(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Beachcomber"

» »rpiimi>n i« i wfv ■ ff i i » r it~- irn 




/ . 









./ LJ X ^1_ 



Voice of the Palm Beach Junior College Student 



Vol. 38 No. 1 



Sept. 7, 1976 



Lake Worth, Fla. 33461 




JC Cafeteria Sports New Look 



Debbie Lockhart 
Copy Editor 

With the beginning of the fall term underway, students may 
have noticed a few changes around JC's campus. Perhaps the 
most noticeable change, and the most convenient, is the 
completion of the modernized cafeteria. 

According to Jay MacLees, the cafeteria manager, the 
renovation of the cafeteria has made things easier for everyone 
concerned. 

"We've gotten a lot of compliments from the students about the 
looks of the cafeteria and the service they have received. I think 
the students approve of the change." 

Bridget Lytle, a cafeteria employee, feels that the students have 
"cooperated very well." 

"The new system is a big help," stated Lytle. "This way, if a 
student wants a coffee and danish he can go right through the line. 
This saves a lot of time." 

The majority of students have reacted enthusiastically to the 
changes that were made. 

Sophomore Grant Cochrane likes this year's system better than 
last year's because "it's all in one unit." 

"That way," stated Cochrane, "it's easier to make a choice. I 
also think the staff is sharper and the food is good. The tables are 
cleared quickly so you don't have a lot of garbage on your fable. 

"Also, the lines seem to be faster because they cook the food a 
little ahead of time so there's not much waiting. " 

Julie Winfree, another sophomore at JC, thinks that the new 
cafeteria is basically a success but feels that a condiment section 
should be organized. 

Another dimension to the modernized cafeteria is the separate 
"no smoking" area set aside for non-smokers. 

According to' the cafeteria employees, students have welcomed 
the installation of the smoke-free area. 

Stated one employee who works in the serving line, "They (the 
students) ask us why we didn't think of this sooner. ' ' 



"We've gotten a lot of compliments from the students 
about the looks of the cafeteria and the service they have 
received. I think the students approve of the change." 

— Jay MacLees 




It! 1 *: 



PHOTO BY BARRY VAN WAGNER 

A NEW LOOK- view shows new serving area in JC cafeteria. 



•-■4&^ : 



Candidates Stump At JC 



Primary Elections Today 



By Cindy McCarthy 
News Editor 

Today is the Palm Beach 
County primary. The majority of 
the candidates in this election 
should not be unknown to the JC 
voter. Over 70 candidates for 
county positions appeared on 



this campus Wednesday, Aug. 
25, to talk to Social Science 
classes and politick with the 
students in between. 

According to Dean Paul J. 
Glynn, coordinator of "Meet 
the Candidates Day", "The 
objective is to get the students 
involved in political affairs in 



the county." It also gives the 
politician a chance to speak with 
a young audience and be 
confronted by his opponent in 
some instances. 

Tom Johnson, seeking the 
office of Circuit Court Judge, 
who is a former JC graduate, 
Student Government and Alum- 




ni Association president, was 
impressed with the students and 
their intelligent questions. 

There is an all college effort 
being made by the Florida 
Association Community Col- 
leges, the Social Science 
department, Inter Club Council 
and United Faculty to ask all 
primary winners to come out 
and face each other in the 
Student Activity Center. 

Efforts are also being made 
by Edwin Pugh, JC's political 
coordinator, to try and get either 
President Ford and/ or Governor 
Carter to appear on campus. 

In addition to the candidates, 
the voter registration bus was 
on hand to register new voters 
and show how the new 
Computer Elections Systems 
works. 

A total of 148 new voters was 
added. This breaks down 
into 93 Democrats, 44 Republi- 
cans, 5 Independents and 6 
undecided. 

For those who did not register 
to vote on that day, there will be 
another chance. The voter 
registration bus is scheduled to 
return on Citizenship Day, Sept. 



17. It will be parked in the rear 
of the Administration building. 
Also there will be someone from 
the League of Women Voters in 
the cafeteria. Anyone who is 18 
on/or before election day is 
elibibleto register to vote. 

The Computer Elections 
System of voting is a new, much 
simpler way to cast ballots, 
according to Pugh. It is an 
extremely portable machine 
called the Voter Recorder. To 
use, all you have to do is: 

■1. Slide the provided punch 
card into the recorder. 

2. Be sure the holes at the top 
of the card fit over the two red 
pins on the machine. 

3. Then to vote, push straight 
up and down through the card 
for each of your choices, with 
the puncher provided. Vote on 
all pages. 

4. After -voting, slide card out 
of the Voter Recorder and place 
in the provided envelope. 

"The voting machines now 
used cost thousands of dollars, 
are apt to have mechanical 
failure and cannot be easily 
transported," said Pugh. 



SIGNED, SEALED AND DELIVERED- Sign near SAC patio tells of Aug. 25 "Meet the 
Candidates Day." 



On The Inside 



Drama Auditions p t 

Book Store Blues p 5 

Sports: 76 Preview p 7 

No 'Comber Next Week 



i 






:t I 



1,; 1 






2 - BEACHCOMBER Tuesday September 7, 1976 



Tuesday September 7, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 3 




M:-::;;::1W _l 

SUNNY MEYER- Observing audition as new play director in place 
of Frank Leahy. photo by greg Roberts 

Justice Dept. Plans 
Third Phase Building 

By Bill Johnson 

Associate Editor-News 

Plans for a new, multi-purpose classroom building for the 
Criminal Justice Department are now being made by John 
Marion, a Palm Beach architect. 

The building will be the third phase of a three phase plan for the 
Palm Beach County Criminal Justice Institute at JC. 

The rough plans will be approved or disapproved by the JC 
Trustees. If approved, the plans will be sent to the State 
Department of Facilities for Program Planning for their approval. 

The funds for the new building will come from a $175,837 grant 
award received by the JCTrustees on July 18. The grant award was 
given expressly for the completion of the third phase. The 
architect has agreed the amount should be just enough to cover 
the cost of the building. 

The site for the building will be directly east of the current 
Criminal Justice buildings. Construction should start sometime at 
the beginning of next year, according to Dr. Tony Tate, vice 
president in charge of business affairs. 

"Anything going on before the beginning of the year will be 
surprising." 

Laurence Turtle, chairman of the Criminal Justice Department, 
is hoping for construction to start in 30 to 90 days. "I hope to 
occupy the building next fall." 

The building will be used for mass film presentations, guest 
speakers, lectures, self defense classes and demonstrations. It will 
be equipped with outside doors, wide enough for a vehicle to pass 
through, two locker rooms with lavatories, showers and skid proof 
floors. It will be furnished with 100 stack tablet arm chairs and 
bleachers that seat a minimum of 100 students. 

Cooling the building will be a pneumatically controlled air 
conditioning system with an automatic heating and cooling 
capability not requiring manual control. 

8" 



Drama Auditions Are Heldf editorials 

Meyer To Direct Fall Play * Allocations Review 

And Grants Needed 



Frank Smith 
Venture Editor 

Theater at JC will have 
another look this fall. 

Missing will be the talents of 
David Batho and Mr. Frank 
Leahy, the one-two actor-direc- 
tor punch behind the success of 
last year's play Dylan." Batho 
has graduated and Leahy, head 
of the drama department, is on 
sabbatical attending classes at 
FAU. 

Replacements, however, are 
on the way. Ms. Sunny Meyer, 
who usually directs the winter 
play such as last years 
"Comings and Goings", has 
been given the task of director. 
Meyer also directed Midsum- 



mer Nights Dream", William 
Shakespeare's fantasy play, 
"Blithe Spirit", and the Winter 
Drama Festival at this college. 

Meyer held open auditions 
Wednesday night to find a 
replacement for Batho and 
although it was not as well 
attended as those of past years, 
she expressed pleasure at the 
talent presented. 

The open audition was to help 
Meyer choose the play to be 
presented. Having reduced the 
number of plays under 
consideration from 27 to two, 
she did not want to make a final 
decision before consulting with 
her technical director, Mr. Art 
Musto. 
The titles of the last two plays 




WW 






i *V i\ • *s- : i " * 






m 



■*'■?■ ,, .\- i "v ■ 

fc-rV 

ml > - 









STAGE LIGHTS- Beaming upon them in the first audition of the 
year for the fall play. photo by greg Roberts 

JC Station Modified 



By Eddie Thompson 
Staff Writer 

On April 2, 1972, -a new radio 
station, WRAP, was introduced 
to JC. Today, an even newer 
station exists here on the central 
campus. 




DJAT WORK- Ray Borgerson at the controls of new equipment. hi-ioto by barry van wagner 



WPBC, formerly WRAP, has 
been remodeled and modern- 
ized to the extent of a new 
control board, two professional 
turn -tables and tone arms. It 
took $2,000 and a lot of work to 
move the office, orce located in 
another building, next door to 
the station in the north end of 
the SAC Lounge 

The station's call letters were 
changed to get broadcast 
approval, as they needed letters 
not in use by any other station. 

The broadcast of progressive 
music is aired in the cafeteria, 
patio and SAC Lounge The cost 
of the station to date is 
approximately $6,050 not inclu- 
ding the recent $2,000 additions 
and the two per cent of student 
activity fees set aside for the 
station. Broadcast hours are 
from 8:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. The 
station's purpose is to give JC 
students a background in 
broadcasting. 

Dean Paul Glynn, Vice 
President of Student Affairs, 
and Jim Klein, the station 
manager, are currently involved 
in setting up a course in the 
broadcasting field. 

Faculty, advisors for WPBC 
are Mrs. Barbara Matthews and 
Dr. Richard Yinger, Social 
Science instructors. Scott Free 
and Hank Richmond of WIRK 
and Joe Burnham of WGMW 
are consultants for the station. 



being considered is still a 
mystery, although Meyer stated 
that they were both "farce" 
type plays with some choreog- 
raphy and music. 

The try-outs for the play 
chosen will be held Sept. 14-15. 
Tuesdays' auditions will be from 
2:00- 4:00 p.m. and at 7:30 p.m. 
that jiight. Wednesday's 
audition begins at 1:30 p.m. The 
play will call for between 12-15 
characters. 

Those people interested in 
behind-the-scene technical work 
should come to the auditorium 
at noon Thursday and meet with 
Mr. Musto. 

More information can be 
obtained from the JC drama 
department. 



Regis traf/onjk/s_ 

DueAtJC; 

SG Contest 
Upcoming 

By Debbie Lockhart | 
Copy Editor 

If you didn't get a chance to j 
register for the November , 
election the last time the voter's ' 
registration bus was on campus, ; 
you'll have one more chance to ' 
do so. 

According to Kim Clark, SG 
secretary, arrangements are! 
being made to have another j 
voter's registration bus come to' 
JC's campus as soon as one is 
available. 

JC is competing with other 
junior colleges in Florida to see 
which one will have more 
students register. For this 
reason it is important for 
students to register on this day. 

Originally begun for the 
purpose of raising money for a 
campus swimming pool, the 
aluminum can drive has gotten 
out of hand. 



fi~ 



Says Secretary Kim Clark, 
"People have been putting tin 
cans in the bins instead of \ 
aluminum. I think the drive is' J 
actually a waste of time anyway! *■ 
It takes time to sort the cans and 
.'bag them so that they are able to 
be picked up. Also, we only 
receive 15 cents for each pound 
of aluminum we collect. At 
the present time there is only ; 
$533.69 in the swimming pool 
fund. 

"The Swimming Pool Com- 
mittee is going to have the clubs 
help bag the aluminum we have 
collected and then we're going 
to take down the bins. " 

Inter Club Council (ICC) is " 
now in charge of funding the 
various clubs and organizations. 

Clark feels it's better for SG if 
they don't deal with the clubs. * 

"SG's function is mainly , 

administrative," explained h- 

Clark, "And by allowing ICC to ^ 

fund the clubs, SG can provide jt 

more services to the students as •*" 

a whole." ; 

August 14, 15 and 16 have [ 
been set aside for the election of 
senate positions. 



Worthwhile campus activities have been ■ Canceled, or 
curtailed for financial reasons — the tight dollar situation. 
Course offerings have heen cut in some areas. Activity fees 
were increased. 

Although only a small per cent of students can benefit 
from sports, the athletic program appears exempt from the 
general belt-tightening. Sports continue to flourish with a 
disportionate amount of allocations. 

Athletic fields, used only a small fraction of the year, get 
continuous maintenance care, while even minor alterations 
for scholastic areas go begging. 

Athletes have little or no opportunity to carve out a career 
in sports. Hopefully, at best, their scholarships can be used 
as stepping stones to other careers far from the 
gymnasium. 

Would it not make more sense and stretch those dollars 
further to channel allocations such as these directly into 
general scholarships available to ALL students? JC's 
strongest claim to fame has been for a superior academic 
program, second to none, and a fine offering of lowel level 
college courses. And that is as it should be. 

From our doors have gone such men as Post Managing 
Editor Sam Pepper, actor Burt Reynolds, Police Chief 
Barnes, former State Attorney Phil O'Connell and a host of 
other prominent citizens. How many athletes who hit the 
big time have we produced? 

It is time for a thorough, impartial review of allocations, 
grants and funding as it affects student aid. The majority on 
campus should have the same financial consideration as the 
favored minority in sports. 



Editor Forum 



Denny Glavin 
Editor-in-Chief 



If It # s Fr©©~Grob It 

It has been said that there isn't a person around who 
doesn't like something free. Apparently, whoever coined 
that phrase never visited JC. 

The formation of the Interclub Council (ICC) was done 
with the idea of tying up the loose ends of Student 
Government (SG). With ICC handling all club monies, SG 
could actually begin to "govern." 

Despite the idea of clubs becoming soilidified, students 
at JC have failed to take advantage of what is offered. 

This campus gives the student little in many areas, but 
the students must respond when he feels cheated. 

Involvement can, if nothing else, help the student to feel 
part of something rather than one of 6000. 

Students should take advantage of clubs and 

organizations (e.g. Beachcomber- Journalism, Sales and 

Marketing (DECA)- Business, etc.) that provide a chance to 

"""* get the practical experience needed for future advancement 

in the chosen major. 

It is a matter of the student seeking an appropriate 
activity within his or her major. A good place to start is with 
the department chairman. 

Many students say it's hard finding a job after 
graduation. Try using JC as a "springboard" rather than a 
"wading pool." 



Beachcomber 

Palm Beach Junior College 
4200 S. Congress Ave., Lake Worth, Fla 33461 
(305) 965-8000, ext. 210 

Editor-in-chief. ■ • • •Dennis Glavin 

Associate Editor-Editorial ...... Gunda Caldwell 

Associate Editor-News Bill Johnson 

Associate Editor- Feature, Sports .Steve Farnsworth 

News Editor ." Cindy McCarthy 

Venture Editor Frank Smith 

Copy Editor . . Debbie Lockhart 

Photo Editor . . . Bill Gullion 

Consultant Charles R. McCreight 

The Beachcomber is published weekly from our editorial offices In 
the Student Pulications Building at Palm Beach Junior College 
Opinions expressed In the Beachcomber are those of the editors or 
writers and are not nesessarlly those of the Palm Beach Junior 
College. . 

Letters must not exceed 2oo words, must be signed by the author, 
received In the Beachcomber office no later than 4 p.m. on 
Wednesday and are subject to condensation. 




Stop The Waste 



The Bicentennial will go down 
in history as a grand celebration 
of our 200 years as a free nation. 
A new feeling of patriotism and 
national pride seems to be 
stirring. 

To further enhance the magic 
of 1976 is the fact that this is an 
election year. We have a chance 
to clean house, from grassroots 
to the White House. If you don't 
like what has been going on in 
government, now is your chance 
to do something about it. 

Space research has opened 
new vistas, presented new 
ideas and raised a whole set of 
new questions. Neither our 
scientists nor our people 
understand the significance of 
our recently acquired informa- 
tion. 

On the other side of the coin, 
"We, the People," have 

Stick Art 

Invades* 
NewCampus 

Craze 

Stick art is the latest "in" 
thing on campus. If you don't 
know what that's all about, 
come by the student publication 
building, near the cafeteria. 

A crowded display of political 
posters on short sticks sprout 
from the grass like a scene 
straight out of "Alice in 
Wonderland." 

Courtesy of JC's administra- 
tion, come see the stick art 
sidewalk display. Meet the 
candidates! Look closely! Some 
of the faces will be cropping up 
in local government in the years 
ahead. 

You may help decide which 
ones that will be, IF YOU 
VOTE! 



experienced reserves. Oil mon- 
opolies, currently pausing to 
solidify recent gains, plan 
further gougjng on markets of 
the world, Uur government 
drags its feet on work for 
alternate power and energy 
sources. 

Nuclear threats increase as 
more small nations gain access 
to atomic materials and 
knowhow. 

Nature has gone on a global 
rampage with earthquakes, 
floods and record smashing 
droughts changing from head- 
lines into routine daily news. 

Insidious environmental pol- 
lution increases, while remedies 
remain locked in drawn-out 
legal debate. Possibilities of 
pandemics hang in balance, 
while "mini-epidemics" graph- 
ically illustrate how vulnerable 



Gunda Caldwell 
Editorials 



we are to illness and death... in 
spite of giant steps achieved in 
medical science. 

As we pass the Bicentennial, 
and enter into our third century 
as a free nation, we find 
ourselves in a changed world. 
Rather than the great abundan- 
ce we once took for granted, we 
are burdened with a soaring 
national debt, rapidly dwindling 
resources and shortages crop- 
ping up everywhere. 

Future plans must emphasize 
conservation. We cannot afford 
to live in the future with the 
wasteful lifestyle we had in our 
past. To do so is to court 
disaster. 

If there is to be that third 
century— the Tricentennial— 
we, the citizens, will have to 
work to make it so. 




4- BEACHCOMBER Tuesday September 7, 1976 



Tuesday September 7, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 5 




f 






if:. *■ •» 



■ . : ■ 



:»' t. 



*!.-, 








' - J . '';;■■, . 


r " SS" "I ' 


■ "■^■h» •. . 


■ » »« *^< ■-.. , ■„ 


■ ■ V'V:\ ■■• .: 


. .-■.■ ■JT^.'.i .* 


■■' ''-'" -::\->- , 


■Si .ft»' ■ '. 




"■ ,.' *.* 1" " " 


' ■.."- * Si- 


•■-V •"■ :*. , * 
■■'..t; _,» .... , 



entire 

Appreciate Ve 



. ■- > , '.(■.■.' . jg-w 




By Ron Kingsbury 
Staff Writer 

Some people believe veterans attend 
college only for money. That statement is 
niore often the exception than the rule. In 
fact the majority of veterans attending 
college today have tragically been made 
aware of the unacceptable conditions (hat 
exist. 

Since the beginning of time men and 
women have dreamed of a better world 
and their dreams have spawned the 
present technology. 

The veteran is also a dreamer. He 
began dreaming during the long, hot 
days in the mountains of a foreign 
country and the lonely night'*m-*trW*"--" 
jungles wailing to be sent home. 

His dreams were of a government 
controlled by the people who. were 
directly affected by their actions. He 
dreamed of the day when his destiny 
would not be in the hands of men who 



never ftesults of their own greed. 

He d| of (he green country-side 
of honiLhe clean, pure water left 
inlael fre generations. There were 
no d<n' smog included in those 
dreams; 

T)icj.tion provided by the 
inxpayi'help the ex-soldiers bring 
the dijtlial have too long been 
drum ii' 

Tliislr needs men and women 
who catgli to do something. The 
vet haseiieed, first hand, some of 
the ptif-tliai rise through lack of 
in tores; 

The jn War has created perhaps 
more (lis Irian any other generation 
iTTTOfcifunainly has created an 
army olers . 

By jcbi-ces for a better world we 
can puH (<> the terrible conditions 
that exjttiust cure the ills that have 
crenlecpss mental casualties in our 
nation^ 



Educations' First Step, On The Wrori Foot 

Rv W PnccThnmac Hurinfi PL,c C A „.. _:_,. .... „.... . < 



By W. Ross Thomas 
Staff Writer 



Summer is gone, school is here, and I 
can't believe it. The first day of class is 
August 17? That's like getting up at 4:00 
a.m. to mow the lawn, or having the 
power go off during the last twenty 
minutes of a good Hitchcock flick. You 
know what I mean? 

The first day of class is always a gas 
when you happen to be a chronic "off on 
the wrong footer." It's a drag when, 
halfway through second period you notice 
you're wearing white pants with ketchup 
stains and your sister's "I'm with him 
because he deserves the best" T-shirt, 
you'd best keep a low profile 



during Phys-Ed, or risk getting 
rearranged. 

Fortunately, Imade it to my first class 
this year without looking totally out of 
whack, at least no one broke out 
laughing when I walked in a prompt ten 
minutes late. The only seat was directly 
in front of the teacher, a short, hawk-eyed 
old man who looked like he was going to 
get even with somebody. He just looked 
disgusted, took a deep breath and 
jumped off into some extended essay 
along the lines of "This is not a 
crip..; expected to do all work... weekly 
quizzed... term paper... I don't stand for 
this... In my day... You are going to 
learn... etc. I decided I was definitely in 
the wrong place. I jumped up and went 
straight to drop-add and nearly dove in 
that computer. 



Still hungover from my first class, I 
headed to second period C.A. (Cafeteria) 
101 class, a pre-requisite for B.S. 210. 
Since I'm the new kid on the block, I 
wanted to make some new friends and 
meet some girls befo 
a chance to get- turn 
with the cutest little heavenward button 
of a nose sitting by herself a few tables 
over, so after getting up and falling over 
my chair, 1 walked over and asked if I 
could sit at her table. Unfortunately, 
there were people "sitting there." Funny 
thing, too, because a chick at another 
table, whose nose was almost as neat, 
had people "sitting there" too. I'm glad 
she told me, too because I nearly sat on 
one of them. Anyway, I ended up sitting 
with all the derelicts; (We always- find 
each other). 



Tired of this atmosphere, I got to my 
next class, Speech, early. I got a chance 
to pick a good seat for a change, and I 
immediately placed myself in the far 
corner of the room where I'd be ,. 

wmfrm ,„. m -.. ftfeTyT the 

as * a bright, cheerful, 
communitive woman suffering from acute 
optimism and considered it mandatory 
that everyone involve themselves in the 
class discussion, including zombies. We 
were to go around the room and give 
everyone a chance to tell a little bit about 
themselves, a move considered wretched. 
We got through about three people, all of 
whom were business majors, Geminis, 
and had lived in the area all their lives! 
when I was beckoned to the podium. 
After getting up and falling over my desk, 
I walked to the front of the room and said: 



"Hijihrie is 'The Disco Kid', I'm 
here oftll scholarship, my major is 
stayiiiffei and my birth sign is 
AspariN'fy hobbies are armpit 
JSI&Es^ demolition horseback 
~niSii™*gie and have a kid wim is 
older $&, and the one word to 
descris mayonnaise. Thank-you." 

Nnbfoghed. In fact, everyone 
lookedft like I was serious. The 
teachcCmc an embarassed "Oh, 
that'slce, Disco, Next please." I 
wandi* to my corner and coughed 
for lluxcLcr of the period. 

I skW last two classes. My first 
day afasn't bad, I had survived, 
and I^ys count my blessings. I 
decidtturn for the second day and 
you wfc believe what happened. 
But. trpther story. 




Gallery 
Presents 



The two pholoN to (he left tire from 
n collection of painliiigs which 
hung In the humanities building ns 
part of a continuing program of art 
presentations. The exhibitions are 
changed periodically and contain 
the work of most of I he outNhuidiiig 
artists of the men along with 
occasional shows (lone by nation- 
ally known outside artists. 



The Book Store Blues 



By Don Vaughan 
Staff Writer 
August 17- 8:30 A.M.: 1 enter the 
bookstore to buy Ihe necessary, texts. No 



Inflation Strikes The College Student 



By Frank Smith 
Venture Editor 

People told me that when I 
was going to college that I would 



have to "hit" the books. 
Nobdoy, however, told me the 
books were going to hit back. 

I was not prepared to hear my 
instructor tell me to purchase an 



english literature book. I had 
forgotten in a moment of 
ignorant bliss how the college 
student really obtains informa- 
tion. Books. 




"You will, of course, have 
your books by Thursday said the 
instructor. (15.00 dollars said a 
small, agitating voice). 

As I sat in my physical science 
class the instructor raised a 
book and flashed a smile. (My 
mind raised its bid to $35.00). 
Psychology will cost $14.00 
more. (Why don't you sell your 
car?) 

By the end of the second day I 
feared to face what 1 would pay, 
my savings dwindling away for 
knowledge. The only way I could 
afford the books that I was not 
implored to buy, would be to cap 
my searches with the trium- 
phant purchase of a Reader's 
Digest for college. 

Actually it isn't the price that 
disturbs me. They're good 
books. The thing that disturbs 
me is that I am a special 
student, different than your 
normal studying bibliophile. 
With the amount of reading I do 
I'm paying about three dollars a 
word. 

I got a good deal on a used 
literature book though, and, if 
I'm lucky, the mud will come off 
after it dries. 




one told mc thai a book was needed for 
Coed Jai Alai and Skydiving 101 . 

9:50 a.m.: The crowd around the single 
salesperson clears enough for mc to 
lunge through the masses and grab his tie 
to gel his attention. After being revived 
he tells me that Coed Jai Alai books are in 
Section DA. I find Sex Therapy 
workbooks and Math Logic supplements 
in Section DA, but no Coed Jai Alai. 

11:45 a.m.: Find Coed Jui Alai in 
Section AA, next to Animal Husbandry 
and Psychology. The sign says to go to 
class first. Now I have to pay for the holes 
in the wall resembling my knuckles. 

4:19 p.m.: Located Skydiving 101 and 
subsequent supplements. I enter end of 
cashier's line in parking lot. 

August 18- 7:00 a.m.: I made it through 
the night without falling asleep and 
losing my place in line. I am fifteen feet 
closer to the cashier. 

1:35 p.m.: I am weak from hunger and 
lack of sleep, but I can see the cashier 
with the aid of a pair of binoculars. 

8:50 p.m.: I passed one of the poor 
souls that couldn't hack it. He died 
twenty feet from the register, too. 

August 19- 10:50 a.m.: I am ten feet 
from the counter. I keep hallucinating 
from lack of sleep and food, and the 
cashier resembles a Keebler elf. Is 
becoming a lint filter salesman worth 
this? 

3:45 p.m.: I make it to the cash register 
in my last moments of consciousness, but 
to no avail. 

While waiting in line my Skydiving 101 
course was cancelled. I hope the cashier 
didn't have too much trouble pulling the 
book out of her ear, one page at a time. 



Vm Ik H • 1 

iva Mexico! 

When must people return from vacation, all (hey have lo show 
for it arc some anecdotes, sonic out-of-foeus snapshots and an 
empty wallet . 

But for many of the 30 members of Arl instructor, Jo Gray's 
( ,IC) Mexican Study Tour, there was more. 

A mininied-l'ull itinerary — visiting »H the major empires of 
Middle America—kept the group busy seeing sights, jotting 
notes, in addition to exploring the shops and eating unusual foods, 
dudng their 18-day tour south of the border. 

Members of the tour ranged in age from 17-67 and their 
minions varied to the highlights of the trip. 

"Visiting Mima is like going back to prc-Colombiun times," 
said Mrs. Gray. . 

"You see the Mayan characteristic in profile and the same sort 
of little huts that you find on ancient pottery." 

"[wen with the mud floors, they somehow managed to keep 
(heir houses very clean, "Sandy, (one of the students) said. 

An amusing sidelight— although it didn't seem funny at the 
time -was the attempt by one of the tour members to purchase a 
black ceramic goal. 

Using her limited Spanish vocabulary, and with the aid of a 
Spanish-English dictionary, the tourist tried to tell the proprietor 
what she wanted, but instead of polite treatment, the tourist was 
uneermoiiiously ushered out the door. 

Their guide explained later that by adding the wrong ending to 
one of the words, she had changed her request into something 
both vulgar and insulting. 

With the guide's help, the group member was ablt to buy her 
goat without further difficulty. 

"The city of Oaxaca— there's no place like it on earth— is 
becoming a famous center for pottery, jewelry and weaving," 
Mrs. Gray said. 

While in Oaxaca, the group got to see Dona Rosa, a world 
famous potter, now in her nineties, at work in her adobe home. 

At their hotel, the concerned lour leader, after seeing billows of 
smoke rolling into the lobby, asked the desk clerk where the fire 
was, 

"No problem, no problem" the clerk replied. 

It turned out those were the only English words he knew," the 
instructor said. 

"We were all prepared to evacuate, but it wasn't necessary. 

"There was a bit of excitement for awhile, but I thrive on 
excitement," Mrs. Gray admits. 

Besides the group can always add the tale to their fund of 
Mexican Study Tour anecdotes. 




6 - BEACHCOMBER Tuesday September 7, 1976 



Tuesday September 7, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 7 



campus combings 



Traffic Problem Worsens 



What is Swine Fin and should I lake the vaccine? A pamphlet sent 

to the college by the Dept. of Health Education and Welfare 

(HEW) gives information about the origin of Swine Flu and its 

possible connection with the 1918 epidemic. This information will 

help you make up your mind about the vaccine. See it on the third 

floor of the library. 

Reminder to all those having heart risk factor screening 

appointments. Next week the appointments begin. Please be sure 

and check your appointment time and date to avoid unnecessary 

problems. Remember that only water and medication may be 

consumed after 8:00 p.m. the night before your appointment. No 

breakfast! Not even coffee! Screening will be given in the SAC 

Lounge. The women's days are Sept. 9, 16, 21, 22 and 29. The 

men's days are Sept. 8, 14, 15, 23 and 28. 

Attention veterans! Do you know what VA benefits are? If you 

don't and would like to know, call Jack Bell, coordinator of 

veteran's affairs at JC, 965-8000, ext. 315. 

Don't procrastinate! If you are planning to graduate at the end of 

the fall term, be sure to turn in a graduation card (which may be 

obtained from your advisor) to Mrs. Harter, graduate section, 

office of the registrar. Absolute deadline is Sept. 20. 

Motor pools are being formed fer those who need a ride and those 

who can share a ride from the north and south areas. Sign up in 

the SAC Lounge. 

Wanted: Action people are needed on the Intramural Recreation (I 

& R) Board. Interested in organizing, administration or 

supervision. We have a place for you in Intramurals. Be where the 

action is! Be a volunteer on the I & R Board. See Mr. Bell in 4k, 

the gym. 

Intramural week 76/77. The Intramural program will blast off the * 

week of Sept. 7-11. Registration for following activities will begin 

on the seventh and run through the 11th: scuba, Softball, karate, 

sailing, bowling. Students interested in entering these activities 

should register in the gym. 

Christian Science Organization will meet Tuesday, Sept. 7, at 

12:30 in the Testing Center (AD-5) Everyone is welcome. 

Key audit for all non- instructional and 12 month administrative 

staff is Sept. 7 and 8. Please check all keys with the property 

records coordinator, rear of the Bookstore-receiving center. Any 

12 month instructional staff who have not had their keys audited 

this year, please do so at this time. 

Sailing club- Interested in sailing? Want to learn how to sail? Join 

the Sailing Club! FREE use of boats; free instruction. 

Monday-Friday from 12:30 - 3:30. For more information contact 

the Intramural Office, 4k, in the gym. 

Karate: The I & R Board will offer a free karate course starting 

Sept. 8, at 1:30, in the gym. For more information contact the 

Intramural office, 4k, in the gym. 

Scuba: The I & R Board will offer a certified scuba course 

beginning Sept. 13 at 3:00 p.m. in PE-6 in the gym. Registration 

will begin Sept. 7 and will run through Sept. 10 in the Intramural 

office. The cost of the course is $20.00 and studentssupply their 

own equipment. Course leads to a scuba certificate. 

Intramural Bowling Men and women leagues. Major League 
Lanes, Wednesdays, 4-6 p.m. Registration: Sept. 8 at 3:30, room 
PE-6, in the gym. First day of tournament, Sept.15 at 4:00. 
Awards for first place team, 1st, 2nd and 3rd. See Mr. Bell in 4k, 
gym. High game- high average- high series. 
Intramural co-ed softball- Intramural tournament. Slow pitch 
co-ed team starts Sept. 13, 2:30, Monday, Tuesday and 
Wednesday at the JC softball field. See Mr. Bell, 4k, gym. 



Use The Beachcomber 
For Your Classifieds- 
Students Free 



ICC Holds First 
Meeting As Club 



Denny Glavin 
Editor-in-Chief 

The- Inter-Club Council 
(I.C.CK a newly formed 
watchdog of campus club 
monies, held their organization- 
al meeting Friday, Aug. 27. 

The meeting was chaired by 
Tom Solder in lieu of election of 
officers. Solder submitted a 
rough draft constitution to the 
club representatives as guide- 
lines toward forming a workable 
constitution. 

The l.C.C. consists of 10 
campus clubs-both service and 
socially oriented. The l.C.C. 



was given seven per cent of the 
Student Activity Fee Commit- 
tee's (SAFC) allottment in order 
to solely control the jumbled 
club situation. 

The constitution submitted by 
Solder had, as Hugh Lambert of 
student government noted, 
"a few things I just couldn't 
pass." 

In their next meeting, which 
was held Friday, Sept. 3, the 
election of officers and possible 
revision and ratification of the 
l.C.C. constitution were sched- 
uled for attention. 

The results of the meeting 
were not available at press time . 



Cindy McCarthy 
News Editor 

Once again there is the usual 
traffic jam designating the 
beginning of fall term. How- 
ever, a new school year and a 
few additional students are not 
the whole cause for this 
situation. 

Since the completion of 1-95, 
there is an overflow of traffic 
entering and exiting at the Sixth 
Ave. entrance. Chief of 



Security, Grant J. Battels, says, 
"We never had this problem 
before. For the first time we 
need to have traffic posts." 

If you have traveled on the 
south-side of the campus, you 
may have seen the Chief 
himself, or one of his men, at 
the Sixth Ave. entrance and 
further up the road near the 
Humanities building, directing 
traffic. The peak hours are 
between 7:30- 8:15 a.m. and 
12:00 -1:10 p.m. 



A traffic light with a left turn 
signal has been requested. 
Battels doesn't know if it will 
help. Directing traffic is not 
easy. It is hard to try and keep a 
flow going. 

There are plans to hopefully 
add more parking spaces out 
from the Humanities parking 
lot on the Sixth Ave. side. 

Presently there are only 2,500 
paved parking spaces to fill the 
needs of the 3,500 - 4,000 cars 
that park daily on this campus. 



Yinger Presents Theory 



By Ken Mylott 
Staff Writer 



Dr. Richard E. Yinger, JC 
Social Science instructor, feels it 
is possible that contact will be 
made with extraterrestrial Hfe 
within five years. 

Anticipating this discovery, 
Dr. Yinger has suggested the 
term Exosociology for a new 
field of sociology to investigate 
the possibility of extraterrestrial 
life and its implications on the 
earth. 

"We are at the edge of the 
Copernian Revolution and 
history may not treat us kindly if 
we fail to see what is 
happening, " says Yinger. 

Yinger first presented his 
unique ideas in a paper 

presented to the Pennsylvania 
Sociological Society in 1974. 
Since that time Yinger has been 
interviewed by publications all 
over the country and in Europe. 

At press time (Sept. 3) Yinger 
is presenting a new paper in 
New York before the 71st annual 
meeting of the American 
Sociological Association. 

"The paper I will discuss 
Sept. 3 is a call to sociologists to 
consider the implications of the 
Viking mission to search for life 
on the planet Mars," says 
yinger, "The main hypothesis is 
that the biologists don't know 
what life is and wouldn't know if 
they found it." 

"In the meantime they may 
well have data that proves life 
does exist on Mars, but because 
of socio-cultural and political 
factors, can not handle it, 
Yinger warns, "There is no 
turning back from our adventure 
in space." 



A Reminder To 
All JC Students 

Gunda Caldwell 

Associate Editor- Editorials 

Title IX of Educational 
Amendments of 1972 requires 
that educational institutions 
inform all students and 
employees of their legal rights if 
they feel they are discriminated 
against because of their sex. 

Administration has published 
this information at intervals in 
the past. 

JC newcomers should be 
aware they may obtain full 
details of this Title IX provision 
in the Director of Personnel 
Office, located in the Business 



"EXOSOCIOLOGY" THEORY- Dr. Richard P. Yinger speaks 
during one of his seminars on Exosociology- the presence of life on 
other planets. 



Flu And Blood Test 
Come To JC Campus 

By Cindy McCarthy 

News. Editor 

Heart Risk Factor Screening Program appointments begin this 
week for all who have signed up. Persons who register will have 
their blood pressure checked, blood tested and be given an 
electrocardiogram. 

This program is being held in the SAC Lounge Sept. 8-9, 14-16 
and 21-23. Students can sign up in Dean Paul J. Glynn's office. 
Helen Diedrich, Director of the Student Health Service, hopes to 
have over 1 ,000 people participate in the program. 

Tentative dates released by Glynn to have Swine Flue Vaccine 
available on campus for students and the local area are Oct. 9-10. 
These dates could be canceled if the vaccine is not delivered. 

There is a pamphlet in the library called "What is Swine Flu and 
Should I Take the Vaccine?" This information will help those who 
are undecided about taking it. 



i* 




r 



Beachcomber 



First Meet Sept. 10 




THROUGH THE WOODS- JC's cross-country team practices at John Prince Park. [1-r] Tom Murdock, 
Steve Farnsworth, Mike Arnold, Hassan EI Abbar, Greg Ulseth, and Frank Gruber. 

JC Sports : Looking Good 



Administration building on 
central campus, or by calling 
965-8000, extension 301. 
Complaints should be sub- 



mitted in writing (within 21 days 
of such incident) to Mr. Joseph 
Schneider, Director of Person- 
nel and Coordinator for Title IX. 



By Steve Farnsworth 
Associate Editor 

After talking with the coaches 
of each of JC's nine 
intercollegiate sports, I've come 
to the conclusion that '76-77 
will be an excellent year, 
sportwise. 

Although JC didn't have any 
state champions last year, five 
teams were state contenders 
and this year should see more of 
the same. 

Here's what each sport looks 
like: 

Baseball, finishing with a 
23-18 record last season, has 11 
players returning, including 
most of the pitching staff. Coach 
Dusty Rhodes said that 
recruiting has been good and 
walk-on tryouts already under- 
way. Although in a tough 
division, the Pacers should 
improve last year's mark. 

The big surprise of last year, 
the basketball team, who made 
the state tournament by what 
seemed to be a series of 
miracles, looks good this year. 
New coach Joe Ceravolo has 
assemble i a combination of 
returning players, local talent 
and big mei from out of state. 
The cagers have the height they 
lacked last season and should be 
tough to beat. 

Fielding a small but speedy 
team, the cross-country Pacers 
are trying for that elusive berth 
in the Nationals. Fourth in the 
state last year, the harriers aim 
to improve to third which will 
qualify them to enter. 

Golf, especially the women's 
team, which was 13th in the 
nation this spring, is in fine 
shape. Coach Joe Sanculius has 
signed six women to scholar- 
ships, including two members of 
Lake Worth High's state 
champions. Sanculius feels the 
lady Pacers can equal or better 




against reigning state champ- 
ions, Miami-Dade South. 

So, JC sports generally .look. 
good, but we'll only know for 
sure after each sport event. 



XC Runners Roll 

By Steve Farnsworth 
Associate Editor 

Making up in talent what it lacks in numbers, the cross-country 
team is training hard for the upcoming season. 

Cross-country coach Dick Melear stated that this year's team is 
similar to last year's but with greater potential. The Pacers were 
fourth in the state last season. 

Leading the harriers is sophomore Tom Murdock, winner of 
All-State honors in 75. Tom is expected to run with the best in the 
state again this year. 

Another runner Melear is counting on to do well is Hassan El 
Abbar, a transplanted Moroccan who ran for Lake Worth High 
School last year. Melear feels that Hassan will surprise a lot of 
people this season. 

Sophomore Steve Farnsworth, last year's No. 4 runner, is the 
only other returning team member, with freshman Frank Gruber, 
from Suncoast, Greg Ulseth, from Cardinal Newman- and Mike 
Arnold, from Leonard rounding out the team. 

One serious problem that faces the Pacers is lack of depth. With 
only six men on the roster, and five needed to make a team, any 
injuries could be disastrous. 

Looking to alleviate this weak spot, Melear says he would 
welcome walk-on runners. He said they should contact Athletic 
Director Dr. Howard Reynolds to find out where practices are 
held. 

Melear declined to make predictions as to how his runners 
would fare this season. 

"There's just too many unknowns," he explained. "I don't 
know how much we will improve and I don't really know what the 
other schools have returning or recruited." 

The Pacers will first swing into action against Miami-Dade 
North Community College, Sept. 10, at the 3rd Annual JC 
Cross-country Clinic. 

The clinic, held for local high schools, features talks, films and 
races for the 400 boys and girls expected to attend. The highlight 
of the clinic is the JC Dade North race. 

The races will be held at John Prince Park in the late afternoon. 



Five New Cheerleaders To Be Picked 



last year's accomplishments. 

The men golfers also have 
recruited well and have several 
returning players. With around 
20 students practicing for a spot 
on the team, Sanculius said the 
team should be in the top third 
in the state and could win some 
tournaments. 

The women's softball team is 
hoping to avoid last year's 
eligibility problems and improve 
on its fifth place finish in the 
state tournament. Coach Bobbie 
Knowles thinks that the soft- 
ballers can break into the top 
three this season. 

Tennis appears to be a mixed 
bag. The men, sixth in the 
nation last spring, have lost only 
two players and have recruited 
more. Coach Hamid Faquiresays 
the team is one of the strongest 
he has ever had, so JC 
opponents should be beware. 

The women, however, don't 
look good. Despite placing third 
in the nation last May, only one 
of JC's three national titlists, 
Vikki Beggs, is certain to be on 
this year's team. 

The women lack a coach and 
had little recruiting done. Beggs 
should retain her No. 1 singles 
title, but one person doesn't 
make a team. The women will 
have to rely heavily on walk-ons. 

JC's newest sport, volleyball, 
is in its first season and 11 
women are practicing daily for a 
sport on the team. Coach 
Knowles hopes that the women 
can be among the top three in 
the state, but says she'll know 
for sure after their first match, 



By Jeanette Banning 
Staff Writer 

Cheerleading practice will begin Monday, 
Sept. 13 at 1:30 p.m. in the SAC Lounge. 
Brendolyn Ireland, 1975-76 cheerleader captain, 
will conduct the sessions. 

Beginning Monday, Sept, 13, nine practices 
will be held. They will continue through 



Thursday, Sept. 23. Actual tryouts are on Friday, 
Sept. 24 at 3:00 p.m. Five new cheerleaders will 
.be chosen. 

Cheerleaders must meet the same eligibility 
requirements as athletes and attend a minimum 
of five tryout practices. 

For additional information, contact Ms. Ireland 
or Dr. Howard Reynolds, athletic director. 




PHOTO BY BARRY VAN WAGNtR 

TROPHY CASE- The past success of JC athletics is displayed here. Will this year bring more additions? 



6 - BEACHCOMBER Tuesday September 7, 1976 



? 



Tuesday September 7, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 7 




What is Swine Fin and should I take the vaccine? A pamphlet sent 
to the college by the Dept. of Health Education and Welfare 
(HEW) gives information about the origin of Swine Flu and its 
possible connection with the 1918 epidemic. This information will 
help you make up your mind about the vaccine. See it on the third 
floor of the library. 

Reminder to ail those having heart risk factor screening 
appointments. Next week the appointments begin. Please be sure 
and check your appointment time and date to avoid unnecessary 
problems. Remember that only water and medication may be 
consumed after 8:00 p.m. the night before your appointment. No 
breakfast! Not even coffee! Screening will be given in the SAC 
Lounge. The women's days are Sept. 9, 16, 21, 22 and 29. The 
men's days are Sept. 8, 14, 15, 23 and 28. 

Attention veterans! Do you know what VA benefits are? If you 
don't and would like to know, call Jack Bell, coordinator of 
veteran's affairs at JC, 965-8000, ext. 315. 

Don't procrastinate! If you are planning to graduate at the end of 
the fall term, be sure to turn in a graduation card (which may be 
obtained from your advisor) to Mrs. Harter, graduate section, 
office of the registrar. Absolute deadline is Sept. 20. 
Motor pools are being formed for those who need a ride and those 
who can share a ride from the north and south areas. Sign up in 
ihe SAC Lounge. 

Wanted: Action people are needed on the Intramural Recreation (I 
& R) Board. Interested in organizing, administration or 
supervision. We have a place for you in Intramurals. Be where the 
action is! Be a volunteer on the I & R Board. See Mr. Bell in 4k 
the gym. 

Intramural week 76/77. The Intramural program will blast off the " 

week of Sept. 7-11. Registration for following activities will begin 

on the seventh and run through the 11th: scuba, softball, karate, 

sailing, bowling. Students interested in entering these activities 

should register in the gym. 

Christian Science Organization will meet Tuesday, Sept. 7, at 

1 2:30 in the Testing Center (AD-5) Everyone is welcome. 

Key audit for ail non-instructional and 12 month administrative 

staff is Sept. 7 and 8. Please check all keys with the property 

records coordinator, rear of the Bookstore-receiving center. Any 

12 month instructional staff who have not had their keys audited 

this year, please do so at this time. 

Sailing dob- Interested in sailing? Want to learn how to sail? Join 

the Sailing Club! FREE use of boats; free instruction. 

Monday-Friday from 12:30 - 3:30. For more information contact 

the Intramural Office, 4k, in the gym. 

Karate: The I & R Board will offer a free karate course starting 

Sept. 8, at 1:30, in the gym. For more information contact the 

Intramural office, 4k, in the gym. 

Scuba: The I & R Board will offer a certified scuba course 

beginning Sept. 13 at 3:00 p.m. in PE-6 in the gym. Registration 

will begin Sept. 7 and will run through Sept. 10 in the Intramural 

office. The cost of the course is $20.00 and students supply their 

own equipment. Course leads to a scuba certificate. ' 

Intramural Bowling- Men and women leagues. Major League 
Lanes, Wednesdays, 4-6 p.m. Registration: Sept. 8 at 3:30, room 
PE-6, in the gym. First day of tournament, Sept.15 at 4:00. 
Awards for first place team, 1st, 2nd and 3rd. See Mr. Bell in 4k, 
gym. High game- high average- high series. 
Intramural co-ed softball- Intramural tournament. Slow pitch 
co-ed team starts Sept. 13, 2:30, Monday, Tuesday and 
Wednesday at the JC softball field. See Mr. Bell, 4k, gym 



Use The Beachcomber 
For Your Classifieds- 
Students Free 



ICC Holds First 
Meeting As Club 



Denny Glavin 
Editor-in-Chief 

The .Inter-Club Council 
(l.C.C.jy a newly formed 
watchdog of campus club 
monies, held their organization- 
al meeting Friday, Aug. 27. 

The meeting was chaired by 
Tom Solder in lieu of election of 
officers. Solder submitted a 
rough draft constitution to the 
club representatives as guide- 
lines toward forming a workable 
constitution. 

The LC.C. consists of 10 
campus clubs-both service and 
socially oriented. The LC.C. 



was given seven per cent of the 
Student Activity Fee Commit- 
tee's (SAFC) allottment in order 
to solely control the jumbled 
club situation. 

The constitution submitted by 
Solder had, as Hugh Lambert of 
student government noted, 
"a few things I just couldn't 
pass." 

In their next meeting, which 
was held Friday, Sept. 3, the 
election of officers and possible 
revision and ratification of the 
LC.C. constitution were sched- 
uled for attention. 

The results of the meeting 
were not available at press time. 



Traffic Problem Worsens 



Cindy McCarthy 
News Editor 

Once again there is the usual 
traffic jam designating the 
beginning of fall term. How- 
ever, a ne.w school year and a 
few additional students are not 
the whole cause for this 
situation. 

Since the completion of 1-95, 
there is an overflow of traffic 
entering and exiting at the Sixth 
Ave. entrance. Chief of 



Security, Grant J. Barrels, says, 
"We never had this problem 
before. For the first time we 
need to have traffic posts." 

If you have traveled on the 
south- side of the campus, you 
may have seen the Chief 
himself, or one of his men, at 
the Sixth Ave. entrance and 
further up the road near the 
Humanities building, directing 
traffic. The peak hours are 
between 7:30- 8:15 a.m. and 
12:00- 1:10p.m. 



A traffic light with a left turn 
signal has been requested. 
Bartels doesn't know if it will 
help. Directing traffic is not 
easy. It is hard to try and keep a 
flow going. 

There are plans to hopefully 
add more parking spaces out 
from the Humanities parking 
lot on the Sixth Ave. side. 

Presently there are only 2,500 
paved parking spaces to fill the 
needs of the 3,500 - 4,000 cars 
that park daily on this campus. 



Yinger Presents Theory 



By Ken Mylott 
Staff Writer 



Dr. Richard E. Yinger, JC 
Social Science instructor, feels it 
is possible that contact will be 
made with extraterrestrial life 
within five years. 

Anticipating this discovery, 
Dr. Yinger has suggested the 
term Exosociology for a new 
field of sociology to investigate 
the possibility of extraterrestrial 
life and its implications on the 
earth. 

"We are at the edge of the 
Copernian Revolution and 
history may not treat us kindly if 
we fail to see what is 
happening," says Yinger. 

Yinger first presented his 
unique ideas in a paper 
presented to the Pennsylvania 
Sociological Society in 1974. 
Since that time Yinger has been 
interviewed by publications all 
over the country and in Europe. 

At press time (Sept. 3) Yinger 
is presenting a new paper in 
New York before the 71st annual 
meeting of the American 
Sociological Association. 

"The paper I will discuss 
Sept. 3 is a call to sociologists to 
consider the implications of the 
Viking mission to search for life 
on the planet Mars," says 
yinger, ' 'The main hypothesis is 
that the biologists don't know 
what life is and wouldn't know if 
they found it." 

"In the meantime they may 
well have data that proves life 
does exist on Mars, but because 
of socio-cultural and political 
factors, can not handle it, 
Yinger warns, "There is no 
turning back from our adventure 
in space." 



"EXOSOCIOLOGY" THEORY- Dr. Richard P. Yinger speaks 
during one of his seminars on Exosociology- the presence of life on 
other planets. 



A Reminder To 
All JC Students 

Gunda Caldwell 
Associate Editor - Editorials 
Title IX of Educational 
Amendments of 1972 requires 
that educational institutions 
inform all students and 
employees of their legal rights if 
they feel they are discriminated 
against because of their sex. 

Administration has published 
this information at intervals in 
the past. 

JC newcomers should be 
aware they may obtain full 
details of this Title IX provision 
in the Director of Personnel 
Office, located in the Business 



Flu And Blood Test 
Come To JC Campus 

By Cindy McCarthy 
News Editor 

Heart Risk Factor Screening Program appointments begin this 
week for all who have signed up. Persons who register will have 
their blood pressure checked, blood tested and be given an 
electrocardiogram. 

This program is being held in the SAC Lounge Sept. 8-9, 14-16 
and 21-23. Students can sign up in Dean Paul J. Glynn's office 
Helen Diedrich, Director of the Student Health Service, hopes to 
have over 1,000 people participate in the program. 

Tentative dates released by Glynn to have Swine Flue Vaccine 
available on campus for students and the local area are Oct 9-10 
These dates could be canceled if the vaccine is not delivered 

c J h fi e r £ a , pam Pk let in the libraf y ^lled "What is Swine Flu and 
Should I Take the Vaccine?" This information will help those who 
are undecided about taking it. 



^ 




r 



ft 



Beachcomber 



First Meet Sept. 10 




THROUGH THE WOODS- JC's cross-country team practices at John Prince Park. [1-r] Tom Mnrdock, 
Steve Farnsworth, Mike Arnold, Hassan £1 Abbar, Greg Ulseth, and Frank Grubcr. 

JC Sports: Looking Good 



Administration building on 
central campus, or by calling 
965-8000, extension 301. 
Complaints should be sub- 



mitted in writing (within 21 days 
of such incident) to Mr. Joseph 
Schneider, Director of Person- 
nel and Coordinator for Title IX. 



By Steve Farnsworth 
Associate Editor 

After talking with the coaches 
of each of JC's nine 
intercollegiate sports, I've come 
to the conclusion that '%■'!! 
will be an excellent year, 
sportwise. 

Although JC didn't have any 
state champions last year, five 
teams were state contenders 
and this year should see more of 
the same. 

Here's what each sport looks 
like: 

Baseball, finishing with a 
23-18 record last season, has 11 
players returning, including 
most of the pitching staff. Coach 
Busty Rhodes said that 
recruiting has been good and 
walk-on tryouts already under- 
way. Although in a tough 
division, the Pacers should 
improve last year's mark. 

The big surprise of last, year, 
the basketball team, who made 
the state tournament by what 
seemed to be a series of 
miracles, looks good this year. 
New coach Joe Ceravolo has 
assemble -< a combination of 
returning players, local talent 
and big niei from out of state. 
The cagers have the height they 
lacked last season and should be 
tough to beat. 

Fielding a small but speedy 
team, the cross-country Pacers 
are trying for that elusive berth 
in the Nationals. Fourth in the 
state last year, the harriers aim 
to improve to third which will 
qualify them to enter. 

Golf, especially the women's 
team, which was 13th in the 
nation this spring, is in fine 
shape. Coach Joe Sanculius has 
signed six women to scholar- 
ships, including two members of 
Lake Worth High's state 
champions. Sanculius feels the 
lady Pacers can equal or better 




against reigning state champ- 
ions, Miami-Dade South. 

So, JC sports generally .look, 
good, but we'll only know for 
sure after each sport event. 



XC Runners Roll 

By Steve Farnsworth 
Associate Editor 

Making up in talent what it lacks in numbers, the cross-country 
team is training hard for the upcoming season. 

Cross-country coach Dick Melear stated that this year's team is 
similar to last year's but with greater potential. The Pacers were 
fourth in the state last season. 

Leading the harriers is sophomore Tom Murdock, winner of 
All-State honors in '75. Tom is expected to run with the best in the 
state again this year. 

Another runner Melear is counting on to do well is Hassan El 
Abbar, a transplanted Moroccan who ran for Lake Worth High 
School last year. Melear feels that Hassan will surprise a lot of 
people this season. 

Sophomore Steve Farnsworth, last year's No. 4 runner, is the 
only other returning team member, with freshman Frank Gruber, 
from Suncoast, Greg Ulseth, from Cardinal Newman and Mike 
Arnold, from Leonard rounding out the team. 

One serious problem that faces the Pacers is lack of depth. With 
only six men on the rosier, and five needed to make a team, any 
injuries could be disastrous. 

Looking to alleviate this weak spot, Melear says he would 
welcome walk-on runners. He said they should contact Athletic 
Director Dr. Howard Reynolds to find out where practices are 
held. 

Melear declined to make predictions as to how his runners 
would fare this season. 

"There's just too many unknowns," he explained. "I don't 
know how much we will improve and I don't really know what the 
other schools have returning or recruited." 

The Pacers will first swing into action against Miami-Dade 
North Community College, Sept. 10, at the 3rd Annual JC 
Cross-country Clinic. 

The clinic, held for local high schools, features talks, films and 
races for the 400 boys and girls expected to attend. The highlight 
of the clinic is the JC Dade North race. 

The races will be held at John Prince Park in the late afternoon. 



Five New Cheerleaders To Be Picked 



last year's accomplishments. 

The men golfers also have 
recruited well and have several 
returning players. With around 
20 students practicing for a spot 
on the team, Sanculius said the 
team should be in the top third 
in the state and could win some 
tournaments. 

The women's softball team is 
hoping to avoid last year's 
eligibility problems and improve 
on its fifth place finish in the 
state tournament. Coach Bobbie 
Knowles thinks that the soft - 
ballers can break into the top 
three this season. 

Tennis appears to be a mixed 
bag. The men, sixth in the 
nation last spring, have lost only 
two players and have recruited 
more. Coach Hamid Faquire says 
the team is one of the strongest 
he has ever had, so JC 
opponents should be beware. 

The women, however, don't 
look good. Despite placing third 
in the nation last May, only one 
of JC's three national titlists, 
Vikki Beggs, is certain to be on 
this year's team. 

The women lack a coach and 
had little recruiting done. Beggs 
should retain her No. 1 singles 
title, but one person doesn't 
make a team. The women will 
have to rely heavily on walk-ons. 

JC's newest sport, volleyball, 
is in its first season and 11 
women are practicing daily for a 
sport on the team. Coach 
Knowles hopes that the women 
can be among the top three in 
the state, but says she'll know 
for sure after their first match, 



By Jeanette Banning 
Staff Writer 

Cheerleading practice will begin Monday, 
Sept. 13 at 1:30 p.m. in the SAC Lounge. 
Brendolyn Ireland, 1975-76 cheerleader captain, 
will conduct the sessions. 

Beginning Monday, Sept, 13, nine practices 
will be held. They will continue through 



Thursday, Sept. 23. Actual tryouts are on Friday, 
Sept. 24 at 3:00 p.m. Five new cheerleaders will 
.be chosen. 

Cheerleaders must meet the same eligibility 
requirements as athletes and attend a minimum 
of five tryout practices. 

For additional information, contact Ms. Ireland 
or Dr. Howard Reynolds, athletic director. 




PHOTO BY BARRY VAN WAUNtR 

TROPHY CASE- The past success of JC athletics is displayed here. Will this year bring more additions? 



8 - BEACHCOMBER Tuesday September 7, 1976 



INTRAMURALS - Scuba and karate are but two of the 
many activities Intramurals sponsor each year. 




/ & R Offers Varied Slate 

By Jim Goodman 
Staff Writer 

A full slate of intramural activities are scheduled for fall term, 
with Softball, bowling, scuba, karate and sailing organizing now. 

Co-ed softball, organizing Sept. 7 at 2:30 in the gym, will be 
played by rules that require pitcher to be male and the infield to 
have alternate male-female positions. Anyone interested can sign 
up for a specific team or as an independent and be drafted onto a 
team. 

An even-popular intramural activity, men's and women's 
bowling, will be held every Wednesday from 4-6 p.m. at Major 
League Lanes in Lake Worth, starting Sept. 13 and ending Dec. 1. 
The top men and women bowlers will %e eligible to compete in a 
tournament for south Florida junior colleges in November. 

If you're into martial arts, the Karate Club will meet in the 
gymnasium on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 1:30 to 3:30 
p.m., starting Sept. 13. The classes are open to beginners, 
intermediate and advanced karate students. The instructor is 
Paul Ratanapasrth , a third degree black belt. 

For sailing enthusiasts, the Sailing Club will have free use of 
boats Monday through Friday from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. Classes for 
beginners are held Tuesday and Thursday afternoons starting at 
2:30. To check out a sailboat, present your I.D. card at the 
equipment room in the gymnasium. The boats must be returned 
by 3:30. 

Scuba classes will begin Monday, Sept. 13 at 3:00 p.m. in 
room PE-06. The Intramural Board pays part of the scuba fee, 
while students pay $20 plus pool fees. All students must supply 
their own equipment. 

The scuba class is a certified course by the Professional 
Association of Diving Instructors (PADI). Doug Curtis is the 
instructor. - 

Mr. Roy Bell, intramural director, said that the main purpose of 
intramural activities is to provide students a varied sports program 
combining competition, recreation and instruction. 

Other activities to be held later this semester are football, 
volleyball, archery, horseshoes and tennis tournaments plus a 
turkey trot. All will be coed. 



PHOTO BY BARRY VAN WAGNER 



Volleyballers Face Champs 
In Tough Season Opener 



By Robbin Barber 
Staff Writer 

Women's volleyball, the new- 
est intercollegiate sport at JC, is 
getting ready for its first season. 
Last year Dr. Howard 
Reynolds,, athletic director, 
conducted a survey concerning 
women's sports. It was to be 
decided whether volleyball or 
baskefball should be added to 
the sport curriculum at JC. 
Women's volleyball won. 



Bobbie Knowles, the mentor 
of the volleyballers this year, is 
described by assistant coach 
John Anderson as very 
knowledgable about that sport. 

Eleven women on the team 
are practicing with six vying for 
starting positions. 

On Sept. 21 at 6:00 p.m. the 
team opens its season, playing a 
doubleheader match against 
Miami Dade-North and Miami 
Dade-South, reigning state 
champions. 

The women play by power 



volleyball rules. The methods 
used are the bump, spike, 
floater and the spin serve. 

The 11 women participating 
in volleyball are Sonia Barraza, 
Martha Castillo, Donna Clark, 
Margaret Egan, Doreen Mac- 
way, Donna Marotta, Melissa 
Meyer, Laura Pierce, JoAnn 
Slater, Valerie Valenti and 
Virginia Warnoch. 

"I feel we will have a decent 
season," says Anderson. 
"We're really fortunate to have 
the talent we have." 







p *jr 



'•£* 



s "**, *«&*J 




PHOTO BY BILL GULLION 

SAILING- Students can check out sailboats provided by the 
Intramural Board. 





Voice of the Pafm Beach Junior College Student 



Vol.38 No. 2 



September 20, 1976 



Lake Worth, Fia. 33461 




Manor Retiring In '78 



:>^ s *>fe* 




PHOTO BY GREG ROBERTS 



JC Board Of Trustees 
Hears Activity Appeal 



Steve Famsworth 
Associate Editor 

Referring the matter to a 
committee, the Board of Trustees 
declined to take immediate action 
on a request for scholarships for 
other activities besides athletics. 

Beachcomber Editor Denny 
Glavin, speaking at the Sept. 15 
meeting, said that JC benefits as 
much or more from non-athletic 
activities than from athletics, and 
the students participating in them 
deserve financial aid. 

Referring to when athletic 
scholarships were first instituted, 
Glavin said that Athletic Director 
Howard Reynolds asked the 
board at that time for 100 
scholarships for all activities. 

Since that time 66 athletic 
scholarships have been establish- 



ed and Glavin questioned why the 
other 34 were not awarded to the 
other activities. 

Noting that the Board gave the 
sports program approximately 
539,000 above their share of the 
student's activity fees, Glavin 
said he thought it wasn't fair that 
the other activities should have to 
rely solely on activity fee money. 

Gunda Caldwell, an associate 
editor of the Beachcomber, also 
addressed the Board and said that 
she was not anti-athletic, nor did 
she want to take aw ay athletic 
monies. She added that she did 
not want to drag the sports 
program down to the level of the 
other campus activities, but only 
bring the other activities up to 
parity with athletics. 

Board member Susan Anstead, 
replying to the request, said the 



Denny Glavin 
Editor 

Dr. Harold C. Manor, JC 
president for 19 years, has 
announced his retirement 
effective in Sept. 1978. 

The announcement was 
made at the Sept. 15 meeting 
of the JC Board of Trustees. 
He felt that giving the 
Trustees two years to find a 
replacement would assure a 
quality choice. 

Manor felt the growth of the 
school enrollment by 1,500 per 
cent was a major accomplish- 



ment during his administra- 
tion. 

The Board was told by 
Manor of the guidelines he felt 
should be followed in selecting 
a new president. They 
included: 

• Arranging a conference 
with Dr. Lee Henderson, 
director of the Division of 
Community Colleges of the 
Slate Department of Educa- 
tion. 

• Determining a calendar 
for the selection. 

• Developing a set of 



qualifications lor the position. 

• Appointing a screening or 
search committee. 

• Announcing the vacancy. 

• Employing the successful 
candidate in the Fall term, 
1977, as President elect, for a 
year of training. 

Manor pointed out that if 
the Board makes their choice 
by March 1977, the successful 
candidate can have time for an 
orderly transition . 

The board voted to begin 
it's selection procedure by 
meeting with Dr. Henderson. 



ICC Readies Constitution; 
Seeks Organized Stance 



Bill Johnson 
Associate Editor 

Readying themselves for official recognition, 
Inter-Club Council held their elections Sept. 10. 

Three of four elected positions were filled. The 
vice-chairmanposition was left open until the group 
can caucus both candidates. 

Tom Sotder, appointed temporary chairman of the 
group by Student Government was unopposed for 
the chairman position. Solder had stated earlier in 
the meeting that he had notified SG of his 
resignation as Secretary of Organizations, thus 
satisfying ICC's constitution that states an officer of 
ICC cannot be in SG. 

Nominees for vice-chairman are Norma Barletta 
and Roosevelt O'Neal. The group decided to put that 
election off until both candidates are at the meeting. 
O'Neal had left the meeting earlier. 

Office of secretary was taken by Jeannie Huff 
when Colleen Kenny dropped out of the race after a 
first ballot tie. Kenny was then voted in treasurer, 
unopposed. 



Lisa Wilder was then appointed chairman of the 
RUSH parties. They will be paid for by what money 
the clubs' have raised, since college monies are 
being held up until ICC is recognized by the Activity 
Committee. 

"There is an ICC," says Solder, "we're just in 
limbo right now." 

As long as ICC is in "limbo" the clubs will have 
their hands tied, and the money that would have 
normally had a whole term to help the students will 
have, as of now, three quarters of a term. 

The only thing holding up ICC is many time 
consuming revisions of their constitution, afterwhich 
they can call a meeting of the Activity Committee to 
get official recognition . 

WhenJCC does get organized, it will be easier for 
everyone concerned, compared to last years method 
of funding the clubs. 

This is why the Activity Fee Committee put so 
much faith in the idea last year by giving money to a 
club that then did not yet exist. 




PHOTO BY GREG ROBERTS 



same problem comes up each 
year. She said that it was not a 
matter of the Board coming up 
with money, but of the activities 
appropriating correctly the money 
they have. 

She stated that if the students 
would eliminate student activity 
fee carry-overs they would have 
the money for scholarships. 

Following Anstead's remark, 
Continued Pg. 6 



Normal Growth Pattern Resumes 



The '76 fall term has been ranked by Registrar 
Charles Graham as the second largest term in JC's 
history. 

Current information from all centers shows an 
enrollment of 7,719 students. These figures are for 
credit courses and do not take enrollment in 
workshops, which is still going on, into the count. 

There will also be additional registration for credit 
courses at JC South, Sept. 15-24. 

According to Graham, all breakdowns of the basic 
head count figure of day and evening students have 
shown a small reduction in semester hours from 175 



but an increase over any other year. • 

"It seems clear to me that we have resumed a 
normal growth pattern after unusually large 
enrollments in both '74 and '75," stated Graham. 

Economic conditions, plus some uncertainty as to 
how many students universities would be able to 
accept, led to higher enrollment in both '74 and '75. 

"When jobs are hard to get, people turn to us for 
addi t ion al education , " Grah am said . 

"When it gets easier to find work, more people 
choose work rather than college." 



Car Pools To Organize 

By Sharon McTyre 
Staff Writer 

Bus service and motor pool transportation is still available to any 
student who wishes access to either. Schedules for the buses are 
printed in the 1977-78 student handbook. The fare depends on the 
number of zones a rider travels. 

Students currently providing their own transportation may be 
interested in sharing the driving and/or the" cost with another 
student from their same area. 

The motor pool is just getting started and many students are still 
looking for rides. To join this program at any time of the year, make 
a visit to Dean Davey's office. 

By making arrangements with another name on the list, driving 
expenses can be cut in half. 



Can Drive Over # p # 2 

Moving Out p # 4 

What is a Pacer? ¥>>- p,7 



M*M*mMJam> 



tin mniniriin i ninn"T"^*"' , '--""- J * 



2 - BEACHCOMBER Monday, Sept. 20, 1976 



Monday, Sept. 20, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 3 



Science Club 
Begins Year 

By Cindy McCarthy 
News Editor 

Science Club (SC) started off a new year, when 58 members went 
on their annual Loxahatchee Rivencanoe run at Jonathan Dickinson 
State Part last weekend. 

This canoe run covered 14 miles of primitive wilderness, a section 
of the park that most visitors do not see. SC members started the 
trip from the back of the park canoeing down Spider Creek branch, 
into Kitchen Creek branch and wound it up in the Loxahatchee 
River. The run was completed by most in three and one-half hours. 

Quite a few rare plants were observed along the way. One sight 
that proved to be interesting was a barn owl — with no barn in sight! 

Tim Lamping searched for primitive plants that he had studied in 
Botany. Some people went on the trip to enjoy the real wild and the 
trees. 

Other activities that SC plans to do this year include camping, 
hiking, skin diving, more canoe trips, swamp tramping and having 
speakers come in. 

Presently no officers have been chosen. Club advisors are Richard 
Gross and Glen Marstellar. 



CANOE TRIP- Science Club members begin their 14 miles journey 
down the primitive wilderness section of the Loxahatchee River. 



Mediator Appointed 

By Debbie Lockhart 
Copy Editor 

Special Master hearings on matters in dispute between JC and 
the United Faulty of JC will begin Monday, Sept. 20, at 9:00 a.m., at 
the Gold Coast Educational Federal Credit Union Office on 
Congress Ave. 

The hearings have been called by Special Master Douglas 
Stowell, a Tallahassee lawyer, who was appointed by the Public 
Employee Relations Commission to settle disputed matters between 
the college and the United Faculty. 

Collective bargaining, followed by mediation, has left a large 
number of unresolved issues between the two sides, including the 
entire economic package. . .- -. .JMMIlllkbW* 

As Special Master he is empowered to set hearings, subpoena 
documents and arrive at findings of fact and recommendations for 
solutions of all disputed matters between the parties. 

Although no time-table has been released for the hearings, the 
meeting room at the Credit Union has been reserved for three 
consecutive days. 

Special Master hearings are often conducted in a manner similar 
to that of pre-trial judicial hearings and are open to the press and 
public within the limitations of the hearing chamber. 




Editorials 



COURTESY OF PALM BEACH TIME! 



Aluminum Drive Disbandec 
Pool Fund Raising Stops 1 



Copy Editor 



The aluminum can drive and 
the stamp drive, two projects 
begun last year in the hopes of 
raising enough money to build a 
swimming pool, have been 
brought to an end. 



secretary, the 
drive was "more 



mmmmm 

aluminum can 
trouble than it 



Gain Valuable College Credit By Exam 
CLEP Appl ications Now Being Accepted 



By Lisa Ostberg 
Staff Writer 

Student applications are now being accepted for 
future College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 
tests. 

These tests are administered each month (with 
the exception of August and December) at the JC 
testing center on the third Wednesday and Thursday 
of each respective month. 

CLEP is a nationwide program that offers 
students the opportunity to pick up college credits 
by taking equivalency exams. 

Developed in 1967 by the College Examination 
Board, students could possible receive up to 45 
hours of credit by taking these exams, which is 
comparable to three semesters of undergraduate 
study. 

Tests can be chosen from five 
categories: English Composition, 



general exam 
Humanities, 



Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Social 
Sciences-History. 

Also, there are more than 40 specific subject 
exams to choose from, ranging from Freshman 
English to Afro-American History, and from 
Statistics to Introduction to Business Law. 

General exams are one hour in length, while 
subject exams run for one and one-half hours. 

Prices range from S20 for one exam, $30 for two 
and S40 for any combination of three to five general 
or subject exams. 

Students planning on taking these tests should 
register as early as possible, since the center is 
limited to 50 tests each month. No applications are 
accpeted later than the Monday of the test week. 

The CLEP test can be very valuable in gaining 
"easy" college credits. Although it is not accepted 
in all colleges in the United States, it is in many. 

Applications and more specific information may 
be obtained from Mr. Cook in the testing center. 



was worth." 

Clark explained that people had 
been placing tin cans into the bins 
instead of aluminum and that a lot 
of time was spent sorting the cans 
and preparing them for pick-up. 

"It seems hardly worth the 
effort," stated Clark, "when you 
receive only 15 cents for each 
pound of aluminum collected. 

"SG is very disappointed with 
the clubs and the Interclub 
Council (ICC)," stated Clark. 
"We asked the clubs for help 
bagging the last of the aluminum 
cans and only three people (all 
from SG) showed up." 

Because it took these three 
people so long to do so little, 



sert C. Moss, assists; 
dean of men, asked for assistant 
from JC's maintenance crew t) 
bag the remainder of the cans, j 

Clark feels that since ICC dofe 
not depend on SGfor funds, llieri 
will, be no communicatiot. 
between the clubs and SG. t; 

The stamp drive has also beetj 
discontinued. L 

According to Clark, the dr\\{ 
was not getting a "big enougf 
response to actually make a grcaj 
deal of money." i: 

"We're not going to Fo<r 
around with these 'Micke;' 
Mouse' projects any longer,'; 
stated Clark, "We are looking foi. 
new ways to make 'big' money."; 

At press time no 'new ways' 
had been found, but SG is hope/u 
that new ideas for making manefe 
will soon be put into action. 



Lewis Telethon 



DECA Aids Muscular Dystrophy 



By BUI Johnson 
Associated Editor 



Members of the Sales and 
Marketing Club (DECA) manned 
telephones and took pledges for 
the Jerry Lewis Labor Day 
Telethon. During the telethon, 
President of DECA, Kathleen 



Kenney, and past President, Bart 
Cunningham, were interviewed 
by* Jim Childress ofWPEC-TV. 
_ DECA also donated S30 to the 
Muscular Dystrophy Association. 
Other newly elected officials of 
DECA are: Vice President, Kevin 
Whitehurst, Vice President of 
Administration, Sharon Waters; 
V.P. of Finance, Jim Cain; V.P. of 



Promotion, Colleen iKenney and 
V.P. of Planning, Fred Mc White. 
On Sept. 29 DECA is 
sponsoring the Campus Blood 
Drive. Their goal will be for 150 
pints. Refreshments are to be 
offered for donors. The drive is to 
incure that blood will always be 
available for JC's faculty and 
students. 



Meyer Chooses Ploy 

By Frank Smith 
Venture Editor 

Sunny Meyer has chosen both play and players for the JC fall 
theatre season. 

The play is "Deadwood Dick or The Game of Gold" and will be 
presented Nov. 4-7. It is a melodrama set in a mining town during 
the Gay Nineties and contains an active cast of 14 characters. 

From an enthusiastic crowd of 39 aspiring actors, Meyers culled 
the numbers down to her final group. 

The plot concerns dance hall hostess Calamity Jane (played by 
either Patty Coopman or Carol Healy) who is in cahoots with 
Blackman Redburn (Gary Lazer) the villian. They conspire to find a 
gold mine, the map of which is tattooed on the back of heroine Lily 
Blossom (Debbie Gaggiani) who is the blind sister of Rose Blossom 
(Sharron Larry). 

(Tim Irish) and Wild Bill 



The heroes of the play are Ned Harris, 
Hickok (Bobby Amor). 

Besides the central plot the play presents intriguing subplots. 
Lost sisters are found and lost again. Death defying hairbreadth 
escapes occur with a hanging and a killing or two thrown in for good 
measure. 

Other characters in the play include Sheriff Loveless (Ross 
Thomas), Judge Nix (Mark Johnson), LaPaloma, exotic adventuress 
t't^ 1, Pon § £ in 8 a chme *e cook (Frank Smith), Chet 
Annfe vZSSSy ^^ TeSSie ( ° We " Matth ->' a " d Pia "° 



K 



ComeOnJIle! 



Good manners and sportsmanship have always been an integral 
part of tennis. We hope it continues to do so. 

During the recent U.S. Open Championships, the spectators were 
treated to an unmatched display of boorish behavior and shocking 
vulgarity. Although an American was not the guilty party, our 
officials must share in the blame because they allowed such 
behavior to continue on the court. 

When winning becomes so important it supersedes decent 
behavior, it is time to stop the game and call forfeit, penalty, or just 
plain out. Tennis should not be allowed to be degraded. 

Championships should be played on a high level, so that winners 
are true champions in every sense of the word. Each participant has 
the right to be treated with respect and courtesy by his opponent. 

It is easy to lose sight of objectives in the excitement of 
competition. How we play is as important as winning. 

IThinkWeSaid . . . 

The Beachcomber was dumbfounded to read a misleading news 
release from the JC News Bureau. 

It was printed just prior to student editors'appearance before the 
Board of Trustees to request academic grants-in-aid for the 
non-athlete. 

Apparently there was an attempt to "set the arena" for a 
"knock-down, drag-out fight" between the Beachcomber and the 
athletic department. 

Had the bureau checked their information, they might have 
discovered what we knew all along. 

That is, Dr. Howard Reynolds, athletic director, at a previous 
meeting of the Board of Trustees, asked for an adequate number 
(100) of scholarships for'ALL* activities.'* " '■ '• 

.....Reynolds also suggested to the editors that they assure the Board 
'.ii'«» ''«=•■ ■ — — = 'n total agreement with the editors. 

We, at the Beachcomber, have always been partial to eggs on 

laces or not! 



One More Vote Will Count 

The steady decrease in voting since 1960 indicates another record 
low for the November elections. Fewer than half of the elibible in 
the 18-29 age group have even registered. 

In the primaries this year, only 17.6% of voting age population 
did vote. 

The views of voters now under 35 — which means YOU — will likely 
dominate elections in the very near future — IF they register and 
vote. 

Voter apathy has grown to an all-time high. People are 

disillusioned and tired of the Watergates, the sex scandals, the 

graft and corruption constantly being exposed. They look for 
something new and clean. 

That is one reason for the appeal Jimmy Carter has generated. 

He is fairly new on the scene, with no evidence of past ties with 
the old guard. 

With Carter getting 4.2% of the votes and Ford 3.4% , only about 
4% of the voters chose the party nominee and a president. 

It would take very little to tip the scales in favor of one or the 
other. More than ever, ONE MORE VOTE DOES COUNT. 



Beachcomber 

Palm Beach Junior College 
4206 S. Congress Ave., Lake Worth, Fla 33461 
(305) 965-8000, ext. 210 

Editor-in-chief Dennis Glavin 

Associate Editor-Editorial Gunda Caldwell 

Associate Editor-News • Bill Johnson 

Associate Editor- Feature, Sports . Steve Farnsworth 

News Editor Cindy McCarthy 

Venture Editor Frank Smith 

Copy Editor Debbie Lockhart 

Photo Editor Bill Gullion 

Consultant Charles R. McCreight 

The Beachcomber Is published weekly from our editorial offices in 
the Student Pulicatlons Building at Palm Beach Junior College 
Opinions expressed in the Beachcomber are those of the editors or 
writers and are not nesessarily those of the Palm Beach Junior 
College. 

Letters must not exceed 2oo words, must be signed by the author, 
received in the Beachcomber office no later than 4 p.m. on 
Wednesday and are subject to condensation. 




( 






ywr>- ■ .-• 










^teve/te\ 



Of course I expect to win. Why do you ask? 



Editor Forum 



We would like to thank the 
Board of Trustees fur its response 
to the Beachcomber's request 
regarding academic grants. The 
question asked by the Board were 
appropriate and needed, in order 
to come to a logical decision. 

The Board's action to refer the 
appeal to the Student Affairs 
Committee of the Board, will be 
beneficial to both Trustees and 
students. » 

One of the strongest objections 
came from a board member who 
claimed organization funds show- 
ed a large carry-over of monies by 
the student-funded organizations. 

However, neither Dr. G. Tony 
Tate, vice president of business 
affairs, nor Mr, J. Barry Rogers, 
JC comptroller, could give a 
definite carry-over figure. 

Perhaps now the Board can 
sympathize with our problem. 

We admit that we, too, are in 
the dark, as was Tate. 

The problem of organization 
carry-overs became a crucial 
issue during winter term 
meetings of the Student Activity 
Fee Committee (SAFC). 



Denny Glavin 
Editor 

Obviously the student activity 
groups have not received the 
promised help and cooperation 
from the Finance Department. 

The SAFC requested that each 
organization receive a bi-monthly 
statement concerning organiza- 
tional finances. 

Perhaps the Board also should 
know it is virtually impossible for 
organizations to operate effec- 
tively without these. That was 
agreed upon last winter term. 

To carry this one step further, 
the organizations have not yet 
received the final print-out for the 
1975-76 fiscal year. 

How effectively can we 
operate? 

These figures are needed by 
advisors and leaders within each 
organization. Without them the 
board cannot expect records to be 
kept well. 

On the other hand, we will not 
get into the position of defending 
student-funded activities that 
"hoard" student funds. Because 
we are a public-funded organiza- 
tion, the organizations must 
justify considerable carry-overs. 



Jeans Over Suits 



Gunda Caldwell 
Editorials 



A recent survey conducted 
by Dartnell Institute of 
Business Research produced 
surprises in more than one 
way. 

The old traditional business 
suit (matching coat and pants, 
shirt and necktie) came in last, 
with only a hard-core 20% 
giving it preference. The other 
80% opted for leisure suits. 
Another surprise was the 
jeans. They have worked up 
from a universal rejection for 
business wear to a 25% 
acceptance. 

Considering that jeans are 
so flexible that they range 
from torn bottom short shorts 



to flamboyant evening pants, 
it is quite possible that per 
cent will go much higher in the 
near future. Turtle neck shirts 
and sweaters are rated OK by 
70% of those polled. 

Everyone approves of pants 
suits for women, anytime, 
anywhere. Miniskirts dropped 
to 70% for office use, although 
the man on the street still 
rates them 100% OK. 

With job markets in the 
doldrums and competition 
waxing furious for available 
openings, it might be a good 
idea to consider this survey. It 
could be as imporatnt as your 
resume. 



NOTES 

We Invite You 
To Speak Out 



"You only get out of something 
what you put into it!" 

This also applies to student 
participation in campus activities. 
There's enough variety to choose 
from that you will find something 
right for you, no matter what your 
interests are. 

The Beachcomber is the voice 
of the students. In this, too, you 
may share. We will be featuring 
submissions by guest editors in 
subsequent editions. Contribu- 
tions are welcomed. 

Letters to the ediotr will also be 
featured. Here's a chance to 
make your own voice heard. 

If you have a sincere, 
constructive commentary or wish 
to express an opinion, send or 
bring it in to an editor in the 
student publication building. 
Consideration will be given to all 
signed entries. 

A Little Bore 

If this year's Beachcomber 
looks a little bare, it may be due 
to lack of any advertising. 

The problem wasn't in finding 
advertisers, but someone to 
handle an advertising depart- 
ment. 

Several clubs, including Sales 
and Marketing, showed a 
"preliminary" interest, but 
nothing resulted. 

We need a person or group who 
can take orders and keep books on 
sales and billing procedures. This 
is a perfect workshop for 
business, accounting, advertising 
and other majors. 

But no one has come forward. 



4 - BEACHCOMBER Monday, Sept. 20, 1976 



Monday, Sept. 20, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 5 




"Hidden linger", Curse Of Low Budget Diets 



PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER 



By Mary Layers 
Staff Writer 



Ever get tired of eating peanut 
butter and jelly sandwiches three 
times a day, five days a week 
because of a lack of money or 
better things to do? 

Your gluey mouthed days are 
over.... 

Arlene Jones, A Palm Beach 
County Extension Home Econo- 
mist, will answer all of your 
problems for the asking. 

Many students shop on the 
most inexpensive budget they 
can, but this may lead to a pseudo 
disease called "hidden hunger." 

"The selection is inexpensive 
but actually it might cause poor 
health," said Jones, who believes 
that nutrition should be the basis 
of any food plan, whether 
luxurious or penny-wise. 

"When you go to a store 
hungry, you buy what your eye 
wants," she said. "You can lose 
money this way and not get a 
proper diet." 

Jones suggested that shopping 
lists be made before stepping foot 



into a grocery stortgt 
should be built «roundj4 
specials, menus for th|4 
possible leftovers. \\ 

"A breakdown of tig 
always wise to eiifbtljf 
diet," she said. Twetp 
alloted for the milk 
category; 25 cents foij 
vegetables; 25 cents fffl 
cents for breads an 
(enriched or whole gri 
cents for fats and swees 

I 

Meat, cheese and |d 
vegetables should beiy 
the weight instead offs 
worth" or by the piecelg 
to literature preparer 
Florida Agricultural In 
Service. ; 

Fresh fruit stands cu'a 
good buy "if you rfe 
quality." "However, iu 
consider the gas it talso 
a standvitwiigjv.flat *?*' 
Jones stated. 

In season, fresh td 
vegetables are usui'e 
economical than canrh 
fruits can be used an 
substitutes in almost il 

"Most surveys 4* 



people don't eat enough dark 
green vegetables," said Jones. 
"They can be cooked in a variety 
of ways, both plain and in 
, casseroles. When serving the 
vegetable itself, it can be cooked 
in a covered pan with a small 
amount of water until tender. 
After cooking, the water can be 



used in soups, gravies and 
sauces." 

Vegetable casseroles can inclu- 
de almost all of the basic 
requirements for a balanced meal 
by adding such ingredients as 
tuna, noodles and a cream sauce. 

Whenever possible, the Exten- 
sion Service suggests buying 



large quantities of sugar, flour, 
cornmeal, rice, beans, nonfat dry 
milk and coffee to save money. A 
large turkey or ham can also 
provide savings if you cook for 
more than one person where 
leftovers will be used and not 
wasted. 
As milk is an important 



supplement to your diet, it should 
be served as a beverage or as part 
of cooked food in every meal. 
Nonfat dry milk is cheap but 
perhaps not as tasty as regular 
skim milk. Serving it as cold as 
possible can improve the taste or 
it can be mixed with an equal part 
of skim milk. 



iSISOUSM^aBHjXra^XHZXHBVM:^^ 



Whatever your likes or dislikes 
may be, it is important that 
nutrition be provided for. 

To obtain more information on 
a variety of "penny-wise 
recipes," write: Florida Coopera- 
tive Extension Service, 531 North 
■Military Trail, West Palm Beach, 
Fl.. 33406. 



=SHH53K3mSK5*'3S»B'Ca«388B8S 



The Pirouetting Silhouette Flies 



"Average" Facade Sets Stage For Anonymity 



By Ross Thomas 
Staff Writer 

Somebody's always got an answer. 
When 1 was a mere tad of a boy, I 
approached my mother with that universal 
plea for relief. "Nobody likes me." She 
tf>!d me not to sweat it, that everybody 
hadn't met me yet. 

Unsatisfied with that reply, I gathered 
up my few worldly goods and made the 
hmg and dangerous pilgrimage to seek the 
mnh from that ancient, venerable sage of 
stages, the school guidance counselor. 
Kneeling dose by her so 1 could catch the 
full breadth of her wisdom 1 heardher say, 
"My son, my son. Though the universe 
beholds with living eyes the beautv and toil 
involved in the sculpture of solid granite, is 
iw-t the "Pet Rock" infinitely more 
accessible, not to mention more profitable, 
in the e*!H! of the public eve?" I told her 
mat I didn't quite catch her drift. She said, 

D»g a ise > t wjrseif as a normal person . ' " 



It took me weeks of pondering to 
understand the full gist of what she had 
Mid, but when 1 finally did. I was 
overwhelmed. "Disguise yourself as a' 
normal person" hit me like a brick in the 
face. The reason no one liked me was 
because I was weird, and therefore 
presented a challenge to the day-in, 
day -out routine that had been so carefully 
built up over the years. I was the proverbial 
throne under the saddle. 

I set out immediately to change my 
ways. I obtained a new wardrobe, complete 
with cuffed pants, Alligator shirts and 
tassle "weejuns." I listened to top-forty 
and ate at the Golden Arches. I put ketchup 
on everything. I started reading TV Guide 
and watched all the top shows. I even 
learned how to smfle when 1 wasn't happy. 

So the transition Was complete. I was 
now accessible and I began to see results 
almost immediately. My fellow students 
now associated with me and my teachers 
stopped giving me F's in roll-call. I was no 



longer being busted by the school safety 

patrol. Whatllikedbest, however, was that" """"" ,! """""M'»iiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiw 



nrore!m!lasxTFs^iiar 



■U 
even TBanaeoniie 
don't dislike you. 

That made me sad. She didn't dislike 
me. That wasn't a very strong reaction, but 
then how could she flip head over heals for 
someone who was just a likeness, and a 
lesser likeness at that, of someone else? At 
least in the old days she would have had an 
opinion of me one way or another, although 
itwould have probably been along the lines 
of "Is this guy for real?" But at least 
people knew I existed. 

So I went back to being my old rowdy, 
ill-dressed and rude self, and I'm still at it 
today. It seems like I'm not alone anymore 
either. Just check out the halls for weirdos 
some day or, better yet, check out the 
mirror. It is truly heartening to me to see a . «m 

s^ht^umS? "° Ut ° f *■" ThCre !S " "~»» * 




By Francis Poulscn 

Staff Writer 

On Saturday, August 14, 1976 a 

sight appeared which proved to 

be a feast for the eyes, the ears 

and the spirit. 

I was at Juno Beach, a lonely, 
lovely stretch of land and was 
gazing alternately at the sea and 
the sky, indulging in my favorite 
pasttlme — marveling at the 
beauty around me and contem- 
plating the vastness that is the 
ocean. Suddenly, the sound of an 
engine at full throttle crashed 
through my tranquility. The noise 
came with overpowering force 
and with startling effect. 

The source of this earth-shat- 
tcrning noise was a very small, 
red bl-plane. My eyes followed it 
moving across the sky, before 
turning around and coming back 
to put on a show and delight the 
senses. And what a show it was to 
bel 

The plane shot straight up at 
full throttle, all the while making 



complete turn-overs — doing 
somersaults in the air before 
wheeling around to plummet 
straight down toward the ocean 
with the engine at full speed. A 
mere instant before falling into 
the sea, the engine became silent 
— a dead dive — for a second's 
time. Inches from the water's 
surface, however, the plane shot 
upward again In a straight course 
to the sky. 

The craft continued its swirling 
action, turning over and over 
again and again, flying upside 
down for sustained periods. Once 
again it shot straight up, twisting 
and turning, once more changing 
course and diving at full speed. 
Again, seconds from the water, 
silence broke over the deserted 
ocean and fell upon my ears, only 
to be resumed when the plane 
changed course and went straight 
up again. 

It was a thing of beauty to see 
and experience its happy flight, It 
made me feel happy; It was 



reminiscent of an eagle soaring, 
pleased and proud of itself. 
I could only marvel at the skill 



with which the pilot handled his 
plane. What control he exercised 
over that inanimate object, which 



seemed only to live for me and 
delight me through Its beckoning 
power. 




Batman And "The Boy Wonder," Re-Visited 



%i 



So, You Want To Get Away From Home? 



n 



By Don Vaughan 
Staff Writer 
Like most people in this 
country, I grew up watching 
television. I missed the so-called 
"Golden Age" of television 
(1954-1960) thanks to my parents, 
who were firm believers in 
planned parenthood. I never saw 
Pinky Lee, Uncle Milty or Ernie 
Kevaks; my era being more the 



likes of "Route 66," "My Three 
Sons," and "The Munsters." But 
the one show that sticks so firmly 
in my mind is "Batman." 
Producer William Dozier struck 
Neilson Gold with campy series, 
and within three episodes every 
kid who owned a television could 
be seen flaunting a Batman 
tee-shirt or some such piece of 
Bat-paraphernalia. 



// 



By Gal Siwplsertt 
Staff Write 
Et«at*at> &H rf m reach the 
ps** when *e ate ready t« break 
free «f pmremtti ties Mid" mrte oat 
•mi #«r wb. 

S*«e «f as. reach ifci* point 
write- dint mhet%, Sftwe ef m 
*mM «* er reads it *: A j w»h-nit 

i'.. ti tV.T p . irh." fc>r U* 

: «• " . •,'".- :,; jr^ K ea . 

-~ " * •"* * <-* ' -i* 1:: r . 

' » " — * - " * M , - . 

•■ • '" 'w how the« viHgtld (ale 

*«*«**»*. v.«nw*v w 1 pa^ed m \ 
m^tdh jF-u4fcmu.ni m M^rtx}. *} 

prepartij a nmfuiit ta.ifut 

*p*n.n tjt m\ mu tair . 

"MjiKf fir*** wsrw:!!.*' 1 
tfews^h f kiurw rH.w to handle her. 
I wtMiid b* turn, but gentle. When 

*h*: mu»- bvm.lt » s my f tct mA 

' -'*".*.-'• , a • « 



out." I braced myself for the 
onslaught of tears that would be 
forthcoming. 1 held my breath. 

" "That's wonderful dear. 

"I think that moving out will be 
a rewarding experience," she 
said with enthusiasm. "Why, I 
remember the first time I left 
boose." 

"If you think that you can talk 
®» ®ut of this you're deluding 
yourself. 

"Well, if you're sure this ts 
what you want, I won't stand ta 
your way." 

1 . T^:a:ub*.4i2 m>*elf <m the 
•'•-. Id' dvil.-i her.' I had Js'« in 



'.in*; 



rm- 

off 



■•• ; a r> : -v. ;;. t r.d. J ! 
" * **> " "V -J- ii;U r. 
: • " ... i.:"-v Mly. 

» \..z'\ z 'a'.c *,. > ::"j v 'i trouble 
..j:".:n^ :*••. :.. >• t ^st*s t.»" Nvks 
y ^ * 7.-e H.&:..- i ' 5 f> Lip |,ur flii>n»s 
^ : -"j '• :ru: I...3 to nty apartment. 
i '.ik-.- an-jj'iT'j inner strength. 
V - a as I dis-uragcd when 1 
found that I'd left my kev on the 



kitchen counter at home; I am 
relatively good at picking locks. I 
was undaunted by the thermostat 
registering 103 degrees in my 
new bedroom; I was prepared to 
make sacrifices in my quest for 
freedom. 

Later that day my friend Billy 
came over to see my new place. I 
proudly escorted him through the 
two rooms and bathroom I 
flushed the toilet. I ran the water 
«n the kitchen sink. I mar ]i v . 
switched lights on w,d off I 
demonstrated the virtues of ray- 
gas stove. 

"See? Everyflfeg works! Isn't 
it marvelous?" 

"Ms." said Billy. "How can 
you live in this dett?" 

"Oh come on," I urge<3> «,j t 
«sa t so bad. A few plants, a 
couple of strategically placed 
beaiibag chairs..." 

"Maybe you should have 
stayed home," he said doubtful- 
Iv, 



"No, maybe you should have 
stayed home," 1 said, showing 
him the door. 

I was hit with a new burst of 
energy. Boy, was I going to slap 
that place into shape. I'd show 
them all. I was convinced that my 
new home had potential, despite 
the peeling walls and the leak in 
the ceiling. By the time I'd 
frntsbed r d have llHonse 
Beautiful" begging me- for 
interviews. If I could just do> 
something with those flourescent 
pink curtains. 

There wa-ilfcbill from FPL in my 

rhdn-; The> . inf r edmeth ^ 

naont paid them $92.50 bv 
«p that I would be cut off (S 
OH ' ' m t0 ° young to die! Whirh 

nrst, Would they start at the ton 
^d work their way jj™ 4 gJ 

W °«W they be satisfied with a 
wmple arm or a leg? I JJ1 1 

^t of the day keeiina . P he 
y Ke eplng a nervous 



watch out the window for the man 
•n the grey uniform with the 
revolver in his belt. 

That night I called home. My 
sister answered the phone. 

<( "Hi!" I screamed jovially. 

'How are you all getting along 

without me so far? Any problems 

yet?" ^ 

"PROBLEMS ?" she screech- 
ed. "Yeah, I've got problems. My 
number- one problem is that when 
you packed yourclothes, you took 
ninety per cent of m y wardrobe ! " 
She started to babble hysterically 
and I decided to leave her alone 
for awhile. She was obviously 
overwhelmed with grief at my 
leaving home. Maybe moving out 
hadn't been such a good idea 
after all. Maybe my little sister 
would be lost without my 
guidance. I called back an hoar 
later. "Mom," I said, "Brace 
yourself. I' m coming back 
home." 




SCENE: THE BATCAVE, HOME 
OF THE LEGENDARY DYNAM- 
IC DUO. BATMAN IS REPAIR- 
ING THE BATMOBILE BECAU- 
SE NO GARAGES ARE OPEN 
ON SUNDAY. THE PHONE 
RINGS. 

BATMAN: That sounds like the 
Hotline, Robin. Would you 
answer it? I'm a bit busy trying to 
keep this crummy car from falling 
on me. 

ROBIN: Sure, Batman! Uh, which 
phone is the Hotline? 
BATMAN: The one with 
"Hotline" written on it, old 
chum. 

(Momentarily) ROBIN: Holy 
Dick Tracy, Batman! That was 
Comissioner Gordon 1 Someone 
just stole the invaluable Maltese 
Dodad from the Gotham City 
Museum of Mundane Art. 
BATMAN: Were there any clues? 
ROBIN: Only a note saying 
"We've got the Dodad now, so 
pthththth." 

BATMAN: The fiends! Come on, 
Robin, to the Commissioner's 
office! ,,-'„.„ 

Then came the part where 
Batman and Robin get to 
Commissioner' Gordon's office by 
climbing up tliPwall. You knew 
right away that they "were walking 
upright and that the camera was 
tilted, but it looked neat anyway. 
BATMAN:' Come on, Robin, old 
friend, we can get to Commis- 
sioner Gordon's office faster if we 
use the Bat-ropes. 
ROBIN: Holy stupidity, Batman] I 
don't think that's such a neat 
idea! 



BATMAN: Why not, old chum? 
ROBIN: Because the Commis- 
sioner's office is on the first floor. 
And stop calling me "old chum!" 
I'm only supposed to be 18. 
BATMAN: The first floor, huh? 
Well, a grand entrance is a grand 
entrance. Through the window! 
COMMISSIONER GORDON; (AS 
BATMAN AND ROBIN PLUM- 
MET THROUGH THE CLOSED 
WINDOW) 

Why can't you guys use the 
door like everyone else? That's 
the third window this week! Why, 
if you two weren't do-gooders and 
forces against evil and stuff like 
that, I'd lock you both up and 
throw away the key! 
BATMAN: Sorry, Commissioner. 
I keep forgetting that you had to 
close the windows because of 
extensive pigeon damage to your 
Mr. Coffee machine. But what's 
the story on the stolen dodad? 

COMMISSIONER GORDON: 

Well, it seems that when the 
guard went to lunch he forgot to 
.-i^ock the door arid the thieves 
came in and swiped the dodad. 
They clogged up the water 
fountain, too. 

BATMAN: What? No ingenious 
tools of crime? No devilishly 
clever villians to contend . with? 
No death rays or super 
electro-magnets or hydrogen 
bazookas or nothin'? 
COMMISSIONER GORDON: 
Nope, that's it. Sorry. 

We skip the part where Batman 
finds, the villians' hideout through 
the use of his Bat-villian Hide-out 



Locator and stupidly gets 
captured, and come in as our two 
heroes are about to be clone away 
with in a typically villianous 
manner. 

VILLIAN: Okay, boys, today 
we're gonna have us a little target 
practice, only this time we have 
two special targets with 'us, 
Batman and Robin! 
BATMAN: Wait a second, Mr. 
Villian. I don't have a gun I 

VILLIAN: That's okay, in a 
second you won't need one. Now 
hush up and allow yourself to be 
plugged like a good boy. Ready, 
boys? One. , .two. ..three. .Fire! ! I 
A HAIL OF BULLETS FALL 
UPON OUR APPARENTLY 
DOOMED HEROES. THIS 
LOOKS LIKE THE END. BUT AS 
THE SMOKE CLEARS... 
BATMAN: Sorry, villians, but 
you failed to notice that Robin and 
I were wearing our non-flamm- 
able, bullet-proof Bat-Doctor 
Demons, right, Robin? Robin? 
Son of a gun, Robin forgot his 
Doctor Dentons! Well, no matter, 
'""because luckily I have my 
Bat-Robin Revivor! 
ROBIN: Holy Resurrection, 
Batman, thanks! I thought I was a 
goner there for a second. Let's 
wipe up this motley crew of FBI 
rejects and get back to the 
Batcave. It's time for mv 
Bat-Bosco! 

ANNOUNCER: Tune in next 
week, same Bat-time, same 
Bat-channel, as the Dynamic Duo 
find Commissioner Gordon guilty 
of accepting graft. 



6 - BEACHCOMBER Monday, Sept. 20, 1976 



Monday, Sept. 20, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 7 



campus combings 



Motor pools are being formed for those who need a ride and those 
who can share a ride from the north and south areas. Sign up in the 
SAC Lounge. 

Sign up for the Heart Risk Screening Test in AD-0. It doesn't hurt 
and it doesn't cost. So what's to lose? 

Wanted: Action people are needed on the Intramural and 
Recreation (I & R) Board. Interested in organizing, adminstration or 
supervision? We have a place for you in Intramurals. Be where the 
action is! Be a volunteer on the I & R Board. See Mr. Bell in 4k in 

the gym. 

"Practicing Nature Photography" will be taught at the Pine Jog 
Environmental Sciences Center, 6301 Summit Blvd., West Palm 
Beadh, starting Wednesday, Oct. 6, at 7:30 p.m. Registration for 
this course is $25.00 which includes all materials except a camera 
(no instamatics, please) and enrollment is limited to 16 people, so 
early registration is recommended. This 20 hour course, meeting 
Wednesday evenings and Saturday mornings in October, will be 
taught by Dick Gross, a Botany professor at JC. He was also a 
professional photographer. The course will include field and 
darkroom work as well as lectures and demonstrations. For 
additional information call Pine Jog at 686-6600. 

W.S. [Steve] Kals, well-known writer of boating books and articles, 
will teach an eight-week, Wednesday evening course in Navigation 
{Chart and compass and Basic Electronic) at JC beginning Sept. 22 
at 7:00 p.m. The course is designed to help the practical boatman 
select charts and other navigational materials, plot courses and take 
bearings, estimate distance and speed. Registration for this 524.00 
course will be held in the Science building, room SC-14 at 7:00 p.m. 
For more information about the course, contact the JC Continuing 
Education Office, 965-8006. 

JC will offer a 10-week Monday evening course in Basic Individual 
Income Tax starting Sept. 20 at 7:00 p.m. Details in preparing and 
filing individual returns will be included, as will the procedure of 
handling different types of tax returns by the IRS. Registration for 
this S30.00 course is scheduled for Sept. 20 at 7:00 p.m. in the 
science building, room SC-08. For further information, call the JC 
Continuing Education Office at %5-8006. 

Wills, Trusts and Estates, a six-week Wednesday evening course 
will be presented at JC starting Sept. 22. Registration for the $12.00 
course will be held in the Business Building, room BA-327, Sept. 22 
at 7-.G0p.rn. (The class tors torn 7 -.30-9 -/JO p.m. each We*aesa«#»jf« 
For further information, call the JC Continuing Education Office, 
965-8006. 



! 

JC Foundation To Raise Funds ■}' Pacers: The Nickname's Origin And Meaning 



Use The Beachcomber 

For Your Classifieds. 

Students Free . 



DR. JAMES MILES and helpers 
try to figure out which end of this 
sculpture is up. Art exhibits by 
Florida A & M is currently on 
display in the Humanities 
building. 



The cost of a college education, 
just about like anything else, has 
risen greatly in recent years. 

A drive is being launched by 
executive board and members of 
the Palm Beach County Scholar- 
ship Foundation (PBC) to raise 
more funds for scholarships 
because of this. 

According to scholarship chair- 
man, Paul J. Glynn, Vice 
President for Student Personnel, 
the Foundation has already 
distributed $25,150 to 51 
graduating JC sophomores in the 
past 12 years. 

"Today, the $500 and $600 



scholarships awarded by the 
Foundation don't go as far as they 
once did," Glynn pointed out. 

The PBC Scholarship Founda- 
tion has an interesting history. 

During 1963-64, the Palm 
Beach County Medical Associa- 
tion and the Jaycees of the county 
underwrote the cost of adminis- 
tering Sabin vaccine to immunize 
county residents against polio. 

These organizations requested 
donations from those participa- 
ting in the "Sabin on Sunday" 
program, to help defray the costs. 

"People responded so gener- 
ously, that after all the bills were 



"HIS END UP 

tAGILE 

WITH CARE 



Car Wash Scheduled 



Phi Theta Kappa is holding a car wash on Sept. 25 to raise money 
for the national convention of Delta Omicron that they are going to 
host. 

The car wash will be at the Phillips 66 station, 2115 Lake Worth 
Rd. Tickets can be bought from any member. 

The National Convention is to be staged at the Hilton Inn on 
Singer Island, Oct. 8,9 and 10. The theme is "Musical Language of 
it's own." 

The Club's newly elected officers are: President, Roosevelt 
O'Neal; Vice President, Kathleen Kenney; Secretary, Pam Saulsby; 
Treasurer, Gwendolyn Twiggs and Reporter Scott Schnurman. 



paid, there was $65,000 left 
over," according to a report from 
the late Dr. V.D. Stone, who was 
treasurer for the donated funds," 
Glynn explained. 

"The principle of the $65,000 
remains with all scholarships 
coming from investment earn- 
ings." 

Trustees Meet 

From page 1 
the Board voted to send the 
request to its Student Affairs 
Committee for study. 

In other action, JC President 
Dr. Harold Manor, announced his 
retirement effective September 
1978. He recommended a 
procedure to the Board for 
choosing his successor. 

The Board moved to have its 
administrative committee (o 
handle the matter. 

Fearing that JC could be held f 
liable for suits arising from the 4 
Swine Flu Injectiotrt*«%Btf^tKrV 
Board voted to withhold the fjfe^ 
donation of space until the 
liability situation is clarified. 

A position for an assistant v ff*' 
basketball coach was approved & "**« lf 
before the meeting adjourned. 



By Steve Farnsworth 
1 Associate Editor 

i what exactly is a Pacer? 
! The meaning of JC's athletic 
teams' nickname is one of the 
biggest mysteries on campus for 
most students, unless they're 
; from bluegrass country. 
S A Pacer is a kind of race horse 
^especially bred to pace, a gait in 
f Which horses run moving both 
* legs on one side forward together, 
I Jnd then both on the other side. 

1 Pulling a lightweight cart called 
J a sulky, and guided by a jockey 
I riding in the sulky, pacers are 




raced mainly in Kentucky and 
other northern states. 

Athletic Director Howard 
Reynolds said the name was 
picked in a contest held around 
1965 to choose a nickname for the 
school's intercollegiate sports. 

Recalling his reactions, Rey- 



nolds admitted being surprised 
by the choice because pacers are 
relatively unknown in this area. 

Some coaches and athletes are 
not entirely satisfied with the 
name, feeling it is blah and lacks 
the punch of names the 'Jaguars' 
or the 'Titans.' 

Reynolds said he personally 
wouldn't mind the name being 
changed if a better one could be 
found. Finding a better one, 
however, is another story. 

JC should have a distinctive 
nickname, one that ties in 
somehow with the area it serves. 



This eliminates the common ones 
such as Bears, Lions, Hawks, 
Wildcats, etc. 

Nicknames which reflect the 
area, unfortunately, are in short 
supply. Florida has the Gators, 
Miami has the Dolphins, Palm 
Beach Atlantic has the Sailfish, 
and so forth. This only leaves 
such names as the Mosquitoes, 
Man O' Wars, Possums, 
Raccoons, Armadillos and other 
strange animals. 

Using sources other than 
animals, a person gets the Palm 
Beach Tourists, Snobs, Palm 



Trees and worse. 

So, the more you think about it, 

the better the name Pacers looks. 

If you feel differently, and think 

you have a better one, drop by the 

Beachcomber office and leave a 

note. 
***************************** 

CORRECTION: In the Sept. 7 
issue, karate instructor Paul 
Ratanapasith was listed as a third 
degree black belt. The Beach- 
comber received the wrong 
information. Ratanapasith is 
actually a fifth degree black belt. 



Beachcomber 



•»*r* 






FORGING AHEAD- Pacer runners take the lead soon after the start of their exhibition meet. 

PHOTO BY BILL GULLION 



Cross-Country Team 
Excel In Exhibition 

By Jim Goodman 
Staff Writer 

Dominating its exhibition meet by taking second through fifth 
places, the cross-country team opened its season. 

Dade-North opposed JC in the practice meet, part of JC's 
cross-country clinic for high schools. Although the meet wasn't 
scored, the Pacers were clearly the winners. 

Carlos Ward, running unattached, led all runners over the 
sun-baked 5,2 mile John Prince Park course, winning in 26:24. 

Pacer runners took the next four places with Hassan El Abbiir 
finishing second with a time of 26:45. Tom Murdock was next, 
27:26, followed by Steve Farnsworth, 27:54, and Frank Grubeiy 
28:58. Other Pacer runners were Mike Arnold, 8th with 29:50, and 
Greg Ulseth, 9th with 30:24. 

Cross-country coach Dick Melear seemed pleased with his 
runners' performance. 

"Times were not real good today," he explained, "but it was 
ninety-two degrees out there. It was a good practice for us." 

The Pacers compete next in the Brcvard-Indian River Invitational 
Sept. 25, at Wickham Park in Melbourne. Ten teams are entered, 
headed by Miami-Dade South, the defending state champions. 



PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER 



Art Department Displays 
Sculpture By A&M's Williams 



PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER 



The works of six Florida A & M 
University Art Department facul- 
ty members will be on exhibition 
in the JC Humanities Building 
Gallery until Sept. 30, according 
to Dr. Jim Miles, JC Art 
Department chairman. 

Coordinator of the show, JC art 
instructor Jim Houser described 
the work of one artist. 

Chester L. Williams Ank-Her 
III is a dynamically spherical 
sculpture with elements of 
Baroque drama; his two paintings 



Freya and Spooning (Pictured 
above) are done in a generally 
hardi-edgsd technique, using 
bright colors. 

Williams, originally from North 
Carolina, received his B.A.De- 
gree from North Carolina Central 
University and his Master's of 
Fine Arts from the University of 
Michigan. 

His work has been exhibited in 
group and one-man shows 
throughout the country and is also 
in many private collections. 



Cheerleading Tryouts Continue 



Cheerleader tryouts are preceding smoothly with 10 women in 
attendance, although there's room for more. 

According to Dr. Howard Reynolds, athletic director, aspirants 
can still compete for a spot on the squad if they attend all the 
practices this week. Practices are held at 1:30 in the SAC lounge. 

Actual tryouts will be on Sept. 24 at 3:00 p.m. 

Cheerleaders are chosen for two years and promote school spirit, 
lead cheers during basketball season and serve as hostesses for 
tennis, golf and other sporting events. 

Reynolds is the faculty advisor with his wife serving as 
chaperone. 

— Jeannette Banning 



Men Golfers Open Season At Brevard 



Classifieds 



u 



LOSTs Diamond ring. Call Beth at 582-7908. Lost in the area of the 

first floor of the library. Reward offered. 

Female needs place to live. Liberal minded army veteran. Hotel 

restaurant major. Good cook. Clean. Twenty-one years of age and 

have own car. Call Karen Dake (Kitty) at 968-2131 or leave reply in 

Beachcomber office. 

1976 Red BMW 2002. Rust-proofing, great shape. Must sell. $300 

and take over payments. Call 683-1398. 

I0'4" O'Day Fiberglass sailboat. Crew of one or two. Roof racks 

included. Like new $225. Call 965-3088. 

Surfboards: 6'2" orange Fox winger, rounded pin; $85.00. 6'8" 

White Fox swallowtail; like new- $110.00. 7'2" white and blue Fox 

swallowtail- $55.00. Call 585-8896. 



By Dani Hayward 
Staff Writer 



JC's men's golf team initiates its fall season 
Sept. 20-21, competing in the Brevard 
Invitational tournament at the Admiralty Lake 
Golf Club in Rockledge, Florida. 

Pacer golf coach Joe Sancullius spent the past 
week holding four qualifying rounds at various 
golf courses around the county. The six men with 
the lowest four day scores qualified to play in the 
match. 

With three rounds completed the six Pacers 
leading, in descending order are: Brad Milam, 
Rich Fellenstein, Joe Nieporte, Ken Greene! 
Mike Mouw and Kim Swan. 

Milam, a sophomore, fired a 70-75-74 for a 
three round low score of 219. Freshman 
Fellenstein, attending JC on a West Palm Beach 
Men's Golf Association Scholarship, shot a 
68-78-76 for a fifty-four hole score of 222. 

Nieporte, in third position after the qualifying 
rounds, shot a 78-73-72 for a total score of 223. 
Following Nieporte was freshman Ken Greene 
shooting a 76-72-76 for a total of 224. Recently, 
Greene finished fourth in the Palm Beach County 
Men's Amateur Gold Championships at Palm 
Beach National Golf and Country Club. 

In fifth position is sophomore Mike Mouw with 



a 226, shooting a 70-76-80 for the individual 
rounds. 

Both Greene and Mouw currently attend JC on 
a scholarship, according to Sancullius 

Rounding out the six after the first three 
rounds is freshman Kim Swan, who led the first 
round with a 67, fell to 76 for the second day and 
85 for the third, giving him a total score of 228. 

Swan, from Bermuda, successfully defended 
his Junior Championship in Bermuda last year. 

"He's one of our top golfers," Sancullius said. 

Offering a battle for the top six positions were 
Dan Miller, Randy Cropp, Mike Mortel and Rich 
Smith, John Morast and Todd Runnells. 

"Cropp had a bad day, shooting a 80 for the 
second round" .Sancullius said. "He scored a 74 
and 78 for the other rounds." 

"Martel was our Mr. Consistent, shooting a 
78-78-79 for a 235 total," he added. 

Also competing were Carlos Rodriquez, Dan 
Fitzgerald and Rich LeMaire. Fitzgerald is the 
younger brother of last year's captain and most 
valuable golfer, Emmet Fitzgerald. 

"We're going into a huzzsaw," Sancullius 
said. "One of our competitors is Brevard 
Community College, the national junior college 
champions. 

"I think we'll come in the top third," 
Sancullius forecast. "We've got the depth and 
desire to win." 



8 - BEACHCOMBER Monday, Sept. 20, 1976 







HOMEWARD BOUND- Jeff Palmer toys to slide Into home as Scott Benedict waits to make the tag during 

an intersquad game. photo by barrv van wagner 



Big Team Boosts 
Baseball Hopes 



By Steve Farnsworth ; 

Associate Editor I 

If numbers equal success, then the baseball team is going to win at 
lot of games this year. [.- 

Walk-on tryouts on Aug. 30 attracted 42 players, of which 15 havet 
survived cuts so far. Counting regular team members, *, 
approximately 35 men are on the roster now. 

Although the team is usually reduced to around 20 men by winter 
term, Coach Dusty Rhodes said future cuts will be hard to make. 

"There's so many good ballplayers," he stated, "that it's tough 
to decide who to keep and who to let go. " 

Rhodes said that this year's team, besides being the largest, is 
also the fastest and the best all-round he's coached at JC. 

An experienced pitching staff is one of the team's strongest 
points. Sophomores Bob Charron, Mark Cleveland, Harry Cook, 
Ted Doss and Andy Giannini all played last year, with Cleveland, 
Cook and Doss winning five games each. 

For offensive power, Rhodes is looking to Eric Keller and Ron 
Woods. Keller, a .330 hitting third baseman, won second team 
All-State honors last year, while Woods was a clutch hitter, coming 
through when the Pacers needed him. 

Baseball opens its fall season Sept. 25 with a home doubleheader 
against Indian River. The game will begin at noon. On Oct. 1 they 
play the University of Miami at Miami, and on Oct. 2 they haveja 
away game at Indian River. --;..■»■'"" *~* 



Sports Calendar- 



Softball Players, Scuba Divers Needed 



By Robbin Barber 
Staff Writer 

The Intramural program got underway with 
Softball, karate, scuba, sailing and bowling. 

Co-ed softball had a meeting on Sept. 7 in the gym 
at 2:30 p.m. It is hampered by a lack of participants. 
Roy Bell, intramural director, is hoping clubs will 
enter teams. Anyone interested in playing softball 
must fill out an entry form in this week's 
Beachcomber. 

Karate had a large turnout with approximately 30 
students working out three times a week. 
Second-year students are helping the first-year 
students develop kada, a routine of movements. 

Karate Club students can earn Presidential Sports 
Awards. In order to qualify for this award a student 
must do the following: 

• Practice karate : skills a minimum of 50 hours, 

« At least 30 of the 50 hours must be under the 



supervision of a qualified instructor. 

credited to the total. 

There were a number of no-shows in the crowd 
that signed up for the Scuba Club. There are still 
several openings left. Next class is on Sept. 20 in the 
gym at 3:00 p.m. The fee is $20.00 for seven weeks. 

The Sailing Club is going to meet on Sept. 20 in 
the gym at 2:30 p.m. regardless of the weather. 

Forty-eight students are entered in 14 bowling 
teams. The leading men's team are the "Atioma's" 
with 1852 pins. The women are led by the "Inlaws" 
with 1672 pins. There are still openings for anyone 
wishing to enter the teams. Bowling meets Sept. 22 
at 4:00 p.m. at Major League Lanes in Lake Worth. 

The Intramural Board is still looking for 
volunteers to work on the board. First semester 
freshmen are preferred but anyone would be 
appreciated. 



Sept. 21 
Sept. 20-21 



VOLLEYBALL 

Dade South, Dade North 

GOLF 

Brevard Invitational 



CROSS-COUNTRY 

Sept. 25 Brevard-Indian River Invitational 



BASEBALL 



6:00 p.m. gym 
at Rockledge 
at Melbourne 




Intramurals Bowling Results 



Men' 


s High 


Team 


Anoma 




1852 


Chargers 




1847 


BIu Max 




1798 


Vikings 




1614 


? Marks 




1600 


Jaws 




1566 


Mooners 




1477 


OK's 




1424 



Women's High Team 

Inlaws J 

190 White Lightnings 1 

Beauties ) 

Anything'U Do 1 

Catch Ups i 



TEAM ENTRY FORM 
CO-ED SOFTBALL 



Team Name- 



Team Manager . 



Team Members (Please List) 



Team limit is 12 per team. Entry must be turned in by 
3:00 p.m. at Organizational Meeting Sept. 22, 1976 in 
Rm, PE/6 Gymnasium. 

For students interested in being drafted on a softball 
team should fill out Draft entry. 



I wish to be drafted on a 
softball team (Signed ) 



Phone . 






Voice of the Palm Beach Junior College Student 

Vol. 38 No. 3 Sept. 27, 1976 Lake Worth, Fla. 33461 

Swine Flu Vaccinations Suspended 




By Mary Lavers 
Staff Writer 

On March 24 President Ford 
announced the planning of a mass 
vaccination program "to innocu- 
late every man, woman and child 
in the United States" in an effort 
to prevent possible spreading of 
the disease, Swine Flu. 

A vaccination program center 
was scheduled to start operations 
at JC next month, but the 
program may be delayed or 
rejected, because of the college's 
possible "liability" in adminis- 
tering the vaccine, according to 
Dean Paul Glynn. 

A spokesman for JC explained 
that Dr. Harold Manor, JC 
president, brought to the 
attention of the Board of Trustees 
an article in which Attorney 
General Robert Shevin was 
quoted. Shevin said that state 
agencies (which would include 
JC) would be liable for damages 
even though the federal govern- 



ment had assumed the primary 
liability. 

"This means a limited liability 
of up to $50,000," the spokesman 
said. He added that the Board of 
Trustees had voted three to one in 
favor of "postponing participa- 
tion in the program until there 
was further clarification of the 
college's possible liability. This is 
the last that I have heard, but 
this does not mean that we will 
not do it," he said. 

Glynn said that the college's 
physical facilities for the program 
had been "tenatively set up." 
"However," he added, "if 
Shevin is right, there goes the 
whole program in the state." 

Swine flu revived itself in 
January of this year, when Pvt. 
David Lewis of Ft. Dix, N.J., 
came to his dispensary complain- 
ing of a headache, sore throat, 
stuffy nose and a low grade fever. 



He was told to stay in bed for 48 
hours but instead he joined his 
fellow recruits on a tiring march. 
A short time later he died. 



It was later determined that 
Lewis, as well as four other men, 
suffered from "swine flu," a 
descendant of the "Spanish 
influenza" that killed more than 
500,000 Americans and some 20 

million people worldwide in 

1918-19. 

"Symptoms of influenza often 
come on suddenly and may 
include some or all of the 
following: fever, chills, headache, 
dry cough and soreness and 
aching in the back and limbs," 
according to the Department of 
Health, Education and Welfare. 

"Fever seldom lasts more than 
several days, although the patient 
may continue to feel weakened for 
several days to a week or more." 



Heart Tests Ending Soon 






PHOTO BY GREG ROBERT!. 

MAYBE LATER- This may occur soon at JC after legal snarls. 



HEART RISK SCREENING 
A I r*^, «*-«.•-+ PROGRAM- Despite dor- 

/KnnUai \*OnCen mant scene, many took- 

advantage of this free and 

Slated For Fall useMservIce 



By John Childers 

A Heart Risk Screening Factor Program will be in 
the SAC lounge three more days, Tues. thru Thurs. 
of this week. 

Co-sponsored by the Heart Association and 
Visiting Nurse Association, the program is staffed 
by Marge Adams from VNA, and a registered 
visiting nurse. Volunteers, sometimes club 
members, compile remaining helpers. 

"This is an excellent screening program for heart 
trouble," says counselor Helen Diedrich. 

Health history, height, weight, and blood 
pressure are the first three sections of the test. Next, 
inside the testing unit, your electrocardiogram will 
, be checked to see if it's within normal limits (WNL) 
or outside normal limits (ONL). Last, a sample of 
blood is tested for sugar, cholesterol and triglyceride 
content. The process takes about fifteen minutes, 



delays seldom occur. A rolling vein might cause a 
hangup. They handle four people every fifteen 
minutes. 

"It went very smoothly," said Dr. Ottis Smith, 
tested Thurs. 23. "They were really couteous as 
they took a little blood sample and the routine blood 
pressure," he added. 

You must fast twelve hours before the test. Only 
water, black coffee and medication can be taken. 

Project reports mailed to you are strictly 
confidential and give statistics only. Workers are not 
qualified to give specific medical advice. - 

Men are to be tested Tuesday, women 
Wednesday, with a split group Thursday. A fifteen 
minute delay splits the shift because you're tested 
with your upper wraps off. 

' 'This program is really good because we've found 
some people who hadn't been aware of any 
trouble," said Diedrich. 



By Sharon McTyre 
Staff Writer 

' With the first days of school 
passing so fast, many students 
may be ^wondering when the 
knowledge they have accumula- 
ted will be put to test. 

The Music Dept. is well on its 
way to the time when that test will 
be given. On Sunday, Oct. 24, at 
3:00 p.m. the band, choir, 
orchestra and the Pacesetters will 
combine to present the Annual 
Scholorship Concert. 

As the name connotes the 
proceeds from the event will be 
used to benefit music students. 

Although the test is still a 
month away, don't wait until the 
last minute to cram it on to the 
calendar. Circle the date now, 
and remember it as an 
opportunity to appreciate the 
sounds of good music. 







SG Planning Friday Movies 

By Debbie Lockhart 
Copy Editor 

"Friday Night At the Movies" at JC provides students with a chance 
for free entertainment; a chance that few students took advantage of last 
year. 

According to SG President Andrea Stebor the hold-up in presenting 
movies this term is caused by a "difficulty in obtaining movies." 

"But," stated Stebor, "as soon as we (SG) are able to get any movies, 
the movie night will again be offered free to students." 

SG wants to show movies with "drawing power." 

Hugh Lambert, SG vice president, feels that they should get "one or 
two really good movies (i.e. "Tommy," "Jaws," "The Man Who Fell to 
Earth, ' ') and work on getting a lot of students there to watch them. ' '- 

"Maybe if we show a few popular movies instead of a lot of not so 
popular ones there will be a good student turn-out." 

Andrea Stebor, SG president, says that a lot of help is needed with 
productions. 

i 

"If anyone has any suggestions for movies, etc., please see me in the 
SG office," stated Stebor. 

"We need all the help we can get." 



Citizenship Day Voter Turnout Wei I Above Anticipation 



During the observance of Citizenship Day, Sept. 
17, there were 244 new registered voters, according 
to Edwin V. Pugh, chairman of JC's Bicentennial 
Committed. 

