(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Bryn Mawr College Yearbook. Class of 1903"




1HMMMMHHM 














k 



i 





/ 





ESM 




The Gift Of 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 









QW&i 



^(XuOv 







— 



— r 



) 






. • , 



* 



- 



#—- — -^— <fc 








Y ' 



1 



Fi 




re&tunau 









% 




( 



I 



I 






' 



" '■■■ I 



■ 



^ 



Class Officers 

Chairman— CHARLOTTE MORTON. 
Temporary Secretary— DOROTHEA DAY. 
President— ANNA TUCKER PHILLIPS. 
Vice-President and Treasurer— MARJORIE CHENEY 
Sccrctarx— DOROTHEA DAY. 



J 






A - 






x 



^y-w:s> 





£k £x 




\ 



October Third, 1899 

Oh, we are Nineteen-three. 

How tunefully we sing! 
What a fine class are we — 

1 1 ear all the campus ring ! 
Yes, we are Nineteen-three, 

You can hear us from afar, 
Tho' our color may he green, 
It can easily be seen 

That we shall be a credit to Bryn Mawr ! 



— Authorship unknown (or unacknowledged) 









mm 



The Presentation of Miss Thomas' Portrait 

AFTER all, there are some ways in which we who are in college now are more fortunate than those honored predecessors to whom 
we have felt ourselves of late so closely drawn. They had, doubtless, the advantage, lost to us in the growth of the community, 
of closer intimacy with the head of the college, the faculty, and the illustrious leaders in any direction; but it is something 
for us to remember that our college course has seen a lasting gift to Bryn Mawr, and a recognition, prompted by sincerest gratitude, of 
the debt we owe our president. 

There was something in the air on Saturday last akin to the spirit so absorbing and so contagious in the last week of college; 
and indeed there were actual reminders of Commencement Day in. the unusual decoration of the chapel, the rows of trustees on the 
platform, the marshaled array of professors, officers and friends of the college, and last of all, the throng of returned alumnae. It was 
their day — theirs and ours; and we were glad to join them in paying honor to "our president, their dean," as Marian Macintosh 
named Miss Thomas in her short opening speech, dwelling on the title endeared by association. Miss Macintosh was followed in 
the presentation by May Campbell, '97, representative of the more recent classes, and Edna Fischel for the students now in college. 

And finally the things that we were still waiting to hear and the things that everyone had been vaguely thinking, Louise Brownell 
said. She reviewed the principles, the steadfast observance of which through any hindrance has made Miss Thomas the person 
living who has done most for women's education; exemplified them in the history of Bryn Mawr, and showed their effect on the 
secondary schools. Miss Brownell's closing words referred to that personal indebtedness for which words are inadequate, as they 
must be for the expression of all the deeper human relations, but of which a portrait is perhaps the most fitting memorial. 

Here was the climax, and Miss Martha Thomas, with a few words of presentation, unveiled the portrait. Of the merits of the 
picture it is no time to speak, until we have learned to know it by daylight; and even so, if one may judge by the universal discussion, 
everything has been said already. The careful and delicate study of the subject must have come with some surprise to such as know 
Sargent only from the bold strokes of characterization and the opposed masses of light and shadow of the "Prophets," but those who 
from an acquaintance with his "Stevenson'' and some of the later portraits, expected a more subtle apprehension and suggestion of the 
personality of the subject, were, I think, not disappointed. The attitude is simple and natural. Miss Thomas, dressed in gown and 
hood, looks out almost directly from the large dark canvas; her hands, one holding the cap, rest in her lap; the only color is given by 
the blue sweep of the hood, falling low over the left arm. 

In receiving the portrait, Mr. Scull spoke very briefly for the trustees, and was followed by Mr. James Wood. Mr. Wood, in 
bis address of thanks, spoke of the three great names of the college — Dr. Taylor, the founder; Dr. Rhoads, whom we who did not know 
him have been taught to love, and Miss Thomas, whose fortune it was that afternoon to hear more words of admiration, of gratitude, 
and of personal devotion than fall to the lot of most mortals in the space of years. 

So the great event was over, except for those who had the pleasure of completing it in the hospitality of the deanery: the por- 
trait — our portrait — belongs to the college and to the future. But that future, past and present of Bryn Mawr are one, I think we 
cannot doubt, as authorities and student-body, faculty and students, graduates and undergraduates, upper-classmen and lower-class- 
men are one, in standing for the idea of women's education, for which it is our pride that Miss Thomas pre-eminently stands. 

C. S. N., '99, in the Fortnightly Philistine. 







I 













1'^ - 







— * ~— 










ffi 


0* Cl*$S 

1 (V 

Tn t- G 












u 


^e/o* tfi C 


^^.rvfl.d 


* >n*i\t" 


*f 


/jot 


f\d 


*»*•£ One 


9 


Pa^ 


0< 


r. 


n**- 



Junior Entertainment and Flag Presentation 

October 13, 1899. 

LIKF everything that *oi gives, the. entertainment for the Freshmen on Friday the thirteenth was clever, entertaining and well 
managed. 

When '03 entered the Gymnasium it was to find not a gymnasium, but a music hall, set out with little tables to which dainty 
maids in red and white or butlers in costume brought little cakes and cider in souvenir steins. 

The stage was arranged with attendants and placards at the sides announcing each number of the excellent "I ligh-CIass Vaude- 
ville." Miss Archbald was a soubrette of the most approved type. The "Poses Plastiques" looked so like their originals that the 
audience was at once transported to the typical double suite in any of the college halls. The songs of the "Bangor Banjo Family" 
were only equaled by their instrumental performance, and we feel sure that could "Pat Malone" have heard their pathetic rendering 
of his tragic history he would indeed forget "that he was dead" and be lost in admiration. The "Pumpkin Pickaninnies" did a splendid 
cake-walk and were unrecognizable by their dearest friends. The farce "Phlorine," written by Miss Daly, was the crowning event 
of the entertainment, and all the actors deserve especial credit. 

At the end of the evening, '03 received their class flag, and the applause which they gave *Ol was truly admirable. 
The usual singing, cheering and dancing followed the performance. 

E. C. f '02, in the Fortnightly Philistine. 



11 



1902 to 1903 

October 20, 1899 

The Adventure of the Lady Ursula 

CAST 

The Earl of Hassenden Joanna Hartshorn 

Sir George Sylvester Inne Rotan 

The Rev. Mr. Blimboe Harriet Spencer 

Mr. Dent May Veatts 

Mr. Castleton Elizabeth Lyon 

Sir Robert Clifford . Caroline McManus 

Mr. Devereu* Ward Elise Gignoux 

Quilton Elisabeth ( ottgdon 

M ills Helen Stuart 

Servant Cornelia Campbell 

Miss Dorothy Kenton Edith Tot ten 

Mrs. Fenton Edith Orlady 

The Lady Ursula Harrington Ethel Clinton 

Stage Manager Grace Douglas 



12 



Song: 1903 to 1902 

Tune : "Just One Girl." 

Who is it that welcomes the Freshmen? 

Sophomore ! Sophomore ! 
To whom do we look for direction? 

Sophomore, Sophomore. 
Who gives us much wholesome correction ? 

Sophomore, Sophomore. 
Their play is a thing of perfection. 

Hurrah for the Sophomores! 

Chorus. 
Sophomores, you we crown with fame. 
No more now do we fear your most dreaded name. 
Stand by us, and we'll stand by you; 
Here's three cheers for the fine Class of 1902! 



13 






Canlegn Presentation 




1002 TO 100:5 



KOVEMHER G, 1K!)!> 



14 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



1903 




1902 



NOVEMBER TENTH 



1899 



The Quest of the Lantern 



The thing that hath been, It is that which shall be; 
and that which Is done Is that which shall be done; and 
there Is no new thing under the sun." 






Act I. Court of Hades. 

Act II. Scene I. Street in Athens. 

Scene 2. Residence of Diogenes, 

Act III. Neptune's Palace under the Sea. 



CAST OF CHARACTERS 



Mephistopheles 

Neptune 

Lieutenant Hobson . . 
Diogenes ........... 

1 torace 

Nebuchadnezzar .... 

Blue Heard 

Doorkeeper of Hades 



Athenian Men 

Newsboy .... 
Bo- Peep 



I una Tucker Phillips 

. . . . Gertrude E. Dietrich 

Martha Root White 

Grace L. Meigs 

Rosamund Alien 

Sophie Boucher 

Mary Gertrude Fetterman 
, . .Marjorie Crissy Great 

Ruth Bowman Whitney 

Helen Ireson Bray ton 

.Eunice Dana Follansbee 

..Margaret Eliot Field 



Sophomore .... 

Junior . . 

< htcen Elizabeth 
Pocahontas .... 
Leading Xympb 
I 'hilippine Lady 

Athenian Ladies 



Booth Girl 

Kreshman 



Ruth Strong 

Ethel Hulburd 

... .Elizabeth S. Sergeant 
. .Elsie Elizabeth Lozvrcy 

Dorothea Day 

Constance D. Leupp 

( Anne Sherwin 
Marguerite Bissell 
Eleanor L. Burr el I 

Helen Lucile Peck 

{Anne Maynard Kidder) 
Marjorie Cheney 



I 



CHORUSES 

Imps, Greek Girls, Sea Nymphs. 

Marjorie Crissy Green Eva White Rosalie Telfair James 

Dorothea Day Ethel M. Bacon Caroline F. Wagner 

Charlotte Moffit Louise Parke Atherton Helen J. Raymond 
I lelen R. Calder 

< )verture — 1903 March Ellen Marks 

Stage Manager Marjorie Cheney 



'7 



— — " 



— *- 






" 




. 




_^i 



The Freshman Play 



■ii A ND there is no new thing under the sun/' So said the Freshmen, in a spirit of graceful and cheerful deprecation, which won 
y~Y_ the hearts of their audience, even before the curtain rose, and the Quest of the Lantern began. But when the curtain did 
rise, it became very clear indeed to the spectators that there was something new. if not under the sun. at least under the pallid 
Welshachs of the Gymnasium. New spirit, for instance; new music, new dances, new — yes, upon our honor, — new jokes! 

The most striking feature of this charming play was the dash and vigor with which it was conducted; a dash that never flagged, 
a vigor that seemed, and doubtless was. the result of genuine enjoyment and good-will. There was life, motion, merriment, and the 
interest was sustained from first to last, without effort on the part of either actors or* auditors. 

The authors are to he congratulated, especially Miss Cheney, whose struggles in behalf of her class were so great and so 
successful. Mis-, Phillips' Mephistopheles was one of the gracefulcst hits of acting and singing that we have seen at Bryn Mawr; the 
choruses were excellently trained, and the stage effects really wonderful. We never thought we should live to see such completeness 
and picturesquenesv .,f scenic arrangement upon that wedge-shaped atrocity known as the Bryn Mawr stage. 

We are a little dubious as to the ethical accuracy of parts oi the pla) ; for instance, we are inclined to smile whenever we recollect 
the expression of 1901's face when that honorable body beheld itself represented as a ver) guileless angel. We felt our brains rotate 
dizzily during our attempt to follow the flight of the Bryn Mawr Freshman through Hades ami ancient Greece, and under the depths 
of the sheeted sea. But perish the critic! We loved the play; and we thank its authors, actors, and managers, and the jovial Class 
of 1903. 

From the Fortnightly Philistine. 



2m 



The School for Scandal 

December 9, 1899. 

THE successful rendering of Sheridan's comedy, 'The School for Scandal," on Friday evening last, is a striking illustration of 
how wise it is to aim high and to attempt the almost impossible, — and so to produce something which may fairly rank as an 
achievement. 

The chief character, "Joseph Surface," is full of difficulty for the amateur ; and Miss Ritchie's rendering was intelligent and 
finished. She managed by restrained and expressive action and by subtle change of expression to convey a' very fair impression of 
smiling villainy. Miss Ritchie, we may add, seemed entirely unconscious of her hands and feet, and in consequence they became as 
expressive as her face. 

Miss Daly is to be heartily congratulated. The difficulties of managing a play so that it passes off without a hitch, and at the 
same time sustaining the chief feminine role, can be fairly estimated only by one who has been either stage manager or leading lady. 
Miss Daly was at her best in the later scenes with "Sir Peter" and "Joseph Surface," especially in the screen scene, in which emo- 
tional intensity lent force to her acting. 

In a play so full of "fat" parts it is impossible to speak at length of all. The roles of "Lady Sneerwell," "Mrs. Candour" and 
"Maria" were well filled. We would also especially mention the capital acting of Miss Parris and Miss Southgate as "Sir Benj. Back- 
bite" and "Mr. Crabtree" and the very easy joviality of Miss Houghton, who made a very delightful figure of careless and irresponsible 
youth as "Charles Surface." Miss Spencer was an excellent fussy and blustering "Sir Peter," and the very difficult role of "Sir Oliver" 
was well done by Miss Lord. 

