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Full text of "Minutes of the annual conferences of the Church of the Brethren, 1945-1954"

TTlinuUs ol tke 

Annual Conferences 



of the 

CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN 

1945-1954 



Compiled and edited by 
Ora W. Garber 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 
Elgin, Illinois 



Printed in the United States of America 

by the 

Brethren Publishing House 

Elgin, Illinois 

1956 



1-" 

'- X JUJG 1 3 1<}j>fl 






iSjfi, 



''T* 



Introductory Statement 



The 1943 Annual Conference adopted a policy of publishing the 
Conference minutes in "some convenient form" in ten-year cycles. This 
volume is the first ten-year compilation, issued upon the authorization 
of the 1954 Conference, which delegated the implementation of its 
decision to the General Brotherhood Board, which in turn lodged the 
responsibility with the Brethren Publishing House staff. 

The compiler and editor has felt it not within his province to omit 
or abbreviate any minutes of the Conference, with the exception of 
those concerning queries laid on the table or queries returned, which 
were omitted because they did not involve any positive action on the 
part of the Conference or change in any way the church's course. Since 
many of the decisions of the Conference during this ten-year period 
were based on lengthy studies and reports, it has seemed necessary to 
include all such reports so that the bases for the decisions might be 
evident. This seeming necessity has resulted in a volume larger than 
had been anticipated, but it is hoped that it will accordingly be more 
useful to those who turn to it to find what the church's official actions 
and pronouncements have been during the last decade. 

The various items of business are arranged under the years of final 
disposition rather than the years of initiation in cases in which Conference 
consideration extended over a period of years. Cross references have 
been made so that closely related yet separate items can readily be found. 
The index beginning on page 228 will also aid in finding any desired 
item. It is based on the wording of the titles of the queries, and ex- 
cepting as these titles reflect the nature of the content of the queries, is 
not related to details of content. 

Editorial changes on minor matters, such as the omission or insertion 
of a word or two for the sake of smooth reading or the deletion of 
numbers or letters identifying preceding queries, are not indicated in 
the text of this volume. These and other editorial changes have been 
kept to a minimum. The insertion of phrases or entire sentences into 
the body of a paragraph is indicated by bracketing those words. The 
addition of an explanatory paragraph is indicated by beginning the 
paragraph with the word Note printed with a capital and small capitals. 

For ease of identification of the various parts of queries and reports 
we have aimed to secure the greatest possible degree of literary 
uniformity without doing violence to the original minutes. However, 
because of the various forms in which items of business were brought 



6 Introductory Statement 

before the Conference and because of the various forms in which reports 
and decisions were printed it was not possible to secure absolute 
uniformity. 

My thanks are extended to the following persons for assistance given 
to me in the course of compiling and editing these minutes: Grace 
Hollinger, administrative assistant in the office of the General Brother- 
hood Board, and Chalmer E. Faw, secretary of the Annual Conference, 
with whom I consulted on various matters and who examined the edited 
manuscript of the book. Without their help I could not have placed the 
completed work before the church with confidence that it would be both 
accurate and easily usable. 

Ora W. Garber 
Elgin, Illinois 
January 1956 



Table of Contents 

1945, North Manchester, Indiana 9 

1946, Wenatchee, Washington 27 

1947, Orlando, Florida 44 

1948, Colorado Springs, Colorado 87 

1949, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 107 

1950, Grand Rapids, Michigan 118 

1951, San Jose, California 128 

1952, Richmond, Virginia 163 

1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 190 

1954, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 210 

Index 228 



1945, North Manchester, Indiana 

Administration of Ministerial and Missionary Service Fund 

1. The Pension Board asks Annual Conference through Standing 
Committee for the administration of the Ministerial and Missionary 
Service Fund in order that all funds designated by the church for the 
retirement and need of ministers be centered in one board. 

2. We further ask Annual Conference through Standing Committee 
to use the yearly Ministerial and Missionary Service Fund as follows: 

a. To continue the present plan which has been in effect for many 
years of helping to supply the real needs of our ministers and missionaries 
and their wives who have been forced to retire because of age or sickness. 

b. To place yearly the balance of the Ministerial and Missionary 
Service Fund which is left after the needs of (a) have been cared for, 
into the supplementary fund of the Pension Board in order that the 
earned pension of members of the plan who have served the church for 
many years, but who will not on account of age receive sufficient pension 
upon retirement to care for their needs, be supplemented according to 
the decisions that might be reached by the Pension Board. 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Requests granted. 

Note: See the minutes of the 1948 Annual Conference, under 
"Ministerial and Missionary Service Fund," for later Conference action 
on 2-b. 

Bethany Biblical Seminary Campus Improvements 

The Council of Boards presents to the Annual Conference through 
Standing Committee the request of Bethany Biblical Seminary for the 
privilege of soliciting, in addition to the annual item included in the 
Conference Budget, a sum of $150,000.00 for a new chapel building and 
other structural improvements on the seminary campus. 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Request granted. 

Brethren Service Budget, 1946-47 

The Council of Boards recommends to the Annual Conference 
through Standing Committee that the Brethren Service Budget for the 
year ending February 28, 1947, be $420,000. 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Budget adopted. 

Compulsory Military Training 

The Council of Boards presents to Annual Conference through 

Standing Committee the recommendation of the Brethren Service 

Committee that a statement on universal compulsory military training 

be filed in behalf of the church before the House Committee on Postwar 



10 1945, North Manchester, Indiana 

Military Policy. The attached copy is submitted as a suggested statement 
with the belief that the moderator of Annual Conference or someone 
whom he may designate should present the statement in person at the 
hearing arranged on June 12, 1945. 

STATEMENT OF THE CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN 

(A Statement on Universal Military Training Authorized by Annual Conference as 
Testimony Before the House Military Committee on Postwar Military Policy) 

The Brethren desire to express their opposition to the proposed 
program of universal compulsory military training as postwar policy 
of the government of the United States. Our opposition is based on the 
following considerations: 

First: The Church of the Brethren originated in Germany nearly 
two and a half centuries ago. It has been committed from the beginning 
of its history to the example of Christ and the teachings of the New 
Testament. This leads us to believe that God's way for man requires 
the attitude of universal goodwill and the practice of brotherhood even 
toward our enemies. 

The proposed universal military conscription plan cuts across our 
historic faith and we are compelled by virtue of religious conviction 
to register our opposition to the plan. Apart from the military aspect of 
the proposal, we believe that the element of compulsion inherent in the 
system is a violation of the Christian conception of the dignity, worth 
and freedom of the individual. The case of democracy itself rests 
on this same religious principle and when the state, as a matter of 
permanent national policy, presumes to exercise universal compulsion 
over the decisions and actions of its citizens it yields itself to the 
principle of totalitarianism. History shows that universal military 
conscription is usually a first step away from Christianity and democracy 
in the direction of tyranny and the absolute authority of the state. Our 
protest, therefore, is both in the name of our religious faith and of our 
conception of citizenship under a democratic government. 

Second: The Church of the Brethren has endeavored to carry its 
full share of the educational load of the country through our program 
of higher education. We have through this medium contributed 
measurably to the scientific, educational, political, and religious leader- 
ship of the country. Our emphasis has been on liberal education, 
intelligent leadership, moral and spiritual integrity, and creative citizen- 
ship. Higher education is bound to discover and defend the truth and 
seek to apply it to human welfare. We must assert liberty of scholarship 
and of thought in the interest of sound education. 

The proposed policy is, in our judgment, a reversal of American 
tradition in education. The army and the navy are not educational 
institutions. Their objectives are military. Their program of training is 
highly specialized, authoritative and rigidly prescribed. It seeks to 



1945, North Manchester, Indiana 11 

establish conformity and obedience rather than independent leadership. 
The system presents a pattern of military indoctrination which has 
prevailed for many years in Germany and Japan and has twice in our 
generation brought its scourge upon the world. 

We believe the system represents a dangerous trend in education 
and we object to it out of our interest in the American ideal of education. 

Third: The Church of the Brethren objects to universal compulsory 
military training on international grounds. We believe that fear, 
suspicion and military rivalry among the nations of the world are one 
of the large contributors to war. Peacetime conscription is essentially 
nationalistic. It stands in contradiction to our international policy as 
expressed in the Atlantic Charter, the Dumbarton Oaks declaration and 
the avowed objectives of the San Francisco Conference. "Conscription 
has never stopped war nor made war less frequent." It places a strain 
on international relationships and is a threat to peace and order among 
nations. 

Because our religion demands our supreme loyalty to God rather 
than to the state, we are unalterably opposed to the principle of 
conscription. Because democracy cannot survive in any except an 
atmosphere of freedom, we object to a system of universal mass training 
based on military authority. Because we regard the establishment of a 
permanent policy of military training on the part of our government as 
a reversal to the policies of militarism against which we have labored 
for these two and a half centuries and against which our manhood has 
suffered and died in two world wars, we must claim the right to dissent 
from this proposed policy of our government. 

We love our government and desire to be loyal citizens. We want 
to bear our share of the burdens of our country, but we cannot follow 
blindly. 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Request granted and statement 
authorized. 

Conference Budget, 1946-47 

The Council of Boards presents the following budget for adoption 
for the year ending February 28, 1947: 

General Mission Board $254,450.00 

Board of Christian Education 37,500.00 

General Ministerial Board 7,750.00 

General Education Board 5,000.00 

Bethany Biblical Seminary 35,000.00 

Ministerial and Missionary Service Fund 30,000.00 

General Education Board (College Fund) 45,000.00 

Historical Commission 1,500.00 

$416,200.00 



12 1945, North Manchester, Indiana 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Budget adopted as revised in 
harmony with Conference action on these two queries: "Financial 
Support of Colleges" and "Revised Budget for the Historical Commission." 

Note: See also related but separate financial items: "Brethren 
Service Budget, 1946-47," "Division of Budget Receipts," "One Million 
Dollars for Christ," and "Revision of the 1945-46 Budget." 

District Title of Church Property 

Queries, 1944 
District Title of Church Property 

We, the Sterling congregation, in council assembled, feeling it wise 
to provide for continuity and greater security in the ownership of local 
church property, petition the district meeting of Northern Illinois and 
Wisconsin to request the Annual Conference to provide that any local 
congregation so desiring may designate the district mission board, or 
some other district board, as holder in trust of the title to such local 
property. Charles W. Cosey, Clerk 

Answer of district meeting: 

Whereas, it is to the best interest of the church body as a whole 
that holding and disposing of church property should be under the 
direction of general council of the church; therefore be it resolved by 
the Annual Meeting of the Church of the Brethren: 

1. That all local church property be held by local trustees in trust 
for the uses and benefits of the ministry and membership of the Church 
of the Brethren in the United States of America, subject to the rules, 
uses, and appointments of said church as from time to time decided and 
declared by the Annual Meeting. 

2. That whenever it is found advantageous to sell or dispose of a 
particular property, the sale and conveyance shall be executed under 
the direction of the local church by the trustees holding it in trust and 
joined in by the executive officers of the district board of the district 
where the property is located. 

District Control of Church Property 
Inasmuch as our present plan of local congregations having absolute 
control of their church properties is resulting in their being taken over 
here and there by subversive groups, and a number of them being entirely 
lost to the church, the Springfield Church of the Brethren of Northeastern 
Ohio hereby petitions Annual Conference through district conference 
to make provision whereby our church properties cannot be occupied, 
sold, transferred, or otherwise disposed of without the consent of either 
the district elders' body or some other appropriate district authority. 

Fred Young, Church Clerk 
Answer of district meeting: Passed to Annual Conference. 



1945, North Manchester, Indiana 13 

Answer of 1944 Annual Conference: Referred to a committee for 
study and report next year. Committee: D. G. Wine, W. H. Brower, 
Hylton Harman. 

Report of the Committee, 1945 

Whereas, there is some concern among our churches over the present 
method of holding title to church property, and 

Whereas, this concern, which your committee after investigation 
believes is more local than general, is justified in part by reason of the 
complete lack of uniformity in holding church property titles, it being 
true that some churches have no legal title whatever to the property 
they now use, and 

Whereas, it would be to the best interests of the local congregations 
as well as the general brotherhood if church property titles were cleared 
and vested for the use of the Church of the Brethren and her beliefs 
as a matter of protection for both the local congregations and the general 
brotherhood: 

Now, therefore, in answer to these queries your committee respect- 
fully recommends: 

1. That each district through its duly elected officers in co-operation 
with the churches in said district make a thorough investigation of 
the title to each church property within that district to determine in 
whom it is vested and if it is merchantable and to take such steps as 
may be needed to correct any which are not. 

2. That the district or districts of each state in which we have 
churches appoint a state committee to investigate and acquire competent 
legal opinion as to the state law governing the legal holding of church 
property in their respective states and report their findings to the 
districts. 

3. That upon the basis of such findings mentioned in paragraph 
two above, each district, where needed, provide a system of joint control 
of church property by the local congregation and the district in harmony 
with the state law. This shall not be construed so as to permit the 
use of compulsion or coercion upon any local congregation but shall 
depend upon the voluntary co-operation of each local congregation 
wishing to participate in the system of joint control of church property. 

D. G. Wine (chairman), Hylton Harman, W. H. Brower 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Report adopted. 

Division of Budget Receipts 

The Council of Boards recommends to Annual Conference through 
Standing Committee the rescinding of G-4 of the 1943 Annual Confer- 
ence's action on emergency funds for our colleges [beginning on page 193 
of Minutes of the Annual Conferences, 1923-1944]: "That the General 
Mission Board, the Brethren Service Committee and the General 



14 1945, North Manchester, Indiana 

Education Board share in the giving of the church in proportion to their 
budget askings. Any excess will be divided according to the need as 
proposed by the Council of Boards and approved by Annual Conference," 
and further that the budget for the General Education Board, except 
the asking for the colleges, be included as the normal budget asking 
along with the other service agencies of the Conference Budget as 
endorsed by Annual Conference in 1935. 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Bequest granted. 

Note: For a related recommendation concerning the church's 
financial aid to the colleges, see the 1945 query entitled "Financial 
Support of Colleges." 

Evangelism 

The Council of Boards presents to Annual Conference through 
Standing Committee the recommendation of the General Ministerial 
Board that in the light of the present world situation with its widespread 
warfare and attendant lowering of the general moral and spiritual levels 
of life the church should initiate a definite program of spiritual offensive 
for the coming year in the field of evangelism as follows: 

(1) By asking regional and district boards and organizations to seek 
to promote both mass and personal evangelism within their several areas 
as largely as possible. 

(2) By calling on all pastors to give special attention to evangelism 
in their churches in all ways which seem most opportune and effective. 

(3) By requesting all Sunday-school teachers and directors of 
Christian education to give special attention to educational evangelism 
in their work. 

(4) By suggesting as far as possible that a goal of at least one new 
member for every twenty-one present members be set for the year 
1945-46. 

(5) By asking our church publications as far as seems possible and 
consistent with their policy to give frequent publicity to this emphasis, 
bringing it to the attention of our membership. 

(6) By authorizing the General Boards to create such literature as 
may be helpful in the promotion of evangelism. 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Recommendation adopted. 

Federal Council of Churches 

Query, 1944 

Inasmuch as it appears that the church became affiliated with the 
Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America without adequate 
study by the church in general; 

And whereas it has been the policy of the church to move forward 
with as complete unity as possible; 

Therefore Standing Committee recommends to Conference that a 



2945, Worth Manchester, Indiana 15 

committee of five be appointed to study the facts concerning the Federal 
Council, together with the general attitude of the brotherhood to it, to 
the end that our people may have dependable information, and that the 
unity of the church may be maintained. Report to be made next year. 
Answer of 1944 Annual Conference: Request granted. Committee: 
C. C. Ellis, C. D. Bonsack, J. Clyde Forney, Edward Kintner, W. H. 
Yoder. 

Initial Report of the Committee, 1945 

History. At the Annual Conference held at La Verne, California, in 
1941, a paper was presented to the Conference from the Council of Boards 
which recommended that the Annual Conference authorize constituent 
membership in the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America. 
Approval was given to the recommendation, and five representatives, 
three alternates and two members to the executive committee of the 
Council were appointed. At the Annual Conference of 1942, held at 
Asheville, North Carolina, the district of Middle Pennsylvania asked 
reconsideration of our membership in the Federal Council of the Churches 
of Christ in America. This was granted; but after discussion the 1941 
La Verne Conference decision was reaffirmed. 

While there was no regular query on the subject before the 
Huntingdon Conference of 1944, the Standing Committee, feeling that 
the unity of the church would be served thereby, presented to Conference 
the above recommendation, which was adopted, and a committee was 
appointed. 

Procedure. Your committee in pursuance of its assignment has 
devoted much prayerful study to the literature of the Council and of 
its opponents and has interviewed officers of the Council and others. 
The committee has also through personal interviews, a brotherhood-wide 
questionnaire and much correspondence endeavored to ascertain the 
attitude of the church respecting the matter. An all-day meeting of 
the committee was held in the month of August [1944] and a two-day 
meeting in the late part of the month of January 1945. Both of these 
meetings were attended by all the members of the committee, who 
endeavored to give prayerful, careful, and fair consideration to every 
phase of the subject. 

As our Conference commitment indicates, it is unfortunate that the 
church became affiliated with the Federal Council of the Churches of 
Christ in America without adequate study of the matter by the church 
in general. Your committee has been charged with the responsibility 
of giving to the church dependable information on the subject. Ac- 
cepting this assignment seriously and with no desire to be other than 
fair both to the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America 
and to the brethren honestly opposed to this affiliation, your commit- 
tee has had but one desire, namely, to present to the Conference a report 
that will be acceptable to our Lord. 



16 1945, North Manchester, Indiana 

Churches' Attitude. We have found that the feeling on this question 
varies greatly in different sections of the brotherhood, ranging from 
none at all to considerable anxiety in the hearts of some. In consequence, 
the attitude of the churches also varies greatly, from active interest 
and support, through more or less indifference, to active opposition. 

Some of the opposition arises from a misunderstanding of the 
purpose and the activities of the Federal Council of the Churches of 
Christ in America; some from a fear that co-operation on our part 
will lead to loss of denominational identity or of our distinctive prin- 
ciples; some to criticism of past activities of the Federal Council of 
Churches; some because of theological views of certain men who are 
members of churches constituting the Federal Council of Churches; 
some is obviously due to prejudice. 

The Federal Council's Objectives. The Federal Council of the 
Churches of Christ in America is a federation of national evangelical 
denominations. It disavows any intention or effort to dictate the 
doctrinal beliefs of its constituent members. There is one basic doctrinal 
statement in the preamble of its constitution in these words — 

"Whereas in the providence of God, the time has come when it 
seems fitting more fully to manifest the essential oneness of the Christian 
churches of America in Jesus Christ as their divine Lord and Savior and 
to promote the spirit of fellowship, service, and co-operation among 
them. . . ." The Biennial Report of 1942 interprets this as "an affirmation 
of the deity of Christ, in keeping with the historic faith of Christianity." 

The constitution of the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ 
in America indicates the objectives of the Council thus: 

"I. To express the fellowship and catholic unity of the Christian 
church. 

"II. To bring the Christian bodies of America into united service 
for Christ and the world. 

"III. To encourage devotional fellowship and mutual council con- 
cerning the spiritual life and religious activities of the churches. 

"IV. To secure a large combined influence for the churches of Christ 
in all matters affecting the moral and social conditions of the people, 
so as to promote the application of the law of Christ in every human 
relationship of Christ. 

"V. To assist in the organization of local branches of the Federal 
Council of Churches of Christ in America to promote its aims in their 
communities." 

Organization of the Council. In pursuance of these objectives the 
Council has organized a Field Department, Department of Evangelism, 
Department of International Justice and Goodwill, Department of the 
Church and Social Service, Department of Race Relations, Department 
of Research and Education, Department of Relations with Churches 
Abroad, Department of National Religious Radio, as well as various com- 



1945, North Manchester, Indiana 11 

missions dealing with worship, religion, and health, etc. Our own 
Brethren are members of various ones of these commissions. For instance, 
our moderator, Warren D. Bowman, has for a few years been vice- 
chairman of the Commission on Marriage and the Home. 

Activities of the Council. Among the activities of the Council may 
be named the establishing of the annual Christian mission under the 
Department of Evangelism, which was carried to cities, camps, and 
universities, in which missions our own Brethren have served; research 
and publications in the fields of the devotional life, social uplift, race 
relations, and international goodwill; radio broadcasting; an extended 
wartime emergency program of Christian service including refugees 
and overseas relief; and a protest against diplomatic representation at 
the Vatican, and also against exclusion of Protestant missions and 
missionaries from South America. 

Criticisms Against Our Affiliation. Criticisms against our affiliation 
with the Federal Council of Churches of Christ in America have arisen 
which prove to be in many instances criticisms of individuals who may 
be either officers of the Council or persons employed by it. It seems clear 
that some individuals prominent in the Federal Council have given 
expression to sentiments at variance with the accepted doctrines of 
historic Christianity. While these individuals may be in good standing 
in their denominations, and while the Federal Council waives respon- 
sibility for the statements of individuals, it is, nevertheless, true that 
in the popular mind the Council is credited with the responsibility. 

Other criticisms prove to be centered upon persons and issues of 
years ago and do not apply to the present. For example, the pamphlet, 
A Christian View of Marriage, gives the authentic, up-to-date attitude 
of the Council on this subject. One strong criticism of the Council lies 
against its pacifist influence upon our government. On the other hand, 
our Brethren representatives at the Cleveland Council meeting were 
unable to endorse the Council's statement relating to the war. In this 
area the criticisms against the Council have proved to be contradictory. 

Conclusion. It is impossible of course in this report to embody every 
detail which has had our consideration; but we have aimed to present 
the facts as we have found them, and to express only such judgment 
when necessary as is maintained by the facts we have found. 

It is our hope and prayer that the church will read and study the 

report in the spirit in which it has been worked out — the spirit which 

characterized our Conference and the appointment of the committee — 

and that every effort will be made to maintain the unity of the church 

in the bonds of peace and love. _ . 

C. C. Ellis 

C. D. Bonsack 

J. Clyde Forney 

Edward Kintner 

W. H. Yoder 



18 lb&, ftorlh Manchester, Indiana 

Supplementary Report of the Committee, 1945 
Urgent requests from many brethren have come to the committee 
lor a definite recommendation for the action of the 1945 Annual 
Conference. In deference to these requests, we present the following: 
The study of the problem of our affiliation with the Federal Council 
by the Conference committee has led to the conclusion that the Federal 
Council of the Churches of Christ in America is simply an affiliation 
of Protestant denominations, such as county Sunday-school associations, 
local ministerial associations, the Home Missions Council, and others 
with which our brethren from time to time have co-operated. Each 
affiliated denomination, whether creedal or non-creedal, is responsible 
for its own doctrinal statement and responsible also for those who 
minister under its direction. It should be kept in mind in this connection 
that each delegate to district and annual conference of the Church of 
the Brethren, in addition to being in good standing in the church, signs 
the Declaration of Principles and Purposes, which are stated as follows: 

1. I again declare my faith in, and grateful acceptance of, Jesus 
Christ, "the only begotten Son of God," as my personal Savior; and the 
Bible as God's infallible Word of Truth, and the New Testament as 
the ultimate rule of faith and practice for men (John 1:14; 3:16, 36; 
12:47, 48; Luke 21:33; Acts 10:43; 2 Timothy 3:16). 

2. It is my sincere endeavor, in submission to God's Holy Spirit, to 
make my life, at all times, in purpose and in act, a true expression of 
the teaching of Jesus and his apostles (1 Corinthians 10:31-33; Romans 
12:; and 2). 

3. I pledge my loyalty, my life and influence, to the Church of the 
Brethren and to her doctrines and practices as taught by the Scriptures 
and defined by her General Conference (1 Peter 1:13-16; 3:3-4; James 
5:12; Luke 3:14; 1 Corinthians 6:1-8; John 18:20; 1 Peter 5:13-14; 
John 13; 1 Corinthians 11:1-21). 

4. As a delegate to the above-named conference, I promise prayer- 
fully to consider, with open mind and teachable spirit, all matters 
presented, and to act, by voice and vote, in good faith, for the best 
interests of the church, that she may continue to be "the pillar and 
ground of the truth" (1 Thessalonians 5:17; Romans 14:22, 23). 

Since at two different Conferences all who voted on this question 
had signed the above declaration; since the time-honored custom of the 
Brethren has been to accept the vote of the church as the guidance of 
the Spirit in accordance with Matthew 18 and Acts 15; and since our 
experience with the Federal Council has been too brief to warrant a 
change in our relationship to it, your committee is led to recommend 
to Standing Committee and to Conference that the Church of the 
Brethren continue its co-operation with the Federal Council of the 
Churches of Christ in America until the Holy Spirit leads otherwise. 
Also, we recommend that a committee of three be appointed to serve 



1945, North Manchester, Indiana 19 

for three years, to create better understanding where it is needed and 

to make such further recommendations to General Conference as may 

seem wise for the peace and unity of the church. 

C. C. Ellis, Chairman 
Edward Kintner 
C. D. Bonsack 
W. H. Yoder 
J. Clyde Forney 
Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Report and recommendation of 

committee adopted. Committee of Understanding: Charles D. Bonsack, 

J. W. Lear, James M. Moore. 

Financial Support of Colleges 

The Council of Boards presents to Annual Conference through 
Standing Committee the recommendation of the General Education 
Board on financial support to our colleges: 

In view of the importance of Christian higher education in the life 
and work of the church; and because of the difficulty in maintaining a 
church program of higher education especially during the war and 
postwar periods; and because of the outright financial assistance which 
our colleges have through the years given to ministers, missionaries 
and their children through scholarships and allowances, and in order 
that this service may be continued, we recommend the following plan 
as a permanent policy of granting financial aid to our colleges: 

(1) It shall be understood that the management of our colleges and 
the major responsibility for their financial support rests with the regions 
and areas in which they are located and that districts, congregations, 
and individuals should continue generous financial support both for 
current expense and for capital funds. 

(2) That it be the policy of the Church of the Brethren to make 
an annual appropriation to our colleges from the Conference Budget. 

(3) That the appropriation for the year beginning March 1, 1946, 
be $7,500 for each of our six colleges. 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Request granted. 

Historical Society Recognized 

Query, 1944 
In 1898 a request from the Green Tree church came through district 
meeting to General Conference for recognition of the Brethren Historical 
Society recently organized with headquarters at Germantown. Confer- 
ence encouraged but did not fully recognize. Meetings of the society at 
Conference through the years produced very valuable historical mate- 
rials. The outstanding historian of the Brethren Church, Dr. M. G. Brum- 
baugh, became interested and became chairman of the executive com- 



20 1945, North Manchester, Indiana 

mittee and greatly desired, before his death, that the society become 
thoroughly established. 

Wherefore, we, the executive committee, who through the dark years 
have maintained our zeal, herewith, through the district meeting, now 
convened at Green Tree, humbly request the General Conference con- 
vening at Juniata College, where Dr. Brumbaugh did his great work 
for our beloved brotherhood, to give full recognition to our Historical 
Society that it may go forth unhindered to bestow its blessings on our 
members and institutions. 

Answer of district meeting: Passed to Annual Conference. 

Answer of 1944 Annual Conference: Referred to a committee of 
three for study and report next year. Committee: H. A. Brandt, L. W. 
Shultz, B. F. Waltz. 

Report of the Committee, 1945 

To the Annual Conference of 1945: 

We, your committee appointed at the Annual Conference of 1944 to 
study Brethren historical interests, desire to submit the following report: 

It is a matter of profound gratitude that there is a growing interest 
in Brethren history and historical writing. This Conference should com- 
mend the pioneer efforts made by individuals and groups in writing our 
church history and in collecting and preserving historical material by 
our colleges, seminary, and publishing house. 

Annual Conference considered the matter of a historical society for 
several years beginning in 1898. No definite action was taken in approv- 
ing the proposed society and its constitution, but those who were inter- 
ested were encouraged to do historical research. The Council of Boards 
appointed a historical commission in 1938 and in 1941 the Annual Con- 
ference approved the action of the Council of Boards and authorized the 
Council to provide funds for the commission's work. 

The committee appointed by the Conference of 1944 to study the mat- 
ter and report recommends: 

I. That this Conference appoint a historical commission of five 
members for five-year terms, excepting those first chosen, who would 
serve for five-, four-, three-, two-, and one-year terms. This commission 
will report to and work with the Council of Boards, report to Annual 
Conference, present historical programs and exhibits at Annual Con- 
ference, and present requests to the Council of Boards for funds to be 
appropriated through the budget. 

II. That the historical commission shall have the following func- 
tions: 

1. To form a fellowship of Brethren historians, librarians, and any 
interested in the work of the commission. It will also encourage the for- 
mation of regional and district historical fellowship societies. 



1945, North Manchester, Indiana 21 

2. To stimulate the writing of present and past Church of the Breth- 
ren history. 

3. To secure, where possible, valuable church records and make them 
available. 

4. To encourage the building of family genealogies. 

5. To complete and revise continually a union list of Brethren ma- 
terial now in our depositories. 

6. To build a central collection of Brethren material at Elgin and an 
eastern collection at Germantown, and to encourage our colleges and our 
seminary to enlarge their present collections. 

7. To look toward and promote a national church memorial at the 
mother church in Germantown. 

III. That this Conference urge upon the brotherhood at large the 
importance of continuing this work, and specifically that individuals 
seek to place in the libraries of church institutions the essential records 
and materials scattered here and there without adequate provision for 
their preservation. That the historical commission is hereby appointed 
the custodian of the J. H. Moore Historical Library and such other ma- 
terial of historical value as may be acquired and preserved in the vaults 
and the historical room at the Brethren Publishing House. 

H. A. Brandt, B. F. Waltz, L. W. Shultz (secretary) 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Report adopted with revision. 
Commission appointed as follows: L. W. Shultz, 1950; H. A. Brandt, 
1949; J. E. Miller, 1948; Floyd E. Mallott, 1947; B. F. Waltz, 1946. 

Ministerial Discipline 

Query, 1944 

The Annual Conference has granted to districts the authority to 
discipline ministers or pastors when the offense merits it [page 167 of 
Minutes of the Annual Conferences, 1923-1944], yet we find that under 
the present setup in the Church of the Brethren our method of disci- 
plining a minister or pastor is too indirect, loses too many members of 
the church, and loses too many properties of the brotherhood. 

Whereas, a minister or pastor can intrench himself in a congregation 
that he has divided, and 

Whereas, he can be and frequently is a source of schisms over 
doctrines, property, his employment, etc., thus ruining congregations, 
seizing church properties, and defying superior church authorities, 

We, the district ministerial board, ask district meeting of Eastern 
Maryland of 1944 to petition the Annual Conference of 1944, meeting at 
Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, to appoint a committee to study the advisa- 
bility of ministers of the Church of the Brethren holding their church 
membership in the district conference, and report one year hence. 
William Kinsey, Secretary, District Ministerial Board 
Berkley O. Bowman, Secretary, Eastern Maryland District Meeting 



22 1945, North Manchester, Indiana 

Answer of 1944 Annual Conference: Referred to a committee for 
study and report next year. Committee: D. G. Wine, W. H. Brower, 
Hylton Harman. 

Report of the Committee, 1945 

Your committee respectfully reports that it is of the opinion that 
sufficient authority and machinery is now in existence to deal adequately 
with the problem presented if used, and therefore recommends the study 
and use of the rulings of Annual Conference as reported on pages 90, 91 
and 92 of the 1922 revision of Annual Conference minutes and as reported 
in the minutes of Annual Conference for the year 1942. 

D. G. Wine (chairman), Hylton Harman, W. H. Brower 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Report adopted. 

Note: For a related concern see the minutes of the 1947 Conference, 
the section of the query "Brotherhood Organization" which deals with 
counseling and discipline. 

Nomination for Church Boards 

Query, 1944 

The Meyersdale church in Western Pennsylvania asks Annual Con- 
ference through district conference to give attention to the ways in 
which the officers of the Conference and members of the various stand- 
ing boards of the church are nominated with a view to greater efficiency. 
Furthermore, we recommend for consideration the appointment of a 
permanent nominating committee of five, representing the five regions of 
the brotherhood; to be elected for one, two, three, four, and five years 
respectively; to serve for a term of five years, not being eligible for a 
succeeding term until after the passing of one term; and whose duties 
shall be: 

(1) To make a careful inquiry into the duties of the various offices 
of the Conference and the various boards of the church and to list the 
qualifications necessary to serving efficiently in official capacity and as a 
member of the General Boards. 

(2) To give attention to the matter of equitable representation by 
regions and districts in the offices of the Conference and within the mem- 
bership of the General Boards. 

(3) To discover the best leadership ability of the brotherhood for 
positions of responsibility within the brotherhood program. 

(4) To make the nominations now made by Standing Committee with 
the understanding that the nominating committee shall, after careful 
study and prayerful deliberation, submit its findings, consisting of at 
least two nominees for each office and board vacancy, to the Standing 
Committee for acceptance, rejection, or amendment. When the nomi- 
nating committee's report shall have been approved, Standing Commit- 



1945, North Manchester, Indiana 23 

tee will then vote and determine the nomination to be submitted to the 

Conference for approval. _. _.«»_, „, , 

Mrs. Paul D. Koontz, Clerk 

Answer of district meeting: Passed to Annual Conference. 

Answer of 1944 Annual Conference: Referred to the committee on 
Home Missions and Reorganization of our General Boards for study and 
report. 

Report of the Committee, 1945 
With reference to the request for a permanent nominating commit- 
tee, we recognize that there is merit in the request in that Standing 
Committee often does not have sufficient time for full consideration. Even 
so, we consider that Standing Committee because of its representative 
nature is sufficiently qualified for the task, but we urge that it meet 
earlier and take more time and give greater consideration and thought 
to the nomination of officers, board and committee members, and per- 
sons for other important tasks. 

Furthermore we recommend that Standing Committee set forth two 

. nominees for each vacancy to be filled for the officers of the Conference 

and members of the General Boards. Immediately following this the 

,» committee shall meet with the delegates from the congregations, where 

* the voting shall be done. _ _ _ _ 

3 J. W. Lear 

Ross D. Murphy 

Charles D. Bonsack 

James M. Moore 

Norman A. Seese 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Report adopted with revision. 

Note: See the minutes of the 1947 Conference, the query entitled 

"Brotherhood Organization," I-F-4 of the section dealing with Annual 

Conference, for a later action on this matter. 

One Million Dollars for Christ 

Recognizing the tragic plight of so many human beings, the increas- 
ing need for human redemption through Christian evangelization which 
is manifested through challenging opportunities for expansion on all 
our mission fields, and unequalled opportunities to do relief work, and 
further believing that the gospel of Christ is the only answer to our 
many and perplexing problems, and knowing that for the past fiscal year 
our giving totaled $872,446.25, which represented only approximately 
one and one-third cent per capita per day, the Council of Boards recom- 
mends: 

That Conference call on the churches to oversubscribe the regular 
combined Conference Budget asking of $387,000.00 and the Brethren 
Service asking of $420,000.00 to at least $1,000,000 for the year ending 



24 2945, Worth Manchester, Indiana 

February 28, 1946, so that we may more adequately meet these chal- 
lenging needs. 

It is further recommended that every congregation conduct an 
every-member presentation by personal canvass or other method. That 
in this presentation of the need members be invited to give toward the 
special One Million Dollars for Christ Fund. Members desiring to desig- 
nate toward either the Conference Budget or the Brethren Service pro- 
gram may do so. 

We further recommend that Conference lay the responsibility for this 
upon the hearts of all members and especially pastors, finance boards, and 
other officials, and ask our general boards and the regional and district 
fieldmen to prepare ways and means for the fulfillment of this ministry to 
the world. 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Request granted. 

Parish Loan Fund 

The Council Of Boards presents to Annual Conference through 
Standing Committee the recommendation of the General Mission Board 
that to the Parish Loan Fund of $50,000.00 approved at the 1943 McPher- 
son Conference there be added an additional $25,000.00 to be taken from 
the Mission Building and Contingent Reserve Fund of the General Mis- 
sion Board. 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Request granted. 

Revised Budget for the Historical Commission 

The Council of Boards presents to Annual Conference through 
Standing Committee the recommendation of the Historical Commission 
for revision of the budget for the year ending February 28, 1946, to allow 
the Historical Commission $1,500 instead of $1,000; and further that a 
like sum of $1,500 is recommended for the Historical Commission for 
the year ending February 28, 1947. 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Request granted. 

Revision of the 1945-46 Budget 

The Council of Boards presents for revision the budget for the year 
ending February 28, 1946: 

Budget as Budget With 

Adopted by Proposed 

1944 Conference Changes 

General Mission Board $249,450.00 $249,450.00 

Board of Christian Education 28,300.00 28,300.00 

General Ministerial Board 7,750.00 7,750.00 

General Education Board 5,000.00 5,000.00 



1945, North Manchester, Indiana 25 

General Education Board (College Emergency) 30,000.00 30,000.00 

Bethany Biblical Seminary 29,500.00 35,000.00 

Ministerial and Missionary Service Fund 30,000.00 30,000.00 

Historical Commission 1,500.00 



$380,000.00 $387,000.00 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Current budget adopted as 

revised. 

Special Gift (Annuity) Agreement Rate Revision 

The Council of Boards presents to Annual Conference through 
Standing Committee the recommendation from the General Mission 
Board and from representatives of our Brethren colleges and church 
institutions writing Special Gift contracts that the rate schedule adopted 
by the 1940 Ocean Grove Conference be revised in keeping with the 
trend of lower interest rates in our country. The revised uniform 
maximum rates to be used by Church of the Brethren institutions writ- 
ing Special Gift Agreement contracts would begin at 2.5% for one 
person at age twenty-five and would continue upward with a maximum 
rate of 7% for one person at age eighty or over. The rate would be 
slightly lower for contracts which include two persons. The rate 
schedule, being different for every age, cannot be published in this 
booklet but the institutions writing Special Gift contracts are in posi- 
tion to quote rates. 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Recommendation adopted. 

Study of Home Missions, Duties of the Moderator, and 
Reorganization of Our General Boards 

Note: See the minutes of the 1946 Annual Conference, under 
"Brotherhood Organization," for a summary of the steps which led to 
the reorganization of the brotherhood. 



1946, Wenatchee, Washington 

Brotherhood Budget, 1947-48 

The Council of Boards presents the following budget for adoption 

for the year ending February 29, 1948: 

Conference Budget: 

General Mission Board $315,200 

Board Of Christian Education 43,000 

Board of Christian Education (Hymnal Fund) 2,500 

General Ministerial Board 7,750 

General Education Board 5,000 

Bethany Biblical Seminary 40,000 

Ministerial and Missionary Service Fund 30,000 

General Education Board (College Fund) 45,000 

Historical Commission 1,500 

$494,950 

Brethren Service 500,000 

Federal Council of Churches (payable from funds so designated) 1,500 



$996,450 
Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: Budget adopted as revised. 
Note: For other actions of this Conference determining details of 
the above budget see "Publication of a New Brethren Hymnal" and 
"Revised Budget for Bethany Biblical Seminary." This budget was 
revised in 1947; see the 1947 query entitled "Revision of Conference 
Budget, 1947-48." For a financial matter not related to the budget see 
"Revised Budget for the Brethren Service Committee," in the 1946 
minutes. 

Brotherhood Organization 
(Report of the Commission of Fifteen) 
Summary of Previous Actions 
For some time there has been widespread feeling on the part of 
many people that the organizational structure of the church should 
be simplified and unified. The matter has been studied for several years 
by various committees appointed by the Annual Conference, as the 
following report will show. The Standing Committee, assembled at 
Wenatchee this year, feeling that the time for action had come, author- 
ized the Commission of Fifteen to present to the full Conference that 
part of its report which contains proposals for brotherhood 
organization. . . . 

In 1942 at Asheville the Annual Conference in response to a query 
from the district of Northern Virginia authorized the formation of a 



1946, Wenatchee, Washington 27 

committee of three members to study "the question of general home 
mission policy and the proper co-ordination and supervision of all home 
mission work which is supported by district and general brotherhood 
funds." The committee was composed of C. D. Bonsack, J. W. Lear, 
and N. A. Seese. 

The McPherson Annual Conference of 1943 authorized the appoint- 
ment of two additional members to the above committee — James M. 
Moore and Ross D. Murphy — and instructed the committee in response 
to another query from the district of Northern Virginia to consider 
in addition "the simplification and integration of the over-all organiza- 
tion of our church." 

This larger committee brought a tentative report to the Huntingdon 
Annual Conference in 1944 for the consideration of the brotherhood 
during the following year. In 1945 at the North Manchester Annual 
Conference the committee brought the following recommendation: 

"We, as a committee, recommend the appointment of a commission 
of fifteen members to study the development of the church, her present 
organizational needs in the light of her future program in advancing 
the Kingdom of God, and to formulate a constitution and a church 
discipline which will provide a minimum amount of organizational 
machinery and a maximum efficiency in performing the task set before 
the church." 

The Annual Conference appointed the following commission: 
William M. Beahm, Desmond W. Bittinger, Earl M. Bowman, Rufus D. 
Bowman, Paul K. Brandt, Calvert N. Ellis, J. Clyde Forney, Hylton 
Harman, J. W. Lear, D. I. Pepple, John A Pritchett, H. F. Richards, 
W. H. Yoder, Harry K. Zeller, Jr., and Edgar Rothrock (deceased). S. L. 
Barnhart has been appointed by the Annual Conference to take the 
place of Edgar Rothrock. 

Note: The Commission of Fifteen brought a report to the 1946 
Conference. The first part Of that report, dealing with the General 
Brotherhood Board, was adopted by the Conference and the General 
Brotherhood Board was formed and began functioning during the 
ensuing year. However, in order that the full report of the Commission 
of Fifteen might be printed as a unit, the section adopted in 1946 appears 
in this volume with the remainder of the report, which was adopted in 
1947. See the 1947 minutes, under "Brotherhood Organization." 

Brotherhood Theme and Slogan 

The Council of Boards presents as a theme for the year beginning 
September 1, 1946, christ the hope of the world — "I am come that 
they might have life." This theme is an expression of the faith and 
conviction of the church. 

The Council of Boards, also, presents the slogan, men and millions 
for christ, for the year ending February 28, 1947. This slogan is a 



28 1946, Wenatchee, Washington 

continuation of the spirit expressed in last year's slogan, a million for 
christ. It is a call for the giving of life and money in keeping with our 
faith and the needs of our day. It is suggested that Conference take 
action regarding the theme and the slogan and commend them to the 
churches for consideration and use. 

Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: The theme and the slogan were 
adopted and they are commended to churches for consideration and use. 

Call to Repentance 

The elders of Southern Ohio, in session April 24, 1946, petition 

Annual Conference through the district conference of Southern Ohio 

(held in the Donnels Creek church, April 25, 1946) to call the entire 

membership of the church (1) to a spirit of penitence for its share, 

direct or indirect, in the sin of the recent world war, (2) to a broader 

and more intense evangelism, and (3) to a renewed and revitalized 

program of peace teaching in the church. _ _ _ , „ 

J. H. Good, Secretary 

Answer of district meeting: Approved and passed to Annual 
Conference. 

Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: Voted: (1) that we approve 
the suggestions of this paper; (2) that we urge all the agencies of the 
church to find ways to promote these aims; (3) that the local churches 
be urged to find ways to bring this to the attention of the membership 
of the church; (4) that this be made a matter of study and prayer at 
this Conference and a time be set aside for the purpose. 

Church Membership 

Queries, 1944 

Teaching for Church Membership 

Recognizing the decline in the traditional study of the Bible in 

the home, and recognizing the inability of the church school to teach 

religion adequately, and recognizing the tremendous loss to the church 

among adolescents, often even after baptism, we, the Hermosa Beach 

Church of the Brethren, respectfully request the Annual Conference 

through the District of Southern California and Arizona to study 

carefully this problem, and, if desirable, to prepare a compendium of 

Christian truth to serve as a minimum basis of religious knowledge 

consistent with membership in the Church of the Brethren. 

Clinton Bowman, Clerk Pro Tern 
Answer of district meeting: Passed to Annual Conference. 

Inactive and Nonresident Membership 
The problem of church membership is of growing concern to us all. 
We have a growing number of nonresident and inactive members, 



1946, Wenatchee, Washington 29 

resulting in a heavy loss of members to the church. Therefore, we, the 
board of administration of the Eastern District of Virginia, petition 
Annual Conference through district conference of Eastern Virginia to 
appoint a committee of five to study this matter. This study would 
include the following: 

1. Requirements for membership. 

a. Candidates for membership. 

b. Active members. 

2. Indoctrination before and after baptism to meet these needs and 
requirements. 

3. Reviving and restoring inactive and lukewarm members, disci- 
plining those who will not meet the requirements for membership. 

4. Nonresident membership. 

a. How to direct those who must leave our church communities and 
go into communities where we have a church. 

b. How to minister to our members in non-Brethren communities. 

5. Any other problem related to the whole question of church 

A. J. Caricofe, Secretary 
Answer of district conference: Passed to Annual Conference. 
Answers of 1944 Annual Conference: Referred to a committee for 
study and report next year. Committee: executive secretary of the 
Board of Christian Education, secretary of the General Ministerial 
Board, president of the Pastors' Association, and a representative of 
the National B.Y.P.D. Cabinet approved by the first three. 

Report of the Committee, 1945 

The committee has had three meetings and has worked diligently. 

The staff of the Board of Christian Education was invited to meet with 

the committee for part of one session. The new graded lessons for 

juniors have some material related to the problem. The material 

produced by Brethren has been carefully canvassed. In addition, 

publications from other denominations have been reviewed. While 

progress has been made, further study is needed. The committee asks 

the Conference to grant it the privilege to continue its study and make 

a final report at the 1946 Conference. _ , ^ _ , 

Raymond R. Peters 

H. L. Hartsough 

T. F. Henry 

D. Eugene Lichty 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Request granted and committee 

continued. 

Report of the Committee, 1946 

The committee has studied the problems listed in these queries and 

brings the following findings and recommendations. 



30 1946, Wenatehee, Washington 

Training for Church Membership 

In addition to present curriculum material the following new 
literature is proposed for use in training for church membership. 

Brethren Junior Graded Lessons. Course VI, Part 1 (ready for use 
in October 1946) includes five sessions on the history of the Church of 
the Brethren. Course VI, Part 2 includes seven sessions on our church, 
what it means to be a church member and a study of church practices. 

This junior material for both teachers and pupils is to be reprinted 
in a special unit for use by churches not using the Brethren graded 
lessons in the Sunday morning class period, in Sunday evening sessions, 
in vacation Bible schools, in pastors' classes on church membership, or 
in other ways determined by the local church. 

New Brethren Graded Lessons for Intermediates. Part 2 of the 
first-year course (ready for use in October 1946) contains a unit of seven 
sessions on the topic, Being a Member of the Church, committed to 
Christian ideals. We recommend the use of this unit with intermediates 
in a manner similar to that suggested for the junior graded materials. 

The Meaning of Church Membership for Brethren. The committee 
recommends the publication of a course of study under this title to be 
used by the minister in conducting classes on church membership. This 
manual is to include general suggestions and content material for the 
minister. A tentative outline for this manual has been prepared by the 
committee. We recommend that the production of this material be 
referred to the Board of Christian Education. 

Each year there appear, in the program materials for youth and 
adults, units dealing specifically with the meaning of church member- 
ship. The committee recommends that the local church avail itself of 
this material. See yearly Local Church Program Guide for outlines and 
catalogs. 

The committee recommends that classes on church membership be 
conducted by the pastor or qualified instructor during the Sunday-school 
period or other time determined by the local church. We believe more 
effective teaching both before and after baptism will be helpful. Study 
reveals a lowering in age at which people are coming into the church. 
Graded curriculum material is scheduled for eleven- and twelve-year- 
olds and special attention should be given to those coming into the 
church earlier than this age. 

The values of both public and private commitments on the part 
of candidates for church membership are recognized. We further believe 
that it would be helpful to review at least annually in the presence of 
the congregation the requirements for church membership. 

Requirements for Church Membership 
The committee suggests that those who express faith in Christ as 
Savior and who show a knowledge of the facts and principles set forth 



1946, 'Wenatchee, Washington 31 

in the above sources, and who pledge loyalty to these ideals and princi- 
ples, may be regarded as meeting the minimum requirements for church 
membership. 

The committee believes that the following minute from Annual 
Conference of 1931 provides an adequate statement on requirements for 
active church membership: 

"An active member is one who avails himself of the public means 
of grace by attending some regular church service, or a communion 
service, or contributes to the support of the gospel and the various 
enterprises in such ways as he is able. . . ." 

Inactive Members 

The 1931 Annual Conference defined an inactive member as follows: 

"... Any member who without sufficient reason shall fail to 
comply with the requirements for active membership for two consecutive 
years, after earnest but ineffectual effort by the church to arouse the 
member to the observance of his vows, may, by action of the church 
or the membership committee be recorded in a separate list as inactive, 
until such time as he shall again become active." 

In dealing with inactive members we wish to refer to the following 
minute from the Annual Conference of 1942: 

"This board ('Supervising Ministry' or the 'Official Board' of the 
congregation) may . . . periodically review the membership roll, and, 
when cases of inactive or delinquent members are discovered, shall 
institute measures to bring about restoration, or, if failing, submit such 
cases to the congregation for action. 

"Cases of a very serious nature, which might destroy the peace and 
unity of the congregation, should be referred to the elders of the district. 
The local board should present the facts to the elders in session. The 
elders may hear the case and render a decision or they may appoint a 
committee with power to act. The decision, in either case, should be 
submitted to the congregation for ratification. The congregation, how- 
ever, may waive all its own authority, and commit the matter to the 
elders for settlement. In such cases the decision would not need ratifica- 
tion by the congregation." 

Nonresident Members 

The committee believes that spiritual life is enhanced by holding 
the letter of membership in the congregation in which the member 
resides and recommends that people who change their permanent 
residence request their letters of membership and place them in the 
church in which they regularly worship. See Annual Conference minutes 
of 1925 [page 25 of Minutes of the Annual Conferences, 1923-1944]. 

We recommend that when members move into non-Brethren 
communities they participate in some church in that community though 



32 1946, Wenatchee, Washington 

they may retain their membership in the home church. We recommend 
that the pastor keep in touch with nonresident members through person- 
al letters and any other means of publicity or communication used in 
his church. The Ministry to Nonresidents sponsored by the General 
Boards is to be regarded as a supplement to the work of the pastor. 

The committee recommends that the total church program be 
undergirded with the spirit of evangelism and that in addition there 
be a special yearly emphasis. As a part of this emphasis we recommend 
a well-planned friendly visitation in which the whole church constitu- 
ency and prospective members are contacted in the name of the church. 
The inactive list should be regarded as a fertile field for evangelistic 
effort. Church visitors should be given guidance on procedure. Subse- 
quent visits should be made by Sunday-school teachers and others who 
are especially qualified to meet definite needs revealed in the preliminary 
visits. The church with a concern for the lost will use every means 
possible to reach them and to build them into the Christian fellowship. 

Raymond R. Peters 
H. L. Hartsough 
T. F. Henry 
D. Eugene Lichty 

Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: Report adopted with its 
recommendations. 

Conference Trustees 

Recommendation, 1944 

Standing Committee recommends that Annual Conference ask the 
Conference trustees to bring a report next year stating their responsi- 
bilities, activities, and legal status. 

Answer of 1944 Annual Conference: Request granted. 

Report of the Committee, 1945 
Your committee reports progress and asks the privilege of another 
year's study to complete their report. 

Calvert N. Ellis, Secretary 
Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Committee continued. 

Report of the Committee, 1946 

The 1944 Annual Conference at Juniata College, Huntingdon, Penn- 
sylvania, recommended that the Conference trustees bring a report the 
next year stating their responsibilities, activities, and legal status. The 
Conference trustees beg to report that they have discovered very little 
information about their responsibilities. 

The Annual Conference of the Church of the Brethren is incor- 
porated in the state of Wisconsin for the purpose of holding property 



1946, Wenatchee, Washington 33 

for the brotherhood. The trustees have been called upon for no service 

during the past year. 

In view of the fact that the various corporations of the brotherhood 

are being studied by the Committee of Fifteen, the Conference trustees 

recommend that this corporation of the Annual Conference be studied 

by this committee. „ , .-,_,. „ 

Calvert N. Ellis, Secretary 

Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: Referred to the Commission of 
Fifteen as recommended. 

Note: The minutes of the 1947 Conference, under "Brotherhood 
Organization," the section on the General Brotherhood Board, 4-e-(4), 
show the final disposition of this matter. 

Co-operation in Organizing New Churches 

The Bridgewater church requests Annual Conference of 1946, 
through the district conference of the Second District of Virginia, to 
accept as a matter of general church policy the principle of interchurch 
co-operation in organizing new congregations and in the continued 
support of weak and competing churches. We request that the General 
Ministerial Board be authorized to represent the Church of the Brethren 
in conjunction with district and local church boards and officials, in 
areas where inter-Protestant comity would result in a better and 
stronger religious ministry to the local community. 

G. Elmer Myers, Clerk 

Action of district conference: Passed to Annual Conference. 

Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: We grant the request of the 
paper and advise the officers, boards, and committees of the church 
which have responsibility in organizing new churches and in supporting 
mission churches already organized, to follow the policy of interchurch 
consultation and to co-operate fully with other Christian bodies where 
interdenominational action based on comity agreement would result 
in a more adequate Christian service to the community. 

Directives on Civilian Public Service 

The Council of Boards approved the Brethren Service Committee 
asking Annual Conference through Standing Committee for directives 
on Civilian Public Service. 

Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: Request granted and the fol- 
lowing directives were adopted. 