This figure breaks down into 149 Democrats, 62 
Republicans, 4 Independent and 29 No Party. 
The Voter Registration Bus received new voters in 



an area north of the Registrar's office and a team 
from the League of Women Voters took registrations 
in the cafeteria. 

SG provided free soft drinks to the new voters. 

"It's very encouraging to know that such a large 
number registered" stated Pugh. "This brings the 
total of voters registered during the Fall Term to 
392." 



Wiggins, Mitchell! Visit P. 2 

Fast Food Chains P. 4 & 5 



Volleyball Team 1-1 p 6 




wmmmm am 



2-BEACHCOWBER Monday, Sept 27, 1976 




Galleon Editor Announced 



f 



3-BEACHCOMBErVMonday, Sept: 27, 1976 



By Cindy McCarthy 
News Editor 
Editors for the 76-77 Galleon 
yearbook have been appointed by 
advisor John Correll. 

They are: Editor-Sandra Koud- 
ehk, Assoc. Ed.- David Southard, 
Layout Ed.- Brenda Shire, Photo 
Ed.-Jimmy DiVatili and Copy 
Ed.- John Childers. 

Correll, a graphics arts 
instructor, has been named as 



advisor, replacing Dr. Miles from 
last year. 

Galleon will be combining with 
Media, the literary magazine. 
However, at this time it is not 
known how the merge will be 
handled. Media may be included 
directly in the yearbook or in a 
separate publication. 

Like last year, the Galleon will 
be published in two volumes. One 
each at the end of the fall and 
winter terms. These volumes are 



in magazine form, like ftople ! 
Magazine. \ 

Articles appearing in the i 
yearbook will reflect on student I 
life, individual activities and ' 
events on campus. 

Editor Sandra Koudelik says, • 
"We need contributing writers. '; 
All those interested can contact I 
us Mondays and Wednesdays ' 
2:30 - 3:30 in the Galleon office I 
(SP5) or Fridays 1:00- 3:00 in Hu \ 
52." I 



1 ■***^t*«4^au 8 ijj|^S|^ig^ v " 



rAIri! „„ . M „„ PHOTO BY BILL GULLION 

GALLEON ADVISOR. John Correll contemplates future of JC's 
yearbook and possible literary Magazine. 

Clubs Fund Rush Parties 
First Gathering Successful 

Since JC currently has only one 

sorority (Philo) the ICC/got 

involved. The result: this term's 

party was sponsored not only by 

Philo, but also Circle-K, the 

Engineering and the Science 

Clubs. These organizations put 

up money that they have earned 

during the past year, in the hopes 

of recruiting new members. 

There is no obligation to join 
any club by going to a Rush party. 
They are meant strictly for 
enjoyment purposes. 

The first '76 party was a 
success and a typical example of 
what ■ Rush .-©a^i^^fiM^giiliisfe. 
second party was held this past 
weekend. 



Gameroom Future Gloomy 
Decision Upcoming Soon 



By Lisa Ostberg 

Rush parties are a tradition 
here at JC. They are parties held 
at the beginning of each semester 
in an attempt to encourage 
students to join campus social 
groups. 

The first party of the '76 Fall 
Term was held on Friday, Sept. 
17, at the Greenbriar Apartments 
Clubhouse in West Palm Beach. 

According to Tom Solder, 
Inter-Club Council (ICC) chair- 
man, approximately 250 students 
attended. "A good time was had 
by all. Most people make new 
friends they otherwise wou\d, not 
have met in their classes," Solder 
noted. 



By Debbie Lockhart 
Copy Editor 

Last year's closing of JC's 
gameroom (located in the North 
SAC Lounge) was accompanied 
by much controversy, as well as 
an overwhelming display of 
student interest. 

Petitions were formed by 
students to prevent the termina- 
tion of the gameroom, which was 
equipped with two pool tables and 
a few pinball machines. 

The reason that SG decided to 
shut-down the gameroom was 
because the American Music 
Company was not fulfilling the 
agreement they made with SG. 
As a result, the gameroom was 



closed down, much to the dismay 
of many students. 

But there may be hope yet. 

According to Andrea Stebor, 
SG president, the executive board 
discussed the possibility of 
reopening the gameroom at the 
Sept. 21 meeting of SG's Senate. 

Stebor explained that if they 
reopen the gameroom they (SG) 
will purchase the necessary 



equipment themselves. j 

"This way," stated Stebor, [■■ 

"anything that we make will be f 

ours." j 

Stebor didn't know when the s 
plans for the gameroom would f 
become effective. I; 

At the present tirns Afcf " 
gameroom is being used as a 
meeting place for various clubs 
'and organizations. 



Mitchell And Wiggins Visit JC; 
Help Writers At North Campus 



Bv John Douglas 
Staff Writer 



Ron Wiggins and Steve 
Mitchell, humor columnists for 
the Palm Beach Post, came to the 
north JC campus to talk with 
English 101 classes about 
effective writing. 

Wiggins said, in order to get 
the reader's attention, shock or 
surprise them in the first few 
sentences. He also added you 
should write as though you were 
talking to a good friend. 

Advice from Mitchell was to 
read a lot of good writings by well 
known authors and incorporate 
them into your own style. 

Both Wiggins and Mitchell 
started out as reporters and 
worked their way up. They said to 
use your imagination and express 
your ideas in detail. 




COLUMNIST- Steve 
Mitchell comes to JC 
North to speak on 
writing to several eng- 
lish classes. 

PHOTO BV JOHN DOUGLAS 




PHOTO BY GREG ROBERTS 



Blood Drive Date Revealed 



The' Palm Beach County Blood 
Bank along with JC's Sales and 
Marketing Club (DECA) are 
scheduling their blood drive on 
Sepi. 29, from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 
p.m. 

The blood drive is an annual 

,, attempt to maintain JC's blood 

„i bank reserve account, one of the 

^ largest in the county. Prior to the 

drive JC's credit balance is over 

700 donations. 

These reserve accounts assure 



JC students and thetr r„ ;■ 

blood when they are^ne/^r 

Jhe actual blood collected from 
I ednvew.ll be used before the 

21 day limit of storage. However 
JC is to be credited. 

The actual blood collected from 
the drive w.ll be used before the 
21 day hrmt of storage. However 
JC is to be credited with over 950 
pints, f deca reaches their goal 
ot 150 pints this drive. 



VETERANS 

October 8th Is The Final Day For Paying 
Fall Semesters Fee Deferments. 
You Must Clear Your Accounts At The 

Cashier's Office By 3:30 P.M. FRIDAY 
Or Your Fall Registration Will Be 
Cancelled. 



Editorials 



KenBreslauer 



Jerry And Jimmy Guest columnist 



Personality, or the lack of it, 
once again seems to push aside 
the issues in this year's 
presidential election. 

Recent reforms in government, 
brought about by the revelations 
of Watergate, were expected to 
bring a new level of political 
awareness to the American 
people. But once again issues are 
being pushed"" aside I for „ -the ■ 
irrelevant trivia of the candidates. 
This can be blamed on the, media, 
the candidate^ #rrd. their sj;yles'-«5f<; 
campaigning;" ''••-'' '*"■<..'■•' ..' 

Jimmy Carter, the easy talking 
southerner, constantly reminds 
us in his rhetoric of his peanut 
farming, God-loving, toothbrush- 
ing days in Georgia. President 
Ford, meanwhile, stumbles his 
way into the past recalling his 
football days at Michigan, still 
insisting he did wear a helmet 
when he played. 

What about the issues? You 
remember — inflation, unem- 
ployment, crime, etc. 

The big news on the 
Republican side still seem to be 
whether or not Jack smokes pot, 
Susan is having an affair and if 
Jerry can walk and chew gum at 
the same time. 

Meanwhile, Carter aides con- 
centrate on covering up ethnic 



Forum 




purity, an evangelistic sister and 
whether or not Jimmy's teeth can 
pass the high beam headlight test 
at an auto inspection station. 
More attention has been given to 
family and friends of the two 
candidates, then that of the 
nominees themselves. 

Back in the White House, our 
President was trying to figure out 
'what to do with 50 million WIN ; 
buttons (Whip Infktion-Now). 
Anything to top Plains, Georgia. 

* ".Fortunately,' a persistent news 
media and a small group of voters 
have pressed for the issues AND 
answers. A significant develop- 
ment occurred when Carter and 
Ford agreed to meet on national 
TV for three debates. These 
debates could be a deciding factor 
in the election. 

Hopefully, each candidate will 
expound on the platforms 
adopted by their respective 
conventions. Perhaps the Ameri- 
can electorate will have a chance 
to hear the issues and not just the 
personalities the campaigns 
portray. 

When we realize we are not 
voting for a "nice guy" or a 
"bright smile," then we can elect 
a president on what counts-the 
issues. Don't forget the great job 
we did in 1972! 



Denny Glavin 
Editor 



Students as JC are in the 
process of being silenced again. 

The student Activity Fee 
Committee (SAFC) was sched- 
uled for their first meeting on 
Sept. 4. No meeting to this date 
has taken place. 

The SAFC is one of the few 
committees left where student 
input is essential to its operation. 

It seems that this is just 
another in the many ways an 
administration can keep students 
from having a say in where their 
monies go. 

It started when the Board of 
Trustee's forced Ron Buckley, 
last year's SG president, to be 



censored as to the availability of 
the Board to meet with students 
at the monthly meeting. 

Now this problem. But just 
where does the fault lie? 

One administrator noted that 
he didn't have the proper figures 
on student enrollment. (They 
were known by Aug. 24 of this 
year.) 

What happened to the 
meeting? 

It seems logical that the 
student would be interested 
where his money goes. Saving the 
SAFC meetings and restoring 
them to something more than 
"shouting matches" would be a 
start. 






Beachcomber 

Palm Beach Junior College 
4206 S. Congress Ave., Lake Worth, Fla 33461 

(305) 965-8000, ext. 210 

Editor-in-chief Dennis Glavin 

Associate Editor-Editorial Gunda Caldwell 

Associate Editor-News Bill Johnson 

Associate Editor- Feature, Sports . Steve Farnsworth 

News Editor Cindy McCarthy 

Venture Editor Frank Smith 

Copy Editor Debbie Lockhart 

Photo Editor . . Bill Gullion 

Business Manager Karen Abramowitz 

Consultant Charles R. McCreight 

The Beachcomber is published weekly from our editorial offices in 
the Student Pulicatlons Building at Palm Beach Junior College 
Opinions expressed in the Beachcomber are those of the editors or 
writers and are not nesassarily those of the Palm Beach Junior 
College. 

Letters must not exceed 2oo words, must be signed by the author, 
received in the Beachcomber office no later than 4 p.m. on 
Wednesday and are subject to condensation. 



'f^-M:&£i'£''*-^* ' i jl. j ? : - rt -.' ' '.' , V i ;'T '' -ii'-".'-'J;'i ' ' ' ^' 




Press Has The Right To 
Print Facts When Found. 




Several recent court cases 
involving the first amendment 
—freedom of the press — have 
brought into sharp focus the 
ease with which that freedom 
can be lost. 

The Vietnam free press was 
nearly strangled by govern- 
ment coercion of advertisers. 
Caring citizens tried to keep 
their press going by paying for 
the empty spaces in the 
advertising sections, putting 
messages and names in the 
blocks. This was a great 
personal risk. But they 
understood the value of 
keeping their press free, and 
backed that freedom to the 
bitter end. 

Two American newsmen 
have recently been imprisoned 
their source of information. 
The Schorr case became an 
embarrassment to the govern- 



ment and everyone associated 
with the inquiry. The 
"information leaked "by Schorr 
was not all that top secret. 
Many portions of it had 
already been published or 
broadcast. 

Watergate hearings again 
brought out a well-known fact 
that government sources are 
the worse leaks. . This is 
common practice when a 
congressman wants to give out 
information without being 
held responsible for it. 

Also well-known is the fact 
that thousands of documents 
are classified unnecessarily. 
One congressman (source 
undisclosed) was quoted as 
saying, 

"Doctors bury their mis- 
takes; government classifies 
it." 

Editors are responsible for 



Gunda Caldwell 
Editorial 



the contents of the paper they 
publish. They strive to 
maintain ah objective view of 
material crossing their desks. 
They print the truth even 
when it may be the unpopular 
thing to do. The Beachcomber 
enjoys the freedom of a 
responsible press. Dr. Harold 
Manor, our JC president, and 
Charles McCreight, consul- 
tant to the Beachcomber, 
pursue a "hands off" policy. 
There is no censorship. We 
print the facts as we find 
them. Good taste and 
judgement of the staff define 
subject matter and set limits 
to the contents. 

The sharpest critics are the 
students. This clearly illus- 
trates they identify closely 
with their newspaper. They 
feel it is their publication. 



Letters 

ICC Head Rebuts SG Position 



Dear Editor: 

I'd like to rectify an injustice 
done to ICC in the 20 Sept. issue 
of the Beachcomber, page two, 
"Aluminum drive...". 

Kim Clark took it upon herself 
to throw some pretty heavy stones 
at ICC in the name of SG. She 
stated that SG was pretty 
disappointed with ICC because 
ICC didn't respond to SG's call 
for help to bag cans for the pool 
fund. 

The fact is that ICC volunteered 
the services of some of the clubs 
over four weeks before SG got 
around to "Bag Day." 

I personally requested that the 
special bags be made available to 
ICC but SG never came through, 
even after repeated requests were 
made for them. Finally SG 
President Andrea Stebor appro- 
, ached me herself for assistance 
on a Friday, and the proposed 



"bagging" was to be that 
Sunday. 

Calls were made to the clubs 
but there wasn't enough time for 
them to get in touch with their 
club members for volunteers. 

Clark seems to fear a lack of 
good rapport between our groups. 
I don't share that fear, in spite of 
.such counter productive speeches 
as Clark's, and her lack of tact in 
her reports to the Beachcomber. 

SG's President Stebor is doing 
an OK job in her group. I've got 
enough good people working for 
ICC to insure its success. 
Together, the two groups will 
make JC a nice place to visit . 

I hope that in the future Clark 
spends less time attacking ICC 
and more time in getting a few 
more than three SG people to help 
outSG. 

Sincerely, 

Tom Solder, 

CHRMN. ICC 



They Helped Us Do It 

We would like to acknowledge 
the valuable assistance and fine 
cooperation rendered by the staff 
of the library, to help get these 
editions to the binders. Also, the 
library has at all times had the 
bound editions available for ready 
reference in their well-stocked 
collection of magazines and 
papers. We are proud of the fine 
collection of Beachcombers that 
will grace the bookshelves. We 
are even more proud of the 
journalism students who have 
gone ahead of us. Their work is an 
inspiration. 

Student Publication offices are 
being gradually upgraded. Fur- 
ther improvements are either on 
the way or in the planning stage. 
Our goal is to make our offices 
conform more closely to upper 
level university and regular 
working environments. 

One of the Beachcomber -fun- 
ded projects became a reality with 
the arrival of permanently bound 
editions covering the last 15 years 
of Beachcomber newspapers. 



fjfciMiiliiUffiiiMgHin 



4-BEACHCOMBER Monday, Sept. 27, 1976 



5-BEACHCOMBeR Monday, Sept. 27, 1976 



Venture 







F RESH 

TASTES 



Is your stomach gn 
erupt? Have the scho 
case, don't worry, lie] 

Just hop in your ci 
several "fast-food" n 
pains quickly and effli 

If you're the conv 
shake and fries, aim jy 
from JC is a McDonal 
a Big Mac, dependii 
budget. 




FooChains 
GroiingFast 




ii Hayward 
Writer 

id grumbling like a volcano about to 
iunchies got you down? If that's the 

han a mile away. 

less than two minutes from JC are 

s all designed to calm your hunger 

very little cost. 

type and just want a hamburger, 
''Golden Arches." A short distance 
ire you can pick up a small burger or 

e size of your hunger pains and 



Also available at M|'s are fish filets, quarter- pounders, 
Egg McMuffins, dantle pies, and even McDonald land 
cookies. Whether voujfag for a breakfast, lunch, dinner or 
dessertMC'©<Ml3^&oj|jh 

In addition to pret 31 food, McDonald's also has clean 
restrooms and McM lers, both a must for the college 
student. 

If you're bored wit! Jacs and sesame seed buns, less than 
a hop, skip, and a juabout an eighth of a mile) down the 
road is a cheaper ver#fcDonald's, Burger Chef. They offer 
approximately the saffction as McDonald's, just disguised 
with different names. f 



The best item Bure 
where you can make) 
thirds, or fourths, d| 
munchies. 

If you're really hun| 
and you can stand the 
to Wuvs. 

Offered at. Wvw.' 



PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER 



has going for them is their salad bar, 
fn salads and go back for seconds. Or 
ig on how hard you're hit with the 

have a little more money than usual, 
rombination of purple and yellow, go 

.rser hamburgers than those at 
lryou nave a cim,.^ <,« „„ t ae tting 
is overdone . 
urr explains, "You have to be really 

Simpson, "You have to be really 



Finally, if you're ttthe hamburger and french fry scene, 
then stop at Lou's Sufeoup Shop. The price for a sub may be 
a little more expenshl a hamburger, but it's definitely worth 
it. The subs are top q|itid service is fast. 

If your hunger pairjfcbt too sharp, and you can wait, Burger 
King, a top-notch feod restaurant is opening opposite 
McDonalds. f 

So the next time >r*ly collapse from hunger pains drive 
about a half mile in feerniy direction from JC and make a 
selection from the Nod restaurants lining Congress 

Avenue. ■;.' 



No One Loves Hamburgers 



** ByDonVaaghan 
Staff Writer 

I have many friends who work in fast food 
restaurants and all profess that if Satan were to build 
an underworld annex, the kitchen at DcMonald's 
during lunch hour would be the perfect location. 

More than one soul has gone insane counting 
pickles for Big Mucs, and God only knows how many 
kids have dropped their glasses or contacts in a french 
fryer, only to have them come out golden brown with a 
dash of salt. 

There must be zillions of fast food restaurants 
around the country, all employing kids. But not 
everyone is cut out to deal Big 01' Burgers to the 
starving masses. It has been said that a waiter or 
waitress in a fast food restaurant must have the gentle 
kindness of Attila the Hun and a strong urge to 
commit legal genocide via "a secret sauce, one so 
secret that we don't even know what's in it!" Every 
employee of a fast food chain is also a master of public 
psychologv, as shown by the example below. 
WAITER:Yeah, what 'II it be? 

CUSTOMER: Uh, I'd like a "Big 01" Burger" without 
mayonnaise, fries, and a small coke. 
WAITER: You want meat with that burger? 
CUSTOMER: Yes, and please hurry, I just heard that 
my house is on fire! 

WAITER: Listen, bub, don't tell me your problems! 
Do you know what it's like to work behind this counter 
for six hours a day, five days a week? It's hell, buddy, 



pure hell! 1 don't have to feed you, you know, so you 
had better appreciate this! Here, take this stuff, get 
out of here and don't come back! Oh yeah, and have a 
nice day! 

Someday I'd like to meet the guy that thinks up all 
those slogans fast food chains use, if he hasn't already 
been committed. They sound good on the radio, but as 
far as practicality goes, they're about as useful as 
Telly Savalas' combs. 

First Burger Monarch came up with "It takes two 
hands to handle a Big 01" Burger. Of course it does! 
Any jerk that eats a Big 01' Burger with only one hand 
deserves to have a h alf of it fall into his lap ! 

DcMonald's is no better. Their motto is "You 
deserve a break today!" Well, I've got news for you, 
kiddo. You're not going to find any breaks at 
DcMonald's unless you enjoy being served miniscule 
hamburgers by uppity, greasy kids wearing funny 
hats. If such is the case, then you and Ronald 
DcMonald deserve each other. 

Each restaurant has it's own specialty besides 
hamburgers. Burger-Monarch's specialty is "City 
Fried Chicken," where "the flavor is not only on the 
chicken, but so are the feathers! " 

DcMonalds' American favorite is the Egg 
McDuffer, which averages an hour to prepare. Well, 
have you tried to make sausage from a live pig? 

I'd like to tell you Burger Cook's specialty, but I 
haven't found anyone that's lived long enough to tell 
me. Oh well, that's burger biz! 







\ 






K* 



>, ..' 



. - : -Mvu- 



iii 



' «-' :■ 









ii—' 



, '" / 



.•' \, s.-S'-'/wt-'-.-r. ■■."■-. . ; :"■■■.-/;.'■ . ■•■-'; :.•'£$£ 

.'•■■•' . . * ' ■ ' . ■. . , 7 - . ,- ■ ... . „''ftV** 



Kite made by Al Hartig, The Nantucket Kiteman. 



Photo by C.J. Walker 



History Of Kite Flying Colorful 



By Audrey Snow 
Staff Writer 

I've always been fascinated by kites. Kites are usually considered as 
toys, but they've also had some rather important purposes. 

Although the actual originator and place of the kite are lost in time 
many countries claim the kite as their own. 

In Egypt there are hieroglyphics carved some 2,500 years ago that tell 
one of the first known stories about a kite. A pharoah had heard many 
tales about his witty vizier, Ahikar, and he wanted to test the man's 
cunning for himself. He ordered Ahikar to build a palace for him midway 
between heaven and earth. The punishment for failure would be death. 

So Ahikar trained two eagles to fly on a string, then he taught two 
young boys to ride on the eagle's back. He then brought the boys and 
their mounts to the Pharoah. They were set a sa\\ in the sty and when 

they were as high as the string allowed they called down to Pharoah that 
they were ready to build his palace if only he would send up the building 
materials. This was a simple request since the Pharoah was thought of as 
a god. Of course, the Pharoah couldn't fly so he called off the project in 
order not to lose face. 

The wings in this tale belonged to real birds but it is considered to be 
one of the earliest recorded attempts at stimulated flight. 

Benjamin Franklin was a dedicated scientist and a kiteflier. His 
discovery electricity in lightning introduced an ancient "toy" as a new 
scientific "tool", but it wasn't the first time this contraption was used 
scientifically. 

Sir Issac Newton (1749) had devoted some attention to kites. Around 
this same time, two students Alexander Wilson and Thomas Melville 
made their first recorded weather experiments with kites. 

Wilson and Melville were successful and recorded their experiments, 



but for some reason their papers were neglected for over 70 years. 

While weather experimenters are forgotten heroes of kite flying, Ben 
Franklin is undoubtedly the best known scientific flier in history. His 
discovery of electricity exploited the kite's usefulness and for some years 
to come it was a tool that aided scientists greatly. 

Kiting is a sport that has lasted over 2,300 years and continues to 
overwhelm human beings all over the world. 

There are many kitefliers organizations around the world. The 
American Kitefliers Association, (AKA) has 2,500 members and 
welcomes anyone who is interested in joining. They publish a magazine 
"Kite Tales" quarterly. For furter information write to American 
Kitefliers Association, P.O. Box 1511, Silver City, New Mexico 88061. 
Another group is vhe International Kitefliers Association (IKA) which 
currently has approximately 30,000 members. IKA meets annually, 
always the nearest Saturday to January 17th, (Ben Franklins birthday), 
in Sarasota, Florida. The next convention will be held on January 15th. 
Various contests are held at these meetings and the subjects range from 
kiteflying to kite sculpture to anything goes! IKA's address is: 321 E. 
48th St., New York, New York 10017. The Maryland Kitefliers Society 
publishes occasional news letters and can probably tell you about kite 
festivals around the country. You can write to: 7106 Camp'field Road, 
Baltimore, Md. 21207. 

Apparently Palm Beach County does not have a public kitefliers club, 
although there are a couple in Florida. Some of you (kite freaks) might 
want to form a public kite flying organization in Palm Beach County. 
Persons interested in establishing such a club leave your name, address 
and phone no. in Frank Smith's mailbox at the Beachcomber Office, 
right next to the cafeteria. 



The Shape Of Future Food Satisfies Pallet 
But Promises Possible Nutritional Impurities 



By Gunda Caldwell 
Associate Editor 

The wonderful world of tomorrow's food supply 
has arrived on the scene. Food, as we know it, is 
slowly passing into history. 

Gone are the days when food was composed of 
real elements and bore a slight resemblance to 
nature's original pattern and structure. We are the 
first generation to eat the new food, whether we like 

it or not. 

Having our food restructured to change taste, 
flavor, and texture is one thing, We have come to 
accept artificial eggs, butter, hamburger, bacon, 
sausage, ham patty, sugar and cream, for the sake 
of diet or health. We even buy artificial imitation 
butter (imitation margarine) without thinking twice. 

But these things are good compared to the choice 
items that agribusiness is developing, with the 
blessings of the United States Department of 
Agriculture, for our future eating. We will soon be 
introduced to chicken feather cookies, beef from 
cattle that have been raised on feed converted from 
manure, chicken whose diet originated from 
sewage, shellfish and trout bred and fed in 
coal-slurry waste water from power plants, and 



vegetables growri in fields that have been irrigated 
with sanitized water flushed from toilets; 

The Ceres Ecology Corporation, Colorado, has 
10,000 head of cattle now obtaining 20% of their diet 
from converted manure. The equipment making this 
possible was perfected by an associate of the 
company, Bill Gaynor, in 1973. 

This type of feed costs about one-fourth of the cost 
of regular feed. Naturally, this will not lower the 
consumer prices. Corporations will reap the 
windfalls. Cereco can market this beef as long as it 
meets Food and Drug Administation purity 
standards and the taste is not affected. What cattle 
eat rarely affects the taste of the meat . 

Scientists working at the University of Georgia 
invented the chicken feather powder. This can be 
mixed with regular flour. The cookie dough may 
further be doctored with raisins and nuts to mask 
any hint of the adulteration it contains. 

Hawaii already uses treated municipal sewage as 
a combination fertilizer and irrigator for their sugar 
cane fields. 



Germans in World War I coped with food 
shortages by cultivating algae on wood wastes. 
Historically, the Germans discarded this type of food 
as soon as possible. 

On the other hand, professors in University of 
Washington are working with scientists on a similar 
project, this time, for all of us. They admit that these 
newly created proteins should be carefully tested for 
cancer-causing agents and toxic materials. They also 
stress that great care must be used and constant 
monitoring maintained to assure safety of these 
products destined for our consumption. 

Our farmers have been placed on the endangered 
species list. In time, our rich harvests will be 
replaced by treatment plants, our lakes turned into 
slurry-ponds, fields of golden grain changed to 
conversion equipment, all in the name of progress. 
We have come a long way.;, ; . 

Once upon a time scientists smiled when they 
predicted that someday people could take a pill 
instead of a meal. Come to think of it, that might not 
be a bad idea, considering the alternatives. 



Bomm a muMB U 



^BEACHCOMBER Monday, Sept. 27, 1976 



7-BEACHCOMBER. Monday, Sept. 27, 1976 



Beachcomber 



Volleyball Splits Matches With Top Teams 




*#«• 



AVOIDING A Rinrv r it ™, P ? OTO BY BARRY VAN wagner 
AV U1DING A BLOCK- Colleen Warwood looks on as a teammate hits the 
ball over the net with a Dade-North player trying to blockT 



By Robbin Barber 
Staff Writer 
JC's women volleyball team 

opened its season splitting a 

doubleheader with Dade South 

and Dade North. 
The first game was played 

against the top-ranked team in 

the state, Dade South. South 
defeated the Pacers 15-0, 15-2. 

In the second game the Pacers 
took on the second best team in 
the state, Dade North. Dade 
North won the first game, 15-5. 

After conquering the jitters, 
the Pacers rallied in the second 
set, tying the score 5-5. Dade 
managed to score only three more 
as the Pacers assumed command 
and swept the game, 15-8. 

The third game was pressure- 
packed, but the women pulled 
through and beat Dade-North 
15-13 to win the match. 

"We (volleyball coach Bobbie 
Knowles and John Anderson) told 
them they had something to 
prove," said assistant coach 
Anderson. "In order to win they 
had to give more effort and they 
did." 

The volleyball team plays next 
Indian River Sept. 28 at 7:00 in 
the JC gym. 



Harriers Trample Hapless Rival 



By Jim Goodman 
Staff Writer 

Sweeping five of the first six 
places, the cross-country team 
won impressively over Dade-Nor- 
th Sept. 18. defeating them 17-42. 

Tom Murdock led the Pacer 
charge, taking first with a time of 
26:43 over the 5 mile course. 
Steve Famsworth was second 
27:21. 



Hassan El Habbar took third, 
27:28. He had led for 4.8 miles, 
where he missed a turn and ran 
an extra 400 yards, dropping him 
back to third. 

Frank Gruber was fifth, 29:24; 
and Mike Arnold sixth, 29:24. 

Coach Dick Melear stated that 
the team must run closer 
together. 



"There's almost a four minute 
gap between our first and last 
runners," he explained, "we've 
got to close it up. 

"I wish a good team had been 
there to give us some 
competition." 

The Pacers' next meet is the 
FSU Invitational Oct. 2. 

"All the teams in the state will 
be there," Melear commented. 
"We'll know how we stand after 
that race. " 




JC Golfers Take 
7th At Brevard 



By Dani Hayward 
Staff Writer 

The Men's Golf team placed seventh out of fourteen teams in the 
Brevard Invitational at Admiralty Lakes Country Club in Rockledge, 
Florida Sept. 21-22. 

Behind the consistent scoring of Ken Greene, the Pacers wound up 
with a 54-hole score of 925. The team's scores for each round were 
302-318-308. 

Greene fired a 73 for the first round, and followed with a 76 and 75 for 
a three-round total of 224, placing ninth overall. 

Competing with Greene were teammates Brad Milam, Mike Mouw, 
Richard Fellenstein, Dan Miller and Joe Nieporte. 

Milam and Mouw Finished second and third for the Pacers, shooting 
233 and 240, respectively. Milam shot a 71-80-82 for the 54 holes while 
Mouw fired a 77-87-76. 

Fellenstein came off the links with a 84-77-81, for a 242 total. 
Teammate Miller also shot a 242, scoring 84-82-76. 

Nieporte followed with a 245, shooting 81-82-82 to finish sixth for JC. 
Broward Community Colege captured team honors with a 888; while 
John Jones of Brevard was medalist, shooting a 216. 

The Pacers will compete next at the Polk Invitational at Willowbrook in 
Winter Haven Oct. 15-16. 



BHii!t.ai"r r Vni. \, > * i 

1 * l" •" 




PRACTICE- Todd Runnells strokes a putt as he practices with the golf team. 



PHOTO BY BARRY VAN WAGNER 



sp.ke. „„„ s , M . y e„ spn ,,. Ih , M ~ z;; v :r 



ERE 



Working With County Could Improve Sports Faciliti 



In a move which could have 
tar-reachmg consequences for JC 
students, the Athletic Depart- 
ment and the County Parks and 
Recreation Department are talk- 
rag about working together. 

Both departments are explor- 
ing the possibility of the countv 
funding improvements in JC 
sports facilities in return for being 
able !■> use them at times when 
line i«Ife : ge doesn't need them. 

Presently JC and the countv in 
J«*n Prince Park have separate 

aad in some case", duplicate 
facilities. Working together, the 

result could be one excellent 
ffai'iHty on either JC or county 

lar,d instead of two mediocre 

ores. 

The concept of ihtring sports 

fanime-s w not entirely new. The 
Gainesville Recreation Dept. and 
the University of Florida have 




done it for many years. 

Although the talks currently 
rover only sports facilities, county 
Parks and Recreation Director 
John Dance indicated that if 
things work out well, the county 
might consider working with JC 
in other activities. 

Dance said that County 
Administrator John Sansbury had 
given him approval to continue 
the talks. 

The Athletic Dept. has not 
consulted much with the 
administration, preferring to 
present a complete proposal for 
the administration and the Board 
«>i trustees to consider. 



Steve Famsworth 
Sports Columnist 



A few specific projects have 
been mentioned already as 
possibilities for cooperation. 

'Lighting for the baseball, 
archery and football fields is one 
area under study. WPB Munici- 
pal Stadium is getting new lights 
and the county could obtain the 
lights and erect them free of 
charge at JC. 

The county, naturally, would 
want to run some programs at the 
newly-lighted fields. 



is 



Another idea brought up is 
air-conditioning the gym with the 
county footing the bills. In return 



the county would be allowed to 
use the gym for basketball clinics 
and other activities. 

Two other ideas for improving 
JCs athletic facilities without 
county help have also come ud 
recently. F 

There is a chance that the 
long-awaited swimming pool if it 
was open to the community and 

not just to JC students, could be 
built with federal funds A 
member of Congressman Paul 
Rogers staff is checking this out. 

Another suggestion was to 
acqu.re a surplus building from 
Kennedy Space Center. The 
prefebncated building contains 

10 000 square feet of floor space 
and sells new for $59,000. 

The college could obtain the 
building completely set up for a 



considerable discount from the' 
new price and the Athletic Dept. is !■ 
trying to get more information ' 
about it. 



The building would be used as 
an alternate place for Jc students 
to shoot baskets, pi ay volleyball, 
eto, when the gym is in use. 

. Although everything right now! 
is no farther than the idea stage 1 
certainly JC could benefit if some" ! 
°l these ideas are converted to 

results. 



ON NICKNAME 



FEEDBACK 
STORY 

One name, the sharks, has 
been brought up by several 
omerent persons as a replace- 
ment for the "Pac ers - A 
called the "Shark 



certamly be fear-i nspiring| 
J aws" has proved. 



team 
would 



All Faces Norton; Could Lose 



By Ron Kingsbury 
Guest Columnist 

Heavyweight champion Mu- 
hammad AH faces what may be 
his toughest title defense yet, 
fighting Kenny Norton Sept. 28 at 
Yankee Stadium. 

Ali has had trouble with Norton 
„u. ;••;' F' <=»«.»., K„„ tB . f a iH n g to 
intimidate Norton as he has other 
heavyweights. 

Norton, the top heavyweight 
contender, was unknown prior to 
his 1973 fight with AH in which he 
broke Ali's jaw and won a 
12-round decision. 

Later that year Norton lost the 
rematch. The referee awarded the 
fight to AH after the judges scored 
it as a tie. 

Norton, with a 37-3-0 fight 
record, is 31 and has knocked out 
30 opponents. His losses were to 
Jose Luis Garcia, 1970; AH, 1973; 
and George Foreman, 1974. 

Since his first loss Norton has 
used self-hypnosis to improve 
concentration and confidence. 
The fundamentals of boxing have 
been planted into his subcons- 
' cious. 

Ali, 52-2-0, is 34 and has 
recorded 37 knockouts. He lost to 
Joe Frazier in 1971 and to Norton 
in 1973. Ali is also an expert in 
using mental tactics to his 
advantage. 

Tomorrow's fight will be the 
19th title defense for Ali, who has 
never lost the championship in 
the ring.' 



Stripped of his title in 1967 for 
refusing to serve in the military, 
Ali is only the second man in 
history to regain the heavyweight 
title. Floyd Patterson was the 
first. 



t *8?ryr 



The fight can be seen via 
closed- circuit television at the 
WPB Auditorium at 8:30 p.m. 
General Admission tickets are 
$10, reserve seats S15. According 
to the box office, tickets are still 
available. 



i ■ M . , * 



i *. i ••, * '2*' "5 •■ 

r ' ~" ■ /■- .»(". - V.. <9 









biL. 






rnu i u BY BARRY VAN WAGNER 

DOWN THE ALLEY. Joe Lesko tries for a strike in intramural bowling. 



as 



'0 Nova, 4 cyl. Economy car. 
S500. Call 582-71 19. 

Female needed to share two 

bedroom apt. and expenses with 
same. Lake Worth area. Call 
586-5275 or 586-2726. 

LOST: Diamond ring. Call Beth at 
£82-7908. Lost in the area of the 
"fst floor of the library. Reward 
offered. 



Classifieds 



Female needs place to live. 

Liberal minded army veteran. 
Hotel-restaurant major. Good 
cook. Clean. Twenty-one years of 
age and have own car. Call Karen 
Dake (Kitty) at 968-2131 or leave 
reply in Beachcomber office. 

1976 Red BMW 2002. Rust-pro- 
ofing, great shape. Must sell. 
$300 and take over payments. 
Call 683-1398. 



10'4" O'Day Fiberglass sailboat. 

Crew of one or two. Roof racks 
included. Like new $225. Call 
965-3088. 



Surfboards: 6'2" orange Fox 
winger, rounded pin; $85. 6'8" 
white Fox swallowtail; like 
new-$110. 7'2" white and blue 
Fox swallowtail- $55, Call 
585-8896. 




Intramural 
Bowling Results 



MEN'S HIGH GAME 

David Greene 
Oscar Cash 
Kin Eng 

MEN'S HIGH SERIES 

David Greene 
Oscar Cash 
Ed Breese 

MEN'S TEAM STANDINGS 

Vikings 

Chargers 

Anonia 

MEN'S HIGH AVERAGE 

Brian Richards 



WOMEN'S HIGH GAME 

202 Kathy Wilk -182 

189 Sandy Rudoff 177 

188 Jean Inzant! 175 

WOMEN'S HIGH SERIES 

552 Kathy Wilk 528 

540 Norma Pyfrin 475 

497 Jerri McConkey 454 

WOMEN'S TEAM STANDINGS 

8-0 In-laws g.(j 

7-1 190 White Lightning 8-0 

7-1 the Beauties 4.4 

WOMEN'S HIGH AVERAGE 

177 Kathy Wilk 170 



campus combings 

JC will offer a 10- week Wednesday evening course in 
Electrocardiography II starting Sept. 29. Basic Electrocardiography is a 
prerequisite tor this course. Included in this advanced cousc if 
Electrocardiograph Principles of Arrythmias Interpretation (Expanded 
exceptional.); Acid Base Balance; Fluid and Electrolytes; 12 Lead EKG 
Interpretation and CPR Certification. Registration for Ms $20cout5e S 
■"Roont AD-9of the Administration WU.J, Wednesday, Sept 29 a 70 
Ksoo" inf0l ™ ati0 ». call the Continuing Education Office. 

FAU counselors will come to the Career Information Center of JC- 
Central I campus every Friday (with the exception of Nov. 26) throunh 
December 3, from 9:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The Career Information CentS 
ts located on the first floor of the JC Library Building Three 2 

KJc'SSMr sept - 28 ' oa - 26 " d *S-.2SM5 

Uken the Florid. 12th Grade H.oemfnt TW ™ ™T' "' mUSt h ™ e 
t«ke the ACT (American Coneg^^^^.TT"'^ " 

gg-Jjji ,he ,e", d Effi^ SZX2Z £S 

Thursday „ 2,00 p.m. .-coM.ctthTStmher offl™ 88 *""**> "" 
booths, chibte. gamestaS agS ttlLl E't- J"*^"™'""' 



8-BEACHCOMBER Monday, Sept. 27, 1976 

Varied Response 
Marks Activities; 
Softball Dropped 



By Jeannette Banning 
Staff Writer 

Intramural activities karate, bowling and sailing have proved popular 
with students, but Softball and scuba suffer from lack of participants. 

Coed Softball has been dropped since not enough persons signed up to 
form two teams. Intramural Director Roy Bell said that team sports are 
always hard to organize and he attributed Softball's failure to this. 

The scuba club needs six more students for a minimum class This 
certified course costs $20 plus poo] fees. Students must provide their 
own equipment which they can either rent, borrow or buy . 

Sailing Club has scheduled another meeting Monday, Sept. 27 at 2:30 
in the gym, Beginner's classes are teaching 10 students the skills needed 
to safely handle the sailboats. Coming about, righting capsized boats, 
propelling the sailboats without using the sail and stepping and 
unstepping the mast are some of the areas being covered. 

Intramurals is also sponsoring jogging which can be done whenever 
students have time. Mileage is kept on a chart in the gym. A map of the 
jogging course appears in this week's Beachcomber. 

Joggers can qualify for the Presidential Award by running 125 miles. 
Mileage slips must be turned in to the intramural director. 

Bowling is going strong in its second week but Bell says there is still 
room for more bowlers. 




National Candidate To Visit 



By Bill Johnson 

Assoc. Ed. News 

Presidential and Vice-Pres- 
idential nominees of the 
American Party, Tom Ander- 
son and Rufus Shackelford, 
are to visit JC on Oct. 28. L 

The American Party ticket, 



the most conservative of the 
tickets, is currently on the 
ballot in 24 states and is 
fighting to be on ballots of 12 
other states. Florida is one of 
the states it is fighting in. 
Currently there are law suits 
for and against the placement 
of the American national 
candidates. 



According to Jimmy Brown, 
a representative of the 
Supervisor of Elections office 
in Palm Beach County, the 
American Party presidential 
candidates are not on the 
Florida ballot. 

"We haven't gotten word 
from Tallahassee about it," 



said Brown. "It's pretty 
certain they will be on the 
ballot." 

Edwin Pugh, JC's political 
advisor, says that if both of the 
major . parties see . that the 
American Party is coming to 
JC that maybe this will help 
persuade them to come. 



The meeting of the 
American candidates is to be 
on the lawn between the 
Business Administration and 
Social Science buildings from 
11:00 to 12:00 noon. An 
meeting is also 
in the 



evening 
planned 



Activities Center at 
night. 



Student 
7:30 that 




Voice of the Palm Beach Junior College Student 



Vol. 38 No. 4 



October 4, 1976 



Lake Worth, Fla. 33461 




PHOTO BY BARRY VAN WAQNE 

INTRAMURALS T-SHIRTS- With the Facet logo on front, white, orange, bine and yellow T-shirts are 
being given to all intramural participants. »*<««: 

The T-shirts are used to publicize and promote the intramural program. Intramural Director Roy Bell v 
has ordered 500 of the shirts. s «^^ / ; *™~*« X 

Modeling the shirts are: Front row [L-R] Kelly Delong, Lee-Anne Pyfrin, Norma Pyfrin and Kim * 
Belong. Standing up [ L-R] Missey Rom key, Karen Skripko and Susan Morgan. 




I & R Board Appoints Two 



Paul Simon and Sandra 
Rudolph have been appointed to 



NEW BOARD MEMBERS- Paul 
Simon [L] and Sandy Rudoff [R] 
have been appointed to the I&R 
Board. 

Photo by Barry Van Wagner 



serve as members of the I 
Intramural Board. 

Simon, a graduate of Cardii 
Newman High School, is 1 
freshman P.E. major. Rudoffj 
sophomore, graduated froi 
Forest Hill and has participated! 
intramural bow ling, ._ ^—m 

with the intramural progra-n 
welcome to submit boa 
applications to Roy Bef 
intramural director. Bell T 
located in Room 4-K in the gym^ 




Delta Omicron Hosts 
National Convention 



CONVENTION HOST- Roosevelt O'Neal, president of Phi Theta Kappa. 



use comber Debate Six Compete 



By John Childers 
Staff Writer 

Delta Omicron, the national chapter of JC's Phi 
Theta Kappa, is hosting their state convention at the 
Hilton Inn on Singer Island, Oct. 8-10, 

Yearly state conventions elect chapters to three 
positions: executive, communications and awards. 

The executive chapter, which JC was elected to 
last year in Mississippi, holds responsibility for 
hosting conventions. 

Chapter officers are also state officers for the 
year. 

On Friday morning there is to be a workshop with 
Mrs. Rosalie Kelley for current and future officers. 
Saturday is the day of new elections . 

FAU president Glenwood Creech is scheduled to 
speak at Saturday's banquet on proper support for 
higher education. JC's Dr. Yinger will speak on 
interplanetary science. 

In addition to the convention, a cookout and 
bonfire on the beach are on Fridays' agenda. A tour 
of the Palm Beaches to visit attractions like Lion 
Country Safari and the Flagler Museum is also 
planned. 

"They're going to have fun, but it's going to be a 
learning experience too," says advisor Dan 
Hendrix. 



"Music, a Language of its Own" is the national 
theme for the convention. FAU music chairman, Dr. 
Eugene Crabb, will speak on music, how it relates to 
man and his enjoyment of life. 

Qualifications for a PTK member are a 3.0 
average and a minimum 13-hour class load. 

Hendrix advises, "Anyone who thinks they have 
the cumulative transcripts and would like to join, 
drop by my office." Letters were sent to many 
students, but not all could be reached. 

Normal yearly activities include planting trees, 
donating books, assisting the handicapped, 
establishing scholarships and tutoring. 

The community may also get the services of a PTK 
student tutor without charge. 

"There's a woman in North Palm Beach whose 
child needs some help in algebra," said Hendrix, 
"We're going to find someone to help her." 

The program receives too many requests for 
tutoring to handle, but with new recruits like Laury 
Becherer, things should be looking up. 

"I wanted to get involved," stated Becherer. She 
also added "They have many interesting projects. I 
can help people in English, Literature and math 
modules. 

New members are initiated twice yearly s in the fall 
and winter terms. 



Classifieds 



Your Activity Fee 
Pays for It- 



Get Your Copy Of 

The Beachcomber 

Every Week 



■***'* — -^ 1 1 Sailing,. [ 

Mon.-Thurs. f 
12:30-3:30 
Fri. 9:00-3:00 

Beginning Classes 
Tues.-Thurs.2:00 




!; 5SBSeS(SSEaE3«S35iEsa!i5j'^57Caai 



Jogg 



ing Course 

Daily -All Hours 
Mileage Chart In Gym 

iniumiiiiKiiii!iiiiiiiimiiiuiiiifiiiiMiiim«iffl^ 





Bv Lisa Ostberg 
Staff Writer 



Under the guidance of coach 
John Connolly, the JC debate 
team is starting a new season. 
The six members will be 
attending the Stetson University 
Novice Debate Tournament this 
weekend, October 8-10, in 
Deland. 

The tournament is open to 
debaters with less than two full 
years of college debate experienc. 
Stetson University sponsors the 

event which attracts teams from 
all around the southeastern 
United States. Representing JC in 
three two-man teams will be 
Gunda Caldwell and Maxwell 
Lizza, Lynn Templeton and Jay 
Kravetz, and Scott Desslets and 
James Kersey. 

The topic of the three days of 
debates is "consumer product 

safety." 



According to Connolly, this 
tournament offers the novice "a 
good introduction to debating." It 
is a very popular and well run 
event. 

Continued page 1 

=11111111111111111 IKIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIII 



Corrected Student Fee Figure 
Announced By Finance Office 




=llllllllUllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIillllllllllltlllllllllllIltlllllUllllllllllllllllIUIIUIIIIIII 



Primary Winners To Speak On Campus 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

The final allotment of actual dollars to be distributed by the Student 
Activity Fee Committee (SAFC) were recently released by J. Barry 
Rogers, JC controller. 

The figures were uncompleted when first received by the 
organizations from Rogers' office. It was corrected in a later 
memorandum. 

The breakdown shows athletics and Student Government (SG) 
comprising 51 per cent of the disbursement, receiving 36 and 15 per cent 
respectively. 

The Beachcomber received 10 percent followed by Intramural and 
Recreation, Interclub Council (ICC), Galleon, Music Assemblies, 
Forensic and WPBC. 

The differences from last year occurred when SG was split into two 
separatef entities, SG and ICC. SG fell from last year's 22 per cent to 15 
per cent^with ICC taking the remaining seven per cent. 

The Galleon absorbed the Media, the now defunct literary magazine, 
but only received one per cent of the three Media had. 

Radio station WPBC was also added for funding. They received two 
percent. 

Rogers said there were good reasons for the slow releasing of the 
correct figures. 

"We were slow in getting the final print-out sheets of drop-add 
refunds as well as figures from the other JC campuses," Rogers 
explained. 



i; 



By Bill Johnson 

Candidates from throughout 
the state, all parties and 
representing all political races are 
going to be invited to JC's 
campus for a "Meet the 
Candidates Day Number Two. ' ' 



The idea of the "day" is to get 
all Democrat and Republican 
nominees to speak in front of JC 
students on the issues surround- 
ing their campaigns. 

Plans were approved by the 
college Thursday. 



"This is to encourage the 
students to participate in the 
political activities of Palm Beach 
County," says Dean Paul Glynn. 

The "day" is planned for Oct. 
13 and the time will be between 
9:50 and 12:00 noon. 





Connally Views Debates ; P.2 

Venture Goes Skating P. 4 & 5 

Golfers Win Tourney , P. 6 

\ 



V I 



2 - BEACHCOMBER Monday October 4, 1976 



Coach Views Presidential Debate 



Monday October 4, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 3 



By Lisa Ostberg 
Staff Writer 

Jimmy Carter won the first 
nationally televised debate with 
President Gerald Ford by a 
narrow margin according to John 
Connolly , JC debate coach. Along 
with two other instructors from 

Boca Raton and Twin Lakes High 
Schools the three served as 



judges for the Palm Beach Post. 

~ Connolly has six years of 
experience as a debate coach. 

Chosen by the Post as a local 
expert in politics and debate, he 
felt that "the format of the debate 

was not good that it was not a 
true debate." The format did not 
allow either Ford or Carter to 



answer their opponent's rebuttals, 
as they should have been. 

As far as the topics of the 
debate, the judges thought that 
they were good, although 
Connolly thought that both Ford 
and Carter were too evasive in 
their answers to the questions 
asked of them. He also felt that 



some of their replies were 
"cardboard" and "planned" and 
that too often their answers were 
not in line with the original 
question that had been asked of 
them. 

These factors, along with those 
in the classifications of persuas- 
ion, rebuttal, knowledge of 



issues, overall impression and 
summation prompted Connolly to 
give Carter the final edge by one 
point over Mr. Ford. 

Connolly's main hope for the 
future debates is that the format 
be changed to allow more 
opportunity for open clash, in the 
form of a true debate. 



Blood Drive Over 
Termed Successful 



By Bill Johnson 
Assoc. Ed.- News 

This semester's blood drive, sponsored by the Sales and Marketing 
Club, totaled 64 pints of blood donated by JC students. 

Even though the goal of the club was ISO pints, Paul Glynn, V.P. 
Student Affairs, said that the turn-out was "pretty good." 

In an incident last year, a relative of an instructor needed blood and 
didn't know about the JC blood reserve. Because of this, Glynn 
emphasizes that all students, faculty, alumni and relatives of the above 
are eligible for the blood, even if they did not donate any. 

Glynn said "that if the college reserve gets too low we can hold an 
emergency blood drive." The blood drives are currently held every 
semester. February, when the last blood drive was held, 43 pints were 
donated, one of the smallest amounts donated in any of JC's blood 
drives. 



ICC Await Report 

By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

The Sept. 25 meeting of the Inter-Club Council (ICC) saw the 
organization take great strides toward stability. 

The motion to set quorums at future meetings was voted on. The ICC 
quorum was defined as having 70 per cent of the clubs and 51 per cent of 
the club members in good standing with the ICC, - - - , , „ ,. 

The Oct. 1 meeting of the ICC was to deal with the first of the clubs 
proposals." . 

Each club is required to give a short presentation as to club goals and 
objectives. The ICC feels this will help determine whether a club is 
worthy of Student Activity Fee Funding. 

Results of the meeting were not available at press time. 

ICC chairman Tom Solder also told of the ICC's plan for a possible 
' 'beer blast" sometime this month. "There are a few things in our path 
right now, but we hope to have it this month," Solder noted. 



Debate Team 

Continued from page 1. 

Last year's debate team made a 
good showing, finishing up as the 
fifth place team in the Florida 
State Junior College Novice 
Division, even though they had 
started the year with a complete 
Novice status. 

Other events in mixed and 
individual debate categories are 
upcoming. Categories in individ- 
ual events follow a wide range 
from humorous to oral interpreta- 
tion of literature. In past seasons 
JC has had state finalists in the 
impromptu, humorous, extemp- 
oraneous speech and oral 
Interpretation categories. 

Students with an interest in 
debate or these categories should 
contact Connolly. He welcomes 
new members and the chance to 
vvork with them. Although the 
team is an outgrowth of his 
debate class, he will take 
non-class debaters with proper 
qualifications. 

Connolly can be contacted for 
details in his office, BA-309. 

Future events include two 
possibel debates in late October, 
as well as Florida Technological 
University's Snowbird Festival, a 
meet for strictly interpretive 
material. 




BLOOD INSURANCE- Jan Ramos donates pint of blood, which insures her and family for future blood 
needs. 

Four Musicians To Represent JC 
At Stephen Foster Mem 



By Cindy McCarthy 
News Editor 

Four young women, all music 
majors, will be representing JC in 
the annual Jeanie with the Light 
Brown Hair competition at 




CLUB LEADER- Tom Solder, chairman ICC, ruling body of JC Clubs. 



Stephen Foster Memorial Park in 
White Springs, Fl. 

They are: Debbi Robinson, 
Lake Worth, and Cathy Geiger, 
West Palm Beach, sponsored by 
the St. Cecilia Music Club of Lake 
Worth, Linda Conn, West Palm 
Beach, sponsored by the Past 
Presidents of St. Cecilia and Mary 
Beth Jackson, Lighthouse Point, 
sponsored by the Music Club of 
Boca Raton. 

According to Miss Letha Royce, 
Music Dept. chairman, JC is also 
co-sponsoring the women with 
the above mentioned clubs. 

In May auditions were held to 
find these four representatives for 
this contest. Since then the group 
worked throughout the summer 
preparing for the competition that 
is taking place Oct. 8-9. 

Approximately 25 women from 
Florida Jr. and Sr. colleges have 
entered. Requirements are that 
they be Florida residents and not 
over age 21. 

Contestants must sing a 
Stephen Foster song, plus two 
Amercan songs. Music to be 
presented by the JC group 
includes a selection from 
"Consul" by Menotti, "Stressa" 



by Winter Watts and "Ellen 
Bayna" by Stephen Foster. 

Judging in the competition will 
be done by out of state judges, 
teachers from other colleges. 
Some of the standards for 
judgements are: musical ability, 
voice quality, interpretation, 
beauty and costume and stage 
presentation. 

In addition to performing 
before the judges, all 25 are to 
sing also for the public in the 
gardens. 

The winner receives a 
substantial cash scholarship and 
the four runner-ups, smaller 
ones. 

"Their costumes are ball 
gowns from the 1850's," states 
Royce, "made of 20-30 yards of 
satin material, covered with lace, 
over hoops." 

Dr. Donald 0. Butterworth, 
Music Dept. instructor and Royce 
provide piano accompaniment for 
the group. 

"Valuable experience is gained 
by going," said Royce. "Usually 
Sr. college women win, and it is 
from the experience they have 
gained by participating in the 
contest for several years." 



Former JC Art Mo /or To Exhibit Works 



By Debbie Lockhart 
Copy Editor 

Jose More, former JC art major and present chief photographer for 
the Palm Beach Post Times, will exhibit his works on the first floor of the 
Humanities Building from Oct. 5-29. 

Originally from Havana, Cuba, More now resides in Lake Worth with 
his wife Joyce. He has traveled widely on assignment for the Post Times 
recording scenes in villages and cities that were destroyed by floods, 
earthquakes and fire. 

Viewer s are touched by his actual photographs of grief-sticken 
people, orphaned children searching the street for food and desperate 



widowed mothers with starving babies clutched tightly to their breasts 
In his eight years as a photojournalist, More rose from apprentice 

darkroom technician to general assignment photographer and finally to 

chief photographer. 
Selected as Region Six Photographer of the Year, More was a winner 

of the features division of the NPPA '(National Press Photographers 

Association.) He also became a recipient of many first place -awards in 

sport news, features and sports picture competitions. 
JC's Humanities Gallery is open to the public free of charge and may 

be visited Monday-Thursday from 8 a.m. - 10 p.m. and on Friday from 8 

a.m. - 4 p.m. The Gallery is closed on Saturday, Sunday and holidays 



pr 



t! 



Editorial s 

Inflation Has Hit JC Too! 

Inflation is an impersonal word, much like famine and dictatorship. 
These words call to mind remote problems across the world, far from our 
own personal involvement. 

Then inflation walks right up to us, here, now. No longer does it seem 
a statistic on a business report or a political catch-all phrase bouncing 
around between candidates. 

College tuition costs already have soared for most of our national 
education systems. Government support for students in meeting the 
rising costs increase faster than they can record as trends. One college 
established 51% of students were receiving federal aid of some type. 

Further tuition boosts for the school year beginning next fall will bring 
an average four-year cost close to $30,000 for some students. 

According to Basic Data of College Scholarship Service- Natural 
Center for Educational Studies — in the past 10 years average outlays for 
an academic year have increased tremendously. 

• Private four-year colleges have increased 29% 

• Public four-year colleges rose 76% 

• Private two-year colleges are up 75% 

•Public two-year colleges gained a whopping 95% . 

Here at JC, for the last 10-year period, tuition per credit hour rose 
from $4.00 to $12.00, or a 300% increase. 

Considering our economy at present, and what it takes to buy poor 
quality products, JC rates as a wonderful bargain. Where else can we 
obtain such quality and value for so little? 



Editor 
Forum 




Denny Glavin 
Editor 







We've got him on stand by just in case the sound goes out again. 



Administration Has To Set We Never Had It So Good 
Precedent Or Priorities ° r So We Have Been Told 



Gunda Caldwell 





Last week when the "incomplete, erroneous," call-them-what 
-you-will figures on allocations to student organizations were 
released, a funny thing happened. 

A Beachcomber editor, not alone in receiving apparently 

inadequate figures, made an attempt to contact Dr. G. Tony Tate 

and J. Barry Rogers, two top men in the Finance Department. 

^ Wo wprenot able to find them due to -their participation in 

prepping" for the upcoming bargaining between the United 

Faculty of JC and the administration. 

The Finance Department blamed the errors on slow drop-add 
print-out sheets and equally slow information from the North arid 
South JC campuses. 

The Finance Dept. has on duty "full-time professionals" 
whereas the organizations are staffed by students who, despite 
trying, can't handle tasks they encounter out of their realm. 

While we, the students, depend on the administration and the 
Finance Department in this instance, don't they also depend on 
the students? 

The student is the purpose for a college as well as the basis for 
administrative salaries. 

We won't squabble over the position of the administration 
whether the bargaining is a worthy cause. But if both activity 
advisors and administrators left at the same time, chaos would be 
the order of the day. 

When, at the expense of the student, people we depend on are 
not available, we must remind them that JC is of and for the 
student. 

It should be a matter of the administration setting up a Faculty 
versus Students issue in lieu of the bargaining, or vice-versa. 

It does not have to be. It would seem to be a momumental task, 
if both sides can come to an agreement on terminology. But at 
least maybe then the students can start learning and the 
administrators can administer. 



Beachcomber 

Palm Beach Junior College 
4206 S. Congress Ave., Lake Worth, Fla 33461 
(305) 965-8000, ext. 210 

Editor-in-chief Dennis Glavin 

Associate Editor-Editorial Gunda Caldwell 

Associate Editor-News Bill Johnson 

Associate Editor-Feature, Sports . Steve Farnsworth 

News Editor Cind V McCarthy 

Venture Editor Frank Smith 

Copy Editor Debbie Lockhart 

Photo Editor Bill Gullion 

Business Manager Karen Abramowitz 

Consultant Charles R. McCreight 

The Beachcomber Is published weekly from our editorial offices in 
the Student Pullcatlons Bullding'at Palm Beach. Junior College 
Opinions expressed in the Beachcomber are those of the editors or 
writers and are not- nesessarlly those pf the Palm Beach Junior 
College. 

Letters must not exceed 2oo words, must be signed by the author, 
received in the Beachcomber office no later than 4 p.m. on 
Wednesday and are subject to condensation. 



Great debates once again 
have become a topic of the 
day. With our President 
deeply involved in TV aspects 
of his appearance and 
coaching lessons in the art of 
debate, wonder who's left to 
keep house? 

Ford is running on Vus past 
record, as incumbents always 
do. He says in debate and on 
the campaign trail that 
everything is coming along 
fine and that the economy is in 
great shape. Anything going 
wrong, Congress did it. He 
claims we never had it so 
good. Everything is coming up 
roses. 

The Census Bureau releas- 
ed statistics at the same time 
through wire services, to show 
that more Americans slid into 
poverty level last year than 
any time during the last 17 



years the government has kept 
records. 

An increase of 2.5 million in 
this category resulted from 
"whipsaw effect" of high 
inflation at the same time as a 
recession (or was that a 
depression?), coupled with 
exhausted unemployment 
benefits last year, according to 
the Census Bureau. 

Poverty level is established 
by figuring cost of a basic 
nutritional diet multiplied by 
three. (Conservative govern- 
ment estimates show poverty 
groups must spend one-third 
of income on food.) 

Costs of medical insurance 
and treatment soared out of 
reach for many low and middle 
income families. 

Students who struggle to 
work their way through 
college find these facts are not 



cold, impersonal, "someone- 
else's-problems" type of data 
put out by a remote Census 
Bureau. 

Reality of financial stress 
hangs like a specter over them 
constantly. Where does one 
turn, if one wants to go on his 
own, and not ask for 
handouts? How far can a 
student go with a low salary 
job and a high cost living? 

Federal funds are available 
for those in direst need. 
Borderline cases, those who 
almost, but not quite, make it, 
continue to struggle with high 
cost and low income. 

Meanwhile, the great de- 
bates will go on. We will again 
hear, we never had it so good. 
This last year proves it. 

Pardon us, if we yawn and 
skip the next debate. We have 
heard it all before. 



Let's Restore Order To Registration Day 



It seems to be traditional to 
spend the first few days of each 
term drowning in a sea of 
exhausted, frustrated students 
going through complicated, 
multi-procedure hours of regis- 
tering. Faculty members handle 
this tremendous load of clerical 
and routine work involved in this 
task. 

Recently, Charles Graham, 
registrar indicated he would 
welcome suggestions for improv- 
ed methods of registration. While 
there is time for administration tc 



consider it, we would like tc 
present a suggestion to ease 
those registration day pains. 

Scheduling problems could be 
separated from routine and 
part-time registrations. There 
should be no need for a part-time 
student, for example, to go 
through the same time-consum- 
ing processing as a full-time 
student. 

Separating the simple from 
complicated would free the 
faculty members to concentrate 
on solving real schedule prob- 



be 



lems. The routine could 
handled through the mails. 

A simple request form which 
includes basic information or a 
written application sent through 
mails, should be sufficient for a 
great majority. Payment of fees 
and confirmation . could also be 
done by mail. 

This would free a harassed 
faculty from routine paper work 
and give them the time needed to 
cope with real problems. Order 
and dignity would be restored to 
our registration days. 



Let fers/ c ^ emistr y Course Needed 



Organic Chemistry Related to 
Health Science (CY 200) is an 
excellent course taught by Dr. 
Truchelut. 

This course has not been 
offered for two years, due to lack 
of student interest and ignorance 
of the course offering. Prerequis- 
ites are CY 100, CY 101 and 102. 



It is a one semester course in 
the fundamentals of organic 
chemistry, related to polymers, 
fibers, dyes, pesticides, vitamins, 
nutrition and metabolism. This 
course relates to all fields within 

the highway of life and leads to a 
clearer understanding of out- 
world. 



Students should take advan- 
tage of this opportunity to gain 
insight before entering a larger 
university. There must be a 
minimum number of students for 
this class in order for it to be 
scheduled for the winter term. 

If interested, call me immedi- 
ately, at 683-7741. 

Denise Jacks 



HBftaii i fflBiBHl l BHgiBmMMi 



i 



4 - BEACHCOMBER Monday October 4, 1976 



f 



Monday October 4, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 5 





j*^ 




A New Game For Skaters/Rollerfair 



By DonVaughan 
Staff Writer 

Recreation in American is weird in that Americans seem t< jore 
than willing to take their lives in their hands under the guise ^ing 
fun. I usually refrain from such chicanery, preferring instead t cise 
and enjoy myself in safer, less strenuous modes of recreatio 
alligator wrestling, but the other day I agreed to go roller ski 
some of my friends. 

I had never been skating in my life and 1 regretted my deft he 
moment we entered the parking lot. There, by the entrancl an 
ambulance. People moaning and groaning covered the intepid, 
after lashing four more to the roof, the ambulance sped off. "Bs^fa-e 
as crowded as I thought," said Steve, encouragingly. 



a fellowbeginner who doesn't know how to stop. I killed four people that 
way. Luckily, I had my girlfriend to cling to, so I only fell 612 times. 
Those beginners with nothing to hang on to did considerably worse. 

As I mentioned earlier, stopping is almost as important as not falling 
down. To stop, they tell you to merely place the little rubber knob on the 
toe of your skate on the floor. It sounds easy, I know, but no one tells you 
that while that one foot with the knob on the floor is steadfast and 
immobile, the other isn't. I don't care what anyone says, stopping that 
way is physically impossible. The easiest way to stop, I found, is to glide 
gently into the padded wall. Remember, I said gently! Cruising around a 
corner doing 65 is not gently. Another way to stop is simply to fall down 
where you are and crawl to the nearest exit. Be wary of nuts skating 
backwards, though. 

If disaster is imminent, and there is no way you can stop or turn in 
time, then the best thing to do is aim for a fat person. Rotund people are 
nice and soft and don't hurt as much as skinny people. This is also a 
great way to meet people of the opposite sex, if you're both living when 
they drag you apart. And those little scars on your body make great 
stories to tell the kids. 

Most rinks have special times set aside for the skaters to do what they 
like best. For instance, there is a "Moonlite Couples" time in which they 
turn out the lights and play romantic music for couples to skate together 
with. Unfortunately, with no lights it's difficult to see where you're 
going, but it's romantic while it lasts. Then there is a time for what is 
called "Crazy Trios" in which — yes, you guessed it — trios get out on 
the rink and attempt mass suicide. If you look closely, you can see 
indentations in the wall shaped like faces. That's because faces made 
them during "Crazy Trios." And finally, there is a time for trains, which 
1 described earlier. The most dangerous part of a train is the end, 
because that is the part that always gets snapped directly into the guard 
rail on sharp turns. Trains are fun, but then, so is dysentery. 

And there you have it, everything you always wanted to know about 
roller skating but didn't really care enough to ask about. As for me, give 
me an alligator anytime. 




JC Student Loses 
Mind In Discotheque 



By Frank Smith 
Venture Editor 

He awoke almost unaware that he did so. 

The place he found himself was dark, 
f'righteningly dark. Speech brought echoes. 
"'Hello..." He spoke. 

"Hello. . hello. . " answered the walls. 
Barely visible, a blue light glowed in the 
darkness. Moving closer revealed it to be a 
silent jukebox. 

"Gallileo." whispered someone behind 
him with startling effect. He turned quickly 
and fell leaning against the jukebox. 
"Gallileo" said the voice again only 
louder. A light came on revealing a red and 
chrome, second juke box barely ten feet 
away. 

"Billy. ." began the machine he leaned 
against, causing him to jump like a nervous 
cat". . don't be a hero." it finished. 

"No!" he begged, with unfathomable 
fear. 

A third machine glowed to his right. 
"Feelings, feelings, feelings, feelings.." It 
droned incessantly with nauseous 
boredom. 

"What is this place?" he asked, then felt 
a tug at his pants leg. Fearfully he looked 
down. 

There, with a cigar and glitter in his 
feathers stood a duck who started singing 
"Disco duck.." 

The sound was beginning to swell into 
chaotic, interspersed; music. It got louder. 

"Feelings, feelings, feelings, Disco 
Duck.. . Billy don't be a Hero. . . Gallileo. . 
FEELINGS.. FEELINGS.. DISCODDCK, 
DISCO. . GALLILEO. . BILLYDON'TBE. . 



FEELINGS DISCO DON'T BE GALLILEO 
FOOL WITH YOUR LIFE FEELINGS. 

"SHAKE YOUR BOOTY!" another 
machine shouted. 

"Help!.. Please! ..Somebody, anybody!!! 
" He shouted in his madness. He was 
answered by more lights, glowing like 
fires, 

"ROLLER COASTER. . GET DOWN 
TONIGHT. . . THAT'S THE WAY 
UH-HUH UH-HUH. ." 

"No. . "he whispered quietly against the 
maelstrom. 

The machines were like scattered auto 
wrecks blazing with lights fearful to view. 
Incandescent demon-boxes shouting pain- 
ful noises. The sound grew louder and 
contained exploding drums, quacking 
ducks in their death throes, lets screaming 
and humans shouting against the pain of 
torture. 

He stood half bent with his hands 
covering his ears. 

ROLLER COASTER GET DOWN GET 
DOWN THAT'S THE WAY . . 
.FEELINGS, FEELINGS. . SHAKE YOU 
BOOGY! BILLY DON'T . . UH-HUH 
UH-HUH. . DISCO, DISCO DUCK.. 
GALLILEO FEELINGS THAT'S THE WAY 
GET DOWN GET DOWN. . . . 

He twisted and fell. The volume grew 
like roaring lions, raging gorillas and the 
tumbling of cathedrals. The sound of train 
wrecking into a bell factory. 

"Please. .."He began, then finished" I 
have feelings, feelings, feelings.." 

He saw and heard the lights and sounds 
blur into darkness and silence. 



Kite Making Can Be Fulfilling 
Maybe As Much As Kiteflying 



Progress Presses For Death (fThis Tree 



By John Childers 
Staff Writer 

If you travel on 6th Ave. So. to school, you may notice branches of a 
huge tree projecting across the road and hanging over the opposite 
sidewalk. 

This banyan tree was planted around 1913 says Chester Wright 
who lived on the property some 17 years ago. A eucalyptus tree 
growing through the middle extends 30 feet over the banyan's crown, 
making the two about 80 feet tall. 

Planned widening of 6th Ave. forshadqws the tree's last days. It's 
too large to be transplanted. 

"I guess it's like everything else," says Wright. "Progress is 
taking over." 

Wright, who owned 76 acres from the lake north of 6th to 12th Ave. 
So., was formerly the supt. of lights and water for Lake Worth, city 
engineer, and later city manager during the depression. 

He remembers all his three children growing up and playing in that 




13 -Ji. 

PHOTO BY GENE ROVINELLI 



tree. He caught onethrof empty basket down on a passerby to 
scare him. f 

"It's just like a big s u Se ." says Mrs xieche, who lives 
directly across the street, i 

She says the giant looPpst the same now as it did when she 
moved down in 1955. 

All the kids in the neigPOd used t0 play in it eyery day ..you 

might not see them but P there." said Tieche. "I'm going to 
miss it." she concluded, k 

The portion of brancsiging directly over the street are 
cropped in a straight linefgieably from large trucks commuting 
on 6th. When it reaches t?| s north side it's allowed to droop to 
the sidewalk. > 

While Wright was iivu# house, roots traveled 75 feet looking 
for water, to the propertyjcorner where a well was located. 

It seems a shame a n#artd m ark as tnis snall be destroyed, 
but progress marches slfff* . 



By Audrey Snow 
Staff Writer 

Building a kite can be as much fun as flying one. Today's materials 
make kite building simple and they are easy to find. 

The covering can be anything from newspaper, silk, oil cloth and 
colored mylar, to imported tissue paper, which is the most commonly 
used material. When shopping for material, keep in mind the size of 
your prospective kite. 

The wood to support the structure must be light in weight, smooth, 
strong and flexible. This can be obtained as hardwood stripwood. Cane 
is often used for special types of kites. 

Animal or fish glue, when used properly are very strong. Balsa cement 
is also suitable. Synthetic resin glues make up another great group. 
Elmer's glue is a little heavy but if you mix it with a small amount of 
water it will hold just as good as any of the others. 

Next on the list comes string. It is required in different strengths and 
thickness according to the purpose it serves. Fine flax line is a strong for 
the bracing on larger kites. For smaller kites (2 ft. length), use No. 10 or 
104 coloured cotton or linen tent thread. Remember that the weight and 
area of the kite determine whether or not it will fly. 

If you don't feel the inspiration to make a" kite, there are many stores 
that carry them. Here are a few area stores that have quite an interesting 
collection of these flying objects: Toyland (LP), Toy King of Rimes 
(WPB), Schwarz F A O (PB), A New Generation (WPB), Jordan Marsh 
(PB Mall), Burdines (WPB) and Farmer's Market (WPB). 

It might be helpful for you to know the five different types of kite that 
are out on the market. They are: the flat, box, bow, non-rigid and the 
novelty kite. 

The flat or diamond kites are the most popular kites in the world. They 
are the easiest to make and available in almost any 7-Eleven or novelty 
shop. 

The most useful kite for such things as weather observation and 
carrying instruments has been the box kite. Box kites are also very 
common and their shape provides greater mobility in flight. 



Bow kites are essentially a diamond shape with the front bowed 
instead of flat This kite needs no tail. 

Non-rigid kites resemble a parachute. Shroud lines are used to hold it 
together. The beauty in this kite is that it can crash into all kinds of 
obstacles without breaking, because it is flexible and adjusts to 
pressure. 

The Novelty kite includes many shapes and sizes. They are often a 
mixture of other kinds of kites. 

A sixth kind of kite is the objet d'art. It is considered more as a piece of 
sculpture with no thought of flying them. 

If you know how to fly a kite, you know how to race them. Kite racing 
requires no athletic ability or technical knowhow; at least for the kind of 
racing I'm talking about. 

Kites are usually raced over bodies of water. Lake Osborne in (John 
Prince Park), is a good location to race kites providing conditions are 
favorable for such events. 

All competitors should have the same amount of string (300 ft) and the 
same type of kite. Once the kites are in the air— tie the end of a string to 
a bottle, (wine bottles are perfect). After the kite is tightly tied to the 
bottle, plug cork back in for buoyancy. 

AH competitors should line up by the water's edge ready to toss their 
bottles in the water. The bottles offer just enough weight to keep the kite 
aloft, yet are pulled brushing the waters surface. 

The creative part of the race lies in the decision to determine the 
winner. 

You can run to the other side of the lake or you can relax under a shady 
tree watching your kite fly high in the sky through binoculars knowing 
that an adventure of finding the kite is just ahead of you. 

Of course, you'll want to find it before you leave. There's no sense in 
litteringour shores and losing a perfectly good kite. Besides, kite racing 
is just too enjoyable not to retrieve and fly again! 

Now, all you need to do is experience kiting on your own. So take your 
bird, fish, butterfly or serpent and sail it through the sky and be amazed 
at how high it flies. 

The kite has turned man into a bird. It can link you with infinity. 






6 - BEACHCOMBER Monday October 4, 1976 




Men Golfers Capture Tournament 



By Jim Goodman 
Staff Writer 

The men's golf team won the 
Indian River Invitational on Sept. 
24 with JC golfer Ken Greene 
claiming medalist honors. 

The Pacers defeated three 
other teams in the tournament, 
finishing four strokes ahead of 
host Indian River. JC's score was 
459 strokes. 

Ken Greene led all golfers over 
the 27-hole tournament with a 
score of 108. 

Green received a trophy for his 
efforts. His name will be the first 
inscribed on a huge plaque which 
contain the name of each future 
medalist of the Indian River 



Invitational. 

Filling out the Pacer top four 
were Mike Mortell, 116 strokes, 
Kim Swan, 118, and Mike Mouw, 
118. 

Coach Sanculius was pleased 
with his team's showing. 

"It was a win that has given us 
confidence," he stated. "Now we 
know we can win." 

"We're a young team facing 
stiff competition," he added, 
"but we expect to make a good 
showing in all our matches." 

The Pacers' next match is with 
FAU Oct. 8. The match will be at 
the La Mancha Country Club in 
West Palm Beach at 2:00 p.m. 



Cross-Counfry Team 
Fifth At Brevard 



By Jim Goodman 
StaffWriter 

The cross-country team finished a disappointing fifth out of six teams 
in the Brevatd-lndian Riviet Invitational Sept. 25- 

The Pacers, favored to place third, finished three points out of third 
place. • '-:■■■■ 

Miami-Dade South, defending state champions, won with 31 points. 
Seminole placed second, 45, and Brevard was third, 90. Indian River 
edged out the Pacers for fourth, 92-93. 

Hassan El Abbar led the Pacers, taking sixth with a time of 26: 15. Tom 
Murdock was 10th, 26:42. 

Rounding out the Pacer scorers were Steve Farnsworth, 20th, 27:23, 
Frank Gruber, 27th, 28:34, and Mike Arnold, 30th, 29:07. 

Coach Dick Melear was unhappy with the team's performance. 

"We ran poorly," he commented. "There's no way we should have 
lost to Brevard and Indian River. " 

"I figured we were in better shape than the other colleges," he added, 
"but they didn't fade in the heat like I though they would." 

"We've got to run better if we're going to do anything this year," he 
stated. 
The Pacers' next meet is the Dade-South Invitational Oct. 9 at Miami. 





PHOTO BY BARRY VAN WAGNER 

EYE ON THE BALL- Kathy Cavanaugh blasts out of a sand trap as she practices with the women's golf 
team. 



Monday October 4, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 7 

Women Golfers 
Play 1st Match 

By Jeannette Banning 
StaffWriter 

Fielding an all-freshman team, the women golfers open their season 
with a match against Broward Central Tuesday, Oct. 5 at Tikber Run 
Country Club in Fort Lauderdale. 

Comprising the team are Elizabeth Aris, Sally Bricker, Kathy 
Cavanaugh, Sue Holden, Parti Prentice, Ann Ranta and Kelley Spooner. 

Aris, Prentiss, Ranta and Spooner all shoot in the low 80's to mid 70's. 
Bricker and Holden score in the mid 80' s and Cavanaugh shoots in the 
high 80's. 

Elizabeth Aris, from Jamaica, comes from a family of golfers. 

Patti Prentiss, a golfer since age four, hails from Ohio. She played last 
year on her high school's boy's team. 

Daughter of former Dodger pitcher Carl Spooner, Kelley Spooner 
comes to JC from Vero Beach. 

Ann Ranta and Sue Holden are both members of Lake Worth High's 
state championship team. 

Sally Bricker is from Jensen Beach while Kathy Cavanaugh comes 
from Palm Beach Gardens. 

Golf coach Joe Sanculius said that the team will play a match before 
each tournament. Tuesday's match with Broward Central precedes the 
Lady Seminole Invitational at Tallahassee Oct. 1 1-12. 



Hassan El Abbar: Moroccan Leads Pacer Runners 



PHOTO BY BILL JOHNSOrs 

SUCCESS- The men golfers display the trophies they won in the Indian River Invitational. [L-R] Ken 
Greene, Kim Swan, Mike Mortell and Mike Mouw. 



Wo tt\ oi^i s ^/ j s©4J 



By Robbin Barber 
StaffWriter 

The volleyball team split its 
matches last week, defeating 
Indian River on Sept. 28 and 
being defeated by Dade South 
Sept. 29. 

The Pacers beat Indian River 
15-10, 15-8. 

Despite the early lead IRCC 
took in the first game the Pacers 
managed to even the score 10-10. 
The Pacers then scored five extra 
points with the final score 15-10. 

In the second set IRCC scored 
the first four points but the Pacers 
came back to life and tied the 
score 4-4. 




After swapping the lead several 
times, the Pacers forged ahead 
and won the match, 15-8. 

Coach Bobbie Knowles and 
assistant coach John Anderson 
were definitely proud of the 
team's performance. 

"They played the way they 
know they can play," said 
Anderson, "and the way we know 
they can play." 

On Wednesday afternoon, 
Sept. 29, JC's women volleyball 
team were defeated in Miami by 
Dade South 15-8, 15-2. 

In the first game the Pacers 
scored the first three points, but 
Dade South gained advantage 



with a win 15-8. 

During the second game tht 
Pacers were able to score only tw< 
points as Dade-South overwhel 
med the Pacers 15-2. 

According to assistant coaoi 
Anderson, the loss of the las 
game was "a psychologica 
letdown." 



On Tuesday evening, Oct. Sf 
the Pacers play against Browarc 
Community College at 7:00 p. ml 
in the gym. They play 
doubleheader against Dade Nortlf 



Moroccan freshman Hassan El 
Abbar, the number one runner on 
the cross-country team, came to 
the United States to get an 
education. He had no idea that 
running would provide the 
means. 

"I didn't run much in 
Morocco," he said. "I only ran 
cross-country at Lake Worth High 
last year to get in shape. " 

Hassan said he was the 
northern Morocco high school 
champion in the 5,000 meters but 
added that didn't mean much. 

"ah niv s »oJ runners in 
Morocco are in the south," he 
admitted. 

A member of the Palm Beacn 
Post's All-Area cross-country 
team last year, Hassan was 




Steve Farnsworth 
Sports Columnist 



awarded a JC cross-country 
scholarship. 

"I didn't practice much in high 
school last year," he stated. "I 
was surprised I made All- Area." 

Hassan first came to the U.S. in 
late June, 1975. He came because 

he wanted to finish his schooling 

outside of Morocco and had heard 
so much about the U.S. 
Hassan's uncle, who lives in the 
area, also played a big part in his 



and Florida 
Miami on Oct 



Bible 
6. 



College 



"I 




f< 



Pacers Play Indian River 
Team Records Tie, Loss 



i 



PHOTO BY BILL GULLION 

SAFE?- JC's Eddie Walker appears to be tagged out on this play but the umpire rules him safe. Indian 
River protested the call. 



By Jim Goodman 
StaffWriter 

The baseball team tied and lost to Indian River in the firs 
doubleheader of the fall exhibition season. Scores for the two game 
were 2-2 and 6-0. 

Three Pacer pitchers, Glen Dooner, Hal Steadman and Andy Gianinr 
combined to throw a four-hitter in the first game. j 

The Pacers scored their first run in the bottom of the third inning. J<;. 
was behind by one run when catcher Scott Benedict drove in Steve Jacof 
from third. 

The Pacers took the lead in the fourth, as Jim Kemp tripled and the; 
scored on a wild pitch . 

Hanging onto the lead until the seventh inning, the Pacers gave u 
another run to Indian River to tie the game, 2-2. The teams played one 
extra inning, but both failed to score, so the game ended as a tie. 

The Pacers failed to generate much offense in the second game; 
collecting only three hits. 

The game was scoreless until the fourth inning, when Indian Rive: 
scored twtfruhs. They added four more in the last three innings. * 

Steve Saco and Gary Cole were the JC pitchers in the second game. * 

Coach Dusty Rhodes appeared fairly pleased with his team's 
performance. 

"We made a few mental mistakes," he commented. "We're just 
trying to get ready for the teams we'll have to play in spring." [ 

The Pacers play next against Miami-Dade North at Miami Oct. 6, and 
at home, Oct. 7 at 3:00. i; 



decision. 

"My uncle paid for my airplane 
ticket, got me my visa, gave me a 
place to live and helped me learn 
English," Hassan said. 

Not knowing a word of English 
when he arrived, Hassan learned 
enough in his first few months 
here to enable him to attend 
regular high school classes. 

He still has some problems 
speaking and understanding 

MnmmmmmuBmmsmms^mm 



English, but English-language 
courses are helping him overcome 
this. 

Hassan plans to return to 
Morocco after he Finishes college 
but without a scholarship he 
couldn't have attended JC. 

"I cannot afford to pay for 
college myself," he stated. "I 
was glad to get the scholarship." 

Cross-country coach Dick 
Melear is enthused about 
Hassan's future as a runner. 

"He has the finest potential 
I've ever seen," he said. "I think 



his running ability is unlimited. 
He's just learning how to run 
now. Hassan should be one of the 
top runners in the state this 
year." 

Hassan said being on the 
cross-country team is fun but the 
practices are very hard. 

When asked if he thinks he can 
gel a scholarship from a four year 
college after he leaves JC, 
Hassan smiled and said, "If I 
stay in shape, yes." 




Safa?6 



3 -9 P.M. 



Clam Bar & Grille 
Game Rooms 



MOST BEERS 
50* 

(BOWLING GAME, PINBALL, and POOL TABLE) 

HAPPY HOURS 3-6 P.M. 
* WEEKEND SPECIALS * 



hFRIDAY 

Steamed Shrimp $1 SO 

in Beer ■ 

SATURDAY "" 



Oysters $130 



SUNDAY 



Steamers IflOO 



2 



DRAFT 
832-9800 



30 



* 



535 25th Street (Between Broadway (U.S. 1 ) & Dixie) West Palm Beach 




PHOTO BY BILL GULLION 

TOP RUNNER- Hassan EI Abbar crosses the finish line at the end of a 
cross-country race. 

New Cheerleaders Picked 

All the positions on the cheerleading squad have been filled with the 
selection of four new cheerleaders. 

Joining Brenda Ireland and Paula Witzel of last year's squad are Rosa 
Blue, Pam Saulsby, Beulah Spencer and Linda Walker. 

The new cheerleaders were chosen by a panel of judges in tryouts held 
Sept. 27 in the SAC lounge. 



8 - BEACHCOMBER Monda" October 4, 1976 



/ & R Sailing On Lake Osborne 



By Tom Kelly 
Staff Writer 

Sailing is a major leisure-time 
activity in the south Florida area 
with its natural resources of 
oceans and lakes. More and more 
people have recognized this and 
the intramural program at JC 
has added sailing as a sponsored 
activity. 

Sunfish sailboats were purch- 
ased and another donated to the 
intramural program for the free 
use of JC students. 

The boats are sailed on Lake 
Osborne, which is east of the 
campus. Heavily used on 
weekends and holidays. Lake 
Osborne is relatively free of boats 
during the week when sailing is 
offered. 

Roy Bell, intramural director, 
estimated that 60 students used 
the boats during Spring 1 this year 
and over 100 students have 
checked one out this term. 

Students that don't know how 
(o sail can learn by attending 
beginner classes on Tuesdays and 
Thursdays. The non-credit class- 
es are free. The only requirement 
is the ability to swim. 

With the ever-increasing use of 
waterways, safe boating is a 
must. Sailors should know the 
rules of the road used on 



waterways in south Florida. This 
is part of the beginner's 
instruction. 

For those students who can 
sail, the boats are available 
Monday, Wednesday and Friday 
from 12:30 to 3:30. The swimming 
requirement applies to experi- 
enced sailors also. 

Sailors are required to 
demonstrate their ability to be 



permitted to use the boats on a 
check-out basis. Life jackets must 
be worn while sailing and can be 
checked out from the equipment 
room in the gym. 

Consistent with today's ecol- 
ogy-conscious attitudes, sailing is 
non-pollutingv During the fuel 
crisis, a sailboat dealer in Miami 
sold over one million dollars of 
inventory in one week. 



Intramural Bowling Results 



MEN 




WOMEN 




TEAM STANDINGS 




TEAM STANDINGS 




Chargers 


10-2 


In-Laws 


12-0 


A noma 


10-2 


190 White Lightning 


8-4 


Vikings 


9-3 


The Beauties 


8-4 


HIGH SERIES 




HIGH SERIES 




Oscar Cash 


615 


Kathy Wilk 


528 


Dave Greene 


610 


Chris Adams 


493 


Ed Breese 


535 


Norma Pyfrin 


475 


HIGH GAME 




HIGH GAME 




Dave Greene 


251 


Kim Delong 


182 


Oscar Cash 


223 


Kathy Wilk 


182 


Ed Breese 


203 


Helen Ryan 


178 


HIGH AVERAGE 




HIGH AVERAGE 




Dave Greene 


185 


Kathv Wilk 


165 


Oscar Cash 


178 


Kim Delong 


147 


Brian Richards 


178 


Norma Pyfrin 


144 



Classifieds 



Scuba equipment for sale. Complete set-up plus 
many extras. Used once. Cost $535.00. Sacrifice. 
Best" offer over S325. Call 659-5780 between 5 p.m. - 
10 p.m. any night. 

For sale: 1973 Suzuke motorcycle TS 185 cc and 
helmet. Topperhnuse Apts. across from JC. Apt. 
#207- Albee. 



For sale: Peavey Musician Amp- 230 watts, 6-12" 
speakers and a horn. Also, a Sekova Les Paul copy. 
Call 622-1366. 



Motorized Skateboard for sale. One horsepower 
gasoline engine. Custom built, cruises about 15-20 
MPH, when it's running good. A super deal at $65. 
Call Rick at 655-9459. 



Lost: a cross pen and pencil set in a pink case. It was 
a meaningful gift to me. Please return to lost and 
found or call 391 -0500. ext. 3455. 



70 Nova, 4 cyl. Economy car. $500. Call 582-7119. 
Female needed to share two bedroom apt. and 
expenses with same. Lake Worth area. Call 586-5275 
or 586-2726. 

Lost: Diamond ring. Call Beth at 582-7908. Lost in 
the area of the first floor of the library. Reward 
offered. 

1976 Red BMW 2002. Rust-proofing, great shape. 
Musi sell. $300 and take over payments. Call 
683-1398. - ..-•"':' -' ' 

]0'4" O'Day Fiberglass sailboat. Crew of one or 
two. Roof racks included. Like new $225. Call 
965-3088. 

For sale: 1973 Honda 450. Good condition. $550. 
Call after 5:00. 737-1480. 

Surfboards: 6'2" orange Fox winger, rounded pin; 
$85. 6'8" white Fox swallowtail; like new- $110. 
7'2" white and blue Fox swallowtail- $55. Call 
585-8896. 



SAILING REGULATIONS 

1. Life jackets must be worn by students while sailing. Check them 
out from equipment room in gym. 

2. Two students are required for each boat 

3. Weather conditions will determine sailing days. 

4. All boats must remain in the north section of Lake Osborne. 

5. Boats mujt be checked out from gymnasium before use. 
be returned to trailer racks after use. 

just be returned by 3:30 p.m. each day. 
ers can't use boats unless accompanied by a swimmer, 
ailors must register with Intramural Office and 
ling skill. 




SAig Club Meeting 

Thus. Oct. 7 -3:00 Gym 




I -~\ 




"** ** PHOTO BY BILL GULLION 

INTRAMURAL SAILING- Fran Lavender and Ron Southard glide agroseA 
Lake Osborne on one of JC's sailboats. f~ 



campus combings 



JC will offer an eight weel^ Wednesday evening course in Profession! 
Writing starting Oct. 6. David Stern, who has written for fhj 
metropolitan newspapers and has written novels, detective stories, shoi 
stories and plays as well as for motion pictures, will teach the course. H« 
will instruct students in the methods of writing, language usage, typf 
usage, style, structure, plot, narrative and dialogue. Registration fortrl' 
$24 course is scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 6 at 7 p.m. in the Scienclj 
building, room SC-11. For further information, call the JC Continuinl 
Education Office at 965-8006. j 

A four- week Tuesday evening learning disabilities workshop will begitl 
at JC on Tuesday, Ojj|^l^ a JttJ7^^ 

Galleon will pay writers. We have many stories from which tcTchoosr 

Contact Mr. Correll, HU-52, or John Childers 582-2986 or mailbox t 

Beachcomber office. 

Early Childhood Club will meet Wednesday, Oct. 6, at 6:30 p.m. at tt 

center for early learning outside in the yard. For more informatio 

contact Norma Barletta, president of ECC, at ext. 242. 

Troubled? Need help? Call Reachout Hotline at 844-1212. Counsela 

who care. 

IEEE meets Monday night at 7:00 p.m. in TE-06 to work on electronii 

projects. Current project: High speed, optical, paper tape reader fi 

mini-computer. 

A comprehensive Salesman Seal Estate Review course will be offer* 

monthly at JC through December. The first of the classes, all to be he', 

on Thursday and Friday evenings from 6-10 p.m. and on Saturdays fro' 

9 a.m. - 5p.m., is scheduled for Oct. 7-9. Registration for the $20 court 

will be accepted in the Registrar's office Monday through Thursday froj 

9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and from 6-7:30 p.m. (The opening day of class, Oct. 

registration will be accepted until 3 p.m. Because the class is in grepr 

demand, it is suggested that applicants register as early as possible. Fj K 

further information, call the Continuing Education Office, 965-8006. 



CONSIDER THIS! 

What takes two people to do, is fun, 
and when you are finished you're tired 
but feel good? 
Find the answer at the 





Meed Racquet Club. 

7625 Meed Drive, Lake Worth, Florida 33460 
Beg. & Adv. Beg. Clinics designed for the novice 
tennis player who doesn't want to miss out on 
the fun and social life tennis has to offer. Call 
now for your reservation in one of our clinics. 
968-9596 

DON'T GET BEAT AT LOVE . . . SCORE! 




Voice of the PaSrn Beach Junior College Student 



Vol. 38 No. 5 



Oct. 11, 1976 



Lake Worth, F I a. 3346-1 




Master Hearings Conclude 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

Despite spending nearly a year 
in negotiation, federal mediation 
. and a special master hearing, the 
United Faculty of JC and the 
administration still are deadlock- 
ed. 

The actual negotiations began 
on Nov. 14, 1976. When these 
proved fruitless, a federal 
mediator was brought in to 
hopefully iron out the numerous 
differences. Each of these plans 
helped settle a few problems, but 



the .long-term attitudes of each 
side still linger. 

The special master hearings, 
conducted by Atty. Douglas 
Stowell, Tallahassee, were also 
unsteady and time consuming. 

Chief negotiator for United 
Faculty, Glen Marsteller felt a 
quiet optimism about what has 
been accomplished. He noted that 
of the some 70 items originally 
being fought over, there are only 
eight or 10 that are still in 
question. But he feels these are 
the most crucial. 



Student Leaders 
Being Recruited 



By Dave Taylor 
Staff-Writer 

Because of the lack of student turn-out Student Government (SG) has 
appointed a committee to recruit people for positions as Senators and 
Secretary of Productions . 

Twelve senators are needed to complete the 24 member legislative 
body. Requirements and completion of at least 12 credit hours with a 
minimum grade point average of 2.0. 

Lambert defines the senate as ' 'the sole student governing body of JC 
who maintain academic standards and regulations that are placed on the 
student body. They have the ability to change things on a statewide 
level." 

Thp office of Secretary of Production coordinates the activities that 
involve the siuucm body such as barbeques, movies, faculty-student 
softbail games and many other student interests. 

"We need a very ambitious student who would be willing to train for 
the position," says Lambert. 

Anyone interested in a position on SG can get an application at the SG 
office and bring it to the Senate meeting Oct. 12 in the SG office at 12:30 
p.m. 



"Realistically, I don't think the 
special master hearings will get 
everything settled," Marsteller 

said. 

There still appears also to be 
some behind the scenes action 
involving the ratification of a new 
contract. The United Faculty of 
JC has yet to sign a contract for 
the 1976-77 year, in lieu of the 
outcome of the hearings. 

"It is conceivable that we could 
teach the entire year without a 
contract," added Marsteller. 

Rumors have also circulated, 
according to some faculty 
members, that if they don't 
accept the decision as final, the 
administration will ratify some 
agreements whether the faculty 
agrees or not. Marsteller did not 



agree or disagree citing them as 
"only rumors at this point." 

The faculty and administration 
both have an "out" to an extent. 
Since this does not involve 
"binding arbitration" each side 
does not necessarily have to agree 

with Stowell's opinion on the 
matter. 

If neither side agrees to "give 
v in" a legislative hearing will be 
the next recourse. The legislative 
body to hear further complica- 
tions would be, ironically, the JC 
Board of Trustees. 

This created quite a stir with 
some members of the United 
Faculty, but as Marsteller put it 
"that is one thing we can't argue 
about." 

On the other hand if Stowell's 
proposals are accepted by both 




CHIEF NEGOTIATOR -Oen 

Marsteller 

sides, the special masters 
findings will be "deemed 
approved" according to Florida 
labor laws. 

But this, as Marsteller said, - 
seems very unlikely. 



Bill Briefing Is Held 



By Cindy McCarthy 

News Editor . 

The League of Women Voters 
conducted a briefing on nine 
proposed amendments to the 
Florida Constitution before a 
group of 60-70 people ' in SAC 
lounge, Wednesday. 

Elsie Leviton, Chairman of the 
Speakers Bureau and past League 
president first spoke about 
educating people. "We need a lot 
of public education before the 




Nov. 2 election," she said. 

Programs of this type are being 
held by the League throughout 
the area for groups of 25 or more 
people, as an attempt to keep the 
public informed on voting issues. 

The format Leviton followed 
had her discuss an amendment, 
then answer questions from the 
audience on it before continuing 
to the next one. 

Of these nine amendments, 
eight were proposed by the 
Florida Legislature, three in the 
1975 session and five in the 1976 
session. 

For the first time in Florida's 
history, an amendment was 
proposed by petition of the 
people. 

The nine proposed amend- 
ments, as they appear on the Fla. 
ballot. 

1. The Sunshine Amendment. 
Contains stricter provisions for 
ethics in government and for full 
financial disclosure by elected 
constitutional officers, for state- 
wide elected officers and 
candidates for these offices. 

2/ Merit Retention and 
Selection of Judges- would, re- 
quire justices of the Supreme 
court and judges of the district 
courts of appeal to submit 
themselves for retention or 
rejection by voters in a general 
election every six years. 

3. Discipline, Removal and 



Retirement of Justices and 
Judges. 

4. Relates to the valuation and 
taxation of property lying within 
certain community redevelop- 
ment areas or for the renewal of 
slum or blighted areas. 

5. Would authorize the 
issuance of revenue — limiting 
the bonds which may be 
outstanding in one fiscal year to 
$100,000 for financing or 
refinancing housing and related 
community development facilit- 
ies. 

6. Relates to limiting the 
number of state employees. 

7. Will check the rulemaking 
powers of administrative agencies 
and make it possible for the 
legislature to nullify or suspend 
any executive agency rule which 
is "without or in excess of 
delegated legislative authority." 

8. Relates to the state 
retirement system, which would 
require that any increase in 
benefits be funded on a sound 
actuarial basis. 

9. Authorizes the creation of a 
capital and mansion commission 
with the authority to establish and 
maintain a plan for furnishing, 
decorating and alternation of the 

Continued page 2 



PHOTO BY BILL JOHNSON 

POLITICAL TALK- Elsie Leviton, League of Women Voters discusses proposed amendments with Dr. 
Yinger, [L] and Dr. Bottasto,[R]. 

Assemblies Announce Delay 



Staff Convenes In Orlando 



By Emily Hamer 
StaffWriter 

Because of the late distribution of activity fees, 
the JC Assembly Committee has been unable to 
arrange performances for the year. 

' 'You can't set up a program unless you know how 
much money you have" stated Chairman Elizabeth 
Davey , Dean of Women . 

Gwendolyn Ferguson, a committee member, 
agreed saying the group is now definitely limited in 
its choice of performers." 

Wednesday's meeting of the committee was 
disbanded shortly after beginning because only five 



of the nine members were in attendance. A quorum 
was not present at the Sept. 29 meeting either, 
which has also stymied the groups ability to 
function. 

The consensus of the group is to obtain one 
speaker, a dancer, a theater performer' and a 
musician. Arthur Musto, a member, would rather 
have three or four good programs than seven or 
eight mediocre assemblies. Musto said the 
committee should concentrate on "name people" 
because students would turn out to see them. 

Andrea Stebor, SG President, agreed, stating, 
' 'people that would generate a lot of interest' ' would 
be best. 



The Beachcomber staff will 
attend the state press meeting in 
Orlando, Oct. 14-16. 

Workshops are divided into 
four categories: editing, news 



writing, feature writing and 
photography. 

Next edition comes out on Oct. 
25. See you then. 



ICC Hears Proposals p> 2 

JC Prepares Play 0.5 

Intramural Round Up p< s 



Monday October II, 1976 BEACHCOMBER -2 



ICC Receives Needed Finances 

Clubs Propose Goals 







PHOTO BY BILL JOHNSON 

ICC HEADS- Tom Solder, chairman flanked by Norma Barletta [L], and Colleen Kenny, [R] secretary 
and treasurer respectively. ■" J *™.™uj 

Yinger To Appear In Film 



in November, deals 



ByJohnChilders 
Staff Writer 

Dr. Richard Yinger was interviewed for a feature 
length film, by William Shatner, at Kennedy Space 
Center. 

The movie, to be released 
with life in outer space. 

Shatner, of Star Trek fame, gave Yinger a VTP 
tour of the center. They filmed in and outside 
Mission Control. 

"It was a lot of fun." says Yinger. "I found 
Shatner to be well informed and bright. The • 
questions were spontaneous." 

Yinger discussed many of the theories he's been 
working on the last two years, such as the possibility 
of the earth being a nest, or lab for space men. 

"The theories of evolution just don't explain the 
complexity of our existence." he says. . ■..- 

He believes humans aren't native to this planet, 
but rather the result of a genetic experiment, and 
that space travel is programmed into the genes. 
"We've migrated all over the earth and now to outer 
space." 

"It's like the salmon swimming upstream." states 
Yinger. "There's no alternative to space travel." 

Which brings on another meaning to, "the meek 



full of space 
extraterrestrial 



shall inherit the earth." 

Yinger believes the Bible is 
references. It may be a record of 
contacts. 

"You can make many references to the Bible 
but," adds Yinger, "My main point is to begin to 
deal seriously with the idea of extraterrestrial life 
and begin scholarly, systematic approach to it." 

Dr. Yinger has now moved from the standpoint of: 
I think — to I believe. 

"I've been gettin the best reactions from my 
ideas." replied Yinger, who is working on a new 
field of exotheology, or a whole new outlook of the 
interpretation of God. 

Dr. Timothy Leary, famed professor fired from 
Harvard for exEerimenlfip] 

at FAU 'Weanesaay night' "concerning ftis own 
exopsychology. He used many of Yinger's ideas and 
even some of the same words. Yinger gave Leary 
some of his papers and they may get together later. 

"People from different backgrounds are coming 
to similar conclusions." Yinger declared. 

Yinger is moving head first into the "outer 
limits." Promoting a legitimate, respected and 
affectable awareness of the universe, he feels will 
help his ideas gain the credibility others have 
attained. 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

Inter Club Council (ICC) became financial reality with the allotment 
of $3,500 from the Student Activity Fees at the Oct. 1 meeting. 

"We are an officially recognized organization," said Tom Solder, 
chairman of ICC. 

Dr. Harold C. Manor noted, "I'm a firm supporter of ICC." "It goes 
hand in hand with academic studies." 
Club proposals were also presented with the first two clubs being the 
Early Childhood Club (ECC) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic 
Engineers (IEEE). 

ECC spoke of building a climbing structure in collaboration with the 
Building Club for the Early Learning Center. 

IEEE, after stating club purposes, proposed field trips to a number of 
engineering plants as well as Southern Bell. They also proposed building 
of a computer to be used by students and for training of 
electrically-inclined students. ICC passed membership for both clubs 
unanimously. 

A new club was also introduced to ICC. The Political Union Awareness 
Club, with Randy Parker as President and Edwin Pugh as faculty 
advisor, will apply soon for recognition in ICC. 

ICC's "beer bash" is to be held Sun. Oct. 31 at John Prince Park in 
the Mound Circle. 

Beer, chicken, baked beans, salads and soft drinks are on the menu. 
As for music, a "coffee-house type" with artists from JC performing, 
highlight the day. 



Transition Eased 
By FA U Advisors 



Assemblies 

From page I 

Ferguson would like to see the 
committee bring in at least one 
black-oriented program. Silvio 
Estrada, a JC music instructor, 
favors Vincent Price and flamenco 
guitarist Carlos Montoya. 

Musto said, "I'm interested in 
Steve Allen and Catherine 
Mackin, the NBC newscaster." 

Stebor expressed an interest in 
Jean-Michel Cousteau, Jacques 
Cousteau's son, and the ex 
vice-president of VietNam, 
Nguyen Cao Ky. 

Also under consideration are 
Sally and Jack Jenkins and Bill 



McDonald. A photographer and 
diver for Cousteau, McDonald 
would provide a week long film 
festival as well as a speech. 

Ferguson would like student 
feedback and ideas for perform- 
ers. Students can contact a 
committee member or attend the 
next meeting. 

Davey announced that meet- 
ings will be held every 
Wednesday' at 2:30 p.m. in the 
South Lounge, until a quorum is 



present and the assembly 
programs selected. 



FAU COUNSELOR - William 
McCray, FAU counselor will 
be at JC, every Friday until 
December. 



making the transition from here 
to an upper division college, are 
being given a chance to ease the 
change somewhat. 

William McCray and Shirley 
Finger, Florida Atlantic Univer- 
sity (FAU) counselors, will be on 
campus for the rest of the 
semester. 

Counseling sessions are every 
Friday through December 3, (with 
the exception of Nov. 26), at the 
central campus' Career Informa- 
tion Center on the first floor of the 
library. Two Tuesday evening 
counseling sessions will be held 
Oct. 26 and Nov. 23 in registrar's 
office. 

According to McCray, their 
major purpose is to make smooth 
transitions from JC to FAU. 

"We can direct a student to 
what he can do at JC to prepare 
himself for FAU. By providing an 



Briefing 



From page I 



capital and Governor's mansion 
with terms of commission 
members not to exceed nine 
years. 

The seventh amendment may 
be taken off the ballot because it 
has received much opposition. 

Leviton closed the ' briefing, 
saying, "They (the amendments) 
are going to affect us and future 
generations." 




rHOTO BY BILL JOHNSON 

FAU COUNSELOR- William McCray, FAU counselor will be at JC, every Friday until December. 



Any student that presents a 
completed application and trans- 
cript to Finger or McCray will 
receive a brief and tentative 
evaluation as to their acceptance 
possibilities at FAU. 

Appointments with depart- 
mental chairmen can be arranged 
for individuals seeking specific 
information about their major. 

Accessible literature in the 
form of pamplet, catalogues and 
applications are furnished at the 
career center. 

"I encourage all students to 
take advantage of the county 
support of both community 
colleges and state universities," 
McCray stated. 

FAU cooperates with JC in 
numerous ways. JC's South 
campus is housed at Henderson 
School at FAU. The advantage 
lies in that the courses offered 
share both JC's semester system 
and FAU's quarter system. A 
student has the opportunity to 
take extra courses. 

Cooperative programs are 
designed for the industrious JC 
student who may enroll in classes 
at FAU under a dual enrollment 
program as part of their lower 
division studies. 

McCray noted that the most 
popular majors, judging students 
response, seem to be business, 
accounting, criminal justice, 
exceptional child education, 
humanities, communications, and 
engineering and science majors. 

"Students responded well to 
the first counseling session held 
last Friday," said McCray. 

Take advantage of this 
opportunity by making an 
appointment with the secretary in 
the guidance office (Mrs. May 
Fecitt) or the registrar's office 
for evening students. 




1 



Editorials 



Books Are For Enjoying 

How would you react if someone told you of a new world, close at 
hand.containing vast storehouses of treasures and delights and free for 
anyone to enjoy? 

"That's impossible! Why haven't I heard about it?" would be the 
universal reaction. 

You have! Only most of us don't bother to take advantage of this 
wonderful opportunity — our own JC library complex. In it you will find 
a top-notch collection of library materials. 

Can't afford all the fine magazines published? Or a newspaper 
subscription? Why not utilize our library and avail yourself of its copies. 
Perhaps if the demand were stepped up magazines could be held back 
longer before being sent to the binders for permanent records. 

Best sellers? Look in the library! 

Year after year, instructors urge their classes to expose themselves to 
the wonderful world of information and knowledge, with very little 
response. 

One deterrent could be that many students are not sure of the best 
way to use a library. When they enter this awesome atmosphere they 
simply do not know how to find what they need. Many students are 
hesitant to admit how little they know about the use of a library filing 
system. 

Instructors could bring new classes into direct contract as a routine, to 
help them feel more at home. Instructors who do this are amply 
rewarded for their trouble when they see their class members react with 
delight as they DISCOVER. 

Repeated contacts with books can be compared to eating olives — you 
develop a taste for them and you'll get hooked for life . 



Fear Of Aging 
To Be Conquered 



David Taylor 

Columnist 



Fear of aging soon will be conquered. 

Scientists in Madison, Wis., are experimenting with a chemical that 
will prevent cross-linking of genes. This process has been found to 
interfere with the functions of a cell, causing aging and death. 

Scientists believe that the aging process can be reversed if they find 
an enzyme that will dissolve the interlocking bonds. If so, this could 
result in an increase to one's lifespan of from 80 to 800 years. 

Many doubtful students are skeptical about this report and think it is a 
fallacy. 

If man questions something — he Can find answers. There's no limit to 
man's capabilities if he tries. 

Polio was considered a "killer disease" before a preventative was 
discovered. 

The Wright Brothers flew the first mechanical airplane in 1903. 
America's first manned rocket was launched 58 years later. We landed 
men on the moon, skylabs orbit the Earth and two Viking Robot 
Laboratories are operating on Mars. 

A single experiment in each, smaller than a breadbox, duplicates the 
performance of 40 technicians in four fully equipped Earth laboratories. 
Who knows what is to come! 

If man makes such achievements in science, then why can he not also 
be competent in conquering aging. 

A prestigious organization such as The American Chemical Society 
would not go out on a limb just for publicity alone. 

The college student of today will have to cope with an 
ever-progressing future. There's no reason to dwell in the past, with all 
the short-sightedness and limitations that this implies . 



Beachcomber* 

Palm Beach Junior College . 
4200 S. Congress Ave., Lake Worth, Fla 33461 
(305) 965-8000, ext. 210 



Editor-in-chief. 
Associate Editor-Editorial 

Associate Editor-News 

Associate Editor-Feature, Sports 

News Editor 

Venture Editor 

Photo Editor ■. 

Business Manager 



■ Dennis Glavin 
, Gunda Caldwell 
. . . Bill Johnson 
Steve Farnsworth 
, Cindy McCarthy 
... Frank Smith 
... .Bill GuUion 
Karen Abramowitz 



Consultant .. Charles R. McCreight 

The Beachcomber is published weekly from our editorial offices In 
the Student Pulications Building at Palm Beach Junior College 
Opinions expressed In the Beachcomber are those of the editors or 
writers and are not nesessarily those of the Palm Beach Junior 

Letter!" must not exceed 2oo words, must be signed by the author, 
received in the Beachcomber office no later than 4 p.m. on 
Wednesday and are subject to condensation. 



Monday October II, I976 BEACHCOMBER-3 



£to^lle*c 



rv. 



ut f VM.wm 




Wanna hear a dirty joke about Earl Butz? 



Editor 
Forum 




In an election year, each 
candidate makes his plea to 
entertain each sector of the 
voting population. 

The candidates will 
te sweet-talk" groups of people 
into believing that "in 
January you will be represen- 
ted." 

But this year something 
happened that should be 
interesting to students of all 
ages throughout the country. 
Gerald Ford forgot about you. 

On Sept. 29, Ford vetoed a 
bill which would upgrade 
education on a national scale. 
It would also force people into 
"helping themselves" by 
education rather than collect- 



ing frivolously on one welfare 
roll or another. 

Here's the capper! Ford, on 
the same day, approved a $2.5 
billion pay increase, a hike of 
some 5 per cent, for federal 
employees, 

Let's give Jerry a little 
credit, the federal employees 
wanted a 8.3 per cent 
increase. The public-works job 
legislation that Jimmy Carter 
has backed will probably be 
vetoed. Is it to be vetoed 
because it is not acceptable or 
because it is endorsed by 
Carter? 

This is something that 
directly affects the students at 
JC. It appears Ford feels that 



Newspaper Week To Be Celebrated 



October 17-23 has been 
designated as National Newspap- 
er Week. The press is our first 
line defense, newspapers are the 
watch dogs of a nation. They 
speak out the truth to let the 
people know what is going on in 
government and communities. 
Corrections of social wrongs and 
government corruption often have 
begun because of an alert press. 

When a reporter errs or acts 



unethical, there is a loud cry 
against an irresponsible press. 
When a member of the news 
media functions exceptionally 
well, no one notices. Correspon- 
dents for newspapers have 
covered wars, disasters, traged- 
ies and celebrations. 

Where there's action, there you 
will find the press. Never has a 
nation been so well-informed as 
we are today, thanks to the 



Denny Glavin 
Editor 



young people simply won't 
turn out and vote. He 
apparently has tried to keep 
his administration one of 
"status quo," 

But students nationally 
have not all stood pat. The 
Michigan Daily (University of 
Michigan at Ann- Arbor) 
editorialized Ford kicking off 
his campaign at their school 
similar to l "Hitler making his 
first donation to the United 
Jewish Appeal." 

With the elections three 
weeks away, the young voters 
must support the candidate 
who best represents their 
opinions. Your views should 
be the most important item 

Gunda Caldwell 
Editorials 



watchful eyes of the newspapers. 
In spite of attempts to manipulate 
news or distort it, a free press can 
make sure that you get accurate 
information. 

Without a free press, we could 
lose all our other freedoms. It has 
happened in other countries, It 
can happen here. When the press 
is no longer free, then neither are 
we. 




W- — 




Monday October II, 1976 BEACHCOMBER 4 



.B$P** 



Monday October II, 1976 BEACHCOMBER-S 




§Sl$i^ Coming: "Dedwood Dick Or The Game Of Gold" 



By Frank Smith 
Venture Editor 

' in- irsals for the JC fall play was about to begin when 

■ 1 1 visitors entered the auditorium. 
. in rs are not normally allowed to view the play 
.'i s but because they seemed kind and quiet they 
-i Lowed to stay. They watched and their comments 
were indicative of the progress the players are making. 

After the run-through a gray haired man with a poetic 
visage stood quickly up. 

"Deadwood Dick or The Game of Gold" he announced, 
then cleared his throat. "The old west, the color of 
whiskey and a gambler's vest. . " He walked to the stage 
where with dancing eyes he continued," The sound of 
pianos and singing saloon girls, gunfire and horses. ." His 
voiced whispered the next line in alliterative succulence 
"Pearl-handled patent pending perforatin' pistols 

spinning in the Spanish hands of the temptress." 

Walking towards Ned Harris (Tim Irish) the hero he 
spoke ' 'The hero stands in the hands of his captors on trial 
for vile accusations untrue. Haunted by the ever present 
evil of a good bad guy." (Gary Lazer as Black'n Red) 

He pauses and looks sadly to the floor," . . and a dagger 
in the heart of poor Pong Ping. ' ' 

Then, pointing to an imaginary audience, he commands 
"Look, for the swinging doors ! Look, for the hanging tree! 
Look for the whipping of the Chinese cook, look! ' ' 

^ The old man turned to the two heroines, smiled and said 
"Rose and Lily. . . The Blossom sisters" then bowed his 
Debbie Gaggiani as Lily head lowly and left. 



'You HI your parts memorized and it looks to me 
like you' irking on characterizations" she continued. 
"Yes, e" acknowledged the cast. 

"Cha: ization is important, you know, because it 
helps y aintain your roles." The cast nodded in 
agreemi fl noticed also that your costumes look so 
nice. . .(tally the hoop skirts on Lily (Debbie Gigiani) 
and Rcw Han Larry)' 

Do yc p all your costumes ready?" she asked. 

"No," * 
thatjoun 
us. . Hey 

"Yes? 

"Can 



jneof the cowboys, "I was just going to ask 
|ver there to put a message in the paper for 

owledged. 
lit a message in the paper asking anybody 



High Drama Exists In "Soaps 



A Deaf Old Lady shuffled up the aisle. 
! ! play is certainly coming along well." 

"Thank you" said the cast in unison. 



'My, my, this 



By Don Vaughan 
Staff Writer 

The majority of American housewives 
have a strong urge for a heavy dose of grief 
and misery thai must be satisfied daily in 
the form of soap operas. Many is the 
number of husbands who have come home 
after a hard day at work to find their wives 
crying loud and long because "Irving is 
having an affair with Mildred's mother and 
Alvin just ran into a garbage truck and 
ruptured his spleen while on his way to see 
his girlfriend who just had an abortion after 
an affair with Mildred' s father ! ' ' 

Let's view an average episode of "The 
Love of Lust" and find out just what fun 
the "Soaps" can be. 

Announcer: When last we left young 
Kimmie Knight, Lake Worth socialite and 
poiitical activist, she was about to go to 
dinner with handsome Melvin Podunk, ace 
brain surgeon and dyed in the wool 
Republican. Let us join them as Kimmie 
speaks. 

Young Kimmie Knight: Oh, Melvin, 
Melvin, Melvin. Whatever will I do! 
Handsome Melvin Podunk: What's the 
matter, Kimmie? Find another man 
sleeping on your steps last night? - 



Young Kimmie Knight: Oh, silly boy! My 
dog Killer took care of that problem long 
ago! No, I was just thinking, here I am, 38 
years old (though a tender 38) and I don't 
even have a boyfriend, mucb less a - 
husband! Sob! 

Handsome Melvin Podunk: What about 
that wealthy and promising Frank 
Fogbound? I thought you two were rather 
smitten on each other ! 
Young Kimmie Knight: You mean 22 year 
old Frank Arnold Fogbound, that 
Republican Architecture major at Pennsyl- 
vania University, son of Philo Pizano 
Fogbound, rubber band mogul and 
member of the Sister of the Uppity Pidgeon 
Catholic church? Why, I hardly know 
anything about him! 

Handsome Melvin Podunk: Oh. Well, let 
us change the subject to one more 
pleasant. How's your overly intelligent 
sister Valerie? 

Young Kimmie Knight: She just had an 
illegitimate child. 
Handsome Melvin Podunk: Again? 
Young Kimmie Knight: Well, it did take 
her mind off her alcoholism! 
Handsome Melvin Podunk: What was it 
this time? 





Young Kimmie Knight: Half Mexican and 

half Japanese. 

Handsome Melvin Podunk: Quite a 

talente(Lgy& 

'ftmisoijrerlllll^MrPo^unBrTBaTS'nice." 

got a letter from my brother Ozzie the other 

day. 

Young Kimmie Knight: Has he finally 

gotten over the mononucleosis he 

contracted from that lady impersonating a 

nun? 

Handsome Melvin Podunk: Yeah, he got 

over that a long time ago. He married a 

lady proctologist. Lots of openings in that 

Field. 

Young Kimmie Knight: A sweet boy, that 

Ozzie. Say, Melvin, you look troubled. Is 

there something bothering you? 

Handsome Melvin Podunk: Well, now that 

you mention it, yes. I told my girlfriend 

that I wanted to date other girls and she 

said okay, but I don't think she meant it 

because she was crying hysterically at the 

time and she threw a wax pear at me. My 

conscience says I should stay with her, but 

my wandering soul says "Go on, jerk, date 

other girls!" 

Young Kimmie Knight: So what are you 

going to do? 

Handsome Melvin Podunk: Go out with 

you. 

Young Kimmie Knight: Wise decision. 

GASP! ! 

Handsome Melvin Podunk: Kimmie!! 

What's the matter? 

Young Kimmie Knight: There's wealthy 

and promising Frank Fogbound in that 

booth over there with that floozie Brenda 

LaBoom ! 

Handsome Melvin Podunk: What are you 

going to do? 

Young Kimmie Knight: There's only one 

thing to do, Melvin! 

Handsome Melvin Podunk: You mean. . . 

Young Kimmie Knight: Yes, I'm going 

over and put croutons on his Ceasar salad! 

Handsome Melvin Podunk: GASP! 

Announcer: Will young Kimmie Knight 
actually put croutons on Frank's Ceasar 
salad? Will Handsome Melvin Podunk ever 
get enough green stamps to buy an 
Inflate-a-Mate so he can avoid further 
embarrassing situations with young 
Kimmie Knight in the future? For the 
answers to these and many other equally 
stupid questions, tune in tomorrow for 
episode 567,897 of "The Love of Lust"! 



In tin 
drama 
product^ 
schedule 
have fini 
Fortunalj 
merely a 
help bull 



requiring 
schedule 
jobs are 
fumishil 



Stage 
design a 
lot of b 
however 
anticipat 



le against time Mr. Art Musto of the JC 
ent has begun the charge. The fall 
'Deadwood Dick of The Game of Gold" is 
November 4-7 and by then Musto must 
uilding Calamity Jane's Mantrap saloon, 
has help. Gone are the days when actors 
on say they "merely" act] they also' must 
ns. 

|(rk on a saloon is an organizational task 

lated effort so the workers have a time 

pp their pace, a work list to make sure all 

along with blueprints of the room and 



iction requires the skills of carpentry, art 

ferstanding of space relations, along with a 

ring of nails. The crew under Musto 

ite large and there are no problems 



The latfevelopment has been to create the walls of 
the saloitonstructed by the glueing of canvas to 
wooden iijs. The "walls" are then painted to appear 
solid. 

concern among the crews so far has 
saim ol ™ al „ n j„ B . TU 6 actors in the 
of toy pistols and holsters, cowboy hats, 
'shirts, cowboy boots, spurs and 
rteckercW||rhe actresses' are in need of petticoats 
Any pew 
needed 
departing ebecca Castle, or Michele Miles. 

by Frank Smith 



Vet Can He 



Mary Lavers 
Staff Writer 

It's hard to imagine him 
being your "best friend," 
when "your dog" has spent 
the day eating your father's 
slippers, destroying the gar- 
den and not waiting to do his 
"duties' ' before you have time 
to take him for a walk. 

But then you remember 
your younger days, in the dead 
of night, when it was 
Ralph... .Spot. ...or Ginger that 
you came to when you were 
scared, unhappy, lonely or just 
needed an open ear. 

All of those deep, dark 
secrets were poured out to that 
one friend who seemingly 
understood everything you 
wanted him to. 

But what is your pet 
thinking as you pour out the- 
trials and tribulations of your 
life? 

Perhaps those who best 
understand pets, other than 



ko may want to help supply these much 
are asked to notify the JC drama 



who has cap pistols, cowboy boots and hats and wouldn't 
mind letting us use them to contact us? ' ' he asked. 

"Nope." I answered. 

".Don't worry kids.." said the Deaf Old Lady," ..I'll tell 
all my friends." Then she started to leave. 

"Thank you," said the cast. 

The third member was another journalist. I discerned 
that by the way he sought out the director, Ms. Sunny 
Meyer, and asked her a host of questions. 

"How are the rehearsals going?" he asked (A. -typical 
journalistic approach) 

"Very well, as a matter of fact we're right on schedule." 
answered Ms. Meyer. 

"What is the idea behind the speeded up scenes?" 
Asked the journalist. For a minute or so the cast had been 
going through their scenes double-time. 

Meyer explained that it was to make the actors work 
harder on picking up their cues and entrances, and to 
make sure the characters are'being seen by the audience. 

Ms. Meyer also explained that the players were indeed 
working on their characterizations, "getting into" their 
roles, that they were working on knowing why their 
character does and says what the script has him to do or 
say. 

The journalist closed his notebook and left, and the 
players continued practicing. 




PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER 

Bobby Amor and Ross Thomas trade lines in a scene from "Deadwood Dick". 



Household Pets And Birth Control 



By Audrey Snow 
Staff Writer 

More than 120 million cats and 
dogs are born every year. 
Twenty-five per cent of these 
animals are claimed or placed in 
new homes. This means that the 
remaining 75% are needlessly 
put to death if they are found by 
pounds or shelters. 

The fate of animals that are 
dumped along roadsides is much 

worse. Many starve to death, 
slowly. Thousands get hit by cars. 
Some die of diseases. Others get 
trapped or eat poison set out for 
wild animals. 



) Your Best Friend 



fcteranar- 
' to keep 
! have to 
m the 
"yner. 



the owner, are 
ians who not onl 
pets healthy but 
advise and 
concerned and lov 

Although physs frcblems 
can usually be 
there is still no k 
understand what 
mind of a pet, ace 
Keith W. Chapin, 
Beach veterinaria 

"It's not that 
like to, and it wc 
help, but there is ay to tell 
' what they're thi £," D r- 
Chapin said. ' ? Ve g ot 
plenty of dog iat are 
boarder-line so 'hrenics, 
but there are very >ho are 
born bad. It's '<:' in the 
training or lack of Nee and 
love." 

Dr. Chapin ejaXed that 
many times a pet'I|son a iity 
is formed by thej|its an( j 
traits of the ow|fe"So me 



P «ay to 
N in the 
Pg.to Dr. 
e st Palm 

wouldn't 
certainly 



dogs will come in here crazy as 
anything and as soon as the 
owner has left, it is as cool as 
glass, he said, "and it's "all 
because the owner is nervous 
orfigidty." 

Some pet problems which 
may be termed as physical by 
the owner, may only be "an 
act" on the part of the animal 
as an attention-getting device. 
"It's very common in toy 
breeds that if they're not 
getting their way, they'll start 
limping," Dr. Chapin said. 
"Bring the dog in here and 
he'll run around like nothings 
wrong. As soon as it gets home 
the limping will start again." 

