. TO APPLY 



or Call 414-862-7578 if you have further questions. 



-\ 



Wm 



n. - ' 



PLEASANT! 
[COMPANY] 



12400 Fox River Road * Wilmot, Wisconsin 



ML 



II Help Wanted 
•J Full-Time 



UMIlKGFOa 
A CAKZB CHANGE 

customer zona. 

S,t tppotnbmnti lorttw futMl 

prmtng cnwutltoe firm In OlnoJj. 

Work fen w coerfsrbM* Buft»ta 

OnmoAC*. FTlPThow-» 

«4l*bU. Utk* tA-oaTt* * CKlnnis- 

Uon/bomaAxntflts. C«llccttit 

■00431-2541 tor bittrdtw. 



Srcnfify 

I ■ DEPARTMENT 
SECRETARY 

FULL TIME, DAYS 

MEDICAL STAFF 

ADMIN. 

Al Highland Park Hospilal. 
wc attribute our success lo 
ihe dedication of each 
employee and wc are proud 
to reward their expertise As 
one of our Department 
Secretaries, you will make 
unmatched coninhulions lo 
our excellence and you can 
enjoy all wc have lo offer' 

This fast paced, highly vist- 
hie rnwilion will entail var- 
ied responsibilities including 
interacting with physicians 
transcribing meeting mm 
ulcs. word processing and 
other medical staff support 
duties 

The successful candidate 
will have I - 2 years of sec- 
retarial experiencetprefcr- 
abiy in hcallhcare) and 
excellent organizational. 
interpersonal and 

written/oral communication 
skills Must also possess 
solid experience in 
WordPerfect 6:1 with the 
ability tQ he flexible and 
work independently m a fasi 
paced environment Some 
college preferred. 

Please forward resume lo 
UuriieUc Caiiy. HR 

t'onsuliani. HKlHLANil 
I'AKK HOSPITAL, 7 IX 

CUcnvicw Ave. liighJiintl 
Cark. IL 6O035. 

Fax: B47-4K0-18.1.V 

(•-mail hcady@hphosp nrg 

■ HIGHLAND PARK I 



Safety/Security 
Representative 

Quill, one ot the world's 

leading direct marketers 

ot business products, 

has an opening at its 

attractive Lincolnshire 

Headquarters for a 

Safety/Security 

Representative. 

You will be 
responsible for: 

• Opening i dosing ot 
Quill's txihiy 

• Verrfying employee and 
visitor deniifcaJion 

■ Maintaining firrj suppression 
' i burglary aSsim systems 

< Conducing secvniy rounds 

• Ensuring compTance wrt 
federal, stale and local safety 
regulations 

• Ptovang preliminary Rrst aid 

■ Pertotm related work as 
required ot requested 

We require a HS diploma 
and prefer some college 
and/or al least I year lire 
suppression and fire 
safety/security experi- 
ence. Completion of 
basic first aid and CPR 
training is a plus. Must 
possess a valid driver's 
license. Strong communl 
cation skills necessary. 
Hours are 4pm - 
12:30am Monday - 
Friday 

Quill offers an excellent 
salary and a tailor-made 
benefits package which 
Includes medical, dental 
and life Insurance, and 
401 (k). To apply send or 

tax your resume to 
QUILL CORPORATION, 

Depl KL-SEC, 100 

Schelter Road, 

Lincolnshire, IL 60069. 

FAXff 847-634-5820. 

Equal Opportunity 

Employer M/F/D/V 

SQUILL* 



November 13, 1998 



i 





E 



Help Wanted 
FuU-Ume >\ 



n'uSTODIAL] 
> FULL TIME! i 

jMcHenry High School} 




|T| Help Wanted 
•J Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Mention tad Lovers! 



ServiceMaster is seeking 
I custodial help al McHenry ■ 
J High School. Contacl Mary ■ 
J or Mike at 815-344-7178 j 
Mon - Fri Bam to 1pm. I 
I Applications available al ! 
J District Maintenance Office, j 

4724 Crystal Lake Rd . 
I McHenry, IL 60050 Or lax I 
I resume lo: (815) 344-7179 J 

L«pn*aai»a*J 



■-•i: 



y 



experienced 
Insaloiien 

Installers 

Needed ';.;*■> 

Hiring Bonus : 

Southern Wl 

I & 

I Northern IL area 

t Builders, Insulation 

1^15)675-0085 



Breadsmith European Bread Factory 
Now Hiring ! 

Full and part-time 

♦Mixer *Bnkcr 

*Production *Counter 

No experience necessary 

Flexible schedules 

Excellent wages 

Exciting environment 



Fax resume (847) 740-9775 

or apply In person on 

Tuesday, Nov. 17 or Wednesday Nov. 18 

10:00am - l:OOpm and 4:30pm - 6:30pm 

at 524 N. Milwaukee Ave., Llbcrtyville 




BREABSMHH 



KIRKWOOP INDUSTRIES, INC. 

K i B - MUNDELEIN SUBSIDIARY 

Due to the expansion of our business, a world leader of electromechani- 
cal components for the automotive, power tool, and home appliance 
industries, has the following opportunities available in our Mundelein, IL 
division'. 

Shipping & Receiving Clerk 
First Shift 

The ideal candidate (or this position will possess good communi- 
calion skills, be a sell starter, and work with minimal supervision 
in a fast paced environment. Experience required In various 
Shipping/Receiving (unctions, including packing, order picking, 
scheduling, transportation, and dale entry. 

Machine Set-Up Operators 

First, Socond and Third Shin 

Must bo mechanically inclined, able lo work independently, 
assuro all perls ero ol acceptable quality, complete tool 
changeovers. bo concerned with safety, maintain a constant now 
of production and properly record production charts. 

We hire only highly motivated Individuals who enjoy working 
in a learn environment. We offer a challenging environment, com- 
petitive salary, and extensive benefits. Please apply in person or 
send your resume lo: 

MRKWOOD INDUSTRIES, INC. 

675 Tower Rd. 
Mundelein, IL 60060 
Fax: (847) 949-8521 

ISO 9001 Certified 

Visit out website at: www.klrkwood-ind.com 



O'iven/Deftiery 



■ 



Kc*e eWcie^ t-Wi * sleigk. 
H\e UPS hue* 



'i*i« 



Seasonal Twicftfr Trailer Wvcrj 
EArti$K00 per four 

Re^uWewehH "mcluMe: 

. CUn A Ct>l Uctve , Knri.be*He*ri-Zl y»j.«U 

* *T e«ut<*«we^ re**C4 . Ejrce»ent-/»Wna record 

» Hlnii-u«w'» yn. riiuJrof fr«a<rr etf. (4 ««««> 

rWiSOh A P*Uh\e JeW ^iW c ^ 
C«H 1«w-$"pi*L Kovn-i ,. „ ? Homwroolf 

Access CUe: Ult . 'IM1MW 

hcctstCUetifll 



^eA^jms 

Crtll 7A IftouTs/^^y * 

7 Anys/umeV 

Access CUc Ult 



%tz<xsG*0\\ Driver Helpers 

C#mi fl.Str ft* Iwur 
Ho r>Hi«^ Re^ulreA. 

• Kitft- tie «v*iiUble fd work VWwUy-fVUwy. 

* tf ye«trf «r olAer 

» At>l< h Kft- 70 IVj I h«| U<m ttkttm tvArtvift 

LocaKom ItiduJlei 

P<0#lHil^ r\AJiS<*, HorUtWMV, Franklin tmk, 

Be^ftfrA fmA, H*wvey, Wertwih 

Jotter * JeMertflH Sheer fCWcwy*) 

for Driver Helf e» Jots, 

Codl: l-m-V/PS-SiS! 

Access C<s>e: 447? 






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November 13, 1998. 




(UMI«Ui 



Pfi2C15^i£5iyXSii2£«i£Si* 



J'.ti " 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / 




I .->■* : .-■ ■ ■ 



220 



//Help Wanted 
a" Rill-Time ." 



;Ji rt;e?ti.; 



. POSITION 

Are you ndtAble, : 
ENcnqoic anc! f un to 
wonk wiifiT IF you Iiave 

bflsic COMpUtCfl Skills; 

MtdicAl on (JentaI off Ice 

EXPERIENCE ANcl COO<) 
AT1ENIION IO dOAil, OUR 

busy ora! suRqcny of ficE 
MAy be ill e pUce foR 
youl This Front office 
posiiioN REobinES full' 

TiME llOURS (NO \VkIc-, 

Ends) ANd sALVny is 

bASEd UpON EXPERIENCE. 

an 

(847) 62 M9 1 5 
io find OUT MORE. 

HIMIIIHIHIIIHHHHI «»«*•*•« l*m*t* Mlt 



220 



-*«w,-:. *m , 4>^>-t*-V-.- i i- ,, t'i*", *&.i> 



Hdp Wanted 
■'. Rill-Time ■ 



220 



HdpWknled' 

Full-lime 



Immcd. Openings-TN. 

AD-MAT International 

Coasters. 

Move to (he beautiful mins 

ofTN. A solid, growing 

co. seeks seeks exp'd Press 

Persons, Die Cutlers & 

Prc-Prcss Persons 
w/proven background in 
quality sheet-fed, multi- 
color offset printing, pre- 
press & die cutting, Co. is 
equal oppty employer 
offering comp wages & 
great bnfts. Responses: 

HR. PO Box 3724. 

Johnson City. TN 37602: 

Fan 423-434-2210: 

Ph 423-434-2373 



jjMnfang 

UluiUnipJutabiitj** 1 

V* rwiun ca*h htndkig upwimci 

raMJ tartprtMieJ to rhriphi 

THIERS 

FULL-TIME AMD PAHT-Tavt; 

Go mo* 

4D4D Grand An. 
Grand Av». G, Hunt Club Rd 

UbartvWW 

354 N. MMadkao Aw. 
QQO E. Miwaukaa Am. 

MundaMn 
BB5 S Route 63 

Vomon HiDa 
1175 Corporeto Woods Pkwy 

You may apply at any °l omt toca- 
tiona lasiod obovo 

Or fan your roauma, inducing 

position of mursat, to (630) 307. 

9371. Wo ore an equal opportunt- 

ty employer. 

gv= HARRIS 
R.rS BANK 

QlU= GURNEE. 



|o*w*iot** 



OPPORTUNITY 
IS HERE 

At Quill, wo aro on the road Io 

doubling, our sales. Imagine how 
ihis much growth and success 
can Impact your future. The bot- 
tom floe? When you |om Quill, 
how far you go and how high you 
climb Is up to you The opportunity 
is here il you want it. 

As iho premiere direct marketer m 
me busmBss-to-buslnoss industry, 
wo utilize leading edge technology 
in our attractive corporate cam- 
pus. Join us m one ol the follow- 
ing opportuniliBS. 

Office Flex Staff 

II you aro interested in helping 
with chock processing and han- 
dling a variety of clerical duties, 
we can otter you either pan lima 
or flexible hours. A friendly, pro- 
lossional manner essential- Date 
entry skills a plus. 

Mail Clerk 

You will son incoming mail, mater 
outgoing mall, prepare Invoices 
and statements end run orrands 
as neoded. Tho soloctod candi- 
date will possess a valid driver's 
license, the ability to lilt 50 lbs 
and o High School Degree or 
oquivalont training required 

Wa altar an excellent compensa- 
tion and beneliis package, as welt 
as an environment lor profession* 

al growth. Please lorword all 

Inquires wilh salary requirements 

to Quill Corporation, 100 Schotlor 

RMd.Dop1.Kl/FLEX, 

Lincolnshire, IL 60069. 

Fax B47-634-S820. Equal 

Opportunity Employer 

M/FrtW 

SQUILL" 



■■•:■ ■ • ■■>./ '.- ■• :• :•■ .-■■■, ". 



220 


Help Wanted 
Ftul-Tlinc:' 



y*w.Tt<Si*tifMfflt& 



220 



. Help Wanted 
FulJ-Tlme 



220 



I HdpWanled 
F FuMtaie';: 



(S15)M-W.3? 



-fr, 



. '-!■ 




WllOUFEJOBS , 

T0*21.60/HR. -■'• 

Inc. Dcncllb. Came wardens, 

security, maintenance, park 

rangers. No rap needed. For 

app. and exam Info call 

i-ooo- an -3 s as, cxi 2 4 07. 

Bam-9pm,7days.". ■■ ! . 








LEADING manufacturer 
for the lowl speaker 
Jndurtry is seeking 
• set-up person for Its 2nd 
■hilt Ideal candidal* ■. 
will have: 
+ M edi in leal Aptitude 
+1 yr.exp.bi 

Mxnufacturlrtf 
♦Stable Work Record 
♦Ability to lift up to SOIbs. 
♦Bilingual In Spanish a plus 
Apply In person 

or sen dV fax. 

(847)395-8862 

Return* tot 

NU-WAY SPEAKER 

PRODUCTS, INC. 

805 Anita Ave. 
Antloch, 1L*00G2 



WAREHOUSE 



Local HVAC 
wholesaler looking ' 
tor reliable Team 
Members." We are 
looking for someone 
to join our team In a 
warehouse/driver 
position. We can offer 
a competitive wage, 
excellent Insurance 
package and a profit 
sharing program. If 
you want a position 
'that Is challenging, but 
also have fun doing It, 
then stop In and lot's 
talk. Applications are 
being taken at 
COrVfROUD 
ENGINEERING SUPPLY 
ZM15 M fieri? Dr. 
Lake BltdL IL 60044 



SUBSTITUTE 
DIRECTORY 

The following schools need 

substitutes on a continuing basis, please contact the 

names listed below for further information. 

Adlal E. Stevenson High School District #125 
TVo Stevenson Drive, Lincolnshire. IL6OO69 

Contact: Personnel (847) 634-4000 

Antloch Community High School District #117 

33 Main SL.Antiodi, 11. 60002 

Contort: Marie x-224 (847) 395-1421 

Aptaklslc - Tripp School District #102 
1231 Wciland Rd, Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 

Contact: Laurel Karolezak , (847) 634-5338 

Big Hollow School District #38 
34699 N.Ihvy 12, Inglesldc, IL 60041 

Contact: Ms. Buchner (847) 587-6800 

Deerfield School District #109 
517 Deerfield Rd. Deerfield, IL 60015 

Contact: Phyllis x-222 (847) 945-1844 

Grass Lake School District #36 
26177 W. Grass Lake Road, Anlioch, IL 60002 

Contact: Pat Reed or Sue (847) 395-15 

Grayslake School District #46 
450 N. Barron Blvd., Grayslake, IL 60030 

Contact: ]an Fabry x-1100 (847) 223-3650 

Hawthorn School District #73 

201 Hawlhorn Parkway, Vernon Hills, IL 60061 

Contact: Shari Keena (847) 367-327 

Lake Bluff School District #65 

121 E. Sheridan Place. Lake Bluff. I L 60044 

CoMtocf.-JeanAmundson x-14 (847) 234-9400 

Lake Forest Elementary Schools 
95 W. Dcerpath, Lake Forcsi, IL 60045 

Contact: Karen Allle (847) 604-7423 

Lake Forest High School District #115 
1285 North McKinlcy Road, Lake Forest, IL 60045 

Contact: Wendy Antrim x-1 18 (847) 234-3600 

Lake Villa School District #41 
131 McKinlcy, Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Contact: Kalhy (847) 356-2385 

North Chicago Community Unit School Dist. #187 
2000 Lewis Ave., North Chicago. IL 60064 

Contact: Mona Armstrong (847) 689-8150 

Northern Suburban Special Education District 
760 Red Oak Lane, Highland Park, 11.60035 

Contact: Bill Chans (847) 831-5100 

Round Lake Area Schools 

316 S. Rosedale Court, Round Lake. IL 6007.3 

Contact: Maureen x-3010 (847) 546-5522 

Wauconda School District #118 
555 N. Main, Wauconda, IL 60084 

Contact: Kadiy x-104 (847) 526-76 

Waukegan Public Schools District #60 
120 1 N. Sheridan Rd., Waukc«an, IL 60085 

Contact: Personnel (847) 360-5404 

Wllmette Public Schools 
615 Locust Rd, Wllmette, (L 60091 

Contact: Susan Goodnow (847) 256-2450 

Woodland School District #50 

17370 Gages Lake Road, Gages Lake, IL 60030 

Contact: Michelle (847) 856-3605 

Young At Heart Center 

610 Peterson Rd., iJbertyville^ IL 60048 

Contact: Lisa or Leslie (847) 367-6110 






Pharmacy Technician 

FuB & Parttim& Will train. Rwdbtd hours. 

Excellent benefits. Apply in person or call 

Grayslake Walgreens 295 S. Hwy. 45, 

Grayslake. (847) 223S2S5 



t 




• - . ' 




BESTOWS 

U looking lo fin the folowtaV positions, 

• Front Desk Pos&lob 

" : -lrtfl»e : ,A,^; : '' 
•BrealifasJHosl/Hosleii 

pan time 6sun. - lOxm. 
: Apply as person 
■DTOnLMOwitmtecAve. : 




8553 



■ '. i - 



DON'T LET THESE 



OPPORTUNITIES PASS YOU BY! 

Midwestern Rtglortal Medical Cafltit Is t ittte-btHha-art (Belly whom 
youll find personal and professional career growth. Put your talents to work 
lor a company that will reward you tor your talent*. 

See tor youmetl the ditlof onl environment wo provide and become a pari ot 
a team wham your iWis era valued! 

StnrerrGrill 

FuN-Tlme, 1 T :30am • 6pm, every other weekend ai required 

ResponsibiliUes Include preparing sandwiches, toed serving and grill work. 

COOK 
Fuu-nme, nenibPfty to work shins between 
830am - 7pm. weekends at required 
Prior experience prolerred 

STOCKROOM CLERK 

Days; Monday - Friday 

Full •Time 

Ability to lift 50 los on a regular basil and strong organizational ikib 
needed. 

All positions require excellent communication skills. 

Competitive wage and cocotiont benofits. For consideration apply In person 
<x tax/send resumoAetler ot interest (faOiCATlNQ POSITION OF t MER- 
EST) to: Jeannle Pflueger, Human Rasouica*. 2S30 Etlsha Avenue 
ZVoo, IL 60099. Fax: (M7) 672-C222. EOE MrF 




I I CUM 1 MEDICAL CtMTtt 
Tomorrow's Hospital Is Here Today. 




1C 




...To work in a creative atmosphere 

designing display ads: Candidates 

must know QuarkXPress for Macintosh. 

Experience in Photoshop, Illustrator, 

and Freehand helpful, but wilt train. 

Must have good typing skills. Please 

mail resume and salary history to: 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 

Attn: Ad Services 

Supervisor 
30 S. Whitney St., 
Grayslake, IL 
60030 



^i 




J 




Full Time RN/LPN 
Needed for our 15 

bed ICF facility 

located in Gurnee, 

Illinois. 

Please contact 

Lona Harrah 

(847) 855-9450 



Prr CNAIHAB Aides 
needed for^JS bed 

ICF facility. Located 

in Gurnee, Illinois. 

Will train & certify. 
Please Contact 
Peggy Larvick 
(847) 855-9450 



CLASSROOM 
AIDE 

Immediate Openings 

Monday-Friday, day 
j hours, entry level, will] 

train. You train 
| MR/DD Adults in per- 
sonal care, prework, 
communication & 
domestic skills. 
Contact 
Gall Becker 
Mount Saint 
Joseph, Lake 

Zurich 
(847) 438-5050 



f DIRECT A 
CARE 

Direct Care Workers 

for MR/DD women in 

residential setting. 

All shifts available. 

Full Time or 

Part Time. We are 

committed to quality 

residential care. 