The Annual Conference of 1941 approved the principle of "alterna- 
tive service" as opposed to military service and appointed the Brethren 
Service Committee as the agency of the church for the administration 
of civilian public service and for representation of the church in relation 
to the government of the United States. The Brethren have had under 



34 1946, Wenatchee, Washington 

their administration about three thousand men and have expended 
approximately $1,250,000 in this program during the period from March 
1942 to March 1946. The men in our jurisdiction have contributed 
without pay two million five hundred thousand man days to those 
enterprises adjudged as of national importance. Expressed in terms of 
cash this would represent a gift to the government of about $10,000,000. 
The United States government has collected from the labor of civilian 
public service men about $3,000,000, of which approximately one third 
may be regarded as the Brethren's share in the accumulated fund. These 
funds are now frozen in the United States Treasury awaiting distribution 
under authorization of Congress. The civilian public service movement, 
in spite of its disappointments and inadequacies, has been an impressive 
protest against war and has offered a constructive service related to soil 
conservation, to the development and protection of national and state 
forests, to the maintenance of public parks and public highways, to 
the administration of public health and sanitation, to the development 
of the dairy industry of the country, to the administration of institutions 
for the mentally ill, to the control and treatment of communicable 
diseases, to the experimentation with starvation and its nutritive treat- 
ment, to the collection, processing, and distribution of clothing and food 
to many parts of the world for relief purposes, to the care and distribu- 
tion of dairy cattle and other livestock to depleted and devastated areas 
of Europe, and to other enterprises of a humanitarian character. These 
enterprises have had the endorsement of our own government and have 
met with the general approval of the world as a ministry of vast signifi- 
cance for international goodwill. 

The Church of the Brethren sought to advance the following objec- 
tives through the civilian public service movement: 

1. To demonstrate and extend the spirit of brotherhood and justice 
as a way of life which leads to world-mindedness and to international 
peace and security. 

2. To offer a medium for the preservation and continued expression 
of the peace testimony of our own and other Christian bodies and to 
provide a witness against war and violence as instruments of national 
policy. 

3. To assist our government in developing appropriate measures by 
which religious minorities which conscientiously reject military service 
may bear witness in times of war in a manner consistent with the 
principles of religious liberty and the priority of fundamental individual 
rights which a democratic government must guarantee. 

Now that active fighting is over and our government must devote 
itself to the aftermath of bitterness and suffering and to the task of 
rehabilitation, we desire, in the spirit of Christ, to apply our resources 
in the fullest possible measure to the alleviation of human want and 
distress. We therefore resolve: 



2946, Wenatchee, Washington 35 

1. To request our government to demobilize civilian public service 
units as rapidly as possible in order that our resources may be more 
fully devoted to relief and reconstruction. We cannot now determine 
a date of withdrawal from civilian public service administration, but 
we register our unwillingness to continue it indefinitely. 

2. To ask the President of the United States to grant amnesty and 
the restoration of civil rights to all conscientious objectors who have 
been imprisoned, and to classify as "work of national importance" those 
measures of relief and humanitarian service upon which we may 
mutually agree as important and urgent, and to release all qualified 
civilian public service men not now eligible for discharge to detached 
service on a basis such as has been done for cattle shipments under 
UNRRA and the Brethren Service Committee. 

3. To labor to the full measure of our ability against the extension 
of the selective service act and to put the full weight of the church 
against any form of peacetime conscription for military purposes. In 
case of continued conscription we urge our government to accept 
alternative service projects for our young men, under church control 
and on a purely voluntary basis. 

4. To authorize and instruct the Brethren Service Committee to 
continue to represent the church in our relation to the government and 
to selective service so long as our young men are subject to call or 
retention under the selective service act. In case Congress should enact 
a peacetime conscription bill, we are unwilling to administer any type 
of alternative service unless it be free from government dominance. 
This Conference appoints the Council of Boards as its representative to 
give advice and counsel on this matter to the Brethren Service 
Committee. 

5. To reaffirm our position that Christian citizenship implies full 
support of the state only insofar as it represents good government and 
the righteous will of God. We realize that the total rejection of 
government on the one hand means anarchy and that the unquestioned 
acceptance of the authority of the state on the other hand means tyranny 
and totalitarianism. The Christian citizen must take his position 
somewhere between these two extremes. The Brethren accept the will 
of God as the supreme authority for the individual and deny to the state 
the right to violate personality or restrain religious faith and practice. 
They concede to the state the right to demand from its citizens financial 
support for the legitimate functions of government and to require 
obedience to laws which operate for the common welfare. But a society 
founded on the principle of democracy must guarantee freedom of faith 
and worship to the individual even in times of war and political crises. 
Where government is good, we support it gladly. Where it is bad, we 
strive to make it good by the processes Of Christian democracy. We 



36 1946, Wenatchee, Washington 

recognize disobedience to law as a matter of last resort in the strain 
between the freedom of conscience and the authority of the state. 

The church as a champion of the doctrines of the worth of the 
individual, of the inherent rights of man, and of the supreme authority 
of the divine will must seek to preserve those freedoms which are 
essential to the good life and to the highest development of human 
personality. We are, therefore, compelled to deny to the state the right 
of absolute authority over the individual and to extend a ministry of 
material aid and spiritual succor to those whose personal rights are 
violated. 

The Brethren are committed to the position of world peace through 
brotherhood and justice. We live in "one world" and are under obligation 
to give our loyalty to the people of the world in sympathy, co-operation, 
and allegiance even beyond national sovereignty. 

Licensing and Ordaining Ministers 

The General Ministerial Board recommends to Annual Conference 
through Standing Committee that Annual Meeting minutes, 1922, be 
amended to read as in the paragraph following the quoted minute. 

"Brethren who are called by the church to preach should be licensed 
by the church to preach, but not to perform the other functions of the 
ministry, until such time as the church and the district ministerial board 
shall decide to ordain them into the ministry. If they have not been 
ordained within a year, the license may be renewed by the church from 
year to year, until such brethren either accept and are ordained into 
the ministry, according to previous decisions, or are discontinued as 
licensed preachers." 

When in the judgment of the church and the district ministerial 
board the best interest of the church can be served, these brethren 
may be given license to preach for an indefinite time. 

Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: . Request granted. 

Local Representation at Annual Conference 

Whereas, the basis for representation of the local churches to .An- 
nual Conference was established in the year 1882, while many of our 
congregations have' greatly increased in the size of their membership 
since that time; 

And, whereas the present basis for representation, which provides 
one delegate for congregations with less than two hundred members, and 
two delegates for congregations with a membership of more than two 
hundred, does not give an equal or truly democratic representation of the 
local churches to Annual Conference, 

We, the board of administration of the Middle District of Maryland, 
respectfully petition the Annual Conference, through district meeting of 



1946, Wenatchee, Washington 37 

Middle Maryland, to constitute a committee to study the matter of 
representation of the local congregations to Annual Conference, and 
bring recommendations for the revision of the minutes of 1882 to 
Annual Conference next year. 

Answer of district meeting: Passed to Annual Meeting. 

Ora DeLauter, Secretary 

Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: Referred to the Commission 
of Fifteen. 

Note: See the minutes of the 1947 Annual Conference, under 
"Brotherhood Organization," II-A-3 in the section entitled "Annual Con- 
ference." 

Mutual Aid Society 
Query, 1945 

Since we are Brethren who have always believed in helping each 
other; and since Brethren genius fits best in rural areas from which 
many of our young people are attracted to large cities and lost to the 
church; and, whereas several thousand of our young men must shortly 
be rehabilitated in normal life; and whereas many of our Older members 
have surplus funds which they would gladly loan at low rates of 
interest on safe investment to help young Brethren couples get started 
in life: 

We, the Rock Run church, assembled in quarterly council, July 6, 
1944, petition Annual Conference, through district conference of North- 
ern Indiana, to establish some kind of mutual aid society to provide 
financial assistance and moral encouragement toward the establishment 
of our young married couples on the land or in some other productive 

rural enterprise near our rural churches. «. — ——... , „, , 

M. G. Whitehead, Clerk 

Answer of district meeting: Passed to Annual Meeting. 
Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Referred to the Church Invest- 
ment Council for study and report next year. 

Report of the Church Investment Council, 1946 
We commend all brethren who in the fellowship of the brotherhood 
for the upbuilding of the church and the assistance of their brethren 
have without formal organization made their financial resources avail- 
able. Homes have been established and congregations built up through 
the mutual financial assistance of brethren. We encourage all brethren 
to build the fellowship through a concern for the economic progress of 
their fellow members. 

We recognize places in which formal organization has been and can 
be useful and commend the Rock Run congregation of the District of 
Northern Indiana for the steps which they have taken. We commend 
to other congregations the study of their plan. 



1946, Wenatchee, Washington 39 

strategic fields regardless of the size of the church; and that no financial 
or professional discrimination be made. 

6. That in the present time we consider $1,800 and a place to live as 
a minimum salary for full-time pastors. 

7. That churches served by part-time pastors allow them time and 
help them find opportunity to earn enough to bring their salaries up to 
the minimum. Careful arrangements should be made in this matter to 
avoid misunderstanding. 

General Ministerial Board 
Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: Report adopted. 

Peacetime Conscription and Military Training 

The Oregon district meeting on January 19, 1946, decided that the 
conference would send its expression of disapproval to the President and 
Congress on peacetime conscription and military training; it was also de- 
cided to recommend that Annual Conference do the same. 

Forrest U. Groff, Clerk 

Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: The Conference adopted the 
following statement prepared by the Resolutions Committee and urged 
the members to send similar messages to the President and to their 
congressmen. 

The Church of the Brethren, assembled June 15, 1946, at Wenatchee, 
Washington, in its General Conference, its first General Conference since 
the close of the war, desires to express to the President and the Con- 
gress of the United States its appreciation for every effort of our gov- 
ernment to create goodwill among the nations. The present program Of 
feeding the hungry in Other lands we believe to be an effective measure 
in achieving this goal. In this program of relief our church through 
its Brethren Service Committee is much interested. 

In order further to bring peace and goodwill among the nations and 
in harmony with our understanding of the spirit and teaching of Jesus 
Christ, we would urge our government — 

1. To allow the Selective Service and Training Act Of 1940 to expire 
on July 1, 1946. 

2. To abandon any proposed system of peacetime military conscrip- 
tion and training. 

3. To abandon the proposed atomic bomb tests. 

4. To seek through the United Nations organization the progressive 
universal reduction of armaments. 

5. To grant amnesty and the restoration of civil rights to the consci- 
entious, objectors who have been imprisoned. 

We pray that the President and the Congress may be guided by 
divine wisdom in directing the affairs of the state. 



40 1946, Wenatchee, Washington 

Publication of a New Brethren Hymnal 

Whereas: 

1. The normal life of a hymnal is twenty-five years and our present 
hymnal was published in 1925; 

2. Other hymns, old and new, as well as other gospel songs are 
needed by our brotherhood and are available; 

3. There is need for more adequate Christian motivation for the ex- 
panding program of the church in such areas as evangelism, missions, 
world service, emphasis on rural life, and the Christian education of 
children, youth and adults; 

4. The average length of time consumed in the preparation and print- 
ing of a new hymnal is around five years; 

We, the Board of Christian Education, assembled at Elgin, Illinois, 
March 7, 1945, recommend that Annual Conference authorize and ar- 
range for the publication of a new Brethren hymnal by approximately 
June 1, 1950. 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Recommendation adopted. 
Referred to the Board of Christian Education. 

Report of the Board of Christian Education, 1946 
The Board of Christian Education has taken this assignment under 
advisement, made a preliminary study of costs and procedures in hymnal 
building and agreed on the following: 

1. That an executive hymnal committee and four functional com- 
mittees to work in the following areas — doctrine, literary, music, and 
worship — be appointed to work on the production of manuscript. These 
functional committees are to report to the Board of Christian Education 
through the executive hymnal committee. The board is not ready to sub- 
mit nominations for personnel of these committees for approval by An- 
nual Conference. 

2. That the board move on the assumption that the Annual Confer- 
ence treasurer provide the funds needed for the work of the board in 
preparing manuscript for the hymnal up to the point where the content 
has been determined. The manuscript would then be turned over to the 
Brethren Publishing House for publication. 

Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: The plan of the Board of 
Christian Education to prepare the hymnal for publication was approved. 

On the second item, however, it was decided that the expense in- 
volved in preparing manuscript for the hymnal, up to the point where 
the content has been determined, be provided in the Conference budget 
as a supplemental item granted to the Board of Christian Education. 
The amounts approved were $1,500 for the present fiscal year, and $2,500 
for the year ending February 29, 1948. [See the item of business entitled 
"Revised Budget for the Christian Education Commission."] 



1946, Wenatchee, Washington 41 

Reincorporation of the Brethren Publishing House 

Whereas, it is desirable that a corporation be organized under the 
General Not-for-Profit Corporation Act of the State of Illinois, for the 
purpose, in substance, of promoting, aiding, and contributing to the ad- 
vancement of Christian religious instruction and education in Sunday 
schools, churches, missions, and otherwise, by research and the develop- 
ing and outlining of lesson helps, plans, and programs, the editing, pub- 
lishing and distribution of religious literature and materials, financial 
support, and other means from time to time deemed appropriate, and 
to apply the principal of any fund or funds, as well as the net income 
therefrom, exclusively to such religious and educational purposes, in- 
cluding missionary purposes at home and in foreign lands, the voting con- 
trol of which corporation will be vested in a Class A Membership to be 
held by the General Mission Board of the Church of the Brethren; 

And whereas, it is desirable that when such corporation is organized, 
that all of the assets and properties of the Brethren Publishing House be 
transferred to such new corporation, and the present Brethren Publishing 
House corporation dissolved; 

And whereas, the General Mission Board of the Church of the 
Brethren and the Brethren Publishing House have requested permission 
to cause such new corporation to be organized and to cause such assets 
to be so transferred; 

Therefore, be it resolved that such permission be granted, and that 
the officers of the said General Mission Board of the Church of the 
Brethren and of the said Brethren Publishing House be authorized to 
do and perform all things necessary in connection therewith. 

Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: Resolution adopted. 

Revised Budget for Bethany Biblical Seminary 

The Council of Boards recommends to Annual Conference through 
Standing Committee that the asking for Bethany Biblical Seminary 
for the year ending February 29, 1948, be increased from $35,000 to 
$40,000 as a part of the brotherhood budget. 

Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: Request granted. 

Revised Budget for the Brethren Service Committee 

The Council of Boards presents to Annual Conference through 
Standing Committee the recommendation of the Brethren Service 
Committee for revision of the budget for the year ending February 
28, 1947, to allow the Brethren Service Committee a minimum budget 
of $500,000 instead of $420,000; and further, that a minimum budget of 
$500,000 is recommended for the Brethren Service Committee for the 
year ending February 29, 1948. 

Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: Request granted. 



1946, Wenatchee, Washington 43 

Fund by April 1, 1947, and that the Pension Board secure the necessary 
promotional assistance. 

Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: Request granted as revised 
in the following item. 

Goal for the Supplemental Pension Finn) 
The Council of Boards recommends to Annual Conference through 
Standing Committee that the Supplemental Pension Fund minimum 
goal be increased from $100,000 to $125,000 and that the goal be reached 
by February 28, 1947, as recommended by the Pension Board, and that 
the Pension Board secure the necessary promotional assistance. 
Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: Request granted. 

Temporary Representative to the World Council of Churches 

The La Verne Conference of 1941 authorized our participation in 
the World Council of Churches. Since that council is now taking more 
definite form and is beginning to function in areas of human service 
which fall within the scope of our own service program such as war 
prisoner relief, material aid to distressed peoples, and reconstruction, the 
Council of Boards, therefore, recommends that the Annual Conference 
of 1946 through Standing Committee name a temporary representative 
to the World Council of Churches for the purpose of participation in 
the organization movement and for keeping the church advised of its 
progress and for better interpreting the implications and responsibilities 
of membership in the council. 

Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: Request granted. M. R. Zigler 
appointed. 

Transfer of Peace Education 

The Council of Boards requests Annual Conference through Stand- 
ing Committee to approve the recommendation of the Board of Christian 
Education and the Brethren Service Committee that the Brethren 
Service Committee be administratively responsible for peace education 
and action, with functional co-operation with the Board of Christian 
Education in providing printed page peace curricular materials for local 
churches with the details on curriculum to be worked out jointly by 
the Board of Christian Education and the Brethren Service Committee. 

Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: Request granted. 



7947, Orlando, Florida 

Advance With Christ — a Call to Action 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
through Standing Committee the following call to action. 

ADVANCE WITH CHRIST 
I. A Call to Action 

A. A Distraught World Desperately in Need of Christ 

The conditions of our time present to the church a challenging 
urgency to unusual action. From every quarter come calls for an 
aggressive program based on the evangelical doctrines of Christ. Atomic 
scientists have appealed to the church to help save the world from 
self-destruction. Judges and law enforcement officers are urging church- 
men to give more effective Christian instruction for youth. Social 
scientists point to evidences of the disintegration of our Western culture. 
The international scene shows signs of growing tensions which the 
church can alleviate. There are poverty, hunger, and urgent need in 
many parts of the world. It is of the utmost importance that the church 
be alerted and moved to immediate and accelerated action. 

We need to catch something of the compelling sense of urgency that 
Christ felt when he said, "Say not ye, There are yet four months, and 
then cometh the harvest? . . . Lift up your eyes and look on the fields 
that they are white already unto harvest," and, again, "I must work 
while it is day for the night cometh in which no man can work." 
Paul felt this same inner compulsion, saying, "Woe is me, if I preach 
not the gospel," and "I am become all things to all men that I might 
by all means save some" for "the love of Christ constraineth me." 

The United Stewardship Council in an overture to Protestant bodies 
says the time is ripe for all communions to express their Christian 
stewardship to an extent far in excess of our present practices. Many 
Protestant bodies have already launched programs of advance and some 
have even achieved many of their advanced goals. They are going 
forward under such slogans as Crusade for Christ, World Mission 
Crusade, The United Advance, and Crusade for a Christian World. 

B. The Church Must See and Act 

Members of the Church of the Brethren have seen at least dimly 
the necessity of transforming our faith into more aggressive action. 
Certain aspects of our program have already moved forward in an 
amazing way. The time seems now here for the church to swing into 
aggressive action on all fronts. The General Brotherhood Board through 
its commissions is attempting to take measure of its tasks and to formu- 
late programs in keeping with the urgency of the need. 

But if there is to be real advance it must take place at every level 



1947, Orlando, Florida 45 

of our church life from the local congregation to the General Brother- 
hood Board. While not all spiritual progress can be measured, in those 
areas where measurement is possible goals need to be set up so that 
progress can be measured statistically. They should include such matters 
as baptisms, church attendance, service projects, missionary and service 
recruits and the giving of money. Such a movement can succeed only 
as the membership of the church understands and appreciates its 
significance and is awakened to individual endeavor. 

H. An Advance Program 

The General Brotherhood Board therefore recommends to the 
Conference through Standing Committee that: 

A. We endorse an Advance movement for the church year 1947-48 
which shall begin immediately and be appraised at the time of the 
1948 Annual Conference. 

B. The movement be called the Advance movement and that we 
adopt the slogan advance with christ. 

C. We encourage all the agencies of the church to press forward 
with their programs with as much vigor as possible. 

D. We encourage the commissions of the board and other church 
agencies to continue their effort to develop clearly denned goals and 
in the light of such goals to set up carefully planned programs of 
advance in their respective fields so that next year the Annual Confer- 
ence may lift up one or more of these areas for special emphasis if 
it seems desirable. 

E. For the year 1947-48 we recognize for special emphasis the 
following causes: 

1. Home missions, including evangelism and church extension. 
(This cause perhaps should be considered as having first priority because 
of its crucial importance.) 

2. A new and more vigorous emphasis on peace education. 

3. Action on the alcohol problem. 

III. Special Goals for 1947-48 

Three papers came to the General Brotherhood Board with carefully 
outlined plans for action in the above-mentioned fields. Those detailed 
plans cannot be given here, but they contain among other things the 
following suggestions: 

A. Home Missions and Evangelism 

1. To increase the practice of daily devotions in the homes of our 
church and to instruct and enlist our people in the spiritual disciplines 
of prayer which are necessary to undergird any Christian program of 
Advance. 

2. To reclaim ten thousand of our inactive members. 

3. To win fifteen thousand new members to Christ and the church. 



46 2947, Orlando, Florida 

4. To establish twenty new churches next year. 

5. To add forty efficient new full-time pastors to our working force. 

6. To reach every nonresident member of the church. 

7. To secure the co-operation of every member in the program of 
the church. 

8. To undergird our home and family life. 

9. To preserve a continued and expanding dedication of financial 
resources to the service of the church. 

B. Peace Education and Promotion 

Because of the urgency of the cause of peace and the danger of 
continuing wars, we propose that this interest shall be lifted up in 
our churches this year. It is proposed that: 

1. We attempt in every way possible to ground our people in the 
New Testament doctrine of peace. 

2. Curriculum materials be provided for use in our church schools 
to present this cause more effectively. 

3. Ministry of service and relief as a means to peace be continued 
and enlarged if possible. 

4. We encourage our schools and colleges to promote peace 
education. 

5. We co-operate with our peace secretaries and others in promotion 
of this cause. 

C. Action on the Alcohol Problem 

Because of the increasing use Of alcohol and its inroads upon the 
life of youth, in keeping with our church heritage it is proposed that we: 

1. Enroll parents and other adults in a study group on alcohol 
education. 

2. Stress alcohol education in our Sunday school and the activities 
of the B.Y.P.D. 

3. Have more sermons on the alcohol problem. 

4. Actively promote campaigns to prohibit the legal manufacture 
and sale of alcoholic beverages within local political units in which 
we have local churches. 

IV. Faith Turned Into Action 
In order that this Advance program be properly implemented, so 
that it may result in prompt and effective action, we recommend the 
following: 

A. That each church in the brotherhood be requested to hold a 
special council meeting, within one month if possible, to consider what 
steps it can take towards an advance especially in these suggested areas 
but also in any other areas of church life which seem necessary. 

B. That district conferences either in their regular or in special 
conferences consider their responsibility for the Advance movement 
and take steps to realize it. 



1947, Orlando, Florida 47 

C. That district mission boards or boards of administration meet 
before August 1, 1947, to consider the problem of church extension for 
their districts. 

D. That the agency to whom the cause of temperance is committed 
in each church meet and develop plans for action on the alcohol problem, 
at its earliest convenience. 

E. That the staff and field organization of the church be utilized 
wherever possible in promoting and executing this program. 

F. That since no program of advance is possible without increased 
personal effort and devotion, and increased cost in money, we would 
urge: 

1. The importance of personal consecration and devotion to the 
church as "unto the Lord." 

2. A full consecration of our material wealth to the cause of Christ. 
In fulfillment of this we propose — 

a. That each member rethink his personal stewardship and give 
adequately to meet the needs of the church program. 

b. That each congregation survey its resources, educate and seek 
for proportionate giving, setting goals which lift the vision of the 
members. 

c. That each congregation consider improved methods of enlisting 
the active support of all members. 

d. That pastors and church leaders co-operate wholeheartedly in 
the efforts of those whose responsibility it is to undergird the program 
with financial support. 

We earnestly pray that God may give wisdom and leadership to 
his church, and that his grace and blessing may rest upon our efforts 
to set forward the work of his Kingdom. 

Answer of 1947 Annual Conference: Request granted and the call to 
action adopted as revised. 

Amendments to the Ministerial and Missionary Pension Plan 

The Ministerial and Missionary Pension Plan adopted by the church 
at the McPhersOn Conference provided that the plan could be amended 
by the Conference. It was further provided that if the executive 
committee of the Council of Boards felt that an amendment should be 
adopted before the next Conference, the amendment could be adopted 
ad interim by the executive committee Of the Council of Boards on 
recommendation of the Pension Board, and such amendment should then 
be presented to the next Conference for ratification. 

Amendments necessary to put the pension plan in line with the 
new organizational set-up of the church were prepared by an attorney, 
and were adopted at the November meeting of the Pension Board. The 
executive committee of the Council of Boards then adopted the amend- 
ments, ad interim. 



48 1947, Orlando, Florida 

The amendments so adopted are here presented to the Annual 
Conference for ratification, per the following resolution: 

RESOLUTION OF ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE CHURCH OF 
THE BRETHREN APPROVING AMENDMENTS TO THE PENSION 

PLAN 

WHEREAS, a pension plan for ministers, missionaries and others 
was set up and adopted by the Annual Conference of the Church of 
the Brethren at the McPhersOn Annual Conference in 1943, the details 
and terms of which are as set forth in the minutes of such Annual 
Conference. 

AND WHEREAS, in the plan as so adopted it was provided that 
such pension plan should be administered by a Pension Board consisting 
of the General Mission Board of the Church of the Brethren and the 
General Ministerial Board of the Church of the Brethren. 

AND WHEREAS, the said General Mission Board of the Church of 
the Brethren, by amendment of its charter and change of name, has 
become and is the General Brotherhood Board — Church of the Brethren, 
and said General Ministerial Board of the Church of the Brethren has 
been merged into said General Brotherhood Board — Church of the 
Brethren. 

AND WHEREAS, it is desirable that the said pension plan be known 
and referred to as the Ministerial and Missionary Pension Plan of the 
Church of the Brethren; that the operation and administration of said 
pension plan be vested in a board of trustees to be known and referred 
to as the trustees of the Ministerial and Missionary Pension Plan of 
the Church of the Brethren; that the members, from time to time, of 
such board of trustees be the individuals who are then serving as the 
members of said General Brotherhood Board — Church of the Brethren; 
and that such pension plan as so adopted at said 1943 Annual Conference 
be amended, as hereinafter set forth. 

AND WHEREAS, upon the recommendation of the Pension Board, 
the executive committee of the Council of Boards has duly adopted ad 
interim the amendments to such pension plan as hereinafter set forth, 
and such amendments should now be ratified and approved. 

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the 1947 Annual Conference of 
the Church of the Brethren that the amendments to the said pension 
plan as hereinafter set forth, and as adopted ad interim by the executive 
committee of the Council of Boards, be, and the same are hereby, ratified 
and approved, and that the said pension plan be, and the same is hereby, 
amended as hereinafter set forth, that is to say: 

(1) That sub-paragraph (b) of Article I be amended to read as 
follows: (b) The term Pension Board shall mean the trustees of the 
Ministerial and Missionary Pension Plan of the Church of the Brethren. 



1947, Orlando, Florida 49 

(2) That sub-paragraph (c) of Article I be amended to read as 
follows: (c) The term Pension Plan shall mean the pension plan as 
adopted at the 1943 Annual Conference of the Church of the Brethren, 
as amended, and which "pension plan" shall be known and referred 
to as the Ministerial and Missionary Pension Plan of the Church of the 
Brethren. 

(3) That Article XIII be amended in its entirety to read as follows: 

Article XIII. Operation op the plan 
Section A — Administration 

(a) The pension plan shall be operated and administered by the 
Pension Board (namely the trustees of the Ministerial and Missionary 
Pension Plan of the Church of the Brethren), in accordance with the 
plan as adopted at the 1943 Annual Conference of the Church of the 
Brethren, as subsequently amended, and in accordance with such rules 
and regulations in harmony therewith as said Pension Board may from 
time to time adopt. The Pension Board's construction and interpretation 
of any provision of the plan or of such rules and regulations shall be 
binding on all parties. 

(b) The members of the Pension Board (namely the trustees of 
the Ministerial and Missionary Pension Plan of the Church of the 
Brethren), from time to time, shall consist of, and shall be, the twenty- 
five (25) individuals who are from time to time designated and appointed 
by the Annual Conference of the Church of the Brethren as members 
of the General Brotherhood Board — Church of the Brethren, and who 
at the time are serving as such members of the General Brotherhood 
Board — Church of the Brethren, including the then-acting moderator 
of Annual Conference of the Church of the Brethren if he is not one 
of said twenty-five (25) individuals so then designated, appointed, and 
serving. 

(c) Upon the adoption of this amendment, the operation and 
administration of the pension plan, as well as all funds and property 
in connection therewith, subject to the liabilities thereof, shall be turned 
over to, and thereafter administered by, the trustees of the Ministerial 
and Missionary Pension Plan of the Church of the Brethren. 

(d) The Pension Board (namely the trustees of the Ministerial 
and Missionary Pension Plan of the Church of the Brethren) may adopt, 
and shall be governed by, such by-laws, rules, and regulations as may 
be adopted by it from time to time, not inconsistent with the said plan. 
The trustees may delegate their powers and duties in respect to the 
operation and administration of the pension plan to committees, officers, 
and agents, selected from within or without the membership of the board 
of trustees. The action or decision of any such committee, officer, or 
agent, within the scope of the powers or duties so delegated, shall 
be deemed to be the action or decision of the trustees, but shall be 



50 1947, Orlando, Florida 

subject to review by the trustees in disputed cases. The decision of 
the trustees upon such review shall be final. 

(e) As of August 31, 1948, and at the end of each five (5) year 
period thereafter, the trustees may readjust annuities or other benefits 
being paid or to be paid where such changes are deemed to be necessary 
to protect and preserve the actuarial and financial solvency of the 
pension plan on the basis of the experience as to mortality, disability, 
security of the principal of the invested funds and the rate of earnings 
thereon. 

Section B — Liability 

The funds and assets of the pension plan shall be and become liable 
to members, annuitants, and other beneficiaries hereunder for the 
payment and discharge of their annuity and benefit claims in the manner 
and to the extent provided in the plan, but in no event shall any liability 
accrue, or be asserted against, any trustee or trustees individually, or 
against the Church of the Brethren, the Annual Conference of the 
Church of the Brethren, or any of the boards or agencies of the Church 
Of the Brethren (other than the funds and assets of the said pension 
plan) for annuities, benefits, or other claims arising out of the establish- 
ment, maintenance, conduct, and operation of the pension plan, nor 
shall any of the funds or assets of the Church of the Brethren, or of 
any of its boards or agencies (other than the funds and assets of the 
said pension plan) become subject to or liable for, any such claim or 
Other liability. No action at law or inequity shall ever accrue or 
be maintained in any court against any trustee or trustees individually, 
or against the Church of the Brethren, the Annual Conference of the 
Church of the Brethren, or any of the boards or agencies of the Church 
of the Brethren (other than the funds and assets of said pension plan) 
to enforce any such asserted claim or liability. 

Section C — Investments 

All funds of the pension plan and the Pension Board shall be 
invested only upon the approval of the trustees, or their duly authorized 
committee or agent. The trustees may designate the General Brother- 
hood Board — Church of the Brethren as the custodian of the funds and 
assets of the pension plan and the Pension Board, and may delegate 
to said General Brotherhood Board — Church of the Brethren such 
authorities in regard thereto, and in regard to the investment thereof, 
as the trustees may, from time to time, deem advisable and expedient. 

Section D — Construction 

(a) This plan and the rules and regulations adopted hereunder and 
the rights of members, annuitants and beneficiaries of the pension plan, 
shall be construed in accordance with the laws of the State of Illinois. 

(b) The pension plan as so adopted at the 1943 Annual Conference 
Of the Church of the Brethren, as amended, together with the by-laws, 



2947, Orlando, Florida 51 

rules and regulations adopted from time to time by the Pension Board 
not inconsistent with the said plan, shall be the instrument controlling 
the operation and administration of said pension plan, and outlining 
and defining the rights and interests of all members, annuitants and 
other beneficiaries thereunder. 

(4) That Article XIV be amended to read as follows: 

Article XIV. Amendments 

This plan may be amended by the Annual Conference of the Church 
of the Brethren; provided that such amendment shall have been 
proposed (a) by the Pension Board, or (b) by written petition presented 
at the preceding Conference and signed by at least twenty-five delegates 
thereof, and provided further, that the text of such amendment and 
the names of its sponsor or sponsors shall have been published in three 
issues of the official church organ at least thirty days prior to the 
Conference at which action thereon is taken. 

Any amendment which, in the judgment of the Pension Board, 
should be adopted before the next Conference, may be adopted ad 
interim by the Pension Board, and any amendment so adopted shall 
be presented for ratification at the next Conference of the church after 
similar advance publication in the official church organ. 

No amendment shall abridge or annul the rights of members in 
respect to their combined accumulations as of the date of the adoption 
of such amendment. 

Answer of 1947 Annual Conference: The resolution was adopted. 

Note: For a later amendment to Article XIII see the minutes of 
the 1948 Annual Conference, under "Amendment to the Pension Plan." 
Further amendments to the pension plan were made by the 1951 
Conference; see the minutes of that Conference, the query entitled 
"Amendments to the Pension Plan." 

Brotherhood Fund, 1948-49 

The following budget for 1948-49 was recommended, totaling 
$1,361,000 and divided as indicated. 

A. Bethany Biblical Seminary $ 50,000 

B. Brethren Service Commission 433,432 

C Christian Education Commission 

1. Department and divisions $75,000 

2. Appropriation to colleges 45,000 120,000 

D- Field Program 26,000 

E- Finance Commission 17,990 

f- Foreign Mission Commission 261,750 

G- General Administration, Promotion, and Visual Education 60,258 

H. Gospel Messenger Subsidy 14,070 



52 1947, Orlando, Florida 

I. Ministerial and Missionary Service Fund 30,000 

J. Ministry and Home Mission Commission 146,000 

1,159,500 
K. Federal Council of Churches (payable from funds so 

designated) 1,500 

1,161,000 
L. Surplus Advance Fund 200,000* 

Total $1,361,000 

* The Annual Conference adopted the following recommendation: 
"The General Brotherhood Board recommends that a surplus Advance 
budget of $200,000 be set up to be divided equally between missions 
and Brethren Service with the missions share to be further divided 
between home and foreign missions in the same ratio as each shares 
in the regular budget." 

Answer of 1947 Annual Conference: Budget adopted. 

Note: This budget was revised in 1948; see the 1948 query entitled 
"Revision of Brotherhood Fund, 1948-49." 

Brotherhood Organization 
(Report of the Commission of Fifteen) 
Note: See the minutes of the 1946 Conference, the query entitled 
"Brotherhood Organization," for a summary of the actions leading up 
to the presentation and adoption of this report. See the minutes of the 
1951 Conference, the query entitled "Revision of Brotherhood Organiza- 
tion," for some later revisions in the organization of the brotherhood. 

The General Brotherhood Board 
The commission believes that, for the sake of unity, efficiency and 
economy in general brotherhood work, there should be one general 
board called the General Brotherhood Board of the Church of the 
Brethren. 

I. Make-up of the Board 

The General Brotherhood Board shall comprise twenty-five mem- 
bers elected by Annual Conference, three to be chosen from each region 
and ten at large. 

The only ex-officio member with voting power on the General 
Brotherhood Board shall be the moderator of Annual Conference. 

II. Eligibility of Board Members 

Any elder, minister, or member of the laity who fulfills the qualifica- 
tions herein set forth may serve on the General Brotherhood Board. 



1947, Orlando, Florida 53 

117. Qualifications of Board Members 

A. Consecrated Christian living in home, church, and community. 

B. Active service in local church and district. 

C. Loyalty to the ideals and program of the Church of the Brethren. 

D. A working knowledge and understanding of the brotherhood 
program. 

E. Ability to exercise mature judgment in the solution of brother- 
hood problems. 

F. Fitness to serve on the commissions of the Brotherhood Board. 

IV. Organization of the Board 

The General Brotherhood Board shall organize and select its 
chairman and vice-chairman and its executive committee from the 
regular board members. The chairman' of the General Brotherhood 
Board shall not be chairman of any commission. 

The General Brotherhood Board shall organize its work by appoint- 
ing the following five commissions composed of five board members 
each: Foreign Missions, Ministry and Home Missions, Christian Educa- 
tion, Christian Service, and Finance. [See the 1947 query entitled 
"Nomenclature of Commissions."] 

The commissions shall include the following interests: 

A. Commission on Foreign Missions 

1. Overseas extension 

2. Evangelism 

B. Commission on Ministry and Home Missions 

1. Ministry 

2. Church extension 

3. Evangelism 

4. Rural life 

5. Architectural counsel 

C. Commission on Christian Education 

1. Church school 

2. Age-group program (children's work, youth work, adult — men's 
and women's work) 

3. Higher education 

4. Peace and moral-welfare curricular materials 

5. Publications (for church school) 

6. Family life education 

7. Leadership education 

D. Commission on Christian Service 

1. Relief 

2. Christian social action 

3. Peace witness through goodwill projects 

4. General peace action and education program of the church 



54 1947, Orlando, Florida 

E. Commission on Finance 

1. Conference budget building and promotion [see 1947 query 
entitled "Responsibility for Financial Promotion"] 

2. Receiving and disbursing Annual Conference and authorized 
funds 

3. Investment of brotherhood funds 

4. Conference trustees 

5. Supervision of pension system 

The General Brotherhood Board shall elect a general secretary to 
give full-time service to the supervision, promotion, and unification 
of the general brotherhood program. The board shall choose a treasurer, 
an editor of the Gospel Messenger, a manager of the Publishing House, 
a secretary for each commission, a secretary of financial promotion, 
and any other personnel needed for its work. 

V. Tenure of Office 

The normal term of office shall be for five years with each board 
member eligible for re-election for a second term. For the first five 
years, however, five members at large shall be elected for one year, 
and five for two years. Of the regional representatives, five board 
members shall serve for three years, five for four years, and five for five 
years. A former board member is eligible for re-election one year after 
his retirement from the board. 

VI. How the General Brotherhood Board Will Function 

The General Brotherhood Board as a whole will consider the total 
brotherhood program, evaluate all phases Of the program, and determine 
the general policies and budget needs in each area of its work. It will 
correlate and unify the work of all commissions, and assign to the 
commissions the responsibility for the detailed planning of the general 
program in their particular areas of service. 

Note: This section of the report of the Commission of Fifteen was 
adopted by the 1946 Annual Conference and put into operation. See 
the 1946 query entitled "Brotherhood Organization." 

Annual Conference 
I. Constitution and Function of Standing Committee 

A. Term of Service 

The members of Standing Committee shall be elected for a one-year 
term, the term of service beginning at the first Annual Conference 
following election and continuing until the next Annual Conference. 
The members of Standing Committee may be elected to serve twice in 
five years, but not more often, and not more than two years in succession. 

B. Basis of Representation 

1. State districts having under 3,000 members shall be entitled to 
one delegate each. 



1947, Orlando, Florida 55 

2. State districts having from 3,000 to 6,000 members shall be 
entitled to two delegates each. 

3. State districts having 6,000 members or more shall be entitled 
to three delegates each. 

4. The foreign districts shall be entitled to representation according 
to the foregoing scale. 

C. Eligibility 

Any elder, minister, or member of the laity who has been in the 
district for at least one year and who fulfills the qualifications as set 
forth by Annual Conference may serve the district on Standing 

Committee. 

D. Qualifications 

1. Consecrated Christian living in home, church, and community. 

2. Faithful service in local church and district. 

3. Loyalty to the ideals and program of the Church of the Brethren. 

4. A working knowledge and understanding of the brotherhood 
program. 

5. Ability to exercise mature judgment in the solution of brother- 
hood problems. 

6. A working knowledge and understanding of the brotherhood. 

7. Acceptance of the declaration of principles and purpose as set 
forth in the credentials for delegates to district and general conferences 
of the Church of the Brethren. At present they read as follows: 

"(1) I again declare my faith in, and grateful acceptance of, Jesus 
Christ, 'the only begotten Son of God,' as my personal Savior; and 
the Bible as God's infallible Word of Truth, and the New Testament 
as the ultimate rule of faith and practice for men (John 1: 14; 3:16, 36; 
12:47-48; Luke 21:33; Acts 10:43; 2 Tim. 3:16). 

"(2) It is my sincere endeavor, in submission to God's Holy Spirit, 
to make my life, at all times, in purpose and in act, a true expression 
of the teaching of Jesus and his apostles (1 Cor. 10:31-33; Rom. 12:1-2). 

"(3) I pledge my loyalty, my life and influence, to the Church of the 
Brethren and to her doctrines and practices as taught by the Scriptures 
and defined by her General Conference (1 Peter 1:13-16; 3:3-4; James 
5:12; Luke 3:14; 1 Cor. 6:1-8; John 18:20; 1 Peter 5:13-14; John 13; 
ICor. 11:1-21). 

"(4) As a delegate to the above-named Conference, I promise 
prayerfully to consider with open mind and a teachable spirit, all matters 
presented, and to act, by voice and vote in good faith, for the best 
interests of the church, that she may continue to be 'the pillar and 
ground of the truth' (1 Thess. 5:17; Rom. 14:22-23)." 

E. Selection of Members to Standing Committee 

1. In the selection of members due consideration shall be given to 
the choice of persons of the highest ability in the district and continuity 



56 1947, Orlando, Florida 

of service on the Standing Committee as well as proper distribution 
of viewpoint and personnel. 

2. Their qualifications shall be read each year before the selection 
of Standing Committee members and shall be seriously considered as 
the basis of their selection. 

3. The Standing Committee member shall be required to secure from 
the clerk of the district his proper credentials to be sent to the secretary 
of Standing Committee. 

F. Functions of Standing Committee 

1. To review the conditions of the brotherhood, to make recom- 
mendations to Annual Conference, and to take steps when necessary 
to conserve the unity of the brotherhood. 

2. To review the reports of the General Brotherhood Board, and 
to consider the problems presented by the General Brotherhood Board, 
regional councils, district boards, district elders' bodies, and individuals 
and to make recommendations to these groups or individuals. 

3. To consider the queries from districts and to suggest answers. 

4. To serve as the Nominating Committee for Annual Conference 
officers, General Brotherhood Board members, and Annual Conference 
committees, it being understood that further nominations can be made 
from the floor by the delegate body. 

G. Voting Privileges 

Only those who represent districts on Standing Committee are 
eligible to make motions or to make nominations or to vote. 

77. Constitution and Function of the Delegate Body 

A. Eligibility 

1. Any member of the Church of the Brethren who fulfills the 
qualifications as interpreted by Annual Conference is eligible to serve. 

2. It is suggested, in order to have a large lay representation in 
the delegate body, that when local churches send two delegates one 
delegate should be from the laity. 

3. Each congregation having a membership of two hundred or fewer 
may send one delegate; each congregation having more than two 
hundred may send one additional for each two hundred or fraction 
thereof. 

B. Qualifications 

1. Consecrated Christian living in home, church, and community. 

2. Faithful service in local church and district. 

3. Loyalty to the ideals and program of the Church of the Brethren. 

4. A working knowledge and understanding of the brotherhood 
program. 

5. Ability to exercise mature judgment in the solution of brother- 
hood problems. 



1947, Orlando, Florida 57 

6. Acceptance of the declaration of principles and purposes as set 
forth in the credentials for delegates to district and general conferences 
of the Church of the Brethren. 

C. Credentials 

1. The Standing Committee delegate credential blank shall be 
changed in form so as to indicate that the delegate whose name it 
bears has been chosen on the basis of the specified qualifications, and 
to indicate the membership of the district and the number of its 
delegates. 

2. Credential blanks for delegates from the church shall be sent, 
along with other literature from the Publishing House, to each pastor 
or minister of each church, or shall appear in an issue of the Messenger 
a few weeks before each Annual Conference. 

3. Each delegate shall be required to present the regular credential 
properly signed, before being seated, unless in the judgment of the 
credential committee there are justifiable reasons for making an 
exception. 

4. Proper identification and seating of the delegates shall be 
arranged by such provisions as special badges, a recognition ceremony, 
and special seating areas. 

D. Functions of the Delegate Body 

1. It is the final authority of the brotherhood in all matters of 
procedure, program, polity, and discipline. 

2. It elects the officers of the Annual Conference, the members of 
the General Brotherhood Board, and the members of special committees 
and commissions authorized by the brotherhood. These elections are 
made from nominations presented to the delegate body by the Standing 
Committee. 

3. It reviews the work Of the brotherhood as presented to Annual 
Conference in the reports of the General Brotherhood Board through 
its commissions and of the institutions of the brotherhood. 

4. It projects the program of the brotherhood, determining the new 
fields of endeavor, plans for advance, size of budget, and all other 
necessary matters. 

5. It disposes of queries. 

6. It receives the reports of committees or commissions appointed 
to deal with specific problems in the life of the brotherhood. 

7. It determines what resolutions shall be the voice of the brother- 
hood on the problems of the day. 

E. Voting Privileges 

Only those who represent churches Or are members of Standing 
Committee are eligible to vote. 



1947, Orlando, Florida 59 

the records of Standing Committee meetings and Annual Conference 
actions. 

E. To approve payment of Annual Conference bills. 

F. To serve as an ex-officio member of the Annual Conference 
Program Committee. 

G. To serve as a member of the Annual Conference Locating 
Committee. 

VI. Function of the Reader 

The reader shall read distinctly all papers as often as requested. 

The Standing Committee shall elect a reader as an officer of the 

Standing Committee who may also be chosen as the Conference reader. 

VII. Constitution and Function of the Program Committee 

A. Personnel 

The program committee shall consist of the moderator of Annual 
Conference, a staff member selected by the General Brotherhood Board, 
who may be selected to serve for two years, and three members 
nominated by Standing Committee and elected by Annual Conference 
for three years with one member's term expiring each year. The writing 
clerk shall be an ex-officio member of this committee. 

B. Duties 

The Program Committee shall prepare and publish the program of 
Annual Conference; and shall provide the necessary supervision for 
the most effective presentation of the program. 

VIII. The Conference Treasurer 

The treasurer of the General Brotherhood Board shall be designated 
as the Annual Conference treasurer. 

IX. The Locating Committee 

The Locating Committee shall be composed of the moderator, the 
clerk, and the staff member of the Conference program committee, 
together with the regional board in the region where the Conference 
is to be held. 

The Region 
I Organization by Regions 

The brotherhood is composed of five regions, namely, Southeastern 
Region, Eastern Region, Central Region, Western Region and Pacific 
Coast Region. 

The Southeastern Region is composed of the following districts: 
Florida and Georgia; Mardela; Maryland, Eastern; Maryland, Middle; 
Maryland, Western; North and South Carolina; Tennessee and Alabama; 
Virginia, Eastern; Virginia, First; Virginia, Northern; Virginia, Second; 
Virginia, Southern; West Virginia, First; West Virginia, Second. 



60 1947, Orlando, Florida 

The Eastern Region is composed of the following districts: Pennsyl- 
vania, Eastern; Pennsylvania, Middle; Pennsylvania, Southeastern, New 
Jersey, Eastern New York and Northern Delaware; Pennsylvania, 
Southern; Pennsylvania, Western. 

The Central Region is composed of the following districts: Illinois, 
Northern, and Wisconsin; Illinois, Southern; Indiana, Middle; Indiana, 
Northern; Indiana, Southern; Michigan; Ohio, Northeastern; Ohio, 
Northwestern; Ohio, Southern. 

The Western Region is composed of the following districts: Colorado; 
Iowa, Middle; Iowa, Northern, Minnesota, and South Dakota; Iowa, 
Southern; Kansas, Northeastern; Kansas, Northwestern; Kansas, South- 
eastern; Kansas, Southwestern; Missouri, Middle; Missouri, Northern; 
Missouri, Southern, and Arkansas; Nebraska; North Dakota and Eastern 
Montana; Oklahoma, Panhandle of Texas and New Mexico; Texas and 
Louisiana. 

The Pacific Coast Region is composed of the following districts: 
California, Northern; California, Southern, and Arizona; Canada; Idaho 
and Western Montana; Oregon; Washington. 

II. A Suggestive Plan of Regional Organization 
A. The Regional Board 

1. Constitution of the board 

The regional board shall be constituted of the members of the 
General Brotherhood Board who reside in the region and at least one 
representative from each district of the region elected or appointed 
in district meeting for at least a three-year tenure. The presidents 
of the colleges and the seminary president shall be members of the 
boards in their respective regions. The regional board may have the 
representatives of the functional program of the region as members of 
the board in an advisory capacity and without voting privilege. 

2. Function of the board 

a. The function of the board shall be to interpret, to co-ordinate, 
and to promote the total program Of the church. 

b. The board shall assume responsibility for the enlistment, place- 
ment, and supervision of the pastors in the region. In so doing, it shall 
communicate and co-operate with the General Brotherhood Board 
and work through district and local church ministerial representatives. 

c. The board shall plan and promote the regional conference. 

d. The board shall represent the region on the Locating Committee 
for Annual Conference when in that region. Other members shall 
be the moderator and the clerk of Annual Conference and the staff 
member of the Conference Program Committee. This committee shall 
set the place and time for Annual Conference. 

e. The board shall choose the regional secretary with the approval 



1947, Orlando, Florida 61 

of the General Brotherhood Board. The board shall select other workers 
as needed. 

f. The board shall aid in planning the regional program and shall 
supervise the workers of the region. 

3. Relation of region to district and brotherhood 

The relation of the regional to the brotherhood program is that 
of creative implementation; to the district program it is that of co-ordi- 
nation and stimulation. 

4. Functions of the regional secretary 

The following functions are suggested and such other functions 
may be added as deemed acceptable by the several regional boards and 
supervised by the boards: 

a. To promote the total church program in the region. 

b. To counsel with churches, ministers, district boards, and group 
organizations regarding the church program. 

c. To co-operate with the General Brotherhood Board and the 
district boards in organizing and promoting church extension. 

d. To aid district boards and the ministerial secretary in the 
enlistment, supervision and placement of ministers, unless the board 
shall choose to designate another person to assume these responsibilities. 

e. To cultivate desirable public relations for the colleges and to 
interpret the college program in the districts. 

B. The Regional Conference 

The purpose of the regional conference is to give inspiration, 
education, and fellowship; to vitalize the church program in the districts 
and the local churches; to interpret the brotherhood program and 
emphases. 

The District 

Following is a suggested plan for district organization. 
I. District Board 

A. Personnel 

It is recommended that the district give consideration to establishing 
one board which shall be called the district board. The district board 
shall be composed of at least five members elected by district conference. 
The moderator, the treasurer, and the clerk of district meeting shall 
be ex-officio members without vote. The district board may have 
advisory groups representing the functional program of the district 
without voting privilege. 

The term of service shall be three years with no member serving 
more than two terms in succession. 

The board shall organize by electing a chairman, a vice-chairman, 
and a secretary. 



62 1947, Orlando, Florida 

B. Functions 

1. To encourage and vitalize the local churches through the promo- 
tion of evangelism, the creating of new churches, the making of surveys, 
peace and moral welfare education, the organization of age-group 
programs, leadership education, group meetings of ministers for inspira- 
tion and fellowship, district rallies, summer camps, work camps, 
stewardship education, the developing of Christian home life, etc. 

2. To promote and supervise the brotherhood program in the district. 

3. To co-operate with the regional board and the General Brother- 
hood Board in the supervision and location of pastors. 

4. To select the district fieldworker and other personnel when 
authorized by the district board, to define his duties, and to supervise 
his work. 

5. To hold and administer the funds of the district. 

6. To hold title to district church property. 

7. To plan and promote the district conference. 

II. The Elders' Body 

A. Composition of the Elders' Body 

The elders' body shall be composed of ordained elders. The elders' 
body shall extend the privileges of the meeting to visiting elders, 
ministers, and members of the laity who are executive heads of their 
congregations, except in the executive sessions of the body, which shall 
be open only to elders of the district. 

B. Functions of the Elders' Body 

1. It shall serve as an advisory board in handling the problems of 
the district. 

2. It shall receive reports of the conditions of the churches and 
shall make recommendations to district meeting in behalf of the 
spiritual welfare of the churches. 

3. It shall pass upon the ordination of ministers and elders. 

4. It shall act as the appeal board for local congregations and 
individual members. 

5. It shall discipline ministers, laymen, or elders when necessary. 

6. Executive sessions Of ordained elders may be held to consider 
items of ordination and matters of discipline. 

III. The District Conference 

The purpose of the district conference is to provide education, 
inspiration, and fellowship; to vitalize the local church program; to 
interpret the regional and brotherhood programs and to transact the 
business of the district; to serve as the vehicle by which the concerns 
of local congregations are passed on to the Annual Conference. 



1947, Orlando, Florida 63 

IV. The Moderator of District Conference 

A. Eligibility 

Any elder or ordained minister of the church who meets the 
qualifications herein set forth may be elected moderator of the district 
conference. He shall not serve more than once in three years. 

B. Qualifications 

1. Consecrated Christian living in home, church, and community. 

2. Faithful service in local church and district. 

3. Loyalty to the ideals and program of the Church of the Brethren. 

4. A working knowledge and understanding of the brotherhood 
program. 

5. Ability to exercise mature judgment in the solution of brother- 
hood problems. 

6. Acceptance of the declaration of principles and purposes as 
set forth in the credentials for delegates to district and general confer- 
ences of the Church of the Brethren. 

7. Familiarity with parliamentary procedures and skill in presiding 
over a deliberative assembly. 

8. Capacity to cultivate desirable public relations. 

9. Demonstrated leadership ability in the brotherhood program. 

C. Duties 

1. Shall preside at business sessions of the district conference. 

2. Shall serve as an ex-officio member of the district board. 

3. Shall study carefully the need of the district. 

4. Shall serve on the program committee of the district conference. 

5. Shall deliver a "state of the church" address at district 
conference. 

V. Duties of Standing Committee Members in the Districts 

These members shall interpret the decisions and recommendations 
of Annual Conference to the delegates of the district conference in a 
written report, in addition to their report to the elders' body. When 
called upon they shall interpret the decisions to local churches. 

VI. Duties of the Clerk of District Conference 

The clerk shall record the minutes of the district conference and 
prepare them for publication, interpret the minutes of the district 
conference on the various problems as they arise in the district business 
sessions, and conserve the records of the district in co-operation with 
the district board. The clerk shall serve for a three-year term. The 
district shall determine whether he shall be elected to succeed himself. 

VII. Duties of the Reader 

The reader shall read distinctly all papers as often as requested. 



64 1947, Orlando, Florida 

VIII. The Treasurer 

There shall be one district treasurer, who shall have custody of 
all district capital funds, district endowments, and district annuities, 
as well as all other funds and moneys coming into the district from 
whatever source; the district treasurer should be elected for a term of 
three years, and should be required to make bond in a sum sufficient 
to safeguard all funds which may come into his hands. The district 
shall determine whether he shall be elected to succeed himself. 

IX. The Delegate Body 

A. It is the final authority of the district in all matters of procedure, 
program, polity, and discipline. 

B. It elects the officers of the district conference, the members of 
special committees or commissions authorized by the district, and 
members of the district board when so authorized. 

C. It reviews the work of the district as presented to the Annual 
Conference in the reports of the boards and committees of the district. 

D. It projects the program of the district determining the new fields 
of endeavor, plans for advance, size of budget, and all other necessary 
matters. 

E. It disposes of queries which come to the district conference. 

F. It receives the reports of committees or commissions appointed 
to deal with specific problems in the life of the district. 

G. It determines what resolutions shall be the voice of the district 
on the problems of the day. 

The Local Church 
The following recommendations for the local church are suggestive 
and permissive only. It is felt that local churches would benefit by 
experimentation with these recommendations working toward greater 
unity in local church organization. 