"Some of these animals are 
almost to the point of being 
human, and they're pretty 
shrewd," he said. 

"I have one large dog who 
comes to me that has been 
taught to smile on command. 
Say 'smile' and his lips curl up 
and he gives you a big grin." 



Dr. Chapin believes that a 
dog's behavior "all boils down 
to the owner. How would you 
like being caged up all day and 
then left out and fed when 
your owner comes home and 
then have him go to bed 
without paying any attention 
to you? It's something to think 
about." 



Over population is the major 
cause for all unwanted animals. 
You'll find some of the animals 
doomed are the cutest, liveliest, 
most lovable little .cats and dogs 
you've ever seen. 
The Animal Regulation, Animal 
Rescue League, and Animal Birth • 
Control are three local organiza- 
tions that prevent cruelty to 
animals through education and 
sterlization. 

In West Palm Beach alone, 
approximately 1,500 dogs and 
cats are injected with a lethal 
overdose of sodium pentobarbi- 
tal. The drug is painless and with 
in a few seconds of inoculation the 
animal is dead. 

Eighty per cent out of 10,780 
impounded animals were put to 
sleep last year by the Animal 
Regulation (AR) according to 
Dennis Moore (humane education 
chairman). AR is funded by the 
county and operates on the fringe 
of Palm. Beach International 
Airport. 

Their objective is to carry out 
the Animal Control Ordinance, 
educate people, collect stray 
animals, shelter, and sterilize 
adopted pets. 

A stray animal is held for a 

minimum of 7-days for redemp- 

. tion. If owner does not claim pet, 

it is elegible for adoption. AH 

adopted pets must be spayed or 



neutered. Adoption costs range 
from $7.00 - $30.00. The fee 
includes all shots and surgical 
sterilization through facility. 
Unadopted animals are put to 
death after 7-days. 

AR provides an effective public 
humane education program 
emphasizing the need for proper 
care, treatment, and control of 
animals. Last year nearly 10,000 
students in 30 schools participa- 
ted in this program. 

"People have got to be aware 
of the responsibility in adopting 
an animal. It's like taking in 
another member to your family," 
stated Moore. 

"The more aware people 
become of this program — the 
more unwanted animals we have. 
We'd rather have people bring 
their pets to us than have them 
drop it off somewhere." 

A free tick and flea dipping 
facility is at your disposal. 
Chemical is good for 2-weeks. 

The Animals Rescue League 
has a larger facility and is 
structured a little differently. 
They have a creamatorium where 
as the AR loads dead animals into 
a pick up truck and carts them to a 
dump. The ARL also has a low 
cost spaying and neutering 
program for persons that have a 
yearly income of S7.000.00. 

"We speak for those who can't 



This pet looks to a dim future for % Sprin mm , ons o£ 
pets are abandoned, left to die in ArtP^Very year. K you 
must have a pet, you must be respond 



lllllllillllillli 




PHOTO COURTESY OF ANIMAL BIRTH CONTROL, INC. 



speak for themselves" is the 
slogan for Animal Birth Control 
(ABC). 

ABC is a non profit 
organization formed five years 
ago to help low and middle 
income individuals who can not 
affort to spay or neuter their pet. 

"We also help find unwanted 
animals homes," noted Mary 
Stein (thrift shop chairman). 

The normal fee to sterilize your 
pet would cost S45-S65. If you 
qualify for a price reduction it will 
cost SI0-S18 for a cat and S15-S20 
for a dog. Prices are slightly 
higher for pregnant animals. 

"We try to send the animal to 
the vetinarian of their choice," 
said Glynda Herman. (a concern- 
ed and devoted member). 

Charles Keenum is the 
President of the 250 member 
organization and he is in an 
unusual position when it come to 
dogs, he's a postman the 
nuisance of all mailman. Instead 
of gingerly walking away from 
them, he goes out of his way to 
become their friend. He seems to 
be more concerned about them 
than himself. 

ABC operates a Thrift Shop on 
Narcissus Ave., W.P.B. where 
most of their revenue is obtained 
through sales and donations. 
Memberships costs $5.00 annual- 
ly and are another reliable source 
of income. Cans are set up in 
restaurants and stores which 
bring $100- $125 in (enough to 
spay four animals). 

ABC pays for half of the fee 
along with the needy individual 
who puts up the other half for 
vetinarian fees. Shots are not 
included in ABC's contribution. 

"Our problem is that no one 
can see what we are doing. We 
try to prevent all cruelties of over 
population but it can't be done 
without your cooperation. Last 
month we had to turn down alot of 
people because we didn't have 
enough funds to help everybody. 
By donating any little bit that you 
can, to Animal Birth Control 
would help spay maybe your 
future dog or cat," added Mrs. 
Evelyn Keenum. 

Two hundred and sixty-four 
dogs and cats' are being born each 
day in Palm Beach County. There 
may soon be more than one dog or 
cat for each of the 184,000 
households existing in this 
county. 



Monday October II, 1976 BEACHCOMBER -7 



Monday Octobet U T 1976 BEACHCOMBER -6 



Ad Managers Join Staff 
Help In Attending Workshop 



By Jeannette Banning 
StaffWriter 

Despite a struggle in finding willing help, the 
Beachcomber is now an advertising paper again. 

With the addition of two advertising managers, 
Mary Ann Macdonald and Randy Duncan, the 
Beachcomber will now be taking commercial ads 
from local businesses. The added revenue will help 
the Beachcomber to attend both state and national 
workshops. 

Both Macdonald and Duncan answered an 
editorial in the paper concerning the need for help in 
advertising. 



Macdonald is a Journalism major while Duncan is 
in the Business Administration program. 

Only two ads were published in the last issue, but 
they will increase as the businesses are notified. 

Both agreed, "New businesses are tight with 
money and old businesses have other advertising 
commitments." 

New rate sheets are being printed. In the 
meantime, Macdonald and Duncan are soliciting ads 
with copies of past Beachcombers and interpreting 
the soon-to-be-printed rates. 



Scuba equipment for sale. 
Complete set-up plus many 
extras. Used once. Cost $535.00. 
Sacrifice. Best offer over $325." 
Call 659-5780 between 5 p.m. - 10 
p.m. any night. 

Foe sale: 1973 Suzuki motorcycle 
TS 185cc and helmet. Topperhou- 
se Apts. across from JC. Apt. 
#207-Albee. 

For sale: Peavey Musician 
Amp-230 watts, 6-12" speakers 
and a horn. Also, a Sekova Les 
Paul copy. Call 622-1366. 
Motorized Skateboard for sale: 
One horsepower gasoline engine. 
Custom built, cruises about 15-20 
MPH, when it's running good. A 
super deal at $65. Call Rick at 
655-9459. 

Lost: a Cross pen and pencil set in 
pink case. It was a meaningful 
gift to me. Please return to lost 
and found or call 391-0500, ext. 
3455. 
70 Nova, 4 cyl. Economy car. 



Classifieds 



$500. Call 582-7119. 
Female needed to share two 
bedroom apt. and expenses with 
same. Lake Worth area. Call 
586-5275 or 586-2726; 
Lost: Diamond ring. Call Beth at 
582-7908. Lost in the area of the 
first floor of the library. Reward 
offered. 

1976 Red BMW 2002. Rust- 
proofing, great shape. Must sell. 
$300 and take over payments. 
Call 683-1398. 

For sale: 1973 Honda 450. Good 
condition. $550. Call after 5:00. 
737-1480. 

Surfboards: 6'2" orange Fox 
winger, rounded pin; $85. 6'8" 
white Fox swallowtail - $55. Call 
585-88%. 

Spelling Bald-win Acto-sonfe 
Spinette Piano. Excellent condi- 
tion. Call 844-7777. 
11 Piece Ludwig Drum Set. 
Zilgian Cymbals. Good Condition. 
$275.00. 844-2743. 



Lost: Leonard H.S. class ring, 
blue stone, 1976, initials J.C. 
McB. reward offered $20. Call 
John 965-7783. 

Wanted Babysitter: 1 year old 
son, October 13- Nov. 17 from 
9:30 to 12:00 a.m. every 
Wednesday, high salary, North 
Palm Beach 844-7777. 
For Rent: with option to buy. 
Single mobile home, completely 
furnished. $200 monthly. In 
Tavares Cove. Call 626-5030. 
VWBng New re-built engine with 
83mm pistons in cylinders. New 
crank bearing etc. 90 horsepower, 
new paint, perfect body and 
interior. $700. Moving North. 
965-9515. 

10'4" O'Day Sailboat, similar to 
"Sunfigh|"!Hq§£ 
-YS^WfetPelftf 
$15, sell for $8. Call 965-3088. 
PREGNANT? PROBLEMS? Call 
Children's Home Society for Free 
Counseling. 844-9785, Ask for 
Trudy Brown. 

















Volleyball 5-4 For Week, Wins Home Match 



_„^, Photo by BUI Johnson 

JC — North News 




PHOTO BY BARRY VAN WAGNER 

GLAD TO HAVE THEM- Randy Duncan [L] and Mary Ann Macdonald 
advertising managers for Beachcomber. 



By Robbin Barber 
StaffWriter 



The women's volleyball team 
compiled a 5-4 record in its 
matches last week. 

The Pacers competed in the St. 

Petersburg Tri-Match Oct. 1 and 

the Manatee Invitational Oct. 2. 

They split their matches there, 

coming away with a 3-3 record for 



the two days. 
On Oct. 5, the Pacers defeated 
Broward North 15-0, 15-11 in a 
home match in the gym. 

In the first game Broward 
North played badly, as the Pacers 
shut them out, 15-0. 

During the second set, Broward 
North awakened to score the first 
five points. The Pacers came right 
back and scored five continuous 
points. After exchanging leads 



several times, the Pacers 
captured the game, 15-11. 

On Oct. 6, the Pacers split a 
doubleheader against Florida 
Bible and Dade North. 

The women defeated Florida 
Bible in an uncompetitive match 
15-0, 15-0. 

In the first game Florida Bible 
didn't score any points as the 
Pacers won 15-0. 

Florida Bible was unable to 



serve in the second game as Mary 
Schuler served 15 consecutive 
points. 

In the second game the women 
were outplayed by Miami Dade 
North 3-15, 2-15. 

Despite the fact that the Pacers 
lost, the team played well. The 
score definitely was not an 
indication of how the Pacers 
played. 

"I would say it was the best 



game we ever played," says 
Knowles, "They were just more 
consistent that we were." 

I predict we will be in the top 
five in state, if we wind up in the 
top five we will have done well 
considering we're an unexperien- 
ced team." 

The next match is scheduled on 
Tuesday evening in the gym 
against Broward Central. 





Hey, Musicians! ICC needs Coffee-house type entertainment for Bash at 
Joh Prince Park, Oct. 31, 12-5 p.m. Please apply through note addressed 
to "Bash chairman, c/o ICC," Include name, address, phone number, 
type music you play, and technical equipment you have or need, etc. 

HH 101-Health Waiver Exam will be given once this semester on 
Thursday, Oct. 21, in Science 26 at 1:00-2:30 p.m. Sign up in the Testing 
Center and pay $22.00 in advance. 

Swine Flue shots planned. Our students, faculty, and staff members 
are encouraged to go to the' Lake Worth Shuffleboard Center on 
Wednesday, Oct. 20, Thursday, Oct. 21, and Friday, Oct. 22 between 
10:00 a.m. -6:00 p.m. 

Attention Students who plan to teach 4-12 year old children, as well as 
teachers and parents who are involved with children in that age bracket. 
You will be interested in a four-week Tuesday evening learning 
disabilities workshop starting at Palm Beach Junior College, Tuesday 
Oct. 12, at 7 p.m. Mrs. Michael Adair, certified learning djsar. " 

«amw" i reac 1 
ng' edulcatiiSft-office 
at 965-8006. 

The Jewish Community Center of the Palm Beaches, Inc. announces a ! 
Simchat Torah rally for freedom on Oct. 17, 7:30 p.m., at the West Palm 
Beach Auditorium. The public is invited to join in the celebration of this 
joyous holiday. 

Speakers of national prominence, such as Secretary of Commerce 
Elliot Richardson, will participate. Many national and local public 
figures will be present. 

Call for ticket information at the Jewish Community Center- 689-7700. 

The Palm Beach Junior College scholarship concert is to be held 
Sunday, Oct. 24 at 3:00 p.m. in the JC Auditorium. You'll hear the I 
concert choir, band and orchestra playing music to suit every taste. i 

All proceeds will go to the music scholarship program at the college. 
Tickets will be available at the door on the day of the concert, Sunday, 
Oct. 24, at 3:00 p.m. See you there!!! 

Travel Agency Procedures, is an eight-session evening course to be 
held on Tuesday and Thursday evenings, starting Oct. 19. Travel agent 
James P. Wallas will teach this basic introductory course. 

He will explain all major aspects of the business, ticket writing, airljne \ 
documents, hotel bookings, tour packages and other valuable topics w'uUg 
be covered. J 

For further information, call the JC continuing education office, = 
965-8006. ' 

JC will offer an eight-week Wednesday evening course in Neurology ' 
and Orthopedics starting Oct. 20 at 7 p.m. 

This valuable course will be taught by Clinical Specialist Mrs. Diana , 

Franfurth, who has a master's degree in Rehabilitative Nursing j 

Education. j 

For further information about the course, please call the JC continuing j 

education office, 965-8006. ! 

We'd Like To Correct 

The Beachcomber would like to apologize for a quote that was ; 
improperly inserted in the Delia Omicron story of the Oct. 4 issue. Laury • 
Becherer was quoted as saying "I wanted to get involved in tutoring." ; 
.Ms. Becherer did not actually make that statement. 




Cross-Country Finishes Seventh 



By Steve Farnsworth 
Associate Editor 

Losing to several teams by a 
narrow margin, the cross-country 
team finished seventh out of nine 
teams in the Florida State 
Invitational. 

"It's bad enough to be 
seventh," said cross-country 
coach Dick Melear, "but it's 
downright frustrating when only 
11 points separated us from 
fourth place." 

Scores for the meet were Dade 
South, 26 points, Seminole 66, 
Florida JC 95, Indian River 116, 
Lake City 123, Brevard 125, JC 
127, Dade North 218 and Santa 



Fe, incomplete. 

Replacing Hassan El Abbar as 
the Pacers' top runner was Tom 
Murdock, who finished 13th with 
a time of 27:03. El Abbar was 
right behind him in 14th place, 
running the five miles in 27:06. 

Other scorers for the team in 
the Oct. 2 meet were Steve 
Farnsworth, 24th, 27:31, Frank 
Gruber, 32nd, 28:14, and Mike 
Arnold, 44th, 29:07. 

Melear said that the meet was a 
preview of the state champion- 
ship being held on the same 
course with the same teams. The 
top three teams and top 20 
individuals qualify for the 
nationals. 



Lady Golfers Drop Match 



PHOTO BY BARRY VAN WAGNER 

BASKETBALL PRACTICE- The basketball team has begun practice, 
preparing for its first game Nov. 19. 



By Jeannette Banning 
StaffWriter 

The women's golf team lost 
their first match of the season to 
Broward Central, 341 to 360. 

Individual scores for JC golfers 
in the Oct. 5 match were Sally 
Bricker, 86 strokes, Patti 
Prentice, 89, Kelley Spooner, 92, 
and Ann Ranta, 93. 

Golf coach Joe Sanculius said 
that the women played poorly as a 
team, which he partially blamed 
on the recent illnesses of Prentice 
and Ranta. 



Bricker, Holden, Ranta, Spo- 
oner and Liz Aris will represent 
JC at the Lady Seminole 
Invitational in Tallahassee today 
and tomorrow. The tourney 
consists of two 18-hole rounds. 



"Jacksonville (Florida JC) is in 
third place just 32 points ahead of 
us," stated Melear. "If each of 
our runners can pick it up a little, 
we can catch them. If not, I've got 
two guys who are certain to make 
the nationals as individuals. 

One person who Melear is 
counting on to help close the gap 
is freshman Mike Arnold. 

"Mike is a walk-on," said 
Melear, "who only ran one year 
in high school. He's made a 
tremendous improvement in the 
time he's been with us and is 
currently our No. 5 runner. 

This Saturday the Pacers host 
their own meet, the Palm 
Invitational, at John Prince Park. 
Four teams are expected to 
attend. 

• -Despite the .team's disappoint- 
ing showing so far, Melear thinks 
that his team can win. 

"All the teams entered we've 
either beat or lost to by a small 
margin," he stated. "The way 
we've run in practice lately, we 
should win it." 



Sonya Barraza 



Colombian Excels At Volleyball 



By John Douglas 

StaffWriter 

The North campus on 45th St. 

is a great time a/id gas saver for 

students in the north county area. 

The campus offers both day 
and evening classes in subjects 
such as: Speech, Health, 
Accounting, Business, Social 
Science and Math. 

The campus can accomodate a 
maximum of 33 classes and now 
has 29. 

There are 255 students enrolled 



in day classes and 807 enrolled in 
evening classes. 

The North campus has six full 
time instructors and one full time 
librarian. 

Dr. Edward Eissey is the Vice 
' Pres. of the North campus and 
Mr. Robert D'Angio is the 
coordinator. 

The North Center is on loan 
from FAU until a permanent 
campus can be built in the north 
county area. 

The campus is located just east 
of 1-95 on 45th St. 




Woman's volleyball received a tremendous boost 
the day Sonya Barraza came out for the team. 

Sonya, a member of her country's national 
volleyball team in 1969-71 , is a native of Colombia. 

"She's a super volleyball player," said assistant 
volleyball coach John Anderson. "Sonya's always 
thinking ahead about what the other team is going to 
try. She's always there when we need her." 

In her first year at JC, Sonya first found out about 
the volleyball team through a tryout poster . 

She came to JC because it was the nearest school 
to Colombia that offered her major, computer 
programming, besides the Miami schools which she 
didn't like. A recommendation from a friend who 
had attended JC also influenced, her. 



She became a member of Colombia's national 
team in' a roundabout way. 

"About 14 of my friends and I used to play 
volleyball everyday," she related. "One day this 
man watched us for a while and asked six of us to 
play for him." 




Steve Farnsworth 
Associate Editor 



The man turned out to be a coach, and of the six 
girls, three including Sonya made her state team. 
From the state team Sonya was selected for the 
national squad. 

While on the national team, she played against 
those of other South American countries. She might 
have played in the '72 Olympics, but her father's 
company transferred him to Spain and she and her 
family moved there. 

Sonya was also a member of her national softball 
team. 

Currently paying for college out of her savings 
with some help from her father, Sonya hopes to get 
an athletic scholarship and cut her expenses. 

Comparing the U.S. to Colombia, Sonya said "It's 
the same system. You have more advantages 
because you are No. 1, while Colombia is only about 
No. 23." 




PHOTO BY BARRY VAN WAGNER 

SETUP- Sonya Barraza sets the ball up for a spike during a volleyball 
match. 



i 
- J) 

i - 

V;: 

■a 



<•! * 



! I • ' 



K 



i I ; li , 

I 

I' ' i, I 



SEA OF SIGNS- Hugh Lambert walks through political signs of "Meet the Candidates Day No. 1". Only j 



; i 



pgpe" 



930SSBSWSBBS3BSaBBaxmSSi 



wmmeBBBBmrn 



laimuuiMi fffffffiflVli' 



Monday October.HJ976 BEACHCOMBER -8 



Baseball Team Still Seeks I Intramural Roundup 

First Win Of Fall Season Vo " eyba " 



By Jim Goodman 
Staff Writer 

The Pacer baseball team tied 
one and lost three games over the 
past week. 

JC tied Indian River in the first 
game of a doubleheader played 
Oct. 2, 1-1, and lost the second, 
2-1. 

The Pacers were defeated by 
Dade-North, Oct. 7, 5-1. JC 
played Dade-North-again the next 
day losing 9-1. 

Pacer freshmen Brian Refusco 
and Ted Akins both had strong 
pitching performances against 
Indian River. 

Refusco pitched seven innings, 
striking out three and walking 
none. Indian River's only run was 
unearned, as they scored in the 
seventh off a Pacer error. 

JC's only run came in the third 
inning. Eddie Walker advanced to 
first when he was struck by a 
pitch. He stole second, and was 
driven in with a single by Brian 
Leth 

In the second game, Akins also 
pitched seven innings without 
giving up any earned runs. But 
Indian River scored two in the 
first inning with the aid of Pacer 



errors. 

JC's only run came in the sixth 
inning when Jeff Smith doubled. 
He was then driven in hy Rich 
Seamon. 

Coach Dusty Rhodes was 
pleased with the performance of 
his two pitchers, who were 
throwing against their first 
college competition. 

"Refusco and Akins were 
outstanding," he said. "They 
kept us in the ball game. ' ' 

The Pacers continued having 
trouble scoring runs in the two 
games " against Dade-North, 
losing both 5-1, 9-1. 

The Pacers' only run of the first 
game was scored by Eddie 
Walker. He was walked, and 
advanced - to second by Jirn 



Kemp's single. He scored when 
Nick Maniotis singled to right. 

In the second game, the Pacers 
were hurt by four errors and a 
lack of timely hitting. 

Coach Rhodes was unhappy 
with the lack of offense. 

"We're getting hits," he said, 
"but we're leaving too many men 
on base." 

The Pacers left a total of 15 
men on base in the two games 
against Dade-North. 

Jeff Smith was the Pacers' 
leading hitter for the four game 
series with seven hits. He is now 
hitting .500. 

The Pacers next games are 
against Broward Oct. 13 at home, 
and with the University of Miami 
at Miami, Oct. 14. 



An organizational meeting for intramural volleyball has been 
scheduled on Oct. 21 at 7:00 p.m. in the gym. 

Volleyball is played by coed rules in which men and women alternate in 
hitting the ball and a team is comprised of three men and three women. 

Each team plays two matches a night, with play beginning the night of 
the meeting. 

Clubs are encouraged to enter teams and unattached students can join 
a team by attending the meeting. 

A round robin format for all matches is followed, with the top four 
teams selected for the championship tournament at the end of the term. 

Trophies are given to each member of the winning team and 
Intramurals T-shirts are given to participating students. 

Tennis 

A tennis singles tournament with separate men's and women's 
divisions has been scheduled by the I&R Board. 

An organizing meeting will be held in PE-06 Oct. 14 at 3:00 p.m. 
Interested students, faculty and staff should sign up in the Intramural 
Office. 



Wrestling 



Men Golfers Seventh 



By Jim Goodman 
Staff Writer 

The men's golf team finished in 
a four-way tie for seventh place in 
the Mirror Lakes Tournament 

to* 







held Oct. 1-3. 

Thirteen teams were entered in 
the tournament, which was won 
by Brevard with a score of 870. 

The Pacers tied Indian River, 
Dade North and Florida JC for 
fourth with a score of 91 8.- 

Ken Greene led the Pacers 
golfers with a 54-hole score of 
225. Rounding out the scorers 
were., Kim Swan, 228, Mike ' 
Mortell, 233, and Mike Mouw, 
237. 

The golfers started slowly in 
the first round, with a 312 stroke 
total having trouble with their 
putting. They finished strong in 
the second and third rounds, 
Firing a 300 and a 306. 

Coach Sanculius summed up 
the match by saying, "It was a 
good team effort. Kim Swan and 
Mike Mortell have shown 
consistent improvement in their 
play. Ken Greene played very 
well as usual. 



Intramural Bowling Results 



MEN 




WOMEN 




High Game 

Dave Greene 


231 


High Game 

Sandra Rudoff 


189 


Oscar Cash 


207 


Jerri McConkey 


183 


S. Kiektan 


^20jt 


NormLajCnViiKM^ ■ i ^jssffiw^ at ^*' " lfr ^ 




High Set 
Dave Greene 
Kim Eng 
Oscar Cash 


581 
538 
532 


High Set 

Kathy Wilk 
Sandra Rudoff 
Jerri McConkey 


513 
491 
478 


High Average 

Dave Greene 
Brian Richards 
Oscar Cash 


187 
180 
178 


High Average 

Kathy Wilk 
Jerri McConkey 
Kim Delong 


167 
147 
145 


Team Standings 

Chargers 

Anoma 

Vikings 


14-1 
12-4 
11-5 


Team Standings 

In-laws 

Ryan's Hope 

190 White Lightning 


16-0 
10-2 
12-4 



Men and women bowlers are 
needed to complete teams; Come 
by Major League Lanes on 
Wednesday at 4:00. 



PHOTO BY BARRY VON WAGNER 

TOP GOLFER- Ken Greene, low scorer for the men's team, putts In a 
practice round. 



Sportswriters 
Needed 

Experience Not Necessary 
Beliablity, Persistence A Must 

Apply Beachcomber Office 



The I&R board is organizing a wrestling club with the first meeting 
Oct. 13 at 7:30 in the gym. 

The purpose of the club is to arrange workouts and wrestling 
practices. 

— Jeannette Banning 





/v~r 






•j / 



/-._ j 



i * i t 
•i i <*■ 



Voice of the Palm Beach Junior College Student 

Vol.38 No. 6 Oct. 25, 1976 Lake Worth, Fla. 33461 




Henderson Preps Board On Choice 




PHOTO BY BILL JOHNSON 



COLLEGE LEADER ADVISES- Dr. Lee Henderson, director of Community Colleges gives hints to Board 
on Screening committee selection. 

American Party Leaders Here 



By BUI Johnson 
Assoc. Ed. 

Tom Anderson and Rufus Shackleford, 
American Party presidential candidates, are to 

appear at JG twice Wednesday. 

The bluegrass band, Phoenix, is to accompany 
the candidates and perform between speeches at 
both events. 

Their first appearance is to be in Sunshine 
Court, between the Business Administration and 
Social Science buildings. The candidates and band 
will share an hour from 11:00 to 12:00 noon. 

Another meeting is set for the Student Activities 
Center at 7:30 that night. The meeting is 
scheduled to last a half hour. 

Anderson, presidential candidate, is a publisher 
of 14 magazines. He started his business from one 
farm journal. 

He has a syndicated column and owns a national 
newspaper syndicate. The vice presidential choice 
of his party in '72, he was also it's national 
chairman in the same year. 

Anderson resides in Gatlinberg, Tennessee with 
his wife and daughter. 

Anderson's running-mate, Shackleford, is the 
largest tomato grower in the United States. The 
president of six family owned corporations , he is 
on the Board of Agriculture in Florida, Texas and 
'California, the states in which he grows tomatoes. 

Shackleford lives in Wauchula, Florida with his 
wife and five children. 

The American Party makes its headquarters in 
Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. 

Highlights of the party's domestic policy are: 

• To oppose or repeal the Equal Rights 
Amendment. 

• Oppose abortion and euthanasia. 

• Remove government interference from local 
schools and end forced busing. 

• Get the federal government entirely out of 
welfare. 

Major stands in the foreign policy include: 




Screening Committee 
To Choose President 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

In a move designed lo alleviate further delay, Dr. Lee Henderson, 
Director of the Division of Community Colleges, met with the JC Board 
of Trustees to begin the search for a new JC president. 

"This is probably the most important decision you will make during 
your tenure here." Henderson told the trustees. 

Those in attendance included trustees and interested students and 
faculty. 

Henderson reiterated that he wanted the position to be "open, 
competitive and advertised". 

Some ol' Henderson's suggestions for She Board included setting, 
qualifications for candidates, writing a specific job description and 
appointing a "screening committee" for applicants. 

Henderson's "screening committee", if accepted by the Board jn 
Henderson's formal, would be made up of nine diverse members. 

They would include three faculty members, two trustees, two 
administrators, a career employee and a student, One of the 
administrators would act as secretary. 

Henderson said that he expected more than 200 applications 
nationally. "But only by accepting applications nationally can we find 
the best," he said. 

The move to put a student on the screening committee caught many 
students and faculty by surprise. 

When asked how he fell about a student on the committee, 
Henderson stated, "We are all here lo serve the students, faculty and 
administration alike. There is no reason why a student shouldn't have a 
voice also." 

From the initial group of applications a group of three or four is to be 
chosen, whom the "screening committee" and Henderson are to 
evaluate with closer scrutiny. 

"This could mean a nip to the campus where the educator is now 
located," stated Henderson. . .' ' 

Both the Bcfard and Henderson agreed that if a new president is to be 
chosen by the Board's projected date of May 1, 1977, they must begin 
immediately by advertising. 

The job opening will be carried in a national education publication 
that is to be announced at a later date. 



Flu Program Settled 



THIRD PARTIES BEST- Tom Anderson, American 
Party nominee for president. 



By Emily Hamer 
Staff Writer 

Swine flu vaccinations were 
given at the Lake Worth 
Shuffleboard courts Wednesday, 
Thursday and Friday. 



Publications Grab Numerous 
Awards At State Convention 



• Withdrawal from 
Communist-dominated' 



"the insolvent, unstable 
United Nations at once. 



• Abolishment of foreign aid. 

• No recognition of Communist "slave states"; 
discontinue all trade with countries which do not 
allow emigration of its citizens. 

Editors Note- Comber coverage of the American 
Party is not meant as an endorsement. We will 
cover any candidate from any party that appears on 
JC's campus. 



By Cindy McCarthy 
News Editor 

JC student publications collected 19 
awards at the recent Florida State 
Journalism Convention. 

The Beachcomber (newspaper) received 
11 awards, five of them being first place in 
various events. The publication took more 
first place awards than any other school in 
its' division. 

Falcon Times (Miami-Dade North) is the 
only other paper that won as many awards as 
the Beachcomber. They only had two first 
place awards. The Beachcomber also placed 
in more events than any other school, 
although it was not entered in every 
category. 

Oscar Sanchez won three first place 
awards: best feature, an award shared with 
former 'Comber editor John Auchterionie; 
best bicentennial division and best editorial 
cartoon. 

A comment made by a judge on Oscar 
Sanchez's best editorial cartoon was, "Mr. 
Sanchez shows the greatest potential in the 
Junior College system. " 

The other first place awards won were by 
Bill Gullion for a feature photo and by the 



entire staff for best typography and 
make-up. 

Two second place awards were in 
advertising lay-outs and editorial, both won 
by the staff overall. 

Tim Tucker won two third place awards in 
the sports reporting and sports column 
competition. 

Other third place awards were won by 
Robin Kindle for in depth reporting and by 
Greg Roberts for a news photo. 

Charles R. McCreight is faculty advisor 
for the Beachcomber. 

Galleon, the student yearbook, won four 
awards. Rhonda Calbetzor won a first place 
award in non-fiction, on a campus subject 
story, Jim Divitale took second place in the 
photo division. 

Two third place awards were won, one by 
Jan Tuckwood for non-fiction and another 
overall for typography and layout. 

Dr. Jim Miles was faculty advisor for the 
Galleon. 

Media, the campus literary magazine, 
won first place in non-fiction oh a story done 
by Michael Alonzo; a first place in 

Continued on Pg. 3 



Although operating in cramped 
facilities, the program moved 
efficiently with 3000 vaccinations 
administered the first day. 11,000 
vaccines were available. 

On entering, participants 
signed a liability release. Persons 
under 65 without medical 
problems received a red form. 
High risk participants, those over 
65 or under 65 with medical 
problems, received a blue form. 

A nurse then spoke to the 
participants, checking for illness 
and allergies to eggs. Those 
under 25 were asked to read the 
newspapers as they might need 
another vaccine. Nurses adminis- 
tered the vaccines with jet 
injection guns in another room. 

Registered nurse J, Elder, a 
health department representative 
stated, "We need to reach the 
high-risk population." There was 
about a 50/50 distribution of 
participants— high-risk and oth- 
ers. 

Continued on Pg. 3 



^waMWasjsMsasssws^ 



lnsid< 



Debates viewed . . . . 
Vaughan: Dear Abby 
Cross Country 



i 




2 - BEACHCOMBER Oct. 25, 1976 



Oct. 25, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 3 



t ,„ .i. . . . 

Focus On The Presidential Debate 



Yinger Conducts Poll 



ConnollyCites Carter 



By Bill Johnson 
Assoc. Ed. 

Dr. Richard Yinger, JC 
sociology instructor, concluded 
from a poll he took that "young, 
intelligent, well informed people 
tend to be for Carter." 

The poll was taken from five of 
Yinger's classes, which, accord- 
ing to Yinger, is one reason they 
are well informed. 



I have assigned my students a 
term paper on the presidential 
debates." Says Yinger, "being a 
registered voter is a requirement 
for mv course. 



"I'm trying to motivate the 
students to become informed," 
adds Yinger, whose class 
textbook is "Harry Truman - 
Plain Speaking." 

Yinger believes democracy is in 
danger. He supports this belief 
with the fact that only 35% of the 
population turned out to vote in 
the primaries. 

"If the trend keeps up, our 
government will be selected by an 
elite group," says Yinger. "We 
are just asking for a dictator- 
ship." 

Yinger feels that the debates 
are strengthing the people's 
confidence in their own choices 
rather than changing them to 
other candidates. 

After the vice-presidential 
debates, Yinger asked a question 
in his poll: Which v. p. candidate 
would they rather have as vice 
president? Most students picked 
democrat Walter Mondale. 

Yinger motivates his students 
by openly supporting Carter, and 
wearing a Carter button. He feels 
"Gerald Ford is a robot, with no 
earthly soul." He realizes that he 
might be persuading some 
students to vote for Carter, but 
thinks probably just as many will 
support Ford for the same reason. 

Yinger stresses the importance 
of being an informed voter. He's 
going to ask people on final 
exams if they voted. 

"Yinger warns the public. 
Non-voters are more of athrea, 
(o the U.S. than any communist 
organization." 





"If the trend keeps up, our 
government will be selected by an 
elite group. We are just asking for a 
dictatorship." 



PHOTOS BY 
BIL.LGULLION 



"If the issues are brought out people 
might get antagonized. They [the 
candidates] are overly cautious to 
really deal with the issues." 



Candidates Return 
Seeking Support 



By Cindy McCarthy 
News Editor 
Seeking support in the Nov. 2 election, candidates 
for state and county wide offices, returned to JC for 
"Meet the Candidates Day Number Two' ' . 

These twenty-three candidates were on the 
campus Oct. 13, from 9:50 a.m. until early 
afternoon. 

Each one had the opportunity to speak for five 
minutes in SAC lounge, in addition to whatevet 
politicking he did around the school, during that 
time. 

Some office-seekers on this day included Peggy 
Evan, Demo., running for P.B. County 
Commission-Dist. 1; Richard Lopez, Demo., running 
for P.B. County Sheriff-, David C. Anderson, Rep., 
running for P.B. County Tax Collector and J. Reeves 




Bright, Rep., running for Fl. H of R-dist. 79. 

Dean Paul J. Glynn, coordinator of the event said, 
"Our objective is to involve our students in the 
politics ot the county," 
, t Edw« V, .Vugtof*"' ' 
acted as moderator for the program was presented 
with a plaque. 

The inscription on the plaque reads: Palm Beach 
Junior College, Student Government Association 
hereby awards Edwin V. Pugh with the Honor of 
Outstanding Service 197S-1976. 

Hugh Lambert, SG vice-president, made, the 
presentation of the award. 

Sponsors for the Meet the Candidates Day 
Number Two included Florida Association of 
Community Colleges, the Social Science 
Department, Student SG. United Faculty and 
Inter-Club Council. 



SERVICE HONOR- Edwin V. 
Pugh, Social Science instruct- 
or, is presented with a plaque 
honoring his service to JC, by 
SG Vice-President, Hugh 
Lambert. 



By Bill Johnson 
Associate Ed. 

The presidential debates now 
over with, we can look back at 
what we have learned about the 
two candidates. 

But what have we learned? 

According to JC's debate 
coach, John Connolly, the 
debates were just free advertising 
for the candidates. 
Connolly says that because of 
the format of the debates, the 
issues are kept "foggy" and just 
the personalities are spotlighted. 

Connolly feels that might have 
been the purpose of this type of 
format. 

"If the issues are brought out 
people might get antagonized," 
says Connally, "they are overly 
cautious to really deal with the 
issues." 

"The format of the Grady- 
Chiles debate was better than the 
Presidential one." said Connolly. 



The advantage, according to 
Connolly, is the one and only 
rebuttal. He feels that the person 
rebuting can bring up new points 
and his opponent doesn j, 

""^ ~"^ -her 

STa*a'tes""afeh' ¥ t ableV-fp:'" 
into the issue this way, so they 
just skim over it. 

"The Kennedy-Nixon debates 
were more clean cut," Connolly 
observed, "the format wasn't as 
stilted as this one." 

Connolly says that Carter is the 
debate winner so far. 

"Ford gained points on the first 
debate, but Carter ran away with 
the second one." Connolly 
declared. Even though Ford is 
behind, Connolly's not sure if 
Ford will really go at Carter in the 
last debate to beat him. 

"If one is even," says 
Connolly, "then status quo 
wins." 



PHOTO BY BRIAN RUCKER 



ICC Fights Attendance Problem 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 



Inter Club Council, (ICC), despite attendance 
problems at their weekly meetings, have announced 
the date of their "beer bash". 

The bash is slated for Sunday. Oct. 31 at the 
Mound Circle shelter in John Prince Park. 

It will be catered by the Bread and Board club. 

Tickets are priced at S2.00 per person and are now 
available around campus. 

A menu consisting of beans, salads, soft drinks 
and a barbeque are planned in addition to the beer. 

"Coffee house" type musical entertainment will 



be provided by local musicians. 

ICC chairman, Tom Solder, in his weekly report, 
noted that the ICC was not functioning to their full 
capabilities. 

Each club, under the present constitution, was to 
send a set representative or alternate weekly, but 
according to Solder, attendance has been spotty. 

Meetings are now being held on a bi-weekly basis. 
This is to facilitate a week between meetings to deal 
with problems incurred at the previous meeting. 

Student Contracting Building Association have 
finalized plans to construct a marquee at the Sixth 
Ave. entrance. No date for completion was 
announced. 



Scholarship Concert 
To Help Music Dept. 

By Emily Hamer 
Staff Writer 

JC's Music department presented the Tenth Annual Scholarship 
Concert Sunday. Proceeds of the concert are to be used for music 
scholarships. 

Letha Madge Royce, department chairman, said, "I believe our 
orchestra, choir and band directors came up with a program to please 
most every musical taste." 

The JC-Community orchestra, directed by James Gross, began the 
program with "The Calif of Bagdad" by Boieldieu. The orchestra also 
performed Bach's Fugue in G Minor, arranged by Calliet, Michel 
Legrand Selections arranged by Polster and Love's Theme, arranged 
by Chattaway. 

The concert choir, directed by Pat Johnson sang a George Gershwin 
medley. The choir also sang Thompson's "Alleluia", Copeland's 
arrangement of "At the River" and "Songs of Peaceful Departure" by 
Daniel Pinkham. 

Doug Furiato was their guitar accompanist. Randy Latim 
accompanied the choir on the piano. 

The JC Concert Band, led by Sy Pryweller, performed the D"Second 
Suite in F" by Gustav Hoist, Bizet's "Pearl Fishers Overture" and 
Loesser-Lang's "Guys and Dolls Overture." 

The program was completed with the "'Americans We" march. 



Trees Uprooted 
For Transplanting 

By Bill Johnson 
Assoc. Ed. 

Four Mahogany trees were uprooted from their 20-year home in 
front of the Student Publications Bldg. and relocated in an attempt to 
give them more room to grow. 

Cecil Edwards, JC's physical plant director, said they were just 
saplings when they were first planted. They had grown to close to one 
another and competed for the same life-giving materials. 

"Rather than lose them we decided to transplant them," said 
Edwards. 

The new location for three of the trees is west of the bookstore and 
south of the AD wing. This spot was cleared last summer of two Orchid 
trees. 

"They were planted too close to the building," Edwards said, of the 
Orchid trees. "They were growing into the building and causing 
problems under the side walk. ' ' 

The fourth Mahogony was planted between the Science and Social 
Science buildings. 

"It was a very smooth operation except for the wind." added 
Edwards referring to a tree the wind tilted. "We'll brace it for a while 
and it'll be fine." 

In about a year they'll drop their branches and start to grow normal, 
according to Edwards. 

When asked if they would put new trees where the Mahogonies 
were, Edwards replied that they would be replanting and replacing all 
year long. 

"We have 180 dwarf Palms down here that we started from 
coconuts. We've inoculated all our trees from lethal yellowing and 
haven't lost any from the disease yet." 











PHOTO BY BILL JOHNSON 



HEAVE HO- Tree taken from 
outside of Student Publica- 
tions building [above] and 
replaced in new home [below]. 




Awards 



From Page 1 

illustration by Gary Matthews 
and a second place in typography 
and layout. 

A third place award was also 
won iii photography by Millie 
Hicks and one for cover design. 

Walker Graham was faculty 
advisor for the phased-out Media. 
In addition to these 11 state 
awards, the Beachcomber has 
also received a First-Class rating 
from the National Scholastic 
Press Association and Associated 
Collegiate Press for the '76 winter 
issues. 

Categories of judgement break 
down into five areas. They are: 
Coverage and Content, Writing 
and Editing, Editorial Leadership 
and Opinion Features, Physical 
Appearance and Visual Comm- 
unications and Photography, Art 
and Use of Graphics. These 
sections are additionally broken 
into subsections. 

Comments by the judge about 
the Beachcomber include: "This 
is your best department, Keep up 
the' good "work".'' '.(Sange ' 'of' 
Opinion)., . '.'!''' ' W " 

"Copy is current. ! ' ,! (f imelfhess '■' 
and Vitality of Content) 



"Beachcomber is an outstand- 
ing publication!" 

"There were many categories 
where an excellent score was 
achieved, but is felt that a 
superior should have been 
given." stated Denny Glavin, 
Beachcomber Editor. 



Swine Flu 



From Page 1 

Elder also stated she hadn't 
been questioned about death, but 
there had been many questions 
concerning medical problems and 
high-risk status. 

Jerome and Geraldine Fein- 
berg, recipients of the vaccine 
said they called their doctor and 
he advised them to take the 
vaccine. A 20-year old elder of the 
Church of the Latter Day Saints 
said God had suggested the 
vaccine was safe and he should 
receive it; 

Vaccinations will be given at 
the FAU Union Building today 
through Wednesday from 10 a.m. 
to 6 'p.m.. the, ;Glades Office 
Building Oct. 28 through 29 from 
ffi:a',m.to:6p.m. and in Century 
-Village on Oct.: 29 from 10 a.m. 
-12 noon and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. 



PHOTO BY BILL JOHNSON 

Debate Team 
Experienced 

By Lisa Ostberg 
Staff Writer 

Six first-year debaters have 
returned from the Stetson Novice 
Debates without trophies, but 
with the experience' of eight 
debates behind them. 

The topic for debate was 
Consumer Product Safety: That 
the Federal Government should 
significantly strengthen the 
guarantee of product safety 
required of manufacturers. 

Three two-man JC teams took 
the negative position in four 
debates and the affirmative in 
four. 

Scott Des Islets and James 
Kersey won three debates and 
lost five. Gunda Caldwell and 
Max Lizza won one and lost 
seven. Lynn Templeton and Jay 
Kravetz won the debate and lost 
seven. 

• Approximately 47 teams, 
representing 13 colleges and 
universities from Florida, Miss- 
issippi', Alabama and Tennessee 
competed. 



Convention News 



By Bill Johnson 
Assoc. Ed. 

Beachcomber and Galleon staff 
members, along with junior 
college publications staffs from 
the state attended the journalism 
convention in Orlando. 

The Florida Community Col- 
lege Press Association Conven- 
tion was held in the Kahler Plaza. 

The three sessions in two days 
consisted of seminars of News 
Writing. Editing, Photography 
and Feature writing. 

Topics in the seminars extend 
from "the camera as a creative 
,triol"i to "Ethics in Journalism". 

Gene Burns, radio commenta- 
tor for WKIS, was guest speaker 
at a luncheon during the 
^ convention. Burns spoke of the 
responsibility of the press to gel 



the truth to the people. 

After a long day of two 
seminars the journalists were 
ready to relax at Sea World, 
where the convention hosted a 
luau and discotheque. 

Some left Friday night and 
others stayed until Saturday to 
take" advantage of the special 
group rates to Disney World: 

Sandy Koudelik, Galleon Editor 
said their group had a good time. 
"It was fantastic because I got to 
be with my staff," said 
Koudelik, "we had a grand 
time." 

Beachcomber Editor, Denny 
Glavin, said that the convention 
was smoothly run. 

"For the $20 dollar registration 
fee, we received a lot of 
benefits," commented Glavin. 




HOLE IN ONE- Jack Nicklaus receives his swine flu shot at the Lake 
Worth Shuffleboard Courts, photo by emily- hamer 



4 - BEACHCOMBER Oct. 25, 1976 



Oct. 25, 1976 BEACHCOMBER -5 



Editorials 



w 



Sore Loser" Impression 



Events following recent local primaries leave us with a definite "sore 
loser" impression. 

Implications that the winner's campaign was unfair, or that there 
were irregularities in the counting of ballots appears to be uncalled for 
and a highly undesirable attitude. 

Taking these insinuations a step further, could we deduce that these 
men lost, not because the majority ,of voters hoped for better 
government through change, but because the system of voting was 
crooked? That an unbeatable incumbent can't lose except by illegal 
methods? That a cleanly conducted campaign doesn't pay?. Is that what 
they are trying to tell us? ■•«.■' 

It is time to recall the fact that, prior to voting, the citizenry was 
overwhelmed with stinging slaps from both Democratic candidates. 
The majority going to the polls and voting, decided the issue, not dirty 
campaign tactics. 

As for demanding a recount, it seems a bit undiginified, especially 
for a man who has previously carried himself in a dignified manner. 
Hard it may be to become a loser, it is to be hoped that a loser could 
and would conduct himself in a manner befitting the office he still 
holds. 



Editor 
Forum 




Denny Glavin 
Editor 



Clubs At JC Maintaining 
Status Quo — HELP! 



It seems unusual to find the same old problem cropping up at JC 
again. 

But the students are directly the focal point in question . 

This year marks the initial year of Deration for the Inter Club 
Council { ICC) as the governing body of clubs-ori campus. 

It was formerly under Student Government (SG) direction but the 
clubs merged in an attempt lo govern themselves as to how they will be 
funded and governed. 

Tom Solder. ICC Chairman, attempted the orient a plan of action that 
would incorpate penalty work hours for each club if they missed the 
weekly meetings ICC holds. The meetings would seem to be even more 
important to a fledging operation of the type ICC is. 

At the first ICC meeting most in attendance scoffed at the idea of 
such a plan. Childish they said. Well the childish ones have come 
forward. 

Maybe the idea of penalty work hours did seem childish but now 
clubs have problems that many though might happen. They've lost 
interest. 

Some clubs haven't lost the will to work but the ICC was set up such 
thai a handful of the clubs could not do the work for the derelict ones. 

At the last ICC meetings clubs were scheduled to present club goals 
and objectives so as to justify Student Activity Fee (SAF) allotment. 
But the club Sales and Marketing failed to justify their standing in 
ICC by a lack of a presentation. 

It seems maybe the idea of penalty work hours was immature. So too 
might be the idea of clubs at JC. The blame cannot be put entirely on 
ICC. 

If it was under SG the same might happen. Now is the time for 
someone to save the clubs. 



Beachcomber 

Palm Beach Junior College 
4200 S. Congress Ave., Lake Worth, Fla 33461 

(305) 965-BOOO, ext. 210 

Editor-in-chief Dennis Glavin 

Associate Editor-Editorial Gunda Caldwell 

Associate Editor-News Bill Johnson 

Associate Editor- Feature, Sports . Steve Farnsworth 

News Editor Cindy McCarthy 

Venture Editor Frank Smith 

Photo Editor , Bill Guliion 

Business Manager Karen Abramowitz 

Consultant Charles R. McCreight 

The Beachcomber Is published weekly from our editorial offices in 
the Student Pulications Building at Palm Beach Junior College 
Opinions expressed In the Beachcomber are those of the editors or 
writers and are not nesessarily those of the Palm Beach Junior 
College. 

Letters must not exceed 2oo words, must be signed by the author, 
received in the Beachcomber office no later than 4 p.m. on 
Wednesday and are subject to condensation. 




Irtl^ 



bus 






So your mom thinks it's the same one too, huh? 



Letters 

Dear Editor: 

I am writing this letter to the Beachcomber in the hope that someone from SG will read it and find it 
upsetting enough that they will get fired up and do something. 

I am disappointed this year with the lack of activity on the part of SG. Last year. SG had sponsored a 
used book sale, was showing movies and had arranged a concert, .all within a few weeks from the start of 
the fall term. Tins year, with the term more than half over, SG is finally sponsoring a coffeehouse. This 
would seem to indicate either laziness or disorganization, neither of which reflect well on SG. 

According to the ^rchcanriijfejaByjiffiffl^ 
can probably be attributedflrSlM ..,,,,, 

SG gets 15% of the student activity fees, which is a lot of money. Almost all other activities, most of 
which receive less money than SG. have been benefiting students since the beginning of the term. Plus. 
most of them have had to start from scratch, while SG has had the advantage of having its officers elected 
last April. 

If SG wants to continue receiving that much of the activity fees, it should do something to justify 
getting that much. I think the students should know where their money is going and how they will benefit 
from it. SG has not presented a proposed budget or even indicated what it will do with the money. 

SG is supposed to supply leadership for the student body. I don't think we're getting it. Students have 
a right to expect more of SG than they have been shown so far this year. 

Steve Farnsworth 

Dear Editor: 

The Florida Student Association has joined the Florida Board of Regents and other educational groups 
in an effort to prevent passage of proposed Amendment Number six to the Florida Constitution. This 
amendment would limit the number of full-time employees to one percent of the state's population for the 
preceding year, and would limit the number of part-time state employees to ten percent 'of the full-time 
employees. - ; 

While proponents of the amendment argue that it will reduce governmental costs, the truth is that it 
will drastically curtail governmental services, particularly in the areas of education, mental health, and 
care for the elderly. 

To begin with, the amendment would eliminate about 12,000 full-time positions in state government 
and about 1 1.000 part-time employees. The immediate effects of this would be to reduce the amount of 
services state universities and other areas are presently offering, and to make much needed progress in 
many other areas, such as mental health and care for the elderly, virtually impossible. 

In terms of the state universities and community colleges one particularly crippling effect of the 
proposed amendment would be the elimination of thousands of student jobs. This would have a three-fold 
effect: first, it would deprive the edcucational system of a relatively inexpensive work force; second, it 
would deprive thousands of students of important on-the-job training and thereby force them to acquire 
their training after graduation at a greater cost to the public; and finally, it would undoubtedly put 
increased demands on the universities' already beleagured financial aids systems. 

In short, under proposed Constitutional Amendment Number six, there is no way for the people of 
Florida or any part of Florida's government to win. A vote for the amendment will not only condemn the 
people of Florida to a less productive government, but will deprive Floridians of badly needed 
opportunities in the areas of education and health care. In some cases, then, a vote for the amendment 
may in a real sense condemn significant numbers of Florida's citizens to unnecessary 'suffering and 
perhaps even death. 

All of this should tell us two important things. In regards to proposed Constitutional Amendment 
Number six, it should tell us that the amendment should be emphatically rejected on Nov. 2. But beyond 
that, it should tell us something about the nature of our government and how it should operate. 

A constitution is the heart of a governmental system. It defines not only the relationship of government 
to itself, but more importantly the relationship of government to the people it was created to serve. 
Changes in a constitution can change these relationships, and before they are made they need to be 
examined at great length in a very public way. This was not the case with proposed Amendment Number 
six, which never received the kind of public hearing it should have. 

And finally when we attempt through any means, constitutional or otherwise, to change the nature of 
our government or significantly alter the scope of its operations, we should do so only after careful 
analysis based on specific, irrefutable evidence. Across the board "shotgun approaches" such as the one 
used in proposed Amendment Number six make a mockery of our system of government. Proposed 
Amendment Number six is not a solution; it is a host of new problems. 

It is imperative, then, that we firmly reject proposed Amendment Number six on November 2; it is not 
just the efficient operation of our state government that's at stake, but the integrity of our constitution as 
well, ■ ■' — ..■ ■■■ -^■•■■:,: .::wr.: ■-;,. ,. ■■,, . ,,.-,, ',.,.; . 

Apollo Visko,FSA Director 
Richard Merrick FSA Assistant Director 






ifi 



Newspapers Helped Bicentennial 



Celebration Benefited 
By Media Coverage 




Gunda Caldwell 
Editorials 



The final quarter of our Bicentennial is here. 
Most of the fanfare and celebrations are over 
and forgotten. We have had a frenzied love 
affair with nostalgia and our immediate past. 

We surely have made many advances in 
concern for human relationships and 
environmental causes. History; may well record 
the present time as a turning point in the 
struggle for survival of both thehuman species 
and life on planet earth. .=- - 

Not a small part of the credit should be given 
to journalists, whose activities :hay : § .focused ■ 
public attention on problem areas and headed 
steps for corrections of these flaws in our 
society. 

The press has been labeled peddlers of bad 
news and seekers of the morbid and sensational. 
Journalists are accused of ignoring much of the 
good that happens in their efforts to shock and 
captivate the reading audience. 

Let us consider some of the types of news 
stories that have become a springboard for 
worthwhile and laudable activities and 
reformations on several levels of importance. 

Our neighbor to the south, the Miami Herald, 
featured a series' of; articles on( the plight; of 

migrants in south FloridarThey. were not written 
to entertain theif^ readers. 'They ! were-cbmp6sed 
of accurate, unvarnished, simply stated facts. 
They became the basis for slow but sure reforms 
and protective legislation to insure these people 
of basic human rights . 

Next came the series on "Rape and Its 
Aftermath." This, too, was written for serious 
and obviously humane reasons, and succeeded 
in bringing about a marked change in official 
attitudes and handling of rape victims.' This is 
not the work of a sensation-seeking press, 
seeking wider circulation at the expense of a 
human being. 

Media renders a fine service to voters during 
election periods by bringing to them background 
information on candidates, so that a better 
qualified voter will be going to the polls. A 
knowing and interested voter goes to the polls 
because he has learned something about the 
candidates that will make him want to support 
one or the other. Two unknown office seekers, 
equal apathy at the polls. 

Public reaction to racial and religious slurs 
have become a reality because the media have 
brought them out into the open. Rockefeller's 
unfortunate remark about Ralph Bunche, the 
Earl Butz racial slur, the Jimmy Carter ethnic 
purity statement, and other such slips of 
prejudice, will, at least, take longer to reoccur, 
due to publicity attending the previously 
mentioned incidents. The newspapers held a 
mirror before us, and we did not like what we 
saw. 

Conservation hardly could have developed 
into its widespread program without the 
wholehearted support of the press. Porpoises 
and baby seals may yet have a chance to survive, 
thanks to modern crusades conducted by a 
caring and concerned press. Journa lists 
everywhere became involved and would not let 
such issues die or get buried in subcommittees. 

We all understand "Care packages" and 
"Hope hospital ships" were created and 
conducted to help unfortunate people around the 
world. We understand how and why of these 
projects because they enjoyed excellent press 
coverage at frequent intervals. 

Our press became our conscience, keeping us 
aware of the needs and hungers of other, less 



ooc „gci uiu/uuuuu t/ua uuuci men. v.uajstci , auou a liiiumg 

ed behind a terminal in Tole- is a prerequisite to a binding order 
Dhio, yesterday and took off. from the council to the nations of 
eaded south. the world to take diplomatic, 

Ohio Highway Patrol said it economic or military action against 
ht up with the bus and David the country deemed to be creating 
lingtdn, 21. near Bowling the threat. 

Ohio, and charged the De- The resolution aimed to have the 
man with possession of stolen council decide that all states shall 
i. end any military cooperation and 

lice quoted Washington as say- arms licensing arrangements with 
lie was 1 "tired "of unseasonably South Africa, stop any recruitment 
weather and wanted to go of mercenaries for it and prevent 
t for the winter. the supply to it of arms, ammuni- 

my midwesterners and east- tion, planes and spare parts. 
rs had reason to feel like A comprehensive economic boy- 
lington yesterday. cott against Rhodesia dating back to 

ow blanketed a belt of the 1966 is the only similar enforcement 
central states from the action, or so-called sanctions, now in , 
tern Rockies to the eastern effect, • 
it Lakes. Low temperature Some western- diplomats held that 
rds tumbled from the central the outcome of the> Namibia debate 
mid-Atlantic would not hurt Secretary of State 
_ nry A. Kissinger's effort to get 
eny """iSfch Africa to withdraw from the 
^untarily. Others con- 
it might stiffen the 
tlline whites, 
t'hite. 



SlUlUlltUUMV 



Introduced 



LONDON (UPI) - The Aston 
Martin company, on the verge of 
collapse until U.S. money saved it, 
unveiled yesterday the world's first 
automobile equipped with computer- 
controlled instruments. It costs $34,- 
000. 

The futuristic-looking Aston Mar 
tin Lagdnda is capable of 140 m.p.h. 
and features what the firm calls Gas 
Plasma Digital Instrumentation- the 
entire width of the dashboard. There 
are no wires, dials, knobs or conven- 
tional flick switches. 

The price of the car will be "about 
20,000 pounds ($34,000)," the makers 
said. 

Aston Martin, best remembered as 
the makers of the cars used in ths 




The Media Has The Burden 
Of Keeping America Informed. 



but 



m our 



fortunate people. Not sensational 
humanitarian from start to finish. 

Reporters hear about the elderly 
country as frequent victims in con games by 
flimflam artists. Particular stress is given to 
stories such as this, and warnings repeated, in 
an effort to prevent our senior citizens from 
being cheated out of money they scarcely can 
affort to lose. Surely no one can accuse a press of 
irresponsible reporting with this type of news. 

Warnings are clear, designed to help and alert 
the public of the potential harm from these 
rackets. This is real community service, for 
which news media is seldom praised. 

Of lesser importance to economy, but carrying 
its own importance, we find a little crusade at 
our own back door. 

For several weeks we have been following the 
case of a grand old banyan tree, spreading leafy 
branches across the road. Picturesque, 
beautiful, and in the way of progress, in this 
case, widening of Sixth Avenue, South. 

We, ourselves, have driven by countless 
times, deriving satisfaction of a sort while 
passing under that arch of green draped across 
the road. Joyce Kilmer's poem, "Trees" come 
to mind, and it is pleasant to consider how long 
that tree has survived the onslaught of 
civilization. 

The inevitable did happen, and the tree was 
doomed. Our local media began telling readers 
what was happening. Readers became a large 
opposition to its destruction. An unnamed local 
businessman volunteered to pay the difference 
between the cost of razing the tree and the cost 
of moving it. County Commissioners agreed, 
and the result will be score one for converging 
something beautiful for beauty's sake, in spite of 



progress. 

A family in desperate circumstances, the 
annual Empty Stocking Funds, the Community 
Chest Drives, the appeal for blood or money for 
worthwhile emergencies — all have been given 
solid press coverage and support, with telling 
results. Where would they all be without the 
news media? 

All of the foregoing subjects and events haye 
not been earthshaking or equally newsworthy. 
Yet they have benefitted from a sympathetic and 
active press. 

It would seem we have developed into a more 
or less "caring" generation. We are concerned 
about people and the things we live with, far 
more actively than most of our ancestors. Giant 
steps have been taken at home, as well as in 
space. 

We have become the involved generation, 
with concern for misfits and victims, the helpless 
and the hopeless, the political and social 
institutions in our midst, and most of all, the 
quality of life for each of us. Because of that 
concern, we may yet reverse the destructive 
attitudes prevalent in our immediate past. We 
may be able to restore human dignity to man, 
regardless of age, sex, finances, race or 
religion,not because the statutes on our law 
books say we must, but simply because we 
prefer it that way. 

You may be sure that th« free press of 
America will be leaders, encouraging and 
covering the events as they happen, for the good 
of all of us. 

What we have hoped for, during this 
Bicentennial year, may become a reality long 
before theTricentenial arrives. 



6 - BEACHCOMBER Oct. 25, 1976 



jT 



Oct. 25, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 7 




Historic Figires Ask "Dear Abby" For Help. 



By Don Vaughan 
Staff Writer 

Like millions of Americans, one of my 
favorite parts of the newspaper is the "Dear 
Abby" column. Good, old Abigail Van Buren 
has been dispensing useful, wholesome advice 
to upset and hysterical readers for close to 25 
years, but it seems that everytime I read her 
column, she is answering the same 18 year old 
girl who is pregnant and doesn't know how she 
got that way and the same 12 year old girl who 
is ticked off because her parents finally put 
their foot down and won't let her go out with her 
27 year old boyfriend whose sole source of 
support is supplying the local heads with 
whatever they might need. 



Scenes From 
Deadwood Dick 



It's a shame Abtsn't immortal. Think of 
how she could havaa-nged the world if she 
had been there toip those troubled souls 
through history. Tretters would sound like 
these. ^ 

Dear Abby: My fkgjf*' n * s my wife. She's 
driving me crazy! fin I'm home she keeps 
nagging me to buy hi .mink-lined fig leaf, and 
it seems that we'vect fruit salad every night 
for the past month, t that I dislike fruit salad 
or anything, but oundlord is getting pretty 
upset about it. Ana top of everything, she 
has this pet snake lis driving me up the wall! 
What should I do? (fused in Eden. 
Dear Confused; Hayou tried talking to her 
mother about thing; 

Dear Abby: My basts finally added the straw 
that broke the cam back! I'm a carpetner, 
and today he put ins order for a giant boat, 
right in the middle/the desert! And after I 
finish this boat, he its me to go out and get 
two of every animalfche. world and load them 
on to it. Abby, I'm sasonable man, but let's 
ook at this sensiblv&er I do load all these 
animals on this boa^h-j in the Devil is going 
to clean up after th* ISJot me! Besides that, 
the nearest water i<> hundred miles away! I 
have to finish thijtter now because it's 
starting to rain. W'should I do? Harried in 
Israel 
Dear Harried: Be sib take your bathing suit! 



Dear Abby: The local peasants are starting to 
become a royal pain in the neck! First came one 
family, then another, and now the town is 
overrun with them. Besides that, I don't think 
they like myself or my husband Louis very 
much. They run around our castle singing "I 
ain't got no body". What do you advise us to 
do? Marie A. 

Dear Marie: Let them eat cake. 
Dear Abby: Everyone says I drink too much and 
that I'll never amount to anything. It's true that 
.1 do take an occasional nip, but I never 
overindulge, except perhaps when my boss 
transfers me to a new town like Vicksburg or 
Leesburg. Do vou think I'll ever go anywhere in 
life? Ulysses S. G. 
Dear Ulysses: I doubt it. 

Dear Abby: I'm a high official, and ever since I 
sent a couple of my employees out to get the 
mail and they got lost and ended up wandering 
around in this hotel called Watergate, everyone 
from John Dean to Walter Cronkite has been on 
my case. Along with that, I don't think anyone 
believes me when I tell them that all those tapes 
in my closet are Elton John's greatest hits. Why 
won't everyone leave me alone? Upset in 
Washington. 

Dear Upset: I don't think your job agrees with 
you. Perhaps you should quit and seek 
employment elsewhere. 



HOUCJWXTELL OO n 





Traps Popularity Grows 



Despite unplanned bar room brawls, 
telephone calls and other clever 
attention attracting ploys the cast 
managed to keep their heads, (well, most 
of the time) 

The exercise is designed to improve the 
players concentration helping them to 
maintain their roles. 

Musto, the technical director has his 
crews putting the final touches on the 
"Mantrap Saloon" set. The scene of the 
play. 

The final preparations for the play 
ncludes setting the lights, preparing 
props, and taking care of sound problems 
that may occur. 

Also crucial is the role of the publicity 
crew. The "Deadwood" cast have all 
chipped in to purchase shirts with 
advertising for the play printed on them. 

The play will open on the 4th of 
November and will run for four nights. 
Tickets for "Deadwood Dick or the Game 
of Gold" will be available at the 
auditorium box-office this week. 



By Audrey & ' 
Staff Writ. 

The exotic, mysterious •nf./of the Venus 
Fly Trap fascinates those Jlcnow such a 
creature exists. Their aggfeness makes 
them unique and quite inteilg . 

A champion insect eattle Venus Fly 
Trap (Dioneae muscipula) tites as well as 
entertains those who have bed this plant 
catch its own food. 

Looking like a bunch of \\\ the plant sits 
unsuspiciously waiting for Sctim. Insects 
are attracted to the sweet nij Scent and the 
reddish color inside the traili a surrounds 
the inside of the trap contaf three trigger 
hairs. When an insect tou<^ trigger hair 
once, nothing seems to hat.: The second 
time the prey brushes a tn^* air ; t s eri( j s 
electrical signals the outefpjp^al" cells of 
the trap. An enzyme is re'e^>Mytch causes 
the outer cells to stretch, th'?c>s e _ ^ nc j mat 
it does. The trap shuts tighta. fraction of a 
second. It fills up with a ^ti Ve emzyme 
liquid which kills the insefcl aDSO rbs its 
nutrients. After three days|E»l Snt: reopens 
with the increased growtlits cen wa ]] s 
leaving a skeleton of the ip r f^e she j| ^ 
usually blown off by the wt^p rain but in 
house plants case the carepi^yg,. talce . 
out themselves. ?'..- 

Because of the amount 4^-th involved 
the trap's life span is Qj£)o Qc j f or ^ 
closings. It then drops off,*y 
more traps. L 

Although the venus fly],} Undoubtedly 
catches flies, it also relies cts ~_ ; f „ __ .■[ 
« . , , ^^ »t-5> main 

source of nourishment. 

Wilmington, N.C., is thofe> be its , 
natural habitat where it g£** Un ancie ^> 
meteor crater which is nHtog TheseV '• 
plants grow in a olta deficien ^v. 
environment thus obtainn*^|, 
from the insect. 

Darwin and his sons sr t^. 
studying these unique planff 
to be "the most w^^Ob^t j n t i 
world." Evolutionary thMf^^ ^ 

plant engages in carnivoiy **>{>-_„._ fnr 
the nitrogen poor soil. Whef S<^™£r 
needed minerals carnif > ' t , omams 
advantage, therefore theh- e rries ' no 
eliminated. r "* ters are 



These plants are no harder to grow than 
ordinary house plants. They grow from a bulb 
ususally planted in spagnum moss which 
should always be kept moist. Give it strong 
sun and humidity and a beautiful reddish color 
will appear on the inside of the trap. This lets 
you know that it has a sufficient amount of 
light. If the trap doesn't secrete a red color 
more sun light is needed. There is little 
growth during the winter. Later on, when 
warmer weather prevails, the plant will 
survive better outside in a garden or on a 
balcony. Do not fertilize your plant, it absorbs 
enough nourishment from insects the natural 
way. Water frequently with rainwater or 
unchlorinated water. To eliminate the chlorine 
let tap water sit in a covered jar for 24 hours. 

The whole plant grows to about 3-4 inches 
across with individual traps an inch long. 
When its time to replant your Venus Fly Trap 
check the bulb and if its large enough you will 
be able to cut a small section off and plant it. 
A week or two later sprouts should appear and 






to produce 



nutrients 



ue plant £* '* 3?«* 
wonde«W^ nd th " m 




iipiisWm*}' 



instead of having one plant you can enjoy the 
company of two. There's no telling how many 
creatures one can evolve. You could start a 
nursery and sell this rare species and'make a 
fortune. One never knows until he tries! 
A very common carnivous plant in Florida is 
the sarracenia better known as a pitcher plant. 
The name describes its shape and you can find 
them growing west of Loxahatchee in dry 
land. 

On each plant there is a collection of 
pitchers on a long stemed flower. The middle 
is hollow like a pitcher and holds a water 
liquid. The mouth of the trap has cilia pointing 
downward. An insect is lured to the plant by a 
sweet smelling secretion outside the trap. Its a 
very colorful and attractive area and easy for a 
bug to move down into the pitcher. Once the 
insect crawls inside the pitcher it cannot crawl 
back out. The hairs are spikes capable of 
piercing the insect's back. The only way is 
down. The area becomes slippery and the prey 
is forced into an area containing glass-like 
hairs. Beneath lies a pool of digestive 
enzymes awaiting the prey. Its rather hard for 
the victim to remain stationary and eventually 
it falls into the liquid and drowns. 

Like the Venus fly trap these plants are easy 
to grow and they can even withstand a light 
frost. 

There are quite a variety of pitcher plants: 

The Sarracenia flava — its size ranges about 3 

ft. tall; they have a yellow flower and 

sometimes contain red veins. The Sarracenia 

psittacina has a red flower. Its size is seven 

inches or less in diameter. They grow best in 

Miss., Ala. and Ga. Sarracenia purpurea — 

are rather interesting plants in the sense that 

tJ-ieir roots contain a hormone that is now 

[iepg studied as a possible cancer cure. It is 

eight inches in diameter and has a red flower. 

v vDhese plants grow best in Miss., Ala., N.C., 

"NS.J., and parts of Canada. 

The portion of roots is used to cure stomach, 
diuretic, and menstrual complaints. It was 
said to cure small pox at one time. 

These are just a few of the 450 species of 
carnivores in existence. They can one day be 
the organic solution to insecticides. They 
might also be the newest "pet" as opposed to 
the "pet rock". I'd like to see a pet rock catch 
and eat a fly! 




On A Nature Trail 



By Frank Smith 
Venture Editor 

David found himself lost in John Prince Park, somewhere 
within the nature trail. 

Standing beneath the pink and blue blossoms of a Eucalitmus 
tree, he called out, "Is anybody here?" 

Malcolm appeared, "Well, I'd though I stumbled upon a new 
species of Herbivore Articulare..." 

"Herbivore. Articu-what?" questioned David. 

"Articulare. ..Genus sporadous elucidus.. sometimes called 
the "whispering" plant because the wind, twisting its leaves can 
caiise it to emit a sound which approximates that of quietly 
whispering women.;' Malcolm said this then listened to the 
wind. 

"Whispering women?" asked David. 

"..or high-pitched males" answered Malcolm. 

They both moved further along tlie path overhung with wispy 
branches of Monogahela Palms, before stopping by a brush of 
lush gossamers. 

"Yes, 1 love walking through a forest filled with flowers and 
rare plants. The different kinds of leaves, the different kinds of 
seems..." said Malcolm. 

"Look Malcolm, what is that flower over there?" asked David 
pointing toward a small petalled blossom that bravely shot up 
from the Pithecanthro Pine-needled floor. 

"It looks like a Meticulas-thesbina.. .commonly called a 
"starlet', a rare thing indeed." said Malcolm, turning to leave. 



fflE'CT'.'Kj&aMsssse 



8- BEACHCOMBER Oct. 25. 1976 



Oct. 25. 1976 BEACHCOMBER • 9 




Tree Crusade Successful 



PHOTO BY BILL. GUL.L.ION 



CENTER 0¥ CONTROVERSY- Recent efforts have apparently 

saved this tree from impending doom. 



Classifieds 



Scuba equipment for sale. 
Complete set-up plus many 
extras. Used once. Cost 
S535.00. Sacrifice. Best offer 
over S325. Call 659-5780 
between 5 p.m. - 10 p.m. any 
night. 

For Sale: Peavey Musician 
Amp- 230 watts, 6-12" speakers 
antl a horn. Also, a Sekova Les 
paul copy. Call 622-1366. 
Motorized Skateboard for sale: 
One horsepower gasoline en- 
gine. Custom built, cruises 
about 15-20 MPH, when it's 
running good. A super deal at 
565. Call Rick at 655-9459. New 
Deluxe Weight Bench with leg 
curl. Best offer over S50. 
588-1514. 

Lost: a Cross pen and pencil set 
in pink case. It was a 
meaningful gift to me. Please 
return to lost and found or call 
391 -0500, ext. 3455. 
God Has a Wonderful Plan for 
Your Life. Interested? Call 
844-1212. 

For Sales 1965 Ford Ranchero, 
excellent shape. For informa- 
tion: during day 842-3551 and 
ask for Ed Mazzola. At night call 
684-0884. 

Male Roommate needed, pref- 
erably foreign student, 2 bdrm, 
5115 monthly including tele- 
phone and utilities. 655-9691. 
Mast Sells Honda Motorcycle 
175ccS125 

Upright Freezer - $35. 964-3547. 
70 Nova, 4 cyl. Economy car. 
S500. Call 582-71 19. 
Female to share two bdrm apt. 
and expenses with same. Lake 
Worth area. Call S86-5275 or 
586-2726. 



By John Childers 
Staff Writer 

The Lake Worth Garden Club and JC's 
Beachcomber recently attended the county 
commission Meeting L"in an effort to save the 
Banyan tree'.Jocated on, Sixth Avenue in Lake 
Worth.' ''■"'"' 

Louise Van Acker of the Garden Club 
explained to the commissioners that her: 
organization had approached the county last year, 
to plead their case on saving the tree from being 
destroyed. "■'■•'■■':■. 

At that time, they were turned down by the 
commissioners. • l * 

Mary Ann Macdonald, representing the 
Beachcomber, urged the commissioners to include 
the demolition funds to the price of saving the tree. 
Earlier that week, Macdonald had met with John 



D. MacArthur who assured her that he will, "back 
them (Garden Club and Beachcomber) up 
accordingly." 

Bart Moore, administrative assistant for the 
County Department of Parks and Recreation gave 
$11,000 as an inflated figure for saving the tree. 

Commissioner Lake Lytal did not seem too 
enthusiastic about the project. He questioned, why 
it was "such a big issue now?" >; .>.•■. ^ ; . 

' 4 All,the credit belongs to the college -students 
who got it publicised again," said Mrs. Van Acker. 

By the end of the discussion, the county 
commissioners agreed to let the tree be uprooted 
and transplanted. 

This decision is more in their favor as it will 
eliminate some of the cost of doing away with the 
tree, that the county would otherwise have to pay 
for. 




Harriers Win 
Home Meet 



Science Club Visits Park 



By Dale Taylor 
Staff Writer 

JC's Science Club (SC) visited 
O'Leno State Park in northern 
Florida, where they explored 
the banks of the Ichetucknee 
River, the weekend of Oct. 
15-17. 

Members of the SC "spent 
most of their time tubing down 
the five-mile, ice cold river.'d' 
remarked SC president Chris- 
tine Lash. Other activities 
included camping and collecting 
fossils. 

Thirtv-two members, includ- 



ing co-sponsor Mr: Glen' 
Marsteller , attendedi .:>■•-.■: 

Activities to take place during 
the year include hiking, skin 
diving, canoe and camping 
trips, swamp . trampiirig, and 
public speaking appearances. 

SC is presently involved in a 
three-year project headed by 
Lee Mandel, to plant mangroves 
along the intercoastal water- 
ways. 

"This project has been 
underway for four months," 
stated Lash. 

Positions in SC have been 



filled as follows: Christine 
Lash-president, Tim Lamping- ' 
vice president, Joann Lilly-trea- 
surer, Susan Shumacher-secre- 
tary, and Jill Midgett and David 
Kitchens : cbhistoriaris, appoin- 
ted to plan their future* at JC. 

SC raised over $48 during its 
recent bake sale. 

Lash said, "1 would like to 
encourage other students to 
join. Club members range from 
engineering majors to biology 
majors. They meet every 
Thursday at 10:00 a.m., in room 
SC-14." 



it- rr ■ un rt f UlBS i; : 



D EC A An nou n ces Fas hion Show 
Feat u res Pa I m Beach N ight Atti re 



By Steve Farnsworth 
Associate Editor 

Running one of its best races 
this season, the cross-country 
learn edged out Indian River and 
outdistanced Dade North to 
capture a tri-meet here at John 
r Prince Park. 

"The guys wanted to win bad 
enough that they went out on top 
at the start and fought to stay 
there," said Cross-country coach 
Dick Melear, discussing the 
victory." 

"Plus, wc may have been 
overworking in practice, because 
we slacked off a little this week 
and everyone's times improved 
by at least 30 seconds." Melear 
: noted." ' ' 



Lost: Leonard High School ring, 
blue stone, 1976, initials J.C. 
McB. Reward offered,. $20. Call 
John 965-7783. 

Accounting tutoring. $5 per 
hour. Call Steve 832-0339. ' 
For Rent: with option to buy. 
Single mobile home, completely 
furnished. $200 monthly. In 
Tavares Cove. Call 626-5030. 
For Sale: 1956 Buick. Good 
Condition. $250.00 Call 5863222 
after 1:00. 

For Sale: 1973 Suzuki motorcy- 
cle TS 185cc and helmet. 
Topperhouse Apts. across from 
JC.Apt.#207-Albie. 
Lost: Diamond Ring. Call Beth 
at 582-7908. Lost in the area of 
the firsr floor of the library. 
Reward Offered. 
1976 Red BMW 2002. Rust- 
proofing, great shape. Must 
sell. $300 and take over 
payments. Call 683-1398. 
Spelling Baldwin. Acro-sonic 
Spinette Piano. Excellent condi- 
tion. Call 844-7777. 
For Sale: 1973 Honda 450. Good 
Condition. $550. Call after 5:00 - 
737-1480. 

10'4" O'Day Sailboat, similar to 
"Sunfish" $175 firm. Also 1,65 
X 15" new retreat, never used, 
cost $15, sell for $8. Call 
965-3088. 

Stereo Equipment for Sale: 
Dynaco ST- 150 Amplifier $200, 
(2) Dynaco A-25 Speakers $50 
each, BSR 12 band graphic 
equalizer $120 (2) Acoustic 
Research LST-1. Monitor spea- 
kers $375 each. Phase Linear 
4000 pre-amp (includes walnut 
case) $375. Call 683-6022. 
VW Bug. New re-built engine 



By Cindy McCarthy 
News Editor 

"Palm Beach After Dark" is 
the theme for the JC Sales and 
Marketing Clubs (DECA) tenth 
annual fashion show. 

"This show features casual 
daytime wear which will work 
up to the high point of the 
show," states DECA president 
Kathleen Kenney. 

The high point of the show is 
evening wear, depicting the 



night life of Palm Beach. 

Several reasons are involved 
for having the fashion show. 

• It is one way in which DECA 
tries to work with the 
community. 

• Shows thanks to area 
merchants, by featuring their 
clothes. 

• Gives DECA students 
practical experience. It exposes 
them to not only merchandising 
and retailing, but also helps 



:hem to try to coordinate and 
organize a project with others. 

Renee Doummar is working 
as coordinator of this program. 
JC radio station WPBC is 
working with DECA on music 
for the fashion show. 

AH students, faculty and the 
public are invited to attend the 
fashion show. It will be in SAC 
lounge, Oct. 30, at 8:00 p.m. 

Admission and refreshments 
are free. 



Scores in theOct. 16 meet were 
-j^iC 32. Indian River 33 and Dade 
§>Norihoo. 



Has,san ELAbbar led the Paper 
charge, finishing second with a 
lime of 26:03 for five miles. 
Following El Abbar were Steve 



Farnsworth, fifth. 26:31, Tom 
Murdock. sixth, 26:43, Frank 
Gruber. eighth. 27:28. and Mike 
Arnold. II th. 28:32. 

The win over Indian River, the 
fourth-ranked team in the state, 
was the first time the Pacers have 
beat them this vear. 



• "It was a big win for us in that 
it puts us in a position to see what 
we're capable of running." he 
stated. "I have every reason to 
believe that we can place fourth 
or better in the state if we 
continue to improve this much in 
our times." 

The team has its last meet 
before the stale championships 
this Saturday, when they .travel to 
Miami for the Division IV 
Championships. 

"1 hope we can take at least 
second place." remarked Melear. 
"Wc don't have the depth to have 
much of a chance to beat Dade 
South (defending state champi- 
ons)." 




PHOTO BY BILL. OULLION 

ON YOUR MARK- The cross-country team starts a race as they train In John Prince Park. [L-tt] Coach 
Dick Melear, Steve Famsworth, Greg Ulseth, Frank Gruber, Tom Murdock and Hassan El Abbar. 

Baseball Sweeps Doubleheader 



By Jim Goodman 
Staff Writer 

The baseball team swept a 
doubleheader from Broward 5-4 
and 4-3. The two wins were the 




first victories of the fall season tor 

the teahi. 

The Pacers had their best 
offensive efforts of the season as 
they came from behind in both 
games. Assistant baseball coach 
Richard Travis, taking over 
coaching duties while Dusty 
Rhodes was recovering from 
appendicitis, was happy with the 
team's effort. 



"Wc finally got some hitting 
when wc needed it," he said. 
"Our speed made Broward make 
mistakes, and we took advantage 

of them." 

"The main thing is that we 
really cut down on our mental 
errors," he added, 

With the fall season now over, 
the" Pacers arc playing one more 
week of intrasquad games. 



Women Golfers 14th 



Campus Combings 



t_ 



$ 



Hey, Musicians! ICC needs 
coffe-house type entertainment 
for Bash at John Prince Park, 
Oct. 31, 12-5 p.m. Please apply 
through note addressed to 
"Bash Chairman, c/o ICC," 
Include name, address, phone 
number, type music you play, 
and technical equipment you 
have or need, etc. 
Attention north county residen- 
ts! Palm Beach Junior College 
North is now accepting 
applications for day classes for 
the winter term starting in 
January. Day classes will be 
held in the JC north 45th Street 
center. For more information, 



call the 45th street center 
between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. and 
the gardens center from 2-9 
p.m. 

Don't miss your opportunity to 

hiss the villian and cheer the 
hero, when Palm Beach Junior 
College presents its first stage 
production of the season, Nov. 
4-7 at 8:14 p.m. in the JC 
auditorium. It's an old-fashion- 
ed melodrama called Deadwood 
Dick or the Game of Gold. So, 
for an evening of family fun, put 
a circle abound the dates, Nov. 
4-7 at 8:14 p.m. in the JC 
auditorium. See you there. 



with 83mm pistons in cylinders. 
New crank bearing, etc. 90 
horsepower, new paint, perfect 
body and interior. $700. Moving 
north 965-9515. 

11 Piece Ludwlg Drum Set. 
Ziligian Cymbals. Good condi- 
tion. $275.00. Also, Surfboard - 
Fox Twin Fin 5'4" Call 
844-2743. 



For Sale: 1974 Malibu Custom 
Classic? 350, A/C, powersteer- 
ing, power disc brakes, auto, 4 
steel-belted radial tires, body, 
interior in good condition. 
$3200.00 Call 684-0824. 
Pregnant? Problems? Call 
Children's Home Society for 
Free Counseling. 844-9785. Ask 
for Trudy Brown, 



"Shells, live and in color, is a 

new course being offered by the 
Pine Jog Environmental Scien- 
ces Center, 6301 Summit Blvd., 
West palm Beach. Classes will 
meet at the Pine Jog Center for 
six Wednesday evenings, 7:30 
p.m. to 9:30 p.m. starting Nov. 
3, 1976. Participants will learn 
where and how these animals 
live, what they are called, how 
to keep them alive in aquaria, 
how to establish collections and 
various ways to use shells 
creatively. The principal 
instructor will be Gary Hanning, 
a graduate student in Malacolgy 
at Florida State University and a 
lor >g time resident of the Palm 
Beaches. He will be assisted by 
guest lecturers from the Palm 
Beach Shell Club who will also 
lead a field trip November 20th. 
Registration for the shell course 
is $8.00 and may be paid at the 
door November 3rd or prepaid 
by mail. The class is limited to 
80 people. For additional 
information call Pine Jog at 
686-6600." 



«* 






v 



JADING FOR THIRD- Jeff Palmer sprints tor third as an opposition player tries to scoop us an infield 



By JeanneMc Banning 
Staff Writer 

The Women's Golf Team 

finished 14th in the Lady 

Seminole Golf Tournament out of 

13-four -year ' universities and 

three junior colleges. 

University of Miami won with 
628 strokes in the 36-hole 
tournament. National champion 
Furman University placed second 
with a 638. JC had a 351-332-683 
for I he two day event held 
October 1 1-12 at Tallahassee. 

Tournament low medalist was 
University of Miami's Carolyn 
Hill with a 73-69-142. JC's low 



PHOTO BY BILL GULLION 



Men Golfers Fifth In Polk invitational 



By Jim Goodman 
T StaffWriter 

fc ine men's golf team edged defending JC national champion Brevard 
yone stroke, finishing a strong fifth in the Polk Invitational. 
»ne Pacers' finished with a 36-hole score of 299-292-591. Seventeen 
■am s were entered in the tournament, which was won by Broward 
; n " a record low score of 568 strokes. 

1 j? ,f n Gr eene led the .Pacers' with a score of 72-71-143. Rich 
i 7 el lenstein,. 73-76-149; ', Kim' Swan, 77-72- 149,' and Brad Milam, 

•73-150. rounded : but the Pacer scorer's^ "" 

c «ach Sanculius was pleased with his teams performance. "It was a 



great team effort," he said. "Ken played excellently, but the rest of 
the team gave htm a strong backing." 

Sanculius feels that this team, which consists mainly of freshman 
maybe the strongest JC has ever had ?' 

"We have a great depth and balance," he said. "That's something 



we didn't have last year.' 

"We're facing tough competition, 
improve because we're a young team. 

"One of the most important things is that we have a beautiful team 
attitude, "he explained. "I think this is the best team 

The Pacers' next match is against FAU, Oct. 29 
Boca Del Mar course. 



he added, "but we expect to 



we've ever had, 
at 2:00 p.m. on the 



golfer was Anna Ranta with 
87-80-167. 

Other scores for Pacer golfers 
were Patti. Prentiss, 87-81-168 
Sally Bricker 89-85-174, Sue 
Hotden, 88-87-175 and Kellcy 
Spooner, 94-86-180. The best four 
low scores of each day were 
added to obtain the team score. 

Golf coach Joe Sanculius 
attributed the weak showing to 
inexperience. "We are competing 
against four-year schools with 
players that have two or three 
years experience," Sanculius 
said. "Our girls relaxed consid- 
erably the second dav and 
improved by 19 strokes'. They 
have to settle down and play their 
own game." 

In other golf news, Sanculius 
stated that since the University of 
South Florida decided not to host 
the USF Invitational, scheduled 
for Nov. 22-23, JC volunteered to 
host a tournament then. The Lady 
Pacer Invitational will be held on 
that date at LaManelia Country 
Club in Royal Palm Beach. 

Today and' tomorrow the 
women play in the Falconetlc 
Invitational at Hollywood Country 
Club in Hollywood. The tourna- 
ment is 36-hole play with the four 
best scores of five players 
determining the team score each 
dav. 



Oct 25. 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 11 



10 • BEACHCOMBER Oct. 25. 1976 







PHOTO BY BILL GULLION 

NEW COACH- Julio Rive instructs members of the women's tennis team. [L-R] Cheryl Lewis, Opie 
Bellas, Ann Marie Ziadie, Rive and Kim Cavanaugh. 



Women's Tennis 
Has New Coach 

By Steve Famsworth 
Associate Editor 

Julio Rive, coordinator of the Hotel-Food Service Program has been 
named as the new women's tennis coach. 

Although he has never coached before, Rive has plenty of tennis 
experience. He has played tennis for over 30 years, including playing 
on the University of Richmond and Air Force teams. 

Rive, originally from Puerto Rico, joined JC's faculty in 1969. 

His philosophy of coaching is to have the women in top physical 
condition. 

"Right now we're running a mile a day," he' stated. "1 want to 
increase that gradually until we reach three miles a day. The girls also 
do calisthenics, rope jumping and tennis drills." 

Rive also wants the women to play matches against local tennis 
clubs to prepare them for the upcoming season. 

Heading up this year's team are returnees Vikki Beggs and Kim 
Cavanaugh. Beggs was the top junior college player in the nation last j 
year and Rive said that Cavanaugh has improved tremendously since j 
last year. 

The new coach also expects national champions Lisa Yap Sam, No. 2 i 
singles, and Cindy Herlich, No. 4 singles, to return next term. \ 

Continued on page 11 



V 

Baltimore, Dallas Favored As Super Bowl Contenders 



With pro football reaching the The AFC Central is difficult to 
halt-way mark for the '76 regular call, but I'll go with Pittsburgh, 
season, surprises and upsets The Steelers have had their 
seem to be the name of the game, troubles, but they appeared over 

Inhabiting their usual places in when they mauled Cincinnati last 
the league cellars are Atlanta, week 23-6. The NFL champs just 
New Orleans, Philadelphia and don't deteriorate that much in one 
both New York teams, the Giants season. 

and Jets. Joining them there, as Cincinnati, although it is ahead 
expected, are expansion clubs of Pittsburgh right now, faces a 
Seattle and Tampa Bay. Nobody much rougher second-half sqhed- 



The Super Bowl should pit NFC 
champs Dallas against AFC 
champs Baltimore. Both teams 
feature explosive offenses and 



solid defenses. 

The game should be high-scor- 
ing and exciting, but the AFC is 
I lie tougher conference of the two 



and following the trend of thd 
past four Super Bowls, the AFG 
team, Baltimore, should be the 
next NFL champion. I 




Steve Farnsworth 
Sports Columnist 



could have expected, however, 
that Miami and Pittsburg would 
be down there, too. 

Likewise, traditional powers 
Dallas, Los Angeles, Minnesota, 
Oakland and Washington are up 
near the top of the standings 
again this year. Newly-emerged 
powers Baltimore, Cincinnati, 
Houston and St. Louis are in the 
running for a playoff spot. It's 
hard to believe, however, that 
teams like New England, San 
Diego and San Francisco would 
be contenders, also. 

Then you hive teams like 
Chicago, Detroit and Kansas 
City, alternately brilliant and 
pathetic on Jifferent weeks. 

But, a*, least there is a little 
sanity in the NFL. Buffalo, 
Cleveland, Denver and Green Bay 
at! are having their typical 
mediocre years. 

Out of this strange season, it's 
hard to pick who will win what. 
I'm going to try, though, and the 
next few weeks will prove me 
right or wrong. 

In the AFC East, Baltimore is 
the favorite. The Colts' only loss 
is a close one at the hands of 
Dallas. 30-27. 

New England, although it did 
go on a three-week upset binge 
against Miami, Pittsburgh and 
Oakland, lacks consistency as it 
has also lost to Detroit. 30-10. 

As tor Miami, it hurts me to say 
this since I'm a loyal Dolphin fan, 
but they just don't have it this 
year. 



ule than the Steelers. The 
Bengals should, however, make it 
as the AFC wild card. 

As for Houston, well, it has the 
misfortune to be in a tough 
division. 

Oakland, as usual, should win 
the AFC West. San Diego looked 
good in victories over St. Louis 
and Houston, but the Chargers 
aren't in the same class as the 
Raiders. 

Looking at the National 
Conference, Dallas appears to be 
the cream of the NFC east. 
Although the Cowboys have lost 
to St. Louis, 21-17, they have 
been more impressive than the 
Cardinals in games against 
common opponents. 

St. Louis suffered a disturbing 
43-24 loss to San Diego, but it has 
a strong team and probably will 
wind up as the NFC wild card. 

Washington didn't get the 
massive transfusion of young 
blood it needed this year, so the 
Redskins are too old and tired to 
make a run for the playoffs. 

The NFC Central is once again 
the sole property of Minnesota. 
None of the other teams in the 
division have the depth or the 
talent to challenge the Vikings. 

San Francisco ought to be the 
winners in the NFC West. The 
49ers were very impressive in 
their 16-0 shutout of Los Angeles, 
and they are tired of the Rams 
dominating the division. The 
Rams look to be out of the playoff 
picture. 



",.<,-., t * „ •■ ;l » »* PHOTO BY JOSE FERNANDEI 

PRO FOOTBALL- Scenes like this are repeated each Sunday as pro teams vie for an elusive Super Bowl 
spot. 



^W^U Volleyball Drops Matches 

Blames Lack Of Practice 







r * ,' 

■'■•\*fr*& , -:>.'"--..-; 
r r t^-i iv6 :."-.* l * 1 




.^^ V W;':.:„;v;-.^..;.:'.-- -,:■ ' 'V/ A 



I 



r 






I 





PHOTO BY GREG ROBERTS 

BLOCK- JoAnn Slater [foreground] joins her teammates to 
successfully block an opposition spike. 



Robbin Barber 
Staff Writer 

The women's volleyball team's 
record dropped to 7-9 after two 
losses in the past two weeks. 

On Oct. 12, the women were 
defeated by Broward Central. 

Broward led the first set from 
the beginning and continued to 
keep the lead throughout the 
game to win 15-6. 

In the second set, after three 
consecutive serves from both 
teams, Broward broke a 1-1 tie 
and scored four extra points to 
take a 5-1 lead. The Pacers were 
able to add only four more points 
as Broward captured the game 
15-5 and won the match. 

Joann Slater (captain of the 
women's volleyball team) feels 
the loss of the game is a result of 
the cut in time the team has for 
practice. 

According to Slater, the teams 
practice time in the gym was 
shortened because of the 
basketball practices. Slater feels 
that if the team had more time to 
practice they would have a much 
better record. 



New Coach 



vt< Continued from page 10 



"""Tie also sees promise in Ann 
Marie Ziadie from Jamaica who is 
in her first year here. Ziadie had 
the same coach in Jamaica as Yap 
Sam: Colin Russell, father of last 
year's men's tennis team captain, 
Norman Russell. 

Opie Bellas and Cheryl Lewis, 
both of whom played for Leonard 
last year, have also come out for 
the team. 

"If Yap Sam and Herlich 
return, we should equal or better 
last year's third place finish in the 
nation." Rive predicted. 

He added that not all of the 



HAVE A 
CHECKUP 

ITCAN 

SAVE 
YOUR LIFE. 



women's tennis scholarships have 
been awarded and that he would 
welcome walk-on players. 



"Walk-ons should come by the 
tennis courts where practices are 
held every day at 3:00," he said. 



'Comber Corrects 



Due to space limitations, the 
Beachcomber ommitted part of a 
correction concerning the Oct. 4, 
Delta Omicron story, on page 1 . 

Laury Becherer was quoted as 
saying she could "help students 
in English, Literature, and Math 



modules." 

We were in error in that 
quotation. Becherer was not 
quoted and later stated, "I really 
do not feel qualified to give help 
to anyone in those subjects." 














Johnny Bench 

_ American 
Cancer Society. $ 

THIS SPACE CONTSIWJTED BY THE PU8U5HER 










**&* 



+ ' ^ 



-2*4 



The volleyball team was also 
defeated by the Indian River on 
Oct. 20, 15-4, 15-3, in one of their 
weakest games of the season. 

The team looked good only in 
its set-ups and receiving the 
serve. Their weak point was their 

serve. 



"We just didn't play well," 
said assistant volleyball coach 
John Anderson. "The other team 

outplayed us." 



On Saturday, the Pacers travel 
to Indian River for the play-offs 
against five other teams. The 



teams ate: Daytona Beach, 
Seminole, Brevard, Hillsborough, 
and Indian River. If the Pacers 
win the play-offs they will play in 
the Region Eight National 
Tournament held in Baltimore, 
during the Thanksgiving holiday. 

The last home volleyball game 
is on Tuesday,' Nov. 2 




ROBERT REDFORD/DUSTIN HOFFMAN ALLTHFPRESIDFNTq mfm 

. ° no JAbUN HOB ARDS as Ben Bradlee . Screenplay bv WILLIAM fini ny &m 
Based on ihe book by CARL BERNSTEIN and BOB WOODWARD Ey OAVD^PF 
Produced by WALTER COBLENZ • Creeled by ALAN J PAkSla "* 
A Wildfcood Enterprises Production 
ARoberlRedlordAlanJ PakulaFilm 




HChmcou*. ftomWirrwrBroi. 
« wwrwr Communlejrtions Company 



o 



NOW AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU. 



12- BEACHCOMBER Oct. 25, 1976 



jp** 




PHOTO BY BILL GULLION 

INTRAMURAL KARATE- Jesus Sanchez works on his form as he practices with the Karate Club. 

I&R Sponsors Fitness Program 



The l&R Board is starting a fitness course to help 
prevent some of the approximately 1,000,000 deaths 
per year in the United States that can be attributed 
lo heart disease and other cardiovascular disorders. 

The major causes of most cardiovascular diseases 
are lack of physical exercise, improper diet and 
smoking. 

Designed to benefit [he average male and female 
between 17 and 50, the physical fitness program will 
include: 

1. Weight loss through proper diet and physical 
exercise. 

2. Maintenance of general physical health. 

• Incorporate minimal physical activities that 
will help maintain tone and normal body 
posture. 



3. Body building 

• Exercises including professional instruction 
on weight lifting, isometric and isotonic 
exercises. 

• Regimens that affect diet and cardiovascular 
systems, 

• Weight gain 

This program is free. Interested persons should 
sign up by October 29. First class session is 
November 2. 

Exercise sessions will be held on Tuesdays and 
Thursdays from 1:30 - 3:00 p.m. 

The Fitness Program will be under the direction qf 
Sid Smith. Physiology Instructor w *ta&££ftfi&Ja&i! 
Department. Mr. Smith is a believer in practicing 
what he teaches and is interested in fitness as a 
preventative form of medicine. 



Tennis Tourney 
Organized 

Sixteen men- and six women 
have entered the Intramural 
Singles Tennis Tournament. 

Format for the men's singies is 
round-robin matches, followed by 
seeding and a single elimination 
tournament. The women's mat- 
ches will be run almost the same 
way, except they will play a 
double round-robin. 

Awards are given for first, 
second and third place for both 
men and women. 

Matches are held Tuesdays and 
Thursdays from 3:3; - 4:45 and 
4:45 - 6:00. The first person to win 
10 games of his match or who is 
ahead after 75 minutes will be 
awarded the match. 



Softball Slates 
First Meeting 

An organizational meeting for 
the women's Softball team has 
been scheduled for Thursday in 
PE-05. Interested players should 
check with softball coach Bobbie 
Knowles for the time. 



The purpose of the meeting is 
to inform prospective players of 
practice times so they can plan 
their winter term schedules to 
avoid conflicts. Rules and team 
rules will also be discussed. 



<*f> palm srx/A/a- & 
rf>PIZZAt RESTAURANT 

Serving a new style pizza in the area. 

* Hot Oven Grinders (Hoagies) 

* Your favorite Italian dinners 

*Beer and wine, by the glass, carafe and pitcher! 

Tel. 964-3500 

NO EXTRA CHARGE FOR TAKE-OUT ORDERS 
10th & Congress Avenues — in the Palm Springs Shopping Center 



The 



'AHuommv 



HOAGIES & COMBINATIONS 

BUSCH-BUD-HEINEKEN 

TO TAKE OUT 

CALL AHEAD FOR QUICK SERVICE 

655-4936 

SOUTHERN BLVD. & DIXIE WEST PALM BEACH 



Karate Popular 
Intramural Club 



By Don Vaughn 
Staff Writer 

Have you been hearing thumps and bumps coming from the gym 
lately? Well, have no fear because it's merely the intramural karate 
club doing their thing. 

Under the guidance of Paul Ratanaprasith, a 5th degree black belt, 
participants learn the basics of karate, from falling and delivering 
blows such as the side kick and the inside crescent to defensive blocks. 
Ratanaprasith began learning the Martial Arts in Thailand when he 
was thirteen. While in Thailand and Korea he also became proficient in 
Thai boxing, Kung Fu and T.ae Kwon Do, all of which he incorporates 
into the course. 

The art of Karate dates back to the 16th century, when Okinawans 
developed it to a fine art to be used for self defense when the 
government forbid them to carry weapons. There are many styles and 
deviations of the original form in practice today. 

Reasons for taking the course are varied. John Eckhart is taking it 
because he is interested in the Marial Arts, which came into public 
popularity through the efforts of the late Bruce Lee. 

"I have been into karate and the Martial Arts for only a little while," 
says John, "but it's physically demanding." 

Birgit Sorenson and; Wanda .Peterson, two of the few females 
students taking the course, are in it because it's good discipline and 
exercise. "It's also a good way to defend yourself, if you have to," 
adds Sorenson. 

Said Jim Weaver, "I'm taking the course because it helps me relax. 
It also helps me gain self confidence and improve fny health." 

"I'm taking the karate course," says William Vivas, "because it's a 
good exercise and it improves your self-discipline. Besides, it's free." 

Classes are from 1 :30 to 3:30 every Monday, Wednesday and Friday 
in the gym. 



BX BEER DEPOT 

3384 S. Congress Avenue, Lake Worth 

(Just next to Bar-B-Q Ben's) 

965-9494 



•CASES 

• 6-PAKS 

• SINGLES 



« SODAS 

• CIGARETTES 

•ICE 



SEE US FOR THE LOWEST 
KEG PRICES IN TOWN 



Intramural Bowlin 


9 


Results 




MEN ' WOMEN 
High Game High Game 

Dave Greene 231 Sandy Rudoff 
Joe Lesko 225 Norma Pyfrin 
Jeff Jenkins 209 KathyWilk 


192 
188 
180 


High Set High Set 

Dave Greene 582 Sandy Rudoff 
JimBradie 568 KathyWilk 
Oscar Cash 566 Jean Inzanti 


541 
510 
478 


High Average High Average 

Dave Greene 185 KathyWilk 
Oscar Cash 181 Kim Delong 
Scott Kirkton 168 Sandy Rudoff 


165 

151 
150 


Team Standings Team Standings 

Chargers 19-5 Inlaws 

Anoma 19-5 190 White Lightning 

Vikings 16-8 Ryan's Hope 


23-1 
19-5 
11-9 


High Team Game High Team Game 

Anoma 690 Inlaws 

Chargers 664 190 White Lightning 

Vikings 643 Ryan's Hope 


661 
620 
558 


High Team Set High Team Set 

Anoma 1924 -190 White Lightning 
Chargers 1921 Inlaws 
BhiMax 1872 Ryan's Hope 


1756 
1746 
1562 







Vol.38 No. 7 



Voice of the Palm Beach Junior College Student 

Lake Worth, Fla. 33461 



November 1, 1976 




American Party Blasts Bureaucracy 

Manner Relaxed ^Wh Gov't Seen As 

In Campaigning 



It was a different style of "politiking" that 
brought attention to the American Party 
aspirations of Tom Anderson aud Rufus 
Shackleford. 

The two candidates, despite a busy schedule, 
stopped by the Beachcomber for lunch and just to 
try to "air their views." 

Anderson fielded a number of questions from 
Beachcomber staffers as weli us giving a capsule 
summary of his accomplishments. 

Attending Vanderbilt University, Anderson 
was business manager of the campus newspaper. 
Apparently it had a positive impact as he now 
owns 14 magazines. 

Having travelled extensively, Anderson told of 
his views on ecology. "Ralph Nader must be a 
Communist," he noted. "He's against our 
system." Anderson felt the states were doing an 
adequate job of enforcing ecological laws. 

Shackleford critized the media "blowup" of 
the 1969 Santa Barbara, Calif, oil spill as an 
example of "ecological brain washing." 

"I personally investigated the area and found 
the claims to be highly exaggerated," 
Shackleford said. 

Both candidates felt that a campus newspaper 
was the focal point of a campus, where views 
should be exchanged. 

"It's a wonder any young voter would be 
interested at all," Anderson noted. 

The candidates also praised Edwin Pugh, 
faculty advisor to the Political Union, for showing 
an interest in, as they put it, "the second party." 

Anderson and Shackleford also noted the lack 
of national attention they were getting. "We 
have to try harder to be heard," Anderson 
stated. 

After lunch Anderson left for South N Carolina 
while Shackleford remained for a night rally in 
the SAC lounge. 

Most of the Beachcomber staff did not agree 
with the platforms and ideas expressed by 
Anderson and Shackleford. 

But as Pugh later noted "an educated voter 
makes a wiser decision." - DENNY GLAVIN 



Deadwood Dick 




PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER 

"There are janitors on the JC campus paying mote taxes than 
Rockefeller did in 1970." . . . Rufus Shackleford. 



Enemy By Duo 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

Tom Anderson and Rufus Shackleford, 
American Party presidential and vice-president- 
ial candidates, appeared at the SAC lounge, 
Thursday, as part of their southern swing. 

Phoenix, a local bluegrass band, set the stage 
for Anderson. 

Anderson's attacks centered on government 
and bureaucracy in general. "Government is 
America's number one enemy. There are a 
million bureaucrats running this country by 
decree." 

When asked why a third party feels it can be 
elected, Anderson said he felt that the American 
Party was the second party. "The Democrats and 
Republicans have no differences; we are second 
party." 

Shackleford, billed as the "world's largest 
tomato grower," concentrated on taxation and 
the inadequacies within the federal income tax 
system. 

He attacked Vice-President Nelson Rockefeller 
by stating, "There are janitors on the JC campus 
paying more taxes than Rockefeller did in 1970. 

Shackleford reiterated that the people must 
"return to the Constitution" rather than drift 
from it. 

Clyde Adams, another "American , who is 
running for Congress against incumbent Paul 
Rogers, also spoke for the party. 

Shackleford returned Thursday evening for an 
address to those unable to make the morning 
session. 

" The event was sponsored by the JC political 
union and their faculty advisor, Edwin Pugh. 





LUNCH BREAK - Rufus Shackleford and Tom Anderson relax for lunch in Beachcomber office. 



PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER 



Campus Players To Present Fall Production 



By Frank Smith 
Venture Editor 

The JC players, under the 
direction of Sunny Meyer, are 
prepared to open the curtain on 
"Deadwood Dick, "this west- 



ern melodrama premiers Thurs- 
day and will run through 
Sunday. 

In an effort to publicize the 
play, the cast declared last 
Thursday as Deadwood Dick 



Day and walked about the 
campus wearing their costumes. 
Members of the crews, who did 
not have costumes wore 
specially printed tee-shirts 
advertising the play. 




Construction of the "Mantrap 
Saloon" is nearly complete with 
only minor details left to 
complete the set. 

Friday the players held a 
"technical" rehearsal, which 
lasted far into the night. The 
reason for such a long exercise 
is the nature of play production. 
The lighting, sound, along with 
the actors movements must be 
coordinated to be effective. 

This coordination must be 
worked out slowly and meticu- 
lously into a choreographed flow 



of motion, moods and sounds. 

Technical director. Art Mus- 
to, commented, "We're trying 
to create the flavor of the period 
-giving a suggesting, a feeling, 
without being totally realistic- of 
arootin' tootin' 1 890' s saloon." 

The effect is achieved by a 
wagon wheel chandelier, swin- 
ging doors, a bar (complete with 
an oh-so-precious mirror) old- 
time chairs and tables and the 
presumably willing "suspension 
of disbelief" of the playgoer. 