The ensemble scenes were unusually well managed, especially the drinking scene in "Charles Surface's" house, where excellent 
judgment was shown in substituting rollicking mirth for the ribald sport of stage rendering. The song with its noisy chorus was 
sung in a charming way and with great spirit by Miss Farquhar. 

The alumnae on the front row had little to say of the performance but praise. They regretted that the simplicity of the earlier 
days seemed to be out of date, and that real satin and velvet, with a proportionate increase in "necessary expenses," had taken the 
place of paper muslin at four cents a yard and double-faced canton flannel, while they acknowledged that the costumes were very effective, 
and the actors looked as if they had stepped out of Abbey's illustrations. 

The thing was well worth doing, and it was done well. May there he many more such plays! 

From the Fortnightly Philistine. 



21 



■ 



1903 to 1901 

March 10, 1900. 

A Melodramatic Medley 

I. THE MA J) TEA PARTY. 

i latter . . Sophie' Boucher 

March I laiv Maud Spencer 

Dormouse Florence ll'aitson 

Alice Helen Raymond 

II. SONGS. 

Spring Flowers Reinecke ) . 

•c- i ii ii \m /- j \ Anna ihuiips 

l-iddle and I Mrs. Goodeve j 

III. DANCE May Montague 

IV. SONG Dorothea Pay and Frances Martin 

\. THE LOAN OF A LYRE. 

An adaptation by Mr. F. T. Hall. 

Meliboeus Barcarole, a popular lyric poet. .Eunice Follansbee 

Milton Barcarole, his nephew Martha White 

I. Selling Cottonbayles, guardian of Miss Lawton 

Philena 11' in si < 

Mrs, Mclihocus Barcarole, wife of the poet Ruth Strong 

Miss Lillie Lawton inne Kidder 



22 






1903 to 1901 

SOXG. 

■ 

\\ e find it very difficult to give this play to-night, 

For what the Juniors gave to us was simply out of sight! 

They showed originality and bully acting, too. 

And this poor attempt to-night, O Juniors, we give you ! 

We hope you're not too critical, for we are very young. 

We have no wit, we make no hit, and stale is all our fun. 

With your example before us, O wondrous things we'll do. 

We'll never follow another class, we'll always follow you! 

Chorus. 

Follow on, follow on, and wonderful things we will do! 
No matter how good, we never could be half so good as you. 
Follow on, follow on, our allegiance you have won. 
The Junior Class, we think, will pass. Three cheers for 1901 ! 

Cheer. 

Do not run. 1901 ! 
Stay and sec, 1903 ! 



2-, 



A Melodramatic Medley 

SUCH was the alluring title of the performance given by 03 to'oi. in the Gymnasium last Saturday night. The factor toward 
making the occasion more than usually agreeable to the Junior Class was, that the Freshmen had followed no precedent, hut 
gave the "Medley*' purely nut of good-will and regard for 01. The curtain rose, or rather parted, on the "Mad Tea Party" 
from "Alice in Wonderland," a performance quite realizing our ideal of that demented function. Miss Raymond as "Alice with her 
long, blonde hair and her air of naive bewilderment, was quite as perfect an "Alice" as could he wished for. Miss Spencer was most 
amusing as the "March Hare," as was also Miss Wattson, who took the part of the "Dormouse," and upon whose soporific tendency 
tea seemed to have lost its usual effect. The "Hatter" was capitally done by Miss Boucher, who put great force and spirit into her 
lines. The "Tea Party" was quite too short to satisfy the audience, and the applause was long continued after the curtain fell upon it. 

Next <>n the program were three songs, delightfully sung by Miss Phillips, 

Perhaps the most successful event of the evening was the dance which followed, by Miss Montague, in which all the amus- 
ing features of a cake-walk were combined in a "pas seul." Xot only was Miss Montague's costume gorgeous in the extreme — we 
have rarely seen such telling effects achieved in the use of color — but her agility in the dance was marvelous. After it was finished, 
the audience fully demonstrated the meaning of the newspaper phrase, "deafening applause." 

A >ong by Miss Day and Miss Martin came next, and last on the program was "The Loan of a Lyre," a highly diverting farce, 
the cast of which showed much good judgment on the part of the stage manager. 

Mis> Follansbee made a surprisingly good lyric poet. As "Meliboeus Barcarole" not only her make-up was good, hut her gestures 
gave an excellent idea of the nervous, poetic temperament. The much tried wife of the poet was rendered by Miss Strong, whose 
agitations and tempers were portrayed in a very lifelike manner. 

Miss Kidder was an altogether charming and graceful "Lillie Lawton." Her admirer, "Milton Barcarole/' a somewhat unscru- 
pulous youth, was very well done by Miss Martha White, whom the audience found almost as attractive as did "Miss Lillie." Miss 
Winslow, who look the part of "I. Selling Cottonbayles," electrified the audience with her deep, manly tones, and showed most con- 
vincingly the magnanimity that can he shown by a guardian who has been outwitted, and a suitor who has been cruelly disappointed. 
The scenery of the play must also be commended; the furnishings of "Eclogue Cottage" were in excellent taste, while through the win- 
dow could he discerned that clear, blue sky peculiar to June. 

Xot only was 01 charmed with the performances on the stage, hut they were delighted with the snugs from the gallery. Alto- 
ther the Junior Class feel like saying as the children do, that "the\ never had so good a time in their lives." 

.1/. />. M.. "01. in the Fortnightly Philistine. 

24 




' 1 



May- Day Fete 

May 1, 1900. 

To the Maypole let us on, 

The time is swift and will be gone! 

There go lasses to the green, 

Where their beauties may be seen. 

All fair lasses have lads to attend 'em, 

Jolly brave dancers, who can amend 'tm 

To the Maypole let us on, 

The time is swift and will be gom ! 

Come together, come, sweet la 
Let us trip it on the <4ra>- ' 
Courting, piping on the green, 
The bravest lads are seen. 
There all day on the first of May, 
Lads and lasses dance and play. 
Come together, come, sweet lass, 
Let us trip it on the grass ! 



26 



i «* 



■ 







y. 



1 




The May-Day Fete 



THROUGH Pembroke Arch, beneath gay banners, came the Heralds, resplendent as to trumpets and costumes. Thousands of 
spectators watched the merry procession that followed the Heralds. Each Elizabethan detail, from the wooll) lambs to Jack 
o' the Green, was complete. Queen Elizabeth sat aloft and her maids in waiting showered rose-leaves upon the moving 
pageant beneath. The welcome sun. for whose presence we had been apprehensive, blinked at the sight. 

"Bless me," he thought, "am I dreaming, or has the world rolled back three hundred years? These merry Maypole dancer- are 
as light of foot. Maid Marian is as fair, Robin Hood as comely, the donkeys as stubborn, as they were then. I'm glad 1 came out 
to-day." 

So thought the privileged crowd who surrounded the green, who hastened down the Maple Avenue, who strolled across the 
campus to where the picturesque garb of Autolycus led them. Near Denbigh might be heard the applause due to the "Ladie of the 
Maie." 

But how can I tell of all the sights and sounds of the most perfect production in the history of Bryn Mawr? To those of u^ 
whom kind Fate transported here it will be forever a pleasant memory. Whether it would be possible to repeat it is a problem for other 
classes to decide. Faithful work, conscientious rehearsals, unselfish co-operation, have been freely given by everyone concerned. To 
the executive and decorating committees much honor is due; no less honor to their more humble but equally zealous assistant-. 

L. P., *99, in the Fortnightly Philistine. 



>S 




y 



Impressive Press Impressions 



# 



FK< »\I mid-day until near dinner-time all roads led to Bryu Mawr, and the) were crowded with the crbme de Ui crtmc of Quaker- 
dom. There has never been a more unanimous outpouring of high society in this section. At three, by the sun, the crowd 

bad assembled in nervous expectancy on the college green, 

"Why don't they come, mamma?" queried the small boy, between each stroke of the clock. "Oh. why don't the) come?" "They 
have gone back to see if their bats are on straight, my boy. Four hundred of them, and perhaps only a single looking-glass! A light 
breeze of laughter shook the assemblage as a wind shakes the leaves of the poplar tree. People took it up and repeated it to each other, no 
matter if they had never met before. We are all equal when the g: - over u** : win not when it is trampled under foot, and send- 

ing off wafts of drying fragrance on the sweet air of May 

For an afternoon the idyllic golden time of long, long ago was lived, danced, and caroled on the campus. The students of Bryn 
Mawr achieved the splendidly unique. The general effect was that of having slipped joyfully into dreamland, when- femininity ruled, 
and the tyrant man could gain no footing. The result was worse than a three-ring circus. 

Slowly the cavalcade came up the drive — a masque of dead heroes of fact and fiction — the costumes more faithful to tradition 
than becoming to the wearers. The lumbering oxen that drew the Maypole, stout and straight and white, cut and decorated that 
morning by the band of revelers, added just the finishing touch of picturesqueness as they stared in mild-eyed amazement at the crowd, 
and every now and then cast a cross-eyed glance upward at the wreaths on their horns, to see if they were on straight. 

Looking as natural as possible for girls, the chimney-sweeps came next. (Just imagine Bryn Mawr girls as chimney- 
sweeps!) Then came a dame in plush robe, under which dainty feet peeped, much be jeweled and stately, who carried an air of court 
about. Bess's dress was a dream, — adorably simple, but the effect was tremendous. She flung tinseled paper and showered kisses on 
the marchers. 

"Oh, that must be a shepherdess/' guesses society. "See, the cute and coy and bleating little lamb! Mow interesting!" 

The May dance was the prettiest sight of the day. The Maypole was seized by the Freshmen, who are regarded by the upper- 
classmen with as much attention as the chorus of a comic opera. Each dancer, taking a streamer, wound in and out, footing it flatly 
the wink, weaving the bright-hued ribbons around the pole in a living loom. 

The morris dancers proved a very entertaining bit of foolery, especially the antics of the hobbyhorse, who kneeled on the gn « n 
with marvelous ease and grace. 

The arraignment of Paris, it is safe to say, was in all points better presented than England's virgin queen ever saw it played. 

The fair Perdita. with rose-crowned hair, would have softened any number of hearts, warranted hard, had they been in the 
audience, but they were not. 

The graduates fairly shivered with delight. The well-earned plaudits rang through the light short vistas late into the waning 
afternoon. 

Supper was served in a hedged-in pleasaunce, a supper of quaintly-named, quaintly-spelled dishes, which yet proved old friends, 

as toothsome as when fashioned forth less gaily. 

The students, tired, bright-eyed, hospitable, saw the last regretful guest to the gate at the end of the fragrant campus, when 
the May dusk had settled lightly down. The fund for the students had prospered in the day. The May-Day revels had surprised, 
delighted and amused a mighty audience. What more did the students, whose guardian angels are youth and health, need to guide 
them happily from the dreams of the day to the dreams of the night ? 

Society liked it. From the Fortnightly /'hi! is fine. 



*Philadclphia dailies of May a 







- < ~7? 



Freshman Supper 



May 1 1, 1900. 

NO inhospitably closed doors greeted the eager spectators who thronged to the Pembroke dining-room Friday 
night to see how 1903 should conduct herself at her first class supper. Xot that there was any doubt as 
to the result, for everyone felt sure that the same happy spirit which characterizes all of 1903V enter- 
tainments would rule as well over this important event of her college year. And the assurance was perfectly 
justified, for from the forming of the procession the Freshman supper was in every respect completely successful. 
The dining-room was simply but effectively decorated with the class colors, the green and white appearing in the dogwood 
on the walls and the smilax and white roses on the tables. To accommodate so large a class with a view to their all hearing the toasts 
must have been rather a difficult matter, but the cross in which the tables were arranged, with the speakers at the ends, seemed to 
solve the problem, for almost all the responses could be plainly heard. 

In choosing Miss Montague as the toastmistress of the evening, the class made a particularly fortunate selection. 
Miss Green, who delivered the first toast, was very original in her remarks on the Freshman Class. Miss Dabney gave a very 
amusing response on "Marriage" and the probable "Seventeen," and 'The Stage" was treated humorously by Miss Allen, whose toast was 
perhaps the best of the evening. "Gym. Kate" and "May Day" were not forgotten, and the toast on the ever-important "Athletic-." 
responded to by Miss Whitney, was greeted with deserved enthusiasm. Miss Kidder, Miss Sherwin, Miss \orton. Miss Morton. 
Miss Cheney and Miss Boucher made the other responses. More characteristic than anything else was the spirit in which the Fresh- 
men entered into the enjoyment of the evening. 