Contact 

Gail Becker 

Mount Saint Joseph 

Lake Zurich 

847-438-5050 

v > 



era Cancer Treatment 
Centers of America, a nationaJiyi 
rocognUed leader in Innovalhrei 
Cancer care. With our beautiful 95 
bed itsie-or-the-Bri hosprisl, wo, 
encompass the letesl technologic 
eel advancements as en Oncology 
provider. Because ol our continued 
growth, we seek; 
MEDICAL ASSISTANTS 
Full - Time 

Our last paced family practice clin- 
ic is looking lor experienced 
team-player medical assistants. 
Must be experienced in phleboio- 
my. Excellent communication skills 
end stable work history required. 
Musi be very patient focused. 
Mon • Frt, plus some Saturdays 
Along with the opportunity to be 
pan ot an Innovative, progressive 
program, we oiler an outstanding 
benefit and compensation pack 
age. For consideration, please tax, 
send or e-mail resume (INCLUD- 
ING SALARY HISTORY) to: 
Jeannle Ptlueger, Human 
Resources. 2520 Etisha Ave. 
Zion. IL 60099. 
Fax 847-072-6222. e-mail 
leannieptluegerOmrmc-cicfl com 




Equal Opportunity Employer 



$15-$35 PER HOUR 
Easy medical billing. 

Full Training. 

PC/modem required. 

1-800-259-6661 

ext.222 



CNA 



P.M.s & NIGHTS 

We oiler excellent starting 
pay $9.00 per hr.+ top ben- 
eliis to applicants. RNs and 
LPNs are welcome to apply 

(or CNA positions at 

increased rates. Our team Is 

looking lor new players. FT 

& PT available. Apply in 

person at CARE CENTRE 

OF WAUCONDA, 176 

Thomas Ct., Wauconda, IL 

(847) 526-5551 



QMRP 

Immediate full time 

position available In our 

Lake Zurich Intermediate 

Care Facility. Will be 

responsibility lor 
planning, developing, 
Implementing, and super- 
vising case 
management activities 

for MR/DO women. 

Bachelor's Degree and 

one year experience with 

MR/DD population 

required. 

'Contact Oefl Becker 

Mount Saint Foseph. 

Lake Zurich 
(847)438-5050 



Health Cam Commercial 
Insurance Biller 

Growing company is 
adding new department 
and looking tor experienced 
candidate lo grow with the 
business Selected 
individual must have 
knowledge ot U892 fields 
and billing requirements lor 
various commercial 
insurance earners. 
Responsibilities will include 
submitting claims and fol- 
lowing up for 
payment. Will have 
demonstrated ability to work 

volume caseload within 
computer queue to process 

claims In limited lime 
frames. Accuracy to detail, 

good phone skills and 
positive cusjomer service 

approach a must. For 
immediate consideration fax 

resume lo 847 -867-8501 

altn: D. Dennhardt or mail to 

860 NorthPoint Blvd. 

Waukegan, IL 60085. 



MHtihCva 

MEDICAL PRACTICE 
OPPORTUNITIES 

LAKELAND MANAGEMENT SER- 
VICES is physioan practice man- 
agement organisation serving inde- 
pendent and employed physicians 
Currently we are seeking dynamic 
individuals to join our team. 

■PATIENT COORDINATOR 
SKOKIE 

Responsible lor greeting, schedul- 
ing and registering patients in a 
busy primary cere orlice Computer 
end customer service expenenco 
required. 

■FLOATER STAFF 

MEDICAL ASSISTANTS 

Positions available lor those who 
Ilka clinical and operational variety. 
rotating in 10 ol our physician prac- 
tices thioughoul the North Shore. 

We otter excellent rjornpeviivs 
solo/lea plus benefits package. To 
schedule on Interview contact 
Raymond Kohn al S47-433-96T0. 
Forward resume to : LAKELAND 
MANAGEMENT SERVICES. 809 
Park Ave. West. Highland Park, IL 
60035. Fax: 64 7-433-9009. (eoa 
mrvdrV) 

LAKELAND MANAGEMENT 
SERVICES 



To Place 

Your 

Medical 

Opportunity 

Here, 

Call 

Paula or 

Darrell 

Today! 

(847) 

223-8161 



s* 



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/Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



November 13, 1998 




mi 



Help Wanted 
Flill-Tlme 



c.rNirRALorricL 

BOOKKEEPING 



Immediate opening 
for .i reliable and detailed 
oriented person. Duties to 
include answering phones. 

typing, A/R and M' 

experience a must. Salary 

based upon en|K"rienco. 

OlllB47)22:i-flfi"l 

or Fax resume in: 

IH47) 22j-86<>3. 

Attn: |an 



NORTEL CERTIFIED 

COMMUNICATION 

TECHNICIAN 

Victory Momonal HospilDl has a 

lull lime opening lor a 

Comrrw'nicatioo Technician The 

xleni cerididalo will hovo oi least 2 

h'.tj experience and be certified 

on Nortel equipment 

nosponsibilihes include maintain- 

mg PBX firmware, facility intra- 

Slrucluro and ancillary equipment 

We provide n compeliltve salary 

Pieose apply in person cm send 

your resiiT>e to 

Cindy Hall 

Sow Slotting Analyst 

VICTORY 
MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

1324 N Sheridan Hd 

WnukOflan, IL 60085 

Ph 847-360-4 1 70 

Fa« B-I7-360-4?30 

Equal opportunity ornptoyoi m-"t 



r 1 

i 



OWNER 



« 

tr 

i 
i 
• 



; OPERATORS 

I in rued Openings. 
J SI 000 Sign on liomis. 
S Family orienicd ee. 

needs Owner 
I Operators to run • 
* regional intermodal, • 
\ Chfio- Cincinnati • 

market. Home most » 



» 
» 
* 

» 



: 

* 

* 



wkiuls. IntiiH'd 
fjppiys. If you have 
[ yr CJTfl exp, 2.1 yrs 
age & good driving 
record, call us 
TODAY 
fl00 7rlH-4^HS or 
5 13-54 1 -4400 or 



1 1 VAC, Electrical 

&. Plumbing 

limned Opening l.n 
mutti-discipline ciiKi- 
nt-t-rinn firm w/ttfe's in 
II. St A/ seeks Mils it 
f.\vs w/all levels t)l wp 
tit institutional, munic- 
ipal & comm'l facility 
design for il*> soon -to- 
open Chgu area ofc 
Knowledge & imple- 
mentation Of IiUIk 
coilcs. tech standards, 
spec writing & strong 
computer skills rcq'd 
Mol-I. Sal commensu- 
rate w/exp Accept the 
challenge X |om higli 
energy, gootl people 
whd enjoy doing state- 
of-the-art design engi- 
neering. Resume in 
confidence Clark 
Ivnginccring MW, Inc. 
Attn HR Mgr, 111 NK 
Jefferson Ave, Peoria, 
IL 61602; 
Fax 3oy-676-S-HS 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



H.V.A.C 

New Construction 

Installer 

EXPERIENCED ONLY 

V. 0LSEN Heating & 

Air Conditioning, Inc. 

Lake Villa, IL 
(847) 356-9581 



WAUCONDA based 

business has a full 

Hme warehouse 

position available. 

Must be able to lit? 

heavy items. 

Salary plus benefits. 

Call 

847-526-1380 

^ & 



GENERAL OFFICE 



Grayslak© W/W 

wholesale oo. 

Booking friendly 

volco, reliable 

Bolf-startor for 

general office duties. 

FT/PT. Immed. Fax 

847-543-9005 or 

call 543-0901 EOE 



^ 



AERIAL 
EQUIPMENT 

In Wheeling. IL has 
immediate openings 
on our night, shift 
(3:30 p.m. • 12 00 a.m.) 
Jo'n our team of techni- 
cians to repair medi- 
um/heavy duty trucks & 
equipment We offer 
an excellent benefits 
package S some 
in house training. 

Call Dan before 

4 00 pm. or Mike after 

4:00 pm, 

at[847)39B-0620 



^ 



MJIMI): 

ItUllAL CAIUUliR 

suns/ 

WADSWOIITII 
P.O. 

• $10 54 PER HOUR 

• MUST PASS 
DRUG TEST. POLICE 

CHECK, A DRIVING EXAM 

• MUST HAVE 
OWN VEHICLE 

PH (847) 662-6625 
FOR MORE INFO 



s 



PRINTING 

WEB 

UIsiVTSl'T 

TliliSS 

OPIiKATOK 

lllllllfll (I/H'IHIUI \W'llll 

( nlni Ht'luil is il it it in Hi/ 

i:\IhiiiiIiiiiI mi tin i iti il II 

it !>■! -it I it it mi in in tr mil 

<*it ii ii hi H ) i turn i i/i/w/v. 

Im rv/i il (•.(m _'jirl Wrh 

llrttt^rl /?(■-.-. i i, k 'i i rli ii ■, 

Wiim hiirr l -Ji()v r\ft 

Itinniiul IftHtiUll -I i i id V 

i ri ilk tie i iffcr il / in j/ ill | 

■ rirllfli'Mtll f l i IfM/Jf'lJSlj 

III HI flkl) I i Hill Mill -i I 

1 1 ■ I XI 1 1/ 1/ l|IJ>» (t II 

iitlriini (infill (/ i /lit i im - 

F< KiKing Itii riijinJ i/rmrfh. 

<i jasiiHit nl I'liiur uimriii 

ii llw unn|ln' op|>llf of 

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(jrl ('(frjii)l It thf Indus 

frif'.s lop luli'nt M'ntJ 

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Hit Mtumift't x^'urfrf ( oliir 

fjflrlil IV J lUix I pH 

Mctitirii". l.-\ 7ixxM 

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tux r,(j.» hjh mm 

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SKCRETARY 

ij*!jiiir ininul»tiirt ,'( ilctl littvmi 
Ih'ni [t<f ihtf rlnlf^ il *fkl f Irtlrtdlti 

itHJuiiiK 1 ! ha» a challffifinf ami 
rrsfcaj.h/if tnrrlanal 1 pmiK'n ■■«tl- 

L) Ittui .in |irtth|||in.f irtrrlaflal *lnl 

fci1nnni.'F«li*r .rfun l.f ihr 
Dirnlt* llarU f ^riJinni RtTVhUp 

ti]irtirrv.r whpIiiij '.-* A \.C) malidftt 

in n|rf iiu-.ul*. iiicinj to |4*[ii |i-r* 

tn*ni *rn ■ [dui 

IW ii*ifiilul ian.Iul.lr tTiutl hjT 

rttclkrrt .'MikJiiurii^t-n 

i*f ajutafllHud «ral IritinHnl *tjlh 

rirf *l*iUly b* »ini ^rll »fih 

mintrnal iu[TrviiMm *rwl 

f nrllrnl 11' till)* arr r<«frill»l 

*r tdln «-»t<llrm *■[«* «hit 

ifcifiiu lltwi vr Iftun > 00 I in 

in S DO p m A|qd} in prrhKi 

\ mpli')Uicc!i MSfJ-i-f 

Nil [^tii-MC t *!)i )i|"!-»«f 

TEMPKL STKKK 

rOMPANV 

lIOOTrinprlDri^r 

liWrtT^Uk. 11. 600U 

«K irVfiW 






TIRED OF X% 

RAISES? 

LOOKING FOR A 

CHANGE? 

Si-rUry lii'iiiraiKc i\ » , 

S? 5 IhIIihii ^iiimli iifiL-niiil 

inn'ri- Inn- niMiram c niiniurn 

( liir ssdes re|>s vll A wftvtOf -i 

viirit-t) nl |f tsnn;il X uuhbcm 

[iriMlltL Is 

• I "ill]* HUM* --rfljl\ 

lll'll J llraw I plu. i uitiHII-,Miitl^ 
- l-iill r Jiiyi- ,il * n,|il,ijfi'i- K-iu-liu 

• CiitiipM-lii-ii^i^c |ijnl irjiiiiny 

• l'li»i-n vl- III ii|: .y.lrin 

• lull hut- til -|i,.t'i -. .-" "I , K 

• W t - JKUVItll lilt llllll (■ St 

,uJmmi^it.iliw MipjhllL 

Call I-KOO-52K-2fHtt 

iii vcml icsunv lu 

SKNTRY tNKl'RAM K 

111 Ijilf^lf- I'irkwgy, Sullr 17U 

Vtnwn llllll, II. HKk.l 

l-iillWlimt-4T72 

I'.IJl. mil 

w»* vrniry-in^uruiK'c i'inn 



Start a Home-Based Business. 

Work Flexible Hours. 

Enjoy Unlimited Earnings. 

AVON 



CALL TOLL FREE (800) 735-8867 



Lakeland netDIRECT, Chicagoland's premier Internet 

access provider, has ground floor opportunities for 

people Interested in the Internet. We are looking for 

Sales Professionals with the ability to introduce and 

sell web sites to businesses and organizations. 




C--C3 




If you are interested in creating a future with a 

rapidly growing organization, fax resume to 

skw, (847) 223-8810 

or e-mail: skw@us-netdirect.com 



Help Wanted 
. Full-Time 




Help Wanted 
Fuli-Tlmc_ - 1 



Receptionist 

Mail order co. needs 

responsible person to 

answer phones, take orders. 

light typing, filing and var- 

ious other duties. 
Call for appl. 9 AM • 1 I'M ' 

A lo Z Engraving 
(Wauconda Industrial Park) ■ 

847-52G-7396 



ASSEMBLER 

Assembler wanted for li^tt 

mechinlcal assembly & rrUled 

duties. Apply In personal: 

ILLINOIS 

iNSTRUMEnTTS, INC. 

J7M0 Concrete Drire 
IniJnlde.lL 60041 




In Antloeh, IL Is 
RE-OPENINGI 

VaoHtng for «)ip«r!*neaif 

• Bartender* 
m Waltrcfe* 

• Cook 

Call: 791-1136 
For Interview Appt. 



jrrtii 




MARKETING 
C00RD1NA TOR 

t.on$-Tcnn IWHls-tm, F/f $m^fh 

opjwrhmlty fttrfwrxm wttli mk/J *!.x/t 

i:n;iy/c«fH:(7i//(Wi»;>"f':r^rci/rfiir> skills. Dynamic. 

g/wiflfij jirimwIkiiuJ ciHiifuvty iii ///J/idvKf Park. 

lictuTtly SnxiktHnw rnv. Pitt likfml b' salary mf. 

IM7) 4H2-Hr>!i7 

Alln Scott 



ri im , | .i) 

Mm 



Olando's Pizza 

843 Rollins Rd. 

Round Lake Beach 

(847) 546-7744 




If you're a "Sweet-Talkln' Guy"(or Gal) 

Stroll your "Blue Suode Shoes" 

down to Olando's to 

nil out an application for 

PHONE HELP 
DELIVERY DRIVERS 

(Muil hovo valid llc«ri«* ft iruuronco} 

Applicant! muil bo: 

Customer friendly, dependable, 

willing lo work weekends & evenings. 

We hope to 
"See You Later Alligator- 



LAO V]LLA DISTRICT 

I lend ol" Aiitomiilion 

I'ull lime pvuiuon (.17 tinurs |ier week) Oversees (lie lilir;ir>'s infor- 
iiuitmii technology infrjsiniL-iurc. pergonal ClMipulef li.inlw.jrc iinJ 

soflwari' Rci|uircil cxj>erieni.c with CNIX ;intl Windows rVT 0(ieru(- 

iiij: '.-, • u-iiis .mil Microsort Desktop applicalinni, II S. in computer 

science or equivalent in iii iii .num. traininc.. uml e*penence 

Av;nl;ihle Decrtntmr 1, IWH ScnJ resume with names of references 
anil salary history In Nann lllainc llilyard. I.ihrary Director, ljikc 
Villa District t.itirary. KKJI l-Uisl ('.rami Ave . Lake Vtlhi. II. 60046 




| Pleasant Company, a 

^ marketer of children's f 



1 



dynamic direct mail | 

products, including ^ 

^ The American Girls Collection, is seeking ^ 

: seasonal Catalogue Fulfillment employees 

for our Distribution Center in Wilmot, 

Wisconsin, Pleasant Company's clean, 

modern facility reflects our emphasis on 

fostering high employee morale, and our 

commitment to excellence. We offer 



S weekend premium pay, generous product 8 
| discounts, and a seasonal bonus. 

xOii^lifir^ririn<i- 4, 



X 



I 



sQualifi cations: 

§• Attention to detail a must. 

Prior warehouse experience preferred, 
but not required. 

Ability to remain calm under pressure. 
■ Ability to work as part of a team. 
| Pleasant Company has a variety of positions | 
available in our Distribution Center, 
including but not limited to Pickers, 
Packers, and Gift Wrappers. 
I Stop in between 8:00 A.M. and 6:00 P.M. 

« ff> .annlw in r-»orc 



I 



§ 



% 

1 



to apply in person or call 

414-862-7578 

if you have further questions. 

Pleasant Company is located at 

1 2400 Fox River Rd. 

Wilmot. Wl 53192. 

EOE 




220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



i 






ROUNDED 

REM0DELER 

. i ij Apprentice 
. 1 1 ) Journeyman 

u teM t yM-<vmi »-art- 

Orouid Up Construction 

0471 648-8261 



Lake Shore Marine Is 

looking for people In the 

loitowlng areas: 

• OHIcq Manager 
Finance Manager 
• Boat Sales 
• Service/Parts 

Call Tracy at 
(847) 587-5B00 
or fax resume to 
(847) 587-5997 



rOSTAUOBS 

TO S18.35/IIR. 

INC. BENEFITS. NO 

EXPERIENCE. FOR APR 

& EXAM INFO CALL 

1-800-813-3585 

EXT 2406 



.AM » V M . 7 DAYS Hl,IK | 
M » m »»« »»"""" ' "" l ' M ""'*****"** 



/p!B 



TTBCM SOWWHEIT 
Lake V7//.1 jo/hvjre companv' 
seeks FT empl to Miht with 
product development and 
technical support for cuS' 
tomen. Thit it aft entry level 
pofition. We produce spe- 
cialized POlan database 
software for justice agencies. 
Must have a working knowl- 
edge of BASIC and database 
experience. 30-38Kplus 
bonus to start. 
Fax 847JS6S938. J 




IntcrnetAVcb-Devclopment Opportunities: 

Lakeland netDlrect, Chicago's 

premier Internet service provider, 

has ground floor opportunities 

due to rapid growth. 

> Marketing Manager ■ Internet Web Development 

> Project Administrator • Web Development 

> Technical Support - Internet 

• Telemarketing P,eps - Web Development 

If you are interested in creating a 

future with a rapidly growing 

organization, fax resume to 

skw, (847) 223-8810 

or e-mail: skw@us-netdlrect.com 



DELIVERY 

i KTO„iS,' 1 " ' 

\rW^W%£Gt£ 







:;:,jmm^iate openings for Individuals to assist 
;^Witfvdc^t6^day "operations in branch location. 
^^^bohs'lBihtie^^wih'fndude setting up papers 
''••^Cyfprdeiivolry.'as.vvell as for 






occasional absence of distributor. 



%f$& Ourfent ppenirigs in the following locations: 

:;; - ,; . ,: -;^Giuniee 
Grayslake 
gjl^TLake Zurich 

prki3^f;hours a day with flexibility in starting and 
" rjimes. Starling pay is S9.62ifhr. plus benellts 



For more inlormalion call: 

(847) 427-4333 




Customor Service 



M 



•'is 



Great Lakes Credit Union 

Come Join Our Winning Team! 

Great Lakes Credit Union is looking for 
key people to become part of our 
tremendous success! We are currently 
accepting applications for a variety of 
positions: 

■ Call Center Reps 

■ Data Entry Reps 

■ Loan Receptionist 

■ Tellers 

■ Visa/Atm Reps 

■ Accountant 

■ Collections 

And Many Mare! 