Continued on page 9 



PHOTO BY BILL JOHNSON 



~~~On The Inside 

Registration P. 2 

No 'Comber Next Week, See .- P. 4. 

"Indiana Triangle" ■ P. 6 & 7 

Column: Ceravolo P. 10 



2 - BEACHCOMBER Nov. 1, 1976 



Winter Term Registration Slated 



Nov. 1, 1976 BEACHCOMBER -3 



By Audrey Snow 
Staff Writer 

Winter term registration for 
currently enrolled JC students 
has been scheduled for Nov. 
4-18, based on the total number 
of semester hours accumulated 
through fall, 1976. 

Students who are graduating 
in May, register Nov. 4th. No 
student will be admitted without 
a completed, signed, graduating 
card showing that he or she is 
graduating during that term. 
Registration for day graduates 
is from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m., and 6-9 
p.m. for evening graduates. 

The more hours a student has 
accumulated, the fewer courses 
the individual needs to 
graduate. Therefore, day stu- 
dents with the highest amount 
of accumulated credit hours are 
to be admitted first, Monday - 
Friday from 9 a.m. til 3 p.m., 
Nov. 5-18. 

"It's the fairest and quickest 
form possible," said Registrar 
Charles Graham. 



Because the attendance at 
night is relatively small, 
currently enrolled JC students 
can register Monday through 
Thursday on Nov. 5-18, from 6-9 
p.m., without regard to 
collected hours. 

Jesse Ferguson, evening 
registrar, encourages students 
to see a counselor before the 
beginning of pre-registration. 

Alphabetical listings of stu- 
dents with their total number of 
completed semester hours are 
available in the Career Center, 
Student Activity Center and on 
bulletin boards near the 
Financial Aid Office. 

Individuals interested in 
taking courses at other 
campuses including the North 
Center, Glades Center, and the 
South Center. In addition to 
courses at the central campus 
students may enroll for all 
classes at this time. 

Students who can not keep 
their registration appointments 
may enroll on a later date but 



will not be permitted to register 
at an earlier date. 

Counseling forms are avail- 
able in the registrar's office. 

Application deadline for new 
day students for the winter term 
is Dec. 10th. 

Fees must be paid by Dec. 14, 



1976, or the schedule will be 
cancelled. 



Day registration appoint- 
ments for winter term 9:00 a.m. 
- 3:00 p.m. on the following 
dates; 

November 4, Winter Term 
Graduates Only. 5, 53 Semester 



Hours & Up. 8, 
Hours & Up. 9, 
Hours and Up. 10 
Hours & Up. 11, 
No School. 12, 
Hours & Up. 15, 
Hours & Up. 16, 
Hours & Up. 17, 
Hours & Up. 18, 
currently enrolled. 



43 Semester 

30 Semester 

, 17 Semester 

Veterans Day 

15 Semester 

13 Semester 

11 Semester 

, 7 Semester 

Any student 



Fee Committee Due 
To Hear Proposals 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

The initial meeting of the 
Student Activity Fee Committee 
(SAFC) was held Tuesday, after 
a month-long delay. 

Dean Paul Glynn, vice 
president for Student Affairs 
and acting chairperson of SAFC 
noted that there are a few 
problems in getting all groups 
together at one time weekly. 

Tom Solder, Inter Club 
Council (ICC) chairman, felt 
that it was a bad sign that some 
organizations did not send any 
representatives at all. Glynn 
staled that more pressure will 
be placed on such clubs. 

The Athletic Dept. and the 
Beachcomber are to make 
budget proposals and expendi- 
tures for the Fall 1977 term at 
the Nov. 2 meeting. 

Each week two of the 10 clubs 
will report to the SAFC to justify 
their payment by the SAFC. 



First Show 



By Emily Hamer 
Staff Writer 

Sounds of the Beatles, 
Carpenters and Three Dog 
Night are to be among the music 
featured in the Pacesetters first 
performance of the semester. 

The Jazz Band and Guitar 
Ensemble will also play, 
providing jazz, rock, blues and 
music from the big band era. 

Featured instrumental solo- 
ists include Doug Furiato, 
guitar; Tom Meierer, tenor sax 
and Bruce Bravvner, trombone. 



If the SAFC feels an 
organizations deserves more or 
less of the SAFC "pie", they 
are the sole body that decides. 

Groups who failed to send 
representitives were the Galle- 
on, Intramurals and the 
Assemblies Committee. 



By Cindy McCarthy 
News Editor 
JC accepted a bid price of $1,582,500 
from a Belle Glade construction firm for 
beginning construction of the Glades campus. 

This bid award went to Roe Steele 
Construction Co. and was approved at the 
October Trustees meeting. 

According to Dr. Harold C. Manor, college 
president, this price is reasonable for 
construction. "One has to remember, this is a 
long term investment." 

Included in Phase I is a two-story structure of 
two joined modules, plus a mechanical building. 

The first floor includes two double classrooms, 
a single classroom, library, bookstore, student 
lounge and other office and support areas. 

On the second floor will be seven classrooms, 
two laboratories and other support areas. 

Presently there are approximately 440 students 
attending the Glades center. Classes are held in 
the Belle Glade Armory, in addition to meeting at 
Glades Central High School Annex and Glades 
Correctional Institute. This number is expected 




,PHO I <J BY Blt-L jOrn<4auiN 

DECA PREVIEWS FASHIONS - Sat., the Sales and marketing Club held their Tenth Annual Fashion 
Show in the SAC lounge. The theme was "Palm Beach After Dark. ' ' 

Transplant Of Banyan Tree 
Blocked By Commission 



Ray Lynn and 
will perform on 
piano, electric 
synthesizer. 

The free concert is Nov 
8 p.m. in the auditorium. 



Bob Tufford 
the acoustic 
piano and 



17 at 



By Mary Ann Macdonald 
Staff Writer 

The Sixth Avenue banyan tree is in danger of 
losing its life because of the widening of the road. 
The county commissioners would not permit the 
removal and transplant of the tree, saying it was 
too large and would not survive the transplant. 
The cost matter was also taken into account. 

Having known of MacArthur's past interests in 
saving trees in our county, this writer thought he 
would at least hear out the situation. And he did. 

We took a ride up to Palm Beach Gardens, a 
town he developed. At MacArthur Blvd., situated 
in the entrance way to Palm Beach Gardens, is 
one huge and healthy banyan tree. 



Mr. "Mac" explained that the tree was 
uprooted and transplanted some years back and 
for the following two or three years after being 
transplanted, residents and officials insisted it 
was dead. This tree was far from dead. 

Further north, at PGA Blvd. and Military Trail, 
MacArthur showed various types of trees. He is 
in the process of developing this land into 
another community. 

He said that sidewalks in the development will 
be built around the trees and that no tree would 
be destroyed for the sake of construction. 

MacArthur assured that he would, "back the 
fight to save the banvan." 



GladesConstruction 
Bid Awarded 



to increase each year. 

Wheaasked about the continuing expansion of 
the Glades campus, Manor had this to say, "Our 
responsibility is for the county as a whole." That 
is why there are JC North and South 
campuses." 

Manor gave an example as to why JC has gone 
to the Glades area. "They are isolated from us. 
At one time students were brought in by bus to 
the central campus. ' ' 

This plan did not work, because the number 
registered did not show. Attempts at car pools 
have failed also. 

Florida State Department of Education 
provides the money for operations. However, 
before action is effected a state survey must be 
conducted. 

"We try to use facjjj 



raufSTfhem," stated 
Manor. "Classes start at 7:30 in the morning and 
run until 10:00 at night. There are activites on the 
weekends." 

Manor adds, "We're doing all we can to get 
the most out of our physical facilities." 



BethesdaBy 
The Sea Set 
For Concert 



By Emily Hamer 
Staff Writer 

World renowned trumpeter 
Edward Tarr and organist- 
trumpeter George Kent join to 
present a concert at Bethesda- 
by-the-Sea Church. The perfor- 
mance, Nov. 9 at 8 p.m., is 
sponsored by the JC music 
department and Bethesda.. 

Tarr is famous for his 
performances on Baroque trum- 
pets and interpretations of avant 
garde music for the trumpet. He 
has toured Europe, Japan and 
the U.S. with Kent. Tarr has 
made more than 50 recordings 
and founded the Edward Tarr 
Brass Ensemble. 

Kent is professor of music at 
the University of Rhode Island 
(R.I.), founder and conductor of 
the 180 voice Chorus of 
Westerly and assistant conduct- 
or of the R.I. Philharmonic 
Orchestra. He is organist-choir- 
master of Christ Church, 
Westerly, R.I. 

The artists will perform at 
JC's seminar Nov. 10 at. 1:20 
p.m. in HU-04 and present a 
trumpet clinic at 3:30 p.m. for 
college and area trumpeters. 

There is no charge for the 
concert or clinic. 

Bethesda-by-the-Sea is locat- 
ed on S. County Rd. in Palm 
Beach. 



I 




PHOTO BY BILL JOHNSON 

LUCY BOOTH- Located in front of the cafeteria, this booth periodically provides information and 
brochures on health related programs. 

Congressman's Impromptu 
Visit Beneficial To Students 



During a surprise visit to 
Palm Beach Junior College 
Tuesday, Congressman Paul 
G. Rogers was pressed into 
service as a substitute teacher. 

When Rogers poked his head 
in the doorway of a government 

class. Dr. Samuel Bounsto. 

chairman of the JC social 
science department , had just 
told the students, their regular 
instructor was ill. 

"But 1 had no idea until just 
now that your substitute would 
be a U.S. Congressman," 
Bottosto said. 

Rogers told the students he is 
impressed with the college 
student of today, because of the 
interest they are taking in 
government. 

While mentioning that he had 
supported the 18-year-old vote, 
Rogers said: 

"It seems that a number of 
the 18-year-old voters tend to 
vote like their parents. 

I'm hoping that eventually 
lhey'11 take the lead and vote 
their own convictions," Rogers 
commented. 

Rogers told the students that 
in the past, the president 
worked out the country's budget 
and Congress simply reacted to 
it. 

Congress has passed a law 
last year under which the 
budget is now set by the 



Congress, "and we're working 
toward, a- balanced budget," 
said Rogers. 

"We've reduced the budget 
deficit 70 billion to 50 billion, 
and we hope to split this in half 
next year and keep reducing it 
until wo fui ally reach a balanced 
budget," lit added. 

He commended the students 
of William Flory and Charles 
McCreight for selecting speech 
as one of their courses and told 
them that his minor in college 
was speech. 

"It's good to learn to think on 
your feet." he said, adding that 
"this year you're hearing a lot 
of speeches, perhaps too many. 

"It's part of democracy to 
listen to the speeches and 
determine the person to vote 
lor," he said. 

In the short time he spent at 
JC. Rogers spoke to Dr. Harold 
C. Manor, JC president, about 
the college's growth through the 
years. 

He was shown the new 
computer registration by Regis- 
trar Charles Graham and shook 
hands with students on his way 
to the classrooms. 

He was also signed up as an 
honorary member of the 
Political Union by Terri 
Anderson, vice president, and 
Edwin V. Pugh, faculty advisor, 



who paid Roger's two cents 
dues. 

The cai-d reads: "Paul G. 
Rogers is a full-fledged member 
of the Palm Beach Junior 
College Political Union and has 
put in his two cents." 



J Heart Association 

Cancer Society 
Inform Students 



By Emily Hamer 
Staff Writer 

Heart Association volunteers will answer questions about Heart 
Association services and give students informative brochures at the 
Lucy Booth Wednesday, Nov. 3 between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. 

The Lucy Booth— patterned after the booth in the Peanuts comic 
strip—was started in 1975 by Helen Deidrich. director of health 
services at JC. 

Since then, representatives from the Lung Association, Mental 
Health Center, Heart Association, Right to Life Agency, a drug 
agency. Planned Parenthood. and Sexual Assault Assistant Project 
have presented programs. 

Cancer Society Representatives will be at the booth Nov. 9. Other 
programs planned are Women's Medical Center. Lung Association. 
Diabetes Association and the county health department. 

Deidrich said, "Response to the booth has been positive." 50 to 
several hundred students take advantage of each program. Deidrich 
stated she would like input on any agencies students want to appear 
on campus. 

The Lucy Booth is located in front of the cafeteria. 

SG Slates Movies 
Possible Festival 



By Dave Taylor 
Staff Writer 

A recent Student Government 
(SG) "coffeehouse" featured 



Hi-Speed Reade 
Is IEEE Project 



Bv Lisa Ostberg 
Staff Writer 

"We hope in the near future to apply engineering and 
technological expertise to solving some of the campuses technical 
problems," said Tom Solder, Engineering Club, chairman. 

The Engineering Club (IEEE) is not standing still. Their present 
project is designing a hi-speed optical reader for paper tape, which 
is the data input method for the engineering deparment mini 
computer. The departments problem is that the computer is 
extremely slow. 

Their purpose is to communicate with other people in the field, to 
maintain contact with the real world of engineering and 
technological fields, rather than being misled by textbooks. 
Belonging to the club is an incentive to keep grades up also. 

Future field trips include visiting local engineering and 
technological facilities such as IBM, ITT, LW Power, FPL, Southern 
Bell and Submarine Research Center on Andros Island. 

Even though the club is not mentioned in the '77-' 78 student 
handbook, they are very much present on the JC campus. 



folk and southern-rock singer- 
guitarist. Pete Harris, who 
performed for an estimated 40 
students. 

Also included in the four-hour 
concert was the folk/country 
group. "Blue Sky." The event 
was held Oct. 24. in JC's SAC 
lounge. 

"We hosted a small, but 
enthusiastic audience," repor- 
ted SG Vice-President, Hugh 
Lambert. "It was due largely to 
a lack of advertisement." 

Future activities planned by 
the SG members include soloist 
Craig Allen doing his favorite 
"Rhythm and Blues" numbers, 
Nov. 10 in the JC cafeteria, 
starting at noon. 

Films sucli as "American 
Graffiti," Nov. 19 in the SAC 
lounge and "Tommy" Dec. 3 
are also being planned. 
Considered by SG is the renting 
of the Polo Grounds for their 
upcoming mini-festival. 

"We (SG) hope to feature at 
least five separate groups," 
stated Lambert. 



FAU, JCM/x Programs 




STimFNT ADVISORY BOARD - These nine people make Up the advisory board at the JC South Center. 
Sir^bM, Penny ReTer, Virginia Mctaemey, Cincy Steel, Lori White, Judy 



Selected JC courses have been offered on the Florida Atlantic 
University Campus (FAU) since the Spring term of 1970-71 

However, it was not until the Fall of 1973-74 that a formalized 
agreement between Palm Beach Junior College (JC) and FAU was 
enacted. 

The South Center then officially came into existence. 
Administrative offices were opened at the Henderson University 
School in Dec. 1973 and classes started in Jan. 1974. 

JC South and FAU, working together, have developed 
cooperative curricula in Science, Engineering and Computer 
Science. 

Therefore students can be enrolled at both institutions 
simultaneously through a Dual-Enrollment agreement worked out 
between the two institutions. 

Curriculums are designed to coincide with the FAU Quarter 
academic calender, as well as the JC Semester. Continuous 
educational endeavors are available for both the upper division 
student as well as the JC student . 

Since its inception, JC South has developed to a student 
population of approximately 700. Approximately one third of the 
students'are full time and one sixth are dually enrolled. 

FAU has helped to make the rapid growth of the South Center 
'possible and through continued cooperation it is expected that the 
growth will be even greater. 

An aid to this growth has been the availability of Student Housing 
nrovidedbv the FAU Housinc Denartment. „ ~ 



™mmim^ ^ mm*.m.mm^*K' r r r m?mrmmr~**m.~'m^. Ylmtn ™-^r™->^ 



i*r 



Nov. 1, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 5 



4 - BEACHCOMBER Nov. 1, 1976 



Editorials 



Payment Isn't Agreement 

In a recent issue of ON CAMPUS REPORT, a national tabloid 
received by the Beachcomber, an interesting report came to light. 

As most students know, they cannot be forced to join a campus 
organization, such as student government. But should the student 
also pay funds to support these groups? 

Washington's State Supreme Court in a case against the 
University of Washington ruled they must pay such fees. 

The court stated ". . .we must balance the plantiffs' rights against 
the traditional need and desirability of the university to provide an 
atmosphere of learning, debate, dissent and controversy." 

The court felt that if this case won, students could then veto every 
event, speech or program they disagree with. 

Some of the dubious fee allotments given out by last year's 
Student Activity Fee Committee (SAFC) should also be checked. 

Perhaps the organizations with the greatest "participation ratio 
should reap the just benefits." 



What Do Our 
Grades Show? 



Gunda Caldwell 
Editorials 



The most concerted effort occurring in any education institution is 
directed toward that all-important grade. How are we doing? Can 
we pull up that low mark? And what for? 

What do our grades mean? 

First of all, let us remember that success is difficult to measure 
and that good grades do not necessarily assure future success. 
Further, financial success does not equate with success as a human 
being. 

An outstanding teacher, for instance, cannot financially compare 
with someone in a business where profit goes to the shrewd and 
enterprising. Yet, who is there that will say a businessman is a 
greater success than an effective teacher? .. 

A minister, educator or social service; worker will never earn as 
much as a doctor or attorney, yet the impact they leave on society 
and their value to humanity are far greater than any mercenary 
comparison to a lucrative practice. 

College grades cannot measure the worth of a human being. They 
can measure the effort exerted and the progress achieved in an 
atmosphere contrived to help develop knowledge and skills. The 
educator sets the course, marks the goal and starts the pupil going. 
The rest is up to the pupil. 

We do not sit passively in a classroom while an instructor 
"teaches" as students are inclined to think is the case. Classroom 
learning is a shared experience, with teamwork between the teacher 
and pupil. The instructor provides motivation, inspiration, 
explanation and examination. The student produces dedication, 
application, evaluation and assimilation. 

Mass cheating surfaces periodically at many colleges. To get a 
good grade by cheating is the loser's way. No one stands to benefit, 
the grading system is discredited and the cheater has deprived 
himself of learning and character. 

Without some system for evaluation, there would be little 
inducement for most students to complete, work assignments and 
maintain a continuity of progress. 

The one way to improve a grade is to work - and work. We should 
not be given a grade, we should earn it. This record will remain a 
part of our past permanently, a silent testimony to performance and 
ability. Future employers can judge our worth, our level or value by 
what we accomplish here, now. 

Your future rests in your hands, as surely as your grades do. Your 
college grades measure you, so make the best of them. 



Beachcomber 

Palm Beach Junior College 
4200 S. Congress Ave., Lake Worth, Fla 33461 
(305) 965-8000, ext. 210 

Editor-in-chief Dennis Glavin 

Associate Editor-Editorial Gunda Caldwell 

Associate Editor-News Bill Johnson 

Associate Editor-Feature, Sports . Steve Farnsworth 

News Editor Cindy McCarthy 

Venture Editor Frank Smith 

Photo Editor Bill Gullion 

Business Manager Karen Abramowitz 

Consultant Charles R. McCreight 

The Beachcomber Is published weekly from our editorial offices In 
the Student Pullcatlons Building at Palm Beach Junior College 
Opinions expressed In the Beachcomber are those of the editors or 
writers and are not nesessarity those of the Palm Beach Junior 
College. 

Letters must not exceed 2oo words, must be signed by the author, 
received in the Beachcomber office no later than 4 p.m. on 
Wednesday and are subject to condensation. 




No Sir, I'm sorry, we don't have any without peanuts. 



Another Viewpoint On Amendment Six 



Amendment Six should recei- 
ve careful scrutiny by every JC 
student before going to the 
polls. We recommend an 
unqualified rejection of this 
amendment. 

This innocuous sounding bill 
will adversely affect every state 
university and community 
college in Florida. It will serve 
to sharply curtail government 
services in education, as well as 
in mental health and care of the 
elderly. 

The immediate effect of this 
amendment would be to reduce 
the amount of state services to 
universities and colleges. Thou- 
sands of student jobs would be 
eliminated. This would deprive 
colleges of a relatively inexpen- 
sive work force, while depriving 
these same students of valuable 
on-the-job training. This one 
feature has served as a boon to 
numberless students caught in 
the "experience required to get 
a job" and "a job required to 
get experience" dilemma. 

As a proposal to limit the 
number of fulltime and 
part-time state employees, to be 
put into effect July 1, 1979, it 
seems like a good idea on the 
surface. The goal sounds 
worthwhile. Manning J. Dauer, 
Professor of Political Science, 



University of Florida, has 
analyzed in depth the actual 
results that can be expected if 
this bill passes. 

He points out several factors 
that reverse the minor financial 
relief the *a*pfcx$K,.w»U, initially. » 
encounter. 

Amendment Six proposes to 
limit the number of state 
employees to 1% official 
population estimate of preced- 
ing year, and part-time 
employees to 10% of the 
fulltime employees. A cut of 
4,160 fulltime and 1,041 
part-time employees would be 
mandatory the day the law went 
into effect. No further functions 
could be added, except by 
reducing services in other 
existing agencies. 

The source of the constitu- 
tional ceiling figures cited in the 
proposed amendment is un- 
known. It does not come from a 
study of government functions. 

Legislature is providing for 
expansion of the state prison 
system to comply with a federal 
court order to reduce the 
overload in prisons. The 
numerical impact of personnel 
for the expanded prison system 
will have to be absorbed by 
other state agencies. We must 
rob Peter to pay Paul. The same 



Letters 



Mandatory Attendance Rule Childish 

Dear Sirs: 

1 am thoroughly disgusted with the ruling at PBJC that class must 
be attended. 

We are being constantly reminded that we are preparing to enter 
an upper-level school someday. But what kind of preparation is 
this? ' 

I am dual enrolled at FAU and PBJC. The difference between the 
child-like treatment at FAU is staggering. Class attendance Is rarely 
taken at FAU. When it is, it is usually to verify enrollment in the 
class and is only done once. 

This junior college is under the false impression that compulsory 
class attendance is somehow beneficial. If a student can make a 
grade with which he is satisfied and never attend class, let him be 
mature enough to make that decision. If he fails, he is the only loser. 
The school still gets their money. 

We are adults attending this school, yet some of the teachers still 
run it like a kindergarten. The initial shock of freedom to make the 
decision to attend or not attend class at FAU or any other school can 
sometimes be fatal. Give students the chance to make that decision 
in their early college years when it is not so detrimental. 

Sincerely, 
Penny Mize 



holds true with expansion of 
state hospitals and even 
universities. 

Growth in any one area will 
penalize other agencies and 
reduce their effecriverje^ggss, 

responsibility for funding em- 
ployees in a regional agency, we 
must also absorb this expansion 
at the cost to other agencies. 

This amendment would prove 
a major stumbling block in 
moving functions between state, 
regional and local levels as 
matters might change in the 
future of the state. Prof. Dauer 
predicts a chaotic aftermath if 
Amendment Six goes through, 
with special crippling effects on 
the educational systems. 

More than ever, your vote will 
count. We urge you to 
participate in the voting so it 
will remain an exercise with 
meaning. 

Each ballot is an expression of 
the will of a free citizen. It is 
proof we are concerned with the 
laws by which we are governed. 

With ever increasing voter 
apathy by the general public, 
more than ever it becomes 
crucial for JC students to get out 
and vote. 

Strike down the Amendment 
Six provision! 



'Comber Will Be 

Back After 
Nat'l Convention 

The Beachcomber will be 
sending four representatives to 
Chicago for the National 
Associated Collegiate Press 
convention, Nov. 4-7. 

Denny Glavin, editor, Bill 
Johnson, Assoc. Ed., Cindy 
McCarthy, News Editor, and 
staff writer, Don Vaughan will 
accompany Charles McCreight, 
faculty advisor. 

The next issue of the 'Comber 
will be Nov. 15. 

The staff will be participating 
in seminars and lectures 
concerning all phases of 
newspaper work, as well as 
picking up ideas from other 
papers, nationwide. 



fe. 



■ yttr* f 



Faculty Announces Endorsement 



Eleanor Myatt 
Guest Columnist 

Campaign talk is cheap. And 
in '76 doubletalk gives you twice 
as much for your money. If 
Carter and Ford, as some think, , 
don't know if they're coming or ) 
going, do we? 

Our starry-eyed dreams of the 
'60's are dimmed by the cynical 
mood of today. More dollars buy 
less. We have higher prices and 
fewer jobs. To treat one disease 
we must worsen another. 

We want Uncle Sam to play 
Santa and Scrooge-Santa to us 
and Scrooge to the neighbors, 
since their benefit checks mean 
our tax hike. 

We want "hands-off" gov- 
ernment, with strict controls on 
every group but our own. We 
want a space-age war machine 
that makes us feared by foes 
and adored by friends. We are 
"fuzzy on the issues." 

The Republican Party is more 
conservative and smaller. It 
attracts rural northerners, 
middle class suburbanites, 
many businessmen, some pro- 
fessionals, the elderly, the 
Protestants, those whose famil- 
ies have lived here longest, 
those of comfortable means who 
have more or less "arrived" and 
have most to lose by change. 

Gerald Ford and Robert Dole 
rennet the folklore. They are 
sons of small-town, small-bus- 
iness, farm-belt midwest. Ford 
and Dole (also Carter and 
Mondale) mirror the eafly 
American Puritan with ethio-in- 
dividualism, competitive labor, 
thrift, and "God-helps-those- 
who-help-themselves" attitude. 

Ford and Dole came from a 
modest start by the rugged 
route of the football field, World 
War II, law school and politics. 

The Democrats, the so-called 
"left", think they're right. With 
a more liberal basis, their 
philosophies are inspired by 
Jefferson and Wesley. Jimmy 
Carter, a southern Baptist and 
Walter Mondale, a Minnesota 
Methodist minister's son, are 
heirs of Evangelical Protestan- 
tism. 

Carter and Mondale share 
Andrew Jackson's faith in equal 
rights and intrinistic worth of 
the common man. 

If Carter seems "all things to 
all men," it may be due to a 
conservative father and liberal 
mother. A boy of the piney 
woods and peanut farms of the 
south, he became a disciplined 
naval officer and nuclear 
engineer, with an intellectual 
flair for seeing both sides. 

In classrooms, we call this 
objectivity. In campaigns, they 
call it deceit. 

Mondale is one of the 
Senate's fiercest fighters for the 
under-dog. His early life among 
debt-ridden farmers in the 30' s 
and his father's preaching, 
helped make him this way. 

The Democrats range from a 
few millionaires and business- 
men, suburbanites, intellect- 
uals, to blue-collar workers, 
southern farmers, blacks, Jews, 
Catholics, and the urban poor. 
There are more Democrats than 




Republicans. With such a loose 
alliance, this party has appeal to 
the young, the not-yet arrived 
who need government help. 

Democrats think our battles 
for human rights and better- 
ment are far from won. Their 
liberal doctrine values freedom. 
Government's role is to curb the 
"greedy" on behalf of the 
"needy." Liberals see the work 
as not yet done. They fear 
change less than conservatives, 
since they may have more to 
gain. Government is an 
instrument for social progress to 
be used with care. 

Democrats view defense as 
important. But man does not 
live by dread alone, and 
strength does not lie just in 
weapons. A nation whose 
people are healthy, wealthy and 
wise is strong. We can lead the 
world by moral example as well 
as by munitions. 

GERALD FORD - 
Republican Presidential 
Candidate: 

Background: Born 1913, adopt- 
ed son of small businessman; 
Yale law degree. Lt. Comman- 
der U.S. Navy, W.W.II, 
Michigan attorney for several 
years. Congressional: 1948-73, 
House of Representative. 1964- 
73 House Minority Leader. 
Renowned for tight budget, 
master of detail, ability to 
compromise, opposed to Medi- 
care. Appointed Nixon's Vice 
President in 1973. Succeeded to 
Presidency in 1974. 



Presidential record: Restored 
honest government after Wa- 
tergate, sought a "good 
marriage" with Congress in 
1974, sees inflation as our No. 1 
problem and big spending as 
main cause. 

Ford calls unemployment a 
necessary economic adjustment 
and recently has shown interest 
in health and the consumer. He 
is proud of his personal 
meetings with foreign leaders, 
and strong defense program. 

However, he proclaimed 
Nixon's innocence through the 
final days, and quickly pardoned 
him. His honeymoon with 
Congress was shortlived. Two 
years unemployment rate is 
highest since the 30' s depres- 
sion. Poor tax reform and the 
swine flu program are also on 
Ford's record. Finally, a 
tarnished record by secret 
Kissinger diplomacy, high arms 
sales to other nations, and 
lowest level European good will 
toward US in decades. 

JIMMY CARTER - 

Democratic Presidential 
Candidate: 

Background: Born 1924, son of 
Georgia peanut farmer and 
small businessman. Grad. U.S. 
Naval Academy, 1946. Union 
College nuclear engineering 
course in 1952, Naval submarine 
officer, with experience in 
atomic submarine program. 
Returned to Plains, Ga., when 



needed in family farming and 
peanut processing business. 
Built it into a large, profitable 
firm. 

Member of Ga. State Senate 
1962-66, Governor 1962-64, 
prevented by long-standing 
state law to serve two 
consecutive terms. 

Record as Georgia Governor: 

Consolidated 300 state agencies 
to 22. centralized human 
resources, welfare, and health 
agencies into one, pushed, bills 
on educational funding, took 
liberal positions ' on mental 
health, consumer protection, 
environmental protection, pro- 
gressive civil rights. 

Proposed Presidential Program: 

Cut unemployment rate from 
8% to 4.5% through direct 
government-paid job program. 

Compress "about 1900 federal 
executive agencies to about 200, 
for efficiency and to produce 
new federal programs. 

Carter plans to close some tax 
loopholes for special interests, 
train and place in jobs the 10% 
welfare recipients who are 
employable, increase federal 
funding for education above the 
present 8%, establish national 
health program and better 
housing for elderly persons, 
effect a good energy policy, 
overhaul federal criminal justice 
system and endorses ERA. 

Carter cites naval experience 
with weaponry, travels abroad 
and special briefings as 
background for foreign affairs. 
He would like to see less cozy 



relations with USSR and closer 
ones with our allies. 



SUMMARY 



Whoever wins this November 
won't have an easy job. Gerald 
Ford, with his 35% League of 
Women Voter's rating on grasp 
of vital problems, is a likable, 
ledger-book, "laissez-faire " 
leader, who will keep this 
nation on "HOLD." 

Ford is pleased with the 
national pulse. He is a good, 
kind man with eyes used to the 
dim cloakrooms of Capital Hill 
and the local . golf club . 
Columnist David Broder thinks 
voting for Ford will make us 
"safe and sorry." With the 
Democrats due for renewed 
control of the House and Senate, 
do we want four more years of 
deadlock? As a lame duck 
president. Ford could not run 
again in 1980. 

Chaplain Peter Marshall once 
said, "It is better to aim at 
something and miss than to aim 
at nothing and think you've hit 
it." In spite of Carter's 
weaknesses and our own cynical 
mood, we feel he has political 
balance and skills. 

Carter and Mondale have 
records of achievement and 
substance. They have the vision 
to face facts. The AFT, 
FEA/United, and NEA, teacher 
unions have endorsed the 
Carter-Mondale ticket. We who 
deal with human growth and 
learning, feel we have no other 
choice. 



] ! 



mmawiBwsiBiFB'uraana 



6 - BEACHCOMBER Nov. 1, 1976 



Venture 



Nov. 1, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 7 



Drama (fast And Crew Optimistic On Opening 



/« 



%' 





V- 1 ' 



's-»"s/. 

•i* -K'Oli .r" «?;?".■'- U 
■ **!rV&3Sif£ ■• jji.'*!" 4 fcX -" * 5 



» *' • V/i '-T 1 " 



vftf-'l 




By Frank Smith 
Venture Editor 



The following is an en masse 
interview, where the journalist, by use 
of keen, adroit senses (and a tape 
recorder), captures the comments of an 
entire group of excited actors and 
actresses. 

"I would say.." said someone "..that 
the hero is not quite as intelligent as a 
buffalo." 

He was talking about Ned Harris, 
hero of Deadwood Dick. 

Someone ran wildly up, grabbed my 
notebook and began writing madly, 
"you got to tell them. .(loud laughter) 
you got to tell them about how Chet gets 
thrown in the Lake it's so funny 
(laughter). 

"Forgive him, he means well," said 
one actress. 

"Yeah.." said the actor, "..thrown in 
the well!" 

I asked if there was anything of 
particular interest about the set, 
something outstanding. A dark 
shadowy figure whispered in my ear, 
"There's a naked lady on the mirror. . ' ' 

I let this pass. 

I decided to listen more carefully 
(turned up my tape recorder) 

"Now rember..the line does not go., 
'toss Polly a Chet, drink' . ' ' 



players were getting along 
rkably well, even trading family 
dotes.. "So's your Mother!" 
one said enthusiastically. 

e ways of tension and hard work 
^sgfsily avoided when the group 
fstands.. ("Ouch!" he said. "Hold 
|adder, dummy!" she said) They 
salways be willing to turn the other 
fc. (Get out of my hoop skirt! slap!) 
uch effort is required to coordinate 
js and action.. "Ready?. ..Lights!... 
pti!... Lights?!?" 

ist then I felt a tug at my arm . 

There's a naked lady on the mirror" 

Sid again. 

pain, I let it pass. 

foil see?" one actor asked, "You 

|he hand on that wrist.. I mean the 

ion that scar.. I mean the cyst on 

fear..." 

pat didn't bother me, anybody can 

ia line) 

t scar on his wrist..?" he said, 
iig at his foot, 
at, however, caught me off guard 

slaughed.) 

eryone in the auditorium turned 

looked at me. 

ho are you? What right have you 

p laugh at our mistakes? We're 

every night practicing, working, 

ing lines, building saloons, 

ing piano parts, making costumes. 



What do you mean, comin' here, 
laughin'...??" 

"I'm sorry, I said. .it just doesn't 
seem like..." I began. 

"Like what?" The cast demanded in 
unison. 

Though I cowered before their 
volume I bravely went on "It just seems 
like you may not be ready 
in., uh.. time?" 

"Not Ready! " they said. 
Ned Harris, hero, stepped forward, 
his chest swelling proudly. "Mr. 
Journalist, we have been working hard 
to get ready by Thursday, There's a lot 
of pressure on us, but everybody has 
been coming through for us so far and 
will continue to do so. ..and this show.." 
He paused to control his anger towards 
my insolence, "This show will go on 
schedule. .this show will be good. .any- 
body who misses it will certainly be 
sorry. .and you, journalist, will have to 
write a good review, if you're honest!" 

After saying this he. sauntered out 

and (he rest followed, leaving me alone. 

A figure moved up to my right, 

There's a naked lady on the mirror." 

"Don't bother me now." I muttered, 

defeated. 

Then he spoke five words for which I 
will be eternally grateful. "She says- she 
knows you ." he said . 




PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER 



Is Mysterious Bermuda Triangle Linked To Di 
Of Sanitation Vehicles in 




By Don Yaughan 
Venture Columnist 

A topic of controversy lately 
has been the existence of the 
Bermuda Triangle, or the 
Devil's Triangle. In it, planes 
and ships have disappeared 
without a trace. Believers in the 
Triangle, label the area as 
anything from a flying saucer 
landing base to a portal to 
another dimension, while det- 
ractors, shouting baloney, pass 
it off as poor atmospheric 
conditions and too much Busch. 

I know not whether these 
explanations are scientifically 
accurate, but it is said that there 
are at least 12 of these dickens 
around the world, every one as 
mysterious as the one off 
Bermuda. 

Take, for instance, the 



infamous Sheboygan-Oshkosh 
Triangle, where city honey 
wagons and Toto-Rooter trucks 
have mysteriously disappeared, 
never to be seen again. 

The mayor of Sheboygan, 
Seymour Patuti, in an interview 
with Humpty Dumpty Maga- 
zine, describes the incidents like 
this. "...they radio the city 
dispatcher saying that their 
visibility is poor and that they 
can't see any recognizable 
landmarks to navigate by and 
then they simply disappear! 
Search and rescue vehicles have 
turned up nothing! " 

The landmarks referred to by 
Mayor Patuti are such well- 
known buildings as Irving's Deli 
and Bosco's Garage, landmarks 
much too big to simply 
disappear to these expert 



sa pea ranee 
ist Perplexed 



drivers in even the most 
inclement weather. Where did 
they go? 

One theory, proposed by one 
of the nation's leading authori- 
ties on the subject of Devil's 
Triangles, Izzie Krackers, is 
that the triangles are indeed 
portals to another dimension; a 
dimension that is clearly in need 
of sanitation facilities, like New 
York City. New York City denies 



anything to do with anything. 

The one flaw with Krackers' 
theory is that, ever since 
Krackers was committed to the 
Passaic Institute for the 
Mentally Insignificant, no one 
believes it. 

The only other theory about 
the Sheboygan-Oshkosh Trian- 
gle, proposed by Oshkosh City 
Councilman Ima Codger, is that 
the whole affair is a practical 



joke perpetrated by the 
Daughters of the American 
Revolution, and that they are 
hiding the trucks and their 
drivers in a Carve! ice cream 
stand somewhere in scenic 
downtown Oshkosh. 

Again, the only flaw with this 
theory is that no one believes it. 
In fact, the majority of the 
population in both towns 
couldn't care less. 



The ad States military, on 
the otlljiand, cares a great 
deal. A^ng quickly at every 
disappince, top military 
brass ijt them all off as 
either s|ip gas or too many 
reruns <<|«lligan's Island." 

But reliable source, has 
informed that the Air Force 
has wrij a book describing 
each dijiearance or related 
incidental Proposing a logical, 



Bermuda Short 



On 12:15 A.M., a disheveled 
old man appeared before the 
Secretary of Defense. "Sir," he 
said, "it happened again." 

"You mean..." 

"Yes, sir. The damn thing got 
another one. The U.S.S. 
Helsinki this time." 

"This has got to stop!" 
bellowed the Secretary. "If we 
tose anymore ships in the 
Bermuda Triangle, we won't 
have any Navy left!" The 
Professor delicately touched his 
mustache and considered the 
propensity of the last statement. 

fhe Secretary paused, "You 
know, three more years on this 
job and I can't retire with full 
pension, but the man upstairs. 
Old Stumblebum. says that if ] 
don't stop this tragic state of 
affairs, he's going to send me on 



a vacation." 

"What's wrong with that?" 
asked the Professor, 

"To Bermuda?" 

"I see what you mean. But I 
wouldn't worry about that, 
Chief." 

"Why's that?" asked the 
Secretary. 

"Bermuda disappeared yes- 
terday." answered the Profes- 
sor. 

"No foolin'?" 
Secretary. 

"No foolin'!" 
Professor. 

"That's great!' 
the Secretary. 

"Why's that?" 
Professor. 

"My wife's went there dav 
before yesterday for a .vaca- 
tion!" said the Secretary with a 
smile. 



scientific explanation . 

The book, titled "Operation: 
Puce Book", has been held 
from the public for 25 years, 
until the Air Force recently 
announced that the only copy 
had disappeared, saying some- 
thing about a Pentagon 
restroom Triangle. 

NEXT WEEK: THE WASH 
INGTON TRIANGLE, OR 
"WHATEVER HAPPENED TO 
TRUTH IN POLITICS?" 



5 °THMS THE 

BERWDA TRIANGLE I 




A 



asked the 
said the 
exclaimed 

asked the 



WANTED 

DEAD OR ALIVE 




AH AUDIEHCE 

FOR THE MELODRAMA! 

DEADWOOD 
DICK 

OR 
THE GAME OF GOLD t 

H0V4-7 8:14*. 

PALM BEACH JUNIOR COLLEGE AUDITORIUM 




Van Decorations Up To Individual Preference 




By Ed Picard 
Staff Writer 

One of the biggest fads in 
recent years is the advent of 
customized vans. Actually, vans 
have been around ever since the 
milk wagon, although nobody 
ever realized the fantastic 
things that could be done with 
them. 

The first, customized vans 
were the hippie vans of the 60's. 
These were hand painted with 
flowers and doodles to cover up 
the rust and poor condition they 
were in. 

Today, vans are a big money 
affair, although the amount of 
money spent is up to you. Vans 
can range anywhere from $400 
to $20,000. 

Most vans are customized by 
the owner, although many 
professional customizing com- 
panies are springing up. Even 
the manufacturer is getting into 



the act. 

Exteriors of vans can consist 
of several coats of lacquer, air 
brush scenes, pinstriping, metal 
flake paint, mirror windows, 
over-sized tires, slotted wheels, 
sidewinders, body moldings and 
modifications. 

With interiors of button 
tucking, shag carpeting, fur- 
ring, woodworking and some- 
times superb architecture. 
There is also the bed which is 
sometimes so glorified, that no 
one would feel comfortable 
sleeping on it, although that's 
not usually the main reason it's 
there. 

Electronics are also coming 
into the van act. Such things as 
AM, FM, MPH radios, eight 
track and cassette tape players 
" and even record players, all with 
quadrifonic triaxeial sound are 
found in many vans. 



But sound devices are not the 
only electronic gadgets found in 
vans. There are also such toys 
as CB's, TV's, car telephones, 
radio scanners and radar. Even 
the newest thing, the radar 
snooper,' which can detect a 
radar signal before the radar 
can detect the van. This gives 
the van an indication to slow 
down if it is speeding before its 
speed is detected. Too bad, 
Smokeys. 

Many people say that they put 
everything in vans except the 
kitchen sink. 

Actually, in many cases, the 
sink is in there. Along with 
refrigerators, air conditioners, 
stoves, ovens, water heaters 
and even hydraulic doors that 
automatically swing open and 
close at the push of a button. 
How much further can this no 
on? h 



! ., 



8- BEACHCOMBER Nov. 1, 1976 



Nov. 1, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 9 



PTK Convention Termed Success 

Yinger Steals Show 




PHOTO BY BILL JOHNSON 

At the convention: above [L-R] Dr. Glenwood Creech, FAU president; Rosalie Kelly, state advisor 
[PTK]; Dr. Richard Yinger, JC instructor; and Dr. Manor, JC president. Below -[L-R] Dan Hendrix, JC 
PTK ad visor; Marty Grant, south, rep.; Roosevelt O'Neal, president JC chapter. 

United Nations Day 
Celebrated By Locals 

By Jeannette Banning 
Staff Writer 

Dr. Robert D. Billinger, Jr., speaker at the 31st annual United 
Nations Day observance on Sunday, Oct. 24, addressed a capacity 
audience at a public forum held at the Ramada Inn on the Green in 
West Palm Beach. 

The subject of Billinger's speech was, "The United States and the 
United Nations: The End of an Ideal and the Need for a New 
Realism." 

Billinger was referring to the relationship and role of the United 
States in the United Nations. 

A Fuibright scholar. Billinger is chairman of the Division of Social 
Sciences at Palm Beach Atlantic College. 

Billinger said the United Nations' status has dropped 
considerably and has become an overgrown debating society. 

"What we have witnessed is the end of an ideal," said Billinger. 
"We hope that the United Nations would assure peace. It was the 
last best hope for peace." continued Billinger. "What we need is a 
new realism regarding United Nations and United States." 

Billinger felt the new realism requires the continued pursuit of a 
new ideal. 

Billinger said the United States has been discouraged by the third 
world vetoes. "The oil weapon is what the third world uses as 
power. They dribble out the oil at their own discretion." 

"The Arab boycott is the most natural thing in the world. The 
United States would do the same thing if they had the opportunity, ' ' 
stated Billinger. "They (the Arabs) can demand economic and 
technical aid." 

Billinger felt aid should be filtered through regional organizations 
as was done after World War 11. Dominating organizations should 
be avoided and, instead, build up self-esteem of participants. 

Billinger said cooperation is needed for a better world 
community. 

The United Nations has to move to a new realism of world 
community,''* concluded Billinger. 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

Delta Omicron, JC chapter of Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) was host 
for the recently-completed state convention held at the Hilton Inn of 
Singer Island. 

Dr. Richard Yinger, social science instructor at JC, spoke on 
exosociology to a large Saturday afternoon luncheon crowd. 
Response was so great that an invitation was given to Yinger to 
appear at the national PTK convention, in April, at Minneapolis. 

At the Saturday evening banquet, Dr. Glenwood Creech, 
president of Florida Atlantic University, spoke on education 
systems. Guests with Creech included Dr. Harold C. Manor, 
president of JC, Dean Paul Glyn, vice-president of Student Affairs 
and their wives. 

During the banquet, state PTK election results were announced. 
The executive chapter, the chapter hosting the next convention, by 
vote was Eta Nu from St. Petersburg JC. 

The Communication Chapter selected was Rho Tau, from 
Tallahassee JC. 

In balloting for Awards Chapter, Mu Epsilon, from Miami Dade 
North copped top honors. 

Daniel Hendrix, faculty advisor to Delta Omicron, was pleased 
with the convention. 

"I was very happy with the job Delta Omicron did in setting up 
the convention. We received nothing but compliments," said 
Hendrix. 

A dance followed the session with music provided by the Glass 
Brothers. 




PHOTO BY BILL JOHNSON 



Campus Combings 



Wlso makes our 
American Economic 
Systmworkf, 



•*'-"-■* / A j 




Attention north county residents! Palm Beach 
Junior College North is now accepting 
applications for day classes for the winter term 
starting in January. Day classes will be held in 
the JC North 45th Street center. For more 
information, call the 45th street center between 8 
a.m. and 4 p.m and the Gardens center from 2-9 
p.m. 

Don't miss your opportunity to hiss the villian 
and cheer the hero, when Palm Beach Junior 
College presents its first stage production of the 
season, Nov. 4-7 at 8:14 p.m. in the JC 
auditorium. It's an old-fashioned melodrama 
called Deadwood Dick or the Game of Gold. So; 
for an evening of family fun put a circle around 
the dates. Nov. 4-7 at 8:14 p.m. in the JC 
auditorium. See you there. Also see related 
stories, pages one, six and seven. 
"Shells, live and in color, is a new course being 
offered by the Pine Jog Environmental Science 
Center, 6301 Summit Blvd., West Palm Beach. 
Classes will meet at the Pine Jog Center for six 
Wednesday evenings, 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. 
starting Nov. 3, 1976. Participants learn where 



and how these animals live, what they are called, 
how to keep them alive in aquaria, how to 
establish collections and various ways to use 
shells creatively. The principal instructor Gary 
Hanning, is a graduate student in Malacolgy at 
Florida State University and a long time resident 
of the Palm Beaches, he is to be assisted by guest 
lecturers from the Palm Beach Shell Club, who 
will also lead a field trip Nov. 20th. Registration 
for the shell course is $8 and may be paid at the 
door Nov. 3 or prepaid by mail. The class is 
limited to 80 people. For additional information 
call Pine Jog at 686-6600. 

Persons planning to take the state pest-control 
certification examination will be interested in a 
brand new 16 session, Monday and Wednesday 
evening course offered by JC. This class in Urban 
Entomology and Pest Control starts Monday, 
Nov. 1 at 7 p.m. Dr. William J. Woodman, who 
holds a PHD in Entomolgoy from the University 
of Wisconsin is teaching the course. For further 
information, please contact the JC office of 
Continuing Education, 965-8006. 




Before 



After 



'Comber office at the beginning 
of fall term. 



Deadwood Dick from 1*8*3 

"We haven't had a melodrama here in quite a 
while," said Sunny Meyer, commenting on why 
she chose the Tom Taggart play. "..and they're 
so much fun." 

The technical crews believe what few problems 
remain will be solved by opening night. There are 
still some costumes to be completed and a secret 
passageway to be installed. 

On the acting side, the Chinese cook still hasn't 
learned to shuffle, but promises that he'll have it 
down by Thursday. 

Tickets for "Deadwood Dick" are available at 
the auditorium box office. (Students $2, 
non-students $3) 

JC South from Page 1 

Student services are being cooperatively 
developed through the governance of a Student 
Advisory Committee. 

This unique merger and cooperative efforts of 
two institutions of higher education brings to 
Palm Beach County and to the southern part of 
the state, a public four-year baccalaureate 
program at one location. 



New office equipment now gives 
the student publications a 
professional look. 



'Comber Off ice 
Has New Look 



By Cindy McCarthy 
News Editor 

In an attempt to modernize an aging office, the Beachcomber 
recently purchased an entire set of new office furniture. 

Beachcomber Editor Denny Glavin explained the new purchases. 
"With an already small office, we needed more functional and 
modern equipment. These desks and typewriters fulfill that void." 

The purchases included eight desks, four electric typewriters, 
racks for the exchange papers from other campuses and other small 
items. 

Much of the credit in ordering goes to Associate Editor, Gttnda 
Caldwell, who tried to bring comfort and efficiency together. 

"If a newspaper office is comfortable, functional and modern, the 
quality should improve." 'Caldwell noted. 

Caldwell also chose to add several art prints and plants to 
"eliminate the stuffiness" of the office. 

Recent visitors to the office included American Party presidential 
and vice-presidential candidates Tom Anderson and Rufus 
Shaekleford. 

Anderson, a newspaperman in his own right, noted that the 
changes were "a definite improvement." He said he hoped to get 
back to "view future changes ." 

Any interested persons who would like to view the improvements 
may slop by at their leisure. The office is located in the Student 
Publications Building. 




PHOTO BY BILL GULLION 



Classifieds 



Pregnant? Problems? Call 
Children's Home Society for 
free counseling. 844-9785. Ask 
for Trudy Brown. 
For Sale: 1974 Malibu Custom 
Classic. 350, A/C, power 
steering, power disc brakes, 
auto, 4 steel-belted radial tires, 
body, interior in good condition. 
$3200.00 Call 684-0824. 
11 Piece Ludwig Drum Set. 
Ziligian Cymbals. Good condi- 
tion. $275.00. Also, surfboard 
Fox Twin Fin 5'4". Call 
844-2743. 

VW Bug. New re-built engine 
with 83mm pistons in cylinders. 
New crank bearing, etc. 90 
horsepower, new paint, perfect 
body and interior. $700. Moving 
north 965-9515. 

Stereo Equipment for Sale: 
Dynaco ST- 150 Amplifier $200, 
(2) Dynaco A-25 speakers $50 
each, BSR 12 band graphic 
equalizer $120. (2) Acoustic 
Research LST-1 monitor speak- 



ers $375 each. Phase Linear 
4000 pre-amp (includes walnut 
case) $375. Call 683-6022. 
Lost: Leonard High School ring, 
Blue stone, 1976, initials 
J.C.McB. Reward offered, $20. 
Call John 965-7783. 
Accounting Tutoring. $5 per 
hour. Call Steve 832-0339. 10*4" 
O'DAy Sailboat, similar to 
"Sunfish" $175 firm. Also 1.65 
X 15" new retreat, never used, 
cost $15, sell for $8. Call 
965-3088. 

For Rent: with option to buy, 
single mobile home, completely 
furnished. $200 monthly. In 
Tavares Cove. Call 626-5030. 
For Sale: 1956 Buick, Good 
Condition. $250. Call 586-3222 
after 1:00. 

For Sale: 1973 Honda 450. Good 
Condition $550. Call after 5:00, 
737-1480. 

Spelling Baldwin. Acro-sonic 
Spinette Piano. Excellent condi- 
tion. Call 844-7777. 



1976 Red BMW 2002. Rust- 
proofing, great shape. Must 
sell. $300 and take over 
payments. Call 683-1398. 
Lost: Diamond Ring. Call Beth 
at 582-7908. Lost in the area of 
the first floor of the library. 
Reward Offered. 
For Sale: 1973 Suzuki motorcy- 
cle TS 185cc and helmet. 
Topperhouse Apts. across from 
JC. Apt. #207 - Albie. 

Ampeg Amplifier Twin Chan- 
nel Unit with reverb on/off floor 
button. Midrange, bass, treble, 
stand-by switch, Unit is 125 
watts and all tubes are in 
excellent condition. Also has 
wheels for carrying. Call 
588-3416. Ask for John Jr. 
Asking $300 or best offer. Call 
only between 1p.m. and 6p.m. 
Scuba equipment for sale: 
complete, set-up plus many 
extras. Used once. Cost $535. 
Sacrifice. Best offer over $325. 
Call 659-5780 between 5 p.m. - 



10 p.m. any night. 
For Sale: Peavey Musician 
Amp- 230 waits, 6-12" speakers 
and a horn, Also, a Sekova 
Los-Paul copy. Call 622-1366. 
Motorized Skateboard for Sale: 
One horsepower gasoline en- 
gine. Custom built, cruises 
about 15-20 MPH, when it's 
running good. A super deal at 
$65. Call Rick at 655-9459. 
New Deluxe Weight Bench with 
leg curl. Best offer over $50. 
Call 588-1514. 

Lost: A Cross pen and pencil set 
in pink case. It was a 
meaningful gift to me. Please 
return to Jost and found or call 
391-0500, ext. 3455. 
For Sale: 1965 Ford Ranchero, 
excellent shape. For informa- 
tion: during the day 842-3551 
and ask for Ed Mazzola. At 
night call 684-0884. 
God has a Wonderful Plan for 
your life. Interested? Call 
844-1212. 




«l 



Wo 
thanks, 

Tdratfier 

Have 
anajyple? 

American 
Cancer Society 




Nov. 1, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 11 



10 - BEACHCOMBER Nov. 1,1976 



Harriers Improve, Nab Fifth At Florida Invit. 



By Jim Goodman 
Staff Writer 

Showing a steady improve- 
ment, the cross-country team 
finished fifth out of nine schools 
in the Florida invitational. 

Hassan El Abbar led the 
team, taking sixth with a time of 
26:01 . 



Other Pacer scores were Tom 
Murdock, 15th, 26:33; Frank 
Gruber, 25th, 27:10; Steve 
Farnsworth, 28th, 27:27 and 
Greg Ulseth, 48th, 29:32. 

Cross-country coach, Dick 
Melear was happy with the 
team's performance. 



"Anytime we improve, it's 
pleasing," he stated. 

All the teams in the state 
were entered in the meet, so it 
was a good indication of where 
the Pacers stand. 

Melear is optimistic about the 
team's chances at the state 
meet. JC needs to finish in the 



top three to~go to the Nationals. 

"I can see where we have a 
chance," Melear said. 

Melear feels that the Pacers' 
first four runners can pick up 15 
places and the fifth runner 
about 10. 

"Hassan is running about 
where he belongs," he said. 



"And Tom should move up 
about five more places." 

"Frank has improved greatly 
the past two races," he added. 
"Steve is also capable of 
running better." 

The state meet is held at FSU 
at the Seminole Country Club, 
Nov. 6, at 10:00 a.m. 




Women Golfers Fifth, 
Top FAU In Match 

By Jeannette Banning 
Staff Writer 

The women golfers came in last out of five teams in the small 
college division of the Falconette Invitational. 

"To put it bluntly, we did poorly," said golf CoachJoe Sanculius. 
"We have a lot of work to be done, which is evident by our scores. 
With the dedication and the experience we have been getting, 
however, we are bound to improve." 

Sanculius added that getting Liz Aris back after her bout with the 
flu should also help the team. 

Rollins won with a score of 632 strokes in the small college 
division. Dade North's .Jeanne Hartman was the medalist with a 
75-75-150. 

The Pacers' score was 333-339-fa''2 in the Oct. 25-26 tournament 
held in Hollywood, Fla. Patti Premiss led the team with a 83-82-165. 

Other Pacer scorers were KcUey Spooner. &1-87-168-, Sue Holdcn. 
82-87-169; Ann Kama. l )l-83-174 and Sally Bricker, 87-84-1 7o. 

Spooner won the long drive award in the tournament with a 
230-yard effort. . 

Tuning up for the tournament, the Pacers won their first match 
against FAU, 344-358, at LaMancha Country Club in Royal Palm 
Beach on Oct. 22. 

Prentiss also led the team in that match with a 43-40-83. She was 
followed by Ranta, 43-42-85; Holden. 40-46-86 and Bricker, 
43-47-90. 

The women are now qualifying for another match with FAU on 
Friday at 2:00 p.m. at the Boca del Mar Country Club in Boca Raton. 

Their next major tournament, the Lady Gator Invitational, is in 
Gainesville Nov. 11-13. It is a 54-hole event. 




to 













,.«."J 




v. . . .»m 



:■&*.*. 



■*/. 









B- - 




\V£ * 



"' .*- 






'iV 



\mm 



...•■■t^^y'ii-* 



PHOTO BY BARRY VAN WAGNER 

TOP GOLFER- Patti Prentiss, shown chipping onto a green here, has been the low player for the 
women's golf team in its last two matches. 



Pacers Beaten In Doubleheader 
Finish Fall Baseball Season 



By Jim Goodman 
Staff Writer 

The baseball team ended the 
fall season losing both ends of a 
double-header to F1U, 11-5 and 

4-3. 



The Pacers pushed across 
four runs in the third inning of 
the first game as Eddie Walker, 
Jimmy Kemp, Nick Maniotis 
and Jerry Contenelli scored. 

The Pacers' final run was 



PHOTO BY BARRY VAN WAGNER 



AWARD WINNER- KeHey Spooner won the long ball award in the 



Women's Volleyball Loses 



By Robbin Barber 
Staff Writer 

The women's volleyball team was defeated by Broward Central 
on Oct. 25, 15-9, 15-3. 

Volleyball coach Bobbie Knowles had little to say about the 
team's loss, because of her disappointment with the way the team 
played against Broward. For the past couple of weeks the Pacers 
seem to have been playing a repetition of what Coach Knowles 
considers "sloppy" games. 

The team has been practicing very hard for the playoffs scheduled 
last Saturday at Indian River. 

The Pacers are expected to place at least third and if by chance 
they beat the two toughest teams, Indian River and Hillsborough, 
they will go on to the Region Eight National Tournament held in 
Baltimore during the Thanksgiving holiday . 

According to Assistant Coach John Anderson, "They (the team) 
are now realizing their mistakes and they know it's either do or 
die." 

The women's volleyball team's last home game is on Tuesday, 



scored in the ninth inning. 
Monty McDermott singled and 
then advanced to third on a base 
hit by Rich Seamon. Eddie 
Walker then drove in McDer- 
mott. 

In the second game, JC 
scored their first two runs in the 
fourth. 

Eric Keller blasted a home 
run to lead off the inning. Conti- 
nelli singled next and advanced 
to third on an error by the 
catcher. He then scored on a 
wild pitch. 

Rick Cooper opened the ninth 
inning, getting a walk. 
McDermott replaced him as a 
pinch runner and proceeded to 
steal second. The throw from 
the catcher went into centerfield 
and McDermott advanced to 
third. 

Seamon next reached first on - 
an error and Walker took over 
from hint as a pinch runner. He 
then stole second and as the 
catcher tried to pick him off, 
McDermott stole home, scoring 
JC's final run. 

In other baseball news, Dusty 
Rhodes said that the final cuts 
would be made today, to bring 



JoeCeravolo: New Coach Starts 1st Season 






Joe Ceravolo, in his first year 
of coaching basketball at JC, is 
also making the adjustment to 
coaching at the junior college 
level. 

A high school coach for 23 
years, Ceravolo said that 
coaching here is actually a little 
easier, 

"The character and personal- 
ity of junior college players is 
easier to deal with," he said. 
"I'm able to get more across to 
them in a shorter length of 
time." 

Ceravolo also- said that while 
having to recruit players is a 
problem, it has its advantages 
also. 

"Recruiting allows you to 
choose the kind of player you're 
looking for," he stated. "In 
high school you had to make do 
with whoever was at school that 
year." 

Ceravolo is an ex-basketball 
player himself, playing for four 
years at Davis and Elkins 
College in West Virginia. He 
also played a year as a 
professional in the Tri-State 
League, a precursor of today's 
NBA. 




He first began coaching at 
Conniston Junior High in 1951. 
In 1952 he moved to St. Ann's 
High and in 1956 he joined the 
Palm Beach High coaching 
staff. 

In 1962 Ceravolo started 
coaching basketball at Palm 
Beach and in the 13 years he 
was there, his teams won seven 
championships. 

His team won the state 
championship in 1971, when 
Palm Beach became Twin Lakes 
High. That same year Ceravolo 
was named Florida Basketball 
Coach of the Year and was 
selected to coach the South in 
the All-Star game. 

Discussing his coaching 
strategy, Ceravolo said that the 
Pacers' offense will be fast 
break oriented, but that the fast 
break is not enough. 

"The fast break is an easy 
way to score," he stated, "and 
it is exciting for the spectators to 



Steve Farnsworth 
Sports Columnist 



watch, but it doesn't win games. 
That is why we are going to use 
the 1-4 offense." 

The 1-4 offense, which 
Ceravolo originated and wrote a 
book about, consists of a point 
guard, two wingmen and two 
forwards. Ceravolo said that his 
team in 1962 was the first to use 
that offense, but now nearly 
every major university includes 
it as part of their offense. 

Ceravolo favors this offense 
because he says it works equally 
well against all defenses. 

For defense, Ceravolo is 
going to man-to-man coverage. 

"The man-to-man is your 
basic defense," he said. "A 
team has to be able to play it 
well before going to more 
advanced defenses like the 



The basketball team opens 
their season Nov. 19 against 
Florida College, 



SG & ICC Ploy Faculty 
In Softball Contest 



COURTESY OF P.B. POST-TIMES 

JOE CERAVOLO- In this 1970 photo, first-year basketball coach Joe 
Ceravolo shows his book on the 1-4 offense. Ceravolo originated this 
offense and plans to use it on this year's basketball team. 



The combined forces of SG 
and ICC take on the faculty and 
administration in a softball 
game Friday. 

The 3:30 p.m. game, to be 
held on the Softball field behind 
the gym, features as pitchers 
Dean of Men, Robert Moss, for 



the faculty and ICC * chairman, 
Tom Solder, for the students. 

Although the faculty won the 
last time a game was played, 
Solder, speaking for the 
students, said, "We are going 
to stomp them so bad, they'll 
need weeks to recover." 



HOW TO KEEP THE 
LIFE OF THE PARTY 
ALIVE. 



For free information, write to: 
DRUNK DRIVER, Box 2345 
Rockville. Maryland 20852 






there's 
lots of living 

and 
loving ahead 




Why cut it short? 



wtc 



American 

Cancer Society 



HOW TO SUCCEED IN EUROPE 

WITHOUT EVEN TRYING!!! 

Your Hosts Abroad 

Programs in Six European countries and Mexico. 
Private homes or multiple residences. Learn your 
new language by "total immersion" 
Moderate cost. 

For information write 

P O Box 2836 Palm Beach 33480 
or phone 655-0962 




ONGRESS jffuTO^ARTS 



Use 'Comber 
Classifieds 



v. 



p^gn. now in stock! 

Filter Plus 

The only oil filter 
of it's kind in the world. 

GALLS64-22S8 

Check Our Prices - EVERYDAY SAVINGS 

1401 SO. MILITARY TRAIL 
In the all new Palm Plaza- West Palm Beach 




$1.00 OFF 

with this ad 

ON ANY LARGE OR 
EXTRA LARGE PIZZA 

Sicilian style pizza 

submarine sandwiches 

salads 




CRUSTY'S PIZZA 
PARLOR 

1771 S. Congress Avenue, 
W. P.B. 968-6100 



-* „* *?.nn . 



12 - BEACHCOMBER Nov. 1, 1976 




Intramural Roundup 

Volleyball 



F.U. II's, Freaks and Setters lead the six 
intramural volleyball teams with a 2-0 lead. Two 
night games were played on Oct. 21 with S.I.U., 
Spirit '76 and the Chumps losing both their 



matches. 

Intramural Director Roy Bell hopes more 
participants will show up to form another team. 



Tennis Tournament 



Norman McCord, Geoffrey Wacks, James 
Gallagher and Landald German are tied for first 
with a 2-0 record in the intramural men's tennis 
tournament. Twelve men are still in competition, 
after four of the original 16 were eliminated. 

Robin Krauch, Helen Darcey, Wanda Peterson 
and Peggy Egan are leading with a 1-0 record in 



six 
the 



the women's intramural tournament. All 
women who started are still playing in 
tournament. 

Sandy Rudoff, Intramural Board member 
reported that the women have games to make up 
due to class conflicts. 

-Jeannette Banning 



FUN AND GAMES?- Norman McCord looks pretty serious td he 
plays against an opponent in the intramural tennis tournament. 



INTRAMURAL BOWLING 


RESULTS 




MEN 




WOMEN 




High Game 




High Game 




Oscar Cash 


242 


Lee Anne Pvfrin 


209 


Dave Greene 


202 


Kim DeLong 


177 


Scott Kirkton 


193 


Jerri McConkey 


177 


High Set 




High Set 




Oscar Cash 


606 


Lee Anne Pyfrin 


529 


Scott Kirkton 


542 


Jerri McConkey 


510 


Bill Atkins 


542 


Helen Ryan 


479 


High Average 




High Average 




Oscar Cash 


184 


Kathy Wilk 


161 


Dave Greene 


18.1 


Kim DeLong 


151 


Scott Kirkton 


170 


Sandy Rudoff 


147 


High Team Set 

i Chargers 




High Team Set 




1999 


Inlaws 


1825 


Anoma 


1967 


Ryan's Hope 


1734 


Bin Max 


1906 


The Beauties 


1512 


High Team Game 




High Team Game 




Anoma 


716 


Inlaws 


648 


Chargers 


692 


Rvan's Hope 


596 


Blu Max 


658 


The Beauties 


560 


Team Standings 




Team Standings 




Chargers 


23-5 


Inlaws 


27-1 


Anoma 


23-5 


190 White Lighting 


21-7 


Vikings 


20-8 


Ryan "s Hope 


15-9 




FITNESS PROGRAM 

SPONSORED BY IbR BOARD 

GENERAL FITNESS 

BODYBUILDING 
WEIGHT GAIN & LOSS 



PROGRAM STARTS 
Nov. 2, 1976 

2:30 



^m 




BETTER LIVING THROUGH HEALTH & FITNESS 




FLORIDA GOLF & TENNIS 

7117 Lake Worth Road 

Lake Worth, Florida 

867-9916 
% mile east of turnpike 



With this ad, all PBJC students are 
allowed 10% off on all merchandise 
with the exception of sale merchandise 
and pro golf balk & clubs (already 
reduced 20%) 

Choose from famous name golf 
and tennis manufacturers as: 

• Head • Hogan « H/lunsingwear 

• Wilson • Haymaker • Izod 

• Davis • Quantum • Etonic 

On sale at present, Wilson 'Mens Tennis Shorts 
p 'IS™ now *J99 





; i _„ ' ^ 



Voice of the Palm Beach Junior College Student 

Vol.38 Uo.f% November 15, 1976 Lake Worth, Fla. 33461 




Play Generates Enthusiasm 



By Bill Johnson 
Assoc. Editor 

The old west made a reappearance at JC, and 
showed students and other patrons how it really 
used to be without John Wayne. 

Singing, dancing, sleezy women and a 
hero-turned-villan and then turned hero again, 
h ighlight the action . 

To call this show a typical Western would be 
unjust, as the typical western plot was twisted, 
bent and turned upside by character, dialogue and 
various murders that didn't take (the immortal 
Pong Ping proved that). 

The only scene, which was more than enough, 
was Calamity Janes Man Trap Saloon where all 
sorts of evil whiskey and tobbacco could be 
smelled. 

As for the actors, they fit the melodrama well, 
"more or less." 

Trying to v find the best scene would be difficult, 
but the audience was clearly partial towards Pong 
Pings mercy mission to Missy, pipe and all! 

The audience enjoyed taking part in the play. 



Booing the villan and cheering the hero (even 
though it looked like they were one in the same for 
a while) gave the theater a relaxed atmosphere. It 
was so relaxed at some points you could see the 
villan dodging paper wads and assorted fruits. 
(Then later throwing them back at the audience) 
One spectator wanted to be in the play so bad that 
she started ad libing.This shocked the poor heroine 
when this girl suggested; "for gosh, sakes let her 
die!" Just imagine if it happened every time the 
play was shown (or was it). 

Ned Harris (white hat) and Blackman Redburn 
(black hat) fought it out to the very end and it was a 
last minute fumble by bartender Chet Pussy that 
gave the good guys the winning hand. And you 
know how it ends. The hero gets the women and 
"Pussy's in the well." 

In all the western movies ever done I've never 
seen a piano player at work 24 hours a day. But 
then how could the hero's sing their duet without a 
background. 

In short, from the drunken judge to Tessy's Tea 
totallers, the costumes were good, the dialogue 
unique and the idea superb. 






r^ 

CM 



oi 



PALM BEACH 
JUNIOR COLLEGE PLAYERS 

PRESENT 

DEAD WOOD DICK 

SUN.. NOV. 7 8:14 P.M. 

COLLEGE AUDITORIUM 

STUDENT S2.00 TAX INCLUDED 

COMPLIMENTS OF FIRST MARINE NATIONAL 
BANK a TRUST COMPANY OF LAKE WORTH 



PLAY SCENES - Tim Irish and 
Bobby Amor [above] perform a 
stirring rendition of Partners, 
[below] Cast of play in a "serious 
moment." 



PHOTOS BY BILL JOHNSON 





NBC's AAackin To Appear 



By Emily Hamer 
Staff Writer 

NBC News Congressional Correspondent Catherine Mackin will 
speak at JC Nov. 17, 12:20 in the gym. 

Mackin gained nationwide recognition as the first woman 
television floor reporter at the national political conventions in 1972. 
She has been described as "a superb interviewer...", 
" ..competent, apparently unflappable " and "star ofthe show" by 

TV critics. 

Covering Congress, various government agencies and the White 
House during the Johnson Administration, Mackin worked for six 
vears as a Washington correspondent in the Washington Bureau of 
the Hearst newspapers. 

She joined NBC News in 1969 as anchorwoman of WRC-TV news 



WPBC Adviser 
Resigns Position 

By Bill Johnson 
Assoc. Editor 

Dr. Richard Yinger, JC sociology instructor, resigned as adviser 
to the campus radio station, WPBC, in what he called a service to 
the students by not interferring with them. 

Yinger has been a co-adviser to WPBC since 1974. When the 
manager of the station asked him to be adviser he said that he didn't 
think he'd have the time. It was then understood that they only 
needed his signature and that Yinger could be a passive adviser, as 
he has been for a year. 

This year Yinger decided to make time for the activity, and see if 
he could help improve the station. 

"I wanted to be more of an adviser than I had been, so I made 
some time for it," said Yinger. 

When Yinger introduced some suggestions he was met with a 
feeling of resentment. 

"I felt like there was a potential of great resentment between me 
and the radio station," said Yinger, "so I had no right to act with 
them if they didn't want me." 

Yinger felt that for the radio station to be a real workshop there 
should be a curriculum in broadcasting or a professional to help 
them so they will learn. "Otherwise," Yinger says, "they are just 
'playing' discjockey." 



program in 



Washington. Mackin. reported extensively on this years 



presidential campaigns and was considered for Barbara Walters 
replacement on the Today Show 

AH classes are to be canceled for the program. 



Winning Candidates at JC ... pg. 2 
Venture Turns To "Love" . . . pg. 7 
Basketball Profile ... pg. 9 




CATHERINE MACKIN- The noted NBC journalist will appear 
Wednesday in JC gym. 



Music Dept. 
Plan Events 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

With the Jazz/Pop ensemble 
already on tap, the JC music 
dept. has events planned for the 
rest of the year. 

On Sunday, Nov. 21, the 
private music teachers of the 
county will be entertained by 
the local pop singing groups in 
the area. 

Three numbers by each group 
(approximately six) will be 
presented at the performance, 
to be held in the auditorium. 

Auditions for music scholar- 
ships are slated for Nov. 24, 
JC's music chairperson, Letha 
Royce said. They are to be held 

Continued on page 3 



2 - BEACHCOMBER Nov. 15, 1976 



Winning Candidates Show 
Gratitude By Appearance 



By Bill Johnson 
Assoc. Ed. 

Four politicians, that were 
successful on Nov. 2, came to .IC 
to familiarize students with 
plans for their terms. 

State Attorney David Blud- 
worth, Judge Tom Johnson and 



his three sons, Commissioner 
Dennis Koelher and Florida 
House Representative Ed Healy 
all sat in the cafeteria and talked 
of current problems with any 
student who was interested 
enough to ask a question. 

Koehler, Democratic winner 



'Comber Writers 
Grab New Ideas 



By Don Vaughan 
Staff Writer 

In order to become more familiar with national trends the 
Beachcomber attended the 52nd Annual Associated Collegiate 
Press (ACP) Convention in Chicago, Nov. 3-6. 

Those in attendance included Denny Glavin, Bill Johnson, Cindy 
McCarthy and Don Vaughan. The Beachcomber adviser, Charles 
MeCreight, accompanied and attended the Collegiate Press Adviser 
meetings, held in conjunction with the student events. 

Beachcomber staffers attended seminars covering writing, 
editing, layout/design, staff organization and content and reader 
interest. 

But as Beachcomber editor Glavin noted, more was learned 
outside the seminars. "I feel we learned more by being exposed to 
other students and publications," he noted. "We supplied other 
schools with some things that will help them and vice versa." 

The two national advertising companies present, CASS and 
NBAS hosted "hospitality" parties on Thursday and Friday 
evenings to acquaint the students with their operations. CASS and 
NEAS are two of the largest student advertising representatives in 
the country. 

The Palmer House, one of the oldest and highly respected names 
in Chicago hotel circles, was the host for the ACP gathering. 

MeCreight, an Illinois native and \eteTan oi ACP conventions, felt 
this convention was as smoothly run as any he ever attended. 

"The Palmer House has always been great in all aspects and they 
did nothing to hurt their reputation with this meeting." 

Winners of the Pacemaker awards for the nations finest 
newspapers in each category included the University of Texas - 
Austin for a four-year daily, the University of Auburn for a weekly 
publication, and the Milwaukee Area Technical College for a junior 
college paper published less than weekly. 




MOTHER AND SON EXHIBITION- Gary Hayes, sculptor In 
plexiglass, and his mother, watercolorist, Mary Ann Hayes, 
combine their talen ts for a fine exhibition. 



over Bob Johnson, made clear 
that his stand on the sixth Ave. 
banyon tree issue, was no 
different from Johnsons view. 
Johnson has spoken, along with 
representatives from the Bea-. 
chcomber and the Lake Worth 
Garden Club, for transplant of 
the giant banyon, instead of 
destroying it. 

Koehler 's main reason for 
coming to JC was to encourage 
students to get involved in their 
government. 

"I want to get some students, 
women and minorities on some 
committees that I can make 
appointments to." 

Resumes will be accepted for 
positions on the Parks and 
Recreation committee (Koehler 
showed extra interest in getting 
a JC student on this committee), 
the Library committee, the 
Consumer Protection hearing 
board, the Zoning board and the 
Charter Government study 
committee. 

Those people interested can 
send a resume to: Commission- 
er Dennis Koehler, Palm Beach 
County Courthouse, 301 N. 
Dixie, West Palm Beach, 33401. 




Photo by Bill Johnson 
CANDIDATES Affi VIEWS - State Attorney David Bludworth, 
confers with both students and faculty in the JC cafeteria. 

DECA Sets Stage 



By Cindy McCarthy 
News Editor 
Tennis wear, casual clothes, 
dinner wear and cafe outfits set 
the scene for JC Sales and 
Marketing Club's (DECA) 
Tenth Annual Fashion Show. 
'"Palm Beach After Dark' 



Media Accepting 



Literw* 




By Mary Hiegel 
Media Editor 

All frustrated writers, poets, award-winning artists and 
unrecognized photographers — you will get your chance. 

The Media, how being printed in conjunction with the Galleon 
and Watson B. Duncan of the communications dept., continues as 
JC's literary magazine. 

It's purpose is for the JC student, who because of time and other 
factors, cannot join the other campus publications. 

Media consists of illustrations, photographs, fiction stories and 
poetry. No limitation on size is to be set on entries. 

First, second and third prize awards are to be given in each 
category of $50, $25 and $10 respectively. In addition to the prizes 
for drawing and photography, each photograph published will 
receive $2.50 and each illustration $5. 

The student who comes up with the best design for the outside 
cover will receive $10, inside cover $5. 

Students must submit their work to their English teachers by 
Feb. 11, 1977. Entries can also be given to John Correll graphic 
arts instructor. 

Written entries must be double spaced and typewritten. 
Negatives of photographs must be turned in, as dimensions of size 
have yet to be determined. 



was a great success," said 
Kathleen Kenney, DECA presi- 
dent. Three stages depicting 
tennis, shopping and at home 
wear filled the first half of the 
show. 

Stages were used because as 
Kenney put it, "We got sick and 
tired of doing it (fashion show) 
the same way with runways. ' ' 

During the intermission 
Penny Williams, a JC music 
major sang and played the 
piano. Refreshments were 
served. 



Water Color Exhibition 
Now Being Displayed 



By Emily Hamer 
Staff Writer 

Watercolors by Mary Ann 
Hayes and sculptures by son 
Gary Hayes are on display in the 
JC gallery until Nov. 30. 

An award-winning water- 
colorist, Mrs. Hayes is a 
member of the American 
Watercolor Society, the Guild of 
the Norton Gallery and the 
board of the Florida Artist 
Group. She is owner-director of 
the Flagler Art Center. Her 
work has been exhibited at the 
Society of the Four Arts. 

"The show is almost a 
retrospective one for me," said 
Mrs. Hayes. "My earlier works 



are smaller, and have more 
color, while my recent water- 
colors have become consider- 
ably larger in size." 

"I work very hard for 
simplicity, trying to discipline 
myself to one color with 
shading, using an ink stick for 
lines." 

Gary Hayes' imaginative 
designs and sculptures have 
also won awards. He began 
experimenting with plexiglass 
sculpture while working in a 
plexiglass furniture factory. His 
work is represented at the 
Norton Gallery, Jacksonville Art 
Museum, Lighthouse Gallery 
and St. Petersburg Museum of 
Art. 



containing: Disco strobe glass 
lights with clothes for dancing; 
An outdoor cafe with informal 
night wear and early cocktail 
party with all formal wear. 

"It was more of a situation 
entertainment than the tradi- 
tional runway," stated Kenney. 
"Things went over very well 
and a lot more work was put into 
it, because it contained six 
stages instead of one runway." 

DECA sent 20 people to 
Orlando for an orientation and 
training conference, Nov. 4-6. 

Two JC DECA members 
conducted seminars. Members 
attended other seminars that 
were also held. 

The state and national 
conventions will be held later 
this year in Tarnpa, at the 
Airport Holiday Inn and in 
Anaheim, California. 

DECA and Phi Theta Kappa 
(PTK) have started a drive for 
canned goods or a $1 donation 
that will be given to a charitable 
organization for Thanksgiving 
day. 

These donations can be 
dropped off at BA-108 or BA-31. 
Attempts are being made to 
have a booth in front of the 
cafeteria on Thursday. 



A former draftsman, Gary 
plans to open a furniture and 
sculpture shop in West Palm 
Beach this month. He stated, 
"The emphasis will -be on 
one-of-a-kind works and my 
free-form designs will be 
displayed in a showroom." 

The gallery, located on the 
first floor of the humanities 
building, is open from 8 a.m. to 
10 p.m. Mondays thru Thurs- 
days and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Fridays. The gallery is closed 
weekends and holidays. 



iT i rnra i nrwii i iin i m i n 



IflJHHlMUAmUHIWlAW 



A— 






Nov. 15, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 3 



Concert To Feature Synthesizer 



By Eden White 
Staff Writer 

To highlight the free Pop and 
Jazz concert to be held in the JC 
auditorium at 8 p.m. on Nov. 17, 
an electronic music synthesizer 
will be featured. 

Popularized by such individ- 
uals as Isao Tomita, Chic Corea 
and Keith Emerson, the 
synthesizer can "do things a 
typical instrument cannot do, 



it's a new sound experience that 
fits many of today's sounds," 
says Jazz Ensemble director Sy 
Pryweller. 

As the synthesizer is not the 
property of JC but of sophomore 
pianist Ray Lyon, 19, Pryweller 
says he is taking advantage of 
not only the students talents but 
of some of their instruments as 
well. 

The concert, which is to 
present the Jazz Ensemble and 



the vocal/instrument group the 
Pacesetters offer music from the 
big-band era, jazz and modern 
rock as well as popular works, 
ballads, folk music and gospel 
and secular (non-religiously 
oriented) jazz. 

In addition to the synthesizer, 
an ARP string ensemble also 
owned by Lyon will be played by 
sophomore Bob Tufford, 18. 

The string ensemble is a 
key-board instrument with 
which Lyon says, "you can 



imitate any conventional string- 
ed instrument." Lyon also plays 
for the New Life Band, a 
non-profit group that plays for 
the Koinonia (fellowship) Reach 
Out Center, a Boca Raton 
gathering place. 

Tufford, a Cardinal Newman 
graduate who for three years 
has played wth Anaheim Ftash, 
a local rock group, says the 
synthesizer offers a sound 
"completely different from 
traditional instruments." 



Playing individually and 
together, Tufford and Lyon will 
be playing some of their own 
arrangements including some 
improvisational material. 

To add to the • evening's 
variety, the two musicians will 
have on hand an acoustic grand 
piano, aHohner Clavinet, which 
sounds simitiar to a harpsichord 
and a Fender-Rhodes Electic 
piano having tines in place of 
strings to produce a mellower 
sound. 



POP AND JAZZ- [from left] Bob Tufford 
: : and Ray Lyon will add variety to the Jara 
Ensemble with their keyboard efforts. 



Budget Proposals 
Highlight Meetings 

By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

Budget proposals from Athletics and Forensics have highlighted 
the last two meetings of the Student Activity Fee Committee 
(SAFC). 

Athletic director Dr. Howard Reynolds, discussed the 
percentages received by athletics from the SAFC. . 

Reynolds stated that because of cutbacks, the department may 
face a program cutback or a ' 'watering down ' ' process. 
Reynolds explained the percentages breakdowns received prior to 
and including this year, for each sport. 

.: John Connolly, Forensics adviser, and Jim Kersey, student 
representative, gave the Forensics presentation. 

Kersey told of the need for Forensics at JC. "It is needed for 
anyone interested in speaking and being able to think quickly on 
their feet." 

Forensics' budget proposal is actually the same in dollar figures 
as last years, with the addition of $300 for scholarships and a $100 
addition to the banquet. 

"There are more students than before, attending our banquet," 
Connolly stated. 

The Beachcomber is attempting to implement a non-athlete 
scholarship program, with the help of SAFC. 

Each group is to submit a list of recommendations concerning 
their organization and its need for scholarship assistance. 

This plan is currently being considered by the Student Affairs 
Committee of the Board of Trustees. They are awaiting further 
reports from the Beachcomber and SAFC before reaching a 
decision. 
Both the Forensics and athletics proposals were accepted by SAFC 
with the right to recall at a later date. 




Annual SG Convention Held 



By Dave Taylor 
Staff Writer 

JC Student Government (SG) 
members attended the annual 
Florida Junior College Student 
Government Association Con- 
vention (FJCSGA) held in 
Daytona Beach, on Oct. 28 - 30. 

Eight members, including six 
senators, Vice President Hugh 
Lambert and treasurer Scott 
Schnurman reached Daytona 
about 12:30 a.m., Thursday 
afternoon. They were immedi- 
ately greeted by the convention 



Science Club Hits Wilderness 
Helps In John Prince Clean-Up 



assembly. 

At the assembly Junior 
College SG members from 
Florida discussed rules and 
regulations that were to be 
followed during the convention. 
They also announced the 
number of electoral votes that 
would be given to each school 
based on each school's number 
of fulltime students. 

Later that night JC SG 
members met with four district 
caucuses including Indian 
River.Broward, Miami Dade and 
Key West where they decided 
on which resolutions they would 
support. 

The following morning at 
10:00 a.m. the convention was 



called to order. Resolutions 
brought up by JC SG members 
included a call for a student to 
serve on the State Board of 
Trustees. This resolution reach- 
ed the House last year and made 
it through the House and Senate 
this year, only to be vetoed by 
the Governor.' 

"I do feel that this bill will be 
passed in the years to come," 
stated Lambert. "This is the 
ninth year for it to be brought 
up." Others submitted resolu- 
tions ranging from one 
permitting alcoholic beverages 
on JC campuses to others 
calling for a reduction in the 
State Trust Fee which now 
stands at $7.02 per student. 

continued on pg. 8 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

The Science Club (SC), just having returned 
from a wilderness camping weekend, is to help 
clean John Prince Park. 

Fisheating Creek Wilderness Camp area was the 
site of the weekend outing. It is located near Moore 
Haven on the west edge of Lake Okeechobee. 

Richard Gross and Glen Marstellar, co-advisers 
to the SC, accompanied the group on this outing. 

Some 20 students attended. Gross said the 
number was held down because of the lack of 



funding by Inter Club Council (ICC). The -entire 
ICC budget was finally approved last week and 
now will be channeled into the clubs. "This should 
help us considerably with our many functions," 
Gross noted. 

Thursday the group was to help the Audubon 
Society of Palm Beach County and the Friends of 
the Custard Apple Trail to clean the nature trail at 
John Prince Park. "It is a fine area and is in need 
of cleaning," Gross said. Twenty-five students 
from the SC are slated to assist. 



Baptist Ministry Club 



Baptist Campus Ministry, 
(BCM), a former active JC 
religious club, has now resumed 
meetings on a weekly basis. 

It's not just for Baptists, it's 
for anyone who's not afraid to 
ask questions about God. By 
asking these questions, people 
can learn more about themsel- 
ves as well as God. 

There are no hassles, no 
judging or preaching, just love 



in its deepest form. 
Meetings are held 



every 



Friday, 7:30 a.m. in the SAC 
lounge. Try it. — if you dare. 



Music 



Continued from page 1 

in Hu-4 at 1:20 p\m. on 

Wednesday. 

The scholarships are available 
to music majors and participants 
of the various programs such as 
choir, band and the like. 
Applications can be picked up 
from Boyce in Hu-3. 



Two performances are to be 
held Monday, Dec. 6, in the 
afternoon and evening. Times 
are scheduled to be announced 
at a later date. 

Appearances by the JC band 
and choir, as well as the 
Pacesetters will highlight the 
show. 




NOW OPEN 



dsP&< 




m%k(ffa/ 



(of Lou's Subs n' Soups) 

Featuring a mfa variety 
of Mexiean Foods 



>u ain't livsd 

till you tiy 
Lou's MiMttrona 



A 



Si 

• O^ \ 



\*&£4&' to* beer 

Sangria Wine 






3001 South Congress Ave. 
Palm Springs 
Across From St. Lukes 



HBWJiMlgiBMffl 



2 - BEACHCOMBER Nov. 15, 1976 



■ JUr 



IMov. 15, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 3 



Winning Candidates Show 
Gratitude By Appearance '"£. 



By Bill Johnson 
Assoc. Ed. 

Four politicians, that were 
successful on Nov. 2, came to JC 
to familiarize students with 
plans for their terms. 

State Attorney David Blud- 
worth. Judge Tom Johnson and 



his three sons, Commissioner 
Dennis Koelher and Florida 
House Representative Ed Healy 
all sat in the cafeteria and talked 
of current problems with any 
student who was interested 
enough to ask a question. 

Koehler, Democratic winner 



'Comber Writers 
Grab New Ideas 



By Don Vaughan 
Staff Writer 

In order to become more famiiiar with national trends the 
Beachcomber attended the 52nd Annual Associated Collegiate 
Press ( ACP) Convention in Chicago, Nov. 3-6. 

Those in attendance included Denny Glavin, Bill Johnson, Cindy 
McCarthy and Don Vaughan. The Beachcomber adviser, Charles 
McCreight, accompanied and attended the Collegiate Press Adviser 
meetings, held in conjunction with the student events. 

Beachcomber staffers attended seminars covering writing, 
editing, layout/design, staff organization and content and reader 
interest. 

But as Beachcomber editor Glavin noted, more was learned 
outside the seminars. "I feel we learned more by being exposed to 
other students and publications," he noted. "We supplied other 
schools with some things that will help them and vice versa. " 

The two national advertising companies present, CASS and 
NEAS hosted "hospitality" parties on Thursday and Friday 
evenings to acquaint the students with their operations. CASS and 
NEAS are two of the largest student advertising representatives in 
the country. 

The Palmer House, one of the oldest and highly respected names 
in Chicago hotel circles, was the host for the ACP gathering. 

McCreight, an Illinois native and veteran of ACP conventions, felt 
this convention was as smoothly run as any he ever attended. 

"The Palmer House has always been great in all aspects and they 
did nothing to hurt their reputation with this meeting. " 

Winners of the Pacemaker awards for the nations finest 
newspapers in each category included the University of Texas - 
Austin for a four-year daily, the University of Auburn for a weekly 
publication, and the Milwaukee Area Technical College for a junior 
college paper published less than weekly. 




MOTHER AND SON EXHIBITION- Gary Hayes, sculptor to 
plexiglass, and his mother, watercolorist, Mary Ann Hayes, 
combine their talents for a fine exhibition. 



over Bob Johnson, made clear 
that his stand on the sixth Ave. 
banyon tree issue, was no 
different from Johnsons view. 
Johnson has spoken, along with 
representatives from the Bea-. 
chcomber and the Lake Worth 
Garden Club, for transplant of 
the giant banyon, instead of 
destroying it. 

Koehler' s main reason for 
coming to JC was' to encourage 
students to get involved in their 
government. 

"I want to get some students, 
women and minorities on some 
committees that I can make 
appointments to." 

Resumes will be accepted for 
positions on the Parks and 
Recreation committee (Koehler 
showed extra interest in getting 
a JC student on this committee), 
the Library committee, the 
Consumer Protection hearing 
board, the Zoning board and the 
Charter Government study 
committee. 

Those people interested can 
send a resume to: Commission- 
er Dennis Koehler, Palm Beach 
County Courthouse, 301 N. 
Dixie, West Palm Beach, 33401. 




rap- 



Photo by Bill Johnson 
CANDIDATES AIR VIEWS - State Attorney David Bludworth, 
confers with both students and faculty in the JC cafeteria. 

DECA Sets Stage 



By Cindy McCarthy 
News Editor 
Tennis wear, casual clothes, 
dinner wear and cafe outfits set 
the scene for JC Sales and 
Marketing Club's (DECA) 
Tenth Annual Fashion Show. 
'"Palm Beach After Dark' 



Media Accepting 

I I f £z± y*f?| i"\# ' p*-yi ■'fr.f^.f' js>»j^ m 

ByMaryHiegel 
Media Editor 

All frustrated writers, poets, award-winning artists and 
unrecognized photographers — you will get your chance. 

The Media, now being printed in conjunction with the Galleon 
and Watson B. Duncan of the communications dept., continues as 
JC's literary magazine. 

It's purpose is for the JC student, who because of time and other 
factors, cannot join the other campus publications. 

Media consists of illustrations, photographs, fiction stories and 
poetry. No limitation on size is to be set on entries. 

First, second and third prize awards are to be given in each 
category of $50, $25 and $10 respectively. In addition to the prizes 
for drawing and photography, each photograph published will 
receive $2.50 and each illustration $5. 

The student who comes up with the best design for the outside 
cover will receive $10, inside cover $5. 

Students must submit their work to their English teachers by 
Feb. 11, 1977. Entries can also be given to John Conell graphic 
arts instructor. 

Written entries must be double spaced and typewritten. 
Negatives of photographs must be turned in, as dimensions of size 
have yet to be determined. 



was a great success," said 
Kathleen Kenney, DECA presi- 
dent. Three stages depicting 
tennis, shopping and at home 
wear filled the first half of the 
show. 

Stages were used because as 
Kenney put it, "We got sick and 
tired of doing it (fashion show) 
the same way with runways." 

During the intermission 
Penny Williams, a JC music 
major sang and played the 
piano. Refreshments were 
served. 



Water Color Exhibition 
Now Being Displayed 



By Emily Hamer 
Staff Write* 

Watercolors by Mary Ann 
Hayes and sculptures by son 
Gary Hayes are on display in the 
JC gallery until Nov. 30. 

An award-winning water- 
colorist, Mrs. Hayes is a 
member of the American 
Watercolor Society, the Guild of 
the Norton Gallery and the 
board of the Florida Artist 
Group. She is owner-director of 
the Flagler Art Center, Her 
work has been exhibited at the 
Society of the Four Arts. 

"The show is almost a 
retrospective one for me," said 
Mrs. Hayes. "My earlier works 



are smaller, and have more 
color, while my recent water- 
colors have become consider- 
ably larger in size." 

"I work very hard for 
simplicity, trying to discipline 
myself to one color with 
shading, using an ink stick for 
lines." 

Gary Hayes' imaginative 
designs and sculptures have 
also won awards. He began 
experimenting with plexiglass 
sculpture while working in a 
plexiglass furniture factory. His 
work is represented at the 
Norton Gallery, Jacksonville Art 
Museum, Lighthouse Gallery 
and St. Petersburg Museum of 
Art. 



f° : ^ tKiff^r 



.^s^'.'. 



aturetPTnree™ 

containing: Disco strobe glass 
lights with clothes for dancing; 
An outdoor cafe with informal 
night wear and early cocktail 
party with all formal wear. 

"It was more of a situation 
entertainment than the tradi- 
tional runway," stated Kenney. 
"Things went over very well 
and a lot more work was put into 
it, because it contained six 
stages instead of one runway." 

DECA sent 20 people to 
Orlando for an orientation and 
training conference, Nov. 4-6. 

Two JC DECA members 
conducted seminars. Members 
attended other seminars that 
were also held. 

The state and national 
conventions will be held later 
this year in Tampa, at the 
Airport Holiday Inn and in 
Anaheim, California. 

DECA and Phi Theta Kappa 
(PTK) have started a drive for 
canned goods or a $1 donation 
that will be given to a charitable 
organization for Thanksgiving 
day. 

These donations can be 
dropped off at BA-108 or BA-31. 
Attempts are being made to 
have a booth in front of the 
cafeteria on Thursday. 



A former draftsman, Gary 
plans to open a furniture and 
sculpture shop in West Palm 
Beach this month. He stated, 
"The emphasis will be on 
one-of-a-kind works and my 
free-form designs will be 
displayed in a showroom. " 

The gallery, located on the 
first floor of the humanities 
building, is open from 8 a.m. to 
10 p.m. Mondays thru Thurs- 
days and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Fridays. The gallery is closed 
weekends and holidays. 



•f 



Concert To Feature Synthesizer 



By Eden White 
Staff Writer 

To highlight the free Pop and 
Jazz concert to be held in the JC 
auditorium at 8 p.m. on Nov. 17, 
an electronic music synthesizer 
will be featured. 

Popularized by such individ- 
uals as Isao Tomita, Chic Corea 
and Keith Emerson, the 
synthesizer can "do things a 
typical instrument cannot do, 



■ it's a new sound experience that 
fits many of today's sounds," 
says Jazz Ensemble director Sy 
Pryweller. 

As the synthesizer is not the 
property of JC but of sophomore 
pianist Ray Lyon, 19, Pryweller 
says he is taking advantage of 
not only the students talents but 
of some of their instruments as 
well. 

The concert, which is to 
present the Jazz Ensemble and 



the vocal/instrument gToup the 
Pacesetters offer music from the 
big-band era, jazz and modern 
rock as well as popular works, 
ballads, folk music and gospel 
and secular (non-religiously 
oriented) jazz. 

In addition to the synthesizer, 
an ARP string ensemble also 
owned by Lyon will be played by 
sophomore Bob Tufford, 18. 

The string ensemble is a 
key-board instrument with 
which Lyon says, "you can 



imitate any conventional string- 
ed instrument." Lyon also plays 
for the New Life Band, a 
non-profit group that plays for 
the Koinonia (fellowship) Reach 
Out Center, a Boca Raton 
gathering place. 

Tufford, a Cardinal Newman 
graduate who for three years 
has played wth Anaheim Flash, 
a local rock group, says the 
synthesizer offers a sound 
"completely different from 
traditional instruments." 



Playing individually and 
together, Tufford and Lyon will 
be playing some of their own 
arrangements including some 
improvisational material. 

To add to the evening's 
variety, the two musicians will 
have on hand an acoustic grand 
piano, a Hohner Clavinet, which 
sounds similiar to a harpsichord 
and a Fender-Rhodes Electic 
piano having tines in place of 
strings to produce a mellower 
sound. 



POP AND JAZZ- [from left] Bob Tufford 
;*:*:* and Ray Lyon will add variety to the Jazz <v¥:*x*:*x : :*>* 
Ensemble with their keyboard efforts. 



Budget Proposals 
Highlight Meetings 

By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

Budget proposals from Athletics and Forensics have highlighted 
the last two meetings of the Student Activity Fee Committee 
(SAFC). 

Athletic director Dr. Howard Reynolds, discussed the 
percentages received by athletics from the SAFC. 

Reynolds stated that because of cutbacks, the department may 
face a program cutback or a ' 'watering down* ' process . 

Reynolds explained the percentages breakdowns received prior to 
and including this year, for each sport. 

John .Connolly, Forensics adviser, and Jim Kersey, student 
representative, gave the Forensics presentation. 

Kersey told of the need for Forensics at JC. "It is needed for 
anyone interested in speaking and being able to think quickly on 
their feet." 

Forensics' budget proposal is actually the same in dollar figures 
as last years, with the addition of $300 for scholarships and a $100 
addition to the banquet. 

"There are more students than before, attending our banquet," 
Connolly stated. 

The Beachcomber is attempting to implement a non-athlete 
scholarship program, with the help of SAFC. 

Each group is to submit a list of recommendations concerning 
their organization and its need for scholarship assistance. 

This plan is currently being considered by the Student Affairs 
Committee of the Board of Trustees. They are awaiting further 
reports from the Beachcomber and SAFC before reaching a 
decision. 

Both the Forensics and athletics proposals were accepted by SAFC 
with the right to recall at a later date. 




Annual SG Convention Held 



Science Club Hits Wi 
Helps In John Prince 



By Dave Taylor 
Staff Writer 

JC Student Government (SG) 
members attended the annual 
Florida Junior College Student 
Government Association Con- 
vention (FJCSGA) held in 
Daytona Beach, on Oct. 28 - 30. 

Eight members, including six 
senators, Vice President Hugh 
Lambert and treasurer Scott 
Schnurman reached Daytona 
about 12:30 a.m., Thursday 
afternoon. They were immedi- 
ately greeted by the convention 



Iderness 
Clean-Up 



assembly. 

At the assembly Junior 
College SG members from 
Florida discussed rules arid 
regulations that were to be 
followed during the convention. 
They also announced the 
number of electoral votes that 
would be given to each school 
based on each school's number 
of fulltime students. 

Later that night JC SG 
members met with four district 
caucuses including Indian 
River.Broward, Miami Dade and 
Key West where they decided 
on which resolutions they would 
support. 

The following morning at 
10:00 a.m. the convention was 



called to order. Resolutions 
brought up by JC SG members 
included a call for a student to 
serve on the State Board of 
Trustees. This resolution reach- 
ed the House last year and made 
it through the House and Senate 
this year, only to be vetoed by 
the Governor. ' 

"I do feel that this bill will be 
passed in the years to come," 
stated Lambert. "This is the 
ninth year for it to be brought 
up." Others submitted resolu- 
tions ranging from one 
permitting alcoholic beverages 
on JC campuses to others 
calling for a reduction in the 
State Trust Fee which now 
stands at $7.02 per student. 

continued on pg. 8 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

The Science Club (SC), just having returned 
from a wilderness camping weekend, is to help 
clean John Prince Park. 

Fisheating Creek Wilderness Camp area was the 
site of the weekend outing. It is located near Moore 
Haven on the west edge of Lake Okeechobee. 

Richard Gross and Glen Marstellar, co-advisers 
to the SC, accompanied the group on this outing. 

Some 20 students attended. Gross said the 
number was held down because of the lack of 



funding by Inter Club Council (ICC). The -entire 
ICC budget was finally approved last week and 
now will be channeled into the clubs. "This should 
help us considerably with our many functions," 
Gross noted. 

Thursday the group was to help the Audubon 
Society of Palm Beach County and the Friends of 
the Custard Apple Trail to clean the nature trail at 
John Prince Park. "It is a fine area and is in need 
of cleaning," Gross said. Twenty-five students 
from the SC are slated to assist. 



Baptist Ministry Club 



Baptist Campus Ministry, 
(BCM), a former active JC 
religious club, has now resumed 
meetings on a weekly basis. 

It's not just for Baptists, it's 
for anyone who's not afraid to 
ask questions about God. By 
asking these questions, people 
can learn more about themsel- 
ves as well as God. 

There are no hassles, no 
judging or preaching, just love 



in its deepest form. 

Meetings are held every 



Friday, 7:30 a.m. in the SAC 
lounge. Try it. — if you dare. 



Music 



Continued from page 1 

in Hu-4 at 1:20 p.m. on 

Wednesday. 

The scholarships are available 
to music majors and participants 
of the various programs such as 
choir, band and the like. 
Applications can be picked up 
from Boyce in Hu-3. 



Two performances are to be 
held Monday, Dec. 6, in the 
afternoon and evening. Times 
are scheduled to be announced 
at a later date. 

Appearances by the JC band 
and choir, as. well as the 
Pacesetters will highlight the 
show. 




NOW OPEN 




,&"&. 



(of Lou's Subs n' Soups) 

Featuring a wide variety 
of Mexican Foods 



*k 



>u ain't toed 

till you try 

Lou's Minestrone 

Soup" 



'tfV^vr drift beer 



V 



Sangria Wine 



3001 South Congress Ave. 

Palm Springs 

Across From St. Lukes 



4 - BEACHCOMBER Nov. 15, 1976 



Nov. 15, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 5 



[editorig 



Conserve Available Energy 



Enormous efforts are underway to find alternate sources of 
energy. But conserving the energy now available may be even more 
important. 

According to a study funded by the Federal Energy 
Administration, more than half the energy consumed in the United 
States is wasted. Efficient energy conservation could enable the 
nation to meet all its new energy needs for the next 25 years. 

The amount of fossil fuel wasted each year in this country, says 
the report, is more than two-thirds of the amount consumed by the 
rest of the world. We waste almost as much as they consume. 
Driving smaller cars could cut fuel needs by 50 percent. 
Abandoning automatic transmissions and switching to radial tires, 
which are lined with steel belts that decrease resistance to the road 
and thereby reduce energy demands, would save another 20 per 
cent. 

Making products that last longer could conserve a significant 
amount of energy. Different construction of the average car could 
triple its present lifetime. Recycling all worn-out cars would help. 
So would recycling a wide variety of products, not including glass 
containers which offer more significant savings by reuse instead of 
recycling. 

Paper and plastic, like coal and oil, contain energy that can be 
released by combustion. Using waste paper and nontoxic plastics 
could reduce dramatically the demand for fossil fuels; and proper 
controls could keep down pollution levels. Fifty per cent of the 
energy required to heat and cool buildings could be conserved by 
more effective insulation and by more efficient furnaces and air 
conditioners. 

Conserving energy can help curb pollution. To find out more 
about tackling problems of energy and pollution, contact the 
American Lung Association of Southeast Florida, 2701 North 
Australian Avenue, West Palm Beach, Florida 33407, phone 
659-7644. 



Buck Stops Here 
With Carter 



Gunda Caldwell 
Editorials 



The cliff hanger election is over and Jimmy Carter is getting ready 
to assume the highest office in our country. 

On the eve of the election, Betty Ford was quoted as saying, "He 
(Carter) doesn't know what he is getting into." At this same time 
Jerry Ford was adamant in his refusal to concede the election, 
fighting to the last vote to retain that office. 

With a pension from the military, the Senate and the two-year 
presidency, Ford will be eligible for over $100,000 annually in the 
various pensions, plus other generous benefits. And that's not 
peanuts in any man's language. 

Most persons agree that Ford brought a semblance of honor and 
order back to the office. The majority also agree that in the past four 
years we had very little "government." 

There has been no group with enough power and inspiration to 
move effectively against the inertia, special interests and public 
lethargy that all but paralyzed government. 

Ford could riot, and did not try to produce any sort of leadership. 
Problems he encountered while president, he did not solve. By 
delays and endless consultations, he managed to postpone most 
serious poblems for another day and, as it turns out, for another 
president to solve. 

How Carter will handle these inherited problmes is as yet 
unknown. 

It is plainly evident that we cannot drift another four years. The 
buck stops with Carter. 



Beachcomber 

Palm Beach Junior College 
4206 S. Congress Ave., Lake Worth, Fia 33461 
(305) 965-8000, ext. 210 

Editor-in-chief, Dennis Glavin 

Associate Editor-Editorial . Gunda Caldwell 

Associate Editor-News Bill Johnson 

Associate Editor-Feature, Sports . Steve Farnsworth 

News Editor , . . Cindy McCarthy 

Venture Editor Frank Smith 

Photo Editor Bill Guliion 

Business Manager ■ ■ Dave Taylor 

Consultant Charles R. McCreight 

The Beachcomber is published weekly from our editorial offices in 
the Student Pullcations Building at Palm Beach Junior College 
Opinions expressed in the Beachcomber are those of the editors or 
writers and are not nesessarily those of the Palm Beach Junior 
College. 

Letters must not exceed 2oo words, must be signed by the author, 
received In the Beachcomber office no later than 4 p.m. on 
Wednesday and are subject to condensation. 




opinions 



c 



contributions 



Campaign Reforms Needed 



Ken Bre slauer 
Guest Columnist 



What do Fred Harris, Sargent 
Shriver, Lloyd Bentsen, Milton 
Shapp, Birch Bayh and Morris 
Udall have in common? If you 
said they all ran for president 
and lost, you are correct. 

These men will be joined by 
■none other than Gerald. Fortf on 
a potential list for an American 
Express Credit Card commer- 
cial. 

This brings up an interesting 
question. Was all that cam- 
paigning necessary? 

The process of how to elect a 
president, or rather how to sell a 
president, needs to be revised. 

In February there were 11 
candidates for the Democratic 
nomination. Most of them faded 
out of the picuture quickly 
because they lacked money, 
organization and votes. 

What was the purpose of all 
those primaries?Looking back, 
regional primaries would seem 
like a better idea. Some way 
should be devised to shorten the 
nearly six months of double-talk 



before national conventions 
start. 

State presidential preference 
primaries have little meaning. 
Delegates are chosen at 
separate meetings, oblivious to 
the BJSBMlafeivM! 

4eSr 

apportioning delegates to the 
convention. Even if candidate 
"A" gets one less popular vote 
than candidate "B", he won't 
receive any delegates! Unfor- 
tunately, this is how the 
electoral college works also. 

Party conventions also need 
reform. Issues on party 
platforms, voted by the 
delegations, are used to 
appease certain factions of the 
party who don't "have a 
candidate. ' ' Presidential can- 
didates should announce their 
vice-presidential choices before 
the delegates vote, as the 
Republicans proposed this year. 

Once the two parties pick 
their candidates, the public 
must endure anothei three 



months of charges and 
counter-charges, usually having 
nothing to do with the issues. 
The fact that Jimmy Carter 
came within a few pages of Miss 
November, or that President 

reason to vote for a particular 
candidate. 

The debates were the best 
thing coming out of this 
campaign. The fomat should 
have allowed the two candidates 
to question each other, as in the 
Grady-Chiles debates, but in 
general they were very good. 

It was unfortunate that the 
debate emphasis was placed on 
"who won" instead of "what 
was said." A mistake such as 
Ford's comment about Eastern 
Europe overshadowed one 
entire debate. 

Now that the election is over, 
we can review the campaign 
with "hindsight" understand- 
ing. One thing is evident. 
Reform is needed. 



Directions Can Change At Registration 



Registration for the winter 
term is now being conducted. 
Some of us may be undecided if 
we should change directions, 
and try for a new major, or 
finish the year in the area we 
started, and think about the 
future later on. 

If you feel in doubt about your 
future goals, here is news you 
should consider before signing 
up for new courses or making 
any changes in majors. 

Results of a survey on college 
courses, as it can affect future 
employment, have been releas- 
ed. According to experiences of 
a 1965 graduate group for the 
past nine years, some definite 
conclusions can be made. They 
have been able to establish 
reliable guidelines on what is 
essential and valuable for future 
employment opportunities. 

College graduates find cour- 
ses in business administration, 



english, and psychology - in that 
order - the most useful training 
available for the many job 
opportunities they encounter 
after graduation. 

This is the result of the latest 
survey in a continuing 15-year 
study funded by College 
Placement Council Foundation 
and the National Institute of 
Education. It involves over 
4,100 1965-graduates from 248 
schools granting bachelor de- 
grees. The degrees include 
liberal arts, business oriented 
and science. 

Ability to conduct laboratory 
and scientific experiments or 
knowledge of medieval litera- 
ture proved relatively useless so 
far as career goes. Tools for 
writing, ability to get along with 
and to manage people have 
become the most valuable skills 
anyone can acquire. 

Handling numbers, account- 



ing and economics proved a 
secondary, additional asset in 
the job market. 

One important point was also 
brought out. The studies reveal 
that nothing in the college 
program was totally useless in 
the employment picture or for 
increasing general knowledge. 
Everything you leam makes you 
a better, more employable 
person. 

The degree itself and the 
general development of one's 
thinking abilities through col- 
lege studies greatly enhance 
and upgrade job opportunities 
after leaving college. 

It seems clear that the 
valuable and useful tools for 
learning skills and to develop as 
a well balanced, skilled 
individual are right here at JC. 
It is up to us what value, if any, 
we derive from exposure to 
them. 



:i90T 



*jpp^ - 



Too Many Cooks Spoil The Broth 




During the next few months a 
"select" screening committee 
will help the Board of Trustees 
in choosing a new president to 
succeed Dr. Harold C. Manor. 

The screening committee, 
includes three faculty members, 
two trustees, two administra- 
tors, a career employee and a 
student. 

Apparently, for some un- 
known reason, the Board took it 
on themselves to be the 
"watchdog" of this committee. 
That is fine because someone 
must oversee the actions of such 
an important committee. 

But when the Board finds 
themselves in a position to 
choose the entire screening 
committee themselves, the idea 
of a representative group falls 
by the wayside. 

It began with the Board 
merely "appointing" Student 
Government (SG) President 
Andrea Stebor to be the student 
on the committee. 

As Manor state, "We believe 
she is representative of the 
student body and let's leave it at 

that." 

Stebor was elected in a 
"pseudo-election" in which 
some 380 students voted. This is 
not to berate Stebor, but is the 
200 votes Stebor received 
"representative"? 

Perhaps the Board feels that 
no students on campus are 
really worried about who 
becomes the next JC president. 
That is generally what has 
become the standard feeling 
■ among administration here, 
status quo. Keep the student 
quiet. 

We are not in favor of saying 
every student should be on this 
screening committee. But to 
appoint someone without giving 
the other students a chance. Not 
fair. 



Denny Glavin 
Editor 



Certainly the Beachcomber 
knew of the committee. But the 
other students were not aware 
of the speed with which the 
Board acts. 

With two administrators to be 
chosen from a group of 40 or 50, 
why is there to be ony one 
student representing 8,000? 
Just another incongruency. 

That then brings us to the 
faculty situation. There is to be 
three members of the faculty on 
the committee of nine. But 
rather than letting the teachers 
choose their own •Syiesenta- 
tives the Board went a step 
further. 

The Board wanted a list of 
some 20 faculty members to 
choose the three committee 
members. Then in essence what 
they would be doing is still 
getting their choices into the 
committee. Not the teachers 
choices, but theirs. 

Certainly the teachers would 
choose the 20, but why should 
the Board have any hand in 
this? 

It actually got down to the 
faculty submitting a list of 10 to 
be reviewed by the Board for 
their selections. Why they must 
choose is still a mystery. 

As one Board member was 
overheard saying "Well, if we 
don't like that teacher you know 
damn well he or she won't be on 
the committee." 

This kind of hoopla only 
shows that the Board members, 
not being on campus regularly, 
should not screen the faculty. 
Who knows the faculty better 
than their peers? 

Hopefully students and facul- 
ty can see how we will choose a 
new president at JC. 





Epidemic Threat 




Antibiotics have been consid- 
ered a miracle drug for various 
infections that once had been 
considered untreatable and 
uncurable. At one point medical 
scientists had hoped, with good 
reason, to wipe out the scourge 
of veneral diseases. 

Syphilis responded so well to 
penicillin treatment that the 
sharp drop in statistics showed 
great promise as a major control 
of this disease. 

Since the new morality and 
women's lib movements have 
gained a combined momentum, 
an alarming trend is surfacing. 
The rate of infection from 
veneral diseases again is 



soaring. Health authorities label' 
the situation epidemic. 

Even worse, a new gonorrhea 
strain that penicillin cannot 
cure, is on the rise and 
spreading rapidly, according to 
the national Center for Disease 
Control (CDC) in a report just 
released. 

This is growing into a 
global-scale threat, and being 
introduced into many states, 
including our own. 

It is not our intention to 
moralize or use scare tactics. 
We bring you the facts, and let 
them speak for themselves. It is 
important to bring the dangers 



Gunda Caldwell 
Editorials 



to light and present them plainly 
for your careful consideration. 

This is not an influenza that 
inoculation can prevent or an 
antibiotic can cure. It is an 
incurable, untreatable disease 
you may contract through your 
own free choice. The threat is to 
your own well being and also to 
your future children. 

As responsible, knowledge- 
able students, we urge you to 
weigh the consequences of this 
new danger. Perhaps a cure will 
be found, someday. Right now 
the outlook is negative. 
Antibiotics won't work. It's your 
responsibility. 



Alcohol And Noise Don't Mix 



Our world is full of noise from 
which there seems no escape. It 
is understood that noise is not 
conductive to good health. In 
fact, noise can damage your . 
hearing, and continued assault 
on the ears can result in loss of 
hearing. 

Certain noise producing 
occupations accelerate-the loss. 
Some steps have been taken to 
protect hearing, as around jet 
planes at airports. Factories 
install routine measures to 
protect losses by workers 
exposed to excessive noise, as 
well as to gain greater 
productivity from the workers. 

Now comes the news that 
certain factors tend to increase 
and hasten hearing loss. This is 
one within the power of anyone 
to prevent. 

We refer to the recently 
released information that com- 
bined alcohol and loud noises, 



such as a loud rock band in a 
nightclub or lounge deliver, can 
effectively destroy much of the 
hearing. 

Alcohol lowers the ability of 
an inner ear muscle to retract 
when exposed to loud noise, 
thus leaving the inner ear 
unprotected against strong 
sound vibrations. The damage is 
permanent. While you are still 
young, you will have the hearing 
loss of an older person. 

African tribes, isolated from 
civilization and its noises, were 
found to have such acute 
hearing they could detect the 
most minute sounds in the 
forests. With oncoming benefits 
of modern society and the 
conveniences of civilization, the 
tribesmen soon began to lose 
their sharp hearing abilities. In 
a few years they have become 
like us, auditory cripples. 

Night clubs and lounges with 



loud bands go hand in hand. 
Where else is alcohol so 
thoroughly and constantly 
paired with noisy music? 

Hearing loss continues unno- 
ticed. You may think you are 
becoming accustomed to the 
loud bands. In fact, you are 
losing your ability to hear them 
so well, and that is why they do 
not bother you, as time goes on. 

With the past decade or so of 
loud and louder bands, the 
discordant sounds we hear are 
quietly but surely robbing us of 
our hearing. We are well on the 
way to becoming a deaf 
generation. 

The music will have to- be 
played louder so that we may 
continue to hear it. The more we 
listen, the dimmer the hearing, 
and finally, we shall truly live in 
a land of goiden silence.... the 
last note of the music will have 
disappeared for us. 



6 - BEACHCOMBER Nov. 15, 1976 



Nov. 15, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 7 



Bluegrass Gains In Popularity 



By Audrey Snow 
Staff Writer 

"Bluegrass music is here to 
stay. We're having a good time 
and that's all that matters," 
said an old toothless wrinkled 
gray-haired man. 

He grabbed his fiddle, tapped 



his foot and showed thousands 
of folks his own brand of music. 
Bill Monroe, the granddaddy of 
bluegrass, coined the term more 
than 30 years ago. He came out 
into the public eye from 
Kentucky in 1940 and intro- 
duced Americans to bluegrass 



with his band, 
Boys." 



"The Bluegrass 



Monroe's music has brought 
many people together over the 
years. He stuck with it even 
when rock n' roll became 
popular in the 50 's and Elvis 




Presley came out, which left 
country music on the bottom of 
the shelf. 

Bluegrass had completely 
died out until Lester Flatt and 
Earl Scrugg's performed on the 
"Beverly Hillbillies" show and 
made it popular again. 

Recently, a new surge of 
excitement and interest in 
bluegrass has aroused many 
spirits which could soon rival 
rock music's popularity. 

"Bluegrass has found its way 
into the hearts of many people 
and once its there, it never goes 
away," one girl said. 

"All of a sudden, people are 
amazingly being turned on to 
this type of music and 
sometimes I worry about it 
becoming a fad," another said. 

"I use to think that bluegrass 
was "hick" music, I didn't want 
any part of it until I went to a 
party where "Harmony Grits" 
was playing. I got so drunk and 
had such a good time trying to 
dance to the fast pace 
bluegrass elites, and I immedi- 
ately took a liking to the music," 
another admirer said. 

An interesting comment came 
from a young man who noticed 
the fact that country people are 
known for their slow "laidback" 
characteristics, but hand them a 
banjo or any kind of instrument 
and they go nuts! 



and enjoy the whole thing. You 
don't have to dress up or go 
someplace where you can't 
smoke, eat or drink. 

One of the most spectacular 
things you'll see at a bluegrass 
festival is all the different types 
of people and the age variation. 
It's a comfortable feeling to 
know you are among people that 
have a common love for 
bluegrass music. 

Like all music, bluegrass has 
_ gone through its changes since 
Monroe. Performers like 
Scruggs introduced electronic 
equipment like moog synthesi- 
zers modifying traditional mus- 
ic. There are still others like, 
Ralph Stanley, who believes 
electric instruments don't be- 
long in bluegrass music, 
because it takes away from that 
natural, earthy sound. He plans 
on sticking with Monroe and his 
philosophy. 

Festivals have contributed a 
lot to the comeback of 
bluegrass. There has been 42 
festivals in Florida alone this 
year featuring two of the most 
talented groups of musicians, 
"Harmony Grits" and "Phoe- 
nix", who have acquainted as 
well as entertained many 
Floridans with Bluegrass music. 

A bluegrass festival will be 
held this weekend in Middles- 



if 






k 




Lovers' Contest 



w 

I 



i 



By Don Vaughan 
Staff Columnist 

While driving to school the other day, 
I suddenly realized that I had 
completely missed the season of Springl 
Sure, I had my share of bird droppings 
on my car and my cat didn't shut up for 
three and a half months, but even these 
obvious signs passed over my head. 

I didn't really miss the flowers that 
only showed their heads during this 
magic season, because I have several 
clients that gladly fork over $3.50 an 
hour for me to mow them down. I did 
catch a baseball game or two, but when 
Baltimore lost seven straight, I said to 
hell with it. 

The.one thing I did miss this Spring, 
though, was the feeling of young love. 
Or old love, for that matter. School does 
that to you. Instead of a young man's 
fancy turning to love, it turns to the 
Principals of Biology (no, not the same 
thing) and Precalculus. 

I neither sent or received a single love 
letter all year. I sent a couple last year, 
but the return correspondence read 
something like: "Dear Don, stay away 
from Mary or you'll never live to see 
191! Sincerely yours, Mary's father." 
Needless to say, I was scared stiff, but 
my wandering soul was left undaunted. 

Which brings me to still another in a 
long list of problems I have. 

In the Beachcomber office there sits a 
small mailbox with my name written in 
purple underneath. Alas, this poor 
mailbox should be sparkling with 



titillating correspondence, but it isn't. 
There's nothing more lonely than an 
empty mailbox. 

And so, girls, in order to Fill an empty 
mailbox, kill a couple afternoons and 
make you read to the end of this 
column, I am starting (and I'll bet you 
saw this coming!) the one and only 
"Write Don A Love Letter" contest! 

You have exactly one week to get 
those letters in.girls, so don't delay. AH 
entries must be 200 words or less and 
each will be read by yours truly. 
Judging will be based on sincerity, 
humor and general mushiness. 

To spur you on even faster, I have 
been authorized by the editors to reveal 
that the winner receives a luncheon date 
with me at Wuv's and their letter 
reprinted in this very column two weeks 
from today! So jot down those words 
you think will win you a trip to Wuv's 
and drop the letter in my mailbox, 
located in the Beachcomber office, 
before Friday. Be sure to include your 
full name, please. 

This contest void where prohibited by 
law or common decency. Sorry men, 
this one's for girls only. 

Hey, Cindy! Do you want to have a 
contest on the Editorial page? We can 
call it the ' ' Write Cindy McCarthy a . . . " 




Ycmturc gfl 



rounds bluegrass is phenomen 
al. It's one of the fastest paced 
type of music that'can get your 
foot stomping, your hands 
clapping and just in the right 
mood to chug down some more 
brew. And yet, with all of this 
going on, the unamplified sound 
of earthy feeling fuses through- 
out the hearts and souls of 
everyone who comes to listen to 
the stories which are sung. 
It's a true expression of people's 
emotions. You can feel relaxed 



you know there's no comparison 
to the experience of any other 
festival. 

What the young and old are 
expressing is earthiness. A 
feeling is what's keeping 
bluegrass living, even in the 
hearts of those who haven't 
loosened up enough yet to 
experience its comfort and 
earthy tunes, for they, too, are 



part of its image 
American image. 



— the 



In Love, The Observations Of One Can Be 
The Unrecognized Participation Of Another 



By Frank Smith 
Venture Editor 

small room two men sit at a table playing cards. One wall 
is (red. by books owned by the old man. Another wall holds 
thi idow of the young man by the lamp. The youth shuffles 
th« 4c. 



' 'How was the picnic?" the old man asked. 

"Marvelous... just marvelous," answered the youth. 

"I take it 'Guinevere' was there.." The old man caught the 
others eye and smiled, and then they both chuckled. 

"Oh, yes!" exclaimed the young man, "Beautiful.... I'm in 
love!" 



Saw**.!*-'* ':^45ir. , '-^isSr. %. 



Agencies Available 
For Help, Information 



By Dani Hayward 
Staff Writer 

Need help and don't know where to 
turn? If that's the case, Palm Beach 
County offers a multitude of public 
service organizations that might prove 
beneficial. 

For example, if illness should prevail, 
call the County Health Department and 
report the nature of your illness. County 
Health officials will then give you 
information concerning consultation 
and/or treatment. 

Some of the divisions of the Health 
Dept. are the Communicable Disease 
Clinic, Family planning and Maternity 
clinics and the premarital Health clinic. 
Also included in the department is a 
Primary Care Clinic and the Public 
Health Dentistry. 

If you need help in legal matters, Palm 
Beach has much to offer. Included in this 



department are several divisions of 
Public Defenders, each handling specific 
areas of legal work. 

When Finances are creating a problem 
then call the County Welfare 
Department. In this department you will 
find the Food Stamps office and the 
Pharmacy division. 

If you are being plagued wth emotional 
problems and feel the need for 
professional help, contact the Community 
Mental Health Center, 

Dripking may present a problem to 
you, and if that's the case, contact the 
Comprehensive Alcoholism Rehabilita- 
tion programs throughout the county. 

To contact any of these agencies for 
assistance or information check your 
telephone directory. Most of these and 
several other agencies not mentioned can 
be found under the listing of "Palm 
Beach County." 







'* i *&£?!k#3 i TI,,S piclljr< " ° r ,hl " "Wetlands" 



*»■*>*<* $fc<.«*»s*i£ 



illustrates 
btvHiiiplamls' import who in migrator} fowls. Miinv 
refuge in the wilds of Okeechobee wetlands. 

—Photo care of 'Conversation News' U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 



the southern 
waicrfoxl find 



"Love. ..Hah!" The old fellow spoke slowly and low, "When 
I was young I believed in love. ..that personal art... but some 
people are incapable of loving even though they think that ... " 

"I'm not incapable." the youngster spoke. "Just to see 
her... touch her, hold her.... I'm in love!" he declared loudly. 
"You're in heat," whispered the old man. 
"What?" the youngster asked. 

The old man took the cards from him and placed them on the 
bookshelf, then began. "There is a point where all things are 
best seen. Closer then that point and the full picture is missing. 
Further then that point and we become too detached for 
observation." He pointed to the books. "I read that 
somewhere." 

"Does it have an explanation?" the youth asked, smiling. 
"Sure. You see, often someone in love is so involved that 
they don't recognize it, while someone detached can see it 
easily. It also means that someone who's never stood close to 
love wouldn't recognize it... I was trying to explain my cynicism 
towards the subject." The old man stopped and stared at 
nothing. 

The old man finally broke the silence, "I've seen iove work 
though. I've seen large, dusty men of anger, killers, become 
gentle because of it. I've seen small men, weak men.. ..you 
know, like Thomas (they both laughed at this, Thomas being an 
acquaintance they had both temporarily forgotten, with good 
reason).. weak fellows, grab hold of something larger than life 
and grow into tiger-like strength. 

"..and even though you've seen it, you don't believe in it?" 
the youth asked. 

"Not for me," he answered. 
"What about Mindy?" the young man persisted. 
"My wife?. .she's never affected me so much as that. No 
once I was growing old and alone and then I met Mindy.... F m 
still old, but I'm not alone. But love? I don't think so." He 
finished, then added, "I have to go now. ..you'll put the table 
away?" 

"Sure," acknowledged the youth, shaking the elders' 
as he stood up, "See you in the morning?" he asked. 
"Certainly," answered the man. 

The young man started folding the card table. "Old man " 
he spoke to no one, as he folded the first leg," ..I too have seen 
love work. I saw an old, old man meet a lady." He folded the 
second leg down," ..and the lady was kind, and gentle, and the 
old old man somehow grew more vital, more alive.'. ' * He folded 