The last toast of the evening was of course that of "The Class," and Miss Phillips, choosing rather the serious side of college life, 
tried to impress upon the class the responsibilities that rest upon it and the duty each member owes to her class and her Alma Mater. 
Then in the same spirit of loyalty which their president's speech had roused, the class arose, and crossing hands, walked slowly around 
the dining-room to end the one memorable occasion with "Anld Lan<>- Svne" and the college hvmn. 

From the Fortnightly Philistine. 



B. M. C. Puzzles 

(With apologies to L. C.) 

"If measles spread o'er every head 
Ami each defenceless foe, 
Where do you think," the Senior said, 
"The poor things ought to go?" 
"Xow, really," said the Graduate, 
"I'm sure I don't quite know." 

M. C. G. t '03, in the Fortnightly Philistine 



33 



Sophomore tJedr 



37 



Class Officers 

President— RUTH BOWMAN WHITNEY. 
Vice-President and Treasurer— GERTRUDE ELIZABETH DIETRICH. 

Secretary— MYRA KENNEDY SMARTT. 



39 



Offices Held During the Year by Members of the 

Class of 1903. 

SELF-< rOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION. 

Advisory Heard — Edith Dabney, 

Gertrude Elizabeth Dietrich, 
Ruth How man Whitney. 

Undergraduate Assoi iatiux. 
Assistant Treasurer — Edith Dabney. 

Christian Union. 
Secretary- -Agnes Sinclair. 

Fortnightly Philisi ine. 

Editors — Anne Maynard Kidder. 
Marjorie Cheney, 
Mary Montague. 

De Remus Club. 
Ruth Bowman Whitney. 



40 



r 




■ -...•• 







The 
RivaJs 

By 

Richard 

Brinsley Sheridan 



Bryn Mawr College, Friday, October the 26th, 1900 



ACT ONE 

SCENE i — Lydia's Dressing Room 
" 2,— Captain Absolute's Lodgings 
11 j.— North Parade. Bath 

ACT TWO 

Scene i.— North Parade 

" 2-— Mrs. Malaprop's Lodgings 
41 3. — Acres' Lodgings 

ACT THREE 

SCENE i.— Mrs. Malaprop's Lodgings 
" 2.— North Parade 

ACT FOUR. 

SCENE i. — Mrs. Malaprop's Lodgings 
" 2.— King's Mead Fields 

Checr&cters 

Sir Anthony Absolute Philena C. Winslow 

Captain Jack Absolute . Martha R. White 

Faulkland Virginia T. Stoddard 

Bob Acres . . Mary Montague 

Sir Lucius O' Trigger Sophie Boucher 

Fag Marjorie C. Green 

David R u th Strong 

Mrs, Malaprop ; . , Anna T. Phillips 

Lydia Languish Anne M. Kidder 

Lucy Helen J. Raymond 

Stage Manager — Marjory Cheney 

Scene Painter— Sally Porter Law 



The Sophomore Play 



THE event of the season — the Sophomore play — passed off with unusual eclat on Friday evening, October 26. From time imme- 
morial each succeeding Sophomore play has been classified as the "very best thing that ever graced the Bryn Mawr boards," until 
this has come to be quite the proper laudatory phrase in the case of Sophomore plays. But I think we all feel that this praise 
has never been more justly deserved than by 1903 and their charming production of "The Rivals." 

The audience was delightedly enthusiastic from beginning to end. There was nothing they would not have said in their zeal to 
outdo one another in singing pretty speeches to the tune of "Here's to 1903." The people on the floor, to be sure, wished their necks 
were longer, but in the delights of the moment quite forgot that the chairs might have been more comfortable. The people upstairs 
who had no chairs to worry them forgot to brood over the possible loss of beauty and front teeth consequent on a collapse of the 
gallery. Everyone was happy. But happiest of all, perhaps, were the Freshmen as they mentally condoled with Lydia Languish over 
the unromantic ending of her love affair. "Poor thing! How sad to have to get married in the usual prosy way, without a soul to object 
to the match; and she so sweet-looking, too." They all loved Mrs. Malaprop, and roared with superior knowledge (they had recently 
taken entrance English), as she made mincemeat of the English language. "It could easily be seen that there was no Bryn Mawr College 
in her days, and the finishing schools of the time were so inefficient." 

Bob Acres brought forth peals of laughter from everyone. He was truly finished in his bumpkinisms, his clumsy, awkward 
clothes, and his struggle between his feelings as a gentleman of honor and his desire to "live to fight another day." Of course Bob was 
no coward. He merely felt a certain amount of pity for the young and inexperienced Ensign Beverly, for you know Bob was an 
awfully ferocious creature. He always killed a man a day and kept a private cemetery for the victims of his sword. It was rather a 
disappointment when Bob Acres did not get married in the end, for he had good points, and we hoped all along that a maiden aunt or 
something might turn up and take him. Sir Anthony Absolute was very popular, too. He was really a very nice sort of old gentle- 
man most of the time. But when he flew into a passion and pounded his cane up and down on the stage it was terrible. How could 
he be so hard-hearted and cruel as to disinherit his handsome son in that beautiful red mat?" the Freshmen whispered to each other as 
they vainly sought a suitable rhyme for Winslow. 

Sir Lucius O'Trigger's brogue and swagger gave the finishing touches to an admirably rendered role, while Faulkland (poor 
fellow, his bride was cut out!), Fag, David and Lucy each contributed towards making the evening one of the most delightful of the 
college year. 

The surprise of the evening was the scenery. It was unusually elaborate and ingenious, especially North Parade and King's 
Mead Fields. There were long rings of applause when North Parade rolled itself out from behind an innocent-looking piece of light- 
blue cheesecloth. But when King's Mead Fields, instead of being the conventional Bryn Mawr stage exterior of green denim, a 
palm or two and a withered branch of a tree, was a real true forest which conveniently rippled apart at one corner to allow for the 
exits and entrances, the applause was deafening. 

Thus with its merrv actors and its dainty scenery the evening was one succession of joy and pleasure; and when it was all 
over, and we drew ourselves reluctantly away from the Gymnasium, every tongue was busy saying nice things about 1903. 

From the Fortnightly Philistine. 



Lantern Presentation 

1903 to 1904 

IlaXXa? *A$TJvr}, Hea 
Ma@yjfJLa.Tos kclI aOivovs. 
Xc Trap fj/xet9 t/xet" 

Ipeixroucrcu crot o€.ivq 

Akov€ ! A /cove ! 

Ma,Kapi£e, dtroOp.ei'. 

Hyx»> cro<f>iav oioov, 
'll/xly crvpytypov dci, 
Md/cap #ed an-ove, 

Afcoue ! *Ak:oi/€ ! 



*i / 



Iepi£e *w row? Kv^vov; 
*Aei (f>auux; <j>douv 
Aafxirpyvovrt^ tt)v 6Sdi> 
MeXaf fftavov iroiovvrts 
"AkovzI *A/COl/€ ! 



M; r. .1., '9^, and S. /-/. P., 'g j, 



46 










A Monologue 

Scene; Interior of a cupboard. 

Channticleer (solus). — Whew! how tired I am! Another such spree will turn my feathers white; but never mind, my boy. 
the poet so aptly puts it : 

"It ain't much fun just now, by Jove, 
But think of times to come!" 



As 



I am on the high road to fame, along with Juno's geese, who saved the capitol, and Hennypenny, who thought the sky was 
falling. It isn't everyone's luck to make a stir in the world. Ha! ha! it was rather alarming, but how envious the boys will be when 
I tell them how much attention I attracted ! I was the centre of all eyes. To be sure, the people in the hall laughed rudely when they 
saw me, but those dear girls in that crowded room ! They sprang to their feet to receive me, uttering the most curious noises, meant 
for welcome I suppose. I had a streak of bash fulness, and retreated under a bed, but the dear creatures lured me out again. Those 
girls are destined to succeed in sport, for one of them instantly began to practice basket-ball with me through the transom. I love to 
be useful. When she had made a goal from the field I was borne back here followed by an enthusiastic escort. The glory of it will 
certainly turn me into a coxcomb. 

"All this, I surmise, 
May occasion surprise." 

But, O dear! how it tires one's legs. I feel like a bird — on toast. It has been glorious. Pertelote will 
scold me when I get home for having been out all night, but when I tell her how popular I have been she will die of 
envy. I shall be the cock of the walk. I shall be "the only blackbird in the dish." 

I have heard people say that the Yankee-dude-'ll-do, but just wait till I get home and I'll show that the cock- 
a-doodle-do. Hurrah ! Cock-a-doodle-do-o-o-o. 

(At this point Channticleer becomes so noisy that the door of his house is suddenly opened and he is thrown 

out of the window.) 

M. R. W., '03, in the Fortnightly Philistine. 




?*#0 



The Election Parade 

November 6, 1900. 

WAS it a spirit of prophecy which put the idea of an election parade into some minds last week: Will the time soon come when 
election day will mean to us what it means to our fathers and brothers? When this time does come, the election parades 
will not probably be any more interesting or amusing than was the one of last Tuesday night. 

Each class was headed by a band, playing on cymbals (chafing-dish covers), fifes (combs), drums (cracker boxes ami < li >h- 
pans), and horns (the genuine article). The ranks marched four abreast, and made a very imposing appearance, as most of the students 
turned out to march. 1904 led the procession, on account of their abilit) to make noise, then 1903 and 1902. 190!, the guard of honor, 
protected the rear. The marshals, with wide yellow sashes, ran frantically about, trying to form the line behind Merion. Mckinley 
and Roosevelt. Uncle Sam and Columbia, and five transparencies were important features of the parade, but the lifelike figure of "Billy 
B." was the "cynosure of all eyes," as the campaign accounts put it. 

After marching down to Pembroke Arch, then past the Greenery, the procession followed the road behind Radnor and the 
Gym, and formed an eager circle about one of the basket-ball goal-posts where Bryan was gracefully swinging by the back of bis 
neck. Much to our sorrow, we learned that he could not be burned, as his coat was borrowed. 

Mark Hanna kindly loosened the string by which he held McKinley and Roosevelt, and permitted them to speak from the Bryn 
Mawr rostrum, a wheelbarrow. Their speeches ably expressed the sentiment of the community, which cheered them to the echo. Mr. 
Hanna declined the honor of addressing the audience, saying that as he had told both McKinley and Roosevelt what to say, he could 
think of nothing else. After cheering Brigadier-! icneral Jones for his able management of the Bryn Mawr campaign, the assembly 
departed to rest ( ?). From which rest some were rudely awakened about two a. m., by bands of creatures who seemed but yells 
incarnate. These announced the election of McKinley and Roosevelt, much to the satisfaction of all. 'Idle emotion aroused cannot be 
called by any more violent name, as the result was a foregone conclusion. 

Editor's Note. — During one of the speeches a slight disturbmce was caused by some Bryanites, but the interruption was not con- 
sidered of sufficient importance to be mentioned in the body of the report. 

//. A. //., 04. in the Fortnightly Philistine. 



4-s 






Barnard vs. Bryn Mawr 

November 17, 1900 

College Chicer. 

avdcrcra KaraKaXw KaXrj 

ta ta ta vlktj ! 

Bryn Mawr! Bryn Mawr! Bryn Mawr! 

College Song. 

Come, cheer for the college 

Where our joyous days are passed, 

Good comrades that we are; 

Of our work and our singing 

Some echoes still shall last 

To the glory of Bryn Mawr. 

Chorus. 

To the glory of Ilryn Mawr we sing, 

To the glory of Bryn Mawr ; 

Then cheer once again for the yellow and the white 

And the glory of Bryn Mawr. 

( ) the years shall pass away 

And we'll all come back again, 

Come hack from near and far 

And shoulder to shoulder 

Will shout the glad refrain 

To the glory of Bryn Mawr. — Cho. 



49 




Eleanor Harriman McCormick, 1904, Back 
■ Substitute for Florence Trotter Wattson, 1903 



Jane Heartt Cragin, 1902, Back 

Substitute for Clarissa I. Crane, 1902 



Madge Daniels Miller, 1901, Captain, Centre 
Elizabeth Wales Emmons, 1901, ForwarJ Fanny Soutter Sinclair, 1901 , ForwarJ 



Barnard vs. Bryn Mawr 

November 17, 1900 

OWING to the rain on Saturday morning, the Bryn Mawr- Barnard game was played in the Gymnasium instead of on the 
athletic field. This dismayed the Bryn Mawr cohorts at first, as the team was unaccustomed to indoor games. Everyone soon 
found, however, that there was no cause for uneasiness, as splendid team-play had been worked up in the short time given 
since the 1900 game. 