All positions reguire exceptional cus- 
tomer service skills, basic PC knowledge, 
excellent communication skills and inter- 
personal skills. 

In return we offer medical/ dental. 401 K, 
tuition reimbursement, paid vacations/ hol- 
idays/personal time, causal dress, incen- 
tives, training and career development. 

Apply in person or mail/fax resume to Attn: 
Staffing. GLCU, 2SZ5 Green Bay Road, 
North Chicago, IL 60064. Fax; 847- 
887-8798. E-mail to jonc@glai.org. Visit 
our web site at gtcu.org. EOE 



'^*****'***^5S»SW5%SSC^^ 



t 



I 






■ 



.1 





November 13, 1998 

... ,., , ,-. .. v . 



220 


ndpWiinied; 

FuU-Tlme 



DIGITAL 
PRINTING 



murine pnmnmn tt aptnta 
4-coiar Ihtmtkmw 4km* 
tmmTmlmt ■■•• 



candidal* w0tev*5er4 

ymmtt l ro tor Mp a H w m on 

OT0 or MtmSar mufitaolor ptojl 

OutfW CMMUita wfD *• 

MnTte IMMtef tmtaint 

etnter, Bantf! fadkaft . : , 

40UI Prctt Mhirtnf. mnd 
■ Hmth bmumtom, -, 

Aik (or Jmy at 

HMMjmntn/Burkmtt ha 

10471660-8233 



•• 



Cabinet Maker. 
2 yean minimum 
experience. Trade 
show experience 

a plus. Must 

Head blueprint* 

Benefits package. 

Call 

\CB47) BJiG~S7GGj 



$$$ EXTRA $$$ 

CASH FOR THE 

HOLIDAYS 

Telemarketing 

$8 - $9/lir. 

Full - time days or 

early evenings. 

Call today 

549-O01G 



Q 



uperior 

Personnel 



•" ---■' ■ - . . .. 




J RctaII CleRks Needed 

tJltxltU -Hunts - 

Bl villi mclixjf iduCAtiOHAl 

MiiiiAftCt. conpttiiiu WAqti 
6 OfiitOftAl lir/^lh ecmimqi 

- Apply jflSt 7 > "«" - 

Ask ton Davhv 

Co&twat Ri. 12 & 

Hwy l20inVob 

Aik Ior Phi lit 

Cimmk o! Ri 22 A 

12 n Lilf Zumcli 



^mmrsNAncD 

MECHANIC 
FUU TINE 

McHenry High School 
ServiceMaster is seeking a 
quality minded mechanic to 

worti at McHenry Hjnh 
School. Qualified candidate 
will possess general skills 
In HVAC, electrical, plumb- 
ins and carpentry. Some 
heavy lifting required. Must 
be available for weekends 
as needed. Knowledge ol 
swimming pool mainte- 
nance and digital building 
control systems a plus. Full 
time position Includes bene- 
fits. Call Mike or Mary at 
815-344-7178 or (ax 
_ resume to: (B15) 344-7179. 

\ :„ \ 



RETAIL SALES 

MERCHANDISERS 

Ferrero USA, mtg. ol Tc Tac & 

Rocher teeta P/TrxJivid 
interested in seSng & merchan- 
dising product} in Ntf1 Acdi 

and inaep-retai outlets. 

Territories tradable hduds: No 

IBnois, Southern Wl area and 

NW Chicago area. To quality, 

youlneed 

• MtHjf to wort Tfrratm 
Oflr onTfflD artndt "s 

' Hrly BIB* * m/ l n gt 
■ RttlitH irmipautlon wim 
*d*ju*lt Inturwm 

• XndrfM. 

CalMcn- Fnonlf 

FERRERO USA, Inc 

EOE 



:■■■.'. 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakelan4Wewspapm/G23L 



220 



Help Wanted 



re*5^~ ~^~^TT, 



220 



LAKE VILLA 
$ DISTRICT 
LIBRARY 

Circulation Cloik 

Part tlmo cu it omor *or- 
rico position crrallabl* 
. Imm&diatoly, Position 
Includo* evening and ' 
woelcend houn. . 
Applications onraUcibla at 
Ibo library. \r>- 

..•'- 1001 E. Grand Am, ■;' 

Lako Villa, IL6004S 

B47-3S6-77I1 



r?:._ 



. 



"Hit Mo With Your Best Shor 
Great Accounting 

opportuniiios al Matthews! 
AttL Payable.. $24-27yr 
Collections ...$27-35yr 

Payroll S32-35yr 

Acct Assist ...$32-38yr 
Staff Acct ....$3W0yr 
Sr. Accountant l$40-45yr 




Line Cooks 
Saute/ Broiler. 

AM & PM wait staff, 

bus persons 

FUN, GREAT PAY, 

FLEXIBLE HOURS, 

IMMEDIATE 

OPENINGS 

high energy pub & grill 

Duke's (847) 526-0002 

Wauconda 



DRIVERS 

OWNER 

OPERATORS 

Immed Openings. 
Southern Wisconsin based 

refrigerated trucking 

company hiring qualified 

Drivers/Owner Operators. 

Must have clean COt & 

3yrs exp verif. We offer 

'Home wily 'Comp 

pay*HeaUh insurance 

'Profit share *Sign on 

bonus $300 after 6mos 

employment. For more 

details call M-F 608-876- 

6150 or 800-B76-604B 



MEDICAL BILLERS 

Full time day positions are now 

available far Bilters In a 

Physician's office or Patient 

Accounts Department at Victory 

Memorial. Previous experience 

with Itiirrj party players, Medicare 

Medicaid and collections 

Is required. Strong 

organizational and 

communication skills 

are also essentia! 

We provide an excellent salary 

and benefits. 

Please send resume 

In confidence to: 

Human Resources 

847-360-4170 

VICTORY 

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

' 1324 N. Sheridan fld 

Wtukogan, 11 60065 

FAX: B47-36CH230 

Equal opportunity prnptaypf irrt 



Hdp Wanted 
' FulHlme ■ ■■ 



;;'Uar 



BuDdlng engineer 

Private North Shore health 

dub has a Full-Time 2nd 

ihifr position available Far 

an Individual who has 

experience In basic 

plumbing and etedrtcuL 

Background In pumpi and 

moron, boiler operations, 

swimming pool 

maintenance and 

HVAC experience a plus. 

Please send/fax 
{jour resume to: 

tB47I739-7l2g 

LAJ03 FOREST HEALTH i. 

fffHBB ■HlnUlfl 

1200 N. Westmoreland Road 

Lake Forest, II 60045 
Equal Opportunity, Employer 



.AHaIhstVUsV 
•nail tech 

Avedi lull service salon 
seeking progressive, .' 
mooVifed individuals 
full or part time. 
Ckeat Endings 
Sryung5slon ! V' 
, .25150 75th St, 
(Paddock Lake Village PUu) 
Salem, Wl 53168 
414-B4J-3778 



225 



Business 
OpportunJttes 



3 



A PERFECT 

PART-TIME BUSIKES9I1 . 

2 hours/day earns you 

(inanciaJ freedom. 

24 hour message. 

(686) 273-5775. 

BUSINESS 
IS EXPLODINQI 

Every home and business 

needs our product 

Ground floor opportunity 

positioned for tremendous 

growth! 2 minute message. 

1-600-659-1790. 

CALLING ALL LAKE COUN- 
TY MOMSIII Bright Begin- 
ning's Family Day Care Net- 
work Is looking for nurturing, 
responsible, creative Individu- 
al's who would liko to start 
their own bulsness while stay- 
ing at home with their children, 
tr you live in Lake or McHenry 
County and would like assis- 
tance In gotllng licensed, on- 
going technical assistance, 
training, equipment lending, 
and child referrals this pro- 
gram Is for you. For more In- 
formation on how to become a 
quality Infant and toddler day 
care provider In your home 
call Dona Thompson at (847) 
556-4112 

CASH IN ON THE INTER- 
NET Internet consulting. Full 
training/support. $495.00 start- 
up. Call now. (6S0) 784-5693 
24hrs. 



EARN $400 
Loss up to 29lbs. 
. .In 30 days. , > -■ 
Or. Recommended. ■ . 
100% Natural . J' 
Call (816) 455- 7339. 

MEXICAN ' RESTAURANT, 
FAST food, eat-In, 5yrs. exist- 
ence, fully equipped, seats 25. 
Waukegan area. Negotiable. 
(847) 548-5275 after 4pm. 



MORE THAN 250 WAYS 

TO EARN YOUR 

FORTUNE OPERATING 

A BUSINESS FROM 

YOUR HOME. 
Call 1-800-078-2505. 

OWN YOUR OWN APPAR- 
EL, shoe, westernwear, linger- 
ie, bridal, gift or $1 .00 store. In- 
cludes inventory, fixtures, buy- 
ing (rip, training. Minimum in- 
vestment $18,900. Call Paul at 
Liberty. 1 -501 -327-8031. 

POPCORN VENDING MA- 
CHINES, attractive, reliable 

and produce" great tasting hot 
popcorn. Bargain price. Call 
Hector (847) 548-0923. 

REPRESENTATIVES 
WANTED 

Excel Communications 

51 ,600/month plus 

long term residual Income 

working at home. 

(847) 785-8843 

after ipm. 



THOUSANDS POSSIBLE 
EACH WEEK! 

Earn money processing 

mall al home. 

Send $1.00 and SASE to: 

Bright Futures, 

P.O. Box 86, 

Wauconda. III. 60064. 



WANT TO REACH B MIL- 
LION HOUSEHOLDS? You 
can now place your ad in more 
than 600 suburban newspa- 
pers reaching more than 8 mil- 
lion households around North 
America with one simple call at 
a low, low cost. For details call 
800-356-2061. (SCA Net- 
work). 



WORK FROM HOMEI 

Earn S500-$1500/month 

Part-Time. 

S2,000-$6,000/monlh 

Full-Time. 

Complete training. 

Paid Vacations. 

Call (847) 622-3729. 



225 



Business 
Opponunites 



■ % %*»VW»VVVMW*»^WS»vy»V*%' | w , wS* , fc | H i 

Eudress 

€ppt>rtLBrity 

In Anttoch Illinois for 
18 years, I ft is respected 
*turn-kcy* Antique and 

Collectible Business 
includes, the $485,000 

inventory', consignor 
and inventory database, 

and award winning 
Internet site. Owner is 

retiring but will offer 

transition assistance. 

Attractively priced at 

$175,000. 

(414)877-9050 



228 



Situations Wanted 



CARPET INSTALLERS 
LOOKING FOR SIDE 
JOSS. Used carpet may be 
available. Reasonable rates. 
Contact Scott (847) 
S73-9247, 

SENIOR CARE SERVICES 

"GMng Seniors the care ihey 
deserve.' Running errands, 
doctor appointments, grocery 
shopping, beauty shop and 
companionship. Excellent ref- 
erences. (847) 740-2775. 



250 


School/Ins IniCLi on 



PIANO LESSONS 
OPENINGS Now for stud- 
ents Syrs. to adult. 
Over 25yrs. experience. 
REASONABLE RATES. 
(847) 356-2780. 



TRAVELING TO EU- 
ROPE7 Language and cultur- 
al training In German and 
French. Native German, trans- 
lator degree (university] In 
French, English, German 
provides evening/weekend 
courses for professionals and 
world travelers. Ubertyvilte, 
(847) 649-6728. 



301 



Antiques 



ATTENTION ANTIQUE 

DEALERS Auntie's gone but 
her Italian Provincial Furniture 
lives on I Same with dad's solid 
oak and naugahyda couch 
and chair wilh end table. Other 
odd and sundry items avail- 
able. All In excellent condi- 
tion. Serious inquiries only. 
Call for appointment (847) 
587-6990 leave message. 



304 



Appliances 



_J 



GE FRIDGE, ALMOND, 
21.8 cu.fl., side-by-sfde, like 
new, $500. GE double oven 
range, bottom oven self-clean- 
ing, almond, excellent condi- 
tion. $250. (847) 362-0536. 



WASHER, GAS DRYER, 

top of the line Whirlpool, ua-sd 
only 6/months. Paid $1,100. 
will sell for $800/best. (847) 
223-9639. 



310 


Bazaars/Crafts 



• *SHAR JOY'S 
BEANIE BABY BASH" 

Holiday Inn-Gumee, 

6161 Grand Ave. 

Friday November 13th. 

6pm - 10pm. 
Sunday November 15th. 

10am-3pm. 

Grand Prize 
New Halo Bear 

on Sunday. 

Adults - $2.00 

Children -$1.00 

(under 2 tree). 

(847)765-8551. 



314 


Building Materials 



STEEL BUILDINGS SALE 
40x60x14, $8,1 B7. 50x75x14 
$10,760. 50x100x16 
$14,631. 60x100x16, $16,883 
Minl-slorage buildings 
40x180, 38 units, $17,818 
Free brochures, www.senlinel 
buildings.com, Sentinel Build 
Ings, 800-327-0790. Exten 
sion 79. 

TWO NEW 24X60 WIND- 
OWS wllh screens and ma- 
roon shuttors. Paid $525, will 
sell lor $350. (847) 680-8876. 



320 



: HectronJcs 
Coniptitcr s ) 

: COMPAQ PASARIO 020 

with 14ln ; monitor, mouse, 
keyboard end speakers. $450. 
(847)548-7005. ' ■ 

SAMSUNG SENS 810 LAP- 
TOP COMPUTER, 1yf. old, 
Windows 05 equipped, 

$2,000. HP694 cotor printer, 
$200. Or both -for $2,100. 
(847)638-2504. •-;. 




Horses & Tacks 




Household Goods 
s£ ttraitare .' - 



328 



Hrewood 



FIREWOOD 2 YEAR sea- 
soned Firewood, delivered. 
M ixed wood, 1 -face cord, $65; 
1-fuil cord, $165. Oak, 1-faco 
cord, $75; 1-fuli cord, $195 
(110 pieces In face cord). Siak- 
tng available, (847) 548-0656. 

FIREWOOD OAK, $50 
face, $135 cord, picked up. 
Delivery extra. (414) 
694-8960. 

FIREWOOD SEASONED 
HARDWOODS. Mixed- 

$65/F.C. Oak-$75/F.C. Prompt 
free delivery (847) 247-1700. 

MIXED HARDWOODS, UN- 
SPLIT LOGS BY THE TRUCK 
LOAD, $200 DELIVERED. 
(847)917-5200. 



STALLS 1 ; AVAILABLE. IN- 

; DOOR/OUTDOOR arenas, 
wash rack, turnout and stall 
cleaning 7 days a week. Bar-; 

rtngton location, $275/monlh. 
(847) 487-8893 for mora b> 
fOnrnaflon.' . .. ..;;... 

TB'S EVENT OR H/J pros- 
pects all geldings, 6yrs..oW 
and up. $3,500 & up. (847) 
464^0420..; .U;^-; ■■O.ylr - 

HORSE SALE BELLE 

Piaino . ' Western Exchange, 
Bone Plaine, IA. Two day cats- 
: log and non-cataloged sale 
November 28 & 29 Horses 12 
noon. Expecting 500 head. 
Call .' for catalogs/consign- 
ments. 319-444-2320, Fax 
319-444-2656. 




m 



Household Goods 
Rimiaire : 




|-| Garage 

■J Rummage Sale 



FLEA MARKET 
Sunday November I51h., 

9am-3pm. 
Round Lake Area Men's 

Club, 

1102 Cedar Lake Rd„ 

Round Lake Beach. 

For Info, and booth rental 

(847) 546-9813. 

(847) 740-0306. 

GURNEE 6235 ROCK- 
POINT, few feet from Grand 
and Lawson. Saturday No- 
vember 14th, 8am-3pm. 

HUGE GARAGE SALE 828 
Cedar Lake Rd., Round Lake, 
Saturdays & Sundays thru No- 
vember. weather permitting. 

MOVING SALE 25' color 
console TV, 19" color console 
TV, numerous car parts. sWIng 
equipment,, exercise equip- 
ment, microwave, VCR, CD 
player, : (847) 216-2172 for 
. more Intormaiion. ,■'■'. . :. ;.•■'' • 

AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIG SALE, and (here 

Is still things that just did not 
go.... Call us at LAKELAND 
Newspapers and run It 
under the 'FREE or Givea- 
ways* classified column, FREE 
ADS are NO CHARGEI 
(847) 223-8161, ext, 140. 



338 



Horses & Tacks 



1996 FEATHERLITE 2 

horse slant with dressing- 
room, $3,900. (815) 
648-4503. 

AQHA CHESTNUT MARE, 
6yrs., 15 1-1/2 hands, pro 
trained, excellent hunt seat 
prospect, sound, excellent pa- 
pers, must sacrifice, 
$2,300/best. (414) 513-0020 
evenings, (414) 246-7474 
days. 



.3 BUND MICE 

Decorative Mini Blinds, 

Valances and Wall Borders 

for Children's Rooms. 

Call for free brochure. 

1-800-307-4956. 

ALL FROM ITALY Italian 
marble dinlngroom table, top 
quality, leather chairs, 4-plece 
matching marble coffee table 
set. 100% Italian feather sofa, 
loveseat and chair. Paid 
$13,000, will separate and 
sacrifice for $5,000. (847) 
247-1931, . 

BEAUTIFUL BRASS 

HEAD AND FOOT BOARD. 

queen size ortho firm mat- 
tress set, and frame, unused, 
factory packaging, must sell. 
Sacrifice $325. Call (847) 995- 
0425. 

CHINA CABINET/CURIO, 
HUMMELS, oil paintings, 
cross country skier, stair step- 
per and desks. (414) 
694-7009. 



COMPLETE KIRBY 

CLEANING SYSTEM. Must 

sell. Wilt sacrifice. Antique sofa 
81", good condition. (414) 
279-6245. 

CORNER FIREPLACE, 

NEW $150. (847) 838-0211 
altar 6pm: 

DESIGNER MODEL 

HOMES FURNITURE . 

CLEARANCE I 

Sofa/Ioveseat set, 
hunter green, $495. 
Sofa, white," $350. 

Sofa/toveseat, 

earth tones. $595. 

Also: Plaids, Florals. 

Leathers and More. 

Oinmgroom sets, 10-piece: 

Cherry, $1,395, 

Mahogany, $2,395, 

Oak $1,695. 

Other sets available. 

Also: Bedroom Sets, 

from $995. 

(847)329-4119. 

DINtNGROOM SET OVAL 
table. 6-chairs, hutch, buffet, 
$1,200/besl. "OLD" Punch 
Bowl Set. (847) 265-0133. 

FOR SALE COUCH, greal 
condition, $50. Floral pattern 
in earth tone. (847) 872-*234. 



FORMAL DINING ROOM 

TABLE, 6 navy biuo-uphol- 
stored chairs,* 1 1n. : thick ', bev- 
eled glass top' with dark hard- 
wood base. $2,400 new,* ask- 
ing $700. f£xe«ftertt,conw > Joa: 
.Must sW to' appreciate. (847) - 
; a73^460..:;.".' : '-":'; , .^:.: ; .-:" 

; IF YOU HAVE 

FURNrTURE TO SELL, 
Acer, or s^lancet, W' . : 
you am having a Garogt 
. Sale or If you have a . 
. house to Mil c* apartment ' 
'-''-■ :torenL v .". 

Call Lisa before 10am 
' Wednesday to place 
your adhere. 
(847) 223-8161 , . 
ext 140. 

KING BED- DELUXE ma- 
tress/box set, with frame,. still 
In plastic, never used, WTO"*!! 
$400. (414) 653-9494 Ke- 

nosha. . :.•■ - : ." ,: -'- ■ 

KING SIZE WATERBED 
frame and heater, headboard 
with mirror. All equipment, no 
mattress. Must go. Lake villa 
area. Best offer. Take It away. 
(847) 973^0473. 