I. Introductory 

A. What the Church Is 

The church is the "body of Christ," the "family of God," "the 
household of faith," and "the pillar and ground of the truth." The church 
is divine in its mission and purpose. Its central purpose is evangelism. 
It is the organism through which Christ works for the redemption of 
individuals and to make the Christian principles operative in all human 
and social relationships. It is the school of Christlike character, the 
Christian fellowship with Christ at the center, and the Christian 
community of believers consecrated to Christlike living. 

B. Functions of the Church 

The functions of the church may be listed as follows: 
1. To win persons to Christ through evangelism. 



1947, Orlando, Florida 65 

2. To teach and preach the Bible and Christian truth as revealed in 
the Bible. 

3. To provide enriching experiences in worship. 

4. To inspire persons and help individuals toward the imitation of 
Jesus. 

5. To educate church members in the history, ideals, and sacraments 
of the church. 

6. To provide an effective educational program in family living, 
missionary education, stewardship, peace, temperance, leadership educa- 
tion, and recreation. 

7. To develop Christian fellowship within the local church, and 
also with other Christian churches and other races. 

8. To provide effective pastoral care and counseling for individuals. 

9. To enlist church members in Christian service projects. 

10. To develop a fellowship of spiritual, emotional, physical, and 
material sharing. 

11. To bring the principles of Christ to bear in all human and social 
relationships. 

C. Principles of Local Church Organization 

1. The local church is the basic unit of all church organization. 

2. The organization of the local church should be determined by 
the needs of the program. 

3. The whole organization should be designed to cultivate loyalty 
to Christ and to the differing phases of church life. 

4. The principles of unity, efficiency, and democracy should be 
exercised in developing the church organization along with the desira- 
bility of using a large number of members in the church program. 

5. The church board should become the unifying and co-ordinating 
element in the local church program. 

6. All officers and committee members should be trained for the 
work assigned to them. 

7. Efforts should be made to enlist new personnel on committees. 
No one person should hold more than one or two church offices. Tenure 
of office in the local church should be similar to tenure in district and 
brotherhood offices: two terms of three to five years. After the lapse 
of a year individuals would again be eligible for office. 

U. The Church Council 

The church council is the final authority of the local congregation; 
it is the church fellowship in business session. It evaluates past accom- 
plishments, hears reports, studies present conditions, elects officers, and 
makes plans for the future program of the church; it provides opportu- 
nity for the sharing and co-ordination of differing points of view. 



66 1947, Orlando, Florida 

III. The Church Board 

It is suggested that a church board with administrative power be 
set up in each church for the purpose of unifying the work of the local 
church. Two plans for such a board are suggested below. The purpose 
of a church board, regardless of the plan of organization used, should 
be to bring about the fullest possible unity and development of the 
church and the highest efficiency in the performance of its work. 

PLAN ONE 

A church board of from five to twelve members (depending on the 
size of the church) who will dedicate themselves fully to the Christian 
task should be elected by the church council. In this selection men, 
women, and youth should be considered in order that all interests of 
the church might be represented. 

A. Term of Service 

Each member of the church board should serve a term of three 
years and should not succeed himself more than once without an interim 
lapse of a year. Terms of service should be staggered for continuity. 

B. Qualifications 

1. Consecrated Christian living in home, church, and community. 

2. Faithful service in local church. 

3. Loyalty to the ideals and program of the Church of the Brethren. 

4. A working knowledge and understanding of the church program. 

5. Ability to exercise good judgment in the solution of church 
problems. 

C. The board shall elect its own officers. 

D. Functions 

Planning, supervising, and co-ordinating the work of the church 
through the fields of the ministry, missions and evangelism, Christian 
education, stewardship, property and finance, music and worship, service 
and relief, and social and recreational life. 

E. Execution of the Program and Policies of the Church Board 

1. The church board shall itself carry out the functions delineated 
above, following something of the commissions pattern of the General 
Brotherhood Board; or, with the approval of the church council, it shall 
select additional commission or committee members to carry out these 
functions. These commission members shall attend the meetings of the 
church board. 

2. The chairmen of the group organizations such as men, women, 
and youth should be invited to attend the board meetings with the right 
to participate in the discussions without vote. 

3. The board shall elect its Own officers. 

4. The pastor shall serve as an ex-officio member of the board 
without right of vote. 



68 2947, Orlando, Florida 

flock" locally and through the district, the regional, and the general 
church program in any way that they can. 

B. Elder-in-Charge or Executive Head of the Local Church 

The elder-in-charge of a local church should seek to be helpful to 
the pastor and to the church in every way he can. It is his responsibility 
to preside at all general business sessions or council meetings unless he 
has designated someone to serve in his stead. He is the executive head 
of the local church and should work co-operatively and carefully with 
the local church board in administering the church program. Conse- 
crated and able laymen may be called by the church to become executive 
heads of local churches, in which case they would perform the functions 
outlined above. 

C. The Pastor 

The pastor is the spiritual shepherd of the church. He serves as 
an adviser on the church program, working through church boards and 
committees. He should work through other people and inspire others 
to serve. He should endeavor to organize and educate his people to 
serve in personal evangelism, visiting, counseling, leading in worship, 
and sometimes in preaching. The pastor's central work is the spiritual 
care of the parish. 

The pastor is an ex-officio member of all church boards and 
committees. 

D. The Deacons 

It is the special responsibility of the deacons to help care for the 
needy within the congregation, and to help maintain the church fellow- 
ship. They can help the pastor in counseling and in ministering to the 
sick, the unfortunate, and the needy. They may assist with the anointing 
services. In addition to these, they should assume general oversight 
of the physical arrangements for observing the ordinances of the church 
such as baptism and love feasts. 

E. The Church Clerk 

The church clerk should be elected for a term of three years. He 
should record the proceedings of church business meetings, act as 
secretary of the church board, keep an official membership list in 
co-operation with the elder or pastor, issue letters of membership, act 
as custodian of important church documents, prepare local, district, 
and brotherhood reports, and act as, or work with, the church historian. 

F. The Church Treasurer 

The church treasurer should be elected for a term of three years. 
He should pay all properly authorized bills, keep accurate records of 
all monies and church expenditures, and give quarterly financial reports. 



1947, Orlando, Florida 69 

VI. The Nominating Committee 

The nominating committee should be composed of three to five 
members who are elected by the church council for three-year terms 
properly staggered for continuity. They should survey the congregation 
and present to the church council worthy servants as candidates for 
church offices as requested. As a general rule, they should nominate 
two candidates for each office to be filled. 

VII. The Specialized Activities of the Church 

The following specialized activities of the church will be cared 
for differently in different churches. In certain churches, particularly 
the smaller churches, they might well be cared for directly by the 
church board. In other churches they might be cared for by special 
committees whose chairmen would be members of the church board 
or who represent them on the church board. 

A. The Ministerial Function 

The ministerial function is to serve as adviser to the pastor; it 
should be helpful in educating the congregation in church-pastor 
relationships; it should recommend ministers to the church when a 
new pastor is needed; it should carry out the details of employing the 
pastor for the church; it should supply speakers in the absence of the 
pastor and recommend evangelists for the church. 

B. The Music and Worship Function 

The music and worship function is to assist the pastor Or elder in 
the total music and worship program of the church. It should sponsor 
special projects such as schools of music and of hymn appreciation; 
it should help to supervise the choir, appoint the choir director, appoint 
music leaders and instrumentalists, provide special music, educate the 
congregation in sacred music, and provide music materials. In addition 
it might well help to educate the congregation in the fine art of group 
worship, family worship, and personal devotions. It should provide 
worship materials needed by the various church and family groups; 
it should sponsor special projects of worship such as retreats and schools 
of prayer; it should study and provide helpful esthetics of worship 
such as furniture, pictures, flowers, and other physical equipment. The 
worship function could also include supervision of ushers. 

C. The Evangelistic and Missionary Function 

The evangelistic and missionary function should be to recommend 
local mission projects, to stimulate interest in and educate for home 
and foreign missions, to promote the brotherhood offerings for missions, 
to seek and to stimulate recruits for mission work. It should co-operate 
with the education function in a school of missions. 



70 1947, Orlando, Florida 

D. The Christian Education Function 

The function of Christian education is to plan and direct the total 
educational program of the church, to outline objectives for the teaching 
program of the church, to recommend curriculum and program for 
the educational work of the church, to plan for leadership education, 
to supervise Sunday evening group meetings and weekday Christian 
education, to recommend nominees to the nominating committee or to 
the church board for appointment as workers in special areas, such 
as temperance, peace, home and family, stewardship, visual education, 
and recreation, and to provide educational materials for the church, 
to provide a library and a librarian, to promote special church confer- 
ences and church camps. 

E. The Christian Service Function 

The Christian service function should promote interest and support 
for the brotherhood service program; it should stimulate interest in a 
dynamic approach to peace; it should enlist church members in local 
service activities in co-operation with men's and women's work; it 
should give vocational guidance to members of the church; it should 
work in behalf of aiding Brethren to settle in the church community; 
it should promote projects of mutual sharing; it should co-operate with 
the Christian education function in peace education; it should assume 
responsibility for welfare work in the congregation in behalf of the 
poor and unfortunate. 

F. The Christian Stewardship Function 

The Christian stewardship function should prepare a church budget 
to be submitted to the church board; it should plan and direct the 
every-member canvass or experience other methods of supporting the 
budget; it should receive and disburse church money as authorized by 
church council; it should co-operate with the Christian education 
function in stewardship education; it should interpret the financial 
condition of the church and the trends in giving. 

G. The Properties Function 

The properties function is to hold for the church the title to all 
church property, to supervise the care and repair of church property, 
to consider special requests for the use of church equipment and 
property, to employ the janitor and supervise his work. 

Home Missions 
For several years there has been a growing feeling in the brother- 
hood that the home mission opportunities are not being fully cared for. 
This feeling finally led to the appointment at the Asheville Conference 
in 1942 of a committee to study and report on the question. The next 
year the committee brought in a report of progress. At the meeting in 



1947, Orlando, Florida 71 

1944 at Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, the committee brought in a report 
which was received by the Conference and recommitted for further 
study. At the same meeting other matters of organization were referred 
to the committee and the committee was enlarged to five. 

At the meeting at North Manchester in 1945, the committee 
requested that a Commission of Fifteen be appointed to study and bring 
in a report on the whole field of church organization and church 
discipline with the purpose of more nearly unifying our practice and 
of promoting a more aggressive program. This commission was ap- 
pointed, and that part of their report which suggests a General Brother- 
hood Board was approved and the Board is now in operation. It is our 
feeling that the General Brotherhood Board will devote itself to the 
problem of producing a workable, aggressive program on home mission 
work. However, we are submitting herewith the following guiding 
principles and particular aspects of home mission work, in the hope 
that they will be helpful to the General Brotherhood Board as it works 
at the problem. 

I. Guiding Principles in Home Mission Work 

A. All North America shall be regarded as the field of activity for 
home mission work. 

B. The General Brotherhood Board shall formulate and adopt an 
over-all policy of home mission work after making a survey of our 
present home mission work. 

C. It shall indicate its acceptance of home mission work as one 
of the major enterprises of the brotherhood by: 

1. Lifting up and dignifying its importance to the level of foreign 
mission work. 

2. Challenging our youth to dedicate their lives to home mission 
service. 

3. Giving it adequate resources Of funds, perhaps $100,000 annually, 
and able, well-trained personnel. 

4. Setting up goals toward which the brotherhood should strive, 
i.e., certain increases in the over-all membership of our church and 
of the number of new churches. 

5. Instituting a vigorous program of evangelism. 

D. Comity shall be practiced in the establishment of home mission 
churches and, where advisable, there should be co-operation with Other 
evangelical groups in the maintenance of union or federated churches. 

E. It shall be the policy of the General Brotherhood Board to give 
grants to districts and local churches for the establishment of missions 
when careful surveys prove the wisdom of such aid. 

F. Financial help to the home mission churches by the General 
Brotherhood Board shall be conditioned by the policy of such churches 
accepting supervision from the district, in co-operation with the General 



72 1947, Orlando, Florida 

Brotherhood Board, with the view of securing for them the most able 
leadership and leading them to become self-supporting as rapidly as 
possible. 

G. The Commission On Christian Service shall be encouraged to 
co-operate with funds and personnel in the formation and strengthening 
of mission churches (note section C under "Particular Aspects of Home 
Mission Work"). 

H. The General Brotherhood Board shall study carefully all general 
and Brethren migration and population shifts with a view to capitalizing 
upon the home mission opportunities inherent within them and alerting 
ourselves to the opportunities for organizing new churches in new city 
and new rural developments. 

II. Particular Aspects of Home Mission Work 

A. Each region and district of our brotherhood should make surveys 
of home mission opportunities and plan to establish new missions. In 
establishing a new church the following order of emphasis is suggested: 
strong leadership, adequate buildings, rapid integration and development 
of the resources of the community. 

B. Regions and districts should make surveys of all weak and dying 
churches in order to determine what their future status should be: 

1. Where the field is promising, leadership should be strengthened, 
ample funds made available, the program of the mission geared to 
the needs of the community and, in some cases, the church plant 
relocated. 

2. Where the field does not show promise, further investment of 
funds should be guarded. 

C. The values of volunteer service as developed in Brethren work 
camps and C.P.S. offer a new approach to church work and church 
extension and we suggest the General Brotherhood Board study them 
with the view of utilizing them in church extension and home mission 
work. 

D. The Commission on Ministry and Home Missions should give 
mission churches guidance in serving their communities and building 
together to preserve the principles of the New Testament as understood 
by the Church of the Brethren; and also assist with helpful materials 
and counsel in making church membership more meaningful. 

E. Each region should have sufficient help for the supervision of 
the program of ministry and home missions. 

F. A ministry of evangelism to other races looking to the establish- 
ment of interracial and racial churches should be pursued aggressively. 

Counseling and Discipline 
I. Definition and Function 

Counseling and discipline are fundamental to the Christian life. 



2947, Orlando, Florida 73 

They should begin in the early years Of childhood and continue through- 
out life. By their nature and meaning counseling and discipline are 
concerned with the two most essential aspects of Christian experience, 
namely, (1) instruction and growth; and (2) correction and redemp- 
tion. Therefore, it is the special responsibility of the church to provide 
adequate opportunities for (1) thorough preparation for church mem- 
bership and Christian growth; and (2) the carrying of special responsi- 
bilities on the various church boards and committees. 

Ministers should feel specially obligated to put themselves under 
a fitting physical, mental, moral, and spiritual discipline throughout all 
the years of their Christian ministry. 

This paper is particularly concerned with the corrective and re- 
demptive aspects of counseling and discipline. It recognizes that where 
the instructional and growth aspects of counseling and discipline have 
been cared for adequately the corrective aspect can be greatly minimized. 

II. Purpose of Counseling and Discipline 

The purpose of counseling and discipline is threefold: 

A. To bring about the redemption of the individual. 

B. To preserve the integrity of the church. 

C. To maintain worthy standards of Christian life and conduct in 
loyalty to the church and in devotion to our Lord Jesus Christ. 

III. Agencies for Counseling and Discipline 

In keeping with Matthew 18 and 1 Corinthians 13, counseling and 
discipline shall be ministered by: (1) the elder, pastor, or ministers 
of the local church; (2) a special committee; (3) official board of the 
local church; (4) elders' body of the district; (5) or, the Standing 
Committee of the Annual Conference. 

IV. Subjects of Counseling and Discipline 

The subjects of counseling and discipline shall be all members who 
have been officially received into the fellowship of the Church of the 
Brethren. 

V. Causes for Counseling and Discipline 

The following offenses shall constitute cause for counseling and 
discipline: 

A. Of Lay Members 

1. Failure to live up to the teachings of the New Testament. 

2. Failure to be loyal to the specific emphases of the New Testament 
as interpreted by the Church of the Brethren. 

3. The following offenses shall be regarded as a basis of counseling 
and discipline: immoral conduct; crime; use, manufacture, or sale of 
intoxicating beverages; dishonesty, fomenting and participating in strife 
in family, church, community, or national relationships; failure to adjust 



74 2947, Orlando, Florida 

differences between members of the church according to Matthew 18; 
failure to maintain Christian standards in all financial dealings; and 
unchristian family relations; etc. 

B. Of Officials Of the Church 

In addition to offenses that apply to the laity, the following shall 
constitute special causes for counseling and discipline of officials of the 
church (deacons, ministers, and elders) : 

1. Persistent neglect of duties of the office. 

2. Disseminating doctrines contrary to the beliefs and practices of 
the Church of the Brethren. 

3. Failure to maintain exemplary Christian family relations in 
harmony with the teachings of 1 Timothy 3:1-9 and Titus 1:5-9. 

4. Insubordination and failure to comply with the established 
doctrines and practices of the Church of the Brethren. 

VI. Procedure in Counseling and Discipline 

A. Of Lay Members and Local Church Officers 

1. Any person who commits an offense against the church shall 
be approached by the elder, pastor, or minister in the spirit of Matthew 
18 and 1 Corinthians 13. An assiduous effort shall be made to develop 
within the offending party an attitude which shall cause him to make 
confession, truly repent, and seek forgiveness. 

2. If the foregoing effort fails to secure the desired result, the elder 
Or pastor shall be empowered to appoint a special committee for further 
counseling with the offending person. 

3. In the event that steps (1) and (2), suggested above, are not 
adequate to restore right relationships, the official board shall appoint 
a committee of investigation, consisting of two Or more members of 
the official board, whose duty it shall be to seek the facts in the situation 
carefully and impartially and offer further counsel. 

4. If these procedures fail to bring about restoration, the offense 
shall be put in writing by the official board and submitted to the church 
for final action. 

5. In case suspension becomes necessary, the church shall continue 
to seek for the redemption of the individual involved, and shall strive 
to bring about his reconciliation with the church. 

6. The suspended individual has the right to appeal his case to 
the elders' body of the district, and if not satisfied with their decision 
he may appeal to the Standing Committee of the Annual Conference. 

B. Offenses of Ordained Ministers and Elders 

An ordained minister Or elder owes his ministry to the district 
elders' body, is responsible to the same, and shall be disciplined by them. 

The following steps shall constitute the procedure in handling cases 
of discipline involving any ordained minister or elder: 



1947, Orlando, Florida 75 

1. The report of any alleged offense, herein before-mentioned or 
otherwise, shall be presented in writing to the moderator, or to one 
of the officers of the district elders' body, setting forth the charges. 

2. The officers of the elders' body shall either appoint or become 
a committee of investigation and counseling, whose duty it shall be to 
gather carefully and impartially all the facts relevant to the case, and 
to counsel with the person involved. 

3. The committee of investigation and counseling shall report its 
findings to the officers of the district elders' body and if, in their judg- 
ment, the facts support the accusations presented, the moderator shall 
bring the matter to the district elders' body. 

4. The accused shall have the right to present any written or oral 
statement in his behalf, and to interrogate the committee of investigation. 

5. The elders' body shall have the authority to review and weigh 
the evidence presented, and to make further investigation if this appears 
desirable; and shall have jurisdiction in determining the degree of the 
guilt of the accused and to make the final decision as to whether or 
not the accused shall be exonerated, or removed from the ministry or 
from the eldership, or from membership in the church, Or whether a 
lesser penalty shall be fixed. 

6. The elders' body shall have the authority to receive and consider 
an application or request for reinstatement into the ministry or elder- 
ship. If there is satisfactory evidence that the individual concerned 
has truly repented and has proved himself worthy of the confidence of 
the church and of the high calling of the office of the Christian ministry, 
they are empowered to reinstate him. 

7. Any minister has the right of appeal to the Standing Committee 
of the Annual Conference if not satisfied with the decision of the district 
elders' body. 

Property Holdings, Financial Resources, and Incorporations 
I. Local 

The commission believes that for the sake of uniformity and greater 
security in Ownership of Church of the Brethren property, the title to 
all local church property should be held by local trustees, in trust, for 
the teaching and dissemination of the gospel of Jesus Christ, according 
to the beliefs, practices, and doctrines of the Church of the Brethren, 
as set forth and promulgated from time to time by Annual Conference. 

A. Make-up of Trustees 

The trustees should consist of three members Of the local church 
who are in good standing, and each member should be elected for a 
period of three years. 

B. Method of Election 

The trustees should be elected by the local church at a regular or 
called business session of the members thereof. 



76 1947, Orlando, Florida 

C. Method of Succession 

The terms of the trustees should expire successively, thereby neces- 
sitating the election of a new member each year; retiring trustees should 
be eligible for re-election, if deemed wise by the local church; in case 
of a vacancy caused by death, resignation, or removal to some other 
church, or in the case of failure to act, steps should be taken by the 
local church to supply the deficiency as soon as practical after the 
deficiency occurs; in cases where for some reason or other a vacancy 
is not filled upon the expiration of the term of any one of the trustees, 
the old member so affected will hold over until his successor has been 
duly elected. 

D. Duties of the Trustees 

The primary duty of the trustees shall be that of holding title to 
all local church property, in trust, as set out in paragraph one above, 
which shall conform to the legal requirements of the various states, 
territories, or other possessions of the United States, or foreign countries; 
as such, the trustees shall take, hold, and convey title to any and all 
real estate belonging to the local church. 

E. Other Duties 

The local church may, if it sees fit to do so, impose Other duties 
and responsibilities upon the trustees, such as caring for the buildings 
and grounds, remodeling and building of new structures, etc. However, 
in such cases specific authority should be given by the local church, 
as in cases where other individuals are chosen to perform some specific 
duties for the local church. 

F. Gifts, Bequests, etc. 

When the local church receives property by gift Or bequest, it 
should be the duty of the trustees to take title to same and hold the 
property, in trust, as in the case of property bought by the local church. 

G. Transfer of Church Property 

When it is deemed wise Or advantageous to the local church to sell 
or otherwise dispose of a particular piece of property, the conveyance 
should be executed by the trustees in their trust capacity, under the 
direction of the local church and with the approval of the district board 
of the district in which the local church is located. 

H. Closed or Abandoned Church Property 

In cases where local churches have been closed Or where the 
property has been abandoned by the removal of the membership to other 
places, by death or otherwise, the district board should intervene and 
give aid and counsel in the matter of the proper disposition of the 
properties thus affected, to the end that title thereto may vest in the 
district board, as trustees for the district, 



1947, Orlando, Florida 77 

I. Uniform Procedure in Conveyance 

1. All property acquired by the local church should be transferred 
in accordance with the provisions set forth in paragraph one (I), above. 

2. Kestrictive covenants should be contained in all deeds of convey- 
ance, as follows: 

a. That if the property ever ceases to be used in accordance with 
the provisions set forth in paragraph one, or in cases where the local 
church has been closed or the property abandoned, the district confer- 
ence of the district in which the local church is located may, upon the 
recommendation of the district board, assert title to the property and 
have the same vested in the district board, as trustees for the district. 

b. That before a legal title to the property can be conveyed, consent 
of the district board must first be secured, and the deed of conveyance 
must have affixed thereto the signatures and acknowledgements of the 
executive officers of the board. 

J. Return of Property to Local Churches 

In cases where the aforementioned restrictive covenant providing 
for the divesture of title to property owned by the local church results 
in the title being vested in the district board, as trustees, it is understood 
that this action is taken only as a means of conserving for the Church 
of the Brethren property which has been purchased and developed by 
consecrated effort, and in many cases at great sacrifice by individuals 
who have been loyal to the principles as set out in paragraph one, and 
that the properties thus affected, or their equivalent, shall be held in 
trust by the district board with the understanding that they shall be 
promptly returned to the local church, if and when the reasons for 
the divesture of title to said properties are removed; it is further 
understood that until such time as the said reasons are removed, the 
district board will use the affected properties in accordance with the 
provisions set forth in paragraph one, and for the best interests of the 
Church of the Brethren. 

K. Examination of Title to Local Church Property 
The district board, in co-operation with local churches, should 
secure the assistance of competent legal counsel and examine the title 
to all local church property located within its respective district, and 
where no legal title exists, by the property being deeded in the name 
of the local church, or otherwise, without the power vested in one or 
more individuals to convey title, assistance should be given the local 
church in the matter of effecting a legal title to its property; and 
secondly, where a legal title does exist, the local church should co- 
operate with the recommendations herewith made by incorporating in 
its deeds the restrictive covenants set forth under section I, above. 



78 1947, Orlando, Florida 

L. Charters of Incorporation 

In cases where local church property has been duly incorporated 
under state law, it is not necessary to provide trustees, inasmuch as the 
officers of the corporation are legally clothed with the power and 
authority to convey title; therefore, it is not necessary where charters 
of incorporation have been provided that the charters be dissolved. In 
deference to the plan of providing trustees, rather than charters of 
incorporation, the former plan seems to be more universally adaptable 
to the holding of local church property because of its simplicity. How- 
ever, in cases where charters of incorporation have been provided, in 
order to safeguard the interests of the Church of the Brethren, the 
local church, under the direction of the district board, should effect a 
trust agreement with the district in which it is located, providing for 
the divestment of title to its property, for the reasons and under the 
conditions set forth under section I, and in keeping with the recommen- 
dations made in section K. 

II. District 

The commission believes that for the sake of uniformity and greater 
security in ownership of Church of the Brethren property the title to 
all district church property should be held by the district board, in trust, 
for the teaching and dissemination of the gospel of Jesus Christ, accord- 
ing to the beliefs, practices, and doctrines of the Church of the Brethren, 
as set forth and promulgated from time to time by Annual Conference. 

A. Gifts, Bequests, etc. 

When the district receives property by gift or bequest, it shall be 
the duty of the district board to take title to same, and hold the property, 
in trust, as in case of property purchased by the district. 

B. District Property 

When it is deemed wise or advantageous to the district to buy, sell, 
or otherwise dispose of a particular piece of property, the conveyance 
shall be executed by the district board, in its trust capacity, with the 
approval of district conference. 

C. Closed or Abandoned Church Property 

In cases where local churches have been closed, Or where the 
property has been abandoned by the removal of the membership to 
other places, by death or otherwise, the district board shall intervene 
in the matter of the proper disposition of the properties thus affected, to 
the end that title thereto may vest in the district board, to be held in 
trust for the district. 

D. Uniform Procedure in Conveyance 

1. All property acquired by the district should be transferred in 
accordance with the provisions set forth in paragraph one, Part II, 
above. 



1947, Orlando, Florida 79 

2. A restrictive covenant should be contained in all deeds of convey- 
ance, as follows: 

That before a legal title to the property can be conveyed, consent 
of the district conference must first be secured, and the deed of convey- 
ance must have affixed thereto the signatures and acknowledgements 
of the moderator and clerk of district conference, in addition to the 
duly authorized signatures and acknowledgements of the members of 
the district board. 

E. Examination of Title to All Local and District Property 

The district board, in co-operation with local churches and the 
assistance of competent legal counsel, should familiarize itself with the 
status of the title to all local and district properties, as recommended 
under sections K and L, Part I, and in cases where necessary, changes 
in the deeds of conveyance should be made in order that all local and 
district properties may be conserved for the best interests of the Church 
of the Brethren. 

F. Budgets 

The district board should have charge of all district budgets; all 
budgets recommended by the board should be ratified by district 
conference. 

III. Brotherhood Owned and Related Institutions 

A. Bethany Biblical Seminary 

The board of trustees of Bethany Biblical Seminary shall be com- 
posed of ten elected members. One member shall be nominated by the 
alumni association and approved by Annual Conference. Nine members 
shall be nominated by Standing Committee and elected by Annual 
Conference; three members representing the colleges, three members 
representing the ministry, three members from the laity of the church. 
The president of the seminary shall be an ex-officio member of this 
board. Each member shall be elected for a three-year term of office. 
The tenure rule of two successive terms shall apply. 

B. Colleges 

The commission feels that because the charters of our various 
colleges differ it is impossible to treat them as a unit. However, there 
are certain things which it would recommend which it feels would tend 
to bring the colleges and our church into a more intimate relationship. 
These recommendations are as follows: 

1. That a majority of the members of the board of trustees should 
be members of the Church of the Brethren. 

2. That, in the selection of faculty, preference be given to members 
Of the Church of the Brethren. 

3. That emphasis should be given by the colleges to the teaching of 



80 1947, Orlando, Florida 

basic Christian doctrines and to the teaching of our Brethren heritage 
and practices. 

4. That greater emphasis should be given through the various 
agencies of the church to the matter of financial support for our colleges. 

5. That the colleges retain the provision in their charters that, in 
case of dissolution, the assets of the college shall be turned over to the 
Church of the Brethren. 

C. Bethany Hospital 

The commission makes recommendations concerning Bethany Hos- 
pital, which are as follows: 

1. That Bethany Hospital should continue as a separate corporation 
held in trust for the Church of the Brethren. 

2. That since the hospital trains nurses for foreign service and since 
the hospital is vitally geared to the program and plans of the church, 
the financial plans of the hospital should be submitted to the General 
Brotherhood Board for approval and encouragement. [See Minutes of 
the Annual Conferences, 1923-1944, page 154.] 

D. Pension Board 

The commission makes recommendations concerning the Pension 
Board, which are as follows: 

1. That a separate corporation be formed for the Pension Board. 

2. That the personnel of the Pension Board may or may not be 
chosen from the General Brotherhood Board, but that it should be under 
the supervision of that board. 

Answer of 1947 Annual Conference: Report adopted as revised. 
After the preparation of the approved report in a compiled booklet for 
distribution the Commission of Fifteen is to be dismissed. 

Note: Two other queries affecting the brotherhood organization 
came before the 1947 Conference. See the query entitled "Nomenclature 
of Commissions" and the one entitled "Responsibility for Financial 
Promotion." For later revisions in the brotherhood organization see the 
minutes of the 1951 Conference, the query entitled "Revision of the 
Brotherhood Organization." 

Co-operation With Other Brethren Bodies 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
through Standing Committee that the commissions of the General 
Brotherhood Board be authorized to invite other Brethren bodies to 
co-operate with them if it seems desirable. 

Answer of 1947 Annual Conference: Request granted after amend- 
ing "Brethren bodies" to read "Christian bodies." 



1947, Orlando, Florida 81 

Ministry to Negroes 

Query, 1945 

Since we as a church have believed and preached the fatherhood of 
God and the brotherhood of man; since we have achieved a high state 
of democracy and equality within our ranks, which needs a wider 
application; since, though we with pride can state that our membership 
has never held slaves, yet with shame we must admit that we have 
done almost nothing for the more than 13,000,000 in America with 
colored skins — 

We, therefore, the Westernport congregation, petition Annual Con- 
ference of 1945, through district conference of Western Maryland, that 
a study be made and recommendations be brought as to how we can 
best serve our colored citizenry in America in the field of economics, 
Christian education, and home missions. p ear le M. Boor Clerk 

Answer of district conference of Western Maryland: Passed to 
Annual Conference with the recommendation that a study be made 
to see whether or not some of our buildings and facilities, such as 
[those of] Daleville Academy or Blue Ridge College, may be used for 
schools for Negroes. Ross Speicheri Writ i ng Clerk 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Referred to the Council of 
Boards for study and report next year. 

Report of the Council of Boards, 1946 
The efforts to improve race relations have moved in four directions 
during the past year. 

1. In order to understand better the principles involved in racial 
co-operation, scholarships have been provided for several people to 
attend the race relations schools at Fiske University, Tennessee, and 
at Storer College, West Virginia, in 1945 and 1946. 

2. Special issues of the Gospel Messenger have been devoted to the 
implications of brotherhood. 

3. Investigations have been made as to whether in areas where 
Negroes are moving in around Brethren churches it might not be 
possible to have these churches become interracial churches rather than 
to sell out and move. The possibility of having joint white and colored 
pastors for such work has been studied. 

4. A study has been made of the possibilities of opening Negro 
churches in the South as home mission projects. In Arkansas an area 
of need has been found and in order to make such a church nontransient 
and more stable a committee is investigating the possibility of helping 
the Negroes gain ownership of the land in the area where the church 
would be located. 

The committee organization is as follows: an Elgin staff committee 
on race, a Mission Board committee to investigate the Arkansas situation. 



82 1947, Orlando, Florida 

These combined committees are acting as the committee on race rela- 
tions for the Council of Boards. 

The Council of Boards asks for counsel and for the privilege of 
continuing its study for another year. 

Answer of 1946 Annual Conference: Report accepted and the com- 
mittee continued. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1947 
The General Brotherhood Board assigned administrative respon- 
sibility for a program of race relations, including a ministry to Negroes, 
to the Commission on Christian Service. Ora Huston has been secured 
to investigate the possibilities and to follow through on a program 
of ministry to Negroes. 

Answer of 1947 Annual Conference: Report accepted. 

Nomenclature of Commissions 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
through Standing Committee that the nomenclature of the commissions 
of the General Brotherhood Board as authorized by the 1946 Annual 
Conference (Item A, Section 1-4) be changed to read: 

a. Foreign Mission Commission 

b. Ministry and Home Mission Commission 

c. Christian Education Commission 

d. Brethren Service Commission 

e. Finance Commission. 

Answer of 1947 Annual Conference: Request granted. 

Responsibility for Financial Promotion 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
through Standing Committee that responsibility for financial promotion 
be lodged directly under the board rather than the Finance Commission 
as outlined in the 1946 Annual Conference minutes, Item A, Section I-4-e. 

Answer of 1947 Annual Conference: Request granted. 

Revision of Conference Budget, 1947-48 

The following is the budget as approved by Annual Conference of 

1946: 

Conference Budget: 

General Mission Board $ 315,200.00 

Board of Christian Education 48,000.00 

Board of Christian Education (Hymnal Fund) 2,500.00 

General Ministerial Board 7,750.00 

General Education Board 5,000.00 

Bethany Biblical Seminary 40,000.00 



1947, Orlando, Florida 83 

Ministerial and Missionary Service Fund 30,000.00 

General Education Board (College Fund) 45,000.00 

Historical Commission 1,500.00 

$ 494,950.00 

Brethren Service 500,000.00 

Federal Council of Churches (payable from funds so 

designated) 1,500.00 



$ 996,450.00 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends that the budget for 
1947-48 be reopened and presents the following for consideration: 
Conference Budget: 

General Administration $ 36,385.00* 

Commission on Christian Education 

Historical Commission $ 1,000.00 

Hymnal fund 2,500.00 

College appropriation 45,000.00 

College Presidents Association 1,500.00 

General 50,218.00 100,218.00 

Commission on Finance 8,220.00* 

Commission on Foreign Missions 284,300.00 

Commission on Ministry and Home Missions 104,575.00 

Bethany Biblical Seminary 49,250.00 

Ministerial and Missionary Relief Fund 30,000.00 

$ 612,948.00 

Commission on Christian Service 542,530.00 



Federal Council of Churches (payable from funds so 

designated) 1,500.00 



$1,156,978.00 
The asterisks indicate that these figures represent one half of the 

budgets for these departments. The other half is included in the 

budget of the Commission on Christian Service. 

Answer of 1947 Annual Conference: Request to reopen the budget 

for 1947-48 granted. The revised budget was adopted as proposed, 

totaling $1,156,978.00. 

Universal Compulsory Military Training 
The following statement was adopted by Annual Conference on 
recommendation by the Standing Committee. The program of action 
was adopted as revised. The delegates were requested to read this 
paper in each local church. 



84 1947, Orlando, Florida 

UNIVERSAL COMPULSORY MILITARY TRAINING 

A Statement by Standing Committee 

The people of the United States have waited for many weeks for 
the report of the President's Advisory Commission on Universal Training. 
It was delivered to the President on May 29 and transmitted by him, 
to the Senate on June 4. 

It was generally known that prominent members of the commission 
were favorable to universal military training prior to their appointment. 
The report, therefore, which unanimously recommends that the govern- 
ment of the United States establish a system of universal compulsory 
military training, is not a surprise to the American public. The plan 
proposed by the commission follows closely the proposal of the army 
which had been developed in the main before the commission was created. 
It provides in general for the registration of young men as they reach 
the age of seventeen and for their induction into training between the 
ages of eighteen and twenty. 

The system is to be administered by a commission of three men 
appointed by the President, two of whom are to be civilians. The staff, 
of course, must necessarily be drawn from the army and navy personnel. 
The first six months of the training period are to be devoted to basic 
military training and the following six months to what is called "optional 
training." These options, however, are nevertheless compulsory and 
have a distinctly military objective. The system therefore provides 
for a minimum of twelve months' training and a maximum of several 
years as determined by the chosen options. 

The report of the commission will certainly be followed by the 
introduction of a bill in Congress designed to establish a system of 
training in harmony with the recommendations of the commission. The 
President and his cabinet, the army and navy staffs, and the American 
Legion are pressing for early consideration by Congress. The entire plan 
has been preceded by months of propaganda calculated to win public 
favor. There is reason to believe that the so-called "American-Russian 
crisis" is being deliberately exaggerated as pressure on the universal 
training issue. Our relations with Russia probably have not deteriorated 
during the last twelve months so drastically as reported by the radio, 
the press, and certain government authorities. The American people 
need to be aware of the professional propagandist with which our 
military forces are amply supplied. 

The system of training proposed by the President's commission 
is ably defended in the report. It would lead the American people 
to accept the system as the very essence of democracy because it 
is universal, as distinctly American because it is assumed that it will 
be endorsed by the majority of the people, and as a definite advance 
in our system of moral and citizenship education. 



1947, Orlando, Florida 85 

We need to be alert to the following implications of the system: 

1. It entrusts annually to the care of the armed forces of the 
country the lives and the education of about 1,000,000 young men 
between the ages of eighteen and twenty years. These men will be 
subject for a period of twelve months to rigid military discipline and 
training and to such indoctrination as the army and navy may choose 
to undertake. It is difficult to understand how such an experience can 
be regarded as preparation for the life of freedom under a democratic 
pattern of society and in a world at peace. 

2. The commission report admits that some military experts are 
demanding training "which teaches hatred and seeks to instill lust 
for killing and emphasizes the most brutal means of destruction" but 
declares such training to be "sadistic" in peacetime. The report insists 
that "training in citizenship" must be a component part of the program. 
We can be assured that once the system is legally established the 
content of the program will ultimately correspond to the wishes of 
military authorities. There is a terrible implication in the plea for 
"citizenship training." It is an admission that a free nation can no longer 
manage its system of public education as regards educational objectives. 
It is also evident that the report visualizes a new type of citizen — a 
citizen whose mind is definitely militarized. 

3. The proposed system implies that the young man who chooses 
to go on with his college education after six months of basic training 
will by necessity be compelled to choose a college where R.O.T.C. 
units are maintained. This would remove young men from our own 
colleges in their freshman and perhaps their sophomore years. 

4. The plan of training for the conscientious objector in work of 
national importance is not revealed in the report. It is known, however, 
that some authorities will demand that this training be under govern- 
ment control and that the services of such men be in tax-supported 
institutions of the state. This implies that the church will have no 
part in such training. If a more liberal policy is followed, then the 
church may be expected to provide comparable training and service 
for her young men of military-training age. 

5. The claim of the report that the proposal will provide a com- 
mendable system of character education is confronted by hundreds 
of years of experience and evidence to the contrary. An army camp 
has never yet proved to be an institution of high moral education. The 
claims of the Fort Knox experiment are irrelevant to the issue. That 
was a controlled experiment and even its results are of doubtful value. 

6. The system is a definite threat to the principle of religious liberty 
and to the peace position of the Church of the Brethren in that it 
removes our young men from the influence of the home and the local 
church at a vital age in their lives and exposes them to the skillful 



86 2947, Orlando, Florida 

methods of indoctrination of the army and to the social pressures 
of an army camp which for immature youth are almost irresistible. 

We could add many implications to this list but these are sufficient 
to impress us with the nature of the crisis before us. The burden 
of this statement to the Annual Conference is to bring to the church 
the gravity of the situation and to urge participation by our people 
in every effort calculated to defeat the measure when it comes to the 
Congress of the United States. 



1948, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

Advance Movement 1948-49 

It seems evident that the Advance movement, inaugurated by the 
Orlando Conference, has brought spiritual uplift to the church. It is 
impossible to measure the intangible values of the movement and 
no adequate report is possible on the tangible results. It is known, 
however, that more than five hundred congregations participated in 
the movement. Progress is reflected in additions to the membership 
of the church, in new home mission projects undertaken, in new 
congregations organized, in larger giving to the work of the church, 
in dedication of life to the cause of Christ, and in a renewed spirit 
of loyalty and devotion to the Kingdom of God. 

It is especially important that we maintain the spiritual under- 
girding of this movement. The aftermath of war is revealed in the 
disintegration and decay which threatens the life of mankind. The 
spiritual malady of our times must be arrested. There is no easy 
panacea. The way of revival is the way of repentance and regeneration. 
"Repent ye therefore . . . that so there may come seasons of re- 
freshing from the presence of the Lord" (Acts 3:19). These are days 
in which "the church must be the church" and prophets must be 
prophets. We, therefore, resolve to make this year one of special 
emphasis on the great doctrines of the New Testament and its inspired 
teachings. We call upon the pastors and ministers of the church 
to carry out this decision in every pulpit of the brotherhood in order 
that our people may be more certainly established in the faith. "God 
gave unto us eternal life, and this life is in his Son" (1 John 5: 11). 
"Speak thou the things which befit sound doctrine" (Titus 2: 1). 

First: We decide to extend the Advance movement for a second 
year and request members of the staff to undertake a more complete 
evaluation of the movement by the time of the 1949 Annual Con- 
ference. 

Second: This Conference appeals to those congregations in the 
brotherhood which have not yet responded to the Advance movement 
to organize themselves at once for this great advance with Christ. 
We reaffirm the objectives and goals approved by the Orlando Con- 
ference for these churches and urge that they follow the plan recom- 
mended for getting started. [See the 1947 minutes, under "Advance 
With Christ— a Call to Action."] 

We commend those churches which have co-operated in the move- 
ment and urge them to conserve all the gains which have been made 
and to seek with continuing zeal to advance in every aspect of our service 
to the world. 

Third: Objectives and Goals for 1948-49 

We recommend that the general objective for the second year of 



88 1948, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

the movement be an advance with Christ in a fuller commitment of life 
and resources to his Kingdom. 

We call upon our people — 

1. To yield their lives to Christ in a personal commitment of time 
and talent to the work of the church. "Present your bodies a living 
sacrifice, holy, acceptable to God" (Romans 12: 1). We call for one 
hundred young men and women to give their lives in special training 
and service to the Christian ministry, to the service program of the 
church, to teaching in our colleges, to service on the administrative 
staff of the church, and to service in foreign mission fields of the world. 
"How can they hear without a preacher? and how can they preach except 
they be sent?" (Romans 10: 14-15). 

We call upon the adult membership for a rededication of themselves 
to the ideals of Christian vocation. We recommend a goal of at least 
twenty-five per cent of the members to such commitment during the 
year. Christians should discipline their lives in the interest of their 
maximum service to the world. They should think more of others 
and less of self. They should look upon their vocation or calling as 
sanctified unto God and glorified in his service. "Whatsoever ye do, 
do all to the glory of God" (1 Corinthians 10: 31). 

We urge our pastors and ministers to call their people to such com- 
mitment and to devise some plan for specific commitment of life 
to Christ. 

2. To dedicate their financial resources to Christ in the spirit of 
good stewardship of the material gifts which are bestowed upon them 
by a generous heavenly Father. "The earth is the Lord's and the fulness 
thereof (Psalm 24:1). "Bring ye the whole tithe into the storehouse" 
(Malachi 3: 1). "Lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven . . . : For 
where thy treasure is, there will thy heart be also" (Matthew 6: 20, 21). 

We commend to the church the Fellowship of Tithers and urge that 
we seek in all of our churches to secure one hundred per cent participation 
in giving to the church and an increase of at least fifteen per cent of 
our membership committed to share at least ten per cent of their income 
for the service of the church in this needy world. 

Fourth: We recommend that the officers, boards, and committees 
of the church in all the districts of the brotherhood be urged to convene 
in special district gatherings or in convenient geographical units to 
formulate plans for this Advance program. We urge pastors, ministers, 
elders, superintendents, teachers, and workers of the local congregations 
to assume leadership in promoting this movement. "Lift up your eyes, 
and look on the fields, that they are white already unto harvest" 
(John 4: 35). 



1948, Colorado Springs, Colorado 89 

Amendment of the Charter of the General Mission Board Trustee In 
Iowa for the Church of the Brethren 

Whereas, General Mission Board Trustee in Iowa for the Church of 
the Brethren is incorporated under the laws of the state of Iowa, and 
it is desirable that its charter be amended in substance as hereinafter 
provided: 

Now, therefore, be it resolved by the Board of Trustees of the 
General Brotherhood Board — Church of the Brethren that the members, 
trustees, and officers of General Mission Board Trustee in Iowa for the 
Church of the Brethren be, and they hereby are, authorized to cause the 
charter of said Iowa corporation to be amended, in substance, as 
follows: 

1. To change the name of said Iowa corporation to General Brother- 
hood Board Trustee in Iowa for the Church of the Brethren. 

2. To provide that the members of said Iowa corporation shall be 
appointed from time to time by the Annual Conference of the Church 
of the Brethren, or as it may designate. 

3. To eliminate from the charter of said Iowa corporation any 
provisions which require, or seem to require, or permit the expenditure 
of the funds of said corporation by any agency other than Iowa 
corporation or outside of the state of Iowa, leaving the disposition of 
the funds of said Iowa corporation to the discretion of the trustees or 
officers of said Iowa corporation. 

Be it further resolved, that the acts and doings of the members, 
trustees and officers of said Iowa corporation pursuant to this resolution 
be, and the same hereby are, approved. 

Answer of 1948 Annual Conference: The amendment was ratified. 
The Annual Conference hereby designates the General Brotherhood 
Board to appoint the members of the Iowa corporation known as the 
General Mission Board Trustee in Iowa. 

Amendment to the Pension Plan 

In the judgment of the Pension Board it is desirable and necessary 
that the Ministerial and Missionary Pension Plan of the Church of the 
Brethren be further amended. The Pension Board, therefore, as outlined 
in the pension plan, has adopted the following amendment, ad interim, 
and present^ the amendment to Annual Conference of 1948 for ratifica- 
tion: 

A. That sub-paragraph (d) of Section A of Article XIII be amended 
to read as follows: 

(d) At any and all meetings of the Pension Board, a quorum shall 
consist of fifteen (15) of the members thereof; that any action taken, 
or proceedings had, by or in the name of the Pension Board at any 
such meeting at which a quorum is present, by affirmative vote of at 
least fifteen (15) of the members so present, as well as any action taken, 



90 1948, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

or proceedings had, by or in the name of the Pension Board, in case of 
emergency, by written sanction or approval of any twenty (20) of the 
members of the Pension Board, without a formal meeting, shall be 
taken as, and shall be deemed to be, the action of the Pension Board, 
and shall be as effectual in all respects as if the entire membership of 
the said Pension Board had met and had affirmatively voted for or 
approved thereof. The Pension Board may adopt and shall be governed 
by such by-laws, rules, and regulations as may be adopted by it from 
time to time, not inconsistent with the said plan. The Pension Board 
may from time to time delegate its powers and duties in respect to the 
operation and administration of the pension plan, including its powers 
and duties in respect to the handling, investing, sale, or other disposition 
of its funds and assets, to committees, officers, or agents, selected from 
within or without the membership of the Pension Board. The action 
or decision of any such committee, officer, or agent, within the scope of 
the powers or duties so delegated, shall be deemed to be the action or 
decision of the Pension Board. The decision of the Pension Board as 
to all matters arising under the pension plan shall be final, and shall be 
binding on all parties. 

B. That Section C of Article XIII be amended to read as follows: 

Section C — Investments 

All funds of the pension plan and the Pension Board shall be invested 
only upon the approval of the Pension Board or its duly authorized 
committee, officer, or agent. The Pension Board may designate one or 
more banks or trust companies selected by it, or may designate the 
General Brotherhood Board — Church of the Brethren, as the depository 
or custodian of the funds and assets of the pension plan and the Pension 
Board, and may delegate to such banks or trust companies or to said 
General Brotherhood Board — Church of the Brethren, such powers and 
authorities in regard to such funds and assets, and in regard to the 
handling, investing, sale, or other disposition thereof as the Pension Board 
may, from time to time, deem advisable and expedient. 

Answer of 1948 Annual Conference: The amendment was ratified. 

Note: For previous amendments to the pension plan see the minutes 
of the 1947 Conference, under "Amendments to the Ministerial and 
Missionary Pension Plan." For later amendments see the minutes of 
the 1951 Conference, the query entitled "Amendments to the Pension 
Plan." 

Bethany Hospital and Our Educational Institutions 

Queries, 1947 

Statement of General Brotherhood Board 
The General Brotherhood Board approves the recommendation of 
the Commission of Fifteen asking Annual Conference to appoint a 



1948, Colorado Springs, Colorado 91 

committee to make an over-all study of Bethany Hospital and the 
educational institutions of the church. 

Petition of Bethany Hospital to Annual Conference 
The General Brotherhood Board passes the following petition from 
Bethany Hospital to Annual Conference: 

What Annual Conference Has Already Said and Done 

In 1926 a Conference committee, in concluding a five-year study of 
hospital work, recommended seven conditions for approving hospitals 
to be operated under the auspices of the Church of the Brethren. 

This committee also reported that it had made a careful survey 
of the work of Bethany Hospital and of its plans for future development. 
Then it said, "These plans meet the above conditions and we therefore 
approve them." At the conclusion of the report, the committee com- 
mented, "The trinity of church, school, and hospital will complete the 
church's educational program, and the training of her youth can 
be done under her own supervision." 

In 1927 the same committee made the following statement: "With 
the foregoing principles established; with the nucleus of a good modern 
hospital under Brethren auspices already undertaken, and an increasing 
number of our young people taking up nursing and medical work, our 
church is finding a new field of service." 

The careful reading of the reports of this committee over the years 
indicates that there has been a strong interest in nursing education. 
This interest has continued to the present. This is seen in the response 
to the training school at Bethany Hospital while it was being operated, 
and in the many inquiries which are continually coming from young 
women of our church who would like to have an opportunity to pursue 
their nursing education under Brethren auspices. 

Present Urgent Needs 
Material Equipment Needed Immediately 

There is a pressing need for storage space, serving rooms, an elevator, 
and laundry, dietary, heating, and sterilizing equipment, as well as minor 
facilities which are required in a growing institution. 
Reopening the Training School for Nurses 

1. The need for nursing education under the guidance of Brethren 
is very important for many reasons, a few of which may here be named: 

(1) To make available nursing education opportunities for our young 
women, where Brethren ethical standards and ideals shall be maintained 
and taught. 

(2) To supply nurses whose chief ambition will be to promote the 
Brethren interpretation of Christianity — in our own hospital, on mission 
fields, in the general extension work of the church, and in local com- 
munities, churches, and homes. 



1948, Colorado Springs, Colorado 93 

permission to publicize the need for storage space, serving rooms, an 
elevator, and laundry, dietary, heating, and sterilizing equipment. Since 
the Annual Conference has previously sought to guard the church from 
an every-member solicitation for the financial needs of the hospital, the 
commission does not understand this decision as authorizing or permitting 
Bethany Hospital to organize a solicitation among the churches. 

Furthermore, the commission does not consider it to be the pre- 
rogative of any committee of the Church of the Brethren to instruct a 
private and independent institution, even though held in trust for the 
church, regarding the nature and scope of its service and building 
program. However, the church has the right to say when, if at all, 
such institutions may solicit the brotherhood for funds. 

After careful consideration, the commission believes it would be 
unwise at this time to initiate a solicitation for funds which would lead 
to the establishment of a nurses' training school in connection with 
Bethany Hospital. 

The commission recommends that the Ministry and Home Mission 
Commission through its department of Ministry to Those in the Healing 
Arts provide for the spiritual welfare of those preparing for service in 
these fields by: 

(1) Selecting approved hospitals and schools in Brethren centers, 
and 

(2) By instituting pastoral care and counseling service under the 
direction of the pastors of local churches. 

(3) By instructing the Commission of Nine to work out a program 
with the officials of Bethany Hospital whereby the needs of the hospital 
and the establishment of a nurses' training school may be realized; 
such program to be brought back to Annual Conference next year, for 
its consideration. 

Part II. The Colleges 

The commission recognizes the important place which education has 
in our church heritage and tradition. The church has evidenced its 
belief in education as a means of developing Christian leadership 
and as a primary method in perpetuating our ideals. Especially in this 
period of expanded interest in higher education and consequently 
the need for enlarged facilities, the church must maintain its vital 
obligations to institutions of higher learning. The church must continue 
to support her colleges by moral and spiritual undergirding as well as 
by granting to the colleges financial assistance. We encourage the 
church at every level of activity to support the program of higher 
education. 

The original purpose of American colleges, educating men for 
the ministry, is now expanded to include enlistment and training for 
all types of Christian service, including lay leadership. The colleges 
should serve the churches to maintain spiritual emphases in home and 



94 1948, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

church as well as in community life. The college should cultivate such 
a religious atmosphere on the campus that students will feel a basic 
loyalty to the church and its ideals. The responsibility for accomplishing 
these functions shall rest with the officers of the administration and 
every member of the faculty of the college. 

A. College-Church Relationships 

1. General promotion 

We believe that a definite share of the responsibility for the support 
and promotion of our college program should be readily and fully 
assumed by the church. 

a. We feel that at brotherhood, regional, and district meetings 
opportunity should be provided for the presentation of the cause of 
Christian higher education. 

b. We feel that each local church should keep the cause of the 
colleges before her members by such methods as: 

(1) Observing College Day. 

(2) Supporting a continuous program to impress members with the 
important place of the college in the life of the church and acquaint 
young people with the values accruing from attending Brethren colleges. 

(3) Using faculty members as guest speakers, student deputations 
and musical groups, and such other extension services as the college 
may make available. 

(4) Encouraging local alumni to be active in keeping the claims of 
the college before the church constituency. 

(5) Urging all members to assume responsibility for publicizing the 
merits of our colleges to their non-Brethren friends. 

2. Financial promotion 

a. Regarding annual contributions for current expenses it is the 
judgment of the commission that: 

(1) The colleges may properly continue to request that a nominal 
sum of money be included in the Brotherhood Budget to meet their 
current expenses since such a procedure establishes a necessary rela- 
tionship between the whole church and all of the colleges. 