the third leg". .it was as if the reason for living was love and 
because of it became more lively." The fourth leg. was folded 
and he put the table behind the bookcase. 

There is a point where all things are best seen, and the 
closest viewer is not always the best. 



hand 



8- BEACHCOMBER Nov. 15, 1976 



Classifieds 



Scuba equipment for sale- 
complete set-up plus many 
extras. Used once. Cost $535. 
Sacrifice. Best offer over $324. 
Call 659-5780 between 5 p.m. - 
10 p.m. any night. 
For Sale: Peavey Musician Amp 
- 230 watts, 6-12" speakers and 
a horn. Also, a Sekova Les-Paul 
copy. Call 622-1366. 
New Deluxe Weight Bench with 
leg curl. Best offer over $50. 
Call 588-1514. 

Lost: A Cross pen and pencil set 
in pink case. It was a 
meaningful gift to me. Please 
return to lost and found or call 
391-0500, ext. 3455, 
For Sale: 1965 Ford Ranchero, 
excellent shape. For informa- 
tion; during the day 842-3551 
and ask for Ed Mazzola. At 
night call 684-0884. . . 
God has a Wonderful Plan for 
your life. Interested? Call 
844-1212. 

professional typist. Twenty 
years experience, all manual. 
School papers. Mrs. G. Gast, 
phone 276-0121. 
Wanted: Hammond M-3 organ 



or equivalent. Please see Albie, 
apt. 207, Topper House Apts. 
Across from JC. 

Guitar for sale, six string combo 
guitar including case and strap, 
only $55. Call Jane at 655-9459. 
Graduating this term. Must sell 
all my furniture. Cheap! Bed, 
dresser's, table chairs, etc. Call 
Jay, 965-7198, anytime, day or 
night. 

Five piece drum set. Excellent 
condition, must sell. Call after 
five p.m., 582-1823. Ask for 
Greg. 

Deluxe weight bench and foot 
press (new). $65 asking $50. 
Call 588-1514 early morning or 
evening. 

Panasonic eight-track car stereo 
with A/C adaptor for home use. 
One pair Craig speakers. 
Excellent condition. Must sell 
all or separate. Call after five 
p.m. 585-1823. Ask for Greg. 
Male or female roommate 
needed - To share two bedroom, 
one and a half bath, apartment 
with male. You own bedroom 
and bath, M-F, 9:30 -5:30 $112 
plus one-half utilities. 



Meet Oscar 
Meet Arica 
Meet yourself 




Three Days to Kensho 



An Arica training by Oscar Ichazo 

You've read about Oscar and Arica in Psychology 

Today. Fortune. New York Magazine. Newsweek. 

The Village Voice and New Age Journal. 

Now. spend three days in intensive study with Oscar 

via large screen video. Experience Kensho : the 

recognition that consciousness is the whole game 

of lite. 

The Kensho training runs from 10 AM to 10 PM 

Friday. Saturday, Sunday and is scheduled for 

Thanksgiving weekend. November 26. 27. 28 

Cost: $150. - 

Meet Oscar. Meet Arica. Meet yourself. 



Reservations and information : 

Arica Palm Beaches Association, Inc. 

184 Sunset Avenue, No. 35 

Palm Beach, Florida 03480 

(305)— 655-3887 



^ 
*>-^ 



A "a ^snd ritee Days ra Kensfto an seme* marks ol Area InsWuie tnc 



i 



Campus Combings 



Basic Grant Recipients who 

will be transferring to another 
college or university in 
January must call the Basic 
Grant Center (1-800-553-6350) 
to request a duplicate Student 
Eligibility Report (SER) The 
SER must be presented to the 
school you will attend in Jan. 
1977. 

Representatives From Mil- 
waukee School of Engineering 
will be on campus Thurs., 
Nov. 18 from 9:30 - 2:00 p.m. 
in the cafeteria. Interested 
students may stop by to talk 
with them. WPBC Gives 
Albums- WPBC, JC's own 
campus radio station, will start 
giving away albums, movie 
passes and other items next 
week. "This is a promotional 
idea" according to Jim Klein, 
WPBC manager. "We hope 
more students can benefit 
from listening to their radio 
station." WPBC is located in 
the north SAC Lounge, room 
2. 

An educational program for 
parents of infants and small 
children with asthma will be 
held Tuesday, Nov. 16 and 



Thursday, Nov. 18 7 -9p.m. at 
the American Lung Associa- 
tion of Southeast Florida, 2701 
North Australian Ave. West 
Palm Beach. 

Do you ever feel as if you can't 
possible read fast enough or 
concentrate long enough to 
remember all the written 
information hurled at you 
these days? If your answer to 
this question is yes, a course in 



reading improvement at JC 
may be just what you need. 
Reading Improvement II (with 
no previous courses required) 
will be offered at two JC 
campuses starting in January. 
JC Central in Lake Worth and 
JC North in Palm Beach 
Gardens. For information abut 
.this valuable course, please 
call the Registrar's office at 
965-8000. 






SMILEY MOPED 




"The resolutions that passed 
are to be submitted to state 
legislators in Tallahassee by our 
SG Student Rights Representa- 
tive," assured Lambert. 

Later that day 250 junior 
college SG members attended a 
luncheon featuring guest 
speaker William J. Usary, U.S. 
secretary of labor. 

The next morning a special 
session was called for the 
purpose of tying up "loose 
ends." Six of the 24 proposed 
resolutions failed, one was 
tabled, while 17 were passed. 




nothimc$^^94peh 

DOWN! 4a *t M0HTH 

CASH PRICE! S 449 Plus: Freight, Assembly, Tax 

UP TO 180 MILES PER GALLON 
NO INSURANCE REQUIRED 
no mum OR LICENSE 

NO SAFETY INSPECTION OR TAO 

On display at Stewart's Lake Park Toyota on US 1 in 
Lake Park across from the Twin City Mall. Call David 
Rhodes or Lee miller at 844-3461 or come in for a 
demonstration. 

§THW MH i w IsMI 

121s north federal hwy., lame park, fla. 

(ACROSS FROM THE TWIN CITY MALL) PMME 844-3481 

24 monthly payments, 18.16% APR, first payment 30 days from date 
of sale, total deferred payment price is $598.56, with approved 

credit. 






Nov.15-Nov.30' • 
mpoOf^hraircut 



riampo 



REG 12.50 



WITH COUPON ONLY 



fj-e<\t tiring (JSrodle 



In te ■motional Hairs tylis t- Former 
Owner of Three feuding Beauty 
Salons in Neve York City. 



We treat and condition problem hair 



-, IBRIMAN' 



For that continental touch, visit Briman and his staff ol 
specialists: (hair colorings, hair cutters, haii stylists.) 



tjjriman i international J-iairitv^liiti of Jbiitinctio 

The most exclusive' Beauty Salon of Palm Beach County 




~$)B$&®$8w< 



2866 S. Military Trai 



965-3030 



Lake Worth, Flo. 



Nov. 15, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 9 





Top Runner Makes 
Trip To Nationals 



PHOTO BY STEVE FARNSWORTH 

TOP RUNNERS - Tom Murdock [L] just missed making the 
nationals while Hassan El Abbar [R] qualified with a ninth place 
finish in the state meet. 



By Steve Famsworth 
Associate Editor 

Although the cross-country team fell short of 
making the nationals as a team, its top runner 
qualified as an individual. 

Hassan El Abbar took ninth in the state meet 
Nov. 6 to claim a nationals berth. The Pacers 
finished a disappointed seventh, needing to place 
third in order to qualify as a team. 

"All season long I thought we could work our 
way up to third, "said cross-country coach Melear. 
"After we were fifth at Gainesville and took second 
at the Divisionals behind (eventual state 
champion) Dade South, 1 was sure we would do 
it." 

"I don't know what happened to us at state," he 
added, "we might have tried too hard and tensed 
up so we couldn't relax and run well." 

Scores in the Florida Junior College 
Cross-Country Championships held at Tallahassee 
were: Dade South 54, Seminole 61, Indian River 
110, Florida JC 118, Lake City 131, Brevard 132, 
Palm Beach 139, Hillsborough 140, Dade North 
232 and Santa Fe incomplete. 

Times for other Pacer scores besides El Abbar, 
who ran the five-mile course in 26:15, were Tom 
Murdock, 17th, 26:40, Frank Gruber, 33rd, 27:35, 



Steve Farnsworth, 34th, 27:36, and Mike Arnold, 
49th, 29:02. 

El Abbar, who is traveling to Bethpage State 
Park in Farmingdale, New York where the 
nationals are held Nov. 13, wasn't surprised that 
he qualified. 

"All year I ran with the top runners," he said. 

His goal at the nationals is to get experience 
running in it this year, since he is a freshman, and 
then come back next year when he's better and try 
to make the top twenty in the nation. 

Tom Murdock, who went to the nationals last 
year, just missed going this year. His 17th-place 
finish was two places short, as only the top 15 
individuals in the state qualified. 

"I expected Hassan to make, it," said Melear. 
"He lived up to his potential. I'm sorry that Tom 
can't go as he's put a lot of time and effort into our 
program and deserved to go." 

Looking over the whole cross-country season, 
Melear said that he felt that the team did a 
tremendous job considering its handicap. 

"We were nev.er more than a few points out of 
third," he stated. "If we had had a fifth man with 
the running background our first four had, we 
would have had a much better season." 

"We were ill-equipped to compete," he 
concluded, "but we did and we held our own." 



First Game Friday 



Basketball Starts Season 



►♦'♦■♦'■♦■*♦"♦♦-■♦■ ♦ ♦♦ ♦♦ ♦♦♦♦ 4» <» 4* 4fc- 4* ^»-4fc- 4^ -4b"4^ 4fr + •+■■+■+ <^ ♦♦♦■♦♦ 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦^ 



By Steve Farnsworth 
Associate Editor 

Featuring a squad with many 
talented players, the basketball 
team is preparing for its first 
game a few days from now. 

Basketball coach Joe Ceravolo 
expects the four returning 
members of last year's team — 
Mike Shoemaker, Bruce Hlatky, 
Adrian Williams and Jerry 
McAdoo- to carry the club in the 
upcoming season. 

"Mike is our only player who 
started last year," Ceravolo 
stated. "He should be one of the 
outstanding big men in the 
conference at 6'7". He played 
well last year and has made 
continuous progress." 

He said that Hlatky is the 
team's best outside shooter and 
an excellent defensive player. 
Williams may be the best 
rebounder on the squad and 
plays inside and outside equally 
well. McAdoo is valuable for his 
speed and his ability to get the 
fast break started. 

The team also has a large 
group of out-of-state freshmen 
in Bill Buchanan, Mike Bennett, 
Steve Kearney, Dirk Jamerson 
and Roy Washer. 

"Buchanan is. from Kentucky 
and could be the outstanding 



freshmen in the conference," 
Ceravolo said, "he's a good 
outside shooter and plays inside 
and rebounds well. 

Ceravolo said that Bennett, a 
native of Boston, is an exciting 
player to watch on offense. 



"He dunks the ball and can 
jump as high as anyone I've 
ever seen. His only weakness is 
that he needs to cut down on 
turnovers." 

Virginaian Steve Kearney, 
the tallest man on the team at 
6'11", plays outside and 
rebounds well. According to 
Ceravolo, he should get better 
as the season progresses. 

Jamerson conies from De- 
Matha High in Washington 
D.C. a perennial power which 
produced such players as 
■Adrian Dantley. 

Roy Washer, from Louisiana, 
is regarded by Ceravolo as one 
of the better defensive players 
on the team. 

The team also features a trio 
of Palm Beach Gardens High 
freshmen in Shack Leonard, 
Derrick Paul and Sam Weath- 
ersbee. 

"Leonard was one of the 
better guards in Palm Beach 
County last year," said 



Ceravolo. "We were fortunate 
in getting him." 

Paul and Weathersbee were 
characterized by Ceravolo as 
promising, solid playes who 
should see action this year. 

A transfer from Palm Beach 
Atlantic, Dennis Mobley, has 
tremendous shooting ability, 
according to Ceravolo. 

Two walk-ons, Larry Dolan 
and Anthony Dawkins, are also 
on the team. 

"Dolan is a big surprise," 
Ceravolo stated, "He's losing 
weight and gaining speed and 
agility. He should help us more 
than I expected. Dawkins is a 
good jumper, but we need to see 
more of him before we decide 
whereto use him." 

Ceravolo assessed the team's 
chances, saying, "We have 
good enough individuals. It all 
depends on how well we jell as a 
team." 

The Pacers' first games are 
Friday against Florida College 
at Tampa and Saturday against 
Manatee in St. Petersburg. 

"It's a disadvantage to play 
the first games on the road," 
Ceravolo said, "but it will help 
us later on because we'll have 
experience playing away 
games." 




«****""'' 



"**S|l f 






BASKETBALL PLAYERS- 
looks on. 



PHOTO BY BARRY VAN WAGNER 

Adrian Williams shoots as Derrick Pant 



jnmTMtiwurryimrMfflTil i 



10 - BEACHCOMBER Nov. 15, 1976 



Volleyball Fourth In Tourney 
Splits Pair Of Home Matches 




PHOTO BY GREG ROBERTS 

AX THE NET- Sonya Barraza tries to block an opponent's spike. 



By Robbin Barber 
StaffWriter 

The women's volleyball team 
finished fourth in the Region 
VIII tournament and split a pair 
of home matches. 

The Pacers won their first 
match and then dropped the 
next three in the tournament 
held Oct. 30 at Indian River. 

In the first match, the team 
defeated Daytona Beach 15-4, 
15-13. 

Valerie Valenti served eight 
straight points to start the 
Pacers off well in the first game, 
which they won. 

The second game was more 
exciting as the team won a 
squeaker, 15-13. The lead was 
swapped several times as the 
score climed to a 13-13 tie. The 
women called a timeout and 
then returned to score two 
points and win the match. 

"The team came out like they 
wanted to win," said assistant 
volleyball coach, John Ander- 
son, describing the win. 



Indian River outclassed the 
Pacers in the second match, 
winning 15-6, 15-9. 

After a good start, the women 
suffered a heartbreaking loss to 
Hillsborough in the third match, 
15-5, 5-15, 16-18. 

Winning the first game 
easily, the team lost the second 
game by the identical score it 
had won the first. 

The third game, the tiebreak- 
er, was a hard-fought contest in 
which the lead switched 
frequently. 

Following a series of ties, 
Hillsborough came out on top to 
claim the win, 18-16. 

Having an off match, the 
Pacers dropped their last 
contest of the tournament to 
Brevard. 

Volleyball coach Bobbie 
Knowles and Anderson were 
hoping to place at least third but 
because of the loss against 
Brevard, the team finished 
fourth out of the six schools 
entered. 



Hillsborough turned out to be 
the champions in the tourna- 
ment. They are also a first-year 
team. 

The women were defeated by 
Dade Downtown 10-15, 14-16, 
on Nov. 2. 

Sporting the opposition a 5-14 
lead, Jo Ann Slater put the 
Pacers back in the first game by 
serving five consecutive points 
to narrow the score to 10-14. 
The team was unable to keep 
Dade Downtown from scoring 
one more point as they lost 
10-15. 

The second game saw much 
more determined play on the 
part of the women as they 
fought to a 14-14 tie. Dade 
Downtown got the next two 
points, however, to take the 
match. 

On Nov. 3 the team played its 
last regular match, defeating 
Broward North 15-12, 15-10. 
The win was expected since 
Broward North is regarded as a 
non-competitive team. 



Splitting Activity Fees Between Cam puses Hurts Sports 



When the Student Acitivity 
Fee Committee decided to give 
each of JC's four campuses their 
share of the activity fees last 
April, it seemed like a good 
idea. 

After all, it's only fair that 
fees paid at a campus should 
remain there. 

It's not that simple, however, 
In fact, the more you look at it, 
the more unfair it appears. 

Three campuses- North, 
South and Glades- lack athletic 
programs and most other 
activities offered at the central 
campus. These campuses are 
receiving funds for these 
programs but their students 
have to go to the main campus if 
they want to participate in them. 

This leaves the activities at 
the main campus in the position 
of serving the same amount of 




students as always, but with 
less money. Meanwhile, the 
other campuses sit on money 
they haven't spent. 



Steve Farnsworth 
Sports Columnist 



spend this year," said Athletic 
Director, Dr. Howard Reynolds. 
"Unless something is done, 
we're going to have to water 
everything down or eliminate 



Some day the other campuses brought up 

^!c^^«»y«^^^»i 
are too small, with the South 
campus having 750 students and 
the Glades and North having 
450 students each. 

The matter of returning the 
fees to the main campus was 



last month's 



voted on 
meeting. 

The Board, if it wants to help . 
athletics and other activities, 
should vote yes to return the 
fees to the main campus. 



"We have $15,000 less to some sports." 



ARMY SPORTS CLINIC- Sponsored by the Army, Leo 
French [R] shows a swimming class the right way to do a 
stroke while Steve Donahue [below] gives tennis pointers. 





Wj 




<-** 



T 



iH fWPsWJWASiWSi 



aI"V "•« '-.Si 







PHOTO BY BARRY VAN WAGNER 

I GOT IT- Two students go for the same ball In an intramural 
volleyball game. 




j***"' 



■<W PAL* 3VMA/&* 

«PIZZJU RESTAURANT 

Serving a new style pizza in the area. 

* Hot Oven Grinders (Hoagies) 

* Your favorite Italian dinners 
•Beer and wine, by the glass, carafe and pitcher! 

t Tel. 964-3500 

*|&> EXTRA CHARGE FOR TAKE-OUT ORDERS 
10th&!||)ngress Avenues — in the Palm Springs Shopping Center 



*. 



"jjj&a&m'' 



f 



PHOTO BY BILL GULLION 



PHOTO BY STEVE FARNSWORTH 



Intram 


ural Bowling 


Res 


ults 




MEN 




WOMEN 




High Game 

Craig Sargent 
Dave Greene 
Oscar Cash 


233 
225 
218 


High Game 

Jean Inzanti 
Jerri McConkey 
Norma Pyfrin 


178 
175 
173 


High Set 

Dave Greene 
Oscar Cash 
Craig Sargent 


614 

576 
571 


High Set 

Norma Pyfrin 
Jerri McConkey 
Kathy Wilk 


504 
490 
449 


Team Standings 

Chargers 

Vikings 

Anoma 


28-8 

27-9 

26-10 


Team Standings 

Inlaws 

Ryan's Hope 

190 White Lightning 


35-1 

23-9 

25-11 


High Team Game 

Blu Max 

Chargers 

Jaws 


704 
703 
682 


High Team Game 

Inlaws 

Ryan's Hope 

190 White Lightning 


616 

585 
578 


High Team Set 

Blu Max 

Jaws 

Chargers 


1984 
1893 
1876 


High Team Set 

Inlaws 

Ryan's Hope 

190 White Lightning 


1803 
1664 

1572 



Nov. 15, 1976 BEACHCHOMBER - 11 



Intramural Roundup 

Turkey Trot Challenges Jogger 



Intramurals is sponsoring a Turkey Trot Nov. 23 
at 11 a.m. The cross-country run, held on the 
jogging course, features prizes of turkeys, Cornish 
hens and chickens. 

There are three divisions: men's, women's and 
faculty. 

The Turkey Trot is an elimination run with the 
person running the most laps of the jogging course 
winning, the person running the second largest 
number taking second and so on. 

Only complete laps count and competitors 



cannot stop to walk or they will be eliminated. In 
case of ties, the person running their laps in the 
faster time wins. 

Turkeys will be given to the top three' in each 
division, with fourth through sixth places receiving 
Cornish hens and chickens. 

Contestants can enter as late as 11 a.m. the day 
of the event, but they are urged to apply in 
advance, and pick up a map of the course in case 
they want to get in some pre-Trot practice. 



FU ll's Lead Volleyball With 5- 1 Mark 



FU II's are in first place with a 5-1 win-loss 
record in intramural volleyball. The Freaks are in 
second place with a 3-3 record. S.I.U., Spirit '76, 
Setters, Chumps and a new team, Magnificent 
Seven, are tied for third with a 2-4 record. 



There were no matches scheduled for Nov. 11, 
but teams will resume playing on Thursday, from 
7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Tuesday is make-up night for the 
volleyball teams. 



Tennis Tournament Enters Third Week 



Robin Krauch leads the 
intramural women's tennis 
tournament with a 4-0 record. 



Twelve Attend 
Fitness Course 

Drawing twelve participants, 
the fitness program sponsored 
by the I & R Board held its first 
session, Nov. 2. 

Roy Bell, intramural director, 
said that the twelve had their 
blood pressure checked, heart 
rates screened and "before" 
pictures taken for a "before and 
after" record. 

Bell added that individual 
programs are being structured 
for each participant according to 
his needs. Proper diet is also 
included in the program. 

Designed to benefit the 
average m.ale and female 
between 17 and 50, the 
program holds exercise sessions 
on Tuesdays and Thursdays 
from 1:30 - 3:30 p.m. Sidney 
Smith, anatomy and physiology 
instructor, coordinates the 
program, which still has 
openings. 



Tied for second place are 
Wanda Peterson, 1-1, Helen 
Darcey, 1-1 and Peggy Egan, 
1-0. 

Sandy Rudoff, intramural 
board member, reported that 
five games have to be made up 
by the women. She said that the 
deadline for making up matches 
is Nov. 18 at 3:30 p.m. and that 
the women can start making up 
games now. She added that the 
men are current in their 
tournament. 



Tied for first in the intramural 
men's tennis tournament are 
Norman McCord and James 
Gallagher with a 3-0 record. 
Christopher Isaacs, Landald 
German, Geoffrey Wacks and 
Steve Washburn all have a 2-1 
record. 

Tomorrow at 3:30 p.m., 
Isaacs plays German and Wacks 
will oppose Washburn. McCord 
and Gallagher play each other 
3:30 p.m. Thursday. 

-Jeannette Banning 



HOW TO SUCCEED IN EUROPE 
WITMOUTEVENTRYIMeffI 

Your Hosts Abroad 

Programs in Six European countries and Mexico. 
Private homes or multiple residences. Learn your 
new language by "total immersion" 
Moderate cost. 

For information write 

P O Box 2836 Palm Beach 33480 
or phone 655-0962 



Annual 




Turkey Trot 



Nov. 23rd 

3 DIVISIONS 

Faculty Staff 
Students 

Men 
Women 

Turkeys - Hens - Chicken 




12 - BEACHCOMBER Nov. 15, 1976 




The 
urgerKing 

gtanaopeniitg 

thatfs twice 

asgian 




i i, '' , v ***' -f *,?#! t-^-MiktiM ;M-V»%*tf#W 



Drive thru. 




Have it Tfourlflgtyi* Either weqi 



Now there's a brand new place to have it 
your way. And two ways to have it. 

You can walk in, place your order, and sit 
down to enjoy your favorite Burger King® 
meal in comfort. 




3796 So. Congress Ave. 
Lake Worth, Florida 

Or, if you're in a hurry, you can use the 
drive-thru window. It's fast and convenient. 

Either way, stop in soon. And bring along 
the coupon in this ad. Then buy a Whopper® 
and we'll treat you to anotherWhopperf ree. 

At Burger King we make every effort to 
not only give you high-quality food, but ser- 
vice your way, too. Fast and courteous. 
In a sparkling clean restaurant. 

Buy oneWhopper, get another one free 
with coupon. Whether you walk in or 
drive-thru. It's our way of making you feel 
welcome— at the newest place in town 
to have it your way. 



mm^^mmK^mM^M^ 






Buy a Whopper* get another Whopper 
FREE with this coupon. 

Please present this coupon before ordering. Limit one per 
customer. Void where prohibited by law.This offer 

expires NOVEMBER 30,1976 

Good only at the Burger King*' 
restaurant at 

Have if, 



3796 So. Congr&ss Ave, 
Lake Worth, Fla. 33461 




€»4M) CttrNIrM? I5*J*>\1N- 



2 ! 

©I 

Hi 

21 

li 

2§a 



Haveif, 



TOUT 



BURGfR 

!€9ffG 



Good at your new ■ 
Burger King restaurant at 

Burger King 84 

3796 So. Congress Ave. 

Lake Worth, Florida 33461 



<- 1976 Burger King Corporation/ Whopper* and Have U Your Way* are trademarks of Burger King Corporation 



1 



, Sifc*- 



"> r 



i ■ \ 




i ■ i > ' > ■ > i 



/ / •. 



Voice of the Palm Beach Junior College Student 



Vol.38 No. 9 



November 22, 1976 



Lake Worth, Fla. 33461 




SffV"- • 




NBC's Mackin Blasts 
Campaign Spending 



il PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER 

NBC'S CATHERINE MACKIN- [above] Addresses 
&:!:•:•:;: students In JC gym and [below] talks informally with :•:•#: 
Beachcomber Editor, Denny Glavin. 



No Settlement Yet 
In Union Dispute 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

"I'm not a celebrity and never have considered 
myself one." 

This is the attitude that prevailed in the JC gym 
as Catherine Mackin, NBC congressional 
correspondent, spoke on "Media in 1976." 

Mackin, 38, has been with NBC on general 
assignment since 1971. She was with an NBC 
affiliate prior to that. 

The crux of her talk centered on the campaigns 
and the spending involved in the Senate races of 
1976. Despite reforms in campaign spending, 
Mackin said "Big money in politics is still the 
issue." 

She noted that there are 30 senators who are 
millionaires or married to one. "Money like this 
has a polluting effect on politics. Mackin feels we 
must still believe that not all politicians have 
motives that include taking their constituents' 
money. 

Mackin attended the University of Maryland 
where she majored in English and minored in 
economics and history. 

After her speech, Mackin met with both 
reporters and interested onlookers in the SAC 



lounge. 

Her manner was calm and relaxed as she spoke 
of her future plans. 

' 'I look forward to getting back to Congress. It is 
a real challenge." 

In talking about local congressman Paul Rogers, 
she noted that both Rogers and Sen. Edward 
Kennedy have great knowledge in the Health 
Insurance program area. 

They should have some action in the near future 
Mackin noted. 

She also "was in favor of ratification of the Equal 
Rights Amendment and abolition of the electoral 
college. 

Mackin, when asked of Vice President-elect Sen. 
Walter Mondale's role, said she believes he will be 
different than most. She also said Mondale may 
fall victim to the same lack of appearance other 
vice-presidents have, if he disagrees with Carter 
on foreign policy. 

The media "breaks fewer stories than we would 
like to believe" she added. "We should be 
concerned about what really happened." 

After doing some filming for Barbara Matthews 
and the Psychology dept., Mackin returned to 
Washington. 



By Bill Johnson 
Associate Editor 

A legislative hearing was one 
of the few things that the 
Faculty Union and college 
negotiating agent came to an 
agreement on at their last 
meeting. 

After weeks of special master 
hearings, Special Master, 
Douglas Stowell resolved almost 
nothing. Both sides agreed that 
further bargaining would be a 
waste of time and that 
legislative hearing in front of 
the JC Board of Trustees would 
be the next step. 

Stowell ruled on 29 of the 
items that are being negotiated. 
According to Glen Marstellar, 
chief negotiator for the faculty, 
the special master ruled 15 
times in favor of the 
administration and 14 for the 
faculty. However these rulings 
resolved only a few items. In 
others, the negotiators were still 
deadlocked as they have been 
for over a year. 

In the economic area, Stowell 
approved the $9,600 base pay 
that the faculty proposed. Then 
he ruled against a fully paid 
health insurance plan for 
families of faculty, an additional 
$10,000 life insurance policy and 
a $1,000 bonus for this year. 



Marstellar said the union 
would not accept this because it 
would only benefit three faculty 
members that are making under 
$9,600, whereas the rest of the 
"economic package" would 
benefit the whole faculty. 

Stowell ruled in favor of an 
academic ranking and salary 
schedule for faculty. The union 
opposed this, but accepted it 

Cont. Pg. 2 




PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER 



Board Names Screen Com m ittee 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

JC's Board of Trustees, at their regular meeting, announced the 
members of the presidential screening committee. 

The nine member committee consists of two board members, Dr. 
Phillip Lichtblau and Mrs. Homer Hand; three faculty members, 
Sallie Taylor, Al Meldon and Freddie Jefferson; a career employee, 
Solomon Jackson; two administrators, Mildred Whatley and John 
Schmiederer and Student Government President Andrea Stebor. 

They will begin meetings as soon as the applications come in. The 
job descriptions are to be publicized in several noted publications, 
among them the Chronicle of Higher Education. 

Many other universities and colleges are to be notified as to the 
vacancy. 

Nepotism, the favortism of relatives in hiring, again was 
discussed. Richard Burk, Board Attorney, said he felt the law was 
"not unconstitutional, not unenforceable and not illegal. " 

Susann Anstead, Board member, disagreed. "If it is right, why 



do we (Board) make exception to the rule?" Dr. Harold Manor, JC 
preident, said "The Board should make exceptions as it sees fit." 

Manor was granted authorization to request space on the Florida 
Atlantic University (FAU) campus. Manor said the great rapport 
between FAU and JC would help. "We need the space and they 
have been very receptive to us in the past," he noted. 

Student Activity Fees may also be returning to the central 

Cont. Pg. 2 



*£ ^j^^gm&&«mi<igm&'mi&&i 



'""% 



fl >l Hh" 



Jazz Concert Staged 
Club Explores Wilds 
Harrier 85th in Nat'l 






. .p. 2 
p. 4,5 
. . p. 6 



E*3iS2HHiB££SBaSiffiSSH3iS 



BBBIIISSBSSHS 



November 22, 1976 BEACHCOMBER -3 



2 - BEACHCOMBER November 22, 1976 



Pop Rock Concert Staged At JC 



By Eden White 
Staff Writer 

The music department presented a free Pop and 
Jazz concert featuring the singing group, the 
Pacesetters and the Jazz Ensemble in the JC 
auditorium, Wednesday, Nov. 17. 

Singing mostly popular rock, Pat Johnson's 
Pacesetters began with some fast-moving tunes, 
slowing down for their own rendition of the 
Beatles' "Yesterday" and the melancholy theme 
from the movie "Brian's Song." 

In addition to a solo of Helen Seddy's "Keep on 
Singing" by Pacesetter Debbie Robinson, the 
singing group also used the material of Loggins 
and Messina, Three Dog Night and John Denver. 

Commenting on their performance, Johnson 
says she "Was very pleased, but that there were 
no surprises. They're more together and their 
voices have matured since last year." 

Similarly, Jazz Ensemble director Sy Pryweller 
said that he was very pleased and that the band 
"played better than when we rehearsed, which is 
how it should be." 

Utilizing a number of different styles, the Jazz 
Ensemble was highly benefited by the solos of Tom 
Meierer at tenor sax, Larry Harrison at trumpet, 
Bruce Brawner at the trombone, Nick Albanese at 



the alto sax and several others. 

"About fifty per cent of what we play is 
improvised," said Pryweller, "it's the first and 
last time that you will hear this music played this 
way." 

An original composition written and arranged by 
pianist Bob Tufford and Ray Lyon, "Lives Past", 
was played taking full advantage of the electronic 
sounds of an ARP synthesizer, and ARP string 
ensemble and a Hohner Clavinet, an instrument 
sounding similar to a harpsichord. 

"They were working on that one for months just 
setting up the equipment," quipped Pryweller. 

The two hour long concert, which was attended 
by a cosmopolitan mixture ranging from the very 
young to the very old, concluded with a medley of 
tunes popular during the Big Band Era. 

The Pacesetters performed again last night in 
the JC auditorium during a Pop Music Festival. 

The festival sponsored by the Pacesetters hi 
conjunction with the Music Department, was 
designed to foster good relations between the 
college and high school performing groups. Six 
high school groups participated, performing three 
songs apiece. 

Johnson's Pacesetters performed six numbers 
while acting as host. 




PACESETTERS- 

concert. 



PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER 

Members perform with Jazz Ensemble during 



Career Day Slated 



Debaters Go For Crown 



By Dave Taylor 
Staff Writer 

The last Forensics tourna- 
ment of the fall term is to be the 
Florida Crown Individual Events 
Classic. It will be held Dec. 3 
and 4, in Jacksonville. 

The tournament is divided 
into two flights, A and B. In 
flight A, rhetorical criticism, 
extemporaneous, prose, inter- 
pretation and impromtu speak- 
ing are included. 

"I am not quite sure whether 
tryouts will be held, it depends . 
mostly on student participa- 
tion," stated Forensics adviser, 
John Connally. "Forensics pays 



for their food, 
transportation." 



lodging and 



Rules and regulations have 
not been received by Connally 
but he assures that "double 
entry" is allowable, but in 
Flight A, only. 

"There is very little activity in 
the state during the fall term. 
We expect it to pick up in the 
Winter," acknowledged Conn- 
ally. 

Student activity fees are 
paying for the judges, as each 
college is required to employ 
their own'judges, 

"We hope to bring back 
trophies, but it is hard to say, 



because I do not know to what 
degree the talent exists," 
commented Connally. 

Anyone interested in entering 
the tournament may contact 
Connally in his office, Ba 309. 



By Frank Smith 
Venture Editor 

Representatives from more 
than 60 colleges are to gather in 
the JC gym on Dec. 1 between 
9am - 4pm. 

The reason is "College and 
Career Day." 

Organized by the Palm Beach 
County School Councilors Asso- 
ciation and JC Student 
Personnel Department, College 
Career Day is designed to allow 
students to meet delegates from 



and 



Budget Proposals 
Highlight SAFC 

Hoping to answer many of the questions concerning the financial 
aspects of the college, two members of the finance dept. attended 
the Tuesday Student Activity Fee Committee (SAFC) meeting. 

Dr. G. Tony Tate, vice-president of Business Affairs and J.Barry 
Rogers, Controller, were on hand to expediate budget proposal 
questions of SAFC. 

Tate felt that the SAFC is only as strong as the members in it. "It 
surprises me that the group has gotten as much done as it has, with 
the members present." Tate was referring to the lack of attendance 

Questions ranged from concerns over organization carry-overs to 
how the finance dept. operates. 

After the question and answer period the Assemblies Committee 
and the Beachcomber talked concerning monies spent in their 
1976-77 budget. 

The Assemblies Committee with student representative Hugh 
Lambert and adviser, Dean of Women, Elizabeth Davey 
representing the group, told of their planned expenditures for this 
year. 

In addition to the completed Catherine Mackin assembly, which 
cost some $2,768.00, three winter term assemblies are slated. The 
cost of the four appearances is $8,268.00. 

Davey noted that the Assemblies budget right .now is $591.00 ut 
. debt. She was reassured by SAFC Chairman, Tj$an : Paul Glynn, that . 
next semester's budget will sufficiently cover not only the deficit, 
but winter term activities as well. 

The Beachcomber also told of their expenditures for the 197&77 
year. Editor, Denny Gtavin, and adviser^ . -Charles McCreight, : 
presented their expenditures and talked about the problem of both 
advertising and the business end of the newspaper. ' : . 

Both the Beachcomber and Assemblies will present their -actual 
budget proposals for 1977*78 at a later meeting. 



Can Food Drive 

Gains Momenf vm ■i£!" , '«r* 



I 



By Emily Hamer 
Staff Writer 

Sales and Marketing club (DECA) has combined efforts 
with Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) for the annual canned goods 
drive. 

The clubs are collecting non-perishable foods to donate to 
needy families for Thanksgiving and Christmas. 

In previous years, DECA sponsored the drive among its 
members only. This year, with PTK's help, the group is 
trying to involve the entire campus . 

Tim Seitz, PTK can good drive chairman, sent newsletters 
to PTK members asking for at least three cans per member. A 
donation of one dollar will be accepted in place of canned food 
so the clubs .can buy meat forthe families. 

Kathleen Kenny, DECA president, said student donations 
can be left in PTK's office, BA131. Kenney said the clubs will 
probably place bins in front of the cafeteria for food. 

Members of PTK and DECA are also asking local grocery 
stores for donations. 



numerous universities 
educational organizations. 

There will be booths set up 
with tables full of information 
that the prospective transfer 
student would be interested in. 
This is an opportunity to learn 
about the various work-study 
programs that are offered. The 
student also could find 
scholarship entrance require- 
ment, and transferable credit 
information along with other 
data on activities available at 
the campuses. 

Also participating in the 
career day are: 

The -North and South 
Education Center, with many 
vocational technical occupation 



Education Center, with its 
community schools and a great 
variety of programs for students 
of all ages. 

Business and professional 
and industrial groups on the 
county and state level will be on 
hand to advise entry into the 
various educational programs 
they have to offer. 

The Armed Forces are 
presenting their career pro- 
grams. 

JC will also have a booth 
exposing students to the many 
facets of JC that they may be 
unaware of. 

College and Career Day could 
provide the answers to 
education questions the JC 
student has. 



Dispute 



FromPg. 1 

after Stowell offered a five per 
cent increase in salary for going 
on the new schedule. The 
administration however wasn't 
as generous and cut the offer to 
a 2.75 per cent increase which 
didn't please the faculty enough 



to accept the ranking and salary 
schedule. 

These, along with other 
disagreements, lead the negoti- 
ators to believe that nothing 
would be accomplished at the 
Nov. 15 meeting, which lasted 
three hours. 

Jesse Hogg, negotiator for 
the administration, said at the 




end of the meeting, "the special 
master didn't get much 
accomplished." 

Marstellar replied, "He 
certainly didn't do us any 
favors." 

Hogg decided to let the blame 
all on Stowell. 

"He shouldhave done a better . 
job of persuading us." said 
Hogg. 

The legislative hearing will he 
scheduled by the Public 
Employees Relation Committee. 
They'll meet with the trustees to 
"decide on a date when the public 
hearing is to be held. 



Board 



. FromPg. 1 '.' 

campus. The three * 'satellite" 
campuses , Glades^ North and 
South are considering returning 
36 per cent oftheiractivities fee 
to the Central athle|ic'dept. . 

This has .necessitated a 
Student Affairs ^Committee 
jneeting for Wedftes&iay at 3:00 
p.m. 



»^jv 



editorials j 



opinions 



j 



Isn't Thanksgiving . . ? 

Thanksgiving Day brings a sigh of relief. A holiday means a 
welcomed respite from the daily hectic schedule most of us must 
follow. 

It means we can sleep late, indulge in the traditional turkey 
dinner, go on a weekend trip or stay home and watch parades and 
games on TV. 

For a moment, take time to consider the many good things we 
ordinarily take for granted. 

Beyond personal comforts, we should be thankful for the 
academic freedom we enjoy. Our colleges continue to produce the 
fruits of a free society. No other country in the world grants to their 
students the kind of academic freedom we have . 

We still can pursue higher education in any area we choose. 

The right to question or disagree is available any time we wish to 
exercise it. 

We are finding more productive methods to change what we feel 
should be changed. No longer do we feel the need to merely tear 
down what we won't accept. 

Our thought processes are not controlled by a "Big Brother. 

In our classrooms we may explore new ideas and contemporary 
concepts. 

Tuition remains relatively stable, in spite of continued inflation. 
The price for attending a semester at JC continues to be the best 
bargain in today's economy. 

Education remains the greatest mind expander ever known to 
mankind. On our campus we are doing just that. 

For all these things and many, many more, we truly should be 
grateful this Thanksgiving Day. 

Mandatory Listings Needed 

Next year's catalogs are now being compiled. We suggest the 
inclusion of a detailed section on scholarships be mandatory on the 
part of the Board of Trustees. 

This section should include listing all scholarships, the dollar 
amount value of each, and other fringe benefits for which students 
may apply. Requirements for such eligibility shoudl also be stated 
in this section of the catalog. 

.It is difficult for many students to ferret out this information, 
which results in some scholarships not being used. 

When scholarship help is available, complete information should 
be made easy for students to find. .-'■.. ""', 

What more logical place to provide this information than in the JC 
catalog, where every student, regardless of race, creed or sex will 

look? 



letters ) 



Dear Editor, 

Mr. Farnsworth, the sports columnist for the Beachcomber, was 
correct in his assertion that student activity fees paid at a campus 
should remain at that campus as was voted by the JC-central 
Student Activity Committee (SAC) earlier this year. 

Our position as the SAC from JC-North is that we will support 
financially any program at JC-Central campus until we have a 
program of similar calibre. 

Under the present system by which we operate as SAC, each 
campus is given the responsibility of spending activity fees as 
subject to approval of the District Board of Trustees. 

Although we do not have an athletic dept. we offer other 
programs that pur money has been budgeted to. We feel that our 
students benefit from these other activities which we will continue 
to provide. 

What we do need is more avenues of communication between 
campuses. Mr. Farnsworth would have found that not only do we 
support the fine athletic dept. at JC-Central but the Galleon and 
Beachcomber as well. 

We wish to maintain a feeling of cooperation between all JC 
campuses so that we may each benefit the other. 

Tim Brooke 

Student Member 

JC-North SAC 



Beachcomber 

Palm Beach Junior College 
4200 S. Congress Ave., Lake Worth, FJa 33461 

'....;. (305) 965-8000, ext. 210 
Editor-in-chief i 

Associate Editor-Editorial 

Associate Editor-News;, ■■ . . . 
Associate Editor-Feature, Sports 

News Editor . '.". . 

Venture Editor 

Photo Editor . 

Business Manager 



Consultant 



Dennis Qfavin 

■ Gunda Caldwell 

... Bill Johnson 

Steve Farnsworth 

Cindy McCarthy 

...... . Frank Smith 

...... Bill GuUion 

Dave Taylor 

Charles R. McCreight 



The Beachcomber Is published weekly from our editorial offices In 

the Student Pulicatlons Building at Palm Beach Junior College 

Opinions expressed In the Beachcomber are those of the editors or 

writers and are not nesessarlly those of the Palm Beach Junior 

College. 

T_etters must not exceed 2oo words, must ba signed by the author, 

received In the Beachcomber office no later than 4 p.m; on 

Wednesday and are subject to condensation. 



"V 



a w Hw 



■ M ,, n nM I i II** 





*ti* m *i*nfcT *m 



lift Bllil 




Now really mam, do you expect me to believe that Billy Carter would do a thing like that at 
10 o'clock on a Sunday morning in the middle of Main Street? 



Editor Forum 




Denny Glavin 
Editor 



SAFC Should Remain Student Group 



Recent developments 
within the Board of Trustees 
concerning appropriate 
channeling,. of Student Activ- 
ity Fees (SAF) show concern 
where it should have been all 
along. 

It stands to reason that a 
campus like the North, South 
or Glades cannot handle an> 
athletic department. For that 
matter, can they handle their 
own publication, their own 
yearbook/literary magazine 
or music dept.? 

No, they cannot. The 
athletic dept . will be the first 
to reap the benefits of the 
funneling of monies back to 



the central campus. And 
rightly so. Since these 
campuses cannot have their 
own athletic dept., they 
should be willing to help the 
main one. 

The same goes for other 
organizations. They, too, 
should- contribute to the 
organizations on the central 
campus that serve the 
satellite. 

If we must justify our 
budgets, so should the 
satellite campuses. They also 
have large sums of money 
that should be scrutinized. 

The Student Activity Fee 



Committee (SAFC) has as its 
goal the creation of a student 
committee to set percentages 
and distribute activity fees 
paid by the students. 

Any organization within 
this group must justify its 
activities before a percent- 
age of the "pie" is awarded. 

Now there is a possibility 
that the SAFC will be taken 
away from student control, 
completely. If that becomes a 
reality, who would control 
the group? Which organiza- 
tion would profit? 

It would be deplorable for 
students not to see where the 
money they pay is going. 



Gymnasium Not Always The Answer 



NBG News Correspondent 
Catherine Mackin may long 
remember her visit to 
JC.for all the wrong 
reasons. 

When she arrived on our 
campus, she was delegated 
to the gymnasium for her 
appearance before the stu- 
dents. Mackin faced adverse 
, conditions in trying to 
communicate with the audi- 
ence. Bleacher seating, poor 
acoustics, loud, noisy fans, 
hot and humid temperatures 
inside the gym and outdoors, 
as well, all contributed to the 
difficulty. 

Even one person, for 
whatever reason, attempting 
to get down from the 
bleachers, caused a distur- 
bance that was most 
disconcerting to both speak- 
er and audience. 

Bleachers are suitable for 
games and circuses. Nation- 
ally known personalities and 
other prominent people who 
appeai;, as JC gttesjts, deserve 
an ; atmosphere ' that ' is 
conductive to good commun- 
ication with a comfortable, 
receptive audience. 




Gunda Caldwell 
Editorials 



Perhaps our Board of 
Trustees should be more 
cautious about earmarking 
expenditures for satellite 
campus projects' at the 
expense of ignoring greater 
needs right here on the main 
campus. 

Is it in the best interest of 
the entire area served by JC 
to commit over a million 
dollars to permanent build- 
ings for a confirmed 
enrollment of only 400? 

If we are to be of service to 
the communities around us, 
and to the students enrolled 
here, we must have facilities 
to handle the numbers we 
are supposed to serve, in the 
manner in which it is to be 
used. 

Our outstanding drama 
department can point with 
pride,, to,; slome of .its 
:"'succespf^.^.offqprin'g^'''; Yet, 
facilities are so limited that 
some classes are held in the 
auditorium. 



Our drama department 
could accomplish much more 
if they had the means to work 
with. An auditorium should 
have facilities to provide for 
better learning experiences 
in speech areas. Productions 
could be improved with 
better sets and backgrounds, 
With a wider range of sets, 
would come a wider choice of 
offerings. 

That also means space is 
needed to build sets and 
store them when they are not 
in use. 

We should have more 
frequent and greater variety 
of minor productions to give 
drama students meaningful 
experiences in stage work, 
lighting, sound and other 
dramatic offerings. 

That also means an 
expanded auditorium. It is 
unthinkable that in this day 
and age we crowd a large 
' 'audierice' in a gymnasium 
onto bleachers for an 
expensive, one-time top 
notch appearance. 



4- BEACHCOMBER November 22, 1976 




Club Expl< 



November 22, 1976 BEACHCOMBER -5 



res The Wilds 



i 






,« 

j 

^ 



■ ■:» y, 



>'r 



- . .-;■'■ ■■•X -' 






1 •*■ . 






:<■' 


.,-•'-'.■■> ,-. 


■*mimm 


ASL. 


■li '.1 -. 






PHOTO BY DAVI D KITCHENS 



By Audrey Snow 
Staff Writer 

Seizing my seat, life preserver, partner and me; iring with 
wonder like a child in a toy store; swiftly driftinjiown the 
Nantahala River. 

Icy water penetrates my jeans and a cool breeze rusg through 
the trees. 

Shore line images reflect upon the water, they st'oodbf h honor 
reaching for all the glory of the sky. | 

Shrills of laughter echoed all the way down the strck and I'm 
happy in knowing reality can be a dream. 

The bottom of the lake . 

A lingering memory with the instant passing of today. 

This is the first time I've ever been canoeing, just hi a taste of 
what the Science Club is doing. 

Somewhere along the line, there seems to be a "complications 
breakdown" between various campus organizations ai;students. 
At the beginning of the year clubs were crying for net in embers. 
Signs posted all over campus invited students to join 'iblr club." 
Parties, bands, movies and dances, all were arrangeto induce 
individuals. Then all of a sudden initiation week was fer, signs 
disappeared, and you never hear from the club agaitjrttil next 
semester. | 

One club making a "noisy" effort to give students alternative 
is the Science Club (SC), Richard Gross and Glen Marst^r are the 
motivators behind its members and the club is undov' jy one of 
— if not — the most active, enthusiastic group operatinjfcaTnpus. 

"It's difficult to inform everyone about the dub, :jve relied 
heavily on word of mouth and bulletin boards," said Chilne Lash, 
SC president. \ 

Fifty members later — the group has had numerouiake sales 
and car washes to provide revenue for activities, duel financial 
problems with ICC. 

"The money we make is used to benefit everyone Lie club," 
Vice President , Tim Lamping said. 

They're presently working with the Audubon Soci to clean 
John Prince Park's "Nature trail" and share an ecologooth with 



Subconscious Jealo 




By Frank Smith 
Venture Editor 

Jealousy runs deep, (so does still water 
but that isn't what this story's about) 

I'm one of the most jealous people I 
know, (how jealous are you?) I'm so 
jealous that when my girl friend ran into 
an ice-cream truck, I left her. 

(What's jealous about that?) Don't you 
understand?!!! Her old boyfriends' name 
was Jones!! Jones rhymes with cones! 
Cones are filled with ICE CREAM! ! ! . . .he 
subconscious is saying that she wants to 
run into her old boyfriend again! If that's 
the way she's going to act, who needs 
her! 
(That's not jealousy.. .That's paranoia!) 
I'm also jealous of pregnant ladies. 



(I'm jealous of their husbands) Seriously 
now, pregnant women get to feel 
something I can never feel. (Yeah, 
morning sickness... labor pains...) No. ..I 
mean the joy of birth, producing a child 
within them.. (You can produce a 
'brainchild', but if you do that you'd be 
writing about something interesting...) 

Jealously is interesting, (and deadly) 
People murder other people just because 
of jealousy, (see what I mean?) 



Luckily I don't have to worry about 
jealousy. Sue loves me and me only, 
(..and me) What? (Sue loves mel) You? 
She can't love you. You're just my 
subconscious! (Why do you think she 
loves you?) Well. ..for my creativity.. .. 



(stemming from your subconscious!)Nol 
(Yes, as a matter of fact, without me 
you're nothing) Don't give me that! Go 
ahead! Leave! See if I care. I don't need 
you! (OK... good bye) 

We'll see if we need him! Good here 
comes Sue now. 

Hey Sue! I'm so glad to see 
you.. ..ah. .well. ..nice day isn't it?... um... 
yes. ...ah 

(Ask her to go to the ballet Friday) 
Would you like to go to the ballet 
Friday?.. You would?... Why do I ask? 
(Tell her that she seemed so delicate and 
graceful...) You seemed so delicate and 
graceful I figured you'd like it. See you 
Friday! 

Hey, subconscious! (Yes?) Thank you. 




rwelve yew old Paul Holstein performing in JC orehes 



The Eternal Struggle, Sharks Vs. Surfers 



ByEdPicard 
Staff Writer 

The shark problem in Florida as well as the rest of the 
world is becoming an ever increasing threat to anyone who 
enters the waters of any ocean. 

Besides the Great Barrier Reef of Australia, Florida has 
the highest concentration of sharks in the world. There are 
approximately 26 million of the little devils, just off shore 
at any one time. Another thing to consider is that -79 
percent of all shark attacks occur within ten feet of shore, 
in four feet of water. 

Last year alone local public beaches had to be closed 
three times because of shark scares. This presents a real 
danger to swimmers, but a far greater danger to surfers in 
that usually when it is good for surfing, it is good for shark 
attacks and vice versa. 

One factor that keeps swimmers safer than surfers is 
that they only go in the water when the conditions are 
perfect. 

Whereas surfers on the other hand love to go out into 
rough churned water, so do sharks. Surfers don't mind 
overcast and rainy weather, neither do sharks. 

Finally surfers are in the water most of the time and 



sharks are too. This is good for the shark, but bad for the 
surfer, so here are my seven rules for staying safe while 
surfing. 

Number one, always send your little brother out into all 
unknown surf spots to test the water. Number two, always 
go out with at least fifty other people, that way you only 
have a one out of fifty chance of being the one that gets it. 

Number three, paint a female shark, on the bottom of 
your board, that way hopefully the shark will -go after it 
instead of you. Number four, never go surfing at night, it 
has been proven that people who surf at night are nuts. 

Number five, if you are in shark infested water and you 
for some reason cut yourself, try to cut someone else 
worse; it is a fact that sharks can smell blood up to three 
miles away. 

Number six, if you are confronted by a shark and 
through it's actions you feel it is about to attack, don't 
splash! Yell, scream, do anything but splash; simply 
prance across the surface of the water until you reach the 
shore. 

Finally number seven, if you are still afraid of being 
eaten, give up surfing and invest in a potato plantation in 
idaho. See ya in the tube. 



I'M" 



it 



u 



them at the South Florida Fair. 

A two-year project has been started to plant Mangrove seeds 
along the Lake Worth Intracoastal waterway to revitalize the food 
chain cycle in the lake. 

Thrilling and interesting events like tubing down the Ichnetukee 
River, camping at O'leno State Park, Long Key, and Sebastian ; and 
canoeing down Fish Eating Creek (west of Lake Okeechobee) 
elevates their spirits as well as enriches their lives. The activities, 
with the exception of food and personal camping equipment, are 
paid for by the club. 

"Last year, about 40 members went white water-rafting down the 
Nantahala River in North Carolina. At the end of the run down the 
river, there was a six foot drop. You had to catch the current just 
right or you'd fall in the ice cold water. Talking about a rush, the 
water was freezing! " Karen Castle a second-year member said. 
* "We also hiked up to the top of Belle Mountain and ate lunch. It 
took us a whole day but the view was worth it. You could hear the 
echoes of dogs barking down in the valley," added another 
member. 

"You should have heard some of the screams that came out of the 
showers at the camping site. Nobody knew there wouldn't be any 
hot water. We had to go into town and pay 35 cents for a hot shower. 
Boy, was it worth it," noted Castle! 

The creek kept the food supply cold and fresh. Volleyball, 
frisbee , and singing around the camp fire seemed to be the favorite 
activities. After working all year, it must have been well-deserved. 
Another camping trip is scheduled for May . 

You need not be a science major to join. As a matter of fact, a lot 
of the members are business and engineering majors. 

Meetings are held every Thurs. at 10:00 a.m. in room SC-14. 
Minutes of the meetings and up coming events are posted on a 
bulletin board across from Mr. Gross's office room SC-11 B. 

"What makes the club so successful is that it makes a lasting 
impression in your life — a group of last years members started an 
ecology club at the University of West Florida, and relationships 
continue to spread as we continue to grow, learn and experience," 
said Lash. 



Holstein Broth©rs f 
Musically Inclined 

Ambitious In Arts 



By Emily Hamer 
Staff Writer 

How did Paul, Pierre and 
Danny Holstein, seventh, eighth 
and ninth graders respectively, 
come to play in the JC-Com- 
munity orchestra? 

When his sons were small, 
father, Roger Holstein bought 
an organ and took lessons for six 
months so he could teach them 
to play. After they learned, he 
stopped playing. 

Thirteen year old Pierre 
began with the violin three 
years ago. He also plays 
trumpet; bass clarinet and is 
learning the french horn. 

Paul , 12, plays cello and french 
horn. The two chose to play 
string instruments because a 
class was offered at their school. 
Danny, 16, learned to play the 
clarinet while in junior high. He 
only took private lessons for 
several months but has received 
"lots of advice." There wasn't 
any particular reason for 
choosing the clarinet, he just 
wanted to learn to play it. 

The Holstein family takes 
advantage of all art galleries, 
concert and other artistic 
programs. Roger Holstein says 
"Life without art is nothing." 
He said there isn't too much 



going on in this area, but feels 
great strides will be made in the 
future. Holstein said, "-We're 
submerging them (the boys) in 
as much as possible into a 
musical atmosphere. 

Pierre was first chair violinist 
in the junior high orchestra that 
performed in the Palm Beach 
Auditorium String Festival last 
spring. He and Paul are 
members of the Lake Worth 
Junior High School band, while 
Dan plays in the Lake Worth 
High School concert and 
marching bands. The trio also 
played with Palm Beach Atlantic 
college's Youth Symphony. ' 

The brothers practice several 
hours daily, except Mondays, 
when they attend orchestra 
practice. 



Pierre likes all types of 
music — jazz and rock as well as 
classical. His favorite composer 
is Beethoven. Paul likes 
"everything but country", 
because there's "not too much 
beat" -it's "so slow." 



Paul wants to be a lawyer and 
Dan a physicist, however the 
family agrees that Pierre , who 
wants to be a doctor someday, 
will continue seriously with his 
music. 




' 'Well, that answers the question, there is no intelligent life on earth' ' 

Space Contact Made 



By Don Vanghan 
Staff Columnist 

Vikings I and II have been 
sitting up on the Martian 
surface for a few months now, 
and for all our effort and money, 
we haven't learned one thing of 
significance that we didn't know 
already. It was a great feather in 
American science's cap getting 
the things up there in the first 
place, though I for one was 
greatly disappointed. I woke upr 
in the morning brimming with 
anticipation of headlines 
screaming "Big Old Dohickies 
Discovered on Mars" or "Vast 
Cities Located on Martian 
Surface, Ford to Send Foreign 
Aid", only to be let down, 
finding instead on the last page 
before the underwear ads, small 
heads usually reading- "Nothing 
Found on Mars", "Mars a 
Flop" or "Small Amount of 
Water Located on Mars, Plans 
for '80 Summer Olympics 
Dumped." 

Its too bad that there wasn't 
anyone up there. I would have 
given anything to have been 
there when your average 
everyday Martian got up in the 
morning to find a Viking 
Explorer sitting in his yard 
digging up his rock garden. 

"Hello, Operator? Connect 
me with the police, please. Yes, 
this is an emergency, there's 
something in my yard digging 
up my lawn!. ...Police? My 
name is Pytoffznx Lipschitz, and 
I live at 365 Deimos Lane. Yes, 
right next to the big 
hole.. ..Listen, I hate to be a 
troublemaker, but there's a big 
monster in my yard and he's 
making a mess of everything. . . 
No, I haven't been drinking! I 
woke up this morning, and there 
it was, humming and waving 
these huge wings.. ..No, I don't 
know where it came from. I 
though at first that it was 
something my wife bought at a 
Swap-Shop, but when it started 
taking pictures of everything I 
realized it couldn' t be . . . . 

"Try and communicate with 
it? Are you crazy? ...Okay, hold 
on a second and I'll see if I can 
talk to it Hello? Well, I tried 



to talk to it, and all it said was 
'hum hum zzzzzzzzz twee 
whooo'. I think it means 'your 
zipper is down', but I'm not 

sure Hey, do you think you 

could come down here and do 
something about it? It's 
beginning to attract attention. 
While I was out there my 
neighbor offered me $100 and 
two kittens for it. ..yeah, okay, 
goodbye." 

It would serve us right if some 
hidden Martian civilization shot 
some sort of exploratory craft 
right back at us. Imagine some 
poor, old farmer in Rooster 
Crotch, Ky. finding one in his 
corn field. 

"Well prime my pump, Zeke, 
look what we got here. It 
appears to be one of them new 
fangled automobiles. " 

"But Billybob, it ain't got no 
wheels." 

"Hmmmmm, you're right. 
Kinda looks like one of them 
outer space monsters like we 
seen on TV." 

"Sure is makin' a lot of noise. 
Maybe it's hungry." 

"Looks like it, the way it's 
pawin" at the ground, diggin' 
holes and stuff. Here, throw it 
part of my bologna sandwich 
and see what it does. ' ' 

"Hey, look at that! It picked it 



up with one of them big claws 
and ate th' whole thing! Hey, 
there's some writin'' on its 
head!" 

"....calcium dithiamide, pot- 
assium tetraphosphate and axle 
grease — wonder what that 
means?" 

"Probably Martian for 
'Thanks!'. ..Uh, Billybob,..." 

"What?" 

"You'd better watch out 
for..." 

"Acccckkkkkk!! Zeke! Help 
me! Ittryin' to ...(zzzzz...clik). 

"Well, I'll be dangblammed. 
That monster done ate Billybob! 
I wonder if the 'Gong Show' 
would be interested in this. . . " 

I read in the National 
Enquirer yesterday that"... 
Amazing Form of Life Discover- 
ed on Mars by NASA 
Scientests". The article said 
that this form of life "...eats, 
sleeps and reads the Wall 
Street Journal." It takes more 
than that to get me excited, 
though. I'm still waiting for 
them to come across with a 
picture of a Martian thumbing 
his nose at the camera. I can 
relate tothat. 

You'll have to excuse me. 
There's a big monster on my 
Toyota and it just 'ate my 
sister... 



I MEAN, THANKS A LOT, DON If X TAKE ALL 
THE TROUBLE TO WRITE A STUPID 101/ E 
LETTER, AaJP yoiA WOAtTLET ME JaJ THIS - 

UEEMi '■■ niusmr/oAj > '.'. ( 




6 - BEACHCOMBER November 22, 1976 



November 22, 1976 BEACHCOMBER - 7 



Harrier 85th In Notional Cross-Country Meet jc Central Third In Own Bowling Tourney 



By Steve Famsworth 
Associate Editor 

Hassan El Abbar, the top 
runner on the cross-country 
team and the only one to 
qualify, finished 85th in the 
National Junior College Cross- 
country Championships. 

Cross-country coach Dick 
Melear called El Abbar's finish 
and his time of 24:54 for five 
miles "an all-time Palm Beach 
record." 



"Hassan ran beautifully," 
said Melear, who went to the 
nationals with him. "He didn't 
seem to be bothered very much 
by the jostling of the other 
runners." 

Although El Abbar was 
pleased with his performance at 
the Nov. 13 meet, he didn't like 
the Farmingdale, New York 
course they ran on. 

"It was cold, muddy, and 
terrible," he said. "I was 



trapped in the middle of 
everyone after the start. " 
Melear, describing the course, 
said it was flat with only one hill 
and was similar to JC's own 
course. He agreed that one bad 
feature of the course was that it 
went from a 50-yard wide start 
to a path where only five could 
run abreast 650 yards later.. 
With nearly 300 persons in the 
race, this made passing other 
runners difficult. 



"Because of the way the 
course narrowed," Melear 
stated, "Hassan had to run 
slower than he wanted to for the 
first mile as he couldn't get out 
of the pack." 

"If he hadn't gotten boxed- 
in," Melear added, "He might 
have been in the top 40 runenrs. 
Twenty-fifth place was only 24 
seconds ahead of him. 

The coach also agreed with El 
Abbar about it being cold, 



saying that the temperature at 
race time was in the 30' s and 
that "they were talking snow 
when we arrived in New York." 

An Allegheny runner won the 
race in the extremely fast time 
of 23:14. The first Florida 
runner finished 11th. 

Melear said that the trip was 
a valuable experience for El 
Abbar, who is a freshman and is 
expected to do even better next 
year. 



Beachcomber 




pot* 




Men Golfers Finish 10th, 
Victorious In Dual Match 



By Jim Goodman 
Staff Write* 

The men's golf team ended 
the fall season by finishing 10th 
in the Edison Invitational and 
defeating the College of Boca 
Raton in a dual match. 

The 10th place finish in the 
13-team tournament was the 
lowest finish of the season for 
the Pacers, who were playing 
without their top golfer, Ken 
Greene. 

JC finished 30 strokes behind 
the winner* Broward. The 
pacers shot a 36-ntue of 
305-312-617. 

Kim Swan led the Pacers with 
a 75-77-152. Other Pacer scores 
were Randy Cropp, 78-76-154, 
Brad Milan, 79-77-156 and Rich 
Fellenstien, 73-84-157. 

Greene had been the Pacers 
leading golfer this season, 



re-injured his bad wrist and has 
just returned from Connecticut 
where he had an operation. 
Coach Sanculuis is hopeful that 
he can return in February. 

"We didn't do as well this 
tournament," Sanculuis said, 
"but we did pretty good 
considering we didn't have 
Greene." 

"Swan did a fine job," he 
added, "and Cropp is really 
putting his game together." 

The match against Boca 
Raton was catted after 13 htiles 
because of darkness. The Pacers 
won by a score of 231-239. 

Brad Milan was JC's top 
scorer with a score of 55 strokes. 
Rounding out the Pacer scorers 
were Kim Swan, 58; Randy 
Cropp, 59; Rich Fellenstein, 59 
and Mike Mouw, 59. 



Sanculius felt that this fall 
season was one of the best that 
JC has had. He said he expects 
the team to do even better next 
term. 

"We've got good talent," he 
said, "we just need to put it 
together." 

Sanculius hopes to have the 
addition of four new players in 
January to further strengthen 
the team. The players are Bob 
Lott, Rick Smith, Brett Sheets 
and Scott Poole. 

„ The next toojunaxnent, the' 
■Paeersr -atc-lxt^tA^S'^k -%s''^»B* ; 
Dixie Amateur, which is held 
during the third week in 
January. The Pacer golfers 
which will compete in the 
tournament are Kim Swan, Brad 
Milanx and Ken Greene, if he 
recovers from the operation in 
time. 




'«««,,,. • \lv«»>'',- 

''•hiii V%*»««* 



#!■)& 









PHOTO BY GREG ROBERTS 

CONCENTRATION - Members of the women's volleyball team wait for an opponent's serve. [L-S] 
Colleen Wamock, Sonya Banma and JoAnn Slater, [foreground] Laura Pierce. 



PHOTO BY BILL JOHNSON 



LOW SCORER. Kim Swan had a 75-77-152 to lead the Pacers in the 
Edison Invitational. 



Dual Loss Ends Volleyball 
Season At State Tourney 



Robin Barber 
StaffWriter 

The women's volleyball team was defeated in their two matches in 
the State Tournament held in Sanford at Seminole Community 
College. 

In the first match the Pacers played against Dade North and lost 
13-15,4-15. 

During the first game the Pacers played well as Dade North and 
squeezed out a win of 13-15. 

Unable to play as well in the second game the women lost to Dade ' 
North 4-15. 

Expected to win their second match with St. Petersburg, the team 
was unable to fulfill its expectations as they lost 9-15 and 8-15. 

The Pacers started off with a lead of 9-0 in the first game. St. 
Petersburg shut the team out the rest of the game to win 9-15. 

St. Petersburg also dominated the second game as the Pacers lost 
8-15. 1 

Despite their losing season record the volleyball coaches ar^'-A&l; 
proud, because they feel the team did play well for a first year team. 

"Even though we don't have the best winning record," says ' 
assistant volleyball Coach John Anderson, "Coach Bobbie Knowles 
and I wouldn't trade them for the world." 




PHOTO BY STEVE FARNSWORTH 

EXTRAMURAL BOWLING- Norma Pyfrtn [foreground] prepares to roll her ball among the many JC and 
other college students taking part In JC's extramural bowling tournament. 

Rhodes Names Baseball Squad 



By Jim Goodman 
StaffWriter 

The final baseball roster has 
been released by Coach Dusty 
Rhodes. 

Having finished a series of 
intrasquad games, Rhodes 
made final cuts, leaving 22 
players on the roster. 

Pitchers are Ted Adkins, 
Mark Cleveland, Harry Cook, 
Ted Doss, Andy Giannini and 
Bryan Refosco. 

Scott Benedict and Rich 
Seamon are the catchers. 

Infielders are Bill Castelli, 
Steve Jacob, Eric Keller, Rick 



Krupa, Bryan Leth, Marty 
McDermott, Jeff Smith and Ron 
Wood. 

Outfielders include Gerry 
Continelli, John Gagnon, Jim 
Kemp, Nick Maniotis, Hal 
Steadman and Ed Walker. 

The leading hitters were 
McDermott with a batting 
average of .444; Smith, .368; 
Continelli, 318 and Castelli, 308. 

Rhodes seemed pleased with 
the team's performance during 
the fall season. 

"We didn't win many 
games," he said, "but we were 
playing mostly freshmen." 



Rhodes declined to predict 
how well his team would do in 
the regular season. 

"We have lots of speed and 
our guys are really working 
hard," he explained, "but this 
is the most inexperienced squad 
I've ever had here. " 

Lack of left-handed pitching 
may be another problem for 
us," he added. 

The Pacers open the winter 
season against Aquinas College 
from Tennessee. The game will 
be played at Ft. Pierce, Jan. 27. 



Intromurals Makes Turkey Trot Change 



Intramural director Roy Bell 
has announced several changes 
in the way tomorrow's Turkey 
Trot will be run. 

A time limit of 30 minutes to 
run laps has been established 
and the starting time changed to 
2:30 p.m.. 



A fourth division has been 
added, women's faculty- staff, 
joining men's faculty-staff and 
men and women student 
divisions. 

Prizes were also clarified, 
with turkeys going to the top 



two in each division, large 
chickens to third and fourth 
places and cornish hens to 
places five and six. 

Members of the cross-country 
team are not eligible to run in 
the Turkey Trot. 



By Jeannette Banning 
StaffWriter 

Dade North, with 13 points, 
won the 15th annual Palm Beach 
Invitational Bowling" Tourna- 
ment held at Major League 
Lanes in Lake Worth. 

Broward Central placed 
second with 10 points in the 
Nov. 12 tournament, followed 
by JC Central, six, Edison, two 
and Broward North and JC 
North, zero. 

First, second and third place 
trophies were awarded in three 
catagories and each winning 
team member received a trophy. 
Points were' awarded in 
women's, men's and coed 
scratch. First place was worth 
five points, second three, third 
' two and fourth one. 

Outstanding bowler for the 
day was Rondal Rhym of Dade 
North with a 268 game, which 
included seveii straight strikes. 
Mary Ledbetter of Edison was 
the top woman with a 226 game. 

In women's scratch competi- 
tion, Dade North won first with 
2046 pins, Broward Central 
placed second with 1948 and JC 
Central third with 1880. 

JC's Kim Delong had a 502, 
Sandy Rudoff, 464, Norma 
Pyfrin, 458 and Kathy Wilk, 



456. 

Coed handicap was won by 
Broward Central with 2418, 
second place went to Dade 
North with 2384 and Edison took 
third with 2350. JC Central 
placed fourth with 2336. 

Total pins of 2193 gave Dade 
North first place in the men's 
scratch. JC Central placed 
second with 2190 and Broward 
Central showed third with 2050. 

JC's Scott Kirkton bowled 
553; Oscar Cash, 543; Bill 
Atkins, 561 and Dave Green, 
533. . 

Top scores for the JC women 
were Jerri McConkey with a 204 
game and a 508 series. Wilk had 
a 200 game and Kim Delong 
bowled. 193 and 528 and 502 
series. 

JC men's high games were 
Atkins, 204 and Kirkton, 203. 

Atkins had the high set, 561; 
followed by Kirkton, 552 and 
Greene, 551, 

High series for the entire 
tournament were by two Dade 
North students, Rhym, 611 and 
Penni Williams, 537. 

Morning competition was 
three games of men's and 
women's scratch bowling. Three 
games of coed scratch were 
bowled in the afternoon. 



Women Golfers 1 ith 

By Jeannette Banning 
StaffWriter 

The women's golf team finished Uth in the Lady Crator 
Invitational Tournament out of 12 teams. 

The University of Miami won with 923 strokes in the 54-hole 
tournament. Tulsa placed second with 933 and Florida came in third 
edging defending national champion Furman by three strokes, 953 
to 956. JC had a 1034. 

Low medalist was Nancy Lopez of Tulsa with a 221. Patti Prentiss 
was the Pacers' low scorer with 84-81-86-251, followed by Sue 
Holdeh, 91-81-87-259, Sally Bricker, 86-86-87-259, Ann Ranta, 
89-89-91-269 and Kelley Spooner, 93-86-90-269. 

Golf coach Joe Sanculius was very pleased with the girl's 
performance. 

"We were competing with the best in the country. We are coming 
into our game," said Sanculius. 

The team is practicing, is dedicated and has a splended attitude," 
he added. 

Today and tomorrow, the women play in the Lady Pacer 
Invitational at LaMancha Country Club in Royal Palm Beach. The 
tournament is 36-hole play with the four best scores of five players 
determining the team score each day. 

Other schools entered are Miami, Florida International South 
Florida, Dade North , Broward Central and FAU. 

Sanculius reported Spooner with 41-40-81, Prentiss, 43-39-82, 
Ranta, 41-41-82, Liz Aris, 43-41-84 and Holden, 43-42-85 qualified 
to represent JC in the tournament. 

Sanculius predicted the Pacers would come in first or second. He 
feels the team is ready and has a good chance to win. 



Melear Would Like Track Added To JC Athletics 



Cross-country coach Dick 
Melear is a man with a dream. 
He wants track added as a JC 
sport. 



"Cross-country is really just a 
ieadup sport for track/' he. 
stated. "It's off-season condi- 
tioning and shouldn't be 
separated from track. We are 
one of the few junior colleges 
that run cross-country without 
having track." 

The idea of adding track is not 
a new one. The Beachcomber in 
1967 and 1973, spearheaded, 
efforts to establish a program. 
Partial success was achieved in 



1973 when cross-country was 
added as a sport. Since then, 
new federal regulations have 
caused precedence to fee given 
to starting new sports for 
women. 

Melear faces two big 
obstacles to overcome before 
track can be added: lack of a 
track and money. 

According to the campus 
master plan, a track is supposed 
to be located in the field south of 
the Humanities Building. It's 
never been built. 

"For $25,000 an 8-lane, 
paved 440-yard track could be 
built," Melear said. "But you 
don't have to have a track to 
have a track team." 



He cited Seminole Commun- 
ity College in Sanford as an 
example. That school . has less 
students than JC, doesn't have 
a track and must practice on a 
local high school track. Yet 
Seminole has never finished less 
than 10th in the nation. 



Money is probably the 
biggest problem. Melear esti- 
mated that he could run both 
track and cross-country on 
$10,000. Since the present, 
cross-country budget is around 
$3,000, this means the athetlc 
department needs to come up 
with an additional $7,000. 

With the present tight money 




situation, the|prospects of track 
'being added iffe poor. 

While it;isihbt an obstacle to 
track being added, Melear said 
that being an off-campus coach 
hutt^-jiim. He presently teaches 
and coaches Jfack at Twin Lakes 

"I've; had several guys 
become ineligible because I 
wasn't there to help them with 
' their problems," he stated. 



Steve Famsworth 
Sports Columnist 



Lack of a track program also 
hurts cross-country recruiting. . 

"Good blue-chip runners 
want to go to a school where 
they have track," he admitted, 
"this gives other junior 
colleges' wjth track a definite 
edge mrecruiting." 

.Although- Melear would like 
to see track added next year, it 
may he "* few years before his 
dream can become a reality . 



TJT" 



werwraegai 



8 - BEACHCOMBER November 22, 1976 



Classifieds 



Campus Combings 



For Sale: 1965 Ford Ranchero, 
excellent shape. For informa- 
tion: during the day 842-3551 
and ask for Ed Mazzola. At 
night call 684-0884. 

God has a Wonderful Plan for 
your life. Interested? Call 
8444212. 



Professional typist. Twenty 
years experience, all manual. 
School papers. Mrs. G. Gast, 
phone 276-0121. 

Wanted: Hammond M-3 organ 
or equivalent. Please see Albie, 
apt. 207, Topper House Apt. 
Across from JC. 

For Sale- Mahogany Mediter- 
ranean coffee table, $35; 
Walnut cane table lamp, 30" 
high, $20; Mediterranean wall 

Guitar- For sale, six string 
combo guitar including case and 
strap, only $55. Call Jane at 
655-9459. 

Graduating this term. Must sell 
all my furniture. Cheap! Bed, 
dresser's, table chairs, etc. Call 
Jay, 965-7198, anytime, day or 
night. 

Five piece drum set. Excellent 
condition, must sell. Call after 
five p.m., 582-1823. Ask for 
Greg. 

Deluxe weight bench and foot 
press (new). $65 asking $50. 
Call 588-1514 early morning or 
evening. 

Panasonic eight-track car stereo 
with A/C adaptor for home use. 
One pair Craig speakers. 
Excellent condition. Must sell 
all or separate. Call after 5 p.m. 
585-1823. Ask for Greg. 



Male or female roommate 
needed - To share two bedroom, 
one and a half bath, apartment 
with male. Your own bedroom 
and bathroom. Pool, sauna, 
tennis. Two miles from JC. 
689-0700.M-F,, 9:30-5:30 $112 
plus one-half utilities. 



Great Christmas Gifts: For the 

car, Lear-Jet AM-FM stereo 8 
track, super nice, for only $65. 
Also orange and white sailboat 
with a new orange and yellow 
sail, $150 or make offer. Call 
965-3088. 

For Sale- 1967 VW good 
condition. New inspection 
sticker, $400. Leslie Byrnes, 
965-5425, after 4:00. 



Will babysit at your home or 
mine. Evenings, weekends and 
all day Tuesdays and Thurs- 
days. Call Edina, 833-5739. 



clock with matching candle 
holders, $15. -Call Edina 
833-5739. 

For Sale: '69 Auto stickshift 
bug. Good condition, needs 
transmission work, $350. Also 
55 gal. aquarium, $50. Two 14" 
Chrome rims, $20. Wanted: 
case for Flying V bass. 272-3216 
after 5:00. . 

Lost: Silver coin ring with two 
coins on top, last Wednesday. 
Reward offered, call 588-1405 
mornings. 

Wanted- experienced sign 
painter for a possible one time 
job. Contact Dennis Glavin, or 
David Taylor in the Beachcom- 
ber office. 



BX BEER DEPOT 

3384 S, Congress Avenue, Lake Worth 

(Just next to Bar-B-Q Ben's) 



ICE COLD 



9654484 



Budweiser 



53 

6-Pak 



ALL PRICES 
PLUS TAX 



ICE COLD 

Michelob 
$197 

1 6-PAK 



IMPORTED 

Becks Beer 



25 



6-PAK 



♦3 

*%% W CtKSE 




NOW OPEN 



S\ tC&fc 




Pckdcu 
[of Lou't Subs n' Soups) 



Featuring a tfkk variety 

.tMyiitiy (——coupon-- "J . ., 
Uu', Cheddar j free «* cup of , draft beer 



If yon know someone whose native language is not English, be sure 
and tell him or her about the free morning and evening English as a 
second language classes offered by Adult Education at JC. Practical 
conversation is emphasized and there are no examinations. Those 
whose first language is not English, will be pleased to know that 
they can start the free classes whenever they wish and finish them 
whenever they wish. The morning classes are on Tuesdays and 
Thursdays from 9:1; - 10:40 a.m. and the evening classes are held 
on Mondays and Wednesdays from 7-9 p.m. Call the JC Continuing 
Education office at 965-8006, for more information. 
All students may register for JC North winter term classes Nov. 19 - 
Jan. 5, (except for holidays) Monday through Thursday from 2-9 
p.m. and Fridays from 9 : 3 p.m. at the mobile office on the campus 
of Palm Beach Gardens High School. The 9-3 p.m. schedule will be 
followed on Nov. 23-24. Registration will also be accepted at JC 
Central Registrar's office from Nov. 29-Dec. 14 from 6-9 p.m. with 
Nov. 29 reserved for current and former students. 



SMILEY MOPED 




3001 South Congress Ave. 
Palm Springs 
Across From St. Lukes 



NOTHING $ j) A 94 PER 
DOWN! ^fafllfr MONTH 

UlSSf PRlQE! MIS Plus: Freight, Assembly, Tax 

UP TO IS® miLIS Pi® ULLiN 
980 SHSURAN6E REQUIRED 
NO HELMET OR LICENSE 



On display at Stewart's lake Park Toyota on US 1 in 
Lake Park across from the Twin City Mall. Call David 
Rhodes or Lee Miller at 844-3461 or come in for a 
demonstration. 

STEWART'S LAKE PARK TOYOTA 

1215 NORTH FEDERAL HWY., UKE PARK, FLA.I 
(ACROSS FROM THE TWIN 0ITY MILL) PHOHE 844-3461 [ 

24 monthly payments, 18.16% APR, first payment 30 days from, date 
of sale, total deferred payment price is $598.56, with approved 
credit. 



Intramural Bowling 
Results 



MEN ■ 

High Game 

OscarCash 204 

Paul Ratanprasifh 190 

JoeLesko 190 

High Set 

Oscar Cash 566 

Dave Greene 522 

Joe Lesko 517 

High Team Game 

Anoma 699 

Blu Max 650 

Chargers 637 

High Team Set 

Anoma 1918 

BluMax 1846 

Chargers 1835 

Team Standings 

Chargers 32-8 

Anoma 30-10 

Blu Max 28-12 



WOMEN 

High Game 

Cindy Creech 215 

• Jerri McConkey 183 

Norma Pyfrin 180 

High Set 

Cindy Creech 594 

Jerri McConkey 518 

Kim D'elong 508 

High Team Game 

Ryan's Hope 680 

Inlaws 657 

190 White Lightning 582 

High Team Set 

Ryan's Hope 1969 

Inlaws 1857 
190 White Lightning - 1636 

Team Standings 

Inlaws : 39-1 

Ryan's Hope - 27-9 
190 White Lightning 25-15 




30 Min. Time Limit 

Pick Up Course 
Map at I & R Office 



Annual 

Turkey Trot 

Nov. 23rd 2:30 P.M. 

4 DIVISIONS 



Men - Fiouhy Staff 

Women - Frailty Staff 

Stodent Men 

Student Women 

Turkeys - Hens - Chicken 



Negotiations End 




j 



Trustees Hear Arguments 



By BUI Johnson 
Assoc. Editor 

The legislative hearing bet- 
ween the Faculty Union and the 
administration, chaired by the 
Board of Trustees, ended .the 
same way it began. In protest. 

The Faculty Union began the 
meeting by trying to make a 
statement saying they did not 
consider the Board a legislative 
body. But the Board, anticipat- 



ing the request, decided they 
would stick to the issues. 

At the end of the meeting, the 
Union asked the Board if they 
could deliberate, then send their 
lawyer back to negotiate. The 
board's decision will not be law 
in the eye of the Union. 

The legality of the Board 
sitting as a legislative body was 

challenged not only by the 

Union, but by a state labor 



organization. The hearing was 
held despite the criticism. 

After the Union saw it was not 
going to officially get its 
complaints into the hearing, 
they began to present their side 
of the first issue. 

The Board sat through the 
hearing only asking a few 
questions, but mostly listening 
to both sides present their 



views on each of the issues still 
in dispute. 

The majority of the hearing 
was spent with the many 
different facets of the economic 
package that the Union wants, 
and the academic rank system 
the administration wants. 

After the Union set the 
conditions they would accept the 
academic ranking by, the 



adiminstration said that it would 
not be worth it. 

"If these are accepted, you 
are giving up the ranking 
system, except for the name," 
said Jesse Hogg, negotiator for 
the administration. 

Glenn Marstellar, Union 
negotiator, then read off 10 
reasons why the Union should 
not accept the ranking system. 

Continued Page 8 




,—7 %$ •^JT f 



■ I.I I I 'l 



• • : !' ''- 
„ i " 



\ 



No. 10 



Voice of the Palm Beach Junior College Student 

December 6, 1976 Lake Worth, Fla. 33461 




£k 










Budget Increases Proposed 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

Student Activity Fee Commit- 
tee (SAFC) heard two controver- 
sial proposals from the Inter 
Club Council (ICC) and WPBC 
at their weekly meeting. 

WPBC, ' represented by sta- 
tion manager Jim Klein, told of 
the stations needs and long term 
goals. "I would like to see a 
broadcasting course taught at 
JC," Klein said. 

Klein also told of the station 's 
need for more money. "New 
equipment is needed to achieve 
greater sound," Klein added. 

John Connolly, faculty advis- 
or to the Forensics program felt 
WPBC should be given a chance 



to grow. "I've seen other 
colleges where the television 
and radio is handled by the 
students. You'd be amazed." 

Klein's proposal would mean 
a doubling of the two per cent 
already allotted WPBC. 

ICC, already in limbo due to 
lack of funds, was represented 
by Chairman Tom Solder. 

Solder asked the SAFC for an 
increase in allotments to ICC in 
noting that clubs have not been 
adequately funded. He propos- 
ed an approximate five per cent 
increase from seven to 12 per 
cent. 

Roy Bell, intramural director, 
noted that until ICC has an 
approved constitution and has 



resolved internal problems, no 
increase is in order, 

The SAFC has as its next 
hurdle, the meeting with the 
SAFC's from the "satellite" 
campuses. Their purpose is to 
discuss tunneling of monies 
from North, South, and Glades 
to the Athletic Dept. 

This has set many clubs on 
the idea of reclaiming their 
monies, if no similar program 
exists at the satellites. 



Board Committee, 
SAFC Meet On 
Activity Fee Move 

By Bill Johnson 
Associate Editor 

At a special meeting of the Student Activities Fee Committee 
(SAFC), Trustees Susan Anstead and Frances Hand advised 
students about their dispersement of monies over the satellite 
campuses. 

Several campus organizations have shown concern about the 
satellite campuses keeping their activity fee money, cutting short 
the expected revenues of main campus activities. 

The move was made last year by the SAFC, but now organizations 
such as the athletic department are beggining to see the pitfalls in 
the idea. 

. "We are short about $1500 in expected revenue," said Dr. 
Howard Reynolds, director of the athletic department. 

The overall feeling of the committee is that if the satellite 
campuses don't have a program such as athletics, why are they 
getting the money for it and still having to use the main campus' 
athletics? 

This view was shared by north centers' Evening Coordinator 
Robert D'Angio and Glades centers' Cecil Conley. They agreed the 
campuses' should have to pay for use of the athletic program. This 
would probably take 36 per cent of all the satellite campus' activity 
fee money, as it does on the main campus. 

Other activities, such as the Galleon, Beachcomber and the Music 
department have also shown interst in getting their share of the 
satellite campus' "dollar". 

> Anstead said that it was up to the SAFC to rearrange the monies 
wherever there was a legitimate claim. 

The next meeting of the SAFC is Tuesday when several activities 
will make claims to the money. Representatives of the North, South 
and Glades campuses are expected to be in attendance. 



Holiday Music-Today 

By Emily Hamer 
Staff Writer 

Santa Claus is coming to the annual Christmas concert. The free 
concert is scheduled for today at 4 p.m. artd 7:30 p.m. in the 
auditorium. 

A variety of music, including both traditional Christmas and 
contemporary sounds will be presented by the concert choir, band, 
jazz ensemble and Pacesetters. . ' 

"Prelude to Christmas" and "President's Trio" are among the 
numbers the band, under the direction of Sy Pryweller, will 
perform. The latter selection features the trumpet section. 

A number of soloists slated to perform during the choir's feature 
presentation "Laud to the Nativity" include Ileana Lavistida (mezzo 
soprano), Karen Bunner (coloratura soprano), Roger Keiper and 
Denny Jones (tenors). Instrumentalists for "The Laud to the 
Nativity" are Phyllis Movitz, Gin Kritch, Letha Royce and Randy 
Latini. 

The Pacesetters will sing a Christmas medley and other 
selections. Some big band numbers and holiday music are to be 
played by the jazz ensemble. 




^t!^ 1 * ACTI0N " S y P*yweUer directs JC band, who are in preparation for their anmial Christinas 



m w.m-m.rvtfvser.aim'j'mavm mnevn-tMismtn 



2 - BEACHCOMBER Dec. 6,1976 



Dec. 6,1976 BEACHCOMBER -3 




Drama Major Cops 
First in Tourney 



By Dave Taylor 
Staff Writer 

Drama major, Sharon Larry, brought back a 
first-place silver bowl trophy for her winning 
performance in dramatic interpretation at the sixth 
annual Snowbird Festival, held at the Florida 
Technological University, in Orlando. 



Recently Sharon played one of the lead roles in 
the fall term melodrama, "Deadwood Dick". 

Using temptation as her theme in the speech 
festival, she portrayed the devil in snake form, 
tempting Eve in the "Garden of Evil", as she 
played scenes from "The Serpent" and "The 
Crucible". 

"She created such a stir at the festival, that 
those who watched her perform called her 'snake 
girl', as she portrayed the parts well," stated JC 
Forensics advisor, John Connolly. 

Sharon was the only student from JC to advance 



to the finals. Other students who attended 
included Patty Koopman for dramatic interpreta- 
tion, Mindy Sue Robbins and Bill Woodard entered 
in the Prose and Poetry category. 

Koopman and Robbins placed first in the 
individual rounds but did not have enough points 
to advance to the finals. 

Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 12 JC students 
competed in the Florida Crown Events Classic at 
the University of North Florida, in Jacksonville. 

Competitors were: in Flight A, John Kerrison 
and Trent Steele, Extemporaneous; Mark Johnson 
and Emily Kairalla, Prose Interpretation; Tim Irish 
and Frank Smith, Poetry Interpretation. 

In Flight B, Michele Miles, Trent Steele and Jim 
Kersey, Persuasion; Vicki Burrichter and Rus 
Geller, Duo-interpretation and Melissa Meyer and 
Gary Lazer, Impromptu. Results were not available 
at press time. 






■■4* 



Smooth Sign Up Ends 












TOP-RATE PERFORMER- Sharon Larry brought back first place 
silver bowl in dramatic interpretation class at Snowbird Festival. 



By Eden White 
Staff Writer 

"Using a system where 
students with the most credit 
hours could register first, 
registration for the winter term 
went much more smoothly than 



Walk-A-Thon Is Planned 
To Help Birth Defect Fight 



By Cindy McCarthy 
News Editor 

One-quarter million babies are born every year 
with birth defects. Sixty thousand die before the 
end of the year. Two million people with birth 
related defects are admitted to hospitals each 
year. 

"That's when it gets scary," says Hugh 
Lambert, JC chairman of County College Action 
Program (CAPS)-- the college division of March 
of Dimes. 

Lambert, who is also SG vice-president has 
been named coordinator of a March of Dimes 
Walk-A-Thon, to take place March 5, 1977. 

His job includes contacting police departments 
town councils, the National Guard and civic 
groups to help with this Walk-A-Thon. 

So far Wuv's has agreed to donate hamburgers 
for the walkers. Lambet has not yet decided the 
exact route, but does say it will go from Palm 
Beach through West Palm Beach, down to Lake 
Worth and back. 

"We need people to join CAPS," states 
Lambert. "Sales and Marketing Club is working 
with us. Also hopefully other clubs and 
uninvolved students will join in." 

Presently CAPS is working by helping to raise 
money and doing paperwork for the organization. 
"Right now we need volunteers," Lambert 
remarked. 

Interested persons should stop in the SG office 
ur cal! March of Dimes at 655-1011. or go to the 
office itt the Paramount Building. S. County 
Road. Palm Beach. 



WINNING SMILES-Hugh 
Lambert, coordinator o£ the 
local March of Dimes 
Walk-A-Thon and Palm 
Beach poster child flash 
hopeful smiles. 



"It gives you a great deal of personal 
satisfaction. It is very rewarding work," Lambert 
added - 



in the past," says Registrar 
Charles Graham. 

"Last fall it was utter 
confusion," said Graham. "This 
year went extremely well. There 
were very few lines because we 
used the priority system instead 
of a first come first serve basis 
where previous credit totals 
were not taken into considera- 
tion. ^ , it ^ -vvj, < > Mi ■».**' 3* 

While JC had a record 
number of 5000 register for the 
fall term, the total for the 
upcoming term is only 300 less. 

"-I must stress that the 
deadline date for payment of all 
fees is December 14," he 
added. 



When asked about the classes 
highest in demand, Graham 
said that the courses with 
limited capacity, such as science 
labs, the social sciences and 
health, rank highest because 
they are necessary to fulfill 
graduation requirements. 




Though some may cor 

' — '■'*" -*-— — lo 

register, Graham, who ha's 'been 
associated with the registrar's, 
office since 1968, asserts that 
before the computer it often 
took all day to register even with 
the full aid of the faculty. 



"Now we do it all ourselves," 
he says. 

Although JC's student popul- 
ation has been increasing 
steadily due to the influx of 
people from the north, Graham 
says that "The college age 
group is leveling off. Florida is 
one of the few states with 
increasing enrollment, in other 
states enrollment is decreas- 
ing." 

Upper level 
Schools Slate 
Liaison Meet 

Students planning on attend- 
ing an upper division college or 
university and have questions 
about them, Dec. 6 is your day. 

Nine universities have sche- 
duled representatives to be on 
campus today to act as a liaison. 
They are to answer any 
questions concerning transfer, 
financial aid and all other 
problems. 

The schools represented 
include, West Fla., North Fla., 
Fla. State, Univ. of Fla., Univ. 
of S. Fla., Florida Atlantic, Fla. 
International, Fla. A and M and 
Florida Institute of Technology. 

More upper level schools than 
ever are setting up quotas for 
incoming transfer students. 
This is another item that can be 
clarified by visiting the JC gym 
on Monday. 






_ *>#S»»K,J 




Special Olympics 
Held In JC Gym 



**-£***** 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

The Florida Special Olympics District 10 
basketball games were to be held in the JC gym on 
Saturday, Dec. 4. 

Events began at 9:30 a.m. with the run, dribble 
and goal shooting. Basketball games are scheduled 
to be played after 11:00 a.m. 

District 10 area includes Palm Beach, Indian 
River, Martin, Glades, Hendry, St. Lucie and 
Okeechobee counties. 

Some of the counties will not field a team, but 
four teams of senior boys, four teams of senior 
girls and four or more teams of junior boys are 
anticipated. 

All ' participants are from Exceptional Child 
Education Centers or Habilitation Centers. 



Gary Slade, County Recreation Division Sports 
Supervisor is the tournament director. Dusty 
Rhodes, JC baseball coach is co-sponsoring the 
event with Palm Beach County Department of 
Parks and Recreation. 

Rhodes' baseball team is assisting in the event. 
Officials are donating their time, thanks to the 
Basketball Officials Association. 

"This is more of what this college needs." 
stated Rhodes. "We need to become involved with 
the community." 

The balance of the county games are slated for 
Saturday, March 12, 1977 at John I. Leonard High 
School with swimming to be at Lake Lytal 
Swimming Pool. The bowling site is not firm at this 
date. 

Results of the competition were not available at 
press time. 



L Studenf Work On Display 



By Dave Taylor 
Staff Writer 

The annual students' work in 
progress exhibit is being held 
through Dec. 17 in the Jc 
Humanities building first floor 
gallery. 

"Drawings, photographs and 
paintings done by any student 
since the start of the term are 



displayed," stated Dr. James B. 
Miles, chairman of the art dept. 
There are 50 to 75 pieces, all 
created by Photography 1, 
Painting 1, Drawing 1, 2 and 3, 
and Advertising Design classes. 

Among the pieces is a design, 
done by JC student William 
Bennett, that is to be used for 



the JC catalog next year. 

The gallery is open from 8:00 
a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Monday 
through Thursday, and from 
8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on 
Fridays, and is closed Saturdays 
Sundays and holidays. 



The gallery is open to 
public with free admission. 



the 




Exams Siart Wednesday 



photos by Emily Hamer 



Final exams for day classes will start 
Wednesday, Dec. 8 and run through Tuesday, 
Dec. 14. Evening class exams begin Tuesday, Dec. 
7 and go through Monday, Dec. 13. 



WEDNESDAY 

M-W-F 


T-TH 


Exam Time 


7:30 
11:00 


12:30 


7:30-9:30 

12:00-2:00 

9:45-11:45 


THURSDAY 
M-W-F 

8:40 . 
1:20 


T-TH 
7:30 


Exam Time 
7:30-9:30 
9:45-11:45 
12:00-2:00 


FRIDAY 

M-W-F 

12:10 
2:30 , 


T-TH 
9:10 


Exam Time 
9:45-11:45 
7:30-9:30 
12:00-2:00 


MONDAY 

M-W-F 

9:50 


T-TH 
9:50 


Exam Time 
9:45-11:45 
7:30-9:30 



TUESDAY 

M_w~F T-TH Exam Time 

2:10 7:30-9:30 

3:40 9:45-11:45 



PTK Can Drive Successful 

Thanks to the efforts of Phi Theta Kappa (PTK), 
six needy families had turkey dinners on 
Thanksgiving Day. 

PTK held a canned food drive on campus 
recently, resulting in donations of food and money 
from faculty members and students. 

According to Tim Seitz, chairman of the Civics 
Committee, which handled the food drive, they got 
the names of the six families from the Welfare 
Department. Baskets were deliverd on Wednesday 
afternoon. 

Roosevelt O'Neal, PTK president, had this to 
say, "The Thanksgiving food drive was such a 
success, that we are doing it again for Christmas." 





SPECIAL OLYMPICS CO-SPONSOR-Dusty Rhodes, JC baseball 
coach, is co-sponsoring the event. He will be assisted by his 
baseball team. photo by Emily Hamer 

Fifty Schools Here 
For Career Day 

By Bill Johnson 
Career Day 

College representatives from all over the southeast, met in JC's 
gym to talk with potential applicants from Palm Beach County. 

About 50 senior colleges were represented along with the armed 
services, industrial and professional groups. 

Juniors and seniors from the county's 14 high schools were 
invited, as were JC students. 

Most of the representatives started as a group in north Florida. 
One woman from Greensboro had been touring for about a week and 
was to go on to the rest of the state, as other representatives would. 

They stopped at high schools, and some go to other colleges 
individually, to council students. 



THE. PRESSURE IS ON-Nurses take blood pressure during 
successful College and Career Day. 



Monday 


Dec. 13 


Tuesday 


Dec. 7 


Wednesday 


Dec. 8 


Thursday 


Dec. 9 


Mon.- Wed. 


Dec, 13 


Tues. - Thu 


s. Dec. 9 




STUDENTS OBTAINING HELP-Some of the many local college and 
high school students during College and Career day. 



&gmwmaw«&mm 



4 - BEACHCOMBER Dec. 6,1976 






Dec. 6,1976 BEACHCOMBER -5 



[editorials) 

December Stands For . . . 



December means the end of a semester, the end of a year, and 
Christmas. 

December is the end of a semester; 

It is" time for Final exams, cramming for them and sweating out 
the grades. Whether you adopted the attitude of just getting by or if 
you really put in some hard work, it is too late to change now . . . the 
evaluations you've earned will go on your permanent record. 

If you plan to go on to an upper level university, you need to 
remember that more and more, colleges are using the quota system 
for outside students. Quotas require Bt or better grades to be 
accepted. Such a record can be obtained only by making a real 
effort. 

December is the end of the year. 

The Bicentennial year of 1976 is nearly over. The fanfare and 
celebrations are gone and nearly forgotten. It's time to see what we 
have accomplished. - 

It also is time to make plans for doing better in the new year and 
new semester coming up. This year, with its failures and successes, 
is nearly over. 

We can make a resolution that next term we will raise those 
grades and to work harder. We can decide to become more involved 
and more concerned about the campus acitivites going on. We 
should give more support to student activities. Campus 
organizations cannot function without support. 

And then there's Christmas! 

For an all-too-short season there will be "Peace on Earth, Good 
WilltoMen." 

We will become concerned about the underprivileged, the sick, 
and the lonely in our midst. Some of us will contribute time and 
money to spread happiness to those we love and to those who are in 
need. -^ 

There will also be an increase in robberies, accidents and violent 
crimes. Not all men are inclined to peace and good will, 
unfortunately, even at Christmas. Human vultures prey on society 
most brutally at this time of year. 

Be alert! Be happy! Be at peace! 

For this upcoming Christmas and holiday season, the staff of the 
Beachcomber, wish you and yours, 

A MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A HAPPY NE W YEAR. 



( letters j 

Space Limitations Broad 

To the Editor: 

I am in complete agreement with Caldwell's editorial concerning 
the limited space the drama department must deal with. Space is 
necessary for broadening the scope of all educational endeavors. 

A case in point is the Early Learning Center located in one room 
in the rear of the science building. The center is a learning situation 
for a great many students on campus. The education, nursing, 
psychology, dental and sociology departments have all gained 
through programs with the youngsters there. Even more, these 
young people are gaining by their interact ion with the adult world . 

The major problem at the center is space, precious space. The 
children are in a single classroom from 7:30 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. 
There is room left idle a great deal of the time and used by only a 
very few students in scheduled classes right next door. With a little 
more "growing room" this model program could better serve the 
student body : students whether three or 30 years old. 

There is no new building necessary, only the use- of the space 
already there. Just room to grow. 

Susan Feinsinget; 



Beachcomber' 

Palm Beach Junior College 
4206 S. Congress Ave., Lake Worth, Fla 33461 
(305) 965-8000, ext 210 

Editor-in-chief. . . . . Dennis Glavin 

Associate Editor-Editorial ...... .Gunda Caldwell 

Associate Editor-News Bill Johnson 

Associate Editor-Feature, Sports . Steve Farnsworth 

News Editor Cindy McCarthy 

Venture Editor Frank Smith 

Photo Editor , Bill Gullion 

Business Manager • ■ ■ Dave Taylor 

Consultant Charles R. McCreight 

The Beachcomber ts published weekly from our editorial offices In 
the Student Pulieations Building at Palm Beach Junior College 
Opinions expressed in the Beachcomber are those of the editors or 
writers and are not nesessarily those of the Palm Beach Junior 
College. 

!_etters must not exceed 2oo words, must be signed by the author 
received in the Beachcomber office no later than 4 ' 

Wednesday and are subject to condensation. 



p.m. on 







Ott.% WAS MiTcHMlKiNfi IM LA kg lA/oRfili. 
WUATAREYOU IM PQR? 



Editor 



Forum 




Denny Glavin 
Editor 



No Easy Decisions Facing "Satellites" 



The Wednesday meeting of 
the Student Activity Fee 
Committee, (SAFC) The Stu- 
dent Affairs Committee of the 
Board of Trustees and the 
satellite campuses did not 
accomplish much. 

It did clarify points that some 
of us were unsure of. 

But what it did was, by 
apparently giving the go-ahead 
to reallocate funds from the 
satellites to the central campus, 
start a "bargaining war." . 

When 36 per cent of the 
activity fees comes back from 
the other campuses to athletics, 
how can they avoid sending a 
similar amount to other groups? 
Do the students at the satellites 
want this? 



Certainly the athletic dept. at 
the central campus may be in 
jeopardy of losing programs. 
Our athletics have expanded to 
include the range of sports they 
should cover. 

But, as has been said, "right 
is right," and when all the 
groups who can get monies 
returned band together, might 
makes right-more right, so to 
speak. 

We feel that before the 
SAFC's of the campuses make a 
move they should take the entire 
picture into view. It stands to 
reason that 'hot only, athletics 
but the Beachcomber, Galleon, 
WPBC et al will be "waiting on 
the doorstep." 

That is why Tuesday's 



meeting of all SAFC's takes on 
added significance. 

When the central SAFC 
decided to give the other 
campuses control of their own 
fees, they failed to. take into 
consideration the lack of 
justified programs on which to 
spend these dollars. 

Perhaps, as Roy Bell, 
intramural director noted, all 
monies should come back, 
except those where a compar- 
able program exists. When one 
exists, the money should go 
back to that campus. 

The SAFC meant well in their 
attitude about letting the other 
campuses decide how to spend 
the money. They are just a 
few years before their time. 



letters ) 

Grrqd Appreciates JCPhys Ed Program 



Dear President, Deans and 
Faculty, 

As a Bicentennial graduate of 
JC, aware of all the talk of 
education on the decline, I was 
unsure of the education I 
received until I attended 
orientation at Florida State 
University with other transfer 
students in my field of 
recreation. 

These students came from 
five or six other junior colleges 
or community colleges in 
Florida and not one of these 
students had had any courses in 
Recreation during their First two 
years. 

This surprised me greatly, as 
I had at least five courses in 
Recreation. These students 
were amazed that I had had any 
courses in Recreation in a junior 
cc.lege. 



As we compared transcripts, I 
found that my general education 
course requirements also were 
more advanced. My courses 
were not only a splattering of 
many different subjects, but 
also dealt more deeply in the 
form of two courses under a 
general subject instead of just 
one in many cases. 

Even my faculty advisor was 
amazed to see the courses that I 
had in Recreation and the texts 
that I used. As a result of those 
courses, I exempted a Five hour 
course in Recreation. 

I would also like to mention 
that all of my general education 
courses transferred and also 
fulfilled some required subjects 
in upper division studies, 
leaving me with 15 and possibly 
18 hours of electives plus the 
five hours I exempted to fulfill, 



whereas I only had three hours 
of electives without these. 

JC has given me a great head 
start in my last two years of 
study. It is a good school and 1 
greatly appreciate the education 
I received there. Although I 
cannot speak for other courses, 
because I have not taken them, I 
believe that in my major of 
Recreation, I don't feel I could 
have received a better education 
elsewhere. 

In closing, I would also like to 
add a special thanks and 
commendation to Miss Betty 
Blanton, my faculty advisor at 
JC who helped to prepare me so 
very much. I would also like to 
thank and commend Mr. Harris 
McGirt for his great help to me. 

Keep it up, JC. 

Sincerely, 
Becky A. Beatty 



m 



-ac 







Historians Forgot Feminine Touch 




Historians should have in- 
cluded women when they 
admitted blacks to a place in 
history. 

Recognition of a second sex is 
on the way. This week is 
Woman's Week to remind the 
men - there is a second sex. 

A ceasefire in the war 
between sexes is eminent. 
Much progress has already 
taken place. Art historians now 
point out that many cave 
paintings attributed to "Anon- 
ymous" were, in fact, female 
creations. This indicates women 
have the potential for great art, 
as well as interior decorating 
and homemaking. 

A cave apartment was far 
from a place of beauty, so the 
little leady in the cave invented 
wall murals. Without books for 
the den, she decorated the walls 
with pictoral information. Pretty 
neat, and in time, He got the 
credit. 

The Garden of Eden should 
have been a paradise. It was for 
Adam. Eve did not fare as well. 
She got the dirty end of the 
apple situation, and although 
Adam loved apple pie, (he still 
does) Eve was blamed for 
talking him into eating it. 
Noah's wife received no thanks 
for that long cruise she took in 
an ark loaded with animals, 
bugs and snakes. It wasn't easy 
to keep house on a boat with a 
passenger list like that. Yet, she 
watched over them all, took care 
of them, and .made sure species 
did not devour one another. 
When the trip was over, Noah 
came out the hero and no one 
remembers Mrs. Noah's first 
name. 

In later years, we find 
women's achievements had to 
be masked by initials or a 
masculine name. George T. 
Sands got published. Georgina 
would not have gotten near the 
editor's desk, much less the 
printer's room. 

As to the claim that the 
Boston Tea Party was a stag 
affair - don't believe it! After 
those phony indians dove off the 
British ships into the harbor, 
soaking wet clothes outlined 
enough reasons to prove 



Gunda Caldwell 
Editorials 



bisexual was the name of that 
game. 

Lady Godiva was the original 
streaker, but no one ever gave 
her credit for inventing this 
form of protest. She was smart 
enough to ride a horse instead of 
running on foot. Today the only 
thing we remember about her is 
her long hair. 

Our founding fathers were 
careful to keep women off the 
Constitutional Committee. They 
had no intentions of sharing 
equal citizenship with the wives, 
so kept them in the dark about 
the whole matter until it was 
signed, sealed, and delivered. If 
women had been aware their 
rights were missing from the 
document, the nation's first 
filibuster would have exploded 
on the spot. 

Wagon trains headed west 
carried two sexes. Ma did a 
great deal more than hold the 
reins when Pa tired of sitting 
and got down for a walk. 
Pioneer women were first 
awake, last to bed, and caught 
in the middle of camp raids and 
cabin attacks. Wives manned 
(pardon the expression) the 
home front while men went 
fishing, hunting game and 
indians. 

You'd never know from 
history that a female ever set 
foot in the Great Divide or Death 
Valley. Not a single tale was 
ever told about a cowgirl riding 
off into the sunset. She stayed 
and took care of the chores, 
while he rode off to another 
adventure. 

Medicine was exclusive male 
territory. The power and the 
glory of the great art of healing 
rested safely with men, while 
mop and bedpan were delegated 
to ladies of mercy, Gradual 
changes have re-arranged the 
pecking order somewhat. The 
inner sanctum of medicine 
finally was violated by women. 
Male orderlies now share the 
bedpan circuit with nurses 
aides. 

Men have insisted for 
countless centuries that women 
were intellectually inferior. She 
was not allowed to administer 
her own business affairs 







because she was legally 
incompetent. 

According to law at that 
time, if a widow was left with an 
estate, the court appointed a 
"keeper." Many a widow was 
cheated out of her inheritance 
by her socalled benefactor. 

Today's woman has more 
than proven herself. She can run 
a business, a household, 
balance a checking account or a 
budget and manage income 
equally or better than her 
counterpart. 

Looking at the world of sports 
we find a woman among the 
long distnce runner champions. 
Man was stunned to discover a 
woman athlete could excel in 
athletics. He had been accust- 
omed to a type of racing where a 
man catches the girl because 
she lets him. This was a new 
game. 

Kinsey and Masters also 
shook up the bedroom Olympics 
picture. Myths have been shot 



down and new guidelines 
drawn. Things will never be the 
same again. 

Woman has broken so many 
traditions there is little left to 
work with. ERA looms on the 
horizon, man has lost control 
and the picture of past male 
superiority is shot to pieces, 

He, for the first time, is 
beginning to see the real 
WOMAN. 

Laws that sheltered man for 
generations no longer afford 
him blanket protection. Chang- 
ing sexual patterns place him on 
shaky grounds. Sex operations 
and sexual freedoms further 
confuse the rules. 

Gender lines are blurred, Sex 
roles are diffused. Recently a 
man filed suit for divorce on 
grounds his new bride had, 
unknown to him, undergone a 
previous sex change operation. 
Couples of the same sex 
demand equal rights of 
matrimony. The male finds 



these changes more difficult to 
cope with, for he is losing his 
sense of identity while woman is 
Finding hers. 

The future holds no promise 
of pat solutions. WHO you are 
will be far more important thant 
WHAT KIND you happen to be. 

For now, woman continues to 
push expansion of her horizons 
while helping man find ways of 
accepting these changes. Merit, 
not sex, must eventually 
become the criteria. Brute 
strength should have no larger 
consideration in our society than 
inner strength. 

Both sexes must learn to live 
together peacefully and equally. 
If not, sex as we now know it, 
will disappear into a Huxley 
social structure with sperm 
banks and incubators replacing 
parental roles. 

This must not happen. After 
all, we have nothing quite as 
wonderful to take its place. 



Screening Committee Unbalanced 



When Dr. Manor furnished 
the names of three teachers 
selected for the Screening 
Committee for the new 
president at the last Board 
meeting, the stage was set for 
many questions. 

How was this decision made? 
No discussion was held at the 
meeting prior to the announce- 
ment, nor was any written 
information introduced to ex- 
plain who made the choice, or 
where or when. 

Sally Taylor will represent the 
main campus. Al W. Meldon 
and Freddie Jefferson are both 
from the north campus. There is 
no representation for the west 
and south campuses. 

Why should the main campus 
with an 8,000 student body have 
aone-third representation, while 
the north campus with a little 
over one thousand enrollment 
receives the other two-thirds? 
And two campuses have no 



voice in the matter at all! 

What method was used to 
make such a selection? 

We have no quarrel with any 
of the chosen teachers. They are 
competent and in good standing 
in the community. These 
questions bear no reflection of 
any sort toward them. 

But, we are a community 
college, serving the entire 
county. We also are a state 
institution. A strong prospective 
candidate and two-thirds of the 
Screening Committee come 
from the same source, the 
smaller north campus. 

Earl Hicks and Glen Marstell- 
er, third and fourth on the staff 
nomination listing, were by- 
passed in order to give the north 
campus a majority vote on the 
committee. 

Since the committee is a 
teacher's group, why was not 
the staff nominations accepted 
as such, rather than using a hit 



and miss basis? 

We have a serious responsi- 
bility to taxpayers who provide 
our state sources of revenue. 
We owe it to them to act in an 
open, above-board manner. 
Even a slight resemblance of 
chicanery will damage our 
public image. 

The community and the 
student body expect the Board 
of Trustees and the Screening 
Committee to conduct a 
thorough, unbiased search and 
examination of the applicants 
for this important position. We 
expect them to select the cream 
of the crop as our future 
president. The future of JC 
depends on how carefully and 
competently the choice is made. 

The best interests of JC 
should come first and last in 
matters of this sort. The choice 
that is made will affect this 
college for many years to come. 
Choose wisely and well. 



( fetters } 

Former Pacer Wants Track 

Dear Editor, 

As a former member of the JC cross-country team , I agree that we 
need a track team here. 

Back in 1973 - the first year of the JC cross-country teams - the 
members of that team which included myself tried to form a track 
club only to get the school runaround. 

So what I have to say is we need to push this school for a track 
team, or even a track club. I'm willing to help - and I hope you, the 
students and staff, will help also , Lets get track ! 

Christopher M. Wagner 

Don't Unload Post Estate 

Dear Editor, 

1 think it would be a crying shame for the U.S. government to 
unload Mar-a-Lago, Palm Beach estate of the late Marjorie 
Merriweather Post. She gave it to us. Now lets use it! 

Undoubtedly, it is an art' institution of great historical 
significance, and we are the only ones that can afford to keep it up. 

We send billions of aid across the seas so foreign countries can 
maintain themselves. Yet, we don't consider the fact that charity 
begins at home. 

Sincerely, 
Jeannette Banning 



6 - BEACHCOMBER Dec. 6,1976 



'// 



m 



Dec. 6,1976 BEACHCOMBER -7 










- — ^V i / — -^ 



Love Confest Entrants Passionate ! 




By Don Vaughan 
Venture Columnist 

After wading through torrents and torrents of letts;jl and 
keeping you on the edge of your seat in bated anticipation 'have 
finally found a winner for my now infamous "Love Letter" a |est! 

First, though, I want to thank the multitudes that enfc 
seven of you), and to those of you that didn't enter, you'rt* 
than I thought. 

I know I asked for nice, juicy, passionate letters, but so| Jf the 
entrants border on diabetic. Kim Day, for instance, infe 
that, "I wrote this just to tell you how much I love you! 
lived without you this long I'll never know. Just at the mi 
your name 1 faint with passion. Darling Donnie, I needyo ; 
you, I'LL HAVE YOU!!!" 
Sounds nice to me, Kim. How about tomorrow? 



•4 (all 
carter 



is me 

vl've 
ion of 
" want 



•i «t» i. i. » ^i«*»Ni««tSa.'ite*»% <& 



Mrs. Emily Sinclair, mother of JC freshman Heatheri: iclair, 
maternally writes me that, "... you are my moon - my sr, » - my 
everything and the times we are not together are as a bits pit of 
dispair." 

In closing, she writes with mother-like style that, "Oaf; may 
have needed a jug of wine and a loaf of bread, but il h the 
incomparable you at my side, I would need nothing else. Ycb re my 
all!" My only problem now is trying to keep Mr. Sine* ' from 
reading this! I think I hear footsteps. behind me . . . 

Other entrants attempted to obtain lunch by playing n my 
vanity. A clever ploy, girls, but flattery will get you ev 
Lynne Humphery and Aleta Williams, in a great grandst 
gain not one, but two lunches at the fast food joint of thei 
wrote to tell me that my body is" ... a monument of pe: 
tribute to the gods of Olympus . . . your eyes are as dee 
limpid pools. I long to see for myself the flame of passion thib urns 
in the heart of your soul," I ought to take you both omtst on 
general principals, but trie Beachcomber budget (Sl.Sajit last 
count) just won't handle it. Maybe next contest. f 

Buttering a person up is one thing, but one letter I receidj made 
me feel like saying "Parkay" everytime I tip my hat! Sign | * * Pink 
with Passion", it took me weeks to find out that the author t| t none 
other than the ever-popular Terri Anderson, who can be s* i daily 
in the library sleeping behind the non-fiction. '{ 

Terri starts out small with, "First I'd like to say that sin ] fou've 
been writing a column in the Beachcomber, I haven't rj.ed an 
issue ..." and goes on to bigger and better things with ' j . . and 
your undaunted humor and dashing wit first attracted me tj >u . . . 
and I've dreamed of walking up to you and saying outW^^Don 



^^wW^tW^*^^t^pp^* 



Vaughan, would you go out with me?' and you'd accept and we'd 
walk off into the sunset together." 

After that she tried the guilty approach "... almost everyday I 
come and gaze in the window of the Beachcomber at you while you 
go about your daily activities. (Ed. Note: What daily activities?) 
Sometimes you see me, but never pay much attention and go back to 
work." 

Sorry, Terri, but since I cant take you out to lunch, perhaps we 
can work something out with the cross-country team. 

One other letter I received attempted to blackmail me, but it can 
never be said that Vaughan has a skeleton in his closet. Lots of dirty 
laundry, perhaps, but never a skeleton. Good, old Rebecca Castle, 
of "Deadwood Dick" fame, wrote to remind me of the time "... I 
walked by your house and you jumped from behind some bushes in 
that darling trench coat. You said you had something to show me, 
but when that patrol car cruised by you ran off and we've never had 
a chance to talk again. I'll admit you've called me a few times since, 
but you were always breathing so heavily I could never understand 
you." 

Then she, too, tried the guilty approach. "Please, Don, don't 
make me suffer the pain of unrequited love. You know where I live . 
. . and I'm anxiously awaiting your answer." 

Rebecca, it was a difficult decision, but I think you will agree that 
the winning letter deserves lunch more than any of the other 
entrants. But I will meet you in the parking lot immediately 
following this column! 

Here it is, Reader, the winner of the "Write Don a Love Letter" 
contest. Simple, yet direct, the sincerity with which this letter was 
written would make even Eric Segal say he was sorry. 

Written by Terri Anderson's younger sister Bernadette, 1 knew 
this letter was a winner when I saw it. So here it is, Reader, you be 
the judge. 
Dear Don, 

First of all, I would like to say that I think you're nice. Secondly, I 
would like to say that I think you're really funny. I haven't known 
you very long, but I would like you to know that I have a terrible 
crush on you! When you call to talk to my sister on the phone, my 
heart throbs! When you say obscene things to me on the phone and 
call me "Little Bernadette" I blush with love! When you ask my 
sister about the tooth I lost and she can't find it, it's because I've 
put it in a special box and keep it under my pillow because you 
touched it! 

This may not sound like a really good letter, but perhaps it's 
bdcause I'm only eleven and in puppy love. 



I like you a lot, (signed) Bernadette Anderson. 

Well, Little Bernadette, I think it's a great letter. And because 
I'm a firm believer in juvenile decency and keeping kids off the 
streets, you can go to lunch with me at the fast food restaurant of 
your choice! Just give.your sister the date for me and we'll workout 
the details. ■ , 

There you have it, Reader, the exciting result of what has to be the 
dumbest contest we've ever held. All the letters are available for 
your inspection in the Beachcomber office. 

In closing, I'd like to wish you all a very Merry Christmas and a 
Happy New Year. Be careful and I'll see most of you next term. 



"When words hold 
no expression 
adequate, weep." 
— Malcolm. 



OH^ZN: 




j'VELCSJ Tc A HEREON UP i 
\ 



) 





TOUTS*.;, 7 = 



Christmas Gifts Can Lift The Saints, 
Dispose Of Junk, And Supply Revenge ! 



By Frank Smith 
Venture Editor 

Christmas is a good time to be nice to people you 
love, however, it's also your best chance to be vicious to 
someone you don't love. 

I am amazingly pleased to know that on Christmas 
morning the girl who dropped me in October will open 
her presents Christmas morning and find a padded bra 
and a copy of the Mark Eden bust development course. 

Just as pleasing is the fact that the "blonde" waif 
who dropped me in November will receive a bottle of 
hair coloring so that gentlemen will prefer her next year 

too. " 

The girl who dropped me in early December will be 
happy to find a ticket to "Chorus Line' ' in her stocking. 

But then.so will the wino who got the ticket for the 
seat next to her. 

Girls are not my only enemies, however. I sent a 
"Handbook for Teachers" to three instructors who 
weren 't up to standards. 

I sent an acquaintance of mine, a weak individual, 14 
tickets to Space Mountain (he hasn't been well since). 
This year I'm only sending him one ticket, one-way to 
Toronto. 

These were fine for visciousness but sometimes it 
pays to be practical. 

Sending a cork to a submarine commander would fit 
in this category. Same with Band- Aids and Iodine for a 
masochist, if you know a masochist. If you know a 
sadist, send the masochist. 

Yes, these are practical gifts. But there are other 
reasons for sending Christmas presents. Two in this 
category would be lust and egotism. 

Let's consider lust. Want to see more of your 
girlfriend? Send her a low-cut gown or a bathing suit 
(although with a bathing suit you might have to wait til 
summer to see it, and you know sublimation of desire is 
bad for you!) 



What about egotism? Just think how great you'll feel 
when you suddenly become a smashing tennis player. 
All you have to do is buy your best friend a tennis 
racket, a bad one. 

But the best thing about Christmas is that you don't 
have to be practical. This provides a marvelous way to 
allieviate yourself of all kinds of worthless junk. 

Got an old mooses head, smelly, mounted and 
framed? Put a red ribbon on it, it's a present! 

That old kayak that needs new canvas? A great 
present for the "boy scout" nephew! 

Shucks! If you're tired of your cat, box him up, ship 
him out! 

Yes, Christmas is a wonderful time. Still, there is 
really just one real reason to send gifts and that is to 
show affection. 

Never let it be said that the Venture Editor did not 
help the cause of romance. 

Dear ...-....., 

The key that is in this envelope belongs to the Porshe 
which will arrive at your houe tomorrow at 4 p.m. I 
know this is a surprise because I haven't written you 
lately, but I have been busy working at the Philcove 
Pharmaceutical company. They've decided to use my 
formula three replacement for aspirin, (the residuals 
have been amazing). Hopefully, this will help, in some 
small way, to make up to you times when I could not 
give as much as I wanted. Drive in good health and I'll 
see you in the summer. 

Best wishes, 



The above is a letter that you can send to that special 
girl who is far away from you, but who holds a special 
place in your heart. 

Of course, we know that you can't afford a Porshe, 
but she doesn't. In January you send this letter. 

Dear 

You have no idea how disappointed I was to hear that 



your car fell off the transport train in Miami. I would 
have sent a replacement but finances dictate that wait 
until the funds are available. If Philco hadn't decided 
that aspirin was cheaper I could have made it up to you 
by now. Perhaps this summer. I have an idea on how I 
can reduce the cost of processing my formula. What the 
heck! Hope you had a good Christmas despite this 
disturbing turn-about. 

Affectionately yours, 



IcVhen the summer rolls around show up with a story 
J disappointing events in the Pharmacy business. 
H 2*11 be understanding. 

1 [fie final gift is one you can give to me. If you know 
ll/one in the newspaper business, tell them you have 
if covered a sneaky, devious and imaginative writer. 

^*me t*»trld use the job to pay for the Porshe Sue expects 
M - to bring over. It seems the mail lost my second 
t ter last year'. 






» - 





E fc -.A O . k k J" I ■ _ - 



. *<V?' 






photo by Emily Hamer 



In Dark 
Reflection 



By Frank Smith 
Venture Editor 

There is no relationship between the 
cost of nuclear warheads and the lack of 
a cure for cancer. 

There is no relationship between the 
quality of television and the fact that it 
appeals to the masses. 

There is no relationship between 
universal loneliness and the brother- 
hood of man. 

Illiteracy and elementary teachers are 
not related. 

There is no truth to those statements. 

Beautiful people are just like ugly 
people. Aren't they? Ask an ugly person 
to kiss you. 

People say that when you die you'll 
go to heaven or, when you die you are 
reincarnated or, when you die you attain 
a higher plane or, when you die there is 
nothing or, something else. 

Religion is one of the many things in 
this world that I do not understand, but 
there are others. 

I cannot comprehend how a drunken 
driver can kill families and be smiling at 
a bar two months later, his keys 
jangling in his pocket. 

How children are allowed to live and 
grow with the violence that is available 
to them. 

Surprisingly, and sadly, -I'm 
beginning to understand the logic of 
wars. 

I understand, and can even 
' appreciate reasons for suicide. 

And, though I cannot read minds, I 
know that because you are reading this 
your feelings must approximate those 
which I have while writing. 

And now that we understand each 
other, Merry Christmas. 



«ITlllWllB»liiaiWHMnilMIM««ianil«lll«MIIMIllM>IBPi« 



8 - BEACHCOMBER Dec. 6,1976 

Bookstore To Buy 
Old Student Books 

As they have done in the past, the campus bookstore is 
purchasing used books from students Dec. 8-10 and 13-14. 

However, due to a large inventory on hand after the Fall buying 
period and new editions from the publisher, the bookstore is limited 
in the number of texts they can buy. 

A used book buyer from the Nebraska Book Company is 
scheduled to be here on Dec. 9, 10 and 13 only. He will buy some of 
the textbooks that the bookstore cannot purchase. 

Posted in the lobby of the bookstore is a list of books that they will 
purchase. 

Legislative Hearing 

Continued from Page 1 

The administration offered an increase in salary if the faculty 
would accept the ranking. 

But Gerry Bagels from the Florida Education Association 
reasoned, "Why in the world would anyone accept $446 for all of 
those benefits that we already have?" 

Other economic topics discussed were the 196-day contract, 
overload and substitute payment, and insurance benefits. 

Conducting Union business on campus and sick leave issues 
ended the hearing. The Union wanted two more days added on to 
the two days they already have for sick leave. 

The administration said this would cost the college $32,000. 
Marstellar added that would only happen if everyone took every day 
they were allowed, then later said that even if that happened it 
would not cost that much. 

Bagels said in behalf of the Union that they had the same right to 
conduct Unjon business as any other college business did. 

Either way the board decides, the negotiations between the 
administration and Faculty Union are finally over after more than a 
year. If negotiations go on, it will be between the Faculity Union 
and the Board 



Dec. 6,1976 BEACHCOMBER -9 




photoby Denny Glavin 

FREEDOM SHRINE REDEDICATION- Dr. Samuel Bottosto, Social 
Science chairman participating in the rededication of the Exchange 
club JC Freedom Shrine. 



Classifieds 



For Sales 1965 Ford Ranchero, 
excellent shape. For information 
during the day 842-3551 and 
ask for Ed Mazzola. At night call 
684-0884. 

God has a Wonderful Plan for 
your life. Interested? Call 
844-1212. 

Professional typist. Twenty 
years experience, all manual. 
School papers. Mrs. G. Gast, 
phone 276-0121. 

Wanted: Hammond M-3 organ 
or equivalent. Please see Albie, 
Apt. 207, Topper House Apts. 
Across from JC. 

Gnitar-For Sale, six string 
combo guitar including case and 
strap, only $55. Call Jane at 
655-9459. 

Graduating this term. Must sell 
all my furniture. Cheap! Bed, 
dressers, table, chair, etc. Call 
Jay, 965-7198, anytime, day or 

night. 

Five piece drum set. Excellent 
condition, must sell. Call after 
five p.m., 582-1823. Ask for 
Greg. 

Deluxe weight bench and foot 
press (new). $65 asking $50. 



Call 5881-1514 early morning or 
evening. 

Panasonic eight-track car stereo 
with A/C adaptor for home use. 
One pair Craig speakers. 
Excellent condition. Must sell 
all or separate. Call after 5 p.m. 
585-1823. Ask for Greg. 

Male or female roommate 
needed - To share two bedroom, 
one and a half bath, apartment 
with male. Your own bedroom 
and bathroom. Pool, sauna, 
tennia. Two miles from JC. 
689-0700. 

M-F, 9:30-5:30 $112 plus 
one-half utilities. 

Great Christmas Gifts: For the 

car, Lear-Jet AM-FM stereo 8 
track, super nice, for only $65. 
Also orange and white sailboat 
with a new orange and yellow 
sail, $150 or make offer. 
Call 965-3088. 

For Sales 1967 WV good 
condition, New inspection 
sticker, $400. Leslie Byrnes, 
965-5425, after 4:00. 
Will babysit at your home or 
mine. Evenings, weekends and 



all day Tuesdays and Thursdays 
Call Edina, 833-5739. 
For Sale: Mahogany Mediterr- 
anean coffee table, $35; walnut 
cane table lamp, 30" high, $20; 
Mediterranean wall clock with 
matching candle holders, $15. 
Call Edina 8133-5739. 
For sale: '69 Auto stickshift 
bug. Good condition, needs 
transmission work, $350. Also 
55 gal. aquarium, $50. Two 14" 
Chrome rims, $20. Wanted: 
case for Flying V bass. 
272-3216 after 5:00. 
Lost: Silver coin ring with two 
coins on top, last Wednesday. 
Reward offered, call 588-1405, 
mornings. 

Wanted- Experienced sign 
painter for a possible one time 
job. Contact Dennis Glavin, or 
David Taylor in the Beachcomb- 
er office. 

Golf Clubs, men's, Ben Hogan, 
four woods, eight irons, $60. 
Call 965-8352 after 6 pirn. 

For Sale: Quarter horse gelding, 
7 yrs. old, pleasure riding, good 
disposition, $400. 582-7039 after 
7, 689-4900, 11 to 6, ask for 
Hershey. 



For Sale: '67 VW Van, 
engine, trans needs work 



good 
$300. 

582-7039 after 7, 689-4900, 11 to 

6, ask for Hershey. 



1971 Vega - Runs fine, AM/FM, 
8 track. New brakes and tuneup, 
incl. valve job. $495. Call 
964-6598. 

Graduating this term. Must sell 
all my furniture. Bed, dresser, 
etc. Cheap. Call Jat at 965-7198. 

Will sell below cost or best 