MOVING SALE EVERY- 
THING must go. Furniture, 
etc. Call and leave message 

(847) 573-0190. 

OLD PINE CABINET from li- 
brary, 2 twin brass beds, di- 
nlngroom table chrome end 
mirror. Oriental trunk. Kimball 
theatrical organ, $50. (847) 
367-1692. 

SPAS-HOT TUBS 

Factory Direct 

Tnickload Sale. 

Save 20-30%. 

Purchase from Factory Rep. 

Woodland Pier One 

(414)534-5264. 

TWO SOFAS 

34lnx84in., $100, 
32iruc971n., $125. 
Excellent condition. 

(847)362-5881. 



■■'.■ 



344 


Jewelry 



WEODINQ.OOWH SIZE 10, 

Caihocrol train fully beaded. 
Worth $V,50o; sell lor $TO0. 
Marquis diamond engage- 
mont/wodd/ng ring, 31 dia- 
monds. Appraised $2,100, 
sell. $1,200. Call Kim (847) 
249-8646. 






349 


Oothing 



12.000 COSTUMES- 

For Sale by Owner. 

CSat'l award-ivtnning 

PA costumcr retiring 

frombusn. Buy the 

entire collection! 

TheatricaL 

masquerade, vintage 

& all accessories. 
leannic 

888-5 IEANNIE 

G visit website 
winir.kvtniAiGurliIit&ls.com 




CoO°R°N° 




FOSTER HOMES NEEr- 

EDI Wanted good, nurturing 
Individuals to provide tempo- 
rary homes for children ages 
birth to adolescent. Training, 
support, compensation, day 
care provided. Contact Cathol- 
ic Chariiies/Lako County. 
(647) 782-4242 or (847) 782- 
4243. 



MOM OF 3_ has 2 lull-time 
openings lor child 6/weeks 
and up. Five years experience. 
Lunches, snacks and field 
trips provided. (847) 
973-2230. 



A NANNY IS WHAT WE 
ARE LOOKING FOR. Are 

you her? Infant care needed 
in our Gurnee home, M-F, 
8am-4pm. Non-smoker. Own 
transportation. Call Michael & 
Christie (847) 336-220B. Ref- 
erences required. 



WILL DO CHILD CARE IN 
MY ANTIOCH HOME, children 
under 5yrs. Have reterencos. 
Snacks and meals included 
Lots TLC. (847) B38-5935. 



CALLING ALL WORKING 
PARENTS!!! Winter Is fust 
around the corner, have you 
planned your children's day 
care yet? Immediate openings 
tor children ages 6 weeks and 
up are available In Bright Be- 
ginning's Home Day Care Net- 
work. For more information on 
how to enroll your child in a 
conveniently located, quality 
day care home please call 
Dena Thompson at (847) 356- 
4112. SPACES ARE LIMITED 
SO CALL IMMEDIATELY. 

CHILD CARE - Fun, Clean, 
Caring Child Care In my home. 
(847)731-1197 

CHILD CARE COUNTY 
Certined, 10yrs. experience. 
Full-lime days. (414) 
654-1155. 



DESIRE LOVING. NUR- 
TURING AND ENERGE- 
TIC PERSON to care for 

4/monih old in our Gurnee 
home. Child care experience 
prelerred. Full/part-lime con- 
sidered. Call Michelle (847) 
648-0929. 



MOTHER OF 1 has FT & FT 
openings In my Grayslake 
home. Meals and snacks in- 
cluded, lots of activities. (847) 
548-4661 ^* 

MOTHER OF 2 wilh CPR 
and First Aide training, would 
like to watch your little one 
while you're at work. Any 
hours, $2/hr. Call Wendy (847) 
546-8695, pager (847) 85 To 
0Q36. 

MOTHER OF 4 will babysit 
your child in her Salem home. 
Raid trips, fenced yard on a 
dead-end street. 14yrs. experi- 
ence. References. (414) 
643-2155. 

MOTHER OF 5 provides 
daycare for your children In 
my Round Lake Beach home. 
Reasonable rates. (847) 
740-1996. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH Li- 
censed caring home daycare. 
Call Rebecca (647) 546-4330, 



RECYCLE 



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C24 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



November 13, 1998 



<■-■■■<: V- - 



350 



Miscellaneous 



TEN FOOT SATELLITE 

DISH, with remote box. com- 
pteto. ready to use, $1,500. 
(B47) 265-7131. 

AEROBIC RIDER EXER- 
CISE MACHINE WITH ris- 
er, excellent condition, like 
new Original $300. best offer. 
(&47) 973-0473 after 6pm. 

BEANIE BABIES AND 
LEAF DONRUSS BASEBALL 
CARDS FOR SALE. Please 
call tor prices. (414} 
843-1379 

BLACK LACQUER BED- 
ROOM SET. $350. 1980s 
piano. $500. {6471 S4&-S684 

BLACK LACQUER FURNI- 
TURE. Loveseal reciiner 
Maple cabinet fronts. Christ 
faat tree. I5rip Evtnrude AJ 
bums Dean ML electric guitar 
Stereo speakers Tumtobio 
[B471 B55 0372 

BUCK STOVE WITH BLOW 
ER $300 Heatttater firopuico 
«5<*t. $200 18471 7*& 7634 

CABLE TV DESCRAU- 
BLERS A." makes and mod 
ot* Qu*m<ry d<*counu 30 day 

in,! i >«< j- *.irranr f Vcu and 
MC accvprnJ Accmf Video 
"V ' MOM' 549' tSCA 

'<i •« ■ -• 

PAX UACMtKE BROTH 
(US 2O0 H|n( concetto" 

y-' !..i--\ ■>-'» v.e-o.vr 
frtv(1m«( £*»cur*»iey« «"<t 

"*jr^ <■«»• Mr J4r ej?o 
gp 4 *c*r- 

rwocn yocti *uru 
i'inromcono»\>Tfni 

'WAf ■ i«ao OsdQa «4" 
■OE C u ' » " u tr»^ M rrw-nxil 

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amcta> ><tJ» 

»'«* ii m aid 
t»ig nfc-i-f:n to»n*!f bat 
• »t» t«vr*»" tt^a J '» 'lev'* 
»mr ft* • '*r, 09K 

SNOWMOBILE t«r« YA- 
MAHA 440 'un» ISOObosI 
1 647, 740 1364 

WOLFF TANNINQ BEDS. 

IhNAT HOME Buy DIRECT 
and SAVE' Commeieial/home 
units Irom St 99 Low monthly 
payments FREE color cata 
log Call today 1-800-842 
1310 



354 



Mrilir.i! I riuif 



DIABETES? STILL PAY- 
ING lor supplies? Why"> You 
may be able to receive sup- 
plies at little ot no cost Call I ■ 
600-678-5733 lor a tree con- 
sultation 

GREAT NEWS1 DIABET- 
ICS. ..Medicare pays lor test- 
ing supplies. You've seen us 
on TV Liberty Medical Supply. 
^o uplrortl cost Satisfaction 
Guaranteed Free shipping. 1- 
800-514-7776 (SCA Network) 

MEDICARE RECIPIENTS: 

ARE you using a NEBULIZER 
MACHINE'' STOP paying lull 
pnee (or Albuterol. Atrovent. 
etc solutions MEDICARE will 
pay lor them We bill Medicare 
for you and ship directly to 
your door. MED-A-SAVE l- 
800-538-9849. 



358 



Musical Instruments 



360 



Pels & Supplies 



360 



Pets & Supplies 



?OLTQN TRUMPET AND 
ASE. $350. Noblet clarinet 
and case. $200 {414) 
279-3093 after 4pm. 

PIANO STARR, GOOD 

shape, needs tuning due lo 
age, built m very early !900's. 
>o47) B72^*234. 



'1) STANDARD POODLE 
'iO/weeks old. (1) Boston Terri- 
er, 10/weeks old. Home 
raised, great with kids. (847) 
464-0420, 

60 GA.LLON FISH TANK, 

complete saltwater setup. 

<^usl sell. $400/best. (847) 

265-8037. 

ROTTWEILER AKC REG- 
ISTERED, male puppy, 
10/wks. old, shots up-to-date. 
Ready to go. (847) 623-4272. 

SIBERIAN HUSKY RES- 
CUE ADOPTIONS lo ap- 
proved homes. Give a 
rescued Siberian a second 
chance. Altered, all vaccina- 
tions, heartworm preventative, 
sweet and loving. We also 
need foster homes. Call (847) 
740-3066 www.wlshres- 
cue.com 



AKC MALE BEAGLE 3yrs. 
wonderful with kids, loveable, 
needs large property or farm 
to roam (will come home), 
$150 negotiable. (414) 
694-2670. 

AMERICAN ESKIMO 

PURE bred, mate, 3/months 
old, friendly, good with child- 
ren. $300. (B47) 837-6043. 

6IQ HEAD REDS PIT 
PUPS, all red, red nose, big 
boned, strong Bullison and 
Sorelt bloodlines. 4-males. 3- 
tomalos. Call Rudy. (847) 
244-7101. 

CAT 1 -FEMALE BENGAL 

(hybrid from Leopard). 1yr. 
old, spayed, all shots, de- 
clawed. $200. (847) 
223-7451. 

CHRISTMAS PUPS AKC 

Labrador puppies, blacks & 
yellows, both sexes, ready for 
good homos in December, 
$400 (647) 566-7353 atlor 
4 pm 

COLLIE PUPS AKC, shots. 
<ryo check, male and lomole. 
eacellenl (omporamenl and 
disposition. health guar- 
antood (647) 223-7641 

CUTE CUDDLY TOY POO 
OLE AKC. vet checked, black. 
1 "weeks, ready 10 go. 1-lofl. 
$300 Melissa (847) 
305 953t 

DACHSHUND PUPPIES, 
AKC. miniature, black and 
inn smooth, males. 0/weoks, 
»•» checked, isl shots, cham- 
r*on tfoodimos. $350 (414) 
653 3199 

GERMAN SHORTHAIR 
POINTER PUPPIES, ready 
now (647) 249 3891 

HORTON FARMS, INC. 
FEED STORE 

High Quality Hay, straw leod 

Puf.na B/and food lor dogs. 

aits snoep and much more 

We deliver tool 

1 2 mile Nolh of lllmors- 

Wisconsin border 

Can loday (414) 857-2525 

Monday-Friday 

8am-5pm 

Saturday 8am- 3pm 

JACK RUSSELL TERRIER 

PUPS [Wishbone) Ready m 
December. UKC. $600 (414) 
652 t702 

LAB PUPPIES YELLOW 
AKC, I si shots. $300 (414) 
657 7079 

LICENSED DOG CARE 

IN MY HOME 

While you're away. 

Call Florence 

(847) 966-6319 

LLAMAS BABIES READY 

now. great color and dispos 
Great pets Call Melissa (847) 
740 7464 

MALACCAN COCKATOO. 

3YR old Very Inendiy, loves 
to cuddle, good talker, no 
swear words, cage and sepa- 
rate sland with perch included 
Moving lo Japan (847) 
266 1626 

MALE FERRET WITH 
cage. SlOO/best (84 7) 
265 - 7907 after 6pm 

PATIENT AND LOVING 
PERSON NEEDED lor shy 
female cat. Princess is a 3yr 
old spayed, lortoise shell shod 
hair. (847) B3i 3398 leave 
message. 

PIT BULLS BEAUTIFUL 

bnndles and blue bnndles 
6/weeks old, papered, 4- 
males. 3-females. starting at 
$250. (847) 973-0277 

POODLE PUPS, STAN- 
DARD, AKC, 10/wks old, 
black, personality plus. $300- 
$350. (414) 552-8929 after 
4 pm. 

QUALITY PUPPIES MY 
SPECIALTY Boxers. 

big/beauiitul Bundle and 
fawns, 9/Wks., 5400-5500 
Boston Terriers, females, 
$300. AKC. shots, priv. party. 
Call for selection of Christmas 
Puppies. (414)537^1066. 



364 



Rcsiauranl 
Kqulpment 




370 


Wauied To Buy 



500 



Homes For Sale 



■a##tw— m 



BLODQETT PIZZA OVEN, 
4 baking decks. (847) 
395-5778. 



500 


Homes For Sale 



ALL OLD TRAINS AND 
TOYS Uonol. American Flyer 
and other old (rains. Also your 
old toys. Private collector pays 
top cash. Bo smart, call before 
selling. (847)299-1101. 

COUNTRY BOUTIQUE AN* 

tiques (Established Blnco 
1968} Is Interested In buying 
silvor, china, paintings, Jewel- 
ry, glassware, furniture end 
other old objects of interest. 
(B47) 546-^1295. 

JUKE BOXES WANTED- 
play 78'B, Wurlitzor, wilt pay up 
lo $2,000 on condition (414) 
961-2113. 

PIANOS WANTED, CASH 

paid lor mosl Grand Pianos, 
any condition. Also small 
uprights, in good condition. 
(414) 728-2440. 

Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
Parts. Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coke Machines. 
Paying CASHI Call 
(830)985-2742. 



35TH PL. 1714 Kenosha 
North side, by owner, 4-bed- 
room onck ranch, hardwood 
floors, brick fireplaces, large 
lonced in yard. Open House 
Saturday-Sunday, 12-4pm or 
(414) 654-7992. 

BEACH PARK FOR SALE 
BY OWNER 3/4 bedroom 
ranch, livingroom, dining- 
room, wan- io- wall carpel, built- 
in bookcase, C/A, newer tur- 
naco. gBrage. 24ti. pool with 
deck, well and septic (no water 
or sewer bills). All on approx- 
imately 1/3 acre. $127,000. 
Open House 1 1/8, lpm-4pm. 
37085 N. Greenbay. (847) 
623-6603: No realtors please. 

COUNTRY LIVING ENJOY 
peace and tranquility in a 
beautiful, quality 2700sq.fl. 
brick ranch. Features 4 -bed- 
rooms, remodeled kitchen, 
sunken livingroom, 2 tire- 
places. 3 season room, fin- 
ished recroom, first floor laun- 
dryroom. new carpeting, 2-1/2 
ca< garage. At 11127 47th 
Ave (414) 694-6472. Re- 
duced to $212,500. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER 3- 

badrooms. 2-baths, 
I840sq.lt , January 1998 new 
construction. 1st floor laun- 
dry, everything upgraded, 140 
I3lh Ave , Union Grove (414) 
878-9071 

FOUR BEDROOM, 3YR. 

old custom built homo. 2-story 
colonial with covered porch is 
located on .5 acre on quiet cul- 
de-sac in Lyons Township. 
Low Walworth County taxes. 3 
miles from Burlington and 3 
miles from Hwy 50. Fireplace, 
deck, A/C, raised panel oak 
cabinets, 6-panei doors, living- 
room, lamilyroom. 2.5 baths, 
insulated and drywalled 2 5 
car garage, appliances and 
much more For Sale By Own 
er Extraordinary buy at 
SI89.000. About this beautiful 
cuslom built home Open 
House, November Blh. I4ih. 
ISth. Ipm-4pm (414) 
763-3935 

GRAYSLAKE HOME BY 

OWNER Brick and cedar 4- 
bedroom with cedar shingles 
in South Creek Subdivision. 
Fireplace. A/C. landscaped 
and fenced yaid with over- 
sized deck. Many upgrades 4 
blocks from Melra Station 
$257,000 (847) 548 7282 

GRAYSLAKE HOME FOR 
SALE BY OWNER. 3 bed 

room Capo Cod, 1st floor 
laundry facilities imijheo 
basomenl, 3-car garagtj new 
wrap around deck Older 
home, updated $139,900 
(847) 223-2483 



WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
WALK TO EVERYTHING 

ADULT COMMUNITY. 

NewlWT 

Manufactured home 

i -bedroom, 1-bath 

wiih garage and recroom. 

Includes: washer/dryer. 

stove/refrigerator, 

off street parking. 

$54,900. 

1995 1 -bedroom, 1-oath. 

carport and shod, 

$39,900. 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message. 

JOHNSBURG/SPRINQ 
GROVE WATERFRONT. 

Johnsburg schools, 3-bed- 
rooms, large country kitchen, 
big livingroom, nice lamily- 
room, 65ft. pier, lenced yard, 
hardwood, newer carpel. 
newer lurnace, central air and 
appliances slay. Must see. 
$125,000. Is the best deal on 
the chain. (847) 497-3408. 

LAKEVIEW OF GAGES 

LAKE in private subdivision. 3- 
bedroom. 1-1/2 bath, at- 
tached 2-1/2 car garage, large 
lamilyroom, oak kilchen. fire- 
place, deck overlooking beach 
across street, Woodland and 
Warren schools. $132,000 
(847) 223-4259. 

MUST SELL. 22056 Sarah 

Dr., Lake Villa. Home on 2 lols. 
Sold in as is condition 
$70,000. Lawrence Group 
Real Estate Property, (630) 
372-6155. 

NOVEMBER OCCUPANCY 
HEATHER Ridge/Stoney 
Brook, single family home. 3- 
bedrooms, 2.5 baths, family- 
room, full basement, large 
deck on pond, new siding, lots 
of extras. $164,900. (847) 
680-0651. 



BY OWNER call for appoint- 
ment. Enjoy a 3-bedroom 
brick home, field stone fire- 
place, appliances, new deck to 
enjoy the wooded yard, wind- 
ing creek, lots of storage and 
access to forest preserve. 
$114,900. (Lake Villa Town- 
ship). (B47) 740-2716. 



POSSIBLY THE . BEST 
VALUE IN GRAYSLAKE. 

Recently remodeled, 3-4 bed- 
rooms, 1-bath, full basement, 
vinyl sided. On Lake Street 
near High School. $112,900. 
(847) 223-1131. 

RANDALL, WISCONSIN 

CEDAR and brick hillside 
ranch, 3500sq.ft, natural light 
cascading thru numerous sky- 
lights, situated on 7.5 heavily 
wooded acres, just north of 
slate line oft Wilmot Rd„ 
$360,000. Call tor appoint- 
ment (414) 862-9622, 



All-Subs 

REPOS 

Low down! 

-CALL" 

A company you can trust 

•MEMBER BETTER BUSINESS' 

Liberty Re. Inc. 

630-539-6200 



What's New 

On The 
Market??? 



IN TOWN ANTIOCH. 

Charming renovated brick 

ranch, 4* bedroom*, 

2-boths, master suite 

with double Jacuzzi, 

3-car garage, new 16x33 

swimming pool, 3-blocki 

to Metro Station. 

$194,900. 

Perry Appraisal Service 

(847) 838-4424. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 3- 

bedroom ranch on cul-de-sac, 
garage, pool, well cared for. 
$99,900. By appointment only 
(847) 740-1642. 

VA/HUD REPOSI 

New lists weekly. 

Call Ryan & Co., Realtors 

'Your Ropo Specialists" 

(847) 526-0300 

Esparto!. 



2BDRMCOXDO- 

OVLV SCG.90O- 

\Otmi BLLTFF AREA 

l,<w .« Si II 4 ■■ t IT } u>*> 

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MONEY 
MONEY 
MONEY 
MONEY 
(MONEY 

MONEY 

If you're reading 

this you know 

classified ads work. 

Place yours today. 

Call Lisa 

847.223.8161 




AVAILABLE IMMEDIATE- 
LY NEWLY remodeled 2- 
bedroom, In Fox Lake. All utili- 
ties and appliances Included, 
$800/monlh. 4847) 740-6275, 
pagor (847) 339-4294. 

AVAILABLE IMMEDIATE- 
LY RECENTLY remodeled 
2-bedroom In unincorporated 
Lake County near Grayslake. 
Appliances and lake rights In- 
cluded. $800/month. (847) 
740-8275, pager (847) 339- 
4294. 