(2) Because of the limited regional and district funds per se the 
colleges may not properly ask for budgetary consideration at these 
organizational levels, with the exception of where the institution is 
owned and controlled by the district. 

(3) Local churches should be urged to support the colleges in a 
regular and consistent manner to be determined by the officials of 
the congregation. It is the feeling of the commission that contributions 
to the college should pass through the hands of the local church 
treasurer. Those churches which have budgets are urged to include 
an annual appropriation for the colleges. 

b. Regarding periodic solicitations for capital funds it is the judg- 
ment of the commission that — 



1648, Colorado Springs, Colorado 95 

Since local church giving annually to the brotherhood program at 
the local and national levels is in excess of $4,000,000; and 

Since it is estimated that the local congregations in the next five 
years will be engaged in building projects to an expenditure in excess 
of $10,000,000; and 

Since educational institutions have tentative plans for building and 
expansion programs in the next decade totaling approximately 
$5,000,000: 

(1) There is serious need for long-range planning and co-ordination 
in order that it may be within the reasonable ability of the church to 
finance and maintain the projects undertaken. The multiplicity and 
scope of these fund-raising activities make it necessary that the institu- 
tions be required to clear all major fund-raising projects through the 
General Brotherhood Board. 

(2) In order to insure proper co-ordination of financial efforts it is 
advisable that those institutions planning financial campaigns make 
clearance first with the regional council, and secondly with the district 
board and the local church board. 

B. What the Church May Expect of the College 

It is the judgment of the commission that the bases upon which 
each college may expect the continued interest and support of the 
church are as follows: 

1. Achieve a distinctive role in the total education program of the 
church and occupy a strategic position in its potential service to the 
church in the years ahead. The General Brotherhood Board shall 
determine when the colleges are meeting these conditions upon the 
basis of such factors as the size of the constituency, the nature of the 
clientele, and the location with respect to competing institutions, 

2. Maintain acceptable accreditation standards, and 

3. Evidence a financial program and outlook which warrants the 
support and wins the confidence of potential contributors. 

The commission is interested in maintaining and augmenting the 
relationship between the church and her educational institutions. The 
church needs the contribution her educational institutions can make 
in guiding and training her youth for Christian service. On the other 
hand, the schools need the moral and financial support of the church, 
as well as her guiding influence. 

Part III. The Seminary 

It is the judgment of the commission that the demerits of having 
Bethany Biblical Seminary in Chicago are more than offset by the 
many advantages and values of being located in the seminary center 
of America and in its accessibility to the entire brotherhood. 

It is suggested that Bethany Biblical Seminary in co-operation with 



96 1948, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

the colleges continue to study and evaluate the role of the Training 
School in relation to the best interests of the church. 

The commission encourages Bethany Biblical Seminary to work 
co-operatively with the Ministry and Home Mission Commission for a 
larger program of inspiration and training of young people for full-time 
Christian service with the church. This program should be initiated 
and promoted in the local congregation. 

We commend the spirit of fellowship and the mutual approach to 
the common problems of Christian education which has grown 
between Bethany Biblical Seminary and the colleges. We urge that 
these institutions continue this fellowship to make articulate the chal- 
lenge to Christian service and to aid young men in maturing their plans 
for lifework in the ministry. 

We are encouraged by the willingness of the church to finance the 
contemplated plans for expansion; we believe that due consideration 
should be given to the reasonable ability of the church to maintain 
permanently an enlarged seminary program. 

Answer of 1948 Annual Conference: Report accepted as amended. 

Note: The adoption of Part I of this report calls for a future report 
by the Commission of Nine on Bethany Hospital. See the minutes of 
the 1949 Conference, under "Bethany Hospital." 

Brotherhood Fund, 1949-50 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
through Standing Committee the adoption of the following Brotherhood 
Budget for 1949-50: 

Bethany Biblical Seminary $ 55,000.00 

Brethren Service Commission 403,000.00 

Christian Education Commission 

General program $86,000.00 

College appropriation 45,000.00 131,000.00 

Finance Commission 20,500.00 

Foreign Mission Commission 286,390.00* 

General Departments — financial promotion, visual educa- 
tion, field program, Gospel Messenger, European office, 

Administration 130,000.00 

Ministerial and Missionary Service Fund 30,000.00 

Ministry and Home Mission Commission 175,000.00 

Reserve Fund 11,610.00 

1,242,500.00 
Federal Council (payable from funds so designated) 1,500.00 

$1,244,000.00 



2948, Colorado Springs, Colorado 97 

* The Foreign Mission Commission anticipates spending $344,265 of 
which $57,875 is income expected from bequests and interest on en- 
dowments. 

Answer of 1948 Annual Conference: The budget was adopted. 

Note: This budget was revised by the 1949 Conference; see the 1949 
query entitled "Revised Brotherhood Fund, 1949-50." 

Change of Historical Commission 
Since the report of the Commission of Fifteen adopted in the 1946 
and 1947 Annual Conference does not recognize the Historical Commission 
and since the 1947 Annual Conference approved a budget of $1,000 for 
the Historical Commission under the Commission of Christian Education, 
the General Brotherhood Board recommends that the present Historical 
Commission be discontinued and that its functions be carried by a 
historical committee appointed by and related to the Christian Education 
Commission. 

Answer of 1948 Annual Conference: The recommendation was 
adopted. 

Help for Ministerial and Other Students 

Query, 1947 

Since young men who are studying for the ministry at Bethany 
Biblical Seminary are training to serve the brotherhood, and since these 
young men need to use their time to the best advantage while they are 
in school; 

We, the board of directors of the District of Northern California, 
petition the Annual Conference of 1947, through the district conference 
of Northern California, to instruct the General Brotherhood Board to 
make more adequate provisions for loans and help to students in 
Bethany Biblical Seminary. 

W. Russell Burriss, Secretary 

Answer of district meeting: Passed to Annual Conference. 

Answer of 1947 Annual Conference: Referred through the General 
Brotherhood Board to the Christian Education and the Ministry and 
Home Mission commissions for study and report next year. It is sug- 
gested that they broaden their study to include both ministerial and other 
students preparing for Christian service, as well as other institutions. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1948 
The General Brotherhood Board has considered the matter of 
increased aid to students at Bethany Biblical Seminary and is encouraging 
increases in loan funds as well as fuller use of those funds now available 
for this purpose. All student loans are now made under uniform policies 
and procedures set up by the board. 



98 1948, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

The current budget reflects an increase of $2,000 in aid to Bethany 
students above the amount granted in the previous year. 
Answer of 1948 Annual Conference: Report accepted. 

Magazines Advertising Liquors 

To the district meeting of the Church of the Brethren of Southern 
Ohio, assembled in the Pleasant Hill church, April 24, 1948, we the 
members of the Brookville church petition Annual Meeting through 
district meeting — 

To request the members of the Church of the Brethren to withdraw 
subscriptions from all magazines advertising liquors and intoxicating 
beverages, as a helpful means of defeating the distraction of our youth. 

And, further, that Annual Meeting advise the Federal Council of 

the Churches of Christ in America of its action requesting that the 

Council ask all participating denominations with the Council to take 

similar action in respect to this matter. _.._.,„ „, , „, , 

Paul Fidler, Church Clerk 

Answer of district meeting: Approved and passed on to Annual 

Conference. T „ _ e 

J. H. Good, Secretary 

Answer of 1948 Annual Conference: The general content of this 
query was heartily endorsed and the following recommendations were 
approved: 

1. That our members voice a vigorous protest to the publishers of 
magazines and newspapers carrying advertisments of alcoholic beverages; 
the following ways are suggested: 

a. Letters of protest to the publishers. 

b. Removing such advertisements and returning them to the pub- 
Ushers stating the reasons for their return. 

c. In instances where advertisements of alcoholic beverages and 
useful commodities appear on the same sheet, this sheet be sent to the 
advertisers of the useful commodities stating that the objectionable 
advertisements render their own less effective. 

2. That so far as possible our members cancel their subscriptions to 
periodicals carrying advertisements of alcoholic beverages, and subscribe 
to those less objectionable. 

3. That we urge our members to protest to the management of radio 
stations which carry programs advertising alcoholic beverages. 

4. That we request our representatives to the Federal Council of 
Churches to convey the action of this Conference to the Council, request- 
ing that it urge all participating denominations to take similar action. 

Ministerial and Missionary Service Fund 

The trustees of the Ministerial and Missionary Pension Plan (the 
Pension Board) recommend to Annual Conference through Standing 



1948, Colorado Springs, Colorado 99 

Committee that Conference rescind the action of 1945 on 2-b of the 
query entitled "Administration of the Ministerial and Missionary Service 
Fund," which was: 

"b. To place yearly the balance of the Ministerial and Missionary 
Service Fund which is left after the needs of (a) have been cared for, 
into the supplementary fund of the Pension Board in order that the 
earned pension of members of the plan who have served the church 
for many years, but who will not on account of age receive sufficient 
pension upon retirement to care for their needs, be supplemented ac- 
cording to the decisions that might be reached by the Pension Board," 
and also authorize that in the future any such unused balances shall be 
cumulative. 

Answer of 1948 Annual Conference: Request granted. 

Mission Points in Europe 

Query, 1947 

We, the Sacramento Suburban church, petition Annual Conference, 
through district conference of Northern California, to establish mission 
points in Poland and other parts of Europe where our relief work and 
heifer projects have been centered, with the purpose in mind of teaching 
the viewpoint of the Brethren way of life, and winning souls for Christ. 

Ruth Marriott, Clerk 

Answer of district meeting: Passed to Annual Conference, 1947. 

Answer of 1947 Annual Conference: Referred to the General Broth- 
erhood Board. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1948 

The General Brotherhood Board has carefully considered the question 
of opening a mission in Poland and/or other parts of Europe. We know 
the poverty, the loneliness, and the discouragement of Protestant 
Christians in Europe and would gladly see the church help to the extent 
of her ability. But European conditions are extremely unsettled and 
may remain so for some time. 

Furthermore, your Foreign Mission Commission is just opening a 
station in South America and we find that in every field prices have 
risen as sharply as in the homeland. We are now drawing heavily on 
our reserves to finance our present undertaking. We have neither the 
finances nor the personnel to open another institutional mission such 
as we now have in India, China, and Africa. 

Since the Brethren Service Commission has representatives in 
various parts of Europe, we recommend that they both continue to 
exercise whatever Christian influence they can, co-operating with local 
agencies in favorable European centers, and continue to explore the 
possibilities of a new type of non-institutional mission in the future. 

Answer of 1948 Annual Conference: Report accepted. 



100 1948, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

Position and Practices of the Church of the Brethren 
in Relation to War 

Queries, 1948 

Alternative Service 
We petition Annual Conference assembled at Colorado Springs, June 
15-20, 1948, to go on record as opposing registration for conscription; 
but favor registration with the church for alternative service, entirely 
under church control. Further, we request Annual Conference to 
authorize the agency and method to put this stand into immediate action. 

C. C. Cripe, Writing Clerk 

(District of Northern Indiana 
special meeting, May 1, 1948) 

Christian Position on Registration 

The District of Southern Ohio, assembled in special district con- 
ference at the Pleasant Hill church on May 8, 1948, petitions Annual 
Conference to adopt the following statement as the official position of 
the Church of the Brethren. 

Some of our Brethren, both ministers and laymen, have expressed 
their intention to refuse to register with the government for military 
service in the event of the passage of a draft law. 

We recognize this position as one which is consistent with the 
spirit and teachings of Jesus Christ. 

We commend and encourage those who have been led to take this 
stand and pledge to them the support and the sympathy of the church. 

J. H. Good, Secretary 

Answer of the 1948 Annual Conference: The Conference regarded 
the following statement from the General Brotherhood Board and the 
Standing Committee, adopted as revised, as the answer to these queries, 
and authorized the General Brotherhood Board to initiate and carry 
forward the actions implied in this paper. 

STATEMENT ON POSITION AND PRACTICES 

OF 

THE CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN 

IN RELATION TO WAR 

The Church of the Brethren views with deep concern current 

proposals to commit our nation to a permanent peacetime policy of 

military conscription through a revival of selective service or the 

enactment of universal military training or both. Fearing that these 

preparations for war will hasten the coming of actual war, the church 

finds it necessary to state again its convictions about war, preparations 

for war, military service, and the attitudes which the church commends 

to its members, particularly those directly affected by conscription. 



2948, Colorado Springs, Colorado 101 

I. The Church and War 
The Church of the Brethren, since its beginning in 1708, has 
repeatedly declared its position against war. Our understanding of the 
life and teachings of Christ as revealed in the New Testament led our 
Annual Conference in 1934 to resolve: "All war is sin. We, therefore, 
cannot encourage, engage in, or willingly profit from armed conflict at 
home or abroad. We cannot, in the event of war, accept military service 
or support the military machine in any capacity." This conviction which 
we reaffirm in 1948 grew out of such teachings of Christ as the fol- 
lowing: "But I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse 
you, do good to them that hate you and pray for them which despitefully 
use you" (Matthew 5: 44). 

II. The Church and CoNScrENCE 

The church has stood likewise for the principle of freedom of 
worship and freedom of conscience. We cannot, therefore, concede to 
the state the authority to conscript its citizens for military training or 
military service against their religious convictions. The church itself 
respects the right of individual conscience within its membership and 
has never set up an authoritative creed. Instead, it accepts the entire 
New Testament as its rule of faith and practice and seeks to lead its 
members to comprehend and accept for themselves the mind of Christ 
as the guide for their conviction and conduct. 

We seek no special privilege from our government. What we seek 
for ourselves, we seek for all — the right of individual conscience, which 
no governmental authority can abrogate. As Peter said, "We must obey 
God rather than man" (Acts 5: 29). 

III. The Church and SprRrruAL Nurture 
The Church of the Brethren seeks by processes of education and 
spiritual nurture to help its members develop within themselves a spirit 
of peace and an attitude of nonviolence as an outgrowth of deep religious 
conviction. We endeavor through the services of the church, our 
Sunday and weekday educational program, our colleges and seminary, 
our preaching ministry, our summer camp activities, our personal 
counseling, and our continuing and widespread ministry in relief and 
rehabilitation to lead individuals into such intimate contact with Jesus, 
our Lord, that they will commit themselves to him and the manner of 
life which he taught and exemplified. We believe that such commitment 
leads to the way of love and nonviolence as a central principle of Chris- 
tian conduct. 

We recognize that there are varying degrees of achievement of this 
sought-for result in individuals and churches, but we seek to maintain 
a deep and growing fellowship among ourselves and between ourselves 
and our Master in order that we might increasingly know his purposes 
and do his will. 



102 1948, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

IV. The Church and Citizenship 

We believe that our supreme citizenship is in the Kingdom of God, 
but we undertake to render constructive and creative service in the 
existing state. We exercise the right of suffrage and encourage our 
members to regard public office as an opportunity to work for good 
government in keeping with our Brethren values. In a Christian 
democracy we must assume responsibility for helping to create an 
intelligent and Christian public opinion which will result in legislation 
in harmony with the eternal laws of God. As Christian citizens we 
consider it our duty to obey all civil laws which do not violate these 
higher laws. We seek, however, to go beyond the demands of law, 
giving time, effort, life, and property in a ministry to human needs 
without regard to race, creed, or nationality. We attempt to reconcile 
conflicting persons and groups, leading them toward fuller human 
brotherhood under a common divine allegiance. 

V. The Church and Conscription 

Inasmuch as the church believes in the right of individual conscience, 
it recognizes that various positions on war and military service will be 
taken by its members. Some feel compelled by their Christian con- 
victions to refuse to register with the government under a draft act. Some 
believe it to be their Christian obligation to render full or limited military 
service. Others feel it to be their Christian duty to register with the 
government as conscientious objectors to military training or service and 
to express their willingness to engage in constructive civilian service. 

The church seeks to maintain a fellowship of all who sincerely 
follow the guidance of conscience. It does, however, recommend that 
as a matter of Christian conviction and practice, its membership support 
the historic position of the church, namely — nonparticipation in military 
training and service and the war system in general. The church pledges 
its full moral strength and offers spiritual nurture and a fellowship of 
prayer and of material aid to all who struggle and suffer for a fuller 
understanding of, and obedience to, the divine will. 

VI. The Church and Alternative Service 
The Church of the Brethren takes the position that our members 
cannot consistently accept any service within the military forces or 
under military supervision. We commend to them instead a constructive 
alternative service under the direction of the church or some other 
civilian agency. We recognize our obligation to provide facilities for 
such service for those who wish it. The church stands ready to establish, 
administer, and finance to the extent of its resources, projects for such 
services under church control or in co-operation with local, state, federal, 
and international civilian agencies. The church desires and will make 
every effort to secure recognition, as fulfilling the requirements for 
service to the nation, any service already being rendered in existing 



1948, Colorado Springs, Colorado 103 

agencies or for service offered on a voluntary basis. For those con- 
scientiously opposed to registration or any co-operation with a system 
of conscription we particularly commend such voluntary service. 

VII. The Church and Its Continuing Witness 
The Church of the Brethren has always believed that war is 
contrary to the will of God and, in its history of nearly two and 
one-half centuries, has come to understand more clearly the tremendous 
evil which war brings upon human beings and upon society. The church 
is, therefore, increasingly committing itself to the prevention of war 
in addition to its historical position of refusing to participate in war. 
In recent decades the church has become more aware of the necessity 
for careful instruction and guidance for its members on these questions. 
It has sought more and more diligently for practical and effective means 
whereby its members can offer constructive evidence of their belief 
that good citizens in a good society must seek a better way than war 
to resolve international conflict. 

The church believes that there is room for further growth in the 
understanding of these questions and in ways of expressing these 
convictions in practical action. This statement embodies the stage of 
thought and action which the church has thus far achieved. It under- 
takes a continuing and growing witness and pledges itself to be 
receptive to new truth and better modes of expression as these are 
brought to its attention. 

Special Statement from Brethren Youth 

(Recommendation As to the Establishment of Brethren Volunteer Service) 
We, a group of young people at the 1948 Annual Conference, because 

of a concern for Brethren youth, in the event of conscription, wish to 

present to the delegate body this plan for immediate action. 

We plead for a plan of definite action to implement the general 

statement of the Conference on the position and practices of the Church 

of the Brethren in relation to war. 

2. We recommend that a broad plan of volunteer service be 
instituted for Brethren, especially those of conscription age, at once. 
We further recommend that this plan carry over into any crisis period 
as the core of our alternative service program. We are willing and 
anxious to co-operate with the General Brotherhood Board in con- 
structing such a plan. 

3. Finally, we ask for the immediate and continuing support of the 
entire brotherhood in the carrying out and financing of such a program. 

Answer of 1948 Annual Conference: The Conference voted that this 
paper from the youth be adopted and that we authorize the General 
Brotherhood Board to implement it. Further, that the youth cabinet 
have a voice in the implementing of this program. 



104 2948, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

Place and Time of Annual Conference 

Queries, 1947 

A Permanent Location for Conference 
We, the Huntingdon Church of the Brethren, petition Annual 
Conference through district meeting of Middle Pennsylvania to consider 
the advisability of deciding upon a suitable permanent location for the 
meeting of Annual Conference. j. Clyde Stayer, Clerk 

Action of district conference: Passed to Annual Conference. 

Study of Dates for Conference 

Whereas, there appears to be a widespread conviction that a more 
convenient time could be found for the holding of our Annual Con- 
ference, we, the Harrisonburg congregation, respectfully ask Annual 
Conference of 1947, through the district conference of Northern Virginia, 
to authorize some committee to make a study of this matter with a view 
of selecting dates which may be more generally satisfactory. 

Blanche D. Huffman, Clerk 

Action of district conference: Passed to Annual Conference. 

Answer of 1947 Annual Conference: Referred to the General Broth- 
erhood Board for study and report next year. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1948 
The General Brotherhood Board has secured the reactions of a 
representative group of church leaders throughout the Brotherhood in 
connection with its study on possible changes in time and place of 
Annual Conference and recommends to Annual Conference that the 
closing Sunday of Conference be the third Sunday of June and that 
the present system of rotation among regions be continued. 
Answer of 1948 Annual Conference: Recommendations adopted. 

Revision of Brotherhood Fund, 1948-49 
The following is the 1948-49 budget as approved by Annual Con- 
ference of 1947: 

Bethany Biblical Seminary $ 50,000.00 

Brethren Service Commission 433,432.00 

Christian Education Commission 

General program $75,000.00 

College appropriation 45,000.00 120,000.00 

Field Program 26,000.00 

Finance Commission 17,990.00 

Foreign Mission Commission 261,750.00 

General Administration, Promotion, and Visual Education . 60,258.00 

Gospel Messenger Subsidy 14,070.00 



1948, Colorado Springs, Colorado 105 

Ministerial and Missionary Service Fund 30,000.00 

Ministry and Home Mission Commission 146,000.00 

1,159,500.00 
Federal Council of Churches (payable from funds so 

designated) 1,500.00 

1,161,000.00 
Surplus Advance Fund 200,000.00* 

Total $1,361,000.00 

* Surplus Advance Fund to be divided equally between missions and 
Brethren Service with the missions share to be further divided between 
home and foreign missions in the same ratio as each shares in the regular 
budget. 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
the reopening of the 1948-49 Brotherhood Budget and presents the 
following askings: 

Bethany Biblical Seminary $ 50,000.00 

Brethren Service Commission 433,432.00* 

Christian Education Commission 

General program $75,000.00 

College appropriation 45,000.00 120,000.00 

Finance Commission 17,990.00 

Foreign Mission Commission 261,750.00f 

General Departments — financial promotion, visual education, 
field program, Gospel Messenger, European office, ad- 
ministration 100,328.00 

Ministerial and Missionary Service Fund 30,000.00 

Ministry and Home Mission Commission 146,000.00 

1,159,500.00 
Federal Council of Churches (payable from funds so 

designated) 1,500.00 

1,161,000.00 
Surplus Advance Fund 200,000.00$ 

Total $1,361,000.00 

* The Brethren Service Commission anticipates spending $545,140, 
of which $48,656 is expected from outside sources and $63,052 from 
the Surplus Advance Fund. 

fThe Foreign Mission Commission anticipates spending $333,228, of 
which $61,478 includes bequests and interest on endowments, $10,000 from 
the Surplus Advance Fund. 



106 1948, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

J The General Brotherhood Board recommends that $28,010 be a 

special appropriation as a prior claim against the Surplus Advance 

Fund for: 

Bethany Biblical Seminary $ 5,000.00 

Finance Commission 3,510.00 

General Departments 19,500.00 

and that anything beyond that be divided in the manner recommended 

by the 1947 Annual Conference. 

Answer of 1948 Annual Conference: The recommendation to reopen 

the budget was accepted and the revised askings were adopted. 

Statement to the World Council Assembly 

Standing Committee recommends to the Conference that we 
authorize a statement on behalf of the Church of the Brethren to the 
First Assembly of the World Council of Churches assembled in Amster- 
dam, Holland, August 22 to September 4, 1948, and to the World Pacifist 
Conference to be held in India in January 1949. Also that the General 
Brotherhood Board be asked to prepare these statements. 

Answer of 1948 Annual Conference: Request granted. 



7949, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 

Advance Movement 

Advance With Christ 
Action of Annual Conference, 1948 
We decide to extend the Advance movement for a second year 
and request members of the staff to undertake a more complete evalua- 
tion of the movement by the time of the 1949 Annual Conference. 

Report of Progress, 1949 

A study is in process which will be in complete form for presentation 
at the Ocean Grove Conference. 

The staff committee on Advance sent a questionnaire to all local 
churches in the spring of 1949 seeking information on the progress 
that had been achieved during the year through the Advance emphasis. 
Only about one fifth of our churches responded to this questionnaire, but 
the returns were scattered throughout the Brotherhood and all the 
districts. It was encouraging to note that according to these replies 
seventeen per cent of the membership of the church had rededicated 
their lives during the past months, that sixty-four per cent of the 
members were giving and that eleven per cent had increased their 
giving with several thousand new tithers. There was a strong feeling 
that the Advance should continue for another year. 

Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: Report accepted. 

Bethany Hospital 

Report of the Commission of Nine, 1949 
Note: See the 1948 minutes, under "Bethany Hospital and Our 
Educational Institutions," for the steps leading up to this report. 

In accordance with the action of the Colorado Springs Annual 
Conference the Commission of Nine has continued to study the request 
of Bethany Hospital for approval by the Annual Conference for the 
establishment of nurses' training. The commission has met jointly with 
the board of trustees of Bethany Hospital and has held several separate 
sessions. We recognize in the decision of the Annual Conference 
at Colorado Springs a desire on the part of some persons that the 
brotherhood attempt a program of nurses' training. The commission 
cannot give its support in approving this proposal at this time. There- 
fore, we respectfully urge the Annual Conference at Ocean Grove to 
relieve us of our responsibility and to come to a decision on the matter 
of nurses' training for Bethany Hospital after hearing from the hospital 
officials directly concerning the planning goals and fiscal needs of the 
nurses' training program. 



108 1949, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 

Report of the Trustees of Bethany Hospital, 1949 

In keeping with the decision of the Colorado Springs Conference 
of 1948, representatives of the hospital met with the secretary of the 
Commission of Nine. It was agreed that the hospital make a study of 
the trends in nursing education and submit it for the consideration 
of both groups. Such a study was made and discussed in joint session. 
Concurrent with the action of the commission we make the following 
report: 

The primary factors involved in establishing a nursing school in 
connection with Bethany Hospital are: 
I. Curriculum and faculty 
II. Affiliation with other hospitals and educational institutions 

III. Additional physical property and equipment 

The necessary curriculum and faculty are attainable. Certain staff 
members are qualified to give instruction. The cost of additional per- 
sonnel would not be great. 

Affiliation with other hospitals for special subjects such as psychiatry 
and pediatrics is practiced by many hospitals. This same method could 
be followed by Bethany. Arrangements can be worked out with our 
own colleges and with educational institutions in Chicago to provide 
instruction in the sciences and related subjects. 

A nurses' home, including classroom facilities, library, etc., would 
cost $275,000 at present price levels. If standards should eventually be 
raised requiring a larger daily census than fifty, the present building 
would have to be enlarged. Its foundations were constructed to carry two 
additional floors. 

The following suggestions are proposed for the consideration of 
Annual Conference: 

I. With Respect to Methods of Procedure 

1. That all general solicitation for capital funds among members 
of the Church of the Brethren shall proceed as approved by the Annual 
Conference and in co-operation with the Brotherhood Board. 

2. That all capital funds and assets shall continue to be held by the 
trustees of Bethany Hospital in trust for the Church of the Brethren, 
or in such manner as may be decided by Annual Conference. 

3. That current operations shall be paid for in so far as possible from 
current income, but interested groups or members of the Church of 
the Brethren may contribute to the various needs of the hospital. 

4. That the hospital shall keep the church informed concerning its 
activities and needs through bulletins, letters, and reports to Annual 
Conference. 

II. With Respect to a Nursing School 

1. Will Annual Conference approve the development of a nursing 
school at Bethany Hospital to be operated under the auspices of the 
Church of the Brethren? 



1949, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 109 

2. Will Annual Conference approve the raising of funds over a period 
of five years to provide the necessary facilities to operate an accredited 
nursing school at Bethany Hospital? (The trustees of the hospital suggest 
that in view of the present financial situation in the church no general 
solicitation of funds for the nurses' home be made during the current 
fiscal year, but that all continue to pray that God's will may be done.) 

3. Will Annual Conference approve the opening of a nursing school 

at Bethany Hospital in the fall of 1955 or whenever nursing school 

standards shall have been met? _ . _ ^, __ .. . 

Trustees of Bethany Hospital 

Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: Received the report of the Com- 
mission of Nine and relieved them of their responsibility. The report 
of the trustees of Bethany Hospital was then considered and adopted. 
The matter was referred, for further consideration as to execution, to 
the General Brotherhood Board. 

Note: See the minutes of the 1950 Conference, under the query 
entitled "Bethany Hospital Relationships," for a study of the relationships 
of Bethany Hospital to the Church of the Brethren. 

Brethren Emphasis for 1949-50 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
through Standing Committee the program of Advance as outlined in 
the following report. 

For some time there has been among many Christian- men and 
women a great feeling of concern regarding the religious life of 
Protestantism in America. This, we believe, has grown in part from a 
deep feeling of discontent with the slow progress of the many interests 
of the Kingdom, and in part from the complacency and indifference of 
many nominal Christians. The confusion of our times, the smothering 
influence of luxury and the all-pervading spirit of secularism have 
apparently sapped the spiritual life of many church members. In all 
too many cases our churches accept the standards of a non-Christian 
society with "calm, consenting indifference." 

At the same time there are many who are discontented because 
of a sense of futility and of frustration, and because of a lack of victory 
and peace. Many seem groping for that which lies just beyond their 
grasp, something that would give their lives meaning, and a sense of 
significance. This inability to lay hold on the reality they seek leaves 
many with a feeling of emptiness — sometimes even of despair. 

All this stands in sharp contrast to the gifts that God so freely offers 
to all and which lie within our grasp. Jesus offers the water of life 
which satisfies the deepest thirst. Our deepest longings can be fulfilled 
in him. He offers victory and joy through faith in him. His adequacy 
is unquestioned. The world awaits the effective presentation of the 
Gospel of Peace. 



110 1949, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 

The Advance movement which emerged at our Annual Conference 
at Orlando, Florida, sprang spontaneously from various sources among 
those who had "concerns" for the welfare of the Kingdom. They saw 
that if the great world-wide program of the church was to succeed 
we would have to undergird it with Christian devotion on the part 
of the whole church. It was evident that unless the spirit of personal 
commitment, of evangelism, and of enlightenment on social issues should 
provide the dynamic, the program of the church would fail. 

As a result a call for Advance was sounded. Specific goals were 
set and a program for their attainment was adopted. These were en- 
thusiastically accepted by the Standing Committee and by the General 
Conference. For two years now this has served as a watchword to 
call the church to action. There is evidence here and there that the 
effort has yielded results and has been of help in the program of 
the church. 

But as of today: 

(1) The Advance can hardly be regarded as the widespread ground 
swell movement anticipated by some. 

(2) There is some doubt as to how long it will be effective and much 
questioning as to what turn we should next take. 

(3) Our present financial situation makes it clear that our planning 
is going ahead of the readiness and enthusiasm of the people to 
support it. This gives us great and immediate concern. 

(4) It is also surmised by many that even if we were successful 
in securing funds we would still fall short in other respects of fulfilling 
the strong hungers and hopes out of which the movement was born. 

(5) There is no indication that many of the present elements in 
the program are misguided or that they should be discontinued. The 
relative emphasis on various aspects of our program, however, may need 
to be changed. 

(6) It is clear that all along the line there is a desire to find our way 
into a richer experience with God, and that the program should find 
deeper motivation. 

There is no wish to shift the emphasis in the church from an active 
program of church extension and of social action to one of other-worldly 
mysticism which ignores the welfare of our fellow men. It is not the 
purpose to attempt to determine the relative importance of various 
aspects of our church program. We would, however, like to see the 
church undergird her far-reaching program of world outreach with 
religious devotion that does not depend primarily upon emergency 
appeals for action, but that acts and moves from deep religious motives. 
Sustained sacrificial service in the Kingdom of God can be assured only 
when men feel an accountability to him and are aware of the resources 
available in him. We serve our brother best when we see in him one 
of God's other children for whom Christ died. Believing this, we would 



1949, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 111 

like to propose that for the next year the general emphasis of the church 
be the deepening of the spiritual LIFE. This calls for the release of our 
utmost energies, and for motivating our lives from spiritual viewpoints. 
A congregation may want to use any method for the deepening of 
the spiritual life which it believes to be useful and effective. In order 
to be helpful we are suggesting the following methods by which we 
believe this end may be furthered. In no case, however, should these 
suggestions be regarded as a blueprint of action to be slavishly followed. 

suggestions: 

I. An Increased Emphasis on Bible Study 

1. Studies on the Biblical basis of our program of missions, service, 
peace, temperance, stewardship, etc. These may form an excellent basis 
for discussion groups. 

2. A careful study of the New Testament as a means of clarifying 
our basic theological belief. 

3. More Bible study in youth groups, Bible institutes, and in district, 
regional, and Annual Conference programs. 

4. Promotion of individual Bible study by suitable methods. 

5. An increase of Biblical and expository preaching. 

II. Prayer 

While in one sense it is true that Advance in the church must come 
from below, in another sense it must come down from above. The 
great ground swell of Christian advance may be possible only as 
"showers of blessing" follow increased devotion and consecration. We 
suggest: 

1. More time for group worship. For prayers of confession and 
intercession in the local church and in the district, regional, and annual 
conferences. 

2. An increased emphasis on private personal devotion and medi- 
tation. 

3. Continued emphasis on family prayers. 

4. Christian groups of interested people of kindred spirits may 
find enrichment and uplift through discussion, testimony, and worship. 

III. Christian Witnessing 

We believe that much of the power of our religion is lost because 
of our unwillingness to share humbly with others our cherished religious 
experience. While we would avoid any ostentatious parading of intimate 
religious experiences which should be shared only with close friends, 
we believe we have overlooked the value and neglected the use of 
testimony as a means of Christian influence. "Ye shall be my witnesses" 
is our mandate from the Master. 

1. We recommend that pastors encourage their members in such 
ways as seem wholesome to share genuine religious experiences as means 
of witnessing. 



112 1949, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 

2. We believe our church publications might well be on the lookout 
for clear evidences of genuine, authentic religious experience and record 
them for Kingdom use. 

3. Visitation evangelism by laymen is a form of witnessing with 
wide appeal and effectiveness. 

IV. Commitment for Service 

The emphasis on deepened spiritual life is effective only as it 
reaches the level of personal commitment. 

1. We should continue to make specific appeals for personal com- 
mitment or recommitment to God. 

2. We should call for the commitment of means — a tithe to the 
Lord and stewardship in all else. 

3. We would recommend and encourage commitment to Volunteer 
Service in some form for the church, for both youth and adults. 

4. And most specifically we should like to encourage our members 
to do at least one specific act of voluntary service for another person 
daily wherever possible in a face-to-face way or by written word. 

5. A willingness to carry on at least one activity for the local church 
to promote organized religion in the community. 

6. More commitments to the work of the ministry. Pastors and 
others may present the claims of the Christian ministry to young men. 

7. Special opportunities to consider how men can find in their daily 
work a deeper fulfillment of their Christian vocation. 

These suggestions call for individual commitment and action. To 
aid members of the church to follow through on this emphasis, we urge: 

1. That local churches study this paper in their official boards, church 
cabinets, and program planning groups. 

2. That regional and district program committees keep this emphasis 
in mind as they prepare programs. 

3. That field people from general, regional, and district staffs keep 
this program in mind in their contacts throughout the year. 

4. That the Gospel Messenger publish a series of articles on the 
fundamental issues on which the paper is based. 

5. That the staff print this document in leaflet form and suggest 
supplementary resource material. 

Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: Voted to continue the Advance 
With Christ by adopting this paper and its emphasis, the deepening of 

THE SPIRITUAL LIFE. 

Brotherhood Fund, 1950-51 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
through Standing Committee that our Brotherhood Fund for 1950-51 
be adopted as follows: 
Bethany Biblical Seminary $ 55,000.00 



1949, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 113 

Brethren Service Commission 304,83800 

Christian Education Commission** 77,745.00 

Finance Commission 19,000.00 

Foreign Mission Commission 290,417.00 

General Departments — financial promotion, visual education, 
regional appropriations, European office, Gospel Mes- 
senger editorial department, administration 116,000.00 

Ministerial and Missionary Service Fund 28,000.00 

Ministry and Home Mission Commission 205,000.00 

Federal Council of Churches 2,000.00* 

Reserve Fund 9,000.00 

Total $1,107,000.00 

"Item added by recommendation of Standing Committee 

as appropriation to the colleges 45,000.00 



$1,152,000.00 
•Payable from funds so designated. 

Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: The budget was adopted as 
amended by Standing Committee. 

Dismissal of the Commission of Fifteen 

Annual Conference Action, 1947 
After the preparation of the approved report in a compiled booklet 
for distribution the Commission of Fifteen is to be dismissed. 

Report of the Commission of Fifteen, 1949 
In accord with the decision of the Annual Conference at Orlando the 
Commission of Fifteen has procured in booklet form the plans of or- 
ganization for the brotherhood which were approved at the Wenatchee 
and Orlando Annual Conferences and has distributed the same in the 
brotherhood, thereby concluding its responsibility. 

Harry K. Zeller, Jr., Secretary 
Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: Report accepted. 

Enlarged Consecration Service 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
through Standing Committee that the consecration service held at 
Annual Conference be enlarged to include the following persons: 

1. Newly appointed missionaries (both home and foreign). 

2. Ministers who have been ordained during the Conference year. 

3. Brethren Service workers who have made a life commitment 
to Christian service. 



114 1949, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 

A suggested order of service has been prepared by a committee of 
the board and is available for use as desired. 

Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: Recommendation adopted. 

Federal Income Tax Deductions 

The following resolution was prepared by the General Brother- 
hood Board in its meeting in November 1948, at the request of the 
Standing Committee: 

WHEREAS, the Church of the Brethren recognizes that its member- 
ship is affected by the tax laws and policy of the Federal government, 
particular concern is shared with other religious, educational, and 
charitable bodies that the "standard deduction" principle of the 1944 Tax 
Simplification Act does not require a declaration of sums contributed. 
The present form of this principle operates with the result that the 
individual may make the same deduction even though he may not 
actually make a contribution. In the interest of corrective tax policy 
and the improved relation of the church and the government, 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Church of the 
Brethren favors the elimination of the standard deduction principle as 
it relates to the contributions to religious, charitable, and educational 
bodies. 

AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that representatives of the 
Church of the Brethren make known to the Congress of the United 
States the values achieved by amendment to Federal tax laws to permit 
unlimited deduction for Federal income tax purposes on account of 
gifts or contributions to religious, charitable, and educational bodies. 

Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: Resolution adopted. 

Fiscal Year of the General Brotherhood Board 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
through Standing Committee that the fiscal year be changed to begin 
October 1 and end September 30 and that the change be made effective 
October 1, 1950. 

Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: Recommendation adopted. 

Publicity Evils 

Query, 1948 
Inasmuch as there is a growing menace placed before our youth 
in corrupt movies, radio murder stories, dangerous comic books, bill- 
boards, magazines, and other kindred evils, and, inasmuch as these evils 
constantly placed before the minds of youth are sure to result in the 
misleading of many, therefore, 



1949, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 115 

We, the elders of Northern Indiana in regular meeting at Camp 
Mack, August 18, 1947, petition Annual Meeting through district meeting 
to appoint a commission of five to study for one year ways and means 
of combating these evils and report to the 1949 Annual Conference. 

Answer of district meeting: Passed to Annual Meeting. 

Answer of 1948 Annual Conference: Referred to the General Broth- 
erhood Board for study and report next year. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1949 
To meet the menace of publicity evils constantly placed before our 
young people, the church can use its resources to build up in each in- 
dividual an inner resistance to such attractions, and to guide its members 
in making effective protests which may help check the spread of this 
menace. Only as individual Christians develop habits of devotion, 
acquire a Christian scale of values, commit themselves to vocations of 
service, and grow in loyalty to the church and the Kingdom of God 
can they effectively stand up against the misleading and harmful things 
they see and hear. Parents of all age groups, teachers in our church 
schools, fellowship groups of young people, youth leaders in camps 
and conferences, and family units must give specific guidance to our 
youth to help them choose the highest Christian attitudes and behavior. 
The Christian Education Commission has outlined nine specific ways in 
which local churches in communities can work at this problem. Copies 
of this approved statement are available free by writing to the Christian 
Education Commission of the General Brotherhood Board. 
Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: Report accepted. 

Revised Brotherhood Fund, 1949-50 

The following is the 1949-50 budget as approved by Annual Con- 
ference of 1948: 

Bethany Biblical Seminary $ 55,000.00 

Brethren Service Commission 403,000.00 

Christian Education Commission 

General program $86,000.00 

College appropriations 45,000.00 131,000.00 

Finance Commission 20,500.00 

Foreign Mission Commission 286,390.00* 

General Departments — financial promotion, visual education, 
field program, Gospel Messenger, European office, ad- 
ministration 130,000.00 

Ministerial and Missionary Service Fund 30,000.00 

Ministry and Home Mission Commission 175,000.00 

Reserve Fund 11,610.00 



$1,242,500.00 



116 1949, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 

Federal Council (payable from funds so designated) 1,500.00 



$1,244,000.00 
•The Foreign Mission Commission anticipates spending $344,265, of 
which $57,875 is income expected from bequests and interest on en- 
dowments. 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
through Standing Committee that the Brotherhood Fund for 1949-50 
be reopened and that the following be approved: 

Bethany Biblical Seminary $ 55,000.00 

Brethren Service Commission 326,100.00(1) 

Christian Education Commission! 

General 82,745.00 

La Verne College 15,000.00 

Finance Commission 19,000.00 

Foreign Mission Commission 275,417.00(2) 

General Departments — financial promotion, visual educa- 
tion, regional appropriations, European office, Gospel 

Messenger editorial department, administration 116,034.00 

Ministerial and Missionary Service Fund 30,000.00 

Ministry and Home Mission Commission 176,704.00 

Federal Council of Churches 2,000.00tt 

Reserve Fund 9,000.00 



$1,107,000.00 
tfPayable from funds so designated, 
tltem added by recommendation of Standing Committee 

as appropriation to colleges 30,000.00 



$1,137,000.00 

(1) Brethren Service Commission anticipates additional income of 
$20,000 from non-Brethren sources. 

(2) Foreign Mission Commission anticipates $31,900 additional in- 
come from investments and bequests. 

Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: The recommendation to reopen 
the budget was accepted and the revised askings were adopted as 
amended by Standing Committee. 

Statement on Displaced Persons 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference, 
through Standing Committee, the adoption of the following statement 
on displaced persons and refugees: 

— Because of the vast need of homes for European displaced persons 
and refugees (there are at least seven million of them in a total 



1949, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 117 

population of forty-five million people in the western zone of Germany), 
and 

— Because America has long been a haven for the persecuted and 
homeless, and 

— Because Brethren should still remember with humility and 
gratitude the opportunity given to our church fathers when they were 
refugees, and 

— Because American Protestants have lagged far behind other groups 
in providing assurances for the present act of Congress for only 205,000 
of these homeless people, and 

— Because our Christian faith impels us to take in the helpless 
stranger, 

We commit ourselves, as a church, to the project of providing homes 
for these people up to the limit of our ability. Further, we call upon 
every local congregation to welcome and provide, if possible, for at least 
one refugee family. 

Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: Statement adopted by unani- 
mous vote. 

Verbatim Report of Annual Conference 

The Greenville congregation assembled in council petitions Annual 
Conference of 1949 through the district conference of Southern Ohio 
to rescind the action of 1931 (see Minutes of the Annual Conferences, 
1923-1944, page 88) and authorize a verbatim report of the business 
sessions of Annual Conference as was the former practice of the church. 
This request is made believing that such a record in the archives of 
the church would be of a value to our future historians, and modern 
facilities make possible such a report at small expense. We do not 
anticipate the publication of this report for general use unless the 
demand should justify it. 

Marlene Rhoades, Clerk 

Answer of district meeting: Passed to Annual Conference. 

Philip Lauver, Secretary 

Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: Request granted. 



7950, Grand Rapids, Michigan 

Bethany Hospital Relationships 

Note: See also the minutes of the 1949 Conference, the query 
entitled "Bethany Hospital." 

Query, 1949 

We, the Detroit church, assembled in business session, petition An- 
nual Conference, through the district conference assembled in Beaverton, 
Michigan, August 27, 1948, to consider the following recommendations 
with regard to Bethany Hospital. 

Since there is doubt in the minds of many as to the exact relationship 
between Bethany Hospital and the Church of the Brethren, we recom- 
mend that the whole problem of relationships be studied by a special 
committee of three and that they make a report at next Annual Con- 
ference. Furthermore, that the committee appointed by Conference 
draft a document of relationships that will safeguard the property of 
Bethany Hospital for the Church of the Brethren and, at the same time, 
safeguard the church from the possibility of litigations arising from the 
operations of the hospital as an institution. 

Grayston Roy Ohmart, Clerk 

Answer of district meeting: Passed and sent on to Annual Confer- 
ence - H. Arthur Whisler, Clerk 

Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: Request granted and referred 
to the General Brotherhood Board. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1950 
The General Brotherhood Board has studied the problem of Bethany 
Hospital relationships as recommended, and submits the following: 

1. Bethany Hospital in Chicago is operated as a community chari- 
table hospital by an Illinois Not-for-Profit Corporation which was or- 
ganized November 15, 1920, under the corporate name of Bethany 
Sanitarium and Hospital. 

2. The control of the hospital corporation is vested in the "members" 
of the corporation by virtue of the right and power of the "members" 
to elect the trustees, and by the right and power of the "members" to 
amend the charter. The present by-laws provide for three classes of 
"members," namely, (1) charter members, (2) elective members, and 
(3) organization members. Elective and organization members are 
restricted to individuals and organizations within the Church of the 
Brethren nominated to membership in the hospital corporation by the 
board of trustees, and elected by members. 

3. There is a clause in the present by-laws of the hospital corporation 
to the effect that the members of the board of trustees "by the act of 
accepting office" shall "pledge themselves to hold all the property and 



1950, Grand Rapids, Michigan 119 

funds of said corporation in trust for the Church of the Brethren," and 
a further clause to the effect that the foregoing provision as to the 
pledge in trust for the church cannot be "nullified or amended in any 
way except by unanimous vote of the board of trustees and the consent 
of two thirds of the members of the corporation." 

4. Inasmuch as the by-laws and the charter of the hospital corporation 
can be amended and changed from time to time by the "members" of 
the hospital corporation, the Church of the Brethren at present has no 
legal control over the hospital corporation, except indirectly by virtue 
of the present provision in the by-laws to the effect that the trustees 
"by the act of accepting office pledge themselves to hold all the property 
and funds of said corporation in trust for the Church of the Brethren." 

5. As long as the hospital is operated as a separate and distinct 
corporation under its Illinois Not-for-Profit Corporation charter (as it 
should be), there will be no liability attaching to the Church of the 
Brethren because of, or on account of, the operations of the hospital. 

As we see it, there is only a very remote possibility of the property 
not being held in trust for the Church of the Brethren. We feel the 
church is now safeguarded from a financial liability on account of 
litigation. 

Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: Report adopted. 

Brotherhood Fund, 1950-51 [Revised] 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 

of 1950 the adoption of the following [revised] Brotherhood Budget for 
the fiscal year 1950-51: 

Bethany Biblical Seminary $ 55,000.00 

Brethren Service Commission 250,000.00 

Christian Education Commission 

General program $72,000.00 

College appropriations 12,000.00 84,000.00 

Finance Commission 19,000.00 

Foreign Mission Commission 275,000.00 

General Departments — financial promotion, visual education, 
regional appropriations, European office, Gospel Mes- 
senger editorial expense, administration 110,000.00 

Ministry and Home Mission Commission 165,000.00 

Ministerial and Missionary Service Fund 30,000.00 

Federal Council of Churches* 2,000.00 

Reserve Fund 10,000.00 

Total $1,000,000.00 

•Payable from funds so designated. 

Ansieer of 1950 Annual Conference: The budget was adopted as 
recommended. 



120 1950, Grand Rapids, Michigan 

Brotherhood Theme for 1950-51 

The Ocean Grove Annual Conference adopted for the year of 
1949-50 the theme, deepening the spiritual life. There is abundant 
evidence of need for this theme to be pressed home to our churches 
even more vigorously than we have yet been able to do. We shall not 
be able to advance on any front unless we deepen more completely 
our spiritual foundations. 

Conditions at home and abroad continuously confront us with 
insistent opportunities to offer a Christlike ministry and demonstrate a 
redemptive love. Everywhere the pagan and materialistic culture of our 
day is undermining the foundations of Christian family life. The hour has 
come when we must advance in the supremely important areas of pro- 
viding spiritual undergirding for Brethren home and family life and in 
a vital evangelism. We shall not have power to advance at any point 
until we have first of all greatly strengthened the spiritual foundations 
of both our personal and our collective life. Spiritual retreat, in the 
sense of profound heart searching and renewal, may and must go hand 
in hand with advance in a more effective ministry to family life and 
in a program of evangelism. 

We have, therefore, sought for the year of 1950-51 a theme that 
is intended to conserve all the values of the 1949-50 program of advance 
and be sufficiently comprehensive to include two additional points of 
emphasis. The theme which we recommend to the brotherhood for 

1950-51 is DEEPENING AND SHARING THE CHRISTIAN LIFE. And We Suggest 

that under this theme, during the year 1950-51, the three following 
points of emphasis be effectively carried forward: 

I. A Continued and Accelerated Endeavor to Deepen the Spiritual Life 

of the Members of Our Churches in Keeping 

With the Brethren Emphasis for 1949-50 

Note: See the Annual Conference minutes of 1949, under "Brethren 
Emphasis for 1949-50." 

II. A Long-range Program to Strengthen Home and Family Life 
and to Reach Other Families for Christ and the Church 

Far-reaching changes have taken place in the family life of our 
time. In the past, the family in its way of life represented a great social 
and spiritual unity. But mobility and shifting of population causing 
impermanence of residence, growing industrialization with its implica- 
tions for the role of women in modern society, economic insecurities 
affecting the stability of the home, disparity and competition of interests 
and loyalties, the loss of the sanctity of the marriage relationship, and 
childless marriages, have seriously impaired family solidarity. 

Many of the social, moral, and spiritual problems of our time emerge 
from broken homes, which confront the Christian church with one of 



1950, Grand Rapids, Michigan 121 

the most insistent challenges of our day. This problem presents some- 
thing more than a subject for discussion and conference resolutions. The 
church must become interested in and undertake the exacting respon- 
sibility of planning and carrying forward a long-range program for the 
enriching of family life and the spiritual undergirding of our Brethren 
homes. Our youth must be prepared for the sacrament of marriage 
and family life. A comprehensive program of family life education 
should seek to achieve the following objectives: 

1. Lead our people to a Christian view of marriage: marriage has 
been ordained of God and is, therefore, a sacred relationship; it is a 
spiritual union or blending of two personalities. 

2. Teach our people that if love is given adequate spiritual nurture 
it will become an ever-deepening stream and the marriage relation 
may continue an increasingly enriching experience. 

3. Help our people realize the deeper meaning, responsibility, and 
opportunity Of parenthood, so that they may see in the family the 
most significant unit of the Kingdom of God. 

4. Provide counsel and guidance for children, adolescents, young 
married couples, young parents, and older adults. 

5. Help our people see that marriage is a permanent spiritual rela- 
tionship in which husbands and wives shall need again and again to 
return to the first deep springs of love and surrender their wills to 
the control of God. 

III. A Greatly Enlarged Program of Aggressive Evangelism, Making 

Use op All Fruitful Methods, and Co-operating with All Other 

Evangelical Groups in this Most Urgent Endeavor 

It is urgent that all our churches co-operate in a forward move- 
ment of vital evangelism. The call to advance in evangelism is made 
imperative by the times in which we live. Conditions in our land and 
across the world demand a revival of genuine Christianity. Everywhere 
men need a cleansing of their unrighteousness through faith in God 
and repentance Of their sins. Vast areas of Our world have become alien 
to the Christian faith. Other areas have never been confronted with 
the gospel of Christ. The churches themselves need to be saved 
from their complacency and impotence and experience a rebirth of 
spiritual power. 

New life for men through faith in God and obedience to his will 
is a necessity. The gospel of Christ is the only hope of our sad and dis- 
traught world. It is incumbent upon the churches to bear witness 
to all men everywhere to the gospel "which is the power Of God unto 
salvation to everyone that believeth." Only a world-wide movement 
of men toward Christ can offer any hope for mankind. The evangelization 
of the whole world is an inescapable duty resting upon the whole church 
and the Church of the Brethren cannot sidestep its responsibility in this 
important area of our ministry. 



122 1950, Grand Rapids, Michigan 

The purpose of the advance in evangelism may be stated as follows: 
(1) the renewal of the spiritual life of the ministry and the membership 
of the churches; (2) reaching the vast unchurched multitudes for Christ 
and his church; (3) thoroughly instructing and assimilating all new 
members brought into the membership of our churches; (4) enlisting 
all members who have changed their place of residence and who have 
not identified themselves with any local church in the community where 
they now live; (5) the spiritual transformation of persons through the 
power of Christ, so that Christian personalities shall be developed in 
all human relationships and in every area of modern life in order that 
the changed persons may in turn create a more Christian society. 

The means suggested to accomplish the foregoing purposes are: 
(1) community religious census; (2) united prayer; (3) home visitation 
and fellowship evangelism, with special effort to enlist the youth of 
the church in this essential work; (4) preaching missions, spiritual 
emphasis week, or series of revival meetings; (5) National Christian 
Teaching Missions; (6) transferring of non-resident members; (7) the 
assimilation of new members; (8) special seasons of ingathering, such as, 
Christmas, Easter, Pentecost, and World Communion Sunday. 

Recognizing the vast possibilities for spiritual growth inherent in 
the above areas of advance we, therefore, urge the church to a more 
persistent and consecrated effort in the deepening of the spiritual life of 
individual members, in the spiritual undergirding of our family life, 
and in sharing the Christian faith with others until the leaven of the 
gospel shall pervade the life of every home within our range of 
responsibility and opportunity. General Brotherhood Board 

Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: Paper adopted as revised. 

Delegates to Annual Conference 

Because representation at the Annual Conference is now on a 
strictly membership basis, and because some churches now send too 
many delegates to Annual Conference while others do not send as many 
as the number to which they are entitled: 

Therefore, we, the First Church of the Brethren, through the First 
District of Virginia respectfully request Annual Conference to say 
that the latest Yearbook membership shall be used as the basis for 
elected delegates to the Annual Conference. 

(See the Annual Conference minutes for 1947.) 

Lillian Martin, Clerk 

The delegate body voted to pass this petition on to the Annual 
Conference. 

D. H. Miller, Clerk 

Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: Request granted. 



2950, Grand Rapids, Michigan 123 

Expense of Publishing the Yearbook 

Whereas there is a heavy increase of expense to the Annual Con- 
ference treasury on matters such as the annual audit and the holding 
of Annual Conference, Standing Committee recommends to the Annual 
Conference of 1950 that we rescind the action of 1937 [Minutes of the 
Annual Conferences, 1923-1944, page 128] and that the General Brother- 
hood Board pay the cost of the pages of the Yearbook which give district 
information, namely, the Directory of Churches. 

Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: Recommendation adopted. 

Financing the Regional Program 

Query, 1949 

Whereas, the regional plan of organization was approved by the 
Annual Conference of 1947, as an agency of interpretation, inspiration, 
and promotion; and, whereas, neither the regional conference nor the 
regional council of boards has official status in that they have no 
legislative power, and, whereas no specific provision was made by 
Annual Conference for financing the regional work, we, the Harrisonburg 
congregation, ask the Annual Conference of 1949, through the district 
conference of Northern Virginia, to recommend a policy whereby the 
regional program may be satisfactorily financed. 

Blanche D. Huffman, Clerk 

Answer of district meeting: Passed to Annual Conference. 

Joseph W. Miller, Secretary 

Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: Referred to a committee of 
five for study and report next year. Committee: Bernard N. King, 
Norman J. Baugher, Russell V. Bollinger, Raymond L. Flory, S. Earl 
Mitchell. 

Report of the Committee, 1950 

We encourage an intimate working relationship between the regions 
and the Brotherhood. 

We believe that the subsidy from the Brotherhood Fund to the 
regions should be the same for each region, except in emergency 
situations where an extra amount may be necessary for a stated time. 
If a region desires a more aggressive program than the appropriation 
from the Brotherhood Board would allow, we recommend that that 
region, through its own resources, finance such a program. 

We suggest that regional budgets be underwritten by district ap- 
portionments, which amounts should be agreed upon by both the districts 
and the region. We do not believe it to be a sound long-range policy 
for a region to appeal directly to local churches or individuals for 
funds and would, therefore, encourage all districts to adopt procedures 
whereby each district supports its regional budget. 



124 1950, Grand Rapids, Michigan 

We commend the colleges for their co-operation in the regional 
budget, as evidenced by their providing of office space and other facilities. 
We recognize that this is a financial contribution to the regional budget 
and a wholesome relationship which should be maintained wherever 

P° ssible - Bernard N. King, Chairman 

Norman J. Baugher 
Russell V. Bollinger 
S. Earl Mitchell 
Raymond L. Flory 
Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: Report adopted as amended. 

Solicitation of Funds by Bethany Biblical Seminary 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
of 1950 that it consider favorably the request of the board of directors 
of Bethany Biblical Seminary that they be given permission to solicit 
funds for memorial windows which are to be placed in the new chapel. 

Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: Request granted. 

Statement on Race 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
the adoption of the following: 

STATEMENT ON POSITION AND PRACTICES OF THE CHURCH 
OF THE BRETHREN IN RELATION TO THE RACE PROBLEM 
The Church of the Brethren urges its members and all other Chris- 
tians to give attention to the cause of love and justice toward those who 
belong, by reason of their ancestry, to minorities denied rights and 
privileges which all people equally deserve. Thus far the church has 
been slow to speak with a prophetic voice on this question. Our 
American congregations have only a few scattered members from other 
races than our own. Our efforts in behalf of better interracial relations 
have been largely limited to occasional casual pronouncements in resolu- 
tions. There is an embarrassing possibility that secular organizations 
may at present be more active in sensitizing the public conscience at 
this point than the church itself. 

I. The Extent of the Problem 
Our largest racial minority consists of fifteen million Negroes whose 
ancestors were brought to this country against their will. The list of 
discriminations and injustices directed against them is a long one. They 
suffer denial of the right to vote, of adequate educational opportunities, 
of decent health and housing facilities, and of common courtesies in 
shops, trains, and places of entertainment. They are excluded from 
various desirable occupations and residential areas. They do not enjoy 
the full protection of our laws and our courts of justice. They are 



1950, Grand Rapids, Michigan 125 

subjected from time to time to mob violence in lynchings and race riots. 

It is true that these conditions are not universal and that they are 
showing some signs of improvement. Neither are they to be blamed 
on certain sections of the country. Yet, the total effect of these conditions 
is still such that many peoples from other parts of the world and 
particularly those of other than the white race are pointing accusing 
fingers at us. Our country and the Union of South Africa share the 
unhappy distinction of maintaining the sharpest color lines in the 
world. American missionaries are pressed ever harder to explain why 
these conditions exist in the country which does so much to preach 
the Christian way elsewhere. Non-Christian groups capitalize on this 
situation in their propaganda. 

The other minority races in the United States are smaller in num- 
ber, and their sufferings are not as uniformly prevalent. Yet in certain 
localities and circumstances they are equally serious. Spanish-speaking 
people, especially the recent arrivals from Mexico in our southwestern 
states, share many of the experiences of the Negro. Persons of Chinese 
and Japanese ancestry have also been subjected to them. Our country's 
recent disgraceful treatment of our Japanese Americans is vivid in our 
memories. Our American Indians, although they lived in this land long 
before the white people came, also continue to suffer discriminations 
and restrictions. Perhaps the most serious factor in their situation is 
the result of their long and once compulsory residence on reservations 
where they could not live normal, self-reliant lives. 

Although the Jews are not actually a distinct race, they are quite 
commonly regarded as such and are frequently treated as undesirable 
strangers among us. Efforts are made to exclude them from attractive 
forms of employment, from some of our important educational institu- 
tions, and from certain desirable places of residence. There is evidence 
of a rising tide of anti-Semitism in this country, an ironical situation 
when we recall that one of our serious charges against Nazi Germany 
was that Jews were mistreated there. 

II. Christian Principles on Race 
We must evaluate our racial attitudes in the light of Christian prin- 
ciples. There is nothing in the New Testament to indicate that God 
extends less of his love or less of his yearning desire for reconciliation 
to one race than another. "Whosoever will" may avail himself of God's 
love (John 3:16; Revelation 22:17). Jesus rebuked the Jews for racial 
exclusiveness and reminded them of cases where "outsiders" were close 
to God (Luke 4:26, 27; 10:33-35). Peter learned that in every nation 
there were righteous people acceptable to God (Acts 10:34, 35). Paul 
told the Athenians that all men are God's offspring (Acts 17:26-29). 

Salvation is not a matter of race. There are saved and lost persons 
in all races. Christians are determined not by birth but by rebirth. 



126 1950, Grand Rapids, Michigan 

Furthermore, it is every Christian's duty to lead as many people to 
Christ as he can, and we cannot lead people to Christ unless we deal 
with them in the fullest spirit of love. It is clear that even in the case 
of the unsaved from other races, Christians have not the slightest excuse 
for treating them unjustly or in an unbrotherly fashion. It is our duty 
to love them and to seek to win them. 

The ideal of democracy is in accord with these Christian principles 
where it holds that all men deserve equal rights and privileges. The 
Declaration of Independence asserts that "all men are created equal." 
The new Universal Declaration of Human Rights specifically guarantees 
its rights and freedoms without distinctions such as race or color. But 
Americans have thus far failed to live up to this lofty ideal, and the 
democracy which we profess remains unconvincing to those large 
portions of the world where people have darker skins. 

Modern science, whose search for truth is in accord with Christian 
principles, makes race discrimination wholly untenable. Unfair treat- 
ment for the Negro has often been justified by the claim that his abilities 
are inferior. But extensive scientific research has now established the 
fact that there is no significant difference among the various races in 
potential ability. All have the same average of ability and the same 
range of genius and stupidity. 

III. The Church's Commitment 

The Church of the Brethren believes in living according to the 
New Testament principles. We, therefore, commit ourselves unhes- 
itatingly to the belief that, regardless of race or ancestry, all men 
deserve equal rights, opportunities, and privileges and should bear 
responsibility according to their individual capacities. 

We acknowledge that we have not thus far done our best to put 
this belief into action and that even the belief itself has at times been 
weak. For this we should be deeply penitent. 

We realize also that it will prove difficult for some of us to put this 
belief into action and that it may take time. Training, tradition, and 
custom, sometimes even law, may hinder. We affirm our fellowship 
and brotherhood with any who encounter such difficulties. We recognize 
that we all fall short of our ideals and that probably none of us is without 
fault in our social attitudes. 

Nevertheless, it is urgent that we begin at once to practice the ideal 
Of interracial justice and brotherhood. We must no longer allow the 
difficulties to excuse lack of effort or the need of time to justify the 
indefinite postponement of action. 

IV. Recommendations for Action 
As concrete steps we recommend such of the following policies as 
are feasible for individuals and congregations: 



1950, Grand Rapids, Michigan 127 

People of all races should be freely welcomed into the membership 
of any and all congregations with no requirements or restrictions other 
than those ordinarily asked of anyone. 

Fellowship in pews and at meals should be equally available to all. 

Particular attention and effort should be devoted to the possibility of 
extending our home mission work to people of other races. Where 
the territory of a local church is becoming predominantly occupied by 
such people, we should seize the opportunity for fellowship and service 
with them. 

Special efforts should be made to help our children, young people, 
and adults make the acquaintance of people from other racial groups. 
The presence of such people in our summer camps and colleges is to be 
commended. They should not, however, be treated as curiosities. Race 
differences may be emphasized by too much special attention as well as 
by aloofness. The goal should be a warm but natural friendship and 
understanding. 

Employers will do well to make an effort to include representatives 
of other races in their staffs, but here again the goal of a natural rela- 
tionship should be kept in mind. Just as we encourage persons of other 
races to mingle in our predominantly white groups, so we should be alert 
for opportunities to enter and establish fellowship with groups where 
another race is in the majority. 

The church should help its members to understand that some 
undesirable behavior by those of other races is as inevitable as it is 
among the white people and that the racial group as a whole is no 
more to be blamed for it than the white race as a whole is to blame 
for its criminals and disturbing elements. 

Our church should co-operate with other religious bodies and with 
suitable secular organizations in efforts to combat race prejudice. The 
church should be ready to protest when discriminatory laws or measures 
are directed against racial minorities. It should give active support to 
wise measures safeguarding their right to fair treatment in employment 
and the other concerns of life. 

In these and in other ways, which will become apparent as we 
look for them under the guidance of the Holy Spirit, it will be possible 
to make the gospel of Jesus with its message of a loving Father and a 
great potential Christian family an actuality in our lives. Let us be 
Brethren, not only with those of our Own immediate circle, but with 
an ever-widening circle of those, whatever their color or class may be, 
whom God loves. 

Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: The statement was adopted as 
edited. 



7957, San Jose, California 

Advancement and Standards in the Ministry 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
the adoption of the following statement: 

L Calling Candidates to the Ministry 

1. Men and women before entering the ministry Of the church should 
feel the call of God to serve. God's call may come in such ways as: 

(a) To the individual who, having heard the call, may volunteer 
to elder, pastor, or pastoral board; 

(b) Through the church, which may lay it upon the heart of the 
person to accept and serve after prayer and under guidance of the 
Holy Spirit. 

2. When such a call of God is felt, it is important that the following 
procedures outlined by the 1942 Conference be carefully carried out, 
namely: 

(a) "Members of the district ministerial board (or similar respon- 
sible persons of the board of administration) should be informed and 
the two boards (local church official board and district board) should 
examine the candidate with reference* 

(1) "to his or her aims, 

(2) "to natural ability, 

(3) "to moral and spiritual fitness, 

(4) "to willing preparation for the duties of the ministry." 

3. We should exercise great care in licensing men and women to 
the ministry. They should not be licensed until it is clear that they 
meet the desired qualifications and possess an attitude of love for 
Christ and for the Church of the Brethren and its institutions and pro- 
gram. 

4. "If and when these boards are satisfied that the applicant qualifies, 
he or she shall be licensed as directed in the minutes of the Annual 
Meeting and the order of service as printed in the Minister's Manual" 
(Annual Meeting minutes, 1942). 

5. ". . . the license of (brethren) may be renewed by the church 
from year to year, until such brethren either accept and are ordained into 
the ministry, according to previous decisions, or are discontinued as 
licensed preachers; or if in the judgment of the church and the district 
ministerial board the best interest of the church can be served, these 
brethren may be given license to preach for an indefinite time" (An- 
nual Meeting minutes, 1946). 

6. Before renewal of the license to preach, an interview with the 



• A questionnaire and rating sheet prepared by the office of Ministry and 
Home Missions should be used in reviewing the qualifications for the ministry. 



1952, San Jose, California 129 

licentiate should be held by the official board of the local church and 
the proper district authorities to ascertain the continued fitness of the 
licentiate for such renewal. 

II. Advancement in the Ministry 

1. Men 

(a) While the church does not require college and seminary train- 
ing of all its ministers, it recognizes this as an ideal and urges effort 
toward this attainment. 

A reading course prepared by the Ministry and Home Mission Com- 
mission and approved by the General Brotherhood Board and admin- 
istered by the proper district authorities, should be required of all 
candidates for the ministry. It will provide reading suitable for growth 
of: 

(1) Those seeking license to the ministry, 

(2) Those licensed, 

(3) Those ordained to the ministry. 

(b) Advancement of licentiates to the ordained ministry should 
not take place until educational preparation has been completed and/or 
active ministerial or other church service is to begin. Before licentiates 
are ordained, an interview should be held by the official board of the 
local church and proper district authorities to ascertain the fitness of 
the licentiate for ordination. (See Brotherhood Organization, "Function 
of the Elders' Body," II-B-3.) 

(c) At the time of ordination to the ministry the candidate should 
be instructed in the calling, function, privilege, and dignity of the 
ministry. He should be urged to consider the ministry a lifetime calling. 

(d) Ordination to the eldership should not be hurried. Time should 
be allowed for growth and the demonstration of able leadership before 
ordination takes place. It may be initiated and carried out in the fol- 
lowing manner (Annual Meeting minutes, 1890, 1927, and 1947): 

(1) "The authority to ordain elders shall be vested in the elders 
of the state districts. 

(2) "The elders assembled at district meeting shall consult as 
to the ordination of all elders to be effected in the district. If the 
majority of the elders decide that the ordination should be made, the 
matter shall be referred to the district ministerial board (to have in 
charge the ordination of ministers to the eldership approved by the 
elders of the districts — Conference minutes, 1927), who shall go to the 
church and, in council with it if they find no gospel objections, the 
ordination shall be made. 

(3) "The necessity of ordaining elders may originate with the 
officers of the church or the elders of the district." 

2. Women 

(a) "These licenses (of sisters) may be renewed from year to year. 



130 1951, San Jose, California 

When in the judgment of the church and the district ministerial board, 
their work and interest justify it, they may receive permanent licenses 
to preach" (Annual Meeting minutes, 1922). 

III. Relinquishing the Ministry 

If ministers desire to relinquish their ministry, they may present 
their resignation to the local church and district officials. 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Statement adopted as revised 
by the committee and amended. 

Amendments to the Conference Rules 

Standing Committee recommends to the 1951 Annual Conference 
that the Conference Rules be amended by the following additional items 
(to be regarded as items number 7 and 8 while the present items 7 and 
8 become numbers 9 and 10). 

"7. The Conference shall have no authority to change the wording 
or the intent of any paper or query submitted as Conference business 
by state districts. 

"8. The Standing Committee may review the reports of Conference 
committees but has no authority to change or revise such reports." 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Recommendations adopted. 

Amendments to the Pension Plan 

I. In the judgment of the Pension Board it is desirable and necessary 
that the Ministerial and Missionary Pension Plan of the Church of the 
Brethren be further amended. As provided in the pension plan, there- 
fore, the Pension Board has adopted the following amendment, ad 
interim, and presents the amendment to Annual Conference of 1951 
for ratification: 

Article III. Member Contributions 
Each member shall contribute an amount equivalent to four per 
cent of his salary during his active membership, except as hereinafter 
provided. All such contributions shall be credited to the individual 
account of the member and be increased by the interest credits thereon. 
Any member of the pension plan shall be permitted, during the 
period of his or her participation under the Social Security Act (H.R. 
6000) as amended from time to time, to pay contributions into the 
pension plan equal to the members' regular contributions, less the 
amount paid in employee taxes under the Social Security Act by or for 
such member, provided the employing organization pays the organiza- 
tion's regular contributions, less the amount paid in employer taxes 
under the Social Security Act on such employee. The pension and other 
benefits payable under this category shall be in proportion to the total 
contributions actually paid into the pension plan as compared to the 



1951, Son Jose, California 131 

total contributions normally paid by and on behalf of members of the 
pension plan who are not participating under the Social Security Act. 
Minimum benefits shall be similarly proportioned. 

n. Growing out of increased interest throughout the country in 
adequate pensions for all workers, both by private plans and government 
provisions, and numerous suggestions that steps be taken to amend our 
pension plan to provide benefits that would more nearly equal the 
purchasing power of the dollar when the plan was launched in 1943, 
the Pension Board recommends to Annual Conference that the pension 
plan be further amended, effective September 1, 1951, as follows: 

Article IV. Congregation Contributions 

Each congregation served by a member shall contribute an amount 
equivalent to six per cent of the salary of such member. Such contribu- 
tions shall be items of current expense and not of benevolence. 

All such congregation contributions shall be subject to a deduction 
by the Pension Board of not to exceed one twelfth thereof toward the 
expense of administering the pension plan, and a further deduction 
of not to exceed one twelfth thereof for the contingent fund. The 
balance of each such congregation contribution shall be credited to 
the individual account of the member serving such congregation and 
shall be increased by the interest credits thereon. 

In the event that a congregation served by a member does not 
contribute as hereinbefore provided, then one half of the amounts 
which would otherwise have been deducted from the congregation con- 
tributions for administrative expenses and for the contingent fund, 
shall be deducted from such member's contributions. 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Amendment per Article III was 
ratified. Amendment per Article IV was adopted. 

Brotherhood Fund Goal 1951-52 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
the adoption of a Brotherhood Fund goal of $1,250,000 for the year 
1951-1952. 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Recommended goal adopted. 

Financial Support of Bethany Seminary 

Query, 1950 

Whereas, the Wenatchee Valley church believes that adequately 
trained leadership is necessary for the continued growth and expansion 
of our denomination in all of its many fields of service, and 

Whereas, the Wenatchee Valley church believes the quality and 
quantity of that leadership is endangered by the present plan of financial 
support of our only seminary, Bethany; 



132 1951, Son Jose, California 

Therefore, we, the Wenatchee Valley church, in regular quarterly 
council September 7, 1949, petition Annual Conference, through district 
meeting held at Sunnyslope, November 16-20, 1949, to place Bethany's 
budget of needs upon a guaranteed basis. 

Merle Travis, Church Clerk 
Action of district conference of Washington: Motion carried to pass 
the above query to Annual Conference with our full support. 

Laurie Kingery, Clerk 

Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: Referred to the General Broth- 
erhood Board. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1951 

The General Brotherhood Board submits the following answer to 
the query on Financial Support of Bethany Seminary: 

Our general church program is financed by the giving of our 
members, mainly during the current year. 

We do not favor any one portion of the program being a first lien 
against the current contribution. 

However, the General Brotherhood Board is aware of long-term 
commitments in certain areas, such as Bethany Biblical Seminary, 
a large portion of our mission program, our obligation to retired mis- 
sionaries, and others. The board will continue its policy of assuring 
such agencies regular support insofar as the continuing giving of the 
church makes it possible. 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Report accepted. 

Future of Brethren Volunteer Service 

Query, 1950 
We, the Denver church, ask Annual Conference of 1950, through 
the district conference of Colorado, that an evaluation and comprehen- 
sive study be inaugurated to determine the future of Brethren Volunteer 
Service as to: (1) its place in our church program; (2) its source of 
financial support; (3) establishment of an adequate budget for it. We 
further petition that a committee be appointed for further study and 
planning; such a committee to include one member of the National 
Youth Cabinet, and others not already encumbered in other projects 
closely related to Brethren Service, and report to Annual Conference 

in 1951 - Galen Hostetler, Clerk 

Answer of district conference of Colorado, August 18-21, 1949: 
Passed to Annual Conference. Frank E Nies> Writing clerk 

Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: Granted the request for the 
study; the Committee to be made up of members of the General Brother- 
hood Board as designated by the board, working in co-operation with 
the National Youth Cabinet. 



1951, San Jose, California 133 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1951 
In harmony with the request of the 1950 Annual Conference the 
General Brotherhood Board submits the following report and recom- 
mendations on the Brethren Volunteer Service program. 

First: We believe that the Brethren Volunteer Service program 
should be regarded as a continuing part of the general church program. 
We regard the present program as one of the most effective means to 
do the following things: 

A. To stimulate our peace witness. 

B. To teach a Christian alternative to the greed and secularism which 
grow in a fiercely competitive society. 

C. To develop creative leadership among our young people. 

D. To provide a means for the church to meet human need which 
would not be met in any other way. 

Second: We believe that the present program should be expanded. 
The expansion should take place in three areas: 

A Developing personnel and projects for volunteer service in 
local churches. 

B. Using middle-aged and older people who are free to go into 
volunteer projects. 

C. Using more young people — especially those seeking a positive 
alternative to military service. 

Third: The program should be given a more adequate financial basis. 
Up to the present time it has been borne by the Brethren Service 
Commission budget within the Brotherhood Fund. A number of very 
worth-while projects have been turned down because there were not 
ample funds to open them. We recommend that wherever possible the 
projects bear the costs of the volunteers while they are on the project. 
To implement this program, we believe that an increased budget will 
need to be provided. 

Fourth: We feel that there should be a strengthening and expansion 
of the supervisory personnel to oversee the work on the projects. This 
should be increased in number, quality, and effectiveness. 

Fifth: Promotion should be increased, with a continuing emphasis on 
careful selection of applicants. We recommend that our youth give Breth- 
ren Volunteer Service serious consideration; we call upon the boards and 
agencies of the church and the local congregations to set forth and 
interpret to the church the significance of the Brethren Volunteer Service 
program; we recommend that the church agencies seek to enlist volun- 
teers and financial support of the program. Program committees for 
local, district, and wider meetings across the Brotherhood might well 
consider including the Brethren Volunteer Service value in their 
program emphases. 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Report accepted as amended. 



134 1951, San Jose, California 

Goodwill Toward Other Nationals 

Query, 1950 

The Pasadena Church of the Brethren petitions Annual Conference 
through district conference to provide for the initiation and promotion 
of a campaign to make all the people conscious of the importance of 
building goodwill toward other nationals, and in other nationals toward 
us as the only sound basis for lasting peace. 

We ask that all other churches be urged to join in an organized, 
united effort to reach the minds of the people through every avenue, 
especially through schools. 

We ask that until better ways are found for building goodwill, this 
campaign should actively advocate the general public support of the 
best foreign relief projects. 

We ask that this campaign be organized and set into action as soon 
as is possible so as to take advantage of the need for great relief in so 
many places, and the consequent opportunity for building goodwill. 

John W. Wilson, Clerk 

Answer of district conference of Southern California and Arizona, 
October 15, 1949: Passed to Annual Conference. 

Burton E. Forney, Secretary 

Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: We commend the Christian 
purposes behind this paper. Since the church already has avenues and 
agencies for this type of work, we refer the query to the General 
Brotherhood Board. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1951 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends the adoption of the 
following statement as the answer to the query on Goodwill Toward 
Other Nationals: 

Commanded by our Lord and Master to love even our enemies, all 
Christians are under steady Obligation of goodwill to all people, regard- 
less of national or other barriers. However, when hatred is deliberately 
cultivated and accepted as normal, Christian people have an extra obliga- 
tion to express goodwill. 

But the words of goodwill often sound empty, because our deeds do 
not fit them. Accordingly the Church of the Brethren proposes whole- 
hearted service as the best carrier wave of goodwill. To this end this 
Conference commends: for schools such projects as toys, towel kits, shoes, 
seeds, and raising heifers to help other children; for homes, the exchange 
of high school and college students; for churches, the resettling of 
displaced persons. It also recommends selecting the "goodwill kind" of 
pictures, songs, stories, drama, and games of other nationals. 

For Older youth, the Conference recommends Brethren Volunteer 
Service and related programs; for adults, travel to learn to know the 



1951, San Jose, California 135 

people of other nations in their home communities. For both churches 
and governments, it recommends the carrying out on a world scale 
and on a long-time basis of the "Point Four" foreign policy program 
as announced by President Truman, without regard to political advantage 
—but as a determined expression of goodwill. For all Christians, it urges 
limiting our personal wants for the sake of our needy neighbors. 
Answer of 1 951 Annual Conference: Report accepted. 

Handbook for New Church Members 

Query, 1950 
The District of Washington in conference assembled at the Sunny- 
slope church, November 16-20, 1949, petitions Annual Conference at 
Grand Rapids, Michigan, June 1950, to make a study of, and if possible, 
to produce a suitable handbook which could be given to those coming 
into our church. It is the desire of the delegate body that said handbook 
contain: 

1. A statement of welcome to the candidate 

2. The baptismal vows 

3. A baptismal certificate suitable for our purposes 

4. A clear statement on the simple life 

5. Teaching on the stewardship of life, time, and possessions 

6. The responsibility of church membership 

7. A lifting up of the New Testament teaching on the way of love 

and goodwill 

Laurie Kmgery, Writing Clerk 

Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: Request granted, and the matter 
is referred to the General Brotherhood Board. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1951 
The General Brotherhood Board reports that the preparation of 
a handbook for new members has been assigned to the Christian 
Education Commission, which, in consultation with the Ministry and 
Home Mission Commission, is now at work on this task. 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Report accepted and more time 
granted. 

Homes for Older People 

Query, 1949 
The board of administration of Northern Illinois and Wisconsin 
requests district conference to petition Annual Conference to appoint a 
committee to study the advisability of the General Brotherhood Board 
receiving funds from the brotherhood for the purpose of establishing 
homes for older people in desirable locations in mild climates. 
Request granted. 

Ora W. Garber, Secretary 



136 2952, San Jose, California 

Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: Voted to authorize the General 
Brotherhood Board to develop a plan whereby small but substantial 
homes may be established for older people in mild climates. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1950 
The General Brotherhood Board asks for more time for a final 
report. 

Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: Granted the request for more 
time. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1951 
The General Brotherhood Board has studied carefully the various 
parts of the problem of providing homes in mild climates for older 
persons. There will be increasing need for such facilities. 

1. We recommend: 

a. That the General Brotherhood Board receive homes, property 
which may be sold, and funds for homes, to be used as donors may 
specify. 

b. That such homes be operated by the districts or the regions. 

c. That the relationship of the General Brotherhood Board and 
the districts or the regions concerning such homes be worked out later. 

d. That the General Brotherhood Board, through the Brethren 
Service Commission, offer an advisory service to such homes, as well 
as to the thirteen or more homes now serving the brotherhood. Efforts 
should be made to provide spiritual and recreational opportunities, as 
well as physical facilities for residents of such homes. 

Note: This is additional to the report of the board submitted above 
and is a procedural suggestion provided the other recommendations are 
passed by Conference. 

2. The General Brotherhood Board asks Annual Conference to 
authorize a committee of three to make a study of the possibilities for 
a retirement home or homes in the vicinity of Sebring, Florida, and to 
ask this committee to bring its report to the General Brotherhood Board. 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Report accepted and commit- 
tee authorized for item 2. Committee: Frank S. Carper (convener) , Levi 
B. Oaks, Jacob F. Replogle. 

Note: This committee brought a report to the General Brotherhood 
Board, who then passed the concern on to the Southeastern Region. 

Location of Church Headquarters 

Query, 1949 

The Bridgewater church asks Annual Conference of 1949, meeting 

at Ocean Grove, New Jersey, through district conference of Second 

Virginia, to inaugurate a comprehensive study of the location of the 

headquarters and publishing interests of the Church of the Brethren 



1951, San Jose, California 137 

now at Elgin, Illinois, with reference to the possibility of relocation in 
Elgin or relocation in some other area where costs of living and labor 
might be more favorable; to the possibility of combining our publishing 
interests with those of some other religious body or bodies; and to the 
advisability of locating the general offices of the church at some point 
other than in connection with the Brethren Publishing House. 

Elmer Myers, Clerk 

Answer of district conference: Passed to Annual Conference. 

M. R. Wolfe, District Secretary 

Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: Request granted. Referred to 
the General Brotherhood Board for study and report next year. They 
are to disregard the words "and labor" in lines five and six. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1950 
The General Brotherhood Board reports that it has canvassed the 
situation regarding location of church headquarters, is in process of 
further study, and asks for more time for a definite recommendation. 

Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: Granted the request for more 
time. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1951 
The General Brotherhood Board, after making a careful and 
comprehensive study of the query regarding the location of church 
headquarters, offers the following answer: 

1. In regard to relocating in Elgin, after canvassing the possibilities, 
it is our judgment that there is no reasonable opportunity at the present 
time. However, the board of directors of the publishing house will keep 
alert to any future possibility. 

2. In regard to relocating elsewhere, we do not find enough variation 
in living costs in other Brethren centers to warrant a change. 

3. In regard to combining our publishing interests with those of 
other religious bodies, we can find no interest on the part of such toward 
working out this arrangement. We do find an interest on the part of 
others in printing our publications. The rates were found to be sub- 
stantially higher than our costs. 

4. In regard to separating the general offices from the publishing 
house, we believe we should remain together, on the basis of economy, 
for at least as long as we occupy our present building. If the time 
should come that we make some disposition of the present property, the 
matter of separating these interests should again be given consideration. 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Report accepted. 

Membership Transfer 

Query, 1949 
Because of the desirability of being an active member of the con- 



138 1951, San Jose, California 

gregation in the community where one lives; because of the tremendous 
loss in membership experienced when members move from the locality 
of one congregation to another; because of the tremendous shifts and 
migrations of American people in recent years; and because Protestant 
churches are losing approximately sixty-six per cent of all church mem- 
bers who move into the Pacific Coast region: 

We, the Long Beach church, petition Annual Conference, through 
the district meeting of Southern California and Arizona, to appoint a 
committee to study procedures by which letters of church membership 
may be transferred within the brotherhood. We would suggest that 
the committee give careful consideration to the advisability of congrega- 
tions of the brotherhood forwarding the letters of church membership 
of members who have moved, as soon as residence is known, to either 
the congregation of the Church of the Brethren within whose proximity 
the member has taken up residence or the office of the secretary of the 
region to which the member has moved, which office shall forward the 
letter to the appropriate congregation, unless the member requests that 
the letter remain with the former congregation. 

Bernice H. Lichty, Clerk 

Answer Of district meeting: Passed to Annual Conference. 

Jesse Brandt, Secretary 

Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: Request granted. Referred to 
a committee: Charles E. Zunkel (convener), Norman J. Baugher, Rufus 
P. Bucher, H. L. Hartsough, J. W. Lear. 

Report of the Committee, 1950 
Report of progress. Final report to be made at 1951 Conference. 

Norman J. Baugher 
Rufus P. Bucher, 

H. L. Hartsough (unable to meet) 
J. W. Lear, 

Charles E. Zunkel (convener) 
Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: Accepted the report of progress 
and continued the committee. 

Report of the Committee, 1951 
I. Preliminary Statements 
1. The church is the spiritual body of Jesus Christ and is called, by 
Paul, "the church of the living God." "God is love," and through his 
grace and the meritorious sacrifice of Jesus Christ this relationship has 
been made available to all men everywhere. Faith, repentance, and 
obedience enable men of all stations in life, through the Holy Spirit, to 
enjoy fellowship with God and one another and thus become the 
Universal Church. 



1951, San Jose, California 139 

2. Denominations (of which there are said to be more than two 
hundred) have arisen as a result of differing interpretations of theology; 
disagreement as to the number and purpose of religious symbols 
(sacraments) ; the forms and authority of church polity; and the varieties 
of church organization. In the early church these divisions were not 
known. Neither was this condition in the purpose of Christ, who prayed, 
"That they all may be one; as thou, Father, art in me, and I in thee, that 
they also may be one in us; that the world may believe that thou hast 
sent me" (John 17: 21). 

3. Church letters of transfer represent the method by which a 
denomination maintains the location and tabulation of its membership 
within the organization. They have no specific value other than this. 
The system does not guarantee Christian discipleship. It is but a formal 
statement announcing such profession. "The Lord knows those that are 
his," and relationship with his spiritual body is neither hindered nor 
abetted by letters of transfer. 

4. A letter of transfer is the property of the congregation and 
should be so understood by all concerned. Its main purpose is to register, 
promote, and safeguard transfer of membership from one congregation 
to another within the denomination. The letter of transfer should go 
from the granting to the receiving congregation. The system of allowing 
the individual to carry the letter of transfer, in the case of timid or care- 
less individuals, has frequently caused a lapse in church membership. 
Congregations need a more dependable plan in their attempt to serve 
the increasing mobile membership and to keep records more reliable and 
up-to-date. The time between the move and the new contacts on the 
part of those who are changing membership should be reduced to a 
minimum. 

5. The matter of transfer by letter is simplified and provides less 
occasion for cavil or criticism when it is understood (a) as registering a 
change of location on the part of the member, and (b) as serving to 
introduce the member to the receiving congregation. The time of the 
transfer of membership should not be the occasion for disciplinary 
methods. Many have been estranged and lost to the denomination, un- 
necessarily, by such procedure. 

II. The Method of Transfer 
1. When members change congregational residence, the congrega- 
tion in which they have lived shall send a letter of transfer, without 
delay, to the pastor or elder (moderator) of the congregation in whose 
territory they intend to move or have moved unless the member requests 
that his membership remain with the former congregation. A personal 
friendly letter should be written to the party or parties to the effect that 
a letter of transfer has been sent to the other congregation, informing the 



140 1951, San Jose, California 

pastor of the change and requesting that as soon as possible they should 
attend the services in the new congregation and create new fellowships. 
A copy of the letter should be sent to the pastor or elder (moderator) 
of the receiving congregation. 

2. This plan, if it is to be both corrective and effective, requires that 
members of a congregation should be made familiar with the meaning 
and method of transfer. Also, that the officers of congregations main- 
tain such fellowship and oversight with the membership as will enable 
them to check the movements of their members with relative accuracy. 
Members planning to change location should, if at all possible, confer 
with the pastor or elder (moderator) prior to moving. 

3. If and when the granting congregation is uncertain as to the name 
of the congregation to which a letter of transfer should be sent (as may 
happen when members move without leaving proper information) the 
office of the regional secretary should assist in clearing the situation. 

4. When members move and desire to place their membership (for 
justifiable reasons) in a congregation of some other denomination, the 
regular form of transfer may be used. The form should be prepared so 
as to be suitable for use within the brotherhood or in transfer to another 
denomination. 

In either case a letter of explanation, with sufficient detail to be 
understandable, should be given the party that is moving and also a 
copy explaining conditions should be sent to the receiving congregation. 

In all cases, a file of the type of transfer should be kept by the 
issuing congregation so that future references, if necessary, would be 
intelligible. 

5. A special form should be used for officials (elders, ministers, 
licentiates, deacons). This form should be used when the official and 
membership fellowship is being transferred to another congregation 
within the denomination. However, when denominational lines are 
crossed, official standing is fully at the option of the receiving denomi- 
nation. 

Note: It is not implied that the Annual Conference encourages the 
actions listed in paragraphs 4 and 5 of Article II. They are inserted as 
a guide when such conditions arise. 

Norman J. Baugher 

Rufus P. Bucher 

H. L. Hartsough 

J. W. Lear 

Charles E. Zunkel (convener) 
Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Report accepted as revised. 
Former decisions in conflict with it are considered repealed. 



1951, San Jose, California 141 

Ministerial Placement 
Queries, 1950 

Ministerial Placement Policy 
The elders' body of Western Pennsylvania assembled in regular 
district meeting, Windber, Pennsylvania, October 26, 1949, requests An- 
nual Conference through district meeting to change the report of the 
General Ministerial Board on Ministerial Placement and Policy, last 
sentence of Section II, Paragraph 1, Annual Meeting Minutes, 1936, 
which now reads: "It shall be understood that the pastoral board of 
the local church has the right, provided it shall first confer with the 
district and General Ministerial boards, to submit as a nomination the 
name of any particular minister in whom the congregation is especially 
interested," to read as follows: "It shall be understood that the pastoral 
board of the local church has the right, provided it shall first secure 
the approval of the district ministerial board and of the Ministry and 
Home Mission Commission, to submit as a nomination the name of any 
particular minister of the Church of the Brethren in whom the congrega- 
tion is especially interested." John D EniSj clerk 

Answer of district conference: Passed to Annual Conference. 

John D. Ellis, Clerk 

Procedure in Calling a Pastor 
The elders of the District of Middle Pennsylvania petition Annual 
Conference through the district conference to consider the following a 
recommended statement of policy: "A congregation shall consult with 
the district mission-ministerial board for its approval before calling 
a pastor. The congregation shall have the right to appeal to the district 
elders in case of an unfavorable decision by the district mission-min- 
isterial board. It is contrary to the practice and policy of the Church of 
the Brethren to call as a pastor one who is not ordained by the Church 
of the Brethren, or one who is under discipline by said Church of the 
Brethren." 

Answer of district conference: Passed to Annual Conference. 

C. L. Cox, Clerk 
Answer of 1950 Annual Conference to the two queries: Referred to 
a committee for study and report next year. Committee: Ralph E. 
White (convener), George Detweiler, F. E. Mallott, H. L. Ruthrauff, W. 
H. Yoder. 

Report of the Committee, 1951 
We your committee offer the following answer: "It shall be under- 
stood that the pastoral board of the local church has the right, after 
clearance with the district ministerial board and other placement persons, 
to submit as a nomination the name of any particular minister of the 



142 1952, San Jose, California 

Church of the Brethren in whom the congregation is especially interested 
and to whom the committee can give unanimous support. It is contrary to 
the practice and policy of the Church of the Brethren to call as a pastor 
one who is not an ordained minister of the Church of the Brethren, or 
one who is under discipline by the Church of the Brethren." 

F. E. Mallott, Secretary 
Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: It is considered that the adop- 
tion of the [following] item of new business, "Ministerial Placement and 
Policy," covers the concern and import of this report. 

Ministerial Placement and Policy 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
the adoption of the following statement: 

MINISTERIAL PLACEMENT AND POLICY 
The Ministry and Home Mission Commission of the General Brother- 
hood Board, with the assistance of many persons of the Brotherhood, 
has given careful study to the revision of the ministerial placement 
policy adopted by the Hershey Annual Conference of 1936.* This has 
been done to bring it into accord with present developments in placement 
procedures which have been found helpful out of experience and to 
include such changes as were introduced by the adoption of the report 
of the Commission of Fifteen in the Wenatchee Annual Conference of 
1946 and the Orlando Annual Conference of 1947. 

The following recommendations are submitted and when adopted by 
Conference shall supersede former decisions on these matters. 

I. General Recommendations 

1. Ministerial Tenure. We recommend that the church be com- 
mitted to the policy of the long pastorate believing that it is productive 
of the greatest good to both the congregation and the ministry. Wisdom 
should be exercised by churches in calling pastors and by pastors in 
accepting calls in order to avoid misfits. Pastoral changes should be 
made with consideration and harmony. 

2. Ministerial Placement, Supervision, and Transfer. The Official 
agencies of the church for placement, supervision, and transfer are: 
(a) the local ministerial board; (b) the district ministerial board or 
ministerial secretary; (c) the regional secretary or ministerial secretary; 
(d) the secretary of the Ministry and Home Mission Commission of 
the General Brotherhood Board, who serves in the area of co-ordination 
and counsel as he is needed. 

3. The Pastoral Term. We recommend that the pastoral term be of 
indefinite duration and that the right to terminate a pastorate by 



• Found on page 120 of Minutes of the Annual Conferences, 1923-1944. 



1951, San Jose, California 143 

resignation generally be conceded to the ministry. There should be 
reasonable notice of a desire to terminate a pastorate either by the 
minister or by the congregation. It would seem wise to seek to make 
desired pastoral changes immediately following Easter, to become effec- 
tive August 1. We would discourage, as much as possible, pastoral 
changes during the pastoral year. 

4. The Elder- or Moderator-Pastor Relationship. The elder or 
moderator of the congregation shall be considered the Official head of 
the congregation and shall preside at all church councils, especially 
when the pastoral relationship is under consideration. He should be 
regarded as the chief counselor and adviser of the pastor in all of his 
work. The pastor should be considered the spiritual leader of the 
church, the active leader in its program and activities, the "shepherd 
of the flock." When conditions warrant, the church may elect the pastor 
as elder or moderator. In such situations a member of the district 
ministerial board (or board of administration) should preside in all 
council meetings when the pastoral relationship is under consideration. 

5. The Pastoral Year. The pastoral year begins August 1. No change 
in pastorates should be contemplated at any other time, except where 
conditions arise which may cause injury to the work of the Kingdom 
or jeopardize in a personal way the welfare of the minister. Such 
situations should be adjusted by mutual consent of the church and 
the minister. 

6. Adjustment of Pastoral Difficulties. The district ministerial board 
may make investigations of congregations or pastors, when, in their 
judgment, conditions warrant them. A congregation, or a minority of 
the congregation, or the pastor may call upon the district ministerial 
board for such service. This should be done when the first difficulties 
arise and while unity may be restored, thug averting serious discord or 
division. In all such cases, if the work of the district ministerial board, 
in counsel with the regional executive, is not satisfactory to the parties 
concerned (minister, church, or minority of the church) they may appeal 
the case to the district elders' body. If a satisfactory solution is not 
reached, appeal may be made to the Standing Committee of Annual 
Conference. 

For further guidance see the section On counseling and discipline 
under "Brotherhood Organization," in the minutes of the 1947 Annual 
Conference. 

II. Procedures in Vacancies and Appointments 
1. Extending a Pastoral Call. The pastoral board or committee shall 

be the official medium through which the congregation shall investigate 

and negotiate with ministers nominated or recommended for pastoral 

services in the church. 

This board or committee shall seek nominations as suggested in 

item 2. Having investigated the qualifications of ministers recommended, 



144 1952, San. Jose, California 

they shall agree upon one person only whom they shall recommend to 
the church to employ as pastor. They may consider various persons 
whose names are presented to them, but only one name shall be given and 
recommended to the church in council for pastoral employment. When 
a recommendation is not approved by the church, the local pastoral board 
shall further study the possible nominees and agree upon another whom 
they shall recommend to the church in another properly announced 
council. In no case should a church negotiate with two or more ministers 
at the same time; neither should it vote on one or the other of two 
candidates. 

Church councils for the consideration of pastoral employment should 
be publicly announced at least ten days in advance. If the ten-day 
advance announcement is impossible, advance announcement may be 
made by mail to each family, giving the nature and the time of the 
meeting. This variation should have the approval of the elder, the local 
ministerial board, and the district ministerial board or secretary. Councils 
should be called to accept or reject the recommendation of the pastoral 
board. Such recommendations should be unanimous on the part of the 
board. Voting in all such councils should be by ballot and should require 
at least a three-fourths majority to extend the call. The pastoral board 
may extend a call to a minister to become pastor of the church, upon the 
terms agreed upon by the ministerial board and the prospective pastor, 
with the approval of the church. It is well if the call can be made 
unanimous. 

2. Pastoral Nominations. Churches desiring a pastor or a change of 
pastors, and ministers desiring to enter pastoral service, to transfer to 
a different field, or to consider a call received from a church, should 
notify the placement agencies, that is, the district ministerial board or 
ministerial secretary and the regional secretary or ministerial secretary. 

It is desirable that, in so far as possible, placement nominations for 
position come through the district board, in consultation with the regional 
secretary. The brotherhood secretary will serve as needed in co-ordina- 
tion between regions. When men are desired for call across regional 
lines, clearance should be made between the secretaries of the regions 
involved before the prospect has been contacted. 

Care should be taken in appealing to pastors who have not indicated 
any desire to change locations, lest their pastoral service be interrupted 
prematurely with loss to the work of the Kingdom. The district, regional, 
or brotherhood secretary should be aware of the situation and be prepared 
to give guidance in such approaches. 

It shall be understood that the pastoral board of the local church 
has the right, after clearance with the district ministerial board and 
other placement persons, to submit as a nomination the name of any 
particular minister of the Church of the Brethren in whom the con- 
gregation is especially interested and to whom the committee can give 



1951, San Jose, California 145 

unanimous support. It is the practice and policy of the Church of 
the Brethren to call as a pastor only one who is a minister in good 
standing in the Church of the Brethren. 

3. Terminating a Pastorate 

a. At the minister's initiative. The minister may for sufficient reasons 
and of his own initiative terminate his pastorate by resignation. The 
resignation should be presented to the pastoral board or corresponding 
board after careful counseling with them and/or the district and regional 
placement persons. Such counseling may help give him objectivity and 
wise guidance in the problems he faces. The pastoral board should 
receive and discuss the resignation before giving it to the church. Such 
discussion may reveal ways of adjusting conditions which caused the 
resignation to be made. If the resignation seems timely, they will help 
the church to receive it kindly, so that the pastoral change can be made 
without disturbing the unity and welfare of the church. The pastoral 
board should present the pastor's resignation to the congregation. 

b. At the pastoral board's initiative. The pastoral board of the 
congregation or corresponding board may, for sufficient cause, suggest 
to the pastor the advisability of pastoral change. Care should be 
taken to be sure of the evidence; it should be more than rumor or 
hearsay. It would be wise if this were first discussed with the district, 
regional, or national placement persons. In cases where such suggestion 
is made to the pastor, he should have reasonable opportunity for con- 
sultation and should have opportunity to resign. Here, again, wise 
counseling with the pastor and/or the church may prevent disharmony 
in the church. 

c. By vote of the church. If the pastor does not see fit to resign, 
the pastoral board, or corresponding board, should have authority, if they 
feel the best interests of the church demand it, to call for a vote on the 
question of retaining the pastor. Councils for considering this question 
should be called in the same manner as those for extending a pastoral 
call. The vote should be taken by ballot and require a three-fourths 
majority to retain the pastor. After official notice of a negative vote, 
the pastor will have from three to four months to be placed elsewhere. 
Churches should be considerate in not working a hardship upon the 
pastor and his family. Councils for considering pastoral change should 
be publicly announced at least ten days in advance and should be called 
for the purpose of accepting or rejecting the recommendation of the 
pastoral board. 

III. Duties of Ministerial Boards and Secretaries 

1. The Local Pastoral Board. We recommend that the local church 

create a board or committee charged with ministerial responsibility, 

according to one of the plans suggested by the 1947 Annual Conference; 

that is, a board of administration, or a pastoral or ministerial board. 



146 1951, San Jose, California 

(See the Annual Meeting minutes, 1947, report on "Brotherhood Or- 
ganization.") 

a. It shall represent the local church in pastoral relationships. It 
shall receive nominations for pastor, investigate candidates, carry on 
negotiations with nominees, and assist in pastoral changes as outlined 
in Section II, items 7, 8, and 9. It shall work closely with and under 
the advice and counsel of the district board and other placement persons. 

b. It shall arrange for a proper farewell for the outgoing pastor and 
a reception and service of installation for the new pastor, inviting a 
district ministerial board member to be present if possible. Everything 
possible should be done to develop an enthusiasm and loyalty in the 
church for the new pastor. 

c. It shall serve as an advisory board to the pastor. Regular periodic 
meetings should be held once each quarter or more often in which the 
interests, the welfare, and the future of the work and of the church- 
pastor relationship can be discussed. Frank and sympathetic sharing in 
these meetings may do much to promote the continued good relationships 
of the church to its pastor. 

d. It shall seek to educate the congregation in the ethics of church- 
pastoral relationships and to maintain the ideas set forth in our code 
of ethics for congregations and ministers. 

e. It shall, in co-operation with the district ministerial board or 
ministerial secretary, seek to discover worthy talent in the local congrega- 
tion and lend encouragement in their selection of the ministry as a life- 
work and in pursuing training for it. 

f. It shall counsel with the pastor and arrange for the supply of the 
pulpit when the pastor must be away or is incapacitated for service. It 
shall counsel with him and arrange for special speakers, evangelists, etc. 

g. It shall carefully consider with the pastor the terms of his employ- 
ment and interpret these to the congregation. The use of the "Record 
of Agreement" for pastors is strongly recommended. These can be 
secured from the regional secretary or the brotherhood office. 

2. The District Ministerial Board 

a. It shall co-operate with the local pastoral boards, the regional 
secretary and the secretary of the Ministry and Home Mission Com- 
mission of the General Brotherhood Board in the placement, supervision, 
and transfer of pastors. 

b. It shall seek to discover worthy ministerial talent among young 
people of the district and lend encouragement in their selection of the 
ministry as a lifework and in pursuing training for it. 

c. It shall supervise the licensing of candidates for the ministry with 
the approval of the local congregation, after careful counseling procedure 
to be assured of the fitness of the candidate for the office. 

d. It shall supervise the ordination of licentiates to the full ministry, 
upon the approval of the local congregation and the district elders' body 



1951, San Jose, California 147 

when the licentiate has shown evidence of worthiness in carrying greater 
responsibility in the work of the church, has completed training and/or 
is ready for active service in the work of the church. 

e. It shall make provision for the ordination to the eldership of 
those ministers approved by district elders' body. 

f. It shall co-operate with pastoral boards in the proper installation 
of pastors, in the development and maintenance of harmonious relation- 
ships between pastors and churches, and in the education of churches 
in the ideals set forth in our code of ethics. 

g. It shall investigate and pass upon applications for ministerial 
relief from the district. 

h. It shall co-operate with churches in adjusting difficulties which 
may arise affecting ministers or pastors. 

i. It shall co-operate with the Ministry and Home Mission Com- 
mission of the General Brotherhood Board in the survey of local churches, 
in keeping on file proper records for the district, and in such other work 
as may strengthen the ministry of the church. 

j. It shall provide district assistance to pastors and churches without 
pastors in reporting annually and correctly the data called for on the 
annual report. 

k. It shall provide district assistance to local churches or pastors 
in evaluating and reporting the "inactive" and "nonresident" members, as 
well as those "dropped" from membership, in an effort to secure the most 
helpful results and the most meaningful reports. 

1. It shall set up training conferences, district or sectional, to train 
local pastoral boards for their work. 

m. It shall arrange on-the-job training conferences for pastors of the 
district. 

n. Where a district ministerial secretary carries the ministerial 
function or responsibility for the district, he shall act in the capacities 
outlined above for the district ministerial board. 

3. The Regional Secretary or Ministerial Secretary 

a. He shall work with the district ministerial boards or secretaries 
in matters of placement, supervision, and transfer. 

b. Working in co-operation with the district ministerial board or 
secretary or the local pastoral board, he shall furnish nominations to 
them for pastor for a local church of the said district. 

c. He shall work with district ministerial boards or secretaries in 
the promotion of desirable church-pastor relationships and the general 
well-being of the churches. 

d. He shall seek to stimulate a wholesome spirit and program 
of evangelism in co-operation with all concerned. 

e. He shall assist district boards or secretaries in on-the-job training 
conferences for ministers and conferences for pastoral boards. 

f. He shall attend meetings of district boards to give counsel and 



148 2951, San Jose, California 

suggestions for enriching and more effectively administering the work, 
g. He shall work closely with the seminary, the college (s) of the 
region, and the brotherhood ministerial secretary in placement and 
supervision of summer pastors. 

4. The Secretary of Ministry and Home Missions 

a. He shall co-operate with the regional secretaries and district and 
local ministerial boards or secretaries in all matters pertaining to pastoral 
enlistment, placement, supervision, and transfer. He shall seek to help 
co-ordinate the pastoral supply and demand from one region to another. 

b. He shall make an annual survey of the churches and keep a 
careful file of data concerning congregations and ministers, and provide 
Yearbook material concerning the ministry and the churches of the 
brotherhood. 

c. He shall seek to enrich the ministry of the church through con- 
ferences and institutes and to maintain proper spiritual and educational 
standards for those who would qualify for the ministry of the church. 

d. He shall visit the regions and the districts in order to present 
the program of the brotherhood and especially to inspire and encourage 
the regional boards and district ministerial and other boards in their 
work. 

e. He shall co-operate with the Christian Education Commission, 
Bethany Biblical Seminary, and our colleges in giving every possible 
assistance to promising young men during their years of preparation 
for the ministry of the church. 

f. He shall supervise and administer the brotherhood program of 
home missions for the Ministry and Home Mission Commission of the 
General Brotherhood Board, in co-operation with regional and district 
boards. 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Statement adopted as revised 
by the committee. The matter of the pastoral year in section 1-5 was 
excepted. This was referred to a special study committee for report 
next year. Committee: Ora DeLauter, J. Clyde Forney, J. Herbert Miller. 

Note: The report of the special study committee is found under 
"Date for the Pastoral Year," 1952 minutes. 

Our Over-all Program 

Query, 1949 

Because our church program of necessity is partially formulated by 
circumstances and pressures, we petition Annual Conference through 
the District of Southern California and Arizona to make a deliberate 
study concerning what the over-all purpose and direction of the Church 
of the Brethren should be, considering such matters as the importance 
of evangelism; our mission program, at home and abroad; the purpose 



1951, San Jose, California 149 

of our service program; our relation to the ecumenical movement; the 
future of the pastoral system. 

Passed in council meeting of the Covina Church of the Brethren, 
on September 8, 1948. Mrs Arvel Larkkj clerk 

Answer of district meeting: Passed to Annual Conference. 

Jesse Brandt, Secretary 

Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: Referred to the General Brother- 
hood Board. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1950 
During the past two years the General Brotherhood Board has been 
giving special attention to a study of the over-all program and goals of 
the church. However, the board is not ready at this time to report on all 
the questions raised in the query and asks Annual Conference to grant 
additional time for completion of its report. 

Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: Granted the request for ad- 
ditional time. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1951 

While it is true that our church program is partially formulated in 
response to changing circumstances and pressures, the church must always 
be sensitive to the changing and emerging needs of men, and must seek 
promptly new ways of meeting those needs in the name and spirit of 
Christ. 

The General Brotherhood Board has sought constantly to evaluate the 
changing circumstances and the many claims on the church and has, 
through committees for research and planning and through prayerful 
consultation of the board and the staff, attempted to meet urgent needs 
and at the same time keep a proper balance in the program of the church. 

In recent years several committees of the Annual Conference and the 
General Brotherhood Board have studied "what the over-all program 
and direction of the Church of the Brethren should be." Therefore, no 
attempt will be made at this time to propose an all-inclusive statement 
and the answer will concern itself only with specific items listed in the 
query. 