offer, still in warranty. Excellent 
condition. Elmo ST 1200 
magnetic optical, sound super 8 
projector with carrying case, 
microphone and 1200 ft. reel 
plus film. Phone 968-9562, ask 
for Fred. Call in morning or 
evening. 

Will sell below cost. Bogen 
stereo turn table with bass and 
Kenwood 4-Channel decoda 
amplifier solid state. Phone 
968-9562 ask for Fred. Call in 
'morning or evening. 
1 need a ride to New York at the 
end of this term. Will share 
expenses. Call Jay at 965-7198, 
anytime day or night. 



Yingerln Louisiana For Press Film Review 



Seeing himself on the giant 
screen being interviewed by 
William Shatner of Star Trek at 
the premiere of the document- 
ary, Mysteries of the Gods, last 
weekend was the exciting 
experience of a Palm Beach 
Junior College Social Science 
instructor last weekend. 

Shatner's discussion with Dr. 
Richard E. Yinger was filmed 
earlier this fall at the Kennedy 
Space Center at Cape Canaveral 



"I was pleased with the wajr 
they handled the documentary; 
they didn't tamper with 
anything I said, "Yinger 
commented. 

Yinger was in Louisiana Nov.. 
17-21 for press, radio, and 
television interviews about the: 
film, which is based on the Eric: 
von Daniken book, Miracles of 
the Bods. 

In the documentary Shatner 
looks into the mysterious places 
and objects left behind by 



ancient civilizations, and speaks 
with scientists and laymen who 
give their views on the 
interesting finds. 

"The theatre at Baton Rouge 
was filled to overflowing," 
Yinger said. 

"They had to turn 200 people 
away." 

Yinger, who introduced the 
term Exosociology in 1974 - 
defined as the sociological 
investigation into the possibilit- 
ies of extraterrestrial life and its 



implications on earth - looks 
back on this past year with 
amazement. 

It started with a January story 
about him in The National 
Enquirer, and the February 
appearance of astronomer and 
UFO expert, Dr. J. Allen Hynek 
at Yinger's Exosociology Semin- 
ar, and resulted in interviews 
with newspapers in this country 
and abroad, throughout the rest 
of the year. 



WPBClub 
Rededicates 

JC Shrine 

Members of the South West 
Palm Beach Exchange Club 
rededicated the Freedom Shrine 
they originally presented to 
Palm Beach Junior College in 
the early 60's, according to Dr. 
Samuel Bottosto, chairman of 
the JC social science depart- 
ment. 

Albert L. Ross, president of 
the organization, presented the 
college with a Bicentennial 
Rededication Plaque in the 
social science building. 

Neil Brabham, chairman of 
the Freedom Shrine Committee 
of the club, and other members 
accompanied Ross. 

The Freedom shrine - copies 
of 28 American historical 
documents - is displayed in the 
social science buiding. 



Campus 
Combings 



Basic grant recipients who have 
been pre-scheduled for winter 
term must bring their computer 
printed class schedule to the 
Financial Aid Office before 3:00 
p.m., Dec. 14. 

Representatives of the Wo- 
r wm*m$m -*ta*»*w««a*«i« r »*(f est"" 
Palm Beach will be hoi'ts 
Monday, Dec. 6 from9 a.m. to 2 
p.m. at the PBJC Lucy Booth 
Mona Needle, administrator, 
and Candice Ryan, counselor, 
will answer questions and hand 
out brochures about the center - 
located in Forum III, Palm 
Beach Lakes Boulevard - to 
interested students. 
Basic Grant Recipients who will 
be TRANSFERRING to another 
college or university in January 
must call the Basic Grant Center 
(1-800-553-6350) to request a 
duplicate Student Eligibility 
Report (SER). The SER must be 
presented to. the school you will 
attend in January 1977. 
The Office of the Evening 
Registrar will be closed during 
evening hours (6:00-9:30 p.m.) 
on the following dates: 
December 20-22, open 8:00 
a.m.-4:00 p.m. only; Dec. 23-24, 
Christmas Holidays (days and 
evenings); Dec. 27-29, open 
8:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m. and Dec. 
30-31, New Year's Holidays, 
(days and evenings) 
Notice to students: Dean 
Elizabeth Davey reports there 
has been a rash of book thefts. 
Students should be careful as to 
where they leave their books. 



In addition, he was invited to 
present a paper on Exosociology 
during a Roundtable Discussion 
at the American Sociological 
Association meeting in New 
York in September. 

The documentary, produced 
by Hemisphere Pictures, and 
directed by Charles Romine 
(who directed Edward R. 
Murrow's shows at CBS) is 
scheduled for the Palm Beach 
County area in January, Yinger 
said. 

"It's G-rated, and should 
prove interesting to people of all 
ages,' he added. 



f 



-C 



.J^IjS&C 



Home Game Tomorrow 



Basketball Team Runnersup At Hillsborough 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

Most teams with a record of 
1-3 start to panic, but there is no 
reason for the basketball team 
to do so. The Pacers, who placed 
second in the Hillsborough 
Thanksgiving Tournament in 
Tampa, have put on a fine show 
in a losing effort. 

After dropping heartbreakers 
to Florida College, Nov. 19, 
81-83, and to Manatee, Nov. 20, 
98-99, the team defeated 
Hillsborough in the tournament 
opener Nov. 26, 94-87. They lost 
the championship game the next 
night, 73-84, to Lake City. 

Hot shooting by forward Bill 
Buchanan got the team off to an 
early lead in the Hillsborough 
game, but the two-pronged 
Hawk attack of Paul Messina 
and Foster Thomas led 



Hillsborough to a 45-38 halftime 
advantage. 

After the half, reserve center 
Greg Ringo got hot and the 
Hawks took a 74-60 lead with 
only 6:30 left in the game. 

Then, off the bench for the 
Pacers, came forward Dennis 
Mobley. Mobley, a transfer 
from Palm Beach Atlantic, hit 
five field goals for 10 points and 
put the Pacers back into 
contention. 

The Pacer defense also turned 
tough, causing turnovers and 
bad shots. The Pacers pulled to 
within one point at 77-76 and 
Mike Shoemaker hit a short 
jumper to give JC a lead they 
never relinquished. 

Six Pacers scored in double 
figures. Shoemaker accounted 
for 19 points followed by 
Buchcanan, 14, and Mike 
Bennett, 12. Mobley, Shack 



Leonard, and Derrick Paul 
scored 10 points each. 

Adrian Williams had seven 
rebounds as did Paul to lead the 
Pacers under the basket. 
Bennett had six assists and 
Leonard five. 

The next night the JC five 
took on the nationally-ranked 
Lake City Timberwolves in the 
championship game. Lake City 
was led by All-American 
candidate, Ron Anthony and 
7'1" Australian Olympian, 
Andy Campbell. 

The Pacers took a quick lead 
by taking the ball right to Lake 
City. They led 15-10 after Larry 
Dolan tapped in a missed jump 
shot. 

Poor first-half foul shooting 
and Anthony's 20 points, 
however, took the Timberwolves 
to a 49-39 lead. 

"We took five straight bad 



shots and they took them right 
back and converted them "into 
points," said basketball coach, 
Joe Ceravolo. 

The second half saw the game 
decided at the foul line. Lake 
City took 21 shots to the Pacers 
four. They hit on 15 to the 
Pacers four. That ended up to be 
the margin of victory as they 
beat the Pacers 84-73. 

Key to the loss was the play of 
Lake City guard Mike Gorman 
who ended up leading the 
Timberwolves with 27 points. 
His penetration powered the 
Lake City offense. 

Ceravolo said he did not like 
the officiating but did not blame 
the officials for the loss. 

"Anytime you leave home, 
you have to expect the 
officiating to change," he 
stated. 



"Had we shot better, we 
would have won. That's what 
did us in." 

Shoemaker again led the 
Pacers with 27 points, 17 
coming in the second half when 
Lake City's lead was cut to six at 
75-69, Shoemaker was named to 
the All-Tournament ream. 



Bruce Hlatky, had nine points 
and Williams eight. 

Anthony was held to six 
points in the second half, but 
had 26 for the game. He took 
advantage of the new dunk rule, 
keeping the crowd excited with 
four "jams." 

Campbell was held to four 
points by the tandem of Steve 
Kearney and Dolan. 

Tomorrow the Pacers play the 
Biscayne JV in the gym at 7:30 
p.m. 




Women Golfers 3rd In Lady Pacer Tourney 



By Jeannette Banning 
Staff Writer 

The women's golf team ended 
the fall season by finishing third 
with a 355-342-697 in the junior 
college - smallcollege division 
of the Lady Pacer Invitational 

University of South Florida 
received the first place trophy in 
the senior college division in the 
Nov. 22-23 tournament with 
326-311-637. Florida Interna- 



tional placed second, 317-328- 
645 and University of Miami 
took third, 33 >-324-660. 

Dade North won the junior 
college - small college division 
with 346-325-671. Second place 
Broward Central had 342-333- 
675 and FAU came in last with 
392-377-769. 

Low medalist was Mary 
Hafeman of South Florida with 
77-77-154. Parti Prentiss, 83-82- 



165, was low scorer for the 
Pacers. 

Golf Coach Joe Sanculius 
stated golf cannot be predicted 
when Kelley Spooner shot a 
100-96-196. Spooner had qualifi- 
ed with 41-40-81 for 18 holes on 
the same course. 

Ann Ranta scored 83-82-165, 
Liz Aris shot 90-94-184, and Sue 
Holden had a 93-84-177. 

Sanculius mentioned fresh 



sand had been placed in the 
traps since the qualifying 
rounds which made it difficult to 
play. He said it takes two or thre 
weeks for the sand to pack. 

"Wind, pin placement and 
new sand played havoc on their 
game. All the teams had 
difficulty," said Sanculius. 

In other golf news, Broward 
Central beat JC 160-166 in a 
best-four, nine-hole match held 



at LaMancha Country Club in 
Royal Palm Beach on Nov. 19th. 

Cindy Young of Broward was 
low medalist with 36. Ranta was 
JC's low scorer with 38. Other 
Pacer scores were Prentiss 41, 
Holden 43, Aris 44 and Spooner 
45. 

Rollins Invitational Tourna- 
ment in Orlando on Feb. 21-23 is 
the first scheduled competition 
for the winter term. 




Setting Up Major Tournament 
No Easy Task For Go/f Coach 



t&^u _ 

photo by Barry Van Wagner 
LADY PACER INVITATIONAL-Liz Aris was one of the Pacer 
golfers that competed in the Lady Pacer Invitational Golf 
Tournament hosted by JC. 



Whenever one of JC's sports hosts a 
tournament, a lot of work and planning go into it. 
Golf coach Joe Sanculius can testify to this, as he 
recently set up the Lady Pacer Invitational. 

Sanculius had less time than usual to organize 
the women's golf tournament, since he decided to 
host it only after another college cancelled its 
tournament for £hat date, . 

The first thing he did was to find a hotel for the 
other teams' to stay. The" criteria were reasonable 
rates and closeness to both the turnpike and the 
golf course. He settled on a Holiday Inn and 
consulted the reservation manager to try to get the 
best rates possible- The coaches of entered teams 
were sent this information, so they could make 
reservations. 

Selecting a golf course came next. La Mancha in 
Royal Palm Beach was chosen. Since a tournament 
must be run with a minimum of disruption to the 
regular paying golfers, the rounds were started at 
8:30 in the morning before most paying customers 
arrived. 

If paying golfers do -arrive, they are sent to start 
on the back nine holes. By the time they finish with 
them, the tournament players have finished the 
front nine and the paying golfers can play those 
holes along with any new arrivals. In the 
meantime, tournament players finish their round 
and leave the course. before it becomes crowded. 

"We try to keep interference with fee-paying 
golfers to a minimum," said Sanculius. 

Before the tournament, Sanculius put together a 
pamphlet for each team with names of students 
and their positions, scorecards, rule sheets and 
first-day pairings of players. He also assigned the 




Steve Farns worth 
Sports Columnist 



coaches of the other teams to scoring, rules and 
second-day pairing committees. 

The problems of awards are taken care of by 
Athletic director Howard Reynolds. Sanculius tells 
him- the number and the kind of trophies and 
awards he wants and Reynolds gets them for him. 

The work of running the tournament, according 
to Sanculius, doesn't infringe on his coaching 
duties. 



"The girls know what to do when they reach the 
course," he stated, "Sometimes it's good if I'm 
not with them since it makes them less nervous." 

The last thing he does, after the tournament is 
over, is to make up a result sheet and mail it to the 
coaches of the entered teams and Golf Digest. 

Sanculius summed it all up by saying,- "A 
tournament is a lot of work, but with the 
cooperation we get from everyone and the. 
organization of committees, the work's cut to" 
minimum because everyone works together." 



mmBasassBSBtB 



mmems^umssm 



mntmTmmwmin 



10 - BEACHCOMBER Dec. 6,1976 



Dec. 6,1976 BEACHCOMBER -11 



Five Teams Vie For College Football Championship 



By Jim Goodman 
Staff Writer 

College football's regular 
season has come to an end, and 
as usual, the question of who's 
number one remains unanswer- 
ed. 

Both the AP and UPI polls 
have Pitt ranked as number one. 
The validity of that ranking 
must be questioned, though. 

Pitt's schedule leaves much to 
be desired. It's played only two 
teams with winning records: 
Notre Dame and Penn St. Only 
Notre Dame was top-quality 
competition. Notre Dame act- 
ually outgained Pitt in total 
yardage when they played. 

This is not to detract from 
Pitt's fine performance against 
Notre Dame. It was a great 
victory. But, should one game 
springboard Pitt into the 
national championship? 

Pitt is not the only team that 
can be singled out for having a 
cakewalk schedule. Of the top 
five teams in the nation - Pitt, 
Michigan, Maryland, Southern 
Cal and Georgia - only the latter 
two had schedules that would 
test them. 

Southern Cal lost one of those 
tests to a tough Missouri squad, 
46-25. 

They've won 10 straight since 
then, including season ending 
victories over arch-rivals UCLA 
and Notre Dame. 

Georgia won its key battles 
with Alabama and Florida by 
scores of 21-0 and 41-27. They 
were upset by Mississippi and 
had to struggle to get by 
Georgia Tech. 

Georgia is a hardened team 
that's benefited from a tough 
schedule. They should give Pitt 
their toughest test of the season 
in the Sugar Bowl. 



Basketball 




Box Scores 




PLAYER 


FG 


FT 


TP 


Shoemaker 


8 


3-5 


19 


Buchanan 


6 


2-2 


14 


Williams 


3 


1-2 


1 


Jamison 


2 


0-1 


4 


Leonard 


4 


2-2 


10 


Bennett 


5 


2-3 


12 


Hlatky 


1 


2-2 


4 


Mobley 


5 


0-0 


10 


Paul 


5 


0-0 


10 


Wethersbee 


2 


04 


4 


Team 


41 


12-17 


94 


HILLSBOROUGH 






PLAYER 


FG 


FT 


TP 


Ringo 


5 


3-4 


13 


Thomas 


9 


2-5 


20 


Garland 


2 


0-0 


4 


Messina 


9 


7-9 


25 


Flack 


4 


4-7 


12 


McRae 


b 


5-6 


15 


Team 


34 


21-31 


87 


PALM BEACH 








PLAYER 


FG 


FT 


TP 


Shoemaker 
Buchanan 
Bennett 
Williams 


11 
3 
2 
3 


5-5 
0-2 
1-2 
2-2 


27 

6 

5 
8 


Leonard 


2 


1-2 


5 


Hlatky 

Paul 

Jamison 

Mobley 

Kearney 

Dolan 

Wethersbee 


4 
1 



2 
1 



1-1 
0-1 
1-2 
1-2 
1-2 
0-0 
2-2 


9 
1 
1 
1 
5 
2 
2 


Team 


29 


15-23 


73 


LAKE CITY 








PLAYER 


FG 


FT 


TP 


Newnam 


4 


1-2 


9 


Gorman 


8 


11-17 


27 


Hewitt 


4 


1-4 


9 


Mitchell 





4-4 


4 


Johnson 


2 


0-1 


5 


Anthony 


12 


2-2 


26 


Campbell 


1 


2-3 


4 



Probably the best team in the 
nation is Michigan. The Wolver- 
ines breezed through their first 
eight games without a chall- 
enge. Their coach said that he 
wanted his team to have a close 
game, so they would know how 
to struggle for a win and 
prepare themselves for the Ohio 
St. game. 

Purdue not only gave the 
Wolverines a struggle but they 
also gave them their first loss. It 
probably helped them in the 
long run. After a scoreless first 
half against Ohio State, 
Michigan regrouped and com- 
pletely dominated the second 
half for a 22-0 win. 

Michigan, like Pitt, has only 
had one victory over a quality 
team. So the Wolverines still 
have to prove just how good 
they are. They'll get their 
chance in the Rose Bowl. 

Maryland has played a weak 
schedule, but actually has as 
much claim to the number one 
ranking as Pitt. 

Pitt and Maryland have three 
common opponents: Syracuse, 
West Virginia and Duke. Pitt 
defeated those teams by close 
scores of 23-13, 24-16 and 44-31. 
Maryland won by scores on 
42-28, 24-3 and 30-3. 

Pitt's average margin of 
victory in those three games was 
just over ten points. Maryland's 
average was over 20 points. 

The latest UPI poll shows that 
Pitt has played only one team 
ranked in the top 20. That team 
is Notre Dame, ranked 13th. 

Michigan has played 10th- 
ranked Ohio State. Southern Cal 
has played two top 20 teams, 
Notre Dame, 13th and UCLA, 
6th. Georgia has played Florida, 
20th, and Alabama, 18th. 
Maryland has played no 



teams in the top twenty. 

Georgia has played five teams 
with a winning record. Southern 
Cal and Maryland have played 
four. Michigan played three and 
Pitt, of course, only two. 

All five teams have something 
to boast. Pitt has Heisman 
Trophy winner, Tony Dorsett. 
Michigan has the best rushing 
offense in the nation. Southern 
Cal has the best overall offense. 



Maryland has their perfect 
record and a great defense. 
Georgia played the toughest 
schedule. 

Of course, other teams such 
as Houston and Texas Tech feel 
that they have the best team in 
the nation but only three teams 
have a chance for the national 
championship. 

If Pitt wins the Sugar Bowl 
they have the championship 



locked up. Should they fall to 
Georgia, then the Michigan- 
Southern Cal - Rose Bowl 
winner would claim the 
championship. 

One thing is certain. No 
matter who ends up number 
one, there will be football buffs 
arguing about it until the 
beginning of the next season. 
Then it will start all over again. 



TurkeyTrot 



A mother-daughter combina- 
tion and a pair of Smiths took 
top honors in the intramural 
TurkeyTrot. 



Sunny Meyer won the 
women's faculty-staff division in 
the Nov. 23 event, while her 
daughter Melissa took first 




W 







mmm»^ 




mmmmv>* JjmM ^^^' 



Learn to Sail 










" ^ '■ ^£!S1 




Team 



31 22-34 



84 



photo by Steve Farnsworth 
SOLO SAILING AWARD- William Vivas is one of six people who 
gained certification to sail solo in intramural sailing. The others are: 
Tom Clark, Pat Koopmah, Ron Southard, Hugh Lambert and Fran 
Lavender. 



FUll's Volleyball Victors 

By Jeannette Banning 
Staff Writer 

The FU II's won first place in the intramural volleyball 
tournament beating SIU (Students for International Understanding) 
in an action-packed playoff. 

Fighting back after losing the first game of the match, the small 
but determined SIU scored a second game victory moving out to a 
commanding 13-point lead. The FU II's fought back to within four 
points but couldn't head off the final charge of SIU. 

In the third game, the FU II's turned the tables and moved to an 
11-pointlead scoring multiple points each time they had the serve. 
The FU II's seemed to have put it all together, using coordinated 
ball handling and spiking to win the game and the championship. 

"In the beginning, we were playing individual volleyball but in 
the end we were playing as a team," said Connie Holmes whose 
final serve won the game. 

Other members of the winning team were Bill Wood, Jerry 
Wildman, Linette Maraletto, Kitty Blizzard, Ray Elwood and Ernie 
Brasch. 

Team members of second place SIU's were Qaiser Toor, 
Nassrince Mohajeu, Chari Collins, Than Nguyen, Steve Barth, 
Genaro Jimenez, Sam Lu and Xavier Pino. 

Intramural Director Roy Bell said men's and women's volleyball 
will be played in the winter term instead of coed. 

Kazen Archery Champion 

Michael Kazen took first with 372 points and Robert Freeman 
placed second with 277 in the men's division of the Intramural 
Archery Tournament held Nov. 9 and Nov. 16. 

Terri Grahe won overall women's competition with 285 points. 
Grahe scored 122 for 30 yards, 87 for 40 yards and 76 for 50 yards. 

Kazen had 160, 105 and 107. Freeman's scores were 1181, 114 and 
45. 

Roy Bell, intramural director said the participants shot six ends of 
six arrows from each distance scoring the four highest ends. 

Scores were arrived at by giving nine points for hitting the bulls 
eye (gold) of the target, seven for hitting the red circle, five for the 
blue, three for the black and one for placing the arrow in the white 
of the target. No points were given if the archer missed the target. 




place among the women 
students. Frank Smith was first 
in the men's students and Sid 
Smith topped the men faculty- 
staff runners. 

The Turkey Trot was a 
30-minute duration run held on 
the jogging course. Frank Smith 
and several men students ran 
five laps of the one-mile course. 
All the other contestants ran 
lesser amounts of laps. 

Second through sixth places 
in the men's student division 
were, in order: Mike Gurklis, 
Charles Wilson, John Gagnon, 
Jerry Wi Idman and Tom Vavra. 

Diane Cates, Christine Rog- 
ers, Mildred Whatley, Jeannet- 
te Sanders and Alice Carlisle 
were second through sixth in the 
women's faculty -staff. 

In the women's student 
division, Roxanne Gillette was 
second, Valerie Valenti, third, 
and Robbin Krauch, fourth. 

Richard Gross was second in 
the men's faculty-staff while Al 
Fellner was third. 





7 TURKEY TROT WINNERS- Clockwise from upper right: Sid Smith, Sunny Meyer, Frank Smith and 
% Melissa Meyer. 



photos by Steve Farnsworth 




-SSI 

a 

' 4 



.P*£F~- 







U|I1IIII1UIIIU||UI 



imiiinigiBWMiMianiBiiiaiiiiiiiBiiaKiaiiiMiawMi 



12 ■ BEACHCOMBER Dec. 6,1976 



McCord Wins I & R Tennis Tournament 



"It was a very close match," 
stated Norman McCord after 
defeating Landale German 10-6, 
in the final round of the men's 
intramural double elimination 
tennis tournament. Going into 
the final round, each had one 
loss. 



McCord received a first place 
trophy with a 5-1 record and 
German finished second with 
5-2. James Gallagher came in 
third with 3-2. 

Robin Krauch, 6-0, admitted 
she was glad it was over after 



winning the first pjace trophy in 
the women's round robin and 
single's elimination tourna- 
ment. Wanda Peterson, 5-1, 
placed second and Peggy Egan, 
3-4, came in third. 

JEANNETTE BANNING 



Final Intramural 
Bowling Results 



FERST PLACE TEAM 



HIGH AVERAGE 



t t 






1 i i V- j , 


<■ ; - - f 




- «S . * A 


!\ ' '■ , 


, v i V< p *».-*• j 




-r . , 


lZt& *■ <»■-* *»**»* u " i 


R- -."..-•- 


?,«.- 




photo by Steve Farnsvworth 



photo by Bill Gullion 



TENNIS TOURNEY- Landale German [L] was the mnnerup in the intramural tennis tournament while 
Norman McCord [R] was the champion. 



MEN 


Dave Geene 


186 


CHARGERS 32-12 


Oscar Cash 


185 


Scott Kirkton 


Bill Atkins 


167 


Bruce Spears 






Brian Richards 


Kathy Wilk 


166 


Bill Atkins 


Jerri McConkey 


153 


, 


Kim Delong 


152 


WOMEN 






INLAWS 42-2 


HIGH SET 




Kelly Delong 






Kim Delong 


Oscar Cash 


615 


Lee Anne Pyfrin 


Dave Geene 


614 


Norma Pyfrin 


Scott Kirkton 


574 


LAST PLACE TEAM 








Sandy Rufoff 


541 


RAJA 0-44 


Norma Pyfrin 


540 




Lee Anne Pyfrin 


529 


Mark Graber 






Jay Weintraub 






Yogesh Patel 


HIGH GAME 




Paul Wong 








Kin Eng 


244 


CATHC-UPS 10-32 


Craig Sargent 


232 


Pattie Taylor 


Joe Lesko 


225 


Maria Telarroja 
Reina Ojeda 
Debby Rowell 


Jerri McConkey 
Lee Anne Pyfrin 
Sandy Rudoff 


213 
209 
202 



Fall Bowling 
Awards Given 



Trophies were awarded to 
intramural bowling winners and 
losers Wednesday night at a 
pizza party held at Sportsman's 
Inn on Military Trail. 

Kathy Wilk, intramural board 
member served as mistress of 
ceremony and presented troph- 
ies to men's and women's first 
and last place teams, high 
individuals, team games and 
sets. 

Intramural Director Roy Bell 
said bowling continues in 
January, but will be coed and is 
going to be held also at Major 
League Lanes in Lake Worth . 

JEANNETTE BANNING 




NOW OPEN 



&!*&. 




J&wtfeu 



"you ain't lived 

til! you try 

Lou's Cheddar 

Choose Soup" 



L 



(of Lou's Subs n' Soups) 

Featuring a wide variety 

I COUPON 1 , . , 

J FREE 45* CUP of j flffllT WW 

Li^Ill^irJ Sangria Mm 

3001 South Congress Ave. 
Palm Springs 
Across From St. Lukes 



Royal Arcades of Lake WorthjNc: 

TOWN & COUNTRY SHOPPING CENTER 
(Just Next to $1.00 Theater) 



j COUPON j 

I 

I STUDENTS!!! ' 




EXPIRES 12-19-76 | 

OPEN DAILY 11:00 TILL? 
ANTIQUE JUKEBOX - GAMES 

FAMILY AMUSEMENT CENTER 



Use 'Comber 
Classifieds 



FOR THE BEST 



ART SUPPLIES 

PICTURE FRAMING 

PRINTS 

LITHOS 



TRY 




582-1045 



Backpacker's General Store 

4443 SOUTHERN BLVD. 
PHONE: 689-HIKE!! 

ASK US ABOUT NAME BRANDS YOU 

KNOW & TRUST LIKE: 



CAMP TRAILS 


SVEA 


NORTH FACE 


OPTIMUS 


EUREKA 


SIGG 


VASQUE 


EFI 


WIGWAM 


GAZ 


SPORTIF 


WONDER 


SWISS SILVA 


AIRLIFT MOUNTAIN HOUSE 



STOP IN AND TALK SHOP WITH GLENN KINSEY 

ABOUT YOUR HIKING, BACKPACKING. 

CANOEING OR KAYAKING EXPERIENCES. 




SMILEY MOPED 




NOTHING $ *% A 94 PER 
DOWN! ^ Bfi MONTH 

CASH PRICE! *449PI«»: Fr.ight, Asumbly, Toi 

UP TO 180 MILES PER GALLON 
NO INSURANCE REQUIRED 
NO HELMET OR LICENSE 

NO SAFETY INSPECTION OR TAG 

On display at Stewart's Lake Park Toyota on US 1 in 
Lake Park across from the Twin City Mall. Call David 
Rhodes or Lee Miller at 844-3461 or come in for a 
demonstration. 

STEWART'S LAKE PARK TOYOTA 

1115 NORTH FEDERAL HWY., LAKE PARK, FLA 
(ACROSS FROM THE TWIN CITY MALL) FHORE 844-3461 

24 monthly payments; 18.16% APR, first payment 30 days from. date 
of sale, total deferred payment price is $598.56, with approved 
credit. 



fg0&S% 



-*Br ■ 



Screening committee meets today 



By Bill Johnson 
Associate Editor 

Nine members of the 
presidential committee are to 
meet today and inspect over 72 
applications for the office of 
President of JC. 

The committee was appointed 
to narrow the field of applicants 
so the board of trustees can 
decide on one to recommend to 



the state board of Education. 

"They are to present no more 
than 10 and no less than four 
applicants " for the board to 
choose from," according to Dr. 
Elisabeth Erling, executive 
secretary of the presidential 
screening committee. 

In addition to the 72 offers (as 
of Wednesday), 23 nominations 



were made by presidents from 
other community colleges, as 
well as applications from some 
presidents themselves. Three of 
the applicants so far have been 
women. 

The application period ends 
February 15, and the chosen 
applicant will be notified by 
May 1 . He-or she will serve one 
year as president-elect, and 



then in '78 will take over for Dr. 
Harold C. Manor as president of 
the college. 

"Many of the applicants are 
of very high quality," said 
Erling, "some are very well 
known in their own parts of the 
country." Applications have 
come from as far away as 
Washington, Oregon and Cali- 
fornia. There is also one 



application from Canada. 

Five nominations have been 
received from within the state, 
but only one full application. 
There have been no local 
applicants. 

Applications are being re- 
ceived daily, and many more are 
expected to be added to the 
collection. 



eachcomher 




Voice of the Palm Beach Junior College Student 



Vol.38 No. 11 



Monday, January 17, 1977 



Lake Worth, Florida 33461 



Member of the 

associaTeo 
coLLeciaTe 
pRess 





Despite manydelays 
Galleon distributed 



MAJESTIC VESSEL 
cover 



PHOTO BY BILL JOHNSON 

Spanish galleon as pictured on JC magazine 



By Cindy McCarthy 
News Editor 

A brilliant color photograph of 
a galleon (large Spanish ship), 
set against a dark background 
has set the cover {heme for the 
'76 Fall volume of the Galleon, 
JC's student magazine, which 
was distributed over Christmas 
vacation. 

Due to a late start in getting 
organized and several delays 
the Galleon came out after the 
Fall Term ended, therefore 
resulting in the mailing of the 
magazine to the students. 

Last year, the former 
conventionally styled yearbook, 
.which' 'had evolved over the 
years from hardback to 
paperback, emerged as a 
two-issue magazine. Former 
advisor, Dr. Jim Miles. Art 
Department chairman, initiated 
the new format. 

This years faculty advisor for 
the Galleon is John W. Correll, 
Graphic Arts instructor. Correll 
graduated from Northwest 
Missouri State University and is 
presently working on his 
master's at Florida Atlantic 
University. 

There are some changes 
being made in the Winter Term 
Galleon staff, with the resig- 



nation of editor Sandra 
Koudclik and photo editor 
Emily Hamer. 

Replacing Koudelik as editor 
is Brenda Shire, former layout 
editor. Taking Hamer' s place as 
photo editor is Bob Freeman. 

Returning editors are: Assoc- 
iate Editor Ed Coggin and 
Copy-Editor John Childers. A 
new layoui editor will be named 
shortly. 

The Winter Term magazine 
may come out in one or two 
volumes depending on the size 
of contributions for the literary 
magazine. 

The literary magazine's 
associate editor is Mary Hiegel. 
who is a member of the Galleon 
staff. 

Correll says, "We're open to 
suggestions, especially those 
concerning articles. See any of 



the editors or myself." 

Any student who did not 
receive a copy of the Galleon 
may pick one up in front of the 
Beachcomber office, Monday-- 
Friday. Jan 24-28 between 10 
a.m. and 2 p.m. Students are 
asked to retain this volume, as a 
binder will be available toward 
(he end of the Winter Term. 

The Galleon is seeking writers 
and photographers for the 
winter volume. Anyone who is 
interested should contact Cor- 
rell in the Humanities Bldg. 

Contributions in the form of 
poetry, short stories, photo- 
graphs and illustrations are still 
being accepted for the literary 
magazine. Any interested stu- 
dents should contact Watson B. 
Duncan 111. English department 
chairman or Mr. Correll, 



Requirement changes made 



By Gunda Caldwell 
Associate Editor 

Students who plan to transfer 
from JC to upper level 
universities, should keep in- 
formed on state university 
requirement changes that occur, 
according to Dr. Paul W. 
Graham, vice president of 
Academic Affairs. 

Two such changes were made 
for the 1976 fall semester and a 
third is to be implemented for 
the fall quarter of 1 977. 

Effective Sept. 1, 1976, all 
students entering a university in 
the State University System 
with less than '90 credit hours 
shall be required to earn at least 
15 credits prior to graduation by 
attendance at one or more 
summer quarters. 

"Also effective for the fall term 
of '76, the Math Education 
required course offered at 
sophomore level for FSU 
elementary education majors 
will be Math 255 Algebraic 
Structures of the Real No. 
System (3 q.h.). 



Advance planning is import- 
ant for all college programs, but 
absolutely essential for students 
who are university bound. It is 
up to you to know current 
requirements as they change, 
and plan your courses accord- 
ingly. 



Beginning with the fall 
quarter of '77, all programs in 
the College of Education will 
require students to complete the 
psychological foundation re- 
quirements, six quarters at the 
upper division, regardless of 
community college course work 
completed. 

Comber cops awards 

By Cindy McCarthy 

News Editor 

Continuing in its award winning tradition, the Beachcomber is the 
recipient of the "Medalist" award in the Columbia Scholastic Press 
Associations (CSPA) 52nd Annual Contest. 

"Medalist" ranking is granted to publications selected from the 
first place ratings. The Beachcomber received a first place rating by 
scoring 96 1 point s out of a possible' 1 000. 

While no specific score is attached to the "Medalist" ranking, it 
is seldom given to publications with less than top scores. 

Generally not more than 10 percent of the entries in a given 
classification received this special distinction. 

.Some of the judges' comments include: 

Content and Coverage: Editorial pages through the year are 
interest-provoking and certainly indicate an all student acceptance 
of the publication. 

Continued Pg. 8 



Registration snafu 
causes many to 
wait for hours 

By Eden White 
Staff Writer 

300 newly-registered students, awaiting registration earlier this 
month, stood in lines for more than four hours because of computer 
problems. 

Although some 6000 returning students had preregistered, those 
who had failed to do so also waited during the first day of winter 
registration while the Data Processing team tried to iron out the 
problem. 

According to Registrar Charles Graham, the team "kept thinking 
they had the problem found. A few students would go through and it 
would stop again. That's why the students stayed. " 

Director of Data Processing Dale Washburn said it was "the 
worst occurrence we've had during registration. If we could have 
isolated the problem sooner, we could have been able to estimate 
how long it would take to remedy the situation but the computer 
kept giving false indications." 

At one p.m., students were given priority numbers to return the 
following day although some remained as late as 3:30 p.m. hoping 
the problem would be solved. 

. Using the process of elimination, the problem was solved by 5:30 
p.m. Those registering for night classes were not affected. 

"The next day was a long one for everybody," says Graham, "we 
had to do twice the work to get everything done. ' ' 

— On the inside 



Debate Nationals ■ • . . . pg. 3 

Venture goes drinking • ■ ■ ■ • • ■ ... pg. 7 

Basketball Roundup pg. 9 



i TrwwHwi rHifVi Mi i 'raw i 



Monday, Jan. 17 BEACHCOMBER - 2 



3 -BEACHCOMBER Monday, Jan. 17 



Book review series 
to feature Duncan 



ByGeorgia Wink 
Staff Writer 

Watson B. Duncan III, renowned JC literature 
instructor, will be conducting a series of book 
reviews which have been an annual event in the 
Palm Beaches for eighteen years. 

"The late Dr. Spivey. a retired president of Fla. 
Southern College, decided to hold lectures here in 
the Palm Beaches and invited me to talk on several 
Shakespearian works," Mr. Duncan said of the 
weekly lectures which have become an integral 
part of the cultural life of Palm Beach. 

The reviews were held in private homes in Palm 
Beach until the audiences of twelve grew to one 
hundred, neccessitating a larger meeting place. 

The First National Bank in Palm Beach, 255 So. 



County Road, offered a cafeteria room which 
proved adequate in seating arrangements and is 
now the site of the reviews. 

The lectures not only serve as an enjoyable 
pastime for the public, but also as a means of 
education for English majors attending JC in the 
form of the Watson B. Duncan III 
Scholarship Fund which procures its monetary 
funds from the two dollar donations given by the 
attending public. 

"Ceremony of the Innocent, ' ' by Taylor Caldwell 
is scheduled for review, Jan. 19, wifh "The Grass 
is Always Greener Over the Septic Tank," by Erma 
Bombeck, Jan 26. 

Other reviews will be held on each Wednesday 
through February and March. 



Survey results not complete 



By Cindy McCarthy 
News Editor 

A three-man survey team, 
headed by Dr. James K. 
Umholz, coordinator of physical 
facilities for the Florida Dept. of 
Education, recently conducted a 
iwo-day survey of all JC 
campuses. 

The survey resulted after a 
formal request was made by the 
Board of Trustees for space on 
the Florida Atlantic University 
campus. The request has 
already been received by FAU 
and the Board of Regents; 
however survey results will 
determine the amount of space 
and the location. 

According lu Dr. Harold C. 
Manor, JC president, the 
results are not expected for 
several weeks, "as it takes 
awhile to write up a report." 

During the survey team's visit 
they looked at prepared data 
and checked the physical space 
available. 

Presently JC South is located 
at Henderson University School 
on the FAU campus, but is 
outgrowing the facility. 

Working together, JC and 
FAU have developed cooper- 
ative curricula, among which 



New classes 
are slated to 
open shortly 



JC will be offering the 
following continuing Education 
classes. 

The Problem of Aging in our 

Society, starting Jan. 17 from 
7:30-9:30 p.m. for six weeks. 
Registration is in room SC-10, 
Jan. 17 ai 7:00 p.m. Fee is 
512.00. 

Respiratory Nursing, starting 
Jan. i S from 7:00-10:00 p.m. for 
eighi weeks. Registration is in 
room TE-01, Jan. 18 at 6:30 
p.m. Fee is 524.00/ 

The Crisis of the Family- 
Today, starting Jan. 19 at 7:30 
p.m. for six weeks. Registration 
is in room SS-03, Jan. 19 at 7:00 
p.m. 

Neurology and Orthopedics, 

starting Jan. 19 from 7:00-10:00 
p.m. for eight weeks. Regis- 
tration is in room TE-01, Jan. 19 



are science, engineering, math- 
ematic and computer science, so 
that students may be enrolled at 
both schools simultaneously 
through a dual enrollment 
arrangement. 

Although JC classes have 
been offered on the FAU 
campus since the Spring Term 
of 1970-71, the formal agree- 
ment between the two insti- 
tutions didn't come about until 



the Fall Term of 1973-74, when 
JC South came into official 
existence with James W. 
Tanner as Coordinator. 

JC South now has a student 
population of approximately 700 
students, with approximately 
one third of them full time and 
one sixth dually enrolled. 

If the request is granted JC 
Trustees can then employ a 
planner. 



Victims receive aid 
from student group 

DECA sponsors "Donate a Dollar Drive" for cancer victims. 
Many JC students are unaware that two instructors on campus 
are seriously ill with cancer. 

These instructors are Robert L Yount, Math department and 
Ed Crowley, English department. 

Several concerned faculty and administers have set up a 
catastrophic illness fund to help these teachers to meet 
astronomical expenses. 

Dr. Ed Eissey, chairman of the fund, commented on the 
possibility of students assisting in the efforts to help these 
faciuly members. 

"If we could get every student to donate one dollar, it would 
help immensely," Eissey comments. Consequently, Sales and 
Marketing Club is orgainizing a Donate A Dollar Drive for 
Youni and Crowley. 

The drive will begin today and run at the following locations: 
cafeteris, student government (SG), registrar's office, finance 
office. Beachcomber, bookstore. Campus Security and library. 

Other organizations including the SG senate have already 




Steele advances 



PHOTO BY EMILY HAN 

A PENSIVE MOOD- Watson B. Duncan III relaxes in his office 
preparing for an upcoming book review. 

Exosociology film 
premiers in La. 



By John Childers 
_ StrffcmUK, ; , , <, . 

Dr. Richard Yinger, JC's 
Exosociology expert , appeared in 
a film on the subject which was 
shown in Baton Rouge, La. 
where he attended the premier 
showing. 

The film seem;: to build up to 
Yinger's ideas. He 

appears while being interviewed 
by Star Trek's William Shatner. 

"The film is really an excerise 
in Exosociology, I couldn't have 
done a better job myself," said 
Yinger who believes we're 
being prepared for a move to 
space. The ideas he was forming 
two years ago are slowly gaining 
popularity and coming to 
realization. 

Viewers seemed to enjoy 
watching the film, which 



at 7:00 p.m. Fee is 524.00. 

Conservational Spanish for 
Health Care Personel at JC 
north and central. JC north- 
Jan. 17, at 7:00 p.m. in Howell 
Watkins Junior High School 
Choral Room, Palm Beach 
Gardens. JC central Jan. 19, at 
7:00 p.m. in SS;01. Fee is 
S20.00. 

Wills, Trusts and Estates, 

starling Jan. 20 from 7:30-9:30 
p.m. for six weeks. Registration 
is in rrom BA-115, Jan. 20 at 
7:00 p.m. Fee is S12. 00. 

Ornamental Plant Identification 

and- Landscape Design, starting 
Jan. 27 at 7:00p.m. for eight 
.weeks. Registration is in room 
SC-10, Jan. 27 at 7:00 p.m. Fee 
is S24.00. 

Horticulture Maintenance, 

starting Jan. 27 from 7:00-10:00 
p.m. for eight weeks. Regis- 
tration is in room SS-04, Jan. 27 
at 7:00 p.m. Fee is $24. 00. 



JC North to return monies 

By Katliy Cavanaugh 
Staff Writer 

As the result of a deficit in the Athletics budget, students at JC 
North, South and Glades campuses will be giving 36 percent of then- 
activity fee dollar this semester to the main campus athletic 
program. 

Although the North Center does not have its own athletic 
program, 50 students are currently participating in the main 
campus program. 

Further expansion and enrollment at JC North may result in the 
creation of new programs, the first of which is expected to be a 
forensics league, to be discussed at upcoming Student Activity 
Committee (SAC) North meetings. 



Winners of. the Performance Scholarship, chosen mainly by 
academic qualifications, have been named by SAC North members. 

Five out of 20 applicants were chosen and will receive $300 each. 
The winners are: Debbie Locke, Sally Genchi, Henry Piggot, Beth 
McCreary and Rosann Scragg. 



JC North students are reminded of the ticket discounts offered by 
SAC North. Events such as concerts, plays, bowling and movies are 
covered in the discount program. Information on the program may 
be obtained at the JC North main office. 



Other plans of SAC at JC North include new furniture for the SAC 
lounge and construction of a patio behind the North Center. 
Expanding honorariums and the number of scholarship recipients is 
also be discussed. 



borders on being a document; 

and said he wanted to seeit 
again. 



"The last thing I want to get 
when 1 go to a movie," says 
Yinger, "is educated. I go to be 
entertained." 

This movie seems to do both 
according to Yinger's evaluation 
of viewer response. Young to 
old attended. 

Yinger also plans to discuss 
his paper concerning the 
relevance of Exosociology to the 
Social Sciences. Economic ideas 
will probably change when 
scarcity, supply and demand 
lake on new meanings. Self 
sufficient space colonies would 
take on totally new modes of 
economics, and Yinger feels 
someone should be studying the 
impact of such changes and, 
"try to direct and anticipate the 
future." 

Anthropologists would be 
interested in culture studies or 
possible power and authority 
problems. 

"Life in outer space is a 
reality (hat needs to be dealt 
with seriously," asserts Yinger, 
"and I think the Social Sciences 
are the best and most 
appropriate areas to deal with 
it," he concluded. 

Already, Yinger explains, 
experiments have been devised 
to test the effects of outer space 
on new born babies. He feels 
that space is the new frontier 
and things are going to progress 
like the colonization of America 
where there was a feeling of 
well being and looking forward 
to the future. 



.ML' 



Speaker in nationals 



By Dave Taylor 
Staff Writer 

JC freshman, Trent Steele, qualified for the 
National Forensics Association's Individual Events 
Tournament after capturing a first and second 
place at the Florida Crown Individual Events 
Classic held in December. 

Steele received a silver tankard for his winning 
performance in Persuasive speaking and a pewter 
tankard for his second place prize in the category 
of Extemporaneous speaking. 

"Trent works mostly on his own. He is a very 
poised young man. I don't think he will feel out of 



place in the National competition," said Forensics 
Advisor, John Connolly. 

Steele who competed against students from six 
southern universities and six Florida junior 
colleges is now qualified to enter the National 
Forensics Association Individual Events Tourn- 
ament to be held later in the year at George Mason 
University in Fairfax, Va., as well as the Junior 
College Nationals to be held April 7-11 in Largo, 
Md. 

Connolly added the team will also attend the 
Florida International Collegiate Tournament held 
Jan. 28-30. 



Musicians gain experience 
at Florida state convention 



By Emily Hamer 
Staff Writer 

Fourteen JC musicians at- 
tended the Music Educators 
National Conference (MENC) 
Florida State Convention in 
Orlando Jan. 6-8. The vocalists 
and instrumentalists performed 
with the All Florida Junior 
College (AFJC) concert choir, 
concert band and jazz ensemble. 

In Orlando the music students 
auditioned for seating assign- 
ments and rehearsed with their 
respective groups, each giving a 
concert during the convention. 

Attending various clinics, the 
group heard many different 
techniques, tried different 
instruments and had the 
opportunity to meet other 
students from the state. 

Commented Phyllis Movitz, 
"The whole thing is a learning 
experience. ..you get an idea of 
what people in other parts of 
Florida are doing." 



IMPORTANT STUDY 
ABROAD ANNOUNCEMENT: 
Limited openings 
remain on CFS accredited 
Spring 1977 Academic Year 
Programs commencing Spring 
Trimester. Early acceptance is 
now open for Fall '77, Winter, 
Spring '78 or Full Year '77-'78 
in Moscow, Salamanca, Paris, 
Dijon, Florence, Perugia, 
Copenhagen, Amsterdam* Vi- 
enna, Geneva, England for 
qualified applicants in lan- 
guages, all subjects incl. int'l 
law, business. All students in 
good standing eligible-Fresh- 
men, Sophomores, Juniors, 
Seniors, Grads. Good faculty 
references, self-motivation, 
sincere interest in study 
abroad, int'l cultural exchange 
count more with CFS than 
grade point. For applications/ 
information: CENTER FOR 
FOREIGN STUDY/AY AD- 
MISSIONS DEPT N/216 S. 
State/Box 606/Ann Arbor, 
mich 48107/(313)662-5575. 



A 10C STAMP 

COULD HELP SAVE 

YOUR FRIEND'S LIFE. 



For Free information, write lo: 
DRUNK DRIVER, Box 2345 
Rockville, Maryland 20852 



€1 



Musicians singing with the 
AFJC choir were: Mary Beth 
Jackson and Cathy Geiger, 
soprano ; Sandi Webb and 
Deborah Robinson, alto; Roger 
Keiper and Tim Johnson, tenor 
and Randy Latini, bass. 

The choir sang "Show Me the 
Way" by Luboff; Kodaly's 
"Jesus and the Traders;" 
"Beat! Drums!" by Howard 
Hansen; "Requim Aeternan," 
by Cherubini; Lotto's "Kyrie 
Eleison" and Svenhnikov's 
"Bird of Youth." 

Sven Nystrom, trumpet; Lorry 
Hodgson, percussion; Scott 
Miller, clarinet; Sharon Mc- 
Tyre, bass clarinet and Nick 
Albanese, alto sax, joined the 
AFJC concert band. y 

The band's program included 
selections from "Symphonic 
Concert March" by Bonelli, 
Walter Piston's "Tunbridge 
Fair" and "Reflections * on 
Paris" by Tull. 



JC members of the AFJC jazz 
ensemble were Bruce Brawner, 
trombone and Bob Tufford, 
piano 




Vv/lyi 



NATIONAL SPEAKER-Trent Steele will be going up against the 
best debaters in the country, later in the year in Virginia. 

Ceramics and crafts on display in 
Humanities building this month 



An exhibition of ceramics, 
wall hanging and crafts of 
unusual texture and design, by 
a Fort Lauderdale craftsman, 
are on display in the Humanities 
Gallery until Jan. 28. 

Irene Batt-whose husband is 
artist, Miles Batt, winner of the 
Society of the Four Arts Hors De 
Concourse Award this year-has 
been in crafts for the past 13 
years. 

Only sculptural ceramics are 
in the show, even though Batt 
also does functional objects. 

The ceramics in the show are 




all Raku works, where the 
pieces are heated in a kiln until 
they reach approximately 1700 
degrees farenheit. At this point, 
the works are then removed 
with tongs, with the artist 
wearing gloves and a face mask. 

The ceramics are then 
plunged into metal garbage 
containers, filled with leaves 
and grasses and are "smother- 
ed" so that minimal amounts of 
oxygen or none at all will reach 
them. 

"This process allows the 
carbon to enter the pores of the 
clay, causes the glazes to luster 
and turns the surfaces of the 

clay very dark," she explains. 



One of the pieces appears in 
full color in the second edition of 
"The Complete Book of 
Pottery" by John B. Keiiny. 

Her fiber works appear as 
paintings, but instead of being 
two-dimensional, they have a 
third demension and a tactile 
surface that paintings don't 
have. 

The craftsman does all her 
own washing, picking and 
cleaning of the wood used in her 
fiber works, as well as the 
spinning and weaving that goes 
into them, she said. 

Batt leaches ceramics at 
Broward Community College 
and weaving at the Fort 
Lauderdale Museum. 



TELL THE STORY WITH THE 
BRIEF AND BUMPTIOUS 

jumper ^ijc^cr 

REMOVABLE VINYL . 

EXPRESS HUMOR • CONCERN « DEFLATE THE 

POMPOUS • HAPPINESS • AWARENESS 

1-$2.00 • RFMEFS 25-$15.00 

BtLltH* 50-$27.50 

100~$40.00 



4 - $4.95 
10-$7.00 



Sand Check orM.O. 



NO PHONE 



RECEIVE 
RETURN 
MAIL 



BUMP.A-SIGNS GALORE! 

2300 N. MILITARY TRAIL 
WEST PALM BEACH-, FLORIDA 33409 

13 TELE POLES N. OF OKEECHOBEE 
ON MILITARY TRAIL 

READ INSOLENT BUMPER 
STICKERS! NOT BOOKS! 



CERAMICS 

AND CRAFTS- 
These displays 
and more are 
currently start- 
ing in the 
Humanities 
building. 



Photos by 
Emily Hamer 



L 



Ask For 
Prices On 
Larger 
Quantities. 




Monday, Jan. 17 BEACHCOMBER - 4 



5 - BEACHCOMBER Monday, Jan. 17 



Keys to car theft decrease 



If you should find your car missing, odds are growing that it will 
be gone for good. Joy ride amateurs have been replaced by experts 
who know how to take it quickly and dispose of it in the high-priced 
markets of today. 

Professional car thieves, lured by soaring prices of auto parts and 
vehicles, have moved into big-time brackets, with over a million 
cars stolen last year. Nearly a third of them were not recovered. 

Thousands have been shipped into other countries for sales while 
other have been stripped and the parts sold to repair wrecked cars. 
Flea markets owe much of their popularity to the ease with which 
thieves can unload hot items under more or less unsupervised 
conditions. 

Professionals use either a master key or a piece of bent wire and 
can break into a car in seconds. With a dent puller or slide hammer, 
used in repair shops, the thief pops the ignition lock, crosses wires, 
and gets going, sometimes in ten seconds. 

The ignition-steering-transmission locks required on all new cars 
have made auto theft more difficult, slowing down the professionals 
and baffling the amateurs. Even if a thief can break open these 
locks, it may take half an hour or more, and broken parts remaining 
inside the mechanism will still prevent the auto from being moved. 

One simple step which every driver should remember is to 
remove the key when leaving the car. It can result in a huge drop for 
car thefts. 

In Cleveland, a drive to encourage people to remove the keys 
when they left (heir cars resulted in a 50% drop in auto theft. 

This will explain to our students why the rules and suggestions 
given by our security system at JC are important. Observing these 
simple precautions will simplify their task, protect our own property 
and provide us a higher degree of property protection. 

No car is completely safe anywhere, not even in your own 
driveway, on the street, or in a parking lot. By making it harder for 
professionals to steal cars, by using care when we buy cars and 
parts for our cars, by observing all regulations posted by our 
security system, we help to bring about a real reduction in auto 
thefts. 

Best of ail, when we are ready to go, chances are greater that our 
car will be there, waiting for us. 



Editor 
forum 




Denny Glavin 
Editor 



A memorandum dated Jan. 5, contained some rather resounding 
items concerning the payment of activity advisors, 

Proposed by JC Pres. Dr. Harold C. Manor would be the payment 
of advisors by the organizations themselves. 

It is ironic that nearly all groups within the Student Activity Fee 
Committee are in need of more money. Certainly if they were not 
granted percentages increases, status quo at least. 

But Manor's plan calls for payment of advisors out of the already 
small budgets of some organizations. We at the Beachcomber are 
not happy, as one would imagine. 

Groups like WPBC, the campus radio station and the Inter Club 
Council are in their growth stages and a financial blow like this 
would be crippling. 

How did Manor come up with a figure of so much money for one 
advisor and a different amount for another? In talking with most 
advisors, we found none had been consulted concerning hours, 
duties and professional skills involved. 

Going back to a previous point, why weren't the people who 
would eventually pay these bills (the students) consulted? 

Doesn't anyone ask questions? Hopefully, the Board of Trustees 
vill prove they do represent the students interests when they take 
.his matter under consideration at the next board meeting. 



Beachcomber 

Palm Beach Junior College 
4200 S. Congress Ave., Lake Worth, Fla 33461 
(305) 965-8000, ext. 210 

Editor-in-chief, . Dennis Glavin 

Associate Editor-Editorial . Gunda Caldwell 

Associate Editor-News Bill Johnson 

Associate Editor-Feature, Sports . Steve Farnsworth 

News Editor Cindy McCarthy 

Venture Editor Frank Smith 

Photo Editor Emily Hamer 

Business Manager - • . Dave Taylor 

Consultant . . . Charles R. McCreight 

The Beachcomber is published weekly from our editorial offices in 

the Student Pullcations Building at Palm Beach Junior College 

Opinions expressed in the Beachcomber are those of the editors or 

writers and are not nesessarity those of the Palm Beach Junior 

Coliege. 

"Letters must not exceed 2oo words, must be signed by the author, 

recelved'Win the Beachcomber office no later than 4 p.m. on 

Wednesday and are subject to condensation. 



£/ &ARy7Z777IZIT\o 

o 



GARY OJLHoaE 

EXECUTION 

£^ £ 5H0W/ W3, Q^y 



o 
o 
o 
o 




'Conktx, i -'77 



editorials 



Resolutions vital to JC success this year 



Welcome back to JC! A new 
semester and a new year. Never 
a better time than noy tor some 
New Year's resolutions. On this 
subject, we would like to offer a 
few suggestions. 

. For the students; 

1. Cultivate responsible and 
serious study habits. You can 
earn good grades by learning. 
Do a little bit more than "just 
get by." 

2. Render cooperation and 
active support to at least one 
student activity each semester. 
Dividends can be gratifying. 

3. Remember your instructors 
are really human beings who are 
concerned and care a great deal 
about you, as a student. They 
are not here to destroy your 
social life or to inflict cruel and 
unusual punishment upon you; 
They are,not sadists, nor do they 
really wish to prove your 
ignorance. Also, keep in mind 
that administration is really 
trying, in its own special way, to 
serve you and your needs, in 
spite of the overwhelming red 
tape, the frustrating, time-con- 
suming processes and the 
fouled-up systems you may now 
and then encounter. 

For the Board of Trustees 

1 . Observe honorable proced- 
ures in all JC business matters. 
Keep sunshire laws in letter and 
in spirit. Deal honestly in all 
matters that come under Board 
jurisdiction. 

2. Maintain an open mind at 
the bargaining table. Refrain 
from cracking the whip at union 
representatives or feeing super- 
ior. In negotiations, remember 
that in any good settlement, 
neither side is completely 
satisfied. 

3. Consider new goals for the 
main campus. Don't neglect 
growth plans for the main 
location in your drive to expand 
county-wide. Top priority for the 
main campus should be a larger 



auditorium with adequate, 
modern facilities. There should 
tjo ©xpirosioji . id,, tfefUtoairej jfljft 
Communications rather than 
cutbacks. 

For the Administration 

1. Establish a first-rate 
recruiting program in high 
schools to attract students with 
ability instead of letting them go 
on to other colleges who do seek 
them out. 

2. Place greater emphasis on 
our ABC's. ..Arts, Business and 
Communications. In these three 
areas lie all the hopes of our 
future. 

3. Streamline operational 
procedures. Reduce costly and 
time-consuming red tape and 
verbose, complicated processes 
for all functions ranging from 
student registration to maint- 
enance. Be aware of the cost 
factor involved in paperwork 
and red tape. Everything costs 
more, even the red tape. (We 
can't afford that red tape 
anymore.) 

And cutting the time it takes 
to get things done, should also 
include negotiations. How about 
getting that done, too? 



For Student Government [SG] 

1. Get a more ambitious 
program going. The higher the 
goals are set,- the greater the 
achievement. Keep in mind that 
"thinking little equals doing 
little." 

2. Raise the dignity and 
value of SG by the quantity and 
quality of activities. Resolve to 
make SG a well-known group 
with a clout that will be 
respected. We asked for SG, 
now we will show them that the 
students are a force to reckon 
with in our representation of the 
student body. 

3. Don't get discouraged and 
give up. If some of your projects 
have failed or fallen short of the 



goals, find new, better ones. Or 
rescue the old ones and try 

For the Beachcomber 

1. Beat the bushes, if we 
must, to find things happening 
around the campus. Resolve 
never again to say that there's 
nothing going on. Keep in mind, 
just because it is not obvious, 
doesn't mean that all goes well. 
Dig, and dig, and dig. 

2. Don't wait until the last 
minute to write up the 
assignments. Faithfully obey 
that Tuesday deadline for 
submission, except for the 
late-breaking items. 

3. Work toward continuing 
the past BC winning tradition 
established for many years in 
the past. Bring back as many 
tophies as possible from state 
and national competitions. 



letters ) 



Dear Editor; 

Fantastic! That's what I say 
whenever I get a chance to see 
your paper, which has won so 
many awards in the past. 

I will be graduating in June 
with a journalism major and 
intend to enter graduate school. 
I would like to stay abreast of 
good collegiate journalism, and 
was wondering if you could 
place my name on your mailing 
list for future Beachcombers. I 
would really appreciate receiv- 
ing your publication. 

I look forward to seeing your 
paper. Do keep up the good 
work; you're setting trends for 
colleges and universities across 
the country. 

Here's my address: 

Michael Sessler 

1019 Indiana Ave. 

Sheboygan, Wis. 53081 



v**l» 



We need talented students here 




Gunda Caldwell 
Editorials 



January is the month of resolutions. It also is the right time 
to examine priorities in our lives and resolve to put important 
things first. We shall be reviewing some of these in future 
editorials. 

One of our most important priorities should involve future 
goals. Every effort should be put forth to make JC an 
ever -improving community college. 

One good way to insure this is to attract top students to our 
course offerings through brochures and active recruiting. 

Why let gifted and talented students leave town for other 
campuses who recruit them, when we have so much to offer 
right here at home? 

This should be a simple and inexpensive matter because 
we have a print shop right on campus. Departments who wish, 
should be able to work up a pamphlet and get it printed for 
distribution in a reasonable period of time. 

It is our understanding that JC maintains a clipping service 
to handle its PR releases and other reports. Apparently this 
ties up so much time and funding that it leaves no funds for 
brochures. At least that seems to be the situation for the 
Beachcomber. Both time and money were given as reasons 
why we could not get one out previously. 

We question the value of a clipping service or the clippings 
themselves. Who. uses these files? Or reads the clippings? 
Surely no one expects high school students to delve into our 
clipping files to find out what JC can promise them? 

How can the cost of this service and the time spent to 
maintain files for them be justified when we are told there is 
no money for brochures OR TIME to print the ones who are 
ready to go? 

A brochure is a conventional, popular method of 
advertising. It means placing valuable information into the 
hands of students while they are still in high school, while 
they may be undecided and ill informed about what a specific 
career area has to offer. This is the proper time to let these 
students know, prior to actually entering college. Frequent 
changes in majors, such as we see in lower levels of colleges, 
indicate a crying need for just such pamphlets. 

Our News Bureau staff should be encouraging production 
of well-written, interesting leaflets that reflect the 
enthusiasm and excitment of education at its best. There are 
too many brochures devoid of conviction and interest. 

Excellent programs at JC go relatively unknown and 
unsung because there is little or no recruiting at high school 
level to attract the talented and ambitious students. 
Brochures, by every measure, deserve top priority. They are 
to education what advertising is to commerce. 

Clipping services and files are custodians of the past, a 
morgue for news. 

Brochures are tangible offerings of exciting and wonderful 
ideas available in high education. They are a bright promise 
of a worthwhile, satisfying future. Let tomorrow take priority 
over yesterday. 

JC catalogs must be precise 



With the current emphasis being placed by the Administration on 
accuracy in all our official and unofficial publications, it hardly 
behooves them to point a finger at others when of it's own official 
information is so far out-of-date. 

A case in point is the JC 76-77 catalog. Out of date and obsolete, 
to put it kindly. 

One can leaf through the pages and find dozens of courses listed 
that were not offered at any time during the period it covers. Why 
do we have a fat catalog of impressive listings when we are not able 
to actually give them these courses. 

There are football and Softball (for women) pictures included. We 
have not had football for 3 years. 

Service clubs listed on p. 44 looks impressive, too. Only 
one-possibly two of these are active and functioning during this 

year. 

An engineering report made for the last issue of the Galleon was 
based on information obtained from the catalog including 
instructions. This turned out to be completely wrong. As an official 
catalog, it cannot be utilized with any degree of certainty or 
reliability. 

If we have such a problem with local use, this can be misleading 
to someone who is not in a position to personally check out facts. It 
would be far better to produce a smaller, accurate, updated catalog 
than to continue with the type we now have. 

Truth in advertising also applies to college catalogs. 



f: 



Board 

of 

Trustees 

Meeting 

Wssa5S3SSSS3SSS2 




\ 



-m 



* 
■^ 



i 







X X.W >'X* V " > ° f i ! 









^p$* 



****** Kk* "* v * x * 



M$%: 5ir-+xxx£*W''>-J%. 



i* . x 






-Hf- 



rM- 



-nxe-VOrZ-ifcl 



Meetings getting stuffy 



One thing is consistent in the 
meetings to be held in choosing 
a new president and in the 
negotiations between the faculty 
and administration. 

That is while these meetings 
are not of an "everyone-join-in 
type" affair, people with 
important views have been left 
out. 

As practicing writers, we 
would find it most difficult to 
write stories without asking' 
questions. 



We wonder if the Board of 
Trustees is not practicing this 
"decide now, ask later" theory. 

At the Wednesday monthly 
Trustees meeting, they will be 
considering 82 pages of 
proposed changes in union 
negotiations. This material will 
have a lasting effect, positive or. 
negative, on the reputation of 
JC. 

Time, space and , in some 
cases, lack of knowledge does 
not permit comment on 



individual changes. Apparently 
the Board has not discussed 
these items because, despite 
numerous requests, we have not 
been informed. Likewise with 
the Presidential Screening 
Committee. 

If this is a violation, of any 
Sunshine Law is not the point. 
We at the Beachcomber feel 
■that not only our staff members, 
but students in general, can add 
needed assistance in these 
areas. 



Center is a top priority 



JC offers a sharp contrast 
with our sister institution to the 
south. Broward Community 
College can be justly proud of 
their foresight and wisdom in 
their planning for a Center for 
the Arts. 

An assortment of celebrities 
took part in a recent 
groundbreaking celebration in 
Broward Community College, 
whicirincluded everything from 
jazz to symphony concerts, a 
Shakespeare play, a planetar- 
ium show, art exhibits and a 
parade. 

The guest list included State 
Commissioner of Education 
Ralph Turlington, Sen. Robert 
Graham, natinally known chor- 
eographer June Taylor and 
opera singer Patrice Munsel. 

This celebration marked the 
start of construction of their 
Arts' Center. The first stage of 
construction will be a $2 to S3 
million concert hall, with a 
dance studio, rehearsal room 
and numerous auxiliary support 
systems. 

Sounds wonderful, doesn't it? 

What do we have? Or hope to 
have? A gymnasium and an 
auditorium too small to seat 
even the students. Imagine a 
Patrice Munsel concert or a 
Shakespeare production in the 
gym with its poor acoustics and 
bleachers. 



We lag far behind in our arts 
and cultural program, compared 
to the community colleges to the 
south of us. We have not kept 
growing in these areas, while 
they have gone forward. 

The planetarium in West 
Palm Beach should have been 
located here, so that both 
community and students could 
take advantage of it. The 
swimming pool project floun- 
dered 

Our parking lots lighting 
system is antiquated. These 
dark areas remain an open 
invitation to hazard and crime. 
Time is standing still at JC. 

We should be expanding and 
encouraging the arts, drama, 
music, forensics and journalism 
departments in every possible 
way. 

These qualities are vital to a 
well-rounded education. They 
significantly contribute to the 
mental and intellectual good 
health of every one of us. 

High schools are failing to 
produce college material. Many 
explanations are offered. We do 
not have the right to pass the 
problem along further. 

Much of the things we 
concentrate on so heavily today 
will be forgotten or become 
obsolete. But the cultural arts in 
JC will remain with us for the 
rest of our lives and we will pass 
them on to our children . 

All that remains of many 
great civilizations are the arts. 



Their gladiators and politicians 
have disappeared into history. 

Museums house relics of 
historical arts that will forever 
be prized and treasured. 

Other colleges understand 
this and provide support. 

When do we get our chance 
for such expansion? Where do 
we go from here? The gym? 

Galleon is... 

The 1976 issues of the Galleon 
is "on the stands." 

It has improved 100% over 
the 1975-76 edition. 

The pictures are clearer, the 
color brighter, and the inform- 
ation contained is more 
pertinent to JC students. 

But something interests me. 
Why is the Galleon considered a 
yearbook? 

In the Student Activity Fee 
Committee meetings (SAFC) 
John Correll, faculty advisor to 
the Galleon, explained in recent 
meetings the reasons why. They 
are very valid. Students in a 
school of this nature are not on 
campus long enough to be 
photographed, among others. 

But with that in mind, why is 
the Galleon in the middle of 
being a literary magazine 
yearbook? 

The fault does not lie with 
Correll or his staff. It lies more 
on the people who want a 
yearbook, but allocates no 
money to the Galleon. 



Bmtt««SB«B«ra« 



Monday, Jan. 17 BEACHCOMBER - 6 



7 - BEACHCOMBER Monday, Jan. 17 








Editors note: This skateboarding article is first of a 
two part story to be competed next week. 

Skateboarding has become in recent years one 
of Americas most popular fads. It is now within 
striking distance of becoming an American 
institution, right up there with baseball and apple 
pie. No you say? Well just try to remember when 
you had apple pie last. 

Skateboarding began as one of many in a long 
list of early 60's fads. It was very popular for a 
short time but then Fizzled out because the 
equipment was more or less unf unctional . 

Now, with the advent of the urethane wheel, 
skateboarding has once again regained it s 
popularity and may be here to stay. 

Skateboarding's roots came from surfing. In the 
beginning, most skateboarders were surfers 
during flat spells. Now the majority of 
skateboarders have never even ridden a wave. 

Another change is the age of the skateboarder.. 
More and More, skateboarders of ages as young as 
five or six are trying their skill on the sidewalks 
and hills of America. 



Last year, skateboarding was officially 
acknowledged as a sport with the first World 
Masters Invitational, held in New York City, with 
$15,000 in prize money. With the appearance of 
cash awards, several companies have sprouted, 
producing all types of professional and very 
sophisticated skateboards. 

Surfing styles and skateboarding styles are very 
close. The only difference is the medium in which 
you wipe out. Surfing is harder in that your surface 
is always changing, but easier because the ocean is 
very forgiving if you eat it. (i.e. take a tumble) 
Skateboarding, on the other hafid, is much easier 
because the surface is predictable and 
unchanging, but your surface is cement and it 
hurts when you fall on it. 

There are dangers to skateboarding, but many 
new types of knee and elbow pads have been put 
on the market, and in almost all of the new 
skateboarding parks, helmets are required 
bringing the danger to a minimum. 

Skateboarding is here to stay in that its fun, its 
cheap, its good exercise, and it gets in your blood. 
See ya on the asphalt. 




PHOTO BY EDDIE PULHMAN 



he ummtiate inebriate learns 
eat, drink and drink some more 



By Frank Smith 
Venture Editor 

First, let me say I drink very 
little, being of sound and sober 
mind. Second, I do not advocate 
heavy drinking except for use in 
forgetting sad affairs of the 
heart (see Don Vaughan Shape 
Up story). 

I'm in good company in this 
thought, too. 

Woody Allen tells the story 



A tragedy of growing up - the separation 



By Don Baughan 
Venture Columnist 

Breaking up with your girl/boy friend 
is a terrible, yet inevitable part of 
maturing into the adult you've waited so 
long to become. But, the acutal 
heartbreak is something that has to be 
experienced to be understood. I ought to 
know, I just experienced it. Please, send 
no condolences, just let me dry my tears, 
take a deep breath and I'll try to convey 
what happens when a "beautiful 
relationship" is torn asunder. 

The first few days are the hardest to 
tak.>. You find yourself reflecting back to 
thir.gs the two of you did together, such 
as your first date (when the car died and 
>ou ended up taking the bus, but she 
gave you a good night kiss anyway); 
meeting her parents ("Where'd you find 
this one? What? You mean he can 
actually hear underneath all that hair? I 
d.n't care if he is planning on becoming a 
lawyer, they're all animals at this age! 
Does he know I have a shot gun in the 
closet?"); all those picnics and movies 
(It's been estimated that the average 
dating teen-ager spends approximately 
$40,000 a year at the movies); and those 
spi:» ial days like the 14th of April. Ah 
yes, the 14th of April! That was the day 
the two of you first, well, you had to be 
there. 

After the good times, your brain 
changes gear and dwells on all the rotten 
things that had occurred during your 
brief time together, snch as the time she 
stood you up because she "had" to go oat 
with her " cousin." Yon knew that was a 
line of ball, but yon were patient and the 
"cousin" left a couple days later. But 
there were those overly long good night 



kisses at Irving's Christinas party, and splitting so you could both date other 

how about the time she offered to sit in people. Boy, it's a good thing you did 

the back seat [with John] "to make room break up! You obviously deserve better! 

for Zlggy, since he's skinny." Sure. 

You were no saint during your stint, After breaking up, you discover 

looking over anything with long legs and yourself listening to the lyrics of songs on 

a skirt, but it was her that suggested the radio, and you become convinced that 




Neil Sedaka had you specifically in mind 
when he recorded "Breaking Up Is Hard 
To Do." You end up turning off "Happy 
Days" because it brings back too many 
memories. A tear comes to your eye every 
time you hear someone whistle "The 
Way We Were." 

You go to the store to buy some new 
clothes and unconsciously get everything 
in light blue because that was her color. 
You find yourself putting your arm 
around girls you don't even know from 
force of habit. You sometimes whisper 
her name in your dreams and your 
mother yells from across the hall to shut 
the hell up and go to sleep . 

After the initial shock h as worn off and 
you think you're' able to enter society 
again, you start looking for other girls to 
take out. If you had been going together 
for quite a while, chances are good that 
you have become a topic of conversation 
and that your availability has become well 
know. Therefore, unless you're a leper or 
have four arms, the girls are there for the 
asking. 

But being the faithful soul that you are 
[except for a couple of times last summer 
when she was up in Sheboygan visiting 
relatives] you haven't dated a new face in 
a year and a half, and unlike riding a 
bicycle the art of dating is not 
something you remember for a lifetime. It 
becomes an awkward situation again. 

It's a good idea to start with something 
simple, something that won't make you 
look like the inept, bumbling bozo you 
really are. A movie is good for this. 

Getting the girl on the phone, you 
quickly glance at the movies in the 
newspaper. Immediately, discarding the 
dirty ones, you are left with a choice 



between "The 
the Naked Dea 
Girls." What h 
movies that 
"Murder By D 
dollar theatre , b 



gy D.A.", "Barn of 
i;nd "The Pom Pom 
ned to all the great 

here last week? 

is playing at the 
iu don't want to look 



like a cheapskaiJ you don't tell her 
about it. Ane ti»^fe^f*e she will say 
she has been mei fetosee "Murder By 
Death" every si M was released but 
never found the eand would love to 
see it with you.; n't question it, just 
accept it. 

If you live in a «*al town, it's almost 
inevitable that yWiH spot your "ex" 
standing in line font of you. What a 
great chance to s r off your date! Then 
you may noticed she is .with the 
captain of the fo-lHeam. Yes, fate is 
cruel. • 

The. first gocght kiss is the most 
awkward mome> u wil1 probably have 
with a date. l>o< e fr ench kiss? Where 
do I put my arrr can 't P u t them where 
I used to be' Nl get punched. 
WHAT ARE "• RELIGIOUS AND 
MORAL OBO<ONS OF A KISS ON 
THE FIRST DA Don't worry about it. 
Just kiss her ar^ e the fancy stuff for 
later. You're lito get as far as you 
did. J 

After a cou jB<|i ontns and two or 
three girls yoixTfEnd yourself having 
trouble rememlfg your ex's name. 
Congratulation s*u have successfully 
gotten through; emotion-wrenching 
experience arid #ou're free as a bird. 
Until next time. ; 



about, how early in his comedy 
career a vodka distributor called 
to ask him to appear in an 
advertisement for their com- 
pany. 

"No," he said. "I do not use 
your product, I would never 
condone your products and I am 
not interested in promoting 
vodka!" 

The voice on the phone said, 
"Too bad... the ad pays 
$50,000." 

"I'll put Mr. Allen on the 
phone," said Woody. 

So it was when I appeared at a 
party with my favorite girl 
("favorite" meaning any girl 
who'll go to a party with me). 

"No matter what you say," 
she stated, "I'm not going to 
drink anything tonight. ' ' 

"That goes double for me!" I 
announced. 

"A double? No problem." 
said a loud voice and I turned to 
find myself staring at a Very 
large man working at a portable 
bar. 

Before I could say anything 



else he announce, "A double." 

"No. ..I couldn't...," I started 
to say. 

He appeared to get angry. 
"Listen fella, you order a 
double, you get a double, and 
you'll drink a double!" 

Something within me gets 
intimidated when very large 
angry people order me to do 
something {called survival 
instinct). I took the drink. My 
date took a look at the drink, 
took offense, and then took off. 

Deciding to circulate and 
perhaps replace her, I fell into a 



group of people who I suppose 
had just come from a night class 
in literature. That's the only 
reason I can assess for a group 
of people discussing the subject. 

"My favorite character is 
Billy Budd," someone said (the 
fellow in the boat shoes). 

"I like Scarlet O'Hara," said 
a succulent lady in red. 

"Scarlet O'Hara, yeah, that's 
a good one." I spoke in attempt 
to get her attention. 

"So you're the one...," a 
voice said behind me. 

"I'm the one what?" I asked, 



Don Vaughan 
shape-up 

Dear Don, 

Having written stories of love in the last three 
or four issues, we [and I think I speak for 
everyone everywhere] are growing concerned. 

People have asked me to talk to you about it, 
although the way they suggested it was not 
nice. "Hey Frank," someone said, "you talk to 
Don, I bet you know a lot about rejection." 

Anyway, here are some suggestions I 
give yous 

.Take a sleazy girl to an erotic movie. 

Find a movie starlet to fantasize about. 

Take up a time consuming hobby 
writing]. 

Begin in earnest to become highly successful 
and independantly wealthy so that she'll come 
back to you [when she does, you can be 
revengeful]. 

These are suggestion I could give.. .but I 
won't. 

They don't work. Perhaps drinking will help 
[see my alcohol story]. 

Signed 
Frank 



could 



[like 




turning to face my accuser. 

"Who wanted the Scarlet 
.O'Hara ." She said, handing 
me a glass and leaving before I 
could protest. 

I was about to throw the drink 
away when the girl in the red 
dress said, "1 like a man who 
drinks." 

' 'That's funny, Hike girls who 
like men who like to drink," I 
said hoping to impress her. 

To further impress her, I 
downed the mixture in one gulp. 

"You're a fast drinker," she 
said. "Do you know what a 
Seven and Seven is?" 

I thought it was a sobriety 
test. "14?" 

She laughed, said I was cute 
and soon handed me a potent 
potion. 

Somewhere between the 
beginning of that drink and the 
end of it the girl had walked 
away and I found myself a 
member of a group of lonely 
people. We were talking about 
what to do to find friends. 

"I play cards," 'I explained. 
"Yep, for finding -friends 
pinochle oughtta do it. ' ' 

"Excuse me...," said yet 
another pretty girl, "did you say 
pina colada?" 

"No, I said Pinochle 
oughtta," trying to explain. 

"Smart alex!," she said, 
handing me yet another drink. 

Being almost blasted, Ibegan 
downing the brew. I explained, 
however, that I was talking 
about cards and card games. 

At this time my date decided 
to forgive me (she needed a ride 
home) and came up next to me. 
The pretty girl I had been 
talking to chose this minute to 
ask me, "How about Tom 
Collins? '■' 

I thought she was suggesting 
a pinochle partner and answer- 
ed, "Sure" and she handed me 
a 'Tom Collins'. 

My date left again. 

I shouted to her. "Sue! Don't 
discard me!" 



PHOTO BY AUDREY SNOW 



Someone put a drink in 
hand. "Bacardi," she said. 



my 



Monday, Jan. 17 BEACHCOMBER - 8 



9 - BEACHCOMBER Monday, Jan. 17 



Expensive oil painting 
donated to JC library. 



By Eden White 
Staff Writer 

A 33,000 oil painting featuring a serene zulu 
girl wearing golden earrings, a neckband and an 
armband has been donated to JC by an elderly 
Palm Beach resident. 

Located on the east wall of the library offices on 
the second floor, the painting was donated by 
Walter A. Wecker, the former board chairman of a 
Chicago cement manufacturing firm who has a 
substantial collection of paintings. 

Wecker decided JC was an appropriate site for 
the work which was painted by Vladimir 
Tretchikoff, a Soviet artist who fled his .native 



country during the revolution and settled in 
Capetown, South Africa. 

A small plate on the bottom of the gold painted 
wooden frame bears the notation "a portrait in 
repose," suggesting the essential spirit of Africa 
still so little known and so greatly misunderstood 
by the European. A simple grace and dignity, a 
primitive patience and an ageless humility. 

Wecker, who has owned the painting since 1954, 
purchased it from Tretchikoff while the artist was 
on a tour of North America exhibiting his works. 

"We are appreciative of Mr. Wecker's fine gift 
to the college," said Dr. Harold C. Manor, JC 
president. 



Classifieds 



Beginning guitar class, Jupiter 
Community School. Starts Jan. 
20, 8:30 p.m. $10.00 plus book, 
9 weeks. 833-6908 or 746-7462. 
For Sales 1973 Olds Cutlass 
Supreme. A/C Auto/power 
steering, brakes, seats. Excel- 
lent paint-S.B. Radials, mid 
mileage. Phone 582-6912. Rea- 
sonable.. 

Free: Two neutered adult male 
cats, one solid black (declawed), 
one solid white. Contact Dot 



Whatley, extension 21 1 . 

For Sales Drafting machine, 

S90.00. Betty Downing, 965- 

9378. 

For Sale: Very reasonable. Bar 

bell set, used very little. Call 

582-6912, 12:30 to 4:00 p.m. Ask 

for Kim. 

Looking for female roommate to 

share an apartment, WPB area. 

Reference, call Jill King. 

833-2439. 

Help wanted: Volunteer helrj is 



needed on the Intramural and 
Recreation Board. No experi- 
ence necessary. Will train. 
Eight weeks of successful 
volunteer work will qualify for 
paid position. See Mr. Bell, 
intramural director, rm. 4k, 
gym. 

Equipment manager wanted: 
Intramural open gym nights, 
Wednesdays, paying minimum 
wage. See Mr. Bell, intramural 
director, rm. 4k, gym. 




PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER 

SG BOOK SALE - Senator Joanna Garioba, assisting in the successful student book sale. 




PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER 

EXPENSIVE DONATION- Picture, donated by Palm Beach 
resident, Walter Wecker. It is valued at $3,000.00. 

SG book sale and 
coffee and don ut 
break a success 

By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

Student Government, in an effort to become more familiar with 
students held a student booksale and a coffee and doughnut break 
last Tuesday and Wednesday. 

Javier Moreno, SGsenator and head of the booksale, noted that 
reaction has been great. "The good thing is that the student sets 
own price. We are merely an interme4iar,y ,.' '».>,, ^ ^^^^F 

The booksale is being held in the North SAC lounge arid is to 
continue until Jan. 21 . Another sale is expected to be held at the end 
of this semester or the beginning of the Fall term. 

John P. Williams, head of the coffee and doughnuts break, also 
was pleased with the turnout. "We met quite a few students and 
found out their interests. It's very valuable." 

SG added a secretary of productions is needed for this semester. 
The job description includes organizing movies, coffee houses and 
any SG production. 

Also, any talented students who would like to perform- in the 
cafeteria may also contact SG. Musicians, actors, debaters and the 
like are needed. 



15% DISCOUNT WITH JC ID 




^ 



^NATIONAL 

g^car parts, inc. 



IMPORTED CAR PARTS 
2824 OKEECHOBEE BLVD. WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. 



Certificate of Opportunity 

THE B.S. IN EDUCATION PROGRAM OF NOVA UNIVERSITY OFFERS YOU THE OPPORTUNITY TO OBTAIN 
A BACHELOR'S DEGREE IN EDUCATION THROUGH SATURDAY CLASSES. UP TO 60 CREDITS MAY BE 
ACCEPTED FROM AN ACCREDITED COLLEGE, THROUGH CLEP OR THROUGH LIFE EXPERIENCE CREDIT. 

EACH 3-CREDIT COURSE MEETS ON SATURDAY FOR FOUR HOURS FOR EIGHT WEEKS. MAJORS ARE 
OFFERED IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, EARLY CHILDHOOD AND SECONDARY EDUCATION. 
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS ARE OFFERED FOR THOSE WHO ALREADY HAVE A BACHELOR'S DEGREE. 

NEXT CYCLE STARTS ON FEBRUARY 5. FOR INFORMATION CALL OR WRITE: DR. ANNA MAE WALSH 
BURKE, NOVA UNIVERSITY, COLLEGE AVE., FT. LAUDERDALE 33314. PHONE: 587-6660 EXT. 340. 
CAMPUSES IN DADE, BROWARD AND PALM BEACH. 



Awards from p.l 

Design and Display: Front 
pages are great! The "Floated" 
nameplate is a real eye catcher. 



Sports Stories: Quite easy for 
even a casual reader to 
comprehend. Apparently full 
mastery of sports events is 
evident in its piece. 

Loss of the first scorebook in 
the mail by the U.S. Postal 
Service, caused a long delay in 
the CSPSA returning the 
evaluation to the Beachcomber. 



Therefore the Beachcomber is 
making a late announcement on 
receiving this award. 



Beachcomber 



Pacers upset top-ranked teams 



\i' 




mm-f'^itt '-• "T?f:<: -♦****-' 



-iG-n 



PHOTOS BY GREG ROBERTS 



PACERS HUSTLE- [above] Dennis Mobley [21] 
pressures a Dade Downtown player as Adrian 
Williams [43] looks on. Sammie Weathersbee 
[below] leads the fast break in the same game, 
which was won handily by the Pacers. 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 



On Dec. 10 the Pacers had not 
played a home basketball game 
and stood 3-4. Today, despite 
being shocked by Broward 
Central Wednesday night, 
104-89, the team is- 9-5. A little 
"home cookin " was the 



The Pacers won six in a row, 
at home, in playing the brand of 
basketball expected of them. 

Perhaps the game that turned 
it around was the defeat of Dade 
South. South, ranked 11th in the 
nation, rode a hot-shooting first 
half to a 46-38 advantage. The 
cagers came out in the second 
half with a pressing combination 
of man-to-man and zone 
defenses and their own scoring 
machines, Mike Bennett and 
Bill Buchanan, to grab at a 76-75 
lead with three minutes left. 



But JC needed five free 
throws from Shack Leonard to 
ice the victory, 91-85. Mike 
Shoemaker and Buchanan had 
20 points each, while Bennett 
hit for 18, 14 in the second half. 



Mercer CC of Trenton, N.J. , 
the 20th-ranked team in the 
nation, also found that beating 
the Pacers at home is _ not an 
easy chore as they dropped a 
92-78 decision. 



Five players hit double 
figures as the team mounted a 
well-balanced scoring attach. 

Mercer's Vikings, who jump- 
ed off to a 21-15 lead, were 
outscored 25-9 in the ensuing 12 
minutes. 



*^ft«i 




Despite scoring but six 
ftrst-half points, the catalyst of 
the offense was Dirk Jamison. 
He had scored only 12 points 
prior to vacation, but has since 
led the bench in recent victories. 
Substitutes accounted for 44 of 
the 92 points. 

Spearheading the Pacers' 
offense were Shoemaker with 17 
points, Jamison with 13, Adrian 
William and Sammie Wethers- 
bee with 12 each, and Bennett 
with 10. 

In the Broward Central game, 
the host team shocked the 
Pacers with a potent defense 
and full-tilt fast break to grab an 
early 39-19 lead. 

The basketball team never got 
to within eight points the rest of 
the way as quicksilver guard 
Ellis James pumped in 38 points 
and the nation's seventh-lead- 
ing scorer, Roman Welch, has 
26, one under his average. 



"We came out flat and fell so 
far behind that we just couldn't 
get caught up," said basketball 
coach Joe Cerovolo. 

For the Pacers, Williams and 
Shoemaker had 14 points and 
Dennis Mobley and Jamison, 
10. 

Joe Ceravolo, enjoying his 
first season as Pacer mentor, 
pointed toward time as the 
biggest factor in the turn 
around. 

"We play better because 
we've played together more," 
he added. 

All players usually see 
playing time under his coaching 
style. "Any coach who thinks 
basketball is a five-man game is 
crazy," stated Ceravolo. 

This week the Pacers travel to 
Indian River and Dade North for 
Division 4 conference games. 
They play Chicago Central at 
home Jan. 24 at 7:30 p.m 




PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER 



DRAFT PICK- Marty McDermott was chosen in the seventh round 
of the winter baseball free agent draft by the Chicago White Sox. 

McDermott 7th-round 
Baseball draft pick 

By Jim Goodman 
Staff Writer 

JC Baseball player Marty McDermott was drafted in the seventh 
round by the Chicago White Sox in the winter baseball free agent 
draft last Tuesday. 

McDermott, a sophmore, is the starting shortstop for the Pacers. 
He was their leading hitter for the fall season with a .444 average in 
nine at bats. 

The former Boca Raton High player was astonished he went as 
early as he did in the draft. 

"I was surprised to be drafted that high," McDermott said. "1 
didn't even know the White Sox were interested in me. The Phillies 
were the only team I knew that was scouting me. " 

Coach Dusty Rhodes wasn't surprised that McDermott was 
drafted high. - 

"He's a hard worker," Rhodes said. "He has great speed and 
he's an excellent fielder." 

McDermott is not sure that he will turn pro. 

"It all depends on how good the offer Is," he said. "The White 
Sox haven't contacted me yet." " 

McDermott plans to finish the Winter Term whether he turns pro 
or not. 






! : Hi 



11 -BEACHCOMBER Monday, Jan. 17 



Monday, Jan. 17 BEACHCOMBER -10 



The little-understood and much-disliked referee 



The referees (or officials as 
they're properly called) are a 
much maligned yet necessary 
group of people. 

Everyone can Temember 
playing, at one time or another, 
sandlot games as a child. Every 
questionable play was argued 
about interminably. Justice 
rarely prevailed as shouting, 
physical size and threats of 
violence were the deciding 
factors. 

A person only has to visualize 
80-odd football players standing 
in the middle of the field 
"discussing" whether the 
receiver was in or out of bounds 
when he caught the pass to 
appreciate how vital a role the 
refs play. 

I thought the best way to 
understand the referee's func- 
tion was to interview one, so I 
talked to Stu Tadlock after he 
had officiated at last Monday's 
home basketbal game. 

The game was a typical one 
with the fans booing or 
applauding the actions of ,the 
refs depending on whether the 
call was for or against the 
Pacers. The visiting team's 
coach vehemently protested one 
call, was hit with a technical and 
accused the refs of calling a 
"homer". 

One of the first things Tadlock 
told me was that I was using the 
term referee wrong. He said 
that officials was the right word, 
since referees are but one kind 
of official, with umpires, 
linesmen, field judges, etc. 
being other kinds; 

Becoming and staying an 
official is not an easy task. 
Officials have to pass an exam 
every year and are evaluated by 
the coaches. The coaches can 
scratch officials from officiating 
at games their school plays in if 
they feel that the official is 
biased or doing a poor job. 

A commissioner assigns the 
official games and officials 
receiving consistently bad 
evaluations can be denied the 
right to officiate. 

Officiating is a parttime 
occupation. Tadlock works 
fulltime at Pratt & Whitney and 
has been an official for 1 6 years. 
One of the requirements of 
officiating is working in a hostile 
atmosphere. 

"When you come out on the 
court, right away it seems like 
you have a strike against you," 
Tadlock related. "There's no 
wa. r you can please everyone." 

"It's the people who know 
only a little of the rules who are 
the worst,", he added. "The 
mor.-i knowiedgable a person is a- 
bout the game, the more he 
appreciates the job the officials 
do." 

He also said that he doesn't 
hold the things coaches say to 
him against them because many 
are totally different persons on 
and off court. He said they often 
undergo a "Jekyll and Hyde" 
change for the worse in a game. 
Tadlock said that officials 
rarely reverse calls even when it 
looks as if they were wrong. 
"One of the wrost things an 




Steve Farnsworth 
Sports Columnist 



official can do is hesitate", he 
stated. "It makes him look bad. 
You have to make your call 
immediately and then not back 
down. If you don't appear sure 
of every call you make, soon 
everyone will question every call 
you make." 

He admitted that officials do 
make mistakes. 

"We're all human beings and 
we all make mistakes. I don't 
know an official who doesn't," 
he stated. 

He said that the thing to 
remember was that the officials 
are right well over 90% of the 
time and that any mistakes are 
in judgement, not about rules. 
Any bad calls are evenly 
distributed between the two 
teams. 

Another frequent complaint 
against officials, bias for the 
home team, was refuted by 
Tadlock. 

"You don't have time to 
discriminate against a team," 
he said. "When you're making 
split-second decisions you don't 
have time to think about which 
team's way the call will go." 

"If the official was biased, the 
coaches would make sure he 
wasn't around long." 



When asked how officials 

manage to keep track of all the 

possible violations that could 

happen, Tadlock said that an 

official must keep himself apart 

from the game's action. 

The official also has to learn 
to watch for certain movements 
which nearly always indicates 
violations. Tadlock says he 
continually talks to players, 
warning them, letting them 
know he's watching them and 
finally hitting them with a 
violation if they don't heed the 
warnings. 

He said that the national' 
increase in sports rowdyism 
hasn't shown up in Palm Beach 
County. 

"There are certain schools in 
the area with fan problems," he 
said, "but they've been like that 
for several years. When there is 
trouble, it's usually outsiders 
that are the cause." 

He considers instant replays 
on television a good idea. 

"On instant replay, every- 
thing is slowed down and easier 
to see. The fan has much more 
time to decide than the official. 
Replays arc good, through, 
because it has shown and 
upheld the integrity of officials.* 




rflr 





PHOTO BY GREG ROBERTS 



PERSONAL FOUL- One official signals a foul while the other 
indicates the number of the player charged with the foul. 
Meanwhile, the fouled player slowly gets up off the floor. 

Cites health reasons 

Sonculius resigns 

By Jim Goodman 
Staff Writer 

Men's and women's golf coach, Joe Sanculius has resigned, 
citing health reasons. 

Sanculius resigned Dec. 31, but is staying on as interim coach 
until his replacements can be found. 

Sanculius said the stress of coaching two teams was what 
prompted his decision. 

"All that cqaching and traveling got to be quite a load," he said. 
"My doctor advised me to quit because of the stress it was putting 
on me." 

The Board of Trustees will appoint new coaches for both the 
men's and women's teams Wednesday. 

The leading candidates for the job are Dan Winters and Donna 
Horton. 

Winters is the director of Delray Beach Community School. He is 
a life-long golfer and has coached golf for several years. . 

Horton is one of the nation's top amateur golfers and a former 
number-one player on the University of Florida women's golf team. 
She lives locally and is one of only two women invited to play in the 
Bing Crosby Golf Tournament Pro- Am. 

Men's tennis needs players 



PHOTO BY BILLGULLION 



ANNOUNCES RESIGNATION- Joe Sanculius has resigned as coach 
of both the men's and women's golf teams. 



Men's Tennis Coach Hamid 
Faquir is looking for a few good 
tennis players. 

Faquir said several players 
that the team was counting on 
have become ineligible and that 
there are openings on the team. 
He urges all male students 
interested in playing tennis to 
see him in room AD-21c or come 
to practices at 2:30 p.m. at the 
tennis courts. 



Faquir also has for sale tickets 
to the Civitan Tennis Classic 
which features a match between 
Rod Laver and Bjorn Borg, The 
classic is Feb. 10 at 81 p.m. in 
the West Palm Beach Audotor- 
ium. Tickets are five, eight and 
ten dollars, and the profits 
benefit the Palm Beach 
Habilitation Center and the 
National Association for Retard- 
ed Citizens. 








•ter*'**^ 







*<% 



.*:-•*• ,.„-' 



-»*■•. 



, "JrV--- *, 



'•«*' 



PHOTO BY BILLGULLION 
NO. MORE PRACTICE- The baseball team has enteredMhe regular season and 
won't have any more practice games like this one last fall in which Steve Jacob 
rounds the bases. 

Baseball season starts 




■"A-T'tl.ftrNG- 
■FmS.T^ .DAY and K.J, KNIGHT", 
%£. Fo r m e ri y of the A M BO Y E&|!& E..53&; 



DATE 



OPPONENT 



TIME 



PLACE 



1/17 
1/18 
1/24 
1/27 
1/31 



2/1 

2/4 

2/11 

2/13 

2/18 

2/19 

2/22 

2/25 

2/26 



3/2 

3/3 

3/4 

3/5 

3/11 

3/12 

3/13 

3/14 

3/15 

3/16 

3/17 

3/18 

3/19 

3/20 

3/21 

3/22 

3/23 

3/24 

3/24 

3/25- 

3/26 

3/29 

3/30 



4/3 

4/5 

4/6 

4/7 

4/8 

4/9 

4/11 

4/12 

4/13 

4/15 

4/16 

4/22 

4/23 



JANUARY 

Ft. Lauderdale Baseball School 
Ft. Lauderdale Baseball School 
Ft. Lauderdale Baseball School 
Aquinas College 
Ft. Lauderdale Baseball School 

FEBRUARY 
Ft. Lauderdale Baseball School 
University of Miami 
Florida International University 
Florida Southern College - 
Ft. Lauderdale Baseball School 
Edison »**» 

Ft. Lauderdale Baseball School 
Dade North 
Dade North 



MARCH 



#*** 
*#*# 



*#* * 
* fr » # 



Ferris State College . 
Ferris State College 
Dade Downtown 
Dade Downtown 
Broward 
Broward 
Delaware Tech 
Catholic University 
Dade South 
Dade South 
Fordham University 
Indian River 
Indian River 
East Strausberg 
William Patterson 
St. Francis College 
Niagara University 
William Patterson 
St. Francis College 
Brandywine College 
Edison 
Dade North 
Dade North 



APRIL 
John Jay University **** 

Kings College ***. 

Kingsbourgh »»■». 

Fairleigh Dickinson University 
Dade Downtown 
Dade Downtown 
University of Buffalo .*** 
Broward 
Broward 
Dade South 
Dade South 
Indian River 
Indian River 



7:00 
2:00 
7:00 
3:00 
2:00 

7:00 

7:30 

7:30 

1:30 

2:00 

12:00 

2:00 

7:30 

1:00 



1:00 

1:00 

3:00 

1:00 

3:00 

3:00 

12:00 

2:00 

3:00 

3:00 

3:00 

3:00 

1:00 

12:00 
1:00 
1:00 
1:00 
1:00 
3:30 
1:00 

12:00 
7:30 
7:30 



12:00 
1:00 
1:00 
1:00 
3:00 
1:00 
1:00 
3:00 
3:00 
3:00 
3:00 
3:00 
1:00 



*** Away 
*** Home 
»■»* Away 

Ft. Pierce 

Home 



► ** Away 
*»» Home* 
r*» Home* 

► «» Home* 

h«* Boca Raton 

■«* Ft. Myers 

n.. Boca Raton 

». Home* 

** Home* 

Home 

Home 
** Home 
** Home 
- * Home 
-»» Home 

Home 

Home 
** Away 
* * Away 

Home 
** Home 
«* Away 

Home 

Home 

Home 

Home 

Home 

Home 

Home 
** Home 
»* Away 
** Away 



Home 

Home 

Home 

Home 

** Away 

** Away 

Home 

** Away 

** Away 

** Home 

»* Home 

** Home 

*» Away 



1=3 HACI£NMi 
T09P9DAS 



MEXICAN TREATS 




PRONTO'' 



2EH 



nmgqmttr am 




" "~ CUSTQMEDSX 




MEXICAN 
TREATS 



• TOST A DAS 

•Beef •Bean 
•Gaucamole •Chicken 
•Combination 



urritos 
liili Con Game 
acienda Stew 

a apeno Peppers 
Sopapillas 

Soda & Beer 



* Municipal 
** Conference games 
*** Exhibition games 
**** Doubleheaders 



fou the adventurous— 

A SPECIAL CUERV.WKK 1 

• WITH THIS AD YOU' ARE ENTITLED 
TOOUR "2 FORI SPECIAL"* 

1870- OKEECHOBEE BLVIX 

WEST PALM BEACH * 689-6229 

JUST WEST of 195 



I?! 



LRwmilHHP 



Monday, Jan. 17 BEACHCOMBER - 12 



BlTMMOFlCiBEaa 



/ & R announces winter activities 



f 



By Jeannette Banning 
Staff Writer 

Bowling, karate and open gym kick-off this 
term's intramural program. 

Coed team bowling begins on Jan. 26, and 
karate is tentatively scheduled for Tuesdays, 
Thursdays and Fridays at 1:30 p.m. Open gym is 
every Wednesday night beginning this week. 

Roy Bell, intramural director, said other 
activities to be held later this term include archery, 
basketball (one on one, three on three and coed), a 
golf putting tournament, horseshoes, sailing, 
scuba, a swim meet, square dancing, table tennis 
and tennis. 

He added that students should watch bulletin 
boards and read the "Beachcomber" to find out 
when new activities start. 

Coed handicap bowling with two men and two 
women to a team is held at Major league Lanes at 
2425 N. Dixie Hwy. in Lake Worth- every 
Wednesday from 4-6 p.m. Entry forms and a 
sign-up sheet are posted outside the intramural 



office ( PE-4k) in the gym . 

Bell recommended the bowling teams should be 
organized and that students not on a team should 
be at the bowling alley to be drafted onto a team. 

Trophies are awarded to the first-place team and 
to scorers of the men's and women's high game. 
Intramural T-shirts are given to all participating 
students. 

Those students interested in karate, whether 
beginner or experienced, should also sign up in 
PE-4k. Paul Ratanaprasitch, Fifth-degree black 
belt in Tae-Kwon-Do karate, is the. instructor. He 
has been teaching intramural karate here for the 
last two years. 

Open gym is from 7-9 p.m. and will be cancelled 
on Jan. 26 and all nights the basketball team plays 
home games. Gymnastic equipment may be used 
during open gym but there must be at least two 
students practicing on the equipment. One student 
must act as a spotter or safety person to assist and 
prevent falls. 





Voice of the Palm Beach Junior College Student 



Vol. 38 No. 12 



Monday, January 24, 1977 



Lake Worth, Florida 33461 



Board lawyer quits 



Member of the 

associaTeD 
coLLeciaie 
pRess | 



EP 



f 



Board passes bill despite Union plea 



Simon named student intramural director 




PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER 

STUDENT DIRECTOR- Paul Simon has been 
named Student Intramural Director. 



By Jeannette Banning 
Staff Writer 

Paul Simon, a second semester • P.E. major, has 
been appointed Intramural Student Director by 
Roy Bell, intramural, director. 

Simon, a graduate of Cardinal Newman High 
School, served as a volunteer member of the 
Intramural Board last semester. 

Bell said Simon's responsibility will include 
planning and organizing intramural activities for 
the winter term, recruiting students to serve as 
members of the Intramural Board, supervising 
activities and act as chairman of the board. 

Simon will also serve as student representative 
for intramural and recreation on the Student 
Activity Fee Committee. 

Over the weekend, Simon accompanied Bell to an 
intramural sports workshop sponsored by the 
National Intramural-Recreational Sports Associa- 
tion at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. 

Bell said some of the topics covered at the 
workshop were Title IX and Intramurals, how to 
organize tournaments and 10 activities for any, 
school. 



. , -Ml 

PHOTO BY STEVE FARNSWORTH 



M 



INTRAMURAL BOWLING-Oscar Cash tries for a strike 
intramural bowling which is going to be held again this term. 



in 



Softball team meets today 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

Despite vehement protests from union and local 
interests, the JC Board of Trustees voted 
unanimously to make changes in faculty working 
conditions. 

Voting on advice of their attorneys, the board 
voted 5-0 in favor of the changes. 

The general contentions on the faculty's part 
were on the academic rank system and the pay 
scale. Many teachers were present at the three 
hour meeting. 

Dan Hendrix, JC math instructor, told that the 
morale of the teachers is at an alarmingly low 
level. Hendrix also asked about the salary of the 
administration lawyer, Jesse Hogg. 

His questions centered around 'a. statement by 
Trustee Susann Anstead that money was not 
available for salary increases. 

According to figures released by Dr. G.Tony 
Tate, vice-president of business affairs, the 
20-month fee of Hogg was $37,778.98. "This 
included preparation for unfair labor hearings as 



well as briefs and other hearings," Tate said. 

When the Figure was released, many union 
leaders said the figure seemed low. 

Glen Marstellar, chief union negotiator, said 
$41,955 had been taken from the instructional 
budget and $27,000 added to that for raise's to 
administrators including JC : President Dr. Harold 
C. Manor. 

In other action. Board attorney Richard Burk 
resigned his post. He was on the edge of being 
fired but his resignation, which was accepted by a 
3-2 vote, took care of that. 

Anstead, who took Burk to task for what she 
termed "numerous errors", had led the effort to 
get Burk removed as board attorney. 

Board chairman Frances Hand felt that only 
Bark's qualifications and -not his' "political 
persuasion" were the most important item. 

This stemmed from a letter from attorney Frank 
McKcown, a former board member who praised 
Burk. McKeown said that one member of the 
board's "political persuasion" disagreed with 
Burk's, thus his dismissal. 



All women students interest- 
ed in playing on the softball 
team are to report torooiriPE-5 
in the gym today at 3 p.m. 

Rules and regulations, along 
with practice time, will be 



discussed during the meeting by 
softball coach Bobbie Knowles. 
Those attending the meeting are. 
expected to come prepared to 
practice. 



EARNUPTQ*30Q0PERSEMESTEI 

OBMUOI^MORE! 

Campus Reps wanted to post distribute for commission. Lines 
guaranteed to sell. Agressive, motivated persons. Few hours 
weekly. Send resume, $2, for job description, info sheets, 
application forms, post & handlg. Upon acceptance receive 
coding number, memb. card, work manual free. With first 
weekly commission check receive your $2 back. WRITE: 
Nationwide College Marketing Services (WCMS), Box 1384, 
Ann Arbor, Ml 48106. 



r 



Backpacker's General Store 

4443 SOUTHERN BLVD. 
PHONE: 688-HIKEH 

ASK US ABOUT NAME BRANDS YOU 



CAMP TRAILS 
NORTH FACE 
EUREKA 
VASQUE 
WIGWAM 
SPORTIF 



KNOW & TRUST LIKE: 

SVEA 

OPTSMUS 
SIGG 
EFI 
GAZ 
WONDER 



SWISS SILVA AIRLIFT MOUNTAIN HOUSE 

STOP IN AND TALK SHOP WITH GLENN KINSEY 

ABOUT YOUR HIKING, BACKPACKING. 

CANOEING OR KAYAKING EXPERIENCES. 




1. 



-if 



INTRAMURAL 



COED TEAM 

LEAGUE 

INTRAMURAL 

BOWLING 
KARATE \ WEDNESDAY, 

(open to men and women) \ JAN. 26th 

FREE KARATE CLASSES 

- Tuesday, Thursday, Friday - 

1:30p.m. 

GYMNASIUM STARTING TUESDAY, JANUARY 25th 





PHOTO BY BILL JOHNSON 

KEY TRUSTEE MEETING^ Trustees confer 
[above], with Trustees attorney Richard Burk who 
resigned at the meeting. The meeting was 
highlighted by Union pleas for the board not to 
accept administration changes in faculty working 
conditions. . 



Screen committee 





PHOTO BY BILL JOHNSON 



MAJOR 
XEAGUE LANES 

4-6p.m. 



„f 



North .campus construction 
is scheduled to -begin soon 



By Bill Johnson . 
Assoc. Editor 

In its first meeting, the 
presidential screening commit- 
tee made some additional rules 
to find a president . 

Dr. Elizabeth Erling, execu- 
tive secretary of the committee, 
reported, that there were 82 
applications, and that only 36 of 
those were qualified. 

Committee member Sally 
Taylor questioned if the ten 
years administrative experience 
is an absolute cut-off point. 



By Kathy Cavanaugh 
Staff Writer 

Construction of the new North 
Campus is scheduled to start 
soon. The new campus will be 
located on PGA Blvd. just east 
of the County Courthouse. 

The only drawback is lack of 
money. All money must come 
from State Legislature alloca- 
tions since no assistance is 
received from the county school 
system. 

' According to Dr. Ed Eissey, 
North Campus vice-president, 
construction would start im- 
mediately if it were not for 
monetary problems. Eissey is 
hopeful that construction will 
begin sometime during the 
1977-78 school year. 

At one point this year, JC was 
going to buy the RCA plant in 
Palm Beach Gardens. Its 
buildings could have been 
converted into classrooms and 
facilities. RCA decided not to 
sell the plant, therefore plans 
for construction of JC-North 
continued. 

The college has owned the 108 
acres of land for the North 
Campus since 1963. But the idea 
of building a North Campus did 
not begin to be seriously 




Some of the committee felt that 
people with nine years of 
experience should be consider- 
ed. The legal aspects of this 
were discussed, as the board 
advertised for 10 years of 
experience. 

The committee decided to 
refer the matter to college 
attorney, Richard Burk (Burk 
resigned as attorney last week 
at the Board of Trustees 
meeting, just before they were 
to vote on dismissing him). 

Taylor added that the 
committee should have met 
before the requirements were 
sent out. 

Recommendations the com- 
mittee gives the board appar- 
entlyarenot confined to the four 
to 10 applicants the board 
instructed. 

"We might pick 20 (appli- 
cants)" said Trustee Dr. Philip 
Lichtblau, chairman of the 
meeting. 

Other ground rules were 
made as to the accessibility of 
the applications to the commit- 
tee. Erling said the applications 
will not be allowed out of the 
building. 

About seeing the applications 
in other than business hours, 
Erling said, "all you have to do 
is call so we can have someone 
here." 

In fact, the group took the 
idea of working on weekends so 
well that they scheduled their 
next meeting for Saturday 
morning, Jan. 29. 



THE WINDY CITY?- So far JC has been hit with cold weather, 
strange white flakes, and a few little breezes that over-turned the 
cement table on the SAC patio. 



Committee hears DECA . 
Monsters invade Venture 
Women's tennis: Profile . 



P. 2 

P.4&5 
P. 7 



2 - BEACHCOMBER Mon. f Jan. 24, 1977 






Fee committee to acton club request 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

At the weekly Student 
Activity Fee Committee (SAFC) 
meeting, both the fate of the 
Inter-Club Council (ICC) and 
Sales and Marketing Club 
(DECA) were discussed. 

ICC. the newly-formed "wat- 
chdog" of JC clubs, has had 
problems from the start. It was 
accepted as a member of SAFC 



in the fall 1976 term 

Some of the problems 
included attendance, club apa- 
thy and money. Because of a 
lack of an official constitution, 
ICC never actually received any 
money until recently. 

It was decided by SAFC that 
the problems of'the ICC will be 
settled best by a general? 
reorganization of the club as it 
now stands. Tom Solder, ICC 
chairman, noted he has already 



Storage building 
built for chemicals 

Construction of a chemical storage building immediately west of 
the science wing has begun. 

This building is being constructed away from the classrooms on 
the west side as a preventative measure in case of chemical 
explosion. When completed it will house acids, highly noxious 
chemicals and other supplies. ■ . • 

Presently chemicals are being stored in the physical plant, 
biology and chemistry rooms and other various places on campus. 

The contract for construction was signed Dec. 21 , the work began 
approximately two weeks ago, and is due to be completed by Feb 
19. J 

County program 
fights for cures 



begun reorganization. , 
.. DECA, now. a -member .''in 
protest" of ICC, made a pitch to 
become a member of SAFC for 
"the fall 1977 term. 

Kathleen Kenney, student 
president of DECA, and 
Aristotle Haretos, faculty advis-' 
or to ^ DECA, made . the 
presentation to the committee. ', 

They noted the many functions 
of DECA as a part of the 
Business dept. 



"We. are a very competitive 
club," noted Kenney. "The 
basis of operation for DECA is 
to compete." 

Kenney went on to tell of the 
many social and service 
functions of the group. It 
includes 40 members who are 
mostly Marketing majors. 

The SAFC voted to accept the 
report from DECA and to see if 
money can be allotted for use 
next semester by DECA. They 



asked for three per cent of the 
total "pie" allocated amount. It 
figures to be about $3,500. 

Dean Paul Glynn, chairman of 
SAFC, noted that the one 
problem that now exists is 
finding fees for DECA. 
Nearly every group has asked 
; for an increase for next term. 
"DECA is a fine group that 
, deserves funding," Glynn said. 
"The trouble is finding the 
money." 

L 



,"S6S 




11 



PHOTO BY BARRY VAN WAGNER, 



Community Action Program 
(CAP) held their first official 
organizational meeting last 
Monday. 

Attending this meeting was 
CAP County Chairman Hugh 
Lambert, County Executive 
Director, Mr. Bostien and the 
new JC Chapter President, 
Stephanie Klinzman. 

The group's main purpose is 
to help fight birth defects, as 
well as to find ways to help 
activities raise money or raise 
the money themselves. 

One way in which they plan to 
help is with the institution of 
Jail and Bail. 

Important people in Palm 
Beach County such as police 
chiefs, mayors, and JC's own 
Dr. Manor are "arrested" with, 
knowledge of it before hand and 
put in jail. 

They stay in jail until they 
raise t heir bail — either by 
pledging money themselves, or 
by their friends pledging. 
However, they have to pay over 
what people may be pledging to 
keep them in jail. 

Presently the main problem is. 

Actor Windom 



plays Thurber 
in assembly 



television cooperation. Accord- 
ing to Lambert, it is essential to 
have help from the TV stations. 
Channel five has turned the 
group down, so channel 12 is 
being asked to help. ' ' 

The group's next meeting is 
Wednesday at 1:30 in SAC 
lounge. 



NEEDED PROJECT— Soon-to-be-completed new wing .of Science building that will house chemicals 

Steele: Nationals a realihL^ 



•B/'»kVe'Ta|tt>r vn» 

Staff Writer 

"Encountered Problems 
Suicide" was the topic 



of 
of 




"discussTon ' fo'r .TC" ' "fresn'rhan 
Trent Steele at the Florida 
Crownjndividual Events Classic 
held in -December. This topic 
gave Steele a first place in 
Persuasive speaking. 

' ' I have ; written three other 
persuasive .oratories since the 
state competition and plan to try 
them out on other state judges 
to decide which I will present at 
the Nationals. These papers 
range from 'Work Dissatisfac- 
tion' ;to 'Personal Discrimina- 
tion'. ■ ■ 

"I do however believe I will 
smooth out the rough edges and 
stick with the paper on suicide. I 
feel the judges were most 
impressed by it", stated Steele. 

He also captured a second 
place in Extemporaneous 
speaking, as he downed 
students from • six southern 
universities and 'six Florida 
junior colleges. ,., :i u .- ;*:,'. 



"We 'first go" "ftTfnugh two 
picliminaiy rounds and then to 
the finals," heexplained^ 

In each of those rounds 
students select three topics from 
a hat and have 20 to 30 minutes 
to prepare a speech 7-10 
minutes long on any of the 
topics. The topics generally 
range from political or 
economical issues to foreign or 
domestic issues. The students 
are allowed to refer to published 
articles before delivering the 
speech. 

Last year he competed in the 
Nationals where he was rated 
third on the high school level. 

"I hope. I do as well in college 
competition as I did in my high 
school years," he stated. 

He has qualified to advance to 
the Nationals being held in 
Fairfax, Va. The date is yet to be 
announced. 



i! 



^L 



E n r o 1 1 m en t a r eco rd 



OFF THE TOP OF HIS HEAD -Trent Steele, who will travel to the 

National Forensics tournament, will be in the Extemporaneous 
speech category. photo by hugh lambert 



By Eden White 
Staff Writer ■ 

Character actor, William Windom, who is 
probably best known for his award winning role in 
"My World and Welcome To It", will present his 
rendition of the life and character of 
•vriicr-humorist James Thurber in the .first 
assembly of three to take place during the winter 
icrm. ■•'•.' 

The assembly, which is to begin at 10:50 a.m. in 
• he gym on February 17, features Windom's 
prnrayal of Thurber, who is perhaps most well 
known for "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty", a 
short story concerning a man's efforts to escape 
i he banality of everyday life . 

In addition to guest appearances in episodes of 
"Night Gallery", "Star Trek", 'T 'reus 
Welby.M.D." and "All in the Family". V* %m 



has also appeared in many feature length films, 
including: "The Man", "Escape from the Planet 
of the Apes" and "To Kill a Mockingbird". 

Windom's interest in Thurber began in his youth 
when he saw his cartoons in The New Yorker. He 
"touched a nerve," says Windom," and fed a 
need and has been a private oasis for me since I 
was fifteen. "The . charm, wit and truth of 
Thurber's work unfolded slowly for. me over the 
next thirty years. " . >. 

The two other assemblies, more musically 
oriented, are scheduled to take place in March. 
They feature the talents of the New York Harp 
Ensemble and a piano duo consisting of twin 
brothers. ,. ;. ,.. . , • , , .,'; , 

Two of the three assemblies are to take place 
during school hours, thus classes are. cancelled at 
those times. 



v, -With the release of registra- 
tion figures by Registrar 
■Charles G. Grahjtm two. winter . 
Merm records -Have ■been broken : - 
> The first was an all time high- 
7,870 for winter term registra- 
tion-surpassed only by the 1975 
;■ fall term figure of 7,982. 

Secondly, this isthe first time 
JC " has ever had a larger 
registration for a winter term 
than for the previous fall term, a 
jump of 151 from the fall term's 
7.719, 

Current enrollment, for the 
main campus and its branches 
are as follows (day and night 
classes combined): 



South 
Mixed 



503 
585 



>'- 


Central 


5,542 


h! 


North 


769 


fe 


Glades 


471 



NOrth . frompgl 

thought about until 1972. Since 
then environmentalists and 
faculty biologists have been 
studying the topography and 
plant and animal life so the 
buildings could be constructed 
in the most suitable areas. 

The master plan, after years 
of alteration, has just been 
completed. It encompasses six 
phases of building. The first two 
phases are planned to be built 
simultaneously. They include 
four multi-story classroom 
buildings, a media center 
(library), student facilities, 
administration building and a 
physical plant. 

Ultimate completion of the 
North Campus will be larger 
than the existing main campus. 



'*S 



[editorials) 

Woes of those who bulge 

Nearly half of America shares a problem. There is no way 
of describing or labeling it to soften the stigma attached to it. 

It is fat no matter what you call it. 

According to researchers, this problem is established 
during infancy, with mother taking some of the credit and the 
cells of the infant taking the rest . 

The number of fat cells remain constant throughout the life 
span of an individual. These unfortunate victims become the 
40% who must conduct a lifetime battle against the bulge, 
support unending diet groups and clubs, follow food fad diets 
and enrich weight-control clinics and spas. 

Entire clothing lines are designed to camouflage, enhance, 
subdue or tolerate obesity. They also cost more. . 

Comics find a rich source of material in this condition. 
Human string beans torture the dieters by stashing away 
banquet-sized meals that seem to disappear without a trace. 

Health spas are multiplying like mushrooms, catering 
almost exclusively to massaging, pounding, steaming and 
exercising those horrible pounds off. 

Medics and nutritionists issue dire warnings on the perils 
of being overweight. 

Insurance companies add to the misery by raising rates 
and uttering statistics to show the worst thing that can 
happen to everyone is to expand the waist.. They have gone 
so far as to say that your waistline is your lifeline, and they do 
not mean that the longer the .tape stretches around the girth, 
the longer the life expectancy. 

The real champion heavies end up in circuses, and books of 
record, where they are in constant demand because, as we 
said, the heavier the body, the shorter the lifespan. 
• Time was when a fat person was happy and jolly. Everyone 
loved a fatty . Or so they said. . 

Today the only jolly fat person is Santa, and even his hoho 
sounds contrived. With conservation as the trend of today, it 
is no wonder a fat person is placed on the defensive. Space 
limitations, food shortages threatening, it seems that only 
thin people fit well into the economy. 

Don't you believe it. It's the stringbeanS' that will 
eventually eat us out of house and home. The overweight will 
be too busy dieting for their health. We're accusing the 
wrong group. 

Trustees in need of polish 

The Board of Trustees of JC are a mixed bag. They consist 
of a teacher, two doctors, a businessman and a housewife. 

But as a child haven't we all uttered: Don't adults act 
funny sometimes? In the case of these adults, their time for 
queer behavorial tendencies is at board meetings. 

During the important hearing Wednesday night the board 
members if not laughing and talking among themselves, they 
were certainly not paying attention to the matters at hand. 

This is not just an observation of this writer. As Joe 
Martin, president of the Palm Beach county chapter of the 
AFL-CIO said quippingly, "could you check the public 
address system or move closer to the microphone? You seem 
to be talking to yourselves." 

Yes Mr. Martin, they were. They couldn't have heard too 
much that transpired due to the demeanor that was 
displayed. -..■". 

This is the same board that runs this institution. We as 
taxpayers deserve a better display than outburst that have 
become an institution at these monthly outings. 

Maybe someone should look longer at just who sits in these 
lofty positions. : 



Beachcomber 

Palm Beach Junior College 
4206 S. Congress Ave., Lake Worth, F la 33461 
(305) 965-8000, ext. 210 

Editor-in-chief. . . .". .Dennis Glavin 

Associate Editor-Editorial • ■ Gunda Caldwelj 

Associate Editor-News ■ • Bill Johnson 

Associate Editor- Feature, Sports . Steve Farnsworth 

News Editor Cindy McCarthy 

Venture Editor Frank Smith 

Photo Editor Emily Hamer 

Business Manager ■ • ■ ■ Dave Taylor 

Consultant. . ■ ■ -Charles R.McCreight 

The Beachcomber Is published weekly from our editorial offices In 
the Student Pullcatlons. Building at Palm Beach Junior College . 
Opinions expressed in the Beachcomber are those of the editors or 
writers and. are riot < nesessarlly those of the Palm Beach Junior 
..College.: . .,■ ,• ,, •• .;:■;■: - { : .,■ ■ ■■'■■ ;■ ,.-.', 

Letters must not exceed 2oci words, must be sighed by the author, 
received in the Beachcomber office no later than 4 p.m. " on 
Wednesday ;and are subJeet;to condensation. ;.-.';;.-•> 

-■- '"' ii; * ■■"^-■^ f''-'% ,| inn, mt * 

■(.•■'./:.; i'iWnJ^T^/.... . ,:! iii;tli 



Mon., Jan. 24, 1977 BEACHCOMBER - 3 




Editor 
forum 



The travesty committed by 
the Board of Trustees at their 
last meeting was ju^t another in 
a long line of strange decisions 
they've made. The end is 
nowhere in sight. ' ' • 

Here on the board we have 
men and women who have 
husbands and wives in some of 
the tightest "union-type" 
organizations in the United 
States. These include the 
American Bar Assoc, the 
American Denial Assoc, and the 
American Medical Assoc. 

Why are they bent on burying 
the faculty and collective 
bargaining? 

Not one person, except 
longwinded Jesse Hogg, attorn- 
ey for the administration, spoke 
against collective bargaining. 

Govenor Askew, who for 
some reason appointed these 
Trustees to their positions 
(maybe because of their party 
affiliation) is in favor of it. Joe 
Martin, county AFL-CIO presi- 
dent, is also. He also said it's 



Vwii 




Denny Glavin 
Editor 



degrading that nothing has 
happened after 14 months of 
hoopla. 

It seems strange that when 
only one board member and 
hardly anyone else wanted a 
name change last year — it was 
almost bulldozed through. , 

But here we have sentiment 
nearly 100 per cent in favor and 
all the board could do is say how 
sorry they felt as they 
unanimously slapped the faculty 
down. ■..;..■_: 

How the board is considered 
impartial in this matter is 
ludicrous. They work monthly, 
with the same ineffectiveness 
they did last night, with Dr. 
Manor, the "other side" in the 
affair. 

They cannot be considered 
legislative because they simply 
are not elected by the people. 

More than that, they don't 
represent the students, the 
teachers or anyone except 
apparently administration in- 
terests. 



As one teacher noted "they 
are not accountable to anyone 
except themselves." 

The general consensus of 
student opinion is that JC 
teachers are a fine and 
formidable group. Why then is 
the board acting like they don't 
belong? 

Why if the rapport between 
students and teachers is so 
high, is it so low between 
students and administration and 
teachers and administration? 

The answers may He in the 
board itself. They must back up 
the teachers and students and 
start getting imput as to what 
they think. We all know too well 
how administrators feel. 

The morale is so low now that 
many students and teachers feel 
like throwing in the towel. As 
this happens JC has lost all the 
dignity that has made it the 
finest junior college in Florida 
and perhaps the nation. 

It's you're college Trustees! 



( letter ) 

Photographer feels catalog ok 



editorial) 



Editor: 

In regard to your Jan. 17 
■Beachcomber editorial, "JC 
catalogs must be precise," I feel 
it is wrong to put down the 
Catalog for being unreliable. 

It is Ms. Caldwell who is 
unreliable in seeking out her 
facts. 

I photographed a consider- 
able number of the pics in the 
catalog so 1 know that I am 
reliable on my facts. 

The editorial mentioned that 
"there are football and softball 
for women pictures included",^ 
and that JC has "not had 
football for three years. " 

• "" JC'neVer had a football team. 

The football pictures shown 
•are! *ne' Intr'amW&Vnflagta-g ' 

!, fcforrJaH"teUms'; ; -•■'- ■ «'' ! <■-■■■-.• 



In addition, there are no 
softball for women pictures in 
the catalog, what is shown is the 
men's intramural softball team. 

It is a shame that Ms. 
Caldwell is lacking in knowledge 
of Mr. Roy Bell's extensive and 
fine intramural program. 

Brian Rucker 
JC News Bureau, Photographer 



Editors Note: We, more than 
most students on campus, know 
of Bell .and bis fine programs. 

But Mr. Rucker, there are no 
intramural softball or flagtag' 
football teams and haven't been 
for nearly two years. 

We felt arty way that this was 
justpart of what was "misleading 
iOur facts were correct. 



There is no better way to 
show the difference between a 
tightly written, professional 
item and the floundering, 
verbose giant that is red tape, 
than the following: 

The Lord's Prayer contains 
56 words. 

The Gettysburg Address has 
266 words. 

■ The Ten Commandments 

•"totals 297'words. 
Declaration of Independen- 
ce was completed with 300 
words. 
BUT: 

A recent U.S. government 
order setting the price of 
cabbage took 26,911 words. 
(Courtesy George Washing- 
ton University description of 
an editing course. Eduea^ 
tion, USA Oct. 1976) 

Anyone want to comment? 



4 - BEACHCOMBER Mon., Jan. 24, 1977 



Mon., Jan. 24, 1977 BEACHCOMBER , 5 



f».. 

T* 1 



M&' 






AAonstersive! 



• \ 






p.-* 




"i . 






«■.*—■. 'J ,- .'3 ■* ,, J1 * t , 

-*'■ v j S. * - " * 
■"V. ' *V 










By Don Vaughan 
Venture Columnist 

After seeing Dino De Laurentiis' "King 
Kong", I left the theatre with a burning 
question: What did they do with the dead 
monkey? The movie ends with Kong lying in the 
middle of 42nd Street tying up traffic and 
making a general nuisance of himself, but no 
explanation is given as to how he. was evicted 
from the Big Apple. 

And if I know New York sanitation workers 
like I think 1 do, they wouldn't touch him with a 
ten-foot pole. It's in their contract. Section six, 
paragraph three, strictly forbids any sanitation 
worker for the State of New York from ' 'picking 
up, cleaning up or kicking into a corner: (a) 
disabled flying saucers, rockets or satellites of 
either national or foreign make; (b) litter caused 
by riots, conventions or parades by the DAR; (c) 
wounded, maimed, mauled or slightly 
disturbed politicians; (d) debris caused by 
geological upheaval, political usurpation, 
collisions with heavenly bodies and 
Armageddon or (e) forty-foot dead monkeys." 
Personally, I feel that if they left him there long 
enough someone would steal him. New Yorkers 
are known to do things like that. 

Throughout the movie I kept hearing 
anonymous persons in the audience utter 
thought-provoking comments such as "Thank 
God he isn't real!" and "Boy, I'd hate to meet 
him in a dark alley!" Actually, I think it would 
liven up things if some of the monsters created 
on the silver screen paid a visit to the real 
world. 

I'd love to see one of my favorites, Godzilla, 
do his thing in scenic downtown Tokyo. I have 
nothing against Tokyo, it's just that I'm still 
upset with them for the cheap radio they refuse 
to fix. Revenge is sweet. 

The majority of monsters in the movies were 
dinosaurs, either of known nationality or 
"composite" dinosaurs, that is, big lizards of 
no known origin. ' .-',** ,,„„, 

*1{ seenis thtof diftft&atir? are always getting a '* ! 
bum deal. Take the one that pm the finger on 
New York in "The Beast From 20,000 
Fathoms." That poor dinosaur, Sid by name, 



was taking j 



million-year nap and 



suddenly foistpself in the present. As 
monsters go, h e ! a little short-tempered and 
put out of its mita large hunk of New York. 
"Gee, Martiwhat happened to your 

house ?" :km 

"I don't knffUce, I went to bed last 
night with ever|* in its place, and I woke up 
to find my pajeattered from here to the 
Hudson River, t 

"If you asl| Martha, I think they're 
getting a little fed away with this urban 
renewal!" | 

In the '50s ill las a 3D movie called "The 
Creature From Black Lagoon", which was 
about a fish-ma | was bumming around the 
Amazon Riven | to get his head together 
(and no doubts |ng sea weed, as fish-men 
are known to to in suddenly he is captured 
by a group of (kists. You see, scientists 
always seem to fthe rap when things went 
wrong with whs f monster they happened to 
be pursuing. !, 

You never i garbage men stalking the 
creature fronrf.-sPTck Lagoon or bag boys 
from Publix nwk^monster from the parts of 
cadavers or men trying desperately to 
figure out somiay to stop Gamera from 
. ravaging Passat : 

Monsters in .future? Well, word has it 
from Paramount: they are about to release a 
picture about a : dinosaur that stays where 
it belongs and x't do anything to anyone. 
Critics at it's ;w showing say it has the 
pulse-poundinj ion of "Nanny and the 
Professor" an social relevance of "My 
Three Sons." 

And Univei 
Paramount to t 
release "You 
Around Anynv 
"You Mean T§st 
tel 



fcs a J 
House cook an 
New York and I federal aid to the hard-hit 



village. Rex Re 
like it since "Tl 



The above is the cover of a book telling the story of the production of the movie "King Kong", Available 

through Ballentine Books, 201 E. 50th Street, N.Y., N.Y. 10022. 




ByEdPicard 
Venture Writer 



in an attempt to beat 

x office money, is about to 

i't Have Jerry To Kick 

the sequal to its popular 

gere Elected?", which 

ormer president Jerry 

■irnade by a crazed White 

i\vs 40 feet, hitchhikes to 



d he hadn't seen anything 
itball That Ate Oshkosh." 





GODZI LLA" COURTESY OF TOJO PRODUCTIONS 



A little "Gorgo" lives in us all 



i%H\±**m 



mi 



,/ 



• *St 



Tne ramp now sits in quiet solitude but will soon be filled with high speed 
skaters when the park opens soon on Gun Club Road . 



In the first article on skateboarding I discussed it's origins. In this 
article I am more or less discussing, the future of skateboarding, a 
future partially made possible by the skateboard park. 

Believe it or not, the people we have to thank for the advent of the 
skateboarding parks are those law enforcement agencies that kept 
kicking us out of the good skateboarding spots like Hypo, or 
"Hamburger Hill". With the removal of the natural hot 
skateboarding spots, there was an increasing need for good places 
to skateboard and as the. saying goes, "necessity is the mother of 
invention". 



It started in California with the drained swimming pools. Finally 
someone got the idea of making money off this love for riding 
vertically in bowls. The first skateboarding parks were opened there 
less than three years ago. 



Since then over 137 parks have opened up in 26 states. Florida is 