MUNDELEIN NEWER 4- 
BEDROOM colonial. 2-1/2 
baths, famllyroom. basement, 
long term OK, $1,800/monlh. 
(847) 634-8311 even- 
Ings/ weekends, 

NEW CONSTRUCTION 
POWERS LAKE, WISCON- 
SIN Largo 3-bedroom homo. 
Randall School District. No 
pels. $995/month. (414) 
537-^034. 

pmiNniAKEAREA 
3 -Bedroom with partially 

finished basement, 

large kitchen, nice yard. 

Available November 1st. 

$850/month. 

ALANWOOD ASSOCIATES 

(847)223-1141. 

pnilMn LAKE BEACH 

3-Bedroom In newer 

neighborhood. 

Familyroom, diningroom. 
basement, 2-car garage. 
Will consider short term 

at higher rent. 

2-Bodroom Doll House 

Ready lo renl. You'll love the 

tree house room 

Come and seo. 

$725/month. 

ALANWOOD ASSOCIATES 

(847) 223-1141. 

ZION SPACIOUS 3-BED- 
ROOM, 2-1/2 bath. 2-car ga- 
rage, deck, on cul-de-sac. 
First floor laundry, living, din- 
ing, famllyroom. 12 miles lo 
Naval Base. No pets. 
51,300/monlh plus utilities 
and security deposit. Available 
12/1.(847)746-9592. 

TWIN LAKES DUPLEX. 3- 
bedrooms. 2-baths, 2-car ga- 
rage, finished basement, ap- 
pliances Included^ 
$925/month, (414) 510-9663. 

TWIN LAKES, WISCON- 
SIN 3-bedroom house with 
garage, quiet subdivision, 
near school and beach, no 
pets. $995/month. (414) 
537-4034. 

TWIN LAKES, WISCON- 
SIN 3-room house for renl, 
wilh basement tor storage. 
quiet, safe area, school, 
church and stores near by, 
$450/month, $450 security, 
2yr. lease. Available 12/1/98 
Contact (70B) 795-0055. 



VACATION VtLLAOE 

Studio, $430/month. 

1 -bodroom, $575/month. 

2-bedroom, $750/month. 

REMAXHNW 

Floyd Edwards. 

(847) 438-6200. 



ZION 2-BEDROOM DU- 
PLEX, back unit, fenced yard, 
appliances Included, $700 
plus utilities. 2116 Belhesda 
Blvd. No subsidies. (847) 
335-1665. 

ZION 3+BEDROOMS, 

BASEMENT, fenced yard. 2- 
car garage, $825/monlh. 
fR471 662-6669. 



CRICHTON 
RENTALS 

LAKE VILLA 

4 bedroom homo. M btumftrt. 2 car 

injched e*r»v«. 11,150 Monty 

ROUND LAKE 

2 bedroom tptrtmsm wflt itxtge. 
(unify fcgML >5M WonWy 



AUftmToiiOKxnMOitomianjNO 

QtiIuk- *"C«<f* 
_^r>2L (M?)s*>na) 



GURNEE TOWNHOUSE, 
2-BEDROOMS, M/2 baths, 
fireplace, C/A, attached ga- 
rage, $850/month plus utilities 
and security deposit Available 
immediately. No section 6. 
(847) 543-1915. 

HOUND LAKE BEACH 3- 

bedroom townhouse. at- 
tached garage, 1-1/2 baths, 
C/A, fireplace, all appliances, 
$875/monih. No Section B. 
Available November 15th. 
(647) 265-1008. 

WAUCONOA 460 N. Main 
St.. 2-bedroorri,. 2-bath, 
$750/rnonlh, ona month se- 
curity. (70B) 424-6566. 



518 



Mobile Homes 



514 



ConfJo/ToMi Homes 



ANTIOCH NEW 2-BED- 
ROOM condo on Antloch Golf 
Course with full appliances, 1- 
car garage, balcony. Spectac- 
ular view. $875/monlh plus se- 
curity deposit. No pets, (847) 
774-2312, (847) 855-9406, 

ANTIOCH NEWER 3-BED- 
ROOM duplex, on pond, cul- 
de-sac, gas fireplace, all ap- 
pliances, 2-car attached ga- 
rage. $123,900. (847) 
838-4457. (847) 209-4778 

FOX LAKE FOR RENT VA- 
CATION VILLAGE CON- 
DO, 2-bedroom, waterfront. 
Boating, tennis, pool, winter 
sports tacllitles, $685/month. 
(647) 256-6290. 

FOX LAKE 2-BEDROOM, 

1-bath, 1-1/2 car garage, fire- 
place; washer/dryer, 4- blocks 
to train, on beautiful Mlneola 
Bay. Pool, tennis courts, 
beach, launch ramps. No pels. 
Available Decembor 1st. 
$775/month. (630) 983-8722 
after 6pm, 

FOX LAKE WATEHFRONT 

1 -bedroom condo, tennis, bas- 
ketball and volleyball courts, 
pool, rec. building, trails for 
hiking and riding, 24hr. securi- 
ty, $600/month. (815) 
563-4312, (815) 563-4455. 

GURNEE 2-BEDROOM, 2- 
BATH, 5th floor, largo balco- 
ny, large countertops and cab- 
inets. Beautiful Heather 
Ridge, Indoor parking, golf, 
tennis and many more ameni- 
ties. $94,500. (847) 
816-6420 



DUKE 2-BEDROOM, 1- 
BATH, central aJr, largo 
screened porch, shed, ap- 
pliances, $13.900/bOSL (847) 

249-3201. 

MOBILE HOME 12X49, 
nowty decorated, stored In Elk- 
horn, Wise. Must sell. $3,900. 
(708) 453-5946. 

MOBILE HOME WHEEL- 
ING Whlppletree Village, 
clean, quiet community, 1977 
New Yorker. 24fl.x52fL. 3-bod- 
rooms, 2 -lull baths, all ap- 
pliances, C/A, carport. 
$42,000 negotiable. (847) 
541-5386. 



MODULAR9 . DOU- 
BL£W)DES • SINGLEWIDES 
- ILLINOIS LARGEST DIS- 
PLAY OF MODEL HOMES. 
FOUNDATIONS. BASE- 

MENTS, GARAGES, SEPT- 
ICS - WE DO IT ALUI FREE 
STATEWIDE DELIVERY/IN- 
STALLATION. RILEY MANU- 
FACTURED HOMES 1-800- 
798-1541. 



PARK CITY 1968 3-bed- 
room, 2-bath, 60ft. long, 
$17.500. (847) 356-7018. 

RURAL GRAYSLAKE 

Cute home, country part*. 

2-bedroom, 1-bath • $17,000. 

Bright New Homes 

S36.5p0^$41 ,000. 

Chain O'Lakbs' Mobile Homes 

Rl. 120 A Fairfield Rd. 



(My. 



HO 



75 



Place your word rate ad in 1 1 

Lakeland papers. Great Lakes 

Bulletin, Market Journal and 

on the Internet, all for SI 9.73! 

i"nce based 00 15 word* 

or fewer Deadline is 

Tuesday SiOO pm. Call Lisa 

(B47) 223-8161 




The Martin (406-29) is a traditional ranch styled hoine with the covered porch There are two dormers 
on ihe front providing additional lighting in the living and dining room areas. The garage faces die front of the home 
and has room for three cars Tkrr. is 3 recycle center neM to the bacL door. 

Thr Manm can he a single sinry home with 2.370 square feel or can have die optional basement added underneath 
fur an addilional 2.247 square feel of living space. The bascmcnl contains a good sued guest suite with a large wall 
closet Next to this suite is a full hath with a shower and two sinks. On the wall facing the gigantic recreation room 
is a fireplace The recreation sooni could be divided up lo contain an exercise area, a video area, an enlertainmenl the- 
ater area, or any other use the imagination can come up with There is a large storage area, ideal for keeping season- 
al iienn. old loys, unused fumilurc and more. 

The vaulted formal living room is pie shaped, open lo ihe main vaulted family room. The divider belween the two 
it ihe stairs id ihe basement There are four skyhghls across ihe family room lo give more natural light within. The 
fireplace is on the outside wall of die master suite with shelves on cither side. 

The L-shapcd kitchen has an eating bar that faces ihe nook area along wilh another L-shaped area that contains 
Ihe range and counter space. Tlic walk-in pantry is across ihe hall, near Ihe opening to the dining area. 

The Martin was designed with iwo rwdrooms nn one side and the master suite on the other. Bedrooms 2 and 3 
have wall closets, em linen closets in the hallway area, and a shared ballroom. Across Ihe hall is the utility room. 
There is a sink wilh a full wall length of counter space 
for folding clothes. It opens into the garage. 

The master suile is vaulted and very open, The large 
walk-in closed is across from the main suile door for 
ease of pulling clean clolhcs away. The bathroom has a 
spa with a skylight overhead, and an oversized shower. 
There arc lwo sinks wilh a pocket door for privacy Jss 
between. 

For a study kit or the MARTIN (406-29LP60) send 
514.95, lo Landmark Designs, 33127 Saginaw Rd. E.. 
Collage Grove, OR 97424 (Specify plan name & number 
for kil), For a collection of plan books, send $20,00. or 
save by ordering the kil and collection together for 
.95, arcall L-gfJO-562- 1 151- 



ALandrrark 
AilDuixn) 




D'snslL 



^dsyuj 



v 



, ,.,. ...,•,. _^.. 



n mi K i 



■ 



K7^r..'*^ri:-»r.'^r*.'!r ; jrr^??i'j: 



if J^ jA r-g^!. 



November 13, 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



- . 



Lakeland Newspapers / C2B ". 



520 



Apartment For 
" "~RtfJj " ' 



520 



Apartment For 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 




1 1 BusIucsj Property 
SJJ'VRirRenivv 



AFFORDABLE '-* ■■• • Z10N 
CLEAN 3-bedroom home, 1- 
1/2 bath, all appliances, good 
area, large yard, "Non-amok' 
Ing. $760 plus utilities. (414) 
634-0387.' 

FOX LAKE 1-BEOROOM 
apartment. Newly redecorat- 

od. Appliances Included,' Prl- 
vato off drool parking, Avail: 
able Immediately. (847) 

973-0139, (847) 520-3341 . 

FOX LAKE VACATION VIL- 
LAQE Largo' . 1 'bedroom,-* 
newly remodeled 'apartment. 
Security' entrance, laundry 
facilities, swimming, tennis, 
boat docks, walking trails. NO 
PETS. $550/month. (847) 
223-1131. 

QURHEE/WAUKEOAN 
NORTH SHORE 
APARTMENTS 

At Affordable Prices. 

Spacious. 

Luxury Lhring. 

Elevators. 

On Site Staff. 

Good Location. 

Easy to Toll Roads. 

IMPERIAL TOWER/MANOR. 

{847} 244-6222. 

LAKEVIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA, Large 1 & 2 bedrooms, 
$6lQ-$745/morrth. Meat, wa- 
ter, air Included. (847) 
356-5474. 

SILVER LAKE, WISCON- 
SIN 2-bedroom, upper apart- 
ment across from par"< and 
beach. All appliances, air, car- 
pet, $590/monlh plus security 
deposit and credit check re- 
quired. No pets. Available Im- 
mediately. (414) 889-4266. 

VACATION VILLAGE 1- 

DEDROOM Alpine overlooks 
lake, newly remodeled, 
5535/monifi plus utilities. 
Available immediately, (847] 
587-5301. 



SON EAST i SIDE beautiful 
2-bedroom In great location,, 
$825/month. No Section 8, 
Will consider pets. (847) 
234-1083. 



WAUKEQAN 2-BEOROOM 
APARTMENT, security, build- 
ing,' heat and water included. 
Nice area. (847) 338-3797. '. 

■■■■■=. : I • ■ , 



RECYCLE 



CRAY/LAKE 

Center Street 

Apartments 

2 Bedroon 

Apartment 

With patio/balcony 

Utilities included 

847-395-0949 



6cfc>|iltn 



WESTWIND 
VILLAGE 

APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave., Zion 
1,2 & 3 BEDROOMS 

FREE HEAT 

Appliances • On-Site 

Manager "No Pats 

Starting from ' 

$495/mo. - 

Call Martha & Isaac 

(847)740-1420 

or BEAR PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

(414)697-9616 



IF YOU HAVE 

FURNITURE TO SELL, 

A car, of appliances, if 

you orb having a Garage 

Sale or If you have a 

house to sell or apartment 

lo rent 

Call Lisa before 10am 

Wednesday to place 

your ad here. 

(847)223-6181 

" ext. 140. 



^ FOK I^^E&Srr^bfr ... 
; flee with good parking, In good . - 



location " -on ... Rt.- - 12.- 
$300/month. (647) 887-3193. 

FOX LAKE NEW lake view 
offices, on Grand Avenue, - 
Starting at $275/montrt, (847) . 
SB7-1615, ' v ••■■'■.. - 

INDUSTRIAL BUILDING 
ROUND Lake. .806 Sunset, 
3,000-1 2,OO0sq,fL, $5.00 sq.ft. 
(847)223^0022. 

Office for Rent ' located In 
Rollins Road Shopping Cen- 
ter, Round Lake Beach, newly 
painted and carpeted. (847) 
223-4900 '. ; . 

OFFICE SPACE FOR 
RENT North Chicago, 
1400sq,ft For more Informa- 
tion . please call (847) 
578-9811. 



OAKRIDGE \1LLAGE 
APAR 1 iVIEiN ITS 



Offering Affordable Housing for 

Qualified Applicants. 

Currently Accepting Applications on our 

■ 1&2 Bedroom Apartments Available. 

Stop In at: 

299 Oakri dge Court In Anti och 

Or call- 

847-395-4840 
1-800-526-0844 TDD 

Managed by Meiidiin Group.lnc 




ATTENTION 
SENIORS 

Affordable apartments 
available in multiple loca- 
tions. Rent tased on 
income. "AppTicaitlSj must 
be 62 years old or 55 *-, 

have a disability and 

meet income guidelines. 

Call Tor a pre-application. 

Ram on a 

223-1 170 x260. 



LAkEivood VilUqc Apartments 

In IsLuid Like ANd Cray3IaI(e 

OlftRiNq AffondAbk rtouiiiMq fort QUAlified AppliCANiS 

NOW ACCEpltNq AppUCAliONS f OR OUR: 

• 1,2, ANd i bednooM ApAnwkms 
CupMiNily AvniLibk /rvfefwo* Uk 

• J bedRoo.ii lowpthoMes 

PltAw caII foa Monc iHfodMAiicm on AppolrnnE.fi av. 

(847) 22 J-6644 TDDtf (800) J26-0844 

LAkEwood VilUqE ApAntMENl is pftofutforutfy 

MAfuqcd by MiRldiAN Group, Inc. 



1 



/lllraclii ' ( j jlparlnic-ni illy hm 



Jlntioch Manor 

445DoninDn, 

Antioch, IL 60002 

395-0949 




<Deep Xgkejiermilage 
149 Milwaukee Ave. 
Lake Villa, IL 60046 

356-2002 



i! ■*•*"* V-t*4** 



On-Sltc Management & Maintenance 
Personnel 
All Amenities 
Laundry Facilities In Each Building, 
Attractive Landscaped Grounds 
Metra Station Nearby 




528 



ApL/Homes 
To Share 



530 



Rooms For Renl 




Business Property 
For Sale 



MCHENRY HOME with fur- 
nished room, includes utilities, 
washer/dryer and stor. 
$100/week. (815) 363-8458. 

ROOMMATE WANTED TO 
SHARE 2-bedroom. 2-bath. 
apartment in Lake Bluff, cioss 
to Abbott, Great Lakes. 
i,0i3sq.ft„ 2nd floor, vaulted 
ceiling, washer/dryer, cable, 
club house, exercise room, 
pool, parking. $55Q/month. 
Call Mike (8471 615-9404. 



ROOM FOR RENT In large 4- 
bedroom home, in Lake Villa, 
olf 59 & Grand, $350/month. 
(847) 973-0128, 

SEMI-FURNISHED 
QUIET, clean, convenient. 
$200 to move, $70/wk. (847) 
360-9568. 



FULL SERVICE SHOE RE- 
PAIR SHOP. Turn-key oper- 
ation Including alt equipment 
and Inventory. Appraised 
value $45,000 Must sell quick- 
ly $15.O00/best (847) 263- 
2399. 



Fax us your info, 
bo place your ad 

(847) 283SB91 



©ur earth 
dean. 




TUCSON, AZ-For 

Sale by Owner. 

Well-est'd Hi-Res 

digital & 4/C 
short run maga- 
zine printing 
plant. Motivated. 

Exc Mexico 

potential. Richard 

520-745-8020 



538 



Business Property 
For Rem 



COMMERCIAL PROPER- 
TY OFFICE and shop space, 
1/2 to 2 acres of outdoor stor- 
age. Mundeleln/Vemon Hills 
area. Ideal tor contractor stor- 
age. (647) 949-1500. 



SILVER LAKE, WISCON- 
SIN, 1800$q.ft. unit with 4 of- 
fices. (414) 843-3705. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
71 3sq.ft. work shop and office, 
with overhead garage door, 
zoned Industrial, includes 
sewer and water, S395/month 
plus security. Available Imme- 
diately. Oays (847) 
526-5000, evenings (847) 
526-0420 leave message. 

RICHMOND CABtl 
LOT or YOUR 
BUSINESS USE 

Brick bldg on Rt. 1?, 

I bay, office, garage & 

sales lot. Excellent 

visibility. Alternate 

use OK. S795/mo. 

Land Mem t. 
815-678-4334 



540 



Investment Property 



SPRING GROVE 4-UNiT 

opartmont building, 3.5 * acr- 
es.' Gross $27,500, possible 
subdivide, $249,000. (847) 
M7-5388r 



544 



Mortgage Services 



NO OOWNPAYMENT? 

PROBLEM CREOIT? Own 

the home you need now, wilh- 
out a big downpayment. Com- 
plete financing il qualified. De- 
George Homo Alliance 1-800- 
343-2884. • 



Bargain 
Shopper 



BEAUTY GLOVES 

100%-Colton- while. 

Protect days, beautify nights. 

Includes beauty lips and girt. 

2/pr/S5.0O. 

P. Wesl, 

P.O. Box 549. 

Fox Lake, III. 60020. 

DO YOU HAVE 

SOMETHING TO SELL 

FOR $75 OR LESS? 

Place your ad in this section 

for only '$3.00 for 10 words or 

less. Must be prepaid. 

Call Lisa (847) 223-8161 

ext. 140 or send ihe ad with 

with your payment to: 

Lakeland Publishers, 

P. 0. Box 268, 

30 S. Whilney St., 

Grayslako 111. 60030. 

Alien' Lisa. 



560 



Vacanl Loi/Acreagc 



LAKEFRONT PROPERTY 
1-ACRE, pare tested, sand 
beach, large oak trees. Lily 
Lake. Wisconsin, $85,000. 
(414) 857-6652. 

MCHENRY/MARTIN 
WOODS, HEAVILY wooded 
1 acre on cul-de-sac. (815) 
344-4269. 



564 



ResoriA/acation 
K end Is 



SPORTSMAN'S PARA- 
DISE • $12,900 ■ Rare wood- 
ed parcel with Public Land, 
abounding with dear and 
turkey out backdoor and wa- 
ter-ski lake out front door. 
TreeTalkln Realty. 1-800-552- 
6184. 