Evangelism. Evangelism has ever been and is a primary task of the 
church, taking priority in its planning and program. Evangelism means 
confronting men, women, and children with Christ in such varied and 
persuasive ways that they are brought to full, deliberate commitment 
of themselves to him as Savior and Lord. We must find and use all those 
methods of evangelism which will effectively achieve this end, and dis- 
cover new methods of witnessing which are in accord with our Brethren 
heritage. We must accept our proper share of the total evangelistic re- 
sponsibility of the whole church of Christ everywhere, and work at it 
with urgency and complete consecration. 



150 1951, San Jose, California 

Missions. The essential nature of the Christian experience is the 
compulsion to share the gospel. This bears fruit in the building of 
churches and in the nurture of the membership. Furthermore, since mis- 
sions abroad have been and are a major interest of the Church of the 
Brethren, as a long-time policy, we would recommend that that program 
be kept strong and vigorous. In a strong and growing home mission pro- 
gram we should attempt to establish new churches at home in needy- 
places each year. If necessary to meet a grave crisis, the program may 
be modified but missions should ever remain high in our program. 

Brethren Service. The Brethren Service program seeks to achieve 
peace through the relief of human suffering out of compassion in the 
spirit of Christ, the reconciliation of nations, races, classes, and creeds 
which are in conflict with one another; and the building of Christian 
brotherhood into the very fabric of contemporary society. All service 
activities are to be carried on in the spirit of Christ and integrated with 
all other aspects of the program of the Church of the Brethren. 

The Ecumenical Movement. In a strong sense of oneness in Christ, we 
believe it is our duty to join our endeavors with our fellow Christians in 
a blending of spirit in a co-operative manner. The Church of the Brethren 
has unique gifts for the larger Christian community. It is our conviction 
that we are enriched by participation in the ecumenical movement as loyal 
members of the Church of the Brethren. 

The Pastoral System. The Church of the Brethren for many years 
was served acceptably by the free ministry. Owing to changing conditions 
the pastoral system of ministry has been adopted to a large extent 
throughout our brotherhood. We believe that a consecrated, trained 
pastoral ministry, properly supported both financially and with the co- 
operative efforts of the membership, will be the most efficient ministry 
in making the church an effective influence in the community through an 
adequate organization of its resources for worship, fellowship, and service. 

We would strongly insist on the full co-operation of laity and ministry 
to provide for each church the best possible leadership and the most com- 
plete participation of the entire membership. 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Report accepted. 

Participation in the Love Feast 

Query, 1950 
The Roxbury congregation assembled in regular council August 3, 
1949, requests Annual Conference, through district meeting of Western 
Pennsylvania, to restate the policy of our church concerning the participa- 
tion of members of other evangelical Christian churches in our love feast. 

William E. Hayes, Clerk 
Answer of district conference: Passed to Annual Conference. 

John D. Ellis, Clerk 



1951, San Jose, California 151 

Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: Referred to a committee for 
study and report next year. Committee: Ralph E. White (convener), 
George Detweiler, F. E. Mallott, H. L. Ruthrauff, W. H. Yoder. 

Report of the Committee, 1951 

The Church of the Brethren regards the observance of the Lord's 
Supper as one of the important ordinances of the Christian church and 
recognizes this ordinance as a Christian family rite, symbolizing the 
unity and fellowship which believers have with Christ and with one 
another (John 13:8; 1 Corinthians 10:16, 17; 1 Corinthians 11:28-34). 

In the observance of the communion we are reminded of the sacrificial 
death of Christ (1 Corinthians 11:26), and in the emblems we find the 
source of renewed spiritual life (John 6:53, 56). 

While every Christian is admonished to examine himself before 
participating in this sacred service (1 Corinthians 11:28), we would also 
urge pastors and elders of congregations to give wise counsel and instruc- 
tion to all communicants preparatory to the love feast. 

Some of our congregations permit those of other evangelical denomi- 
nations to participate in the love feast, thus recognizing them as members 
of the family of Christ. 

We, therefore, would recommend to the Annual Conference that local 
churches, where they so desire, may extend to evangelical Christians the 
privilege of participating in the love feast. 

F. E. Mallott, Secretary 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Report adopted as amended. 

Pastoral Apprenticeship 

Query, 1950 

The district conference of Idaho and Western Montana assembled 
at Bowmont, Idaho, October 28-30, 1949, petitions Annual Conference as 
follows: 

Inasmuch as beginning pastors would benefit from practical ex- 
perience in addition to theological training, and inasmuch as inexperienced 
men often become discouraged when they come face to face with practical 
problems and often leave the pastoral work because of the discourage- 
ments, costing the church good men and retarding the church program; 
and because of the fact that the Church of the Brethren does not provide 
close supervision for its young pastors, we petition Annual Conference to 
appoint a committee to study and present a plan for pastoral apprentice- 

Shlp ' C. E. Flory, Clerk 

Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: Granted the request for a com- 
mittee to study the matter and report next year. Committee: Ralph E. 
White (convener), George Detweiler, F. E. Mallott, H. L. Ruthrauff, W. 
H. Yoder. 



152 1951, San Jose, California 

Report of the Committee, 1951 
A study of our needs for pastoral apprenticeships reveals certain 
problems inherent in trying to suggest any comprehensive program, such 
as: 

1. A shortage of ministers to furnish even one minister to a church. 

2. The difficulty in securing well-qualified supervision. 

3. A shortage of adequate funds to carry on a comprehensive program. 

4. The fact that there are relatively few large churches in the Church 
of the Brethren. 

However, we realize that the church and its ministry could be profited 
by a pastoral apprenticeship plan. The value of the plan was fully dem- 
onstrated in a former day in the training which some of our ministers 
received under the guidance of wise and able elders or older ministers 
in the free ministry plan. We believe that an apprenticeship plan should 
include the following: 

1. Wider use of training young ministers under the guidance of older 
ministers who have done outstanding work. 

2. Wider use of field-secretaries as supervisors. 

3. Finding and enlisting a larger number of churches which are able 
and willing to support such a program, of which we have several ex- 
amples. Thought should also be given to finding and training the kind 
of young people who can make a contribution to the church served. 

4. Wider use of students from colleges and seminary in adjacent 
churches with adequate supervision and a recognition that such service 
has some part in a thorough training. 

5. Grouping churches where possible similarly as in the larger 
parish plan and using partly trained people under the direction of 
someone who is more fully trained. 

We recognize that to a large extent the carrying out of any such 
plan will rest largely in the hands of those charged with church ad- 
ministration; so we recommend that the Ministry and Home Mission 
Commission of the General Brotherhood Board, district mission boards 
or boards dealing with this problem, and the colleges and the seminary 
include plans for apprenticeship training as parts of their programs and 
put the plans into operation as far as they are able. 

F. E. Mallott, Secretary 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Report accepted. 

Peace Education and Promotion 

Whereas there appears to be need for clear and comprehensive in- 
terpretation of the historic Brethren Biblical principles of peace and 
nonresistance in the light of prevailing secular thought and patterns of 
living, 

The district conference of the Second District of Virginia, assembled 



1951, San Jose, California 153 

at Bridgewater, Virginia, March 30, 1951, petitions Annual Conference: 

1. To clarify and interpret its previous decisions on peace and non- 
resistance in the light of present needs. 

2. To renew the policy of providing adequate assistance and guidance 
to districts and regions through peace consultants or through such other 
plans and programs as Conference may approve. 

3. To commend our colleges for such courses on peace and non- 
resistance as are now being offered in their curricula, and to request 
all our church colleges to strengthen their offerings in this important 
area of our life and heritage. M R Wolfe> Secretary 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: It is considered that the 1948 
statement on "Position and Practice of the Church of the Brethren in 
Relation to War" is the answer to point one. On point two we urge our 
youth and adults to support the current efforts of the General Brother- 
hood Board in peace education and counseling, by taking advantage of 
institutes, workshops, and camp programs on peace. We do indeed 
commend our colleges for the place which they are giving to peace in 
their curricula and we would encourage them to expand their offerings 
in this field as much as practicable. 

Revision of the Brotherhood Organization 

Query, 1949 

Standing Committee recommends that Annual Conference appoint a 
committee of three to consider needed revisions to the report of the Com- 
mission of Fifteen adopted at the 1946 and 1947 Annual Conferences, and 
to bring recommendations next year. 

Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: Request granted. Committee: 
Rufus D. Bowman, chairman, Harry K. Zeller, Jr., secretary, William M. 
Beahm. 

Report of the Committee, 1950 
This committee met on December 20, 1949, and gave careful con- 
sideration to the report of the Commission of Fifteen as to areas in need 
of revision. It also considered a number of suggestions from various 
sources for revision or amendment. 

1. The committee recommends to the Annual Conference that a 
committee be appointed periodically, or constituted on a permanent 
basis, to prepare revisions of the organizational structure for the con- 
sideration of Annual Conference. 

2. The Committee also recommends the following proposed revisions 
to the published booklet, Brotherhood Organization, Church of the Breth- 
ren. [Note: Since only one revision recommended in the 1950 report of 
the committee was adopted by the Annual Conference, it is the only one 
included here.] 



154 2951, San Jose, California 

Under "The Local Church" 
V. Officials of the Church 

B. Elder-in-charge or Moderator of the Local Church 

The elder-in-charge of a local church should seek to be helpful to 
the pastor and to the church in every way he can. It is his responsibility 
to preside at all general business sessions or council meetings unless he 
has designated someone to serve in his stead. He is the moderator of the 
local church and should work co-operatively and carefully with the 
local church board in administering the church program. Consecrated 
and able laymen may be called by the church to become moderators of 
local churches, in which case they would perform the functions outlined 
above. 

Congregations which choose their moderator from the laity shall 
secure confirmation from the district board of administration or from the 
district elders' body. 

Action of 1950 Annual Conference: After some editorial revisions 
made by the committee the following motion was passed: That we 
adopt [the] recommendation [V-B under "The Local Church"] and 
appoint a committee of three as provided in the recommendation and 
recommit the remainder of this report along with the Orlando Conference 
report, to be edited, revised, and harmonized with the democratic con- 
cept of Brethren procedure and reported to the Conference of 1951. 
Committee: C. N. Ellis (convener), William M. Beahm, Galen B. Ogden. 

Report of the Committee, 1951 
In accordance with the action of the 1950 Annual Conference, the 
committee submits to the 1951 Annual Conference the following recom- 
mended revisions of the 1946 and 1947 Annual Conference actions as 
contained in the pamphlet, Brotherhood Organization; Church of the 
Brethren. [Note: Only the adopted revisions are included in this report; 
those interested in seeing the details of the original organization may 
refer to the 1947 minutes, under "Brotherhood Organization."] 

Under "The General Brotherhood Board" 
V. Tenure of Office 

Each board member shall be eligible for re-election for a second 
term. The normal term of office shall be for five years. A former board 
member is eligible for re-election one year after his retirement from 
the board. Any portion of a normal term shall be considered as a term. 
(This is an editorial revision and eliminates the sentences having to 'do 
with the inaugural steps of the new organization.) 

VII. How the General Brotherhood Board Will Function 

(This change of number is to allow for the insertion of the following 
addition as VI.) 



1951, San Jose, California 155 

VI. Method of Election 

The Standing Committee shall nominate two persons for each 
vacancy. Elections shall be by majority vote of the delegate body in 
regular session. (This is an addition to clarify procedure in harmony 
with former action of Annual Conference. See the minutes for 1945.) 

Under "Annual Conference" 

P. Functions of Standing Committee 

4. To serve as the nominating committee for Annual Conference 
officers, General Brotherhood Board members, and Annual Conference 
committees. The Standing Committee may use its own procedures in 
preparing the ballot. Further nominations may be made from the floor 
by the delegate body. (An editorial revision to clarify a point raised 
about Standing Committee's procedure.) 

III. Moderator 

A. Qualifications 

(Item 10 is to be omitted here and included in the following section 
as added.) 

B. Eligibility and Tenure 

1. The moderator must be an ordained elder or an ordained minister. 

2. Any elder or minister in the Church of the Brethren is eligible 
to be moderator. 

3. The moderator may serve not more than one term in five years. 

C. Method of Election 

The Standing Committee shall present at least two nominees. 
Further nominations may be made by the delegate body. A majority 
vote is necessary for election. 

D. Functions 

(The above is a rearrangement and an addition on tenure and method 
of election in harmony with Annual Conference minutes of 1944. 

IV. Alternate Moderator 

The alternate moderator shall act as moderator in case the elected 
moderator cannot serve. He shall serve for the moderator at his request 
in presiding over Standing Committee and Annual Conference, con- 
tacting regional and district conferences, and representing the brother- 
hood at strategic inter-church conferences. The method of nomination, 
election, and tenure shall be the same as for the moderator. (This 
revision is in harmony with the original idea of the alternate moderator, 
as per Annual Conference minutes of 1944.) 

V. The Writing Clerk or Secretary 

A. Qualifications and Tenure 

1. He shall be an ordained elder or minister. 



156 1951, San Jose, California 

2. He shall be elected for a three-year term. 

B. Functions 

He shall record the minutes of Standing Committee and of Annual 
Conference and shall publish the Annual Conference minutes. He shall 
interpret the actions of the Annual Conference on problems of the church. 
He shall serve as a member of the Annual Conference Program Com- 
mittee and of the Annual Conference Locating Committee. He shall 
approve the payment of all withdrawals from the Annual Conference 
treasury. 

(The above revisions are in harmony with the listing of qualifications 
and functions of the other Annual Conference officers. The statement on 
tenure is a clarification of present procedure. See Annual Conference 
minutes of 1924.) 

VI. The Reader 

The Standing Committee shall elect a reader from among their 
number who shall become the reader of Annual Conference. He shall not 
serve more than one year in five. The reader shall read distinctly all 
papers as often as requested. (This revision is a slight editing for 
consistent form and to clarify procedure in choosing the Conference 
reader.) 

VII. The Program Committee 

The program committee shall consist of the moderator of Annual 
Conference, a staff member selected by the General Brotherhood Board, 
who may be selected to serve for two years and cannot succeed himself, 
three members nominated by Standing Committee and elected by Annual 
Conference for three years with one member's term expiring each year. 
No member may succeed himself who has served a three-year term. The 
writing clerk shall be an ex-offlcio member of this committee. 

The program committee shall prepare and publish the program of 
the Annual Conference; and shall provide the necessary supervision for 
the most effective presentation of the program. (This is a slight editorial 
revision and adds the terms of tenure.) 

Under "The District" 
II. The District Elders' Body 

1. The district elders' body shall be composed of ordained elders 
and moderators of local congregations. The elders' body may extend 
the privileges of the meeting to visiting elders and moderators of 
local congregations Outside of the district. 

2. It shall receive reports of the conditions of the churches and 
shall make recommendations to district meetings in behalf of the spiritual 
welfare of the churches. 

3. It shall be responsible for the ordination of ministers and elders. 



1951, San Jose, California 157 

4. It shall act as the board of appeal for individual members and for 
local congregations. 

5. It is responsible for the counseling and discipline of ministers and 
elders. 

6. When the authority of the elder or moderator is disputed the 
elder, moderator, minister, congregation, or board of administration 
may refer the dispute to the elders' body for decision. 

7. The district elders' body shall initiate action in any situation in 
which it feels it necessary. 

8. The authority of the elders' body over moderators of local churches 
shall be the same as that over ordained elders." 

(This revision represents an editorial rearrangement of the material. 
It changes the term "executive head" to "moderator." Item 7 is added in 
harmony with Annual Conference minutes, 1942. Item 8 is added to 
clarify an ambiguity about the status of moderators.) 

Under "The Local Church" 
III. The Church Board 

PLAN TWO 

The Officials of the Church 

B. Moderator of the Local Church 

The moderator of a local church should seek to be helpful to the 
pastor and to the church in every way he can. It is his responsibility 
to preside at all general business sessions or council meetings unless 
he has designated someone to serve in his stead. He should work co- 
operatively and carefully with the local church board in administering 
the church program. Consecrated and able laymen or ordained ministers 
may be called by the church to become moderators of local churches, 
in which case they would perform the functions outlined above. 

Congregations which choose their moderators from the laity shall 
secure confirmation from the district board of administration or from 
the elders' body. 

(The above revisions represent a change of nomenclature using 
"moderator" instead of "executive head.") 

Under "Counseling and DiscrPLmE" 
VI. Procedure in Counseling and Discipline 

B. Offenses of Ordained Ministers and Elders and Moderators Of 
Local Churches 

7. Any minister or moderator has the right of appeal to the Standing 
Committee of the Annual Conference if not satisfied with the decision 
of the district elders' body. Until such time as the Standing Committee 
reverses the decision Of the district elders' body their decision stands. 



158 1951, San Jose, California 

(This adds the term "moderators of local churches" and also clarifies 
the status of decisions of the district elders' body.) 

Calvert N. Ellis (chairman) 
William M. Beahm (secretary) 
Galen B. Ogden 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Report adopted as revised. The 
committee is authorized to bring a further report to the 1952 Conference 
if they so desire and to revise and reprint the pamphlet entitled Brother- 
hood Organization at such time as they deem appropriate. 

Statement on Economic Problems 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
the adoption of the following: 

STATEMENT OF THE CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN ON ECONOMIC 

PROBLEMS 
The Church of the Brethren believes that the economic perplexities 
of our time require the church to give spiritual and practical guidance. 
The gospel of Jesus Christ must be more fully and successfully applied 
in this as in all areas of human life. It is doubtful whether any other 
area affects the individual more tangibly and immediately. Of his 
economic concerns he is most quickly conscious, and by them he is most 
quickly moved. Yet the church, which has often sought to guide or 
regulate more trivial aspects of the individual's conduct, has been slow 
and even fearful to speak on these larger issues. 

I. The Relevance op the Gospel 

The gospel of Jesus is relevant to every human motive and act. It 
has light to throw on every human problem. It brings judgment on every 
human error. Economic practices and beliefs can under no circumstances 
be exempt from the gospel's searching light. In the simpler economic 
relationships, the Bible made this clear long ago. "Thou shalt not steal" 
and "Thou shalt not covet" are commandments from Sinai (Exodus 
20:15, 17). The more elaborate codes of the Old Testament have much 
to say about property rights and obligations. 

The New Testament emphasizes the supremacy of the spiritual. But 
it does not support the idea that material concerns have no bearing on 
the spiritual. The cases of the young man with great possessions 
(Matthew 19: 16-22), of Ananias (Acts 5:1-11), and of the pious Pharisees 
who devoured widows' houses (Matthew 23:14) show how certain 
economic motives and practices can be fatal obstacles to spiritual 
achievement. 

In our own time it is evident that the claims and urgencies of 
"making a living" affect for good or ill the spiritual welfare of man. 



1951, San Jose, California 159 

A man's economic sins have both spiritual and physical consequences 
for himself and others. Our urban and rural slums, with their 
attendant evils of ill-health, juvenile delinquency and crime, immor- 
ality and despair show how economic conditions can bring even our 
children to moral ruin. The preoccupation of millions of our citizens 
with the effort to "get rich quick" results in such degrading practices 
as widespread gambling, false advertising, the sale of foolish or even 
pernicious commodities, and the corruption of government officials. 
The individual's concern for livelihood and possessions colors 
his motives and acts. His economic behavior affects his relationship 
to his neighbor and his eternal destiny. Thus, the two great com- 
mandments — to love God and to love one's neighbor — obligate the 
church to give guidance to men in their economic affairs. 

II. The Present Economic Situation 

Our current situation has certain special characteristics which 
should increase the church's concern. We are in the midst of a great 
conflict between two widely different economic philosophies. Each 
has millions of adherents, many of whom believe firmly that their 
system alone is right. 

To one of these our traditions and the extraordinary good fortune 
of this country encourage us to be intensely loyal. The other is so 
alien to our traditions that we regard it with horror. But it also 
has a multitude of loyal adherents, and millions see in its promises 
a spark of hope for a better life. 

Church leaders increasingly realize that it is not wise to bless 
one system without reservation while totally condemning the other. 
To do so makes the church a partisan in a struggle which threatens 
the world with untold tragedy. Moreover, the church thus endorses 
evils in our system which cannot be condoned. It is the church's 
business, instead, to measure all things by the gospel of Jesus and 
so to proclaim the will of God. 

There is another alarming aspect in the present situation. The 
temptation to go to war stems not alone from the threat of external 
attack. It stems also from the threat of depression and unemploy- 
ment, evils which persistently recur in our present system. It is 
tragic indeed that our economic ingenuity has as yet devised no other 
means than war to assure full employment and economic security. 
Yet, today there are people who look toward another war with some 
degree of welcome because they think it will mean prosperity. 

This strange perversion of values is the outgrowth of still another 
distressing characteristic of our time — materialism. An age of great 
inventions and discoveries, when marvelously intricate machines are 
devised for production, when the hidden secrets of the universe are 
probed, when the very barriers of space itself are crumbling, is, 



160 1951, San Jose, California 

nevertheless, an age when men are but little concerned about their 
Creator or his eternal values. Millions of men, neither moved nor 
inspired by our great discoveries, lose themselves in the pursuit of 
personal pleasure and gain. 

A final characteristic of our present world is the continued 
existence of misery and want. In spite of the ingenuities of mass 
production, even now a substantial part of our population is ill- 
housed, ill-clothed, and ill-fed. Other portions of the world are in 
far worse circumstances. The gospel teaches Christians to share 
with those less fortunate than themselves. We must recall the irony 
of James concerning those who piously say, "Be ye warmed and 
filled," without taking any practical steps to give aid (James 2:16). 
The church must encourage constructive criticism of any system, 
however excellent, which continues to be trailed by want, ignorance, 
and despair. 

If our economic beliefs and practices produce these sad results, 
how can the church valiantly and uncritically defend them? Is it 
not rather the church's place to seek for their causes and for means 
of correcting them? 

III. Christian Economic Principles 
The church recognizes the complexity of current economic issues. 
When experts disagree, it is understandable that church leaders who 
are not themselves experts hesitate to speak. Yet, basic Christian 
principles are within the understanding of the average Christian just 
as the effects of our present economic situation are within his powers 
of observation. 

The Sermon on the Mount, the Golden Rule, the twelfth chapter 
of Romans, the letter of James, and, in fact, the entire New Testament 
give us not only specific precepts but also a general atmosphere and 
spirit which is the spirit of Christ. The church can bless only those 
economic beliefs and practices which harmonize with this spirit. 

The Church of the Brethren presents the following applications 
of basic Christian principles to our economic life: 

1. It is not the church's place to ally itself with any particular 
system. The name of a system is not important; what it does is very 
important. The virtues and the faults of any system must be examined 
in the light of Christian teaching. 

2. Every person physically and mentally able to work should con- 
tribute a fair share of labor to the good Of society in the steady effort 
to fulfill his Christian vocation. 

3. Every person able to work should have the opportunity to do so. 
It should be possible for a willing person to find work suited to his 
capacities and to earn a decent living for himself and his dependents. 

4. Work should be done under conditions which are as healthful, 



1951, San Jose, California 161 

safe, interesting and gratifying as the nature of the work permits. 
Man's inventiveness should be employed to improve these conditions 
as quickly and as fully as possible. 

5. Educational facilities should be available for every youth to 
develop his abilities to the point where he can be of the greatest use 
to society and to God. 

6. Efficient and ample production of wholesome commodities is 
desirable. The benefits of such production should be enjoyed by society 
as a whole, not merely by a small minority. If production no longer 
requires long hours of labor from the average worker, earnings should 
be sufficient for his needs and the wholesome, constructive use of his 
leisure. 

7. The desire for security, economic advancement, and prestige must 
be subject to Christian self-control to avoid injury to others or to society 
as a whole. "Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself" (Matthew 22:39). 
For the sake of his neighbor the Christian will limit his personal wants. 

8. The church cannot approve national economic policies which 
injure other nations. Trade barriers or monopolies which prevent 
equitable distribution of needful goods at fair prices are wrong. The 
sharing of technical knowledge with the more-backward areas of the 
world is Christian. 

9. The idea that the profit motive is and must be the mainspring 
of human endeavor is contrary to Christian teaching. 

10. The possession of wealth out of all proportion to a person's 
needs or to his contribution to society cannot be easily reconciled with 
the spirit of Christ. Neither can unusual degrees of economic power 
or control. The legitimate possession of wealth or economic influence 
must take the form of a stewardship which is sensitive to God's will 
and the needs of mankind. 

11. The production of unwholesome commodities and services and 
the waste it involves should be abolished. So also should the selfish 
exploitation of natural resources Or of any persons or groups. 

12. Since production for war purposes leads either to the destruction 
of goods and resources (not to speak now of human lives) or to the 
stagnant waste of these goods, neither war nor preparation for war 
can be defended on Christian principles. 

13. Economic groups having common interests, such as labor, em- 
ployers, or consumers, have the right to organize to promote their 
legitimate needs and purposes. The church cannot, however, approve 
the pursuit of selfish advantage or any practices which injure society 
or any segment Of it. 

IV. Recommendation for Action 
Recognizing again that these are complex issues, but also that the 
Christian gospel is adequate, the church makes the following recom- 



162 1951, San Jose, California 

mendations for action. They are a beginning, subject to the tests of time 
and experience. They are to be improved, enlarged, and enriched. 

1. Church leaders and the general membership should study the 
facts of economic life. Appropriate boards, committees, or individuals 
should be appointed to research on our economic practices, the tensions 
and conflicts to which they give rise, and possible solutions. This will 
involve more than the reading of books. Firsthand acquaintance should 
be made with labor, management, the professions, and consumer groups 
to understand their various viewpoints. 

In the training of ministers and other leaders the impact of economic 
needs and desires on human behavior must be duly recognized. Our 
seminary and colleges, as well as the less formal programs of our 
conferences and camps, should regularly include the economic aspects 
of the church's task in their curricula. 

Likewise, the local church should deal with these issues in pulpit, 
classroom, and discussion groups. 

2. The goal of such study should include the development of in- 
formed Christian attitudes on the questions and conflicting claims which 
arise. Among such attitudes are these: That every individual, regard- 
less of race, creed, sex, or economic status, is a being of infinite potential 
worth in the sight Of God. That Christian love constrains us to be 
concerned for the entire welfare of all persons and groups. That the 
Christian must testify for the principles of the gospel in whatever groups 
he is a member. That every worthy vocation is a form of Christian 
service. That men are stewards of the knowledge, skills, and wealth 
which God has given to them. 

3. The church should encourage experimentation with new types 
Of economic organization which show promise Of exemplifying the 
Christian ideal more fully. For example, co-operatives, credit unions, 
and profit-sharing plans deserve more attention. 

4. The church must keep its own economic house in order. Since 
the church itself acts as employer, purchaser, and owner of property, 
its own practices with respect to wages, hours, pensions, and rentals 
should be in harmony with Christian principles. A sharing of burdens 
between those parishes which enjoy few advantages and those which 
have many should be increasingly practiced in the distribution of lead- 
ership, financial aid, and quotas for giving. 

5. Regardless of risks or penalties, the church must speak prophet- 
ically concerning economic conflict and injustice. It must be ready to 
mediate between opposing economic groups. It must join hands with 
other Christian bodies and with worthy secular organizations to work 
for the increasing realization of a Christian economic order. 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Statement adopted as revised 
by the committee. 



7952, Richmond, Virginia 



Bible Training Problem 

Query, 1950 
The board Of directors of Bethany Biblical Seminary requests 
Annual Conference through Standing Committee to appoint an Annual 
Conference committee to study the problem of Bible training school 
work in the Church of the Brethren and report to the next Annual 
Conference. 

This study may well include the effect of independent Bible schools 
on the Church of the Brethren, a more adequate Brotherhood program 
for the education of lay workers, the possibilities of increasing extension 
work from our colleges and the seminary, and the place of Bethany 
Bible Training School in the future educational program of the church. 

Rufus D. Bowman, President 
E. G. Hoff, Chairman Board of Directors 

Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: Request granted. Committee: 
C. Ernest Davis (convener), S. Loren Bowman, T. Wayne Rieman, 
R. W. Schlosser, Jesse H. Ziegler. 

Report of the Committee, 1951 
I. The Statement op the Problem 

A. Need for Greater Bible Literacy in the Church 

The Church of the Brethren was born out of Bible study. It has 
sought to base its doctrines and practices solidly on the New Testament. 
Our understanding of the real teaching of the Scriptures is vital to 
the spiritual health and progress of our church. We believe that greater 
Biblical literacy on the part of our people will assist in curing whatever 
ills we have. Increased understanding of the Bible will enable us to 
know our Lord better, correct our errors, and strengthen our spiritual 
life and program. A love for the Bible and a desire to study and know 
it are distinct characteristics of our people at their best. 

B. Effect of Negative, Subversive Teaching 

Unfortunately, this very eagerness to learn has sometimes left us 
wide open to the approaches of would-be-teachers of the Word who, 
despite their pretensions of love for the Bible, exactness of understand- 
ing, and finality of interpretation, have actually led many astray from 
the heritage of Biblical doctrine and practice that has come down to 
us in the Church of the Brethren, through a long line of faithful students 
and teachers of the Word, a heritage that, under the guidance of the 
Holy Spirit, has been tested by time and experience. 

These false teachers often stress the letter which kills but neglect 



164 1952, Richmond, Virginia 

the spirit which gives life (2 Corinthians 3:6). Ignoring basic principles 
of literary interpretation, they, with great zeal, have wrested the 
Scriptures to the upsetting of the faith of many and the disruption of 
the peace of entire congregations. 

These successors of the false teachers of the apostolic age whom 
Paul branded as "dogs" and "evil workers" (Philippians 3:2) today 
effectively sow discord among brethren (Proverbs 6: 19) as they creep 
into houses and lead astray silly women and unwary men. Even the 
old motive, "for filthy lucre's sake" (Titus 1:11), seems often to be 
present not merely as greed for personal income but in the subtler and 
more dangerous form of seeking to wrap the cloak of religion around 
serious inequities in our social, economic, and political organizations 
and operations. It is high time for us to understand that the attitudes 
of the Master must be found in all who would interpret his message. 

C. Sources of Infection 

There are many sources of infection from erroneous Bible teachings 
and interpretations. Tracts, books, magazines and publications of un- 
savory and divisive character, and radio speakers and traveling preach- 
ers and lecturers that pretend great loyalty to the Scriptures but warp 
and twist the real message of the Bible and misinterpret the very spirit 
of Christ are among the serious offenders. Posing as teachers, they 
need that someone teach them. Parading as messengers of light, they 
are actually leading their followers back into the darkness and slavery 
of unscriptural concepts that make a mockery of Christian truth and 
doctrine. Sometimes this source of infection even takes the organized 
form of an independent Bible school of dubious character which poisons 
the minds of the students and then sends them forth as ministers and 
church workers, to confuse and misguide the unsuspecting. 

D. More Effective Teaching Needed 

Clearly we need a program that will protect us administratively 
from multiplying and maintaining the ministry of false teachers and 
that, positively, will teach our people the Bible in a more effective way, 
enabling them not just to trust, but to "try the spirits whether they are 
of God" (1 John 4:1). This teaching program, by replacing our inadequate 
understanding with more abundant knowledge and insights, will enable 
us more certainly to "be not moved away from the hope of the gospel" 
which we have heard but to "continue in the faith grounded and settled" 
(Colossians 1:23), holding "fast the form of sound words" which we 
have received (2 Timothy 1:13) and the "traditions which [we] have 
been taught" (2 Thessalonians 2:15). Only the competency which 
emerges from such a program of sound Bible study and teaching will 
enable us to overcome the eating canker of false doctrines (2 Timothy 
2:15-18). 



1952, Richmond, Virginia 165 

II. A Program for Meeting the Problem 
We suggest the following as elements in a projected program of 
Bible teaching for the church: 

A. More Bible Teaching in Local Churches 

In order that the lay membership of our church may not fall into 
erroneous teaching subversive of the peace of the church, we recom- 
mend: 

1. That where uniform Sunday-school lessons are used, a genuine 
effort be made to use them more effectively. 

2. That elective units should be used in the Sunday school to 
provide a more balanced emphasis upon the fundamental Bible doc- 
trines. Such elective units should find wider use in midweek services 
also. 

3. That congregations or groups of congregations arrange a mini- 
mum of twenty hours a year when all their members can come together 
for a systematic study of the great doctrines of the Bible, or the books 
of the Bible, under the leadership of a competent teacher who is in 
sympathy with the beliefs and program of the Church of the Brethren. 
This can be accomplished by the concentrated work of institutes and 
retreats — or by a weekly session over a period of weeks. 

4. That classes be arranged for young people desiring to study 
ordinances of the church, with reference to specific Brethren teachings. 
These should be set up by congregational units — or by a group of 
churches located close together. Teachers of such classes would discover 
the best talent among our young people and could be instrumental in 
their going on to college or to Bethany Training School. 

5. That regional councils assume the responsibility for planning 
and sponsoring such a program in their respective districts and churches. 
The councils should suggest suitable courses of study and develop a list 
of capable teachers who would be available to the churches. We believe 
that such courses would be self-sustaining, but, should any deficit occur, 
the regional council should provide what additional help is needed. 

B. Continuation of the Bible Training Program in Our Colleges 

We commend our colleges for their continuing efforts to provide 
educational opportunities within the framework and atmosphere of 
the Christian faith. 

We believe that a man who does not understand the Hebrew- 
Christian tradition and who has not made a serious study of its literature 
and institutions is not an educated man. 

We recommend to our colleges: 

1. The continuation of Bible requirements for graduation and an 



166 1952, Richmond, Virginia 

extension of these to include every student regardless of the course in 
which he enrolls. 

2. An extension of offerings which will especially train students 
for service in the local church. Such courses ought to include: 

a. The art of worship 

b. Teaching in the church school 

c. Youth and the Christian church 

d. The Christian family 

e. The purpose and program of the church 

f. The Christian faith 

g. History of the Church of the Brethren 
h. Music in the local church 

3. That only teachers who have a Christian philosophy of life be 
selected. 

4. That every effort be made to provide warm religious experience 
and meaningful religious activities for the students. 

5. That they make available, to the greatest possible extent, their 
facilities and faculty members for conferences, leadership training 
retreats, and Bible institutes. 

C. Future of the Bible Training School 

1. The following facts are relevant in making a decision: 

a. The Training School has produced directly some men who are 
rendering excellent service to the church. 

b. For the last ten years the Training School has sent an average 
of twelve students, with a range of six to nineteen students, each year 
to college, many of whom otherwise never would have gone into a 
Brethren college. 

c. The Training School satisfies in some earnest church people the 
desire to attend "Bible school." 

d. Classes for seminary students' wives who are not college gradu- 
ates would be necessary whether or not the Training School continues 
to operate in Chicago. 

e. Economic aid due to ready employment makes it possible for 
some to start their higher education who would otherwise be deprived. 

f. The Training School satisfies the need of the older married person 
for training for church service and could do more. 

g. If the Training School continues in its present location, it would 
be possible to provide courses in Bible and the Christian faith for nurses 
in training in the proposed Nurses' Training School authorized by 
Conference in conjunction with Bethany Hospital. 

h. The Training School is not at present adequately staffed to offer 
enough courses to fit the needs. 

i. Accreditation agencies will likely require further divorce of the 
Training School from the Seminary. 



1952, Richmond, Virginia 167 

j. A wide gap in educational background between some Training 
School and Seminary students causes some strains. 

k. Physical facilities such as library, classrooms, and housing are 
taxed to capacity. 

1. Needs of the Seminary alone point toward the erection of a 
combined classroom-library-administration building within five to eight 
years. 

2. Recommendations: A careful weighing of all relevant factors 
leads us to make the following recommendations: 

a. The Training School should continue to be the central Bible 
training school for the church. 

b. The Training School should remain in Chicago under the over-all 
administration of the Seminary. 

c. Steps should be taken to effect a further separation of the Train- 
ing School from the Seminary. 

(1) A separate dean for the Training School would seem advisable. 

(2) Separate classroom, office, and housing facilities should be 
allocated as soon as possible. Early erection of the building mentioned 
in C-l-1, the need for which is indicated, will help to make this separa- 
tion possible. 

(3) The Training School should be renamed to eliminate confusion 
between attendance at and graduation from the Training School or the 
Seminary. 

d. The Training School curriculum should be enriched by providing 
courses in religious art and such other additional fields as the church 
may desire. 

e. The present restrictive policy should be changed so that solicita- 
tion for suitable students for the Training School may be allowed. 

f. A nominal tuition charge should be made to all Training School 
students. 

g. More clearly defined relation between Training School courses 
offered and college curricula should be worked out to facilitate transfer 
to college where that seems desirable. 

h. The Training School should add at least one additional person 
to the staff and another should be anticipated with the increase in the 
Training School student body. 

i. A minimum age for entrance to the Training School should be 
set at twenty and additional supervisory and counseling personnel 
should be assigned to Training School students. 

j. A minimum of 10,000 annually should be added to the grant from 
the Brotherhood Fund to the Seminary-Training School budget for 
operating the increased program of the Training School when fully 
inaugurated. 

k. Solicitation of $50,000 should be authorized for the purchase of 



168 2952, Richmond, Virginia 

an additional apartment building for providing needed housing for 

Training School students. 

C. Ernest Davis, Chairman 
S. Loren Bowman, Secretary 
T. Wayne Rieman 
R. W. Schlosser 
Jesse H. Ziegler 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: A section on the calling and 
placing of ministers and pastors was deleted because the matter is 
already cared for in other papers. The report was then spread on the 
minutes for one year in order to allow the Bethany electors to examine 
its implications and possibilities. 

Report of the Bethany Board of Directors, 1952 

The board of directors of Bethany Biblical Seminary, after a careful 
study of the recommendations of the Annual Conference committee 
appointed to study the Bible Training School problem, makes the 
following report: 

1. The board of directors finds in the report of the Annual Confer- 
ence Committee a valuable and factual statement regarding the need 
of more Biblical and doctrinal teaching throughout our church. 

2. The board of directors also believes that the statements under 
C-l, "Future of the Bible Training School," represent a correct analysis 
of the present situation. 

3. The board of directors, however, sees serious problems in a great- 
ly expanded Bible Training School program in connection with the 
Seminary. 

a. Priority of the Seminary. Recognizing the desirability of an 
expanded Bible Training School, the board of directors nevertheless 
regards the Seminary as primary. It holds that the Seminary interests 
must be adequately safeguarded in any new plans and developments. 

b. Present Budget Increase. The board of directors has had to ask 
for a $10,000 increase from the Brotherhood Fund to cover increased 
costs and a modest strengthening of the Seminary and the Bible Training 
School of the present size, making a total asking of $70,000 for current 
expenses. 

c. Budget Requirements for an Expanded Bible Training School. An 
expanded Training School would call for at least two new teachers and 
at least $10,000 more per year to operate the increased program. 

d. Student Housing. An expanded Bible Training School would 
require the building of a new apartment building for housing. The more 
economical procedure of purchasing an apartment building would not 
be feasible under present laws, for the school would have no right to 
vacate the apartments in order to put students in them. 



1952, Richmond, Virginia 169 

e. School Equipment. In order to provide necessary facilities and 
make possible the required separation between Seminary and Training 
School, the classroom-library-administration building would need to be 
built before there could be an expanded Bible Training School. C-l-1 
of the report indicates that the Seminary needs alone may require this 
building in from five to eight years. The expanded Bible Training 
School would hasten the need and make a larger building necessary. 

It appears to the board of directors that nothing short of a ground 
swell of interest in an enlarged training school could justify a decision 
to proceed with these two buildings and realignment of percentages 
in allotments in the Brotherhood Fund necessary to the maintaining 
of the enlarged institution in lean years as well as fat ones. 

RECOMMENDATIONS : 

The board of directors therefore recommends to Annual Conference 
that the C-2 recommendations of the [1951] report be revised to read as 
follows: 

a. That the Bible Training School continue to be the central Bible 
Training School for the church. 

b. That the Training School remain in Chicago under the over-all 
administration of the Seminary. 

c. That for the present the Bible Training School be modestly 
strengthened rather than expanded, and that increased effort be made 
to get into it the people whose training would be most useful to the 
church. 

d. That feasible steps be taken to effect a further separation of the 
Bible Training School from the Seminary. 

(1) By the appointment of a separate dean for the Bible Training 
School — one of our present faculty men. 

(2) By realigning classroom, office, and housing facilities and look- 
ing toward the erection of the classroom-library-administration building 
in the not-too-distant future. 

e. That the Training School curriculum be restudied and enriched. 

f. That a nominal tuition charge be made to all Training School 
students. 

g. That the enrollment of the Training School should not exceed 
one hundred students per year, the number that may possibly be housed 
within our present buildings. Recruiting for the Bible Training School 
should be carried on from the ranks of mature church workers who 
cannot go to college. 

h. That as a general rule the minimum age of entrance to the 
Bible Training School be twenty. 

This recommended strengthening of the Bible Training School can 
be put into operation in the school year of 1952-1953, provided the 



170 1952, Richmond, Virginia 

increased budget item of $70,000 from the Brotherhood Fund is provided. 

E. G. Hoff, Chairman 
Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Report adopted as slightly 
revised and regarding the board of directors' recommendations as a 
substitute for the C-2 recommendations of the 1951 report of the 
committee. 

Brotherhood Fund Goal, 1952-53 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
the adoption of a Brotherhood Fund goal of $1,260,000 for the year 
1952-1953. 

Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Adopted the goal as recom- 
mended. 

Brotherhood Theme, 1952-54 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
the adoption of a continuous emphasis on evangelism, using for two 
years beginning October 1, 1952, the theme, win men to christ. 

Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Adopted the recommended 
emphasis and theme, together with the following statement on the 
theme prepared by Desmond W. Bittinger and Harper S. Will: 

WIN MEN TO CHRIST 

The earnest supplication, "Thy Kingdom come," has always been 
at the center of the Disciples' Prayer. Jesus taught it that way to his 
little band of followers on a hillside in Galilee. 

Those first followers yearned for the Kingdom with almost painful 
intensity. Their daily condition was steeped in suffering; their long-time 
outlook seemed utterly despairing unless God intervened. Their per- 
sistent prayer for the Kingdom ended with the cry, "How long, O Lord, 
how long?" 

But even though they walked with Jesus in Galilee, sat with him 
in the upper room and witnessed Calvary, they still could not understand 
how the Kingdom was to come. As Jesus led them up Mt. Ascension 
they asked once more, "Will you at this time restore the Kingdom?" 
They expected him to call it out of heaven in some miraculous way. 

There on the mountain Jesus clarified for them and for us how 
the Kingdom is to come. His words were mountaintop words destined 
for all times and for all people. "Go ye," said he, "into all the world 
and win men to Christ." He did not ask them to go hesitatingly or alone; 
he would go with them. Working in his strength and power, "for Thine 
is the power," men were to be the instruments in whom and through 
whom Christ would build his Kingdom. 

That is the way he would still build it. "Go ye and win men to 



1952, Richmond, Virginia 171 

Christ" is forever the rallying cry of Kingdom building. There is no 
other way in which it can be done. The Church of the Brethren has 
recommended for its theme for the next two years this Christian rallying 
call, win men to Christ. We suggest that evangelism be at the center 
of our program of outreach and work. Our leader and source of power 
will be Jesus Christ; our goal will be to lead men to him that he might 
redeem them, help them to grow in grace, and use them in his Kingdom. 
To this theme and commission we would dedicate ourselves, our 
time, and our means without restriction or reservation. 

Our Stewardship 

During the past year the Church of the Brethren has sought to 
render faithful stewardship in the Master's Kingdom. The groundwork 
has been laid for a program of evangelism which solicits and merits 
the participation of every member of the church. 

This year the largest group of missionaries to be sent out in any 
recent year will be consecrated in the name of the Lord. Our overseas 
work is growing; God's hand of blessing is clearly upholding it. But 
the work has only begun to reach its fullest possibilities. 

In Brethren Service work we have endeavored to be faithful 
Samaritans along a Jericho road where not one but thousands lie broken 
in body and in spirit. As we help them to their feet we are also trying 
to help them do something about the Jericho road itself. We are 
prepared to enter Korea and Palestine in this spirit as soon as the way 
opens. 

Our program of temperance education and preparation for home 
and family life has been enlarged. 

New churches have been built or improved in home mission areas 
and in vital sectors of population expansion. Great challenges still 
await our acceptance. 

The Brethren are at work: God's Spirit has been leading and 
blessing them. Our financial undergirding of this far-flung program 
has been encouraging. At Our last Annual Conference we accepted 
seriously a financial goal of $1,250,000. So far our giving to support 
this goal is 23% above what it was during the corresponding period a 
year ago. 

The Year Ahead 

Our heavenly Father has shown great faith in us, his children, in 
that he has placed in our hands the expansion and work of his Kingdom. 
He has called us to be Kingdom builders with him. "He has no hands 
but our hands to do his work today." 

We dare not fail him. The work of the church must not falter. 
Christ needs every one of us. 

A Brotherhood goal of $1,260,000 is recommended for the year 



172 1952, Richmond, Virginia 

ahead. That is an increase of $10,000 over the goal of the current year. 
With this amount the Church of the Brethren hopes to carry forward 
and enlarge its great Christian work which knows no boundaries and 
has no turning-back places. 

Let us accept the goal that we may win men to Christ for his sake. 

Go ye, Brethren, and win men to Christ. 

Date for the Pastoral Year 

Note: This item deals with Section 1-5 of the query entitled 
"Ministerial Placement and Policy," considered by the 1951 Conference. 

1-5. The Pastoral Year. The pastoral year begins August 1. No 
change in pastorates should be contemplated at any other time, except 
where conditions arise which may cause injury to the work of the 
Kingdom or jeopardize in a personal way the welfare of the minister. 
Such situations should be adjusted by mutual consent of the church 
and the minister. 

Answer of the 1951 Annual Conference: Statement adopted as 
revised by the committee. The matter of the pastoral year in section 
1-5 was excepted. This was referred to a special study committee for 
report next year. Committee: Ora DeLauter, J. Clyde Forney, J. 
Herbert Miller. 

Report of the Committee, 1952 

A report before the San Jose Conference suggested the change of 
the pastoral year from September 1 — August 31 to August 1 — July 31. 
This suggested change was referred to a committee to study. 

From our study the following is apparent: 

1. That the majority of the pastors do not see the need for a change. 

2. It is also evident that among those who feel that a change would 
be good, there is no unity as to what date should be chosen. 

3. That no date would be entirely satisfactory. 

Therefore the committee feels that we should not change the date 
of the pastoral year at this time. 

Ora DeLauter (chairman), J. Clyde Forney, J. Herbert Miller 
Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Report adopted. 

Equalization of Pastors' Salaries 

Query, 1950 
Because we believe that the principles of Christian brotherhood 
should operate more definitely in the area of church-pastor relation- 
ships, we the District of Oregon, assembled in district conference at 
Portland, October 27-30, 1949, petition Annual Conference through the 
Standing Committee that a committee be appointed by the Ministry 



1952, Richmond, Virginia 173 

and Home Mission Commission to make a study of a possible plan 
for the -equalization of pastors' salaries throughout the brotherhood. 

Mrs. Gladys Faw, Writing Clerk 
Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: Granted the request and the 
query was referred to the General Brotherhood Board for study and 
report next year. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1951 
The General Brotherhood Board wishes to report progress in the 
study of equalization of pastors' salaries and to ask another year in 
which to work further. 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: More time granted. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1952 

The General Brotherhood Board has given careful study on the 
concern of this query. Information has been sought to discover new 
insights and creative ways of dealing with the problem of a just and 
equitable payment to all pastors. 

We recognize the need to locate strong pastoral leadership in all 
parishes of the brotherhood regardless of their size or location. Smaller 
and weaker churches need leadership just as capable as the larger and 
stronger ones, even though their resources often do not make possible 
the payment of adequate salaries for such service. The future of the 
church depends in large measure upon the quality of leadership 
available to it. 

Certain inherent problems tend to make impractical a general wage 
scale covering all our ministry across our brotherhood. 

First, such a plan would necessitate a pooling of funds for pastors' 
salaries, either on a district or a brotherhood level. Some sort of 
assessment would need to be made on the basis of numerical and/or 
financial strength in order to have funds available. 

Second, conditions and costs of living, added increments from field 
and farm, opportunities to supplement by garden or livestock, size and 
health conditions of family, and demands upon the minister socially 
and otherwise, all greatly vary the salary necessary in each individual 
case. 

There seem to be other possibilities of dealing creatively with this 
deep and just concern. We would mention the following: 

(1) Wherever a unit, such as a district, desires to do so and can 
find a satisfactory arrangement, we would encourage creative efforts 
of equitable salary payment for all. On the district level such a plan 
may be possible. 

(2) The brotherhood and the districts will need to continue to 
supplement salaries for ministers of smaller churches until they can 
assume the full support. The present plan is based upon careful 



174 3952, Richmond, Virginia 

investigation of need, principles of stewardship in the local church, 
and the continuous yearly retirement of such aid. 

(3) We believe it is helpful to have a suggested minimum salary 
scale for the brotherhood. At present this is the case. Such a minimum 
salary scale should serve as a floor for a minister's salary. It should be 
revised as national economic conditions change. It should encourage 
our churches to support our ministers adequately. 

(4) In addition to the minimum salary scale we believe both the 
Ministerial and Missionary Pension Plan and the Ministers' Group Life 
Insurance and Hospitalization Plan represent steps toward financial 
security for all our ministers. The Board would encourage all local 
churches, pastors, and districts to press toward participation in both 
of these brotherhood-sponsored plans. 

Further, our churches should be taught by district boards and local 
laymen of vision to understand the responsibility of the church to 
support adequately its minister and to seek creative ways of making 
possible a living comparable to the average of the members of the 
congregation. 

Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Report adopted as revised. 

Literature for Youth 

Query, 1951 
The Limestone Church of the Brethren, assembled in council August 
6, 1950, requests the district conference convening at the Jackson Park 
church, Jonesboro, August 16-18, 1950, to petition the 1951 General 
Conference to appoint a committee to make a study looking toward 
the improvement of the youth quarterly of our Sunday-school literature 
and to explore the possibility of providing helps for Sunday evening 
young people's meetings. 

Sam Presley, Clerk 

Answer of district meeting: Passed by Tennessee district conference 
to General Conference, August 17, 1950. 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Amended to include inter- 
mediates and referred to the General Brotherhood Board. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1952 
The General Brotherhood Board presents the following answer to 
the Conference query, "Study of Literature for Youth." It is thought 
that an analysis of our materials and the efforts being made to meet 
the needs in this area may cover the concerns of the query. 

The query called for a study of the Brethren Youth Quarterly and 
the helps provided for Sunday evening young people's meetings. The 
Conference action specified including intermediate materials in the 
study. 



2952, Richmond, Virginia 175 

The Brethren Youth Quarterly is directed to youth of both inter- 
mediate and senior ages. It is prepared over the intermediate-senior 
age group outlines of the Uniform Lesson Series, and is written by our 
Brethren youth editor, Vernard Eller. Older youth use the Brethren 
Adult Quarterly. It will be apparent that the interests and needs of inter- 
mediate and senior youth differ widely, but denominations much larger 
than ours find it necessary to seek to serve these needs in one publica- 
tion. The circulation of our Youth Quarterly — about 13,000 — is too lim- 
ited to sustain financially even the one publication without loss. 

In addition to the Youth Quarterly on uniform lessons, we imprint 
a Brethren edition of closely graded lessons for intermediates. These 
graded lessons are fitted directly to the needs of intermediates in each 
year of their growth, and are edited for Brethren use. 

Besides these series of lessons we have an elective peace unit for 
younger youth, Calling All Peacemakers, by Gordon Shull, and an 
elective unit on the church for older youth and adults, You and Your 
Church, by DeWitt L. Miller. Other good elective courses published by 
other denominations are available. These elective courses are suitable 
for use either in the Sunday-school hour or at some other time. 

We have one Sunday-school paper, Horizons, for youth of all ages. 
It has a circulation of about thirty thousand. A new press has recently 
made possible the use of two colors in Horizons as well as in the chil- 
dren's papers. Much thought has been given to publishing a paper 
specifically for intermediates, but in a denomination of our size we have 
not yet seen how this could be done without subsidizing it to the extent 
of perhaps $10,000 per year. Much intermediate-level material is now 
included in Horizons. The Five Year Meeting of Friends uses our 
Horizons as well as our Youth Quarterly in an imprint edition. 

Program materials for Sunday evening meetings are carried each 
month in Horizons. These materials are written by many of our best 
Brethren leaders. Some Friends also contribute. Printing in Horizons 
is the economical way of publishing the program materials. They might 
well be clipped and filed for future reference when not used immedi- 
ately. Interests such as the following have been covered in recent 
months: "The Challenge of the Church," by Dan West; "Christianity 
South" (Latin America), by Benton Rhoades; "From Friendship to 
Being in Love," by Jesse Ziegler; "Christians in an un-Christian World," 
by Gordon Shull; "Stewards of God's World," by Kenneth Morse; 
"Tremendous Trifles," by Vernard Eller; "Exploring the Bible," by 
Burton Metzler; "Before You Say 'I Do,' " by DeWitt and Mary Miller; 
"Missions on Your Doorstep," by Loren Bowman. 

The National Youth Cabinet is now studying its organizational 
structure looking toward a new approach in local CBYF cabinet 
organization. The new pattern being studied is built around functional 



176 1952, Richmond, Virginia 

program responsibilities and will lift up the total Christian life. This 
reorganization, if adopted, will help the youth fellowships to find greater 
variety for their Sunday evening programs and will lend itself to a 
more complete Christian witness. 

Our editors keep in touch with other denominations in order to 
share in their experience and utilize such materials of theirs as are 
of value to us. 

Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Report accepted. 

Redistribution of Districts 

Query, 1949 
The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference, 
through Standing Committee, the appointment of a committee to study 
the matter of redistricting some of our territory in order to give each 
district, as much as possible, the financial and leadership strength to 
make it more nearly indigenous and better equipped to meet an expand- 
ing church program. 

Annual Conference recognized the need for giving attention to this 
problem as early as 1924 when a committee was appointed to study 
the whole question. This committee reported to the 1928 Annual Confer- 
ence [see pages 56-60, Minutes of the Annual Conferences, 1923-1944]. 
No action was taken to implement the report of this committee. 

Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: Authorized the General Broth- 
erhood Board to make such a study. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1950 
The General Brotherhood Board is carefully studying the alignment 
of districts of the brotherhood but is unable at present to do more than 
report progress and ask another year for continuation of the study. 
In the meantime, the General Brotherhood Board recommends that 
wherever districts feel the need of consideration of merger for the best 
interest of the progress of the church, they be urged to proceed with 
such study and such action as they may deem advisable. 