now getting into the act with the opening of six parks on the Gold 
Coast. Palm Beach County will be on the scene with the opening in 
less than a month of a large park located on Gun Club Road near the 

Airport. 

Skateboarding parks are big money, but so are the costs. The 
amount of cement is astronomical, as, is the designing, wire 
mesh and the real biggie, insurance. Despite these short comings, 
skateboarding parks are profitable as is indicated by the rapid build 
up of parks throughout the U.S. 

The average fee for riding in these parks is a dollar an hour which 
may seem like a lot, but for three dollars you can ride until you can't 
ride anymore. 

Many safety precautions are taken at these parks such as the 
mandatory use of helmets which are usually supplied by the 
management. In addition, attendants are posted to make sure 



Ich are designed to minimize 



everyone follows the rules 
accidents. 

The courses have different 
beginner can have a goodj4 
advanced, there are runs ascl 

Skateboarding parks have s | 
nonskater. In most parks ther | 
along with places to view the a;[ 

With all this going for thetfpw can they lose? See ya in the 
bowl! if 



*ees of difficulty so that even the 
jSffsfVout killing himself. For the 
tgi n g as their ability to go for it. 
:hing for everyone, including the 
1 pinball machines and snackbars 



By Frank Smith 
Venture Editor 

I don't need psychiatric help, I just wanted 
psychiatric help. Just like I don't need to tell you 
i Ins sums but 1 want to. After all, a publishing 
firm may read it and want to buy the movie rights 
and I can use the money, I don't need the money 
bui 1 want the money. 

But I disgress, even though I don't need to. 

The psychiatrist lulled me into a 
semi-conscious (half-asleep) state, and asked me 
pertinent (timely?) questions about my early 
adolescent stages (childhood). 

He said, "Go back to your early childhood." 

I concentrated (thought real hard) on being 
young and arrived at a time of rainbows (as in 
"Somewhere over the .."), sunbeams (as in 
electric razors) and diapers (which are like three 
corner hats in that they have three corners). 

1 was three years old. 

"That's not early enough," he said, "Go 
further back!" 

He was egging me on, milking me for facts. I 
grilled my teeth (sounds like breakfast). 

"Think young!" he admonished. It was 
obviously his desire to seem young. He wore a 
long hair wig and a suit, cut for disco 
dancing. He'd have been more with it, without it. 

I thought backward, "Now clear all it's," I 
said. 

"Say what?" he asked. 

"Now clear...," I began but corrected myself. 
"It's all clear now." 

"There, 1 see my mother, someone's handing 



me to her," I reported, 

"Think further back!" he demanded. 

"1 don't understand," 1 said (because 1 didn't). 

" What do you mean?" he asked (he didn't 
either). '■' 

Suddenly I had found myself in a scene straight 
from King Arthur, medieval place complete with 
castles and bad underwear. 

"Think further back," he said. 

1 concentrated harder. There was a lot of 
people listening to a man on a hill. They were 
passing out fish and bread. No mayonnaise 
however. 

"You are going back to former lives," said a 
faraway voice. 

Closing my eyes against the effort, I felt my 
brain shift imperceptibly ,(a small motion in the 
case of an arm, but scary when it concerns 
something that normally doesn't move, like a 
corpse.) 

There was the smell of decaying plants and the 
sound of small animals moving through the 
antediluvian swamp (I don't have time to look up 
antediluvian). It looked like a dark, thick jungle, 
only more so. 

I felt very small and vulnerable (susceptible to 
nosebleeds). 

The trees seemed alive with creeping 
movement. There came the sound like that of a 
large steam machine along with a low gutteral 
rumble whose vibrations moved my body to 
trembling (I was scared). 



To my right something which I had mistook for 
a bulky, black, massive tree moved. 

"Doctor?" 1 called as an assurance of safety. 
The thing moved again, allowing a shaft of light 
to strike its form. It was a nightmare lizard, 30 
feet tall with a head full of teeth. His oily, black 
skin crinkled like armor in the sun. A thrashing 
shadow of clawing anger. 

It's forelegs wrapped around my chest, I felt 
the press of steel tendons. Strangely it seemed an 
affectionate embrace, but slowly the plated arms 
began cracking my bones.... 

"I've got to get away!" I spoke and closed my 
eyes. I awoke. "You've hardly touched your 
fish," someone said. 

I closed them again. Raising my lids brought 
the perception of draw bridges and moldy walls. 
Thought took them away. 

To my relief I returned to the couch. 

"1 saw a monster!" lsaid shakily. 

"What kind of monster?" he asked with a 
contemplative air. 

"A large, terrible one. It was horrible 
(reminded me of my wife)," 1 managed. 

"That's strange, "he commented. 

"I know," I agreed(I'm not married). 

He stood up and stated, "You are suffering 
from negative delusions with psychosomatic 
depressional acuity towards Leviathanic 
Terrere 

"What does that mean?" I had to know. 

"You see monsters, "he said. 



Unctcided majors find careers in future titillating 



By Audrey Snot- 
Venture Writer 

Are you suffering from sff ects f 
undecidedness? Has it k^Pu from 
choosing a major in colleger .:. 

There are approxiriy JO00 
undecided majors currentit-olj e d at 
JC. According to last y ears sti CSi the 
normal college student w ; at]g e his 
major area of interest 3-4 tibef ore he 
graduates from a two ye^tttution. 
One thousand students g^g.s from 
JC as undecided majors y«-p*- 

Collegeis supposed to belc e wn ere 
people can explore many intts as vvell 
as prepare them for a car S ut the 
impact to having a : a Jor is 
recognizable—just operjUt ^77 



student catalog or talk to a guidance 
counselor. The undecided major is 
encouraged to take general required 
courses and explore. 

Many students entering a 4-year 
institution who've previously changed 
their major, more then often will find 
themselves needing an extra semester to 
meet graduation requirements. Most 
college students will tell you that they 
want to get their college education over 
with as quick as possible. That extra 
semester can feel like an extra year, as 
well as add to financial expenditures. 
Then, what can be done to help the 
Undecided major? 

Taking this question to Mr. Paul 
Butler, JC counselor, stressed the fact 



that the student must first want help and 
then seek it. There are eight counselors at 
JC's central campus who are eager to 
help any individual who needs assistance 
and who realize that they can only 
provide information not decisions. 

Basically, what a counselor does is set 
up a program of exploration into career 
clusters. This research is mostly 
conducted in the career information 
center, located on the 1st floor of the 
central campus library and comes in the 
form of written, audio and visual 
literature. 

Aptitude tests are always quick and 
easy feedback. A series of three one hour 
vocational preference tests and a 
personality profile test, are administered 
by Mr. Cooke, JC counselor, in the 



testing center AD-1 for a $3.00 cover 
charge which covers scoring and mailing 
costs. The student is advised to take one 
test daily because of the length and type 
of questions involved. Results can be 
obtained within a week of completion. 

The test consists of a list of various jobs 
and life activities. You are to determine 
how much you liked the descriptions 
listed in terms of most to least. 

The tests effectiveness has been 
questioned in the past, but since then, 
many improvements have been made to 
perfect it and make it appear more 
interesting. The test are simple, brief, 
and rather fun. The results are another 
story. 

A daily list of descriptions of full and 
part time employment needed covering 



St. Lucie to Broward Counties from the 
Florida State Employment Service and 
it's located in the career center. Miss 
Gwendolyn Ferguson, JC counselor, who 
presides over the career information and 
began last year sending a list of 
graduating students and their majors to 
companies all over the state of Florida at 
student's request. Last year, out of 300 
graduates only 30 complied. A letter will 
be sent to all winter term graduates 
requesting you to write your name 
address and major, by all means fill it out 
if you're planning on working after you 
graduate. If you need information take 
advantage of this school, you're paying 
for it. 

And with all this, I leave you to stumble 
unto your ultimate dream. 



6 -BEACHCOMBER Mon, Jan. 24, 1977 



■■■^^r 



Mon., Jan. 24, 1977 BEACHCOMBER ■ 7 



How to run long distances through the snows of winter 




Distance running is a 
year-round sport. There's no 
way a person can become good 
al it if he doesn't run all the 
time. 



Florida, with its usually warm 
winters, poses no problem to the 
serious runner. In Michigan and 
New York, however, two states 
with lots of runners, snow 
remains on the ground three or 
four months of the year. 

Winter running there requir- 
es a special kind of person with 
special kinds of clothing. Here's 
how they do it: 

Starting with the feet, regular 
distance training shoes usually 
suffice. Runners do their 
workouts on plowed roads, not 
in the snow. Some things done 
are to put plastic bags over your 
socks to keep water from icy 
slush out and to buy a pair of 



oversized shoes to allow 
wearing several pairs of socks. 

The body is kept warm by 
layers of clothing. The outer 
layer should be of a special kind 
of breathable nylon that allows 
moisture .to go through but 
keeps the wind out. If the outer 
layer isn't breathable the person 
can overheat. Plus, if sweat 
collects inside the clothes, it can 
freeze and further chill the 
runner. 

Although the number of inner 
layers will vary according to how 
cold it is outside, they have to be 
able to trap air to conserve body 
heat. Thermal underwear, 
sweatsuits, tee-shirts, etc., are 



the clothes usually used. 

Layer treatment is also 
applied to the hands, with a 
fluffy inner glove underneath a 
wind and water-proof one. 

A runner dressed as describ- 
ed above becomes a sort of 
chimney, with all his body heat 
rising and escaping around his 
head. To stop this heat loss, a 
.hat is a must. 

There are as many hats worn 
as there are runners, but one of 
the best is the balachava. It 
cuts the heat loss and also copes 
with the problem of the 
burned-out feeling lungs get 
after breathing lots of cold air. 

Shaped like a bag with an 
opening, and made of knitted 



wool, the balachava covers the 
entire head except for the eyes 
and nose. This means the mouth 
is covered by a layer of cloth 
through which air has to pass 
before reaching the lungs. 

Passing through the wool, the 
frigid air become preheated 
before reaching the lungs and 
the burnt-out feeling is 'avoided. 

Now, dressed properly, the 
runner can face the cold and get 
his miles in. He won't be 
comfortable, but then he won't 
be real uncomfortable, either. 
And, as he runs, he can look/ 
happily forward to next spring 
when he can destroy all his 
running rivals who didn't run 
during the winter. 



Beachcomber 



Pacers foil to Dade South, 
stage second-half rally 
to overcome Indian River 



By Denny Glnvin 
Editor 

Despite dropping a tougn 
decision to archrival Dade 
South, the Pacers took a vital 
road test at Indian River 89-81 

Wednesday. 

Against South, the team dug 
a deep hole in the first half as 
turnovers and torrid shooting by 
the Jaguars spotted them to a 
56-40 lead in the Jan. 15 game. 

The second half saw a 
complete reversal of form as the 
JC five went to a double-team- 
ing press that finally converted 
Jaguar mistakes into points for 
the Pacers. 

With guard Mike Bennett 
providing the punch, the Pacers 
pulled to within 10 at 68-58. 
Then the cagers ran off a spree 
of fast break layups by Slim 
Wethersbee and Mike shc Jf" 
maker to grab an 85-80 
advantage as the home crowd 
roared their approval . 

But Bruce Huckle , coach of 
Dade South, and his team 
showed why they are the ninth 
rated team in the nation. Their 
methodical offense was too 
much for the tired Pacer 
defense, as South came back to 
take a 100-87 victory. 

The team was without starter 
Bill Buchanan who had 20 points 
in the big win over South earlier 
this month. But Joe Ceravolo 
would not use this as an excuse 
for the defeat. 

"We missed some|d#ensive^ 
assigments and that Was t 
difference," he admitted. • 

Shoemaker, and Benfrett.- ^ v 
£6 and 21 points respectively 
iand., Derrick .Pajjl and/VY ether* 
Ijee added 12 and 10 points. 



The team then traveled to 
Indian River to face the 
Pioneers. They have always 
been doubly tough at home as 
the Pacers found out in the first 
20 minutes. 

The Pioneers used Pacer 
mistakes and good inside play 
by center Joe Manley to gain an 
eight-point spread at 47-39. 

But as has been the case for 
most of the season, the second 
half saw the Pacers come to life. 
As in the Dade South game, the 
pressing defense and full-tilt 
running game was the cure for 
the ailing offense . 

Putting pressure on Indian 
River, they erased their lead 
and went ahead with five 
minutes left in the game. They 
never relinquished the lead and 
went on to post their tenth win 
of the season against six 
setbacks. 

JC presently is 2-2 in the 
conference. Indian River, who 
dropped overtime setbacks to 
Dade North and Dade South, fell 
to 9-9 overall and 1-3 in Division 
IV play. 



They were led by Manley and 
Rod Montgomery who each 
tallied 18 points. 



For the Pacers Shoemaker 
and Bennett again led the way 
with 23 and 22 points 
respectively. Bennett had 16 in 
the second half and Buchanan. 
1 2 of his 1 4 point total. 



Shoemaker hit :llpf 14 shots! 
for 7? per cent from the field 1 
and Bennett was 10 for 10 at the 
fpulline. :';;.... 



The Pacers scheduled games 
with Chicago Central- for |qn;ight| 
was cancelled. The next homel 



game with Edison is slated for 
Wednesday Jan." 26 at 7:30 p.m. 
in the JC gym. Students 
.admitted free with^ JC ^jgniifi; 
cation." ' ' t - ^ * •■>- - 



ON THE MOVE- Derrick 
Paul [R] snags a rebound 
while Mike Shoemaker 
[below] pressures an oppo- 
sing player. 



PHOTOS BY GREG ROBERTS 








Women netters prep 
for season opener 



By Jeannette Banning 
Staff Writer 



Six women comprise a small but talented women's tennis team 
which women's tennis coach Julio Rive feels can win whenever it 
walks on the curt. 

Leading the team again this year is Vikki Beggs, last year's 
national junior college champion. Beggs did not lose a single set last 
year and has been ranked as high as 22nd in the nation. 

Number two player is returning sophomore Lisa , Yap-Sam. 
Yap-Sam also was a national champion, winning the rjo. 2 singles 
last season. She and Beggs combined to win last year's Florida 
junior college No. 1 doubles. ; 

Veteran player Kim Cavanaugh is the No. 3 player. Rive said that 
she has improved greatly since last year, recently. winning the 
women's singles title at the Meed Racquet Club. 

Three first-year players - Debbie Fung, Anne Marie Ziadie and 
Cheryl Lewis - make up the rest of the team. 

Fung, from Guyana in South America, has been one of the top 
players on the Caribbean Junior Circuit and in her own country. 

Rive "discovered" Ziadie when he saw her playing tennis in a 
P.E. class. Impressed by her form, he encouraged her to try out for 
the team. He considers her to have a great deal of promise. 

Former Leonard High player Lewis belongs to the Palm Springs 
Tennis Association and has won several of its tournaments. 

"We hope to win state and go to nationals," Rive said, speaking 
about the team's chances this year, "but we won't know how well 
we're going to do until after a few matches." 

The team is playing a 20-match schedule this year, with two 
matches against national power University of Miami. 

On Thursday, the women open the season against Dade North at 
2 p.m. on the JC tennis courts. Friday they take on the University of 
Miami at Miami. 




PHOTO BY STEVE FARNSWORTH 

WOMEN NETTERS- [above L-R] Women's tennis coach Julio Rive and veteran players Lisa Yap-Sam, 
Vikki Beggs and Kim Cavanaugh. [below L-R] Cheryl Lewis and Anne Mane Ziadie. 



"•"Cr™* 



* , ■'■--'■I.: *i'.-*A-j^ , ss&K- , £~-! , '.-».vto 




Baseball drops exhibition game 



PHOTOS BY STEVE FARNSWORTH 

MORE WOMEN NETTERS - Debbie Fung is one of three first year 
players on the team this year. * 

New golf coaches named 

Two new coaches have been hired to replace men's and women's 
golf coach, Joe Sanculius, ,;■•_,„ «^ 

Dan Winters is the new men's golf coach and Donna Morton 
White is the new women's coach. They were approved at the Board 
of Trustees meeting last Wednesday night. 

The Beachcomber will carry interviews of the two new coaches in 
next week's issue. 



By Jim Goodman 
Staff Writer 



The baseball team began the 
winter season by losing an 
exhibition game to Ft. Lauder- 
dale Baseball School, 7-5. 

Although they out hit Ft. 
Lauderdale 9-7, the team 
committed five errors and 
walked seven batters. It all 
added up to five unearned runs 
for Ft. Lauderdale. 

JC held a 3-1 lead after five 
innings, but the sixth inning 
proved disasterous for the 
Pacers. Four walks and a hit 
batter led to four runs, for Ft. 
Lauderdale. 

The Pacers added another run 
in the seventh inning to close 
the score to 5-4, but Ft. 
Lauderdale added two more 
runs in the top of the eighth to 
ice trie victory, 

Hal Steadman blasted a 
350-foot home run over the left 



field fence for the Pacers' final 
score. 

Leading hitters for the Pacers 
were Steadman, John Gagnon, 
and Gerry Continelli with two 
hits apiece. . 

Mark Cleveland, Steve Sacco, 
Harry Cook, Ted Adkins and 
Andy Giannini shared the 
pitching duties for the Pacers. 

Coach Dusty Rhodes felt the 
team needs a little more work. 
"We had some guys a little out 



of 



he commented, 
of mental 



shape," 

"There were a lot 
mistakes out there." 

"We're playing better now 
than we did last year at this 
time, though," he added. 

The Pacers play another 
exhibition game against Ft. 
Lauderdale Baseball School 
today at Ft. Lauderdale. They 
open the regular season against 
Aquinas College Thursday in Ft. 
Pierce at 3:00 p.m. 



15% DISCOUNT WITH JC ID 




^NATIONAL 

^car parts, inc. 

IMPORTED CAR PARTS 
2824 OKEECHOBEE BLVD. WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. 



8 - BEACHCOMBER Mon., Jan. 24, 1977 



Cancer drive for teachers 



DECA's sponsoring "Donate 
a Dollar Drive" for cancer 
victims. Many JC students are 
unaware that two instructors on 
campus are seriously ill with 
cancer. 

These instructors are Robert 
L. Yount, Math department and 
Ed Crowley, English depart- 
ment. 

Several concerned faculty and 
administers have set up a 
catastrophe illness fifnd to help 
these teachers to meet astro- 
nomical expenses. 

Dr. Ed Eissey, chairman of 
the fund, commented on the 
possibility of students assisting 
in the efforts to help these 
faculty members. All over 
campus there are areas where 
students can donate. 

"If we could get every 
student to donate one dollar, it 
would help immensely," Eissey 



comments. Consequently, Sales 
and Marketing Club is organiz- 
ing a Donate a Dollar Drive for 
Yount and Crowley. 

The drive has begun and will 
run at the following locations: 
cafeteris, student government 



(SG), registrar's office, finance 
office, Beachcomber, bookstore, 
Campus Security and library. 

Other organizations including 
the SG senate have already 
offered, their services to assist 
with the drive. 



classifieds 



I & R announces activity changes 



Changes in intramurals- 
sponsored open gym and karate 
have been announced by 
Intramural Director Roy Bell. 

Open gym moves to daytime 
as well as night with the gym 
open Monday, Wednesday and 
Friday from ll a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 
Students can shoot baskets, play 
table tennis, practice gymnas- 



tics and play badminton since 
there are no classes at those 
times. 

The meeting time of karate 
has been rescheduled for 
Mondays and Fridays at 1:30 
a.m. and Tuesdays at 2 p.m. 
Class changes caused the 
rescheduling. 



Beginning guitar class, Jupiter 
Community School. Starts Jan. 
20, 8:30 p.m. $10 plus book, 9 
weeks. 833-6908 or 746-7462. 
Free: Two neutered adult male 
cats, one solid black 
( declawed), one solid white. 
Contact Dot Whatley, extension 
211. 

For Sale: Drafting machine, 
$90. Betty Downing, 965-9378. 
For Sale: Very reasonable, bar 
bell set, used very little. Call 
582-6912, 12:30 to 4 p.m. Ask 
for Kim. 

Looking for female roommate to 
share an apartment, WPB area. 
Reference, call Jill King, 
833-2439. 



Help wanted:Volunteer help is 
needed on the Intramural and 
Recreation Board. No exper- 
ience necessary. Will train. 
Eight weeks of successful 
volunteer work will qualify for 
paid position. See Mr. Bell, 
intramural director, rm. 4k, 
gym ; 

Equipment manager wanted: 
Intramural open gym nights, 
Wednesdays, paying minimum 
wage. See Mr. Bell, intramural 
director, rm. 4k, gym. 
14 foot aluminum boat and 
trailer, 35 h.p. Evinrude. Great 
for fishing $500, call 626-0432. 
Iost-1970 Seacrest class ring. If 
found please call 659-1619, or go 
to gym for John Anderson. 



LEARN THE ART OF BACKPACKING 
SIGN UP AT: 

Backpacker's General Store 

4443 SOUTHERN BLVD. 
PHONE: 689-HIKE!! 

FOR 3 SESSION COURSE 
$5.00 Inclusive 



combings 



Feb. 3 -7:30P.M. 
Feb. 10 -9:30P.M. 
Feb. 19 and/or 20 



DAY HIKE 



SIU Meeting- The students for International 
Understanding are meeting Tuesday, Jan. 25 at 
2:15 in the cafeteria. AH students from foreign 
countries are asked to attend. Come in and meet 
other foreign students. 

Veterans you are invited to join the JC Veterans 
Association which is now being formed. This is a 
way that the veterans of JC can be able to help 
each other in the future. If you are interested in 
joining the association, please see Mr. Debee in 
the Registrar's office or J.' Bell or J. Wolfe in the 
V.A. office. 

Any student who did not receive a copy of the 
Galleon may pick one up in front of the 
Beachcomber office, Mon-Fri, Jan. 24-28 between 
10 and 2 p.m. Please retain this volume, as a 



second volume along with a literary magazine and 
binder will be available towards the end of the 
winter term. The Galleon is seeking writers and 
photographers for the winter volume. Anyone who 
is interested should contact Mr. Correll in the 
Humanities Building. Contributions in the form of 
poetry, short stories, photographs and illustrations 
are still being accepted for the literary magazine. 
JC will offer the following courses: 

Lawn and Golf Green management starting Feb. 3. 
Registration for the course will be held in SC-13 
Thursday Feb. 3 at 7 p.m. Fee is $24. 
Basic Electrocardiolography starting Feb. 7 from 
7:30 - 9:30 p.m. Registration will be held in the 
TE-01. Monday, Feb. 7 at 7 p.m. Fee is $20. 



kAkkk&*AA * A)kk* & M '&T k irf!r &:A Ak Ak ik k & l i 




COED IBM 
LEAGUE 
INTRAMURAL BOWLING 
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 26th 



Major 
League Lanes 



T Negotiations end without new contract 



5*.; 



-"T*, 



By BUI Johnson 
Associate Editor 

The Board of Trustees, in its 
January meeting, voted to give 
the faculty a pay raise, and in 
the same vote took it away. 

Amendments made by the 
board have given teachers who 
work only fall and winter terms 
a 2.75 per cent raise. Then the 
board cut the spring term and 
overload pay by 40 per cent, in 



effect taking back what they had 
given, as most instructors teach 
either overload or a spring term. 

These amendments made by 
the board will not be in effect 
until the 77-78 fiscal year, 
whereas the Faculty Union 
started negotiations in 1975 for 
a contract in the 76-77 fiscal 
year. 

So the union can negotiate for 
next year's contract, despite 



what has happened this year. 

"Regardless of the action 
taken this year, the union will be 
back to the table to negotiate a 
contract prior to the next fiscal 
year," said Glenn Marstellar, 
union negotiator. 

Marstellar feels that the 
negotiations can be completed 
before July, the beginning of 
the fiscal year. 

"I think the attitude of the 



board and administration has 
changed. At first they thought 
the union would just go away." 
said Marstellar. "1 believe the 
faculty is more united now that 
the administration has exposed 
themselves in what they are 
trying to do." 

This time the union will follow 
the schedule, and not negotiate 
longer than is recommended. 
Impasse-when both sides are 



deadlocked- will be called so the 
contract can be negotiated in 
time for the '78 fiscal year. 

"I think we will come to 
agreement before impasse," 
said Marstellar. 

Currently there are lawsuits 
being fought in Tallahassee 
concerning the legality of the 
board being the legislative body 
in the negotiations. 




Voice of the Palm Beach Junior College Student 
Vol. 38 No. 13 Monday, January 31, 1977 Lake Worth, Florida 33461 




Member of the 

associateD 

coLLeciaTe 
pRess 



Fee committee allotment 
set for upcoming semester 



The Student Activity Fee 
Committee (SAFC) has set its' 
percentages to be distributed to 
the 1 1 organizations within it. 

Meetings lasted nearly four 
months as the organizations 
presented objectives as well as 
budget proposals. 

The actual allotments were 
made by students representing 
the original 10 organizations. 
The percentages are to be in 
effect for the 1977-78 school 



year. 

Chairman of SAFC. 



Dean 



Paul Glynn said he felt the 
group worked well. "Their job 
is only to set percentages in a 
fair manner. They accomplished 
this very well," Glynn added. 

A new club, Sales and 
Marketing was added to SAFC 
jurisdiction. They were given 
two percent of the total. 

Changes in last year's 
percentages included one per 
cent deductions in Athletics and 
the Inter Club Council and a one 
per cent increase for the campus 
radio station, WPBC. 



l AA» Ai fcA AAA * i»A » !» AAA»M*AAAAA< ltA' AAA AAAAA )>AAAAAAA 




Most students felt WPBC had 
done a good job and was worthy 
of a chance to grow. Some of the 
improvements planned are 
greater range of broadcast and 
the possible institution of a 
broadcasting class at JC. 

Some of the items that SAFC 
opposed included the breaking 
up of "year round activities. " 
They also went on record 
against payment of advisors 
with activity fee money. 

The SAFC has recommended 
a further study into this matter. 



SAFC MEMBERS- [above] Miml Alierton, Paul 
Simon, Dr. Howard Reynolds and Mike Shoemaker 




? t. v< r" ** 

PHOTO BY BILL JOHNSON 

|1 to rj listen as percentage breakdowns lleft] are 
given at the final SAFC meeting. 



Campus fraternity back 
in operation after censure 



By Cindy McCarthy 
News Editor 

Chi Sig, the only surviving fraternity of JC has 
been returned to an active status after being 
"bounced off the campus" during the '76 winter 
term. 

The fraternity was removed from active status 
because of harassment in the pledge and 
recruiting system and rowdiness. In a recent 
meeting, Dean Moss and the Student Activities 
Committee agreed to permit Chi Sig to return on 
campus. However it will be on one year's 
probation and subject to a performance review in 
January of 1978. 

Sales and Marketing advisor Aristotle Haretos 
has accepted the position of being advisor for Chi 
Sig. 

"I feel strongly that there is a place for 
fraternities and sororities on campus," states 
Haretos. While attending the University of 
Pittsburg as an eveninig student he was a 
fraternity member. "I think it added to my life," 
he noted. 

Timothy Edward Milton, a business major, is 
president of Chi Sig. Even though the group had 
been banned from the JC campus, they stayed 
together. They held meetings at Milton's home. 

Chi Sig will try to get facilities on campus for 



their use, where they can hold meetings and have 
a place to go. 

While the group is strictly social, Haretos says 
he has suggestions for the group that think in 
terms of civic and campus good. 

Any mate interested in joining can contact 
Milton or Haretos in BA-110. 

"Let us not let the last fraternity die." 

PTK slates show 



All aspiring actors and those who think they 
are will have their chance as the Delta Omicron 
chapter of Phi Theta Kappa presents their 
version of the "Gong Show." 

Their take-off on the popular television show is 
scheduled for Sunday, Feb. -20, in the auditorium 
from 8:00 -9:30 p.m. 

The tickets are a $2.00 donation on sale 
through PTK members and at the auditorium box 
office one hour prior to the show. 

Denise Jacks, PTK vice president, noted that 
talent is needed. "We are still searching for 
talent and terribly bad acts." 

The purpose of the presentation is to raise 
money for the PTK national convention in 
Minneapolis. 

Jacks can be contacted at 683-7741 anytime. 
"A great show means we need great acts," she 
said. 



EXTRA COPIES DIS- 
TRIBUTED- Galleons 
that were not mailed 
were distributed outside 
the Beachcomber office. ' 
AH full-time students 
were mailed a copy with 
part-time students given 
a chance last week. 



n the msi 



Feature - Pugh 

Pro and con - children . . 
Profile - New golf coach 



P. 2 
P. 4 
P. 7 



PHOTO BY BILL JOHNSON 



KKU^i^vm^m^svw^iss^GMmpmimwm^ 



*mM!BmmrtKir™?^MM*aiWJIrmmiKHmi 1« * KMUWM -»IU 



2- BEACHCOMBER Mon. Jan. 31, 1977' 



»*■ 



Mon. Jan. 31, 1977 BEACHCOMBER -3 



Pugh behind JC political awareness 



{edffor;a/s) ( opinions 



By Eden White 
Staff Writer 

Who is responsible for visits 
to JC by nationally recognized 
political figures like former 
Presidential contenders Ronald 
Reagan, George Wallace, Gov. 
Milton Schapp and others 
including American Party can- 
didate Tom Anderson? 

The reply to this perhaps not 



so-oft-ansvvered query is the 
head of JC's Political Union, 
Edwin Pugh, a history teacher 
who got interested in politics 
years ago while running a small 
town newspaper in his home 
state of Ohio. 

Referring to some of his more 
notable failures, Pugh said, 
"We had Ford scheduled but he 
cancelled out at the last minute. 



By Emily Hamer 
Staff Writer 

"We were busy every 
minute. ..up 'till the wee hours 
and up again in the morning," 
commented Sy Pryweller, JC 
jazz ensemble director. 

Pryweller and eight JC 
students attended the 4th 
Annual Convention of National 
Association of Jazz Educators 
(NAJE) in Davtona Beach Jan. 
20-23. 

The musicians participated in 
jazz improvisation, theory and 
arranging workshops, instru- 
mental clinics and enjoyed 
concerts presented by university 
college and high school bands, 
jazz ensembles and vocalists. 

Jam sessions with some of the 
finest professional jazz artists in 
the country, including Billy 
Cobham, Marvin Stamm, Mar- 
ion McPartland, Bill Watrous, 
and Buddy De Franco highligh- 
ted the convention. 

Cobham was the number one 
drummer in the Downbeat 1976 
readers poll and has worked 
with the Mahavishnu Orchestra, 
Dream, Miles Davis and the 
"Tonight Show" band. Clarin- 



etist De Franco played with the 
orchestras of Tommy Dorsey 
and Count Basie. 

Stamm, a trumpeter, worked 
with Stan Kenton, Woody 
Herman, Buddy Rich, Benny 
Goodman, Michele Legrand and 
recorded with Burt Bacharach, 
the Average White Band, 
Rolling Stones and Dione 
Warwick. 

. Internationally known as 
"Britian's First Lady of Jazz" 
McPartland has appearances on 
the "Tonight Show", "Today" 
and "Mike Douglas Show" to 
her credit. 

According to the 1976 
Downbeat readers poll Watrous 
is number one trombonist in the 
U.S. 

A student NAJE chapter is 
being formed here. Anyone with 
interest in performing, arranging 
and teaching jazz, pop and rock 
can contact Pryweller in HU 4. 

The following students atten- 
ded the convention: Mani 
Zavala, Larry -Harrison, Bob 
Tufford, Tom Coates, Bruce 
Brawner, Lee Harris, Nick 
Albanese and Penny Williams. 



Vet club reorganizes 

, By Ron Kingsbury 
Staff Writer 

The Veterans Association (VA) of JC met Wednesday night for 
the first time in two years to re-establish the club. 

Evening counselor Wayne Debee, VA Coordinator Jack Bell and 
VA Outreach worker James Wolfe were among the group of 
ex-service personnel gathered to revive the dormant VA club. 

The prime objective of the VA club, as stated by Wolfe, is one of 
communications, 

"Our voice is not being heard here on campus. We're concerned 
about the vet who needs academic, personal, physical or 
psychological help as he has very few people or organizations to 
turn to for assistance," he said. 

"Our goal is providing veterans with a place to go when he or she 
needs help, someone who understands the problem and people who 
can actually do something about the problem." 

Free tutoring was suggested for each vet in need. According to 
Wolfe many faculty members have agreed to cooperate with the VA. 

Fund raising events for organizations such as Muscular 
Dystrophy and the March of Dimes, various community projects and 
the creation of an emergency fund for vets are a few of future 
objectives of the V A . 

The next meeting will be held at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 9, in 
the SAC lounge, and will not interfere with evening classes. 

Every vet is urged to attend this meeting. 

PTK recognized by North Campus 



By Kathy Cavanaugh 
Staff Witer 

The Student Activity Com- 
mittee (SAC) of the North 
Campus has decided to 
recognize Phi Theta Kappa 
(PTK) this term by giving the 
organization S150. 

Dr. Ottis Smith, chairman of 
the SAC North, said, "This is 
our way of showing them we 
want to support and participate 
in their organization. ' ' 



The North Campus is going to 
suggest that some meetings of 
PTK be held there because 
some of the North students have 
become members. 

It was recommended to SAC 
by Dr. Smith that the North 
support the commencement 
exercises. About 80 students 
from the North Campus will be 
graduating this May, so it was 
decided that S300 will be given 
to the commencement speaker. 



It rained heavily that day 
anyway." 

"Carter had a choice between 
coming here and going to Pratt 
& Whitney. He chose them." 

Pugh received an invitation to 
attend the new president's 



Annual jazz meet 
draws JC students 




POLITICAL MOTIVATOR- Ed- 
win Pugh of the Social Science 
Dept. 



Speakers 
participafe 
in debate 



By Dave Taylor 
StaffWriter 

Eight JC students participa- 
ted in the annual Florida 
Intercollegiate Forensics Cham- 
pionship last Saturday. 

Participants included Gunda 
Caldwell and Lynn Templeton 
as a team in the Novice Debate 
category. Trent Steele and Mary 
Watson in Extemporaneous 
competition, and Steele and Sue 
Robbins in Persuasive speaking. 

"Michele Mile's gave a 
Rhetorical Criticism," said John 
Connolly, JC Forensics advisor. 
"Mortye Johnson and Sharon 
Larry Arnold entered the 
category of Oral Interpretation 
of Prose." 

Mark Johnson and Fred St. 
Laurent did Oral Interpretation 
of Poetry. St. Laurent chose 
Frank Smith's arrangements of 
four war poems. 

This event was held Jan. 28, 
29, and 30 in Gainesville. 
Results were not available at 
press time. 

Charges of note 

Dr. Paul W. Graham, 
vice-president of academic 
affairs, released two announce- 
ments of special interest to 
those who may be planning on 
attending the University of 
South Florida or Florida 
State University. 

By BOR policy, an overall 2.5 
grade average will be required 
for all students entering College 
of Education, University of 
South Florida, effective quarter 
I, 1977. 

The annual 1977 Community 
College' Informational Retreat 
for students interested in 
transferring to Florida State 
University, will be held on Feb 
11-12, 1977. 

Full information may be 
obtained through Dr. Graham's 
office. 



inauguration. However, he 
declined because of his strong 
dislike for the cold weather. 

Asked about the low publicity 
profile that he maintained 
during the election-time visits, 
Pugh replied, "When you're 
going for those candidates, 
some people might think you're 
promoting yourself, trying to 
get attention." 

Because there's no use in 
interfering with other activities, 
the Political Union is busy only 
when political activity prevails. 
Pugh has attempted to increase 
voter registration, give students 
a "first hand look at the political 
process and meet, listen to and 
question the candidates." 

"We work closely with the 
Supervisor of Elections and the 



League of Women Voters," he 
added. 

Pugh, along with Dean Glynn, 
lined up all the participants for 
"Meet the Candidates Day" in 
which numerous local candi- 
dates, including State Attorney 
David Bludworth and Sheriff 
Richard Wille, visited JC and 
answered questions tossed their 
way by interested students. 

Receiving his Master Degree 
in Pittsburgh, Pa., Pugh also 
spent one summer studying in 
Edinboro, Scotland. A JC 
faculty member for eleven 
years, Pugh said that when he 
first came to Florida, he was 
struck by the lack of political 
activity going on which led him 
to his efforts in the political 
field. 






SG hosts FJCSGA 
convention in Feb 

By Georgia Wink 
StaffWriter 

Student Government (SG) is hosting the Florida Junior College 
Student Government Association (FJCSGA) Conference on Feb. 19, 
at 10 a.m. 

FJCSGA is used as a media for idea exchange between the junior 
colleges in this district and those throughout the state. 

Resolutions for the forthcoming State Spring Legislative 
Conference are to be decided upon and the statewide election of 
FJCSGA officers will be discussed. 

"It (FJCSGA) is a great way to find out what is happening on 
other campuses," Hugh Lambert, SG vice-president, said of the 
coferences.. . ^ _ -i 8wi**** ! 

.. FJCS<%\ nveetsj monthly„across t-he'state,-1m@t!«s^'ffvcseparate 
districts and although each district may not meet monthly, each 
does meet at least five times a year. 

Students are invited to attend the conference. There is going to be 
an afternoon of outdoor fun and games at John Prince Park 
following the conference. 

After the Indian River basketball game on Feb. 12, a dance is 
being held in the south SAC lounge with a live band and 
refreshments. 

Kim Clark, SG secretary, said, "We hope that by advertising the 
dance, we will encourage support for the team." 

On Feb. 25, Shampoo, the lightly acclaimed movie starring 
Warren Beatty as a flamboyant Los Angeles hairstylist, is going to 
be shown in the south SAC lounge. ° 

Pinball wizards can get ready to show your stuff in the soon to be 
re-opened game room. Last year, the game room was closed 
because the company which owned the machines took a percentage 
off the top of the profits. SG then could not afford to pay an 
attendant to care for the room and equipment. 

All throughout the baseball season SG is selling tickets for the 
five Pacer baseball games scheduled to be played at the West Palm 
Beach Municipal Stadium. 



Math teacher Yount 
succumbs to cancer 



< w 



Robert L. Yount, JC math 
instructor, died early Wednes- 
day morning from respiratory 
problems associated with 
lung cancer. 

Yount, a math instructor here 
since fall 1968, is survived by 
his wife Charlene and his 
parents. He died at 3:05 a.m. 

Yount, an avid photographer, 
had won local contests for his 
film prowess. 

He was described by his peers 
as a "man who cared in his 
quiet wayV and by Vice . 
President Ed Eissey, who called 
him "one of the most respected 
men on campus." 

Yount and his wife resided at 
) 236 Henthorne Dr. in Palm 
i! Springs. ,';'■' . -' ■ ■ 

Yount was also a former 
treasurer of Faculty Union of 
JC. 




'■■i-'.'s:*'-' 



Robert L. Yount 



A private service was held 
and a memorial is scheduled at a 
later date for friends. 

Yount was to be recipient 
along with English instructor Ed 
Crowley of fund-raising efforts 
by students, faculty 
administration. ■ - 



"* t 



Vt- 




Mopeds need special space 

It is not too soon to begin plans to provide a special type of 
parking facility for Mopeds. 

As energy costs continue to spiral up and up, more 
students will be thinking Moped. 

Palm Beach Mall has Mopeds on display, with enticing 
statistics for anyone who must guard the wallet. Up to 180 
miles an hour on a gallon of gas could stretch the 
transportation fund for JC students considerably. 

These vehicles weigh about a hundred pounds, which will 
make them an easy target for stealing. One man in a truck or 
van can easily load one and be gone in a minute. 

Before this happens, we could be planning for tie-downs 
anchored in concrete for those who carry chains to secure 
them. This same type of security could also be used by 
bicycle owners. It would lessen the chances of theft 
considerably. ■ 

We already have a fine security department, composed of 
efficient members who do an excellent job. It is a matter of 
prudence to do everything in our power to keep security high 
by eliminating easy targets and temptations for those with 
larceny in the heart. 

Mopeds should be a big item in transportation before long. 
It is a vehicle that will hold appeal for many students. 

Security we now have cannot protect these new Mopeds. 
Let's make plans before it happens, and be prepared to act 
quickly when the time comes. 



Editor 
forum 



One of the items we feel the JC presidential screening 
committee should use as criteria for a president would be his 
views on campus press. 

It stands to reason that the personality of the person can be 
told in his view on how he handles the paper. 

Certainly we don't always agree with JC President Dr. 
Harold C. Manor,, but he has given the Beachcomber a 
chance to educate the student. If a president determines 
what is news, watch out. 

The screening committee would be wise to ask for several 
issues of the paper from the schools of the five or six finalists. 
We could keep from events occuring similar to those at 
Miami-Dade South. 

They are under university presidential attack for what he 
called "...exhibiting a poor brand of journalism when you 
print articles and take positions on issues about which you 
have no substantial facts nor direct experience." 

This was Ambrose Garner, Dade South vice-president 
referring to the Catalyst, one of the nations top junior college 
newspapers. 

Garner felt that because they were students they had no 
right to talk in editorials' about faculty unionism. He doesn't 
feel the student should know the issues. 

What happens to a faculty that educates us is certainly our 
business. The screening could give up a preview of things to 
come by requesting other campus papers. 
After all, it is in our best interests. 



Beachcomber 

Palm Beach Junior College 
4200 S. Congress Ave., Lake Worth, Fla 33461 

(305) 965-8000, ext. 210 

Editor-in-chief .Dennis Glavin 

Associate Editor-Editorial Gunda Caldwell 

Associate Editor-News Bill Johnson 

Associate Editor-Feature, Sports . Steve Farnsworth 

News Editor , . Cindy McCarthy 

Venture Editor Frank Smith 

Photo Editor Emily Hamer 

Business Manager • ■ Dave Taylor 

Consultant Charles R. McCreight 

The Beachcomber Is published weekly from our editorial offices In 
the Student Pullcatlons Building at Palm Beach Junior College 
Opinions expressed In the Beachcomber are those of the editors or 
writers and are not nesessarlly those of the Palm Beach. Junior 
College. ■■'....- • '"■■>'' . 

Letters must not exceed 2oo words, must be signed by the author,., 
received In the Beachcomber office no later than 4 p.m. on 
Wednesday and are subject to condensation. 



and 



*"Sfe'iV I J " 




My Class Attendance Has Improved 25% 
Since I Hung That Farrah Fawcett Poster Up There 



Colors help add flair to campus 



Red excites. Yellow cheers. 
Green refreshes. Purple de- 
presses. Blue cools and 
subdues. Gray is a vacuum. 

Psychologists and decorators 
long have been aware of the 
influence of colors and utilized 
them to whatever effect they 
wanted. 

Hospitals historically have 
been a sterile, emotionless 
world of white where patients 
came to die. 

Not so now. They have 
become institutions for mira- 
cles. At the same time they 
discovered the depressing effect 
of the colorless environment. 

Pink uniforms, green walls, 
blue or yellow curtains, 
patterned floors, wood grain 
furniture with brightly colored 
cushions create a cheerful 
atmosphere for patient and 
family, as well as the staff. New 
patient attitudes developed. 
With color also came cheer. 

Let us look around the 
campus. 

We continue to live in a world 
of institutional green and drab 
gray. Our classrooms are quiet 
rooms where no one notices how 
thev look because they all look 



alike. 

Perhaps future students will 
have bright colors to excite, 
stimulate and alert according to 
the subject being taught. These 
are effective learning environ- 
ments according to psychology. 
Each of the three primary 
colors has its own emotional 
overtone. Red is aggressive, 
...warm and . vital. It exudes 
success. We give' VIP's the. red 
carpet treatment. It stimulates 
our senses and excites us. 
Restaurants often use red in 
their decor for that reason. 

Blue is peaceful and relaxing, 
symbolic of rest and nightfall. It 
helps create an atmosphere of 
study and thoughtfulness, gives 
a feeling of orderliness. Blue is 
a fine color for a library. 

Yellow is bright and energiz- 
ing, but more as a suggestion 
rather than direct stimulation. It 
is a cheery color, as is the sun 
and warmth. It gives the 
impression of newness and 
freshness. 

While green is not a primary 
color, it is so basic it becomes as 
important, and is a blend of two 
of the primaries. It is cooling 
and refreshing, a water color, 



and denotes quietness. 

Pure colors used with 
discretion and care bring a 
whole area to life. Artists make 
their pictures come - alive by 
using small amounts of bright 
raw color in balanced areas; to 
contrast with a drab or dull 
scene. 

A quiet, boring classroom 
could spring to life with a flash 
of bright color to wake up the 
class, to quicken their pace of 
learning. 

Our interior decorating and 
art students could integrate 
classroom decorating as practi- 
cal learning laboratories. We all 
would benefit from such 
combined projects. Why waste 
time and money on artificial 
projects when they can use their 
effort to enliven and beautify 
our classrooms with on-the-job 
learning? 

Colors can change the "feel" 
of a classroom. Students can 
add practical experience to their 
studies, and JC itself will reap 
the benefit. 

Yesterday's "halls of ivy" 
have no place in the world of 
today. 



( letters] 



Dear Mr. Glavin 

Unlike many of my fellow 
students, my reasons for picking 
JC as the first step in my 
post-high-school education were 
not financial. 

I did have the opportunity to 
attend other colleges, but 
decided on JC for one main 
reason. Several reliable sources 
informed me that this college 
was one of the finest colleges in 
the nation. 

From what I had seen of other 
schools, this college had some of 
the finest teachers available. 1 
still think I have had more than 
my share of luck concerning the 
excellent teachers I have had 
here. 

But I fear this is about to 



change. Already discouraged by 
a long series of frustrating 
events, including last year's ■ 
decision by Dr. Manor to abolish 
the Faculty Senate, I feel the 
final straw that broke teacher's 
backs came in a Board ' of 
Trustee's proposal which is so 
ludicrous, that it boggles the 
mind. Until now I had thought 
the Board's members were 
rational intelligent human 
beings, but not any longer. 

What the board's decision 
boils down to is the more days a 
teacher works a year, the less 
that teacher will earn. A teacher 
working more than 180 days a 
year will earn less than a 
teacher working less than 180 
days a year. And they won't 
even get the cost of living raises 
they, need and deserve. 

I fear this is the beginning of 
the end. Many teachers have 
already left JC, and now, I'm 



sure, many others will follow. 

And in the long run, the 
students will suffer. 

On behalf of the entire 
student body of JC, whose best 
interests I have sworn to serve, I 
beg the Board of Trustees not 
only to reverse its decision, but 
to grant a simple, fair cost of 
living increase in salary to the 
faculty of this college. 

I'm sure that since they 
granted $68,000 in raises to the 
administration, they can find 
the funds to give the faculty the 
raises they deserve. 

The Board of Trustees has the 
power to reverse the trend of 
apathy and deteriorating educa- 
tional quality at this college. It is 
their moral duty to do so. But if 
they do not do it soon, it will be 
too late. 

Yours' s truly, 
Hugh N. Lambert III 

v 'ce-president, SG 



gjwSi-sflnftnTKffiira&twun 



4- BEACHCOMBER Mon. Jan. 31, 1977 




Beauty 

lives in 

children 



I started out as a child at a 
blackboard. 

My parents had set me up 
with chalk, the alphabet and an 
eraser. 

I seemed to be always in the 
way. in the hallway, clogging 
the freeway between my 
brothers' rooms and the living 
room. They were older, and they 
would pass me by, concerning 
themselves with more intricate 
diversions such as model planes 
and train sets. 

But once in a while they 
would stop to see what I was 
doing. And I was glad they 
stopped. It gave me something 
to strive for. 

Childhood was filled with awe 
and wonder. How marvelous, it 
seemed, that the scrapes and 
scratches I acquired would 
magically heal themselves. 
Puzzling, but marvelous. 
Time was measured by how 
long a jawbreaker took to 
dissolve. 

I still eat jawbreakers, but 
time passes too quickly to be 
gauged by that standard. And 
I've lost touch with most of the 
revelations of childhood, al- 
_■ though I still have a fondness for 
that time. It is pleasurable to 
remember when I was growing, 
and young and pink with purity. 
Children are the closest ones 
to God, unlimited by learning 
and unblemished by the 
impurities of their alder 
counterparts. 

Their eyes are glowing wise, 
and yes, I plan to know a child of 
my own . 

— Frank Smith 



,*5£I*e<J!£33II ^^=«?3cai2s^r*^E:ci_^:^jHGKKisaH^sa5igS2 



PHOTO BY AUDREY SNOW 






[iiiiiiiiiiiintiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiMimiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'iiiiiiiiiiiim mi n i iiiii iitniii,: ^himiumimii iimi iiiiiiimiiiu iiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiii iiiiMimiiiiiniiiiuiiiimii i ilium 



Pros and cis for children 



Mon. Jan. 31, 1977 BEACHCOMBER - 5 



By Audrey Snow 
Venture Writer 

"Do I really want children?" This is the 
question young married couples are asking 
themselves today. 

Ron and Julie Schroeder are a good example of 
a couple who've joined the ranks of thousands in 
the decision against parenthood. 

Ron, 29, a foreign consultant for a law firm, 
explains that the decision not to have children 
was really never planned, it more or less became 
an understanding after five years past without 
them. 

Julie, 30, a freelance photographer, feels that 
if she had married very young the possibilities of 
having children now would be very great. 

"As the years wore on, 1 got used to the idea of 
being without them," she commented. 

For both of them, the desire for an unfettered 
life style played an important role in their 
decision. Both Ron and Julie are working on their 
masters degrees, pursue their own interests as 
well as friends and seem to be relaxed, 
'laid-back' people. 

"Having a child at this time in my life would 
distract attention from my career, which is finally 
beginning to profit," Julie added. 

She's a member of Zero Population Growth 
(ZPG) and is very much aware of the crowded 
condition facing the next generation. 

"I'm doing my part to keep the world from 
trampling over itself," she said. 

''If we had the money, yve'-ii'prob&BI^ffcSaftprir 

child in the future, but I don't know. I think ihc 
most important thing is not whether or not you 
are going to have a child, it's whether you really 
want one," said the Schroeders. 

Used to be, when a couple got married, having 
children was the next step. It was absurd to 
weigh the pros and cons of having a family, you 
just had them. 

To a large majority of Americans, it's 
unthinkable or unacceptable for a woman to 
choose against motherhood. 

One out of every 25 couples decide against 



parenthood 
students,!^ 
children. 

While th< 
strong, thij 
concern i 
resources, 
the restrict! 
several otlicf 
of careers 
improved It] 
also play ji 
against, sizti 

Although tj 
been loweti 
nourish that 



one group of coed college 
cent voted against having 

:o become a parent is still very 

,de is witnessing a growing 

ver population', deminishing 

financial responsibilities and 

mposed upon a parent and 

men now have the availability 

alternative to motherhood, 

ntrol devices and abortions 

encing part in determining 

[ay of a family. 

S. birth and death rates have 
itlic population continues to 
jtillion figure. Last year's birth . 
rates exceefdeath rates by 1.3 million,! 
boosting thejuation 0.59. We are still faced 1 
with- a -2.2 pSScrease a year and at this rate (■ 
in the year f the world's population will l' 



are reaching epidemic proportions. More than 60 
per cent of babies born in Palm Beach County are 
welfare cases costing the taxpayer approximately 
4 million-dollars for some 82,000 children. This is 
outrageous and shows human ignorance. 

Why all the poverty stricken, all the starved, 
malnourished in all countries? Why a 7 
percent unemployment rate?Why a gas rationing? 
Why inflation? Why? 

And yet, there's always a need for "one child 
born, and a world to carry on ; to carry on." 
—Blood Sweat & Tears 




Children- today's innocence and tomorrow's 
adults, thrust into a world that knows no purity and 



squelches youthful exuberance. 

while they can, for they'll never 



Let them enjoy it 
see it again. 



x^$ir»'t&/ r,'%i-'i7, , ;.~]^p'T?!t<L. . jj„ r 3 ; 



-. juisms^sssmss^mmsm 



■Bms^s^msd'^m 



quadruple, 

everyone. 



it impossible to feed 



Space: 1 999 - good unless you watch it 



Another stlring statistic is that each child |, 
born in Amelill use 50 times the amount of}. 
natural resoilused by a child in India. Food is 
already a lar substance in several foreign 
countries, much longer will we be able to 
throw food at 

In 1969, tjtimated figure to have a baby 
through the tear cost $1,651.00. Today, that 
figure has injed over 60 per cent. 

A surveyipleted two years ago by Dr. 
Agnus CamSf the University of Michigan's 
Institution Jej-ijl^Kesearch asked single, 
(pgj^gj^jgppomen of all ages how satisfied ■ 
neywere/iBIIlt* lives:? The category proved 
to be theiMpent Was the young childless | 



married c W |he parents whose children are J ^ ^^ fkn'ow 



grown were ij 



The 



quesfbf motherhood is extremely 
relevent to aiager. Society's indoctrination 
starts very eaf life. Pronatalism is reinforced 
repeatly overf.in books, in schools, at home 
and elsewhenj 

Most teeniltoday, even those who take 
time to think fa family, will have children. 

Unwanted Iscent and adult pregnancies! 



I was watching the television show 
"Space 1999" the other day and 
started thinking about its implica- 
tions in relationship to the present. 
For one thing, according to the show, 
in 22 years our moon is going to be 
blasted out of orbit. That's right. We 
might as well face it. Our days of 
making out under the harvest moon 
are numbered. This is also bad news 
for all those werewolves that use to 
come out when the moon was full. 

There were some other things 
about the show that left me puzzled, 
such as the question of how they can 
possibly come up with enough 
Eagles (the names given to their 
space ships) to keep destroying at 
least five of them every week. 

all of 

you have been asking yourselves for 
a long time, how long does it take for 
all that dust they raise during blast 
off to settle, considering that the 
moon has no atmosphere and very 
little gravity. 

The more I thought about the show 
the more confused I got. The show 
can get deep, to say the least. Taking 



^iaa^OiSSZ3SK2^3!^;^^r^SMISi.v2ffESi^"ai<:St 



We're all bozos in this business 



ByDonVaughan 
Venture Columnist 

Journalism is a difficult field :o major in, 
primarily because statistics show that for 
every four graduates with a degree in 
journalism there is only one opening. In 
other words, you will be making 
hamburgers at McDonald's for a living 
long before you'll be making headlines. 
But journalists are a hardy breed and don't 
easily take no for an answer. Those 
dedicated members , strive for only the 
highest positions offered, which means 
nothing lower than Women's Auxiliary 
Breakfast Bureau Chief for the Sheboygan 
Daily Hokum. 



In an attempt to gain some insight into 
the hectic yet rewarding field of the 
newspaper reporter, many journalism 
majors work on the JC newspaper, the 
Beachcomber, which you now hold in your 
cold, little hands. Some have compared 
working on the Beachcomber to living 
"The Miekey Mouse Club", probably 
because our editor bears a striking 
resemblance to Annette Funicello. 



Every member of the staff has a job to 
do, which allows them to escape from home 
every Thursday with the excuse of putting 
the paper to bed and then go out and get 



smashed. But, contrary to popular belief, 
there are a select few that actually do work. 
Denny Glavin, for instance, is our beloved 
editor-in-chief, Denny's primary job is 
keeping things going smoothly and 
harrassing local school officials. He's loved 
by ICC and revered by the cafeteria staff. 



That lovely blond-haired lass viewed 
daily in the Beachcomber office crying 
because she doesn't understand her 
Physical Science class is none other then 
Cindy McCarthy, news editor. Cindy's 
main duty is editing copy (which is fancy 
journalism talk for news stories that are 
handed in), but her main joy in life is 
chopping the hell out ' of my column. 
Nothing pleases her more than dissecting 
my weekly masterpiece into 97 distinct and 
separate paragraphs. I like her anyway. 
Wlien Cindy has nothing to edit (which is 4 
days out of five) she spends her free time 
hassling our associate editor, Bill Johnson. 



And when Bill isn't associate editing, he 
likes to play investigative reporter. With 
visions of Bob Woodward and Carl 
Bernstein dancing in his head, it was Bill 
that uncovered, the infamous SG scandal, 
where it was discovered that wholesale 
wall paper with naked ladies on it was 
being used instead of squeezably soft 



Charmin. Yes, it's Bill you can" thank for 
taking the naked ladies out of the bathroom 
and putting them where they belong, in the 
Administration building. 

Steve Earnsworth, sports editor and 
part-time tall person, is a favorite among 
the Beachcomber staff. If was Steve, you'll 
remember, that did his column one issue 
on how to inflate volleyballs with your 
mouth and why bats should be used while 
playing baseball in another. Some people 
call Steve esoteric, others call him . 
ridiculous. 



The Beachcomber art staff, budding Van 
Goghs all, is our proudest and most 
priceless commodity. Steve Allen draws all 
those editorial cartoons you get mad at, 
Steve Tortorici illustrates my column and 
does an occasional illustration for our 
editorial page and Ed Picard picks up 
whatever's left, along with periodic story. 
Ed's lifelong dream is to skateboard down 
Mt. Everest. 



claims to have the first photograph of God, 
taken when he came to her house and told 
her to let the cat out. We don't let Emily 
hang around the developing chemicals as 
much as we used to. 



Last, but certainly not least, I must 
mention my very own editor, Frank Smith 
Frank has been going to JC ever since he 
can remember, and some members of the 
faculty swear he was born here. Majoring 
in journalism, art, theatre and music, 
Frank professes a desire to graduate with a 
well-rounded education. As editor of the 
Venture section, Frank's trademark is 
inserting a photograph that has absolutely 
nothing to do with anything. He says it 
keeps the reader on their toes. Mr 
McCreight, our beloved and much adored 
advisor, says it's because Frank will do 
anything to avoid a gutter (another fancy 
journalism word referring to a blank line 
running the length of the page). Whatever 
the reason, Frank says he's too old to stop 
now. 



The photography department, headed by 
the omnipotent Emily Hamer, can always 
be counted on to be where the action is, as 
•long as the action doesn't interfere with 
their lunch. hour, studying or general 
screwing around. One serious note, it 
should be mentioned that it's Emily who midsen.. 



There are many other staffers that help 
put this newspaper together, too many to 
mention now. Besides/Cindy says she can *"tt# 
hardly wait to get hold of this weeks' - - -" 



column. Someday she's going to edit me in 




this into consideration, I decided to 
write my own script to make it easier 
for the average watcher to 
understand. 

In the long but happy hours of 
duty on the moon base Alpha, which 
is cruising along through the galaxy 
along with the rest of the moon, a 
call from deep space comes into the 
control room of the base. Grabbing 
the receiver is commander Koenig, 
leader of the base and loved by all. 
EAGLE 4: "Commander Koenig, 
Commander Koenig, this is Eagle 
4." . 

KOENIG: "Eagle 4, Eagle 4, this is 
Commander Koenig, so what?" 
EAGLE 4: "This is Eagle 4. 1 have 
landed on Planet X." 
KOENIG: "Eagle 4, do you have 
visual contact?" 

EAGLE 4: "No, I have my eyes 
closed." 

KOENIG: "Eagle 4, Eagle 4, open 
your eyes and describe visual 
contact." 

EAGLE 4: "Visual contact is the 
optical images given off by an object 
in range of the retina of the eye 
when..." 

KOENIG: "Eagle 4, Eagle 4, what 
do you see outside the ship?" 
EAGLE 4: "The planet." 
KOENIG: "Eagle 4, Eagle 4, return 



to base." 

Later that same day in the control 
room Paul second in command and 
an all around good guy says to 
Commander Koenig, 
PAUL: "Are you going to send a 
landing expedition to Planet X." 
KOENIG: "I'd rather fool around 
with Eleanor, if you must know." 
PAUL: "But you never fool around 
with Eleanor on this show." 
KOENIG: "True. I'll call over the PA 
for volunteers." 

PAUL: "To fool around with 
Eleanor?" 

KOENIG: "No, stupid, to go on the 
landing expedition." 

Koenig. grasping the microphone 
which is the information line to the 
very heart of the moon base, clears 
his throat and says, 
KOENIG: "Crew this is your 
commander, who wants to volunteer 
to go on a landing expedition to 
Planet X*?" 
CREW: Silence. 

KOENIG:"Oh well that didn't work, 
lets try a different approach." 
KOENIG: "This is a RED ALERT, 
the moon is about to explode, 
prepare for evacuation. All command 
crew members to Eagle 1." 
CREW: Scream, yell, hustle, 
hustle. 



Upon entering the space ship full 
to the brim with dedicated and 
scared crew members. Commander 
Koenig states... 

KOENIG: "I would like to thank ail 
of you for volunteering for this 
landing expedition . " 
CREW: (in unison) "Drats, fooled 
again." 

The ship speeds ahead into deep 
space to intercept the path of Eagle 4 
on its way back to earth. 
EAGLE 1: "Eagle 4, Eagle 4, this is 
Eagle 1 , do you read me? 
EAGLE 4: "Eagle 1, Eagle 1, almost 
but the prints a little fine, I'll move 
in closer." 
— CRASH! — 

EAGLE 4: ."I guess I'm close 
enough now, {read you fine." 
EAGLE 1: "Eagle 4, .Eagle 4, what is 
the planets location, our censors are 
not picking it up." 

EAGLE 4: "Oh, Planet X? I made it 
up, funny huh? ha! ha!" * 
EAGLE 1: Silence. 

EAGLE 4: Ha! Ha! Ha? ha? Sweat 
gulp." 

EAGLE 1: Silence 

EAGLE 4: "Choke gasp, I'll go find 
it, be right back." 

And so ends another thrill packed 
day in the lives of the crew of MOON 
BASE ALPHA. 






Bozos huh? So where do you think 
you got started in the business? ! 



yyiA 



By Frank Smith 
Venture Editor 

Many people ask me how Don Vaughan came to write for the 
Venture section. More people ask me why. 

It was Thursday night and a group of people were milling around 
inside the Beachcomber office, where the college newspaper is 
printed. . 

Suddenly, a collection of bums, derelicts and vagabonds rushed 
the building, grabbing everyone inside and throwing them out in 
rough fashion. 

The newspaper staff had arrived. 

I sauntered, over to my desk and looked for the articles I was 
planning to print. They weren't there, but I wasn't upset. 

I strolled over to my mailbox, the second most likely place for 
them.to be. They weren't there, either. 

I called my best writer, "Hello, Audrey?.... You mean no one you 
interviewed could help you with your story? .. . 

What was it about?.,.. Collusions of Illusionary Phenomena in 
Sub-intellectual Folklore??.. .well, save it for next week. 

1 was worried, despondently desperate and imagined visions of 
failure. Of course, I could use a totally irrelevant photo to fill space, 
(see Don's story- 9th paragraph - 4th sentence), but I had already 
planned to do that. No, I needed something new. 

Running from writer to writer, I asked them to say something 
funny. They did and I wrote it down. Asking the last person for 
a humorous name for a column he said, "Do an Advice For the 
Lovelorn column written by Don Juan." After some subtle changes 
the name Don Vaughan was born. We printed the story. 

The paper came out Monday. The real Don Vaughan came in to 
complain (Don get feisty when you upset him). Before he could say 



anything, however, everyone congratulated him on the story he 
wrote. 

I pulled him away and told him to go along with it. 

" But I write better than that ! ' ' spake Don . 

Indeed! I thought, a mere wisp of a fellow (although he's bigger 
than me, I just wanted to use that phrase) being able to write better 
humor than the entire staff collectively. 
' But he does. 

All of the staff members like him. I have statements from some of 
them: 

"Who's Don Vaughan?"- Cindy McCarthy, News Editor. 

"I'd like to say something nice about Don. ..but I can't think of 
anything. Fellow staff members tell me I'm mentioned in his 
column, but I wouldn't know. I only look at the 'Comber pictures. "- 
Emily Hamer, photographer. 

"Don is one of those obscure persons who writes long, wordy 
stories using humongous words, like humongous. Some people call 
him diminutive, but we at the Beachcomber prefer runt and tolerate 
him as long as he keeps out from underfoot.- Steve Farnsworth, 
Associate Editor - Feature, Sports. 

"There's one thing I like about Don. ..nothing. For a little guy, he 
wields a large typewriter. It's people like him that make me believe 
in censorship." - Denny Glavin, Editor-in-chief. 

"Don is a fine person, and a good friend; I try not to hold his 
column against him., .and I often wonder how he gets that light bulb 
to hover over his head."- Bill Johnson, Associate Editor - News. 

"Mindy doesn't know Don... .and she's glad. When I lay my 
hands on a Don Vaughan story I wish I were a faith healer. He 
worries about love a lot, but then again, he should. "Frank Smith, 
(Kick a man when he's down, I always say). 

"I'm the nicest guy I know." -Don Vaughan, Venture columnist. 



imXXKSSUHASS 



roras*sw«JM«Mttau-M™« 



31! IH H iaMffl4 B Mti l i l K H 2lJ*^ ^ 



** 



6 - BEACHCOMBER Mon. Jan. 31, 1977 



Mon. Jan. 31,1977 BEACHCOMBER - 7 



Pacers pound Aquinas 9-2 in season opener 



By Jim Goodman 
Staff Writer 

The baseball team put 
together its best offensive game 
of the year and combined it with 
solid pitching to down Aquinas 
College, 9-2. 

Dominating every department 
of the game, the Pacers jumped 
off to a quick, lead and never 
trailed as they pounded out 1 1 
hits and stole five bases. 



Five straight singles and a 
walk batter led to three 



First-inning runs as Rick Krupa, 
Marty McDermott and Nick 
Maniotis all scored for the team. 



Aquinas scored their only two 
runs in the top of the 
fourth-inning. The Pacers coun- 
tered with three runs in the 
bottom of the inning. 

Ron Wood led off with a 
single. Scott Benedict then 
walked and Jim Kemp followed 
up with a double to drive in 
Wood. 

Benedict scored on a sacrifice 



fly by Krupa. Kemp then stole 
third and scored on a sacrifice 
fly to center field by Marty 
McDermott. 



The Pacers iced the game in 
the sixth with three more runs. 



John Gagnon tripled and Rick 
Krupa then drew a walk. 
McDermott drove in both of 
them with a triple. Bill Castelli 
singled to drive in McDermott 
for the team's final run. 

Mark Cleveland pitched the 
full seven innings for the Pacers 



scattering nine hits and walking 
. only two batters. 

The Pacers committed only 
one error. Coach Dusty Rhodes 
was happy with the team's 
performance. 

"It was good to get a lot of 
;runs, he commented. "We 
really cut down on our 
mistakes." 



"Cleveland looked good* 
especially considering he had to 
pitch a full game this early in 



the season," Rhodes added. 

An exhibition game was 
played with the Ft. Lauderdale 
Baseball School Jan. 24. Ft. 
Lauderdale won 7-5. 

The Pacers have a home game 
today in an exhibition match 
with Ft. Lauderdale Baseball 
School at 2 p.m. They play them 
again at Ft. Lauderdale the next 
day. 

The team also plays the 
University of Miami, February 
4, at Municipal Stadium. 
Starting time is 7:30 p.m. 




Cogers' hopes dim after losses 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 



With eight conference games 
still remaining, basketball head 
coach Joe Ceravolo finds his' 
team in the position of down, 
but not out. 

After winning six in a row, the 
Pacers have dropped four of five 
to put their division title hopes 
into a different prospective. 

The latest defeats came at the 
hands of Dade North and Edison 
by 100-85 and 97-95 scores. The 
Edison game was not decided 
until double overtime. 

Against Dade North, turnov- 
ers and fouls again plagued JC. 
They lost three players via fouls 
in the 15-point loss. 57 fouls 
were called in the ircreasingly 
familiar trend that officials seem 
to have followed this year. 

Still the Pacers were behind 
by only five, 43-38, as the 
second half began. But lack of 
good ball handling hurt them as 
coach Al Heim's Dade North 
squad posted the win. 

Dade North's 39 field goals to 
the Pacers' 28 really told the 
story. The cagers hit 27 of 39 
free throws for a fine 79 per 
cent, but their inability to score 
from the field hurt them. 

Leading scorer Mike Shoe- 
maker had 26 points before 
fouling out in the Jan. 22 game. 
Adrian Williams and Mike 



Bennett tossed in 17 and 14 
respectively. 

Last Wednesday, in what was 
one of the most exciting games 
ever seen here, the Pacers 
dropped a heartbreaking doub- 
le-overtime Joss to the Buccan- 
eers of Edison. 

The team suffered through a 
miserable first half where 
Edison did everything right, and 
they did everything wrong. 

The Buccaneers grabbed a 
19-point lead at 40-21 before a 
Pacer spurt narrowed the 
margin to 46-34 at the half. 

Slowly but surely the team 
made up the 12-point deficit to 
pull within one at 78-77 with five 
minutes left. Down 85-81 with 
10 seconds left, Williams hit a 
layup to pull the team within 
two points. 

Ceravolo called a time out 
with four seconds left, down by 
two and Edison in possession, 
Edison could not bring the ball 
in play within the allotted five 
seconds so the Pacers had one 
last chance. , 

The pass came in to 
Shoemaker whose shot hit the 
rim and rebounded to Shack 
Leonard and Bill Buchanan. 
They both fought for the ball 
and Buchanan gained control, 
tossed up an off-balance 
desperation 18-footer that went 
in to put the team into overtime. 

In the first overtime, Leonard 
hit four points to offset baskets 



by Glenn Morgan and Robert 
Jenkins of Edison as the score 
knotted at 89-89 as the first 
overtime expired. 

The second overtime saw the 
Pacers go into a four-corner 
offense and use up nearly three 
minutes off the clock, Shoemak- 
er hit a field goal and two free 
throws to put JC on top 93-89. 
Bui the buccaneers- roared .back. 

Morgan hyt .two. jumpers, and - 
Clifton Griffin and Ben 
Bundrage one each to give 
Edison a 97-93 advantage. Dirk 
Jamison hit a layup at the 
buzzer to make the final score 
97-95. 

The loss, in what was 
probably the key game of the 
year, hurt the Pacers dearly. 
They dropped to 2-4 in Division 
IV play and 10-8 overall. Edison, 
only 10-10 overall, is 4-2 in the 
conference and is challenging 
Dade South for the top spot 
along with Dade North. 

The team lost another player 
when guard Dennis Mobley quit 
the team. Roy Washer left the 
squad earlier and returned to 
Louisiana. Starting forward 
guard Bruce Hlatky was 
declared ineligible for academic 
reasons. 



4 l >wl 



w*j>-. , --'i*r-' 
W ■■;. v"-4r ' 



PHOTOS BY GREG ROBERTS 

SURROUNDED- Both Bill Buchanan [above] and Slim Wethersbee 
' [below] appear surrounded as they look for some one to pass off to. 
The pictures are from last Wednesday's Edison game. 



Women netters impressive 
overpower Dade North 



By Robbin Barber 
Staff Writer 

The women's tennis team 
began the season with an 
impressive win over Dade 
North, sweeping all nine 
matches. 

Vikki Beggs overpowered 
Diane Aten 6-0, 6-0 in No. 1 
singles. In No. 2 singles, Lisa 
Yap Sam downed Carol Jones 
6-1 , 6-0 and Kim Cavanaugh 
nipped Fran McLean 6-1, 6-3 in 
No. 3 singles. 

Debbie Fung defeated Amy 
Cato in No. 4 singles 6-3, 6-2. 
Anne Marie Ziadie won her 
match with Chris Siceloff in No. 



5 singles and Cheryl Lewis 
trounced Sandra Rojas 6-0, 6-0. 

The doubles matches were a 
repeat of the singles as 
Beggs-Yap Sam crushed Aten- 
Jones 6-2, 6-1 in no. 1, 
Cavanaugh-Fung beat McLeari- 
Cato 6-3, 6-1 and Ziadie-Lewis 
won their match against 
Siceloff-Rojas 6-1 , 6-3. 

Coach Julio Rive was very 
pleased with the results of the 
match, commenting as he 
walked away, "A great 
performance." 

This week's matches are both 
away, at Edison on Tuesday and 
at Broward North Thursday. 





«,- ' 



r" ; 



Jk 



New coach Donna White 
ponders future as a pro 



■&& 



If Donna White can transfer 
some of her ability to the people 
she coaches, JC will have one 
fantastic women's golf team. 

Named women's golf coach 
when Joe Sanculius resigned, 
Donna is the 1976 U.S. 
Women's Amateur Golf Cham- 
pion. 

She won the championship 
last August in Sacramento, 
California, as Donna Horton. 
Five weeks ago she married 
Mike White, a PE teacher and 
track coach at Lake Shore Junior 
High. 

"I -was in position to win the 
last four years, making the 
quarter and semi-finals," she 
said, discussing the champion- 
ship. "This year everything fell 
into place. I think the Curtis Cup 
matches in England helped me a 
lot since they have the same 
format at the U.S. Amateur." 

A graduate from the 
University of Florida last June, 
Donna was the 'Gators No. 1 
woman golfer and led them to 
fourth place in the nationals. 

During the two years she was 
there, the team won many 
statewide tournaments. Her 
first two years of college golfing 
were spent at the University of 
North Carolina. 



She is presently in the process 
of turning professional. Attem- 
pting to qualify for a tour card, 
she and 32 other women are 
competing for six to 10 cards. 

Although her qualifications 
would appear to make her a 
shoo-in, Donna said that isn't 
so, citing three national amateur 
champions among the 32 trying 
for their cards. 

One of two women invited to 
compete in last week's Bing 



r 




Steve 
Famsworth 
Sports 
Columnist 



V k 



Crosby Pro-Am, Donna wasn't 
eligible to compete. 

"My application for a tour 
card made me no longer an 
amateur, but I'm not a pro yet, 
either," she stated. "I guess I 
don't have any status right 
now." 

Donna plans to play full-time 
on the pro tour if she qualifies, 
but says that coaching the 
women's team won't interfere. 

"I don't have to play every 
tournament," she said. "Be- 
sides, most of them are in the 
summer when school's out. If 
there's a conflict between a 
team match and a tournament, I 
won't go." . . ■ 

She said that she wants to 
coach here for several years, but 
admits she might not be able to 
if she becomes a big success on 
the pro tour. But, she considers 
the whole thing too far ahead in 
the future to be sure of what 
she'll do. 

When asked if being young 
(22) would be a help or handicap 
as a coach, she said it would be 
an asset. 

"I think I can communicate 
better with the girls than an 
older person could," she stated. 
"1 just finished four years of 
college golf, so 1 know the kind 
of problems they face. It'll be a 
great learning experience for 
me." 



Intramural Bowling Resuults 



MEN 



WOMEN 



Although she's never coached 
golf before, Donna has 
experience coaching recreation 
programs and outlined a 
coaching philosophy. 



"Golf is an individual sport," 
she declared. "If a girl has a pro 
helping her, I'll tell her to stick 
with him. I'll only help her if 
needed. I don't think I have the 
right to tell someone they have 
to change their form." 



She does plan to institute a 
system where each stroke of 
every round is analyzed. All 
rounds are to be reviewed at the 
end of the week to spot and 
correct individual weaknesses. 



Summing it all up, Donna 
said, "I'm looking forward to 
working with the girls. 
Everyone at JC has been so nice 
to me. I just hope to do as good a 
job as Joe (former women's golf 
coach Joe Sanculius) did." 





HIGH GAME 




Craig Mitchell 
Dave Greene 
Kent Knox 


213 Jerri McConkey 
212 Lee Anne Pyfrin 
209 Norma Pyfrin 

HIGH AVERAGE 


181 
171 
170 


Scott Kirkton 
Kent Knox 
Joe Lesko 


590 Jerri McConkey 
566 Norma Pyfrin 
559 Lee Anne Pyfrin 


491 
463 
456 


\ 


HIGH SERIES 




Scott Kirkton 
Kent Knox 
Joe Lesko 


196 Jerri McConkey 
188 Norma Pyfrin 
186 Lee Anne Pyfrin 

TEAM STANDINGS 

Team 11 4-0 
Team 8 4-0 
Outlaws 3-1 


163 
154 - 
152 




COMBER FILE PHOTO 



NATIONAL AMATEUR CHAMP- Donna White, the new women's 
golf coach, displays the trophy she won last August. 



Sanculius successor Winters 
sees bright future for men's golf 



By Jim Goodman 
Staff Writer 



Dan Winters, Director of Delray Community 
School, is the new coach of the men's golf team. 

Winters has been a basketball and track coach, 
but this is his first experience as a golf coach. He 
does have an extensive background as an 
amateur golfer, though. 

As a student at Wittenburg College in Ohio, 
Winters played basketball and captained the 
track team. He graduated in 1956. 

He first started playing golf when he was 24 
years old. 

"I spent all of one summer playing golf," 
Winters said, "Before I knew it, I was shooting 
consistantly in the 70's. 

He has won several pro-am tournaments since 
then. 

Winters feels that his coaching duties consist 
mainly with organization and fundamentals, but 
not much physical coaching. 

"We'll work a lot on the fundamentals," 
Winters commented. "The players will spend half 
their time shooting rounds and the other half 
practicing drives, chip shots and putting." 

The new coach plans to analyze the players 
performances round by round and shot by shot. 

"At the end of the day I can look back and see 
how each player did," Winters explained. "This 
way I can find out what each player needs to work 
on." 

Former golf coach Joe Sanculius is going to 
continue to help with the coaching duties until 
the transition is complete. 

Winters feels that Sanculius has built the golf 
program into one of the best in the state. 

"Joe has done a great job," Winters said. 
"He's left me with some fine players here." 

He said that he expects the team to do very 
well in state competition. 

The players that he is looking for are the ones 
who can play under pressure. 

"A lot of players can go out with their friends 
and shoot a 75," Winters commented, "but I 
want to find the ones who can put it together 
when everything's on the line." 

To help him achieve this purpose, Winters is 




PHOTO BY STEVE FARNSWORTH 

NEW MEN'S GOLF COACH- Dan Winters in his 
office at the Delray Beach Community School. 

considering having the players compete in a 
qualifying match like a regular tournament. 

Because of his job with the Community school, 
Winters realizes that he can't put in as much 
coaching time as his predecessor, but he does not 
feel that it will hurt the team's performance. 

Another facet of coaching that Winters must 
concern himself with is recruiting. 
> "I'll have the time to do a lot of recruiting," 
Winters said. "I plan to especially go after the 
local kids." 

"I also want kids with a good scholastic 
average," he commented. "There's no use 
recruiting them if they can't make good enough 
grades to play." 

Winters is not certain about his plans for next 
season. He said he wants to see how the winter 
season goes first. 

"I'll tell you one thing though," Winters 
added, "I sure am glad to be back in coaching, 
especially golf." 



mm 



8 - BEACHCOMBER Mon. Jan. 3.1, 1977 



Campus Combings 



Attention: All applicants for 

May graduation ! If you have not 
already done so, please report to 
Mrs. L. Pugliese, Office of the 
Registrar Graduate section, 
to have cap and gown 
measurements taken and to 
verify names for diplomas. 
Parking! In the past there has 
been no assigned parking after 
4:30 p.m. However, spaces 
which have been designated for 
the handicapped will be 
reserved for the handicapped 
until the end of the normal 
college day. (10 p.m. in the 
evening). It would be apprecia- 
ted if all non-handicapped 
college personnel and students 
would refrain from parking in 
handicapped spaces during both 
daytime and normal evening 
hours. 

The Volunteer AuxUliary of 
Doctor's Hospital will be having' 



their rummage sale this year on 
Feb. 19, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
on the hospital grounds, 2829 
10th Ave., Lake Worth. 
Clothing, both men's and 
women's, household items, 
bric-a-brac, etc. that can be 
donated, will help immensely. 
Anyone interested in helping 
please contact Mrs. Denny 
Dixon phone 965-1953 and 
arrangements for receiving 
donations will be made. Dean 
Glynn has offered his office as a 
staff collection point. 
The Galleon staff is seeking 
writers and photographers for 
the winter volume. Anyone who 
is interested should contact Mr. 
Correll in the Humanities 
building. Contributions in the 
form of poetry, short stories, 
photographs and illustrations 
are still being accepted for the 
literary magazine. 



I & R starts fitness program, 
organizes frisbee clinic 



I Basketball Box ScoresJ 



PALM BEACH 


FG 
6 


FT 
- 2-2 


TP 
14 


DADE NORTH FG 


FT 


TP 


Bennett 


Pinder 


12 


§-7 


29 


Shoemaker 


8 


10-10 


26 


Teague 


3 


0-0 


fi 


Buchanan 


3 


2-2 


8 


Knight 


2 


4-6 


H 


Williams 


4 


9-14 


17 


Anderson 


10 


2-4 


?? 


Paul 


1 


4-5 


6 


Parrish 


4 


8-9 


16 


Leonard 





2-2 


2 


Morris 





2-2 


2 


Dolan 


1 


0-2 


2 


Jones 


1 


0-0 


? 


Kearney 


1 


0-0 


2 


Brittingham 


4 


0-1 


8 


Dawk ins 


1 


0-0 


2 


Sevmore 


3 


1-3 


7 


Jamison 


3 


0-0 


6 


Totals 


39 


22-32 


100 


Totals 


28 


29-37 


85 










PALM BEACH 


FG 


FT 


TP 


EDISON 


FG 


FT 


TP 


Shoemaker 


11 


3-3 


25 


Bundrage 


6 


3-5 


15 


Buchanan 


4 


2-3 


10 


Lombardo 


9 


1-2 


19 


Williams 


6 


7-10 


19 


Branson 


9 


2-2 


20 


Leonard 


4 


2-3 


10 


Morgan 


7 


4-4 


18 


Bennett 


2 


0-0 


4 


Jenkins 


8 


1-2 


17 


Jamison 


4 


1-2 


9 


.Griffin 


4 


0-0 


8 


Paul 


2 


0-0 


4 


Totals 


43 


11-15 


97 


Wethersbee 


6 


2-2 


14 











By Jeannette Banning 
Staff Writer 

Physical fitness and frisbee 
have been added to the 
intramural activities, while 
bowling has already started. 

Physical fitness, under the 
direction of Biology instructor 
Sid Smith, resumes organized 
activity at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday 
in the gym 

"Any student that is 
interested in losing or gaining 
weight, and general improve- 
ment of physical fitness, can 
participate in this class," said 
Intramural Director Roy Bell. 

Individual exercise programs 
and diets will be developed, 
based on the needs of the 
students. 

Bell also reported the 
International Frisbee Assn. has 
released the rules for team and 
guts frisbee. Guts frisbee can be 
played in the gym whereas team 
frisbee is played on the fields. 

Students interested in form- 
ing a frisbee clinic can sign up in 
the intramural office (PE-4k) in 
the gym. The date of the frisbee 
clinic will be announced in the 
Daily Bulletin and the "Beach- 
comber." 

Competition will also be held 
in distance and free-style 
frisbee. 

Last Wednesday, 16 teams 
bowled for handicaps in the ■ 



intramural league. There are 
still openings in bowling, and 
anyone interested should be at 
the Major League Lanes, 2425 
N. Dixie Hwy. in Lake Worth by 



4 p.m. Wednesday. 

The Intramural Board is still 
looking for ' volunteer help. 
Anyone interested should see 
Bell in PE-4k in the gym. 



15% DISCOUNT WITH JC ID 




NATIONAL 

car parts, inc. 



IMPORTED CAR PARTS 
2824 OKEECHOBEE BLVD. WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. 



TELL THE STORY WITH THE 
BRIEF AND BUMPTIOUS 

REMOVABLE VINYL 

EXPRESS HUMOR • CONCERN • DEFLATE THE 
POMPOUS • HAPPINESS • AWARENESS 
i-$2.oo •BELIEFS 25-$i5.oo 



4 - $4.95 
10-$7.00 



Send Check or M.O. 



WO PHONE 



RECEIVE 
RETURN 
MAIL 



BUMP.A .SIGNS GALORE! 

2300 N. MILITARY TRAIL 

WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA 33409 

13 TELE POLES N. OF OKEECHOBEE 

ON MILITARY TRAIL 



50-$27.50 
100-$40.00 



Ask For 
Prices On 

READ INSOLENT BUMPER - nfZLe 
STICKERS! NOT BQOKSI *, t^ 



Totals 



39 



19-25 95 



Classifieds 



Equipment manager wanted: Intramural 

open gym nights, Wednesdays, paying 

minimum wage. See Mr. Bell, intramural 

director, rm. 4k, gym. 

14 foot aluminum boat and trailer, 35 h.p. 

Evinrude. Great for fishing $500, call 

626-0432. 

Lost-1970 Seacrest class ring. If found 

please call 659-1619, or go to gym for John 

Anderson. 

Lost: Gold watch with thin gold band and 

safety chain. Caravelle-Reward, call Paula 

Wright 588-1543. 

1964 MGB conv. super condition, best 

offer. Delray, evenings 278-7156. 

For sale: 1966 Ford Galaxy. White exterior, 

black interior, very clean. This two door 

comes with power steering, power brakes, 

radio and an 8-cylinder engine S350. Call 



586-5744. Anytime after 1:30 p.m. 

Free: Two neutered adult male cats, one 

solid black (declawed), one solid white. 

Contact Dot Whatley, extension 211. 

For Safe: Drafting machine, $90. Betty 

Downing, 965-9378 

For Sale: Very reasonable, Barbell set, 

used very little. Call 582-6912, 12:30 to 4 

p.m. Ask for Kim. 

Looking for female roommate to share an 
apartment, WPB area. Reference, call Jill 
King", 833-2439. 

Help Wanted: Volunteer help is needed on 
the Intramural and Recreation Board. No 
experience necessary. Will train. Eight 
weeks of successful volunteer work will 
qualify for paid position. See Mr. Bell, 
intramural director, rm. 4k, gym. 



PHYSICAL FITNESS 



# Exercise 

# Weight Loss 

# Weight Gain 

# General Fitness 
and Conditioning 
TUESDAY, FEB. 1st 2:30P.M. Gym 



-w ^ ^ 




Steele wins state Forensics title 



By Gunda Caldwell 
Associate Editor 

JC's Trent Steele is officially 
acknowledged as the best 
persuasive speaker in Florida. 

He won first place in 
persuasive and second in 
extemporaneous speech at the 
Florida Intercollegiate Forensics 
championships conducted in 
Gainesville Jan. 28-30. He also 
led his teammates to an 
impressive sixth place finish 



(University of Fla. was no one). 
John Connolly, Forensic 
adviser, stated that JC was the 
only school to have -finalists in 
every individual event. Of the 
nine students who entered 
Individual Events, five made 
finals in six events. 

Sharon Larry Arnold received 
fourth place in the Prose 
category; Mortye Johnson Fifth 
in Prose; Michele Miles took 
fifth in Rhetorical Criticism and 



Fred St. Laurent placed seventh 
in Poetry. , 

In the Novice Debate, the 
team of Gunda Caldwell and 
Lynn Templeton, won two and 
lost four. All six rounds resulted 
in close decisions. They lost the 
sixth round by only one point to 
the team who went on to win the 
championship with a four-two 
score. 

"Both members of the team 
earned high speaker points," 



Connolly said. "Debate is such 
a great opportunity for growth. 1 
wish the students only knew 
about it. 

"There's a terrific amount of 
talent on the campus that I 
haven't found." Connolly add- 
ed, "Students don't know the 
fine opportunities they have in 
these tournaments. 

"Anyone interested in the 
Forensic program should come 
by and talk to me," Connolly 
included. 




CHAMP-Trenl Steele 




Beachcom 

Voice of the Palm Beach Junior College Student 




Member of the 

associaieD 
coiLeciaTe 
pRess 



Vol. 38 No. 14 



Monday, February 7, 1977 Lake Worth, Fforida 33461 




Student Health Service fair has varied schedule 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

The JC Health Fair, sponsor- 
ed by the Student Personnel 
Health Services, has an even 
more diversified program plan- 
ned than ever before. 

On Tuesday Feb. 15-16 from 9 
a.m. -2. p.m. in the SAC lounge, 
the fair will commence. 

Fifteen groups from off-cam- 
pus agencies comprise the bulk 
of the program. The groups 
from JC include the Speech and 
Hearing Center, Nursing and 
Physical Education majors, 
Dental Health Services and the 



Audio-Visual Center. 

According to JC Health 
Services director Helen Died- 
rich, this program has "some- 
thing for everyone. We got 
feedback from the students as to 
what they wanted and we feel 
we have it here," she added. 

Some of the new activities 
include the Biofeedback Train- 
ing Center and a workshop on 
physical fitness. JC physical 
education majors will assist in 
this endeavor. 

Much of the program is to 
consist of both films and 
literature. Both SG and Phi 



Theta Kappa (PTK), led by 
President Roosevelt O'Neal will 
assist in manning tables and 
booths. "Roosevelt and PTK 
have done quite a job," stated 
Diedrich. 

Diedrich also noted that 
faculty support has been great. 
She singled out Bobbie 
Knowles, physical education, 
Dr. Samuel Bottosto, social 
science, William Flory and 
Watson B. Duncan III, com- 
munications for their assistance. 

Also in conjunction with the 
fair is the JC blood drive headed 
by Dean Paul J. Glynn and the 



Sales and Marketing Club. 
Scheduled to be in the North 
SAC lounge at the same time as 
the fair, it will run one hour 
later, until 3 p.m. 

The blood drive is trying to 
elicit student help too, as Glynn 



put it, "give a pint for Ed." He 
was referring to English teacher 
Ed Crowley, who is suffering 
from leukemia. Glynn hopes 
that students donate blood to 
help Crowley in his fight against 
the disease. 



iCC joins in fund raising 
with benefit bash today 



Screen committee 
narrows choices 

for JC president 



Joining in the cancer fund 
raising drive for instructor Ed 
Crowley and the late Robert 
Yount's family, Inter-Club 
Council and other JC organiza- 
tions are throwing a bash today. 

Featuring live coffee house 
type entertainment by JC 
students, the activities begin at 
noon in SAC lounge and 
continue on until no one else 
comes. A 50-cent donation is 



being collected at the door. 

In addition to the live 
entertainment, other events 
scheduled to raise money for the 
fund include: raffles, a kissing 
booth, cake walks and a dunking 
booth. 

Free coffee and "munchies" 
are being provided by the clubs 
for all who come. 

A great effort has been put in 



by the ICC to organize 
publicize this event to 
students and faculty of JC. 



and 
the 



By Bill Johnson 
Associate Editor 
The presidential screening 
committee, at their first 
Saturday morning meeting, 
individually perused applica 1 
tions. 

There w,as no discussion on 
screening procedure as in the 



Scholarship money 
open to students 



.*** 









i*«Ki 



J**** 



'.fr 




PHOTO BY JOHN LEONE 

PICTURES AT AN EXHIBITION-Painting is an example of works 
shown at JC art gallery. Story on pg. 2. 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

Many students are to 
graduate from JC in hopes of 
attending an upper-division 
school in Florida. But money 
problems will keep them from 
doing so. 

To alleviate this problem, the 
Financial Aid office has 
announced the availability of 27 
scholarships for sophomore 
graduates. 

These are available to all May 
graduates who have achieved a 
cumulative grade point average 
of 3.0 or better. 

In the past, some of the 
scholarships were not even 
given out because of a lack of 
applicants. 

"Last year only one applica- 
tion was received so the donor 
did not even _ give the 
scholarship," said Dr. Marian 
McNeely, director of Financial 
Aids. "Most of the donors want 
competition." 

The time period for applica- 
tions runs until March 1 . A 
college committee then screens 
applications for the purpose of 
sending the lists to the correct 



donor. 

Donors can then in turn 
interview the students and make ' 
their selections. Winners will be 
announced by the Financial 
Aids office. 

Cont. pg. 2 



last meeting according to Dr. 
Elisabeth Erling, committee 
secretary, "they just worked 
individually on the applica- 
tions." 

The question of whether it 
was legal to lower the executive 
experience quota for applicants 
was answered by the college 
attorney. 

"The attorney advised us that 
it could be changed by board 
action." said Erling, "but Dr. 
(Philip) Lichtblau said to 
proceed with the 10-year 
requirement." , 

With nine days left in the 
application period there are 129 
total applicants, only 56 of 
which are qualified for further 
screening. 

The next meeting is sched- 
uled for Feb. 22 at 4 p.m. The 
committee will be discussing the 
second step in the screening 
procedure. 



SG to hold dance 
following hoop game 

A dance featuring Black Jack, a disco-rock band, is to be held in 
the SAC lounge after the Indian Rivier basketball game this 
Saturday. 

The dance is being held by SG to generate interest and support 
for the Pacers. Attendance at the previous games has been quite 
low. 

Indian River is bringing three buses of people to join in the 
festivities, according to Hugh Lambert, SG vice-president. 

"We are expecting to have a really good time," said Lambert of 
the $200 SG venture. 



On the inside' 



JC art exhibits featured P. 2 

Venture spotlights Montessori . P. 4 

Cagers win twice; stand 11-8 . P. 6 



2- BEACHCOMBER Mon. Feb. 7, 1977 



~*W 



Mon. Feb. 7, 1977 BEACHCOMBER - 3 



Art exhibits show talent of faculty 



Works displayed 
to viewing public 

By Cindy McCarthy 

News Editor 

Display cases on the second floor of the 

library that formerly held fossils are now being 

used to exhibit crafts created bv members of the 

JC staff. 

• Currently on exhibit until Feb. i 1 are crafts 
by library staff members. Those contributing 
are: Penny Brown, Marian Southard, Barbara 
Braeunig, Anita Barber, Judy Neumann, Tess 
Fouse and Joyce St. Bernard. 

Items in the two glass cases just inside the 
second floor library entrance include: a . 
crewel-worked pillow and small framed 
pictures, decoupaged purses and plaques, a 
bracelet made of quarters, crocheted fruit and 
multi-colored doilies, a varnished brown paper 
bag, stuffed and shrunk Christmas ornaments, 
and more. There are four eases in all. 

According to St. Bernard, coordinator, the 
idea for the display belonged to no one in 
particular. "We had toyed around with the idea 
of it for a while. We also got tired of looking at 
fossils." 

St. Bernard also added, "There seems to be 
quite a bit of interest by. the students in the 
display." 

The next scheduled exhibition is by the 
second floor administration, to run from Feb. 
14-Marchll. 

In future exhibits, hobbies, collections and 
crafts from other departments of the college will 
be presented. 

The display is open to the public 
Monday-Thursday from 7:30-10p.m. and Friday 
from 7:30-4 p.m. 




PHOTOS BY JOHN LEONE 



TAKE YOUR CHOICE- Crafts made by staff 
members of the library staff are shown above. 
The four cases contain many ornamental items 
including crocheting and decoupage. Below, 
doilies and assorted crafts made by library 
staffers Penny Brown and Tess Fouse. 




Staff croftwork 
adorns library 

By Eden White 
Staff Writer 

Showing that some instructors have talents 
along other lines besides teaching, an art 
exhibit offering the works of faculty members is 
on display in the Humanities building art 
gallery. 

According to Art Department Chairman Dr. 
Jim Miles, who has several works on display, 
the exhibit is one of many offered throughout 
the year to show the work of local artists, 'former 
students who have gone on to become 
professionals, and traveling art shows. 

"We think it is good communication between 
the faculty and students if the students see that 
faculty members are doing something. It also 
helps them to get to know us better as people," 
he said. 

Ranging from starkly realistic, sharply 
detailed photographs and paintings to wildly 
abstract drawings, some of the more creative 
works include paintings of a beach house on a sea 
background, an exceptionally sharp photograph 
of water cascading through a series of rapids 
and the sun peeping through angry purple 
clouds. 

Still others follow a more traditional 
approach: an oil painting of snow capped peaks, 
a moss-covered tree reflecting down on a placid 
lake and a abstract-style painting of a flower pot 
with roughly painted flowers. 

One of the more interesting displays is a 
series of roughly drawn black and white 
drawings dealing mainly with life along the 
sea: lighthouses on rocky shores, decrepit 
fishing boats and craftsmen making lobster 
traps. 

Totaling over 30 prints, paintings, drawings 
or photographs, the display will be open to the 
public from 8 a.m. until 10 p.m. Monday 
through Thursday and until 4 p.m. on Friday for 
the entire month of February. 



JC south plans vet organization 



By Frank Falcone 
Staff Writer 

Dr. Harris McGirt has 
announced plans for the forming 
of a "Veteran's Service 
Organization for south campus 
veterans. This enables veterans 
who are having problems with 
their checks, .or who have 
problems in other areas to get 
help in a hurry. 

Rap sessions will be held, and 
information made available 
concerning the multitude of 
programs that are available to 
veterans. Those vets who are 
interested in helping with the 
forming of this organization are 
asked to contact Dr. McGirt at 
Ext. 2903 or 2904. 



Students who attend evening 
classes at the University School 
are soon to have fresh brewed 
coffee during their nightly 
breaks. A 100-cup percolator 
has been purchased with funds 
from the student activity fees 
and coffee and cookies will be 
served free of charge. The 
purchase was approved by the 
student advisory (SAC) commit- 
tee. 

In another effort of the SAC to 
arrange for activities for South 
campus students the SAC is 
pleased to announced .that an 
agreement has been reached 
with the Caldwell Theatre 
whereby students of JC-South 
may purchase tickets to shows 



on weekday nights for $2 per 
ticket. 

The regular price for tickets is 
S6 and the difference is being 
paid with student activity fees. 
There is a limit of 2 tickets per 
ID card. 

Beginning on March 7, 
students may register for the 
classes -being offered at 
JC-South. The registration 
period ends March 18 and 
additional information may be 
obtained at the south campus 
registration office which is 
located in room 22 of the 
Henderson University School. 
Classes run from March 28 to 
June 9. Some classes fill early so 
early registration is advised. 



PTK version of hit 
show presented 

The nationwide hit, "The Gong Show" is to be presented JC style 
next week. 

Sponsored by Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) the event is scheduled for 
Sunday, Feb. 20, in the auditorium from 8-9:30 p.m. 

Denise Jacks, PTK vice-president, is still in need of acts. "We 
have some crazy ones lined up, but we need more." 

Rehearsal is slated for Tuesday, Feb. 15 from 7-10 p.m. in the 
auditorium. If you have signed up and cannot attend or would like to 
sign up, call Jacks at 683-7741. 

"We have cooperation of the drama and music departments," 
Jacks added. Judges include Watson B. Duncan III, Sunny Meyer 
and Silvio Estrada, all of the communications dept. 

Gary Lazer, JC "comedian", is acting as emcee. 

Acts should be three to five minutes. Some acts already on the bill 
include a barbershop quartet and a magic show. 

The purpose of the presentation is to raise money for the PTK 
national convention in Minneapolis. 

Tickets are a S2.00 donation and available from any PTK member 
or an hour prior to the show. 

Scholarships Frompg. i 



North committee returns fees 



By Kathy Cavanaugh 
Staff Writer 

Next year the North campus is giving 53,000 to 
the main campus athletic program for the fall and 
winter terms. It is currently giving the program 36 
per cent of its Student Activity Fee dollar. 

The controversy over how much money to give 
next year, or whether to give any money 
whatsoever to the program, has been discussed in 
depth at every North campus budget meeting. 

At one meeting, Budget Committee member Dr. 
Ottis Smith stated, "We should give the main 



campus athletics some support since we are a part 
of JC. However, because we have only two 
participants in the program that attend our 
campus, we will not give the same percentage of 
money to athletics that the main campus gives." 

The North campus does not have its own athletic 
or Intramural Program, but starting this semester 
the Student Activity Committee (SAC) will 
organize bowling tournaments for North students. 

Dr. Smith described the program by saying 
"The tournaments will be open invitationals and 
have prizes furnished by the SAC. " 



Of the 27 scholarships 
available, 12 are of no particular 
course of study while the other 
15 are of a major study. 

They include Business (1), 
Health (5), Engineering (3), Art 
(3), Conservation (1), Foreign 
Student (1) and graduates of 
John I. Leonard of Lake Worth, 
living in Lake Worth, Palm 
Springs or Lantana ( 1 ) . 

Also SG has announced they 
will again be giving service 
scholarships to students who 
have served JC, Four $300 



awards are offered to May 
graduates who have given 
special service to the JC 
campus. 

They are also to be awarded 
at the May graduation. 

There is another scholarship 
offered by the Florida Associa- 
tion of Election Supervisors. It is 
for a government or journalism 
major. 

Information on all these 
scholarships available from Dr. 
McNeely in the Financial Aid 
office, AD-02. 



"U.S. GOVERNMENT SURPLUS 
DIRECTORY" 

How and where to buy thousands of articles at a fraction of 
original cost including: jeeps, motorcycles, scooters, aircraft, 
boats, musical instruments, claculators, typerwriters, clothing, 
etc. 

Send $1.50 Markscolor Labs, Box 570, Glen Cove,N.Y. 11542 



..VIET 



JWfyf'*- 



• — : - s 

■editorials} 



Instead of fight . .-. switch 

As the price of coffee rises, the threat of switching also increases. 
This is one situation in which drinkers would rather switch than 
fight. 

Americans in 1976 paid nearly three times as much for coffee as 
they did in '75. That's enough to drive anyone to drink. By the end 
of the year it is entirely possible that a cup of coffee will cost as 
much as a glass of good wine or a cocktail. 

The Brazilian Coffee Institute, the U.S. State Department and 
coffee market manipulators are suspects in this possibly contrived 
price squeeze. 

Several House subcommittees have called for hearings to 
investigate the impact of soaring coffee prices and to determine if 
there really is an actual world shortage, or if the consumers are 
getting victimized. 

The Dept. of Agriculture and others estimate the supply is 
sufficient to meet the demand. That sounds very much like the 
consumers, really are getting ripped off. 

The only way to beat the game is to cut back sharply on our 
consumption and literally leave them holding the (coffee) bag. 

This proved effective when the sugar industry took advantage of 
our well-known love of sweets. Not long ago sugar industry 
spokesmen were complaining that people who had cut back 
drastically when the prices soared had not resumed buying when 
the cost dropped. 

To counteract this, the coffee industry already is planning a huge 
selling campaign about the delights of drinking $5 a pound coffee. 

Anyone for a coke? 



t 






™"\ 






Denny Glavin 








Editor 






* 







Ed/for 
forum 

Students did a good job 



The Student Activity Fee Committee meetings are over, the 
percentages have been set. The students have in turn done their 
job, despite the fact most administrators and trustee members may 
not like the allocations. 

As we all know the student turnover at JC is, as junior colleges 
go, rather high. This presents a problem as far as activities go. 

Leadership within a club ultimately determines what type of an 
organization it becomes. Who instills leadership qualities? The 
adviser holds that burden. 

Because the average student at JC is in a leadership position for 
only one year someone has to make the transition a smooth one. The 
adviser again must come through. 

The Board of Trustees and administration have complained in the 
past that the SAFC has not done their job. They have told Dean Paul 
Glynn, SAFC chairperson he must be more assertive in determining 
percentages. In other words, if he did not like what percentages the 
students came up with he should change them. 

Glynn has stood steadfast that his only job in the matter is 
chairing the meetings where the students tell how he wants his 
money spent. He advocates teachers being able to vote in SAFC 
matters. Only students representing the 11 groups have voting 
rights now. 

Rather than have the complaints from the board and 
administration about the SAFC how about some leadership from 
upstairs. 

The. monthly printout to activities to tell of budgetary expenses 
was a step in the right direction. But pressure on the group to help 
an organization that the board and administration likes is not. 



Beachcomber 

Palm Beach Junior College 
4206 S. Congress Ave., Lake Worth, Fla 33461 

(305) 965-8000, ext. 210 

Editor-in-chief Dennis Glavin 

Associate Editor-Editorial Gunda Caldwell 

Associate Editor-News Bill Johnson 

Associate Editor-Feature, Sports . Steve Farnsworth 

News Editor Cindy McCarthy 

Venture Editor Frank Smith 

Photo Editor Emily Hamer 

Business Manager ■ ■ ■ • Dave Taylor 

Consultant Charles R. McCreight 

The Beachcomber Is published weekly from our editorial offices in 
the Student Pullcatibns Building at Palm Beach Junior College 
Opinions expressed in the Beachcomber are those of the editors or 
writers and are not nesessarlly those of the Palm Beach Junior 
College. 

Letters must not exceed 2oo words, must be signed by the author, 
received In the Beachcomber office no later than 4 p.m. on 
Wednesday and are subject to condensation. 




Night driving more dangerous 



Gunda Caldwell 
Editorials 



Driving at night can be far 
more dangerous than during 
daylight hours, and chances of 
getting killed are also greater, 
according to the Florida 
Highway Patrol, , 

FHP Director Eldrige Beach 
said that their records show the 
most dangerous driving hours 
are 5-11 p.m. While 33 per cent 
of the fatalities happen during 
these evening hours. 

"After meeting bright head- 
lights of an oncoming car, it 



takes seven seconds for a driver 
to regain clear sight. At 55 miles 
per hour a car will travel almost 
600 feet in 'that time." Beach 
added, "Motorists often over- 
estimate their vision when they 
are diving in a familiar area. A 
driver should never drive so fast 
that he cannot stop within the 
distance illuminated by his 
headlights." 

Good advice to remind us we 
should exert extra caution 
during our evening travel. FHP 



also reminded drivers the value 
of defensive driving at all times. 
If we observed those two 
cautions from the FHP, there 
would be a significant drop in 
our fatalities, as well as having a 
far safer way to travel on our 
way to and from JC. When you 
are behind the wheel in traffic is 
the one good time to feel a little 
bit paranoid about the drivers 
you meet. They not only PICK 
on you, they could conceivably 
DEMOLISH you. 



The subject of money is used to cure ills 



A recent letter writer to the 
editor of a local paper recently 
struck a responsive note, when 
he asked, "Must it be money to 
solve all ills?" 

Coming from Boston, he was 
in a position to observe what 
money could ot could not do for 
schools because in that area 
were three feeder schools for 
Harvard University. Two were 
private, high-grade prep schools 
and one a public school. Nothing 
in the records there show that 
the expensive prep schools 
accomplished anything better in 
the way of preparing their 
students than the publicly 
supported school. 

At any mention of a problem, 
be it personal or national, 
chances are the first thought for 
solving it will be more money. 
Money is always the first 
thought for improving the 
situation. 

When the food stamp 
program reform was proposed 
to eliminate several groups who 
definitely should not need them, 
congressional experts immedi- 
ately declared such reforms 
would not produce any more 
cuts in federal spending. 

It would seem the criteria 
here should be the intent of the 
program itself, which is to 
enable needy citizens to eat. It 
should have nothing to do with 
the amount of spending 
involved. 

If the size of the budget was 
the only consideration, we 
could suggest cutting off the 
poverty group. They do indeed 
cost the most to support. 
Shutting the door on helping 
them would eliminate a large 
sum of the federal spending. 



That makes just about as 
much sense as budget experts 
saying that unnecessary spend- 
ing is all right because it is not 
the most expensive item in the 
federal budget. 

The total of unnecessary 
spending done by our govern- 
ment would stagger the most 
complacent. This sort of attitude 
will inevitably lead to a financial 
crisis for everyone. 

Consider our various school 
systems. Johnny can't read or 
write? He won't stay in class 
and behave? The new math, 
involving 20 years and millions 
of dollars, a failure? Vandalism 
in schools soars to new records? 
Colleges teaching remedial 
subjects to high school 
graduates? 

And to solve all this will only 
involve money? 

If that was the answer to all 

the education problems we 

• struggle with today, just think 

back about that depression we 

went through. 

During that critical period, 
the average child was far more 
deprived than the majority of 
welfare cases are today. 
Teachers continued to stay on 
the job, paid with city-issued 
script, . which some stores 
accepted. That- did not change 
the dedication or the skills of the 
instructors. 

Out of that painful era came a 
generation with fine basic skills. 
The things taught in those 
depression years became the 
backbone of real education for a 
whole generation. 

'Johnny could read, write, 
reason and do math without a 
calculator. He had to because 
further on was a dead end if he 



did not study. Remedial courses 
had not yet been invented, and 
there was no money. 

Money cannot solve the 
problem of teaching the 
oncoming generation the fun- 
damentals of education. Money 
cannot solve anything. To say 
that a cut in facilities must 
inevitably lead to a decline in 
education quality is a fallacy. 
Our expenditures have soared to 
all-time records, yet along with 
that rise follows crime and 
welfare expenses. Spending 
money in school has not cut 
welfare or crime. School 
Superintendent Carroll is be- 
ginning to sense the direction in 
which our public schools must 
head, when he questioned just 
how well the students function 
when they are graduated. 

The testing results indicate 
the wrong things are being 
taught, emphasis has not been 
placed on the learning required 
in our complex socity and the 
skills they will need are 
neglected by the high schools. 

Rather than adding fuel to the 
fire already going strong, would 
it not be wiser to return to the 
conventional subject matter for 
students? To stress the old 
values? To< teach the former 
subjects in our public schools? 

JC is trying to see that each 
student planning on going to an 
upper level university is 
prepared to continue without 
losing time or credits. 

Colleges should be for those 
who are already prepared for it. 
And all the money in the world 
cannot change this situation. 
But people can. 



nmiwmmuia 



4 - BEACHCOMBER Mon. Feb. 7, 1977 




Mon. Feb. 7, 1977 BEACHCOMBER - 5 




Montessri child workshop 



By Georgia Wlrth 
Staff Writer 
Montessori as an american pub 1 i <-" sc(io j 
lecture to be given by Dr. Nancy fvl crCormi e ; 
\to help inspire the use of Montossori-ed 
grades K-3 in Palm Beach County, the kctu 
auditorium. 

On Friday, Feb. 11, at 7:30 p.m. Rambu: 
American Montessori Society is going to 
that Montessori educational metliocis ti 
school system. 

An overview of Children's Houses, Ciruj 
public Montessori school will be tlio mail; 
morning session of the workshop alsi 
Rambusch. 

The charge is $7 for the Saturday , Feb . 
in the JC Food Service building (SCI- 1 6} Fn 
In the afternoon, planning and nr£*amzit 
school system for an elementary program I 
curriculum for a Montessori public siC/too 
training and organizing a physical and sort 
discussed. 

"We suggest that those wishing- to attei 
reservations early because of the limited e 
Kathleen Bowser, director of the JC" Center 

Dr. Rambusch, a graduate of the tin 
received her Montessori teaching ur 
Teaching Center, London, England 



tr native is a free 
ffibusch. Planned 
bnal methods in 
sto be held in the 

(he founder of the 
k of the potential 
phe' PB county 

the nation's first 

discussed in the 

frig held by Dr. 



LJiiivevsi 
rodent! 



Some key personnel from the Palm Boat.' 
have been invited to the program. 

When asked about the possibility 
Montessori methods into the public eier 



r~ 










Don Vaughan 




!«. * _S 


Venture 




f-1 


Columnist 


<_*, 





PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER 



What to do with a cluttered room 



arkshop to be held 
a.m. to4 p.m. 
jjvlontessori public 
(9 d reconfiguring a 
mentary teacher 
ironment will be 

fi workshop make 
merit." said Mrs. 
iarly Learning. 
Toronto, Canada, 
pm the Montessori 

' School system 



n 
aty 



integration of 
schools, Mrs. 



Bowser replied, "The superintendent has shown enough interest 
to assign the assistant superintendant to work with me toward that 
goal." As of this date the only Montessori public school open in 
Florida is in Sarasota and the Montessori method is applied in only 
the kindergarten section. 

"They have the school in Sarasota, but no facilities to train the 
teachers. On the other hand, we have the teachers, but no place 
for them to work within the public school system here in Palm 
Beach county," stated Mrs. Bowser of the awkward situation. 

There is increasing interest in many of the late Dr. Maria 
Montcssori's insights by current leading theorists, parents, and 
educators. 

On Jan. 8, 1973, JC became the first junior college in the nation 
to offer complete Montessori Training courses. The center is an 
on-campus demonstration school for students in Early childhood 
Education. 

Having received official approval from the Teacher Training 
Committee of the American Montessori Society in 1974, the center 
is designed to serve as a model for other child care facilities in the 
area. 

Leading citizens representing organizations such as Head Start 
and Community Coordinated Child Care of PB County serve on the 
center's advisory committee. Professional educators, pediatricians 
and psyhcologists also act as advisors for the center. 

Organized in 1960, the American Montessori Society is a 
national, non-profit, tax-exempt organization. 

In the Montessori method the teacher acts as a catalyst and 
guide for the child as he strives to construct, direct and teach 
himself. The child is guided in the development of self-disipline 
and allowed to properly express both negative and positive 
feelings. 







.' "H 






vM 
















r r 


i 









Cleaning my room this weekend was no 
easy task, considering it hasn't had a 
going over since my mother i went on a 
binge celebrating V-J Day, 1961. 

Everything in my room is divided into 
four groups- under the bed, behind the 
dresser, crammed info the desk or hidden 
in the closet. The difficulty lies in the fact 
that I'm not exactly sure what's in each 
group. 

My mission, should I decide to accept it 
(and it would be a good idea, said dear, 
old Mom, if 1 wanted to eat again) was to 
plunge into these groups and sort out the 
junk from the stuff that should be kept. 
My problem, though, is determining 
what's junk and what's useful. 

Take the ball of string saved since 
Christmas of '67 that lies in one of my 
clutiered corners at this very moment. To 
me. it's useful. Someday 1 might want to 
be nice to my cat and give him something 
to play with besides my leg and we'd be 
out of string. But sleep will come soundly 



now knowing that in one corner there's a 
ball of string just waiting to be used. 

Closing my door to exclude the rest of 
the world (you don't want people barging 
in while you're reminiscing), I tackled my 
desk first. Searching through the debris, I 
located it underneath some dirty laundry. 

Opening the first drawer slowly so as 
not to be killed by " the crazed 
eight-year-old Slinky that lurked inside, it 
leaped and missed me on it's 
blood-crazed lunge and the work 
proceeded. 

The drawer contained six old MAD 
magazines (a great diversion from math 
that denies solving), four Enos Slaughter 
baseball cards (I liked Enos Slaughter), 
two leaky waterguns, a beat-up golf ball 
with a big hole in it (an oddity since it's a 
well-known fact by kids everywhere that a 
golfball explodes when cut), and 60 
reams of typing paper. 

The other drawers contained a 
Nixon-Agnew button, three dried-up 
Magic Markers, a die (half of a pair of 
dice), a cassette of my sister reciting 
some obscure prose, $45,000 worth of 



Monopoly money, four Spiderman 
comics, a 1963 calendar and two broken 
pencils. I kept it all. 



Replacing all of this obviously useful 
stuff, my bed came next. Dustballs had 
congealed underneath it and threatened 
to eat me while sleeping. In the right 
hand 'corner so'm"e'.,i)tiknb'wn plant had 
taken root and seemed to be doing nicely. 
1 left it all alone. 

Pulling out my dresser, there lay the 
history book I had lost in the fourth 
grade, the remains of my pet turtle which 
had mysteriously disappeared during the 
1968 Democratic convention (may he rest 
in peace), my sister's picture, an 
autograph book with Maria "The 
Wolfman" Ouspenskeya and George 
"Star Trek" Takei's signatures in it, a 
deck of marked cards, a dried-up maple 
leaf acquired during a trip north and 
$1.89 in pennies. 1 gathered this plethora 
of youthful memories and dumped it in 
my sister's room. Let her worry about it. 



My closet was the only place left 
untouched. And if I hurried, "American 
Bandstand" might still be on. 
Quickly opening the door with the hope 
of catching anything alive that wasn't 
supposed to be there, I was greeted by 
my father's World War Two army 
uniform, the one (hat was worn on 
Halloween when I was 10. _„„« 

,-;-,, , • - , ., wi s^wf*®* 1 *® 

In the coiner v\as <i three-loot stack of 
Spons Illustrated magazines. Eight pair 
of shoes were in another. Six Navy 
blankets peered down from the shelf 
above and a broken heating pad fell on 
my head. To hell with it all! "American 
Bandstand was more important if T was 
ever going to learn The Hustle. 

During a commercial, my mother 
peered into my room. Asking her why, 
she said, "You've been condemned, Don. 
The Board of Health said we have to burn 
it." 

I quickly hid the matches. There was 
too much valuable stuff to be lost in 
there. 



*>*-. N»n 

llllllllllljilnlllllllllllllil 



t^. Rambusch. ..reading the child's potential for self-development in a prepared and 

ironment. PHOTQ BY EM(LY HAM£R 



llllllilllllllilllllllilllli 




BY NEWS BUREAU 

llllllllflllllil 



Quinlan case paves way toward morality 





By Debbie Gaggiani 

\ Staff Writer 

tug with the advances of today's medicine in 
pijlging life comes the problem of legally defining 
pj pal death. For years, the definition of death in most law 
^ Wj»s the failing of the human heart and respiratory 
■sjifcf "The Karen Anne Quinlan case, beginning in April 
, challenged that definition. 

doctors treating Karen Quinlan described her 

lion as irreparable brain damage caused by a lack of 

fit due to respiratory failure. There was no hope that 

jhji'ould ever recover. She was being kept alive by a 

jator. 

|en * s father, Joseph T. Quinlan, asked the New Jersey 
or Court to tell Karen's doctors to take her off the 
tator. The Quinlans, after much thought, wished to let 
^daughter 'die with dignity'. The judge appointed the 
JqfiJersey prosecutor to defend Karen's rights and the 
fj&ourt case began. 

p question arose: Does the court have the right to give 
£ rs permission to remove artificial means of sustaining 
j Iri light of the recent danger of malpractice suits, 
fix's doctors refused to do it on their own. 

er .months of investigation and testifying, and a great 
iS ;of public opinion," the New Jersey Superior Court 
* s refused to grant permission to remove the respirator. 
j^clared that it was a medical decision and that since the 
Jrs had refused to do it, the court had no right to make 
J,' The law, as it stood, was inadequate to deal with the 
iioru One prominent priest stated that it was time for a 
'rial re-evaluation of life. 

3 Quinlans appealed their case and in lieu of the great 
?f public opinion, the case was taken up again. Chief 
J& Richard J. Hughes ruled on March 31, 1976, that the 
;*pgMical respirator may be disconnected if her attending 
'iciaris and a panel of hospital officials agree that there 
•" reasonable possibility that she will ever recover, the 
■X said that no criminal liability would occur if it was 
Ved- The ruling was hailed as a precedent for all other 
like it. 
Quinlans, relieved after many months of anxiety over 



the court cases, set about to find doctors who would remove 
the respirator. The doctors 'weaned' Karen away from her 
artificial breathing machine bit by bit, with the result that 
when it was finally removed, she breathed by herself. 

This unforseen turn of events caused another uproar. The 
question arose if medicine and food should be witheld also. 
They decided against it. 

Some felt that the Judge should take back his ruling, but 
he stood firm. Karen was finally moved to a nursing home 
where she received normal treatment with the stipulation 
that no artificial means would be used to keep her alive. 

The Quinlan case, tragic as it was for the family 
concerned, raised many questions that challenged today's 
society and brought them before the public. No one was 



willing to take the moral responsibility to end Karen Anne 
Quinlan'slife. 

As a result of this public awareness, many state 
legislatures began debating and evaluating their laws and 
definitions concerning death. They became concerned with 
an individual's wish not to live on indefinitely as a 
vegetable, but their right to 'die with dignity.' 

In October of 1976, the California State Legislature 
passed a bill that would permit healthy people to sign 'living 
wills'. If the occasion ever arose, these wills would order 
physicians to disconnect any life sustaining equipment if 
their only purpose is to delay death. 



From a different point of view 



I'm not dead, but I should be. They saved me. My 
body was spilled all over with no place whole enough to 
keep the blood in and should have died, but didn't; they 
saved me. 

They hooked me up and plugged me in and pieced me 
back together. They rushed so much, they- worked so 
hard, they toiled so long: they shouldn't have. They 
didn't know I was already gone or they didn't care. 

They told my mother that I would never speak to 
anyone again, never see again with comprehension nor 
would my ears hear again with recognition. And yet, I 
heard them, and saw them, but it was not with eyes and 
ears. I was already gone, somewhere in between where I 
had been and should be. I saw and heard them, and saw 
my shattered body lying hooked and plugged and 
motionless. 

There is something ahead of me, drawing me to it. It's 
impossible for me to leave, being tied to this body, to this 



room and to this place. There is a beauty and peace up 
ahead, somewhere, that is just waiting for me. I'm not 
dead, but I ought to be. 

My mother sits beside the bed. I don't like her to see 
me looking like this, I don't look good. She thinks of all 
my suffering. ..I didn't suffer. It was over very quickly. It 
hurt for a short time, there was a beautiful light and a 
soft voice. It promised me no pain, just beauty and 
peace, then I left. I left, but didn't go far, didn't get my 
promise, didn't die. There was no suffering, mother, 
there's more suffering now. 

Don't look at what remains of me, mother, remember 
me as before. I'm not there, I'm here, they can keep the 
hooks and plugs in as long as they want, there is some 
place I have to go, you'll see me there soon, you haven't 
really lost me, let me go. Mother, let me go. Mother, 
make them let me die. 



T~"TTrT*~' 



jts^itavM siesiis sewi^smaam^sxiiassMii i 



»HWVlLllfTirof> Bt 1MB 



m«mrm.gswi«» 




6 - BEACHCOMBER Mon. Feb. 7, 1977 




Squeaker win keeps Pocers in playoff race 



Division IV record now 4-4 

By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

Dade Downtown found that the old cliche, "a game lasts for two 
halves" all too true Wednesday night as the Pacers came out victors 
in a 54-53 thriller. 

The Downtowners, on the short end talent-wise, slowed the 
tempo down and the result was a 31-18 lead at halftone. 

The Dade five played a smart offense in the first half, parlaying a 
four-corner offense into numerous lay-ups, and catching the Pacer 
defense napping. 

"Our defense played poorly and they knew they did," said JC 
coach Joe Ceravolo. 

Changes in halftime strategy called for more off-side help to cover 
holes in the defense created by the penetration of Downtown's 
guards. 

"The same players who were scoring for Downtown in the first 
half were taking bad shots in the second half because of our 
improved defense," added Ceravolo. 

The offense came to life also as Mike Bennett and Mike 
Shoemaker had 12 and 11 points respectively in the second half. The 
Pacers outscored their Miami counterparts 36-22 to post the 
one-point win. 

Shoemaker had 17 points and Bennett 12 to grab scoring honors 
for the Pacers. Emory Cook led Downtown with 20 and Matt Teahan 
former Cardinal Newman star, had 12. 

The neutral court game was played at Dade South. 

Earlier in the week, the Pacers took on Broward North in a game 
played at Pompano Beach High. 

Unlike the game against Downtown, the Pacers started hot and 
stayed that way as they won by eight points, 91-83. 

"We started out with an early lead and never faltered," Ceravolo 
noted. "This is the way we should play game in and game out." 

The cagers never held a lead over 12 points but were never 
headed. Every time the Northmen made a run at the Pacers, they 
couldn't cash in for key points. 

The team's lead was only six at halftime, 48-42. But steady play 
by Shoemaker, Shack Leonard and Bill Buchanan was the advantage 
that led to victory. 

Shoemaker led the parade with 22 followed by Buchanan and 
Leonard with 18 and 15 respectively. 

For Broward North, Jim Morgan and Ward Webster showed hot 
hands as they poured in 47 points between them. But the Pacer 
depth was too much as all 1 1 men on the team scored. 

The two wins leave JC with a 4-4 record in Division IV play. They 
are in fourth place behind Dade North, Dade South and Broward 
Central, all with 6-2 marks. 

"Needless to say, we can't lose or we're out of it," said guard 
Bennett. "We'll also need some help from somewhere else." 

The next home game is set for Saturday, in the gym. Indian River 
provides the opposition in a key Division IV contest. 

A dance will follow the 7:30 game. 




-Tfc^ 






•** fc»w 



i 




PHOTO BY STEVE FARNSWORTH 



TOURNEY WINNERS-The men's tennis team was the surpise winner in the FAU Sun Belt Tournament. 
[L-R] Coach Hamid Faquir, Chris Beecroft, Jimmy Harris, Gus Orellana and Xavier Pino. 



By Janice Krieg^r 
Staff Writer 

The men's tennis team, 
thought to be a pushover before 
the season started, siirprised- 
everyone by winning the FAU 
Sun Belt Tournament and doing 
it without one of its top players. 

"1 didn't think we'd do as 
well as we did," said men's 
tennis coach Hamid Faquir, 
"but the guys played super. I'm 
very proud of them." 

The Pacers took first with a 
total of 16 points in last 
Saturday's tournament. FAU 
and St. Petersburg tied for 
second with 14 points and 



Daytona had four points., 
Broward Central was fifth with 
two points. 

Jimmy Harris led the netters, 
winning the Division I finals 8-6 \ 
over St. Pete's Steve Block. 
Chris Beecroft won the tie break 
to take the title in Division II. ■ 

Beecroft also combined with 
Joe Gracey to win the Division II 
doubles. Gus Orellana,' one of 
JC's top players, injured his 
back in his- match and was 
unable to continue. 

Tomorrow the men play FAU 
at Boca Raton at 2 p.m. and on 
Sunday they take on the Tennis 
Club of the Palm Beaches at the 
tennis courts at 2 p.m. 



Mon. Feb. 7, 1977 BEACHCOMBER - 7 




Broberg glad he was drafted, 
looks forward to joining Seattle 



Most pro baseball players aren't too happy if jr* 
they're picked in an expansion draft. Pete Broberg * '" 
feels just the opposite. 

"I'm glad to be going to Seattle," said the 
former Milwaukee Brewer pitcher. "I liked playing 
for the Brewers, but either the management didn't 
like me or I didn't fit into their picture, because I 
didn't pitch much." 

Broberg, working out on his own with JC's 
baseball team, was picked by the Seattle Mariners 
baseball team in last year's expansion draft. The 
Mariners will play their first season ever this 
spring. 



Steve Farnsworth 



Sports Columnist 










X^4^**&£ *Vi. 



PHOTO BY STEVE FARNSWORTH 



ON TARGET- Pete Broberg, working out here at JC, displays the 
i .Jifryle that made him one of the top prospects in the nation as a 

collegian. 



A star at Palm Beach High from 1966-68, 
Broberg pitched three years for Dartmouth and 
then joined the Washington Senators in 1971. He 
became a Ranger when the Senators moved to 