Time Share in Minnesota, 
October, Great Price, must 
sell. (847)543-1349 



568 



OuiOfArtaPropert) 



SO. COLORADO RANCH. 
53 acres - $32,900. Bring your ' 
horses and rids out to one of 
the last great ranches in CO. 
Nice fields, with 'outstanding - 
Reeky Mln views, Yr, round ar> , 
cess, tot/elec. Excellent finanr> 
lng. Call now 719-678-6367 
Hatchet Ranch.' . ■; ■ ••■-; - 



AJUUJK* 



lUffiVUIrrl 

,imtd r i i imwij m — mi hwjw i ' 
mtrtttmGt tt m ia m i m . 

Y*0-mm4 curt I. <,«!« «<!(«. H 



kt« d ep«i van. m ,— km Iniut 




WISCONSIN 

Up North Hoollof Land! 

75iaWbl!eUllfrTflrfcty 

Heifto. i spjrta, wi area. 

Abo iwlt CcatnlQL 

l20acbMMSfead(a 

pjrceU. tntXUttiot 

tctDen/flrTocub.Wi, 

floctloo oo fri, 11/27/98 

Bnod w-fllll BOCflOD Cr 

Rt»!ry. tooiitL m 

60S-U3-719I 

Offlct/60S-#63-765J RU 



UPonTE CouNiy, IN 

Fori saIe by Owimfr. 

VacatIon Coumirty Home. 

WEll'MAiMrAINCd llOME 

bEHVEEN Fish Lftkr & 
LaPome Schools. 

A'FOAME (llii'ltVfl), 

l7J5sf, ? BR/2 DA, 
2c'Cah. Fnpl w/ENERqy 

t ff. iNsem. 20x40 
iNqnouNd pool, IencecI 

deck & yAnd. 20x22 
siorwqf. qAR/OARN. Pine 

iiiees suriRouNrJ Front 
yAnd. S1I8K. CaII For 
Appi 219-569-1 J 19 



ARIZONA | 
| BEST BUY! *[ 

" BsauUIul WHoric ranch property | 
\ biK«nkaNWArlz.PrWat»40 r 
i acre ranch pan»!» no* aval Bblo i 
I Irom only 535 VqcI Near 
| CoionxJo River, (Uhlng, boattng, 
t rjambllng, stunning sunsola * 
; rmn vtowa. Pristine, lush high 
; dosert covorsd with ssguarcs, J 

• yuccas, palo vcrdes, Joshuas - No • 
J qunl. low down, xfril Icnns. 100% ! 
: water/mineral rights. Title 

• tnsuriad, survoyed, good access. J 

Selling Fas!! Must sea. 

Open daily. 

STAGECOACH TRAILS 

1-SO0-71 1-3340 

!■■•■ 4M4J •*>■*»* a ■***■>■*+* ■■—•••*■• 



ARIZONA 

Escapo to Sun City. 
Buy your own 2BR vaca 

home w/dayi of 
sunshine. Great for golf, 

swimming, 

tennis, exercising or Just 

relaxing. Wknds, vacas 

or the rest of your Hie. 

Investment In yourself at 

879,900. 

Erma 

602-972-5GGL 

Hen Meade Realty 



ILLINOIS {Central, 
WhloperLng Plnw. 
SOOic development aiij. 
Kickapoo Stale Park, loctl 
near Danville, IL Oecoming 
known ihroughout Ihe 
Midwest as 1 ortnemoM 
unique recreational & retire- 
men i areas in Ihe U.S. This 
development offers wtxxtcd 
lots (hat are 5ac. some with 
their own pvi. stocked pond, 
others situated on I of 4 pvt 
lakes, exclusive to our clients 
onty. Unique oppty r« those 
who arc looking Tor a wknd 
retreat or a once-in-a-!ifciune 

Ktirerncnt oppty. Imagine 
fishing in your backyard or hik- 
ing into a beautiful idj. state 

park, or an evening stroll 
down Wandering Forest Road. 
Whispering Pines offers this 
& w much more. We also ofTer 
consultation on construction 
& local finc'g. Let us make 
your dreams come true. Call 
for appt A illow us to accommodate 
you as our guest for the night 
in ■ comfortable executive suite. 
For more Info call 

800-668-0655 

217-497-8733 

E-raiU 
westlakedanville.net 



■b. 



704 



" Vehicles- 



SS 



:.--' 






720 



■■(SpOtar^prnrMJ; 



:.t. 1 



1B8fl:r TOAVEL . ; : THAILER 

CAMPER, 16ft.,- tuny loaded, , 
fiberolass outsWo,' AJO, fioat,' 
fridge, '- TV,; propone/electric . ' 
compatable. Bathroom with . 
shower. Only sleeps 2. MUST 
SEEll $2^00. (S47) 265^203. 

1999 ' LARGE PALOMINO 
POP-UP; CAMPER, excellent 
condition, rarely used, $4,600. 
(847)662-3512. 

STAR CRAFT POP-UP 

NICE, sleeps 8, stove, fridge, 
taOO/best (847) B72-0203. : 

TRUCK CAP, FULL size. 
$600. 1972' Steury camper, 
sleeps 6, $650. 1982 Gold- 
wing motorcycle, $2,800. 
(847) 74(M930. 



708 



Siowmobilei/AIVs 



1997 1KB' KAWASAKI: PRO 

CIRCUIT ' 125,: $3 ( 800/best. 
, (847) 556-5949/ v ;'": --,. <-.\i '; ■;-, 

'■■■ AEROBIC K RIDER EX6R- 
CISE MACHINE WfTH ris- . 

. or, excellent condition,', like 
new. Original $300, best offer. 
(847) 973-0473 after 6pm. ': • 

ATTEHTIOH DEER HUNT- 
ERS Remington 700. BdL 243 : 
Wla with 4X scope, $425. K. 
WWte (414) 662-9772.: --- . ■ 

healthrider; like 

. NEW, $350/bosi. Aluminum . 
topper for 6IL box, $75/Tirm. 
(847) 567-5662 after 5pm. 

NORDIC TRAC EXCELL 

MODEL, almost now,' paid 
$550," best offer. (847) 

546-5593. ,■ 



1995 POLARIS XLT-SP, 
great shape, low miles. A must 
see. Cornea with additional 2 
up seaL $4.000/bosi. (414) 
877-3665. 

1996 PHAZER II, $2,500. 
1996 Pfiazer II LE, $2,500. 
1994 Polaris Storm, "96 cylin- 
ders, $2,700 or best. (847) 
356-2015 

1996 POLARIS STORM. 
1985 Skl-Ooo Formula SS. 
Both In excellent condition. 
(414) 843-3436. 

ARCTIC CAT 1996 Kitiycai, 
good condition, $800. Call 
evenings (847) 587-0218. 

SNOWMOBILE 1997 YA- 
MAHA 700 Triple Venlere. 
only 232 miles. Used t sea- 
son, brand new 2 place trailer, 
$9,000 Invested, $6.900/best 
(847) 548-0558. 

SNOWMOBILES 1990 

INDY 650; 1988 500 Phazer. 
Both In great shape. 
$3,200/both. Will separate. 
(847) 497-4466. 



804 


Cui for Sale 



". $100-$500 CARS V*- 
Police Impounds. 
Honda's, Chevy's, ' 
Jeep's and Sport utilities. 
Must Sell!. 
1-600-522-2730 
ext 2292. ■ 

1982 VOLKSWAGEN 
QUANTUM, 68K, white. 4- 
door, $800/best. (847) 
587^272. 

1990 COUGAR LS fully 
loaded, good condition, power 
rnoonroof, sharp. $4.000/best 
(847) B72-0481. 

1991 QUICK PARK AVE. 
Good condition, white with 
burgandy Interior. $5,400 
(847) 975-3799. 



1992 CORVETTE CON- 
VERTIBLE white with white 
top, garage kept, 55,000 
miles. Excellent condition. 
(8)5) 385-6468. 

1895 VOLVO SELECT 850 
(Sik *V-1138) leather, sun- 
roof, $20,995. (847) 362-9200. 



LEGAL/REAL ESTATE 



. ■ ."-r.irfliV* 



KSl-'C! » IH?-**** 



•■■■V tfi*. '■ 



FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 31312 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 
Citibank. Plaintiff, Case No. 97 C 1414 

VS. Judge Shadur 

Gary N. Litvin, Northern Trust Bank/Lake Forest N A, 
Defendants. 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OUR FILE NO. 31312 <tT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED 
PARTIES CONSULT THEIR O W N ATTORNEYS BEFORE 

BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 
Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgment 
entered in the above entitled cause on August 29. 1997 . 

I. Thomas Johnson and/or Tina Douglas. Special 
Commissioner for this court mill on December 02, 1998 at the 
hour of 1:30 p.m. at Ihe front door of Lake County Court House, 
18 N. County St., Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder 
for cash. Ihe following described premises: 
c/k/a 1360 Everett Road. Lake Forest. IL 60045 
Tax ID » 16-07-102-014 

The improvements on (he property consist ol single family 
dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 
The property will NOT be open lor Inspection. 
The Judgment amount was $247,063.50. 
Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle Ihe purchaser to a Deed on 
a specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to 
law. 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney. 
Fisher and Fisher, 120 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 
372-4784 from 1 :00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law. the 
Sales Officer is osl required lo provide additional Information 
other than that set forth In this Notice. 



? 



^ 



FISHER AND FISHER RLE NO. 31537 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 
Norwest Mortgage Inc.. A California Corporation, 

Plaintiff. Case No. 97 C 2001 

VS. Judge AlesEa 

Kelly W. Devereaux and Patricia D.Devereaux, Defendants. 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OUR FILE NO. 31S37 (fT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED 

PARTIES CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE 
BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgment 
entered in the above entitled cause on December 2. 1997 . 

I. Max Tyson, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
November 20, 1998 at the hour of 9:00 a.m. at Lake County. - 
Court House. Waukegan. Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for 
cash, the following described premises: 

c/k/a 105 E. Aspen Circle, Hainesvllle, IL 60030 
Tax ID » 06-28-200-023 

The Improvements on the property consist of single family 
dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24. 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 

The judgment amount was $1 71 ,210,57 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on 
a specified date unless the property is redeemed according to 
law. 

For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney, 
Fisher and Rsher, 120 North LaSalle, Chicago. Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales' 
Officer is ool required to provide additional information other 
than that set forth In this Notice. 



■ ■ 



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026 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



November 13, 1998 



804 



Can For Sale 



804 



Can For Sale 



1903 INFINIT1 Q4S'S {Slk. 
•N-1188) leather, sunroof, 
$22,995. (847) 362-9200. 

1695 INFINITt'8 130'S, 9 
to choose (Slk. (H-4016) 
leather, sunroof, starling at 
SI 6.995. (647) 362-9200. 

1995 VOLVO SELECT B50 
TURBO (Stk W-1140) 34K 
mltos, leathor, sunroof, 
$22,595. (647} 362-9200. 

1996 INFINITI 130T (Stk 
WN-2000) loathor, sunroof. 
$19,995. (647)362-9200. 

1998 VOLVO SELECT S 

70 QLT (Slk #V-2029) lealhor. 
sunroof. $26,595. (647) 362- 
9200. 

1996 VOLVO SELECT 

S70 - s, 12 to choose (Slk. «V 
1182) leather, sunroof Starl- 
ing at $23,995 (847) 362 
9200. 

1998 VOLVO SELECT V 

70 WAGONS, 13 to crtooso 
(Slk. ffV-2020) leathor. sun- 
roof, starling at $26,995 (647) 
362-9200. 

IS98 VOLVO SELECT V 
70 R/AWD WAGON, loathor. 
sunroof. $33,995 (847) 362 
9200. 

199B VOLVO SELECT V- 
70 WAGON AWD (Slk 
0V2O32) 9K miles, leather, 
sunroof. $31,995 (847) 362- 
9200. 

ACURA 1995 INTEGRA 

low mites, mint condition, 
$12,700 Must sell (630) 
377 9156 

AMC 1976 PACER, red. 
good condition. 59K. A/C, cas- 
sette. $1,000 (84 7) 

551 1167 

' BMW 1979 3201. 77K miles, 
pristine. Ricaro seals. Blau- 
punkf radio. A/C sunroof. 4- 
speed manual, limited Slip, 
original owner, non smoker. 
$4.850 (647)492 OB77 

BRAND NEW 1998 DODGE 
AVENGER. 315.251 (847) 
.362-3800 

BUICK 1976 SKYLARK. 

V6 loyv mii(iago, excellent run- 
ner. 5595/best. (414) 
652 4910 

BUICK 1965 CENTURY 

WAGON Clean and reliable 
Asking St. 500/best (414)652 
7952 

BUICK 1993 CENTURY. 

$4,995. (847) 587-6473. 



CHRYSLER 
LXI, $17,999. 



CHRYSLER 1999 
COUNTRY LXi, 
(847) 234-2800. 



EAGLE SUMMIT DL 
$1,895. (847) 244-1010 



1989, 



EAGLE TALON 

speed manual. 
AM/FM cassette. 
ing. excellent 



ESI 1995, 5 

40K. A/C. 

power steer- 

condilion. 



$8,700 (847) 
fore 7pm. 



356-5695 be- 



FOR SALE 1966 SILVER 
MOONLIGHT OLDS CUT- 
LASS SIERRA, A/C, heal, 
power locks, new tiros, new 
brakes, new exhaust, now ra- 
diator, new cam shall. Runs 
great Son left (or Navy. Must 
sell $1,600 (414) 654-6543 
leave message 



FORD 196B 

plenty ol good 
whole Make 
623-4505. 



MUSTANG, 

pans or as 

Offer (B47) 



BUICK 1993 REGAL, load 
ed. $4,500/besl |847) 

746 3990 ^_^^_ 

BUICK 199B PARK AVE- 
NUE. $26,999 1647) 234- 
^2600 



FORD 1993 TAURUS GL, 

$4,995. (647) 395-3600 

FORD 1994 THUNDER-* 
BIRD V6. 42.000K, climate 
control, fully loaded, new 
tires. $7.200/besi (847) 
740-8564 atler 5pm. 

FORD ESCORT 1992, 4- 
door sedan, good mechanical 
condition, needs some paint, 
silver, runs great, new tires 

and brakes. $2,500 (647) 

543-1938 



BUICK 
CUSTOM 

2B00 



1999 CENTURY 
S1B.999 (B47) 234- 



GEO PRIZM 1995, 
(847) 587-3300. 



$6,995 



CADILLAC 1994 SEVILLE 

SSTS Northstar, sunroot, ra- 
• 'tie healed seats, excellent 
warranty. like new 
S21,995/be'st <B47) 
394 8677 

CARS $100-$500 POLICE 

impounds 1980'5-1997's Hon- 
das. Chevys, Jeeps and Sport 
Utility Must sell B00-772- 
7470 ext 7040 (SCA Net- 
work). 

CHEVROLET 1987 

.' MONTE CARLO SS. T-tops. 
air, am/tm stereo, brand new 
tires and exhaust, excellent 
condition, 97,000 miles, 
$3.500/best. (414) 694-9870. 

CHEVY 1971 CHEVELLE 

'. 307 small block, excellent con- 
dition, new tires, rims, etc. 
Must see to appreciate. 
$6, 500/best. (847) 417-2241. 
(847) 265-7952. 

CHEVY 1992 CAVALIER, 

$2,135. (847) 587-6473. 

CHEVY 1992 LUMINA 3.4L 

V6. black/gray interior, $4,800. 

' jS47) 304-5839, 

CHEVY 1994 CAVALIER 
RS. $7,995. 847) 362-3800. 

CHEVY 1997 LUMINA, 4- 

door, white, maroon interior, 
j fully loaded, low miles. A/C, ex- 
cellent condition. Must sell. 
Asking $14, 500/best. Ptease 
call (847) 223-3161 after 5pm 
or leave messaoe. 

MERCURY 1992 SABLE 

LS 3.8L V6, A/C, ABS. airbags, 
.automatic, all power, leather 
seats, 78K. Blue book $7,650, 
asking $6,650. (847) 356- 
« 0852. 

MERCURY 1992 TOPAZ 

QS SPORT COUPE, $1,795. 
(847) 244-1010. 



804 



Cars For Sale 



804 




824 



Vans 



CHRYSLER 1988 FIFTH 
AVE. Great transportation. 8- 
cyllndor. 130K, full power. 
leather. $1,400 invested over 
last year. Definite dependabili- 
ty. Wheeling. $l,750/bcst. 
(847) 215-9655. 

CHRYSLER 1996 CIR- 
RUS, $10,980. (847) 587- 
6473. 



1999 CIRRUS 
847) 234-2800. 



TOWN & 
$27,999. 



MERCURY 1994 SABLE. 
$9,995. (347) 395-3700, 

MOVING OUT OF STATE. 
MUST SELL 1997 Black Pon- 
tiac Sunfire. 5-speed, 2-door 
sedan, A/C. cassette. Asking 
$9,900. (847) 438-4160- 

MUSTANG 1997 COBRA, 

$20,995. (847) 336-2340. 

NISSIAN 1998 SENTRA 

XE. $10,995. (847) 336-2340. 

OLDS 1981 REGENCY, 

good runner. $800/besl. (414) 
862-2037. 



CONTOUR GL 1998, 
$11,795.(847)336-2340. 

DODGE 1989 SHADOW, 2 

door, A/T. A/C. AM/FM cas- 
sette, 75K, $2,500. (847) 
438-6865 

DODGE 1991 DYNASTY, 

$2,995. (847) 5B73300. 

DODGE 1994 INTREPID, 

$6.995. (847) 362-3800. 

DODGE 1994 SHADOW 

ES. $7,995. (647) 362-3800 

DODGE 1995 INTREPID 

ES, $5,995. (647) 244-1010 

DODGE 1998 NEON 

SPORT, flame red, power sun- 
roof, spoiler, loaded in mint 
condition, very low miles, 
(414) 654-2450 



OLDS 1994 
CONVERTIBLE. 
(647) 336-2340. 



CUTLASS 

$11,995. 



OLDS 1997 ACHIEVA SE- 
DAN, $11,575. (847) 587- 
6473. 

OLDSMOBILE 1984 CUT- 
LASS SUPREME 231, blue. 
4-door, V6 engine, excellent 
runner, dependable work vehi- 
cle. $650 price negotiable. Call 
after 6pm, (414) 654-6543 ask 
lor Mr. Coleman. 

PLYMOUTH 1995 NEON 

SON. $4,995. (847) 587-6473. 

PLYMOUTH 1999 NEON, 
$12,999. (847) 2342800. 

PONTIAC 1987 GRAND 

AM, 4-cylmder, extremely low 
miles, very clean, $1,900. 
(414) 658-0777 

PONTIAC 1994 BONNE- 
VILLE, $8,995 (847) 587- 
3300 

PONTIAC 1995 GRAND 

AM $8,995 (847) 362-3BO0. 



FORD .1993 TAURUS SHO, 
S3,20Q/bd3t (847) 740-6216. 

FORD 1997 TAURUS GL, 
$11,995. (847) 336-2340. 

FORD 1998 TAURUS SE. 
$13,995. (847) 336-2340, 

GEO PRIZM 1994, $6,695 
(647)362-2683. , 

HONDA 1993 ACCORD 
LX, $9,995. (847) 395-3600. 

MERCEDES 1977 300 DIE- 
SEL, automatic, low miles, 
$2,689/best. (414) 859-2631. 

MERCURY 1994 COUGAR 
XR7. $7,995. (847) 587-3300. 

MERCURY 1994 TOPAZ, 

Stock #10-6712, $4,995. (847) 
587-6473. 

MOVING OUT OF STATE. 
MUST SELL. 1997 Black Pon- 
tiac Sunfire, 5-spoed, 2-door 
sedan, A/C, cassette. Asking 
$9,900. (847)438-4180. 

NISSAN 1998 SENTRA XE, 

$10,995. 1347) 336-2340. 