At 11.18 the game opened. At 11.20 Emmons threw the first goal, and at 11. 21 the second. The rest of the game was in pro- 
portion. Barnard fought well and used some fine team-work, but was unable to compete with her opponents. To the delight of every- 
one, Miller, who was playing centre, also scored for the 'Varsity. Sinclair made goals with her customary ease and fluency. At the 
end of the first half the score stood 12-0. 

In the second half, Barnard fought even harder, and neither side, in the excitement, used quite as much team-work as in the 
first half. Emmons threw goal after goal, and she and Sinclair drew the score up to 22-0. 

Barnard deserves much credit for the plucky fight she made. A team is always at a disadvantage playing on strange ground 
and in a somewhat unsympathetic atmosphere. Our team had the hearty good-will of their college mates to urge them on, while Bar- 
nard lacked this encouragement. We admire them for the spirit they have shown in coming down to play Bryn Mawr. 

Barnard: Forwards, Kimball, Budd ; centre, W r are; backs, Allsberg, Moen. 

Brvn Mawr: Backs, Cragin, McCormick ; centre, Miller; forwards, Sinclair, Emmons. 

Score — First half: Sinclair, 2 goals; Emmons, 3 goals; Miller, 1 goal; 12-0. 

Second half: Sinclair, 1 goal; Emmons, 4 goals; 10-0. 

Total, 22-0. From the Fortnightly Philistine, 



5' 





Class Parties 

"The business of the meeting, the discussion of class enter- 
tainments for promoting sociability, was opened by the president, 
and it was moved, seconded and carried that we have these enter- 
tainments once in every three weeks." 

From the Class Minutes, February 20, 1901. 



52 





The College Settlement Benefit 

OX Saturday, December 8, "The Loan of a Lyre" was presented 
in the Gymnasium for the benefit of the College Settlement 
Association. The play was as amusing and successful as 
last year, when 1903 gave it for the entertainment of 1901. Owing 
to the illness of Miss Winslow, her part was taken by Miss Virginia 
Chauvenet, who did herself great credit. 



53 



Dr. Scott's Fire 

March 27, 1901. 

Gleanings from the Press 

^ yt LITTLE later than half-past twelve on the morning of the twenty-seventh, a whistle blown with startling significance turned 
J~\_ all of Bryn Mawr's gentle womanhood out into the air with a single-minded purpose." . . . "The long, low dormitories 
with their Gothic walls, in sleepy repose against the sky, made a picture as peaceful as a village church. In an instant all 
was changed. The chief of the Bryn Mawr College fire brigade, trumpet in hand, cried, 'Hurry, girls! or we may be too late!' 
Then the army of fluttering skirts sped at flying pace in a wild scamper across the wind-swept fields, laid bare by the frosty clasp of 
winter, to a little frame cottage nearly half a mile from the main buildings. " . . . "The campus was made a kaleidoscope by small 
groups of rosy-cheeked maidens, who played tag with the long lines of hose." . . . "Like fleet gazelles the fair fire-fighters, clad 
in dainty costumes, dashed into the house just in time to save the professor and his family, calmly eating luncheon. 'Your house is on 
fire!' shouted the captain. The professor looked more puzzled than alarmed, but was dragged out and shown the flames coming from 
the upper windows. Then he was convinced. 1 * . . . "The rank and file of Bryn Mawr's fire-lassies, some of them with million- 
aires for papas, engaged in the work with vim. Some of them formed lines of rescue, others froze their dainty fingers on the cold 
nozzles, others tackled the duties assigned them with the same grace with which they danced around the Maypole last spring. Cooler 
than cucumbers, the fire- women rushed valiantly into the burning house and threw trunks in every direct ion."' 

"The work of fighting the flames was fast, and although the fire had eaten through to the roof, where tongues of flame darted 
through the black cloud, the courageous little women, blistering their pink fingers, succeeded in subduing their stubborn enemy. Wet 
but glorious, the brigade, composed of all the students on the four years' rolls, received with demure modesty the congratulations 
which the residents of the fashionable suburb showered upon them, for having proved themselves brave and heroic in time of danger." 
. . . "Then strolling across the wide lawn as nonchalantly as if they had been to a dance, they returned to the dormitories to change 
their shoes and to do up their hair." 

M. M., '03, in the Fortnightly Philistine. 



55 



Picnic to 1901 

Extract from the Minutes of the Class of 1903. 

April 30, 1901. 

"It teas moved, seconded and carried: That all eating on the 
part of the Class of 1903 be purely incidental," 




57 




i 




Commencement 



June 6, 1901 



Marshals: 

Ruth Bowman Whitney — Head Marshal. 

Agnes Maitland Sinclair, 
Hetty Goldman, 
Helen Ireson Bray ton, 
Anne Isabel Sherwin, 
Martha Root White, 
Eunice Dana Follansbee, 
Mvra Kennedy Smartt, 
Edith Dabney, 
Philena Winslow, 
Ethel Hulburd, 
Grace Lynde Meigs, 
Anne Mavnard Kidder. 




59 



^Junior tkdr 



61 



Class Officers 



President— GERTRUDE ELIZABETH DIETRICH. 
rice-President and Treasurer— PHILENA WINSLOW. 
Secretary— ELEANOR WALLACE. 



63 



Offices Held During the Year by Members of the Class of 1903 



Self-Govern ment Association. 

Executive Board — Edith Dabney, 

Ethel Hulburd. 

Advisory Board — Ida Langdon, 

Gertrude E. Dietrich. 

Secretary — Evelyn F. Morris. 

Treasurer — Agnes M. Sinclair. 

Undergraduate Association. 
President — Martha Root White, 

Christian Union. 

Vice-President — Evelyn F. Morris. 
Treasurer — Agnes M. Sinclair. 

The Lantern. 
Anne Mavnard Kidder. 



De Rebus Club. 
Martha Root White. 

Music Committee. 
Martha Root White. 

Fortnightly Debating Club. 

President — Edith Dabney. 
Secretary— Ida Langdon. 

Fort nigh tly Philisti n e. 

Editor-in-Chief Anne Mavnard Kidder. 
Managing Editor — Martha Root White. 

Athletk Association. 

Secretary — Helen Jackson Raymond. 

Outdoor Manager — Linda Bartels Lange, 



College Settlement Chapter. 

Secretary— Agatha Laughlin. 
Chairman of Committee on Saturday Morning Games — Philena Winslow 
Chairman of Committee of Speakers — Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant. 



64 



1903 Becomes Ambitious and Blooms as an Upper Class 



The Philistine congratulates 
1904 on one of the most success- 
ful Lantern presentations that 
has ever been held at Bryn 
Mawr, and suggests that they 
extend a vote of thanks to 1903 
for so ably assisting them in their 
plans. It is delightful to see 
even after two years in college 
such refreshing verdure, such 
effervescing vim, such exuberant 
youth fulness combined with such 
marvelous intuition, and such 
remarkable foresight in antici- 
pating the every wish of others. 
Thanks to 1903, the possibility 
of any awkward pause in pro- 
ceedings on Tuesday night was 
completely removed. The Phil- 
istine also suggests that appro- 
priate tokens of gratitude are in 
order from the Seniors, 1903 
having most thoughtfully formed 
a new precedent in order that 
1902 might be saved the trouble 
of taking the part in this Lantern 
festivity which has heretofore 
been theirs by custom. The 
Philistine feels that we should 
all of us be most grateful to 
1903, except perhaps the Fresh- 
men, who did after all get their 
Lanterns from 1904. 



65 



The Pan-American Exposition 



THOSE of us who remember the Midway Plaisance at Buffalo or the World's Fair were strongh remanded of it last Friday night 
mi entering the Gymnasium, when we found ourselves at the Pan-American Exposition and on the Midway itself. Perhaps the 
Chinese theatre resembled its original most closely — the charming Chinese lady spinning about on her toes, while her many 
admirers apparently tried to chop off her head, seemed quite as inexplicable and delightfully mysterious as could have any bona fide 
Chinese play. The naive lady to my right, who, upon being shown the sign "Cook's Guides," looked eagerly at the white-capped girls 
bustling about below and remarked. "Hut they are not cooking anything." called my attention from the allurements of the Chinese 
theatre to the more dashing charms of the Gymnasium proper. Here was a scene of motion and color. Groups of girls hurried breath- 
lessly after guides who displayed with tact and volubility the beauties of the menagerie, the incubators, the African village and the 
Chamber of Horrors. 

Stripe-shirted porters hurriedly wheeled passengers among the crowd, having hairbreadth escapes on every possible occasion. 
Cook's guides chased madly after stray members of the African village, belaboring them with their wooden spoons, while the Freshmen 
were alternately diverted and terrified by the startling rushes of the wild animals. And above all the animals roared, the Indians whooped 
and everybody talked and laughed and screamed and shouted. Hut undoubtedly the centre of attraction was the camel — was ever such 
a camel seen by land or sea? It would take Kipling to describe him and Rosa Bonheur to paint him. Not one — but two humps! 
There was no mistaking him — a real live humping camel — and the matter scarcely needed to be clinched by the fact that he would 
actually take people to ride. 

After the agitation of these surprises the Freshmen were escorted in small parties to Alt Nurnbcrg and there regaled on ice 
cream and cake to the tune of "The Watch on the Rhine'' — thereby being sufficiently soothed for what was still to come. 

Shortly after nine o'clock the curtain rose upon the tableau which was the real event of the evening. There was an appreciative 
hush as the curtain went up and displayed the living representation, of the Tan-American poster. The green shimmering water, the 
graceful pose and simple, quiet lines came out strongly in the reflected light. Miss Dietrich is to lie congratulated on her successful 
imitation of the original. One could only regret that the glimpse was so short. When the curtain rose again, this time displaying in 
addition a large red flag with the numerals [905, the cheering began in earnest. Miss Le Fevre accepted the Hag in the name of her 
class, saying that she hoped the Class of 1905 would follow the example which "1901 had left them and which 11)03 bad set them." 
After the presentation of the flag, the evening closed with the usual singing and cheering — 1905 showing plainly their appreciation 
of the bright entertainment and the good feeling already existing between them and their hospitable Juniors, the Class of [903. 

.1/. C. B., 02, in the Fortnightly Philistine. 

66 



■ 




Pan-American Midway 

1903 to 1905 

October 18, 1901. 
Tune; "Strike up the "Bandy 



This show to-ni^ht 

Js for the Freshmen ; 

With all our might 

We hope it has pleased them. 

Side-shows, midways, 

Dances and plays, 

For what we do is all for you, 

( >h. Freshmen ! 



Strike up the band, 

Here come the Freshmen; 

Cheer them along, 

Good-luck go with them. 

Hear how we tell 

We love you well, 

Nineteen-five we hope will thrive 

Forever ! 




Boyd vs. McManus 



ON the evening of March 13 a large and enthusiastic body of spectators appeared in the chapel to witness the trial of the case 
enjoined between Lydia Paxton Boyd, plaintiff, and Caroline Esther McManus, defendant. 

The first sensation of the evening was caused by the appearance of the reporters in their gallery, to the left of the judges' 
seats. These, wonderfully garbed and labeled in large letters, represented Town Topics, the North American, the New York Evening 
Post, and last but by no means least, our cherished Fortnightly Philistine. 

At the entrance of the judges the audience rose respectfully — that is, as much of the audience as had been present at rehearsals 
and knew it ought to rise — and the proclamation was impressively made by the clerk, Miss Douglas, in a rich Irish brogue. Pro- 
ceedings had been going on but a few minutes, when the clerk in stentorian tones announced that "all hats should be removed in the 
audience!" 

Then, fixing her glassy eye on the corner where a derby ornamented an unmistakably feminine head, he motioned to the sheriff, 
who by means of his baton quickly removed the objectionable article of wearing apparel. Assistant Justice Congdon then proceeded 
with his interrupted task of swearing in the jury. This done, Miss Rotan. the counsel for the plaintiff, rose to make her opening speech. 
This she did with such fire and eloquence that the jury was quite carried off its feet. The cross-examination of witnesses followed. 
Miss Lydia Paxton Boyd, the plaintiff, in the course of her evidence took occasion to quote the following poem, attributed to Words- 
worth, which we here repeat, since it may not be as familiar to our readers as it deserves to be: 

ODE TO THE FRISKY 'BUS-HORSE. 

Oh, frisky, frisky 'bus-horse 

That frisketh o'er the lea, 
I prithee, frisky 'bus-horse, 

Come frisk a while with me ! 