We commend the districts of Southwestern Kansas and North- 
western Kansas in their considered action toward merger. 

Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: Granted the request for anoth- 
er year of study. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1951 
The General Brotherhood Board reports progress and asks for more 

time to continue the study. 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Request for more time was 

granted. 



1952, Richmond, Virginia 177 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1952 

There seems to be considerable evidence that some alteration in 
our district lines and perhaps some shifting of our churches from one 
district to another would be highly desirable for the effectiveness of 
the work of the Kingdom. 

In 1928 the following recommendations were adopted by Annual 
Conference: 

"I. After a careful study of the field and the work of the state 
districts, we find some of them small in membership, which tends to 
discouragement and disintegration. We therefore recommend: 

"First. That since there are many advantages for co-operation and 
supervision in the larger districts, we suggest that districts consider 
combining where this advantage seems possible, and especially districts 
with a membership under 750. 

"Second. That hereafter no state districts be organized without a 
membership of at least 750." 

We recognize that many of the more important spiritual values 
cannot be reliably judged by measurable standards. However, we feel 
that some specific standards are necessary and valuable and therefore 
suggest the following criteria as valid standards in determining the 
spiritual condition of districts and guides to assist in working out 
constructive solutions to the problems of redistribution of districts: 

First, Organizing New Districts 

a. No new district should be organized (1) without the approval 
of the district or districts now in existence from whose territory the 
new district is to be established and (2) without the approval of the 
Annual Conference, and (3) without careful study as to the apparent 
strength of the proposed new district. It should have sufficient numerical 
strength and leadership to make possible a strong nurturing fellowship, 
and aggressive growth and development. 

b. The regional office should be ready to assist and serve in a 
counseling relationship in working out arrangements for the organiza- 
tion of new districts. 

Second, Strengthening Existing Districts 

a. If existing districts have grown weak and lack sufficient member- 
ship or adequate leadership to provide a vital and aggressive fellowship, 
steps should be taken by the regional board to conserve the best interests 
of the churches. 

b. In order to change district lines or to shift a church from one 
district to another, approval should be secured from the districts 
involved. 

Third, Merging Districts 

a. A district now in existence desiring to merge with another dis- 



178 1952, Richmond, Virginia 

trict, for purposes of more effective administration, acquiring stronger 
leadership, or strengthening the financial resources, must have the 
approval of its own district meeting. 

b. Such a district may approach the district or districts with which 
it desires to merge through the respective district boards and/or district 
meetings or the regional board or boards. 

c. Before such a merger can be consummated, both of the merging 
districts must grant approval to the merger. 

Fourth, General Encouragement 

Wherever districts feel the need of consideration of merger for the 
best interest of the progress of the church, they are urged to proceed 
along the lines suggested above with such study and such action as 
seem advisable. In all such interests, the regional and brotherhood 
offices should be kept informed and may be called upon for assistance 
whenever needed. 

Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Report adopted. 

Statement on Alcohol 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
the adoption of the following statement on alcohol. 

The Church of the Brethren views with deep concern the enormous 
proportions which the manufacture, sale, and distribution of alcoholic 
beverages have reached in recent years. A people cannot live within 
a culture or social group without being affected to some extent by the 
beliefs and practices of the group. We, therefore, deem it necessary 
to restate our position and implement it with a program for the present 
era. 

I. The Problem 

A. The Problem in America 

Alcoholism has emerged as one of America's greatest problems. 
Authorities from Yale University, Allied Youth, and other outstanding 
organizations estimate that approximately sixty-five to sixty-six million 
people fifteen years of age and older are drinking. While a great number 
of these are moderate drinkers, alcoholics are made from the moderate 
user. 

The basic effect of alcohol is upon the moral relationships of people. 
The use of drugs, such as alcohol, in normal living is a drag upon 
individual moral character and upon American culture. 

B. The Problem in the Church of the Brethren 

Available evidence points to the fact that there is a problem of 
sizable proportion relative to the use of alcoholic beverages by members 
of our church. The basic problem lies in the inner conflicts created by 
the necessity of adapting ourselves to a rapidly changing atomic age. 



1952, Richmond, Virginia 179 

The use of depressant drugs becomes a way of attempting to escape 
from reality, of delaying the facing of difficult decisions, and/or of 
covering our problems with a thin veneer that offers no real solution. 
With alcohol eliminated, the difficulty still remains. We urge our mem- 
bers to go beneath the surface to face the deeper problems and to find 
creative solutions. 

II. Christian Principles 

The New Testament appeals to the individual for clean, moral living 
(Romans 6:12; 1 Corinthians 3:16, 17). The individual who uses alcohol 
places a limitation upon judgment, reason, spirit, and conscience, as 
well as upon the physical body, in proportion to the amount used and 
for the period the body contains such a substance. Alcohol causes the 
individual to be less than his best and, therefore, to fall short of New 
Testament requirements. 

The New Testament challenges every individual to the stewardship 
of life, time, talents, and money (Matthew 25:14-30). We are required 
to be faithful stewards (1 Corinthians 4:2). The use of our time, talents, 
life, or money in the production, distribution, or use of anything that 
makes life less than the best is a misuse of our stewardship. Alcohol 
never makes a person better. Christ and the church demand true 
stewardship. 

The church recognizes that the final answer to all problems is in 
Jesus Christ and his way of life — not in some form of escape mechanism. 
Freedom from the use of substances such as alcohol tends to assure us 
of a more complete use of our faculties in meeting life's problems. 

Christian principles demand clean, moral living; the stewardship 
of life, time, talents, and money; and the meeting of our problems by 
finding our answer in Jesus and his way. 

III. Recommendations for Action 
A. Our Position in Relation to Alcohol and the Alcohol Problem 

The Church of the Brethren has consistently and repeatedly stated 
its opposition to the manufacture, sale, distribution, and use of alcoholic 
beverages. We, therefore, recommend and urge Brethren to abstain from 
the manufacture, sale, or use of alcoholic beverages. We further urge 
Brethren to refrain from working in the production, distribution, or 
dispensing of alcoholic beverages for consumption by the individual, 
or the production or sale of materials to be used in the manufacture 
of such products. And furthermore, since those groceries, drugstores, 
restaurants, etc., that do not sell alcoholic beverages lose a very lucrative 
income thereby, as well as the total trade of those who wish to buy 
alcoholic beverages while purchasing their groceries, drug supplies, 
meals, etc., we urge all Brethren to travel a little farther or spend a 



180 1952, Richmond, Virginia 

little more, if necessary, to patronize those enterprises which do not 
sell alcoholic beverages. 

B. Recommendations for Program and Implementation 

Educative prevention is the best way to meet the problems of 
alcohol. Every church should integrate education on alcohol and the 
alcohol problem into the total educational program of the church. We 
urge the use of forums, study series, audio-visual aids, scientific informa- 
tion, dramatics, and Commitment Day in our churches and groups. 
We recommend that our churches help youth and adults meet the 
social pressure to drink by personal spiritual vitality, by supportive 
fellowship, by provision of effective group recreation and enterprise, 
and by commendation for abstinence. 

The church must also engage in the rehabilitation of those who 
use alcoholic beverages. Ministers and laymen should seek, in counseling 
with people, to meet the needs of the entire individual. Our fellowship 
must be one of redemptive love. The church is challenged by Paul, 
"Brethren, if a man is overtaken in any trespass, you who are spiritual 
should restore him in the spirit of gentleness" (Galatians 6: 1). 

Conclusion 

The use of alcohol and its deleterious effects on a man and society 
constitute a problem for the church. The church is called by Jesus Christ 
to be an example to the world of love, life, and the way of redemption. 
Our task is twofold: by the educative processes and the fellowship 
of the brotherhood, to be a preventive agency; and by counseling and 
redemptive love to be an agency for the rehabilitation and conversion 
of the users of alcohol. We call the Church of the Brethren to the 
acceptance and execution of this task. 

Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Statement adopted as amended. 

Statement on Tobacco 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
the adoption of the following statement on tobacco. 

I. The Problem 

Among the social problems which we recognize, and which affect 
us, is the widespread use of tobacco. It is estimated that approximately 
sixty million Americans use tobacco. There are high economic, physical, 
and sometimes moral costs. For instance, the National Fire Prevention 
Association reports that smoking causes about 120,000 fires a year, 
costing approximately $60,000,000. Nicotine, a habit-forming drug, is 
used primarily to attain a desired effect on the nervous system. 

In the Church of the Brethren, available evidence indicates there 
is more extensive use of tobacco than of alcohol. 



1952, Richmond, Virginia 181 

II. Basic Christian Principles 

Basic Christian principles apply to all areas of life. The New Testa- 
ment appeals to the individual for clean, moral living (Romans 6:12; 
1 Corinthians 3:16, 17). Nicotine affects both the physical body and 
the mental and moral capacities of man. By causing man to be less 
than his best physically and mentally, tobacco tends to make him fall 
short of the New Testament requirements. 

Christian principles demand clean, moral living; the stewardship of 
life, time, talents, and money; and the use of our faculties to meet life's 
problems. God requires us to be faithful stewards (1 Corinthians 4:2; 
Matthew 25:14-30). The use of our time, talents, life, or money in the 
production, distribution, or use of anything that does not assist a man 
or a woman to be a better person is a misuse of our stewardship. The 
use of tobacco never makes an individual better. Christ and the church 
demand true stewardship. 

The church has recognized that freedom from the use of substances 
such as nicotine tends to assure us of a more complete use of our faculties 
in meeting life's problems. 

III. Recommendations for Action 
A. Our Position in Relation to Tobacco 

Educative prevention is the best solution to the tobacco problem. 
Information on the tobacco problem and the effects of nicotine on the 
individual and society should be integrated into the educational program 
of each local church. We urge the use of scientific information, forums, 
study groups, audio-visual aids, and the observance of Commitment 
Day in our churches. We challenge our churches to assist individuals 
to meet the social pressure to use tobacco by developing within them 
the resources of the redeemed life, by personal example and supportive 
fellowship, and by commendation for constructive living. 

The church must present the fuller Christian life to those who use 
tobacco. Our ministry must be one of redemptive love. Christians 
should seek through love to assist the individual in finding answers to 
the problems he faces. "Brethren, if a man is overtaken in any trespass, 
you who are spiritual should restore such an one in the spirit of 
gentleness" (Galatians 6:1). 

We also urge the churches to help people to recognize the problems 
that lead them to seek artificial stimulation and to point them to creative 
solutions. 

Conclusion 

The use of tobacco and its effects on man and society constitute a 
problem for the church. The church is called to the Christlike way of 
life — to be an example to the world of Jesus, of love, of life abundant. 
Christ demands the best of individual Christians. We call the Brethren 



182 1952, Richmond, Virginia 

to a complete commitment to Christ. We urge the churches to promote 
abstinence from the production, sale, and use of tobacco and to imple- 
ment the program through Christian education and redemption in the 
local church. 

Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Statement adopted. 

Symbolism in Worship 

Query, 1951 
The elders' body of the District of North Dakota and Eastern Mon- 
tana petitions Annual Conference through the 1950 district conference 
that: Since there is considerable confusion as to forms of worship, 
chancel arrangements, and other liturgical trends, the Annual Confer- 
ence appoint a committee of five, representative of the related interests 
of the church, to: 

1. Make a study of symbolism in its relationship to worship in the 
light of the historic position of the Church of the Brethren. 

2. Define the function of the minister in worship in the light of the 
New Testament doctrine of the priesthood of believers. 

3. In the light of this study, recommend chancel arrangements and 
church architecture which may serve to guide local building committees 
and our church building counselors. 

4. Let the conclusions of this study serve to guide the seminary in 
its training of our ministers and church leaders, and in the chancel 
arrangements of the new Bethany chapel. 

5. Make a report of this study to the Annual Conference next year. 

Mark Emswiler, Secretary 
Answer of district conference: Approved and passed to Annual 
Conference. 

Mark Emswiler, Clerk 
Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Granted the request for the 
study by a committee of three; disregarding the latter part of item 4. 
Committee: H. F. Richards (convener), Burton Metzler, Nevin H. Zuck, 
Forrest U. Groff (consultant). 

Report of the Committee, 1952 

We, your committee appointed by the San Jose Conference to make 
a study of symbolism in worship, as requested by a query, wish to make 
the following report to the 1952 Conference convened in Richmond, 
Virginia: 

First: Symbolism in its relation to worship in the light of the 
historic position of the Church of the Brethren: 

Historically, we as a church have accepted the idea of symbolism 
as we found it set forth in the New Testament. We, therefore, have 
given more attention to symbolism in act, such as baptism, than in form 



1952, Richmond, Virginia 183 

of worship and arrangement of building. As a consequence we have 
made many changes across the years in the form and setting of public 
worship. Within the memory of those who are older a large number 
of our church houses were equipped with a long table back of which 
was placed the "preachers' bench," all on the main floor level. Later 
this place gave way to a raised platform and a center pulpit. This 
arrangement was found more satisfactory and was widely adopted in 
the churches. 

Earlier the church did not have, or approve, musical instruments 
in the worship service of the church, nor were there choirs or special 
music. Because of a desire to enrich the worship service these have 
come to be widely used and their use has given rise to necessary changes 
in architectural arrangement. Formerly worship services grew up more 
or less spontaneously on the spot with even the ministers themselves 
unaware as to who among them would bring the sermon. Now many 
of our churches use church bulletins with a prearranged program of 
worship which is followed in the service. Gradually the very simple 
and unadorned meetinghouse gave way to the preacher-centered and 
concert-choir arrangement of the past generation, often with art win- 
dows, pictures, and various symbols which represent some phase of 
our Christian faith. Today many of our churches are attempting to 
build even more churchly houses of worship. 

It is the finding of your committee in this regard that the church 
can scarcely be said to have had a "historic position" on the matter 
Of form and arrangements in worship except that of making changes 
from time to time, often amid divergent opinions, when it was felt that 
such changes would better serve the church in the hours of worship, 
and that simplicity and spirituality would be fostered. 

Second: The function of the minister in worship in the light of the 
New Testament doctrine of the priesthood of believers: 

The New Testament declares the truth of the priesthood of believers 
(1 Peter 2:9), a doctrine which is strongly emphasized in Protestantism, 
and is practiced by our own brotherhood. Each believer has direct 
access to God in worship, in the confession of his sins, and in receiving 
forgiveness. This truth may rightly be impressed upon us by a wise 
use of symbolism. However, the New Testament does recognize that 
"some should be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, and some 
pastors and teachers, for the equipment of the saints, for the work of 
ministry, for building up the body of Christ" (Ephesians 4:11). Each 
worshiper must make his own spiritual pilgrimage to the meeting place 
with God, it is true, but ministers, or others who lead in worship, may 
lead the way and give assistance. One who officiates in a worship service 
functions in both a priestly and a prophetic capacity, leading the people 
Godward, and in a sense speaking for them to him, and in turn, giving 
his message to the people. Much of the effectiveness Of a worship service 



184 1952, Richmond, Virginia 

will depend upon the measure of the faith of the leader and upon the 
depth of his devotion. 

It is our belief that we should approach a worship experience with 
expectation and should be taught how to worship in spirit and in truth. 
For such true worship ho type of architectural arrangement and no 
mere ceremony or ritual can be substituted. We draw near to meet 
God, who comes with his gifts and his grace that we may accept them 
with gratitude and may in turn bring to him our gifts and our lives. 
Apart from this, worship in any setting is hollow and meaningless. 

Third: Chancel arrangements and church architecture. 

In recent years strong emphasis has been placed on worship, which 
emphasis we believe to be good provided it be kept well seasoned with 
the prophetic spirit and outlook. Many of our churches have become 
increasingly aware of a need for creating an atmosphere which is 
conducive to a richer and more meaningful worship experience. Your 
committee shares the belief that the physical properties or architectural 
design of our churches can have a great deal of favorable or adverse 
effect on the worshipers and the worship service. Since the concern of 
the query and the focal point of interest is that of chancel arrangements, 
the committee wishes to present the following observations: 

1. The chancel should be so designed as to present proper propor- 
tion, balance, and color harmony. 

2. It should minimize the mechanics of the service which would 
otherwise be obvious and might detract the worshiper. 

3. It should express basic doctrines, and various elements of worship 
through appropriate use of symbols and appointments. 

4. Some favor the central pulpit for the following reasons: 

a. It has for many years been the prevailing pattern. 

b. It places the major emphasis on the spoken word and the 
preacher. 

c. It tends to allow for greater informality in worship. 

d. It makes for greater economy in that it eliminates need for 
lectern and altar. 

e. Some forms of architecture and pew arrangement lend them- 
selves only to a center pulpit. 

5. Others favor the open chancel for the following reasons: 

a. With the altar in the center it tends to place the major emphasis 
on the worship of God instead of on the preacher or the spoken word. 

b. By removing the physical barrier of pulpit and minister, it allows 
for an unobstructed center of worship, suggesting a direct approach 
to God open to all. 

c. It provides for greater variety of worship experiences without 
moving chancel furniture. 

d. It provides more convenient arrangement for weddings, funerals, 
dedications, baptisms, etc. 



1952, Richmond, Virginia 185 

e. It enhances the proportions of the sanctuary by giving it greater 
length. 

f. It allows for better use of symbolism in architectural design. 

6. The committee believes that Annual Conference should not 
attempt to set up rules governing the exact arrangement and design 
of chancels for the Church of the Brethren, but should rather encourage 
congregations faced with the problem to consider it prayerfully in the 
light of the local situation and to consult someone who has knowledge 
of church architecture, so that whatever plans are projected they may 
have a sound doctrinal and practical basis. While one type of chancel 
may serve its purpose better than another, there will always be need 
for the worshipers to "practice the presence of God." 

H. F. Richards 
Burton Metzler 
Nevin Zuck 

Forrest Groff (consultant) 
Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Report adopted. 

Women in the Ministry 

Query, 1949 

The Church of the Brethren, McClave, Colorado, petitions Annual 
Conference through district conference of Colorado to allow women 
equal rights with men in the ministry. Paul cline clerk 

Answer of district conference: Query passed to Annual Conference. 

Roscoe P. Baker, Writing Clerk 
Answer of 1949 Annual Conference: Referred to the General Broth- 
erhood Board for study and report next year. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1950 
The General Brotherhood Board respectfully requests Annual 
Conference of 1950 to appoint a committee to make a study of the 
whole problem of the role of women in the life of the church, and 
bring a report, with recommendations, to the Annual Conference of 1951. 
Answer of 1950 Annual Conference: Granted the request for a study 
to be made on the role of women in the life of the church. Committee: 
T. F. Henry (convener), Mrs. Rufus D. Bowman, E. R. Fisher, DeWitt 
L. Miller, Ruth Shriver. 

Report of the Committee, 1951 

Your committee has engaged in extensive study of the subjects 

assigned. We have studied the Scriptures at length. We have considered 

the findings of psychology and anthropology regarding characteristics 

of male and female. A questionnaire was sent to each of our congrega- 



186 1952, Richmond, Virginia 

tions, and to one hundred representative lay members. Another ques- 
tionnaire was sent to each of our women ministers. Careful consideration 
was given the Amsterdam and American reports on the status of women 
in the church. We exchanged findings by mail, worked through subcom- 
mittees, and held two meetings of the full committee. 

We have given attention to two broad subjects: The Role of Women 
in the Church; The Work of Women in the Ministry. 

I. The Role of Women in the Church 
Regarding the role of women in the church, on the basis of a 
questionnaire answered by four hundred twenty-three congregations 
we find some women serving on almost every board and committee of 
the local church. One third of the congregations reporting have at least 
one woman member on the board of administration, trustee board, 
finance board, and ministerial board. Two thirds report at least one 
woman member on each board of Christian education, music committee, 
and Brethren service committee. Eighty-two percent reported a woman 
on the missionary committee. Participation as church-school teachers 
is especially interesting. The following percentages of church-school 
teachers are women: adult division, 42%; youth division, 64%; chil- 
dren's division, 92%. 

Several facts stand out: 1. Women do hold a significant place in 
the life and program of the Church of the Brethren. When compared 
with a number of denominations the extent of the participation seems 
to be larger for the Church of the Brethren. 2. The Church of the 
Brethren has made extensive progress over a period of years in granting 
a larger place to women in her organized church life. 3. Nevertheless, 
it is still true that except for Sunday-school teachers, women do not 
have representation equal to their numerical strength on the boards 
and committees of the church. Thus while 34% of our churches have at 
least one woman board member, 66% of the churches having boards of 
administration have no women board members. The same proportion 
holds true for boards of trustees, finance boards, and ministerial boards. 
Further, some congregations reporting in our questionnaire have only 
one woman member on five-member boards, which further reduces the 
proportion of women members. When we look at our district and 
national organizations we find women far short of proportionate repre- 
sentation in official capacity. 

We recommend increased recognition of the contribution of women 
in the life and work of the church, and we recommend a more extensive 
use of their wisdom and ability. We would urge election on the basis 
of ability and capacity for all who are called to positions of service. 
Especially do we urge that women be more widely represented on 
boards and committees on the local, district, and brotherhood level. 



1952, Richmond, Virginia 187 

II. The Work of Women in the Ministry 
Regarding women in the ministry, we call attention to the fact 
that the original query arose in a situation of need in a local congrega- 
tion, and we have felt inclined to make an effort to meet that need. 
Our study disclosed a number of places where women ministers could 
make a larger contribution than they are able to do at present. 

We confess our inability to harmonize all the specific Scriptures on 
this subject, but have felt led to build on what we believe is the spirit 
and mind of Christ. Certain verses from Paul can be quoted against 
women in the ministry, and certain others in support of women in the 
ministry, so that it becomes difficult to arrive at a conclusion on the 
basis of Paul. But in Christ we have an attitude of respect for personal- 
ity, of treatment of women on a plane of equality. 

We recommend that a woman who is the pastor of a church be 
granted the privileges of the ordained minister to function in the 
congregation of which she is pastor. Permission to exercise these 
privileges shall be granted by the local congregation with the approval 
of the district ministerial board or district board of administration. 

T. F. Henry, Convener 
Mrs. Rufus D. Bowman 
E. R. Fisher 
DeWitt L. Miller 
Ruth Shriver 
Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Recommitted for further study 
and report next year. 

Report of the Committee, 1952 
Your committee engaged in further study of the request of the 
query which came before Conference in 1949 and of the broader assign- 
ment of the Conference of 1950. 

I. The Role of Women 
We believe that the division of labor which assigns to women a 
special function in home and family life is Scriptural, and that normally 
this offers the greatest opportunity open to women for the service of 
mankind and the Kingdom of God (Genesis 2:18, 21, 24; Proverbs 31:10- 
31; 2 Timothy 1:3-5). It is also true that experience proves that women 
can make outstanding contributions in other areas. We believe this 
also is Scriptural and in harmony with the spirit and teaching of the 
Bible (Judges 4:4 ff.; 2 Kings 22:14; the story of Esther; Proverbs 31:10- 
31; Luke 2:36-38; Acts 9:36; 16:14, 15; 21:9; Romans 16:1-6; 1 Corinthi- 
ans 11:5; Galatians 3:26-28). 

II. The Role of Women in the Church 
Regarding the role of women in the church, on the basis of a 



188 1952, Richmond, Virginia 

questionnaire answered by four hundred twenty-three congregations 
we find some women serving on almost every board and committee 
of the local church. One third of the congregations reporting have at 
least one woman on the board of administration, trustee board, finance 
board, and ministerial board. Two thirds report at least one woman 
member on each board of Christian education, music committee, and 
Brethren service committee. Eighty-two per cent reported a woman 
on the missionary committee. The following percentages of church- 
school teachers are women: adult division, 42%; youth division, 64%; 
children's division, 92%. 

Several facts stand out: 1. Women do hold a significant place in 
the life and program of the Church of the Brethren. When compared 
to a number of denominations the extent of the participation seems 
to be larger for the Church of the Brethren. 2. The Church of the 
Brethren has made extensive progress over a period of years in granting 
a larger place to women in her organized church* life. Of the mission- 
aries now serving or on furlough, 68% are women, and of those in 
the Brethren service program 56% are women. 3. Nevertheless, it is 
still true that except for Sunday-school teachers, women do not have 
representation equal to their numerical strength on the boards and 
committees of the church. Thus while 34% of our churches have at 
least one woman board member, 66% of the churches having boards 
of administration have no women board members. The same proportion 
holds true for boards of trustees, finance boards, and ministerial boards. 
Further, some congregations reporting in our questionnaire have only 
one woman member on five-member boards, which further reduces the 
proportion of women members. When we look at our district and 
national organizations we find women far short of proportionate repre- 
sentation in official capacity. 

We recommend increased recognition of the contribution of women 
in the life and work of the church, and we recommend a more extensive 
use of their wisdom and ability. We would urge election on the basis 
of ability and capacity for all who are called to positions of service. 
Especially do we urge that women be more widely represented on boards 
and committees on the local, district, and brotherhood level. 

III. The Work of Women in the Ministry 

1. We recognize from Scripture and experience that woman's special 
role in society due to the privileges and responsibilities of motherhood 
places certain practical limitations on her work in the ministry. More- 
over, many women are disqualified for the same reasons some men are. 

2. We recognize on the other hand that these are not ultimate 
discriminations against her as a person, "for there can be neither male 
nor female in Christ Jesus" (Galatians 3:28). 



1952, Richmond, Virginia 1 89 

ordained nrnnsteT^Cction tat". *" T** ** P " Vi1 '"" °< *» 
Permission to S^l. J? * congregntion of which she is pastor. 

eonSSatL ^h ,?! P'"Uegos shall bo granted by the local 



1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

Brotherhood Fund Goal, 1953-54 
The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
the adoption of a Brotherhood Fund goal of $1,275,000 for the year 
1953-54. 

Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Goal adopted as recommended. 

Central Agency for Vocational Placement 

Query, 1952 

We, the elders of Middle Iowa, request the district meeting held 
at Cedar Rapids, August 31 — September 2, to ask Annual Conference of 
1952 to appoint a committee to make a study of the possibility of a 
central placement person or agency whereby our people could give 
and receive information which would facilitate vocational placement 
of Brethren in our church communities. Report of the study would 
be made to the following Conference. 

Answer of district conference: Passed by district meeting to 
Annual Conference. 

Earl F. Deardorff, Clerk 

Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Referred to the General Broth- 
erhood Board for study and report next year. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1953 
The General Brotherhood Board has studied the question of a 
central agency for vocational placement and reports that a limited 
placement service has been provided by the Brethren Service Commis- 
sion through notices in the Gospel Messenger. Some local congregations 
have organized successful vocational placement committees. There is 
a widespread interest across the brotherhood for guidance and assistance 
in securing homes and jobs in new locations. In the light of these 
findings, we feel that there is a need for an expansion and co-ordination 
of the present placement activities. We, therefore, recommend the 
establishment of a Brethren Placement Service: 

1. To facilitate the vocational placement in the communities of local 
churches and in brotherhood programs; 

2. To develop or assist in developing interpretative and educational 
materials to describe the services and its objectives; 

3. To assist interested congregations in the establishment of local 
vocational placement services; 

4. To co-operate with the placement program of other churches and 
church-related agencies; 

5. To establish and maintain a registry of church members inter- 



1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 191 

ested and available (sometime) for vocational placement, locally, na- 
tionally, and/or internationally; 

6. To study the experience of similar programs Of other churches 
and church-related agencies. 

We further recommend that upon the adoption of this plan, the 
General Brotherhood Board be asked to implement its provisions. 

Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Report adopted. 

Church of the Brethren Radio Hour 

Query, 1952 
The ministry and mission board of the District of Michigan petitions 
Annual Conference through the Michigan district conference to appoint 
a committee to study the possibility of initiating a Church of the 
Brethren radio hour over a national hookup. 

Glenn J. Fruth, Secretary 
Answer of district conference: Passed to Annual Conference. 

H. Arthur Whisler, Writing Clerk 
Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Referred to the General Broth- 
erhood Board. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1953 
The General Brotherhood Board, after a careful study Of the 
question, believes a national radio hookup for the Church Of the 
Brethren is inadvisable because of: 

a. The cost of radio time, which ranges from $25,000 to $125,000 
per year, depending on the number Of stations carrying the program. 

b. The difficulty of securing a suitable time in the already-crowded 
schedules Of the major networks, a problem greatly complicated by the 
three to four hours' difference in time involved. 

c. The fact that we do not have churches in large areas of the 
country and the reluctance of stations to carry programs without 
relevance to their constituency. 

Broadcasting companies and several of the major denominations 
point out that the competitive scramble which results when denomina- 
tions try to purchase time tends to jeopardize the free time which the 
major networks contribute as a public service to co-operative Protes- 
tantism. These denominations feel that better results can be obtained 
by participating in such co-operative radio programs as the National 
Council of Churches' National Radio Pulpit and The Art of Living over 
NBC, National Vespers over ABC, and Faith in Our Times over the 
Mutual system. In addition, this co-operative church agency arranges 
for numerous special-event and seasonal broadcasts on behalf of all 
Protestantism. 

If the church wants a radio program, it can better be provided by 



192 1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

making recordings on discs or tape for distribution to stations in areas 
where we have Brethren. The time could be arranged and paid for by 
local congregations or organizations. However, the cost of planning, 
producing, and distributing such a program on a continuous, national 
basis would be considerable. It would be substantially reduced if we 
could secure the free services of competent technicians, musicians, and 
speakers and the free use of studios and equipment. Perhaps $10,000 per 
year would be the minimum cost for even the overhead direction and 
secretarial services of such a program, to say nothing of production 
costs or the cost of radio program time. 

For the present we would encourage the types of program experi- 
mentation being contemplated by the Southeastern Region and carried 
on by some co-operating churches in Eastern Pennsylvania in The 
Brethren Hour, and the further use of local radio station facilities by 
our churches or groups of churches as opportunity can be found. In 
some areas, it will be found advantageous to approach local stations 
co-operatively with other Protestant denominations represented in the 
community. 

Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Report adopted. 

Concern ior Ministerial Recruitment 

Greatly disturbed by the present critical shortage of ministers, 
which is making it impossible for us to meet our opportunities to 
establish new churches as well as to give adequate pastoral care to 
the existing ones, Standing Committee recommends to the 1953 Colorado 
Springs Conference: 

1. That the delegates of this Conference express their deep concern 
on this matter and convey that concern to their local churches; and 

2. That the General Brotherhood Board, through the appropriate 
channels, be asked — 

a. To devise a strategy for meeting this great need; 

b. To lift up the need before the brotherhood in a special way 
during the coming year; and 

c. To implement further the meeting of this concern in any other 
way they would consider expedient. 

Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Recommendations adopted. 

Financing of Bethany Biblical Seminary 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends that Annual Confer- 
ence authorize the raising of funds for capital improvements and for 
permanent endowments outside the brotherhood budget by special 
promotion for which the seminary shall be responsible. This movement 
shall be subject to the approval of the General Brotherhood Board as 
regards general plans and objectives. It shall be carried on by regions 



1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 193 

and shall be conducted in the closest co-operation with our colleges 
and the department of promotion of the General Brotherhood Board. 
Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Request granted. 

Identification Symbol for Brethren 

We, the Pleasant Hill congregation, met in regular council July 11, 

1952, and agreed to ask this district meeting [Second West Virginia] 
to pass the following on to General Conference in 1953: 

(1) Ask General Conference to place the following in the hands 
of a special committee to study for one year. 

(2) Ask General Conference to make legal and available (not 
compulsory) a lapel badge or button of identification for its members. 
Colored according to rating. 

(3) Also place one with its identification in every hospital or 
charitable institution in the United States. 

Orpha E. Martin, Clerk 

Action of district meeting: Passed to Annual Conference. 

Ada Scrogum, Secretary 

Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: We are grateful for the spirit 
reflected in this query and appreciate the satisfaction of easy identifica- 
tion of Brethren during the time of travel. The Conference, however, 
does not feel that the need is sufficiently great at this time to justify 
the expense involved in making the study requested. But, as a step 
in the direction of the action requested by the query, we suggest that 
the committee on arrangements, hereafter, make available stickers for 
travel to Annual Conference. 

International Conference on Peace and World Order 

The General Brotherhood Board, meeting in Elgin, Illinois, in March 

1953, was deeply disturbed with continued threats to world peace and 
felt the need to encourage stronger efforts toward building peace. It, 
therefore, recommends to Annual Conference the adoption of the follow- 
ing statement: 

"The Annual Conference of the Church of the Brethren, assembled 
at Colorado Springs, Colorado, June 16 to 21, 1953, feels led by the 
Holy Spirit to call upon the Central Committee of the World Council 
of Churches, of which it is a numerically small but grateful member, 
to consider the advisability of planning for an International Conference 
of the Churches on a Christian Basis and Strategy for Peace and World 
Order. 

Answer of the 1953 Annual Conference: Recommendation adopted. 



194 1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

Investment of Endowment Funds 

Query, 1952 
The placement committee of the Panther Creek Church of the 
Brethren asks the Panther Creek church to request the District of 
Middle Iowa convening at Cedar Rapids, Iowa, August 31 — September 2 
to petition the 1952 Annual Conference to appoint a committee to study 
the possibility of investing more of the endowment funds from the 
General Brotherhood Board and our church colleges in the local church 
communities of the brotherhood; the report of this study to be made 
to the following Annual Conference. Passed. 

Dale Emmert, Clerk 

Answer of district conference: Passed to Annual Conference. 

Earl F. Deardorff, Clerk 

Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Referred to the General Broth- 
erhood Board for study and report next year. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1953 
The General Brotherhood Board understands that this query refers 
to church and farm loans and presents the following report: 

1. The Annual Conference does not assume any responsibility or 
authority regarding investment of endowment funds of our church 
colleges, but we refer this concern to the boards of trustees of the 
individual colleges. 

2. In the investment of its endowment and annuity funds, the 
General Brotherhood Board during the past five years has more than 
doubled the amount invested in local churches and communities, as 
can be seen from the following figures: 

September 30, 1952 September 28, 1947 



Amount Percent Amount Percent 

Church 
loans ....$759,869 25.0 $ 76,833 2.4 

Farm and 
home 
loans .... 693,721 22.6 578,572 17.9 



Sub- 
totals . $1,453,590 47.6 $ 655,405 20.3 

Bonds $963,539 31.1 $2,002,037 61.7 

Common 
stocks ... 540,059 17.5 407,892 12.6 



1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 195 



Preferred 
stocks . . 


. 116,086 3.8 


176,392 5.4 


Sub- 
totals 


1,619,684 52.4 


2,586,321 79.7 


Totals 


$3,073,274 100.0 


$3,241,726 100.0 



3. Our fixed obligations under annuity agreements total $1,178,600. 
Our endowments total $1,127,300. Our best judgment is that we must 
have a diversification of investments. On this theory, we feel at the 
present that this proportion in local church and farm loans is proper. 
Furthermore, a sizable portion of the shares of stock held are gifts, 
some of which must be retained to comply with the wishes of the donors. 

Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Report adopted and confidence 
expressed in the officers and agencies carrying on this work. 

Our General Church Government 

Query, 1952 

In view of the seeming tendency for the delegates from the churches 
to Annual Conference to participate increasingly less in the discussions 
at the business sessions and for Standing Committee increasingly to 
consider most of the items of Conference business and to make recom- 
mendations to the delegates; and, further, the need of clarifying the 
relationship between the executive and the legislative branches of our 
general church government: - 

The district meeting of Oregon, assembled at Klamath Falls, 
petitions Annual Conference of 1952 to appoint a committee of five to 
study our general church government and report to the next Annual 
Conference. 

The study of the committee to include the following: 

1. Organizing the Annual Conference program so as to include 
more time for business sessions. 

2. Clarifying the functions of the Standing Committee regarding 
the consideration of Annual Conference business. 

3. Ways of stimulating the delegates to think through the business 
of Annual Conference and to participate in the discussions. 

4. The responsibility of Annual Conference delegates to their local 
churches and districts. 

5. The point of view on the part of some that the business of Annual 
Conference should be referred to the local churches for consideration. 

6. The relationships between the General Brotherhood Board (the 
executive branch) and the Annual Conference (the legislative branch) 
in general church government. 



196 1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

7. Any other matters of Conference procedure and program. 

Passed by vote of delegate body of the district meeting. 

Mrs. Alma Lett, Clerk, Pro Tem 

Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Referred to the committee on 
revision of the brotherhood organization for study and report. Commit- 
tee: Calvert N. Ellis (chairman), William M. Beahm (secretary), Galen 
B. Ogden. 

Report of the Committee, 1953 

Your committee met in Chicago on March 13, 1953, and submits the 
following report on the items raised in the above query. 

1. More Time for Business Sessions 

A comparison of the 1942 program with the 1952 program shows 
there were four sessions for business in the former and seven in the 
latter. The number of hours was nearly equal. Moreover, the 1952 
program had the business sessions more interspersed with the general 
programs so that the business sessions were centered at the time of 
maximum attendance. 

The program committee has the Conference officers on it and stands 
ready to defer to the priority of business sessions. In the 1947 Orlando 
Conference Booklet a program is listed on page eleven to be waived 
for a business session if necessary. 

In actual practice, the delegate body has the prerogative to shift 
or lengthen the business sessions and on occasion this prerogative has 
been exercised. Pressure of time does arise but it is usually due to 
the judgment of the business session that haste is desirable. 

2. Function of Standing Committee in Considering Business 

a. Business arises from local congregations and district meetings; 
also from boards and committees constituted by Annual Conference. 
Such business is published in the Gospel Messenger before Conference 
and in the Conference Booklet which is available to all in attendance. 

b. The function of Standing Committee is to review all business 
to be considered by Conference. This has been the historic practice 
as outlined in the Annual Conference minutes, published each year in 
the Conference Booklet, and formally stated in the pamphlet, Brother- 
hood Organization. 

c. The Standing Committee is responsible for suggesting answers 
to all queries. These are listed in the Conference Booklet as "New 
Business." These answers include: granting the request; referral to 
a board or committee for action, or for study and report; and respect- 
fully returning the query. 

d. In regard to "Unfinished Business" items such as reports by 
committees and boards to whom a previous Conference has referred 
business or made assignments, the rule, as adopted by the 1951 San 



1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 197 

Jose Conference, is: "The Standing Committee may review the reports 
of Conference committees but has no authority to change or revise such 
reports" [see the minutes of the 1951 Conference, under "Amendments 
to the Conference Rules"]. These items are regarded as already being 
in the hands of the Conference session, which in turn has delegated 
them to a special board or committee for study and recommendation. 

3 and 4. Ways of Stimulating Delegates 

a. They are encouraged to acquaint themselves with the Conference 
business by reviewing the previous year's Annual Conference minutes, 
and by studying the business items as published in the Gospel Messenger 
and in the Conference Booklet. 

b. The local congregations are encouraged to review, in council 
or in special meetings, the business to come before Conference. This 
will enable the chosen delegates to represent them properly. 

c. The local congregations should choose as delegates those best 
able to participate in the functions of a large deliberative assembly. 

d. The Conference officers and the Committee on Arrangements 
are commended for every effort to promote free but balanced and 
pointed discussion of Conference business. 

e. The delegates are urged to make early and interpretative reports 
to the districts and the congregations whom they represent. 

5. The Referral of Annual Conference Business to the Local Congrega- 
tions for Consideration 

Since the local congregations are the source of much of the Confer- 
ence business through their queries, and 

Since the local congregations have opportunity to be informed about 
the Conference business as it appears in the previous year's Annual 
Conference minutes and in the Gospel Messenger before Conference 
convenes, it is considered that the concern of item 5 is already cared for. 

Since our church functions through duly elected representatives 
gathered in deliberative assembly, it is regarded that this proposal 
deviates from our historic policy. 

6 and 7. The Annual Conference and the General Brotherhood Board 
The Annual Conference is regarded as the highest human authority 
of the church. It determines the policy and direction of the church 
program at the general brotherhood level. It gives guidance and direc- 
tion also to regions, districts, and local congregations. 

The Annual Conference created the General Brotherhood Board, 
elects its members, hears its reports, and gives it guidance and 

Calvert N. Ellis, Chairman 
William M. Beahm, Secretary 
Galen B. Ogden 
Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Report adopted. 



198 1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

Proposed Adoption of the Revised Standard Version 

The following query was passed by the Northwest District of Kansas 
in their district meeting held at Quinter on October 18, 1952: 

"The District of Northwest Kansas petitions the Annual Meeting 
assembled at Colorado Springs to adopt the Revised Standard Version 
of the Bible as the authorized version for our church." 

Samuel Bowman, Temporary Writing Clerk 

Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: The Church of the Brethren 
has used the Scriptures in various languages and versions in its congre- 
gations around the world and we reaffirm our policy of not adopting 
any specific version. Devotional reading and careful study of the Bible 
have been strong emphases of the Brethren and we again call our 
people to diligent study of the Word. 

Proposed Revision of the Pension Plan 

Query, 1952 

Whereas, our Brethren heritage has emphasized the New Testament 
principle of brotherhood and ministering to her people according to 
their needs; 

Whereas, our Ministerial and Missionary Pension Plan, as now 
constituted, provides a retirement pension in proportion to salary 
received irrespective of need; 

Whereas, we believe the present plan unjustly penalizes ministers 
and missionaries who serve sacrificially on the lower salary levels; 

And whereas, we believe a correction can be effected without 
changing the financial stability of the pension plan. 

Therefore we, the Fairfax congregation, petition Annual Conference 
through district meeting of the Eastern District of Virginia to authorize 
revision of the pension plan so that the amount paid by the local 
churches, less deductions for contingent fund and expense reserve, will 
not accrue to the credit of the individual ministers, as the plan now 
provides, but be pooled and appropriated on the basis of years served 
rather than salary drawn. j T Myers> clerk 

Action of district conference: Passed on to Annual Conference. 

Paul E. Swigart, Clerk 

Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Referred to a committee of 
five to be studied with emphasis on the equalization phase of the query 
having regard to both length of service and need. Committee: Elmer 
M. Hersch (convener), Hylton Harman, Henry Gibbel, W. Newton Long, 
Robert L. Sherfy. 

Report of the Committee, 1953 

1. The spirit of this query is in keeping with the Christian principle 
of brotherhood and sharing. 



1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 199 

2. Three different funds are referred to in our report: 

a. The Ministerial and Missionary Pension Plan represents money 
contributed by members and their employing congregations. Out of 
this fund retirement benefits are paid; the amount of benefits depends 
on the amount of money standing to the member's credit at the time 
of his retirement. 

b. The Supplemental Benefit Fund of the pension plan was raised 
by offerings and gifts. Until the pension plan has been in operation 
for some years the amount payable to those who retire is pitifully small. 
The supplemental fund increases the retirement payments to those in 
the pension plan now retiring who have been in only long enough to 
draw a very small amount. As the normal retirements become more 
adequate, this fund will eventually disappear. Now it is serving a real 
need. 

c. The Ministerial and Missionary Service Fund is not part of the 
pension plan; it is a welfare fund. $33,250 has been designated by 
Conference this year out of the Brotherhood Fund. It is paid out 
quarterly to needy missionaries and ministers and their wives, regardless 
of their membership in the pension plan. 

3. With reference to changing the pension plan: 

a. The money now in the pension plan is not brotherhood money; 
it belongs to those ministers for whose benefit it has been deposited. 
The plan itself provides: "No amendment shall abridge or annul the 
rights of members in respect to their combined accumulation as of the 
date of the adoption of such amendment." 

b. If any change is made in the present plan the obligation to the 
members up to the time of the change must be fulfilled. 

c. If the plan is changed as proposed in the query, those now in 
the plan that would continue in the new plan would have their retire- 
ment figured on two bases: 

(1) The accumulation to their credit at the time of the change. 

(2) The amount due after the new plan goes into effect, based on — 

(a) Their personal contribution; 

(b) The number of years of service under that plan; 

(c) How much is needed. 

4. Payments on the basis of length of service: 

a. We assume that "length of service" means "length of service 
while a member of the pension plan." We think a plan could be made 
to work on such basis. 

b. We have not incurred the expense of determining accurately 
the difference in dollars that would be paid in retirement benefits to 
members on the basis of length of service rather than on the present 
basis. It is our judgment that the retirement benefits would change 
only slightly from the present plan. 



200 1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

5. Payments on the basis of need: 

a. If based on need, our pension plan would in effect become a 
"welfare fund." We already have such a fund — the Ministerial and 
Missionary Service Fund described under 2c. We question the wisdom 
of setting up a duplicate agency. 

b. If payment of retirement benefits were made according to 
"needs" no member would have any way of knowing what retirement 
benefits to anticipate, as such payments would depend upon what funds 
were left after payments to the most pressing cases. 

c. The problem of defining what "need" is, judging it fairly all 
across the brotherhood, and administering the funds proportionately 
without excessive costs, is a large one. 

6. General observations: 

a. We sent questionnaires to pastors and finance representatives 
in local churches in five districts, one in each region of our brotherhood. 
We received much help from them. We can find no strong sentiment 
for change. 

b. To change the plan now would, in our judgment, entail consider- 
able more overhead expense. 

c. To attempt to administer one plan on the basis of both length 
of service and need appears to be very difficult. 

d. We recognize the possibilities of some unfairness in the retire- 
ment benefits of our present system if real service to the church is 
recognized as the proper basis for benefits; but we feel that our mission- 
aries and ministers do not have financial justice as a chief motive in 
their service to the church. 

e. There is a feeling among many that Social Security may soon 
be available to ministers. 

7. We recommend: 

a. That the Ministerial and Missionary Service Fund be substantially 
strengthened to care more adequately for cases of need. 

b. That no change be made now in the pension plan. 

Robert L. Sherfy 
Henry Gibbel 
Hylton Harman 
W. Newton Long 

(E. M. Hersch asked to be relieved 
from serving on the committee) 
Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Report adopted. 

Reading Course for Licensed Ministers 

Query, 1951 
The Waynesboro, Virginia, church requests Annual Conference 
through district conference Of the Second District of Virginia, assembled 



1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 201 

at Bridgewater, Virginia, March 30, 1951, to set up as a rninimum 
educational qualification for licensing to the ministry of the Church 
of the Brethren, the completion of a reading course sufficient to give 
a foundation for ministerial work (see 2 Timothy 2:15). The areas to 
be covered in the course of reading may be: 

1. Familiarity with the Bible (concordance and dictionary) 

2. The Pastor's Manual 

3. History of the church 

4. Pastoral work 

5. Preaching, worship, religious education 

6. Annual Conference minutes and the Gospel Messenger. 

The execution of these requirements to be in the hands of the district 
board dealing with the ministry: specific books for the plan to be 
selected by the General Brotherhood Board Commission on Ministry 
and Home Missions. Russell Thackeri Clerk 

Answer of district conference: We pass this query to Annual 
Conference with the request that there be included in the plan minimum 
reading requirements for those being ordained into the ministry. 

M. R. Wolfe, Secretary 

Answer of 1951 Annual Conference: Referred to the General Broth- 
erhood Board. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1952 
The General Brotherhood Board reports progress and asks for more 
time to continue the study. 

Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Request for more time granted. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1953 
The General Brotherhood Board asked the Ministry and Home 
Mission Commission to prepare a recommended reading list for the 
use and guidance of our licensed ministers before ordination. The list 
is available for district boards to present to all licensed ministers, or 
licentiates themselves may order it from the General Brotherhood 
Board. We commend its distribution and use for all those who have 
been licensed by the church that they may grow in their ministry. 
If district ministerial boards or boards of administration so desire 
they may select a few books from this list for reading by men before 
being licensed to the ministry. 

Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Report adopted. 

Regular Locations for Annual Conference 
In view of the great difficulty in finding an adequate location for 
our Annual Conference, we, the East Nimishillen congregation, in 



202 1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

regular council assembled, request the district conference of Northeast- 
ern Ohio to petition the 1953 Annual Conference to appoint a committee 
to study the possibility and advisability of locating our Annual Confer- 
ence permanently at Ocean Grove, New Jersey, and Colorado Springs, 
Colorado, alternating each year until such time as more suitable loca- 
tions are found in other regions. AB)ert j Brumbaugh, Clerk 

Answer of district conference: Passed to Annual Conference. 

E. G. Diehm, Clerk 

Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: We consider the present plan 
of regional rotation of the Annual Conference important for the purposes 
of wide-spread attendance. We grant, however, to any region which 
finds difficulty in locating the Conference within its own area the right 
to hold the Conference outside its regional boundaries. In case such 
action is considered necessary it should be done by the Locating 
Committee of Annual Conference and with the approval of the region 
in whose area the Conference is to be held. 

Revision of the Pamphlet, Brotherhood Organization 
The 1951 San Jose Annual Conference authorized this committee 
to revise and reprint the pamphlet entitled Brotherhood Organization 
at a time deemed appropriate; also to bring a further report if desired. 
The committee wishes to report that the General Brotherhood Board 
is publishing a new handbook for ministers to be called Manual of 
Worship and Polity: Church of the Brethren. This handbook includes 
the material your committee was asked to publish and it is still planned 
to supplement the publication of the handbook by a revised printing 
of the pamphlet, Brotherhood Organization. This will be smaller than 
the handbook and thus available for wider distribution. Because of 
the fact that the handbook is already on the press, this committee does 
not propose any further revisions of the pamphlet at this time. With 
the republication of this pamphlet in its revised form the committee 
will regard its assignment as having been fulfilled. 

Committee: Calvert N. Ellis, Chairman 

William M. Beahm, Secretary 
Galen B. Ogden 

Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Report adopted. 

Statement of the General Brotherhood Board on Our Sunday-school 
Publications and the Use of the Revised Standard Version 

The Revised Standard Version of the Scriptures, begun nearly 
twenty-five years ago, was completed during this Conference year. 
This monumental work has been warmly and widely accepted by 
millions of Christians throughout the country. The New Testament 



1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 203 

revision was finished in 1946 and has been used extensively by our 
own people with almost universal approval. 

Our people have from time to time been requesting our editors 
to use the new version in our Sunday-school publications. In response 
to these requests, the General Brotherhood Board approved an experi- 
mental use of the version beginning with the second quarter of 1953. 
We have now used the new version for nearly one quarter, during which 
time we have sought expressions of opinion from our church leaders. 

We have found that the vast majority of our people heartily approve 
the use of the new version. There is, however, opposition to its use 
on the part of a small minority of our people who are very honest and 
sincere in their objection. Some have requested the use of both versions 
printed in parallel columns as was once the practice of the church [King 
James and American Standard versions]. 

The General Brotherhood Board desires to serve our churches in 
their ministry of Christian education in the manner most acceptable 
and helpful to them. We, therefore, seek the approval of the Conference 
of 1953 for the printing of both the King James and the Revised Standard 
version in our publications beginning at the earliest possible date, which 
will be October 1, 1953. 

Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Request granted. 

Statement on Discrimination 

It is the belief of the General Brotherhood Board that discrimina- 
tions due to color, nationality, or creed are out of keeping both with the 
teachings of the New Testament and with the stated position of the 
Church of the Brethren. We therefore recommend: 

A. That the Annual Conference Locating Committee attempt to 
secure assurances in the host city that discriminations due to color, 
nationality, or creed which might embarrass the international character 
of our Conference, will be removed or set aside. 

B. That all Brethren churches move ahead courageously by ways 
most successful in their cultural surroundings to remove all discrimina- 
tion within their own fellowship. 

C. That Brethren work in the ways most adapted to their local 
situation for the removal of discriminatory practices within the cities 
and communities where Brethren churches are located. 

D. That in all projects, where General Brotherhood funds are 
appropriated, special efforts be made to teach against and to remove all 
forms of discrimination as rapidly as possible. 

Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Statement adopted as recom- 
mended. 



204 1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

Travel Bureau for Brethren 

Query, 1952 
The Pipe Creek congregation asks Annual Conference through 
district conference of Eastern Maryland to organize a travel bureau 
to assist our folk in buying all kinds of travel tickets at a reduced 
cost and in securing reservations and other accommodations; this service 
to be self-supporting and available to any member of Brethren families 
at all times. It is suggested that, following the pattern of the Mennonite 
Travel Bureau, this service be closely allied to Brethren Service. 

Marian Young, Clerk 
Answer of district conference: Passed to Annual Conference. 

Berkley O. Bowman, Writing Clerk 
Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Referred to the General Broth- 
erhood Board for study and report next year. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1953 

The General Brotherhood Board has studied the advisability of 
organizing "a travel bureau to assist our folk in buying all kinds of 
travel tickets at a reduced cost and in securing reservations and other 
accommodations; this service to be self-supporting and available to 
any member of Brethren families at all times." We are very appreciative 
of the concern of the query that greater travel assistance and co-ordina- 
tion be given to members of the church. It is true that the Mennonite 
Travel Bureau has rendered significant and profitable service to mem- 
bers and friends of the Mennonite fellowship. 

Investigation reveals, however, that travel tickets at reduced costs 
to the purchaser cannot be secured. Any financial advantage in purchas- 
ing travel tickets comes to the travel agency involved in the form of 
commissions on tickets sold and not to the individual purchaser in 
the form of reduced costs. Furthermore, it is found to be illegal for 
a travel bureau to distribute its commissions to purchasers thereby to 
reduce indirectly the costs of tickets. The two respects in which a 
Brethren Travel Bureau might be conceived as providing "travel tickets 
at a reduced cost" are, first, the increased services provided at usual 
travel agency rates and, second, a financially profitable operation of 
the bureau itself, which bureau might allocate its profits to the support 
of the brotherhood program. 

In view of these considerations the General Brotherhood Board 
does not believe it advisable at this time to establish a Brethren Travel 
Bureau. In lieu of establishing a travel bureau, we make the following 
suggestions: 

1. Brethren who are planning major travels may advise our broth- 
erhood office of their contemplated plans and receive what counsel and 
services are available through this office; 



1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 205 

2. The General Brotherhood Board is pleased to encourage Brethren 
who travel to visit areas and projects of the brotherhood program at 
home and abroad and is glad to have brotherhood staff personnel share 
in the planning for such visits; 

3. For Brethren who contemplate travel we recommend aspects of 
our present program, such as Brethren tours to Europe, summer work 
camps abroad, Annual Conference tours, and visits to our foreign 
mission fields. 