OLDS 1981 REGENCY, 

good runner, $800/best. (414) 
662-2037. 

OLDS 1989 CALAIS, Stock 
#106728, $3,995. (847) 587- 

6473. 

OLDS 1994 CUTLASS 

CONVERTIBLE, $1 1 .995. 
(847) 336-?^40 



FORD 1090 TAURUS GL, 
$3,995. (647) 395-3900. 

FORD 1990 THUNDER* 
BIRD, $4,495. (B47) 395- 

3900. 

FORD 1991 TEMPO, 
$2995. Call (647) 587-6473 

FORD 1992 CROWN VIC- 
TORIA, $6,495. (847) 380- 
5000. 

FORD 1993 ESCORT 

WAGON. $6,990. (815) 363- 
2277. 

FORD 1993 MUSTANG 

CONVERTIBLE. $7,495. (847) 
360-5000. 

FORD 1993 TAURUS GL 
WAGON. $4,995. (847) 395- 
3900. 

FORD 1993 TAURUS GL. 

$3.995. (847) 395-3600. 

FORD 1994 ESCORT, 

$3,995. (847) 395-3900. 

FORD 1998 MUSTANG 
GT CONVERTIBLE with roll- 
bar, Laser Red. 8.500 miles, 
asking $18,750. (847) 
656-1902 evenings. 

FORD 1999 CONTOUR 

LX, $13, 290. (847)336-2340. 

CHEVY 1994 CAVALIER, 
4-ddor, $4,950. (847) 244- 
1010. 

CHEVY 1995 CORSICA 
$5,990. (815) 3632277 



RAMBLER 1957 CLAS- 
SIC, needs work, $500/best. 
(414) 657-3058 after 4pm. 

PONTIAC 1997 GRAND 

$11.990. (815) 363-2277. 

SKYLARK 1993 GRAND 
SPORT. 2-door. $7,995. (847) 
244-1010 

TAURUS GL 1997, 

$11,995.(847)336-2340. 

TOYOTA 93 COROLLA. 
$5,995. (847)223-8651 



814 



Senicc & Parts 



HONDA 1984 ACCORD 4 
door, 5-speed, power, excel- 
lent condition in/out. 
$1.600/besl (647)336-5657 

HONDA 1993 ACCORD 

LX. $9,995 (647) 395-3600 

HONDA 1995 ACCORD, 
V6, loaded, leather, sunroof, 
CD player, spoiler 

$15.000/best (847) 

355-5494. 

HONDA 1997 CIVIC EX. 2- 

door, low mileage, warranty, 
SI 3,500 (414) 942-0536 

HONDA CIVIC, 1995, "Car 
olma" Car 48.000 miles, au- 
lomattc transmission, A/C. 
Viper alarm. $9,500 or best 
Offer. Call (847) 473-8650 
Ext. 5712A. 

IF YOU HAVE 

FURNITURE TO SELL, 

A car, or appliances. It 

you are having a Garage 

Sale or If you have a 

house to sell or apartment 

to rent. 

Call Lisa before 10am 

Wednesday to place 

your ad hero. 

(847) 223-8161 

ext. 140. 



SATURN 1993 SC2, 

$7,995 (847)395-3600. 

SATURN 1996 4-DOOR 

Sedan, 5-speod, air. low 
miles, I -owner, excellent con- 
dition, $8.900/besl. (847) 
548-2356 

SATURN SL2 1996, 

$10,550 (847) 336-2340 

SHARP 1989 VW CABRIO- 
LET blue convertible, au- 
tomatic, air. power steering, 
power brakes, stereo. $3,500. 
(647) 395-6860. 

TAURUS GL 1997, 

$1 1.995. (847) 336-2340. 

l^nfT — _ . — — — . i 

TOYOTA 1987 CRESSIDA 

V6. power sunroof, leather in- 
terior, excellent condition, ga- 
rage kept, loaded. Must sell 
$3,250. (847) 310-1 87B. 

TOYOTA 1994 CAMRY, 

iully loaded. 65K. excellent 
condition, $9,900/best. (847) 
956-6460. 

TRADE 1965 PONTIAC 

FIERO, 2.6 V6. automatic 
Trade lor snowmobile, motor- 
cycle. 4-wheeler or ? (815) 
338-6925 



TRANS AM, RAM AIR 1998 
Pontiac, 5,000 miles, rare 6- 
speed, $35,000/best (414) 

699 8206 

VOLVO 1986 240 WAGON. 
4-speed with overdrive, new 
tires, good condition, $2,000. 
(847) 746 9363 

BUICK 1993 LESABRE, 
$5,990. (847) 223-8651 . 

BUICK 1998 CENTURY 
LTD. Knauz price, $19,999 
(847) 234-2800 

BUICK 1998 PARK AVE- 
NUE, Knauz Price $26,999. 
(B47) 234-2600. 

BUICK 1999 LESABRE 

CUSTOM. Knauz $21,999 
(847) 234-2600 

CHEVY 1984 CORVETTE, 

$8,995. (847)223-8651. 

CHEVY 1991 CORSICA 
LT, $5,595. (847) 623-7676. 

CHEVY 1994 CORVETTE, 
$23,995. (647) 362-2683 

CHRYSLER 
CORDE LX 



PLYMOUTH 1991 LASER, 

Stock #3-6283. $3,995. (647) 
587-6473. 

PLYMOUTH 1995 NEON 
H1GHLINE. $5,995. (647) 623- 
7676. 

PLYMOUTH 1999 NEON, 

Knauz Price $12,999. (847) 
234-2600 

PONTIAC 1987 GRAND 

AM. 4-cylinder. extremely low 
miles, very clean, $1,900. 
(414) 658-0777. 

PONTIAC 199S SUNFIRE, 

$9,995. (847) 395-3600. 

SATURN SL2, 1994, 

$7,895. (847) 362-2683. 

SATURN SU 1994, $5,990. 

(847) 223-6651. 

SUZUKI ESTEEM 1995, 
$4,995. (647) 395-3600. 

TOYOTA 1992 CELICA 

GT. $8.990. (847) 223-8651. 

TOYOTA 1996 PASEO> 

$9.495. (647) 362-2683. 

CHEVY 1991 CORSICA, 

$3,995. (847) 395-3900. 

CHEVY 1992 CORSICA. 

V6. A/T, A/C, lilt, cruise, cas- 
sette, good condition. 88K, 
$3.600. (847) 363-9910. 

CHEVY 1994 BERATTA 

$5,995 (847) 223-8651 



810 



Gassic/Aniluue Cars 



OLDS 1994 CUTLASS 

CONVERTIBLE. $11,995. 
(647) 336-2340. 

OLDSMOBILE 1993 RE- 
GENCY, excellent condition, 
$7,900. (847) 546-5452 after 

3pm, ask for Sue. 

PLYMOUTH, 1993, COLT. 
$24 B2. Call (847) 58 7-6473. 

PONTIAC, 1990 GRAND 

Am, $10,995.00 (647) 395- 
3700 

PONTIAC 1988 FIRE- 
BIRD, $3,995. (B47) 360- 
5000. 

PONTIAC 1991 SUNBIRD, 

$3,995. (847) 249-1300. 

PONTIAC 1993 GRAND 

PRIX SE, 2-door, $7,990. 
(847) 244-1010. 

PONTIAC 1993 SUNBIRD 
COUPE, white, excellent 
condition, low miles, well main- 
tained, many new parts, 
$6,000/best. (847) 265-5602. ■ 



PONTIAC 1994 GRAND 
AM GT, $6,970 (847) 244- 
1010. 



ARE WHEELS. SET of four 
American Racing Equipment 
15x8, GM bolt pattern. True 
spoked wheels. Good shape. 
$150.(847)548-1115. 

BMW WHEELS SET OF 
FOUR, to fit 3, 5, 6. 7, 8 ser- 
ies. Mille Mlglia 5 spoke 
wheels with Yokohama AVS 
tires. 50% tread left, wheels In 
good shape. $700. (847) 548- 
1115. 

CLASSIC QUARTER 

PANEL SALE. Mustang, Cam- 
aro, Nova. Chevelle, Cutlass, 
Mopars, Pontiac. Chevrolet, 
more! TRUCK PANS, FLOOR 
PANS. DOORS. FENDERS. 
BUMPERS. New and Califor- 
nia. Rust free. MARK'S PLAT- 
ING & SUPPLY 217-824-6184. 

TRANSMISSIONS 

■Rebuilt 

"Warranty 

•Great Prices. 

(847) 566-2254. 

TRUCK PARTS (1) 19B8 
GMC 8ft. truck bed complete, 
$375/best. Contact Terry 
(847) 255-9525, 



PLYMOUTH 1085 MINI 

VAN, 63K miles, $3,200/bO4l, 
(414) 551-7094, 

PLYMOUTH 1895 VOYAG- 
ER, $8,595. (847) 567-6473. 

PLYMOUTH 1096 VOYAG- 
ER SE, $14,995. 847) 382- 

3800. j::\: 

^ ^— - PMHM. I T M I , 1,1 

PLYMOUTH 1999 GRAND 

VOYAGER. $18,999. (647) 
234-2800. 

PLYMOUTH 1998 VOYAG- 
ER, Knauz Price $18,499. 

(847) 234-2600. 

- 

PONTIAC 1994 TRANS- 
PORT, Stock W7-8494T, 
$4,995. (847) 587-6473. 

CHEVROLET 1092 LUMI- 
NA APV, $3,990. (647) 223- 

6651, 

DODGE 1992 CARAVAN 
ES, $4,995. (647) 362-2683. 

FORD 1991 AEROSTAR 
AWD VAN. $4,990. (847) 223- 
8651. 

FORD 1993 AEROSTAR 
WAGON. $6,995. (847) 58" 
3300, 

NEW 1998 GMC SAVANA 
CONVERSION VAN, $22,309. 
(847) 2441010, 

NISSAN 1994 QUEST 

GXE. $8,995. (847) 223-8651. 

PLYMOUTH 1985 MINI 
VAN, 63K miles, $3,200/best. 
(414) 551-7994. 



824 


Vans 



m7 6MC 

Sqvqrg van 

Excellent Condition 

67K miles 80,500 

@.B.e. 

(JW7) 540-7000 Days 
CW) A3B-3333 Eve 



♦«!»»»« MM M « I I ******* * *** * * * 



CHEVY 1988 CONVER- 
SION VAN, 75K miles. A/C, 
AM/FM cassette, tow pack- 
age, $4,000/best. Days (B47) 
358-8008, evenings (847) 
587-5592. Ken. 

CHEVY 1S92 LUMINA 
APV, $6.995. (847) 395-3700. 

CHEVY 1993 G20 CON- 
VERSION VAN, $6,225. (647) 
244-1010. 

CHEVY 1993 LUMINA 
APV. $7.995. (847) 587-3300. 

GRAND CARAVAN LE 

1996. $14,995. (B47) 5B7- 
6473. 

NISSAN 1995 QUEST XE, 

7-passenger with air. tilt, cas- 
sette, overdrive and new tires, 
in great condition. (414) 
654-2450. ' 

OLDS 1994 SILHOUETTE 
MINIVAN. $9,680. (647) 244- 
1010. 



828 



Four Wheel Drv? 

JLVPS 



CHEVY 1991 BLAZER 2- 

door, 4x4. A/T, 4.3L V6, spOrt 
package, $6,200. (647) 
332-3425. 

CHEVY 1991 S-10 BLAZ- 
ER, 4WD, automatic. 2-door. 
A/C. all power. $6,000. (847) 

746-8579. 

FORD 1999 EXPLORER 

SPORT, $17,995. (847) 336- 
2340. 

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 

LIMITED 1996, $20,995. 
(847) 336-2340. 

JEEP WRANGLER 1997, 

$12,900.(847)336-2340, 

LIKE NEW, 1998 GEO 
METRO LSI, 2-door hatch- 
back, 4-cyllnder, 6,000 miles, 
2yrs. old, all options, alarm, 
phone, $7.900/besl. (847) 
548-7844 



LOOK WHAT'S COMING UP 




JAGUAR 1991 XJS, red, 2- 
door, 50K miles, 
$20.000/best. (847) 
277-074B. 

LEXUS 1993 LS400, Pro- 
grammed maintenance, while 
with black leather, loaded, ex- 
cellent condition, very clean, 1- 
owner, $19, 500/best. (847) 
428-9468. 

MERCEDES 1977 300 DIE- 
SEL, automatic, low miles, 
$2,689/best. (414) 859-2631. 



MERCURY 1993 SABLE, 

$5,995. (647) 362-3800. 



1998 CON- 

Knauz Price 
$21,999.(847)234-2800. 



CHRYSLER 1998 SE 
BRING CONVERTIBLE JXI 
Knauz Price $23,989. (847 
234-2800. 

HONDA 1996 ACCORD LX 
SEDAN. $14,495. (B47) 362- 
2683. 

CONTOUR GL 1998, 
$11,795. (847)336-2340. 



HOT REAL ESTATE HOMES WAITING FOR YOU" 

REAL ESTATE SECTION 
2x1 WITH PHOTO 

ONLY $25°° VOU SAVE $1 4.00 

CALL YOUR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE TODAY AT 





FORD 1991 
BIRD, $6,395. 
7676. 



THUNDER- 
(647) 623- 



FOHD 1993 TAURUS GL. 

$4,995. (847) 395-3600. 




OR 112 




This 4 br, 2.5 bn. huge family 
room w/fircplacc, dining room, 
large kiichcn w/brcnkfasl 
nook. Huge bonus room and 
so much more! 

soon.ooo 

Likcliinu Really 
847-000-00 





ers 



it^ ^^.^-" i ' » i" " » i. ' . H ' " * ni n, mV< U ii m^, 



. ' ■ '. '"■' ' 






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•*<»•—••'-*.-; ^ 



»*»i 



...^'<i.Wi »-£■» -w'i*^*; 






November 1% 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers r /\G27 ■ 



828 



four Wtad Drive 



GEO TRACKER 1964, 
$7,705. (847) 362-2683. . r, 

ISU2U 1892 AI4IQO, 
$6,995.(647) 623-7676, .• 

JEEP CHEROKEE 1808, 4- 
door, 4x4, $4,990. (847) 223- 
8651. 

JEEP WRANGLER 1097, 

$13,495. (647)336.2340. 



834 



Tnicks/Trallers 



S39 



838 


Heaw Equlpmeni 



S33 


Handyman 



THE HANDYMAN NO job 
too small. Painting, carpentry 
and repair work. Reasonable 
rates and Iroe estimates. 
(847} 223-7724. 



. ItQtisekeeptxig ; ' 



?• 



1976 FORD ' HBO'" 4x4,* 

good running truck, $600/best. 
[BAT) 746-7634. 

CHEVY 1985 C-10 Custom 
Deluxe pickup, new 
tlros/brakos/boitory, great 
work truck, S3,(XWbost.' Call 
after 6pm (847) 356-7573 ask 
for Rich, days (847) 356-2213 
Walter. 

CHEVY 1994 S-10 P/U 4x4. 
$11.100.(647)336-2340. 

CHEVY IBM 8-10 PICKUP, 

$5.895. (847) 395-3600. 

CHEVY 1896 S-10 SPORT 
SIDE, 4-cyllnder. 5-spoed, air. 
custom wheels, power steer- 
ing/brakes, 8,500 miles, 
$11,000. (815) 943-4757 
attar 6pm. 

DODQE 1992 DAKOTA 
CLUB CAB. $7,995. (847) 362- 
3800. 

DODQE 1993 DAKOTA, 

$5.895. (847) 395-3700. 

DODGE 1994 DAKOTA 
SLT. $5.545. (847) 587-6473, 

FORD 1884 VAN WORK 
TRUCK, heavy duty, 6-cy- 
llnder, very excellent runner, 
alt new pans, $700/besl. (847) 
395-6088. 

FORD 1989 F-150 TRUCK, 
with cap. good condition, 
$5,500/bost. (847) 438-9752. 

FORD 1989 RANGER 4x4 
Ext. cab. $3,695. (847) 395- 

3700. 

FORD 1991 RANGER XLT 
PICKUP, $3,895. (947) 244- 
1010. 

FORD 1993 RANGER 4x4, 

S9.995. 847) 362-3600. 

FORD 1990 RANGER XLT, 
$7,995- (847) 587-6473- 

FORD F-150 1992, 6-cylm- 

dor, slick, with air, AM/FM cas- 
soito, low mileage, 

$6,500/beSl. (847) 356-5949. 

_ - 

NISSAN 1998 PICKUP, 
$6,627. (847) 587-6473. 

TRAILER TILT, SINGLE 

axle, 3000lbs. gross, 5-1/2ft. 
wide and all. long, 3/monlhs 
old, red, $400. (847) 
249-6723. 



FORD 1999 RANGER XL. 
$10,395. (847) 336-2340. 

FORD F-150 1992, 6-cylin- 
der, stick, with elr, AM/FM cas- 
sette, low mileage, 
$6,500/best, (647) 356-5949. 

ISUZU PICKUP 1991, 
$4,995. (847) 362-2683. 

NEW 1996 GMC SONOMA 
SL. $10.798. (847) 244-1010. 

NISSAN 1986 PICKUP, 
Stock #5-6399T. $6,627. (847) 
587-6473. 



> .; 'r.'ITS AblRTY JOBV ; - :{ 
CLEANING SERVICE. 
And we're willing to do IL 

For all your cleaning needs,' 
can us at (847) 646-7403. , 

DOUBLE. KK KLEANINQ 
Reasonable rates. ' Depend- 
able. 'Free In-Home. Quote. 
.Call KJm (647) 546-3408. 

MOTHER AND DAUGH- 
TER cleaning team will clean 
your, home or office. TO years 
experience and excellent ref- 
erences. .1847) 546-8061, 
(847)546-6230. .' ' 

NO TIME FOR 
CLEANING? 

But need the job done right? 

Call Maria. 
I clean weekly or 
bi-weekly only. 

Non-smoker. 

References; 
(647) 546-3759 
leave messaae. 



1962 WD CHALMERS 
TRACTOR with 3pt. 2 bottom 
plow and mounted cultivator, 
$3.000. (815)338-1211. 

BOLENS 16HP TRACTOR 
with hydro trans., chains, 
snowptow, mower, excellent 
condition. $T,250/best. (414) 
B62-7070, 

IRRIGATION PUMP & MO- 
TOR, model 6203A, 40hp. 
phase 3. Peerless pump, 4 In. 
Ductal lalangod. 20hp. motor. 
$650. (847) 740-7380 after 
5pm. 

STONE ELECTRIC CE- 
MENT MIXER, large, barely 
used, 51,500/best. (847) 
838-0211 after 6pm. 



S42 


Landscaping 


FALL CLEAN UP. Trimming, 
cutting down trees, blaekdirt. 
sod, mulch, planting. All your 
fall clean up work. (815) 
385-5607, 


S72 


Professional 
_ Services 



§ 

* 

* 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 

* 
* 




WRITE FOR YOUI 

•X-Mat Cards 

• Wedding Invitation* 

•Shower/Party Invitations. 

'Handwritten. 

* Reasonable ratot. 

Call (815) 363-5330. 



S78 



Remodeling 



DC TILE WE install floor and 
wall tiles of ail kinds. Remodel 
all bathrooms and kitchens. 
Free estimates. (B47) 395- 
0777. 



S87 


Storage 



STORAGE ROOM FOR 
200 boats and campers- Win- 
terizing white you wait. Shrink 
wrap. Certified. (414) 

534-C258. 

STORAGE SPACE FOR. 
BOATS, cars, RVs. Now build- 
ing, cement noor. (647) 395- 
0394. 