Towards the close of her statement of the facts in the case, a sensation was caused by the entrance of the Dog, the horror of 
whose ferocious plastic countenance was somewhat offset by the size of the chains whereby he was fastened. The plaintiff identified 
this Dog as the Dog in question. 

The evidence given by Mr. Willie Trotter Wattson, Dr. Cornelius Quackus Campbell, the plaintiff's attendant physician; Mr. 
Mogard, the constable of Denbigh, and Mrs. O'FIaharitv, the defendant's washerwoman, all seemed to point towards the guilt of the 
defendant in maintaining a public nuisance on her premises. 

70 



Miss Meigs, the lawyer for the defendant, then arose, and in a few calm, collected words spoke ably in her client's behalf. Mrs. 
McManus was then called to the witness-stand. A deadlock ensued, because the defendant, defining herself as a lady, refused to 
swear. Her scruples were finally overcome, however, the oath was administered, and she proceeded to give her evidence. The three 
following witnesses testified to the truth of her statement that the plaintiff had tried to steal her Dog Rip— Preserved Brayton, Fairy 
Montague and Mrs. Johnson, the Denbigh colored cook. Miss Dorothy Dudley would undoubtedly have done the same, but owing to 
the fact that she was a Freshman, Miss Rotan objected to her being sworn, on the ground that she was too young to know the nature 
of an oath, and the objection was sustained by Chief Justice Ashley. 

A summary of the evidence in favor of each client was then given by each counsel. Miss Meigs, overcome by her own elo- 
quence, broke down at one point, but manfully regained her self-control and proceeded. Just before the jury adjourned, the Dog, 
apparently in an uncontrollable passion at the way things were going, took occasion to fall on his head and break. This fact, added 
to the eloquence of the lawyers and the wonderful evidence of the witnesses, apparently upset the jury, for in bringing in the verdict they 
absent-mindedly forgot the case in question and decided for the New Library Building, a fine of $230,000 to be paid by Mr. John D. 
Rockefeller and the cost of the action to be paid by the trustees of the college. 

The one regrettable incident of the evening was the discovery we made and feel obliged to set forth that the jury had been bribed 
by the plaintiff. We are given to understand on good authority that the jury now claims its reward and the plaintiff refuses to pay. 
Forsooth, here is a fit subject for another trial! 

C. D. L., 03, in the Fortnightly Philistine. 



71 



Denbigh Fire 

March 16, 1902 




72 



— — 



1 



Denbigh Fire 

March 16, 1902 





Hi • 
in 



h 



xt 




— '. • 



W HOTW 
IU1 





After 

73 



——^— 



Junior-Senior Supper 



May 10, 1902 



SCENES IN FAIRYLAND 

PROLOGUE 

Puck . E. Follansbee 

DANCE OF THE FAIRIES 

Titania . . . G. Dietrich 

Cobweb M. Stewart 

Moth S. Tyler 

Mustard- Seed E. Larrabee 

Pease Blossom M. Montague 



THE TALE OF THE THREE BEARS 
AND LITTLE GOLDYLOCKS 

Gold ylocks M . Field 

Big Bear . . S. P. Law 

Middle-sized Bear G. L. Meigs 

Little Bear H. Goldman 






THE TALE OF SNOW-WHITE AND THE 

DWARFS 

DWARFS 

A Henrickson A. Laughlin M. Taylor R. James 

A. Lovell C. Wagner E, Neergaard 

Step-mother M. White 

Snow-white A. Kidder 



THE TRAGEDY OF THE LITTLE MERMAID 
Act I. Home of the Seawitch under the Sea 
Act II. The Court of the King of Sorrento 
Act III. On beard the Silver Sail 

King of Sorrento P. Window 

Prince of Waldemar .V. Stoddard 

Lord High Chamberlain E. L, Fleisher 

Queen of Sorrento E. Hulburd 

Princess Leonore E. W. Wallace 

Littk- Mermaid H. J. Raymond 

Sea Witch L. Lange 



S. Boucher 



LORDS OF THE COURT 

R. Strong I. Langdon 



LADIES OF THE COURT 

E. Br van E. Bacon A. Sherwin 



E. Gird wood 



C. Garrett 



D. Dav 



PAGES 

E. L. Burrell F. T. Wattson 

MERMAIDS 

H. L. Peck L. Atherton 



A. B. Austin 



74 



. *** - i.» 








1903 to 1902 

Here's to the Seniors, we give them a cheer, 

Vive la 1902! 
Happy the years that we've spent with you here, 

Vive la 1902! 
Here's to the blue, loyal and true, 
And all that you stand for here; 
We'll ne'er forget you, good old 1902, 
We sing to you loud and clear. 
Here's to the Seniors, we give them a cheer, 

Vive la 1902! 
Rowing we speed you with never a fear, 

Vive la 1902 ! 




How the Great Fund was Raised 

President Thomas Describes the Enthusiasm Which Took Hold of the Alumnae After the Announcement of Mr. Rockefeller's Gift. 

PRESIDENT M. CAREY THOMAS, of Bryn Mawr College, in announcing the completion of the Rockefeller fund at the Com- 
mencement yesterday, said in part : 

"The trustees, faculty and students of Bryn Mawr College recognized clearly three years ago that the college could not 
continue to give five hundred and more students what we were proud to think was the best intellectual and moral discipline in 
academic buildings planned for one hundred students. And it was then that we began to dream of a new library and lecture build- 
ing, of new halls of residence, and an up-to-date central heating and electric-light plant. 

"After the urgent plea for these new buildings made on Commencement Day last year, I had faith enough to spend the summer 
in England studying the buildings of Oxford and Cambridge and pondering whether it would be possible to make our new buildings, 
if they should be given to us, even more beautiful than our present ones. So great has been the success of our architects in the past 
that I was told yesterday by some one who had never been abroad that she had been advised by a much-traveled friend to spend a 
few days at Bryn Mawr College in lieu of a European trip, absorbing the QUI World atmosphere of its last two buildings — Denbigh 
that was and will be again, and the two Pembrokes. 

"At last, on the fifth of last December, our hopes came to fruition when Mr. John D. Rockefeller, after a careful examination of 
the resources and needs of the college, promised to give us two of the buildings we most needed — a central heating and light plant, to 
cost approximately $100,000 (since increased to $120,000), and a new hall of residence, to cost $130,000; in other words, agreed to 
make a gift to the college of the value of $250,000 if the friends of the college would in their turn give it a library and lecture building 
of the value of $250,000. This great gift was to be made if during the six months that were to elapse between December 5 and to-day 
our other friends shared Mr. Rockefeller's faith in the college sufficiently to double his gift. 

"Since December all our efforts have been bent to the one great end of raising this fund. Our undergraduate students have 
subscribed $10,000; over $6,000 of this is in hand and the remaining $4,000 is to be obtained by a May Day fete next year, guaran- 
teed by three responsible people. The alumnae of the college have organized themselves by classes and by cities and have not only 
themselves subscribed to the extent of their means, but have asked many others to join them in subscribing. Two subscriptions of 
$10,000 each, three subscriptions of $5,000 each and four subscriptions of $1,000 each come from individual alumnae. If we count 
subscriptions given by fathers and mothers of alumnae and former students or obtained by the efforts of alumnae, the grand total of 
$149,000 is reached. Of this amount, apart from sums of $1,000 and over, 306 members of the thirteen classes made up of graduates of 
the college and former undergraduate students have subscribed $15,894.83 in smaller sums, a magnificent result when we remember that 
these subscribers are young women without independent fortunes, who are not engaged in business giving them control of mono;. 

"If the raising of this fund for the college had had no other tangible result it has sufficed to assure those of us who have fol- 
lowed most closely the efforts of the alumnae that the future of Bryn Mawr College is secure in the devotion and love of the graduates 

76 



I » 



and the students whom she has sent out. The names of our generous donors will be commemorated on the arches of the cloister gar- 
den of the library. 

"Our profoundest gratitude is due to Mr. Rockefeller first of all for his magnificent individual gift, and also to the 416 generous 
donors of our library building, many of whom have made personal sacrifices to make this splendid gift to the college. 

"In looking over the list I have been deeply touched to see many contributions that represent what would be equivalent to many 
thousands of dollars from people more richly endowed with this world's goods; for example, one alumna who has educated two sisters, 
one at college and one in a profession, on the money she has earned since leaving college (during which time she has been doing her 
iiwn cooking for economy's sake) has subscribed $25 to the library, which represents in sacrifice as many thousands. 

''Each individual stone of the beautiful library building which will soon be constructed on our college campus will thus repre- 
sent the gifts of many friends of the college; each subscription built into its walls will symbolize a friend in the present and for the 
future, and beside the library building that we shall see will stand one even more stately and beautiful, shadowy and yet real, built of 
the good wishes and the sympathy of those who would have given if they could. 

"This is the first gift of such magnitude received by the college since its foundation in 1885. One-half the cost of Dalton Hall, 
or $30,000, was subscribed by many friends, and we owe a large increase in our educational facilities each year to the generous gifts 
of a woman who is always first to help all things that concern women's education, whose check for $10,000 for general college pur- 
poses was sent me only last week, and whose total contributions during the past nine years have amounted to $150,000. She is so well 
known to the faculty and students of Bryn Mawr College that I need scarcely name her — my friend, our friend. Miss Garrett, of 

Baltimore." 

Philadelphia paper. June 6, 1902. 



77 



f 



— 1^»— — . 



ua 




entor 




79 



■ ■ ■— ~ '■■ ■" ii^^^ tm » i im^— ^p»— — w^w^Bpawifi 



Class Officers 

President—- GERTRUDE ELIZABETH DIETRICH. 

Vice-President and Treasurer— IDA LANGDON. 

ELEANOR LOUDENOIS BURRELL, resigned. 
Secretary — ^ 

MARGRETTA SHAW STEWART. 



Si 



Offices Held During the Year by Members of the Class of 1903 



Self-Govern m ent, 

President — Edith Dabney. 

I 'iee-P resident — Gertrude Elizabeth Dietrich. 

Advisory Board — Ethel Hulburd, 

Ida Langdon, 
Evelvn Morris, 
Christina Garrett. 

College Settlement Chapter. 
S ecretary — Rosalie Telfair James. 

Philosophical Club. 

President — Anne Maynard Kidder. 

I ice-P resident — Eleanor Loudenois Rurrell 



Athletic Association. 

President — Helen Jackson Raymond. 
Indoor Manager — Rosalie Telfair James. 

De Rebus Club. 

Grace Lynde Meigs, 
Louise Parke Atherton, 
Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant, 
Martha Root White. 



Lantern. 

Editor-in-Chief — Anne Maynard Kidder. 
Editor — Grace Lynde Meigs. 



Fortnightly Philistine. 

Editor-in-Chief — Martha Root White. 
Managing Editor — Constance Davis Leupp. 
Editor — Grace Lynde Meigs. 



82 



— 




Bryn Mawr vs. Merion Cricket Club 



Tune: "Australian Girl." 
O the Bryn Mawr team is the best of all, 

Hit along ! hit along ! 
When they bully or whack or shoot the ball, 

Hit along ! hit along ! 

Hit along, O 'Varsity, 

Hit along ! hit along ! 
Hit along and don't you muff the ball, 
You're playing for Bryn Mawr! 

Tune: "Son of a Gambolier." 
We've swept the East, we've swept the West, 

We've swept both near and far ; 
The brightest of the hockey stars 

Are gathered at Bryn Mawr. 
Though Merion may play the game 

And keep a pretty line, 
Yet whither doth the moon go 

When the sun begins to shine? 



Chorus. 

So, hit along, hit along, hit along, hit along, 

Hit along, 'Varsity! 
Your heart may pound and your breath be short, 

You're playing for B. M. C. ; 
And well we know so fine a team 

Can never defeated be. 
So, hit along, hit along, hit along, hit along, 

Hit along, 'Varsity ! 

We love to see young Denny hit, 

We love to see Day run ; 
Whenever Raymond gets the ball, 

There's bound to be some fun. 
W r ith Peters playing full-back, 

Guarded well by stalwart Smith, 
We fear that Merion 's hoped-for goals 

Are but a transient mvth. — Cho. 



— 



— 



- 



Hockey Match Games 



Bryn Mawr vs. Merion, November 6 



MHRION TEAM. 

Forwards. 

Right wing . . Sharwood 

Right inside Tatnell 

Centre M. Wood 

Left inside E. Lloyd 

I *e ft wing Mrs. Barlow 

Half-Backs. 

Right , Blanchard 

Centre D. Crawford 

Left . . .S. Tunerick 

Full-Backs. 

Right E. P. Williams 

Left Brown 

Goal A. Bowan 



BRYN MAWK TEAM. 