Texas and was traded to Milwaukee in 1975. 

One of the few players at the time to go directly 
from college to the pros, Broberg has since served 
time in the minor leagues. 

Although he hasn't met the people in the Seattle 
organization, Broberg knows manager Darrell 
Johnson from previous encounters in baseball. 

Even though expansion team's records are 
usually bad, Broberg feels the Mariners will be at 
least as good as the last-place clubs in each 
division. Being on a losing team is nothing new for 
him, though. 

"I know that bad feeling," he admitted. "I think 
the only good team I've ever been on is the '74 
Rangers who were second in the AL West. 

Theoretically, a pitcher's win-loss record should 



depend solely on his throwing ability. But Pete 
said that isn't always true. 

"You need a lot of luck to have a good season," 
he stated. "It doesn't hurt to be on a team that's 
strong up the middle (cathcer, second basemen, 
shortstop and center fielder) either." 

Although Seattle may not prove to be strong up 
the middle, Broberg is optimistic about the 
upcoming season. 

"I had my best season after I was traded to the 
Brewers," he said. "I hope the same will happen 
again this season. I'm looking forward to moving 
on to a new team." 



The spring training camp for Seattle is at 
Tempe, Arizona and pitchers report on Feb. 23. 

Broberg is helped by JC baseball players when 
he works out and in return he helps the team as 
much as he can. He assessed this year's version of 
the baseball team as "a good team, the best I've 
seen in the several years I've been working out 
here." 



Women netters top Edison 

lose to powerful Miami 



PHOTO BY TIM TUCKER .Jf-Jc 

IN FOR TWO- Mike Shoemaker tips in a missed shot as everyone looks on. V. 



W Men's tennis team 
surprise champions 

in Sun Belt tourney 



By Robbin Barber 
Staff Writer 

The women's tennis team upped its 
record to 2-1, defeating Edison but falling 
to the University of Miami. 

Sweeping all seven matches, the 
women easily handled the Edison netters. 
Vikki Beggs started things off right in the 
match last Tuesday by trouncing 
Margaret Radtke 6-1 , 6-0 in the No. 1 
■singles. Joan Baggett was the next Pacer 
victim, falling to Lisa Yap Sam 6-0, 6-0 in 
the No. 2 singles. 

In No. 3 singles, Kim Cavanaugh 
overpowered Yolanda Novo 6-2, 6-0. 
Debbie Fung defeated Shari Bartz 6-2,6-3 
in the No. 4 singles and Anne Marie 
Ziadie defeated Jane Love in No. 5 
singles 6-2, 6-4. 



The doubles matches went the same 
way as the singles, as Beggs-Yap Sam 
downed Radtke-Baggett 6-1, 6-3 in the 
No. 1 doubles. Ziadie combined with 
Cheryl Lewis to win the No. 2 doubles 
6-3, 6-3 over Novo-Bartz. 

Coach Julio Rive was pleased with the_ 
victory, saying that the women played 
exceptionally well. 

On Jan. 28, the women learned the 
difference between junior college and 
college tennis as they fell to the 
University of Miami, losing all nine 
matches. Miami is a nationally-ranked 
team and Rive termed the match "a good 
learning experience." 

This week's matches are both away, 
Tuesday against Dade Downtown and 
Thursday versus Broward Central. 



Baseball team ties, loses 



By Jim Goodman 
Staff Writer 

The Ft. Lauderdale Baseball School 
continued its mastery over the Pacers by 
tying the team 2-2 and defeating them 
16-1 the next day in two exhibition 
games, 

Last Monday's game was a 
come-from-behind effort for the Pacers. 
Trailing 2-0 in the bottom of the ninth 
inning, Jim Kemp singled to start the 
Pacer rally. 

Bryan Leth followed with another 
single. Kemp then stole third base and 
Leth stole second to advance both 
runners into scoring position. 

Nick Maniotis grounded out but Ed 
Walker came up and drove in Kemp and 
Leth with a single. 

The team traveled to Pompano the next 



day to play Ft. Lauderdale again. 
Numerous errors and the hot bats of Ft. 
lauderdale proved too much for the 
Pacers as they were whipped 16-1. 

As one would expect, Coach Dusty 
Rhodes was disappointed with the team's 
performance. 

"This is the worst we've played all 
season," he said. "Some of our players 
are hurting, but we just made too many 
mistakes." 

The Pacers' next game is at home 
against Florida Internationa, Feb. 11. 
Starting time is 7:30 p.m. at Municipal 
Stadium. 

Florida Southern University comes to 
town Feb. 3. That game is also at 
Municipal Stadium and starts at 1:30 
p.m. 




SOUTHERN 
EXPRESS 

■'■■■■ E D* .^"f x jLj jlA 



Mmm\mMmwtwwMMM'v%m% mmm wwhwhi mmmrn mmmm mmm 



8 - BEACHCOMBER Mon. Feb. 7, 1977 



Classifieds 



For sale: Drafting machine, 590. 
Betty Downing. 965-9378. 
Looking for female roommate to 

share an apartment, WPB area, 
reference, call Jill King, 
833-2439. 

Help wanted: Volunteer help is 
needed on the Intramural and 
Recreation Board. No experi- 
ence necessary. Will train. 
Eight weeks of . successful 
volunteer work will qualify for 
paid position. See Mr. Bell, 
Intramural director, rm. 4k, 

gym- 

Equipment 

Intramural 



manager wanted: 
open gym nights, 



Wednesdays paying minimum 
wage. See Mr. Bell, Intramural 
director, rm. 4k, gym. 
14 foot aluminum boat and 
trailer, 35 h.p. Evinrude. Great 
for fishing S500, call 626-0432. 
Lost-1970 Seacrest class ring. If 
found please call 659-1619 or go 
to gym for John Anderson. 
Lost: Gold watch with thin gold 
band and safety chain. 
Caravelle-reward, call Paula 
Wright 588-1543. 
1964 , MGB conv. super 
condition, best offer. Delray, 
evenings 278-7156. 
For sale: 1966 Ford Galaxy. 



White exterior, black interior, 
very clean. This two door comes 
with power steering, power 
brakes, radio and an 8-cylinder 
engine $350. Call 586-5744. 
Anytime after 1:30 p.m. 
Beginning guitar and banjo 
lesson. Call Jim at 842-8794. 
Dunlop Maply Tennis Racquet 
New condition, new strings. 4 
5/8 light size $22. Ask for John 
at 659-4635 or 968-5092. 
'71 Vega, must sell. AM-FM, 
8-track, new brakes, tune-up 
$395 firm. Call 964-6598 
evenings or contact 3163 Prince 
Drive, Lake Worth. 



I&R storts 
Sailing Club 



Sailing enthusiasts as well as 
beginners can get a chance to 
hit the water as the J&R Board 
announces the formation of a 
sailing club. 

A meeting is scheduled for 
Wednesday at 12:45 p.m. in the 
SAC lounge. Club president Bill 
Vivas said the club's purpose is 
mainly to teach students how to 
sail but added that the club may 
eventually enter regattas. 

There are no costs for 
students nor any special 
requirements. At the comple- 
tion of a three-day sailing 
course, students will receive a 
sailing competence certificate. 

Four new Sailfish sailboats 
were recently purchased by SG, 
so the club now has seven boats 
that it can use. 



15% DISCOUNT WITH JC ID 




©NATIONAL 



^car parts, inc. 



IMPORTED CAR PARTS 
2824 OKEECHOBEE BLVD. WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. 



r ^ 

Use 'Comber 

Classifieds 

Students 

Free — - 



4^f»!ZZAfRESTJUJftANT 

in the Palm Springs Shopping Center, 10th & Congress Aves. 

Sunday through Thursday we invite you 
to bring a companion and this coupon and. . . 



from 4p.m. to 8p.m.: 

Select any pasta dinner from our menu at regular 
price, and order a second dinner of similar value 
for only $.1.00. All dinners include salad, bread 
and butter. 

from 8p.m. to 11p.m.. 

With any size pizza - draft beer at half price! 

; This coupon good Feb. 7-10,1977 

Tel. 964-3500 

Open Sun. thru Thurs. 11a.m. - 12 midnight; 
Fri. &Sat. 11a.m. - 1a.m. 



'I 
I 
1 
I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
1 
1 

I 

■1 



oaiiina' vK -~* 




Beginner Classes 

Wed. f Feb. Sth at 12:45 
SAO Lounge 



Campus Combings 



Palm Beach Post No. 12, the American Legion, has announced that 
applications are now being received for scholarship grants and loans 
for the 1977-1978 academic school year from qualified applicants. 
Applicants are invited to pick up forms from Mrs. Louise Martin at 
the American Legion Home, 625 Okeechobee Road, W.P.B., phone 
655-1343. The applications should be filed immediately as it takes a 
minimum of eight weeks to process an application. Applicants must 
be Palm Beach county residents. 

The Volunteer Auxiliary of Doctor's Hospital will be having their 
rummage sale this year on Feb. 19, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.- on the 
hospital grounds, 2829 10th Ave., Lake Worth. Clothing, both 
men's and women's, household items, bric-a-brac, etc. that can be 
donated, will help immensely. Anyone interested in helping please 
contact Mrs. Denny Dion phone 965-1953 and arrangements for 
receiving donations will be made. Dean Glynn has offered his office 
as a staff collection point. 

The Galteon staff is seeking writers and' photographers for the 
winter volume. Anyone who is interested should contact Mr. Correll 
in the Humanaties building. Contributions in the form of poetry, 
short stories, photographs and illustrations are still being accepted 
for the literary magazine. 



intramural 
Bowling Results 



•r 



i&>* 



MEN 



HIGH GAME 



WOMEN 



HIGH GAME 



Kent Know 
Oscar Cash 
Jim Nowicki 



225 
221 
202 



Kim Delong 
Leona Tomlinson 
Jerri McConkey 



HIGH SERIES 



HIGH SERIES 



Oscar Cash 
Kent Knox 
Jfimltewic)«(v 



559 Kim Delong 
549, Jerri, McConkey 
$49 '' tee An' ' 



189 
180 
177 



500, 



HIGH AVERAGE 



HIGH AVERAGE 



Scott Kirkton 
Kent Knox 
Oscar Cash 



196 

185 
185 



Jerri McConkey 
Kim Delong 
Lee Anne Pyfrin 



459 



159 
155 
152 



TEAM STANDINGS 

Blockbusters 7-1 

Dido 7-1 

Outlaws 6-2 



HAVE A 
HEART! 




Send her the 

FTD 

LoveBundle 

Bouquet for 

Valentine's 

Weekend. 



Reach out and 

touch her with this 

FTD LoveBundle™ 

Bouquet. Your 

FTD Florist can 

send one almost 

anywhere by wire, the 

FTD way. Order early. (Most FTD 

Florists accept major credit cards. 




* As an independent businessman, each 
FTD Member Florist sets his own prices. 

Say FTD. . .and be sure. 

© 1977 Florists' Transworld Delivery 



Fee committee decision under fire 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

The Student Activity Fee 
Committee (SAFC), having 
already set percentages for JC 
activity fee allotments, has been 
called back into session by JC 
President Dr. Harold Manor. 



Problems have arisen over the 
dropping of one per cent of fees 
from athletics. Manor said in a 
memorandum to Dean Paul 
Glynn, SAFC chairman, he is 
not in favor of this and other 
portions of the SAFC recom- 
mendations. 



"In view of the Board's 
concern about the funding of 
athletics, I cannot approve this 
without having more informa- 
tion as to why the committee 
thought it should reduce the 
percentage from 36 to 35 per 
cent." 



Manor also disagreed with a 
one per cent addition to the 
campus radio station WPBC and 
the funding of the Sales and 
Marketing club. 

. The meeting to discuss 
possible changes is scheduled 



for Tuesday at 1 :30 in CJ-8. 



The SAFC's purpose is to set 
the percentages to be given out 
to the 11 organizations. Manor 
must in turn either accept or 
reject SAFC's recommendation. 




Voice of the Palm Beach Junior College Student 
Vol. 38 No. 15 Monday, February 14, 1977 Lake Worth, Florida 33461 




Actor Windom 
to portray 

humorist Thurber 

Character actor William Windom, who is probably best known 
for his award winning role in "My World and Welcome To It" 
presents his rendition of the life and character of writer-humorist 
James Thurber this Thursday. 

The assembly, which is to begin at 10:50 a.m. in the gym 
features Windom 's portrayal of Thurber, who is perhaps most 
widely known for "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," a short story 
concerning a man's efforts to escape the banality of everyday life. 

Windom has played in numerous on and off-Broadway 
productions, has done summer stock and commercials in addition 
to his wide variety of television roles. 

TV credits include guest appearances in episodes of "Night 
Gallery", "Star Trek", "Marcus Welby M.D." and "All in the 
Family". He has also appeared in many feature length films 
including "The Man", Escape from the Planet of the Apes" and 
"To Kill a Mockingbird". 

Windom's interest in Thuiber began in his vouth when he saw 
Ins i_.ii iiiun in mc New V'lkci He touched a ner\e," says 
Window.? ."and fed a need and has been a private oasis for me 
since 1 was fifteen. The charm, wit and truth of Thurber's work 
unfolded slowly for me over the next thirty years. 

Classes are being canceled for the assembly. No radio apparatus 
or transmitting or recording device, specifically including 
television, shall be used to reporduce the artist's performance." 




THUKBER IMMORTALIZED- Character actor Wiliam WtiAom 
brings many years of experience to JC gym as James Thurber. 



Guns appear on campus 

Police allowed to carry firearms in classes 



By Eden White 
Staff Writer 

A release from the State 
Department of Education 
asserts that possesion of 
firearms in JC classrooms is 
permitted; whereas JC's own 
security police are not allowed 
Firearms. 

Joseph Macy, law enforce- 
ment instructor said, "An 
officer may have classes on 
campus, working towards his 
degree just like any other 
student. If they are armed, 
they've been properly trained." 



of Security Grant J. 
prefers not wearing 



Chief 
Battels, 
guns. 

"That way we all feel better," 
said Battels, "there's no need 
for them. If this were a bigger 
school with live-in facilities, 
then we might need them, but 
not as things are." 

Battels is quick to add, 
however, "that mace and 
nightsticks are carried for 
protection during the evening." 
He said that, as full time 
security officers they are also 
Deputy Sheriffs; and because 



Guns . . . 

"There's no need for them. If this were a bigger school 
with live-in facilities, then we might need them, but not 
as things are." - Chief Bartels 



two of the three full time 
personnel are former members 
of the military and the third is a 
former security guard, he would 
have "not compunction" to arm 
them if the need arose. 

"But that would be under 
extremely severe circumstan- 
ces," Bartels said. 



Under the Department of 
Education's specifications, 
Criminal Justice students can 
carry firearms: 

•Where a proper facility 
designed to accomodate ballistic 
experiments is available. 

•While under close supervis- 
ion of a qualified instructor, and 
being instructed in handling and 
using firearms loaded weapons 



may be used. 

•When a recruit officer 
successfully completes the 
required firearms training 
portion of the basic Recruit 
Training Program as required 
by the Florida Police Standards 
and Training Commission. 

The latter being the only 
reason for a loaded gun on 
campus, but still not necessita- 
ting it, . 

The Department of Education 
said that "all trained law 
enforcement officers will be 
expected to use utmost care and 
camion when wearing their 
firearms in classrooms." 




ijn fh-'? ij^rofe 



PHOTO COURTESY SCIENCE CCUB 

THE WATER'S FINE- Science Club members ham it up on trip down the rapids near Gainsville. 

V f l— -■ ■ " ■ " n. — —»«»» ■ -— «^——- T.,!, ™ .., ..,, . , ■^ ^ ■,-|-., w..„ ■ „ ■, , ■. ■ 



ICC bash helps fund .'.... 

Thurber comes to Venture 
Cagers post two upsets . . , 



• ■ ■ P. 2 

.. P. 6 
■ •• P. 8 



fe»MCT *o iaiBra ii u t matBi»jj*»»BHiatM 



r--.. 



2- BEACHCdrVIBER Mon., Feb. 14, 1977 



Mon., Feb. 14, 1977 BEACHCOMBER - 3 



ICC bash yields aid 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

The Inter-Club Council (ICC) 

bash raised approximately S200 

, Ao^id fire expense fund for Ed 

CrOwley and the late Robert 

Yount's family. 

Tom Solder, ICC chairman 
thanked the students who 
"supported the ICC effort." 

Crowley, communications in- 
structor and Ybunt, former math 
instructor are recipients of the 
fund. 

Clubs involved with the bash 
included the Student Contrac- 
tors and Builders Association, 



the Early Childhood Club, 
Bread and Board, the Institute 
of Electrical and Electronic 
Engineers, the Science Club, 
Circle KandChiSig. 

Probably the most successful 
event, both from a monetary 
and spectator standpoint was 
the "dunking booth." Interest 
centered on baseball coach 
Dusty Rhodes, biology instruc- 
tors Richard Gross and Glen 
Marstellar and athletic trainer 
John Anderson as well as many 
student and club leaders. 

Other areas of 'lesser 
participation included a kissing 




booth, Chinese auction and cake 
walk. 

Live music, provided by JC 
students was another good 
drawing card. Norma Barletta of 
the Early Childhood Club 
accompanied a large group of 
singing children from the 
Northern Private School, 

Jim Walker, Karen Castle 
and Rosanne Craig, local 
bluegrass enthusiasts, enter- 
tained with a variety of tunes 
combining fiddle, guitar and 
mandolin. 

Robin Plitt and Frank Smith 
played some of their own 
compositions and preceded the 
debut of a local group, Caribou 
with Ken Bergstrom, John 
Bishop and Steve Mathewson. 

Penny Williams played selec- 
tions on a electric piano and 
Fran Lash sang and played 
guitar. 

The ICC and Sales and 
Marketing are still accepting 
donations for the Crowley-Yount 
fund all over campus including 
the Beachcomber office. 



BASH YIELDS CASH-BootK at 
ICC bash to aid the Yount - 
Crowley fund [above). Most 
popular was "the dunking 
booth". 

PHOTOS BY EMILY HAMER 






>Agf^*^5,(Sf w , A4 _^ 



A^WwCuw, rfL&j 






'^^u, 



" 1 *■ la You f fr", 

H ERE rite K \m 



h 




Plans for commencement 
begmtrt 



PTK version of hit 
show presented 



The nationwide hit, "The 
Gong Show" is to be presented 
JC style next week. 

Sponsored by Phi Theta 
Kappa (PTK) the event is 
scheduled for Sunday, Feb. 20, 
in the auditorium front 8-9:30 
p.m. 

Denise Jacks, PTK vice-pres- 
ident, is still in need of acts. 
"We have some crazy ones 
lined up. but we need more." 

Rehearsal is slated for 
Tuesday Feb. 15 from 7-10 p.m. 
in ide auditorium. If you have 
signed up and cannot attend or 
would like to sign up, call Jacks 
at 68.3-7741. 

"We have cooperation of the 
drama and music departments" 
Jacks added. Judges intlude 
Watson B. Duncan III, Sunny 
Meyer and Silvio Estrada, all of 
the communications dept. 

Gary Lazer, JC "comedian", 
is acting as emcee. 

Acts should be three to five 
minutes. Some acts already on 
the biil include a barbershop 
quartet and a magic show. 

The purpose of the presenta- 
tion is to raise money for the 
PTK national convention in 
Minneapolis. 

Tickets are a S2.00 donation 



and available from f any PTK 
member or an hour prior to the 

show. 



Plans for the May commence- 
ment 'exercises are underway 
with Registrar Charles Graham 
as committee chairman. 

The committee is comprised 
of the following members: John 
Correll, Galleon advisor; Fred 
Holling, coordinator of Contin- 
uing Education; Letha Madge 
Royce, music chairperson; 
Rosalind S. Kochel, social 
science instructor and Meacham 
Tomasello, communications in- 
structor. 

Also Donald W. Cook 
counselor student affairs; Dr. 
Ottis R. Smith, counselor 
student affairs JC north; 




REGISTRAR- Charles Graham. 



© SHQpQ 

Roosevelt O'Neal Phi Theta 
Kappa president and Cathy 
McWicker,- student. 

Assignments that are being 
worked on by the group includes 
program printing, auditorium 
decorating, music and faculty 
and student line-ups. 

Presently the members are in 
the process of nominating and 
soon selecting a commencement 
speaker. Funds for the speaker 
are coming from the central and 
north campuses. 

Over 600 students * have 
signed up to participate in the 
commencement ceremonies. 



Science club to camp atMyakka 



By Audrey Snow 
Staff Writer 

Do you enjoy communing with 
nature, camping, canoeing, 
horseback riding, fishing or 
singing beside a campfire with 
friends? The Science Club 
extends its friendship to anyone 



interested in having fun and 
who can add to the energy of 
this enthusiastic group. 

What better way to be 
welcomed than with a three-day , 
camping trip to one of Florida's 
largest state wildlife preserves,* 
Myakka State Parkin Sarasota. 




Through .bake sales and 
available funds, the Science 
Club will set off early Feb, 17 for 
another weekend full of 
adventure. 

Seeing nature is an education 
in itself, one you will not soon 
forget. 

Richard Gross and Glen 
Marstellar are the energizing 
forces behind the Science Club. 
There are no dull moments on a 
camping expedition with the two 
along. They are walking 
encyclopedias, ready to identify ' 
any plant or animal in question.. 

Camping equipment should 
include a' tent and sleeping bag, 
a portable stove, enough food to 
last three days, warm clothing, 
a towel and personal toiletries. 
For a sensitive eye, a camera is 
a must! 

The group realizes that not 
everyone has the' proper 
camping attire.. They'll do all 
they can to help the needy 



compensate for any missing 
gear. 

Some of the club members 
contribute their own special 
dishes to provide one large 
dinner for all, followed by some 
good ol' guitar picking. 

It's free, if you join the 
Science Club for a $2 semester 
fee. Transportation is provided. 

Another one is planned in 
mid-March to the John 
Pennekamp coral reef preserve 
in Key West. 

If you want to go camping, 
sign up ahead of time in Gross' 
office, in C-ll, and indicate 
what type of equipment you 
have and what you need, 



"The Science Club is. a 
motivated, fun-loving group of 
individuals who want to learn 
and share what nature has to 
offer," said Chris Lash, SC 
president. 






'JQ: 



Duncan book reviews 



By Eden White 
Staff Writer 

Earning money for scholarships and providing a 
source of entertainment at the same time, the 
second of four book review lectures -scheduled for 
February was presented by Communications 
Department Chairman, Watson B. Duncan, III, 
February 9. 

The reviews, which take place on Wednesdays at 
3:30 p.m. at the First National Bank of Palm 
Beach, are scheduled to continue until March 30. 

On Feb. 2, Watson reviewed newsman Edwin 
Newman's work "A Civil Tongue", a book "for 
those who care about the English language." 

Duncan reviewed "Margot Fonteyn:Autobiog- 
raphy" during his latest lecture. The book 



concerns "the drama and heroism of one of the 
worlds greatest dancers, a beautiful, heartwarm- 
ing book." 

The next review, which is scheduled for Feb. 16, 
will be of David Weiss's "The Venetian", a 
"brilliant new novel about the great painter 
Titian." 

The Feb. 23 review will feature Mary Walsh 
Hemingway's "How it Was" in which "the 
vibrant, spirited woman who was married to 
Ernest Hemingway for Fifteen years, gives the 
whole story of their life . ' ' 

The two dollar donations received from those 
who attend go towards scholarships for JC 
students. 



Total silence the key 
in reality of creative mime 



By Frank Smith 
Venture Editor 

Exercising their art in total 
silence, creating reality from 
their gestures in space, mimes 
are a rare breed. Their mode of 
expression demands concentra- 
tion, discipline and imagination 
of great proficiency. 

For three weeks Drora Schub 
and Gayle Davis have conducted 
workshops in mime. The classes 
met for five sessions of two hour 
duration as students were given 
an introductory course to the 



ancient Greek theatre tech- 
nique. 

A mime (short for pantomim- 
ist) works without stage props 
and usually without words 
leaving his actions to delineate 
what occurs on stage. The 
sudden movement of a hand can 
suggest a pet dog pulling at his 
leash, or the presence of a fog, 
or even an escaping butterfly. 

The class sessions began with 
exercises," ..To become more 
familiar with skeletal struc- 
ture." explained Gayle, "..To 



'*♦%* »- *• 




PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER 

A SILENT ART- Sunny Meyer teaches the intricate art of mime to a 
novice class. 

DEC A leaders meet 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

This past weekend, the Sales 
and Marketing Club (DECA) of 
JC hosted a weekend meeting of 
all 10 state chapters. 

The purpose of the meeting 
was to prepare for state DECA 
competition as well as for the 
nationals. 

State competition will take 
place March 20-23 at the Tampa 
airport Holiday Inn. Nationals 
are slated for May 4-8 in 
Anaheim, California. 

Discussions at last weekend's 
conference included comparing 
ideas between chapters and 
activities for the state competi- 
tion. "This meeting hopefully 
cleared up any problems that 
will keep our competitions from 



running smoothly," said DECA 
President Kathleen Kenney. 

DECA also plans to help with 
any last minute Valentine's Day 
gift buying by holding a plant 
sale today on the Business 
Patio. 

A wide variety of plants is to 
be sold at reasonable prices. 
Money raised will be used to 
help send DECA members to 
state and national competition. 

Plants will be available from 
9a.m. -4p.m. 

Also, the high school DECA 
district 'competitions take place 
on our campus. JC Sales and 
Marketing members are to act 
as customers for the Sales 
Representative competition. 

Times are Wednesday from 
1-3 p.m. and Friday, 1-3 p.m. 



be aware of 'alignment', where 
movement begins." Part of 
learning movement is under- 
standing the bones and muscles 
involved. 

Teaching mime is not an easy 
task. "It's hard to make 
students realize that it will take 
time." says Schub," ..both of 
us are still learning!" 

' 'You learn a lot by 
teaching.." interjected Davis, 
"But the important thing is that 
mime will help in so many 
areas, salesman, comics, clowns 
singers, teachers... al) these 
people can use the training, not 
just actors!" 

"It can be a basis for other 
expressions or an art form in 
itself," stated Drora, taking 
once again the conversational 
gauntlet, "The idea is to use 
your body for expression. ..to be 
focused on a stage, clear and 
precise." v-". 

The classes contained exer- 
cises culled from various 
sources such as modern dance, 
Tai Chi, ballet and yoga and 
taught techniques of stage 
fights, prat-falls, and others 
such as stationary "walking". 
The tw6 instructors are students 
themselves attending The 
Valley School of Mime in Spring 
Green, Wisconsin. An outstan- 
ding mime school founded in - 
1970 by E. Reid Gilbert. 

The two women will be 
conducting a final workshop on 
Saturday, Feb. 19. The 
enrollment fee will be $10 for 
the five hour class. 




PHOTO BY MIKE DIEMER 

BOOK REVIEWER- Watson B. Duncan III, chairman of the 
Communications dept., helps contribute to scholarship funds with 
his lecture series. 

Vetoutreach 
program instituted 

By Kathy Cavanaugh 
Staff Writer 

The Outreach program, which started this semester at the North 
Campus, is designed to inform veterans of benefits they may not 
have known existed for them . 

Larry Isom, coordinator of the program for the North Campus 
believes, "a large number of veterans in this community don't have 
any idea of what is available for them, therefore Outreach is an 
attempt to notify the veterans of benefits they have earned by 
serving their country." 

Full-time vet students receive $292 per month for school; benefits 
are then reduced according to the number of hours they are enrolled 
in. 

In the Outreach program, letters concerning these educational 
benefits will be sent to a!) North Campus area businesses and 
companies that have 10 or more employees. Extra effort will be 
made in contacting iarge companies such as Floria Power and Light 
and Pratt and Whitney where many veterans work. 

Not only are educational benefits available, but the Veterans 
Administration (VA) also' pays for flight training of a veteran if he 
shows interest. 

The North Campus maintains a file of tutors available to veterans 
who need academic assistance. The VA pays for the tutoring. The 
list includes certified teachers from local high schools and Phi Theta 
Kappa members. 

Further information concerning VA benefits may be obtained 
from ISOM at the North Campus or Jack Bell on the main campus. 
ISOM can be contacted at the 45th St. JC center on Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. or at the Palm 
Beach Gardens High School office, 622-3863. 







Coed club meets 



/ 



If you've seen the sand circle "K" in the middle around 
campus you might be a little confused. These symbols signify 
International Circle K week, celebrated Feb. 6-12. 

Affiliated with both the Key Club and Kiwanis organization, 
the main function is one of service to both JC and the 
community. 

Mimi Allerton is the president of Circle K, an Inter Club 
Council member. Meetings are every Thursday evening at 7:30 
in the North SAC lounge. 

. Activities have included a trip to Gainesville last weekend for a 
roller skate-a-thon to benefit victims of Multiple Sclerosis. 

On Feb. 26, a car wash is slated at the Shell gas station in 
Boynton Beach, the corner of Woolbright and Dixie Hwy., all day 
Saturday. ■ 



PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER j 

Reminder to 
state transfers 

State university officials are 
reminding students that one 
session in summer school is now 
mandatory. 

Students who entered a 
university in September or plan 
to anytime in the future with 
fewer than 90 credit hours must 
earn at least 15 hours in summer 
school to graduate. 

The purpose of the program is 
to make better use of university 
buildings all year round. 



- I 



J } 

i 



s mmimM&mtwmymiMmmimMiimiiimfmt 



4- BEACHCOMBER Mon., Feb. 14, 1977 



Mon., Feb. 14, 1977 BEACHCOMBER • 5 



editorials 



Religion seemingly the vogue 

It began as an idea in the mind of one man on campus in 
Arrowhead Springs, California. It grew into a benevolent revolution 
spreading far from its place of origin. 

We refer to a catchy little slogan, "I found it," that is spreading 
across the country. Part of a subtle campaign designed to arouse 
curiosity, it has succeeded far beyond the dream that inspired its 
conception. You can find it on bumpers, billboards and graffiti. 

The initial slogan was followed by another, "You can find it, 
too." And a third, "New life in Jesus Christ." 

Starting in California, it is developing into one of the most widely 
supported evangelistic drives ever staged in America. 

Pres. Jimmy Carter's personal declaration of his own "born 
again" type of religious experience gave further impetus to the 
"Here's Life America," campaign with its bouncy slogan. Campus 
Crusade for Christ, headed by Wm. R. Bright, who planned and 
placed the crusade into operation, shows promise of becoming even 
more popular in the future. 

There is a whole world between a young girl on her knees 
weeping over a death at Kent to kneeling students joyfully being 
born again in California. 

The timing is flawless. Weary of Watergate and other seemingly 
endless exposes, we are ready and eager to embrace something 
with an air of wholesomeness. "I found it" has great appeal. It 
offers quick solution, refreshing honesty and a new attitude. The 
unrest and revolts of the recent past provided no good solutions, 
only room for further bitterness and greater discontent. 

Perhaps wc can, indeed, find it and begin again with a new start, 
from the White House down to the grass roots. And if we do, we can 
alsn recall that this, too, began on a campus, a fitting place for the 
birth of the new idea and the good that will come out of it. 



c 



lettei 



CARE director responds 

Letter to the Editor: 

February 4th marks the anniversary of one of the worst tragedies 
ever to strike Latin America. Earthquakes in Guatemala killed 
almost 22,000 persons and left millions homeless. Within, hours 
CARE was repairing water systems, providing blankets and medical 
supplies, and soon was feeding 300,000 people daily. 

The people of Florida and the rest of the nation and Canada 
responded magnificently to this emergency. Over $3,666,000 was 
given to CARE to assist the stunned survivors. This is the kind of 
help those dollars made possible: 

Because the earthquake struck at 3 a.m. most of the deaths were 
caused by the heavy tile roofs falling on the sleeping occupants. 

Now, with a model and materials provided by CARE, the people 
have been taught to build a new kind of house with a lightweight 
zinc roof which is much safer. Some 2,500 of these have been 
constructed every month with an anticipated total of 21,000. Water 
systems have been repaired.. ..150 of them so that epidemics were 
averted. Ten million pounds of food have been distributed to 
450,000 people, much of it in Food-for-Work programs. But, of 
course, statistics can never tell the human story. 

In behalf of these people whose shattered lives you are helping to 
rebuild. CARE says heart-felt "Thank yous". 

Appreciatively, 

Glenda W. Nelson 

CARE Florida Regional Director 

121 Majorca Avenue 

Coral Gables, Florida 33134 



Beachcomber 

Palm Beach Junior College' 
4206 S. Congress Ave., Lake Worth, Fla 33461 

J305) 965-8000, ext. 210 

Editor-in-chief Dennis Glavin 

Associate Editor-Editorial .Gunda Caldwell 

Associate Editor-News Bill Johnson 

Associate Editor- Feature, Sports . Steve Farnsworth 

News Editor . Cindy McCarthy 

Venture Editor Frank Smith 

Photo Editor Emily Hamer 

Business Manager • ■ • ■ Dave Taylor 

Consultant . Charles R. McCreight 

The Beachcomber is published weekly from our editorial offices In 
the Student Pulicatlons Building at Palm Beach Junior College 
Opinions expressed in the Beachcomber are those of the editors or 
writers and are not nesessarily those of the Palm Beach Junior 

College. 

Letters must not exceed 2oo words, must be signed by the author, 

received in the Beachcomber office no later than 4 p.m. on 

Wednesday and are subject to condensation. 




Parity should be the goal ofJC 



Everyone is aware there are 
two sides to every question.. 
Trouble is that most of us tend 
to forget the other side, when 
we are caught up in a situation 
where we feel strongly pro or 
con. Neutrality or fairness is one 
of the most difficult of all 
attitudes to cultivate. 

This appeared to be one'of the 
weaknesses connected with the 
recent JC union-trustee bar- 
gaining situation. Both sides felt 
they were the injured party and 
that the other side was 
completely wrong. The result 
was a stalemate of no small 
proportion. This could not be 
allowed to continue indefinitely. 

First of all, it had a 
demoralizing effect on the 
instructors who were embroiled 
in the situation and in 
classrooms. It is hard to do your 
best work when security and 
Finances are involved, no matter 
what line of work you follow. 

To their credit, we have 
instructors who continued to put 
out their best no matter how 
uncertain or unhappy they 
might have been about the 
situation. The students have not 
suffered from this tug-of-war. 

As professionals, instructors 
have educational standards and 
ethical commitments quite 
different from most union 
members. Teachers were slow 
to embrace unionism. That they 
did, in fact, eventually accept 
and support a union on campus 
indicated a strong need for 
representation before the 
Board. 

Any employee who has 
continued employment for many 
years in one corporation or 
organization, becomes more 
valuable with the passage of 
time because of greater 
experience and maturity. Fam- 
iliarity with their particular 
institution makes them more 
valued members. Most organi- 
zations rely on their old-timers 
more than they like to admit. It 
is true here, too. 



We have a number of persons 
who have seen the campus grow 
during the passage of years. 
They have made contributions 
to our growth, and as such, we 
own them a great deal. Each/ 
one, no matter what capacity he 
is serving JC, should be 
considered an asset, and 
encouraged to remain here. 

We should not feel that 
administrative positions are 
more important than the faculty. 
Each has equal value to the 
functions of JC. To favor the 
administrative section over the 
faculty would be unfair. Here, 
again, parity should be the 
objective. 

JC has a three-part operation. 
The Board, administration and 
faculty. These three should 
work together for the common 
good of the entire school for the 
purpose of educating students. 
At the risk of sounding 
redundant, we must again say 
that the most important person 
on campus is the student. Every 
bit of planning and every part of 
the function should be for the 
student. All other interests 
should fall into a lower category. 

The union must keep in mind 
that many others in our society 
not represented by a bargaining 
agency have not had cost-of-liv- 
ing wage increases for a number 
of years, in spite of the huge 
inflation bite taken from their 
purchasing power. 

The union cannot realistically 
expect to gain through bargain- 
' ing everything they should 
ideally receive. All of us must 
lighten the belt and pull back a 
little, or inflation will gallop 
right into bankruptcy for the 
nation. 

Because certain segments 
have created greedy advantages 
for their own benefit does not 
mean all of us can do the same. 
If we do, it will surely bring 
economic disaster for all. 

Some of us must be willing to 
make a few sacrifices for the 
good of the majority. But no one 
should expect the faculty to 
make the sole sacrifices or 



concessions. This should right- 
fully be a shared burden. 

Somewhere along the long 
trail of bargaining, the trustees 
may have forgotten the overall 
picture for a time. Whatever 
gains the administration obtains 
the same should go for the 
faculty. Here, again, parity 
. should be the goal. «■? • "* ' "' 

Trustees should, by virtue of 
their office, be the voice of 
community and state as they 
tend to JC business. Personal- 
ities and feelings should not 
enter the picture. 

This is asking a great deal 
from a group, when we consider 
how much further the big 
trustees — our federal govern- 
ment — have gone in forgetting 
the good of the nation over their 
own interests. 

Our trustees have much to be 
proud of, as they look back on 
their record. There may be a few 
things they should and could 
have done that is not too late to 
consider now. 

Our community reacted to the 
trustees setting themselves up 
as an impartial arbitrator board. 

As integral members of 
administration, they should not 
be impartial.. .nor should they 
be arbitrators. They should be 
pro-administration and willing 
to let the state legislative body 
appoint the arbitrators from 
outside our community. 

Since trustees are part of 
management, that is where they 
belong. 

With a long-continuing bar- 
gaining record such as JC has 
had, it hardly seemed likely that 
management and union could 
see eye to eye, nor agree on any 
further compromise. 

Our best chance for a fair 
settlement would have been an 
outside, neutral panel to 
mediate the differences, and for 
both sides to concede a little on 
their final differences. 

We have spent too much time 
and money on this problem. 
Hopefully, it will not happen 
again. 



Drugs prove to be a mixecLbag 



i 

J: 
5 



J- r ¥ 



-') 



Drugs are the Dr. Jekyll/Mr. 
Hyde of our society. They can 
satisfy a gamut of needs, 
beneficial or malignant, for 
everyone. 

They have saved lives, 
restored health, relieved pain 
and contributed to a longer and 
better life. 

On the other hand, they also 
have destroyed health or life, 
induced euphoria, blown the 
mind, accidently killed or 
provided quiet exits from life for 
the desperate who no longer can 
cope. 

They may be legal or illegal, 
according to the source and the 
handlers. Illegal drugs have no 
quality control, resulting in a 
Russian roulette game with 
unknown odds. 

For those who become 
enmeshed in the drug scene 
there is little or no escape. Life 
becomes a constant struggle to 
insure the next "fix." And the 
next. The ever-increasing appe- 
tite creates a new brand of 
criminals. Breaking-and-enter- 
ing statistics show increasing 
numbers of addicts turn to 
stealing to fund their expensive 
habit. 

In spite of changing attitudes 
and an increasing use of 
marijuana, a great majority of 
young people continue to 
disapprove the use "of other 
illegal drugs, according to a 
survey conducted by the 
University of Michigan. 

This should not be interpreted 
to mean that only a small 
number"' of students are 
involved. 

By the time last year's high 
school seniors left school, over 
half had used some type of 
illegal drug at least once. A 
third of them had used other 
drugs in addition to marijuana. 
A fifth had gone deeper than 
experimenting with the serious 
drugs. 

These statistics indicate, 
however, an apparent tapering 
off, which should, on the face of 
it, seem encouraging. The real 
flaw in this is the fact that, while 
drug use has slowed down, 
another trend is surfacing. 

Young people are adopting a 
bad habit from their elders — al- 
cohol. As drug abuse drops, 
alcohol abuse rises. 



letters 



Dear Mr. Manor, 

1 am a student at JC South 
and I am writing this letter to 
you in hopes of getting some 
cooperation in the matter that 
follows: 

My complaint and dissatis- 
faction has to do with my 
Biology lab 105, section 597. 
Since the -beginning of this 
current term I have faced 
nothing but problems concern- 
ing this particular course. 

When I registered for this 
class 1 was told a new Biology 
Lab had been created to handle 
the additional students request- 
ing this course. The new course 
was to be held on Thursday 
nights from 7-10 p.m. in the 
FAU Biological Science build- 
ing, Mr. Allan Maxwell as 
instructor. 

What I was not told was that 
this course would be scheduled 
on FAU's quarter system 
instead of JC's semester 
system, therefore I had missed 
one lab before the JC current 
semester had started. 

We do not have the 
equipment that our labs require 




Alcohol is easier to obtain and 
cheaper because it is legal, but 
the eventual price may yet prove . 
too high. 

Most of us are acquainted 
with the physical consequences 
of short and long term abuse of 
alcohol. They arc more 
commonly known than what will 
happen to the long-term users of 
drugs. It will take many more 
years before we can with any 
certainty say exactly what the 
consequences of marijuana will 
be. 

Drinking is now estimated to 
be involved in about half of our 
auto accidents last year. 

There are many alcohol-based 
factors involved. It affects 
muscle and motor activity and 
tends to diminish, ability to make 
decisions. Serious effects on 
human vision has been observed 
and confirmed by the University 
of California in Berkeley and the 



in this course of study; hence as 
students we are not getting the 
level of education that we 
should expect and that vve have 
paid for. Let me stress "that we 
have paid for". 

I assume that the lab fee that 
is assessed against the students 
is to pay for the materials that 
we use during this course. I can 
only simply say I am certainly 
not getting what I paid for. 

In addition because of the lack 
of proper materials our 
instructor cannot do an 
adequate job of teaching us, but 
does JC suffer because of this? 
Of course not, the student is the 
one that suffers. 

Perhaps I should pursue this 
as a legal matter in the area of 
"violation of student education- 
al rights." Hopefully some 
action will be taken to straighten 
out this mess before the end of 
this term. 1 remain at this point 
very disappointed and disallus- 
ioned at the quality of education 
demonstrated at JC. 

Sincerely, 
Donna Slebodnik 



Pacific Medical Center in San 
Francisco. 

Their research clearly indi- 
cates that even moderate 
drinking causes significant 
changes in identifying and 
keeping track of moving objects, 
recovering from glare and 
bright lights and distinguishing 
between certain color levels. 
These effects last up to six 
hours. 

Even one drink gave the test 
subjects up to 20 per cent 
greater difficulty identifying 
objects that were moving. The 
faster they moved, the more 
difficult it became to focus on 
the image. Even moderate 
drinking decreased the ability to 
see fine details after light 
exposure, up to twice as long as 
normal. 

It is worth noting that while 
the subject is recovering from 
this glare exposure he is in a 



state of relative blindness. The 
frequency with which drivers 
become "blinded" by passing 
cars at night and other light 
reflections bouncing off the 
windshield illustrates why 
alcohol so frequently is linked to 
auto accidents. 

To add to hazardous condi-r 
tions on our highways, drivers 
under the influence of drugs 
have shown up in increasing 
numbers, also involving may- 
hem on the road. 

These are more difficult to 
pinpoint because the lack . of 
odor as in drinking plus the fact 
there are large numbers who 
have legitimate reasons for drug 
use. Partly to blame' for 
dangerous drivers is the medical 
profession with its failure to use 
caution in mixing several types 
of drugs for the patient, and not 
giving ample warning on use 
• while behind the wheel. 



Those who use illegal drugs 
for unnecessary purposes, with 
reduced alertness and caution 
behind the wheel, add to the 
heavy toll on our highways. 

Our wars have rightfully been 
condemned as a terrible, 
unnecessary waste of human 
life, yet there have been more 
deaths on the highways in one 
year than [here have been in all 
our wars. 

Reducing our national speed 
limit has been credited with 
some drop in the statistics. 

These same figures also show 
us that we could cut in half our 
fatalities if we made an 
inflexible resolution for oursel- 
ves and for anyone we might 
ride with, never to mix alcohol 
or drugs with gasoline. It still is 
a deadly mixture in any auto.Aiid 
the life you save could be your 
own . 



opinions 



Editor 
forum 



Many hours of student and 
faculty work might go by the 
boards this week because of 
asenseofp aranoia . 

JC President Dr. Harold 
C. Manor, in a recent memo 
to Student Activity Fee 
Committee chairman Dean 
Paul Glynn, Manor spelled it 
all out in his concise way. 

"In view of the board's 
concern about the funding of 
athletics...", said Manor. 

In other words despite 
what a responsible group of 
knowledgable students de- 
cided to be the fee 
allotments, Manor said that 
board pressure would appar- 
ently overrule this. 

Whether the Board - of 




Trustees and Manor want to 
believe it, the students pay 
100 per cent to the activity 
fee and are being asked to 
take what' Manor and the 
board decided is fair. 

The Board has again 
proven they fail to represent 
the student, only their own 
pet projects, such' as the 
bolstering of athletics dept. 
and the ill-fated name 
change. 

When several years ago 
the Beachcomber, without 
prodding, gave up one per 
cent to a fledging athletic 
dept., Manor and the board 
showed no emotion. 

But now, the ire of both is 
apparent. 



Perhaps some legislative 
group should come to JC and 
talk to the students prior to 
the next legislative session. 
Since the trustees are merely 
political appointees , this is a 
possibility. 

Some students have writ- 
ten Governor Reubin Askew, 
the very person who 
appointed our trustees. 
Maybe he will listen, maybe 
not. His political appoint- 
ments mirror his image, so. . . 

Students, by their actions 
within the SAFC have told 
the Board of Trustees what 
they want. This Wednesday 
meeting should go a long 
way in determining whether 
the student at JC is 
continued to be neglected. 



y 






aaSaaEfflOCMMK K 



6 - BEACHCOMBER Mon., Feb. 14, 1977 




Don Vaughan 

Venture 

Columnist 



Valentine courting 



Don Vaughan 
Venture Columnist 

The United States is a nation 
that enjoys celebrating holidays, 
and one of the more popular is 
St. Valentine's Day, which is 
today. 

Valentine's Day, as you 
probably know, is a day in which 
people everywhere, drunk with 
love for someone, somewhere, 
attempt to entice that person's 
affections with candy, cards and 
flowers. 

Commonly known as "court- 
ing" by anyone who watches 
"Little House On The Prairie", 
enticing is a tricky and 
meticulous process governed by 
certain unwritten rules, which I 
am about to write down. 

For your crash lesson in 
courting, we'll divide this 
semi-civilized rite into categor- 
ies-dating, serenading, music, 
flowers and candy. 

The crucial part of courting 
comes first- asking the girl out. 
If she says yes, your journey's 
half over. Some ways of asking a 
girl out work better than others. 

Lines to. avoid include "The 
football team says you're great! 
Want to go out?", "Your phone 
number was just sitting here on 
the phone booth wall, so I 
thought I'd give you a call" and 



"How would you like to do 
yourself a favor and go out with 
an irresistible guy like me?". 
Your choice of words depends 
on your personality. Just be 
yourself. 

If she says yes, you can 
strengthen the frail bond that 
holds you by serenading her. 

Serenading can only take 
place when the man can play a 
musical instrument. But not just 
any old musical instrument can 
be used. 

The most commonly used 
serenading instruments are the 
violin (primarily in restaurants), 
the guitar (good for picnics 
because it's portable) and the 
piano (if you're related to 
Liberace, Van Cliburn or Elton 
John). 

Certain instruments are not 
usually used for serenading for 
obvious reasons. Take the 
fluegelhorn, for instance. While 
it does produce very pretty 
music, it's about as romantic as 
being staked to an anthill. A girl 
hasn't been born that has come 
home, flushed with loves 
whispering, "Oh, Mother, it 
was so romantic! Ozzie 
serenaded me after the party 
with his fluegelhorn!" 

Other not so romantic 
instruments include the Kazoo, 



the tuba, an old washboard and 
a comb with tissue paper over it. 
Men who play these usually 
date girls with great personalit- 
ies,. 

Now that you've gotten your 
instrument, your choice of 
music takes second priority. 
The songs you pick to play at 
that special moment will either 
make or break your relationship. 
Girls, as a rule, enjoy songs 
that reek of sentimentality and 
heartfelt love. Songs such as 
"Yes, We Have No Bananas", 
"Dead Skunk In The Middle Of 
The Road" and Aerosmith's 
"Sick As A Dog" are generally 
avoided. 

Candy and flowers make a 
great icebreaker in getting this 
somewhat dubious rdmance 
onto the road to success. Some 
flowers are better for this than 
others, though. Stinkweed is 
definitely out. So is bloodroot, 
black-eyed Susans and poison 
ivy. 

Be tactful in your choice.AJso, 
be careful in the candy you 
select. Girls enjoy chocolates, 
but few will swoon over a large 
box of Cracker Jack or marry 
you on the spot for a 
jawbreaker. 

You now know the rules and 
regulations for courting, so use 




Mon., Feb. 14, 1977 BEACHCOMBER - 7 



Have a heart 



What is a valentine? A scrap of red paper in the shape of a heart, 
(don't believe what you learned in anatomy class), bordered by 
white lace with an arrow through it. No, I'm not kidding. 

What do you do with a valentine? You put a person's name on the 
card who you really like and slip it into their hot little hands. 

What does a valentine mean? It means just what it says, "Be my 
valentine." No, the person does not change into a scrap of red paper 
in the shape of a heart belonging to you. They just change into a real 
friend or a sweetheart. Debbie Gaggiani 



*$&■*>" 



w " a --' .a <i ■ 

PHOTOS BY AUDREY SNOW 




Unlike a girlfriend your dog will remain faithf u 



By Ross Thomas 
Venture Writer 

Loneliness can do strange things to a man. It can drive 
him to drink excessively and talk silly, usually to himself. 
It can make him stay in bed all day and then stay awake all 
night, watching "My Mother the Car" and "Mr. Ed" 
reruns in Spanish until A.) He learns the language and 
thus loses interest, or B.) he keels over from radiation 
poisoning. A sad ending to a sad story, but it's so 
needless. 

Half the time a man is alone it is because someone who 
was with him has left him, usually a woman. My friend 
Dave once remarked to me that Man is foolish to put faith 
in such an unstable commodity as Woman when, for a lot 
less time and money, he can receive more love and 
affection for today 's inflated dollar. 

"How so?", you ask. 

"Get a dog.", I reply. 

Now before you slam down this article in disgust, 
muttering epithets and making false, tot to mention weird, 



conjectures as to where my head is at, let me just say that I 
would never suggest for a minute that Dog could ever take 
the place of Woman . 

If at all possible, Man should be entitled to both, the 
proverbial cake and snarf it, too. If, however, you are a 
male short on Woman-attracting capital (nice car, big 
bucks, good reputation), or are just downright, earthbound 
ugly, I suggest you go for the'dog. 

Certainly there are disadvantages to the dog. They are 
for one, sloppy kissers and the breath acquired from 
cumulative years of eating dog food does nothing to 
enhance close quarters conversation. 

These disadvantages can be easily overlooked, however, 
in view of the many practical advantages Dog has over 
Woman. Dogs are easier to feed and kick. They will 
seldom, if ever, talk back. Dogs will also sleep outside in 
bad weather, leaving more room inside for friends and 
relatives who may be stopping by . 

All things considered, though, the biggest advantage in 
the dog is their stability. After years of faithful love and 



care, it is not likely that one day, out ot the blue, your dog 
will walk up to you and announce, "We aire breaking up, 
here's your collar back." because you've been playing 
with that french poodle down the street. 



They would be even less likely to then storm off to the 
courts, demanding a thousand bones a month alimony, 
plus possession of the doghouse and custody of the 
puppies. 

No, more than likely, your dog will remain yours for life, 
which presents the problem of how you can break up with 
your dog, but hopefully, you are not such an animal, for 
Dog certain is not. 

You may throw your dog only one bone all year and then 
kick him every day from there on out, but in the end all 
they will remember is that bone you so generously gave 
them. , 

That's selective memory, for sure, but maybe we could 
learn something from our four-legged friends. They are 
creatures of love, not of choice. The dumb i mutts. 



By Audrey Snow 
Venture Writer 

On the northwest side of JC's central campus stands a 
Usybut rather silent school within a school, that of the 
ental Hygiene Department. 

Preventing dental disease and maintaining adequate 

intal health is the department's goal it attempts to do so 

^rating a dental hygiene clinic. Looking like a huge 

jffisi office fully equipped and staffed with a 

BfessionaI, rf hygienist, the clinic serves as a training 

liter for stu8eWs'affd'renders'various dental services. 

The clinic is open to JC students and the public Monday 

j rough Friday from 8 a.m.to4 p.m. and for a small fee, an 

I Jividual can get a flouride treatment, X-rays and their 

flh polished. 

| Miss Nancy MacPherson, a dental hygiene instructor, 
sides over approximately 100 female dental hygiene 
jors and one can rest assured that clinical procedures 
conducted on a professional level. 
Dental Health programs are noted for their strict 
Jission requirements including at least a C average in 
Ity subject as well as passing a dental hygiene aptitude 
).,'.. 

These women are constantly kept on their toes while 

sking in the clinic .and graded for such things as 

aniiness, personality, personal awareness, position of 

Sent and instruments, the removal of all plaque, 

Sjhlus and stain for a daily total of 40 points. 

^"Because the clinic is part of the curriculum and a fee is 

/ft£vea; you have to show the patients that you really care 

'' fftake an interest in them. Every day you enjoy it more 

■■jlmore," exclaims Cindy Jenkins, a dental hygiene 

jljor. 



lames Thurber 



James Thurber's works, needless to say, have drawn acclaim 
from all walks of life. 

His style is one of simplicity, that is if we consider the 
imagination of an already imaginative humorist simple. 

The cartoons that accompany show the ease of line within his 
drawings. -•* 

He places emphasis on message, coupled with simplicity of 
drawings, making the effect on the reader more pronounced. 

The "blahs" of everyday life were most often found to be the 
subject of Thurber stories and cartoons. 

As with Twain, Thurber's works talked of subjects that seemingly 
dealt with childish subjects. But in "reading between the lines" the 
. Myle sets itself from the subject. 

Actor William Windom has a difficult task in immortalizing 
Thurber. But if we get even a glance of what made this literary 
talent go, we're the better off for it. 



>'- — ,„^"f 



!zir^n 













'"% 



j \i 



NX W 



i 



.y 



~V, * y' 









hill ^ii 

ygiemsts 



Trie clinic is often filled with the mouths of individuals 
ranging from a four year old kindergarten class to elderly 
nursing home occupants. . 

Last year, a new program was established to work with 
the mentally and physically handicapped. Some of these 
people have never experienced dental health procedures 
or to some the familiarity of such is questionable. 

Imagine dealing with an epileptic who goes into a 
seizure, or a mentally disturbed person who never 
acknowledges the cave and patience one must spend to 
ease their weary souls. The blind and deaf mutes sit. in 
their silence of darkness and one hears a screaming 
conscious. 

"You don't want to play up a handicap or act overly 
sympathetic. You've got to let them know you recognize 
their potential and make them feel comfortable," Bonnie 
Nielson, student and Junior American Dental Hygiene 
Association (JADHA) president said. 

The JADHA is a nationwide service club linked with ail 
dental health schools. Last week was Children's Dental 
Hygiene Week, where the club members and other 
students shared their knowledge about dental health with 
area third graders and Pediatric Care Centers. 

Monthly meetings derive special guest speakers, fund 
raising projects and community services. The club has won 
a number of dental hygiene awards, as shiny plaques 
display their glory on a small office wall. 

"You have to really like people and . help them 
understand how to take care of their teeth. There's so- 
much in the mouth that's going on and people don't realize 
this. Teeth are supposed to last a life time but in many 
cases they don't because of improper care," said Cindy 
Jenkins. 




V - \ 

\ \ 



/ 



/ / / / 

17 A— 



\f ■ 
v J / 



r» t_- 



! I 



j/k 



\. 



' j' 



I t I 



"Well, 'Who Made the Magic Go Gut of Our Marriage— You or Me?" 






i i 



I!-. 



i; 



( j'^ ^ 



A. 



C I 



i 



m 

v < 

_ * ! 



U. ! 



I h 



\ \ 



'\ \ 



i / 



V. ! l 



M 1 1 



A jy 



■ i i 






t i ' 



j 



\ \ , i 
\ 



U 



i i > 



i 
i 



.fc> 



i It 



j I >'b 



(V ,L - * 'It i i i-ong Number, Why Did 1 



"This Gentleman Was Kind Enough, to Sec Mc Home, Djribi ; f 



:i«ra»»MmraaafcH«a«« f|T rT irirm rff^ nmnwiwr^num htt-m l h - , TfimnTrn m -rawnn i i n M iraf 



Ksaasassouisai 



Mon., Feb. 14, 1977 BEACHCOMBER - 9 



8- BEACHCOMBER Mon., Feb. 14, 1977 



Women golfers take second in UAA Invitational 



By Jeannette Banning 
Staff Writer 

The women golfers opened 
the winter season by finishing 
second out of four teams in the 
small college division of the 
Miami Invitational. 

New women's golf coach 
Donna White was pleased with 
their performance in the 54-hole 



three-day event. It was the first 
tournament the team has played 
under her guidance. 

"Everyone played well. Their 
potential is unlimited," said 
White, 

Dade North won with a score 
of 965 strokes in the small 
college division. University of 
Miami won the large college 



division with a score of 893 
followed by the University of 
Florida with 931. 

The Pacers' score was 
339-328-331-988 in the Feb. 7-9 
tournament held in Miami. Ann 
Ranta led the team with 
84-82-77-243. 

Other Pacer scorers, were 
Patti Prentiss, 80-83-82-245; 



Sally Bricker, 87-85-80-252; Sue 
Holden, 88-83-82-253 and Kel- 
ley Spooner, 89-80-84-253. 

The women are now qualify- 
ing for a match with Dade North 
Wednesday at Hollywood Lakes 
Golf Course. 

Their next major tournament, 
the Rollins Invitational, is in 
Orlando Feb. 21-23. White 



mentioned that 14 teams have 
already entered and more are 
expected. 

"I have found it very 
rewarding to be coach instead of 
playing," added White, a 1976 
graduate of the University of 
Florida and their No. 1 woman 
golfer. She is also the 1976 U.S. 
Women's Amateur Golf Cham- 
pion. 




Twin upsets maintain win streak 




PHOTO 8Y GRE6 ROBERTS 



GIVE ME THE BALL- Shack Leonard tries to keep aggressive 
Broward central player Bobby McCray from knocking the ball away. 



On Feb. 2 last year, the 
basketball team stood 7-8 over 
all and 1-5 in Division IV play. 
Their quick rise to the- 
quarter-finals of the state 
tournament is history. But 
history repeats itself. 

Two weeks ago the Pacers 
stood 10-8 and 3-4 in the 
conference, three games off the 
pace set by Dade North and 
Dade South. But five wins in a 
row, four in the conference, 
have added new impetus to this 
season. 

The two latest conquests were 
over Broward Central and Dade 
South in what were both 
considered upsets. 

Against Broward, a team that 
whipped them earlier in the 
year, the Pacers started slowly, 
falling behind 21-15. They then 
took off on a 34-16 binge to post 
a 49-37 lead at the half. 

Mike Shoemaker, who wound 
up with 32 points for JC, hit 18 
in the decisive first half r Ball 
movement, a weak spot in 
earlier losses, was vastly 
improved as Shoemaker, Bill 
Buchanan and Slim Wethersbee 
were the recipients of fine guard 
play by Shack Leonard, Mike 
Bennett and Dirk Jamison. 

The defense was also the key. 
Roman Welch, the nation's No. 
6 scorer, was held to only seven 
before fouling out. James Ellis, 
who pumped in 38 against the 
cagers last time out, netted only 
1 1 . 

The Pacers stretched their 








&*£si! ^ 







m^-^M^&KZ'^x^Z, 






PHOTO BY GREG ROBERTS 



SAFE- A University of Miami player dives for the bag to avoid being picked off as first baseman Ron 
Woods [14}- awaits the pitcher's throw. 



lead to 20 at 79-59 before 
holding on for a 87-73 final 
score. 

Besides Shoemaker, Buchan- 
an had 13 points, Bennett 11. 
and Leonard 10. Shoemaker also 
grabbed 1 6 caroms. 

Sam Rhoden, Broward center, 
had a fine night tossing in 25 
points and taking down 20 
rebounds. 

Last Wednesday the cagers 
traveled to Dade South to take 
on the nation's 15th-ranked 
team. A loss would have 
eliminated the team from the 
state tournament. 

But the Pacers took control on 
the hostile Dade South court to 
post a stunning 88-81 victory 
and knock the Jaguars out of a 
ftrsj-place tie with Dade North. , . 

The team won the game at the 
foul line, sinking 26 of 35 
attempts while the Jaguars had 
only 10 shots, cashing in on 
seven. 

Three starters fouled out for * 



Dade South; Robert Rutledge, 
Robert Stanley and Henry 
Green. Bennett made an early 
retreat via the foul route for JC. 

Key to the victory for the 
Pacers was freshman guard 
Leonard. Normally a playmaker, 
the former Palm Beach Gardens 
standout hit eight field goals for 
16 points, 10 in the second half. 

Leonard's outburst and a 
switching tenacious defense 
held South's vaunted offense 
down. 

For JC, Shoemaker had 20 
points followed by Leonard with 
16 and Adrian Williams, 
Buchanan and Bennett with 
14,13 and 12 points respective- 

iy- 

Ken Butler and Stanley, h^fj- ■■ 
16«eachforthSJaglT^ r s.. '"" 

The most important game of 
the season awaits the Pacers 
Wednesday night as they take 
on the top team in Division IV, 
Dade North. Game time is 7:30 
p.m. 



Tough Miami squad 
too much for Pacers 

By Jim Goodman 
s Staff Writer 

Getting a taste of big time college baseball, the Pacers dropped a 
13-2 -decision to the University of Miami at Municipal Stadium. 

Miami, one of the top-ranked teams in the nation, showed why 
they are so highly rated by combining power hitting with solid 
pitching in the Feb. 4 game. -■...-■ 

The Hurricanes started the scoring in the top of the second inning 
as Jim Maler, Dave Knott, Matt Syner and Richard Feldman all 
scored to give Miami a 4-0 lead. 

Knott also hit a solo homer in the third inning giving the 
Hurricanes a 5-0 lead. 

Miami lengthened the lead to 8-0 when Rick Montoni hit a 
three'run homer in the fourth inning. 

The Pacers scored their two runs in the sixth inning . 

Rick Krupa started the inning with a walk. An error by Miami's 
first baseman allowed Krupa to score and Marty McDermott to 
advance to second. Nick Maniotis then singled, moving McDermott 
to third. 

Eddie Walker, pinch runner for Maniotis, stole second and 
McDermott raced home as Miami missed the throw to second base. 

Miami added their final five runs in the ninth inning against 
Pacer substitutes. 

Even though the team committed five errors allowing Miami to 
score three unearned runs, the team also made some impressive 
defensive efforts as they turned three double plays.Despite the loss, 
baseball coach Dusty Rhodes was pleased with the team's 
performance. 

''We played a good game against one of the best teams in the 
nation," Rhodes said. "We made some mistakes and Miami took 
advantage of them." 

Rhodes also had priase for Jim Kemp, who led the Pacers at the 
plate with three hits. 

The team's next game is against the Ft. Lauderdale Baseball 
School, Feb. 18. The game is being played at Boca Raton. 

The team then travels to Ft. Myers the next day to play Edison 
Community College. The contest will be the first conference game 
for the Pacers. 






S.a*«». 1 



OriainsofJCs seven intercollegiate sports 

XkZJB 



Of the seven different 
intercollegiate sports played 
here, only two are completely 
American in origin. The other 
four are either completely or 
partially English and one is of 
Scottish origin. 

The two American sports, 
basketball and volleyball, were 
born in the same decade and in 
the same state by persons 
associated with the YMCA. 

Basketball was created by 
James Naismith, a student at 
the YMCA Training School in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, in 
December 1891. His PE 
instructor told Naismith's class, 
which hated the calisthenics 
they were doing, to come up 
with a sport to fill the void 
between football and baseball 
seasons. 

Naismith thought up a game 
he called basketball, with nine 
men to a team and peach 
baskets nailed 10 feet high at 
either end of a gym. Of his 
original 13 rules, five are still in 
force today. 

The first baskets were without 
holes in the bottom and the ball 
had to be retrieved with a pole 
after each successful shot. A 
few years later the basket was 
replaced by netting, and a few 
years after that a hole for the 
ball to escape through was cut in 
the bottom of the net. 

The backboard was originally 
added to keep balcony specta- 
tors from interfering with shots. 

Volleyball was the brainchild 
of YMCA director William 
Morgan in Holyoke, Massa- 
chusetts. He formulated the 
game in 1895 as a not too 
strenuous game for older men. 



His rules generally still stand 
today. 

Our "national pasttime", 
baseball, has its roots in 
the English games of cricket and 
rounders, despite a legend to 
the contrary. Baseball originally 
was a slang term for cricket. 

According to the legend, 
Abner Doubleday, an American 
army officer stationed at 
Cooperstown, New York, cre- 
ated the game there in 1839. 
That myth was so widely 
believed that the Baseball Hall 
of Fame was located in 
Cooperstown and a baseball 
centennial celebrated in 1939. 

Research debunked the myth, 
revealing that the account of 
baseball's creation was written 
by a friend of Doubleday's and 
that Doubleday couldn't have 
been in Cooperstown that year. 



The real credit for originating 
baseball goes to Alexander 
Cartwright of New York City's 
Knickerbocker Club. 



Cartwright changed the rules 
of cricket, setting the baseball 
diamond dimensions, declaring 
an out when a ball was caught in 
the air or on the first bounce, 
eliminating hitting a runner 
with the ball to make an out, and 
instead substituting a tag, 
defining a foul ball, and 
limiting a batter to three strikes 
per up and three outs per 
inning. 

He also reduced players to 
nine per team and made them 
bat in order and decided that a 
game . was won when a team 



scored 21 runs or "aces" as 
they were called then. 

Although baseball has chan- 
ged considerably since then, 
Cartwright certainly did lay 
down many of the ground rules. 

Softball is derived from 
baseball, with the credit going 
to George Hancock. Hancock 
started the game in 1877, 
supposedly when he saw 
someone batting around a 
boxing glove in a gym. The first 
game of Softball was indoor 
baseball. 



Cross-country is a wholly 
English invention, with the 
Crick Run in 1837 at Rugby 
School beginning the sport. The 
first cross-country club was the 
Thames Hares and Hounds, 
formed in 1868. 



The club would divide its 
runners into "hares" and 
"hounds". The "hares" got a 
head start and then the 
"hounds" tried to catch them. 
The course was truly "cross- 
country" as the runners ran 
through forests and streams and 
hurdled fences and obstacles 
enroute to their destination. 
Runners getting lost was the 
rule rather than the exception. 



Another totally English sport 
is tennis. Inspired by the 
medieval game of court tennis, 
played indoors in a walled court, 
Major Walter Wingfield of the 
British army devised a game he 
called "lawn tennis" in 1873. 

His game called for ' a 
hourglass-shaped court with a 
high net and auxiliary nets 



r 



Men's tennis team victorious, 
win every match from Daytona 



Intramural 
Bowling Results 



MEN 




WOMEN 




HIGH GAME 




High Game 




OscarCash 
Kent Knox 
Jim Nowicki 


258 
224 
220 


Kathy Wilk 
Jerri McConkey 
Lee Anne Pyfrin 


200 
175 
171 


High Series 




High Series 




Oscar Cash 
Brian Richards 
Jim Nowicki 


603 

575 
574 


Kathy Wilk 
KimDelong 
Lee Anne Pyfrin 


487 
476 
470 


High Average 




High Average 




Oscar Cash ' 
Scott Kifkton 
Kent Knox 


190 
182 
182 


Kim Delong 
Jerry McConkey 
Lee Anne Pyfrin 


156 
155 

153 




Steve 
Farnsworth 

Sports 
Columnist 



called side curtains. Today, all 
that remains of his game is the 
net. 

In 1877, the All-England Club 
in Wimbledon, facing declining 
croquet revenues, turned over 
some of its lawns to tennis play. 
The same year the first tennis 
tournament was held and 
Wimbledon was on its way to 
becoming the tennis capital of 
the world. 

Golf comes from Scotland, 
where the sport came into being 
in the 15th century. The first 
golf courses were on "links" on 
the east coast of Scotland where 



the wind had sculpted dunes, 
ridges, knolls, gullies and 
hollows. 



Rabbits lived on the "links" 
and had made flat grassy areas 
where they played and 
grass-covered runs between the 
areas. The flat areas became 
greens and runs, fairways. 

The early golf balls were 
feather-stuffed leather bags and 
the clubs were similarily crude. 



Golf almost died before it 
started. The Scottish Parliament 
tried to repress the sport three 
times, since it was drawing 
people away from archery, a 
much more useful sport in times 
of invasion. 



Since nearly all the sports are 
of fairly recent origins, it makes 
you wonder what people did 
before they were invented. I 
guess the common man was just 
too busy trying to stay alive. 



Team Standings 



Dido 

Blockbusters 
JC Junkers 



11-1 

10-2 

8-4 



By Janice Krieger 
Staff Writer 

The men's tennis team was 
victorious again as they 
defeated Daytona Beach, win- 
ning every match. 

Score in the Feb. 4 match was 
7-0 with individual results as 
follows: Jim Harris, No. 1 
singles, 4-6, 6-2 and 6-2; Chris 
Beecroft, No. 2 singles, 6-2 and 
8-6; Gus Orellana, No. 3 singles, 
6-1 and 6-3; Xavier Pino, No. 4 
singles, 6-4 and 6-0; and Joe 
Gracey, No. 5 singles, 6-4, 6-0. 

No. 1 doubles team of 
Orellana and Gracey won 6-2 
and 6-3. No. 2 doubles were won 
by Beecroft and Mark Wenzel. 
The first set score was 6-4 and 
the second was at 5-5 when a 
default was called on the other 
team because of foul language. 

Last Tuesday's game with 
FAU was cancelled because of 
rain, this Sunday the team plays 
a ■home match with the Meed 
Racquet Club on the tennis 
courts. 




> vtif&ftfp&te; 



UNDEFEATED- No. 1 men's tennis player Jim 
in competition so far. 



»i»».l M *"»» ^ ' 



Wu I U at sTtvL tHhiuiiLiil , r. 

Harris is unbeaten 



CHI SIG FRATERNITY 



Perforata 
leatiirdelyifig 

ac*w 

Hawe regular 
medical check-ape. 

Give Heart Fund ♦ > 

AmiM.can Hea't Associalmu I,' 




MowAestBptmg Pi&dgs Applications! 

Available in BA-1 10 or from Chi Sig members. 

Must be 1 8 and currently enrolled at JC. 

Deadline for applications is Feb. 23rd. 

Deposit in SG office or Chi Sig mailbox. 



0, 
if 



^"-"■""w^mTWWnTM jEM^ Tv^jv^ , ^^ ^ 



10- BEACHCOMBER Mon„ Feb. 14, 1977 

Lady netters topped 
by Broward North 



By Robbin Barber 
Staff Writer 

The women's tennis team was overthrown by Broward North as 
the Pacers lost seven out of nine matches. 

Vikki Beggs started the match well with a win of 6-0, 6-1 against 
Broward North's Annette Llarena in the No. 1 singles. However, 
the other singles players failed to do the same as Lisa Yap-Sam was 
surprised by Lisa Echert in the No. 2 singles 3-6, 0-6. 

In the No. 3 singles Kim Cavanaugh lost to Debbie Gawne 4-6, 
2-6 and Debbie Fung was outclassed by Linoa Richou in the No. 4 
singles 0-6, 2-6. In the No. 5 singles Ann Marie Ziadie was 
defeated by Michele Savage 2-6, 6-7 and Cheryl Lewis was beaten 
by Leslie Gilby 0-6, 4-6. 

The doubles matches went almost the same way as the singles, 
as Beggs- Yap-Sam overpowered Echert - Richow 6-1, 6-3 in the No. 
1 doubles. The winning streak ended there as Cavanaugh - Fung 
were topped by Gawne - Llahena in the No. 2 doubles 4-6, 4-6, and 
Ziadie - Lewis lost to Savage - Giltz 3-6, 3-6, in No. 3 doubles. 

It's known that Broward North is regarded as a strong women's 
team but the Pacers were expected to give a better performance 
than they did. 

"Broward has far more depth than we have, so all considered, 
the girls played pretty well , ' ' said Coach Julio Rive , ' 'but it should 
have been a closer match." 

Last Tuesday's match against Broward Central was forfeited due 
to the fact that BC no longer has a women's tennis team. 



Mon., Feb. 14, 1977 BEACHCOMBER - 11 




4tp« 




k 


PHOTO BY STEVE FARNSWORTH 



SAILING CLUB- Members of the Sailing Club pose in front of one of 
their new sailboats. [L-R] David Finklea, Allison Hankey, club 
president Bill Vivas, Robin Krauch, Dana Bathurst and Ana Diaz. 



Basketball Box Scores 


PALM BEACH 
PLAYERS FG FT 


TP 


PALM BEACH 
PLAYERS FG FT 


TP 


Shoemaker 12 
Buchanan 4 
Bennett 5 
Williams 4 
Leonard 3 
Paul 1 
Jamison 2 


8-8 
5-7 
1-2 
0-0 
4-5 
0-2 
1-3 
2-2 


32 
13 

11 

8 

10 

2 

5 

6 


Shoemaker 5 
Buchanan 5 
Bennett 4 
Williams 4. 
Leonard 8 
Paul 2 
Jamison 3 


10-14 

3-4 

4-4 

6-8 

0-1 

0-0 

3-4 


20 

13 

12 

14 

16 

4 

9 


Wethersbee 2 


Totals 31 26-35 

DADE SOUTH 
PLAYERS FG FT 


88 


Totals 33 21-29 87 

BROWARD CENTRAL 
PLAYERS FQ FT TP 


TP 


Khoden 10 
Welch 3 
Ellis 4 
Mason 6 
McCray 5 
Gil ley 2 
Madry 1 


5-10 

1-4 

3-3 

0-0 

2-4 

0-0 

0-0 


25 

7 

11 

12 

12 

4 

2 


Brown 6 
Rutiedge 5 
Stanley 8 
Manning 4 
Green 3 
Butler 7 
Glushakow 4 


1-2 
0-0 
0-0 
2-2 
1-1 
2-4 
1-1 


13 

10 

16 

10 

7 

16 

9 



Totals 



31 



11-21 73 




¥D _ „_ .__ ., PHOTO BY STEVE FARNSWORTH 

I&R BOARD- Meeting at Major League Lanes are the members of the I&R Board. [L-R] Intramural 
Director Roy Bell, Krista Meglen, Dave Greene, Paul Simon and Gloria Lopez. Not pictured are new 
Board members BUI Vivas, Nancy Brown and Robin Krauch. 

Intramurals slates new activities 
scuba, volleyball and badminton 



Jeannette Banning 
Staff Writer 

Scuba, volleyball and bad- 
minton are being incorporated 
into the intramural (I&R) sports 
program. 



Students interested in learn- 
ing how to underwater scuba 
dive can register in the gym 
(rm.PE-05) next Monday, Feb. 
21 at 3 p.m. 



I&R Director Roy Bell stated 
that the I&R Board pays S15 of 
the diving fee and the students 
pay $20. 



Bell said the scuba club is 
designed so that, at the end of 
seven weeks, students will have 
accumulated knowledge and the 
skills of this water sport. He 
said that the physiological 



aspects of diving, education on 
buying equipment, commercial 
diving and emergency proced- 
ures will be taught. 



Doug Curtis, certified by the 
YMCA and Professional Asso- 
ciation of Diving Instructors, 
instructs the course. 



The scuba club's activities 
include five days at Lake I.ytal 
Poo) on Gun Club Rd., four days 
at the ocean on the beach or in a 
boat and classroom activities. 
Participants pay 50 cents a day 
pool fees and can borrow, buy or 
rent their equipment. 



Bell added the class will be 
limited to 20 students meeting 
from 3-6 p.m. Mondays and 
Wednesdays. A medical exam- 
ination is required. 



Men and women interested in 
coed volleyball can obtain a 
team entry form on the bulletin 
board near rm. PE 4k in the gym 
according to Paul Simon, 
student I&Rdirector. 



Simon said volleyball begins 
Thursday, Feb. 24 from 7-9 p.m. 
Students not on a team can sign 
up and be drafted. 



Badminton tournaments, both 
singles and doubles, will be on 
Tuesdays from 7-9 p.m. starting 
Feb. 22. Registration for 
badminton is held the first night 
prior to play. 



Bell added that T-shirts are 
given to all participants of I&R 
activities and trophies are 
awarded to winners. 



Totals 



37 7-10 



81 




SCUBA 

Registration 

Feb. 21 3P.M. Gym 

$20 For Course 



COURSE LEADSTO YMCA 
AND/OR PADI CERTIFICATION 



Director named 



Frank A. Falcone, a first year communications major, has 
been named Director of Media Affairs for the JC south 
campus. This announcement has been made by Dr. Harris 
McGirt, counselor of student affairs at the South center. 

Falcone is a graduate of the Charles Morris Price School of 
Journalism and has had previous experience in all areas of 
mass media communications. He currently heads the newly 
formed ' ' Florida Educational Radio Network . " 

McGirt has stated that Falcone's responsibilities will be the 
gathering of South Campus news and to work as a liason 
between JC publications-The Beachcomber and the Galleon 
and Florida Atlantic University's, Atlantic Sun. 

The South Campus thus joins the North Campus as regular 
contributors to the Beachcomber. 



New I&R Board members named 



By Jeannette Banning 
Staff Writer 

The Intramural Board has 
added Nancy Brown, Bill Vivas, 
Robin Krauch and Krista 
Meglen as new members. 

Brown, from Princeton New 
Jersey, is a business and 
executive secretary major. She 
is a first-semester freshman 
interested in track, tennis, 
basketball and gymnastics; 

Leonard High graduate Vivas 
is a second-semester pre-med 
major. He has been active in 
karate and sailing and has been 



named president of the sailing 
club. 

Freshman Krauch is also a 
graduate of Leonard and her 
interests are in swimming and 
tennis. 

Meglen is a sophomore, 
having transferred from Kent 
State where she played 
intercollegiate volleyball. Art, 
water safety and volleyball are 



where her interests lie. 

' 'Meglen ' s artistic talents will 
be " applied towards making 
posters," said Intramural Dir- 
ector Roy Bell. 

Bell added that the new board 
members are being oriented and 
are going to publish a calendar 
of activities as soon as their 
programs are developed. 



Campus Combings 



Classifieds 



St. Valentine's Day plant sale is 
being sponsored by the Sales 
and Marketing Club today on 
the patio of the Business 
Admin. BIdg. 

Free Health Fair is being held in 
SAC lounge Feb. 14-15, 9 a.m. -2 
p.m. 

A representative from Jackson- 
ville University will be on 
campus Wednesday, Feb. 16 at 
10 a.m. in the cafeteria. Any 
student interested in transferr- 
ing to Jacksonville should come 
and talk with him. 
An assembly program, William 
Windom plays "Thurber" is 
being presented Feb. 17, 10:50 
a.m. - 12:15 p.m. in the gym. 
Mr. Windom, veteran of many 
motion pictures and Broadway 
plays is best known for his 
Emmy award winning lead role 
in TV's "My World and 
Welcome to It" based on the 
writings of James Thurber. 



Windom presents some of 
Thurber's fables, satires and 
sketches. All classes will be 
cancelled for this program. 
Health waiver exams March 1, 7 
p.m. at Palm Beach Gardens 
High school, $22 fee. For 
further information call JC 
North at 622-3863. 
Don't forget the Chi Sig party to 
be held at El Pomar Trace 
Clubhouse on Feb. 18 (BYOB). 
the student body is invited and 
I.D.'s will be required. If any 
females are interested in joining 
the fraternity .and partying, 
attend this get together and 
meet the members. Guys are 
invited too. 

Palm Beach Post No. 12, the 
American Legion, has announ- 
ced that applications are now 
being received for scholarship 
grants and loans for the 
1977-1978 academic school year 
from qualified applicants. Ap- 



plicants are invited to pick up 
forms from Mrs. Louise Martin 
at the American Legion home, 
625 Okeechobee Road, W.P.B., 
phone 655-1343. The applica- 
tions should be filed immedU 
ately as it takes a minimum of 
eight weeks to process an 
application. Applicants must be 
Palm Beach county residents. 
The Volunteer Auxiliary of 
Doctor's Hospital will be having 
their rummage sale this year on 
Feb. 19, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
on the hospital grounds, 2829 
10th Ave., Lake Worth, 
Clothing, both men's and 
women's, household items, 
bric-a-brac, etc. that can be 
donated, will help immensely. 
Anyone interested in helping 
please contact Mrs. Denny 
Dixon phone 965-1953 and 
arrangements for receiving 
donations will be made. Dean 
Gl>i\n has offered his office as a 
staff collection point. 



14 foot aluminum boat and trailer, 35 h.p. Evinrude. Great for 
fishing $500, call 626-.0432. ' 

Lost-1970 Seacrest class ring. If found please call 659-1619 or 
go to gym for John Anderson. 

Lost: Gold watch with thin gold band and safety chain. 
Caravelle-reward, call Paula Wright 588-1543. 
1964 MGB conv. super condition, best offer. Delray, evenings 
278-7156. 

For sale: 1966 Ford Galaxy. White exterior, black interior, 
very clean. This two door comes with power steering, power 
brakes, radio and an 8-cytinder engine $350. Call 586-5744. 
Anytime after 1:30 p.m. 

Beginning guitar and banjo lessons. Call Jim at 842-8794. 
Dunlop Maxply "Tennis Racquet". New condition, new 
strings. 4 5/8 light size $22. Ask for John at 659-4635 or 
968-5092. 

'71 Vega, must sell. AM-FM, 8 track, new brakes, tune-up 
$395 firm. Call 964-6598 evenings or contact 3163 Prince" 
Drive, Lake Worth. 

"Jason" A .handsome and affectionate black persian, 
6-month-old cat, who needs a safe area in which to roam and a 
loving family. Call 844-2648 after 4 p.m. 
For sale: Open GT 1971, fine condition, very clean. 964-0574. 
For sale: 3 bedroom, 2 bath house. Central heat, carpet w/w. 
964-0574. 

'71 Merc Montego, 41,000 miles. Good gas mileage, a/c, ps, 
pb and radio. $900 firm. Call 732-2868. 

Female roommate needed to share nice 2 bedroom mobile 
home near college. Swimming pool, clubhouse facilities 
• available for $90 including utilities. Call Sharon at 968-4381. 




12 - BEACHCOMBER Mon., Feb. 14, 1977 




. andwell 
double your older. 




.X»ij' 



Boy a Wltoppcr with dotage 'meat 
Whopper Juniof with dbubfe meat hamburger 
with double meat, cheeseburger with 

ooutoii meat; and you 1 get' amiKr sandwich 
just lite it Ftoe.. 

You read it right. Come on in and orderoneof our 
famous burgers with double meat. Like our Whopper®with 
double meat .Two big 100% beef patties. Broiled, never 
fried. And served your way. With lettuce.Tomatoes. Onions. 
Pickles. Catsup and mayonnaise. All piled high on a sesame 
seed bun. Or choose the Whopper Junior®with double meat. 
For smaller appetites but just as great. Or try a hamburger 
or cheeseburger with double meat. Whatever your choice, 
when you present the coupon below, you'll get a second 
sandwich just like your first one. Free: 

So clip the coupon. For a double bargain. 



, fl , t^fW 1 



aM#*w 




Buy one Whopper with douhtemeat, 
Whopper Juniof with double meat, hamburger 

with doubie meat, or cheeseburger with 
double meat. Get another one just Iil<e it free. 



Buy one of the double meat 
sandwiches listed and get another 
one just like it free! But hurry. 
Offer expires 2/28/77 .Limit 
one per customer. Good only at: 
3796S. CONGRESS AVE. 
LAKE WORTH, FLA/33460 



Have if, 




Void where prohibited 



3796 S. CONGRESS AVE. 
LAKE WORTH, FLA. 33460 



(C> 1974 Burger King Corporation - Printed in USA 




Beachcomber 



Voice of the Palm Beach Junior College Student 



Member of the 

associaTeD 
coLLeaaTe 
pRess 



Vol. 38 No. 16 



Monday, February 21, 1977 



Lake Worth, Florida 33461 




Fee committee still alive 



Motion to give power 
'to administration dies 

By Bill Johnson 
Associate Editor 

The Student Activity Fee Committee survived attack from a 
proposal made by trustee George Michael at this month's Board of 
Trustees meeting. 

The motion, if accepted, would have taken away the power from 
the SAFC and make individual organizations submit budgets to the 
administration. 

Michael cited excessive carryover of funds and JC being the only 
college in Florida to use this method. 

"Let the administration handle the money," said Michael. "We 
are the exception, none of the other schools do it." 

Trustee Susan Anstead opposed the motion saying that it was 
brought up every year and that some carryover was necessary. 

Dr. Harold Manor, JC president, also voiced opposition to the 
hill, pointing out that he had been to an SAFC meeting the day 
before, and heard what the students had lo say. 

Jim Klein, manager of WPBC, spoke in behalf of the committee, 
which gave (lie station an extra one percent. Glen Marsteller, ICC 
advisor, also spoke. 

Tom Solder, chairman of ICC, challenged Michael saying that he 
wasn't fully informed about the SAFC. 

"I've never seen you at any of the meetings," Solder said to 
Michael. 

After more discussion Smith withdrew his second to the motion 
adding. "I didn't know the students had such strong feelings about 
it." 

In other board action a contract with the city of Lake Worth for (he 
disposal of JC sewage has been under dispute and was a topic of 
discussion at the meeting. 

The city of Lake Worth is" changing methods of disposal to a more 
<--sp>.-nsivc >v;iv. ihus increasum I he price of the service from $2,400 
toi>20,0lil) .1 N...I. 

Jfimmrmi&TSfiinvzi Under the old price, dud the irustees 
arc reluctant lo give it up, though some talk of a compromise was 
made. , • 




PHOTO BY GREG ROBERTS 

Slim. NT OPINION HEARD — Station manager of WPBC, Jim 
Klein, reacts to motion to drop (he student fee recommendations in 
fa\ or of administrative power. 



Windom assembly delights audience 



V V - J « J. 

Wtj" - *' - E 'J\ 




By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

Capturing a JC audience with an assembly is not an easy task. 

But using James Thurber as the go-between, noted character 
actor William Windom thrilled a crowd of an estimated 1,000 with 
his portrayal of the 20th century humorist. 

Windom. who portrays Thurber some 30 limes a year at colleges 
throughout the country, took bits from some of Thurber's 
better-known short works. He I hen went into a crowd-pleasing 
rendition of "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty". 

The audience asked for some performances including "Unicorn in 
I he Garden." and "The Night the Bed Fell" but as Windom noted 
"These w:orks are contained in 'Thurber's Carnival' and Mrs. 
Thurber said noto these,." 

Windom delighted the large throng with his ■transition from the 
meek, always-dreaming Mitty, to the flamboyant, racy characters 
he portrayed in his thoughts. 

After his hour-long performance. Windom entertained audience 
questions (hat ranged from his initial inierest in Thurber to his 
acting beginnings in the Army. 

The Assembly Committee, headed by Dean of Women Elizabeth 
Davcy, was also ecstatic about the affair. "We are extremely happy 
with the crowd reaction," Davcy noted. "The crowd was so 
receptive." 

Following an autograph session. Windom was guest of the Food 
Service department for lunch. He then returned to his home in Van 
Nuvs, California. 



SAFC 
satisfies 
Dr. Manor 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

In a special meeting designed 
to clarify their recommenda- 
tions, the Student Activity Fee 
Committee (SAFC) met with JC 
President Harold Manor. 

Manor noted at the outset 
that he was merely meeting to 
shed light on the changes made 
by this year's SAFC. 

Changes included a one 
percent increase in the campus 
radio station, WPBC. a drop of 
one per cent from Galleon, 
Athletics and ICC and the 
funding of the Sales and 
Marketing Club by two percent. 

Jim Klein, station manager of 
WPBC and Kathleen Kenney. 
president of Sales and Marketing 
club explained to Manor why 
they asked for percentage 
increases. 

"We want to upgrade our 
program, to some sort of 
professional quality." Klein 
said. He also spoke of [lie 
broadcasting field as an 
increasing one at JC. "People 
are using this station as a 
springboard for further car- 
eers." he added. 

Kenney stated that her club 
cannot continue with the lack of 
funding that plagues them now. 
She brought up Indian River 
Community College as an 
example of a school that takes 
care of the academia. 

Dr. Howard Reynolds, direc- 
tor of athletics, felt thai the 
decision to send money to the 
satellite campuses may cost 
I hem some programs. Athletics 
have had some satellite fee 
monies returned for this 
semester but next fall's actions 
arc uncenain. 

In closing. Manor praised the 
committee for its diHigcnee. But 
passage of the recommenda- 
tions are pending due to further 
studv bv Manor. 



On the inside 



Health fair recap p - 2 

Venture hits the books P. 4 

Cagers win two; still alive P. 6 




2 BEACHCOMBER Mon. f Feb. 21, 1977 



Mon., Feb. 21, 1977 BEACHCOMBER - 3 



Health fair varied 

By Maurice Gaffney 
Staff Writer 

JC's Health Fair, sponsored by Student Health Personnel 
Services, was held Tuesday and Wednesday in the SAC lounge. 

A raiher small but enthusiastic group viewed and participated in 
the two-day affair. 

Most in attendance felt that they learned something that they 
didn't know before attending. A total of 17 organizations 
participated. 

The most popular organizations included the Dental Health 
Auxiliary of JC and the Biofeedback Center. 

Headed by Dave Albee, former JC student and graduate of 
Florida State, the Biofeedback program was one of the new 
organizations lo appear. 

The blood drive, held in conjunction with the fair, was not as 
successful as was hoped by blood drive Chairman Paul Glynn. "I 
can't pinpoint what happened but the turnout was not near what we 
had expected." 

Blood donated added to only 64 pints. It was donated to aid 
English instructor Ed Crowley, who is battling leukemia. 

Helen Diedrich, director of JC health services stated she was 
disappointed with the low turnout "but overall the people who cam 
left impressed and more aware." 







editorials] 



PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER 

■ BLOOD DRIVE- Booth in the corner of the SAC lounge during JC's Health fair collected from students. 



Darkroom nears completion 



By Emily Hamer 
Photo Editor 

Graphic arts students at JC 
are anticipating completion of 
the new darkroom under 
construction in the Humanities 
building. 

Fully equipped, the darkroom 
will accommodate six students 
working individually, or an 
entire class working in teams 
and observing demonstrations: 

John Correll, graphic arts 
instructor, said the darkroom 
"will upgrade us technologic- 
ally." He noted JC has never 



really pushed the graphics arts 
program, and hopes the new 
facilities will attract students to 
the graphics field. 

Approximately 20 commercial 
art and graphic arts majors are 
to graduate from JC this term. 

Cost of constructing the 
darkroom is $15,000, however 
equipment costs have not yet 
been figured. 

Equipment to be purchased 
includes a process camera, a 
point source light (an exposure 
system for duplicating) with a . 



vacuum contact frame and a 
photomechanical transfer .system 
used for reducing and enlar- 
ging- 

Also included will be an 
enlarger, photomechanical type- 
setting equipment, a process 
camera already being used by 
the department and a tempera- 
ture control sink. 

Construction outside the 
darkroom consists of a sink with 
hot and cold water taps and 
storage cabinets. Entrance is 
through rotary darkroom doors . 



Walk-a-thon "scheduled 



John Childers 
Staff Writer 

SG is helping with a March of Dimes 
Walk-a-thon to be held Saturday, March 5 at 
Howard Park near Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm 
Beach. 

Registration is it 7:00 a.m., the Walk-a-thon 
begins at 8:00. 

"This is our big money raiser," said Hugh 
Lambert College Walk-a-thon coordinator. 

Last years event netted $60,000 of $90,000 
pledged from 4,500 walkers. 

This year, 7,000 walkers is the hopeful figure for 
a S 100,000 goal. 

"We're attempting to set up a college action 
program to assist the March of Dimes," asserts 
Kathleen Kennev. 



Volunteers are going to be' needed 
registration and clean up on Saturday. 



for 



Interested walkers obtain sponsor sheets from 
the bookstore, SG or Beachcomber, then get 
friends and family to pledge any amount of money 
for each mile completed. If a dollar is pledged and 
the 20-mile course is completed, $20 is the total 
donation. If five cents is committed, $1.00 is given. 

Walkers report with pledge sheets and get a 
walk card prior to the journey, to be marked at 
seven check points along the route. 

Awards for the first person to finish, one with 
the highest amount of pledges, and the school with 
the most entries are to be given. .,■ 



Board sets aid requirements 



In order to comply with 
federal regulations, the Board of 
Trustees established require- 
nicms for students who receive 
federal financial aid. 

The Education Amendments 
of 197t> provide that financial aid 
payments under federal pro- 
grams not be given to 
non-progressing students. The 
; rux of the hoard decision dealt 
with establishing standards and 
practices for JC recipients. 

Programs include BEOG, 
SEOG. work study and other 
federal loans. 

All recipients of federal 
•.ludenl financial aid are to be 
;>laced on probation if the 
following standards are not met: 
Cum. grade pt. aver, of 1.4 for 
1-14 sem. his. attempted. 
Cum. grade pt. aver. of 1.6 for 
i.S-27 sent, iirs . attempted, 
'..'urn. grade pt. aver, of 1.8 for 
?K-45 sem. Iirs. attempted. 
Cum. grade pt. aver, of 2.0 over 
45 sem. hrs. attempted. 

The student will be notified 
on the grade report at the end of 
term if they are mi probation. 
If the appropriate grade point 



average has not been attained 
after one semester on probation, 
the student will be notified on 
his or her grade report that 
unsatisfactory progress has 
been made. Federal student 
financial aid will then be 
discontinued. 



The student may re-establish 
federal student financial aid 
eligibility by enrolling at their 
own expense, and subsequently 
raising grade point averages to 
meet JC standards. 

This procedure is in effect 
beginning this semester. 




PHOTO BY EMILY HAMER 

GREENERY SALE- DECA sells plants to make money for upcoming 
trip to national competition in Anaheim, Cal. 



South Campus News 

By Frank Falcone 
Staff Writer 

Registration for the JC South Campus spring quarter will be 
held in room 22 of the Henderson University School on March 7 - 
18. 

This registration period differs from most by the fact that you 
must pay for all classes at the time of registration. No classes 
may be held for an individual who does not pay for the classes at 
the time of registration. 

All veteran's and BEOG deferments are allowed. 

It is a fact that most of the classes offered fill very quickly, so it 
is advised that delays in registration be avoided. A list of the 
classes being offered, their dates and times may be obtained at 
the South campus office. It is advised that you plan your 
schedule now! 



Tennessee WiUiams, "Night of the Iguana" is the, ««■**•#" 
prod'tfetfon o'f rh'e Caldwell Theatre that South Campus students 
may obtain discount tickets toi . Student nights aie March 8 - 10. 
Tickets are '$2 for" student's with a limit: of two tickets per "ID. 
Those students desiring tickets must sign up and pay, in roofh 1 1 
in hus. The deadline to sign up is March 3. 



JC South recently returned 36 per cent of their student activity 
fees from this past registration to the Central campus. According 
to Dr. Harris McGirt the monies will be used by the Central 
campus to "help finance the JC athletic program." 



The Health Challenge Exam is being given in room 22 of HUS 
on March 3, and will give students the opportunity to fulfill thier 
health requirement, in their area of study. The cost is $22.00 
payable on' 'the date! oft'esting. 

Further information' may be obtained', from your counselor, or 
by calling the South campus office, Ext. 2903. 



A meeting held by the JC South and FAU produced some 
significant response from students and administration. The 
forming of this joint committee could start a new era in the 
co-existence of the two schools. 

A meeting to formalize the forming of the organization has 
been scheduled for March 17. An immediate area of discussion is 
that of intramural sports and both groups are compiling a list of 
subjects that need to be discussed so that the idea of 
"cooperative education" between the two schools may be 
enhanced, 

North campus news 

••.-'.• By Kathy Cavanaugh 
StaffWriter 

! The North cafhpus will pay for food and lodging of any North 
student, who -participates in speech tournaments: that the main 
campus Fprensicsteam attends. 

Dr. Smith, coordinator of the North campus said, "If enough 
interest, is ."shown, for participation in tournaments this semester, 
fwould like tohire a Forensics advisor and start a, team next year 
that would represent JC North." 

This semester, Freddie Jefferson, Speech and English 
instructor at JC North has volunteered to assist students in areas 
of competitive speaking to prepare them for Forensics 
tournaments. 

The next tournament will be held in Orlando on March 25 and 
26. Speaker categories include poetry and prose interpretation. 

Any North campus day or evening students a ; re asked to see 
Mrs. Jefferson at 45th St. 



<?r 



Board lawyer qualifications 



We understand that the Board of Trustees is advertising for a new 
attorney. Qualifications are mentioned, which reminds us of some 
skills an applicant should keep in mind. Judging from past 
performance, a school board attorney should master, among other 
things, the following: 

Be an expert on filibuster. Especially around contract negotiation 
time. 

He must not understand readily nor should he explain issues 
plainly. If he does, contract discussions could move along at a fast 
pace, making the Board look as if it was not working. 

He will need wordiness. What good is an attorney unless he can 
turn a five- word sentence into 500 words? 

He must show adeptness at confusing explanations and ideas. 

Anyone who can not slow down to snail's pace a proceeding, need 
not apply. 

He must have special vision... with one point of view, to be 
decided upon by the trustees. 

He must be a mindreader. ESP also will help. If he can figure out 
what the trustees will think of next week, he will earn extra brownie 
points. 

He must have a one-word speaking vocabulary — "No." 

His ability to.run up large legal bills must be proven. The greater 
the expenses, the more impressive he will be. 

He must be gifted in special ways. For instance, how to keep an 
argument going on, and on, and on and on. 

His written vocabulary must include alternate definitions for 
faculty communications that will slightly alter the intent and 
meaning" of subject terms. 

He also must have mastered methods to delay and block actions 
by "studying the matter" or "further- research into the matter." 
This also includes the ability to half-solve the problems. Proficiency 
in delay tactics are essential. 

Have a complete legal jargon perfected to keep the public both 
confused and in the dark about what is going on. 

References from other school districts will be an asset, since he 
will have acquired a great deal of these skills through working with 
other school systems. 

Someonewho qualifies, will show up at one of these meetings and 
we shall be the first to congratulate the winner. We know 
competition will be strong, because all these skills are in use in our 
current courts. We hear about them daily. 
• Here's to the lucky winner! 



-fa 



,^-pFg- 



- -> f-f;- 



oughhuts never die 



Styles come and styles go, but the doughnut lives on forever. 

As inflation takes an ever deeper bite into our spending power, 
people give up one luxury after another. According to the doughnut 
industry spokesmen, doughnuts are not one of them. 

More and more people are changing their coffee and hamburger 
snack to coffee and doughnuts. It may not be as nutritious, but a 
doughnut is far tastier than some of the adulterated, low-cost 
hamburger. 

Chocolate candy bar snacks have lost sales because synthetic 
ingredients and soaring costs have soured both flavor and demand. 

Even the good old hot dog has. not withstood the ravages of 
inflation. 

Instead of trying to decide what kind of a hot dog or what variety 
of ice cream to-buy, consumers are turning to doughnut shops to 
satisfy the sweet tooth at the same time as they take care of the 
hunger pang. 

Recently on campus we have had several successful doughnut 
"events," so even at JC we have favored the doughnut. 

Counting calories or not, increasing numbers of people are 
enjoying a new "finger-licking-goodie" that the good Colonel from 
Kentucky never dreamt of when he coined the phrase. 

Whether it is a dunkin' doughnut or the little hole in the middle 
that is served, doughnuts are the "in" thing today. 



Beachcomber 

Palm Beach Junior College 
4206 S. Congress Ave., Lake Worth, Fla 33461 
(305) 965-8000, ext. 210 

Editor-in-chief .Dennis Glavin 

Associate Editor-Editorial ....... Gunda Caldwell 

Associate Editor-News Bill Johnson 

Associate Editor- Feature, Sports . Steve Farnsworth 

News Editor Cindy McCarthy 

Venture Editor Frank Smith 

Photo Editor Emily Hamer 

Business Manager ■ • Dave Taylor 

Consultant Charles R. McCreight 

The Beachcomber Is published weekly from our editorial offices In 
the Student Pulicatfons Building at Palm Beach Junior College 
Opinions expressed In the Beachcomber are those of the editors or 
writers and are not nesessarily those of the Palm Beach Junior 
College. 

Letters must not exceed 2oo words, must be signed by the author, 
received in the Beachcomber off,lce no later than 4 p.m. on 
Wednesday and are subject to condensation. 



■•- inff ii-ntii 



"Record Albums Or 
"3"ock S+raps ? Houo Cotwe. 

X Gf£-l- A(( The, rWa decisions? 



i? 3 !*.WA'J.M ^ ■ MA*> ? *^ £ «?' ' * T T J ' « !« l'>.rTy 



7 v r g xr t i ri 1 1 1 1 1 





Editor 



forum 



Board shows new interest in student opinion 



i£^"~" 


f) 


Denny Glavin 
Editor 


-> 


^ ■ . — 


} 




J> 



Wednesday's Board of Trus- 
tees meeting showed a spark of 
the kind of leadership we've 
been looking for in recent 
mon i lis. 

The motion; made by trustee 
George- Michael to abolish 
student control of activity fee 
allotments, died due to lack of a 
second. 

Dr. Robert Smith withdrew 
his second after what he termed 
"high student feeling against 
it." 

That is not to say that the 



students should run the college. 
Bui the Board listened, found 
that the group had not acted 
flippantly and said they 
deserved to remain as u 
fuiilibnihg unit. 

Dr. Harold Manor, who 
listened to the SAFC prior to the 
board meeting came to the- 
defense of the students. He 
found at the meeting what 
we've known all along, that this 
is where student priority is. 

But Manor has still yet to pass 
these recommendations made 
bvSAFC. 



Despite i he fact Manor came 
to the aid of the committee when 
they needed him. ratification of 
SAFC's percentages would 
show that he has faith in the 
students who have logged the 
hours in setting these percent- 
ages. 

If Manor needs more 
consultation, we're sure the fee 
committee would be more than 
happy to meet. Student and 
administration interaction is the 
first step in the upgrading of the 
student apathy at JC. 



Myths surround life of man we revered 



We have just celebrated 
Abraham Lincoln's birthday. 
The myths and the legends that 
have been built around him 
since his death shows little 
evidence of abating. 

This year he has been 
selected as I he most outstand- 
ing president this countrv ever 
had. 

He took part in the most 
tragic period of our history — the 
Civil War. 

Lincoln authored documents 
such as "The Gettysburg 
Address" and "The Declaration 
of Emancipation," two of the 
greatest expressions of policy 
man has known. They both 
testify to his powerful command 
of words and the incisive 
analyses he made of the crises 
of his day. 

He suffered great melanchol- 
ia and a dire foreboding outlook 
on the future. 

He also had a beautiful dream 
of what America should be and 
to the end of his life he 
struggled to direct the country 
toward its fulfillment. 

With all his greatness, he also 
had earmarks of an ordinary 
mortal. This was Lincoln the 
man. 

Like so many of us, he hated 
his nickname. He refused to let 
anyone call him "Abe." They 
were required to call him 
Lincoln or Mr. Lincoln. 



He did not become famous for 
his impassioned court cases as 
we believed, but for the 
successful higher level appeals 
he conducted. 

He also suffered from vanity. 
Lincoln was painfully aware of 
his bony features and rugged 
facial cotuours. He grew a beard 
in an effirl to look distinguish- 
ed, in hopes that it would divert 
attention from his ugliness. 

Ho had political practices not 
unlike those practiced today. At 
one lime he let ii be understood 
thai his upper level officers in 
.government should contribute 
10 per cent of their salaries to 
the Republican Party. 

Ambition burned brightly in 
Lincoln despite the depressions. 
He craved money for the power 
it gave. 

Wc Americans must have 
hems. If wc can't find a genuine 
one, we will invent one. We 
have shown repeatedly that we 
feel compelled io glorify our 
outstanding men, worthy or not. 
And some of our hems have 
proven to be shoddy, indeed. 

Lincoln has stood the test of 
time. He remains today as 
inspiring and genuinely great as 
when he was alive. 

His words continue to move 
men just as they did when he 
spoke them. Wc fall silent and 
filled with emotion when we 
read them. 



Whatever we learn of Linclon 
the man or Lincoln the martyred 
.saint, nothing changes our 
concept of him. and he remains 
as impressive as ever. 

Lincoln — man or saint — wc 
shall nut sec the likes of him 
again. He stands unique in 
hisiorv. 



[ letter J 

Clubs say thanks 



Dear Editor, 

I would like to say thank you 
to air the clubs, organizations 
and individuals who helped 
make the ICC bash for Yount 
and Crowley a great success on 
Monday Feb. 7 

Perhaps JC will realize that 
we students care about our 
"family" and will continue to 
strive towards better under- 
standing and more compassion 
amongst ourselves. 

The money we raised might 
be considered insignificant 
when compared to the mount- 
ainous medical bills, but no one 
will over shadow the generosity 
of their efforts. 

Tom Solder 
Chairman ICC 



ii« i 

"i 

at 

A 



4 - BEACHCOMBER Mon., Feb. 21, 1977 




Reading improvement lab offers aid 



By Audrey Snow 

There arc over 23 million functional illiterate adults in our country 
who arc unable to read the want ads, according to the U.S. Office of 
Education. This is not to mention the millions of individuals reading 
below their academic level. 

The National Assessment of Educational Progress in Denver 
reports that eleven percent of the 17-year-olds in our nation's 
schools cannot read a newspaper, much less medicine and food 
labels. 

Television commercials encourage audiences to support: their 
local library; Reading Is Fundamental (RIF) distributes paperback 
books free to children in some 350 communities throughout the 
country; specdreading courses charge a small fortune to teach 
people how to brisk over sentences while headlines tell of low 
literacy iesl scores in high schools. 

Plagued with students whose reading ability is below average, 
academic institutions have found it necessary to establish some type 
of reading improvement program. 

JC's central campus harbors a College Reading Center fully 
equipped with modern mechanical devices, current resource 
materials, and qualified instructors. 

Approximately 350 students are currently taking advantage of the 
programs which offer reading classes as well as volunteer work for 
l Ik isc who wish to improve their reading skills- comprehension', 
speed, vocabulary, studying techniques and understanding the 
psychology of taking tests. 

The lab is open six hours a week, (Monday and Friday 8:30 - 10:00 
a.m. : Wednesday 8:30 - 9:30 a.m.; Tuesday and Thursday 8:00 - 
9:00 a.m. ). No college credit is given for volunteer work. 

Reading Improvement classes are available to both day and 
evening JC students. EH-115, Reading Improvement I and 
I-: HN-1 i h Reading Improvement II each carry three hours of transfer 
credits. 

Day courses can be taken in conjunction with EH 101-102, 
sections 50-59 and 70-79 and yield six transferable credits. 

Two evening Reading Improvement II courses are offered, one at 
i he north campus taught by Dorothy Witherspoon and Helen Darcey 
ui the central campus. 

Students entering these particular classes are not required to take 
Reading-Improvement I as a prerequisite; however day Reading II 
classes require a background in Reading I. 

• Every Tuesday evening, Darcey and 20 students meet for three 
hours in AD-10 to learn reading skills and anything from how to 
read a newspaper to how the "Terminal Man" functioned. 



"You learn faster when you know the rest of the class. That way, 
if you missed something, you don't feel afraid to ask your 
classmates," said Olivia Watkins, student. 

The class is not your ordinary class. You have all kinds of 
individuals of different ages, nationalities and occupations. 

Spanish and German speaking students, a janitor, bus driver, real 
estate saleswoman, a practicing teacher, a mother-daughter 
combination, as well as a handful of veterans and recent high school 
graduates make up the Darcey's Reading Improvement II evening 
class. . ■'■'■::■<,: ■;. 

The reasons for taking this course are just as unique as the 
student's backgrounds. 

"I've enjoyed this class more than any other. I was a slow reader 
and this course has proven to me that it should be mandatory in high 
schools," Leslie Clifford said. 

"I wasn't worried about people thinking that I was illiterate, I just 
wanted to increase my vocabulary. I start work very early and when 
1 come home it's hard to dig into the books, but this class has 
restored some confidence in me so that when I once would put my 
homework off for another day, I now usually persue it," explained 
Gregory Lee Kudlicka. 

"In northern schools this is a required subject," Jeff Einsohn 
added. 

After completing a workbook page, Darcey checks each student's 
understanding of the material, discretely encouraging and praising 
them in her own special way. 

"Mrs. Darcey is the kind of professor that'll let you become a 
vacuum so you can collect as much knowledge as you possible can 
absorb. She's whatever every student needs her to be," said Jan 
Williams. 

The second half of the time is spent working individually on 
reading and vocabulary in the lab. The labs are fully equipped with 
speed reading mechanical devices, vocabulary, study skills and 
spelling material. 

JC students who work during the day and wish to do some 
volunteer work on their reading skills feel cheated by the fact that 
the lab is closed in the evening. 

"We're not getting our money's worth. We have an instructor 
willing to devote some time to preside over the lab and we still can't 
use it," exclaims Len Dunn. 

All classes are limited to 20 students and are offered all terms. 

"I truly enjoy leaching reading. I love it because it's so vital; so 
necessary in college and in a career. I've never stopped feeling 
enthusiastic about teaching this course, because I think enthusiasm 
is contagious," Darcey said. 



7 



Mon., Feb. 21, 1977 BEACHCOMBER - 5 



I* 

M 



K 



Don Vaughan 

Venture 

Columnist 



Satire, according to my handy Funkat 
sarcasm, irony or keen wit in denou 
Americans seem to have a never ending 
so many abuses and follies to dertout 
percent of all humor in the United States i 

It's satire that eases life for mostJVi 
institutions that' serve no purpose orsom 
foul-up and giving it a swift kick in the 
you can't change it, make fun of it. « 

It's this craving for social justice tf 



Mad is America! 



f agnail, is "the use of 
ig abuses or follie." 
d for satire (they have 
because ninety-nine 
tire. 

cans by taking stupid 
nple, passing national 
Its. It's our lifestyle - if 



school time killer, MAD Magazine, the s kit is. 



made the old high 



While other magazines have a lat 
Digest, for instance, seems to have t 
everyone in the world), MAD Magaa 
includes everyone from 12-year-old kii 
gives the public what it wants, a way to | 
that bother them (such as politics), thinj 
politics) and things they seem to be pot 
politics). 

Publisher William M. Gaines, often cal 
for takingga simple humor comic book and 
making it a million dollar baby, has nosac 
tackle anyone or anything, no matter 

government or Mom's apple pie, MAD ! jlaken them all on and 
seen victory in a war won by laughter, Ij 

MAD's theory for success is simple -f Ik people don't like it, 
lampoon it. The same theory applies J|lecollegiate version of 
MAD, National Lampoon 

Taking national foibles and idiosyncras 
into something the public can relate to 
does mimic Rich Little, comedian Moi 
Lampoon. 

Seldom does the individual reader 
"Gosh, I do that, too! boy, am I stur. 



readership (Reader's 
inflation • that reaches 
j has a following that 
o college professors. It 
rib their noses at things 
iat stifle them (such as 
sssto change (such as 

maverick and genius 
er some refurbishing, 
ttows. His "baby" will 
r big. Be it religion, 



satirists rewrite them 
iBuchwald does it, as 
ihl and the Harvard 



viewer laugh, saying, 
'Instead, he/she will 



guffaw, snidely thinking to themselves, "Hey, my next door 
neighbor does that! Boy, is he stupid!" It's a self-preservation 
mechanism known as social survival, or more commonly, looking 
out for Number One. 

It's a well-known fact that "All In The Family", one of the" 
leading satirical situation comedies on television", is not a success 
because the public can relate to it. On the contrary, the majority of 
the public bristles at the neck when compared to Archie. But 
everyone who views the show "knows someone like that." 

Most of today's satire is aimed at the government. MAD and 
National Lampoon base most of their material on whoever happens 
to be renting that big, white house on Pennsylvania Avenue. 

Those editorial cartoons you either laugh at or are offended by 
each morning are a satirical attempt to call attention to something 
that needs change or looking into. Art Buchwald, one of the nation's 
foremost satirists, bases his daily column almost always on some 
event in Washington. 

A small thing called Freedom makes this possible. For further 
information, look in your encyclopedia under "D" for Democracy. 

Try writing a satirical piece in the Soviet Union on Brezhnev, 
("The Brezhnev Primer" or "What's a Dissident Peasant Among 
Friends?"), and chances are good that you will soon disappear 
forever, spending the rest of your life in Siberia chipping ice cubes 
for Kosygin's get togethers. They don't have much of a sense of 
humor in Russia. 

Satire is a commentary. It makes you laugh, it makes you cry, but 
it's serving a purpose - to make you see how stupid or useless 
something is. You may not agree with it, in fact, you may be 
convinced that the whole thing is a Communist plot (MAD has had 
more than its share of communist allegations), but it's doing what it 
should, calling for change. After all, it's change that's made 
America what it is today - something to be made fun of. If it will 
make you feel better, just think of Jimmy Carter as a walking 
punchline. 





Book holds key to character 
in the confines of its' covers 






1,1 



■Wi£ f 



Windom - 

By Debbie Gaggiani 
Venture Writer 

"With me, it's always been tomfooleryi lid 
William Windom who played James Thu|in 
the JC gym Thursday. 

He explained in a before-show intervj* tat 



acting had always been fun 
something to take too seriously. 



for hii 



Sot 



"But don't misunderstand me. I don't 
discredit theatre as an art. I just mean ' i* 
don't have to be a dedicated, chunpg 
theatre goer to get along in the business. 

Windom began his 30-year acting. <fj '*>:' 
1946 when he played "Richard III" in.tW?.' 
His first television series, "The W ts 
Daughter", lasted three years. His sec »»d 
last-, series, "My World and Welcome *■>■ 
based on the work of Thurber, lasted >"e 
season. ! 

"We thought it was a sad thing, beca! 1 ' ^ 
a good show," said Windom. Iro^fP 
afterwards he began getting his present " ' 
show together and touring colleges. 

Windom said that before he started d"* 
college tour, he hadn't been on a college ,us 



views and lite 

for 25 years. All he knew about them was what he 
read in the papers, and that wasn't very good. 

Yet, after meeting the college students, he 
said, "The country's in great shape, everything's 
alright, you don't have to worry." 

Asked if he liked college audiences, Windom 
said he was surprised but appreciative of their 
enthusiasm. "If they like me, they show it," he 
said. "They're very responsive." 

He first became acquainted with Thurber's 
work in school by reading "The, Secret Life of 
Walter Mitty." He still considers it his favorite 
Thurber piece. 

Window's advice for all aspiring yoUng actors 
was to be "resilient". "A sense of humor is also 
very important," he said. "I know of some actors 
who don't have any and I wonder if they're 
happy." 

Another pointer for the future actors sending 
in their credits was to be creative in the acting 
work they have done. "They know you're lying, 
they just like your attitude. Don't go into it like 
you're going into law, it's not the same thing at 
all." 

Of all his acting experiences, Windom sees his 
"one man show" as his biggest thrill. 



By Frank Smith 
Venture Editor 

Your character is reflected in the books you read (same 
with the music you listen to, but let's stay with the 
subject). 

In high school, it was my honor (honest) to carry books 
for all the pretty girls I knew (both of them). 
Unfortunately, the girls I knew also knew tall, handsome, 
ail-American types whom they could go with, leaving me 
with their books, by myself, to carry to class. Everybody 
called me a bookworm, a misnomer. 

I got that reputation and figured if that was my lot, the 
thing to do would be to nurture it by carrying more books, 
not to read, but for effect. 

Big, black books were best for this purpose, irregardless 
.of content. It was also best if they possessed imposing 
tides such as "Existentialism Through Demographics", 
"The Territorial Imperative", or "Genedlogy of 
Extraterrestrial Phenomenae." 

1 started wearing large, owlish glasses and became 
popular, having acquired this new character. 

The problem, however, occurred when I inadvertently 
began reading these books. My vocabulary grew more and 
more sophisticated and began including metaphors, 
hyperboles and literary allusions. Finally, no one 
understood me anymore. 

I became introverted, introspective, withdrawing from 
reality into the fantasies and abstractions of literature, 
which is great for English classes but bad on dates. 
"Frank, what are you thinking about?", my date would 
ask. 

"Well. Sue, I actually was in reverie where the pirates 
on the Barbary Coast were in metaphysical discussions 
with Kubla Khan and the Ku Klux Klan in Kuala Lumpur, 
Malaysia, ' ' was my answer. 

"Take me home," she said. 

I really couldn't blame her. 

The problem was apparent, so the solution presented 
itself. Somehow, 1 had to pull it all back. I had to cultivate 
stupidity - if not stupidity, at least ignorance. 

The next week I started carrying books by Irving 
Wallace and Harold Robbins, along with a battered copy of 
'•Jonathan Livingston Seagull"- That did the trick, I was 
popular again. 

It worked so well that 1 began bringing Mad magazine to 
my classes, and started quoting the "National Lampoon". 



During lunch 1 would read the National Enquirer. But even 
■.with almost more friends than could be dealt with. 1 

-«t*iw#." 

At parties. I read pages from books by Rod McKuen, 
and finally made myself officially a connoisseur of the 
common by subscribing to one of those magazines that has 
naked people in it. I would tel! you which, but I embarrass 

easily. 

Although these measures made friendships for mc. 
there was something missing- pleasure. The pleasure of 
reading the best your mind can consume. So. I'm proud to 
say that I don't read those books anymore, concerning 
myself with deeper wonder. The wonder of S.T, Coleridge. 
t lie wonder of Poe and the wonder of where my friends 
weiu. 



SONNET I: 

IMMORTALITY 

by Watson B. Duncan, III 

The year is gone: 

the facile pen shall leap 
To hold forever battles lost and won; 
The pen, racing against oblivion 
Immortalizes Armageddon 's sweep. 
Boundaries change, 

and seas and mountains cower; 
Man feeds the irony of genesis; 
Volumes of chaos growing out of this 
Would wall up progeny 

in some dark tower. 
And yet among these 

ponderous and grim 
Old manuscripts of war 

there shall be books, 
Slender and bright, that sing 

of stars and brooks, 
And faith: of peace 

as life 's own synonym. 
And men shall lay 

their histories aside 
To know that love 

and beauty never died. 



6 -BEACHCOMBER Mon., Feb. 21, 1977 



Mori., Feb, 21, 1977 BEACHCOMBER - 7 




Eliminating out-of-state scholarships good idea, but ... . 



Cagers topple Dade North, 68-66 



By Denny Glavin 
Editor 

From Wednesday's battle with Dade 
North it would appear that guard Dirk 
Jamison has a hearing problem. The 
Pacers are better off for it as it turned 
out. 

Jamison, pushed into the starting line 
ii]) when Mike Bennett was sidelined 
with the flu, couldn't hear basketball 
coach Joe Ceravolo telling him to call 
limc-oui and hit a 15-foot jumper with 
one second left as the Pacers look a 
hard-fought 68-Mi win. 

Dade North, now tied for first place in 
Division IV with Dade South, was the 
latest of the top three teams in the 
division in fall victim to the Pacers in 
the past two weeks. 

Last week it was Dade South and 
Broward Central. As JC head coach Joe 
Ceravolo noted, "North was in first and 
we look care of them, South was too and 
we got them us well as Broward 
Central. 

"Because of the way we handled 
iheni, we're in a lot better shape than 
we were a few weeks ago," he added. 

Jamison's winning basket, an 
off-balance juniper l'roin the foul line, 
was made despite frantic efforts by 
Ceravolo to call a time-out. 

"We warned to work an out-of-bounds 
play but Dirk didn't hear me, thank 
goodness," he revealed. , 

The game turned physical from the 
siart. Reserve guard Slim Wethersbee 
was knocked senseless by Falcon guard 
Isiali Knight, who landed several elbows 
on Welhersbec throughout the contest. 

The Pacers eventually "got the last 
Jaugh on him (Knight).." according to 
"Jamison, as Knight was ejected on a 
technical foul for throwing the ball in 
the direction of the scorers table after a 
foul. The foul ironically was called 
against the Pacers. 



Knight's lack of control cost the 
Falcons dearly. 

"We had the chance but you blew 
it," said Falcon mentor Bill Alheim as 
Knight left the game. JC ended up 
getting three .points due to Knight's 
ejection. 

For the Pacers, Mike Shoemaker, 
who fouled out with five minutes left, 
had 15 points while Shack Leonard, who 
Ceravolo termed "gutsy and determin- 
ed", tossed in 14, Adrian Williams and 
Bill Buchanan had 13 and 11 points 
respectively, 

Leonard, also riddled with the flu, 
was the bright spot among the team's 
guards as he played a brilliant floor 
game both offensively and defensively. 

Saturday the Pacers took another 
nail-biter as thev nipped the Pioneers of 
Indian River 80-78. 

Two missed free throws at different 
limes during the last 45 seconds enable 
JC to keep alive in a race for the spot in 
the state tourney. 

Indian River hit only 10 of 21 from 
free throw line as they actually lost the 
game due to their 45 per cent foul 
shooting. 

Shoemaker and Leonard again led the 
Pacers with 17 points each. Buchanan 
had Id while Bennett and Williams 
improved play defensively and also 
attributed to the victory. 

Joe Manley. Pioneer center, pumped 
in 2b lo lead Indian River. In three 
games against JC, Manley has scored 64 
points. Jasper Hatten had 19 and Dave 
Chadwick 13. 

The Pacers now stand 8-4 in Division 
IV play, 17-8 overall. They have vVon 
seven in a row. 

The Pacers close out the home season 
tonight against Broward North at 7:30 in 
■the gym. The game marks the end of the 
home careers of Shoemaker and 
Williams. 



PHOTO BY GREG ROBERTS 

ON THE MOVE- Shack Leonard [15] dribbles toward the basket as Indian River's Jack 
Scollin 1431 looks on. 



Baseball team surprises Florida International 



By Jim Goodman 
Staff Writer 

- Playing two of the toughest teams on 
its schedule, the baseball team came 
away with a big 8-4 victory over Florida 
International (FTU) arid then bowed to 
Florida Southern two days later, 1 1-0. 

The FIU game, which was played at 
Municipal Stadium Feb. II, found the 
visitors taking a 1-0 lead in the first 



inning. The Pacers came back to tie it in 
the bottom of the third inning. 

Marty McDermott and Jim Kemp 
singled, putting them on first and second. 
McDermott advanced to third and Kemp 
to second on a double steal. 

Eric Keller walked ,to load the bases 
and Gerry Continello came up and 
grounded out, but McDermott was able to 
score on the out. 







PHOTO BY GREG ROBERTS 

n>0 SLOW- The umpire moves in to watch the tag as second baseman Rick Krupa 
tags Florida Southern's Randy Cenlrella as he attempts to steal second. 



The Pacers added two more runs in the 
fourth inning. 

Scott Benedict doubled and Ed Walker 
replaced him as a pinch runner. After Hal 
Steadman and Rick Krupa grounded out, 
McDermott hit a double driving in 
Walker. Kemp then singled driving in 
McDermott. 

FIU cut the lead to 3-2 in the fifth 
inning but the Pacers countered with two 
runs in the sixth. 

John Gagnon singled and then 
advanced to third on a Krupa single. 
Krupa stole second and Gagnon scored 
when the second basemen missed the 
throw. McDermott then followed up with 
a triple to drive in Krupa. 

FIU again cut the lead to one run by 
scoring twice in the seventh inning. 

The Pacers withstood the challenge 
i hough, scoring their Final three runs in 
the bottom of the inning. 

First baseman Ron Wood singled and 
then Nick Maniotis walked, moving Wood 
io second. Rich Seamon next hit a single, 
but the throw, to first base was wild, 
allowing Wood and Maniotis to score and 
moving Seamon to third. 

Ed Walker replaced Seamon as a pinch 
runner and scored on a sacrifice fly to 
centerficld by Krupa, bringing the final 
score to 8-4. 

Coach Dusty Rhodes was naturally 
pleased with the team's victory. 

"It was a big victory for us," Rhodes 
said. "Our whole team played great. 



There were a few times when FIU was in 
scoring position, but our defense kept 
coming up with big plays." 

Against" Florida Southern, the Pacers 
were unable to mount any offense as 
opposing pitchers Andy McGaffigan and 
Wayne Kessler limited the team to just 
three hits. 

The Pacers stayed close until the 
eighth inning when Florida Southern 
erupted for seven runs. 

Despite the loss, Rhodes wasn't upset 
with the team's performance. 

"We were in the game until the eighth 
inning," Rhodes stated. "We just 
couldn't gel any runs. Their pitchers 
were outstanding." 

"They're probably the best team we've 
played," he added. 

The team received some bad news 
when it was learned that leading hitter 
Jim Kemp is to be lost for an indefinite, 
time because of illness. Tests are being 
run to diagnose the problem. 

Rhodes said that John Gagnon will 
replace Kemp. 

The Pacers- 1 next contest is an 
exhibition game against the Ft. 
Lauderdale Baseball School tomorrow at 
2 p.m. in Boca Raton. 

Two conference games against Dade 

North are scheduled Friday and 

Saturday, both at home. Starling time for 

Friday's game is 7:00 p.m. and 

' Saturday's begins at 1 p.m. 




J&i. 



A little over a week ago, the Florida 
Senate Education Committee voted 8-1 
to approve a bill which would ban 
granting community and junior college 
athletic scholarships to out-of-state 
students. 

If passed by both houses of the state 
legislature, the bill will take effect July 
1. The measure would ban scholarships 
to anyone who had not graduated from a 
Florida high school or resided in the 
state at least two years. 

An amendment to extend the ban to 
four-year universities was narrowly 
defeated, 5-4. Scholarships already 
granted would not be affected by the 
measure. 

Senator Tom Tobiassen, of Pensa- 
cola, the bill's sponsor, was quoted in 
an article as saying "coaches shouldn't 
go out of state and recruit foreign 
players for community colleges. A 
community college should be just what 
it says - a community college." 

I couldn't agree with you more, Sen. 
Tobiassen. JC should be a place for 
local athletes to continue playing their 
sports. 

Although the college does have some 
out-of-staters, and some of the best 
athletes in the past haven't been native 
Floridians, the locals have been the 
majority on nearly every team and have 
borne the brunt of competition. 

Aside from serving the community, 
having only local athletes has another 
advantage in this age of tight money, 
they cost less. 



The typical local athlete receives 
tuition and books. Since most of them 
live at home, this eliminates the room 
and board allowance out-of-staters 
receive. Having only local athletes 
would result in extra money the athletic 
department could use for other 
expenses. 

There's just one thing that bothers 
me, though. Here at JC we have