* 
* 

* 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 
* 

* 

* 

* 
* 

i 



CHILD CARE In , my home. 
Excellent references. 6:30am 
10 6:30pm. 647-555-0000 



LOVING CHILD 
CARE IN MY 

^V^jORAYSLAKE 
"^ HOME. Hot lunch, 
nutritious snacks, educational 
toys and lots ol TLC. 34 years 
experience. Will lake 6mo to 
6yrs. Please can tor many set 
erences or to visit and 
observe. 

847-555-0000 




M e Ha n r y/ 

Johntburg mom 
of 2 wiO watch your 
child In my. home 
Big,- fenced backyard, large 
playroom, no pets, non smok- 
ing, and plenty of love 
Available Monday-Friday 6am 
to 6pm. Breakfast, lunch and 
snacks will be provided. 
Please call Sue 
847-5554000 



CHILD CARE in your home, or 
mine. References available. 
847-555-0000 



LICENSED DAYCARE in my 
home. Excellent references. AH 
ages are welcome. Also will 
watch your school aged child 
before and after school. 847- 
555-0000 

NEWBORN TO 5 YEARS 
5:30am to 8:30pm. B47-555- 
0000 

CHILD CARE IN YOUR HOME 
OR MY HOME. Let your 
child(ren) spend their day 
learning, exploring and having 
fun. Certified in CPR. 647- 
555-0000 



Word Rate Ads 

H5 words $975 

150 for each 

additional word 

(pre-paid) 

Ad with border 
and logo 

15 words $14.75 

150 for each" 

additional word 

(pre-paid) 

PRIVATE PARTY 
ONLY 



Classified Order Blank 

Use the handy coupon below. Count words. 
Phone numbers and hyphenated words count as one word. Write copy below. 



Enclose check & mail to: Lakeland Publishers, 30 S. Whitney P.O. Box 268, 

Grayslake, IL 60030 or fax (847) 223-2691. To place an order by pKohe call 

Lisa at (847) 223-8161 ext. 140. We also accept Visa & MasterCard. 



n 

i 

i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
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i 
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i 

i 



PLACES TO GO- 
THINGS TO DO... 



WINCHESTER 
HOUSE 14th 

ANNUAL 
CRAFT FAIR 

AND BAZAAR 

NOVEMBER 14, 1998 

BEANIE BABY 

BAFFLE 

BAKE SALE 

DOOR PRIZES 

LUNCH AVAILABLE 

1125 N. MILWAUKEE 

LIBERTYVILLE 




The Holiday Season Is 
Just Around The Corner 



We offer the right mix-. 



Need A 

Place To 

Go? 



SAe C(kikma& Qoxulc 



i Moliday. exaft Shorn f 

November 14 th , 10.™ to 4^ 
November 15'\ I0«nto4pm 

HEATHERRIDGE 

COMMUNITY CENTER 

5900 Heatherridge Drive, Gurnce, IL 

Bnicr From Ri 21 or Gages Lake Road. 

Door Prizes 
liol Lunches & Quill Raffle 



Recipe 



■— — -rrrj^- r:y .~ . - ; ., . . .■>. 



miallfled Help . .. ■ (V7^ ^v*r t 

I mfetx employee, 




Don't ^ 
Forget... 



...to send us your favorite 

photo and any 

Information about the pet 

you would like to 

see mentioned In the 

paper to 
Lakeland Publishers, 

AHn: Classified 

PET OF THE MONTH, 

P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, 

Illinois 60030. 

Sorry, photos cannot 

be returned. 

AD Information is 

subject to editing. 



■■■ » 

::.■ -." 



I ■• 'if' 



Let our qualified 

■Classified Chefs" cook 

up an ad for you. 

Call (8471223-8161 
today! 



- 




if v$ 
*, . 

# 

* 
* 

* 

* 

* 
* 

* 

* 
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■ 



* 
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CLASSIFIED 



j»fcufiOTfi»ri3..ja3e 




Lakeland's 



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1) 

2) Ad ii! QWS 

3Mtol in Market Journal 

on 



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&£.&• § (847)223*ext140>S^^ 



Lakeland Newspapers is your 




|To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you hove plnccd classified 
advertising with Ihe Lake- 
land newspapers you may re- 
ceive a misleading statement 
from nnoltier firm requeu- 
ing payment for tills advertis- 
ing. To receive proper' cred- 
it tq your account, all pay- 
ments for your Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

must be made ns invoiced 
and directed lo: 

Lakeland Newspaper* 

PO Dox 208 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Gr-yslskc. It 60030-0268 



AIKIi..V©U..Triil8EII2). 



.■.'■•-: ( 



you can be debt free ln ] 
3 to 7 yrs. including your 
mortgage, on the money 

you are now making. 

For free information call 

(8471 24g-5652 



J ft* i iiiitiiiimuiiifiiztiiriiiiiiijiiuii^ 

HYPNOSIS BY 
DAVID 

| The Holistic approach jj 
to Good Health. s 

51op Smoking • icno Woight 
jj Stop motional lourt Manago thou ■ 5 
- Facui youl lllo 4 prut Ufa ronionion jj 
jj Alto Iplrll lulouiomonl ; 

toil coniullolion 
3 Call mo Conlai loi Habit Conliol § 

David Wold muiloi hypnotist : 

| (647) 016 4951 

; Now Uboity vlllo O»co 

tlllllDIIIIluUKIIlljlllllt,,,,,,,,,,,.,,! 



Painting, Wallpapering 
Fa pert Installation 



Paper • Fabric •, Vinyl 




DECORATING: 

INSURED i: 

(847) 395-8428 



* 
* 
* 

*■ 
» ♦■ 
m* 
8?e 

. * 

" + 

* 



4—U Pointing 



Cf Interior & Exfetior Painting 

(^Drywali Repans 

jjf Paper Removal 

rjf we Relmisn Garage Doors 



rjf Rolled wood Replacement 

rf Aluminum Siding Painting 

^Handyman Work 

rjfwe Ropalf Loose Aluminum Siding , 



***•«***********..*****».♦.. ***»*«. 



FREE ESTIMATE 

(047) 956-9282 
Jim Fay - Owner 

34 Yfcar* Ixp«H*nc* - Owner InvotvtnwTt on all Jobs, bocaiiM wm corn 





Lower your ELECTRIC BILL with our ENERGY PERFO RMANCE SE RVICE 

HEATWAVE £JE) 

Hooting m Air Conditioning 

(847) 740-4127 

Fax (847) 546-0855 

We Service All Makes & Models 
Fully Licensed & Insured 
All Work Guaranteed 




COUPON 



r#* 



We accept All Mitor 
Credit Cards 



visa 



PRE-SEASON SPECIAL 

I PRECISION FURNACE 
TUNE-UP 

IONLY $39.95 

WITH THIS COUPON 



All Wired, Inc. 

847.296.9900 
Proudly Serving Like. 
Cook. McHeray, snd 

many other counties. 

Computer! • Home Theater • Phones 

• FrM Estimate* 

• Always Reasonibty Priced 

• Home Theater Installation ft Calibration 

• Custom Wiring and Design Services 

• Dolby Pro-Logic, Dolby Digital ft THX 

• DSS & Direct Duo Installation Available 

• MATV (Antenna). CATV (Cabte TV) 

• Phone, Modem ft ISDN Unea 

• Phone Syitama available 

• Closed Circuit TV (CCTV) 
a Horn* Theater Automation 

• Condanae 8 to B Remotea to just ONE 

• Computer Network Design and Installation 
a Computer Contjot Your Whoto House 

a Whole House Speaker Syatema 

• Front and Rear Protection Specialists 

• TV Distribution Specialist* (Multiple TVs) 

• One Source (DSS, Cable Box) To all TV. 

• Carter ID on one or all TVs In your houae 
a Whota Mouse Remote Control 

e Commercial Sound Systems (70 Volt) 

• Conference Rooms, Training Rooms 

• Ws Clean after our own work areas 

Check us out on the Web 
P^j^J^f www.allwiredlnc.com 

Commercial ■ Residential • industrial 



FANTASTIC FIREWOOD 

2-YMR OLP StASOSBP NARP»O0t> 

OAK, ASH, MAPLE, CHERRY $6; 
100% OAK $75 (FCJ 
(847) 546-3613 
(8IS) 344-9522 
l~80D-430-6262r2 





DECKS PLUS 

• CONSTRUCTION 
GENERAL CARPENTRY 

• Custom Decks 

•Porches «Room Additions 

• Basement Remodeling 
■ Bathrooms - Kitchens 

'Custom Carpentry 
Improvements & Repairs! 
QsfUXSD If IOHDED 
n*X ESTIMATES 
(414) B89-S442 

Hesst Csll Ciry Kolkiu 



/CONTRACTORS ELECTRIC SEtWICeIT 
/ ELECTRICAL COfWRACTORS 
/ "Call Us For Fast Courteous Service" 
33265 N. Ftte. 45 
*• Wlldwood, IL 60030 

(847) 223-4682 
ft RESIDE NTIAL - COMMERCIAL 





~ ■» 



1 



■:;. *.\I.V» >_.-l 



■;■,: . .:■:■■■ :■■- ,- 



-::■, ,1 



-'.- '*.-!• U» 



November 13, 1998 






st-vrw:" 



CLASSIFIED 



V '•S'llC-!r,-J(:'- 







JZckeQnlinel 

www.lake-bnline.com 

Lake County's Hot Spot on Hie WWWI 
Your All Inclusive Qukte to ; 

Lake County and the Intamet I 




Internet ., 
www.tbistudio.com 

Just -the Ftoti. . . 

FACT: Sates Online 1997 $21.8 Billion 
FACT: 12,000,000 Get Online In 1998 
FACT: First Year Web Site ROI 245% 

'Core 5" Starter Web Sites 
$795.00 Including Training 

Don't Ignore the facts. 



" Business is like rowing it 

basti upstream. You h.-wo no 

choice but to go ahead or you 

will go linck. " 



847-595-9115 

39 1 Like Strut DowntoNn Anlloeh 




SofflttFwcia . 

Jaswnwit Mntshtng . 

• Decks/Screen Porchw 

•Window IUpUe«neirt 

»D«ywmnefPalatfc- 

Quautt Work 

GUABANTiaonf •, ,. 
Call CB4f) 637-0*77 
Asltfiot-Tony 
FnMy tmtured 

" Mill 



-nE8(oeiSr^.jw*B^g»i^»U3USTB!Ai. 



(BM»P 




klTCHEMI/BASEMENTI j 
CARPENTRY -TkXE 

SMALL JOBS OK 
TQM KIOLBASA 
4tLAT\ I9S-1898 






z 



RASCKL 
Corp 

Laka Villa, IL 
ptioaa or fax £8*7) 83ffl-0S*7 
Fraa Estlmataa-Fotlf Inanrad 

Carpentry • Addition 

BalAroeca-SaaanMiA and 

KJtcb«n ramoda'tao 

■"-'•• «nadawD»ar raplacanant 

Including Stonv doota 

Majntio (JrapUco* aod 

■IdHtnra 'ImUlM, 





LOSCH'S 



SMALL ENGINE REPAIR 



•CHAIN SAWS 
■RIDINQ MOWERS 
•LAWN MOWERS 
■EDQERS 
■TILLERS 
ALL MAKES .TRIMMERS 
All MODELS -SNOW BLOWERS 
ALL MODELS .QEHgpjTORS 







• ••" - '» "•' 



BUYERS OF NON-FERROUS METALS 
INDUSTRIAL SCRAP 



,.n«»8BIHlBS»r.X:'.-i ; -&V ; .. 



"."'■ 



T & C. Metal Co. 



BuyttofNonFfmaU*ltls 

LodtoffbbCtuutliofNitvini H 

I indDEUVERV [ (olurday M 



DONT THROW AWAY 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR 
LAMPDOCTOR$i 
FOR REPAIRS.^ 

V74RREN ELECTRIC INC 

33261 H. Highway 45 

Wlldwood, IL 60030 

(647) 223-8691 




If you have 
an image to uphold... 

Let CSP design your image. 

CSP can design an image that 
will make an impression. 

•Logo fleaA/A* brochures* F(ier&* fneerts 
• fids* business Cards 

• find More 
Call: (847) 244-6966 



_LA-£J-LL2JLUL 



CABLEBOXES 



WHY REM 



< <m\ 



■;j3 



■ i 

■ - 



.. i 






\| vii M» lilt \M>' 



' 



,1-888-800-8078 



IINLIMITEP 



or e-mail: csi 



Lnet 





FREE DELIVERY 
SEASONED 2 YEARS 

Mixed Hardwoods S73 EC. 
Oak $85 EC. 
Cherry. Birch &. Hickory $94 EC 
Separated $105 EC. 
DISCOUNT ON 2 OR MORE 
CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED 
STACKING AVAILABLE 
(630) S76-0UI 




CREATIVE EXTERIOR CONCEPTS, INC 



Save 10% Up to $50© 



- Siding 

• Vinyl Windows 

• Bays & Bows 

• Patio Doors 




• Roofing 

• Soffit & Fascia 

• Gutters 

• Doors 



Licensed, Insured and Bonded 



(847) 72&-1060 



Love Correction 



■quality 

DftlHRIMG 
WATER 

Hugged by R.O* 

Kissed by U.V.* And 

Caressed By A.C.* 

Bottled and 

Distributed By 

The 

Ecowater 

Store 

£nteftpsri&e&, 3nc 

1-800-397-1480 

Reverse Osmosis, Ultra Violet, 
Activated Carbon 



fact all OccmUm 



■Hem*, of OtfUt 
itUMfif an) ildvfl*i 
.aoaltaiU (847) 838-5762 





■ rtdferafflKI 



ALL-AMERICAN 
Painters 



Painting* Staining 
Interior/Exterior 

Lt Carpentry 

Summer Specials 

FREE Estimates 

Use • Bonded •Insured 



(847) 548-51 lO 



Free Estimates • Free Computer Design 






V 



^balli, kitchen, basamenVflafJ 
&£;.-. PNWMHG% 
' " Insltte, outside* 
'.'':, '^CARPENTER WO! 
>{ WALLPAPER & TILES 
i%\ iffii': Fully Insured \ _ 
^n^rQuaillyaiLowCosUt! ^ 
feflL 847-791^00#0| 
KPAX'B47-31848fC 



Freo Estimates • Froe Computer Design 



ALL- A MERICA N 
Cons truction 



Kitchen 'Bath 

Basement 

Custom Remodeling 

Deck Specials NOW 

FREE Estimate 
Use • Bond • Insured 



I I M »»* 



I TREE 6 STUMP 
REMOVAL 



.i!i 



(847) 548-51 lO 



AFFORDABLE^ 
HOME REPAIRS 



HANDYMAN SERVICE 



Save money by using America's 

largest handyman service. 
Insured; bonded, guaranteed. 

(847) 726-1 061 



Land Clearing 

[Wholesale Seasoned 

Hardwood 

Nordstrom 
Tree Experts Co. 

(Fully insured) 

(847) 526-0858 



ptubKegiazi _ 

S Give your worn, peeling bathtub 
i a face Hit with a "like new" finish 
9 in any color. We also reglaze sinks, ! 
||3|. X B ceramic tile & tub surrounds. 

S -Paint stripping, colors & shower 
c doors warrant additional charges. 

Rhino 

| ^^iSte> Refinf shing | 

Services a 

847-^14-1325 1 



JSBk 




: »♦> ** 



HQBoaoBBBBaBOOBaoyaaoBOoaona 




iedat^ 

ftdffi 





OFFICES IN 30 STATES 



Deborah W. Anzclc, CFA c^S 

Cofpof«lr and Indnkkul Tin ind AttounlUg 
Ttl tM7l 3&2-M41 IB76 Sotrth Chprey Un« 

Fu (M7) JM-MSI Libtrtyvillc, lllinob 6004B 

A IocaI CtHiitlid PuWic AccpuNiirw FiiwwoskiNii 

M'lk W*ll buUNtttt* "«l iNUIVldUAl* oIlEBINq 

cliuin pinwiwIilEd mrvIce* *rawpriitivt mih. 
Our timicu iNcludt: 

• BoaUltlplMi »wl «COU«lll»ii 

• Pnynol! tucket* 

•FImwUI 1UII MlMt p«p»«»ilwii 
•Niw buiint" »i»«i-up *Ml«»wt 

• PufpAiiAiloN ol btnln(» i*> auuam 

• Paip*uiloN ol pcinprMl i« auuim 

■0«ioh«rK3>n 



(B3(BW(§[LSa 

Cash For 

• Aluminum Cans 

• All Other Scrap Metals 

Industrial Accounts Welcome 

CHICAGO SURPLUS 

11304 260th Avenue 
Trevor* Wl 

location: Irevoi. Wl 1 mile west or 83 ft C. Turn 
North on 259th St. voor to led 2 blocks 

Mon.-Fri. 9:00am - Spm 

Saturday 9:00am - 3pm 

closed 12- Hot iunch 

(414) M2-2S17 




Youll never get stuck with us! 



We offer 24-hour: 

• Snowplowing 

• Salting & Sanding 

• Snow removal 



■ Sidewalk shoveling 

• Loader and dumptruck 
services 

• Bulk salt & sand delivery 



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Small & large lot contracts Call for a free estimate! 

Lake County Snowplowing & Salting 
847-362-9400 • Fax 847-362-9435 






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C30 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 






November 13^1998 



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MIDWESTERN REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER 

ZION, ILLINOIS 



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ling the fight against cancer, every day. 
toll-free 

1-800-577-1255 



case is typical. You should not expect to experience these results. 



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a^Sfe^ GURNEE FURNITURE'S GREAT THANKSGIVING 



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DownGb. Dinette &\pin^: Room Prices; 

Jifet in Time Fbr;Thanksgiyih^. 



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ME |FREE LAYAWAY « LOW PRICES • IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 



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AVAILABLE IN 

•Black • Hickory 

• White 

• Walnut Finishes 



BRASSTRIM 

• Black • White » Hickory • Walnut 







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RYDAY LOW PRICES FREE LAYAWAY EASY CREDIT T 








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3 PC LIVING ROOM SE- 

Sofa* Loyea'eat & ChaSr* 




ULTRA MODERN 
SOFA, LOVESEAT & CHAIR 

Iri Black or fvoiy Vinyl. 

All three pieces 

for only. 





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Sofa, Loveseat, Chair w/Wood Trim 

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OCCASIONAL 
UBI 

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$88 



TABLES 

3 Place S«ta From 





CARPET 
REMNANTS 

. Now Only 





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Jack tatifmmofm iimit JKWtmtormam compart" 
ment underneath for blankets, pillows, •tc 




SLEEPER SOFA SALE 

TWIN PRICES START AT $249" 
FULL SIZE PRICES START AT $279" l |p 
QUEEN 
SLEEPERS 
at $299" 





MAGIC SLEEP 5 YEAR WARRANTY MATTRESSES & FOUNDATIONS 







5 YEAR 

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Serving Lake County 45 yrs. 



PLENTY OF 
FREE PARKING 

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1 (tem-8pm 

SATURDAY 

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SUNDAY 

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3S35 WEST GRAND ON RT. 132 



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Between 4t and Green Boy Road in Gurnee SALE ENDS NOVEMBER 25, 1998; 



847-623-5060 

\ GRAND AVE. (HweIBI 



GURNEEDISCOUHTO 
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On Rollins Road between Route 83 and Cedar Lake Road, Round Lake Beadi, Illinois 




18 Wall To Wall Screens • 3,900 Seats 



High Back Chairs 

with retractable cupholder armrests 



Gourmet Cafe 

| serving hot drinks & baked goods 

Large Concession Stand • Customer Service Counter 
Credit Card Sales Accepted at Box Office 
DTS, SDDS & Dolby Digital Sound 
Equipped for the Hearing Impaired 
2 Day Advanced Ticket Sales 





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