Forwards. 

Right wing L. Marshall, '05 

Right inside H. Kempton, '05 

Centre H. Raymond, '03 

Left inside D. Day, '03 

Left wing L. Lombardi, '04 

Half-Backs. 

Right L. Peck, '04 

Centre C. Denison, '05 

Left C. Case, '04 

Full-Backs. 

Right , . . E. Harrington, '06 

Left . I. Peters, '04 

Goal H. Smith, *o6 



Umpires, 
Merion — J. A. Lester. Bryn Mawr — S. F. Adams. 

The first of the three match hockey games between the Merion Cricket Club and Bryn Mawr College was played on Thursday, 
November 6. Score, 2-0 in favor of Bryn Mawr. 

The game was called at three o'clock, and consisted of two halves of thirty minutes each with an intermission of ten minutes. 
The game was particularly interesting because it was the first match game of hockey ever played at Bryn Mawr. The two teams were 
very evenly matched, although their methods were different. Merion depended on individual work, while Bryn Mawr won by team- 
play. Merion played a defensive game for the most part, but the splendid work of their full-backs and the fact that all of their for- 
wards and half-backs play within their own circle prevented Bryn Mawr from shooting many goals. 

85 



The good features of the game were the pretty passing of the Bryn Mawr forwards, the straight line that they kept and the fast 
dribbling of the right wing. The half-backs and full-backs are especially to be commended for their well-aimed long hits. The Bryn 
Mawr team fulfilled our highest expectations and played in beautiful form, scarcely ever losing position. 



MERION TEAM. 

Forwards. 
Right wing F. M. Horstman 



Bryn Mawr w, Merion, November 8 

BRYN MAWR TEAM. 

Forwards. 

Right wing L. Marshall, 05 



Right inside E. P. William^ 

Centre M. Wood 

Left inside E. Lloyd 

Left wing Mrs. Barlow 

Half-Backs. 

Right R- Wyatt 

Centre D. Crawford 

Left S. Tunerick 

Full-Backs. 
Right Brown 



Left 
Goal 



.R. Wood 
A. Bowan 



Right inside H. Kempton, '05 

Centre H. Raymond, '03 

Left inside M. Richardson, 06 

Left wing L. Lombard i, '04 

Half-Backs. 

Right L Peck. 04 

Centre C. Denison, 05 

Left C. Case, '04 

Full-Backs, 

Right H. Sturgis, '05 

Left E. Harrington, '06 

Goal H. Smith, '06 



On Saturday, November 8, the second match hockey game with the Merion Cricket Club was played. 

The game began in a lively manner. There was much exciting dribbling up and down the field, which after three minutes 
resulted in a pretty goal for the Merion team. During the remainder of the half no more goals were scored, but the plays were none 
the less interesting. Excitement rose when the Merion forwards went running up the field with the ball, but the Bryn Mawr right full- 
back stepped in their way, made a clean stop, — one of her long hits, — and all the players faced around. 

During the second half the side lines appreciated more and more the excellent playing of the Merion full-backs. After fifteen 
minutes of running, Merion scored her second goal. It was only a little later when it seemed as if Merion were to make another goal, 
but the Bryn Mawr goal -keeper hit a pretty ball and so the score remained 2-0 in Merlon's favor. 

86 



Bryn Mawr <vs. Merion, November 1 1 



MKRION TEAM. 

Fonvards. 

Right wing M. Horstmau 

Right inside E. P. Williams 

Centre M. Wood 

Left inside E. Lloyd 

i p, j Mrs, Barlow 

Lett wing . ' 

j Sharwood 
Half-Backs. 

Right H. Wood 

Centre D. Crawford 

Left . . S. Tuncrick 

Full- Backs. 

Right Brown 

Left R. Wood 

Goal A. Bowan 



BRYN MAWS TEAM. 

Forwards. 

Right wing H. Kempton, '05 

Right inside M. Richardson, 06 

Centre H. Raymond, 03 

Left inside A, Haveineyer, 05 

Left wing .L. Lombardi, '04 

Half-Backs. 

Right L, Peck, '04 

Centre C. Denison, '05 

Left C. Case, 04 

Fit II -Backs. 

Right I. Peters. 04 

Left G. Fetterman, 03 

Goal H. Smith. 06 



The third game of the Bryn Mawr-Merion hockey match was played Tuesday, November ii, resulting in a score of 30 in favor 
of Bryn Mawr. Both teams went into the game with a firm determination to win, and good playing was done on both sides. The 
Bryn Mawr team adopted their opponents' tactics and resorted to individual play, quite abandoning the perfect team-work which had 
characterized the two former games. Particularly brilliant playing was done by the right wing, whose long runs and clever passes 
excited the admiration of everyone. Several subs were on the team, but they rose to the occasion nobly and did much to win the day. 
The Merion team played a defensive game as before and it required great ingenuity on the part of the Bryn Mawr team to pass their 
formidable full-backs. 



87 






AA: 



Extracts from the Minutes of the Class of 1903 

NOVE M HER 10, 1 902. 

Moved, seconded and carried: 

That the chair be empowered to appoint a committee of two 
to see about buying cups and spoons for the class teas. 

Xo\ K.MIJKK 1 8, KJ02. 

Moved, seconded and carried: 

That the committee get plain green cups and spoons for the 
class. 

Moved, seconded and carried: 

That if we are going to rent the spoons, the chair appoint 
a committee to take care of them. 

December i, 1902. 
Moved, seconded and carried: 

That the class buy cups at $3.50 a dozen. 

Dkchuiu.k 16, 1902. 
Moved, seconded and carried: 

That we wait to get green cups. 

90 



4 ^v ( / <st 



T*> 




<F 



<S 




u The Loan of a Lyre" 

Friday, October 24, 1902 

THE annual performance of " The Loan of a Lyre" took place on Friday evening, October 24. The play, or more correctly, the 
money that was taken in at the play, was for the benefit of the [Undergraduate Association. 

The principal part was well rendered by Miss Leupp, who prompted perfectly from beginning to end. The audience 
enjoyed hearing her say all the things the cast should have said but forgot, — you see the play was so new to them. We feel sure that 
anyone hi college, barring 05 and 06, could have taken any rule without even rehearsing. 

Comparing this last performance to the former ones, we feel that the cast may boast of a few improvements. Miss Follansbee's 
fiery heard had mined gray and didn't come off whenever she began one of her long soliloquies. Miss Strong's voice had grown more 
refined and sensitive and her hair was becomingly coiffured. Miss White, as Milton Llarcarole, had developed great strength of 
character since we saw her last. This was shown by the firm manner she assumed toward the other members of the cast when they 
forgot their parts. 'That's the wrong thing.'' she would say; and then the audience would have the pleasure of hearing the cast go 
back and repeat a few speeches in order to catch the right cue. Miss Chauvenet's acting showed force, and we had no idea a crusty 
guardian could find the situation so laughable. Miss Kidder was good enough to encore several of her speeches even before she was 
asked. 

The most astonishing thing in connection with the play is that a poster announced it as "positively the last appearance!" It 
would seem incredible, hut we have it on the best authority that the one surviving manuscript is to be burned at the Senior bonfire! 
And the cast really need a manuscript to be prompted from during every performance of "The Loan of a Lyre." 

From the Fortnightly Philistine. 



91 




Oral Songs 



Tune: "Mr. *Dooley." 



There is a language known to all, 

Oh, parlez-vous Frangais ; 
A language that is spoken by the Senior Class to-day. 
They're conversant with Brunetiere, 

They know their lists no doubt, 
But once behind the fatal door, 

You hear them stammer out: 



Oh Mr. Foulet, oh Mr. Foulet, 

Am I the very worst you ever knew? 

Vous dites traduisez, je suis epuise, 

But, Mr. Foulet, kindly let me through ! 



As the inner door was opened wide, 
She bowed and stepped right in ; 

Shu thought she knew her German 
As they know it in Berlin. 

She read it schlecht, 

She was not keck, 




They did not ask for more ; 

And as she finished, who was first to show her to the door ? 

Twas Mr. Collitz, 'twas Mr. Collitz. 

A man we do not care to interview ! 

( )h, see our thranen, how they are rain in,' 

Oh, Mr. Collitz, won't you put me through ! 

Tune: " Baby on the Shore." 
Ritchie's checks were clanking very loudly, 

Clanking as they'd never clanked before, 
As she dragged each Senior from her burrow 

And engulfed her behind that awful door. 

They had swiped our Anglo-Saxon baby, 
From Yarrow and his medieval lore, 

And stuck him up in Taylor office, 

To cry, "Come back again, zuruek, encore!" 



Pianissimo: 

We done it, no mortal could do more ! 

We skedaddled very quickly through that door, 
And we told the Ritchie, very gently, 

She would find some ruddy locks upon the floor ! 




Fellowship Dinner 



Denbigh, March 20, 1903 
On this occasion there were with us several distinguished guests. 

Song to 1903— March 

O we are Seniors, yes we're 1903, 

We have a Fellow here as you can see, 

She brings high credit to her class and college, 

Wonderful prodigy of universal knowledge. 

I'.rokcn all records of the Bryn Mawr Fellow, 

Added more glory to the white and yellow, 

When have such dizzy heights been safely reached before? 

Three rousing cheers for Eleanor ! 



93 



1905 to 1903 

April 4, 1903 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Uncle Tom Carlos Denis oni 

St. Clare Algernon M. Eigs 

Legree Hill N. Carrot 

Shelby Henry Jagson 

Haley More Great Pickles 

George Harris H. Lynn Unkempt One 

Sambo Mike McGuckin 

Topsy Miss Fetch To-day 

Eliza Miss E. G, Sandwich 

Ophelia .Miss Mulberry Sparks 

Marie St. Clare , . Miss Adellegg Havebog 

Casmeline \ „ J. > . . Miss . L Merry Spender 

J bmehne J 

Little Eva Miss L, C. Henrietta 






94 







1903 to 1905 

Tune: The Pope, He Leads a Merry Life." 

The Sophs, they lead a merry life, merry life, 
With wit and humor they are rife, they are rife. 
When we're their guests we're in for fun, 
And so we love them every one ! 

In basket-ball they are wonders, they are wonders; 

In Gym contests they make no blunders, make no blunders, 

And when their histrionic art they try, 

Upon the Bryn Mawr stage — oh, my! 

Their Pegasus hath soared so high, soared so high, 
He most scorched his wings up in the sky, up in the sky, 
He hath consorted with the muses nine, 
And that is why this play's so fine. 

So chant their praises, 1903. 1903, 
Good-luck and long prosperity, prosperity, 
To this the nicest class alive, 
Our jolly Freshmen, 1905! 

Cheer 
Juba! Juba ! Julia ! Juba ! 

Oh, Seniors, come and look alive. 

And cheer the class that's bound to thrive, 

It is the Class of 1905! — Juba! 



95 



"The Belle's Stratagem" 

Cast. 

Doricort Martha White 

Hardy Anne Greene 

Sir George Touchwood Frederika LeFevre 

Flutter Caroline Morrow 

Saville . Ruth Strong 

Courtall Alice Meigs 

Villers .Isabel Lynde 

Dick Adelaide Neall 

Gibson Constance Lcupp 

Saville's Servant Marion Reillev 

-, ,, f Virginia Stoddard. Ethel Hulburd 

Gentlemen . J ,; . _ .„ TT , 

| Morton Reilley, Helen Kcmpton 

Letitia Hardy Anne Kidder 

Lady Francis Touchwood Avis Putnam 

Mrs. Rackett Florence Craig 

Miss Ogle Lucia Ford 

Kitty Willis Eunice Follansbee 

t ,. ( Edith Dabney, Emily Larrabee 

( May Montague, Ethel Girdwood 



96 



r 



• 













98 



t if 



Class Song 



Here's to our class and the happy days we've spent 

In our work and our play together; 

Here's a health to classmates true, 

Whom we've known the four years through 

In fair and in stormy weather! 

Chorus. 
Winds that sweep the campus, 
Winds that stir the vines, 

High o'er the towers standing gray and still 
When the shadows lengthen, 
When the summer shines, 
Blow her our blessings and steadfast will. 
Though the years shall part us, 
Though we be far, 
1903 shall honor and praise LJryn Mawr! 




"•— 






Guess! 

IT was June fourth, nineteen-thirteen, and a jovial bevy of ladies, no longer in their first youth, were having tea on the campus. 
At the lemonade table presided a white-gowned, ruddy-haired young matron, with a graee that recalled Philos. teas of years 
gone by. 