The board labors constantly at co-ordinating the domestic and 
foreign travel schedules of the church's missionaries, service workers, 
staff personnel, and deputations. Furthermore, it can be anticipated 
that travel by Brethren generally will steadily increase in volume in 
the future. However, at the present time we do not believe there is 
a sufficient dollar-volume of travel to advise the organization of a 
travel bureau without a major subsidy for several years from brother- 
hood funds. Meanwhile it shall be the intention of the General Brother- 
hood Board to evaluate carefully and frequently the travel facilities, 
problems, and opportunities of the Brethren. 

Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Report adopted. 

Urban Churches 

Query, 1952 

Standing Committee of 1952 requests the appointment of a commit- 
tee by the Annual Conference to study the conditions and problems of 
our urban churches. This study should include such items as conserving 
members to the brotherhood, using best procedures in locating and 
financing new churches, the provision of adequate program and leader- 
ship in these areas, and the special problems of small churches. 

Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Request granted. Committee: 
Harper S. Will (convener), James H. Beahm, I. V. Funderburgh, W. 
Newton Long, Paul B. Studebaker. 

Report of the Committee, 1953 

To the close of the nineteenth century the Church of the Brethren 
has been almost entirely a rural church. Since then and particularly 
in recent years, population movements have been toward the cities, 
and within cities toward suburban areas. Many Brethren have been 
caught up in this mobile trend. Some have lost their Brethren connec- 
tions. To conserve these and to provide a Christian ministry to the 
growing number of unchurched groups in our cities is a challenge to 
the Brethren. 

It is generally accepted that the newest and most apparent opportu- 
nities for the church today are around the bulging edges of our growing 
cities. Rural methods are not all suitable for building strong urban 



206 1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

churches. An effective urban church promotion strategy needs to be 
developed if the Brethren are to help in meeting the needs of unchurched 
areas of urban life. 

The committee sent a questionnaire to a sampling of our city church 
pastors, and among the twenty who responded there was general agree- 
ment that Brethren should not find it difficult to minister to city people. 
There was also general agreement that we could increase our effective- 
ness by more thorough training of members received and by making 
more meaningful our rites and ordinances. 

It is impossible in one short year for a committee to gather pertinent 
data and make a thorough analysis of even the major problems involved 
in the scope of this query. However, the committee attempts in this 
report to point out a few directions which, if followed, we believe, will 
start us on the way toward constructive and permanent work in our 
urban efforts. Accordingly the following observations and recommenda- 
tions are offered: 

A. Regarding Leadership Responsibility 

1. Responsibility for leadership in developing new church projects 
or reviewing the effectiveness of existing urban churches should rest 
primarily with district boards of administration, district mission boards, 
or other proper district authorities. 

2. Such district authorities should be on the constant alert for 
opportunities to begin new work, keeping in mind the potential assist- 
ance of Brethren residing in these communities. 

B. Regarding Existing City Churches 

1. The location, facilities, leadership, and program of our small 
urban churches, and others where specific problems are present, ought 
to be studied by the proper district and/or brotherhood and regional 
authorities in conjunction with the local congregations, and appropriate 
steps taken to strengthen the work or to look toward desirable 
relocation. 

2. An appropriate religious census should be conducted before 
deciding to close or relocate a church. 

C. Regarding Location and Building of New Urban Churches 

1. The spiritual needs of a community are to be considered of 
primary importance in establishing urban church work. This should 
be measured in terms of the findings of a careful, well-planned religious 
census and of the ability of the Brethren to serve the present and 
potential population of the area. 

2. In locating new churches recognition and co-operation should be 
given existing comity agencies, and the available counsel of brotherhood, 
regional, and district leadership utilized. 

3. In an effort to find the general community for a church project, 



1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 207 

careful attention should be given to available property for church 
building and parsonage — its size, suitability, cost, zoning, and other 
regulations. 

4. Plans for financing a new church should be made in the light 
of the development of the project, and the willingness and ability of 
the community, the membership of the district, and the general brother- 
hood to support it. 

5. The location, promotion, and program of a new urban church 
should be planned with the objective of its being a self-supporting 
congregation within five years. However, it should be recognized that 
further financial assistance from the district and/or brotherhood may 
be necessary at times beyond the initial investment for the best interests 
of the project. 

6. The establishment and early progress of new urban churches 
should have the administrative and supervisory help of the district board 
or special committee as needed. 

D. Miscellaneous Recommendations 

1. That our people should be encouraged to seek locations accessible 
to one of our churches when changing residence. 

2. That we should practice the transfer of church membership as 
adopted at the San Jose Annual Conference [see the 1951 minutes, the 
query entitled "Membership Transfer"]. 

3. That Bethany Biblical Seminary be encouraged to provide 
courses designed to assist in training pastors and parish workers for 
urban church work. 

4. That our Loan Library should add the best books available on 
urban church work. 

5. That Brethren leaders working in urban areas or contemplating 
such work be urged to consult expert references such as Frederick A. 
Shippey's book entitled Church Work in the City, and The Effective City 
Church, by Murray A. Leiffer. 

6. That the Ministry and Home Mission Commission be encouraged 
to continue reporting in the Gospel Messenger stories of those ventures 
in new church activities that are significant in achievement. 

7. That in all Our efforts we make Christ central, and keep as our 
objective the bringing of men, women, youth, and children into personal 
fellowship with him. 

I. V. Funderburgh, Chairman 
James H. Beahm, Secretary 
W. Newton Long 
Paul B. Studebaker 
Harper S. Will 

Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Report accepted and committee 
continued, 



208 1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 

Voting Body In District Meeting of India 

The following request came to the Standing Committee and was 
received for consideration by the Annual Conference. 

The Church of the Brethren 

Anklesvar, Broach District, B. P. 

May 1, 1953 

Early in the history of the Joint Council here, a decision was made 
by the district meetings and the Foreign Mission Commission that, to 
ensure some continuing tenure in our district meetings, elders and 
pastors be voting members of the district meeting delegate bodies by 
virtue of office. This was passed by the Foreign Mission Commission 
for a trial period of five years; and this period expired a couple of 
years ago. Now this year the question was raised in district meeting, 
and the district meeting voted as follows: 

"That the decision by which elders and pastors are voting members 
of district meeting be extended indefinitely." 

Be pleased then to have this put on the agenda of the Foreign 
Mission Commission, General Brotherhood Board, and/or Annual Con- 
ference, and to inform the district meetings in India of the decision 

made - R. M. Christian, Secretary, First District of India 

Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Request granted for the next 
five years from now. 

Win Men to Christ 

The 1952 Annual Conference adopted as the brotherhood theme 
for 1952-54, win men to Christ. Under the constraint of the love of 
Christ, in whose will alone we find our peace, our brotherhood this 
past year has sought earnestly so to do. 

We have experienced heartening growth in membership; new home 
mission churches have been started; new frontiers have beckoned; new 
areas of need have challenged the sacrificial spirit of the church. 
Everywhere, as we have sought to make disciples, and to minister 
to the needs of persons in their suffering and tragedy, we have found 
the deep and unmet hunger for spiritual bread. We have been brought 
to our knees in prayer for the Spirit's grace that the church may be 
an adequate channel of the Father's love. 

Laymen and laywomen have sat at the feet Of Christ as he bade 
them come after him that he might make them fishers of men. More 
than four hundred churches united their prayer, concern, and strength 
in a series of preaching missions in which twenty-four hundred laymen 
and laywomen and a thousand two hundred young people received 
training in the skills of winning others to Christ. Thoughtful Brethren 
have taught, preached, witnessed, and written their deep concern for 
the redemption of our lost neighbors. 



1953, Colorado Springs, Colorado 209 

The task is yet unfinished. As we see more clearly the vision of 
the face of Christ, we see his eyes turned in loving compassion upon 
our brothers who struggle hopelessly with evil, without his saving 
grace; upon the millions of children and youth in our own and other 
lands who have not the guiding light of the word of the gospel to 
live by; upon the hard and superficial brightness of countless lives lived 
for material things alone. We see his hands stretched out in appeal 
to the lost, the frightened and fearful, the exploited and down-trodden, 
the sad and lonely, that they come to him and find rest. 

So long as his compassionate longing for the redemption of all these 
little ones, his brethren, is unsatisfied, we cannot rest content. Since 
we are a branch of the church, his body, it is through our hands and 
lips that he will bring the Bread of Life to a portion of the sixty-six 
million persons still outside his church in America and of the billion 
who know him not in other lands. 

The lofty obligation to follow Christ, the constraint of his love, 
the compassion which moves our hearts when we see the hunger and 
need of our world — all these conspire to make a true and vigorous 
evangelism central in the life of our church again this year. 

Therefore, this Annual Conference calls the church again to win 
men to Christ. In every area of our program, this is now our central 
aim: that for all children there be faith in God; that for all youth, 
there be the comradeship of Christ; that for all adults there be the 
abundant life in Christ. The redemption of our world, the melting 
of the hard barriers which keep brother men apart, the establishment 
of honor and justice and peace upon earth, all depend at last upon 
the faithfulness and effectiveness of our evangelism. 

The call to stewardship — to supply for our general brotherhood the 
sum of $1,275,000 which is required for the carrying on of the brother- 
hood mission — is a call to evangelism. This we shall give in sacrificial 
sharing, that through our giving and the sacrificial devotion of the 
church's servants in the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Africa, the Church 
of the Brethren may win men to Christ. 

Let this theme then be central in the life, the teaching, the worship, 
the giving, the whole program of the Church of the Brethren for 
1953-54 — that all men may receive the abundant life in him — win men 

TO CHRIST. 

Action of 1953 Annual Conference: Statement adopted. 



7954, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 

Annual Conference Expenses 

Query, 1953 

The General Brotherhood Board voted to receive the following 
paper from the Central Region Board and to pass it on to Standing 
Committee for consideration. 

The Central Region Board in its regular meeting, March 9, 1953, 
expressed its concern regarding the present arrangement for financing 
the expenses in connection with location and arrangement of Annual 
Conference, prior to the time when Conference begins. 

In 1949 the Standing Committee voted the following decision about 
Annual Conference expenses: 

"1. That the expense of the regional representatives on the Commit- 
tee of Arrangements, preliminary to the opening of the Conference, 
be regarded as regional expense to be paid from regional funds. The 
expense of those designated to represent the Arrangements Committee 
during the time of the Conference shall be regarded as brotherhood 
expense to be paid from the Annual Conference treasury, provided this 
representation does not exceed three members. 

"2. That the expense of the Program Committee be regarded as 
brotherhood expense to be paid by the Annual Conference treasurer, 
including the representation of the Program Committee, or Committee 
on Arrangements. 

"3. That the expense for holding the Conference, including rental 
of auditorium, the making of placards and signs, the travel and honorari- 
um of special speakers, the printing of program and other necessary 
expense in connection with the actual administration of the Conference 
be regarded as brotherhood expense to be paid by the Annual Conference 
treasurer. 

"4. That the financial arrangements for holding the Conference 
be negotiated by the Committee on Arrangements ("Location"), it 
being understood that the moderator, the clerk, and staff representatives 
are members of the committee." 

In actual practice this has placed a heavy financial burden upon 
some of the regions in the year when the Conference was held there. 
The Central Region Board questioned the logic of penalizing a region 
financially, when it already has many difficult problems in the location 
and arrangements for Conference, which requires the time and services 
of many people. Why should a person be eligible to have his expenses 
paid, after Conference begins, for doing the same type of work that 
was charged to the region prior to that time? 

Because the present arrangement periodically places an undue 
financial burden on regions, the Central Region Board requests the 



1954, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 211 

General Brotherhood Board to give consideration to this problem, in 
the hope that a satisfactory solution may be found and that the 
necessary steps might be taken to correct the present arrangement for 
financing pre-Conference expenses. 

Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Answer of Standing Committee 
adopted. Bequest granted and referred to a committee for study and 
report next year. Committee: Bobert G. Greiner (convener), E. B. 
Fisher, Graybill Hershey. 

Report of the Committee, 1954 

In 1949 the Standing Committee voted the following decision about 
Annual Conference expenses: 

"1. That the expense of the regional representative on the Commit- 
tee of Arrangements, preliminary to the opening of the Conference, 
be regarded as regional expense to be paid from regional funds. The 
expense of those designated to represent the Arrangements Committee 
during the time of the Conference shall be regarded as brotherhood 
expense to be paid from the Annual Conference treasury, provided 
this representation does not exceed three members." 

In answer to the query we would recommend that this be amended 
to read as follows: 

"1. That the expense of the regional representatives on the Commit- 
tee of Arrangements shall be regarded as brotherhood expense to be 
paid from the Annual Conference treasury, provided this representation 
does not exceed three members." 

2. Upon its adoption, we recommend it to be effective with the 1955 
Conference. 

E. B. Fisher (chairman), Bobert Greiner, Graybill Hershey 

Answer of 1954 Annual Conference: Beport adopted. 

Brotherhood Fund Goal, 1954-55 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to the Ocean Grove 
Conference of 1954 a Brotherhood Fund goal of $1,300,000 for the church 
year beginning October 1, 1954. This is only $25,000 more than the goal 
for this year. 

This is a small advance, and is the amount needed to carry forward 
the program of the Lord's work in the year ahead. 

The board has carefully studied the plans and projects of the 
commissions and in view of the great needs would challenge the church 
to reach this goal. 

Goals for brotherhood giving seem to inspire response in sharing 
resources to support the world-wide witness of the church. So many 
important opportunities await Christian sacrifice and the board calls 



212 1954, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 

upon the church to give as unto the Lord — to preach the gospel, to teach 
the children, to build the church, and to help the needy. 

Answer of 1954 Annual Conference: Recommendation adopted. 

Brotherhood Theme. 1954-56 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
through Standing Committee the adoption of the theme, seek first his 
kingdom, for a two-year period beginning October 1, 1954. 

The General Brotherhood Board has prepared an interpretative, 
inspirational statement which suggests some of the implications of this 
theme for all of life. The reading of this statement is planned as a 
part of the Sunday evening convocation service. 

Answer of 1954 Annual Conference: Recommendation adopted for 
a two-year period beginning October 1, 1954. 

District Authority Over Churches 

Query, 1953 

The First Church of the Brethren in Alliance, in regular council 
assembled, April 20, 1952, asks district conference of Northeastern Ohio 
to petition Annual Conference to appoint a committee to study the 
advisability and possibility of having some authority in each district 
to step in and take over the operation of any church where the minister 
has gone wrong morally or spiritually, or who persists in criticism 
of our church leaders or doctrine and causes division among members 
of the church. 

Robert N. Antram, Acting Clerk 

Answer of district conference: Passed to Annual Conference. 

E. G. Diehm, Clerk 

Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Request granted and the com- 
mittee is also instructed to codify the actions of Annual Conference 
bearing on this problem. Committee: E. M. Detwiler (convener), 
Kenneth Hollinger, Edward Kintner. 

Report of the Committee, 1954 

We believe that the newly revised pamphlet on brotherhood organi- 
zation will bring together many of our Annual Conference decisions 
relating to matters of organization and discipline in our brotherhood. 
We are submitting to the officers and the Standing Committee of Annual 
Conference a codified list of the minutes we found that pertain to the 
matter raised by the query of last year's Annual Conference. 

The brotherhood organization plan adopted by Annual Conference 
in recent years, in matters dealing with discipline of ministers, elders, 
and moderators of local churches, has placed the responsibility on the 



1954, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 213 

elders' body of the district. Therefore, to bring our decisions of authority 
over churches in line with our present organization, we recommend 
that the authority asked for in the query be vested in the elders' body 
of the district. In such cases the elders' body may select a committee — 

1. To have complete supervision of the church, superseding the 
local minister, elder, or moderator, if the elders' body believe this to 
be necessary; or 

2. To act in an advisory capacity to the church, the minister, the 
elder, or the moderator of the local church, as the elders' body may 
believe to be best. 

In either case, this committee shall act in their assigned capacity 
until such time as they are relieved by the elders' body. It should be 
understood that the elders' body in the appointing of such a committee 
is still free to exercise its disciplinary authority as outlined by Annual 
Conference. 

An elder, a member of any district board, a member of the official 
board, or any active layman from the church may suggest in a signed 
statement to the moderator of the elders' body the need in a local church 
for investigation and possible use of such a committee. 

E. M. Detwiler, Convener 
Kenneth W. Hollinger, Secretary 
Edward Kintner 

Answer of 1954 Annual Conference: Report adopted as amended 
by the committee with the insertion of the words "in a signed statement" 
in the last paragraph. 

Eligibility of Standing Committee Members 

Standing Committee recommended to the Annual Conference of 
1954 that it amend the statement on Constitution and Function of Stand- 
ing Committee, section C on Eligibility, by the insertion of the words, 
"immediately before election" after the words "one year," the amended 
statement to read as follows: "Any elder, minister, or member of the 
laity who has been in the district for at least one year immediately 
before election and who fulfills the qualifications as set forth by Annual 
Conference may serve the district On Standing Committee." 

Answer of 1954 Annual Conference: Recommendation adopted. 

Extension of Annuity Rates 

The General Brotherhood Board recommends to Annual Conference 
through Standing Committee that the Uniform Annuity Agreement 
Rate Table as adopted by the June 1945 Annual Conference be extended 
to seven percent for older ages under agreements covering two persons 
as indicated on the table below. It is further recommended that the 
table be adopted for use of other brotherhood organizations. 



214 



1954, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 



UNIFORM ANNUITY AGREEMENT RATES 
TWO LIVES— JOINT LIFE AND SURVIVOR 

Calculated on the basis recommended to the Interdenominational 
Annuity Rate Conference, October 4, 1939. Adopted by the Church of 
the Brethren Annual Conference in June 1945. Combined annuity mortal- 
ity table. Interest at 3%%. Two females ages set back two years. 
Residuum 70%. 

AGE OF OLDER LIFE 







95 


94 


93 


92 


91 


90 


89 


88 


87 


86 


85 


84 


83 


82 


81 


A 


86 


















7.0 


6.9 












G 

E 


85 
















7.0 


6.9 


6.8 


6.7 













84 












7.0 


7.0 


6.9 


6.8 


6.7 


6.5 


6.5 








F 


83 






7.0 


7.0 


7.0 


6.9 


6.8 


6.7 


6.7 


6.6 


6.5 


6.4 


6.3 






Y 



82 


7.0 


7.0 


6.9 


6.9 


6.8 


6.8 


6.7 


6.6 


6.5 


6.5 


6.4 


6.3 


6.2 


6.2 




u 

N 


81 


6.9 


6.8 


6.8 


6.7 


6.7 


6.6 


6.6 


6.5 


6.4 


6.4 


6.3 


6.2 


6.1 


6.1 


6.0 


G 

E 


80 


6.7 


6.7 


6.6 


6.6 


6.5 


6.5 


6.4 


6.4 


6.3 


6.3 


6.2 


6.1 


6.1 


6.0 


5.9 


R 

L 

I 


79 


6.5 


6.5 


6.5 


6.4 


6.4 


6.4 


6.3 


6.3 


6.2 


6.2 


6.1 


6.0 


6.0 


5.9 


5.8 


78 


6.4 


6.4 


6.3 


6.3 


6.3 


6.2 


6.2 


6.1 


6.1 


6.1 


6.0 


5.9 


5.9 


5.8 


5.8 


F 
E 


77 


6.3 


6.2 


6.2 


6.2 


6.1 


6.1 


6.1 


6.0 


6.0 


5.9 


5.9 


5.8 


5.8 


5.7 


5.7 




76 


6.1 


6.1 


6.1 


6.0 


6.0 


6.0 


6.0 


5.9 


5.9 


5.8 


5.8 


5.8 


5.7 


5.7 


5.6 




75 


6.0 


6.0 


5.9 


5.9 


5.9 


5.9 


5.8 


5.8 


5.8 


5.7 


5.7 


5.7 


5.6 


5.6 


5.5 



Projection of rates for ages of ninety-five. These go beyond the 
printed table showing ages to eighty only. In order to have only one 
table of extended rates we are embodying in this schedule the rates to 
age eighty-five, rates issued under date of May 24, 1946. Note that the 
ages of the older life are shown from eighty-one to ninety-five while 
the ages of the younger life are shown from seventy-five to eighty-six. 
However, the rates are stopped at equal ages on the one hand and when 
they reach the limiting rate of 7.0%. 

The above table was prepared 4-21-54 by Huggins & Co. for the 
General Brotherhood Board. The regular table in use does not carry 
ages of persons above eighty years who wish a Brethren annuity. 
Assuming that the Huggins table is scientifically correct the residue 



2954, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 215 

from agreements entered into using this above-eighty table should be 
the same as from the legal annuity table. 

Answer of 1954 Annual Conference: Recommendation adopted as 
revised. 

Keeping Church Records 

Query, 1953 

We, the churches of the Western District of Pennsylvania, petition 
Annual Conference to study and evaluate our policy regarding the use 
and disposition of valuable historical data and documents. As a basis 
for such procedure, we offer the following at the recommendation of 
our District Historical Committee: 

Inasmuch as all minutes, deeds, and historical documents of local 
churches and district boards, committees, and other church organizations 
are the property of the local church and/or of the district, rather than 
of the individuals charged with recording such proceedings, we recom- 
mend: 

1. That each local church provide and conserve faithfully such 
records in a safe place. 

2. That all minutes of district organizations, defunct and functioning 
(except those in current use), be placed in a central repository. 

3. That such records be made available to persons concerned, 
especially historical committees. 

We petition Annual Meeting through district meeting to make this 
the general policy of the brotherhood. 

Answer of district meeting: Adopted and passed to Annual Meeting. 

Clarence R. Bowman, Clerk 

Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Referred to the General Broth- 
erhood Board for study and report next year, as well as for subsequent 
promotion among the churches. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1954 
We approve the policies set forth in this query and ask local 
congregations, districts, regions, and institutions of the church to arrange 
for the responsible and safe care of their records and documents. 

We call attention to our Historical Library at Elgin as a central 
repository for the brotherhood and to our college and seminary libraries 
as repositories also interested in preserving the records of the church. 

The General Brotherhood Board 
Answer of 1954 Annual Conference: Report adopted. 

Membership in Secret Societies 

Query, 1952 
We, the New Hope congregation, in council assembled, petition the 
district conference of Southern Missouri and Arkansas, assembled in 



216 1954, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 

the Carthage, Missouri, church, August 17-20, 1951, to petition Annual 
Conference to restate the Church of the Brethren interpretation of the 
New Testament teaching as it relates to secret orders or oath-bound 
societies. Mary ^ Birkhead, Clerk 

Answer of district conference: Passed to Annual Conference. 

Orin Harvey, District Clerk 

Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Request is granted by the 
appointment of a committee to make a study of this problem and to 
formulate the restatement for the consideration of next year's Annual 
Conference. Committee: Harper S. Will (convener), Warren D. Bow- 
man, Kenneth I. Morse. 

Report of the Committee, 1953 
The committee views its assignment as twofold: to make a study 
of the situation in our churches with regard to membership in secret 
societies, and to formulate a restatement Of our church's position for 
consideration by Annual Conference. In order to complete a careful 
study, already initiated this year, the committee reports progress and 
asks for another year to complete its assignment. 

Harper S. Will, Chairman 
Warren D. Bowman 
Kenneth I. Morse 
Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Report of progress accepted 
and request for more time granted. 

Report of the Committee, 1954 

On the basis of information secured from representative pastors 
and laymen across the brotherhood, the committee concludes that 
membership in secret societies involves only a small percentage of our 
members and creates a serious problem for only a few churches. Yet 
we believe that where such association with secret orders affects the 
loyalty of members to their church it constitutes enough of a problem 
that the church should again state its conviction that membership in 
secret, oath-bound orders represents a compromise with secular stand- 
ards that is unworthy of a consecrated Christian. The New Testament, 
though not commenting on secret societies as such, is clearly opposed 
to the taking of oaths and to associations whose aims may be counter 
to the ideals of the church. When Christians are confronted with such 
a conflict of loyalties, they must "seek first the kingdom of God and his 
righteousness." 

We urge pastors, On receiving members, to give specific instruction 
on the position of the church on this matter, emphasizing the member's 
primary loyalty to Jesus Christ and his church. We believe that the 
supreme claims of the church, not only in regard to secret orders but 



2954, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 217 

also in relation to other clubs, fraternities, and social and professional 
organizations should be repeatedly brought to the attention of members. 
In situations where the effective witness of a local congregation is 
hindered because of the association of members with secret societies, 
we recommend that the church leaders seek counsel from the elders' 
body, the ministerial board, or the board of administration of the 
district. We recommend that when members continue their participation 
in secret societies the churches hold them in loving fellowship provided 
their conduct is otherwise consistent with the Christian faith. At the 
same time we should seek to make the church so vital and its fellowship 
so genuine for all members that none will feel the need for associations 
such as those offered by the fraternal orders. 

Harper S. Will, Chairman 
Warren D. Bowman 
Kenneth I. Morse 

Answer of 1954 Annual Conference: Report adopted. 

Methods of Financial Promotion 

Query, 1952 

The following recommendation of the elders' body in the form of 
a query to Annual Conference was accepted unanimously by the 
delegates: 

"Recognizing the difficulties involved in securing adequate and 
suitable financial support for all aspects of a unified program, since some 
phases possess more popular appeal than other necessary functions, 
we, the district conference of Southwestern Kansas, assembled in the 
Eden Valley church, request the Annual Conference to appoint a commit- 
tee to study our methods of financial promotion and to devise a plan 
by which all aspects of the general brotherhood program shall receive 
their proper proportionate share of brotherhood giving." 

Raymond L. Flory, Writing Clerk 

Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Referred to the General Broth- 
erhood Board for study and report next year. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1953 
The General Brotherhood Board reports progress and asks for more 
time to study methods of financial promotion. 

Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Request for more time granted. 

Report of the General Brotherhood Board, 1954 
This query presents a difficult and continuing problem. It is related 
not only to the Brotherhood Fund but to the budgets of districts and 
local churches as well. There probably is no final answer to the problem 



218 2954, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 

except patience and perseverance in the discipline of Christian stew- 
ardship. 

We, however, offer the following recommendations in the belief 
that they will be helpful in relation to the problem of the query: 

First: That pastors and officers of the local churches and officers 
and secretaries of districts, regions, and the brotherhood give greater 
encouragement to unrestricted giving to the Brotherhood Fund by our 
people, recognizing that all items of the fund are essential to the full 
and complete ministry of the church. 

Second: That the principle of designated giving continue to be 
respected for all who desire to give to special causes in which they 
have a particular interest but that all such gifts be expected to bear 
the full expense of their administration. 

Third: That all districts of the brotherhood seek to determine, 
in the spirit of sharing in the total work of the church, what is their 
rightful proportionate giving to the Brotherhood Fund. We would 
further urge that the current giving of our people be remitted monthly 
to the ongoing work of the church. 

Fourth: The Brotherhood Fund as presented to the Conference 
represents intensive study of the program of the church in relation to 
world needs. An effort is made to adjust and correlate the items of the 
budget in the most equitable manner and with due consideration to the 
needs which prevail in districts and in local churches. The expenditures 
of the church through the General Brotherhood Board are reported to 
Annual Conference in great detail. We urge the delegates to give close 
scrutiny to these items and to offer suggestions freely to the General 
Brotherhood Board. 

We believe that the advantages of the unified budget far outweigh 
the difficulties of administration. The Conference, therefore, urges our 
churches to strive to improve their procedures in the interest of an 
equitable and effective sharing of the funds of the church in its total 
world-wide ministry. The General Brotherhood Board 

Answer of 1945 Annual Conference: Report adopted. 

Pastoral Care of Rural Churches 

Query, 1952 

1. Because the rural church is important in the life of the brother- 
hood; 

2. Because many Of our rural churches are small in the number of 
members and cannot afford full-time pastoral care; 

3. Because many small rural churches are without resident minis- 
terial help, and the present outlook offers little hope for improvement; 

4. Because the small rural church demands specialized leadership 



1954, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 219 

adapted to rural conditions which are usually quite different from 
those of our larger rural and urban churches; 

5. Because there is evidence that the rural church and its setting 
deserves more intelligent understanding, genuine appreciation, and 
exalted promotion in the Church of the Brethren than it now receives; 

We, the Ministerial Board of the Second District of Virginia, petition 
Annual Conference through the district conference of the Second District 
of Virginia to provide a thorough study of this matter. The findings 
of this report should indicate with factual data the importance and 
health of our rural churches in the brotherhood and the present situation 
and outlook as to pastoral care. It might include suggestions for enlist- 
ing ministers for service in rural areas, propose programs for support, 
partial or full time, whereby the local church might secure resident 
ministerial care; suggest ways and means by which our colleges and 
seminary might more adequately promote this emphasis; and such other 
points as may seem pertinent in order that the church might move 
toward the solution of this problem. Boyd E Cupp> Secre tary 

Answer of district conference: Passed to Annual Conference. 

M. R. Wolfe, District Secretary 

Answer of 1952 Annual Conference: Report adopted as revised, and 
amended to include the following as a final paragraph: 

The Rural Life Advisory Council and the director of evangelism 
and the rural church are asked (1) to study further the problems of 
the rural church, (2) to encourage the appropriate agencies to carry 
out the above recommendations, and (3) to bring a report of progress 
to the 1953 Annual Conference. The Rural Life Advisory Council: 
Robert F. Eshleman (chairman), Edward K. Ziegler (secretary), Ross 
A. Heminger, Harold E. Kettering, Paul E. Miller, Daryl M. Parker. 

Report of the Rural Life Advisory Council, 1953 

The Rural Life Advisory Council, in following the mandate of the 
1952 Annual Conference "to 

"(1) study further the problems of the rural church; 

"(2) encourage the appropriate agencies to carry out the recom- 
mendations of the 1952 committee report; and 

"(3) to bring a report of progress to the 1953 Annual Conference," 
submits this report of progress in the work assigned: 

Study of the Problems of the Rural Church 

The council has initiated studies of the growth and decline of rural 
churches, and encouraged serious students of our rural church to share 
and exchange data and findings which will lead to understanding and 
creative planning. Several significant conferences have been held, partic- 
ularly at Manchester College and in Southern Ohio, to deal with the 
problems Of rural church life. One member of the council is preparing 



220 1954, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 

a book which will give guidance to rural churches in keeping our rural 
communities stable and Christian. 

In several districts, strong committees have been set up to encourage 
the churches in placement and maintenance of farms in Brethren hands. 
Many rural churches are likewise taking this step and setting up land 
and home committees. 

Much attention has been given to rural evangelism. The director 
of evangelism has held thirty-nine conferences, either on a district or 
subdistrict level, in which the outreach of the rural church and rural 
evangelism have been stressed. 

Rural Life Emphasis in the Colleges 

Two of our colleges have strong rural life programs. McPherson 
offers a major in rural life, with substantial offerings in both rural 
sociology and the rural church on the one hand, and practical courses 
on the other. A core curriculum in rural life is in the process of 
preparation. 

Manchester has begun the organization of a program of rural life 
studies, comparable to its eminently successful program of peace studies. 

Bridgewater works closely with the state agricultural college and 
is interested in finding a man who will do both teaching and extension 
work in this field. 

The other colleges offer some courses in rural sociology, but have 
no specific emphasis here. They offer some extension courses of value 
to rural and urban churches alike. 

Aside from the two first mentioned there is no progress to be 
reported in the action of our colleges in line with the recommendations 
of last year's Conference minutes. This is an area of very great and 
urgent need. 

Bethany Biblical Seminary 

Because of the change in administration at Bethany, there is no 
progress to report in the fulfillment of the Conference recommendations 
of 1952. It is apparent that at least an adequate proportion of Bethany 
Seminary graduates are committed to serving in rural churches, in many 
cases at considerable personal sacrifice. The Rural Life Advisory 
Council is strongly of the opinion that we must move in the direction 
of having a department of rural church in the seminary as soon as 
it can be worked out. 

The decline in membership and rate of growth in many predom- 
inantly rural districts of the church is still very alarming. It is urgent 
that all departments of the life and work of the church will serve to 



1954, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 221 

strengthen, rebuild, and renew the life of rural churches, if the Church 

of the Brethren is to survive. 

Rural Life Advisory Council: , 

Robert F. Eshleman, Chairman 
Edward K. Ziegler, Secretary 
Harold E. Kettering 
Daryl M. Parker 
Paul E. Miller 
Ross A. Heminger 
Answer of 1953 Annual Conference: Report accepted and committee 

continued. 

Report of the Rural Life Advisory Council, 1954 
The rural churches (open-country and those in towns and villages 
under two thousand five hundred population, by U. S. Census definition) 
constitute seventy-three percent of our total congregations, and contain 
approximately sixty-four percent of our total membership. About one 
third of the rural churches have full-time pastors, as over against 
eighty-five percent of the urban churches. Many rural churches are 
served by a minister who divides his time between two or more 
churches. Fully as many or more are served by men who give only 
part time to the ministry and make the greater proportion of their 
living from farming, teaching, or some Other rural business or profession. 
The Southeastern and Western regions have the most acute problem 
in pastoral care. Some districts in the Southeastern Region have never 
had adequate leadership, and are retarded in their total church life 
as a consequence. The greater part Of the Western Region finds its 
open-country churches in areas of rapidly declining population, and 
the churches there must have statesmanlike leadership to adapt location 
and program to the rapidly changing needs. 

Leadership Needs for Our Rural Churches 
The committee recognizes that in all areas the problem of securing 
and maintaining adequate leadership — ministers and laymen with a 
profound understanding of rural life and with a deep consecration to the 
welfare of the Christian rural community — is a paramount problem. 
We see and would point out to the church the need for a much more 
vigorous and adequate program of leadership training on three levels. 

Graduate Training for Professional Leaders 

We reiterate the emphasis in former reports to Annual Conference 
upon the need for a strong rural church department in our seminary 
[1952 and 1953]. We are deeply conscious of the common core of training 
necessary for competent ministers, wherever they may be called to 
serve. Nevertheless, we believe that adequate courses should be offered 



222 1954, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 

to train our ministers specifically for rural and for urban work. We 
would note that all Methodist seminaries, most Presbyterian seminaries, 
and many of other churches as well now have rural church departments. 
We would urge that ministers avail themselves of the opportunities 
now offered for graduate in-service summer training in several of the 
best seminaries. We commend the General Brotherhood Board for 
making scholarship aid available for ministers attending such schools. 

Training in the Colleges 

The committee commends the department of rural life in McPherson 
College and the rural life studies program at Manchester College as 
vigorous attempts to make the college a source of continuing help to 
our rural churches. It is essential that in all our colleges there be 
guidance and curriculum emphases designed for a better understanding 
of rural life and the church to meet the needs of young people, in farm 
and non-farm occupations and vocations, planning to continue life and 
work in rural communities. Rural life conferences, vocational guidance 
techniques which give adequate emphasis to rural vocations, aid to 
rural churches in research and extension services, more adequate 
curricular offerings in preparation for life and work in rural Christian 
communities are essential developments if the colleges are to deserve 
the support and patronage of our rural churches, which constitute so 
large a proportion of their constituency. 

In-Service Training for Lay Leaders and Part-Time and Free Ministers 

The committee sees as one of the most important steps in providing 
more adequate care for rural churches the planning of a comprehensive 
in-service training program for the leaders of these churches. Some 
regions and districts have already made great strides by setting up 
conferences for deacons and pastoral boards, as well as the constant 
and excellent series of in-service training provisions for church-school 
workers. 

The General Brotherhood Board, the regional offices, and the 
colleges should set up training institutes which would Offer to free and 
part-time ministers the training and inspiration which were received 
in times past through the college Bible terms and other training 
facilities. 

For a long time to come, many of our churches will have the free 
ministry and/or the ministry of men without complete professional 
training. It is essential that the best of in-service training be regularly 
offered, and that they be urged to take advantage of such training. 

Placement Plans for Rural Churches 
Every rural church should have a standing committee charged with 
placement in the church community. These committees should not 



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224 1954, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 

only seek farms for those wanting land; they should find opportunities 
in all kinds of wholesome non-farm occupations and seek to attract 
young people to all kinds of vocational and professional openings in 
the community. They should also serve as a clearing-house for places 
to live. They should be the local church agency for co-operation with 
the brotherhood placement service. 

Districts and regions should provide institutes to train the personnel 
of placement committees for their tasks. 

Local Church Responsibility 
The local church is at last responsible for its own leadership. The 
church must constantly be on the alert to find, encourage, train, and 
give responsibility to local indigenous leadership. The church should 
encourage, both in spirit and through financial aid, its lay and ministerial 
leaders to attend conferences, district, regional, and annual. It should 
likewise place in its budget adequate provision for giving aid in 
attending leadership training classes, institutes, and conferences. 

The local church must recognize and accept its responsibility for 
laying the claims of the Christian ministry and other full-time church- 
related vocations upon its finest youth, at the same time nurturing 
the sense of Christian vocation in all its members. 

Committee, The Rural Life Advisory Council: 
Robert F. Eshleman 
Harold E. Kettering 
Donald Royer 
Paul E. Miller 
Ross Heminger 
Edward K. Ziegler 
Answer of 1954 Annual Conference: Report adopted and referred 
to the General Brotherhood Board to take under consideration whether 
there is need for a secretary of town and country church and, if so, 
bring a recommendation to Annual Conference. 

Publication of Annual Conference Minutes 

The Annual Conference of 1954 voted to lift up and refer to the 
General Brotherhood Board for implementation the Annual Conference 
minute of 1943 authorizing the editing and publication of Annual Con- 
ference minutes every ten years. 

Schwarzenau Memorial 

Queries 

1. Commemorative Marker at Schwarzenau 

In looking forward to the 235th anniversary of the Mother Church 

in this country in 1958, we are reminded of the 250th anniversary of 



2954, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 225 

the beginning of our church in Schwarzenau, Germany, in the year 
1708. The Mother Church in America at Germantown, Pennsylvania, 
in council requests through the district conference of Southeastern 
Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Northern Delaware, and Eastern New York, 
that the Annual Conference authorize the erection of a suitable marker 
in Schwarzenau commemorating the 250th anniversary of the beginning 
of our church, the Church of the Brethren. The work would be directed 
by the Historical Committee under the supervision of the Brethren 
Service Commission and the Board of Christian Education. All Brethren 
bodies should be invited to co-operate. Offerings should be asked of 
all our congregations as well as from all interested parties. 

E. F. Ertel, Clerk 

Answer of district conference: Passed on to Annual Conference. 

D. Alfred Replogle, Clerk 

Answer of 1954 Annual Conference: This query to be considered 
together with the query which follows. 

2. Schwarzenau Church Memorial 

Since 1958 will represent two hundred fifty years of the history 
of the Church Of the Brethren, we the Bethel church request the 1953 
district conference of Northern Indiana to request the Annual Confer- 
ence of 1954 to authorize the Historical Committee of the church, work- 
ing through the Christian Education and Brethren Service commissions 
of the church, to plan a suitable memorial at Schwarzenau, Germany, 
to commemorate the beginning of our church there, and to request 
each congregation to contribute ten dollars or more to this cause, and 
to seek the co-operation of other Brethren bodies in this historical 
project. 

Iva Neff, Clerk 

Answer of district meeting: Request granted and passed to Annual 
Meeting. 

Answer of 1954 Annual Conference: Those queries referred to the 
General Brotherhood Board for favorable consideration and power to 
act in their planning for the 250th anniversary of the founding of our 
church. 

Stewardship of Accumulated Possessions 

The District of Southern Ohio, at its ninety-ninth district conference 
at Covington, November 5, 1953, passed the following query to the 
Annual Conference at Ocean Grove, New Jersey, June 15-20, 1954: 

Inasmuch as the Annual Conference of 1944 set forth the position 
of the Church of the Brethren, giving guidance to members with respect 
to proportional giving and tithing, and believing this is usually inter- 
preted as applying largely to the stewardship of current income, 



226 1954, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 

We, the district board of Southern Ohio, ask district conference to 
propose to Annual Conference that a statement be issued with regard 
to the stewardship of accumulated possessions through the instrumental- 
ity of a Christian will, the annuity plan, or some other effective means. 

We offer the following statement to be considered in the answer 
of Annual Conference: 

STEWARDSHIP OF ACCUMULATED POSSESSIONS 
A Christian is a steward of all life and possessions. The Conference 
of 1944 set forth the position of the church with respect to proportionate 
giving and tithing. We now call upon our members as they make their 
wills or otherwise plan for the distribution of their accumulated 
possessions, to express their Christian faith by providing resources for 
the work of Christ's Kingdom. We ask ministers and teachers to uphold 
deep spiritual motives in the acquiring, the using, and the distributing 
of financial assets. 

Answer of 1954 Annual Conference: Statement adopted as the 
action of Annual Conference. 

Travel Pool for Standing Committee Delegates 
Query, 1953 

Believing that: 

1 — Standing Committee is functioning at her best when there is 
the fullest participation by all districts through their delegates, 

2 — The burden of sending delegates is unduly heavy upon small 
districts located on the perimeter of the brotherhood in North America, 

3 — Other Organizations, including our own Church of the Brethren 
Youth Fellowship in their national youth gatherings held biennially, 
have found material advantage in the travel pool, 

We, the Second Irricana church, petition district meeting of Western 
Canada, assembled June 29 — July 2, 1952, to request a study to be made 
concerning the possibility Of establishing a travel pool for all Standing 
Committee delegates. j^. j j Crawford> Clerk 

Answer of district conference: Passed by the district meeting. 

Fred E. Oberholtzer, District Secretary 

Answer of the 1953 Annual Conference: Request for the study was 
granted. Committee: Robert G. Greiner (convener), Everett R. Fisher, 
Graybill Hershey. 

Report of the Committee, 1954 

After a study of comparative costs to the districts for Standing 
Committee delegates over a five-year period, and of the problems and 
expense involved in setting up and administering a travel pool, your 
committee feels that this proposal would create more problems than it 



1954, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 227 

would solve. We, therefore, do not advise the establishment of a travel 
pool for Standing Committee delegates. 

We do want to express a concern for those districts whose size 
and location make the sending of a delegate more of a problem, 
particularly in the years when Conference is farthest away from those 
districts. As a partial answer to this problem we would invite each of 
the regional boards to consider the advisability of a Standing Committee 
delegate travel pool for their particular region. 

E. R. Fisher, Robert Greiner, Graybill Hershey 

Answer of 1954 Annual Conference: Report adopted. 

Voting Privileges of Elders in the Second District of India 

The Second District Of India in its Annual Meeting at Palghar, 
February 19-22, 1954, requests that the privilege previously granted for 
ordained elders to be voting members of district meeting be extended 
for an additional five-year period. g g Thorati Secretary 

Answer of 1954 Annual Conference: Request granted to 1958 to 
coincide with the privilege granted to the First District of India in 1953. 



Index 



Accumulated Possessions, Stewardship 

of, 225 
Adoption of the Revised Standard Ver- 
sion, Proposed, 198 
Advance Movement, 87, 107 
Advance With Christ, 44 
Advancements and Standards In the 

Ministry, 128 
Alcohol, Statement on, 178 
Alternative Service, 100 
Amendment of the Charter of the Gen- 
eral Mission Board Trustee in Iowa 
for the Church of the Brethren, 89 
Amendment to the Pension Plan, 89 
Amendments to the Conference Rules, 

130 
Amendments to the Ministerial and Mis- 
sionary Pension Plan, 47 
Amendments to the Pension Plan, 130 
Annual Conference 
Delegates to, 122 
Expenses, 210 

Local Representation at, 33 
Permanent Location for, 104 
Place and Time of, 104 
Regular Locations for, 201 
Study of Dates for, 104 
Verbatim Report of, 117 
Annual Conference Minutes, Publication 

of, 224 
Annuity Rates, Extension of, 213 
Apprenticeship, Pastoral, 151 

Bethany Biblical Seminary 

Campus Improvements, 9 

Financial Support of, 131 

Financing of, 192 

Revised Budget for, 41 

Solicitation of Funds by, 124 
Bethany Hospital, 107 
Bethany Hospital and Our Educational 

Institutions, 90 
Bethany Hospital Relationships, 118 
Bible Training Problem, 163 
Brethren Emphasis for 1949-50, 109 
Brethren Hymnal, Publication of, 40 
Brethren Publishing House, Reincorpo- 
ration of, 41 
Brethren Service Budget, 1946-47, 9 
Brethren Service Commission, Revised 

Budget for, 41 
Brethren Volunteer Service, Future of, 
132 



Brotherhood Fund 

1948-49, 51 

1949-50, 96 

1950-51, 112 
Brotherhood Fund, Revision of 

1948-49, 104 

1949-50, 115 

1950-51, 119 
Brotherhood Fund Goal 

1951-52, 131 

1952-53, 170 

1953-54, 190 

1954-55, 211 
Brotherhood Organization, 26, 52 

Revision of, 153 

Revision of the Pamphlet, 202 
Brotherhood Theme 

1950-51, 120 

1952-54, 170 

1954-56, 212 
Brotherhood Theme and Slogan, 27 
Budget, Brotherhood, 1947-48, 26 
Budget, Revision of 

1945-46, 24 

1947-48, 82 
Budget Receipts, Division of, 13 

Call to Repentance, 28 
Central Agency for Vocational Place- 
ment, 190 
Change of Historical Commission, 97 
"Christ the Hope of the World," 27 
Christian Education Commission, Re- 
vised Budget for, 42 
Christian Position on Registration, 100 
Church Boards, Nomination for, 22 
Church Headquarters, Location of, 136 
Church Membership, 28 

Teaching for, 28 
Church of the Brethren Radio Hour, 191 
Church Property 

District Control of, 12 

District Title of, 12 
Church Records, Keeping, 215 
Churches 

District Authority Over, 212 

Urban, 205 
Churches, Federal Council of, 14 
Civilian Public Service, Directives on, 33 
Colleges, Financial Support of, 19 
Commission of Fifteen 

Dismissal of, 113 

Report of, 26, 52 



Index 



229 



Commissions, Nomenclature of, 82 
Compulsory Military Training, 9 
Concern for Ministerial Recruitment, 192 
Conference Budget, 1946-47, 11 
Conference Rules, Amendments to, 130 
Conference Trustees, 32 
Consecration Service, Enlarged, 113 
Control of Church Property, District, 12 
Co-operation in Organizing New 

Churches, 33 
Co-operation With Other Brethren Bod- 
ies. 80 
Date for the Pastoral Year, 172 
Delegates to Annual Conference, 122 
Directives on Civilian Public Service, 33 
Discipline, Ministerial, 21 
Discrimination, Statement on, 203 
Dismissal of Commission of Fifteen, 113 
Displaced Persons, Statement on, 116 
District Authority Over Churches, 212 
District Control of Church Property, 12 
District Meeting of India, Voting Body 

of, 208 
District Title of Church Property, 12 
Districts, Redistribution of, 176 
Division of Budget Receipts, 13 
Duties of the Moderator, Study of, 25 

Economic Problems, Statement on, 158 
Elders in the Second District of India, 

Voting Privileges of, 227 
Eligibility of Standing Committee Mem- 
bers, 213 
Endowment Funds, Investment of, 194 
Enlarged Consecration Service, 113 
Equalization of Pastors' Salaries, 172 
Expenses, Annual Conference, 210 
Expense of Publishing the Yearbook, 123 
Extension of Annuity Rates, 213 
Europe, Mission Points in, 99 
Evangelism, 14 

Federal Council of Churches, 14 
Federal Income Tax Deductions, 114 
Financial Promotion 
Methods of, 217 
Responsibility for, 82 
Financial Support of Bethany Seminary, 

131 
Financial Support of Colleges, 19 
Financing of Bethany Biblical Seminary, 

192 
Financing the Regional Program, 123 
Fiscal Year of the General Brotherhood 

Board, 114 
Future of Brethren Volunteer Service, 

132 



General Boards Reorganization, Study 

of, 25 
General Brotherhood Board, Fiscal Year 

of, 114 
General Church Government, Our, 195 
General Mission Board Trustee in Iowa 

for the Church of the Brethren, 

Amendment of the Charter of, 89 
Goodwill Toward Other Nationals, 134 

Handbook for New Church Members, 

135 
Help for Ministerial and Other Students, 

97 
Historical Commission 

Change of, 97 

Revised Budget for, 24 
Historical Society Recognized, 19 
Home Missions, Study of, 25 
Homes for Older People, 135 

Identification Symbol for Brethren, 193 
Inactive and Nonresident Members, 28 
Income Tax Deductions, Federal, 114 
International Conference on Peace and 

World Order, 193 
Investment of Endowment Funds, 194 

Keeping Church Records, 215 

Licensed Ministers, Reading Course for, 
200 

Licensing and Ordaining Ministers, 36 

Liquors, Magazines Advertising, 98 

Literature for Youth, 174 

Loan Fund, Parish, 24 

Local Representation at Annual Confer- 
ence, 33 

Location of Church Headquarters, 136 

Love Feast, Participation in, 150 

Magazines Advertising Liquor, 98 
Membership 

Church, 28 

In Secret Societies, 215 

Inactive and Nonresident, 28 

Transfer, 137 
"Men and Millions for Christ," 27 
Methods of Financial Promotion, 217 
Military Training 

Compulsory, 9 

Peacetime Conscription and, 39 

Statement on, 10 

Universal Compulsory, 83 
Ministerial and Missionary Pension 
Plan, Amendments to, 47 



230 



Index 



Ministerial and Missionary Service 

Fund, 98 
Administration of, 9 
Ministerial and Other Students, Help 

for, 97 
Ministerial Discipline, 21 
Ministerial Placement, 141 
Ministerial Recruitment, Concern for, 

192 
Ministers, Licensing and Ordaining, 33 
Ministry, Advancements and Standards 

in, 128 
Ministry, Women in, 185 
Ministry to Negroes, 81 
Mission Points in Europe, 99 
Mutual Aid Society, 37 

Negroes, Ministry to, 81 

New Brethren Hymnal, Publication of, 
40 

New Church Members, Handbook for, 
13S 

New Churches, Co-operation in Organ- 
izing, 33 

Nomenclature of Commissions, 82 

Nominations for Church Boards, 22 

Older People, Homes for, 135 

One Million Dollars for Christ, 23 

Organization, Brotherhood, 26 

Other Brethren Bodies, Co-operation 

With, 80 
Other Nationals, Goodwill Toward, 134 
Our Educational Institutions, Bethany 

Hospital and, 90 
Our General Church Government, 195 
Our Over-all Program, 148 

Parish Loan Funds, 24 
Participation in the Love Feast, 150 
Pastor, Procedure in Calling, 141 
Pastoral Apprenticeship, 151 
Pastoral Care of Rural Churches, 218 
Pastoral Year, Date for, 172 
Pastors' Salaries, Equalization of, 172 
Peace and World Order, International 

Conference on, 193 
Peace Education and Promotion, 152 
Peace Education, Transfer of, 43 
Peacetime Conscription and Military 

Training, 39 
Pension Plan 

Amendment to, 89 

Amendments to, 130 

Proposed Revision of, 198 
Place and Time of Annual Conference, 
104 



Placement, Ministerial, 141 

Position and Practices of the Church 
of the Brethren in Relation to War, 
100 

Procedure in Calling a Pastor, 141 

Proposed Adoption of the Revised 
Standard Version, 198 

Proposed Revision of the Pension Plan, 
198 

Publication of a New Brethren Hymnal, 
40 

Publication of Annual Conference Min- 
utes, 224 

Publicity Evils, 114 

Race, Statement on, 124 

Radio Hour, Church of the Brethren, 191 

Rate Revision, Special Gift (Annuity) 
Agreement, 25 

Reading Course for Licensed Ministers, 
200 

Redistribution of Districts, 176 

Regional Program, Financing the, 123 

Registration, Christian Position on, 100 

Regular Location for Annual Confer- 
ence, 201 

Reincorporation of the Brethren Pub- 
lishing House, 41 

Relationships, Bethany Hospital, 118 

Reorganization of Our General Boards, 
25 

Repentance, Call to, 28 

Responsibility for Financial Promotion, 
82 

Revised Standard Version 
Proposed Adoption of, 198 
Statement of the General Brotherhood 
Board on Our Sunday-school Publi- 
cations and the Use of, 202 

Revision of the Brotherhood Organiza- 
tion, 153 

Revision of the Conference Budget 
1945-46, 24 
1947-48, 82 

Revision of the Pamphlet, Brotherhood 
Organization, 202 

Revision of the Pension Plan, Proposed, 
198 

Rural Churches, Pastoral Care of, 218 

Schwarzenau 

Church Memorial, 225 

Commemorative Marker at, 224 
Second District of India, Voting Priv- 
ileges of Elders in, 227 
Secret Societies, Membership in, 215 



Index 



231 



Solicitation of Funds by Bethany Bibli- 
cal Seminary, 124 

Special Gift (Annuity) Agreement Rate 
Revision, 25 

Special Sunday-school Lessons, 42 

Standing Committee Delegates, Travel 
Pool for, 226 

Standing Committee Members, Eligibili- 
ty of, 213 

Statement of the General Brotherhood 
Board on Our Sunday-school Publi- 
cations and the Use of the Revised 
Standard Version, 202 

Statement on Alcohol, 178 

Statement on Discrimination, 203 

Statement on Displaced Persons, 116 

Statement on Economic Problems, 158 

Statement on Race, 124 

Statement on Tobacco, 180 

Statement to the World Council Assem- 
bly, 106 

Stewardship of Accumulated Posses- 
sions, 225 

Sunday-school Lessons, Special, 42 

Supplemental Pension Fund, 42 

Symbolism in Worship, 182 

Teaching for Church Membership, 28 
Temporary Representation to the World 

Council of Churches, 43 
Title of Church Property, District, 12 
Tobacco, Statement on, 180 



Transfer of Peace Education, 43 
Travel Bureau for Brethren, 204 
Travel Pool for Standing Committee 

Delegates, 226 
Trustees, Conference, 32 

Universal Compulsory Military Training, 

83 
Urban Churches, 205 

Verbatim Report of Annual Conference, 
117 

Vocational Placement, Central Agency 
for, 190 

Voting Body in District Meeting of 
India, 208 

Voting Privileges of Elders in the Sec- 
ond District of India, 227 

War, Position and Practices of the 

Church of the Brethren in Relation 

to, 100 
"Win Men to Christ," 170, 209 
Women in the Ministry, 185 
World Council Assembly, Statement to, 

106 
World Council of Churches, Temporary 

Representation to, 43 
Worship, Symbolism in, 182 

Yearbook, Expense of Publishing, 123 
Youth, Literature for, 174 



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