"Well, my dear," she was saying to a tall brunette nearby, bearing in her eyes all the marks of mild genius, "who would have 
thought, in the days when you painted the scenery that set off the numerous affaires d' amour in which we have indulged, that you would 
be leading a semi- Bohemian life in Paris, with your music and your art? 1 have often excited John by telling him I was quite used to 
having dark-eyed young men fall on their knees before me — " and she ended in a coquettish little laugh. 

"What's that — what's that you are saying?'' interrupted the short, jolly little president of Thomas University, Seattle, Wash. 
(People sometimes wondered why she had such influence with the students, but the ladies at the tea-party knew well it was because of 
her strict adherence to truth and a kindly interest in the individual — qualities she had always considered essential in a president.) 

"Here's someone who wants to hear all about it, too," she went on, drawing into the circle a golden-haired, pale-faced woman, 
with a serious mouth and an artificial demureness in her eyes. "What — " she began. " Gosh victuals !" shouted a loud voice from behind, 
"where did you get that Chinese upholstered coat, like the old one?" "Why?" came the reply, "do you want a picture and description 
of it for the next edition of your magazine. Miss Editor? I'll have it taken to-morow — will that be in time-: And must it be at 
Broadbent's?" 

At this point a fuzzy-haired, pink-cheeked little lady strolled up. "Have you heard the news?" she asked. "Our friend Nell 
is going to be at the head of the Poly. Con. department next year. It will be as good as having Dr. Kcasbey back again. I hope she 
will still be here when my little Sue comes in. And lure comes another faculty member." as a slender, stooping woman approached 
from the direction of Low Buildings. "I was so sorry I could not come earlier, but if you knew how manv Descriptive English papers 
I had to correct and how many deferred Gwinn portraits due back to-day!" "Never mind." they answered, "we heard you had some 
news for us." •'There is added more glory to the white and yellow," she went on. "Broken all records of the Bryn Mawr Fellow, a Ph. D. 
from Oxford, an honorary LL. D. from the Sorbonne, an E. L. E. at Leipsig, and the offer of the chair in the 'Literature of the 
World' at Chicago University!" 

"Goodness me!" exclaimed a slim, piquant, yellow-haired woman in a basket-ball suit. "What's this? we've just come to tell you 
that we've done it for once, and the alumna? have beaten the 'Varsity 22-0 at last. And besides I want to introduce to you the new 
leader of the Philharmonic — the first Bryn Mawr girl to lead an orchestra." And she pushed forward a modest, strong-looking woman 
with smooth brown hair. 

"In the light of the memory of singing on the steps, I am sorry for the orchestra," sighed a round little person with fly-away 
hair and a turned-up nose. 

"You needn't talk," someone answered her, "after afflicting us with another volume of 'Plain Tales from the West.' Have you 
seen the review of them by our faculty critic?" Here they turned on the other literary lady again, but she had wandered off a little, 
and the authoress flew after her, reaching her just as the innocent pedlar at the gate shouted: "Oranges, peanuts and bananas!" The 
party around the tea-table looked after them smiling, knowing they would be lost in reminiscences until time for the supper. 




There comes our Angel Junior," shouted the brown-haired musician, as there came over the green lawn a stately, beautiful 
woman dressed in shining white and with a parasol over her shoulder. "So it is," they echoed, "and there's Bob Acres, too, looking 
as sprighth as ever, in spite of his gay career, I wonder if she still dances 'the pickaninnies' — we must make her do it later." And 
they turned to greet the newcomers. 

At the other end of the table four young matrons were busily discussing household affairs. 

'They used to tell us college spoiled us for married life," declared the tall one. "But, golly, I've been married ten years and 
have the model household of Pittsburg." 

'That's only because I've been living in Lawrenceville all that time. Charlie says I'm the model housekeeper of the century," 
came from a small, brown-haired girl with a clean-looking complexion. Then a demure little woman remarked: "Harrisburg isn't a 
good field for housekeepers, but I've done well and had only six cooks this winter. But Meg here can give us all points about 
housekeeping in Porto Rico — we couldn't all do that well — but then we didn't all start with a 1903 loving cup to grace our parlors — 
no, sitting-rooms." And she turned, laughing, toward a pretty, pink-cheeked young matron. 

"No, and we couldn't all be Goldylocks and married in the same week," laughed a "nice old hag" joining them. 'You T've- 
been-married-for-ten-years' people bunch so dreadfully. Won't you have some more lemonade?" and she turned to do something for 
those around her, quite oblivious of the fact that a classmate, with whom she had an engagement to play tennis, had been waiting twenty 
minutes. Suddenly she stopped in doubt. " 'Two cherries moulded on one stem — two hearts that' — what shall I do, give them one or 
two glasses of lemonade?" as she saw the class inseparables approaching. "They have only one name, but I'll give them two glas 
— "Why, hello there, hag, how's Boston?" as a tall, sweet-faced woman swept up, seeming to bring with her an atmosphere 
of calm and composure. "Well, well, it is nice to be back again," she remarked, beaming about on everybody. "1 wonder if my imps 
are as sprightly as of yore. Where are they?" 

But what is occupying this little group under the tree? From the laughter of the auditors and the grimaces of the smiling, expan- 
sive narrator it must be an ape or a willy story. "Isn't it sivect? It amused me so, oh dear," she sighed, as she ended. "I can match 
that." exclaimed a listener, who was distinguished by her strangely vivid clothes and the air of a woman of the world. "When I w 
living in New Zealand — " she began. "Dear. I don't like these stories — where is — where is — oh there she is!" and a fly-away, light- 
haired spinster turned and walked off toward Merion with the president of Thomas College, inquiring anxiously about the success of 
her honor-system. 

"Girls, girls!" shouted a young-looking person, whose yellow hair and childish lisp contrasted oddly with her strenuous face. 
"You really must come and dress for the class supper, or it will be so hard for the committee to seat you. Be ready at 4.15 sharp — 
no— I mean eight o'clock. But first let's give a cheer for Bryn Mawr and decennial reunions. Now show your college spirit!" 

The tea-party joined heartily, under their old leader, and then wandered off over the grass. 

Tavlor tower blinked genially over the deserted campus, as the warm light faded. "Heigho," he sighed, "how the years do fly! 
Who would have thought it ten years ago, who would have thought it?" 



rot 



1 



1900 



DATE 



April 25 
April 26 
May 4 . 
May 7 
May 8 . 
Mav 10 



TEAM. 

1902 
1902 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1900 



6 

5 
2 

16 

4 
2 



Synopsis of Basket- Ball Scores 



SCORE. TEAM. 
I9O3 



I903 
I9OI 
1 90 1 
I902 
I9O2 



DATE 



May 2 
May 3 



1901 

TEAM. SCORE. TEAM. 

1902 



tgOl 

1903 



May 6 1901 

May 7 

May 8 



1903 

1903 

May 13 1901 

May 15 1901 

May 17 190 1 



2 
2 

3 
1 

o 

4 
11 

8 



1904 
1902 
1904 

1904 
1902 
1904 
1904 



SCORE. VICTOR. TOTAL. 



I 

4 

I 

3 
o 

1 



1902 
1902 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1900 



6-1 

5-4 
2-1 

16-3 

4-0 

2-1 



SCORE. VICTOR, TOTAL. 



2 

O 
2 

4 
2 

2 

1 

o 



Tie 

1903 
1901 
1904 
1904 
190 1 
1 90 1 
1901 



2-2 
2-0 

3-2 

4-0 
2-0 

4*2 

1 1-0 
8-0 



DATE 



1902 

TEAM. SCORE. 



May 5 
May 6 
May 7 



1 902 
1904 
1902 



May 8 1904 

May 10 1904 

May 12 1902 

May 14 1902 

May 16 1902 



4 

3 
6 

5 
4 
6 
1 

5 



TEAM. 
IQO3 
I905 
I9O3 
I905 

*905 
1904 

1904 
1904 



1903 

They beat us to-day. 
Will they beat us to-morrow? 

Let it be as it may, 

They beat us to-day. 

But we didn't half play, 
As I know to my sorrow — 

They beat us to-day, 
Will they beat us to-morrow ? 



SCORE. VICTOR. TOTAL. 



I 
O 

I 

IO 

2 

O 

I 
O 



1902 

1904 

1902 

1905 
1904 

1902 

Tie 

1902 



4-i 

3-0 
6-1 

10-5 

4-2 
6-0 

1-1 

5-o 



102 



Synopsis of Hockey Scores — 1902 



TEAM. SCORE. TEAM. SCORE VICTOR. TOTAL. 



>9°5 


1 


1906 


3 


1906 


1-2 


1 9 >3 





1904 


3 


1904 


3-0 


1905 


5 


1906 





i9°5 


5-o 


1903 


5 


1904 





1903 


5-o 


J 905 


4 


1906 





1905 


4-0 


1903 


2 


1904 


1 


1903 


2-1 


1903 


2 


1905 


3 


1905 


3-2 


1903 


1 


'905 


3 


1905 


3- 1 



103 






Class Addresses 

Rosamond Allen 1O3 Beacon Street, I Soston, Mass. 

Louise Parke Atherton Wilkesbarre, Pa. 

Agnes Bell Austin . . Care J. B. Austin, Drexel Building, Philadelphia. 

Ethel McClellan Bacon ■ * lannibal, Mo. 

Elizabeth Baggaley Carroll* Fifth Avenue, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Claire-: Grace Barnhisel San Jose, Gal. 

Marguerite Bissell 400 W. Third Street, Dubuque, Iowa. 

Sophie Boucher 237 Central I 'ark West, New York City. 

Anna Maria Bourne . . 107 Fourth Street, Bangor, Maine. 

Martha Getz Bover 238 Penn Street, Reading, Pa. 

A x na Mae Branson Coatesville, Pa. 

Helen Ireson Brayton 294 Prospect Street, Fall River, Mass. 

Helen Gerry Briggs 1 53 Craig Street. Pittsburg, Pa. 

Fannie Isabella Brown . . , . I '< »rt Richmond, Staten Island, X. Y. 

Margaret Elizabeth Brusstar 5 io 9 Market Street, Philadelphia, 

Elizabeth Middleton Bryan 42 South Battery, Charleston, 5. C. 

Mary Creighton Burns SunnielifTe, Manayunk, Philadelphia. 

Eleanor Loudenois Burrell 248 W. Seventy-fifth Street, New York City. 

Emma Danforth Bush . . 601 S. Clayton Street, Wilmington, Del 

Helen Remington Calder , 503 N. Front Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Clara Greenough Canby 2308 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

Marjorie Cheney South Manchester, Conn. 

Edythe Clarke Dean and Drucc Streets, Brookline, Mass. 

Edith Clothier The Aldine, Philadelphia. 

Tiierese Pauline Coles 21 14 Pine Street, Philadelphia. 

Emma Walker Crawford New Centreville, Pa. 

Edith Dabney 1 104 First Avenue, West, Seattle, Wash. 

Sarah Ellen Davis Care Rev. William P. Davis, Camden, N. J. 

Dorothea Day Catskill, N. Y. 

* Mrs. Rook Carrol!. 

I04 






Eleani »k I )i:.\i [NG Care- H. E. Deming, i 1 William Street, New York City. 

( Iertrude Elizabeth Dietrich Hastings, Nebraska. 

I Ielen Sydney Ditmars 1422 S. Broad Strict. Philadelphia. 

I Iarriet Adele Down ing 705 V Nineteenth Street, Philadelphia. 

J ilia C. I Owning 705 N. Nineteenth Street, Philadelphia. 

Doris Earle t . Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pi. 

Elizabeth Eastman Pottsville, P l. 

Katharine Frederika Failing 383 West Park, Portland, Ore. 

Mary Gertrude Fetterman Mt. Airy, Pa. 

Margaret Field DeMotte* Wayne, Pa. 

Margaret Allina Fish ,346 Kent Street, limokliue, Mass. 

Eleanor Louie Fleisher 1901 Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia. 

I h li:n Fleischmann Hotel Savov. New York Citv. 

Eun [CE Dana Follansbee 2342 Indiana Avenue, Chicago, III. 

Cukisti na I [allovvell ( rARRETT 903 Clinton Street, Philadelphia. 

\\ ii.iillm 1 \ a ( Ie< lUtiiNA Marie von ( Jerber Weston, Mass. 

Flora Sawyer < iiFFORD 289 Highland Avenue, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Ethel Matiilws Gird wood -. .Luddington Road, West Orange, N. J. 

I I etty Goldman 132 E. Seventieth Street, New York City. 

M \rjorie ( kissv ( rREEN Rosemout, Pa. 

Lynda Myra 1 [arbeson 1532 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Louise < hrriLiE 1 Ieike . . 25ft Montgomery Street, Jersey City, N. J. 

\ m \ \ 1 ) \ Henj >ric ks< > n . 337 Manheim Street, Germantown, Pa. 

Jessie Kellogg I [enry 3714 Hamilton Street, Philadelphia. 

I 11 vrlotte I [olden 406 Stratford Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Ethel IIulburd 40 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, 111. 

Katherine Dent Hull 24 K. Madison Street. Baltimore, Md. 

Rosalie Telfair James Coshocton, Ohio. 

Anne Maynard Kidder Orange, N T . J. 

Ida Langdon Elmira, N. Y. 

Linda Bartels Lange 220 W. Seventy-ninth Street, New York City. 

* Mrs, Laurence DeMi 

105 



k 



Emily Dork Larrabee 102 Emery Street, Portland, Me. 

Agatha Laughlin 5747 Lexington Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Sally Porter Law 100 Washington Street, Hartford, Conn. 

Constance Davis Leupp 1813 Sixteenth Street, Washington, D. C. 

Edith Harvey Lodge South Pittsburg, Tenn. 

Alice Lovell Care J. W. Lovell, 66 Park Place, New York City. 

Elsie Elizabeth Lowrey The Esmond, Twelfth and Spruce Streets, Philadelphia. 

Ellen Scott Marks 305 Catona Street, Montgomery, Ala. 

Evelyn Flower Morris 1619 Arch Street, Philadelphia. 

Frances Martin . 329 S. Dallas Avenue, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Grace Lynde Meigs 618 Franklin Street, Keokuk, Iowa. 

Rebecca Charlotte Mofi-ttt 1705 N, Front Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Mary Montague 504 Walnut Street, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Lilian Everett Mooers .249 Haverhill Street, Lawrence, Mass. 

Charlotte Morton 35 1 State Street, Albany, N. Y. 

Lillie Elizabeth Muller 1 144 N. Fourth Street, Philadelphia. 

Edith Louise Neergaard .Concord, New Hampshire. 

Mabel Harriet Norton Marsh Building, Pasadena, Cal. 

Elizabeth Breading O'Neil , 5961 Alder Street, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Helen Lucile Peck Fondnlac, Wis. 

Anna Tucker Phillips 299 Berkeley Street, Boston, Mass. 

Alice Montelius Price 3613 Locust Street, Philadelphia. 

Marjorie Gertrude Price 509 South Highland, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Helen Jackson Raymond . 438 Lafayette Street, Salem, Mass. 

Monica Railsbach Kansas City, Mo. 

Emma Dun woody Roberts King of Prussia, Montgomery Co., Pa. 

Margaret Ropes .333 Hammond Street, Bangor, Me. 

Margaret Ross Haverford, Pa. 

Emma Maria Schmauk Lebanon, Pa. 

Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant Hawthorne Road, Brookline, Mass. 

Anne Isabel Sherwin Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Agnes Maitland Sinclair , .4030 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

ro6 



Myra Kennedy Smartt 712 Georgia Avenue, Chattanooga, Tenn, 

Julia Pratt Smith Greens Farms, Conn. 

Elizabeth Snyder Ardmore, Pa. 

Maud Sollenberger Mahanoy City, Pa. 

Maud DuPuy Spencer 519 W. Sixth Street, Erie, Pa. 

Margretta Shaw Stewart Merlon Pa. 

Virginia Tryon Stoddard Mt. Holly, N. J. 

Ruth Strong Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Edith Ellen Sykes 2106 X. Camac Street, Philadelphia. 

Marianna Taylor Haverford, Pa. 

Elsie Cecil Thom as . 16 S. Twentieth Street, Philadelphia. 

Susan Bancroft Tyler 1303 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Elizabeth Minerva Utley 1085 Shady Avenue. Pittsburg, Pa. 

( rENEViEVE Vollmer Lewiston, Idaho. 

Caroline Frances Wagner 128 Tulpohocken Street, Germantown, Pa. 

Eleanor Wigton Wallace .202 Walnut Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Florence Trotter Wattson Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 

Frances Charlotte Wayne 716 Clinton Street, Philadelphia. 

Eva White Washington Court House, Ohio. 

Martha Root White 18 West Sixty-ninth Street, New York Citv. 

Ruth Bowman Whitney Boylston Street, Brookline, Mass. 

Mary Peaiiody Williamson Glenville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio. 

Catharine Victoria Wilson 1250 Carlisle St., Philadelphia. 

Helen An a ms Wilson Tenth and Clay Streets. Portland, Ore. 

Philena Clarke \Yi nslow 135 Commercial Street, Portland. Me. 

Lois Met \ Wright - ■ . ■ Med ford, Mass. 

T11 1 - >eh )K,\ Ethel Wye Sunderland. Calvert Co., Md. 



107 



X 



' ' 



— — — I 1 





In iltemotrictm 




LULU 


JOHNSTON 


WHITE. 


1903 




Died December 


14, 1899 




LILLIAN VICKERS, 1903 




died December 


21, 1901 













109 



1 




ftV&. ^03» 






\ 










r 



> 



V 



V 










I 



> 1 



^iq ^ vw*Mo- 1/^, 













■uLk 











_L 







' ■ " ■ 










L . 



1W 1 

























k 












->" — 



\ 



v ' 





\ 



\ 



^/<? ^/^-^ 




' 






i 










i 




— 












r, 



















i 














1 
















1 










mtm 






• •• - • " ■ ■ 












^■k 



V 



LEWANDO'S 




THE LARGEST 



Dyeing & 
Cleansing 

Company 



IN THIS GOVS TRY 



MISS MAGRUDFR »;■;;■« - »£; ™™T» 

MACRUDER, OR MENTION HER NAME T<> I'S l\ BRINGING GOODS HERE g) £> 



LEWANDO'S 

1 63 1 Chestnut Street, - Philadelphia 

Alio, NEW YORK BOSTON BALTIMORE PROVIDENCE 

NEW HAVEN HARTFORD NJWI'ORT WATERTOWN LYNN 



\ 




GEORGE ALLEN 



IMPORTER OF 



TRIMMED HATS . . 
'BONNETS, RIBBONS 
SILKS . . . VELVETS 
MILLINERY and . 



• • 



, . STRAW GOODS 



NOTIONS, BUTTONS, HOSIERY, TOILET ARTICLES, DRESS TRIM- 
MINGS, ZEPHYRS, YARNS, HANDKERCHIEFS, CORSETS, 
EMBROIDERIES, SHIRE WAISTS, TOWELING AND 
WHITE GOODS, CAMBRIC 1 and MUSLIN UNDER- 
WEAR, SILK and MOREEN PETTICOATS 

All goods dttivtrtd on Main Line by our 9Vm tcagons. 



S 






GEORGE ALLEN 

1 2 14 Chestnut Street 



3 Rue Bleue, Paris, 



PHILADELPHIA 



129 











\ 









1 

• 


College Emblems 




CLASS PINS 
STICK PINS 
BADGES 
CLASS RINGS 
CLASS STATIONERY 
PRIZES 


DESIGNS AND FULL INFORMATION MAILED 
UPON REQUEST 

Makers of the New Lantern Pin 


ORDERS SOLICITED 


The Bailey, Banks & Biddle Co. 

PHILADELPHIA 













IVORY MINIATURES 




1«K»4 CHESTNDT SX. 



I30 



I 



,.,' 



\ 



'■■ ■■• 









i* mrwr ftiDOie. Jr.. PrtsMcn? ions L. <i/UinCR, General Superintendent 

C LCSTCR SHERrMK. ir.. Secretary unci Treasurer 



Established 1850 




JOHN LGAUAMlR COMPANY 

N. C. OK*. NINETEENTH and HAMILTON STREETS, PHILADELPHIA 

Antique WrougtU-lronGasand electric rixfures^-e specialties 
In iron, Brass and Bronze* Hardware; Grilles, etc ^ Lanterns 
and Sfreel Lamps. ^ Tinsmith and Sheet Metal WorK. 
Manufacturers of Mudge Pa rent Conner. ^ ^ ^ 



ANTIQUE VVROlhiHI IRON and ART MET7XL WORK. ^ ELECTRO 
PI mNO IN GOLD, SILVER, NICKEL, COPPER, etc. ^ ^ ^ 



BROADBENT CO 

Artists and 
Photographers 




^m^ 



141 5 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia 



PORTRAITURE IN PLAIN PHOTOGRAPHY, 
CRAYON. WATER COLOR OR PASTEL PROM 
LIFE or BY COPY. LANDSCAPE OR IN- 
TERIOR WORK GROUPING INDOOR OR 
IN THE OPEN AIR. ONLY THE BEST 
WORK AT REASONABLE PRICES : 



SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS 



iy 



■ I I 



' liilenl 
{I'lHOnKllDF i 

lilt (IWK 




*r iiiiflNEyRErnp(b. 




T 1 

.ihisisaTjUHNIYmki my Mamma has" 
MyNamiahasone too." 



THE 



Gurneg Refrigerator Go. 

Leads in Those Things That Go to 
Make a Perfect Refrigerator :: ;: 



Manufacturers of the Following Lines . 

GURNEY ZINC-LINED 
GURNEY ENAMEL-LINED 
COLD WAVE ZINC-LINED 
COLD WAVE ENAMEL- LINED 
LA BELLE ZINC-LINED 

All leaders of their class. All equipped 
with adjustable sliding shelves. The Gur- 
ney is the best. If your local dealer does 
not handle out goods, send to as for our 
Catalogues and Price Lists. The largest 
and best equipped refrigerator works in the 
world, loo different styles and sizes. Out- 
put zoo refrigerators per day. 



Fond Du Lac, 



Wis. 



* 



&&&&&9»&&&&&&&&$&&&&»&&&»&6»3&&&$&&§&&&&&^&»9 



m 



Yo\jng Women's 
Footwear 

Whatever you like — the dainty Slipper or 
Tie for your June fete — the heavy Oxford 
for general wear — or our high-cut " Bryn 
Mawr ' shoe. All are here in the latest 
modes. 



* 



w 






HANAN, 



1318 Chestnut Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. 



m 



THE LIBRARY BOOK SHOP 

1516 CHESTNUT STREET j* j* Ji PHILADELPHIA 

All the LATEST and BEST BOOKS 

in Every Department of Literature 

PVe will get you any book you may desire 



Special attention given to mail orders 
THE LIBRARY BOOK SHOP 

1516 CHESTNUT STREET v* ^ J* PHILADELPHIA 



i3 2 






ELGIN 



•w 3 ?**, 



;u"».ii 






fefc 



vj^ : : 



.^ 






The Greatest Watch 
Works in the World, 

Even' Elgin Watch baK the word 

"Elgin" engraved on its works. 

Booklet free. 

ELGIN NATIONAL WATCH CO. 

Elgin, III. 







> 



'BOYS' SAILOR SUITS A SPECIALTY 



PETER THOMSON 



Naval and Merchant Tailor 



1118 WALNUT STREET 



14 and 16 West Thirty-third Street 
New York 



Philadelphia 



MISS McNALLY %£ Lancaster Ave, Bryn Mawr 



./ Full Spring Stock of 

Ladies' and Gents' Furnishing Goods 

HOSIERY, NECKWEAR, FINE WHITE GOODS 
AND ART M l.DLEH'ORK 



IVY HOUSE : 



REPARATQRYTO BrYN Ma\\ rCoLLI 



TE WHING BY SPECIALISTS IN EACH DEPARTMENT 

vnr>REss 

MISS MARY E. STEVENS 

59 High Street Germa'ntovvn, Philadelphia 



42,000 Telephones 



IN SERF ICE IN 
PHILADELPHIA 



I/,000 in Fourteen Surrounding Counties 

THE DELAWMl 4HD .4T1.1STIC TEL. V TEL. CO. 



LOW RJTES 



EFFICIENT SERVICE 



Contract Department, Telephone JVo. Filbert 2J-Q0 



406 Market Street 
Seventeenth and Filbert Streets 



Seventeenth Street and Allegheny Ave. 
IO North Preston Street 



THE BELL TELEPHONE CO. 



Or PHI /.J DELPHI .1 



The Bryn Mawr Pharmacies 

OLDEST AND RELIABLE 

Pure Drugs and Toilet Requisites All Kinds of Stat tone ry 

Prescriptions a Specialty 



Goods Delivered Promptly 



CHRISTIAN MOORE 



MISS SUSIE LINDSEY 



&t 



IDressmahino 



ON THE PIKE, NEAR ROSEMONT 



/ 



I 



i 



i33 



Lv 



, 



'. 



I 



\ 






' 







134 



. • 



V 




i 









MM 




I 






^^^Hi 



am. 



^^M 



— . 



. _ 



■■■^■^■I^HHI^^^H 



hmhhhhh